Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Newspaper
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Halifax Media Group
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Rod Dixon
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Leesburg, Floirda
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University of Florida
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Vol. 137, No. 322 | 4 sections MISSED YOUR PAPER?Call 787-0600 (Lake County), or 877-702-0600 (Sumter County)NEWS TIP?Call Scott Callahan at 365-8203 INSIDE CLASSIFIED D2 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D4 DEAR ABBY C7 LEGALS D1 en LIVING HEALTHY C1 NATION A4 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 WORLD A6 TODAYS WEATHER HIGH 83en LOW63 See A8 JIMMIE JOHNSON WINS 6TH NASCAR TITLE, SPORTS B1GROVELAND: City plans to ll vacated top council post with vice mayor, A3 MONEY: Boeing takes $100 billion in orders from Gulf, A6 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, November 18, 2013 www.dailycommercial.com 50 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillardives@dailycommercial.comAn early morning rainsoaked skate park in Lake Panasoffkee couldnt dampen the spirits of 21-yearold skate boarder Jeff Nixon. Clinging to his skateboard with a picture of Superman plastered on top, the resident of the small (3,400) community in northwest Sumter County said on Sunday hes been waiting too long for the area to add more enjoyable activities. So he decided to wait a little longer Sunday for the recently completed skate park to dry out. Im ready to try this park out, said Nixon, as the sun continued to break through the clouds. The facility is lled with slopes, bars and concrete and is open from dusk to dawn in the Lake Panasoffkee communitys Recreation Park on County Road 459. The skate park, along with the nearby library and re station, is part of other recent expansions to government facilities in Lake Panasoffkee that will be recognized on Tuesday with a grand opening at 3 / p.m. The recreation park has received several improvements, including a new racquetball court and paved walking trail, which is about 2,000 feet in length. Weve already seen a lot of interest for it, said county Administrator Brad Arnold. Arnold said the existing cen-AP FILE PHOTOIn this Nov. 14 photo, President Barack Obama speaks about his signature health care law in the Brady Press Brieng Room at the White House in Washington. Lake Pan rec park promises more fun, better services SEE SERVICE | A2 ERIC TALMADGEAssociated PressABOARD THE USS GEORGE WASHING TON As soon as Navy pilot Matthew Staf ford puts his helicopter down in the village of Borongan, he is rushed by dozens of local men who form a line to unload the supplies and water he has own in from the moth ership, the USS George Washington aircraft carrier. Children swarm him as he breaks out a box of sweets. On the Philippine islands of Leyte and Sa mar that were shattered by Typhoon Haiyan, there is no doubt about it: the U.S. military Aid missions boost readiness ASSOCIATED PRESS Villagers stranded by last weeks Typhoon Haiyan scramble for aid from a U.S. Navy Sea Hawk helicopter from the U.S. aircraft carrier USS George Washington in the coastal town of Tanawan, central Philippines Sunday. SEE MISSIONS | A2 PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL LEFT: New books set on the shelf in the new addition to the Lake Panasoffkee Library in Lake Panasoffkee on Friday. RIGHT: Eddie Tassone, 52, with Royal Concrete Concepts, puts the nishing touches on the new addition to the re station. JULIE PACEAP White House CorrespondentWASHINGTONThroughout President Barack Obamas rst four years in ofce, he prided himself on his ability to bounce back when much of Washington thought his pres idency was in peril. But the political challenge posed by Obamas disastrous health care rollout is far greater than those he overcame during the nasty debt ceiling ght with Republicans, his stumbling campaign debate in 2012 or even the painful recession.Obama fights for credibilitySEE FIGHT | A2 CAROLYN THOMPSONAssociated PressWhen a 16-year-old student slammed a metal trash can onto Philip Raimondos head, it did more than break open the history teachers scalp, knock him out and send him bleeding to the oor. It changed my whole world, Raimondo said about the attack in the school where he taught for 22 years. Experts say the phe nomenon of student-on-teacher violence is too often ignored. Theres some reluc tance to think that the teaching profession can be unsafe, said Dr. Dorothy Espelage of the University of Illinois. The educational psy chology professor recently headed a na tional task force on classroom violence di rected at teachers. The group found that little has been done to try to understand or prevent such incidents despite the potential implications on teacher retention and student per formance, among other things. But the October deaths, one day apart, of Nevada middle school math teacher Mi chael Landsberry, who was shot on a basketball court by a suicidal 12-year-old, and Massachusetts high school math teacher Colleen Ritzer, who authorities said was attacked by a 14-year-old student in side a school bathroom, have brought the issue to the forefront. About 4 percent of public school teachers reported they had been attacked physically during the 2007-08 school year, according to the U.S. Department of Education, citing a 2012 school safety re port. Seven percent were threatened with Teacher killings bring professions risks to light MIKE GROLL / AP Columbia High School Principal John Sawchuk poses at the school on Nov. 14 in East Greenbush, N.Y. In 2004 Sawchuk found himself wrestling a 16-year-old student for the loaded shotgun the boy used to wound a teacher in his East Greenbush, N.Y. school. SEE TEACHER | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013 BRIDGE HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Nov. 18, 2013: This year you often might stray off topic and nd that you are mentally distracted. Learn to eliminate distractions by handling the issue at hand. Many interesting and creative ideas emerge from your daydreaming; be sure to write them down. If you are single, romance remains a high priority. You are likely to see potential suitors only through rose-colored shades. If you are attached, use care with children, as they can be evasive at times. Your relationship benets from sharing more with your sweetie. Develop a mutual hobby. GEMINI can be verbal, distracting and charming all at the same time. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You will state your case or pursue a desire with intention. Those around you could be a little confused by your words and actions. You might see doubt in their expressions, so try to understand where they are coming from. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You might feel a bit self-indulgent and go overboard. Listen to your instincts in a meeting or perhaps at a get-together with a friend. You will gain unexpected insights that could stop you in your tracks. Digest this perspective rst, then act. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You smile, and the world smiles with you. You have unusual insight into a friendship and its meaning. You can count on the unpredictability of this person, but you still will enjoy and value this bond. Tension builds around a responsibility. CANCER (June 21-July 22) You might want to head in a more appealing direction. Do some testing rst, and consider that you might not know the whole story. You also might not have a grasp on what could happen if you decide to follow an untried path. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Meetings will bring good results. A partner could be in disagreement, as he or she might not have heard all the details. Know that you cant change this persons mind. Detach and see what happens. You will learn a lot about him or her if you do. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Pressure builds and creates a lot of nervous energy. You might wonder what to do about a situation that demands your attention. Others do not realize how much you do, and they will continue to be unclear until you walk away. An offer comes your way. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Detach. You might wonder which way to go with an important relationship. You and this person have wanted to plan a trip for a while, so get the ball rolling. The true reason for the trip might not be what you say or think. Be honest with yourself. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Deal with others directly if you want to get a reasonable response. Stop wonder ing what might be best to do. Ask for feedback, encourage a brainstorming situation and move forward only when you have enough information to make a sound decision. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Defer to others, especially if you are not as sure of yourself as you normally are. Allow someone else who is more condent to take the lead, at least about the issue at hand. A child could be provocative yet endearing. You need to maintain a strong stance. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You might be more focused on an idea than you realize. Someone could drop a heavy book right by you, and you would not even hear it hit the oor. Try to be present in the moment, at least some of the time. Take a walk to center yourself. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Allow your creativity to emerge. Whether you decide to share some of your ideas will be up to you. Know that your intuition might be off about money. Avoid making agreements right now. An unusual phone call heads your way. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Your intuition comes through regarding what you should do. You could feel as if some element of your life is out of control. You will make a strong presentation, but you might worry a lot about how you come off and the impression you make. HOROSCOPES HOW TO REACH US SUNDAYCASH 3 . ............................................... 5-5-5 Afternoon . .......................................... 7-4-0 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 7-9-6-5 Afternoon . ....................................... 1-2-0-2FLORIDALOTTERY SATURDAYFANTASY 5 . ........................... 7-15-17-28-35 2 of 5 wins free ticket 3 of 5 wins $9.50 4 of 5 wins $114 5 of 5 wins $262,995.63LOTTO . ............................. 8-19-22-29-32-383 of 6 wins $5 4 of 5 wins $69 5 of 5 wins $6,454 Rollover POWERBALL .................. 10-29-37-44-5910With Powerball Without Powerball Powerball alone wins $4 . ........................... 3 of 5 wins $7 1 of 5 w/Powerball wins $4 . ................. 4 of 5 wins $100 2 of 5 w/Powerball wins $7 . ...... 5 of 5 wins $1,000,000 3 of 5 w/Powerball wins $100 . ............................ Rollover 4 of 5 w/Powerball wins $10,000 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $91.59 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 787-0600 in Lake County or (877) 702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Mon day through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Depart-ment 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . .............. 787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. SUBSCRIPTION REFUND POLICY: Subscription refunds will be calculated at the current basic subscription price, excluding the cur rent month. All refund requests must be made in writing and signed. Send to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 26.82 1.88 28.70 47.22 3.31 50.53 85.60 5.99 9 1.59 7 days a week Mail Subscription 3 months 6 months One Y ear Daily/Sunday 45.19 84.88 163.16 Sunday only 28.67 50.72 92.61 ROD DIXON, publisher352-365-8214 .................................. rod.dixon@dailycommercial.comBILL KOCH, assistant managing editor352-365-8208 . ................................... bill.koch@dailycommercial.comSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comPAUL RYAN, visual editor352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.comFRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, school boards352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comOTHERS PAM FENNIMORE, editorial assistant 352-365-8256 ............. pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com DON HUNSBERGER 352-365-8279 ........ donald.hunsberger@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD 352-365-8258 ............... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be e-mailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.GOOD FOR YOU/ CELEBRATIONSTo have your club or organizations events printed in the YourCommunity calendar listings, just email the information to pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com. SUBSCRIPTION RATES NEWSROOM CONTACTS ter has been upgrad ed to meet current standards mandated by the Americans with Disabilities Act. To accommodate more reading activities, the library added 4,000 square feet, almost doubling in size to of 7,280 square feet. Now, a dark-beige stucco concrete building with a bur gundy stripe and brown-tinted windows helps make room for more public computers and provides separate areas for adult and childrens collections. There is a separate computer lab, a ded icated space for the Friends of the Library and a meeting room for community use and library programs. It was kind of difcult trying to accommodate the needs for all the area families, said Lucy Gangone of the old building, as the for mer manager of the Sumter County Library Services at a 2008 ceremony for the expansion. The new re station, which is almost r eady to open, matches the librarys color. The new re station has been expanded by 4,400 square feet from its former 3,000 square foot. The extra room allows the station to have three pullthrough apparatus bays, a living area containing a dor mitory, day room, dining and kitchen area, ofce, laundry and tness room. This will allow for better service and comfort, said Leland Greek, chief of the Sumter County Fire and EMS. Tuesdays ceremony will be held west of the community center near the new walking track. The ceremony begins at 3 p.m. SERVICE FROM PAGE A1 has been a godsend. It is awesome to see this, says one grateful villager. They are saving us. But while U.S. mil itary support can be critical when disasters like Haiyan strike, stag ing massive humanitarian relief missions for allies in need isnt just about being a good neighbor. They can be a strategic and public ity goldmine for U.S. troops whose pres ence in Asia isnt always portrayed in such a fa vorable light and a powerful warning to countries that arent on board. These disasters are not unique only to the Philippines. It will send a signal to all of Southeast Asia, to Asia, that the U.S. is serious about its presence here, said Philippine political analyst Ramon Casiple. Its easy to translate this capabili ty for disaster handling into handling warfare. This is the new orienta tion of the task forces. From the military perspective, humanitarian missions like the ongoing Operation Damayan in the Philippines offer concrete benets the chance to operate in far-ung places. MISSIONS FROM PAGE A1 This time, the president is ghting to regain trust and credibility with the Amer ican people. Those are the same qualities that helped keep him aoat during those earlier battles. Its legitimate for them to expect me to have to win back some credibility on this health care law in par ticular and on a whole range of these issues in general, Obama said during a news conference last week that turned into an extensive mea culpa for the health care failures consuming the White House. As bad as things are for Obama, they may be worse for many members of Congress. Democrats in both the House and Senate worry the health care problems could dim their re-election chances next year. Republicans are saddled with his torically low approval rat ings and an internal debate over the direction of their party, though the heath law woes have proved a life line following the GOPs much-criticized handling of the government shutdown. With Republicans sensing an opportunity in Obamas free fall, the president is sure to face a struggle in getting their support, par ticularly in the House, for White House priorities such as an immigration overhaul or broad budget deal. Without success on oth er fronts to counteract the health care failures, Obama will have fewer chances to change the publics view that Washington, and the president himself, are ineffective. We appear to be stuck, whatever direction we look, William Galston, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, said about Washingtons political land scape. Obamas health care ca lamity began with the ood of computer problems that crippled HealthCare.gov, the website that had been billed as a quick and easy way for people to purchase insurance. Those troubles were compounded when at least 4.2 million people started receiving cancellation letters from their insurance companies despite Obamas repeated assurances that any one who liked his or her insurance plan could keep it. The widespread problems have spurred ques tions about the normally cool and condent presidents management style and his competence. It has also shaken his allies. The rollout of the web site, thats terrible. But the fact is, that will be xed, House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi told NBCs Meet the Press on Sunday. Why was the White House so poorly prepared for the long-anticipated rollout of Obamas major legislative achievement? Why did the president seem personally unaware of the extent the problems until they became publicly known? For the public, those fail ures are changing how they view the president. Many polls now show that Americans say Obama isnt honest or trustworthy, or a strong leader. For example, Quinnipiac Universitys poll of registered voters con ducted this month found just 44 percent thought Obama was honest and trustworthy, down 10 points since earlier this fall. Only 48 percent felt he has strong leadership qualities, a low point in his presidency. FIGHT FROM PAGE A1 injury by a student. A 2011 survey found that 80 per cent of teachers reported being intimidated, harassed, assaulted or other wise victimized at least once during the previous year. Of the 3,000 teachers surveyed, 44 percent reported physical offenses including thrown objects, student at tacks and weapons shown, according to the American Psy chological Association Task Force on Violence Directed Against Teachers, which conducted the national webbased survey. The task force recommended creating a national registry to track the nature and frequency of in cidents, saying this would help develop plans for prevention and intervention. TEACHER FROM PAGE A1

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Monday, November 18, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT GROVELAND Nourish the Needy program The South Lake Animal Leagues Nourish the Needy Program provides families in need with free pet food through a partnership with local food pantries. During November, thanks in part to a grant from ASPCA, South Lake Animal League and Bill Bryan Subaru, the animal league is asking people to join the league in collecting pet food and supplies for the program. On Nov. 22, Bill Bryan Subaru will be collecting donations to Stuff the Subaru, at 8730 U.S. Highway 441 in Leesburg. Donations will be collected and distributed to food pantries and for adoptable animals at South Lake Animal Leagues Adoption Center in Groveland. For information or to donate, go to www.slal.org, or call 407-342-8876.EUSTIS Training is being offered for landlords and investorsA special training for landlords or those looking to invest in rental property offers information on fair housing, energy efciency and sustainability at this event scheduled from 11 / a.m. to 2 / p.m., Dec. 11, held at the Eustis Womens Club building, 227 N. Center St. Lunch is included and seating is limited. A reservation is required by Nov. 29. Call 352-742-6540 or send an email to aelliott@lakecounty.gov.LEESBURG City library hosts sale at Barbara Morse bookstoreCheck the Barbara Morse Bookstore at the Leesburg Public Library, 100 E. Main St., in downtown on Wednesday for sale priced items on hardcover and paperback books. The library is closed Fridays and Sundays. Its open at 9 / a.m. daily and Saturday. For information, call 352-728-9790.MIAMI Special needs students crowned at homecomingTwo Miami high school students with special needs have been crowned homecoming king and queen. Students repeatedly shouted Howard Rouses name during the fanfare at Southwest Miami High last weekend. Nearly 75 percent of the students voted Rouse as king. Special needs student 22-year-old Isis Chirino was named his queen. The Miami Herald reports both are completing their seventh and nal year at the school. Senior Matthew Fernandez mentors 21-year-old Howard through the schools Best Buddies program and says special needs students are treated like family there. Earlier this year, Fernandez and Rouse went to Tallahassee and spoke with Gov. Rick Scott to heighten awareness for Best Buddies and to lobby for more money. ___State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8208 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillardives@dailycommercial.comA Lake County osteo pathic physician accused of having sex with one of his patients on the job has agreed to an order not to treat any females with out a qualied female health care practitioner in the room, according to State Department of Health records. The order was handed down recently by the Board of Osteopathic Medicine to Celestino David Santi, who was working at Express Care of Lake County in Tavares. The conditions also re quire Santi to be placed on probation for two years, undergo an evaluation, take a course on medical professional boundaries and pay a $10,000 ne. According to a copy of a Department of Health administrative complaint, a 56-year-old fe male had been seeing Santi as a patient at Ex press Care in March 2009. During a visit around February 2010, the doctor and patient engaged in sexual intercourse at the facility, the com plaint added. The two continued the sexual relationship until June, the records state. It is not clear how of cials discovered the relationship, but accord ing to a copy of the order and settlement by the Department of Health, it led the administrative complaint against Santi in April and the Board of Osteopathic Medicine met on the charges in Deereld Beach in late August. A settlement on the conditions was made in September. The purpose of pro bation is not to prevent (Santi) from practicing osteopathic medicine. Rather, probation is a supervised educational experience designed by the Board to make (San ti) aware of certain obli gations to (his) patients and the profession, according to the complaint. During the probation, Santi also must maintain a log that identies all female patients. It is not known if Santi still works at the Express Care.TAVARESDoctor disciplined after accusations of having sex with female patient ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxannebrown@dailycommercial.comFormer mayor James Gearhart resigned Wednesday, leaving a vacant seat on the council. City ofcials said they would ll that position by appointing an interim mayor prior to holding a special election early next year. The election would be for a new mayor. Council members were planning to discuss the mayoral appointment at todays meeting. Howev er, citing the citys charter, city Attorney Anita Geraci-Carver told the council on Thursday the decision may have to be delayed. The vice-mayor shall act as mayor during the absence or disability of the mayor. In case of the death, resignation, or re moval of the mayor, the vice-mayor shall vacate the ofce of coun cil member and serve as mayor until the next reg ular election when the ofce shall be lled for a full two-year term, reads the citys char ter. Vice mayor Tim Loucks was told by Geraci-Carver last week to prepare to surrender his council position in or der to assume the role of mayor. Geraci-Carver said Loucks will hold the position for one year. The council must ap point an interim council member to ll Loucks seat. Loucks said on Sunday as mayor he plans to appeal to his peers for a smooth transition. As we all look forward, we must close this ugly chapter in Grovelands history and begin to heal hard feelings. The council must now begin to work as one body for the common good of our cit izens and city, Loucks said. Glen Wilson, a resident of Groveland, said hes not sure ofcials are reading the city charter correct ly. He sent an email to city ofcials Thursday outlining some of his concerns. This is not a correct position for the city to take and here is why. Un der the city charter Sec 3.04. Duties of mayor and election of vice mayor, it clearly states that At the rst council meeting after each regular city election, the council shall elect one of its mem bers as a vicemayor. At the Nov. 18, 2013 Council meeting, after James Smith and Evelyn Wilson are sworn in and seated, then the Council will elect one of its members as a vice-mayor, Wilson wrote. Mr. Loucks ceases to be the vice mayor at that moment, so he cannot be automatically giv en the position of mayor to complete the term till 2014. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement reportedly has been investigating claims that Gearhart and Loucks violated Floridas Govern ment in the Sunshine Law by discussing police dispatching with a police sergeant in a grocery store parking lot on June 20. The city council vot ed on Aug. 19 to transfer dispatching services to the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce, and the Sarasota-based Citizens for Sun shine Inc. sued the city to block that transfer, saying the parking lot discussion tainted the council vote. Loucks has denied that conversation took place. GROVELANDCity plans to fill vacated top council post with vice mayor ERIN JESTERThe Gainesville SunGAINESVILLE When Melissa Corbett picks up her guitar to play, she sometimes doesnt know what chords shes using. Its as if God places her ngers where they need to go, she says. Corbett, a fth-grade teacher at the Healthy Learning Academy char ter school, uses that gift to help her students learn and retain complicated grammar rules with ease. To date, she has written about 50 songs designed to help children remember everything from nouns to idioms to subor dinating conjunctions. And seeing the success students have had with her educational jingles, Corbett and her husband launched a website and a YouTube channel to share the lessons with others. I can be teaching my class all day, but when Im sleeping, I can be help ing someone on the other side of the world, Cor bett said. Corbett has taught since the early 1990s although she took sever al years off from teaching to raise a family. She has spent most of her career teaching rst grade. But two years ago when she was looking for a new job, Corbett came across Healthy Learning Academys advertisement: Searching for a teacher who isnt afraid to sing and dance with students. And I thought, Well, I can do that, she said. Corbett brought her guitar to her interview with HLA and sang a song about short vowel sounds to Principal Anni Egan. And I said, Im throw ing away every other application, Egan said. Teacher uses songs to teach grammar DOUG FINGER / ASSOCIATED PRESS Melissa Corbett, a fth grade teacher at the Healthy Learning Academy, and students prepare to sing their grammar lessons Nov. 12. GEARHART LOUCKS

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCALA352-291-0152 Army ~ Navy~ Air Force ~ Marines ~ Coast GuardActive Duty/Veterans Thank you for serving our country.Steverson-Hamlin and Hilbish Funerals and Cremations226 East Burleigh Blvd, Tavares, FL 32778 352-343-4444 www.steversonhamlinhilbish.com DON BABWINAssociated PressCHICAGO Intense thunderstorms and tornadoes swept across a number of Midwestern states Sunday, causing damage in several central Illinois communities while sending people to their basements for shelter and even prompting ofcials at Soldier Field in Chicago to evacuate the stands and post pone the Bears game. Amid reports of property damage in the small central Illinois community of Washington, the storm raced through downtown Chicago so powerful ly that the rain was not falling as much as it was slamming into the sides of buildings. There were no conrmed reports of injuries. Our primary message is this is a danger ous weathers system that has the potential to be extremely deadly and destructive, said Laura Furgione, deputy director of the Na tional Weather Service National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Get ready now. Weather service of cials conrmed that a tornado touched down just before 11 / a.m. near the central Illinois community of East Peoria, but au thorities did not immediately have damage or injury reports. Within an hour, the weath er service said that tor nadoes had touched down in Washington, Metamora, Morton and other central communities, though ofcials could not say wheth er it was one torna do touching down or several. Weather ofcials said it was mov ing northeast about 60 mph; East Peoria is about 150 miles southwest of Chicago. This is a very dan gerous situation, said Russell Schneider, director of the weather services Storm Predic tion Center. Approximately 53 million in 10 states are at signicant risk for thunderstorms and tornadoes.Tornadoes, damaging storms hit Midwest OBITUARIESVincent Vinny FolgoreVincent Vinny Folgore, II passed away on Friday, November 15th, 2013, after a brave battle with leukemia. He was born in Leesburg, Florida, and raised in Eustis by his loving par ents, Vincent and Jose phine, along with his brothers, Louis, Joseph, Paul and Salvatore. He attended Eustis High School, and worked at his familys business establishment, Mount Dora Pizza and Subs. He truly enjoyed music, and had a passion for DJing. He loved to travel and was always making plans for his next adventure. He made sure to keep those around him smiling and laughing with jokes of all kinds. As he cherished the joy and happiness of those he loved. He met his love ly wife as a young man and married Danielle E. Burdette, with whom he shared 8 incredible years in marriage. To gether they have two beautiful children, daughter, Niya, and son, Gino. He was a man full of life and energy. He lived every moment to the fullest, spending time with his family and friends. He had the most beautiful and radiant smile, that greeted every one with warmth and love. A devoted hus band, beloved son and brother, a loving daddy and caring friend to countless people. He will truly and deep ly be missed by all who knew him and loved him, as we all yearn to be with him again. A visitation will be held on Tuesday, November 19th, 2013 from 5 PM to 7 PM at the Allen J. Harden Funeral Home, 1800 N. Donnelly St., Mount Dora, FL. A Vig il service will follow at 7 PM. A Mass of Resur rection will be held on Wednesday, November 20th, 2013 at 10 AM at St. Mary of The Lakes Catholic Church 218 Ocklawaha Avenue, Eustis, FL. Burial will follow at Pine For est Cemetery in Mount Dora. The Family request that donations be made in Vinnys name to H Lee Moftt Cancer Center 12902 USF Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL 33612. Please be sure to share your con dolences at www.allenjharden.comRonald E. HartmanRonald Earl Hartman, age 87, of Tava res, FL died Saturday, November 16, 2013. He was born September 6, 1926 in West Unity, OH and graduated from West Unity High School in 1945. After gradua tion he began employ ment at Lindsay Au tomotive. On June 1, 1946, he married Marcene Blakely. Together they enjoyed 63 years of marriage and four loving children. They owned Sinclair Service Station, The Hartman Boat and Motor Sales, the Shell station in Montpelier, OH, Palace Bowling Lanes in Bry an, OH and Topline Building Com pany, also in Bryan. Ronald and Marcene moved to Naples, FL in 1978 where they managed the Vanderbilt Condos. In 1988, they settled in Lake County and began the real estate com pany known as Hart man Properties, Inc. in Astatula, FL. A de voted husband and father, Ronald enjoyed traveling, collecting pocket watches, play ing cards, selling real estate and most of all, being with his family. Ronald was preced ed in death by his wife, Marcene, his son, Michael and his daughter, Pamela Sheets. He is survived by his sons, Ronald (Sue) Hartman of Howey-in-the-Hills, FL and James (Donna) Hartman of Santa Bar bara, CA; grandchildren, Troy, Tab, Tricia, Elizabeth, Adam, Zach ary, Kelsey and Ashley; great grandchildren, Kourtney, Garrett, Hay ley and Gavin; great great grandson, Mason; one brother and one sister. Ronald will be greatly missed by all who knew him. Fami ly and friends are invited to gather on Satur day, November 23 from 10:00 11:00 am with a funeral ceremony star ing at 11:00 am in the funeral home chap el. Burial will follow at Taylor Memorial Cem etery in Howey-in-theHills. Arrangements are entrusted to Stever son, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Crema tions, Tavares, FL. Condolences and memo ries may be shared on the tribute wall at www. SteversonHamlinHilbish.com.DEATH NOTICESAnnie M. ChiniAnnie M. Chini, 91, of Leesburg, died Friday, Nov. 15, 2013. Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg.Thomas E. ColemanThomas E. Coleman, 84, of Coleman, died Saturday, Nov. 16, 2013. Bank/Page-Theus Funeral Home and Cre mation Services.Doris P. LantzDoris P. Lantz, 83, of Lake Panasoffkee, died Saturday, Nov. 16, 2013. Bank/Page-Theus Funeral Home and Cremation Services.IN MEMORY HARTMAN FOLGORE

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Monday, November 18, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013 AYA BATRAWYAssociated PressDUBAI, United Arab Emir ates U.S.-based Boeing Co. dominated on the rst day of the Dubai Airshow, netting $100 billion in orders at an event that showcased the spending power and ag gressive expansion efforts of the Middle Easts Gulf Arab carriers. The 342 orders represent ed more than twice the val ue of those seen by European rival Airbus, who said it took 142 orders worth some $40 billion. The massive commitments came from just four carriers in the tiny nations of Qatar and the United Arab Emirates, which are in a race to create more jobs for their own citizens and diversify their oil-dependent economies. In recent years, much of the action in global aviation has shifted to the Middle East because countries like the U.A.E. and Qatar have tapped into our geographical advantage to build a new air transport connection for the world, Sheikh Ahmed bin Saeed Al Maktoum, chairman of Emirates and the smaller ydubai, told re porters. Of the major Gulf Arab carriers, Dubai-based Emir ates airline exed its buying power the hardest, with or ders for 150 of the planned Boeing 777x at a combined price tag of $55.6 billion. The aircraft is a larger and more fuel-efcient model of the companys popular 777 wide-body. Boeing CEO James McNer ney Jr. called it part of the largest product launch in commercial jetliner history. The airline also an nounced orders for 50 Air bus A380s the main com petition for the 777X. Airbus says the planned purchase is listed at $23 billion. The Dubai Airshow is seen as an increasingly important barometer on the state of the aviation industry and the rising roles of the big-spend ing Gulf carriers Etihad, Qatar Airways, Emirates and ydubai as they compete for routes and critical stopover trafc between Asia and Eu rope and the Americas. This years event, which also included announce ments of promised purchasing rights for dozens more aircraft, surpassed the re cord $155 billion in deals in 2007s edition, before the global economic downturn. The ve-day aviation trade shows location, at the new Dubai World Central air ports grounds, further re ects the Gulf Arab regions own rapid growth in the avi ation industry. Dubai hopes the new airport will be the largest in the world and the most frequented transit hub, connecting European and Asian travelers. Plans calls for most of the trafc from Dubais cur rent airport to be eventual ly shifted to the new facili ty, which ofcials say could one day handle 160 million passengers a year as part of the regions growing pro le as a global aviation hub. It remains unclear whether Dubai will continue to oper ate both airports or eventu ally move trafc entirely to the new airport grounds. To me whats happen ing at Dubai World Central, Dubai (International) Air port, Emirates Airline and ydubai, all this reects the growth of aviation globally and in this region, Al Maktoum of Emirates and y dubai said. For Boeing and Airbus, the Gulf Arab region has become a key battleground for new aircraft and big-ticket orders that can shape the compa nies outlooks for years. Boeing received orders at the airshow for 150 777X planes from Emirates, 50 from Qatar Airways and 25 from Abu Dhabis Etihad Air ways, the Chicago-based manufacturer and the air lines announced in separate news conferences. Boeing also inked deals with Etihad for 30 of its 787-10 Dreamliners and one cargo plane, and with budget carrier y dubai for 86 aircraft, most for its single-aisle 737 models. The Dreamliner deal is an important nod of support in the Gulf for the troubled aircraft, which has suffered groundings in the past year over battery problems. The 777X orders come even as Boeing looks for alternative sites to develop the plane after machinists in the Seattle area rejected a longterm contract. The long-range, twin-aisle 777 holds about 365 passen gers, making it Boeings sec ond-biggest plane. Since its rst ight in 1994, its been a best-seller for Boeing, which has sold more 777s than any of its other current large planes. In May, it began offering the revamped 777X. Boe ing is still nalizing plans for the plane aiming to deliver the rst aircraft by the end of the decade but it has said it is expected to carry as many as 400 passengers and to be more fuel efcient than the current 777. Previously, Lufthansa had made a commitment for 34 of the 777X. With almost $78 billion in combined purchasing com mitments announced at the opening of the ve-day air show, Emirates airline ce mented itself as one of Boe ing and Airbus largest and most important clients. The airlines said some of the new aircraft will replace existing ones and others will be used in the companys expansion. The airlines chairman said Sundays announcements will likely scare some of his competitors who are ghting to preserve monopolies on landing rights at airports. Boeing takes $100 billion in orders from Gulf Boeing says Gulf Arab airlines place record $100 billion in orders at Dubai event ASSOCIATED PRESS UAE Vice President, Prime Minister and Ruler of Dubai, Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, middle right, listens to Sheikh Ahmed Bin Saeed Al Maktoum, President of the Dubai Civil Aviation, center left, during the opening day of the Dubai Airshow in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, Sunday. SINAN SALAHEDDINAssociated PressBAGHDAD Attacks across Iraq killed at least 20 people Sunday, of cials said, as gunmen attacked a militia lead er and bombs targeted police ofcers and civil ians. In the capitals eastern New Baghdad neigh borhood, a parked car bomb missed a police patrol but killed three civilians and wounded 10, a police ofcer said. An other police ofcer said a car bombing in Baghdads eastern Sadr City neighborhood killed one person and wound ed 11. In the Baghdads southwestern suburb of Radwaniyah, a bomb went off in a commercial area, killing three civilians and wounding 10, authorities said. In the town of Tarmiyah, about 30 miles north of Bagh dad, a bomb exploded near soldiers on patrol, killing two and wound ing ve, ofcials said. At dawn Sunday, mil itants attacked a lo cal leader of pro-government, anti-al-Qaida Sunni miliia in his house in the town of Madain, 14 miles south of Bagh dad, killing his broth er and wounding one guard, authorities said. Two militants were killed in the clashes and two others were wounded, police said. The Sahwa move ment, also known as the Awakening Council, was formed by U.S. forces in 2007 to help ght the insurgents during the height of Iraqi war. Ever since, it has been a tar get for Sunni hard-liners who consider them trai tors. In Baghdads south ern Dora neighborhood, a car bomb exploded in a vegetable market, killing three civilians and wounding 12, a police ofcer said. Separate attacks kill 20 Thousands mar ch in memory of 1973 revoltAssociated PressATHENS, Greece Thousands have joined marches through central Athens to commemorate the 40th anniversary of a bloody student uprising against the then dictatorship. Previous marches have been marked by riots, but appeared to be peaceful. According to police estimates, about 10,000 mostly leftist, anarchist and union supporters have joined one march.

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Monday, November 18, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDROD DIXON . ................................... PUBLISHERBILL KOCH . ............... ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ....................... NEWS EDITORGENE PACKWOOD . ............ EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. DOONESBURYHAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edit ed for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Sub missions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 OTHER VOICESDont raise the bridge. Lower the river, divert the water, steamroll the riverbed, and install a bullet train as an affordable bridge substitute. Such grandiose thinking is derailing ObamaCare at breakneck speed. Long after it has passed from the American body politic, ObamaCare will be remembered as a Smithsonian-grade specimen of what happens when too much government smothers a manageable problem. Well before the (un)Affordable Care Act became law, Obama complained in August 2009 that million of our fellow citizens have no cover age. Meanwhile, the Congressional Budget Office forecast last May that, even if ObamaCare suddenly became as efficient as Swiss Federal Railways, 31 million Americans still will lack coverage in 2023. So, todays unfolding healthcare catastrophe will help at best just 15 million people. Given ObamaCares 10-year outlay of $2.6 trillion, this equals $17,333 annually (or $1,444 per month) per net beneficiary. This is an astonishing cost for such a concentrated benefit. However, rather than tar get these 15 million people, ObamaCare unleashes chaos on 315 million Americans. Already, some 5 million people, and counting, have seen their health plans cancelled. Others are watching their work hours get chopped from full time to part time. Even more are losing their jobs outright or simply not getting hired. Doctors increasingly are choosing golf and tennis over bureaucracy and disrespect. Among the American workers whom the Employee Benefit Research Institute sur veyed last September, 88 percent were somewhat to extremely satisfied with their health insurance. Why didnt ObamaCare just focus on the other 12 percent? Atop its recurring inability to set priorities, Team Obama displays staggering managerial incompetence. HealthCare.gov is a $400 million misadventure in computer science. Its dysfunction surely helped limit Octobers ObamaCare enrollment to just 106,185 paying and non-pay ing participants including a mere 26,794 in the federal exchanges just 21.3 percent of Obamas 500,000 monthly goal. Nevertheless, Obama considers this website novel. Just visit HealthCare.gov, Obama said in the Rose Gar den on Oct. 1. You can compare insurance plans, side by side, the same way youd shop for a plane ticket on Kayak or a TV on Amazon. David Axelrod, Obamas political guru, claimed on MSNBCs Morning Joe on Oct. 28: This is the first time in history that you can make an apples-to-apples comparison about healthcare plans on line in front of you. Obama, Axelrod, and their ilk need to escape their bubble. Websites that long pre-dated ObamaCare already help Americans shop for health in surance as if they were buying books or albums. Indeed, if the people who brought us HealthCare.gov had listened to me, they would have saved Amer ica millions and spared themselves embarrassment. Websites like ehealthinsur ance.com could become the cornerstones for a thriving, private, national health-insur ance market, I wrote in February 2010. This is far more encouraging than Obamacares creaky, Washington-driven exchange. Prospering since 1997, ehealthinsurance.com is what HealthCare.gov wants to be when it grows up. Imagine if Obama simply had offered vouchers, or Health Stamps, to Americas uninsured. Lets say each needy individual without coverage received $5,000 to pur chase insurance. Those with severe conditions could receive additional support. They then would have visited ehealthinsurance.com and similar websites. The uninsured could compare prices and buy whatever plans suited their circumstances. So, post-menopausal women need not purchase birth control and maternity cover age, as ObamaCare mandates. Childless male 23-year-olds would not be forced to buy pediatric dental insurance, as ObamaCare requires. At roughly 29 percent of ObamaCares cost, this rational approach would have fulfilled Obamas promise to cover the uninsured. Conservatives would be pleased to see freedom and choice central to this arrangement. Those who like their healthcare plans could have kept their healthcare plans. Period. And ehealthinsur ance.com would have let America avoid the humiliation of launching an unworkable website as the whole world was watching. Obama could have enjoyed all of this. Instead, and ironically, his massive, statist scheme has soiled the reputation of big-government liberalism perhaps for decades.Deroy Murdock is a columnist with Scripps Howard News Service and a media fellow with the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace at Stanford University. Email him at deroy.Murdock@gmail.com There seems to be no economic problem that Venezuelas new president, Nicolas Maduro, cant make worse. Maduro inherited from his predecessor, longtime strongman Hugo Chavez, a hazy, not to say incoherent, form of socialism called Bolivarism, that was slowly wrecking the economy of the oil-rich nation. Instead of quietly scrapping those policies after Chavez death last spring, Maduro chose to double down on them. By trying to x articially low prices for such basics as food and electronics, Maduro has created shortages; an annual ination rate of over 50 percent, one of the highest in the world; a U.S. dollar trading at 10 times the ofcial rate; and a money supply that grew over 70 percent last year. Traditionally, Venezuela, a nation of 30 million with some of the worlds largest proven oil reserves, has been bailed out by periodic spikes in the price of crude oil, but the United States, Venezuelas best customer, has started producing more oil than it imports. With the economy rapidly worsening and facing municipal elections next month, Maduro dispatched his security forces to enforce government price controls. Maduro denounced the stores as bour geois parasites and ill advisedly called on Venezuelans to empty the shelves, which at the governments laughably low prices they were happy to do. Maduro then had to call out the national guard to force the stores to honor those prices and to keep or der among the thousands of Venezuelans who lined up to take advantage of them. With the major appliance stores emptied out and unable to restock, Maduro is threatening to conscate stores in other retail sec tors and is asking Congress to grant him spe cial powers to run the economy by decree. Historian Ines Quintero told the Associated Press that the politics of polarization eventually exhausts itself. You cant continue in power forever offering solutions to peoples problems that dont work. Sadly for the average Venezuelan, Maduro seems determined to try.Distributed by Scripps Howard News Service.AVOICEVenezuelas crackpot economic crackdown Obamacare is another triumph of government Deroy MurdockSCRIPPS HOWARD NEWS SERVICE

