Daily Commercial

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Title:
Daily Commercial
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Creator:
Halifax Media Group
Publisher:
Rod Dixon ( Leesburg, Floirda )
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or C
a~ 41


-'U


The Dail y Cmeial

SBURG, FLORIDA Saturday, November 30, 2013 www.dailycommercial.com


SKI TRIALS: Vonn says rehab going well,
aims to make splash at 'Lake Lindsey, B4


ANGEL FLIGHT: Area pilot
recognized for charity work, A3


RAIDERS BEATEN, NOT DEFEATED
South Sumter High School fell short in the Class 5A Region Champi-
onship game against St. Petersburg Lakewood.
While their season has finally come to an end, their achievements
are still remarkable. Before Friday's 27-21 loss, the Raiders went unde-
feated for 12 games.
For full coverage, see page BI.


BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL
Robyn Patterson, store manager at The Purple Pig, helps customers at the store in The Villages on Friday.


Black Friday brings


optimism for retailers
LIVI STANFORDIStaff Writer
hvi.stanford@dailycommerc ia1.com
Elvisa Stevenson felt
a little uneasy, but re-
mained hopeful late
Friday morning as
shoppers made their
way into her Van Heu-
sen store at Lake Sum-
ter Landing in The Vil-
lages.
Last year at this
same time, Steven-
son, the store's man-
ager, said the "clothing
store was busier," with LIVI STANFORD/!DAILYCOMMERCIAL
a long line outside. Shelley Lavallee shops for bargains at Van Heusen Friday
SEE RETAILERS I A2 in The Villages.


Shoppers kick off

2-day marathon
ANNE D'INNOCENZIO
AP Retail Writer
The holiday shopping sea-
son started as a marathon, not
a sprint.
More than a dozen major
U.S. retailers stayed open for
24 hours or more on Thanks-
giving Day through Black Fri-
day, and crowds formed ear-
ly and often over the two days.
About 15,000 people wait-
ed for the flagship Macy's in
NewYork to open at 8 p.m. on
Thanksgiving. Long check-
out lines formed at the Tar-
get in Colma, Calif., on Friday
morning. And by the time Jes-
sica Astalos was leaving North
Point Mall in Alpharetta, Ga.,
SEE SHOPPING I A2


TAVARES


Few tickets


for drivers


who text
MILLARD K. IVES I Staff Writer
millardives@dailycommercial.com
It's not clear if a new law is keep-
ing motorists' hands on their steering
wheels instead of their cell phones.
But citations for texting while driving
don't appear to be a hot ticket in Lake
County.
Two months after a ban on texting
while driving was enacted in Flori-
da, only three such citations have been
handed to motorists in Lake County as
of Wednesday, according to court re-
cords. Two were from the Lady Lake Po-
lice Department and one was from the
Florida Highway Patrol.
Sgt. Kim Montes, a FHP spokeswom-
an for Lake County, whose agency is
tasked with patrolling the highways,
said when the law went into effect Oct.
1, she wasn't expecting a lot of citations.
"I do not think we can rush to judg-
ment on the number of tickets issued so
far, as a determination of the success of
this law," she said.
The law is a secondary offense, like
wearing seatbelts used to be, so a driver
will have to be pulled over for a primary
violation such as speeding before
law enforcement can issue a texting ci-
tation.
The first such citation in Lake County
was issued by the FHP on Oct. 12 to Mat-
thew Joel Lewis-Grant, who was travel-
ing on U.S. Highway 27 near Greater
Groves Boulevard. According to a copy
of the citation, the trooper saw the driv-
er come to an abrupt stop at a light,
well beyond the white stop bar on the
SEE TICKETS I A6


Diving into history of Florida's springs


BILLTHOMPSON
Halifax Media Group
Throughout this
year, the state of Flor-
ida has been celebrat-
ing the 500th anniver-
sary of the arrival of
Juan Ponce de Leon,
the Spanish explorer
credited with discover-
ing and christening the


Fragile Springs
EXPLORING THE STATE'S NATURAL RESOURCES
snrin s-painesvill_-com


state.
As Florida has
marked the occasion,
it's also become fash-
ionable among the
history-minded set to
point out that the leg-
endary quest tied to


Ponce de Leon's expe-
dition the hunt for
a fountain of youth -
was an utter fable.
Sources as varied as
the website history.
com, the Smithsonian
Institute's magazine


and the Florida Histori-
cal Society have written
that Ponce de Leon was
here for other reasons.
"What Ponce is re-
ally looking for is is-
lands that will become
part of what he hopes
will be a profitable
new governorship,"
SEESPRINGS I A6


HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP
This undated souvenier post card shows a mermaid drinking a
Coke underwater at the Silver Springs attraction.


INDEX CROSSWORDS D3 OBITUARIES A4 Vol.137 TODAY'S WEATHER 77
50 CLASSIFIED D2 DIVERSIONS E5 SPORTS BI No. 334 Detailed forecast -:
99 17II COMICS E4 MONEY C5 VOICES A7 5 sections on page A8. '- m Partly sunny and pleasant


uINA ReV i *^'1l4 77-+


DEEMER6
pHISMASF.HONE"N
& LE RSTIUESO

DECEMBER 7


BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL


HOW TO SET THE SEASONAL STAGE, HOME LIFE El I





DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, November 30, 2013


HAPPY BIRTHDAY for
Saturday, Nov. 30, 2013:
This year you open up to
many new opportunities,
though some of them come
with quite a few hassles
and difficult people. Go
for what you want, but be
aware that there could be
some unwanted trappings.
If you are single, you could
meet someone who is emo-
tionally unavailable. Unless
you desire a situation like
this, walk away fast. If you
are attached, the two of you
often sit down to have a
conversation. Look for the
best ways to support each
other in your life goals.
SCORPIO is willful; avoid ar-
guing with him or her.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) Your intuition helps
you land on your feet and
deal with an unexpected.
This situation could involve
some travel or encourage a
meeting with a very offbeat
person. Know that you will
have the control you need
if you decide to head down
that path.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) Others come to you be-
fore you even pick up the
phone to call them. Try
not to get uptight about all
the invitations you receive.
Something you have wished
for could become a reality.
Refuse to get caught in a
war of wills.
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) You might be back to
the humdrum of your dai-
ly life, as you have so much
on your plate that you need
to complete. Work with a
partner directly, but un-
derstand that this person
could change direction at
the drop of hat. You can't
control this person.
CANCER (June 21-
July 22) Your naughtiness
seems to be contagious.
News from a distance might
persuade you to hop the
next plane. You could find it
difficult to change gears as
quickly as you might want.
A partner or dear friend
might not see the situation
as you do.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
Realize that you might need
a day off from the intense
holiday pace that is starting
to build. Lounging at home
seems like a good day. You
might need to handle a per-
sonal issue. Some of you


might decide to take a stab
at the holiday frivolity.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) Take news with a grain
of salt, especially if it
comes to you from a child
or loved one. This person
might have heard only what
he or she wanted to. You
could be surprised by the
whole story, once it become
readily available to you.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22) No one would say any-
thing if you took off and in-
dulged yourself instead of
everyone else. Lose any
feeling of guilt, and en-
joy yourself. Meet a family
member or friend for a late
lunch. Do not orchestrate
the whole day, just go with
the flow.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21) Wherever you are, you
shine. It is obvious that you
are filled with confidence
and are making excel-
lent choices. Call home or
check in with an older rel-
ative or parent. You might
opt to adjust plans after
having this conversation.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21) Be discreet, espe-
cially if something bothers
you. Choose to be an ob-
server and gather more in-
formation. You might not be
prepared to make a change
or walk in a new direction
just yet. Use caution with
your spending.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19) Zero in on what
you want. You might not
feel as if your desires can
be realized. Think positively
so that you don't jinx your-
self. You might not realize
just how many friends you
have supporting you.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18) Listen and be more di-
rect when dealing with an
older friend who always
wants to have it his or her
way. When you are too busy
to hang out, this person
tends to throw tantrums.
The time has come to clear
the air. Remember to honor
your needs first.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20) You still might be trying
to detach and understand
a recent development in a
relationship. Try imagining
that you are the other party,
and let go of your own inner
chatter. You might need to
set a stronger boundary be-
tween you and this person.


BRIDGE


Try the Impossible


son to think that East might be taxed
with the burden of guarding both
hearts and clubs.
South's best plan of play to
avoid what appears to be a certain
heart loser is to exert pressure on
Fast that he cannot withstand. After
wirimng the heart shift with the king,
declarer draws two rounds of trumps,
ruffs a spade in dummy, then cashes
two more trumps to produce this


North
VA6
+K874
West
Immaterial


East dealer.
North-South vulnerable.
NORTH
+5
YAK6
A .1 732
4K874
WEST EAST
*AKQ10962 4743
V107 VQJ82
+5 +64
+632 +J1095
SOUTH
*J8
V9543
*KQ 1098
*AQ
Thc bidding:
East South West North
Pass 1 4 6*
Opening lead king of spades.
It is, of course, impossible to
achieve the truly impossible, but
there arc many seemingly hopeless
contracts that can be made by means
not readily apparent. For example.
take this deal where it appears South
must go down one in six diamonds
after a spade lead and a heart shift.
However, the outlook is not as
bleak as it may seem. West's leap to
four spades was obviously based on
lots of spades, so there is good rea-
D2013 King Fealt


SHOPPING
FROM PAGE Al

after a six-hour buy-
ing binge that started
on Thanksgiving, an-
other wave of shoppers
was coming in about
5:30 a.m. on Friday.
"You just have to be
out in the midst of all of
it," said Ricki Moss, who
hit stores near Portland,
Ore., at 5:30 a.m. on Fri-
day "It's exciting."
This year may cement
the transformation of
the start of the holiday
shopping season into a
two-day affair.
For nearly a decade,


East
VQJ
+J 1095


South
954
VY9 5 4
10
*AQ
When South leads his last trump,
discarding a heart from dummy, East
finds himself in a hopeless situation.
Whatever he discards, declarer
makes the rest of the tricks.
If he sheds a club, South cashes
the A-Q of clubs and leads a heart to
dummy to score the K-8 of clubs. If
East discards a heart instead, South
plays a heart to the ace and takes the
last four tricks with the A-Q of clubs
and 9-5 of hearts.
ure- Syndicate In

Black Friday had been
the official start of the
shopping season be-
tween Thanksgiving
and Christmas. It was
originally named Black
Friday because it was
when retailers turned
a profit, or moved out
of the red and into the
black. Retailers opened
early and offered deep
discounts.
But in the past few
years, store chains
have been opening on
Thanksgiving.
This year, several wel-
comed shoppers for the
first time on Thanks-
giving night, while Gap
Inc., which owns Ba-


HOROSCOPES


nana Republic, Gap and
Old Navy, opened half
its stores earlier on the
holiday.
Wal-Mart stores, most
of which stay open
24 hours, has for the
past several years of-
fered doorbusters that
had been reserved for
Black Friday. And Kmart
planned to stay open 41
hours starting at 6 a.m.
on Thanksgiving.
That has led some
to question how much
further Black Friday will
creep into Thanksgiv-
ing, which along with
Christmas is one of only
two days a year that
most stores are closed.


RETAILERS
FROM PAGE Al

By contrast, Friday
morning the store had
numerous customers,
but there were no lines.
As retailers kicked off
the holiday season with
Black Friday deals, many
retailers said the two-
day period is important
to their businesses' suc-
cess.
Most reported steady
business both Thursday
and Friday, compared to
last year.
Meanwhile, other
business owners said
their success did not
hinge on Black Friday
because they are able
to draw customers year-
round to their stores.
Stevenson said Black
Friday is a critical time
for retailers.
"It is a big deal for us,"
she said. "It is the big-
gest sale of the year,
compared to other holi-
days."
Rhonda Bushway,
manager of JcPenney at
the Lake Square Mall,
had a smile on her face
Friday afternoon, de-
scribing the steady
stream of customers
who were enthusias-
tic about the many bar-
gains available.
"It is as busy as last
year," she said, citing a
strong turnout Thursday
evening, where the store
opened for the first time
on Thanksgiving. "We
offer value to the cus-
tomer."
However, many shop-
pers interviewed Friday
said they were not rush-
ing out to the stores this
year.
Visiting her dad in The
Villages, Shelley Lavallee
said she doesn't usually
shop on Black Friday.
"I usually shop on-
line," she said as she
browsed through the
sweaters at Van Heusen.
But this year, she said,
she found Van Heu-
sen inviting because it
wasn't packed wall-to-
wall with people.
Lynda Carmichael
also does not care for
large crowds and usual-
ly stays home on the big-
gest shopping day of the
year.
But shopping at Lake
Sumter Landing on Fri-
day was relaxing, she said.
She preceded to look
at the wide array of
Brighton jewelry items
at Lucky Charm, anoth-
er Lake Sumter Landing
store.
The store is often
busy until April, when
the snowbirds leave, ac-
cording to Patty Kellogg,
manager of the shop that
sells handbags, jewelry
and accessories. Snow-
birds traditionally return
to the area beginning in
October.
"Black Friday is not the
barometer for our sales
picture for the holiday
season," she said. "The


"Black Friday is now
Gray Friday," said Craig
Johnson, president of
Customer Growth Part-
ners, a retail consul-
tancy.
The earlier openings
have met with some re-
sistance.
Workers' rights
groups and some shop-
pers had planned pro-
tests on Thanksgiving
and Black Friday to de-
cry the way some store
employees were forced
to miss holiday meals at
home. But as of Thurs-
day afternoon, there
were no reports of wide-
spread protests.
Judy Espey ducked


entire weekend is indica-
tive of our retail season."
Today is Small Busi-
ness Saturday, which is
"dedicated to support-
ing small businesses,"
according to the Small
Business Administra-
tion.
"From the Main Street
shops to the high-tech
startups, small business-
es are the backbone of
our economy and the
cornerstones of a diverse
and thriving marketing-
place," said Acting SBA
Administrator Jeanne
Hulit in a statement. "By
shopping small and sup-
porting local business,
we all have a role to play
in giving millions of fam-
ilies the opportunity to
achieve the American
dream."
The SBA report-
ed that the "28 million
small businesses create
two out of every three
net new private sector
jobs... with half of work-
ing Americans either
owning or working for a
small business."
Kellogg said small
businesses are able to
reach out to customers
in a personal way.
"We know a lot of
our customers by first
name," she said.
Ellie Heiner, owner of
the Purple Pig at Lake
Sumter Landing, said
while she receives many
customers on Black Fri-
day, she draws them year
round.
"I do what I think is
necessary to make my
customers happy," she
said, describing how she
does research and is not
afraid to try new things.
"You have to spend mon-
ey to make money."
Jeanne Thorpe, own-
er of Alada's China
and Gifts in Leesburg,
agreed, saying creativi-
ty is important in mak-
ing sure you are reach-
ing the customer.
"Variety is good," she
said. "People can come
in here and shop for just
about everybody."
Thorpe said the store
was busy Friday morn-
ing, comparable with
Black Friday in 2012.
"We are fortunate we
are able to get to know
our customers because
we are a small business,"
she said. "We think about
what they like and don't
like."
Many customers shop-
ping Friday said they
were out to simply enjoy
the holiday season.
Charlotte Doucette
was looking through the
handbag collection at
the Purple Pig while en-
couraging her sister-in-
law to consider a similar
bag she had previously
bought.
But, she said, it was a
stress-free shop day.
"It is not really a mad
rush for me," The Vil-
lages resident said. "It is
more about having fun
and enjoying the holi-
day."


MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER?
P EF, I-UI F ,i J 1 .II_ E:LF I I J
LT,',: :IJ 1':l 1 i, rITEF
Call 787-0600 in Lake County
or (877) 702-0600 in Sumter
County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Mon-
day through Friday. Call 7 a.m.
to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to
10 a.m. on Sunday.
GOING ON VACATION

Call the Circulation De-
part-ment 48 hours ahead to
stop service.


HOW TO REACH US

365-8200
In Sumter County:
877-702-0600
ADVERTISING
Retail ....................365-8200
Classified ............. 314-3278
CIRCULATION
Lake Co...............787-0600
Sumter Co. .. 877-702-0600
Circulation Billing .787-0600
ACCOUNTING ......365-8216


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calculated at the current basic subscription price, excluding the cur-
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Send to The Daily Commercial, PO. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL
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on a subscription to another party or make it available to students
through our "Newspapers in Education" program.)
RECYCLING: The Daily Commercial supports environmental
protection through recycling. Plastic bags may be recycled at grocery
stores. Newspapers may be recycled at the Commercial's Leesburg
office, 212 E. Main St., during business hours. This newspaper is
printed on recycled newsprint.
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STAFF INFORMATION
ROD DIXON, publisher
352-365-8213 ..................................rod.dixon@dailycommercial.com
MARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director
352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com
NEWSROOM CONTACTS
TOM MCNIFF, managing editor
352-365-8250............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com
BILL KOCH, assistant managing editor
352-365-8208....................................bill.koch@dailycommercial.com
TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS
SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor
352-365-8203............................scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com
REPORTERS
UVI STANFORD, county government, schools
352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com
ROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County
352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com
MILLARD IVES, police and courts
352-365-8262................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com
THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages
352-365-8209..................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com
OTHERS
PAM FENNIMORE, editorial assistant
352-365-8256............. pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com
SPORTS RESULTS
Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call-
ing 352-3658268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be
e-mailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.
FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor
352-365-8268.................................frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com
GOOD FOR YOU/ CELEBRATIONS
To have your club or organization's events printed in the YourCom-
munity calendar listings, just email the information to pamfenni-
more@dailycommercial.com.


out of a Thanksgiving
family dinner to buy
a 50-inch flat-screen
TV at Wal-Mart near
Clifton Park, N.Y., for
$288. But "I don't real-
ly dig the Thanksgiving
night thing," she con-
fessed. "I feel bad for
the workers."
Vinnie Gopalakrish-
nan pledged not to hit
the stores after seeing
TV footage of people
shopping on Thanks-
giving. But he flip-
flopped after his cous-
in told him about a deal
on a big-screen TV
"I said, 'I'm not go-
ing to do it. Those peo-
ple are crazy,'" Gopal-


akrishnan said before
heading to a Wal-Mart
on Friday.
It's unclear whether
the early openings will
lead shoppers to spend
more over the two days
or simply spread sales
out.
Last year, sales on
Thanksgiving rose 55
percent from the pre-
vious year to $810 mil-
lion, as more stores
opened on the holiday,
according to research
firm ShopperTrak. But
sales dropped 1.8 per-
cent to $11.2 billion on
Black Friday, though
it still was the biggest
shopping day last year.


FLORIDA


|@5 LOTTERY

FRIDAY
CA SH 3 ................................................ 3-6-0
Afternoon .......................................... 1-0-1
PLAY 4 ............................................. 9-9-0-9
Afternoon....................................... 4-3-7-5

THURSDAY
FANTASY 5............................. 2-5-11-28-29
2 of 5 wins free ticket 3 of 5 wins $9
4 of 5 wins $109.50 5 of 5 wins $85,631.92


The Daily Commercial
THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875
The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for
$91.59 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group
at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is
paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address
changes to The Daily Commercial, RO. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL
34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of
The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of
the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without
written consent from the publisher.


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 30, 2013




Saturday, November 30, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL





State&Region
NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN I scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com I 352-365-8208


www.dailycommercial.com


Area Briefs

LEESBURG
Small Businesses Saturday
targets local shops
Come out and support local
Chamber members and get
Christmas shopping done with-
out the crowds today in downtown
Leesburg for "Shop Small Businesses
Saturday."
Rather than wait in lines and deal
with the crowds, people are encour-
aged to shop local, get great deals,
and not have to fight over "that spe-
cial gift."
For information, call the Leesburg
Area Chamber of Commerce at
352-787-2131.

THE VILLAGES
Artist Showcase to be held
today at Savannah Center
The 16th annual Artist Showcase
featuring original works of art in wa-
tercolor, oil, pastels and more will
take place from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.,
today at the Savannah Center in The
Villages.
An art demo, "Artistry in Motion"
will also feature The Villages Art
League members who will take
turns painting simultaneously on
three canvases.
The event is hosted by The
Villages Art League and admission
is free.
For information, call 352-259-4308
or go to www.thevillagesartleague.
org.

MOUNT DORA
Lakeside Inn hosts Weavers
of Orlando show and sale
The Weavers of Orlando will host
the 15th Annual Fiber Arts Show
and Sale to be held at the Lakeside
Inn from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., on Dec. 6
and Dec. 7 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Items in the sale are handcrafted
by artisan-members of the Weavers
of Orlando, who will provide
demonstrations of fiber arts during
the show and will be available to
discuss techniques in the fiber arts
that include, weaving, spinning,
basketry, dyeing, felting, beading
and related fiber crafts.
For information, go to www.weav-
ersoforlando.com.

TAVARES
School financing plans
on agenda at meeting
The Lake County Schools
EngageLCS initiative moves to an-
other phase next month as a draft
of the Three-Year Strategic Finance
Plan (SFP) is released.
The objective of the SFP is to
identify the District's instructional
priorities.
The draft of the SFP is on the
workshop agenda for the school
board meeting at 2 p.m. Monday at
the Institute of Public Safety, 1565
Lane Park Cut-Off.
The community is invited to a
town hall meeting at 5:30 p.m., on
Tuesday in County Commission
Chambers of the Lake County
Administration Building, 315W.
Main St., Tavares.
For information about
EngageLCS, go to engageLCS.mind-
mixer.com.



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accomplishments, festivals, charity
events and other things that make our
communities special. And don't overlook
those family milestones birthdays,
engagements, marriages, business
promotions and military news.


Just email your photos and news to...
pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com


EUSTIS


Firefighters put out nursery blaze


MILLARD K. IVES I Staff Writer
millard .ives@dailycommercial.com
Fire officials are try-
ing to determine what
sparked an early Fri-
day morning blaze that
charred part of a Eustis
nursery.
Firefighters reached the
150,000-square-foot Jon-
athan Nursery on County
Road 44A in the Lake Nor-
ris area about 6 a.m. Fri-
day, and fire was shooting


through the roof of at least
one of the metal han-
gar-like structures that
was attached to 10 other
buildings, said Lt. Brian
Gamble, vice president of
the Professional Firefight-
ers of Lake County.
The structure held
pothos, a houseplant, said
the owner, Maria Rivas.
Gamble said the fire was
in the middle of the giant
nursery complex and the
SEE FIRE I A4


COURTESY PHOTO
Lake County firefighters extinguish a blaze early Friday morning
at Jonathan Nursery which destroyed about 20 percent of the
150,000-square-foot complex.


DOUG ENGLE/ HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP
David Walker of Ocala was named 2013 Pilot of the Year with Angel Flight Southeast, a Leesburg-based
charity that helps patients reach treatment facilities that are far from home.


Leesburg-based charity



recognizes Angel pilot


MARIAN RIZZO
Halifax Media Group
In 2005, David Walker
turned a fun pastime into a
ministry when he decided
to be a volunteer pilot with
Angel Flight Southeast, a
Leesburg-based charity
that helps patients get to
treatment facilities that are
far from home.
Over the years, Walker
has flown 351 missions, in-
cluding 54 this year, some-
times getting up at the
break of dawn to fly to a
fixed-base airport with a
patient in need.
Walker recently was
named Angel Flight South-
east Pilot of the Year for the
Central Florida East region.
An awards ceremony was
held Nov. 10, honoring pi-
lots and nominees for the
nonprofit group's six re-


gions in Florida, Georgia
and Alabama.
Walker previously re-
ceived Pilot of the Year
awards for 2007 and 2011,
and an award for being
nominated in 2012. During
his time with Angel Flight,
Walker has witnessed nu-
merous success stories and
some tragedies.
"I like to fly, and it's my
favorite charity," Walk-
er said. "It's a good reason
to fly. People are out there
who have all kinds of things
wrong with them. Some of
them are pretty young, too.
When I fly these young
people around with so
many medical problems, it
gives me a greater appreci-
ation for my own health."
A retired electrical con-
tractor, Walker, 79, learned
to fly when he was 28 years


old. He and his older broth-
er, Jack, teamed up with
a friend to purchase an
Aeronca Champ for $350
apiece. Later, Walker bought
other airplanes, which he
used for business trips.
Among Walker's most
treasured passengers, lit-
tle Aubrey Duffey started
taking Angel Flights when
she was 3 months old. Born
with head and neck defor-
mities, Aubrey had been fit-
ted with a helmet that had
to be adjusted weekly. The
only facility that could han-
dle her case was in Miami.
Since the Duffeys lived
in the Panhandle, the trip
was broken down into two
parts. Various pilots would
fly Aubrey and her mom,
Andrea Duffey, to Lees-
burg, where Walker would
SEE PILOT I A4


CLERMONT

World AIDS

day event

on Monday

Staff report
The Florida De-
partment of Health
in Lake County will
host its 4th Annual
World AIDS day cel-
ebration of life at Cl-
ermont's Waterfront
Park on Monday.
The event from
9 a.m. until 3 p.m. is
free and open to the
public. The park is at
330 Third St.
A portion of the
National AIDS Me-
morial Quilt will be
on public display
and HIV testing and
Hepatitis B vaccina-
tions will be provid-
ed at no cost.
World AIDS Day is
a global campaign to
end AIDS and help
bring awareness of
the disease world-
wide. First orga-
nized by the World
Health Organization
in 1988, the World
AIDS Day theme for
2013 is "Getting to
Zero."
World AIDS Day
is important in re-
minding people that
HIV has not gone
away, Paul Butler, in-
terim public infor-
mation officer for
the health depart-
ment, said in a press
release.
Last year, the state
had 98,530 cases of
HIV/AIDS. Florida
still remains No. 3 in
the United States.
SEE AIDS I A4


Educational app helps parents track kids' behavior


ANNIE MARTIN
Halifax Media Group
DAYTONA BEACH If
the phone rings at the end
of a school day, parents
might already know why a
teacher is calling.
Thanks to a tool that al-
lows teachers to commu-
nicate instantaneously
about what's happening at
school, parents can moni-
tor their youngsters' con-
duct via smartphone
throughout the day
Several Flagler and Volu-
sia county teachers use
Class Dojo, a free website
and app where students
receive points for good be-
havior or lose points for
misdeeds.
Class Dojo was creat-
ed using $75,000 from the


PHOTO COURTESY OF CLASS DOJO
Class Dojo, a free website and app, helps parents and teachers
manage their child's behavior.


2011 Citi Innovation in Ed-
ucation Prize, awarded to
entrepreneurs who use
technology to help edu-
cators. Hundreds of thou-
sands of teachers world-
wide now use Class Dojo,
according to the website.


Class Dojo is among a
growing number of educa-
tional apps more than
40,000 are available for the
iPad alone.
One teacher who uses
Class Dojo, Christina Clau-
dio, said the program


brings out her students'
competitive streaks be-
cause they want to earn
more points they can re-
deem for free incentives,
like using the teacher's roll-
ing desk chair or sitting
with a friend for the day.
"This generation of stu-
dents, I feel, loves anything
that's 'gamified' if it feels
like a game, they're in,"
said Claudio, who teaches
fourth-grade at Pine Trail
Elementary in Ormond
Beach.
To help students feel
more accountable, Clau-
dio allowed them to cus-
tomize their avatars, little
icons that represent each
student.
Class Dojo ranks also in-
SEEAPPI A4





DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, November 30, 2013


IN MEMORY


OBITUARIES


William E. Jerrells
William E. Jerrells,
70, of Leesburg, went
to be with his Lord on
Wednesday, November
27, 2013. Born Novem-
ber 12,1943 inWinslow
Indiana the son of Ver-
non and Anna Mae
(Mull-
ins) Jer-
rell, he lat-
er married
Kathleen
J. (Kurth),
they
moved to JERRELLS
Leesburg
from Hobe
Sound, FL
in 1997.
Bill was a member of
First Baptist Church,
Leesburg where he was
very active, he taught
sign language class, Bi-
ble study for the deaf,
was a counselor for the
People Helpers Minis-
try, involved with mu-
sic and Bible study at
the nursing homes and
used fishing as a min-
istry. He enjoyed fish-
ing and playing golf.
Bill was a retired elec-
trical mechanic for
Pratt-Whitney Aircraft,
a veteran of the US Air
Force and enjoyed a life
of helping and serving
people. Surviving with
his wife Kathleen Jer-
rells of Leesburg are 3
sons Brian (Sandy) Jer-
rells of Hobe Sound,
FL, Andy (Michele) Jer-
rells of Port St. Luc-
ie, FL and Ralph (Deb-
orah) Jerrells of Bay
Lake, FL, 5 grandchil-
dren Kyle, Timothy, Ja-
cob, Daniel and Sabri-
na; 4 brothers, Warren
of Gadsden, AL, James
(Jasmine) of West Palm
Beach, Leslie (Kath-
leen) of Durham, NC,
Roger (KT) of Seat-
tle, WA; 4 sisters, Dixie
Hume of Jacksonville,
FL, Cathy (AJ) Johnson,
BILL BAILEY'S
SOUTHERN GOSPEL


lI% JHMTU I11 Wl iSNM1Q
Thursday, December 5,2013 7pm
Leesburg, Florida
First Baptist Church
(220 North 13th Street)
NO TICKETS REQUIRED!
A $12 donation per person will be
requested at the door for the concert
A free-will offering will be received
during the concert for FCC Ministries
Doors open at 6pm, and
all seating is general admission
FOR MORE INFORMATION
call (352) 787-1005
http://www.billbaileyconcerts.com


Susan Jerrell and Ruth
Jerrell all of Hunts-
ville, AL. Funeral ser-
vices will be held Mon-
day, December 2nd in
the Chapel at the First
Baptist Church, Lees-
burg with Pastor Cliff
Lea officiating. Burial
will be at 2pm Tuesday
in Forest Hills Memori-
al Park in Palm City, FL.
In lieu of flowers me-
morials may be made
to The First Baptist
Church of Leesburg,
220 N. 13th Street,
Leesburg, FL 34748 or
Cornerstone Hospice,
2445 Lane Park Rd. Ta-
vares, FL 32778. On-
line condolences may
be left at www.beyers-
funeralhome.com Ar-
rangements entrust-
ed to Beyers Funeral
Home and Crematory,
Leesburg, FL.
Rocella Mary Smith
Rocella Mary Smith
(Cavin), 75, was born
July 27, 1938 in King-
sport, Tennessee and
departed this life
Wednesday, November
27, 2013 at home after a
short illness. We would
like to express our
thanks to Cornerstone
Hospice care members
for their compassion
during our difficult
days. Please remember
them with your char-
itable donations. Ro-
cella had been a resi-
dent of Okahumpka,
FL since 1965 and was a
homemaker who prid-
ed herself on her fam-
ily Rocella is survived
by her husband of
nearly 58 years, Dovie
Smith "Smitty" of Oka-
humpka, FL; son and
daughter-in-law, Na-
than and Barbara Smith
of Lady Lake, FL; son
and daughter-in-law,
Dale and Lisa Smith
of Ozark, MO; daugh-
ter and son-in-law,
Joe and Cindy Smith
of Fruitland Park, FL;
grandchildren, Chris-
tian and Amy Miller of
Leesburg, FL, Robert






BIEYERS
FUEALHM dCEMTR
Trdtoa rProaie


Smith of Lady Lake, FL
and Mackenzie Smith
of Ozark, MO; Rocella's
beloved sister, Dolores
Blount of Dade City, FL;
two great grandchil-
dren, Aubrey and Char-
lotte and many niec-
es and nephews who
she loved dearly. Ser-
vices will be held at
Beyers Funeral Home,
1123 West Main Street,
Leesburg, FL on Mon-
day, December 2 at
10.00 AM with a visita-
tion from 9:00 to 10:00
AM. Interment will fol-
low at Lone Oak Cem-
etery, Leesburg, FL.
Mom wanted her ser-
vice to be a casual gath-
ering of friends and rel-
atives to visit with each
other, a short service
and then interment.
Please join us in hon-
oring her wishes. On-
line condolences may
be left at www.beyers-
funeralhome.com, Ar-
rangements entrust-
ed to Beyers Funeral
Home and Crematory,
Leesburg, FL.

DEATH NOTICES
Robert Caron
Robert Caron, 88, of
Leesburg, died Thurs-
day, November 28,
2013. Page-Theus Fu-
nerals & Cremations.
Robert "Bob" Lamp Sr.
Robert "Bob" Lamp,
Sr., 95, of Inverness,
died Wednesday, No-
vember 27, 2013. Pur-
cell Funeral Home.
Betty A. Sohn
Betty A. Sohn, 82,
of Mount Dora, died
Wednesday, November
27, 2013. Page-Theus
Funerals & Cremations.
Stephen J. Sullivan
Stephen J. Sullivan,
67, of Lady Lake, died
Thursday, November
28, 2013. Banks/Page-
Theus Funerald and
Cremations.
Herman Urscher
Herman Urscher, 85,
of Ocala, died Friday,
November 29, 2013.
Banks/Page-Theus Fu-
nerals and Cremations.

You're Reading

PAPLOCAL

PAPER
1heacinmeida1


APP
FROM PAGE A3

clude fifth- and sixth-
grade teachers at Rym-
fire Elementary in
Palm Coast. On a re-
cent morning, sixth-
grade teacher Janie
Ruddy compared the
thickness of the earth's
atmosphere to the
skin on an apple and
asked students to find
out, using their iPads,
which gases comprise
that layer. During that
activity, Ruddy asked
Daijah, 11, to use her
teacher's iPhone to add
points for two students
who shared their an-
swers with the class -


and deduct a point for
a boy who wasn't stay-
ing on task. Parents of
those students could
find out right away
whether their students
earned or lost points
and why. At the start of
the school year, Ruddy
said she sent 41 invita-
tions to parents detail-
ing how to sign up for
Class Dojo and track
their student's prog-
ress, and 37 accepted.
"Before, as a teach-
er, you really only had
time to call home when
a kid made a major er-
ror," Ruddy said.
Class Dojo goes
deeper than simply
showing whether a
child had a good or bad


PILOT
FROM PAGE A3


pick them up and transport them
the remaining distance to Miami.
Sadly, during that time, Aubrey's fa-
ther, Adam Duffey, was killed in a
motorcycle accident.
Now 18 months old, Aubrey is do-
ing well and no longer needs a hel-
met or the flights to Miami, said
her maternal grandmother, Debbie
Freeman.
"You would never know that she
had any of the challenges she had,"
Freeman said. "She's walking and
talking above her age range. She's
going to have normal appearance
and abilities. Without the transpor-
tation, she would not have been
able to finish the course of treat-
ment. She would have had crani-
al skeletal deformities that would
have impacted the rest of her life.
I am so glad that Dave won the
award, because he is definitely Au-
brey's angel."
Angel Flight Southeast is celebrat-
ing its 30th year in operation. CEO
Steve Purello said the charity was
started by pilot MaryWebb, who co-
ordinated mission trips at her kitch-


FIRE
FROM PAGE A3

possibility of fertilizer,
heaters and propane
made the effort a chal-
lenge.
"You never know
what you are going
to encounter with a
nursery fire," he said.
Gamble said it took
crews about 30 min-
utes to get the fire un-
der control.



AIDS
FROM PAGE A3

According to statis-
tics provided by But-
ler, blacks comprise
15 percent of Flori-
da's population, but
represent 49 percent
of persons living with
HIV/AIDS as report-
ed in 2012. At least 1 in
22 men who have sex
with men are living
with HIV/AIDS.


day Each student's re-
port, Claudio said, in-
cludes time-stamped
information about
their ups and downs
each day The parents
of a student with Atten-
tion Deficit Hyperac-
tivity Disorder showed
a printout of their son's
Class Dojo page, which
showed more prob-
lems in the afternoons
than in the mornings,
to their son's pediatri-
cians, who determined
the boy's medication
wore off about lunch-
time each day Claudio
also uses the class-wide
reports to determine if
her students lose focus
during a particular ac-
tivity or time of the day.


en table at her home in south Flor-
ida. Today, Angel Flight Southeast
has 650 volunteer pilots who han-
dle a variety of humanitarian trans-
ports, including medical patients,
organ transplant candidates, vic-
tims of abuse seeking relocation
and disabled children going to sum-
mer camp programs.
The Pilot of the Year awards are
based on 14 criteria, such as num-
ber of missions, feeding the sick and
last minute transportation requests,
Purello said. Walker is one of those
pilots who goes above and beyond
the call, he said.
"Dave is great about not only fly-
ing the passengers, but he will take
missions he can do roundtrip. He
drives the patient to the airport,
drives them to the hospital and
back, and sometimes he'll even
pick them up at their house" Purel-
lo said."
"These are pilots that are not do-
ing it for an award. They really want
to do it. They're not only financial
contributors, because it's expensive
to fly an airplane, but they also give
their time," Purello added.
For more information about An-
gel Flight Southeast, call 326-0761
or visit www.angelflightse.org.


The nursery also
sells philos, palms,
arboricola and other
plants. About 20 per-
cent of the nursery
was lost. Amid burnt
plants, lost roofs and
charred wood and
metal, Rivas and her
family were still try-
ing to repair and sal-
vage what they could
at 5:30 p.m. Friday.
"We don't know how
it started," Rivas said.
A passer-by appar-
ently saw black smoke


"It is import-
ant to know that ev-
ery 91/2 minutes, an-
other person in the
United States be-
comes infected with
HIV," Butler said.
"HIV/AIDS knows no
boundaries; it affects
all of us, regardless of
our race, gender, or in-
come. That is why it is
important to 'Take the
Test, Take Control.'"
In addition to a
free, rapid, 20-minute


from behind a house
and called it in, Gam-
ble said. The State Fire
Marshal's Office is try-
ing to determine the
cause.
Gamble added it was
fortunate the winds
died down Friday
morning compared to
the last few days.
"If we had faced
those stiff winds, most
of the building might
have been lost," he
said.


testing offered at the
event, the Florida De-
partment of Health in
Lake County can per-
form a mouth swab to
test for HIV, which will
be sent to the state
laboratory. Results are
available in approxi-
mately 3 weeks.
For more informa-
tion, call the Flori-
da Department of
Health's Disease Con-
trol Program office at
352-771-5547.


Army ~ Navy~ Air Force ~ Marines ~ Coast Guard
Active Duty/Veterans
Thank you for serving our country.
Steverson-Hamlin and Hilbish Funerals
irs and Cremations
226 East Burleigh Blvd, Tavares, FL 32778
352-343-4444 www.steversonhamlinhilbish.com


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 30, 2013


Pa do' q



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Saturday, November 30, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5


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DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, November 30, 2013


SPRINGS
FROM PAGE Al

J. Michael Francis, a
Ponce de Leon schol-
ar at the St. Petersburg
campus of the Universi-
ty of South Florida, told
historycom. "From ev-
erything I can gather, he
was not at all interest-
ed or believed that he
would find some kind
of miraculous spring or
lake or body of water."
The myth, howev-
er, is so enduring that
up in Holmes County
sits the town of Ponce
de Leon, a burg of 556
people that is home to
Ponce de Leon Springs
- a source of fresh wa-
ter and recreation for
European settlers since
at least the 1820s, for
Native Americans long
before that and even for
today's visitors to the
namesake state park at
the site.
Ponce de Leon's in-
tentions aside, tying his
name to a spring pump-
ing out 14 million gal-
lons of water daily helps
make clear that the his-
tory of Florida is close-
ly associated to the his-
tory and usage of these
unique waterways.
Harley Means, assis-
tant state geologist for
the Florida Geological
Survey's geological in-
vestigative section, said
most Florida springs
developed 20 million to
25 million years ago.
They are, essentially,
large sinkholes.
Millions of years ago,
once the seas had suf-
ficiently receded to ex-
pose the Florida pen-
insula to rainfall, the
slightly acidic rainwa-
ter ate away at the lime-
stone landscape, Means
said.
The voids created
by that action subse-
quently reached a depth
where the groundwa-
ter beneath pushed
through the earth's sur-
face.
Almost all of the
state's springs are locat-
ed north of Interstate
4, Means said, because
that part of Florida is
richest in the karst ter-
rain that holds lime-
stone.
And the history of the
springs continues to
evolve, Means noted.
Much like new sink-
holes continue to open,



TICKETS
FROM PAGE Al

pavement.
Lewis-Grant also
waited five seconds to
proceed after the light


This a publicity still from the 1960's showing filming of what is
"I Spy." The fiberglass statues are in the Main Spring at the Silv
statues were originally placed in the spring for the Television se
Culp and Bill Cosby. The statues have been used in several othe


including James Bond films.
the chasms from which
existing springs sprang
continue to grow with
each new rain.
"It's imperceptible on
a human scale, but in
geologic time, it's a con-
stant process," Means
said.
What also has been
constant, for at least
the past 12,000 years,
is human reliance on
the springs, said Scott
Mitchell, executive di-
rector of the Silver Riv-
er Museum in Silver
Springs.
Archaeologists have
uncovered tools and
weapons around
springs across North
Florida that date to the
end of the last Ice Age,
he said.
"As long as there have
been people in Flori-
da, they've been hang-
ing around the springs,"
Mitchell said.
"Springs have always
been magnets for hu-
man habitation. If you
live out in the woods


turned green, which
further aroused the
trooper's suspicions.
Lori Michele Rich-
ards, of Ocala, was giv-
en a citation after a
Lady Lake officer, driv-
ing behind her on U.S.
Highway 27, said he


and have to make a liv-
ing, they are the place
to be."
Freshwater springs,
he pointed out, were
not just a source of wa-
ter for the earliest Flo-
ridians, but also food
and transportation.
Besides tools, weap-
ons and pottery, sci-
entists have found
remains of turtles, alli-
gators, white-tail deer,
otters and other critters
that prehistoric people
captured and ate as the
animals ventured near
the water, Mitchell said.
And in a distant age
when wetlands were
a lot wetter, Native
Americans in dugout
canoes could travel far
from home by launch-
ing from a springhead,
Mitchell noted.
"From Silver Springs
you could float down
to Orlando or up to
Jacksonville, and nev-
er have to get out of the
boat," he said.
The arrival of the


spotted her swerving
from lane to lane. The
officer said the light
was on in her Oldsmo-
bile and she appeared
to be holding up a cell
phone.
The officer stopped
Richards on Oct. 16,


It" Almost




That Time!













