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Daily Commercial
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p',A


SOUTH AFRICA: By turns celebratory and
somber, mourners remember Mandela A5


CHIEFS IN CHARGE: Umatilla,
Mount Dora add top cops, A3


Hiring points to an economy finally building steam


CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER
AP Economics Writer
WASHINGTON The job
market is showing signs of
the consistent gains the na-
tion has awaited in the 41/2
years since the Great Reces-
sion.


Employers added 203,000
jobs in November, and the
unemployment rate fell to 7
percent, a five-year low, the
Labor Department reported
Friday. Four straight months
of robust hiring have raised
hopes that 2014 will be the
year the economy returns to


normal.
The steady job growth
could also hasten a move by
the Federal Reserve to reduce
its stimulus efforts.
Stock investors were heart-
ened by the report. The Dow
Jones industrial average
jumped 198 points.


A steadily improving job
market could give consumers
and business executives the
confidence to keep spend-
ing and investing, even if a
pullback by the Fed leads to
higher interest rates. The Fed
has been buying bonds each
month to try to keep long-


term borrowing rates low to
spur spending and growth.
The celebration on Wall
Street suggested that inves-
tors think a healthierjob mar-
ket, if it fuels more spend-
ing, would outweigh higher
SEE JOBS I A2


PHOTOS COURTESY OF SIDNEY BROCK AND CHRIS BELL
Clockwise from top left: A hut is shown on the side of the Bocay River in Nicaragua. A young boy pounds rice in the village
of IMAK, home to the Mayangna people. Fruitland Park Mayor Chris Bell speaks with villagers south of the city of Rivas. Two
children are pictured in the Village of San Andres

Missionaries marvel at the richness

of spirit in the poorest of lands


LIVI STANFORD I Staff Writer
Iivi.stanford@dailycommercial.com
he village elders had to
make a decision no one
wants to make.
Two young men had been bit-
ten by the Fer-de-Lance, a ven-
omous snake in Nicaragua.
But there was only enough an-
tivenin to save one of the men,
Pastor Sidney Brock said, recall-
ing the story he was told while
visiting Nicaragua last month.
"They had a medical clinic
there supported by the govern-


ment, but they lacked resourc-
es," he said.
As a result, the elders had to
choose who would live.
Such circumstances often il-
lustrate life in the second poor-
est country in the western hemi-
sphere.
Many villagers in Nicaragua
lack safe drinking water and
sanitation. They live in huts and
hunt and fish for their food.
Brock, Fruitland Park May-
or Chris Bell and eleven others
from the Heritage Community
Church traveled to Nicaragua in


separate trips this past month to
aid those in the region. During
one mission, the visitors built a
water well. The church has also
been actively investing in the
country, working to train lay vet-
erinarians and medical person-
nel where there is no medical as-
sistance.
Bell can't forget the couple
whose 6-year-old daughter con-
tracted a bacterial infection
from drinking the river's water
and died.
SEE MISSIONARIES I A6


Experts: Feds


should measure


the pursuit


of happiness
SETH BORENSTEIN
AP Science Writer
WASHINGTON Happy or sad? Con-
tent or bored? And how many times did you
smile yesterday? A panel of experts thinks
Uncle Sam should be more in touch with
our feelings.
By gauging happiness, there'd be more to
consider than cold hard cash when deciding
matters that affect daily lives, according to a
report this week from the National Academy
of Sciences, which advises the government.
The panel of economists, psychologists
and other experts assembled by the acade-
my recommended that federal statistics and
surveys, which normally deal with income,
spending, health and housing, include a few
extra questions on happiness.
"You want to know how people are do-
ing?" said panel chairman Arthur Stone, a
SEE HAPPINESS I A2



a.





AP PHOTO
A smiley face balloon floats over Revere Beach in
Revere, Mass.


Celebra-pig Chris P. Bacon could be in hog heaven


COURTESY DR. LEN LUCERO
Chris R Bacon has added a few pounds since the piglet's
online video placed him in the limelight.


Staff Report
Will Chris P Bacon sizzle the
competition?
That should be known some-
time next week when NBC's To-
day Show announces the winner
of its inaugural Orange Room
Awards. The show announced
Wednesday it was letting vi-
ral video aficionados choose
the best Pet of the Year online
video. The voting ends at mid-


night today at www.today.com/
orangeroom/orange-room-
awards-most-precious-pets-
2D11689602.
"Cute animals really do rule
the Internet, and this group of
adorable furry friends just goes
to prove it," said Matt Murray of
the Today show.
Chris P Bacon met Dr. Len Lu-
cero in January when a woman
brought the one-pound potbel-
lied piglet into his Eastside Vet-


erinary Clinic. The critter's hind
legs didn't work.
"I told the (the woman) if she
surrendered (the pig) to me, I
would try to give it the best life
possible," he previously told The
Daily Commercial.
Lucero build a tiny wheelchair
for Chris P Bacon and a video of
him scooting around went viral
in February. This led to national
SEE PIG I A2


INDEX DIVERSIONS E5 OBITUARIES A4 Vol. 137 TODAY'S WEATHER 0 /
50 CLASSIFIED Dl LEGALS D4 SPORTS BI No. 341f IDAY S WfAoHr E .c /
cOMICS E4 MONEY C5 VOICES A7 No341 Detailed forecast
90994 17001 CROSSWORDS D4 NATION A4 WORLD A6 5 sections on page A8. "'1-1, Partly sunny and warm


r?- ---- -. -- I-- -I0--. -w-- -.,-- DOWNLOADOUR
.- --- MOBILE APP i

Lake County United Motorcyclist TOY RUN 12/7 JOIN OUR EMAIL
MEET at Wal-Mart 9am-10:30am, $10pp + unwrapped toy. (no stuffed animals) LIKE US ON
Police escorted Ride ends at Gator Harley-Davidson FACEBOOK
Benefits the Salvation Army and Lake/Sumter Foster parents. I O W
VISIT OUR WEB-SITE


lThe Daily Cercial

KEESBIURG, FLORIDA Saturday, December 7, 2013 www.dailycommercial.com





DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, December 7, 2013


JOBS
FROM PAGE Al

borrowing rates caused
by a Fed pullback.
"It's hinting very, very
strongly that the econo-
my is starting to ramp up,
that growth is getting bet-
ter, that businesses are
hiring," said Joel Naroff,
president of Naroff Eco-
nomic Advisors.
The economy has add-
ed a four-month average
of 204,000 jobs from Au-
gust through November,
up sharply from 159,000
a month from April
through July.
"The consistency (in hir-
ing) is actually reassuring,"
said Doug Handler, chief


HAPPY BIRTHDAY for
Saturday, Dec. 7, 2013:
This year you will go
with the flow of the mo-
ment more easily than you
have in the recent past. You
could become involved in
a cause of some sort. You
often will spend time with
friends and associates. If
you are single, you eas-
ily might meet someone
through this activity; howev-
er, you are unlikely to get in-
volved in a major relation-
ship before summer. If you
are attached, the two of you
enjoy each other's compa-
ny, but you also love being
with your friends. You of-
ten are seen smiling togeth-
er. AQUARIUS knows how to
turn boring into exciting.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) At some point today,
you will want to join a friend
for some fun, whether it's
a tree-decorating party or
simply coming up with gift
ideas for a difficult person.
Be careful with a temper-
amental partner who has
very different ideas.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) Take a stand. You will
want to finish a project be-
fore you relax. For some of
you, this responsibility could
involve an older friend or
relative. For others, it might
involve work from your job.
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) Make phone calls to
loved ones at a distance.
You might want to discuss
their gift preferences, as
you are not with them every
day. On the other hand, they
might prefer getting togeth-
er for a visit.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) A partner might be con-
trolling. You could experi-
ence some uproar on the
homefront, which might just
be dragging in the tree to
decorate it. Make an effort
to allow others to have their
say. You tend to dominate
family matters.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
You'll want to be more con-
vivial and go along with oth-
ers' wishes. Make time
for just you and the apple
of your eye. Feelings flow,
whether you're under mistle-
toe or just relaxing at home
together.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) Learn to juggle your
busy schedule. Avoid do-


South dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.
NORTH
4108
VT J10962
*AQ6
4K J 4
WEST EAST
+Q964 +J73
V3 Y8
*J983 *K105
410986 +AQ7532
SOUlTH
+AK52
YAKQ754
+742
*-
The bidding:
South West North East
1 V Pass 3 V Pass
3 Pass 4 Pass
6V
Opening lead ten of clubs.
A conscientious declarer never
stakes his contract solely on a finesse
without first seeking some other
approach. Ile looks for a line of play
that will not only give him better
than a 50 percent chance to succeed,
but one that might elevate his
chances to 100 percent.
Consider today's deal where
South is in six hearts and West leads
the ten of clubs. Upon viewing


U.S. economist at IHS
Global Insight. "Slow and
steady is something you
can plan and build on."
The Fed could start
slowing its bond purchas-
es as soon as its Dec. 17
meeting. Some econo-
mists think the Fed may
only telegraph a move at
that meeting and wait un-
til next year to cut back.
Even if the Fed does
start reining in its stim-
ulus, most economists
think growth will accel-
erate next year. Drew Ma-
tus, an economist at UBS,
forecasts that growth will
top 3 percent in 2014,
from roughly 2 percent
this year. That would be
first time growth had
topped 3 percent for a full


ing any impulse shopping.
If you do, hold on to the
receipts, just in case you
change your mind. Go for a
walk, get into the mood of
the season, but avoid the
stores. Center yourself.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22) Mars enters your sign
and creates a likelihood
that diplomacy will fly out of
the window in the next few
weeks. You are likely to ex-
press your feelings, which
could shock some people
who think they know you.
Get in some exercise to
lessen your stress.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21) You might choose to
suppress your feelings in
order to maintain a more
even-tempered mood. Un-
derstand what is happening
between you and someone
else. Be careful, as holding
in hurt feelings could turn
you into a volcano when you
finally let go.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21) You are likely to
say and do what you want.
Don't be surprised if a
close friend turns your day
upside down with plans that
he or she has for you. Why
have words when you could
choose to be flattered?
Clear out an errand or two if
possible.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19) You easily could
wonder what is going on
with an older friend, relative
or someone you have put
on a pedestal. You might
see how much this person
is passionate about the hol-
idays, as he or she barks
out orders. Be polite.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18) Someone at a distance
will reach out to you and
demonstrate his or her car-
ing. You might beam from
ear to ear, which could draw
others to you. You have a
lot of energy; direct it to-
ward getting some of your
holiday errands or projects
done.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20) Know that you might
need some time just for
yourself. Explaining that to
a loved one could take tal-
ent, but know that it is nec-
essary. Take some time
to clear up a problem. At
the same time, try to get
through some personal mat-
ters.


dummy, declarer's first thought
might be that the contract depends on
a successful diamond finesse. If
declarer thinks no further than that
and simply takes the finesse, he will
go down one, since the king of dia-
monds is offside.
But if South gives full weight to
other options, he may spot a way to
guarantee the slam against virtually
any lie of the opposing cards. All he
needs is for Last to hold the ace of
clubs a veritable certainty since
West would hardly have led away
from the ace at trick one.
South begins by covering West's
ten of clubs with the jack and ruffing
East's queen. After drawing trumps
in one round, declarer cashes the A-
K of spades and ruffs a spade. He
then ruffs the four of clubs in his
hand and his last spade in dummy.
The king of clubs is next led, and
when East covers with the ace,
declarer simply discards a diamond.
East wins the trick, but his fate is
sealed. Whether he returns a dia-
mond into dummy's A-Q or leads a
club, allowing South to discard
another diamond from his hand as he
ruffs in dummy, the slam is home.
By adopting this approach,
declarer in effect takes a diamond
finesse without running the risk of
losing it.


calendar year since 2005.
In addition to the solid
job gains and the drop in
unemployment, Friday's
report offered other en-
couraging signs.
Higher-paying indus-
tries are adding jobs.
Manufacturers added
27,000, the most since
March 2012. Construc-
tion companies added
17,000. The two indus-
tries have created a com-
bined 113,000 jobs over
the past four months.
Hourly wages are up.
The average rose 4 cents
in November to $24.15.
It's risen just 2 percent in
the past year. But that's
ahead of inflation. Con-
sumer prices are up only
0.9 percent in that time.


Employers are giving
their workers more hours.
The average workweek
rose to 34.5 hours from
34.4. A rule of thumb
among economists is that
a one-tenth of an hour in-
crease in the workweek
is equivalent to adding
300,000 jobs.
Hiring was broad-
based. In addition to
higher-paying industries,
retailers added 22,300
jobs, and restaurants,
bars and hotels 20,800.
Education and health
care added 40,000. And
after years of cutbacks,
state and local govern-
ments are hiring again. In
November, governments
at all levels combined
added 7,000 jobs.


AP FILE PHOTO
People laugh as they take part in performing a group exercise
during a laughter yoga class in St. Albans, England.


HAPPINESS
FROM PAGE Al

professor of psycholo-
gy at New York's Stony
Brook University. "One
of things you may want
to do is ask them."
Asking how people
feel can be as important
as how much they are
spending, Stone said.
For example, econo-
mists have something
they call the "misery in-
dex" which adds the un-
employment and infla-
tion rates, but doesn't
include how people feel.
If you want to know mis-
ery, the question to ask is
"how much suffering is
going on," he said.
The panel suggests a
series of questions to
measure daily happiness
and general well-being,
asking how often you
smiled, were stressed,
laughed or were in
pain. Example ques-
tions ranged from a sim-
ple yes-no "Yesterday,
did you spend time with
friends or family?" to a
more complex 1-10 rat-
ing for "Overall, how sat-
isfied are you with your
life nowadays?"
Over the past decade,
these types of questions
have shown to be valid
scientifically, said Carol
Graham, a Brookings In-
stitution economist who
was on the panel.
The report said the
answers can help gov-
ernments shape pol-
icy on basic benefits,
such as retirement age
and pensions, care for
the chronic and termi-
nally ill, unemployment
and working conditions.
It cited a study by one of
the Nobel Prize-winning
panelists that showed
people's feelings about
commuting problems
helped officials decided
whether or not to create
commuter toll lanes on
highways.
In terms of collecting
happiness data, the Unit-
ed States government "is
a bit of a laggard" behind
other industrial nations,
said John Helliwell, an
economist who co-di-
rects an institute that
studies well-being at the


University of British Co-
lumbia in Vancouver.
In one of the few sur-
veys where the govern-
ment does ask, we're a
pretty happy nation. Last
year, about 87 percent of
Americans considered
themselves very happy
or pretty happy.
But we're far behind
No. 1 Denmark, a host
of northern European
countries, Canada, Israel
and Mexico. The United
States ranked 17th in a
world happiness ranking
report directed by Helli-
well, which was based
on international surveys
and came out in Septem-
ber.
When governments
and academics study
happiness they find that
money isn't everything.
Many of the richest
countries, including the
United States, weren't in
the Top 10 in self-report-
ed happiness in the re-
port.
"Having no money is
terrible for everything,"
said Graham, author of
several books on the eco-
nomics and measuring
of happiness. But after
people make "a comfort-
able amount of money,"
it doesn't add too much
to happiness, she said.
That's what a study
last week in the jour-
nal PLoS One found. It
used worldwide surveys
and found that as peo-
ple made more mon-
ey worldwide they got
happier but only to a
point. That point is just
shy of $36,000 a year per
person, or $144,000 for a
family of four.
Once people reached
that point, happiness
measurements level off
and even go down ever
so slightly, said study
lead author, Eugenio
Proto, an economist at
the University of War-
wick. According to the
study, in general, people
in the U.S. passed that
"bliss point" a few years
ago, however federal in-
come figures don't show
nearly that high a house-
hold wealth level.
Happiness studies,
Helliwell said, "keep re-
minding you that there
is much more to life than
income and housing."


FLORIDA


|@5 LOTTERY

FRIDAY
CA SH 3 ................................................ 6-4-6
Afternoon ........................................... 2-4-3
PLAY 4 ............................................. 0-1-3-9
Afternoon....................................... 7-4-7-4

THURSDAY
FANTASY 5......................... 20-21-27-34-36
2 of 5 wins free ticket 3 of 5 wins $25
4 of 5 wins $555 Rolldown


The Daily Commercial
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STAFF INFORMATION
ROD DIXON, publisher
352-365-8213...................................rod.dixon@dailycommercial.com
MARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director
352-365-8287............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com
NEWSROOM CONTACTS
TOM MCNIFF, executive editor
352-365-8250............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com
BILL KOCH, assistant managing editor
352-365-8208....................................bill.koch@dailycommercial.com
TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS
SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor
352-365-8203 ...........................scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com
REPORTERS
UVI STANFORD, county government, schools
352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com
ROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County
352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com
MILLARD IVES, police and courts
352-365-8262................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com
THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages
352-365-8209..................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com
OTHERS
PAM FENNIMORE, editorial assistant
352-365-8256............. pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com
SPORTS RESULTS
Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call
ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be
e-mailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.
FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor
352-365-8268.................................frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com
GOOD FOR YOU/ CELEBRATIONS
To have your club or organization's events printed in the YourCom-
munity calendar listings, just email the information to pamfenni-
more@dailycommercial.com.



PIG
FROM PAGE Al

television exposure, a Facebook page and
even worldwide T-shirt sales.
In addition to Chris P Bacon, Ray
Charles, the blind golden retriever; Mad-
die the standing dog; and Blind Puppy
and his seeing-eye brother; are vying for
the Pet of the Year award.
Other award categories include Most
Memorable Viral Moment and Best Dig-
ital Dance-Off.
The winners of each award will be an-
nounced one at a time next week, live on
the TODAY show, from Tuesday through
Thursday.

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HOROSCOPES


BRIDGE


Handle With Care


U2013 King Fma.u-es S-ndicate Inc,


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, December 7, 2013




Saturday, December 7, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL




State&Region
NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN I scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com I 352-365-8208


www.dailycommercial.com


Area Briefs

LEESBURG
LC Swing Band slated
for christmas concert
The 17-piece, LC Swing Band
will present its Christmas Concert
at 3 p.m. Sunday at the Lake
Square Presbyterian Church, 10200
Morningside Dr., in Leesburg, offer-
ing a wide variety of holiday music,
both traditional and contemporary.
The band, under the direction of
Larry Lutte, will feature the sounds
of the Nashville-based, Jericho
Brass, including, "Deck the Halls,"
Angels We Have Heard on High,"
and others.
A free will donation will be
received.

WILDWOOD
GFWC hosts 27th annual
Christmas Tour of Homes
The GFWC Wildwood Woman's
Club will host its main group fund-
raiser event for community projects
and scholarships of the year with
the 27th annual Christmas Tour of
Homes from 1 to 5 p.m. today.
Three Wildwood homes are on
the tour as is a stop at the United
Methodist Church, which serves
as the tea house and opening at
2:30 p.m.
Tickets, programs and maps will
be available at the ArborVillage
Nursing Home on old State Road 44,
from noon to 1 p.m. Tickets can also
be purchased at the Red Door store,
U.S. Highway 301 in downtown
Wildwood.
For information, call Roslyn
Davidson at 352-457-4936 or Elberta
Ritchie at 352-748-4360.

SUMMERFIELD
Compassionate Friends
host candlelight service
The Central Florida Chapter of
Compassionate Friends will host a
candlelight service at 7 p.m. Sunday
at St. Mark the Evangelist Catholic
Church, 7081 S.E. County Road 42 in
Summerfield.
The group offers support for those
that have lost a child, and fondly
friendship, understanding and hope
to those going through the grieving
process.
For information, call Cheryl
Dungan at 352-347-1942.

LEESBURG
Swing in the holidays with
high school jazz band
The Leesburg High School Jazz
Band is hosting two Christmas
events for the public on Dec. 12 and
Dec. 13.
General admission for the
"Christmas Prism Concert" at the
school is $4; preferred seating is $5
and limited view seating is $3, for
the concert from 7 to 8:30 p.m. in
the school auditorium in Leesburg.
Tickets are available at www.lees-
burg.brownpapertickets.com or by
calling 800-838-3006.
"Swing in the Holidays" Dinner
and Dance will be at the school, at
6 p.m. Dec. 13. The jazz band will
perform and a full-course dinner
will be served. Tickets are $15 and
can be purchased in advance at
352-728-3739.



... and we'll share it with our readers.
Some of our best story ideas and photos
come from our readers. So don't hesitate
to share your youth activities, awards,
accomplishments, festivals, charity
events and other things that make our
communities special. And don't overlook
those family milestones birthdays,
engagements, marriages, business
promotions and military news.


Just email your photos and news to...
pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com


New chiefs take charge in Lake


Staff Report
Interim Umatilla Police Chief
Adam Bolton apparently im-
pressed City Manager Glenn Irby
enough to permanently head up
the department.
Irby announced Friday that
Bolton, who joined the force in
2005 and held the rank of sergeant,
had been promoted to chief.
The 31-year-old Eustis resident
has been interim chief since May
16, 2013, when former Chief Doug
Foster was suspended from duty.
The task of finding a replace-
ment for Foster has not been easy


for Irby, who had more than 30 ap-
plicants, eight of whom were re-
viewed for qualifications.
Umatilla thought it had a new
chief in October when a Michigan
sheriff, with more than 28 years in
law enforcement, accepted the job
pending his certification as a law
enforcement officer in Florida. Is-
abella County Sheriff Leo Mio-
duszewski, a graduate of the FBI
National Academy, then turned
down the position after saying Isa-
bella residents begged him to stay.
Irby then said in October he
would offer the job to the No. 2
candidate, a Florida-certified offi-


Airmen from MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa placed wreaths on the graves of veterans during
Wreaths Across America Day last year at Florida National Cemetery. Ten Airmen from MacDill traveled
to the cemetery to participate in the event.

BUSHNELL


Less money for wreaths


on veterans' graves


Staff report
Wreaths Across Amer-
ica, a program to place
Christmas wreaths on the
graves of fallen soldiers, is
experiencing a big drop
in donations for its ef-
fort this year at the Flor-
ida National Cemetery in
Bushnell.
Volunteers have only
come up with enough
donations and sponsors
for about 5,000 wreaths,
WUSF News in Tampa is
reporting. Last year, vol-
unteers were able to lay
7,000 wreaths and had
hoped to reach a goal of
10,000 wreaths for 2013.
"With the amount of
people we had last year,
we figured we could do


10,000," Randy Lewer, a
veteran and one of three
veterans who started the
Bushnell wreaths pro-
gram, told WUSF News.
"Unfortunately with the
economy, it will fall quite
short."
Lewer and two other
veterans started Wreaths
Across America in 2006
at the Florida Nation-
al Cemetery in Bushnell
with only six wreaths.
"As long as you remem-
ber somebody up here,
they'll live forever," vet-
eran Jack Sellers said
during an interview last
year. "It's when you for-
get them, or never come
talk to them, never speak
about them, is when


they're gone."
Sellers died this year
from tumors linked to
Agent Orange. The third
veteran Steve Leinwand
also quit volunteering
for health reasons.
Volunteers will be-
gin laying the wreaths
at about 10:30 a.m. Dec.
14, 2013, at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery in Bush-
nell. A ceremony will fol-
low with speakers and
the laying of a wreath
in honor of POWs and
MIAs.
You can sponsor a
wreath or checkout the
cemeteries participating
in the program at www.
WreathsAcrossAmerica.
org.


Fleeing suspect leads police

on a 'triathlon tour' of Leesburg


MILLARD K. IVES I Staff Writer
miIIardives@dailycommercial.com
A Leesburg motorist was arrested
Thursday after leading police on a high-
speed chase that ended when he crashed
his vehicle, ran through a lake and found
a bicycle to continue his flight.
Phillip Michael McFadden was
charged with driving without a license,
fleeing police and possession of a small
amount of marijuana.
He was released from the Lake County
jail after posting a $6,000 bond.
According to an arrest affidavit, a Lake
County Sheriff's deputy spotted a gold
2006 Pontiac traveling south on U.S.
Highway 441 near the Lake Square Mall
on Thursday. After running the plate,
the deputy realized the owner's driver li-
cense was suspended and tried to pull


over the vehicle.
The Pontiac drove into the Hurricane
Dockside Grill parking lot, only to make
a U-turn and quickly take off.
The Pontiac later crashed and flipped
about six times, according to witness-
es. When deputies arrived at the crash
scene, they said all of the windows in the
car were broken and marijuana and Mc-
Fadden's wallet were in the car.
One witnesses said the driver, lat-
er identified as McFadden, ran through
Lake Eustis and behind a restaurant be-
fore he disappeared out of sight.
According to a report, deputies were
searching for the suspect when they
spotted McFadden riding a bicycle,
wearing soaked clothes and with several
lacerations on his face.
McFadden was taken to an area hospi-
tal and then jailed.


cer he did not identify. There has
been no word from the city man-
ager since then until Friday's
announcement of Bolton's promo-
tion.
Bolton's annual salary will be
$58,750 and he will oversee seven
sworn officers and three civilians.
The city and Foster agreed to
part ways earlier this year amid
criticism of his leadership. Serving
as chief for 21 years, he received
a salary of $55,000 a year. He was
placed on administrative leave un-
til his 52nd birthday in November,
SEE CHIEFS I A4


LEESBURG

Raffle prize

will cover

utility bill

MILLARD K. IVES I Staff Writer
miIIardives@dailycommerciaI.com
Some needy peo-
ple could have their
burdens lightened for
Christmas.
Restoration Outreach
Community Center
in Leesburg, which of-
fers financial assistance
and other help to area
residents in need, will
hold a raffle Wednes-
day, when five people
will win a prize of hav-
ing one of their utility
bills paid.
Neda Johnson, the
agency's office manag-
er, said they thought it
was important to hold
the raffle in light of the
"bad economy."
"People need more
help than just free toys
this time of year," John-
son said.
SEE RAFFLE I A4


THE VILLAGES

Bomb threat

was made to

get employee

off work

MILLARD K. IVES I Staff Writer
millardives@dailycommercial.com
A 28-year-old man
was arrested Thursday
after po-
lice said
he phoned
in a bomb
threat to
a restau-
rant so his
girlfriend BORRELL
could
leave work early.
The threat led to law
enforcement evacuat-
ing Gators Dockside on
Main Street in The Vil-
lages on Sunday after-
noon and police dogs
searching the building.
No bomb was discov-
ered.
Anthony Nason Bor-
rell, of Ocoee, was
charged with making
a false report about
planting a bomb. He
was released from the
Lake County jail after
posting a $4,000 bond.
According to Lady
Lake police, some-
one called from a pay-
phone just after 2 p.m.
Sunday saying, "I have
SEE THREAT I A4





DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, December 7, 2013


IN MEMORY
DEATH NOTICES
August Eugene Edel Jr.
August Eugene Edel,
Jr., 89, of Leesburg,
died Thursday, Decem-
ber 5, 2013. Beyers Fu-
neral Home and Cre-
mation.
Ruth E. Gilmore
Ruth E. Gilmore, 87,
of Wildwood, died Fri-
day, December 6, 2013.
Banks/Page-Theus Fu-
nerals and Cremations.
Betty J. Masters
BettyJ. Masters, 88, of
Leesburg, died Thurs-
day, December 5, 2013.
Page-Theus Funerals &
Cremations.


RAFFLE
FROM PAGE A3

The Restoration Out-
reach Community Cen-
ter, a nonprofit agen-
cy, provides financial
assistance as well as
educational training,
mentoring and other
services.
Johnson estimated
they serve between 20
and 40 people a day in
the office and clients
coming in can sub-
mit their name for the
drawing.
Johnson said they
have been soliciting do-
nations from area busi-
nesses for the effort and
hope to raise $500 by
the 10 a.m. Wednesday
drawing at 1501 Griffin
Road, The $500 will al-
low the agency to pay
up to at least $100 for
a utility bill for each of
the five winners.
For more informa-
tion, call 323-8020.



BEYEJR c
IT E 1 1M -dCEA R


CHIEFS
FROM PAGE A3

so he could claim
full retirement.
In Mount Dora,
John O'Grady was
officially sworn in
as the city's newest
police chief during
a change of com-
mand ceremony on
Thursday.
The search began
for a new deputy po-
lice chief in Novem-
ber 2012, when dep-
uty chief Ron Rauth
announced his re-
tirement after 13
years with Mount
Dora. Next, police
chief Scoggins an-
nounced he would
be retiring at the end
of this year. O'Grady
became Mount Do-
ra's deputy police
chief in February.
O'Grady began his
career with the Or-
lando Police Depart-
ment in 1986, serv-
ing in various roles,
including the vio-
lent crimes section,
and commanding
the Orlando's first
homeland securi-
ty section. Most re-
cently, he served as
the division com-
mander for the Or-
lando Internation-
al Airport where he
was responsible for
airport security and
fiscal oversight.
Scoggins took on
the Mount Dora po-
lice chief job in June
1999 after a career
with the Orlando
Police Department.
After retirement,
Scoggins plans to
continue serving as
chair of the Crimi-
nal Justice Technol-
ogy program at Va-
lencia College.

You're Reading

/4 LOCAL


PMPER


Pearl Harbor survivor thrives



meeting with memorial visitors


AUDREY MCAVOY
Associated Press
PEARL HARBOR, Ha-
waii Herb Weather-
wax cruises the open-
air grounds of the
visitors center at Pearl
Harbor on a motor-
ized scooter dubbed
"Herb's Hot Rod."
When a woman notic-
es his blue and white
cap embroidered with
the words "Pearl Har-
bor Survivor," he coax-
es her over.
"Come get a picture,"
Weatherwax says. Her
family surrounds his
scooter to pose for a
snapshot and shake
his hand.
The 96-year-old
charms visitors in a
similar fashion each of
the three days a week
he volunteers at a me-
morial for the USS Ar-
izona, a battleship that
sank in the 1941 Jap-
anese attack. The re-
tired electrician is one
of four former service-
men who lived through
the aerial bombing and
now greet people at the
historic site.
People like hearing
stories directly from
the survivors, Weath-
erwax says. And he en-
joys meeting people
from around the globe
- just the other day
he met visitors from
New Zealand, China
and Texas. He joked he
wants his photograph
"in every home in the
world."
"This is my reason to
continue to keep go-
ing," he says. "Other-
wise, it's time for me to
say goodbye."
Weatherwax was a
24-year-old Army pri-
vate living in Honolulu
when he heard loud ex-
plosions the morning
of Dec. 7,1941. He saw
the sky fill with black
smoke and heard an-
ti-aircraft guns firing.


AP PHOTO


Herb Weatherwax, left, talks to a visitor in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.


When he turned on the
radio, he learned Japan
was bombing Oahu
and all military per-
sonnel were to imme-
diately report to their
stations.
He saw the USS Ar-
izona enveloped in
flames and the USS
Oklahoma turned on
its side as he head-
ed to his post. Twen-
ty-one ships were sunk
or heavily damaged
that day while 320 air-
craft were damaged or
destroyed. Some 2,400
sailors, Marines and
soldiers were killed.
Pam Johnson, a sixth
grade teacher in a ru-
ral community outside
Honolulu, said meet-
ing Weatherwax trans-
formed her students.
She had been
struggling to get the
12-year-olds from
Hauula Elementary
School interested in
research. After meet-
ing Weatherwax, sev-
eral students suddenly
told her they wanted to
look up Pearl Harbor.


Weatherwax ignited in
them a desire to learn,
she said.
"That's a huge con-
nection," she says. Her
students wouldn't have
developed this inter-
est just by walking
through the exhibition
halls at the visitors'
center or even the me-
morial for the Arizona,
Johnson says.
"This is the best
classroom so far this
year," she says.
At their peak in the
early 1990s, 21 survi-
vors volunteered, says
National Park Service
historian Daniel Mar-
tinez.
Meeting a survivor
enlarges or enhanc-
es the experience of
coming to Pearl Har-
bor for many, Martinez
says. It can give people
a tangible connection
to meet someone who
was on site when the
bombing happened.
Their numbers are
dwindling, however.
"It's a fading frater-
nity. Right before my


eyes we're seeing them
disappear," Martinez
says.
The three others who
remain are also in their
90s. During the week,
Weatherwax is joined
by Sterling Cale, who
was a hospital corps-
man assigned to the
shipyard dispensary in
1941, and Alfred Ro-
drigues who was sta-
tioned at the mouth of
Pearl Harbor. On the
weekend, USS Penn-
sylvania survivor Ever-
ett Hyland greets visi-
tors.
This Saturday, they
will join a few thou-
sand guests for a pub-
lic ceremony remem-
bering those who died
in the attack 72 years
ago.
Weatherwax vows to
keep volunteering as
long as he is physically
able. "I tell people that
I meet out here, 'If you
come back in three-
and-a-half years and
you see me here, I'll be
100 years old,'" Weath-
erwax says.


THREAT
FROM PAGE A3

a timed bomb in your
restaurant, I hope you
have time to get every-
one out," which result-
ed in law enforcement
being called.


Soon afterward, the
girlfriend told officers
that her boyfriend,
Borrell, had sent her
several text messag-
es throughout the day,
stating he was going to
call in a bomb threat to
the restaurant in an ef-
fort to get her off work


for a family meal at his
Ocoee home.
The woman told de-
tectives she didn't
think he was serious
and that she gave him
the wrong phone num-
ber to the business
when he asked.
An arrest affida-


vit said detectives dis-
covered the payphone
from where the bomb
threat was made is
less than five miles
from Borrell's home in
Ocoee.
Borrell turned him-
self in to the Lady Lake
police on Thursday.


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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, December 7, 2013




Saturday, December 7, 2013


Song, dance, tears for Mandela in South Africa


CHRISTOPHER TORCHIA
and JASON STRAZIUSO
Associated Press
JOHANNESBURG -
Themba Radebe spun
slowly in a circle.
First he pointed his
cellphone camera at
a group of children
chanting Nelson Man-
dela's name as they
waved posters of the
anti-apartheid cham-
pion. Then pivoting to
his right, Radebe aimed
his camera at a sway-
ing group of adults who
sang in Zulu while rock-
ing and clapping.
A day after Mandela's
death at 95, South Afri-
cans of all colors erupt-
ed in song, dance and
tears Friday in emotion-
al celebrations of the life
of the man who bridged
this country's black-
white divide and helped
avert a race war.
"I don't think Mr.
Mandela belonged to
black people," said Alex
Freilingsdorf, a Toyo-
ta executive at a Sowe-
to dealership. "He be-
longed to South Africa."
Freilingsdorf and oth-
er white South Afri-
cans mingled among
the hundreds of blacks
gathered outside a
home where Mandela
lived as a young lawyer
in the rough and tumble
Soweto township.
The mood was simul-
taneously celebratory
and somber at the im-
promptu street festival
where Radebe filmed
scenes to share with his
family.
"I'm sorry, I'm too
emotional. The tears


Mourners sing and dance to celebrate the life of Nelson Mandela in the street outside his old house in Soweto,


Johannesburg.
flow too easily," said the
balding 60-year-old, his
eyes sparkling with tears
as he reflected on how
South Africa's race rela-
tions have improved -
"not perfect, but much
better" compared
with his childhood in
the black township.
"This is a celebration
of the death, because
we knew he was an old
man," Radebe said. "He
brought a lot of chang-
es to our communi-
ty, because I grew up in
apartheid. It was a very
bad situation."
At a service in Cape
Town, Archbishop Des-
mond Tutu, a Nobel lau-
reate like Mandela and
himself a monumen-
tal figure in the strug-


gle against apartheid,
called on South Africa's
51 million people to em-
brace the values of uni-
ty and democracy that
Mandela embodied.
"God, thank you for
the gift of Madiba," Tutu
said, using Mandela's
clan name.
"All of us here in many
ways amazed the world,
a world that was ex-
pecting us to be devas-
tated by a racial confla-
gration," Tutu said as he
recalled how Mandela
helped unite South Af-
rica as it dismantled the
cruel system of white
minority rule, and pre-
pared for all-race elec-
tions in 1994.
In those elections,
Mandela, who spent 27


years in prison, became
South Africa's first black
president.
At Mandela's home
in the leafy Johannes-
burg neighborhood
of Houghton, where
he spent his last sickly
months, a multi-racial
crowd paid tribute.
"What I liked most
about Mandela was his
forgiveness, his passion,
his diversity, the impact
of what he did," said
Ariel Sobel, a white man
who was born in 1993,
a year before Mande-
la was elected presi-
dent. "I am not worried
about what will happen
next. We will continue
as a nation. We knew
this was coming. We are
prepared."


As a doze
were release
sky, people s
songs, the na
them, God I
ca the anth
anti-apartheic
gle and
hymns.
Many wore
ditional garb
tion's Zulu, X
other ethnic g
"He will ruml
verse with G
claimed a pos
aloft by a mou
President Ja
announced a
of ceremonies
to draw huge
of world digni
ordinary mou
Mandela's b
lie in state fror


day through Friday af-
ter a memorial service
at the same Johannes-
burg stadium where he
made his last public ap-
pearance in 2010 at the
closing ceremony of the
soccer World Cup. He is
to be buried in his ru-
ral childhood village of
Qunu on Dec. 15, after a
state funeral.
"We call upon all
our people to gath-
er in halls, churches,
mosques, temples, syn-
agogues and in their
homes for prayer ser-
vices and meditation,
reflecting on the life of
Madiba and his contri-
bution to our country
and the world," Zuma
said.
The White House
said President Barack
BEN CURTIS/AP Obama and first lady
Michelle Obama would
visit South Africa next
week to participate
en doves in memorial events,
I into the though no precise dates
ang tribal were given.
tional an- Mandela was a "very
less Afri- human person" with
iem of the a sense of humor who
d strug- took interest in peo-
Christian ple around him, said
FW. de Klerk, South Af-
the tra- rica's last apartheid-era
of the na- president. The two men
hosa and negotiated the end of
roups. apartheid, finding com-
e the uni- mon cause in often
rod," pro- tense circumstances,
ster raised and shared the Nobel
irner. Peace Prize in 1993.
cob Zuma Summarizing Man-
schedule dela's legacy, de Klerk
expected paraphrased Mande-
numbers la's own words: "Never
taries and and never again should
rners. there be in South Africa
)ody is to the suppression of any-
nWednes- one by another."


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DAILY COMMERCIAL









New consumer tips for Obama's fixer-upper site


RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR
Associated Press
WASHINGTON It
doesn't rival Amazon and
Travelocity, but President
Barack Obama's much-ma-
ligned health insurance web-
site finally seems to be work-
ing reasonably well most of
the time.
Still, consumers are
well-advised to verify, not
just trust.
More than 3.7 million
people visited Health-
Care.gov this week and it
didn't crash, administration
spokeswoman Julie Bataille
deadpanned Friday on a call
with reporters.
Officials say 29,000 people
enrolled the first two days of
the week, exceeding total sig-
nups for the 36 states served
by the federal site during Oc-
tober, the month of its prob-
lem-plagued launch.
Online Spanish-language
signups, delayed because of
initial problems, will final-
ly go live this weekend in a
"soft launch" to tease out
any lurking glitches. Con-
sumers around the country
will be able to use the new
feature at CuidadoDeSalud.
gov. A promotional cam-
paign in Spanish will follow.
Overall, work has shift-


ed from zapping technical
gremlins that frustrated con-
sumers to cleaning up gar-
bled enrollment files that
the system has been deliver-
ing to insurers.
"The new process put
in place this week is mak-
ing a difference," acknowl-
edged Karen Ignagni, head
of the largest industry group,
America's Health Insurance
Plans. "The enrollment files
are getting better, but there
is more work to be done to
ensure consumers are cov-
ered."
While not calling it an "er-
ror rate," Bataille says mis-
takes on those files are now
affecting 1 in 10 transactions
with insurers, down from an
estimated 25 percent. She
still recommends that con-
sumers verify enrollment
with their insurer, and im-
portantly- pay their first
month's premium by Dec.
31.
The web is now the gate-
way to subsidized private
health insurance for people
who don't have job-based
coverage. Along with the fed-
eral site, 14 states and Wash-
ington, D.C., are running
their own.
Independent testers ques-
tion the blazing Internet


J PAT CARTER / AP
Gina Denis, a certified counselor at Miami's Boringuen Health Center,
works with an unidentified Haitian client.


speeds claimed by techies at
the Health and Human Ser-
vices Department, and some
of the state websites, but
confirm there's been notice-
able progress.
"The trend is in the right
direction ... but there are still
things they can do to make
the user experience better,"
said Michael Smith, a vice
president of engineering at
Compuware Corp., which
helps companies monitor
the technical performance
of their websites.
As of Friday morning, the
number of states where con-
sumers are experiencing un-
acceptably long wait times


had been cut to 9, down
from 26 states in late Octo-
ber. Conversely, Compuware
now rates 17 states as "ac-
ceptable," up from just six in
October.
Compuware defines "un-
acceptable" as more than 8
seconds average response
time to load the home page.
The government claims a re-
sponse time of less than 1
second. But Smith says that
is likely being measured
from computers with fast
Internet connections and
doesn't account for the ex-
perience of consumers with
less than ideal access, which
is incorporated in his com-


pany's testing.
Compuware says avail-
ability a measure of con-
sumers' success accessing
the site is up to 98 per-
cent, close to the standard
for commercial websites.
HealthCare.gov is being
measured against the stan-
dard for health care indus-
try sites.
Many consumers were
puzzled and frustrated when
the federal website went
live because it would not let
them browse health plans
without first setting up an
account. That's the opposite
of how e-commerce general-
ly works. Most websites ask
consumers to open an ac-
count after they're ready to
purchase.
The flaw drove many peo-
ple to an accounts creation
page that turned out to be
riddled with bugs and con-
tributed to the system's ear-
ly woes.
On Monday, HHS an-
nounced the deployment of
a window-shopping func-
tion that lets prospective
customers see plans and
prices in their area, includ-
ing previously unavailable
details such as deductibles
and cost-sharing, as well as
provider networks.


MISSION
FROM PAGE Al

"We all wanted to
get to work to dig the
well," he said of the ex-
perience.
The mayor made the
trip with his two oldest
sons.
Bell said the visit af-
fected him.
"Anytime you see
it, it makes you very
humbled at what we
as Americans take for
granted," he said.
Villagers wash their
clothes by hand, hang-
ing them outside to
dry. Meals are cooked
on a clay oven stove
warmed by a wood fire.
Even though the vil-
lagers have little, Bell
noted, they are content
with what they have.


"There was no quar-
reling and no ugli-
ness at all," he said..
"And they had noth-
ing. It makes you won-
der what is important
in life."
Medical care in the
region is poor. Only 6.3
percent of the popula-
tion is insured, accord-
ing to the World Health
Organization.
Further, WHO re-
ported that "22 percent
of children living in the
most disadvantaged
quartile of urban areas
suffer from malnutri-
tion" in Nicaragua.
Municipalities with
indigenous popula-
tions in Nicaragua also
suffer from Malaria,
WHO reported.
Bell he was shocked
shocked when he came
across a cemetery


where workers were
unloading a casket
with an infant inside.
MEN
About 300 children
die each year from di-
arrhea caused by un-
safe water and poor
sanitation, accord-
ing to Water Aid Nica-
ragua, a nonprofit or-
ganization working
to improve water and
sanitation services in
the region.
Dr. Marty Schnell,
medical director for
Wound Care and Hy-
perbaric Medicine for
Central Florida Alli-
ance, who accompa-
nied Brock on the trip,
said he believes that
number to be much
higher.
"People have stand-
ing water underneath
their homes," he said


of the remote villag-
es of IMAK and San
Andres, where indige-
nous tribes live. "These
are areas where wa-
terborne diseases like
typhoid and cholera
breed."
Water Aid also stated
that about "2.8 million
people don't have ac-
cess to adequate san-
itation in Nicaragua,"
which represents half
the population.
On a separate trip
from Bell's, Brock and
several others took a
journey down the Rio
Coco and Bocay riv-
ers to the Village of San
Andres, which lies be-
yond the entrance to
the Bocay River.
The route along the
Rio Coco is known to
be dangerous because
of drug trafficking and
other illegal activities.
Violence on the river is
not uncommon, said
Brock.
Medical facilities do
not have enough med-
ication to meet health
needs.
"They have a clin-
ic with a nurse but very
little medicine," Brock
said of the village, which
is 12 hours away from
by boat to the nearest
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Fresh Veggies, Plants, Seafood, Homemade
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city.
"In the Village of San
Andres last month,
nine children died
from pneumonia,"
Schnell added.
Educational resourc-
es are few and far be-
tween, Brock said.
"Most children are
not busy with school,
but they spend their
time working to as-
sist the family because
if they do not do the
work, they don't eat,"
he said.
The work entails
gathering unclean wa-
ter, field chores and
washing clothes, he
said.
San Andres is situ-
ated in the jungle and
is home to the Miskito
people, Brock said.
"The night was pret-
ty tough, trying to get
used to sleeping in a
hammock as well as
the sounds of rain, ani-
mals,etc," he said.
The group then trav-
eled back up the riv-
er and down the Bocay
to locate the Mayang-
na people, an indige-
nous tribe living in and
along the Bocay River.
Two armed guards ac-
companied the team
because of the insta-
bility in the area, Brock
said.
The village had sim-
ilar medical issues.
Schnell said the clinic
had one nurse to serve
more than 8,000 peo-
ple.
"They have rea-
sonably well-trained
health care provid-
ers, but they don't have
any resources," he said.