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8208Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013www.dailycommercial.comTENNIS: Czechs take Cup / B2 BERNIE MCGUIREAssociated PressDUBAI, United Arab Emirates Henrik Stenson won the season-end ing World Tour Championship on Sunday after shooting an 8-under 64 in the nal round. The Swede became the rst golfer to win the PGA Tours FedEx Cup and European Tours Race to Dubai in the same season. It is still taking a little time to sink in what Ive achieved this week as was the case when I won the FedEx Cup but then it just kept getting better and better as the days went on and I Stenson wins World Tour Championship KAMRAN JEBREILI / APHenrik Stenson from Sweden, right, kisses his wife Emma Lofgren on Sunday after he won the nal round of DP World Golf Championship in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. SEE GOLF | B2 RALPH D. RUSSOAP College Football WriterBaylor closed in on third-place Ohio State in the latest BCS standings. The Bears and Buckeyes have little hope of catching rst-place Alabama or second-place Florida State in the race to the BCS championship game without a loss from one of the top two. The Buckeyes are ahead of the Bears in both the Harris and USA Today coaches polls, but behind Baylor in the computer rankings. The com bined average of the six computer rankings has the Bears third, with Alabama and Florida State tied for rst. Ohio State is fth in the computers. J PAT CARTER / APJimmie Johnson holds his daughter, Genevieve, as they greet fans during driver introductions before the NASCAR Sprint Cub Series auto race in Homestead. JENNA FRYERAP Auto Racing WriterHOMESTEAD Back on top with only two NASCAR greats left to catch, Jim mie Johnson won his sixth championship in eight years Sunday and staked his claim as one of the most dominant competitors in sports history. Johnson, needing only to nish 23rd or better to spoil Matt Kenseths career season, was on cruise con trol most of the day at Homestead-Miami Speedway. Johnson had just one hiccup en route to his ninth-place nish, when a stack up on a restart caused Johnson and Kenseth to bang slightly, costing Johnson 15 spots. Although the incident caused slight damage to the fend er on the No. 48 Chev rolet, Johnson only dropped to 23rd in the eld. A caution allowed him to head to pit road, where crew chief Chad Knaus methodically barked commands to repair the damage. Johnson was soon off and running as if nothing had happened. He claimed the championship by 19 points over Kenseth, now looming squarely ON A ROLL REINHOLD MATAY / APTampa Bay Buccaneers running back Bobby Rainey (43) scores past Atlanta Falcons outside linebacker Paul Worrilow (55) on a 4-yard touchdown reception on Sunday during the third quarter in Tampa. BRIAN BLANCO / APTampa Bay free safety Dashon Goldson (38) runs with the football after intercepting a pass intended for Atlanta wide receiver Harry Douglas (83) during the fourth quarter. Rainey, Bucs win again, top slumping Falcons 41-28 FRED GOODALLAP Sports WriterTAMPA Bobby Rain eys never lacked con dence in himself. All he wants is an opportunity to show he can play in the NFL. Thats my motivation, when people tell me what I can and cannot do, the diminutive running back said Sunday after rushing for 163 yards and scor ing three touchdowns to help the Tampa Bay Buc caneers dominate the At lanta Falcons 41-28. Picked up on the waiv er wire last month, Rain ey is playing for his third team in less than two seasons. This perfor mance came six days af ter he carried the ball for the rst time with Bucs and played a key role in helping them get their rst win. To come back and do it again today was huge, Rainey said. The 5-foot-8, 212-pounder whose lack of size hurt his chances of being drafted is mak ing his mark while lling in for the injured Doug Martin and Mike James. Rainey scored on rsthalf runs of 43 and 3 yards, then caught a 4-yard TD pass from Mike Glennon in the third quarter to help the Bucs (2-8) win for the second straight time fol lowing an 0-8 start. The previous week, he rushed for 45 yards and scored the go-ahead touchdown in a 22-19 victory over Miami. He began the season as a kick returner and back up running back with the Cleveland Browns. Hes stepped up. We put a lot on his plate, but hes handled it well, receiver Vincent Jackson said. Hes being very coach able. Hes taking in every thing thats being asked of him, doing a great job in the passing game as well, picking up blocks, he said. I see the kid be ing successful the rest of this year. We put guys in position to be successful. Hats off to our coaches for working with him, putting the time in so he can go out there and compete. Matt Ryan threw an 80-yard TD pass to Har ry Douglas, extending his streak of consecutive games with at least one touchdown to 16 games. He threw a 6-yarder to Roddy White in the fourth quarter, but also was sacked three times by Tampa Bays Gerald Mc Coy and had one of two interceptions returned 37 yards for a TD by line backer Mason Foster. The Falcons (2-8), who went a NFC-best 13-3 and nished one victo ry shy of the Super Bowl last season, have lost four straight by a combined score of 135-61. Its embarrassing, the way we came out and performed as a team. I mean all of us, Atlanta tight end Tony Gonzalez said. Its all of us. (Im) getting tired of it. Its all of us. Thats the thing about it. Its going to take all of SEE BUCS | B2Jimmie Johnson wins 6th NASCAR championship after finishing 9thSEE NASCAR | B2Baylor closes on Ohio State in BCS BOWL CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES STANDINGS 1 Alabama .998 points 2 Florida St. .966 3 Ohio St. .887 4 Baylor .886 5 Oregon .792 6 Auburn .786 7 Clemson .723 8 Missouri .628 9 Stanford .589 10 Oklahoma St. .539 18 UCF .303 AP rankings, See Page B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013 AUTO RACING Formula 1-United States Grand Prix ResultsSunday At Circuit of the Americas Austin, Texas Lap length: 3.43 miles 1. Sebastian Vettel, Germany, Red Bull, 56 laps, 1:39:17.148, 115.807 mph. 2. Romain Grosjean, France, Lotus, 56, 1:39:23.432. 3. Mark Webber, Australia, Red Bull, 56, 1:39:25.544. 4. Lewis Hamilton, England, Mercedes, 56, 1:39:44.506. 5. Fernando Alonso, Spain, Ferrari, 56, 1:39:46.740. 6. Nico Hulkenberg, Germany, Sauber, 56, 1:39:47.548. 7. Sergio Perez, Mexico, McLaren, 56, 1:40:03.840. 8. Valtteri Bottas, Finland, Williams, 56, 1:40:11.657. 9. Nico Rosberg, Germany, Mercedes, 56, 1:40:16.289. 10. Jenson Button, England, McLaren, 56, 1:40:34.426. 11. Daniel Ricciardo, Australia, Toro Rosso, 56, 1:40:38.152. 12. Jean-Eric Vergne, France, Toro Rosso, 56, 1:40:41.722. 13. Felipe Massa, Brazil, Ferrari, 56, 1:40:44.062. 14. Esteban Gutierrez, Mexico, Sauber, 56, 1:40:48.855. 15. Heikki Kovalainen, Finland, Lotus, 56, 1:40:52.211. 16. Paul di Resta, Scotland, Force India, 56, 1:40:54.001. 17. Pastor Maldonado, Venezuela, Williams, 55, +1 lap. 18. Jules Bianchi, France, Marussia, 55, +1 lap. 19. Giedo van der Garde, Netherlands, Caterham, 55, +1 lap. 20. Charles Pic, France, Caterham, 55, +1 lap. 21. Max Chilton, England, Marussia, 54, +2 laps. NASCAR Sprint Cup-Ford EcoBoost 400 ResultsSunday At Homestead-Miami Speedway Homestead Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (5) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 267 laps, 130 rating, 47 points. 2. (1) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 267, 139.9, 44. 3. (21) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 267, 122.5, 42. 4. (8) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 267, 104.8, 40. 5. (25) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 267, 96.5, 39. 6. (4) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 267, 110.4, 39. 7. (11) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 267, 109.2, 37. 8. (3) Joey Logano, Ford, 267, 98.7, 36. 9. (7) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 267, 109.1, 35. 10. (6) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 267, 91.7, 35. 11. (26) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 267, 102.4, 33. 12. (18) Carl Edwards, Ford, 267, 87.5, 32. 13. (13) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 267, 88.1, 31. 14. (10) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 267, 74.8, 0. 15. (20) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 267, 77, 0. 16. (19) Aric Almirola, Ford, 267, 78.4, 28. 17. (15) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 267, 78.1, 27. 18. (27) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 267, 65.6, 26. 19. (22) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 267, 79.3, 25. 20. (24) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 267, 61.4, 24. 21. (2) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 267, 74.1, 24. 22. (9) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 267, 66.7, 22. 23. (14) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 267, 65.9, 21. 24. (16) Greg Bife, Ford, 267, 70.7, 20. 25. (30) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 267, 55.7, 0. 26. (23) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 267, 57, 18. 27. (31) David Gilliland, Ford, 266, 48, 17. 28. (40) Casey Mears, Ford, 266, 49.4, 16. 29. (29) David Ragan, Ford, 266, 48.8, 16. 30. (28) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 265, 51.4, 14. 31. (32) David Reutimann, Toyota, 265, 38.5, 13. 32. (37) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 264, 40.5, 12. 33. (39) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 264, 39.7, 0. 34. (41) Ken Schrader, Ford, 263, 34.6, 10. 35. (42) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 263, 31.9, 0. 36. (36) A J Allmendinger, Toyota, 257, 48.9, 8. 37. (33) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 248, 27.9, 7. 38. (38) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 242, 36.5, 6. 39. (12) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, accident, 229, 76.8, 5. 40. (17) Trevor Bayne, Ford, engine, 223, 53.8, 0. 41. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, rear gear, 119, 31.2, 0. 42. (43) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, vibration, 104, 26.9, 0. 43. (34) Michael McDowell, Ford, brakes, 63, 27.8, 1.Sundays College BasketballMajor Scores EAST NJIT 71, New Hampshire 63 Pittsburgh 84, Howard 52 UConn 77, Boston U. 60 UMBC 90, Mount St. Marys 84, OT UMass 85, Youngstown St. 69 Villanova 78, Towson 44 West Virginia 96, Duquesne 83 SOUTH Belmont 83, North Carolina 80 Clemson 71, South Carolina 57 Delaware 90, Hampton 79 Florida St. 89, UT-Martin 61 Morehead St. 102, Marshall 94, OT Oregon St. 90, Maryland 83 UCF 83, Bethune-Cookman 63 UNC Greensboro 97, Chowan 58 MIDWEST Illinois 81, Bradley 55 Indiana 90, Stony Brook 74 Indiana St. 83, Notre Dame 70 Iowa 103, Abilene Christian 41 Iowa St. 77, Michigan 70 James Madison 79, San Jose St. 66 Kansas St. 71, Long Beach St. 58 Kent St. 75, St. Peters 58 Milwaukee 82, N. Illinois 69 Nebraska 83, SC State 57 Ohio 76, Valparaiso 72 W. Michigan 73, Alabama A&M 69 SOUTHWEST Baylor 87, Louisiana-Lafayette 68 Houston 80, Lehigh 66 IPFW 69, Tennessee Tech 66 Texas A&M-CC 72, Texas-Pan American 61 UTEP 67, West Alabama 46 FAR WEST Air Force 67, Ark.-Pine Bluff 64 New Mexico 109, Charleston Southern 93 Pacic 66, W. Illinois 52 Stanford 66, Denver 57 Washington St. 84, Lamar 64 National Basketball Association All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Philadelphia 5 6 .455 Toronto 4 7 .364 1 Boston 4 7 .364 1 New York 3 6 .333 1 Brooklyn 3 6 .333 1 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 7 3 .700 Atlanta 6 4 .600 1 Charlotte 5 5 .500 2 Orlando 4 6 .400 3 Washington 2 7 .222 4 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 9 1 .900 Chicago 5 3 .625 3 Detroit 3 5 .375 5 Cleveland 4 7 .364 5 Milwaukee 2 7 .222 6 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 9 1 .900 Houston 7 4 .636 2 Dallas 6 4 .600 3 Memphis 4 5 .444 4 New Orleans 4 6 .400 5 Northwest W L Pct GB Portland 8 2 .800 Oklahoma City 6 3 .667 1 Minnesota 7 4 .636 1 Denver 4 5 .444 3 Utah 1 10 .091 7 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 7 3 .700 Golden State 7 3 .700 Phoenix 5 4 .556 1 L.A. Lakers 4 7 .364 3 Sacramento 2 6 .250 4 Saturdays Games Dallas 108, Orlando 100 Cleveland 103, Washington 96, OT Miami 97, Charlotte 81 Atlanta 110, New York 90 Chicago 110, Indiana 94 Minnesota 106, Boston 88 Houston 122, Denver 111 New Orleans 135, Philadelphia 98 Oklahoma City 92, Milwaukee 79 Golden State 102, Utah 88 L.A. Clippers 110, Brooklyn 103 Sundays Games Portland 118, Toronto 110, OT Memphis at Sacramento, late Detroit at L.A. Lakers, late Todays Games Portland at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m. Charlotte at Chicago, 8 p.m. Denver at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Philadelphia at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Golden State at Utah, 9 p.m. Memphis at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Tuesdays Games Minnesota at Washington, 7 p.m. Atlanta at Miami, 7:30 p.m. New York at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Boston at Houston, 8 p.m. Phoenix at Sacramento, 10 p.m. COLLEGE FOOTBALL The AP Top 25 The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with rst-place votes in parentheses, records through Nov. 16, total points based on 25 points for a rst-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking: Record Pts Pv 1. Alabama (55) 10-0 1,495 1 2. Florida St. (5) 10-0 1,445 2 3. Baylor 9-0 1,351 4 4. Ohio St. 10-0 1,343 3 5. Oregon 9-1 1,210 6 6. Auburn 10-1 1,205 7 7. Clemson 9-1 1,115 8 8. Missouri 9-1 1,067 9 9. Texas A&M 8-2 956 10 10. Stanford 8-2 899 5 11. Oklahoma St. 9-1 889 12 12. South Carolina 8-2 870 11 13. Michigan St. 9-1 749 14 14. UCLA 8-2 710 13 15. Fresno St. 9-0 572 16 16. Wisconsin 8-2 559 17 17. UCF 8-1 535 15 18. LSU 7-3 439 18 19. Arizona St. 8-2 430 21 20. N. Illinois 10-0 426 20 21. Louisville 9-1 412 19 22. Oklahoma 8-2 318 22 23. Southern Cal 8-3 187 NR 24. Mississippi 7-3 119 NR 25. Duke 8-2 94 NR Others receiving votes: Minnesota 77, Notre Dame 11, Texas 10, Georgia 5, Cincinnati 1, Nebraska 1. National Hockey League EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Tampa Bay 20 14 6 0 28 64 50 Boston 19 12 6 1 25 53 36 Toronto 20 12 7 1 25 57 47 Detroit 21 9 5 7 25 54 60 Montreal 21 10 9 2 22 52 45 Ottawa 20 8 8 4 20 58 62 Florida 21 5 12 4 14 46 70 Buffalo 22 5 16 1 11 41 68 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 20 12 8 0 24 56 47 Washington 20 11 8 1 23 65 58 N.Y. Rangers 19 10 9 0 20 42 49 Carolina 20 8 8 4 20 39 55 New Jersey 20 7 8 5 19 42 49 N.Y. Islanders 21 8 10 3 19 61 68 Columbus 20 7 10 3 17 52 57 Philadelphia 19 7 10 2 16 35 48 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA Chicago 20 13 3 4 30 73 60 St. Louis 18 13 2 3 29 65 42 Colorado 19 14 5 0 28 59 41 Minnesota 20 12 4 4 28 53 43 Dallas 19 10 7 2 22 56 55 Winnipeg 21 10 9 2 22 56 59 Nashville 20 9 9 2 20 46 63 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 22 15 5 2 32 71 56 San Jose 20 13 2 5 31 71 45 Phoenix 21 14 4 3 31 73 66 Los Angeles 20 13 6 1 27 57 46 Vancouver 21 11 7 3 25 55 56 Calgary 20 6 11 3 15 54 75 Edmonton 22 5 15 2 12 53 83 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. Saturdays Games N.Y. Islanders 5, Detroit 4, SO Toronto 4, Buffalo 2 N.Y. Rangers 1, Montreal 0 New Jersey 4, Pittsburgh 1 St. Louis 4, Carolina 2 Nashville 7, Chicago 2 Phoenix 6, Tampa Bay 3 Florida 4, Colorado 1 Edmonton 4, Calgary 2 Sundays Games Columbus 4, Ottawa 1 St. Louis at Washington, late Los Angeles at N.Y. Rangers, late San Jose at Chicago, late Winnipeg at Minnesota, late Dallas at Vancouver, late Todays Games Boston at Carolina, 7 p.m. Anaheim at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m. Calgary at Winnipeg, 8 p.m. Tuesdays Games St. Louis at Buffalo, 7 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Toronto, 7 p.m. Ottawa at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Montreal, 7:30 p.m. Nashville at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Boston at N.Y. Rangers, 7:30 p.m. Chicago at Colorado, 9 p.m. Columbus at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m. Florida at Vancouver, 10 p.m. Tampa Bay at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. Sundays Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League KANSAS CITY ROYALS Signed C Francisco Pena and added him to the 40-man roster. HOCKEY National Hockey League CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS Recalled G Antti Raanta from Rockford (AHL). DALLAS STARS Claimed F Dustin Jeffrey off waivers from Pittsburgh. Reassigned D Aaron Rome to Texas (AHL). DETROIT RED WINGS Assigned C Luke Glendening to Grand Rapids (AHL). PHOENIX COYOTES Assigned D Connor Murphy to Portland (AHL). LEADING OFF | TENNIS DUSAN STOJANOVICAssociated PressBELGRADE, Serbia The Czech Republic retained the Da vis Cup title by beating Serbia 3-2 in the nal Sunday after Radek Stepanek swept past Dusan Lajo vic in the decisive singles match. The Czech veteran beat the 117th-ranked Lajovic 6-3, 6-1, 6-1, converting his rst match point with a volley. That sent about a thousand visiting Czech fans at Belgrade Arena into wild celebrations, blowing trumpets and beating their drums. Stepanek spread his hands on the court as Tomas Berdych and other Czech teammates mobbed him. This is an amazing moment, Stepanek said. The Czechs won their second straight Davis Cup title, with last years its rst as an indepen dent nation. Serbia won its only crown in 2010, beating France in Belgrade. Lajovic, who has a 5-12 record on the ATP tour and had never played in the Davis Cup before this weekend, replaced Janko Tipsarevic, who missed the nal with a heel injury. He also lost his rst singles against Berdych on Friday his rst career best-of-ve-sets match and was thrust into the biggest match of his life against Stepanek. The 23-yearold Serb started well, breaking Stepanek in the opening game of the match. But the 34-yearold Czech responded swiftly with two consecutive breaks to take a 5-2 lead. Stepanek then broke Lajovic for 3-1 in the nal set and add ed another before serving out the match. Serbia captain Bogdan Obradovic said his teams chanc es of winning the title were hurt by Tipsarevics injury and a 12-month doping ban against Viktor Troicki, who helped Ser bia win its only title. We couldnt nd the real replacement for the two, Bog danovic said. Well try the next year. The Czechs got the crucial point in Saturdays doubles to go up 2-1. Second-ranked Novak Djokovic then kept alive Serbias hopes by beating Berdych 6-4, 7-6 (5), 6-2 Sunday to improve his career re cord against the Czech to 15-2.TV2DAYSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED 2in SportsDAY OVER HEARDThis is an amazing moment. RADEK STEPANEK, after defeated Dusan Lajovic to retain the Davis Cup for the Czech Republic. MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m.FS1 Vermont at Providence NFL FOOTBALL LEAGUE8:25 p.m.ESPN New England at Carolina FIGURE SKATING4:30 p.m.NBC ISU Grand Prix: Skate France, at Paris NHL HOCKEY7:30 p.m.NBCSN Anaheim at Pittsburgh WOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL8 p.m.FSN Rice at Baylor Czech Republic retains Davis Cup am sure this will be the same, he said. Stenson had six bird ies in the nal round before nishing with an eagle at the 18th hole left him at 25 un der for the tournament. It was his rst victory of the season on the Euro pean Tour. To achieve the dou ble, double if you like in winning the DP World Tour Championship and the Race to Dubai on top of winning the PGA Tour Championship to capture the Fe dEx Cup takes some beating, I guess, Stenson said. I am just very, very pleased with the way I played. I knew it was going to be a tough week as I knew the guys like Justin (Rose) and Ian (Poulter) would come charging at me and try to catch me. Poulter birdied his closing two holes to shoot a 66 and nish second at 19 under. He also nished in second in the Race to Dubai. I have to take my hat off to Henrik as he is unbelievable, Poulter said. I tried to run him down as hard as I could but even with a sore wrist he has pressed on and I just could not get close enough. Henrik has not made a mistake all week and all I could do was make sure of second place and some valuable Ryder Cup points. Victor Dubuisson of France shot a 71 to claim third place at 17 under. Rory McIl roy continues to show signs of returning to form, closing with a 67. GOLF FROM PAGE B1 us to get out of it. Falcons owner Arthur Blank said he still has condence in coach Mike Smith and gen eral manager Thomas Dimitroff. I absolutely do. And, theyve earned it over the past ve years, Blank said. Its a tough business. Weve had a lot of injuries, and is sues on top of the injuries. These guys are proven leaders and proven by success. ... Theyll do the work that has to be done with my full support. Glennon completed 20 of 23 passes for 231 yards, two touchdowns and no interceptions. Jackson caught a 3-yard TD pass and nished with 10 receptions for 165 yards. Rainey entered the NFL as an undrafted free agent with Baltimore after leaving Western Kentucky as the Hilltoppers ca reer rushing leader. He was released once, re-signed to the Ra vens practice squad and eventually wound up on the active roster before suffering a sea son-ending knee injury. Baltimore went on to win the Super Bowl, and Rainey received a championship ring despite not appearing in a regular-season game as a rookie. I think preparation meets opportunity. ... Hes not lucky. This guy worked his tail off, he trained to do all the right things, and here come his chance and hes ready for it, Bucs coach Greg Schiano said. So good for us, good for him. The Bucs opened the season with eight straight losses, with four of the setbacks coming in the nal two minutes of regulation or overtime. BUCS FROM PAGE B1 in Johnsons windshield is the mark of seven titles held by Richard Petty and the late Dale Earnhardt. I have six, and well see if I can get seven, said Johnson, who has been asked repeatedly of late where he thinks he stands in NASCAR history. Time will tell. I think we need to save the argument until I hang up the helmet, then its worth the argument. Lets wait until I hang up the helmet until we really start thinking about this. Kenseth, needing a Johnson collapse to have any shot at the title, positioned himself to pounce should anything go awry. He led a race-high 144 laps and nished second to Joe Gibbs Racing teammate Denny Hamlin. It was just unbelievable year for us, obvious ly we wanted to win the championship as good as we ran all year, said Kenseth, who won sev en races in his rst season with JGR. Kenseths effort just wasnt enough against a Hendrick Motorsports team that wouldnt be denied for a third consecutive year. If Jimmie would have got a at or some thing, that would have been all right, Kenseth lamented. Never seen anything like this in the sport and probably never will again. ... Maybe hell retire. Johnson won a record ve straight titles from 2006 through 2010, was mathematically elim inated before the 2011 nale, but was back in the title hunt last season. Only he had a tire failure in the penultimate race at Phoenix and then a mechanical failure in the nale to lose the championship to Brad Keselowski. His two-year drought is over, and his crew was ready for the party on the South Beach. You better get a sip of that (water) bottle, its the only healthy liquid youre going to get all night, Knaus radioed Johnson after he crossed the nish line. NASCAR FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, November 18, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF P A Home A way AFC NFC Div New England 7 2 0 .778 234 175 5-0-0 2-2-0 4-2-0 3-0-0 3-1-0 N.Y. Jets 5 5 0 .500 183 268 4-1-0 1-4-0 2-5-0 3-0-0 2-2-0 Miami 5 5 0 .500 213 225 3-2-0 2-3-0 4-3-0 1-2-0 0-2-0 Buffalo 4 7 0 .364 236 273 3-3-0 1-4-0 3-6-0 1-1-0 2-2-0 South W L T Pct PF P A Home A way AFC NFC Div Indianapolis 7 3 0 .700 252 220 3-2-0 4-1-0 5-2-0 2-1-0 3-0-0 Tennessee 4 6 0 .400 227 226 2-4-0 2-2-0 3-4-0 1-2-0 0-3-0 Houston 2 8 0 .200 193 276 1-4-0 1-4-0 2-4-0 0-4-0 1-1-0 Jacksonville 1 9 0 .100 129 318 0-5-0 1-4-0 1-5-0 0-4-0 1-1-0 North W L T Pct PF P A Home A way AFC NFC Div Cincinnati 7 4 0 .636 275 206 5-0-0 2-4-0 5-3-0 2-1-0 2-2-0 Pittsburgh 4 6 0 .400 216 245 3-2-0 1-4-0 3-4-0 1-2-0 1-1-0 Baltimore 4 6 0 .400 208 212 3-1-0 1-5-0 4-4-0 0-2-0 2-2-0 Cleveland 4 6 0 .400 192 238 3-2-0 1-4-0 3-4-0 1-2-0 2-2-0 West W L T Pct PF P A Home A way AFC NFC Div Kansas City 9 0 0 1.000 215 111 5-0-0 4-0-0 6-0-0 3-0-0 1-0-0 Denver 8 1 0 .889 371 238 5-0-0 3-1-0 4-1-0 4-0-0 2-0-0 Oakland 4 6 0 .400 194 246 3-2-0 1-4-0 4-3-0 0-3-0 1-2-0 San Diego 4 6 0 .400 228 222 2-2-0 2-4-0 2-5-0 2-1-0 0-2-0 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF P A Home A way NFC AFC Div Philadelphia 6 5 0 .545 276 260 1-4-0 5-1-0 5-2-0 1-3-0 3-2-0 Dallas 5 5 0 .500 274 258 4-1-0 1-4-0 5-2-0 0-3-0 3-0-0 N.Y. Giants 4 6 0 .400 192 256 3-2-0 1-4-0 3-4-0 1-2-0 1-2-0 Washington 3 7 0 .300 246 311 2-2-0 1-5-0 1-6-0 2-1-0 0-3-0 South W L T Pct PF P A Home A way NFC AFC Div New Orleans 8 2 0 .800 288 183 6-0-0 2-2-0 6-0-0 2-2-0 2-0-0 Carolina 6 3 0 .667 214 115 3-1-0 3-2-0 6-2-0 0-1-0 2-0-0 Tampa Bay 2 8 0 .200 187 237 2-4-0 0-4-0 1-6-0 1-2-0 1-3-0 Atlanta 2 8 0 .200 214 292 2-3-0 0-5-0 2-5-0 0-3-0 1-3-0 North W L T Pct PF P A Home A way NFC AFC Div Detroit 6 4 0 .600 265 253 3-1-0 3-3-0 5-2-0 1-2-0 3-1-0 Chicago 6 4 0 .600 282 267 4-2-0 2-2-0 3-4-0 3-0-0 2-2-0 Green Bay 5 5 0 .500 258 239 3-2-0 2-3-0 3-4-0 2-1-0 2-1-0 Minnesota 2 8 0 .200 240 320 2-3-0 0-5-0 1-7-0 1-1-0 0-3-0 West W L T Pct PF P A Home A way NFC AFC Div Seattle 10 1 0 .909 306 179 5-0-0 5-1-0 7-0-0 3-1-0 3-0-0 San Francisco 6 4 0 .600 247 178 3-2-0 3-2-0 3-3-0 3-1-0 2-1-0 Arizona 6 4 0 .600 214 212 4-1-0 2-3-0 4-4-0 2-0-0 0-3-0 St. Louis 4 6 0 .400 224 234 2-3-0 2-3-0 1-5-0 3-1-0 1-2-0 This Week Thursdays Game Indianapolis 30, Tennessee 27 Sundays Games Chicago 23, Baltimore 20, OT Oakland 28, Houston 23 Buffalo 37, N.Y. Jets 14 Tampa Bay 41, Atlanta 28 Pittsburgh 37, Detroit 27 Philadelphia 24, Washington 16 Cincinnati 41, Cleveland 20 Arizona 27, Jacksonville 14 Miami 20, San Diego 16 Seattle 41, Minnesota 20 New Orleans 23, San Francisco 20 N.Y. Giants 27, Green Bay 13 Kansas City at Denver, 8:30 p.m. Open: Dallas, St. Louis Todays Game New England at Carolina, 8:40 p.m. Next Week Thursdays Game New Orleans at Atlanta, 8:25 p.m. Nov. 24 Minnesota at Green Bay, 1 p.m. Jacksonville at Houston, 1 p.m. San Diego at Kansas City, 1 p.m. Chicago at St. Louis, 1 p.m. Pittsburgh at Cleveland, 1 p.m. Tampa Bay at Detroit, 1 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Baltimore, 1 p.m. Carolina at Miami, 1 p.m. Tennessee at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. Indianapolis at Arizona, 4:05 p.m. Dallas at N.Y. Giants, 4:25 p.m. Denver at New England, 8:30 p.m. Open: Buffalo, Cincinnati, Philadelphia, Seattle Nov. 25 San Francisco at Washington, 8:40 p.m. CHICAGO The Chicago Bears game against the Baltimore Ravens was delayed about two hours because of a torrential downpour. Play was stopped with 4:51 left in the rst quar ter when fans were ordered to seek cover. Players stayed on the sideline for a few minutes before heading to the locker room as heavy rains and strong winds hit. The rain was so heavy it looked as if the Chicago skyline was gone. More than two hours later, the game was resumed with the Bears winning 23-20. Downpour delays game Eagles 24, Redskins 16 Washington 0 0 0 16 16 Philadelphia 7 10 7 0 24 First Quarter PhiFoles 4 run (Henery kick), 2:48. Second Quarter PhiMcCoy 1 run (Henery kick), 14:31. PhiFG Henery 24, 3:51. Third Quarter PhiMcCoy 1 run (Henery kick), 9:41. Fourth Quarter WasYoung 62 pass from Grifn III (N.Williams pass from Grifn III), 12:56. WasA.Robinson 41 pass from Grifn III (Grifn III run), 5:57. A,144. W as Phi First downs 23 22 Total Net Yards 427 402 Rushes-yards 38-191 33-126 Passing 236 276 Punt Returns 1-0 2-6 Kickoff Returns 1-23 2-23 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-0 Comp-Att-Int 17-35-1 17-26-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-28 3-22 Punts 6-37.2 6-50.7 Fumbles-Lost 3-1 0-0 Penalties-Yards 4-39 9-68 Time of Possession 33:42 26:18 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGWashington, Morris 22-93, Grifn III 1044, Helu Jr. 3-39, Garcon 1-9, Young 2-6. Philadel phia, McCoy 20-77, Foles 9-47, Brown 4-2. PASSINGWashington, Grifn III 17-35-1-264. Phila delphia, Foles 17-26-0-298. RECEIVINGWashington, Garcon 6-68, Helu Jr. 3-11, A.Robinson 2-60, Moss 2-41, Young 1-62, Reed 1-12, Hankerson 1-5, N.Williams 1-5. Philadelphia, Jackson 4-82, McCoy 4-73, Cooper 3-37, Ertz 2-31, Brown 2-28, Celek 1-42, Avant 1-5. MISSED FIELD GOALSNone. Bills 37, Jets 14 N.Y. Jets 0 0 7 7 14 Buffalo 0 20 14 3 37 Second Quarter BufFG Carpenter 40, 12:40. BufGraham 34 pass from Manuel (Carpenter kick), 4:05. BufSummers 3 run (Carpenter kick), 3:17. BufFG Carpenter 42, 1:15. Third Quarter NYJIvory 1 run (Folk kick), 7:18. BufGoodwin 43 pass from Manuel (Carpenter kick), 4:40. BufSearcy 32 interception return (Carpenter kick), 1:14. Fourth Quarter NYJCumberland 13 pass from Simms (Folk kick), 9:36. BufFG Carpenter 43, 4:02. A,036. NYJ Buf First downs 12 14 Total Net Yards 267 313 Rushes-yards 23-134 38-68 Passing 133 245 Punt Returns 1-16 4-17 Kickoff Returns 5-115 1-26 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 3-41 Comp-Att-Int 12-29-3 20-28-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-30 1-0 Punts 6-47.3 6-33.3 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 1-0 Penalties-Yards 4-24 8-64 Time of Possession 26:18 33:42 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGN.Y. Jets, Ivory 15-98, Powell 5-27, Cribbs 2-9, Smith 1-0. Buffalo, Jackson 12-34, Goodwin 1-17, Manuel 7-9, Spiller 13-6, Summers 2-4, Choice 2-1, Graham 1-(minus 3). PASSINGN.Y. Jets, Smith 8-23-3-103, Simms 4-6-060. Buffalo, Manuel 20-28-0-245. RECEIVINGN.Y. Jets, Cumberland 3-25, Holmes 2-71, Salas 2-32, Bohanon 2-5, Winslow 1-17, Nelson 1-12, Powell 1-1. Buffalo, Goodwin 6-81, Hogan 3-29, Graham 2-74, Chandler 2-40, Spiller 2-10, Jackson 2-5, Summers 1-5, L.Smith 1-1, Choice 1-0. MISSED FIELD GOALSN.Y. Jets, Folk 48 (WR). Buccaneers 41, F alcons 28 Atlanta 0 6 7 15 28 Tampa Bay 3 21 14 3 41 First Quarter TBFG Lindell 30, 1:45. Second Quarter AtlFG Bryant 46, 12:07. TBRainey 43 run (Lindell kick), 10:14. TBFoster 37 interception return (Lindell kick), 7:05. TBRainey 3 run (Lindell kick), 3:16. AtlFG Bryant 49, :56. Third Quarter TBRainey 4 pass from Glennon (Lindell kick), 9:34. TBJackson 3 pass from Glennon (Lindell kick), 1:54. AtlDouglas 80 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick), 1:02. Fourth Quarter TBFG Lindell 46, 7:15. AtlSmith 50 run (Gonzalez pass from Do.Davis), 5:22. AtlWhite 6 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick), 1:45. A,360. Atl TB First downs 24 24 Total Net Yards 420 410 Rushes-yards 20-152 38-186 Passing 268 224 Punt Returns 2-16 0-0 Kickoff Returns 0-0 5-61 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 2-37 Comp-Att-Int 24-43-2 20-25-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-20 2-7 Punts 2-12.0 4-42.0 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 0-0 Penalties-Yards 7-45 11-121 Time of Possession 26:46 33:14 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGAtlanta, Smith 2-88, Jackson 11-41, Rod gers 6-22, Vaughan 1-1. Tampa Bay, Rainey 30-163, Leonard 4-16, Glennon 1-4, Hill 3-3. PASSINGAtlanta, Ryan 19-36-2-254, Do.Davis 5-70-34. Tampa Bay, Glennon 20-23-0-231, Koenen 0-1-0-0, Rainey 0-1-0-0. RECEIVINGAtlanta, Douglas 6-134, Gonzalez 6-51, White 3-36, Jackson 2-24, D.Johnson 2-18, Vaughan 2-7, Rodgers 1-8, Toilolo 1-6, Smith 1-4. Tampa Bay, Jackson 10-165, Leonard 4-21, Rainey 2-4, Underwood 1-20, Wright 1-13, Crabtree 1-5, Lorig 1-3. MISSED FIELD GOALSTampa Bay, Lindell 55 (WR). Cardinals 27, Jaguars 14 Arizona 7 7 10 3 27 Jacksonville 14 0 0 0 14 First Quarter JaxNoble 62 pass from Henne (Scobee kick), 12:53. AriFitzgerald 14 pass from Palmer (Feely kick), 7:50. JaxJones-Drew 1 run (Scobee kick), 5:08. Second Quarter AriMendenhall 5 run (Feely kick), 1:55. Third Quarter AriFG Feely 21, 10:36. AriFloyd 91 pass from Palmer (Feely kick), 7:29. Fourth Quarter AriFG Feely 32, 7:03. A,862. Ari Jax First downs 19 14 Total Net Yards 416 274 Rushes-yards 24-14 16-32 Passing 402 242 Punt Returns 4-22 6-48 Kickoff Returns 0-0 4-144 Interceptions Ret. 2-15 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 30-42-0 27-42-2 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-17 2-13 Punts 8-44.8 8-47.8 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 5-42 6-40 Time of Possession 35:53 24:07 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGArizona, Mendenhall 13-14, Ellington 8-3, Palmer 3-(minus 3). Jacksonville, Jones-Drew 1423, Todman 2-9. PASSINGArizona, Palmer 30-42-0-419. Jacksonville, Henne 27-42-2-255. RECEIVINGArizona, Floyd 6-193, Housler 6-70, Fitzgerald 6-61, Roberts 3-14, Mendenhall 3-13, Dray 2-18, Ellington 2-10, Ballard 1-29, Peterson 1-11. Jacksonville, Sanders 8-61, Jones-Drew 4-12, Harbor 3-32, Lewis 3-23, Brown 2-23, Shorts III 2-22, Taylor 2-20, Noble 1-62, Taufoou 1-5, Todman 1-(minus 5). MISSED FIELD GOALSJacksonville, Scobee 60 (WL). Bengals41, Browns 20 Cleveland 13 0 7 0 20 Cincinnati 0 31 0 10 41 First Quarter CleFG Cundiff 20, 4:10. CleFG Cundiff 28, 3:04. CleHaden 29 interception return (Cundiff kick), 2:19. Second Quarter CinGresham 25 pass from Dalton (Nugent kick), 14:52. CinSanu 6 pass from Dalton (Nugent kick), 11:49. CinDye 24 blocked punt return (Nugent kick), 4:35. CinBurct 13 fumble return (Nugent kick), 2:45. CinFG Nugent 41, :01. Third Quarter CleGordon 74 pass from Campbell (Cundiff kick), 9:29. Fourth Quarter CinAl.Smith 2 pass from Dalton (Nugent kick), 11:50. CinFG Nugent 38, 8:04. A,856. Cle Cin First downs 15 10 Total Net Yards 330 224 Rushes-yards 19-102 31-106 Passing 228 118 Punt Returns 3-25 3-39 Kickoff Returns 3-42 0-0 Interceptions Ret. 2-44 3-16 Comp-Att-Int 27-56-3 14-28-2 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-20 0-0 Punts 7-33.0 9-45.3 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 0-0 Penalties-Yards 5-40 8-64 Time of Possession 32:24 27:36 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGCleveland, Ogbonnaya 8-69, Whittaker 4-20, McGahee 6-13, Edwards 1-0. Cincinnati, Green-Ellis 16-62, Bernard 10-45, Dalton 4-0, M. Jones 1-(minus 1). PASSINGCleveland, Campbell 27-56-3-248. Cincin nati, Dalton 13-27-2-93, Sanu 1-1-0-25. RECEIVINGCleveland, Ogbonnaya 6-30, Cameron 6-29, Gordon 5-125, Whittaker 5-41, McGahee 2-4, Barnidge 1-12, Little 1-4, Bess 1-3. Cincinnati, Ber nard 4-41, Gresham 2-27, Sanu 2-11, Green 2-7, Ei fert 1-15, M.Jones 1-9, Hawkins 1-6, Al.Smith 1-2. MISSED FIELD GOALSNone. Raiders 28, Texans 23 Oakland 14 0 14 0 28 Houston 0 17 0 6 23 First Quarter OakD.Moore 5 pass from McGloin (Janikowski kick), 9:26. OakStreater 16 pass from McGloin (Janikowski kick), 3:45. Second Quarter HouGraham 42 pass from Keenum (Bullock kick), 11:52. HouMartin 87 punt return (Bullock kick), 2:54. HouFG Bullock 51, :40. Third Quarter OakRivera 26 pass from McGloin (Janikowski kick), 8:13. OakJennings 80 run (Janikowski kick), 2:26. Fourth Quarter HouFG Bullock 26, 12:13. HouFG Bullock 30, 8:02. A,726. Oak Hou First downs 12 14 Total Net Yards 341 394 Rushes-yards 31-165 21-90 Passing 176 304 Punt Returns 4-30 7-125 Kickoff Returns 3-77 3-65 Interceptions Ret. 1-0 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 18-32-0 25-49-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-21 2-21 Punts 11-49.1 9-49.1 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 3-1 Penalties-Yards 8-77 9-50 Time of Possession 31:31 28:29 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGOakland, Jennings 22-150, Streater 1-8, Reece 4-6, Ford 1-4, McGloin 3-(minus 3). Houston, Tate 19-88, D.Johnson 2-2. PASSINGOakland, McGloin 18-32-0-197. Houston, Keenum 13-24-1-170, Schaub 12-25-0-155. RECEIVINGOakland, Streater 6-84, Rivera 5-54, Reece 2-17, D.Moore 2-11, Jennings 2-(minus 2), Holmes 1-33. Houston, A.Johnson 10-116, Gra ham 7-136, Tate 4-29, Martin 2-32, Hopkins 1-7, Posey 1-5. MISSED FIELD GOALSOakland, Janikowski 54 (WL). Steelers 37, Lions 27 Detroit 0 27 0 0 27 Pittsburgh 14 6 3 14 37 First Quarter PitA.Brown 34 pass from Roethlisberger (Suisham kick), 6:20. PitA.Brown 47 pass from Roethlisberger (Suisham kick), 3:58. Second Quarter DetFG Akers 35, 14:05. PitFG Suisham 25, 10:31. DetJohnson 79 pass from Stafford (Akers kick), 10:13. PitFG Suisham 34, 7:19. DetJohnson 19 pass from Stafford (Akers kick), 3:52. DetBell 2 run (Akers kick), 1:42. DetFG Akers 19, :04. Third Quarter PitFG Suisham 21, 5:14. Fourth Quarter PitW.Johnson 1 pass from Roethlisberger (Suisham kick), 4:46. PitCotchery 20 pass from Roethlisberger (Suisham kick), 2:29. A,905. Det Pit First downs 21 24 Total Net Yards 451 398 Rushes-yards 25-107 27-40 Passing 344 358 Punt Returns 4-17 2-17 Kickoff Returns 4-92 1-21 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-27 Comp-Att-Int 19-46-1 29-45-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-18 1-9 Punts 3-50.7 5-43.8 Fumbles-Lost 2-2 0-0 Penalties-Yards 8-45 4-23 Time of Possession 27:44 32:16 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGDetroit, Bell 9-49, Bush 12-31, Stafford 3-24, Martin 1-3. Pittsburgh, Bell 18-36, Roethlisberger 6-12, Dwyer 1-0, F.Jones 1-0, A.Brown 1-(minus 8). PASSINGDetroit, Stafford 19-46-1-362. Pittsburgh, Roethlisberger 29-45-0-367. RECEIVINGDetroit, Johnson 6-179, Bell 3-48, Durham 3-42, Pettigrew 3-37, Bush 2-23, Ross 1-19, Fauria 1-14. Pittsburgh, Miller 8-67, A.Brown 7-147, Bell 4-52, Cotchery 3-48, Wheaton 3-38, Dw yer 2-12, Sanders 1-2, W.Johnson 1-1. MISSED FIELD GOALSNone. Bears 23, Ra vens 20 Baltimore 10 7 0 3 0 20 Chicago 0 13 0 7 3 23 First Quarter BalRice 1 run (Tucker kick), 9:58. BalFG Tucker 52, 4:51. Second Quarter ChiFG Gould 20, 8:50. ChiBass 24 interception return (Gould kick), 8:38. BalT.Smith 5 pass from Flacco (Tucker kick), 4:08. ChiFG Gould 46, :00. Fourth Quarter ChiForte 14 pass from McCown (Gould kick), 10:33. BalFG Tucker 21, :03. Overtime ChiFG Gould 38, 8:41. A,367. Bal Chi First downs 23 18 Total Net Yards 317 319 Rushes-yards 41-174 26-104 Passing 143 215 Punt Returns 2-7 1-0 Kickoff Returns 4-47 3-32 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 2-24 Comp-Att-Int 17-31-2 19-31-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-19 2-1 Punts 4-44.3 6-38.7 Fumbles-Lost 2-0 2-0 Penalties-Yards 5-46 13-111 Time of Possession 35:41 30:38 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGBaltimore, Rice 25-131, Flacco 4-20, Pierce 10-18, J.Jones 1-4, Leach 1-1. Chicago, Forte 18-83, Jeffery 3-17, Bush 3-5, McCown 2-(minus 1). PASSINGBaltimore, Flacco 17-31-2-162. Chicago, McCown 19-31-0-216. RECEIVINGBaltimore, T.Smith 5-32, Doss 3-37, Rice 3-17, Clark 2-31, J.Jones 2-18, Dickson 1-16, Thompson 1-11. Chicago, Jeffery 7-83, Forte 5-42, Marshall 4-42, M.Bennett 2-48, E.Bennett 1-1. MISSED FIELD GOALSNone. Dolphins 20, Charger s 16 San Diego 7 3 3 3 16 Miami 3 7 7 3 20 First Quarter MiaFG Sturgis 22, 9:13. SDGates 5 pass from Rivers (Novak kick), :18. Second Quarter MiaDan.Thomas 1 run (Sturgis kick), 9:43. SDFG Novak 27, :54. Third Quarter MiaClay 39 pass from Tannehill (Sturgis kick), 7:43. SDFG Novak 50, 4:00. Fourth Quarter SDFG Novak 29, 14:52. MiaFG Sturgis 37, 8:34. A,256. SD Mia First downs 22 21 Total Net Yards 435 343 Rushes-yards 26-154 19-104 Passing 281 239 Punt Returns 3-46 0-0 Kickoff Returns 2-43 2-48 Interceptions Ret. 1-0 1-8 Comp-Att-Int 22-34-1 22-35-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-17 4-29 Punts 4-43.5 4-52.3 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 10-76 3-15 Time of Possession 31:24 28:36 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGSan Diego, Mathews 19-127, Woodhead 5-21, Rivers 2-6. Miami, Dan.Thomas 10-57, Tannehill 4-21, Miller 4-17, Thigpen 1-9. PASSINGSan Diego, Rivers 22-34-1-298. Miami, Tannehill 22-35-1-268. RECEIVINGSan Diego, Green 4-81, Gates 4-52, Allen 3-45, Ajirotutu 2-38, Royal 2-20, V.Brown 2-17, Mathews 2-16, Woodhead 2-16, Phillips 1-13. Miami, Clay 6-90, Hartline 5-65, Matthews 4-52, Wallace 4-39, Miller 2-20, Dan.Thomas 1-2. MISSED FIELD GOALSNone. Giants 27, P ackers 13 Green Bay 0 6 0 7 13 N.Y. Giants 7 3 10 7 27 First Quarter NYGRandle 26 pass from Manning (J.Brown kick), 5:34. Second Quarter NYGFG J.Brown 40, 14:03. GBFG Crosby 24, 10:21. GBFG Crosby 57, :00. Third Quarter NYGFG J.Brown 28, 10:06. NYGJacobs 1 run (J.Brown kick), :25. Fourth Quarter GBLacy 4 run (Crosby kick), 12:43. NYGPierre-Paul 24 interception return (J.Brown kick), 10:49. A,114. GB NYG First downs 16 19 Total Net Yards 394 334 Rushes-yards 20-55 24-78 Passing 339 256 Punt Returns 3-34 1-32 Kickoff Returns 3-69 2-35 Interceptions Ret. 1-10 3-34 Comp-Att-Int 24-34-3 25-35-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 0-0 4-23 Punts 4-45.0 5-53.0 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 5-38 3-30 Time of Possession 24:46 35:14 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGGreen Bay, Lacy 14-27, Kuhn 1-12, Tolzien 2-11, Jennings 1-6, Starks 2-(minus 1). N.Y. Giants, A.Brown 18-66, Jacobs 5-9, Manning 1-3. PASSINGGreen Bay, Tolzien 24-34-3-339. N.Y. Giants, Manning 25-35-1-279. RECEIVINGGreen Bay, Nelson 8-117, Boykin 6-91, Kuhn 3-11, J.Jones 2-55, Lacy 2-21, Quarless 2-18, Bostick 1-26. N.Y. Giants, Cruz 8-110, Nicks 4-50, Randle 3-37, Myers 3-32, A.Brown 3-27, Jernigan 2-21, Conner 2-2. MISSED FIELD GOALSNone. Seahawks 41, V ikings 20 Minnesota 3 10 0 7 20 Seattle 10 14 0 17 41 First Quarter SeaFG Hauschka 50, 11:25. MinFG Walsh 32, 4:40. SeaLynch 4 run (Hauschka kick), :00. Second Quarter MinWright 38 pass from Ponder (Walsh kick), 11:28. SeaLynch 1 run (Hauschka kick), 6:26. MinFG Walsh 45, :48. SeaBaldwin 19 pass from Wilson (Hauschka kick), :10. Fourth Quarter SeaLynch 6 pass from Wilson (Hauschka kick), 13:14. SeaThurmond 29 interception return (Hauschka kick), 12:30. SeaFG Hauschka 26, 10:12. MinWright 21 pass from Cassel (Walsh kick), 2:18. A,235. Min Sea First downs 19 16 Total Net Yards 336 323 Rushes-yards 33-132 28-93 Passing 204 230 Punt Returns 0-0 3-17 Kickoff Returns 5-117 5-100 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 3-41 Comp-Att-Int 18-35-3 14-21-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-3 1-6 Punts 3-42.3 5-41.6 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 1-0 Penalties-Yards 4-20 7-96 Time of Possession 34:09 25:51 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGMinnesota, Gerhart 7-67, Peterson 2165, Ponder 5-0. Seattle, Lynch 17-54, Turbin 7-17, Wilson 2-14, Michael 1-9, Jackson 1-(minus 1). PASSINGMinnesota, Ponder 13-22-2-129, Cassel 5-13-1-78. Seattle, Wilson 13-18-0-230, Jackson 1-3-0-6. RECEIVINGMinnesota, Carlson 5-69, Wright 3-69, Patterson 3-28, Felton 2-13, Jo.Webb 2-9, Ford 1-11, Gerhart 1-7, Simpson 1-1. Seattle, Miller 4-69, Baldwin 2-63, Lynch 2-9, Lockette 1-27, Tate 1-26, Harvin 1-17, Turbin 1-12, Willson 1-7, Robinson 1-6. MISSED FIELD GOALSNone. Saints 23, 49er s 20 Eds:Fixed time of score on Dawson FG in 4th quarter San Francisco 0 10 7 3 20 New Orleans 7 7 0 9 23 First Quarter NOHill 3 pass from Brees (Hartley kick), :44. Second Quarter SFBoldin 11 pass from Kaepernick (Dawson kick), 10:16. SFFG Dawson 55, 3:34. NOCollins 1 run (Hartley kick), 1:58. Third Quarter SFV.Davis 17 pass from Kaepernick (Dawson kick), 10:52. Fourth Quarter SFFG Dawson 29, 13:23. NOFG Hartley 21, 7:50. NOFG Hartley 42, 2:06. NOFG Hartley 31, :00. A,025. SF NO First downs 12 23 Total Net Yards 196 387 Rushes-yards 22-81 23-92 Passing 115 295 Punt Returns 2-23 3-5 Kickoff Returns 0-0 1-82 Interceptions Ret. 1-22 1-43 Comp-Att-Int 17-31-1 30-43-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-12 1-10 Punts 7-49.4 3-51.3 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 3-2 Penalties-Yards 5-45 4-48 Time of Possession 25:21 34:39 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGSan Francisco, Gore 13-48, Kaepernick 3-25, James 2-7, Hunter 4-1. New Orleans, Thomas 11-49, Ingram 6-25, Sproles 3-16, Collins 2-3, Brees 1-(minus 1). PASSINGSan Francisco, Kaepernick 17-31-1-127. New Orleans, Brees 30-43-1-305. RECEIVINGSan Francisco, Boldin 6-56, V.Davis 4-33, Gore 2-8, Miller 2-8, V.McDonald 1-10, Man ningham 1-8, James 1-4. New Orleans, Graham 6-41, Colston 5-80, Thomas 5-35, Sproles 4-19, Moore 3-23, Meachem 2-78, Stills 1-11, Toon 1-8, Ingram 1-4, Collins 1-3, Hill 1-3. MISSED FIELD GOALSNone. STEVEN WINEAP Sports WriterMIAMI GARDENS The Miami Dolphins ended a dismal week with something to celebrate. Miami held San Diego without a touchdown over the nal three quar ters, and Brent Grimes broke up Philip Rivers nal pass in the end zone as time expired, giving the embat tled Dolphins a 20-16 win Sunday. Ryan Tannehill threw for 268 yards, including a 39-yard score to Charles Clay, who broke two tackles on the play. Miami managed 104 yards rushing behind a makeshift line. The victory came amid a harass ment scandal that has raised ques tions about the teams locker room culture. An NFL special investigator will question players this week about what might have happened between offensive tackle Jonathan Martin and guard Richie Incognito. The Dolphins (5-5) won for only the second time in the past seven games, and bounced back from a defeat Monday night at previous ly winless Tampa Bay. The Chargers (4-6) lost their third game in a row to further hurt their chances of an AFC wild-card berth. Trailing by four points, San Diego started from its own 17 with 1:54 left and drove to the Miami 25. On the nal play, a harried Rivers lofted a pass toward Vincent Brown in the end zone, but the 5-foot-10 Grimes leaped to swat the ball to the turf. Rivers threw for 298 yards and Ryan Mathews ran for 127, including a career-best 51-yard dash to set up a eld goal. But the Chargers had 76 yards in penalties, including two in fractions that cost them 11 points in the rst half. Miami played at home for the rst time since the scandal broke. The stands were less than two-thirds full, and an airplane banner reected the mood by calling for the ring of gen eral manager Jeff Ireland, who has long been in disfavor with fans. Because center Mike Pouncey missed the game with an illness, the Dolphins had three backups starting in the offensive line. Martin is sidelined while his harassment allega tions are investigated, and Incogni to was suspended. The Dolphins gave up four sacks, increasing their season total to 41, but averaged 5.5 yards per rush to limit the Chargers time of posses sion. On the games opening drive, the Dolphins drove 76 yards with all but 2 coming through the air for a eld goal. Penalties repeatedly hurt the Chargers. Corey Liuget was agged for roughing the passer to negate a teammates fumble recovery at the Chargers 1, and two plays later the Dolphins scored a touchdown.Embattled Dolphins stop Chargers to win, 20-16