Individuals or Groups

Please Call 365-0079 ext: 25
Ask for Barbara


Cox said in an email.
"Almost all Florida
springs, including Silver
there in Ocala, are asso-
ciated with a wide va-
riety of prehistoric and
historic sites."
The march of time,
and of new settlers to
the Sunshine State,
eventually meant tour-
SSists.
Sf And springs were -
and still are a key
Sbdestination.
Silver Springs is of-
ten credited as Flori-
da's first major tourist
attraction, drawing as
many as 50,000 visitors
a year by the 1870s.
The journalist Ed-
ward King, who in 1874
S n published an account
of his tour through the
defeated Confederacy,
called attention to Silver
Springs during a steam-
fboat journey down the
"' Ocklawaha River.
















inSa Martinnde Onitweb site the win-
"Silver Springs is cer-
tainly one of the won-
ders of the world," King
wrote. "The tradition
l w that it is the 'Fountain
of Youth,' of which the
aborigines spoke so en-
thusiastically to Ponce
h de Leon, seems firmly
founded."
church PO The city of White
CORTSYPHTOSprings, however, dis-
believed to be an episode of putes Silve Springs'
ver Springs attractions. The claim to be Florida's
series "I Spy" starring Robert first tourist btrap i
Dr films made at the springs first tourist trap.
The Library of Con-
gress has in its col-
Spaniards continued election a picture of a
the process. Mitch- four-story bathhouse
ell said 16th-centu- built in the early 20th
ry Spanish missionar- century around White
ies following in Ponce Springs, in Hamilton
de Leon's wake migrat- County near the Geor-
ed to the areas inhabit- gia state line.
ed by Native Americans The caption for the
for the same reasons artwork recalls that the
the Native Americans spring was "recognized
lived there. for its medicinal quali-
Dale Cox, a retired ties by Indians, settlers
journalist writing at the and subsequent devel-
website exploresouth- opers of this locale."
ernhistorycom, notes The building featured
that the most signifi- examination and treat-
cant historical feature ment rooms, a conces-
at Ichetucknee Springs, sions area and dressing
for example, is the Mis- rooms.
sion San Martin de On its website, the city
Timucua, founded in of White Springs main-
1608. tains that the "healing
That mission, Cox powers" of the spring
writes, like others in water, which was bor-
Florida, was home to dered by rocks covered
Catholic friars sent to with sulfur crystals, at-
convert Native Amer- tracted visitors from as
icans to Christiani- far away as Philadel-
ty. The sites included a phia as early as 1832.
church, cemetery and a That, in essence,
home for the priest, madeWhite Springs the
"Springs were very first tourist destination
clearly draws for early in Florida, city officials
settlers and explorers," claim.


gave her a warning for
failure to maintain a
lane and issued a cita-
tion for texting while
driving.
Lady police also is-
sued a texting while
driving citation to Ali-
cia Michelle Stanling
on Nov. 9 after she
was spotted using her
"hand-held phone"
while driving.
When asked why
Lady Lake had two
thirds of the texting ci-
tations issued in Lake
County, Police Chief
Chris McKinstry said
his department has not
put any extra effort in
issuing the citations.
But he said the offi-
cer who wrote the ci-
tations drives an SUV,
which "possibly puts
him in a better posi-
tion" to spot someone
texting as a secondary
offense.
He said he wished
the law was stronger.
"Distracted driving is
more dangerous than
DUI. I just think more
should be done to pre-
vent it," the chief said.
According to a press
release from the Flor-
ida Department of


Transportation and
the AAA, in their "Put
It Down" campaign,
sending or receiving
a text takes a driver's
eyes from the road for
an average of 4.6 sec-
onds, the equivalent of
driving at 55 mph for
the length of an entire
football field.
Nancy Rasmus-
sen, a spokeswoman
with the Florida De-
partment of Highway
Safety and Motor Ve-
hicles, said her agen-
cy believes about 4,500
crashes in the state last
year involved a driv-
er who was texting or
distracted by an elec-
tronic communication
device. But that's hard
to prove and the num-
bers aren't concrete,
she said.
Capt. Rob Hicks, a
spokesman for the
Leesburg Police De-
partment, said his de-
partment would likely
begin by giving viola-
tors a warning.
"We do want to ed-
ucate them first," said
Hicks, whose agency
put "New Law ... No
Texting," messages on
their electronic bill-


Today, White Springs
is more renowned as
the home of the Ste-
phen Foster Memo-
rial Museum and the
annual Florida Folk
Festival. That's because
the springs went dry in
1990.
Today, although tour-
ists divers, canoeists,
swimmers and tubers
- are still a key audi-
ence, it is the state of
Florida that's doing the
beckoning.
Many of Florida's best
known springs in-
cluding in this region
Rainbow, Ichetucknee,
Manatee and Peacock
- are in state hands,
incorporated into the
state park system.
The state has been ac-
quiring them since 1949
and now owns 17 ma-
jor springs, the Tampa
Bay Times reported last
year.
Silver Springs joined
them as part of the park
system on Oct. 1.
Florida's environ-
mental regulators are
doing so because the
future of the state's
springs does not appear
as glorious as their past.
Pumping to feed a
thirsty populace has de-
pleted the flow of many
springs, while pollu-
tion has robbed them of
their clarity.
In 2000, a special
task force appoint-
ed by then-Gov. Jeb
Bush noted that threat-
ened springs were plac-
es where children were
baptized, where towns
were born and tourists
came for healing.
Preserving them was
vital for ecological and
economic reasons, the
panel concluded, in
recommending a series
of steps to reverse their
decline.
"Each is a special
place to someone, and
each has a story," the
report said of Florida's
springs. "The imple-
mentation of the rec-
ommendations con-
tained in this report
will help ensure that
Florida's 'bowls of liq-
uid light' will sparkle
for the grandchildren of
the children who play
in Florida's springs to-
day."
Contact Bill Thomp-
son at 867-4117 or bill.
thompson@ocala.com.


boards in the city in the
beginning of October.
Hicks noted that the
Florida law does allow a
driver's phone records
to be used as evidence
in court if a death or
injury occurred as a re-
sult of texting.
Montes added that
some troopers, who
come in contact with
motorists with phones
visible during traffic
stops, try to educate
them on the law.
"You have a certain
segment of the popula-
tion that will automati-
cally comply, because it
is now law," said Mon-
tes. "I think as time
goes by, you will see a
higher compliance rate
with drivers as we saw
with the seatbelt law,


which started out as a
secondary law."
Sen. Maria Sachs,
D-Fort Lauderdale,
one of the original pro-
ponents of the texting
while driving ban, has
filed a bill for the 2014
legislative session that
would make texting
while driving a primary
offense.


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 30, 2013






YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD
ROD DIXON........................................... PUBLISHER
TOM MCNIFF................................. MANAGING EDITOR
BILL KOCH....................... ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR
SCOTT CALLAHAN................................. NEWS EDITOR
GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Vo i c e s www.dailycommercial.com


VOICE


Congress free


from threat


of overwork
T he headline on the Congress-watching
newspaper Politico said it all: "Done."
The subhead expanded on the
assertion, but there wasn't much to add:
"Congress is through legislating for the rest
of 2013." And that was mid-month, even
before the lawmakers knocked off for a 10-
day Thanksgiving recess.
House Speaker John Boehner said the
House shouldn't even remain in session in
December. He was joking we think.
As it is, the House, according to Majority
Leader Eric Cantor's schedule, is to be in
session only eight days in December and
go home Dec. 13. This is no accident; the
schedule was made out in January. The
Senate doesn't have a strict schedule but
generally sticks close to the relaxed pace of
the House.
The immigration bill is not likely to pass
in December, and neither is the farm bill.
The 12 appropriations bills that fund the
operations of the government and were
supposed to have been passed by Sept. 30
haven't been passed.
Meanwhile, Congress will resort to
continuing resolutions, as a fancy way, as
they say on Capitol Hill, of kicking the can
down the road.
Dealing with the "sequester," the
automatic, across-the board budget
cuts Congress passed in a vain attempt
to galvanize itself into action, will have
to wait until next year; in the meantime,
it's beginning to do real damage to
critical government operations such as
defense.
The House spent much of the year
occupied with pointless trivia, such as
repeated and fruitless attempts to repeal
"Obamacare." Now it has found a new
distraction, beating up on the White House
for the botched rollout of the Affordable
Care Act.
The Republicans had better hurry. The
act is starting to work, especially in those
states that opted to administer the law
themselves.
Thanks to Senate Republicans needlessly
blocking President Barack Obama's judicial
nominees, Senate Democrats changed the
rules to allow the nominees' approval by 51
votes instead of 60.
Thus, the major legislative trophy
the Senate will have for the year end is
filling three seats on the D.C. Court of
Appeals.
Winston Churchill said democracy was
the worst form of government, except for
all the others. He was right, of course, but
sometimes you can't help wondering.
Provided by Scripps Howard News Service.


The Daily Commercial

The newspaper of choice for Lake
and Sumter counties since 1875

EDITORIALS
Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board,
not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are
not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday,
Saturday and Sunday.
COLUMNS
Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and
picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reflect
the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a
diversity of views.
If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state
or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom-
mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL
34749-0007.
Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length.
The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published
with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.


KI TO


OTHERVOICES


Protect your children from



ads for unhealthy products


We are desperately
searching for a topic on
which the White House
may speak without raising
the hackles of every breathing
Republican. It is difficult.
But in this season of good
will and gluttony, we are
called to worry, by the Obama
administration, about obesity
among our young. The White
House has raised this as a
subject of grave national
concern, and we rejoice, seeing
a parallel.
Back in the Paleozoic age of TV
advertising, tobacco companies
were forced to fund anti-
smoking ads aimed at children.
Children nagged smoking
adults to quit. Parents hid
cigarettes from disapproving
progeny. But cigarette ads
no longer are permitted on
network TV and thus there is no
coordinated industry-funded
anti-smoking ad campaign
aimed at children. States still
collect about $25 billion a year
from the federal government's
1998 agreement with the
tobacco industry and taxes but
spend only two percent on anti-
smoking efforts, according to the
Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.
Last year the federal Centers
for Disease Control conducted
a three-month general anti-
smoking campaign, resulting
in 100,000 adults quitting,
according to the medical journal
The Lancet. The campaign cost
$54 million, compared with $8.8
billion spent on advertising by
the tobacco industry.
The moral? Media campaigns
work. Adult smoking has
declined although the National
Cancer Institute says it still
accounts for 90 percent of lung
cancer deaths among men and
80 percent among women.
Having looked at such evidence,


Ann
McFeatters
SCRIPPS HOWARD
NEWS SERVICE
Children are twice as likely to
be overweight as they were in
1980 and adolescents are three
times more likely to be too fat
as in 1980, according to the
National Institutes of Health.
President Obama, who told a
U.N. official he hasn't smoked for
several years because he's scared
of his wife's disapproval, heartily
approved Michelle Obama's
current campaign to reduce
childhood obesity.
The first lady's "Let's Move"
campaign is just the beginning.
She complained at aWhite House
conference in September that
marketing to children of foods
high in sugar and fat is a serious
problem. She wants it to stop.
The Federal Trade Commission
estimated in 2006 that about $1.8
billion is spent on advertising
junk food to American children;
70 percent of TV ads on children's
programming are for empty
calories.
Children are twice as likely to
be overweight as they were in
1980 and adolescents are three
times more likely to be too fat
as in 1980, according to the
National Institutes of Health.
Other countries are paying
attention. Britain forbids
advertising food high in fat, salt
and sugar to children under
16. The Economist magazine
reports Mexican children watch
12,000 commercials for junk
food every year, prompting
the Mexican government to
take steps to ban such ads in


the afternoons, evenings and
on weekends. Quebec bans all
advertising aimed at children.
Regulatory action against
advertising junk food to children
is spiking around the globe.
Some U.S. companies such
as Unilever, Coca Cola and
Disney voluntarily vow to limit
children's exposure to ads for
fattening products such as soft
drinks. But there will be no
government move any time soon
to curb advertising to children.
Despite Republican sentiment
that government is too heavy
handed when it comes to
regulating business, there is no
drumbeat for new, extensive
federal regulation on such
social issues. Although it may
seem obvious that watching
commercials causes children
to demand junk food, there has
been no overwhelming research
blaming such commercials for
obesity. At most it's seen as one
cause among many, such as the
prevalence and relatively cheap
cost of high-fat, high-sugar foods.
That leaves the issue of what
children put in their mouths
mainly up to parents, who
collectively are fighting a losing
battle on obesity. Carefully
explaining to a two-and-a-half
year old in the supermarket
that spinach and broccoli are
"yum-o," a mother the other day
got this solemn declaration, "No,
mommy. Not yum-o."
Mrs. Obama, do your thing. We
need you to keep the pressure on
to educate more of us and heap
shame on companies clogging
little bodies with worthless
calories. Just leave the leftover
turkey, pie and Chocolate Frosted
Sugar Bombs to the adults.
Ann McFeatters has covered the White
House and national politics since 1986.
Readers may send her email at amc-
featters@nationalpress.com.


HAVE YOUR SAY
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to write letters to the editor. Letters
should be no longer than 350 words.
They must be original, signed with the
full name of the writer, and include
the writer's address and telephone
number for verification. We reserve
the right to edit for length. Letters
also will be edited for grammar, clarity,
taste and libel. We accept no more
than two letters per month from the
same writer. No open letters, form
letters or copies of letters to third
parties will be published. We do not
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By fax to: 325-365-1951


DOONESBURY


ZIPPR,& WAS THE OF COURSE!
FOUVAR OF UN*- H5 WAS A
CLE BEN'S RICE CLASSIC
AN eILPERLY AMERICAN
BLACK COOK? 5UCCESS
/ STORY!


KI IESTE


Saturday, November 30, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL





DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, November 30, 2013


I FVEDA FREASg.R EEBUG


TODAY




Partly sunny and
pleasant

HIGH LOW
770 58


5W
Ar -


I


Pe6sacola
84/48 ::


SUNDAY

-a '^t.-L


Partly sunny with a
shower in places

HIGH LOW
770 600


MONDAY




Periods of clouds and
sunshine

HIGH LOW
730 470


TUESDAY




Partly sunny


HIGH LOW
70 47


WEDNESDAY


,,--,l

Mostly sunny


HIGH LOW
730 530


':.,.-.' .


4


Tallahassee .
68/45


Panama Cit Fiii,,
66/49 C '; .. !iiii !


F-or up to the minute and detailed Astor'
weather information, go to: 7
1 AccuWeather.com

The Villa es Altoona
Oxford Villages 77/58
.. Oxford/5 -- Layao Im_ .
*L "a-"""--"'c5 -Umatilla "
7756 4L. a785i8 4L77/58 Soret
S Wildwood Fruitland Park Eustis
77/56 t.78/8 ft77/58 Sorrent
tColem in IL I t 0.77/58
Lake Panasoeet LeeburgTavares.
Pn Sumtervi e n ,. r758

/ 77'55 tev 771111
6ush n e ll C n te r H ill .. -
r56 9t156
S. Mo M erde
oveland Shown,
.. and Clermoni
756 78161 toays weo
Temperature
today's high
|| tonight's Ic

*'M... J :


Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 0


L Jacksonville
Lake City L t152
70/50 t


Gainesville ,. Daytona Beach
S73/52 ,74/61
, Ocalae. i ...t. ,
75f.4 .
4L ^ i .."'l itusville
.... eebur 2 62
- Orlando 1!,
S Tampa 1 .
; ,77161 .": Y ,; Vero Beach
n:::: ....- 't ,,L. -1 o
Rt. Petersburg ""-
77/61
SOkeechobee "
Sarasota .. 77/61 4. t
79/61 ,
''Hi Palm Bea i
lr ~80170 1
R.Myers. i4
is 81/60 ^ !!!
s 81/60 "a Fort Laudble
er Naplel 80/70 t
es are g^ 81/63 .
s and ,tr. .. sliami
IWS. 0/68


Key Largo
.... KvWal -We 79/70


8W/72 4L


Shown are noon postons of weather systems and predpitation. Temperature bands are today's highs for the
day. Forecast higMow temperatures are gWen for seltedo cities.


7s
60s san 'a.cao S
GY/47
ft.
U G

Xk 77553


10s

-os
*10s


^A l na n ," "
E', (NICE) ShowersM
\ f '.' \,,, 2 T-stormsE
.; -^ "'i .... Rain
*. a .""""" Flurrles[
m kI S asw .'
S,,,,,,,, IceE ]


Yesterday's National High/Low: (for the 48 contiguous states)
High 790 in West Palm Beach, FL Low-1


4
v
012 345678
0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10
Very High, 11+ Extreme
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Indext
number, the greater the need for
eye and skin protection.


l11 in Alamosa, CO


The solunar period schedule allows planning
days so you will be fishing in good territory or
hunting in good cover during those times. Major
periods begin at the times shown and last for
1.5 to 2 hours. The minor periods are shorter.
Major Minor Major Minor
Today 8:48 am. 2:35 a.m. 9:15 p.m. 3:02 p.m.
Sun. 9:39 a.m. 3:24 a.m. 10:07 p.m. 3:53 p.m.


I H 00D


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


Today
7:02 a.m.
5:30 p.m.
4:21 a.m.
3:43 p.m.


Sunday
7:03 a.m.
5:30 p.m.
5:25 a.m.
4:33 p.m.


New First



Dec2 Dec 9


Full



Dec 17


Last


Dc25


ITIEI


Homosassa
Day High Feet
Today 1:47am......1.3
3:23 pm......1.1
Daytona Beach
Day High Feet
Today 5:13 am.....4.6
5:29 pm..... 4.2


Low Feet
10:26 am ....-0.1
10:22 pm.....0.3

Low Feet
11:32 am.....0.3
11:37 pm....-0.3


High Feet
2:30 am......1.3
4:15 pm......1.1

High Feet
6:05 am .....4.8
6:20 pm..... 4.3


Low Feet
11:14 am....-0.2
11:10 pm.....0.3

Low Feet
12:24 pm.....0.0


I NAINLCTE


Today Sunday
City Hi LOW Hi LoW
San Francisco 63 47 pc 65 47 s
San Juan, PR 84 72 sh 82 72 sh
Santa Fe 50 29 pc 50 28 pc
St. Ste. Marie 34 25 sn 31 17 pc
Seattle 52 48r 53 41 r
Shreveport 60 43 pc 62 53 c
Spokane 39 33 c 44 34 r
Syracuse 36 28 pc 39 29 sf
Topeka 50 27 pc 50 28 pc
Tucson 72 50 pc 73 50 pc
Tulsa 59 39 pc 58 34 pc
Washington, DC 42 32 pc 48 34 pc
Wilmington, DE 40 32 pc 46 29 pc
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.


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Albany
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte, NC


Today
Hi Lo W
32 27 pc
54 36 pc
14 7s
46 26 pc
50 38 pc
42 33 pc
43 30 pc
48 34 pc
57 38 pc
36 19 pc
48 33 c
33 30 pc
34 31 c
28 25 pc
58 44 pc
48 29 pc
47 30 pc


Sunday
Hi Lo W
40 27 sf
55 34pc
20 5s
53 32 pc
55 42pc
48 31 pc
46 32 pc
49 40 pc
57 41 pc
38 24 sf
50 39 sh
46 37 c
39 30 sf
37 27 sn
62 46 pc
49 31 pc
51 37 pc


City
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Concord, NH
Dallas
Dayton
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
El Paso
Fargo
Fairbanks
Flagstaff
Grand Rapids


Today
Hi LOW
52 29 pc
43 28 pc
46 30 pc
38 31 pc
53 36 pc
30 19pc
61 50 pc
42 29 pc
56 28 pc
42 23s
38 30 pc
31 16 sn
66 46 pc
30 14pc
-17 -32 s
49 21 pc
36 30 c


wV


Sunday
Hi LOW
49 35s
38 25 pc
45 31 c
40 33 c
58 41 pc
40 24 sn
66 47 c
42 30 c
58 33s
39 25 pc
40 29 c
26 17 pc
68 40 pc
28 21 pc
-11 -21 s
50 20 pc
39 28 pC


City
Great Falls
Greensboro, NC
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City


Today
Hi LOW
47 30 pc
44 28 pc
32 24 pc
83 72 sh
66 48pc
44 28 pc
60 37 pc
50 27 pc
63 47s
58 41 pc
50 32 pc
56 39 pc
36 28 pc
38 21 pc
54 33 pc
64 48 pc
38 36pc


Sunday
Hi LOW
48 38 sh
52 34 pc
43 28 sn
81 69 t
69 57 c
44 29 c
63 45 pc
48 31 pc
64 49 s
56 42 c
49 36 c
56 43 c
37 25 pc
33 24 pc
54 37 c
67 51 pc
47 38 sh


City
Norfolk, VA
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego


Today
Hi LOW
47 39 pc
62 40 pc
44 22 s
42 34 pc
73 54 pc
41 28 pc
30 24 pc
49 45 r
34 28 pc
47 30 pc
52 27 pc
46 31 c
64 40 pc
52 34 pc
50 33 pc
66 55 c
71 56 pc


Sunday
Hi LOW
52 37 pc
61 36 pc
44 26s
46 35 pc
75 54 pc
42 34 c
42 30 sn
53 45r
46 33c
51 35 pc
55 31 s
53 31 pc
67 40s
49 32 c
50 36s
70 55 c
74 55 pc


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 30, 2013


m


lo


)2013


0 You
o2








Sports
sports@dailycommercial.com


Bl
DAILY COMMERCIAL
Saturday, November 30, 2013
SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY
352-365-8208
www.dailycommercial.com


t IRON BOWL: Auburn, Bama face off/B3


0Raiders fall 27-21

Raiders fall 27-=2 1


South Sumter
loses its 1st
game of year
in title tilt
MARK FISHER
Special to the Daily Commercial
The South Sumter
Raiders (12-1) suffered
their first and only loss
of the season Friday
night at Raider Field,
falling 27-21 to the St.
Petersburg Lakewood
Spartans (10-3) in the
2013 FHSAA Class 5A
Football Regional Fi-
nals.
The Raiders had
stormed back after
trailing 14-0 to take a
21-14 lead late in the
3rd quarter when South
Sumter faked a punt on
4th-and -5 from their
own 30 yard line. Bran-
don Anderson took the
direct snap and snuck
around the right end
and broke free for 70
yards and the go ahead
score with 4:14 remain-
ing in the 3rd quarter.
Wes Moir's point after
gave the Raiders a brief
lead.
But the Spartans an-
swered quickly when
Lakewood signal call-
er Ryan Davis hit one
of his receivers with a
short pass and he broke
a tackle and out-sprint-
ed the secondary for
the touchdown. And
with Bryant Benjamin's
point after the Spartans
had tied the score 21-21
in less than a minute.
The Spartan defense
victimized the Raiders
repeatedly in the sec-
ond half after the ty-


PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL
Lakewood senior Darquez Watson (6) is tackled by South Sumter senior Joey Mohler (25) on Friday at South Sumter
High School in Bushnell. Lakewood won, 27-21.


ABOVE: South Sumter Senior Chase Kelly scores a
touchdown. RIGHT: South Sumter sophomore JT Taylor (46)
runs the ball towards Lakewood senior Brujoun Bonner at


ing score, intercepting
Levi Sapp on 3 of the
next 4 Raider posses-
sions as he was under
a heavy pass rush and
forced into poor situ-
ations. But it was after
forcing a punt that the
Spartans returned to


the Raider 23 yard line
and set up the deciding
score. Ryan Davis car-
ried Lakewood into the
next round of the play-
offs rushing for 15 yards
on 5 carries including a
critical 4th down con-
version at the Raid-


er 2 yard line and then
punching the ball in on
the next play for the 27-
21 lead when the point
after was unsuccessful.
South Sumter made a
final drive with 8:37 re-


maining in the game,
twice cnoverting on
4th down to extend
the drive but a third at-
tempt resulted in an-
other Sapp intercep-
tion.


Duncan's

hot shooting

leads Spurs

past Magic
Associated Press
ORLANDO Tim
Duncan scored 17 of
his 19 points in the first
half, Marco Belinelli
also had 19 points, and
the San Antonio Spurs
beat the Orlando Magic
109-91 on Friday night.
San Antonio scored
17 straight points in the
second quarter, turn-
ing a one-point edge
into a 58-40 lead, and
was able to rest Dun-
can for much of the
second half while Or-
lando couldn't slice the
deficit into single dig-
its.
Both teams were
playing without start-
ing guards. The Spurs
were without Tony
Parker, who had a
sprained ankle, and Or-
lando's Jameer Nelson
was nursing a sprained
foot. Both injuries were
sustained in games
Wednesday night.
The Magic battled
back slightly in the
third quarter, slicing
the Spurs' lead to 81-
70 before San Antonio
pulled away again.
The Spurs shot 55 per-
cent and got back on
track after having their
11-game winning streak
snapped Wednesday
by Oklahoma City. San
Antonio's 14-2 record
is best in the Western
Conference.
Arron Afflalo scored
17 points for Orlando,
who now heads for a
six-game, 12-day road
trip.


Florida tries to salvage


season against No. 2 FSU


MARK LONG
AP Sports Writer
GAINESVILLE After all
the injuries, the program's
longest losing streak in 34
years, the shocker against
lower-division Georgia
Southern and the disappoint-
ment of missing a bowl, woe-
ful Florida has a chance to
salvage one gratifying mem-
ory from an otherwise forget-


table season.
It's a very, very slim chance,
according to odds-makers.
The Gators (4-7) are
four-touchdown underdogs
heading into Saturday's an-
nual rivalry game against
second-ranked Florida State
(11-0).
The Seminoles, meanwhile,
can move on step closer to
the Bowl Championship Se-


ries national title game with a
victory.
"It's hard to believe the gap
is so huge between us two,"
Gators guard Jon Halapio
said.
Just a year ago, Florida ran
roughshod over FSU, pulling
away in the fourth quarter for
a 37-26 victory in Tallahassee
that propelled the Gators into
SEE FSU I B2


Florida wide receiver Solomon Patton, left, loses his helmet when he is
tackled by the Georgia Southern defense including Tay Hicklin (14) in
Gainesville. Georgia Southern won the game 26-20.


:'I "_ ... . -. ^" ^ l ., -.... ..., '





DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 30, 2013


SCOREBOARD


Friday's College Basketball
Major Scores
EAST
Monmouth (NJ) 81, MVSU 79
Providence 78, Fairfield 69
Towson 84, The Citadel 59
SOUTH
Clenmson 69, Coastal Carolina 40
Florida 67, Florida St. 66
Georgia 71, Appalachian St. 53
Louisville 69, Southern Miss. 38
Maryland 89, Morgan St. 62
NC A&T 85, Longwood 78
Samford 79, Campbellsville 68
Stephen F Austin 60, UNC Wilmington 55
VCU 79, Northeastern 66
Virginia 76, SMU 73
Virginia Tech 81, Radford 56
MIDWEST
Cal Poly 70, North Dakota 43
Cincinnati 95, Kennesaw St. 67
Michigan 87, Coppin St. 45
Michigan St. 98, Mount St. Mary's 65
Ohio St. 99, North Florida 64
W. Michigan 83, Cornell 70
SOUTHWEST
Liberty 70, Hampton 53
Oklahoma 101, UALR 81
SE Missouri 79, N. Kentucky 65
Sam Houston St. 75, Ark.-Pine Bluff 49
Texas St. 70, Tulane 52
West Alabama 77, Abilene Christian 67
FAR WEST
CS Bakersfield 61, N. Arizona 50
Oregon 85, Pacific 62
TOURNAMENT
Barclay's Classic
First Round
Mississippi 77, Georgia Tech 67
Penn St. 89, St. John's 82, OT
Battle 4 Atlantis
Semifinals
Iowa 89, UTEP 53
Consolation Bracket
Tennessee 64, Xavier 49
Wake Forest 77, Southern Cal 63
Carrs/Safeway Great Alaska Shootout
Consolation Bracket
Indiana St. 97, Alaska-Anchorage 87
Pepperdine 68, Denver 56
Las Vegas Invitational
Championship
Gardner-Webb 86, Morehead St. 82, OT
Third Place
Chattanooga 87, IUPUI 76
NIT Season Tipoff
Championship
Arizona 72, Duke 66
Third Place
Drexel 85, Alabama 83, 30T
Old Spice Classic
Semifinals
Memphis 76, LSU 69
Oklahoma St. 69, Butler 67
Consolation Bracket
Washington St. 69, Purdue 54
Wooden Legacy
Semifinals
Marquette 76, George Washington 60
Consolation Bracket
Miami 48, Cal St.-Fullerton 46
National Basketball Association
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic
W L Pet GB
Toronto 6 9 .400 -
Boston 7 11 .389 1/
Philadelphia 6 11 .353 1
Brooklyn 4 12 .250 21h
New York 3 11 .214 21h
Southeast
W L Pet GB
Miami 13 3 .813 -
Atlanta 9 8 .529 4'/
Charlotte 8 9 .471 51
Washington 7 9 .438 6
Orlando 6 10 .375 7
Central
W L Pet GB
Indiana 15 1 .938 -
Chicago 7 7 .500 7
Detroit 6 10 .375 9
Cleveland 4 12 .250 11
Milwaukee 2 13 .133 121h
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 14 2 .875 -
Houston 12 5 .706 21
Dallas 10 7 .588 41h
Memphis 8 7 .533 51h
New Orleans 7 8 .467 61
Northwest
W L Pet GB
Portland 13 3 .813 -
Oklahoma City 10 3 .769 11
Denver 8 6 .571 4
Minnesota 8 9 .471 51h
Utah 2 14 .125 11
Pacific
W L Pet GB
L.A. Clippers 11 5 .688 -
Golden State 9 7 .563 2
Phoenix 8 7 .533 2'/
L.A. Lakers 9 8 .529 21h
Sacramento 4 9 .308 51/
Thursday's Games
No games scheduled
Friday's Games
San Antonio 109, Orlando 91
Charlotte 92, Milwaukee 76
Miami 90, Toronto 83
Boston 103, Cleveland 86
Atlanta 88, Dallas 87
L.A. Lakers 106, Detroit 102



FSU

FROM PAGE B1


the Sugar Bowl.
Coach Will Mus-
champ's team has
dropped eight of 12
games since.
The Seminoles hav-
en't lost since, reeling
off 13 in a row.
"It's something that
has driven us this whole
season, something that
we fed off of going into
the summer," FSU line-
backer Telvin Smith
said. "We've been using
it as drive, but we've got
to understand this is
a new team and we've
got our own purpose,
our own life to live.
"At the same time, a
lot of us players were
on that field. We feel
that pain. We definite-
ly are going to tote that
with us, but we're not
going to shape this


game around" that.
Florida has been dec-
imated by injuries, los-
ing quarterback Jeff
Driskel, running back
Matt Jones, receiv-
er Andre Debose, de-
fensive tackle Dom-
inique Easley, three
offensive tackles and


Houston 114, Brooklyn 95
New Orleans 121, Philadelphia 105
Indiana 93, Washington 73
Golden State at Oklahoma City, late
New York at Denver, 9 p.m.
Phoenix at Utah, 9 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Atlanta at Washington, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Brooklyn at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Houston at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Utah at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Boston at Milwaukee, 9 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Denver at Toronto, 1p.m.
Indiana at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Detroit, 3:30 p.m.
Golden State at Sacramento, 6p.m.
Charlotte at Miami, 6 p.m.
Minnesota at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Portland at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Emirates Australian Open Scores
Friday
At Royal Sydney Golf Club
Sydney
Purse: $1.15 million
Yardage: 6,939; Par: 72
a-amateur
Second Round
Adam Scott, Australia 62-70 132
Rory Mcllroy, Northern Ireland 69-65 134
Richard Green, Australia 69-66 135
Matthew Jones, Australia 68-68 136
Leigh McKechnie, Australia 73-65 138
Alistair Presnell, Australia 67-71 138
Josh Younger, Australia 69-69 138
a-Brady Watt, Australia 68-70 138
Aron Price, Australia 70-69 139
Max McCardle, Australia 68-71 139
Scott Arnold, Australia 70-70 140
Jamie Arnold, Australia 72-68 140
Ryan Yip, Canada 65-75 140
Bryden MacPherson, Australia 71-70 141
John Senden, Australia 73-68 141
GeoffOgilvy, Australia 75-66 141
Rhein Gibson, Australia 71-70 141
Nathan Holman, Australia 69-72 141
Aaron Baddeley, Australia 67-74 141
Adam Bland, Australia 69-72 141
Jason Scrivener, Australia 67-74 141
Cameron Percy, Australia 71-70 141
David McKenzie, Australia 66-75 141
James Nitties, Australia 70-71 141
Nick O'Hern, Australia 70-72 142
.,,, :v.., :,, i, 75-67 142
i,,, i,,i .,, ,, 69-73 142
Steven Bowditch, Australia 68-74 142
Ashley Hall, Australia 71-71 142
Anthony Brown, Australia 68-74 142
Michael Long, Australia 72-71 143
Peter Lonard, Australia 72-71 143
Mahal Pearce, New Zealand 72-71 143
Rod Pampling, Australia 75-68 143
Jason Norris, Australia 67-76 143
Mathew Goggin, Australia 70-73 143
Ryan Hailer, Australia 74-69 143
Matthew Millar, Australia 70-73 143
Kalem Richardson, Australia 69-74 143
Timothy Wood, Australia 73-70 143
Scott Strange, Australia 71-73 144
Chan Shih-chang, Taiwan 76-68 144
Adam Crawford, Australia 71-73 144
Marcus Cain, Australia 71-73 144
a-Ryan Ruffels, Australia 77-67 144
Anthony Summers, Australia 74-70 144
Tim Wilkinson, New Zealand 73-71 144
Leigh Deagan, Australia 71-73 144
Choi Joon-woo, South Korea 72-72 144
Steven Jeffress, Australia 75-69 144
John Young Kim, United States 65-79 144
Jason Day, Australia 70-74 144
Stephen Allan, Australia 75-70 145
Matthew Griffin, Australia 73-72 145
Mark Brown, New Zealand 75-70 145
Ryan Lynch, Australia 73-72 145
Steven Jones, Australia 68-77 145
Paul Spargo, Australia 74-71 145
Lucas Lee, Brazil 70-75 145
Wang Minghao, China 75-70 145
Robert Allenby, Australia 72-73 145
a-Anthony Murdaca, Australia 71-74 145
Matthew Guyatt, Australia 71-74 145
Michael Choi, Australia 70-75 145
Missed cut
Brad Shilton, New Zealand 74-72 146
Daniel Fox, Australia 74-72 146
Andrew Martin, Australia 77-69 146
Neven Basic, Australia 70-76 146
Craig Parry, Australia 72-74 146
James McLean, Australia 70-76 146
Rika Batibasaga, Australia 72-74 146
a-Cameron Davis, Australia 76-70 146
Scott Gardiner, Australia 75-71 146
Gareth Paddison, New Zealand 72-74 146
Terry Pilkadaris, Australia 74-72 146
a-Zac Stolz, Australia 73-73 146
Kim Woo-hyun, South Korea 73-73 146
Peter Cooke, Australia 73-74 147
Annop Tang'prasert, Thailand 71-76 147
Tze Huang Choo, Singapore 73-74 147
Marcus Fraser, Australia 75-72 147
Bronson La'Cassie, Australia 74-73 147
Kieran Pratt, Australia 75-72 147
David Bransdon, Australia 71-76 147
Lee Jun-seok, South Korea 74-73 147
Aaron Pike, Australia 74-73 147
Kim Shi, South Korea 71-76 147
Scott Laycock, Australia 68-79 147
Josh Geary, New Zealand 73-74 147
Peter O'Malley, Australia 73-74 147
Stephen Dartnall, Australia 73-74 147
Ryan Fox, New Zealand 73-74 147
Bradley Lamb, Australia 73-74 147
Varut Chomchalum, Thailand 71-76 147
David Klein, New Zealand 74-73 147
Thomas Petersson, Sweden 76-72 148
Matthew Stieger, Australia 81-67 148
Martin Dive, Australia 74-74 148


several others for the
season. Backup quar-
terback Tyler Murphy
also missed the last
two games because
of a sprained throw-
ing shoulder, leaving
third-stringer Skyler
Mornhinweg to start.
With Mornhin-
weg under center, the
Gators were most-
ly one-dimensional
against South Carolina
and Georgia Southern.
That might not be the
case against the Semi-
noles, who rank second
in the nation in scoring
offense (55.2 points a
game) and scoring de-
fense (11.4 points).
With Heisman Tro-
phy candidate Jam-
eis Winston at quar-
terback, Devonta
Freeman and James
Wilder Jr. in the back-
field and a number of
talents targets on the
outside, the Seminoles


have scored at least 50
points seven times in
2013. Throw in a de-
fense that has found
the end zone eight
times, and it's no won-
der FSU hasn't really
played a close game.
Still, the Gators be-
lieve anything can hap-


Michael Wright, Australia 71-77 148
Grant Thomas, Australia 77-71 148
ZhangXinjun, China 74-74 148
Brendan Smith, Australia 74-74 148
Stephen Leaney, Australia 73-75 148
Christopher Campbell, Australia 77-71 148
Jin Daxing, China 73-75 148
Rory Bourke, Australia 76-72 148
Clint Rice, Australia 72-76 148
Peter Wilson, Australia 76-73 149
Cameron Smith, Australia 75-74 149
Craig Hancock, Australia 76-73 149
Andre Stolz, Australia 73-76 149
Jeong Jin, South Korea 73-76 149
Dimitrios Papadatos, Australia 75-74 149
Troy Cox, Australia 76-73 149
Michael Moore, Australia 75-74 149
Son Joon-eob, South Korea 73-76 149
Peter Fowler, Australia 76-74 150
Eric Mina, United States 75-75 150
Rohan Blizard, Australia 71-79 150
Greg Chalmers, Australia 78-73 151
Cao Yi, China 77-74 151
Andrew Tschudin, Australia 76-75 151
Andrew Kelly, Australia 77-74 151
a-Dou Zecheng, China 73-78 151
Park Hyo-won, South Korea 72-79 151
Daniel Popovic, Australia 77-74 151
Liu Yuxiang, China 70-81 151
Brody Ninyette, Australia 77-75 152
Richard T Lee, Canada 73-79 152
Kristopher Mueck, Australia 76-76 152
Matthew Giles, Australia 80-72 152
John Wade, Australia 75-77 152
Matthew Ballard, Australia 78-74 152
Li Xinyang, China 76-76 152
Toby Wilcox, Australia 76-76 152
Kim Geon-ha, South Korea 76-76 152
..... ,, .,,,,,, i,. 75-77 152
,,11 ., . i,,, ,,i 75-78 153
HuangWen-yi, China 78-76 154
Aaron Townsend, Australia 78-76 154
Pasavee Lertvilai, Thailand 74-80 154
Ouyang Zheng, China 82-72 154
Richard Lee, New Zealand 76-78 154
Peter Senior, Australia 74-81 155
He Zeyu, China 78-77 155
Ou Zhijun, China 79-77 156
Terry Price, Australia 78-78 156
Pravee Visalkit, Thailand 79-77 156
Brett Rankin, Australia 75-81 156
Han Ren, China 77-81 158
Zhao Xiongyi, China 80-79 159
Jack Wilson, Australia 80-79 159
Deng Lejun, China 80-85 165
Kevin Streelman, United States 70-WD
Alfred Dunhill Championship Leading
Scores
Friday
At Leopard Creek Golf Club
Malelane, South Africa
Purse: $2.03 million
Yardage: 7,287; Par: 72
Second Round
Morten Orum Madsen, Denmark 65-71 136
Charl Schwartzel, South Africa 68-68 136
Ross Fisher, England 72-65 137
Soren Hansen, Denmark 72-65 137
Tyrone van Aswegen, South Africa 70-68 138
Richard Finch, England 68-70 138
Michael Hollick, South Africa 69-70 139
Romain Wattel, France 70-69 139
Kim Sihwan, South Korea 70-69 139
DannyWillett, England 69-70 139
Victor Riu, France 68-71 139
Missed cut
John Daly, United States 72-75 147
Richard Sterne, South Africa 80-77 157
National Hockey League
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 26 17 7 2 36 72 54
TampaBay 26 16 9 1 33 76 66
Detroit 27 13 7 7 33 74 71
Montreal 26 14 9 3 31 69 55
Toronto 26 14 9 3 31 73 69
Ottawa 26 10 12 4 24 76 86
Florida 26 7 14 5 19 58 86
Buffalo 27 6 20 1 13 48 84
Metropolitan
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 27 17 9 1 35 81 63
Washington 26 13 11 2 28 79 76
N.Y Rangers 26 13 13 0 26 55 64
New Jersey 26 10 11 5 25 58 64
Carolina 26 10 11 5 25 55 75
Philadelphia 25 11 12 2 24 54 61
Columbus 26 10 13 3 23 66 77
N.Y Islanders 26 8 15 3 19 70 90
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 26 18 4 4 40 95 73
St. Louis 25 18 4 3 39 89 57
Colorado 24 18 6 0 36 73 50
Minnesota 27 15 8 4 34 66 64
Nashville 26 13 11 2 28 60 72
Winnipeg 28 12 12 4 28 73 80
Dallas 23 12 9 2 26 67 68
Pacific
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 25 17 3 5 39 88 57
Anaheim 28 18 7 3 39 88 73
Los Angeles 26 16 6 4 36 69 56
Phoenix 25 15 6 4 34 83 79
Vancouver 27 13 9 5 31 72 70
Calgary 25 8 13 4 20 68 92
Edmonton 27 8 17 2 18 70 93
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Thursday's Games
Vancouver 5, Ottawa 2
Edmonton 3, Nashville 0
Friday's Games
Washington 3, Montreal 2, SO
Philadelphia 2, Winnipeg 1
Boston 3, N.Y Rangers 2


pen, especially at home
and in a rivalry game.
"This is the sea-
son for us. This is our
bowl game," Florida of-
fensive lineman Kyle
Koehne said. "This is
our big game of the
year. We want to end it
on a good note."
KEY MATCHUP: Flor-
ida State receivers Ra-
shad Green, Kenny
Shaw and Kelvin Ben-
jamin have been a big
reason for Winston's
success this season.
They have combined
to catch 140 pass-
es for 2,343 yards and
23 touchdowns. They
could face their tough-
est test, though, going
against Florida's talent-
ed cornerback trio of
Loucheiz Purifoy, Mar-
cus Roberson and Ver-
non Hargreaves III.
"Where we do have the
upper hand is that we go
against a better defense


every day," Shaw said. "I
like the challenge."
MORE INJURIES: As
if Florida's injury list
wasn't long enough,
the Gators will be with-
out two more lineback-
ers against FSU. Mike
Taylor (knee) and Alex
Anzalone (shoulder)


Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 0
Detroit 5, N.Y Islanders 0
Anaheim 5, Calgary 2
San Jose 6, St. Louis 3
Colorado 3, Minnesota 1
New Jersey 5, Carolina 2
Columbus 4, Edmonton 2
Buffalo 3, Toronto 2, OT
Chicago at Dallas, late
Saturday's Games
Vancouver at N.Y Rangers, 2 p.m.
Columbus at Boston, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Florida, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Washington at N.Y Islanders, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Calgary at Los Angeles, 10 p.m.
Anaheim at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Vancouver at Carolina, 1p.m.
Detroit at Ottawa, 5:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Dallas, 6 p.m.
Major League Soccer Playoff Glance
KNOCKOUT ROUND
Times EST
Eastern Conference
Thursday, Oct. 31: Houston 3, Montreal 0
Western Conference
Wednesday, Oct. 30: Seattle 2, Colorado 0
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Eastern Conference
New York vs. Houston
Leg 1 Sunday, Nov. 3: New York 2, Houston 2
Leg 2 Wednesday, Nov. 6: Houston 2, New York
1, OT, Houston advanced on 4-3 aggregate
Sporting KC vs. New England
Leg 1 Saturday, Nov. 2: New England 2, Sport-
ing KC 1
Leg 2 Wednesday, Nov. 6: Sporting KC 3, New
England 1, OT, Sporting KC advanced on 4-3 ag-
gregate
Western Conference
Portland vs. Seattle
Leg 1 Saturday, Nov. 2: Portland 2, Seattle 1
Leg 2 Thursday, Nov. 7: Portland 3, Seattle 2,
Portland advanced on 5-3 aggregate
Real Salt Lake vs. LA Galaxy
Leg 1 Sunday, Nov. 3: LA Galaxy 1, Real Salt
Lake 0
Leg 2 Thursday, Nov. 7: Real Salt Lake 2, LA
Galaxy 0, OT, Real Salt Lake advanced on 2-1 ag-
gregate
CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIP
Eastern Conference
Leg 1 Saturday, Nov 9: Sporting KC 0, Houston 0
Leg 2 Saturday, Nov. 23: Sporting KC 2, Houston
1, Sporting KC advanced on 2-1 aggregate
Western Conference
Leg 1 Sunday, Nov. 10: Real Salt Lake 4, Port-
land 2
Leg 2 Sunday, Nov. 24: Real Salt Lake 1, Port-
land 0, Real Salt Lake advanced on 5-2 aggregate
MLS CUP
Saturday, Dec. 7: Real Salt Lake at Sporting KC,
4p.m.
Friday's Sports Transactions
BASEBALL
Major League Baseball
MLB LHP Ted Lilly announced his retirement.
American League
KANSAS CITY ROYALS Agreed to terms with
senior vice president of baseball operatons/gen-
eral manager Dayton Moore on a two-year contract
extension.
National League
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS Agreed to terms with
RHP Ryan Vogelsong on a one-year contract.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NFL Fined Pittsburgh CB William Gay $15,750,
New Orleans DE Cam Jordan $10,000 and Detroit
DT Ndamukong Suh, N.Y Jets DT Kenrick Ellis and
Chicago G Kyle Long $7,875 for their actions during
last week's games.
CHICAGO BEARS Signed S Sean Cattouse from
the practice squad. Released DT Tracy Robertson.
WASHINGTON REDSKINS Signed CB Chase Min-
nifield from the practice squad.
Women's Indoor Football League
PHILADELPHIA FREEZE Named Mike Ochmano-
wicz coach and signed him to a three-year contract.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS Returned D Tim
Erixon to Springfield (AHL).
NEW JERSEY DEVILS Activated D Anton Volchen-
kov from injured reserve.
NEW YORK RANGERS Reassigned Fs Michael
St. Croix and Josh Nicholls from Hartford (AHL) to
Greenville (ECHL).
PHOENIX COYOTES Recalled D Rostislav Klesla
from Portland (AHL). Assigned F Chris Brown to
Portland.
TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS Recalled F Carter Ash-
ton from Toronto (AHL).
American Hockey League
HAMILTON BULLDOGS Signed F Jordan Owens to
a 25-game professional tryout contract. Assigned F
Ben Duffy to Wheeling (ECHL).
ECHL
ECHL Fined Evansville RW Josh Beaulieu and D
Matt Krug and Guillaume Lepine and Gwinnett G
Louis Domingue and F Jeremie Malouin undisclosed
amounts for their actions during Thursday's game.
READING ROYALS Claimed FTyler Brenner off
waivers. Signed F Brandon Blandina.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
TORONTO FC- Exercised 2014 contract options
on Gs Joe Bendik, Chris Konopka and Quillan Rob-
erts; Ds Gale Agbossoumonde, Mark Bloom and
Ryan Ricther; Ms Kyle Bekker, Reggie Lambe and
Jeremy Hall; and Fs Bright Dike, Emery Welshman
and Andrew Wiedeman. Declined option on FRob
ert Earnshaw.


will miss the season fi-
nale after sustaining
injuries against Geor-
gia Southern. Anto-
nio Morrison and Matt
Rolin already are out
for the season. The in-
juries thrust freshman
Jarrad Davis and Nei-
ron Ball into the start-
ing lineup and leave
Florida with just two
healthy backups, one
of them being walk-on
David Campbell.
MARGIN WATCH:
Florida State's most
lopsided win in the se-
ries came in 1988, a 52-
17 drubbing in Talla-
hassee. The Seminoles
have since notched
three wins over Florida
by at least 20 points -
1992, 2000 and 2010.
FAREWELL? Offen-
sive coordinator Brent
Pease and offensive line
coach Tim Davis could
be coaching their fi-
nal game at Florida. Al-


though Muschamp has
made no announce-
ment about their fu-
ture, he has hinted that
offensive changes are
coming. Pease and Da-
vis seem like obvious
choices since the of-
fense ranks 111th in the
country.


TV2DAY

BOXING
10:15 a.m.
HBO Champion Sergey Kovalev (22-0-1) vs. Ismayl Sillakh (21-1-0), forWBO light
heavyweight title; champion Adonis Stevenson (22-1-0) vs. Tony Bellew (20-1-0) for
WBC light heavyweight title, at Quebec City, Canada.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Noon
ABC Ohio State at Michigan
ESPN Florida State at Florida
ESPN2 Duke at North Carolina
ESPNEWS -Temple at Memphis
FS1 Kansas State at Kansas
2:30 p.m.
FSN North Texas at Tulsa
NBC FCS, Southern U. vs. Grambling St., at New Orleans
3:30 p.m.
ABC Georgia at Georgia Tech
CBS -Alabama at Auburn
ESPN Penn State at Wisconsin
ESPN2 Baylor at TCU
4 p.m.
FS1 Iowa State at West Virginia
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Clemson at South Carolina
FOX Notre Dame at Stanford
7:45 p.m.
ESPN -Texas A&M at Missouri
8:07 p.m.
ABC UCLA at Southern Cal
10:15 p.m.
ESPN2 New Mexico at Boise State
GOLF
5:30 a.m.
TGC European PGATour,Alfred Dunhill Championship, third round, at Mpumalanga,
South Africa
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
FSN Lipscomb at Georgetown
2 p.m.
NBCSN Barclays Center Classic, doubleheader, third place game and champion-
ship,teams TBD, at Brooklyn, N.Y
7 p.m.
NBCSN Battle 4 Atlantis, third place game, teams TBD, at Paradise Island, Bahamas
9:30 p.m.
NBCSN Battle 4 Atlantis, championship, teams TBD, at Paradise Island, Bahamas
NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION
7:30 p.m.
WGN Chicago at Cleveland
SOCCER
9:55 a.m.
NBCSN Premier League, Cardiff City vs. Arsenal
12:30 p.m.
NBCSN Premier League, West Bromwich at Newcastle
WINTER SPORTS
12:30 p.m.
NBCSN USSA, RaptorWorld Cup, women's super G, atAvon,Colo.





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Saturday, November 30, 2013


Bragging rights take back seat in Iron Bowl


JOHN ZENOR
APSportsWriter
AUBURN, Ala. Brag-
ging rights are taking a back-
seat for a change in this Iron
Bowl.
It's No. 1 Alabama ver-
sus No. 4 Auburn Saturday
in a rivalry game that has
reached epic proportions in
the state beyond even the
usual craving for 364 days of
rubbing it in.
The winner of only the sec-
ond Top-5 matchup in the
Iron Bowl's 78-year history
will play for the Southeast-
ern Conference champion-
ship, and live on in the na-
tional title derby.
"Oh man, it's going to be a
battle," Crimson Tide receiv-
er Kevin Norwood said.
If the SEC title game has
been a national semifinal
game during the league's
seven-year run of BCS
champs, welcome to what
could amount to the quar-
terfinals. Iron Bowl style.
The Tide (11-0, 7-0
SEC) remains the nation-
al front-runner and is a
10.5-point favorite for this
one. The Tigers (10-1, 6-1)
have arguably been the
season's biggest surprise,
though unlike Alabama
they'd likely still need either
No. 2 Florida State or No. 3
Ohio State to lose.
Auburn has lost the past
two Iron Bowls by a com-
bined 91-14 and failed to
produce an offensive touch-
down in either game. Much
has changed since coach
Gus Malzahn's arrival.
"We've been fueled by
doubt all season," Auburn
tailback Tre Mason said. "A


Auburn running back Tre Mason (21) dances into the end zone after a touch
the first half in Auburn, Ala.


lot of guys are fired up and
we like being the underdog."
It hasn't been an ideal po-
sition in this game histor-
ically. The highest ranked
team has gone 42-10 in the
Iron Bowl since 1955, but
there have been precious
few like this one.
The 1971 game pitted No.
3 Alabama versus No. 5 Au-
burn. The 1989 game was
huge for Auburn fans as
the first one played at Jor-
dan-Hare Stadium.
Perhaps this one will end
up topping them all. The Ti-
gers haven't been under this
kind of spotlight since the
2010 national championship
season that helped give the
state a string of four straight.
The teams are jockeying to


preserve their hopes of mak-
ing it five.
"We're going to try not to
have that outside pressure
feed in and all the media and
hype that the outside people
are going to bring in affect us
but at the same time, we're
going to bring that intensity
ourselves," Auburn tight end
C.J. Uzomah said.
No top-ranked Alabama
team has faced an opponent
ranked this high during the
regular season.
Plus, it's Alabama-Auburn,
a statewide obsession even
in lean years. Tide coach
Nick Saban says games like
this boil down to execution.
"It really doesn't matter
what anybody says, what
anybody thinks, who's fa-


yards per game behind two
of the league's top-6 rush-
ers, Marshall and Mason. Al-
abama's fourth against the
run, with opponents man-
aging just 91.3 rushing yards
on average. The Tigers have
four runners with at least
five touchdowns, matching
what the Tide has allowed all
season.
POTENT OFFENSES:
They go about it different-
ly, but both offenses are for-
midable. The Tigers have
scored 30-plus points sev-
en games in a row for the
first time since 1994, using
a fast-paced style. Alabama
is No. 2 in the SEC in points
per game (39.7) and has had
trasfr' caree whileonly 19 three-and-outs in
______hswntwnaion 119 possessions, or 15.8 per-
W cent, the fourth-lowest per-
SECs tN AP centage nationally.
DAVE MARTIN/AP SEEING RED: Alabama's
down run against Georgia during defense is the SEC's best in
several key categories, in-
cluding scores allowed with-
vored," Saban said. "It really in the Tide's 20-yard line. Op-
doesn't matter." ponents are scoring just 60
Here are five things to percent ofthe time in the red
watch in the Iron Bowl: zone. Auburn is second-stin-
MARSHALL VS. MCCAR- giest, at 73.7 percent. The Ti-
RON: The Tide's AJ McCa- gers offense has scored on a
rron is a Heisman Trophy league-best 42 of 48 red zone
candidate with a big-game trips (87.5 percent), includ-
reputation. Auburn's Gus ing 33 touchdowns.
Malzahn has fashioned his TOUGH BLOCKERS: Al-
offense to take advantage of abama and Auburn could
Nick Marshall's strengths: both make a case for hav-
downfield passing and run- ing the SEC's best offensive
ning. This will be the biggest line. Led by Cyrus Kouand-
game of the junior college jio and Anthony Steen, the
transfer's career while Mc- Tide has allowed just two
Carron has won two nation- sacks in the past 29 quarters.
al titles. Center Ryan Kelly's status is
WHAT A RUSH: It's the uncertain with a sprained
SEC's top running game knee. Greg Robinson and
against the best run defense. Reese Dismukes have paved
Auburn ranks second na- the way for a potent running
tionally in rushing at 320.3 game and given up 12 sacks.


KEITH SRAKOCIC/ AP
Miami wide receiver Stacy Coley (3) runs away from
Pittsburgh linebacker Todd Thomas (8) on his way to the end
zone in the second quarter on Friday in Pittsburgh.


Coley leads Miami


past Pitt 41-31


WILL GRAVES
AP Sports Writer
PITTSBURGH Sta-
cy Coleyhauled in a pair
of touchdown passes
and zig-zagged 73 yards
on an end around for
another score as Miami
kept its slim hopes for
a spot in the ACC title
game alive with a 41-31
victory over Pittsburgh
on Friday.
Allen Hums caught
nine passes for 173
yards for the Hurri-
canes (9-3, 5-3 ACC),
who raced to a quick
14-point lead and had
no real trouble with the
Panthers (6-6, 3-5).
Isaac Bennett ran for
a 141 yards and a score
for Pitt but the Panthers
were never really in it.
Miami assured itself
of its first nine-win sea-
son since 2009 with the
victory. The Hurricanes
need losses by Duke
and Virginia Tech on
Saturday to earn a re-
match with No. 2 Flor-
ida State in the title


game in Charlotte next
Saturday.
Stephen Morris com-
pleted 17 of 28 passes
for 296 yards and three
scores for Miami, which
has won eight straight
against the Panthers
and 16 of the last 17
meetings.
Switching confer-
ences, however, has
done little to change
the result.
The Panthers have
shown signs of prog-
ress under second-year
coach Paul Chryst, but
the Hurricanes showed
the gap between the
Panthers and the ACC
elite will take some
time to close.
Coley provided the
glaring evidence.
He scored twice in the
game's first 3:30 on pass-
es from Morris after Pitt
miscues but gave the
Hurricanes control for
good with his remark-
able 73-yard journey
through the Panther
defense late in the first
half.


Jennings rescues No. 15 LSU


in 31-27 victory over Razorbacks


BRETT MARTEL
AP Sports Writer
BATON ROUGE, La.
- Backup quarterback
Anthony Jennings
closed out LSU's regu-
lar season by giving Ti-
gers fans a big dose of
hope for the future.
The freshman re-
placed an injured Zach
Mettenberger in the
fourth quarter and
lofted a 49-yard touch-
down pass to Travin
Dural with 1:15 left as
No. 15 LSU pulled out
a tense 31-27 victory
over upset-minded Ar-
kansas on Friday.
Jennings entered the
game after Metten-
berger hurt his left leg
in the fourth quarter,
and the game came
down to whether Jen-
nings could drive the
Tigers 99 yards in the
final 3 minutes.
He responded with
a pair of clutch first-
down passes and a 21-
yard scramble to set
up his winning scoring
strike that kept LSU
(9-3, 5-3 Southeastern
Conference) alive for a
fourth-straight 10-win
campaign.
Brandon Allen com-
pleted two touch-
down passes to tight
end Hunter Henry, the
second giving Arkan-
sas (3-9, 0-8) a 27-21
lead that stood most
of the fourth quarter.
But Jennings' heroics
extended the Razor-
backs' school-record
losing streak to nine
games and ensured Ar-
kansas' first winless re-
cord in the SEC since
joining the conference


BILL HABER / AP
LSU running back Terrence Magee (14) gets into the end zone in front of Arkansas safety
Alan Turner (27) for a touchdown on Friday in Baton Rouge, La.


in 1992.
LSU's defense sealed
up the victory when
cornerback Dwayne
Thomas sacked and
stripped Allen and de-
fensive end Jermauria
Rasco recovered in the
final minute, allowing
Jennings to take a cur-
tain call in kneel on the
ball to run out the clock.
The Tigers first three
scores all came on long
runs. Terrence Magee
had TDs of 29 and 23
yards in the first and
Jeremy Hill broke loose
for a 52-yarder in the
third quarter. Hill fin-
ished with 145 yards
on 20 carries.
Junior receiver Jar-
vis Landry caught eight
passes for 113 yards in
what may have been
his final game in Tiger
Stadium, including an
awkward, leaping cir-
cus catch from behind


a defender to set up a
field goal that cut Ar-
kansas' lead to 27-24
with about 5 minutes
to go. The catch came
on the 32-yard pass that
Mettenberger delivered
just as hit low and twist-
ed underneath a de-
fender and blocker.
Mettenberger, a se-
nior, finished 14 of 22
passing for 156 yards,
becoming the third
QB in LSU history to
eclipse 3,000 yards in a
season.
Allen completed 19
of 29 passes for 178
yards.
Arkansas, a more-
than three-TD under-
dog, led 17-14 at half-
time and increased its
lead on Zach Hocker's
field goal in the third
quarter, which was set
up by Alan Turner's in-
terception of Metten-
berger's overthrow that


was tipped by Landry.
LSU regained the
lead on Hill's touch-
down, but Arkansas
responded with a 15-
play, 75-yard drive that
ended with Henry's
second TD catch.
Early in the fourth
quarter, LSU was in-
side the Arkansas 20.
But on fourth-and-2,
coach Les Miles kept
the offense on the field
instead of trying a field
goal, and Mettenberg-
er's pass to Hill went
for only 1 yard, leaving
the Tigers' deficit at six
with 9:20 left.
Early on, it looked
like LSU was on its way
to the type of romp
odd makers expect-
ed. The Tigers forced
a quick punt, then
marched 70 plays on
their first possession
to take a 7-0 lead Ma-
gee's first score.


DAILY COMMERCIAL





DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, November 30, 2013


SKIING


Vonn trains, eyes her


return to 'Lake Lindsey'


PAT GRAHAM
AP Sports Writer
VAIL, Colo. Lind-
sey Vonn is energized
by her progress in re-
covering from a knee
injury and might be in
the starting gate next
week in Canada.
Vonn spoke with
The Associated Press
on Friday after three
early super-G train-
ing runs. This was her
first big test since she
crashed during train-
ing at Copper Moun-
tain last week and
partially tore a recon-
structed ligament in
her right knee.
"Definitely, I'm en-
couraged," she said.
"It's looking a lot bet-
ter than everyone ex-
pected. Things are go-
ing well."


Wearing a brightly
colored jacket over her
speed suit, the reign-
ing Olympic down-
hill champion took
an easy opening run
through the course on
a crisp morning.
On her second pass,
Vonn got a little more
aggressive, picking
up more speed as she
glided down the hill.
For her third and final
run, she opened it up
even more to see how
her knee responded.
"So far, so good,"
she said after her
workout.
So much so she re-
mains hopeful she
might race in Alber-
ta next week. Asked
about her readiness
for Lake Louise, Vonn
said: "I'm not sure yet.
As it looks right now,


yeah."
She concedes there's
plenty more work to
do to get into shape.
"I'm taking it day by
day. I'm not pushing
it that hard yet," Vonn
said. "Today, I was just
kind of feeling it out.
But the last run was
better. It was more like
normal. I'm skiing in
my clothes and seeing
how things go so far.
I'm not taking unnec-
essary risks yet."
Some say Vonn
shouldn't push so
soon, especially with
the Sochi Games not
until February.
"Because I want
to start in Lake Lou-
ise," Vonn said of a
course she dominates
so much it's known as
"Lake Lindsey."


AP FILE PHOOTF
In this Dec. 7, 2011 file photo, Lindsey Vonn kneels down in front of the podium after
winning the women's World Cup Super G ski competition in Beaver Creek, Colo. Vonn is
looking forward to a return to the slopes in the Canadian event next week in Alberta.





It's their Holiday too...


NBA


MARK BLINCH /THE CANADIAN PRESS
Miami Heat's LeBron James, center, is guarded byToronto Raptors'Terrence Ross, back left,
Tyler Hansbrough, center left, Kyle Lowry, center right, and Rudy Gay during the first half of
an NBA basketball game on Friday in Toronto.


LeBron scores 27 as


Heat beat Baptors 90


IAN HARRISON
Associated Press
TORONTO LeB-
ron James scored 27
points, Dwyane Wade
had 22 and the Miami
Heat won their ninth
straight game, beating
the Toronto Raptors 90-
83 on Friday.
Ray Allen and Mi-
chael Beasley each
scored seven points
and Chris Bosh fouled
out with four points as
the Heat won their 13th
straight over the Rap-
tors and their seventh
straight in Toronto. Mi-
ami has not lost to the
Raptors since Jan. 27,
2010.
DeMar DeRozan
scored 25 points and
Rudy Gay had 21 points
and 11 rebounds for
the Raptors, who lost
their second straight.
Kyle Lowry had 15 for
Toronto.
Miami called time-


out after back-to-back
baskets by Lowry and
DeRozan cut it to 83-
79 with 5:24 left in the
fourth quarter.
After DeRozan
missed a pair of free
throws, Gay grabbed
the rebound and scored
on a layup, cutting it to
83-81. James respond-
ed with a 3, pushing the
lead to five, and Toron-
to missed its next four
shots.
Gay had a chance
to end the scoring
drought when he went
to the free throw line
with 1:37 to play, but
missed both attempts.
James answered with a
layup, pushing the lead
to seven.
Toronto made just
two of 10 free throw
attempts in the final
quarter.
James' only points in
the first came on a re-
verse slam dunk, but
Wade and Chalmers


-83


each had six for the
Heat, who led 27-22 af-
ter one.
James scored eight in
the second, including a
pair of alley-oop dunks,
and Chalmers also had
eight as Miami took a
57-43 lead at halftime.
A fast-break dunk by
James put Miami up
74-54 with 5:13 left in
the third, but the rap-
tors closed the quarter
on a 16-4 run, making it
78-70 heading into the
fourth.
Toronto's Tyler Hans-
brough needed two
stitches to close a cut
over his left eye in the
first half, but he was
able to return.
The Heat enjoyed
Thanksgiving dinner
at James' Ohio home
on Thursday.... Quin-
cy Acy returned for To-
ronto after missing the
past three games with a
sore right ankle.


COLLEGE BASKETBALL


Johnson leads No. 4 Arizona


past No. 6 Duke 72-66


Step u 'th efir Pla teE...

Please Donate.
Lake Cares Food Pantry is helping our neighbors by distributing
everything a family will need to prepare a holiday dinner this year.

Your donation of $50.00 can feed a family of 4. Please help
make their holidays special by putting "Food on the Table".

Help us reach our goal to provide 400 families
with food for the holidays!
"In Honor of' Cards are available for your holiday gift list.


Lake Cares Food Pantry
2001 W. Old Hwy Ste.l1
Mount Dora, Fl. 32757
352-383-0100
www.LakeCares.org


N a.e'
CA r


JIM O'CONNELL
AP Basketball Writer
NEW YORK Nick
Johnson scored all but
two of his 15 points in
the second half and
No. 4 Arizona beat No.
6 Duke 72-66 on Friday
night in the champion-
ship game of the NIT
Season Tip-Off.
The game was ex-
pected to be a matchup
of two of the best fresh-
men in the country and,
although Aaron Gordon
of Arizona and Jabari
Parker of Duke didn't
spend a lot of time cov-
ering each other, they
were both key factors in
the outcome.
Gordon, the quiet
forward, finished with
10 points and seven re-


JASON DECROW/AP
Arizona's Aaron Gordon (11) and Kaleb Tarczewski (35)
react after a basket by Rondae Hollis-Jefferson (23) against
Duke during the second half in the championship of the NIT
Season Tip-off tournament on Friday, in New York. Arizona
won 72-66.


bounds and came up
big late with a dunk on
an alley-oop pass and
then fed Rondae Hol-
lis-Jefferson for a dunk


less than a minute lat-
er to give the Wildcats
(7-0) a 61-51 lead with
3:59 to play
Parker, who had
19 points for his first
game with fewer than
20 points this season,
struggled against Ari-
zona's physical defense
and was 7 of 21 from
the field. He came into
the game shooting 60
percent from the field.
The victory gave Ari-
zona its fourth NIT Sea-
son Tip-Off title, tying
Duke for the most ever.
Johnson, the Wild-
cats' leading scorer at
17.3 per game, shook
off a quiet first half to
become the focal point
of Arizona's offense.


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 30, 2013




Saturday, November 30, 2013


GOLF


ROB GRIFFITH / AP
Adam Scott of Australia, right, and fellow countrymen Jason Day take shelter from the
rain behind their umbrellas on Friday during the second round of the Australian Open golf
tournament in Sydney, Australia.


Scott holds 2nd-round



lead at Australian Open


COLLEGE BASKETBALL


Gardner, Marquette beat


George Washington 76-60


Associated Press
FULLERTON, Calif. Davante
Gardner scored 20 points and had
nine rebounds to lead No. 25 Mar-
quette to a 76-60 victory over George
Washington University on Friday in
the semis of the Wooden Legacy.
Marquette (5-2) used a 12-2 run
early in the first half to build a dou-
ble-digit lead, and never trailed.
The Colonials (5-1) tried to stage
a couple of comebacks in the sec-


ond half but never got any closer
than 12 points in the second half.
George Washington hurt itself by
shooting just 35 percent from the floor,
and making just 15 of 25 free throws.
Gardner had 14 of his game-high
20 points, when the Golden Eagles
built a 21-point halftime lead.
The Colonials were led by Kethan
Savage and Maurice Creek, who
scored 15 and 14 points, respec-
tively.





Pol, C VO LET


Associated Press
SYDNEY Adam
Scott held a two-shot ad-
vantage over Rory Mcll-
roy as the tournament's
star players moved to
the top of the Australian
Open leaderboard at
Royal Sydney on Friday.
Scott shot 2-un-
der-par 70 for a two-
round total of 12-under
132. Mcllroy, playing
in the morning and
avoiding the rain and
storms that later hit the
course, had a 65.
Scott and Mcllroy will
play together on Satur-
day in the third round.
"It was always going
to be a day where you
just had to hang on,"
Scott said of the tough
conditions. "He (McIl-
roy) is one of the best
players in the world
so I'm going to have to
bring my best game."
Australian Richard
Green shot 66 and was
three strokes behind
Scott, who is trying
to add the Australian
Open to his Australian
PGA and Australian
Masters titles to be-
come the second play-
er to capture the Tri-
ple Crown of Australian
majors.
Mcllroy felt lucky to
have escaped the wors-
ening conditions.
"The weather wasn't as
bad as we thought it was
going to be and the wind
didn't pick up," he said.
"So I knew we could take
advantage of that, and
the greens were a little


bit softer as well."
Defending champi-
on Peter Senior had an
81 Friday and did not
make the cut.
Kevin Streelman,
who played with Matt
Kuchar in the Ameri-
can team at last week's
World Cup, retired on
the fourth hole due to
an eye infection. Play-
ing for the first time in
Australia, he was lat-
er taken to hospital for
treatment.
Streelman, play-
ing with Scott and Ja-
son Day, shot 70 in the
opening round Thurs-
day and began Friday's
round with a birdie.
But as his eye condi-
tion worsened, he had
a 5 on the par-3 third
and a bogey on the par-
4 fourth before decid-
ing to retire.
"I've been trying to
do some drops but I
started getting dizzy
and it's the first time


I've ever (withdrawn) at
a tournament... I'm re-
ally sad to do it."
Streelman won the
PGA Tour's Tampa Bay
Championship in March
and finished second
with Kuchar behind Day
and Scott in the team
event at the World Cup
at Royal Melbourne.
EUROPEAN TOUR
MALELANE, South
Africa-Charl Schwart-
zel and Morten Orum
Madsen share the lead
after two rounds at the
European Tour's Alfred
Dunhill Champion-
ship.
Defending champi-
on Schwartzel shot a
second straight 4-un-
der 68 on Friday to join
Madsen on 8-under
136 at Leopard Creek in
northern South Africa.
Denmark's Madsen
added a 71 to his open-
ing-round 65 to stay
on course for a second
straight title.


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Donna Weinheimer, the owner of
Out of the Blue Half Moon Retreat,
has been serving Lake County since
1990 as a Martial Arts Instructor,
Nutritional, Spiritual and Holistic
Counselor and Massage Therapist.


DE-stress, relax and rejuvenate with any one or combinations
of our signature holistic and spa treatments. We offer you;
Native Hot Stone Therapy, Cellulite Reduction and Body
Shaping with Pure Light Slim LED Technology, Clay Body
Wraps, Swedish, Deep Tissue, Shiatsu, Reflexology, Detox
Lymphatic Drainage, Aroma Therapy, and several different
types of Energy Therapies.
I specialize in integration of holistic therapy's for cancer
patients. Integration is not alternative. Integration is
combining Holistic treatments with standard medical
treatments that complement each other. Some of our
integrated treatments are; Visualization, Nutrition, Massage,
Stress Reduction, Detoxification and Counseling.
Out of the Blue is located in Groveland 2 miles south of Lake
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for your workshops, meetings or private get together, please
call for details.
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www.outofthebluehalfmoonretreat.com


DAILY COMMERCIAL








Moreno making most of his second chance


ARNIE STAPLETON
AP Pro Football Writer
ENGLEWOOD, Colo.
- During his two-month
banishment for fumbling,
Knowshon Moreno prom-
ised himself if he ever got
another shot, he'd let nei-
ther the opportunity nor the
football slip through his fin-
gers again.
He's had 389 touches since
that fateful fumble in Atlan-
ta inWeek 2 last year and he's
gotten up with the football
in his hands all 389 times.
"I just think it's that im-
portant to him, this team,
this game," Denver running
backs coach Eric Studesville
said. "He plays this game in a
way that I absolutely love be-
cause it's every bit of who he
is, and he gives you every bit
of what he has."
It's a lesson his three young
backups are learning them-
selves as they try to put fum-
bling issues aside so they
can take the load off Moreno
and help the Broncos (9-2)
balance out their high-pow-
ered offense.
Moreno's ball security was
never more pronounced
than last Sunday night at
frigid New England, where
the football looked like a
frozen turkey in everyone's
hands but his.
Moreno set career highs
with 37 carries for 224 yards
before leaving Gillette Sta-
dium in a walking boot after
bruising his right ankle on
his longest run, an 18-yard-
er in overtime.
"It's a shame we lost that
game because that was one
of the better performances
I've seen by a running back,"
offensive coordinator Adam


STEPHAN SAVOIA/ AP
Denver Broncos running back Knowshon Moreno (27) runs against the New England Patriots in the second
quarter on Sunday in Foxborough, Mass.


Gase said.
Moreno, who ditched the
boot and crutches by mid-
week, looked sharp and
smooth at practice late in the
week. He said he's ready to
start in Sunday's showdown
at Kansas City between 9-2
teams vying for first place in
the AFC West.
"My body feels really
good," Moreno said Friday,
showing no lingering effects
of his heavy workload aside
from the bright red scrapes
on his elbows.
Finally living up to his sta-
tus as a first-round pick out
of Georgia in 2009, More-
no is a leading contender for
Comeback Player of the Year.
He leads the AFC with a ca-
reer-high nine TD runs and
his 824 yards rushing are
second in the conference to


Jamaal Charles' 918.
Moreno emerged from
coach John Fox's doghouse
this time a year ago only be-
cause of Willis McGahee's
season-ending knee inju-
ry. He rushed for 510 yards
and three TDs down the
stretch, then caught a touch-
down pass early in the play-
off game against Baltimore
before an injury to his right
knee proved costly.
Behind undersized rook-
ie Ronnie Hillman, the Bron-
cos were unable to run out
the clock in the fourth quar-
ter and lost to the Ravens in
double overtime.
They went out and draft-
ed Montee Ball, the bruising
Badger who set the NCAA
record with 83 touchdowns
at Wisconsin, and Hillman
bulked up to 195 pounds.


The two of them battled in
training camp but made
enough mistakes for More-
no, who is better at picking
up the blitz and holding onto
the football, to win the job.
His coaches take no credit
for his turnaround.
"I wish I could say it was
something that we did or
drills. It wasn't that," Studes-
ville said. "This has been a
credit to him as a young man
to have gone through such
adversity, people saying
things about you, whether
you're not playing, inactive.
And yet, he stayed focused.
He came to work every day,
never complained, was nev-
er an issue, was never neg-
ative and had the patience
and the mental toughness
to stay the course and elim-
inate all the outside noise."


Moreno said not a day
goes by that he doesn't pon-
der ball security, and, there-
fore, job security.
"In the NFL, holding onto
the ball is your livelihood," he
said. "All you can do is block
it all out and on that one play
just make sure you get up
with the ball in your hands."
Once a cautionary tale,
Moreno is now a model run-
ning back, one all the others
on Denver's roster are trying
to emulate.
Hillman was benched a
month ago for fumbling. Ball,
who fumbled just twice in
983 touches in college, has
three fumbles in 83 touch-
es in the pros, including one
that sparked New England's
comeback, after which he
didn't see another snap from
scrimmage.
Instead, it was undrafted
rookie C.J. Anderson giving
Moreno breathers, but he,
too, had a critical fumble on
an exchange in overtime. He
recovered it himself, but that
miscue helped kill a drive
5 yards short of Matt Prat-
er's range for a winning field
goal attempt.
Asked what they've learned
from Moreno, all three back-
ups answered "overcom-
ing adversity" something
they're all trying to do them-
selves now.
"We have no other op-
tions," Gase said. "I mean,
nobody is coming through
that door. At some point one
of these three guys, these
young guys, they have to
step up. We have to be able
to not have 'Know' go 37 car-
ries a game. So one of these
guys has to step up and hold
on to the ball."
Just like Moreno.


J PAT CARTER / AP
Miami Dolphins' Cameron Wake sits on the bench all
alone after an NFL football game on Sunday in Miami
Gardens. The Carolina Panthers won 20-16.


Dolphins, Jets


meet with playoff


lives on the line


DENNIS WASZAK JR.
AP Sports Writer
EAST RUTHER-
FORD, N.J. Mike
Pouncey needs no
rah-rah speeches
or reminders about
how crucial the latest
matchup in the Dol-
phins-Jets rivalry is.
Playoff game in
Week 13? Well, this
one between 5-6
teams is pretty close.
After all, the win-
ner Sunday will walk
out of MetLife Stadi-
um with its postsea-
son hopes still intact.
The loser can start
thinking about next
season.
"We know where we
stand," said Pouncey,
Miami's center. "We
know we can't lose an-
other game."
Both teams are
treating it that way,
and it's no exaggera-
tion. Miami and New
York are part of a
jumbled group of six
teams aiming for the
final AFC playoff spot.


After Baltimore's win
over Pittsburgh on
Thanksgiving, the los-
er between the Dol-
phins and Jets would
be a game back in the
loss column and
each has also been
defeated by the Ra-
vens.
"We're behind the
8-ball and we put
ourselves there,"
Jets linebacker Cal-
vin Pace said. "We're
stuck behind a bunch
of (teams) that are
5-6 and some people
have the tiebreaker
over us, so we have to
win the rest of them."
The Dolphins are
2-2 since the bully-
ing scandal involv-
ing Richie Incognito
and Jonathan Martin
rocked the franchise.
Injuries, inconsistent
play and an offensive
line that has allowed
Ryan Tannehill to be
sacked a franchise-re-
cord 44 times have
made them difficult
to gauge.


Through the toughest times,



Schiano holding Bucs together


FRED GOODALL
Associated Press
TAMPA Greg Schi-
ano's belief in his plan
for turning the Tampa
Bay Buccaneers around
never wavered.
After spending the
first half of the NFL sea-
son looking like a coach
destined to be fired, he
has led the Bucs (3-8)
to three straight victo-
ries and could be on
the verge of saving his
job.
With five Sundays
remaining in his sec-
ond season in Tampa
Bay, no one can be sure
how many more games
he needs to win to en-
sure his return for 2014.
Still, there are signs his
vision for turning the
struggling franchise
around is moving in the
right direction if own-
ership decides to stay
the course.
That's considerably
better than his situa-
tion appeared less than
a month ago, when the
Bucs were 0-8, reeling
from a messy divorce
with quarterback Josh
Freeman and trying to
clean up an even nas-
tier scene in the locker
room following an out-
break of MRSA infec-
tions that brought more
unwanted attention to
the organization.
"There's nothing I
can do about what's
transpired except learn
from it. I don't waste
emotional energy or re-
ally any energy going
back," Schiano said of
the about-face that ac-
tually began with an
overtime loss at Se-


*- F, '"" - *
***"*. -, '.:., > "*> -. m. V - \ *^ ^ t.
,t ,".'' I;'- .. ' .. . . *'*-. ***- "" *-*.' "*^ , W F , " ,

AP FILE PHOTO
Tampa Bay Buccaneers head coach Greg Schiano, left, walks the sidelines during the first
half against the Carolina Panthers in Tampa. After spending the first half of the NFL season
looking like a coach destined to be fired, he's led the Bucs to three straight victories.


attle, which owns the
league's top record.
"We try to learn from it
as we go and then put
it behind us and move
forward, so that's really
where we are now."
The Bucs built a 21-0
lead over the Seahawks
only to fall 27-24 in OT.
It was the fourth time
this season they'd let
a game slip away after
leading in the fourth
quarter, however the
performance on the
road against a quali-
ty opponent dispelled
the notion that Schiano
had lost the support of
his players.
Beating Miami, Atlan-


ta and Detroit the past
three weeks has bol-
stered his chances of
keeping his job. The fact
he has turned the tide
while playing a rookie
quarterback and a cadre
of young, no-names fill-
ing in for injured and/or
suspended starters sup-
ports the belief of some
that he has already
saved himself.
Schiano, lured from
Rutgers after the 2011
season, said patience
and sticking with his
plan for making the
Bucs relevant again is
paying off.
"I think everybody
kind of collectively tak-


ing a breath to just keep
going," Schiano said.
The steady, if unspec-
tacular, play of quarter-
back Mike Glennon has
been one of the keys. The
third-round draft pick
out of North Carolina
has started eight games
since replacing Free-
man, a 4,000-yard pass-
er a year ago who was
benched and subse-
quently released after
struggling the first three
weeks of the season.
Helped by the
re-emergence of a pro-
ductive running game,
Glennon has thrown
for 10 touchdowns with
just one interception.


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 30, 2013




Saturday, November 30, 2013


Loo hee frmavaretyofmxciingne
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1 1V





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MUSIC MINISTER FRMT DESK MA, LPN &
Grand Island Baptist IFION D RA IOL
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Apply at 3793 Pepper Tree Lane
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l~eeG S ri~nyUO Email: jamlung@
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MARINE f
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MGR. FT tuiNA DENTAL
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Experienced in boat to work with Childrene ASSISTANT
parts, accessories, with Medical Needs.
phones & cash drawer. Pediatric Day Experienced only.
Email resume to: Health Facility $15/hr.
SharonNobles@ Call 352-360-0137 or Fax resume to:
NoblesMarine.com Fax resume to: 352-787-9036
DFWP/EOE 352-360-1082 NO PHONE CALLS


December 4th 1pm-4pm
Lake Harris Health at
Lake Port Square
701 Lake Port Blvd. Leesburg
Interviews will be conducted
on site for:
*Nursing
*Dining Services
*Security
Stop by if you are interested
in joining the Brookdale
Community.