"The medicines are
very scant."
Many travel many
miles to the clinics,
Brock said.
"Some would walk
two days to get to the
clinic," he said. "It was
humbling to see the
conditions they were
working in: few medi-
cations, poor working
conditions, few instru-
ments.
Many Mayangna
people suffered from
mountain leprosy and
other ailments. The
group brought medica-
tions to treat them.
"We took them a lot
of antibiotics and a lot
of medicines for deal-
ing with parasites and
skin diseases," Brock
said. "Basic things we
take for granted."
Overall, the group's
mission was to walk
alongside the villagers.
He remembers many
of them.
"I have a picture of
a young man who was
blind in one eye, and
approached us while
we stopped along the
river for a brief break,"
he said. "You could tell
that life had been hor-
rendous for him. He
kept inching closer and
I started feeding him."
And then there was
Noni, a little girl who
was curious about his
arrival but too shy to
interact with him.
"I have a progres-
sion of pictures that
shows her progress in
approach, with the last
being eye contact," he
said. "She eventually
made it close enough
that I was able to com-
municate through an
interpreter, but then
she disappeared."
Bell was taken aback
by the "sincere grati-
tude of the people."
Brock said the trip
reminded him of the
all the blessings at
home, he said.
"There is a whole
other culture of people
out there that are still
living in extreme pov-
erty and living off the
land," he said. "We live
in the land of the plen-
ty and act as if we are
so poor. We were in the
land of the poor and
yet they acted as if they


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, December 7, 2013






YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD
ROD DIXON........................................... PUBLISHER
TOM MCNIFF.................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR
BILL KOCH....................... ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR
SCOTT CALLAHAN................................. NEWS EDITOR
GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Vo i c e s www.dailycommercial.com


VOICE


Job market


shows promising


signs of strength
he jobless rate fell to 7 percent in No-
vember, its lowest in five years, down
from 7.3 percent in October, a fairly
steep drop as these things are measured.
This time, the good news was not diluted
by the usual statistical caveats the work-
force is shrinking, workers have given up
looking and thus aren't reflected in the fig-
ures, what little growth there is has been in
low-wage jobs, the decline only looks good
because the rest of the economy is flat.
The economy added 203,000 jobs last
month, for a four-month average of 204,000
August through November. The 200,000 lev-
el is where the employment situation begins
making real progress. The rate was 159,000 a
month April through July.
One positive sign was that high-paying
industries added more jobs 27,000 in
manufacturing and 17,000 in construction.
Those well-paid jobs are vital to the recov-
ery because the people who hold them tend
to spend more and in our consumer-driv-
en economy more spending means faster
growth.
But, as the Associated Press noted,
"Roughly half the jobs that were added in
the last six months through October were
in four low-wage industries: retail; hotels,
restaurants and entertainment; temp jobs;
and home health care workers.
Labor organizers and fast-food workers
have orchestrated a drive to raise the fed-
eral minimum wage from $7.25 an hour to,
ideally, $15 an hour, but the drive seems to
have gathered little traction and, further,
faces opposition in the U.S. House.
Robust economic growth might change
that equation and the economy did grow at
a healthy 3.6 percent in the July to Septem-
ber quarter but it wasn't matched by an ac-
companying growth in consumer spending
which grew at its slowest pace since 2009.
At the other end of the economic scale,
Wall Street is anxious for some indication of
how long the Fed will keep up its $85 billion
a month bond-buying program, a stimulus
measure in effect since September 2012.
Outgoing Fed chairman Ben Bernanke
has said the Fed would end the purchases
once the unemployment rate hit 7 percent;
other members of the central bank would
hold out until the rate reached 6.5 percent.
In either case, the Fed seems in no hurry to
make a decision, although it could begin ta-
pering off its purchases after it meets later
this month.
However we got there, that 7 percent fig-
ure has been a long time coming. Perhaps
a rate in the 6 percent range won't take as
long. Maybe in the new year.
Provided by Scripps Howard News Service


The Daily Commercial

The newspaper of choice for Lake
and Sumter counties since 1875

EDITORIALS
Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board,
not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are
not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday,
Saturday and Sunday.
COLUMNS
Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and
picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reflect
the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a
diversity of views.
If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state
or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom-
mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL
34749-0007.
Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length.
The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published
with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.


THINQ5 YOu CAN FIT AT HOBBY LOBBY...


OTHERVOICES


Some good news emerges



on the diabetes frontier


irst, the bad news: Diabe-
tes is America's No. 7 cause
of death, killing 71,000 an-
nually. This disorder endangers
nearly 26 million Americans and
adds 1.9 million new patients
annually or 5,205 daily. Left un-
checked, one third of American
adults will be diabetic by 2050.
U.S. diabetic care consumes
some $245 billion annually and
devours 20 percent of Medicare's
budget.
And now the good news: Scien-
tists and entrepreneurs are work-
ing hard to manage, treat, and ul-
timately defeat this disease. And
they are making progress.
"Researchers are not choosing
diabetes as their area of study,"
warns Dr. Karen Talmadge, who
chairs the American Diabetes As-
sociation. "One reason is the level
of funding."
Enter the ADA's new Pathway to
Stop Diabetes.
Over the next 10 years, Pathway
aims to award $160 million to 100
promising young scientists who
will invent new treatments and
seek possible cures. Research-
ers will compete for these por-
table, five-year grants of up to
$1,625,000 each. ADA wants to
initiate researchers and acceler-
ate the work of those already tar-
geting diabetes. ADA particularly
wants to introduce experts from
unusual specialties to begin bat-
tling diabetes with "new or even
radical ideas," in ADA's words.
This could include using materi-
als engineering to create benign
cells and tissues to improve dia-
betics' metabolisms.
The first five to seven Pathway
awardees will be unveiled in Jan-
uary, with grants totaling between
some $8 million and $11 million.
Dr. Taylor Wang, a physicist


Deroy
Murdock
SCRIPPS HOWARD
NEWS SERVICE


and former astronaut, invent-
ed the bio-artificial pancreas. It
emerged from research he con-
ducted in zero gravity aboard the
Space Shuttle Challenger in April
1985. Dr. Wang now leads Encap-
sulife, a company dedicated to
developing and marketing this
device.
The bio-artificial pancreas con-
tains tens of thousands of living
pancreas islets harvested from
pigs or live human donors. These
cells would be encased in a poly-
mer capsule, fashioned into a
pancake-like patch the size of a
half-dollar coin, and implant-
ed beneath the skin. Encapsulife
says this device protects the islets
from a diabetic's auto-immune
system. It welcomes the patient's
digestive glucose. This stimu-
lates the islets to produce insulin
and then secretes it automatical-
ly into the diabetic's system as
would a working pancreas.
Dr. Wang successfully reversed
diabetes for up to seven months
in nine dogs in 2007. More re-
cently, he, Harvard's Dr. James
Markmann, and the living-cell
patch counteracted diabetes in
small monkeys without using im-
munosuppressants. A patent ap-
pears imminent.
Vmersion Health, a San Fran-
cisco-based start-up, has devel-
oped Gluco-Share. It lets dia-
betics use their smart phones to
monitor their self-treatment and
reward those who test their blood
glucose, take insulin on schedule,


and otherwise vigilantly care for
themselves.
"Young diabetics often do not
understand the dire consequenc-
es of going off of their treatment
regimens," says Joe Madden, a
48-year old as broad-shouldered
as the ballplayers his sportscaster
father, John Madden, described
across hundreds of games in his
career. Sipping his coffee at the
Cup of Joe Cafe on Sutter Street
here, Madden adds, "We believe
Gluco-Share is a promising way
to give new diabetics incentives
to keep doing what their doctors
prescribe."
Madden launched Gluco-Share
after his son Sam was diagnosed
with diabetes at age 5. As most
parents of diabetics recognize,
material inducements motivate
their children to manage their dis-
ease more carefully. Through Glu-
co-Share, diabetics especial-
ly young ones use their smart
phones to record their glucose
checks and insulin injections.
Soon, users will be able to track
diet and exercise. The points gen-
erated from each entry can be re-
deemed for video games from
Electronic Arts, online-game cur-
rency, and Lego (and other) toys
from King's Variety Stores.
The parents and doctors of di-
abetics can use Gluco-Share's
data to evaluate patients, con-
firm their adherence to treatment
plans, and correct them when
they stray.
Many miles, millions of re-
search dollars, and countless
hours of laboratory time remain
before diabetes follows smallpox
into oblivion. But, for now, the
momentum is undeniable and
positive.


E-mail deroy.Murdock@gmail.com


HAVE YOUR SAY
The Daily Commercial invites you
to write letters to the editor. Letters
should be no longer than 350 words.
They must be original, signed with the
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number for verification. We reserve
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taste and libel. We accept no more
than two letters per month from the
same writer. No open letters, form
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parties will be published. We do not
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By fax to: 325-365-1951


DOONESBURY


THREE. WHAT
ALL WITH WOULP
INFANTS. YOU 5AY
\ YOUR
5TRAN6THS
^ ARE?


SCRAROOKINQ
SUPPLIES




ti


Saturday, December 7, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL





DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, December 7, 2013


TODAY




Fog in the morning; War
partly sunny, warm clou

HIGH LOW H
820 630 8



. ...... -
S Pensacol53 ::'
55/53 ...........


F


Ie


SUNDAY

b..'


m with intervals of
ds and sunshine

IGH LOW
320 650


'a


MONDAY




Remaining warm with
periods of sun

HIGH LOW
830 650


Tallahassee
74/57


Panama City
68/57 ,y .


or up to the minute and detailed A .o ..
weather information, go to: 26:co "
WAccuWeather.com

.o TheVillages Alt3
O4rfoid 834 Ao863
*" *-- KB1- u ayak-1 T,, .,

SWildwood uitand Park Eustis
/8362 I I I82163 Sonento
\ r = ,C ole m in a & B A

Lake2Panasos, eN2/61 U bgTa...s
83161 [ Sumtervi .e .
63162 r. ..
ushnelli C nter Hill
62 418 162 ^*
o o Me erde
boter T! Shown
-oveland ClermonI Swn
/62 8264 toway's weE
STemperalur
today's high
tonight's I
I iiiiiiii! :'i6-iiiii!!


Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ,


TUESDAY




Some sun with a couple
of showers possible

HIGH LOW
820 590


WEDNESDAY




Not as warm with
intervals of clouds
and sun
HIGH LOW
700 600


Lake City acksonville
Lake City 0 *W
80- 61 ,I

In
SGainesville Daytona Beach
82/60 5 ,81/63
\!MOcalat I .
8 61/60 -'__ .
\ "--, 'itusville
-. ebur w64
\ "-<,.- LJ..,,JOrlando !
4 Tampa 8a3/64 :
I,; ) -8 8 ..., Vero Beach
j2I=P : :. "' 82/67
*Ii t ,, Petersburg
.81/68
aase Okeechobee .,
Sarasota "... 81/65 4L ,
82/6i5 ; "!
'8'25 Palm Bealb
J'l; 82/74 i
Ft. Myerst ..... 8
IS8 . >-iiiii
ep Fort Laud Wle
awher.a ^-" l
Naples& 82/73 _
es are 8 i
is and i aini.
ows. ,,-" ". l|272


S"Key Largo
... KK vWest ..* .. 81/74


2wUl1


81.-7. .. .-..
81174 4L ':, .


I IV-AYFOEAS FRLESBR


4
10112345I78
0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8.10
Very High, 11+ Extreme
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index
number, the greater the need for
eye and skin protection.


The solunar period schedule allows planning
days so you will be fishing in good territory or
hunting in good cover during those times. Major
periods begin at the times shown and last for
1.5 to 2 hours. The minor periods are shorter.
Major Minor Major Minor
Today 3:25 a.m. 9:38 a.m. 3:52 p.m. 10:05 p.m.
Sun. 4:23 a.m. 10:36 a.m. 4:49 p.m. 11:02 p.m.


I U I MO


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


Today
7:08 a.m.
5:30 p.m.
11:08 a.m.
10:52 p.m.


Sunday
7:08 a.m.
5:30 p.m.
11:50 a.m.
11:54 p.m.


First Full Last New

Df Ie

Dec 9 Dec 17 Dec 25 Jan 1


ITIEI


Homosassa
Day High Feet
Today 7:15 am......1.3
8:51 pm......1.1
Daytona Beach
Day High Feet
Today 11:19am.....4.8
11:43 pm .....4.4


Low Feet
3:11 am .....0.3
3:52 pm....-0.1

Low Feet
4:47 am ....-0.3
5:31 pm....-0.3


High Feet
8:17 am......1.2
9:38 pm.....1.1

High Feet
12:14 pm.....4.6


Low Feet
4:09 am .....0.2
4:41 pm..... 0.0

Low Feet
5:48 am .....0.0
6:29 pm....-0.1


I AINLCTE


Today
City Hi LOW
Great Falls -6 -12 pc
Greensboro, NC 56 29 r
Hartford 36 19 pc
Honolulu 82 65 s
Houston 39 35 r
Indianapolis 24 13 pc
Jackson, MS 42 37 r
Kansas City 16 12 c
LasVegas 44 31 sf
Little Rock 28 22 c
Louisville 26 21 pc
Memphis 32 25 c
Milwaukee 16 10 pc
Minneapolis 4 0 pc
Nashville 36 30 c
New Orleans 47 45 r
NewYork City 42 28 pc


Sunday
Hi LoW
9 Oc
33 33 i
35 26 pc
83 65 pc
46 40 C
28 24 sn
47 42 r
25 11 sn
42 27 pc
32 27 i
34 31 sn
37 29 i
27 20 c
15 6sn
41 35 r
61 54t
35 33 sn


City
Norfolk, VA
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego


Today
Hi LoW
57 35r
22 16 c
12 -2c
43 28 pc
56 45 pc
29 14 pc
38 20sf
27 10 s
41 23 pc
6632r
27 4 sn
51 31 r
44 25 pc
24 15 pc
28 15 sn
36 28 c
60 48sh


Sunday
Hi LOW
44 43 r
28 19i
18 3sn
35 33 sn
57 36 pc
30 29 sn
32 19s
30 15 pc
35 28 pc
36 34 i
23 2pc
33 33 i
42 24 s
29 21 sn
18 -2 c
53 38 pc
57 44 pc


City
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Santa Fe
St. Ste. Marie
Seattle
Shreveport
Spokane
Syracuse
Topeka
Tucson
Tulsa
Washington, DC
Wilmington, DE


Today
Hi LoW
49 37 pc
83 74 sh
31 19 c
22 6sn
29 18 s
35 29i
9 -4pc
32 20 pc
16 14 c
59 39 pc
24 18 c
44 31 pc
44 26 pc


Sunday
Hi LoW
48 36 s
83 75 pc
30 6sn
21 16 pc
32 21 pc
39 31 i
12 -1 c
35 25 pc
27 10 sn
54 32 pc
31 20 sn
32 32 sn
33 33 sn


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.


Sk


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Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bends are today's highs for the
day. Forecast highMow temperatures are given for selected ciles.


'COLD
I ( 9
B"Ilngs' FRIGIDk 1 4'..

M,*. 4'4. *'.,I"o ," 1" W. Fr o r
F RS D w rol'*. .* Da w. L^ 'W t~ n~ p A

T-Wastor', .
41 K ,ansdsCm, 4 ''. WarFrom
COLD.C
*e4 I *6 y Front


-lOe .. . Af.

/ D Iceg
Yesterday's National High/Low: (for the 48 contiguous states)
High 860 in Naples, FL Low -34o in West Yellowstone, MT


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte, NC


Today
Hi LoW
30 18 pc
39 26 c
34 26 pc
51 36r
54 47 r
46 26 c
44 28 pc
-7 -14 c
48 42 r
-4 -14 pc
26 5sn
39 26 sf
29 16 sf
30 19 pc
74 51 sh
35 27 pc
60 34r


Sunday
Hi LoW
31 23 pc
37 16 sn
32 24 pc
38 38 r
50 47 r
35 33 sn
34 33 sn
10 Oc
55 51r
6 -11 c
16 2pc
35 29s
30 27 pc
30 20 s
57 51 sh
38 35 sn
38 38 r


City
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Concord, NH
Dallas
Dayton
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
El Paso
Fargo
Fairbanks
Flagstaff
Grand Rapids


Today
Hi LoW
12 1 sf
19 13 pc
26 17pc
26 14pc
70 43 sh
36 15 pc
24 20 c
24 13pc
14 4sn
12 9pc
26 15 pc
3 -6 pc
51 38 pc
0 -9 pc
30 14pc
28 12 sf
24 14 Sf


Sunday
Hi LoW
16 -4sn
28 20 sn
31 29 sn
31 28 sn
49 40 sh
30 18s
33 28 c
28 26 sn
19 Osn
20 8sn
29 25 c
10 2c
54 32 pc
10 -8 c
21 8sn
25 4pc
26 24 c


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, December 7, 2013


.,.Mow,, %"


,-'"


ire
IN
lo








Sports
sports@dailycommercial.com


Bl
DAILY COMMERCIAL
Saturday, December 7, 2013
SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY
o 352-365-8208
www.dailycommercial.com


NFL: Texans fire Kubiak/ B6


Knicks beat



Magic by 38 to



end home skid


BRIAN MAHONEY
AP Basketball Writer
NEW YORK Car-
melo Anthony had
20 points and 11 re-
bounds, and the New
York Knicks snapped
a seven-game home
losing streak by beat-
ing the Orlando Magic
121-83 on Friday night
for their first victory at
Madison Square Gar-
den since October.
Andrea Bargnani and
J.R. Smith each add-
ed 17 points for the
Knicks, who followed
their 113-83 rout of
Brooklyn on Thurs-
day with an even more
powerful performance,
giving them consec-
utive victories for the
first time this season
after a nine-game los-
ing streak.
The Knicks hadn't
won at home since
beating Milwaukee
in their season open-


er on Oct. 30. The sev-
en-game skid had
matched the longest
in franchise history, set
during the 2007-08 sea-
son.
They ended it em-
phatically, just miss-
ing the biggest victory
in the NBA this season,
the Clippers' 39-point
rout of Chicago on Nov.
24, according to STATS.
The Knicks made a
season-best 17 3-point-
ers one night af-
ter hitting 16 and
turned it into another
easy night for Anthony,
who took only 10 shots.
New York moved
ahead of Brooklyn and
out of last place. De-
spite their struggles,
the Knicks (5-13) en-
tered only 21/2 games
behind first-place Bos-
ton in the pathetic At-
lantic Division, and can
move even closer when
SEE MAGIC I B2


BILL KOSTROUN / AP
New York Knicks'Andrea Bargnani, left, drives under the
basket as Orlando Magic center Glen Davis defends during
the second quarter of an NBA basketball game on Friday at
Madison Square Garden in NewYork.


PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL
Lake Minneola junior Anthony Brown (3) dribbles around The Rock senior Mitchell Wilbekin (1) on Friday during the
Lake Minneola-The Rock boys basketball game at the Center Stage Classic at Montverde Academy in Montverde. Lake
Minneola won 78-47.



LMHS tops The Rock


FRANK JOLLEY I Staff Writer
frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com
Lake Minneola boys
basketball coach Fred-
die Cole said earlier in
the week that he con-
sidered Friday's game
against Gainesville The
Rock to be a crucial
test for the Hawks.
They passed with fly-
ing colors.
Lake Minneola used
a swarming, suffocat-
ing defense to bury
the Lions with a near-
ly perfect second quar-
ter en route to a 78-47
victory at the Center
Stage Classic on the
Mills Championship
Court at the Mont-


The Rock junior Andre Kelly (15) reaches for the ball.


verde Academy Field-
house.
Lake Minneola broke
open a close game in
the second quarter
with an overwhelming
display of total basket-


ball. The Hawks sealed
off The Rock's pass-
ing lanes with its zone
defense and used its
quickness to beat the
Lions down the floor
for a series of run out


baskets that were cre-
ated from turnovers.
At the same time,
Lake Minneola's of-
fense fed off its de-
fense, with Anthony
Brown draining three
3 pointers in the sec-
ond quarter and twin
brother Avery Brown
scoring from inside the
arc. Anthony Brown
had 17 points in the
first half and Avery
Brown totaled 15.
On the defensive
end, Marcus Dodson
energized Lake Minne-
ola's trapping defense
that rattled and con-
fused the Lions.
SEE LMHSI B2


perfect Buckeyes hope to wrap up unbeaten season


MICHAEL MAROT
AP Sports Writer
INDIANAPOLIS Urban
Meyer has No. 2 Ohio State
in a seemingly perfect spot.
The Buckeyes are 12-0,
have won 24 straight and
are likely one win away
from making their fourth
appearance in the BCS ti-
tle game. They have a po-
tential Heisman Trophy fi-
nalist in Braxton Miller,


the first 1,000-yard runner
of Meyer's coaching career
in Carlos Hyde, an offen-
sive line that fits with the
Ohio State tradition and
an underrated defense that
makes all the big plays.
This is a team that heads
into the Big Ten title game
with flaws and questions
and down a starting right
guard after Meyer benched
Marcus Hall on Friday with
a Saturday night show-


down against No. 10 Michi-
gan State looming.
"He won't start the
game," Meyer said. "Oth-
er than that, we'll see what
happens. But that's where
it's at."
It's the latest twist for a
team that has been any-
thing but perfect this sea-
son.
Last week, Hall and
kick returned Dontre Wil-
son were ejected after get-


ting involved in a fight with
archrival Michigan. Hall re-
sponded by throwing his
helmet to the ground on the
sideline and making an ob-
scene gesture at the Wol-
verines fans as he walked
through the tunnel. On Fri-
day, Meyer said he benched
the lineman and will start
freshman Pat Elflein.
That's not all.
SEE OSU I B2


Ohio State head coach Urban Meyer
listens to a question during a news
conference for the Big Ten Conference
championship game against Michigan
State on Friday, in Indianapolis.




B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, December 7,2013


SCOREBOARD


National Basketball Association
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic
W L Pet GB
Boston 8 12 .400 -
Toronto 6 11 .353 1/
Philadelphia 7 13 .350 1
New York 5 13 .278 2
Brooklyn 5 14 .263 21
Southeast
W L Pet GB
Miami 14 5 .737 -
Atlanta 11 10 .524 4
Washington 9 10 .474 5
Charlotte 9 11 .450 51h
Orlando 6 13 .316 8
Central
W L Pet GB
Indiana 17 2 .895 -
Detroit 9 10 .474 8
Chicago 8 9 .471 8
Cleveland 6 13 .316 11
Milwaukee 4 15 .211 13
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest
W L Pet GB
San Antonio 15 3 .833 -
Houston 13 7 .650 3
Dallas 12 8 .600 4
New Orleans 9 9 .500 6
Memphis 9 9 .500 6
Northwest
W L Pot GB
Portland 16 3 .842 -
Oklahoma City 13 4 .765 2
Denver 11 7 .611 41h
Minnesota 9 10 .474 7
Utah 4 16 .200 121
Pacific
W L Pet GB
L.A. Clippers 13 7 .650 -
Golden State 11 8 .579 11h
Phoenix 10 9 .526 21
L.A. Lakers 9 9 .500 3
Sacramento 4 12 .250 7
Thursday's Games
New York 113, Brooklyn 83
L.A. Clippers 101, Memphis 81
Chicago 107, Miami 87
Friday's Games
Milwaukee 109, Washington 105, OT
Charlotte 105, Philadelphia 88
Atlanta 108, Cleveland 89
New York 121, Orlando 83
Denver at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Golden State at Houston, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Toronto at Phoenix, 9p.m.
Utah at Portland, 10 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Denver at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Miami at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Golden State at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Brooklyn at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Indiana at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Utah, 9 p.m.
Dallas at Portland, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Boston at New York, 12 p.m.
Miami at Detroit, 6 p.m.
Orlando at Houston, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Toronto at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
National Football League
All Times EST
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pet PF PA
New England 9 3 0 .750 322 261
Miami 6 6 0 .500 252 248
N.Y Jets 5 7 0 .417 189 310
Buffalo 4 8 0 .333 267 307
South
W L T Pet PF PA
Indianapolis 8 4 0 .667 285 274
Tennessee 5 7 0 .417 264 267
Jacksonville 4 9 0 .308 201 372
Houston 2 11 0 .154 250 350
North
W L T Pot PF PA
Cincinnati 8 4 0 .667 292 216
Baltmore 6 6 0 .500 249 235
Pittsburgh 5 7 0 .417 263 278
Cleveland 4 8 0 .333 231 297
West
W L T Pot PF PA
Denver 10 2 0 .833 464 317
Kansas City 9 3 0 .750 298 214
San Diego 5 7 0 .417 279 277



LMHS
FROM PAGE B1


The result was a 28-3
outburst that gave the
Hawks a 42-14 lead at
intermission.
As the quarter pro-
gressed, the Hawks'
baseline- to -baseline
play drew increasing-
ly audible responses
from fans in the stands
- many of whom were
early arrivals for tour-
nament hosts Mont-
verde Academy's game
that would cap off the
evening. No matter
their allegiance, fans
took the time to appre-
ciate Lake Minneola's
high-octane effort.
In the second half,
Lake Minneola con-
tinued to build its lead
using the same frenet-



osu
FROM PAGE BI


The doubters con-
tend Ohio State's im-
perfect resume is filled
with victories over
mostly bad teams and
won a conference in
which Top 25 match-
ups have been rare.
This year, the Buckeyes
faced only two ranked
teams beating usu-
ally strong Wisconsin


by a TD at home and a
Northwestern squad by
10 on the road, a team
that never lived up
to the ranking. Some
say Saturday night's
game will be the big-
gest challenge of Mey-
er's two-year tenure in


Oakland 4 8 0 .333 237 300
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pot PF PA
Dallas 7 5 0 .583 329 303
Philadelphia 7 5 0 .583 300 281
N.Y Giants 5 7 0 .417 237 297
Washington 3 9 0 .250 269 362
South
W L T Pot PF PA
New Orleans 9 3 0 .750 312 230
Carolina 9 3 0 .750 285 157
Tampa Bay 3 9 0 .250 217 285
Atlanta 3 9 0 .250 261 340
North
W L T Pot PF PA
Detroit 7 5 0 .583 326 287
Chicago 6 6 0 .500 323 332
Green Bay 5 6 1 .458 294 305
Minnesota 3 8 1 .292 289 366
West
W L T Pot PF PA
x-Seattle 11 1 0 .917 340 186
San Francisco 8 4 0 .667 297 197
Arizona 7 5 0 .583 275 247
St. Louis 5 7 0 .417 279 278
x-clinched playoff spot
Thursday's Game
Jacksonville 27, Houston 20
Sunday's Games
Atlanta at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Baltmore, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at Washington, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at Tampa Bay, 1p.m.
Miami at Pittsburgh, 1p.m.
Detroit at Philadelphia, 1p.m.
Indianapolis at Cincinnat, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at New England, 1 p.m.
Oakland at N.Y Jets, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Seattle at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
N.Y Giants at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
St. Louis at Arizona, 4:25 p.m.
Carolina at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m.
Monday's Game
Dallas at Chicago, 8:40 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 12
San Diego at Denver, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 15
Philadelphia at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
Washington at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
San Francisco at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Seattle at N.Y Giants, 1p.m.
Chicago at Cleveland, 1p.m.
Houston at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at Jacksonville, 1p.m.
New England at Miami, 1p.m.
Kansas City at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y Jets at Carolina, 4:05 p.m.
Arizona at Tennessee, 4:25 p.m.
New Orleans at St. Louis, 4:25 p.m.
Green Bay at Dallas, 4:25 p.m.
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 8:30 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 16
Baltmore at Detroit, 8:40 p.m.
RSA Nedbank Golf Challenge Scores
Friday
At Gary Player Country Club
Sun City, South Africa
Purse: $6.5 million
Yardage: 7,831; Par: 72
Second Round
Jamie Donaldson, Wales 67-66 133
Ryan Moore, United States 71-65 136
HenrikStenson, Sweden 69-67 136
Thomas Bjorn, Denmark 67-70 137
Martn Kaymer, Germany 71-66 137
D.A. Points, United States 71-67 138
Brendon de Jonge, Zimbabwe 70-68 138
Charl Schwartzel, South Africa 68-70 138
Luke Donald, England 68-71 139
Darren Fichardt, South Africa 71-68 139
Thongchai Jaidee, Thailand 69-70 139
Sergio Garcia, Spain 66-73 139
Peter Uihlein, United States 70-69 139
Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano, Spain 67-72 139
Justin Rose, England 73-67 140
Joost Luiten, Netherlands 74-68 142
Louis Oosthuizen, South Africa 74-69 143
David Lynn, England 73-71 144
Victor Dubuisson, France 73-72 145
Francesco Molinari, Italy 76-70 146
Matteo Manassero, Italy 72-74 146
Richard Sterne, South Africa 73-73 146
Ernie Els, South Africa 75-71 146
Branden Grace, South Africa 75-71 146
Kevin Streelman, United States 75-71 146
Thaworn Wiratchant, Thailand 71-76 147
Gary Woodland, United States 74-73 147
Morten Orum Madsen, Denmark 76-71 147
Peter Senior, Australia 80-68 148
Dawie Van der Walt, South Africa 77-72 149
Northwestern Mutual World Challenge


ic attack that created
havoc in the first two
quarters. The Hawks
increased their lead in
the third quarter and
,early in the fourth,
Cole began to empty
his bench.
Anthony Brown led
all scorers with 25
points, followed by Av-
ery Brown with 23.
Chris Weech added 19
for Lake Minneola (8-
0).
Mitchell Wilbekin
led The Rock (6-2) with
14 points, followed by
DeVaughn Jenkins with
11.
In the opening game
of the tournament,
Oldsmar Christian
overcame a sluggish
start with a dominant
second quarter to walk
away with a 63-41 win
against Haines City.
Oldsmar Christian



Columbus.
Michigan State coach
Mark Dantonio doesn't
see things quite the
same way.
A year ago, the Spar-
tans (11-1) fell 17-16 to
Ohio State in East Lan-
sing, and this year, Dan-
tonio insists the Buck-
eyes are improved.
"What you see is an
extremely productive
offensive football team
that is capable of a big
play at any point in


time, at any given mo-
ment, from anywhere
on the field," he said.
"We've got to be able
to control that, work
through that.... They're
a very well-coached
football team with tre-
mendous players with


Scores
Friday
At Sherwood Country Club
Thousand Oaks, Calif.
Purse: $3.5 million
Yardage: 7,023; Par 72
Second Round
Tiger Woods 71-62 133
Zach Johnson 67-68 135
Matt Kuchar 68-68 136
Graeme McDowell 72-67 139
Bubba Watson 70-70 140
Bill Haas 73-68 141
Jim Furyk 72-69 141
Keegan Bradley 75-68 143
lan Poulter 76-67 143
Jason Day 76-68 144
Webb Simpson 73-71 144
Jason Dufner 74-71 145
Jordan Spieth 77-72 149
Steve Stricker 75-74 149
Lee Westwood 74-75 149
Rory Mcllroy 73-77 150
Hunter Mahan 70-80 150
Dustn Johnson 74-79 153
Omega Dubai Ladies Masters Leading
Scores
Friday
At Emirates Golf Course (Majlis Course)
Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Purse: $679,000
Yardage: 6,425; Par: 72
Third Round
Stacy Lewis, United States 70-65-70 205
Pornanong Phatum, Thailand 68-70-69 207
Diana Luna, Italy 73-68-69 210
Vikki Laing, Scotland 71-70-69 210
Carlota Ciganda, Spain 67-70-73 210
Louise Larsson, Sweden 72-71-68 211
Pernilla Lindberg, Sweden 67-69-75 211
Laura Davies, England 70-71-71 212
Shanshan Feng, China 76-67-71 214
Sarah Kemp, Australia 70-72-72 214
Also
Maria Hjorth, Sweden 72-71-72 215
Charley Hull, England 70-72-73 215
Sophie Gustafson, Sweden 73-72-71 216
Cindy Lacrosse, United States 73-70-73 216
Beth Allen, United States 71-72-76 219
Kate Burnett, United States 73-74-77 224
National Hockey League
All Times EST


Montreal
Boston
Tampa Bay
Detroit
Toronto
Ottawa
Florida
Buffalo

Pittsburgh
Washington
N.Y Rangers
Carolina
Philadelphia
New Jersey
Columbus
N.Y Islander


Chicago
St. Louis
Minnesota
Colorado
Dallas
Winnipeg
Nashville

San Jose
Anaheim
Los Angeles
Phoenix
Vancouver
Calgary
Edmonton


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic
GP W L OT Pts
30 18 9 3 39
28 18 8 2 38
28 17 10 1 35
29 14 8 7 35
29 15 11 3 33
29 11 14 4 26
29 8 16 5 21
29 6 21 2 14
Metropolitan
GP W L OT Pts
30 20 9 1 41
28 14 12 2 30
29 15 14 0 30
29 12 12 5 29
28 13 13 2 28
29 11 12 6 28
28 11 14 3 25
rs 29 8 16 5 21
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central
GP W L OT Pts
30 20 6 4 44 1
27 19 5 3 41
30 17 8 5 39
26 19 7 0 38
27 13 9 5 31
30 13 13 4 30
29 13 13 3 29
Pacific
GP W L OT Pts
28 19 4 5 43
30 18 7 5 41
29 18 7 4 40
28 16 8 4 36
30 15 10 5 35
27 10 13 4 24
30 10 18 2 22


NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Thursday's Games
N.Y Rangers 3, Buffalo 1
Toronto 3, Dallas 2, OT
Pittsburgh 5, San Jose 1
Montreal 2, Boston 1
Tampa Bay 3, Ottawa 1
Florida 5, Winnipeg 2
St. Louis 5, N.Y Islanders 1


struggled to get to the
basket in the first quar-
ter, despite enjoying a
decided height advan-
tage over the Hornets,
which had no player
taller than 6-foot-3. At
times, the Eagles had
three players on the
floor who were at least
6-foot-7.
In the second quar-
ter,however, Oldsmar
Christian began to take
command around the
basket and used a 17-0
scoring run in the first 5
minutes, 30 seconds of
the period to open up a
10-point lead.
The Eagles built onto
their lead in the sec-
ond half, leading even-
tually by as many as 24
points.
Isiah Manderson led
Oldsmar Christian (8-
1) with 15 points, fol-
lowed by Corin Mou-



an X-factor, the X-fac-
tor being Braxton Mill-
er, quarterback. That's
what makes it so diffi-
cult."
Meyer knows bet-
ter than anyone things
don't always go accord-
ing to the script. Twice
at Florida, he won na-
tional championships
with one-loss teams.
Twice, he's finished a
season 12-0, at Utah
in 2004 and last year
with the Buckeyes, and
didn't win a title.
Miller sprained his
left knee in Week 2 and
missed the next two
games. Watching Ken-
ny Guiton, Meyer said,
helped Miller figure out
what he had to do better
to prepare for games.


Carolina 5, Nashville 2
Minnesota 4, Chicago 3
Edmonton 8, Colorado 2
Friday's Games
Detroit at New Jersey, late
San Jose at Carolina, late
Minnesota at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Anaheim at Chicago, late
Colorado at Calgary, late
Phoenix at Vancouver, late
Today's Games
Philadelphia at Dallas, 2 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Boston, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Ottawa, 7p.m.
Rorida at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Washington, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at N.Y Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
Anaheim atSt. Louis, 8 p.m.
Calgary at Edmonton, 10 p.m.
N.Y Islanders at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
San Jose at Minnesota, 6 p.m.
Boston at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Washington at N.Y Rangers, 7 p.m.
Rorida at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Colorado at Vancouver, 8 p.m.
Friday's Sports Transactions
BASEBALL
American League
CHICAGO WHITE SOX -Assigned INFMike McDade
and OF Blake Tekotte outright to Charlotte (IL).
HOUSTON ASTROS Agreed to terms with RHP
Scott Feldman on a three-year contract.
NEW YORK YANKEES Agreed to terms with INF/
OF Kelly Johnson on a one-year contract.
National League
MIAMI MARLINS Agreed to terms with C Jarrod
Saltalamacchia on a three-year contract.
American Association
AMARILLO SOX Traded INF/C Trey Ford to San
Angelo to complete an earlier trade.
WICHITA WINGNUTS- Released RHP Chris M.
Smith and C Cole Armstrong.
Frontier League
RIVER CITY RASCALS Signed 2B Brian Aanderud
to a contract extension.
WINDY CITY THUNDERBOLTS Signed RHP Jessie
Snodgrass to a contract extension.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NBA Fined Denver G Nate Robinson $25,000 for
public criticism of officiating.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NFL- Fined Detroit LB DeAndre Levy and Atlanta
LB Sean Weatherspoon $15,750 for their actions
during last week's games.
HOUSTON TEXANS Fired coach Gary Kubiak and
special teams coordinator Joe Marciano. Named
defensive coordinator Wade Phillips interim coach.
Promoted special teams assistant Bob Ligashesky
to coordinator.
Canadian Football League
OTTAWA REDBLACKS Named Rick Campbell
coach.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS Traded F Kyle Beach to
the N.Y Rangers for F Brandon Mashinter, and as-
signed Mashinter to Rockford (AHL).
DALLAS STARS Placed D Trevor Daley on injured
reserve. Reassigned F Travis Morin to Texas (AHL).
NEW YORK RANGERS Recalled F J.T. Miller from
Hartford (AHL).
TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS Recalled D John-Mi-
chael Liles from Toronto (AHL).
American Hockey League
NORFOLK ADMIRALS Signed RW Chad Painchaud
to a professional tryout agreement.
PEORIA RIVERMEN Signed F Corey Tamblyn to a
three-game tryout contract.
ECHL
ECHL Suspended Colorado D Jason Beatty two
games and Idaho F Brett Robinson one game and
fined them undisclosed amounts.
READING ROYALS- Signed D Marvin Degon and
Rob Rorentino.
SAN FRANCISCO BULLS- Traded F Rob Linsmayer
to Idaho for future considerations.
COLLEGE
DUKE Announced men's basketball FAlex Mur-
phy has left the school.
NEW HAMPSHIRE Fired women's hockey coach
Brian McCloskey.
NJIT Announced it will not renew the contract of
women's volleyball coach J.R. Martins.
PENN STATE- Announced the resignation of wom-
en's tennis coach Dawna Denny-Wine.
TEMPLE -Announced it will eliminate baseball,
softball, men's crew, men's indoor and outdoor
track and field, women's rowing and men's gymnas-
tcs for the 2013-14 academic year.


zon with 11.
Jack Tisdale and
Derwin James paced
Haines City (3-2) with
eight points apiece.
In Friday's late game,
Montverde Academy
defeated St. Petersburg
Lakewood 91-73.
Second-day action
begins at 12:30 p.m. to-
day when Spruce Creek
plays Jacksonville Pot-
ter's House Christian.
Mount Dora Bible then
squares off against
Heritage at 2 p.m. and
Montverde Academy
hosts Deerfield Beach
at 7 p.m.
Games also will be
played at 3:30 p.m.,
5:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.
Tickets are $10 for all
six games.



Hyde, meanwhile,
was suspended for
Ohio State's first three
games after allegedly
confronting a woman
in a Columbus bar. Yet
the Buckeyes contin-
ued to win.
'Against Wisconsin,
I saw some toughness
in our defense that I
was concerned about,"
Meyer said Friday be-
fore the Buckeyes held
a walkthrough at Lu-
cas Oil Stadium in In-


dianapolis. "The of-
fensive line, last year I
was concerned about
our toughness as an of-
fense. This year, pret-
ty much week in, week
out, we've shown it. It's
going to be a physical,
hard, tough game."


TV2DAY
BOXING
8 p.m.
SHO Champion Sakio Bika (32-5-2) vs. Anthony Dirrell (26-0-0), forWBC super
middleweight title; Erislandy Lara (18-1-2) vs.AustinTrout (26-1-0),for vacant WBA
interim super welterweight title; champion Devon Alexander (25-1-0) vs. Shawn Porter
(22-0-1),for IBF welterweight title; welterweights,Zab Judah (42-8-0) vs. Paulie Malig-
naggi (32-5-0), at Brooklyn, N.Y
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Noon
ABC Oklahoma at Oklahoma St.
ESPN -UCFatSMU
ESPN2 -Conference USA, championship game, Marshal at Rice
3:30 p.m.
FOX -Texas at Baylor
4 p.m.
CBS Southeastern Conference, championship, Auburn vs. Missouri, atAtlanta
7:30 p.m.
ESPN South Florida at Rutgers
7:45 p.m.
ESPN2 Pac-12 Conference, championship game, Stanford at Arizona St.
8 p.m.
FOX Big Ten Conference, championship, Ohio St. vs. Michigan St., at Indianapolis
8:07 p.m.
ABC Atlantic Coast Conference, championship, Duke vs. Florida St., at Charlotte, N.C.
10 p.m.
CBS Mountain West Conference, championship, Utah St. at Fresno St.

GOLF
1 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour,World Challenge, third round, at Thousand Oaks, Calif.
3 p.m.
NBC PGA Tour, World Challenge,third round, atThousand Oaks, Calif.
Midnight
TGC European PGA Tour, Hong Kong Open, final round
4 a.m.
TGC Nedbank Challenge, final round, at Sun City, South Africa

MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
11 a.m.
FSN La Salle vs. Stony Brook, at New York
Noon


FS1 Colgate at Georgetown

FS1 UCLA at Missouri

FSN Fordham at St. John's

FS1 Bowling Green at Xavier

ESPN2 Kansas at Colorado

FS1 Fla. Gulf Coast at FlU

ESPN2 UNLV at Arizona


12:30 p.m.

1:30 p.m.

2 p.m.

3:15 p.m.

4 p.m.

5:15 p.m.

6 p.m.


FS1 North Dakota at Butler
MEN'S COLLEGE HOCKEY
6:30 p.m.
NBCSN UMass at Notre Dame
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
WGN Detroit at Chicago
SOCCER
7:40 a.m.
NBCSN Premier League, Newcsatle at Manchester United
9:55 a.m.
NBCSN Premier League, Manchester City at Southampton
12:25 p.m.
NBCSN Premier League, Tottenham at Sunderland
4 p.m.
ESPN MLS Cup, Real Salt Lake at Kansas City
WINTER SPORTS
2 p.m.
NBC USSA, Birds of Prey, atAvon, Colo. (same-day tape)


Leesburg rolls




over South Lake

Staff Report

Eletra Graham scored 32 points on Friday
night to lead the Yellow Jackets to an 83-46 vic-
tory over South Lake.
Adrienne Jackson chipped in with 15 points
and six rebounds for Leesburg.
For South Lake, Morgan Kearns finished with
16 points.
Leesburg will travel to Ocala on Tuesday
night to face Forest High School.


