Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Halifax Media Group
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Rod Dixon ( Leesburg, Floirda )
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SThe Daily Commercial

LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, November 11, 2013 www.dailycommercial.com

LOCAL: Boats race across Lake Dora for Tavares regatta / A3


LOCAL: Organization wants to deliver 1,000 meals / A6



Philippine typhoon deaths I


climb into the thousands .


JIM GOMEZ
Associated Press
TACLOBAN, Philippines
- As many as 10,000 peo-
ple are believed dead in one
Philippine city alone af-
ter one of the worst storms
ever recorded unleashed
ferocious winds and gi-


ant waves that washed
away homes and schools.
Corpses hung from tree
branches and were scat-
tered along sidewalks and
among flattened buildings,
while looters raided gro-
cery stores and gas stations
in search of food, fuel and
water.


Officials projected the
death toll could climb even
higher when emergency
crews reach areas cut off
by flooding and landslides.
Even in the disaster-prone
Philippines, which regu-
larly contends with earth-
quakes, volcanoes and
SEE TYPHOON | A2


S- .- -. .4J . % -
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Residents push bodies on a cart after strong waves caused by Typhoon Haiyan
slammed into Tacloban city, Leyte province central Philippines on Sunday.


Service behind bars


Health law's



troubles give


GOP a boost


Post Commander and inmate Ryan Carroll, in front, leads a drill ceremony during a commissioning ceremony for American Le-
gion Post 403 at the Sumter Correctional Institution on Friday. The Veterans Day program included a number of civilian Ameri-
can Legion officials.


MILLARD K. IVES I Staff Writer
millard.ives@dailycommercial
These military veterans
served their country, and then
they started serving time in
prison.
Now they are serving both.


American Legion Post 403
was commissioned Friday in a
specialVeterans Day Ceremo-
ny behind high walls, fenc-
es, bars, rows of barbed wire
and guards at the Sumter Cor-
rectional Institution.
The ceremony comes after


the post recently received its
temporary charter that will al-
low 15 qualified inmate mil-
itary veterans to participate
in regular meetings and oth-
er functions associated with
SEE PRISON I A6


Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
The health care law's
seemingly endless
problems are giving
congressional Repub-
licans a much-needed
boost of energy, help-
ing them to move past
the government-shut-
down debacle and fo-
cus on a theme for next
year's elections.
Republicans are back
on offense, and more
quickly than many had
expected, after see-
ing their approval rat-
ings plunge during last
month's partial shut-
down and worrisome
talk of a possible U.S.
debt default.
They pillory adminis-
tration officials at Cap-
itol Hill hearings. They
cite the millions of peo-
ple getting dropped by
insurers despite Pres-


ident Barack Obama's
promise that it wouldn't
happen. They harp on
the program's flawed
enrollment process.
Now they're relish-
ing Obama's apology
to those who are losing
health insurance plans
he had repeatedly said
they could keep.
"If the president is
truly sorry for break-
ing his promises to the
American people, he'll
do more than just issue
a halfhearted apology
on TV," Senate Minor-
ity Leader Mitch Mc-
Connell, R-Ky., said in a
statement.
Republicans once
pinned their health
care criticisms largely
on computer glitches
in the application and
enrollment process.
Today, they're accusing
SEE HEALTH I A2


WWII reunions poignant for dwindling veterans


In this Sept. 27
photo Lenard
Wichtowski is re-
flected in the me-
morial to the 57th
Bomb Wing during
a reunion outside
the U.S. Air Force
Museum at Wright
Patterson Air Force
base in Dayton,
Ohio.
AP


DAN SEWELL
Associated Press
DAYTON, Ohio Paul Young rare-
ly talked about his service during World
War II about the B-25 bomber he pilot-
ed, about his 57 missions, about the dan-
gers he faced or the fears he overcame.
"Some things you just don't talk
about," he said.
But Susan Frymier had a hunch that
if she could journey from Fort Wayne,
SEE REUNION I A2


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Oct. 30 file photo, President Barack Obama speaks at
Boston's historic Faneuil Hall about the federal health care law.


Vol. 137, No. 315 I 4 sections
MISSED YOUR PAPER? CLASSIFIED Q1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 HIGH
Call 787-0600 (Lake County), or CLASSIFIEDDl LIVING HEALTHY Cl 80
S 877-702-0600 (Sumter County) COMICS C6 OBITUARIES A4 LOW
S NEWS TIP? CROSSWORDS D3 SPORTS B3 1 62
90994 17001 Call Scott Callahan at 365-8203 DEAR ABBY C7 VOICES A7 See A8
____________ ____________See A8


Loud & Clear and FREE
Fiorida residents with a hearing loss are eligible to receive a free
aivil:lihed phone from the non-profit Florida Telecommunications
R.laIv Inr: Cordless and corded phones for persons with mild to severe
Ii-earing loss are available at 23 distribution centers statewide.
lk Hondai Limit one per customer.


Deaf and Hearing Services of
Lake and Sumter Counties
220 South 9th St
Leesburg, FL 34748
352-323-0757 (v)
352-323-9106 (tty)
www.ftri.org/leesburg


Center for Independent Living
in Central Florida
720 North Denning Drive
Winter Park, FL 32789
407-623-1070 (v)
407-623-1185 (tty)
www.ftri.org/winterpk


I urntF R ci n s: fy u h n s n'tworingpro erl oSyorS h arig h s caned, orshould S you no lon ge n eedyor.ho eorar Sm vngou5 o Foid al TR a 8 8-5 -1 51fo s sit ne


Contact your area center for details.


/al

*a C,
4f',
one
06 !

aoa I.





DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 11, 2013


HAPPY BIRTHDAY for
Monday, Nov. 11, 2013:
This year you often
demonstrate an unusual-
ly creative yet disciplined
side of your personali-
ty. When you use it well,
you could find that very
little is unattainable. If
you are single, you seem
to be able to attract the
type of person you desire.
You will meet several de-
sirable suitors. As a result,
you will date a lot. If you
are attached, your sweet-
ie often finds you closed
down. This person might
be manipulative in his
or her desire to have you
open up. Avoid fighting,
and understand where
your significant other is
coming from. PISCES of-
ten makes you feel like a
kid again.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) You might want to
keep a secret or allow a
matter to stay hush-hush.
You need to be intuitive,
especially with others.
Several friends could ap-
proach questions from a
different angle as they try
to find out what informa-
tion you are holding back.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) Zero in on what ap-
pears to be a hot issue.
You are capable of putting
what lies ahead in per-
spective, which increases
your ability to accomplish
what you desire. Use your
unique talent to detach
and see the big picture.
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) You might be trying to
work through a problem.
You are able to handle a
lot, but tension keeps ris-
ing. Your effectiveness is
dependent on your abil-
ity to process stress. You
can't avoid certain sit-
uations. Take a walk at
lunchtime, if need be.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) Detach and you'll
gain a unique perspec-
tive, especially when
dealing with a particu-
larly contentious or con-
trolling person. Your cre-
ativity falls flat, but a
brainstorming session
will open many doors.
You'll get a better grasp of
what is happening.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
Work with others directly.
You communicate effec-
tively, and many people
around you gain insight
quickly. As a result, you
can make changes near-
ly immediately. An asso-
ciate could present a risk
you might not be aware
of.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) Defer to others. Know


South dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.
NORTH
*KJ 5
VJ 7 3 2
*KJ52
*QJ
WEST
4974
V854
10974
4762
SOUTH
*Q 108 3
V9
*Q6
*'AK 108


EAST
+A6
V \ KQ 106
*AS 3
4943
2

5


Fhe bidding:
,outh West North East
Pass Pass 1 IV
S4 Pass Pass 1 NT
)blc 2 V 2 Pass
3 4 Pass 3* Pass
openingg lead eight of hearts.
At the highest levels, winning at
bridge is determined less by system
or card play than it is by accurate
udgrncnt in the bidding. Sound play-
ers who consistently display fine bid-
Iing judgment are almost certain to
.rimd up on top of the heap.
Today's deal, which occurred in
he 1993 Spingold Knockout Teams,
s exceptional in that it featured a
surprising lack of judgment on the
part of just about everyone con-
;erned with it.
At one table, the bidding went as
'hown. After South initially passed


when you are in a no-win
situation. It is important
to recognize what is hap-
pening before you en-
counter a problem. Al-
low others to experience
some of the issues you
face, and they might be-
come more understand-
ing.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22) Your easygoing at-
titude allows others the
space to be free and come
forward. You tend to gain
insight more easily about
the people in your life be-
cause they reveal them-
selves often. Do not sit on
anger.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21) Many opportunities
come forward that could
involve adjusting your
schedule. You might want
to tap into someone's re-
sourcefulness. Your seri-
ousness will strengthen a
situation. A friend could
become very irritable. To-
night: Approach a loved
one with sensitivity.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.22-
Dec. 21) Your compassion
comes out when dealing
with a family member.
Tap into your intuition in
order to succeed today.
Feedback from a family
member presents a dif-
ferent idea that might not
coincide with yours. Be
sure to touch base with a
superior.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19) You could be
moving forward with a
project that is often dis-
cussed. A talk will help
this goal become a reali-
ty. News from a distance
could shake up plans.
This newly shared enter-
prise will stick because
time has encouraged per-
spective and thought.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18) You will indulge
yourself, whether it is
sharing a favorite break-
fast or taking a few hours
for yourself. You'll main-
tain your responsibilities,
even if the pace is more
easy than usual. A part-
ner might want to take a
different approach. Anger
could emerge.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20) You might need to
handle a situation differ-
ently from how you an-
ticipated. You could be
upset with someone far
away. The more you push,
the more resistant this
person becomes. Know
when to leave a situation.


with a hand that most players woLuld
open, North decided to pass his part-
ner's one-spade response. North-
South were thus about to miss a cold
game when East unwittingly came to
the rescue by reopening the bidding.
Given another chance, North-South
quickly zipped into fourI spades and
shortly thereafter entered plus 620 oni
their scorecards.
One can sympathize w ith poor
East for refusing to sell out to one
spade, but the fact remains that his
misjudgment cost his side dearly and
spared North-South a similar embar-
rassment.
But that was not all. At the other
table, the bidding went:
South West North East
1 4 Pass 1 1V
1 + Pass 2 V Pass
2 *, Pass 2 NT Pass
3 NT Pass Pass Dble
Pass Pass Redble All Pass
Here South did open the bidding
and later bid his spades twice to iden-
tily a live-card suit. This should have
led to the routine four-spade con-
tract, but North opted to play in
notrump despite his tenuous heart
holding and lack of controls.
East then miscalculated by dou-
bling three notrump, which gave
North a chance to reconsider. Incred-
ibly, North not only refused to budge,
but redoubled! This contract went
down two 1,000 points after
East led the A-K-Q and another
heart, giving his team a total gain ol
1,620 points on the deal!


HOROSCOPES


TYPHOON
FROM PAGE Al


tropical cyclones, Ty-
phoon Haiyan appears
to be the deadliest natu-
ral disaster on record.
Haiyan hit the eastern
seaboard of the Philip-
pine archipelago on Fri-
day and quickly barreled
across its central islands
before exiting into the
South China Sea, pack-
ing winds of 147 miles
per hour that gusted
tol70 mph, and a storm
surge that caused sea
waters to rise 6 meters
(20 feet).
It wasn't until Sunday
that the scale of the dev-
astation became clear,
with local officials on
hardest-hit Leyte Island
saying that there may be
10,000 dead in the pro-
vincial capital of Taclo-
ban alone. Reports also
trickled in from else-
where on the island, and
from neighboring is-
lands, indicating hun-
dreds, if not thousands
of more deaths, though
it will be days before the
full extent of the storm's
impact can be assessed.
"On the way to the air-
port we saw many bod-
ies along the street," said
Philippine-born Austra-
lian Mila Ward, 53, who
was waiting at the Ta-
cloban airport to catch
a military flight back to
Manila, about 360 miles
to the northwest. "They
were covered with just
anything tarpaulin,



HEALTH
FROM PAGE Al


Obama and congressio-
nal Democrats of much
worse, including deceit
and incompetence.
Conservative groups
are pouring money into
ad campaigns remind-
ing voters that many
Democrats had prom-
ised Americans they
could keep their current
insurance policies if they
wanted. In particular,
Republicans hope these
efforts will help them
with women, who tend
to vote Democratic and
often make health care
decisions for their fami-
lies and in-laws.
In the 2014 elections,
"this is going to be a big
issue, and it's not go-
ing away," said Daniel
Scarpinato of the Na-
tional Republican Con-
gressional Committee.
"Democrats who voted
for Obamacare," he said,
"are pretty desperate-
ly running around with
their hair on fire, trying
to distance themselves,
which they're not going
to be able to do."
The White House says
canceled policies can
be replaced with better
coverage, sometimes at
lower prices. What the
administration doesn't
emphasize is that bet-
ter coverage often costs
more, and those looking
for new policies may not


roofing sheets, card-
boards." She said she
passed "well over 100"
dead bodies along the
way.
Haiyan raced across
the eastern and cen-
tral Philippines, inflict-
ing serious damage to at
least six of the archipel-
ago's more than 7,000 is-
lands, with Leyte, neigh-
boring Samar Island,
and the northern part
of Cebu appearing to
take the hardest hits. It
weakened as it crossed
the South China Sea be-
fore approaching north-
ern Vietnam, where it
was forecast to hit early
Monday morning.
On Leyte, regional
police chief Elmer So-
ria said the provincial
governor had told him
there were about 10,000
deaths there, primarily
from drowning and col-
lapsed buildings. Most
of the deaths were in Ta-
cloban, a city of about
200,000 that is the big-
gest on Leyte Island.
On Samar, Leo Dacay-
nos of the provincial di-
saster office said 300
people were confirmed
dead in one town and
another 2,000 were miss-
ing, while some towns
have yet to be reached by
rescuers. He pleaded for
food and water and said
power was out and there
was no cellphone signal,
making communication
possible only by radio.
Reports from the other
affected islands indicat-
ed dozens, perhaps hun-
dreds more deaths.


qualify for the tax subsi-
dies available under the
new law.
Brad Dayspring, a
spokesman for the GOP's
top Senate campaign
group, acknowledged
that Republicans took
a hit last month when
an angry public blamed
them for the 16-day par-
tial government shut-
down.
But now, he said,
"there's a spring in the
step" of party activists.
Potential congressio-
nal candidates "who
might have been 50-50
about running for office
might be a little more
inclined" to plunge in,
he said. Best of all, Day-
spring said, the most
vulnerable Democratic
lawmakers have echoed
Obama's now-disproven
promises about insur-
ance cancellations and
"most of them are on
film doing it."
The conservative
group American Cross-
roads already is using
such film clips against
Democratic Sens. Mark
Begich of Alaska, Mary
Landrieu of Louisiana
and Kay Hagan of North
Carolina, who face re-
election next year. The
group is paying to place
the videos on Facebook
and other sites.
Another conservative
group, Americans for
Prosperity, says it will
spend $2 million in a
new ad campaign tying
Obama's health care law
to Hagan and Landrieu.


3 of 6 wins $5
5 of 5 wins $3,457.50


4 of 5 wins $55.50
Rollover


POWERBALL...................... 3-9-37-49-56-32
With Powerball Without Powerball
Powerball alone wins $4........................... 3 of 5 wins $7
1 of 5 w/Powerball wins $4................. 4 of 5 wins $100
2 of 5 w/Powerball wins $7......5 of 5 wins $1,000,000
3 of 5 w/Powerball wins $100............................ Rollover
4 of 5 w/Powerball wins $10,000


The Daily Commercial
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NEWSROOM CONTACTS
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352-365-8208....................................bill.koch@dailycommercial.com
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352-365-8203 ...........................scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com
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352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com
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REUNION
CONTINUED FROM Al


Ind., with her 92-year-old
dad for a reunion of his com-
rades in the 57th Bomb wing,
he would open up.
She was right: On a private
tour at the National Muse-
um of the U.S. Air Force near
Dayton, amid fellow veter-
ans of flights over southern
Europe and Germany, Young
rattled off vivid details of his
plane, crewmates, training
and some of his most har-


rowing missions.
"Dad, you can't


remem-


ber what you ate yesterday,
but you remember every-
thing about World War II,"
his daughter said, beaming.
When Young came home
from the war, more than 70
years ago, there were 16 mil-
lion veterans like him -
young soldiers, sailors and
Marines who returned to
work, raise families, build
lives. Over the decades, chil-
dren grew up, married, had
children of their own; ca-
reers were built and faded
into retirement; love affairs


followed the path from the
altar to the homestead and
often, sadly, to the grave-
yard.
Through it all, the veter-
ans would occasionally get
together to remember the
greatest formative experi-
ence of their lives. But as the
years wore on, there were
fewer and fewer of them. Ac-
cording to the Department
of Veteran Affairs, just a little
over 1 million remain. The
ones who remain are in their
80s and 90s, and many are
infirm or fragile.


So the reunions, when they
are held, are more sparsely
attended yearly remind-
ers of the passing of the
Greatest Generation.
* When veterans of the Bat-
tle of the Bulge gathered in
Kansas City this summer,
only 40 came, according to
organizers, down from 63
last year and 350 in 2004.
* Of the 80 members of
Doolittle's Raiders who
set out on their daring at-
tack on mainland lapan
in 1942, 73 survived. Sev-
enty-one years later, only


four remain; they decid-
ed this year's April reunion
in Fort Walton Beach, Fla.,
would be their last, though
they agreed to meet Nov. 9
for a final toast in honor of
those who have gone be-
fore them.
MA half-century ago, when
retired Army First Lt. Frank
Towers went to his first re-
union of the 30th Infan-
try Division soldiers
who landed at the beaches
of Normandy and fought
across France and Germa-
ny he was surrounded
by 1,000 other veterans.


lFLORIDA

LOTTERY

SUNDAY
C A S H 3 ................................................ 0-2-7
Afternoon ........................................... 2-2-5
PLAY 4 ............................................. 9-5-5-8
Afternoon....................................... 4-6-9-5

SATURDAY
FANTASY 5......................... 19-23-27-31-33
2 of 5 wins free ticket 3 of 5 wins $10.50
4 of 5 wins $120 5 of 5 wins $86,517.59
LOTTO............................. 9-12-15-21-33-45


BRIDGE


Famous Hand


Tomorrow: Stop, look and act.
I-pol 3 K- I -th-- S-d-- le Il


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, November 11, 2013




Monday, November 11, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL




State&Region
NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN I scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com I 352-365-8208


www.dailycommercial.com


Area Briefs

TAVARES
'Aging Well' series to
highlight cooking healthy
The UF/IFAS Extension in Lake
County is hosting a monthly educa-
tional series through March to aid
older residents on a variety of top-
ics related to health, finances and
safety.
The series entitled "Aging Well
in Lake County" will continue
with its second class in the series,
"Healthy Meals for 1 or 2," from
10 to 11:30 a.m. on Nov. 20 at the
Lake County Extension Office, 1951
Woodlea Road, Tavares. Cost is $5.
Registration is required by Nov. 19
for the monthly classes and can be
completed online at agingwellno-
vember.eventbrite.com.
For information, call Julie England
at 352-343-4101 ext. 2721, or email
julieeng@ufl.edu.

MOUNT DORA
Christmas Tour of Homes
tickets available
Advance tickets are available for
the Women's Committee of Fine Arts
annual Christmas Tour of Homes
at the Mount Dora and Tavares
Chamber of Commerce offices.
The $15 tickets are for either day
of the tour, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.,
Dec. 7-8.
Each stop along the self-guid-
ed tour will have a theme. Guests
can begin the tour at any of the six
houses.
Money raised from the event helps
the scholarship fund of the Women's
Committee of Fine Arts of Mount
Dora.
Tickets also will be available at the
individual homes during the tour.
For information, call 352-357-3761
or 352-385-4619.

LEESBURG
SBDC to offer seminar on
the basics of marketing
The Small Business Development
Center (SBDC) at UCF-Lake County
will offer entrepreneurs the oppor-
tunity to learn some basics of mar-
keting at a free seminar entitled,
"Basic Marketing," helping entre-
preneurs learn about the four "P's"
of marketing at two locations in
November.
Registration for the seminar is
recommended, as space is limited
at both locations: From 6 to 9 p.m.
Thursday, at Lake-Sumter State
College, 9909 U.S. Highway 441, in
Leesburg; and from 6 to 9 p.m., Nov.
20, Lake-Sumter State College, 1250
N. Hancock Road, Building 2, Room
102, in Clermont.
For information and registration,
call Theresa Davis at 352-315-1846,
email theresa.davis@bus.ucf.edu
or go to www.sbdcorlando.com/
lakecounty.

EUSTIS
'Natives for Your Yard'
presented by Plant Society
Join the Florida Native Plant
Society Lake Beautyberry Chapter
at 2:30 p.m., on Nov. 17 with Jon
Pospisil and Jim Lobb as they pres-
ent a program on "Natives for Your
Yard."
For information, call
352-357-7536.




... and we'll share it with our readers.
Some of our best story ideas and photos
come from our readers. So don't hesitate
to share your youth activities, awards,
accomplishments, festivals, charity
events and other things that make our
communities special. And don't overlook
those family milestones birthdays,
engagements, marriages, business
promotions and military news.


Just email your photos and news to...
pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com


For the love of boating Hospital


THERESA CAMPBELL
Staff Writer
theresacampbell@
dailycommercial.com
Bill Edwards, 76,
from southern Mary-
land, was among sev-
eral senior racers
cherishing the pic-
ture-perfect weather
Sunday for the seventh
annual Fall Thunder
Regatta on the waters
of Lake Dora at Woot-
on Park.
His love for boats
dates back to the
1950s.
"There are a cou-
ple old guys out here
older than I am and
they're still going and
doing this," Edwards
said from the pit area,
proudly showing the
tunnel boat that he
built in 1973 with one
purpose in mind: to
race the boat in na-
tionals in Miami.
Now 40 years later,
his royal blue beauty
still stood out among


THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL
Bill Edwards, 76, from southern Maryland, was among boat-
ers taking part in the Fall Thunder Regatta at Wooton Park in
Tavares on Sunday.


the crowd of more
than 75 other restored
vintage and classic
boats at the regatta.
Edwards was among
boaters with inboard
runabouts, outboard


racers, and hydro-
planes, who compet-
ed in running demon-
strations and heats for
sheer fun and to en-
tertain the crowd.
SEE BOATS I A6


MOUNT DORA I SCOTTISH HIGHLAND FESTIVAL


Avery Skinner and Daisy the Border Collie herd sheep during one of the demonstrations at the
inaugural Mount Dora Scottish Highland Festival at Gilbert Park Sunday. The festival was held
Friday and Saturday and was hosted by the city of Mount Dora. It offered athletic games, bag
pipers, dancing and Scottish food.


Travis Gray gives his all during the modi- Craig Thomas of the Wyndbreakers performs at
fied caber toss event, the festival.


earns high


grade for


safety

Staff report
Florida Hospital Waterman in
Tavares was recently honored
with an "A" grade in the Fall 2013
update to the Hospital Safety
Score, which rates how well hos-
pitals protect patients from acci-
dents, errors, injuries and infec-
tions.
The Hospital Safety Score is
compiled under the guidance of
the nation's leading experts on
patient safety and is adminis-
tered by The Leapfrog Group, an
independent industry watchdog.
The score is the only hospital
safety rating to be analyzed in
the peer-reviewed Journal of Pa-
tient Safety, and is designed to
give the public information they
can use to protect themselves
and their families, Kim Milne,
Waterman's marketing and com-
munications director, said in a
press release.
"Protecting the patients in
our community and providing
them with a safe environment
for healing is central to our mis-
sion," said David Ottati, presi-
dent and chief executive officer,
Florida Hospital Waterman.
Calculated under the guidance
of Leapfrog's Blue Ribbon Ex-
pert Panel, the Hospital Safety
Score uses 28 measures of pub-
licly available hospital safety
data to produce a single "A," "B,"
"C," "D," or "F" score represent-
ing a hospital's overall capacity
to keep patients safe from pre-
ventable harm.
More than 2,500 general U.S.
hospitals were assigned scores
this fall.
"As patients begin to take a
more active role in selecting
where to receive health care, it
has never been more important
to focus on hospital safety and
transparency," said Leah Bind-
er, president and CEO of Leap-
frog. "The 'A' hospitals, including
Florida Hospital Waterman, are
helping us to raise the standards
of health care nationwide.
"We offer our congratulations
and hope the hospital will con-
tinue to strive for an ever-in-
creasing level of excellence in
patient safety."
To see Florida Hospital Water-
man's scores as they compare
nationally and locally, and to
find safety tips for patients and
their loved ones, go to the Hospi-
tal Safety Score website at www.
hospitalsafetyscore.org. Local
hospitals' scores are also avail-
able on the free mobile app,
available at www.hospitalsafe-
tyscore.org.


Local artist recognized for duck art


Staff report
Groveland artist John
Harris has won third
place in the 2014 Louisi-
ana Waterfowl Conserva-
tion Stamp competition
sponsored by the Louisi-
ana Department of Wild-
life and Fisheries.
The contest determines
the image to be used on
what is commonly known
as the Louisiana Duck


Stamp.
Harris, a mostly self-
taught artist who works
for the Walt Disney World
Resort at Epcot in the En-
gineering Services De-
partment, is considered
Florida's Foremost Duck
Stamp Artist, winning this
state's waterfowl conser-
vation competition three
times, including two in a
row.
He is the only artist to


win the Florida contest
three times.
Harris is the 2006 Mich-
igan Ducks Unlimited
Artist of the Year, the 2002
Florida Ducks Unlimited
Artist of the Year and the
1999 Wyoming Ducks Un-
limited Artist of the Year.
The Louisiana Water-
fowl Conservation Stamp
program was established
in 1988 by the Louisi-
ana Legislature to gener-


ate revenue for conserva-
tion and enhancement of
state wetlands and oth-
er worthy programs that
benefit Louisiana's ducks
and geese, according to a
press release from the
This program has gen-
erated over $11 million
for wetland conservation
in Louisiana since 1989,
with over $270,000 from
last year's stamp sales
alone.





DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 11, 2013


IN MEMORY


OElsi ARIESae
Elsie M. Creamer
Elsie M. Creamer,
70, of Umatilla, passed
away Saturday, No-
vember 9, 2013. Born
in Holly Hill, Florida,
she was a lifelong resi-
dent of Central Florida.
She worked in the food
service department for
Altoona Elementary
School and Eustis El-
ementary School. El-
sie was a member of
the Magnolia Springs
Hunt Club and En-
counter Life Church
of Umatilla. She loved
the outdoors, fishing,
family reunions, cro-
cheting, sewing, mak-
ing family holidays &
birthdays special for
her family. She is sur-
vived by her husband
of 54 years, William C.
(Billy) Creamer, Uma-
tilla, FL; son, Richard
D. (Ricky) Creamer and


Mary, North Altoona,
FL; daughter, Yvette Ta-
bor and Tod, North Al-
toona, FL; brother,
Lonnie Register, Bon-
ifay, FL; sister, Jewell
J. Houghton, Mount
Dora, FL; 6 grandchil-
dren and 8 great-grand-
children. She was pre-
ceded in death by her
father, Robert Register;
mother, Jewell Sutton;
brother, Eugene Regis-
ter. Services will be held
at Harden/Pauli Funer-
al Home Chapel, Eustis
on Tuesday, November
12, 2013 at 11:00 AM.
Interment will follow at
Lakeside Memory Gar-
dens, Eustis. The fami-
ly will receive friends at
the Funeral Home prior
to the service from 9:00
- 11:00 AM. Online
Guestbook available
at wwwhardenpauli.
com Arrangements by
Harden/Pauli Funeral
Home, Eustis.


,, ,, I . 0 ,
'1.444:r-.



