Daily Commercial

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Title:
Daily Commercial
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Halifax Media Group
Publisher:
Rod Dixon
Place of Publication:
Leesburg, Floirda
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All rights reserved by the source institution.
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AA00019282:00089


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r fntrbrn r rtr nrnt frtr rrt frtr rrrnrt frtr rnr Call Our Experienced Physicians For Family Medicine Podiatric/Foot Careand Chiropractic Treatment 357-8615 ~ www.lakehealthcarecenter.com 910 Mt. Homer Rd. ~ Eustis Most Insurance AcceptedServing Lake County Since 1963 ~ Founded by Dr. Jim Glisson DID YOU REMEMBER TO TURN YOUR CLOCKS BACK AN HOUR? LOCAL: City manager gets high marks from council / A3 NATION: Scientists oppose bill that would destroy wildlife / A6 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Sunday, November 3, 2013 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 137, No. 307 | 4 sections MISSED YOUR PAPER? Call 787-0600 (Lake County), or 877-702-0600 (Sumter County) NEWS TIP? Call Scott Callahan at 365-8203 INSIDE CLASSIFIED C3 COMICS INSIDE CROSSWORDS C3 DEAR ABBY E7 LEGALS C4 MONEY E1 NATION A4 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES C1 WORLD A6 TODAYS WEATHER HIGH 74 LOW 57 See A8 $1.00 KELLI KENNEDY Associated Press MIAMI Dean Grif n liked the health in surance he purchased for himself and his wife three years ago and thought hed be able to keep the plan even after the federal Affordable Care Act took effect. But the 64-year-old recently received a let ter notifying him the plan was being can celed because it didnt cover certain benets required under the law. The Grifns, who live near Philadelphia, pay $770 monthly for their soon-to-be-ter minated health care plan with a $2,500 de ductible. The cheap est plan they found on their state insurance You are canc elled Sticker shock often follows when companies terminate individual health policies ASSOCIATED PRESS Dean and Mary Lou Grifn sit their home in Chadds Ford, Pa. on Friday. SEE HEALTH | A2 GEOFF MULVIHILL and TAMI ABDOLLAH Associated Press LOS ANGELES Federal prosecu tors led charges of murder and com mission of violence at an international airport against the unemployed mo torcycle mechan ic suspected of car rying out the deadly shooting at the Los Angeles airport. If convicted, Paul Ciancia could get the death penalty. He was arrested Fri day after authorities Suspected LAX gunman charged SEE LAX | A2 LIVI STANFORD Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com T here are 330 miles of roads in Lake County that need resurfac ing. But only about $2 million in funding is available this year to spend on a tiny por tion of those roads. Lake County Pub lic Works Director Jim Stivender said the county needs $18 mil lion to treat all the roads, many of which have not been resur faced for more than 10 years. The worst ones we pave and the rest will have to wait, he said. Stivender said the roads are aging faster than the revenue com ing in to x them. Fur ther, the costs to treat roads have also risen substantially, he said. The longer the roads remain untreated, the more problematic Lake ofcials weigh options to repair local highways PHOTOS BY THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Road maintenance continues on Alfred Street in Tavares, one of several ongoing road projects the county is funding. However, county ofcials said they do not have the money to resurface all 330 miles of roads in need of repair. The county is working on a two-phase project on Old Highway 441 from Tavares to Mount Dora. The road has not been re surfaced since 1978. SEE ROADS | A2 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com Justin Plank and Chris Matier prepared extensively for their rst participation in the 14th annual Chili Cook-Off in down town Leesburg. We have 17 types of chili Mexican peppers, said Plank, an executive chef at Lake Port Square, a retirement commu nity. That is why we are called the Red Hot Chilis. The pouring rain did not stop chili enthusiasts Saturday from preparing their secret recipes, each hoping to garner the top prize at the fun-lled competition. Those competing spent all day perfecting their recipes. Many arrived as early as 6 a.m to begin preparing for the com munity event, with more than 20 taking part in the competi tion. While the cooks would not give away their secret recipe, they all agreed that fresh ingre dients, mildly spiced chili and slow cooking were all keys to a successful pot of chili. As he cooked up several pounds of ground beef, Allen Shaffer, president of the Pro fessional Fire Fighters of Lees burg, said it is critical that the chili not be too spicy. Dont make it too hot, he said. We dont use anything frozen or buy anything pre pared. The Professional Fire Fight ers of Leesburg have won the Peoples Choice Award for best chili in the past two years. Sgt. Elvin Rodriguez, of the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce, said every year the LCSO works to perfect their recipe. You want to make sure you have the right amount of veg etables and meat, he said, ex plaining everything must be in balance. You dont want too much powder or spices. Certainly, fresh produce and ingredients are vital to Amanda Cooks: Dont make your chili too hot LEESBURG No money for bad roads SEE CHILI | A2 AP A passenger gets his luggage back at Los Angeles International Airports Terminal 3 on Saturday.

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013 BEST TRAVEL SCOOTER only$699 1323 S. 14th Street (US Hwy 27) Leesburg Easy to break down only 5 pieces!Lightweight the heaviest part is only 29 lbs! HOW TO REACH US SATURDAY CASH 3 ............................................... 9-4-7 Afternoon .......................................... 7-7-7 PLAY 4 ............................................. 8-7-5-1 Afternoon ....................................... 2-8-3-0 FLORIDA LOTTERY FRIDAY FANTASY 5 ............................. 1-9-10-29-35 2 of 5 wins free ticket 3 of 5 wins $10.50 4 of 5 wins $120 5 of 5 wins $115,151.82 MEGA MONEY ....................... 4-13-31-422 With Megaball Without Megaball Powerball alone wins free ticket .............. 2 of 4 wins $4 1 of 4 w/Megalball wins $7.50 ........... 3 of 4 wins $121 2 of 4 w/Megalball wins $65 ..... 4 of 4 wins $2,417.50 3 of 4 w/Megalball wins $948.50 ...................... Rollover 4 of 4 w/Megalball wins $2 M THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $91.59 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 787-0600 in Lake County or (877) 702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Mon day through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. .............. 787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION RATES SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. SUBSCRIPTION REFUND POLICY: Subscription refunds will be calculated at the current basic subscription price, excluding the cur rent month. All refund requests must be made in writing and signed. Send to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. (In lieu of a refund, we will transfer any remaining time on a subscription to another party or make it available to students through our Newspapers in Education program.) RECYCLING: The Daily Commercial supports environmental protection through recycling. Plastic bags may be recycled at grocery stores. Newspapers may be recycled at the Commercials Leesburg ofce, 212 E. Main St., during business hours. This newspaper is printed on recycled newsprint. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 26.82 1.88 28.70 47.22 3.31 50.53 85.60 5.99 91.59 7 days a week Mail Subscription 3 months 6 months One Year Daily/Sunday 45.19 84.88 163.16 Sunday only 28.67 50.72 92.61 ROD DIXON publisher 352-365-8214 .................................. rod.dixon@dailycommercial.com BILL KOCH, assistant managing editor 352-365-8208 ................................... bill.koch@dailycommercial.com SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com PAUL RYAN visual editor 352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, school boards 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com OTHERS PAM FENNIMORE editorial assistant 352-365-8256 ............. pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com DON HUNSBERGER 352-365-8279 ........ donald.hunsberger@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD 352-365-8258 ............... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR E-mail submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. GOOD FOR YOU/ CELEBRATIONS To have your club or organizations events printed in the YourCom munity calendar listings, just email the information to pamfenni more@daily commercial.com. SUBSCRIPTION RATES NEWSROOM CONTACTS exchange was a socalled bronze plan charging a $1,275 monthly premium with deductibles to taling $12,700. It cov ers only providers in Pennsylvania, so the couple, who live near Delaware, wont be able to see doc tors theyve used for more than a decade. Were buying in surance that we will never use and cant possibly ever benet from. Were basical ly passing on a ben et to other people who are not other wise able to buy ba sic insurance, said Grifn, who is retired from running an in formation technolo gy company. The Grifns are among millions of people nationwide who buy individu al insurance policies and are receiving no tices that those pol icies are being dis continued because they dont meet the higher benet re quirements of the new law. They can buy dif ferent policies di rectly from insur ers for 2014 or sign up for plans on state insurance exchang es. While lower-in come people could see lower costs be cause of government subsidies, many in the middle class may get rude awakenings when they access the websites and realize theyll have to pay signicantly more. Those not eligible for subsidies gen erally receive more comprehensive cov erage than they had under their soon-tobe-canceled policies, but theyll have to pay a lot more. Because of the higher cost, the Grif ns are consider ing paying the fed eral penalty about $100 or 1 percent of income next year rather than buy ing health insur ance. They say they are healthy and dont typically run up large health care costs. Dean Grifn said that will be cheaper because its unlikely they will get past the nearly $13,000 de ductible for the cov erage. HEALTH FROM PAGE A1 say he barged into a terminal, pulled an AR15 semi-automatic rie from his duffel bag and opened re. The bullets killed a Transportation Security Administra tion ofcer and injur ing four others before Ciancia was gunned down by airport police. The killing was be lieved to be a premed itated act of murder in the rst-degree, U.S. Attorney Andre Birotte Jr. said in announcing the charges. Authorities believe someone dropped Ciancia off at the air port, and agents are re viewing surveillance tapes and other evi dence to piece together the sequence of events. We are really go ing to draw a picture of who this person was, his background, his history. That will help us explain why he chose to do what he did, FBI Special Agent in Charge David L. Bowdich said. LAX FROM PAGE A1 they become. It will cost the taxpay er more money to resur face at a later date, Stiv ender said. As a result, Stiv ender said there should be an additional reve nue source to resurface roads, such as as addi tional ve-cent local op tion gas tax. There are current ly only two sources of funding for roads, a local gas tax of 6 cents, where the revenue is split be tween the county and its 14 municipalities, and a 1-cent sales tax where the revenue is divid ed equally between the county, the school board and the cities. County commission ers agree that resurfac ing the roads remains a top priority, but there are differing opinions on where the addition al funding should come from. Many said a new revenue source should be looked at while others do not support any new taxes. AGING ROADS The roads in the coun ty are rated on a num bering system, with the lower the number the the more severe the roads condition. Old Highway 441 from in Tavares to Mount Dora is rated a 3 one of the roads that will be worked on in two phas es because of funding is sues. That road has not been treated since 1978, Stivender said. The county would like to work on roads rated at a 4 and 5, but doesnt have the money to resur face the 5-rated roads, Stivender said. Five-rated roads can be seen throughout the county, several in subdi visions. When you prioritize the roads, you dont have the money to do sub division roads, such as Mount Plymouth and Picciola Island subdivi sion north of Leesburg, he said. They were all built back in the 1980s. We never resurfaced those roads. The roads are porous, rough and old, Stivender said. As the roads contin ue to age, Stivender said, the cost of materials to x them continues to skyrocket. Everything has gone up in price in the last 30 years and I am still re ceiving the same (tax) on a gallon of gas, he said. From an econom ics point of view, as phalt pavement costs so much. In ve years what is it going to cost? My dollar will not stretch as far. OPTIONS In November 2011, the Capital Facilities Advi sory Committee, a group tasked with nding al ternative sources for road funding, recom mended six key pro visions to the county commission. One of the provisions included an additional ve-cent local gas tax option. The com mittees top recommen dation was to allocate money from the general fund for roads, but that is not feasible, county ofcials said. Several county com missioners agree that the aging infrastructure of roads in the county is a concern. It would be nice to have an additional fund ing source for roads, said Commissioner Jim my Conner. I think at some point and time, we need to have a con versation with the pub lic about the ve-cent gas tax option. It is much better than a proper ty tax. Tourists and peo ple that dont live in the county participate in it. Commissioner Sean Parks agreed that the lo cal ve-cent gas tax op tion, which would bring in about $3.7 million a year for the resurfacing of roads, should be ex amined more closely, particularly in aiding the countys sidewalk im provement projects. I think we have to look at it, we have no choice, he said. Cutting other depart mental funds isnt going to raise us enough mon ey. The state isnt going to help us. This is a local issue and our residents want more sidewalks. If we want to pursue this new extensive side walk plan, we are going to have to work togeth er and make some tough choices. According to the CFAC recommendations, the estimated revenue from 2014-2035 (for the vecent local option gas tax) would be $73 million for Lake County Commission Chair woman Leslie Campione is not warm to the idea of the local ve-cent gas tax option. I support renewal but do not support any new taxes, she said. Instead, Campione said more money from the countys portion of the sales tax should go to roads. There will always be repairs and maintenance and that is why prioriti zation is so important, Campione said in an email. I would like to see the countys portion largely dedicated to resurfacing existing roads and mak ing improvements that directly benet more residents on an annual basis. But time is of the es sence, ofcials say. In my position, the No. 1 issue is the 330 miles of roads that need to be resurfaced, Stiv ender said. You have to put mon ey in to repave it. A smoother ride in front of (a residents) house makes them feel better. Stivender said more money should be allo cated toward roads. The challenge is peo ple dont want to pay for something else, he said. The problem is your in frastructure is getting old and there is no mon ey out there committed to solve the problem. ROADS FROM PAGE A1 Storts chili. The facilities man agement director of Lake Medical Imaging said her team begins preparing as early as 7 a.m. Bill Wonus, vice pres ident for commer cial lending at United Southern Bank, said he participates every year in the event. It is a good, fun and family environment, he said. Wonus said his group was preparing an old family recipe and hoped to win this year. A large black pot was lled to the brim with chili at Guy Ross table. Dont stop stirring, said Ross, co-owner of Doggibags, a boutique downtown. For 14 years, Ross has taken part in the event, calling it a tradition. We want to support the downtown. Asked what is the se cret to the best chili and Ross insisted home grown vegetables and his special secret blend of spices. It is not super hot or super spicy, he said. Competition aside, Shaffer said the event is a great opportunity to connect with fellow reghters and meet new people. CHILI FROM PAGE A1 Va. man visiting for GeorgiaFlorida game drowns The Associated Press JACKSONVILLE Authorities say a Virginia man visiting Jacksonville for the Georgia-Florida football game drowned in a pond. The Jacksonville Sheriffs Ofce tells The Florida Times-Union that the 31-year-old man died Friday night after slipping into a pond. The mans name was not immediate ly released. According to the sheriffs ofce, the man was out with friends in the city late Friday. The group went to a restaurant near their hotel. It was raining when they left the restaurant, so they attempt ed to run to the hotel.

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Sunday, November 3, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LEESBURG Opera Thunder II: An encore performance Central Florida Lyric Opera will present Opera Thunder II: An Encore Performance, at 3 p.m., today at Paul P. Williams Fine Arts Auditorium, LSSC, 9501 U.S. Highway 441 and College Dr. Join Maestro Bill Doherty and the men of the opera as they also pres ent the music of Broadway, jazz and Italian masterpieces. Tickets are $30, seniors $28, and students $15. Tickets are available online at www.centraloridalyri copera.org or, for information, call 877-211-5346. BUSHNELL Florida Folk Heritage and Music Festival on Saturday Dade Battleeld Historic State Park in Bushnell will host the 1st annual Florida Folk Heritage and Music Festival from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday at the park, 7200 County Road 603. The festival will feature folk art, crafts and music, historical dem onstrations, the Ann Thomas Youth Storytelling and Writing Contest, and a Florida photography contest. Admission is $5 per vehicle with no more than eight people per car. For information, call the park at 352-793-4781. UMATILLA Marine Corps celebration scheduled for Nov. 10 All Marines, FMF Navy Corpsman, families of Marines and guests are invited to celebrate the 238th anni versary of the United States Marine Corps, from 3 to 4:30 p.m., Nov. 10, at the Olde Mill Stream RV Resort, 1000 N. Central Ave. Cost is $5. Uniform or coat and tie is pre ferred and reservations are required by calling 352-669-3141. MOUNT DORA The Rhythm Club Fire documentary at the library Filmmaker / photographer Bryan Burch of Umatilla will talk about his documentary lm, The Rhythm Club Fire that took place in Natchez, Miss., in 1940. The lm will be shown on Tuesday at the W.T. Bland Public Library, 1995 N. Donnelly St. The Rhythm Club Fire won the Best Documentary Short Film at the Orlando Film Festival. Call the library at 352-735-7180, option 5 for details. EUSTIS Quit-smoking program offered on Tuesday For those that are ready to quit to bacco, the IQuit Program will be of fered on Tuesday at the city com mission room, City Hall, from 10 a.m. to noon, 10 N. Grove St. The personalized two-hour pro gram offers participants the Tools to Quit program, and enrollment and materials are free. To register or for information, call 877-252-6094. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8208 Staff report A 74-year-old Paisley woman was arrested after she allegedly fought with police after a trafc acci dent in Eustis, according to an arrest afdavit. Beverly Jean Price, 2753 Corrine Ave., was charged with driving under the in uence, battery on a law enforcement ofce and re sisting a law enforcement ofcer without violence. She was booked into the Lake County jail and re leased later after posting a $26,000 bond. Accord ing to the afdavit, Price was involved in a trafc accident at the in tersection of Orange Av enue and Grove Street in Eustis, and a half-dozen ofcers responded to as sist with road blockage and possible injuries. One of these ofcers, Luke Summa, said that when he arrived at the scene, the 4-foot, 11-inch, Price was being restrained by three of the other ofcers. Price was resisting law enforcement by pulling away, kicking her feet at the ofces and spitting at them, Summa said. After being placed in the rear of a patrol car, Price somehow removed her handcuffs and began banging on the window, Summa said. The wom an was re-handcuffed and transported to the police station, where she con tinued to struggle aggres sively, he said. While being physical ly restrained, Price hurt her left wrist and had to be transported to Flori da Hospital Waterman, Summa said. There, the woman allegedly became violent again, thrash ing with her medical re straints and yelling vul garities, he said. The 120-pound Price was treated and released, handcuffed once again and taken to jail, the af davit stated. EUSTIS Cops fight off 74-year-old woman PRICE Staff report Umatilla City Manager Glenn A. Irby is well above exceeding the ex pectations of city council members, his latest report card shows. You are doing a good job moving the city in the right direc tion, council mem ber Peter Tarby said in his comments sec tion of the review. The board will dis cuss Irbys annual evaluation at Tues day nights city coun cil meeting. In the areas of administrative skill, scal management, personal skills and community relations, Irby re ceived an overall average score of 87.5. A score of 60 would be Meeting Expectations, a score of 75 would be Exceeding Expectations and a score of 100 would be Excellent. UMATILLA City manager gets high marks Staff report The Florida Nation al Cemetery will sponsor its annual Veterans Day ceremony at the Flori da National Cemetery on Nov. 11 with Col. Rob ert D. Crawford, United States Marines Corps Re serve (Retired), as key note speaker. Steve Jerve of WFLA TV News Channel 8 in Tampa will be the master of cer emonies. Pete Perrone, band director and mem ber of the South Sumter High School Band, will play patriotic music pri or to and during the cer emony. Patriotic songs dur ing the ceremony will be performed by Linda Bur nette, while Kevin Sulfrige will perform on the bag pipes and Gayle Williams will play Taps. The nations colors will be posted by the Florida National Guard. Ye Mys tic Air Krewe will provide a yover. Guests are invited to ar rive early and enjoy the patriotic and inspiration al musical prelude which will begin shortly before the ceremony. Seating is limited; those attend ing are encouraged to ar rive early, wear comfort able clothing and bring a lawn chair or blanket to sit upon. The ceremony begins promptly at 11 a.m. rain or shine. Organizations with colors are invited to participate in the massing BUSHNELL Veterans Day ceremony set for Nov. 11 IRBY Staff report A University of Florida student from Clermont has made the list of White House interns for the fall 2013 session. Makda Matthew was among those picked by the White House for work in one of several White House de partments, including the Domes tic Policy Council, the National Eco nomic Council, the Ofce of Cabinet Affairs, the Ofce of Chief of Staff, the Ofce of Communications, the Ofce of Digital Strategy, the Ofce of the First Lady, the Ofce of Legis lative Affairs, the Ofce of Manage ment and Administration, the Ofce of Presidential Correspondence, the Ofce of Presidential Personnel, the Clermont student gets internship at the White House SEE INTERN | A6 SEE GRADE | A6 SEE RITE | A6 PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL From left, J.P. and Greg the Mime work the congas on Saturday at the Downtown Clermont Art Festival in Clermont. The Downtown Clermont Art Festival, sponsored by the South Lake Art League, will gear up today from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. with free parking and free admission. The festival will be located on Montrose Street in historic down town Clermont, featuring a variety of ne arts and crafts. The Gatorsktch Interactive area will host a variety of hands-on ac tivities for children. The festival is an entertainment zone. After 12 p.m., festival pa trons will be able to purchase beer or wine from the local vendors and enjoy their beverage while stroll ing the festival. Rockin weekend in downtown Clermont ABOVE LEFT: Ted Jelsema and his ukelele. ABOVE RIGHT: Featured artist Pat Percy dis plays one of her artistic pieces. Entertainment Zone featured

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013 When the time comes wouldnt you prefer your loved ones celebrate your legacy rather than stress about making arrangements? Give them the relief theyll need during a tough time.Well discuss: RESERVATION REQUIRED Limited seating available. CALL NOW!First time attendees only please.Ruby Tuesdays Friday, November 8th FREE Early Bird Dinner & Informational Seminar CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) Army ~ Navy~ Air Force ~ Marines ~ Coast GuardActive Duty/Veterans Thank you for serving our country.Hamlin Hilbish Funeral Directors326 East Orange Ave., Eustis, FL 32726 352-357-4193 www.hamlinhilbish.com Paul Allen Mako Paul Allen Mako, 54, of Okahumpka, Flori da, died Thursday, Oc tober 31, 2013. He was born March 24, 1959 in Barnesville, Ohio and moved to Oka humpka, FL in 1982. He was a re tired me chan ic with the City of Lees burg. He liked motorcycles, hunting and shing and spending quali ty time with his family and friends. He is sur vived by his wife, Cin dy Mako of Okahump ka, FL; son Chad A. Mako of Okahumpka, FL; and sister, Clau dette M. Stokes of Leesburg, FL. He was predeceased by his mother, Virginia Hen drix. A Memorial Ser vice will be held at Beyers Funeral Home Chapel, Leesburg on Saturday, Novem ber 9, 2013 at 2.00 PM with Chaplain Wendy Coats ofciating. On line condolences may be left at www.beyers funeralhome.com Ar rangements entrust ed to Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg, FL. Stephen P. Kupferberg Stephen P. Kupfer berg, 69, Leesburg, FL went to be with the Lord on October 29, 2013 at Leesburg Re gional Medical Cen ter, Leesburg, FL. Mr. Kupferberg was born on October 4, 1944 in Brooklyn, New York to his parents Lazarus Lee Kupferberg and Beatrice (Silverman) Kupferberg. He gradu ated from Northern Il linois University with his Bachelors Degree in 1966 and received his Masters Degree from the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island in 1997. Mr. Kupferberg was a former Systems En gineer in the Defense Industry and had worked for the Na tional Imagery Map ping Agency and as a Contractor for S.A.I.C. in Washington, D.C. He was a longtime volunteer with the Boy Scouts of America. He and his wife moved to Leesburg, FL 3 years ago from Middle town, Maryland and were members of The Church of the Trans guration in Brad dock Heights, MD and St. James Episcopal Church of Leesburg. Mr. Kupferberg was the Commander of the Harris Chain Sail and Power Squadron, Vice Commander of the Legacy Neighborhood Watch and was a vol unteer for the Ameri can Red Cross where he was an instructor in both Maryland and Florida. He is survived by his loving wife of 43 years: Ann D. Kupfer berg of Leesburg, FL; a son: Andrew Stephen Kupferberg of Tam pa, FL; two sisters: Jill Kupferberg Cap padoro and Jody Lee Kupferberg both of Tampa, FL; a brother: Robert Bob Kehne of Maryland; many lov ing nieces and neph ews. Mr. Kupferberg was preceded in death by his parents, a step mother Dorothea Stal ey Kehne Kupferberg, a daughter Melissa Ann Kupferberg and a brother Jeffrey Kehne. A Funeral Mass will be held on Saturday, November 9, 2013 at 2:00PM at St. James Episcopal Church in Leesburg, FL. In Lieu of owers the family requests donations be made to Houndhaven a safe haven for dogs at P.O. Box 185 Min neola, FL 34755 or The American Red Cross in his loving memory. Online condolences may be left by visiting www.pagetheusfuner alhome.com. Servic es entrusted to PageTheus Funeral Home Chapel, Leesburg, FL. Frances Ann Wood Frances Ann Wood (Proctor) Frankie 61 of Umatilla, Florida passed away peaceful ly at home on October 31st from aggressive breast cancer which metastases to the liv er, bones, and nal ly the brain. The visi tation will be held on Tuesday, November 5th from 5:00pm to 7:00pm at Beyers Fu neral Home in Umatil la. The funeral service will be held on No vember 6th at 10:30am at Grand Island Bap tist Church in Grand Island. Pastor Don Feezor will be ofci ating. Burial will fol low the funeral at Pine Forest Cemetery, Mt. Dora, Florida. Frankie was born in Lees burg, FL. She graduat ed from Mount Dora Christian Bible School and continued her ed ucation in the Univer sity of Life. Frankie worked as an Ofce Oper ations Ana lyst for Ford Motor Com pany and retired after 31 years of dedicated ser vice in 2007. Frankie is survived by husband: Tony; mother: Pauline and Ralph Barbano; father: William Proc tor; brother: Wa yne and Valerie Proctor; children, son: Andy and Tressa Tylenda of Sanford, FL; daugh ter: Ashley and Patrick Russell of Lakeland, FL; step son: Robert (Tony) Markham of Knoxville, TN; grand children: Kallin and Brysen Tylenda; niec es: Micha and Alyson and many other loving and caring relatives in the Harbison, Proctor, and Markham family. The family would also like to extend its grat itude and thanks to the Twin Lakes Com munity in Umatilla. In Lieu of owers, me morial donations can be given to The Amer ican Cancer Society. Online condolences can be made at ww w. beyersfuneralhome. com. IN MEMORY MAKO WOOD

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Sunday, November 3, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013 On the corner of Hwy. 27/441 & Water Oak Blvd. Lady Lake, (Across from Race Trac)Over 60 VendorsEvery Item Hand Crafted Ofce of Public En gagement and Inter governmental Affairs, the Ofce of Schedul ing and Advance, the Ofce of the Vice Pres ident, the Ofce of the White House Coun sel, and the Ofce of White House Fellows. A White House In ternship provides a unique opportunity to gain valuable pro fessional experience and build leader ship skills, the White House said in a press release. Matthew is a former AP National Scholar Award winner who at tended Lake-Sumter Community College (now Lake Sumter State College and re ceived some scholar ship money to attend UF from The Lake County Gator Club, an afliate organiza tion of the UF Alumni Association. He could not be reached for comment Friday. INTERN FROM PAGE A3 Each council member could rank Irbys perfor mance on a scale of 0-4. Out of a possible high score of 36 in the area of administrative skills, the city manager re ceived an overall aver age of 30. Both Mayor Laura Kelley Wright and council member Eric Olson gave Irby perfect scores of 36, council member Ralph Cadwell gave him a 33, council member David Adams gave him a 32, council member Donnie Kent gave him a 25 and Tarby gave him a 20. Out a possible high score of 12 in the area of scal management, Irby received an over all average of 10.8. Ad ams, Cadwell, Wright and Olson all gave Irby all 12s, while Kent gave the city manager a 10 and Tarby gave him a 7. Out of a possible high score of 32 in the area of personal skills, Irby re ceived an overall average of 27.5. The city manag er received 32s from Ad ams, Cadwell and Ol son, along with a 31 from Wright, a 26 from Kent and a 19 from Tarby. Out of a possible high score of 20 in the area of community rela tions, Irby received an overall average of 17.6. Wright and Olson gave him perfect scores, Ad ams and Cadwell gave him 19s, and Kent and Tarby gave him 14s. Your addition to this city six years ago was the right move for us, Tarby remarked. GRADE FROM PAGE A3 of colors at the begin ning of the program. Veterans organizations should plan to arrive by 9:30 a.m. The Avenue of Flags consisting of approx imately 400 ags will be on display along the roadways of the cem etery. These ags were donated to the ceme tery by the next of kin of deceased veterans and were once draped over the caskets or crema tion urns of veterans. RITE FROM PAGE A3 SCOTT SONNER Associated Press RENO, Nev. More than 200 biologists, ecologists and other scientists are urging Congress to defeat leg islation they say would destroy critical wildlife habitat by setting aside U.S. environmental laws to speed logging of burned trees at Yo semite National Park and other national for ests and wilderness ar eas across the West. The experts say two measures pushed by pro-logging interests ignore a growing sci entic consensus that the burned landscape plays a critical role in forest regeneration and is home to many birds, bats and oth er species found no where else. We urge you to con sider what the science is telling us: that post-re habitat created by re, including patches of se vere re, are ecological treasures rather than ecological catastro phes, and that post-re logging does far more harm than good to the nations public lands, they wrote in a letter mailed to members of Congress Friday. One bill, authored by Rep. Doc Hastings, R-Wash., would make logging a requirement on some public for estland, speed timber sales and discourage legal challenges. The House approved the legislation 244-173 in September and sent it to the Senate, where it awaits consideration by the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. The White House has threatened a veto, saying it would jeopardize endangered species, increase law suits and block cre ation of national mon uments. Hastings, chairman of the House Natural Resources Committee, said wildres burned 9.3 million acres in the U.S. last year, while the Forest Service only harvested timber from about 200,000 acres. Hastings bill in cludes an amend ment by Rep. Tom McClintock, R-Ca lif., which he also in troduced as separate legislation specic to lands burned by this years Rim Fire at Yo semite National Park, neighboring wilder ness and national for ests in the Sierra Ne vada. We have no time to waste in the after math of the Yosemite Rim Fire, McClintock said at a subcommit tee hearing in October. By the time the formal environmental review of salvage operations has been completed in a year, what was once forestland will have al ready begun convert ing to brushland, and by the following year, re forestation will become innitely more difcult and expensive. The Rim Fire start ed in August and grew to become one of the largest wildres in California history. It burned 400 square miles and destroyed 11 residences, three com mercial properties and 98 outbuildings. Members of the House Natural Re sources Committee re main optimistic the Senate will take up Hastings bill before the end of the year, said Mallory Micetich, the committees. We have a lot of hazardous fuel build up, and it will help al leviate some of the threat of catastrophic wildres, she said. The scientists see it differently. Just about the worst thing you can do to these forests after a re is salvage-log them, said Dominick Della Sala, the lead author of the letter. SETH BORENSTEIN AP Science Writer WASHINGTON Starvation, poverty, ooding, heat waves, droughts, war and disease already lead to human tragedies. Theyre likely to wors en as the world warms from man-made cli mate change, a leaked draft of an interna tional scientic report forecasts. The Nobel Peace Prize-winning Inter governmental Pan el on Climate Change will issue a report next March on how global warming is al ready affecting the way people live and what will happen in the future, including a worldwide drop in in come. A leaked copy of a draft of the sum mary of the report ap peared online Friday on a climate skep tics website. Gov ernments will spend the next few months making comments about the draft. Weve seen a lot of impacts and theyve had consequences, Carnegie Institution climate scientist Chris Field, who heads the report, told The Asso ciated Press on Satur day. And we will see more in the future. Cities, where most of the world now lives, have the highest vul nerability, as do the globes poorest peo ple. Throughout the 21st century, climate change impacts will slow down econom ic growth and pover ty reduction, further erode food security and trigger new pov erty traps, the latter particularly in urban areas and emerging hotspots of hunger, the report says. Cli mate change will ex acerbate poverty in lowand lower-mid dle income countries and create new pov erty pockets in uppermiddle to high-in come countries with increasing inequality. For people living in poverty, the report says, climate-related hazards constitute an additional burden. The report says sci entists have high con dence especially in what it calls certain key risks: People dying from warmingand sea rise-related ood ing, especially in big cities. Famine because of temperature and rain changes, espe cially for poorer na tions. Farmers going broke because of lack of water. Warming report sees violent, sicker, poorer future Scientists oppose logging bills that would destroy wildlife AP FILE PHOTO In this September 2013 photo provided by the U.S. Forest Ser vice, a deer walks along Cherry Lake Road in the aftermath of the Rim Fire area near Yosemite National Park, Calif.

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Sunday, November 3, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 365-255024 Hour Answering Service 1501 N. US Hwy 441 Suite 1836, Bldg 1800 The VillagesPunya Clinic 1070 Flagler Avenue Leesburg PULMONARY MEDICINE INTERNAL MEDICINE TROUBLE SLEEPING?Shakti Narain, M.D. FCCP Accepting New Patients LRDA SLP DSRDRSCenterLRDA SLP DSRDRSCenter FRANK JORDANS Associated Press BERLIN Germa nys foreign intelligence agency conrmed Sat urday that it swaps in formation on the latest technological develop ments with its Europe an counterparts, but denied a report that it tried to bypass legal re strictions on Internet surveillance to be able to use advanced tech nology developed by the British. The London-based Guardian newspaper cited documents re leased by NSA leak er Edward Snowden according to which Britains GCHQ spy agency helped their German counterparts to change or bypass domestic laws. It is not true that the Federal Intelli gence Agency alleged ly tried to circumvent legal restrictions in or der to use British sur veillance technology, said Martin Heine mann, a spokesman for the agency, which is known by its Ger man acronym BND. Heinemann told The Associated Press that the exchange be tween the two agen cies, which took place in 2008, focused not on legal, but on techni cal questions related to mooted surveillance regulation reforms in Germany that were never implemented. He acknowledged, though, that the BND swaps tech tips with friendly agencies. A regular exchange of information about technological develop ments takes place with other European agen cies, said Heinemann. The extent to which Western intelligence agencies cooperate on Internet surveillance has come under public scrutiny since Snowden rst released docu ments about the work of the U.S. National Se curity Agency in June. SARAH EL DEEB Associated Press CAIRO Egypts new military-backed gov ernment had hoped trying Mohammed Morsi would close the chapter on his presi dency. Instead, the trial of the ousted Islamist president on charges of inciting murder, which begins Monday, is only compounding their troubles. Morsis supporters plan widespread pro tests on the day of the trial, threatening to dis rupt the proceedings. Security concerns are so high that the ven ue for the trial has still not been formally an nounced, though it is expected to be held in a heavily secured police academy in Cairo. Then there is the po litical risk of Morsis anticipated rst public appearance since the military deposed him on July 3 and locked him in secret deten tion, virtually incom municado. Morsi will likely represent him self in the trial, the rst time public gure to do so in the host of trials of politicians since au tocrat Hosni Mubaraks ouster in 2011, Broth erhood lawyers say. He will use the platform to insist he is still the true president, question the trials legitimacy and turn it into an indict ment of the coup, fur ther energizing his sup porters in the street. If Morsi is not brought to court at all, his absence will further throw into question the fairness of a trial that rights experts say is al ready in doubt. Morsis Brotherhood has de nounced the trial as a farce aimed at political revenge. During four months of detention in undis closed military facili ties, Morsi has been ex tensively questioned and has not been al lowed to meet with lawyers. Virtually his only contact with the outside world was two phone calls with his family. Brotherhood supporters have called the detention an out right kidnapping, and Morsi has refused to cooperate with his in terrogators. Rights groups say the rst test in the trial will be if the judge rules whether Morsi should be brought out of secret detention and moved to a regular prison dur ing the trial. Authori ties have said military detention is necessary for security reasons in the countrys turmoil. Further weighing on the trials fairness, Mor si will be tried in a ju dicial system stacked with his adversaries, with whom he clashed repeatedly during his year-long presidency. Rights activists even ones who believe Mor si should be tried for abuses during his pres idency fear the pro ceedings are more con cerned with retribution than justice. And the trial is taking place in the atmosphere of a widescale crackdown on the Brotherhood and its Islamist allies in which several thou sand have been arrest ed and hundreds killed. For the militarybacked government, the trial is key to show ing its plan for political transition toward de mocracy is on track. Au thorities want to show the international com munity, sharply criti cal of the anti-Brother hood crackdown, that they are justied in moving against the Is lamist group by prov ing Morsi committed real crimes. The military says it removed Morsi only af ter the public turned against him with pro tests by millions de manding his removal, accusing him and the Brotherhood of trying to subvert the law and impose their will on the country. Morsis sup porters accuse the mili tary of crushing Egypts nascent democracy by overturning the results of multiple elections won by the Islamists the past 2 years. Undoubtedly, this is an unfair trial par excellence. It is fall out from the coup, said Mohammed elDamati, senior lawyer in the Brotherhood le gal team that plans to be present in the court. But Morsi who is an engineer by train ing has the experi ence to defend himself. Trial of Egypts Morsi fraught with risks AMR NABIL / AP A child of a supporter of Egypts ousted President Mohammed Morsi wears a mask with the leaders picture as people raise their hands with their four ngers, which has become a symbol of the Rabaah al-Adawiya mosque, where Morsi supporters held a sit-in for weeks in August that was violently dispersed later, during a protest in Cairo on Friday. Germans: European spy agencies swapping tech tips