MAGIC
FROM PAGE B1


they host the Celtics
on Sunday afternoon.
Arron Afflalo scored
20 points for the Mag-
ic, who dropped their
fourth straight. Vic-
tor Oladipo added 17
points and nine re-
bounds.
Amare Stoudemire
sat out for the Knicks,
still not ready to play
on back-to-back nights
after offseason knee
surgery. No matter,
as Metta World Peace
picked up the extra
minutes and scored 12
points. Tim Hardaway


Jr. finished with 15.
The Knicks broke
it open by outscoring
the Magic 30-15 in the
third quarter to open
a 20-point lead. The
highlight came on a fe-
rocious drive and dunk
by Iman Shumpert.
Orlando fell to 1-8
on the road, running
out to a quick start
but then getting run
over from there.
The Magic hit six of
their first seven shots,
including all three
3-pointers, to storm
to a 15-5 lead. The
Knicks started 2 for
12 but eventually got
going and trailed just
31-28 after one.


CONTACTS

SPORTS EDITOR or 352-365-8279.
FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Amateur Listings (cl-
------------- Amateur Listings (col-
FAX 352-365-1951 lege scholarships, meeting

EMAIL announcements, schedule
sports@dailycommercial.com changes, outdoors notices) can

U Schools or coaches can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or
report game results after 6 emailed to sports@dailycom-
p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, mercial.com




Saturday, December 7, 2013


COLLEGE BASKETBALL


No. 6 Jayhawks continue


monthlong road trek


DAVE SKRETTA
AP SportsWriter
LAWRENCE, Kan. -
Kansas coach Bill Self
freely admits he is to
blame for the nearly
monthlong trek that
his young, impres-
sionable bunch of
Jayhawks is trying to
weather early in the
season.
After all, he is the
one who signed off on
the schedule.
It seemed like a
good idea back when
he was piecing it to-
gether. The Jayhawks
would start by hit-
ting the Bahamas
for a tournament
during the Thanks-
giving weekend, and
then play tough road
games against Colora-
do and Florida before
facing New Mexico in
Kansas City, Mo.
Now, after a slug-
gish three games at
the Battle 4 Atlantis,
the No. 6 Jayhawks are
trying to catch their
breath with a trip to
the high altitude of
Boulder, Colo., up
next.
"I don't know who
did our scheduling.
I don't really under-
stand," Self said fa-
cetiously. "It's prob-
ably not the wisest
thing to have done.
But you know what?
We'll come together.
The Atlantis trip didn't
serve its purpose for
coming together, so
hopefully we'll do a
much better job in
Boulder."


TIM AYLEN / AP
Kansas' Perry Ellis, left, attempts a shot for the basket as
he's blocked by UTEP's John Bohannon on Nov. 30 during
the second half in Paradise Island, Bahamas.


Saturday's match-
up isn't going to be
easy for the Jayhawks,
either, like so many
were when the Buffa-
loes were still mem-
bers of the Big 12. Col-
orado is off to an 8-1
start on the season.
"We're familiar with
them, and I'm sure
they are with us," said
Self, whose team rout-
ed Colorado at Allen
Fieldhouse last year.
"But they've got a nice
team. They've won
eight in a row. They
should be confident.
They've won away
from home, and it'll
be a tough game, very
tough. But fun."
After that comes a
date with the No. 15


Gators (6-1) as part of
the Big 12-SEC Chal-
lenge, and then the
Jayhawks' now-annu-
al game at the Sprint
Center against the Lo-
bos (6-1)
Throw the cur-
rent road trip on top
of beating then-No.
4 Duke in Chicago in
their second game of
the season, and it's
hard to imagine the
Jayhawks (6-1) having
a more difficult open-
ing schedule. The lost
in the Bahamas to Vil-
lanova.
"You know, this is
one thing about my
guys that I need to be
careful of," Self said.
"Guys, it's a mara-
thon, and you're going


NBA


Taylor fills in with 20



as Bobcats beat Sixers


Associated Press
CHARLOTTE, N.C.-
Jeffery Taylor matched
a career high with 20
points, leading six
Charlotte scorers in
double figures, and the
Bobcats beat the Phil-
adelphia 76ers 105-88
on Friday night.
Subbing for injured
starter Michael Kidd-
Gilchrist at small for-
ward, Taylor scored
nine of Charlotte's
first 22 points. Ger-
ald Henderson and
Kemba Walker added
18 apiece, and Walker
also dished out a sea-
son-high 10 assists.
Al Jefferson had 14
points and 12 rebounds
for the Bobcats. Ra-
mon Sessions added 13
points and rookie Cody
Zeller chipped in with
10.
HAWKS 108, CAVS 89
ATLANTA Kyle
Korver set the NBA re-
cord for consecutive
games with a 3-point-
er, Al Horford scored
22 points and the
Atlanta Hawks beat the
Cleveland Cavaliers
108-89 Friday night.
Korver's 3 with 5:29
remaining in the first
quarter gave him
at least one in a re-
cord-90th straight
game, breaking a tie
with Dana Barros
(1994-96). Korver was 2
for 3 from beyond the
arc and finished with
10 points.
Paul Millsap had
16 points and 14 re-


CHUCK BURTON / AP
Charlotte Bobcats' Ramon Sessions (7) drives past
Philadelphia 76ers' Spencer Hawes on Friday during the
first half of an NBA basketball game in Charlotte, N.C.


bounds for the Hawks.
DionWaiters
scored a season-high
30 points for the
Cavaliers. Andrew
Bynum tied his sea-
son high with 20 points
and grabbed a sea-
son-best 13 rebounds,
and Jarrett Jack added
13 points.
The rest of the Cavs,
however, combined
to shoot 12 for 50 and
starters Kyrie Irving
and Alonzo Gee went
scoreless.
CELTICS 106, NUG-
GETS 98
BOSTON Kris
Humphries came off
the bench to score a


season-high 18 points,
adding seven rebounds
for the Celtics on
Friday night as Boston
scored the first 14
points of the game and
held on for a 106-98
victory over the Denver
Nuggets.
Jordan Crawford had
22 points and eight as-
sists, and Avery Bradley
scored 18 for Boston,
which won its second
straight game to re-
main in first place in
the Atlantic Division
despite a 9-12 record
that would rank no
better than fifth in any
division in the Western
Conference.


SKIING


JONATHAN BANKS/THE CANADIAN PRESS
LindseyVonn competes on Friday during the women's
downhill race at Lake Louise, Alberta.


Lindsey Vonn


races 10 months


after tearing knee
HOWARD FENDRICH first race, right out of
AP Sports Writer the blocks win, and
LAKE LOUISE, Al- it was wishful think-
berta Thrilled as she ing. But might as well
was to be shoot for the best, you
was to be racing again, know?"Vonn said.
Lindsey Vonn began "I was just too ner-
Friday hoping for a vic- vous. I wasj really tight,
tory, no matter how and I skied that way.
unrealistic that might I skied tight," she ex-
have been 10 months plained. "I wasn't in
after major knee sur- a ral de tu I
geryandles thn treea really deep tuck. I
gery and less than three wasn't pushing the line
weeks after partially where I could have.
re-tearing a ligament. And I just kind of skied
As it turned out, she it, and that's not my
felt some jitters in her style. That's not how I
first competition since attack a race."
a February fall and Still, the reigning
skied conservatively by Olympic downhill gold
her standards, finishing medalist took an im-
40th of 60 starters in a portant step in prepa-
World Cup downhill. ration for the Sochi
"I'm always a positive Games by racing for
thinker. I try to look on the first time since her
the bright side of every- high-speed crash at the
thing, and I was really world championships
optimistic that I could tore two ligaments in
come down and just her right knee.


NASCAR


Pairing of Johnson, Knaus gives



NASCAR a magical combination


JENNA FRYER
AP Auto RacingWriter
LAS VEGAS Rick
Hendrick remembers
the stress-filled days
in 2001 when he was
trying to launch a new
team with an unprov-
en driver.
He had an interested
sponsor in Lowe's, but
wasn't sure he could
sell the company built
around a 25-year-old
nobody who had four
top-five finishes in an
underwhelming Na-
tionwide Series career.
So Hendrick called
in Jeff Gordon for help
in sealing the deal on
Jimmie Johnson, the
driver Gordon had no-
ticed on the track and
brought to the team
owner's attention.
"I was scared to
death when I went to
talk to Lowe's the first
time about Jimmie -
could he win?" Hen-
drick recalled. "We
had to get Jeff to go
make appearances for
Lowe's in the begin-
ning. We were doing
everything we had to
do in the beginning to
make that deal work."
Lowe's signed off on
Johnson, and Hen-
drick pulled former
Hendrick Motorsports
mechanic Chad Knaus
back into the orga-
nization for the crew


ISAAC BREKKEN / AP
Jimmie Johnson waves to the crowd as he is introduced before leading a victory lap on
the Las Vegas Strip during NASCAR Champions Week on Thursday in Las Vegas.


chief job on the brand
new No. 48 Chevrolet.
Twelve seasons later,
the duo was looking
forward to collecting
the hardware for their
sixth championship in
Friday night's awards
ceremony atWynn Las
Vegas.
"I don't take any
credit for it," Hendrick
said. "Sometimes it
just happens. We were
able to put something
together that turned
out to be lightning in a
bottle."
Johnson has won 66
races since Hendrick
paired him with Knaus
for the start of the 2002
season. They reeled off
an unprecedented five
consecutive Cup ti-
tles from 2006 through
2010, and after a two-


year hiatus they cap-
tured No. 6 to put
Johnson behind only
Richard Petty and the
late Dale Earnhardt's
record seven titles.
"I know the pairing
of us, there's some-
thing magical there
and it works," Johnson
said. "I say this con-
fidently: I would not
have the success I've
had in this sport if it
wasn't for Chad and
our relationship to-
gether."
Knaus trails only
Hall of Fame crew
chief Dale Inman,
who won eight cham-
pionships seven
with Petty and one
with Terry Labonte.
He steadfastly refus-
es to compare him-
self to Inman, or con-


sider where he might
rank among NASCAR's
greatest crew chiefs.
"I'm not even close
to what he's done, so
there's no reason to
even talk about that,"
Knaus said. "I think
Dale, until we get sev-
en (championships),
then maybe we can
start to develop that
parallel or draw those
comparisons. But
right now? No. Dale's
the man. He's done
some pretty impres-
sive stuff."
So have Johnson
and Knaus. The duo
has defied the odds
in becoming the pres-
ent-day version of Pet-
ty and Inman, who
were cousins and
worked on cars to-
gether as young boys.


DAILY COMMERCIAL






COLLEGE FOOTBALL


SUE OGROCKI / AP
Oklahoma State running back Jeremy Smith (31) carries
against Baylor in the fourth quarter in Stillwater, Okla.
Oklahoma State won 49-17.


Big 12 title


on the line for


Cowboys, Sooners


JOHN TRANC
Associated Pr


HINA
press


With both squads
coming off bye weeks,
each should bewell-rest-
ed and ready to go.
"We understand that
it's a big challenge," OU
coach Bob Stoops said.
"I feel like that week off
should have hopefully
helped us just with some
of those nagging injuries
and hopefully that will
make us a little stronger
coming into this game."
With the temperature
expected to be around
lJew is both 20 degrees
ave to deal Fahr-
enheit
It's not like and with
for one and winds of
their Stoops 10 mph,
think the wind the con-


Oklahoma State's loss
to West Virginia just ap-
pears more inexplica-
ble in retrospect. And it
was bad enough at the
time that the Cowboys'
Big 12 title hopes ap-
peared over.
But the No. 6 Cow-
boys (10-1, 7-1 Big 12)
responded by winning
seven straight, includ-
ing a dominant 49-17
blowout over
then-No. 3 "Our v
Baylor Nov. teams h
23, and now with it.
have just one
more obsta- it's bad
cle to over- not the 0o
come before said. "I tl
claiming a
their second affects
conference much mc
title in three the co
years. Bob
Only their Oklah
cross-state
rivals, No.
18 Oklahoma (9-2, 6-2),
can spoil the story-
book ending for Okla-
homa State, which has
lost nine of the schools'
past 10 meetings.
A win Saturday would
land Oklahoma State a
major BCS bowl game
and help solidify its
newly earned status as
a national power, and
demonstrate how it has
closed the gap on its
more celebrated foes.
Even if its only blemish
is from a team that fin-
ished 2-7 in the confer-
ence.


I


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Sthe game
ore than just
ild does."
SStoops,
oma coach


U11Uo11s
won't be
pleasant,
although
the Cow-
boys de-
feated
Baylor in


similar weather. "Our
view is both teams have
to deal with it. It's not
like it's bad for one and
not the other," Stoops
said. "I think the wind
affects the game much
more than just the cold
does."
Since replacing Blake
Bell at QB early in the
second quarter on
Nov. 16 against Iowa
State, freshman Trev-
or Knight has sparked
the Sooners' offense.
He rushed for 123 yards
and a touchdown on 10
carries.


Auburn, Mizzou guarding


against letdowns in title game


PAUL NEWBERRY
AP Sports Writer
ATLANTA Auburn
and Missouri are com-
peting for the South-
eastern Conference
title Saturday, and pos-
sibly a chance to play
for the national cham-
pionship.
Yet both teams have
to guard against a let-
down.
As ludicrous as that
might sound, Auburn
and Missouri are com-
ing off emotionally
charged victories last
week that gave each
coach a reason to fret
just a bit.
No. 3 Auburn (11-1,
7-1 SEC) used one of
the greatest finishing
plays in college foot-
ball history a 109-
yard return of a missed
field goal with no time
on the clock to beat
two-time defending
national champion
Alabama in the Iron
Bowl for the West Di-
vision title. No. 5 Mis-
souri (11-1, 7-1) won
the East with a thrill-
ing victory of its own,
knocking off Heisman
Trophy winner John-
ny Manziel and Texas
A&M 28-21.
"The challenge of
any coach, the leader-
ship of the team, the
coaching staff, every-
body, is can you stay
focused to do what
you do day-to-day to
play your best?" Mis-
souri coach Gary Pin-
kel said Friday at the
Georgia Dome, where


DAVID GOLDMAN / AP
Auburn head coach Gus Malzahn, left, shakes hands with Missouri head coach
Gary Pinkel on Friday during a photo op at a press conference ahead of Saturday's
Southeastern Conference championship football game in Atlanta.


each team held its fi-
nal workout. "I would
like to think we're do-
ing all the right things.
We've done it all year
long."
Auburn must get
past one of the most
improbable victories
ever, beating its big-
gest rival in a game
that likely eliminated
the Crimson Tide from
its quest for an unprec-
edented third straight
national title. Auburn
coach Gus Malzahn
watched the frenzied
crowd storm the field
at Jordan-Hare Sta-
dium, then urged his
team to get right back
to work.
"The challenge with
emotional wins like
that is you've got to put
it behind you," he said.
"Our guys showed up


for their Sunday prac-
tice, went about their
business like normal.
I thought that was a
very good sign. We
had a very good week
of practice. Our guys
understand. You can
turn the film on from
Missouri. We've got to
play our best game,
play better than we
did last week, to win
the game."
The winner could get
a shot to play for the
SEC's eighth straight
national title, but that
will depend on what
happens in Charlotte
and Indianapolis.
Top-ranked Florida
State (12-0) is a huge
favorite against Duke
in the Atlantic Coast
Conference champi-
onship game, while
second-ranked Ohio


State (12-0) figures to
face a much tough-
er challenge against
Michigan State in the
Big Ten title game. If
both win, that will like-
ly set the matchup for
the BCS champion-
ship. If either falters,
the Auburn-Missou-
ri winner can expect to
land a trip to Pasadena.
Malzahn's team
has one of the na-
tion's most prolific
running games, cen-
tered on quarterback
Nick Marshall and ju-
nior back Tre Mason.
Auburn's hurry-up
spread formation in-
corporates elements
of old-school offenses
such as the wishbone,
but can strike sudden-
ly with its lesser-used
passing attack. Just ask
Alabama.


Petersen leaving Boise for Washington


TIM BOOTH
AP Sports Writer
SEATTLE Chris
Petersen has final-
ly been persuaded to
leave Boise State.
Petersen has agreed
to leave Boise State
and become the foot-
ball coach at Wash-
ington, a person with
knowledge of the de-
cision told The Asso-
ciated Press on Friday
morning. The person
told spoke on the con-
dition of anonymity
because the hiring had
not been announced
by Washington. Pe-
tersen reportedly met
with Washington ath-
letic director Scott
Woodward on Thurs-


AP FILE PHOTO
In this Nov. 23, 2013 file photo, Boise State coach Chris
Peterson talks to his team during a timeout against San
Diego State in the first half of an NCAA college football
game in San Diego.


day night in Boise.
The decision was
first reported by ESPN.
Petersen will replace
Steve Sarkisian, who
went 34-29 in five sea-
sons at Washington
before leaving earlier
this week to take the
job at USC. Petersen
was 92-12 in his eight
seasons at Boise State,
turning the Broncos
into a national pro-
gram with two Fies-
ta Bowl titles. But he's
coming off his worst
regular season in his
tenure with the Bron-


cos after going 8-4 in-
cluding a 38-6 loss
at Washington in the
season opener.
The fact Washington
was able to pry Peters-
en out of Boise is sur-
prising after so many
other schools called in
the past and were re-
buffed by the Broncos
coach. He took over for
Dan Hawkins in 2006
and turned Boise State
into the darlings of the
BCS. Whether it was
the audacious trick
plays that led to Boise
State's first BCS upset


K4" ,t 'FR ESO0R T & C [ U B
.123113F HOWEY-IN-THE-HILLS



GratSaigson 1 HleGren ee& ,hre Cr


of Oklahoma in the Fi-
esta Bowl, or the stag-
gering run of victories
with Kellen Moore at
quarterback, Petersen
was the one directing
the Broncos rise.
The Broncos won
five conference cham-
pionships under Pe-
tersen and between
2008-11 won 12 games
in every season. The
Broncos reached as
high as No. 2 in The
AP Top 25 in 2010 and
might have found
themselves playing
in another BCS game
if not for an overtime
loss at Nevada in the
next-to-last game of
the regular season.
But the Broncos
seemed to plateau this
past season. The year
started with the blow-
out loss at Washing-
ton, the worst defeat
of Petersen's career.
Boise State lost three
more times on the
road at Fresno State,
at BYU and at San Di-
ego State, and a loss
in a bowl game would
leave the Broncos with
five defeats for the first
time since 1998 when
they were in their third
season at the Football
Bowl Subdivision level.
The struggles this
season left some won-
dering if Petersen
had already done all
he could do at Boise
State.
Petersen will inherit
a program at Washing-
ton coming off its first
eight-win season since
2001. The Huskies had
been stuck on sev-
en wins the past three
seasons.


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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, December 7, 2013


'T,





DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, December 7, 2013


NFL FOOTBALL


Texans fire Kubiak


DARRELL LOVELL
Associated Press
HOUSTON Gary
Kubiak pulled the Tex-
ans out of the NFL
basement and re-
mains the only coach
to take them to the
playoffs.
That wasn't enough
to save his job, not
with the Texans mired
in an 11-game skid
that has dropped
them back to the bot-
tom of the league.
Houston fired Kubiak
on Friday, one day af-
ter the Texans lost 27-
20 at Jacksonville and
continued their stun-
ning fall for a team that
expected to make a Su-
per Bowl run. Hous-
ton (2-11) was flagged
14 times for a fran-
chise-record 177 yards.
The 52-year-old
Kubiak was hired in
2006 and led the team
to AFC South titles in
2011-2012, the high-
lights of his eight-year
tenure as coach of his
hometown NFL team.
The Texans said
they couldn't wait any
longer to start turn-
ing things around, not
with the losses and
undisciplined play
piling up.
"What's taken place
with this organiza-
tion is unacceptable,"
general manager Rick
Smith said. "We've
got three weeks of an
evaluation process
left and we've got to
right the ship."


PHELAN EBANHANK/AP
In this Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 photo, Houston Texans
head coach Gary Kubiak adjusts his headset as he
watches his team against the Jacksonville Jaguars during
an NFL football game in Jacksonville.


Kubiak thanked the
team for giving him
his first head coach-
ing job in the NFL.
"Though we came
up short this season,
the work, effort and
sacrifice they gave me
and this organization
over the last eight sea-
sons is not to be taken
for granted," he said in
a statement provided
by the Texans. "We had
a great run here and
we will never forget
our back-to-back AFC
South championships.
Coming back home
was a dream come true
for all of us. This will al-
ways be our home."
Kubiak's overall re-
cord is 61-64, with a 2-2
mark in the playoffs.
Owner Bob McNair
said the decision to let
him go was a hard one.
"It was difficult for
me because I think
so much of Gary,"


McNair said. "We've
been evaluating it ev-
ery game and asking
the question, 'What's
in the best interest
of the organization?'
We're at the point now
where we need to go
ahead and make some
changes because los-
ing like this is unac-
ceptable."
He added: "We're
here to have a win-
ning culture and this
year has not contrib-
uted to that."
The Texans said de-
fensive coordinator
Wade Phillips would
serve as interim coach
for the rest of what has
been a miserable sea-
son. McNair said NFL
and head coaching
experience were im-
portant factors in fill-
ing the job, and that
the 66-year-old Phil-
lips will be consid-
ered.


LS TV


Bradley to caution


Jags on brash remarks


MARK LONG
AP Sports Writer
JACKSONVILLE
- Jacksonville Jag-
uars coach Gus Brad-
ley let his players jump
around on the field,
dance in the lock-
er room and hoot
and holler as much as
they wanted Thursday
night.
He also rewarded
them with three days
off.
When they return
Monday, Bradley plans
to ground them a little
bit.
"If we're going to
boast, we boast our
weaknesses to each
other," Bradley said Fri-
day, a day after Jack-
sonville's 27-20 win
over the Houston Tex-
ans.
Bradley doesn't want
the hottest team in
the AFC blowing any
smoke. The Jaguars (4-
9) have won three in
a row and four of five
games since the bye,
a modest turnaround
that Bradley and play-
ers are enjoying. But
the rookie head coach
is trying to keep his
players humble and
hungry, sticking with
his motto of "eating
crumbs" after wins.
"I don't want us feel-
ing like we did some
good things, we accom-
plished some things,"
Bradley said. "We're
getting better and we
still have a lot of work
to do."
Following the prime-


JOHN RAOUX / AP
Jacksonville Jaguars outside linebacker Geno Hayes, right,
celebrates an intercepted pass with teammate J.T. Thomas
during the final moments of an NFL football game against
the Houston Texans on Thursday in Jacksonville.


time victory, sever-
al Jacksonville players
used the spotlight to
respond to critics who
called the team the
worst in NFL history.
"Everybody who was
talking noise can just
eat some crow," guard
Uche Nwaneri said.
Running back Mau-
rice Jones-Drew called
out a specific sports
talk show for appar-
ently ripping the Tex-
ans-Jaguars game long
before kickoff.
"It's like, 'Listen, we
are all adults and we all
get paid to do a job and
sometimes you don't
do your job to the best


of your ability,'" Jones-
Drew said. "But you
shouldn't be cracking
jokes about guys that
are busting their butts
every day and no one is
quitting on our team.
"They still talk trash
about us. We are go-
ing to keep getting bet-
ter and we are going to
keep making plays. We
are going to keep doing
our thing and be happy
for everyone around us
that is making plays."
Bradley let his play-
ers vent, knowing they
were frustrated by los-
ing the first eight games
by double digits.


Vikings: Ponder out against Ravens


LAKE SUMTER TELEVISION




,, In our December episode we'll
Nfsto bring you stories on the new
nH or "Cancer Care Coordinator at
Florida Hospital Waterman,
Talk about Holiday Heels, and
Good Things for Those Who Wait take a look back at 2013



Tune in for features on
PSL Construction Company,
Total Nutrition & Therapeutics.
the Leesburg Herb Shoppe and ROF] L E
much more in December's Episode

2013 State of the County:

LSTV presents Commissioner
Leslie Campione's presentation
addressing Lake County's

LAKE COUNTY achievements for the year and
F [OR!I DA some of what's in store for 2014



Keep up-to-date and informed
about the news and headlines IDaihj C6"nmwrcral
shaping our community as ,,,i ,,,,I ,"I ,,,,h' ,, miiri& I',n-
LSTV and the Daily Commercial "Newslinmr0"
you "News in 90"
bring you "News in 90"




For production inquiries or
programming comments contact us at
LakeSumterTV@gmail. corn

O YouteTVco


DAVE CAMPBELL
AP Pro Football Writer
EDEN PRAIRIE, Minn. -The Minne-
sota Vikings have ruled Christian Pon-
der out for Sunday's game at Baltimore,
because the quarterback has not yet
passed all of his post-concussion tests.
Coach Leslie Frazier said Friday
that Ponder will not suit up against
the Ravens, with Matt Cassel start-
ing and Josh Freeman backing him
up per the plan set at the beginning
of the week.
This is Ponder's third significant
injury of the season. He had a bro-
ken rib that paved the way for Cas-
sel to start against Pittsburgh on


Sept. 29, and dislocat-
ed his shoulder at the
iend of the third quar-
ter against Washington
on Nov. 7. Ponder took
ilk a hit to the head late in
PONDER the second quarter last
week against Chicago.
Running back Adrian Peterson re-
turned to practice Friday after taking
the last two days off to rest his sore
groin, following the pattern that has
developed in the second half of the
season to keep him fresh.
"No real need to burst or go 100
miles per hour today, but just some-
thing to make him feel comfortable
about Sunday," Frazier said.


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Saturday, December 7, 2013




Saturday, December 7,2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL B7


.*feleTel


I* l[


MUSIC MINISTER
Grand Island Baptist
Church, Southern Baptist
Church, (avg. attendance
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seeking PT music leader
for this growing ministry.
For details see website
grandislandbaptist.com
Resumes accepted until
Jan. 31st.


DRIVER TRAINEES MA, LPN & FRONT DESK MECHANIC
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Teams $100 -125k! Urgent Care. appearance & well A-1 Automotive
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"COME TRUCK WITH US"
Hiring OTR Drivers current
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Reefer experience a plus
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great pay and bonuses.
Apply at
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Call at 1-800-328-2499
Ext. 106


SCHOOL BUS COMPANIONS COME JOIN MEDICAL POOL DENTAL
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DRIVER HS Diploma/GED required. IF $150-$200 WOULD HELP YOU REEPTONST SERV CE ASSISTANT
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different locations in our delivery FT busy office. Must be NIGAHT SA
Training provided, mentally disabled, area. 20-25 hrs/wk. Hours + high energy, love people, NI H ony
Lake County Schools, Wknd/eve/holidays a commission. Good forcollege and have experience. No exp. required. Experienced only.
Transportation must. Must pass students & retirees. Wil train $ /r
background check. the right person. Must be clean Hourly wage plus bonus Apply in Personr
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^^ ^^ ^E ^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^^ ^- I^^ ^^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^


BARTENDER &
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MUST be exp'd.
Evenings &Wknds.
Apply in person 3-5pm
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APPRENTICE ELECTRICIAN
Seeking dependable organized detail
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repairing and diagnosing electrical
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Apply with resume to
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RM-heial r~iurfn|g Cifle-r


AUTOMOTIVE
DETAILERS
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al


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LSEIN EwC A* unenthusiasticc, and exhibit a high
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L&IIUI lY Asendp r resume by mail F/T position with benefits & Help Local Non-Profits; to include medicaldental, life,
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Mt. Dora 352-978-0752 352-343-3449 813-992-7788 EOE


iNIls


Busy medical office
has the following
openings available FT:
*CT Technologist Must be
FL registered & have at
least 1 yr. exp.
*Paramedic -ACLS Certified
& able to work shifts
*Basic X-Ray
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Must have experience
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*Medical Asst. Phlebotomy
experience helpful.
Benefits are available.
Fax resume 352-323-9507


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}




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Faith


Life


352-365-8208 I features@dailycommercial.com


Cl
DAILY COMMERCIAL
Saturday, December 7, 2013


www.dailycommercial.com


Disgraced priest to wed



pope adviser's daughter


NICOLEWINFIELD
Associated Press
VATICAN CITY Thomas
Williams, the onetime pub-
lic face of the disgraced Le-
gion of Christ religious order who
left the priesthood after admitting
he fathered a child, is getting mar-
ried this weekend to the child's
mother, The Associated Press has
learned. The bride is the daughter
of former U.S. Ambassador to the
Holy See Mary Ann Glendon, one
of Pope Francis' top advisers.
Glendon, a Harvard Universi-
ty law professor, is one of the high-
est-ranking women at the Vati-
can as president of the Pontifical
Academy for Social Sciences. She
is also one of five people on Fran-
cis' commission to reform the
scandal-marred Vatican bank. Her
daughter, Elizabeth Lev, is a Rome-
based art historian and colum-
nist for the Legion-run Zenit news
agency, which Williams published
for over a decade while he was in
the order.
Williams, a moral theologian,
author, lecturer and U.S. televi-
sion personality, admitted last year
that he had fathered a child several
years earlier.
At the time, Williams apolo-
gized for "this grave transgression"
against his vows of celibacy and
said he had stayed on as a priest
because he hoped to move beyond
"this sin in my past" to do good
work for the church. The Legion's
retired superior later admitted he
had learned about the child in 2005
but allowed Williams to keep teach-
ing and preaching about morality.
After taking a year off for reflec-
tion, Williams left the priesthood
in May to care for his son. Accord-
ing to their wedding registry, he
and Lev are due to marry on Satur-
day in the United States.
Asked for comment Thursday,
Lev confirmed the wedding plans
in an email, adding: "We have no
intention of ever discussing our
personal life in this forum."
She had initially denied an inti-
mate relationship with Williams,
though they frequently appeared
together in American circles in


GIULIO RIOT-A/AP
In this 2011 file photo, Father Thomas Williams gestures during a meeting in Rome.


Rome, particularly with visiting
U.S. student and Catholic tour
groups.
Their wedding closes a circle of
sorts, even as it raises some uncom-
fortable questions: Who beyond Wil-
liams' superior in the church knew
about the child while the couple
tried to cover it up? Was Williams
already in a relationship with Lev
when she became a regular contrib-
utor to the magazine he published?
And did the family ties to Williams
influence Glendon in her defense of
the Legion and its disgraced found-
er despite credible reports that the
founder was a pedophile?
The questions swirled Thursday
as the Legion dropped a bomb-


shell of its own, admitting that a
superior who was in charge of the
bulk of its American priests-in-
training for over a decade sexual-
ly abused a minor at the Legion's
novitiate in Cheshire, Connecticut.
The Legion said a second accus-
er had also come forward with an
allegation against the Rev. William
Izquierdo, who was novice director
at the Cheshire school from 1982-
1994 and in Ireland before then. Iz-
quierdo, now 85, has dementia.
The saga of the Legion of Christ
represents one of the most egre-
gious examples of how the Vat-
ican ignored decades of reports
SEE PRIEST I C3


RICK REED
Special to the Daily Commercial
It began last year as
a way for First Baptist
Church of Wildwood to
reach out to the commu-
nity during the Christmas
season, but A Gift to Wild-
wood is back for an en-
core presentation.
The free event held on
two nights includes a
meal, entertainment and
a $100 gift card giveaway.
"Last year was our first


A Gift to Wildwood," said
Pastor Marc Fennimore,
the minister of music and
education. "It was very
successful. This year we
added a number to it, A
Gift to Wildwood 2013."
The event was held
last year at the Wild-
wood Community Build-
ing. This year the event
takes place at the fellow-
ship hall of First Baptist
of Wildwood at 7p.m. on
Dec. 13 and at 5:30 p.m.
on Dec. 14.


The church is easy to
find behind Wildwood
City Hall.
Due to limited seat-
ing are required and can
be picked up before the
event at the church office.
Giving to the commu-
nity during the holiday
season is nothing new for
First Baptist of Wildwood.
In the past the church of-
fered a free Christmas
concert or drama.
"Last year we wanted to
do something a little dif-


ferent," said Fennimore.
"We wanted to reach the
community at large; peo-
ple who wouldn't want to
come into a church build-
ing. That's why we did it at
the community building."
The community build-
ing was already booked
so church officials de-
cided to use their fellow-
ship hall, which will make
things easier logistical-
ly since that's where the
SEEGIFT I C2


CHURCH CALENDAR
TODAY
CENTRAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH HOSTS
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT BREAKFAST: From
7:30 to 10 a.m., at the church, 3720
N. State Road 19A in Eustis. Tickets
are $4. Call Bob McCracken at 352-
383-2636 for details.
CHRISTMAS CONCERTS AT FIRST
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH: At 7 p.m.,
today, and at 4 p.m., Sunday, at the
church, 117 S. Center St., Eustis. Fea-
turing Chancel Choir, Gold Hand-
bell Choir, soloists and orchestra.
Refreshments will be served. Call
352-357-2833 for details.
CRAFT SHOW AND SALE AT CORPUS
CHRISTI EPISCOPAL CHURCH: From
9 a.m. to 3 p.m., 3430 County Road 470,
Okahumpka. Items include Bridge tal-
lies, handcrafted items, artwork, a raf-
fle and lunch for a small fee.
SUNDAY
CENTRAL FLORIDA CHAPTER OF
COMPASSIONATE FRIENDS CANDLE-
LIGHT SERVICE: At 7 p.m., St. Mark the
Evangelist Catholic Church, 7081 S.E.
County Road 42 in Summerfield. For
details, call Cheryl Dungan at 352-
347-1942.
ANNUAL CHRISTMAS MUSIC PRO-
GRAM AT FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH: At 8:30 and 11 a.m., during
morning worship services at the
church in Tavares, with the 50-voice
choir and chamber orchestra pre-
senting "God Has Always Been" in-
corporating music from the 13th
Century to present day celebrating
the birth of Christ. For information,
call 352-978-3171.
THE 'NIGHT BEFORE CHRISTMAS'
AT FAIRWAY CHRISTIAN CHURCH: At
6 p.m., with choir, musicians and dra-
matists at the church, 251 Avenida
Los Angelos, The Villages. Free ad-
mission and open to the public. Call
352-259-9305.
'SING NOEL' AT LEESBURG STAKE
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LAT-
TER DAY SAINTS: At 7 p.m., 2615Way-
cross Avenue in Eustis. At 8 p.m., a
live television presentation from Salt
Lake City, Utah will be shown. Free
event, public welcome. For informa-
tion, call 352-633-0324.
'ETERNAL THREADS' GATHERING
SALE: From 2 to 4 p.m., at South
14th Street Church of Christ, 1506
S. 14th St., Leesburg. All items are
handmade and come from many
countries, including India, Mada-
gascar and Nepal. Eternal Threads
is dedicated to improving the lives of
women and children most at risk of
poverty and trafficking. Go to www.
EternalThreads.org for information.
TUESDAY
THE VILLAGES CHORALETTES PER-
FORM 'A RECIPE FOR CHRISTMAS': At
6 p.m., New Covenant United Meth-
odist Church,Woodridge Drive in Ox-
ford. Help local charities and enjoy
festive songs. Monetary donations ac-
cepted for local food banks. Call Anita
Misso at 352-753-1609 for details.
TRIANGLE NEWCOMERS CLUB
CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION: At 11:30
a.m., with buffet luncheon at Lake
Receptions in Mount Dora. Reser-
vations can be made by calling 352-
365-6154.


To place a religion event on the cal-
endar, send an email to pam.fenn-
imore@dailycommercial.com.


Our faith wavers when we forget Jesus is with us


et's spend one more week
on the shield of faith as
we observe Paul's advice
on dressing for success spir-
itually by putting on the full
armor of God.
We began with the belt of
truth, on which everything
hangs. Next, he told them
to put on the breastplate
of righteousness followed
by the feet and sharing the
gospel of peace. Two weeks
ago we looked at the shield,
probably the most import-
ant piece of armor for a Ro-
man soldier. Paul advised the


Rick
~Reed
'" REFLECTIONS

Ephesians, "In all circum-
stances take up the shield of
faith, with which you can ex-
tinguish all the flaming darts
of the evil one."
Jesus asked in Luke 18:8:
"When the Son of Man comes,
will he find faith on earth?"


Five times in Matthew Je-
sus rebuked His disciples
saying, "0 you of little faith."
The first time was during
the Sermon on the Mount
when He told them not to
be anxious, or worry, about
their lives, what they would
eat or drink or wear.
The second time was
during a boat trip when a
great storm arose, threat-
ening to capsize their boat
while Jesus slept. He asked
why they were afraid. These
were seasoned fishermen
for the most part and had


likely been in heavy seas
several times. But this time
was different, Jesus was with
them. Why were they afraid?
The answer of course was
their little faith, but why was
it little?
The third time was when
Peter attempted to walk
on water to Jesus. He sank
when he gazed at the wind
whipping up the water and
took his eyes off Jesus. Once
again it was fear. And more
specifically, when he took
his eyes off Jesus.
The fourth time came af-


ter Jesus warned them,
"Watch and beware of the
leaven of the Pharisees and
Sadducees."
The Apostles didn't un-
derstand and discussed
it, saying they didn't bring
any bread with them. Je-
sus knew what they were
talking about and asked
about their little faith and
why they failed to perceive
He was talking about spiri-
tual things. Still He remind-
ed them how they feed both
SEE REED I C2


WILDWOOD


A Gift to Wildwood returns to First Baptist




DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, December 7, 2013


REED
FROM PAGE C1

5,000 and 4,000 people,
with plenty of bread
left over, though they
started with less than a
basketful.
The final recorded
time came after Jesus
took Peter, James and
John up a high moun-
tain to witness "The
Transfiguration."
Imagine the spiritu-
al high that must have
been. But then they
came down to find the
disciples arguing with
some in the crowd be-
cause they'd been un-
able to chase an evil
spirit out of a little boy,
according to Mark's
Gospel.
Jesus called them a


faithless generation,
which is worse than
having at least a little
faith.
The boy's father
asked Jesus, "But if You
can do anything, have
compassion on us and
help us."
Jesus answered him,
"If you can! All things
are possible for one
who believes." Then the
father cried out, "I be-
lieve; help my unbe-
liefi"
Later the disciples
privately asked Jesus
why they couldn't heal
the boy and Jesus said,
"Because of your little
faith. For truly, I say to
you, if you have faith
like a grain of mustard
seed, you will say to
this mountain, 'Move
from here to there,'


and it will move, and
nothing will be impos-
sible for you."
Mark tells us Jesus
told them that type of
spirit came out only by
prayer, though some
manuscripts also add,
"and fasting."
The boy's father must
have understood the
prayer part because he
asked Jesus to help his
unbelief.
Why do we have lit-
tle faith, or maybe no
faith?
We worry about the
things of this world,
our jobs, our homes,
obtaining food and
clothing and oth-
er necessities. The
birds don't worry and
God feeds them. Je-
sus reminded us we are
worth more.


Our faith wavers
when we forget Jesus is
with us as He promised
He always would be
and when we take our
eyes off Him.
It also wavers when
we forget we are spir-
itual beings and focus
on the physical. Let
our perception be on
spiritual things.
Finally, pray. Don't
forget to ask for Jesus
to help us with our un-
belief. That prayer is a
prayer of faith. And our
faith will extinguish Sa-
tan's flaming arrows.
Maybe we'll spend
one more week on
faith next week.
Rick Reed is a columnist
who lives in Mount Dora.
To reach him, call 352-383-
1458, or send an email
to ricoh007@aol.com.


GIFT
FROM PAGE C1

food is prepared.
There'll be several varieties of music by dif-
ferent groups within the church including the
Fab 5 Ensemble, the full church choir, the wor-
ship band, the handbell choir, the children's
ministry, some skits by the youth group and a
few words by Pastor Craig Attaway
While the schedule is packed the evening
moves along quickly and takes about 90 min-
utes.
"We've got it timed up," said Fennimore. "We
keep things moving."
Marc's wife, Pam Fennimore, is in charge of
the meal.
"She's a great cook," he said.
While the event is free, a canned goods dona-
tion is suggested to help those in need.
"It's a great meal and entertainment," said
Fennimore. "But you need a ticket to get in."
First Baptist Church of Wildwood is behind
Wildwood City Hall at 402 Oxford St., Wild-
wood. For information, call 352 748-1822 or go
to www.fbcwildwood.org.


A Cordof Three Strands


I* C'1 a, t V ., -



kO60 es, L
*,. f *
.... ., "., c P-&



O t Z- s



RlotoCredit I~kphoto cm[TratHom broct
A bride, a groom, vows and rings carefully chosen. What
can place this new family on a firm foundation? Included in the
beautiful wedding ceremony is a line from the book of Ecclesiastes
4:12 which says... "A cord of three strands is not easily broken." If
the bride and groom weave their life together with God, His power
will strengthen their relationship and He will give them guidance
and wisdom in their future lives together. Whether or not you are
married, god can be the strengthening strand in your life. Visit
your house of worship this week and weave yourself with Him.
Weekly Scripture Reading
Psalm Isaiah Isaiah Isaiah Isaiah Isaiah Isaiah
93 11.1-16 35.1-10 51.1-23 52.1-12 54.1-17 55.1-13
captures Selealed by the Aaemra n Sbie Socety
02013, Keister- Williams Newspaper Services, P.O. Box 8187, Charlottesville, VA 22906, www.kwinews.com


Come visit our new location!