BARTENDER &
SERVER'S FT
MUST be exp'd.
Evenings &Wknds.
Apply in person
3-5pm
Vic's Embers
Supper Club
7940 US Hwy. 441
Leesburg, FL


4IUNmIES
Busy medical office
has the following
openings available FT:
*CT Technologist Must be
FL registered & have at
least 1 yr. exp.
*Paramedic -ACLS Certified
& able to work shifts
*Basic X-Ray
Tech/Phlebotomist.
Must have experience
performing Dexa Scans
*RN -ACLS certified.
Critical care and cardiac
cath lab exp. preferred.
*MedicalAsst. Phlebotomy
experience helpful.
Benefits are available.
Fax resume 352-323-9507


REGISTERED NURSE
SPECIALIST SURVEYOR
Participants as a team member in
surveys of health care facilities in a
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Citrus, Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist,
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Please apply at:
peoplefirst.myflorida.com
Requisition 68053522
Application Deadline: 12/4/13
Contact Info: Rebecca Hord
386-462-6201


AUTOMOTIVE
DETAILERS
Exp. a +, will train the
right person. Must be
over 21 w/clean driving
record. Must pass
background check.
Apply in person:
Bill Bryan Kia
9039 US Hwy. 441,
Leesburg
EOE/DFWP


QUALIFIED CDL A
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paid holidays &
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Call for more details.
800-456-2336 X 114


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looking for an organized,
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Apply at
Lake Eustis Care Center
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411 W. Woodward Ave.
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Online amauger@gchc.com
Or Fax 352-357-2874
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COME JOIN DIETARY AIDE/ MEDICAL
OUR TEAM! COOK RECEPTIONIST
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DAILY COMMERCIAL


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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 30, 2013








Faith


Life


352-365-8208 I features@dailycommercial.com


Cl
DAILY COMMERCIAL
Saturday, November 30, 2013


www.dailycommercial.com


CHURCH CALENDAR
TODAY
WILDWOOD COUNTRY FAIR AT WILD-
WOOD UNITED METHODIST CHURCH:
From 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., at the church,
300 Mason St., with Christian per-
forming artist Norman Lee Schaffer
as the musical guest. Churches, aid
groups and help agencies will be part
of the free event. Face painting, and
games for all ages. Call 352-748-1275
for information.
SUNDAY
WORLD AIDS DAY INTERFAITH PRAYER
SERVICE: At 7 p.m., at the Catholic
Community of St. Paul, 1330 Sunshine
Avenue in Leesburg, showing sup-
port for people living with HIV and
to commemorate people who have
died of the disease. Refreshments and
fellowship follow the service. For in-
formation, please call 352-787-6354.
CELEBRATE THE ARTS CONCERT: Fea-
turing a group of eight singers in
authentic Dickens era costumes to
usher in the holiday season with the
"Caroling Company" at First United
Methodist Church, Tavares. Free ad-
mission. Call 352-343-2761 for details.
CORPUS CHRISTI EPISCOPAL
CHURCH ADDS SECOND WORSHIP SER-
VICE: At 4 p.m., 3430 County Road
470, Okahumpka.
MONDAY
FAIRWAY CHRISTIAN CHURCH SIN-
GLES GOTO OAKWOOD GRILL: At 6 p.m.
For details, call 352-259-9305.
TUESDAY
TRI-COUNTY INTERFAITH ALLIANCE
HOSTS MUSIC AND ART PROGRAM:
From 7 to 9 p.m., at The Villages
United Church of Christ, 12514 State
Road 101, Oxford. Event includes a
religious symbols design workshop.
For details, call Janet Onnie at 941-
323-8513.
THURSDAY
CELEBRATE HANUKKAH AT THE W.T.
BLAND PUBLIC LIBRARY: At 4:30 p.m.,
1995 N. Donnelly St., Mount Dora.
Rabbi Geoff Solomon will talk about
Hanukkah and its customs. For infor-
mation, call 352-735-7180.
MOUNT DORA JAZZ ORCHESTRA PER-
FORMS: At 7 p.m., with a "Swingin'
Christmas" at St. Edward's Episcopal
Church, 460 N. Grandview St., Mount
Dora. Call 352-383-2832 for details.
Faith offering received.
FRIDAY
HOLIDAY GRIEF SHARE CLASS HELD
AT FAIRWAY CHRISTIAN CHURCH: From
9:30 to 11:30 a.m., 251 AvenidaLosAn-
gelos, TheVillages. Call 352-259-9305.
THE BELLE CHORDS PERFORM AT
FAIRWAY CHRISTIAN CHURCH: At
6 p.m., at the church, 251 Avenida Los
Angelos, TheVillages. $2 donation at
the door. Call 352-259-9305.
DEC. 7
CHRISTMAS CONCERTS AT FIRST
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH: At 7 p.m.,
Dec. 7, and at 4 p.m., Dec. 8, at the
church, 117 S. Center St., Eustis. Fea-
turing Chancel Choir, Gold Hand-
bell Choir, soloists and orchestra.
Refreshments will be served. Call
352-357-2833 for details.


To place a religion event on the cal-
endar, send an email to pam.fenn-
imore@dailycommercial.com.


A RARE CONVERGENCE


PHOTO COURTESY OF ED ZIEGLER
Geri Rittberg, right, a member of Temple Shalom, prepares to light the Menorah at a Hanukkah lighting ceremony in The Villages.


Hanukkah began the night before

Thanksgiving for the first time since 1888


LIVI STANFORD I Staff Writer
livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com
A rare convergence happened
this Hanukkah for the first
time since 1888: the holiday,
which means "rededication" in
Hebrew and is celebrated through
Dec. 4, began the night before
Thanksgiving.
"The next time it will occur will
not be in our lifetime, our chil-
dren's lifetimes or our grandchil-
dren's lifetimes and beyond," said


Sheldon Skurow, spiritual leader
for Temple Shalom in a recent in-
terfaith ceremony in The Villages.
"The reason is because the Jewish
calendar is very slowly getting out
of sync with the solar calendar at a
rate of four days per 1,000 years."
The next time Hanukkah will
overlap with Thanksgiving will be
in the year 2146, Skurow said.
Jews locally reflected on the
convergence of the two holidays
known as Thanksgivukkah.


"Unlike the holidays of Purim
and Passover, which are about
physical persecution and potential
destruction, Hanukkah is about re-
ligious and spiritual persecution,"
said Marlene Honigstein, ritual
chairperson of Temple Shalom, a
congregation with more than 600
members in Oxford. "The victory is
one of religious freedom."
Similarly, Honigstein said
Thanksgiving originated with the
SEE HANUKKAH I C3


Pope ramps up charity


office to be near poor, sick


NICOLEWINFIELD
Associated Press
VATICAN CITY When he
was archbishop of Buenos Ai-
res, Pope Francis was known
to sneak out at night and break
bread with the homeless, sit
with them on the street and eat
with them, as part of his aim to
share the plight of the poor and
let them know someone cared.
That's not so easy to do now
that he's pope. But Francis is
still providing one-on-one dos-
es of emergency assistance to
the poor, sick and aged through
a trusted archbishop. Konrad
Krajewski is the Vatican Almo-
ner, a centuries-old job of hand-
ing out alms and Francis has
ramped up the job to make it a
hands-on extension of his own
personal charity.
As Americans gathered for
Thanksgiving on Thursday, Kra-
jewski described how Francis
has redefined the little known
office of papal almoner and ex-
plained the true meaning of
giving during a chat with jour-
nalists over coffee and pastries


a few steps from the Vatican
gates.
"The Holy Father told me at
the beginning: 'You can sell
your desk. You don't need it.
You need to get out of the Vat-
ican. Don't wait for people to
come ringing. You need to go
out and look for the poor,'" Kra-
jewski said.
Krajewski gets his marching
orders each morning: A Vati-
can gendarme goes from the
Vatican hotel where Francis
lives to Krajewski's office
across the Vatican gar-
dens, bringing a bundle
of letters that the pope
has received from the
faithful asking for
help. On the top of /
each letter, Fran-
cis might write
"You know what jl|
to do" or "Go find
them" or "Go talk
to them."
And so Don Cor-
rado, as he likes to be
called, hits the streets
SEE POPE C2


More on how Paul helped the Ephesians dress for success


we've been observing
how Paul helped the
Ephesians dress for
success spiritually. We
began four weeks ago with
the belt of truth, on which
everything hangs. Next,
he told them to put on the
breastplate of righteousness
followed by the feet and
sharing the gospel of peace.
Last week we look at the
shield, probably the most
important piece of armor
for a Roman soldier, Paul's
model in this example.
Paul advised the Ephe-
sians, "In all circumstanc-


~1


Rick
Reed
REFLECTIONS


es take up the shield of faith,
with which you can extin-
guish all the flaming darts of
the evil one."
Faith is of extreme impor-
tance.
It is our ultimate piece
of armor in ALL circum-
stances. Faith can smother


all the flaming arrows of the
devil.
Faith is defined in He-
brews as, "the assurance of
things hoped for, the con-
viction of things not seen."
Christians are told to walk
by faith, not by sight.
We're told in the Old and
New Testaments the righ-
teous will live by faith.
While faith may be un-
seen, its manifestation is.
Of the more than 270
times faith is used, almost
250 of those are in the New
Testament. Faith moves
from trust in the unseen


God (Yahweh) in the Old
Testament to belief in and
active submission to the
person of Jesus, God in hu-
man form, in the New Tes-
tament.
While the word faith isn't
used much in the Old Testa-
ment, the results were cer-
tainly visible.
Let's go back to Hebrews
11, the "Hall of Faith."
It begins, "Now faith is the
assurance of things hoped
for, the conviction of things
not seen. For by it the peo-
ple of old received their
commendation. By faith we


understand that the uni-
verse was created by the
word of God, so that what
is seen was not made out of
things that are visible"
Though mentioned only
27 times in the Old Testa-
ment, many men and wom-
en of those days were com-
mended for the way they
showed their faith and trust
in God and His promises by
their actions.
By faith Abel offered to
God a better sacrifice than
his brother Cain, and we're
SEE REED I C3




DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 30, 2013


POPE
FROM PAGE C1

of Rome and beyond.
He visits homes for the
elderly in the name of the
pope, writes checks to the
needy in the name of the
pope even traveled to
the island of Lampedusa in
the name of the pope after
a migrant boat capsized last
month, killing more than
350 people.
Over four days on Lampe-
dusa, Krajewski bought 1,600
phone cards so the survivors
could call loved ones back
home in Eritrea to let them
know they had made it. He
also prayed with police div-
ers as they worked to raise
the dead from the sea floor.
"This is the concept: Be
with people and share their


lives, even for 15,30 minutes,
an hour," Krajewski said. The
former Cardinal Jorge Mario
Bergoglio "would go out at
night in Buenos Aires, not
just to find people, talk with
them, or buy them some-
thing to eat ... He would eat
with them. He would sit with
them and eat with them on
the street. This is what he
wants from me."
The existence of the Vat-
ican Almoner dates back
centuries: It is mentioned
in a papal bull from the
13th-century Pope Innocent
III, and Pope GregoryX, who
ruled from 1271-1276, orga-
nized it into an official Holy
See office for papal charity.
Until Krajewski came
along, the almoner was typ-
ically an aging Vatican dip-
lomat who was serving his
final years before being al-
lowed to retire at age 75.


Francis changed all that,
tapping the 50-year-old Pole
who had been a close assis-
tant to Pope John Paul II in
his final years, to be a more
vigorous, hands-on exten-
sion of himself.
Krajewski has also enlisted
others to help out: Off-duty
Swiss Guards now get called
into duty, helping drive
a stranded person home,
or recently helping to box
27,000 rosaries that Francis
handed out to the general
public one recent Sunday as
"spiritual medicine."
Krajewski demurred when
asked if Francis himself had
slipped out of the Vatican on
his own "Next question!"
he said. But there was a clear
suggestion that the pope
may very well have snuck
out before Vatican security
got wind of it.
The almoner's duties are


two-fold: carrying out acts of
charity and raising the mon-
ey to fund them.
Krajewski's office funds
its work by producing pa-
pal parchments, hand-made
certificates with a photo of
the pope that the faithful can
buy for a particular occasion
- say a wedding, baptism or
priestly ordination with
the name of the recipient
and an apostolic blessing
written in calligraphy.
The parchments range
from eight euros ($11) to
30 euros ($40) apiece, plus
shipping and handling. All
proceeds go directly to the
works of charity. Last year,
the office spent 1 million eu-
ros ($1.4 million) on 6,500
requests for help. Krajewski
says the numbers will likely
have doubled this year.
The amounts given out ar-
en't high: Recently Krajews-


ki sent a check for 200 euros
($270) to an elderly wom-
an from Venice who wrote
to Francis lamenting that a
pickpocket had stolen 54 eu-
ros ($75) from her.
Larger and longer-term
charity works are handled
by the Vatican's interna-
tional Caritas federation or
Cor Unum, a Vatican office.
The almoner, Krajewski ex-
plained, is more a "first aid"
charity station: quick, small
doses of help that don't re-
quire bureaucratic hurdles,
but are nevertheless heartfelt
and something of a sacrifice.
"Being an almoner, it has
to cost me something so
that it can change me," he
said. He contrasted such
alms-giving with, say, the
unnamed cardinal who once
boasted about always giving
two euros to a beggar on the
street near the Vatican.


Gift


WVith the beginning of Advent we begin to think of Christmas
and the gift the Heavenly Father shared with us...his Son Jesus. As
we enter the holiday season we can consider what gifts we can share
to brighten the lives of others. A gift can have great or little value,
depending on our resources; it's the thought that counts. Even if
it's only a smile, we all have something we can thankfully share
each day. At your house of worship this week, think about God's
greatest gift and prepare your minds and hearts for the miracle of
Christmas.
Weekly Scripture Reading
Matthew Matthew Matthew Psalm Psalm Psalm Psalm
24.29-44 25.1-13 25.31-46 24 29 81 84
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490 S Old Wire Rd. Wildwood 3521748-3322

Buyers FUNERAL
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Locally Owned and Operated
Leesburg Lady Lake
Umalilla Astor


Dunstan & Son Plumbing Co., Inc.
.I2I PLUMBING REPAIR & REMODELING
Est. 1922 CF C057100
(352) 787-4771
1127 W. Main St., Leesburg
John W. Snyder. President


U Ceront 19Lesbu*


Liberty Baptist Church
11043 True Life Way, Clermont
352-394-0708
Senior Pastor Chris Johnson
Sun. Svc. 10:40am, Family Prayer Svc. 6:00pm
Unashamed Students Service 6:00pm
Sun. Bible Fellowship 9:30am
Wed. Bible Study 6:30pm,
Kids 4 Truth Clubs 6:30pm
Groups for all ages, Nursery provided all services
www.lbcclermont.org



First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Grove and Lemon Avenues, Eustis
352-357-3899
Sunday Service 10:30am
Sunday School 10:30am
Wednesday Testimonial Meeting 12:15pm
Christian Science Reading Room
108 E. Magnolia Ave., Eustis
First United Methodist
Church of Eustis
"A Place where You Matter"
600 S. Grove Street, Eustis
352-357-5830
Senior Pastor Beth Farabee
Coffee and Fellowship 9:00am
Contemporary Worship 9:30am
Traditional Worship 11:00am

St. Thomas Episcopal Church
317 S. Mary St., Eustis (corner S. Mary &
Lemon St.)
352-357-4358
Rev. John W. Lipscomb III, Rector
Sunday Holy Eucharist Services
8:00am & 10:30am
Adult Sunday School 9:20am,
Children's Chapel
Thurs. Holy Eucharist & Healing Service
10:00am
www.stthomaseustis.com



LIFE Church Assembly of God
04001 Picciola Rd., Fruitland Park
352-787-7962
Pastor Rick Welborne
Sunday Deaf Impaired 10:00am
Sunday Evening 6:00pm
Wednesday Prayer and Youth Service
7:00pm
Sunday School 9:00am
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm

Pilgrims' United Church of Christ (UCC)
509 County Road 468, Fruitland Park
www.pucc.info
352-365-2662 or office@pucc.info
Rev. Ronal Freyer Nicholas, OSL, Pastor
Rev. Robert Van Valkenburg,
Pastoral Associate Emeritus
Inclusive Progressive
Sunday Worship 10:00am
Contact us or visit our website for
more info



Mt. Olive Missionary
Baptist Church
15641 Stucky Loop, Stucky
(West of Mascotte)
352-429-3888
Rev. Clarence L. Southall-Pastor
Sunday Worship Service 11:00am
Sunday School 9:30am
Bible Study-Wednesday 7:00pm
Youth Bible Study-Wednesday 7:00pm


Bethany Lutheran Church
1334 Griffin Road, Leesburg
352-787-7275
Sunday Service 8:00am & 10:30am
Cont. Praise Thursday Service 6:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 10:00am
Sunday Bible Study 9:15am

Emmanuel Baptist Church of
Leesburg
1710 U.S. Hwy. 441 E., Leesburg
352-323-1588
Pastor Jeff Carney
Sunday Celebration Service 10:30am
Wednesday Men's Prayer Breakfast
8:00am
Wednesday Praise & Prayer 6:30pm
Sunday Bible Study 9:15am
Wednesday Epic Youth Ministry 6:30pm
www.EmmanuelFL.com

First Baptist Leesburg
220 N. 13th St., Leesburg
352-787-1005
Sunday Service 8:15am, 9:30am
& 10:45am
Sunday Bible Study 8:15am,
9:30am & 10:45am
Wednesday Night Activities 6:00pm
www.fbcleesburg.org

First Church of Christ,
Scientist, Leesburg
13th & Line St., Leesburg
352-787-1921
Sunday Service 10:30am
Sunday School 10:30am
Wednesday School 3:30pm

Gloria Dei Lutheran Church
130 S. Lone Oak Drive, Leesburg
352-787-3223
Pastor Roy Stackpole
Sunday Worship October-April
8:00am & 10:30am
Sunday Worship May-September
9:15am
Christian Education October-April
9:15am
www.lutheransonline.com/gloriadeifla

Lakes and Hills Covenant Church
Rev. Ken Folmsbee, PhD, Pastor
Worship Service 10:15am
Bible Study 9:00am
@ Women's Club of Leesburg
700 S. 9th Street, Leesburg
Church Office
106 S. Palm Ave., Howie-in-the-Hills
352-552-0052
www.lakeshillscovenantchurch.org

Seventh Day Adventist
508 S. Lone Oak Dr., Leesburg
352-326-4109
Worship Service 9:30am
Sabbath School Service 11:00am
Wednesday Prayer Meeting 7:00pm

The Healing Place
1012 W Main Street, Leesburg
352-617-0569
Facilitator: Phyllis Gilbert
Sunday Service and Kids Club 11:00am
Wednesday Bible Study and
Kids Club 6:00pm
(Nursey open for all services)
"Come as you are and leave different!"


Congregational Church
650 N. Donnelly St., Mount Dora
352-383-2285
Reverand Dr. Richard Don
Sunday 11:00am
(Communion 1st Sunday of the month)
Monday Bible Study 9:00am & 6:00pm
St. Philip Lutheran Church
1050 Boyd Drive, Mt. Dora
352-383-5402
Pastor Rev. Dr. Johan Bergh
Sunday Service 9:30am
(Childcare Provided)
Fellowship 10:45am
www.stphiliplc.com


Corpus Christi Episcopal
Church
3430 County Road 470, Okahumpka
352-787-8430
Sunday Eucharist Service 9:00am
Evening Prayer 4:00pm
Fellowship following both services
Thursday Morning Prayer 9:30am
www.corpuschristiepiscopal.org


All Saint's Roman Catholic
Chapel
11433 U.S. 441, River Plaza #11, Tavares
407-391-8678
352-385-3880
Sunday Latin Mass 8:00am & 10:00am

Tavares First United Methodist
Church (UMC)
Corner of Old 441 & SR 19, Tavares
352-343-2761
Pastor John Barham
Traditional Service 9:00am
Contemporary Cafe Service 10:30am
Children of Light-Youth & Family Service
1st Sunday of each month 6:00pm
www.fumctavares.com


The Final Hour Ministries
P.O. Box 523, Webster
847-912-0596
Email: finalhourminitries@ymail.com
Speaking Engagements Contact:
Kingdom Citizen
Apostle Michael White Jr.
Prophetess Wanda White
Church Planting Travel Ministry
Let Us Pray For You Affiliation Cl
www.thefinalhourministries.org

Lighthouse Foundation
Ministries International INC.
11282 SR 471, Webster
352-793-2631
Pastor Patricia T. Burnham
Sunday Services 8:30am & 6:00pm
Thursday Night 7:00pm
3rd Saturday Food Basket Give-A-Way
www.lighthousefoundationministries.org

Linden Church of God
4309 CR 772, Webster
Pastor Doyle D. Glass
Sunday Morning Worship 10:30am
Sunday Evening Worship 6:00pm
Sunday School 9:45am
Wednesday Night (Family Training Hour) 7:00pm


C2


For information on listing your church
on this page call Michelle at

352-365-8233




Saturday, November 30, 2013


Latter-day Saints bishop dresses

as homeless man to teach lesson


Associated Press
AYLORSVILLE, Utah Mem-
bers of a Mormon congregation in a
Salt Lake City suburb encountered
someone they thought was a home-
less man at church on Sunday. What
they did not know was the man was a
bishop for The Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter-day Saints.
At least five people asked David
Musselman to leave the church prop-
erty in Taylorsville, some gave him
money and most were indifferent.
He said he disguised himself as a
homeless man to teach his congre-
gation a lesson about compassion.


REED
FROM PAGE C1

told that through his
faith, though dead, he
still speaks.
We're told about
Enoch, who taken
to Heaven so that he
should not see death
because he was God's
friend. And then there's
Noah. Talk about faith
in action, he built an
ark, even though it had
never rained before the
Flood.
Of course, Abraham
is in the Hall of Faith
and so is his wife Sar-
ah who had a son way
past the age it was hu-
manly possible. By
faith Abraham, offered
up that son Isaac.
Space doesn't permit
telling about Isaac and
Joseph and Moses and
Rahab, a prostitute,
and Gideon, Barak,
Samson, Jephthah, Da-
vid and Samuel.
These were not nec-
essarily stellar, strong
and perfect peo-
ple. Samson had ev-
erything to be God's
greatest servant, but
his pride and plea-


To make his appearance more con-
vincing, he contacted a Salt Lake
City makeup artist to transform his
familiar face to that of a stranger not
even his family recognized.
"The main thing I was trying to get
across was we don't need to be so
quick to judge," Musselman said.
He received varied reactions to his
appearance at church, he said.
"I'd approach them and say, 'Hap-
py Thanksgiving.' Many of them I
wouldn't ask for any food or any kind
of money, and their inability to even
acknowledge me being there was very
surprising," he told the DeseretNews.


sure seeking did him
in. Still, he turned to
God at the end. Gide-
on and Barak couldn't
be called pillars of
strength, yet God was
able to use their mea-
ger faith, because it
was enough for them
to put into motion.
Though they were
used by God we're re-
minded, "All these,
though commended
through their faith, did
not receive what was
promised, since God
had provided some-


thing better for us,
that apart from us they
should not be made
perfect."
Faith, like love, is
nothing until it's put
into action.
Since we have some-
thing better than they
did, shouldn't our faith
be manifested all the
more.
More next week.
Rick Reed is a columnist
who lives in Mount Dora.
To reach him, call 352-383-
1458, or send an email
to ricoh007@aol.com.


HANUKKAH
FROM PAGE C1

Pilgrims, who came to the country,
also for religious freedom.
Hanukkah is celebrated with
family and friends with distinct rit-
uals, Honigstein said.
"Every Hanukkah we eat food
fried in oil such as potato lat-
kes and we play the game of the
Dreidel," she said.
Historically, Jews were forbid-
den to study the Torah, Honigstein
said.
"They used the game of Dreidel
as a decoy for studying," she said.
"The four Hebrew letters on the
Dreidel stands for the words: A
great miracle happened here."
The story of Hanukkah refers to
167BCE when the "Jews ofJudea
(known as the Maccabees) rose up
in revolt against the oppression of
King Antiochus IV Epiphanes of
the Seleucid Empire," according to
information from MylewishLearn-
ing.com.
In particular, the Menorah held
special meaning as a component
of daily service in the Holy Temple,


7 pm
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Dail N ommrdial
"Your First Choice" In-Print & On-Line


according to Chabad.
When the Maccabees liberated
the temple, they only had a suffi-
cient amount of oil to light the me-
norah for one day, but in a testa-
ment to the holiday's theme of "a
festival of miracles," the menorah
stayed lit for eight days.
For eight days, Jews light the Me-
norah and exchange presents each
night.
"When you think of Hanukkah
it comes at the darkest time of the
year and every night we increase
the amount of light," Honigstein
said.
Religious persecution is still hap-
pening today, Honigstein noted.
"In Syria, they are killing Chris-
tians," she said.
Helene Ziegler said she enjoys
the holiday and loves the opportu-
nity to give her grandchild, now in
her 20s, eight separate gifts.
Reflecting on the holidays' con-
vergence, Ziegler, who resides in
The Villages, said the two holidays
are similar.
"Hanukkah relates to Thanksgiv-
ing and being grateful," she said.
"They are both holidays where we
give thanks to God."


No matter what time
of the day it is,
you can place
your classified
merchandise ad
online, pay for it and
just wait for the
phone to ring!

Fast, convenient and
on your schedule!


www,,ilycorIrIeiC 1,1, Icorn

*Employment advertisements are excluded.
Please call 352-314-FAST to speak with a customer service rep.
Lake: 352-314-3278 or Sumter: 352-748-1955


LAKE COUNTYUNITE

MOORCCLSTASOCATION, NC


Friday, December 20th

An Evening with

John Sebastian 7pm

Saturday, December 21 st

Christmas Festival

10am-4pm


-Florida


www.dailycommercial.com
ST'H LAKE PREss

RIAWASSEC VETIERINARY CLINIC
m.Ill ad.liI .d t .i.w .l ..iin 1 Ti. nia, y&i tr 1f lln
MIN SOUTH ClAKE
TIinii1 T


~.II*~~o ~i.s, n C0m on


LAKE COUNTY
FLORIDA
OFFICE Of ECONOMIC
DEVELOPENT & TOURISM


Tickets available at
The Florida Scrub-JayTrailhouse
or on the web at scrubjaytrail.org
or by phone (352)-429-5566


"Lake County's
Largest
Motorcycling
Tradition"
Proudly
Contributing
More Than
$185,000
To Date!


X ^KEACJN yT
We 'e;-TOcy *// |
*T.',cjr^ I -.O^,>gJm '/


WE NEED k

SPONSORS! SATURDAY DECEMBER 7, 2013


To Benefit:
Lake/Sumter


The Salvation Army &
Foster Parent Association


FOSTER HOMES NEEDED Contact: 352-873-6332 FOOD NEEDED Contact: 352-365-0079



LIEMSC9 SLETAUCIO

4 DATE: Saturday, December 7,2013
TIME: Sign Up from 9-10:30am
PLACE: Wal-Mart 2501 N Citrus Blvd, Leesburg 32748
ENDING: Gator Harley in Leesburg
(1745 Hwy 441) Food Available
COST: $10.00/person & 1 New Unwrapped Toy
(no stuffed animals please)


Chapter/Club challenge: Trophy given to the top
3 groups with the most participants.
SPONSORS WANTED Call Any Number Below for more info
Chairman, Big Dawg 352-400-0035 Central FL Cruisers Bones 321-689-9138
US Military Vets MC Boomhauer 352-457-6975 ABATE of FL, Inc. Lake Cnty Chapter Griz 352-742-7754
CMA Pilgrim 352-793-3600 American Legion Riders #35 Jan 352-408-0750
Eagle Riders, Eustis Gary M 352-455-7373 Lake County HOG Wayne 352-396-3593
,.,,* Pre-ride prayer & bike blessing Thank you for your continual support.
Blood Mobile will be on site give blood help save a life
w wC mi ned aeIounyI oy nI co


Daifl Comnmeria


DAILY COMMERCIAL


F^SESFSELD
INNSSSs
&arrioll^^^^


I




C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, November 30, 2013


CLERMONT


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Make a child smile this Christmas!
Drop off your toy donation
here at Ford of Clermont!
a MIn7F a


Frr0rii
Ford,':.rea-ih


TRADE-IN MARETPLA


IIIII


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"CLERMONT


C4


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 30, 2013


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QUALITYCHECHJ1 AwhPAT'-
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The Market In Review


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 30, 2013


Auto sales
Analysts project that U.S.
auto sales accelerated in
November to a faster
pace than a year earlier.
J.D. Power and LMC
Automotive expect sales
to have hit a seasonally
adjusted annual rate of
16.1 million in November,
up from 15.4 million in the
same month last year
and far above the 2009
trough of 10.4 million. Automakers are due to report their
latest sales figures on Tuesday.


Selling better?
Sales of previously occupied
homes fell in September and
October. Did sales of newly built
homes follow suit?
Find out on Wednesday, when
the Commerce Department
reports its latest data on new
home sales. The release of
September figures was delayed
due to the partial government
shutdown in October. Economists
expect the government will report
that sales of new homes improved
in September and October.


1,840 ................................. S&P 500 16,200 .......................... Dow Jones industrials
:,,,- ..- Close: 1,805.81 ,,,. Close: 16,086.41
Change: -1.42 (-0.1%) Change: -10.92 (-0.1%)
1,760 ........10 DAYS . 15,840 ........10 DAYS .........

1,8 4 0 .. ........................ ............. ........... ....... .......... ... ...... ... 1 6 ,4 0 0 : ........ .... .......... ... : .. ........... -........... .............. ............

1 ,7 60 ........... ............. ............. ........ ...... 1 6,0 0 0 .. ............. ............. ........... ............. .
15 600 .............. ....
1,680. i ^ / ^^^h

..5,200 ....... .. .... ...............

,6 .........j ...... .......... ............ A S N A........N
1,520-- .. .. v '"...... ..... .. A... "... .......S .........b" ....... ... ..... 14,400 "'; "'" "'."'". ..... ........... A "....... S... g .. ........0"O .............N .....


StocksRecap


Vol. (in mil.)
Pvs. Volume
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows


NYSE NASD

1,515 822
2,575 1,453
1657 1500
1333 936
220 339
15 12


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
16174.51
7273.81
490.19
10229.57
4069.70
1813.55
1310.72
19276.43
1147.00


LOW
16074.14
7229.20
486.72
10174.33
4055.45
1803.98
1304.01
19186.75
1141.62


CLOSE
16086.41
7235.69
487.13
10183.22
4059.89
1805.81
1304.18
19201.96
1142.89


CHG.
-10.92
-19.31
-0.03
+0.23
+15.14
-1.42
-4.53
-8.49
+1.56


%CHG.
-0.07%
-0.27%
-0.01%
...%
+0.37%
-0.08%
-0.35%
-0.04%
+0.14%


YTD
+22.76%
+36.35%
+7.51%
+20.60%
+34.46%
+26.62%
+27.81%
+28.05%
+34.56%


New home sales, in thousands


M J


Unemployment rate report Unemployment rate
Furloughed federal employees
during the partial government 7.5c:
shutdown helped lift the U.S. 7.
jobless rate in October.
Without the 16-day shutdown 7.0 .
as a factor, economists
anticipate that the nation's
unemployment rate dipped back 6.5 .
to 7.2 percent in November. The
latest gauge of unemployment,
due out Friday, will be closely 6.0
watched by the Federal Reserve,


A S U which is weighing when to
source. FactSet reduce its economic stimulus.



Stocks of Local Interest

52-WK RANGE CLOSE


J A 0 U IN
Source. FactSet


YTD 1YR


NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV

AT&T Inc T 32.76 -0-- 39.00 35.21 -.20 -0.6 V V A +4.4 +10.7 26 1.80
Advance Auto Parts AAP 70.02 -- 0 102.84 101.01 -1.02 -1.0 A A A +39.6 +33.5 18 0.24
Amer Express AXP 54.16 0 85.66 85.80 +.21 +0.2 A A A +49.8 +58.8 20 0.92
AutoNation Inc AN 38.28 --- 54.49 49.04 -.37 -0.7 A V +23.5 +25.2 17
Brown& Brown BRO 24.88 --- 35.13 31.62 +.07 +0.2 V V V +24.2 +21.5 22 0.40f
CocaColaCo KO 35.58 -- 43.43 40.19 ... ... A A A +10.9 +11.1 21 1.12
Comcast CorpA CMCSA 35.91 0 50.75 49.87 +.09 +0.2 A A A +33.5 +39.2 21 0.78
Darden Rest DRI 44.11 0- 55.25 53.33 -.16 -0.3 V A A +18.3 +5.0 19 2.20
Disney DIS 47.84 71.69 70.54 -.23 -0.3 A A A +41.7 +47.2 21 0.75f
Gen Electric GE 20.26 -0- 27.50 26.66 -.17 -0.6 V A A +27.0 +32.2 20 0.76
General Mills GIS 39.75 -0- 53.07 50.43 -.10 -0.2 A A A +24.8 +27.9 19 1.52
Harris Corp HRS 41.08 65.87 64.51 -.30 -0.5 V A A +31.8 +42.3 22 1.68
Home Depot HD 60.21 82.27 80.67 +.01 ... A A A +30.4 +27.5 22 1.56
IBM IBM 172.57 -0-- 215.90 179.68 +.71 +0.4 V A V -6.2 -4.5 12 3.80
Lowes Cos LOW 34.20 -- 52.08 47.48 -.41 -0.9 V V V +33.7 +37.4 23 0.72
NYTimes NYT 7.86 14.56 13.96 +.18 +1.3 A A +63.7 +71.9 45 0.16
NextEra Energy NEE 66.49 -- 89.75 84.59 -.35 -0.4 V V A +22.3 +30.0 19 2.64
PepsiCo PEP 67.39 -- 87.06 84.46 +.04 ...V V A +23.4 +23.6 20 2.27
Suntrust Bks STI 25.99 0 36.99 36.23 -.21 -0.6 V A A +27.8 +37.5 14 0.40
TECO Energy TE 16.15 -0-- 19.22 17.04 -.02 -0.1 V V A +1.7 +8.6 18 0.88
WalMart Strs WMT 67.37 0 81.00 81.01 +.08 +0.1 A A A +18.7 +19.0 16 1.88
Xerox Corp XRX 6.48 11.41 11.38 +.09 +0.8 A A A +66.9 +76.2 12 0.23


New York Stock Exchange


Name Div Last Chg

ABBLtd 74e 2555 +02
ACELtd 200eu10278 -37
ADTCorp 50 4056 -29
AESCorp 20f 1457 +10
AFLAC 148f 6637 -07
AGCO 40 5828 +05
AGLRes 188 4654 -17
AK Steel u566 +05
AOL 515e 4458 -12
ARC-Dou 861 +11
AUOptron 310 +08
AVG Teh 1728 -14
Aarons 08f 2864 -08
AbtLabs 88f 3819 -13
AbbVien 160 4845 +20
AberFitc 80 3428 -09
AbdAsPac 42 604 +02
Accenture 174e 7747 -14

A,
AcretiH 848 +18
Accunde 3 51

AGr~

A -4
Actavis 16307 -63
Actuant 04 39 08 -01
*'836 +15
A 364 +08
AeomTh 29906 06
AegeanMP 04 1072
Aegon 26e u888 -01
Aeropostl 1032 +48
Aetna 80 u6893 +06
Agilent 53f 5357 -24
Agnioog 88 2754 +54
". .. 300f 90 07 +46
12f 3167 -10
AirProd 284 10883 -29
Aircastle 80f 1872 -01
AlaskaAir 80 7774 -45
Albemarle 96 u6871 -29
AloatelLuo 18e u431 +08
Alcoa 12 961 -03
AlexREE 272f 6326 -89


Amv
A
AtwoodOcn
Augusta g
AuRico g
AvalnRare
AvalonBay
AveryD
Avnet
Avon
Axiall
AXIS Cap
B2gold g
BB&T Cp
BBVABFrn


5256 + 01
170 + 02
.16 3.93 +.24
64 +03
428 118 56 -116
116 4890 -18
60 3990 -03


100 u4913
2.08
6 3474
915
233 4419
32e 68 22
32e 60 68
P28f 4701
05e 7604


BakrHu 60 5696 +23
BallCorp 52 4998 -44
BallyTech 7457 +71
BalticTrdg .05e 5.06 +.30
BoBilVArg 55e 1189 09
BcoBradpf 51 e 1327 +07
BooSantSA 79e 894 05
AF 9
BcoSBrasil 26e 646 01
BcpSouth 20 2391 -11
BkofAm 04 1582 -01
Bklreland u1563 +68


oMedR 94 1858
1tautoH 31 50
akRok 672 30275
kCpHYVI 97a 11 74
ikDebtStr 30a 402
H1kGbOp 125 1461
i1kMuTTT 1 13 1670
29a 3 94


CallonPet 6 65
Calpine 1891
CAMAC En ... ul.38
CamdenPT 252 5792
" 40 20 51


CampusCC 66 995
1 72 11250
80f 32 92
140U153 88
1 20 71 63
CapSenL 22 33
CapitSroe 04a 14 06
CapsteadM123e 1203
CardnlHlth 1 21 6460
CareFusion u39 85
CarMax 50 35
Carnival 10%~ 36 11
CarpTech 72 60 29
Caterpillar 2 40 84 60
CedarF 2 80f u49 80
Celanese 72 56 13
Cemex 45t 1093
M9
66


u26 40
CheniereEn 3959 -57
35 26 87 + 22
400 122 44 +02
ChloB&I 20 7668 -01
Oioes 30f 18 69 +08
Camera 36 295 -02
ChiMYWnd ... 2.34 +.29
CInaMble224e 5424 -01
ChinaUMi 19e 1581 +40
ChinZenix ... d2.48 +.25
Chquita 1057 + 13
Chubb 76 u9645 -89
Chur hDwt 12 6525 -46
04 87 45 -57
56 9458 -226
inoiBell 320 +04
inemark 100 3299 + 06
04 5292 -13
172 u2507 -07
5277 +14
ClearChan 56e 885 -05
ChlffsNRs 60 2501 -02
Clorox 284 93 17 +01
CloudPeak 1654 -03
Coach 135 57 90 + 77
CobaltlEn 2223 -13
CocaCE 80 4194 -22
Coeur 11 02 + 34
ColeREIn 72 14 31 -15
S 6581 -02
2022 + 11
ColumPTn 120 2310 +19
Comenca 68 4535 -28
CmclMtls 48 u1942 -08
CmwREIT 10 2387 -13
CmtyBkSy 112 u3886 +23
CmtHIt 25e 41 25 +24
CBD-Pao 51e 4708 -91
CompScl 80 52 62 -09
ComstkRs 50 1693 +14
".." 1 00 32 99 +18
10393 -24


Corpbanca.74e
CorpOffP 1 10
CorrectnCp 1 92


19.39 +1.94
17 08 -09
19.39 +1.94


Cyann 443 +16

dbXHvChiA 2585 +26


DejourE g
DeAek 6a
DelphAuto 68


1798 -07
8424 +44
d.ll -.04
3026 -04


eltaAir 24 u28 98
emndMda 551
enburyR 25 1668
1 15
97e 4796
BGoldDS 7 17
evonE 88 60 62
laOffs 50a 60 05


u3960 +01
24 9150 -25
DirSPBr rs d3613 +13
DxGldBII rs ... 32.60 +1.82
DxFinBr rs d2333 +20
DxEBear rs 2199 +10
DxEMBr rs 4005 -131
DxSCBrrs d1826 -01
Dx3TBear 6914 -31
DxEMBIIs 09e 2943 +85
DxFnBulls u8415 -97
DirDGdBrs ... 41.86 -2.80
DxSCBull s u74 45
DxSPBulls u5929 -16
Disover 80 5330 +03
DrReddy 26e 4075 +133
DocuSec ... 2.13 +.25
DollarGen 5694 -41
DomRes- s 225 6491 -14
Donaldson 56f u4173 -29
DoublnSol 180 20 35 +09
DEmmett 80f 2298 -15
Dover 150 9074 +11
DowChm 128 3906 -04
DrPepSnap 152 4826 -21
DresserR 5644 -16
DuPont 180 6138 -16
DuPFabros 100 2347 -14
DukeEngy 312 6996 -07
DukeRlty 68 1518 -07
Dycom 2830 -30
21 41 +01
931 -04
15e 1068 +37
EMCCp 40 23 85
EMCOR 24 3973 +12
EOGRes 75 16500 -143
EPAMSys 3547 +23
EQTCorp 12 8511 -64


s 41 u17 67
n 124 2691
Mrs 69
ess 2461
yn u25 18
1pe 60 41 92
Mbl 252 9348


dNatlnfo 88 50 68
fth&Pa 32 66
a corn n 3271
stAFmn n 48 26 46
tBpPR 6 38
itCwlth 24 u936
itHonzon 20 11 21
stlnRT 34 1746
989
82
T Europe 47e 32 57
TEmMkt 59e 2500
T Finl 38e u21 42
TRNG 07e 1964
r 220 3263
2022
leetor u121 78
Iotek 20 94
owrsFds 45 21 73
owserv s 56 71 38
uor 64 7781
EMSA 1 6 9495
MtLokr 80 u3889
-dM 40 1708