"Ready and Willing"
Tell a firefighter today that their willingness to act in
the face of danger is appreciated.
Steverson-Hamlin and ilbish Funerals
fand Cremations
226 East Burleigh Blvd, Tavares, FL 32778
352-343-4444 www.steversonhamlinhflbish.com


Fundraiser planned




for Mote-Morris House


Staff report
A special recep-
tion at the Mote-Mor-
ris House this week
will help to raise funds
needed to fix up the
121-year-old local
landmark.
The event from 5:30
to 7:30 p.m. Friday will
include tours and pre-
sentations about the
home's classic archi-
tecture and past own-
ers, according to a
press release by city
spokesman Robert
Sargent.
Snacks and refresh-
ments will be avail-
able. All tax-deduct-
ible donations will
help to pay for much
needed improvements
to the building located
at 1195W Magnolia St.
Leesburg has pro-
claimed Nov. 15 as
Mote-Morris House
Celebration Day to
recognize fundraising
efforts, Sargent said.
"This was one of
the original houses in
Leesburg," said Glori-
anne Fahs, president
of the Leesburg Heri-
tage Society.
A recent investiga-
tion identified need-


COURTESY CITY OF LEESBURG
The Mote-Morris House was built in 1892 at 1021 North Main St. by Leesburg's eight-term
Mayor Edward H. Mote, at a cost of $9,000.


ed repairs to the roof,
windows, doors and
exterior wood siding.
Fencing and sidewalks
need to be fixed.
The Mote-Mor-
ris House was built
in 1892 at 1021 North
Main St. by Leesburg's
eight-term Mayor Ed-
ward H. Mote, at a cost
of $9,000.
The Mote family
sold the house in 1908
to Bishop Henry Clay


Morrison and, in 1918,
it came into the pos-
session of the Morris
family, which resided
there for the next 70
years.
In 1990 the house
was moved to its pres-
ent location and is list-
ed on the U.S. Nation-
al Register of Historic
Places.
Fahs also is help-
ing the house with do-
nated proceeds from


a new history book -
"Images of America -
Leesburg" that she
co-authored with Bob
Grenier. The book fea-
tures pictures and sto-
ries of Leesburg's col-
orful past as a growing
economic hub and
residential communi-
ty. Books can be pur-
chased at the Leesburg
Heritage Museum, 111
S. Sixth St. in down-
town Leesburg.


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Where Quality Meets Affordability

If you have ever been to Mattress Market of Florida, located at
16129 SR 50 in the "Green Roof" buildings in Clermont, then you
know they have a diverse and large inventory of top brand name
mattresses and their quality home furnishing line is direct from
Macy's, Ashley Furniture and American Manufacturing.
If you have ever bought from local owner, Danny, then you know
he offers high-end merchandise at low end prices and his
reputation is honest, fair and educated. Danny has more than
twenty years experience in the industry, having started out in
assembly at a mattress facility He really knows what is in a
mattress and how it is intended to last.
Mattress Market of Florida offers three showrooms in one
location. You may call and speak to Danny at 407.340.3751 /
407.877.6677 or visit the location Monday Saturday O10AM -
7PM and Sundays closed.
In any economy, affordable quality is a necessity and Danny has
built his business to offer that daily, to the community Twin
mattress sets start at $99 and sofa & loveseat combos at only $589.
Financing is available and no credit checks eliminate the hassle
between your desire and purchase. Mattress Market of Florida
also offers delivery, removal of your old mattress and set-up of
your new one.
If you have ever thought you would benefit from a quality mattress
or wanted an upgrade to your living room or dining room
furniture, stop in to Mattress Market of Florida and see how easy
and attainable that can happen.
More information is available at www.MattressMarketFL.com
Se Habla Espanol.


I


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, November 11, 2013




Monday, November 11, 2013


All the great benefits you expect with a PPO, but with extras like
SilverSneakers, over-the-counter medications and more

If you like your Medicare PPO plan, wait until you check out the
HumanaChoice (RPPO) plan:
/ $0 monthly Plan Premium
$ Freedom to choose any doctor or hospital and lower out-of-pocket
costs when you use in-network providers
$ No referrals required for specialist visits
/ Prescription drug coverage
/ Convenient mail-order prescription coverage
/ Maximum annual out-of-pocket protection
/ Over-the-counter medication allowance
/ Preventive coverage
/ Vision and dental coverage
/ 24-hour nurse advice line
/ Wellness programs
/ Emergency coverage at home and when you trave[
/ And so much more!

Get the flexibility you're looking for in your health coverage.

1 Call a licensed sales agent now.
1-800-336-6764 (TTY: 711)
8 a.m. to 8 p.m., seven days a week

Don't wait. Enrollment ends Saturday, December 7.






Humana is a Medicare Advantage PPO plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in a/this Humana plan depends on contract renewal. The benefit
information provided is a brief summary, not a complete description of benefits. For more information contact the plan. Limitations, copayments and
restrictions may apply. Benefits, formulary, pharmacy network, premium and/or co-payments/co-insurance may change on January 1 of each year.
You must continue to pay your Medicare Part B premium. A sales person will be present with information and applications. For accommodation of
persons with special needs at sales meetings call 1-800-336-6764 (TTY:711), 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., seven day a week. Applicable to HumanaChoice (RPPO)
plan: R5826-074.


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Y0040_G-HHHPLEN Accepted


ORL 11/13





DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 11, 2013


PRISON
FROM PAGE Al

the American Legion, the nation's
largest wartime veterans service
organization.
"It's a way to show we can still
serve our country, even behind
bars," said Post Commander Ryan
Carroll, also inmate 134230 and a
former U.S. Coast Guard member.
In a ceremony that included a
number of civilian American Le-
gion officials, the 15 inmates were
called up one-by-one and given
their memberships cards. They
also were handed a gavel to run
the meetings and their post flag.
Eastern Area Commander Bob Ki-
ley, who conducted the ceremony,
said while Carroll and others com-
mitted crimes, they did serve their
country well in the military and
should have the chance to contin-
ue serving, even behind bars.
"They defended our way of
life for all our citizens," said Ki-
ley at the podium as a number of
the prison's inmates and officials
watched.
The prisoners will run meet-
ings just as they are run outside of
prison. There's a chaplain, histori-
an, a sergeant-at-arms to keep or-
der during its meeting and other
positions. The meetings will take
place
in the prison's veterans dormito-
ry that is filled with military signs
and is part of a re-entry program
overseen by the Florida Depart-
ment of Corrections.
The dormitory allows veterans
to live the military life where they
are required to conduct a dai-
ly flag raising, abide by military
standards, refrain from profanity
and participate in other military-
type duties.
"You can definitely see the dif-
ference it has made on our veter-
ans," said Warden Jimmy Johnson
of the 81 veterans who are in the
program at Sumter Correctional
Institution.
But behind bars, the American
Legion members won't be able to
contribute to community chari-
ties such as little league baseball
and soccer, scouting and home-
less veterans. Warden I. Johnson
said fundraising by the prison le-


gion for community groups will be
challenging.
"This will be kind of new for us,"
said Kiley, who will initially attend
some of the prison American Le-
gion meetings.
But the post's prisoners are
working to establish a fund-rais-
ing project that will involve col-
lecting and recycling pop-tabs
from soda cans. Carroll said they
would use the funding for local
charities as well as helping older
and indigent prisoners who have
little or no family to give them
money.
"Even though we are locked up,
we can still volunteer our time for
worthwhile causes," Carroll said.
It is the prisoners' little access to
money that will make projects dif-
ficult and prolonged the prison's
two-year effort to start the post.
With only menial income coming
from car washes, working the pris-
on canteen and other menial jobs
in the prison, it was difficult to
find the 15 minimum number of
inmates required to start the post
because many of the them had
difficulty raising the $21.50 fee to
join.
"It took a lot of work to get it
started," said prison employee,
Sgt. Denise Bedwood, who helped
start the post.
Inmate post members are serv-
ing time for a variety of crimes, in-
cluding drugs and burglary. Car-
roll, 29, was on active duty with
the Coast Guard in 2010 when he
was charged with 10 counts of
possession of child pornography.
He is scheduled to be released in
2015. Robert Perkins, 80, inmate
031293 and the post historian,
served in Army between 1951 and
1954. He was sentenced to life in
1956 on a sexual battery and other
convictions.
Perkins has a parole hearing in
January of next year and hopes to
join a civilian post if he's released.
Both said they hope being mem-
bers of an inmate post will help
transform their criminal reputa-
tions.
"Now we're even more deter-
mined to give back to the com-
munity and live productive lives,"
Perkins said.
A permanent charter eventually
will replace the temporary charter.


M@2* A


LEESBURG North Lake Plaza (352) 435-9251
LADY LAKE County Crossings Shopping Center (352) 750-1826
SW VILLAGES Buffalo Ridge Shopping Center (352) 259-3865


Agency wants to



deliver 1,000 meals


Staff report
Florida's leading hunger relief or-
ganization, Deliver The Difference
that is housed here in Lake County,
has earmarked Nov. 18 and 19 as the
days that the organization will be de-
livering 1,000 Thanksgiving dinners
to families in need. They are asking
for help.
"If you can donate or sign up to
volunteer now, please do so at our
website, www.DeliverTheDifference.
org," says Bob Bostic, founder/direc-
tor, Deliver The Difference.
"We need to have all the donations
in as quickly as possible in order all
the food in time," Bostic said, not-
ing there are thousands of families
in Lake and Sumter County who will
not experience the joy and comfort
of a Thanksgiving meal.
Volunteers will begin packing box-
es on Saturday.
"We all know what it can mean
to be able to sit down together and
share a meal and fellowship with
those we love," he said.
"This Thanksgiving, we want to
provide a full thanksgiving meal to at
least 1,000 local families," said Bos-


BOATS
FROM PAGE A3

"This is all for dem-
onstration. We're rac-
ing, but not really,"
he said of the Classic
Race Boat Association
event, where Tavares
is now a major stop on
the CRA Florida Vin-
tage Race Boat Circuit.
He and other boat-
ers happily showed off
the sights and sounds
of their beloved boats

Iiir M I


tic, who has reached out to all his
contacts and phoned in a lot of fa-
vors, while local food suppliers have
committed their support.
"As a result, we'll be able to provide
a full Thanksgiving dinner for four
for just $25," he said. Bostic, along
with volunteers, will provide box-
es full of food, and the pre-qualified
folks who receive them will be able
to prepare them at home.
For a total of $25 per family of four,
each will receive food packages con-
taining 11-14 pound turkey, stuff-
ing, mashed potatoes, gravy, green
beans, corn, yams, cranberry sauce,
bread rolls, and pumpkin pie.
Bostic said the goal is to deliver a
minimum of 1,000 meals. However,
Deliver the Difference plans to pack
as many boxes as possible based
on how much money is donated.
"These are all folks who are pre-
qualified by the schools, church-
es and food pantries that we work
with," Bostic said of the families re-
ceiving the food.
For information, call Bostic at 343-


6700 or go
ence.org.


from yesteryear.
"This is the origi-
nal motor, the original
boat, and the original
builder," Edwards said
of his boat decorated
with large, bright or-
ange numbers 1937.
"That was a very
good year," he added.
"The year I was born."
Before taking the
vessel out on Lake
Dora, Edwards showed
off some features of his
boat.
"This has a tun-


NEWMENUS

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nel down the side and
there's nothing in the
middle," he said.
"The air gets com-
pressed and you lit-
erally fly. The fastest
speed that I ever had
with this boat has been
100 mph."
Edwards recalled he
was in a marathon race
at the time.
"I looked down at
the speedometer and
it was pointing direct-
ly to 100 mph and I'm
going, 'Oh yeah!'" he
said.
"And then I look up
and it was all blue wa-
ter."
Edwards flashed a
wide grin and admit-
ted racing never gets
old.
"I love it, I absolute-
ly adore it. The thrill is
going out and beating
other guys," he said.
His weekend in Ta-
vares was his second
time in Lake County,
after his first visit here
in March.
"The weather is
beautiful here," he
said. "Back home right
now, it's getting on the
verge of winter."
The Classic Race
Boat Association
members will return
Jan. 17-19, 2014, for the
Winter Thunder Regat-
ta at Wooton Park.
Bill Neron, Tavares
economic develop-
ment director, noted
the regatta has been
expanded to three
times a year.
"We have just a great
turnout and it's just
a neat event," Neron
said.
"I like the big old
hydros. They got me
out in one a couple of
years ago. Let's just say
it's one off my bucket
list that I don't need to
do again. It was quite
an experience."


Need

Tax Help?

Call
352-787-1040

Open Year Round.


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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, November 11, 2013






YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD
BILL KOCH............... ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR
SCOTT CALLAHAN .......................NEWS EDITOR Vi
GENE PACKWOOD ............ EDITORIAL CARTOONIST w dIm c o
< ^^ ^r r ^^www.dailycommercial.com


VOICE



Good bye




trans fats


f eliminating a tasteless and easily re-
placeable ingredient from the nation's
food supply would save 7,000 lives and
prevent 20,000 heart attacks a year,
we'd do it, right? Of course, we would.
But because of timid regulators and
industry inertia, it took a couple of de-
cades to do so after the health dangers
of artery-clogging trans fats were first
recognized. But on Thursday, the fed-
eral Food and Drug Administration an-
nounced plans to begin eliminating ar-
tificial trans fats from the nation's food
supplies.
Consumers are unlikely to notice the
absence of the fats, largely used in fried
fast food, baked goods and processed
foods requiring a long shelf life. The As-
sociated Press says that Dunkin' Donuts
sold 50 million doughnuts made with a
trans-fat substitute to see if any custom-
ers noticed. Apparently none did.
The ban will have some food manufac-
turers scrambling for replacements for
trans fat, a specially treated form of veg-
etable oil originally concocted in the ear-
ly 1900s as a cheaper substitute for but-
ter and lard.
But the impact on manufacturers was
largely mitigated because regulators
have been telegraphing their punch for
years. In 2003, for example, the FDA be-
gan requiring food labels to list the num-
ber of grams of trans fat per serving.
The crusade really took off when it
was taken up by New York City May-
or and food-safety maven Michael
Bloomberg, who initiated a ban that was
phased in over three years and took full
effect in 2008.
The health-conscious mayor has suc-
ceeded in driving most tobacco smok-
ers in his city outdoors. He has been less
successful in limiting the sale of large,
heavily sugared drinks.
Bloomberg must leave office Jan. 1,
and at least some of his healthy-New-
Yorker campaign will survive. His first
health commissioner, Dr. Thomas Frie-
den, is now head of the U.S. Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention.
But NewYork City, with its huge pop-
ulation and ability to move markets, is
unique in having had a mayor relentless
and wealthy enough to ignore what the
special-interest groups think.
Distributed by Scripps Howard News Service.


The Daily Commercial

The newspaper of choice for Lake
and Sumter counties since 1875
EDITORIALS
Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board,
not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are
not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday,
Saturday and Sunday.
COLUMNS
Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and
picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reflect
the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a
diversity of views.
If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state
or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom-
mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL
34749-0007.
Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length.
The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published
with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.


OTHERVOICES

Pakistan violence overshadows progress


Last week's deadly U.S.
drone strike on a no-
torious Taliban lead-
er put Pakistan back
in the headlines, reflecting
the country's strategic im-
portance. But global me-
dia emphasis on violence in
Pakistan also overshadows
progress in democratic pol-
itics.
The Nov. 1 drone strike
killed Hakimullah Mehsud,
notorious leader of the Tali-
ban in Pakistan. He had been
a priority target of the Paki-
stan and U.S. governments
for initiating many terrorist
attacks, including a Decem-
ber 2009 Afghanistan bomb-
ing that killed Americans.
Last month, President
Barack Obama met with Ma-
lalaYousafzai, the 16-year-
old Pakistani girl shot by the
Taliban in revenge for her ad-
vocacy of female education.
The vicious attack has
made her an influential in-
ternational leader against vi-
olence. Vital Voices Global
Partnership, a nonprofit or-
ganization to empower girls
and women, has established
the Malala Fund. Yousafzai
has become a vital global
symbol of courage.
The country's first peaceful
presidential transition also
deserved headlines: In Sep-
tember, beleaguered Pres-
ident Asif Ali Zardari, who
did not seek re-election, was
succeeded in office by Mam-
noon Hussain.
In May, Pakistan's National
Assembly elections provided
a significant victory to Nawaz
Sharif and his opposition
Pakistan Muslim League-N.
The new president, Hus-
sain, is a Sharif ally. (Despite
violence, turnout in these


Arthur
I. Cyr

SCRIPPS HOWARD
NEWS SERVICE


elections was about 60 per-
cent.)
The orderly office handover
to the opposition represents
a distinctive departure from
the nation's history of mili-
tary coups.
Sharif was prime minister
twice earlier. He was forced
out of the post in 1999 in a
military coup led by Gen.
Pervez Musharraf, and spent
more than a decade in exile
in Saudi Arabia.
The election was a serious
reversal for the powerful Pak-
istan People's Party, dominat-
ed by the Bhutto family, and
Imran Khan's Pakistan Teh-
reek-e-Insaf.
Charismatic Benazir Bhut-
to, who'd served twice as
prime minister, was making
a dramatic third effort to win
national power when she was
assassinated late in Decem-
ber 2007.
In recent years, Pakistan-
U.S. relations have been
vexed. Pakistan since 9/11
has been a front line in the
struggle against terrorism.
Targeted killings of individ-
uals by American drone air-
craft have caused intense,
continuing controversy.
Osama bin Laden's ability
to hide in Abbottabad raised
suspicion that Pakistan of-
ficials may have been com-
plicit in concealing him.
The Pakistani government
was not informed in advance
of the SEAL Team 6 raid that
killed him.


Islamic radicalism is in-
fluential in Pakistan, but the
scope of support is unclear.
Extreme violent fundamen-
talism also represents a se-
rious threat to the govern-
ment.
Pakistan possesses nucle-
ar weapons. This vastly raises
the stakes of a possible radi-
cal takeover of power.
Pakistan and U.S. militaries
cooperate closely on secur-
ing these weapons, in a long-
established durable partner-
ship.
Historically, the nation has
been a relatively solid ally of
the West, a point almost al-
ways overlooked in media
commentary.
The British-trained military
is extremely capable. Dur-
ing the Cold War, Pakistan
was generally a conservative
counterweight to neutralist
India and communist China.
In the 1950s, Secretary of
State John Foster Dulles en-
sured that this important ally
joined both the Central Trea-
ty Organization and South-
east Asia Treaty Organiza-
tion, designed to replicate
NATO in the Middle East and
South Asia, respectively.
The nation was unique in
having membership in both
alliances. Both are long gone,
but the geostrategic impor-
tance of Pakistan continues.
While media emphasize Is-
lamabad-Washington strains,
threats of Islamic radical-
ism and incidents of brutal
violence, what's really hap-
pening as usual is more
complex and more promis-
ing.
Arthur I. Cyr is Clausen Distinguished
Professor at Carthage College in Keno-
sha, Wis., and author of "After the Cold
War." Email acyr@carthage.edu.


HAVE YOUR SAY
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number for verification. We reserve
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By fax to: 325-365-1951


DOONESBURY


Editor's note: Garry Trudeau is on hiatus. This is a collection of some of his favorite strips.


Monday, November 11, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL





DAILY COMMERCIALMonday, November 11, 2013


I IV-DY ORCg. FO LESUR


TODAY




Comfortable with times
of clouds and sun

HIGH LOW
810 61
V
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Pensacola- i
75/55 '::Pa
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75P


TUESDAY




Intervals of clouds and
sunshine

HIGH LOW
79 620


WEDNESDAY




Cooler with a couple of
showers possible

HIGH LOW
670 500


Tallahassee t '--
'" .. 78/53
inama Cil j*..iiiii
154


Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. @2013


THURSDAY

".9 9.b,


Partial sunshine


HIGH LOW
700 550


FRIDAY

Aa


Clouds and breaks
of sun

HIGH LOW
74 63


,,Jacksonville
SLakeCity t. "7
79/56

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79/57 79/62
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Shown amre noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are today's highs for the
day. Forecast highlow temperatures are given for selected cities.


70s k 'Si.'.Mflnrapob'* yllt'.'~~v^

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Yesterday's National High/Low: (for the 48 contiguous states)
High 88' in Immokalee, FL Low 12' in Gunnison, CO


5
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0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10
Very High, 11+ Extreme
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Indexr
number, the greater the need for
eye and skin protection.


S^TOLNRTABLE^
The solunar period schedule allows planning
days so you will be fishing in good territory or
hunting in good cover during those times. Major
periods begin at the times shown and last for
1.5 to 2 hours. The minor periods are shorter.
Major Minor Major Minor
Today 6:27 a.m. 12:17 a.m. 6:52 p.m. 12:40 p.m.
Tue. 7:13 a.m. 1:01 a.m. 7:37 p.m. 1:25 p.m.


I E A 00


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


Today
6:47 a.m.
5:35 p.m.
1:49 p.m.
12:59 a.m.


Tuesday
6:48 a.m.
5:35 p.m.
2:27 p.m.
1:59 a.m.


Full



Nov17


Last New First



Nov25 Dec 2 Dec 9


ITIEI


Homosassa
Day High Feet
Today 11:13am......1.1

Daytona Beach
Day High Feet
Today 2:01 am.....4.4
2:36 pm.....4.5


Low Feet
6:52 am .....0.3
7:25 pm.....0.2

Low Feet
8:17 am .....0.5
8:51 pm.....0.3


High Feat
12:19 am......1.1
12:42 pm......1.0

High Feat
3:06 am.....4.4
3:37 pm.....4.4


Low Feet
8:11 am .....0.2
8:30 pm.....0.2

Low Feet
9:21 am .....0.5
9:47 pm.....0.2


I 0AINLCTE


Today Tuesday
City Hi LoW Hi LoW
San Francisco 64 53 pc 67 50 pc
San Juan, PR 86 75 s 88 75 pc
Santa Fe 63 32 s 52 31 pc
St. Ste. Marie 31 19 sf 30 23 sf
Seattle 59 45 c 55 47r
Shreveport 72 50 pc 59 31 pc
Spokane 48 34 c 49 35 c
Syracuse 48 29 sh 37 25 sf
Topeka 53 23 pc 37 16 pc
Tucson 84 57 s 85 58 pc
Tulsa 69 32 pc 44 22 pc
Washington, DC 58 39 s 47 30 c
Wilmington, DE 54 37 s 46 29 c
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.


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Fww pm-hs iciSans 0m wwp anorid.comS


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte, NC


Today
Hi LoW
48 28 pc
65 42 s
31 12 pc
60 37 s
64 45 pc
53 39 s
56 38 s
32 27 c
70 46 pc
21 2c
62 42 pc
53 35 s
44 27 sn
44 26 c
69 46 s
59 33 pc
60 38 s


Tuesday
Hi LoW
38 22 c
56 43pc
22 8s
49 26 pc
64 36s
45 28 c
46 27 c
56 43 pc
60 30s
36 17s
57 36 c
44 29c
35 26sf
35 19pc
70 41 pc
38 23 c
56 30s


City
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Concord, NH
Dallas
Dayton
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
El Paso
Fargo
Fairbanks
Flagstaff
Grand Rapids


Today
Hi LoW
53 22pc
43 23 r
56 29 pc
49 27 sn
66 40 s
49 25 s
72 47 pc
51 24 pc
61 25 pc
41 18 c
45 24 sn
22 10 pc
73 50 pc
21 6pc
21 -3c
63 27s
40 24sf


w0


Tuesday
Hi Lo W
50 33 pc
34 20 sf
38 23 sn
37 24 sf
67 39 s
40 18 c
52 31 c
37 21 c
53 34 pc
33 18pc
37 22 c
27 17s
68 43 pc
30 17s
6 -5 s
62 26 pc
35 22 c


City
Great Falls
Greensboro, NC
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City


Today
Hi Lo W
36 27 c
60 38 s
50 31 s
82 66 s
78 55 pc
52 26 pc
72 48 pc
53 23 pc
78 53 s
68 44 pc
59 33 pc
67 41 pc
39 23 sf
29 15 c
64 38 pc
76 58 pc
54 37 s


Tuesday
Hi Lo W
57 38 pc
50 28s
42 25 c
82 66s
72 40 pc
39 21 sf
63 30 pc
37 18 pc
78 56 pc
47 28 pc
39 27 sn
45 30 pc
33 22c
29 19 s
44 26 pc
74 40 pc
43 30 pc


City
Norfolk, VA
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego


Today
Hi Lo W
56 42s
68 33 pc
38 15 c
54 38s
87 58 s
50 29 pc
48 29 pc
59 46 c
51 34s
60 38 s
67 41 pc
58 41 s
68 46 pc
57 27 pc
65 41 pc
76 57 pc
70 58 pc


Tuesday
Hi Lo W
47 36 s
42 23 pc
33 16pc
44 30 c
90 63 pc
37 21 sf
42 22 sn
58 48 r
44 26 c
52 30 s
68 31 pc
46 30 c
73 46 pc
38 21 pc
62 43 pc
71 41 pc
71 58 pc


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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, November 11, 2013


...,Wmw I
0410-








Sports
spoits'-'dai l c o i:rneic ial.c oi


Nadal ends Federer's year/ B5


Bl
DAILY COMMERCLL
,id'.-y, N,,Nov eml, e h 11,21I1:1



\\ \\W. (:li lyOIniei'ci1l._co I
SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY
1352-365-8208


MDB's Clark


finishes fourth


at state meet
FRANK JOLLEY I Staff Writer
frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com
Lake and Sumter counties were rep-
resented at Saturday's Florida High
School Athletic Association Cross
Country Championships atApalachee
Regional Park in Tallahassee.
For a while, in fact, in the Class
1A boys race, it
appeared that
AMount Dora Bi-
LHI rble might have to
L make room for a
-^i. .state champion-
"-F ship trophy.
I Bulldogs senior
Troy Clark hit the
first checkpoint in
the 5-kilometer run ahead of all oth-
er competitors, but tailed off in the
stretch to finish fourth in 16 min-
utes, 10.07 seconds. Clark's run was
the top finish for all area runners over
the course which wound through the
woods near the state capitol.
Windermere Prep's Franco
SEE LOCAL I B2


Alabama, FSU


at top of BCS

standings

RALPH RUSSO
Associated Press
Florida State took firm hold of sec-
ond place in the BCS standings behind
top-ranked Alabama and grabbed the
inside track to the national champion-
ship game.
The Seminoles were in second last
week, but seemed likely to get passed
by Oregon if the Ducks could have re-
mained unbeaten.
The Seminoles (.9619) are a solid sec-
ond in the USA Today coaches' poll and
Harris poll, and second in the comput-
er rankings that make up the final third
of a BCS average.


1 Alabama .996 points
2 Florida State .962
3 Ohio State .893
4 -Stanford .869
5 Baylor .862
6 Oregon .767
7 Auburn .721
8 Clemson .720
9 Missouri .712
10 South Carolina .558
17 -UCF .341
AP, USA Today rankings, B2


THRILL OF VICTORY


PHOTOS BY MARK ZALESKI /AP
Jacksonville's Ace Sanders (18), Cecil Shorts (84) and Mike Brown (12) celebrate as they leave the field Sunday after the Jaguars beat Tennes-
see 29-27 in Nashville, Tenn. The win was the first of the season for Jacksonville.


Jaguars end skid, beat Titans
to earn first victory of season


TERESA WALKER
Associated Press
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
The Jacksonville Jaguars
are winless no more, and
they can thank the Ten-
nessee Titans for helping
them finally getting their
first victory this season.
Maurice Jones-Drew
and Jordan Todman each
ran for a touchdown, and
the Jaguars held off the Ti-
tans 29-27 Sunday, leaving
Tampa Bay at 0-8 as the
only winless team left.
The Jaguars (1-8) scored
the most points in a game
this season for first-year
coach Gus Bradley They
never trailed and forced
four turnovers they turned
into 17 points.
The Titans scored twice
in the final 4:15, the last
on a 14-yard TD pass by
Ryan Fitzpatrick to Dela-
nie Walker with 40 sec-
onds left. But Johnathan
Cyprien recovered the on-
side kick to seal the victory.
On a day the Titans (4-5)
held a moment of silence
for late owner Bud Adams,
they got caught looking
ahead to Thursday night's
AFC South game with di-
vision leader Indianap-
olis. The Titans also lost
Jake Locker to an injured


right foot that had him on
crutches and in a walking
boot in the second half.
The Titans were com-
ing off an emotional win
over their former coach
Jeff Fisher in St. Louis, and
they looked flat from the
start when even Adams'
family was late to the sta-
dium and a news con-
ference introducing the
owners scratched before
kickoff.
The Jaguars took advan-
tage despite being out-
gained 214-362 in total of-
fense. Chad Henne threw
for 180 yards.
Outscored 70-15 in the
first quarter of the first
eight games combined,
the Jaguars jumped out to
a 13-0 lead with Paul Po-
sluszny stripping Chris
Johnson of his first fumble
this season on Tennessee's
first offensive play and
Dwayne Gratz intercepted
a Locker pass.
The first turnover set
up Jones-Drew for three
straight carries capped by
a 6-yard TD run, and Josh
Scobee kicked his second
field goal, a 44-yarder, af-
ter the interception giving
the Jaguars' their biggest
lead in any game this sea-
son at 13-0 early in the sec-


Jacksonville running back Jordan Todman (30) celebrates with Clay
Harbor (86) after Todman scored a touchdown on a 5-yard run against
Tennessee.


ond quarter. The Jaguars
could have had a bigger
lead if not for a shotgun
snap bouncing off receiv-
er Ace Sanders as he ran
in motion on third down.
That forced them to settle
for Scobee's first field goal.
Not even Titans coach
Mike Munchak seemed
ready. He wanted to chal-
lenge a 22-yard sideline


catch by Cecil Shorts III
but threw the flag as the
Jaguars snapped the ball.
Locker hurt his right
foot in the second quar-
ter at the end of an option
keeper. He was so hobbled
he couldn't connect with
Johnson on a handoff on
the next play, and the Jag-
uars recovered with 6:22
left.