KIA of LEESBURG
9039 US HWY 441 LEESBURG
352-365-1228
www.KiaofLeesburg.com


The Charlotte Mayfield
Assisted Living
Retirement Community
460 Newell Hill Rd.. Leesburg
352-365-6011
Assisted Living, Independent Living, Day Stay Residency
Combining Independence with Peisonal Caie foi ovei 40 years


Q TOYOTA
LEESBURG:
I'p 728-2030






CASON & GASKINS TV
Radio Ihk
DOALEN
Established 1951
308 Shopping Center Drive
Wildwood, Florida 34785
SUMTER CO. LAKE CO.
352-748-2021 352-753-1555





Rehab foi orthopedics, caidiac. stroke,
surgical patients & generahlized weakness
490 S Old Wire Rd. Wildwood 3521748-3322

Beyer FUNERAL
HOME
AND CREMATORY
Locally Owned and Operated
Leesburg Lady Lake
Umalilla Astor


Dunstan & Son Plumbing Co., Inc.
[I2I PLUMBING REPAIR & REMODELING
Esl. 1922 CF C057100
(352) 787-4771
1127 W. Main St., Leesburg
John W. Snyder. President


Liberty Baptist Church
11043 True Life Way, Clermont
352-394-0708
Senior Pastor Chris Johnson
Sun. Svc. 10:40am, Family Prayer Svc. 6:00pm
Unashamed Students Service 6:00pm
Sun. Bible Fellowship 9:30am
Wed. Bible Study 6:30pm,
Kids 4 Truth Clubs 6:30pm
Groups for all ages, Nursery provided all services
www.lbcclermont.org



First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Grove and Lemon Avenues, Eustis
352-357-3899
Sunday Service 10:30am
Sunday School 10:30am
Wednesday Testimonial Meeting 12:15pm
Christian Science Reading Room
108 E. Magnolia Ave., Eustis
First United Methodist
Church of Eustis
"A Place where You Matter"
600 S. Grove Street, Eustis
352-357-5830
Senior Pastor Beth Farabee
Coffee and Fellowship 9:00am
Contemporary Worship 9:30am
Traditional Worship 11:00am

St. Thomas Episcopal Church
317 S. Mary St., Eustis (corner S. Mary &
Lemon St.)
352-357-4358
Rev. John W. Lipscomb III, Rector
Sunday Holy Eucharist Services
8:00am & 10:30am
Adult Sunday School 9:20am,
Children's Chapel
Thurs. Holy Eucharist & Healing Service
10:00am
www.stthomaseustis.com



LIFE Church Assembly of God
04001 Picciola Rd., Fruitland Park
352-787-7962
Pastor Rick Welborne
Sunday Deaf Impaired 10:00am
Sunday Evening 6:00pm
Wednesday Prayer and Youth Service
7:00pm
Sunday School 9:00am
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm

Pilgrims' United Church of Christ (UCC)
509 County Road 468, Fruitland Park
www.pucc.info
352-365-2662 or office@pucc.info
Rev. Ronal Freyer Nicholas, OSL, Pastor
Rev. Robert Van Valkenburg,
Pastoral Associate Emeritus
Inclusive Progressive
Sunday Worship 10:00am
Contact us or visit our website for
more info



Mt. Olive Missionary
Baptist Church
15641 Stucky Loop, Stucky
(West of Mascotte)
352-429-3888
Rev. Clarence L. Southall-Pastor
Sunday Worship Service 11:00am
Sunday School 9:30am
Bible Study-Wednesday 7:00pm
Youth Bible Study-Wednesday 7:00pm


Bethany Lutheran Church
1334 Griffin Road, Leesburg
352-787-7275
Sunday Service 8:00am & 10:30am
Cont. Praise Thursday Service 6:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 10:00am
Sunday Bible Study 9:15am

Emmanuel Baptist Church of
Leesburg
1710 U.S. Hwy. 441 E., Leesburg
352-323-1588
Pastor Jeff Carney
Sunday Celebration Service 10:30am
Wednesday Men's Prayer Breakfast
8:00am
Wednesday Praise & Prayer 6:30pm
Sunday Bible Study 9:15am
Wednesday Epic Youth Ministry 6:30pm
www.EmmanuelFL.com

First Baptist Leesburg
220 N. 13th St., Leesburg
352-787-1005
Sunday Service 8:15am, 9:30am
& 10:45am
Sunday Bible Study 8:15am,
9:30am & 10:45am
Wednesday Night Activities 6:00pm
www.fbcleesburg.org

First Church of Christ,
Scientist, Leesburg
13th & Line St., Leesburg
352-787-1921
Sunday Service 10:30am
Sunday School 10:30am
Wednesday School 3:30pm

Gloria Dei Lutheran Church
130 S. Lone Oak Drive, Leesburg
352-787-3223
Pastor Roy Stackpole
Sunday Worship October-April
8:00am & 10:30am
Sunday Worship May-September
9:15am
Christian Education October-April
9:15am
www.lutheransonline.com/gloriadeifla

Lakes and Hills Covenant Church
Rev. Ken Folmsbee, PhD, Pastor
Worship Service 10:15am
Bible Study 9:00am
@ Women's Club of Leesburg
700 S. 9th Street, Leesburg
Church Office
106 S. Palm Ave., Howie-in-the-Hills
352-552-0052
www.lakeshillscovenantchurch.org

Seventh Day Adventist
508 S. Lone Oak Dr., Leesburg
352-326-4109
Worship Service 9:30am
Sabbath School Service 11:00am
Wednesday Prayer Meeting 7:00pm

The Healing Place
1012 W Main Street, Leesburg
352-617-0569
Facilitator: Phyllis Gilbert
Sunday Service and Kids Club 11:00am
Wednesday Bible Study and
Kids Club 6:00pm
(Nursey open for all services)
"Come as you are and leave different!"


Congregational Church
650 N. Donnelly St., Mount Dora
352-383-2285
Reverand Dr. Richard Don
Sunday 11:00am
(Communion 1st Sunday of the month)
Monday Bible Study 9:00am & 6:00pm
St. Philip Lutheran Church
1050 Boyd Drive, Mt. Dora
352-383-5402
Pastor Rev. Dr. Johan Bergh
Sunday Service 9:30am
(Childcare Provided)
Fellowship 10:45am
www.stphiliplc.com


Corpus Christi Episcopal
Church
3430 County Road 470, Okahumpka
352-787-8430
Sunday Eucharist Service 9:00am
Evening Prayer 4:00pm
Fellowship following both services
Thursday Morning Prayer 9:30am
www.corpuschristiepiscopal.org


All Saint's Roman Catholic
Chapel
11433 U.S. 441, River Plaza #11, Tavares
407-391-8678
352-385-3880
Sunday Latin Mass 8:00am & 10:00am

Tavares First United Methodist
Church (UMC)
Corner of Old 441 & SR 19, Tavares
352-343-2761
Pastor John Barham
Traditional Service 8:30AM & 11:00am
Contemporary Cafe Service 10:00am
Children of Light-Youth & Family Service
1st Sunday of each month 6:00pm
www.fumctavares.com


The Final Hour Ministries
P.O. Box 523, Webster
847-912-0596
Email: finalhourminitries@ymail.com
Speaking Engagements Contact:
Kingdom Citizen
Apostle Michael White Jr.
Prophetess Wanda White
Church Planting Travel Ministry
Let Us Pray For You Affiliation Cl
www.thefinalhourministries.org

Lighthouse Foundation
Ministries International INC.
11282 SR 471, Webster
352-793-2631
Pastor Patricia T. Burnham
Sunday Services 8:30am & 6:00pm
Thursday Night 7:00pm
3rd Saturday Food Basket Give-A-Way
www.lighthousefoundationministries.org

Linden Church of God
4309 CR 772, Webster
Pastor Doyle D. Glass
Sunday Morning Worship 10:30am
Sunday Evening Worship 6:00pm
Sunday School 9:45am
Wednesday Night (Family Training Hour) 7:00pm


C2


For information on listing your church
on this page call Michelle at

352-365-8233




Saturday, December 7, 2013


Court hears discrimination

case over wedding cake


IVAN MORENO
Associated Press
DENVER A Colorado baker who
refused to make a wedding cake for
a same-sex ceremony should not be
forced to violate his religious beliefs,
his attorney told a judge deciding
whether the cake-maker should be
made to accommodate gay couples.
But an attorney representing a gay
couple countered Wednesday that
the baker's faith doesn't give him a
right to discriminate.
At issue in the complaint from Da-
vid Mullins and Charlie Craig against
Masterpiece Cakeshop in suburban
Denver is whether religious freedom
can protect a business from discrim-
ination allegations from gay couples.
Mullins and Craig wanted to buy a
cake last year, but when one of the
shop owners, Jack Phillips, found out
the cake was to celebrate a gay wed-
ding, he turned the couple of away
and cited his religious faith.
"(His) faith, whatever it may have
to say about marriage for same-sex
couples or the expressive power of a
wedding cake, does not give the re-


PRIEST
FROM PAGE Cl
about sexually abusive
priests as church lead-
ers put the interests of
the institution above
those of the victims.
The Rev. Marcial Ma-
ciel founded the cult-
like Legion in 1941 in
Mexico and oversaw its
growth into a large and
prominent congrega-
tion despite credible
reports that he was a
drug addict and child
molester. After Maciel's
death in 2008, the Le-
gion admitted that he
fathered three children
and sexually abused
his seminarians.


spondents a license to discriminate,"
Amanda Goad, an attorney with the
American Civil Liberties Union, told
an administrative judge in Colora-
do's Civil Rights Commission.
Phillips' attorney, Nicolle Martin,
said her client shouldn't be forced to
ignore his Christian faith while run-
ning the business he's had for nearly
40 years. She said Phillips feels "priv-
ileged to design and create the cakes
that celebrate the joyous events of
people's lives."
"He believes this is a vocation cho-
sen for him by God, and as a man
of God, Jack Phillips lives by certain
biblical principles," Martin said.
She said Phillips faces fines if the
court rules against him and he con-
tinues to refuse to make wedding
cakes for gay couples.
Judge Robert N. Spencer said he
would issue a ruling later this week.
The ACLU in Colorado filed the
discrimination complaint on behalf
of Mullins, 29, and Craig, 33, who
were married in Massachusetts and
planned to celebrate their wedding
in Colorado.


In 2010, the Vatican
took over the order and
a papal delegate has
been overseeing a re-
form and "purifica-
tion." In January, the
Legion will elect a new
leadership and ap-
prove a new set of con-
stitutions.
The Legion scan-
dal has been particu-
larly damaging to the
Vatican because Ma-
ciel was held up by
Pope John Paul II and
his cardinals as a mod-
el for the faithful, with
the order admired for
its orthodoxy and abil-
ity to bring in money
and new priests.
Like all Legion
priests, Williams had
been a staunch de-


fender of Maciel. When
Maciel's double life be-
came public in 2009,
Williams told the Cath-
olic ETWN program
that the revelations
were a "very, very hard
blow to all of us."
Until he left ac-
tive ministry, Williams
was the most publicly
prominent priest in the
950-strong order. He
is the author of such
books as 2008's "Know-
ing Right From Wrong:
A Christian Guide to
Conscience," and was
a commentator for the
U.S. broadcaster CBS.
He was the superior of
the Legion's general di-
rectorate in Rome in
the late 1990s and ear-
ly 2000s.


'..., LEESBURGX
^WW t "REGIONAL
WELLNESS S RIICEII


presents

19th Annual

Mistletoe ot

0&Race 5k &10k

Saturday December 14th

Lake Sumter State College, Leesburg
Register online at www.itsyourrace.com
or at the LRMC Wellness Center (352) 323-5640
Registration Opens 6:30 am Race Begins 8:00 am
Healthy refreshments, fresh fruit and snacks will be available
First 200 Pre-Registered Entrants
Will Receive an Official Event T-Shirt


J Male & Female Awards Top Overall and
Top 3 in Each Age Group Receive Awards
Kid's Fun Run -Ages 8-13
All Participants Receive Certificate of Completion and
Top 3 Receive an Award

Door Prizes & Gift Certificates will be randomly awarded

Sponsored by


Dafili C(Mi a1rjI -l
"lMWF fbst olce" Imn-Pint & On-Une


WOLLENSCHLAEGER
ORIHODOU(%1


i LLC'Oiin, RegF'ii,,,
Mf>.i'LI.I Center Foundation


LAKECOUNTY UNITE
MOORCCLSTASOCATION, NC


"Lake County's
Largest
Motorcycling
Tradition"
Proudly
Contributing
More Than
$185,000
To Date!


.- TCDUN"
0LP1 WOTORclite Ty
x^s",ocIATi oS


WE NEED
SPONSORS! x
SPONORS! SATURDAY DECEMBER 7, 2013

To Benefit: The Salvation Army &
Lake/Sumter Foster Parent Association
FOSTER HOMES NEEDED Contact: 352-873-6332 FOOD NEEDED Contact: 352-365-0079


LIEMSC9 SLETAUCIO

SDATE: Saturday, December 7,2013
TIME: Sign Up from 9-10:3Oam
PLACE: Wal-Mart 2501 N Citrus Blvd, Leesburg 32748
ENDING: Gator Harley in Leesburg
I ~(1745 Hwy 441) Food Available
COST: $10.00/person & 1 New Unwrapped Toy
(no stuffed animals please)


Chapter/Club challenge: Trophy given to the top
3 groups with the most participants.
SPONSORS WANTED Call Any Number Below for more info
Chairman, Big Dawg 352-400-0035 Central FL Cruisers Bones 321-689-9138
US Military Vets MC Boomhauer 352-457-6975 ABATE of FL, Inc. Lake Cnty Chapter Griz 352-742-7754
CMA Pilgrim 352-793-3600 American Legion Riders #35 Jan 352-408-0750
Eagle Riders, Eustis Gary M 352-455-7373 Lake County HOG Wayne 352-396-3593
,,,* Pre-ride prayer & bike blessing Thank you for your continual support.
Blood Mobile will be on site give blood help save a life
w wC mined aeI ounyI oy nI co


~L~W~fl1 b~


~LL LILLi ~LV~L1A~Lb












w


Lighted Holiday Boat Parade

Sunday December 8th
7pm Ski Beach Venetian Gardcens

I I t 15 ', i II


For Registration & Information

Call Fred O'Brien (352)326-8274
email: fredandkaren@mpinet.net

Madaor Cptins Meting* Wdnsdy* Dec4t

Sponsored by
Leesburg Boating Club City of Leesburg Boyd Rental
Daily Commercial Leesburg Partnership Sea Tow
Vic's Embers Triangle Marine Ford Press
Drs. Bosshardt & Marzek Hurricane Dockside & Grill
Prize sponsors
*Holiday Marine O'Keefe's Irish Pub Sonny's Real Pit Bar-B-Q Chili's
Nobles Marine Palm Gardens Zachary's Bar & Grill Sinbad's
Red Lobster a Olive Garden Oakwood Smokehouse e Papa Johns
*Outback Steakhouse a Cousin Vinnie's Chicken Wings
Like us on Facebook at "Leesburg Christmas on the water"


1(


Make life a little sweeter"


/ ERIE$,
0l t ii L


DAILY COMMERCIAL


"ITiftSO
FIRwaST B, \


ANL





C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, December 7, 2013


Sumter County Chamber of Commerce


4'


0


Nominate a future leader


Do you know some-
one who has the right
stuff to become a lead-
er in Sumter Coun-
ty? Nominate them
for Leadership Sum-
ter County. Leader-
ship Sumter County
builds and strength-
ens the Sumter com-
munity through train-
ing its leaders for the
challenges of tomor-
row. The program fo-
cuses on developing
informed leaders and
channeling their ideas
and experiences to-
ward community re-
sources, including is-
sues and concerns, so
that they might help
direct the future of
Sumter County.
Leadership Sumter
County participants
learn specific lead-
ership skills, gain a
broad based exposure
to the community, and
meet peers in other
fields. The friendships
and networks formed
during the program
benefit professional
and volunteer activ-
ities. In addition, the


community gains a
group of trained lead-
ers who have devel-
oped a heightened
sense of civic concern
and responsibility.
The curriculum in-
cludes a retreat in Jan-
uary, one full day ses-
sion per month from
February through
October and a com-
mencement dinner.
Each program ses-
sion concentrates
on a specific area of
the community us-
ing panel discussions,
speakers, special pre-


Annual meeting set for Jan. 24
The Sumter County Chamber of Commerce's
91st Annual Meeting and Installation Dinner
will be held Friday, January 24 at the Savannah
Center in The Villages. A fabulous evening of
dining and entertainment is planned, featuring
live performances by Sumter County's own Em-
ily Rose and Emily Graham. In addition to the
installation of the chamber's 2104 Board of Di-
rectors, worthy businesses and individuals mak-
ing an impact in Sumter County will be cele-
brated during the annual Business and Industry
Awards.
Tickets to the Annual Meeting and Installation
Dinner are $40 per person.
A silent auction will be held at the event. By
donating an item, gift certificate, gift basket, or
service valued at $50 or more you can directly
support the chamber's mission to educate, sup-
port, and promote businesses in Sumter County.
For more information, call (352) 254-0105, or
visit www.sumterchamber.org.

BIG SCREEN HD TVS
FOR THE HOLIDAYS WE REPAIR TV'S
Free delivery and installation Call for a "Guesstimate!"
for new sets over 32"
z...L


sentations and partic-
ipatory experiences.
A homework assign-
ment is to be com-
pleted prior to each
session which re-
quires approximately
two hours of work.
Topics covered in-
clude local govern-
ment, the judicial sys-
tem, local economics,
quality of life, the ed-
ucation system, med-
ical services, state
government, cultural
diversity, volunteer-
ism and leadership
skills.


The cost for Lead-
ership Sumter Coun-
ty is $500 per stu-
dent, which includes
all retreat expenses,
meals at the monthly
programs, materials
needed throughout
the year, transporta-
tion for the state gov-
ernment session and
graduation fees.
Scholarships may be
available on a limit-
ed basis. For more in-
formation, contact the
Sumter County Cham-
ber of Commerce at
352-793-3099.


T. Westons wins cook-off
Congratulations to Beef and Boogie
Cook-offWinners: Brandell Campbell, and
Tracy Smith of T.Weston's
Congratulations to the winners of the
third annual Beef and Boogie Cook-offs.
Brandell Campbell, a winner at Beef and
Boogie two years ago, won for Sumter's
Best Burger against strong competition.
Tracy Smith ofT.Weston's Smokehouse in
Wildwood was the day's big winner, taking
the prizes for Best Ribs and Best Brisket.
The awards were the result of blind judg-
ing, as the judges did not know the origin
of any entries. Thanks to Beth Kenny of
Rubbin' Bones Barbecue for chairing the
competition, and to our judges: Lt. Bobby
Caruthers of the Sumter County Sheriff's
Office, Roger Kane, County Tax Collector
Randy Mask and his wife Christy, Martha
Maddox of the UF/IFAS Extension Office,
and Nathan Overstreet of Langley Health
Services.



.S@feScript

PHARMACY
dispensing care...
2 Locations
352-748-9900
342-Shopping Center Dr., Wildwood
352-793-8000
880 N. Main St., Bushnell
www.safescriptpharmacy.com


City manager's update


City of Bushnell Up-
date with City Manager
at December Chamber
Luncheon
The latest develop-
ments in the City of
Bushnell will be the
topic of the Chamber
Lunch Exchange on
Wednesday, Decem-
ber 11, ll:30am, at the
Blueberry Hill RV Resort
in Bushnell. New City
Manager Bruce Hickle,
who was selected by the
City Council upon the
retirement of longtime-
Manager Vince Ruano
this summer, will out-
line some of the city's
ongoing projects and
future plans.
The Blueberry Hill
RV Resort is located at
6233 Lowery Street (ad-


ajacent to
WalMart)
in Bush-
nell. The
cost to at-
tend this
BASHAM event is
$12 for
members and $18 for
non members, and in-
cludes lunch. Please call
the Chamber office at
352-793-3099 or email
sumter-coc@sumter-
chamber.org to let us
know in advance that
you are planning to at-
tend.
Would you like to re-
serve a spot in the Mem-
ber Midway and receive
premium exposure at
this event? Call 352-793-
3099 or email member-
ship@sumterchamber.


Gourmet Today is a
relatively new member
to the chamber, but is
already making quite
an impact. Jessy Flynn
and her husband Kev-
in are the dynamic duo
that makes up Gour-
met Today. A full-ser-
vice catering company
specializing in private
and corporate catering,
Gourmet Today served
samples of their signa-
ture dishes at "A Taste
of Simply Sumter," and


catered a recent cham-
ber luncheon, receiv-
ing rave reviews from
attendees. Jessy has
referred several new
members to the cham-
ber, and her enthusi-
asm and energy about
the chamber is infec-
tious. The Chamber
Ambassadors proud-
ly recognize Jessy and
Kevin Flynn of Gour-
met Today as Novem-
ber's Member of the
Month.


COURTESY PHOTO
Chamber Ambassador Ryon Meyers, left, of SECO Energy
presents the Member of the Month award to Jessy and Kevin
Flynn of Gourmet Today.


"No job too big
or small"


MARTIN
E LECTRI


&
E


GILL
INC.


o M-in oU-rIOUU
No Minimum on Embroidery ^'**'


of SuT.

No Insurance?
Insurance Doesn't Fully
Cover Your Prescriptions?
Have You Fallen
Into the Donut Hole?
CONTACT US!
Call Today
(352) 569-1484


512 N. Main St.
Bushnell
FAX: (352) 569-1485


I FE .l l! S IP N II I


.o5u


~D8DO
MEHOMPECr CONN[


I
The Leadership Sumter County Class of 2013 celebrates at its commencement dinner in
October. The Sumter County Chamber of Commerce is now accepting nominations for the
Class of 2014, which begins in January. For more information, call the chamber at (352)
254-0105, or visit www.sumterchamber.org.


Member of the Month

Gourmet Today


CASON & GASKINS TV
(4 RadioShack Dealer Established 1951
748-2021 CasonGaskinTV.com
Wildwood Mon-Fri 8am-5:30, Sat 8am-4pm


352-254-0456
Servicing Ridge Manor, FL
and the surrounding areas.


Full Service Salon
Hair, Nails, Spa Pedicures, Facials,
Waxing, Color Correction
352-330-4040
F~ 104 S. Main St., Wildwood "Tc


C4


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, December 7, 2013










Markets&Money
features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8208
www.dailycommercial.com


NASDAQ 3 S&P500 GOLD I-
4,062.52 1,805.09 1,229.00
+29.35 +20.06 -2.90


SILVER *-*
19.52
-0.047


CRUDEOIL *-*
97.65 .
+0.27


T-NOTE 10-year28
2.88 0
-0.02 -


Gov't: OK if windmills kill eagles


DINA CAPPIELLO
Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
Under pressure from
the wind-power indus-
try, the Obama adminis-
tration said Friday it will
allow companies to kill
or injure eagles without
the fear of prosecution
for up to three decades.
The new rule is de-
signed to address envi-
ronmental consequenc-
es that stand in the way
of the nation's wind en-
ergy rush: the dozens of
bald and golden eagles
being killed each year
by the giant, spinning
blades of wind turbines.
An investigation by
The Associated Press
earlier this year docu-
mented the illegal kill-
ing of eagles around
wind farms, the Obama
administration's reluc-
tance to prosecute such
cases and its willingness
to help keep the scope
of the eagle deaths se-
cret. President Barack
Obama has champi-
oned the pollution-free
energy, nearly doubling
America's wind power in
his first term as a way to
tackle global warming.


AP FILE PHOTO
A golden eagle flies over a wind turbine on Duke energy's wind farm in Converse County Wyo.


But all energy has
costs, and the adminis-
tration has been forced
to accept the not-so-
green sides of green en-
ergy.
Another AP investi-
gation recently showed
that corn-based etha-
nol blended into the na-
tion's gasoline has prov-
en more damaging to
the environment than
politicians promised
and worse than the gov-
ernment acknowledges.
These examples high-
light Obama's willing-
ness to accept envi-


ronmental trade-offs
- pollution, loss of con-
servation land and the
deaths of eagles in
hopes that green energy
will fight climate change.
The new rule will pro-
vide legal protection
for the lifespan of wind
farms and other proj-
ects if companies obtain
permits and make ef-
forts to avoid killing pro-
tected birds.
Companies would
have to take additional
measures if they killed or
injured more eagles than
they had estimated they


would, or if new infor-
mation suggested that
eagle populations were
being affected. The per-
mits would be reviewed
every five years, and
companies would have
to submit reports of how
many eagles they killed.
Now, such reporting is
voluntary, and the Interi-
or Department refuses to
release the information.
"This is not a program
to kill eagles," said John
Anderson, the direc-
tor of siting policy at the
American Wind Energy
Association.


AT&T says it doesn't


have to disclose


dealings with NSA


MARTHA MENDOZA
AP National Writer
SAN JOSE, Calif. -
AT&T, under fire for
ongoing revelations
that it shares and sells
customers' commu-
nications records to
the National Security
Agency and other U.S.
intelligence offices,
says it isn't required to
disclose to sharehold-
ers what it does with
customers' data.
In a letter sent
Thursday to the Se-
curities and Exchange
Commission, AT&T
said it protects cus-
tomer information
and complies with
government requests
for records "only to
the extent required by
law."
The telecom giant's
letter was a response
to a shareholder re-
volt sparked on Nov.
20 by the New York
State Common Re-


tirement Fund, the
ACLU of Northern
California and others.
The groups are de-
manding that AT&T
and Verizon be more
transparent about
their dealings with the
NSA.
In the letter, ob-
tained exclusively by
The Associated Press
before it was made
public by the SEC,
AT&T said informa-
tion about assisting
foreign intelligence
surveillance activi-
ties is almost certain-
ly classified. The com-
pany said it should
not have to address
the issue at its annu-
al shareholders meet-
ing this spring.
Nicole Ozer, tech-
nology and civil liber-
ties policy director at
the ACLU of Northern
California said AT&T
has overstepped its
bounds.


Market jumps after jobs report


STEVE ROTHWELL
AP Markets Writer
NEW YORK Good
news was finally good
news for the stock mar-
ket on Friday.
Stocks rose sharply af-
ter the government re-
ported a fourth straight
month of solid U.S. job
gains, the latest encour-
aging sign for the econ-
omy
The strengthening job
market focused investors
on the nation's improv-
ing economy instead of
concerns about the Fed-
eral Reserve's stimulus,
snapping a five-day los-
ing streak for stocks.
Stocks had been fall-
ing this week after a
string of positive eco-
nomic reports made in-
vestors worry that the
Fed would soon pull
back on its $85 billion
in monthly bond pur-
chases, which have kept
long-term interest rates
low and supported the
stock market.
Now that hiring is
showing consistent
strength, investors seem
to be letting go of their
earlier worry that the
CURRENCIES
Dollar vs. Exchange Pvs
Rate Day
Yen 102.78 102.09
Euro $1.3678 $1.3639
Pound $1.6358 $1.6330
Swiss franc 0.8950 0.9003
Canadian dollar 1.0661 1.0688
Mexican peso 12.9763 13.0391


Need

Tax Help?

Call
352-787-1040

Open Year Round.


economy isn't ready for
the Fed to start weaning
the U.S. off that stimu-
lus.
"The jobs report was
outstanding," said Ran-
dy Frederick, a director
of trading and deriva-
tives at Charles Schwab.
"It's refreshing to see the
markets react positively,
because we've been in a
mode for so long of'good
news is bad news.'"
Employers added
203,000 jobs last month
after adding 200,000 in
October, the Labor De-
partment said Friday.
November's job gain
helped lower the unem-
ployment rate to 7 per-


cent from 7.3 percent in
October.
Stocks jumped at the
open and moved higher
throughout the day The
Dow Jones industrial
average rose by as much
as 200 points in early af-
ternoon trading before
easing back slightly be-
fore the close.
"Now we're getting in-
vestors trading more on
fundamentals and long-
term earnings for next
year," said Mike Serio,
regional Chief Invest-
ment Officer for Wells
Fargo Private Bank.
"There may be some
backbone to the econ-
omy."


0ONNENTAG THEATRE ...
(I,/f,/ ICEHOUSE /
1100 N. UNSER STREET, MOUNT DORA -.-1"

NOVEMBER 22 DECEMBER 15
* ADDEDSHOW! Wednesday, December 11 at 7:30 pm *
SH f |c One of the best-loved musicals of all time! In 1905, in a
little Russian village, Tevye tries to instill in his five daughters
Hl Ic R oo a sense of tradition. Songs include Matchmaker, If I Were
A Rich Man, Sunrise, Sunset, and To Life!

Adults $20 Seniors $18 (Thurs&A/ l Matinees) Students $10/$15 Groups $16
Thurs 7:30 PM Fri 8:00 PM Sat 2:00 PM or 8:00 PM Sun 2:00 PM
(Some Saturdays have Matinees Only)
Box Office (352) 383-4616 www.icehousetheatre.com
TMcLinFoundation FLoRiDHOSAL rr 3- V
WATERMANr .R1E10
*THE FRSTrRsnnTI0nR4- MRrI- MOUNT F lr rW R
IET...1R T f ,R,1OfL*Rf W DORA.
INSIGHT


DOW JONES
16,020.20
+198.69


0


Leesburg
s&Area.WM.C.

Come celebrate and unite with fe/low., chamber meinbers
highlighting our members' contributions and the installation
of our neu'ly elected board members.

7-hri',ll" Da m/.,', 12rt. 2013
5:30I, 8-3Opm,
c.'j,.' 'a Fi, ritir:, ,t Butildig
i., ,',s { tle1 i t/esbi,' .4rp'iirtl
8-125" LS HuTv 4-i. L4i.':og

Bulffr D' ia'wr liid C B.a/, t.

S 50.OO I*00h .uh / T,/cr-'et


R.S. V'/? by December 6. 2013
352-787-2131 A'dmin lIee'burgchainber.corn

Ausical peformanrIc by, the Leesburg High Shool Ellusion..

Silent Auction featuring gorgeous hand-nmade holiday
u'wreathls donated by our local chamber members and
community partners.

Professional pictures with Santa for your holiday cards!

CD


PLAZAS~
CADILL~a


Saturday, December 7, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL








The Market In Review


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, December 7, 2013


Eye on mortgage applications MBA's weekly mortgage
The Mortgage Bankers applications survey
Association issues its latest Weekly percent change
weekly tally of mortgage .
applications on Wednesday. ,:
While mortgage rates remain -12.8
near record lows, banks have
been receiving fewer requests
for home loans throughout -6
November. Mortgage applica-
tions typically slow as the -12
holiday season nears. They fell Oct.Nov.
sharply two weeks ago, 25 1 8 15 22 29
coinciding with the Thanksgiving
holiday. Source: FactSet


Economists anticipate
that growth in U.S. retail
sales eased slightly in
November from the
previous month.
A slide in gasoline
prices has held back
overall retail sales in 2
recent weeks, though
increased spending on clothing, autos and furniture boosted
sales by 0.4 percent, up from a flat reading in September.
Excluding sales at gas stations, retail spending rose an even
stronger 0.5 percent. The Commerce Department reports last
month's retail sales data on Thursday.


Prices unchanged?
Declining energy costs have helped
keep inflation subdued over the
past year.
The producer price index, which
measures prices before they reach
the consumer, declined in Septem-
ber and October. Economists
project that the November reading,
due out Friday, will show that U.S.
wholesale prices were unchanged
from the previous month. High
unemployment and weak wage
increases have made it difficult for
businesses to raise prices.


Producer price index
Month-over-month percent change


est.
-0.1-0.2 Flat


J J A S O N


Source. FactSet


1,840 ................................ S & P 500
CC. i Close: 1,805.09
Change: 20.06 (1.1 %)


16,200 ............. ................... Dow Jones industrials
15,. ,, %- Close: 16,020.20
v Change: 198.69 (1.3%)


1,760 ........10 DAYS .... 15,760 ........ 10 DAYS ....
1 ,8 4 0 . ............ ............. ............. ............ .............. ............ 1 6,4 0 0 ........... .............: ............. ............ .............. ............; "
1,764o .......... ..................... ........... ............ ...... ... .... .... 16,400 ....................... ............. ............ ..............


1,6 ........ ." 1............ 16,00 .. .. ........... "" .. .. .... . .......... .
680...........15,600............


1 ,6 0 0 .. .. ....... ............ ............ "".. "............ .............. 1 4 8 0 .. . . . . . . . . .


1,680.. 4 .. .
1,520 ...... j............1400..... j.... ...... j..........140.............


StocksRecap

NYSE NASD

Vol. (in mil.) 3,088 1,676
Pvs. Volume 3,251 1,825
Advanced 2223 1736
Declined 868 827
New Highs 146 177
New Lows 103 92


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
16022.35
7216.41
491.30
10138.78
4069.86
1806.04
1312.83
19193.36
1135.88


LOW
15825.55
7168.94
485.76
10081.47
4042.35
1788.36
1303.22
18989.45
1122.47


CLOSE CHG.
16020.20 +198.69
7200.41 +43.90
490.29 +5.88
10131.21 +114.47
4062.52 +29.36
1805.09 +20.06
1309.68 +10.63
19179.84 +190.39
1131.38 +8.88


%CHG.
+1.26%
+0.61%
+1.21%
+1.14%
+0.73%
+1.12%
+0.82%
+1.00%
+0.79%


YTD
+22.25%
+35.68%
+8.21%
+19.99%
+34.54%
+26.57%
+28.35%
+27.91%
+33.21%


Stocks of Local Interest

52-WK RANGE CLOSE


TICKER LO


AT&T Inc
Advance Auto Parts
Amer Express
AutoNation Inc
Brown & Brown
CocaCola Co
Comcast Corp A
Darden Rest
Disney
Gen Electric
General Mills
Harris Corp
Home Depot
IBM
Lowes Cos
NY Times
NextEra Energy
PepsiCo
Suntrust Bks
TECO Energy
WalMart Strs
Xerox Corp


T
AAP
AXP
AN
BRO
KO
CMCSA
DRI
DIS
GE
GIS
HRS
HD
IBM
LOW
NYT
NEE
PEP
STI
TE
WMT
XRX


32.76
70.02
55.47
38.28
24.88
35.58
36.30
44.11
48.55
20.26
39.75
41.08
60.21
172.57
34.20
7.86
67.75
67.39
25.99
16.15
67.37
6.62


--- 39.00
- 107.72
- 086.53
- 54.49
-- 35.13
--- 4343
-0- 50.75
- 5525
- 071.69
-4- 2750
-0- 53.07
-4- 6587
-0- 82.27
;-215.90
-0- 52.08
-0- 14.56
-- 89.75
- 8706
-0- 36.99
---- 19.22
-0- 81.37
-4- 11.70


HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK


YTD 1YR
MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV


34.53
104.55
85.93
50.55
30.98
40.46
49.27
52.48
71.46
26.94
51.50
66.42
79.84
177.67
47.98
13.71
84.63
83.15
35.45
17.34
79.94
11.28


New York Stock Exchange


Name Div Last Chg

ABB Ltd 74e 2536 +42
ABM 60 2781 +21
ACE Ltd 20 10195+186
ADTCorp 50 4052 -22
AESCorp 20f 1502 +28
AFLAC 148f 6664 +94
AGMtgelT240m 1541 +18
AGCO 40 5898 +65
AGLRes 188 4584 +52
AKSteel 570 -20
AOL 515e 4444 +64
ARC'Dou u894 +84
AU Option 06 +05
A 6
AVGTeoh 1650 -21
Aarons 08f 28 92
AbtLabs 88f 753 +61
AbbV en 160 u5185+159
AberFit 80 487 -50
AbdAsPa 42 590 -03
A1centure 1 74e 7553 -26
A VessMid 214f 5185 +38
Actavis u16678+383
A tuant 04 3853 +74
AMD 366 +02
AdvSemi 18e 503 +09
Aeropost 900 -09
A 6 1



Aetna 90f 6602+121
A


Agilent 53f 5483 +133
Agnioog 88 2545 -12
3800f 9043 -65
12f 3121 +39
AProd 284 10951 +300
Alaska 80 7351 -91
AlatelLu 1 u450 -01
Aloa 12 936 +01
Alere 3274 +27
AlexRE 272f 6329 +64


AlliData
AlliBInco
AlliBern 1
AlIdNevG
AllsonTrn
Allstate
AllyFn pfB
AlonUSA
AlphaNRs
AlpTotDiv
AlpAlerMLP1
AlhisResd n
Altria
Alumina
Am bev n
Amdocs
Ameren
AMovilL
AmApparel
AmAxle
AmCampus
AEagleOut
AEP
AEqlnvLf
AHm4Rnt n
AmlntlGrp
AmTower
AmWtrWks
Amerppise
Amergn
Ametek

Amphenel
Anadarko
At A
At
At
At










Ann In
Annaly 1
AnteroRs n
Anworth
Aon plc
Apache
Aptlnv
ApoIloGM 3
AquaAm s
AroelorMit
ArohCoal
A A
AM












ArchDan
AroosDor
Argan
ArmcoMetl
ArmourRsd
ArrowEl
AshfordT
Ashland
Aspenlns
AsdEstat
A 1 1
A n














Assurant
Assu redG
AstonaF
AstraZen


1 19 +04
2000 -02
144 299 +54
.50 14.85 -1.55
0Of 4710 +62
18f u2462 +16
20 1650 +55
40 4955+136


61 2860 +28
20 1685 +04
6 6

12 427 -20
76 41 94 +47
24 1169 +06
.75e u25.15 +3.78
30 +00
60m d3 68 07


B pSouth 20 u2429 +38
BkpAm 04 1556 +13
296 6617+111
60 3362 +49
248 6004 +46
84 8242 +51
60 -02
3673 +09
Barclay 42e 1747 +31
BarVixMdT d1663 -28
B iPVlx rs 45 13 -1 58
BarnesNob ... 14.43 -1.96
Barnes 44 3690 +47


BigLots
BBarrett
BoMedR
BitautoH
BlackRock
BIkBIdAm


68 4105 -388
... 32.47 -4.66
... 26.22 -1.55
94 1878 +15
... 28.42 -2.35
672 301838+628
158 1868 +17


31kCpHYVl 97a 1187 +09
ilkDebtStr 3[ 397 -02
IkEEqDv 56 784 06
31kMuTTT 1 13 d1654 +02
31ackstone 1 18e 2824 +49
31ookHR 80 2901 +47
AdwkPnI 213 2493 63


96 4642 +109
BrMySq 140 5068 -12
Brxmorn 80 2019 +10
84 859 +61
2818 -11
80f 866+40
56 1916 -10
BrownFB 16f u761 +190
Brunswick 10f 4567 +1 18
Buenavent 31e 1090 -08
120 u8094 +55
28f 21 25 +05
2397 +12
98f 1828 +40
CBLpfD 184 2501 +14
CBREGRE 54a 782 +02
CBREGrp 2510 +84
CBSA 48 589 +71
CBSB 48 58 90 +76
CF Inds 400f 233809 -2 53
CITGrp 40 5039 +40
1 02 26 49 + 22
1052 +06
CNOFincl 12 1667 +09
CSTBrdsn 25 33632 +07
CSX 60 u2775 +17
50 5 98860 -42
120m 2269 +15
90 6675 +88
CYS Invest1I 28m 7 44 -06
CblvsnNY 60 1600 -21
CabotOGs 08 35 20 -67
CalDive 1 79 + 07
CallGolf 04 785 +04
CallonPet ... 6.12 -.47

Calpne 1958 + 14
CamdenPT 252 6012 -1 01
"^' 40 20 43 +35
55 98 09
CampSp 1.25 42.43 +2.33
CampusCC 66 971 +24
86 5651 + 89
80f 3209 -06
221 +358
CapOne 1 20 u72 60 + 66
CapSenL 2340 -02
CapitSrce 04 u1488 +20
CapsteadM 2e 1199 -10
CardnlH3th 1 21 693 +1 0
CareFuson 967 + 17
CarMax 51 20 + 40










619
Carnival 10a 8584 +85
CarpTeoh 72 62 11 +.9
Carters 64 7025 -20

Caterpillar 240 8550 +1 09
CedarF 2 80f 47 60 +67



CelSlrs 80 +02
Celanese 72 5588 +51
Cemex 45t 11 52 +52
Cn ^dv 24n e 830 +29
97 2928 -10
Centene 60 19 + 22
CenterPnt 83 2336 + 17
CenEIBras .20e 2.61 +.15
CFCdag 01 13884
CntryLink 216 81 07 +42
ChambStn 50 795 -02
ChanAdv n ... 39.69 +2.40
ChRvLab u5292 + 86
957 +08
2669 +94
CheniereEn u44 90 + 59
85 26 48 57
400 12229 +1 19
CloB&I 20 76 76 +93
Chiees 30f 1834 -16
Chimera 36 301 +03
ChiMYWnd 2 12 -08
ChinaMble 224e 5502 + 25
ChiNBorun ... 2.24 +.41
Chiquita 1080 + 10
Chubb 176 94 85 +1 76
ChurohDwt 1 12 u6691 +1 21
04 8650 +218
56 95 95 -2 84
CinciBell 336 + 09
04 51 49 + 43
06
5298 +72
120 1661 -16


cIMtls 48 u1986


CooperCo .06 125.76 -7.97


CrestwdEq 54f 1297 -26
CrstwdMid 162f 21 38 -46
CrwnCstle 7540 +85
CrownHold 4378 -06
CubeSmart 44 1571 -01
Cummins 250 13048 +88
CurEuro 13549 +33
Cyan n 407 -16

dbXHvCA 2579 +05
DCTIndl 28 735 +03
DDRCorp 54 1601 +10
DNPSelot 78 953 +02
DR orton 15 1908 +29
DSWIns 50 4300 -1 11
DTE 262 6761 +123
20 1906 -11
10 7512 +148
21 27 +37
5826 +1 14
DeanFdsrs 1843 +14
Deere 204 8532 +46
12 -01
60a 3000 +126
DelphiAuto 68 5844 +96
DeltaAir 24 2823 +29
Deluxe 1 00 u51 68 +149


DxFinBr rs 28355 -992
DxEMBr rs ... 41.02 -2.92
DxSCBrrs 1871 -46
Dx3OTBear 71 84 -97
DxEMBIs .09e 28.480+1.77
DxFnBuII s 8335 +298


180 2006 +11
DEmmett 80f 2811 +15
Dover 150 91965 +19
DowChm 28 927 +66
DrPepSnap 152 4900 +79
DresserR 58 29 +74
9 9
DnI-Quip 10928 -95
DuPont 180 61834 +123
312 7019 +59
68 1513 +20
21 93 +27
108m 802 -05
E- 909 -23
E- 15e 1158 -19
EMCCp 40 2400 +10
EMCOR 24 4029 +54
EOG Res 75 16004 -534
EPLO&G 2765 -109
EQTCorp 12 8567 -35
E 40 7566 +1 14
E 140f 7621 +190
Eaton 168 7242 +1 10
EatnVan 88f 41 73 + 93
EVLtdDur 122 1492
EVTxDiver 101 1073 +08
EVTxMGIo 98 975 +02
EVTxGBW 1 17 1188 +11
Eolab 1f 10569 +264
Edsonnt 135 4589 +49
EdubRIty 44 9 03
EdwLfSci 6629 +108
EIPasoPpl 260f d35 16 +35
Elan 1807 +02
EldorGldg 12e 556 +04
ElephTalk ... 1.18 +.12
ElleMae 2646 -29


EntArk63 1 19 d1862 -03
E 332 6301 +77
E 276f 6213 +66
Entravisn 10a 643 +27
EnviroStr s .40e u4.58 +.82
EnvisnHn u3099 +67
Equifax 88 u6831 +165
E 197e 5316 +54
E 484 15398 -24
EsteeLdr 80f 7371 +98
Ester1ne u9247 +372
EverBank .12 u17.57 +.87
ExcoRes 20 d493 -18
Exehs 41 1736 +22
Exelon 1 24 28 44 +63
ExeterRgs ... d.50 -.05
Express 1957 +45
ExtraSpe 1 60 42 46 +34
E AonMbl 252 9565 +152
FMC Corp 54 7440+127
FMC Tech 5072 +51


220 d3244 +36
:. .:... ... U24.33 +3.97
Fleetcor 11873 -3846
Flotek 19 98 -01
1 6
FlowrsFds 45 2228 +56
Flowserv s 56 70-94 +188


FMCG 1 25a 3425 -03
Freescale 1483 +25
Frontline ... 3.31 -.25
Fusion-io 963 19

GNC 60 5914 +46
GabelET 56e u753 + 10
Gafsa SA 288 +04


GameStop
Gannett
Gap
GastarExp
GencoShip
Gen era G 5
GnCable
GenDynam
GECap5-53
GenGrPrp
Gen Motors
G Mot wtA
2
1



GMotwtB
GMwtC

GM A
Gensco
GenesWyo
Gen pact
GenuPrt
Genworth
Gerdau
Giantlnter
G
G


GimohRt
GlobPay
GlobusMed
GolLinhas
GoldFLtd



GoodrPet
vjG race
GrafTech
GranTrra g
GraniteC
GraphPkg
GrayTelev

GpFnSnMx


40 4674 +65
8 909 09
10 4508 -05
80 2555 +46
80 3946 -78
... 5.45 -.53
259 -12

72 2864 + 46


u4017 +108
uD052 +1007
u2247 +104
... u5.35 +.42
u69 39 -198
9657 +71
1831 +29
15 81 72 +1 39


416 +06
Ogr 355 -01
60 2106 +21
46 +02
220f 16721 +1 65
... 17.92 -1.67
9751 +194
1125
706 +01
.52 31.95 +1.64
910 + 13
... 12.75 +1.17
69 +01
92f 2423 +45


170 3618 +28
70 3279 + 13
HollyFront 2 4691 +128
HomeProp 280 5551 +01
HomexDev ... 1.22 +.06
Honwllntl 180f 8832 +1 46
Hormel 80f 4581 +73
Hospira 4157 +57
HospPT 192f 2700 +27
HostHotls 48f 1847 +27
HovnanE 495 +01
Humana 108 104O0+209
Huntsmn 50 u2882 +82
25 387 -03
75e 3854 +1 64
INGGIbDv 91 882 +08
ING 1268 + 19
INGPrRTr 38 588 -01
INGUSn 04 3475 +78
ION Geoph 318 -08
iShGold 11 93 +02
iSAsta 144e 2484 + 17
iShBrazil 136e 4522 +60
iShCanada 68e 2861 +13
iShEMU 92e 3955 +53
iSFrance 68e 2729 +835
iShGerm 44e 3016 +42
iShHK 56e 2072 +14
iShltaly 31e 1479 +22
iShJapan 15e 1194 + 15
iShSKor 37e 6351 +106
iSMalasa 87e 1601 +31
iShMexico 63e 6740 +88


r Market Review


Every Sunday


In The


Money



Section of The



Daily Commercial

SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 787-0600 (Lake Co.)
or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5
p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months
or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily
Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007.