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8208 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013 www.dailycommercial.com NFL: Schedule, standings / B3 MARK LONG Associated Press JACKSONVILLE Todd Gurley scored twice in his rst game in more than a month, helping Georgia beat rival Florida 23-20 on Saturday. Gurley returned from an ankle injury and totaled 187 yards, nding the end zone on a 5-yard run and a 73yard reception. The Bull dogs scored on their rst four possessions, taking a 20-0 lead that looked like it would be enough against one of the Southeastern Conferences most anemic offenses. But the Gators rallied, tak ing advantage of a fumble, a safety and some question able play calls to seize mo mentum in weird, wacky and chippy game. Florida cut it to 23-20 ear ly in the fourth, putting Georgia on its heels after a failed fourth-down run fol lowed by a huge defensive penalty. But the Gators fal tered down the stretch. Georgia (5-3, 4-2 SEC) won its third in a row in the series, the programs rst three-game winning streak against Florida since 1989. This one kept the Bulldogs in contention in the Eastern Division. HOWARD ULMAN Associated Press BOSTON From the Green Monster to the Charles River, the bearded champions celebrated their improbable journey with another familiar sight in Boston. The World Series trophy. For the third time in 10 years, the Red Sox carried the prize through their city in a roll ing rally of amphibious duck boats as thousands of fans lined the streets and the banks of the waterway that separates Boston from Cambridge. The most poignant moment occurred early in Saturdays trip when the vehicles stopped at the Boston Marathon nish line, near where two explosions killed three spectators at the race on April 15. Outelder Jonny Gomes placed the trophy on the line and he and catcher Jarrod Saltalamac chia held Red Sox jerseys with the words BOSTON STRONG and the number 617, the citys area code. A jersey with that mes sage hung in the Red Sox dugout throughout the season after the bombings. On a mild, sunny day, noted tenor Ronan Tynan sang God Bless America and the crowd joined in. That was an emotional mo ment, Gomes said. To bring the World Series trophy to the n ish line, I dont think that the sto ry was written that way, but I was glad to be a part of it and put the exclamation point on it. Before the rally began at Fen way, manager John Farrell re called that the Red Sox had left after their 3-2 win over the Tam pa Bay Rays the day of the Mara thon for Logan Airport for a road trip. Along the way, they saw JOHN RAOUX / AP Florida head coach Will Muschamp, left, has words with line judge Michael Tay lor during the rst half of Saturdays game against Georgia in Jacksonville. JOSH REYNOLDS / AP Lisa Jay, of North Reading, Mass., holds a sign while waiting along the bank of the Charles River in Cambridge, Mass. on Saturday for Boston Red Sox players to ride past in amphibious duck boats during a rolling victory parade celebrating the teams World Series title. LM OTERO / AP Jimmie Johnson, left, playfully interrupts Matt Kenseth as Kenseth gives an interview during qualifying on Friday for todays NASCAR Sprint Cup series race at Texas Motor Speedway in Fort Worth, Texas. STEPHEN HAWKINS Associated Press FORT WORTH, Texas Matt Kenseth started to answer a question about how he could affect Jimmie Johnson on the track when the ve-time Sprint Cup champi on suddenly leaned around a corner of the room. Then after both nished their qualify ing laps later at Texas, Kenseth was track side during more interviews when Johnson playfully interrupted him and handed him a drink. Its appropriate that the two are so close to each other so much. Kenseth and John son are deadlocked for the points lead in the Chase for the Sprint Cup with three rac es left. The next race is today at the highbanked, 1-mile Texas track where they are statistically the best two drivers. Johnson and Kenseth have each won twice Red Sox hold rolling rally to celebrate title with fans Kenseth, Johnson best at TMS in deadlocked race for championship SEE SOX | B2 SEE NASCAR | B2 DAWG DAY AFTERNOON GEORGIA 23, FLORIDA 20 Bulldogs score early, hold on late to edge Gators in annual rivalry SEE GATORS | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013 AUTO RACING NASCAR Sprint Cup-AAA Texas 500 After Fridays qualifying; race today At Texas Motor Speedway Fort Worth, Texas Lap length: 1.5 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 196.114. 2. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 196.1. 3. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 195.943. 4. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 195.837. 5. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 195.78. 6. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 195.518. 7. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 195.312. 8. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 195.171. 9. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 195.129. 10. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 195.03. 11. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 194.665. 12. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 194.517. 13. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 194.384. 14. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 194.377. 15. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 194.161. 16. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 193.805. 17. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 193.659. 18. (16) Greg Bife, Ford, 193.618. 19. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 193.604. 20. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 193.403. 21. (33) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 193.334. 22. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 193.126. 23. (30) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 193.043. 24. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 192.933. 25. (55) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 192.905. 26. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 192.802. 27. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 192.651. 28. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 192.048. 29. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 191.891. 30. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 191.829. 31. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 191.421. 32. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 191.347. 33. (14) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 190.53. 34. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, 189.88. 35. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 189.321. 36. (51) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 189.235. 37. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 38. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, Owner Points. 39. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, Owner Points. 40. (32) Timmy Hill, Ford, Owner Points. 41. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points. 42. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 43. (36) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, Owner Points. BASKETBALL NBA EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Philadelphia 2 0 1.000 Brooklyn 1 1 .500 1 New York 1 1 .500 1 Toronto 1 1 .500 1 Boston 0 2 .000 2 Southeast W L Pct GB Atlanta 1 1 .500 Charlotte 1 1 .500 Miami 1 2 .333 Orlando 1 2 .333 Washington 0 2 .000 1 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 2 0 1.000 Chicago 1 1 .500 1 Cleveland 1 1 .500 1 Detroit 1 1 .500 1 Milwaukee 1 1 .500 1 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB Houston 2 0 1.000 San Antonio 2 0 1.000 Dallas 1 1 .500 1 Memphis 1 1 .500 1 New Orleans 0 2 .000 2 Northwest W L Pct GB Minnesota 2 0 1.000 Oklahoma City 1 1 .500 1 Portland 1 1 .500 1 Denver 0 2 .000 2 Utah 0 2 .000 2 Pacic W L Pct GB Phoenix 2 0 1.000 L.A. Clippers 2 1 .667 Golden State 1 1 .500 1 Sacramento 1 1 .500 1 L.A. Lakers 1 2 .333 1 Fridays Games Orlando 110, New Orleans 90 Philadelphia 109, Washington 102 Charlotte 90, Cleveland 84 Milwaukee 105, Boston 98 Atlanta 102, Toronto 95 Minnesota 100, Oklahoma City 81 Houston 113, Dallas 105 Memphis 111, Detroit 108, OT Brooklyn 101, Miami 100 Portland 113, Denver 98 Phoenix 87, Utah 84 L.A. Clippers 110, Sacramento 101 San Antonio 91, L.A. Lakers 85 Saturdays Games Cleveland at Indiana, late Chicago at Philadelphia, late Charlotte at New Orleans, late Memphis at Dallas, late Toronto at Milwaukee, late Houston at Utah, late San Antonio at Portland, late Sacramento at Golden State, late Todays Games Brooklyn at Orlando, 6 p.m. Washington at Miami, 6 p.m. Boston at Detroit, 6 p.m. Phoenix at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. Minnesota at New York, 7:30 p.m. Atlanta at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Mondays Games Golden State at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Boston at Memphis, 8 p.m. Houston at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. HOCKEY NHL EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Toronto 14 10 4 0 20 48 32 Tampa Bay 13 9 4 0 18 43 33 Detroit 14 8 4 2 18 33 37 Boston 12 8 4 0 16 35 22 Montreal 14 8 6 0 16 40 27 Ottawa 13 4 6 3 11 39 43 Florida 13 3 8 2 8 26 46 Buffalo 15 2 12 1 5 23 43 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 14 10 4 0 20 45 33 N.Y. Islanders 13 5 5 3 13 42 43 Washington 13 6 7 0 12 41 38 Carolina 13 4 6 3 11 26 39 N.Y. Rangers 12 5 7 0 10 20 37 Columbus 12 5 7 0 10 33 33 New Jersey 12 3 5 4 10 26 37 Philadelphia 12 3 9 0 6 20 37 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA Colorado 12 11 1 0 22 38 18 Chicago 13 8 2 3 19 45 38 St. Louis 11 8 1 2 18 42 25 Minnesota 14 7 4 3 17 34 34 Nashville 13 6 5 2 14 27 37 Dallas 13 5 6 2 12 33 39 Winnipeg 14 5 7 2 12 34 40 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA San Jose 13 10 1 2 22 51 24 Anaheim 14 10 3 1 21 44 36 Phoenix 14 9 3 2 20 48 44 Vancouver 15 9 5 1 19 42 41 Los Angeles 14 9 5 0 18 40 36 Calgary 13 5 6 2 12 39 47 Edmonton 14 3 9 2 8 36 54 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. Fridays Games N.Y. Islanders 5, Ottawa 4, SO Washington 7, Philadelphia 0 Pittsburgh 4, Columbus 2 Tampa Bay 3, Carolina 0 St. Louis 4, Florida 0 Minnesota 4, Montreal 3 Colorado 3, Dallas 2, OT Detroit 4, Calgary 3 Saturdays Games Chicago at Winnipeg, late Anaheim at Buffalo, late St. Louis at Tampa Bay, late Philadelphia at New Jersey, late Boston at N.Y. Islanders, late Carolina at N.Y. Rangers, late Florida at Washington, late Pittsburgh at Columbus, late Toronto at Vancouver, late Montreal at Colorado, late Detroit at Edmonton, late Nashville at Los Angeles, late Phoenix at San Jose, late Todays Games Dallas at Ottawa, 1 p.m. Calgary at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. New Jersey at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Mondays Games Anaheim at N.Y. Rangers, 7:30 p.m. Detroit at Winnipeg, 8 p.m. SOCCER MLS KNOCKOUT ROUND Eastern Conference Thursday, Oct. 31: Houston 3, Montreal 0 Western Conference Wednesday, Oct. 30: Seattle 2, Colorado 0 CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS Eastern Conference New York vs. Houston Leg 1 Today: New York at Houston, 3:30 p.m. Leg 2 Wednesday, Nov. 6: Houston at New York, 8 p.m. Sporting KC vs. New England Leg 1 Saturday, Nov. 2: Sporting KC at New England, late Leg 2 Wednesday, Nov. 6: New England at Sport ing KC, 9 p.m. Western Conference Portland vs. Seattle Leg 1 Saturday, Nov. 2: Portland at Seattle, late Leg 2 Thursday, Nov. 7: Seattle at Portland, 11 p.m. Real Salt Lake vs. LA Galaxy Leg 1 Today, Nov. 3: Real Salt Lake at LA Gal axy, 9 p.m. Leg 2 Thursday, Nov. 7: LA Galaxy at Real Salt Lake, 9 p.m. CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIP Eastern Conference Leg 1 Saturday, Nov 9: East (lower seed) vs. East (higher seed), 2:30 p.m. Leg 2 Saturday, Nov. 23: East (higher seed) vs. East (lower seed), TBA Western Conference Leg 1 Sunday, Nov. 10: West (lower seed) vs. West (higher seed), 9 p.m. Leg 2 Sunday, Nov. 24: West (higher seed) vs. West (lower seed), TBA MLS CUP Saturday, Dec. 7: at higher seed, 4 p.m. TV 2 DAY AUTO RACING 7:30 a.m. NBCSN Formula One, Abu Dhabi Grand Prix, at Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates 3 p.m. ESPN NASCAR, Sprint Cup, AAA Texas 500, at Fort Worth, Texas FIGURE SKATING 1:30 p.m. NBC ISU, Grand Prix: Skate China, at Beijing GOLF 4:30 p.m. TGC Champions Tour, Charles Schwab Cup Championship, nal round, at San Francisco NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 1 p.m. CBS Tennessee at St. Louis 4 p.m. FOX Tampa Bay at Seattle 4:25 p.m. CBS Pittsburgh at New England 8 p.m. NBC Indianapolis at Houston RUNNING 9 a.m. ESPN2 New York City Marathon 4 p.m. ABC New York City Marathon SOCCER 10:55 a.m. NBCSN Premier League, Swansea at Cardiff 3:30 p.m. NBC MLS, Playoffs, conference seminals, leg 1, 9 p.m. ESPN MLS, Playoffs, conference seminals, leg 1, SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED emergency vehicles re sponding to the explo sions. Knowing that we were heading out of town, thats going to bring back a lot, and a lot of uncertainty at that moment, Farrell said, because no one knew where to turn next. So we were fortu nate to be part of may be a little bit of a heal ing process. Second baseman Dustin Pedroia said: We played for the whole city, what the city went through. Bostons climb from last place in the AL East in 2012 to the top of the baseball world was stunning. Bu t not to Pedroia, a gritty leader of a close ly knit team that won the title with a 6-1 vic tory over the St. Lou is Cardinals in Game 6 on Wednesday night. It was the rst time the Red Sox won the Series at home in 95 years. The way we start ed spring training, it seemed like everybody counted us out, he said. We always said, One day closer to a pa rade. Its here. The line score from the clinching game was still on the scoreboard on the left-eld wall as season-ticket holders gathered for a pre-rally ceremony. We just wanted this group to win so bad ly, general manag er Ben Cherington told the crowd, because we know they wanted it so badly. Then the team board ed 25 duck boats of many colors pink, yellow, maroon, lime green, white and more normally used for tourist trips. Some boats even had light brown carpeting cut into the shape of beards attached on the front. Players still had their beards, which some had grown all season long. Hopefully, we can all get together and shave them for a good cause, third baseman Will Middlebrooks said. Some fans also were at rolling rallies after the 2004 and 2007 champi onships. This may be the best parade yet, said Charles Butler, 48, of Boston, who attended his third. It is the best thing that could have happened to Boston right now. The bomb ing was a sad time, and now we have a reason to come together and celebrate. Anna Mitkevicius, 24, of Medford, watched from near the nish line that she never reached on April 15. She was stopped about one mile before the end because of the explosions. It is still a very emo tional experience to come down here, she said. I didnt know if it would be too hard to be at the nish line, but Im happy I came. It felt really good to be here when everyone is cele brating and the mood is good. There was a very heavy police presence, with dogs and bull horns. Crowds were about 15 people deep on both sides near the nish line on Boylston Street. Many wore Red Sox gear, some with foam beards and holding signs Papi for Mayor, a vote for World Series MVP David Ortiz. Farrell said if Ortiz hadnt hit a tying grand slam in the eighth in ning of Game 2 of the AL championship se ries against the Detroit Tigers we might not be standing here today. Steve Horgan, the po lice ofcer who raised his arms in a V when Tigers right elder To rii Hunter tumbled over the bullpen wall in pur suit of Ortizs homer, rode in the lead vehicle with John Henry and other team owners. A thrill of a lifetime, Horgan said. When the vehicles slid into the river an other big splash for the Red Sox spectators cheered. The departure from Fenway was delayed when a atbed truck carrying Dropkick Mur phys, a band which had played at the ceremony, and heavy equipment became stuck in the turf along the rst-base line. A duck boat drove up in front of it and, with a tow rope between the vehicles, pulled the at bed out of the ruts. Less than three hours later, the rally was over. We were ready to go another lap, Gomes said. We didnt want it to end. It was pretty fun. SOX FROM PAGE B1 at Texas, where their 15 top-10 nishes are tied for the most and they have the best average nishes Kenseth at 8.5, just ahead of John sons 9.1 It might change from his end if were still in it all the way to the end, but Im just not really into all the head games, Kens eth said. My brain is over capacity already with trying to gure out how to make my race car fast enough to be the best. They always say, if you want to be the man, you have to beat the man and hes always denitely been the man. Johnson qualied his No. 48 Hendrick Motor sports Chevrolet third at Texas. He will start in the row ahead of Kens eths No. 20 Toyota for Joe Gibbs Racing, who will roll off from the sixth position. The two competitors seem to be genuinely enjoying the Chase so far, on and off the track. I think we do have a lot of similarities in the way we race. Be ing around him, off the track as well and with his family, we have a lot in common, Johnson said. I wouldnt say we are identical. But we do have something very deep down that is very common between the both of us, the way we approach things a little more laid back. Carl Edwards, the only three-time Cup winner at Texas, is the polesitter for the 501mile race. Jeff Gordon starts eighth a week after he got himself back in the title conversation with a victory at Martins ville that moved up to a season-high third in points. He is 27 points behind the leaders. Still, this is likely a two-man Chase in Tex as, where in the last two falls the top two contenders coming in also nished 1-2 in that race. Fully living up to the billing of a Tex as Title Fight in 2011, Tony Stewart won to get within eight points of Carl Edwards lead. Stewart went on to win the season title. Last November, Johnson and Brad Kes elowski raced side-byside in the closing laps, even slamming togeth er without crashing. Johnson won the race and left still with the points lead, but Kes elowski overcame him the last two races for the championship. Its denitely a tense period of time. Actual ly its a lot of fun once I can really slow things down and pay atten tion to it, Johnson said. Having to race so hard for it and ght for each and every point as we have is, in most sit uations, a lot of fun. Its not over yet. Johnson had a slim points lead when he ar rived at Texas in 2010 in a close three-way Chase, but nished ninth that day and fell out of the lead. He did recover to win the last of his ve consecutive titles. At Texas in 2009, Johnson crashed on the third lap and spent more than an hour sit ting in his car while his crew made repairs to get him back on the track. He nished 38th and 129 laps off the pace to see his points lead shrink from 184 to 73, though he stayed on top the rest of the sea son. Kenseth has been a runner-up at Tex as four times, includ ing the spring race in 2007 when Jeff Burton past him on the last lap for his only lead to win. That fall, Kenseth and Johnson traded the lead several times in the closing laps. NASCAR FROM PAGE B1 The Gators (4-4, 3-3) have their second threegame losing streak in coach Will Muschamps three years, raising speculation about his fu ture in Gainesville. Muschamp fell to 0-7 in the series. He was 0-4 as a Georgia player between 1991 and 1994 and now hes 0-3 as Florida. Possibly making things worse for Muschamp, he was seen screaming back at a fan as he left the eld. Georgia players and coaches were celebrat ing all around something theyve rarely been able to do in this series. Florida won 18 of 21 meetings before the Bulldogs started their cur rent streak. This had signicantly less at stake than many of those, with both unranked teams enter ing the game riding multigame losing streaks. It was the rst time that had happened since 1926. Georgia, though, looked nothing like the same team that lost consecutive games to Mis souri and Vanderbilt. The Bulldogs scored on the games opening possession and then shocked Florida when Aaron Murray found Gurley over the middle for a 73-yard catch and run. The Bulldogs piled on from there, making it 23-3 with a 32-yard eld goal just before half time. Florida looked down and out. But Georgia helped the Gators get back in it. Arthur Lynch dropped what he thought was a screen pass near the sideline. Ofcials ruled it a lateral and a fumble. Lynch didnt realize the call and left the ball on the ground. Floridas Leon Orr scooped it up and returned it to the 13-yard line. Mack Brown scored two plays lat er, cutting Georgias lead to 23-10. Loucheiz Purifoy sacked Murray in the end zone two series later, making it 23-12. Tyler Murphy, playing with a sprained right throw ing shoulder, had two long runs on the ensu ing drive, the second one a 14-yard TD scam per. Murphy hooked up with Clay Burton for the 2-point conversion and it was a differ ent game. Georgia tried to reclaim the momentum, but Gurley failed to move the chains on a fourthand-1 play. Florida did little on the next series, but Georgia gifted the Gators more life by hav ing 12 men on the eld on a fourth-and-2 play. Nonetheless, Florida oundered as it has in recent weeks. Not only did linebacker Neiron Ball remove his helmet on the stop, drawing a 15-yard penalty, but the offense stumbled as usual. Equally troubling for the Gators were two missed eld goals. Murray completed 16 of 25 passes for 258 yards and a touchdown for Georgia. Gurley had 100 yards rushing and 87 receiving. Murphy was 13-of-29 passing for 174 yards, and was sacked four times. Kelvin Taylor, mak ing his rst career start, ran 20 times for 76 yards. GATORS FROM PAGE B1

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Sunday, November 3, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 FALL TUNE-UP AND PLAY SPECIALTaught by PGA ProfessionalStephen WreshFor additional information or to register call(352)267-4707Located at Continental Country Club, 15 minutes from The Villages$249(reg. $299)Fall Tune-Up and Play Specials Expire 11/30/13.(3) 40-Minute Private Lessonsplus(1) 90-Minute Playing Lesson 4 Short Game Series or 4 Full Swing Series$180(reg. $220) NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div New England 6 2 0 .750 179 144 4-0-0 2-2-0 3-2-0 3-0-0 3-1-0 N.Y. Jets 4 4 0 .500 143 211 3-1-0 1-3-0 2-4-0 2-0-0 2-1-0 Miami 4 4 0 .500 174 187 2-2-0 2-2-0 3-3-0 1-1-0 0-2-0 Buffalo 3 5 0 .375 176 213 2-2-0 1-3-0 2-4-0 1-1-0 1-2-0 South W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div Indianapolis 5 2 0 .714 187 131 3-1-0 2-1-0 3-2-0 2-0-0 1-0-0 Tennessee 3 4 0 .429 145 146 2-2-0 1-2-0 3-2-0 0-2-0 0-1-0 Houston 2 5 0 .286 122 194 1-2-0 1-3-0 2-2-0 0-3-0 1-0-0 Jacksonville 0 8 0 .000 86 264 0-4-0 0-4-0 0-5-0 0-3-0 0-1-0 North W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div Cincinnati 6 3 0 .667 217 166 4-0-0 2-3-0 4-2-0 2-1-0 1-1-0 Baltimore 3 4 0 .429 150 148 2-1-0 1-3-0 3-3-0 0-1-0 1-1-0 Cleveland 3 5 0 .375 148 179 2-2-0 1-3-0 2-3-0 1-2-0 1-1-0 Pittsburgh 2 5 0 .286 125 153 1-2-0 1-3-0 2-3-0 0-2-0 1-1-0 West W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div Kansas City 8 0 0 1.000 192 98 5-0-0 3-0-0 5-0-0 3-0-0 1-0-0 Denver 7 1 0 .875 343 218 5-0-0 2-1-0 3-1-0 4-0-0 1-0-0 San Diego 4 3 0 .571 168 144 2-1-0 2-2-0 2-3-0 2-0-0 0-1-0 Oakland 3 4 0 .429 126 150 3-1-0 0-3-0 3-3-0 0-1-0 1-2-0 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div Dallas 4 4 0 .500 230 186 3-1-0 1-3-0 4-1-0 0-3-0 3-0-0 Philadelphia 3 5 0 .375 176 211 0-4-0 3-1-0 3-2-0 0-3-0 2-2-0 Washington 2 5 0 .286 173 229 1-2-0 1-3-0 1-4-0 1-1-0 0-2-0 N.Y. Giants 2 6 0 .250 141 223 1-2-0 1-4-0 2-4-0 0-2-0 1-2-0 South W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div New Orleans 6 1 0 .857 196 120 4-0-0 2-1-0 4-0-0 2-1-0 2-0-0 Carolina 4 3 0 .571 170 96 2-1-0 2-2-0 4-2-0 0-1-0 1-0-0 Atlanta 2 5 0 .286 166 184 2-2-0 0-3-0 2-2-0 0-3-0 1-1-0 Tampa Bay 0 7 0 .000 100 163 0-4-0 0-3-0 0-5-0 0-2-0 0-3-0 North W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div Green Bay 5 2 0 .714 212 158 3-0-0 2-2-0 3-1-0 2-1-0 2-0-0 Detroit 5 3 0 .625 217 197 3-1-0 2-2-0 4-2-0 1-1-0 2-1-0 Chicago 4 3 0 .571 213 206 3-1-0 1-2-0 2-3-0 2-0-0 1-1-0 Minnesota 1 6 0 .143 163 225 1-3-0 0-3-0 0-5-0 1-1-0 0-3-0 West W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div Seattle 7 1 0 .875 205 125 3-0-0 4-1-0 4-0-0 3-1-0 3-0-0 San Francisco 6 2 0 .750 218 145 3-1-0 3-1-0 3-1-0 3-1-0 2-1-0 Arizona 4 4 0 .500 160 174 3-1-0 1-3-0 4-4-0 0-0-0 0-3-0 St. Louis 3 5 0 .375 165 198 2-2-0 1-3-0 1-5-0 2-0-0 1-2-0 This Week Thursdays Game Miami 22, Cincinnati 20, OT Todays Games Minnesota at Dallas, 1 p.m. Tennessee at St. Louis, 1 p.m. Atlanta at Carolina, 1 p.m. New Orleans at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m. Kansas City at Buffalo, 1 p.m. San Diego at Washington, 1 p.m. Philadelphia at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Seattle, 4:05 p.m. Baltimore at Cleveland, 4:25 p.m. Pittsburgh at New England, 4:25 p.m. Indianapolis at Houston, 8:30 p.m. Open: Arizona, Denver, Detroit, Jacksonville, N.Y. Giants, San Francisco Mondays Game Chicago at Green Bay, 8:40 p.m. Next Week Thursdays Game Washington at Minnesota, 8:25 p.m. Nov. 10 Detroit at Chicago, 1 p.m. Philadelphia at Green Bay, 1 p.m. Jacksonville at Tennessee, 1 p.m. Cincinnati at Baltimore, 1 p.m. St. Louis at Indianapolis, 1 p.m. Seattle at Atlanta, 1 p.m. Oakland at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m. Buffalo at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. Carolina at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m. Denver at San Diego, 4:25 p.m. Houston at Arizona, 4:25 p.m. Dallas at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m. Open: Cleveland, Kansas City, N.Y. Jets, New England Nov. 11 Miami at Tampa Bay, 8:40 p.m. INJURY REPORT NEW YORK The updated National Football League injury report, as provided by the league ATLANTA FALCONS at CAROLINA PAN THERS FALCONS: OUT: LB Stephen Nicholas (thigh). QUESTIONABLE: T Sam Baker (knee), S William Moore (hip), DE Osi Umenyiora (knee), WR Roddy White (hamstring, ankle). PROB ABLE: LB Akeem Dent (ankle), C Joe Hawley (elbow), DT Peria Jerry (toe), G Garrett Reynolds (knee), RB Jason Snelling (ankle). PANTHERS: QUES TIONABLE: LB Chase Blackburn (foot). PROBABLE: LB Thomas Davis (shoul der), DT Dwan Edwards (hamstring), DE Charles Johnson (groin), WR Marvin McNutt (ankle), RB DeAngelo Williams (quadriceps). MINNESOTA VIKINGS at DALLAS COWBOYS VIKINGS: OUT: RB Matt Asiata (shoulder), CB Chris Cook (hip), TE Rhett Ellison (ankle), DT Fred Ev ans (knee), S Jamarca Sanford (groin). PROBABLE: LB Chad Greenway (wrist), CB A.J. Jefferson (ankle), WR Greg Jen nings (knee), T Phil Loadholt (illness), RB Adrian Peterson (not injury related), WR Rodney Smith (hip), K Blair Walsh (left hamstring), DT Kevin Williams (knee). COWBOYS: OUT: CB Morris Claiborne (hamstring), LB DeVonte Hol loman (neck), G Brian Waters (elbow), S J.J. Wilcox (knee). DOUBTFUL: WR Miles Austin (hamstring), DE DeMarcus Ware (thigh). QUESTIONABLE: S Danny McCray (hip, toe). PROBABLE: DT Mar vin Austin (back), S Barry Church (ham string), RB Lance Dunbar (hamstring), WR Dwayne Harris (hip), DT Jason Hatcher (neck), RB DeMarco Murray (knee), DE George Selvie (shoulder). NEW ORLEANS SAINTS at NEW YORK JETS SAINTS: QUESTIONABLE: WR Marques Colston (knee), G Jahri Ev ans (hip), TE Jimmy Graham (foot), S Roman Harper (knee), DE Tom John son (hip), DE Cameron Jordan (ankle), S Kenny Vaccaro (concussion, back), DE Tyrunn Walker (knee). PROBABLE: LB David Hawthorne (ankle), DE Akiem Hicks (knee), S Malcolm Jen kins (knee). JETS: OUT: WR Santonio Holmes (hamstring). QUESTIONABLE: G Willie Colon (calf), TE Jeff Cumberland (concussion), RB Alex Green (ham string), C Nick Mangold (ribs). PROB ABLE: S Antonio Allen (nger), WR Josh Cribbs (knee), CB Antonio Cromartie (hip), DT Kenrick Ellis (back), WR Ste phen Hill (foot), WR Jeremy Kerley (ill ness), LB Garrett McIntyre (knee), WR David Nelson (quadriceps), TE Konrad Reuland (knee), WR Greg Salas (knee), CB Darrin Walls (shoulder), G Brian Winters (ankle). TENNESSEE TITANS at ST. LOUIS RAMS TITANS: OUT: LB Moise Fokou (knee). QUESTIONABLE: S Mi chael Grifn (quadriceps), WR Justin Hunter (nger), DE Ropati Pitoitua (calf), TE Craig Stevens (back), T Da vid Stewart (shoulder). PROBABLE: LB Patrick Bailey (hamstring), DT Jurrell Casey (ankle), LB Zaviar Gooden (ham string), DE Derrick Morgan (shoulder). RAMS: OUT: G Harvey Dahl (knee). QUESTIONABLE: RB Benny Cunning ham (ankle), QB Brady Quinn (hip), DE Robert Quinn (illness), RB Daryl Richardson (foot), RB Zac Stacy (foot). PROBABLE: QB Kellen Clemens (right shoulder), T Jake Long (knee), CB Bran don McGee (illness), WR Austin Pettis (thigh), S Darian Stewart (foot), C Scott Wells (thigh). KANSAS CITY CHIEFS at BUFFALO BILLS CHIEFS: OUT: DE Mike Cata pano (ankle). PROBABLE: WR Donnie Avery (shoulder), WR Dwayne Bowe (groin), RB Jamaal Charles (knee), TE Anthony Fasano (knee, ankle), T Eric Fisher (knee, back), S Kendrick Lewis (ankle), TE Sean McGrath (knee), LB Dezman Moses (toe), CB Ron Parker (toe), RB Anthony Sherman (knee, calf). BILLS: OUT: QB EJ Manuel (knee). DOUBTFUL: QB Thad Lewis (ribs). QUESTIONABLE: WR Chris Ho gan (back). PROBABLE: WR Marquise Goodwin (elbow), RB Fred Jackson (knee), WR Stevie Johnson (hip), LB Manny Lawson (hamstring), RB C.J. Spiller (ankle), G Kraig Urbik (knee), DT Kyle Williams (Achilles), DE Mario Wil liams (hip). SAN DIEGO CHARGERS at WASHING TON REDSKINS CHARGERS: OUT: T Mike Remmers (ankle). DOUBTFUL: LB Donald Butler (groin). QUESTION ABLE: G Chad Rinehart (toe), WR Eddie Royal (toe). PROBABLE: DE Lawrence Guy (toe), LB Jarret Johnson (ham string), S Eric Weddle (toe). REDSKINS: QUESTIONABLE: S Jose Gumbs (an kle). PROBABLE: DE Stephen Bowen (shoulder, knee), S Reed Doughty (con cussion), WR Pierre Garcon (calf), QB Robert Grifn III (knee), WR Leonard Hankerson (foot), NT Chris Neild (calf), TE Logan Paulsen (knee), RB Chris Thompson (shoulder). PHILADELPHIA EAGLES at OAKLAND RAIDERS EAGLES: OUT: QB Michael Vick (hamstring). DOUBTFUL: LB Jake Knott (hamstring). QUESTIONABLE: S Patrick Chung (shoulder), WR Damaris Johnson (ankle), LB Casey Matthews (hip). PROBABLE: LB Connor Barwin (back), C Jon Dorenbos (groin), QB Nick Foles (concussion), WR DeSean Jack son (ankle), P Donnie Jones (left foot), T Jason Peters (shoulder, nger), RB Chris Polk (shoulder), DE Cedric Thorn ton (knee). RAIDERS: OUT: S Tyvon Branch (ankle), C Andre Gurode (quad riceps), T Tony Pashos (hip). QUES TIONABLE: WR Andre Holmes (ham string), T Menelik Watson (calf). TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS at SE ATTLE SEAHAWKS BUCCANEERS: OUT: RB Jeff Demps (groin), RB Doug Martin (shoulder), G Carl Nicks (foot). QUESTIONABLE: S Mark Barron (hip), S Dashon Goldson (knee), DT Derek Landri (back), WR Chris Owusu (foot), LB Dekoda Watson (shoulder). PROB ABLE: LB Mason Foster (hamstring), G Davin Joseph (knee), DT Akeem Spence (wrist), S Keith Tandy (ankle). SEAHAWKS: OUT: RB Derrick Cole man (hamstring), T Breno Giacomini (knee), S Jeron Johnson (hamstring). PROBABLE: DE Michael Bennett (ill ness), RB Marshawn Lynch (knee), DT Brandon Mebane (not injury related), G J.R. Sweezy (elbow), S Earl Thomas (illness). BALTIMORE RAVENS at CLEVELAND BROWNS RAVENS: OUT: G Kelechi Osemele (back, knee). QUESTIONABLE: WR Brandon Stokley (thigh). PROB ABLE: LB Josh Bynes (nger, thigh), NT Terrence Cody (knee), C Ryan Jensen (foot), T Michael Oher (ankle), RB Ber nard Pierce (thigh). BROWNS: QUES TIONABLE: LB Quentin Groves (ankle), DE Billy Winn (quadriceps). PROBABLE: DE Desmond Bryant (thumb), RB Willis McGahee (knee), RB Chris Ogbonnaya (ribs), CB Chris Owens (nger), LB Ja baal Sheard (wrist). PITTSBURGH STEELERS at NEW ENG LAND PATRIOTS STEELERS: OUT: CB Curtis Brown (not injury related), G David DeCastro (ankle), WR Markus Wheaton (nger). PROBABLE: G Ramon Foster (concussion), NT Steve McLen don (illness), TE Heath Miller (not in jury related), QB Ben Roethlisberger (not injury related), LB Lawrence Tim mons (hand), T Guy Whimper (knee). PATRIOTS: OUT: DT Tommy Kelly (knee). QUESTIONABLE: CB Kyle Ar rington (groin), CB Aqib Talib (hip), RB Leon Washington (ankle). PROBABLE: WR Danny Amendola (groin), RB Bran don Bolden (knee), QB Tom Brady (right shoulder), T Marcus Cannon (shoul der), WR Julian Edelman (thigh), TE Rob Gronkowski (back, forearm, ham string), WR Matthew Slater (wrist). INDIANAPOLIS COLTS at HOUSTON TEXANS COLTS: OUT: CB Josh Gordy (groin), S Delano Howell (neck), CB Greg Toler (groin). QUESTIONABLE: WR Darrius Heyward-Bey (hamstring), LB Cam Johnson (knee). PROBABLE: C Samson Satele (knee), LB Bjoern Wer ner (foot). TEXANS: QUESTIONABLE: RB Arian Foster (hamstring). PROBA BLE: G Brandon Brooks (toe), T Duane Brown (toe), S Shiloh Keo (Achilles), WR Keshawn Martin (shoulder), CB Brice McCain (knee), NT Earl Mitchell (knee), T Derek Newton (knee, elbow), S Eddie Pleasant (toe), WR DeVier Posey (calf), QB Matt Schaub (ankle), LB Darryl Sharpton (foot, toe), G Wade Smith (knee), RB Ben Tate (ribs). CHICAGO BEARS at GREEN BAY PACKERS BEARS: DNP: LB Lance Briggs (shoulder), QB Jay Cutler (groin). LIMITED: CB Charles Tillman (knee). FULL: WR Joe Anderson (abdomen), LB Blake Costanzo (knee), S Major Wright (knee). PACKERS: OUT: TE Jermi chael Finley (neck), LB Clay Matthews (thumb). DNP: LB Nick Perry (foot). LIMITED: WR James Jones (knee), TE Ryan Taylor (knee). FULL: LB Brad Jones (hamstring). STEVEN WINE Associated Press MIAMI The NFL Players Association will investigate possi ble harassment of Mi ami Dolphins tackle Jonathan Martin by his teammates, a person familiar with the situa tion said Saturday. The person said the union wants to deter mine whether Martins treatment by team mates contributed to his abrupt departure from the Dolphins. The person spoke to The Associated Press on condition of an onymity because the Dolphins have said lit tle about the reasons for Martins absence. Martin left the team Monday to receive help for emotional issues, and its unclear wheth er or when hes expect ed back. The Dolphins are off this weekend, and the union plans to look into the matter next week. The Dolphins have attributed Martins ab sence to a non-football illness. The secondyear pro from Stan ford played in Sundays loss at New England, then missed practice this week and sat out Thursday nights victo ry over Cincinnati. Source: Union to look into Martin situation

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013 You dont have to pay extra for an evening service call. Munns is the home of 8 to 8 Same Great Rate. Emergency services are also available. Were there when you need us!Carl Munn www.munnair.com2135 US Hwy 441/27Fruitland Park, FL24/7/365 (352)-787-7741 Best Western Chain of Lakes GOLF DOUG FERGUSON Associated Press SHANGHAI For 16 holes, Dustin Johnson looked like the player who has won every year since turning pro and has played on two Ry der Cup teams. Start ing the third round of the HSBC Champions with a five-shot lead, he blasted his way to 10 birdies and was running away from the field. As for the other two holes, it was a remind er that no lead is safe in his hands. All those birdies were offset by two double bogeys, the last one cutting his lead in half going into the final round of this World Golf Champi onship. About the only thing that cheered him up Saturday after noon was a 6-under 66 for a three-shot lead over Ian Poulter. Its a good score, Johnson said. Im definitely happy with what I shot. Im just not happy with the way I finished. Making two doubles, theres no excuse for that, es pecially the way Im playing right now. Johnson ran off five straight birdies to close out a 30 on the front nine of Sheshan International and a five-shot lead over Poulter. For his next trick, the 29-year-old American hit wedge four times from inside 100 yards before he could get the ball on the green at the 10th hole. He had to make a 12-foot putt for dou ble bogey. He followed with another run of four straight birdies, hit ting a 5-iron into 15 feet for a two-putt birdie on the par5 14th, and a 3-iron to the front of the 16th green for a chipand-putt birdie that stretched his lead to six shots. Everything changed in the final half-hour of a soft, gentle day for scoring in Shanghai. Poulter, who shot 30 on the front nine with out making birdie on either of the par 5s, closed with a birdie on the par-5 18th for a 63. He thought that was a good day of work, even though he wasnt making up any ground on Johnson. This golf course gives up a lot of bird ies, and hes a good player, Poulter said. And in this form, hes going to make a lot of birdies. I just need to do my thing tomorrow and make a lot more than what he does. Im going to have to see what happens coming down the stretch. Poulter was talking about today. He didnt realize he would be getting some help on Saturday. Johnsons tee shot sailed to the right and into the middle of the lake on the 18th. It ap peared that he could have dropped fur ther up the fairway, but playing partners Boo Weekley and Bub ba Watson didnt offer much help as to where (or if) the shot ever crossed land before it entered the hazard. Not wanting to take any chance, Johnson opted to return to the tee. He ripped anoth er drive down the edge of the water, this time with his draw to reach the fairway. But his approach went left near the lip of a bunker, and he did well to blast out to 15 feet and take two putts for his 7. Johnson was at 18-under 198 and will be in the final group with Poulter and Graeme McDowell, who had a 64 and was four shots behind. Rory McIlroy bird ied three of his last five holes for a 67 and was six shots behind, along with Graham DeLaet and U.S. Open champion Justin Rose, who each had a 65. They still had an out side chance, though so much of that de pends on Johnson and how to he responds to his pair of double bo geys. Im still a little mad from my double bogey on 18, Johnson said. Obviously, to have a three-shot lead go ing into the last day is good and Im looking forward to the chal lenge. I still have to play really well. The guys that are right be hind me, theyre play ing very well, too. So its still going to be a tough day tomorrow. Got to come out and make a lot of birdies. That wasnt the problem for John son and most every one else. Martin Kaymer, who won the HSBC Cham pions two years ago by tying the course re cord with a 63 in the final round, went one better. The German started with six bird ies in seven holes and thought briefly about a 59 with three straight birdies on the front nine that put him at 10-under with three to play. He missed an 8-foot birdie on No. 7, failed to birdie the par-5 eighth and had to settle for a course record 62. Kaymer was eight shots behind. Ive shot 59 before and I thought, Theres a chance, especial ly after my birdies on 4, 5, 6, Kaymer said. But you cant make them all. McDowell was six shots out of the lead when he finished and it looked as though he might lose ground to Johnson. Even so, McDowell has a lot at stake today at No. 2 on the European Tour money list, and he could move past Hen rik Stenson in the Race to Dubai if he were to finish alone in second. From here, it looks like Dustin is going to have to beat himself for anybody to have a chance to catch him, McDowell said. Race to Dubai points will be very important to me. I have a lot to play for tomorrow. If not the trophy, second place will certainly be worth my while. And then, the trophy became a little more realistic. I have to do my thing tomorrow, Poulter said. Its only Saturday. You cant win tournaments on Saturday. Its all about playing well on Sun day. WGC HSBC Champions Saturday At Sheshan International Golf Club Shanghai Purse: $8.5 million Yardage: 7,266; Par: 72 Third Round Dustin Johnson 69-63-66 198 Ian Poulter 71-67-63 201 Graeme McDowell 69-69-64 202 Graham DeLaet 71-68-65 204 Justin Rose 68-71-65 204 Rory McIlroy 65-72-67 204 Martin Kaymer 70-74-62 206 Boo Weekley 70-67-69 206 Bubba Watson 68-69-69 206 Jamie Donaldson 67-74-66 207 Keegan Bradley 71-68-68 207 Sergio Garcia 70-68-69 207 Tommy Fleetwood 68-70-69 207 Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano 67-71-70 208 Scott Hend 69-74-66 209 Jordan Spieth 68-71-70 209 Ernie Els 69-69-71 209 Bo Van Pelt 77-67-66 210 Gregory Bourdy 75-68-67 210 Louis Oosthuizen 70-70-70 210 Jin Jeong 70-69-71 210 Paul Casey 69-73-69 211 Francesco Molinari 72-69-70 211 Luke Donald 70-71-70 211 Jason Dufner 73-67-71 211 Phil Mickelson 71-68-72 211 Wen-Chong Liang 72-67-72 211 Lee Westwood 71-73-68 212 Thongchai Jaidee 76-68-68 212 Matteo Manassero 72-70-70 212 Mark Brown 72-68-72 212 Billy Horschel 71-69-72 212 David Lynn 74-70-69 213 Wenyi Huang 70-74-69 213 Ryan Moore 70-74-69 213 Peter Hanson 70-73-70 213 Bill Haas 72-72-69 213 Jaco Van Zyl 72-73-68 213 Scott Piercy 72-73-68 213 Hiroyuki Fujita 75-70-68 213 Mikko Ilonen 72-69-72 213 Rickie Fowler 74-70-70 214 Michael Thompson 74-72-68 214 Brian Gay 71-72-72 215 Kevin Streelman 70-73-72 215 Ken Duke 70-72-73 215 Chris Wood 71-71-73 215 Masahiro Kawamura 73-72-70 215 Jimmy Walker 73-73-69 215 Gaganjeet Bhullar 69-71-75 215 Kiradech Aphibarnrat 69-78-68 215 Branden Grace 77-71-67 215 Derek Ernst 71-72-73 216 Thomas Bjorn 74-72-70 216 D.a. Points 72-74-70 216 John Merrick 72-75-69 216 Nick Watney 75-74-67 216 Hao Tong Li 72-71-74 217 Peter Uihlein 71-73-73 217 Brandt Snedeker 73-74-70 217 Daniel Popovic 77-71-69 217 Henrik Stenson 74-76-67 217 Michael Hendry 72-73-73 218 Stephen Gallacher 73-73-72 218 Seuk-Hyun Baek 81-68-69 218 Darren Fichardt 70-74-75 219 Jonas Blixt 70-75-74 219 Ashun Wu 74-75-70 219 David Howell 72-75-73 220 Johnson wastes chance to run away at HSBC EUGENE HOSHIKO / AP Dustin Johnson tees off at the third hole during Saturdays third round of the HSBC Champions at the Sheshan International Golf Club in Shanghai, China.