Embattled Dolphins, winless


Bucs eager to move forward


ELAINE THOMPSON /AP
Tampa Bay quarterback Mike Glennon passes in the first half of last week's
game against Seattle. The winless Buccaneers hosts Miami a team beset
by turmoil -today in a nationally televised game at Raymond James Stadium.


FRED GOODALL
Associated Press
TAMPA For Warren
Sapp, it will be a night to re-
member one the embat-
tled Miami Dolphins and
winless Tampa Bay Bucca-
neers aren't likely to forget,
either.
The 2013 Hall of Fame in-
ductee will have his No.
99 jersey retired and be-
come the newest member
of the Bucs' Ring of hon-
or at halftime of today's na-
tionally televised game. The
matchup showcases a pair
of struggling teams eager


to play rather than answer
more questions about their
problems.
The Dolphins (4-4) are
the talk of the NFL, with
the league investigating ac-
cusations that second-year
pro Jonathan Martin left the
team because he was being
harassed or bullied by fel-
low offensive lineman Rich-
ie Incognito, and perhaps by
other players.
The Bucs (0-8) have their
share of distractions, what
with that zero in the win col-
umn.
From the awkward bench-
ing and release of quarter-


back Josh Freeman to an
outbreak of MRSA infec-
tions in the locker room to
ongoing speculation about
coach Greg Schiano's fu-
ture, it's been a trying year
for a team that's lost 13 of 14
games dating to 2012.
Sapp, Tampa Bay's ca-
reer sacks leader and one
of the key players on the
franchise's only Super Bowl
champion, has watched a
disappointing season un-
fold from afar in his job as
an analyst for the NFL Net-
work.

SEE BUCS I B2





DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, November 11, 2013


AUTO RACING
NASCAR
Sprint Cup
Sunday
At Phoenix International Raceway
Avondale, Ariz.
Lap length: 1 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (9) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 312 laps, 140.7 rat
ing, 48 points.
2. (7) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 312,122.2,43.
3. (1) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 312,121.9,42.
4. (11) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 312,107.3,
41.
5. (8) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 312,102.6,39.
6. (19) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 312,
93.5,38.
7. (4) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 312, 96,37.
8. (10) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 312, 94.8,36.
9. (3) Joey Logano, Ford, 312,107.8,36.
10. (17) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 312, 92.3,35.
11. (12) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 312,106.5,34.
12. (27) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 312, 73.8,32.
13. (18) Greg Biffle, Ford, 312, 84.4,32.
14. (5) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 312,110.2, 31.
15. (16) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 312, 80.6, 29.
16. (13) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 312, 81.3, 28.
17. (15) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 312, 69.7, 27.
18. (36) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 312, 73.7, 27.
19. (21) Aric Almirola, Ford, 312, 67.5, 25.
20. (6) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 312, 79.4, 24.
21. (23) Carl Edwards, Ford, 312, 91.1, 24.
22. (26) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 311,59.6,22.
23. (14) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 311, 70.4, 21.
24. (33) David Gilliland, Ford, 311, 62.9, 21.
25. (22) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 311, 56.5, 0.
26. (20) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 311, 67,18.
27. (30) Casey Mears, Ford, 311,57.1,17.
28. (2) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 311, 63.6,17.
29. (35) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 311,45.1,15.
30. (42) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 310,41.6,14.
31. (25) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 309,47.9,0.
32. (39) Michael McDowell, Ford, 308, 39.4,12.
33. (32) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 302,33.2,11.
34. (38) Timmy Hill, Ford, 285, 28.9,10.
35. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 282,46.5,9.
36. (28) Josh Wise, Ford, brakes, 280,35.7,0.
37. (24) Reed Sorenson, Ford, engine, 266,
36.3,0.
38. (43) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, engine, 193,30,0.
39. (37) David Reutimann, Toyota, accident, 187,
45.7,5.
40. (29) Cole Whitt, Toyota, accident, 142,39.5,0.
41. (31) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, engine, 129,42.1,3.
42. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, brakes, 63,
27.9,0.
43. (41) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, brakes, 29,
26.3,0.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 105.733 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 57 minutes, 3 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 1.796 seconds.
Caution Flags: 8 for 49 laps.
Lead Changes: 23 among 13 drivers.
Lap Leaders: D.Hamlin 1-18; J.Gordon 19-51;
D.Gilliland 52-53; J.Gordon 54; K.Harvick 55-101;
K.Kahne 102-120; B.Keselowski 121-147; J.Gordon
148-158; J.McMurray 159; J.Gordon 160-163;
R.Newman 164-166; J.Logano 167; R.Newman
168-191; J.Logano 192-223; K.Kahne 224-245;
J.Johnson 246; C.Edwards 247; K.Harvick 248-
268; D.Earnhardt Jr. 269-270; R.Newman 271-
274; G.Biffle 275; C.Edwards 276-310; K.Harvick
311-312.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): K.Harvick, 3 times for 70 laps; J.Gordon, 4
times for 49 laps; K.Kahne, 2 times for 41 laps;
C.Edwards, 2 times for 36 laps; J.Logano, 2 times
for 33 laps; R.Newman, 3 times for 31 laps;
B.Keselowski, 1 time for 27 laps; D.Hamlin, 1
time for 18 laps; D.Earnhardt Jr., 1 time for 2 laps;
D.Gilliland, 1 time for 2 laps; J.Johnson, 1 time
for 1 lap; G.Biffle, 1 time for 1 lap; J.McMurray, 1
time for 1 lap.
Top 13 in Points: 1. J.Johnson, 2,384; 2.
M.Kenseth, 2,356; 3. K.Harvick, 2,350; 4.
Ky.Busch, 2,327; 5. D.Earnhardt Jr., 2,321; 6.
J.Gordon, 2,304; 7. G.Biffle, 2,301; 8. C.Bowyer,
2,297; 9. J.Logano, 2,287; 10. Ku.Busch, 2,285;
11. R.Newman, 2,259; 12. K.Kahne, 2,252; 13.



GOLF
PGA Tour
McGladrey Classic
Sunday
At Sea Island Resort (Seaside Course)
St. Simons Island, Ga.
Purse: $5.5 million
Yardage: 7,005; Par: 70
Final
(FedEx Cup points in parentheses)
Chris Kirk (500), $990,000 66-66-68-66
Briny Baird (245), $484,000 63-70-67-67
Tim Clark (245), $484,000 67-67-71-62
Scott Brown (115), $227,333 66-68-68-66
Brian Gay (115), $227,333 63-72-66-67
John Senden (115), $227,333 66-67-68-67
Matt Every (85), $171,417 67-68-69-66
Webb Simpson (85), $171,417 65-68-71-66
Matt Kuchar (85), $171,417 68-68-68-66
Greg Chalmers (64), $121,917 68-68-72-64
Brian Harman (64), $121,917 67-68-70-67
Robert Karlsson, $121,917 68-68-71-65
Daniel Summerhays (64), $121,917 69-66-69-68
Jason Kokrak (64), $121,917 69-65-69-69
Kevin Stadler (64), $121,917 68-68-65-71
Brendon de Jonge (54), $85,250 67-71-70-65
Zach Johnson (54), $85,250 70-68-68-67
Heath Slocum (54), $85,250 67-71-69-66
Brendon Todd (54), $85,250 68-67-67-71
Trevor Immelman (51), $68,750 67-72-70-65
Kevin Kisner (51), $68,750 65-73-70-66
Robert Garrigus (47), $52,800 65-74-67-69
Charley Hoffman (47), $52,800 66-73-68-68
Scott Langley (47), $52,800 66-71-68-70
George McNeill (47), $52,800 62-76-68-69
Boo Weekley (47), $52,800 67-69-73-66
Harris English (42), $39,050 68-70-71-67
Charles Howell III (42), $39,050 69-70-66-71
Seung-Yul Noh (42), $39,050 65-70-73-68
David Toms (42), $39,050 68-73-68-67
Cameron Tringale (42), $39,050 70-69-68-69
Kevin Chappell (38), $31,831 65-68-74-70
Ben Curtis (38), $31,831 68-69-72-68
Russell Knox (38), $31,831 70-71-69-67
John Rollins (38), $31,831 65-76-66-70
Stuart Appleby (34), $26,469 68-70-71-69
Chad Campbell (34), $26,469 70-70-71-67
Brice Garnett (34), $26,469 67-72-67-72
Ted Potter, Jr. (34), $26,469 67-67-72-72
Woody Austin (28), $19,800 68-73-68-70
Aaron Baddeley (28), $19,800 68-71-70-70
Will Claxton (28), $19,800 65-71-71-72
Lucas Glover (28), $19,800 69-72-68-70
David Hearn (28), $19,800 74-66-70-69
Danny Lee (28), $19,800 70-71-70-68




LOCAL

FROM PAGE BI


Martins won the race in
15:44.23 and hit the in-
termediate checkpoint
trailing Clark by .12
seconds. Clark was the
only area runner in the
boys Class 1A race.
In the girls Class 1A
race, Christina McKin-
ney led Mount Dora Bi-
ble to a 13th place fin-
ish with 162 points.
Melbourne Holy Trinity
won the team title with
44 points, followed by
Gainesville Oak Hall


with 72 points.
McKinney also post-
ed the best finish by
any area girls run-
ner, finishing llth. She
stopped the clock in
18:54.92. Melbourne
Holy Trinity's Julie Woll-
rath won with a time of
18:14.88.


C.Edwards, 2,250.
BASKETBALL
NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic
W L Pct
Philadelphia 4 3 .571
Toronto 3 4 .429
Boston 3 4 .429
New York 2 4 .333
Brooklyn 2 4 .333
Southeast
W L Pct
Miami 4 3 .571
Atlanta 3 3 .500
Charlotte 3 3 .500
Orlando 3 4 .429
Washington 2 3 .400
Central
W L Pct
Indiana 7 0 1.000
Cleveland 3 4 .429
Milwaukee 2 3 .400
Detroit 2 3 .400
Chicago 2 3 .400
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest
W L Pct
San Antonio 6 1 .857
Houston 4 3 .571
Dallas 4 3 .571
New Orleans 3 3 .500
Memphis 3 3 .500
Northwest
W L Pct
Oklahoma City 4 1 .800
Minnesota 4 2 .667
Portland 4 2 .667
Denver 1 4 .200
Utah 0 7 .000
Pacific
W L Pct
Phoenix 4 2 .667
L.A. Clippers 4 3 .571
Golden State 4 3 .571
L.A. Lakers 3 4 .429
Sacramento 1 5 .167
Saturday's Games
Toronto 115, Utah 91
Indiana 96, Brooklyn 91
Cleveland 127, Philadelphia 125,20T
Boston 111, Miami 110
Atlanta 104, Orlando 94
L.A. Clippers 107, Houston 94
Memphis 108, Golden State 90
Dallas 91, Milwaukee 83
Portland 96, Sacramento 85
Sunday's Games
San Antonio 120, New York 89
Washington at Oklahoma City, late
New Orleans at Phoenix, late
Minnesota at L.A. Lakers, late
Today's Games
San Antonio at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Memphis at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Orlando at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Toronto at Houston, 8 p.m.
Denver at Utah, 9 p.m.
Detroit at Portland, 10 p.m.
Minnesota at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Men's College
Sunday's Scores
EAST
Boston U. 72, Northeastern 69
Charleston Southern 95, Delaware 93
Dartmouth 106, Lyndon St. 61
Princeton 67, Florida A&M 50
Stony Brook 81, Haverford 65
SOUTH
Youngstown St. 75, E. Kentucky 67
MIDWEST
Iowa St. 95, UNC Wilmington 62
Notre Dame 80, Stetson 49
Tiffin 101, Bluefield St. 86


Troy Matteson (28), $19,800
Camilo Villegas (28), $19,800
Eric Axley (20), $13,671
James Hahn (20), $13,671
J.J. Henry (20), $13,671
Pat Perez (20), $13,671
Michael Putnam (20), $13,671
Mark Wilson (20), $13,671
Josh Broadaway, $13,671
Blake Adams (13), $12,320
Jonathan Byrd (13), $12,320
Martin Flores (13), $12,320
Spencer Levin (13), $12,320
Carl Pettersson (13), $12,320
Kyle Stanley (13), $12,320
Mike Weir (13), $12,320
Steven Bowditch (9), $11,880
Erik Compton (8), $11,715
Scott Piercy (8), $11,715
Darren Clarke (5), $11,385
Retief Goosen (5), $11,385
Russell Henley (5), $11,385
Justin Leonard (5), $11,385
Andres Romero (2), $11,110
D.H. Lee (1), $10,945
Rory Sabbatini (1), $10,945
Paul Goydos (1), $10,725
YE. Yang (1), $10,725
Turkis
Si
At Montgom
Belel
Purse:'
Yardage: 7
F
Victor Dubuisson, France
Jamie Donaldson, Wales
Justin Rose, England
Tiger Woods, United States
Raphael Jacquelin, France
lan Poulter, England
Henrik Stenson, Sweden
Marc Warren, Scotland
Bernd Wiesberger, Austria
Ross Fisher, England
Justin Walters, South Africa
Paul Casey, England
George Coetzee, South Africa
Julien Quesne, France
Thomas Aiken, South Africa
Darren Fichardt, South Africa
Chris Wood, England
Thomas Bjorn, Denmark
Alejandro Canizares, Spain
Robert-Jan Derksen, Netherlands


Other runners for
Mount Dora Bible's girls
team included a pair of
sixth graders Regan
Saulsbury (21 minutes,
47.86 seconds) and
Faith Burno (22:25.86)
- Madison Cooney
(22:31.86), Jessica Hite-
shew (24:31.17) and
Morgan Lee (26:33.45).
In the girls Class
2A event, Montverde
Academy's Ciara Hop-
kins ran as an individu-
al and finished in 40th
place with a time of
20:29.02.
In the boys Class 2A
race, Montverde Acad-
emy had two runners
competing as individu-
als Ryder Valiquette
(55th place, 17:02.74)
and Conner Bergin
(78th, 17:18.48).
The Villages field-
ed a team in the race
and were led by Kyle
Fox, who finished 62nd
with a time of 17:09.44.


Valparaiso 113, North Park 50
College Women's
Sunday's Scores
EAST
Albany (NY) 77, W. Michigan 61
Cent. Michigan 105, UMass 61
Kentucky 96, Wagner 57
Lafayette 70, Brown 69
Navy 72, Stony Brook 54
Penn St. 78, Fordham 61
Rutgers 79, Princeton 65
San Francisco 83, Columbia 69
Seton Hall 86, Rider 75
St. Bonaventure 77, Colgate 72
Villanova 63, Drexel 52
SOUTH
Clemson 72, Wofford 50
Florida 88, North Rorida 77
Georgia 45, Presbyterian 30
Georgia Tech 87, W. Carolina 47
Maryland 89, Loyola (Md.) 53
Richmond 57, Miami 50
South Carolina 68, Louisiana Tech 45
South Rorida 81, CCSU 47
Winthrop 67, Coll. of Charleston 49
MIDWEST
Iowa 97, Dayton 93, OT
Kansas St. 73, Charlotte 65
Ohio 94, Xavier 88
Ohio St. 91, FAU 88
Purdue 63, Ball St. 57
Saint Louis 78, Valparaiso 56
SOUTHWEST
Oklahoma St. 74, Texas-Arlington 35
HOCKEY
NHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic
GP W L OT Pts GF
TampaBay 16 12 4 0 24 54
Toronto 17 11 6 0 22 51
Detroit 18 9 5 4 22 45
Boston 16 10 5 1 21 45
Ottawa 17 7 6 4 18 53
Montreal 17 8 8 1 17 44
Florida 17 3 10 4 10 34
Buffalo 19 3 15 1 7 33
Metropolitan
GP W L OT Pts GF
Pittsburgh 17 11 6 0 22 50
Washington 17 9 7 1 19 56
N.Y Rangers 16 8 8 0 16 35
Carolina 17 6 7 4 16 32
N.Y Islanders 17 6 8 3 15 49
New Jersey 16 4 7 5 13 30
Columbus 16 6 10 0 12 41
Philadelphia 16 5 10 1 11 26
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central
GP W L OT Pts GF
Colorado 15 13 2 0 26 50
Chicago 17 11 2 4 26 61
St. Louis 15 11 2 2 24 52
Minnesota 18 10 4 4 24 48
Nashville 16 8 6 2 18 37
Dallas 17 8 7 2 18 46
Winnipeg 18 7 9 2 16 45
Pacific
GP W L OT Pts GF
Anaheim 18 14 3 1 29 63
Phoenix 18 12 4 2 26 60
San Jose 16 10 2 4 24 59
Vancouver 19 11 6 2 24 53
Los Angeles 17 11 6 0 22 50
Calgary 17 6 9 2 14 47
Edmonton 18 4 12 2 10 44
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Saturday's Games
Minnesota 3, Carolina 2, SO
Phoenix 4, Washington 3, SO
Philadelphia 4, Edmonton 2
Ottawa 3, Rorida 2
Boston 3, Toronto 1
Tampa Bay 3, Detroit 2, OT
Columbus 5, N.Y Islanders 2


71-69-70-69
66-74-72-67
71-70-68-71
69-72-73-66
67-72-72-69
68-71-72-69
68-73-72-67
70-71-68-71
72-68-75-65
73-68-73-67
66-69-72-74
70-68-72-71
69-70-71-71
66-74-75-66
68-71-70-72
70-71-68-72
68-73-68-73
68-73-76-66
67-73-71-72
69-70-71-74
68-71-69-76
69-71-71-73
71-70-73-70
70-69-72-74
67-70-71-78
66-73-73-74
68-71-76-72
68-71-76-72
h Airlines
sunday
erie Maxx Royal
k, Turkey
$7 million
,100; Par: 72
Final


67-65-63-69
68-67-68-63
70-66-67-65
70-63-68-67
67-72-62-68
66-66-68-69
64-68-69-69
69-70-66-65
68-72-66-64
68-68-70-65
66-66-70-69
66-73-67-66
66-71-68-67
67-69-68-68
71-67-66-69
64-73-71-65
69-70-65-69
64-72-71-67
67-68-66-73
67-69-69-69


St. Louis 2, Pittsburgh 1
Chicago 5, Dallas 2
Los Angeles 5, Vancouver 1
Sunday's Games
N.Y Islanders at Montreal, late
Nashville at New Jersey, late
Rorida at N.Y Rangers, late
Edmonton at Chicago, late
San Jose at Winnipeg, late
Washington at Colorado, late
Vancouver at Anaheim, late
Today's Games
Tampa Bay at Boston, 1p.m.
FOOTBALL
The AP Top 25
The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college
football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses,
records through Nov. 9, total points based on 25
points for a first-place vote through one point for a
25th-place vote, and previous ranking:
Record Pts Pv
1. Alabama (56) 9-0 1,472 1
2. Florida St. (3) 9-0 1,418 3
3. Ohio St. 9-0 1,310 4
4. Baylor 8-0 1,303 5
5. Stanford 8-1 1,272 6
6. Oregon 8-1 1,139 2
7. Auburn 9-1 1,109 7
8. Clemson 8-1 1,049 8
9. Missouri 9-1 1,012 9
10. Texas A&M 8-2 909 11
11. South Carolina 7-2 857 13
12. Oklahoma St. 8-1 780 15
13. UCLA 7-2 669 16
14. Michigan St. 8-1 633 18
15. UCF 7-1 596 19
16. Fresno St. 9-0 588 17
17. Wisconsin 7-2 503 21
18. LSU 7-3 470 10
19. Louisville 8-1 467 20
20. N. Illinois 9-0 396 22
21. Arizona St. 7-2 362 23
22. Oklahoma 7-2 285 12
23. Texas 7-2 185 NR
24. Miami 7-2 121 14
25. Georgia 6-3 78 NR
Others receiving votes: Mississippi 68, Minnesota
60, Nebraska 16, Duke 11, Southern Cal 10, Wash-
ington 9, Ball St. 7, Virginia Tech 5, BYU 3, Notre
Dame 2, Houston 1.
USA Today Top 25'
The USA Today Top 25 football coaches poll, with
first-place votes in parentheses, records through
Nov. 10, total points based on 25 points for first
place through one point for 25th, and previous
ranking:
Record Pts Pvs
1. Alabamna (58) 9-0 1,546 1
2. Florida State (4) 9-0 1,485 3
3. Ohio State 9-0 1,401 4
4. Baylor 8-0 1,376 5
5. Stanford 8-1 1,307 6
6. Clemson 8-1 1,164 7
7. Oregon 8-1 1,162 2
8. Missouri 9-1 1,083 9
9. Auburn 9-1 1,069 10
10. Oklahoma State 8-1 965 11
11. Texas A&M 8-2 898 13
12. South Carolina 7-2 830 15
13. Louisville 8-1 653 16
14. Fresno State 9-0 646 17
15. UCLA 7-2 641 18
16. Michigan State 8-1 620 19
17. Oklahoma 7-2 510 8
18. LSU 7-3 476 12
19. Central Florida 7-1 468 21
20. Wisconsin 7-2 460 22
21. Northern Illinois 9-0 445 20
22. Arizona State 7-2 262 24
23. Miami (Ha.) 7-2 228 14
24. Texas 7-2 176 NR
25. Minnesota 8-2 91 NR
Others receiving votes: Georgia 44; Nebraska 43;
Ball State 22; Duke 22; Virginia Tech 15; Louisiana-
Lafayette 7; Cincinnati 6; Mississippi 6; Southern
California 6; Texas Tech 5; Washington 5; Arizona 4;
Notre Dame 2; Buffalo 1.


Maximilian Kiefer, Germany 66-73-68-67
Joost Luiten, Netherlands 72-70-65-67
Garth Mulroy, South Africa 70-69-66-69
Richie Ramsay, Scotland 70-69-71-64
Australian PGA Championship
Sunday
At Royal Pines Resort
Gold Coast, Australia
Purse: $1.25 million
Yardage: 7,378; Par: 71
Final


Adam Scott, Australia
Rickie Fowler, United States
Jack Wilson, Australia
Cameron Percy, Australia
Michael Wright, Australia
Jason Norris, Australia
Kang Ji-man, South Korea
Gareth Paddison, New Zealand
Nathan Green, Australia
Ashley Hall, Australia
Stephen Leaney, Australia
Marc Leishman, Australia
David McKenzie, Australia
Jason Scrivener, Australia
David Klein, New Zealand
Mathew Goggin, Australia
Scott Hend, Australia
Peter Cooke, Australia
Nathan Holman, Australia
Nick Flanagan, Australia
Steven Jeffress, Australia
James McLean, Australia
Scott Strange, Australia
Adam Bland, Australia
Aron Price, Australia
Matthew Griffin, Australia
Nick Cullen, Australia
Steven Jones, Australia
Josh Geary, New Zealand
Richard Green, Australia
Leigh McKechnie, Australia
Matthew Millar, Australia
Kim Geon-ha, South Korea
Brody Ninyette, Australia
Cameron Smith, Australia
Josh Younger, Australia
Garrett Sapp, United States
Leigh Deagan, Australia
Bradley Lamb, Australia
Nick Gillespie, New Zealand
Michael Hendry, New Zealand
Anthony Summers, Australia
Sven Puymbroeck, New Zealand
Matthew Guyatt, Australia


65-67-71-67
63-72-71-68
68-71-69-68
69-73-67-68
69-70-68-71
67-74-71-67
72-68-70-69
68-67-73-71
66-69-73-71
68-69-71-71
68-73-69-70
69-71-68-72
65-69-72-74
70-67-76-68
72-69-72-68
73-70-69-69
72-68-71-70
70-74-67-70
69-71-70-71
75-68-67-71
68-68-71-74
70-73-72-67
75-69-70-68
69-70-73-70
72-71-69-70
69-69-73-71
71-72-68-71
69-74-72-68
68-68-76-71
69-70-72-72
72-70-75-67
71-72-74-67
72-72-71-69
69-75-69-71
69-71-77-68
74-69-74-68
71-73-73-68
70-71-74-70
68-72-74-71
72-69-73-71
69-75-70-71
73-69-71-72
67-72-72-74
69-69-72-75


The next-best Buffa- Delton and DeLand.
lo was Edward San- Winning in the La-
chez in 92nd place with dies' Main bracket was
a time of 17:31.12. Oth- Joan Cook and Arlene
er runners for The Vil- Guerrini. Glenda Brake
lages included Mathew and Glenna Earl were
Hanshaw (17:45.57), Ja- second.
cob Stoffer (18:34.30), In the Ladies' Conso-
Conor McGann lation bracket, Marion
(18:58.27), Stephen Att- Lohbusch and Linda
away (19:56.22) and Ri- Carlson took top hon-
ley Graham (20:18.37). ors. Sue McLaughling
Winter Park Trinity and Carol Adams were
Prep won the team in second.
Class 2Awith 31 points, For the men, in the
followed by Jackson- Main bracket, Bob
ville Bishop Kenny with Marshman and Da-
96 points. vid Rushton walked
The Villages were away with the cham-
21st with 160 points, pionship, followed by

SHUFFLEBOARD the team of Glen Pelti-

The Northern Dis- er and Mickey Henson.
trict Shuffleboard tour- In the Mens' Conso-
nament was hosted re- lation bracket, Harry
cently by the Leesburg Armstrong and Doug
Shuffleboard Club at Stockman took the
the Hawthorne facility, championship, fol-
A total of 88 play- lowed by Bill Mychen-
ers competed from as berg and Fred New-
far away as Clearwater, mann.


SCOREBOARD


FS-Florida Orlando at Boston

NBA- Denver at Utah
NATI

ESPN Miami at Tampa Bay
NA

SUN -Tampa Bay at Boston


IONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE
8:25 p.m.

TIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE
1 p.m.


TENNIS
3 p.m.
ESPN2 ATP World Tour Finals, championship, at London
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Stanford at UConn


ESPN2 Tennessee at North Carolina


BUCS

FROM PAGE B1


"It's everything but a Ring of Honor night. It's
Schiano, is he getting fired? It's Richie Incogni-
to," said Sapp, who joins Hall of Famer Lee Roy
Selmon, John McKay, Jimmie Giles and Paul Gr-
uber in having his name displayed atop Ray-
mond James Stadium. He also will receive his
Hall of Fame ring during a halftime ceremony.
Sapp was a four-time All-Pro and selected to
the Pro Bowl seven times in nine years with the
Bucs, who lost 10 or more games for 11 con-
secutive seasons before picking him in the first
round of the 1995 draft.
The one-time University of Miami star
teamed with Derrick Brooks and John Lynch to
form the nucleus of a dominant defense that
helped transform Tampa Bay from a laughing-
stock into NFL champions. He was the league's
Defensive Player of the Year in 1999, and three
years later earned a Super Bowl ring. Tampa
Bay hasn't won a playoff game since.
The 2013 Bucs have sputtered offensively
and struggled to close out opponents defen-
sively. They've held fourth-quarter leads in four
games, losing each in the final 89 seconds of
regulation or overtime.
"I never thought it would get to this. I know
we had 11 straight double-digit loss seasons at
one time ... but this feels wrong really, real-
ly wrong," Sapp said. "It's hard to watch. Most
teams have an identity, here's who we're trying
to get the ball to, you figure out over the course
of the game. ... I can't understand what we're
doing."
Schiano is 7-17 since leaving Rutgers to take
over a team that lost the final 10 games of 2011.
The Bucs are 0-7 in games decided by three or
fewer points under the second-year coach.
"It's hard to look at because it is my team un-
til the day I die," said Sapp, who finished his ca-
reer with the Oakland Raiders.
"'I fully embrace the pewter, the red, the ici-
cle. I am Tampa. I can't hide it," he added, allud-
ing to the team's current team colors as well as
the hideous creamsicle orange jerseys the Bucs
wore before the franchise's turnaround. "It was
a place where careers came to die. And me and
Brooks and Lynch turned it into a destination."
The Dolphins are playing for the first time
in 11 days. They beat Cincinnati on a safety in
overtime to stop a four-game skid about the
same time the bullying scandal began brewing.
Martin's teammates are weary of answering
questions about the situation and eager to fi-
nally get back on the field for a game.
"I feel like it has been forever since we played,"
said defensive end CameronWake, whose end-
zone sack provided the winning points against
the Bengals.
Martin, a tackle, is in counseling for emotion-
al issues. Incognito, a guard, has been suspend-
ed by the Dolphins.





