Daily Commercial

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Title:
Daily Commercial
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Unknown
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Halifax Media Group
Publisher:
Rod Dixon ( Leesburg, Floirda )
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0heDaily C
s'The Dai Commercial

^$i ILLBP( LEESBURG, FLORIDA Saturday, November 9, 2013 www.dailycommercial.com

MONEY: Jobs report gives hope despite gov't shutdown / C3

WORLD: Philippines hit by one of world's strongest storms / A5


Mount Dora rated a


top city for retirees


DAILY COMMERCIAL FILE PHOTO
People visit an ice cream shop in downtown Mount Dora.


Staff report
Mount Dora was profiled in a usatoday.
com story on Friday as one of four top cit-
ies in America for people looking to retire
to a small town.
The story said many Baby Boomers are
looking for small towns as they approach
retirement.


"After battling the traffic and hassles
of suburban living during their working
days, the attractions of a Norman Rock-
well-esque community can seem like a
relaxing alternative," the story said.
In addition Mount Dora, Old Saybrook,
Conn., Port Townsend, Wash., and Beau-
fort, S.C. also were listed as top retirement
SEE RETIREES I A2


Obama nudges


parties to stop


thwarting growth
JOSH LEDERMAN
Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS Dwarfed by towering cranes
and cargo containers, President Barack Obama
came to a port in conservative-leaning Louisiana
on Friday to nudge both parties to stop throwing
up roadblocks to jobs and economic progress.
At the Port of New Orleans, Obama made his
case that the U.S. can reverse the decay of the
American Dream by embracing ideas with bipar-
tisan support, like technology, roads and schools
- and some without, like his unpopular health
care law. The alternative, Obama said, is to fall
further and further behind competitors like Eu-
rope and China.
"The first thing we should do is stop doing
things that undermine our businesses and our
economy," Obama said. "It's like the gears of our
economy, every time they are just about to take
off, somebody taps the breaks and says, 'Not so
fast.'"
Gumming up the gears most recently, Obama
said, was a partial government shutdown last
SEE OBAMA | A2


I 7


PHOTO COURTESY OF JOANNE DAISY
A butterfly alights on a flower in this image, which is featured in a photography exhibit at the Trout Lake Nature Center.


Nature Center

showcases

photography


THERESA CAMPBELL I Staff Writer
theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com
Folks who savor scenic walks and nature pho-
tographs will have a chance to enjoy both today at
Trout Lake Nature Center.
The 230-acre wildlife preserve is hosting In Focus
Photo Club's exhibit opening: "Art in Nature" along
with speaker James O'Connor from 1 to 3 p.m. today
at the center, 520 E. County Road 44, Eustis.
SEE PHOTOS I A2


Wounded warriors get rehab alongside pro athletes


MELISSA NELSON-GABRIEL
The Associated Press
GULF BREEZE Green Bay
Packers offensive lineman Josh
Sitton is a tough competitor in
a tough sport, blocking big de-
fenders and taking heavy hits
week after week. But the men
and women Sitton considers
tough are the wounded warriors
he trained with throughout the
summer at a Florida Panhandle
rehabilitation center.
Since 2010, more than 300 in-
jured military members from


all branches of service have re-
ceived care alongside college
and pro athletes at Athletes Per-
formance, an injury rehabili-
tation center. It's connected to
the Andrews Institute, a sports-
medicine hospital founded by
Dr. James Andrews. He's been
the surgeon of choice for de-
cades for top professional ath-
letes including Michael Jordan,
Adrian Peterson and Robert
Griffin III.
Sitton underwent offseason
conditioning there.
"It is amazing to see their work


ethic," Sitton said of the injured
military personnel he trained
with. "It is an inspiration when
you see a guy who has had half
of his leg blown off working next
to you. It makes you do more."
Former San Francisco 49er
linebacker Alex Lincoln, now a
vice president for Athletes Per-
formance, said working with in-
jured veterans has given him a
deeper appreciation of the high-
quality medical care that comes
with being a professional athlete.
SEE REHAB I A6


I IV
AP PHOTO
In this undated photo provided by Athletes Performance, U.S. Air
Force Chief Master Sgt. Damian Orslene works out in Gulf Breeze.


Vol. 137, No. 313 I 5 sections
MONEY B4
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NEWSTIP? DEAR ABBY E4 VOICES A7 61
90994 17001 Call Scott Callahan at 365-8203 LEGALS D2 HOME LIFE El See A8


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DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, November 9, 2013


PHOTOS
FROM PAGE Al

Lavon Silvernell, ad-
ministrative director/
naturalist at Trout Lake
Nature Center, believes
attendees will enjoy the
exhibit and the opportu-
nity to go out on the trails
where they may possibly
spot bald eagles, wood-
peckers, snowy egrets
and other birds.
"We have lots of ani-
mals that you might see
in the woods," Silvernell
said. "It's just enjoyable to
get out and enjoy the nat-
ural areas. Even though
we think of Florida not
having fall colors, we do
have leaves that are turn-
ing color; and the cypress
trees are just gorgeous
too, especially at sunset."
The center is near


HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Sat-
urday, Nov. 9, 2013:
This year you sometimes
might confuse others as you
give off mixed vibes. You con-
nect on a close one-on-one
level with others, yet you ab-
solutely need your freedom
in an intimate relationship.
Some people can't visualize
having both. Realize that you
can have both with the right
person. If you are single, be
careful committing this year.
If you are attached, there is
an element of chaos in your
household that helps balance
your diverse and nearly oppo-
site needs. AQUARIUS is al-
ways lively.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
Holding yourself back to stick
to the tried-and-true would be
a mistake. Your significant
other might need to join you
on an adventure. See differ-
ent people and experience
different cultures. You have a
very upbeat quality about you.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
Shaking up the status quo
could be close to impossible,
depending on your interests
and the direction you want to
head in. Someone you often
look to for help seems to be
closed down right now. Don't
worry about it. Go off and en-
joy yourself.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
You might be in the mood for
a spontaneous trip or a visit
to someone who lives away
from your immediate area.
The drive and the change of
scenery might be more re-
freshing than you would think.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) It seems as if every-
one wants quality time with
you. Honor your priorities and
make some choices. You also
might want to use your diplo-
matic skills in order to keep
the peace. With some careful
planning, you might not have
to disappoint anyone.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
Others come forward with
suggestions. Though you
might have felt as if you
needed to take full respon-
sibility with a project, it be-
comes apparent that you
can step back. Know that
you do not need to be the
pivotal person.


South dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.
NORTH
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WEST EAST
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The bidding:
South WVest
1 Pass
2 V Pass
Opening lead -


North E
24 P.
4V
king of clubs.


Some plays in bridge are not seen
very often, largely because the
opportunity to use them is compara-
tively rare. But when they arise, they
can spell the difference between suc-
cess and failure, so the conscientious
player must continuously be on the
lookout for them.
Take this case from a leam-of-four
match. At both tables South got to


the southern entrance
to Ocala National For-
est in Eustis, and it has
a 1,000-foot long board-
walk extending into
Trout Lake, with a pavil-
lion on the lake. There
are numerous interpre-
tive trails including an
Adventure walk with
a swinging bridge and
a picnic pavilion. The
Charles Newell Hall and
Museum serves as a mu-
seum/classroom and
the Environmental Ed-
ucation Center housing
an audio visual meeting
room seats 125 people.
Trout Lake Nature Cen-
ter began as a vision of
Oklawaha Valley Audu-
bon Society members in
1985, the Center has be-
come a thriving and vi-
tal place dedicated to en-
vironmental education
and conservation.
As the In Focus Photo


VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Your efficiency is a desired
quality. Others recognize your
ability to clear up quite a few
problems with ease. It is im-
portant to understand your
strengths, but you also need
to take better care of your-
self. Do this by saying "no"
once in a while.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Take at least half the day
to be frivolous, if not more.
Though your levity mixed with
your creativity could be a tre-
mendous asset for you at
work, it also is a great qual-
ity that allows you to have a
good time with friends.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21) If you can hang at home,
do. You could be involved with
a home project, or perhaps
you might decide to clean up
a room or two for the upcom-
ing holidays. Some of you
might have already started
buying your holiday gifts.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21) Your phone rings
as others seek you out. You
could have a difficult time
saying "no" to invitations. Fo-
cus on the people around
you. You still might be a little
off if you have not yet heard
from a special person. Do not
stand on ceremony make
the call.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Honor what is happen-
ing. Even if you feel inclined
to take a risk, be careful. Can
you afford the loss? Don't get
involved in any money risks
after noon. Make a phone call
to someone you care about
who always has good advice.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18) You are energized and
ready to head right out the
door. You might want to make
some calls first to check out
the lay of the land. You are
the sign of friendship, and
you can be found visiting with
different sets of friends today.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20) Know when to take the
lead in a strategic situation.
On the other hand, you might
be happier kicking back and
doing more of what you want.
A friend's suggestion might
seem off. Be polite, but do
what you want.


four hearts and West led the king of
clubs. This was followed at each
table by a spade shift at trick two.
At the first table, declarer won the
spade with dummy's king and, in an
attempt to reduce the possibility of a
spade ruff. led a heart to the ace and
continued with the jack.
This approach failed to produce
the desired result when West took the
jack of trumps with the king and
shifted to a diamond. Declarer put up
dummy's king, but East won with the
ace and returned a spade, ruffed by
West, so the contract went down one.
At the second table, West's spade
shift at trick two was also taken in
dummy, but South found a superior
line of play that enabled him to make
the contract. At trick three, he led the
queen of clubs from dunmmyiny and,
after East followed low, discarded
the ten of diamonds!
West took the queen with the ace
and switched to a diamond, but the
bird had by this time flown the coop.
South ruffed, played the ace and
queen of hearts and easily scored the
rest of the tricks. He had executed a
"scissors coup" a play designed to
cut the lines of communication
between the defenders in order lo
defuse an impending threat.


02013 King Features Sndicate Inc.


Club presents its nature
exhibit, Silvernell be-
lieves attendees will ap-
preciate the photogra-
phers' works.
"I have the additional
advantage of having seen
the photographs that
they have hung this time;
their photographs are al-
ways excellent represen-
tational photographs of
natural subjects and they
are always delightful,"
she said.
Whether the artist uses
just the composition of
line, space, and color
found in nature, or the
digital techniques avail-
able in many photo pro-
grams, Silvernell noted
the results are stunning.
Since the exhibit goes
beyond representation-
al, it's a perfect tie in with
accomplished Central
Floridian artist and au-
thor James O'Connor's



RETIREES
FROM PAGE Al

locations.
"While you might not
think of culture as a typ-
ical small-town draw,
many towns offer the
rich cultural life de-
sired by Baby Boomers,"
the story said. "Mount
Dora has multiple cul-
tural venues, with two
theaters, including the
Mount Dora Center for
the Arts, plus many fes-
tivals and events on the
Town Square."
The city exudes a com-
fortable Southern charm
and hospitality, the story
noted.
"This central Flori-
da lakefront communi-
ty is nestled amid gentle
hills, orange groves and
Live Oak trees. Its eleva-
tion of 184 feet makes it
Florida's equivalent of a
mountain-top town," it
said. "Laid out around a
large square, the down-



OBAMA
FROM PAGE Al

month that Obama said
had without question
hurt the nation's jobs mar-
ket. Still, as Obama was
leaving Washington Fri-
day morning, the govern-
ment released surprising-
ly strong hiring numbers
for October, calling into
question how negative an
effect the shutdown real-
ly had.
"We should be building,
not tearing things down,"
Obama said, with the dim
roar of machinery in the
distance.
Obama wants Congress
to include spending for
roads, bridges, airports
and ports during ongoing
budget negotiations. Such
projects usually have bi-
partisan support, but talks
have stumbled over how
to pay for the cost.
Indeed, Obama
throughout his presiden-
cy has pressed for more
infrastructure spending
during numerous other
visits to ports just like this
one, hoping to expand
trade in service of his elu-
sive goal of doubling U.S.
exports by 2015. His pro-
posals have gained little
traction in Congress, and
the president on Friday of-


fered no new suggestions
for breaking the impasse.
Obama's visit brought
him to a Democratic-
friendly enclave within a
state that's been generally
hostile to his approach to
governing.
Arriving in New Orleans,
Obama was all smiles on
the tarmac as he greet-
ed Republican Gov. Bob-
by Jindal. But later, with
Jindal in the audience,


visit to the center to-
day. His work has been
dubbed "Primitive Sur-
realism" and visitors will
hear James reflect on art
and photography.
His works have been
shown in galleries and
museums in Miami,
Palm Beach, Martha's
Vineyard, NewYork's Mu-
seum of Art, The Vatican,
The Orlando Museum of
Art 1st Thursday, The De-
Land Museum of Florida
Art, and The Lake Eustis
Museum of Art. They also
are in the private collec-
tions of Helen Boehm,
Kildare and Linda Dobbs,
Patrick Burke, Senator Bill
Nelson, Kirby Kooluris,
Dr. Richard Stark, Fr. Allen
Duston, (O.P Internation-
al Director of the Patrons
of the Arts in the Vatican
Museums), and Countess
Monika von Habsburg.