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Sunday, November 3, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 COLLEGE FOOTBALL AP Top 25 No. 1 Alabama (8-0) did not play. Next: vs. No. 11 LSU, Saturday. No. 2 Oregon (8-0) did not play. Next: at No. 6 Stanford, Thursday. No. 3 Florida State (7-0) vs. No. 7 Miami, late. Next: at Wake Forest, Saturday. No. 4 Ohio State (9-0) beat Purdue 56-0. Next: at Illinois, Saturday, Nov. 16. No. 5 Baylor (7-0) did not play. Next: vs. No. 13 Oklahoma, Thursday. No. 6 Stanford (7-1) did not play. Next: vs. No. 2 Oregon, Thursday. No. 7 Miami (7-0) at No. 3 Florida State, late. Next: vs. Virginia Tech, Saturday. No. 8 Auburn (7-1) at Arkansas, late. Next: at Ten nessee, Saturday. No. 9 Clemson (8-1) beat Virginia 59-10. Next: vs. Georgia Tech, Thursday, Nov. 14. No. 10 Missouri (7-1) vs. Tennessee, late. Next: at Kentucky, Saturday. No. 11 LSU (7-2) did not play. Next: at No. 1 Ala bama, Saturday. No. 12 Texas A&M (6-2) vs. UTEP, late. Next: vs. Mississippi State, Saturday. No. 13 Oklahoma (7-1) did not play. Next: at No. 5 Baylor, Thursday. No. 14 South Carolina (7-2) beat Mississippi State 34-16. Next: vs. Florida, Saturday, Nov. 16. No. 15 Texas Tech (7-1) vs. No. 18 Oklahoma State, late. Next: vs. Kansas State, Saturday. No. 16 Fresno State (7-0) vs. Nevada, late. Next: at Wyoming, Saturday. No. 17 UCLA (5-2) vs. Colorado, late. Next: at Ari zona, Saturday. No. 18 Oklahoma State (6-1) at No. 15 Texas Tech, late. Next: vs. Kansas, Saturday. No. 19 UCF (6-1) did not play. Next: vs. Houston, Saturday. No. 20 Louisville (7-1) did not play. Next: at UConn, Friday. No. 21 Northern Illinois (9-0) beat UMass 63-19. Next: vs. Ball State, Wednesday, Nov. 13. No. 22 Wisconsin (6-2) beat Iowa 28-9. Next: vs. BYU, Saturday. No. 23 Michigan (6-2) lost to No. 24 Michigan State 29-6. Next: vs. Nebraska, Saturday. No. 24 Michigan State (8-1) beat No. 23 Michigan 29-6. Next: at Nebraska, Saturday, Nov. 16. No. 25 Arizona State (6-2) beat Washington State 55-21, Thursday. Next: at Utah, Saturday. No. 4 OHIO ST. 56, PURDUE 0 Ohio St. 28 14 7 7 56 Purdue 0 0 0 0 0 First Quarter OSUD.Grant 33 interception return (Basil kick), 14:03. OSUHeuerman 40 pass from B.Miller (Basil kick), 11:28. OSUVannett 8 pass from B.Miller (Basil kick), 2:37. OSUCorey (Philly).Brown 2 pass from B.Miller (Ba sil kick), 2:10. Second Quarter OSUFields 1 pass from Guiton (Basil kick), 8:20. OSUElliott 10 pass from B.Miller (Basil kick), 1:46. Third Quarter OSUGuiton 4 run (Basil kick), 11:20. Fourth Quarter OSUGuiton 1 run (Basil kick), 10:37. A,423. OSU Pur First downs 30 10 Rushes-yards 41-345 27-27 Passing 295 89 Comp-Att-Int 28-36-1 13-29-1 Return Yards 35 0 Punts-Avg. 2-40.0 10-47.1 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 1-1 Penalties-Yards 6-48 3-25 Time of Possession 35:12 24:48 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGOhio St., Hyde 8-111, Guiton 9-98, El liott 5-37, R.Smith 6-30, Jones 4-24, Wilson 4-23, Ball 2-17, B.Miller 1-7, Team 2-(minus 2). Purdue, A.Hunt 6-23, Mostert 5-18, Cottom 7-16, Dawkins 1-5, Etling 8-(minus 35). PASSINGOhio St., B.Miller 19-23-1-233, Gui ton 8-11-0-59, Jones 1-2-0-3. Purdue, Etling 1329-1-89. RECEIVINGOhio St., Heuerman 5-116, Wilson 4-34, Corey (Philly).Brown 4-27, Elliott 3-23, D.Smith 3-18, Spencer 2-34, Vannett 2-21, Fields 2-6, Hyde 1-7, Epitropoulos 1-6, R.Smith 1-3. Purdue, Bush 2-18, Dawkins 2-13, A.Hunt 2-11, Sinz 2-10, Cottom 2-4, Knauf 1-16, Carter 1-14, Anthrop 1-3. No. 9 CLEMSON 59, VIRGINIA 10 Clemson 14 21 7 17 59 Virginia 7 0 3 0 10 First Quarter ClemS.Watkins 33 pass from Boyd (Catanzaro kick), 13:33. UVaWatford 6 run (Vozenilek kick), 5:00. ClemDavidson 2 run (Catanzaro kick), 2:59. Second Quarter ClemMcDowell 10 pass from Boyd (Catanzaro kick), 4:18. ClemMcDowell 25 run (Catanzaro kick), 1:29. ClemBoyd 1 run (Catanzaro kick), :13. Third Quarter ClemS.Watkins 96 pass from Boyd (Catanzaro kick), 10:58. UVaFG Vozenilek 40, 8:55. Fourth Quarter ClemKelly 38 run (Lakip kick), 12:37. ClemFG Lakip 41, 8:24. ClemHoward 10 run (Lakip kick), 3:05. A,959. Clem UVa First downs 26 13 Rushes-yards 43-175 39-114 Passing 435 163 Comp-Att-Int 34-45-1 19-46-2 Return Yards 93 2 Punts-Avg. 6-37.0 12-43.5 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 2-1 Penalties-Yards 3-25 6-74 Time of Possession 28:30 31:30 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGClemson, McDowell 12-70, Kelly 7-56, Howard 9-32, Davidson 3-23, Stoudt 3-23, Team 2-(minus 4), Boyd 7-(minus 25). Virginia, Parks 16-82, Mizzell 8-17, Shepherd 5-8, Watford 7-8, Lambert 2-0, Jennings 1-(minus 1). PASSINGClemson, Boyd 24-29-1-377, Stoudt 5-90-31, Kelly 5-7-0-27. Virginia, Watford 16-35-1-130, Lambert 3-11-1-33. RECEIVINGClemson, S.Watkins 8-169, Bryant 5-72, Leggett 4-30, M.Williams 3-39, McDowell 3-37, Howard 3-18, Hopper 3-9, Humphries 1-25, Forbush 1-17, Seckinger 1-12, Rodriguez 1-5, Mc Cullough 1-2. Virginia, Johnson 5-77, Mizzell 4-24, Parks 3-20, Jennings 3-13, Severin 2-17, McGee 2-12. No. 14 SOUTH CAROLINA 34, MISSISSIPPI ST. 16 Mississippi St. 7 3 0 6 16 South Carolina 14 3 17 0 34 First Quarter MSStPrescott 1 run (Sobiesk kick), 8:46. SCRoland 14 pass from Shaw (Fry kick), 6:23. SCRoland 43 pass from Shaw (Fry kick), 1:20. Second Quarter SCFG Fry 44, 11:25. MSStFG Sobiesk 38, 4:15. Third Quarter SCByrd 6 pass from Shaw (Fry kick), 12:54. SCAdams 4 pass from Shaw (Fry kick), 7:52. SCFG Fry 37, 2:07. Fourth Quarter MSStPrescott 11 run (pass failed), 5:38. A,111. MSSt SC First downs 23 12 Rushes-yards 35-150 34-160 Passing 235 147 Comp-Att-Int 28-43-3 10-20-0 Return Yards (-3) 24 Punts-Avg. 5-47.6 8-40.4 Fumbles-Lost 3-2 0-0 Penalties-Yards 6-25 4-20 Time of Possession 33:46 26:14 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGMississippi St., Prescott 15-78, Perkins 12-40, J.Robinson 6-24, Lewis 1-6, Shumpert 1-2. South Carolina, Davis 15-128, P.Cooper 6-23, Car son 6-18, J.Smith 4-5, Shaw 3-(minus 14). PASSINGMississippi St., Prescott 28-43-3-235. South Carolina, Shaw 10-20-0-147. RECEIVINGMississippi St., R.Johnson 7-53, Lewis 7-45, Wilson 3-40, J.Robinson 3-34, Perkins 3-29, M.Johnson 3-15, Shumpert 1-13, Samuel 1-6. South Carolina, Roland 2-57, Davis 2-26, Byrd 2-25, Carson 1-24, Ellington 1-6, Anderson 1-5, Adams 1-4. No. 21 N. ILLINOIS 63, UMASS 19 N. Illinois 21 21 7 14 63 UMass 6 7 6 0 19 First Quarter MassFG Levengood 42, 11:28. NIULynch 6 run (Sims kick), 8:03. MassFG Levengood 46, 5:35. NIULynch 25 run (Sims kick), 4:16. NIULynch 19 run (Sims kick), :10. Second Quarter NIUStingily 6 run (Sims kick), 14:09. MassWoodley 1 run (Levengood kick), 9:41. NIUBrescacin 66 pass from Lynch (Sims kick), 9:33. NIULewis 15 run (Sims kick), :31. Third Quarter NIULynch 11 run (Sims kick), 10:21. MassFG Levengood 44, 6:03. MassFG Levengood 40, 2:37. Fourth Quarter NIUBeebe 81 pass from Hare (Sims kick), 9:02. NIUHare 47 run (Sims kick), 5:31. A,061. NIU Mass First downs 27 15 Rushes-yards 49-354 45-155 Passing 258 169 Comp-Att-Int 12-17-0 10-25-2 Return Yards 19 0 Punts-Avg. 2-44.0 6-40.0 Fumbles-Lost 2-2 4-1 Penalties-Yards 1-15 5-40 Time of Possession 25:46 34:14 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGN. Illinois, Lynch 17-119, Stingily 8-58, Hare 2-52, Bouagnon 9-39, Smith 6-21, Sebas tiano 1-20, D.Brown 1-17, McIntosh 2-17, Lewis 1-15, Team 2-(minus 4). UMass, Woodley 38-163, S.Harris 2-15, Wegzyn 4-(minus 4), Team 1-(mi nus 19). PASSINGN. Illinois, Lynch 10-13-0-160, Hare 2-40-98. UMass, Wegzyn 10-25-2-169. RECEIVINGN. Illinois, Lewis 4-45, Semisch 2-30, Smith 2-26, Beebe 1-81, Brescacin 1-66, Maxwell 1-10, Eakes 1-0. UMass, Sharpe 5-65, Davis 2-27, Long 1-31, Mills 1-25, Beck 1-21. No. 22 WISCONSIN 28, IOWA 9 Wisconsin 0 7 7 14 28 Iowa 3 3 3 0 9 First Quarter IowaFG Meyer 28, 6:20. Second Quarter IowaFG Meyer 22, 4:52. WisPedersen 44 pass from Stave (Russell kick), 1:49. Third Quarter WisAbbrederis 20 pass from Stave (Russell kick), 7:34. IowaFG Meyer 29, :38. Fourth Quarter WisWhite 11 run (Russell kick), 6:29. WisWhite 2 run (Russell kick), 1:35. A,812. Wis Iowa First downs 15 14 Rushes-yards 45-218 32-115 Passing 144 179 Comp-Att-Int 11-19-1 16-40-2 Return Yards (-1) 18 Punts-Avg. 8-33.9 7-41.1 Fumbles-Lost 3-0 1-0 Penalties-Yards 7-55 4-30 Time of Possession 32:06 27:54 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGWisconsin, White 19-132, Gordon 1762, Stave 7-15, Abbrederis 1-11, Team 1-(minus 2). Iowa, Canzeri 5-58, Rudock 4-18, Weisman 9-15, Daniels 4-14, Bullock 6-6, Beathard 4-4. PASSINGWisconsin, Stave 11-19-1-144. Iowa, Ru dock 12-24-1-109, Beathard 4-16-1-70. RECEIVINGWisconsin, Pedersen 3-73, Abbrederis 3-30, White 2-19, Doe 2-17, Duckworth 1-5. Iowa, Powell 3-43, Bullock 3-39, Shumpert 2-35, T.Smith 2-26, Duzey 2-8, Martin-Manley 2-6, Fiedorowicz 1-16, VandeBerg 1-6. No. 24 MICHIGAN ST. 29, No. 23 MICHIGAN 6 Michigan 3 3 0 0 6 Michigan St. 3 10 3 13 29 First Quarter MichFG Wile 49, 10:38. MSUFG Geiger 40, 9:10. Second Quarter MSUFG Geiger 44, 11:19. MichFG Gibbons 39, 3:22. MSUFowler 14 pass from Cook (Geiger kick), :23. Third Quarter MSUFG Geiger 35, 9:54. Fourth Quarter MSUCook 1 run (kick blocked), 10:31. MSULangford 40 run (Geiger kick), 2:43. A,306. Mich MSU First downs 12 19 Rushes-yards 29-(-48) 39-142 Passing 216 252 Comp-Att-Int 15-30-1 18-33-1 Return Yards 22 21 Punts-Avg. 8-40.9 5-40.8 Fumbles-Lost 3-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 3-39 5-25 Time of Possession 27:39 32:21 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGMichigan, Toussaint 8-20, Morris 1-0, Team 2-(minus 22), Gardner 18-(minus 46). Michi gan St., Langford 26-120, Shelton 2-38, D.Williams 2-5, Hill 1-2, Team 3-(minus 8), Cook 5-(minus 15). PASSINGMichigan, Gardner 14-27-1-210, Mor ris 1-3-0-6. Michigan St., Cook 18-33-1-252. RECEIVINGMichigan, Funchess 6-65, Gallon 5-67, Chesson 3-82, Toussaint 1-2. Michigan St., Fowler 6-75, Lippett 5-62, Pendleton 2-62, Kings 2-14, Gleichert 1-18, Price 1-12, Mumphery 1-9. No. 25 ARIZONA ST. 55, WASHINGTON ST. 21 Arizona St. 21 21 7 6 55 Washington St. 0 14 7 0 21 First Quarter ASUT.Kelly 7 run (Gonzalez kick), 9:44. ASUT.Kelly 6 run (Gonzalez kick), 5:34. ASUStrong 11 pass from T.Kelly (Gonzalez kick), 3:20. Second Quarter WSUMarks 34 pass from Halliday (Furney kick), 14:51. ASUFoster 7 pass from T.Kelly (Gonzalez kick), 7:49. ASUR.Smith 51 pass from T.Kelly (Gonzalez kick), 6:22. ASUCoyle 8 pass from T.Kelly (Gonzalez kick), 1:40. WSUGalvin 15 pass from Halliday (Furney kick), :20. Third Quarter WSULaufasa 4 run (Furney kick), 10:32. ASUFoster 23 pass from T.Kelly (Gonzalez kick), 7:08. Fourth Quarter ASUFG Gonzalez 37, 14:51. ASUFG Gonzalez 36, 5:49. A,617. ASU WSU First downs 33 14 Rushes-yards 57-282 11-2 Passing 275 300 Comp-Att-Int 22-31-1 29-54-1 Return Yards 31 32 Punts-Avg. 2-40.5 8-42.5 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 3-1 Penalties-Yards 4-20 5-43 Time of Possession 37:27 22:33 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGArizona St., Grice 18-94, T.Kelly 1366, D.Lewis 13-48, Foster 8-30, Bradford 1-20, Garoutte 1-19, Bercovici 1-8, Team 2-(minus 3). Washington St., Mason 4-13, Caldwell 1-9, Laufasa 2-5, Halliday 4-(minus 25). PASSINGArizona St., T.Kelly 22-31-1-275. Wash ington St., Halliday 29-54-1-300. RECEIVINGArizona St., Foster 7-77, Strong 4-35, R.Smith 3-79, Coyle 3-28, Grice 2-31, Gammage 1-14, Ca.Smith 1-7, Rogers 1-4. Washington St., Mayle 6-56, Cracraft 4-78, Marks 4-66, Myers 3-30, Galvin 3-19, K.Williams 3-19, Caldwell 1-8, Mason 1-8, D.Williams 1-7, Fullington 1-4, Laufasa 1-3, Ratliff 1-2. GEORGIA 23, FLORIDA 20 Georgia 17 6 0 0 23 Florida 0 3 9 8 20 First Quarter GeoGurley 5 run (Morgan kick), 12:15. GeoGurley 73 pass from Murray (Morgan kick), 9:19. GeoFG Morgan 49, 2:13. Second Quarter GeoFG Morgan 27, 14:37. FlaFG Velez 31, 9:54. GeoFG Morgan 32, :00. Third Quarter FlaM.Brown 5 run (Velez kick), 6:21. FlaSafety, 1:19. Fourth Quarter FlaMurphy 14 run (C.Burton pass from Mur phy), 14:20. A,693. Geo Fla First downs 21 18 Rushes-yards 35-156 41-145 Passing 258 174 Comp-Att-Int 16-26-0 13-29-0 Return Yards 1 2 Punts-Avg. 2-42.5 4-39.5 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 0-0 Penalties-Yards 6-45 7-70 Time of Possession 26:26 33:34 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGGeorgia, Gurley 17-100, Douglas 6-36, Green 3-14, Murray 6-6, Hicks 1-3, Team 2-(minus 3). Florida, Kel.Taylor 20-76, M.Brown 9-41, Mur phy 10-28, Patton 2-0. PASSINGGeorgia, Murray 16-25-0-258, Team 0-10-0. Florida, Murphy 13-29-0-174. RECEIVINGGeorgia, Bennett 5-59, Gurley 3-87, McGowan 3-43, Rome 2-24, Lynch 1-31, Doug las 1-8, Wooten 1-6. Florida, Dunbar 4-91, Pat ton 3-38, Fulwood 2-22, T.Burton 2-11, Joyer 1-7, Showers 1-5. NOTRE DAME 38, NAVY 34 Navy 7 13 0 14 34 Notre Dame 10 7 7 14 38 First Quarter NDG.Atkinson 41 run (Brindza kick), 12:12. NavyReynolds 2 run (Sloan kick), 7:32. NDFG Brindza 26, 4:57. Second Quarter NavyC.Swain 11 run (Sloan kick), 8:04. NDT.Jones 36 pass from Rees (Brindza kick), 6:18. NavyReynolds 3 run (kick failed), 2:07. Third Quarter NDKoyack 17 pass from Rees (Brindza kick), 6:25. Fourth Quarter NavyReynolds 4 run (Sloan kick), 14:56. NDMcDaniel 4 run (Brindza kick), 12:51. NavyAiken 34 pass from Reynolds (Sloan kick), 8:55. NDFolston 1 run (Brindza kick), 3:47. A,795. Navy ND First downs 28 25 Rushes-yards 70-331 36-264 Passing 88 242 Comp-Att-Int 6-9-0 12-20-2 Return Yards 11 5 Punts-Avg. 2-39.5 0-0.0 Fumbles-Lost 2-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 0-0 5-55 Time of Possession 37:36 22:24 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGNavy, C.Swain 16-85, Singleton 16-77, D.Brown 7-55, Reynolds 22-53, Whiteside 7-48, Sanders 1-13, Lynch 1-0. Notre Dame, Folston 18140, G.Atkinson 7-74, McDaniel 7-52, Daniels 1-2, Team 3-(minus 4). PASSINGNavy, Reynolds 6-9-0-88. Notre Dame, Rees 12-20-2-242. RECEIVINGNavy, Thomas 2-25, Bolena 2-17, Aiken 1-34, Dudeck 1-12. Notre Dame, T.Jones 4-111, Niklas 2-44, Koyack 2-34, Daniels 2-33, Prosise 1-13, C.Brown 1-7. SATURDAYS SCORES EAST Albright 33, Widener 19 Alfred 31, Salisbury 21 American International 43, New Haven 34 Amherst 17, Trinity (Conn.) 16 Anna Maria 42, Castleton St. 14 Bates 17, Bowdoin 10 Bentley 24, S. Connecticut 19 Boston College 34, Virginia Tech 27 Brockport 14, College of NJ 3 Brown 27, Penn 0 Bucknell 28, Colgate 7 Buffalo St. 59, Hartwick 41 CCSU 52, Wagner 17 Colby 37, Tufts 0 East Stroudsburg 52, Lock Haven 28 Fitchburg St. 26, Westeld St. 23 Fordham 32, Holy Cross 30 Framingham St. 58, Mass. Maritime 12 Franklin & Marshall 41, Susquehanna 36 Gallaudet 40, Becker 34 Gannon 40, Seton Hill 21 Geneva 39, Grove City 7 Hobart 41, Union (NY) 20 Husson 39, NY Maritime 17 Indiana (Pa.) 42, Clarion 14 Ithaca 23, Frostburg St. 0 Kean 47, Morrisville St. 21 Kings (Pa.) 28, Lycoming 24 Kutztown 45, Millersville 9 Lafayette 45, Georgetown 27 Lebanon Valley 34, Delaware Valley 31, OT Maine 19, Stony Brook 14 Marist 42, Jacksonville 35 Mercyhurst 19, Edinboro 6 Merrimack 31, Assumption 21 Middlebury 40, Hamilton 13 Moravian 41, Gettysburg 21 Muhlenberg 42, Dickinson 3 N. Illinois 63, UMass 19 Norwich 38, Mount Ida 19 Penn St. 24, Illinois 17, OT Plymouth St. 34, Worcester St. 31 Princeton 53, Cornell 20 RPI 28, Merchant Marine 13 Robert Morris 24, Bryant 3 Rowan 10, Cortland St. 9 Rutgers 23, Temple 20 Sacred Heart 24, Monmouth (NJ) 21 Salve Regina 45, Maine Maritime 8 Slippery Rock 35, California (Pa.) 17 St. John Fisher 28, Utica 27 St. Lawrence 32, WPI 15 Stevenson 48, Misericordia 3 Stonehill 42, Pace 14 Syracuse 13, Wake Forest 0 Thomas More 31, St. Vincent 0 W. Connecticut 35, Mass.-Dartmouth 12 W. New England 38, Curry 27 Washington (Mo.) 9, Carnegie-Mellon 7 Waynesburg 38, Westminster (Pa.) 19 Wesleyan (Conn.) 16, Williams 14 West Chester 66, Cheyney 14 Yale 53, Columbia 12 SOUTH Albany St. (Ga.) 31, Benedict 6 Ave Maria 45, Edward Waters 14 Bethune-Cookman 38, NC Central 14 Birmingham-Southern 35, Rhodes 34 Bowie St. 76, Lincoln (Pa.) 19 Bridgewater (Va.) 34, Emory & Henry 17 Campbell 19, Stetson 18 Catawba 38, Mars Hill 31 Centre 49, Hendrix 20 Charleston Southern 27, Presbyterian 16 Chattanooga 35, Appalachian St. 28 Clemson 59, Virginia 10 Coastal Carolina 50, Charlotte 25 Concord 44, Virginia-Wise 6 Cumberland (Tenn.) 34, Bethel (Tenn.) 13 Cumberlands 70, Campbellsville 17 Delaware St. 22, Howard 20 E. Kentucky 44, Tennessee St. 0 Elizabeth City St. 28, Virginia Union 21 Faulkner 66, Belhaven 14 Fayetteville St. 34, Livingstone 31 Florida A&M 16, Norfolk St. 6 Furman 16, Georgia Southern 14 Gardner-Webb 51, Warner 14 Georgetown (Ky.) 49, Blueeld South 7 Georgia 23, Florida 20 Grambling St. 47, MVSU 40 James Madison 31, Villanova 21 Johns Hopkins 24, Ursinus 18 Liberty 17, VMI 7 Marshall 61, Southern Miss. 13 Middle Tennessee 24, UAB 21 Millsaps 38, Berry 3 North Alabama 30, West Alabama 27, OT North Carolina 27, NC State 19 Old Dominion 66, Rhode Island 14 Randolph-Macon 42, Shenandoah 7 Richmond 27, Albany (NY) 10 SC State 45, Savannah St. 9 South Carolina 34, Mississippi St. 16 St. Augustines 13, Johnson C. Smith 6 The Citadel 28, Samford 26 Virginia St. 28, Chowan 0 W. Kentucky 44, Georgia St. 28 MIDWEST Akron 16, Kent St. 7 Albion 42, Olivet 28 Augustana (Ill.) 28, Carthage 0 Augustana (SD) 25, Concordia (St.P.) 7 Baker 54, Evangel 10 Baldwin-Wallace 31, Marietta 7 Benedictine (Ill.) 28, Concordia (Ill.) 27 Benedictine (Kan.) 48, Cent. Methodist 23 Bethany (Kan.) 24, Tabor 17 Bethel (Minn.) 55, Hamline 6 Bluffton 28, Anderson (Ind.) 0 Buena Vista 37, Luther 14 Butler 33, Dayton 30 Case Reserve 16, Chicago 3 Cent. Missouri 56, Nebraska-Kearney 0 Central 48, Loras 3 Coe 24, Wartburg 10 Cole 2, Haskell Indian Nations 0 Concordia (Moor.) 35, Carleton 27 Concordia (Wis.) 55, Rockford 13 Cornell (Iowa) 28, Carroll (Wis.) 22 Culver-Stockton 42, Avila 35 Dakota Wesleyan 31, Nebraska Wesleyan 17 Denison 27, Oberlin 14 Doane 56, Dordt 13 Drake 56, Morehead St. 14 E. Illinois 56, Tennessee Tech 21 Elmhurst 28, North Park 14 Emporia St. 35, Missouri Western 30 Eureka 23, Iowa Wesleyan 10 Ferris St. 41, Wayne (Mich.) 10 Findlay 35, Ashland 28 Fort Hays St. 63, S. Dakota Tech 17 Franklin 41, Deance 7 Friends 47, Bethel (Kan.) 10 Grand View 70, Waldorf 14 Greenville 28, Westminster (Mo.) 7 Illinois College 35, Monmouth (Ill.) 13 Illinois St. 13, N. Iowa 3 Indianapolis 27, St. Josephs (Ind.) 24 Jamestown 49, Presentation 41 John Carroll 63, Wilmington (Ohio) 3 Kalamazoo 14, Adrian 10 Kansas St. 41, Iowa St. 7 Lake Erie 63, Walsh 41 Lakeland 35, Aurora 32 Marian (Ind.) 26, Taylor 19, OT Mary 28, Northern St. (SD) 14 Mayville St. 20, Dakota St. 14 Michigan St. 29, Michigan 6 Minnesota 42, Indiana 39 Notre Dame 38, Navy 34 Ohio St. 56, Purdue 0 S. Illinois 34, W. Illinois 28 SE Missouri 37, Urbana 35 SW Minnesota St. 51, Winona St. 44, 2OT Saginaw Valley St. 55, Michigan Tech 35 San Diego 58, Valparaiso 14 Wisconsin 28, Iowa 9 Youngstown St. 38, South Dakota 34 SOUTHWEST Angelo St. 25, Texas A&M Commerce 20 Arkansas Tech 26, East Central 17 Austin 25, Southwestern (Texas) 6 Bacone 41, Oklahoma Baptist 38 Cent. Oklahoma 49, Lincoln (Mo.) 42 Harding 42, SE Oklahoma 10 Henderson St. 37, Ark.-Monticello 21 Incarnate Word 47, McMurry 43 Langston 20, Okla. Panhandle St. 19 Mary Hardin-Baylor 80, Howard Payne 0 Midwestern St. 64, Menlo 7 Mississippi College 41, E. Texas Baptist 28 NW Missouri St. 52, Washburn 21 Northeastern St. 31, SW Baptist 3 S. Arkansas 31, Ouachita 23 SW Assemblies of God 26, Wayland Baptist 21 SW Oklahoma 42, S. Nazarene 14 Texas 35, Kansas 13 UTSA 34, Tulsa 15 West Virginia 30, TCU 27, OT FAR WEST Air Force 42, Army 28 Arizona 33, California 28 Black Hills St. 48, NM Highlands 45 Carroll (Mont.) 48, S. Oregon 30 Cent. Washington 21, Humboldt St. 14 Chadron St. 59, W. New Mexico 17 Chapman 45, La Verne 7 Colorado Mines 14, Western St. (Col.) 13 E. Oregon 57, Dickinson St. 3 Fort Lewis 27, Adams St. 24 Montana St. 35, N. Colorado 28 Pacic 68, Lewis & Clark 28 Redlands 34, Claremont-Mudd 6 San Jose St. 34, UNLV 24 Associated Press No. 4 Ohio State laid another beating on an overmatched confer ence foe, and No. 24 Michigan State took control of the Big Tens other division with a rout of Michigan. The Buckeyes, com ing off 49-point vic tory over Penn State, crushed Purdue 56-0 in W est Lafayette, Ind. Ohio State has won 21 straight and has been far and away the Big Tens most impressive tea m. The Buckeyes ap pear to be cruising to ward a Leaders Divi sion title and their rst Big Ten title game. They have a one-game lead over Wisconsin, a team theyve already beat en, and have games left against Illinois, Indiana and Michigan. Michigan State and the nations No. 1 de fense were even more impressive. The Spar tans pummeled their rivals 29-6 in East Lan sing, Mich., and have a game and a half lead in the Legends Divi sion. Michigan State plays second-place Ne braska in two weeks. The Huskers kept pace by beating Northwest ern 27-24 on a last-play touchdown pass. NO. 4 OHIO STATE 56, PURDUE 0 WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. Doran Grant picked off Purdues rst pass, returning it for a touchdown, and Brax ton Miller threw for 233 yards and four touch downs as Ohio State ex tended the nations lon gest winning streak to 21. The Bucke yes (90, 5-0 Big Ten) have not lost in 22 months. Coach Urban Mey er also won his 22nd straight game, tying a personal best estab lished at Florida. Ohio State scored the most points and produced the most lopsided scor ing margin in the 56game history of this se ries. Both topped the marks set in Ohio States 49-0 victory in 2010. Purdue (1-7, 0-4) lost its sixth in a row. Grays interception helped the Buckeyes take a 28-0 lead after one quarter, and they extended it to 42-0 at the half. NO. 24 MICHIGAN ST. 29, NO. 23 MICHIGAN 6 EAST LANSING, Mich. Shilique Cal houn, Ed Davis and the rest of Michigan States defense battered rival Michigan, and the Spar tans remained unbeat en in the Big Ten. Michigan State (8-1, 5-0 Big Ten) has won ve of the last six meet ings with the Wolver ines, and this was the Spartans most lop sided win in the series since 1967. They held Michigan (6-2, 2-2) to minus-48 yards rush ing, the worst output in the Ann Arbor pro grams history. Connor Cook threw for a touchdown and ran for one, but this game belonged to Michigan States de fense, which solidied its spot among the na tions best with an over whelming performance on a rainy afternoon at Spartan Stadium. Calhoun and Davis each had 2 sacks. NO. 9 CLEMSON 59, VIRGINIA 10 CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. Tajh Boyd threw three touchdown pass es and ran for a score and Clemson broke the game open with three touchdowns in the last 4:18 of the rst half. The Hampton, Va., native became the At lantic Coast Confer ences career leader in touchdown-making with a 33-yard pass to Sammy Watkins to start the scoring for the Ti gers (8-1, 6-1 ACC). It broke a tie at 112 TDs with North Caroli na States Philip Rivers. Boyd later added TD throws of 10 yards to Roderick McDowell and 96 yards to Watkins, and scored on a 1-yard run 13 seconds before half time to make it 35-7. Virginia (2-7, 0-5) lost its sixth in a row and for the 15th time in its last 19 games. It also suf fered its second 59-10 loss at home this sea son, having lost by the same score against No. 2 Oregon in the second week of the season. NO. 14 S. CAROLINA 34, MISSISSIPPI STATE 16 COLUMBIA, S.C. Connor Shaw threw for four touchdowns, Mike Davis ran for 128 yards to move past 1,000 yards this season and South Carolina tied a school record with its 15th straight home vic tory. Shaw matched his personal best for TD throws after missing two days of practice with a virus. Davis, the SECs leading rusher, had his seventh game reach ing the centu ry mark and became the teams rst 1,000yard rusher since Mar cus Lattimore gained 1,1 97 yards his fresh man season three years ago. South Carolina (7-2, 5-2 Southeastern Con ference) won its sev enth in row over the Bulldogs (4-4, 1-3) and tied the record for consecutive victo ries at Wlliams-Brice Stadium, equaling the mark set from 197880. The Gamecocks will get the chance to break the record in two weeks when they close league play at home against Florida. NO. 21 N. ILLINOIS 63, MASSACHUSETTS 19 FOXBOROUGH, Mass. Jordan Lynch ran for 119 yards and four touchdowns and threw for another in just over a half to help Northern Illinois stay unbeaten. The Huskies (9-0, 5-0 Mid-American Conference) scored touchdowns on their rst ve possessions and six of their sev en drives in the rst half. Cameron Stingi ly rushed for 58 yards and a touchdown, and Tommylee Lewis also ran one in for North ern Illinois. Buckeyes, Spartans in control of Big Ten MICHAEL CONROY / AP Ohio State running back Ezekiel Elliott, center, straight-arms Purdue safety Taylor Richards as he cuts in front of defensive back Frankie Williams during Saturdays game in West Lafayette, Ind.

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The yard sale and auction got under way in the morning at the Reliant Center, the convention center adjacent to the nowclosed stadium. More than 4,000 people were inside or wait ing to get in by about 10 a.m. Saturday, Re liant Park officials said, the line twist ing through the center and out the door. For those looking for a cheap memento, a 12-inch by 12-inch piece of AstroTurf cost $20. Seats were going for $200 a pair, and larger items, including autographed lockers and dugout benches, were to be auctioned off. The first item up for auction a set of 10 pretzel warmers from an old conces sion stand went for $50. Other items for sale included projectors, VCRs and turnstiles. Marcos Escobar bought four squares of AstroTurf and two pairs of seats. He re called fond memories of watching Houston Astros baseball games and Houston Oilers football games there with his father. I wanted to come out here and get something before they tear it down, Escobar said. Opened in 1965, the Astrodome was the worlds first multipur pose domed stadium. It was home to the As tros and the Oilers. But no professional sports team has played there since 1999 and has been closed to all events since 2009. Voters will decide Tuesday whether to approve a referendum authorizing up to $217 million in bonds to turn the stadium into a giant convention center and exhibition space. Houston-area leaders have said that if the referendum fails, the Astrodome will probably be razed. A poll conduct ed in mid-Septem ber by Rice University in Houston found 45 percent of likely vot ers supported the ref erendum, with 35 per cent opposing it and nearly 20 percent still undecided. With its fate still un decided, the Astro dome was awash in nostalgia Saturday. Some people showed up in the Astros fa mous orange-striped rainbow jerseys from the 1970s. Others wore old Oilers caps, commemorating a team that left Houston for Nashville in the late 1990s after failing to get a new stadium. Lorenzo Fuentes re called paying $4 for tickets to games as he finished buying four squares of turf. I have a lot of big memories of the As trodome, Fuentes said. He added that his wife didnt neces sarily understand, and told him that anything he brought home from the stadium would have to stay in the ga rage. Astrodome sale features turf, lockers AP FILE PHOTO This 1965 photo made with a sheye lens shows the Houston Astrodome in its original state. The Houston Astros played their rst game in the stadium on April 9, 1965. A yard sale and auction began Saturday for anyone wanting to buy a memento from the stadium once dubbed the eighth wonder of the world. The sale is being held at the Reliant Center, adjacent to the now-closed As trodome.

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Taxpayers $7 billion subsidy to fast-food profits Is fast food so vital to the nation that taxpayers shou ld spend $7 billion a year to sup plement the industrys prots? Imagine the outcry if that was proposed. And yet a study by econo mists at the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana and the University of California at Berkeleys Labor Center says its already happening. Seven billion dollars a year is what it costs taxpayers for Medicaid, food stamps and the other public assistance programs for fast-food workers who are paid poverty-level wages. A second report, Super-Sizing Public Costs by the National Employment Law Project, said low wages and missing benets at the 10 largest fast-food com panies in the country cost tax payers about $3.8 billion a year. Another way to look at it: McDonalds posted $1.5 bil lion in third-quarter prots. Taxpayers paid $1.2 billion last year for public assistance to the McDonalds workforce. Its enough to give you indigestion. The study also looked at only ve of the largest federal public assistance programs, excluding other federal and state programs that would have pushed the g ures higher,. By under-paying employees, companies push their real cost of doing business onto the public at large. This can be called cor porate welfare. Or socialism. But not capitalism. Fast-food workers should be paid a living wage. The corpora tions that hire them must stop relying on the public for any thing more than bu yi ng the occa sional burger. St. Louis Post-Dispatch Its the Democrats who have abandoned reality The author of the Voices let ter, Robert Wesolowski (To Republicans: Stick to the Facts, not ction, Oct. 20), is clue less about what a realist, or a Republican or a patriot is, and is no way qualied to discuss the Republican brain. Democrats are as far from re ality as anyone can get. Possibly the stupidest state ment ever made is: You have to pass it to see whats in it, as Democrats pushed through Obamacare when they had a majority. If 62 percent of Americans dont want Obamacare, then 62 percent of Congress should have voted against it. What happened to representing the people? This administration caused thousands of small and large businesses to shut down and put thousands on the welfare rolls. The government needs to stay out of the pockets of those trying to build businesses. I also dont expect the writer to understand that you can no more prove the theory of evolu tion than the existance of God. Theres more to support God than the reliability of carbon dating. Remember, over half of the Democratic Convention voted to take God out of their party. That should explain a lot. Maybe you can explain precisely where it all began. President Obama says he has cut the decit not! Because of the sequester he was forced to spend less this year. The in crease in the 2013 decit was reduced but the nations de cit hasnt been reduced at all. Its just not growing as fast. Thank the Republicans. Obama said raising the debt ceiling was unpatriotic until it was his ceiling. I am retired Army and thought how childish the Democrats acted during the shutdown by closing the parks and mon uments, as well as the White House which belong to the people. We know how the Democrats felt. Can they explain where theyre going to get the $17 trillion from when they have to stop printing useless money. The secrecy around everything this administration does is rea son enough for most Americans to not trust the government. If this administration was as transparent as they claim there would be no problems they would have all been impeached by now. It seems everytime Obama, Reid, Pelosi, or any other lib eral (not to be confused with realists) opens their mouth we get nothing but lies and exaggerations. Anyone understanding simple math knows that there should not be a default. They would also know that realistic unem ployment is closer to 14 percent than 7 percent even with the 300 thousand jobs Obama created. Obama continues to claim, America does not have a spending problem, but he has spent over $7 trillion more than we have taken in, in the last ve years. As we approached the shut down and throughout the pro cess Obama and Reid refused to negotiate unless they got all of what they wanted before they would actually negotiate. Is that how they negotiate for the peo ple? Is that even what negotiate means? If you want reality, Obama said he would fundamentally change America and then pro ceeded to, by hook or crook, steal and create the votes to get well on the way. There is no way any Democrat could be called a realist. I can only assume that Weslowski is one of the 47 million with his hand out and his facts wrong. John Cohn lives in Tavares YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD BILL KOCH ............... ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ....................... NEWS EDITOR GENE PACKWOOD ............ EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com V oter turnout during federal elections typically rises at least compared to state and local races. Big elections garner the most at tention because issues stretch across a wider spectrum of pubic interest: federal entitlements, de fense spending, foreign affairs. The media help parlay interest in federal candidates with expansive coverage. As American citizens we should feel a compulsion to vote. In a mi nuscule and nonetheless signicant way, we maintain a stake in the di rection this nation travels. We help determine the future of our Ameri can generation. Voting responsibly is a noble en deavor and should never be taken lightly. We ought to investigate can didates claims and cast our ballot with diligence. But while the grander issues right ly occupy our political landscapes every two and four years, we seem to forget and neglect the lesser known contests the ones involv ing local candidates and races. Voter turnout for those races is of ten dismal often in the singledigit percentages and should serve as an indictment of our civil responsibilities. Local candidates shape our com munities futures, perhaps more so than in the larger races that parade before us the bigger personalities and the deeper issues in brief tele vised sound bites. Forming opinions on the larger electoral horizons is easier. Infor mation is more accessible. Nonetheless, the local races sometimes play an even more piv otal role in shaping our political destinies as the state and feder al ones. But nding concise infor mation sometimes doesnt come as quickly and easily. But it is available. On Tuesday, local voters will be presented with the opportunity to make their voices heard. Twentyeight candidates in 13 races in sev en Lake County municipalities will have their names on local ballots. The winners of these races will then be given the authority and the responsibility to establish local or dinances and to determine how their municipalities are governed. Unfortunately, less than one in ten eligible voters typically make those determinations and, by de fault, decide their communities fate. We have been given the opportu nity and the privilege to participate in how we are governed. It is an op portunity few in human history have been granted. Come Tuesday, we should exercise this right and contribute to the fu ture of our hometowns. After all, as American citizens, who sits in City Hall should be as equally important as who sits in the White House The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for gram mar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two let ters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 OUR VOICE LETTER of the WEEK C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013 OTHER VOICES Make sure you vote on Tuesday ASSOCIATED PRESS

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013 Russ Sloan, in his re sponse (Ul tra-liberal views of columnist often miss the mark! Aug. 5) to a guest col umn I had written, shows how differently we view our history and politics. We do have one area of agreement, and that is we both ap plaud the access the Daily Commercial gives its read ers to air their views. I will begin with what he called the most revealing aspect of my column and the main divide as those who believe in government and those that do not. Sloan writes, I do not know of any conservative or tea party member who does not love and support our re public, our constitution and our form of representative government. Ronald Reagan, the most worshipped conservative, once said: The government is not the solution, govern ment is the problem. That does not sound like a ring ing endorsement of our form of government. Most tea party members I know do not like govern ment, period. Wearing ag lapel pins and wrapping yourself with a ag does not make one a believer in government. Sloan wrote: But we be lieve, as our Founding Fathers did, in a limit ed government. The fram ers of our constitution feared a large centralized government. Nothing could be further from the truth if one under stands our history. Yes, our Founding Fathers did believe in a small gov ernment initially, and they tried it with the First and Second Continental Congresses and found them totally lacking in authority to govern. They decided to strength en the power of govern ment with the Articles of Confederation, another lim ited form of government, and within a few years found it was inadequate in its governmental powers. A meeting was called to revise the Articles of Confederation, and the founders quickly decided a much more powerful form of a central government was needed. They created the most powerful central gov ernment the world had ever seen. The Founding Fathers gave Congress tremendous power in Article I: The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes, du ties, imposts and excises, to pay the debts and provide for the common defense and general welfare of the United States. Congress received the au thority to make any law needed to carry into exe cution any of the enumer ated powers given them in Article I with this clause: To make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into execution the foregoing powers. The above two clauses make Sloans statement that our constitution was care fully crafted to give power to the people not to the government seem rather uninformed. In fact, the founders did quite the opposite by limit ing the power of the people by limiting voting rights to white property own ers; creating the elector al college as a buffer so the people could not elect the president directly; by the election of senators by the state legislatures. Sloan wrote, The real fact is that conservatives and tea party groups are attempt ing to run our government as crafted by our Founding Fathers. He may be right on this, since the Founding Fathers suppressed the vote, gave women no rights, kept the blacks ensla ved, and were all white. Marvin Jacobson resides in Clermont OTHER VOICES Voices | www.dailycommercial.com SUBMIT YOUR OWN GUEST COLUMN: If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA (D) 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W. Washington, D.C. 20500 202-456-1111 Web address: whitehouse.gov U.S. SENATE BILL NELSON (D) 716 Hart Senate Ofce Building Washington, D.C. 20515 202-224-5274 Fax: 202-228-2183 Web address: billnelson.senate.gov/contact 225 E. Robinson St., Ste 410 Orlando, FL 32801 407-872-7161 Fax: 407-872-7165 MARCO RUBIO (R) 317 Hart Senate Ofce Building Washington DC, 20510 Phone: 202-224-3041 Orlando Ofce: 201 South Orange Avenue Suite 350 Orlando, FL 32801 Phone: 407-254-2573, or toll free 1-866-630-7106 Web address: rubio.senate.gov/public U.S. HOUSE FI F TH DISTRICT CORRINE BROWN (D-JACKSONVILLE) 2111 Rayburn House Ofce Building Washington, DC 20515 202-225-0123 Fax: 202-225-2256 Web address: corrinebrown.house.gov Orlando Ofce: 455 N. Garland Ave., Suite 414 Orlando, FL 32801 407-872-2208 Fax: 407-872-5763 10TH DISTRICT DANIEL WEBSTER ( R -WINTER GAR D EN) 1039 Longworth HOB Washington, DC 20515 Phone: 202-225-2176 Fax: 202-225-0999 Web address: webster.house.gov Lake County Ofce: 122 E. Main St. Tavares, FL 32778 Phone: 352-383-3552 11TH DISTRICT RICHARD NUGENT ( R -BROOKSVILLE) 1727 Longworth HOB Washington, DC 20515 202-225-1002 Fax: 202-226-6559 Web address: nugent.house.gov Brooksville ofce: 16224 Spring Hill Dr. Brooksville, FL 34604 352-799-8354 Fax: 352-799-8776 GOVERNOR RICK SCOTT (R) The Capitol 400 S. Monroe St. Tallahassee, FL 32399 850-488-7146 Web address: www.gov.com FLORIDA SENATE 8TH DISTRICT DOROTHY L. HUKILL (R) 210 Senate Ofce Building 404 S Monroe St. Tallahassee, FL 32399 850-487-5008 Ocala ofce: 110 S.E. Watula Ave. Ocala, FL 34471 352-694-0160 Email address: hukill.dorothy.web@senate.gov 11TH DISTRICT ALAN HA YS (R) 320 Senate Ofce Building 404 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32399-1100 850-487-5011 Email address: hays.alan.web@senate.gov LOCAL O FF ICES: 871 South Central Ave. Umatilla, FL 32784-9290 352-742-6441 1104 Main Street The Villages, FL 32159 352-360-6739 Fax: 352-360-6748 18TH DISTRICT WILTON SIMPSON (R) 322 Senate Ofce Building 404 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32399-1100 850-487-5018 Email address: simpson.wilton.web @senate.gov DISTRICT O FF ICE: P.O. Box 787 New Port Richey, FL 34656 727-816-1120 YOUR GOVERNMENT HOW TO CONTACT THOSE WHO REPRESENT YOU Marvin Jacobson GUEST COLUMNIST OTHER VOICES Tea party misguided about the Founding Fathers Congress needs to walk the walk and talk the talk When I was in the Marine Corp, we had a saying, You talk the talk, but can you walk the walk? Every election cycle politicians on both sides of the aisle, talk the talk. Few ever attempt to walk the walk. Recently, Republicans in the House of Representatives attempted to follow through on their promises of smaller government and less spending. They failed miserably and they have no one to blame but themselves. The recent government shutdown, as Shakespeare once wrote, was much ado about nothing. But Democrats, keeping their promise of never letting a crisis go to waste, took full ad vantage of the hapless Republicans, and put the blame squarely on Republicans. Other stories, not favorable to Democrats, got pushed aside. In case you have forgotten your schooling, let me remind you that the House of Representatives controls the purse strings and all spending bills must originate with them. The Republicancontrolled House voted all the money required to fund all government activities except for Obamacare. The Constitution gives the House the right to de cide whether or not they want to fund or not fund a particular government activity. Forget what the Supreme Court said about a law being legal. That doesnt mean Congress has to fund it. Each branch of government is separate and the Founding Fathers made the judiciary the least powerful. But presidents found passing some laws took too long, but if they appointed like-minded judges to positions of power, those judges could do what Congress would not do. Congress has let activist judges usurp their power. Democrats choose to shut down government. Democrats blamed Republicans. With their con trol of the mainstream media, liberals know they can lie with impunity and few in the media will confront them. Sadly, the media has become the propaganda arm of liberal government. There was never any chance of government de faulting on the debt. Money was available in the Treasury to take care of the interest on our nation al debt. If you listened to the talking heads on TV or followed the story in your local paper, you would never have known that. The Senate chose to shut down government because the House did not include money for Obamacare. That was their right! But it was also their responsibility to live up to what they did! Obama lied when he claimed it was some new outrage to withhold funds and change govern ment policy by withholding those funds. Whether withholding money to fund a government activity is good or bad, it is lawful for Congress to do so. Did you see Republicans stand before the media and tell their side of the story? I did, but it was on the Blaze, Glenn Becks network. If Republicans could tell their story there, couldnt they also tell it to the mainstream media? Did they? And if so, did the mainstream media decide to not tell their side? Congress does not have to lift the debt ceiling. Congress could make politicians on both sides of the isle cut back and spend only what taxes bring in. If Congress would not lift the ceiling on our na tional debt, it would mean government could not run-up any new debt. Wouldnt it be nice if Congress would walk the walk, and live up to some of their promises? Sonny Heninger lives in Leesburg Sonny Heninger GUEST COLUMNIST