When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to
report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches
of recreational and youth leagues can send game results,
statistics, team and action photos, and we'll publish them
in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can
send us individual photos and accomplishments.

Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com




CONTACTS

SPORTS EDITOR or 352-365-8279.
FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Amateur Listings (cl-
------------- Amateur Listings (col-
FAX 352-365-1951 lege scholarships, meeting

EMAIL announcements, schedule
sports@dailycommercial.com changes, outdoors notices) can

* Schools or coaches can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or
report game results after 6 emailed to sports@dailycom-
p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, mercial.com


TV2DAY
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPNU Kent State at Temple
8 p.m.
FSN North Texas at Oklahoma
FS1 Mo.-Kansas City at Creighton
9 p.m.
ESPNU Colorado State at Gonzaga
11 p.m.
ESPN2- BYU at Stanford
la.m.
ESPN2 -W. Kentucky at Wichita St.
3 a.m.
ESPN2 Akron at Saint Mary's (Cal)
5a.m.
ESPN2 New Mexico St. at Hawaii
NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION
7:30 p.m.


rllai





Monday, November 11, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE


New England
N.Y. Jets
Miami
Buffalo


Indianapolis
Tennessee
Houston
Jacksonville


Cincinnati
Cleveland
Baltimore
Pittsburgh


Kansas City
Denver
San Diego
Oakland


AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
PF PA Hi
234 175 5
169 231 4
174 187 2
199 259 2
South
PF PA Hc
222 193 3
200 196 2
170 248 1
115 291 0
North
PF PA Ho
234 186 4-
172 197 3-
188 189 3-
179 218 2-
West
PF PA Ho
215 111 5
371 238 5
212 202 2
166 223 3


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


Dallas
Philadelphia
N.Y. Giants
Washington


New Orleans
Carolina
Atlanta
Tampa Bay


Detroit
Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota


Seattle
San Francisco
Arizona
St. Louis


Jaguars 29, Titans 27
Jacksonville 10 3 7 9 29
Tennessee 0 7 3 17 27
First Quarter
Jax-Jones-Drew 6 run (Scobee kick), 13:29.
Jax-FG Scobee 32, 6:31.
Second Quarter
Jax-FG Scobee 44,10:47.
Ten-Thompson 9 pass from Fitzpatrick (Bironas
kick), :41.
Third Quarter
Jax-Todman 5 run (Scobee kick), 10:17.
Ten-FG Bironas 39,5:15.
Fourth Quarter
Ten-FG Bironas 37,12:50.
Jax-Team safety, 7:44.
Ten-Fitzpatrick 4 run (Bironas kick), 4:15.
Jax-Blackmon 21 fumble return (Scobee kick),
2:32.
Ten-Walker 14 pass from Fitzpatrick (Bironas
kick), :40.
Jax Ten
First downs 13 19
Total Net Yards 214 362
Rushes-yards 30-54 27-83
Passing 160 279
Punt Returns 2-6 2-15
Kickoff Returns 4-120 4-81
Interceptions Ret. 1-17 2-7
Comp-Att-lnt 14-23-2 2642-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 3-20 1-9
Punts 743.4 5-43.8
Fumbles-Lost 3-0 5-3
Penalties-Yards 4-19 6-45
Time of Possession 29:24 30:36
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Jacksonville, Jones-Drew 2141, Todman
3-11, Robinson 4-3, Sanders 1-0, Henne 1-(minus
1). Tennessee, C.Johnson 12-30, Greene 9-22,
Locker 3-18, Fitzpatrick 3-13.
PASSING-Jacksonville, Henne 14-23-2-180. Tennes-
see, Fitzpatrick 22-33-0-264, Locker 4-9-1-24.
RECEIVING-Jacksonville, Jones-Drew 4-33, Lewis
3-39, Shorts III 242, Brown 2-40, Harbor 1-13,
Burton 1-11, Todman 1-2. Tennessee, Wright 7-78,
C.Johnson 543, Walker 4-62, Washington 3-29,
Greene 3-10, Hunter 2-51, Thompson 1-9, Ste-
vens 1-6.
Rams 38, Colts 8
St. Louis 7 21 10 0 38
Indianapolis 0 0 8 0 8
First Quarter
StL-C.Long 45 fumble return (Zuerlein kick), 12:12.
Second Quarter
StL-Stacy 1 run (Zuerlein kick), 14:30.
StL-Austin 98 punt return (Zuerlein kick), 10:28.
StL-Austin 57 pass from Clemens (Zuerlein kick),
6:58.
Third Quarter
StL-Austin 81 pass from Clemens (Zuerlein kick),
13:55.
StL-FG Zuerlein 32,5:15.
Ind-D.Brown 13 pass from Luck (Reener pass from
Luck), 1:35.
StL Ind
First downs 12 21
Total Net Yards 372 406
Rushes-yards 37-140 14-18
Passing 232 388
Punt Returns 4-145 3-25
Kickoff Returns 1-27 4-60
Interceptions Ret. 434 0-0
Comp-Att-lnt 9-16-0 31-52-4
Sacked-Yards Lost 2-15 3-33
Punts 548.4 6-49.7
Fumbles-Lost 2-1 1-1
Penalties-Yards 846 2-20
Time of Possession 30:38 29:22
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-St. Louis, Cunningham 7-72, Stacy
26-62, Austin 14, Clemens 3-2. Indianapolis,
Luck 4-17, Richardson 5-2, Havili 1-1, Herron 1-0,
D.Brown 2-(minus 1), Hasselbeck 1-(minus 1).
PASSING-St. Louis, Clemens 9-16-0-247. Indianap-
olis, Luck 2947-3-353, Hasselbeck 2-5-1-68.
RECEIVING-St. Louis, Austin 2-138, Givens 2-54,
Stacy 2-6, Cunningham 1-18, Cook 1-17, Harkey
1-14. Indianapolis, Hilton 7-130, D.Brown 5-64,
Reener 4-33, Whalen 3-36, Richardson 3-33,
Heyward-Bey 3-30, Havili 3-25, Herron 1-57, Brazill
1-11, Reed 1-2.
Lions 21, Bears 19
Detroit 7 0 7 7 21
Chicago 7 0 3 9 19
First Quarter
Chi-Marshall 32 pass from Cuter (Gould kick),
12:37.
Det-Durham 5 pass from Stafford (Akers kick),
5:57.
Third Quarter
Det-Johnson 4 pass from Stafford (Akers kick),
12:58.
Chi-FG Gould 25, 7:25.
Fourth Quarter
Chi-FG Gould 32, 9:17.
Det-Johnson 14 pass from Stafford (Akers kick),
2:22.
Chi-Marshall 11 pass from McCown (run failed),
:40.
Det Chi
First downs 21 19
Total Net Yards 364 338
Rushes-yards 26-145 20-38
Passing 219 300
Punt Returns 0-0 1-16
Kickoff Returns 3-71 4-114
Interceptions Ret. 1-0 1-35
Comp-Att-lnt 18-35-1 2749-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 0-0 2-12
Punts 444.5 5-42.6
Fumbles-Lost 1-0 0-0
Penalties-Yards 5-51 5-39
Time of Possession 28:25 31:35
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Detroit, Bush 14105, Bell 1041, Staf-
ford 2-(minus 1). Chicago, Forte 17-33, Jeffery 2-5,
Bush 1-0.
PASSING-Detroit, Stafford 18-35-1-219. Chicago,
Cuter 2140-1-250, McCown 6-9-0-62.
RECEIVING-Detroit, Johnson 6-83, Pettigrew 5-70,
Bush 3-8, Ross 2-28, Fauria 1-25, Durham 1-5.
Chicago, Jeffery 9-114, Marshall 7-139, M.Bennett
4-29, Forte 4-16, E.Bennett 2-10, Fiammetta 1-4.
Seahawks 33, Falcons 10
Seattle 3 20 3 7 33
Atlanta 0 3 7 0 10
First Quarter
Sea-FG Hauschka 39, 7:32.
Second Quarter
Sea-FG Hauschka 43,11:53.
Al-FG Bryant 53, 6:30.
Sea-Kearse 43 pass from Wilson (Hauschka
kick), 5:33.
Sea-FG Hauschka 44,1:52.
Sea-Tate 6 pass from Wilson (Hauschka kick), :01.
Third Quarter
Sea-FG Hauschka 53, 7:49.
Al-D.Johnson 12 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick),
1:02.
Fourth Quarter
Sea-Lynch 1 run (Hauschka kick), 8:48.
Sea Atl
First downs 25 16
Total Net Yards 490 226
Rushes-yards 42-211 16-64
Passing 279 162
Punt Returns 3-55 0-0
Kickoff Returns 1-22 3-64
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0
Comp-Att-lnt 19-26-0 23-36-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 1-8 2-10
Punts 241.0 5-53.4
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 2-1
Penalties-Yards 9-80 1-15
Time of Possession 35:30 24:30
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Seattle, Lynch 24-145, Michael 8-33, Wil-
son 3-20, Turbin 7-13. Atlanta, Rodgers 3-31, Ryan
3-15, Jackson 9-11, Snelling 1-7.


PASSING-Seattle, Wilson 19-26-0-287. Atlanta,
Ryan 23-36-0-172.
RECEIVING-Seattle, Tate 6-106, Baldwin 5-76, Ke-
arse 3-75, Lynch 3-16, Willson 1-19, Turbin 1-(mi-
nus 5). Atlanta, Douglas 749, Rodgers 5-28, Gon-
zalez 3-29, Snelling 3-25, Jackson 3-9, White 1-20,
D.Johnson 1-12.
Steelers 23, Bills 10
Buffalo 3 0 0 7 10
Pittsburgh 0 10 7 6 23
First Quarter
Buf-FG Carpenter 20, 6:16.
Second Quarter
Pit-FG Suisham 36, 8:47.
Pit-Cotchery 5 pass from Roethlisberger (Suisham
kick), 1:55.
Third Quarter
Pit-Bell 4 run (Suisham kick), 3:02.
Fourth Quarter
Pit-FG Suisham 37, 8:00.
Pit-FG Suisham 23, 4:34.
Buf-Gragg 2 pass from Manuel (Carpenter kick),
:03.
Buf Pit
First downs 16 19
Total Net Yards 227 300
Rushes-yards 22-95 33-136
Passing 132 164
Punt Returns 4-15 2-74
Kickoff Returns 1-18 1-1
Interceptions Ret. 1-57 1-37
Comp-Att-lnt 22-39-1 18-30-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 3-23 440
Punts 9-36.9 5-39.0
Fumbles-Lost 1-0 1-0
Penalties-Yards 4-30 642
Time of Possession 24:44 35:16
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Buffalo, Jackson 12-55, Spiller 8-23,
Manuel 2-17. Pittsburgh, Bell 22-57, Dwyer 6-38,
Sanders 1-25, FJones 4-16.
PASSING-Buffalo, Manuel 22-39-1-155. Pittsburgh,
Roethlisberger 18-30-1-204.
RECEIVING-Buffalo, Gragg 4-25, Johnson 3-48,
Chandler 3-21, Spiller 3-11, Jackson 3-7, Easley
2-13, Goodwin 2-9, Hogan 1-16, Graham 1-5. Pitts-
burgh, A.Brown 6-104, Sanders 4-13, Bell 3-39,
Cotchery 2-31, Palmer 1-8, Miller 1-6, Dwyer 1-3.
Ravens 20, Bengals 17 (OT)
Cincinnati 0 0 3 14 0 17
Baltimore 10 7 0 0 3 20
First Quarter
Bal-Clark 1 pass from Flacco (Tucker kick), 9:42.
Bal-FG Tucker 36,4:39.
Second Quarter
Bal-T.Smith 7 pass from Flacco (Tucker kick), 6:30.
Third Quarter
Cin-FG Nugent32,10:37.
Fourth Quarter
Cin-Bernard 18 pass from Dalton (Nugent kick),
8:22.
Cin-Green 51 pass from Dalton (Nugent kick), :00.
Overtime
Bal-FG Tucker 46,5:27.


First downs
Total Net Yards
Rushes-yards
Passing
Punt Returns
Kickoff Returns
Interceptions Ret.
Comp-Att-Int
Sacked-Yards Lost
Punts
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


Cin Bal
21 18
364 189
31-120 30-85
244 104
6-62 3-17
2-50 241
23 346
24-513 2036-2
5-30 536
6-37.2 8.44.4
1-0 1-1
9-134 8.65
37:58 31:35


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Cincinnati, Bernard 14-58, Green-Ellis
9-36, Dalton 6-22, M.Jones 1-7, Hawkins 1-(minus
3). Baltimore, Pierce 8-31, Rice 18.30, Taylor 1-18,
Flacco 14, Leach 2-2.
PASSING-Cincinnati, Dalton 24-51-3-274. Balti-
more, Racco 20-36-2-140.
RECEIVING-Cincinnati, Green 8.151, Bernard 8.37,
Eifert 3-55, Sanu 3-26, AI.Smith 1-3, M.Jones 1-2.
Baltimore, Rice 6-26, TSmith 546, Dickson 3-28,
J.Jones 2-17, Pierce 2-12, M.Brown 1-10, Clark 1-1.
Giants 24, Raiders 20
Oakland 10 7 3 0 20
N.Y. Giants 7 7 7 3 24
First Quarter
Oak-Pryor 1 run (Janikowski kick), 14:07.
NYG-Taylor 21 blocked punt return (J.Brown kick),
9:22.
Oak-FG Janikowski 33,3:21.
Second Quarter
NYG-Randle 5 pass from Manning (J.Brown kick),
7:36.
Oak-Porter 43 interception return (Janikowski
kick), 1:18.
Third Quarter
Oak-FG Janikowski 24, 6:56.
NYG-A.Brown 1 run (J.Brown kick), 2:15.
Fourth Quarter
NYG-FG J.Brown 23, 8:04.
Oak NYG
First downs 12 19
Total Net Yards 213 251
Rushes-yards 25-107 38.133
Passing 106 118
Punt Returns 1)(1) 3-30
Kickoff Returns 2-77 1-19
Interceptions Ret. 143 1-65
Comp-Att-lnt 11-26-1 12-22-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 4-16 3-22
Punts 6-42.3 4-30.3
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 3-2
Penalties-Yards 8.65 1-5
Time of Possession 27:58 32:02
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Oakland, Jennings 20-88, Pryor 5-19.
N.Y Giants, A.Brown 30-115, Hillis 5-21, Manning
3-(minus 3).
PASSING-Oakland, Pryor 11-26-1-122. N.Y Giants,
Manning 12-22-1-140.
RECEIVING-Oakland, D.Moore 345, Reece 3-30,
Rivera 2-22, Jennings 2-19, Streater 1-6. N.Y Gi-
ants, Nicks 449, Randle 3-50, Cruz 3-37, A.Brown
14, Hillis 1-0.
Eagles 27, Packers 13
Philadelphia 7 3 17 0 27
Green Bay 0 3 7 3 13
First Quarter
Phi-Jackson 55 pass from Foles (Henery kick),
5:57.
Second Quarter
Phi-FG Henery 25,1:16.
GB-FG Crosby 26, :02.
Third Quarter
Phi-Cooper 45 pass from Foles (Henery kick),
11:21.
Phi-FG Henery 41, 7:28.
GB-Bostick 22 pass from Tolzien (Crosby kick),
3:22.
Phi-Cooper 32 pass from Foles (Henery kick), :10.
Fourth Quarter
GB-FG Crosby 35,12:19.
Phi GB
First downs 19 23
Total Net Yards 415 396
Rushes-yards 37-204 30-99
Passing 211 297
Punt Returns 0-0 1-2
Kickoff Returns 2-10 4-69
Interceptions Ret. 2-86 0-0
Comp-Att-lnt 12-18-0 2944-2
Sacked-Yards Lost 3-17 1-8
Punts 2-38.5 2-48.0
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 1-0
Penalties-Yards 5-65 5-31
Time of Possession 25:36 34:24
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Philadelphia, McCoy 25-155, Foles 8-38,
Brown 4-11. Green Bay, Lacy 24-73, Tolzien 1-19,
Starks4-5, Kuhn 1-2.
PASSING-Philadelphia, Foles 12-18.0-228. Green


This Week
Thursday's Game
Minnesota 34, Washington 27
Sunday's Games
Detroit 21, Chicago 19
Philadelphia 27, Green Bay 13
Jacksonville 29, Tennessee 27
Baltimore 20, Cincinnati 17 (OT)
St. Louis 38, Indianapolis 8
Seattle 33, Atlanta 10
N.Y. Giants 24, Oakland 20
Pittsburgh 23, Buffalo 10
Carolina 10, San Francisco 9
Denver 28, San Diego 20
Arizona 27, Houston 24
Dallas at New Orleans, late
Open: Cleveland, Kansas City, N.Y. Jets, New England
Today's Game
Miami at Tampa Bay, 8:40 p.m.


Next Week
Thursday's Game
Indianapolis at Tennessee, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Baltimore at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Oakland at Houston, 1 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 1p.m.
Detroit at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Cincinnati, 1p.m.
Arizona at Jacksonville, 1p.m.
San Diego at Miami, 4:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.
San Francisco at New Orleans, 4:25 p.m.
Green Bay at N.Y. Giants, 4:25 p.m.
Kansas City at Denver, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Dallas, St. Louis
Nov. 18
New England at Carolina, 8:40 p.m.


Manning throws 4 TDs to lead




Broncos past San Diego


Associated Press

SAN DIEGO Pey-
ton Manning threw
for 330 yards and four
touchdowns, three to
Demaryius Thomas,
as he efficiently led the
Broncos to a 28-20 vic-
tory on Sunday in their
first game since coach
John Fox had heart
surgery.
Fox, who was re-
leased from the hospi-
tal Friday, planned to
watch the game on TV
at his offseason home
in Charlotte, N.C., a
team spokesman said.
With interim coach
Jack Del Rio in charge,
Manning kept the
Broncos (8-1) rolling.
He threw touchdown
passes of 11, 7 and 34
yards to Thomas on
consecutive drives
spanning the second
and third quarters.
Manning has thrown
for 3,249 yards and 33
touchdowns in nine
games. San Diego fell
to 4-5.


DENIS POROY/AP

Denver quarterback Peyton Manning fumbles as he is hit by
San Diego outside linebacker Tourek Williams during Sunday's
game in San Diego.


of regulation.
The Bengals have
lost two straight in
overtime.
Cincinnati pulled
even when A.J. Green
caught a desperation
pass from Andy Dalton
for a 51-yard touch-
down. Green posi-
tioned himself behind
the pack and caught
the ball after it flicked
_N 2, o 1 ,.. nA _o D t-v


RAVENS 20, off te nand o0 havens
BENGALS 17, OT safety James Ihedig-

BALTIMORE Jus- bo, who earlier had the
tin Tucker kicked a first two interceptions
46-yard field goal of his career.
with 5:27 left in over- LIONS 21, BEARS 19
time, and the Ravens CHICAGO Calvin
won after blowing a Johnson had two sec-
17-point halftime lead ond-half touchdown
and giving up a touch- receptions, Reggie Bush
down on the final play rushed for 105 yards


Bay, Tolzien 24-39-2-280, Wallace 5-5-0-25.
RECEIVING-Philadelphia, Jackson 4-80, Cooper 3-102, Avant 2-25,
Casey 1-8, Celek 1-7, McCoy 1-6. Green Bay, Boykin 8.112, Nelson
6-56, J.Jones 444, Bostck 3-42, Lacy 2-11, Kuhn 2-10, Starks 1-9,
White 1-9, Quarless 1-8, R.Taylor 14.
Panthers 10, 49ers 9
Carolina 0 7 0 3 10
San Francisco 3 6 0 0 9
First Quarter
SF-FG Dawson 52,10:45.
Second Quarter
SF-FG Dawson 43,13:34.
SF-FG Dawson 25, 6:16.
Car-D.Williams 27 run (Gano kick), 1:52.
Fourth Quarter
Car-FG Gano 53,10:05.
A-69,732.
Car SF
First downs 15 10
Total Net Yards 250 151
Rushes-yards 30-111 24-105
Passing 139 46
Punt Returns 5-65 3-35
Kickoff Returns 2-42 1-18
Interceptions Ret. 1-2 141
Comp-Att-lnt 16-32-1 11-22-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 4-30 6-45
Punts 745.7 7-48.7
Fumbles-Lost 3-1 1-1
Penalties-Yards 3-25 4-25
Time of Possession 32:03 27:57
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Carolina, D.Williams 846, Stewart 1341, Newton 7-17,
Tolbert 2-7. San Francisco, Gore 16-82, Kaepernick 4-16, Hunter 3-8,
James 1-(minus 1).
PASSING-Carolina, Newton 16-32-1-169. San Francisco, Kaepernick
11-22-1-91.
RECEIVING-Carolina, Smith 6-63, LaFell 4-48, Ginn Jr. 2-19, Tolbert
2-16, Olsen 1-14, Hixon 1-9. San Francisco, Manningham 3-30,
Boldin 3-23, Gore 2-21, Miller 1-10, K.Williams 1-5, V.Davis 1-2.


and Lions took over first
place in the NFC North.
Johnson broke Her-
man Moore's franchise
record with his 63rd
career touchdown re-
ception with 2:22 to go,
giving the Lions a 21-
13 lead with a 14-yard
grab. He also had a tie-
breaking 4-yard TD re-
ception on the first
drive in the third quar-
ter.
Jay Cutler threw for
250 yards and a touch-
down in his first ac-
tion since he injured his
groin last month. He
looked progressively
worse as the game wore
on and departed before
the Bears' final drive
with what the team said


MISSED FIELD GOALS-Carolina, Gano 48 (WL).
Broncos 28, Chargers 20
Denver 7 14 7 0 28
San Diego 0 6 7 7 20
First Quarter
Den-J.Thomas 74 pass from Manning (Prater kick), 9:18.
Second Quarter
SD-FG Novak 26,14:58.
SD-FG Novak 40, 9:05.
Den-D.Thomas 11 pass from Manning (Prater kick), 6:38.
Den-D.Thomas 7 pass from Manning (Prater kick), :13.
Third Quarter
Den-D.Thomas 34 pass from Manning (Prater kick), 11:34.
SD-Woodhead 7 pass from Rivers (Novak kick), 8:38.
Fourth Quarter
SD-Mathews 1 run (Novak kick), 10:42.
Den SD
First downs 22 20
Total Net Yards 397 329
Rushes-yards 22-84 35-131
Passing 313 198
Punt Returns 2-6 0-0
Kickoff Returns 4-103 0-0
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0
Comp-Att-lnt 25-36-0 19-29-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 2-17 4-20
Punts 546.6 547.6
Fumbles-Lost 2-1 1-0
Penalties-Yards 3-28 640
Time of Possession 21:57 38:03


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Denver, Moreno 15-65, Ball 5-20, Manning 2-(minus 1).
San Diego, Mathews 14-59, R.Brown 9-36, Woodhead 6-27, Rivers
5-7, Weddle 1-2.
PASSING-Denver, Manning 25-36-0-330. San Diego, Rivers 19-29-
0-218.
RECEIVING-Denver, Moreno 8.49, D.Thomas 7-108, J.Thomas 3-96,
Decker 3-52, Welker 3-21, Green 1-4. San Diego, Gates 4-62, Al-
len 441, Woodhead 4-17, V.Brown 3-35, Royal 2-36, Green 1-25,
Mathews 1-2.


was an ankle injury.

SEAHAWKS 33,
FALCONS 10

ATLANTA Rus-
sell Wilson threw a pair
of touchdowns passes
and Marshawn Lynch
ran for 145 yards in a
one-sided follow-up to
last season's NFC divi-
sional playoffs.
After struggling for
victories the last two
weeks, the first-place
Seahawks (9-1) blew
out a team that not so
long ago was talking
Super Bowl, but now is
just two defeats away
from its first losing sea-
son since 2007.

RAMS 38, COLTS 8

INDIANAPOLIS -
Tavon Austin returned
one punt 98 yards for
a touchdown, caught
TD passes of 57 and 81
yards and almost sin-
gle-handedly ended the
Rams' three-game los-
ing streak.
The touchdown
catches were the only
receptions Austin had
on his biggest day of
the season, and St. Lou-
is (4-6) won for the first
time since Kellen Cle-
mens replaced the in-
jured Sam Bradford.
It was the Colts' worst
loss since a 55-point
thrashing at New Or-
leans in 2011. Indy
(6-3) fell for the sec-


Cardinals 27, Texans 24
Houston 7 10 0 7 -
S Arizona 7 7 6 7 -
0 First Quarter
Ari-Shaughnessy 6 fumble return (Feely kick), 14:46.
Hou-A.Johnson 7 pass from Keenum (Bullock kick), 5:55.
Second Quarter
Ari-Housler 12 pass from Palmer (Feely kick), 13:57.
Hou-Griffin 2 pass from Keenum (Bullock kick), 9:37.
Hou-FG Bullock 48, 6:31.
Third Quarter
Ari-FG Feely 35, 6:06.
Ari-FG Feely 21, :02.


Fourth Quarter
Ari-Roberts 19 pass from Palmer (Feely kick), 6:42.
Hou-A.Johnson 5 pass from Keenum (Bullock kick), 4:34.
Hou Ari
First downs 17 19
Total Net Yards 235 332
Rushes-yards 21-76 29-97
Passing 159 235
Punt Returns 2-12 6-74
Kickoff Returns 5-118 2-38
Interceptions Ret. 1-0 0-0
Comp-Att-lnt 2243-0 20-32-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 342 1-6
Punts 7-58.9 5-43.8
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 2-2
Penalties-Yards 7-53 5-29
Time of Possession 28:52 31:08
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Houston, Tate 15-56, Keenum 2-13, D.Johnson 4-7. Ari-
zona, Ellington 11-55, Mendenhall 1342, Taylor 2-6, Palmer 2-(minus
2), Peterson 1-(minus 4).
PASSING-Houston, Keenum 2243-0-201. Arizona, Palmer 20-32-
1-241.
RECEIVING-Houston, Hopkins 6-69, A.Johnson 5-37, Posey 3-34,
Tate 3-8, G.Graham 2-18, G.Jones 1-19, D.Johnson 1-14, Griffin 1-2.
Arizona, Roberts 5-72, Housler 4-57, Fitzgerald 3-23, Royd 2-31, El-
lington 2-18, Ballard 1-15, Dray 1-9, Mendenhall 1-9, Brown 1-7.