town has shopping, ex-
cellent antiquing and
a rich cultural life with
many festivals."
Mount Dora certainly
attracts retirees, not just
from northern states, but
from across Florida as
well, Kelda Senior, public
communications officer
for the city, told The Dai-
ly Commercial Friday.
"The area's natural
beauty, combined with a
quaint downtown shop-
ping district and wel-
coming neighborhoods,
appeal to those look-
ing for a unique town
to spend their golden
years," she said.
Mayor-elect Cathy
Hoechst was thrilled
to hear about the city's
ranking.
"I think it's fabulous,"
she said Friday. "We are
a vibrant town with lots
of activities. What a great
environment for some-
one to come and retire,
and get involved in the
activities of the town."


Obama chided state Re-
publican leaders who
have failed to take ad-
vantage of a provision in
his health care to expand
Medicaid to cover more of
the working poor. He said
such expansion would
benefit 265,000 people in
Louisiana.
"So we want to work
with everybody may-
or, governor, insurance -
whoever it is that wants to
work with us here in Loui-
siana," he said. Even those
don't support the over-
all law should be able to
embrace the Medicaid ex-
pansion to help the unin-
sured, he added.
Don't count on it, Jindal
quickly rebutted. The gov-
ernor said Louisiana had
rejected the expansion be-
cause it would cost tax-
payers up to $1.7 billion
over a decade.
"We will not allow Presi-
dent Obama to bully Lou-
isiana into accepting an
expansion of Obamacare,"
he said.
A day after apologizing
to Americans who are los-
ing health insurance plans
despite Obama's prom-
ise they could keep it, the
president tried his hand at
humor as he invoked an-
other aspect of the health
law's wobbly launch: the
error-prone HealthCare.
gov web site.


"I wanted to go in and fix
it myself, but I don't write
code," he said to scattered
laughter.
After his speech, Obama
was flying to the Miami
area to raise money for
Senate Democrats and for
the Democratic Nation-
al Committee at a trio of
high-dollar fundraisers.
He planned to stay over-
night in Florida.


lFLORIDA

LOTTERY

FRIDAY
CA SH 3 ................................................ 9-4-9
Afternoon ........................................... 5-3-9
PLAY 4............................................. 2-0-5-3
Afternoon....................................... 8-6-2-2

THURSDAY
FANTASY 5......................... 14-26-31-35-36


2 of 5 wins free ticket
4 of 5 wins $146


3 of 5 wins $12
5 of 5 wins $210,678.48


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NEWSROOM CONTACTS
ROD DIXON, publisher
352-365-8214 ..................................rod.dixon@dailycommercial.com
BILL KOCH, assistant managing editor
352-365-8208....................................bill.koch@dailycommercial.com
SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor
352-365-8203 ...........................scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com
PAUL RYAN, visual editor
352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com
FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor
352-365-8268 ................................frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com
REPORTERS
UVI STANFORD, county government, school boards
352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com
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352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com
MILLARD IVES, police and courts
352-365-8262................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com
THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages
352-365-8209..................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com
OTHERS
PAM FENNIMORE, editorial assistant
352-365-8256............. pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com
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352-365-8258...............whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com
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GOOD FOR YOU/ CELEBRATIONS
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munity calendar listings,just email the information to pamfenni-
more@dailycommercial.com.


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HOROSCOPES


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Slow Danger Ahead


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 9, 2013




Saturday, November 9, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL




State&Region
NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN I scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com I 352-365-8208


www.dailycommercial.com


Area Briefs

FRUITLAND PARK
Firefighters set to host
community open house
Meet your Fruitland Park
Firefighters at their third annual
open house event from 11 a.m. to
2 p.m. today at the station, 506 West
Berckman St., Fruitland Park.
The free event is open to the pub-
lic and is for all ages. Guests can
visit with firefighters, take a tour of
the fire station, meet Sparky the fire
dog, take part in activities for chil-
dren, get free blood pressure checks
and enjoy refreshments.

BUSHNELL
Florida Folk Heritage and
Music Festival is today
Dade Battlefield Historic State
Park will host the Florida Folk
Heritage and Music Festival from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. today at the park,
7200 County Road 603 in Bushnell
with folk art crafts and music, his-
torical demonstrations, the Ann
Thomas Youth Storytelling and
Writing Contest, and a Florida pho-
tography contest.
Admissions $5 per vehicle with up
to eight people.
For information, call 352-793-4781.

ORLANDO
Free homeownership workshop
set for military personnel
The Orlando Regional Realtor
Association invites all active mili-
tary, reservists, retirees, veterans
and their families to a free seminar
and luncheon to learn about home-
ownership opportunities and the
challenges facing military personnel
in today's market.
The workshop is from 11:30 a.m.
to 1:30 p.m., Nov. 14, atVFW Post
No. 10147, 519 S. Central Avenue,
Apopka.
For information, call the Orlando
Regional Realtor Association at
407-513-7272.

LEESBURG
Senator Alan Hays to
speak at Sunrise Rotary
On Tuesday, State Senator Alan
Hays will be updating the Rotary
Club of Leesburg (Sunrise) about re-
cent and future legislative activity in
Tallahassee.
Interested citizens are welcome to
attend the presentation at 7:11 a.m.,
at the Beacon College Chopping
Block Dining Hall, 117W Main St.,
downtown Leesburg.
An optional buffet breakfast will
be available for $12.

MOUNT DORA
Lake Receptions to host
holiday shopping affair
Lake Receptions is hosting a re-
make of its summer shopping
event from 3 to 6 p.m., Sunday, at
4425 Highway 19A in Mount Dora.
Approximately 20 vendors will be
in attendance selling their products
such as handmade jewelry, Thirty
One bags and children's toys.
Admission is $5 per person and
includes one raffle ticket.
Complimentary holiday desserts,
beverages and entertainment will
also be part of the event.
For information, call 352-357-8223.