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013 rf r f n t b f b f n b r f t f f f ffb bn tbnf bnnt n f f f r f f f f f r f b n b r b r f f b f n f f f n f f n f b b f f f f f f f n f f r t n n f f f f f r n t f f b f f f t f f f f f b f b f f f n n f b f f f f rf ntbf ff t b f f r f f f f f f t f f t t n f r t f r f f f n f r n f t t f r f f f b f f t f n t r t f t n f f f nfbb fb tfrb ftrtff fbn f nfbb r n b n f f f r fbtnf fnfnt tffbff fff ttffnf nnnftb frfffr rnrnfbfbrfrfbn tfttn tfntf rr nff nnn fnbtfbffbt ftffffbr fffrtrr bf rtrr ftfff r tff nfff nnnb nffbt fff n f f f t f b t r f f f f f f b f f ffffr rftfbr frtrr nr ft ffnn ftfntn nbfff ffnfnn nffbbnt nfnb fbttfff tfbrffb fffrf nfffffff ffffffb r tr fffr fff fnfnfbfn fffffbf rfff fff bfrfb ftfffr tr b fbtfff ffb ffb fbrtrf nrffbr fbrftffrfr r r r r r r r r r r nbnfff ffbff ffbrfbrfr btfffbf ftffb fff nfbnnf nfffnnfn fnnbbf rbfnff bffff rf nrffrnnr bffftf fnr fffbt nfnnf r fbtfffffb fn brtrrfb ffbf rfnffb rtffr frnnfnf tntff nf ff nfnnb bffnffb ffff rfn rffrnnr bffftf fnr fffbt nfnnf fffr fff fnfnfbfn fffffbf rfff fff bfrfb ftfffr tr fff r trf fnf tr b r r fr t r r r f nff ff b f r f rff fff fbrr rr rf fr rr r ff fffff ffr rrr b r rf nnfbff frff r r r r r r r r r r b n f f b b f f n f n f f n r b f f r f f f b r f f n t f f f f f f f f f f f f r f f f r f r t r r r n r f f b b n f f f b t n r ff b f r ff b nfb ffb f fffrf fr n tf ftr b fbf ffffrf fbffr fffff ffnt fnnn fbf frfrfrrft rfrffrf fffff nfff f f f r f t r frfn fbf fftfbft fffffftff ffffnfb ff t t tr nbt fbtfftr tbn frbf frfrn fnnfbfffb ff f fnbnf ffff b ff bnbtff fb f fff f r r r f t bf ftr nbt fbtfftr tbn frbf frfrn fnnfbfffb ff f fnbnf ffff b ff bnbtff fb f fff f r b f r r fft bff n bf bf ftr tf f fn f ftr b nbt fbtfftr tbn frbf frfrn fnnfbfffb ff f fnbnf ffff b ff bnbtff fb f fff f f r b r f r ff fbtffff ffb fbrt rf ff fff brff ffrfr nfnnb bffnffbff ffr fnrffr nnrbf fftffn rfffb tnfnn fffr fff fnfnfbfn ffffnff fffnf ff bfrfb ftfffr tr fbtffff ffb fbrtr ff ffn ffb rffffrfr nfnnb bffnffbff ffr fnrffr nnrbf fftffn rfffb tnfnn fffr fff fnfnfbfn fffnff nfbff n f bfrfb ftfffr tr b b

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Sunday, November 3, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 rfntr bbr trbnnn br bnt rfrnnn rrnnrnn bnnnrn nrr nnb rbrrn rntn nnnnn brbbbrbn rn brrr ntrrr rbr bnn nnrr r rnrnrfnr rrfrn nbrnr trr brrbr n bnntbr nnnnr brrnr rnrtnnr nnbr rnr trbrnt rn rnt t nrnnt brrn rrrnfr bn nrnr rb b rrn trrnrn rtnr bnrntr rbnrnn nrtrnf rnr bnn rnnrr nrbn nt rnb tnnbn nnr nrnn brnn rntrn bbr nnr ttnrnr btr nrnn ntrnt bbtrn btrn rrnb brn nr nrnr rtrrn brbn bbrbr nrnnr rnrtrn br rr brrr nr rrn brbrbnttrr tbr trnrrrn rnnn r f ntbbnn nnnnnntn tntnnn b b n n n n b n r tnbtnbb nnnnb t t b nntntnnt nb nnnnttn ftb n n n b n n b n b f nnnnnt ntnbtbbt bbnnb tnnbnn nnnnt frbtn n b t n t b b t r b r n n n t n t n t f n n nn tnntbn nnnnnnnnnnn nnnbnntnbn ntbn b b b b n b n f t b t n b nnntf f b ff nb bnnnfn nbnn nbnbnnn nbnbnt bbbb nbbntnnb bnb bnnn n n n n nnnntn nbbnn nnnnnnt nntntbtbnnnnt b nbnbnnnnn tbbbb nbbnt bnnbbnb bnnn b n b n n r nnn fb nnbb bnnnnt nnnt nnnt bnfbb tnnbbnn b nnnnb bnb bnnn t n b n t n n b n n t r n n n t n n b nnntbb bnnn nnnnn n b r n b t n t n n r r t t n n n t n t b n t b n b b n n n n t n n n n b n n n n t n t n b b t n b b n n f n n b n n n b n n f b b n b b n n b t b t n b b b n n n f n n b n n n t b n n n n n t n n n n b b b n t b t n b nnntn nnttnn nttb n n n b n n b t n t n b b b n b f n n n n t b n n b n n n t b n n b nnntnnb btnntfb n bbbnt nbnnbbn bnnnntbbnn nbnnnbbbnbnt bbnbbnbn tnbntnnbnn nnbtbn nbt nnnnnnn nbbnnntbbb nnnn nnbbnntb nbnntnn tbnnn bnttbnnttnn nnbnn tnnnbnntn nbntnn nnntnnt bbbnbntn bbnnbnnnn n b b b b n n rf ntbn b n b n b n b r ttb f t n n f n b r b r t r b f t f n t t n n n n b f f t n n f n b b t n n n n b b f b n b n n n f n b b f b b n n n b b n n n b b n n b b rbb f n n b n n n b t n b n n n n n b r b n b b b b b n n n f b t t f b n n n n t n n t b n n

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013 rf ntb t r nt rr n f t brfnt t brft brftr btr brbt brnb nrffr t tr ntrbnrr fr nt rft nt nrnrrt rrt b b b t t t t f t b f b r r n r f n t r r btrr ntt n rr nrrn tt rf rfn nt t r t t t t t t t r r n t tbt r r trtntrt f nt rr r nt b rtr r brtrf rt tt t rr t t t t rt nrf trt trf tnbtt t ttr rtrtr ntr rr bnt t r rr r btrt f b nbtr r tnt fn r r r b t n b r r t r n n b t fn r t tb bt f r t bntb t r r t t n r b b bbt tn nn tnt nn r r b tnbbtnr nrtbtt tnttbb nbttn t n t t n r t f n t t n t t f t b b b b n b b t t b b b b f r r t b b t t f t n t n b t b b b t btb tfbbbr fntn fbbr ntr tr b f nt tbt btnrnt b b b b b n r n b f t t r b b b bbn bt tnf tn rrntb ft t tbfnt ttnt b b f t n r r nnnr ftrttf b f f f n b t f n t b b b b n r rb brn rnt brntr brttbrr bttf t tffb btt tfb n

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Sunday, November 3, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 rf rfrnt brrf rrntt bfnbrff nbf rff nt brffff rt brfrf b nrf r nbrrff t n t t n b r r f tt nbfrrfrrf n ttbfrrfff t b r r f tn tbrrff tb rfr ntf tbr tft tbrfr tfft brrffr tnt tb tftnt brfrrr ft br rf n tb rfr b n b r f r f b r f r f tbbf r b r f r r brf ntt ttbrf nntbf rfrf tt nbrr nt brr n bf rff ntt tbf ntb ttfr n brf r ttt ttt tnbf rf t ttfb rfr tt ttbfr rtttt bffrrf tn tttf ffbfrr t nbrf n bfrff ttt nbfr ttt fbrrff rt ntbr nnt brfr fbr rf r tnt trtbr frff tt bfrrfr ttnt brrfr r brf tt tnbrf n t n b f r r n tbfffrr brrfr ntn ntb nbrrff n brff tt fbrrfr fnt br nbrfr n bff tf ftbr tt tttbfff t nbrfr nn ntbrrfr ttt ttbfrr ttt tbrrfr brf bfrff r tt brff ttt ftbf t bfrrfr tt btbrf nnbfrf t t brfr tntttbrff t brrfrr nbf t brff tn nbr t nbrfr tn brfff ntbr trfr f r b r r f f r ftnt tbrrfr tr ttbbrrr n b b r f nbr trfrr n t b r r f tbr t nbrfr fbrffr t ttbrfrrrf r ttt tbr tbrr brrfr b f f f tn tbrrfr fbf tt nnbrrff t n nbfrf ttr tbffrr nfft tbrrfrf brrfr ntb trfrr r r n tbrfff brf f fbrfr ntr tb tr rbf f bf nb rf ntfn brf n brrfr t brrff t tbr t t b r t t t t f f t t b f f r t t t f f b t b f r t t t n t b rffff f fnftn nnbfr fftttbrrff t nt brrfrrff tttt t tbrb tttf r f b rf tnt trtbr frff t bfrfr b rfff fttt brfrf t brff nt tnbrf tt fbrf f brfr brfrr t tt r fn rfnttt ttttt tnn tt r ff ft t tt ttt rt t f t rttt tttt r ttn bfrrfff bf t bfrf f f f n b r ttf br tt brfrrf tttf rrbfrfr tttt bfrfr br rfff rff br rfff b t nnr tbrrfrr t bf t n n n n t n b b r f r brff fntbr rffrrf b

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Sunday, November 3, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 r fntnnb rfnf rfn f n tr b f rfrn nn fn nffnfbbnbnr nnnbnr b rfnftbnnnnn nnr rfntbb b rrrr trrrrbrrf rrftrrrr brrrr trrrrb rrrr trrrrb rrrrrf brrtr rrnrrnnrrt btrrrrb frbrr b n bbrnf t t rf rfnr fnntbb bb rfrntbb nf r f n t b n t t fnbb f tt f n n t t ff rfn t t t b t t t f t t t b t t t bb tt rbbr rbnt ftt r b b r b b b t t rf r t t rf b t t n n n b b t b f b b t b r r b f t r b b n n f n b f b b t b r rnbrrt bbt b brfbr f tt n tbrf f n f n f t t n b n b b n b b b f t t r b b r b b b t t t r t t f f b f b b b b t t tr bbf nnbbbf rnrfr rnbrbrtrft nfrbfrb tt r rrt tt n tbrf f n n t t ff rfn t t t b t t t f t t t b t t t bb tt n tbrf tt bffr brnbrbr ff tttt r t t b t t b b r r tt r r b r f b t t bbrr bb f tt rfr brbbtt nbbrbrb tt rr brbbttr tbrf r f f f r r f f b t t f n n t t ff rfn t t t b t t t f t t t b t t t bb tt tbrf b b n n b b t t rf b b r b n b b b r b n b f b b n t t r r nfrbbt tt tt n n tt r br tt rfb ftt rnbbt tt fn fbfr nf brbrnb tt b tt r

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Sunday, November 3, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL D5 rf rfntb b nb r trnrb ntb bb fr ntbb ttrrnfrrnb b rfnbrf ntb brn rfbb bbb rb bb b rbrnb bbtfb b rrf n b r n t b n tbf b b r b b n n b rn nr b b r r r r f f t r n t n b b rrf tr trbb fb bbf rtnb b r t b n r n b b nrrf f nbbt b t b r bt rnb bb n b b b n nn tbt br rnfbrb tnrnrnfn rbb tb nbb t rtrnrn rnbtb n f b b b bb t rn tnnrn rtr rbb n b b n n b r b b r b n n r n r r n b n r n rn rtr btrr bb n bb bnnb b b n nn frfbt b b b t b n b t b n nn f t f b n b r t n b n r n n r r r n r b r n n r n r b n n b rnfb bb b n r t t n r n n r f tn n r b n n r n nn nnf f nnntrf f b nttf bb n n r t r n b n r b b b n n t r n b r t r r rnfb ntb b b n n r n f r n b r r nf f t n f r r f r b n r n r b n b b b f b t r n r n n b r b b r f r b t n nf f nnff f b t r f b b rbbb brb nnbtrrn rbb b n r t t n r n n r f tn n r b n n r n nn r r n b n t r n n r r f r n r b r r r b b b b t b n b t b trf fft r f trnrrrb rnrnn frnftrn rrnntrrr nrnntnb b nnrnn rnb n b t r r r n b b b r t t b r r b r n r r r frb f b b n rrnr b nrbnb t tf r b rtr nt brb b t r b b b b r f nff

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E1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013 Money bill.koch@dailycommercial.com DOLDRUMS: Eurozone jobless rate reaches record high / E5 www.dailycommercial.com Russ Sloan THE BOTTOM LINE Russ Sloan is former director of Entrepreneurial Services at Lake-Sumter State College. PRE-GAME SHOW LHS FOOTBALL LIVE WEBCAST You can also follow LHS Football on Facebook Listen to ALL the LHS Football Games!All LHS Football Games will be Broadcast atwww.meridix.com/everywhere.php?liveid=LHSJacketFootballwww.facebook.com/pages/Leesburg-Jackets-Broadcast/1409574212595072 I n my 75 years I have been inspired by the actions, bravery, te nacity and intellect of many exception al Americans wheth er they were born in America or immi grated to our country. One of these remark able Americans is Dr. Charles Krauthammer, who in the opinion of many people, includ ing myself, is the fore most political journal ist of our time. Dr. Krauthammer has come to his cur rent position of prom inence via a vary un orthodox route. The youngest of two broth ers, he treasured his relationship with his older brother (four years older) who be came a physician and was a key inuence in the early development, athletically, vocational ly and as a role model for Krauthammer. The life of Krautham mer has ironically re inforced a quote at tributed to Winston Churchill who Krau thammer feels was the most indispens able man of the 20th Century. I would agree with that assessment. Churchill once fa mously said, If you are not a liberal before 20 you have no heart, if you are not a conserva tive at 40 you have no brain. Born in New York City in 1950 Krautham mer grew up in Cana da and graduated from McGill University (BA), Ballia College, Ox ford and Harvard Uni versity (MD). A prac ticing psychiatrist for three years, there had been an inner yearn ing towards politics which surfaced and changed the course of his professional career. He shifted his aspira tions to political jour nalism and with little published history (oth er than his collegiate newspaper experience) he was hired by the New Republic maga zine in 1981. His journalistic ex pertise quickly sur faced and in 1987 he earned the Pulit zer Prize for his writ ings with the Washing ton Post. An admitted Great Society liber al mixed with a strong anti-communist phi losophy he served as a speech writer for Vice President Walter Mon dale. But Krautham mers political evolu tion from outspoken liberal to Americas foremost conservative columnist did not oc cur overnight. The transformation was gradual and began with his recognition of the empirical evidence that big government programs not only did not work, but were of ten harmful to the peo ple they were designed to help. He also be came concerned that the anti-communists Democrats such as Senator Scoop Jack son were becoming a disappearing breed within the Democrat ic Party. From a national de fense policy position the Democratic Par ty he had known had largely disappeared. Once the transforma tion was complete he became the preemi nent conservative jour nalist of our time and in 2006 the Financial Times named Kraut hammer the most in uential commenta tor in America. He now writes a weekly col umn for more than 400 newspapers and is a regular political pundit on several leading TV news and political pro grams. Krauthammer suf fered a very freak, but serious spinal cord in jury in a diving acci dent during his rst year in medical school which left him para lyzed and wheelchair bound. However, his tenacity was to contin ue with medical school and graduate with his class a goal he achieved. In his new book enti tled Things That Mat ter the reader is able to gain a very personal insight into the mind, heart and soul of Krau thammer and his three decades of expressing his passions, pastimes and politics. An ardent baseball fan and chess player he probably can dis cuss baseball strategy with the best of major league managers and do the same with the worlds best chess mas ters. His book reveals his broad-based com mon sense perspec tive on the issues that affect most all of our lives. In 1787 the greatest collection of political Dr. Charles Krauthammer, a remarkable journalist SEE JOURNALIST | E2 Staff report More than 60 jobs are expected to be created when a new Mellow Mushroom pizza restaurant opens in Mount Dora, according to the general contractor. Evergreen Construction Man agement broke ground on the project next to Green Bank on U.S. Highway 411 on Oct. 15. When completed in the spring of 2014, the restaurants economic impact is projected to be a recur ring $2.5 million per year, creating more than 60 jobs and a significant number of local companies being engaged as subcontractors, said Mark Starcher, president of Ever green Construction Management. Starcher said this particular project will be uniquely sustain able, which includes substantial ly lower energy consumption com pared to other restaurants; reuse of rainwater for a number of prac tical purposes; LED lighting; high ly reflective roof and paving areas to prevent heat from being ab sorbed; and native species plant ings requiring very little watering, which he pointed out is rare in the restaurant industry. The 6,880-square-foot restau rant will have a silver rating in the Leadership in Energy and Environ mental Design (LEED). The eat ery will seat 234 diners and fea ture a large outside seating area of 1,100-square-feet. The driving force behind the project is Ken LaRoe, CEO and founder of First Green Bank. This a fantastic project with a client who is forward-thinking in their approach, Starcher said. The building will set the standard for quality and sustainability for the Mellow Mushroom franchise and projects of this nature. The franchise began in Atlanta in 1974 and has more than 120 lo cations nationwide. It specializes in pizza, but also serves calzones, hoagies and salads. The restau rants also offer a large selection of beer, typically 20-40 beers on draft and 50 or more bottles in coolers. Pizza restaurant breaks ground THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Workers prepare the ground for construction of Mellow Mushroom pizza restaurant. MOUNT DORA

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E2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013 It Almost That Time!Individuals or GroupsPlease Call 365-0079 ext: 25 Ask for Barbara KettlebellVolunteers Needed Attend a FREE LUNCH N LEARN spine seminar:Wednesday, November 6, at 11:00 amComfort SuitesCall 1-888-847-8876 to RSVP. CANDICE CHOI AP Food Industry Writer NEW YORK Kraft says it plans to remove articial dyes from three macaro ni and cheese varieties that come in kid-friendly shapes, a move that comes as people increasingly reach for foods they feel are natural. The change doesnt affect Krafts plain elbow-shaped macaroni and cheese with original avor. The packaged-food com pany, which also makes Os car Mayer and Jell-O, said the revamped recipes arent a response to a petition on Change.org that asked it to remove articial dyes from its famous macaroni and cheese kits. That petition, which was posted in March, had more than 348,000 sig natures. The creator of the petition wasnt immediately avail able for comment. Krafts new recipes, which begin shipping early next year, will be for its maca roni and cheese varieties that come in shapes; they include the SpongeBob Squarepants, Halloween and winter shapes. Two new shapes will also be added. The company said it plans to use spices such as papri ka for coloring, rather than the combination of articial dyes it currently uses. Ingredients in packaged food have come under great er scrutiny in recent years. People are increasingly try ing to eat foods they feel are better for them, and big food makers are adjusting their offerings to keep pace. In the meantime, small er players such as Annies Homegrown Inc., which makes a variety of macaroni and cheese, are getting more shelf space at the supermar ket. Earlier this year, PepsiCo also said it would remove a controversial ingredient from its Gatorade sports drink because of customer complaints. The move came after a petition by a Missis sippi teenager on Change. org, although PepsiCo said the petition wasnt what prompted its decision. Kraft to remove artificial dyes from 3 products TOBY STERLING Associated Press AMSTERDAM Anheuser-Busch InBev, the worlds lar gest brewer, says its third-quarter prots rose as the takeover of new brands and higher selling prices offset the im pact of lower sales volumes. The company, based in Leuven, Belgium, said that net prot was up 31 percent to $2.37 billion (1.73 bil lion euros), from $1.81 billion in the same period a year earlier. The gain largely reects the com panys $20 billion purchase in June of the 50 percent of Mexicos Grupo Modelo it didnt already own. Revenues rose 14 percent to $11.6 billion due to the takeover, currency effects and growth. Although sales volumes rose 11 percent, that was mainly due to the Modelo deal. Without it, vol umes sank 1.3 percent, something the company had to offset by rais ing prices. Among the best performing brands were its agship Budweiser beer, which grew global sales by 8.1 percent, and Corona, up 3.7 per cent. AB InBevs purchase of Mod elo included rights to sell and mar ket Corona globally except in the U.S., where AB InBev brands, in cluding U.S. bestseller Bud Light, al ready have a market share of around 50 percent. We are not satised with our top line performance in 2013, which continues to be impacted by mac roeconomic headwinds in a num ber of our markets, said CFO Feli pe Dutra. However, he said the integration of Modelo was going faster than forecast, and the company is al ready saving $250 million on an an nual basis by combining operations. Shares rose 2.1 percent at the start of trade in Brus sels, to 76.13 euros. Bud brewer AB Inbevs Q3 profits rise 31 percent ASSOCIATED PRESS In this March 2, 2011, le photo, Budweiser cans run through a lling machine at the AnheuserBusch brewery in the Van Nuys area of Los Angeles. minds in human history came to gether to create our constitution which has been the very foundation for Americas success. Krauthammer believes that, If yo u get the politics right most everything else will fall into place. It was that fundamental belief that took him from medicine to political journalism. Im grateful that we are privileged to read and hear Krauthammer on a regular basis and Im convinced that Franklin, Je fferson, Adams and Mad ison would have viewed him in 1787 as favor ably as millions of Ameri cans do today. Krauthammer is the Norman Rockwell of political journalism. His written and spoken words capture the essence of Am erica in the same fashion the Rockwells paintings re ected the best of Ame rica and our people. JOURNALIST FROM PAGE E1

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Optional Christmas EVE DAY in New Orleans.Taking Reservations Now for November 26thCall Now To Reserve! Need Tax Help?Call352-787-1040Open Year Round. P lease consider two impressive, veri able facts about women, nance and investing: Over the next de cade, women will control two thirds of consumer wealth in the United States and be the bene ciaries of the larg est transference of wealth in our coun trys history. Esti mates range from $12 to $40 trillion. Many Boomer wom en will experience a double inheritance windfall, from both parents and hus band. Claire Behar, Fleishman-Hillard New York If academic enroll ment is any indica tor, in 25 years wom en will dominate once male-dominat ed elds such as law and medicine.-Au thor Liza Mundy in the Wall Street Jour nal With all the wealth controlled by and be ing transferred to women, many are just now starting to im merse themselves in the investment pro cess. And statistics show that many more husbands than wives still handle the family investments. A Wall Street Journal article by Susan Thom as entitled The Rise of the Female Inves tor purports that most women dont have the time or the inclination to coordinate family investment accounts. men are still more likely than women to take the lead with the family nancial ac count, says Thomas. According to a recent study% of wives said they took control of nancial decision making, versus 38% of husbands. Among fe male breadwinners, 20% said they were very well prepared to make wise nancial decisions, compared with 45% of their male counterparts. Thomas also quotes a recent study that has found that wom en differ substantial ly from men in how they relate to invest ing. They dont want to hear aboutgrowth or comparative per formance of different funds; they want infor mation about reach ing their long-term goals, like putting a kid through college. Having advised male and female investors both singularly and as couples for 18 years, I think its difcult to generalize or stereo type. Each investor is different, regardless of gender. That said, it seems certain that by necessity women are becoming and will become more famil iar with investing. And its certainly prefera ble that women engage the process prior to the passing of a spouse, es pecially one who han dled all family nanc es. Many husbands will establish a relation ship with a trusted in vestment advisor for the express purpose of easing the nan cial transition for their spouse if the husband passes away rst. Some statisti cal studies show that women are more risk averse than men. Iron ically, the biggest sin gle determinant of risk tolerance that I expe rience as an advisor is not gender, but age. Both genders general ly exhibit less risk tol erance as they grow older, as they have less time to make up for drastic market down turns. This age-based diminished risk toler ance is not always ap plicable, of course, as each investor is differ ent, but generally age and not gender has had a greater impact on risk aversion. Margaret McDowell GUEST COLUMNIST Margaret R. McDowell, a syn dicated economic columnist, chartered nancial consultant and accredited investment duciary, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, a fee-only registered investment advisory rm near Destin. Mars vs. Venus in the new world of investing SEIZETHE DA Y SBUSINESSNEWS.www .dailycommer cial.com WAYNE PARRY Associated Press ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. Reve nues at Atlantic Citys top casino in creased by nearly 7 percent in the third quarter of this year. The Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa reported net revenues of more than $200 million, an increase of 6.9 per cent. Its earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization were up nearly 40 percent to $46.6 mil lion, largely due to better luck at ta ble games. The casino also increased its share of the Atlantic City casino market by three percentage points, to 21 per cent. Keith Smith, president and CEO of Boyd Gaming, which co-owns the Borgata with MGM Resorts Inter national, said the Borgatas perfor mance in a struggling Atlantic City market was encouraging. Borgata generated strong results, and we are now nalizing prepara tions for real-money online gaming in New Jersey, he said. The company said in a news re lease that the Borgata is doing well in a challenging market with new competitors continuing to pop up around the region. It cited the Bor gatas amenities, service and mar keting programs. The Borgata received New Jerseys rst Internet gambling permit, and is expected to be among the rst ca sinos in the state to offer online bet ting once it begins in late November. Borgata revenue up nearly 7 percent

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E4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013 7amBrett picked his price, uploaded a photo and paid for his ad. Its just that simple!No matter what time of the day it is, you can place your classified merchandise ad online, pay for it and just wait for the phone to ring! Fast, convenient and on your schedule! Time to sell those golf clubs! 7 24www.dailycommercial.com*Employment advertisements are excluded. Please call 352-314-FAST to speak with a customer service rep. Lake: 352-314-3278 or Sumter: 352-748-1955 Representing Mesothelioma & Lung Cancer Victims for Over 25 Years Throughout FloridaFlorida Lawyers Representing FloridiansTerrell Hogan( 904 ) www.FloridaAsbestos.comAlan Pickert Anita Pryor ELAINE KURTENBACH Associated Press TOKYO U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz said that he expects deepening cooperation with Japan over the high-stakes cleaning up and decommissioning of the crippled Fukushima nu clear plant. The Fukushima plant has had a series of mishaps in recent months, including radioactive water leaks from storage tanks. The incidents have added to concerns about the ability of operator Tokyo Electric Power Co., or TEPCO, to safely close down the plant, which suf fered meltdowns after be ing swamped by the March 2011 tsunami on Japans northeastern coast. We expect the relation ship in the area of decom missioning between TEPCO and our national laborato ries to expand and deepen in the coming years, Moniz said in a lecture in Tokyo. Just as the tragic event had global consequences, the success of the cleanup also has global signicance. So we all have a direct inter est in seeing that the next steps are taken well and ef ciently and safely, he said. Japanese regulators on Wednesday approved the removal of fuel rods from an uncontained cooling pool at a damaged reactor build ing considered the highest risk at the plant following its multiple meltdowns. Moniz was meeting with top Japanese ofcials dur ing his visit, including in dustry minister Toshimitsu Motegi, who is overseeing the governments role in the plant cleanup. Our decommissioning and decontamination in dustries stand ready to aid should Japan need their help, Moniz said. The U.S. is ready to assist our part ners with this daunting task. He is due to visit the Fuku shima plant on Friday. Removing the fuel rods from the Unit 4 cooling pool is the rst major step in a decommissioning pro cess that is expected to last decades at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant. Japans nuclear regulatory chairman Shunichi Tanaka has warned that removing the fuel rods is a painstak ing, high risk process. He says he is more worried about that than the massive amounts of radiation-con taminated water that TEP CO is struggling to manage. Despite the worries over potential risks from radia tion escaping from the plant, Japans ruling Liberal Dem ocratic Party has pushed for a restart of nuclear reactors that have all been ofine for safety checks and must be inspected under new guide lines. Moniz said he expects nu clear power to remain a cru cial part of the energy mix as the world moves away from fossil fuels in its effort to mitigate global warming. The Department of Energy has provided billions of dol lars in loan guarantees for new nuclear plants in the U.S. Smaller nuclear plants now under development probably offer the safest, most nancially viable op tions, he said. We cannot lose perspec tive on nuclear as a clean, reliable supplier of baseload (electricity), while recogniz ing each country will make its own decisions, he said. US energy chief offers Japan aid with nuke cleanup ASSOCIATED PRESS In this Aug. 16 photo, U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, center, attends a meeting with businessmen at the Con federation of Industry in Brasilia, Brazil. BARRY HATTON Associated Press LISBON, Portugal Lisbon subway work ers walked off the job Thursday for the fth time this year to pro test government aus terity measures being enacted in return for Portugals 2011 bailout. The 24-hour sub way strike coincided with the start of a par liamentary debate on the governments 2014 state budget proposal, which aims to slash an other 3.9 billion euros ($5.3 billion) about 2.3 percent of gross do mestic product off state spending. Debt-heavy Portu gal is battling to regain its credibility on nan cial markets before its 78 billion-euro inter national aid package comes to an end midnext year and it must start borrowing again from private investors. At the same time, Lis bon has to abide by the demands of its bail out creditors oth er countries using the euro currency, the Eu ropean Central Bank and the International Monetary Fund who want to restore Portu gals scal health and resolve the eurozones protracted debt crisis. Prime Minister Pe dro Passos Coelho told Parliament his cen ter-right coalition gov ernments budget pro posal is the countrys passport to a bailoutfree future. The government has enough votes in Par liament to approve the spending plan de spite resistance from opposition parties and trade unions. Howev er, it could be foiled by the Constitution al Court, which previ ously has struck down some planned pay and pension cuts. Next week, walkouts are expect at national train services and Lis bon buses and ferries. Government workers are staging their own national strike on Nov. 8. Under the budget proposal, government workers earning more than 600 euros ($825) a month will have their pay cut by up to 12 per cent, while pensions higher than 600 euros a month will be reduced by 10 percent. Workers at stateowned companies, in cluding those in the public transport sec tor, will also see cuts to their pensions, over time pay and entitle ments such as subsi dized meals. Lisbon subway shuts in anti-austerity protest

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Sunday, November 3, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL E5 Shoppes of Lake Village (Next to Lake Square Mall)www.leadingdental.comLEESBURG 365-6442Sleep through your Dental Appointment The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for paym ent for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of an within 72 hours of responding to the a dvertisement for treatment.License# DN14389MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTED Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg. Enhance your life with Mini Dental Implants in 1 hrIV SEDATION: FREECONSULTATIONNew Patients$85 Value*x-rays not includedFinancing Available Dr. Vaziri & Staff sponsors Albert L. Brown Foundation Inc. Dr. Susan G. Caddell, DDS Bay Street Paint & Body 17th Annual Golf Tournament Pilot Awards Gala & Pairing Party November 10th & 11th COME FIRE THE GOLF BALL BAZOOKA4 Players will get a chance to shoot for 1 MILLION DOLLARS!Each Foursome will get a MLB or NFL Celebrity as their 5th player.Register Now to Lock in your Celebrity Team Member (352)326-0761www.AngelFlightSE.org/EventsMember of the Air Charity NetworkWere raising enough money so 250 children and adults can get the ights they need to the doctors that can save their lives.Arlington Ridge Golf Club4463 Arlington Ridge Blvd. Leesburg, FL 34748 JUERGEN BAETZ Associated Press BRUSSELS The number of unem ployed in the 17-nation eurozone reached a re cord high in Septem ber as the blocs na scent recovery failed to generate jobs, ofcial data showed. The ranks of the job less swelled by 60,000 to a record 19.45 mil lion, according to Eu rostat, the European Unions statistics agen cy. Though the un employment rate re mained steady at 12.2 percent, the previous month was revised up from 12 percent. The latest gures put a dent in hopes that the labor mar ket may have reached a turning point, said analyst Ben May of Capital Economics. A sharp and unex pected drop in ina tion also cast doubts over the recovery of the eurozone, which just emerged from reces sion, and put pressure on the European Cen tral Bank to act. The euro dropped sharply, from above $1.3700 be fore the news to about $1.3615 in afternoon trading. By contrast, the Fed eral Reserve in the U.S. this week hinted it might start tighten ing its monetary policy in coming months as growth proves robust and the labor market improves. Ernst & Young ana lyst Marie Diron said economic activity in the eurozone will re main slow and unem ployment high un til the bloc nishes cleaning up its bank ing sector to restore condence and boost lending. Eurozone unemployment reaches new record high ASSOCIATED PRESS Soledad Carrasquilla Delgado, 53, left, reacts as her husband and sister, in background at right, look out of a window as the police arrive during their eviction in Madrid, Spain.

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E6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013 The Associated Press COLOMBO, Sri Lanka Britain warne d that addi tional delays in the Mal dives troubled presidential election could tarnish the countrys reputation and harm an economy heavily reliant on tourism. The minister of state at the British Foreign and Com monwealth Ofce, Hugo Swire, said that legal chal lenges to the electoral pro cess appear to be aimed at preventing citizens from ex pressing their views at the ballot box. The unacceptable delays to elections and reports of the intimidation of parlia mentarians, NGOs and me dia organizations have been closely watched by the in ternational community, he said. Further delays could result in greater damage to the Maldives international reputation and could have a negative impact upon the Maldives economy. The Maldives Supreme Court annulled the results of the Sept. 7 election, say ing that the voter registry was awed with made-up names and those of dead people. It ordered a revote, which police then stopped, saying that ofcials had not complied with all guidelines set out by the court in hold ing the election. Now, a third attempt at holding the election has been xed for Nov. 9. How ever, the country could face a possible constitution al crisis if none of the three candidates receives more than 50 percent of the vote because the current presi dential term ends Nov.11, ve days before a runoff be tween the top two vote-get ters would be held. A prolonged political cri sis could wreak havoc on the economy in the Maldives, an Indian Ocean archipela go known for its luxury re sorts. Last year, tourism ac counted for 27 percent of the countrys GDP. Swires statement came a day after U.N. High Com missioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay said that the Maldives Supreme Court was interfering excessive ly in the presidential elec tion, thereby subverting the democratic process. The country has faced much political upheaval in the ve years since it held its rst multiparty election in 2008 after 30 years of au tocratic rule. The Maldives rst demo cratically e lected president resigned midway through his term amid weeks of pub lic protests and slide in sup port from the military and police after he ordered the arrest of a senior judge. Britain warns against Maldives election delay ROB GILLIES Associated Press TORONTO The worlds largest gold mining compa ny announced it is temporari ly suspending construction of its troubled Pascua-Lama gold mine that straddles the border be tween Chile and Argentina. Barrick said in its earnings re lease that the decision to re-start the $8.5 billion mine will depend on improved project econom ics, the outlook for metal prices, and reduced uncertainty associ ated with legal and regulatory re quirements. We have determined that the prudent course at this stage is to suspend the project, but naturally we will maintain our option to resume construction and finish the project when im provements to its current chal lenge have been attained, Barrick chief executive Jaime So kalsky said in a statement. Falling gold prices, rising costs and a sagging stock price weighed down by its Pascua-Lama project have plagued the Toronto-based company. Barrick said the suspension will reduce the companys 2014 capital costs by up to $1 billion. The company also said 10 oth er mines around the world were being scaled back, suspended or sold to focus on more profitable production. Earlier this year, Chiles en vironmental regulator stopped construction on its side of Pas cua-Lama and imposed sanc tions on the mine, citing serious violations of its environmental permit. Barrick has already spent $5 billion on the project, which sits 6,400 feet (1,950 meters) above sea level. Barrick had hoped to begin pro duction in early 2014, and previ ously warned shareholders that it might abandon the Chilean side because of construction delays. The bi-national mine was ini tially expected to be producing gold and silver by the second half of 2014. While Argentine officials were eager to keep building, most of the estimated 18 million ounc es of gold and 676 million ounces of silver are buried on the Chil ean side. On the Argentine side, where Barrick fuels a third of San Juan provinces economy, offi cials have been watching close ly and trying to figure out how to preserve thousands of jobs. Chiles Supreme Court con firmed last month the suspen sion of the mine until environ mental commitments and all works to protect the water sys tems are adopted. An indigenous community liv ing below the mine accused Bar rick of contaminating their water downstream. Scarce river water is vital to life in Chiles Atacama Desert, and the Diaguita Indians fear the Pascua-Lama mine is ru ining their resource. Sokalsky promised sharehold ers in April that Barrick was committed to focus on produc ing returns for investors. Barrick ousted former CEO and President Aaron Regent last year, citing its disappointing share price perfor mance. The stuck has plummet ed from over $40 to around $20 since then. Barrick remains committed long-term to Argentina, where it plans to invest $400 million next year, said Guillermo Calo, the companys top executive in the country. The company announced a temporary reduction in PascuaLamas construction and not its cancellation, as was rumored, he said, adding that Barricks nearby Veladero mine continues to employ 3,000 people directly. Market conditions are not fa vorable for the industry, with gold prices that have remained low during an extended period of time, which has generated a challenging environment for the sector. In this context, we need to eval uate how to make the invest ments that Pascua-Lama needs to complete its construction. Barrick suspends construction of its Pascua-Lama mine

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Sunday, November 3, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL E7 Dr. Heydari, DDSSUNY Buffalo School of Dental Medicine rfntb Golf Cart Accessable NOW OPEN IN THE VILLAGES NEW PATIENT EXAM & X-RAYPlease call for details and appointment. Can not be combined with other discount offers. Applies to cash paying patients only. Insurance will be billed for exam and x-rays.FULL SET OF DENTURESOffer only applies to Premium Comfort Dentures. Please call for details and appointment. Can not be combined with other discount offers. How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Sunday, Nov. 3, 2013: This year you will have un usual energy swings. A re alization will occur involving your career or a relationship that will point you in a new direction. The whole saga will take a year to complete. You often push very hard to have your way. In the next 12 months, you will see the futility of that behavior. If you are single, you could meet someone quite spectacu lar. Take your time getting to know this person. If you are attached, the two of you will see a life goal manifest it self. The path to your desire might be very different from what you had anticipated. SCORPIO might be far more intense than you realize. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You can express your feelings any way that you want, but ultimately a friend will respond only when he or she is ready. Look at the issue at hand, and see if there is a more effective way of handling the problem. If so, follow through. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You might sense that there are changes ahead, and you might not have as much control as you would like. Know that you only have control over your self. Honor where someone is coming from, and dont try to change this persons mood. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You might want some kind of change to happen in your life in order to feel reinvigo rated. You could be looking at making an adjustment to your schedule, trying a new exercise program or learning a new sport or hobby. Avoid creating uproar. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Your creativity is high, yet your nurturing qualities and emotional nature seek self-expression. Make time for your family, and pursue an activity that they would love. If you are single, you might be seeing a change in status. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You might look back on this period and realize that you made some important deci sions regarding real estate and your home. Make sure you are not overreacting and making snap judgments. Al low yourself a lot of space to evaluate each decision. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You could be out of sorts and wondering what is important. You might feel drained by todays eclipse. As a result, you could be somewhat accident-prone. Try not to put yourself in a situation where you could cause yourself a problem. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You cant be too careful with your nances. Hold off on making any commitments or purchases for a while. You easily could make a mis take or buy a faulty item. You might not like restric tions, but that would be best for now. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Todays eclipse might be making you feel hyper. Know that the element of instability that might result from your energy is like ly to be elsewhere, too. En joy yourself, but remember that nothing is set in stone. Make no agreement at this moment. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) You could be ready for a swift change or a new development. However, for right now, it would be best to play it low-key. Keep a dis cussion tame. If you lose control, there could be longterm ramications. A partner will come through for you. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) A loved one is the bearer of good news. Dont hesitate to get together or have a chat with this per son. A group of friends could be changing. Understand that you might be changing, too. What seemed OK be fore might not be the case anymore. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) A situation demands all of your attention. You might feel like you have no choice as long as you want the status quo to continue. Do you? You are in a period of hard reection. When an opportunity arises, you will know what to do. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Jump in your car, and take a day drive or go visit a friend in the country. Youll feel re-energized once you move out of your immedi ate area. When you detach, you will start changing your opinions and gain a new per spective of your life. HOROSCOPES Bigars Stars JACQUELINE BIGAR www.dailycommercial.com Diversions 352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE DEAR ABBY: I recent ly found out that after 13 years of marriage, my son and daughterin-law are expecting a child; my rst grand child! I was overjoyed at the news. They live about 1,000 miles away from me. I mentioned to my son that I have been looking at ights and want to come out a week before her due date so Ill be there for the big moment, and stay three to four weeks to help with the baby. I was shocked when he told me they dont want me to visit until at least three weeks after the birth, and stay for one week MAX. He said my daughterin-law will need time to heal, and they both need time to adjust to being parents before they have guests. I am not a guest. I am the grandmother! I was also told not to expect to take care of the baby because it is their job. It hurts so bad not to be wanted to share in the joy of the new baby. I have always dreamed of watching my grand child take his or her rst breath, and see the look on my sons face when he holds his child for the rst time. Is there anything I can do to change their minds and allow me to be there for my son at this important mo ment? Do you agree that they are being un reasonable and cruel? FAMILY FIRST IN FLOR IDA DEAR FAMILY FIRST: Im sure you are a lov ing mother, but I dont agree, and I doubt you can change their minds. If it is going to take three weeks for your daughter-in-law to heal, it appears the ba bys birth will be by Csection, and she will need time to regain her strength. The new par ents will also need time to adjust to the ba bys sleep and feeding schedules. They will be sleep-deprived, and she will be nursing ev ery few hours and not up for company. While you have al ways dreamed of being present at your grand childs birth, the reality is your son and daugh ter-in-law would prefer this intimate moment be shared by them alone. Im sorry you are hurt, truly. Let them know you are willing to help them in any way you can on their terms, and take your cues from them. Do not take any of this personally. DEAR ABBY: My grand mother died recent ly after a long life. A cousin decided that all of the grandchil dren should chip in for an expensive oral ar rangement. I reluctant ly participated after my wife said it would be cheap of me to re fuse. I had a closer rela tionship with Grandma than most of my cous ins did, but I felt it was an odd request. I have always understood that owers were sent to the grieving family. In this instance, we WERE the family. It felt like we were sending con dolences to ourselves. Am I wrong, or was I just being cheap, as my wife suggested? MOURNING IN NEVADA DEAR MOURNING: Please accept my sym pathy for your loss. Your assumption that families do not provide owers at a loved ones funeral was incorrect. It is very common for family members to ar range for a oral dis play or spray of owers for a deceased rela tives casket. At a sad time like this, it is nev er wrong to err on the side of being gener ous, and Im glad that is what you did. Dear Abby is written by Abi gail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her moth er, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAb by.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Grandma is crushed when shes told to stay home Today is Sunday, Nov. 3, the 307th day of 2013. There are 58 days left in the year. Daylight saving time ends at 2 a.m. local time. Clocks go back one hour. Todays Highlights in His tory: On Nov. 3, 1992, Demo crat Bill Clinton was elect ed the 42nd president of the United States, defeat ing President George H.W. Bush. In Illinois, Democrat Carol Moseley-Braun be came the rst black woman elected to the U.S. Senate. On this date: In 1900 the rst ma jor U.S. automobile show opened at New Yorks Madi son Square Garden under the auspices of the Automo bile Club of America. In 1903 Panama pro claimed its independence from Colombia. In 1911 the Chevrolet Motor Car Co. was founded in Detroit by Louis Chevrolet and William C. Durant. (The company was acquired by General Motors in 1918.) In 1936 President Frank lin D. Roosevelt won a land slide election victory over Republican challenger Al fred M. Alf Landon. In 1957 the Soviet Union launched Sputnik 2, the sec ond manmade satellite, into orbit; on board was a dog named Laika who was sacri ced in the experiment. In 1960 the Meredith Will son musical The Unsink able Molly Brown opened on Broadway with Tammy Grimes in the title role. In 1961 Burmese dip lomat U Thant (oo thahnt) was appointed acting U.N. Secretary-General follow ing the death of Dag Ham marskjold (dahg HAWMahr-shoold). President John F. Kennedy established the U.S. Agency for Internation al Development. In 1964 President Lyn don B. Johnson soundly de feated Republican Barry Goldwater to win a White House term in his own right. In 1979 ve Commu nist Workers Party mem bers were killed in a clash with heavily armed Ku Klux Klansmen and neo-Nazis during an anti-Klan protest in Greensboro, N.C. TODAY IN HISTORY

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E8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013

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Mid Florida Eye Center has been advancing eye care in Lake County for over 25 years. Now, with Laser Cataract Surgery, our patients have more options than ever before for restoring their vision and being independent of glasses. Bladeless Board-Certied | Fellowship-Trained | Participating Medicare Provider | Two Surgical Locations Laser is the most advanced cataract surgery technique available today. Our renowned cataract surgeons Dr. Jerey D. Baumann, Dr. Gregory J. Panzo, and Dr. Keith C. Charles have performed more than 140,000 cataract and laser procedures, they understand how to effectively leverage laser technology to achieve the best possible visual outcomes. Schedule your cataract consultation today by calling 1-888-820-7878 or 352-735-2020 to see if Laser Cataract Surgery is an option for you. expertise meets NEW LOCATION:Mid Florida Eye Center The Villages/Santa Fe Crossing 8630 E. CR 466, Suite A Santa Fe Crossing Professional Center CR 466 441 27 MORSE BLVD. BUENA VISTA BLVD. ROLLING ACRES RD.