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013 JIM VERTUNOAP Sports WriterAUSTIN, Texas Four-time world champion Sebastian Vettel set a Formula One sin gle-season record with his eighth consecutive victory, winning the U.S. Grand Prix with yet another dominat ing drive. Starting from the pole position, Vettel got through the critical rst turn with his trademark quick start and gave the eld no chance to catch his Red Bull car. Vettel charges into next weekends season nale in Brazil with a chance to tie Michael Schumachers Formula One record of 13 victo ries in a single season. Schumacher set the mark in 2004, and also won seven straight races that year. Vettel also is closing on the overall Formula One record for consec utive victories of nine, set by Alberto Ascari over parts of the 1952 and seasons. Lotus Romain Gros jean of France was second, his best nish this year. Vettels Red Bull teammate, Mark Webber of Australia, was third. As hes done twice before, Vettel spun his car through several doughnuts after the checkered ag, a move that has drawn nes from the sports governing body. Vettel hardly seemed to care, however, telling his crew over his radio, We have to remem ber these days. I love you guys. We have an incredible team spirit. Im so proud of you. I love you. Vettel later appeared to wipe away tears while standing on the podium while listening to the German national anthem. The 26-year-old Vettel made his Formula One debut at 19 in the 2007 U.S. Grand Prix in Indianapolis and now has an American title that escaped him last year. Vettel led the 2012 race in Austin most of the way until Lewis Hamilton passed him with 14 laps to go and went on to win. Vettel had called that a frustrating result and ruth lessly dominated the eld this time. He avoided any dan ger in the treacherous rst corner that pushes the drivers up 133 feet out of the start and into a blind turn left back down the hill. Typical of his quick starts, Vettel immediately started putting distance between him self and the other cars.Vettel wins US Grand Prix DAVID J. PHILLIP / APRed Bull driver Sebastian Vettel of Germany reacts after winning the Formula One U.S. Grand Prix auto race on Sunday at the Circuit of the Americas in Austin, Texas.

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Monday, November 18, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 rfntb CALL TODAY 877-265-2510 www.gingerbreadinsurance.comHome Auto Collector Car Commercial 1640 East Hwy 50 Suite B Clermont, FL 34711352-404-8990 rrfn trfb frContact UsAccounting rf831 E. Myers (Hwy. 50)Groveland Donna We i nhe im er, the owner of Out of the Blue H alf Moon Retrea t, h a s been servi ng L a ke County s i nce 1990 a s a M a rtia l Arts Instructor, Nutr i t i on a l, Sp i r i tu a l a nd Hol i st i c Counselor and Massa ge Ther a p i st DE-stress, rela x a nd rejuvenate wi th a ny one or com b i n a t i ons of our s i gna ture holi sti c a nd spa trea t m ents. We offer you; N a t i ve Hot Stone Thera py, Celluli te Reduct i on a nd Body Sh a p i ng wi th Pure Li ght Sl im LED Technology, Cla y Body Wra ps, Swedi sh, Deep T i ssue, Sh ia tsu, Reflexology, Detox Ly m pha t i c Dr ai n a ge, Aroma Thera py, a nd severa l di fferent types of Energy Ther a p i es I specia l i ze i n i ntegra t i on of hol i st i c thera pys for c a ncer p a t i ents Integr a t i on i s not a ltern a t i ve. Integr a t i on i s co m b i n i ng Hol i st i c trea t m ents w i th st a nda rd m ed i c a l trea t m ents th a t com ple m ent ea ch other Som e of our i ntegra ted trea tments are; Vi sual i za ti on, Nutr i ti on, M assa ge, Stress Reduct i on, Detoxi fi c a ti on and Counseli ng. Out of the Blue i s loca ted i n Groveland 2 mi les south of Lake D a v i d P a rk a nd Hwy 50, 10 mi les from Hwy 50 & 27 i n Cler m ont, a nd one hour fro m The V i lla ges The retre a t i s pr i va tely loc a ted on 50 be aut i ful acres and i s also a vai l able for your workshops, meeti ngs or pr i va te get together, ple ase c all for detai ls. Co m e to m y Yo Ch i Do cla ss. I developed thi s cl a ss by co m b i n i ng my 24 ye ars of hol i st i c and martia l arts trai n i ng just for you Yo Ch i Do i s a fun mi x of core exerc i ses, yog a, stretch i ng, Chi Gong and T ae Kwon Do. Thi s one hour class w i ll be held out doors All you need i s a Yog a ma t and $7 per cl ass. All a ges are welcome. No exper i ence i s necess ary C all 352-394-7388 www .outoftheblueh alf moonretrea t.co m Donna Weinheimer, LMTMassageDetox ProgramsBody ShapingHalfMoonRetreat@Gmail.com352-394-7388OutOfTheBlueHalfMoonRetreat.comMM12675 MA27125 rfntbft n407-877-6677Mattress Market of Florida rfnftbfnrfnntbttfffbttttt GERALD IMRAYAP Sports WriterJOHANNESBURG The Russian drug-testing lab for Februarys Winter Olympics in Sochi faces suspension unless it signicantly improves the reliability of its re sults by Dec. 1. The World Anti-Doping Agency has provisionally suspended the Moscow An tidoping Center on Sunday, saying its operations must improve or a six-month ban on the facilitys accreditation will be imposed. The WADA announcement of the possible suspension comes just three months be fore the start of the Sochi Games. In its statement, WADA said the suspension will be enacted unless the cen ter demonstrates by Dec. 1 that it is preparing a quality management program to in crease condence in its op erations, and that by April 1 of 2014 the improved pro gram has been drafted, nalized, implemented and embedded. WADA is not the responsi ble medical authority for the upcoming Olympics but said it strongly suggests the In ternational Olympic Committee consider appropriate action to ensure the com plete integrity of all analy sis at the laboratory both in Moscow and the satellite facility at the Sochi Games. The IOC gave the Russian facility its support, say ing that it is condent that all the necessary measures will be taken and the Sochi lab will be fully functioning during the Games. The integrity of the Games-time testing program will remain unaffected by these developments, indeed it will be strengthened, an IOC statement added. WADA regularly checks that its accredited labs are working properly by sending them blind samples, samples meant as tests to ensure the lab is giving correct nd ings, and not false positives or false negatives. Labs deemed non-compli ant with WADAs standards can have their accreditation revoked as has happened with the Rio de Janeiro lab that had been scheduled to test samples at next years World Cup in Brazil. FIFA will instead have to y World Cup samples to the lab in Lausanne, Switzerland. The Moscow lab handled drug tests for the world track and eld championships in August and is also due to do the same for the Sochi games at its satellite facility. Should the Moscow lab have its WADA accreditation revoked, the facility in Sochi would likely not be able to operate.WADA provisionally suspends Russian doping lab

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013 BOB WIENEKEAssociated PressSOUTH BEND, Ind. After watching his team lose for the rst time at home in No vember in his 14 years at the school, Notre Dame mens basketball coach Mike Brey was disappointed. If it was a team you didnt feel was going to have a good year, said Brey after the 83-70 loss to Indiana State on Sunday. Id be much more distraught. The Sycamores improved to 2-1, handing the 21st-ranked Irish their rst loss of the season after two wins. We got beat by one heck of a basketball team today, Brey said. I think their veteran poise was better than our veteran poise. It was Indiana State imposing their will on us on both ends of the oor. The Irish were led by Eric Atkins 18 points while Jerian Grant add ed 17 and Pat Con naughton chipped in 16. No other Irish play er scored more than six points. Five Sycamores scored in double gures, led by Justin Gants 17 points and Smiths 15. Manny Arop chipped in 13 while Jake Odum and Devonte Brown each added 10. Its a tough one, Connaughton said. Weve got to get bet ter. I think that showed today. Theyre a very good team. They beat us straight up and won both halves. This is something weve got to go back to and take with us for the rest of the season. Notre Dame shot 37 percent (28-of-58) from the oor, and commit ted 16 turnovers, many of them in the rst nine minutes of the game. Those are just so de ating for a team that historically has taken pretty good care of the ball, Brey said. Thats just deating. The Sycamores built their halftime lead thanks to a 12-0 run. Smith scored eight points during the spurt, starting it with a dunk and adding in a 3-pointer. The Irish surged ahead when Austin Burgett completed a three-point play with 15:07 remaining. Indiana State, however, re sponded with an 18-3 run that put the Syca mores in control.NO. 19 UCONN 77, BU 60STORRS, Conn. DeAndre Daniels scored 24 points to lead No. 19 Connecticut to a 77-60 victory over Boston University on Sunday in the 2K Sports Classic. Ryan Boatright added 16 points and Shabazz Napier had 12 points, 12 rebounds and six as sists for UConn (4-0), which blew a 19-point rst-half lead before pulling away again in the second half. D.J. Irving had 17 points for Boston (2-1), which had a one-point lead with 17 min utes to play. Dom Mor ris added 13 points and nine rebounds, and Maurice Watson Jr. also scored 13 for the Terriers. Daniels, who had just 19 points in the Hus kies rst three games, was 10 of 18 from the oor against BU. Boston University hasnt won a game against a ranked team since 1959.FLORIDA ST 89, UTMARTIN 61TALLAHASSEE Ian Miller scored 13 of his 20 points in the rst half, nishing 5 of 5 from the oor and 7 of 7 from the free-throw line, as Florida State de feated Tennessee-Mar tin 89-61 Sunday. Tennessee Martin led 12-11 with 11:31 to halftime. But Miller put Florida State ahead with a layup at 11:07 and the Seminoles (30) nished the sec ond half on a 30-9 run to pull ahead 41-23 at the half. Aaron Thomas scored 19 points and Okaro White added 17 points. DENNIS PASSAAP Sports WriterMELBOURNE, Australia Adam Scott successfully defended his Australian Mas ters title for his second victory in two weeks, scrambling Sunday for an even-par 71 and a two-shot victo ry over Matt Kuchar at wind-swept Royal Melbourne. Scott won the Aus tralian PGA last week in his rst event in Australia since win ning the U.S. Masters in April.LORENA OCHOA INVITATIONALGUADALAJARA, Mexico Lexi Thompson won the Lorena Ochoa Invitational on Sunday for her second victory in her last four starts, birdieing the nal hole to beat Stacy Lewis by a stroke. The 18-year-old Thompson made a 5-foot putt on the par5 18th, then won when Lewis missed her 5-foot try. Thompson closed with a 3-under 69 to nish at 16-under 272 at Guadalajara Country Club. She won the 2011 LPGA Navistar Classic at 16, and took the LPGA Malaysia last month for her second tour title.OHL CLASSICPLAYA DEL CARMEN, Mexico Harris English won the rain-delayed OHL Classic for his second PGA Tour title, pulling away for a fourstroke victory in a 29hole Sunday nish at Mayakoba. English closed with a 6-under 65 after completing the third round in the morning with a 68. He moved into contention Saturday morning in the second round, matching the lowest round of his tour career with a 62. STEVE REEDAP Sports WriterCHARLOTTE, N.C. Its a regular day in the Panthers locker room when offensive tackle Jordan Gross sees coach Ron Rivera walk ing by and says, Hey, Riverboat Ron. Rivera shakes his head, blushes a little and keeps on walking. Carolinas third-year coach earned the nickname after his 180-degree turn in coach ing philosophy earlier this season one that has helped spark the Panthers ve-game win streak entering Monday nights game against the New England Patriots. One of the NFLs most conservative coaches in terms of going on fourth down a year ago, Rivera now rarely misses an opportunity to keep his offense on the eld, urging them to go for it and pick up the rst down and seize momentum. The thing I real ly like is the guys have said to me they appreciate me showing faith in who we are as a football team, Rivera said. And it seems to have changed the course of the Panthers season. The nickname was born after Charlotte Observer sports writer Joseph Person dubbed him Riverboat Ron after the Panthers con verted a pair of fourth downs on their open ing drive in a win at Minnesota on Oct. 13. The Panthers went on to win 35-10. Riveras moves that day have set the tone for the Pan thers new philosophy: all or nothing. In the past ve games the Panthers have gone on fourth down six times and converted ve, three resulting in touchdowns, including a 14-yard pass from Cam Newton to Greg Olsen on a play-action fake against Atlanta. Said Olsen: Going for it has shown he has condence in us as an offense. Riveras new ap proach is far different from a year ago when he went on fourth down less than any coach in the league with the exception of Broncos coach John Fox, the man he replaced here in 2011. Rivera said his change in philosophy came af ter he didnt go for the jugular on fourth down in Week 2 against Buf falo, instead settling for a eld goal and a sixpoint lead. The Bills then drove 80 yards in the nal 1:39 with out any timeouts to beat the Panthers 24-23 on a 2-yard touchdown pass by EJ Manuel. Rivera said hes al ways played it by the book but came to realize that, hey, there is no book. Sometimes, he said, you just have to go for touchdowns in stead of eld goals. The nickname Riverboat Ron seemed destined to slowly fade into Panthers folk lore. But it received new life when Riveras daugh ter, Courtney, re-post ed on Instagram a photo-shopped picture of Rivera as a riverboat gambler. Graphic artist Jim Kennedy from Raleigh, N.C., created the online picture of Rivera wearing dark sun glasses, a Panthers blue jacket and black cow boy hat while holding a cigar in one hand and some playing cards in the other. When told Courtney had re-posted the image of him, the upbeat Rivera laughed and said, Oh, thats not fair now. Im going to talk to her. Rivera has said in the past he doesnt particularly care for the mon iker. If you ask him hell tell you he prefers Calculated Risk Taker Ron. That one never caught on for some rea son. But Riverboat Ron has, particularly with the help of Riveras daughter. I love it, Gross said of the nickname. Ive been calling him that. Its funny. He loves foot ball and its been hard for him going through his rst two seasons and Im as happy for him as I am for my self or anybody else. He works hard and all of the players respect him. Gross, now in his 11th season, is one of the few who feels com fortable calling Rivera by that name. Younger players such as de fensive end Greg Hardy and Newton have shied away. Hey, you can give your boss a name (but) Im going to keep my job. So no, (its) Ron, Hardy said.Riverboat Ron has Panthers back in NFL hunt MIKE MCCARN / APCarolina Panthers head coach Ron Rivera, right, shakes hands with Atlanta Falcons head coach Mike Smith after an NFL football game on Nov. 3 in Charlotte, N.C. The Panthers won 34-10. NFL FOOTBALL GOLF TERTIUS PICKARD / APAdam Scott of Australia celebrates with the trophy on Sunday after winning the Australian PGA golf championship at the Royal Pines Resort, Gold Coast, Australia. COLLEGE BASKETBALL DP World Tour Championship Leading Scores Saturday At Jumeriah Golf Estates (Earth Course) Dubai, United Arab Emirates Purse: $8 million Yardage: 7,675; Par: 72 Final Henrik Stenson, Sweden 68-64-67-64 263 Ian Poulter, England 69-68-66-66 269 Victor Dubuisson, France 70-66-64-71 271 Joost Luiten, Holland 73-68-65-66 272 Rory McIlroy, Northern Ireland 71-67-68-67 273 Luke Donald, England 73-66-67-67 274 Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain 72-66-66-70 274 Peter Hanson, Sweden 70-68-70-67 275 Justin Rose, England 70-67-68-70 275 Jonas Blixt, Sweden 72-65-71-68 276 Francesco Molinari, Italy 70-68-70-69 277 Richard Sterne, France 70-70-70-68 278 Rafa Cabrera-Bello, Spain 68-71-68-71 278 Alejandro Canizares, Spain 66-67-70-75 278 Australian Masters Leading ScoresSunday At Royal Melbourne Golf Club Melbourne, Australia Purse: $1 million Yardage: 7,024; Par: 71 Final Adam Scott, Australia 67-66-66-71 270 Matt Kuchar, United States 71-66-67-68 272 Vijay Singh, Fiji 72-68-63-71 274 Nick Cullen, Australia 65-69-69-72 275 Ryan Fox, New Zealand 68-71-66-73 278 Matthew Grifn, Australia 69-65-69-75 278 Marc Leishman, Australia 71-71-72-65 279 Aron Price, Australia 73-71-67-68 279 Jason Scrivener, Australia 69-71-70-69 279 Geoff Ogilvy, Australia 71-72-67-69 279 Mathew Goggin, Australia 72-71-67-69 279 Brendon de Jonge, Zimbabwe 68-70-68-73 279 Matthew Millar, Australia 69-70-71-70 280 Gaganjeet Bhullar, India 69-72-69-70 280 Nathan Holman, Australia 68-65-70-78 281 Gareth Paddison, New Zealand 74-69-72-67 282 Peter Senior, Australia 74-68-71-69 282 Michael Hendry, New Zealand 72-69-71-70 282 Scott wins Aussie Masters for 2nd win in 2 weeksNo. 21 Irish lose 1st Nov home game in 14 years JOE RAYMOND / APIndiana State guard Manny Arop, left, drives the lane as Notre Dame guard VJ Beachem defends in the second half on Sunday in South Bend, Ind. OHL Classic Leading Scores Sunday At Mayakoba Resort (El Camaleon Golf Club) Playa del Carmen, Mexico Purse: $6 million Yardage: 6,987; Par: 71 Final Harris English (500), $1,080,000 68-62-68-65 263 Brian Stuard (300), $648,000 65-70-65-67 267 Jason Bohn (145), $312,000 67-68-65-68 268 Rory Sabbatini (145), $312,000 68-65-65-70 268 Chris Stroud (145), $312,000 66-68-66-68 268 Justin Hicks (89), $194,250 69-67-66-67 269 Charles Howell III (89), $194,250 67-67-66-69 269 Robert Karlsson, $194,250 63-67-67-72 269 Justin Leonard (89), $194,250 70-67-65-67 269 Bob Estes (73), $156,000 68-69-65-69 271 Tim Wilkinson (73), $156,000 70-63-71-67 271 Freddie Jacobson (61), $126,000 70-69-67-66 272 Will MacKenzie (61), $126,000 69-69-69-65 272 Kevin Stadler (61), $126,000 67-63-68-74 272 Peter Malnati (56), $108,000 69-69-70-65 273 Robert Allenby (52), $84,171 70-68-66-70 274 Jeff Maggert (52), $84,171 69-66-69-70 274 Jay McLuen, $84,171 67-69-69-69 274 Pat Perez (52), $84,171 66-68-71-69 274 Alvaro Quiros, $84,171 67-70-66-71 274 Brendan Steele (52), $84,171 70-66-68-70 274 Scott Brown (52), $84,171 69-66-67-72 274 Chad Collins (45), $49,350 69-67-70-69 275 Tommy Gainey (45), $49,350 71-65-68-71 275