PA
209
244
243
287
South
PA
146
115
251
190
North
PA
216
247
212
279
West
PA
159
155
198
234




Monday, November 11, 2013


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Limitations, copayments, and restrictions may apply. Benefits, formulary, pharmacy network, provider network, premium and/or co-payments/
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A sales person will be present with information and applications. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings,
call 1-855-272-9557, TTY 711.
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Y0066_131004_161316_FINALFLDC_ 111 _ROP Accepted 283442


DAILY COMMERCIAL


(( 1




Monday, November 11, 2013


TENNIS


Nadal beats Federer at ATP World Tour Finals


SAMUEL PETREQUIN
Associated Press
LONDON Rafa-
el Nadal ended Roger
Federer's hopes of fin-
ishing a disappointing
season on a high note,
defeating the six-time
champion 7-5, 6-3 on
Sunday in the semifi-
nals of the ATP World
Tour Finals.
The top-ranked
Spaniard also claimed
his first win over Feder-
er on an indoor hard
court.
Nadal, who extended
his winning record over
Federer to 22-10, has
now beaten the Swiss
great on every surface.
Federer had won their
four previous matches
at the ATP Finals, drop-
ping only one set.
"The most important
thing for me is (that in-
door) is the toughest
surface for me to play,"
Nadal said. "The most
difficult for me was
to be able to win four
matches against top-
eight players. It's a very
good way to finish the
year."
Nadal, who is bid-
ding to win the elite
event for the first time,
played down the im-
portance of his victo-
ry over his greatest ri-
val. In London, he won
his three round robin
matches to reach the
last four and will face
either Novak Djokovic
or Stanislas Wawrinka
in Monday's final.
"It is probably one of
my best seasons," said
Nadal, who reclaimed
the No. 1 spot this year
after coming back from


a knee injury in Febru-
ary. "The most satisfy-
ing thing is always (to
win) the tournament
more than the person-
al victories. So for me
it is more important to
be in the final in the
last tournament of the
year than to have the
chance to win against
Roger."
Since he returned
from his seven-month
injury layoff, Nadal has
produced one of the
most impressive come-
backs in tennis history.
He has won 75 matches
- losing only six to
win 10 titles including
the French Open, U.S.
Open and five Masters
1000 events.
Federer's season was
very different. Ham-
pered by a back injury,
he won only one title
in 2013 and was hop-
ing to secure a big tro-
phy before the year-
end break.
He played aggressive-
ly early on but faded af-
ter losing the first set,
making too many mis-
takes to threaten the
Spaniard.
"In the beginning,
his serve worked very
well," Nadal said. "My
feeling is that in the first
set, he played very well.
He was closer than me
to have the break. So in
my opinion until 4-all,
he was playing better
than me."
Nadal and Feder-
er treated the 02 Are-
na fans to some superb
exchanges early on,
reminiscent of the clas-
sic matches that have
punctuated their nine-
year rivalry. But Nad-


al was much sharper
at the important mo-
ments, converting all
four of his break points,
while Federer some-
times looked like a
shadow of his old self,
making 32 unforced er-
rors and hitting some
poor volleys.
"I struggled to stay
consistent enough
throughout the match,
and that's why he de-
served to win," Feder-
er said. "This game is
a game of making or
missing your opportu-
nities. Today was a little
bit more of that, again."
The 32-year-old Fe-
derer, who beat Juan
Martin del Potro on
Saturday to qualify for
the semis while Nad-
al had a rest day, also
looked tired toward the
end.
Federer missed an
early chance when he
failed to convert three
break points in the
sixth game. Nadal took
advantage of his first
opportunity to break
for 5-4 with a superb
forehand winner.
Federer sent the
crowd into rapturous
cheers as he broke back
immediately after win-
ning a long rally with
a forehand down the
line.
But Federer failed
to build on the mo-
mentum, dropping his
serve in the very next
game before going on
to concede the set. He
then struggled with his
rhythm and was bro-
ken twice in the second
set, with Nadal sealing
victory when Federer
sent a volley long.


GOLF

Adam Scott defies weather,


wins Australian PGA by 4


ALASTAIR GRANT /AP
Rafael Nadal plays a return to Roger Federer during Sunday's semifinals at the ATP World Tour Fi-
nals at the 02 Arena on London.


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LAKE SUMTER TELEVISION


Associated Press
GOLD COAST, Aus-
tralia Adam Scott
shot a 4-under 67 to
win the storm-delayed
Australian PGA by four
strokes on Sunday.
Scott and playing
partner Rickie Fowler
marked their balls on
the 12th fairway after
a severe storm warning
suspended play with
Scott holding a one-
shot lead.
When Scott returned,
his iron shot from the
fairway nearly holed
out for an albatross and
he made the 1-foot ea-
gle putt.
Scott was 4 under in
his seven holes after
the weather suspen-
sion. Fowler finished
second with a 68.
Making his first ap-
pearance back in Aus-


tralia since his April
win at The Masters,
Scott finished with a
14-under 270 at Royal
Pines.
Scott joins Greg Nor-
man, Craig Parry, Peter
Lonard, Robert Allenby
and Peter Senior as the
only Australian golf-
ers to add the Joe Kirk-
wood Cup for winning
the Australian PGA to
the Australian Open
and Australian Masters
titles in their careers.
Those three tourna-
ments are considered
the Australian majors.
Scott's shot on the
12th came on a 4-iron
from 266 yards.
"I came out and knew
I had to do something
great to win this," Scott
said. "It's been an in-
credible year since
April, and so great to
come home. I've had a


great week."
Fowler said the storm
suspension hurt him.
"I had some good mo-
mentum going up un-
til we had the rain de-
lay," Fowler said. "I got
to within one and then
he came out swinging.
"He made some great
swings coming down
that last stretch. So it's
a little tough to catch a
guy when he's making
an eagle and a couple
of birdies."
Scott moves on to
Royal Melbourne next
week to defend his
Australian Masters ti-
tle. Then he will play
with Jason Day on the
Australian team at the
World Cup, also at Roy-
al Melbourne, then will
play at the Australian
Open at Royal Sydney a
week later.


In our November episode we'll
bring you the latest in medical
news and information including
stories on Lung Awareness Month,
the latest on Balloon Sinuplasty
and Imaaina Options


for production inquiries or
programming comments contact us at
LakeSumterTV@gmail.com

O 0 YourT~co


DAILY COMMERCIAL







COLLEGE FOOTBALL



Dominant second half lifts Bama past LSU


JOHN ZENOR
Associated Press
TUSCALOOSA, Ala.
- Zach Mettenberg-
er and the LSU Tigers
didn't leave town feel-
ing like they were out-
classed.
The 10th-ranked Ti-
gers battled back from
two early fumbles but
couldn't hold No. 1 Al-
abama down in Satur-
day night's 38-17 loss,
when the Crimson
Tide scored the final 21
points.
"You could look at
the score and think
one thing," Metten-
berger said. "But if you
watched the game you
would know that if we
didn't turn the ball over
and made some smart-
er decisions in the third
and fourth quarters, it


would be a ball game."
It was a ball game
into the third quarter
before the Tigers (7-3,
3-3 Southeastern Con-
ference) got overpow-
ered.
AJ McCarron threw
three touchdown pass-
es, T.J. Yeldon ran for
133 yards and two
scores and the Tide
(9-0, 6-0) turned to
smash-you-in-the-
mouth football to take
control of a game that
was tied early in the
third quarter. Yeldon
carried 18 times in the
second half, 25 overall.
"I think we probably
played our best half of
football," Tide coach
Nick Saban said. "We
didn't play great in the
first half, but man I tell
you what, a lot of char-
acter out there in the


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second half."
Yeldon and McCar-
ron had hooked up
for the game-winning
touchdown pass in the
final minute of last sea-
son's meeting with the
Tigers. This one had no
such dramatic finish.
Two-time defending
national champion Al-
abama brushed aside
its first challenge since
Game 2 against Tex-
as A&M. It was a dom-
inant performance two
days after one contend-
er, No. 2 Oregon, fell to
another, No. 6 Stanford.
McCarron was a
workmanlike 14-of-20
passing for 179 yards,
letting Yeldon, Kenyan
Drake and their block-
ers assert control. He
did hit speedy fresh-
man tight end O.J. How-
ard for a 52-yard touch-
down and overtook
John Parker Wilson to
become Alabama's top
career passer.
Mettenberger com-
pleted 16 of 23 pass-
es for 241 yards and
a touchdown but was
also sacked four times.
It was the most points
Alabama has scored
against LSU since a 41-
12 victory in 1947.
LSU had won five of
the last six meetings
in Tuscaloosa, but lost
fumbles on its first two
possessions, includ-
ing one on the goal
line. The Tigers, who
came in averaging 40.2
points, couldn't regain
the lost momentum
and managed just 52
yards in the second half


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DAVE MARTIN /AP
Alabama tight end O.J. Howard runs to the end zone as LSU safety Ronald Martin defends during
the first half of Saturday's game at Bryant-Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Ala.


and minus-9 in the fi-
nal quarter.
"You can't turn the
ball over," LSU coach
Les Miles said. "In the
first half it's a 7-to-
nothing game and the
fullback (J.C. Cope-
land) runs the ball off
left tackle. Then we
turn the ball over on
the other side of the
field. That cost us a ter-
rible start.
"We overcame it but
it took time."
It was a contest un-
til Alabama scored two
touchdowns in the
fourth quarter.
"We weren't going to
back down from Ala-
bama," Mettenberger
said. "We had a good
game plan going, but
we just weren't able to
execute it."
LSU swiftly threat-
ened to get back in
the game in the fourth
quarter when Odell
Beckham Jr. raced 82
yards on the kickoff
return. Alabama held
firm and Mettenberg-
er's fourth-and-13 pass
to a well-covered Jarvis
Landry was off target.
Alabama's Drake ran
for 65 yards on 10 car-
ries. The Tide out-
gained LSU 372-282,
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including a 193-43 ad-
vantage on the ground
in a game both sides
typically call one of the
most physical of each
season.
LSU's playmaking re-
ceivers Beckham and
Landry turned in some
big ones but it wasn't
nearly enough. Landry
had five catches for 90
yards and Beckham
gained 42 yards on
three catches.
Alabama limited Jer-
emy Hill, who came in
as the SEC's No. 2 rush-
er, to 13 carries for 42
yards and a touch-
down.
LSU tied the game
at 17 with Colby Dela-
houssaye's 41-yard field
goal to cap the open-
ing drive of the second
half.
Then Alabama
turned to a fake punt
in its own territory. Ala-
bama's Jarrick Williams
took a handoff from
linebacker C.J. Mosley
and ran for a first down
on fourth and 2 in Tide
territory after calling
time out.
The buck-the-odds
gamble that is more
Miles' calling card than
Saban's paid off. Yeldon
capped a 14-play drive
consuming seven min-


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utes, 50 seconds with a
4-yard touchdown for a
24-17 lead.
"We said if they put
their defense back in
there, we were going to
run it," Saban said. "I
felt like we didn't want
to give them the ball
back. We were play-
ing great on defense. I
think it was a big play
in the game and for our
offense to go down and
finish that drive, I think
it really changed the
momentum."
No. 1 ALABAMA 38, No. 10 LSU 17
LSU 0 14 3 0 17
Alabama 3 14 7 14 38
First Quarter
Ala-FG C.Foster 41, 3:54.
Second Quarter
LSU-Hill 3 run (Delahoussaye kick), 14:56.
Ala-Howard 52 pass from A.McCarron (C.Foster
kick), 12:35.
Ala-Norwood 9 pass from A.McCarron (C.Foster
kick), 5:17.
LSU-Dural 6 pass from Mettenberger (Delahous-
saye kick), :43.
Third Quarter
LSU-FG Delahoussaye 41,12:01.
Ala-Yeldon 4 run (C.Foster kick), 4:11.
Fourth Quarter
Ala-Yeldon 1 run (C.Foster kick), 10:31.
Ala-Fowler 3 pass from A.McCarron (C.Foster
kick), 4:10.
A-101,821.
LSU Ala
First downs 16 25
Rushes-yards 3143 42-193
Passing 241 179
Comp-Att-lnt 16-23-0 14-20-0
Return Yards 8 0
Punts-Avg. 2-37.5 243.5
Fumbles-Lost 2-2 0-0
Penalties-Yards 7-73 4-35
Time of Possession 26:09 33:51
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-LSU, Hill 1342, Magee 9-31, Hilliard
1-1, Team 1-OCopeland 1-(minus 2), Mettenberger
6-(minus 29). Alabama, Yeldon 25-133, Drake 10-
65, J.Williams 1-6, A.McCarron 3-(minus 2), Team
3-(minus 9).
PASSING-LSU, Mettenberger 16-23-0-241. Ala-
bama, A.McCarron 14-20-0-179.
RECEIVING-LSU, Landry 5-90, Hill 347, Beckham
3-42, Boone 1-28, Gordon 1-22, Dural 1-6, Blue 14,
Magee 1-2. Alabama, Norwood 4-38, Cooper 346,
White 2-17, Howard 1-52, Yeldon 1-13, Drake 1-10,
Fowler 1-3, Ch.Jones 1-0.


News

,e -A.m
.r .." .. For'Home .
line." Delivery Call
& ^332) 787-0600


No matter what time
of the day it is,
you can place
- your classified
merchandise ad
S online, pay for it and
just wait for the
phone to ring!

Fast, convenient and
on your schedule!


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*Employment advertisements are excluded.
Please call 352-314-FAST to speak with a customer service rep.
Lake: 352-314-3278 or Sumter: 352-748-1955


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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, November 11, 2013


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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, November 11, 2013


bilian








Living
Send your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 1 352-365-8208


Cl
DAILY COMMERCIAL
Monday, November 11, 2013



www.dailycommercial.com


WORKOUTS: The dance craze takes a new twist/ C3


Health ,

check ,


LEESBURG
Lake County Parkinson's
group holds meeting
Eric Millhorn from the Millhorn
Law Firm is the guest at this meet-
ing, from 1 to 3 p.m., Tuesday at the
Lake Square Presbyterian Church,
10200 Morningside Dr.
Millhorn will be speaking on
Medicaid planning, household as-
sets and other subjects and will an-
swer questions.
For information, call Marion or
Jim Papson at 352-315-9359.

TAVARES
County Health Department
closes for Veterans Day
All Florida Department of Health
Lake County offices will be closed
today to observe the Veterans Day
holiday. All offices will reopen on
Tuesday with regularly scheduled
hours.

EUSTIS
Gynecological cancer
lunch bunch scheduled
This Dutch treat luncheon is
women who have been affect-
ed by ovarian or other gyneco-
logical cancers and family and
friends, at 1 p.m., Tuesday at Olivia's
Coffeehouse and Bistro, 108 N. Bay
St.
Reservations are required by noon
today be calling 352-324-4172.

LAKE COUNTY
AARP offers driver
safety classes
The AARP Driver Safety pro-
gram helps participants refine their
skills and develop safe driving hab-
its. Upon completion of the course,
Florida drivers 50 or older may be
eligible for insurance discounts.
Cost for the classes is $12 for
AARP members and $14 for non
members, and payment must be
made by check to AARP, no cash or
credit cards will be accepted.
The two-day classes will be of-
fered at the following locations:
* Tuesday and Thursday, from Ito
4 p.m., at the Harden-Pauli Funeral
Home, 1617 S. Bay St., in Eustis. To
register, call 352-394-0250.
* Nov. 18 and Nov. 20, from 6
to 9 p.m., at South Lake Hospital
(NTC), 1935 DonWickham Dr., in
Clermont. Call 352-394-0250 to
register.
* Nov., 13, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., at
Hawthorne of Leesburg, South U.S.
Highway 27, Leesburg. To register,
call 402-910-0822.


Strep scorecard might help



tell if you need a doctor


LAURAN NEERGAARD
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Debating
whether to seek a strep test for that
sore throat? One day there could
be an app for that: Researchers are
developing a home scorecard that
aims to prevent thousands of un-
necessary trips to the doctor for this
common complaint.
More than 12 million people make
doctors' visits for a sore throat ev-
ery year. Usually the culprit is a vi-
rus that they just have to wait out
with a little TLC.
In fact, the risk of strep throat is
low enough for adults that doctors
may skip testing them, deciding not
to bother after running down a list
of symptoms. That can leave pa-
tients wondering why they spent
hours in the waiting room and had
to pay the doctor's bill.
"If you could know that your risk
was low enough that you wouldn't
even be tested, you might actual-
ly save yourself a visit," said Dr. An-
drew Fine, an emergency physician
at Boston Children's Hospital.
The trick: Combine some of the
symptoms that doctors look for
with a bit of computer data to tell
if strep throat is circulating in your
geographical region. If the bug's in
your neighborhood, that increases
the chances that you've caught it,
said Dr. Kenneth Mandl, a Harvard
professor and informatics specialist
with Boston Children's.
As a first step, Fine and Mandl
turned to the records of more than
70,000 sore-throat patients who
got strep tests and had their symp-
toms recorded at CVS MinuteClin-
ics in six states between 2006 and
2008. They determined those peo-
ple's risk of strep using the exper-
imental scorecard approach and
checked the computer model's ac-
curacy against the strep test results.
Nationally, identifying those with
less than a 10 percent chance of


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Harvard Medical School and Boston Children's Hospital Informatics program professor Dr. Ken-
neth Mandl, left, and Harvard Medical School and Children's Hospital assistant professor Dr.
Andrew Fine, stand in an examination room at Children's Hospital with an iPad used by patients
to gather symptom scores while they wait in the emergency room for treatment in Boston on
Nov. 4.


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ASSOCIATED PRESS
An iPad app used by patients at Boston Children's Hospital displays a questionnaire used to
gather symptom scores.


strep throat could save 230,000 doc-
tor visits a year, the team reported
Monday in the journal Annals of In-
ternal Medicine.
The method wasn't perfect: It


meant 8,500 strep cases would have
been missed, or the diagnosis de-
layed, concluded the government-
funded study.
SEE TEST I C3


Testosterone treatments linked with heart risks


LINDSEY TANNER
Associated Press
CHICAGO Testosterone treat-
ments may increase risks for heart
attacks, strokes and death in older
men with low hormone levels and
other health problems, a big Veter-
ans Affairs study suggests.
The results raise concerns about
the widely used testosterone gels,
patches or injections that are heav-
ily marketed for low sex drive, fa-
tigue and purported anti-aging
benefits, the authors and other
doctors said.
Men who used testosterone were


30 percent more likely to have a
heart attack or stroke or to die dur-
ing a three-year period than men
with low hormone levels who didn't
take the supplements. Hormone
users and nonusers were in their
early 60s on average, and most
had other health problems includ-
ing high blood pressure, unhealthy
cholesterol and diabetes.
The research doesn't prove that
testosterone caused the heart at-
tacks, strokes or death, but echoes
a previous study in older men and
should prompt doctors and pa-
tients to discuss potential risks and


benefits of using the products, said
study lead author Dr. Michael Ho,
a cardiologist with the VA's Eastern
Colorado Health System in Denver.
The nationwide study involved
an analysis of health data on 8,700
veterans with low levels of testos-
terone, the main male sex hor-
mone. All had undergone a heart
imaging test and many had risk
factors for heart problems, includ-
ing blocked heart arteries. Risks
linked with testosterone were sim-
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Docs to parents: Limit kids' texts, tweets, online


LINDSEY TANNER
Associated Press
CHICAGO Doc-
tors 2 parents: Limit
kids' tweeting, texting
& keep smartphones,
laptops out of bed-
rooms. #goodluckwith-
that.
The recommenda-
tions are bound to
prompt eye-rolling and
LOLs from many teens
but an influential pe-
diatricians group says
parents need to know
that unrestricted me-
dia use can have seri-
ous consequences.
It's been linked with
violence, cyberbully-
ing, school woes, obe-
sity, lack of sleep and
a host of other prob-
lems. It's not a major
cause of these troubles,
but "many parents are
clueless" about the
profound impact me-
dia exposure can have
on their children, said
Dr. Victor Strasburger,
lead author of the new
American Academy of


Pediatrics policy
"This is the 21st cen-
tury and they need to
get with it," said Stras-
burger, a University of
New Mexico adoles-
cent medicine special-
ist.
The policy is aimed at
all kids, including those
who use smartphones,
computers and oth-
er Internet-connected
devices. It expands the
academy's longstand-
ing recommendations
on banning televisions
from children's and
teens' bedrooms and
limiting entertainment
screen time to no more
than two hours daily.
Under the new poli-
cy, those two hours in-
clude using the Inter-
net for entertainment,
including Facebook,
Twitter, TV and movies;
online homework is an
exception.
The policy statement
cites a 2010 report that
found U.S. children
aged 8 to 18 spend an
average of more than


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ASSOCIATED PRESS


In this Oct. 24 photo, Amy Risinger, right, watches her son Mark Risinger, 16, at their home in Glenview, III.


seven hours daily using
some kind of entertain-
ment media. Many kids
now watch TV online
and many send text
messages from their
bedrooms after "lights
out," including sexually
explicit images by cell-
phone or Internet, yet
few parents set rules
about media use, the
policy says.
"I guarantee you that
if you have a 14-year-
old boy and he has an
Internet connection
in his bedroom, he is
looking at pornogra-
phy," Strasburger said.
The policy notes that
three-quarters of kids
aged 12 to 17 own cell-
phones; nearly all teens
send text messages,
and many younger kids
have phones giving
them online access.
"Young people now
spend more time with
media than they do in
school it is the lead-
ing activity for children


and teenagers other
than sleeping" the pol-
icy says.
Mark Risinger, 16, of
Glenview, Ill., is allowed
to use his smartphone
and laptop in his room,
and says he spends
about four hours dai-
ly on the Internet doing
homework, using Face-
book and YouTube and
watching movies.
He said a two-hour
Internet time limit
"would be catastroph-
ic" and that kids won't
follow the advice,
"they'll just find a way
to get around it."
Strasburger said he
realizes many kids will
scoff at advice from pe-
diatricians or any
adults.
"After all, they're the
experts! We're media-
Neanderthals to them,"
he said. But he said he
hopes it will lead to
more limits from par-
ents and schools, and
more government re-


search on the effects of
media.
The policy was pub-
lished online today in
the journal Pediatrics.
It comes two weeks aft
er police arrested two
Florida girls accused
of bullying a classmate
who committed sui-
cide. Police say one of
the girls recently boast-
ed online about the
bullying and the local
sheriff questioned why
the suspects' parents
hadn't restricted their
Internet use.
Mark's mom, Amy
Risinger, said she
agrees with restrict-
ing kids' time on so-
cial media but that de-
ciding on other media
limits should be up to
parents.
"I think some chil-
dren have a greater
maturity level and you
don't need to be quite
as strict with them,"
said Risinger, who runs
a communications
consulting firm.


Her 12-year-old has
sneaked a laptop into
bed a few times and
ended up groggy in the
morning, "so that's why
the rules are now in
place, that that device
needs to be in mom
and dad's room before
he goes to bed."
Sara Gorr, a San Fran-
cisco sales director and
mother of girls, ages 13
and 15, said she wel-
comes the academy's
recommendations.
Her girls weren't al-
lowed to watch the
family's lone TV un-
til a few years ago.
The younger one has
a tablet, and the old-
er one has a computer
and smartphone, and
they're told not to use
them after 9 p.m.
"There needs to be
more awareness," Gorr
said. "Kids are getting
way too much comput-
er time. It's bad for their
socialization, it's over-
stimulating, it's numb-
ing them."


Colon cancer testing may be leveling off in US


MIKE STOBBE
Associated Press
ATLANTA After
years of steady increas-
es, testing for colon
cancer may be level-
ing off, a federal report
suggests.
A large survey done
last year found that
about two-thirds of
Americans ages 50 to
75 have had the rec-
ommended screenings
for colorectal cancer.
That's the same per-


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centage from 2010, ap-
parently marking the
first year in at least a
decade there was no
increase.
It's not clear why
rates may be slowing,
said Dr. Marcus Ples-
cia of the Centers for
Disease Control and
Prevention. The CDC
report was released
Tuesday.
"Even the hint of a
leveling off is very con-
cerning," he said.
Screening rates in


the U.S. had been ris-
ing steadily, up from
54 percent in 2002.
The jump was attribut-
ed partly to the "Katie
Couric effect," named
for the former "Today"
show host who lost
her husband to colon
cancer and then had a
colonoscopy on televi-
sion.
The test is the most
common of the three
screening options for
people 50 and older. It
is recommended once


every 10 years. Doc-
tors use a long flexi-
ble tube to spot and
remove polyps before
they turn cancerous.
Colonoscopy has
been credited with
making an impact:
colorectal cancer
death rates have been
dropping for more
than 20 years. But the
test can be uncomfort-
able, expensive and re-
quire taking a day off
from work.
Another option is a
test that checks only
the lower colon. But
the easiest choice is a
home stool test done
annually, which health
officials say can be just
as good for most peo-
ple. Doctors should
work harder to suggest
it, said CDC Director
Tom Frieden.
"The best test is the
test that gets done,"
Frieden said.
The national tele-
phone survey of more
than 200,000 Amer-
icans is done every
two years. Last year's
survey included cell-
phones for the first
time, which may have
affected the results.
But other research has
also suggested screen-
ing rates are climbing
less rapidly, CDC offi-
cials said.


C2


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, November 11, 2013




Monday, November 11, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Vixen Workout: The dance-as-fitness




craze takes a sexy, new twist


ROBBYN MITCHELL
Tampa Bay Times
Yolyvee Gordon popped
and percolated down to the
floor as the nightclub lights
flashed and the F-bomb-
filled rap music rattled ear-
drums. On weekdays, Gor-
don's an attorney with a
large Tampa law firm. But
on this night, she was assist-
ing Janet Jones in her cam-
paign to liberate women
from the gender roles and
social mores that keep them
two-stepping at holiday
parties. In the safety of Club
Prana, Gordon and Jones
encouraged 39 women in
workout gear to twerk their
hearts out free of judg-
ment and join the Vixen
Workout's Vixen Army.
"It's just so freeing," said
Gordon, 31, who once
danced for the Miami
Heat. "To be able to come
to a place like this and just
dance like no one is watch-
ing. It's a great feeling and I
really believe in Janet's mes-
sage."
On paper, the Vixen Work-
out is the next evolution in
the dance-as-fitness craze
that's seen dozens of itera-
tions from Latin-dance-
inspired Zumba to strip-
club-inspired Strippercise.
In practice, the class not
only teaches raunchy dance
moves, but stresses confi-
dence and embracing sen-
suality.
Jones, 32, of Miami,
worked as a professional
dancer with the Miami Heat
and rap acts before settling
down to work a corporate
job in finance and become


Former professional dancer with the Miami Heat, Janet Jones leads a "Vixen Workout" class on Nov. 6


a wife and mother. "I found
myself as a woman, you're
expected to be so many
roles," Jones said. "You have
to be a mom. You have to be
a wife. You have to be this
domestic diva. And for the
first time in my life ... I felt
invisible. I went through a
real depression."
After being laid off, Jones
returned to dance in the
studio. Under the lights, she
felt at home.
"Having my experience
with a corporate job, I real-
ized that there must be a lot
of women who felt the same
way I did," Jones said.
Starting with a couple


of relatives, Jones began
teaching the Vixen Work-
out in Miami. Routines were
performed to uncensored
rap. Women-only classes
gathered in gyms and some-
times in nightclubs. The
class grew from one gym to
11. More than 1,300 women
a week were paying to burn
calories while shaking it in
the 60-minute sessions.
Jones' unusual new ter-
minology landed on mer-
chandise like "Sophisti-
ratchet," Jones-speak for
sophisticated women let-
ting loose and the Vixen
Workout morphed into an
organized sisterhood, the


Vixen Army.
Women would post sweaty
selfies on Instagram in full
makeup wearing their latest
Vixen gear. They were en-
couraged to wear tank tops,
sexy leggings and wedge
sneakers instead of normal
ratty gym wear.
Jones traveled around the
state teaching classes, be-
fore deciding it was time to
open it up and set up shops
outside South Florida. She
got the idea to do a college
tour. "A lot of girls from Mi-
ami who took the class go to
school all over the state and
they had been encouraging
us to come up (to Tampa)


for a while," Jones said.
Natasha Olano, 29, a med-
ical receptionist, brought
her sorority sisters out to a
recent class at Club Prana. It
was her third time in aVixen
workout. "It's empowering,"
she said. "I just have a great
time every time."
The class was a part of
a five-city tour called the
Vixen Workout School of
Ratchet Tour. Jones and her
team hit Boca Raton, Tam-
pa, Gainesville, Orlando and
Tallahassee, teaching class-
es and holding auditions for
new instructors. During the
class, Jones announced that
Gordon would be teaching
a new class at FlavaFitness
Studio in Tampa.
"I'm excited and nervous,"
Gordon said. "You want to
follow Janet's example and
have the same energy but
you never know if they're
going to follow you."
Erika Hunter, 30, a Me-
dia General employee from
Tampa, said she was all in. "I
loved it," she said. "Especial-
ly for women like me, who
might feel a little too old for
the club environment I
was never really a club per-
son getting to dance and
have fun to the music that
you would hear in the club
is a lot of fun."
Jones said that's no acci-
dent.
"We are offering women
a safe space, there are no
men around in the gyms,
to be themselves and dance
as nasty as they do at home
with their friends," she said.
"It's ratchet, but in a very
controlled environment."