40f 5539 -08
FMCG 125a 3469 +01
Freescale 1456 +04
Frontline ... 3.00 +.27
Fuson-_o 1004 +37

GNC 60 6018 -38
GabelET 56e u739
Gaf saSA 298 +07


Gap 80
Gartner
48f

GencoShip ...
General 500~e
GnCable 72
GenDynam 224
GenGrPrp 56f
GenMoly
Gen Motors
Gen pact
GenuPrt 215
Genworth
GeoGrp 2 20f
Gerdau 1e
G antlnter 65e
GlaxoSKIn 241e
GinmhRt 40
GlobalCash
GIbGeophy
GlobPay 08
GIbShipLs
GblXGuru 98p
GbXGreece 04e
GIblScape 05e
GlobusMed
G







GolLinhas ...
GoldFLtd 09r
GoldResr 36
60

GoldmanS 220f
GeedrPet
GovPrplT 172
GrafTech
GramroyP


GtPanSilvg ...
GtPinEn 92f
Green Dot
GpFnSnMx
G pTelevisa 14e
Guess 80a
GugSPEW 94e
1 42e
U0

450
210
HDFC Bk 31e
HSBC 240e
HalconRes
Hallibrtn 60f
84
Harman 120
HarmonyG 05e
HarnsTtr 60
Harsco 82
HartfdFn 60
HarvNRes ...
HatterasF 2 65e
HawlEI 1 24
HItCrREIT 306


4097 + 20
u6465 -95
1593
u589 +19
2.66 +.26
u5326 +38
2914 -14
9166 -61
2075 -22
1.21 +.15
3873 -12
1790 +01
8284 +100
1511 -10
3280 +01
774 -01
11 23 -03
5292 + 48
971 -06
u975 + 15
152 +07
6305 +03
u536 +01
u2481 -01
22 87 + 63
242 +04
u1926 -01
4.37 -.25
401 +02
516 + 15
2246 + 14
45 +01
16894 +72
1924 + 17
2481 11
1152 +03
u538 -10
710 -01
898 +03
u1225 -24
.74 +.04


4938 -05
2615 + 01
3563 -42
3.82 +.43
1671 -04


aM 02e 29


Brazil 1936
Canada 68
EMU 92
rance 68


EMBd 527e 10867


[e 1 76e
sMid 2 16
SPMidl 55s
xHYB621e
1 95e
KVaI 1 79%


SMsoIVal 16 5683 +12
iStar u1288 -08
ITTCorp 40 4082 -27
iBio ... .39 +.02
Idaoorp 172 51 68 +44
ITW 168 7958 +08
Imax Corp 30 83 + 27
ImmunoCII 331 -06
Infoblox 31 78 -30
Infosys 82e 5402 +83
84 u71 42 +32
u57 15 +36

2344 + 19
152 6916 +04
57 1084 +03
InovioPhm 210 -05
'' r 272 53 74 +04
2139 -1 13
IntFla 1 56f 8835 -07
IntlGame 44f 1749 +10
IntPap 140f 4665 -08
IntlRectuf 2394 -30
8840 + 19
30 1740 +02
IntPotash 75e 1545 -05
Intrexon n 22 89 + 96
InvenSense 1729 +28
Invesoo 90 u3485 -18
15 10 +03

InvRIEst 52 881 +02
IronMtn 108 2812 -06


Jabil 32 2027 -09
.. ....... 59 77 -07
28 1088 +09
Jarden s 56 24 + 04
JinkoSolar ... 29.39 -2.20
JohnJn 264 94 66 -32
JohnsnCtl 88f 5051 +05
JonesGrp 20 1404 -06
JouRalCm u966 +41
JoyGlbl 70 5656 +85
JnprNtwk 20 27 -07
zr 84 703 + 18
1l00f 27 59 -18
KBHome 10 17 53 -34
KBRInc 32 33 83 +35
KKR 162e 2373 -09
KKRFn 88f 958 +11
KT Corp 15 67 + 23
KCSouthn 86 12102 -41
184 6064 -24
784 -02
22 12 75 -04
KimbC(k 324 10916 +94
Kimco 90f 2062 -26
KindME 540f 8197 +54
164f 3554 -30


M&TBk 280 11536 -59
MBIA 129 +22
MDC 100 3022 -10
MDU Res 71f 2967 -05
MFAFncl 729 -04
MGIC 911 +01
MGM Rsts 1919 +01
MRC GIbl 3059 -17
Maenh 24f 5694 -63
MackCahi 120 2036 -26
Mays 10O0 u5326 -23
1 23 3134 -27
724 +14
08 2059 +09
ManpwrGp 92 7993 -22
52 u1933 + 11
76 3604 -19
MarathPet 163 3274 -1 60
MVJrGld rs 3250 +1 10
MktVGold 46e 2223 +47


MasN o 30
MasterCrd 2 40
MatadorRs
Maximus s 18
M-Corm 148f
MoDrmlnt
McDnlds 324f
MoGrwH 1 12
McKesson 96u
McEwenM
MeadJohn 1 36
MeadWvco 1 00
Meche
MedProp 84f
Medtrcic 1 12
MeetMe
MensW 72
Merck 1 76f
Meredith 1 63


6900 -39
815 + 12
9737 + 31
7450 -08
16589 39
2.03 +.12


MonstrWw 563
Moodys 100 7463 +40
20 31 30 11
100 4790+102
MotrlaSolu 124 6588 +38
MuellerWat 07 861 -02
MurphO 125b u6493 -16
NCRCorp 3495 + 16
NQ Mobv 1306 + 10
48 2646 -19
76 2365 +02
16 1655 10
NamTai 08m 732 -06
NBGrcers ... 6.27 +.37
NatFuGas 150 6748 -40
NOilVaroo 104 81 50 +04
NatRetPrp 1 62 3175 -40
Nationstar 3963 -06
NatResPtrs 220 2009 +27
NavideaBlo 1 62 06
Navies 24 774 + 10
NaviosMar 177 1681 +31
Navistar 4019 + 19
Neuralstem 271 -01
NeuStar 4875 +33
Nevsung .14 3.27 +.25


NwGold g
NewOnEd
NewResd n
NY CmtyB
Newcastle
NewellRub
NewfldExp
NewmtM


... 5.33 +.26
5e 2969 +16
10 604 +04
O0 1652 +10


NvCredStr 70 9 38
NuvMuVal 44a 881
NuverraE ... 1.72
,s 84 3442
4613
ol Pet 256 9496
S 88 77619
142e u1389
O iwenFn 5666


PlansGP n
PlumCrk
PolyMet g
PolyOne
PortGE

PwshDB


76 4374 -62
1.06 -.08
24 u246 +04
10 2981 + 11
u5065 +64
40 3165 +34


EMSov 130 2694
nda 17e 1687
air 240 12626


Pre IDnll 24f 9335
Pretium g ... 5.43
PnnFncl 104 u50 63
ProLogis 1 12 3793
ProShtDow d2697
ProShtQQQ d1880
ProShtS&P d2591
ProUItQQQ 22e u9412
PrUShQQQ d1596
ProUtSP 27e u9765


udentl 212f 8876
EG 144 3269
560f 15270
20 1876


QEP Res 08
Qihoe360
QuantaSvc
QntmDSS
Quaterra g ...


2961 -01
125 + 02
.08 +.01
6094 -48
2252
292 +01
890 +18


+20 RPM


wensCorn 3916 -01
Owenslll 3300 11

120 23385 -27
1 2 40 37 +11
PHH Corp 2404 +10
PimooTR 345e 10606 -03
PMCCT 50 362 -05
PNC 176 7695 -46
9 9
PNMRes 66 2327 +06


PVRPtrs 220 2470 +21
PackAmer 160 61 26 -31
PallCorp 1 1Of 8370 -03
PaloAtNet 4995 +0
PampaEng 666 +02
Pandora 2840 -14
ParaG&S ... 1.16 +.06
ParkDrl 798 -04
ParkerHan 1830 11734 -41
Parkwy 75f 1829 +21
PartnerRe 256u10290 +30
PeabdyE 34 1320 +09
43 621 -01
1073 +03
6 9



PennWstg 56 850 +03
Penney 10 19 + 11
PennaRE 80f 1799 -08
PennyMa 228 225 +07


er yo 41 /4
pMor 376f 8554
psNV 9 35 76
lps66 156f 6961
Ma 9 86
dmOfc 80 16 38
1 20 22 29


RedHat 4685 -05
RedwdTr 1 12 1858 -15
RegalEnt 84 1948 -03
185 4684 -68
12 973 -09
452 -05
Renren ... 2.98 -.37
RepubSv 104 3491 +09
ResMed O0 4881 +14
ResoluteEn 901 +09
ResoluteF 1620 +06
ResreCap 80 602 6 07
RetalProp 66 1333 +09
RexAmRes 3274 +59


Ryder 136 u694 +29
Ryland 12 3952 -09

SAPAG 272 -66
SCANA 203 4717 -10
SK Tlcm 238 +49
SLGreen 200f 9047 -121
10 14 -79
3 49eu16072 -13
G
SpdrGold 120 70 + 124
SpdrEuro501 12e u41 17 +0
SpdrlntRE 261e 4226 +02

M7
SPMid 221e 23743 -104
S&P5OOETF3 39eu1810O0 12
Spot 339 13049 +1 17
SpdrDiv 160 7304 -17
SpdrHome 16e 3194 -09
SpdrS&PBk 53e 3264 -03
SpdrWIRE 229e 71269 -76
SpdrBarcCvl 67eu4671 +07
SpdrShTHiI166e 3097 +02
SpdrLehHY302e 4075 +03
SpdrSTCpBd 32e 3032
SpdrBarTip 669 5527 -10
SpdrLel-3bll 45 77 -02
SpdrS&PRB 63 u3996 -06
SpdrRetl 96e u3346 -03
SpdrOGEx 32e 6773 -27
SndrMetM 60 3907 +22


SandRMs2231e 941 +25
SandRdgP235e 13 10 +43
SandstG g ... 4.56 +.33
Sanof 186e 5283 + 19
SaratogaRs ... dl.38 -.10


SealNr 52 32 11
Seaspan 1 25 21 80
SelMedHId 40 866
SemGroup 84f 61 38

4 5
2 52 88 44
SenHous 156 2265


SensataT 38 9
ServioeCp 28 18 07
ServcNow 53 11
SesaSterlte 17e 11 55

ShpFin 1 56 1690
SibanyeGn 15p 495
SiderurNac 38e 522
60 76 84
45e 20 94
10 254
SimonProp 480f 14985
1 88f 37 21
u3362
SmthAO6s 48 5415
Smucker 232 104 24
SooQ&M I104e 25 01
Solarintn s 33 44
SonyCp 28e 18 30
Sothebys 40 51 26
SouFun 100e 6495
SouthnCo 2 03 40 63
SthnCopper 68e 25 10
SwstAirl 16 1859
S38 66
1 22 33 55
SpintAero 32 64
SpintRC n 66 9 93
Sprint n u8 39
SprottSilv 7 91


StawdHtl 1 35f 7448
StawdPT 184 2787
StateStr 1 04 72 61
StatolASA 16e 2254
SllwtrM 11 23
33 08
893
Stker 1 06 74 42
SumitMitsu 10 01
SummitHtl 45 908
1 44 34 98
u22 67
80 34 68
1271
SunstnHtl 20 1307
2548
645
1331
23 15
SymetraF 36 19 17
944
04 349
Sysco 116f 33V63
T-MobIUS n 26 01
TCFFncl 20 1567
TCW Strat 39a 5 51
S Amentr 48f 28 78
TE Connect 0 52 72
TIM Part 74e 2478


3MCo 254u13351
Tiffany 1 36 u89 14
TWv Cable 260 13822
TimeWarn 1 15 6571
Timken 92 51 76
Titan Intl 02 17 25
TollBros 34 1C
340f 9141
323e 6032
TotalSys 40 31 OE
TowersWat 56f 112 6C
TransDiam2200eu156 52


Travelers 200 u90-74
TremorV n ... 4.65
TnPonte n 1985
~ 10 62
14O00
Trinity 60f 51 91


UGI Corp
URS
US Ainwy
US Geoth


13 4026
84 51 97
2348
.37
50 3451
947


UtdMicro 07e 201 +02
6 6 M
UPSB 24u10238 -16
UtdRentals 6873 -16

6 66
USBancrp 92 u3922 -13
USNGas 1915 +07
US OlFd 3346 +27
USSteel 20 2681 -03
UtdTech 236f 11086 -65
UtdhlthGp 1 12 7448 +12
UnivHIthS 20a 8243 +22
Univ Insur .49e u12.40 +.88
UnunGrp 58 3357 -13
Uranerz 1 10 +02
UraniumEn 1 94 +08


VananMed 78 05 +136
VectorGp 160 16 38 -04
VeevaSys n 40 49 -1 42
Ventas 268 d56 83 -81
VenFone 2561 -20
VenzonCm 212f 4962 -31
Vin-eHld n 2927 -43
VioinMn 345
Vipshop 8311 +242
VirneX 2002 +18
Visa 160f 20346 -53
VishayInt 1293 +12
VMware 8063 -16
331
292 8793 -123
Voxeljet n 41 O0 -05
VulcanM 04 5637 -74
W&T Off .40f 17.20 -1.72
1859 +21
12 14 + 14
Wabtecs 16 u6900 -09
126 5920 -01
04 1423 +02
Walterlnv 38 13 -08
WREIT 120 2374 -08
WsteMIno 146 4568 +04
Weathflntl 1566 + 11
We sterFn 60 12948 -18


WillisGp
Wipro
WirelessT


24 59 12 -26
12 4478 +30
13r 11 67 + 19
... 2.50 +.24


YumBrnds 148 7768 +09
ZaleCp ... 14.75 +.73
Zimmer 80 91 41 +79


Stocks in bold changed 5% or more in price from the previous day.
1..1,, ,:, :.,|,,,)l:,.

issue r*
last year vj- Company in bankruptcy or receivershp, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law Appears in fro
Dividend Footnotes: a-Extra dvden .
declared or pad in last 12 months f[ -
dends paid after stock splht, no regular rate j Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent divdend was omitted or
or paid this year, a cumulatie issue with dividends in arrears m Current annual rate, which was decreased by
ann(
t P t ,,,,i.-..,i.
PE exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


SMarket Review

Every Sunday

In The


Money


Section of The


Dally Commercial

SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 787-0600 (Lake Co.)
or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5
p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months
or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily
Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007.


KI


Q n


D
D





Saturday, November 30, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7


Nasdaq National Market


Name Div Last Chg


ASMLHId 69e 9338 -21
AoadliaHIt 4620 -83
AoadlaPh 2329 + 10
Aoouray 798 -22
AcelRx ... 9.78 +1.00
Achillion ... 3.46 +.27
Aot-' sBlz 19f 1721 + 12
AdobeSy 5678 -1 3
Adtran 36 2568 +42
Aeroion 3017 +41
Afymetnx 8 49 08
AkamaiT 4472 +32
Akorn u2575 +14
AlaskCom 20 221
Alexion 12450+3826


AlscrlptH
AlnylamP
Alterap If
Aman
Amazon
Ambarella
Amedlsys
Ai

AFMulti
3
28
AmSupr
Amgen
AmicusTh
AmkorTh
AnacorPh
AnalogDev

ApolloEdu
Apollolnv
A I
Apple Inc 1
ApldMatl
Approach
A oc
ArenaPhm
AresCap 1
AriadP
ArmHId
Arotech
ArrayBio
Ars
ArubaNet
AscenaRtl
AsscdBanc
athenahlth
A I

Atmel
AutoNavi
Autodesk
AutoData
Ai 1
Auxiim


AVEO Ph


3962 +691
2480 +01
663 +12


u600 02
14.00 +.74
482-32
102 +15
u3435 05
2629 +01
902+ 11
55607+10 11
1730 -05
1255 -08
21 19 + 11


590 +06
16657+358
5573 -49
790 -02


Biocryst

BieSonp
BIkRKelso
BlackBerry
BloominBr
Blucora
BodyCentrl
BreitBurn
Broadcom
BroadSoft
BrcdeCm
BrukerCp
BldrFstSrc
CA Inc


2920 -35
6.45 +.56
29097 -286
704 4 -80
681 11

1 04 9 89 + 09



67.05 -.3705
2620 -12
29 08 +26
892 +02
1 95f 1891 +03
44 2669 +10
26 57 +03

1934 +01
... 7.05 -.37


dH obins 140 5865
MEGrp 180 8195
TC Media 64 1265
VBFnl 40 u1614
CadencePh 9 02
Cadence 1825
CaesarAn u12-16
Caesars 20 44
CalAm p 24 94
CalumetSn 274 2859


aran 45 66
yGen 20f u2763


ChiFnOnl


61 86 + 12
5217 +02
u,, u4.03 +,45
2629 +80


12 49
60f u3901
22 32 95

90


Cynosure 2589 +69
44 969 +11

G +079
DFC Glbl 1001 -29


IV 6611
omA 87 27
Itwhl00e u54 16
Tree 55 65
yRR 104 1850
ksA 31 86


DurataTh


S 344 +15 Gr.
76 u4898 -24 Gr
12.32 +.67 Gr,
175 +01 Gl


E-Trade 1792 +03
eBay 5052+122
EagleBulk ... 4.02 +.30
EaglRkEn 60m 606 +04
ErthLink 20 545 +09


22 17 +06
39 53 -11
u67 19 -06


Euroseas .06 1.31
Exe1ls 5 83
Expedla 6 6 69
69,
Expdnt 60 4344
ExpScrlpts u67 35
ExtrmNet 695
Ezoorp 11 68
F5 Netwks 82 26
FLIR Sys 36 2967


FstSolar 59 82
FstMent 64 22 96
Fiserv 109 89
FiveBelow 58 16
Flextrn 7 58
Fortinet ... 17.10
Fossl Grp 12727


FrontierCm 40 468 -01
FuelTech u7.21 -.42
FuelCellE 137 -01
FultonFncl 32 1307 +01


GTAdvTo 981 -01
Gam&Lsrn 4612 -56


69
56 2981 +09
537 +06
178 -03
7481 + 18
64f u2996 + 17
72a 759 +05
1411 -02
869 -02
2667 -26
66 6
180 8688 +12
20 2226 -09
105959 -352
4554 +69
08a 891 +02
100 6788 -13
16 1728 + 16


2291 -16
1476 -17
anHId 96 u3520 -16
anwhaSol 349 +02


u912 +06


HercOffsh 639 +05
HimaxTh 25e 1000 -8
Hollysys ... u18.99 +1.19
2239-27
180 227 +12
HomeAway 3650 + 11
HorizPhm ... u7.22 +.39
HorsehdH u1497 -01
Hudsity 16 934 -02
HuntJB 60 7519 +20
HuntBncsh 20 917 -07


IAC Inter 96
devLabs
iShAsiaexJ 1 06e


hACWI 111e u5692


IdenixPh
Ilumna
ImunoGn


8814 -06
u3968 + 11
,, 5.37 +29
9800 -1837


3702 +836
992 -01
2984 -06
11 59 + 46
2425 -06


InterM,


Isis u3876 -52
Ixia If 1299 -01


JA Solar rs 9 45 -37
JDS Uniph 12 14
JazzPhrm 11692 +127
JetBlue 8 89 -11
JiveSoftw 1109 +16
JosABank u5682 -06
KLATnc 180 6387 -16
KandiT-eh 717
70e 7 81 +26
210f 5312 -27
KratosDef 669 +06
Kulicke 1262 +02


68 -129


Liquidity


569 -07
443 +110
23,17 +1,18


lululemn gs 6972 -48


MCGCap 50 481 +02
64 u2276 +35
1147 -28
2996
499
MarlntA 68 4702 +09


Metabolix
Microchp

M T
M
M
M
M
MI
MironT
MIcros~ys
MioroSeml
Microsoft
Mlorovls
MillerHer
Mindspeed


394 + 13
1.12 +.27
4329 11
21 10 -07
5372 + 12
2443 + 03
j38 13 +53
132 +03
3191 +04
503
8 60 02
3864 +01
8858 -45
8840 -06
5918 -67
471 -06


NasdOMX 52 3929 +65
Natlnstrm 56 31 26 -21
NatPenn 40 11 29 +08
NatusMed u2303 + 50
NektarTh 1256 + 24
u +


NetlUEPS ... 8.19 -3.34
NetApp 60 41 25 +01
NetEase 00e 71 81 +1 28
Netfhx 36580 +331
Netlist h ... .71 +.10
Neurnne 982 + 16


OmniVisn 1603 -24
OnSmcnd 709 +01
OnTrack ... 3.21 +.32
Oncothyr ... 2.03 +.10
1800Flowrs 509 +10
OraSure 615 -02
S683 +17
1758 +64


5891 -11
60 u977 +11
PMCSra 600 +03
PTC InC u3254 -21
PaoWstBo 100 41 14 -15
Paooar 80a 5731 +03
PaoBioscl 422 -02
PalnThers 75e 458 +06
PanASIv .50 10.79 +.63
Parexel 4122 -13
Patterson 64 4149 +14
PattUTI 20 2331 +10
Payhex 1 40 43 73 -02
PnnNGm 1444 -02
PennantPk 1 12 1217 +23
PeopUtdF 65 1514 -06
PerfeotWId 45e 1897 +56
Perficient ,,, u21.68 +1.34
PerfTe1h 290 -14
Performnt 1049 +08


PwShs QQQ 98


san 489
QQ d1576
;tCap 182 1141
EN 2329


79 -66


859 -06
50f 7075 +177
1389 +06
2241 -05
29386 +98
1137 + 10
entACt 84 3406 -03
lApubir 11 26 +07
tlOpp 60 1457 -09
1918 + 14
266 +11
1730 -08
VokwlM 1463 -13
osettaR 5057 -55
ossStrs 68 7646 -22
ovICorp 1840 +23
yGId 84f 4509 +29


SBACom 8517 -42


SLMCp
SanoDisk

Sanofi rt


997 +33
60 u2665 +05
90 6815 +27
1221 +47
1548
.60 +.03


SareptaTh ... 18.64 +1.06
SciGames 1795 -04
1T I172f 49 04 + 02
6858 -15
G 19
SeattGen 41 09 + 19
SelCmfrt 21 11 + 10
Sequenom 268 + 02
ShandaGm 406 + 01
ShoreTel u808 -10
Shutterfly 47 28 +.72
86 86 24 79
1332 +46
542
597 +15
77 07 59
Sinclar 60 3282 +20
SinusXM 05e 377 +09
SironaDent 6878 +43
SkywksSol u26 59 02
SmIthWes 11 82 -11
SmithMicr ,,, 1.41 +.12
SodaStrm 5748 -36
Sohu cm 67 39 +2 59
SolarCap 160 23 15 +04
SolarCity n ... 52.28 +3.21
Solazyme ... 8.96 +.58
SoltaMed 2 00
SomO~orp 1979 -21
Sonu 291 +01


Sprouts n 8784 -26
Staples 48 1553 +07
StarBulkC ... 9.52 +.46
StarSoient 1 30 +02
Starbuks 04f 81 46 -16
StarzA 2828 + 18
StlDynam 44 1822 +07
StewEnt 18 1325 +01
Stratasys 11777 -80
SungyMo n ... 15.26 -.81
SunPower 3034 -32
Supernus 723 +08
SusqBnc 32 1259
SwisherH h 53
Symantec 60 2249 -19
Synaptios 5051 -09
458 +09
3663 -13
'ntaPhm 507 -11
TICCCap 1 16 1081 + 10
tw telecom 28 32 24
TakeTwo 166 +21
To 1574 -04
17 19 -41
Tellabs 08a 245 +01
TeslaMot 127 28 +834
Texlnst 1 20 u43 00 + 48
Theravnce 3776 +36
Thoratec ... 39.37 -2.75


TileShop 1675 +69
TiVo Inc 1283 +17
TowerGplf 66 416 +18
TractSups 52 7321 -83
T imbleNs 31 90 -29
TripAdvis 8832 +01
TriQuint 788
TrstNY 26 u760
Trustmk 92 28 05
21stCFoxA 25 3349 -01
21stCFoxB 25 3303 +16
21Vianet 1785 +22
UTiWrldwd 06 1581 -05
Ubiqultl 18e 8940 -14
UltaSalon 126 94 -1 58
A1



Umpqua 60a u1841 +12

Unhfe u445 +04
UtdCmBks u1835 +16
UtdOnlnrs 60 1588 -02
UtdTherap 9231 +77
UnwvDisp 6 11 -03
UnwiredP 1.50 +.10
UrbanOut 3902 -05


Mutual Funds


12-mo
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
AQR
DivArbtl 1123 -01 +25
MaFtStrl 1042 +03 +104
MaFtStrN b 1034+03 +100
MIStrAtl 1027 -02 +50
Acadian
EmgMkts d 1883 +17 +45
Alger Group
CapAplnsI 2912 +04 +316
CapApprA m 2183+03 +315
Alliance Bernstein
GIblBdA m 830 -12
GrthlncA m 527 +332


Il.,..!CI
NFJAIICpVaA m 15 6
NFJAIICpValns 1577
NFJSmCVAd b8649
NFJSmCV-s 3859
NFJSmCVA m651
Amana
Growi b 8206
Income b 4328
American Beacon
27 07
2861
2914 +
American Century
DivBdlnstl 1071
DivBdlnv 1071
EqGrowlnv 3149
EqlncA m 909
Eqlnolnstl 910
EAlnlnv 909


InvGrlnv 3868 + 10 +256
MdCpVallnv 1646 -04 +301
1206-0 +309
S 144 +171
Selectlnv 5484+02 +250
Ultralnv 3455 +05 +8325
Valuelnv 809 -01 +305
Vistalnv 2291 -02 +312
American Funds
AMCAPA m 2838+01 +355
BalA m 2413 +209
BondA m 1251 -14
CaplncBuA m 58 10+01 +17
CaplnBuB m 58 14+01 +129
A
CapWIdBdA m201+01 -26
CpWIdGrA m 44 68+06 +249
CpWldGrlB m 44 42 +06 +24 0
EurPaGrA m 486+40 +21
FnlnvA m 51 61 +03 +295
GIbBalA m 3052+04 +166
GrthAmA m 4469 +06 +20
GrthAmB m 412 +06+10
HInoA m 1133 -01 +73
HilnoMuA m 1436 -38
IncAmerA m 2047 -01 +173
IntBdAmA m 1351 -07
IntlGrlnA m 3578 +18 +192
InvCoAmA m 389+04 +00
LtdTmTxEA m 1598 -07
MuUalA m 3498 -01 +264
NewEonA m961 +12 +426
New PerspA m 884+17 +267
NwWrldA m 5957 +37 +135
STBdFdA m 1000 -02
SmCpWIdA m 50 81 +24 +313
TaxEBdAmA m 1243 -38
TaxECAA m 1673 -33
USGovSeoA m1378 -24
WAMutlnvA m83964 -02 +299
Arbitrage
Arbtragl d 1287 -01 +32
Ariel
Appreclnv b 5373 -08 +442
Anellnv b 7137 -04 +428
Artio Global
GlobHiYldl 1012 +107
TotRtBdl 13805 +01 -21
Artisan
Intl d 2986 +19 +258
IntVal d 8608+14 +317
MdCpVal 264 -06+352
MidCap 4613 -08 +356


Aston Funds
MidCapN b 4624+02
2995 -04
b 2975 -04
.1611
BrdMktFxl 10V6 +01
TaxEEq d 2164
BNY Mellon
1017 + 10
'1475 -03
NtllntM 1340
NtlShTM 1292
Baird
1050
1088 +01
ShTmBdIns 974
Baron
Asset b 5989 -12
Growti b 7053 -17
SmCap b 3357 -03
Bernstein
DiversMul 1484
2784+17
1 49
IntlPort 1688 +05
NYMuni 1401
TxMIntI 1650 +05
Berwyn
Income d 1487 +01
BlackRock
BasIValA m 3420 -06
BasVall A 451 -05
CapApplnA m 3017+083
CorBdlnstl 9 45
EqDivA m 280 -06
EqDivl 2886 -06
EqDivR b 2391 -05
EquitDivC m 2325 -06


31 +01 +106
49 +426
97 -02 -72
13 -01 -69


Brown Advisory
GrEqlnv d 1842 -03 +270
Brown Cap Mgmt
SICols b 7415+02 +500
Buffalo
Flexlblno d 1429 -01 +158
SmallCap d 4000+06 +464
CG Capital Markets
2185+01 +316
1228 -02 +312
CC4
Focus 3844 -14 +378
Realty 3095 -14 +101
CRM
MdCpVllns 3916 -06 +307
Calamos
GrIncA m 644 +06 +149
GrowA m 6099+10+287
MktNeuli 104 +54
MktNulnA m 1317 +52
Calvert
EqutyA m 4880+04 +278
Causeway
IntlVllns d 1606 + 10 +267
Clipper
Copper 9018 +13 +347
Cohen & Steers
CSPSI x 1295 -06 +44
Realty 6494 -68 +64
Realtylns 4284 -44 +68
Columbia
A ornA m 3672 -02 +299
Acorn lntA m 4810 +25 +222
Aoornlnt 4829 +25 +226
Acorn USAZ 3780+03 +327
A
AcornZ 3821 -01 +303
CAModA m 1246 +18
A
Au 9
m 1885 +171
21834+01 +336
ComlnfoA m 4822 +190
DivlncA m 1825 -08 +256
DivlncZ 1827 -02 +260
DivOppA m 1054 -01 +251
DivrEqlnA m 1243 -02 +298


TaxExmptA m 1332
ValRestrZ 5781 +02
Community Reinvest
Ouallnv b 1066
Constellation
SndsSelGrl 1765 +03
SndsSelGrll 1726 +03


2656
1540
GEqlnst 1765
GIblRIEstSeosl 917
InfPrtSol 11 71
IntCorEql 1263


49 1622 -01 +404
DWS-Scudder
58 EqDivB m 4197 -07 +231
52 GNMAS 1434+01 -34
25 GrlnoS 2411 +350
02 GvtSc m 817+01 -36
HInoA m 498 +86
07 m 886 -56
07 887 -54
15 2585 -02 NA
TechB m 1387+06 +202
62 Davis
55 NYVentA m 4212+02 +37
59 NYVentC m 40 2 +01 +2 6
NYVentY 4264 +01 +340
19 Delaware Invest
43 Di3erlncA m 891 -13
18 OpFlnl 951 -22
24 US~owls 2428+04 +80+ 8
23 Valuel 1606 -04 +328
6 Diamond Hill
LngShortl 2225 -02 +225
7 Dodge & Cox
Bal 9701 08 +288
79 GIbStock 1176 +06 +362
88 Income 1865+01 +08
69 IntlStk 402 +29 +612
07 Stock 16479 +07 +405
24 DoubleLine
27 CrFxdlncl 1086 -07
21 TotRetBdN b 1095 +07
6 Dreyfus
48 Apprealn 5149+05 +183
89 BasSPS00 3711 03 +301


Driehaus
Actbelnc
EmMktGr d


Eaton Vance
FIRtHIA m
FloatRateA m
IncBosA m


FMI
CommStk 30 52
LgCap 2169
FPA
Capital d 47 36

Acres d 83357
New1n1 d 10837
Fairholme Funds
FaIrhome d 42 76
Federated


MunlUShIl
MuniUltA
StrValA m


anA m 6 85
anR m 686


9+01 +19
81 +01 +19E


Ultrals 16
Fidelity

1861
2269


S90 -06


96 -03 +267
415 -03 +265


ntMu d 1069
mBond 60
CapDiso d 32 07
CapStk d 21 49
CpGr d 1979
Cppp 13846
JpVal d 2044
ele 36 79
iln 1409


Trend 9571
USBdldx 11 46
USBdldx 11 46
USBdldxlnv 11 46
Value 101 27
Worldwid d 2598
Fidelity Advisor
AstMgr70 2044


sAm 29 42
sC m 27 61
sl 29 84
sT m 28 96
A m 0 96

SmCp d 2669


Fidelity Select
BIoteh d 1796
Chemical d 146 16
ConsStpl d 9896
Enernv d 61 94


08 +306
+41
-01 +42
+01 +109
02 121
f 01 15 1
+02 +163
+01 +189
+02 +193
f 06 +320
+04 +504
-08 +882
+85
+296
+287
+299
+298
+14 +888
+15 +887

+10
+03
+18
+10

f 94 +61 2
S01 +315
-21 +186
-06 +241


Fidelity Spartan


First Eagle
GIbA m 5528 +16 +167
OverseasA m 2442+13 +147
USValueA m 2044 +154
First Investors
GrowlncA m 2204 +344
Forum
AbStratl 1100 -01 -1 4
FrankTemp-Frank
FedTFA m 1182+01 -55
Fed TF C m 1181 +01 -61
FedlntA m 1200 +01 -33
FedTxFrIA 1183 +01 -54
FrankTemp-Franklin
BallnvA m 5592 -12 +369
CATFA m 697 -51
CAInTFA m 1215 -41
EqlnA m 2256 +297
FLRtDAAdv 920 +52
FIRtDAooA m 920 +50
FIxCpGrA m 629 -0 +337
GrowthA m 688 -07 +276
HYTFAm 988 -72
m 211 +93
211 +94
m 242 +158
IncomeA m 239 +160
InoomeAdv 238 +163
InsTFA m 1176 -46
LoDurTReA m 1017 +1 5
NYTFA m 1125 -56
OHTFA m 1219 -52
HisDivAd 4825 -10 +291
RisDvC m 4726 -10 +277
sDvA m 4821 -11 287
SmCpValA m 6156 -1 +387
SmMdCpGrA m 45 22-07+360
StrlnoA m 1056 -04 +42
StnncC m 1056 -03 +37
TotalRetA m 999 -02
USGovCx 646 -02 -16
GA-16
USGovA x 650 -02 -1 1
UtlsA m 1491 +132
FrankTemp-MutualI

A 9
DISooC m 40 +01 +265
DIscooyZ 8585 +01 +277
DIsoLA m 3479 +01 +274
EuroZ 2625 -02 +294
QuestA m 1974 -01 +262
Ques0 1997 +266
Shares C m 2753 -02 +285
Shares Z 2823 -01 +298
SharesA m 2794 -01 +294
FrankTemp-Templeton
DvMkA m 2313+06 +4
r 8 62 + 03 +32 8
2180 +246
S"' 858 +08 +882
m 1309 +20
GIBondA m 107 +01 +25
GIBondAdv 1302 +27
GrowthA m 2501 +07 +337
WorldA m 2018+03 +330
Franklin Templeton
FndAIIA m 1340 +265
FndAIIC m 1317 +256
HYIdTFInA 992 +01 -71
ModAlIoA m 1605 +150
GE
ElfunTr 5790 + 15 +320
ElfunTxE 1142 -52
IslntlEq d 1330 +09 +232
IsSmCaplv 2149 -01 +384
S&Slno 1143 -04
S&SUSEq 5864 -02 +336
GMO
2754 +08 +316
d 995 +1 1
j 1123 +07 +18
d 11 19 +07 +21
3456 + 13 +281
IntlVIIII 2558 + 10 +282
IntltVIIV 2556 + 11 +288
Quill 2711 +02 +2'2
QulV 2715 +03 +233
QuVI 2714 +02 +233
StFxinVI d 1619 +29
USCorEqVI 1721 -01 +278
Gabelli
Asset AAA m 6664 -02 +31 2
EqlncomeAAA m 28 05-03 +288
SmCpGrAAA m 47 18+01+37 6
Gateway
GatewayA m 2877 +75
Goldman Sachs
GrOppA 29 7 -05+31 0
GrOppls 81 80 -05 +315
HffdMunls d 860 -56
Hi)eldls d 738 +90
MIdCapVaA m 50 -09 +324
MIdCpVals 5084 -09 +329
ShDuTFIs 1053 -03
SmCpValA m 5727 -02 +393
SmCpValls 6050 -01 +399
GuideStone Funds
BIoAIloGS4 1391 +112
IntEqGS4 1515 +07 +214
Harbor
Bond 1224 -02
CapAplnst 5652 + 10 +334
CapAprln b 5559 +10 +329
HyBdinst d 1123 +64
IntlAdm b 7042 +14 +181
Intllnstil 71 04 + 15 +184
Intlln b 7015 + 15+180
Harding Loevner
d 5006+833 +85
1789 +05 +158
Hartford
BaIHLSIA 2497 +01 +196
BallnoA m 1316 -01 +112


InOpHLSIA 1467
MdCpHLSIA 3695


MidCapA m
SmCoHLSIA
SHLSIA
LA
TRBdHLSIA
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IntlOppA m 2645
Hennessy
GsUtlldxlnv 2638
Hotchkis & Wiley
MidCpVall 3981
Hussman
StratGrfi d 1011
ICM
SmCo 3769
ING
CorpLeadB 3072
GIREstA m 1825
INVESCO
CharterA m 2251
ComstokA m 23 28
DevMktA m 3315+
DIvDivA m 1682
DivDivlnv b 1681
EqlncomeA m 11 14


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HIYIdMuA m
IntlGrA m
IntlGrl
MidCapGrA r
MidCpCrA m
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2697 -01
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24 60 -27


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iscEqUlt 2308 -01 +324
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lnoSeleot x 1806 -05 +2983
x 820 -04 +82
x 820-04 +86
1532 +03 +246

trAmerS 3433 -06 +322


+296
3531 -12 +293
3604 -11 +300
1398 -03 +361


ValAdvSel 2743
James Advantage
GoldRainA b 2415
Janus
BaIT 3049
FortyS b 488
Gr&lncT 4368.
H ildT 989
OverseasT 38388
PerkinsMCVT 26388


TwentyT 8C
Jensen
QualtyGrl 38
QualtyGrJ b 38
John Hancock
BondA m 15
IncomeA m 6


USLCGr d 1891 +02
Lazard
d 1951 +20
m 1994+20
1432 +07M
Legg Mason/Western
m 178 39+05
19233 +07


Appre A


790 +295
1982 +266


EqlncA m 1797
SmCpGrA m 2810
ValueC m 5725
Litman Gregory
Maslntllntl 1800
Longleaf Partners
Intl 1755 +
3303
31 11 +
Loomis Sayles
BdlnstI 1522
BdR b 1516
FDlnol 1530
GIbBdlnstl 1653 +
Lord Abbett
AffiliatA m 1538
BalA m 1243


vG rowA


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M An
MidCpStcA
NatlTaxFA m
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ShDurlncC r
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IntlNDisA m
IntlNDisl
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MAInvA m
MAInvGrA m
MAInvl
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Reslntll
ResearchA n
TotRetA x
UtilA x
ValueA m
ValueC m
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MainStay
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950 +65
2269 -06 +300
1058 -69
457 +22
460 +15
4 57 +24
4209 -03 +346
448 -0+350
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m 1449
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GrCilnv 11045 -
Managers
BondSvc 2738 +
1063
1972 -
Manning & Napier
WrIdOppA 911 +
Matthews Asian
China d 2547 +
Divlnv d 1605 +
GrInc d 1930 +
PacTiger d 2537 +
Merger
Merger b 1629 -
Meridian
MendnGr d 3616
Metropolitan West
Hi-YIdBdM b 1057
LowDurBd b 880
LowDurBdl 881
TotRetBdl 1068
TotRtBd b 1068
Morgan Stanley
d 2573 +
n 5384 +
IntlEqA m 1669 +
IntlEql d 169 +
MdCpGrA m 4418 -
MdCpGrl 46 05 -
SmCoGrl d 21 74 -
Munder Funds
MdCpCrGrA m 41 45-
MdCpCrGrY 4260 -
Mutual Series
Beacon Z 1680 +
Nations
LgCpIxZ 35 30 -
Nationwide


Natixis
LSInvBdA


LSStratlnoA m 1630
LSStratlnoC m 16 40 -01
LSValY 2758 -0
Neuberger Berman
Geneslslnstl 6512 +02
Genesslnv 4540 + 02
GenessTr 6758+02
Partnrlnv 3582 -09
Nicholas
NIhol 6459
Northern
Bdlndx 1052
FIxedln 1021
GIbREIdx d 929


Nuveen
HYIdMunA m 1549
HYIdMunC m1548
HYIdMunl 1549
IntMunBdl 895
LtdTmMuA m 11 08
LtdTmMunl 1097
RIEstSedl 2096
Oak Associates


uteOak 5560 -09 +299
Oakmark
Eqlnl 469 -08 +225
GISell 1653 +02 +380
Global 086 +10 +393
Intll 2688 +09 +36 7
IntlSmCpl d 1772 +10 +331
Oakmark I 6467+043+62
Select I 4089+08 +375
Old Westbury
GIbSmMdCp 1761 +03 NA
1230 +02 NA
11 93 NA
RealRet 810+06 NA
Oppenheimer
AMTFrMunA m 6 52 -77
AotAllooA m 1179 +217
CapApA m 6054+01 +253
CaplncA m 961 +84
DeMkA m 3791 +25 +110
DeMktY 3758+25+114
De-MktsC m 3612 +23 +103
DiscoverA m 870+01 +435
EqlncA m 249+01 +327
EquityA m 1207 +275
FdMunA m 166 -01 -101
G obA m 7999+5+284
GlobOpprA m 40 2+2 +417
GobY 8023+4+287
IntlBondA m 608 -34