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r fntrbrn r rtr nrnt frtr rrt frtr rrrnrt frtr rnr Call Our Experienced Physicians For Family Medicine Podiatric/Foot Careand Chiropractic Treatment 357-8615 ~ www.lakehealthcarecenter.com 910 Mt. Homer Rd. ~ Eustis Most Insurance AcceptedServing Lake County Since 1963 ~ Founded by Dr. Jim Glisson DID Y OU REMEMBER TO TURN YOUR CLOCKS BACK AN HOUR? LOCAL: City manager gets high marks from council / A3NATION: Scientists oppose bill that would destroy wildlife / A6 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Sunday, November 3, 2013 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 137, No. 307 | 4 sections MISSED YOUR PAPER?Call 787-0600 (Lake County), or 877-702-0600 (Sumter County)NEWS TIP?Call Scott Callahan at 365-8203 INSIDE CLASSIFIED C3 COMICS INSIDE CROSSWORDS C3 DEAR ABBY E7 LEGALS C4 en MONEY E1 NATION A4 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES C1 WORLD A6 TODAYS WEATHER HIGH 74en LOW57 See A8 $1.00 KELLI KENNEDYAssociated PressMIAMI Dean Grif n liked the health in surance he purchased for himself and his wife three years ago and thought hed be able to keep the plan even after the federal Affordable Care Act took effect. But the 64-year-old recently received a let ter notifying him the plan was being canceled because it didnt cover certain benets required under the law. The Grifns, who live near Philadelphia, pay $770 monthly for their soon-to-be-ter minated health care plan with a $2,500 de ductible. The cheapest plan they found on their state insurance You are canc elledSticker shock often follows when companies terminate individual health policies ASSOCIATED PRESSDean and Mary Lou Grifn sit their home in Chadds Ford, Pa. on Friday. SEE HEALTH | A2 GEOFF MULVIHILL and TAMI ABDOLLAHAssociated PressLOS ANGELES Federal prosecutors led charges of murder and commission of violence at an international airport against the unemployed motorcycle mechanic suspected of car rying out the deadly shooting at the Los Angeles airport. If convicted, Paul Ciancia could get the death penalty. He was arrested Fri day after authorities Suspected LAX gunman charged SEE LAX | A2 LIVI STANFORD Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comThere are 330 miles of roads in Lake County that need resurfac ing. But only about $2 million in funding is available this year to spend on a tiny por tion of those roads. Lake County Public Works Director Jim Stivender said the county needs $18 million to treat all the roads, many of which have not been resur faced for more than 10 years. The worst ones we pave and the rest will have to wait, he said. Stivender said the roads are aging faster than the revenue coming in to x them. Fur ther, the costs to treat roads have also risen substantially, he said. The longer the roads remain untreated, the more problematic Lake ofcials weigh options to repair local highways PHOTOS BY THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIALRoad maintenance continues on Alfred Street in Tavares, one of several ongoing road projects the county is funding. However, county ofcials said they do not have the money to resurface all 330 miles of roads in need of repair. The county is working on a two-phase project on Old Highway 441 from Tavares to Mount Dora. The road has not been re surfaced since 1978. SEE ROADS | A2 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comJustin Plank and Chris Matier prepared extensively for their rst participation in the 14th annual Chili Cook-Off in down town Leesburg. We have 17 types of chili Mexican peppers, said Plank, an executive chef at Lake Port Square, a retirement community. That is why we are called the Red Hot Chilis. The pouring rain did not stop chili enthusiasts Saturday from preparing their secret recipes, each hoping to garner the top prize at the fun-lled competition. Those competing spent all day perfecting their recipes. Many arrived as early as 6 a.m to begin preparing for the com munity event, with more than 20 taking part in the competi tion. While the cooks would not give away their secret recipe, they all agreed that fresh ingre dients, mildly spiced chili and slow cooking were all keys to a successful pot of chili. As he cooked up several pounds of ground beef, Allen Shaffer, president of the Pro fessional Fire Fighters of Lees burg, said it is critical that the chili not be too spicy. Dont make it too hot, he said. We dont use anything frozen or buy anything prepared. The Professional Fire Fighters of Leesburg have won the Peoples Choice Award for best chili in the past two years. Sgt. Elvin Rodriguez, of the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce, said every year the LCSO works to perfect their recipe. You want to make sure you have the right amount of veg etables and meat, he said, explaining everything must be in balance. You dont want too much powder or spices. Certainly, fresh produce and ingredients are vital to Amanda Cooks: Dont make your chili too hotLEESBURGNo money for bad roads SEE CHILI | A2 APA passenger gets his luggage back at Los Angeles International Airports Terminal 3 on Saturday.

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013 BEST TRAVEL SCOOTER only$699 1323 S. 14th Street (US Hwy 27) Leesburg Easy to break down only 5 pieces!Lightweight the heaviest part is only 29 lbs! HOW TO REACH US SATURDAYCASH 3 . ............................................... 9-4-7 Afternoon . .......................................... 7-7-7 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 8-7-5-1 Afternoon . ....................................... 2-8-3-0FLORIDALOTTERY FRIDAYFANTASY 5 . ............................. 1-9-10-29-35 2 of 5 wins free ticket 3 of 5 wins $10.50 4 of 5 wins $120 5 of 5 wins $115,151.82MEGA MONEY . ....................... 4-13-31-422With Megaball Without Megaball Powerball alone wins free ticket .............. 2 of 4 wins $4 1 of 4 w/Megalball wins $7.50 . ........... 3 of 4 wins $121 2 of 4 w/Megalball wins $65 . ..... 4 of 4 wins $2,417.50 3 of 4 w/Megalball wins $948.50 . ...................... Rollover 4 of 4 w/Megalball wins $2 M THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $91.59 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 787-0600 in Lake County or (877) 702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Mon day through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . .............. 787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION RATESSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. SUBSCRIPTION REFUND POLICY: Subscription refunds will be calculated at the current basic subscription price, excluding the cur rent month. All refund requests must be made in writing and signed. Send to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. (In lieu of a refund, we will transfer any remaining time on a subscription to another party or make it available to students through our Newspapers in Education program.) RECYCLING: The Daily Commercial supports environmental protection through recycling. Plastic bags may be recycled at grocery stores. Newspapers may be recycled at the Commercials Leesburg ofce, 212 E. Main St., during business hours. This newspaper is printed on recycled newsprint. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 26.82 1.88 28.70 47.22 3.31 50.53 85.60 5.99 9 1.59 7 days a week Mail Subscription 3 months 6 months One Y ear Daily/Sunday 45.19 84.88 163.16 Sunday only 28.67 50.72 92.61 ROD DIXON, publisher352-365-8214 .................................. rod.dixon@dailycommercial.comBILL KOCH, assistant managing editor352-365-8208 . ................................... bill.koch@dailycommercial.comSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comPAUL RYAN, visual editor352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.comFRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, school boards352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comOTHERS PAM FENNIMORE, editorial assistant 352-365-8256 ............. pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com DON HUNSBERGER 352-365-8279 ........ donald.hunsberger@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD 352-365-8258 ............... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR E-mail submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.GOOD FOR YOU/ CELEBRATIONSTo have your club or organizations events printed in the YourCommunity calendar listings, just email the information to pamfennimore@daily commercial.com. SUBSCRIPTION RATES NEWSROOM CONTACTS exchange was a socalled bronze plan charging a $1,275 monthly premium with deductibles totaling $12,700. It cov ers only providers in Pennsylvania, so the couple, who live near Delaware, wont be able to see doctors theyve used for more than a decade. Were buying insurance that we will never use and cant possibly ever benet from. Were basically passing on a ben et to other people who are not other wise able to buy ba sic insurance, said Grifn, who is retired from running an in formation technology company. The Grifns are among millions of people nationwide who buy individual insurance policies and are receiving notices that those pol icies are being discontinued because they dont meet the higher benet requirements of the new law. They can buy dif ferent policies directly from insur ers for 2014 or sign up for plans on state insurance exchanges. While lower-income people could see lower costs be cause of government subsidies, many in the middle class may get rude awakenings when they access the websites and realize theyll have to pay signicantly more. Those not eligible for subsidies generally receive more comprehensive coverage than they had under their soon-tobe-canceled policies, but theyll have to pay a lot more. Because of the higher cost, the Grif ns are consider ing paying the federal penalty about $100 or 1 percent of income next year rather than buy ing health insur ance. They say they are healthy and dont typically run up large health care costs. Dean Grifn said that will be cheaper because its unlikely they will get past the nearly $13,000 deductible for the cov erage. HEALTH FROM PAGE A1 say he barged into a terminal, pulled an AR15 semi-automatic rie from his duffel bag and opened re. The bullets killed a Transportation Security Administration ofcer and injur ing four others before Ciancia was gunned down by airport police. The killing was be lieved to be a premed itated act of murder in the rst-degree, U.S. Attorney Andre Birotte Jr. said in announcing the charges. Authorities believe someone dropped Ciancia off at the air port, and agents are reviewing surveillance tapes and other evidence to piece together the sequence of events. We are really going to draw a picture of who this person was, his background, his history. That will help us explain why he chose to do what he did, FBI Special Agent in Charge David L. Bowdich said. LAX FROM PAGE A1 they become. It will cost the taxpay er more money to resur face at a later date, Stivender said. As a result, Stivender said there should be an additional revenue source to resurface roads, such as as additional ve-cent local option gas tax. There are currently only two sources of funding for roads, a local gas tax of 6 cents, where the revenue is split between the county and its 14 municipalities, and a 1-cent sales tax where the revenue is divided equally between the county, the school board and the cities. County commissioners agree that resurfacing the roads remains a top priority, but there are differing opinions on where the additional funding should come from. Many said a new revenue source should be looked at while others do not support any new taxes.AGING ROADSThe roads in the county are rated on a numbering system, with the lower the number the the more severe the roads condition. Old Highway 441 from in Tavares to Mount Dora is rated a 3 one of the roads that will be worked on in two phases because of funding issues. That road has not been treated since 1978, Stivender said. The county would like to work on roads rated at a 4 and 5, but doesnt have the money to resur face the 5-rated roads, Stivender said. Five-rated roads can be seen throughout the county, several in subdivisions. When you prioritize the roads, you dont have the money to do subdivision roads, such as Mount Plymouth and Picciola Island subdivision north of Leesburg, he said. They were all built back in the 1980s. We never resurfaced those roads. The roads are porous, rough and old, Stivender said. As the roads continue to age, Stivender said, the cost of materials to x them continues to skyrocket. Everything has gone up in price in the last 30 years and I am still receiving the same (tax) on a gallon of gas, he said. From an economics point of view, asphalt pavement costs so much. In ve years what is it going to cost? My dollar will not stretch as far.OPTIONSIn November 2011, the Capital Facilities Advisory Committee, a group tasked with nding alternative sources for road funding, recommended six key provisions to the county commission. One of the provisions included an additional ve-cent local gas tax option. The committees top recommendation was to allocate money from the general fund for roads, but that is not feasible, county ofcials said. Several county commissioners agree that the aging infrastructure of roads in the county is a concern. It would be nice to have an additional funding source for roads, said Commissioner Jimmy Conner. I think at some point and time, we need to have a conversation with the public about the ve-cent gas tax option. It is much better than a proper ty tax. Tourists and people that dont live in the county participate in it. Commissioner Sean Parks agreed that the local ve-cent gas tax option, which would bring in about $3.7 million a year for the resurfacing of roads, should be examined more closely, particularly in aiding the countys sidewalk improvement projects. I think we have to look at it, we have no choice, he said. Cutting other departmental funds isnt going to raise us enough money. The state isnt going to help us. This is a local issue and our residents want more sidewalks. If we want to pursue this new extensive sidewalk plan, we are going to have to work together and make some tough choices. According to the CFAC recommendations, the estimated revenue from 2014-2035 (for the vecent local option gas tax) would be $73 million for Lake County Commission Chair woman Leslie Campione is not warm to the idea of the local ve-cent gas tax option. I support renewal but do not support any new taxes, she said. Instead, Campione said more money from the countys portion of the sales tax should go to roads. There will always be repairs and maintenance and that is why prioritization is so important, Campione said in an email. I would like to see the countys portion largely dedicated to resurfacing existing roads and making improvements that directly benet more residents on an annual basis. But time is of the essence, ofcials say. In my position, the No. 1 issue is the 330 miles of roads that need to be resurfaced, Stivender said. You have to put money in to repave it. A smoother ride in front of (a residents) house makes them feel better. Stivender said more money should be allocated toward roads. The challenge is people dont want to pay for something else, he said. The problem is your infrastructure is getting old and there is no money out there committed to solve the problem. ROADS FROM PAGE A1 Storts chili. The facilities management director of Lake Medical Imaging said her team begins preparing as early as 7 / a.m. Bill Wonus, vice president for commer cial lending at United Southern Bank, said he participates every year in the event. It is a good, fun and family environment, he said. Wonus said his group was preparing an old family recipe and hoped to win this year. A large black pot was lled to the brim with chili at Guy Ross table. Dont stop stirring, said Ross, co-owner of Doggibags, a boutique downtown. For 14 years, Ross has taken part in the event, calling it a tradition. We want to support the downtown. Asked what is the secret to the best chili and Ross insisted home grown vegetables and his special secret blend of spices. It is not super hot or super spicy, he said. Competition aside, Shaffer said the event is a great opportunity to connect with fellow reghters and meet new people. CHILI FROM PAGE A1 Va. man visiting for GeorgiaFlorida game drownsThe Associated PressJACKSONVILLE Authorities say a Virginia man visiting Jacksonville for the Georgia-Florida football game drowned in a pond. The Jacksonville Sheriffs Ofce tells The Florida Times-Union that the 31-year-old man died Friday night after slipping into a pond. The mans name was not immediately released. According to the sheriffs ofce, the man was out with friends in the city late Friday. The group went to a restaurant near their hotel. It was raining when they left the restaurant, so they attempted to run to the hotel.

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Sunday, November 3, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LEESBURG Opera Thunder II: An encore performanceCentral Florida Lyric Opera will present Opera Thunder II: An Encore Performance, at 3 / p.m., today at Paul P. Williams Fine Arts Auditorium, LSSC, 9501 U.S. Highway 441 and College Dr. Join Maestro Bill Doherty and the men of the opera as they also present the music of Broadway, jazz and Italian masterpieces. Tickets are $30, seniors $28, and students $15. Tickets are available online at www.centraloridalyricopera.org or, for information, call 877-211-5346. BUSHNELL Florida Folk Heritage and Music Festival on SaturdayDade Battleeld Historic State Park in Bushnell will host the 1st annual Florida Folk Heritage and Music Festival from 9 / a.m. to 5 / p.m., Saturday at the park, 7200 County Road 603. The festival will feature folk art, crafts and music, historical demonstrations, the Ann Thomas Youth Storytelling and Writing Contest, and a Florida photography contest. Admission is $5 per vehicle with no more than eight people per car. For information, call the park at 352-793-4781.UMATILLA Marine Corps celebration scheduled for Nov. 10All Marines, FMF Navy Corpsman, families of Marines and guests are invited to celebrate the 238th anniversary of the United States Marine Corps, from 3 to 4:30 / p.m., Nov. 10, at the Olde Mill Stream RV Resort, 1000 N. Central Ave. Cost is $5. Uniform or coat and tie is preferred and reservations are required by calling 352-669-3141. MOUNT DORA The Rhythm Club Fire documentary at the libraryFilmmaker / photographer Bryan Burch of Umatilla will talk about his documentary lm, The Rhythm Club Fire that took place in Natchez, Miss., in 1940. The lm will be shown on Tuesday at the W.T. Bland Public Library, 1995 N. Donnelly St. The Rhythm Club Fire won the Best Documentary Short Film at the Orlando Film Festival. Call the library at 352-735-7180, option 5 for details.EUSTIS Quit-smoking program offered on TuesdayFor those that are ready to quit tobacco, the IQuit Program will be offered on Tuesday at the city commission room, City Hall, from 10 / a.m. to noon, 10 N. Grove St. The personalized two-hour program offers participants the Tools to Quit program, and enrollment and materials are free. To register or for information, call 877-252-6094.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8208 Staff reportA 74-year-old Paisley woman was arrested after she allegedly fought with police after a trafc accident in Eustis, according to an arrest afdavit. Beverly Jean Price, 2753 Corrine Ave., was charged with driving under the in uence, battery on a law enforcement ofce and resisting a law enforcement ofcer without violence. She was booked into the Lake County jail and re leased later after posting a $26,000 bond. According to the afdavit, Price was involved in a trafc accident at the intersection of Orange Av enue and Grove Street in Eustis, and a half-dozen ofcers responded to as sist with road blockage and possible injuries. One of these ofcers, Luke Summa, said that when he arrived at the scene, the 4-foot, 11-inch, Price was being restrained by three of the other ofcers. Price was resisting law enforcement by pulling away, kicking her feet at the ofces and spitting at them, Summa said. After being placed in the rear of a patrol car, Price somehow removed her handcuffs and began banging on the window, Summa said. The wom an was re-handcuffed and transported to the police station, where she continued to struggle aggres sively, he said. While being physically restrained, Price hurt her left wrist and had to be transported to Florida Hospital Waterman, Summa said. There, the woman allegedly became violent again, thrashing with her medical re straints and yelling vul garities, he said. The 120-pound Price was treated and released, handcuffed once again and taken to jail, the afdavit stated.EUSTISCops fight off 74-year-old woman PRICE Staff reportUmatilla City Manager Glenn A. Irby is well above exceeding the expectations of city council members, his latest report card shows. You are doing a good job moving the city in the right direction, council member Peter Tarby said in his comments sec tion of the review. The board will discuss Irbys annual evaluation at Tuesday nights city coun cil meeting. In the areas of administrative skill, scal management, personal skills and community relations, Irby re ceived an overall average score of 87.5. A score of 60 would be Meeting Expectations, a score of 75 would be Exceeding Expectations and a score of 100 would be Excellent.UMATILLACity manager gets high marks Staff reportThe Florida National Cemetery will sponsor its annual Veterans Day ceremony at the Flori da National Cemetery on Nov. 11 with Col. Rob ert D. Crawford, United States Marines Corps Re serve (Retired), as key note speaker. Steve Jerve of WFLA TV News Channel 8 in Tampa will be the master of cer emonies. Pete Perrone, band director and mem ber of the South Sumter High School Band, will play patriotic music prior to and during the cer emony. Patriotic songs dur ing the ceremony will be performed by Linda Bur nette, while Kevin Sulfrige will perform on the bagpipes and Gayle Williams will play Taps. The nations colors will be posted by the Florida National Guard. Ye Mystic Air Krewe will provide a yover. Guests are invited to ar rive early and enjoy the patriotic and inspirational musical prelude which will begin shortly before the ceremony. Seating is limited; those attend ing are encouraged to ar rive early, wear comfortable clothing and bring a lawn chair or blanket to sit upon. The ceremony begins promptly at 11 / a.m. r ain or shine. Organizations with colors are invited to participate in the massing BUSHNELLVeterans Day ceremony set for Nov. 11 IRBY Staff reportA University of Florida student from Clermont has made the list of White House interns for the fall 2013 session. Makda Matthew was among those picked by the White House for work in one of several White House de partments, including the Domes tic Policy Council, the National Eco nomic Council, the Ofce of Cabinet Affairs, the Ofce of Chief of Staff, the Ofce of Communications, the Ofce of Digital Strategy, the Ofce of the First Lady, the Ofce of Legislative Affairs, the Ofce of Manage ment and Administration, the Ofce of Presidential Correspondence, the Ofce of Presidential Personnel, the Clermont student gets internship at the White HouseSEE INTERN | A6SEE GRADE | A6 SEE RITE | A6 PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIALFrom left, J.P. and Greg the Mime work the congas on Saturday at the Downtown Clermont Art Festival in Clermont.The Downtown Clermont Art Festival, sponsored by the South Lake Art League, will gear up today from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. with free parking and free admission. The festival will be located on Montrose Street in historic downtown Clermont, featuring a variety of ne arts and crafts. The Gatorsktch Interactive area will host a variety of hands-on ac tivities for children. The festival is an entertainment zone. After 12 p.m., festival pa trons will be able to purchase beer or wine from the local vendors and enjoy their beverage while stroll ing the festival. Rockin weekend in downtown Clermont ABOVE LEFT: Ted Jelsema and his ukelele. ABOVE RIGHT: Featured artist Pat Percy displays one of her artistic pieces.Entertainment Zone featured

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013 When the time comes wouldnt you prefer your loved ones celebrate your legacy rather than stress about making arrangements? Give them the relief theyll need during a tough time.Well discuss: RESERVATION REQUIRED Limited seating available. CALL NOW!First time attendees only please.Ruby Tuesdays Friday, November 8th FREE Early Bird Dinner & Informational Seminar CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) Army ~ Navy~ Air Force ~ Marines ~ Coast GuardActive Duty/Veterans Thank you for serving our country.Hamlin Hilbish Funeral Directors326 East Orange Ave., Eustis, FL 32726 352-357-4193 www.hamlinhilbish.com Paul Allen Mako Paul Allen Mako, 54, of Okahumpka, Florida, died Thursday, October 31, 2013. He was born March 24, 1959 in Barnesville, Ohio and moved to Okahumpka, FL in 1982. He was a re tired mechanic with the City of Leesburg. He liked motorcycles, hunting and shing and spending quality time with his family and friends. He is sur vived by his wife, Cin dy Mako of Okahump ka, FL; son Chad A. Mako of Okahumpka, FL; and sister, Clau dette M. Stokes of Leesburg, FL. He was predeceased by his mother, Virginia Hendrix. A Memorial Ser vice will be held at Beyers Funeral Home Chapel, Leesburg on Saturday, November 9, 2013 at 2.00 PM with Chaplain Wendy Coats ofciating. Online condolences may be left at www.beyers funeralhome.com Ar rangements entrusted to Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg, FL.Stephen P. KupferbergStephen P. Kupfer berg, 69, Leesburg, FL went to be with the Lord on October 29, 2013 at Leesburg Regional Medical Center, Leesburg, FL. Mr. Kupferberg was born on October 4, 1944 in Brooklyn, New York to his parents Lazarus Lee Kupferberg and Beatrice (Silverman) Kupferberg. He graduated from Northern Il linois University with his Bachelors Degree in 1966 and received his Masters Degree from the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island in 1997. Mr. Kupferberg was a former Systems Engineer in the Defense Industry and had worked for the National Imagery Mapping Agency and as a Contractor for S.A.I.C. in Washington, D.C. He was a longtime volunteer with the Boy Scouts of America. He and his wife moved to Leesburg, FL 3 years ago from Middletown, Maryland and were members of The Church of the Transguration in Brad dock Heights, MD and St. James Episcopal Church of Leesburg. Mr. Kupferberg was the Commander of the Harris Chain Sail and Power Squadron, Vice Commander of the Legacy Neighborhood Watch and was a vol unteer for the Ameri can Red Cross where he was an instructor in both Maryland and Florida. He is survived by his loving wife of 43 years: Ann D. Kupfer berg of Leesburg, FL; a son: Andrew Stephen Kupferberg of Tampa, FL; two sisters: Jill Kupferberg Cap padoro and Jody Lee Kupferberg both of Tampa, FL; a brother: Robert Bob Kehne of Maryland; many loving nieces and neph ews. Mr. Kupferberg was preceded in death by his parents, a step mother Dorothea Staley Kehne Kupferberg, a daughter Melissa Ann Kupferberg and a brother Jeffrey Kehne. A Funeral Mass will be held on Saturday, November 9, 2013 at 2:00PM at St. James Episcopal Church in Leesburg, FL. In Lieu of owers the family requests donations be made to Houndhaven a safe haven for dogs at P.O. Box 185 Min neola, FL 34755 or The American Red Cross in his loving memory. Online condolences may be left by visiting www.pagetheusfuner alhome.com. Services entrusted to PageTheus Funeral Home Chapel, Leesburg, FL.Frances Ann WoodFrances Ann Wood (Proctor) Frankie 61 of Umatilla, Florida passed away peacefully at home on October 31st from aggressive breast cancer which metastases to the liv er, bones, and nally the brain. The visitation will be held on Tuesday, November 5th from 5:00pm to 7:00pm at Beyers Funeral Home in Umatilla. The funeral service will be held on No vember 6th at 10:30am at Grand Island Bap tist Church in Grand Island. Pastor Don Feezor will be ofciating. Burial will fol low the funeral at Pine Forest Cemetery, Mt. Dora, Florida. Frankie was born in Lees burg, FL. She graduat ed from Mount Dora Christian Bible School and continued her education in the Univer sity of Life. Frankie worked as an Ofce Oper ations Analyst for Ford Motor Com pany and retired after 31 years of dedicated ser vice in 2007. Frankie is survived by husband: Tony; mother: Pauline and Ralph Barbano; father: William Proctor; brother: Wayne and Valerie Proctor; children, son: Andy and Tressa Tylenda of Sanford, FL; daughter: Ashley and Patrick Russell of Lakeland, FL; step son: Robert (Tony) Markham of Knoxville, TN; grandchildren: Kallin and Brysen Tylenda; nieces: Micha and Alyson and many other loving and caring relatives in the Harbison, Proctor, and Markham family. The family would also like to extend its grat itude and thanks to the Twin Lakes Com munity in Umatilla. In Lieu of owers, memorial donations can be given to The Amer ican Cancer Society. Online condolences can be made at ww w. beyersfuneralhome. com.IN MEMORY MAKO WOOD

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Sunday, November 3, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013 On the corner of Hwy. 27/441 & Water Oak Blvd. Lady Lake, (Across from Race Trac)Over 60 VendorsEvery Item Hand Crafted Ofce of Public En gagement and Inter governmental Affairs, the Ofce of Schedul ing and Advance, the Ofce of the Vice President, the Ofce of the White House Coun sel, and the Ofce of White House Fellows. A White House Internship provides a unique opportunity to gain valuable professional experience and build leader ship skills, the White House said in a press release. Matthew is a former AP National Scholar Award winner who attended Lake-Sumter Community College (now Lake Sumter State College and received some scholar ship money to attend UF from The Lake County Gator Club, an afliate organization of the UF Alumni Association. He could not be reached for comment Friday. INTERN FROM PAGE A3 Each council member could rank Irbys perfor mance on a scale of 0-4. Out of a possible high score of 36 in the area of administrative skills, the city manager re ceived an overall aver age of 30. Both Mayor Laura Kelley Wright and council member Eric Olson gave Irby perfect scores of 36, council member Ralph Cadwell gave him a 33, council member David Adams gave him a 32, council member Donnie Kent gave him a 25 and Tarby gave him a 20. Out a possible high score of 12 in the area of scal management, Irby received an over all average of 10.8. Ad ams, Cadwell, Wright and Olson all gave Irby all 12s, while Kent gave the city manager a 10 and Tarby gave him a 7. Out of a possible high score of 32 in the area of personal skills, Irby received an overall average of 27.5. The city manag er received 32s from Ad ams, Cadwell and Ol son, along with a 31 from Wright, a 26 from Kent and a 19 from Tarby. Out of a possible high score of 20 in the area of community rela tions, Irby received an overall average of 17.6. Wright and Olson gave him perfect scores, Adams and Cadwell gave him 19s, and Kent and Tarby gave him 14s. Your addition to this city six years ago was the right move for us, Tarby remarked. GRADE FROM PAGE A3 of colors at the begin ning of the program. Veterans organizations should plan to arrive by 9:30 / a.m. The Avenue of Flags consisting of approximately 400 ags will be on display along the roadways of the cemetery. These ags were donated to the ceme tery by the next of kin of deceased veterans and were once draped over the caskets or cremation urns of veterans. RITE FROM PAGE A3 SCOTT SONNERAssociated PressRENO, Nev. More than 200 biologists, ecologists and other scientists are urging Congress to defeat leg islation they say would destroy critical wildlife habitat by setting aside U.S. environmental laws to speed logging of burned trees at Yo semite National Park and other national for ests and wilderness ar eas across the West. The experts say two measures pushed by pro-logging interests ignore a growing sci entic consensus that the burned landscape plays a critical role in forest regeneration and is home to many birds, bats and oth er species found nowhere else. We urge you to con sider what the science is telling us: that post-re habitat created by re, including patches of se vere re, are ecological treasures rather than ecological catastrophes, and that post-re logging does far more harm than good to the nations public lands, they wrote in a letter mailed to members of Congress Friday. One bill, authored by Rep. Doc Hastings, R-Wash., would make logging a requirement on some public for estland, speed timber sales and discourage legal challenges. The House approved the legislation 244-173 in September and sent it to the Senate, where it awaits consideration by the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. The White House has threatened a veto, saying it would jeopardize endangered species, increase lawsuits and block cre ation of national monuments. Hastings, chairman of the House Natural Resources Committee, said wildres burned 9.3 million acres in the U.S. last year, while the Forest Service only harvested timber from about 200,000 acres. Hastings bill includes an amendment by Rep. Tom McClintock, R-Calif., which he also in troduced as separate legislation specic to lands burned by this years Rim Fire at Yo semite National Park, neighboring wilder ness and national for ests in the Sierra Nevada. We have no time to waste in the after math of the Yosemite Rim Fire, McClintock said at a subcommit tee hearing in October. By the time the formal environmental review of salvage operations has been completed in a year, what was once forestland will have already begun converting to brushland, and by the following year, re forestation will become innitely more difcult and expensive. The Rim Fire start ed in August and grew to become one of the largest wildres in California history. It burned 400 square miles and destroyed 11 residences, three commercial properties and 98 outbuildings. Members of the House Natural Re sources Committee remain optimistic the Senate will take up Hastings bill before the end of the year, said Mallory Micetich, the committees. We have a lot of hazardous fuel buildup, and it will help alleviate some of the threat of catastrophic wildres, she said. The scientists see it differently. Just about the worst thing you can do to these forests after a re is salvage-log them, said Dominick DellaSala, the lead author of the letter. SETH BORENSTEINAP Science WriterWASHINGTON Starvation, poverty, ooding, heat waves, droughts, war and disease already lead to human tragedies. Theyre likely to worsen as the world warms from man-made climate change, a leaked draft of an interna tional scientic report forecasts. The Nobel Peace Prize-winning Inter governmental Panel on Climate Change will issue a report next March on how global warming is al ready affecting the way people live and what will happen in the future, including a worldwide drop in in come. A leaked copy of a draft of the sum mary of the report ap peared online Friday on a climate skeptics website. Gov ernments will spend the next few months making comments about the draft. Weve seen a lot of impacts and theyve had consequences, Carnegie Institution climate scientist Chris Field, who heads the report, told The Asso ciated Press on Satur day. And we will see more in the future. Cities, where most of the world now lives, have the highest vul nerability, as do the globes poorest people. Throughout the 21st century, climate change impacts will slow down economic growth and pover ty reduction, further erode food security and trigger new pov erty traps, the latter particularly in urban areas and emerging hotspots of hunger, the report says. Climate change will ex acerbate poverty in lowand lower-mid dle income countries and create new pov erty pockets in uppermiddle to high-income countries with increasing inequality. For people living in poverty, the report says, climate-related hazards constitute an additional burden. The report says sci entists have high con dence especially in what it calls certain key risks: People dying from warmingand sea rise-related ooding, especially in big cities. Famine because of temperature and rain changes, espe cially for poorer na tions. Farmers going broke because of lack of water.Warming report sees violent, sicker, poorer futureScientists oppose logging bills that would destroy wildlife AP FILE PHOTOIn this September 2013 photo provided by the U.S. Forest Ser vice, a deer walks along Cherry Lake Road in the aftermath of the Rim Fire area near Yosemite National Park, Calif.

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Sunday, November 3, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 365-255024 Hour Answering Service 1501 N. US Hwy 441 Suite 1836, Bldg 1800 The VillagesPunya Clinic 1070 Flagler Avenue Leesburg PULMONARY MEDICINE INTERNAL MEDICINE TROUBLE SLEEPING?Shakti Narain, M.D. FCCP Accepting New Patients LRDA SLP DSRDRSCenterLRDA SLP DSRDRSCenter FRANK JORDANSAssociated PressBERLIN Germanys foreign intelligence agency conrmed Sat urday that it swaps information on the latest technological developments with its European counterparts, but denied a report that it tried to bypass legal re strictions on Internet surveillance to be able to use advanced tech nology developed by the British. The London-based Guardian newspaper cited documents re leased by NSA leak er Edward Snowden according to which Britains GCHQ spy agency helped their German counterparts to change or bypass domestic laws. It is not true that the Federal Intelligence Agency allegedly tried to circumvent legal restrictions in or der to use British sur veillance technology, said Martin Heine mann, a spokesman for the agency, which is known by its Ger man acronym BND. Heinemann told The Associated Press that the exchange between the two agencies, which took place in 2008, focused not on legal, but on techni cal questions related to mooted surveillance regulation reforms in Germany that were never implemented. He acknowledged, though, that the BND swaps tech tips with friendly agencies. A regular exchange of information about technological developments takes place with other European agen cies, said Heinemann. The extent to which Western intelligence agencies cooperate on Internet surveillance has come under public scrutiny since Snowden rst released docu ments about the work of the U.S. National Se curity Agency in June. SARAH EL DEEBAssociated PressCAIRO Egypts new military-backed government had hoped trying Mohammed Morsi would close the chapter on his presidency. Instead, the trial of the ousted Islamist president on charges of inciting murder, which begins Monday, is only compounding their troubles. Morsis supporters plan widespread pro tests on the day of the trial, threatening to disrupt the proceedings. Security concerns are so high that the ven ue for the trial has still not been formally an nounced, though it is expected to be held in a heavily secured police academy in Cairo. Then there is the po litical risk of Morsis anticipated rst public appearance since the military deposed him on July 3 and locked him in secret detention, virtually incom municado. Morsi will likely represent him self in the trial, the rst time public gure to do so in the host of trials of politicians since autocrat Hosni Mubaraks ouster in 2011, Brotherhood lawyers say. He will use the platform to insist he is still the true president, question the trials legitimacy and turn it into an indictment of the coup, fur ther energizing his sup porters in the street. If Morsi is not brought to court at all, his absence will further throw into question the fairness of a trial that rights experts say is al ready in doubt. Morsis Brotherhood has de nounced the trial as a farce aimed at political revenge. During four months of detention in undis closed military facilities, Morsi has been ex tensively questioned and has not been al lowed to meet with lawyers. Virtually his only contact with the outside world was two phone calls with his family. Brotherhood supporters have called the detention an outright kidnapping, and Morsi has refused to cooperate with his in terrogators. Rights groups say the rst test in the trial will be if the judge rules whether Morsi should be brought out of secret detention and moved to a regular prison dur ing the trial. Authori ties have said military detention is necessary for security reasons in the countrys turmoil. Further weighing on the trials fairness, Mor si will be tried in a judicial system stacked with his adversaries, with whom he clashed repeatedly during his year-long presidency. Rights activists even ones who believe Mor si should be tried for abuses during his pres idency fear the pro ceedings are more concerned with retribution than justice. And the trial is taking place in the atmosphere of a widescale crackdown on the Brotherhood and its Islamist allies in which several thou sand have been arrested and hundreds killed. For the militarybacked government, the trial is key to showing its plan for political transition toward democracy is on track. Au thorities want to show the international com munity, sharply critical of the anti-Brother hood crackdown, that they are justied in moving against the Is lamist group by prov ing Morsi committed real crimes. The military says it removed Morsi only after the public turned against him with protests by millions de manding his removal, accusing him and the Brotherhood of trying to subvert the law and impose their will on the country. Morsis supporters accuse the mili tary of crushing Egypts nascent democracy by overturning the results of multiple elections won by the Islamists the past 2 years. Undoubtedly, this is an unfair trial par excellence. It is fall out from the coup, said Mohammed elDamati, senior lawyer in the Brotherhood le gal team that plans to be present in the court. But Morsi who is an engineer by train ing has the experience to defend himself. Trial of Egypts Morsi fraught with risks AMR NABIL / APA child of a supporter of Egypts ousted President Mohammed Morsi wears a mask with the leaders picture as people raise their hands with their four ngers, which has become a symbol of the Rabaah al-Adawiya mosque, where Morsi supporters held a sit-in for weeks in August that was violently dispersed later, during a protest in Cairo on Friday. Germans: European spy agencies swapping tech tips