TEST
FROM PAGE C1

But Mandl said it's
unlikely that would
lead to lasting harm
as most of those infec-
tions would clear up
on their own, or per-
sisting pain eventually
would send patients to
the doctor. And he not-
ed that the rapid strep
tests that doctors use
in their offices can miss
cases, too.
Much more research
is needed to prove if the
method would work in
everyday life and if a
mobile app or a phone
call to the doctor would
be the best approach.
The Boston team has
begun the next step:
Parents of kids who
come to the hospital's
emergency room for a
strep test are handed a
digital tablet and asked
to fill out the scorecard
first. Researchers will
see how the combina-
tion of symptoms and
local infection trends
compare with actual


strep test results.
Sore throats are a
challenge. Strep throat,
caused by bacteria
named Group A strep-
tococcus, is to blame
for only about 10 per-
cent of cases in adults,
and 30 percent in chil-
dren.
It's hard to tell who
needs a strep test
based on symptoms
alone, cautioned Dr.
Chris Van Beneden of
the Centers for Dis-
ease Control and Pre-
vention, which helped
fund the new research.
But what is clear: Doc-
tors should be sure it's
strep before prescrib-
ing antibiotics because
those bacteria-fighting
drugs have no effect on
viruses.
Yet research pub-
lished last month in
the journal JAMA Inter-
nal Medicine found 60
percent of adults who
sought care for a sore
throat received anti-
biotics. Unneeded an-
tibiotic use can spur
development of drug-
resistant germs.
The Boston team


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looked at the flip side
of the issue: Who could
safely skip a strep
check? Because strep is
most common in chil-
dren ages 5 to 15, doc-
tors usually test young-
sters with a sore throat
for the bacteria.
For anyone 15 or old-
er, Mandl said doc-
tors may skip a test de-
pending on symptoms.
While a cough and run-
ny nose are more typi-
cal of a cold virus, strep
symptoms might in-
clude a fever, enlarged
lymph nodes, tonsils
with swelling or pus
and lack of a cough.
So Fine and Man-
dl focused first on the
over-15 crowd. Be-
cause feeling lymph
nodes and peeking at
tonsils could be diffi-
cult for the average lay-
man, their scorecard
posed easy questions:
Is there a fever? Is there
a cough?
Then came the key:


The scorecard auto-
matically merged those
symptoms with local
trends in strep diagno-
sis.
It's a practice called
biosurveillance. Al-
ready, hundreds of
hospitals, clinics and
health departments
automatically report
certain symptoms and
diagnoses to the gov-
ernment. That lets of-
ficials track the spread
of flu every year, for
example and some
web sites now show flu
activity by zip code so
people can check if in-
fluenza has reached
their community.
Likewise, results of
strep tests are available
digitally from testing
laboratories, clinics,
even large doctors' of-
fices, Mandl said. They
just have to be collect-
ed and used, which
isn't routine.
In an accompany-
ing editorial, Dr. Rob-


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Monday, November 11, 2013


Feds post food allergy guidelines for schools


MIKE STOBBE
Associated Press
ATLANTA The feder-
al government is issuing its
first guidelines to schools
on how to protect children
with food allergies.
The voluntary guidelines
call on schools to take such
steps as restricting nuts,
shellfish or other foods that
can cause allergic reactions,
and make sure emergen-
cy allergy medicine like
EpiPens are available.
About 15 states and nu-
merous individual schools
or school districts al-
ready have policies of their


own. "The need is here" for a
more comprehensive, stan-
dardized way for schools to
deal with this issue, said Dr.
Wayne Giles, who oversaw
development of the advice
for the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention.
Food allergies are a grow-
ing concern. A recent CDC
survey estimated that about
1 in 20 U.S. children have
food allergies a 50 per-
cent increase from the late
1990s. Experts aren't sure
why cases are rising.
Many food allergies are
mild and something chil-
dren grow out of. But severe
cases may cause anaphy-


lactic shock or even death
from eating, say, a peanut.
The guidelines released
Wednesday were required
by a 2011 federal law.
Peanuts, tree nuts, milk
and shellfish are among the
food that most often most
trigger reactions. But ex-
perts say more than 170
foods are known to cause
reactions.
The new advice call for
schools to do such things
as:
* Identify children with
food allergies.
* Have a plan to prevent ex-
posures and manage any
reactions.


* Train teachers or others
how to use medicines like
epinephrine injectors, or
have medical staff to do
the job.
* Plan parties or field trips
free of foods that might
cause a reaction; and des-
ignate someone to carry
epinephrine.
* Make sure classroom ac-
tivities are inclusive.
For example, don't use
Peanut M&M's in a count-
ing lesson, said John Lehr,
chief executive of an advo-
cacy group that worked on
the guidelines, Food Aller-
gy Research & Education
(FARE).


Carolyn Duff, an elemen-
tary school nurse in Colum-
bia, S.C., said she was glad
to see the guidelines.
"Many schools may not
have policies. And if they do,
maybe the policies aren't re-
ally comprehensive," said
Duff, president of the Na-
tional Association of School
Nurses.
U.S. Rep. Nita Lowey, a
New York Democrat who
worked on the law that led
to the guidelines, said in a
statement that they are a
big step toward giving par-
ents "the confidence that
their children will stay safe
and healthy at school."


Travelers push US malaria

count to most in 40 yrs


Associated Press
ATLANTA-U.S. ma-
laria cases are at their
highest level in four
decades, mostly from
Americans bringing
home an unwelcome
souvenir from their
travels.
Malaria is not a big
problem in the U.S. -
there were only 1,925
cases in 2011, includ-
ing five deaths. But
cases were up 14 per-


HEART
FROM PAGE C1

Nearly 26 percent of
men using testoster-
one had one of the bad
outcomes within three
years of the heart test,
compared with 20 per-
cent of nonusers. It's
unclear how the hor-
mone might increase
heart risks but possibil-
ities include evidence
that testosterone might
make blood substanc-
es called platelets stick
together, which could
lead to blood clots, the
study authors said.
Previous studies
on the supplements'
health effects have had
mixed results, with
some research sug-
gesting potential heart
benefits but none of
the studies has been
conclusive.
The new study was
published Tuesday
in the Journal of the
American Medical As-
sociation.
An editorial in the
journal said it is uncer-
tain if the study results
apply to other groups
of men, including
younger men using the
hormone for supposed
anti-aging benefits.
"There is only an-
ecdotal evidence that
testosterone is safe for
these men," said edi-
torial author Dr. Anne
Cappola, a hormone
expert at University of
Pennsylvania and an
associate journal edi-
tor.
"In light of the high
volume of prescrip-
tions and aggressive
marketing by testos-
terone manufacturers,
prescribers and pa-
tients should be wary"
and more research is
needed, she wrote.
Annual prescrip-
tions for testosterone
supplements have in-
creased more than five-
fold in recent years,
climbing to more than
5 million and $1.6 bil-
lion in U.S. sales in
2011, the study noted.
Dr. Nathaniel Pol-


cent from the previous
year, and the most since
1971.
Nearly all the cases
were Americans or for-
eign travelers bringing it
into the country. About
two-thirds were infect-
ed in Africa, where ma-
laria is common.
Malaria is a deadly
tropical disease spread
by mosquitoes. It's
treatable when caught
early.


naszek, a urologist with
Scott & White Health-
care in Round Rock,
Texas, said he pre-
scribes testosterone for
many men, mostly in
their 40s and 50s, with
low levels and erec-
tile dysfunction or oth-
er symptoms. He called
the study "concerning."
"This is something
I'm going to be discuss-
ing with my patients,"
he said.
Testosterone levels
gradually decline as
men age, and guide-
lines from doctors
who specialize in hor-
mone-related prob-
lems say hormone sup-
plements should only
be considered in men
with symptoms of low
levels, including sexu-
al dysfunction. They're
not advised for men
with prostate cancer
because of concerns
they could make the
disease spread, said
Dr. Robert Carey, a for-
mer Endocrine Society
president and a profes-
sor of medicine at the
University of Virginia
Health System.
AbbVie, Inc., makers
of one heavily market-
ed testosterone sup-
plement, AndroGel, is-
sued a statement in
response to the study,
noting that testoster-
one treatments are ap-
proved by the Food and
Drug Administration,
and the risks are listed.
Possible side effects
shown on the pack-
age insert include high
blood pressure, blood
clots in the legs, and
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Monday, November 11, 2013

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POSSIBLE; AND SUDDENLY YOU ARE DOING
THE IMPOSSIBLE. FRANCIS OF ASSISI


WORD s)G)R) D)M)M)A)G)EY
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bonus. All words can be found in Webster's New World College Dictionary.
11-11-13 JUDD'S SOLUTION TOMORROW )

WORDI 80RIMNARE SOLUTION BY JUDD HAMBRICK
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.........................................................................................................................
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11-10-13


DAILY COMMERCIAL
I DENNIS THE MENACE


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DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 11, 2013


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Monday, November 11, 2013
mi,9


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DIRECTORY

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Sell your merchandise today at *


IDaily Commercial


YOUR CLASSIFED AD IN PRINT & LINE CALL



2-314-FAST

d It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST!


Lake: 352-314-3278 or


Sumter: 352-748-1955 Monday Friday 8am 5pm


Legal Notices ..
Announcements
At Your Service.
Financial ......
Employment ...
Pets/Animals ..


Classified Index
.........003 Merchandise Mart ...
......... 100 Real Estate/For RENT
......... 200 Real Estate/For SALE
........ .300 Manufactured Homes
... .....400 Recreation .........
.........500 Transportation ......


.... 600
.... 800
.... 900
.1000
..1100
.1200


In Lake County
A, i "L'' L
For Local News Sports Weather '
In-Print & On-Line
-~1.!


.....'. . ... .
IjI .1 "
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lfY'i Li IJFW JIC~iirVL

www.dailycommercial.com
; v...


2004 FORD FOCUS ZX3 STK#13422A............................................................................$5,254
2004 LINCOLN TOWN CAR STK#14079A............................................................$......... 6,568
2004 HYUNDAI ELANTRA STK#14069A. AUTO, SUNROOF ............................................ 775
2000 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX GTP STK#14085A. ONLY 67K MILES, LOADED.......... $7,783
2005 TOYOTA PRIUS STK#13483B................................................................................... 8,245
2008 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN STK#14037B.......................................................... $9,898
2008 NISSAN SENTRA S STK#8L741680................................................................ 10,935
2009 CHEVROLET AVEO LT STK#13085B. ONLY 11K MILES....................................$10,972
2010 CHEVROLET IMPALA STK#13506A.................................................................$11,934
2006 HONDA CR-V EXL STK#14050A. 4WD, SUNROOF, LOADED........................1...... 1,923
2008 NISSAN ROGUE SL STK#P13-034A1.AWD, SUNROOF.............................. ....... 1,968
2008 CHEVROLET IMPALA STK#14010A1...............................................................$12,630
2009 CHEVROLET IMPALA STK#14063QA............................................................... $12,957
2006 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500 STK#13412C. LT, LEATHER, LOADED .......$12,958
2007 DODGE RAM 1500 STK#13269B.......................................................................$13,252
2011 CHEVROLET CRUZE STK#13372A.....................................................................$13,458
2011 HYUNDAI ELANTRA STK#13305A....................................................................$13,658
2013 CHEVROLET SONIC 5 LTsTK#P13-088.........................................................$14,787
2008 BUICK LUCERNE CXL STK#14111A................................................................ $14,792
2012 CHEVROLET IMPALA STK#P13-076................................................................$14,858
2010 MERCURY MARINER STK#13054B. LEATHER, LOADED.................................. $14,897
2010 FORD ESCAPE STK#P13-015A. XLT, LOW MILES .........................................1.......$5,693
2013 CHEVROLET IMPALA STK#P13-087. SUNROOF, ALLOYS, ALL POWER ............15,875
2010 CHEVROLET EQUINOX STK#13478A...............................................................$16,489
2013 CHEVROLET MALIBU STK#P13-086...............................................................$1 6,984
2010 HYUNDAI TUCSON LIMITED STK#13095A. NAV, LEATHER, LOADED...........$17,896
2009 CADILLAC DTS STK#14067A.............................................................................. $20,298
2011 CHEVROLET CAMARO RS STK#13471A................................................. ....20,968
2007 CHEVROLET AVALANCHE LTZ STK#13507A. ONLY 66K MILES ............. s23,864
2012 CHEVROLET SILVERADO LTZ ONLY 4K MILES ....................................... ..... $33,671
Ove 90PeI' IVhclsInIvet
FIND NEWROADS" -
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M J;9JLAKECOUNTYCHEV.COM AINT
KECh ENGINELITfF111 8843 HWY 441 352-787-6888
We'll Check a fr FEE! OPEN MONDAY-FRIDAY 8:30am-8:Opm
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'PRICFR S PAYMENTS PI11S TAX TAG TITLE F AND rQ n)FAl ELR ADMIN PHOTOS FO RII L STRATIn nNI Y THANK YIAN n HAUF & RFAT nfAYV


CHECK OUT OUR SPECU


ssified
lercial.comlclasslfieds o


DEADLINES
For Insertion COPY DATE
Friday Thursday, 5pm
Saturday Friday, 3pmr
Sunday Friday, 5:00pm
Monday Friday, 5:00pm
Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pm
.Ip llr. ,1 1,' ,' I,Fr.. ,',,''. i..,-6 ,1 P.-.-... ,TJ, 1 I,
made by 5:00pm Friday.
ADJUSTMENTS
* ,. .. . .. ..ii . .. i
The publisher essemes no hnancsel responsibility for errors arfor
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Monday, November 11, 2013


A/


Local, Trusted
A/C Expert
Kalos Services
352-243-7088
KalosFlorida.com
Lic.#CAC 1814620
Flrida Air & Heat Inc.
Your Comfort Company
rFor All Your Air Conditioning
& Heating Needs
r, r352-326-3202
| Serving lake County State Licence #
since 1986 CAC1814030

1shawn A/ leamtfi
'Repairs at great prices. I
Residential & Commercial
407-617-0450 1
U6c.4.CAC817515 State Certified jo




' Eustis Senior Care
AssisW 1UvW F1i i4 tAL 8993
Accepting New Clients for our
brand new bedrooms.
Call Rhea, RN at 352-551-5307
for inquiries and a free tour.

Aurora Home Care Inc.
"Illuminating Care"
Companions/Homemakers
Sewing oil of Lake, Sumter, Motion Counties
Rates start at S18.50/hr *4hr min.
Aurorohomecoreinc.org. Lic/ins
Ahca#239l2 Office: 352-435-7751
Toll Free: 866-702-6197






Serving Lake, Sumter
&S. Marion Counties
DWe Service All
Appliance Brands
Licensed/Insured
Free Service Call
w/Repair
15+ Years Exp, 24 Hr, Emergency Svc.
We Don't Want To Be The Biggest
Just The Best
Eric Wolf 352-630-2202


AutoSeric



Complete Automotive Care
9 Transmissions AC Brakes
STune Ups Body Work Oil Change
Family Owned 26 Yrs 352-326-2400
1406 Emerson St, Leesburg across from Post Office

Bathroom

R E- T*I L *
RE-TILE
352-391-5553
SBacksplashes Re-Tile Tub & Shower
Walls Grab Bars Floors
Handicap Baths Repairs
Leaky Shower Pan
Ins./Lic. 30 yrs. exp.




BATHTUBS REFINISHED
ON LOCATION
Renew, on location, your
3* Porcelain Fiberglass
* Ceramic Tiles
Shower Stalls
LAKESIDE TUB ILa TILE HERNISEING
(352) 742-9602



lmdkayH-^^, C P~ftroffiPlCC
II W Senice

0le9W.lakeViewSLLady Lakl
Behind Mom & Dadis Restarant
-in.iisolS~i Mlidfppts ci


Stucky's Carpet
Cleaning
L Spring Special
2 ooms & Hall $50
352.365.9889


i .BJ tbt'S All-Natural
S' Cleaning Service
Quality Cleaning with
-T -., only natural products.
Licensed and Insured
352-348-6576
www.bambisallnaturalcleaning.com

VIE E-A& INGRQi~I
IkQEAJ ING,
Cleaning, Sealing & Grout Repair.
Also Carpet, Upholstery Pressure
washing, Driveways & Sidewalks.
We do it right! Call Tim
52-243-1215 or 407-383-8783

Simone's Cleaning Services
Commercial/Residential
Reliable/References
Lie/Bonded- 10 Yrs Exp.
SpImmediate Availlibility-
iFlexible Hours
44r Call: Simone
407-844- 11 83

ESP Services
Doctors Visits Cooking & Laundry
Pet Caring General Errands
Housekeeping
Call For A Free In-Person
Consultation
352-348-6408

CLEAN SWEEP
(Clutter Free Cleaning)
lean, Sort, Pack or Spring Clean
Ref's & Yrs. of Experience
.352-742-0014
Reasonable Rates





Your PC Repair Specialists
Fast friendly service at a
flat rate affordable price.
g Education & Repair
in your home or our office.
WCall
352-897-1309





QUALITY CONCRETE & BLOCK
8xO $500.00 10x40 $1200.00
Includes labor, concrete & cleanup
ast turnaround, no hassle & local
#CRC1326327, Ins. & References
BRIAN DEGAGLIA
352-267-5723j

& Concrete For Less
"%b 8]X10 Slab $450
No=uNTg 101x40 Slab $1325
Includes Concrete & Labor
0 Blocklng/ flReJLIcJ.lns.
Ii Phillip 352-504-8372


We ELIMINATE all trip
hazards due to UNEVEN and
or RAISED concrete.
Commercial/Residential
Concrete Grinding is 1/2
the cost of replacement.
Entry ways Ramps Sidewalks
Driveways Puddling Water, etc.
Insured
(877] 454-0113 (toll free]
Alconcretegrinding.com




METAL TILE SHINGLE ROOFING
New Construction or Re-Roofing
B 308 Oak Street
Lady Lake, FL 32159
352-430-2773
www.sackroofing.com
Serving the Tri County Area For 26 Years




D & LoCk12S2465
S & LOCK SERVICE
We Repair, Replace and Install
Emergency Services Available!
(352) 314-3169


E nc[losure (
ScreeingS


Ul UiUIM Ill UINIInciiE
FREE ESTIMATES
352408.2142


a. -


Enclsur


n Triple Crown
S Tile & Wood
Installation & Repairs
Owner does all work.
Free Est. Lie/Ins
3524274825


Screens Ripped?
Call 352-504-047i
SCREEN GENIE
One panel or complete screen
enclosure, lavs. Enryways,
Doors a Nojob too sil.


BOYDS
You call it, We haul it!
352
460-7186





METAL TILE SHINGLE ROOFING
New Construction or Re-Roofing I
B 308 Oak Street
Lady Lake, FL 32159
352-430-2773
www.sackroofing.com
Serving the Tri County Area For 26 Years

D&B RENOVATIONS
352-572-1847
FREE ESTIMATES
"NE CALL DOES IT ALL"
lBathroom Remodels, Flooring,
Painting, Pressure Washing,
Privacy Fence AND MORE
SInsured & Experienced


~LawnManeac
St xervices o







R l 5^
r IMDoCnt Stres allr Thsam Beslt
FREE ESTIMEIES UCAINH
We Take A Bie Out 01 OverPricing
352-326-8712 / 352-406-3354


SPRAYING
Fertilizer-Weeds -Insects
Lawn Maintenance
352-357-5905
I A Pest Exterminator









4 Landaping, Tr iI III








--r iihus.edn i l
1-101L1 rIAL.HD








Howards L4aw
Tree Service At
Reasonable Rates
I can climb the highest trees,
anrd I can mow the biggest
la ns, but please don't ask me
to leap tall buildings
Fair Pricing. Trim Trees,
Cut Lawns & Clean Ups
Cal Tony for estimate 352-759-2080

Don't Stress Call The Best!
Dependable Commercial
Lawn Services
Lic/ins. Designer
Landscaping, Trimming,
Shrubs. We do it all
Rick 352-427-8919

HRwards Lawn
Service
*sslihmtlal/Cmnlnmial











DcIn
800-9085

pHplaw1111care









All AtVeetan Gardens4001
INow accetin w dmein Nl &
Residential cutomeuls. lowbing
I Ladsapiiurririgafio idi more.








IUNhmTaler. Nogeiae Prboblem. i
INIce B352-552-456 COe 352-72-646

'.oI, All Lawn
a M and Tree
Care
Service
Boas Natural Land
40 ,^Clearing (Goats)
"BEST PRICES" 0 Free Est
352-460-7186











BilSMarine
SMoverv Service
2m(N 2^5y Center
WiAAUMMa352l-602-1735
At Venetian Gardens
Marina on the
Harris Chain of Lakes.
No Trailer. No Problem.
Boat Repairs & Svc. on water

COVERED BOAT SUPS FOR RENT
win Palms Mana located on
[Make Griffin. Water & elec. avail.
FMeekly, Monthly or Yearly. BOAT
RENTALS: Pontoons,
Jon Boats, Kayaks & Canoes.
Call 352-787-4514







Morvinggae M n
&SumervCunices
Bill' s Moving
a u Mover Rag. No: 2095
Owner On Every iob
Fair Hates t27+ u rs.Exp.
352-669-4456
Toll Feef 888-444-3559

Little John's Movers &
Storage 352-812-4889
Serving Lake, Manion,
& Summer Counties
'1-15 items same day delivery
Local & Long distance moves
*Loading & unloading pods, rental
trucks, & storage units.
We have trcks going up &
"Less Than a POD"'* "Door to Door"
You're Coming ....Your Neighbor Is Going!
Jump on Board and $ave
SER VING ALL 50 STATES
One item to a full house!!!
We will get off the interstate for you!
ljm9575@yahoo.com
___ US DOT #2406621 ___


^ __ iU OCBC1252465
i"b. GARAGE DOORS
Complete Service & Installation
Lake County's Largest Provider!
We Sell & Program Remotes!
1 (3521 748-4575





Licensed & Insured midfldoor.com
1352-630-0292 Sarne Blantor











A fp fordable Horn.I
S Repair, e C e




Home Repair Apt, Clean Outs
& Repair Decks & Ramps
Soffits/Siding Doors/Windows
Painting Tile Work Li/Ins I
Cal pat 352-551-6073


Dave Hills Handiyman & Painting
iSL / Door & Window Installion
tI a of- Carpentry,
iHome Improvement,
icIs Drywall & More! Just Ask!
S Professional Service
./ Li cJlns. 352-259-5357


j[ yMMCTU IA! VM 1
:::Home Repair, :::.:
Pressure Washing Painting
bFlooring e Carpet Clean Outs
PClean Ups Hauling Licensed
I352-787-7056I

l John Philibert, IncP
n We do Everything from Ceilings to
7 Floors. Window and Doors,
,,t* Pantries, Cabinets and more.
Your pesky Leaks gone, Your Soffits
we Fix, and Houses We'll Paint. From
inside and out, we'll make it great Uc/lns
JPHandy.com(352) 308-0694

SMike Shoffstall Ser i
ffCall 352 552 187553
Rpie.._, hUNGLE HUThig

Repair everWthing Replace anything.


Trusted. Quilitr Craftsmanship jor 30+y.rears
Kitchens Bathrooms Windows
Vinyl Siding- Decks- Painting/Staining
Tile/Marble Lanai Enclosures
Mike Lalonde 352-409-8311
mike~q image4me.com


*f I l .


GOT MNb?
Water Damage, Allergies?
352 552-3386





Local Agent
Long Term Care Ins.
Medicare Supplements
Critical Care Ins.
Cancer Ins.
Call Bill Bell
352.589-0454 or 352.551.3504


Dec. 7 is the Last day
to change Medicare
for 2014.
352-742-2425
lange.rob.ins@gmail.com




Irrigation Tune-Up
$35 Check & Adjust
=, L Entire System.
135 Provide Written Est.
STo RFix Problems!
Lower Your Monthly Cost
352-409-3163

IT^ Sprinl .er
IrRepairs
Timers, Valves, Heads,
,oLeaks, etc.
(352) 787-9001
That's all we do since 1979
G l Native, 4th Generation





.C.C. Bobcat a Tree Svc. Inc.
S Land Clearing/Excavating
0 m, Fill Dirt/Clay
I .ifim auling/Debris Removal
] Stump Grinding
Demolition/Grading/ Driveways
Owner Operator
352-455-7608

CHRIS CARNESLANDSCAPE
Ampisigllniwftt
Lawn Maelmtnnce. arnscai.e. Pat"s
lBetUilng Wills, MaliL. Sodding
Leeshurg 536-3708
S20V11 0 5% M% o I "
alids.|ir """ ausamic

A-1 .Premier Scapes
P^ & Services Inc.
Land Clearing Bush Hogging
Debris Removal
Hauling Free Estimates
352-308-5508


I Landscaping

Trimming, Mulching,
Sod, Tree Trimming,
Pavers & Much Morel
Armando Santamario
352-587-1323


-niiki 7 Brightman Home Improvement
AllMakes 1 aMotIls. Wallpaper, Drywall
BIErenom Sprng uo ulacemzii Inteior Painting, Trim
10 lolhw/alsid adREE ESTIMATES
S352-341 -6411 3 Insured
daZ-41-411'^1^T 352S.598.3169


Garag^*****, Doo
M~c*I S eiiHia<~rvicesc


DAILY COMMERCIAL




Monday, November 11, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


quality Assurance FPainting, Inc.
L "If you want quality, you want us!"
r l lIterier- i~ erer epaits
S New eConstrucuone
L_ |- lUcensed/Insured
Lkiiii TIE~un
ua- I 352-483-6915
www.qualityassurancepaintinginc.com
-i~fCO-ED
PROFESSIONAL
PAINTING, INC.
ommorcial FEE ESlATES
S Residential (352) 267-6430
WtWK CO-EDFZ~IqNII$.ImM
S ic ensed and I.nsured
IEOR/IEXTERIOR PAINTING & OTHER S
(352) 348-6923
Tim Mundy Painting
Pressure Cleanng Services, Inc.
"fhere QuiAyWh N.oAccideat"
\ Licensed f Insured
SJohn Philibert, Inc
SFor All Your Interior/Exterior
l ~ Painting Needs.
I We Also Offer
Driveways Patios
And Faux Finishes Lic/Ins
Call John @ (352) 308-0694
JPHandy.com
New England Painter
Semi-Retired
30 Years Exp
Interior, Exterior, Pressure
Washing No Job Too Small
Bob Kelley Painting
352-702-7739
CLAUDE WILD PAINTING
High Quality @ Reasonable Prices
Int. & Ext. Free Est. Lic/Ins
Pressure Cleaning Ref. & 35 yrs. exp.
I in Lake County
cwilIdpainting@gm all.com


L.- Affordable Home
I Repair, LLC
Interior/Exterior Painting
Free Pressure Washing with all
Exterior Paints.Driveways and Decks
NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL Lic/Ins
call Pat 352-551-6073
BmerlstrIa EImrlor
PAINTINGSeS&alants
Roof CoatingI
concrete Coatings
Pressure Cleaning
Uc.& Iin- Froe Estinmates
352-728-4561



/ INDOOR PEST
& CONTROL
As low as $20 per mo.
A s 352-357-5905
Pest Exterminator
American Pest EControl
Termites Rodent Exclusions
^ German Roaches
i e..-Property Inspections
S Soil Pre-treatment
L c/lns 352-446-231


(352) 383-3440 #0FC1426750

=i Plumbing, LLC
ml Plumbing RepairsConm/Res
Kltcewns & Bath Remoedels i
DsisOsaL Water Heater. Gas Pinl,
DrafrlSewer Clmaning.
Ne Grot Showers, 24 Hr. Emergency
uc-i2sc3c-44([352] 343-3763




Ace Pool Service
Complete Pool Services
Motor & Pump Repair
Pool & Patio Remodeling
Servicing Commercial & Residential
Properties Since 1969
Licensed/Insured Free Estimates
352-735-3050

Prss r
CleanJ Uing


352.260.7490

All Airports, Cruise Terminals,
Hotels, Casinos & Attractions
Shands-VA and Jacksonville Mayo
Yi-L eG. e.. Ju stiv g


Qp AVH Providing
f No-Cost Svcs.
to Lake county
Sexual assault victims 24/7/365.
S On-Call Rape Advocacy
Counseling, Legal Assistance
Hotline 352-787-1379

Rofn


SECURITY TRAINING
r|^Security "DW&"G" Lie.
L3s PLUS: FL Concealed Lic.
* NRA Instructor Training
Ladies Only Classes Avail.
s 352-350-2855
uL. 5s513000 www.TheRightTraining.comr

1IShower Doorigsi


Plants & Florist
Service I


I* ll o- I -.111 III I -

ClassifiedDepartmentat
(35) 35-833 r b em~0
mihele u 0e@P0ilco 0ecil- o


m 352-978-7015
Sn Lake, .ua=,er
& S..arin.::de PremierPowerlnc.com
We Service AllComple Automotive Care Licensed, Bonded, Insured
Appliance BrandsM....
FLicensed/insured Transmissions AC Brakes Mster E #
Free Service Call
Sw/Repair Tune Ups Body Work Oil Change :
15+ Years EUp. 24 Hr. Emergency Svc.Fa O 2 s6 4
SWe Don't Want To Be The Biggest FamilyOwned26Yrs352-326-2400
.JustThe Best "" 1406 Emerson St.,Lerburg across from Post Office w e:
Eric Wolf 352-630-2202
All About Appliances repairs and installs Emerson Street Automotive has been fam- Our mission is to
all brands of major appliances. We are a ily owned and operated for nearly 30 :
. ".provide you with quality,
small husband/wife company. Eric has years. Lori and Michael Farfaglia pur- : Y
over 15 years experience repairing appli- chased the business from Lori's family in professional, and a safe
ances and Lavinia (Vinnie) has over 20 2010. Lori's father, Terrill Davis stayed as electrical installation at a
years in business management experience. the onsite manager. Emerson Street is lo- fair p ce. We answer our
Together, we strive to offer you ,prompt, cated at 1406 Emerson Street, right next to p
Toehr esrv oofryupop,:" :p
professional, courteous and personal serv- the Post Office in Leesburg, Florida. We p:: hone 24/7, seek to
professional, courteous and personal serv-whl
ices far beyond your expectations, both by are opened Monday-Friday 7:30-5:30 and save you money while
Saturday 7:30-3:00. Phone: 352-326-2400. viding 1l,+ dl ($
phone and in your home. We respect you Saturday- .providingoutstanding
an We do all kinds of automotive repair in-
and your time and make every effort to be :: S c
dyour time and make every effort to be .. cluding light body work. We have state of : service that meets or
inand out of your home as quickly as p-
ad out ofyour home as quickly as pos- the art diagnostic equipment that takes the exceeds your expectations.
sible yet provide a thorough diagnosis and :
:vd .. guess out of repairing your car. We service Y an dp nd and
timely repair. We genuinely appreciate all all makes and models including SUVs', :
your business. ATV's, and RV's. trust us!
.. . . . .... . .. . .. . . . . .. . .. . .. . .. . ... .. . .. .. . . .. . .. . . . . .. . . . . .