IntlDivA m
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Qc 876
Instl 1067
odl 1010
s 962


Adm b 988
mA m 988
mls 988
Is 960
s 1036


PRIMECAP Odyssey
2966+
2376 -C
Stock 2106 -C
Parametric
TxMgEMInstI d4966+
Parnassus
Eqlnclnv 3589 -C
Pax World
Bal b 2707 -0
Permanent
Portfolio 47 47 + 1
Pioneer
CoreEqA m 1537
HIdA m 1069
oneerA m 3836 -
StratlncA m 1083 -


Principal


74 +79
(443 +161
466 +1983


MGIIIInst 1421 -01 +32
MidCapA m 2014 -01 +324
PrSeolnst 1019 -04 +27
SAMBalA m 1581 -01 +16!
SAMConGrA m1785 +22;
SCGrllnst 1531 -01 +41
SCValII 1436 +01 +41 5
Prudential
GblRealEstZ 22083-13 +81
JenMCGrA m 3881 -07 +26
Prudential Investmen
2020FooA m 1971 +01 +28
GovtlncA m 9 44 -18
H SeldA m 573 +8
JenMidCapGrZ 40 41 -06 +26.
JennGrZ 28938+05+33
MuniHIn A m 946 -5!
NaturResA m 4906I+04 +11
ShTmCoBdA m 11839 +1q
SmalICoZ 80 80 08 +841(
TotRetBdA m 1411 -0;
UtlityA m 1414 -02 +24.
Putnam
CATxEInoA m 781 -01 -4.
D'rlnA m 781 +01 +7!
DynAstAIGA m 1659 N/
EqlnoImeA m 21 60 -04 +317
GrowlncA m 1946 -01 +35!
InestorA m 1913 -01 +326
Mult CapGrA m 73 48+05 +33
Voyager A m 052+07 +41
RS
GINatResA m 3549+02 -1!
PartnersA m 4425 -05 +40
RidgeWorth
A 17


uppMiv 6 Io/ + UO +4
PAMutlnv d 1520+01 +368
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Russell


2685 +299
1766 +01 +329


Russell LifePoints
BalStrC b 1186 +
Rydex


23 SSCm
16 S&P5001d
29 Schwab


TotStkMSI d 3348
Scout
InterntI 36 91
Selected
AmerShS b 5090
American D 5093
Sentinel
CmnStkA m 4331
Sequoia
Sequoia 21506
Sound Shore
SoundShor 47 68
Spectra
SpectraA m 1791
State Farm
Balanced 62 01
Grow 67 42
SteelPath
MLPIncA x 1086
SunAmerica
FocDvStrC m 1744
T Rowe Price
Balanced 23892
BIChpGAdv b6223
BIChpGr 6251
CapApprec 26 74
DivGrow 33823
EmMktBd d 1247
EmMktStk d 3294


99 +469
942 -01 -1 7
015 +02 +285
392 +01 +198
185 +02 +268
884 +129
464 +163
9 9

5 6 221
635 +262
1 25 22 +6 5


CpValAd m 50 64
ecGrow 24883
eclnc 1296
mMulnt 11 54
FH4ld d 1096
Fn 986
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t2020Ad b 20 62
t2030Ad b 22 63
M
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T.Rowe
ReaAsset d
TCW


TotRetBdl
TotRetBdN b
TFS
MktNeut d
TIAA-CREF


163 +06 +256


Target
SmCapVal 2849 -01 +369
Templeton
InFEqSeS 2316+07 +24 6
Third Avenue
IntlVal d 2012+01 +248
RealEsVal d 2929 -09 +197
Value d 5878+14 +234
Thompson
Bond 11 91 +34
Thornburg
IncBldA m 2068 01 +16
InoBdC m 2068 01 +157
ntlValA m 104 09 +16
IntlValC m 2900 +09 +160
IntlVall 31 72+ 09 +17
LtdTMuA m 1441 -01 -07
LtdTMul 1442 -03
LtdTmlncl 1337 +08
Thrivent
m 2826 +273
n 11 13 -46
Tocqueville
Dlfld m 3789+03 +30 9
Gold m 3402+74 -479
Touchstone
SdCaplnGr 2370+04 +379
Transamerica
AsAlMdGrA m 14 68+01 +200
AsAlMdGrC m 1457 +191
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 2752+08 +20
U.S. Global Investor
Gld&Prec m 611 +17 -49E
GlobRes m 96+04 -
WrdProMnr m 587+14 -50
UBS PACE
d 2417 -02 +Y5C
d 2668+01 +31
USAA
-114
333
HYOpp d 885 +98
Income 1310 +03
InoomeStk 1720 -01 +29 C
IntermBd 10 74 +18
Int 30380 + 18 +216
S&P500M 2585 -02 N
ShTmBond 922 +13
TaxEInt 1317 -18
. . 1307 -39
1071 +0E
Value 1985 -01 +352
Unified
Winlnv m 1723 -01 +144
VALIC Co I
MdCpldx 2707 -09 +320
Stokldx 359 -02 +29
Vanguard
500Adml 16707 -13 +30


Adml 10861
al 1556
t 146
ktldx 11 69
ktsldxlP 12090
Dlnv 29 69


EmMktlAdm 3447
EmMktStkldxlP8722
EmerMktld 2624
EnergyAdm 12832
Energylnv 68 83
Eqlnc 3011
EqlncAdml 6312
EurldxAdm 7165
5293
10845
Explr 111 07
ExtdldAdm 6160
Extdldlst 61 60
Extd MktldxlP 152 05
Exdldx 6152
FAWeUSIns 9907
GNMA 1052
GNMAAdml 1052
GIbEq 2324
GrIncAdml 649
Groln- 888
Growthldx 4648
GrthldAdm 4648
Grthlstld 4648
48 04
604
HYCorAdml 604


HlthCare 19620 +17 +409
TBond 1134 -01 -26
TBondAdm 1134 -01 -25
TGradeAd 986 -08
TIGrade 986 -09


18 16+01 +93
27 50+02 +212
1450 +37
2816 +01 +152
2689 -05 +31C
4579 -36 +347
2945 -08 +345
3+80 -33 +347
2956 -07 +347
4222 -10 +347
2600+02 +313
8067+06 +314
10 57 -41
1378 -26
1378 -25
11 07 -41
11 04 +02
11 04 +03
1586 +04
1586 +04
11 66 -38


S 9548
Adml 9911
p orl 1995
dx 21 74
xAd 92 76
xnst 1436
2476
1056
ndAdm 1056
1056
1076


S 2896
)ldx 51 97
ldxlP 15029
dAdm 506
dlst 52 06
ndxSan14690


,SCAdm 43 29+
Gre 2785+
GroAdml 72 16+
dxAdm 29 37
dxlns 29 37
3056
2936


WellslAdm 6187 -02
Welltn 39 17 -01
WelltnAdm 6765 -03
WndsllAdm 6620 -11
Wndsr 1999 -03
WndsrAdml 6748 -07
Wndsrll 3729 -07
ex-USIdxIP 10491 +839
Virtus
967 +06
] 487
MulSStC b 492
Waddell & Reed Adv
AcumA m 10A69
AssetrA m 11 89 + 02
BndA m 636
CorelnvA m 817+01
HilnoA m 779
NewCnptA m 1268-02
SoieohA m 1658+04
VanguardA m 1138
Wasatch
IntlGr d 2920+06


L/Slnv d 16
SmCapGr d 52
Weitz
ShtlntmIno 12
Wells Fargo
AdvCoBdl 12
AstAGIoA f 14A
AstAIIIoC m 13
EmgMktEqA f21
GrI 56
Growlnv 51
GrowthAdm 54
fl13
9
ShTmBdInv 8
UISTMInA f 4
UISTMInl 4
Westcore
PlusBd 10
Western Asset


43 +207
73 +08 +296

56 +1 4

50 -183
18 +138
62 +130
31 + 16 +34
16 -01 +31 1
62 -01 +305
50 -01 +309
396 +302
98 +07


m 1592 -57
m 640 -45
William Blair
nsllntIG 1729 + 10 +199
ntGrI d 2664+ 16 +200
IntlGrN m 2597 + 16 +196
World Funds
EpGloEqShYI 1933 +03 +229
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$8,991


2013 HYUNDAI SONATA
4ID L11661A
$13,991
2009 HYUNDAI SONATA
4ED L11891A
$13,991


2012 HYUNDAI ACCENT
4IED L11572A
$13,993


2012 HYUNDAI SONATA
4m D L11839A
$160491
2011 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
4UD L11920A
$16,491


2013 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
UND L11614A
$16,593


2006 PONTIAC VIBE 2012 TOYOTA COROLLA 2011 HONDAACCORD
L11690B L10914A LMT1550A
$8,991 $14,481 $16,791


2008 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
LM1290B
$9,391

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2007 HONDA ACCORD
LOL11046D
$10,384
2010 HYUNDAI ACCENT
4 I D L11707A
$10,493
2012 FORD FOCUS
L11582A
$11,994


2009 HYUNDAI AZERA
MID= L11663A
$14,593


2012 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
MED L11837A
$14,691


2011 KIA SOUL
LT11273A
$14,991


2013 KIA RIO
LMLT11230A
$14,991

*~~~IJ Jd*


2011 KIA SORENTO
L11694A
$16,791


2008 CADILLAC DTS
4- -I-


2008 CADILLAC DTS
L11139B
$16,841
2011 HYUNDAI TUCSON
46D L11527A
$16,891


2012 HYUNDAI SONATA
46s L11831A
$16,891


2011 HYUNDAI SONATA
40i LT11652A
$18,994


2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
L11766A
$19,591


2008 NISSAN FRONTIER
L11900A
S19,991


i m


I I 1 1 :


I-VJ"1L .1. Is


2013 HYUNDAI SONATA
LT11941A
$20531


2012 HYUNDAI TUCSON
41a L11809A
$20,791


2011 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
L11211A
$21,192


2012 HYUNDAI VELOSTER 2013 HYUNDAI TUCSON
4 iD L11639AI L11777A
$17,153 $22,291


2011 BMW 128i COUPE
L11566A1
$17,364


2013 HYUNDAI GENESIS
4-a PL1942
$22,324


2010 NISSAN SENTRA 2013 HYUNDAI ELANTRA 2010 HYUNDAI SANTA FE 2011 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
L11658A1 =ED L11665A <* LT10316A LT11957A
$12,751 $15,021 $17,553 $22,991
2008 HYUNDAI AZERA 2012 HONDA CIVIC 2013 HYUNDAI VELOSTER 2013 HYUNDAI TUCSON
L10190B LOT6611A ofm LT11968A LN1234A
$13,242 $15,053 $17,991 $23143
2011 HYUNDAI SONATA 2011 HYUNDAI SONATA 2012 HYUNDAI ELANTRA 2012 HONDA PILOT
6ED L11659A LT11874A <-D L11853A L11022A
$13,093 $15,082 $17,991 $25,874


2010 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS
L11360A
$13,793


2012 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
4MID L10770A
$15,854


2012 KIASPORTAGE
L11681A
$18,391


2009 HONDA CR-V 2012 HYUNDAI SONATA 2011 HYUNDAI SONATA
PLI940A L11924A 0MD L11866A
$13,991 $15,991 $18,691


2012 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
ftiED L11357A
$13,991


2008 HONDA CR-V
LT11757A1
S16,393


2011 CHEVROLET CAMARO
L10191B
$25,991
PLU


2011 HYUNDAI SONATA
otD L11926A
$18,991


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Inside:

Classifieds

D2-D8


Cruisin'
352-365-8208 I features@dailycommercial.com


Dl
DAILY COMMERCIAL
Saturday, November 30, 2013



www.dailycommercial.com


Mazda innovations power Skyactiv technology


FRANKA.AUKOFER
Scripps Howard News Service
If you had to pick one word
to describe Mazda of Japan,
it would be innovation.
Over the last 50 years, the
company has delivered an
array of vehicles with con-
ventional, rotary and Mill-
er cycle engines. With the
MX-5 Miata, it presided over
the resurrection of the af-
fordable two-seat sports car,
which is still going strong.
The rotary, also called a
Wankel engine, powered the
Mazda R7 and R8 sports cars.
The Miller, which breathes
differently from convention-
al gasoline engines, was in-
stalled in the company's Mil-
lenia sedan.
Mazda's latest tool is some-
thing the company calls Sk-
yactiv technology, now the
soul of the 2014 Mazda3,
the company's entry in the
compact class of sedans and
hatchbacks. It's a catchall
word that describes a suite
of developments to every as-
pect of a new car to improve
performance and fuel econ-
omy.
Call it a holistic approach
to automotive design. It
means removing unneeded
weight from every nook and
cranny, redesigning auto-
matic and manual transmis-
sions, refining suspension
systems, directly injecting
fuel and air into engines,
and minimizing power loss-
es with electric steering.
One special enhance-
ment, called i-ELOOP, gath-
ers electricity from braking
and stores it in a capacitor
to power on-board systems.
It comes as part of an option
package that also includes
active grille shutters to man-
age air flow, lane departure
and forward obstruction
warnings, and adaptive ra-