iSEafe 176e 6587 +80
iSCorSPMidl 55e 1099 +1 10
iSBxHYB 617e 9286 +26
195e 11 96 -01
247e 76 08 +72
iShMBS 98 10495 +19
iShlndiabt 250 + 67
ISR1KVal 179e 9246 +105
ISR1KGr 120 8382 +74

iSR2KVal 19 979 +81
iShlntCrBd 2 99e 108 20 + 02
iShl-8CrBdl 66e 10540
iSR2KGr 147e 13190 +90
iShFItRtB 28 5063 -01
iShR2K 170e 11248 +87
iShChna 102e 4996 +95
iShUSPfd 201e 8751 +02
iShRussia 58e 21 00 + 56
iShREst 257e 63840 +49
iShHmCnst 12e 2261 +36
iShCrSPSm 1 83 10687 +380



IShEurope 1 18 4569 +61
iStar 1800 +08
ITTCorp 40 4019 +20
Idacorp 172 5290 +98
ITW 168 u8049 +158
ImmunoCII 294 -14
IndoTel 1 78e d8442 -81
Infoblox 81 37 -81
Infosys 82e u55.48 +1361
84 56 69 + 98




2iulc 30 57 + 11
152 68589 +38
1 98 -06
'* 272 5498 +79
21 20 -09
IntontlExG u218 20 +555
IntlGame 44f 1787 +16
IntPap 1 40f 46 44 +387
Interdil g ... 55,50-33,13
Interpubhio 30 1688 + 11
IntraLinks ull 54 + 49


EM 54e 5001 +97


JinkoSolar ... 27.88 -1.64
JohnJn 264 9444 +147
JohnsnCtl 88f 5041 + 48
JonesGrp 20 14 05 + 12
JoualCm 949 +2
JoyGIbl 70 5598 +45
JnprNtwk 2167 +32
KARAuot 1f 2709 -16
KB Home 10 1751 +41
KBRInc 32 3224 -43
KCG HId n 1155 +25
KKR 162e 2323 +15
KKRFn 88f 939 +03
KTCorp 1447 +14
KCSouthn 86 11815 +06
184 61 64 +106
72 u4905 +1 61
76 -36
22 1295 +21
KflroyR' 140 5092 +836
KimbClk 324 10558 +168

Kmo 90f 2098 +25
KindME 540f 8049 +1 14
1 64f 88 51 +58
890 +05
KindMM 540t 7452 +97
KindredHIt 48 17 59 + 17
454 -02
24 640 +08
KnightTr 24 18 11 +22
KodiakOg ... 11.05 -.59
Kohls 140 5470 -34
KoreaEIc 1487 +24
KornFer 2436 +42
KosmosEn 1131 + 18
KnspKrm 1997 +24
Kroger 66f 4044 +38
L Brands 120 684+1 16
L-3Com 220 10180 +99
LDK Solar 1 39 -03
LabCp 10000 +76
LadThalFn ... u3.22 +.24
LaredoPet ... 25.92 -1.36


Lonllards 220 5080 +26
LaPac 1601 +08
LumberLiq ... 104.20 +6.64
LyonBasA 240f 7655+140


M&TBk 280 11430+157
MBIA 1225 -10
MDC 100 2944 +39
MDURes 71f 2982 +21
MFAFncl 88a 715 +01
MIN 55a d510 -04
MGIC 831 +02
MGM Rsts 2017 +48
MRCGlbl 3206 +31
MSCInd 132f 7931 +248
MSCIInc 4421 +34
Macench 248f 6049 +1 21
MackCah I120 20 94 +01
MaNys 100 51 83 +29


08
ManpwrGp 92
52
76
MarathPet 1 68
MVJrGId rs
MktVGold 46e
Mv
Mv
MV OilSvo 41e
MV Semi 70e
MktVRus 73e
MarkWest 40f
MarshM 1O00
MartMM 160
Masco 30
MastThera
Master
MatadorRs ...
McCorm 148f
MoDrmlnt
McDnlds 3824f
MoGrwH 1 12
McKesson 96
McEwenM
Mead John 1 86
MeadWvoo 1 O00
Mechel
MedProp 84f
Medtrnio 1 12
Merck 1 76f
Mentor
MerL pfD 1 75
MerL pfE 1 78
MerL pfF 1 82
Methode 28
MetLife 1 10
MKors
MidAApt 2 92f
MidstsPet
MillenMda
MillerEnR
MindrayM 50e
MitsuUFJ
MobileTele 94e
Mohawk
Mols~oorB 1 28
Molycorp
Monsanto 1 72f
MonstrWw
Moodvs 1 O00
M 6

Milkdrl
M r 148
Mc~mn
Mcnd 324




M


Meno




Mor
MiAp A 2
Misse


669 -28




656 +25
87 204+885
d2889 -28




2066 -01
4812 +31




u4164 +948
2809 +62
6556 -34
u480 +183
97247+162
2164 +32
43 -O00
3126 +37
20.87 -1.51
6937+1835
796 + 18
9680 +1837
7478 +1 08
16281 +283


20 8046 + 25
100 1885 +07
M,6


M 6 4
N Mobisalc 100 46792.54 -1.00
MotrlaSolu 1 24 6618 +95



MuellerWat 07 860 +40
MurphO 125b 6390 +36
MurpUSA n 4562 +27
NCR Corp 3268 + 44
NGLEnPt 205f 8185 -70
NQ Mobile ... 12.54 -1.00
48 2859 + 49
76 2367 -02
16 1575 -34
NBGrcers 589 +07
NatFuGas 150 6921 +48
NOilVarco 104 81 59 -02
NatRetPrp 162 81 19 +83
Nationstar 4197 +1 49
Nav0deaBlo 179 + 02


Navistar 40 06
Neuralstem ... 2.54
NeuStar 4932
14 309
472
35e 2998
NewResdn 70f 619
NYCmtyB 100 1639
Newcastle 40 5 43
NewellRub 60 u8091
NewfldExp 26 43
NewmtM 80m d2302
NewpkRes 1247
69k~s


NikeB s 96f 7986
NobleCorp 10 37 85
NobleEn s 56 6950
NokiaCp 7 88
NorcAm 64 802
Nordstrm 120 60 36
NorflkSo 2 08 u89 67
d89
1 47 41 58
NthnO&G ... 14.43
NthnTEn 349e 2410
NorthropG 244 11026


PennVa
PennWst g
Penney
PennaRE
PennyMac
Pentair
PepcoHold
PerkElm
Pemngo
JM


PetCina
A
PetrbrsA
Petrobras
PtroqstE
Pfizer
PhlpMor
PhxpsNVMda
PBhllps66
PhxNMda


624 -05
10.15 -.85
861 + 10
8.08 -.77


9.20 -.61
1168 +17
1671 +83
21 26 + 23


PlumCrk 176 4478 +76
Polaris 168u13598 +85
PolyMet g ... 1.01 -.09
PolyOne 32f u3325 +1 14
PortGE 1 10 2976 +39
PostPrp 132 4615 +65
Potash 140 3154 -27
PwshDB 2574 +09
PSFinPf 120 1702 +02
PSBuybk 36e 4164 +50
PSKBWBk 40 3471 +49
PSSrLoan 1 18e 2484
PSSPLwV 89 3295 +53
PwShPfd 9 159 +03
PShEMSov180e 2678 +11
PSInd1 a 17e 1763 +58
Prax1 r 240 12546 +297
PrecMxNik 38 1802 +35


UltQQQ 22e u9481
hQQQ d1582
UtSP 27e 9766
IShD30 3285
ihtin 1846


ProSUItNGrs
PrVixSTF rs
PrUVxST rs


PumaBiotc
QEP Res
Qhoe360
QuantaSvc
OntmDSS


8e 899+276
3738 -09
3022 -112
... 18.96 -1.46
6775 +152
12895 +436


20 1818 +19
... u86.75 +9.05
08 3143 -36
8276 -91
u2954 +42
129 +06
20 5999 -22
72 2294 +20


RBSpfG 2169 +03
82 2340 +16
96f 994 +45
Radkspace d3361 -1 15
RadianGrp 01 1450 -11
RadoShk 291 -02
RallySft n ... 19.02 -6.44
RLauren 1 80f 17229 -121
16 7906 -34
64f u488 +26
Rayonier 196 4407 +20
Raytheon 220 8668 +68
4716 +46
218 3708 +40
RedHat 4677 + 10
RedwdTr 1 12 1825 +11
80 7158 -01
84 1944 +06
185 4858 +53
188f 2455 +14
12 971 +15
1567 +01
ReneSola ... 3.02 -.56
Renren 301 -04
RepubSvF 104 3490 +43
ReaMed 100 4788 +65
ResoluteEn 865 +01
Resr eCap 80 590 +05
RestorHdw 7252 -150
RetalProp 66 1279 + 19
RexAmRes 3840 +81
RexahnPh 39 -01
Rexnord u2491 +63
RevnAmer 252 5126 +73


SAPAG 8222 +82
SCAA 203 4764 +80
SK Tlom 2415 +60
SLGreen 200f 9424+182
SM Energy .10 u84.85 -5.82
SpdrDJIA 49e 166+204
SpdrGold 11855 +25
SpdrEuro501 12e 4029 +67
SpdrDJRE189e 4167 +28
SPMid 221e 23855+177
S&P500ETF889e 18094+200
SpdrDiv 160e 7307 +1 12
SpdrHome 16e 3130 +43
SpdrS&PBk 58 3265 +45
SpdrShTHiY1 6e 3084 +06


rOGEx 82e 669
rMtM 60 898


SamsO&G ... .44 +03
SanchezEn 24 30 -1 04
SandRdge 546 -07
SandstGg ... d4.01 -.23
Sanofi 86e 51 07 +40
.....-L 1 25 88 15+1 28
56e 25 22 + 56
Schwab 24 2483 +42
SoiApphlon 1 12 3443 -06
ScorpioTk 28f 11 17 -02
Sootts 1 75 u60 26 08
SppsNet 60 799 +1 14
SeadrnllLtd 380f 4181 +08
SealAir 52 u7252 +1 06
SelMedHId 40 861 +10
SempraEn 252 8807 +69
SenHous 156 2253 +08
SensataT 8787 +89
ServioeCp 28 1838 +25
ServcNow 52 71 78
SesaSterlte 17e 11 80 + 15
Sherwin 200 18483 +3810
ShipFin 1 56 16 90 +08
SibanyeGn 15p 459 +02
SiderurNac 38e 542 +08
60 76 26 + 57
45e 1983 +20
10 287 -03
480f 15275 +195
188f 37 26 +66
u8882 -55
SmthAOs 48 5r07 +55
Smucker 232 10432 +203
SooQ&M I104e 24 25 + 51


SPMatls 101e 4427 +60
SPHIthC 82e 5522 +71
SPCnSt 11We 4808 +58
SPConsum 82e 6513 +54
149e 8641 +27
2e 21 39 +29
SPInds 8 504 +76
SPTeoh 61e u6482 +24





SPUtnl 146e 1844 +52
StdPa 8 612 +08
StanBlkDk 200 8071 +94
StarwdHtl 1385f 7398 +1 11
StarwdPT 184 2789 +33
StateStr 1 04 71 23 +1 07
Statoil ASA 1 16e 22 66 + 08
Steel2se 40 1579 + 16




llwtrM 11 0 -45
Sw 81 85 -1 20
881 -04
Stryker 1 22f 7452 +1 86
SumitMitsu 991 + 14
SunCokeE 2200 -53
80 88 56 54
1323 -23
SunstnHtl 20 1820 +28




636 +02
SwERCmTR 817 +05
SwffEng ... 12.57 -.79
SwiftTrans 23888 +46
948 -17






TD A 669
04 8 48 +01
STJso 1 16f 3431 +74







T A 6

M 6
T-MobUSn 26883 +02
TCFFnel 20 1596 +26
TCW Strat 89a 5839 01
TDAmentr 48f 28 82 +25
TE Connect 1 0 5 62 + 57




TIM Part 74e 2566 +96
TJX 58 6234 +11








12 6 -61
TRWAuto 7577 +78
TableauA n 6629 -35
TaiwSemi 50e 1762 +22
TahsmEg 27 1179 -10
Target 172 6388 +75
Taseko 1 92 + 02
TataMotors 18e 3213 +56
Taubmn 200 66 43 +09
Team HIth 4680 + 63
TeckResg 90 2346 + 01
TeekayTnk 12e 816 -10
Teledyne 90 70 + 28
TelefBrasil 1 22e 19 14 +62
Tel.Esp 47e 1577 + 11
TelData 51 2661 +833


3MCo 254 12861 +178
Tidwtr 100 58 15 +42
Tiffany 1 36 89 70
TWCable 260 18100 -1 53
TimeWam 1 15 6657 +98
Timken 92 52 10 + 54
Titan Intl 02 17 12 +04
TollBros 3289 + 15
Torchmark 68 7678 +122
344f 8958 + 86
323e 5918 +71
TotalSys 40 3076 + 42
TowersWat .56fu122.10 +5.89


ransom 224 4977 +06
Travelers 200 8901 +159
TnangPet 1082 -14
TrinaSolar ... 12.57 -.79
Trinty 60f 4986 +33
TnumphGp 16 7433+104
Trulia 3092 -21
TurqHilIRs 335 -02
TurqH rt ... 1.02 -.08
Twitter n 44 95 67
TwoHrblnv 1 42e d899 -01
Tycolntl 64 3775 +50
Tyson 30f u3382 +91
UBSAG 16e 1879 +30
UDR 94 2421 +10
UGICorp 11 4062 +38
UQMTech ... 2.11 +.20
URS 84 5817 +94
USAirwy 2255 +20
USGeoth 40 +01
US.. ca 50 3524 -10
USG 2561 +48
21 "5 +34
8209 +12
UnilevNV 140 3969 +79
Unilever 140e 4066 +80
UronPa 316 164834+1j97
Unisys ... u30.O0+2.50
Unit u51 50 +38
UtdCont 3674 -05
UtdMicro 07e 197 +01


VFCp 420fu23357 +162
VaalcoE ... 6.45 +.55


076 +63
VananMed 7982 +47
VectorGp 160 1668 +16
VeevaSys n 40 05 98

6 16
Vents 268 5685 -33
VenFone 2513 -43
VenzonCm 212 4948 +57
VinceHIdn 2910 -28
Vipshop 8255 +91
Visa 160f 201 87 +16
Vishaylnt 1258 +16
Visteon 7899 +42
VMware 86 48 +2 32
334 +06
292 9075 +1 11
Voxeljet n 4045 -145
Vul anM 04 5592+130
W&T Off .40f 15.67 -1.08
1829 -33
12 18 + 17
WABCO 9029+110
Wabtes 16 6695 +31
WaddellR 112a 6899+138
5802 +34
126 5671 +60
04 15 17 -33
Walterlnv 3785 ++10
WREIT 120 2367 +23
WsteMInc 146 4483 +49


WidePoint ... ul.24
WmsCos 152f 3621


6286 +24
YingliGrn ... 4.52 -.55
YoukuTud E 025 -138
YumBrnds 148 7437 -02
ZBB En rs .67 +.07


Stocks in bold changed 5% or more in price from the previous day.
1,:, k :,:,,:,1,',,1': .


+ 091 last year vj-ompany i
+ 60 Dividend Footnotes: a


Sorce: The Associated Press. Sales igresa no..icial.
Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


7892+153





Saturday, December 7,2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7


Nasdaq National Market


Name Div Last Chg


AMCNet 6354 +08
ASMLHId 69e 9145 +31
AXT Inc 228
AcaciaTc 50 1371 +33
AoadiaHIt 4581 -58
AcadiaPh 2439 -09
Accuray 797 + 11
AoelRx 871 -24
Achillion 336 -01
AotisBliz 19f 1720 +42
Actuate 755 -31
Acxiom ... u36.24 +2.29
AdobeSy 5560 +56
Adtran 36 2629 -04
AdvEnId 2243 +06
" ^ ^ 6700 -70
827 +04
AkamaiT 4495 -17
Akorn 2576 + 15
AlbnyMIo 1054 -17
Alexion u125 45 +328


AllscnptH
AlnylamP
AlteraCp If
Al

Amann
Amazon
AmbacFn n
Ambarella
Amedlisys
ACapAgy 3
AmCapLtd
A
A A
A,


AmSupr
Amgen
AmkorTch
AnacorPh

A
AngiesList


Apollolnv
Apple Inc 1
A
ApldMatl
AMCC
Approach
ArenaPhm
AresCap 1
AriadP
ArmHId
Arotech
ArrayBio
Arris
ArubaNet
AsoenaRtl
AsoentSol
AsialnfoL
AspenTech
AssodBanc
Atmel
AudCodes
Autodesk
AutoData
Auxilium


3985
1518
6298
60 3212
.40 31.15
177
38695


0m d1928 -18
1507 +013
3m 1815 -03
94f 1280 -10
154 + 03
88 11412 +77
585 +05
... u16.84 +1.02
199+04

69
36 4927 +45
1280 +28








4.07 -.50
u1645 +63
2506 -07
80 883 +09
20 56002 -788
40 1683 +33
1265 + 07
d1924 -69
595 -25
52a 1827 +07
.. 4,07 -,50
23e 5006 +g8
250 -08
598 + 02
21 26 -10


u399g +29
1732 +36
746 -04
6.80 +.34
u4642 +48
7966+1 13
u21.64 +2.31
u4696 -63
434 +16
3663 +65
1632 +32


BallardPw ... 1.70 +.27
BncFstOK 124 56 30 + 89


59 +09


CDWCpn 17 2259 +08
CH Robins 40 5789 -38
CMEGrp 80 7997 +131
CVBFncl 40 u1645 +36
Cache ... 5.11 +.38
CadenePh 953 -07
Cadence 1336 -02
Caesars 1950 + 29
CalAmp 23 90 32
A 9
Calhidus u1208 + 23
Camtekh 430 -20
CdnSolar ... 27.57 -1.50


9 9
CapProd 93 935 +13
CapFedFn 30a 1212 +20
CpstnTurb 1 28 + 02



CareerEyond 46.7049 402



CecoEnv .20 15.89 +.75
CarlyleGp 128e 3299 +96
Carnzo 39 17 -1 53
CasellaW u601 + 08
Catamaran 44 99 + 45
Caylum 3507 -22
Cbeyond ... 6.70 +.49
CecoEnv .20 15.89 +.75
"^' u16643 +1 92
25 87 + 76
CEurMed 264 + 03
CentAI 876 -10


Chartlnds
CharterCm
ChkPoInt
Cheesecake
ChIdPlace
ChiAutL rsh
ChiRecyEn


29 83
... 92.04
127 75
6100


ConurTch 94 99 -83
Conns u7299+317
Copart 3576 +49
ConnthC 173 -02
CorOnDem 4983 +36
Costoo 124 12206+1 11
CowenGp 400 -01
CreeInc 5803 -22
Crocs 13 13 -13
CrssCtryHI 694 -10
Ctnp om 4739 -13
CublstPh 65 14 +56
CumMed 687 14
Cuns 343 +05
Cyberonos 6880 +42
CypSemi 44 967 +18


D FC3Gbl d946 -11


dELIAs
Dndreon
Dentsply
DexCom
DiamondF
DiambkEn
DireTV
DIscComA
D AshNet1h
DollarTree
DonlleyRR
DrmWksA


1959 +24
104 +02
301 -01
25 4787 +93
3465 +21
... u25.79 +1.65
... 46.18 -3.02
6644 +106
8506+107
00e u5477 +68
55 17 -08
04 u1951 +39
34 10 +61
350 -10
76 4860 + 15


EagleBulk ... 3.84 -.27
EaglRkEn 60m 549 +05
ErthLink 20 519 +03
EstWstBcp 60 u3451 +66
Ebxl Inc 1396 22
8x8I no 954 +04
ElectArts ... 22.24 +1.23
EndoPhrm 6594 -01
Endoloqix 1731 -19


-7.97 1EnzonPh s2.05e


56 4849 +49
53 12 -08
... 3.76 -.54
... 4.14 +.38

6 74 -13
2335 +09
168 52 28 +89
77f 54 83 +99


1086 +13
496
1.58 +.13
16548 -195


dis 60 6348
Intl 60 43 44
cnpts 66 95
iNet u699
6p 11 01
etwks 83 59
Sys 36 29 38


FstMent 64 2313 +57
Fiserv 111 16 +288
FiveBelow ... 45.29 -2.46
Flextrn 748 + 17


Fresh Mkt
FronterCm
FuelTech
FuelCellE


40 456 +13
u847 -04
... Ul.72 +.14


Gentex 56 2977 +38
Gentherm 2457 +57
GeronCp 586 -01
o leadSois 7399 +80
GluMobile 342 -07
3289
180 35 80 -22
GolLNGPt 2.09f 29.02 -1.92
Goodyear 20 2256 +57
u1069 87+12 53
08a 859 +18
100 71 30 +1 97
GreenP ns 16 1731 +46
Groupon 909
GulfRes u278 +06
GulfportE 5821 -1 70
HD Suppn 2106 +34
2247
8327 +42
Halozyme 1446 +07
HanwhaSol ... 3.14 -.18
Harmonic 738 + 05
Hamnslntl 201 + 01
Hasbro 1 60 5176 -61


HawHollysysd 817.86 +1.012
Healthwys 1403 14
HrtlndEx 08 1839 +09
HSchein 11388 +1 43
Her6Offsh 614 -17
HimaxTch 25e 1065 -24
Hollysys ... 17.06 +1.03
2229 -18
S3936 -21
HonzPhm 677 -10
HudsCty 16 923 + 15
HuntJB 60 7673 +72
HuntBncsh 20 924 +23
IAC Inter 96 5626 +20
ICGGrp u1772 +54
IdenxLabs 10400
iGateCorp u3481 +1 23
iPass d950 -05
iShAsaexJ 106e 6084 + 92
iShACWX 109e 4593 +59
iShACWI 11I e 5655 +66
iShNsdqBo 18e 22201 +1 82
Icahn Ent 500u14439 +465
Icon PLC 3958 +1 68
IconixBr 3946 -33
IdenixPh ... 4.93 -.46
Illumina 9925 +1 60
ImunoGn 1497 -04
Imunmd 452 +03
Incyte 4659 + 04
Infinera 943 + 10


1495 +59
3982 +135
3675 +39
4724 +192
1024 +05
S 2482 56
a 11 54 04
0a 2466 13
a 3305 +41
1373 +28
48 11 01 +29
76 u7491 +90


IronwdPh 11 28 + 18
Isis 39 12 13
Ixia If ... 13.07 +1.06


A Solar rs 890 -33
JDS Uniph 1265 +33
JazzPhrm 11704 +270
JetBlue 829 -03
JiveSoflw 1060 +33
JosABank 5672 +26
KLATn 180 6265 +84
Kandeh 717 +33
KearnyFn 1056 +32
KiOR 1 92 +06
KraftFGp 210Of 5355 +89
Kuhcoke 1221 +09
LKQCorp 3362+1 37
LSICorp 12 810 +16
LTX-Cred 719 +06
LamResrch 51 16 +31
LamarAd 4980 +21
Lattice 565 +01


LibGlobC 80 26+1 07
IbMedAn 14903+154
LbtylntA 2768+ 19
LifeTeh 7569+ 07
LifePtH 5124+ 06
197 +01
104 u43 93 +49
290 3053 -11
290 316 +09
Lionbrdg 578
Logitech .23e u12.05 +.66
lululemngs 6984 -78


MSG 5625 +15


MarlntA
MarvellT
Mattel
MattressF
MattsonT


2997
512 + 15
68 4623 +61
24 1360 -25
I144 46 26 + 47
... 41.00 +2.10
267 -04
104 2846 +42
2129 + 15
u3820 -71
6220 +91
u3677 -43
3916 +57
20f 1997 +30
18 2244 +06
57 10608 +80


Methanx
Microchp
MioronT
MicrosSys
MicroSem
Microsoft
MI
MillerHer
MitelNet g
Molex
MolexA
Mondelez
MonstrBev
Move Inc
MultimGm
Mylan
MynadG
NIC Ino
Nil HIdg


NewsCpA n
NewsCpB n
Noodles n
NorTrst
NwstBcsh


56f u3509 69
63 05 +76
1588 61
... 29.59 +1.69
4414 +79
25 45 +06
35e 2403 +14
... 2.64 +.16


1736 -01
... 37.70 -2.43
24 5875 +100
52 1497 +24


ayne 1572 -38 1Metabolix 1.63 +.56 INuanceCm 1425 +0




Campers Inn








Buy or Consign with us!



Turn Your -


Unused RV


Into CA$H! 4


Campers Inn

3230 US llwy 27/441 Fruitland Park, FL 34731

352-787-7744
wwwu.campersinn.comn


OSI Sys
OceanPw


999 -12
12500 +404
... 64.75 -6.97


OmniVisn 1561 -05
OnSmcnd 751 +06
OnTrack ... 3.23 +.23
Oncothyr 195 +01
OpenTxt 120 8835 -53
OpenTable 8166 +35
OraSure ... 6.05 +.35
Orexigen 573 +05


5855 -259
60 829 +19
PGT Ino 1010 +35
PMC Sra 596 -02
PTC In- u3331 +61
PaoWstBo 1 00 u42 11 +62
Paooar 80a 5695+135
PacSunwr ... 3.28 +.52
PaciraPhm 5187 -64
PanASlv 50 1029 +04
Parexel 41 10 +78
Patterson 64 4176 +79
PattUTI 20 2382 -62
Paychex 140 4337 +69
PnnNGm 1436 +36
PeopUtdF 65 1484 +15
PefetWId 45e 1829 -52
PetSmart 78 7338 +42
Photrn 820 +09
PigrnmsP 1644 +20









00
Polyom 1082 -07
Popular 2847 +42











Ou80o O~ 23 -3.95
PorfRe s 5398 +20-
PwShsQQQ98e u8600 +62






Pozen 175e 8026 +03
Premier n 3583 +33
PnceTR 152 7982+128
prorepne 118040 +601
PnvateB 04 u2840 +1 01
ProUPQQQ u11524 +233
ProgniosPh 460 + 11
Proofpoint 28 03 -1 42
PrUPShQQQ d1556 -34
ProspctCap 132 11 17 +08
QIAGEN 2349 +56
QhikTeh 2496 +09
Qlog 5 6 1170 -05
Qualcom 1 40 u73 76 + 53
Questcor 1.00f 52.63 -3.95
RF Inds ,.28. 9.20 -.67
RF MioD 522 -09
RPXCorp 1623 +14
RadiSys ... 2.63 +.52
Rambus 858 +02
50f 6544 -21


Air 99
onsys u199(
IOpp 60 148;
1907


RoyGId 84f 44 15 + 19


SFX Ent n ...
SLM Cp 60
SahixPhm
SanDisk 90

Santarus
Sapient
SareptaTh
SciGames
SeaChange ...
SeacoastBk

SeattGen
SelCmfrt
Semtech


33 97 +43
11.59 +.55
644 +29
8649 +134
6797 +1 11
1247 -26
1579 +58
3197 -02
1600 +71
1807 -91
1745 +04
12.03 -2.37
233 +02
u51 42 +1 58
48 09 -1 89
4435 +08
2072 -05
2976 +33


19 17
3 16
86 u89 18 +


sXM 05e 369
wksSol u27 50
thWes 1221
daStrm 53 33
hu cm 68 80
vrCity n 53 72
azyme 8 52
mcCorp u21 05
nus 2 91
ectPh 15e 944

ritAir 44 17
unk 69 68
eadtrm 40 30 62
outs n 37 85
pies 48 15 96
rSoient 1 29
rhunks I104f 7994


support.cm ...
SusqBnc 32
SwisherH h


3678 + 19
13 22 -02
17 00 -3 59
14 22 -31
30 38 -40
7 23 -04
3.61 +.19


aptios 4926 + 41
opsys 3794 +53
taPhm 4 98
CCap 116 1068 +11
elecom 28 89
eTwo 1664 +23
1551 -49
1680 +29
aMot 13736 -312
seraToh 40a 18 95 +06
3apBsh u5648 + 99


Tex-nst 1 20 u43 49 + 83
Theravnce ... 37.34 +1.79
Thorate 3856 -36
TibcoSft 2381 -13
TiShop 1665 +22
TitanMaoh 1501 +06
TiVo Inc 1259 -13
Tornier 1753 + 13
TowerGp If .66 3.90 -.24
TractSups 52 7276 +11
TnmbleNs 3260 -15
TripAdvis 8561 +07
TnQuint 8 13 -17
21stCFoxA 25 3314 +40
21stCFoxB 25 3216 +20
21Vianet 1950 -22
UTiWrldwd 06 1689 +37
Ubiquiti .18e 36.47 -3.48
UltaSalon ... 93.76-24.24


299 -79


VimpelCm 159e 1206 +31
ViroPhrm 4956 -03
VisnChina ... 10.35 +1.36
VitesseS 272 -07
Vius 973 +10
Vodafone 161e 3772 +96
Volcano 2293 +43
WarrenRs 323 +05
Web oom 2878 -16
WebMD 3837 -45
WendysCo 20 855
WernerEnt 20 24 18
120f u7891 +213
d1972 -52
274 -01
WholeFds 48f 5626 +65


38 86
3994
u1841
73 83
16 2973
325
1673


Mutual Funds


12-mo
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
AQR
DivArbtl 11 22 +21
MaFStrl 1041 +14 +94
MaFtStrN b 1033+13 +90
MIStrAtl 1026 +07 +40
Acadian
EmgMkts d 1857+17 +08
Alger Group
CapAplnsI 2917+25 +327
CapApprA m 2188 +20 +327
Alliance Bernstein
GIblBdA m 825 -20
GrthlncA m 526+06 +333


NFJAIICpVaA
NFJAIICpValn
NFJSmCVAd
NFJSmCVIs
NFJISmCVIA n+


937-12 +69
948 -12 +62
3853 +40 +336
m 1564+19+276


Amana
Growfi b 3220 +35
Income b 4332 +67
American Beacon
26 94 +31
28 47 +33
2896 29
American Century
DivBdlnstl x 1059 -07
DivBdlnv x 1059 -07
EqGrowInv 3149 +39


EqlnA x 851 -46 +18:
Eqlnclnstl x 852 -46 +188
Eqlnclnv x 851 -46 +185
GinMaelnv 1065 +03 -2
Hentlnv 2483 + 19 +29


1171 -28 -99
1359+11 +216
3412+30 +266
3372+30 +264
1553 -78 +298
x1171-16 +302


29+339


American Funds
AMCAPA m 2833
BalA m 24 06
AMAA
BondA m 1246
CaplnBuA m 57 78
CaplncBuB m 57 80
A
CapWIdBdA mM202
CpWldGrlA m4434
CpWldGrlB m4408

EurPacGrA m4802
FnlnA m 51 45
GIbBalA m 3039
GrthAmA m 4454
GrthAmB m 4296
HiIncA m 11 35
HilnoMuA m 1428
IncAmerA m 2038
IntBdAmA m 1347
IntlGrlnA m 3519
InvCoAmA m 3838
LtdTmTxEA m 1595
MutualA m 3500
NewEonA m3962
NewPerspA m 38 49
NwWrldA m 5884
STBdFdA m 999
SmCpWIdA m5040
TaxEBdAmA m1237
TaxECAA m 1665
USGovSeoA m 13 71
WAMutlnvA m 3959
Arbitrage
Arbitragl d 1288
Ariel
Appreclnv b 5403
Anellnv b 71 34
Artio Global
GlobHYIdl 1015
TotRtBdl 1299
Artisan
Intl d 2959
IntPal d 3573
MdCpVal 2634
MidCap 4616


Aston Funds
MidCapN b 4
M
b 2
WH
BrdMktFxl
TaxEfEq d 2
BNY Mellon


NtllntM 1
NtlShTM
Baird


ShTmBdIns
Baron
Asset b (
Growfit b 7
SmCap b !
Bernstein
DiversMu 1


IntlPort
NYMuni
TxMIntI
Berwyn
Income d
BlackRock
BasicValA m 3


Brown Advisory
GrEqlnv d 1844+18 +
Brown Cap Mgmt
SmCo Is b 7363 +65+
Buffalo
Flexrb-nc d 1426 + 11 +
SmallCap d 3960 +08 +
CG Capital Markets
21 81 + 16 +
1226 + 13 +
E:CD
Focus 3819 +36 +
CRM
MdCpVllns 3924 +49 +
Calamos
GrInoA m 3634 + 19 +
GrowA m 6086 +43 +
MktNeul 1303 +02
MktNulnA m 1316+02
Calvert
EquityA m 4679 +54 +
Causeway
IntlVllns d 1582 + 16 +
Champlain Investment
ChSmlComp b 1826+ 16 +
Clipper
Cipper 8976+1 07 +
Cohen & Steers
CSPSI 1292 +01
Realty 6572+57
Realtylns 42 86 + 38
Columbia
AcornA m 36 66 + 23
AcornlntZ 4790+25
AcornUSAZ 3776+30
AoornZ 3815+24
CAModA m 1240+06


oA m 4860
A m 1826


IntmBdA m 897
IntmBdZ 898
IntmMuniBdZ 1045-01
LgCpGrowA m 32 36+ 3
m844 +0i
30 68 +1
MdCapldxZ 1517 + 13
MdCpVa7 1921 +21
SIlnoZ 997
ShrTrmMuniBdZ 10 49
SmCaValIZ 1961 + 1S
SmCapldxZ 2390 + 1
m 18 81 +1,i
19 08 + l'
StratlncA m 618+0
TaxExmptA m 1325 -0'
ValRestrZ 57 65 + 5,
Community Reinvest
Quallnv b 1060
Constellation
SndsSelGrl 1756 +0z
SndsSelGrll 1716 +0;
Gj 6

G 65


28 27+26 +08
2071 +14 +30
266 26 +06
1533 08 +159
1755 +17 +289
917 +06 +43
1157 -98


1623 +16
1611 + 16
1429 +16


1615
DWS-Scudder
EqDivB m 41 85
GMAS 1426
GrlncS 2407
GvtSc m 813
G
HIlncA m 498
m 881

25 86
TechB m 1392
Davis
NYVentA m 41 97
NYVentC m 4018
NYVentY 4250
Delaware Invest
DiverlncA m 888
OpFIxlncl 9 47
US~rowls x 2413
A
Value 1604
Diamond Hill
22818
Dodge & Cox
Bal 9669
GIbStook 11 62
Income 1360
IntlStk 42 24
Stock 164 21H
DoubleLine
CrFxdlncli 1074
TotRetBdN b 1086
Dreyfus
Apprecalnv 5142


tkl 1549 +05 +9
dCapldx 37 45 +30 +32
nIBd 11 14 -01 -5(
axEBd 1431 -01 -6
pMdCpVaA f 38 87+ 53+403
5001dx 49 38 +55 +298


Driehaus
ActiveInc 1
EmMktGr d 3
Eaton Vance
FIRtHIA m
FloatRateA m
IncBosA m


CommStk 30 68
LgCap 2163
FPA
Capital d 47 36
Acres d 33 53
Newlnc d 1036
Fairholme Funds
Fairhome d 41 30
Federated


mA 6 85 +06
nRm 685+06


Fidelity
1357+04 +46
1825+ 10 +130
1725+15 +236
Bal 2270 +17 +188
BIChGrow 6284+44 +366
CAMuIno d 1228 -31
Canada x 5673 -21 +88
CapAprx 3500-327+336

Caplnx x 977 -05 +95
x 3376-342 +262
100950 +88 +319
ConvSec 3091 +18 +265
DiscEq x 3156 -61 +349
DivGrow 3551 +28 +310
DivrlntI x 3560 -26 +231
E 3063-21 +68
E 2392+19 +65
EqInc 5767054+25
Eqlno II 24 12 + 30 +26 1
ExpMulNat x2382 -16 +250
FF2015 1292+07+108
FF2035 13 60 +10 +190
FF2040 958+08+195
GA




Fidety 42 78 + 40 +27 3
FItRtBlIn x 995 -04 +40
FocStk x 18 97-1 04 +34 5
FourlnOne 35 52 +31 +23 5
Fr2045 11 11 +08 +200
Fr2050 11 17 +08 +203
Free2010 1545+06 +102
Free2020 1583+08 +120
Free2025 1348+09 +151
Free2030 1638+12 +163
Freeln 11 90+03 +41
GNMA 1127+03 -19
Govtlnc 10 23 -2 6
GrStr d 2768+25 +358
GrowCo x 11652-763+349


2634 -29
60 7-6 66


269 -46
82 -02 -47
002+27 +34 6
567+03 -71
761 +28 +426


lesl001dx 11 76
tMu d 1068
mBond 859
;apDisc x 30 96


SmCpValx 1962 -53
StkSelec 36 83 + 37
StrDivlnc 14 09 + 12
Stratlno 10 99
TaxFrB d 1096
TotalBd 1047 +01
Trend 95 79 + 84
USBdldx 11 41 +01
USBdidx 11 41 +01
USBdidxlnv 11 41 +01
Value x 10037 -02
WorldwId x 2365-1 91
Fidelity Advisor
2037 + 16


13 26 +02
86 42 + 64
80 39 + 59
97 -03
S995 -03
1358 +07
1332 +09


Fidelity Select
Boteh x 17844
Chemical d 14683
ConsStpl d 9368
d 61 47


Soft-Oom d 1181
Telh x 1177S
Fidelity Spartan
5001dxAdvta 642;


First Eagle
GIbA m 5458+31
OverseasA m 2397+06
USValueA m 2034 + 16 +
First Investors
GrowlncA m 2205 +24
Forum
AbStratl 1103
FrankTemp-Frank
FedTFA m 1172
Fed TF C m 1171
FedlntA m 1194 -01
FedTxFrIA 1173 +01
FrankTemp-Franklin
BallnA m 55 80 + 61
CATFA m 693+03
CAInTFAm 1208+01
EqlnA m 2252+25
FLRtDAAdv 920
FIRtDAooA m 9 19
FIxCpGrA m 6240+43
GrowthA m 63 60 + 57
HYTFAm 980
m 210
210
m 241 +02 +
IncomeA m 2 38 + 01
IncomeAdv 2 36 + 01
InsTFA m 1170+01
LoDurTReA m 1017+01
NYTFAm 1116
OHTFA m 1212+01
HisDivAdv 4764+60 +
HisDvC m 4702+59 +
F-sDA m 4770 +60+
SmCpValA m 61 33 + 60 +
SmMdCpGrA m 45 25+33
StrlnoA m 1055 +01
StrinoC m 1055 +02
TotalRetA m 995+01
USGo Cm 645 +02
USGoA m 649+01
UtlsA m 1479 +17
FrankTemp-Mutual
DisovC m 3394 +21 +


QuestA m l968 +90g
QuestZ 1991 +09
Shares C m 2734+22
Shares Z 280399 +22
SharesA m 2774+21
FrankTemp-Templeton
DvMkA m 2284+08
FgnA m 8446+04
FrSmCoSer 21 60 + 07
"' 836 +04
m 1312+06
GIBondA m 1310+06
GIBondAdv 1305 +05
GrowthAm 24956+17
WorldA m 19 84 + 14
Franklin Templeton
FndAIIA m 1328+09
FndAIIC m 13 05 +08
HYIdTFInA 984
ModAIloA m 1601 +09
GE


-596 SmRt2
19 7 TxAwR


StFxInV d 1619 +26
USCorEqVI 1717 +20 +273
Gabelli
AssetAAA m 6626+69 +302
EqlncomeAAA m 2796+31 +282
SmCpGrAAA m 46 80+43+36 4
Gateway
GatewayA m 2877+08 +74
Goldman Sachs
GrOppAm 2728+20+316
GrOpps 2973 +23 +321
HiYdMuns d 854 -64
HYeldls d 738 +01 +79
MidCapVaA m 42 86+42 +316
MidCpVals 4319+42 +322
ShDuTFIs 1053 -03
SmCpValA m 51 86 +50 +387
SmCpValls 5488 +53 +393
GuideStone Funds
BoAoGS4 1378 +93
Harbor
Bond 1218 -10
CapAplnst 5639 +37+346
CapAprln b 5545+36 +341
HYBdlnst d 1124 +01 +56
IntlAdm b 6945 +78 +158


Harding Loevner
d 4963
1772+
Hartford
BalHLSIA 2491
BallnoA m 1312
Balln)C m 1297
CapAprC m 4159
CapAprA m 4722
CapAprl 47 33
CapAprY 51 50
ChksBalsA m 11 96
CpApHLSIA 5836
DivGrowA m 2607
DivGrowl 25 99
DivGthY 26 48
DvGrHLSIA 2703
EqlncA m 1826
FloatRtA m 901
FloatRtC m 9 00
FloatRt 902

InOnHLSIA 1449


MdCpHLSIA 3715+33
MidCapA m 2648+24
SmCoHLSIA 2543 + 18
S HLSIA 5779 +75
TRBdHLSIA 1133
Heartland
Value m 5212+19
ValuePlus m 3835 +33
Henderson
IntlOppA m 2605+11
Hennessy
GsUtlldxInv 2656+31
Hotchkis & Wiley
MidCpVall 3975+42
Hussman
StratGrfi d 1007 -03
ICM
SmCo 3755 +35
ING
SCorpLeadB 3093+45
GIREstA m 1824 +15
INVESCO
CharterA m 2250 +20
ComstokA m 23 14 + 22
DeMktA m 3270+25
DivDivA m 1683+22
DivDivlnv b 1681 +22
EqlncomeA m 11 11 +09
EqlncomeC m 1094+09
EqWSP500A m 44 42+ 50
GrowlncA m 2703 +30
HiYldMuA m 905
IntlGrA m 3308+25
IntlGrI 3362 +25
MidCapGrA m 37 15+41
MidCpCrA m 2690+18
MunilnA m 1289
RealEstA m 2478+21
SmCapValA m 22 56+16
Summit b 1720+15
Ivy
AssetStrA m 31 13 +29
AssetStC m 3016 +28
AssetStrY b 31 19 +30
HiInoA m 876
HlnoC m 876
LtdTmBdA m 1099
MdCpGrA m 2344+05
MdCpGrthl 2460 +06
SoTeohA m 51 43 + 57
JPMorgan
CoreBdUlt 1160
CoreBondA m 159 -01


1873+16
996 -01
1471 + 16


USLCpCrPS 2946^
ValAdvSel 27 40^
96
James Advantage
GoldRainA b 2383
Janus
BaIT 3046+
FortyS b 4823+
Gr&lncT 4365+
HiYldT 937
OverseasT 37 75
PerknsMCVT 2637+


TwentyT 8C
Jensen
QualtyGrl 38
QualtyGrJ b 38
John Hancock
BondA m 15
InoomeA m 6


m 1967+1
1410 + 10
Legg Mason/Western
AggGrowA m 17854+1 37
19250+148
m 1776 + 19
ApprecA m 1978+21
CrPIBdFI b 11 21 +01
CrPIBdIns 11 21 +01
EqlncA m 1794 +20
SmCpGrA m 2802+20
ValueC m 5716 +51
Litman Gregory
MaslntllntI 1763 + 10
Longleaf Partners
Intl 1736 +09
3304 +21
3089 +09
Loomis Sayles


GIbBdInstl
Lord Abbett
AfflatA mL
BalA m
BondDebA m


169

1536+16


CabrdDiA m 551
DeNGrowA m 2500 +
De'Growl 27 47
m 1481 +
950
MidCpStNA m 22 73 +
NatlTaxFA m 1052
ShDurlncA m 457
ShDurlniC m 459
ShDurlnol 4 56
SmCpValA m 41 95
SmCpVall 44 69
ValOppA m 1996
MFS
BondA m 1371
ConAo1A m 1443+
GrAIlooA m 1776 +
GrowA m 6404
Growl 6688
IntDivA m 1623
IntlNDsA m 2776
IntlNDsl 2856
IntValA Am 3361
IslntlEq 2212 +
MAInvA m 2742
MAInGrA m 2243
MAInvl 2688
ModAllooA m 1620
MuHlnoA f 745
Reslnt[A m 1765+
Reslntll 1824 +
ResearchA m 3662
TotRetA m 1746 +
UtilA m 21 48
ValueA m 3295
ValueC m 3261 +
Valuel 3312 +
MainStay
HYIdCorA m 606