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Monday, November 18, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL B7 The Helpful PlaceWe Sell & ServiceEquipment* APOPKA Apopka Ace Hardware & Lumber 530 South Park Avenue (407) 889-4111 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5 LEESBURG South Leesburg Ace Hardware 27649 U.S. Highway 27 (352) 787-5446 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5 EUSTIS Bronson Ace Hardware 26 East Orange Avenue (352) 357-2366 M-Sat 7-6:30, Sun 9-5 MOUNT DORA Mount Dora Ace Hardware 18691 U.S. Highway 441 (352) 383-2101 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5 SORRENTO Sorrento Ace Hardware 24329 St. Rd. 46 (352) 383-2061 M-Sat 7-7:00, Sun 9-5 TAVARES Tavares Ace Hardware 509-South Highway 19 (352) 343-3361 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5 UMATILLA Umatilla Ace Hardware 811 North Central Avenue (352) 669-3411 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5Come See Our Great Selection of Benjamin Moore Paint *At select stores only. LATE COLLEGE TOP-25 BOXES No. 1 ALABAMA 20, MISSISSIPPI ST. 7 Alabama 3 7 7 3 Mississippi St. 0 0 7 0 7 First Quarter AlaFG C.Foster 33, 7:59. Second Quarter AlaVogler 18 pass from A.McCarron (C.Foster kick), :20. Third Quarter MSStSiddoway recovered fumble in end zone (Sobiesk kick), 10:11. AlaNorwood 11 pass from A.McCarron (C.Foster kick), 5:46. Fourth Quarter AlaFG C.Foster 35, 12:15. A,211. Ala MSSt First downs 20 10 Rushes-yards 33-196 29-53 Passing 187 144 Comp-Att-Int 18-32-2 15-29-1 Return Yards 19 38 Punts-Avg. 4-55.0 6-42.3 Fumbles-Lost 2-2 4-0 Penalties-Yards 5-41 1-5 Time of Possession 30:57 29:03 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGAlabama, Yeldon 24-160, Drake 4-28, A.McCarron 3-12, Team 2-(minus 4). Mississippi St., Perkins 10-25, J.Robinson 6-17, Williams 5-6, Russell 4-4, Shumpert 3-3, Team 1-(minus 2). PASSINGAlabama, A.McCarron 18-32-2-187. Mis sissippi St., Russell 15-24-1-144, Williams 0-5-0-0. RECEIVINGAlabama, Ch.Jones 5-37, Cooper 4-45, White 2-28, Norwood 2-23, Drake 2-9, Howard 1-21, Vogler 1-18, Yeldon 1-6. Mississippi St., M.Johnson 6-84, Lewis 4-36, Per kins 3-12, Wilson 1-13, Morrow 1-(minus 1). No. 4 BAYLOR 63, TEXAS TECH 34 Texas Tech 20 7 7 0 34 Baylor 21 14 21 7 63 First Quarter TTAmaro 6 pass from Ke.Williams (Bustin kick), 11:02. TTAmaro 20 pass from Mayeld (Bustin kick), 6:57. BayNorwood 40 pass from Petty (A.Jones kick), 6:05. TTE.Ward 5 pass from Mayeld (kick failed), 3:25. BayNorwood 58 punt return (A.Jones kick), 1:39. BayGoodley 31 pass from Petty (A.Jones kick), :04. Second Quarter BayChan 3 run (A.Jones kick), 8:18. TTGrant 3 pass from Mayeld (Bustin kick), 4:28. BayNorwood 58 pass from Petty (A.Jones kick), 3:12. Third Quarter BayPetty 6 run (A.Jones kick), 12:33. BayChan 47 run (A.Jones kick), 8:35. TTR.Davis 19 pass from Mayeld (Bustin kick), 2:45. BayPetty 1 run (A.Jones kick), :19. Fourth Quarter BayLinwood 10 run (A.Jones kick), 7:30. A,188. TT Bay First downs 24 32 Rushes-yards 34-134 57-340 Passing 320 335 Comp-Att-Int 29-54-1 17-31-0 Return Yards 6 64 Punts-Avg. 7-48.1 4-49.8 Fumbles-Lost 4-2 1-1 Penalties-Yards 8-93 12-128 Time of Possession 31:02 28:58 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGTexas Tech, Ke.Williams 8-48, Mayeld 13-35, S.Foster 4-27, Washington 7-25, Grant 1-2, Team 1-(minus 3). Baylor, Linwood 29-187, Chan 11-100, Russell 3-29, Webb 4-17, Petty 9-9, Team 1-(minus 2). PASSINGTexas Tech, Mayeld 28-51-1-314, Brewer 0-2-0-0, Ke.Williams 1-1-0-6. Baylor, Petty 17-31-0-335. RECEIVINGTexas Tech, E.Ward 7-82, Grant 6-72, Amaro 4-55, J.Davis 4-33, R.Davis 2-30, Ke.Williams 2-17, Mar quez 1-28, Cantrell 1-3, S.Foster 1-0, Washington 1-0. Baylor, Norwood 7-156, Goodley 4-101, Coleman 3-45, C.Fuller 2-18, Lin wood 1-15. SOUTHERN CAL 20, No. 5 STANFORD 17 Stanford 7 3 7 0 17 Southern Cal 14 3 0 3 20 First Quarter USCVainuku 1 pass from Kessler (kick failed), 8:47. StanGaffney 35 run (Ukropina kick), 6:46. USCAllen 1 run (Lee pass from Kessler), 2:34. Second Quarter USCFG Heidari 23, 9:05. StanFG Ukropina 27, :17. Third Quarter StanGaffney 18 run (Ukropina kick), 8:22. Fourth Quarter USCFG Heidari 47, :19. A,607. Stan USC First downs 18 18 Rushes-yards 35-210 27-23 Passing 127 288 Comp-Att-Int 14-25-2 25-37-0 Return Yards 0 38 Punts-Avg. 5-45.8 6-35.3 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 2-1 Penalties-Yards 6-70 4-45 Time of Possession 30:34 29:26 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGStanford, Gaffney 24-158, Hogan 4-18, Montgomery 2-14, Young 1-10, Wilkerson 3-9, Hewitt 1-1. Southern Cal, Allen 16-26, Madden 6-11, Isaac 1-2, Team 1-(minus 1), Kessler 3-(minus 15). PASSINGStanford, Hogan 14-25-2-127. Southern Cal, Kessler 25-37-0-288. RECEIVINGStanford, Montgomery 4-23, Rector 2-44, Pratt 2-21, Trojan 2-17, Cajuste 1-19, Whiteld 1-6, Hewitt 1-5, Gaffney 1-3, Lloyd 0-(minus 11). Southern Cal, Agholor 8-104, Lee 6-83, Allen 4-58, Vainuku 2-16, Grimble 2-10, Rogers 1-14, Flournoy 1-3, Madden 1-0. No. 21 ARIZONA ST. 30, OREGON ST. 17 Oregon St. 0 3 7 7 17 Arizona St. 13 7 0 10 30 First Quarter ASUGrice 1 run (Gonzalez kick), 11:57. ASUFoster 8 run (kick blocked), :32. Second Quarter ASUGrice 1 run (Gonzalez kick), 8:22. OrStFG Romaine 22, :00. Third Quarter OrStSmith 6 pass from Mannion (Romaine kick), 2:17. Fourth Quarter ASUFG Gonzalez 18, 5:25. ASUR.Nelson 23 interception return (Gonzalez kick), 5:08. OrStHamlett 29 pass from Mannion (Romaine kick), 2:41. A,386. OrSt ASU First downs 20 20 Rushes-yards 26-70 39-156 Passing 320 183 Comp-Att-Int 31-46-4 22-37-2 Return Yards 27 35 Punts-Avg. 4-39.0 5-42.2 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 0-0 Penalties-Yards 7-69 5-33 Time of Possession 32:36 27:24 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGOregon St., Woods 15-53, Cooks 2-11, Ward 7-11, Bolden 1-4, Mannion 1-(minus 9). Arizona St., Grice 24-118, Foster 4-20, R.Smith 1-15, T.Kelly 8-6, Team 2-(minus 3). PASSINGOregon St., Mannion 31-46-4-320. Arizona St., T.Kelly 22-37-2-183. RECEIVINGOregon St., Hamlett 9-119, Cooks 9-99, Mullaney 3-43, Anderson 3-27, Gilmore 3-18, Smith 2-13, Woods 1-1, Hateld 1-0. Arizona St., Strong 7-106, R.Smith 7-26, Grice 4-13, Foster 2-12, Ozier 1-21, Coyle 1-5. No. 19 LOUISVILLE 20, HOUSTON 13 Houston 0 13 0 0 13 Louisville 7 3 10 0 20 First Quarter LouDo.Brown 13 run (Wallace kick), 6:45. Second Quarter LouFG Wallace 37, 14:11. HouFG Bullard 46, 12:12. HouFarrow 4 run (Bullard kick), 6:35. HouFG Bullard 22, :25. Third Quarter LouDo.Brown 3 run (Wallace kick), 11:09. LouFG Wallace 39, 2:55. A,027. Hou Lou First downs 13 20 Rushes-yards 29-74 41-129 Passing 121 203 Comp-Att-Int 16-35-0 19-29-0 Return Yards 2 0 Punts-Avg. 7-39.9 6-38.5 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 1-1 Penalties-Yards 3-35 6-55 Time of Possession 22:11 37:49 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGHouston, R.Jackson 13-46, Farrow 9-24, OKorn 7-4. Louisville, Do.Brown 27-137, Perry 7-17, Team 3-(minus 5), Bridgewater 4-(minus 20). PASSINGHouston, OKorn 16-35-0-121. Louisville, Bridgewater 19-29-0-203. RECEIVINGHouston, Farrow 5-13, Rodriguez 3-24, Spencer 2-23, R.Jackson 2-20, Ambles 1-28, Ward 1-7, Maxwell 1-5, Ayers 1-1. Louisville, E.Rogers 5-38, Parker 4-72, Copeland 3-31, R.Clark 3-14, Perry 2-23, Do.Brown 1-14, Hubbell 1-11. No. 11 SOUTH CAROLINA 19, FLORIDA 14 Florida 7 7 0 0 14 South Carolina 3 3 7 6 19 First Quarter SCFG Fry 25, 10:21. FlaKel.Taylor 20 run (Hardin kick), 3:03. Second Quarter SCFG Fry 45, 14:04. FlaKel.Taylor 29 run (Hardin kick), 10:51. Third Quarter SCEllington 32 pass from Shaw (Fry kick), 10:23. Fourth Quarter SCFG Fry 22, 6:43. SCFG Fry 43, 2:16. A,853. Fla SC First downs 15 15 Rushes-yards 41-200 35-164 Passing 107 213 Comp-Att-Int 10-14-1 14-28-0 Return Yards 0 13 Punts-Avg. 4-36.3 3-33.3 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 8-65 5-45 Time of Possession 31:01 28:59 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGFlorida, Kel.Taylor 21-96, M.Brown 11-51, Showers 2-31, Patton 3-11, Joyer 1-8, T.Burton 3-3. South Carolina, Carson 13-102, Davis 13-54, Ellington 1-5, Shaw 8-3. PASSINGFlorida, Mornhinweg 10-13-1-107, T.Bur ton 0-1-0-0. South Carolina, Shaw 14-28-0-213. RECEIVINGFlorida, Dunbar 3-25, Fulwood 2-6, M.Brown 1-28, T.Burton 1-24, Kel.Taylor 1-15, Ajagbe 1-5, Patton 1-4. South Carolina, Ellington 4-67, Byrd 4-55, Anderson 3-69, Roland 1-9, Jones 1-7, Davis 1-6. STEPHEN HAWKINSAP Sports WriterARLINGTON, Texas Baylor keeps passing tests and changing perceptions about if the high-scoring Bears are for real. A day after over coming their rst double-digit decit of the season, and turning that into yet another lopsid ed victory to stay undefeated, the Big 12-leading Bears moved up a spot to third in the new Associated Press poll Sunday. That matches the highest ranking ever. The Bears (9-0, 6-0 Big 12) jumped ahead of Ohio State (10-0), which on Saturday matched a school record with its 22nd win in a row, 60-35 over Illinois. Two-time defending national champion Alabama and Florida State, both 10-0, stayed in the top two spots. After a 6-0 start in 1953, Baylor was third in the AP poll for a two-week stretch before losing three of its last four games. Coach Art Briles and Baylor extended its school-re cord winning streak to 13 with a 63-34 victory over Texas Tech, which had jumped ahead 14-0 in the rst 8 minutes and scored touch downs on its rst three drives Satur day night at the Dal las Cowboys stadium. The impressive part is we took a cou ple shots, and then we dodged a bunch, next thing you knew it was a ght and we were actually in it, Briles said. As you get deeper on in, youre go ing to have more games that could very easily fall that way. How right Briles is. Baylor plays next Saturday night at No. 11 Oklahoma State (91, 6-1), the preseason Big 12 favorite that has now won six in a row. The Cowboys are coming off a 38-13 win at Texas (7-3, 6-1), another Big 12 contender the Bears still have to play. This is a special team and I knew it from the get-go. We like these games, quar terback Bryce Petty said. Its these kinds of games that you want to ght with your brothers and win together. While the AP media poll is not factored into the Bowl Champi onship Series, Baylor is expected to move up in the new BCS standings later Sunday. They were fth last week, a spot behind Stanford, now a two-loss team after a 20-17 setback at South ern California on Satur day night. Texas Tech (7-4,44) was up 14-0 on two TD catches by stand out tight end Jace Amaro. The Red Raiders led 20-7 after an incredible one-handed 5-yard TD catch by Eric Ward. But Baylor, on pace for major college records with 61.2 points and 684.8 yards per game, had a 21-20 lead by the end of the rst quarter and never trailed again. And the Bears were playing without Big 12 rushing leader Lache Seastrunk, second-string running back Glasco Martin and 103-yard-agame receiver Tevin Re ese. They have accounted for a combined 24 touchdowns. I like how calm ly you mentioned their names, Briles said when asked about the missing trio. To us theyre not guys. I mean, theyre dynamic teammates. ... With them not being there, I think we are growing as a team from an offen sive standpoint. KELLI KENNEDYAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE Florida State did what coach Jimbo Fisher said the Seminoles would do: control the things they can control. Jameis Winston and second-ranked Florida State rolled over Syra cuse 59-3 on Saturday, getting a respite from the ongoing sexual assault investigation of the redshirt freshman quarterback. But the probe re mains a dark cloud over the program. State attorney Willie Meggs has said the investigation will continue for a few weeks and are setting up an interview with the alleged victim. A female student rst made the report to campus police on Dec. 7, 2012 and the case was turned over to the Tallahassee Police Department. Prosecutors were presented the case last week. The outcome of the in vestigation could come after the Atlantic Coast Conference championship game on Dec. 7 exactly one year from the date of the original report. The uncertainty of Winstons status could also affect the deci sion-making of Heisman Trophy voters with ballots due afterward. Voters could also drop Florida State out of the top two in the polls and the BCS standings if Winston is eventually suspended. None of that is within the Seminoles control, and Fisher says Win ston and the team have not it become a distrac tion on the eld. The Seminoles (10-0, 8-0 Atlantic Coast Conference) certainly were not distracted against the Orange. Its the same every week, Winston said. I have a great team. We have so many veterans. We use the (same) plan every single week and weve got to show up every single week. Thats how it is. Sem inole football. Winston played just two quarters Saturday and missed on two of 21 pass attempts the sec ond time he completed 90 percent of his passes this season. He threw for 277 yards and two touch downs without an in terception. He remains a Heisman front-run ner as the Seminoles led 38-0 at halftime. Florida State has now defeated opponents 59-3 in consecutive weeks and gone undefeated in ACC play for the rst time since 2000. I thought we came out very focused and, again, started very fast and got a great open ing drive, Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher said, and were able to make a couple big plays early, get control of the game and we were able to execute. Winston and the offense has dominated on the eld there have been 10 offen sive scoring drives that took less than two min utes in the last two games. But the Seminoles also have the No. 3 scoring defense in the league that allows just 11.1 points per game. Theyve given up 17 points just twice.Baylor earns highest ranking ever LOUIS DELUCA / DALLAS MORNING NEWSBaylor wide receiver Antwan Goodley (5) catches a rst quarter touchdown pass in front of Texas Tech defensive back Justis Nelson (31) on Saturday in Arlington, Texas. No. 2 Florida St. rolls, investigation continues PHIL SEARS / APFlorida State quarterback Jameis Winston (5) poses with former Florida State quarterback and Heisman Trophy winner Charlie Ward on Saturday in Tallahassee.

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LivingHealthySend your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8208 C1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013EARLY BIRDS: Boys more likely to be born early than girls / C2 Health check www.dailycommercial.com LINDSEY TANNERAssociated PressCHICAGO Identical twins Kelly McCarthy and Kristen Maurer have shared a lot in their lives so when one was diag nosed with breast cancer, she urged the other to get tested, too. You just do everything together, dont you, the doctor told Maurer before delivering the bad news that she, too, had the dis ease. Now the 34-year-old twins from Crown Point, Ind., are sharing a medi cal rarity: Maurer donated skin and fat tissue for McCarthys breast reconstruction. It wasnt a question, she didnt have to ask me, said Maurer, a college en rollment counselor. Having a twin is very like hav ing a child. You would do anything for them ... in a heartbeat. The rst successful or gan transplant was be tween identical twins in Boston in 1954 and in volved a kidney. Since then, identical twins have been involved in many other transplant operations, involving kid neys and other organs, bone marrow, and stem cells. But breast reconstruction between identical twins has only been done a handful of times; Maurer and McCarthy, a nurse, are among the youngest patients. Identical twins are ideal donors because their skin, tissue and organs are per fect genetic matches, ex plained Dr. David Song, chief of plastic and re constructive surgery at the University of Chicago Medical Center. And that Identical twins share breast cancer, surgery ASSOCIATED PRESS This Nov. 11 photo shows identical twins Kristen Maurer, left, and Kelly McCarthy at Kellys mother-inlaws house in Beecher, Ill. SEE TWINS | C4 MIKE STOBBEAssociated PressATLANTA Next time you go for a checkup, dont be surprised if your doctor gets on your case about your weight. The medical profession has issued new guidelines for ghting the nations obesity epidemic, and they urge physicians to be a lot more aggressive about helping patients drop those extra pounds. Doctors should calculate your body mass index, a weight-to-height ratio. And if you need to lose weight, they should come up with a plan and send you for counseling. We recognize that telling patients to lose weight is not enough, said Dr. Donna Ryan, co-chair of the guide lines committee. The good news? By next year, most insurance companies are expected to cover counseling and other obesity treatments, following in the steps of the Medicare program, which began pay ing for one-on-one help last year. More than a third of U.S. adults are obese, and thats been the case since the mid dle of the last decade. Of cials dene someone with a BMI of 30 or higher as obese. A 5-foot-9 person would be obese at 203 pounds. Doctors are well aware that excess weight can trig ger diabetes and lead to Doctors are told to get serious about obesity TIM MUELLER / ASSOCIATED PRESS In this Nov. 12 photo, Diane LeBlanc, 50, poses for a photograph in her ofce in Baton Rouge, La. LeBlanc lost 40 pounds since joining Heads Up, a supervised weight loss assistance program, provided by the Pennington Biomedical Research Center and the Louisiana Ofce of Group Benets. SEE OBESITY | C3 LEESBURG Books are Fun fundraiser to be held at hospitalThe Leesburg Regional Medical Center Auxiliary will host a Books are Fun book sale fundraiser for the Auxiliary from 7 / a.m. to 8 / p.m., from Wednesday to Friday, and 7 / a.m. to 4 / p.m., Friday at the hospi tal west lobby, Dixie Highway. Purchases can be made by credit card, cash or payroll deduction. For information, call Korky Saunders at 352-750-2062.ATLANTA Baby illnesses tied to parents nixing newborn shotHealth ofcials are reporting four Tennessee cases of a rare infant illness that have been linked to par ents refusing a routine shot for newborns. The four Nashville-area infants suffered brain or stomach bleeding earlier this year. Their parents had declined vitamin K shots, which have routinely been given to newborns since 1961. The shots improve blood clotting and prevent internal bleeding. All four children were treated with vitamin K and survived. Last week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the illnesses were the rst tied to parents opting out of the shots; reports of vitamin K deciency are rare. The CDC said the parents cited a belief that the shots werent necessary or cause leukemia. Ofcials say neither is true.BERLIN Drug-resistant bacteria spreading in EuropeA last-line defense against dangerous infections is becoming less effective in Europe because bacteria are increasingly resistant to drugs. The European Center for Disease Prevention and Control says countries in Europe are recording increasing numbers of cases where hospital-acquired bacterial infections cant be treated with antibiotics called carbapenems. The agency said in a report released Friday that ve southern European countries saw carbapenem-resistant bloodstream infections with Klebsiella pneumonia bacteria last year, compared with two countries in 2009. It also said resistant Acinetobacter species have been found in more than a quarter of all infections in eight of 18 reporting countries. ECDC Director Marc Sprenger called the ndings a very worry ing development for the treatment of diseases that for decades had been thought conquered thanks to antibiotics.

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This is a double whammy for boys, said Dr. Joy Lawn of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Med icine, who led the team of researchers. Its a pattern that hap pens all over the world. The gender difference isnt large: About 55 per cent of preterm births in 2010 were male, the report found. Nor is it clear exactly why it happens. The nding comes from a series of international studies being published Friday that examine newborn health and prematurity. About 15 million babies worldwide are born too soon, most of them in Afri ca and parts of Asia where survival is difcult for frag ile newborns. Globally, about 1 million babies die as a direct result of preterm birth and anoth er million die of conditions for which prematurity is an added risk, the researchers calculated. Fridays report offers some of the rst estimates of how many preemie sur vivors go on to suffer cer tain disabilities, and found that where these babies are born, and how early, deter mines their risk. Overall, Lawn said about 7 percent of survivors have two of the most burden some disabilities: neurologic-developmental impair ment ranging from learning disabilities to cerebral pal sy, and vision loss. But the biggest risk is to the youngest preemies, those born before 28 weeks gestation. Worldwide, 52 percent of them are estimated to have some degree of neurodevelopmental im pairment, the report found. Moreover, the risk of impairment in middle-income countries is double that of wealthy countries like the U.S. For example, China is sav ing more preemies lives but at the cost of their vi sion, Lawn said. Middle-income countries are missing out on a lesson the U.S. learned the hard way several decades ago, that giving these tiny babies too much oxygen can trig ger a potentially blinding condition called retinopathy of prematurity. Disability is not something thats inevitable. Its preventable, she said, calling for improved quality of care including eye checks to prevent or reduce vision loss. The March of Dimes re ported this month that 11.5 percent of U.S. births now are preterm. That rate is inching down, thanks mostly to fewer babies being born just a few weeks early as standards for elective deliveries have tightened, but it still is high er than in similar countries. For the public, the gen der difference may be the most surprising nding of Fridays report, although Dr. Edward McCabe of the March of Dimes says pedi atric specialists have long noticed that baby boys start out a bit more vulnerable. People are curious about it. Wed like to understand why this occurs, McCabe said. One possible reason: Mothers have a higher risk of certain pregnancy com plications high blood pressure and placenta ab normalities when carry ing boys, Lawn said. And if a boy preemie and a girl preemie are born at the same gestational age, the boy will be at higher risk of death or disability, she said. But the report concluded there is too little infor mation to quantify how big that risk is. Girls walk sooner than boys. They talk sooner than boys. They develop more quickly. Thats also true in utero, Lawn said. For a preterm baby, the difference of a few days maturity between a boy and a girl can mean the difference between major lung com plications or not. Its not just a prematurity issue. The report found that full-term boys also are more likely than girls to experience other newborn health problems including birth complications. Other ndings from the studies, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and published in the jour nal Pediatric Research: %  en In high-income countries the U.S., Canada, Australia and most of Eu rope more than 80 per cent of preemies both sur vive and thrive, although babies born even a little premature are more likely than full-term babies to be rehospitalized or have learning and behavioral challenges. %  en In low-income countries, preterm babies are 10 times as likely to die as those in high-income countries, and death is more common than surviving with a serious disability. %  en Aside from preterm birth, other leading causes of death and disability among newborns include birth complications that block breathing; severe jaundice and infections.Boys a bit more likely than girls to be born early Study: Where, how early preemies born affects long-term health but risk a bit higher for boys MARIA CHENGAssociated PressLONDON A strain of bird u that scien tists thought could not infect people has shown up in a Taiwan ese woman, a nasty surprise that shows scientists must do more to spot worrisome u strains before they ignite a global outbreak, doctors say. On a more hope ful front, two pharmaceuticals separately re ported encouraging results from human tests of a possible vaccine against a differ ent type of bird u that has been spreading in China since rst being identied last spring, which is feared to have pandemic potential. The woman, 20, was hospitalized in May with a lung infection. After being treated with Tamiu and antibiotics, she was released. One of her throat swabs was sent to the Taiwan Centres for Dis ease Control. Experts there identied it as the H6N1 bird u, widely circulating in chickens on the island. The patient, who was not identied, worked in a deli and had no known connection to live birds. Investiga tors couldnt gure out how she was infected. But they noted several of her close family and friends also developed u-like symptoms after spending time with her, though none tested positive for H6N1. The research was pub lished online Thursday in the journal Lancet Respiratory Medicine. Since the H5N1 bird u strain rst broke out in southern China in 1996, public health of cials have been ner vously monitoring its progress it has so far killed more than 600 people, mostly in Asia. Several other bird u strains, including H7N9, which was rst identied in China in April, have also caused concern but none has so far mutated into a form able to spread easily among people. The question again is what would it take for these viruses to evolve into a pandemic strain? wrote Marion Koopmans, a virologist at the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment in the Netherlands, in a commentary accompanying the new report. She said it was worry ing that scientists had no early warning sig nals that such new bird us could be a problem until humans fell ill. Scientists often monitor birds to see which viruses are killing them, in an attempt to guess which u strains might be troublesome for humans but nei ther H6N1 nor H7N9 make birds very sick.Bird flu strain infects human for 1st time ASSOCIATED PRESS In this April 11 le photo, a chicken is kept in a cage waiting to be inspected by health workers in Hong Kong. In May, a Taiwanese woman caught a new strain of bird u scientists previously thought was incapable of infecting humans.

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The guidelines were released this week by a group of medical orga nizations that include the American Heart Association, the Amer ican College of Cardiology and the Obesity Society. They come amid a spate of important developments in the ght against obesity. Last year, the Food and Drug Adminis tration approved two more obesity-ghting drugs. And this year, the AMA labeled obe sity a disease, a measure intended to get doctors to pay more attention to the problem and prod more in surers to pay for treat ments. Yet many people have been on their own when it comes to slimming down, left to sift through the myr iad diets and exercise schemes that are promoted for weight loss. And most doctors have little training in how to help their obese pa tients, other than telling them its a prob lem and they need to do something about it. I feel for these guys, said Dr. Tim Church, a researcher at Louisiana State Uni versitys Pennington Biomedical Research Center. They have patients who come in and ask them about the latest fad diet. Theyre not trained in this stuff and theyre not comfortable recommending particular diets or weight-loss plans. The guidelines advise doctors to: %  en At least once year, calculate patients BMI, measure their waists and tell them if they are overweight or obese. %  en Develop a weightloss plan that includes exercise and moderate calorie-cutting. %  en Consider recommending weight-loss surgery for patients with a BMI of 40 or for those with a BMI of 35 who also have two other risk factors for heart disease such as diabetes or high blood pres sure. %  en Refer over weight and obese pa tients who are head ed for heart problems to weight-loss pro grams. Specically, discuss enrolling them in at least 14 face-toface counseling sessions over six months with a registered dieti tian, psychologist or other professional with training in weight man agement. Web or phone-based counseling sessions are considered a less effective option. Diane LeBlanc said the new guidelines are overdue. More than year ago, the Baton Rouge, La., woman sat down with her longtime fami ly doctor to talk about her weight and get a referral for some kind of help. She had tried dieting without success for more than a decade, had high blood pressure and was about to hit a dress size of 20. She said the doctor smiled and told her: Theres a lot of pro grams out there. But really, you just have to eat less. It just devastated me, LeBlanc recalled. He was saying, Its all in your mind. I was thinking, If I could do that, dont you think I would have done it by now? She changed doctors and has lost 40 pounds from her 5-foot-4 frame since May af ter getting into an intensive Pennington weight-loss program that includes counseling sessions. Doctors need to get the message, LeBlanc said. Just telling someone you need to push the plate away is not going to work for everyone. OBESITY FROM PAGE C1 KIMBERLY HEFLINGAssociated PressWASHINGTON The deaths of two girls in Illinois and Virginia from severe food aller gies have helped spur efforts to get schools to stockpile emergency medications that can save lives. That effort has now reached the high est level: President Barack Obamas desk. The president signed a bipartisan bill on Wednesday that offers a nancial incen tive to states if schools stockpile epinephrine, considered the rstline treatment for people with severe aller gies. The medication is administered by injection, through preload ed EpiPens or similar devices. This is something that will save childrens lives, Obama said, adding that his daugh ter Malia has a peanut allergy. Several states have passed or are considering bills that also aim to stock epinephrine in schools, primarily in nurses ofces. And late last month, the Cen ters for Disease Con trol and Prevention issued its rst guidelines to schools on how to protect kids with food allergies. The guidelines, which are volun tary, ask schools to take steps to restrict com mon foods that cause allergic reactions and to make epinephrine available. Everything is moving in the direction which adheres to our mission, which is to keep kids safe and included in schools, said John Lehr, the chief ex ecutive ofcer of the Food Allergy Research and Education advocacy organization. Epinephrine can be used for severe aller gic reactions called anaphylaxis to food as well as insect bites, latex and medication. Policies vary by school, district and state about the handling of epi nephrine and access to high allergy-risk foods. Some schools have lunch tables that are peanut-free, for exam ple. The epinephrine stockpiling is aimed primarily at children who have previously undiagnosed allergies or as a backup for those with known allergies. Most people are very accepting, but you still have those people who are very skeptical who havent seen an anaphylactic reaction and dont understand, said Sally Porter, a Sammamish, Wash., mother whose 10-year-old son has a severe peanut al lergy. She and her hus band had to call paramedics to their house when their son was 1 after he broke out in hives and had oth er symptoms right after consuming peanut butter. I think were coming into a new time when people are going to un derstand and theyre going to get it, and its sad these children are dying who dont have to be dying, Porter said. Theres a way to save them. Just by having this medicine there is so easy. A recent CDC sur vey.found that about 1 in 20 U.S. children had food allergies a 50 percent increase from the late 1990s. The deaths of Katelyn Carlson, 13, in a Chicago school in 2010 and Ammaria Johnson, 7, in a Chestereld County, Va., school in 2012 raised awareness of the dangers of food al lergies. But even before then, a grass-roots group of parents had lobbied school districts, state leaders and Congress for help. House Democratic Whip Steny Hoy ers 11-year-old granddaughter, Alexa, has a severe peanut aller gy and twice had to be taken to the emergency room as a young child. The Maryland lawmaker co-sponsored the House bill along with Rep. Phil Roe, R-Tenn. We think its a very positive step in raising awareness, but I must say I think school sys tems all over the country are becoming better and better educated on the risks that food aller gies pose to their students, Hoyer said. Children with known food allergies often have doses of epineph rine stored at school specically for them. The epinephrine stockpile is not meant to re place that. Stacey Saiontz of Chappaqua, N.Y., has lobbied the New York state Legislature for passage of a bill that re quires all teachers to be trained to recognize anaphylaxis and to administer epinephrine. Its for her own 6-yearold son, who has mul tiple food allergies, as well as his friends, she says. Knowing that their life would be saved, I think its wonderful because a lot of his friends are trying foods for the rst time at school, she said. Already, Pittsburgh-based Mylan Inc., which markets and distributes EpiP ens, said it is has dis tributed free EpiPens to more than 30,000 Food allergy awareness reaches presidents desk ASSOCIATED PRESS Examples of epinephrine pens that the Center for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines recommend that schools stock to combat food allergies are photographed in the Washington, Nov. 13.

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013 eliminates the need for anti-rejection medicine, he said. Song performed the twins surgeries on Tuesday and both fared well. Typically, breast reconstruction surgery involves implants and/ or a womans own tis sue, sometimes taken from the abdomen, thighs or buttocks. But McCarthy is among women who dont have enough ex tra tissue; plus, radia tion treatment dam aged tissue near her breasts. So Maurer offered to be a donor. McCarthy said her sisters sacrice, just so I can feel better about myself ... is really humbling. With their blonde bobs, sparkling brown eyes and easy, engaging smiles, the twins are clearly mirror images of each other. Discovering breast cancer in identi cal twins isnt unusual because of their exact genetic makeup, Song said. With twins, theres also often a mirror ing effect, with breast cancer developing in the opposite breast, he said. Thats what happened with McCarthy and Maurer. While their mother died from colon cancer last year, there was no family history of breast cancer. McCarthy was di agnosed rst, in De cember 2011, with tri ple-negative breast cancer, a hard-to-treat form of cancer whose growth is not fueled by hormones. She was nine months pregnant and her son was born a week later. Soon after she started treatment, chemotherapy, surgery to remove her right breast, and radiation. Maurer was diagnosed with a very ear ly-stage cancer in her left breast a few months after her sister. Kelly was more up set than I was during my diagnosis, and like wise, when she was diagnosed I was a mess, Maurer said. Maurer had a dou ble mastectomy, rec ommended because her sisters cancer was so aggressive, but she didnt need chemother apy or radiation. She had reconstruc tion with implants after the birth of her second child last March. McCarthys operation this week involved a second mastectomy, and reconstruc tion of both breasts. Some of her own tis sue was used to fash ion one breast. At the same time, surgeons essentially performed a tummy tuck on Maurer, removing lower abdominal skin and fat tissue and trans planted it to her sister to create a second new breast. The twins have always been extreme ly close, sometimes speaking in unison or completing each others sentences. But now, McCarthy said, I feel closer. Her tissue is over my heart. TWINS FROM PAGE C1

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Monday, November 18, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013 DEAR ABBY: My mother-inlaw tends to embrace every pitiful creature she comes into contact with. This Thanksgiving she has invited my ex-boyfriend and his wife to her home to share in the festivities. My ex was abusive to me most of the time, and we did not end on good terms. The woman he cheated on me with is now his wife. My ex was sneaky and manipulative, and I believe his only reason for wanting to be there is to check up on me and my husband. I have explained this to my husband and his mother, and told them I dont feel comfortable with the situation. They both told me I am overreacting and that he was a part of my past and I have since moved on. I feel the family I love has betrayed me. The idea of my ex being involved in what should be a comfortable family day has me afraid and un easy. AM I overreacting? Or is my husbands mother being unreasonable? DREADING THANKSGIVING DEAR DREADING THANKSGIVING: I do not think you are overreacting. It was insensitive of your mother-in-law to invite your abusive ex and his wife to the gathering without first checking with you. While you may have moved on, I can see why this would not be something you would look forward to. Frankly, its surprising that your motherin-law would even know your ex let alone invite him to her home. DEAR ABBY: I have been living on my own for three years. I recently moved back to my hometown and share a great apartment with my best friend from childhood. My mother has had a serious alcohol problem for as long as I can remember. She will be moving back to the area next month for a new job. Dad couldnt get a job transfer, so hell have to stay at their current house, which is five hours away. I love Mom, but Im very worried because I will be her closest family member location-wise. Her drinking has grown progressively worse over the last few years and has been the cause of three major surgeries. If something happens while shes living on her own, I dont know what Ill do. Talking to my family is useless. It gets brushed aside because they dont want to deal with the pain after all these years. Do you have any suggestions to make this transition easier? HEAVY-HEARTED DAUGHTER IN VIRGINIA DEAR HEAVY-HEARTED: For the sake of your sanity, you must not assume responsibility for your mothers drinking problem. Before she ar rives, it would be helpful for you to attend some Al-Anon meetings or visit a chapter of Adult Children of Alcoholics World Service Organization. They can help you to maintain your emotional equilibrium as well as share experiences that will help you to cope with her without being overwhelmed. Al-Anon should be listed in your phone directory because it is everywhere, or you can visit www.Al-AnonFamilyGroups.org. The website for Adult Children of Alcoholics is www.adultchildren.org.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Comics&Diversions LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM MUTTS ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE HEATHCLIFF PEANUTS www.dailycommercial.comTurkey of an ex-boyfriend could ruin thanksgiving dinner Dear AbbyJEANNE PHILLIPS

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Monday, November 18, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 SNUFFY SMITH HAGAR THE HORRIBLE BEETLE BAILEY BABY BLUES BLONDIE PHANTOM PICKLES SHOE DILBERT DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and ninesquare sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013

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Monday, November 18, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 r f f n r n t n b n n n nnn nnffn rntnbnnn bnnn nbn tf nn n nnnnf nntfn nnfnnn nf tf nb nnf fffb nn rtbn nbff b rffn bffnff nnnnn t r t t t t t t t t r t t r t t t t b n n f f n n n n b n b n n r n n n r b n f n n t n n n n b n n b n n n f n n rrrr rbn t rr ttr nntb n r fn r r r r r r r r t rr n nfn fnnf bfn r t rtbnbn nnnr rrrnb rbnbrnbn rbnnn nf nfn nfbfn nrn rbn nnt rrt tt tfn nnn nbf ttrr tr r rtr ttfrbn t brn b n n f f n n n n b n b n n r n n n r b n n b n n b n n r b n r b b n r n tbf ttt rnnntb nbn fn r r r r r r r rtr tttrrtt r rtr r t t r r t bnb tbffnbfnbn n rrrnb rbnbrnbn rbnnt ttrrtt r rtr rtrrtr rbnf nbbnnf nnn bnfn nnnn nbnnf nbbnnf n nn rrtrb rbnbtnt nf nn nnnnnb f t t t r t t t r t t t tnn t n f n b n b n f n n n n f b f n

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013

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Monday, November 18, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013 rf ntbtb ff r r b b b f f b r b b b f f t fnt n t b b t f f b b t t rbb nnrb bbtn b b bbbbb tbt bn bbbft t f n f b t n r b t b t n b b f f r fb f b r b r r b b f t r b b b b b t t b b b b r b b f t f f f f b r n b t t b b t b b b n fb r b b t b r f f n f f f bbttbf bt bnb bbbbf bt t t b f f f tbrrn bntbn nbntbtn tb r b f f nb bt b nb t f f f b b r t n b t r b n t b b b n b b b b f b b r t b n t b b t b b n t b t r b n b n b b f b b t t bttb b n b n r r b t b trf bbtrb bbbnt brrbtbt bb f f f f t b b b n b b b f f b rb b f f f n rbrr ttr rb brrfb r b b f f nbtrr btn btbbrb b f f rbbbb bb b b t b b f f n r b b b t b b f b b b r f b f f f f f f f t b f f f b b r r b t f bf rbb t f f f bbbnbn b b b n n b b b b b r b t b r t t b b r b b b b b b b r b b b t t b b b r b b n b n t b t b b b b b r b f f f t b r b b r b t r b nb brf brfb btnf bbnb brbrbbtt brbbtf br b bbb n b rbr bbf brf rbnb rbnbbnbn bnb rbn bb b rbb bbtbt bbbtf bbtb btbbbr bbtb b b b t t n b b b b b t b r b f r b b f f f b f r f f rr b n n t f f t b b f f f r n n b n t b r r f f r b b t b r r b b r r b f f t n f f b f b brt b t f f t n b f f n b t b b r f f f n b r b b b f f r bbrt rt rb b b t b n f f f b n t b r b b b b r f f b b b b b n b r r n n b b b b b b b b b r t b t b b t b b b t b t b b n t t b b b b b n t b t r b b t b b t t b b b t b b r t r b t b b b b b t b t b t b t t b b n b t t r b b b r t b b b b r t b n r t b n b b b b n b b n b b b r r t b r t b b r f n b f b b b f n r r b b b t b b r b t b t b t r b b t b t t f b b f f n f r b r bt r bbbtbn nbbt rbbtttbb bttr bbb bff n bbbf btbtrrf brbt btfn bf bbn btbbb rbbbbtf bbbbbbbbt btbbrbtf bbtrbtf rbbtbbb bbbb bbtbrbtbb bbbbb bbbtbf btbbbbtf brf bbbtbbtbf b fbbbb bbbnbbn nbnnr ffntff trrtrbtbf btfb bbttnf tbbb bbrbtf nbbbbntbbrbbrn rnnb bfbtfrf rrbbn tbbrt bbbbbrbb bbtb bbbbtbtb rbbb bbbbtb tbbn btt n nt

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Monday, November 18, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL D5 rfrfntrf btrtrtf bbb bfnrf fffnrf b bfnrftrrr fnftrrrr f ffntrtt ffnbtrrr rfbbf nrftr n r b b t r t fb fntrftrrtt rfnftrtttt bf bfnrftrrt trbf fnrbtr tbf fnrftrttrrt bb fb bbbfnrftrr rf ntbf bffnrf tr bfnf tr fbbb ffnb trtr b b f b n t r f t r t r bfnrftrtt b fnrf rf b bfnf btrt trf nrftr t tfnrftr bfbftr rfnfb trt b fnftrt rb fnrftrr fb nrnr bbntrf trtr b f n t r f r bfntf trt tbbfnrf btrt bb fnrftrrr bfbfn f btfr nrfbtrtt bb bfnftrttt bb ftfrbfnrttr bfntrtt f fnftrtt fbft fnrt bff nftrt bfnrf trttr ffnb bb tfnrf f fnbtrtrr bnf tr bf bff fftbtftrf fb f b b f b b b b b f b t r t b b r f b f t bf bfnrfbbfrrt frf ffnftrtttt ff r bfbfnrftr fnfb tr bf nftrrtt bb ffnrfttr b bfnrftrrrrrf r fr fffntf btrt n ffnrbtrrrt rbf nfbfttt tbf nrfbtrtr rr fnrftrtr rrbfnff bt bnrb trtrr bb nrbtrr t ff nftrtt bf fnrbtrtrtr bbf fnrftrr rfb fnrftrr b bfntrtrr bf nbtrrrtt bbfntr t b bnftrt bfffnt btrrrr b fff ffnftt ff bffnrfb ttrbb b fnrftrtrr bf nftr bttff fnrrr bbf nftrtr ffnrftrt fnrbtrtrr rff nftr ff b b b n b b b b b t r t ff bb ffntrt b ntr b fnrfbtrtr bbtf fnbtrr rb bfnrff bfnft b fnfbtrt ffnrfb tr bbf fnbttr bfnf trr b bfntbtrrt bb fnrbtr bbf bbfnrftrtrt b b b f b b b b f b f b f b n r f f b fnrftt fb fnftrr bbfnrf btrt r b fnrbtrt fnfb rtrr rt bfntrr b fbfnrftrttr bbff fnf b b f n r b t r r r r bbb fnrftrr b b b b n r b t r t r t t f r f r r b fnrftrrrrt f f n r f b t r t r t bttr bbfnrftrttr bfnr btrtt b bbb bntrf f fnrftrr bb fnftr bff nftrttr tb bfnftrtt bfnrf trt ffnftr rfb bfnrf btr ffnrtrtt bfb bfnftrrtr bbf nftrtbf bb fnfr ffrbf nbtrt b b b b b b f b b b b f f b f b t r r b b b f rtf bfnrftt bb nftrtr bf bbnft tb ffnfrr b fnrb trttrr bf fnftr f ntrfbf btrrtt ff bfnrft ff fbb fbf bfnbf bftrrr

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D6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013 rf ntbtt r fnt ft trn bf n r fft tt tt tt t ttttf ttttf rf n tr rfnrtbrn rfnrtb rn r fn tr r f n t b t b t b b f b b n r r n b b b n b r b rf f tb tb fb r bb fb b b bfr fb b b b b b r f b bbbb fn r f f b b r b f f tb tb fb f bb b fn r tb nt f b f bb bb fbb b fb f b r b bb b b fbb b b r f b n r f n n n n f b bb fb b fnnb fbbbb b bb b b f b f bbb f bb f f b fb f b n n n n n f f b f f fn tn f f bf bfb f f bb f f b b f f b b f b fn tn r n n n n bb r r b bbb f b f r f b r fb f b f b b r b r b f bb b bbfb fb f r bbb f bfbb fr bbb fb nb bbbb b f fb r b bb r f fbbb r r f bb f f f b fbb f f bbb n n n bf b bb f f bbb b b f bb r f fbbb b r r b f b b rb bb f r b f b f bf bb f b fb nb

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Monday, November 18, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL D7 r f n t b r t t n t b n b b n r r r n n t n r r r r n n b f t n n b n r r r n b n b r r n r n n b b r r r r r t n b n r r b f n n b r fn n b r tn b n t t r t t r n n nn n n n t n t t r n t n n n n n n r t n t b n b t t r r t n n b b r n r n tn n n b n rn t r r r n t n n r tn n tn n t nt rrbn nnnntbn tnnt tbtnntbb ntnbb ntbt tbtnb bnntt nbtn tn tbntn ntbnt ntbttt nntbntb tftn nt fn n t n t b n r r r r n n nbn n b b n n n n r n rr b r r n f t r r r n t n n r n t t t n t b n b t t r t b r r n t n t t r n tn nn n n t n t f b t t r n r r r r r r r fn n r r n n b b b r r rr f n r t b b r t r r r n t n n r nn n t n nt t b n n n n r b b t n n t b n t t bn r r n n

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D8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013 rrfntbrn rrfnt fb r fftfr bn ftt bbn f bb b nfr t t rrfntbrf rfn r f ntbrb nb nr rffnnntbnfnfnbntntnbnbnfnnn nffnbnnbffnbnfnbnnrfntb rfntb rf r nnntbtt ft nrf nff ft fn nn frfrn rn ffrn fnn ff rf nf rff n f nnf fn rf f nff rnn ff r nnf frf rnff ffr t nff ff f ft trn ff nt nn fn ff rnr fn n rnfn n f nr f rf fff nfrn rn nf fn rfn nn rnn rfntb fr ntbb r ntfnn nrbb rrf n b bt b rnb rrf n rbb n rb b b bb nnbrrbb rtnrb ntf b b r b b n n b rn bnr t bb rnrbnntbrn rbb rrntn rnbrbfrnb b b nrnb r n r n r f r n b b n n r b n n f t r r n r b brrf f rfb rb b r r r r f f t r n t n b brrf f btt rn nbb b