.... ......
~~~. . .... .,':.. . .. ..: . "" .... ...... .. ....
........... ....
- -.,-, -a.= =. ... .........."... ........,....': "........... :......


SHNS PHOTO
Though the Mazda3 competes in the compact class against popular cars, it has always managed to stand apart.


dar cruise control.
There are 11 versions of
the Skyactiv Mazda3. Mod-
els with an "i" designation
come with a 155-horsepower,
2.0-liter four-cylinder engine.
Those with an "s" attached
come with the 184-horse-
power, 2.5-liter four.
All feature the company's
new Kodo design philoso-
phy, which delivers a sculpt-
ed body minus the big smile
grille of the previous mod-
el. They start with the 3i SV
four-door at $17,740 and top
out with the 3s Grand Tour-
ing hatchback at $26,790.
Options can push it into
around $30,000.
The Mazda folks are boast-
ful of the new Mazda3 in-
teriors. They say their de-
signers used the interior
of a $42,000 BMW 320i as a
benchmark for quality ma-
terials and workmanship. It
shows. The new 3 has a sim-
ply designed, tasteful interi-
or with soft touch materials


SPECIFICATIONS
MODEL: 2014 Mazda3 i
Grand Touring four-door hatch-
back sedan.
ENGINE: 2.0-liter four-cylinder,
155 horsepower.
TRANSMISSION: Six-speed
manual.

and contrasting trim.
Though the Mazda3 com-
petes in the compact class
against such popular cars
as the Honda Civic, Toyo-
ta Corolla, Ford Focus, Nis-
san Sentra and Versa Note,
Dodge Dart and Chevrolet
Cruze, it has always man-
aged to stand apart.
With a choice of engines as
well as four-door sedan and
hatchback body styles, it has
a reputation as a driver's car.
That impression has been
reinforced by the Mazdas-
peed3, a performance mod-
el, along with a high per-
centage of customers who


* OVERALL LENGTH: 14 feet 8
inches.
* EPA PASSENGER/CARGO VOL-
UME: 96/20 cubic feet.
* WEIGHT: 2,797 pounds.
* EPA CITY/HIGHWAY/COMBINED
FUEL CONSUMPTION: 29/40/33
mpg.
* PRICES TESTED: $24,335.

order manual gearboxes -
anywhere from 12 percent
to 17 percent. In the overall
market, only about 5 percent
choose manuals.
There's no word yet about a
new Mazdaspeed3. For now
the engine choices, both Sk-
yactiv, are the 2.0-liter and
2.5-liter four-bangers. All
models come with pushbut-
ton starting, air conditioning
and Bluetooth connectivi-
ty. Cruise control is standard
on all but the base SV model.
For those who crave con-
trol, the 2.0 with the six-
speed manual would be the
combination of choice. The


stick is available on all 2.0-li-
ter versions. Unfortuate-
ly, for those who crave a bit
more power and appoint-
ments, the 2.5-liter engine
only comes with the six-
speed automatic, though
it includes a manual shift
mode.
The test car, a 3i Grand
Touring four-door hatch-
back, had a smooth shift
linkage with light clutch en-
gagement, a good thing be-
cause driving uphill and
down required frequent
shifting. Acceleration was
decent but the engine some-
times became overtaxed in
higher gears.
At $24,040, equipment in-
cluded a navigation sys-
tem, automatic climate con-
trol, Sirius XM satellite radio,
HD radio rearview camera,
blind-spot monitoring, rear
cross traffic alert and full
safety equipment, including
a device that holds the car in
place when setting off uphill.
An unusual feature avail-
able on some upscale mod-
els is a head-up display,
which Mazda calls an active
driving display. It provides
driver information at eye
level but, unlike the systems
in most cars that reflect off
the inside of the windshield,
Mazda displays the visuals
on a separate small screen
on the top of the dash, clos-
er to the driver. It works fine,
but sometimes the display
washes out in bright sun-
light.
Interior comfort is first rate
for four people, although the
leatherette-trimmed sport
seats on the test car became
hot and sticky over long dis-
tances. The hatchback's back
seat has decent room for the
outboard passengers but the
center seating position is
impossibly cramped.


Lexus launches face-lifted CT 200h in China


KELVIN CHAN
AP Business Writer
GUANGZHOU, Chi-
na While a flurry of
new car models are be-
ing paraded this week
at auto shows in Los
Angeles and Tokyo,
Toyota's luxury brand
Lexus is using the
week's other big auto
show in China to unveil
the latest version of its
CT 200h.
This four door hatch-
back hybrid is posi-
tioned as a sporty lux-
ury compact. The 2014
model is the first ma-
jor update since it was
launched in China in
2011.


A Lexus CT 200h is displayed at the company's booth
during the Guangzhou Auto Show in China's southern
city of Guangzhou.


Changes are mostly
cosmetic to give the car
a fresher look. The hy-
brid powertrain stays
the same. The F Sport
version also gets a roof
spoiler and suspension


tweaks.
Lexus said it
to launch the c
the Guangzhou
in southern Chin
sign of its commit
to the country, wh


the world's biggest auto
market and the second
biggest for the compa-
ny. The automaker said
it would hold "more
and more" global pre-
miers in China, where
auto sales grew 7.1 per-
Scent last year to 15.5
million vehicles.
For automakers, Chi-
na's also a key market
AP PHOTO for hybrid cars, as the
government encour-
ages the development
of new energy vehi-
cles to cut air pollution
chose and raise fuel efficien-
*ar at cy. Lexus said hybrids
show account for nearly 30
a as a percent of sales in Chi-
tment na, making it the com-
lich is pany's third biggest hy-


brid market worldwide.
Here are some high-
lights of the new 2014
CT 200h:
UNDER THE HOOD
No major chang-
es to the 1.8 liter gas-
oline-electric motor
putting out 134 horse-
power.
OUTSIDE
The biggest change
to the car is its face-
lift. The car gets a more
aggressive and sporty
front end thanks to Lex-
us' new "spindle grille"
design, part of a broad-
er effort to give all of the
upscale brand's mod-
els a new face. Oth-
er new touches include


10-spoke alloy wheels
and a shark fin-style
roof antenna. The rear
bumper is also restyled
with new vents at the
corners. Buyers can also
opt for two-tone color
schemes that feature a
black roof.
INSIDE
Door panel and cen-
ter console trim choic-
es now include Lexus'
Shimamoku synthet-
ic wood. Shimamoku,
which is Japanese for
striped wood, is made
by layering alternate
strips of dark and light
wood veneer in a pro-
cess that takes up to 38
days.


[ aeavnaeo er ddals on hatr,fiealgs andstorge, I


WI STPOIN I B'


wtsTPoIF.Tr


wESTPoINTr


SAVE 32% SPECIAL
1699 PURCHASE SAVE 33%
reg" 97 9999
750/1500W Compact Ceramic 5997 999
Heater W 137 701 B6 While supplies last. 120V Infrared Fireplace reg. 149.99 Heater
Stove T1708W Iwhite suesW120V/1500W Infrared Heater
Stove T 170 806 1 Whilesupples las. W 154 937 1 While supplies last.


SAVE 42% W

1499
reg. 25.99
6-Pk., 3-Hour Fire Logs
T 120 809 1 While supplies last.
Contents not included.


Your choice
SPECIAL
PURCHASE

497 I
40-Qt. Locking Lidi
Storage Box or 18-Gal.
Red Storage Tote
W 172 139,138 While supplies last.
Contents not included.


Electric Razor
Repair Clinic

Wed., Dec.11th


I


TRUE VALUE/JUST ASK RENTAL
LEESBURG
729 N 14TH ST. (Hwy 27), LEESBURG PALM PLAZA
352-728-1888
SERVING LEESBURG SINCE 1978


START RIGHT. START HERE:
Sale Ends 12/31/13
02013 by True Value' Company. All rights reserved.





DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, November 30, 2013


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^3^*11 q* 3 J 1 11 '1 1 MiB^ 1 l l^AiF! *^uE~BBu^ Sf~^ iEafl


Classified Index


Legal Notices ..


. . .. . .003


Announcements .........100


At Your Service
Financial .....
Employment ..
Pets/Animals .


.m ....... 200


.300
.400
.500


Merchandise Mart ...... 600
Real Estate/For RENT ... .800
Real Estate/For SALE ... .900
Manufactured Homes .. .1000
Recreation ............1100


Transportation


.1200


EI



new is jut a click a



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ray!


2
Legal Notices

003 Legal Notices
NOTICE of Public Sale
or Disposition
The personal r.,'-r,- ',- h,-, -, I ; ,- ,-I
contents of I,, i, 11,,.1 1 -,-,, I 1 r ill -'
sold for cash or otherwise disposed of to sat
isfy rental liens for unpaid rent in accordance
with the Florida statutes
F .I . I,,;r 13, 2013 at 10:00 am
L .1 .- and Storage Tavares, LLC
2601 State Road 19
Tavares, Florida 32778
For information on this sale please call
352 383 6525
Name:
Clint Lyttle G728
Neil Bagaus H804
Anthony McDow H843
Ad No.00418129
November 30 & December 7, 2013

You're Reading

/ LOCAL

PAPER
ThemDatuCoMMia


003 Legal Notices
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
The Truck Shop Inc. gives Notice of Foreclo
sure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles
on 12/14/2013, 8:00 am at 3711 Rogers In
dustrial Park Rd., Okahumpka, FL
34762 3206, pursuant to subsection 713.78
of the Florida Statutes. THE TRUCK SHOP
INC. reserves the right to accept or reject and
and/or all bids.
3C3EL55HXYT303508
2000 CHRYSLER
Ad No:00418639
November 30, 2013
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2012CP1354
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FRANCES L MADDOX
DATE OF DEATH:
AUGUST 4, 2012
NOTICE OF UNCLAIMED FUNDS
TO: JOHN POPHAM
ADDRESS UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that you are a
beneficiary in the Estate of FRANCES L MAD
DOX. An Order Authorizing Deposit of Funds
to the Registry of the Court has been entered
by this Court. Funds in the amount of
$18,807.29 have been received by the Clerk
of Circuit Court for deposit into the Registry
of the Court, to be disposed of as directed by
Florida Statute 733.816.
You are required to serve a copy of your re
sponse or pleading at the office of Neil Kelly,
Clerk of Circuit Court, 550 W. Main Sbeet,


003 Legal Notices
P.O. Box 7800, Tavares, FL 32778 on or be
fore MAY 1, 2014. If you fail to respond and
the Clerk of Circuit Court does not receive on
Order from the Court directing the Clerk to
pay the deposited funds, the Clerk must de
posit the funds with the State Treasurer.
Dated at Tavares, Lake County, Florida this
28TH day of OCTOBER, 2013.
NEIL KELLY
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
By:/s/S.PADILLA
Deputy Clerk
Ad No.:00414660
October 30 & November 30, 2013
100
Announcement

104 Special
Notices
NOTICE TO
ADVERTISERS
PLEASE CHECK YOUR AD FOR
ERRORS THE FIRST DAY IT APPEARS
SINCE THE DAILY COMMERCIAL WILL
NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
INCORRECT ADS AFTER THE FIRST
DAY OF PUBLICATION. IF YOU FIND
AN ERROR CALL THE CLASSIFIED
DEPARTMENT IMMEDIATELY AT
314-3278 OR 748-1955.
THE PUBLISHER ASSUMES NO
FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY FOR
ERRORS OR FOR COMMISSION OF
COPY. LIABILITY SHALL NOT EXCEED
THE COST OF THE PORTION OF
SPACE OCCUPIED BY SUCH ERROR.
CANCELLATIONS
CANCELLATION FOR ADS RUNNING
SATURDAY MUST BE MADE BY
FRIDAY BY 2:00, CANCELLATIONS
FOR SUNDAY & MONDAY MUST BE
MADE FRIDAY BY 5:00
105 Positions Wanted
CAREGIVER TO ELDERLY LOCALLY
10 yrs. exp. Avail, for 24/7 shifts or
daily. Dr. appts., meds & meals.
Call 813-748-1309
106 Personals
WHITE MALE 71, seeking female
60-80 who enjoys nature, animals,
outdoors, for companionship.
352-669-6910.


124 Professional
Services
COMMUNITY
SEMINAR:
How To Avoid Low
Back and Neck
Pain Surgery!
Learn about DRSTM Protocol, a
breakthrough and successful
nonsurgical treatment for
herniated and degenerative
disc condition.
Featuring: Dr. Jason E. Davis
Davis Clinic of
Chiropractic, Inc.
Discussion of chronic
and severe back and
neck conditions,
treatment options,
respective advantages,
treatment for failed
back or neck surgery.
Q& A Period
Light Refreshments.
Reservations Preferred
3:00-4:00pm Tues.
December 3, 2013
DAVIS CLINIC
OF CHIROPRACTIC
Reservations:
(352) 430-2121
DavisSpinelnstitute.com



200
At Your Service


201 Insurance

205 Adult Care
NOTICE
Florida Statute states, "It is a
misdemeanor for any person willfully,
knowingly, or intentionally to operate
or attempt to operate a family day
care home without a license or
without registering with the
department, whichever is applicable".
Florida Statute states, "No person
shall advertise a child care facility
without including within such
advertisement the state or local
agency license number of such
facility. The statute applies to anyone
with more than 1 unrelated child
in their home.


205 Adult Care
SILVER LAKE
ASSISTED LIVING
Private Room avail. $3,100/mo.
What are you paying for Dementia
care? No point system or
entrance fee. Lie #ALF8956
Call 352-365-9929

245 Financial

SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Contact us if your claim has been
denied or if you need help.
Over 30 yrs. exp.No fees or costs
unless your claim is approved.
I.rOiEr ..rn-..jIir, ]
2228 South St., Leesburg
352-728-5552

250 Handyman
Hard working Lie. Business owner,
seeks to improve your home.
Ability to perform jobs including
Remodeling TreeTrimming -
Drywall Tiling, etc.
References avail.
Robert Plante's Home Maintenance
352-484-3543



LARRY GOUGH HANDYMAN SERVICE
Reliable, Dependable! One call does it
all! Lic/Ins. 352-409-4059

268 Moving



Two Brothers Moving
1 Room or a Full House
FL Reg. #IM1539
Russell & Todd Franks
Lie. & Ins. Call 352-793-8960


275 Plumbing
^ ^ SINCE
1987
KILEY&
SONS, INC.
A Full Service Plumbing Company.
Lake 787-1904 Sumter 748-9500
CentralFloridaPlumber.com
VISIT OUR ONSITE SHOWROOM.
24 Hr. Emergency Service
Lic#CFC1426882

281 Roofing
#1 IN ROOFING
\ illg: Fir,.-,ign -, '.r.- r:inij.;ihri. ir..;.
"Leak e,,.ji- ""iinqle4 1ij1 giO.,I.
*Lifetime Metal Roofs. Free Roof Est.
352-314-3625. Lic. #CCC1329936



MCHALE ROOFING INC
Re-Roofs and Repairs, Tile, Metal,
Shingles Flat Roofs & Mobile Homes
Excel. Ref's Lie & Ins. CCC1328197
Call 352-255-2758

288 Tree
Service


*Land Clearing eTree Removal
*Trimming & Shaping
*Hauling & Stump *Grinding
Free Est. **SPECIALS**
352-267-5720
MICHAEL'S TREE
& TRACTOR SERVICE
| FREE
l~kSTIMATES
Stump Grinding, *Tree Trimming &
Removal *Box Blading, *Bush
Hogging & Grading. Lic & Insured.
Call 352-504-1597


M;M tafps fM am, mPahi g ffzr i ukM e rles F
"Your First Choice"
In-Print & On-Line


DEADLINES
For Insertion COPY DATE
Friday Thursday, 5pm
Saturday Friday, 3pmr
Sunday Friday, 5:00pmr
Monday Friday, 5:00pmr
Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pmr
Cancellation for ads running Saturday must be made by
3pm Friday. Cancelations for Sunday & Monday must be
made by 5:00pm Friday.
ADJUSTMENTS
first day of prubhcaion If you find an error call their classified
department immediately at 314-3278 r 748-1955
* The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors orfor


O-he


Found it,
Bought it,
Sold it,



FAST!
in The
Daily Conmanercial
REAL ESTATE SECTION!


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 30, 2013


IlIllll




Saturday, November 30, 2013


300
Financial


301 Business
Opportunities

RESTAURANT
150 SEATS WITH FULL LIQUOR
North Lake County,
Serious buyers only. 352-250-7813




400
Employment


410 Sales












I, *I T;
Th* pre el ae o 'ran 1,l









tos llaprodut hebli ev n
w ae. I n l t,. I


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atlat6 monthsIto 1 yersle
*xeiene Is *3lymoivaedan



..fssoa, etui atcan
*&s. a S evlofInerfy


432 Dental
DENTAL ASSISTANT
Experienced only. $15/hr.
Fax resume to: 352-787-9036
NO PHONE CALLS

435 Medical


jJI IUHNITES
Busy medical office has the following
openings available FT:
*CT Technologist Must be FL
registered & have at least 1 yr. exp.
*Paramedic ACLS Certified & able
to work shifts
*Basic X-Ray Tech/Phlebotomist.
Must have experience performing
Dexa Scans
*RN ACLS certified. Critical care
and cardiac cath lab exp. preferred.
*Medical Asst. Phlebotomy
experience helpful.
Benefits are available.
Fax resume 352-323-9507


OlE
LIII
The Daily CommerialW
www.dailycommercial.com


435 Medical
FRONT DESK -
For busy Urgent Care. Computer ori-
ented typing skills a must. Profes-
sional appearance & well groomed.
Fax resume to:
352-315-1703 Brandie
MA, LPN & RADIOLOGY TECH.
Needed for Busy Urgent Care.
Email to:
medicalbillingtoday@ yahoo.com
MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST
F/T, exp. with knowledge of EMR for
Primary Care Practice in The Villages,
with opportunity for advancement.
Fax resume to: 407-217-2687
RN OPENING FT
FOR MDS/PPS CO-ORDINATOR
looking for an organized, professional,
knowledgeable individual. Experience
required.
Apply at
LAKE EUSTIS CARE CENTER
8:30am 3:00pm
Monday Friday
411 W. Woodward Ave. Eustis, FL.,
Online amauger@gchc.com
Or Fax 352-357-2874
DFWP/EOE

450 Trades
CONSTRUCTION ALL POSITIONS
$12/hr and up to start. Paid medical,
vacation & 401 k. CDL & travel a must.
DFWP/EOE
Call 352-383-3159 Ext. 229
MACHINE OPERATORS
Laborers 2nd & 3rd Shifts
Apply in Person
2231 W CR 44, Eustis 32726
MAINT C.*


Cr


CROSSWORD PUZZLE


CROSSWORD
By THOMAS JOSEPH


ACROSS
1 Outfits
5 With 20-
Down,
African
capital
10 "No
Turn -"
12 "Lorna-"
13 Hot spot
14 "... like I
need
in the
head"
15 Belief, in
brief
16 Flock
father
18 Crude
shack
19 Kath-
mandu
native
21 Tex-Mex
snack
22 Science
fiction
genre
24 Pricing
phrase
25 Have a
long
sleep
29 Dunham
of "Girls"
30 Film
awards
32 Outmoded
33 Fitting
34 Custodi-
an's tool
35 Letter
feature
37 Gladden
39 Make
law


R E B|U|S H A F T S
INAN A L 0HA
S I M1l 1R EY
E G SAL U TES
U M A ESEUNO0

FLT STAN
P A I S T A LN D
NOD SHE
C HIE FA H A B
FpL UsMP ErA UyT A
RdOiPAJL NKEV
0 T T E R T o0TA L
S H E E T 0 B E S E
T E R N S S I|R E DI
Yesterday's answer


26 How
Hoffman
played
Tootsie
27 Tex-Mex
snack
28 Steamy
29 Places
last
31 Tiny dot
33 P.M. times
36 Water
cooler
38 Headed


11 Love of
music
17 Delivery
via
parachute
20 See 5-
Across
21 "Dear
Mama"
rapper
23 Witty
fellow
25 Western
capital


NEW CROSSWORD BOOK! Send $4.75 (check/m.o.) to
Thomas Joseph Book 2, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475
11 12 13 4 15 6 17 19


450 Trades

AUTOMOTIVE DETAILERS i
Exp. a +, will train the right person.
Must be over 21 w/clean driving re-
cord. Must pass background check.
Apply in person:
Bill Bryan Kia
9039 US Hwy. 441, Leesburg
EOE/DFWP




QUALIFIED CDL A DRIVERS
2 YEARS EXPERIENCE
See what we offer, assigned
equipmentgood home time,
weekly pay, direct dep.,health ins,
paid holidays & vacation.
GREAT
BONUS
PROGRAM!
Call for more details.
800-456-2336 X114

TIME DEFINITE SERVICES
Hiring Over The Road Drivers Class
A CDL required. All late model equip-
ment 2012 & newer. We pull 53'
Reefers. Great Pay & Bonuses. Must
be willing to run 48 states.
Apply at:
www.timedefinite.com
or call 352-399-7900 xl1015

455
Restaurants/
Hotels/Clubs

BAH I iNUli-&SI-KVEI-'ZS-FI-
MUST be exp'd. Evenings & Wknds.
Apply in person 3-5pm
VIC'S EMBERS SUPPER CLUB
7940 US Hwy. 441 Leesburg, FL

470 General
SCHOOL BUS
DRIVERS NEEDED
Training provided.
Lake County Schools, Transportation
352-728-2561 or
Apply online: www.lake.k12.fl.us
CAR DETAILER
for busy Dealership. Be ready to work
& eager to learn. Have clean drivers
license and able to pass drug test.



SEE SCOTT RODERICK
PHILLIPS BUICK
2160 Hwy. 441, Fruitland Park, FL
DFWP



~*JOBl


470 General




DECEMBER 4th 1 pm-4pm
Lake Harris Health at
Lake Port Square
701 Lake Port Blvd. Leesburg
Interviews will be conducted
on site for:
*Nursing
'Dining Services
eSecurity
Stop by if you are interested in
joining the Brookdale Community.
DIETARY AIDE / COOK
FT SPLIT SHIFT.
Exp. preferred
Apply at
Lake Eustis Care Center
8:30am 3:00pm
Monday Friday
411 W. Woodward Ave. Eustis, FL,
DFWP/EOE

COME JOIN
OUR TEAM!








MARINE ACCESSORIES MGR. FT
Experienced in boat parts, accesso-
ries, phones & cash drawer.
Email resume to:
SharonNobles@NoblesMarine.com
DFWP/EOE



500
Pets/Animals


501 Pets
For Sale
BICHON FRISE/POO PUPPIES Male/fe-
male, health cert. $350/$400.
352-669-3649.
MALTESE 3 mo. old. Home raised. All
shots. $700. 352-391-9021
SHORKIE PUPPIES Shih-tzu/Yorkie
$100 obo. Call 352-728-6272 or
352-396-3007

520 Livestock
FANCY CHICKENS & ROOSTERS (9)
$45 obo Call 352-669-2785

560 Pet
Supplies
BIRD CAGE, Excel. cond. white w/toys,
16"xl 4"xl 7" tall. $45. 360-1209
BIRD CAGES. Asking $35. The Villages.
Call 352-753-1834
DOG CAGE 18X20X24. $50. Call
352-343-5754


In Lake County

~iLD KA
*r^ -- ^j '^~


For Local News Sports Weather
In-Print & On-Line .


*
-.. .tt...
', ,...;. ::; ,'-

.a ~h.:""' ..


"... ,


p
'Ar


560 Pet
Supplies
DOG CAGE Large. 24 x 21 wrought
iron. $70.352-742-2149
DOG CRATE Large, hard plastic. 25W x
29D x37L. $20 obo. 352-321-2174
PET STROLLER, like new. $85. Call
352-323-1861



Goo
Merchandise
Mart


601 Antiques
DOLL HOUSE wooden, w/39 accesso-
ries. Very nice. $100. 602-1055

602 Arts/Crafts
RUG HOOKING EQUIPMENT Traditional,
$100. SOLD

603 Collectibles
AUGUSTA XII Color Print 25 x 30, '92.
Framed/signed. $65. 330-4484
WOODEN JIGSAW PUZZLE made in
England. $25. SOLD

604 Furniture
ADJUSTABLE BED twin, good cond.
$75 Call 352-326-5766
BAR STOOLS (2) BIk wrought iron w/tan
seats. 30". $100 301-788-6361
BED FRAMES (2) adjustable, twin full.
$40. 352-793-7027 leave msg.
BEDROOM RETRO 2 pieces, dresser
w/mirror. Excel. $95 352-233-0408
BEDRROM SET full, maple,good cond.
$500 Call 352-589-4405
BOX SPRING & FRAME for King size
bed. FREE.352-728-4488
BRASS HEADBOARD full size & 2 lamps
$20. Call 352-435-0888
BUNK BEDS METAL top twin bottom
full. excel. $100. 352-246-9948
CEDAR CHEST Thomasville. VERY NICE.
$100.SOLD
CHAIR fabric cover, excel, cond. $75
Call 352-750-5446
CHAIRS 4 Blonde maple. Like new.
$100.352-343-0587
CHAISE LOUNGE Beige. Very good
cond. $100. 352-406-3054
CHAISE LOUNGE wicker rattan w/cush-
ions. $40. 352-742-1422
CHINA CABINET 60"Lx19"Wx80"H.
Good cond. $50.352-589-0469
COFFEE TABLE & 2 END TABLES round
glass. $50 Call 352-589-4405
COFFEE TABLE Oak, excel cond. $75
Call 352-343-0161
COFFEE TABLE oval shape. Very nice.
$25 Call 352-326-2849


40 Museum
piece
41 Wise ones
42 Dealing
need

DOWN
1 Fiddler's
need
2 "Hold
on!"
3 Cross
4 Capitol
Bldg.
worker
5 First
person
6 Cry from
Homer
7 Co-star
of Nimoy
and
Shatner
8 Fortunate
9 Handle


The Daily Commercial
11^ a i -yo, im D u-d-l _-

www.dai lycomniercial .com
C. ;.,


vmcy tin" u1,ivilsom
)W711 1 Mployces.^^^^^
T I" Daily Commercial^^
Employment Listings.&^^^^
I igh tililig fa t lest ... Ilse


DAILY COMMERCIAL




DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 30, 2013


A/


Local, Trusted
A/C Expert
Kalos Services
352-243-7088
KalosFlorida.com
Lic.# CAC 1814620

Floria Air & Heat Inc.
Y CourComfort Company
For All Your Air Conditioning
f k & Heating Needs
r^l 352-326-3202
I Serving Lake County State Licence #i
LL. since 1986 CACI814030





Eustis Senior Care
AsslstcdUvig aility AL 8993
Accepting New Clients for our
brand new bedrooms.
Call Rhea, RN at 352-551-5307
for inquiries and a free tour.


Aurora Home Care Inc.
"Illuminating Care"
Companions/Homemakers
Serving allol Lake, Sumter, Marion Counties
Rates start at $18.50/hr *4hr mln.
Aurorahomecareinc.org. Lc/Ins
Ahca#23912 Office: 352-435-7751
Toll Free: 866-702-6197





352.260.7490

All Airports, Cruise Terminals,
Hotels, Casinos & Attractions
Shands-VA and Jacksonville Mayo






R Transportation
Airports Seaports Doctors
"Forget the Fuss, Leave the Driving to us"
Village Resident
David 352.552.0064


-I Serving Lake, Sumter
& S. Marion Counties
( We Service All
i Appliance Brands
Licensed/Insured
Free Service Call
w/Repair
15+ Years Exp. 24 Hr. Emergency Svc.
We Don't Want To Be The Biggest
Just The Best
Eric Wolf 352-630-2202


Former Sears $20 OFF
& Factory ALL REPAIRS
Technicians Many Referemncs
SLi Ucensed&
koffed
ATER,R
Free Estimates No Trip Charge
1 Yr Parts Guarantee
FREE VENT CLEANING
With Any Washer/Dryer Repair


,

Srame-DaySericeal




Complete Automotive Care
Transmissions AC Brakes
* Tune Ups Body Work Oil Change
Family Owned 26 Yrs 352-326-2400
1406 Emerson SL, Leesburg across from Post Office





RE-TILE
352-391-5553
Backsplashes Re-Tile Tub & Shower
Walls Grab Bars Floors
Handicap Baths Repairs
Leaky Shower Pan
Ins./Lic. 30 yrs. exp. I


Bahu
Reiihn


INDS
^'... Comatlflve ilces-
rdJS^ QualftPredicts'

I -lul IWM

Werviesvc
1109 W. Lake View St. Lady Lake
I*ehhie.d Mum & .Did.s..Resimuant I


35^U3^^waF


IStucky's Carpet
r Cleaning
Spring Special
2 Rooms & Hall $50
1352.365.9889





i F B;8 ,'"All-Natural
S' -Cleaning Service
.' Quality Cleaning with
f.- ,, only natural products.
Licensed and Insured
352-348-6576
www.bambisallnaturalcleaning.com


LE t& EANINGj F
faning, Sealing & Grout Repair.
Also Carpet, Upholstery, Pressure
washing, Driveways & Sidewalks.
We do it right! Call Tim
2-243-1215 or 407-383-8783

Simone's Cleaning Services
Commercial/Residential
Reliable/References
SLie/llBoaded-10 Yrs Exp.
Immediate Availibility-
i Flexible Hours
1( Cal: Simone
407-844-1 IIS3





Your PC Repair Specialists
Fast friendly service at a
flat rate affordable price.
Education & Repair
In your home or our office
Call
352-897-1309

Concrete



OUALfTY CONCRETE & BLOCK
8X10 $500.00 10x40 $1200.0
W Includes labor, concrete & cleanup
Fast turnaround, no hassle & local
#CRC1326327, Ins. & References
BRIAN DEGAGLIA
352-267-5723

C onConcrete For Less
*h 80stO Slab $450
nItrOF Ix4W O Slab $1325
Includes Concrete a Labor
( 8 Blocklnf h113 tllfres.
I Phili 352-504-8372



We ELIMINATE all trip
hazards due to UNEVEN and
or RAISED concrete.
Commercial/Residential
Concrete Grinding is 1/2
the cost of replacement.
Entry ways Ramps Sidewalks
Driveways Puddling Water, etc.
Insured
(8771454-0113 (toll free)








IWILady Lake, FL 32159
~352-430-2773
wwwsckconcretegrindoofing.com




Serving the Ti County Area For 26 Years
METAL TILE ~ SHINGLE ROOFING
New construction or Re-Roofing
B308 Oak Street
Lady Lake, FL 32159
352-430-2773
rwww.sackrooflng.con
Serving the Tri County Area For 26Yer


BDaniel Byars
Rescreens
Pato, Pool Enclosures a
A111 Alminum Repairs
FREEESTIMATES
352A082142


7 Triple Crown
Tile & Wood
Installation & Repairs
Owner does all work.
Free Est. Lic'/lns
3524274825


Birdcages/Lanais
Garage Screen Sliders
Screen Doors
OUR SPECIALTY SCREENS:
Privacy/Sunscreen
Super Solar Screen
Super Screen Pet Screen
FL Glass 20x20 Screen
Kickplate Dog Doors
FREE ESTIMATES
Lic/Ins. NO MONEY DOWN!






I Ars Al e DoorsI


IopeeService &Istlain
S All Maes aes& Models.
l IBrekeu Suring Hwleliseumsin
10%ROw/ilsadt r
352-347-6411

QCi #CBC1252465
GARAGE DOORS
Complete Service & Installation
Lake County's Largest Provider!
We Sell & Program Remotes!
1 3521 748-4575


Repairs &
Garage Door Repants
& Locally Owned
Gate All Work
Warranted
Licensed & Insured midfldoor.com
352-630-0292 o Shane Blanton











Affordable Horn.
~Repair, LLC
&ragepair- Decks & Rampsvcs
Mobil Homng Replacement. Free Est.s









Softs/Siding Doors/Windows
Panting Tile Work. Lic/Ins
tt FLA07
D We service all of Central FLA.
L i/Ins. Call 352-6t1 24







rsHandymindo




Door & WidwInstallion
~Carpentry,

fessional Service
352-259-5357
Affordable Some












VEMM T Dl'AM7
Home Repair, LLC







1Pressure Washing Painting
Mobile FloHome Repair Apt. Clean Outs
& Repair Decks & Ramps
Soffits/Siding e Doors/Windows






P Clean Ups T Hauling Work* Lice/Insed
Cal at 352-787-70560








wewJOhn Philibert, lncI
WeHdo Everything tram Ceilings to
Pantries, Cabinets and more.i
FDoor & Window Installion







Cur pesky Leaks gone, Your Sofyits
x, and Houses We'll Paimrovement. From,
inside and out, we'll makre Just Ask!
JPHandycom(f352eional Se38-e694
Licflns. 352-259-5357

f ItklktT IftroaM 71
^:-:-:Home Repair:-*-, ;
*Pressure Washing Painting
*Flooring e Carpet Clean Outs
C lean Ups Hauling o Licensed
352-787-7056

~~ ohn Philibert, Inc
'SW^e do Everything from Ceilings to
^Bf Floors. Window and Doors,
*'Pantries, Cabinets and more.
Your pesky Leaks gone, Your Soffits
we Fix, and Houses We'll Paint From
inside and out, we'll make it graL Lic/Ins
,JPHandy.com(352) 308'-06941


BATHTUBS REFINISHED I-A Li #C125246
ON LOCATION DOOR & LOCK SERVICE
iMW Porcelain Fiberglass We Repair, Replace and Install
r Ceramic Tiles
Shower Stalls Emergency Services Available!
LAKESIDE TUB & TILE REfiNISHING
(352) 742-9602 (352) 314-3169


J Mike Shoffstall
Call 352 552 1875 |
JUNnGLE HUThi
REPAIR Si
Repair everything. Replace anything.


Kitchens Bathrooms -Windows
Vinyl Siding Decks Painting/Staining
Tile/Marble Lanai Enclosures
Mike Lalonde 352-409-8311
mike@ image4me.comn

















l IBOYDS

You call it We haul it! l
352
460-7186




METAL TILE SHINGLE ROOFING
New Construction or Re-Roofing
B 308 Oak Street
Lady Lake, FL 32159
352-430-2773
www.sackroofing.com
Serving the Tri County Area For 26 Years

D&B RENOVATIONS
352-572-1847
FREE ESTIMATES
S "ONE CALL DOES IT ALL"
JI j k Bathroom Remodels, Flooring,
r---r Painting, Pressure Washing,
I Privacy Fence AND MORE
|i Insured & Experienced

Brighlman Home Improvement
Wallpaper, Drywall
Interior Painting, Trim
n51 REE ESTIMATES
-Insured
-352.598-3169


_________1


0'sNGOT M11ED?
r Water Damage, Allergies?
11352 552-3386
OX Testing Dry-Outs, Restoration





Local Agent
Long Term Care Ins.
Medicare Supplements
Critical Care Ins.
Cancer Ins.
Call Bill Bell
352.589-0454 or 352.551.3504

Dec. 7 is the Last day
to change Medicare
for 2014.
352-742-2425
lange.rob.ins@gmainall.com




Irrigation^ Tune-Up
$35m Check & Adjust
p! K Entire System.
$J5l Provide Written Est.
To Fix Problems!
Lower Your Monthly Cost
352-409-3163

6P111 Sprinkler
SRepairs
Timers, Valves, Heads,
SLeaks, etc.
52) 787-9001
s all we do since 1979
lye, 4th Generation




i.C.C. Bobcat a& Tree Svc. inc.
^KLand Clearing/Excavating
i">S lil Dirt/Clay
I .^,&JlaulingIDebrs Removal
wV^9 Stump Grinding
Demolition/Gradingl Driveways
352-455~-7608


ClarngService

1CHRIS CAnNES LANDSCAPE
icceOng haeit
Lawn Maliateanc Hautscae. PatiNs,
ReMalInIg Walls. ManL Sadi li
Leesburu 536-37068
26 Yes I U, M.I qaFl.
u11Mad ma La pec

A-1 -Premier Scapes
& Services Inc.
Land Clearing Bush Hogging
Debris Removal
Hauling Free Estimates
352-308-5508




Landscaping

Trimming, Mulching,
Sod, Tree Trimming,
Pavers & Much Morel
Armando Santamario
352-587-1323


(AllYardWork




LAWN E^R. 1S.


SDon't Stress Call The Best!
|6 tDependable Commercial
Lawn Services
Lic/Ins. Designer
Landscaping, Trimming,
1 ~ Shrubs. We do it all
r ^ ick 352-427-8919

Howards Lawn
service
Estdenuial/Commircial
Uclns
(352)
i800-9985

Iji4Wa wLawngre

Now acceiting ncw Ceinmrcial &
Resdelntlal customers. Mowni.
Laadscaping, Irrigatiin ani ldre.
Reasonable DepIndaIle, Exurlencedi
Office 352-552-45561 Cell 352-702-6460

dAll Lawn
I -P. l - l_'94 Care
m Service
;w eClearing (Goats)
"BEST PRICES" Free Est
352-460-7186




Service
Center
^&&/402* -'352-602-1735
At Venetian Gardens
Marina on the
Harris Chain of Lakes.
No Trailer. No Problem.
Boat Repairs & Svc. on water


COVERED BOAT SUPS FOR RENT
wn Palms Marna located on
[Make Griffin. water & elec. avail.
"eekty, Monthly or Yearly. BOAT
RENTALS: Pontoons,
Jon Boats, Kayaks & Canoes.
Call 352-787-4514





Bill's Moving
nla. Mover Reg. No: 295
Owner On Every Job
Fair Rates a 27+ Yrs. Exii.
352-669-4456
Toll Free 888-444-3559


I




Saturday, November 30, 2013


Little John's Movers &
Storage 352-812-4889
Serving Lake, Marion,
& Sumter Counties
1-15 items same day delivery
Local & Long distance moves
SLoading & unloading pods, rental
trucks, & storage units.
We have trucks going up &
down 195 & 1 75
"Less Than a POD" "Door to Door"
You're Coming ....Your Neighbor is Goingi
Jump on Board and Save
SERVING ALL 50 STATES
One item to a full housef!!
We will get off the interstate for you!
ljm9575@yahoo.com
US DOT #2406621



QuaUityAssurance Painting, Inc.
"If you want quality, you want us!"
Ti ~ Iuturler-~ htrler- Repaints
^^" W New eenstruciont
L Uconsed/lInsured
IT I TimGrubbs I
-- 352-483-6915
wqualityassurancepaintinginc.com

[^ff CO-ED
Ir' PROF'KSISONALI
fPAINTIN9, INC.
SCommercial FREE ESIMTES
& Residential (352) 267-6430
5* WWW CO-EDPROPANrELCOM
UvIcensed and Insured
NTERIOREXTERIOR PAINTING & OTHER SV
(352) 348-6923
Tim Mundy Painting
& Pressure Cleaning Services, Inc.
('^ "Whre Quality Is No Accideat"
\- Licensed & Insured
1 John Philibert, Inc
SFor All Your Interior/Exterior
[ ~ Painting Needs.
I C We Also Offer
Driveways Patios
And Faux Finishes Lic/Ins
Call John @ (352) 308-0694
JPHandy.comr
New England Painter
VSemi-Retired
30 Years Exp
Interior, Exterior, Pressure
Washing No Job Too Small
Bob Kelley Painting
352-702-7739

CLAUDE WILD PAINTING
High Quality @ Reasonable Prices
Int. & Ext. Free Est. Lic/Ins
Pressure Cleaning Ref. & 35 yrs. exp.
in Lake County
cwildpainting@gmail.comrn


Affordable Home
S Repair, LLC
Interior/Exterior Painting
Exterior Paints.Driveways and Decks
NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL Lic/Ins
Call Pat 352-551-6073
linifhor a Exterior
Se&alats
concrete CoatIngs
Pressure CleanlIng
UL&Ins.- Free estimates
352-728-4561


INDOOR PEST
P CONTROL
s low as $20 per me.
L 352-357-5905
SPest Exterminator


Servi~ces~iTiT


pSince 1969
L Spec~ializing in
Vandas.
Call for hours
:77 Hl 352-787-9001
H 1, Ds+ 2902 South St.
Leesburg, FL
GoodwinOrchids.com






Family Owned & OperatedIlg
Residential & Commercial
www.PrimePlumbinginc.com
(352) 383-3440 #CFc142675o


Ac Plumbing, LLC
Al Plumbing Re pairs Comm/ies
Piclei&s a Batio Remodels
Dispsal, Water Heater. Gas Pp1nmg.
rain/Seower Clea sing.
N Grout Showers. 24 inr. Emergency
u 35.c6.(3521343-3763





Ace Pool Service
Complete Pool Services
Motor & Pump Repair
Pool & Patio Remodeling
Servicing Commercial & Residential
Properties Since 1969
Licensed!insured Free Estimates
352-735-3050

Prss r
Cle nin


.HAV.EN Providing
No-Cost Svcs.
to Lake county
sexual assault victims 24/7/365.
On-Call Rape Advocacy
Counseling, Legal Assistance
Hotline 352-787-1379
You need an ADVOCATE now!!!
You have rights when it comes to your care
at home, in a hospital or nursing home.
Call Ann @352-326-2030 or visit
www.ProfessionalAdvocacyPartners.com
We'll help you get the care you deserve!




5&vut., Pryj
Shingle, Tile, Licensed Bonded Insured
I Metal, and Rubber Residential/Commercial
Roof Systems RC29027460 I
(352) 669-6607 I

METAL TILE SHINGLE ROOFING
New Construction or Re-Roofing
B 308 Oak Street
Lady Lake, FL 32159
352-430-2773
www.sackroofing.com
Serving the Tri County Area For 26 Years

#1 IN ROOFING
Leak Repairs Shingles/Flat Roof
Lifetime Metal Roofs Screen Rooms
Lic. #CCC1329936
Villages Roofing and
Construction, Inc.-
FREE ROOF ESTIMATES
3BZ-314-36BZ

Lake Contracting, Inc.
Shingles, Metal or Flat
Additions, Remodels, Renovations
Roof to Foundation
352-602-8794
E :Z Lic. CGC1507556 CCC 1326899

RE-Roofs & Leak Repairs


IOME ZPNE
352 552-3386

We're Proud of Our Service
.... and you will be too!




1H OUN ER Rouwr,;
Free Estimates
Metal, Tile & Shingle Re-roofs
Serving all Lake &
Sumter Counties.
Mike Hunter
Fl License #RC29027482
Office (407) 947-2223
Fax (407) 347-3472
mike@hunterroofingLLC.com


SECURITY TRAINING
* Security "D"&"G" Lic.
PLUS: FL. Concealed Lic.
NRA Instructor Training
Ladies Only Classes Avail.
352-350-2855
iLODS13M133 www.TheRightTraining.corn




352-3017-8474 or 427-7767
Robert Manning, Inc.
SShower Doors Tub Enclosures
SGrab Bars Bath Accessories
Mirrors Closet/Garage Storage
SSales Service Installation
S Lic/Ins FREE Estimates




Speaizd Storage Soutions
Now is the timne...
To organize your life!
Custom Closets, Home Office, Garages
Tailored To Your Needs,
17 Years Exp.
Free Hiome Design Consultation
352-383-7058 407-718-6818 (Cell)




John Philibert, Inc
For All Your Tile Needs
Pergo, Ceramic Tile,
Travertine, Vinyl & More
Call John @(352) 308-0694
JPHandy.com Lic/Ins


RE-TILE
352-391-5553
Backsplashes Re-Tile Tub & Shower
Walls Grab Bars Floors
Handicap Baths Repairs
Leaky Shower Pan
Ins./Lic. 30 yrs. exp.


IJA a beweat a Tree Svc. Inc,
eRsidentlal/Commercial
Trimming/Removal
Palms/Hedges/Stump Grinding
Debris removal/Hauling
Fill DirtlClay/Grading/Driveways
Lic/Ins Insurance Work 24 Hrs.
352-455-7608

A Affordable Tree
Service
Tree Trimming & Removal
I Lake Cleaning Dead Wooding
I Moss Spraying Lic/Ins
Free Est. Senior Discounts
352-459-9428


.J1R ,JREE TRIMMING
mC & MORE
352-551-4222]

At Premier Scapes
m & Services Inc.
Complete Tree Service
Trimming Debris Removal
Stump Grinding ~ Free Estimates
352-308-5508


WA1ind[o[wY'i

i Uc. CBC1252465
"%w WINDOWS
We Install, Replace and Repair
Most Major Brands Available
Glass and Screen Repair
(352) 787-4545 1

S352-587-2735
CRC# 1330701 Lanai Enclosures
IGlass Window
Replacement
7 IAcrylic Windows
Screen Rooms

352-602-9849
SPARKLING
WINDOWS
MARK ANDERSON
Window Cleaning,
Screens, Tracks. FREE Estimates


SECURITY TRAINING
Security "D&"G" Lic.
PLUS: FL. Concealed Lic.
NRA Instructor Training
Ladies Only Classes Avail.

^^ 35*35-04255
Lic# DS303 www.TheRightTraining.com

Since 2007, The Right Training
has been providing Lake, Mar-
ion, and Sumter counties with
the BEST firearms training pos-i
sible.
Chief Instructor, Paul "Mac"
McIntyre (former Military, Law
enforcement, and Private Inves-i
tigator) and his associate in-
structors are dedicated to
educating, not just the public,
but up-and-coming NRA In-
structors and the
dedicated men and women in
Private Security.


Competitive Prices
* ,Qual1V Products
h~Pofssiona
Service
S109 W. LaM View SL Laf Lake
Behind Mom & Dad's Restaurant
www.blindsforeess.Mz hlindsforless.com
352.753.5003 :

Steve and Brenda Rizer

have owned Blinds 4 Less

since 2000. The business

is still in it's original

location in Lady Lake.

The company focuses on

strong customer service

and also selling the best

brand names in the indus-

try at very competitive

prices.


C/HRISCARNES LANDSrCAPE
et!.rsliSliwl
AcepngpN Chients
S Lawn Malntemance, Hardscape, Patios
Retaining Walls, Maint. Sodding
SLeeshurg 536-3708
20Ymars 5%n I 15%ON 3-
20Years Kerlscame wIttimis Design
Exerience w/d ad Landscape

Chris Gamrnes Landscape has been in
business since 2005 along with over
30 yrs experience in everything
from hardscapes such as patios,
retaining walls, to sod repair and
installations, to ripout of old
landscapes and design. We also can
provide maintainence to your newly
installed landscape or even mowing
maintainence services to even
sprinkler repairs. We serve all
projects big or small" create
landscapes one lawn at a time".
Mention this bio ad and receive 15
percent off when you call for your
estimate on any of our services.


I<


To hve-our rofssionalServic
listedheeplesecotat Mchlli
theClas-fed e-atmet a
(32)36-833 orbySmai
*.. S aiyco meria.co


........................................................... .............................................. =====.j


DAILY COMMERCIAL




DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 30, 2013


604 Furniture

COFFEE TABLE square 38"x38"x15"
inlaid oak. $95 obo. 352-343-6165

COFFEE TABLE Wood 20 x 52. $25.
Call 352-636-1352

COMPUTER DESK. Good cond. $50.
Call 352-396-5739

COMPUTER/TV CABINET 2 pcs, oak
w/doors. $65. 352-508-5593

CORNER TV CABINET, bi-fold doors
wood. 75. 715-671-8152

COUCH w/2 recliners & massage sys-
tem. Nearly new, dark brown man
made leather. $500. 735-2334

DINING ROOM SET rattan, Oak color. 4
swivel chairs w/caster. 42" glass
top table. New $1600 will sell for
$350. Call 352-406-5419

DINING TABLE made by Ashley, beauti-
ful wood & 6 chairs. Nearly new.
$500 Call 352-735-2334

DRESS/DESK antique, white w/4 draw-
ers. $50 Call 352-460-5557

DRESSER large, 6 drawer. Excel cond.
Wildwood. $100 obo. 461-7892

END TABLES (2) & Coffee table w/lift
top. Oak. $50.352-314-3657

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Ig. washed
oak, excel. $80 352-502-3445

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER, 5'Lx3'H, 2
glass doors. $60 352-561-1167

KITCHEN TABLE 41 "x54", w/4 chairs,
very solid. $75 Call 352-702-7632

LOVE SEAT leather, elec. reclining. $75
obo Call 352-357-3728

LOVE SEAT SLEEPER camel back. Clay-
ton Marcus $100. 352-742-0177

LOVE SEAT tan leather, reclines, new
$500 sell $100 Call 352-217-4809

MATTRESS & BOX SPRING Full. clean,
& good ocnd. $100. 352-460-0458

MATTRESS & BOX SPRING Queen,
clean. $100 Call 812-767-1918

OTTOMAN brown leather, new. $75
Call 352-750-5446

PATIO SET wrought iron. Table w/ped-
estal & 4 chairs. $95 365-0109

PORCH CHAIR, high back dark alum.
rocker. $75.SOLD

RECLINER dark brown leather, nice.
$99.352-636-9358

RECLINER Swivel rocker. Blue. $50.
352-742-1940

SOFA BED Cream color. $100.
352-561-4940

SOFA BED good cond. Neutral color, no
smoke/no pets. $100 787-8835

SOFA by Lane, brown leather. Good
cond. $100 Call 337-501-2198

SOFA La-Z-Boy 81" long, like new.
$300 Call 352-315-1294

SOFA with skirting, floral with wood
trim. $99. Call 352-321-4019

TABLE & 6/CHAIRS Duncan & Phyfe.
antique, asking $150. 267-8693

TABLE, Heart Shaped, 3 tier. brown,
good cond. $8 Call 352-504-6689

TEAK BAR, blk top, 2 draws + cabinet,
like new. $99 Call 352-602-7522

TELEVISION TABLE Black wood, 18 x
34, glass door. $25. 352-636-1352

WICKER ROCKER w/metal legs & cush-
ion, very nice $100 352-409-6691


605 Appliances

CERAMIC TOP RANGE, 36 inch GE
white, excellent cond. Price 250.00.
229-563-3159.

CHEST FREEZER 5'. Works good.
$100. 352-669-6742

CHEST FREEZER Frigidaire, like new.
$95 obo Call 352-326-8570

COFFEE MAKER Keurig K45 Elite. Excel
cond. $60 Call 352-435-4669

COFFEE MAKER Keurig mini plus
w/coffee. $50 Call 352-250-2302

DISCOUNT
APPLIANCE
Repair-Sales-Service Most Repairs
$60 Plus Parts





WASHER, DRYER,
REFRIGERATOR
"Don't Toss It
Fix It For Less"
Buying Clean
Washers & Dryers
Days, Evenings & Weekends
Call Now
352-874-1238

DORM SIZE REFRIGERATOR Whirlpool,
excel, cond. $75. 352-483-4762


DRYER gas, works great, white, used.
$99.352-315-9886

DRYER, Gas. New. $100. Call
352-408-4658

FREEZER small, Upright, Kenmore.
$100 obo. 352-748-2947

FREEZER upright, works great, moved
don't need. $95. 352-735-0519

REFRIGERATOR Whirlpool, never used.
26.cu.ft. French door w/water in
door. $1500 Call 352-259-0689


605 Appliances

JET STREAM OVEN made by American
Harvest. $75. 417-208-8420

REFRIGERATOR Whirlpool, new, $600
Call 352-750-5446

STOVE Magic Chef, elec.
Almond/black. Immaculate excel.
Cond. $125. Call 352-728-8466

606 Electronics

DIGITAL TV ANTENNA. Asking $40. Call
417-208-8420

GAME PSP Sony brand new in box.
$100 Call 352-455-3342

GAME SYSTEMS Nintendo 64, Game
Cube, PS1. $90 for all 357-2771

GOGGLE NEXT BOOK extended war-
ranty like new. $75. 352-435-0211

RECORD PLAYER CD/Tapes/Radio.
Doesn't convert. $50. 357-0225

TELEVISION STAND 20" w/wheels. $4
TV is free. 352-753-0657

SPEAKERS (4) Boston, acoustics. Micro
11 Ox. $50 Call 352-385-7359

TELEVISION 55" Hitachi. $100. obo.
Call 863-287-1468

TELEVISION RCA 32" not flat screen.
$25. Call 352-735-1647

TELEVISION, 51", Hitachi, big box style.
$50 obo. Works great. 383-0043

TOUCH BOOK READER Sony, Red, ex-
cel. cond. $50 Call 352-516-5364

624 Children's
items

BABY BATHTUB, toddler potty & sassy
seat. $15. 352-455-7557.

CRIB w/matching set, bumper pad,
quilt & skirt. Excel. $75. 330-0459

PACK N PLAY & WALKER almost new.
$49 will split. 352-253-9236

TODDLER BED Complete. Asking $45.
Call 352-751-4227

VANITY Girls, w/bench. $10. Call
352-742-2716

VIDEO PLAYER VHS, & 25 Disney
tapes. Great gift. $25. 793-1285

625 Building
Supplies/
Materials

KITCHEN SINK white, w/faucet &
sprayer. $40 Call 352-365-2301

PATIO DOORS Sliding glass. White
Frame. $75. Call Dave. 255-7623


630 Garage Sales

EUSTIS
Faith Lutheran, 2727 S. Grove St.
Fri. & Sat. 8am-1:OOpm
Furn, tools, appl., household items,
baby/children's items, lot's of books,
& much more!

FRUITLAND PARK
604 Smith St. Sat Nov. 30-Sun Dec.
1st. From 8am-2pm. Furniture,
small appliances, shoes, clothes,
toys, set of 4 car wheel rims, lamps,
end table, and much more. EVERY-
THING MUST SALE

LADY LAKE
Fri. Sat. 8 ??. 40406 Grays Air-
port Rd. Tools, antiques & house-
hold items.

LADY LAKE
Fri. Sun. 8 3pm. 607 Third Ave.
Furn., tools, go-cart, bow, bikes, ta-
bles, dressers, cooldkies & wood
flooring.

LEESBURG
Fri. Sat. Dec. 6th 7th from 7am -
1pm. Perkins, 27811 HWY. 27. All
proceeds go to: *Give Kids The
World Village*. (Children with life
threatening nr':-.::.

LEESBURG
Sat. 11/30/13 from 8am 12pm.
The Meadows in Leesburg #6 Gin-
ger Circle. Furn., Gator items,
kitchen items, and other misc.
items.

***LEESBURG***
HUGE SALE! Fri.- Sat. Griffin Rd.
between Thomas and HWY. 27 at
Oasis Apts. & Storage. See signs.
Mention Ad Get a FREE Soda.

635 Garden

CONCRETE FOUNTAIN, no pump. Good
cond. $100 Call 352-735-1570

FISH POND 50 gallons w/African Lily's.
You dig up. $100 Call 357-0766

GLIDER & 2 CHAIRS, vintage alum.
$100 Call 352-617-5498

GRILL Members Mark. 4 burner + side.
$99 obo. 352-308-7474

LAWN MOWER (Yard Machine) push
type, 20" cut. $45. 352-742-0789

LAWN MOWER elec. w/bag. Used 3
times, like new. $95 307-9462

LAWN MOWER Lowe's 21" self pro-
pelled runs good. $75. 536-3826

LAWN MOWER Self propelled. Very
Nice. $100. 352-383-0462

LAWN MOWER Troy Bilt self propelled
w/bagger. $100 352-636-6374

MOWER Murray Briggs & Stratton 20"
cut. 3.5hp classic. $65 343-4445


635 Garden

PATIO TABLE SET & 2 end tables
w/glass tops, 2 chairs w/cushions.
$75.352-636-1352

PATIO TABLE, 2 chairs cast iron with
ceramic. $100. 352-742-3332

ROTOTILLER Rally, 3.5hp, 14" CRT,
$75. Call 352-669-8833

SPREADER, NEW pull behind tractor.
$100 Call 352-728-6189

WEED EATER Feather weight gas,
String trimmer. $50. 352-552-7942

640 Guns

COLT Police Positive (First issue) 38
Special. Serial # 179XXX. Very good
cond. $620 firm. 352-205-2925

GUN SAFE 2013 Winchester TS9, 10
gun capacity w/mechanical dial
lock. Hold up to 10 long guns. Re-
cessed door. 2 way 1" diameter
locking bolts. 3 spoke handle. Exte-
rior dimensions 18"Wx15"Dx55"H.
Like new. $275 Call 937-681-3256

ITHICA Mod. 72 Saddle gun 22 WMRF
$500, Browning 12 GA Pump $500,
Savage 22 Over 20 GA $350.
352-748-3571

PISTOL Ethan Allen 4 shot black pow-
der, 36 caliber. $100. 383-9589

RUGER Reaper Camo Rifle. 10/22.
$360. New in box. 352-324-2236

TAURUS PT 24/7 OSS. 40 caliber, 3
magazines. $350. 352-569-1103

649 Medical

CARRIER FOR SCOOTER/POWERCHAIR
NEW, fits into hitch, 60" fold out
ramp. $195. 352-217-3437

POWER LIFT CHAIR Large, green. $99.
Call 352-365-1710

MEDICAL TRANSPORT CHAIR, like new
cond. $75.352-326-2849

TRUNK LIFT, elec. mobility for scooter.
Like new. $160 Call 352-383-0855

WHEELCHAIR heavy duty. $100 obo.
352-748-7847

WHEELCHAIR, Light weight portable
transport. $50. 352-217-4809

650 Computers
& Equip

MONITOR 23", Dell, LED, flat screen.
Like new. $75. 352-343-7553

PRINTER Brother MFC-495CW. Extra
ink. $50.224-356-6857

PRINTER HP office jet 4315, all in one.
Good cond. $50 Call 352-272-9770


652 Articles
For Sale

AFGHAN hand Crocheted, Granny
square's. $100 obo. 352-787-0551

BEDSPREAD King size, w/bedskirt.
shams, pillows. $50. 728-8460

BEDSPREAD Queen, beautiful. Good
backing. $65. 352-536-1744

BEDSPREADS (2) Twin size, floral pale
blue. $20. 352-787-5580

BOOKS (25) Clive Cussler including the
latest & 8 Lincoln Child books. $75
for all. Call 610-291-0556

CANISTER SET, 4 pcs. w/cookie jar,
Ducks. $35.352-753-8361

CARPET STRETCHER stainless steel.
$100 Call 352-787-5917

CD'S & OLD MOVIES $25 for all Call
352-728-3928

CHINA 58 pc. English Garden Platinum.
Asking $50. 352-742-2107

CHINA service for 8, includes serving
pieces.. $70 Call 352-455-6427

CHINA service for 8, includes, serving
pieces, excel. $100 357-1363

CHRISTMAS DISHES Service for 8, plus
serving pieces. $60. 352-750-0552

CHRISTMAS DOLLS, ceramic, from 18"
-2' tall. $25 obo. 352-751-6252

CHRISTMAS TREE and beautiful hand-
made tree skirt. $45. 787-0410

CHRISTMAS TREE prelite clear lights.
7.5'. Used once. $50 343-0110

CHRISTMAS TREE, 7', (Mountain King)
w/storage bag. $75. 352-748-9611

CHRISTMAS TREES (2) & other Christ-
mas items. $75 all. 989-284-2966

CHRISTMAS VILLAGE Snow Boarders
Elec. w/music. $25. 728-3802

CIVILIAN GAS MASK, new, 3 extras fil-
ters. $100. 407-310-6628

COFFEE MAKER KitchenAid. New. Paid
$189. Sell for $100. 352-978-7461

CRIMES OF A GUILTY LAND by Lees-