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8208Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013www.dailycommercial.comNFL: Schedule, standings / B3 MARK LONGAssociated PressJACKSONVILLE Todd Gurley scored twice in his rst game in more than a month, helping Georgia beat rival Florida 23-20 on Saturday. Gurley returned from an ankle injury and totaled 187 yards, nding the end zone on a 5-yard run and a 73yard reception. The Bulldogs scored on their rst four possessions, taking a 20-0 lead that looked like it would be enough against one of the Southeastern Conferences most anemic offenses. But the Gators rallied, tak ing advantage of a fumble, a safety and some question able play calls to seize mo mentum in weird, wacky and chippy game. Florida cut it to 23-20 ear ly in the fourth, putting Georgia on its heels after a failed fourth-down run followed by a huge defensive penalty. But the Gators fal tered down the stretch. Georgia (5-3, 4-2 SEC) won its third in a row in the series, the programs rst three-game winning streak against Florida since 1989. This one kept the Bulldogs in contention in the Eastern Division. HOWARD ULMANAssociated PressBOSTON From the Green Monster to the Charles River, the bearded champions celebrated their improbable journey with another familiar sight in Boston. The World Series trophy. For the third time in 10 years, the Red Sox carried the prize through their city in a roll ing rally of amphibious duck boats as thousands of fans lined the streets and the banks of the waterway that separates Boston from Cambridge. The most poignant moment occurred early in Saturdays trip when the vehicles stopped at the Boston Marathon nish line, near where two explosions killed three spectators at the race on April 15. Outelder Jonny Gomes placed the trophy on the line and he and catcher Jarrod Saltalamac chia held Red Sox jerseys with the words BOSTON STRONG and the number 617, the citys area code. A jersey with that mes sage hung in the Red Sox dugout throughout the season after the bombings. On a mild, sunny day, noted tenor Ronan Tynan sang God Bless America and the crowd joined in. That was an emotional mo ment, Gomes said. To bring the World Series trophy to the n ish line, I dont think that the story was written that way, but I was glad to be a part of it and put the exclamation point on it. Before the rally began at Fen way, manager John Farrell recalled that the Red Sox had left after their 3-2 win over the Tam pa Bay Rays the day of the Mara thon for Logan Airport for a road trip. Along the way, they saw JOHN RAOUX / APFlorida head coach Will Muschamp, left, has words with line judge Michael Tay lor during the rst half of Saturdays game against Georgia in Jacksonville.JOSH REYNOLDS / APLisa Jay, of North Reading, Mass., holds a sign while waiting along the bank of the Charles River in Cambridge, Mass. on Saturday for Boston Red Sox players to ride past in amphibious duck boats during a rolling victory parade celebrating the teams World Series title. LM OTERO / APJimmie Johnson, left, playfully interrupts Matt Kenseth as Kenseth gives an interview during qualifying on Friday for todays NASCAR Sprint Cup series race at Texas Motor Speedway in Fort Worth, Texas. STEPHEN HAWKINSAssociated PressFORT WORTH, Texas Matt Kenseth started to answer a question about how he could affect Jimmie Johnson on the track when the ve-time Sprint Cup champion suddenly leaned around a corner of the room. Then after both nished their qualify ing laps later at Texas, Kenseth was track side during more interviews when Johnson playfully interrupted him and handed him a drink. Its appropriate that the two are so close to each other so much. Kenseth and John son are deadlocked for the points lead in the Chase for the Sprint Cup with three rac es left. The next race is today at the highbanked, 1-mile Texas track where they are statistically the best two drivers. Johnson and Kenseth have each won twice Red Sox hold rolling rally to celebrate title with fansKenseth, Johnson best at TMS in deadlocked race for championshipSEE SOX | B2SEE NASCAR | B2DAWG DAY AFTERNOONGEORGIA 23, FLORIDA 20 Bulldogs score early, hold on late to edge Gators in annual rivalrySEE GATORS | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013 AUTO RACING NASCAR Sprint Cup-AAA Texas 500 After Fridays qualifying; race today At Texas Motor Speedway Fort Worth, Texas Lap length: 1.5 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 196.114. 2. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 196.1. 3. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 195.943. 4. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 195.837. 5. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 195.78. 6. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 195.518. 7. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 195.312. 8. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 195.171. 9. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 195.129. 10. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 195.03. 11. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 194.665. 12. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 194.517. 13. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 194.384. 14. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 194.377. 15. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 194.161. 16. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 193.805. 17. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 193.659. 18. (16) Greg Bife, Ford, 193.618. 19. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 193.604. 20. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 193.403. 21. (33) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 193.334. 22. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 193.126. 23. (30) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 193.043. 24. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 192.933. 25. (55) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 192.905. 26. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 192.802. 27. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 192.651. 28. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 192.048. 29. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 191.891. 30. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 191.829. 31. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 191.421. 32. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 191.347. 33. (14) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 190.53. 34. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, 189.88. 35. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 189.321. 36. (51) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 189.235. 37. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 38. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, Owner Points. 39. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, Owner Points. 40. (32) Timmy Hill, Ford, Owner Points. 41. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points. 42. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 43. (36) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, Owner Points.BASKETBALLNBA EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Philadelphia 2 0 1.000 Brooklyn 1 1 .500 1 New York 1 1 .500 1 Toronto 1 1 .500 1 Boston 0 2 .000 2 Southeast W L Pct GB Atlanta 1 1 .500 Charlotte 1 1 .500 Miami 1 2 .333 Orlando 1 2 .333 Washington 0 2 .000 1 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 2 0 1.000 Chicago 1 1 .500 1 Cleveland 1 1 .500 1 Detroit 1 1 .500 1 Milwaukee 1 1 .500 1 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB Houston 2 0 1.000 San Antonio 2 0 1.000 Dallas 1 1 .500 1 Memphis 1 1 .500 1 New Orleans 0 2 .000 2 Northwest W L Pct GB Minnesota 2 0 1.000 Oklahoma City 1 1 .500 1 Portland 1 1 .500 1 Denver 0 2 .000 2 Utah 0 2 .000 2 Pacic W L Pct GB Phoenix 2 0 1.000 L.A. Clippers 2 1 .667 Golden State 1 1 .500 1 Sacramento 1 1 .500 1 L.A. Lakers 1 2 .333 1 Fridays Games Orlando 110, New Orleans 90 Philadelphia 109, Washington 102 Charlotte 90, Cleveland 84 Milwaukee 105, Boston 98 Atlanta 102, Toronto 95 Minnesota 100, Oklahoma City 81 Houston 113, Dallas 105 Memphis 111, Detroit 108, OT Brooklyn 101, Miami 100 Portland 113, Denver 98 Phoenix 87, Utah 84 L.A. Clippers 110, Sacramento 101 San Antonio 91, L.A. Lakers 85 Saturdays Games Cleveland at Indiana, late Chicago at Philadelphia, late Charlotte at New Orleans, late Memphis at Dallas, late Toronto at Milwaukee, late Houston at Utah, late San Antonio at Portland, late Sacramento at Golden State, late Todays Games Brooklyn at Orlando, 6 p.m. Washington at Miami, 6 p.m. Boston at Detroit, 6 p.m. Phoenix at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. Minnesota at New York, 7:30 p.m. Atlanta at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Mondays Games Golden State at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Boston at Memphis, 8 p.m. Houston at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.HOCKEYNHL EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Toronto 14 10 4 0 20 48 32 Tampa Bay 13 9 4 0 18 43 33 Detroit 14 8 4 2 18 33 37 Boston 12 8 4 0 16 35 22 Montreal 14 8 6 0 16 40 27 Ottawa 13 4 6 3 11 39 43 Florida 13 3 8 2 8 26 46 Buffalo 15 2 12 1 5 23 43 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 14 10 4 0 20 45 33 N.Y. Islanders 13 5 5 3 13 42 43 Washington 13 6 7 0 12 41 38 Carolina 13 4 6 3 11 26 39 N.Y. Rangers 12 5 7 0 10 20 37 Columbus 12 5 7 0 10 33 33 New Jersey 12 3 5 4 10 26 37 Philadelphia 12 3 9 0 6 20 37 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA Colorado 12 11 1 0 22 38 18 Chicago 13 8 2 3 19 45 38 St. Louis 11 8 1 2 18 42 25 Minnesota 14 7 4 3 17 34 34 Nashville 13 6 5 2 14 27 37 Dallas 13 5 6 2 12 33 39 Winnipeg 14 5 7 2 12 34 40 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA San Jose 13 10 1 2 22 51 24 Anaheim 14 10 3 1 21 44 36 Phoenix 14 9 3 2 20 48 44 Vancouver 15 9 5 1 19 42 41 Los Angeles 14 9 5 0 18 40 36 Calgary 13 5 6 2 12 39 47 Edmonton 14 3 9 2 8 36 54 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. Fridays Games N.Y. Islanders 5, Ottawa 4, SO Washington 7, Philadelphia 0 Pittsburgh 4, Columbus 2 Tampa Bay 3, Carolina 0 St. Louis 4, Florida 0 Minnesota 4, Montreal 3 Colorado 3, Dallas 2, OT Detroit 4, Calgary 3 Saturdays Games Chicago at Winnipeg, late Anaheim at Buffalo, late St. Louis at Tampa Bay, late Philadelphia at New Jersey, late Boston at N.Y. Islanders, late Carolina at N.Y. Rangers, late Florida at Washington, late Pittsburgh at Columbus, late Toronto at Vancouver, late Montreal at Colorado, late Detroit at Edmonton, late Nashville at Los Angeles, late Phoenix at San Jose, late Todays Games Dallas at Ottawa, 1 p.m. Calgary at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. New Jersey at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Mondays Games Anaheim at N.Y. Rangers, 7:30 p.m. Detroit at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.SOCCERMLS KNOCKOUT ROUND Eastern Conference Thursday, Oct. 31: Houston 3, Montreal 0 Western Conference Wednesday, Oct. 30: Seattle 2, Colorado 0 CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS Eastern Conference New York vs. Houston Leg 1 Today: New York at Houston, 3:30 p.m. Leg 2 Wednesday, Nov. 6: Houston at New York, 8 p.m. Sporting KC vs. New England Leg 1 Saturday, Nov. 2: Sporting KC at New England, late Leg 2 Wednesday, Nov. 6: New England at Sporting KC, 9 p.m. Western Conference Portland vs. Seattle Leg 1 Saturday, Nov. 2: Portland at Seattle, late Leg 2 Thursday, Nov. 7: Seattle at Portland, 11 p.m. Real Salt Lake vs. LA Galaxy Leg 1 Today, Nov. 3: Real Salt Lake at LA Galaxy, 9 p.m. Leg 2 Thursday, Nov. 7: LA Galaxy at Real Salt Lake, 9 p.m. CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIP Eastern Conference Leg 1 Saturday, Nov 9: East (lower seed) vs. East (higher seed), 2:30 p.m. Leg 2 Saturday, Nov. 23: East (higher seed) vs. East (lower seed), TBA Western Conference Leg 1 Sunday, Nov. 10: West (lower seed) vs. West (higher seed), 9 p.m. Leg 2 Sunday, Nov. 24: West (higher seed) vs. West (lower seed), TBA MLS CUP Saturday, Dec. 7: at higher seed, 4 p.m.TV2DAY AUTO RACING7:30 a.m. NBCSN Formula One, Abu Dhabi Grand Prix, at Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates 3 p.m. ESPN NASCAR, Sprint Cup, AAA Texas 500, at Fort Worth, TexasFIGURE SKATING1:30 p.m. NBC ISU, Grand Prix: Skate China, at Beijing GOLF 4:30 p.m. TGC Champions Tour, Charles Schwab Cup Championship, nal round, at San FranciscoNATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE1 p.m. CBS Tennessee at St. Louis 4 p.m. FOX Tampa Bay at Seattle 4:25 p.m. CBS Pittsburgh at New England 8 p.m. NBC Indianapolis at HoustonRUNNING9 a.m. ESPN2 New York City Marathon 4 p.m. ABC New York City MarathonSOCCER10:55 a.m. NBCSN Premier League, Swansea at Cardiff 3:30 p.m. NBC MLS, Playoffs, conference seminals, leg 1, 9 p.m. ESPN MLS, Playoffs, conference seminals, leg 1,SCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED emergency vehicles responding to the explo sions. Knowing that we were heading out of town, thats going to bring back a lot, and a lot of uncertainty at that moment, Farrell said, because no one knew where to turn next. So we were fortunate to be part of may be a little bit of a heal ing process. Second baseman Dustin Pedroia said: We played for the whole city, what the city went through. Bostons climb from last place in the AL East in 2012 to the top of the baseball world was stunning. Bu t not to Pedroia, a gritty leader of a closely knit team that won the title with a 6-1 vic tory over the St. Lou is Cardinals in Game 6 on Wednesday night. It was the rst time the Red Sox won the Series at home in 95 years. The way we start ed spring training, it seemed like everybody counted us out, he said. We always said, One day closer to a pa rade. Its here. The line score from the clinching game was still on the scoreboard on the left-eld wall as season-ticket holders gathered for a pre-rally ceremony. We just wanted this group to win so bad ly, general manager Ben Cherington told the crowd, because we know they wanted it so badly. Then the team boarded 25 duck boats of many colors pink, yellow, maroon, lime green, white and more normally used for tourist trips. Some boats even had light brown carpeting cut into the shape of beards attached on the front. Players still had their beards, which some had grown all season long. Hopefully, we can all get together and shave them for a good cause, third baseman Will Middlebrooks said. Some fans also were at rolling rallies after the 2004 and 2007 championships. This may be the best parade yet, said Charles Butler, 48, of Boston, who attended his third. It is the best thing that could have happened to Boston right now. The bomb ing was a sad time, and now we have a reason to come together and celebrate. Anna Mitkevicius, 24, of Medford, watched from near the nish line that she never reached on April 15. She was stopped about one mile before the end because of the explosions. It is still a very emotional experience to come down here, she said. I didnt know if it would be too hard to be at the nish line, but Im happy I came. It felt really good to be here when everyone is cele brating and the mood is good. There was a very heavy police presence, with dogs and bull horns. Crowds were about 15 people deep on both sides near the nish line on Boylston Street. Many wore Red Sox gear, some with foam beards and holding signs Papi for Mayor, a vote for World Series MVP David Ortiz. Farrell said if Ortiz hadnt hit a tying grand slam in the eighth in ning of Game 2 of the AL championship se ries against the Detroit Tigers we might not be standing here today. Steve Horgan, the po lice ofcer who raised his arms in a V when Tigers right elder To rii Hunter tumbled over the bullpen wall in pur suit of Ortizs homer, rode in the lead vehicle with John Henry and other team owners. A thrill of a lifetime, Horgan said. When the vehicles slid into the river another big splash for the Red Sox spectators cheered. The departure from Fenway was delayed when a atbed truck carrying Dropkick Mur phys, a band which had played at the ceremony, and heavy equipment became stuck in the turf along the rst-base line. A duck boat drove up in front of it and, with a tow rope between the vehicles, pulled the at bed out of the ruts. Less than three hours later, the rally was over. We were ready to go another lap, Gomes said. We didnt want it to end. It was pretty fun. SOX FROM PAGE B1 at Texas, where their 15 top-10 nishes are tied for the most and they have the best average nishes Kenseth at 8.5, just ahead of John sons 9.1 It might change from his end if were still in it all the way to the end, but Im just not really into all the head games, Kenseth said. My brain is over capacity already with trying to gure out how to make my race car fast enough to be the best. They always say, if you want to be the man, you have to beat the man and hes always denitely been the man. Johnson qualied his No. 48 Hendrick Motor sports Chevrolet third at Texas. He will start in the row ahead of Kenseths No. 20 Toyota for Joe Gibbs Racing, who will roll off from the sixth position. The two competitors seem to be genuinely enjoying the Chase so far, on and off the track. I think we do have a lot of similarities in the way we race. Being around him, off the track as well and with his family, we have a lot in common, Johnson said. I wouldnt say we are identical. But we do have something very deep down that is very common between the both of us, the way we approach things a little more laid back. Carl Edwards, the only three-time Cup winner at Texas, is the polesitter for the 501mile race. Jeff Gordon starts eighth a week after he got himself back in the title conversation with a victory at Martins ville that moved up to a season-high third in points. He is 27 points behind the leaders. Still, this is likely a two-man Chase in Tex as, where in the last two falls the top two contenders coming in also nished 1-2 in that race. Fully living up to the billing of a Tex as Title Fight in 2011, Tony Stewart won to get within eight points of Carl Edwards lead. Stewart went on to win the season title. Last November, Johnson and Brad Keselowski raced side-byside in the closing laps, even slamming together without crashing. Johnson won the race and left still with the points lead, but Keselowski overcame him the last two races for the championship. Its denitely a tense period of time. Actually its a lot of fun once I can really slow things down and pay atten tion to it, Johnson said. Having to race so hard for it and ght for each and every point as we have is, in most sit uations, a lot of fun. Its not over yet. Johnson had a slim points lead when he ar rived at Texas in 2010 in a close three-way Chase, but nished ninth that day and fell out of the lead. He did recover to win the last of his ve consecutive titles. At Texas in 2009, Johnson crashed on the third lap and spent more than an hour sit ting in his car while his crew made repairs to get him back on the track. He nished 38th and 129 laps off the pace to see his points lead shrink from 184 to 73, though he stayed on top the rest of the sea son. Kenseth has been a runner-up at Tex as four times, including the spring race in 2007 when Jeff Burton past him on the last lap for his only lead to win. That fall, Kenseth and Johnson traded the lead several times in the closing laps. NASCAR FROM PAGE B1 The Gators (4-4, 3-3) have their second threegame losing streak in coach Will Muschamps three years, raising speculation about his fu ture in Gainesville. Muschamp fell to 0-7 in the series. He was 0-4 as a Georgia player between 1991 and 1994 and now hes 0-3 as Florida. Possibly making things worse for Muschamp, he was seen screaming back at a fan as he left the eld. Georgia players and coaches were celebrat ing all around something theyve rarely been able to do in this series. Florida won 18 of 21 meetings before the Bulldogs started their cur rent streak. This had signicantly less at stake than many of those, with both unranked teams enter ing the game riding multigame losing streaks. It was the rst time that had happened since 1926. Georgia, though, looked nothing like the same team that lost consecutive games to Mis souri and Vanderbilt. The Bulldogs scored on the games opening possession and then shocked Florida when Aaron Murray found Gurley over the middle for a 73-yard catch and run. The Bulldogs piled on from there, making it 23-3 with a 32-yard eld goal just before halftime. Florida looked down and out. But Georgia helped the Gators get back in it. Arthur Lynch dropped what he thought was a screen pass near the sideline. Ofcials ruled it a lateral and a fumble. Lynch didnt realize the call and left the ball on the ground. Floridas Leon Orr scooped it up and returned it to the 13-yard line. Mack Brown scored two plays lat er, cutting Georgias lead to 23-10. Loucheiz Purifoy sacked Murray in the end zone two series later, making it 23-12. Tyler Murphy, playing with a sprained right throw ing shoulder, had two long runs on the ensuing drive, the second one a 14-yard TD scamper. Murphy hooked up with Clay Burton for the 2-point conversion and it was a differ ent game. Georgia tried to reclaim the momentum, but Gurley failed to move the chains on a fourthand-1 play. Florida did little on the next series, but Georgia gifted the Gators more life by hav ing 12 men on the eld on a fourth-and-2 play. Nonetheless, Florida oundered as it has in recent weeks. Not only did linebacker Neiron Ball remove his helmet on the stop, drawing a 15-yard penalty, but the offense stumbled as usual. Equally troubling for the Gators were two missed eld goals. Murray completed 16 of 25 passes for 258 yards and a touchdown for Georgia. Gurley had 100 yards rushing and 87 receiving. Murphy was 13-of-29 passing for 174 yards, and was sacked four times. Kelvin Taylor, mak ing his rst career start, ran 20 times for 76 yards. GATORS FROM PAGE B1

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Sunday, November 3, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 FALL TUNE-UP AND PLAY SPECIALTaught by PGA ProfessionalStephen WreshFor additional information or to register call(352)267-4707Located at Continental Country Club, 15 minutes from The Villages$249(reg. $299)Fall Tune-Up and Play Specials Expire 11/30/13.(3) 40-Minute Private Lessonsplus(1) 90-Minute Playing Lesson 4 Short Game Series or 4 Full Swing Series$180(reg. $220) NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF P A Home A way AFC NFC Div New England 6 2 0 .750 179 144 4-0-0 2-2-0 3-2-0 3-0-0 3-1-0 N.Y. Jets 4 4 0 .500 143 211 3-1-0 1-3-0 2-4-0 2-0-0 2-1-0 Miami 4 4 0 .500 174 187 2-2-0 2-2-0 3-3-0 1-1-0 0-2-0 Buffalo 3 5 0 .375 176 213 2-2-0 1-3-0 2-4-0 1-1-0 1-2-0 South W L T Pct PF P A Home A way AFC NFC Div Indianapolis 5 2 0 .714 187 131 3-1-0 2-1-0 3-2-0 2-0-0 1-0-0 Tennessee 3 4 0 .429 145 146 2-2-0 1-2-0 3-2-0 0-2-0 0-1-0 Houston 2 5 0 .286 122 194 1-2-0 1-3-0 2-2-0 0-3-0 1-0-0 Jacksonville 0 8 0 .000 86 264 0-4-0 0-4-0 0-5-0 0-3-0 0-1-0 North W L T Pct PF P A Home A way AFC NFC Div Cincinnati 6 3 0 .667 217 166 4-0-0 2-3-0 4-2-0 2-1-0 1-1-0 Baltimore 3 4 0 .429 150 148 2-1-0 1-3-0 3-3-0 0-1-0 1-1-0 Cleveland 3 5 0 .375 148 179 2-2-0 1-3-0 2-3-0 1-2-0 1-1-0 Pittsburgh 2 5 0 .286 125 153 1-2-0 1-3-0 2-3-0 0-2-0 1-1-0 West W L T Pct PF P A Home A way AFC NFC Div Kansas City 8 0 0 1.000 192 98 5-0-0 3-0-0 5-0-0 3-0-0 1-0-0 Denver 7 1 0 .875 343 218 5-0-0 2-1-0 3-1-0 4-0-0 1-0-0 San Diego 4 3 0 .571 168 144 2-1-0 2-2-0 2-3-0 2-0-0 0-1-0 Oakland 3 4 0 .429 126 150 3-1-0 0-3-0 3-3-0 0-1-0 1-2-0 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF P A Home A way NFC AFC Div Dallas 4 4 0 .500 230 186 3-1-0 1-3-0 4-1-0 0-3-0 3-0-0 Philadelphia 3 5 0 .375 176 211 0-4-0 3-1-0 3-2-0 0-3-0 2-2-0 Washington 2 5 0 .286 173 229 1-2-0 1-3-0 1-4-0 1-1-0 0-2-0 N.Y. Giants 2 6 0 .250 141 223 1-2-0 1-4-0 2-4-0 0-2-0 1-2-0 South W L T Pct PF P A Home A way NFC AFC Div New Orleans 6 1 0 .857 196 120 4-0-0 2-1-0 4-0-0 2-1-0 2-0-0 Carolina 4 3 0 .571 170 96 2-1-0 2-2-0 4-2-0 0-1-0 1-0-0 Atlanta 2 5 0 .286 166 184 2-2-0 0-3-0 2-2-0 0-3-0 1-1-0 Tampa Bay 0 7 0 .000 100 163 0-4-0 0-3-0 0-5-0 0-2-0 0-3-0 North W L T Pct PF P A Home A way NFC AFC Div Green Bay 5 2 0 .714 212 158 3-0-0 2-2-0 3-1-0 2-1-0 2-0-0 Detroit 5 3 0 .625 217 197 3-1-0 2-2-0 4-2-0 1-1-0 2-1-0 Chicago 4 3 0 .571 213 206 3-1-0 1-2-0 2-3-0 2-0-0 1-1-0 Minnesota 1 6 0 .143 163 225 1-3-0 0-3-0 0-5-0 1-1-0 0-3-0 West W L T Pct PF P A Home A way NFC AFC Div Seattle 7 1 0 .875 205 125 3-0-0 4-1-0 4-0-0 3-1-0 3-0-0 San Francisco 6 2 0 .750 218 145 3-1-0 3-1-0 3-1-0 3-1-0 2-1-0 Arizona 4 4 0 .500 160 174 3-1-0 1-3-0 4-4-0 0-0-0 0-3-0 St. Louis 3 5 0 .375 165 198 2-2-0 1-3-0 1-5-0 2-0-0 1-2-0 This WeekThursdays Game Miami 22, Cincinnati 20, OT Todays Games Minnesota at Dallas, 1 p.m. Tennessee at St. Louis, 1 p.m. Atlanta at Carolina, 1 p.m. New Orleans at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m. Kansas City at Buffalo, 1 p.m. San Diego at Washington, 1 p.m. Philadelphia at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Seattle, 4:05 p.m. Baltimore at Cleveland, 4:25 p.m. Pittsburgh at New England, 4:25 p.m. Indianapolis at Houston, 8:30 p.m. Open: Arizona, Denver, Detroit, Jacksonville, N.Y. Giants, San Francisco Mondays Game Chicago at Green Bay, 8:40 p.m.Next WeekThursdays Game Washington at Minnesota, 8:25 p.m. Nov. 10 Detroit at Chicago, 1 p.m. Philadelphia at Green Bay, 1 p.m. Jacksonville at Tennessee, 1 p.m. Cincinnati at Baltimore, 1 p.m. St. Louis at Indianapolis, 1 p.m. Seattle at Atlanta, 1 p.m. Oakland at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m. Buffalo at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. Carolina at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m. Denver at San Diego, 4:25 p.m. Houston at Arizona, 4:25 p.m. Dallas at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m. Open: Cleveland, Kansas City, N.Y. Jets, New England Nov. 11 Miami at Tampa Bay, 8:40 p.m. INJURY REPORT NEW YORK The updated National Football League injury report, as provided by the league ATLANTA FALCONS at CAROLINA PANTHERS FALCONS: OUT: LB Stephen Nicholas (thigh). QUESTIONABLE: T Sam Baker (knee), S William Moore (hip), DE Osi Umenyiora (knee), WR Roddy White (hamstring, ankle). PROBABLE: LB Akeem Dent (ankle), C Joe Hawley (elbow), DT Peria Jerry (toe), G Garrett Reynolds (knee), RB Jason Snelling (ankle). PANTHERS: QUESTIONABLE: LB Chase Blackburn (foot). PROBABLE: LB Thomas Davis (shoulder), DT Dwan Edwards (hamstring), DE Charles Johnson (groin), WR Marvin McNutt (ankle), RB DeAngelo Williams (quadriceps). MINNESOTA VIKINGS at DALLAS COWBOYS VIKINGS: OUT: RB Matt Asiata (shoulder), CB Chris Cook (hip), TE Rhett Ellison (ankle), DT Fred Evans (knee), S Jamarca Sanford (groin). PROBABLE: LB Chad Greenway (wrist), CB A.J. Jefferson (ankle), WR Greg Jennings (knee), T Phil Loadholt (illness), RB Adrian Peterson (not injury related), WR Rodney Smith (hip), K Blair Walsh (left hamstring), DT Kevin Williams (knee). COWBOYS: OUT: CB Morris Claiborne (hamstring), LB DeVonte Holloman (neck), G Brian Waters (elbow), S J.J. Wilcox (knee). DOUBTFUL: WR Miles Austin (hamstring), DE DeMarcus Ware (thigh). QUESTIONABLE: S Danny McCray (hip, toe). PROBABLE: DT Marvin Austin (back), S Barry Church (hamstring), RB Lance Dunbar (hamstring), WR Dwayne Harris (hip), DT Jason Hatcher (neck), RB DeMarco Murray (knee), DE George Selvie (shoulder). NEW ORLEANS SAINTS at NEW YORK JETS SAINTS: QUESTIONABLE: WR Marques Colston (knee), G Jahri Evans (hip), TE Jimmy Graham (foot), S Roman Harper (knee), DE Tom Johnson (hip), DE Cameron Jordan (ankle), S Kenny Vaccaro (concussion, back), DE Tyrunn Walker (knee). PROBABLE: LB David Hawthorne (ankle), DE Akiem Hicks (knee), S Malcolm Jenkins (knee). JETS: OUT: WR Santonio Holmes (hamstring). QUESTIONABLE: G Willie Colon (calf), TE Jeff Cumberland (concussion), RB Alex Green (hamstring), C Nick Mangold (ribs). PROBABLE: S Antonio Allen (nger), WR Josh Cribbs (knee), CB Antonio Cromartie (hip), DT Kenrick Ellis (back), WR Stephen Hill (foot), WR Jeremy Kerley (illness), LB Garrett McIntyre (knee), WR David Nelson (quadriceps), TE Konrad Reuland (knee), WR Greg Salas (knee), CB Darrin Walls (shoulder), G Brian Winters (ankle). TENNESSEE TITANS at ST. LOUIS RAMS TITANS: OUT: LB Moise Fokou (knee). QUESTIONABLE: S Michael Grifn (quadriceps), WR Justin Hunter (nger), DE Ropati Pitoitua (calf), TE Craig Stevens (back), T David Stewart (shoulder). PROBABLE: LB Patrick Bailey (hamstring), DT Jurrell Casey (ankle), LB Zaviar Gooden (hamstring), DE Derrick Morgan (shoulder). RAMS: OUT: G Harvey Dahl (knee). QUESTIONABLE: RB Benny Cunningham (ankle), QB Brady Quinn (hip), DE Robert Quinn (illness), RB Daryl Richardson (foot), RB Zac Stacy (foot). PROBABLE: QB Kellen Clemens (right shoulder), T Jake Long (knee), CB Brandon McGee (illness), WR Austin Pettis (thigh), S Darian Stewart (foot), C Scott Wells (thigh). KANSAS CITY CHIEFS at BUFFALO BILLS CHIEFS: OUT: DE Mike Catapano (ankle). PROBABLE: WR Donnie Avery (shoulder), WR Dwayne Bowe (groin), RB Jamaal Charles (knee), TE Anthony Fasano (knee, ankle), T Eric Fisher (knee, back), S Kendrick Lewis (ankle), TE Sean McGrath (knee), LB Dezman Moses (toe), CB Ron Parker (toe), RB Anthony Sherman (knee, calf). BILLS: OUT: QB EJ Manuel (knee). DOUBTFUL: QB Thad Lewis (ribs). QUESTIONABLE: WR Chris Hogan (back). PROBABLE: WR Marquise Goodwin (elbow), RB Fred Jackson (knee), WR Stevie Johnson (hip), LB Manny Lawson (hamstring), RB C.J. Spiller (ankle), G Kraig Urbik (knee), DT Kyle Williams (Achilles), DE Mario Williams (hip). SAN DIEGO CHARGERS at WASHINGTON REDSKINS CHARGERS: OUT: T Mike Remmers (ankle). DOUBTFUL: LB Donald Butler (groin). QUESTIONABLE: G Chad Rinehart (toe), WR Eddie Royal (toe). PROBABLE: DE Lawrence Guy (toe), LB Jarret Johnson (hamstring), S Eric Weddle (toe). REDSKINS: QUESTIONABLE: S Jose Gumbs (ankle). PROBABLE: DE Stephen Bowen (shoulder, knee), S Reed Doughty (concussion), WR Pierre Garcon (calf), QB Robert Grifn III (knee), WR Leonard Hankerson (foot), NT Chris Neild (calf), TE Logan Paulsen (knee), RB Chris Thompson (shoulder). PHILADELPHIA EAGLES at OAKLAND RAIDERS EAGLES: OUT: QB Michael Vick (hamstring). DOUBTFUL: LB Jake Knott (hamstring). QUESTIONABLE: S Patrick Chung (shoulder), WR Damaris Johnson (ankle), LB Casey Matthews (hip). PROBABLE: LB Connor Barwin (back), C Jon Dorenbos (groin), QB Nick Foles (concussion), WR DeSean Jackson (ankle), P Donnie Jones (left foot), T Jason Peters (shoulder, nger), RB Chris Polk (shoulder), DE Cedric Thornton (knee). RAIDERS: OUT: S Tyvon Branch (ankle), C Andre Gurode (quadriceps), T Tony Pashos (hip). QUESTIONABLE: WR Andre Holmes (hamstring), T Menelik Watson (calf). TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS at SEATTLE SEAHAWKS BUCCANEERS: OUT: RB Jeff Demps (groin), RB Doug Martin (shoulder), G Carl Nicks (foot). QUESTIONABLE: S Mark Barron (hip), S Dashon Goldson (knee), DT Derek Landri (back), WR Chris Owusu (foot), LB Dekoda Watson (shoulder). PROBABLE: LB Mason Foster (hamstring), G Davin Joseph (knee), DT Akeem Spence (wrist), S Keith Tandy (ankle). SEAHAWKS: OUT: RB Derrick Coleman (hamstring), T Breno Giacomini (knee), S Jeron Johnson (hamstring). PROBABLE: DE Michael Bennett (illness), RB Marshawn Lynch (knee), DT Brandon Mebane (not injury related), G J.R. Sweezy (elbow), S Earl Thomas (illness). BALTIMORE RAVENS at CLEVELAND BROWNS RAVENS: OUT: G Kelechi Osemele (back, knee). QUESTIONABLE: WR Brandon Stokley (thigh). PROBABLE: LB Josh Bynes (nger, thigh), NT Terrence Cody (knee), C Ryan Jensen (foot), T Michael Oher (ankle), RB Bernard Pierce (thigh). BROWNS: QUESTIONABLE: LB Quentin Groves (ankle), DE Billy Winn (quadriceps). PROBABLE: DE Desmond Bryant (thumb), RB Willis McGahee (knee), RB Chris Ogbonnaya (ribs), CB Chris Owens (nger), LB Jabaal Sheard (wrist). PITTSBURGH STEELERS at NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS STEELERS: OUT: CB Curtis Brown (not injury related), G David DeCastro (ankle), WR Markus Wheaton (nger). PROBABLE: G Ramon Foster (concussion), NT Steve McLendon (illness), TE Heath Miller (not injury related), QB Ben Roethlisberger (not injury related), LB Lawrence Timmons (hand), T Guy Whimper (knee). PATRIOTS: OUT: DT Tommy Kelly (knee). QUESTIONABLE: CB Kyle Arrington (groin), CB Aqib Talib (hip), RB Leon Washington (ankle). PROBABLE: WR Danny Amendola (groin), RB Brandon Bolden (knee), QB Tom Brady (right shoulder), T Marcus Cannon (shoulder), WR Julian Edelman (thigh), TE Rob Gronkowski (back, forearm, hamstring), WR Matthew Slater (wrist). INDIANAPOLIS COLTS at HOUSTON TEXANS COLTS: OUT: CB Josh Gordy (groin), S Delano Howell (neck), CB Greg Toler (groin). QUESTIONABLE: WR Darrius Heyward-Bey (hamstring), LB Cam Johnson (knee). PROBABLE: C Samson Satele (knee), LB Bjoern Werner (foot). TEXANS: QUESTIONABLE: RB Arian Foster (hamstring). PROBABLE: G Brandon Brooks (toe), T Duane Brown (toe), S Shiloh Keo (Achilles), WR Keshawn Martin (shoulder), CB Brice McCain (knee), NT Earl Mitchell (knee), T Derek Newton (knee, elbow), S Eddie Pleasant (toe), WR DeVier Posey (calf), QB Matt Schaub (ankle), LB Darryl Sharpton (foot, toe), G Wade Smith (knee), RB Ben Tate (ribs). CHICAGO BEARS at GREEN BAY PACKERS BEARS: DNP: LB Lance Briggs (shoulder), QB Jay Cutler (groin). LIMITED: CB Charles Tillman (knee). FULL: WR Joe Anderson (abdomen), LB Blake Costanzo (knee), S Major Wright (knee). PACKERS: OUT: TE Jermichael Finley (neck), LB Clay Matthews (thumb). DNP: LB Nick Perry (foot). LIMITED: WR James Jones (knee), TE Ryan Taylor (knee). FULL: LB Brad Jones (hamstring). STEVEN WINEAssociated PressMIAMI The NFL Players Association will investigate possi ble harassment of Mi ami Dolphins tackle Jonathan Martin by his teammates, a person familiar with the situa tion said Saturday. The person said the union wants to deter mine whether Martins treatment by teammates contributed to his abrupt departure from the Dolphins. The person spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the Dolphins have said little about the reasons for Martins absence. Martin left the team Monday to receive help for emotional issues, and its unclear whether or when hes expect ed back. The Dolphins are off this weekend, and the union plans to look into the matter next week. The Dolphins have attributed Martins ab sence to a non-football illness. The secondyear pro from Stan ford played in Sundays loss at New England, then missed practice this week and sat out Thursday nights victory over Cincinnati.Source: Union to look into Martin situation

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013 You dont have to pay extra for an evening service call. Munns is the home of 8 to 8 Same Great Rate. Emergency services are also available. Were there when you need us!Carl Munn www.munnair.com2135 US Hwy 441/27Fruitland Park, FL24/7/365 (352)-787-7741 Best Western Chain of Lakes GOLF DOUG FERGUSONAssociated PressSHANGHAI For 16 holes, Dustin Johnson looked like the player who has won every year since turning pro and has played on two Ry der Cup teams. Start ing the third round of the HSBC Champions with a five-shot lead, he blasted his way to 10 birdies and was running away from the field. As for the other two holes, it was a remind er that no lead is safe in his hands. All those birdies were offset by two double bogeys, the last one cutting his lead in half going into the final round of this World Golf Championship. About the only thing that cheered him up Saturday after noon was a 6-under 66 for a three-shot lead over Ian Poulter. Its a good score, Johnson said. Im definitely happy with what I shot. Im just not happy with the way I finished. Making two doubles, theres no excuse for that, es pecially the way Im playing right now. Johnson ran off five straight birdies to close out a 30 on the front nine of Sheshan International and a five-shot lead over Poulter. For his next trick, the 29-year-old American hit wedge four times from inside 100 yards before he could get the ball on the green at the 10th hole. He had to make a 12-foot putt for double bogey. He followed with another run of four straight birdies, hitting a 5-iron into 15 feet for a two-putt birdie on the par5 14th, and a 3-iron to the front of the 16th green for a chipand-putt birdie that stretched his lead to six shots. Everything changed in the final half-hour of a soft, gentle day for scoring in Shanghai. Poulter, who shot 30 on the front nine without making birdie on either of the par 5s, closed with a birdie on the par-5 18th for a 63. He thought that was a good day of work, even though he wasnt making up any ground on Johnson. This golf course gives up a lot of bird ies, and hes a good player, Poulter said. And in this form, hes going to make a lot of birdies. I just need to do my thing tomorrow and make a lot more than what he does. Im going to have to see what happens coming down the stretch. Poulter was talking about today. He didnt realize he would be getting some help on Saturday. Johnsons tee shot sailed to the right and into the middle of the lake on the 18th. It appeared that he could have dropped fur ther up the fairway, but playing partners Boo Weekley and Bubba Watson didnt offer much help as to where (or if) the shot ever crossed land before it entered the hazard. Not wanting to take any chance, Johnson opted to return to the tee. He ripped anoth er drive down the edge of the water, this time with his draw to reach the fairway. But his approach went left near the lip of a bunker, and he did well to blast out to 15 feet and take two putts for his 7. Johnson was at 18-under 198 and will be in the final group with Poulter and Graeme McDowell, who had a 64 and was four shots behind. Rory McIlroy birdied three of his last five holes for a 67 and was six shots behind, along with Graham DeLaet and U.S. Open champion Justin Rose, who each had a 65. They still had an out side chance, though so much of that de pends on Johnson and how to he responds to his pair of double bogeys. Im still a little mad from my double bogey on 18, Johnson said. Obviously, to have a three-shot lead going into the last day is good and Im looking forward to the challenge. I still have to play really well. The guys that are right be hind me, theyre play ing very well, too. So its still going to be a tough day tomorrow. Got to come out and make a lot of birdies. That wasnt the problem for Johnson and most every one else. Martin Kaymer, who won the HSBC Champions two years ago by tying the course re cord with a 63 in the final round, went one better. The German started with six birdies in seven holes and thought briefly about a 59 with three straight birdies on the front nine that put him at 10-under with three to play. He missed an 8-foot birdie on No. 7, failed to birdie the par-5 eighth and had to settle for a course record 62. Kaymer was eight shots behind. Ive shot 59 before and I thought, Theres a chance, especially after my birdies on 4, 5, 6, Kaymer said. But you cant make them all. McDowell was six shots out of the lead when he finished and it looked as though he might lose ground to Johnson. Even so, McDowell has a lot at stake today at No. 2 on the European Tour money list, and he could move past Hen rik Stenson in the Race to Dubai if he were to finish alone in second. From here, it looks like Dustin is going to have to beat himself for anybody to have a chance to catch him, McDowell said. Race to Dubai points will be very important to me. I have a lot to play for tomorrow. If not the trophy, second place will certainly be worth my while. And then, the trophy became a little more realistic. I have to do my thing tomorrow, Poulter said. Its only Saturday. You cant win tournaments on Saturday. Its all about playing well on Sun day.WGC HSBC Champions Saturday At Sheshan International Golf Club Shanghai Purse: $8.5 million Yardage: 7,266; Par: 72 Third Round Dustin Johnson 69-63-66 198 Ian Poulter 71-67-63 201 Graeme McDowell 69-69-64 202 Graham DeLaet 71-68-65 204 Justin Rose 68-71-65 204 Rory McIlroy 65-72-67 204 Martin Kaymer 70-74-62 206 Boo Weekley 70-67-69 206 Bubba Watson 68-69-69 206 Jamie Donaldson 67-74-66 207 Keegan Bradley 71-68-68 207 Sergio Garcia 70-68-69 207 Tommy Fleetwood 68-70-69 207 Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano 67-71-70 208 Scott Hend 69-74-66 209 Jordan Spieth 68-71-70 209 Ernie Els 69-69-71 209 Bo Van Pelt 77-67-66 210 Gregory Bourdy 75-68-67 210 Louis Oosthuizen 70-70-70 210 Jin Jeong 70-69-71 210 Paul Casey 69-73-69 211 Francesco Molinari 72-69-70 211 Luke Donald 70-71-70 211 Jason Dufner 73-67-71 211 Phil Mickelson 71-68-72 211 Wen-Chong Liang 72-67-72 211 Lee Westwood 71-73-68 212 Thongchai Jaidee 76-68-68 212 Matteo Manassero 72-70-70 212 Mark Brown 72-68-72 212 Billy Horschel 71-69-72 212 David Lynn 74-70-69 213 Wenyi Huang 70-74-69 213 Ryan Moore 70-74-69 213 Peter Hanson 70-73-70 213 Bill Haas 72-72-69 213 Jaco Van Zyl 72-73-68 213 Scott Piercy 72-73-68 213 Hiroyuki Fujita 75-70-68 213 Mikko Ilonen 72-69-72 213 Rickie Fowler 74-70-70 214 Michael Thompson 74-72-68 214 Brian Gay 71-72-72 215 Kevin Streelman 70-73-72 215 Ken Duke 70-72-73 215 Chris Wood 71-71-73 215 Masahiro Kawamura 73-72-70 215 Jimmy Walker 73-73-69 215 Gaganjeet Bhullar 69-71-75 215 Kiradech Aphibarnrat 69-78-68 215 Branden Grace 77-71-67 215 Derek Ernst 71-72-73 216 Thomas Bjorn 74-72-70 216 D.a. Points 72-74-70 216 John Merrick 72-75-69 216 Nick Watney 75-74-67 216 Hao Tong Li 72-71-74 217 Peter Uihlein 71-73-73 217 Brandt Snedeker 73-74-70 217 Daniel Popovic 77-71-69 217 Henrik Stenson 74-76-67 217 Michael Hendry 72-73-73 218 Stephen Gallacher 73-73-72 218 Seuk-Hyun Baek 81-68-69 218 Darren Fichardt 70-74-75 219 Jonas Blixt 70-75-74 219 Ashun Wu 74-75-70 219 David Howell 72-75-73 220 Johnson wastes chance to run away at HSBC EUGENE HOSHIKO/ APDustin Johnson tees off at the third hole during Saturdays third round of the HSBC Champions at the Sheshan International Golf Club in Shanghai, China.