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Vol. 137, No. 322 | 4 sections MISSED YOUR PAPER? Call 787-0600 (Lake County), or 877-702-0600 (Sumter County) NEWS TIP? Call Scott Callahan at 365-8203 INSIDE CLASSIFIED D2 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D4 DEAR ABBY C7 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 NATION A4 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 WORLD A6 TODAYS WEATHER HIGH 83 LOW 63 See A8 JIMMIE JOHNSON WINS 6TH NASCAR TITLE, SPORTS B1 GROVELAND: City plans to ll vacated top council post with vice mayor A3 MONEY: Boeing takes $100 billion in orders from Gulf A6 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, November 18, 2013 www.dailycommercial.com 50 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com A n early morning rainsoaked skate park in Lake Panasoffkee couldnt dampen the spirits of 21-yearold skate boarder Jeff Nixon. Clinging to his skateboard with a picture of Superman plas tered on top, the resident of the small (3,400) community in northwest Sumter County said on Sunday hes been waiting too long for the area to add more en joyable activities. So he decid ed to wait a little longer Sunday for the recently completed skate park to dry out. Im ready to try this park out, said Nixon, as the sun continued to break through the clouds. The facility is lled with slopes, bars and concrete and is open from dusk to dawn in the Lake Panasoffkee communitys Recreation Park on County Road 459. The skate park, along with the nearby library and re sta tion, is part of other recent ex pansions to government facili ties in Lake Panasoffkee that will be recognized on Tuesday with a grand opening at 3 p.m. The recreation park has re ceived several improvements, including a new racquetball court and paved walking trail, which is about 2,000 feet in length. Weve already seen a lot of in terest for it, said county Admin istrator Brad Arnold. Arnold said the existing cen AP FILE PHOTO In this Nov. 14 photo, President Barack Obama speaks about his signature health care law in the Brady Press Brieng Room at the White House in Washington. Lake Pan rec park promises more fun, better services SEE SERVICE | A2 ERIC TALMADGE Associated Press ABOARD THE USS GEORGE WASHING TON As soon as Navy pilot Matthew Staf ford puts his helicopter down in the village of Borongan, he is rushed by dozens of local men who form a line to unload the supplies and water he has own in from the moth ership, the USS George Washington aircraft carrier. Children swarm him as he breaks out a box of sweets. On the Philippine islands of Leyte and Sa mar that were shattered by Typhoon Haiyan, there is no doubt about it: the U.S. military Aid missions boost readiness ASSOCIATED PRESS Villagers stranded by last weeks Typhoon Haiyan scramble for aid from a U.S. Navy Sea Hawk helicopter from the U.S. aircraft carrier USS George Washington in the coastal town of Tanawan, central Philippines Sunday. SEE MISSIONS | A2 PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL LEFT: New books set on the shelf in the new addition to the Lake Panasoffkee Library in Lake Panasoffkee on Friday. RIGHT: Eddie Tassone, 52, with Royal Concrete Concepts, puts the nishing touches on the new addition to the re station. JULIE PACE AP White House Correspondent WASHINGTONThroughout President Barack Obamas rst four years in ofce, he prided himself on his ability to bounce back when much of Washington thought his pres idency was in peril. But the political challenge posed by Obamas disastrous health care rollout is far greater than those he overcame during the nasty debt ceiling ght with Republicans, his stumbling campaign debate in 2012 or even the painful recession. Obama fights for credibility SEE FIGHT | A2 CAROLYN THOMPSON Associated Press When a 16-year-old student slammed a metal trash can onto Philip Raimondos head, it did more than break open the history teachers scalp, knock him out and send him bleeding to the oor. It changed my whole world, Raimondo said about the attack in the school where he taught for 22 years. Experts say the phe nomenon of stu dent-on-teacher vi olence is too often ignored. Theres some reluc tance to think that the teaching profession can be unsafe, said Dr. Dorothy Espelage of the University of Illinois. The educational psy chology professor re cently headed a na tional task force on classroom violence di rected at teachers. The group found that little has been done to try to understand or prevent such incidents despite the potential implica tions on teacher reten tion and student per formance, among other things. But the October deaths, one day apart, of Nevada middle school math teacher Mi chael Landsberry, who was shot on a basket ball court by a suicidal 12-year-old, and Mas sachusetts high school math teacher Colleen Ritzer, who authorities said was attacked by a 14-year-old student in side a school bathroom, have brought the issue to the forefront. About 4 percent of public school teach ers reported they had been attacked physical ly during the 2007-08 school year, according to the U.S. Department of Education, citing a 2012 school safety re port. Seven percent were threatened with Teacher killings bring professions risks to light MIKE GROLL / AP Columbia High School Principal John Sawchuk poses at the school on Nov. 14 in East Greenbush, N.Y. In 2004 Sawchuk found himself wrestling a 16-year-old student for the loaded shotgun the boy used to wound a teacher in his East Greenbush, N.Y. school. SEE TEACHER | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013 BRIDGE HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Nov. 18, 2013: This year you often might stray off topic and nd that you are mentally distracted. Learn to eliminate distrac tions by handling the issue at hand. Many interesting and creative ideas emerge from your daydreaming; be sure to write them down. If you are single, romance remains a high priority. You are likely to see potential suitors only through rose-colored shades. If you are attached, use care with children, as they can be evasive at times. Your rela tionship benets from shar ing more with your sweet ie. Develop a mutual hobby. GEMINI can be verbal, dis tracting and charming all at the same time. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You will state your case or pursue a desire with inten tion. Those around you could be a little confused by your words and actions. You might see doubt in their expres sions, so try to understand where they are coming from. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You might feel a bit self-in dulgent and go overboard. Listen to your instincts in a meeting or perhaps at a get-together with a friend. You will gain unexpected in sights that could stop you in your tracks. Digest this per spective rst, then act. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You smile, and the world smiles with you. You have un usual insight into a friend ship and its meaning. You can count on the unpredict ability of this person, but you still will enjoy and value this bond. Tension builds around a responsibility. CANCER (June 21-July 22) You might want to head in a more appealing direc tion. Do some testing rst, and consider that you might not know the whole story. You also might not have a grasp on what could happen if you decide to follow an un tried path. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Meetings will bring good re sults. A partner could be in disagreement, as he or she might not have heard all the details. Know that you cant change this persons mind. Detach and see what hap pens. You will learn a lot about him or her if you do. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Pressure builds and cre ates a lot of nervous ener gy. You might wonder what to do about a situation that de mands your attention. Oth ers do not realize how much you do, and they will contin ue to be unclear until you walk away. An offer comes your way. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Detach. You might wonder which way to go with an im portant relationship. You and this person have wanted to plan a trip for a while, so get the ball rolling. The true rea son for the trip might not be what you say or think. Be honest with yourself. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Deal with others direct ly if you want to get a reason able response. Stop wonder ing what might be best to do. Ask for feedback, encourage a brainstorming situation and move forward only when you have enough information to make a sound decision. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Defer to others, es pecially if you are not as sure of yourself as you normal ly are. Allow someone else who is more condent to take the lead, at least about the issue at hand. A child could be provocative yet endear ing. You need to maintain a strong stance. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You might be more fo cused on an idea than you re alize. Someone could drop a heavy book right by you, and you would not even hear it hit the oor. Try to be present in the moment, at least some of the time. Take a walk to center yourself. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Allow your creativity to emerge. Whether you decide to share some of your ideas will be up to you. Know that your intuition might be off about money. Avoid making agreements right now. An un usual phone call heads your way. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Your intuition comes through regarding what you should do. You could feel as if some element of your life is out of control. You will make a strong presentation, but you might worry a lot about how you come off and the impression you make. HOROSCOPES HOW TO REACH US SUNDAY CASH 3 ............................................... 5-5-5 Afternoon .......................................... 7-4-0 PLAY 4 ............................................. 7-9-6-5 Afternoon ....................................... 1-2-0-2 FLORIDA LOTTERY SATURDAY FANTASY 5 ........................... 7-15-17-28-35 2 of 5 wins free ticket 3 of 5 wins $9.50 4 of 5 wins $114 5 of 5 wins $262,995.63 LOTTO ............................. 8-19-22-29-32-38 3 of 6 wins $5 4 of 5 wins $69 5 of 5 wins $6,454 Rollover POWERBALL .................. 10-29-37-44-5910 With Powerball Without Powerball Powerball alone wins $4 ........................... 3 of 5 wins $7 1 of 5 w/Powerball wins $4 ................. 4 of 5 wins $100 2 of 5 w/Powerball wins $7 ...... 5 of 5 wins $1,000,000 3 of 5 w/Powerball wins $100 ............................ Rollover 4 of 5 w/Powerball wins $10,000 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $91.59 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 787-0600 in Lake County or (877) 702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Mon day through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation De part-ment 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. .............. 787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. SUBSCRIPTION REFUND POLICY: Subscription refunds will be calculated at the current basic subscription price, excluding the cur rent month. All refund requests must be made in writing and signed. Send to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 26.82 1.88 28.70 47.22 3.31 50.53 85.60 5.99 91.59 7 days a week Mail Subscription 3 months 6 months One Year Daily/Sunday 45.19 84.88 163.16 Sunday only 28.67 50.72 92.61 ROD DIXON publisher 352-365-8214 .................................. rod.dixon@dailycommercial.com BILL KOCH, assistant managing editor 352-365-8208 ................................... bill.koch@dailycommercial.com SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com PAUL RYAN visual editor 352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, school boards 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com OTHERS PAM FENNIMORE editorial assistant 352-365-8256 ............. pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com DON HUNSBERGER 352-365-8279 ........ donald.hunsberger@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD 352-365-8258 ............... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be e-mailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. GOOD FOR YOU/ CELEBRATIONS To have your club or organizations events printed in the YourCom munity calendar listings, just email the information to pamfenni more@dailycommercial.com. SUBSCRIPTION RATES NEWSROOM CONTACTS ter has been upgrad ed to meet current standards mandat ed by the Americans with Disabilities Act. To accommodate more reading ac tivities, the library added 4,000 square feet, almost dou bling in size to of 7,280 square feet. Now, a dark-beige stucco concrete building with a bur gundy stripe and brown-tinted win dows helps make room for more pub lic computers and provides separate areas for adult and childrens collec tions. There is a separate computer lab, a ded icated space for the Friends of the Li brary and a meeting room for commu nity use and library programs. It was kind of dif cult trying to ac commodate the needs for all the area families, said Lucy Gangone of the old building, as the for mer manager of the Sumter County Li brary Services at a 2008 ceremony for the expansion. The new re sta tion, which is al most r eady to open, matches the librarys color. The new re station has been ex panded by 4,400 square feet from its former 3,000 square foot. The extra room allows the station to have three pullthro ugh apparatus bays, a living area containing a dor mitory, day room, dining and kitchen area, ofce, laundry and tness room. This will allow for better service and comfort, said Le land Greek, chief of the Sumter County Fire and EMS. Tuesdays ceremo ny will be held west of the community center near the new walking track. The ceremony begins at 3 p.m. SERVICE FROM PAGE A1 has been a godsend. It is awesome to see this, says one grateful villag er. They are saving us. But while U.S. mil itary support can be critical when disasters like Haiyan strike, stag ing massive humani tarian relief missions for allies in need isnt just about being a good neighbor. They can be a strategic and public ity goldmine for U.S. troops whose pres ence in Asia isnt always portrayed in such a fa vorable light and a powerful warning to countries that arent on board. These disasters are not unique only to the Philippines. It will send a signal to all of Southeast Asia, to Asia, that the U.S. is seri ous about its presence here, said Philippine political analyst Ramon Casiple. Its easy to translate this capabili ty for disaster handling into handling warfare. This is the new orienta tion of the task forces. From the military perspective, human itarian missions like the ongoing Operation Damayan in the Phil ippines offer concrete benets the chance to operate in far-ung places. MISSIONS FROM PAGE A1 This time, the president is ghting to regain trust and credibility with the Amer ican people. Those are the same qualities that helped keep him aoat during those earlier battles. Its legitimate for them to expect me to have to win back some credibility on this health care law in par ticular and on a whole range of these issues in general, Obama said during a news conference last week that turned into an extensive mea culpa for the health care failures consuming the White House. As bad as things are for Obama, they may be worse for many members of Con gress. Democrats in both the House and Senate worry the health care problems could dim their re-election chances next year. Repub licans are saddled with his torically low approval rat ings and an internal debate over the direction of their party, though the heath law woes have proved a life line following the GOPs much-criticized handling of the government shutdown. With Republicans sensing an opportunity in Obamas free fall, the president is sure to face a struggle in getting their support, par ticularly in the House, for White House priorities such as an immigration overhaul or broad budget deal. Without success on oth er fronts to counteract the health care failures, Obama will have fewer chances to change the publics view that Washington, and the president himself, are inef fective. We appear to be stuck, whatever direction we look, William Galston, a senior fellow at the Brook ings Institution, said about Washingtons political land scape. Obamas health care ca lamity began with the ood of computer problems that crippled HealthCare.gov, the website that had been billed as a quick and easy way for people to purchase insurance. Those troubles were com pounded when at least 4.2 million people started re ceiving cancellation letters from their insurance com panies despite Obamas re peated assurances that any one who liked his or her insurance plan could keep it. The widespread prob lems have spurred ques tions about the normally cool and condent presi dents management style and his competence. It has also shaken his allies. The rollout of the web site, thats terrible. But the fact is, that will be xed, House Democratic Lead er Nancy Pelosi told NBCs Meet the Press on Sunday. Why was the White House so poorly prepared for the long-anticipated rollout of Obamas major legislative achievement? Why did the president seem personal ly unaware of the extent the problems until they became publicly known? For the public, those fail ures are changing how they view the president. Many polls now show that Americans say Obama isnt honest or trustworthy, or a strong leader. For example, Quinnipiac Universitys poll of registered voters con ducted this month found just 44 percent thought Obama was honest and trustworthy, down 10 points since earlier this fall. Only 48 percent felt he has strong leadership qualities, a low point in his presidency. FIGHT FROM PAGE A1 injury by a student. A 2011 survey found that 80 per cent of teachers re ported being intim idated, harassed, assaulted or other wise victimized at least once during the previous year. Of the 3,000 teach ers surveyed, 44 percent reported physical offenses in cluding thrown ob jects, student at tacks and weapons shown, according to the American Psy chological Associa tion Task Force on Violence Directed Against Teachers, which conducted the national webbased survey. The task force rec ommended creating a national registry to track the nature and frequency of in cidents, saying this would help develop plans for prevention and intervention. TEACHER FROM PAGE A1

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Monday, November 18, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT GROVELAND Nourish the Needy program The South Lake Animal Leagues Nourish the Needy Program pro vides families in need with free pet food through a partnership with local food pantries. During November, thanks in part to a grant from ASPCA, South Lake Animal League and Bill Bryan Subaru, the animal league is ask ing people to join the league in col lecting pet food and supplies for the program. On Nov. 22, Bill Bryan Subaru will be collecting donations to Stuff the Subaru, at 8730 U.S. Highway 441 in Leesburg. Donations will be collected and distributed to food pantries and for adoptable animals at South Lake Animal Leagues Adoption Center in Groveland. For information or to do nate, go to www.slal.org, or call 407-342-8876. EUSTIS Training is being offered for landlords and investors A special training for landlords or those looking to invest in rental property offers information on fair housing, energy efciency and sus tainability at this event scheduled from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Dec. 11, held at the Eustis Womens Club building, 227 N. Center St. Lunch is included and seating is limited. A reservation is required by Nov. 29. Call 352-742-6540 or send an email to aelliott@lakecounty.gov. LEESBURG City library hosts sale at Barbara Morse bookstore Check the Barbara Morse Bookstore at the Leesburg Public Library, 100 E. Main St., in down town on Wednesday for sale priced items on hardcover and paperback books. The library is closed Fridays and Sundays. Its open at 9 a.m. daily and Saturday. For information, call 352-728-9790. MIAMI Special needs students crowned at homecoming Two Miami high school stu dents with special needs have been crowned homecoming king and queen. Students repeatedly shouted Howard Rouses name during the fanfare at Southwest Miami High last weekend. Nearly 75 percent of the students voted Rouse as king. Special needs student 22-year-old Isis Chirino was named his queen. The Miami Herald reports both are completing their seventh and nal year at the school. Senior Matthew Fernandez men tors 21-year-old Howard through the schools Best Buddies program and says special needs students are treated like family there. Earlier this year, Fernandez and Rouse went to Tallahassee and spoke with Gov. Rick Scott to height en awareness for Best Buddies and to lobby for more money. ___ State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8208 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com A Lake County osteo pathic physicia n accused of having sex wit h one of his patients on the job has agreed to an order not to treat any females with out a qualied female health care practitioner in the room, according to State Department of Health records. The order was hand ed down recently by the Board of Osteopath ic Medicine to Celesti no David Santi, who was working at Express Care of Lake Cou nty in Tava res. The conditions also re quire Santi to be placed on probation for two years, undergo an eval uation, take a course on medical profession al boundaries and pay a $10,000 ne. According to a copy of a Department of Health administrative com plaint, a 56-year-old fe male had been seeing Santi as a patient at Ex press Care in March 2009. During a visit around February 2010, the doc tor and patient engaged in sexual intercourse at the facility, the com plaint added. The two continued the sexual relationship until June, the records state. It is not clear how of cials discovered the re lationship, but accord ing to a copy of the order and settlement by the Department of Health, it led the administrative complaint against San ti in April and the Board of Osteopathic Medi cine met on the charges in Deereld Beach in late August. A settlement on the conditions was made in September. The purpose of pro bation is not to prevent (Santi) from practicing osteopathic medicine. Rather, probation is a su pervised educational ex perience designed by the Board to make (San ti) aware of certain obli gations to (his) patients and the profession, ac cording to the complaint. During the probation, Santi a lso must maintain a log that identies all fe male patients. It is not known if Santi still works at the Express Care. TAVARES Doctor disciplined after accusations of having sex with female patient ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com Former mayor James Gearhart resigned Wednesday, leaving a va cant seat on the council. City ofcials said they would ll that position by appointing an interim mayor prior to holding a special election early next year. The election would be for a new mayor. Council members were planning to discuss the mayoral appointment at todays meeting. Howev er, citing the citys charter, city Attorney Anita Gera ci-Carver told the council on Thursday the decision may have to be delayed. The vice-mayor shall act as mayor during the absence or disability of the mayor. In case of the death, resignation, or re moval of the mayor, the vice-mayor shall va cate the ofce of coun cil member and serve as mayor until the next reg ular election when the of ce shall be lled for a full two-year term, reads the citys char ter. Vice mayor Tim Loucks was told by Geraci-Carver last week to prepare to surrender his council position in or der to assume the role of mayor. Geraci-Carver said Loucks will hold the posi tion for one year. The council must ap point an interim coun cil member to ll Loucks seat. Loucks said on Sun day as mayor he plans to appeal to his peers for a smooth transition. As we all look forward, we must close this ugly chapter in Grovelands history and begin to heal hard feelings. The council must now begin to work as one body for the com mon good of our cit izens and city, Loucks said. Glen Wilson, a resident of Groveland, said hes not sure ofcials are reading the city charter correct ly. He sent an email to city ofcials Thursday outlin ing some of his concerns. This is not a correct position for the city to take and here is why. Un der the city charter Sec 3.04. Duties of mayor and election of vice mayor, it clearly states that At the rst council meeting af ter each regular city elec tion, the council shall elect one of its mem bers as a vicemayor. At the Nov. 18, 2013 Coun cil meeting, after James Smith and Evelyn Wilson are sworn in and seat ed, then the Council will elect one of its members as a vice-mayor, Wilson wrote. Mr. Loucks ceas es to be the vice mayor at that moment, so he can not be automatically giv en the position of mayor to complete the term till 2014. The Florida Depart ment of Law Enforcement reportedly has been in vestigating claims that Gearhart and Loucks vi olated Floridas Govern ment in the Sunshine Law by discussing police dispatching with a po lice sergeant in a grocery store parking lot on June 20. The city council vot ed on Aug. 19 to transfer dispatching services to the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce, and the Saraso ta-based Citizens for Sun shine Inc. sued the city to block that transfer, saying the parking lot discussion tainted the council vote. Loucks has denied that conversation took place. GROVELAND City plans to fill vacated top council post with vice mayor ERIN JESTER The Gainesville Sun GAINESVILLE When Melissa Corbett picks up her guitar to play, she sometimes doesnt know what chords shes using. Its as if God places her ngers where they need to go, she says. Corbett, a fth-grade teacher at the Healthy Learning Academy char ter school, uses that gift to help her students learn and retain complicated grammar rules with ease. To date, she has written about 50 songs designed to help children remem ber everything from nouns to idioms to subor dinating conjunctions. And seeing the success students have had with her educational jingles, Corbett and her husband launched a website and a YouTube channel to share the lessons with others. I can be teaching my class all day, but when Im sleeping, I can be help ing someone on the oth er side of the world, Cor bett said. Corbett has taught since the early 1990s although she took sever al years off from teaching to raise a family. She has spent most of her career teaching rst grade. But two years ago when she was looking for a new job, Corbett came across Healthy Learning Acad emys advertisement: Searching for a teach er who isnt afraid to sing and dance with students. And I thought, Well, I can do that, she said. Corbett brought her guitar to her interview with HLA and sang a song about short vowel sounds to Principal Anni Egan. And I said, Im throw ing away every other ap plication, Egan said. Teacher uses songs to teach grammar DOUG FINGER / ASSOCIATED PRESS Melissa Corbett, a fth grade teacher at the Healthy Learning Academy, and students prepare to sing their grammar lessons Nov. 12. GEARHART LOUCKS

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCALA352-291-0152 Army ~ Navy~ Air Force ~ Marines ~ Coast GuardActive Duty/Veterans Thank you for serving our country.Steverson-Hamlin and Hilbish Funerals and Cremations226 East Burleigh Blvd, Tavares, FL 32778 352-343-4444 www.steversonhamlinhilbish.com DON BABWIN Associated Press CHICAGO In tense thunderstorms and tornadoes swept across a number of Midwestern states Sun day, causing damage in several central Illinois communities while sending people to their basements for shelter and even prompting ofcials at Soldier Field in Chicago to evacuate the stands and post pone the Bears game. Amid reports of property damage in the small central Illinois community of Wash ington, the storm raced through downtown Chicago so powerful ly that the rain was not falling as much as it was slamming into the sides of buildings. There were no conrmed reports of injuries. Our primary mes sage is this is a danger ous weathers system that has the potential to be extremely deadly and destructive, said Laura Furgione, dep uty director of the Na tional Weather Service National Oceanic and Atmospheric Admin istration. Get ready now. Weather service of cials conrmed that a tornado touched down just before 11 a.m. near the central Illi nois community of East Peoria, but au thorities did not imme diately have damage or injury reports. With in an hour, the weath er service said that tor nadoes had touched down in Washington, Metamora, Morton and other central commu nities, though ofcials could not say wheth er it was one torna do touching down or several. Weather of cials said it was mov ing northeast about 60 mph; East Peoria is about 150 miles south west of Chicago. This is a very dan gerous situation, said Russell Schneider, di rector of the weather services Storm Predic tion Center. Approxi mately 53 million in 10 states are at signicant risk for thunderstorms and tornadoes. Tornadoes, damaging storms hit Midwest OBITUARIES Vincent Vinny Folgore Vincent Vinny Fol gore, II passed away on Friday, November 15th, 2013, after a brave bat tle with leukemia. He was born in Leesburg, Florida, and raised in Eustis by his loving par ents, Vincent and Jose phine, along with his brothers, Louis, Joseph, Paul and Salvatore. He attended Eustis High School, and worked at his familys business establishment, Mount Dora Pizza and Subs. He truly enjoyed mu sic, and had a passion for DJing. He loved to travel and was al ways making plans for his next adventure. He made sure to keep those around him smil ing and laughing with jokes of all kinds. As he cherished the joy and happiness of those he loved. He met his love ly wife as a young man and married Danielle E. Burdette, with whom he shared 8 incredible years in marriage. To gether they have two beautiful children, daugh ter, Niya, and son, Gino. He was a man full of life and energy. He lived every moment to the fullest, spending time with his family and friends. He had the most beauti ful and radiant smile, that greeted every one with warmth and love. A devoted hus band, beloved son and brother, a loving dad dy and caring friend to countless people. He will truly and deep ly be missed by all who knew him and loved him, as we all yearn to be with him again. A visitation will be held on Tuesday, November 19th, 2013 from 5 PM to 7 PM at the Allen J. Harden Funeral Home, 1800 N. Donnelly St., Mount Dora, FL. A Vig il service will follow at 7 PM. A Mass of Resur rection will be held on Wednesday, Novem ber 20th, 2013 at 10 AM at St. Mary of The Lakes Catholic Church 218 Ocklawaha Ave nue, Eustis, FL. Burial will follow at Pine For est Cemetery in Mount Dora. The Family re quest that donations be made in Vinnys name to H Lee Moftt Can cer Center 12902 USF Magnolia Drive, Tam pa, FL 33612. Please be sure to share your con dolences at www.allen jharden.com Ronald E. Hartman Ronald Earl Hart man, age 87, of Tava res, FL died Satu rday, November 16, 2013. He was born September 6, 1926 in West Unity, OH and graduated from West Unity High School in 1945. After gradua tion he began employ ment at Lindsay Au tomotive. On June 1, 1946, he married Marcene Blakely. To gether they enjoyed 63 years of marriage and four loving children. They owned Sinclair Service Station, The Hartman Boat and Mo tor Sales, the Shell sta tion in Montpelier, OH, Palace Bowling Lanes in Bry an, OH and Topline Build ing Com pany, also in Bryan. Ronald and Marcene moved to Naples, FL in 1978 where they managed the Vanderbilt Condos. In 1988, they settled in Lake County and began the real estate com pany known as Hart man Properties, Inc. in Astatula, FL. A de voted husband and fa ther, Ronald enjoyed traveling, collecting pocket watches, play ing cards, selling real estate and most of all, being with his fami ly. Ronald was preced ed in death by his wife, Marcene, his son, Mi chael and his daugh ter, Pamela Sheets. He is survived by his sons, Ronald (Sue) Hartman of Howey-in-the-Hills, FL and James (Donna) Hartman of Santa Bar bara, CA; grandchil dren, Troy, Tab, Tricia, Elizabeth, Adam, Zach ary, Kelsey and Ashley; great grandchildren, Kourtney, Garrett, Hay ley and Gavin; great great grandson, Ma son; one brother and one sister. Ronald will be greatly missed by all who knew him. Fami ly and friends are invit ed to gather on Satur day, November 23 from 10:00 11:00 am with a funeral ceremony star ing at 11:00 am in the funeral home chap el. Burial will follow at Taylor Memorial Cem etery in Howey-in-theHills. Arrangements are entrusted to Stever son, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Crema tions, Tavares, FL. Con dolences and memo ries may be shared on the tribute wall at www. SteversonHamlinHil bish.com. DEATH NOTICES Annie M. Chini Annie M. Chini, 91, of Leesburg, died Friday, Nov. 15, 2013. Beyers Funeral Home and Cre matory, Leesburg. Thomas E. Coleman Th omas E. Coleman, 84, of Colema n, died Saturday, Nov. 16, 2013. Bank/Page-Theus Fu neral Home an d Cre mation Serv ices. Doris P. Lantz Doris P. Lantz, 83, of Lake Panasoffkee, died Saturday, Nov. 16, 2013. Bank/Page-Theus Fu neral Home and Cre mation Services. IN MEMORY HARTMAN FOLGORE

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Monday, November 18, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013 AYA BATRAWY Associated Press DUBAI, United Arab Emir ates U.S.-based Boeing Co. dominated on the rst day of the Dubai Airshow, netting $100 billion in orders at an event that showcased the spending power and ag gressive expansion efforts of the Middle Easts Gulf Arab carriers. The 342 orders represent ed more than twice the val ue of those seen by Europe an rival Airbus, who said it took 142 orders worth some $40 billion. The massive commit ments came from just four carriers in the tiny nations of Qatar and the United Arab Emirates, which are in a race to create more jobs for their own citizens and diversify their oil-dependent econo mies. In recent years, much of the action in global aviation has shifted to the Middle East because countries like the U.A.E. and Qatar have tapped into our geographi cal advantage to build a new air transport connection for the world, Sheikh Ahmed bin Saeed Al Maktoum, chairman of Emirates and the smaller ydubai, told re porters. Of the major Gulf Arab carriers, Dubai-based Emir ates airline exed its buying power the hardest, with or ders for 150 of the planned Boeing 777x at a combined price tag of $55.6 billion. The aircraft is a larger and more fuel-efcient model of the companys popular 777 wide-body. Boeing CEO James McNer ney Jr. called it part of the largest product launch in commercial jetliner history. The airline also an nounced orders for 50 Air bus A380s the main com petition for the 777X. Airbus says the planned purchase is listed at $23 billion. The Dubai Airshow is seen as an increasingly important barometer on the state of the aviation industry and the rising roles of the big-spend ing Gulf carriers Etihad, Qa tar Airways, Emirates and ydubai as they compete for routes and critical stopover trafc between Asia and Eu rope and the Americas. This years event, which also included announce ments of promised purchas ing rights for dozens more aircraft, surpassed the re cord $155 billion in deals in 2007s edition, before the global economic downturn. The ve-day aviation trade shows location, at the new Dubai World Central air ports grounds, further re ects the Gulf Arab regions own rapid growth in the avi ation industry. Dubai hopes the new airport will be the largest in the world and the most frequented transit hub, connecting European and Asian travelers. Plans calls for most of the trafc from Dubais cur rent airport to be eventual ly shifted to the new facili ty, which ofcials say could one day handle 160 million passengers a year as part of the regions growing pro le as a global aviation hub. It remains unclear whether Dubai will continue to oper ate both airports or eventu ally move trafc entirely to the new airport grounds. To me whats happen ing at Dubai World Central, Dubai (International) Air port, Emirates Airline and ydubai, all this reects the growth of aviation globally and in this region, Al Mak toum of Emirates and y dubai said. For Boeing and Airbus, the Gulf Arab region has become a key battleground for new aircraft and big-ticket orders that can shape the compa nies outlooks for years. Boeing received orders at the airshow for 150 777X planes from Emirates, 50 from Qatar Airways and 25 from Abu Dhabis Etihad Air ways, the Chicago-based manufacturer and the air lines announced in separate news conferences. Boeing also inked deals with Etihad for 30 of its 787-10 Dream liners and one cargo plane, and with budget carrier y dubai for 86 aircraft, most for its single-aisle 737 mod els. The Dreamliner deal is an important nod of support in the Gulf for the troubled aircraft, which has suffered groundings in the past year over battery problems. The 777X orders come even as Boeing looks for al ternative sites to develop the plane after machinists in the Seattle area rejected a longterm contract. The long-range, twin-aisle 777 holds about 365 passen gers, making it Boeings sec ond-biggest plane. Since its rst ight in 1994, its been a best-seller for Boeing, which has sold more 777s than any of its other current large planes. In May, it began offering the revamped 777X. Boe ing is still nalizing plans for the plane aiming to deliv er the rst aircraft by the end of the decade but it has said it is expected to carry as many as 400 passengers and to be more fuel efcient than the current 777. Previously, Lufthansa had made a com mitment for 34 of the 777X. With almost $78 billion in combined purchasing com mitments announced at the opening of the ve-day air show, Emirates airline ce mented itself as one of Boe ing and Airbus largest and most important clients. The airlines said some of the new aircraft will replace existing ones and others will be used in the companys expansion. The airlines chairman said Sundays announcements will likely scare some of his competitors who are ght ing to preserve monopolies on landing rights at airports. Boeing takes $100 billion in orders from Gulf Boeing says Gulf Arab airlines place record $100 billion in orders at Dubai event ASSOCIATED PRESS UAE Vice President, Prime Minister and Ruler of Dubai, Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, middle right, listens to Sheikh Ahmed Bin Saeed Al Maktoum, President of the Dubai Civil Aviation, center left, during the opening day of the Dubai Airshow in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, Sunday. SINAN SALAHEDDIN Associated Press BAGHDAD Attacks across Iraq killed at least 20 people Sunday, of cials said, as gunmen attacked a militia lead er and bombs targeted police ofcers and civil ians. In the capitals eastern New Baghdad neigh borhood, a parked car bomb missed a police patrol but killed three ci vilians and wounded 10, a police ofcer said. An other police ofcer said a car bombing in Bagh dads eastern Sadr City neighborhood killed one person and wound ed 11. In the Baghdads southwestern suburb of Radwaniyah, a bomb went off in a commercial area, killing three civil ians and wounding 10, authorities said. In the town of Tarmiyah, about 30 miles north of Bagh dad, a bomb exploded near soldiers on patrol, killing two and wound ing ve, ofcials said. At dawn Sunday, mil itants attacked a lo cal leader of pro-gov ernment, anti-al-Qaida Sunni miliia in his house in the town of Madain, 14 miles south of Bagh dad, killing his broth er and wounding one guard, authorities said. Two militants were killed in the clashes and two others were wound ed, police said. The Sahwa move ment, also known as the Awakening Council, was formed by U.S. forces in 2007 to help ght the insurgents during the height of Iraqi war. Ever since, it has been a tar get for Sunni hard-liners who consider them trai tors. In Baghdads south ern Dora neighborhood, a car bomb exploded in a vegetable market, kill ing three civilians and wounding 12, a police ofcer said. Separate attacks kill 20 Thousands mar ch in memory of 1973 revolt Associated Press ATHENS, Greece Thousands have joined marches through cen tral Athens to com memorate the 40th anniversary of a bloody student upris ing against the then dictatorship. Previous marches have been marked by riots, but appeared to be peaceful. According to police estimates, about 10,000 most ly leftist, anarchist and union supporters have joined one march.

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Monday, November 18, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD ROD DIXON ................................... PUBLISHER BILL KOCH ............... ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ....................... NEWS EDITOR GENE PACKWOOD ............ EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. DOONESBURY HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edit ed for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Sub missions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 OTHER VOICES D ont raise the bridge. Lower the river, divert the water, steamroll the riverbed, and install a bullet train as an affordable bridge substitute. Such grandiose thinking is derailing ObamaCare at break neck speed. Long after it has passed from the American body politic, ObamaCare will be remembered as a Smithso nian-grade specimen of what happens when too much gov ernment smothers a manage able problem. Well before the (un)Afford able Care Act became law, Obama complained in August 2009 that million of our fellow citizens have no cover age. Meanwhile, the Congressio nal Budget Office forecast last May that, even if ObamaCare suddenly became as efficient as Swiss Federal Railways, 31 million Americans still will lack coverage in 2023. So, to days unfolding healthcare ca tastrophe will help at best just 15 million people. Giv en ObamaCares 10-year out lay of $2.6 trillion, this equals $17,333 annually (or $1,444 per month) per net beneficia ry. This is an astonishing cost for such a concentrated ben efit. However, rather than tar get these 15 million people, ObamaCare unleashes chaos on 315 million Americans. Al ready, some 5 million people, and counting, have seen their health plans cancelled. Others are watching their work hours get chopped from full time to part time. Even more are losing their jobs out right or simply not getting hired. Doctors increasingly are choosing golf and tennis over bureaucracy and disrespect. Among the American work ers whom the Employee Ben efit Research Institute sur veyed last September, 88 percent were somewhat to ex tremely satisfied with their health insurance. Why didnt ObamaCare just focus on the other 12 percent? Atop its recurring inability to set priorities, Team Obama displays staggering managerial incompetence. HealthCare.gov is a $400 mil lion misadventure in com puter science. Its dysfunction surely helped limit Octobers ObamaCare enrollment to just 106,185 paying and non-pay ing participants including a mere 26,794 in the federal ex changes just 21.3 percent of Obamas 500,000 monthly goal. Nevertheless, Obama con siders this website novel. Just visit HealthCare.gov, Obama said in the Rose Gar den on Oct. 1. You can com pare insurance plans, side by side, the same way youd shop for a plane ticket on Kayak or a TV on Amazon. David Axelrod, Obamas po litical guru, claimed on MSN BCs Morning Joe on Oct. 28: This is the first time in his tory that you can make an ap ples-to-apples comparison about healthcare plans on line in front of you. Obama, Axelrod, and their ilk need to escape their bubble. Websites that long pre-dat ed ObamaCare already help Americans shop for health in surance as if they were buying books or albums. Indeed, if the people who brought us Health Care.gov had listened to me, they would have saved Amer ica millions and spared them selves embarrassment. Websites like ehealthinsur ance.com could become the cornerstones for a thriving, private, national health-insur ance market, I wrote in Feb ruary 2010. This is far more encouraging than Obamacares creaky, Washington-driven ex change. Prospering since 1997, ehealthinsurance.com is what HealthCare.gov wants to be when it grows up. Imagine if Obama sim ply had offered vouchers, or Health Stamps, to Ameri cas uninsured. Lets say each needy individual without cov erage received $5,000 to pur chase insurance. Those with severe conditions could receive additional sup port. They then would have visited ehealthinsurance.com and similar websites. The un insured could compare prices and buy whatever plans suited their circumstances. So, post-menopausal wom en need not purchase birth control and maternity cover age, as ObamaCare mandates. Childless male 23-year-olds would not be forced to buy pe diatric dental insurance, as ObamaCare requires. At roughly 29 percent of ObamaCares cost, this rational approach would have fulfilled Obamas promise to cover the uninsured. Conservatives would be pleased to see freedom and choice central to this arrange ment. Those who like their health care plans could have kept their healthcare plans. Period. And ehealthinsur ance.com would have let America avoid the humiliation of launching an unworkable website as the whole world was watching. Obama could have enjoyed all of this. Instead, and iron ically, his massive, statist scheme has soiled the reputa tion of big-government liberal ism perhaps for decades. Deroy Murdock is a columnist with Scripps Howard News Service and a media fellow with the Hoover In stitution on War, Revolution and Peace at Stanford University. Email him at deroy.Murdock@gmail.com T here seems to be no economic problem that Venezuelas new president, Nicolas Maduro, cant make worse. Maduro inherited from his predecessor, longtime strongman Hugo Chavez, a hazy, not to say incoherent, form of socialism called Bolivarism, that was slowly wreck ing the economy of the oil-rich nation. Instead of quietly scrapping those poli cies after Chavez death last spring, Maduro chose to double down on them. By trying to x articially low prices for such basics as food and electronics, Maduro has created shortages; an annual ination rate of over 50 percent, one of the highest in the world; a U.S. dollar trading at 10 times the ofcial rate; and a money supply that grew over 70 percent last year. Traditionally, Venezuela, a nation of 30 mil lion with some of the worlds largest proven oil reserves, has been bailed out by periodic spikes in the price of crude oil, but the United States, Venezuelas best customer, has started producing more oil than it imports. With the economy rapidly worsening and facing municipal elections next month, Maduro dispatched his security forces to enforce government price controls. Maduro denounced the stores as bour geois parasites and ill advisedly called on Venezuelans to empty the shelves, which at the governments laughably low pric es they were happy to do. Maduro then had to call out the national guard to force the stores to honor those prices and to keep or der among the thousands of Venezuelans who lined up to take advantage of them. With the major appliance stores emptied out and unable to restock, Maduro is threat ening to conscate stores in other retail sec tors and is asking Congress to grant him spe cial powers to run the economy by decree. Historian Ines Quintero told the Associ ated Press that the politics of polarization eventually exhausts itself. You cant contin ue in power forever offering solutions to peoples problems that dont work. Sadly for the average Venezuelan, Maduro seems determined to try. Distributed by Scripps Howard News Service. A VOICE Venezuelas crackpot economic crackdown Obamacare is another triumph of government Deroy Murdock SCRIPPS HOWARD NEWS SERVICE