burg author Brooke Stewart. A perfect
gift for the history buff or for the Afri-
can American who is trying to reach
back through history and for all who
would put down hatred and racism.
Signed copies available through
guiltyland@cfl.rr.com at $16.00 tax
paid, or from Amazon.corn in paper or
Kindle versions or from Barnes and
Noble and Books A Million. Also
crimesofaguiltyland.com


652 Articles
For Sale

DISHES Pfaltzgraff Heirloom, 12 pc set-
tings. New cond. $100. 242-1609

DISNEY VHS TAPES & Player. (25).
$50. Call 352-250-4711

DRESS SHIRTS long sleeve 5 XL & 10
)XXL, $75 takes all. 586-945-1415

FAN tall, like new, marble & brass.
$100 Call 352-409-8264

FLEA MARKET ITEMS Jeans, tops, Holi-
day decor & more. $58. 793-8102

GLASS DISPLAY CASE 38"Hx48"W $65
obo Call 352-314-2123

JACKET Harley Davidson blk, XL. New,
not leather. $100. 352-243-1458

JEWELRY ARMOIRE, lined drawers
$100.352-603-4113

JEWELRY vintage sterling silver, 20
pieces. $75 for all. 716-319-7349

LEATHER JACKET BLACK, MEN'S size
40-44. $75.352-742-2856

LIBRARY LADDER 10' oak. $100.
352-669-2379

LIGHTED REINDEER (2). $40. Call
352-343-4550.

MEN'S CLOTHING XLg shirts 40-44W
shorts. 10 pcs. $20. 321-246-4371

MINK JACKET Ladies med. $100.
704-530-4305

MODEL TRAIN N-Scale layout, w/track
84X64X38. $99 Call 407-733-3022

MOTORCYCLE JACKET leather, U.S
made. size 56. $100. 669-7544

POT HOLDER wrought iron. $50.
417-208-8420

QUILT homemade queen, w/2 val-
ances. Gold/Greens $80 315-1033

RUG oriental Prussian, wool, 11'x9',
good cond. $250. 352-589-4405

SEWING MACHINE Brother NEW in box,
paid $79 sell for $50. 408-8033

SEWING MACHINE Kenmore in maple
cabinet. Good cond. $45 326-2849

SHAMPOOER Bissell, works good. $75.
352-365-1437

SKECHERS shape ups shoes 10 wide
men's, NEW. $50. 352-347-7350

SOLAR HOT WATER HEATER SYSTEM
$3000 obo. Call 352-728-6346


InPit&ChOn-Line


LtU~lnt& Onl-Line


taufl


A'- I:
*.N -...


Timoffjp




Saturday, November 30, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


652 Articles
For Sale
SQUARE DANCE OUTFITS (3 + 2 crino-
line), med/Ig. $50. 320-237-7461

TELEVISION ANTENNA 12'. $20 obo
Call 219-405-4086
TRAINS, HO gauge, Engine plus as-
sorted cars. $100 352-728-5262
TUXEDO Men's, Coat/Pants/Shirt, new
cond. $65. 352-217-4809
WEDDING DRESS size 6, w/little pearls.
Excel. cond. $90 352-821-0063
WINDOW AIR CONDITIONER, BTU
7,700, runs great. $40. SOLD!!!!
WOOD BURNING HEATER For Fireplace.
Forester. Fan forced air w/ermostat.
Double door glass front. 120V.
24Hx27Wx30D. $400. 406-9405
WRANGLER JACKET petite women's
med. from the '80's 352-315-1612

655 Musical
Instruments
BANJO 5 string, Kay. W/accessories.
$225. Call 352-343-6608

ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT RACK GATOR
4 post open, 42U. 23"D w/casters.
New $200 Call 937-681-3256
GUITAR acoustic Hohner (case &
stand, great shape. $100 323-3518
KEYBOARD Yamaha PSR730 w/stand.
Excel cond. $100. 343-9279
ORGAN Hammond, E133 over 30 yrs.
old. As is. $100 352-787-4877
ORGAN Lowrey C300, manuals. $100.
Eustis. 207-650-9838

674 Exercise Equipment
AB DOER. New. $65. Call
352-460-4741

ELLIPTICAL EXERCISER $300. Obo. Call
352-751-4912
INVERSION TABLE Like new w/instruc-
tions. $75. SOLD!!!!
RECUMBENT EXERCISE BIKE Schwinn A
Fitness 20. $100. 742-1221
STEPPER, XL, hydraulic w/meter & Bike
glider, $40 both. 352-383-5846
THIGH MASTER & GUT BUSTER, new.
$25 for both. 352-669-1163
TREADMILL Proform 775 cooling
breeze, inclines, program, good
cond. $1100 or. $250 obo Call
610-291-0556

675 Sports/
Recreation
BICYCLE 26" girls, Sears, 1 speed,
fenders, basket, A1 $49. 728-6835

BICYCLE 26" Ladies Scwinn Legacy.
Excel cond. $55.502-750-1085


8pm


675 Sports/
Recreation

BICYCLE 3 wheel, Miami Sun. Like
new. $300 obo. Call 352-343-7710

BICYCLE Men's Schwinn, Trail Way Hy-
brid, alum. $95. 434-5314

BICYCLE small girls, Barbie Doll. Like
new $50 Call 352-357-3616

BICYCLES 3 Wheel, rebuilt. Large Seat
& Basket. $150. 1-352-343-6608

CHILD CARRIER enclosed for behind
bike. $85 Call 352-314-9820

GOLF CADDY CART New, black. $25.
Call 352-365-6784

GOLF CLUBS brand new Ladies over-
sized in box $90. 352-735-6927

GOLF CLUBS men's complete set
w/bag. $25. 502-750-0512

GOLF SET irons, oversized woods,
w/bag. Like new. $50. 729-2595

GOLF SHOES LADIES, Foot Joy, 7.5
narrow. $65 obo. 352-323-8031

GOLF CLUBS Rawlings, bag plus pull
cart. $60 obo. 352-787-1539

TREADMILL Ride Strider 3360. $100.
352-406-3988

WET SUIT Men's large. Excel cond.
$50. Call 352-242-0152

685 Tools/
Machinery

DRILL 1/2" & SAWZALL made by Mil-
waukee. $150. 417-208-8420

LADDER 24" alum. Good cond. $100
Call 352-504-6406

LADDER Extends 12'6". Excel. cond.
$50.352-553-8364

LADDER Gorilla 28 positions. Used
once. $85 Call 352-408-4084

LADDER Metal, 3 step, w/tray. $65.00.
Call 352-748-0702

LEATHER IDEAL TOOL POUCH & BELT.
$40.417-208-8420

MOTOR, electric. 2hp. $100.
352-314-9065

RECIPROCATING SAW Craftsman. $35.
352-729-6610

ROUTER Craftsman. Like new. $50.
352-408-1576.

SAWZALL Makita model 2RVT3000.
$70. Cell 305-215-4463

TOOLS Yard & Workshop. Variety $100.
Call 352-748-2415

WORK BENCH 35H x 72W x 26D. $40.
352-874-2806


Time to sell that
motorcycle!


800
Real Estate
For Rent



806 Houses
Unfurnished

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
CLERMONT Palisades Golf Course,
13th Fairway, 3/2, vaulted ceilings,
fireplace 2 garage. $1,395 mo./yrly.
$1,500 mo. seasonal. Call Realty
USA, 407-599-5000 or call
305-607-7886

EUSTIS Historic house, 4/1, $1000/mo
Call 561-385-5579

EUSTIS nice 2 br, safe neighborhood,
close to water. W/D, $595/mo Call
813-781-9540

EUSTIS, 2/1, No Smoking. No Pets.
$750/mo., 1st, last & security
352-357-3457

LEESBURG, 3/1, fenced backyard,
newly remodeled. $750/mo. On
Cul-de-sac. Call 352-516-7921

LEESBURG, quiet 55+, 2/1, CHA, quiet
area, near Lake Griffin. $600/mo. +
dep. incl. lawn care.
407-928-6002 or 407-932-0898.
RENTALS
LONG TERM & UNFURN. RENTALS IN
SOUTH LAKE COUNTY.
ROCKER REALTY 352-394-3570
Ask For Janet or Emily
RockerRealtylnc.com
WEBSTER nice Ig. 4/2 $750/mo Call
813-781-9540

807 Apartments
Unfurnished

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375


24 No matter what time
7 of the day it is,
you can place
your classified
merchandise ad
online, pay for it and
just wait for the
phone to ring!


Fast, convenient and
on your schedule!


Dalu irCommercial
"Your Ftnt Choice" In-Print & On-Line


www.dolilycc'nrr erc-il. c'rm

*Employment advertisements are excluded.
Please call 352-314-FAST to speak with a customer service rep.
Lake: 352-314-3278 or Sumter: 352-748-1955


Add an exciting photo to your


advertisement and see


how fast the phone rings.


The Daily Commercial Classifieds

(352) 314-FAST (3278)


807 Apartments
Unfurnished

EUSTIS nice 1 br. $600/mo incl. all
util. 813-781-9540 or 303-6266

EUSTIS
All remodeled Apts!
1, 2 & 3 Bedrooms
Special starting at
$475 Only $350 Dep. Pet OK.
352-357-5675

LEESBURG
FIRST MONTH $99
MOVE IN SPECIAL!
*2/1 $500/dep.
o2/1 w/W/D hookup $550/dep.
*2/2 w/W/D hookup $600/dep.
Call 352-516-1244
Ask for Tina

LEESBURG,
2br, 1.5ba, townhome, spacious,
neat, near Venetian Gardens, W/D,
porches, only $625. Also 2br, 1 ba for
$595 plus deposit, no pets.
Call 352-787-5885

LEESBURG, Duplex VERY CLEAN 2/1,
no pets $550/mo + dep. 551-6772

LYN TERRACE
Eustis
352-357-7332
www.lynterrace.com
Great Move-In
Specials & Free Gifts!
*1 & 2 Bedroom Units
*All 1st Floor- No Stairs!

PALM BROOK APTS.
LEESBURG
1 br's starting @ $470
Payment on security deposit.
Call 352-787-1912 TDD 711


EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

808 Apartments
Furnished

FRUITLAND PARK
TWIN PALMS MARINA
1 BR. MOBILES NEWLY RENOVATED
FULLY FURNISHED
ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED
WEEKLY & MONTHLY RATES.
NO DEPOSIT
SMALL DOGS ALLOWED.
OLD FLORIDA FISH CAMP WITH
CONVENIENCE STORE ON PROPERTY.
CALL 352-787-4514
LEESBUHRJ
1ST MO. FREE!
SPANISH VILLAGE
Pool, great location!
Furn. Efficiency, incl.
util. & cable. $700/mo.
2/1 apt. $600/mo.
Furn. $700/mo + util.
352-728-5555

809 Roommate
Wanted

LEESBURG female to share 2/1 apt.
House privileges. $400/mo incl. util.
$100 dep. Call 352-460-5668

810 Duplexes

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375

LEESBURG 2/2, Paulling Dr. $650/mo.
1st, Last, Security & Good Refer-
ences. Call 352-787-0004

LEESBURG, 2br/1ba $450/mo. 1721
Birchwood Cir. Call now!
352-325-1289

811 Condos
Townhouses




HOWEY-IN-THE-HILLS 4/2.5/1 very
nice 3 story, 2200sf. Stainless appl.
granite counter tops, W/D hookup.
$10O00/mo + security. Call
407-947-4968 ______


816 Commercial
Property

LEESBURG
Warehouses w/Offices
2315-25 Griffin Rd. 1,150 up to
12,400sf. Starts at $300/mo.
Office/Showroom
1607 Hwy. 441 $850/mo
Small Shop or Office
2204 Citrus Blvd (441)
$320/mo., includes utilities
352-787-0004

SABAL PROFESSIONAL SUITES II
The Villages/Lady Lake
New all inclusive office suites.
Receptionist, conference room,
full kitchen, deskw/chairs, phones,
copier/fax, internet, wi-fi, all office
needs in one low payment.
JUST SIT DOWN, PLUG IN,
GO TO WORK.
Conveniently located on CR 466
East of Rolling Acres.
'.:rn:i Frefnrrd I3aIR 1mtjgn'i. Group
(352)633-1900

819
Manufactured
Homes Rental

ALTOONA QUIET COUNTRY SETTING
2/1 $475/mo. w/$300 dep.
3/2 $560 plus $300 dep.
And RV Lot $290/mo. w/$100 dep.
352-735-2071 or 352-636-6800

ATTENTION SENIORS AND ADULTS
Never lived in. Brand New 66x14, .'.
in nice quiet park in Eustis.
$650/mo + utilities. Sorry NO KIDS.
Call 352-589-4407

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
FRUITLAND PARK 3/2 great area,
fenced yard. $825/mo + security.
Call 352-874-8880

LAKE PANASOFFKEE 3/2 in adult park,
no pets. $650/mo, + security dep.
You pay elec. 352-793-6633

LEESBURG 6 mi. West. 2/1, CHA.
$525/mo. + security. 409-2492




900
Real Estate
For Sale



902 Open Houses
For Sale

EUSTIS COMMUNITY
OPEN HOUSE &YARD SALE
Southern Palms RV Resort
1 Avacado Lane
Next to Eustis Fairgrounds)
Sat. 8am 1pm
Food & Sale/Raffles
Something for Everyone!

903 Homes
For Sale

WATERFRONT HOMES LEESBURG
Immaculate 2/2 almost new on Lake
Harris Lagoon. $259,900
FRUITLAND PARK
3/2 canal front, Lake Griffin
$144,900
Call 352-787-4584
GalbreathRealty.com


910 Condos/Townhouses

CLERMONT
FOR SALE BY OWNER (352)
394-1574 2-BEDROOM 2-BATH
2-CAR GARAGE TILE AND CARPET
THROUGHOUT, NEW APPLIANCES
INCLUDING WASHER AND DRYER.
A/C RECENTLY UPGRADED. PER-
FECT FOR YEAR ROUND LIVING OR
SNOWBIRD. MOVE IN READY. IM-
MEDIATE OCCUPANCY. ONE STORY
WITH VAULTED CEILING @ GREAT
ROOM. LOW MONTHLY H.O.A. FEES
OF $130.00 INCLUDES LAWN CARE
AND IRRIGATION. CLUBHOUSE WITH
POOL AND TENNIS COURT. BRING
YOUR GOLF CART AND CLUBS AND
ENJOY GREEN VALLEY'S 18 HOLE
CHAMPIONSHIP GOLF COURSE.




1000
Manufactured
Homes



1001 Mfd Homes
For Sale

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
LADY LAKE Immaculate, 1987 Skyline,
Bays, 14x66, 2BR/2BA, w front
Sunroom and side screened porch,
utility room, roof over, beautiful end
lot. Only minutes from The Villages.
$13,900, motivated Seller.
850-591-9955

LEESBURG Completely renovated park
model. New appliances and floors.
Lots of shade. Partially furnished.
AC/Heat, Washer/Dryer. Pet friendly
park located on Haines creek where
fishing is great. Dock access. Lot rent
$310.00 a month. Reduced! $9,900
OBO. Call 906-440-1020

SENIORS AND ADULTS
NEW and NEWER
Homes in a nice quiet part in Eustis.
$25,000 $45,000 Financing avail.
Only 3 left! Lot rent $350 per mo.
Call 352-589-4407

1002 Mid
Homes
W/ land
For Sale

1012 RYVLots

ALTOONA QUIET COUNTRY SETTING
2/1 $475/mo. w/$300 dep.
3/2 $560 plus $300 dep.
And RV Lot $290/mo. w/$100 dep.
352-735-2071 or 352-636-6800




1100
Recreation



1101 Boats

PONTOON BOAT '03 Sweet Water 18'.
40hp, Yamaha oil injected engine.
Power elec. trim, elec. trolling mo-
tor, navigator, new batteries, very
low hours, all covers. $6500.
SOLD!!!!!


^ Eustis N
1 Bedroom, Private Patio I
I 1 Story, Walk to Publix
Bring This Ad To Receive
$100 OFF
I First Full Month Ren
I 1651 N. County Rd 19A,
I Eustis Fl 32726
1^ 352-357-7332




I A picture is worth a


thousand words....


--The Daily Commercial
IThe DiyCommercial





DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, November 30, 2013


1101 Boats
JON BOAT 10' alum. Good cond. $100
Call 352-702-8956

1120 Marine
Equip/
Supplies
OUTBOARD MOTOR 1952, 15hp evin-
rude, for parts. $99. 589-4712
SPARE TRAILER TIRE ST215-75R14
radial. New. $75. 267-4632

1150 RV&
Campers
ALUMINUM 6 STEP, for truck slide-in
camper. Folds up when on the road.
$200 CASH ONLY. 352-638-9060
ALUMINUM TOPPER w/ladder rack,
7'Lx6'W. $50 obo 255-4354
CAMPER PORT A POTTY new with
chemicals. $50. 352-323-4862
FORD-250 2203. Super Duty Crew
Cab, 7.3L Powerstroke diesel, 161K
miles, 4x4, automatic, air, power
windows, power doors, power seats,
sliding 5th wheel hitch with goose
neck adapter, power programmer,
5" exhaust, roof mount wind deflec-
tor, accessory tailgate. Kelley Blue
Book $14,300. 2005 Keystone
Montana M3400RL, 37', 4 slides,
washing machine, dryer, central
vacuum system, electric fireplace, 2
a/c units. NADA average retail
$32,875. Will sell as package
$42,000. 402-926-6177.
REESE 5TH WHEEL HITCH w/bed rail
kit. Like new. 16K towing capacity.
$250.407-886-7653


1200
Transportation

1205 Autos
CORVETTE 81 blk on blk. 383 w/auto-
matic, mirrored T-Top. Running &
driving project. Tagged/registered.
Needs love! Factory A/C car, com-
ponents somewhat there? Starts
right up & runs very, very, strong.
Some of these go for $10-$15K
correctly done. No joy rides. $5750
obo. Call 352-728-6254
















Stc#1 40245
9 ,;3 i
pls a tagan $99delefe



Lesbr, Florid

352I I-240-7480 l]Y.1 Il


1205 Autos
CASH PAID FOR JUNK CARS! I
$300 and up. Call 352-771-6191
LINCOLN TOWNCAR 2000. Looks
good, runs great! $2600. 750-2755

1206 Aviation

1210 Mcycles/
Mopeds
HELMETS (2) HJC full face silver/blk.
$100 for pair. 352-589-1384
KAWASAKI '05, VN2000, 2053cc, larg-
est production V-twin. Pristine cond.
Many extras. $6800 obo. Call Greg
407-497-3874
TAIL LIGHTS for Honda Gold Wing, $80.
Call 352-552-0114

1240 Trucks
Light Duty
DODGE DAKOTA '07, 4 door, 6 cylin-
der, 60K, $11,300 Call 365-6238

1247 Trailers
CALIBER CARHAULER 2012, 7X1 6, ex-
cellent cond., radial tires. $2,000.
Tie downs avail. 352-343-0747
TRAILER TIRES & RIMS 12". Good
tread. $45. SOLD!!!!
UTILITY TRAILER 2013. 5 x 10 w/15"
wheels. $775. Call 352-399-2228


1247 Trailers
UTILITY TRAILER 4 x 8. Used once. Like
new. $550. 352-365-9917

1264 Auto
Parts
Accessory
CAR COVER late model Volkswagen
Bug. $60 Call 413-539-4402
CAR WHEEL DOLLY'S (4) $100 Call
352-636-1352
CARGO CARRIER 2" connector, w/cast-
ers & handle. $75 352-315-1294
DIGITAL FIT FLOOR LINER 08-'12 for a
Scion XB, $78. 352-633-2457
REESE HITCH for Ford. Class 5 w/ball &
plug. $50 Call 352-460-6409
TIRES (4) Goodyear Wrangler
P235/75R/15. $100 636-9141
TOW BAR, good cond. $60 Please call
352-383-0855
TRUCK BED roll up cover, will fit 8' bed.
$200 CASH ONLY 352-638-9060
TRUCK TOOL BOX Husky, full size, as
new. $100. 352-242-1038

1275 Golf
Carts
CLUB CAR '95, 48V runs good & looks
good. $1295 Call 352-638-0731
TIRES for golf cart (4), like new. $100
Call 336-817-7509


AUTI




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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 30, 2013


iMLSM]I'ra)M fI~s!








Home
352-365-8208 I features@dailycommercial.com


El
DAILY COMMERCIAL
Saturday, November 30, 2013


www.dailycommercial.com


RESTORATION: Couple revives home in childhood neighborhood / E7


As a general rule, leave the leaves


LEE REICH
Associated Press
If you had driven past my
house in recent days, you
might have thought you
were watching a movie in
reverse. There I was, open-
ing trash bags, dumping out
leaves and spreading them
over the ground.
These were bags left curb-
side for me by neighbors
near and far.
It does seem crazy, doesn't
it, gathering up all these
bags and dumping out all
those leaves? But dried, dead
leaves contain stored energy,
the sun's energy. Put them


on or in the soil, as I have
been doing, and they release
their energy to support the
growth and activity of fungi,
earthworms and other soil
organisms. Mostly, these are
friendly creatures, and nur-
turing them allows them to
thwart unfriendly organ-
isms, such as those causing
some plant diseases.
Besides disease preven-
tion, when leaves are gob-
bled up by soil organisms,
the nutrients in them are
being released. Think of all
those minerals taken in by
a tree's wide, spreading and
deep roots. Just falling to


the ground all around you,
leaves are, pound for pound,
about as rich in minerals as
is manure.
NOT FOR EVERYWHERE
Of course, spreadingleaves
over the ground or just leav-
ing them there in the first
place is not an option for ev-
ery site.
I have spread leaves over a
hayfield in which I've plant-
ed chestnut trees. In coming
years, these trees will shade
out the grass; I'm just help-
ing the ground become the
leaf-blanketed forest floor
SEE LEAVES I E2


AP PHOTO


This photo provided by Ikea shows Heart and Folk Santas that can be rendered in any material.


Setting the seasonal stage,


what's new in holiday decor


KIM COOK
Associated Press
Following the general trend
in home decor, holiday trim
and accessories this year are
an eclectic mix of traditional
and non-traditional colors and
styles.
Remember when blue or pas-
tel pink ornaments were the
height of kitsch? Now they're
mainstream, elegant options.
And while red and green are
popular hues, they are not mar-
ried to each other. Red might be
paired with ivory, or amethyst;
green may partner with copper,
caramel or bright white.
As for what goes on the tree


or the mantel, well, that's the
thing anything goes.
Style watchers say we're ap-
proaching the holidays with a
more open mind. Households
are more diverse, relaxed and
less tied to old-school ways of
celebrating. So it follows that
ideas of what works in decor
have never been more expan-
sive.
Some general trends:
HOLIDAY HUES
While jewel tones and creamy
palettes hold strong, red is red-
hot.
"When it comes to an 'it' col-
or for Christmas this year, it's


red a bright, cheery red like
you find on traditional Scan-
dinavian ornaments," says
Sara Peterson, editor in chief
of HGTV Magazine. "Red may
seem like an 'oh, duh' col-
or trend, but there have been
years when greens, blues and
purples were more popular.
This season, we're seeing a ton
of decorations in candy red."
Ikea has a cheery collection
of traditional Scandinavian or-
naments including folk people,
stars and goats. Land of Nod's
Rising Star tree topper fea-
tures curly white embroidery
on crimson felt. Cranberry red
SEE DECOR I E6


AP PHOTO
A gardener spreads leaves beneath a row of dwarf apple trees where a
leafy mulch keeps weeds from growing and stealing nutrients and water
from small trees.


" Add color to


I your landscape


/ for the holidays


As we get ready for
the holiday sea-
son, everyone
wants some color in
their landscape. Don't
just think poinsettia.
December is a great
time to plant mass-
es of petunia, pansy
and snapdragons for
winter color. Petunia
and snapdragons are
planted in the spring
in the north, but will
do well in Central Flor-
ida in the winter. Cool
season vegetables like
celery, cauliflower, let-
tuce, cabbage and car-
rots can be planted re-
liably this month too.
Parsley, thyme, sage,
dill, fennel and cilan-
tro are great herbs that
will also thrive in our
December weather.
Amaryllis bulbs are
popular holiday plants


Juanita
Pop enoe
LAKE COUNTY
EXTENSION


and may be forced to
bloom now or plant-
ed outdoors for spring
blooms. To force
bloom, pot the bulb
with 1/2 to 2/3 of the
bulb above the soil sur-
face. Water thorough-
ly and place the con-
tainer in a cool, bright
location. Do not wa-
ter again until the bulb
begins to sprout.
After the bulb
sprouts, keep the soil
consistently moist, but
not over watered. Place
the pot where it will
receive several hours
SEE POPENOE I E2


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Learn to make holiday crafts at the "First Saturday in the
Gardens" program on Dec. 7 at the Discovery Gardens.


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Dog-doo scofflaws get bagged through DNA testing


RODRIQUE NGOWI
Associated Press

BRAINTREE, Mass.
- Apartment and con-
do managers, dogged
by complaints from
those who've experi-
enced the squishy and
smelly sensation of
stepping onto a pile of
dog doo, are turning to
DNA testing to identi-
fy the culprits who don't
clean up after their pets.
It's the latest twist
in the long-running
struggle to keep ca-
nine waste off lawns,
hallways, elevators and
other common areas of
animal-friendly com-
munity buildings.
DNA monitoring has
yielded immediate and
dramatic results in the
condominium com-
munity of Devon Wood,
where maintenance
staff previously report-
ed seeing, stepping
onto or driving over
several piles of drop-
pings each week on its
350-acre property.
"We initially didn't
- for a better part of
a month didn't find
any waste, which just
floored us," said Bar-
bara Kansky, who man-
ages the 398-unit con-
do development in the


town of Braintree that
introduced DNA mon-
itoring in July.
Polite reminders, let-
ters and notices previ-
ously failed to persuade
errant pet owners to ob-
serve condo rules re-
quiring them to clean
up after their animals,
Kansky said. There were
problems even after
residents reported see-
ing others failing to pick
up their dog's messes.
"We would call or
send a letter and that
dog owner would say:
'Prove it,'" Kansky said.
So she searched on-
line and found Knox-
ville, Tenn.-based Bio-
Pet Vet Lab, which
specializes in testing
DNA from dog poop to
identify offending ani-
mals. BioPet has beefed
up its staff with more
scientists to meet de-
mand for what Eric
Mayer, director of busi-
ness development,
calls "a booming, grow-
ing, new product," and
has started distribut-
ing throughout the U.S.
and into Canada, Isra-
el and Singapore in the
past two years.
The service, brand-
ed PooPrints, is a very
simple, Mayer said.
The first step is to


* 4 "~-'


Barbara Kansky, condo manager of Devon Wood in Braintree, Mass., uses a long cotton
to demonstrate how to obtain a DNA cheek cell sample from her dog, Justine.


register the DNA of all
dogs in the communi-
ty by collecting sam-
ples of their cheek cells
using a pair of sterile
swabs, Mayer said in an
email. The second is to


collect a sample of fe-
ces and send it to the
lab for matching.
An attorney advised
Kansky that condo
trustees could enforce
existing condo rules by


requiring all dog
ers to submit the
imals for collect
DNA samples. Dog
ers paid a one-tin
of $59.95 for the
DNA testing for th


LEAVES and water from my
small trees.
FROM PAGE El And no need to rake
up all the leaves from
that it will eventually even a manicured
turn into. lawn: A mulching
Beneath a row of mower can grind them
dwarf apple trees, a up to let enough grass
leafy mulch keeps peek through to thrive.
weeds from growing If leaves form such a
and stealing nutrients thick blanket that rak-


ing is necessary, don't
bag them until you've
spread all you can un-
der your shrubs and
trees, and over your
flower beds. Save your-
self effort and do some-
thing for the plants:
At the very least, leave
leaves where they drop.


LEAVES PLUS TIME
EQUALS COMPOST
Still drowning in
leaves? Hold off a bit
longer before you pack
them into trash bags.
Consider packing the
leaves into a dense pile
for composting. Leaves
make excellent, weed-
free compost if you let
them sit long enough.
In a rush? Then mix
in some manure, sprin-
klings of soybean meal


POPENOE
FROM PAGE El

of direct sunlight and
temperatures close
to 750F. You should
have flowers within
six weeks of planting.
Once the flowers open,
move the pot away
from bright sunlight.
When the flowers fade,
place the pot in light
shade. Water and fer-
tilize to encourage new
growth or transplant
the bulb outdoors to a
spot with light shade.
From 5:30 to


Brownwood
Paddock
Square

&^"
E = CLOW
m1cirom~
mKsm SfmS


or other materials rich
in nitrogen.
By next year at this
time, most of the leaves
you spread around or
piled up this year will
have either settled or
evanesced into thin air,
becoming mostly car-
bon dioxide and water.
A significant but small
portion will endure in
the soil, having been
transformed to hu-
mus. This humus pro-
vides long-term bene-

7:30 p.m., on Dec. 3,
you can have fun and
reduce holiday stress
by making inexpensive
beverage mixes that
your family and friends
will love in the class
"Gifts from your Kitch-
en: Holiday Beverage
Mixes." Preregistration
is required.
Holiday crafts are
also the topic of the
"First Saturday in the
Gardens" program on
at 10 a.m., on Dec. 7.
Come and learn about
holiday plants and
their care, then make
and take a vintage hol-


BlackalMty PG 1041 1:05 320 5:35 7:50 10:05*
HoitefroI R 10:50 1:45 430 7:45 10.10'
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k mt P613 10130 5:15 730 9:45'
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Free Wns 3D P6 1:15 only
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JackM Preuts
Bad Grandpa R


5:45 &W and 10:15 only
* Friday and Saturday only


fit to the soil, aerating
sticky clays and help-
ing sands sponge up
and hold onto water for
plant use.
Roses, rhododen-
drons, lawns almost
all plants, in fact ap-
preciate any leaves left
or applied around their
"feet."
Of course, if everyone
follows my advice, I'll
no longer be importing
neighbors' leaves.

iday wreath made of
vines from the garden.
Other crafts made of
items from the garden
will be shown and dis-
cussed. Preregistration
and $5 is fee required.
The Discovery Gar-
dens will be open on
Dec. 7 from 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. and are always
free.
If you missed "Chick-
en University," we have
an encore presenta-
tion. From 6 to 8 p.m.,
on Dec. 5, Megan Brew
will introduce begin-
ning farmers to the art
and science of rais-
ing chickens on a small
scale. She will cover
getting started, under-
standing avian biolo-
gy, preventing preda-
tion and dealing with
laying problems. If you
are thinking of raising
a few chickens for eggs,
this course is a must.
Visit the Discovery
Gardens and our plant
clinic with your plant
problems and ques-
tions from 9 a.m. to
4 p.m., weekdays, at the
ag center, 1951 Wood-
lea Road, Tavares.
Juanita Popenoe is the di-
rector of the UF/IFAS Lake
County Extension office
and environmental horti-
culture production agent III.
Email jpopenoe@ufl.edu.


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Friday, November 29 through Thursday, December 5
KIII Your DBarlings R 9:45 12.10 2:35 5:1 7:25 t:5*
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The Boek Thief PG13 10:101:10 4:05 71101:00
Spanish Dallas B Glub R 10:40 1:35 4:15 7:15 9:55'
Springs 12YesASIla R 9:45 1-00 4:05 710 10:05"
Town All Ist LPS13 1050 1:30 4:15 6:50 920'
Square EnoughSaid .,s-T-.,n, 10:45 115 405 6:30 9:00"
Aftd 110945 1:15 4:05 6:30
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SAlMutT m R 1020120 0 1242072110:05'
S' Friday an Salurday only


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 30, 2013


tabase. Subsequent lab
Tests of dog droppings
that end up identifying
Sthe offending animal
Result in a $50 testing
fee plus a $100 fine.
So far, one resident
dog has been identified
as an offender.
Kerry Weidner, a pet
owner in Devon Wood,
says the service has
transformed life at the
sprawling complex.
"We used to see dog
poop almost every oth-
er day. You had to wor-
ry about where you
"-' walk on the grass be-
cause there was dog
poop, a lot of different
a places," Weidner said.
. -1' "Now, you don't real-
S" ly have to worry about
. dog poop. You can walk
where you want, the
grass is now ours again,
we don't have to worry
S about it, and that's just
s a great thing."
lq Now, Kansky said,
residents want her to
A solve another problem.
AP PHOTO "We've now had peo-
)nswab ple say: 'Well, now
can we get them to
own- stop having their dogs
ir an- lift their legs on the
on of shrubs?'" Kansky said,
;own- smiling. "That's a little
ne fee more difficult and we
initial are not going to tackle
he da- that."




Saturday, November 30, 2013


Pilot makes propeller


home's hub in Alaska


JEFF RICHARDSON
Fairbanks Daily News-Miner
FAIRBANKS, Alas-
ka There are a lot of
custom-built homes
in Fairbanks, but Andy
Lyon almost certainly
has the only one with a
ceiling fan as the cen-
terpiece.
That fact says more
about the fan than the
house. Above the living
room, a Douglas DC-6
propeller slowly spins,
moving air through the
handsome wood-ac-
cented building off
Chena Ridge.
Lyon designed his
house specifically to
accommodate the
131/2-foot propeller.
For Lyon, a pilot and
the director of mainte-
nance for Everts Air, it
was a chance to bring
his love of aviation
home.
The idea had been
half-seriously dis-
cussed before among
the mechanics at
Everts, and Lyon said
he decided to make
it happen when he
planned the design for
his house. When he be-
gan building in 2006,
Lyon made sure the
27-foot-high ceiling in
his living room was big
enough for the giant
fan.
"Since nobody had
one and I'm innovative,
I decided to let it rip,"
Lyon said.
Lyon took the pro-
peller from a salvaged
Everts-owned DC-6
parts aircraft, then fig-
ured he spent about


AP PHOTO
Andy Lyon poses next to a DC-6 aircraft propeller that he
incorporated into his Fairbanks, Alaska home as a ceiling fan.


80 hours fabricating
a 1/2-horsepower en-
gine to make it spin. Al-
though the typical pace
is leisurely, Lyon said it
can make a serious gust
if put on top speed.
Lyon and five of his
friends came over to
hoist the beefy pro-
peller onto a scissors
lift, which was used to
push it up to the top of
the towering cathedral
ceiling above the living
room. It's heavily bolt-
ed to a ceiling beam, a
must for a 600-pound
blade that hangs above
the sofa.
"I did put a safety ca-
ble on it, just in case,"
Lyon said.
From the second
floor, the whirring gears
of the massive struc-
ture give a better sense
of its scope. Lyon's done
some research online,
and believes he's the
only homeowner in the
U.S. who has made the
DC-6 propeller-to-ceil-
ing fan conversion.
After spending sev-


en years working on
the home, Lyon final-
ly completed it last
summer. In a twist,
he decided the newly
finished 2,472-square-
foot building was too
big for him Lyon
has moved to a smaller
place along the Chena
River, putting the home
up for sale.
Lyon's real estate
agent, Bennie Colbert,
said he starts his discus-
sions about the home by
mentioning its special-
ized cement-block style
construction. That con-
versation pretty much
ends when people walk
in the living room and
see the unique appara-
tus above their heads.

SWILDWOOD
CYCLERY
Bikes for Every Terain & Budget
Sales *Service
WD Plaza 352-399-2983
www.wildwoodcyclery.com


Ufacebook.


wwwfacebookcm/aly


isplaedtowlcmeD. oudSha oEu nw rloySearmet

0 S S ... ... .... .S @


Dr. Fouad Shami is a urologist who has spent 41 years
proudly servicing patients in Lake and Sumter counties.
Throughout the years, he has developed an excellent
reputation for his bedside manner, genuine concern,
and medical expertise. A graduate of Saint Joseph's
University, Dr. Shami is a board-certified urologist.
This experienced and skilled urologist is excited to be a
member of the leading medical team in Central Florida
at Florida Heart and Vascular Multi-Specialty Group.


AL.
.,-- u%


"It has been an honor and a privilege to serve my
patients and I appreciate the special bonds and
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Four-hour commute is an iffy

investment in relationship


DEAR ABBY: I have been see-
ing my boyfriend, "Casey," for
a year. He has said throughout
our courtship that we could
get married in four to five
years.
Over the past couple of
months, he has become dis-
tant and less romantic. I drive
four hours to see him almost
every week, and he seems fine
then, but when we're apart, he
rarely texts me and seems dis-
interested.
On one of my recent visits,
Casey said he NEVER wants
to get married! When I asked
what had changed his mind,
his response was that he has
decided that marriage is a
trap. When I asked if he still
wanted to be with me, he said
yes.
I know I don't want to be Ca-
sey's girlfriend forever. I don't
want to waste my time if he's
not going to marry me, but
I really want to be with him.
Do you think he'll change his
mind again, or is it time for
me to end things? WAITING
AND HOPING IN MARYLAND
DEAR WAITING AND HOPING: If
you're doing all of the four-
hour commuting, you're not
only waiting and hoping, you
are also doing most of the
work in your relationship with
Casey From your description
of his attention span, when
you're out of sight, you are not
on his mind.
You didn't mention how old
you both are, but it appears
Casey has some growing up
to do. Marriage isn't a trap; it's
a partnership. And like any
strong partnership there is
commitment involved. If Ca-
sey isn't up to making a com-
mitment and marriage is what
you're after, you should save
the wear and tear on your car
and the expense of the gas and
find a man who is less gun-
shy.
DEAR ABBY: We live near my
wife's sister "Bree" and her
husband, "Joe." We socialize
often at one of our homes or
at a restaurant. They have re-
cently become good friends
with another couple, the "Rus-
sells," who are delightful.


I


Bree and Joe sometimes in-
vite us over when the Rus-
sells are there. The problem is,
when I try to carry on a con-
versation with Mr. Russell, Joe
gets bent out of shape. He in-
terrupts and changes the sub-
ject or says something to make
me look bad. If that doesn't
stop the discussion, Joe walks
off in a huff. I think he's act-
ing like an immature mid-
dle-schooler. (It also triggers
memories I have of being bul-
lied and excluded as a child.)
I'd like to avoid these
three-couple get-togethers,
but I don't know how many
times I can do it without rais-
ing questions. An alternative
would be to avoid the Russells
and converse only with oth-
er guests who may be present.
Either option, or mentioning
it, risks making me look like
the jealous 12-year-old instead
of Joe. Any ideas? ODD MAN
OUT IN KANSAS
DEAR ODD MAN OUT: It appears
that your brother-in-law is in-
secure, or he wouldn't behave
the way he is. How sad for
him.
Start limiting the time you
spend as a threesome. Ask
your wife to find out in ad-
vance if the Russells will be
visiting when you are. If Bree
asks her why, your wife should
tell her that Joe seems up-
set when you try to carry on
a conversation with the hus-
band and you don't want to
make him uncomfortable. Per-
haps if she tells her husband
to knock it off and grow up, he
will. However, if the problem
continues, explain to the Rus-
sells that as much as you enjoy
their company, you'll be see-
ing them less often, and why.
It isn't necessary to mention
to any of them the grief you
experienced in middle school
because, frankly, it is none of
their business. If it's any com-
fort to you, it appears Joe had
insecurities back then, too, but
he never outgrew them.
Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren,
also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was
founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips.
Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or
RO. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.


ALL
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GolfCart l|l fl Across from McCall's Tavern
Accessible 3I 5 9U 3O UU Mon-Sat1lO-6


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Section of The

Daly Commercial
SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 787-0600 (Lake Co.)
or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5
p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months
or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily
Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007.


I ORECK VACUUMS I


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 30, 2013


5 *
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Saturday, November 30, 2013

S udoku ****** 4puz.com

1 28

824 95

9

6 1 75

42 1 36

36 5 1
4

71 348_

29 1
Fill in the squares so that each row, column, andl
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION
894172356
367958214
125463879
753619482
249385167
681247935
518794623


43652
97283


17


How to play: Fill in the blank
squares with the numbers 1
through 9 so that each horizon-
tal row, vertical column and nine-
square
sub-grid contains no repeated
numbers.
Puzzles range in difficulty from
one to six stars.
The solution to today's puzzle
will be in tomorrow's paper.


AXYDLBAAXR
isLONGFELLOW
One letter stands for another. In this sample, A is used
for the three L's, X for the two 0's, etc. Single letters,
apostrophes, the length and formation of the words
are all hints. Each day the code letters are different.


11-30


CRYPTOQUOTE


BEKW LJFWIBDMO


IJ LER,


EMC LER DI EL YGWEAGR


EL


RJV YEM. IBEI DL IBW JMGR


L W Y A W I

- FEIIBWX


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EAMJGC


Yesterday's Cryptoquote: IF MAN IS TO BE
LIBERATED TO ENJOY MORE LEISURE, HE MUST
ALSO BE PREPARED TO ENJOY THIS LEISURE
FULLY AND CREATIVELY. ELEANOR ROOSEVELT



WORD S)G)R) DM)M)A)G)EY
BY JUDD HAMBRICK 2013 UFS / Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS
QQQQ Q 2nd Letter 1 DOWN
+ 7 PTS


00000030c 2nDOWN



2Y3" DOWN
.3rd Down
+ 40 PTS

0000000 4t" DOWN
. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .............. ...... . . . . .. . . . . .

FOUR PLAY
TIME LIMIT: 20 MIN AVERAGE GAME 235-245 PTS TOTAL
Directions: Make a 2- to 7-letter word from the letters on each yardline. Add points
to each word or letter using scoring directions. Seven-letter words get a 60-point
bonus. All words can be found in Webster's New World College Dictionary.
11-30-13 JUDD'S SOLUTION TOMORROW

WORD SCRIMMAEtFM SOLUTION BY JUDD HAMBRICK
W OR CIMllPI I IOII 2013 UFS / Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS
(C6 J (E ) A R2 Y 1 ,stDOWN 89
. . .. . .. .. .. . . . . .................................... . . . . . ....... ,. ........ .
P6 R2 E E N 2 2nd DOWN 34
."..'... '. .............................................. ................... 6 2
(B6 02 S2S2,Y7 3rd DOWN 49
(A2 2 T JW2A Y7 S)2 4thDOWN- 62
AVERAGE GAME 145-155 PTS JUDD'STOTAL = 234
11-29-13


DAILY COMMERCIAL
I DENNIS THE MENACE


DILBERT


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DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, November 30, 2013


DECOR
FROM PAGE El

candlesticks from Pier
1 take mercury glass
down a different road,
while beaded reindeer
and snowflakes bring
glamour to red velvet
and satin throw pil-
lows.
Grandin Road's Zoey


chevron-patterned, ru-
by-and-white-resin urn
could be used to hold
a live or artificial tree,
or an assortment of
greens.
Winter white contin-
ues to appeal to hol-
iday decorators; with
or without touches of
sparkle, it's calming,
elegant and chic. And
don't disregard earth-


ier colors think of
bare birch branch-
es hung with gold and
silver stars; luxe bowls
brimming with copper
ornaments; chocolate
brown mohair throws.
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TRADITIONAL
"Since folks are open
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we'll continue to see a
looser interpretation
of the traditional tree,"
says Catie Parrish, as-
sociate editor at Way-
fair, the online home
furnishings outlet.
"We're starting to see
lots of paper and card-
board tabletop trees,
and people are get-
ting inventive, creating
flat Christmas trees on
walls, doors and even
fridges. They're even
decorating them with
real ornaments and
garlands. For someone
who craves the charm
of a real tree, even an
evergreen branch in a
mason jar can lend a
hint of the holidays."
Ikea has a pop-up
cardboard tree that
comes with ornaments.
At Ellesstudio.blogspot.
corn, you'll find simple
instructions on how to
turn wine corks, wood-
en sticks, colored paper
and glitter into pretty
little trees.
A general theme this
season:
BEACH HOLIDAY
"One of my favorite
holiday decor themes
is what we're calling
aquatic Christmas,'"


"~ 4


'M *~*~*~
44, 1~


AP PHOTO
This photo provided by Land of Nod shows colorful ornaments.


says Parrish. "It's an ex-
tension of the sea-life
trend that's been hot in
home decor for a few
seasons. Look for octo-
pus and mermaid or-
naments, especially in
glittery silver and gold
finishes."
Coastal dwellers
know that a beachy pal-
ette of blues, greens and
whites sets the tone. A
tree skirt block-print-
ed with shells and star-
fish in soft blues and
creams evokes a sea-
side Christmas.
Gump's has a collec-


tion of painted, blown-
glass ornaments that
include jellyfish, her-
mit crabs, stingrays
and leopard fish.
Find trees, wreaths
and garlands crafted of
shells and driftwood, as
well as clear glass balls
filled with soft white
sand and tiny shells, at
www. seasideinspired.
com.
If you've got a pile of
seashells on the porch,
check out Marthastew-
art.com for a clever way
to glitter them up and
hang them on the tree.


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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 30, 2013




Saturday, November 30, 2013


Couple restores home in childhood neighborhood


TAMMY SMITH
The Sun Herald
OCEAN SPRINGS,
Miss. When she was
a girl, Louann Sekul en-
joyed walking from her
home near downtown
Ocean Springs down to
the pier and back up to
the stores lining Wash-
ington Avenue, where
she knew every shop
owner and they knew
her.
It's a tradition she's
heard from her con-
temporaries as well
as women a genera-
tion older than her who
also grew up in Ocean
Springs. Her walk
would take her past
a single-story Queen
Anne house on a corner
almost across the street
from her own home.
It had a deep, inviting
front porch, and it be-
longed to the grand-
parents of one of her
friends, Virginia Shan-
teau Newton.
Louann grew up and
married Rock Sekul,
and they bought a
house in the Gulf
Hills neighborhood of
Ocean Springs. Then
Hurricane Katrina hit
in 2005.
"We lost our home in
Gulf Hills in the storm,"
she said. "After that, we
were living in the Bien-
ville subdivision, but
it's kind of far out of
town, and I missed be-
ing near everything."
Meanwhile, carpen-
ter George Scham-
berger was planning
on putting a house he
owned on the market.
It was a Queen Anne
near downtown and
had undergone a huge
transformation, retain-
ing much of its origi-
nal architectural detail
while becoming more


AP PHOTO
The home of Rock and Louann Sekul, a restored and renovated Queen Anne-style home in downtown Ocean Springs, Miss.,
is shown. Louann grew up not far from the house and remembers walking by it as a child.


open, inviting and up-
dated inside.
Louann found out
about Schamberger's
plans, and she and Rock
were interested in his
house. So, through a se-
ries of puzzle pieces fit-
ting together just right,
the Sekuls bought the
Queen Anne, the same
house Louann would
walk past en route to
her own when she was
a girl.
Longtime Ocean
Springs residents like-
ly remember it as the
home of Marcus Frank-
lin Shanteau and Lo-
raine Craft Shanteau.
The owners aren't
sure exactly how old
the house is. Ocean
Springs historian Ray
Bellande has informa-
tion stating the cottage
was relocated from an-
other site in 1899.
The front porch is a
probable place to find
the Sekuls, who bought
the house about a year


and a half ago.
"Oh, yes, we sit out
here and just enjoy, en-
joy, enjoy. I grew up
right over there," she
said, pointing to her
childhood home. "Peo-
ple do that all along the
street, sit on the porch
and watch everybody
go by."
Enter through the
house's original front
door and sunlight
streams into the living
room from a bay win-
dow onto hardwood
floors and antique and
contemporary furni-
ture.
The room's fireplace
is one of its focal points.
"That's an original
fireplace, but it crum-
bled on George, so he
put this faux fireplace
in," she said.
A spandrel over the
doorway appears to
be original, as identi-
cal Victorian-era wood-
work can be seen in
photos taken during


the renovation.
Schamberger re-
moved a wall be-
tween what was a bed-
room and the dining
room, replacing it with
a two-sided fireplace
providing transition be-
tween the two spaces.
The old bedroom is
now a cheerful dining
area, and the former
dining room is now
the family area. The
east wall showcases the
house's original beaded
board walls.
"I'm glad he did that,"
Louann said, referring
to Schamberger. "It's
just right. It's neat to
see the beaded board,
but I don't think do-
ing it all over the house
would work."
Pottery she rescued
from the site of their
Gulf Hills house adds
color to the mantel in
the living room.


The kitchen's foot-
print is identical to that
of the original house,
she said, but the ad-
joining breakfast area
is reuse of an existing
space.
"This used to be the


porch," Louann said.
"Virginia told me her
grandparents had a lit-
tle table out here, and
that's where they would
eat breakfast."
The Sekuls continue
that tradition in the en-
closed space. Scham-
berger used more of
the beaded board on its
ceiling, subtly calling to
mind the original porch.
The kitchen's new ceil-
ing is pressed tin.
Schamberger also
added the current mas-
ter bedroom and bath.
The bedroom includes
a generous walk-in
closet, and the bath's
showpiece is the origi-
nal clawfoot tub.
For Louann, coming
back to her old neigh-
borhood is more than
just a place to live.
"I used to do the his-
toric walking tours
here, and I love the
old houses in Ocean
Springs," she said. "I'm
so glad I get to live in
one."


m

LS. TV



LAKE SUMTER TELEVISION




In our November episode we'll
,., bring you the latest in medical
_H news and information including
_H stories on GERD Awareness Week,
How Lifestyle Choices Impact Your
Good Things for Those Who Wait Joints and Diabetic Foot Care



Tune in for features on
TT County Podiatry's Dr. Rosa,
LRMC 50 Years & Beyond, ROFI LES
Chiropractor Dr. Joe and
much more in November's Episode


We invite you to be an informed


member of our community and
view the most recent
LAKE COUNTY Lake County Commission
and School Board meetings
FLORID



Keep up-to-date and informed
about the news and headlines Daij ]HIII'oiuobe
shaping our community as ..mir .c., hi..'. .,
v ie w th eaiI lm ommstrr re c e n tOli




LSTV and the Daily Cmmercial sin90"
bring you "News in 90".d"News





For production inquiries or
programming comments contact us at
LakeSumterlV@gmCil. cor
......".


~LLL'~$& Y1LDL~LLLL~L~ ~liL LLL~ ~L~Y


Lighted Holiday Boat Parade

Sunday December rth

7pm Ski Beach Venetian Garderins





For Registration & Information

Call Fred O'Brien (352)326-8274
email: fredandkaren@mpinet.net

Madtr Catan Metn Is edesayIs e c.4t


Sponsored by
Leesburg Boating Club City of Leesburg Boyd Rental
Daily Commercial Leesburg Partnership Sea Tow
Vic's Embers Triangle Marine Ford Press
Drs. Bosshardt & Marzek Hurricane Dockside & Grill
Prize sponsors
*Holiday Marine O'Keefe's Irish Pub Sonny's Real Pit Bar-B-Q Chili's
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DAILY COMMERCIAL




DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, November 30, 2013


HURRY! SALE ENDS MONDAY, DECEMBER 2ND

BEST PRICES OF THE YEAR!
THE PRICE YOU SEE IS THE PRICE YOU PAY!


2014 CRUZE LSstk#14140
$19,295MSRP
$18, 797 BLACK FRIDAY PRICE
2,000 HOLIDAY CASH
BLACK FRIDAY SALE PRICE'
$16,797

2014 MALIBU stk,#14126
$23,240 MSRP
$22,582 BLACK FRIDAY PRICE r
2,500 HOLIDAY CASH &


BLACK FRIDAY SALE PRICE'
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$24,233 BLACK FRIDAY PRICE
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2014 TRAVERSE
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DAILY COMMERCIAL


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