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Sunday, November 3, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 COLLEGE FOOTBALL AP Top 25 No. 1 Alabama (8-0) did not play. Next: vs. No. 11 LSU, Saturday. No. 2 Oregon (8-0) did not play. Next: at No. 6 Stanford, Thursday. No. 3 Florida State (7-0) vs. No. 7 Miami, late. Next: at Wake Forest, Saturday. No. 4 Ohio State (9-0) beat Purdue 56-0. Next: at Illinois, Saturday, Nov. 16. No. 5 Baylor (7-0) did not play. Next: vs. No. 13 Oklahoma, Thursday. No. 6 Stanford (7-1) did not play. Next: vs. No. 2 Oregon, Thursday. No. 7 Miami (7-0) at No. 3 Florida State, late. Next: vs. Virginia Tech, Saturday. No. 8 Auburn (7-1) at Arkansas, late. Next: at Ten nessee, Saturday. No. 9 Clemson (8-1) beat Virginia 59-10. Next: vs. Georgia Tech, Thursday, Nov. 14. No. 10 Missouri (7-1) vs. Tennessee, late. Next: at Kentucky, Saturday. No. 11 LSU (7-2) did not play. Next: at No. 1 Ala bama, Saturday. No. 12 Texas A&M (6-2) vs. UTEP, late. Next: vs. Mississippi State, Saturday. No. 13 Oklahoma (7-1) did not play. Next: at No. 5 Baylor, Thursday. No. 14 South Carolina (7-2) beat Mississippi State 34-16. Next: vs. Florida, Saturday, Nov. 16. No. 15 Texas Tech (7-1) vs. No. 18 Oklahoma State, late. Next: vs. Kansas State, Saturday. No. 16 Fresno State (7-0) vs. Nevada, late. Next: at Wyoming, Saturday. No. 17 UCLA (5-2) vs. Colorado, late. Next: at Ari zona, Saturday. No. 18 Oklahoma State (6-1) at No. 15 Texas Tech, late. Next: vs. Kansas, Saturday. No. 19 UCF (6-1) did not play. Next: vs. Houston, Saturday. No. 20 Louisville (7-1) did not play. Next: at UConn, Friday. No. 21 Northern Illinois (9-0) beat UMass 63-19. Next: vs. Ball State, Wednesday, Nov. 13. No. 22 Wisconsin (6-2) beat Iowa 28-9. Next: vs. BYU, Saturday. No. 23 Michigan (6-2) lost to No. 24 Michigan State 29-6. Next: vs. Nebraska, Saturday. No. 24 Michigan State (8-1) beat No. 23 Michigan 29-6. Next: at Nebraska, Saturday, Nov. 16. No. 25 Arizona State (6-2) beat Washington State 55-21, Thursday. Next: at Utah, Saturday.No. 4 OHIO ST. 56, PURDUE 0 Ohio St. 28 14 7 7 56 Purdue 0 0 0 0 0 First Quarter OSUD.Grant 33 interception return (Basil kick), 14:03. OSUHeuerman 40 pass from B.Miller (Basil kick), 11:28. OSUVannett 8 pass from B.Miller (Basil kick), 2:37. OSUCorey (Philly).Brown 2 pass from B.Miller (Ba sil kick), 2:10. Second Quarter OSUFields 1 pass from Guiton (Basil kick), 8:20. OSUElliott 10 pass from B.Miller (Basil kick), 1:46. Third Quarter OSUGuiton 4 run (Basil kick), 11:20. Fourth Quarter OSUGuiton 1 run (Basil kick), 10:37. A,423. OSU Pur First downs 30 10 Rushes-yards 41-345 27-27 Passing 295 89 Comp-Att-Int 28-36-1 13-29-1 Return Yards 35 0 Punts-Avg. 2-40.0 10-47.1 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 1-1 Penalties-Yards 6-48 3-25 Time of Possession 35:12 24:48 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGOhio St., Hyde 8-111, Guiton 9-98, El liott 5-37, R.Smith 6-30, Jones 4-24, Wilson 4-23, Ball 2-17, B.Miller 1-7, Team 2-(minus 2). Purdue, A.Hunt 6-23, Mostert 5-18, Cottom 7-16, Dawkins 1-5, Etling 8-(minus 35). PASSINGOhio St., B.Miller 19-23-1-233, Guiton 8-11-0-59, Jones 1-2-0-3. Purdue, Etling 1329-1-89. RECEIVINGOhio St., Heuerman 5-116, Wilson 4-34, Corey (Philly).Brown 4-27, Elliott 3-23, D.Smith 3-18, Spencer 2-34, Vannett 2-21, Fields 2-6, Hyde 1-7, Epitropoulos 1-6, R.Smith 1-3. Purdue, Bush 2-18, Dawkins 2-13, A.Hunt 2-11, Sinz 2-10, Cottom 2-4, Knauf 1-16, Carter 1-14, Anthrop 1-3.No. 9 CLEMSON 59, VIRGINIA 10 Clemson 14 21 7 17 59 Virginia 7 0 3 0 10 First Quarter ClemS.Watkins 33 pass from Boyd (Catanzaro kick), 13:33. UVaWatford 6 run (Vozenilek kick), 5:00. ClemDavidson 2 run (Catanzaro kick), 2:59. Second Quarter ClemMcDowell 10 pass from Boyd (Catanzaro kick), 4:18. ClemMcDowell 25 run (Catanzaro kick), 1:29. ClemBoyd 1 run (Catanzaro kick), :13. Third Quarter ClemS.Watkins 96 pass from Boyd (Catanzaro kick), 10:58. UVaFG Vozenilek 40, 8:55. Fourth Quarter ClemKelly 38 run (Lakip kick), 12:37. ClemFG Lakip 41, 8:24. ClemHoward 10 run (Lakip kick), 3:05. A,959. Clem UV a First downs 26 13 Rushes-yards 43-175 39-114 Passing 435 163 Comp-Att-Int 34-45-1 19-46-2 Return Yards 93 2 Punts-Avg. 6-37.0 12-43.5 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 2-1 Penalties-Yards 3-25 6-74 Time of Possession 28:30 31:30 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGClemson, McDowell 12-70, Kelly 7-56, Howard 9-32, Davidson 3-23, Stoudt 3-23, Team 2-(minus 4), Boyd 7-(minus 25). Virginia, Parks 16-82, Mizzell 8-17, Shepherd 5-8, Watford 7-8, Lambert 2-0, Jennings 1-(minus 1). PASSINGClemson, Boyd 24-29-1-377, Stoudt 5-90-31, Kelly 5-7-0-27. Virginia, Watford 16-35-1-130, Lambert 3-11-1-33. RECEIVINGClemson, S.Watkins 8-169, Bryant 5-72, Leggett 4-30, M.Williams 3-39, McDowell 3-37, Howard 3-18, Hopper 3-9, Humphries 1-25, Forbush 1-17, Seckinger 1-12, Rodriguez 1-5, McCullough 1-2. Virginia, Johnson 5-77, Mizzell 4-24, Parks 3-20, Jennings 3-13, Severin 2-17, McGee 2-12.No. 14 SOUTH CAROLINA 34, MISSISSIPPI ST. 16 Mississippi St. 7 3 0 6 16 South Carolina 14 3 17 0 34 First Quarter MSStPrescott 1 run (Sobiesk kick), 8:46. SCRoland 14 pass from Shaw (Fry kick), 6:23. SCRoland 43 pass from Shaw (Fry kick), 1:20. Second Quarter SCFG Fry 44, 11:25. MSStFG Sobiesk 38, 4:15. Third Quarter SCByrd 6 pass from Shaw (Fry kick), 12:54. SCAdams 4 pass from Shaw (Fry kick), 7:52. SCFG Fry 37, 2:07. Fourth Quarter MSStPrescott 11 run (pass failed), 5:38. A,111. MSSt SC First downs 23 12 Rushes-yards 35-150 34-160 Passing 235 147 Comp-Att-Int 28-43-3 10-20-0 Return Yards (-3) 24 Punts-Avg. 5-47.6 8-40.4 Fumbles-Lost 3-2 0-0 Penalties-Yards 6-25 4-20 Time of Possession 33:46 26:14 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGMississippi St., Prescott 15-78, Perkins 12-40, J.Robinson 6-24, Lewis 1-6, Shumpert 1-2. South Carolina, Davis 15-128, P.Cooper 6-23, Carson 6-18, J.Smith 4-5, Shaw 3-(minus 14). PASSINGMississippi St., Prescott 28-43-3-235. South Carolina, Shaw 10-20-0-147. RECEIVINGMississippi St., R.Johnson 7-53, Lewis 7-45, Wilson 3-40, J.Robinson 3-34, Perkins 3-29, M.Johnson 3-15, Shumpert 1-13, Samuel 1-6. South Carolina, Roland 2-57, Davis 2-26, Byrd 2-25, Carson 1-24, Ellington 1-6, Anderson 1-5, Adams 1-4.No. 21 N. ILLINOIS 63, UMASS 19 N. Illinois 21 21 7 14 63 UMass 6 7 6 0 19 First Quarter MassFG Levengood 42, 11:28. NIULynch 6 run (Sims kick), 8:03. MassFG Levengood 46, 5:35. NIULynch 25 run (Sims kick), 4:16. NIULynch 19 run (Sims kick), :10. Second Quarter NIUStingily 6 run (Sims kick), 14:09. MassWoodley 1 run (Levengood kick), 9:41. NIUBrescacin 66 pass from Lynch (Sims kick), 9:33. NIULewis 15 run (Sims kick), :31. Third Quarter NIULynch 11 run (Sims kick), 10:21. MassFG Levengood 44, 6:03. MassFG Levengood 40, 2:37. Fourth Quarter NIUBeebe 81 pass from Hare (Sims kick), 9:02. NIUHare 47 run (Sims kick), 5:31. A,061. NIU Mass First downs 27 15 Rushes-yards 49-354 45-155 Passing 258 169 Comp-Att-Int 12-17-0 10-25-2 Return Yards 19 0 Punts-Avg. 2-44.0 6-40.0 Fumbles-Lost 2-2 4-1 Penalties-Yards 1-15 5-40 Time of Possession 25:46 34:14 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGN. Illinois, Lynch 17-119, Stingily 8-58, Hare 2-52, Bouagnon 9-39, Smith 6-21, Sebas tiano 1-20, D.Brown 1-17, McIntosh 2-17, Lewis 1-15, Team 2-(minus 4). UMass, Woodley 38-163, S.Harris 2-15, Wegzyn 4-(minus 4), Team 1-(minus 19). PASSINGN. Illinois, Lynch 10-13-0-160, Hare 2-40-98. UMass, Wegzyn 10-25-2-169. RECEIVINGN. Illinois, Lewis 4-45, Semisch 2-30, Smith 2-26, Beebe 1-81, Brescacin 1-66, Maxwell 1-10, Eakes 1-0. UMass, Sharpe 5-65, Davis 2-27, Long 1-31, Mills 1-25, Beck 1-21.No. 22 WISCONSIN 28, IOWA 9 Wisconsin 0 7 7 14 28 Iowa 3 3 3 0 9 First Quarter IowaFG Meyer 28, 6:20. Second Quarter IowaFG Meyer 22, 4:52. WisPedersen 44 pass from Stave (Russell kick), 1:49. Third Quarter WisAbbrederis 20 pass from Stave (Russell kick), 7:34. IowaFG Meyer 29, :38. Fourth Quarter WisWhite 11 run (Russell kick), 6:29. WisWhite 2 run (Russell kick), 1:35. A,812. Wis Iowa First downs 15 14 Rushes-yards 45-218 32-115 Passing 144 179 Comp-Att-Int 11-19-1 16-40-2 Return Yards (-1) 18 Punts-Avg. 8-33.9 7-41.1 Fumbles-Lost 3-0 1-0 Penalties-Yards 7-55 4-30 Time of Possession 32:06 27:54 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGWisconsin, White 19-132, Gordon 1762, Stave 7-15, Abbrederis 1-11, Team 1-(minus 2). Iowa, Canzeri 5-58, Rudock 4-18, Weisman 9-15, Daniels 4-14, Bullock 6-6, Beathard 4-4. PASSINGWisconsin, Stave 11-19-1-144. Iowa, Rudock 12-24-1-109, Beathard 4-16-1-70. RECEIVINGWisconsin, Pedersen 3-73, Abbrederis 3-30, White 2-19, Doe 2-17, Duckworth 1-5. Iowa, Powell 3-43, Bullock 3-39, Shumpert 2-35, T.Smith 2-26, Duzey 2-8, Martin-Manley 2-6, Fiedorowicz 1-16, VandeBerg 1-6.No. 24 MICHIGAN ST. 29, No. 23 MICHIGAN 6 Michigan 3 3 0 0 6 Michigan St. 3 10 3 13 29 First Quarter MichFG Wile 49, 10:38. MSUFG Geiger 40, 9:10. Second Quarter MSUFG Geiger 44, 11:19. MichFG Gibbons 39, 3:22. MSUFowler 14 pass from Cook (Geiger kick), :23. Third Quarter MSUFG Geiger 35, 9:54. Fourth Quarter MSUCook 1 run (kick blocked), 10:31. MSULangford 40 run (Geiger kick), 2:43. A,306. Mich MSU First downs 12 19 Rushes-yards 29-(-48) 39-142 Passing 216 252 Comp-Att-Int 15-30-1 18-33-1 Return Yards 22 21 Punts-Avg. 8-40.9 5-40.8 Fumbles-Lost 3-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 3-39 5-25 Time of Possession 27:39 32:21 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGMichigan, Toussaint 8-20, Morris 1-0, Team 2-(minus 22), Gardner 18-(minus 46). Michigan St., Langford 26-120, Shelton 2-38, D.Williams 2-5, Hill 1-2, Team 3-(minus 8), Cook 5-(minus 15). PASSINGMichigan, Gardner 14-27-1-210, Morris 1-3-0-6. Michigan St., Cook 18-33-1-252. RECEIVINGMichigan, Funchess 6-65, Gallon 5-67, Chesson 3-82, Toussaint 1-2. Michigan St., Fowler 6-75, Lippett 5-62, Pendleton 2-62, Kings 2-14, Gleichert 1-18, Price 1-12, Mumphery 1-9.No. 25 ARIZONA ST. 55, WASHINGTON ST. 21 Arizona St. 21 21 7 6 55 Washington St. 0 14 7 0 21 First Quarter ASUT.Kelly 7 run (Gonzalez kick), 9:44. ASUT.Kelly 6 run (Gonzalez kick), 5:34. ASUStrong 11 pass from T.Kelly (Gonzalez kick), 3:20. Second Quarter WSUMarks 34 pass from Halliday (Furney kick), 14:51. ASUFoster 7 pass from T.Kelly (Gonzalez kick), 7:49. ASUR.Smith 51 pass from T.Kelly (Gonzalez kick), 6:22. ASUCoyle 8 pass from T.Kelly (Gonzalez kick), 1:40. WSUGalvin 15 pass from Halliday (Furney kick), :20. Third Quarter WSULaufasa 4 run (Furney kick), 10:32. ASUFoster 23 pass from T.Kelly (Gonzalez kick), 7:08. Fourth Quarter ASUFG Gonzalez 37, 14:51. ASUFG Gonzalez 36, 5:49. A,617. ASU WSU First downs 33 14 Rushes-yards 57-282 11-2 Passing 275 300 Comp-Att-Int 22-31-1 29-54-1 Return Yards 31 32 Punts-Avg. 2-40.5 8-42.5 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 3-1 Penalties-Yards 4-20 5-43 Time of Possession 37:27 22:33 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGArizona St., Grice 18-94, T.Kelly 1366, D.Lewis 13-48, Foster 8-30, Bradford 1-20, Garoutte 1-19, Bercovici 1-8, Team 2-(minus 3). Washington St., Mason 4-13, Caldwell 1-9, Laufasa 2-5, Halliday 4-(minus 25). PASSINGArizona St., T.Kelly 22-31-1-275. Washington St., Halliday 29-54-1-300. RECEIVINGArizona St., Foster 7-77, Strong 4-35, R.Smith 3-79, Coyle 3-28, Grice 2-31, Gammage 1-14, Ca.Smith 1-7, Rogers 1-4. Washington St., Mayle 6-56, Cracraft 4-78, Marks 4-66, Myers 3-30, Galvin 3-19, K.Williams 3-19, Caldwell 1-8, Mason 1-8, D.Williams 1-7, Fullington 1-4, Laufasa 1-3, Ratliff 1-2.GEORGIA 23, FLORIDA 20 Georgia 17 6 0 0 23 Florida 0 3 9 8 20 First Quarter GeoGurley 5 run (Morgan kick), 12:15. GeoGurley 73 pass from Murray (Morgan kick), 9:19. GeoFG Morgan 49, 2:13. Second Quarter GeoFG Morgan 27, 14:37. FlaFG Velez 31, 9:54. GeoFG Morgan 32, :00. Third Quarter FlaM.Brown 5 run (Velez kick), 6:21. FlaSafety, 1:19. Fourth Quarter FlaMurphy 14 run (C.Burton pass from Murphy), 14:20. A,693. Geo Fla First downs 21 18 Rushes-yards 35-156 41-145 Passing 258 174 Comp-Att-Int 16-26-0 13-29-0 Return Yards 1 2 Punts-Avg. 2-42.5 4-39.5 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 0-0 Penalties-Yards 6-45 7-70 Time of Possession 26:26 33:34 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGGeorgia, Gurley 17-100, Douglas 6-36, Green 3-14, Murray 6-6, Hicks 1-3, Team 2-(minus 3). Florida, Kel.Taylor 20-76, M.Brown 9-41, Mur phy 10-28, Patton 2-0. PASSINGGeorgia, Murray 16-25-0-258, Team 0-10-0. Florida, Murphy 13-29-0-174. RECEIVINGGeorgia, Bennett 5-59, Gurley 3-87, McGowan 3-43, Rome 2-24, Lynch 1-31, Douglas 1-8, Wooten 1-6. Florida, Dunbar 4-91, Pat ton 3-38, Fulwood 2-22, T.Burton 2-11, Joyer 1-7, Showers 1-5.NOTRE DAME 38, NAVY 34 Navy 7 13 0 14 34 Notre Dame 10 7 7 14 38 First Quarter NDG.Atkinson 41 run (Brindza kick), 12:12. NavyReynolds 2 run (Sloan kick), 7:32. NDFG Brindza 26, 4:57. Second Quarter NavyC.Swain 11 run (Sloan kick), 8:04. NDT.Jones 36 pass from Rees (Brindza kick), 6:18. NavyReynolds 3 run (kick failed), 2:07. Third Quarter NDKoyack 17 pass from Rees (Brindza kick), 6:25. Fourth Quarter NavyReynolds 4 run (Sloan kick), 14:56. NDMcDaniel 4 run (Brindza kick), 12:51. NavyAiken 34 pass from Reynolds (Sloan kick), 8:55. NDFolston 1 run (Brindza kick), 3:47. A,795. Na vy ND First downs 28 25 Rushes-yards 70-331 36-264 Passing 88 242 Comp-Att-Int 6-9-0 12-20-2 Return Yards 11 5 Punts-Avg. 2-39.5 0-0.0 Fumbles-Lost 2-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 0-0 5-55 Time of Possession 37:36 22:24 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGNavy, C.Swain 16-85, Singleton 16-77, D.Brown 7-55, Reynolds 22-53, Whiteside 7-48, Sanders 1-13, Lynch 1-0. Notre Dame, Folston 18140, G.Atkinson 7-74, McDaniel 7-52, Daniels 1-2, Team 3-(minus 4). PASSINGNavy, Reynolds 6-9-0-88. Notre Dame, Rees 12-20-2-242. RECEIVINGNavy, Thomas 2-25, Bolena 2-17, Aiken 1-34, Dudeck 1-12. Notre Dame, T.Jones 4-111, Niklas 2-44, Koyack 2-34, Daniels 2-33, Prosise 1-13, C.Brown 1-7.SATURDAYS SCORESEAST Albright 33, Widener 19 Alfred 31, Salisbury 21 American International 43, New Haven 34 Amherst 17, Trinity (Conn.) 16 Anna Maria 42, Castleton St. 14 Bates 17, Bowdoin 10 Bentley 24, S. Connecticut 19 Boston College 34, Virginia Tech 27 Brockport 14, College of NJ 3 Brown 27, Penn 0 Bucknell 28, Colgate 7 Buffalo St. 59, Hartwick 41 CCSU 52, Wagner 17 Colby 37, Tufts 0 East Stroudsburg 52, Lock Haven 28 Fitchburg St. 26, Westeld St. 23 Fordham 32, Holy Cross 30 Framingham St. 58, Mass. Maritime 12 Franklin & Marshall 41, Susquehanna 36 Gallaudet 40, Becker 34 Gannon 40, Seton Hill 21 Geneva 39, Grove City 7 Hobart 41, Union (NY) 20 Husson 39, NY Maritime 17 Indiana (Pa.) 42, Clarion 14 Ithaca 23, Frostburg St. 0 Kean 47, Morrisville St. 21 Kings (Pa.) 28, Lycoming 24 Kutztown 45, Millersville 9 Lafayette 45, Georgetown 27 Lebanon Valley 34, Delaware Valley 31, OT Maine 19, Stony Brook 14 Marist 42, Jacksonville 35 Mercyhurst 19, Edinboro 6 Merrimack 31, Assumption 21 Middlebury 40, Hamilton 13 Moravian 41, Gettysburg 21 Muhlenberg 42, Dickinson 3 N. Illinois 63, UMass 19 Norwich 38, Mount Ida 19 Penn St. 24, Illinois 17, OT Plymouth St. 34, Worcester St. 31 Princeton 53, Cornell 20 RPI 28, Merchant Marine 13 Robert Morris 24, Bryant 3 Rowan 10, Cortland St. 9 Rutgers 23, Temple 20 Sacred Heart 24, Monmouth (NJ) 21 Salve Regina 45, Maine Maritime 8 Slippery Rock 35, California (Pa.) 17 St. John Fisher 28, Utica 27 St. Lawrence 32, WPI 15 Stevenson 48, Misericordia 3 Stonehill 42, Pace 14 Syracuse 13, Wake Forest 0 Thomas More 31, St. Vincent 0 W. Connecticut 35, Mass.-Dartmouth 12 W. New England 38, Curry 27 Washington (Mo.) 9, Carnegie-Mellon 7 Waynesburg 38, Westminster (Pa.) 19 Wesleyan (Conn.) 16, Williams 14 West Chester 66, Cheyney 14 Yale 53, Columbia 12 SOUTH Albany St. (Ga.) 31, Benedict 6 Ave Maria 45, Edward Waters 14 Bethune-Cookman 38, NC Central 14 Birmingham-Southern 35, Rhodes 34 Bowie St. 76, Lincoln (Pa.) 19 Bridgewater (Va.) 34, Emory & Henry 17 Campbell 19, Stetson 18 Catawba 38, Mars Hill 31 Centre 49, Hendrix 20 Charleston Southern 27, Presbyterian 16 Chattanooga 35, Appalachian St. 28 Clemson 59, Virginia 10 Coastal Carolina 50, Charlotte 25 Concord 44, Virginia-Wise 6 Cumberland (Tenn.) 34, Bethel (Tenn.) 13 Cumberlands 70, Campbellsville 17 Delaware St. 22, Howard 20 E. Kentucky 44, Tennessee St. 0 Elizabeth City St. 28, Virginia Union 21 Faulkner 66, Belhaven 14 Fayetteville St. 34, Livingstone 31 Florida A&M 16, Norfolk St. 6 Furman 16, Georgia Southern 14 Gardner-Webb 51, Warner 14 Georgetown (Ky.) 49, Blueeld South 7 Georgia 23, Florida 20 Grambling St. 47, MVSU 40 James Madison 31, Villanova 21 Johns Hopkins 24, Ursinus 18 Liberty 17, VMI 7 Marshall 61, Southern Miss. 13 Middle Tennessee 24, UAB 21 Millsaps 38, Berry 3 North Alabama 30, West Alabama 27, OT North Carolina 27, NC State 19 Old Dominion 66, Rhode Island 14 Randolph-Macon 42, Shenandoah 7 Richmond 27, Albany (NY) 10 SC State 45, Savannah St. 9 South Carolina 34, Mississippi St. 16 St. Augustines 13, Johnson C. Smith 6 The Citadel 28, Samford 26 Virginia St. 28, Chowan 0 W. Kentucky 44, Georgia St. 28 MIDWEST Akron 16, Kent St. 7 Albion 42, Olivet 28 Augustana (Ill.) 28, Carthage 0 Augustana (SD) 25, Concordia (St.P.) 7 Baker 54, Evangel 10 Baldwin-Wallace 31, Marietta 7 Benedictine (Ill.) 28, Concordia (Ill.) 27 Benedictine (Kan.) 48, Cent. Methodist 23 Bethany (Kan.) 24, Tabor 17 Bethel (Minn.) 55, Hamline 6 Bluffton 28, Anderson (Ind.) 0 Buena Vista 37, Luther 14 Butler 33, Dayton 30 Case Reserve 16, Chicago 3 Cent. Missouri 56, Nebraska-Kearney 0 Central 48, Loras 3 Coe 24, Wartburg 10 Cole 2, Haskell Indian Nations 0 Concordia (Moor.) 35, Carleton 27 Concordia (Wis.) 55, Rockford 13 Cornell (Iowa) 28, Carroll (Wis.) 22 Culver-Stockton 42, Avila 35 Dakota Wesleyan 31, Nebraska Wesleyan 17 Denison 27, Oberlin 14 Doane 56, Dordt 13 Drake 56, Morehead St. 14 E. Illinois 56, Tennessee Tech 21 Elmhurst 28, North Park 14 Emporia St. 35, Missouri Western 30 Eureka 23, Iowa Wesleyan 10 Ferris St. 41, Wayne (Mich.) 10 Findlay 35, Ashland 28 Fort Hays St. 63, S. Dakota Tech 17 Franklin 41, Deance 7 Friends 47, Bethel (Kan.) 10 Grand View 70, Waldorf 14 Greenville 28, Westminster (Mo.) 7 Illinois College 35, Monmouth (Ill.) 13 Illinois St. 13, N. Iowa 3 Indianapolis 27, St. Josephs (Ind.) 24 Jamestown 49, Presentation 41 John Carroll 63, Wilmington (Ohio) 3 Kalamazoo 14, Adrian 10 Kansas St. 41, Iowa St. 7 Lake Erie 63, Walsh 41 Lakeland 35, Aurora 32 Marian (Ind.) 26, Taylor 19, OT Mary 28, Northern St. (SD) 14 Mayville St. 20, Dakota St. 14 Michigan St. 29, Michigan 6 Minnesota 42, Indiana 39 Notre Dame 38, Navy 34 Ohio St. 56, Purdue 0 S. Illinois 34, W. Illinois 28 SE Missouri 37, Urbana 35 SW Minnesota St. 51, Winona St. 44, 2OT Saginaw Valley St. 55, Michigan Tech 35 San Diego 58, Valparaiso 14 Wisconsin 28, Iowa 9 Youngstown St. 38, South Dakota 34 SOUTHWEST Angelo St. 25, Texas A&M Commerce 20 Arkansas Tech 26, East Central 17 Austin 25, Southwestern (Texas) 6 Bacone 41, Oklahoma Baptist 38 Cent. Oklahoma 49, Lincoln (Mo.) 42 Harding 42, SE Oklahoma 10 Henderson St. 37, Ark.-Monticello 21 Incarnate Word 47, McMurry 43 Langston 20, Okla. Panhandle St. 19 Mary Hardin-Baylor 80, Howard Payne 0 Midwestern St. 64, Menlo 7 Mississippi College 41, E. Texas Baptist 28 NW Missouri St. 52, Washburn 21 Northeastern St. 31, SW Baptist 3 S. Arkansas 31, Ouachita 23 SW Assemblies of God 26, Wayland Baptist 21 SW Oklahoma 42, S. Nazarene 14 Texas 35, Kansas 13 UTSA 34, Tulsa 15 West Virginia 30, TCU 27, OT FAR WEST Air Force 42, Army 28 Arizona 33, California 28 Black Hills St. 48, NM Highlands 45 Carroll (Mont.) 48, S. Oregon 30 Cent. Washington 21, Humboldt St. 14 Chadron St. 59, W. New Mexico 17 Chapman 45, La Verne 7 Colorado Mines 14, Western St. (Col.) 13 E. Oregon 57, Dickinson St. 3 Fort Lewis 27, Adams St. 24 Montana St. 35, N. Colorado 28 Pacic 68, Lewis & Clark 28 Redlands 34, Claremont-Mudd 6 San Jose St. 34, UNLV 24 Associated PressNo. 4 Ohio State laid another beating on an overmatched confer ence foe, and No. 24 Michigan State took control of the Big Tens other division with a rout of Michigan. The Buckeyes, com ing off 49-point vic tory over Penn State, crushed Purdue 56-0 in W est Lafayette, Ind. Ohio State has won 21 straight and has been far and away the Big Tens most impressive team. The Buckeyes appear to be cruising to ward a Leaders Divi sion title and their rst Big Ten title game. They have a one-game lead over Wisconsin, a team theyve already beat en, and have games left against Illinois, Indiana and Michigan. Michigan State and the nations No. 1 de fense were even more impressive. The Spar tans pummeled their rivals 29-6 in East Lan sing, Mich., and have a game and a half lead in the Legends Division. Michigan State plays second-place Nebraska in two weeks. The Huskers kept pace by beating Northwestern 27-24 on a last-play touchdown pass.NO. 4 OHIO STATE 56, PURDUE 0WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. Doran Grant picked off Purdues rst pass, returning it for a touchdown, and Brax ton Miller threw for 233 yards and four touch downs as Ohio State extended the nations lon gest winning streak to 21. The Buckeyes (90, 5-0 Big Ten) have not lost in 22 months. Coach Urban Mey er also won his 22nd straight game, tying a personal best established at Florida. Ohio State scored the most points and produced the most lopsided scor ing margin in the 56game history of this se ries. Both topped the marks set in Ohio States 49-0 victory in 2010. Purdue (1-7, 0-4) lost its sixth in a row. Grays interception helped the Buckeyes take a 28-0 lead after one quarter, and they extended it to 42-0 at the half.NO. 24 MICHIGAN ST. 29, NO. 23 MICHIGAN 6EAST LANSING, Mich. Shilique Calhoun, Ed Davis and the rest of Michigan States defense battered rival Michigan, and the Spar tans remained unbeaten in the Big Ten. Michigan State (8-1, 5-0 Big Ten) has won ve of the last six meet ings with the Wolver ines, and this was the Spartans most lop sided win in the series since 1967. They held Michigan (6-2, 2-2) to minus-48 yards rush ing, the worst output in the Ann Arbor programs history. Connor Cook threw for a touchdown and ran for one, but this game belonged to Michigan States de fense, which solidied its spot among the na tions best with an over whelming performance on a rainy afternoon at Spartan Stadium. Calhoun and Davis each had 2 sacks.NO. 9 CLEMSON 59, VIRGINIA 10CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. Tajh Boyd threw three touchdown pass es and ran for a score and Clemson broke the game open with three touchdowns in the last 4:18 of the rst half. The Hampton, Va., native became the At lantic Coast Confer ences career leader in touchdown-making with a 33-yard pass to Sammy Watkins to start the scoring for the Ti gers (8-1, 6-1 ACC). It broke a tie at 112 TDs with North Carolina States Philip Rivers. Boyd later added TD throws of 10 yards to Roderick McDowell and 96 yards to Watkins, and scored on a 1-yard run 13 seconds before half time to make it 35-7. Virginia (2-7, 0-5) lost its sixth in a row and for the 15th time in its last 19 games. It also suffered its second 59-10 loss at home this sea son, having lost by the same score against No. 2 Oregon in the second week of the season.NO. 14 S. CAROLINA 34, MISSISSIPPI STATE 16COLUMBIA, S.C. Connor Shaw threw for four touchdowns, Mike Davis ran for 128 yards to move past 1,000 yards this season and South Carolina tied a school record with its 15th straight home vic tory. Shaw matched his personal best for TD throws after missing two days of practice with a virus. Davis, the SECs leading rusher, had his seventh game reaching the centu ry mark and became the teams rst 1,000yard rusher since Mar cus Lattimore gained 1,197 yards his fresh man season three years ago. South Carolina (7-2, 5-2 Southeastern Conference) won its sev enth in row over the Bulldogs (4-4, 1-3) and tied the record for consecutive victo ries at Wlliams-Brice Stadium, equaling the mark set from 197880. The Gamecocks will get the chance to break the record in two weeks when they close league play at home against Florida.NO. 21 N. ILLINOIS 63, MASSACHUSETTS 19FOXBOROUGH, Mass. Jordan Lynch ran for 119 yards and four touchdowns and threw for another in just over a half to help Northern Illinois stay unbeaten. The Huskies (9-0, 5-0 Mid-American Conference) scored touchdowns on their rst ve possessions and six of their sev en drives in the rst half. Cameron Stingily rushed for 58 yards and a touchdown, and Tommylee Lewis also ran one in for North ern Illinois.Buckeyes, Spartans in control of Big Ten MICHAEL CONROY / APOhio State running back Ezekiel Elliott, center, straight-arms Purdue safety Taylor Richards as he cuts in front of defensive back Frankie Williams during Saturdays game in West Lafayette, Ind.

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The yard sale and auction got under way in the morning at the Reliant Center, the convention center adjacent to the nowclosed stadium. More than 4,000 people were inside or wait ing to get in by about 10 / a.m. Saturday, Re liant Park officials said, the line twisting through the center and out the door. For those looking for a cheap memento, a 12-inch by 12-inch piece of AstroTurf cost $20. Seats were going for $200 a pair, and larger items, including autographed lockers and dugout benches, were to be auctioned off. The first item up for auction a set of 10 pretzel warmers from an old concession stand went for $50. Other items for sale included projectors, VCRs and turnstiles. Marcos Escobar bought four squares of AstroTurf and two pairs of seats. He recalled fond memories of watching Houston Astros baseball games and Houston Oilers football games there with his father. I wanted to come out here and get something before they tear it down, Escobar said. Opened in 1965, the Astrodome was the worlds first multipur pose domed stadium. It was home to the As tros and the Oilers. But no professional sports team has played there since 1999 and has been closed to all events since 2009. Voters will decide Tuesday whether to approve a referendum authorizing up to $217 million in bonds to turn the stadium into a giant convention center and exhibition space. Houston-area leaders have said that if the referendum fails, the Astrodome will probably be razed. A poll conduct ed in mid-September by Rice University in Houston found 45 percent of likely voters supported the referendum, with 35 per cent opposing it and nearly 20 percent still undecided. With its fate still un decided, the Astrodome was awash in nostalgia Saturday. Some people showed up in the Astros famous orange-striped rainbow jerseys from the 1970s. Others wore old Oilers caps, commemorating a team that left Houston for Nashville in the late 1990s after failing to get a new stadium. Lorenzo Fuentes re called paying $4 for tickets to games as he finished buying four squares of turf. I have a lot of big memories of the As trodome, Fuentes said. He added that his wife didnt neces sarily understand, and told him that anything he brought home from the stadium would have to stay in the ga rage.Astrodome sale features turf, lockers AP FILE PHOTOThis 1965 photo made with a sheye lens shows the Houston Astrodome in its original state. The Houston Astros played their rst game in the stadium on April 9, 1965. A yard sale and auction began Saturday for anyone wanting to buy a memento from the stadium once dubbed the eighth wonder of the world. The sale is being held at the Reliant Center, adjacent to the now-closed As trodome.

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Taxpayers $7 billion subsidy to fast-food profitsIs fast food so vital to the nation that taxpayers should spend $7 billion a year to supplement the industrys prots? Imagine the outcry if that was proposed. And yet a study by economists at the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana and the University of California at Berkeleys Labor Center says its already happening. Seven billion dollars a year is what it costs taxpayers for Medicaid, food stamps and the other public assistance programs for fast-food workers who are paid poverty-level wages. A second report, Super-Sizing Public Costs by the National Employment Law Project, said low wages and missing benets at the 10 largest fast-food companies in the country cost taxpayers about $3.8 billion a year. Another way to look at it: McDonalds posted $1.5 billion in third-quarter prots. Taxpayers paid $1.2 billion last year for public assistance to the McDonalds workforce. Its enough to give you indigestion. The study also looked at only ve of the largest federal public assistance programs, excluding other federal and state programs that would have pushed the gures higher,. By under-paying employees, companies push their real cost of doing business onto the public at large. This can be called cor porate welfare. Or socialism. But not capitalism. Fast-food workers should be paid a living wage. The corporations that hire them must stop relying on the public for any thing more than buying the occasional burger.St. Louis Post-DispatchIts the Democrats who have abandoned realityThe author of the Voices letter, Robert Wesolowski (To Republicans: Stick to the Facts, not ction, Oct. 20), is clueless about what a realist, or a Republican or a patriot is, and is no way qualied to discuss the Republican brain. Democrats are as far from reality as anyone can get. Possibly the stupidest statement ever made is: You have to pass it to see whats in it, as Democrats pushed through Obamacare when they had a majority. If 62 percent of Americans dont want Obamacare, then 62 percent of Congress should have voted against it. What happened to representing the people? This administration caused thousands of small and large businesses to shut down and put thousands on the welfare rolls. The government needs to stay out of the pockets of those trying to build businesses. I also dont expect the writer to understand that you can no more prove the theory of evolution than the existance of God. Theres more to support God than the reliability of carbon dating. Remember, over half of the Democratic Convention voted to take God out of their party. That should explain a lot. Maybe you can explain precisely where it all began. President Obama says he has cut the decit not! Because of the sequester he was forced to spend less this year. The increase in the 2013 decit was reduced but the nations decit hasnt been reduced at all. Its just not growing as fast. Thank the Republicans. Obama said raising the debt ceiling was unpatriotic until it was his ceiling. I am retired Army and thought how childish the Democrats acted during the shutdown by closing the parks and monuments, as well as the White House which belong to the people. We know how the Democrats felt. Can they explain where theyre going to get the $17 trillion from when they have to stop printing useless money. The secrecy around everything this administration does is reason enough for most Americans to not trust the government. If this administration was as transparent as they claim there would be no problems they would have all been impeached by now. It seems everytime Obama, Reid, Pelosi, or any other liberal (not to be confused with realists) opens their mouth we get nothing but lies and exaggerations. Anyone understanding simple math knows that there should not be a default. They would also know that realistic unemployment is closer to 14 percent than 7 percent even with the 300 thousand jobs Obama created. Obama continues to claim, America does not have a spending problem, but he has spent over $7 trillion more than we have taken in, in the last ve years. As we approached the shutdown and throughout the process Obama and Reid refused to negotiate unless they got all of what they wanted before they would actually negotiate. Is that how they negotiate for the people? Is that even what negotiate means? If you want reality, Obama said he would fundamentally change America and then proceeded to, by hook or crook, steal and create the votes to get well on the way. There is no way any Democrat could be called a realist. I can only assume that Weslowski is one of the 47 million with his hand out and his facts wrong.John Cohn lives in Tavares YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDBILL KOCH . ............... ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ....................... NEWS EDITORGENE PACKWOOD . ............ EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com Voter turnout during federal elections typically rises at least compared to state and local races. Big elections garner the most attention because issues stretch across a wider spectrum of pubic interest: federal entitlements, defense spending, foreign affairs. The media help parlay interest in federal candidates with expansive coverage. As American citizens we should feel a compulsion to vote. In a mi nuscule and nonetheless signicant way, we maintain a stake in the di rection this nation travels. We help determine the future of our American generation. Voting responsibly is a noble en deavor and should never be taken lightly. We ought to investigate can didates claims and cast our ballot with diligence. But while the grander issues right ly occupy our political landscapes every two and four years, we seem to forget and neglect the lesser known contests the ones involv ing local candidates and races. Voter turnout for those races is of ten dismal often in the singledigit percentages and should serve as an indictment of our civil responsibilities. Local candidates shape our com munities futures, perhaps more so than in the larger races that parade before us the bigger personalities and the deeper issues in brief tele vised sound bites. Forming opinions on the larger electoral horizons is easier. Infor mation is more accessible. Nonetheless, the local races sometimes play an even more pivotal role in shaping our political destinies as the state and feder al ones. But nding concise infor mation sometimes doesnt come as quickly and easily. But it is available. On Tuesday, local voters will be presented with the opportunity to make their voices heard. Twentyeight candidates in 13 races in sev en Lake County municipalities will have their names on local ballots. The winners of these races will then be given the authority and the responsibility to establish local or dinances and to determine how their municipalities are governed. Unfortunately, less than one in ten eligible voters typically make those determinations and, by default, decide their communities fate. We have been given the opportunity and the privilege to participate in how we are governed. It is an opportunity few in human history have been granted. Come Tuesday, we should exercise this right and contribute to the fu ture of our hometowns. After all, as American citizens, who sits in City Hall should be as equally important as who sits in the White House The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for gram mar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two let ters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to:325-365-1951OURVOICE LETTER of the WEEK C1DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013 OTHERVOICESMake sure you vote on TuesdayASSOCIATED PRESS

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013 Russ Sloan, in his response (Ultra-liberal views of columnist often miss the mark! Aug. 5) to a guest column I had written, shows how differently we view our history and politics. We do have one area of agreement, and that is we both applaud the access the Daily Commercial gives its readers to air their views. I will begin with what he called the most revealing aspect of my column and the main divide as those who believe in government and those that do not. Sloan writes, I do not know of any conservative or tea party member who does not love and support our republic, our constitution and our form of representative government. Ronald Reagan, the most worshipped conservative, once said: The government is not the solution, government is the problem. That does not sound like a ringing endorsement of our form of government. Most tea party members I know do not like government, period. Wearing ag lapel pins and wrapping yourself with a ag does not make one a believer in government. Sloan wrote: But we believe, as our Founding Fathers did, in a limited government. The framers of our constitution feared a large centralized government. Nothing could be further from the truth if one under stands our history. Yes, our Founding Fathers did believe in a small government initially, and they tried it with the First and Second Continental Congresses and found them totally lacking in authority to govern. They decided to strengthen the power of government with the Articles of Confederation, another limited form of government, and within a few years found it was inadequate in its governmental powers. A meeting was called to revise the Articles of Confederation, and the founders quickly decided a much more powerful form of a central government was needed. They created the most powerful central government the world had ever seen. The Founding Fathers gave Congress tremendous power in Article I: The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts and excises, to pay the debts and provide for the common defense and general welfare of the United States. Congress received the authority to make any law needed to carry into execution any of the enumer ated powers given them in Article I with this clause: To make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into execution the foregoing powers. The above two clauses make Sloans statement that our constitution was carefully crafted to give power to the people not to the government seem rather uninformed. In fact, the founders did quite the opposite by limiting the power of the people by limiting voting rights to white property owners; creating the elector al college as a buffer so the people could not elect the president directly; by the election of senators by the state legislatures. Sloan wrote, The real fact is that conservatives and tea party groups are attempting to run our government as crafted by our Founding Fathers. He may be right on this, since the Founding Fathers suppressed the vote, gave women no rights, kept the blacks enslaved, and were all white.Marvin Jacobson resides in ClermontOTHERVOICESVoices | www.dailycommercial.comSUBMIT YOUR OWN GUEST COLUMN: If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. PRESIDENTBARACK OBAMA (D) %  en 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W.Washington, D.C. 20500 202-456-1111 Web address: whitehouse.govU.S. SENATEBILL NELSON (D) %  en 716 Hart Senate Ofce Building Washington, D.C. 20515 202-224-5274 Fax: 202-228-2183 Web address: billnelson.senate.gov/contact %  en 225 E. Robinson St., Ste 410 Orlando, FL 32801 407-872-7161 Fax: 407-872-7165 MARCO RUBIO (R) %  en 317 Hart Senate Ofce Building Washington DC, 20510 Phone: 202-224-3041 %  en Orlando Ofce: 201 South Orange Avenue Suite 350 Orlando, FL 32801 Phone: 407-254-2573, or toll free 1-866-630-7106 Web address: rubio.senate.gov/publicU.S. HOUSE FIf F TH DISTRICT CORRINE BROWN (D-JACKSONVILLE) %  en 2111 Rayburn House Ofce Building Washington, DC 20515 202-225-0123 Fax: 202-225-2256 Web address: corrinebrown.house.gov %  en Orlando Ofce: 455 N. Garland Ave., Suite 414 Orlando, FL 32801 407-872-2208 Fax: 407-872-5763 10TH DISTRICT DANIEL WEBSTER (R R -WINTER GARd D EN) %  en 1039 Longworth HOB Washington, DC 20515 Phone: 202-225-2176 Fax: 202-225-0999 Web address: webster.house.gov %  en Lake County Ofce: 122 E. Main St. Tavares, FL 32778 Phone: 352-383-3552 11TH DISTRICT RICHARD NUGENT (R R -BROOKSVILLE) %  en 1727 Longworth HOB Washington, DC 20515 202-225-1002 Fax: 202-226-6559 Web address: nugent.house.gov %  en Brooksville ofce: 16224 Spring Hill Dr. Brooksville, FL 34604 352-799-8354 Fax: 352-799-8776GOVERNORRICK SCOTT (R) %  en The Capitol 400 S. Monroe St. Tallahassee, FL 32399 850-488-7146 Web address: www.gov.comFLORIDA SENATE 8TH DISTRICT DOROTHY L. HUKILL (R) %  en 210 Senate Ofce Building 404 S. Monroe St. Tallahassee, FL 32399 850-487-5008 %  en Ocala ofce: 110 S.E. Watula Ave. Ocala, FL 34471 352-694-0160 Email address: hukill.dorothy.web@senate.gov 11TH DISTRICT ALAN HA YS (R) %  en 320 Senate Ofce Building 404 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32399-1100 850-487-5011 Email address: hays.alan.web@senate.gov LLOCAL Off FF ICES: %  en 871 South Central Ave. Umatilla, FL 32784-9290 352-742-6441 %  en 1104 Main Street The Villages, FL 32159 352-360-6739 Fax: 352-360-6748 18TH DISTRICT WILTON SIMPSON (R) %  en 322 Senate Ofce Building 404 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32399-1100 850-487-5018 Email address: simpson.wilton.web @senate.gov DISTRICT Off FF ICE: %  en P.O. Box 787 New Port Richey, FL 34656 727-816-1120 YOURGOVERNMENTHOW TO CONTACT THOSE WHO REPRESENT YOU Marvin JacobsonGUEST COLUMNISTOTHERVOICES Tea party misguided about the Founding Fathers Congress needs to walk the walk and talk the talkWhen I was in the Marine Corp, we had a saying, You talk the talk, but can you walk the walk? Every election cycle politicians on both sides of the aisle, talk the talk. Few ever attempt to walk the walk. Recently, Republicans in the House of Representatives attempted to follow through on their promises of smaller government and less spending. They failed miserably and they have no one to blame but themselves. The recent government shutdown, as Shakespeare once wrote, was much ado about nothing. But Democrats, keeping their promise of never letting a crisis go to waste, took full ad vantage of the hapless Republicans, and put the blame squarely on Republicans. Other stories, not favorable to Democrats, got pushed aside. In case you have forgotten your schooling, let me remind you that the House of Representatives controls the purse strings and all spending bills must originate with them. The Republicancontrolled House voted all the money required to fund all government activities except for Obamacare. The Constitution gives the House the right to decide whether or not they want to fund or not fund a particular government activity. Forget what the Supreme Court said about a law being legal. That doesnt mean Congress has to fund it. Each branch of government is separate and the Founding Fathers made the judiciary the least powerful. But presidents found passing some laws took too long, but if they appointed like-minded judges to positions of power, those judges could do what Congress would not do. Congress has let activist judges usurp their power. Democrats choose to shut down government. Democrats blamed Republicans. With their control of the mainstream media, liberals know they can lie with impunity and few in the media will confront them. Sadly, the media has become the propaganda arm of liberal government. There was never any chance of government defaulting on the debt. Money was available in the Treasury to take care of the interest on our nation al debt. If you listened to the talking heads on TV or followed the story in your local paper, you would never have known that. The Senate chose to shut down government because the House did not include money for Obamacare. That was their right! But it was also their responsibility to live up to what they did! Obama lied when he claimed it was some new outrage to withhold funds and change government policy by withholding those funds. Whether withholding money to fund a government activity is good or bad, it is lawful for Congress to do so. Did you see Republicans stand before the media and tell their side of the story? I did, but it was on the Blaze, Glenn Becks network. If Republicans could tell their story there, couldnt they also tell it to the mainstream media? Did they? And if so, did the mainstream media decide to not tell their side? Congress does not have to lift the debt ceiling. Congress could make politicians on both sides of the isle cut back and spend only what taxes bring in. If Congress would not lift the ceiling on our na tional debt, it would mean government could not run-up any new debt. Wouldnt it be nice if Congress would walk the walk, and live up to some of their promises?Sonny Heninger lives in Leesburg Sonny HeningerGUEST COLUMNIST