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8208 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013 www.dailycommercial.com TENNIS: Czechs take Cup / B2 BERNIE MCGUIRE Associated Press DUBAI, United Arab Emirates Henrik Stenson won the season-end ing World Tour Championship on Sunday after shooting an 8-under 64 in the nal round. The Swede became the rst golfer to win the PGA Tours FedEx Cup and European Tours Race to Dubai in the same season. It is still taking a little time to sink in what Ive achieved this week as was the case when I won the FedEx Cup but then it just kept getting better and better as the days went on and I Stenson wins World Tour Championship KAMRAN JEBREILI / AP Henrik Stenson from Sweden, right, kisses his wife Emma Lofgren on Sunday after he won the nal round of DP World Golf Championship in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. SEE GOLF | B2 RALPH D. RUSSO AP College Football Writer Baylor closed in on third-place Ohio State in the latest BCS standings. The Bears and Buckeyes have little hope of catching rst-place Alabama or second-place Florida State in the race to the BCS championship game without a loss from one of the top two. The Buckeyes are ahead of the Bears in both the Harris and USA To day coaches polls, but behind Baylor in the computer rankings. The com bined average of the six computer rankings has the Bears third, with Al abama and Florida State tied for rst. Ohio State is fth in the computers. J PAT CARTER / AP Jimmie Johnson holds his daughter, Genevieve, as they greet fans during driver introductions before the NASCAR Sprint Cub Series auto race in Homestead. JENNA FRYER AP Auto Racing Writer HOMESTEAD Back on top with only two NASCAR greats left to catch, Jim mie Johnson won his sixth championship in eight years Sunday and staked his claim as one of the most dominant competitors in sports history. Johnson, needing only to nish 23rd or better to spoil Matt Kenseths career sea son, was on cruise con trol most of the day at Homestead-Miami Speedway. Johnson had just one hiccup en route to his ninth-place nish, when a stack up on a restart caused Johnson and Kenseth to bang slightly, costing Johnson 15 spots. Although the in cident caused slight damage to the fend er on the No. 48 Chev rolet, Johnson only dropped to 23rd in the eld. A caution allowed him to head to pit road, where crew chief Chad Knaus methodically barked commands to repair the damage. Johnson was soon off and running as if noth ing had happened. He claimed the championship by 19 points over Kenseth, now looming squarely ON A ROLL REINHOLD MATAY / AP Tampa Bay Buccaneers running back Bobby Rainey (43) scores past Atlanta Falcons outside linebacker Paul Worrilow (55) on a 4-yard touchdown reception on Sunday during the third quarter in Tampa. BRIAN BLANCO / AP Tampa Bay free safety Dashon Goldson (38) runs with the football after intercepting a pass intended for Atlanta wide receiver Harry Douglas (83) during the fourth quarter. Rainey, Bucs win again, top slumping Falcons 41-28 FRED GOODALL AP Sports Writer TAMPA Bobby Rain eys never lacked con dence in himself. All he wants is an opportuni ty to show he can play in the NFL. Thats my motivation, when people tell me what I can and cannot do, the diminutive running back said Sunday after rushing for 163 yards and scor ing three touchdowns to help the Tampa Bay Buc caneers dominate the At lanta Falcons 41-28. Picked up on the waiv er wire last month, Rain ey is playing for his third team in less than two seasons. This perfor mance came six days af ter he carried the ball for the rst time with Bucs and played a key role in helping them get their rst win. To come back and do it again today was huge, Rainey said. The 5-foot-8, 212-pounder whose lack of size hurt his chances of being drafted is mak ing his mark while lling in for the injured Doug Martin and Mike James. Rainey scored on rsthalf runs of 43 and 3 yards, then caught a 4-yard TD pass from Mike Glennon in the third quarter to help the Bucs (2-8) win for the second straight time fol lowing an 0-8 start. The previous week, he rushed for 45 yards and scored the go-ahead touchdown in a 22-19 victory over Miami. He began the season as a kick returner and back up running back with the Cleveland Browns. Hes stepped up. We put a lot on his plate, but hes handled it well, re ceiver Vincent Jackson said. Hes being very coach able. Hes taking in every thing thats being asked of him, doing a great job in the passing game as well, picking up blocks, he said. I see the kid be ing successful the rest of this year. We put guys in position to be success ful. Hats off to our coach es for working with him, putting the time in so he can go out there and compete. Matt Ryan threw an 80-yard TD pass to Har ry Douglas, extending his streak of consecutive games with at least one touchdown to 16 games. He threw a 6-yarder to Roddy White in the fourth quarter, but also was sacked three times by Tampa Bays Gerald Mc Coy and had one of two interceptions returned 37 yards for a TD by line backer Mason Foster. The Falcons (2-8), who went a NFC-best 13-3 and nished one victo ry shy of the Super Bowl last season, have lost four straight by a combined score of 135-61. Its embarrassing, the way we came out and performed as a team. I mean all of us, Atlanta tight end Tony Gonzalez said. Its all of us. (Im) getting tired of it. Its all of us. Thats the thing about it. Its going to take all of SEE BUCS | B2 Jimmie Johnson wins 6th NASCAR championship after finishing 9th SEE NASCAR | B2 Baylor closes on Ohio State in BCS BOWL CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES STANDINGS 1 Alabama .998 points 2 Florida St. .966 3 Ohio St. .887 4 Baylor .886 5 Oregon .792 6 Auburn .786 7 Clemson .723 8 Missouri .628 9 Stanford .589 10 Oklahoma St. .539 18 UCF .303 AP rankings, See Page B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013 AUTO RACING Formula 1-United States Grand Prix Results Sunday At Circuit of the Americas Austin, Texas Lap length: 3.43 miles 1. Sebastian Vettel, Germany, Red Bull, 56 laps, 1:39:17.148, 115.807 mph. 2. Romain Grosjean, France, Lotus, 56, 1:39:23.432. 3. Mark Webber, Australia, Red Bull, 56, 1:39:25.544. 4. Lewis Hamilton, England, Mercedes, 56, 1:39:44.506. 5. Fernando Alonso, Spain, Ferrari, 56, 1:39:46.740. 6. Nico Hulkenberg, Germany, Sauber, 56, 1:39:47.548. 7. Sergio Perez, Mexico, McLaren, 56, 1:40:03.840. 8. Valtteri Bottas, Finland, Williams, 56, 1:40:11.657. 9. Nico Rosberg, Germany, Mercedes, 56, 1:40:16.289. 10. Jenson Button, England, McLaren, 56, 1:40:34.426. 11. Daniel Ricciardo, Australia, Toro Rosso, 56, 1:40:38.152. 12. Jean-Eric Vergne, France, Toro Rosso, 56, 1:40:41.722. 13. Felipe Massa, Brazil, Ferrari, 56, 1:40:44.062. 14. Esteban Gutierrez, Mexico, Sauber, 56, 1:40:48.855. 15. Heikki Kovalainen, Finland, Lotus, 56, 1:40:52.211. 16. Paul di Resta, Scotland, Force India, 56, 1:40:54.001. 17. Pastor Maldonado, Venezuela, Williams, 55, +1 lap. 18. Jules Bianchi, France, Marussia, 55, +1 lap. 19. Giedo van der Garde, Netherlands, Caterham, 55, +1 lap. 20. Charles Pic, France, Caterham, 55, +1 lap. 21. Max Chilton, England, Marussia, 54, +2 laps. NASCAR Sprint Cup-Ford EcoBoost 400 Results Sunday At Homestead-Miami Speedway Homestead Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (5) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 267 laps, 130 rating, 47 points. 2. (1) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 267, 139.9, 44. 3. (21) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 267, 122.5, 42. 4. (8) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 267, 104.8, 40. 5. (25) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 267, 96.5, 39. 6. (4) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 267, 110.4, 39. 7. (11) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 267, 109.2, 37. 8. (3) Joey Logano, Ford, 267, 98.7, 36. 9. (7) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 267, 109.1, 35. 10. (6) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 267, 91.7, 35. 11. (26) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 267, 102.4, 33. 12. (18) Carl Edwards, Ford, 267, 87.5, 32. 13. (13) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 267, 88.1, 31. 14. (10) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 267, 74.8, 0. 15. (20) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 267, 77, 0. 16. (19) Aric Almirola, Ford, 267, 78.4, 28. 17. (15) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 267, 78.1, 27. 18. (27) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 267, 65.6, 26. 19. (22) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 267, 79.3, 25. 20. (24) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 267, 61.4, 24. 21. (2) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 267, 74.1, 24. 22. (9) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 267, 66.7, 22. 23. (14) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 267, 65.9, 21. 24. (16) Greg Bife, Ford, 267, 70.7, 20. 25. (30) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 267, 55.7, 0. 26. (23) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 267, 57, 18. 27. (31) David Gilliland, Ford, 266, 48, 17. 28. (40) Casey Mears, Ford, 266, 49.4, 16. 29. (29) David Ragan, Ford, 266, 48.8, 16. 30. (28) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 265, 51.4, 14. 31. (32) David Reutimann, Toyota, 265, 38.5, 13. 32. (37) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 264, 40.5, 12. 33. (39) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 264, 39.7, 0. 34. (41) Ken Schrader, Ford, 263, 34.6, 10. 35. (42) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 263, 31.9, 0. 36. (36) A J Allmendinger, Toyota, 257, 48.9, 8. 37. (33) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 248, 27.9, 7. 38. (38) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 242, 36.5, 6. 39. (12) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, accident, 229, 76.8, 5. 40. (17) Trevor Bayne, Ford, engine, 223, 53.8, 0. 41. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, rear gear, 119, 31.2, 0. 42. (43) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, vibration, 104, 26.9, 0. 43. (34) Michael McDowell, Ford, brakes, 63, 27.8, 1. Sundays College Basketball Major Scores EAST NJIT 71, New Hampshire 63 Pittsburgh 84, Howard 52 UConn 77, Boston U. 60 UMBC 90, Mount St. Marys 84, OT UMass 85, Youngstown St. 69 Villanova 78, Towson 44 West Virginia 96, Duquesne 83 SOUTH Belmont 83, North Carolina 80 Clemson 71, South Carolina 57 Delaware 90, Hampton 79 Florida St. 89, UT-Martin 61 Morehead St. 102, Marshall 94, OT Oregon St. 90, Maryland 83 UCF 83, Bethune-Cookman 63 UNC Greensboro 97, Chowan 58 MIDWEST Illinois 81, Bradley 55 Indiana 90, Stony Brook 74 Indiana St. 83, Notre Dame 70 Iowa 103, Abilene Christian 41 Iowa St. 77, Michigan 70 James Madison 79, San Jose St. 66 Kansas St. 71, Long Beach St. 58 Kent St. 75, St. Peters 58 Milwaukee 82, N. Illinois 69 Nebraska 83, SC State 57 Ohio 76, Valparaiso 72 W. Michigan 73, Alabama A&M 69 SOUTHWEST Baylor 87, Louisiana-Lafayette 68 Houston 80, Lehigh 66 IPFW 69, Tennessee Tech 66 Texas A&M-CC 72, Texas-Pan American 61 UTEP 67, West Alabama 46 FAR WEST Air Force 67, Ark.-Pine Bluff 64 New Mexico 109, Charleston Southern 93 Pacic 66, W. Illinois 52 Stanford 66, Denver 57 Washington St. 84, Lamar 64 National Basketball Association All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Philadelphia 5 6 .455 Toronto 4 7 .364 1 Boston 4 7 .364 1 New York 3 6 .333 1 Brooklyn 3 6 .333 1 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 7 3 .700 Atlanta 6 4 .600 1 Charlotte 5 5 .500 2 Orlando 4 6 .400 3 Washington 2 7 .222 4 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 9 1 .900 Chicago 5 3 .625 3 Detroit 3 5 .375 5 Cleveland 4 7 .364 5 Milwaukee 2 7 .222 6 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 9 1 .900 Houston 7 4 .636 2 Dallas 6 4 .600 3 Memphis 4 5 .444 4 New Orleans 4 6 .400 5 Northwest W L Pct GB Portland 8 2 .800 Oklahoma City 6 3 .667 1 Minnesota 7 4 .636 1 Denver 4 5 .444 3 Utah 1 10 .091 7 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 7 3 .700 Golden State 7 3 .700 Phoenix 5 4 .556 1 L.A. Lakers 4 7 .364 3 Sacramento 2 6 .250 4 Saturdays Games Dallas 108, Orlando 100 Cleveland 103, Washington 96, OT Miami 97, Charlotte 81 Atlanta 110, New York 90 Chicago 110, Indiana 94 Minnesota 106, Boston 88 Houston 122, Denver 111 New Orleans 135, Philadelphia 98 Oklahoma City 92, Milwaukee 79 Golden State 102, Utah 88 L.A. Clippers 110, Brooklyn 103 Sundays Games Portland 118, Toronto 110, OT Memphis at Sacramento, late Detroit at L.A. Lakers, late Todays Games Portland at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m. Charlotte at Chicago, 8 p.m. Denver at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Philadelphia at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Golden State at Utah, 9 p.m. Memphis at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Tuesdays Games Minnesota at Washington, 7 p.m. Atlanta at Miami, 7:30 p.m. New York at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Boston at Houston, 8 p.m. Phoenix at Sacramento, 10 p.m. COLLEGE FOOTBALL The AP Top 25 The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with rst-place votes in parentheses, records through Nov. 16, total points based on 25 points for a rst-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking: Record Pts Pv 1. Alabama (55) 10-0 1,495 1 2. Florida St. (5) 10-0 1,445 2 3. Baylor 9-0 1,351 4 4. Ohio St. 10-0 1,343 3 5. Oregon 9-1 1,210 6 6. Auburn 10-1 1,205 7 7. Clemson 9-1 1,115 8 8. Missouri 9-1 1,067 9 9. Texas A&M 8-2 956 10 10. Stanford 8-2 899 5 11. Oklahoma St. 9-1 889 12 12. South Carolina 8-2 870 11 13. Michigan St. 9-1 749 14 14. UCLA 8-2 710 13 15. Fresno St. 9-0 572 16 16. Wisconsin 8-2 559 17 17. UCF 8-1 535 15 18. LSU 7-3 439 18 19. Arizona St. 8-2 430 21 20. N. Illinois 10-0 426 20 21. Louisville 9-1 412 19 22. Oklahoma 8-2 318 22 23. Southern Cal 8-3 187 NR 24. Mississippi 7-3 119 NR 25. Duke 8-2 94 NR Others receiving votes: Minnesota 77, Notre Dame 11, Texas 10, Georgia 5, Cincinnati 1, Nebraska 1. National Hockey League EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Tampa Bay 20 14 6 0 28 64 50 Boston 19 12 6 1 25 53 36 Toronto 20 12 7 1 25 57 47 Detroit 21 9 5 7 25 54 60 Montreal 21 10 9 2 22 52 45 Ottawa 20 8 8 4 20 58 62 Florida 21 5 12 4 14 46 70 Buffalo 22 5 16 1 11 41 68 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 20 12 8 0 24 56 47 Washington 20 11 8 1 23 65 58 N.Y. Rangers 19 10 9 0 20 42 49 Carolina 20 8 8 4 20 39 55 New Jersey 20 7 8 5 19 42 49 N.Y. Islanders 21 8 10 3 19 61 68 Columbus 20 7 10 3 17 52 57 Philadelphia 19 7 10 2 16 35 48 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA Chicago 20 13 3 4 30 73 60 St. Louis 18 13 2 3 29 65 42 Colorado 19 14 5 0 28 59 41 Minnesota 20 12 4 4 28 53 43 Dallas 19 10 7 2 22 56 55 Winnipeg 21 10 9 2 22 56 59 Nashville 20 9 9 2 20 46 63 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 22 15 5 2 32 71 56 San Jose 20 13 2 5 31 71 45 Phoenix 21 14 4 3 31 73 66 Los Angeles 20 13 6 1 27 57 46 Vancouver 21 11 7 3 25 55 56 Calgary 20 6 11 3 15 54 75 Edmonton 22 5 15 2 12 53 83 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. Saturdays Games N.Y. Islanders 5, Detroit 4, SO Toronto 4, Buffalo 2 N.Y. Rangers 1, Montreal 0 New Jersey 4, Pittsburgh 1 St. Louis 4, Carolina 2 Nashville 7, Chicago 2 Phoenix 6, Tampa Bay 3 Florida 4, Colorado 1 Edmonton 4, Calgary 2 Sundays Games Columbus 4, Ottawa 1 St. Louis at Washington, late Los Angeles at N.Y. Rangers, late San Jose at Chicago, late Winnipeg at Minnesota, late Dallas at Vancouver, late Todays Games Boston at Carolina, 7 p.m. Anaheim at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m. Calgary at Winnipeg, 8 p.m. Tuesdays Games St. Louis at Buffalo, 7 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Toronto, 7 p.m. Ottawa at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Montreal, 7:30 p.m. Nashville at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Boston at N.Y. Rangers, 7:30 p.m. Chicago at Colorado, 9 p.m. Columbus at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m. Florida at Vancouver, 10 p.m. Tampa Bay at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. Sundays Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League KANSAS CITY ROYALS Signed C Francisco Pena and added him to the 40-man roster. HOCKEY National Hockey League CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS Recalled G Antti Raanta from Rockford (AHL). DALLAS STARS Claimed F Dustin Jeffrey off waiv ers from Pittsburgh. Reassigned D Aaron Rome to Texas (AHL). DETROIT RED WINGS Assigned C Luke Glenden ing to Grand Rapids (AHL). PHOENIX COYOTES Assigned D Connor Murphy to Portland (AHL). LEADING OFF | TENNIS DUSAN STOJANOVIC Associated Press BELGRADE, Serbia The Czech Republic retained the Da vis Cup title by beating Serbia 3-2 in the nal Sunday after Radek Stepanek swept past Dusan Lajo vic in the decisive singles match. The Czech veteran beat the 117th-ranked Lajovic 6-3, 6-1, 6-1, converting his rst match point with a volley. That sent about a thousand visiting Czech fans at Belgrade Arena into wild celebrations, blowing trumpets and beating their drums. Stepanek spread his hands on the court as Tomas Berdych and other Czech teammates mobbed him. This is an amazing moment, Stepanek said. The Czechs won their second straight Davis Cup title, with last years its rst as an indepen dent nation. Serbia won its only crown in 2010, beating France in Belgrade. Lajovic, who has a 5-12 record on the ATP tour and had never played in the Davis Cup before this weekend, replaced Janko Tipsarevic, who missed the nal with a heel injury. He also lost his rst singles against Berdych on Friday his rst career best-of-ve-sets match and was thrust into the biggest match of his life against Stepanek. The 23-yearold Serb started well, breaking Stepanek in the opening game of the match. But the 34-yearold Czech responded swiftly with two consecutive breaks to take a 5-2 lead. Stepanek then broke Lajovic for 3-1 in the nal set and add ed another before serving out the match. Serbia captain Bogdan Ob radovic said his teams chanc es of winning the title were hurt by Tipsarevics injury and a 12-month doping ban against Viktor Troicki, who helped Ser bia win its only title. We couldnt nd the real re placement for the two, Bog danovic said. Well try the next year. The Czechs got the crucial point in Saturdays doubles to go up 2-1. Second-ranked Novak Djokovic then kept alive Serbias hopes by beating Berdych 6-4, 7-6 (5), 6-2 Sunday to improve his career re cord against the Czech to 15-2. TV 2 DAY SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED 2 in Sports DAY OVER HEARD This is an amazing moment. RADEK STEPANEK after defeated Dusan Lajovic to retain the Davis Cup for the Czech Republic. MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. FS1 Vermont at Providence NFL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 8:25 p.m. ESPN New England at Carolina FIGURE SKATING 4:30 p.m. NBC ISU Grand Prix: Skate France, at Paris NHL HOCKEY 7:30 p.m. NBCSN Anaheim at Pittsburgh WOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 8 p.m. FSN Rice at Baylor Czech Republic retains Davis Cup am sure this will be the same, he said. Stenson had six bird ies in the nal round before nishing with an eagle at the 18th hole left him at 25 un der for the tournament. It was his rst victory of the season on the Euro pean Tour. To achieve the dou ble, double if you like in winning the DP World Tour Championship and the Race to Dubai on top of winning the PGA Tour Champion ship to capture the Fe dEx Cup takes some beating, I guess, Sten son said. I am just very, very pleased with the way I played. I knew it was going to be a tough week as I knew the guys like Justin (Rose) and Ian (Poulter) would come charging at me and try to catch me. Poulter birdied his closing two holes to shoot a 66 and nish second at 19 under. He also nished in second in the Race to Dubai. I have to take my hat off to Henrik as he is unbelievable, Poulter said. I tried to run him down as hard as I could but even with a sore wrist he has pressed on and I just could not get close enough. Henrik has not made a mistake all week and all I could do was make sure of second place and some valuable Ryder Cup points. Victor Dubuisson of France shot a 71 to claim third place at 17 under. Rory McIl roy continues to show signs of returning to form, closing with a 67. GOLF FROM PAGE B1 us to get out of it. Falcons owner Arthur Blank said he still has condence in coach Mike Smith and gen eral manager Thomas Dimitroff. I absolutely do. And, theyve earned it over the past ve years, Blank said. Its a tough business. Weve had a lot of injuries, and is sues on top of the in juries. These guys are proven leaders and proven by success. ... Theyll do the work that has to be done with my full support. Glennon completed 20 of 23 passes for 231 yards, two touchdowns and no interceptions. Jackson caught a 3-yard TD pass and nished with 10 receptions for 165 yards. Rainey entered the NFL as an undraft ed free agent with Bal timore after leaving Western Kentucky as the Hilltoppers ca reer rushing leader. He was released once, re-signed to the Ra vens practice squad and eventually wound up on the active roster before suffering a sea son-ending knee injury. Baltimore went on to win the Super Bowl, and Rainey received a championship ring de spite not appearing in a regular-season game as a rookie. I think preparation meets opportunity. ... Hes not lucky. This guy worked his tail off, he trained to do all the right things, and here come his chance and hes ready for it, Bucs coach Greg Schiano said. So good for us, good for him. The Bucs opened the season with eight straight losses, with four of the setbacks coming in the nal two minutes of regulation or overtime. BUCS FROM PAGE B1 in Johnsons windshield is the mark of seven titles held by Richard Petty and the late Dale Earnhardt. I have six, and well see if I can get seven, said Johnson, who has been asked repeatedly of late where he thinks he stands in NASCAR history. Time will tell. I think we need to save the argument until I hang up the helmet, then its worth the argument. Lets wait until I hang up the helmet until we really start thinking about this. Kenseth, needing a Johnson collapse to have any shot at the title, positioned himself to pounce should anything go awry. He led a race-high 144 laps and nished second to Joe Gibbs Racing teammate Denny Hamlin. It was just unbelievable year for us, obvious ly we wanted to win the championship as good as we ran all year, said Kenseth, who won sev en races in his rst season with JGR. Kenseths effort just wasnt enough against a Hendrick Motorsports team that wouldnt be denied for a third consecutive year. If Jimmie would have got a at or some thing, that would have been all right, Kenseth lamented. Never seen anything like this in the sport and probably never will again. ... Maybe hell retire. Johnson won a record ve straight titles from 2006 through 2010, was mathematically elim inated before the 2011 nale, but was back in the title hunt last season. Only he had a tire failure in the penultimate race at Phoenix and then a mechanical failure in the nale to lose the championship to Brad Keselowski. His two-year drought is over, and his crew was ready for the party on the South Beach. You better get a sip of that (water) bottle, its the only healthy liquid youre going to get all night, Knaus radioed Johnson after he crossed the nish line. NASCAR FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, November 18, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div New England 7 2 0 .778 234 175 5-0-0 2-2-0 4-2-0 3-0-0 3-1-0 N.Y. Jets 5 5 0 .500 183 268 4-1-0 1-4-0 2-5-0 3-0-0 2-2-0 Miami 5 5 0 .500 213 225 3-2-0 2-3-0 4-3-0 1-2-0 0-2-0 Buffalo 4 7 0 .364 236 273 3-3-0 1-4-0 3-6-0 1-1-0 2-2-0 South W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div Indianapolis 7 3 0 .700 252 220 3-2-0 4-1-0 5-2-0 2-1-0 3-0-0 Tennessee 4 6 0 .400 227 226 2-4-0 2-2-0 3-4-0 1-2-0 0-3-0 Houston 2 8 0 .200 193 276 1-4-0 1-4-0 2-4-0 0-4-0 1-1-0 Jacksonville 1 9 0 .100 129 318 0-5-0 1-4-0 1-5-0 0-4-0 1-1-0 North W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div Cincinnati 7 4 0 .636 275 206 5-0-0 2-4-0 5-3-0 2-1-0 2-2-0 Pittsburgh 4 6 0 .400 216 245 3-2-0 1-4-0 3-4-0 1-2-0 1-1-0 Baltimore 4 6 0 .400 208 212 3-1-0 1-5-0 4-4-0 0-2-0 2-2-0 Cleveland 4 6 0 .400 192 238 3-2-0 1-4-0 3-4-0 1-2-0 2-2-0 West W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div Kansas City 9 0 0 1.000 215 111 5-0-0 4-0-0 6-0-0 3-0-0 1-0-0 Denver 8 1 0 .889 371 238 5-0-0 3-1-0 4-1-0 4-0-0 2-0-0 Oakland 4 6 0 .400 194 246 3-2-0 1-4-0 4-3-0 0-3-0 1-2-0 San Diego 4 6 0 .400 228 222 2-2-0 2-4-0 2-5-0 2-1-0 0-2-0 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div Philadelphia 6 5 0 .545 276 260 1-4-0 5-1-0 5-2-0 1-3-0 3-2-0 Dallas 5 5 0 .500 274 258 4-1-0 1-4-0 5-2-0 0-3-0 3-0-0 N.Y. Giants 4 6 0 .400 192 256 3-2-0 1-4-0 3-4-0 1-2-0 1-2-0 Washington 3 7 0 .300 246 311 2-2-0 1-5-0 1-6-0 2-1-0 0-3-0 South W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div New Orleans 8 2 0 .800 288 183 6-0-0 2-2-0 6-0-0 2-2-0 2-0-0 Carolina 6 3 0 .667 214 115 3-1-0 3-2-0 6-2-0 0-1-0 2-0-0 Tampa Bay 2 8 0 .200 187 237 2-4-0 0-4-0 1-6-0 1-2-0 1-3-0 Atlanta 2 8 0 .200 214 292 2-3-0 0-5-0 2-5-0 0-3-0 1-3-0 North W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div Detroit 6 4 0 .600 265 253 3-1-0 3-3-0 5-2-0 1-2-0 3-1-0 Chicago 6 4 0 .600 282 267 4-2-0 2-2-0 3-4-0 3-0-0 2-2-0 Green Bay 5 5 0 .500 258 239 3-2-0 2-3-0 3-4-0 2-1-0 2-1-0 Minnesota 2 8 0 .200 240 320 2-3-0 0-5-0 1-7-0 1-1-0 0-3-0 West W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div Seattle 10 1 0 .909 306 179 5-0-0 5-1-0 7-0-0 3-1-0 3-0-0 San Francisco 6 4 0 .600 247 178 3-2-0 3-2-0 3-3-0 3-1-0 2-1-0 Arizona 6 4 0 .600 214 212 4-1-0 2-3-0 4-4-0 2-0-0 0-3-0 St. Louis 4 6 0 .400 224 234 2-3-0 2-3-0 1-5-0 3-1-0 1-2-0 This Week Thursdays Game Indianapolis 30, Tennessee 27 Sundays Games Chicago 23, Baltimore 20, OT Oakland 28, Houston 23 Buffalo 37, N.Y. Jets 14 Tampa Bay 41, Atlanta 28 Pittsburgh 37, Detroit 27 Philadelphia 24, Washington 16 Cincinnati 41, Cleveland 20 Arizona 27, Jacksonville 14 Miami 20, San Diego 16 Seattle 41, Minnesota 20 New Orleans 23, San Francisco 20 N.Y. Giants 27, Green Bay 13 Kansas City at Denver, 8:30 p.m. Open: Dallas, St. Louis Todays Game New England at Carolina, 8:40 p.m. Next Week Thursdays Game New Orleans at Atlanta, 8:25 p.m. Nov. 24 Minnesota at Green Bay, 1 p.m. Jacksonville at Houston, 1 p.m. San Diego at Kansas City, 1 p.m. Chicago at St. Louis, 1 p.m. Pittsburgh at Cleveland, 1 p.m. Tampa Bay at Detroit, 1 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Baltimore, 1 p.m. Carolina at Miami, 1 p.m. Tennessee at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. Indianapolis at Arizona, 4:05 p.m. Dallas at N.Y. Giants, 4:25 p.m. Denver at New England, 8:30 p.m. Open: Buffalo, Cincinnati, Philadelphia, Seattle Nov. 25 San Francisco at Washington, 8:40 p.m. CHICAGO The Chicago Bears game against the Baltimore Ravens was delayed about two hours because of a torrential downpour. Play was stopped with 4:51 left in the rst quar ter when fans were ordered to seek cover. Players stayed on the sideline for a few minutes before heading to the locker room as heavy rains and strong winds hit. The rain was so heavy it looked as if the Chicago skyline was gone. More than two hours later, the game was resumed with the Bears winning 23-20. Downpour delays game Eagles 24, Redskins 16 Washington 0 0 0 16 16 Philadelphia 7 10 7 0 24 First Quarter PhiFoles 4 run (Henery kick), 2:48. Second Quarter PhiMcCoy 1 run (Henery kick), 14:31. PhiFG Henery 24, 3:51. Third Quarter PhiMcCoy 1 run (Henery kick), 9:41. Fourth Quarter WasYoung 62 pass from Grifn III (N.Williams pass from Grifn III), 12:56. WasA.Robinson 41 pass from Grifn III (Grifn III run), 5:57. A,144. Was Phi First downs 23 22 Total Net Yards 427 402 Rushes-yards 38-191 33-126 Passing 236 276 Punt Returns 1-0 2-6 Kickoff Returns 1-23 2-23 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-0 Comp-Att-Int 17-35-1 17-26-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-28 3-22 Punts 6-37.2 6-50.7 Fumbles-Lost 3-1 0-0 Penalties-Yards 4-39 9-68 Time of Possession 33:42 26:18 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGWashington, Morris 22-93, Grifn III 1044, Helu Jr. 3-39, Garcon 1-9, Young 2-6. Philadel phia, McCoy 20-77, Foles 9-47, Brown 4-2. PASSINGWashington, Grifn III 17-35-1-264. Phila delphia, Foles 17-26-0-298. RECEIVINGWashington, Garcon 6-68, Helu Jr. 3-11, A.Robinson 2-60, Moss 2-41, Young 1-62, Reed 1-12, Hankerson 1-5, N.Williams 1-5. Philadelphia, Jackson 4-82, McCoy 4-73, Cooper 3-37, Ertz 2-31, Brown 2-28, Celek 1-42, Avant 1-5. MISSED FIELD GOALSNone. Bills 37, Jets 14 N.Y. Jets 0 0 7 7 14 Buffalo 0 20 14 3 37 Second Quarter BufFG Carpenter 40, 12:40. BufGraham 34 pass from Manuel (Carpenter kick), 4:05. BufSummers 3 run (Carpenter kick), 3:17. BufFG Carpenter 42, 1:15. Third Quarter NYJIvory 1 run (Folk kick), 7:18. BufGoodwin 43 pass from Manuel (Carpenter kick), 4:40. BufSearcy 32 interception return (Carpenter kick), 1:14. Fourth Quarter NYJCumberland 13 pass from Simms (Folk kick), 9:36. BufFG Carpenter 43, 4:02. A,036. NYJ Buf First downs 12 14 Total Net Yards 267 313 Rushes-yards 23-134 38-68 Passing 133 245 Punt Returns 1-16 4-17 Kickoff Returns 5-115 1-26 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 3-41 Comp-Att-Int 12-29-3 20-28-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-30 1-0 Punts 6-47.3 6-33.3 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 1-0 Penalties-Yards 4-24 8-64 Time of Possession 26:18 33:42 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGN.Y. Jets, Ivory 15-98, Powell 5-27, Cribbs 2-9, Smith 1-0. Buffalo, Jackson 12-34, Goodwin 1-17, Manuel 7-9, Spiller 13-6, Summers 2-4, Choice 2-1, Graham 1-(minus 3). PASSINGN.Y. Jets, Smith 8-23-3-103, Simms 4-6-060. Buffalo, Manuel 20-28-0-245. RECEIVINGN.Y. Jets, Cumberland 3-25, Holmes 2-71, Salas 2-32, Bohanon 2-5, Winslow 1-17, Nelson 1-12, Powell 1-1. Buffalo, Goodwin 6-81, Hogan 3-29, Graham 2-74, Chandler 2-40, Spiller 2-10, Jackson 2-5, Summers 1-5, L.Smith 1-1, Choice 1-0. MISSED FIELD GOALSN.Y. Jets, Folk 48 (WR). Buccaneers 41, Falcons 28 Atlanta 0 6 7 15 28 Tampa Bay 3 21 14 3 41 First Quarter TBFG Lindell 30, 1:45. Second Quarter AtlFG Bryant 46, 12:07. TBRainey 43 run (Lindell kick), 10:14. TBFoster 37 interception return (Lindell kick), 7:05. TBRainey 3 run (Lindell kick), 3:16. AtlFG Bryant 49, :56. Third Quarter TBRainey 4 pass from Glennon (Lindell kick), 9:34. TBJackson 3 pass from Glennon (Lindell kick), 1:54. AtlDouglas 80 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick), 1:02. Fourth Quarter TBFG Lindell 46, 7:15. AtlSmith 50 run (Gonzalez pass from Do.Da vis), 5:22. AtlWhite 6 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick), 1:45. A,360. Atl TB First downs 24 24 Total Net Yards 420 410 Rushes-yards 20-152 38-186 Passing 268 224 Punt Returns 2-16 0-0 Kickoff Returns 0-0 5-61 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 2-37 Comp-Att-Int 24-43-2 20-25-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-20 2-7 Punts 2-12.0 4-42.0 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 0-0 Penalties-Yards 7-45 11-121 Time of Possession 26:46 33:14 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGAtlanta, Smith 2-88, Jackson 11-41, Rod gers 6-22, Vaughan 1-1. Tampa Bay, Rainey 30-163, Leonard 4-16, Glennon 1-4, Hill 3-3. PASSINGAtlanta, Ryan 19-36-2-254, Do.Davis 5-70-34. Tampa Bay, Glennon 20-23-0-231, Koenen 0-1-0-0, Rainey 0-1-0-0. RECEIVINGAtlanta, Douglas 6-134, Gonzalez 6-51, White 3-36, Jackson 2-24, D.Johnson 2-18, Vaughan 2-7, Rodgers 1-8, Toilolo 1-6, Smith 1-4. Tampa Bay, Jackson 10-165, Leonard 4-21, Rainey 2-4, Underwood 1-20, Wright 1-13, Crabtree 1-5, Lorig 1-3. MISSED FIELD GOALSTampa Bay, Lindell 55 (WR). Cardinals 27, Jaguars 14 Arizona 7 7 10 3 27 Jacksonville 14 0 0 0 14 First Quarter JaxNoble 62 pass from Henne (Scobee kick), 12:53. AriFitzgerald 14 pass from Palmer (Feely kick), 7:50. JaxJones-Drew 1 run (Scobee kick), 5:08. Second Quarter AriMendenhall 5 run (Feely kick), 1:55. Third Quarter AriFG Feely 21, 10:36. AriFloyd 91 pass from Palmer (Feely kick), 7:29. Fourth Quarter AriFG Feely 32, 7:03. A,862. Ari Jax First downs 19 14 Total Net Yards 416 274 Rushes-yards 24-14 16-32 Passing 402 242 Punt Returns 4-22 6-48 Kickoff Returns 0-0 4-144 Interceptions Ret. 2-15 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 30-42-0 27-42-2 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-17 2-13 Punts 8-44.8 8-47.8 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 5-42 6-40 Time of Possession 35:53 24:07 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGArizona, Mendenhall 13-14, Ellington 8-3, Palmer 3-(minus 3). Jacksonville, Jones-Drew 1423, Todman 2-9. PASSINGArizona, Palmer 30-42-0-419. Jackson ville, Henne 27-42-2-255. RECEIVINGArizona, Floyd 6-193, Housler 6-70, Fitzgerald 6-61, Roberts 3-14, Mendenhall 3-13, Dray 2-18, Ellington 2-10, Ballard 1-29, Peterson 1-11. Jacksonville, Sanders 8-61, Jones-Drew 4-12, Harbor 3-32, Lewis 3-23, Brown 2-23, Shorts III 2-22, Taylor 2-20, Noble 1-62, Taufoou 1-5, Tod man 1-(minus 5). MISSED FIELD GOALSJacksonville, Scobee 60 (WL). Bengals41, Browns 20 Cleveland 13 0 7 0 20 Cincinnati 0 31 0 10 41 First Quarter CleFG Cundiff 20, 4:10. CleFG Cundiff 28, 3:04. CleHaden 29 interception return (Cundiff kick), 2:19. Second Quarter CinGresham 25 pass from Dalton (Nugent kick), 14:52. CinSanu 6 pass from Dalton (Nugent kick), 11:49. CinDye 24 blocked punt return (Nugent kick), 4:35. CinBurct 13 fumble return (Nugent kick), 2:45. CinFG Nugent 41, :01. Third Quarter CleGordon 74 pass from Campbell (Cundiff kick), 9:29. Fourth Quarter CinAl.Smith 2 pass from Dalton (Nugent kick), 11:50. CinFG Nugent 38, 8:04. A,856. Cle Cin First downs 15 10 Total Net Yards 330 224 Rushes-yards 19-102 31-106 Passing 228 118 Punt Returns 3-25 3-39 Kickoff Returns 3-42 0-0 Interceptions Ret. 2-44 3-16 Comp-Att-Int 27-56-3 14-28-2 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-20 0-0 Punts 7-33.0 9-45.3 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 0-0 Penalties-Yards 5-40 8-64 Time of Possession 32:24 27:36 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGCleveland, Ogbonnaya 8-69, Whittaker 4-20, McGahee 6-13, Edwards 1-0. Cincinnati, Green-Ellis 16-62, Bernard 10-45, Dalton 4-0, M. Jones 1-(minus 1). PASSINGCleveland, Campbell 27-56-3-248. Cincin nati, Dalton 13-27-2-93, Sanu 1-1-0-25. RECEIVINGCleveland, Ogbonnaya 6-30, Cameron 6-29, Gordon 5-125, Whittaker 5-41, McGahee 2-4, Barnidge 1-12, Little 1-4, Bess 1-3. Cincinnati, Ber nard 4-41, Gresham 2-27, Sanu 2-11, Green 2-7, Ei fert 1-15, M.Jones 1-9, Hawkins 1-6, Al.Smith 1-2. MISSED FIELD GOALSNone. Raiders 28, Texans 23 Oakland 14 0 14 0 28 Houston 0 17 0 6 23 First Quarter OakD.Moore 5 pass from McGloin (Janikowski kick), 9:26. OakStreater 16 pass from McGloin (Janikowski kick), 3:45. Second Quarter HouGraham 42 pass from Keenum (Bullock kick), 11:52. HouMartin 87 punt return (Bullock kick), 2:54. HouFG Bullock 51, :40. Third Quarter OakRivera 26 pass from McGloin (Janikowski kick), 8:13. OakJennings 80 run (Janikowski kick), 2:26. Fourth Quarter HouFG Bullock 26, 12:13. HouFG Bullock 30, 8:02. A,726. Oak Hou First downs 12 14 Total Net Yards 341 394 Rushes-yards 31-165 21-90 Passing 176 304 Punt Returns 4-30 7-125 Kickoff Returns 3-77 3-65 Interceptions Ret. 1-0 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 18-32-0 25-49-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-21 2-21 Punts 11-49.1 9-49.1 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 3-1 Penalties-Yards 8-77 9-50 Time of Possession 31:31 28:29 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGOakland, Jennings 22-150, Streater 1-8, Reece 4-6, Ford 1-4, McGloin 3-(minus 3). Houston, Tate 19-88, D.Johnson 2-2. PASSINGOakland, McGloin 18-32-0-197. Houston, Keenum 13-24-1-170, Schaub 12-25-0-155. RECEIVINGOakland, Streater 6-84, Rivera 5-54, Reece 2-17, D.Moore 2-11, Jennings 2-(minus 2), Holmes 1-33. Houston, A.Johnson 10-116, Gra ham 7-136, Tate 4-29, Martin 2-32, Hopkins 1-7, Posey 1-5. MISSED FIELD GOALSOakland, Janikowski 54 (WL). Steelers 37, Lions 27 Detroit 0 27 0 0 27 Pittsburgh 14 6 3 14 37 First Quarter PitA.Brown 34 pass from Roethlisberger (Suisham kick), 6:20. PitA.Brown 47 pass from Roethlisberger (Suisham kick), 3:58. Second Quarter DetFG Akers 35, 14:05. PitFG Suisham 25, 10:31. DetJohnson 79 pass from Stafford (Akers kick), 10:13. PitFG Suisham 34, 7:19. DetJohnson 19 pass from Stafford (Akers kick), 3:52. DetBell 2 run (Akers kick), 1:42. DetFG Akers 19, :04. Third Quarter PitFG Suisham 21, 5:14. Fourth Quarter PitW.Johnson 1 pass from Roethlisberger (Su isham kick), 4:46. PitCotchery 20 pass from Roethlisberger (Suisham kick), 2:29. A,905. Det Pit First downs 21 24 Total Net Yards 451 398 Rushes-yards 25-107 27-40 Passing 344 358 Punt Returns 4-17 2-17 Kickoff Returns 4-92 1-21 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-27 Comp-Att-Int 19-46-1 29-45-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-18 1-9 Punts 3-50.7 5-43.8 Fumbles-Lost 2-2 0-0 Penalties-Yards 8-45 4-23 Time of Possession 27:44 32:16 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGDetroit, Bell 9-49, Bush 12-31, Stafford 3-24, Martin 1-3. Pittsburgh, Bell 18-36, Roeth lisberger 6-12, Dwyer 1-0, F.Jones 1-0, A.Brown 1-(minus 8). PASSINGDetroit, Stafford 19-46-1-362. Pittsburgh, Roethlisberger 29-45-0-367. RECEIVINGDetroit, Johnson 6-179, Bell 3-48, Durham 3-42, Pettigrew 3-37, Bush 2-23, Ross 1-19, Fauria 1-14. Pittsburgh, Miller 8-67, A.Brown 7-147, Bell 4-52, Cotchery 3-48, Wheaton 3-38, Dw yer 2-12, Sanders 1-2, W.Johnson 1-1. MISSED FIELD GOALSNone. Bears 23, Ravens 20 Baltimore 10 7 0 3 0 20 Chicago 0 13 0 7 3 23 First Quarter BalRice 1 run (Tucker kick), 9:58. BalFG Tucker 52, 4:51. Second Quarter ChiFG Gould 20, 8:50. ChiBass 24 interception return (Gould kick), 8:38. BalT.Smith 5 pass from Flacco (Tucker kick), 4:08. ChiFG Gould 46, :00. Fourth Quarter ChiForte 14 pass from McCown (Gould kick), 10:33. BalFG Tucker 21, :03. Overtime ChiFG Gould 38, 8:41. A,367. Bal Chi First downs 23 18 Total Net Yards 317 319 Rushes-yards 41-174 26-104 Passing 143 215 Punt Returns 2-7 1-0 Kickoff Returns 4-47 3-32 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 2-24 Comp-Att-Int 17-31-2 19-31-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-19 2-1 Punts 4-44.3 6-38.7 Fumbles-Lost 2-0 2-0 Penalties-Yards 5-46 13-111 Time of Possession 35:41 30:38 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGBaltimore, Rice 25-131, Flacco 4-20, Pierce 10-18, J.Jones 1-4, Leach 1-1. Chicago, Forte 18-83, Jeffery 3-17, Bush 3-5, McCown 2-(minus 1). PASSINGBaltimore, Flacco 17-31-2-162. Chicago, McCown 19-31-0-216. RECEIVINGBaltimore, T.Smith 5-32, Doss 3-37, Rice 3-17, Clark 2-31, J.Jones 2-18, Dickson 1-16, Thompson 1-11. Chicago, Jeffery 7-83, Forte 5-42, Marshall 4-42, M.Bennett 2-48, E.Bennett 1-1. MISSED FIELD GOALSNone. Dolphins 20, Chargers 16 San Diego 7 3 3 3 16 Miami 3 7 7 3 20 First Quarter MiaFG Sturgis 22, 9:13. SDGates 5 pass from Rivers (Novak kick), :18. Second Quarter MiaDan.Thomas 1 run (Sturgis kick), 9:43. SDFG Novak 27, :54. Third Quarter MiaClay 39 pass from Tannehill (Sturgis kick), 7:43. SDFG Novak 50, 4:00. Fourth Quarter SDFG Novak 29, 14:52. MiaFG Sturgis 37, 8:34. A,256. SD Mia First downs 22 21 Total Net Yards 435 343 Rushes-yards 26-154 19-104 Passing 281 239 Punt Returns 3-46 0-0 Kickoff Returns 2-43 2-48 Interceptions Ret. 1-0 1-8 Comp-Att-Int 22-34-1 22-35-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-17 4-29 Punts 4-43.5 4-52.3 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 10-76 3-15 Time of Possession 31:24 28:36 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGSan Diego, Mathews 19-127, Woodhead 5-21, Rivers 2-6. Miami, Dan.Thomas 10-57, Tanne hill 4-21, Miller 4-17, Thigpen 1-9. PASSINGSan Diego, Rivers 22-34-1-298. Miami, Tannehill 22-35-1-268. RECEIVINGSan Diego, Green 4-81, Gates 4-52, Al len 3-45, Ajirotutu 2-38, Royal 2-20, V.Brown 2-17, Mathews 2-16, Woodhead 2-16, Phillips 1-13. Mi ami, Clay 6-90, Hartline 5-65, Matthews 4-52, Wal lace 4-39, Miller 2-20, Dan.Thomas 1-2. MISSED FIELD GOALSNone. Giants 27, Packers 13 Green Bay 0 6 0 7 13 N.Y. Giants 7 3 10 7 27 First Quarter NYGRandle 26 pass from Manning (J.Brown kick), 5:34. Second Quarter NYGFG J.Brown 40, 14:03. GBFG Crosby 24, 10:21. GBFG Crosby 57, :00. Third Quarter NYGFG J.Brown 28, 10:06. NYGJacobs 1 run (J.Brown kick), :25. Fourth Quarter GBLacy 4 run (Crosby kick), 12:43. NYGPierre-Paul 24 interception return (J.Brown kick), 10:49. A,114. GB NYG First downs 16 19 Total Net Yards 394 334 Rushes-yards 20-55 24-78 Passing 339 256 Punt Returns 3-34 1-32 Kickoff Returns 3-69 2-35 Interceptions Ret. 1-10 3-34 Comp-Att-Int 24-34-3 25-35-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 0-0 4-23 Punts 4-45.0 5-53.0 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 5-38 3-30 Time of Possession 24:46 35:14 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGGreen Bay, Lacy 14-27, Kuhn 1-12, Tolzien 2-11, Jennings 1-6, Starks 2-(minus 1). N.Y. Giants, A.Brown 18-66, Jacobs 5-9, Manning 1-3. PASSINGGreen Bay, Tolzien 24-34-3-339. N.Y. Gi ants, Manning 25-35-1-279. RECEIVINGGreen Bay, Nelson 8-117, Boykin 6-91, Kuhn 3-11, J.Jones 2-55, Lacy 2-21, Quarless 2-18, Bostick 1-26. N.Y. Giants, Cruz 8-110, Nicks 4-50, Randle 3-37, Myers 3-32, A.Brown 3-27, Jernigan 2-21, Conner 2-2. MISSED FIELD GOALSNone. Seahawks 41, Vikings 20 Minnesota 3 10 0 7 20 Seattle 10 14 0 17 41 First Quarter SeaFG Hauschka 50, 11:25. MinFG Walsh 32, 4:40. SeaLynch 4 run (Hauschka kick), :00. Second Quarter MinWright 38 pass from Ponder (Walsh kick), 11:28. SeaLynch 1 run (Hauschka kick), 6:26. MinFG Walsh 45, :48. SeaBaldwin 19 pass from Wilson (Hauschka kick), :10. Fourth Quarter SeaLynch 6 pass from Wilson (Hauschka kick), 13:14. SeaThurmond 29 interception return (Hauschka kick), 12:30. SeaFG Hauschka 26, 10:12. MinWright 21 pass from Cassel (Walsh kick), 2:18. A,235. Min Sea First downs 19 16 Total Net Yards 336 323 Rushes-yards 33-132 28-93 Passing 204 230 Punt Returns 0-0 3-17 Kickoff Returns 5-117 5-100 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 3-41 Comp-Att-Int 18-35-3 14-21-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-3 1-6 Punts 3-42.3 5-41.6 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 1-0 Penalties-Yards 4-20 7-96 Time of Possession 34:09 25:51 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGMinnesota, Gerhart 7-67, Peterson 2165, Ponder 5-0. Seattle, Lynch 17-54, Turbin 7-17, Wilson 2-14, Michael 1-9, Jackson 1-(minus 1). PASSINGMinnesota, Ponder 13-22-2-129, Cassel 5-13-1-78. Seattle, Wilson 13-18-0-230, Jackson 1-3-0-6. RECEIVINGMinnesota, Carlson 5-69, Wright 3-69, Patterson 3-28, Felton 2-13, Jo.Webb 2-9, Ford 1-11, Gerhart 1-7, Simpson 1-1. Seattle, Miller 4-69, Baldwin 2-63, Lynch 2-9, Lockette 1-27, Tate 1-26, Harvin 1-17, Turbin 1-12, Willson 1-7, Rob inson 1-6. MISSED FIELD GOALSNone. Saints 23, 49ers 20 Eds:Fixed time of score on Dawson FG in 4th quarter San Francisco 0 10 7 3 20 New Orleans 7 7 0 9 23 First Quarter NOHill 3 pass from Brees (Hartley kick), :44. Second Quarter SFBoldin 11 pass from Kaepernick (Dawson kick), 10:16. SFFG Dawson 55, 3:34. NOCollins 1 run (Hartley kick), 1:58. Third Quarter SFV.Davis 17 pass from Kaepernick (Dawson kick), 10:52. Fourth Quarter SFFG Dawson 29, 13:23. NOFG Hartley 21, 7:50. NOFG Hartley 42, 2:06. NOFG Hartley 31, :00. A,025. SF NO First downs 12 23 Total Net Yards 196 387 Rushes-yards 22-81 23-92 Passing 115 295 Punt Returns 2-23 3-5 Kickoff Returns 0-0 1-82 Interceptions Ret. 1-22 1-43 Comp-Att-Int 17-31-1 30-43-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-12 1-10 Punts 7-49.4 3-51.3 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 3-2 Penalties-Yards 5-45 4-48 Time of Possession 25:21 34:39 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGSan Francisco, Gore 13-48, Kaepernick 3-25, James 2-7, Hunter 4-1. New Orleans, Thomas 11-49, Ingram 6-25, Sproles 3-16, Collins 2-3, Brees 1-(minus 1). PASSINGSan Francisco, Kaepernick 17-31-1-127. New Orleans, Brees 30-43-1-305. RECEIVINGSan Francisco, Boldin 6-56, V.Davis 4-33, Gore 2-8, Miller 2-8, V.McDonald 1-10, Man ningham 1-8, James 1-4. New Orleans, Graham 6-41, Colston 5-80, Thomas 5-35, Sproles 4-19, Moore 3-23, Meachem 2-78, Stills 1-11, Toon 1-8, Ingram 1-4, Collins 1-3, Hill 1-3. MISSED FIELD GOALSNone. STEVEN WINE AP Sports Writer MIAMI GARDENS The Miami Dolphins ended a dismal week with something to celebrate. Miami held San Diego without a touchdown over the nal three quar ters, and Brent Grimes broke up Phil ip Rivers nal pass in the end zone as time expired, giving the embat tled Dolphins a 20-16 win Sunday. Ryan Tannehill threw for 268 yards, including a 39-yard score to Charles Clay, who broke two tackles on the play. Miami managed 104 yards rushing behind a makeshift line. The victory came amid a harass ment scandal that has raised ques tions about the teams locker room culture. An NFL special investigator will question players this week about what might have happened between offensive tackle Jonathan Martin and guard Richie Incognito. The Dolphins (5-5) won for only the second time in the past sev en games, and bounced back from a defeat Monday night at previous ly winless Tampa Bay. The Chargers (4-6) lost their third game in a row to further hurt their chances of an AFC wild-card berth. Trailing by four points, San Diego started from its own 17 with 1:54 left and drove to the Miami 25. On the nal play, a harried Rivers lofted a pass toward Vincent Brown in the end zone, but the 5-foot-10 Grimes leaped to swat the ball to the turf. Rivers threw for 298 yards and Ryan Mathews ran for 127, including a career-best 51-yard dash to set up a eld goal. But the Chargers had 76 yards in penalties, including two in fractions that cost them 11 points in the rst half. Miami played at home for the rst time since the scandal broke. The stands were less than two-thirds full, and an airplane banner reected the mood by calling for the ring of gen eral manager Jeff Ireland, who has long been in disfavor with fans. Because center Mike Pouncey missed the game with an illness, the Dolphins had three backups starting in the offensive line. Martin is side lined while his harassment allega tions are investigated, and Incogni to was suspended. The Dolphins gave up four sacks, increasing their season total to 41, but averaged 5.5 yards per rush to limit the Chargers time of posses sion. On the games opening drive, the Dolphins drove 76 yards with all but 2 coming through the air for a eld goal. Penalties repeatedly hurt the Chargers. Corey Liuget was agged for roughing the passer to negate a teammates fumble recovery at the Chargers 1, and two plays later the Dolphins scored a touchdown. Embattled Dolphins stop Chargers to win, 20-16