Mairs & Power
Grilnv 11024+1
Managers
BondSvc 2732 +
1059
1984 +
Manning & Napier
WrIdOppA 897+
Matthews Asian
China d 25 64 +
Divlnv d 1594 +


01 +64
19 +207
06 +329

47 +302
48 +300
56 +296

65 +34 0


GrInc d 1917 -01 +70
PacTiger d 2539+16 +59
Merger
Merger b 1629+01 +40
Meridian
MerdnGr d 3591 +13 +248
Metropolitan West
Hi-YIdBdM b 1055 +78
LowDurBd b 880 +22
LowDurBdl 880 +24
TotRetBdl 1063 +06
TotRtBd b 1063 +04
Morgan Stanley
FooGrA m 5392 +29+438
ntlEqA m 1646+14+182
IntlEql d 1670 + 15 +185
MdCpGrA m 4432+10 +367
MdCpGrl 4620 + 10 +370
SmCoGrl d 2157+08+623
Munder Funds
MdCpCrGrA m 41 48+39+318
MdCpCrGrY 4263 +40 +322
Mutual Series
Beacon Z 1666+07+275
Nations
LgCplxZ 3531 +40 +302
Nationwide
b1146+09 +209
839+09 +216
S&P5001s 1502 + 17 +303
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Neuberger Berman
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GenessTr 676 62 345
Partnrlnv 3555 +41 +313
Nicholas
Nihol 6449+87 +372
Northern
Bdlndx 1046 -26
Fxedn 1016 -1 7
GIbREIdx d 920 +07 +46
HYFixlnc d 762 +79


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DivVall 1832 +20 +299
HYIdMunA m 1535 -65
HIYIdMunC m 1534 -70
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IntMunBdl 892 -29
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Oakmark
Eqlnl 3469+27 +227
GISell 1631 + 14 +344
Global 3050 +25 +360
Intll 2627 + 16 +31 6
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Select I 41 13 +44 +365
Old Westbury
GIbSmMdCp 1756+12 +246
1221 +09 +241
1190 -01 -23
RealRet 813 +04 -141
Oppenheimer
AMTFrMunA m 647 -85
AotALooA m 1166 +193
CapApA 606 62+53+265
CaplncA m 959 +04 +75
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GlOrA m 3975+ 19 391


GlobY 7926 93 ++
ntlBondA m 607 02
IntlBondY 607 02
IntlDiA m 1439 +
IntlGrY 3684 25
ntlGrowA m 3695 26 +
ManSSMCA m2983 25
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RsDivA m 1916 +23 +
RsDiY 1964 +23 +9
SmMIdVaA m4327 +53
SrFItRatA m 841 +
SrF-tRatC m 842 +
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StratlnmC m 411
Oppenheimer Rocheste
FdMuniA m 1450 _-
LmtTmMunA m 1404


RohHYMA
RoFhHYMC
Osterweis
OsterStrInc d
PIMCO
AAstAAutP
AIIAssetA m
AIIAssetC m
AIIAssetl
AIIAstP
AIIAuthA m
AIIAuthC m
AIIAuthln


ShTermAdm b 987
ShtTerms 987

LA
ToRtlllls 955+
ToRtllls 1031 +C

TotRetAdm b 1082
TotRetC m 1082
TotRetls 1082
TotRetrnD b 1082
TotlRetnP 1082
PRIMECAP Odyssey
2957 + 1
2382 +;
Stock 21 04 +
Parametric
TxMgEMInstI d4933+;3
Parnassus
Eqlnclnv 3588 + I
Pax World
Bal b 2698 +16
Permanent
Portfolho 47 32 + 1
Pioneer
CoreEqA m 1536+1
HIdA m 1065+
PioneerA m 38 30 + 4
StratlnoA m 1080 +
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Principal
1069
11 74+ 1
HYIdA m 792
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Principal
169

dA m 92


MGIIIInst 1420 +08 +33 1
MidCapA m 2009 +20+316
PrSeclnst 1013 +24
SAMBalA m 1576+11 +163
SAMConGrA m 1778+15+216
SCGrllnst 1530+11 +423
SCValG 1427 + 11 +403
Prudential
GblRealEs 2195 +16 +66
JenMCGrA m 3858+25 +259
Prudential Investmen
2020FooA m 1961 +13 +282
GotlnA m 939 -24
H~eldA m 5 72 +72
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JennGrZ 2886+18+344
MuniHIncA m 940 -67
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Putnam
CATxEInoA m 778 -48
DrlnA m 785 +02 +80
DynAstAIGA m 16 52+ 14+236
EqlnomeA m 2159+26 +310
EqlnomeY 2160+27 +313
GIbHtCrA m 6163+89 +387
GrowlnoA m 1938+19 +347
InestorA x 1890 -02 +325
MultCapGrA x 73 13+ 46 +333
VoyagerA x 3024 +419
RS
GINatResA m3526 -08 -2 1
PartnerA m 4438+43 +410
RidgeWorth
1013 +63
1858+24 +332
1505+15 +33 1
SmCapEqi 1830+20+372
USGovBndl 1011 00
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Russell
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Russell LifePoints
BalStrC b 11 77 +
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6 +339


SSCM
S&P5001d
Schwab


38 +27 +29 5
40 22 299
06 16 +327
77 +21 216
63 +32 303
43 + 22 +39 4


TotStkMSI d 33 47 +34
Scout
Internt1 36 30 + 28
Selected
AmerShS b 5069+56
Amercan D 5072 + 55
Sentinel
CmnStkA m 43 23 +47
Sequoia
Sequoia 21393+179
Sound Shore
SoundShor 4770 +65
Spectra
SpectraA m 1796 + 16
State Farm
Balanced 6212+52
GrowA 685+100
SteelPath
MLPInoA m 1067+02
SunAmerica
FoIDvStrC m 1744 +22
T Rowe Price
Balanced 2383+17
BIChpGAdv b 62 24+63
BIChpGr 6253+64
CapApprec 2681 +24
DivGrow 3317+41
EmMktBd d 1240+03
EmMktStk d 3267+37


+31 6

+125

+316
+320

+292

+316

+404

+328

+125
+245

+183

+366


5084 +42 +362
6141 +61 +500
714 +96
2040+10 +395
2638+23 +421
993 +90


CapVa 3061 +28
CpGr 74 87 +54
G
AmGro 4798+44
AG 9
Asa d 1669+04
',!Era 46 83 + 08
Honz 4772+19
',Income x 933 -05
eaStk d 1003 +09
StrBal 23 84 + 16
StrGr 31 24 + 27
8trlno 1880 +09
15 1460+09


T.Rowe
ReaAsset
TCW


TFS
MktNeut d
TIAA-CREF


Target
SmCapVal 28
Templeton
InFEqSeS 2r
Third Avenue


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Thornburg
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Tocqueville
Dlfld m 3797 +45
Touchstone
SdCaplnGr 2357 +05
Transamerica
AsAIMdGrA m1453
AstAMdGrC m1443
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 2707+12
U.S. Global Investor
Gd&Pre m 573 -02
GlobRes m 947
WrdProMnr m 552 -03
UBS PACE


USAA


eStk x 1686
3d x 1069
2974
O0M 25 85
Bond 9 21


Unified
Winlnv m 17
VALIC Co I
MdCpldx 27
Stokldx 33
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500Adml 167
5001nv 167
A-WexUSIdxAdm 3
Balldx 27
BalldxAdm 27


12744 +28 +
6786+ 15 +
3009 +39
6307 +82
7059+ 82
5280 +35
10291 +64
11049 +69
6145 40
61 46 +41
151 69+1 00+
61 37 +40 +
9776+1 02+


cAdml 6345
Inc 3885
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ldAdm 46 57
-lstld 4657
4312
603
CorAdml 603
7E 1051
CrAdml 8279

ndAdm 1126


stdxl 16599 86
stPlus 16600 86
stTStld 41 42 +42
stTStPI 41 43 +43
tIExpln 1850 15 +
tlGr 22 89 +23
t -GrAdm 72+89 +74
tlStkldxAdm 27+56 +28


REITIdxAd 9353+78 +56
HEITIdxlnst 1448 + 13 +56
2497+21 +56
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1054-01 +02
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1054 -01 +03
1074 +1 1
STFedAdml 1072 -02
\TGradeAd 1074 +12
TIGradel 1074 +1 3
STTsry 1071 -01 00
STsryAdml 1071-01 +01
SelValu 2893 +31 +389
SmCapldx 51 74 38 +37 6
SmCapldxlP 14965+1 12 +37 9
SmCpldAdm 5184 +39 +378
SmCpldlst 51 84 +39 +378


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54 16 + 14
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UISTMInl 41 82 +04
Westcore
PlusBd 1076 -14
Western Asset
m 1584 -62
m 638 -49
William Blair
InsllntIG 1700 + 08 +17C
IntlGr d 2619 + 13 +169
IntlGrN m 2553 + 12+166
World Funds
EpGoEqShYI 19 16 + 16 +214
Yacktman
Focused d 2572+30 +254
Yacktman d 24 06 + 27 +262


I V-W-X-Y-Z :


+292


+309


+0
+ 1
+ 0
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+ 4
+5




DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, December 7, 2013


1 r"


AII


5 YEAR/I100,00 MILE
-WAERANTY
ModiAvailable Onn
Pre-Owned Vehicles' -e
Mileage
10^ Restrictions!
Modil Year RAetritilnst


2005 NISSAN MAXIMA
L11600A
$8,881


2010 NISSAN SENTRA
L11658A1
$13,173
2009 HYUNDAI SONATA
4mi L11633A
$13,453
2008 HYUNDAI SONATA
L06387B
$13,591


2012 HYUNDAI SONATA
L11924A
$15,641
2011 HYUNDAI SONATA
LT1I1874A
$15,674
2012 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
401 L10770A
$15,794


2011 BMW 128i COUPE
L11566A1
$18,124
2011 HYUNDAI SONATA
41 L11926A
$18,451
2008 CADILLAC DTS
L11139B
$18,463


2007 HYUNDAI TUCSON 2009 HONDA CR-V 2012 HYUNDAI ELANTRA 2012 KIA SPORTAGE
LT11841A PL1940A moD L11357A L11681A
$8,934 $13,694 $15,871 $18,781
2006 HYUNDAI SONATA 2012 HYUNDAI ACCENT 2011 HYUNDAI ELANTRA 2011 HYUNDAI TUCSON
L10061A D L11572A 00 L11920A 40 L11761A
$8,991 $13,783 $16,271 $19,831
2007 HONDA ACCORD 2012 TOYOTA COROLLA 2011 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
L11643A IED L10914A om L11989A I
$9,491 $14,121 $16,291L
2008 HYUNDAI SONATA 2010 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS 2013 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
L11825A L11360A r L11665A ____ I_ III
$9,781 $11,394 $16,473 _
2010 HYUNDAI ACCENT 2009 HYUNDAI AZERA 2012 HYUNDAI SONATA 2012 HYUNDAI TUCSON
4ED L11707A 4 EDn L11663A 6D L11839A D L11809A
$9,894 $14,594 $10,491 $20,431
2012 HYUNDAI ACCENT 2008 HONDA CR-V 2012 HYUNDAI SONATA
L11618A LT11757A1 L11622A
$14,681 $16,494 S21,181
2012 HONDA CIVIC 2012 HYUNDAI SONATA 2010 HONDA ACCORD
LOT6611A UD L11921A LT12027A
02(DD$14,894 $10,671 $21,291
2007 BUICK LACROSSE 2011 KIA SOUL 2011 HONDAACCORD 2013 HYUNDAI TUCSON
L12003A LT11273A LMT1550A 1- L11777A
$10,291 $14,991 $16,791 $21,381
2008 HYUNDAI SONATA 2013 KIA RIO 2013 HYUNDAI ELANTRA 2012 HYUNDAI GENESIS COUPE
L11778A LMLT11230A 4UD L11614A 4n L10944C
$10,991 $14,991 $16,854 $21,491
2012 FORD FOCUS 2013 HYUNDAI SONATA 2011 HYUNDAI SONATA 2011 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
L11582A 4M L11661A m LT11652A 49 LT11957A
$11,994 $14,991 $16,894 $21,991
2009 HYUNDAI SONATA 2011 HYUNDAI SONATA 2013 HYUNDAI SONATA
PL1942A NO- L11710Anm L10944C1
$12,691m1114$17,691 $22,691
2006 JEEP LIBERTY 2013 HYUNDAI VELOSTER 2013 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
L11495A-m u LT11968A ,L11910A
$12,871 _$17,791 $23,591


2008 HYUNDAI AZERA
L10190B
S13.164


2012 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
L11945A
$15,471


2012 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
hnUD L11853A
$17,991


2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
L11766A
$23P991


HUNDREDS MORE TO CHOOSE FROM!


i m


1&


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, December 7, 2013


14


LIi





Inside:

Classifieds

D4-D8


Cruisin'
352-365-8208 I features@dailycommercial.com


Dl
DAILY COMMERCIAL
Saturday, December 7, 2013



www.dailycommercial.com


CARLOS OSORIO / AP
J Mays, Ford's global design chief, describes the features on the automaker's new 2015 Ford Mustang in Dearborn, Mich. The Mustang is celebrating its 50th birthday with a new design
the automaker plans on taking global. It goes on sale next fall in North America and will arrive later in Europe and Asia.



New-look Mustang still has plenty of muscle


DEE-ANN DURBIN
AP Auto Writer
DEARBORN, Mich. The
Ford Mustang is still gallop-
ing at 50.
Ford Motor Co. on Thurs-
day introduced the 2015 Mus-
tang, a confident and aggres-
sive riff on the iconic pony
car that first made Americans
swoon in the 1960s.
The Mustang's passionate
fans are sure to love it, but
Ford will have to wait and
see if it's enough to overtake
rivals and win over interna-
tional buyers.
The Mustang was revealed
at events in New York, Los
Angeles, Shanghai, Sydney,
Barcelona and Ford's home-
town of Dearborn. It goes on
sale next fall in North Ameri-
ca and will reach Europe and
Asia in 2015.
"Mustang cuts to the
heart and soul of our com-
pany and really represents
our company at its best,"
Ford Chief Operating Officer
Mark Fields told hundreds of
dealers and employees gath-
ered in Dearborn to see the
new car.
The Mustang isn't any-
where near Ford's best-sell-
er. Ford sells more pickups
in a week than it does Mus-
tangs in a month. But Ford
says the Mustang has the
highest name recognition
and highest favorable opin-
ion of any of its cars. And car
companies count on beauti-
ful sports cars to cast a glow
over the rest of their lineup.
The Mustang's first full re-
design since 2005 present-
ed Ford with a tough task:
Update and freshen an icon
without alienating fans.
More than 9 million Mus-
tangs have been sold since
1964, and the car has more


This undated image provided by Ford Motor Company shows a rear view of the 2015 Mustang.


than 300 fan clubs around
the world, including one
in Iceland and one solely
for owners of yellow Mus-
tangs. Farrah Fawcett drove
a white one in "Charlie's An-
gels;" Steve McQueen raced
a dark green one through the
streets of San Francisco in
1968's "Bullitt."
The new car takes plenty of
cues from the old. The long
hood and sloping fastback
are still there, as is the trap-
ezoid-shaped grille with the
Mustang logo from the origi-
nal. But the new car sits low-
er and wider, and the roof
tapers dramatically in the
front and back. The signa-
ture rounded headlights are
smaller and sit back under a
fierce, chiseled brow, while
the traditional three-bar tail-
lights are now three-dimen-
sional and tucked beneath
the rear deck lid. The overall
look is wirier than the cur-
rent, more muscular version


designed in 2005.
This new generation of
Mustang is engineered to
meet various international
safety and emissions stan-
dards. There's a right-hand-
drive version for the Unit-
ed Kingdom and Australia.
And Ford will market the car
more heavily overseas.
Ford design chief J Mays
said the design wasn't overly
influenced by European or
Asian sensibilities.
"The reason they love
it is because of its Ameri-
can-ness," he said.
Still, Stephanie Brinley, an
auto analyst with the con-
sulting company IHS, ex-
pects modest sales overseas.
IHS forecasts European Mus-
tang sales will triple from
current levels to around
2,500 in 2015. Sales in Chi-
na will likely remain low be-
cause two-door coupes ar-
en't popular there.
Ford hopes Mustang can


"Mustang cuts to the,
and soul of our comp
and really represents
company at its bes
Mark Fields,
Ford chief operating office
again become the top
ing pony car in the U.S
Chevrolet Camaro,
followed the Mustan
market in 1966 and wa
redesigned in 2009, ha
sold its rival for the last
years and is on track tc
again this year, accord
Kelley Blue Book.
Aaron Bragman, the
troit bureau chief fo
Web site cars.com, liki
new Mustang but que
whether it can beat th
maro, which has a les
ro-inspired design.
'Anyone looking for s
thing a bit more mod
going to choose the (
ro," he said.


But Ford countered that
it takes its history serious-
ly. Fields noted that he was
wearing a set of gold cuff
links given to him by some-
one on the original Mustang
marketing team, and said he
plans to pass them on when
another new Mustang is re-
vealed someday.
I "It's a car, like our compa-
In ny, that has heritage," Fields
said.
F Mustang buyers will have
three engines to choose from:
updated versions of the cur-
rent 3.7-liter V6, which gets
a projected 300 horsepow-
er, and 5.0-liter V8, with 420
horsepower, as well as a new
S 2.3-liter EcoBoost four-cylin-
der that gets a projected 305
AP PHOTO horsepower or more.
The car sits on the Mus-
tang's first independent rear
heart suspension, which should
improve handling because it
gany lets the wheels operate inde-
our pendently
t" Inside, new options in-
clude blind-spot detection
and toggle switches that ad-
just the steering, stabili-
p sell- ty control and other settings
S. The depending on the road con-
which editions. The interior also has
ng to nicer materials, with brushed
is last aluminum replacing painted
s out- plastics and analog dials in-
* three spired by airplane cockpits.
o do it Ford isn't saying how much
ing to the new Mustang will cost.
The current one starts around
e De- $23,000. A convertible version
)r the will also be offered.
es the Dealers at the Dearborn
stions event were thrilled with the
ie Ca- new car.
ss ret- "They captured what's dis-
tinctly Mustang but it's new
some- and fresh," said Brian God-
ern is frey, general manager of Pat
lama- Milliken Ford in Redford,
Mich.


.l<,, I. o II, i t lt 11 20 14 .u itl .I >> \ ) iI \\ >II It. k i t th,. II\ -t>,-,I\ tt 11,.****,.
thu t >.'j, l< ;|i \ I 11 111 lI\ I11 \ >'I 0 II I. t lil A t \\t alerm an \V illIage \>' II t.ii|>'\
/ IMjlilt iluih>, t-Ili>. li\ li1^
S|\h. l>'ll> 5illlhJ ->l~ |\ \ illl illJ~lihH tl >i .>'IUt.l
/ DclCLabl_ dning 1 Illnu, diSLiSIMll11-uaOlllpUSt,0 \lUtS
/ Fun activities, events and golf
/ Wellness center with heated pool and golf simulator
/ Access to home care, assisted living, skilled nursing and rehab if needed


Call (352) 385-1126.


CZVatenngiv





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www.WatermanVillage.com


i^^Jufe^ ~^iuf




Saturday, December 7, 2013


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"f Includes labor, concrete & cleanup
;bFast turnaround, no hassle & local
#CRC1326327, Ins, & References
BRIAN DEGAGLIA
352-267-5723

Q Concrete For Less
8x10 Slab $450
Mep 10x1O40 Slab $1325
Includes Concrete & Labor
S Blocking/lReIlLcJIcns.
I Phillip 352-504-6372

5 [5 T' i i;-t R In
We ELIMINATE all trip
hazards due to UNEVEN and
or RAISED concrete.
Commercial/Residential
Concrete Grinding is 1/2
the cost of replacement.
Entry ways Ramps Sidewalks
Driveways Puddling Water, etc.
Insured
(8771 454-0113 (toll free]
Alconcretegrinding.com


Contactor^

METAL TILE SHINGLE ROOFING
New Construction or Re-Roofing
B 308 Oak Street
I Lady Lake, FL 32159
I1 352-430-2773
www.sackroofing.com
Serving the Tri County Area For 26 Years




A U0Lic.4=BC1252465
ftSDOOR & LOCK SERVICE
We Repair, Replace and Install
Emergency Services Available!
(352) 314-3169


Enclosure0
Screening^


SLCB. CC1252465
I GARAGE DOORS
Complete Service & Installation
Lake County's Largest Provider!
We Sell & Program Remotes!
(3521 748-4575

~Repairs &
Garage Door Replacenments
& Locally Owned
GateAll Work
Warranted
Licensed & Insured midfldoor.com
352-630-0292 Shane Blanton










[ S Affordable Homos
R sapir, LLC
Home Repair Apt. Clean Outs
or installation/repair svcs




Sofis/Siding Doors/Windows
RPainting Tieplacement. Free Est.
wsevice all of Central FLA.




L CallPatl 352-615-12946073


a rs Handyman Painting
Affordable Rome
IP Repair, LLC
Mobile Home Repair 9 Apt. Clean Outs
& Repair Decks & Ramps
Soffits/Siding e Doors/Windows
Painting Tile Works Lie/Ins;
ICall Pat 352-51-8073

gave Hills Handyman a Painting
Door & Window Installion
sf Carpentry,
J Home Improvement,
i Drywall & More! Just Ask!
Professional Service
Liclns. 352-259-5357

VI ,METu InrAN fl
:-:-:Home Repair:::--::
Pressure Washing Painting
Flooring Carpet Clean Outs
Clean Ups Hauling Licensed
352-787-7056

I John Philibert, Inc
We do Everything from Ceilings to
y )Floors. Window and Doors,
r i Pantries, Cabinets and more.
Your pesky Leaks gone, Your Soffits
we Fix, and Houses We'll Paint From
inside and out, we'll make it great Li.c/Ins
JPHandycom(352) 308-0694

lMike Shoffstall
Call 352 552 1875W
1.LJUNGLE HUI ~
AMl [ REPAIRS
. k\ ; .....HU'

Repair everything. Replace anything.


Trted,, Qualit) Craftsmanship fr 30+ Year
Kitchens Bathrooms Windows
Vinyl Siding ,Decks Painting/Staining
Tile/Marble Lanai Enclosures
Mike Lalonde 352-409-8311
1 mikee image4ne.comr


SDaniel Byars
Rescreens
Paio. Pooeel Enclosures &
All Aluminum Repairs
FREEESTIMATES
352A08.2142


HRSUHRNINIb & IREPAIb UI-:
Pool Enclosures
Birdcages/Lanais
Garage Screen Sliders
Screen Doors
OUR SPECIALTY SCREENS:
Privacy/Sunscreen
Super Solar Screen
Super Screen Pet Screen
FL Glass 20x20 Screen
Kickplate Dog Doors
FREE ESTIMATES
Lic/Ins. NO MONEY DOWN!
~^., ^.

Screens Ripped? 1 l
Call 352-504-047 ^"J
SCREEN GENIE
One panel or complete screeri.'
enclosure. Lanais, Etrywa I
Doors. Nojob toosmall.


Cabinetry
Services I


.i5


'I00GO ,Tr M ?
S Water Damage, Allergies?
E 352 552-3386
0 X Testing. Dry-Outs Restoration





Local Agent
Long Term Care Ins.
Medicare Supplements
Critical Care Ins.
Cancer Ins.
Call Bill Bell
352.589-0454 or 352.551.3504

Has your Medicare
Advantage Plan
DROPPED your DOCrTOR?
I have a Solution
Robert Lange
352-742-2425




Irrigation Tuna-Up
$35A Check & Adjust
-. Entire System.
35 i Provide Written Est.
To RFix Problems!
Lower Your Monthly Cost
352-409-3163

p _1Sprinkler
7t Repairs
Timers, Valves, Heads,
Leaks, etc.
(352) 787-9001
That's all we do since 1979
C Native, 4th Generation







Clearing Servmsincales
I.C.C. Bobcat & Tree Svc. Inc.
,.r Land Clearing/Excavating
Fiull Dirt/Clay
R&etJaulingl/Debris Removal
MWtee Stump Grinding
Demolition/Grading/ Driveways
Owner Operator
352-455-7608

CHRIS CANNES LANDSCAPE
^-y:-ww~'///' lthu'isklSknlus
lawn Halutehanee. Hauiscame. Paties,
Rletmlmlg Wallskl IL SOdWINg
Leesbuig 536-3708
20 lYaw s a.l t3 s flislom
uyBr'I X1,adLodsehan


BOYDS
You call it, We haul it!
352
r460-7186





METAL TILE SHINGLE ROOFING
New Construction or Re-Roofing
B 308 Oak Street
Lady Lake, FL 32159
I I 352-430-2773
www.sackrooflng.com
Serving the Tri County Area For 26 Years


Don't Stress Call The Best!
sDependable Commercial
~Lawn Services
.1 Lic/Ins. Designer
Landscaping, Trimming,
rf Shrubs. We do it all
t, Rick 352-427-8919

Howards Lawn
Service
dnUnt/Commereia1
805LIlns
13521
800-9985


w acceulg mew Commrcial &
Lascau iaflm" maid mre.
Reaoahe Dpeialle, Exerifenced
Office 352-552-4556 CON 352-702-6460M

CA> All Lawn
Sand Tree
Care
iService
I Natural Land
t hearing (Goats)
"BEST PRICES" Free Est.
352-460-7186



S cService
ji~9& C&(~Y Center
*jAQM I* 352-602-1l735
At Venetian Gardens
Marina on the
Harris Chain of Lakes.
No Trailer. No Problem.
Boat Repairs & Svc. on water

COVERED BOAT SUPS FOR RENT
win Palms Marina located ao
Lake Griffin. Water& elec. avail.
Weekly, Monthly or Yearly. BOAT
RENTALS: Pontoons,
Jon Boats, Kayaks & Canoes.
Call 352-787-4514




Bill's Moving
Fla. Mover Reg. No: 2095
Owner On Every Job
Fair Rates a 27+ Yrs. ExP.
352-669-4456
Toll Free 888-444-3559

Little John's Movers &
Storage 352-812-4889
Serving Lake, Marion,
& Sumter Counties
1-15 items same day delivery
Local & Long distance moves
Loading & unloading pods, rental
trucks, & storage units.
We have trucks going up &
down 195 & 175
"Less Than a POD" "Door to Door"
You're Coming ....Your Neighbor is Goingl
Jump on Board and Save
SERVING ALL 50 STATES
One item to a full housell!
We will get off the interstate for you!
ljm9575@yahoo.com
US DOT #2406621


Opm M Pramaces

109 W. La View ,SL Lady lake
Belvid nMom a Dad's Restoauramt
wwmwbllMlsliessJz liislrlss.comu
352.753.5003


77 ............ .......
I Triple Crown
STile & Wood
Installation & Repairs
Owner does all work.
Free Est. Lic/Ins
S3524274825


'iI flII I <~ lllllll
Hau ling


Landscaping

Trimming, Mulching,
Sod, Tree Trimming,
Pavers & Much Morel
I Armando Santamario
352-587-13235


Garag Diooir Brightman Home Improvement
Wallpaper, Drywall
Interior Painting, Trim
... REE ESTIMATES
ama... __ Insured
.,.,A352&-598-3"169
All Mael Nals Models.&fiw*W M*
Broken Spring Replacenme
i10% Ofw/lthis ad
352-347-6411 k


WE WEE
rn~n90.
*A Yad oka5
$A 1H u W ate f on

-IeainyTLLFE


Lawn
Services


I


DAILY COMMERCIAL




Saturday, December 7, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


QuaUtyAssurance Painting, Inc.
"If you want quality, you want us!
r't Y Ixoriw-Enerior-Re aints
Ji NewConstrucionm
i Ucensel/lusured
:. Tim Grubbs
-- 352-483-6915
www.qualityassurancepaintinginc.com


(352) 348-6923
Tim Mundy Painting
& PressWe Cleanlo Services, In.
S DWhere Quality I No Atcido t
\n LiFenseds &Insured
I John Philibert, Inc
For All Your Interior/Exterior
IrW Painting Needs.
['5 We Also Offer
Driveways Patios
And Faux Finishes Lic/Ins
Call John in (352) 308-0694
S JPHandy.com o
New England Painter
iSemii-Retired
30 Years Exp
Interior, Exterior, Pressure
Washing No Job Too Siniall
Bob Kelley Painting
S 352-702-7739

CLAUDE WILD PAINTING
High Quality @ Reasonable Prices
Int. & Ext. Free Est. Lic/Ins
Pressure Cleaning Ref. & 35 yrs. exp.
in Lake County
cwildpainting@gmail.com


-Affordable Home
V Repair, LLC
Interior/Exterior Painting
Exterior Paints.Driveways and Decks
NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL LIc/ins
Call Pat 352-551-6073
S inte a krioatenew
Root Coaling
Seolants
Cmenrete Coatinigs
Uc.~ ~~ aI -Feestimates
352-728-4561
alms F^B ro))mB [sim |;ulus


iLn lu^^BBH


/,INDOOR PEST
Pes CONTROL
s low as $29 per m.
352-357-5905
SPest Exterminator


Serv^^fices ^


Since 1969
LSpecializing in
Vandas.
-y T Call for hours
i'JcflWll 352-787-9001
ORCHIDS-o 2902 South St.
< Leesburg, FL
GoodwinOrchids.com











^cc Plumbing, LLC
Al Plumbing Repairs Com/iRes
Kichens a Bath Remodeiels
Disposal. Water Neater, Gas Piping.
Drain/Sewer Cleaninhg.
No Grout Showers. 24 Hr. Emniergency
uc-i.s-c4mrz (352) 343-3763





Ace Pool Service
Complete Pool Services
Motor & Pump Repair
Pool & Patio Remodeling
Servicing Commercial & Residential
Properties Since 1969
Licensed/Insured Free Estimates
352-735-3050


Prss r
ClJT eaning


M=947LI


Serving Lake, Sumter
& & S. Marion Counties
We Service All
SAppliance Brands
SLicensed/Insured
Free Service Call
Sw/Repair
15+ Years Exp. 24 Hr. Emergency Svc.
We Don't Want To Be The Biggest
Just The Best
Eric Wolf 352-630-2202
All About Appliances repairs and installs
all brands of major appliances. We are a
small husband/wife company. Eric has
over 15 years experience repairing appli-
ances and Lavinia (Vinnie) has over 20
years in business management experience.
Together, we strive to offer you prompt,
professional, courteous and personal serv-
ices far beyond your expectations, both by
phone and in your home. We respect you
and your time and make every effort to be
in and out of your home as quickly as pos-
sible yet provide a thorough diagnosis and
timely repair. We genuinely appreciate all
your business.


9,MAY N Providing
',, ^r .iNo-Cost Svcs.
to Lake county
sexual assault victims 24/7/365.
On-Call Rape Advocacy
Counseling, Legal Assistance
Hotline 352-787-1379

You need an ADVOCATE now!!!
You have rights when it comes to your care
at home, in a hospital or nursing home.
Call Ann @352-326-2030 or visit
www.ProfessionalAdvocacyPartners.com
We'll help you get the care you deserve!




5&n.& Prqg
*^-- wfi~LL^
SShinle, Tile, Licensed Bonded -Insured
Metal, and Rubber ResidentiallCommercial I
Roof Systems RC29027460
(352) 669-6607 I

METAL TILE SHINGLE ROOFING
New Construction or Re-Roofing
B 308 Oak Street
Lady Lake, FL 32159
352-430-2773
www.sackrooflng.com
Serving the Tri County Area For 26 Years

#1 IN ROOFING
Leak Repairs Shingles/Flat Roof
Lifetime Metal Roofs Screen Rooms
.Lic. #CCC1329936
Villages Roofing and
Construction, lnc. FREE ROOF ESTIMATES
3B2-314-3B2B

Lake Contracting, Inc.
GAF Certified
Shingles, Metal or Flat
Additions, Remodels, Renovations
Roof to Foundation
E~jA352-602-8794
iUc CGC1507556 CCC1326899

RE-Roofs & Leak Repairs


IOME ZNE
352 552-3386


S Complete Automotive Care
Transmissions AC Brakes
Tune Ups Body Work Oil Change
Family Owned 26 Yrs 352-326-2400
1406 Emerson St., Leesburg across from Post Office

Emerson Street Automotive has been fam-
ily owned and operated for nearly 30
years. Lori and Michael Farfaglia pur-
chased the business from Lori's family in
2010. Lori's father, Terrill Davis stayed as
the onsite manager. Emerson Street is lo-
cated at 1406 Emerson Street, right next to
the Post Office in Leesburg, Florida. We
are opened Monday-Friday 7:30-5:30 and
Saturday 7:30-3:00. Phone: 352-326-2400.
We do all kinds of automotive repair in-
cluding light body work. We have state of
the art diagnostic equipment that takes the
guess out of repairing your car. We service
all makes and models including SUVs',
ATV's, and RV's.


SECURITY TRAINING
if Security "D"&G" Lic.
SPLUS: FL. Concealed Lic.
NRA Instructor Training
Ladies Only Classes Avail.
352-350-2855
LDs130oo13 www.TheRightTraining.com




352-3017-6474 or 427-167n
Robert Manning, Inc.
Shower Doors Tub Enclosures
Grab Bars Bath Accessories
I Mirrors Closet/Garage Storage
SSales Service Installation
S Lic/Ins FREE Estimates




SpedaGzed Storage Solions
Now is the time...
To organize your life!
Custom Closets, Home Office, Garages
Tailored To Youir Needs,
17 Years Exp.
Free Iome Design Consultation
352-383-7058 407-718-6818 ((Cell)




John Philibert, Inc
For All Your Tile Needs
Pergo, Ceramic Tile,
Travertine, Vinyl & More
Call John (352) 308-0694
JPHandy.com Lic/Ins


RE-TILE
352-391-5553
Backsplashes Re-Tile Tub & Shower
Walls Grab Bars Floors
Handicap Baths Repairs
Leaky Shower Pan
InsiLic. 30 yrs. exp.


Sc eat aTree Svc. Inc.
i Residential/Commerclal
Trimming/Removal
ft aloms/Hedges/Stump Grinding
Debris removal/Hauling
Fill Dirt/Clay/Grading/Driveways
Lic/Ins Insurance Work 24 Hrs.
352-455-7608

--' A Affordable Tree
Service
W-Tree Trimming & Removal
Lake Cleaning Dead Wooding
Moss Spraying Lic/Ins
Free Est. Senior Discounts
352-459-9428


.JH^ REE TRIMMING
&mP^m ft MORE
352-551-4222

WA1indow1'~i

Uic #CBC1252465
WINDOWS
We Install, Replace and Repair I
Most Major Brands Available
Glass and Screen Repair
13521 787-4545 I

| 352-587-2735
CRC# 1330701 Lanai Enclosures
-Glass Window
Replacement
Acrylic Windows
Screen Rooms


352-602-9849
SPARKLING
WINDOWS
MARK ANDERSON
Window Cleaning,
Screens, Tracks. FREE Estimates


To have our ProfssioalSeric
liste hre pese onac Mchlli
theClasifed Depatmnta
(35) 065823 o0b eai
Lmihele -ll aSai So me- ia.co0


Spew&eafts ae So dis
Now is the time...
To organize your life!
Custom Closets, Home Office, Garages
Tailored To Your Needs,
17 Years Exp.
Free Home Design Consultation
352-383-7058 407-718-6818 (Cell)


Now is the time to organize

your life with Specialized Stor-

age Solutions. With 17 years of

experience ranging from luxury:

homes across the state to your"

neighbor down the street, atten-.

tion to detail and high quality

finished product are the memo-

ries I wish to leave with my cus-.:

S tomers. Our in home

consultation will pinpoint your

specific needs, and tailor a stor-i

age solution that you have al-

: ways dreamed of.


We're Proud of Our Service
.... and you will be too!






Free Estimates
Metal, Tile & Shingle Re-roofs
Serving all Lake &
Sumter Counties.
Mike Hunter
Fl License #RC29027482
Office (407) 947-2223
Fax (407) 347-3472
mike@hunterroofingLLC.com


I


I Q D O 4 O O 0O O 0 OI I
..... ..... ............... ..... ..... ....


t





DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, December 7, 2013


PROFESSIONAL

SERVICE

DIRECTORY


$65
FOR FIRST AD
AND 2ND AD

HALF OFF


ATTENTION

REALTORS
5 LINES 7 DAYS

$30,44*
*Must be a Licensed Realtor


Daily(


0i
,onunercia]


TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL





352-5314 FAST


Find It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST!

Lake: 352-314-3278 or Sumter: 352-748-1955 Monday Friday 8am 5pm


2
Legal Notices


003 Legal Notices

NOTICE of Public Sale
or Disposition
The personal property, household items and
contents of the following rental spaces will be
sold for cash or otherwise disposed of to sat
isfy rental liens for unpaid rent in accordance
with the Florida statutes
F,;.I [. .. I,,.r 13, 2013 at 10:00 am
Fi .1 .. i ,... and Storage Tavares, LLC
2601 State Road 19
Tavares, Florida 32778
For information on this sale please call
352 383 6525
Name:
Clint Lyttle G728
Neil Bagaus H804
Anthony McDow H843
Ad No.00418129
November 30 & December 7, 2013

NOTICE of Public Sale or Disposition
The personal property, household items and
contents of the following rental spaces will be
sold for cash or otherwise disposed of to sat
isfy rental liens for unpaid rent in accordance
with the Florida statutes
December 21, 2013 at 10:00 am Lake
Warehouse and Storage Eustis, LLC
36622 CR19A
Eustis, Florida 32726
Name:
B037 Kerri Cunningham
Household goods
C256 Matt Franklin
Household goods
C258 Kandice Cinningham
Household goods
Ad No.00419455
December 7 & 14, 2013


LEGAL NOTICE
Dana Purvis
Unit 312
Anna Bailey Leonard
Unit 406
Jose A Cotto Maldonado
Unit 411
Sarah Marie Peterson
Unit 618
Antonio Luis Rosado
Unit # 622
Katheryn Frances Sheffield
Unit # 718
Frank Reynaldo Soto
Unit # 723
Robert Lords Even II
Unit # 909
The contents of the above Units consisting of
household Items will be seized, sold, or Oth
erwise disposed of after the Time listed be


Daily'Comnme
llHH I f"" I, p h,,r I" " hI-I'i .1 I
Your Town Your



"My first choice
everyday either
S-print or o-li


Classified Indexi


Legal Notices ..
Announcements
At Your Service.
Financial ......
Employment ...
Pets/Animals ..


........ 003
........ 100
........ 200
........ 300
........ 400
........ 500


I I I


003 Legal Notices
low to satisfy the Owner's lien for rent due in
Accordance with Florida Statutes sections
83.801 83.809
AAA American Storage
199 Villa City Road
Groveland, FL 34736
(352) 429-4718
Auction Date & Time
December, 21, 2013
11:00AM
Ad No.00419324
December 7 & 16, 2013

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL
JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO.:35 2011 CA 001303
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.;
Plaintiff,
vs.
STEPHANIE D. CANEY, H R CANEY II, ET AL;
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the
Default Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated
NOVEMBER 6, 2013, in the above styled
cause. Foreclosure sales are held Monday
through Friday at 11:00 a.m. in the first floor
lobby near the information desk in the Lake
County Courthouse, 550 West Main St., Ta
vares, on JANUARY 9, 2014 the following de
scribed property:
LOT 131 OF FOXCHASE, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 61, PAGES) 63 THROUGH 66, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF LAKE COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA.
Property address: 3699 BRIAR RUN DRIVE,
CLERMONT, FL 34711
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE
DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A
CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
If you are a person with a disability who
needs any accommodation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of certain as-
sistance. Please contact Nicole Berg, the
ADA Coordinator at the Office of the Trial
Court Administrator, Lake County Court-
house, P.O. Box 7800/550 W. Main Street,
Tavares, Florida 32778, Telephone (352)
253=1604, at least 7 days before your
scheduled court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving notification if the time before
the scheduled appearance is less than 7
days; if you are hearing or voice impaired,
call 711.
WITNESS my hand on 7 day of NOVEMBER,
2013.
NEIL KELLY
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Lake County, Florida
By:/s/D. NEAL
Deputy Clerk of Court,
Lake County
Ad No:00418617
December 7 & 14, 2013


003 Legal Notices

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FIFTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE N0:2013 CA 003136
JUDGE: G. Richard Singelatary
IN RE: FORFEITURE OF
2000 Toyota Truck
VIN# 4TAWN72N4YZ595399
SEIZED BY GARY S. BORDERS, SHERIFF OF
LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CLAIMANT: ANTHONY WRIGHT
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE
TO: ALL PERSONS WHO CLAIM AN INTEREST
IN THE FOLLOWING PROPERTY:2000 Toyota
Truck VIN# 4TAWN72N4YZ595399
Gary S. Borders, as Sheriff of Lake County,
Florida, seized the above described property
on or about 10/5/2013, at or near CR 450A,
Lake County, Florida., Lake County Florida.
A Complaint for Forfeiture, pursuant to the
Florida Contraband Forfeiture Act has been
filed in the Circuit Court in and for Lake
County.
If no claimant appears and no claim is filed, a
request will be made for immediate hearing
and Final Order of Forfeiture.
CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE
I HEREBY CERTIFY that a true and correct
copy of the foregoing was furnished by regu
lar US mail this 3rd day of December 2013
to:
ANTHONY WRIGHT 18709 Hinson Rd. Al-
toona, FL 32702; ANTHONY WRIGHT, ID#
56030, Lake County Detention Center, 551
West Main Street, Tavares, FL 32778
/s/PATRICIAT. GROSS, Esq.
General Counsel
Lake County Sheriff's Office
360 West Ruby Sbreet
Tavares, FL 32778
(352) 343 2101
FL Bar #274909
Ad No.:00419476
December 7 & 14, 2013

BID ANNOUNCEMENT
LAKE COUNTY SCHOOLS
LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA
BID #3814DG
Sealed bids will be received by Lake County
Schools, Purchasing Department 29529
County Road 561, Tavares, Florida 32778
until 2:00 PM, local time, January 21, 2014,
for the following:
Fire Suppression Cleaning, Testing, and In
section
All questions regarding the specifications,
terms and/or conditions of this bid must be
received by no later than 4:00 PM, Friday,
January 3, 2014. This bid may be down
loaded from the Lake County School's web
site at htp://lake.k12.fl.us; click on Bid Op




Iii aihi L!nieldjd


News16..



4.
r JFoPHome
ine." Delivery Call
'"g.)787-0600
":" S ^ ....,^ -- ...,;:'iiiiiit= L" ..


Merchandise Mart ...
Real Estate/For RENT
Real Estate/For SALE
Manufactured Homes
Recreation .........
Transportation ......


.... 600
... .800
.... 900
. 1000
S. .1100
S. .1200


CROSSWORD PUZZLE


0 P A LASBATRSE AI
OPALS AREAS
RERAN CURVE
E R R GOAK T R E E
R A Y G U N S Y UM
SM I TS AMPS
CcB-S- AaRnC
LAMBECILAMPM
EMU SEABIRD
TURTLE SLIE
ULTRA KALEL
PEROT AVAST
TYNE ANITS
Yesterday's answer


11 Spills the
beans
15 Contrary
to good
manners
19 Reactor
parts
21 Brandy
base
24 Hires
25 Invited
26 Cohesive


27 Prefer to
29 George
and T.S.
30 Past and
future
31 Rocker
Bob
33 Key
37 Columnist
Barrett
39 Historic
stretch


ACROSS
1 One of a
bear trio
5 Bud's
place
9 Big to-do
10 Squashed
circles
12 Fancy
neckwear
13 Roofed
patio
14 Generous
virtue
16 Family
17 Great
weight
18 Flying
high
20 Be short
with
22 Wallet
bills
23 Con-
cluded
25 Mystique
28 Begin-
nings
32 Trapper's
job
34 Gettys-
burg loser
35 Model buy
36 Very hot
38 One
of the
Kennedys
40 Silly one
41 Plow
pioneer
42 Computer
key
43 "Blast it!"