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013 rf r f n t b f b f n b r f t f f f ffb bn tbnf bnnt n f f f r f f f f f r f b n b r b r f f b f n f f f n f f n f b b f f f f f f f n f f r t n n f f f f f r n t f f b f f f t f f f f f b f b f f f n n f b f f f f rf ntbf ff t b f f r f f f f f f t f f t t n f r t f r f f f n f r n f t t f r f f f b f f t f n t r t f t n f f f nfbb fb tfrb ftrtff fbn f nfbb r n b n f f f r fbtnf fnfnt tffbff fff ttffnf nnnftb frfffr rnrnfbfbrfrfbn tfttn tfntf rr nff nnn fnbtfbffbt ftffffbr fffrtrr bf rtrr ftfff r tff nfff nnnb nffbt fff n f f f t f b t r f f f f f f b f f ffffr rftfbr frtrr nr ft ffnn ftfntn nbfff ffnfnn nffbbnt nfnb fbttfff tfbrffb fffrf nfffffff ffffffb r tr fffr fff fnfnfbfn fffffbf rfff fff bfrfb ftfffr tr b fbtfff ffb ffb fbrtrf nrffbr fbrftffrfr r r r r r r r r r r nbnfff ffbff ffbrfbrfr btfffbf ftffb fff nfbnnf nfffnnfn fnnbbf rbfnff bffff rf nrffrnnr bffftf fnr fffbt nfnnf r fbtfffffb fn brtrrfb ffbf rfnffb rtffr frnnfnf tntff nf ff nfnnb bffnffb ffff rfn rffrnnr bffftf fnr fffbt nfnnf fffr fff fnfnfbfn fffffbf rfff fff bfrfb ftfffr tr fff r trf fnf tr b r r fr t r r r f nff ff b f r f rff fff fbrr rr rf fr rr r ff fffff ffr rrr b r rf nnfbff frff r r r r r r r r r r b n f f b b f f n f n f f n r b f f r f f f b r f f n t f f f f f f f f f f f f r f f f r f r t r r r n r f f b b n f f f b t n r ff b f r ff b nfb ffb f fffrf fr n tf ftr b fbf ffffrf fbffr fffff ffnt fnnn fbf frfrfrrft rfrffrf fffff nfff f f f r f t r frfn fbf fftfbft fffffftff ffffnfb ff t t tr nbt fbtfftr tbn frbf frfrn fnnfbfffb ff f fnbnf ffff b ff bnbtff fb f fff f r r r f t bf ftr nbt fbtfftr tbn frbf frfrn fnnfbfffb ff f fnbnf ffff b ff bnbtff fb f fff f r b f r r fft bff n bf bf ftr tf f fn f ftr b nbt fbtfftr tbn frbf frfrn fnnfbfffb ff f fnbnf ffff b ff bnbtff fb f fff f f r b r f r ff fbtffff ffb fbrt rf ff fff brff ffrfr nfnnb bffnffbff ffr fnrffr nnrbf fftffn rfffb tnfnn fffr fff fnfnfbfn ffffnff fffnf ff bfrfb ftfffr tr fbtffff ffb fbrtr ff ffn ffb rffffrfr nfnnb bffnffbff ffr fnrffr nnrbf fftffn rfffb tnfnn fffr fff fnfnfbfn fffnff nfbff n f bfrfb ftfffr tr b b

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Sunday, November 3, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 rfntr bbr trbnnn br bnt rfrnnn rrnnrnn bnnnrn nrr nnb rbrrn rntn nnnnn brbbbrbn rn brrr ntrrr rbr bnn nnrr r rnrnrfnr rrfrn nbrnr trr brrbr n bnntbr nnnnr brrnr rnrtnnr nnbr rnr trbrnt rn rnt t nrnnt brrn rrrnfr bn nrnr rb b rrn trrnrn rtnr bnrntr rbnrnn nrtrnf rnr bnn rnnrr nrbn nt rnb tnnbn nnr nrnn brnn rntrn bbr nnr ttnrnr btr nrnn ntrnt bbtrn btrn rrnb brn nr nrnr rtrrn brbn bbrbr nrnnr rnrtrn br rr brrr nr rrn brbrbnttrr tbr trnrrrn rnnn r f ntbbnn nnnnnntn tntnnn b b n n n n b n r tnbtnbb nnnnb t t b nntntnnt nb nnnnttn ftb n n n b n n b n b f nnnnnt ntnbtbbt bbnnb tnnbnn nnnnt frbtn n b t n t b b t r b r n n n t n t n t f n n nn tnntbn nnnnnnnnnnn nnnbnntnbn ntbn b b b b n b n f t b t n b nnntf f b ff nb bnnnfn nbnn nbnbnnn nbnbnt bbbb nbbntnnb bnb bnnn n n n n nnnntn nbbnn nnnnnnt nntntbtbnnnnt b nbnbnnnnn tbbbb nbbnt bnnbbnb bnnn b n b n n r nnn fb nnbb bnnnnt nnnt nnnt bnfbb tnnbbnn b nnnnb bnb bnnn t n b n t n n b n n t r n n n t n n b nnntbb bnnn nnnnn n b r n b t n t n n r r t t n n n t n t b n t b n b b n n n n t n n n n b n n n n t n t n b b t n b b n n f n n b n n n b n n f b b n b b n n b t b t n b b b n n n f n n b n n n t b n n n n n t n n n n b b b n t b t n b nnntn nnttnn nttb n n n b n n b t n t n b b b n b f n n n n t b n n b n n n t b n n b nnntnnb btnntfb n bbbnt nbnnbbn bnnnntbbnn nbnnnbbbnbnt bbnbbnbn tnbntnnbnn nnbtbn nbt nnnnnnn nbbnnntbbb nnnn nnbbnntb nbnntnn tbnnn bnttbnnttnn nnbnn tnnnbnntn nbntnn nnntnnt bbbnbntn bbnnbnnnn n b b b b n n rf ntbn b n b n b n b r ttb f t n n f n b r b r t r b f t f n t t n n n n b f f t n n f n b b t n n n n b b f b n b n n n f n b b f b b n n n b b n n n b b n n b b rbb f n n b n n n b t n b n n n n n b r b n b b b b b n n n f b t t f b n n n n t n n t b n n

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013 rf ntb t r nt rr n f t brfnt t brft brftr btr brbt brnb nrffr t tr ntrbnrr fr nt rft nt nrnrrt rrt b b b t t t t f t b f b r r n r f n t r r btrr ntt n rr nrrn tt rf rfn nt t r t t t t t t t r r n t tbt r r trtntrt f nt rr r nt b rtr r brtrf rt tt t rr t t t t rt nrf trt trf tnbtt t ttr rtrtr ntr rr bnt t r rr r btrt f b nbtr r tnt fn r r r b t n b r r t r n n b t fn r t tb bt f r t bntb t r r t t n r b b bbt tn nn tnt nn r r b tnbbtnr nrtbtt tnttbb nbttn t n t t n r t f n t t n t t f t b b b b n b b t t b b b b f r r t b b t t f t n t n b t b b b t btb tfbbbr fntn fbbr ntr tr b f nt tbt btnrnt b b b b b n r n b f t t r b b b bbn bt tnf tn rrntb ft t tbfnt ttnt b b f t n r r nnnr ftrttf b f f f n b t f n t b b b b n r rb brn rnt brntr brttbrr bttf t tffb btt tfb n

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Sunday, November 3, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 rf rfrnt brrf rrntt bfnbrff nbf rff nt brffff rt brfrf b nrf r nbrrff t n t t n b r r f tt nbfrrfrrf n ttbfrrfff t b r r f tn tbrrff tb rfr ntf tbr tft tbrfr tfft brrffr tnt tb tftnt brfrrr ft br rf n tb rfr b n b r f r f b r f r f tbbf r b r f r r brf ntt ttbrf nntbf rfrf tt nbrr nt brr n bf rff ntt tbf ntb ttfr n brf r ttt ttt tnbf rf t ttfb rfr tt ttbfr rtttt bffrrf tn tttf ffbfrr t nbrf n bfrff ttt nbfr ttt fbrrff rt ntbr nnt brfr fbr rf r tnt trtbr frff tt bfrrfr ttnt brrfr r brf tt tnbrf n t n b f r r n tbfffrr brrfr ntn ntb nbrrff n brff tt fbrrfr fnt br nbrfr n bff tf ftbr tt tttbfff t nbrfr nn ntbrrfr ttt ttbfrr ttt tbrrfr brf bfrff r tt brff ttt ftbf t bfrrfr tt btbrf nnbfrf t t brfr tntttbrff t brrfrr nbf t brff tn nbr t nbrfr tn brfff ntbr trfr f r b r r f f r ftnt tbrrfr tr ttbbrrr n b b r f nbr trfrr n t b r r f tbr t nbrfr fbrffr t ttbrfrrrf r ttt tbr tbrr brrfr b f f f tn tbrrfr fbf tt nnbrrff t n nbfrf ttr tbffrr nfft tbrrfrf brrfr ntb trfrr r r n tbrfff brf f fbrfr ntr tb tr rbf f bf nb rf ntfn brf n brrfr t brrff t tbr t t b r t t t t f f t t b f f r t t t f f b t b f r t t t n t b rffff f fnftn nnbfr fftttbrrff t nt brrfrrff tttt t tbrb tttf r f b rf tnt trtbr frff t bfrfr b rfff fttt brfrf t brff nt tnbrf tt fbrf f brfr brfrr t tt r fn rfnttt ttttt tnn tt r ff ft t tt ttt rt t f t rttt tttt r ttn bfrrfff bf t bfrf f f f n b r ttf br tt brfrrf tttf rrbfrfr tttt bfrfr br rfff rff br rfff b t nnr tbrrfrr t bf t n n n n t n b b r f r brff fntbr rffrrf b

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Sunday, November 3, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 r fntnnb rfnf rfn f n tr b f rfrn nn fn nffnfbbnbnr nnnbnr b rfnftbnnnnn nnr rfntbb b rrrr trrrrbrrf rrftrrrr brrrr trrrrb rrrr trrrrb rrrrrf brrtr rrnrrnnrrt btrrrrb frbrr b n bbrnf t t rf rfnr fnntbb bb rfrntbb nf r f n t b n t t fnbb f tt f n n t t ff rfn t t t b t t t f t t t b t t t bb tt rbbr rbnt ftt r b b r b b b t t rf r t t rf b t t n n n b b t b f b b t b r r b f t r b b n n f n b f b b t b r rnbrrt bbt b brfbr f tt n tbrf f n f n f t t n b n b b n b b b f t t r b b r b b b t t t r t t f f b f b b b b t t tr bbf nnbbbf rnrfr rnbrbrtrft nfrbfrb tt r rrt tt n tbrf f n n t t ff rfn t t t b t t t f t t t b t t t bb tt n tbrf tt bffr brnbrbr ff tttt r t t b t t b b r r tt r r b r f b t t bbrr bb f tt rfr brbbtt nbbrbrb tt rr brbbttr tbrf r f f f r r f f b t t f n n t t ff rfn t t t b t t t f t t t b t t t bb tt tbrf b b n n b b t t rf b b r b n b b b r b n b f b b n t t r r nfrbbt tt tt n n tt r br tt rfb ftt rnbbt tt fn fbfr nf brbrnb tt b tt r

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Sunday, November 3, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL D5 rf rfntb b nb r trnrb ntb bb fr ntbb ttrrnfrrnb b rfnbrf ntb brn rfbb bbb rb bb b rbrnb bbtfb b rrf n b r n t b ntbf b b r b b n n b rn nr b b r r r r f f t r n t n b b rrf tr trbb fb bbf rtnb b r t b n r n b b nrrf f nbbt b t b r bt rnb bb n b b b n nn tbt br rnfbrb tnrnrnfn rbb tb nbb t rtrnrn rnbtb n f b b b bb t rn tnnrn rtr rbb n b b n n b r b b r b n n r n r r n b n r n rn rtr btrr bb n bb bnnb b b n nn frfbt b b b t b n b t b n nn f t f b n b r t n b n r n n r r r n r b r n n r n r b n n b rnfb bb b n r t t n r n n r f tn n r b n n r n nn nnf f nnntrf f b nttf bb n n r t r n b n r b b b n n t r n b r t r r rnfb ntb b b n n r n f r n b r r nf f t n f r r f r b n r n r b n b b b f b t r n r n n b r b b r f r b t n nf f nnff f b t r f b b rbbb brb nnbtrrn rbb b n r t t n r n n r f tn n r b n n r n nn r r n b n t r n n r r f r n r b r r r b b b b t b n b t b trf fft r f trnrrrb rnrnn frnftrn rrnntrrr nrnntnb b nnrnn rnb n b t r r r n b b b r t t b r r b r n r r r frb f b b n rrnr b nrbnb t tf r b rtr nt brb b t r b b b b r f nff

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E1DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013Moneybill.koch@dailycommercial.com DOLDRUMS: Eurozone jobless rate reaches record high / E5 www.dailycommercial.com Russ SloanTHE BOTTOM LINERuss Sloan is former director of Entrepreneurial Services at Lake-Sumter State College. PRE-GAME SHOW LHS FOOTBALL LIVE WEBCAST You can also follow LHS Football on Facebook Listen to ALL the LHS Football Games!All LHS Football Games will be Broadcast atwww.meridix.com/everywhere.php?liveid=LHSJacketFootballwww.facebook.com/pages/Leesburg-Jackets-Broadcast/1409574212595072 I n my 75 years I have been inspired by the actions, bravery, te nacity and intellect of many exception al Americans wheth er they were born in America or immi grated to our country. One of these remark able Americans is Dr. Charles Krauthammer, who in the opinion of many people, includ ing myself, is the fore most political journal ist of our time. Dr. Krauthammer has come to his cur rent position of prominence via a vary unorthodox route. The youngest of two brothers, he treasured his relationship with his older brother (four years older) who became a physician and was a key inuence in the early development, athletically, vocationally and as a role model for Krauthammer. The life of Krauthammer has ironically reinforced a quote attributed to Winston Churchill who Krauthammer feels was the most indispensable man of the 20th Century. I would agree with that assessment. Churchill once famously said, If you are not a liberal before 20 you have no heart, if you are not a conservative at 40 you have no brain. Born in New York City in 1950 Krauthammer grew up in Canada and graduated from McGill University (BA), Ballia College, Oxford and Harvard University (MD). A practicing psychiatrist for three years, there had been an inner yearning towards politics which surfaced and changed the course of his professional career. He shifted his aspirations to political jour nalism and with little published history (other than his collegiate newspaper experience) he was hired by the New Republic magazine in 1981. His journalistic expertise quickly sur faced and in 1987 he earned the Pulitzer Prize for his writings with the Washington Post. An admitted Great Society liber al mixed with a strong anti-communist philosophy he served as a speech writer for Vice President Walter Mondale. But Krauthammers political evolution from outspoken liberal to Americas foremost conservative columnist did not oc cur overnight. The transformation was gradual and began with his recognition of the empirical evidence that big government programs not only did not work, but were often harmful to the people they were designed to help. He also became concerned that the anti-communists Democrats such as Senator Scoop Jackson were becoming a disappearing breed within the Democratic Party. From a national defense policy position the Democratic Par ty he had known had largely disappeared. Once the transformation was complete he became the preeminent conservative jour nalist of our time and in 2006 the Financial Times named Krauthammer the most inuential commentator in America. He now writes a weekly column for more than 400 newspapers and is a regular political pundit on several leading TV news and political programs. Krauthammer suffered a very freak, but serious spinal cord injury in a diving accident during his rst year in medical school which left him paralyzed and wheelchair bound. However, his tenacity was to continue with medical school and graduate with his class a goal he achieved. In his new book entitled Things That Matter the reader is able to gain a very personal insight into the mind, heart and soul of Krauthammer and his three decades of expressing his passions, pastimes and politics. An ardent baseball fan and chess player he probably can discuss baseball strategy with the best of major league managers and do the same with the worlds best chess masters. His book reveals his broad-based common sense perspective on the issues that affect most all of our lives. In 1787 the greatest collection of political Dr. Charles Krauthammer, a remarkable journalist SEE JOURNALIST | E2 Staff reportMore than 60 jobs are expected to be created when a new Mellow Mushroom pizza restaurant opens in Mount Dora, according to the general contractor. Evergreen Construction Management broke ground on the project next to Green Bank on U.S. Highway 411 on Oct. 15. When completed in the spring of 2014, the restaurants economic impact is projected to be a recur ring $2.5 million per year, creating more than 60 jobs and a significant number of local companies being engaged as subcontractors, said Mark Starcher, president of Ever green Construction Management. Starcher said this particular project will be uniquely sustain able, which includes substantial ly lower energy consumption com pared to other restaurants; reuse of rainwater for a number of prac tical purposes; LED lighting; high ly reflective roof and paving areas to prevent heat from being ab sorbed; and native species plant ings requiring very little watering, which he pointed out is rare in the restaurant industry. The 6,880-square-foot restau rant will have a silver rating in the Leadership in Energy and Environ mental Design (LEED). The eat ery will seat 234 diners and fea ture a large outside seating area of 1,100-square-feet. The driving force behind the project is Ken LaRoe, CEO and founder of First Green Bank. This a fantastic project with a client who is forward-thinking in their approach, Starcher said. The building will set the standard for quality and sustainability for the Mellow Mushroom franchise and projects of this nature. The franchise began in Atlanta in 1974 and has more than 120 lo cations nationwide. It specializes in pizza, but also serves calzones, hoagies and salads. The restau rants also offer a large selection of beer, typically 20-40 beers on draft and 50 or more bottles in coolers.Pizza restaurant breaks ground THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIALWorkers prepare the ground for construction of Mellow Mushroom pizza restaurant. MOUNT DORA

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E2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013 It Almost That Time!Individuals or GroupsPlease Call 365-0079 ext: 25 Ask for Barbara KettlebellVolunteers Needed Attend a FREE LUNCH N LEARN spine seminar:Wednesday, November 6, at 11:00 amComfort SuitesCall 1-888-847-8876 to RSVP. CANDICE CHOIAP Food Industry WriterNEW YORK Kraft says it plans to remove articial dyes from three macaroni and cheese varieties that come in kid-friendly shapes, a move that comes as people increasingly reach for foods they feel are natural. The change doesnt affect Krafts plain elbow-shaped macaroni and cheese with original avor. The packaged-food company, which also makes Oscar Mayer and Jell-O, said the revamped recipes arent a response to a petition on Change.org that asked it to remove articial dyes from its famous macaroni and cheese kits. That petition, which was posted in March, had more than 348,000 signatures. The creator of the petition wasnt immediately available for comment. Krafts new recipes, which begin shipping early next year, will be for its macaroni and cheese varieties that come in shapes; they include the SpongeBob Squarepants, Halloween and winter shapes. Two new shapes will also be added. The company said it plans to use spices such as papri ka for coloring, rather than the combination of articial dyes it currently uses. Ingredients in packaged food have come under great er scrutiny in recent years. People are increasingly try ing to eat foods they feel are better for them, and big food makers are adjusting their offerings to keep pace. In the meantime, small er players such as Annies Homegrown Inc., which makes a variety of macaroni and cheese, are getting more shelf space at the supermar ket. Earlier this year, PepsiCo also said it would remove a controversial ingredient from its Gatorade sports drink because of customer complaints. The move came after a petition by a Missis sippi teenager on Change. org, although PepsiCo said the petition wasnt what prompted its decision. Kraft to remove artificial dyes from 3 products TOBY STERLINGAssociated PressAMSTERDAM Anheuser-Busch InBev, the worlds lar gest brewer, says its third-quarter prots rose as the takeover of new brands and higher selling prices offset the im pact of lower sales volumes. The company, based in Leuven, Belgium, said that net prot was up 31 percent to $2.37 billion (1.73 bil lion euros), from $1.81 billion in the same period a year earlier. The gain largely reects the com panys $20 billion purchase in June of the 50 percent of Mexicos Grupo Modelo it didnt already own. Revenues rose 14 percent to $11.6 billion due to the takeover, currency effects and growth. Although sales volumes rose 11 percent, that was mainly due to the Modelo deal. Without it, vol umes sank 1.3 percent, something the company had to offset by rais ing prices. Among the best performing brands were its agship Budweiser beer, which grew global sales by 8.1 percent, and Corona, up 3.7 per cent. AB InBevs purchase of Mod elo included rights to sell and mar ket Corona globally except in the U.S., where AB InBev brands, including U.S. bestseller Bud Light, already have a market share of around 50 percent. We are not satised with our top line performance in 2013, which continues to be impacted by mac roeconomic headwinds in a num ber of our markets, said CFO Feli pe Dutra. However, he said the integration of Modelo was going faster than forecast, and the company is al ready saving $250 million on an an nual basis by combining operations. Shares rose 2.1 percent at the start of trade in Brus sels, to 76.13 euros.Bud brewer AB Inbevs Q3 profits rise 31 percent ASSOCIATED PRESSIn this March 2, 2011, le photo, Budweiser cans run through a lling machine at the AnheuserBusch brewery in the Van Nuys area of Los Angeles. minds in human history came together to create our constitution which has been the very foundation for Americas success. Krauthammer believes that, If you get the politics right most everything else will fall into place. It was that fundamental belief that took him from medicine to political journalism. Im grateful that we are privileged to read and hear Krauthammer on a regular basis and Im convinced that Franklin, Jefferson, Adams and Madison would have viewed him in 1787 as favor ably as millions of Americans do today. Krauthammer is the Norman Rockwell of political journalism. His written and spoken words capture the essence of Am erica in the same fashion the Rockwells paintings re ected the best of Ame rica and our people. JOURNALIST FROM PAGE E1

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Sunday, November 3, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL E3 Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. rrfntbn nntnb nft bfnfnb frn $19900$16900tb rfSCHEDULED DEPARTURES EVERY SUNDAY. tb rfIP CASINO RESORT4 DAYS/3 NIGHTSwww.goclassictours.comBILOXI BOUND4 DAYS 3 NIGHTSBEAU RIVAGErffntb fnBest Western Historic rrfnTHE BIG EASYNEW ORLEANS5 DAYS, 4 NIGHTS7 MEALS/$15 FREE PLAYnttb ttft tt tt t ttbtt$49595$599 Singlebnnfbbfbrrn t tt Taking Reservations Now for CHRISTMAS In BILOXI, 4 Days/3 Nights AND 5 Days/4 Nights Tours Available. Optional Christmas EVE DAY in New Orleans.Taking Reservations Now for November 26thCall Now To Reserve! Need Tax Help?Call352-787-1040Open Year Round. Please consider two impressive, veri able facts about women, nance and investing: %  en Over the next decade, women will control two thirds of consumer wealth in the United States and be the beneciaries of the largest transference of wealth in our countrys history. Estimates range from $12 to $40 trillion. Many Boomer women will experience a double inheritance windfall, from both parents and husband. Claire Behar, Fleishman-Hillard New York %  en If academic enrollment is any indicator, in 25 years women will dominate once male-dominated elds such as law and medicine.-Author Liza Mundy in the Wall Street Jour nal With all the wealth controlled by and being transferred to women, many are just now starting to immerse themselves in the investment process. And statistics show that many more husbands than wives still handle the family investments. A Wall Street Journal article by Susan Thomas entitled The Rise of the Female Investor purports that most women dont have the time or the inclination to coordinate family investment accounts. men are still more likely than women to take the lead with the family nancial account, says Thomas. According to a recent study% of wives said they took control of nancial decision making, versus 38% of husbands. Among female breadwinners, 20% said they were very well prepared to make wise nancial decisions, compared with 45% of their male counterparts. Thomas also quotes a recent study that has found that women differ substantially from men in how they relate to investing. They dont want to hear aboutgrowth or comparative per formance of different funds; they want infor mation about reaching their long-term goals, like putting a kid through college. Having advised male and female investors both singularly and as couples for 18 years, I think its difcult to generalize or stereotype. Each investor is different, regardless of gender. That said, it seems certain that by necessity women are becoming and will become more familiar with investing. And its certainly preferable that women engage the process prior to the passing of a spouse, es pecially one who handled all family nances. Many husbands will establish a relationship with a trusted investment advisor for the express purpose of easing the nancial transition for their spouse if the husband passes away rst. Some statistical studies show that women are more risk averse than men. Ironically, the biggest single determinant of risk tolerance that I expe rience as an advisor is not gender, but age. Both genders generally exhibit less risk tolerance as they grow older, as they have less time to make up for drastic market downturns. This age-based diminished risk toler ance is not always applicable, of course, as each investor is differ ent, but generally age and not gender has had a greater impact on risk aversion. Margaret McDowellGUEST COLUMNISTMargaret R. McDowell, a syndicated economic columnist, chartered nancial consultant and accredited investment duciary, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, a fee-only registered investment advisory rm near Destin. Mars vs. Venus in the new world of investing SEIZETHE DA Y SBUSINESSNEWS.www.dailycommercial.com WAYNE PARRYAssociated PressATLANTIC CITY, N.J. Reve nues at Atlantic Citys top casino in creased by nearly 7 percent in the third quarter of this year. The Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa reported net revenues of more than $200 million, an increase of 6.9 per cent. Its earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization were up nearly 40 percent to $46.6 mil lion, largely due to better luck at ta ble games. The casino also increased its share of the Atlantic City casino market by three percentage points, to 21 per cent. Keith Smith, president and CEO of Boyd Gaming, which co-owns the Borgata with MGM Resorts Inter national, said the Borgatas perfor mance in a struggling Atlantic City market was encouraging. Borgata generated strong results, and we are now nalizing preparations for real-money online gaming in New Jersey, he said. The company said in a news re lease that the Borgata is doing well in a challenging market with new competitors continuing to pop up around the region. It cited the Bor gatas amenities, service and mar keting programs. The Borgata received New Jerseys rst Internet gambling permit, and is expected to be among the rst casinos in the state to offer online bet ting once it begins in late November.Borgata revenue up nearly 7 percent

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E4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013 7amBrett picked his price, uploaded a photo and paid for his ad. Its just that simple!No matter what time of the day it is, you can place your classified merchandise ad online, pay for it and just wait for the phone to ring! Fast, convenient and on your schedule! Time to sell those golf clubs! 7 24www.dailycommercial.com*Employment advertisements are excluded. Please call 352-314-FAST to speak with a customer service rep. Lake: 352-314-3278 or Sumter: 352-748-1955 Representing Mesothelioma & Lung Cancer Victims for Over 25 Years Throughout FloridaFlorida Lawyers Representing FloridiansTerrell Hogan( 904 ) www.FloridaAsbestos.comAlan Pickert Anita Pryor ELAINE KURTENBACHAssociated PressTOKYO U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz said that he expects deepening cooperation with Japan over the high-stakes cleaning up and decommissioning of the crippled Fukushima nu clear plant. The Fukushima plant has had a series of mishaps in recent months, including radioactive water leaks from storage tanks. The incidents have added to concerns about the ability of operator Tokyo Electric Power Co., or TEPCO, to safely close down the plant, which suf fered meltdowns after be ing swamped by the March 2011 tsunami on Japans northeastern coast. We expect the relationship in the area of decommissioning between TEPCO and our national laboratories to expand and deepen in the coming years, Moniz said in a lecture in Tokyo. Just as the tragic event had global consequences, the success of the cleanup also has global signicance. So we all have a direct inter est in seeing that the next steps are taken well and ef ciently and safely, he said. Japanese regulators on Wednesday approved the removal of fuel rods from an uncontained cooling pool at a damaged reactor build ing considered the highest risk at the plant following its multiple meltdowns. Moniz was meeting with top Japanese ofcials dur ing his visit, including in dustry minister Toshimitsu Motegi, who is overseeing the governments role in the plant cleanup. Our decommissioning and decontamination in dustries stand ready to aid should Japan need their help, Moniz said. The U.S. is ready to assist our part ners with this daunting task. He is due to visit the Fukushima plant on Friday. Removing the fuel rods from the Unit 4 cooling pool is the rst major step in a decommissioning pro cess that is expected to last decades at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant. Japans nuclear regulatory chairman Shunichi Tanaka has warned that removing the fuel rods is a painstak ing, high risk process. He says he is more worried about that than the massive amounts of radiation-contaminated water that TEP CO is struggling to manage. Despite the worries over potential risks from radiation escaping from the plant, Japans ruling Liberal Democratic Party has pushed for a restart of nuclear reactors that have all been ofine for safety checks and must be inspected under new guide lines. Moniz said he expects nu clear power to remain a cru cial part of the energy mix as the world moves away from fossil fuels in its effort to mitigate global warming. The Department of Energy has provided billions of dol lars in loan guarantees for new nuclear plants in the U.S. Smaller nuclear plants now under development probably offer the safest, most nancially viable options, he said. We cannot lose perspective on nuclear as a clean, reliable supplier of baseload (electricity), while recognizing each country will make its own decisions, he said.US energy chief offers Japan aid with nuke cleanup ASSOCIATED PRESSIn this Aug. 16 photo, U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, center, attends a meeting with businessmen at the Con federation of Industry in Brasilia, Brazil. BARRY HATTONAssociated PressLISBON, Portugal Lisbon subway workers walked off the job Thursday for the fth time this year to pro test government aus terity measures being enacted in return for Portugals 2011 bailout. The 24-hour subway strike coincided with the start of a par liamentary debate on the governments 2014 state budget proposal, which aims to slash an other 3.9 billion euros ($5.3 billion) about 2.3 percent of gross do mestic product off state spending. Debt-heavy Portugal is battling to regain its credibility on nan cial markets before its 78 billion-euro inter national aid package comes to an end midnext year and it must start borrowing again from private investors. At the same time, Lis bon has to abide by the demands of its bailout creditors oth er countries using the euro currency, the European Central Bank and the International Monetary Fund who want to restore Portu gals scal health and resolve the eurozones protracted debt crisis. Prime Minister Pedro Passos Coelho told Parliament his center-right coalition governments budget proposal is the countrys passport to a bailoutfree future. The government has enough votes in Par liament to approve the spending plan despite resistance from opposition parties and trade unions. Howev er, it could be foiled by the Constitutional Court, which previously has struck down some planned pay and pension cuts. Next week, walkouts are expect at national train services and Lis bon buses and ferries. Government workers are staging their own national strike on Nov. 8. Under the budget proposal, government workers earning more than 600 euros ($825) a month will have their pay cut by up to 12 per cent, while pensions higher than 600 euros a month will be reduced by 10 percent. Workers at stateowned companies, including those in the public transport sec tor, will also see cuts to their pensions, over time pay and entitle ments such as subsidized meals.Lisbon subway shuts in anti-austerity protest

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Sunday, November 3, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL E5 Shoppes of Lake Village (Next to Lake Square Mall)www.leadingdental.comLEESBURG 365-6442Sleep through your Dental Appointment The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of an within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for treatment.License# DN14389MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTED Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg. Enhance your life with Mini Dental Implants in 1 hrIV SEDATION: FREECONSULTATIONNew Patients$85 Value*x-rays not includedFinancing Available Dr. Vaziri & Staff sponsors Albert L. Brown Foundation Inc. Dr. Susan G. Caddell, DDS Bay Street Paint & Body 17th Annual Golf Tournament Pilot Awards Gala & Pairing Party November 10th & 11th COME FIRE THE GOLF BALL BAZOOKA4 Players will get a chance to shoot for 1 MILLION DOLLARS!Each Foursome will get a MLB or NFL Celebrity as their 5th player.Register Now to Lock in your Celebrity Team Member (352)326-0761www.AngelFlightSE.org/EventsMember of the Air Charity NetworkWere raising enough money so 250 children and adults can get the ights they need to the doctors that can save their lives.Arlington Ridge Golf Club4463 Arlington Ridge Blvd. Leesburg, FL 34748 JUERGEN BAETZAssociated PressBRUSSELS The number of unem ployed in the 17-nation eurozone reached a re cord high in September as the blocs na scent recovery failed to generate jobs, ofcial data showed. The ranks of the jobless swelled by 60,000 to a record 19.45 mil lion, according to Eurostat, the European Unions statistics agency. Though the unemployment rate remained steady at 12.2 percent, the previous month was revised up from 12 percent. The latest gures put a dent in hopes that the labor mar ket may have reached a turning point, said analyst Ben May of Capital Economics. A sharp and unex pected drop in ination also cast doubts over the recovery of the eurozone, which just emerged from reces sion, and put pressure on the European Central Bank to act. The euro dropped sharply, from above $1.3700 be fore the news to about $1.3615 in afternoon trading. By contrast, the Fed eral Reserve in the U.S. this week hinted it might start tightening its monetary policy in coming months as growth proves robust and the labor market improves. Ernst & Young ana lyst Marie Diron said economic activity in the eurozone will re main slow and unemployment high until the bloc nishes cleaning up its banking sector to restore condence and boost lending.Eurozone unemployment reaches new record high ASSOCIATED PRESSSoledad Carrasquilla Delgado, 53, left, reacts as her husband and sister, in background at right, look out of a window as the police arrive during their eviction in Madrid, Spain.

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E6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013 The Associated PressCOLOMBO, Sri Lanka Britain warned that addi tional delays in the Mal dives troubled presidential election could tarnish the countrys reputation and harm an economy heavily reliant on tourism. The minister of state at the British Foreign and Com monwealth Ofce, Hugo Swire, said that legal chal lenges to the electoral pro cess appear to be aimed at preventing citizens from expressing their views at the ballot box. The unacceptable delays to elections and reports of the intimidation of parlia mentarians, NGOs and me dia organizations have been closely watched by the international community, he said. Further delays could result in greater damage to the Maldives international reputation and could have a negative impact upon the Maldives economy. The Maldives Supreme Court annulled the results of the Sept. 7 election, say ing that the voter registry was awed with made-up names and those of dead people. It ordered a revote, which police then stopped, saying that ofcials had not complied with all guidelines set out by the court in holding the election. Now, a third attempt at holding the election has been xed for Nov. 9. How ever, the country could face a possible constitution al crisis if none of the three candidates receives more than 50 percent of the vote because the current presidential term ends Nov.11, ve days before a runoff between the top two vote-get ters would be held. A prolonged political crisis could wreak havoc on the economy in the Maldives, an Indian Ocean archipelago known for its luxury re sorts. Last year, tourism ac counted for 27 percent of the countrys GDP. Swires statement came a day after U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay said that the Maldives Supreme Court was interfering excessively in the presidential election, thereby subverting the democratic process. The country has faced much political upheaval in the ve years since it held its rst multiparty election in 2008 after 30 years of au tocratic rule. The Maldives rst demo cratically elected president resigned midway through his term amid weeks of pub lic protests and slide in sup port from the military and police after he ordered the arrest of a senior judge.Britain warns against Maldives election delay ROB GILLIESAssociated PressTORONTO The worlds largest gold mining compa ny announced it is temporarily suspending construction of its troubled Pascua-Lama gold mine that straddles the border be tween Chile and Argentina. Barrick said in its earnings re lease that the decision to re-start the $8.5 billion mine will depend on improved project econom ics, the outlook for metal prices, and reduced uncertainty associated with legal and regulatory re quirements. We have determined that the prudent course at this stage is to suspend the project, but naturally we will maintain our option to resume construction and finish the project when im provements to its current challenge have been attained, Barrick chief executive Jaime Sokalsky said in a statement. Falling gold prices, rising costs and a sagging stock price weighed down by its Pascua-Lama project have plagued the Toronto-based company. Barrick said the suspension will reduce the companys 2014 capital costs by up to $1 billion. The company also said 10 oth er mines around the world were being scaled back, suspended or sold to focus on more profitable production. Earlier this year, Chiles environmental regulator stopped construction on its side of Pascua-Lama and imposed sanc tions on the mine, citing serious violations of its environmental permit. Barrick has already spent $5 billion on the project, which sits 6,400 feet (1,950 meters) above sea level. Barrick had hoped to begin pro duction in early 2014, and previ ously warned shareholders that it might abandon the Chilean side because of construction delays. The bi-national mine was initially expected to be producing gold and silver by the second half of 2014. While Argentine officials were eager to keep building, most of the estimated 18 million ounc es of gold and 676 million ounces of silver are buried on the Chil ean side. On the Argentine side, where Barrick fuels a third of San Juan provinces economy, offi cials have been watching close ly and trying to figure out how to preserve thousands of jobs. Chiles Supreme Court confirmed last month the suspension of the mine until environ mental commitments and all works to protect the water sys tems are adopted. An indigenous community liv ing below the mine accused Bar rick of contaminating their water downstream. Scarce river water is vital to life in Chiles Atacama Desert, and the Diaguita Indians fear the Pascua-Lama mine is ru ining their resource. Sokalsky promised shareholders in April that Barrick was committed to focus on produc ing returns for investors. Barrick ousted former CEO and President Aaron Regent last year, citing its disappointing share price perfor mance. The stuck has plummet ed from over $40 to around $20 since then. Barrick remains committed long-term to Argentina, where it plans to invest $400 million next year, said Guillermo Calo, the companys top executive in the country. The company announced a temporary reduction in PascuaLamas construction and not its cancellation, as was rumored, he said, adding that Barricks nearby Veladero mine continues to employ 3,000 people directly. Market conditions are not fa vorable for the industry, with gold prices that have remained low during an extended period of time, which has generated a challenging environment for the sector. In this context, we need to eval uate how to make the invest ments that Pascua-Lama needs to complete its construction.Barrick suspends construction of its Pascua-Lama mine

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Sunday, November 3, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL E7 Dr. Heydari, DDSSUNY Buffalo School of Dental Medicine rfntb Golf Cart Accessable NOW OPEN IN THE VILLAGES NEW PATIENT EXAM & X-RAYPlease call for details and appointment. Can not be combined with other discount offers. Applies to cash paying patients only. Insurance will be billed for exam and x-rays.FULL SET OF DENTURESOffer only applies to Premium Comfort Dentures. Please call for details and appointment. Can not be combined with other discount offers. How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper.YESTERDAYS SOLUTIONHAPPY BIRTHDAY for Sunday, Nov. 3, 2013: This year you will have unusual energy swings. A realization will occur involving your career or a relationship that will point you in a new direction. The whole saga will take a year to complete. You often push very hard to have your way. In the next 12 months, you will see the futility of that behavior. If you are single, you could meet someone quite spectacular. Take your time getting to know this person. If you are attached, the two of you will see a life goal manifest itself. The path to your desire might be very different from what you had anticipated. SCORPIO might be far more intense than you realize. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You can express your feelings any way that you want, but ultimately a friend will respond only when he or she is ready. Look at the issue at hand, and see if there is a more effective way of handling the problem. If so, follow through. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You might sense that there are changes ahead, and you might not have as much control as you would like. Know that you only have control over yourself. Honor where someone is coming from, and dont try to change this persons mood. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You might want some kind of change to happen in your life in order to feel reinvigorated. You could be looking at making an adjustment to your schedule, trying a new exercise program or learning a new sport or hobby. Avoid creating uproar. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Your creativity is high, yet your nurturing qualities and emotional nature seek self-expression. Make time for your family, and pursue an activity that they would love. If you are single, you might be seeing a change in status. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You might look back on this period and realize that you made some important decisions regarding real estate and your home. Make sure you are not overreacting and making snap judgments. Allow yourself a lot of space to evaluate each decision. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You could be out of sorts and wondering what is important. You might feel drained by todays eclipse. As a result, you could be somewhat accident-prone. Try not to put yourself in a situation where you could cause yourself a problem. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You cant be too careful with your nances. Hold off on making any commitments or purchases for a while. You easily could make a mistake or buy a faulty item. You might not like restrictions, but that would be best for now. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Todays eclipse might be making you feel hyper. Know that the element of instability that might result from your energy is likely to be elsewhere, too. Enjoy yourself, but remember that nothing is set in stone. Make no agreement at this moment. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) You could be ready for a swift change or a new development. However, for right now, it would be best to play it low-key. Keep a discussion tame. If you lose control, there could be longterm ramications. A partner will come through for you. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) A loved one is the bearer of good news. Dont hesitate to get together or have a chat with this person. A group of friends could be changing. Understand that you might be changing, too. What seemed OK before might not be the case anymore. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) A situation demands all of your attention. You might feel like you have no choice as long as you want the status quo to continue. Do you? You are in a period of hard reection. When an opportunity arises, you will know what to do. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Jump in your car, and take a day drive or go visit a friend in the country. Youll feel re-energized once you move out of your immediate area. When you detach, you will start changing your opinions and gain a new perspective of your life. HOROSCOPES Bigars StarsJACQUELINE BIGAR www.dailycommercial.comDiversions352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGEDEAR ABBY: I recently found out that after 13 years of marriage, my son and daughterin-law are expecting a child; my rst grandchild! I was overjoyed at the news. They live about 1,000 miles away from me. I mentioned to my son that I have been looking at ights and want to come out a week before her due date so Ill be there for the big moment, and stay three to four weeks to help with the baby. I was shocked when he told me they dont want me to visit until at least three weeks after the birth, and stay for one week MAX. He said my daughterin-law will need time to heal, and they both need time to adjust to being parents before they have guests. I am not a guest. I am the grandmother! I was also told not to expect to take care of the baby because it is their job. It hurts so bad not to be wanted to share in the joy of the new baby. I have always dreamed of watching my grandchild take his or her rst breath, and see the look on my sons face when he holds his child for the rst time. Is there anything I can do to change their minds and allow me to be there for my son at this important moment? Do you agree that they are being unreasonable and cruel? FAMILY FIRST IN FLORIDA DEAR FAMILY FIRST: Im sure you are a loving mother, but I dont agree, and I doubt you can change their minds. If it is going to take three weeks for your daughter-in-law to heal, it appears the babys birth will be by Csection, and she will need time to regain her strength. The new par ents will also need time to adjust to the babys sleep and feeding schedules. They will be sleep-deprived, and she will be nursing every few hours and not up for company. While you have always dreamed of being present at your grandchilds birth, the reality is your son and daughter-in-law would prefer this intimate moment be shared by them alone. Im sorry you are hurt, truly. Let them know you are willing to help them in any way you can on their terms, and take your cues from them. Do not take any of this personally. DEAR ABBY: My grandmother died recently after a long life. A cousin decided that all of the grandchildren should chip in for an expensive oral ar rangement. I reluctantly participated after my wife said it would be cheap of me to refuse. I had a closer relationship with Grandma than most of my cous ins did, but I felt it was an odd request. I have always understood that owers were sent to the grieving family. In this instance, we WERE the family. It felt like we were sending condolences to ourselves. Am I wrong, or was I just being cheap, as my wife suggested? MOURNING IN NEVADA DEAR MOURNING: Please accept my sympathy for your loss. Your assumption that families do not provide owers at a loved ones funeral was incorrect. It is very common for family members to ar range for a oral display or spray of owers for a deceased relatives casket. At a sad time like this, it is never wrong to err on the side of being gener ous, and Im glad that is what you did.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Grandma is crushed when shes told to stay home Today is Sunday, Nov. 3, the 307th day of 2013. There are 58 days left in the year. Daylight saving time ends at 2 a.m. local time. Clocks go back one hour. Todays Highlights in History: On Nov. 3, 1992, Democrat Bill Clinton was elected the 42nd president of the United States, defeating President George H.W. Bush. In Illinois, Democrat Carol Moseley-Braun became the rst black woman elected to the U.S. Senate. On this date: In 1900, the rst major U.S. automobile show opened at New Yorks Madison Square Garden under the auspices of the Automobile Club of America. In 1903, Panama proclaimed its independence from Colombia. In 1911, the Chevrolet Motor Car Co. was founded in Detroit by Louis Chevrolet and William C. Durant. (The company was acquired by General Motors in 1918.) In 1936, President Franklin D. Roosevelt won a landslide election victory over Republican challenger Alfred M. Alf Landon. In 1957, the Soviet Union launched Sputnik 2, the second manmade satellite, into orbit; on board was a dog named Laika who was sacriced in the experiment. In 1960, the Meredith Willson musical The Unsinkable Molly Brown opened on Broadway with Tammy Grimes in the title role. In 1961, Burmese diplomat U Thant (oo thahnt) was appointed acting U.N. Secretary-General following the death of Dag Hammarskjold (dahg HAWMahr-shoold). President John F. Kennedy established the U.S. Agency for International Development. In 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson soundly defeated Republican Barry Goldwater to win a White House term in his own right. In 1979, ve Communist Workers Party members were killed in a clash with heavily armed Ku Klux Klansmen and neo-Nazis during an anti-Klan protest in Greensboro, N.C. TODAY IN HISTORY

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E8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, November 3, 2013

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