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013 JIM VERTUNO AP Sports Writer AUSTIN, Texas Four-time world cham pion Sebastian Vettel set a Formula One sin gle-season record with his eighth consecutive victory, winning the U.S. Grand Prix with yet another dominat ing drive. Starting from the pole position, Vettel got through the critical rst turn with his trademark quick start and gave the eld no chance to catch his Red Bull car. Vettel charges into next weekends season nale in Brazil with a chance to tie Michael Schumachers Formula One record of 13 victo ries in a single season. Schumacher set the mark in 2004, and also won seven straight rac es that year. Vettel also is closing on the overall Formula One record for consec utive victories of nine, set by Alberto Ascari over parts of the 1952 and seasons. Lotus Romain Gros jean of France was sec ond, his best nish this year. Vettels Red Bull team mate, Mark Webber of Australia, was third. As hes done twice be fore, Vettel spun his car through several dough nuts after the checkered ag, a move that has drawn nes from the sports governing body. Vettel hardly seemed to care, however, telling his crew over his radio, We have to remem ber these days. I love you guys. We have an incredible team spirit. Im so proud of you. I love you. Vettel later appeared to wipe away tears while standing on the podium while listening to the German national anthem. The 26-year-old Vet tel made his Formula One debut at 19 in the 2007 U.S. Grand Prix in Indianapolis and now has an American title that escaped him last year. Vettel led the 2012 race in Austin most of the way until Lewis Hamilton passed him with 14 laps to go and went on to win. Vettel had called that a frus trating result and ruth lessly dominated the eld this time. He avoided any dan ger in the treacherous rst corner that pushes the drivers up 133 feet out of the start and into a blind turn left back down the hill. Typical of his quick starts, Vettel immedi ately started putting distance between him self and the other cars. Vettel wins US Grand Prix DAVID J. PHILLIP / AP Red Bull driver Sebastian Vettel of Germany reacts after winning the Formula One U.S. Grand Prix auto race on Sunday at the Circuit of the Americas in Austin, Texas.

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Monday, November 18, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 rfntb CALL TODAY 877-265-2510 www.gingerbreadinsurance.comHome Auto Collector Car Commercial 1640 East Hwy 50 Suite B Clermont, FL 34711352-404-8990 rrfn trfb fr Contact UsAccounting rf831 E. Myers (Hwy. 50)Groveland Donna We i nhe im er, the owner of Out of the Blue H alf Moon Retrea t, h a s been servi ng L a ke County s i nce 1990 a s a M a rtia l Arts Instructor, Nutr i t i on a l, Sp i r i tu a l a nd Hol i st i c Counselor and Massa ge Ther a p i st DE-stress, rela x a nd rejuvena te w i th a ny one or co m b i n a t i ons of our s i gna ture holi st i c a nd spa trea t m ents We offer you; N a t i ve Hot Stone Thera py, Celluli te Reduct i on a nd Body Sh a p i ng wi th Pure Li ght Sl im LED Technology, Cla y Body Wra ps, Swedi sh, Deep T i ssue, Sh ia tsu, Reflexology, Detox Ly m pha t i c Dr ai n a ge, Aroma Thera py, a nd severa l di fferent types of Energy Ther a p i es I specia l i ze i n i ntegra t i on of hol i st i c thera pys for c a ncer p a t i ents Integr a t i on i s not a ltern a t i ve Integr a t i on i s co m b i n i ng Hol i st i c trea t m ents w i th st a nda rd m ed i c a l trea t m ents th a t com ple m ent ea ch other Som e of our i ntegra ted trea tments are; Vi sual i za ti on, Nutr i ti on, M assa ge, Stress Reduct i on, Detoxi fi c a ti on and Counseli ng. Out of the Blue i s loca ted i n Groveland 2 mi les south of Lake D a v i d P a rk a nd Hwy 50, 10 mi les from Hwy 50 & 27 i n Cler m ont, a nd one hour fro m The V i lla ges The retre a t i s pr i va tely loc a ted on 50 be aut i ful acres and i s also a vai l able for your workshops, meeti ngs or pr i va te get together, ple ase c all for detai ls. Co m e to m y Yo Ch i Do cla ss. I developed th i s cl a ss by co mb i n i ng my 24 ye ars of hol i st i c and martia l arts trai n i ng just for you Yo Ch i Do i s a fun mi x of core exerc i ses, yog a, stretch i ng, Chi Gong and T ae Kwon Do. Thi s one hour cl ass w i ll be held out doors All you need i s a Yog a ma t and $7 per cl ass. All a ges are welcome. No exper i ence i s necess ary C all 352-394-7388 www .outoftheblueh alf moonretrea t .co m Donna Weinheimer, LMTMassageDetox ProgramsBody ShapingHalfMoonRetreat@Gmail.com352-394-7388OutOfTheBlueHalfMoonRetreat.comMM12675 MA27125 rfntbft n407-877-6677Mattress Market of Florida rfnftbfnrfnntbttfffbttttt GERALD IMRAY AP Sports Writer JOHANNESBURG The Russian drug-testing lab for Februarys Winter Olympics in Sochi faces suspension unless it signicantly im proves the reliability of its re sults by Dec. 1. The World Anti-Doping Agency has provisionally suspended the Moscow An tidoping Center on Sunday, saying its operations must improve or a six-month ban on the facilitys accreditation will be imposed. The WADA announcement of the possible suspension comes just three months be fore the start of the Sochi Games. In its statement, WADA said the suspension will be enacted unless the cen ter demonstrates by Dec. 1 that it is preparing a quality management program to in crease condence in its op erations, and that by April 1 of 2014 the improved pro gram has been drafted, nalized, implemented and embedded. WADA is not the responsi ble medical authority for the upcoming Olympics but said it strongly suggests the In ternational Olympic Com mittee consider appropriate action to ensure the com plete integrity of all analy sis at the laboratory both in Moscow and the satellite fa cility at the Sochi Games. The IOC gave the Rus sian facility its support, say ing that it is condent that all the necessary measures will be taken and the Sochi lab will be fully functioning during the Games. The integrity of the Games-time testing program will remain unaffected by these developments, indeed it will be strengthened, an IOC statement added. WADA regularly checks that its accredited labs are working properly by sending them blind samples, sam ples meant as tests to ensure the lab is giving correct nd ings, and not false positives or false negatives. Labs deemed non-compli ant with WADAs standards can have their accreditation revoked as has happened with the Rio de Janeiro lab that had been scheduled to test samples at next years World Cup in Brazil. FIFA will instead have to y World Cup samples to the lab in Lausanne, Switzerland. The Moscow lab handled drug tests for the world track and eld championships in August and is also due to do the same for the Sochi games at its satellite facility. Should the Moscow lab have its WADA accreditation revoked, the facility in Sochi would likely not be able to operate. WADA provisionally suspends Russian doping lab

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013 BOB WIENEKE Associated Press SOUTH BEND, Ind. After watching his team lose for the rst time at home in No vember in his 14 years at the school, Notre Dame mens basketball coach Mike Brey was disappointed. If it was a team you didnt feel was going to have a good year, said Brey after the 83-70 loss to Indiana State on Sunday. Id be much more distraught. The Sycamores im proved to 2-1, handing the 21st-ranked Irish their rst loss of the season after two wins. We got beat by one heck of a basketball team today, Brey said. I think their veteran poise was better than our veteran poise. It was Indiana State imposing their will on us on both ends of the oor. The Irish were led by Eric Atkins 18 points while Jerian Grant add ed 17 and Pat Con naughton chipped in 16. No other Irish play er scored more than six points. Five Sycamores scored in double g ures, led by Justin Gants 17 points and Smiths 15. Manny Arop chipped in 13 while Jake Odum and Devonte Brown each added 10. Its a tough one, Connaughton said. Weve got to get bet ter. I think that showed today. Theyre a very good team. They beat us straight up and won both halves. This is something weve got to go back to and take with us for the rest of the season. Notre Dame shot 37 percent (28-of-58) from the oor, and commit ted 16 turnovers, many of them in the rst nine minutes of the game. Those are just so de ating for a team that historically has taken pretty good care of the ball, Brey said. Thats just deating. The Sycamores built their halftime lead thanks to a 12-0 run. Smith scored eight points during the spurt, starting it with a dunk and adding in a 3-pointer. The Irish surged ahead when Austin Burgett completed a three-point play with 15:07 remaining. Indi ana State, however, re sponded with an 18-3 run that put the Syca mores in control. NO. 19 UCONN 77, BU 60 STORRS, Conn. DeAndre Daniels scored 24 points to lead No. 19 Connecticut to a 77-60 victory over Bos ton University on Sun day in the 2K Sports Classic. Ryan Boatright added 16 points and Shabazz Napier had 12 points, 12 rebounds and six as sists for UConn (4-0), which blew a 19-point rst-half lead before pulling away again in the second half. D.J. Irving had 17 points for Boston (2-1), which had a one-point lead with 17 min utes to play. Dom Mor ris added 13 points and nine rebounds, and Maurice Watson Jr. also scored 13 for the Terri ers. Daniels, who had just 19 points in the Hus kies rst three games, was 10 of 18 from the oor against BU. Boston Universi ty hasnt won a game against a ranked team since 1959. FLORIDA ST 89, UTMARTIN 61 TALLAHASSEE Ian Miller scored 13 of his 20 points in the rst half, nishing 5 of 5 from the oor and 7 of 7 from the free-throw line, as Florida State de feated Tennessee-Mar tin 89-61 Sunday. Tennessee Martin led 12-11 with 11:31 to halftime. But Miller put Florida State ahead with a layup at 11:07 and the Seminoles (30) nished the sec ond half on a 30-9 run to pull ahead 41-23 at the half. Aaron Thom as scored 19 points and Okaro White added 17 points. DENNIS PASSA AP Sports Writer MELBOURNE, Aus tralia Adam Scott successfully defend ed his Australian Mas ters title for his second victory in two weeks, scrambling Sunday for an even-par 71 and a two-shot victo ry over Matt Kuchar at wind-swept Royal Mel bourne. Scott won the Aus tralian PGA last week in his rst event in Australia since win ning the U.S. Masters in April. LORENA OCHOA INVITATIONAL GUADALAJARA, Mexico Lexi Thomp son won the Lorena Ochoa Invitational on Sunday for her second victory in her last four starts, birdieing the nal hole to beat Stacy Lewis by a stroke. The 18-year-old Thompson made a 5-foot putt on the par5 18th, then won when Lewis missed her 5-foot try. Thompson closed with a 3-under 69 to nish at 16-under 272 at Guadalajara Coun try Club. She won the 2011 LPGA Navistar Classic at 16, and took the LPGA Malaysia last month for her second tour title. OHL CLASSIC PLAYA DEL CARMEN, Mexico Harris English won the rain-delayed OHL Classic for his second PGA Tour title, pull ing away for a fourstroke victory in a 29hole Sunday nish at Mayakoba. English closed with a 6-under 65 after com pleting the third round in the morning with a 68. He moved into contention Saturday morning in the sec ond round, matching the lowest round of his tour career with a 62. STEVE REED AP Sports Writer CHARLOTTE, N.C. Its a regular day in the Panthers locker room when offensive tack le Jordan Gross sees coach Ron Rivera walk ing by and says, Hey, Riverboat Ron. Rivera shakes his head, blushes a little and keeps on walking. Carolinas third-year coach earned the nick name after his 180-de gree turn in coach ing philosophy earlier this season one that has helped spark the Panthers ve-game win streak entering Monday nights game against the New En gland Patriots. One of the NFLs most conservative coach es in terms of going on fourth down a year ago, Rivera now rarely miss es an opportunity to keep his offense on the eld, urging them to go for it and pick up the rst down and seize momentum. The thing I real ly like is the guys have said to me they appre ciate me showing faith in who we are as a foot ball team, Rivera said. And it seems to have changed the course of the Panthers season. The nickname was born after Charlotte Observer sports writer Joseph Person dubbed him Riverboat Ron after the Panthers con verted a pair of fourth downs on their open ing drive in a win at Minnesota on Oct. 13. The Panthers went on to win 35-10. Riveras moves that day have set the tone for the Pan thers new philosophy: all or nothing. In the past ve games the Panthers have gone on fourth down six times and converted ve, three resulting in touchdowns, includ ing a 14-yard pass from Cam Newton to Greg Olsen on a play-action fake against Atlanta. Said Olsen: Going for it has shown he has condence in us as an offense. Riveras new ap proach is far different from a year ago when he went on fourth down less than any coach in the league with the ex ception of Broncos coach John Fox, the man he replaced here in 2011. Rivera said his change in philosophy came af ter he didnt go for the jugular on fourth down in Week 2 against Buf falo, instead settling for a eld goal and a sixpoint lead. The Bills then drove 80 yards in the nal 1:39 with out any timeouts to beat the Panthers 24-23 on a 2-yard touchdown pass by EJ Manuel. Rivera said hes al ways played it by the book but came to real ize that, hey, there is no book. Sometimes, he said, you just have to go for touchdowns in stead of eld goals. The nickname Riv erboat Ron seemed destined to slowly fade into Panthers folk lore. But it received new life when Riveras daugh ter, Courtney, re-post ed on Instagram a pho to-shopped picture of Rivera as a riverboat gambler. Graphic artist Jim Kennedy from Ra leigh, N.C., created the online picture of Rive ra wearing dark sun glasses, a Panthers blue jacket and black cow boy hat while holding a cigar in one hand and some playing cards in the other. When told Courtney had re-posted the im age of him, the upbeat Rivera laughed and said, Oh, thats not fair now. Im going to talk to her. Rivera has said in the past he doesnt particu larly care for the mon iker. If you ask him hell tell you he prefers Calculated Risk Taker Ron. That one never caught on for some rea son. But Riverboat Ron has, particularly with the help of Riveras daughter. I love it, Gross said of the nickname. Ive been calling him that. Its funny. He loves foot ball and its been hard for him going through his rst two seasons and Im as happy for him as I am for my self or anybody else. He works hard and all of the players respect him. Gross, now in his 11th season, is one of the few who feels com fortable calling Rivera by that name. Young er players such as de fensive end Greg Hardy and Newton have shied away. Hey, you can give your boss a name (but) Im going to keep my job. So no, (its) Ron, Hardy said. Riverboat Ron has Panthers back in NFL hunt MIKE MCCARN / AP Carolina Panthers head coach Ron Rivera, right, shakes hands with Atlanta Falcons head coach Mike Smith after an NFL football game on Nov. 3 in Charlotte, N.C. The Panthers won 34-10. NFL FOOTBALL GOLF TERTIUS PICKARD / AP Adam Scott of Australia celebrates with the trophy on Sunday after winning the Australian PGA golf championship at the Royal Pines Resort, Gold Coast, Australia. COLLEGE BASKETBALL DP World Tour Championship Leading Scores Saturday At Jumeriah Golf Estates (Earth Course) Dubai, United Arab Emirates Purse: $8 million Yardage: 7,675; Par: 72 Final Henrik Stenson, Sweden 68-64-67-64 263 Ian Poulter, England 69-68-66-66 269 Victor Dubuisson, France 70-66-64-71 271 Joost Luiten, Holland 73-68-65-66 272 Rory McIlroy, Northern Ireland 71-67-68-67 273 Luke Donald, England 73-66-67-67 274 Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain 72-66-66-70 274 Peter Hanson, Sweden 70-68-70-67 275 Justin Rose, England 70-67-68-70 275 Jonas Blixt, Sweden 72-65-71-68 276 Francesco Molinari, Italy 70-68-70-69 277 Richard Sterne, France 70-70-70-68 278 Rafa Cabrera-Bello, Spain 68-71-68-71 278 Alejandro Canizares, Spain 66-67-70-75 278 Australian Masters Leading Scores Sunday At Royal Melbourne Golf Club Melbourne, Australia Purse: $1 million Yardage: 7,024; Par: 71 Final Adam Scott, Australia 67-66-66-71 270 Matt Kuchar, United States 71-66-67-68 272 Vijay Singh, Fiji 72-68-63-71 274 Nick Cullen, Australia 65-69-69-72 275 Ryan Fox, New Zealand 68-71-66-73 278 Matthew Grifn, Australia 69-65-69-75 278 Marc Leishman, Australia 71-71-72-65 279 Aron Price, Australia 73-71-67-68 279 Jason Scrivener, Australia 69-71-70-69 279 Geoff Ogilvy, Australia 71-72-67-69 279 Mathew Goggin, Australia 72-71-67-69 279 Brendon de Jonge, Zimbabwe 68-70-68-73 279 Matthew Millar, Australia 69-70-71-70 280 Gaganjeet Bhullar, India 69-72-69-70 280 Nathan Holman, Australia 68-65-70-78 281 Gareth Paddison, New Zealand 74-69-72-67 282 Peter Senior, Australia 74-68-71-69 282 Michael Hendry, New Zealand 72-69-71-70 282 Scott wins Aussie Masters for 2nd win in 2 weeks No. 21 Irish lose 1st Nov home game in 14 years JOE RAYMOND / AP Indiana State guard Manny Arop, left, drives the lane as Notre Dame guard VJ Beachem defends in the second half on Sunday in South Bend, Ind. OHL Classic Leading Scores Sunday At Mayakoba Resort (El Camaleon Golf Club) Playa del Carmen, Mexico Purse: $6 million Yardage: 6,987; Par: 71 Final Harris English (500), $1,080,000 68-62-68-65 263 Brian Stuard (300), $648,000 65-70-65-67 267 Jason Bohn (145), $312,000 67-68-65-68 268 Rory Sabbatini (145), $312,000 68-65-65-70 268 Chris Stroud (145), $312,000 66-68-66-68 268 Justin Hicks (89), $194,250 69-67-66-67 269 Charles Howell III (89), $194,250 67-67-66-69 269 Robert Karlsson, $194,250 63-67-67-72 269 Justin Leonard (89), $194,250 70-67-65-67 269 Bob Estes (73), $156,000 68-69-65-69 271 Tim Wilkinson (73), $156,000 70-63-71-67 271 Freddie Jacobson (61), $126,000 70-69-67-66 272 Will MacKenzie (61), $126,000 69-69-69-65 272 Kevin Stadler (61), $126,000 67-63-68-74 272 Peter Malnati (56), $108,000 69-69-70-65 273 Robert Allenby (52), $84,171 70-68-66-70 274 Jeff Maggert (52), $84,171 69-66-69-70 274 Jay McLuen, $84,171 67-69-69-69 274 Pat Perez (52), $84,171 66-68-71-69 274 Alvaro Quiros, $84,171 67-70-66-71 274 Brendan Steele (52), $84,171 70-66-68-70 274 Scott Brown (52), $84,171 69-66-67-72 274 Chad Collins (45), $49,350 69-67-70-69 275 Tommy Gainey (45), $49,350 71-65-68-71 275