44 Pert talk


DOWN
1 Try to
budge
2 Secret
stuff
3 Penni-
less
4 Skilled
worker
5 Russian
river
6 One of
Frank's
wives
7 Regis-
tered
8 Broad-
way's
Stritch
9 Forgoes
food


NEW CROSSWORD BOOK! Send $4.75 (check/m.o.) to
Thomas Joseph Book 2, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475
M 1 12 13 14 5 16 17 18


DEADLINES
For Insertion COPY DATE
Friday Thursday, 5pmr
Saturday Friday, 3pmr
Sunday Friday, 5:00pmr
Monday Friday, 5:00pmr
Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pmr
, I h , I ......... ,h I. ..... I . I I
made by 5 00pm Friday
ADJUSTMENTS
first day of publication If you find an error call the classified
department immediately at 314 3278 or 748- 1955
SThe publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for


CROSSWORD
By THOMAS JOSEPH


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, December 7, 2013





Saturday, December 7, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


003 Legal Notices

The St. Johns River Water Management
District (District) gives notice of
receipt of the following
permit applicationss:
ERP Permit Applications Christian Home &
Bible School, Inc., 301 W 13th Ave, Mt.
Dora, FL 32757, application
#IND -069- 136417 1. The project is located
in Lake County, Section: 30, Township: 19
South, Range: 27 East, and includes 0.66
acres. The Environmental Resource Permit
application is for construction of a stormwa
ter management system to serve a develop
ment known as Christian Home & Bible
School Science Building Addition. The file(s)
containing the permit applications) are avail
able for inspection Monday through Friday,
except for District holidays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
at the District's Headquarters, 4049 Reid St.,
Palatka, FL 32177 2529. You may also view
files at one of the District's Service Centers,
but you should call Service Center staff in ad
vance to make sure that the files are at a
specific Service Center. Service Center con
tact information is available online at floridas
water.com/contactus/offices.html. Addition
ally, most permit application file documents
can be viewed online at
floridaswater.com/permiting/index.html. To
obtain information on how to find and view
permit application file documents, go to the
HELP tab in -E Permitting and click on Sup
port and FAQs and then follow the directions
provided under "How to find a Technical Staff
Report (TSR) or other application file docu
ments." The decision on permit applications
will be made at the District's Service Center
where the application is processed. A sub
stantial objection to a permit application must
be made in writing and filed with (received
', I Bureau Chief, Bureau of Regulatory
"l P.O. Box 1429, Palatka, FL
32178- 1429, or by e- mail at applicationsup
port@sjrwmd.com, within 14 days of notifi
cation of the application. Please include ei
other the Permit Application number or the
Project Name in the objection. Notification of
the application is either the fifth day after the
date on which the written notice is deposited
in the U.S. mail (for those persons who re
ceive actual notice by U.S. mail), the day the
notice is emailed (for those persons who re
ceive actual notice by email), or the date the
notice is published in the newspaper (if ac
tual notice is not provided by U.S. mail or
email). A "substantial objection" means a
written statement directed to the District that
identifies the objector, concerns hydrologic or
environmental impacts of the proposed activ
ity, and relates to applicable rule criteria. If
the Disrict receives a timely substantial ob
section from you, then you will receive written
notice of the District's intended decision on
trhe permit application. You are advised to no
tify the District within 14 days of notification
of trhe applications) if you have questions,
objections, comments, or information regard
ing the activity proposed in the permit appli
cation. If you make a written request to trhe
District for additional information regarding a
specific permit application, you will be pro
vided an opportunity to obtain the available
information. Please note that filing a written
objection does not entitle you to a Chapter
120, Florida Statutes, administrative hearing.
Notice of intended (proposed) District Deci
sion will be provided to persons who have re
quested individual notice. A request for indi
vidual notice of intended (proposed) District
Decision on the application must be received
by trhe District's Bureau Chief, Bureau of
Regulatory Support prior to the date the no
twice of intended (proposed) District Decision
is generated.
Margaret Daniels, Bureau Chief
Bureau of Regulatory Support
St. Johns River Water Management District
4049 Reid Street
Palatka, FL 32177 2529
(386) 329 4570
Ad No.00419571
December 7, 2013

Tired of the slow pace?
\


003 Legal Notices

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND
FOR LAKE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE N0.2010 CA 2416
BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY,
Plaintiff
vs
BRIAN D. SHORT, et al.,
Defendants.

RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a
Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure en
tered in April 5, 2013 in Civil Case No. 2010
CA 2416 of the Circuit Court of the FIFTH Ju
dicial Circuit in and for Lake County, Tavares,
Florida, the Clerk will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at Lake County Court
house, 550 West Main Sbtreet, First Floor, Ta
vares, FL. 32778 in accordance with Chapter
45, Florida Statutes on trhe 14 day of Janu-
ary, 2014 at 11:00 AM on trhe following de
scribed property as set forth in said Summary
Final Judgment, to wit:
Lots 28 and 29, PINE VALLEY, a subdivision
in Lake County, Florida, according to the Plat
thereof as recorded in Plat Book 16, Page
62, Public Records of Lake County, Florida.
Together with: 1982 MALAGUTI Mobile Home
ID Nos. GDOCFL22828889A &
GDOCFL22828889B and Title Nos.
21739656 and 21739657, and all fixtures
and a appurtenances thereto.
Any person claiming an interest in the sur
plus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the LIS Pen
dens, must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.
Dated this 20 day of November, 2013.
NEIL KELLY
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
As Clerk of the Court
By:/s/S.HOLEWINSKI
Deputy Clerk
MCCALLA RAYMER, LLC, ATTORNEY FOR
PLAINTIFF
225 E. ROBINSON ST. SUITE 660
ORLANDO, FL 32801
(407)674 1850
Ad No. 00417866
December 7 & 14, 2013

100
Announcement

103 Found

YOUNG CAT STRIPED GRAY. N. GROVE
ST. 352-360-3335

104 Special
Notices
NOTICE TO
ADVERTISERS
PLEASE CHECK YOUR AD FOR
ERRORS THE FIRST DAY IT APPEARS
SINCE THE DAILY COMMERCIAL WILL
NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
INCORRECT ADS AFTER THE FIRST
DAY OF PUBLICATION. IF YOU FIND
AN ERROR CALL THE CLASSIFIED
DEPARTMENT IMMEDIATELY AT
314-3278 OR 748-1955.
THE PUBLISHER ASSUMES NO
FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY FOR
ERRORS OR FOR COMMISSION OF
COPY. LIABILITY SHALL NOT EXCEED
THE COST OF THE PORTION OF
SPACE OCCUPIED BY SUCH ERROR.
CANCELLATIONS
CANCELLATION FOR ADS RUNNING
SATURDAY MUST BE MADE BY
FRIDAY BY 2:00, CANCELLATIONS
FOR SUNDAY & MONDAY MUST BE
MADE FRIDAY BY 5:00


;x .. t. -.


200
At Your Service


201 Insurance


205 Adult Care

NOTICE
Florida Statute states, "It is a
misdemeanor for any person willfully,
knowingly, or intentionally to operate
or attempt to operate a family day
care home without a license or
without registering with the
department, whichever is applicable".
Florida Statute states, "No person
shall advertise a child care facility
without including within such
advertisement the state or local
agency license number of such
facility. The statute applies to anyone
with more than 1 unrelated child
in their home.
SILVER LAKE
ASSISTED LIVING
Private Room avail. $3,100/mo.
What are you paying for Dementia
care? No point system or
entrance fee. Lic #ALF8956
Call 352-365-9929

245 Financial


SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Contact us if your claim has been
denied or if you need help.
Over 30 yrs. exp.No fees or costs
unless your claim is approved.
'.,,or, ,. orr.ul ring
2228 South St., Leesburg
352-728-5552


250 Handyman

Hard working Lic. Business owner,
seeks to improve your home.
Ability to perform jobs including
Remodeling TreeTrimming -
Drywall Tiling, etc.
References avail.
Robert Plante's Home Maintenance
1 352-484-3543




LARRY GOUGH HANDYMAN SERVICE
Reliable, Dependable! One call does it
all! Lio/Ins. 352-409-4059


268 Moving




Two Brothers Moving
1 Room or a Full House
FL Reg. #IM1539
Russell &Todd Franks
Lic. & Ins. Call 352-793-8960

You're Reading

X LOCAL


PAPER
TheW9A Cmndll


270 Pets

GOT DOG? GET TRAINING!
Wont sit? Wont come when called?
We Can HELP! K-9 Training
offering 6 week obedience classes.
352-343-4697

275 Plumbing

^ SINCE
1987
KILEY&
SONS, INC.
A Full Service Plumbing Company.
Lake 787-1904 Sumter 748-9500
CentralFloridaPlumber.com
VISIT OUR ONSITE SHOWROOM.
24 Hr. Emergency Service
Lic#CFC1426882

281 Roofing
#1 IN ROOFING
Villages Roofing & Construction Inc.
*Leak Repairs *Shingles/Flat Roof.
*Lifetime Metal Roofs. Free Roof Est.
352-314-3625. Lic. #CCC1329936




MCHALE ROOFING INC
Re-Roofs and Repairs, Tile, Metal,
Shingles Flat Roofs & Mobile Homes
Excel. Ref's Lic & Ins. CCC1328197
Call 352-255-2758

288 Tree
Service




*Land Clearing *Tree Removal
*Trimming & Shaping
*Hauling &Eluiii' *'lrirndir,,
Free Est. *"'_PF'i -Ai"
352-267-5720

MICHAEL'S TREE
& TRACTOR SERVICE
& | FREE
l^kESTIMATES

Stump Grinding, *Tree Trimming &
Removal oBox Blading, oBush
Hogging & Grading. Lic & Insured.
Call 352-504-1597





300
Financial



301 Business
Opportunities

RESTAURANT
150 SEATS WITH FULL LIQUOR
North Lake County,
Serious buyers only. 352-250-7813




400
Employment



410 Sales





FOR A SALES SUPERVISOR
Qualified candidates will possess a
valid Florida Dr. Lic. and must pass a
pre-employment drug screen. Previ-
ous exp. in the Pest Control Industry is
not necessary but a working knowl-
edge of Termites, Florida Turf, and
Pest Control is helpful. Prior Sales
exp. a plus. Company Vehicle pro-
vided, paid holidays and vacations.
Salary plus commission.
Please apply in person
Monday Friday
8:30-11:30am, 1:30pm-4:00
Bray's Pest Control
2300 EC 470
Sumterville, FL 33585
OR Fax Resume to: 352-793-4389
NO PHONE CALLS OR
EMAILS PLEASE






















*3i 6i!1 .~11
.3.: U I.;
I'' :" 1' .3,


cmi ssion; I excllnbefitsir to~

inc ;luemdclrdntllife, 401
andmor; pid fl611Ttime off'; adrining





432 Dental

I DENTAL ASSISTANT
Experienced only.$15/Tr.
I Fax resume to: 352-787-9036
NO PHONE CALLS


435 Medical



fUMNITIES
Busy medical office has the following
) r, irig: vdiirl I- :
*CT Technologist Must be FL
registered & have at least 1 yr. exp.
*Paramedic ACLS Certified & able
to work shifts
*Basic X-Ray Tech/Phlebotomist.
Must have experience performing
Dexa Scans
*RN ACLS certified. Critical care
and cardiac cath lab exp. preferred.
*Medical Asst. Phlebotomy
experience helpful.
Benefits are available.
Fax resume 352-323-9507

COMPANIONS
2 FT Reliable individuals, HS
Diploma/GED required. Flexible hrs
w/developmentally disabled.
Wknd/eve/holidays a must. Must pass
background check.
352-602-4075
Send resume to:
bxplus4@gmail.com

FRONT DESK
For busy Urgent Care. Computer ori-
ented typing skills a must. Profes-
sional appearance & well groomed.
Fax resume to:
352-315-1703 Brandie

LOOKING FOR
*MEDICAL OFFICE MANAGER,
*FRONT DESK & *MA. EXP'D
Email resume to:
densherl@comcast.net

LPN
FT for busy medical office.
Computer skills a must.
Send resume to: Fax 352-787-0338

MA, LPN & RADIOLOGY TECH.
Needed for Busy Urgent Care.
Email to:
medicalbillingtoday@ yahoo.com

MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST
F/T, exp. with knowledge of EMR for
Primary Care Practice in The Villages,
with opportunity for advancement.
Fax resume to: 407-217-2687

MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST
FT busy office. Must be high energy,
love people, and have experience.
Hourly wage plus bonus potential.
Please email resume to
ddimura@gmail.com

RN OPENING FT
FOR MDS/PPS CO-ORDINATOR
looking for an organized, professional,
knowledgeable individual. Experience
required.
Apply at
LAKE EUSTIS CARE CENTER
8:30am 3:00pm
Monday Friday
411 W. Woodward Ave. Eustis, FL.,
Online amauger@gchc.com
Or Fax 352-357-2874
DFWP/EOE


450 Trades

APPRENTICE ELECTRICIAN
Seeking dependable organized detail
oriented persons, willing to learn to
build electrical services by designed
plans, repairing and diagnosing elec-
trical problems as well as terminating
electrical transformers & components.
Work is in/around Lake County. Exp. a
plus. Must have FL Dr. Lic., CDL a
plus. Full time work, competitive pay
great benefits.
Apply with resume to
Hewitt Power & Communications
Via email at hrdept@hewittcontract-
ing.com or by fax 352-787-5199
No phone calls please.
EOE, DFWP, E-VERIFY

AUTOMOTIVE DETAILERS
Exp. a +, will train the right person.
Must be over 21 w/clean driving re-
cord. Must pass background check.
Apply in person:
Bill Bryan Kia
9039 US Hwy. 441, Leesburg
EOE/DFWP

"COME TRUCK WITH US"
Hiring OTR Drivers current DOT Physi-
cal and Class A CDL required with one
year verifiable experience. Reefer ex-
perience a plus not required. We offer
great pay and bonuses.
Apply at www.walbon.com or
Call at 1-800-328-2499 Ext. 106

CONSTRUCTION ALL POSITIONS
$12/hr and up to start. Paid medical,
vacation & 401k. CDL & travel a must.
DFWP/EOE
Call 352-383-3159 Ext. 229
FABRICATOR
Tavares co. has opening for FIT posi-
tion with benefits & growth potential.
Heavy lifting and ability to use power
tools & drive fork lift required. Wood
working experience a plus. Drug test-
ing req;d.
Please call 352-343-3449

MECHANIC
Must have own tools & 10 yrs exp.
APPLY IN PERSON
A-1 Automotive
15125 Classique Lane. Tavares
NO CALLS

POOL SERVICE NIGHTS
No exp. required.
Apply in Person
POOL CONTROL 2191 Hwy. 441/27

TIME DEFINITE SERVICES
Hiring Over The Road Drivers Class
A CDL required. All late model equip-
ment 2012 & newer. We pull 53'
Reefers. Great Pay & Bonuses. Must
be willing to run 48 states.
Apply at:
www.timedefinite.com
or call 352-399-7900 xl1015


455
Restaurants/
Hotels/Clubs

BAK I EN~i-E & 6EKI-VE-I-'b 1- I
MUST be exp'd. Evenings & Wknds.
Apply in person 3-5pm
VIC'S EMBERS SUPPER CLUB
7940 US Hwy. 441 Leesburg, FL

FRONT DESK CLERK AT HOTEL
Email resume to
nishcoinvest@cfl.rr.com


455
Restaurants/
Hotels/Clubs

HOUSEKEEPING & LAUNDRY
Position Available.
Apply in person at:
Hampton Inn
19700 US Hwy. 441
Mt. Dora

LINE COOK EXPERIENCED
DISHWASHER PART-TIME
Apply in person or send resume
by email
MOUNT DORA BREWING
405 S. Highland St., Mt. Dora 32757
jeff@mountdorabrewing.com
352-978-0752

465 Domestic

COMPANION for gentleman, Part-time
live-in (Tavares) non-smoker, cooking
& light cleaning. Must have car, and
ref's. Salary $125. 24/hr.
Call leave message 352-250-5672

470 General

SCHOOL BUS
DRIVERS NEEDED
Training provided.
Lake County Schools, Transportation
352-728-2561 or
Apply online: www.lake.k12.fl.us

BECOME A WINE ADVISOR
Help Local Non-Profits; Earn an
Income AND It's Tax Deductible! If you
are a self-starter and love wine, we'll
show you how. 813-992-7788

RAT

JOS!













DIETARY AIDE/COOK
F SPLT SHIFT.
Exp. preferred
Apply at






LAKE EUSTIS CARE CENTER
8:30am 3:00pm
Monday Friday






411W.WoodwardAve.Eustis.FL,
DFWP/EOE

FANEUIL INC.
NOW HIRING TOLL COLLECTORS
Icu exph prefnmerrendadrs








Open House -A 12/9-N12/13



10:00 AM 3:00PM
7700 Southland Blvd., Ste 250
Orlando, FL 32809
FANEUI INC.







Westat seeks individuals to work par1









time on an important study, theNa-
tional Study of Health-Related Behav-









iors (NSHB). Interviewers will collect
information from respondents aboul
tobacco use and its effects on health.
To learn more about this position&
apply, go to: l
COME ES JOIAR CNTR

























www.westat.com/fieldjobs and enter
Job ID 7205BR. EOE

S SEEKING ENGLISH TUTOR
INTERVIEWER











for Westat seeks individuals to work part
time on an important study, the Na-
tional Study of Health-Related Behav-
iors (NSHB). Interviewers will collect
information from respondents about



tobacco use and its effectsto brush up on her English.
352-347-1357To learn more about this position
apply, go to:
www.westat.com/fieldjobs and enter
Job ID 7205BR. EOE

SEEKING ENGLISH TUTOR
for Spanish speaking person who
wants to brush up on her English.
352-347-1357


500
Pets/Animals


501 Pets
For Sale

BICHON FRISE/POO PUPPIES Male/fe-
male, health cert. $350/$400.
352-669-3649.

CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES 8 wks. 3 females
w/shots. $200. 352-636-0289

KITTENS 4 months old. Free to good
home. Call 352-771-3367

KITTENS Free to good home. 4 months
old. 352-874-3329

PIT BULL PUPS great for Christmas tak-
ing deps. $200. 352-874-2660

560 Pet
Supplies

DOG CRATE 13"W x 22.5"L x 15"H.
Like new. $20. 352-360-1386

FERRET CAGE, Ig. multi level w/wheels.
excel, cond. $100. 352-250-2869


600
Merchandise
Mart


601 Antiques

FIRE EXTINGUISHER, brass w/em-
bossed New York Central System.
$20 FIRM. 352-383-1280 between
8am 11am&6pm-9pm.


"-; ,S


In Lake County



For Local News Sports Weather

In-Print & On-Line


The Daily Commercial




www.dailycommercial.com

"v. :%... '% ,

... . . ... . .
.'., . ,:.:. ,- 1- .%
:, "x ..:*., h '.i '": . .


Speed Mings up with soine
new cinployees.
The Daily Commercial
Employment Listings.
Lightningfast response!




DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, December 7, 2013


601 Antiques

COIN SET Antique. $99. Call
352-787-8594


602 Arts/Crafts

TOOL SETS leather (3) complete. $75
Call 352-748-0702

603 Collectibles

AUGUSTA XII Color Print 25 x 30, '92.
Framed/signed. $65. 330-4484

GRANDPA ASH TRAY 20"H Maple with
6" amber top. $20. Call
352-383-1280 between 8am -
11 am &6pm 9pm.

HESS TRUCKS (15) 1997-2012. $250
takes all. 352-272-9746

HUMMEL LETTER TO SANTA 1957, 7"
tall. $80. 352-787-4388

PICTURE framed, Schneider Trophy
Winner 1931, by James Leech
1984. $85. 352-399-2027

RECORD ALBUMS 185 PIECES. $65.
352-315-1612

SANTAS Heartwood Creek by Jim
Shore (3) in boxes. $45. 326-8490

TOY TRUCK'S HESS mint in box. $10.
Call 352-874-5418 (Leesburg)

TRUCKS HESS/TEXACO & HOT WHEELS
$25 Call 352-409-4933

604 Furniture

ADJUSTABLE BED twin, good cond.
$75 Call 352-326-5766

ARMOIRE Computer/TV, solid oak.
Beautiful. 60.5"H x 48.5"W x 25"D.
$125.239-826-9914

BAR STOOLS (4) like new. Asking $80.
SOLD!!!!!

BED COMPLETE King size. Senior
owned. $150. 352-343-2438

BED full Spring Air winter/summer
w/linens. $100 obo. 352-483-1772

BED Single, used 6 mo. Paid $800.
Asking $400 obo. 352-602-7339

BED, full, box spring, mattress, head-
board & bedding. $100. 323-4903

BEDROOM RETRO chest, dresser
w/mirror. Excel. $95 352-233-0408

BEDRROM SET full, maplegood cond.
$500 Call 352-589-4405

BUTLERS TABLE excel, cond. $25 Call
352-748-3580

CHAIR green, dark blue, mauve & beige
stripes. $25. 419-966-7286

CHAISE LOUNGE wicker rattan w/cush-
ions. $40.352-742-1422

CHEST OF DRAWERS Tall w/5 drawers
& 2 night stands. $100. 435-4520

CHINA CABINET Good cond. $250.
352-793-5366

COFFEE TABLE & 2 END TABLES round
glass. $50 Call 352-589-4405

CREDENZA Fruit wood finish. Fair cond.
$50. 352-787-8217

DINETTE TABLE octagon, white w/leaf,
4 chairs. $90. 352-787-5379

DINING ROOM SET Oak, 6 ladder back
chairs, table & china closet. $750.
352-483-0591

DINING TABLE washed Oak w/leaf. Like
new $65 Call 352-602-7003

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Ig. washed
oak, excel. $80 352-502-3445

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER, 5'Lx3'H, 2
glass doors. $60 352-561 -1167

KITCHEN TABLE white tile top w/wood
trim. Good cond. $50. 408-5357

LOVE SEATS (2) Simmons, beige, $80
for both. Call 352-253-1155

LOVESEAT Rocker/Recliner Tan. $100.
352-326-8532

MAlTRESS Only queen Sealy Pos-
turepedic. $85 obo. 352-406-1253

ROCKER RECLINER, mauve, good cond.
$35. 574-527-9168 (Fruitland Pk)

ROLL AWAY BED like brand new, used
twice, $100. 352-617-0398 (Eustis)

SOFA 3 cushion, embossed flowers.
Wood trim. $85. 352-330-0874

SOFA dark blue, w/recliners. Like new.
$350.419-966-7286

SOFA w/skirting, tan w/Southwest de-
sign. Good cond. $125.728-2473

SOFA, 98" long, light muted floral, very
good clean. $45. 728-6835

TABLE & 6/CHAIRS Duncan & Phyfe.
antique, asking $150. 267-8693

WICKER FURNITURE White, 5pc. Excel.
cond. $95. SOLD!!!!!

605 Appliances


605 Appliances

COFFEE MAKER Keurig K45 Elite. Excel
cond. $60 Call 352-435-4669

COFFEE MAKER Keurig mini plus
w/coffee. $50 Call 352-250-2302

FREEZER Sears works great cheap to
operate extra thermometer. $100
obo. 352-383-1280 between 8am -
11 am &6pm 9pm.

REFRIGERATOR Kenmore, top freezer,
ice maker. 21 cu.ft $1 OO.SOLD

REFRIGERATOR Whirlpool side by side
ice/water in door, 21.9cu.ft. Excel.
cond. $175. SOLD 1ST DAY!

REFRIGERATOR Whirlpool, never used.
26.cu.ft. French door w/water in
door. $1100 Call 352-259-0689

STOVE GE Cook Top, works good. $50.
SOLD!!!

VACUUM Roomba, Model 550, new in
box. $95 Call after 9am 259-5629

WASHER & DRYER (elec.) GE. $100 for
both (will separate). 352-404-5130

606 Electronics

CELL PHONE w/camera & charger.
Sanyo, $50. Call 352-787-5262

RADIO/RECORD/TAPE/CD PLAYER
w/speakers. $60 Call 326-2492

RECORD PLAYER on stand & records.
$50 Call 352-326-8520

SATELLITE RECEIVER w/remote. $10
Call 352-365-2301

TELEVISION 16" Polaroid Flat Screen.
Never used. $65. SOLD 1ST DAY!

TELEVISION 32" Sharp color with oak
stand. $35. 352-343-2438

TELEVISION 55" Phillips Magnavox
older no HD. $100. 352-750-0910

624 Children's
items

VANITY Girls, w/bench. $10. Call
352-742-2716

625 Building
Supplies/
Materials

ANCHORS Self sticking 3 1/4" w/wash-
ers (150) $40 CALL 352-365-2297

BASSWOOD -8- 1 x 6 x 8'. $75. Call
352-357-2708

CHAIN LINK FENCE 50'x4' roll, great
shape accessories $40. 330-4338


625 Building
Supplies/
Materials

HOT WATER HEATER Used 4 years. As-
tatula. $50. 352-742-0063


626 Farm
Equipment

BUSH HOG 6', not rusty, needs work.
$100. 352-242-1038

630 Garage Sales

CENTER HILL,
Thur Sat. 8am 2pm. 7784 CR
702 (Snowbird South RV Park, Lot
22 & 23) Two Family Yard Sale.

EUSTIS
Fri. -Sat. 8 2pm. 509 Cricket Hol-
low Lane. Christmas & misc. items.

EUSTIS
Sat. Only! 8 2pm. 401 South Ave.
Household, collectibles, Christmas,
children's clothing.
Something for Everyone!

FRUITLAND PARK
Fri. Sat. 8 3pm. Shalimar Dr.
Waterford Cookie jar, Kitchen Aid
professional mixer, karaoke, clothes,
purses, Christmas, elec. appliances,
tools & etc.

FRUITLAND PARK,
LARGE SIX FAMILY YARD SALE!.
Fri. & Sat. 8am ? 2461 E Hwy.
27/441 in front of Tony's Market.

GROVELAND,
Sat. 8:30am ? 16706 CR 33.
Household items, (5) 15x8 5 lug
Jeep or Ford rims, furn., elec. fire-
place, CR 250 motorcycle.

LADY LAKE
Sat. 12/7. 601 First Ave. & 612
Second Ave. 8 ?. Lamps, books,
small appliances, furn., sewing ma-
chine, home decor, & misc. house-
hold, etc.

LADY LAKE
Fri. & Sat. 8am ?? 37527 Leggett
Lane off Grays Airport Rd. 3 family
garage & barn sale. Tools, horse
tack & equipment, clothes & more.

LADY LAKE
Fri. Sat. 8am ? 901 April Hills
Blvd. Furn., clothes, housewares,
collectibles & much more!

LAKE PANASOFFKEE
Dec 6th Dec. 7th. Fri. & Sat.
8am-? Hwy. 470, turn at CR. 485
on corner see signs. Antique furn., 2
TV's, Christmas decor, jewelry, ma-
terial, crafts & more.

LAKE PANASOFFKEE
Fri. & Sat. Dec. 6th & 7th. 8 2pm.
4124 CR. 400. Selling my 1/2.
Something for Everyone! Pontoon
boat & motor, new leather-bound
western books, furn., appliances,
household items & baby clothes.


'V


630 Garage Sales

LEESBURG
6 FAMILY SALE!
BIG CHRISTMAS SALE!
Sat. 8:30 ? 10640 Treadway School
Rd. Trees, lights, decorations, New
gifts & lot's of misc.

LEESBURG
BAZAAR AT
MIDWAY MANOR
RV&MHP
36033 Emeralda Ave. Jct. of Emer-
alda & CR. Rd. #44 (signs posted)
Fri. & Sat. Dec. 6 & 7, 8am 2pm.
Offering a variety of items to fill your
Christmas present needs at very rea-
sonable prices. The clubhouse will
feature a variety of special craft items
along w/Christmas/occasion cards,
jewelry, toys (sewed & wood) along
with small antique/collectible items.
Coffee & donuts for the early, and our
famous all beef hotdogs (with all the
fixins) a bit later.. As always, a variety
of yummy homemade baked goods.
Soft drinks available. Most yard sale
items will be located in front of the
clubhouse where parking is available.
A desk, tv, antique/collectible tools,
misc., furn., rocking chair, blue glass-
ware collection, & more. Bring money
and enjoy yourself with us!

LEESBURG
Fri. Sat. 8 2pm. 32641 Radio
Rd. Across from Sears at Lake
Square Mall. Clothes $.50, table &
chairs. Lots of goodies, big assort-
ment.

LEESBURG
Fri. Sat. 8 ? 7305 Hillcrest St. -
Sunnyside. Christmas items & More!

LEESBURG
Fri. Sat. Dec. 6th & 7th. 9 3pm.
10550 Holloway Dr. Hide away
home MHP. Multi-Family Sales!!!!
(Across from Lake Square Mall, be-
tween Office Max & Play it Again
Sports). Christmas decor,
fishing/boating equip., tools, house-
hold items, Beanie Babies, TV,
much antique furn., MTD
chipper/shredder, glass Pepsi bot-
tles/plastic carriers, misc., PVC
birds.

***LEESBURG***
HUGE SALE! Fri.- Sat. 2008 Griffin
Rd. between Thomas and HWY. 27
at Oasis Apts. ,io)raqOe -:E signs.
Mention Ad GTI ,i FRFF idj.

LEESBURG
Sat 9am-1lpm Lakes at Leesburg
Clubhouse Craft Sale! (Off 441 on
Lakes Blvd.) Craft & Christmas orna-
ments. Plus Raffle!

LEESBURG
Sat. & Sun. Dec. 7th & 8th 8am -
3pm. Palm Ridge Mobile Home
Park. Tally Rd. Park Wide Sale.

LEESBURG
Thur. Sat. 7 2pm. 2400 South
St. Cook Rental. Tools, hand &
power, golf equip., household & lots
of stuff.


630 Garage Sales

LEESBURG
Thur. Sat. 9am 4pm. Cherokee
At Leesburg, Hwy. 473. Riding
mower & cart, lumber, Christmas
items, tools, yard items & lots more.

LEESBURG,
COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH
YARD & BAKE SALE. Dec. 7th, 8am
2pm. 333 Tomato Hill Rd.

LEESBURG,
Fri. & Sat. (Sun.?) 507 Indian Lane
off Lone Oak follow signs. Lot's of
old stuff. Clean, new stuff. 20 yrs of
collecting

LEESBURG,
Fri. & Sat. 7am ? 2809 W. Main
St. New & used, Christmas, house-
hold. Something for Everyone!

MT. DORA
Estate Sale! Dora Pines. Sat. Only!
Dec. 7th. 8 -4pm. 2125 Oak Circle.

MT. DORA
FOUR FAMILY SALE
Fri.-Sat. 8am ? Off Hwy. 441, be-
hind Bingo Hall Furn. Some collecti-
bles, lot's of Christmas items &
household.

MT. DORA
Fri & Sat. 8am-?? 1325 Bay Rd.
Woods-n-Water RV Park & Lake
Saunders RV Park. (1175 Bay Rd.)
HUGE 2 RV PARK YARD SALE

MT. DORA
Fri. & Sat. 8am-2pm, 100 Lisa Dr.,
Southernaire MHP, Off 46 and First.
Lots of goodies.

MT. DORA,
Sat. & Sun. 9am 4pm. 5 Harp Dr.
(Hibiscus Estates Old 441) Christ-
mas items & misc. household items.

TAVARES
Fri. Sat. 8 2pm. 3116 Wekiva
Rd. Fox Run. Clothing, housewares,
crafts, misc. items. Must See!

TAVARES
Fri. & Sat. 7am 2pm. 1643 Ban-
ning Beach Rd. Baby girl clothes
newborn 3T like new & misc.

TAVARES
Fri. Sat. 12/6 & 12/7. 8 1pm.
117 Hickory Dr. Tiki Village. Christ-
mas items, crafts & more!

TAVARES
LAKE SQUARE MALL AREA. Sat.
8am ? 32137 Elizabeth Ave. 3
Family. Nice housewares & home
decor, clothing, jewelry & wallpaper,
CD's, DVD's. Too much to list.

TAVARES
Sat. 8 ?. 1015 Belmont Circle.
Christmas Houses, misc. household
items.


630 Garage Sales

UMATILLA
Sat. 8-4pm. 19120 Branson's Way.
Antiques, furn., collectibles & more.

WILDWOOD
Fri. & Sat. 8amrn 2pm. 342 Young
Circle. (Behind old shopping center.)
Huge Sale. Lot's of Christmas, col-
lectibles & misc. household.

WILDWOOD
Sat. 8am-? Annual Lake Miona
Heights Community Yard Sale! Yard
sales every which way, watch for
signs.

635 Garden

BARBECUE GRILL, Blue Rhino, new in
box, propane. $50. 352-787-9197

GRILL gas 4 burner Grill Master. $75.
352-357-0309

LAWN MOWER MTD push. Big wheels.
6hp. $70.352-383-0462

LAWN MOWER, self propelled, good
cond. $35 Call 352-326-8520

LAWN TRACTOR Honda, Hydrostatic
Drive, 18hp, 38" cut. Excel cond.
$400. SOLD 1ST DAY!

ROSE TREES Knockout. 2 yellow 4.5'
tall. $90. Call 352-365-6749

TILLER Manthis, used little, excel, cond.
$100. SOLD!!!!

640 Guns

BUSHMASTER AR-15 Patrolman. New
in box. Never fired. $1250. Call
352-429-3938

GUN & KNIFE SHOW
BROOKSVILLE HSC
Dec. 7th, 9am-5pm
Dec.8th, 9am-4pm
Held at Hernando Co. Fairgrounds.
Admission $6.00
352-799-3605

PISTOL Ethan Allen 4 shot black pow-
der, 36 caliber. $100. 406-9405

RIFLE Citadel, M-1 22 long. New in
box. $350. 352-357-9074

SIG SAUER 1911 STX from Sig Sauer
Custom shop, 45ACP, adjustable
Sig nite sites. 5" barrel, stainless.
Excel. like new. $950. 552-6612

SMITH & WESSON 38/357 Magnum,
M-686, Revolver, 6" barrel, stain-
less. Excel., like new. $650.
352-552-6612

649 Medical

MEDICAL SCOOTER Heavy Duty. 3
wheels. New batteries. $500 in-
cludes curb side lift that needs part.
352-669-3249


AEiiiiW;t l Choice"


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DISCOUNT
APPLIANCE
Repair-Sales-Service Most Repairs
$60 Plus Parts





WASHER, DRYER,
REFRIGERATOR
"Don't Toss It
Fix It For Less"
Buying Clean
Washers & Dryers
Days, Evenings &Weekends
Call Now
352-874-1238


, Ar




Saturday, December 7, 2013


649 Medical

POTTY CHAIR, good cond $10 Call
859-512-8144

SCOOTER Pride Celebrity X, $425 Call
SOLD!!!

WALKER UltraLight w/seat and hand
brakes. $50. 352-217-4809

WHEELCHAIR elec. 2 yrs. old. w/Ig. &
sm. seat. Excel cond. $800 Call
352-669-6253

WHEELCHAIR heavy duty. $100 obo.
352-748-7847

WHEELCHAIR like new. $55 Call
352-253-1155

WHEELCHAIR no pedestals, walker &
shower chair. $75 all. 348-7490

650 Computers
& Equip

COMPUTER Dell desk top w/XP, 2400
$85 Call 352-729-3124

COMPUTER Hewlett-Packard 17" flat
screen $100. Call 352-793-7982

PRINTER HP Photo Smart All In One,
extra cartridges. $50. 461 -9344

651 Articles
Wanted

HOT WHEEL CARS still in package. Call
352-365-6570

WANTED TREADMILL w/incline. Must
be in good shape. 352-483-6064

652 Articles
For Sale

ASSORTED KNICK KNACKS from all
over America. $25. 352-508-9415

BED SHEETS (2 PCS) full size, complete
set floral design, & white full set &
cover & sheet & pillowcase. $20.
352--383-1280 between 8am -
11 amS&6pm -9pm.

BOX OF KITCHENAID ATTACHMENTS
new never used. $95. 357-2771

BREAD MAKER Regal Kitchen Pro. Ex-
cel cond. $30.352-516-5364

CANISTER SET, 4 pcs. w/cookie jar,
Ducks. $35. 352-753-8361

CHRISTMAS TREE 7.5', w/lights used 1
yr. Asking $35. 352-324-4110

CHRISTMAS TREE Douglas Fur 6', ex-
cel. cond. $10 Call SOLD!

CHRISTMAS TREE Retro, silver. $50.
Call 352-483-5604

CHRISTMAS TREE STAND Ig. metal un-
breakable. $15 Call 352-259-3522

COFFEE MAKER KitchenAid. New. Paid
$189. Sell for $100. 352-978-7461

COMFORTER Luxurious, w/sham, Twin
size, never used. $30. Call
352-326-9096

CRIMES OF A GUILTY LAND by Lees-
burg author Brooke Stewart. A perfect
gift for the history buff or for the Afri-
can American who is trying to reach
back through history and for all who
would put down hatred and racism.
Signed copies available through
guiltyland@cfl.rr.com at $16.00 tax
paid, or from Amazon.com in paper or
Kindle versions or from Barnes and
Noble and Books A Million. Also
crimesofaguiltyland.com
DISHES Pfaltzgraff Heirloom, 12 pc set-
tings. New cond. $100. 242-1609

FIREPLACE TOOLS, Lg. (5) pieces
Brass & Cradle w/5 logs & box of
logs, High quality. 161b. weight. 33"
high. $75 FIRM. 352-383-1280 be-
tween 8am -11 am & 6pm 9pm.

FIREWOOD Oak FREE. Please call
352-431-3074

FORMAL/LONG GOWN brand new $20
Call 352-357-4358

GRILL Coleman, Round Trip, collapsi-
ble, used 2x. $100. 517-458-6163

LADIES DESIGNER CLOTHING Chico's
12 pieces. $100. 321-246-4371


652 Articles
For Sale

LEATHER JACKET Woman's Ig. Jones
of NY. NEW. $75. 352-435-7893

LIGHTED DBL. BELLS 30" X 40". $40
Call 352-253-1155

LUGGAGE Jordache, 6 piece tapestry,
excel cond. $99 Call 352-748-4299

MEN'S SHOES (2 pairs) 11 wide, 1 new
in box never worn black, 1 pair 12"
Russell boots slightly worn. $35.
352-383-1280 between 8am -
11 amS&6pm -9pm.
HARLEY LEATHER JACKET USA, New,
Size 56. $100. 352-669-7544
MOTORCYCLE TRIUMPH JACKET
Leather LG. $100. 407-310-6628
PUNCH BOWL SET antique, heavy crys-
tal. 19 pieces $100 357-1363

QUILT homemade queen, w/2 val-
ances. Gold/Greens $80 315-1033

QUILT Queen, green. Very pretty. Re-
versible. $35.352-460-2588

RECORDS 78RPM 100 assorted. $75
obo. 352-787-0551
ROOM SCREEN DIVIDER folds. Printed
both sides. 62 x 72. $80. 821-9902

RUG oriental Prussian, wool, 11'x9',
good cond. $250.352-589-4405

SEWING MACHINE Singer, fully auto-
matic. $75. 352-751-0369

SHOES New Bass, Men's size 8 Loafer
style. $30. 352-787-0410

SKECHERS shape ups shoes 10 wide
men's, NEW. $50. 352-347-7350

SQUARE DANCE OUTFITS (3 + 2 crino-
line), med/Ig. $40. 320-237-7461

STAGHORN huge tied to tree will repro-
duce. $50.352-460-9983
THERMAL THERAPY PARAFFIN BATH
Dr. Scholl's. $20. 352-314-3706
TOLE TRAY hand painted flowers. Excel
cond. $40 Call 352-793-9513

TRAIN elec. by LGB, G-gauge, vintage
passenger set in org. box. Additional
powered tender, coach, Ig. trans-
former + 20 ft. of track. $400 Call
352-324-3536
TUXEDO Men's, Coat/Pants/Shirt, new
cond. $65.352-217-4809

VACUUM Orick XL upright, like new
$85 cash. Call 321-246-4371

WEDDING CAKE TOP Bride & Groom.
Precious Moments. $50 .669-4100

655 Musical
Instruments

BANJO 5 string, Kay. W/accessories.
$225. Call 352-343-6608

ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT RACK GATOR
4 post open, 42U. 23"D w/casters.
New $175 Call 937-681-3256

FLUTE in good cond. w/case $100
CALL 352-504-6406

VIOLIN & BOW new w/case & book.
$100.1-352-343-6608

660 Office
Furniture/
Supplies

DESK Metal 60"Wx29"Hx30"D,
6/drawers, $75. 352-406-1253

674 Exercise Equipment

BUN & THIGH ROLLER, comes w/guide.
Good cond. $30. 352-455-8339

EXERCISE BIKE BY HEALTH MASTER,
$35 SOLD!!!

EXERCISE MACHINES In Stride Edge +
another. $100 both. 357-1760
EXERCISE MACHINES. (2) Tony Little.
Both $70. 352-874-0352
GRAVITY TRACK INVERSION TABLE.
$85. 352-259-8092
HEALTH MAX, cost over $500, brand
new. Asking $100. 352-603-1779


674 Exercise Equipment

POWER DRIVE WEIGHT BENCH
W/WEIGHTS. $100.352-516-7920

TREADMILL Sears, 10 yrs. old. $90.
Good Shape! 352-793-8414

675 Sports/
Recreation

BICYCLE 26" w/coaster brakes. Good
cond. $35 Call 352-483-3029

BICYCLE Men's, Large seat & tires, 1
speed. Runs good. $40.728-4913
BICYCLE Unis folding, good for camp-
ing. $100. 352-360-7049.
BICYCLES 3 Wheel, rebuilt. Large Seat
& Basket. $150. 1-352-343-6608
CAR ROOF RACK 66" Wide. Asking
$50. Please call 352-324-0583
FLY ROD 7', Courtland, new. Fly's, line
& misc. $90. Call 352-787-0032
FOOSEBALL TABLE regulation size
great cond. $125. 352-742-1422
GOLF CLUBS & BAG square 2 clubs.
$40 Call 352-326-8520
GOLF CLUBS men's complete set
w/bag. $25.502-750-0512
HUNTING OUTFIT size XLG, new com-
plete. $85. 352-241-9844

685 Tools/
Machinery

AIR COMPRESSOR John Deere, 2hp,
220V, 125psi. $$75. SOLD!!!!

AIR TANK, portable 10 gallon Iron
Horse 150 PSI. $40. 352-357-0120
CHAIN SAW Poulan 35cc, 16" bar, 2
chains. (1 new) $50. 343-1037

GENERATOR new 5,250 watts, Porter
Cable. $400. 352-343-6608

LADDER 20' extension, alum. $100
Call 352-253-1155

LADDER 8' wooden Werner, rugged.
$30.352-343-4587
PRESTOLITE TORCH & B TANK $65
Call 352-253-1155

ROUTER Craftsman. Like new. $40.
352-408-1576.
STEP LADDER 6' FIBERGLASS. $15.
SOLD!!!!

TOOL BOX Kennedy Industrial with 13
drawers. $100. SOLD!!!

VACUUM PUMP 110 volts, full size.
$75 Please call 352-406-9405




800
Real Estate
For Rent



806 Houses
Unfurnished

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
CLERMONT Palisades Golf Course,
13th Fairway, 3/2, vaulted ceilings,
fireplace 2 garage. $1,395 mo./yrly.
$1,500 mo. seasonal. Call Realty
USA, 407-599-5000 or call
305-607-7886

EUSTIS, 2/1, No Smoking. No Pets.
$660/mo., 1st, last & security
352-357-3457
LEESBURG
Home for rent. Age Qualified
2br/1ba. $440 per month
Call 352-234-8364


806 Houses
Unfurnished

LEESBURG, 3/1, fenced backyard,
newly remodeled. $750/mo. On
Cul-de-sac. RENTED!