... and we'll share it with our readers.
Some of our best story ideas and photos
come from our readers. So don't hesitate
to share your youth activities, awards,
accomplishments, festivals, charity
events and other things that make our
communities special. And don't overlook
those family milestones birthdays,
engagements, marriages, business
promotions and military news.


Just email your photos and news to...
pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com


Sheriff's reserve deputy found dead


MILLARD K. IVES I Staff Writer
millard.ives@dailycommercial.com
A Lake County sheriff's
reserve deputy, found dead
Wednesday from an appar-
ent gunshot wound, had
his Leesburg home raided
the day before by the U.S.
Department of Homeland
Security, officials said.
Warwick Dale, 43, had
been placed on paid ad-
ministrative leave on Tues-
day and turned in his ser-


vice weapon pending the
outcome of a Homeland
Security investigation, Sgt.
James Vachon, sheriff's
spokesman said Friday
Vincent Picard, spokes-
man with the U.S. Immi-
gration and Customs En-
forcement, confirmed
Friday that Dale was the
target of an investigation
by Homeland Security
and that agents conduct-
ed a search of his home


Tuesday. Despite Dale's
death, Picard said the in-
vestigation is continuing
and details remain sealed
per court order.
According to a sheriff's
incident report, deputies
responded to a suicide
call in Dale's Leesburg
neighborhood just before
7:30 a.m. Wednesday and
found his body near a lake
about 300 yards from his
home. A firearm was re-


ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL
Panera Bread's Debi Hall gave Rick Scherer of Winter Garden the low down on the pas-
tries she was sampling at the South Lake Chamber of Commerce's third annual Taste of
South Lake and Business Expo at Clermont's Waterfront Park on Thursday night.




Taste of South Lake


sees repeat winner


ROXANNE BROWN I Staff Writer
roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com
Upwards of 1,000 people at-
tended Thursday night's Taste of
South Lake and Business Expo,
organizers said.
Those taking part in the third
annual event, sponsored by the
South Lake Chamber of Com-
merce, had a chance to sample
signature appetizers, entrees,
desserts, drinks and spirits from
29 local restaurants, plus gath-
er information and goodies from
businesses in the area.
Charlie DeChant, the saxo-
phonist for Hall and Oates, along
with Grammy-nominated Jerry
Bravo and the Jerry Bravo Band,
provided entertainment for the
evening.
"We thought it was a great
event," said Doris Bloodsworth,
the chamber's director of mar-
keting. "We were thrilled with the
turnout and with the participa-
tion of so many restaurants and
businesses this year.
"This event is one that is really
developing a reputation beyond
South Lake," she added, noting


people even showed up from Or-
lando.
Rick Scherer of Winter Garden
said he's attended all three years
and would not miss the South
Lake event.
"I'm an expert here," he said.
"There's a lot of food and every-
thing is so good. The first place I
stop is at San Jose's Mexican Res-
taurant for a margarita and go on
from there. Everything is so good."
Attendees were also given
tickets to vote for their favorite
booths in four categories best
appetizer, best dessert, best en-
tree and overall People's Choice.
Karen and Gene Richter, there
for the first time, said they were
blown away by the variety of food
and drinks for sampling.
"It's nice," Gene Richter said.
"Everyone is here just having a
great time and relaxing."
The winners this year were:
Cheeser's Palace Cafe for best ap-
petizer, Uncle Kenny's BBQ and
Catering for best entree, Jackie's
Creative Catering for best dessert
and, for the third year in a row,
Carrabba's Italian Grill for the
people's choice award.


covered at the scene and
an investigation into the
death also is ongoing.
Dale joined the sheriff's
office as a reserve deputy
in December 2012 and be-
came a full-time civil pro-
cess server in July Vachon
said the man did not have
any discipline issues.
Dale's wife also is em-
ployed with the sheriff's
office as a road patrol cor-
poral, Vachon added.


Lots of events


scheduled for


the weekend
Staff Report
From a holiday open house, to a big
band tribute, to a home show and a
turkey shoot, there are plenty of things
to do this weekend in Lake County.
Events include:
* Lakeridge Winery & Vineyards
has its 23rd annual Holiday Open
House today and Sunday. Local art-
ists and crafters will be selling their
creations, and live music will be of-
fered throughout the weekend at
19239 N. U.S. Highway 27, Clermont.
The hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. today
and lla.m. to 5p.m. on Sunday.
Admission to the event is free. In ad-
dition to complimentary winery tours
and wine tasting, there will be spe-
cial prices on wines and mulled cider
available at the event. The entertain-
ment includes Baby Blues and the
No Attitude Band from 10 a.m. to
1:30p.m. on Saturday, Tory Wynter
from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, The
Selwyn Birchwood Band from 11 a.m.
to 1:30 p.m. Sunday, and Beautiful
Bobby Blackmon and the B3 Blues
Band from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday.
* Also today and Sunday, a Duke
Ellington and Count Basie Big Band
Tribute will be held at Paul P Williams
Fine Arts Auditorium at Lake-Sumter
State College, 9501 U.S. Highway 441,
Leesburg. The times for both days
are 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., and tickets
cost $22. The Orlando Jazz Orchestra
will perform both legends' legacies,
including "Take the A Train," "One
O'clock Jump," "Rockin' in Rhythm,"
"April In Paris" and "Shiny Stockings."
* The Home Builders Association of
Lake-Sumter has a free home show
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. today at the
Wildwood Community Center, 6500
Powell Road. There will be classes on
reverse mortgages and wind mitiga-
tion, while the Sumter County Sheriff's
Office will offer information about its
home security inspection and Vial
of Life programs. Companions for
Courage will be in attendance, as well.
* Umatilla Merchants' Evening
on the Avenue returns to Central
Avenue from 5-8 p.m. today The free
event held of the second Saturday
of the month includes free drinks,
SEE EVENTS I A4


More than 4,500 pounds of food collected at drive


Staff Report
When people say "a
ton of food," they usually
mean a lot, but not actu-
ally 2,000 pounds. Well, a
recent Lake County food
drive actually collect-
ed 2.25 tons of food or
more than 4,500 pounds.
The Lake County Com-
munity Services, Pub-
lic Transportation Divi-
sion collected the items
during its annual "Stuff
the Bus" food drive at


Walmart stores in Lees-
burg and Mount Dora,
and the Publix Supermar-
ket in Clermont, accord-
ing to a press release is-
sued Friday.
"It was great to see the
amount of giving by the
community during the
event," County Commis-
sionerWelton Cadwell. "At
the location I was at, there
were a number of people
coming out with several
bags of items to give."
A total of 34 volunteers


and County employees
assisted with the event.
The nonperishable food,
pet and baby items col-
lected during the cam-
paign were donated to
The United Way of Lake
and Sumter Counties' Hu-
man Care Network.
The mission of the Hu-
man Care Network is "To
improve the quality of life
for all individuals by le-
veraging resources, unit-
ing agencies and impact-
ing community needs."