A Affordable True
Service
I"Tiree Trimming & Removal
Lake Cleaning Dead Wooding
Moss Spraying Lic/Ins
Free Est. Senior Discounts
352-459-9428


RE-Roofs & Leak Repairs

InOME >NE
352 552-3386


Pet Grooming
Services


-i 352-301-8474 or 421-7761 REE TRIMMING
5n p-ry Robert Manning, Inc. & MORE
I Shower Doors *Tub Enclosures 352-551-4222
R^f" LiW z Grab Bars Bath Accessories -
Shingle, Tile, iL I 1 Mirrors Closet/Garage Storage
Metal, iand Rubie ir censed Bonded Insured ,i Sales Service Installation i Pim
Roof Systems R2902740 Lc/Ins FREE Estimates I Premier Scapes
(352) 669-6607 & Services Inc.
(3-f) ----660 i _y- Complete Tree Service
Sto g Trinmming Debris Removal
Ser vieStump Grinding Free Estimates
METAL TILE SHINGLE ROOFING ______ 352-308-5508
New Construction or Re-Roofing Spe azedStnrage So i ions
S 308 Oak Street Now is the time...
Lady Lake, FL 32159 To organize your life!
s352-430-2773 Custoin Closets, lIoic 011kv (;iarage's W4Cj 1sindowITA'
352-,430-2773 I Tailored To Your Needs,
www.sackrooflng.com 17 Years Exp. Seri-
Serving the Tri County Area For 26 Years Free homne Design Consuiltationi ________
S352-383-7058 407-718-6818 (Cell) U& #9BC1252465
WINDOWSS
*#1 IN ROOFING Ti We Install, Replace and Repair
Leak Repairs Shingles/Flat Roof IS c Most Major Brands Available
Lifetime Metal Roofs *Screen Rooms MoIst ajo Brand Avaiabl
Li. #CCC1329936 ___________________G___ Glass and Screen Repair
Villages Roofing and i John Philibert, Inc (3521 787-4545
Construction, Inc.<- For All Your Tile Needs
FRE OSTfASS Pergo, Ceramic Tile, 35 2 S9
Travertine, Vinyl & More 3 2"187-2735
eContracting, Inc. Replacement
OAF Certified Acrylic Windows
Shingles, Metal or Flat I El-/ILE LI ( Screen Rooms
Additions, Remodels, Renovations
Roof to Foundation 352-391 -5553
352-602-8794 I Backsplashes Re-Tile Tub & Shower
I C i507556 CI26899 Walls -Grab Bars Floors 352-602-9849
__ Handicap Baths # Repairs
Leaky Shower Pan SPARKLING
Ins./Lic 30 yrs exp. i WIN DOWS
MARK ANDERSON
We're Proud of Our Service reeRWindowNCleaning,
.... and you will be too! Screens, Tracks. FREE Estimates

Lac."obCall&Tree Svc Inc E ^ J.;.j^
|Palms/Hedges/Stump Grinding
Debris removal/Hauling
Fill Dirt/Clay/Grading/Driveways
I-IUN'EER R Li c/lIns Insurance Work 24 Hrs.
Free Estimates 352-455-7608
Metal, Tile & Shingle Re-roofs
Serving allbLake & 'To hav,-yor
Sumter Counties.
Mike HunterPs -11 --'llS r c-i
F1 License #RC29027482
Office (407) 947-2223 i -.-
Fax (407) 347-3472
mike@hunterroofingLLC.com I 1 H.


I


........................................................ .......................................................
0.,o,..ooW 0.,o,..ooW





DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 11, 2013


2
Legal Notices


100
Announcement

104 Special
Notices
NOTICE TO
ADVERTISERS
PLEASE CHECK YOUR AD FOR
ERRORS THE FIRST DAY IT APPEARS
SINCE THE DAILY COMMERCIAL WILL
NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
INCORRECT ADS AFTER THE FIRST
DAY OF PUBLICATION. IF YOU FIND
AN ERROR CALL THE CLASSIFIED
DEPARTMENT IMMEDIATELY AT
314-3278 OR 748-1955.
THE PUBLISHER ASSUMES NO
FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY FOR
ERRORS OR FOR COMMISSION OF
COPY. LIABILITY SHALL NOT EXCEED
THE COST OF THE PORTION OF
SPACE OCCUPIED BY SUCH ERROR.
CANCELLATIONS
CANCELLATION FOR ADS RUNNING
SATURDAY MUST BE MADE BY
FRIDAY BY 2:00, CANCELLATIONS
FOR SUNDAY & MONDAY MUST BE
MADE FRIDAY BY 5:00
106 Personals
SINGLE WHITE FEMALE in search of
SWM over 65. Outgoing, enjoys fes-
tivals, visiting Florida sites & more.
Riding motorcycle is a plus. 15 mi.
radius of Mt. Dora. 352-383-8065


134 Cemetery
Lots/Crypts
HILL CREST MEMORIAL GARDENS 2
lots side/side. $2000 obo Call
352-753-3370


200
At Your Service

201 Insurance
205 Adult Care
NOTICE
Florida Statute states, "It is a
misdemeanor for any person willfully,
knowingly, or intentionally to operate
or attempt to operate a family day
care home without a license or
without registering with the
department, whichever is applicable".
Florida Statute states, "No person
shall advertise a child care facility
without including within such
advertisement the state or local
agency license number of such
facility. The statute applies to anyone
with more than 1 unrelated child
in their home.

230 Cleaning
Service
DO YOU WANT A
STRESS FREE DAY.....
You deserve it!! I will clean your house
or office to make your life less stress-
ful. Relocated from PA. Servicing Lake
County area Very Dependable.
Reasonable Rates. Yrs. of Exp.
Pet sitting available.
Contact Denise
@717-574-1956


245 Financial

SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Contact us if your claim has been
denied or if you need help.
Over 30 yrs. exp.No fees or costs
unless your claim is approved.
Cooper Consulting
2228 South St., Leesburg
352-728-5552

250 Handyman
Hard working Lic. Business owner,
seeks to improve your home.
Ability to perform jobs including
Remodeling-TreeTrimming-Drywall-
Tiling, etc. References avail.
Call Robert Plante's
Home Maint. 352-484-3543


LAhh/' *WH HAtIK'MAN ;EFEUCE
Reliable, Dependable! One call does it
all Lic/Ins. 352-409-4059

268 Moving



Two Brothers Moving
1 Room or a Full House
FL. Reg. #1M1539
Russell & Todd Franks
Lic. & Ins. Call 352-793-8960



The Dafly Coninxiftii] -"f
rt^Ai- ',*r,- I,,:,k rt _^^


275 Plumbing
SINCE
1987
KILFY&
SONS, INC.
A Full Service Plumbing Company.
Lake 787-1904 Sumter 748-9500
CentralFloridaPlumber.com
VISIT OUR ONSITE SHOWROOM.
24 Hr. Emergency Service
Lic#CFC1426882

281 Roofing
#1 IN ROOFING
Villages Roofing & Construction Inc.
*Lea K w-r,-,," '.'.riirE:i Fai nR,o)f.
*Lifetime Metal Roofs. Free Roof Est.
352-314-3625. Lic. #CCC1329936



MCHALE ROOFING INC
Re-Roofs and Repairs, Tile, Metal,
Shingles Flat Roofs & Mobile Homes
Excel. Ref's Lic & Ins. C0C1328197
Call 352-255-2758

288 Tree
Service

MICHAEL'S TREE
& TRACTOR SERVICE
I FREE
rlSTIMATES

Stump Grinding, *Tree Trimming &
Removal *Box Blading, eBush
Hogging & Grading. Lic & Insured.
Call 352-504-1597


`0 I 'I I 111 [14 (qs
C -J ^The news sjut click a"ay!
www.dailycomnJercial.comn


288 Tree
Service


Land Ii riing *Tree Removal
*Trimming & Shaping
'Hauling &Stump 'Grinding
Free Est. **SPECIALS**
352-267-5720



300
Financial


400
Employment


410 Sales
ADVERTISING SALES
REPRESENTATIVE NEEDED FOR
LOCAL NEWSPAPER IN CLERMONT
Candidates will maintain existing
account base and solicit for new
businesses in South Lake County.
We are looking for a highly motivated
and organized professional individual
able to work independently. Reliable
transportation a must. Outside sales
experience preferred but will train the
right candidate.
Hours are 8am to 5pm. Base salary
plus commission. Benefits include
paid vacation, sick time, health and
dental insurance available and 401 k.
Please email resume and
cover letter to:
maria.cortinas@dailycommercial.com
or fax resume to: 352-365-8229


410 Sales
EARN MONEY FOR THE HOLIDAYS
PART TIME SALES
$$$$ START IMMEDIATELY $$$$
Join a professional marketing team
working in Lake County. I need ma-
ture, professionals that would like to
interact with people in local stores at
a kiosk while working on commission.
Current representatives average
$15-$20/hr. EARN EXTRA MONEY
working weekends and evenings.
THIS IS THE BEST
PART TIME JOB EVER
CALL OR FAX 800-781-1547


CROSSWORD PUZZLE


CROSSWORD
By THOMAS JOSEPH


ACROSS
1 Strong
wind
5 Outstand-
ing
9 Kick back
10 "American
Buffalo"
playwright
12 Caper
13 Durance
of "Small-
ville"
14 Being
rude,
in a way
16 Writer
Deighton
17 Luau dish
18 Flying
high
20 Icy
dessert
22 Feedbag
fill
23 Threw in
251975
Wimble-
don
champ
28 Like some
training
32 Frugal
34 Narc's
org.
35 Shoe hue
36 White-hot
38 Collectible
car
40 Silly one
41 "Super-
man" star
42 Computer
key
43 Louver
piece


44 Lip

DOWN
1 Long-
tailed
penguin
2 Star in
Aquila
3 Comfy
home
4 Removed
surgically
5 Last
letter
6 Kids' card
game
7 Clarke of
"Game of
Thrones"
8 Respect-
able
9 Grating
sounds
11 Distinct
flavors


Z____ T_--I
P A BTAJMHT I IN
A T MS I C E R S
P 0SMTT OW I T
A N T I I N YOU
SjC OFF AT OD D
NOLA FR

K E -E -I-fPIA K
E L LEC I TNTI
LATE H T IO N
S P I RO UNCLE
I s C R p1 I _K E R
Ae sIT e PIsaS T
Yesterday's answer


15 Contrary
to good
manners
19 Reactor
parts
21 Boxer
Buddy
24 Hires
25 Showy
flower
26 Black suit
27 Ginger-
bread
eater


29 Block-
heads
30 Past,
present,
and
future
31 Raring to
go
33 Key
37 Writer
Jaffe
39 Longoria
of
TV


NEW CROSSWORD BOOK! Send $4.75 (check/m.o.) to
Thomas Joseph Book 2, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475
= 1 12 13 14 = 5 16 1 18


I 1-V


Make your



escape!



Find a new job in



The Daily



Commercial



Employment



Listings.



Appearing daily!


a


"pced things I(P with Some
nev, employers.
The Daily Commercial
Employment Listings.
I ightlfingfast response!


=;I


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, November 11, 2013




Monday, November 11, 2013


415 Technology

NOW HIRING A FULL-TIME
WEB DESIGNER
Outside sales experience preferred.
Email resume to
design@silverlinegraphicdesign.com

RESTORE TELECOM IN LEESBURG
seeks full-time Electronics Tester.
Test functionality of equipment, circuit
boards by following procedures.
Mount components & parts. Docu-
ment issues & prepare equipment for
final quality inspection. HS
Diploma/GED & working knowledge of
computer operation required. Exp.
with electronic assembly, soldering,
troubleshooting preferred. Must be
able to stand/walk for full shift &
lift/move up to 50 pounds. DFWP/EOE
Submit resumes to 888-420-1861 or
humanresources@restortelecom.com
Or complete application at
912-1 Venture Ave., Leesburg

423 Accounting

BOOKKEEPER/HR NEEDED
For small Company.
Send Resume to:
BOOKKEEPINGHR@YAHOO.COM

430 Retail

RETAIL SALES CONSULTANTS
needed for retail lighting and fan store
located in The Villages. Applicants
must have retail lighting & fans sales
experience, plus clean driving record;
design and construction knowledge a
plus but not required. We offer base
pay plus commission, excellent health
benefits plus 401 k and paid time off.
Company is an Equal Employment Op-
portunity Employer and Drug-Free
Workplace; full-time and part-time
positions available.
Fax resume to: (352)399-2965 or
Apply in person at:
1115 Canal Street,
Lake Sumter Landing,
The Villages, FL 32162


Rural King
Amewfc's Fom&HSn Hoff M"
L... A. .mk.ft


432 Dental

DENTAL ASSISTANT
Experienced only. $15/hr.
Fax resume to: 352-787-9036
NO PHONE CALLS
DENTAL RECEPTIONIST
Professional & experienced only.
Fax resume to: 352-728-3373

435 Medical

FRONT OFFICE POSITION P/T
For Medical Office. Must have exp.
Fax resume to: 352-323-1894

MA, LPN & RADIOLOGY TECH.
[I l],:?Oka ,B-. u y ijrgeI'ni ,.
Email to:
medicalbillingtoday@ yahoo.com

MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST
F/T, exp. with knowledge of EMR for
Primary Care Practice in The Villages,
with opportunity for advancement.
Fax resume to: 407-217-2687

OPTICAL TECH / DISPENSER
Exp. Lab Tech need for busy optha-
molic practice in The Villages. Dis-
pensing experience a plus.
Apply in person:
Beacon Advanced Eye Care
1128 Bichara Blvd.
Lady Lake, FL 32159

RECEPTIONIST, FULL TIME
Needed for busy dermatology office.
Previous experience highly preferred.
References required. Will need travel
to Villages Office 2-3 times per/mo.
Please fax resume to
Lake Dermatology 352-365-0932

450 Trades

CLASS "A" OTR DRIVERS
No NYC. Benefits & Bonus. Exp'd and
new CDL Grads welcome.
Call Windy Hill at 800-864-3404


450 Trades

DRIVERS WITH CLASS A OR B, CDL
& DUMP TRUCK DRIVER EXP'D.
With/fork lift exp., and able to unload
construction supplies.
Apply at: 4399 CR 156 Wildwood
Call 352-689-0251










li ','TLJT lit T Y








ELECTRICIANS &
ELECTRICAL
APPRENTICES
Applicants must have experience and
a clean driving record, high school di-
ploma or equivalent. Company is an
EOE and Drug-Free Workplace. Excel-
lent health benefits, 401k and PTO;
MVR & Background checks.
Apply in person at:
PIKE'S ELECTRIC, INC.
719 Industrial Drive
Wildwood, FL 34785
FABRICATION PLUMBER
Experienced needed for large contrac-
tor in Wildwood. Benefits available.
DFWP, EEO. NO PHONE CALLS.
Submit resume
jmoser@nashincp-m.com
Daili Conmmeridal
"Your First Choice"
tr i In-Print & On-Litae__ e


RURAL KING FARM & HOME STORE
IS COMING TO LEESBURG!

Rural King is the fastest growing farm
and home store in the Midwest.
We have 67 stores in 8 states.
www.ruralking.com


All Retail Positions OPEN:
Cashiers, Sales Associates, Receiving Associates, Loaders, and
Managers at all levels including Department Managers

COME JOIN OUR TEAM!!! We have competitive wages and excellent benefits!

APPLY:
ONLINE AT www.ruralking.com/careers
EMAIL resume to careers@ruralking.com
OR APPLY AT THE STORE:
1715 North Citrus Blvd
9 AM 4 PM M-F


450 Trades

ENTRY LEVEL CONSTRUCTION
$35K $40K per year, Paid medical,
vacation & 401k. CDL & travel a must.
DFWP/EOE
Call 352-383-3159 Ext. 229

MAINTENANCE
Scottish Highlands maintenance posi-
tion available. Should be experienced
in irrigation, lawn mowing equipment
and pool maintenance. Excellent start-
ing pay with insurance package.
Background check required.
Call Chris at 352-483-6054

MAINTENANCE/GROUNDS PERSON
Fifty five plus community is looking for
a full time year round person that is
physically able to do some heavy
grounds work. Knowledge of plumb-
ing, irrigation systems and/or STP
plant operations an asset.
Please send resume to
fax 352-343-0100 or bring your
resume to Molokai Co Op, Inc.
1 Hawaiian Way Leesburg, FL 34788

SMALL TOOL MANUFACTURER
WILL TRAIN.
Apply in person at:
28415 Lake Industrial Blvd.
Tavares, FL. 32778

TIME DEFINITE SERVICES
Hiring Over The Road Drivers Class
A CDL required. All late model equip-
ment 2012 & newer. We pull 53'
Reefers. Great Pay & Bonuses. Must
be willing to run 48 states.
Apply at:
www.timedefinite.com
or call 352-399-7900x 1015

455
Restaurants/
Hotels/Clubs

BAK I ENUIEK& sEKVEK'b 1-I
MUST be exp'd. Evenings & Wknds.
Apply in person 3-5pm
VIC'S EMBERS SUPPER CLUB
7940 US Hwy. 441 Leesburg, FL

DELIVERY DRIVERS & PREP
Must have own transportation.
Apply in person at: Tai's #2 in Eustis
1600 S. Bay St., Eustis

| DISHWASHER &COOK EXP'D.
EUSTIS. Call 352-357-1887
I DISHWASHER/
COOK, SERVER
EUSTIS
Call 352-357-1887

470 General

SCHOOL BUS
DRIVERS NEEDED
Training provided.
Lake County Schools, Transportation
352-728-2561 or
Apply online: www.lake.kl 2.fl.us


470 General





CAI RRIE


APPLY IN
PER









COLLISION TECH. EXPERIENCED
With benefits.




SEE DAVIS COLEMAN
PHILLIPS BUICK
COLLISION CENTER
3320 Hwy. 441, Fruitland Park, FL

CUSTODIAN PART TIME
Experienced in light maintenance.
Send resume to:
communityumcfp@gmail.com
or mail to:
COMMUNITY UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
309 College Ave.
Fruitland Park.t FL 34731

DELIVERY PERSONNEL
Office equip dealer seeks reliable per-
son to deliver equip & supplies, assist
in inventory control & light bldg.
main. Must have neat appearance,
good communication skills, able to
follow written/oral directions, & be in-
surable. Must be able to safely oper-
ate a box truck. Heavy lifting req'd.
100+ Ibs. Please do not respond if
you can't pass a drug test, MVR &
background check. M-F 8am 5pm.
Apply in person at:
Mon.-Fri. 9am -12pom.
2854 West Main St.
Leesburg, FL.













s Dablu Coinimeadal


Your ir~stho ice"
In-Print & On-Line


k iiiT.r.m........ .i:..
iiiiiiiiii&LAELLULLUPE-


h~


470 General

NURSERY WORKER
FOR CHURCH P/T
On Sunday mornings, some Wed.
evenings & as needed. Background
check required. Must be mature &
love children.
Apply in person M-F 9am 2pm
First Presbyterian Church
200 S. Lone Oak Dr.
Leesburg




500
Pets/Animals



501 Pets
For Sale

BICHON FRISE/POO PUPPIES Male/fe-
male, health cert. $250/$400.
352-669-3649.

CHIHUAHUA PUP 8 wks., male, health
cert. parents on premises. Pure
bred, no papers. $250 Cash. Grove-
land. 352-429-2505

FREE PUPPIES MDIX BREED gorgeous
fluffy & cute. Call 874-2610 Lady
Lake area.

KITTENS Free to a good home. 7
weeks old please call (352)702-5591
THREE PUPPIES LEFT. 150.00 dep. and
750.00 due. Available @ 8 weeks
NOV 18. 352-748-0912

560 Pet
Supplies

BIRD CAGE, Excel. cond. white w/toys,
16"x1 4"x1l7" tall. $45.360-1209

BIRD CAGES. Asking $35. The Villages.
Call 352-753-1834
DOG CRATE folding 36 x 23 x 25. $50.
352-728-1363


600
Merchandise
Mart


601 Antiques

DOLL HOUSE wooden, w/39 accesso-
ries. Very nice. $100. 602-1055

602 Arts/Crafts

RUG HOOKING EQUIPMENT Traditional,
$100.352-748-3580

603 Collectibles

AUGUSTA XIl Color Print 25 x 30, '92.
Framed/signed. $65. 330-4484

BUYING Baseball, Football, Basketball,
Non-sports cards 1870 to 1980.
Autographs, memorabilia, bobbin
heads. Sets, singles. No collection to
large. Call: 352-589-7981 or Email:
sportscards4john@aol.com
TIN SIGNS, reproductions, Packard &
Chevrolet Truck. $10. 874-5418

604 Furniture

BED Queen size, small pillow top. Great
shape. $99.352-408-5357

BEDROOM SET 6 piece Ethan Allen, 2
twin beds. $800 obo Call
352-793-4160

CHAIR barrel style, swivels, white. $50.
352-326-8127
CHAIRS 3 oak counter height, w/woven
seats. $120. 352-728-1363

CHAIRS 4 French Provincial, maple.
Like new. $100. 343-0587

CHAISE LOUNGE wicker rattan w/cush-
ions. $40.352-742-1422
COFFEE & END TABLES, inlaid woods,
ball & claw feet, elegant, gold trim,
sacrifice $475. 787-7048

COFFEE TABLE Oak, excel cond. $75
Call 352-343-0161

COFFEE TABLE square 38"x38"x15"
inlaid oak. $95 obo. 352-343-6165

COMPUTER DESK. Good cond. $50.
Call 352-396-5739
CORNER TV CABINET, bi-fold doors
wood. 75.715-671-8152
DINING ROOM TABLE rattan, 4 chairs
like new. $500. 352-406-5419
END TABLES (2) & Coffee table w/lift
top. Oak. $50. 352-314-3657

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER, 5'Lx3'H, 2
glass doors. $60 352-561-1167

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER, vintage
claw foot legs, solid oak, w/lead
glass doors, solid oak cabinet/mi-
crowave cart & burgundy recliner.
$375 obo takes all. MUST SEE
352-357-1647

ETHAN ALLEN 6 pcs Dining table
$1,000. Oriental rug 4X6 Genuine
$600. Hammock and frame LL Bean
new in box $100. Lawn Mower Gas
Powered $50. Electric edger new
$75. 352-735-8084
LOVESEAT 58" Double recliner, beige
cloth. Wall hugger. Like new. $400.
Call 352-728-4847

MATTRESS & BOX SPRING Full. $75.
Call 352-460-0458

MATTRESS & BOX SPRING King, clean.
$100. SOLD

MATTRESS & BOX SPRING Queen Pil-
lowtop. $130. 352-787-3249


vim m m OR w Wk. 777, wpm TR


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DAILY COMMERCIAL


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DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 11, 2013


604 Furniture

MATTRESS & box spring, double, Serta
perfect sleeper. $85. 330-0874

MEDIUM BROWN LEATHER COUCH,
chair and ottoman, wood/metal
cocktail and 2 side tables.Purchased
from Rooms to Go in July 2012. Still
in brand new condition, sofa is
86"$1150.00. SOLD!!!I

PATIO SET 44" square glass top table,
w/4 swivel rockers. Excel. cond.
$275. Call 352-446-9846

ROCKER/RECLINER, beige, great
shape. $30 Call 352-753-1170

SOFA BED Cream color. $100.
352-561-4940

SOFA by Lane, brown leather. Good
cond. $100 Call 337-501-2198

SOFA with skirting, floral with wood
trim. $99. Call 352-321-4019
SOFA, England, full size. good cond.
$99. Call 352-385-7359

TABLE & 6/CHAIRS Duncan & Phyfe.
Asking $200. Call 352-267-8693

TABLE 45" glass top, & 4 wrought iron
chairs. $75. Like new. 460-0728

TABLE, Heart Shaped, 3 tier. brown,
good cond. $8 Call 352-504-6689

TELEVISION STAND, good cond. $25.
Call 352-636-1352

VANITY Girls, w/bench. $10. Call
352-742-2716

WICKER CHAIR w/seat cushion, excel
cond. $25. Call 352-357-2218

WICKER ROCKER w/metal legs & cush-
ion, very nice $100 352-409-6691

605 Appliances

CHEST FREEZER 5'. Works good.
$100. 352-669-6742
DISCOUNT
APPLIANCE
Repair-Sales-Service Most Repairs
$60 Plus Parts




WASHER, DRYER,
REFRIGERATOR
"Don't Toss It
Fix It For Less"
Buying Clean
Washers & Dryers
Days, Evenings & Weekends
Call Now
352-874-1238


605 Appliances

Appliances With Warranties
$75 & up! Used Beds all sizes!
*Buy *rii0 *Trjadd *Fast delivery
Call BuZZy's 352-315-9886
www.buzzysbeds.com
DISHWASHER GE, White, built-in, new
cond. $75 Call 352-357-5941

DRYER gas, works great, white, used.
$99.352-315-9886
FREEZER Avanti, 20Wx20 1/4Dx33H..
works good. $100 715-520-7156

REFRIGERATOR 21 cuft. Whirlpool,
stainless steel, 2 yrs. old. $485. Call
337-501-2198 Fruitland Park
REFRIGERATOR Kenmore, side/side, ice
& water in door. Excel. cond. $300
obo Call 352-751-0552
STAND MIXER new, 5 quart, 10 speed,.
3 blades. $75. SOLD!Hr'

606 Electronics
DISH NETWORK RECEIVER w/remote &
manual. $10 352-988-7004

GAME PSP Sony brand new in box.
$100 Call 352-455-3342
GARMIN GPS Nuvi 50. New in box.
$75. After 4. 352-793-7982
PALM ORGANIZER Sony, w/keyboard &
accessories. $20 352-324-2559
PRINTER Brother MFC495CW. Extra
ink. $50.224-356-6857
SPEAKERS (4) Boston, acoustics. Micro
11 Ox. $50 Call 352-385-7359
TELEVISION 27", works great $50 Call
352-326-5527
TELEVISION 55" Hitachi. $100. obo.
Call 863-287-1468
TELEVISION RCA 32" not flat screen.
$25. Call 352-735-1647
TELEVISION, 51", Hitachi, big box style.
$100. Works great. 352-383-0043
TOUCH BOOK READER Sony, Red, ex-
cel. cond. $50 Call 352-516-5364

624 Children's
items
BABY BATHTUB, toddler potty & sassy
seat. $15. 352-455-7557.

PACK N PLAY & WALKER almost new.
$49 will split. 352-253-9236
VIDEO PLAYER VHS, & 25 Disney
tapes. Great gift. $25. 793-1285


626 Farm
Equipment
BUSH HOG 6', not rusty, needs work.
$250.352-242-1038

630 Garage Sales
FRUITLAND PARK
2915 Arbor Ridge Blvd. Friday -
Sunday 8 am until 3 pm.
Indoor/Outdoor Furniture, Kitchen
Items, Home Decor, Clothes, Craft
Supplies, Handcrafted Items More!