LEESBURG, near Lake Square Mall,
2/2, W/D/Dishwasher/garage, active
55+ community indoor pool incl. ca-
ble $850+ util. 352-742-2588
LEESBURG, quiet 55+ area, 2/1, CHA,
near Lake Griffin. $600/mo. + dep.
incl. lawn care. 407-928-6002 or
407-932-0898.
HNNIALS
LONG TERM & UNFURN. RENTALS IN
SOUTH LAKE COUNTY.
ROCKER REALTY 352-394-3570
Ask For Janet or Emily
RockerRealtylnc.com

807 Apartments
Unfurnished

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 &2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375

EUSTIS
All remodeled Apts!
1,2 & 3 Bedrooms
Special starting at
$475 Only $350 Dep. Pet OK.
352-357-5675
LEESBURG downtown 1/1, all utilities
incl. $625/mo + $250 damage dep.
Call 352-552-0181

LEESBURG
FIRST MONTH $99
MOVE IN SPECIAL!
*2/1 $500/dep.
e2/1 w/W/D hookup $550/dep.
*2/2 w/W/D hookup $600/dep.
Call 352-516-1244
Ask for Tina
LEESBURG,
2br, 1.5ba, townhome, spacious,
neat, near Venetian Gardens, W/D,
porches, only $625, plus dep.
No pets.
Call 352-787-5885
LEESBURG, Duplex VERY CLEAN 2/1,
no pets $550/mo + dep. 551-6772

LYN TERRACE
Eustis
352-357-7332
www.lynterrace.com
Great Move-In
Specials & Free Gifts!
*1 & 2 Bedroom Units
*All 1st Floor No Stairs!
TAVARES 1/1 Fully remodeled Down-
town $495/mo. + $300 dep.
352-552-0181


808 Apartments
Furnished
EUSTIS clean 1/1, util. & cable incl.
Adults only. No pets. Background
check. $200 dep. & $160 weekly.
Call 352-357-9169
FRUITLAND PARK
TWIN PALMS MARINA
1 BR. MOBILES NEWLY RENOVATED
FULLY FURNISHED
ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED
WEEKLY & MONTHLY RATES.
NO DEPOSIT
SMALL DOGS ALLOWED.
OLD FLORIDA FISH CAMP WITH
CONVENIENCE STORE ON PROPERTY.
CALL 352-787-4514
FRUITLAND PARK, 2/1, lake front 4 mo.
min. $750/mo. incl. util.
352-728-2736
LEELSBUHG
1ST MO. FREE!
SPANISH VILLAGE
Pool, great location!
Furn. Efficiency, incl.
util. & cable. $700/mo.
2/1 apt. $600/mo.
Furn. $700/mo + util.
352-728-5555
MOUNT DORA,, 1/1 Downtown. $875
month, 1 yr. lease. Incl. util., Wi-Fi,
no pets/smoking. Call for seasonal
rates. 352-988-4022

809 Roommate
Wanted
LEESBURG female to share 2/1 apt.
House privileges. $400/mo incl. util.
$100 dep. Call 352-460-5668

810 Duplexes
CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 &2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
LEESBURG 2/2, Paulling Dr. $650/mo.
1st, Last, Security & Good Refer-
ences. Call 352-787-0004
LEESBURG, 2br/1 ba $450/mo. 1721
Birchwood Cir. Call now!
352-325-1289


OPEN MON.-FRI., 8-7
SAT. 8:30-6:00 z


811 Condos
Townhouses
WILDWOOD beautiful 2/2, W/D.
$645/mo. incl. water/trash/~80
channels cable TV. 352-874-5966

812 Rooms to
Rent
EUSTIS private home 2nd fir furn. Pri-
vate entrance, util incl. Clean perfect
for single $600/mo Call 357-2708

816 Commercial
Property

LEESBURG
Warehouses w/Offices
2315-25 Griffin Rd. 1,150 up to
12,400sf. Starts at $300/mo.
Office/Showroom
1607 Hwy. 441 $850/mo
Small Shop or Office
2204 Citrus Blvd (441)
$320/mo., includes utilities
352-787-0004
SABAL PROFESSIONAL SUITES II
The Villages/Lady Lake
New all inclusive office suites.
Receptionist, conference room,
full kitchen, deskw/chairs, phones,
copier/fax, internet, wi-fi, all office
needs in one low payment.
JUST SIT DOWN, PLUG IN,
GO TO WORK.
Conveniently located on CR 466
East of Rolling Acres.
Contact Preferred Realty Mgmt. Group
(352)633-1900

819
Manufactured
Homes Rental

-ALTOONA DECEMBER SPECIAL**
2/1 $475/mo. w/$300 dep.
3/2 $560 plus $300 dep.
And RV Lot $290/mo. w/$100 dep.
352-735-2071 or 352-636-6800
CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
.1 &2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375


4P Eustrs

1 Bedroom Private Patio 1
1 Story, Walk to Publix
Brfna ThFs Ad To R ooru..
S1 00 OFF
FFirst Full Month R*nt
1651 N. County Rd 19A,
Eunstis Fl 32726
*P -52-:357-7-32 73


2200 U.S. HWY 441

EUSTIS, FL 32726


VAUi 'MUD/.AYhVA \





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DAILY COMMERCIAL





DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, December 7, 2013


819
Manufactured
Homes Rental

ATTENTION SENIORS AND ADULTS
Never lived in. Brand New 66x14, 3/2,
in nice quiet park in Eustis.
$650/mo + utilities. Sorry NO KIDS.
Call 352-589-4407
FRUITLAND PARK 3/2 great area,
fenced yard. $825/mo + security.
Call 352-874-8880

LEESURG, $300/ mo. plus $100 dep.
RENTED!!!!!


900
Real Estate
For Sale


903 Homes
For Sale

LEESBURG
Home for sale. Age Qualified
2br/1 ba. $3,500 Act fast.
Call 352-234-8364
LEESBURG
New home for sale. Age Qualified
3br/2ba, 1,456sf.
Waterfront lot $59,995. Must See
LEESBURG
Home for sale. Age Qualified.
2br/2ba Water view.
$4,000 Won't Last
LEESBURG
Home for sale. Age Qualified.
2br/1.5ba. New carpet and vinyl
$5,000 Great buy
Call 352-234-8369




1000
Manufactured
Homes


1001 Mfd Homes
For Sale

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375


1001 Mfd Homes
For Sale
LADY LAKE Immaculate, 1987 Skyline,
Bays, 14x66, 2BR/2BA, w front
Sunroom and side screened porch,
utility room, roof over, beautiful end
lot. Only minutes from The Villages.
$13,900, motivated Seller.
850-591-9955
SENIORS AND ADULTS
NEW and NEWER
Homes in a nice quiet part in Eustis.
$25,000 4-;, 1:1ilX(I Fiin n,.iri j.,j,1.
Only 3 left! Lot rent $350 per mo.
Call 352-589-4407
SNOW BIRD SPECIAL TAVARES, TIKI
VILLAGE, 55+ park 12'x50'. 1/1
possible 2/1 10x20 enclosed screen.
rm., almost fully furn., new carpet,
$4,950 obo. Lot rent $300/mo incl.
water, sewer & trash.
352-551-3536 or 352-253-0512
WILDWOOD 2/2 furn. W/D, scrn porch.
Low lot rent. $12,000.
352-742-2231 Or 352-330-6541

1002 Mfd
Homes
W/ land
For Sale
WEIRSDALE AREA, newly remodeled,
w/new appl. 3/2, scrn front porch.
$73K, $2,500 down, $700/mo for
15 yrs. Own Financing.
352-821-1597

1012 RVLots

**ALTOONA DECEMBER SPECIAL**
2/1 $475/mo. w/$300 dep.
3/2 $560 plus $300 dep.
And RV Lot $290/mo. w/$100 dep.
352-735-2071 or 352-636-6800
MOUNT DORA -
Southernaire RV sites for rent
All rates includes trash, water,
sewer, electric, and taxes.
$340 per mo. Daily & wkly rates avail!
Call 352-234-8364




1100
Recreation


1101 Boats
BASS MASTER BOAT/TRAILER 85hp.
W/trolling motor. 2 Live wells. Runs
& starts easy. Lots of extras. $2500.
Call 352-245-4846


Found iti,
Bought iti,I
Sold it,

FAS T!
BfIL F4I F ldI I. j1IO'.0


1101 Boats

FISH RIG Gheenoe 15'. 5HP
motor/trailer $1950. 352-988-3129

PRINCECRAFT 14'. 8hp four stroke
Mercury engine. Ventura galvanized
Trailer w/extras. $2500. Call
352-793-5106 or 352-250-8650

1150 RV&
Campers

ALUMINUM TOPPER w/ladder rack,
7'Lx 6'W. $50 obo 255-4354

FORD-250 2203. Super Duty Crew
Cab, 7.3L Powerstroke diesel, 161K
miles, 4x4, automatic, air, power
windows, power doors, power seats,
sliding 5th wheel hitch with goose
neck adapter, power programmer,
5" exhaust, roof mount wind deflec-
tor, accessory tailgate. Kelley Blue
Book $14,300. 2005 Keystone
Montana M3400RL, 37', 4 slides,
washing machine, dryer, central
vacuum system, electric fireplace, 2
a/c units. NADA average retail
$32,875. Will sell as package
$34,000.402-926-6177.

REESE 5TH WHEEL HITCH w/bed rail
kit. Like new. 16K towing capacity.
$225. 407-886-7653

SOLID ROCK GUARD for Class A Allegro
Bus. $60. 704-682-4351

1200
Transportation

1205 Autos





Stock, # S1a477











I o -:4. o6 o -
*$II8I
















[ ]llllt llig!7
IStock # S 17; 4l2i4Y1 A
*$4,88l8ll~ll !
lDODGE DAKOIiTA LUBCA
2005lt ~l!!Jl


1205 Autos

HONDA ACCORD '10 Limited. Low mi.
Excel cond. $16,000. 406-0478

CASH PAID FOR JUNK CARS!
$300 and up. Call 352-771-6191
CORVETTE '81 blk on blk. 383 w/auto-
matic, mirrored T-Top. Tagged/reg-
istered. Needs Love! Factory A/C.
Runs well. No joy rides. $5300 obo.
Call 352-728-6254

LINCOLN TOWNCAR 2000. Looks
good, runs great! $2600. 750-2755

SUBARU OUTBACK '05, manual turbo
94K. $9,900. 513-470-7178

1206 Aviation

1210 Mcycles/
Mopeds

HARLEY 1200 Sportster. '99. Loaded.
$5500.352-988-3129

HONDA 2005 REFLEX SCOOTER PKG.,
250cc engine, cover, helmet,
gloves, padded riding jacket. $2600
Call 360-0245 leave voice message

KAWASAKI 2012 Vulcan 900 custom,
purplish-blk. Less than 500 mi.
Memphis shade windshield, Vance
& Hines exhaust, power commander
for easy laptop adjustments + much
more. $8200 Call Mark
352-742-3506

SCOOTER Magnum RL 150. Runs great
Like new. 1200mi. $750. 250-7373

1230 Vans

CHEVROLET WHEEL CHAIR VAN, full
size, air. Good cond. $5,000.
352-343-7825

1235 SUV

GEO TRACKER '95. $1000 obo. Call
352-753-9637

1240 Trucks
Light Duty

CHEVROLET SLIVERADO 2011, 1500
LT, extended cab. low mileage.
$24,900 Call 352-267-6942

FORD RANGER 1998. 23K mi. Abso-
lutely As New! Loaded. Every option.
$8350. Call 352-589-4415.

You're Reading

6 LOCAL

PAPER
The *aill lCnMne


1240 Trucks
Light Duty
FORD F-150 '89, 300 6 auto. Runs
great. Reliable. $1,000. 250-7373.

1245 Trucks
Wanted
WANTED Small Pick Up. Ford or GMC
preferred. Call 352-753-9637

1247 Trailers
CALIBER CARHAULER 2012, 7X16, ex-
cellent cond., radial tires. $2,000.
Tie downs avail. SOLD
CARGO TRAILER 6' X 10' w/new radial
tires. $1,500. 352-978-1352
UTILITY TRAILER 2013. 5 x 10 w/15"
wheels. $750. Call 352-399-2228
UTILITY TRAILER 4 x8. Used once. Like
new. $500. 352-365-9917

1250 Antique
Cars
AUTO SWAP-CORRAL SHOW
DEC. 8TH Sumter Cnty. Fairgrounds
Sumter Swap Meets.
800-438-8559


1264 Auto
Parts
Accessory
CAR COVER late model Volkswagen
Bug. $60 Call 413-539-4402

CHILTON'S AUTO REPAIR MANUAL, for
'72-79. Like new. $20. 343-1411
TOW BAR, good cond. $60 Please call
352-383-0855
TRUNK LIFT, elec. mobility for scooter.
Like new. $160 Call SOLD!

1275 Golf
Carts
CLUB CAR '98, 48V, high speed motor,
sunbrella seats, full enclosure,
lights. $1450 obo. SOLD!

GOLF CLUBS Excel cond. Mens' &
women. $35. Call 352-253-9236




[ IDallqiiCmnicf I -=


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LOANS




888


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, December 7, 2013








Home
352-365-8208 I features,@dailycoiiiinercial.comii


El
DAILY COMMERCIAL
Saturday, December 7, 2013


\\-\\-\\-. .( l i ln er .ia.:l.(oll


f DECOR: Sporting pursuits with style / E2


S *=16
4f,,


AP PHOTO
This photo provided by Brian Patrick Flynn shows bold colors and whimsical decorating touches that emphasize the
playful side of holiday celebrations.


Change it up for the holidays


In a season of traditions, there's

still room to play with decorations


MELISSA RAYWORTH
Associated Press
The holiday season is synon-
ymous with tradition. But that
doesn't mean you have to fill
your home with the same hol-
iday decorations in the same
color scheme every year.
"Until four years ago, I was
Scrooge-y when it came to hol-
iday decorating a result of
seeing the same old thing over
and over again," says Brian Pat-
rick Flynn, a Los Angeles-based
interior designer and executive
producer of HGTVcom's "Holi-
day House."
But after finding ways to "rein-
vent the look and feel of Christ-
mas for my own home," Fly-
nn says he "rediscovered how
much fun seasonal styling can
be when you make it your own."


Here he and two other design
experts Jon Call of Mr. Call
Designs and Betsy Burnham of
Burnham Design offer sug-
gestions on shaking up holiday
decorating.
SUPER STOCKINGS
Call's family takes a cre-
ative approach to Christmas
stockings: On the night before
Christmas Eve, they make new
stockings by sewing together
large pieces of felt (inexpensive
at any craft store) using a sim-
ple blanket stitch.
"We let our imaginations fly
when it comes to decorating
the outsides, and top off each
one with our name and the
year," he says. "Making these
stockings gives us all some-
thing to do the night before
Christmas (Eve), and we share


memories and laughter along
the way."
TERRIFIC TREES
A Christmas tree doesn't have
to stay parked in one place.
Flynn recommends putting a
small tree on wheels (maybe
in a vintage metal wagon or an
old metal washtub with cast-
ers on the bottom) so you can
change its location when you're
entertaining to create space or
to bring extra holiday style to a
different room.
Another option is ditching
red and green tree decorations
for an understated color pal-
ette.
"This year I created a tone-
on-tone tree using all shades
of light gray," Flynn says. "To
do this right, it's all about hav-
ing a balance of texture, finish,
shape, scale and proportion."
Try a white tree if you'll be us-
ing light colors and neutrals, or
SEE CHANGE I E2


Will Christmas


lights harm


house plants?


Q Will using Christ-
mas lights on my
trees harm them?
A Christmas lights
are usually safe
to use on plants un-
less they are left on
too long. Some people
try to leave the lights
on year round and
may girdle their trees.
Woody trees expand
in diameter every year
with growth. A strand
of lights strung light-
ly around branches
and trunks one year
will be strangling the
tree in a few years un-
less removed every
year. Palm trees are
the exception their
trunks do not increase


Juanita
,Popenoe
LAKE COUNTY
EXTENSION


in diameter every year.
Large Christmas lights
that become hot may
burn tender foliage on
indoor plants.
Q The price of pecans
is very high right
now. Can I grow pe-
cans here in central
Florida?
A The price for pe-
cans has increased
because of the in-
creased world-wide
SEE POPENOE I E2


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Do not leave Christmas lights on trees for multiple years.
The wires can strangle the trees.


For the blackest of thumbs, some

Stips and a list of easy-to-grow plants


The butterfly bush is a pollinator-attracting, low-maintenance shrub that
once established can tolerate weather extremes and gardener neglect.


DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press
Gardening is a forgiving
pursuit. Get it wrong one
year and you can start fresh
again the next, wiser, with
lessons learned.
Study up between planting
seasons. Scan the seed cata-
logs for bulletproof plants
that anyone with the black-
est of thumbs can grow.
"Start small," said Claire
Watson, Wave brand manag-
er for Ball Horticultural Co.


in West Chicago, Ill. "Wheth-
er it's a vegetable garden or
flowers, don't give in to tak-
ing on too much, too soon. A
few small successes will give
you the confidence to ex-
pand or at least you'll re-
alize your limits."
Learn the rules of the row.
"The right plant for the
right place" may be a gar-
dening cliche, but it's an ac-
curate one. So, too, is the
caution, "Know your (USDA
plant hardiness) zone."


"Like humans, plants
will perish without water
and food," Watson said. "So
plants that can survive the
stress of missing a few water-
ings, or can withstand poor
soils and extreme weather,
are the ones to look for."
Some proven low-mainte-
nance varieties include:
SHRUBS: hydrangea (pa-
niculata "Levana"), spiraea
(japonica "Norman") and
butterfly bush (Buddleia
SEE PLANTS I E3


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ANY RECLINER ANY SOFA .!ANY DINING ROOM SET:: ANY BEDROOM SET
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Leesburg, FL I 352.319.6768
M352.435.6131 F 9-6 Sat 10s6, Sun12.5


www.shopfamilyfurniture.com
*Prior sales excluded from offer. Dinina Room set consists of Table/(4) Chairs/Case niece. Bedroom set consists of Dresser/Mirror/Chest/Bed/Niaht Stand.





DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, December 7, 2013


AP PHOTO
This photo provided byAlexandra Llewellyn Design Ltd shows a detail of a carnival backgammon set
from Alexandralldesign.com.


Sporting pursuits with style


KIM COOK
Associated Press
"To the art of work-
ing well, a civilized race
would add the art of play-
ing well," philosopher
George Santayana said.
For those with means,
pursuing leisure can in-
volve the finest compo-
nents. Beautiful materi-
als and craftwork can take
these items into the realm
of art.
"The market for these
high-end sporting items
is extremely fractured. No
one is authentically show-
casing these exception-
al artisans in a way that
celebrates their superior
craftsmanship," says Pippa
McArdle, co-founder of Be-
spoke Global, which sells
custom-made home fur-
nishings and accessories.
So what does play look
like, at the luxury end of
the spectrum?
WATER SPORTS
As journalist Tom Bro-
kaw said, "If fishing is a
religion, fly fishing is high
church." Aficionados ap-


preciate the craftsman-
ship ofWillow Reels, start-
ed in Clarkston, Mich., by
Chris Reister. He makes
classic fly fishing reels out
of aircraft-grade alumi-
num, brass, and ebony,
redwood, or maple burl.
You can buy the reels la-
ser-cut with scroll, tribal
or flower motifs, or have
your own design inlaid.
In Blue Ridge, Ga., Bill
Oyster's eponymous com-
pany makes supple bam-
boo fly rods that he sells
worldwide. Former Pres-
ident Jimmy Carter has
one. The reel seats are
hand-engraved, the cane
is flamed to add spring
and resilience, the fin-
ish guides are bronze and
the hardware is blued, an
electrochemical process
that protects against rust.
And then there are
boats. Nick Schade, a de-
signer and boat builder in
Groton, Conn., draws in-
spiration from early Inu-
it and Aleut designs, craft-
ing kayaks and canoes
from variety of cedars, fi-
berglass and carbon-Kev-


lar cloth. His Night Heron
kayak is in the Museum of
Modern Art's permanent
collection.
Plying the waters in a
human-powered vessel
requires a fine paddle;
Sanborn Canoe, a Minne-
sota-based outfitter, of-
fers some elegant ones,
with names like Min-
netonka and Gitchi Gum-
mi. Made of woods like
cedar, aspen and black
walnut, they're painted
with striking graphics that
might leave you wonder-
ing whether to dip them
in the water or mount
them on the wall.
LAND SPORTS
Are teams chasing balls
more your thing? Week-
end gridironers might
like one of the footballs or
baseballs made by Leath-
er Head Sports, started by
Cooperstown, N.Y, home-
boy Paul Cunningham.
Rawhide-laced, in colors
ranging from classic taw-
ny caramel to royal blue
and red, the balls are made
SEE STYLE I E3


CHANGE
FROM PAGE El

a green tree with decorations in
earth tones.
To shake up your tree's dec-
orations, Call suggests going
with a theme.
"Last year for a client, I in-
dulged in masses of vintage
mercury-glass ornaments of all
sizes and shapes. Silver was lit-
erally dripping off the tree. It
was spectacular," he says. "This
year we are changing it up a bit
and creating a completely ed-
ible tree, including childhood
favorites such as homemade
popcorn balls, small sacks of
chocolates tied with a ribbon
and hung from the branches,
and pungent gingerbread."
NO TREE AT ALL
If you have minimal space,
Call says you can skip the tree
altogether without losing any
holiday cheer. Instead, cluster
together a bunch of white poin-
settias. They set a holiday tone
in a fresh way, he says, and in
a large group look "almost like
snowfall."
Or create your own "tree" out
of branches: "In my kitchen, I
love to fill a large galvanized pot
with armfuls of branches full of
red berries," Call says. "As the
season progresses, I simply clip
incoming cards to the arrange-
ment so that everyone can en-
joy. It's become a tradition over
the years, and everyone loves to
come and check out my 'fami-
ly tree.'"


FOCUS ON UNEXPECTED PLACES
Christmas doesn't just hap-
pen in your living room. Fly-
nn suggests adding a tiny tree
to any space, even a breakfast
nook.
To spice up a staircase, he cre-
ated a garland out of "old men's
flannel and denim shirts cut and
stitched" into pennant squares
with tiny pockets. Strung to-
gether, they create a colorful ad-
vent calendar (mark all 25 days
with sew-on varsity letters).
Each one can hold a tiny gift and
"add life and activity to an oth-
erwise humdrum space."
And for a new twist on out-
door decorating, Burnham sug-
gests investing in a profession-
al decorating service to string
your outdoor trees with white
lights. "I don't mean drape
lights over branches. I mean re-
ally wrap the trunk and every
branch," she says.
MAKE IT ALL ABOUT THE MANTEL
"One of the most searched-
for terms on HGTVcom is 'man-
tel decorating,'" Flynn says.
For homes with a flat-panel TV
mounted above the mantel, he
has a high-tech idea: Burn imag-
es to DVD that coordinate with
the accessories you lay out on
your mantel, then let the DVD
run during holiday entertaining.
For one project, Flynn dis-
played colorful pop art imag-
es (including a reindeer by art-
ist Jonathan Fenske) on the TV,
and then put colorful items like
candy in apothecary jars and
brightly colored ornaments on
the mantel "to make it all pop."


AP PHOTO
Swatches of mens' shirt fabrics are used to create a holiday garland that also
serves as an advent calendar.


POPENOE
FROM PAGE El

demand for this native
American nut. We are
at the southern lim-
it for pecans, but pe-
cans can be grown in
central Florida. Pecan
trees can take five to
12 years to get a har-
vestable crop. Select
an area for planting


Brownwood
Paddock
Square


with full sun and well
drained soil. Avoid
planting in low lying
areas that are prone to
late frosts. Pecans can
be grown without a lot
of care, but a commer-
cial crop will require
more inputs of fertiliz-
er, irrigation and pest
control. Several pecan
cultivars need to be
planted together to en-
sure cross-pollination.


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Of the pecan cultivars
that have been test-
ed in north Florida,
the best pecan culti-
vars for homeowners
are Cape Fear, Elliott,
Curtis, Stuart, Sumner
and Moreland, with
more cultivars cur-
rently in trials. More
details on pecans can
be found at http://
edis.ifas.ufl.edu/
mg367 and http://edis.
ifas.ufl.edu/st122.
Q My tomato leaves
are all curled and
yellowed. Are they get-
ting enough fertilizer?



m*da


Music; S-ch
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Lr'soii' lot All tqji'
All [It lrhiiigi'll_ I pI I'
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Instrniments. Eqnipmen
A((essories (ne% & nsedd
Pointed Musk
Marching Band Supplies
MN ii,,i l ii di r l Di',1-io i '15
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A If your tomato
leaves are distorted,
curled and yellow, you
may have tomato yel-
low leaf curl virus (TY-
LCV). We have been
seeing more virus in-
fected plants show up
this year at the plant
clinic. Infected plants
are stunted with small,
upward curling leaves.
The leaves are crum-
pled and yellow. Flow-
ers usually do not de-
velop and fall off, so
few fruit are formed.
These symptoms may
also be caused by oth-
er viruses or various




e/,/,'-, 47,551,


i &tStore
.h le.&\ol-e 0/


' Gift
Specials for
Cluistmas!


REGISTER NOW!
lesstons@nindnda miisicstore.com


growing conditions.
Whiteflies carry the
disease to other plants.
If you have a heavy in-
festation of white flies
and these symptoms,
you are more likely to
have the virus and it is
best to remove infest-
ed plants before the vi-
rus spreads. The same
virus can cause leaf
curl in certain beans,
and some weeds will
carry the virus with-
out symptoms. It can
take up to three weeks
for disease symptoms
to develop. TYLCV re-
sistant tomato culti-
vars are available.
Q My Valencia orang-
es are all green. Do
they have citrus green-
ing?


A Valencia orang-
es are not ripe un-
til March- June, so you
should not expect the
fruit to color up un-
til closer to the time
of ripening. 'Navel',
'Hamlin' and 'Parson
Brown' are the early
ripening orange variet-
ies that should be ripe
and orange from Octo-
ber through January.
Visit the Discov-
ery Gardens with your
plant problems and
questions from 9 a.m.
to 4 p.m., weekdays,
at the ag center, 1951
Woodlea Road, Tavares.
Juanita Popenoe is the di-
rector of the UF/IFAS Lake
County Extension office
and environmental horti-
culture production agent III.
Email jpopenoe@ufl.edu.


I NOW PLAYINGAT --

GIie GVIlage.$ 259-1M
Friday, December 6 through Thursday, December 12
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Sumter LadVsegas '"Pn- 1 10:30 1:30 4:15 6:50 9.'15*
Landing .O 110:30 1:30 and 4:15 only
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HOFriday and Saturday only


12:01am Midnight only
*Friday and Saturday only


Saturday, December 7 at 7:00 PM and
; Sunday, December 8 at 4:00 PM
Featuring the Chancel Choir,
S Gold Handbell Choir, Soloists and Orchestra
Selections from Handel's Messiah,
S Traditional Christmas Carols, and More

*9 First Presbyterian Church
117 South Center Street, Eustis

Refreshments Served Following Each Concert.
Church Nursery Provided. Free Concerts.
Open To The Public Without (Ci.ii.
S F.-r- M.-re Information. Call 2-1-7-2RU ,
... ,. 7 \ . .. '.. I


2633 State Road 19 1urures,%32778
352-508-5091 h


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, December 7, 2013


II


I




Saturday, December 7, 2013


STYLE
FROM PAGE E2

of leather from the Horween
company in Chicago.
Leather Head also makes
the Lemon Ball Baseball, in-
spired by the original 19th
century lemon-peel-style
ball.
Hit a home run with one
of Jamey Rouch's bats made
of pieced cherry and wal-
nut that comes from near his
studio in Three Rivers, Mich.
Kara Ginther's hand-
tooled bike seats and saddle
bags elevate cycling to an-
other level. Leaves, fronds,
Scottish knitting patterns
and even zodiac patterns
have inspired her designs.
The look and feel of Cali-
fornia 1950s surf culture can
be found in purple heart,


mahogany and walnut beach
racquet paddles, outfitted
with leather grips and loops.
Remote-control vehicles at
the luxury end are more like
mini versions of real cars, with
quality elements like titanium
shocks, steel gears and leather
seats. Retailers offer off-road
vehicles, slick sports cars and
speedboats, including several
from high-end maker Traxxas
which zoom at speeds up to
100 mph.
AIR SPORTS
Once the sport of kings, fal-
conry has developed a mod-
ern following in groups like
The North American Falcon-
ers Association. Ken Hooke
of Winnipeg, Manitoba, may
be falconry's pre-eminent
craftsman, making hoods for
the sporting birds.
The hoods are placed over


DAILY COMMERCIAL

the birds' heads to calm
them. Hooke makes them
out of calf, goat, and exotic
skins such as ostrich, iguana
and red monitor lizard.
TABLE SPORTS
Alexandra Llewellyn was
introduced to backgammon
by her Egyptian step-grand-
father. It became a lifelong
passion, and she now de-
signs eye-catching sets with
photographic images of
pheasant feathers, antlers
and vintage female portraits.
"Growing up in the coun-
try, I've collected pheasant
feathers for years. The pea-
cock feather design was in-
spired by the game's Persian
roots, and the carnival and
nude women evoke gam-
bling and nightclubs in the
1920s," Llewellyn says.
She recently made a cus-


tom backgammon set that
documented a couple's life
together. "Their first date,
where they lived and their
nationalities inspired the
artwork," she says. "The
leather compartments were
embossed with hand-writ-
ten quotes from their love
letters, and the playing piec-
es were engraved with the
places they've traveled over
the years."
She also offers custom
game pieces made of mala-
chite, rock crystal, lapis la-
zuli, turquoise or jasper, en-
cased in brass.
Hattrick backgammon
sets, popular with profes-
sional players, are offered
with white, blue, red or green
leather playing fields, mar-
bleized acrylic playing pieces
and gold-plated case locks at
www.zontikgames.com.


Chess fans know how dis-
maying it can be when an
ongoing game gets jos-
tled. Hammacher Schlem-
mer offers a wall-mounted
board complete with acryl-
ic shelves and rosewood and
boxwood pieces that will
keep the action safe for days
or weeks.
Foosball is for more than
college pubs. High-end Ital-
ian game-table maker Teck-
ell offers crystal, walnut and
even 24-karat gold in their
collection.
Billiard Toulet has de-
signed the Lambert pool ta-
ble, crafted of sleek stain-
less steel, with a top that
slides on when play is over.
A soundproofed ball return
and tournament-grade cloth
are part of the package, but
you can add an LED light set
as an option.


PLANTS
FROM PAGE El

"Miss Molly").
PERENNIALS: Cone-
flowers ("Cheyenne
Sprit," "Sombrero"),
hosta ("Sun and Sub-
stance") and black-
eyed Susan (Rudbeckia
fulgida "Goldsturm").
BULBS, RHIZOMES
AND TUBERS: Canna lil-
ies ("Whithelm Pride")
and daylilies ("Lilt-
ing Belle") can endure
a wide variety of chal-
lenging conditions.
ANNUALS: Drag-
on Wing red begonia
(full sun to full shade),
zinnias ("Profusion"
and "Zahara"), ange-
lonia ("Serena," which
is deer- and rabbit-re-
sistant) and Cool Wave
pansies. "Plant them
in the fall and they'll
bloom until the snow
flies," Watson said of
the pansies. "Then,
they'll re-bloom to be
your first pop of color
in the spring."
SUCCULENTS AND
CACTI: agave (Par-
ryi truncata "Mes-
cal"), sedum (Sarmen-
tosum "Yellow Moss")
and yucca (Hesperaloe
parviflora "Texas Red").
VEGETABLES: Mal-
ibar spinach and okra
(Clemson "Spineless"
for heat tolerance);
Brussels sprouts, garlic,


leeks and parsnips for
cold hardiness. "Those
veggies are so cold-tol-
erant that they can be
left in the garden and
allowed to freeze out-
right," said Robert Po-
lomski, an extension
consumer horticultur-
ist with Clemson Uni-
versity. Herbs (rose-
mary), lettuce, beans
and peppers also are
forgiving.
INDOOR PLANTS:
The aptly named cast-
iron plant (Aspidis-
tra elatior) and Grape
ivy (Cissus rhombifo-
lia) display striking foli-
age. The easy-care wax
plant (Hoya carnosa
"Variegata") produces
attractive flowers. "I've
accidentally allowed
these plants to experi-
ence extended drought
periods and they've al-


ways come back for
me," Polomski said.
Annuals get a mod-
est nod over perenni-
als for being easier to
grow, Polomski said in
an email.
"Obviously, it de-
pends upon species
and cultivars," he said,
"but I'd lean toward
annuals. They typical-
ly grow rapidly and be-
gin flowering in a short
time."
A similar case can be
made for seedlings over
seeds, Polomski said.

WILDWOOD
'l0CYCLERY
Bikes for Every Terain & Budget
Sales Service
WD Plaza 352-399-2983
www.wildwoodcyclery.com


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LUANN


MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
f6RIMMi, I OTA LIVE CHRISTMAS
'TRE THIS A5 0 SO YOU CAN'T
L CLIMB UPAND PIDDLE ON IT.


MUTrTS


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GARFIELD


ROSE IS ROSE


PEANUTS HEATHCLIFF
7' 7' -. 1:- 47- L N -
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I .SHOOL-b HAVE
LEF- THE? SOC4'S
OFF... V
0i


Mom is slow to address

girl's excessive weight


DEAR ABBY: I'm 12 and weigh
204 pounds. I feel really fat
and I want to go on a diet,
but my mom won't let me.
I'm getting bad grades in gym
class and need your help. -
SAD GIRL IN NEW HAMPSHIRE
DEAR SAD GIRL: By recog-
nizing that you have a prob-
lem that you can't deal with
on your own, you have al-
ready taken an important first
step in resolving it. The next
is to talk to your gym teacher
about this and enlist her aid
in convincing your mother to
give you the help you need.
Childhood obesity is ram-
pant in this country, and all
those extra pounds could
negatively affect your health
- not only now, but in the fu-
ture. If you have a pediatri-
cian, the doctor may be able
to discuss the importance of a
healthy diet and exercise pro-
gram for you with your mom.
You will need the help of oth-
er adults to make her under-
stand if she can't see that you
need help now.
DEAR ABBY: I am 18 and dating
someone of a different race. We
have been together for more
than a year. The problem is
my father is very racist. Every
time I sneak out to go see my
boyfriend, my father wants to
know who I am with. I tell him
it's "my friends," but he knows
I'm lying.
I want to tell him who I'm
dating, but I know he's going
to be judgmental and rude if
I introduce him to my boy-
friend. Any advice on what to
do? NERVOUS IN THE NORTHEAST
DEAR NERVOUS: At 18 you
are too old to be sneaking
around. Your father knows
something is up, and he
probably suspects the rea-
son you're not being truth-
ful or open, so stop lying. If he
wants to know why you hav-
en't brought the young man
around, tell him it's because
you know how he would react.
And IF you decide to make in-
troductions, be sure your boy-
friend knows in advance what
the reaction will probably be
- if he agrees to meet your


dad, that is. But I wouldn't
blame him if he didn't.
DEAR ABBY: I ran into an old
high school friend a while ago.
"Jan" and I are both single
moms. We want what's best
for our kids. She has no fami-
ly living here, and she doesn't
have many friends. Jan has
low self-esteem, high anxiety
and, I believe, she mismanag-
es her finances. Her house is
extremely unkempt.
She calls me in tears often,
asking for advice and help. I
have tried to help her, but it is
becoming overwhelming.
I asked my boss for two days
off over the holidays. Jan called
me shortly after and asked me
if I can take care of her son
on any days I have off over
the holidays so he won't have
to go to his day care facility. I
feel bad and want to help, but
I took the time off to spend
much-needed time with my
family. I don't want to have to
bring her son to my family fes-
tivities. Is this wrong of me?
Needless to say, this rela-
tionship has added a lot of
stress to my life. I tried break-
ing off the relationship over
the summer, and I'm not
even sure why it still contin-
ues. I feel mean and rude, but
I don't want to be and can't
be this girl's only means of
support. -TRAPPED IN BUFFALO
DEAR TRAPPED: It is neither
mean nor rude to draw the
line when someone's need-
iness is more than you can
cope with. It is OK to say no,
and you needn't feel guilty
about it. It is also OK to ad-
vise someone that low-cost
counseling is available in
most communities if the per-
son appears unstable or un-
able to cope with life. When
you do, tell her that her needs
are more than you are able to
handle. If you do, you may not
need to end the friendship
- she may do it for you, but
you'll be doing her a favor.
Dear Abby is written byAbigail Van Buren,
also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was
founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips.
Write DearAbbyat www.DearAbby.com or
RO. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.


I ALL o..I.
r---AC -__ -- -- 1 r --1
LL VACUUM SERVICE/
VACUUMS TUNE-UP

20%* 1 NOW$19.99
1 1 WithCoupon.Validthrough12/31/13. DC
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OFF Iriiuc E
iALL VACUUM CLEANER BAGS
I I L i i
With Coupon. I I


*Not valid on previous purchases or with other coupons or discounts.
MAccessible o U UU Mon-Sat-6
Ma g n e s iu m .. '., I
Valid through0OF
12/31/13. DCOF
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*Not valid on previous purchases or with other coupons or discounts.
990 Alverez Ave, Spanish Springs, The Villages
Golfs be35-29-80 Across from McCall's Tavern
Accssile 352259380 1 Mon-Sat 10-6


Cofee
with the morning newspaper...
they just go together.
LA fE 14 -FAST sm 748 1955

TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY CALL 787III0600UI
TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY CALL 787-0600


I


41



OIJJ

2s~m

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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, December 7, 2013




Saturday, December 7, 2013

S udoku ******4puz.com

7 2 4

5 2

48 95

82

4 9 7

45c

49 57

1 8 _3
__ 5 6 9

Fill in the squares so that each row, column, andi
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION
46157i8239
379124586
582963174
834659721
195287643
627431895
248315967


79167
75389


4128
412


How to play: Fill in the blank
squares with the numbers 1
through 9 so that each horizon-
tal row, vertical column and nine-
square
sub-grid contains no repeated
numbers.
Puzzles range in difficulty from
one to six stars.
The solution to today's puzzle
will be in tomorrow's paper.


AXYDLBAAXR
isLONGFELLOW
One letter stands for another. In this sample, A is used
for the three L's, X for the two 0's, etc. Single letters,
apostrophes, the length and formation of the words
are all hints. Each day the code letters are different.


12-7


CRYPTOQUOTE


YL UBXHRM


WV LVT HN


QVW


WV HQETHPM GFL VP GFHWFMP,

STW ATNW MQAVL LVTP HRM

RPMUY GFHDM HW'N VQ LVTP


CDUWM. WFVPQWVQ


Yesterday's
ECONOMICS


GHDBMP


Cryptoquote: A STUDY OF
USUALLY REVEALS THAT THE


BEST TIME TO BUY ANYTHING IS
- MARTY ALLEN


LAST YEAR.


WORDiS)G)R)1DM)M)A)G)EY
BY JUDD HAMBRICK 2013 UFS/ Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS
0000000 1"DOWN



0000000~d DOWN







0000000^ 4t2'DOWN
*0 2nd Letter 3 D" OWN
.... 6 PTS /I0




....4th Down1 .%
..... g + 30 PTS
FOUR PLAY
TIME LIMIT: 20 MIN AVERAGE GAME 190-200 PTS TOTAL
Directions: Make a 2- to 7-letter word from the letters on each yardline. Add points
to each word or letter using scoring directions. Seven-letter words get a 60-point
bonus. All words can be found in Webster's New World College Dictionary.
12-7-13 JUDD'S SOLUTION TOMORROW
WOIRDl .RIMMAlGF SOLUTION BY JUDD HAMBRICK
11 I O UCIMMIAI G IHUrl 2013 UFS / Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS
K12 12 03 03 12 E 1st DOWN 83
". .. ... ... .. .. .. '.. .. ... ... .............................................2n .OW ".................... 7 5
S2 EJA2)(MKA2)(N2 2nd DOWN 75
.." . .. .. . .. . .. . ... . ..... .. . . . . . . . . ..r O N ". . . . ..7
A72 0rJ3 M 12 2 S2 3rd DOWN 77
" .............. '.................. ....................................4' D W N. ................... 1 4 2 .
K12 (E) (Y (H) 02 2 Ei 4th DOWN = 142
..........................................................................................................................
AVERAGE GAME 240-250 PTS JUDD'S TOTAL = 377
12-6-13


DAILY COMMERCIAL
I DENNIS THE MENACE


1^ =9 ^ I
",ALL FINIGISHEP, MOM.,. UT YOU MI1HT WANT
TO WEART/15 IF YOU OPfN 114IF CLOSET."


DILBERT
YOU KEEP PRESSING
THE PUBLIC ADDRESS
BUTTON ON YOUR
PHONE WHEN YOU
MAAKE CALLS.


SHOE


PICKLES


PHANTOM


BLONDIE
WHAT'S FO:R IT'S CALLED THE
BREAKFAST, '5 "BEAKFAST OF
OEA? CHAMPIONS'


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BABY BLUES
TAw UsTo'e V %weu SE
M^~Tose v~=S
MNUTO SEEWo,/ wAr




BEETLE BAILEY; -
BEETLE BAILEY


FAMILY CIRCUS


www famnly..r.us com
"I keep wavin' at the faucet,
but it won't turn on."


0
LJE CAN'T TELL IF
E YOU'RE TALKING TO
@ YOUR DOCTOR OR YOU'RE
Z REALLY, REALLY BAD
SAT TALKING DIRTY TO
YOUR WIFE.


__j 0 L-


BECAUSEE THEN YOU'LL. HAVE_
STHE ENERGY TO CLEAN
THE ATTIC TODAY




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"Wm swe0s "ToT
SI H ,PeNED 'Y T.
jl \


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HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


18




Saturday, December 7, 2013


? ~A WIN, WIN
SITUATION!







H7AM TO 7PM
F 7 DAYS A WEEK!


j* Factory trained technical
service advisors
Fast, same day service-fully
stocked trucks
S Next day installation on
system replacements
\ FREE 2nd opinion on any
THERMO COO'L repair
ATH RCTOCOOLN We service all makes &
AIR CONDITIONING & HEATING models
L 0* FREE detailed, written
201 W Miller St, Fruitland Park, FL 34731 estimates on system

352-326-5530relcmn
www.ThermoCoolAir.com

-C 5-------- DC -- ---- - -
IIln &Cooilnlt Hitdlng 1 Coolng Systui Htali a Coolln( Systms
Regular $4,785 New Bryant 3 Ton New Bryant 3 Ton, MobileI
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I I I Just $3,577 1


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to r ay of or O
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If you are not completely satisfied for any reason, simply contact me within one year of your purchase date and I will remove the system you purchased at my expense.
You will then receive a prompt refund of the products purchase price. This promise is in writing and is good toward any service I offer, including repairs and system
replacements. You are either absolutely delighted with the entire experience or you get a full refund. It's that simple and as promised, no fine print and no conditions.
My name is Michael Raffensberger and I look forward to offering you exceptional service for years to come.
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All system installation offer assumes reconnection to existing refrigerant lines and ductwork. Horizontal installations will incur an additional fee. $2,977 offer assumes air conditioning installation
using existing gas furnace. Offers cannot be combined except for 0,:. financing. Certain restrictions apply. See ThermoCool Air Conditioning & Heating for details. Offers expire September 30,2013.


Servicing our Central Florida Customers for over 21 years.
BBB
Licensed. Bonded & InsUred. #CAC1 817167


lil:Ht


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