Founded in 2002, the Hu-
man Care Network works
with other nonprofits,
faith-based organizations
and local and state agen-
cies to service the needs
of low-income residents,
which includes managing
14 food pantries in Lake
and Sumter Counties.
For more information
about donating food to
the Human Care Network,
or for information on re-
ceiving donated food
items, call 2-1-1.





DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, November 9, 2013


OBITUARIES
Grace Maloy
Grace Maloy, 81, of
Leesburg, passed away
on Monday, November
4, 2013.
She was b a
a be-
loved
sister,
mother,
grand-
moth-
er and MALOY
aunt.
She was born Grace De-
Graff on July 29,1932.
She graduated from
Fairleigh Dickinson
University in New Jer-
sey and dedicated her-
self to the service of
others as a registered
nurse for many years.
She married James
Quinn Maloy in 1965;
together they had one
son, James Scott Maloy.
Grace is survived by
her sister Lois Latimer
and her husband Bud;
her son James, his wife
Laura and their chil-
dren Audrey and Con-
nor; and her neph-
ew Bob Latimer, his
wife DeeDee and their
daughters Dana, Laura
and Amanda. A funer-
al service will be held
on Monday, Novem-
ber 11, 2013 at2 p.m. at
Beyers Funeral Home


in Lady Lake with Pas-
tor Rick Welborne offi-
ciating. Grace's burial
will follow at Hillcrest
Memorial Gardens in
Leesburg, FL. Condo-
lences may be left at
www.beyersfuneral-
home.com. Beyers Fu-
neral Home and Cre-
matory, Lady Lake/The
Villages, FL in charge of
arrangements.

DEATH NOTICES
Clinton J. Bartley
Clinton J. Bartley,
95, of Leesburg, died
Thursday, November 7,
2013. Page-Theus Fu-
nerals & Cremations.
Mildred G. Fort
Mildred G. Fort, 84, of
Lake Panasoffkee, died
Thursday, November
7, 2013. Banks/Page-
Theus Funerals and
Cremations.
Nancy B. King
Nancy B. King, 69, of
Leesburg, died on No-
vember 6, 2013. Na-
tional Cremation Soci-
ety.
Robert Edward Taylor
Robert Edward Tay-
lor, 94, of Leesburg,
died Thursday, Novem-
ber 7, 2013. Beyers Fu-
neral and Crematory.


FU R .10~MC NA I ORYn e s


IN MEMORY


DAN SE
Associate
DAYTON,
Many items
up the sea
es from the
tion of Pres
F. Kennedy
the ill-fat
dential lim
the gravesi
flame, to 1
ic Air Force
where Lynd
son took tl
office ar
for public
years later.
In some
cials had tc
to make tha
Aboard 1
now in a
Wright-Patt
Force BasE
squeeze do
row walkway
where peof
into its
state room
Johnson,
vice preside
in, with
Kennedy al
the suit stai
husband's b
"It's getti
and hotter,
crammed ir
are getting
higher," ex[
Underwood
an of the Na
seum of th
Force, refli
famous im
the plane.
As on th
of Sept. 11
wasn't clear


-j6.


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2008 NISSAN ROGUE SL STK#P13-034A1. AWD, SUNROOF..................................... $ 1,968
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WELL
ed Press
Ohio -
Sthat make
ring imag-
assassina-
3ident John
from
ed presi-
iousine, to
ite eternal
the histor-
One plane
on B. John-
he oath of
e available
viewing 50

cases, offi-
o scramble
t happen.
the plane,
hangar at
erson Air
e, visitors


AP PHOTO
Lonna McKinley, of the National Museum of the US Air Force, looks through the log for Presi-
dent John F. Kennedy's Air Force One, rear, Friday, Nov. 8, 2013, at the museum in Dayton,
Ohio. The blanket at center was used by President Kennedy on the plane, and the blanket at
left was used by First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy.


wn a nar- hours after the shoot-
iy to stand ing what was unfold-
ple packed ing, he said. Johnson
sweltering wanted to show the
to watch nation that a constitu-
Kennedy's tional transfer of pow-
ent, sworn er had been made, and
Jacqueline Mrs. Kennedy insisted
ongside in upon being there, Un-
ned by her derwood said.
)lood. Visitors can also see
ing hotter the saw cuts in a rear
people are wall hastily made by
i, emotions Air Force crew mem-
higher and bers who didn't want
gainedd Jeff the late president's
1, histori- coffin carried in the
itional Mu- cargo hold. They re-
ie U.S. Air moved two rows of
acting the seats for the coffin,
ages from which Mrs. Kennedy
sat across from on the
e morning flight back to Washing-
1, 2001, it ton.
Sin the first Experiencing histo-
ry in a personal way
by being where it hap-
I opened goes beyond
reading it, Underwood
I said Friday during a
news media tour.
S"Sometimes I see
the looks on the fac-
Hes (of visitors), and it
all comes back to me,"
said Underwood, a
fourth-grader in 1963.
"The story is so viscer-


The federal spend-
ing reductions of the
sequester had in May
halted shuttle bus trips
from the museum to
the hangar, but mu-
seum officials decid-
ed to resume the tours


on a trimmed sched-
ule with the anniver-
sary approaching. The
Boeing jet built spe-
cially in 1962 for pres-
idential use was re-
tired by the Air Force
in 1998, having flown
eight presidents start-
ing with Kennedy.
Among the other
items that were part of
the events of late No-
vember 1963 on display
around the county:
* The eternal flame
was recently returned
to its spot at Kennedy's
gravesite in Arlington
National Cemetery in
Virginia after months
of repairs and up-
grades. The flame was
on a temporary burner
in the cemetery visible
to tourists during the
project.
* The limousine the
Kennedys were rid-
ing in when the pres-
ident was fatally shot
in Dallas is at the
Henry Ford Museum
in Dearborn, Mich.
* The flag that draped
the president's coffin
and the saddle, sword
and boots from the
"riderless horse" in his
funeral procession are
among the artifacts
being exhibited for
the first time starting
Nov. 22 at the Kennedy
Library in Boston.
* A drum and drum-
sticks from his fu-