LADY LAKE
Sat. -Mon. 8am-?? 912 Jacaranda
Dr. April Hills Subd. Power tools,
grill, adult clothing, & misc.
LEESBURG
St. James Episcopal Church Annual
Bazaar. WEDNESDAY Only! 11/13.
10 3pm. 204 Lee St. Homemade
lunch! Come check out our various
booths.

635 Garden
CONCRETE FOUNTAIN, no pump. Good
cond. $100 Call 352-735-1570

DUMP TRAILER Craftsman, steel, box is
30"Wx48"Lxl12"D. $75. 357-3293
GRILL Members Mark. 4 burner + side.
$99 obo. 352-308-7474
LAWN MOWER elec. w/bag. Used 3
times, like new. $95 307-9462
LAWN MOWER Troy Bilt self propelled
w/bagger. $100 352-636-6374
LAWN TRACTOR, Craftsman 22.5hp,
50" cut, runs great. $200.
352-406-5419
MOWER 22" & GAS TRIMMER $95 for
both. Call 352-250-1467
MOWER Murray Briggs & Stratton 20"
cut. 3.5hp classic. $65 343-4445
ROTOTILLER Rally, 3.5hp, 14" CRT,
$75. Call 352-669-8833
TRACTOR LIFT, Craftsman, nearly new.
$100 Call 352-365-2297
TREE SALE
*Oaks, Sycamores, Cypress, Fig,
Mulberry, Cherry Laurel, etc.
* Palms, Queen, Pindo or Sago
*Special 6' +/- Oaks $10 or 15/$100
*Cypress or Oaks up to 12'
CATT'S TREES
352-669-1618
WEED EATER Feather weight gas,
String trimmer. $50. 352-552-7942

640 Guns
ARMAS BOST, 12 gauge double barrel,
3" magnum shot gun. Excel cond.
$400.352-793-2303


640 Guns

COLT Agent .38 revolver, 6 shot. Excel
cond. $425 Call 352-324-4125

COLT M-4, model 6920 (AR-15). Never
fired, in box. $1250. 321-0482

ITHICA Mod. 72 Saddle gun 22 WMRF
$500, Browning 12 GA Pump $500,
Savage 22 Over 20 GA $350.
352-748-3571

MILLET RED DOT SIGHT w/ rings, excel
cond. $40. Call 352-357-2880

MUZZLE LOADER Wolf Mag. 50 Cal.
Breach brake, camo syn stock. Ano-
dized finish. Fiber optic sites, raised
scope rings. Tasco 3-9 scope.
$200. 352-638-8476

REMINGTON Model 770 .30 caliber
w/scope & carry case. Brand new,
never fired. $375. 352-459-8724

RIFLE SCOPE Swift, 3-9 w/rings. Excel
cond. $30 Call 352-357-2880

SEARS WINCHESTER .22 caliber bolt
action, excel. $150. SOLD!!!!

SMITH & WESSON snub nose, 38 spe-
cial revolver. Like new, $425 FIRM.
Call 352-793-4019


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Dalir Coinmercial
'Your First Choice" In-Print & Online


649 Medical

PICK UP TRUCK LIFT for Scooter.
$1500 obo. 352-793-4970

WHEELCHAIR red motorized Jazzy, 2
covers, car lift, small metal ramp
$1,500.352-326-2557

WHEELCHAIR, Portable. Like new. $50.
352-217-4809

650 Computers
& Equip

PRINTER HP office jet 4315, all in one.
Good cond. $50 Call 352-272-9770

652 Articles
For Sale

BED SPREAD Queen, beautiful. Good
backing. $65. 352-536-1744

BORDEN'S ICE CREAM SIGN, neon light
1950's. $70. 352-343-3436

CANISTER SET, 4 pcs. w/cookie jar,
Ducks. $35. 352-753-8361

CHINA service for 8, includes serving
pieces.. $70 Call 352-455-6427


24


652 Articles
For Sale

CHINA service for 8, includes, serving
pieces, excel. $100 357-1363

CHRISTMAS DISHES Service for 8, plus
serving pieces. $60. 352-750-0552

CHRISTMAS TREE 7' LED, pre-lit, in
box. 2yr. old. $50. 742-7256

CHRISTMAS TREE and beautiful hand-
made tree skirt. $45. 787-0410

CHRISTMAS TREE Pre-lit, 5.5'. $35.
Call 352-324-0583.

CHRISTMAS TREE, 7', (Mountain King)
w/storage bag. $75. 352-748-9611

CHRISTMAS TREES (2) & other Christ-
mas items. $75 all. 989-284-2966

CIVILIAN GAS MASK, new, 3 extras fil-
ters. $100. 407-310-6628

COFFEE MAKER KitchenAid. New. Paid
$189. Sell for $100.352-978-7461

DESIGNER CLOTHING Chicos/Cache,
10/pcs. $100. obo 321-246-4371


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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, November 11, 2013




Monday, November 11, 2013


652 Articles
For Sale

DISNEY VHS TAPES & Player. (25).
$50. Call 352-250-4711

FLEA MARKET ITEMS Jeans, tops, Holi-
day decor & more. $79. 793-8102

GAS GRILL Weber, 2 burners w/gas
bottle & cover. Good cond. $250
Call 352-446-9846

GAS GRILLE w/side burner, used once
w/cover. $65. Call 352-636-1352

HOT TUB Leisure Bay, w/lounger, 2
seats, & cover. Works excel.. you
must move. $600 obo Call
352-365-2906

JACKET Florida State men's Ig., heavy,
$25. Call 352-589-8064

JACKET Harley Davidson blk, XL. New,
not leather. $100. 352-243-1458

JACUZZI TUB used twice, $2,500 Call
352-365-1724

JEWELRY BOX, 46"Hx15"Dx17"W.
lined drawers $100. 352-603-4113

LEATHER JACKET BLACK, MEN'S size
40-44. $75.352-742-2856

MAILBOX w/key lock, large, white
w/post. $35. SOLDH!

MANNEQUIN female, 5'6". $50. Call
904-673-3727

MEN'S CLOTHING XLg shirts 40-44W
shorts. 10 pcs. $20. 321-246-4371

MODEL TRAIN N-Scale layout, w/track
84X64X38. $99 Call 407-733-3022

ORNAMENTS for Christmas tree. Large
box. $25. Call 352-324-0583

PAPER CUTTER 18" brand new in box.
$40. 352-728-1363

PICTURE Erte, Art deco, 34 x 45, gold
frames. $65. Call 352-324-3274

RUG like new, sunlight yellow,
cotton/wool. 8' x 10'. Was $800.
Now $150. 352-728-1363

SHAMPOOER Bissell, works good. $75.
352-365-1437

SINGING, DANCING SANTA 5'. Excel
cond. $30. Call 352-348-9946

SKECHERS shape ups 10 wide men's,
NEW. $50 Call 352-347-7350

SMOKER gas, Masterbuilt, never used.
$75. 352-446-9846

TRAIN Radio control, large, battery op-
erated. $25. Call 352-324-0583

TUXEDO Men's, Coat/Pants/Shirt, size
48-42. $65.352-217-4809

VACUUM Orick XL upright, like new
$100 obo. Call 321-246-4371

655 Musical
Instruments

BANJO 5 string, Kay. W/accessories.
$225. Call 352-343-6608

GUITAR acoustic Hohner (case &
stand, great shape. $100 323-3518

KEYBOARD Yamaha PSR730 w/stand.
Excel cond. $100. 343-9279

KEYBOARD Yamaha, Excel. cond. Ask-
ing $195. Mt Dora. 419-308-6345

ORGAN Hammond electric, Cedarwood.
Excel. cond. $100. 352-617-0398

ORGAN Lowrey C300, manuals. $100.
Eustis. 207-650-9838

TRUMPET & CASE good cond $70.
352-343-1037

VIOLIN w/case. Full size. Excel cond.
$45.SOLD

674 Exercise Equipment

AB DOER. New. $65. Call
352-460-4741

RECUMBENT BIKE Weflo. Pursuant
2.OR. $65. SOLD!
TIIGH MASTER & GUT BUSTER, new.
$25 for all. 352-669-1163
TREADMILL Proform, works good. $80
Call 352-366-0225


675 Sports/
Recreation

BICYCLE 26" girls, Sears, 1 speed,
fenders, basket, A1 $49. 728-6835

BICYCLE Diamond Back, Sorrento
Sport, Men's 26", 21 speed, excel.
cond. $75.352-259-0633

BICYCLE Men's Schwinn, Trail Way Hy-
brid, alum. $95. 434-5314
BICYCLE Schwinn men's, 27" multi
speed. $30. SOLD!!!!

BICYCLES 3 Wheel, rebuilt. Large Seat
& Basket. $150. 1 -352-343-6608

CORN HOLE BOXES (2). New w/8 bags.
$60. Call 859-512-8009

GOLF BAG ladies, brand new. $50 Call
352-323-8031

GOLF CLUBS brand new Ladies over-
sized in box $90. 352-735-6927

GOLF CLUBS Rawlings, bag plus pull
cart. $60 obo. 352-787-1539
GOLF SET irons, oversized woods,
w/bag. Like new. $50. 729-2595
GOLF SHOES LADIES, Foot Joy, 7.5
narrow. $75 obo. 352-323-8031
LIFE VESTS (2) Inflatable comfortable,
easy to store. $90. SOLD

TREADMILL Ride Strider 3360. $100.
352-406-3988

WET SUIT Men's large. Excel cond.
$50. Call 352-242-0152

685 Tools/
Machinery

CHAIN SAW Poulan Pro, 35cc, 16" bar,
2 chains (1 is new). $55.
352-343-1037

CHAINSAW 16" Echo. Like new. $200.
352-728-1363

DRILL PRESS on stand. Craftsman
15.5". Excel. $98. 352-250-1515

GENERATOR DEK 5650 watts, 2hr. List
$629. Now $380.352-483-6120

GENERATOR Porter Cable. 5250watts.
$450.. Call 352-343-6608

LADDER Extends 12'6". Excel. cond.
$50. 352-553-8364

LADDER Metal, 3 step, w/tray. $65.00.
Call 352-748-0702

SAWZALL Makita model 2RVT3000.
$70. Cell 305-215-4463

TOOLS Yard & Workshop. Variety $100.
Call 352-748-2415

WORK BENCH 35H x 72W x 26D. $40.
352-874-2806




800
Real Estate
For Rent



802 Vacation
Rentals

FLORIDA Winter Vacation, lease to
own at Lake Weirs Big Lake Village
in Weirsdale. A 55 senior community.
Lease for 3mo or more. 2 people,
1 sm. pet, park rules apply.
$950/mo with lease money going on
purchase of homes.
Priced at $9500. up.
12701 SE Sunset Harbor Rd.
Gate Open Wed. & Sat. 9am 5pmr
Go to biglakevillage.com
By owner 352-434-7276

806 Houses
Unfurnished

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 & 2br from
-$350/month$$-
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375


806 Houses
Unfurnished

CENTER HILL 5/2/2 house, $1,000/mo
1st, last + security. 352-568-7486,

LEESBURG 2/1, $590. Lease/purchase.
352-269-4051

LEESBURG, Legacy 55+, 2/2.
$975/mo. Call 352-638-3046

LEESBURG, Sunnyside area 1/1 Cot-
tage on Lk. Harris. $550/mo. $200
dep. 352-551-4222

MT DORA HANDYMAN $200/mo, 1/1.
321-244-6555
HEN I ALS
LONG TERM & UNFURN. RENTALS IN
SOUTH LAKE COUNTY.
ROCKER REALTY 352-394-3570
Ask For Janet or Emily
RockerRealtylnc.com

SILVER LAKE FOREST 3BR 2BA
2055sf, 2 car garage 10041 Silver
Bluff Dr. $1100. 352-314-2668.
GunnPropertyServices.com

UMATILLA HANDYMAN $200/mo. 2/1.
321-244-6555

807 Apartments
Unfurnished

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375

EUSTIS
All remodeled Apts!
3 Bedrooms
Special starting at
$675 Only $350 Dep. Pet OK.
352-357-5675


SUNWUGO
VILLAGE
LEESBURG MOVE-IN SPECAIL
2 BRS. 1.5 BA, TOWNHOUSES
352-728-1955
LEESBUHRG
1ST MO. FREE!
SPANISH VILLAGE
Pool, great location!
Furn. Efficiency, incl.
util. & cable $700/mo.
2/1 apt. $600/mo.
Furn. $700/mo + util.
352-728-5555

LEESBURG downtown 1/1, all utilities
incl. $645/mo + $250 damage dep.
Call 352-552-0181

LEESBURG
FIRST MONTH $99
MOVE IN SPECIAL!
*2/1 $500/dep.
e2/1 w/W/D hookup $550/dep.
*2/2 w/W/D hookup $600/dep.
Call 352-516-1244
Ask for Tina

LEESBURG, 1/1, with W/D, CHA, car-
port. $450 plus security. 787-2715
Ext. 225

LEESBURG,
92/1 $595/mo. + dep.
*2/1.5 $625/mo. + dep.
No Pets. Call 352-787-5885

LEESBURG, Duplex VERY CLEAN 2/1,
no pets $550/mo + dep. 551-6772

LYN TERRACE
Eustis
352-357-7332
www.lynterrace.com
Great Move-In
Specials & Free Gifts!
*1 & 2 Bedroom Units
*All 1st Floor -No Stairs!

PALM BROOK APTS.
LEESBURG
1 br': il31.r-.Ij -..S4,0i
Payment on security deposit.
Call 352-787-1912 TDD 711


EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY ___________


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how fast the phone rings.


The Daily Commercial Classifieds

(352) 314-FAST (3278)


808 Apartments
Furnished

EUSTIS clean 1/1, util. & cable incl.
Adults only. No pets. Background
check. $200 dep. & $160 weekly.
Call 352-357-9169
LEESBUHRG
1ST MO. FREE!
SPANISH VILLAGE
Pool, great location!
Furn. Efficiency, incl.
util. & cable. $700/mo.
2/1 apt. $600/mo.
Furn. $700/mo + util.
352-728-5555

809 Roommate
Wanted

FRUITLAND PARK in 55+ park, util. in-
cluded Male or female. $500/mo
Call 352-455-6794

810 Duplexes

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375


810 Duplexes
LEESBURG 2/2, Paulling Dr. $650/mo.
1st, Last, Security & Good Refer-
ences. Call 352-787-0004
LEESBURG 3/2 with garage. $770 mo.
+ $600 dep. Ref's req'd. Call Mike
352-223-5300

811 Condos
Townhouses
CLERMONT, 2/1, $750/mo. Vacation
Village #74, 10301 Hwy. 27.
352-223-3493
LEESBURG 2br/2ba, bonus room,
patio villa, gated community,
pool/gym. NO PETS or SMOKERS,
references required. $850/month.
352-978-3724
LEESBURG W. Main St. 2/2 Condo.
Avail. $700/mo. Call 352-455-5095

812 Rooms to
Rent
LOOKING TO RENT A ROOM in Lake
Cnty/Tavares. Professional male,
clean. Call Tim 352-217-7069

813 Homes
To Share
FRUITLAND PARK in 55+ park, util. in-
cluded. Male or female. $500/mo
Call 352-455-6794
LEESBURG Private bedroom & bath
with rest of house privileges.
$125/wk. Call 352-504-5407


816 Commercial
Property

LEESBURG
Warehouses w/Offices
2315-25 Griffin Rd. 1,150 up to
12,400sf. Starts at $300/mo.
Office/Showroom
1607 Hwy. 441 $850/mo
Small Shop or Office
2204 Citrus Blvd (441)
$320/mo., includes utilities
352-787-0004
SABAL PROFESSIONAL SUITES II
The Villages/Lady Lake
New all inclusive office suites.
Receptionist, conference room,
full kitchen, deskw/chairs, phones,
copier/fax, internet, wi-fi, all office
needs in one low payment.
JUST SIT DOWN, PLUG IN,
GO TO WORK.
Conveniently located on CR 466
East of Rolling Acres.
Contact Preferred Realty Mgmt. Group
(352)633-1900

819
Manufactured
Homes Rental

ALTOONA SPECIAL!!
3/2 $560 plus $300 dep.
2/1 $475/mo. w/$300 dep.
And RV Lot $290/mo. w/$100 dep.
352-735-2071 or 352-636-6800

DailJ Commeidal
"Your First Choice"
In-Print & On-Line


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thousand words....


The Daily Commercial

Classifieds

(352) 314-FAST

(3278)


DAILY COMMERCIAL





DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 11, 2013


819
Manufactured
Homes Rental

ATTENTION SENIORS AND ADULTS
Never lived in. Brand New 66x14, 3/2,
in nice quiet park in Eustis.
$650/mo + utilities. Sorry NO KIDS.
Call 352-589-4407

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
EUSTIS on 44A East of Eustis 2/1 for 1
or 2 people w/experience in han-
dling horses. $350/mo. + elec. &
approx. 1 hr work in barn, early am
daily. Background check is req'd.
Call Jan for details. 589-5825

LEESBURG 3/2, beautiful & clean on
dead-end street W/D hookup
$750/mo. Call Bill 603-858-1160

LEESBURG 6 mi. West. 2/1, CHA.
$525/mo. + security. 409-2492

WILDWOODAREA
2/2 $650/mo dbl. wide (Adult Park)
Call 352-745-8620




900
Real Estate
For Sale



903 Homes
For Sale

FLORIDA WINTER VACATION, lease to
own at Lake Weirs Big Lake Village
in Weirsdale. A 55 senior community.
Lease for 3/mo or more. 2 people,
1 sm. pet, park rules apply.
$950/mo with lease money going on
purchase of homes.
Priced at $9500. up.
12701 SE Sunset Harbor Rd.
Gate Open Wed. & Sat. 9am -5pm
Go to biglakevillage.com
By owner 352-434-7276




LEESBURG
Home for sale $3500. Great buy!
2br 2ba, remodeled bathrooms,
modern day accents in kitchen.
Age Qualified
Call 352-234-8369
LEESBURG 2/1, $590. Lease/purchase.
352-269-4051




LEESBURG
Home for sale $7,500. Won't last!
2br 2ba, new carpet, freshly painted.
Waterview
Age Qualified
Call 352-234-8369
MT DORA HANDYMAN $200/mo, 1/1.
321-244-6555

UMATILLA HANDYMAN $200/mo. 2/1.
321-244-6555
WATERFRONT HOMES LEESBURG
Immaculate 2/2 almost new on Lake
Harris Lagoon. $259,900
FRUITLAND PARK
3/2 canal front, Lake Griffin
$144,900
Call 352-787-4584
GalbreathRealty.com

910 Condos/Townhouses

CLERMONT
FOR SALE BY OWNER (352)
394-1574 2-BEDROOM 2-BATH
2-CAR GARAGE TILE AND CARPET
THROUGHOUT, NEW APPLIANCES
INCLUDING WASHER AND DRYER.
A/C RECENTLY UPGRADED. PER-
FECT FOR YEAR ROUND LIVING OR
SNOWBIRD. MOVE IN READY. IM-
MEDIATE OCCUPANCY. ONE STORY
WITH VAULTED CEILING @ GREAT
ROOM. LOW MONTHLY H.O.A. FEES
OF $130.00 INCLUDES LAWN CARE
AND IRRIGATION. CLUBHOUSE WITH
POOL AND TENNIS COURT. BRING
YOUR GOLF CART AND CLUBS AND
ENJOY GREEN VALLEY'S 18 HOLE
CHAMPIONSHIP GOLF COURSE.


910 Condos/Townhouses

MULTIPLE ADORABLE/ AFFORDABLE
CONDOS FOR RENT! DON'T MISS
OUT!
4- 2/2'S $699
1-1/1 $625
1-2/2 $750. 407-359-9500




1000
Manufactured
Homes



1001 Mfd Homes
For Sale

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
EUSTIS 2/1 in 55+ park. Shed & car-
port & A/C porch. $2,500. Call
352-357-5556

LEESBURG Completely renovated park
model. New appliances and floors.
Lots of shade. Partially furnished.
AC/Heat, Washer/Dryer. Pet friendly
park located on Haines creek where
fishing is great. Dock access. Lot rent
$310.00 a month. $11,500 OBO. Call
for appointment. 906-440-1020
LEESBURG, 14'-60', '91, 55+ commu-
nity, 2/2, newly remodeled. $4,000.
352-348-7376

LEESBURG, Haines Creek, leading to
Chain of Lakes, fish from your dock,
work on the old boathouse. Enjoy
the 3/2 on 2 ac. Call Adelee Richey
Vangie Berry Realty 352-242-7907
MT. DORA, dbl. wide 2/2, w/Ig. carport,
scn porch, den, W/D, shed, new
CHA. 407-399-4491
SENIORS AND ADULTS
NEW and NEWER
Homes in a nice quiet part in Eustis.
$25,000 $45,000 Financing avail.
Only 3 left! Lot rent $350 per mo.
Call 352-589-4007
TAVARES 2/2, beautiful waterfront
home on the Chain of Lakes. 55+
park. 1767sf. 34'x12' family rm.
New sea wall & boat lift. Inside laun-
dry & tons of storage. Call
608-697-2095

1002 Mfd
Homes
W/ land
For Sale
LEESBURG, 2/2 in 55+ park. Only
$32/mo. fees. Incl. land, porch,
shed, new roof, a/c, windows.
$46,900. 352-360-0028

1012 RV Lots

ALTOONA- SPECIAL!!
3/2 $560 plus $300 dep.
2/1 $475/mo. w/$300 dep.
And RV Lot $290/mo. w/$100 dep.
352-735-2071 or 352-636-6800




1100
Recreation



1101 Boats

BAYLINER '09, 17.5' Model 175 Bow-
rider, I/0 Merc Cruiser, bimini top
plus accessories & trailer. Low time.
$9,400. Tavares SOLD!!!

BOAT V BOTTOM ALUMINUM. $400.
Call 352-217-9937
COBIA BOW RIDER 15'. 50hp Johnson,
magic tilt trailer. $1200 obo. Call
352-999-2654

1120 Marine
Equip/
Supplies

OUTBOARD MOTOR 1952, 15hp evin-
rude, for parts. $99. 589-4712


1150 RV&
Campers
CAR TOTE for Motorhome. $900. Call
352-748-2415

FLEETWOOD FLAIR '04, 34', w/2
slides. 6,800 actual miles. Excel.
cond. $34,000 obo Call
352-617-0078
FORD-250 2203. Super Duty Crew
Cab, 7.3L Powerstroke diesel, 161K
miles, 4x4, automatic, air, power
windows, power doors, power seats,
sliding 5th wheel hitch with goose
neck adapter, power programmer,
5" exhaust, roof mount wind deflec-
tor, accessory tailgate. Kelley Blue
Book $14,300. 2005 Keystone
Montana M3400RL, 37', 4 slides,
washing machine, dryer, central
vacuum system, electric fireplace, 2
a/c units. NADA average retail
$32,875. Will sell as package
$42,000. 402-926-6177.
PORTABLE TANK of Gray water. 15 gal-
lon. $50. 352-728-1363

1200
Transportation

1205 Autos
BUICK LeSabre Limited '04, loaded ex-
cel. cond. well maintained 98K mi.
$6,000. 352-394-2275

CAMERO RS '67, 327, auto, ps, pb.
$15K. 352-603-1883
CASH PAID FOR JUNK CARS! I
$300 and up. Call 352-771-6191




2 6010
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121 010ces
2 0I0 2 F






120 0Aiaio











1210a Mlsscyles/aGie;E 5
Mopded
iscRaYL.d t Stedl I$R,000.










Cal352 -7568-1415 Ldae
HARLEY DAVIDSON 2005. FLHTCUI


TiGieUltra ClassicEecr Guide; Elc1k,


low miles, extended warranty,
$11210, AmaMyers77@yahoo.com
415-553-2192

HELMETS (2) HJC full face silver blk.
$100 for pair. 352-589-1384
HONDA 4 wheel '08, Foreman 500
4x4, elec. shift/ps, retiree owned,
garage kept, 147 hrs used, excel
condo. $4,900. MiketClermont
352-396-9797
HONDA GOLD WING wltrailer. *96.
Mopeds

































1500cc. New tires, battery, alterna
tor. $4999 Firm. 856-371-3556
SCREAMING EAGLE Harley Davidson1









'01 FLTRSEI2, touring bike, blue in
color. 1550cc. Clean, chromed out
and priced to sell at $10,500 OBO.









:.aosdfIer3j and trunk with multiple
CD changer, cruise. 352-516-2172
TAIL LIGHTS for Honda Gold Wing, $80.


1230 Vans
CHEVROLET CDAVDSONVERSION VAN 93.FLHTCU












Runs good $550.352 552 7999
1240Tri Glide Ultra Classic, Trucksike, black,
low miles, extended warrantyight Duty
$11200DDGE DAKO, AmaMyers77@ah4 door, 6 cylin.com
415-55der, 60K, $11,300 Call 365-21926238
HELMETS (2) HJC full face silver/blk.
$10O0 for pair. 352-589-1384
HONDA 4 wheel '08, Foreman 500
4x4, elec. shift/ps, retiree owned,
garage kept, 147 hrs used, excel
cond. $4,900. Mike/Clermont
352-396-9797
HONDA GOLD WING w/trailer. '96.
1 500cc. New tires, battery, alterna-
tor. $4999 Firm. 856-371-3556
SCREAMING EAGLE Harley Davidson
'01 FLTRSEI2, touring bike, blue in
color. 1550oc. Clean, chromed out
and priced to sell at $10,500 OBO.
:.addiei,)g; and trunk with multiple
CD changer, cruise. 352-516-2172
TAIL LIGHTS for Honda Gold Wing, $80.
Call 352-552-0114

1230 Valin*


1240 Trucks
Light Duty
DODGE RAM 1500 SXT. 2004. 41,000
miles. $8000. Contact John.
SOLD!!!!!

1247 Trailers
LANDSCAPE TRAILER, new used once.
12'x6'. $1000 352-406-2864
TRAILER, 2005, 18'-20' for Pontoon
boat, excel cond. used very little.
$800 obo. SOLD 1ST DAY.

1264 Auto
Parts
Accessory
CAR WHEEL DOLLY'S (4) $100 Call
352-636-1352
REESE HITCH for Ford. Class 5 w/ball &
plug. $50 Call 352-460-6409
TIRES (4) Michelin Hydro Edge,
225/60R/17 low milage. $125
352-383-0855
TIRES 185-65-15 & 4 mag rims. $80
Call 608-347-1483
TRUCK TOOL BOX Husky, full size, as
new. $100. 352-242-1038

1275 Golf
Carts
CLUB CAR '95, gas w/lift kit, great
shape. $3400 obo 989-780-2653
TIRES for golf cart (4), like new. $100
Call 336-817-7509


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Monday, November 11, 2013