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Second Quarter AlaVogler 18 pass from A.McCarron (C.Foster kick), :20. Third Quarter MSStSiddoway recovered fumble in end zone (So biesk kick), 10:11. AlaNorwood 11 pass from A.McCarron (C.Foster kick), 5:46. Fourth Quarter AlaFG C.Foster 35, 12:15. A,211. Ala MSSt First downs 20 10 Rushes-yards 33-196 29-53 Passing 187 144 Comp-Att-Int 18-32-2 15-29-1 Return Yards 19 38 Punts-Avg. 4-55.0 6-42.3 Fumbles-Lost 2-2 4-0 Penalties-Yards 5-41 1-5 Time of Possession 30:57 29:03 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGAlabama, Yeldon 24-160, Drake 4-28, A.McCarron 3-12, Team 2-(minus 4). Mississippi St., Perkins 10-25, J.Robinson 6-17, Williams 5-6, Russell 4-4, Shumpert 3-3, Team 1-(minus 2). PASSINGAlabama, A.McCarron 18-32-2-187. Mis sissippi St., Russell 15-24-1-144, Williams 0-5-0-0. RECEIVINGAlabama, Ch.Jones 5-37, Cooper 4-45, White 2-28, Norwood 2-23, Drake 2-9, Howard 1-21, Vogler 1-18, Yeldon 1-6. Mississippi St., M.Johnson 6-84, Lewis 4-36, Per kins 3-12, Wilson 1-13, Morrow 1-(minus 1). No. 4 BAYLOR 63, TEXAS TECH 34 Texas Tech 20 7 7 0 34 Baylor 21 14 21 7 63 First Quarter TTAmaro 6 pass from Ke.Williams (Bustin kick), 11:02. TTAmaro 20 pass from Mayeld (Bustin kick), 6:57. BayNorwood 40 pass from Petty (A.Jones kick), 6:05. TTE.Ward 5 pass from Mayeld (kick failed), 3:25. BayNorwood 58 punt return (A.Jones kick), 1:39. BayGoodley 31 pass from Petty (A.Jones kick), :04. Second Quarter BayChan 3 run (A.Jones kick), 8:18. TTGrant 3 pass from Mayeld (Bustin kick), 4:28. BayNorwood 58 pass from Petty (A.Jones kick), 3:12. Third Quarter BayPetty 6 run (A.Jones kick), 12:33. BayChan 47 run (A.Jones kick), 8:35. TTR.Davis 19 pass from Mayeld (Bustin kick), 2:45. BayPetty 1 run (A.Jones kick), :19. Fourth Quarter BayLinwood 10 run (A.Jones kick), 7:30. A,188. TT Bay First downs 24 32 Rushes-yards 34-134 57-340 Passing 320 335 Comp-Att-Int 29-54-1 17-31-0 Return Yards 6 64 Punts-Avg. 7-48.1 4-49.8 Fumbles-Lost 4-2 1-1 Penalties-Yards 8-93 12-128 Time of Possession 31:02 28:58 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGTexas Tech, Ke.Williams 8-48, May eld 13-35, S.Foster 4-27, Washington 7-25, Grant 1-2, Team 1-(minus 3). Baylor, Linwood 29-187, Chan 11-100, Russell 3-29, Webb 4-17, Petty 9-9, Team 1-(minus 2). PASSINGTexas Tech, Mayeld 28-51-1-314, Brewer 0-2-0-0, Ke.Williams 1-1-0-6. Baylor, Petty 17-31-0-335. RECEIVINGTexas Tech, E.Ward 7-82, Grant 6-72, Amaro 4-55, J.Davis 4-33, R.Davis 2-30, Ke.Williams 2-17, Mar quez 1-28, Cantrell 1-3, S.Foster 1-0, Washington 1-0. Baylor, Norwood 7-156, Goodley 4-101, Coleman 3-45, C.Fuller 2-18, Lin wood 1-15. SOUTHERN CAL 20, No. 5 STANFORD 17 Stanford 7 3 7 0 17 Southern Cal 14 3 0 3 20 First Quarter USCVainuku 1 pass from Kessler (kick failed), 8:47. StanGaffney 35 run (Ukropina kick), 6:46. USCAllen 1 run (Lee pass from Kessler), 2:34. Second Quarter USCFG Heidari 23, 9:05. StanFG Ukropina 27, :17. Third Quarter StanGaffney 18 run (Ukropina kick), 8:22. Fourth Quarter USCFG Heidari 47, :19. A,607. Stan USC First downs 18 18 Rushes-yards 35-210 27-23 Passing 127 288 Comp-Att-Int 14-25-2 25-37-0 Return Yards 0 38 Punts-Avg. 5-45.8 6-35.3 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 2-1 Penalties-Yards 6-70 4-45 Time of Possession 30:34 29:26 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGStanford, Gaffney 24-158, Hogan 4-18, Montgomery 2-14, Young 1-10, Wilkerson 3-9, Hewitt 1-1. Southern Cal, Allen 16-26, Madden 6-11, Isaac 1-2, Team 1-(minus 1), Kessler 3-(minus 15). PASSINGStanford, Hogan 14-25-2-127. South ern Cal, Kessler 25-37-0-288. RECEIVINGStanford, Montgomery 4-23, Rector 2-44, Pratt 2-21, Trojan 2-17, Cajuste 1-19, Whiteld 1-6, Hewitt 1-5, Gaffney 1-3, Lloyd 0-(minus 11). Southern Cal, Agholor 8-104, Lee 6-83, Allen 4-58, Vainuku 2-16, Grimble 2-10, Rogers 1-14, Flournoy 1-3, Madden 1-0. No. 21 ARIZONA ST. 30, OREGON ST. 17 Oregon St. 0 3 7 7 17 Arizona St. 13 7 0 10 30 First Quarter ASUGrice 1 run (Gonzalez kick), 11:57. ASUFoster 8 run (kick blocked), :32. Second Quarter ASUGrice 1 run (Gonzalez kick), 8:22. OrStFG Romaine 22, :00. Third Quarter OrStSmith 6 pass from Mannion (Romaine kick), 2:17. Fourth Quarter ASUFG Gonzalez 18, 5:25. ASUR.Nelson 23 interception return (Gonzalez kick), 5:08. OrStHamlett 29 pass from Mannion (Romaine kick), 2:41. A,386. OrSt ASU First downs 20 20 Rushes-yards 26-70 39-156 Passing 320 183 Comp-Att-Int 31-46-4 22-37-2 Return Yards 27 35 Punts-Avg. 4-39.0 5-42.2 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 0-0 Penalties-Yards 7-69 5-33 Time of Possession 32:36 27:24 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGOregon St., Woods 15-53, Cooks 2-11, Ward 7-11, Bolden 1-4, Mannion 1-(minus 9). Arizona St., Grice 24-118, Foster 4-20, R.Smith 1-15, T.Kelly 8-6, Team 2-(minus 3). PASSINGOregon St., Mannion 31-46-4-320. Ar izona St., T.Kelly 22-37-2-183. RECEIVINGOregon St., Hamlett 9-119, Cooks 9-99, Mullaney 3-43, Anderson 3-27, Gilmore 3-18, Smith 2-13, Woods 1-1, Hateld 1-0. Arizona St., Strong 7-106, R.Smith 7-26, Grice 4-13, Foster 2-12, Ozier 1-21, Coyle 1-5. No. 19 LOUISVILLE 20, HOUSTON 13 Houston 0 13 0 0 13 Louisville 7 3 10 0 20 First Quarter LouDo.Brown 13 run (Wallace kick), 6:45. Second Quarter LouFG Wallace 37, 14:11. HouFG Bullard 46, 12:12. HouFarrow 4 run (Bullard kick), 6:35. HouFG Bullard 22, :25. Third Quarter LouDo.Brown 3 run (Wallace kick), 11:09. LouFG Wallace 39, 2:55. A,027. Hou Lou First downs 13 20 Rushes-yards 29-74 41-129 Passing 121 203 Comp-Att-Int 16-35-0 19-29-0 Return Yards 2 0 Punts-Avg. 7-39.9 6-38.5 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 1-1 Penalties-Yards 3-35 6-55 Time of Possession 22:11 37:49 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGHouston, R.Jackson 13-46, Farrow 9-24, OKorn 7-4. Louisville, Do.Brown 27-137, Perry 7-17, Team 3-(minus 5), Bridgewater 4-(minus 20). PASSINGHouston, OKorn 16-35-0-121. Louisville, Bridgewater 19-29-0-203. RECEIVINGHouston, Farrow 5-13, Rodriguez 3-24, Spencer 2-23, R.Jackson 2-20, Ambles 1-28, Ward 1-7, Maxwell 1-5, Ayers 1-1. Louisville, E.Rogers 5-38, Parker 4-72, Copeland 3-31, R.Clark 3-14, Perry 2-23, Do.Brown 1-14, Hubbell 1-11. No. 11 SOUTH CAROLINA 19, FLORIDA 14 Florida 7 7 0 0 14 South Carolina 3 3 7 6 19 First Quarter SCFG Fry 25, 10:21. FlaKel.Taylor 20 run (Hardin kick), 3:03. Second Quarter SCFG Fry 45, 14:04. FlaKel.Taylor 29 run (Hardin kick), 10:51. Third Quarter SCEllington 32 pass from Shaw (Fry kick), 10:23. Fourth Quarter SCFG Fry 22, 6:43. SCFG Fry 43, 2:16. A,853. Fla SC First downs 15 15 Rushes-yards 41-200 35-164 Passing 107 213 Comp-Att-Int 10-14-1 14-28-0 Return Yards 0 13 Punts-Avg. 4-36.3 3-33.3 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 8-65 5-45 Time of Possession 31:01 28:59 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGFlorida, Kel.Taylor 21-96, M.Brown 11-51, Showers 2-31, Patton 3-11, Joyer 1-8, T.Burton 3-3. South Carolina, Carson 13-102, Davis 13-54, Ellington 1-5, Shaw 8-3. PASSINGFlorida, Mornhinweg 10-13-1-107, T.Bur ton 0-1-0-0. South Carolina, Shaw 14-28-0-213. RECEIVINGFlorida, Dunbar 3-25, Fulwood 2-6, M.Brown 1-28, T.Burton 1-24, Kel.Taylor 1-15, Ajagbe 1-5, Patton 1-4. South Carolina, Ellington 4-67, Byrd 4-55, Anderson 3-69, Roland 1-9, Jones 1-7, Davis 1-6. STEPHEN HAWKINS AP Sports Writer ARLINGTON, Tex as Baylor keeps passing tests and changing percep tions about if the high-scoring Bears are for real. A day after over coming their rst double-digit decit of the season, and turning that into yet another lopsid ed victory to stay undefeated, the Big 12-leading Bears moved up a spot to third in the new Associated Press poll Sunday. That matches the highest ranking ever. The Bears (9-0, 6-0 Big 12) jumped ahead of Ohio State (10-0), which on Saturday matched a school record with its 22nd win in a row, 60-35 over Illi nois. Two-time de fending national champion Alabama and Florida State, both 10-0, stayed in the top two spots. After a 6-0 start in 1953, Baylor was third in the AP poll for a two-week stretch before losing three of its last four games. Coach Art Briles and Baylor extend ed its school-re cord winning streak to 13 with a 63-34 victory over Tex as Tech, which had jumped ahead 14-0 in the rst 8 minutes and scored touch downs on its rst three drives Satur day night at the Dal las Cowboys stadi um. The impressive part is we took a cou ple shots, and then we dodged a bunch, next thing you knew it was a ght and we were actually in it, Briles said. As you get deeper on in, youre go ing to have more games that could very easily fall that way. How right Briles is. Baylor plays next Sat urday night at No. 11 Oklahoma State (91, 6-1), the preseason Big 12 favorite that has now won six in a row. The Cowboys are com ing off a 38-13 win at Texas (7-3, 6-1), anoth er Big 12 contender the Bears still have to play. This is a special team and I knew it from the get-go. We like these games, quar terback Bryce Petty said. Its these kinds of games that you want to ght with your broth ers and win together. While the AP me dia poll is not factored into the Bowl Champi onship Series, Baylor is expected to move up in the new BCS standings later Sunday. They were fth last week, a spot behind Stanford, now a two-loss team after a 20-17 setback at South ern California on Satur day night. Texas Tech (7-4,44) was up 14-0 on two TD catches by stand out tight end Jace Ama ro. The Red Raiders led 20-7 after an incredible one-handed 5-yard TD catch by Eric Ward. But Baylor, on pace for major college re cords with 61.2 points and 684.8 yards per game, had a 21-20 lead by the end of the rst quarter and never trailed again. And the Bears were playing without Big 12 rushing leader Lache Seastrunk, second-string running back Glasco Martin and 103-yard-agame receiver Tevin Re ese. They have account ed for a combined 24 touchdowns. I like how calm ly you mentioned their names, Briles said when asked about the missing trio. To us theyre not guys. I mean, theyre dynam ic teammates. ... With them not being there, I think we are growing as a team from an offen sive standpoint. KELLI KENNEDY Associated Press TALLAHASSEE Florida State did what coach Jimbo Fish er said the Seminoles would do: control the things they can control. Jameis Winston and second-ranked Florida State rolled over Syra cuse 59-3 on Saturday, getting a respite from the ongoing sexual as sault investigation of the redshirt freshman quarterback. But the probe re mains a dark cloud over the program. State attorney Willie Meggs has said the investiga tion will continue for a few weeks and are set ting up an interview with the alleged victim. A female student rst made the report to campus police on Dec. 7, 2012 and the case was turned over to the Tallahassee Police De partment. Prosecu tors were presented the case last week. The outcome of the in vestigation could come after the Atlantic Coast Conference champion ship game on Dec. 7 exactly one year from the date of the original report. The uncertainty of Winstons status could also affect the deci sion-making of Heisman Trophy voters with bal lots due afterward. Voters could also drop Florida State out of the top two in the polls and the BCS standings if Winston is eventually suspended. None of that is within the Seminoles control, and Fisher says Win ston and the team have not it become a distrac tion on the eld. The Seminoles (10-0, 8-0 Atlantic Coast Con ference) certainly were not distracted against the Orange. Its the same every week, Winston said. I have a great team. We have so many veterans. We use the (same) plan every single week and weve got to show up every single week. Thats how it is. Sem inole football. Winston played just two quarters Saturday and missed on two of 21 pass attempts the sec ond time he completed 90 percent of his passes this season. He threw for 277 yards and two touch downs without an in terception. He remains a Heisman front-run ner as the Seminoles led 38-0 at halftime. Florida State has now defeated opponents 59-3 in consecutive weeks and gone unde feated in ACC play for the rst time since 2000. I thought we came out very focused and, again, started very fast and got a great open ing drive, Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher said, and were able to make a couple big plays early, get control of the game and we were able to execute. Winston and the of fense has dominat ed on the eld there have been 10 offen sive scoring drives that took less than two min utes in the last two games. But the Semi noles also have the No. 3 scoring defense in the league that allows just 11.1 points per game. Theyve given up 17 points just twice. Baylor earns highest ranking ever LOUIS DELUCA / DALLAS MORNING NEWS Baylor wide receiver Antwan Goodley (5) catches a rst quarter touchdown pass in front of Texas Tech defensive back Justis Nelson (31) on Saturday in Arlington, Texas. No. 2 Florida St. rolls, investigation continues PHIL SEARS / AP Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston (5) poses with former Florida State quarterback and Heisman Trophy winner Charlie Ward on Saturday in Tallahassee.

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Living Healthy Send your health news to features @dailycommercial.com 352-365-8208 C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013 EARLY BIRDS: Boys more likely to be born early than girls / C2 Health check www.dailycommercial.com LINDSEY TANNER Associated Press CHICAGO Identi cal twins Kelly McCarthy and Kristen Maurer have shared a lot in their lives so when one was diag nosed with breast cancer, she urged the other to get tested, too. You just do everything together, dont you, the doctor told Maurer before delivering the bad news that she, too, had the dis ease. Now the 34-year-old twins from Crown Point, Ind., are sharing a medi cal rarity: Maurer donat ed skin and fat tissue for McCarthys breast recon struction. It wasnt a question, she didnt have to ask me, said Maurer, a college en rollment counselor. Hav ing a twin is very like hav ing a child. You would do anything for them ... in a heartbeat. The rst successful or gan transplant was be tween identical twins in Boston in 1954 and in volved a kidney. Since then, identical twins have been involved in many other transplant operations, involving kid neys and other organs, bone marrow, and stem cells. But breast recon struction between iden tical twins has only been done a handful of times; Maurer and McCarthy, a nurse, are among the youngest patients. Identical twins are ideal donors because their skin, tissue and organs are per fect genetic matches, ex plained Dr. David Song, chief of plastic and re constructive surgery at the University of Chicago Medical Center. And that Identical twins share breast cancer, surgery ASSOCIATED PRESS This Nov. 11 photo shows identical twins Kristen Maurer, left, and Kelly McCarthy at Kellys mother-inlaws house in Beecher, Ill. SEE TWINS | C4 MIKE STOBBE Associated Press ATLANTA Next time you go for a checkup, dont be surprised if your doctor gets on your case about your weight. The medical profession has issued new guidelines for ghting the nations obe sity epidemic, and they urge physicians to be a lot more aggressive about helping patients drop those extra pounds. Doctors should calculate your body mass index, a weight-to-height ratio. And if you need to lose weight, they should come up with a plan and send you for coun seling. We recognize that telling patients to lose weight is not enough, said Dr. Donna Ryan, co-chair of the guide lines committee. The good news? By next year, most insurance com panies are expected to cover counseling and other obe sity treatments, following in the steps of the Medicare program, which began pay ing for one-on-one help last year. More than a third of U.S. adults are obese, and thats been the case since the mid dle of the last decade. Of cials dene someone with a BMI of 30 or higher as obese. A 5-foot-9 person would be obese at 203 pounds. Doctors are well aware that excess weight can trig ger diabetes and lead to Doctors are told to get serious about obesity TIM MUELLER / ASSOCIATED PRESS In this Nov. 12 photo, Diane LeBlanc, 50, poses for a photograph in her ofce in Baton Rouge, La. LeBlanc lost 40 pounds since joining Heads Up, a supervised weight loss assistance program, provided by the Pennington Biomedical Research Center and the Louisiana Ofce of Group Benets. SEE OBESITY | C3 LEESBURG Books are Fun fundraiser to be held at hospital The Leesburg Regional Medical Center Auxiliary will host a Books are Fun book sale fundraiser for the Auxiliary from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., from Wednesday to Friday, and 7 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday at the hospi tal west lobby, Dixie Highway. Purchases can be made by credit card, cash or payroll deduction. For information, call Korky Saunders at 352-750-2062. ATLANTA Baby illnesses tied to parents nixing newborn shot Health ofcials are reporting four Tennessee cases of a rare infant ill ness that have been linked to par ents refusing a routine shot for newborns. The four Nashville-area infants suffered brain or stomach bleeding earlier this year. Their parents had declined vitamin K shots, which have routinely been given to new borns since 1961. The shots im prove blood clotting and prevent internal bleeding. All four children were treated with vitamin K and survived. Last week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the ill nesses were the rst tied to parents opting out of the shots; reports of vitamin K deciency are rare. The CDC said the parents cited a belief that the shots werent necessary or cause leukemia. Ofcials say nei ther is true. BERLIN Drug-resistant bacteria spreading in Europe A last-line defense against dan gerous infections is becoming less effective in Europe because bacteria are increasingly resistant to drugs. The European Center for Disease Prevention and Control says coun tries in Europe are recording in creasing numbers of cases where hospital-acquired bacterial infec tions cant be treated with antibiot ics called carbapenems. The agency said in a report re leased Friday that ve southern European countries saw carbape nem-resistant bloodstream infec tions with Klebsiella pneumonia bacteria last year, compared with two countries in 2009. It also said resistant Acinetobacter species have been found in more than a quarter of all infections in eight of 18 reporting countries. ECDC Director Marc Sprenger called the ndings a very worry ing development for the treatment of diseases that for decades had been thought conquered thanks to antibiotics.

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES Save Up To... 80% OFFPharmacy Prices!Generic MedicinesCialis 20mg.24 count.....$89.95Viagra 100mg.20 count.....$65.95Actonel 35mg.12 count.....$69Flomax 4mg.90 count.....$68Nexium 40mg.90 count.....$74 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com Aching Feet?Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748 352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted NEW OFFICELOCATION LAURAN NEERGAARD Associated Press WASHINGTON Boys are slightly m ore lik ely to be born premature than girls, and they tend to fare worse, too, says a new report on the health of the worlds newborns. This is a double wham my for boys, said Dr. Joy Lawn of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Med icine, who led the team of researchers. Its a pattern that hap pens all over the world. The gender difference isnt large: About 55 per cent of preterm births in 2010 were male, the report found. Nor is it clear exactly why it happens. The nding comes from a series of international stud ies being published Fri day that examine newborn health and prematurity. About 15 million babies worldwide are born too soon, most of them in Afri ca and parts of Asia where survival is difcult for frag ile newborns. Globally, about 1 million babies die as a direct result of preterm birth and anoth er million die of conditions for which prematurity is an added risk, the researchers calculated. Fridays report offers some of the rst estimates of how many preemie sur vivors go on to suffer cer tain disabilities, and found that where these babies are born, and how early, deter mines their risk. Overall, Lawn said about 7 percent of survivors have two of the most burden some disabilities: neurolog ic-developmental impair ment ranging from learning disabilities to cerebral pal sy, and vision loss. But the biggest risk is to the youngest preemies, those born before 28 weeks gestation. Worldwide, 52 percent of them are esti mated to have some degree of neurodevelopmental im pairment, the report found. Moreover, the risk of im pairment in middle-income countries is double that of wealthy countries like the U.S. For example, China is sav ing more preemies lives but at the cost of their vi sion, Lawn said. Middle-income countries are missing out on a lesson the U.S. learned the hard way several decades ago, that giving these tiny babies too much oxygen can trig ger a potentially blinding condition called retinopa thy of prematurity. Disability is not some thing thats inevitable. Its preventable, she said, call ing for improved quality of care including eye checks to prevent or reduce vision loss. The March of Dimes re ported this month that 11.5 percent of U.S. births now are preterm. That rate is inching down, thanks mostly to fewer ba bies being born just a few weeks early as standards for elective deliveries have tightened, but it still is high er than in similar countries. For the public, the gen der difference may be the most surprising nding of Fridays report, although Dr. Edward McCabe of the March of Dimes says pedi atric specialists have long noticed that baby boys start out a bit more vulnerable. People are curious about it. Wed like to understand why this occurs, McCabe said. One possible reason: Mothers have a higher risk of certain pregnancy com plications high blood pressure and placenta ab normalities when carry ing boys, Lawn said. And if a boy preemie and a girl preemie are born at the same gestational age, the boy will be at higher risk of death or disability, she said. But the report conclud ed there is too little infor mation to quantify how big that risk is. Girls walk sooner than boys. They talk sooner than boys. They develop more quickly. Thats also true in utero, Lawn said. For a preterm baby, the difference of a few days ma turity between a boy and a girl can mean the difference between major lung com plications or not. Its not just a prematurity issue. The report found that full-term boys also are more likely than girls to experi ence other newborn health problems including birth complications. Other ndings from the studies, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and published in the jour nal Pediatric Research: In high-income coun tries the U.S., Canada, Australia and most of Eu rope more than 80 per cent of preemies both sur vive and thrive, although babies born even a little premature are more like ly than full-term babies to be rehospitalized or have learning and behavioral challenges. In low-income coun tries, preterm babies are 10 times as likely to die as those in high-income coun tries, and death is more common than surviving with a serious disability. Aside from preterm birth, other leading caus es of death and disabil ity among newborns in clude birth complications that block breat hing; severe jaundice and infections. Boys a bit more likely than girls to be born early Study: Where, how early preemies born affects long-term health but risk a bit higher for boys MARIA CHENG Associated Press LONDON A strain of bird u that scien tists thought could not infect people has shown up in a Taiwan ese woman, a nasty surprise that shows sci entists must do more to spot worrisome u strains before they ig nite a global outbreak, doctors say. On a more hope ful front, two pharma ceuticals separately re ported encouraging results from human tests of a possible vac cine against a differ ent type of bird u that has been spreading in China since rst being identied last spring, which is feared to have pandemic potential. The woman, 20, was hospitalized in May with a lung infection. After being treated with Tamiu and antibiot ics, she was released. One of her throat swabs was sent to the Taiwan Centres for Dis ease Control. Experts there identied it as the H6N1 bird u, widely circulating in chickens on the island. The patient, who was not identied, worked in a deli and had no known connection to live birds. Investiga tors couldnt gure out how she was infected. But they noted several of her close family and friends also developed u-like symptoms af ter spending time with her, though none test ed positive for H6N1. The research was pub lished online Thursday in the journal Lancet Respiratory Medicine. Since the H5N1 bird u strain rst broke out in southern China in 1996, public health of cials have been ner vously monitoring its progress it has so far killed more than 600 people, mostly in Asia. Several other bird u strains, including H7N9, which was rst identied in China in April, have also caused concern but none has so far mutated into a form able to spread easily among people. The question again is what would it take for these viruses to evolve into a pandemic strain? wrote Marion Koopmans, a virologist at the National Insti tute for Public Health and the Environment in the Netherlands, in a commentary accom panying the new re port. She said it was worry ing that scientists had no early warning sig nals that such new bird us could be a problem until humans fell ill. Scientists often moni tor birds to see which viruses are killing them, in an attempt to guess which u strains might be troublesome for humans but nei ther H6N1 nor H7N9 make birds very sick. Bird flu strain infects human for 1st time ASSOCIATED PRESS In this April 11 le photo, a chicken is kept in a cage waiting to be inspected by health workers in Hong Kong. In May, a Taiwanese woman caught a new strain of bird u scientists previously thought was incapable of infecting humans.

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Monday, November 18, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 905 E. Alfred Street Tavares, FL 32778 352.343.3006 AirWay has over 80 Years of Combined Experience in the Home Health Industry. Our Lift & Recline Chairs make great gifts that are custom made to your specifications.Please contact us to see if you qualify under Medicare Guidelines. Hearing WorksChange your life. Call us today at (888) 403-27798602 S.W. Hwy 200, Suite E Ocala, FL 3448110601 US Hwy 441, Suite E-1 Leesburg, FL 347882721 S. Woodland Blvd Deland, FL 327201216 Mt. Homer Rd. Eustis, FL 32726 10935 SE 177 Pl, Suite 203 Summerfield, FL 34491Better Hearing... Better Living!!!www.hearingworksflorida.com heart disease and oth er health prob lems. Yet surveys have shown that only about a third of obese patients recall their doctor talking to them about their BMI or counseling them about weight loss. The guidelines were released this week by a group of medical orga nizations that include the American Heart Association, the Amer ican College of Cardi ology and the Obesity Society. They come amid a spate of important developments in the ght against obesity. Last year, the Food and Drug Adminis tration approved two more obesity-ghting drugs. And this year, the AMA labeled obe sity a disease, a mea sure intended to get doctors to pay more attention to the prob lem and prod more in surers to pay for treat ments. Yet many people have been on their own when it comes to slimming down, left to sift through the myr iad diets and exercise schemes that are pro moted for weight loss. And most doctors have little training in how to help their obese pa tients, other than tell ing them its a prob lem and they need to do something about it. I feel for these guys, said Dr. Tim Church, a researcher at Louisiana State Uni versitys Pennington Biomedical Research Center. They have patients who come in and ask them about the latest fad diet. Theyre not trained in this stuff and theyre not comfortable rec ommending particu lar diets or weight-loss plans. The guidelines ad vise doctors to: At least once year, calculate patients BMI, measure their waists and tell them if they are overweight or obese. Develop a weightloss plan that includes exercise and moderate calorie-cutting. Consider recom mending weight-loss surgery for patients with a BMI of 40 or for those with a BMI of 35 who also have two oth er risk factors for heart disease such as diabe tes or high blood pres sure. Refer over weight and obese pa tients who are head ed for heart problems to weight-loss pro grams. Specically, discuss enrolling them in at least 14 face-toface counseling ses sions over six months with a registered dieti tian, psychologist or other professional wi th training in weight man agement. Web or phone-based counseling sessions are considered a less effective option. Diane LeBlanc said the new guidelines are overdue. More than year ago, the Baton Rouge, La., woman sat down with her longtime fami ly doctor to talk about her weight and get a referral for some kind of help. She had tried dieting without suc cess for more than a decade, had high blood pressure and was about to hit a dress size of 20. She said the doctor smiled and told her: Theres a lot of pro grams out there. But really, you just have to eat less. It just devastated me, LeBlanc recalled. He was saying, Its all in your mind. I was thinking, If I could do that, dont you think I would have done it by now? She changed doctors and has lost 40 pounds from her 5-foot-4 frame since May af ter getting into an in tensive Pennington weight-loss program that includes counsel ing sessions. Doctors need to get the message, LeB lanc said. Just telling someone you need to push the plate away is not going to work for everyone. OBESITY FROM PAGE C1 KIMBERLY HEFLING Associated Press WASHINGTON The deaths of two girls in Illinois and Virginia from severe food aller gies have helped spur efforts to get schools to stockpile emergency medications that can save lives. That effort has now reached the high est level: President Barack Obamas desk. The president signed a bipartisan bill on Wednesday that of fers a nancial incen tive to states if schools stockpile epinephrine, considered the rstline treatment for peo ple with severe aller gies. The medication is administered by injec tion, through preload ed EpiPens or similar devices. This is something that will save childrens lives, Obama said, adding that his daugh ter Malia has a peanut allergy. Several states have passed or are consid ering bills that also aim to stock epinephrine in schools, primarily in nurses ofces. And late last month, the Cen ters for Disease Con trol and Prevention is sued its rst guidelines to schools on how to protect kids with food allergies. The guide lines, which are volun tary, ask schools to take steps to restrict com mon foods that cause allergic reactions and to make epinephrine available. Everything is mov ing in the direction which adheres to our mission, which is to keep kids safe and in cluded in schools, said John Lehr, the chief ex ecutive ofcer of the Food Allergy Research and Education advoca cy organization. Epinephrine can be used for severe aller gic reactions called anaphylaxis to food as well as insect bites, latex and medication. Policies vary by school, district and state about the handling of epi nephrine and access to high allergy-risk foods. Some schools have lunch tables that are peanut-free, for exam ple. The epinephrine stockpiling is aimed primarily at children who have previously undiagnosed allergies or as a backup for those with known allergies. Most people are very accepting, but you still have those people who are very skeptical who havent seen an ana phylactic reaction and dont understand, said Sally Porter, a Samma mish, Wash., mother whose 10-year-old son has a severe peanut al lergy. She and her hus band had to call para medics to their house when their son was 1 after he broke out in hives and had oth er symptoms right af ter consuming peanut butter. I think were coming into a new time when people are going to un derstand and theyre going to get it, and its sad these children are dying who dont have to be dying, Porter said. Theres a way to save them. Just by hav ing this medicine there is so easy. A recent CDC sur vey.found that about 1 in 20 U.S. children had food allergies a 50 percent increase from the late 1990s. The deaths of Katelyn Carlson, 13, in a Chica go school in 2010 and Ammaria Johnson, 7, in a Chestereld Coun ty, Va., school in 2012 raised awareness of the dangers of food al lergies. But even be fore then, a grass-roots group of parents had lobbied school dis tricts, state leaders and Congress for help. House Democrat ic Whip Steny Hoy ers 11-year-old grand daughter, Alexa, has a severe peanut aller gy and twice had to be taken to the emergency room as a young child. The Maryland lawmak er co-sponsored the House bill along with Rep. Phil Roe, R-Tenn. We think its a very positive step in raising awareness, but I must say I think school sys tems all over the coun try are becoming better and better educated on the risks that food aller gies pose to their stu dents, Hoyer said. Children with known food allergies often have doses of epineph rine stored at school specically for them. The epinephrine stock pile is not meant to re place that. Stacey Saiontz of Chappaqua, N.Y., has lobbied the New York state Legislature for passage of a bill that re quires all teachers to be trained to recognize anaphylaxis and to ad minister epinephrine. Its for her own 6-yearold son, who has mul tiple food allergies, as well as his friends, she says. Knowing that their life would be saved, I think its wonderful be cause a lot of his friends are trying foods for the rst time at school, she said. Already, Pitts burgh-based Mylan Inc., which markets and distributes EpiP ens, said it is has dis tributed free EpiPens to more than 30,000 Food allergy awareness reaches presidents desk ASSOCIATED PRESS Examples of epinephrine pens that the Center for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines recommend that schools stock to combat food allergies are photographed in the Washington, Nov. 13.

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013 eliminates the need for anti-rejection medi cine, he said. Song performed the twins surgeries on Tuesday and both fared well. Typically, breast re construction surgery involves implants and/ or a womans own tis sue, sometimes tak en from the abdomen, thighs or buttocks. But McCarthy is among women who dont have enough ex tra tissue; plus, radia tion treatment dam aged tissue near her breasts. So Maurer of fered to be a donor. McCarthy said her sisters sacrice, just so I can feel better about myself ... is real ly humbling. With their blonde bobs, sparkling brown eyes and easy, engaging smiles, the twins are clearly mirror images of each other. Discovering breast cancer in identi cal twins isnt unusual because of their exact genetic makeup, Song said. With twins, theres also often a mirror ing effect, with breast cancer developing in the opposite breast, he said. Thats what hap pened with McCarthy and Maurer. While their mother died from colon cancer last year, there was no family history of breast cancer. McCarthy was di agnosed rst, in De cember 2011, with tri ple-negative breast cancer, a hard-to-treat form of cancer whose growth is not fueled by hormones. She was nine months pregnant and her son was born a week later. Soon after she started treatment, chemotherapy, surgery to remove her right breast, and radiation. Maurer was diag nosed with a very ear ly-stage cancer in her left breast a few months after her sister. Kelly was more up set than I was during my diagnosis, and like wise, when she was di agnosed I was a mess, Maurer said. Maurer had a dou ble mastectomy, rec ommended because her sisters cancer was so aggressive, but she didnt need chemother apy or radiation. She had reconstruc tion with implants after the birth of her second child last March. McCarthys opera tion this week involved a second mastecto my, and reconstruc tion of both breasts. Some of her own tis sue was used to fash ion one breast. At the same time, surgeons essentially performed a tummy tuck on Maurer, removing low er abdominal skin and fat tissue and trans planted it to her sister to create a second new breast. The twins have al ways been extreme ly close, sometimes speaking in unison or completing each oth ers sentences. But now, McCarthy said, I feel closer. Her tissue is over my heart. TWINS FROM PAGE C1

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Monday, November 18, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013 DEAR ABBY: My mother-inlaw tends to embrace every pitiful creature she comes into contact with. This Thanksgiving she has invited my ex-boyfriend and his wife to her home to share in the festivities. My ex was abu sive to me most of the time, and we did not end on good terms. The woman he cheat ed on me with is now his wife. My ex was sneaky and ma nipulative, and I believe his only reason for wanting to be there is to check up on me and my husband. I have ex plained this to my husband and his mother, and told them I dont feel comfortable with the situation. They both told me I am overreacting and that he was a part of my past and I have since moved on. I feel the family I love has betrayed me. The idea of my ex being involved in what should be a comfortable fam ily day has me afraid and un easy. AM I overreacting? Or is my husbands mother be ing unreasonable? DREADING THANKSGIVING DEAR DREADING THANKSGIV ING: I do not think you are overreacting. It was insensi tive of your mother-in-law to invite your abusive ex and his wife to the gathering with out first checking with you. While you may have moved on, I can see why this would not be something you would look forward to. Frankly, its surprising that your motherin-law would even know your ex let alone invite him to her home. DEAR ABBY: I have been liv ing on my own for three years. I recently moved back to my hometown and share a great apartment with my best friend from childhood. My mother has had a seri ous alcohol problem for as long as I can remember. She will be moving back to the area next month for a new job. Dad couldnt get a job transfer, so hell have to stay at their current house, which is five hours away. I love Mom, but Im very worried because I will be her closest family member loca tion-wise. Her drinking has grown progressively worse over the last few years and has been the cause of three major surgeries. If something happens while shes living on her own, I dont know what Ill do. Talking to my family is use less. It gets brushed aside be cause they dont want to deal with the pain after all these years. Do you have any sug gestions to make this transi tion easier? HEAVY-HEARTED DAUGHTER IN VIRGINIA DEAR HEAVY-HEARTED: For the sake of your sanity, you must not assume responsibil ity for your mothers drink ing problem. Before she ar rives, it would be helpful for you to attend some Al-Anon meetings or visit a chapter of Adult Children of Alcoholics World Service Organization. They can help you to main tain your emotional equilib rium as well as share expe riences that will help you to cope with her without being overwhelmed. Al-Anon should be listed in your phone directory be cause it is everywhere, or you can visit www.Al-AnonFami lyGroups.org. The website for Adult Children of Alcoholics is www.adultchildren.org. Dear Abby is written by Abi gail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was found ed by her mother, Pauline Phil lips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Comics & Diversions LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM MUTTS ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE HEATHCLIFF PEANUTS www.dailycommercial.com Turkey of an ex-boyfriend could ruin thanksgiving dinner Dear Abby JEANNE PHILLIPS

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Monday, November 18, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 SNUFFY SMITH HAGAR THE HORRIBLE BEETLE BAILEY BABY BLUES BLONDIE PHANTOM PICKLES SHOE DILBERT DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizon tal row, vertical column and ninesquare sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013

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Monday, November 18, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 r f f n r n t n b n n n nnn nnffn rntnbnnn bnnn nbn tf nn n nnnnf nntfn nnfnnn nf tf nb nnf fffb nn rtbn nbff b rffn bffnff nnnnn t r t t t t t t t t r t t r t t t t b n n f f n n n n b n b n n r n n n r b n f n n t n n n n b n n b n n n f n n rrrr rbn t rr ttr nntb n r fn r r r r r r r r t rr n nfn fnnf bfn r t rtbnbn nnnr rrrnb rbnbrnbn rbnnn nf nfn nfbfn nrn rbn nnt rrt tt tfn nnn nbf ttrr tr r rtr ttfrbn t brn b n n f f n n n n b n b n n r n n n r b n n b n n b n n r b n r b b n r n tbf ttt rnnntb nbn fn r r r r r r r rtr tttrrtt r rtr r t t r r t bnb tbffnbfnbn n rrrnb rbnbrnbn rbnnt ttrrtt r rtr rtrrtr rbnf nbbnnf nnn bnfn nnnn nbnnf nbbnnf n nn rrtrb rbnbtn t nf nn nnnnnb f t t t r t t t r t t t tnn t n f n b n b n f n n n n f b f n

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013

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Monday, November 18, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013 rf ntbtb ff r r b b b f f b r b b b f f t fnt n t b b t f f b b t t rbb nnrb bbtn b b bbbbb tbt bn bbbft t f n f b t n r b t b t n b b f f r fb f b r b r r b b f t r b b b b b t t b b b b r b b f t f f f f b r n b t t b b t b b b n fb r b b t b r f f n f f f bbttbf bt bnb bbbbf bt t t b f f f tbrrn bntbn nbntbtn tb r b f f nb bt b nb t f f f b b r t n b t r b n t b b b n b b b b f b b r t b n t b b t b b n t b t r b n b n b b f b b t t bttb b n b n r r b t b trf bbtrb bbbnt brrbtbt bb f f f f t b b b n b b b f f b rb b f f f n rbrr ttr rb brrfb r b b f f nbtrr btn btbbrb b f f rbbbb bb b b t b b f f n r b b b t b b f b b b r f b f f f f f f f t b f f f b b r r b t f bf rbb t f f f bbbnbn b b b n n b b b b b r b t b r t t b b r b b b b b b b r b b b t t b b b r b b n b n t b t b b b b b r b f f f t b r b b r b t r b nb brf brfb btnf bbnb brbrbbtt brbbtf br b bbb n b rbr bbf brf rbnb rbnbbnbn bnb rbn bb b rbb bbtbt bbbtf bbtb btbbbr bbtb b b b t t n b b b b b t b r b f r b b f f f b f r f f rr b n n t f f t b b f f f r n n b n t b r r f f r b b t b r r b b r r b f f t n f f b f b brt b t f f t n b f f n b t b b r f f f n b r b b b f f r bbrt rt rb b b t b n f f f b n t b r b b b b r f f b b b b b n b r r n n b b b b b b b b b r t b t b b t b b b t b t b b n t t b b b b b n t b t r b b t b b t t b b b t b b r t r b t b b b b b t b t b t b t t b b n b t t r b b b r t b b b b r t b n r t b n b b b b n b b n b b b r r t b r t b b r f n b f b b b f n r r b b b t b b r b t b t b t r b b t b t t f b b f f n f r b r bt r bbbtbn nbbt rbbtttbb bttr bbb bff n bbbf btbtrrf brbt btfn bf bbn btbbb rbbbbtf bbbbbbbbt btbbrbtf bbtrbtf rbbtbbb bbbb bbtbrbtbb bbbbb bbbtbf btbbbbtf brf bbbtbbtbf b fbbbb bbbnbbn nbnnr ffntff trrtrbtbf btfb bbttnf tbbb bbrbtf nbbbbntbbrbbrn rnnb bfbtfrf rrbbn tbbrt bbbbbrbb bbtb bbbbtbtb rbbb bbbbtb tbbn btt n nt

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Monday, November 18, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL D5 rfrfntrf btrtrtf bbb bfnrf fffnrf b bfnrftrrr fnftrrrr f ffntrtt ffnbtrrr rfbbf nrftr n r b b t r t fb fntrftrrtt rfnftrtttt bf bfnrftrrt trbf fnrbtr tbf fnrftrttrrt bb fb bbbfnrftrr rf ntbf bffnrf tr bfnf tr fbbb ffnb trtr b b f b n t r f t r t r bfnrftrtt b fnrf rf b bfnf btrt trf nrftr t tfnrftr bfbftr rfnfb trt b fnftrt rb fnrftrr fb nrnr bbntrf trtr b f n t r f r bfntf trt tbbfnrf btrt bb fnrftrrr bfbfn f btfr nrfbtrtt bb bfnftrttt bb ftfrbfnrttr bfntrtt f fnftrtt fbft fnrt bff nftrt bfnrf trttr ffnb bb tfnrf f fnbtrtrr bnf tr bf bff fftbtftrf fb f b b f b b b b b f b t r t b b r f b f t bf bfnrfbbfrrt frf ffnftrtttt ff r bfbfnrftr fnfb tr bf nftrrtt bb ffnrfttr b bfnrftrrrrrf r fr fffntf btrt n ffnrbtrrrt rbf nfbfttt tbf nrfbtrtr rr fnrftrtr rrbfnff bt bnrb trtrr bb nrbtrr t ff nftrtt bf fnrbtrtrtr bbf fnrftrr rfb fnrftrr b bfntrtrr bf nbtrrrtt bbfntr t b bnftrt bfffnt btrrrr b fff ffnftt ff bffnrfb ttrbb b fnrftrtrr bf nftr bttff fnrrr bbf nftrtr ffnrftrt fnrbtrtrr rff nftr ff b b b n b b b b b t r t ff bb ffntrt b ntr b fnrfbtrtr bbtf fnbtrr rb bfnrff bfnft b fnfbtrt ffnrfb tr bbf fnbttr bfnf trr b bfntbtrrt bb fnrbtr bbf bbfnrftrtrt b b b f b b b b f b f b f b n r f f b fnrftt fb fnftrr bbfnrf btrt r b fnrbtrt fnfb rtrr rt bfntrr b fbfnrftrttr bbff fnf b b f n r b t r r r r bbb fnrftrr b b b b n r b t r t r t t f r f r r b fnrftrrrrt f f n r f b t r t r t bttr bbfnrftrttr bfnr btrtt b bbb bntrf f fnrftrr bb fnftr bff nftrttr tb bfnftrtt bfnrf trt ffnftr rfb bfnrf btr ffnrtrtt bfb bfnftrrtr bbf nftrtbf bb fnfr ffrbf nbtrt b b b b b b f b b b b f f b f b t r r b b b f rtf bfnrftt bb nftrtr bf bbnft tb ffnfrr b fnrb trttrr bf fnftr f ntrfbf btrrtt ff bfnrft ff fbb fbf bfnbf bftrrr

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D6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013 rf ntbtt r fnt ft trn bf n r fft tt tt tt t ttttf ttttf rf n tr rfnrtbrn rfnrtb rn r fn tr r f n t b t b t b b f b b n r r n b b b n b r b rf f tb tb fb r bb fb b b bfr fb b b b b b r f b bbbb fn r f f b b r b f f tb tb fb f bb b fn r tb nt f b f bb bb fbb b fb f b r b bb b b fbb b b r f b n r f n n n n f b bb fb b fnnb fbbbb b bb b b f b f bbb f bb f f b fb f b n n n n n f f b f f fn tn f f bf bfb f f bb f f b b f f b b f b f n tn r n n n n bb r r b bbb f b f r f b r fb f b f b b r b r b f bb b bbfb fb f r bbb f bfbb fr bbb fb nb bbbb b f fb r b bb r f fbbb r r f bb f f f b fbb f f bbb n n n bf b bb f f bbb b b f bb r f fbbb b r r b f b b rb bb f r b f b f bf bb f b fb nb

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Monday, November 18, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL D7 r f n t b r t t n t b n b b n r r r n n t n r r r r n n b f t n n b n r r r n b n b r r n r n n b b r r r r r t n b n r r b f n n b r fn n b r tn b n t t r t t r n n nn n n n t n t t r n t n n n n n n r t n t b n b t t r r t n n b b r n r n tn n n b n rn t r r r n t n n r tn n tn n t nt rrbn nnnntbn tnnt tbtnntbb ntnbb ntbt tbtnb bnntt nbtn tn tbntn ntbnt ntbttt nntbntb tftn nt fn n t n t b n r r r r n n nbn n b b n n n n r n rr b r r n f t r r r n t n n r n t t t n t b n b t t r t b r r n t n t t r n tn nn n n t n t f b t t r n r r r r r r r fn n r r n n b b b r r rr f n r t b b r t r r r n t n n r nn n t n nt t b n n n n r b b t n n t b n t t bn r r n n

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D8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 18, 2013 rrfntbrn rrfnt fb r fftfr bn ftt bbn f bb b nfr t t rrfntbrf rfn r f ntbrb nb nr rffnnntbnfnfnbntntnbnbnfnnn nffnbnnbffnbnfnbnnrfntb rfntb rf r nnntbtt ft nrf nff ft fn nn frfrn rn ffrn fnn ff rf nf rff n f nnf fn rf f nff rnn ff r nnf frf rnff ffr t nff ff f ft trn ff nt nn fn ff rnr fn n rnfn n f nr f rf fff nfrn rn nf fn rfn nn rnn rfntb fr ntbb r ntfnn nrbb rrf n b bt b rnb rrf n rbb n rb b b bb nnbrrbb rtnrb ntf b b r b b n n b rn bnr t bb rnrbnntbrn rbb rrntn rnbrbfrnb b b nrnb r n r n r f r n b b n n r b n n f t r r n r b brrf f rfb rb b r r r r f f t r n t n b brrf f btt rn nbb b