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neral are among
items on display at
the Smithsonian's
National Museum of
American History in
Washington.
* The Texas School
Book Depository from
where Lee Harvey
Oswald fired the fatal
shots houses the Sixth
Floor Museum at
Dealey Plaza.
* The suit worn
by Texas Gov. John
Connally, which has
bullet holes and blood
stains from the shoot-
ing that also serious-
ly wounded him as he
rode in the limo, re-
cently went on dis-
play at the Lorenzo de
Zavala State Archives
and Library in Austin.
Oswald's rifle and the
blood-stained pink suit
Jacqueline Kennedy
wore that day are not on
display They are among
assassination-related
items and documents
kept by the National Ar-
chives and Records Ad-
ministration.
Kennedy library
spokeswoman Rachel
Flor said the where-
abouts of Mrs. Kenne-
dy's hat aren't known,
while the outfit worn
by the late John Ken-
nedy Jr. when the tod-
dler saluted his father's
funeral procession has
remained with the
Kennedy family.


EVENTS
FROM PAGE A3

appetizers, entertain-
ment and door gifts/
prizes. The event also
offer 50/50 drawings
and 10 percent of par-
ticipating stores' pro-
ceeds during the event
will go to a different
local nonprofit youth
organization each
month.
* Leesburg's Food
truck 'N Flick Night
kicks off at 5:30p.m.
today on Main Street.
Gourmet food trucks
line up in front of City
Hall, beer and bar sta-
tions are available, and
a free movie is present-
ed on a 24-foot outdoor
movie screen.
* The Cassia Com-
munity Club, 29245 E.
State Road 44, Eustis,
will have a turkey shoot
beginning at 10 a.m.
today until the birds
run out. Bring your
own gun and the club
will provide the shells
at $2 per shot. Country
music will begin
around 5 p.m. and a
full concession is avail-
able until 8 p.m.


Historic items from JFK



assassination on display


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 9, 2013





DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, November 9, 2013


GERALD HERBERT/AP
President Barack Obama speaks about the economy on Friday at the Port of New Orleans.


Few options for Obama to



fix cancellations problem


RICARDO
ALONSO-ZALDIVAR
Associated Press
WASHINGTON President
Barack Obama says he'll do ev-
erything he can to help people
coping with health insurance
cancellations, but legally and
practically his options appear
limited.
That means the latest politi-
cal problem engulfing Obama's
health care overhaul may not
be resolved quickly, cleanly or
completely
White House deputy spokes-
man Josh Earnest said Friday
that the president has asked his
team to look at administrative
fixes to help people whose plans
are being canceled as a result
of new federal coverage rules.
Obama, in an NBC interview
Thursday, said "I am sorry" to
people who are losing coverage
and had relied on his assurances
that if they liked their plan, they


could keep it.
The focus appears to
easing the impact for a


REHAB
FROM PAGE Al

"I was given so much
and I played a game. I
feel like it is our duty to
make sure that we pro-
vide those same expecta-
tions to people who don't
play a game, who go out
to very dangerous places
on our behalf," he said.
One of the patients
was Lt. Col. Jose Enrique
Melendez, who served
seven deployments to
Iraq and Afghanistan
before becoming com-
mander of the Army's
Golden Knights para-


be on
specif-


ic group: people whose policies
have been canceled and who
don't qualify for tax credits to
offset higher premiums. The ad-
ministration has not settled on
a particular fix and it's possible
the final decision would apply
to a broader group.
Still, a president can't just
pick up the phone and order
the Treasury to cut checks for
people suffering from insur-
ance premium sticker shock.
Spending would have to be au-
thorized by law.
Another obstacle: Most of the
discontinued policies appear
to have been issued after the
law was enacted, according to
insurers and independent ex-
perts. Legally, that means they
would have never been eligible
for cancellation protections of-
fered by the statute. Its grandfa-
ther clause applies only to pol-
icies that were in effect when
the law passed in 2010.
More than five weeks af-
ter open-enrollment season
started for uninsured Ameri-
cans, Obama's signature do-


chute demonstration
team. While preparing
for the team's 2013 sea-
son in February, Melen-
dez had a hard landing,
hitting the ground at
more than 20 mph. He
broke his leg, pelvis and
numerous vertebrae.
After months of surgery
and rehabilitation at
Walter Reed Army Med-
ical Center and else-
where, he faced a med-
ical discharge and the
end of his career.
"Unfortunately atWal-
ter Reed there is just an
overwhelming number
people they have to care
for," Melendez said. Mil-


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mestic policy achievement is
still struggling. Persistent web-
site problems appear to have
kept most interested custom-
ers from signing up. Repairs are
underway. Friday the admin-
istration said the website's in-
come verification component
will be offline for maintenance
until Tuesday morning. An en-
rollment report expected next
week is likely to reflect only pal-
try sign-ups.
Website woes have been
eclipsed by the uproar over
cancellation notices sent to
millions of people who have in-
dividual plans that don't mea-
sure up to the benefits package
and level of financial protection
required by the law.
"It was clear from the begin-
ning that there were going to be
some winners and losers," said
Timothy Jost, a law professor at
Washington and Lee Universi-
ty in Virginia, who supports the
health overhaul. "But the losers
are calling reporters, and the
winners can't get on the web-
site."


itary hospitals excel at
treating traumatic in-
juries when they first
happen, but finding the
right longer-term recov-
ery care can be difficult
for injured soldiers, sail-
ors and Marines, he said.
After months of very
slow progress, Melen-
dez began to ask where
professional athletes are
treated and what, if any-
thing, he could do to re-
turn to the air. A friend
told him that Athletes
Performance is now re-
habilitating injured
members of the military
through the nonprofit
Eagle Fund.
Melendez arrived at
the center last summer.
"I had a physical ther-
apist that was on me all
day. I had two workouts
a day," Melendez said.
He used specialized
equipment, including a
treadmill that works in-
side a pool to help ease
the stress on joints. Me-
lendez said the guid-
ance from his nutri-
tionist about foods that
would help him recov-
er and build muscle was
especially helpful.
"The whole thing just
made a world of differ-
ence," he said.
After six weeks of ther-


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Height of I World


Trade Center


debated in Chicago


JASON KEYSER
Associated Press
CHICAGO Ris-
ing from the ashes of
9/11, the new World
Trade Center tower has
punched above the New
York skyline to reach
its powerfully symbol-
ic height of 1,776 feet
and become the tallest
building in the country.
Or has it?
A committee of archi-
tects recognized as the
arbiters on world build-
ing heights was meeting
Friday to decide whether
a design change affect-
ing the skyscraper's 408-
foot needle disqualifies
it from being counted.
Disqualification would
deny the tower the title
as the nation's tallest.
But there is more than
bragging rights at stake;
1 World Trade Cen-
ter stands as a mon-
ument to those killed
in the terrorist attacks,
and the ruling could
dim the echo of Amer-
ica's founding year in
the structure's height.
Without the needle, the
building measures 1,368
feet, a number that also
holds symbolic weight
as the height of the orig-
inal World Trade Center.
What's more, the de-
cision is being made by
an organization based in
Chicago, whose cultur-
al and architectural his-
tory is embodied by the
Willis formerly Sears
- Tower that would be
knocked into second
place by avote in favor of
the NewYork structure.
"Most of the time
these decisions are not
so controversial," said
Daniel Safarik, an ar-


chitect and spokesman
for the nonprofit Coun-
cil on Tall Buildings and
Urban Habitat. The 30
members of its Height
Committee are meeting
to render a judgment
behind closed doors
in Chicago, where the
world's first skyscraper
appeared in 1884.
The committee will
announce its decision
next week.
The question over
1 World Trade Cen-
ter, which remains un-
der construction and is
expected to open next
year, arose because of a
change to the design of
its tower-topping needle.
Under the council's cur-
rent criteria, spires that
are an integral part of a
building's aesthetic de-
sign count; broadcast an-
tennas that can be added
and removed do not.
The designers of 1
World Trade Center had
intended to enclose the
mast's communications
gear in decorative clad-
ding made of fiberglass
and steel. But the devel-
oper removed that ex-
terior shell from the de-
sign, saying it would be
impossible to properly
maintain or repair.
Without it, the ques-
tion is whether the mast
is now primarily just a
broadcast antenna.
According to the ar-
chitecture firm behind
the building, the nee-
dle will have a com-
munications platform
for radio and television
equipment, but it will
also be topped with an
LED beacon that will fire
out a horizontal blaze of
light visible from up to
50 miles away.


AP PHOTO
In this undated photo provided by Athletes Performance, U.S. Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Damian


Orslene works out in Gulf Breeze
apy, he walked on his
own and began train-
ing in a wind tunnel to
return to skydiving. He
plans to make his first
post-injury jump this
month.
Not all military reha-
bilitation stories are as
successful as Melendez's,
said Russell Orr, an ath-
letic trainer at the cen-
ter and a former strength
and conditioning trainer
for the NewYorkYankees.
But he said all of them
are just as inspirational.
Orr said the injured vets
are humble and grateful
for the help, and will of-
fer to assist trainers with
moving equipment and
other drudgery that pro-
fessional athletes would
expect staff members to
do for them.
And Orr said the mil-
itary members are
taught to tough out in-
jury, which can lead
to further injury in the
long run. Orr likened his
job to cooking, the way
a chef tastes the food to


gauge progress.
"The profession-
al athlete will definitely
tell you if you have over-
cooked them," he said.
"The military guy will
keep saying 'I'm good.'"
The military person-
nel, many of them am-
putees, sometimes gauge
success by being able to
carry their child or live
without constant pain
that can make them irri-
table with their families.
"If you are wrapped
up by saying 'Man, I
train this star,' that can
definitely change your
attitude," Orr said.
Athletic trainer Tyler
Wilkins said profession-
al athletes are often fans
of the military members
just as much as the mil-
itary members are fans
of the athletes.
"The military guys will
come here and if there is
a pro guy or a college guy
they will ask if that is so
and so. You can tell that
they are kind of a fan of
the athlete, but when


the athlete interacts with
them, when they are in
the same group or same
room, every time I've
noticed the athlete is
entirely humbled in the
presence of the military
guy," Wilson said.
The plan is to expand
the program under a
new name, The Come-
back Initiative, to in-
clude injured police of-
ficers, firefighters and
other first-responders
at Athletes Performance
facilities nationwide.
Melendez hopes to
bring more of his in-
jured Army buddies. He
has already helped to
get three into the pro-
gram.
"It felt like we were
all one big team here.
It was pretty cool be-
cause of course you are
all here for different rea-
sons," he said. "They
were getting ready for
the NFL and I was get-
ting ready for my sea-
son, which is going back
to the Army."


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 9, 2013






YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD
BILL KOCH............... ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR
SCOTT CALLAHAN .......................NEWS EDITOR Vi
GENE PACKWOOD ............ EDITORIAL CARTOONIST w dIm c o
< ^^ ^r r ^^www.dailycommercial.com


VOICE


A Veterans Day


with dwindling


number of vets

At many fancy banquets in
Washington, D.C., it's customary
for the band to play the official songs
of the Army, Air Force, Navy, Marine
Corps and Coast Guard. And it is the
custom of audience members who've
served with those branches of our
military to stand at attention.
Each year, fewer and fewer do and
they're older and grayer but visibly proud of
their service. On Monday, we honor veter-
ans with a holiday meant to mark the end of
that human meat grinder known as World
War I. First celebrated in 1919 as Armistice
Day, it now pays tribute to all who have
served their country in uniform.
Last year, there were 21.2 million veter-
ans in the United States, but their numbers,
thanks to the fine grinding of the actuari-
al tables, are fast dwindling: 9.6 million of
them are older than 65 and 1.8 million of
them younger than 35.
It is a clear imbalance but not necessari-
ly a bad one. We are fighting no great wars,
and this administration is making only to-
ken efforts to get involved in small ones. We
are, as much as we've ever been, a nation at
peace, and we are willing to spend as much
as the rest of the world combined to keep it
that way.
But even as Veterans Day approached, De-
fense Secretary Chuck Hagel was wheeling
and dealing with Congress to ward off fur-
ther budget cuts. He has complained that
projected cutbacks of $1 trillion during the
next decade will weaken the muscle and
bone of military readiness.
The cutbacks have changed America's
longstanding strategy of being able to fight
two large wars and one smaller one simul-
taneously. Army Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odi-
erno warns that if the Army continues to
shrink, the military might not be able to
deal with even one contingency.
Our country has often been taken by sur-
prise and unprepared to find itself at war.
But we have always risen to the occasion,
and in eye-opening ways.
The universal draft threw together Ivy
Leaguers, farm boys, intellectuals and il-
literates that the armed forces trained for
battle in World War II. In four years, they
helped to defeat two great military pow-
ers. Later troops, first as draftees and then
volunteers, served on battlefields in Ko-
rea, Vietnam, Iraq, Kuwait, Afghanistan and
elsewhere or strove to keep peace.
On Veterans Day, we must thank our vet-
erans and we must nurture the genera-
tions that will take their place. One day, they
too will stand tall when the band strikes up
the service songs.
Provided by Scripps Howard News Service.


The Daily Commercial

The newspaper of choice for Lake
and Sumter counties since 1875

EDITORIALS
Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board,
not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are
not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday and
Sunday.
COLUMNS
Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and
picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reflect
the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a
diversity of views.
If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state
or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom-
mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL
34749-0007.
Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length.
The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published
with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.


0 1j 0


//w


3-


OTHERVOICES


Health insurers don't deserve scorn


eyond the relentless lies,
paternalistic arrogance and
show-stopping incompe-
tence that now define the Af-
fordable Care Act, the health
care reform now sports two
new features: an assault on free
speech and severe scapegoating
of a law-abiding industry.
"White House officials have
pressured insurance industry
executives to keep quiet amid
mounting criticism over Obam-
acare's rollout," CNN's Drew
Griffin and Chris Frates reported
Oct. 30. "After insurance officials
publicly criticized the imple-
mentation, White House staff-
ers contacted insurers to express
their displeasure, industry in-
siders said. Multiple sources de-
clined to speak publicly about
the pushback because they fear
retribution."
While White House press sec-
retary Jay Carney calls this ac-
cusation "preposterous and
inaccurate," health insurers' si-
lence in this controversy is chill-
ing. Insurance consultant Bob
Laszewski told CNN, "The White
House is exerting massive pres-
sure on the industry, including
the trade associations, to keep
quiet."
Obama has been anything but
taciturn in his latest tactic: vilify-
ing health insurers.
"Before the Affordable Care
Act, these bad-apple insurers
had free rein every single year to
limit the care that you received
or used minor pre-existing con-
ditions to jack up your premi-
ums or bill you into bankruptcy,"
Obama bellowed last week. As if
prosecuting a product-liability
case, Obama decried the evil in-
surers' "cut-rate plans that don't
offer real financial protection in
the event of a serious illness or
an accident."
Some 4.2 million Americans
with canceled medical policies


IWF6


Deroy
Murdock

SCRIPPS HOWARD
NEWS SERVICE


now recognize that Obama lied
just last Sept. 26 when he said,
"If you already have health care,
you don't have to do anything."
As outrage grew, Obama un-
veiled a new lie Monday to con-
ceal at least 23 previous ones. He
told supporters: "What we said
was you can keep it (your health
plan) if it hasn't changed since
the law passed."
"No, no, no, no, no," the Na-
tional Journal's Ron Fournier
protested. "That's not what the
Obama administration said."
As usual, Obama points his
finger everywhere but inward.
People are losing plans, Obama
claims, because wicked insur-
ers changed and, thus, invalidat-
ed them.
But why would insurers sud-
denly cancel coverage for 4.2
million clients, and counting? Is
this the latest innovation in cus-
tomer service?
"The health insurance com-
panies are required to offer their
customers new plans that com-
ply with all of the new federal
benefit and regulatory require-
ments," explains Grace-Marie
Turner of the Galen Institute, a
health-policy think tank. "It is
reckless for the White House to
blame the insurance companies
simply for complying with this
law."
Insurers are obeying Obam-
acare's Section 2707: 'A health in-
surance issuer that offers health
insurance coverage in the in-
dividual or small-group mar-
ket shall ensure that such cover-
age includes the essential health


benefits package required under
section 1302(a) of the Patient Pro-
tection and Affordable Care Act."
These 10 new treatment cate-
gories include hearing aids, pe-
diatric dentistry, eyeglasses for
children, drug-addiction servic-
es, psychiatric care, and other
things that not everyone wants
nor needs. Once every plan fea-
tures these pricey "essentials,"
Obama's "affordable care" prom-
ise craters, too.
Any plan that lacks these
goodies and was sold af-
ter Obamacare was signed
on March 23, 2010, cannot be
grandfathered and, therefore,
must be canceled before Jan.
1, 2014. Obama concealed this
detail when he said during the
presidential debate of Oct. 4,
2012: "If you've got health insur-
ance, it doesn't mean a govern-
ment takeover. You keep your
own insurance."
For those whose coverage pre-
dates Obamacare, federal law
now mandates that if such plans
have changed ever so slight-
ly (say a $5 co-insurance boost)
they become ungrandfathered
and cannot be renewed af-
ter Dec. 31, 2013. This rigid no-
change rule is like telling some-
one to hold his breath and then
smacking him when he tries to
inhale.
Rather than let Obama slap
them around in public, the
top 10 health-insurance CEOs
should man up, hold a joint
press conference, and slam
Obama's destructive, self-serving
lies. If these executives hang to-
gether, it will be tough for Amer-
ica's Thug-in-Chief to hang them
separately.
Deroy Murdock is a columnist with Scripps
Howard News Service and a media fel-
low with Stanford University's Hoover In-
stitution on War, Revolution and Peace.
Email Deroy.Murdock@gmail.com.


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR


Second-hand smoke
may kill nonsmoker
I was informed today that my
55-year-old daughter was diag-
nosed with a rare mouth cancer.


YOUR POINT OFVIEW
She has never smoked a day in
her life.
The prognosis depends, along
with treatment, on the coop-
eration of those who light up.
Second-hand smoke kills, al-


though not everyone.
Are you who smoke willing to
risk the health problems of oth-
ers? Please pray for my daughter.
GAIL CAIN I Leesburg


HAVE YOUR SAY
The Daily Commercial invites you
to write letters to the editor. Letters
should be no longer than 350 words.
They must be original, signed with the
full name of the writer, and include
the writer's address and telephone
number for verification. We reserve
the right to edit for length. Letters
also will be edited for grammar, clarity,
taste and libel. We accept no more
than two letters per month from the
same writer. No open letters, form
letters or copies of letters to third
parties will be published. We do not
publish unsigned letters. Submissions
are not returned. We retain the right
to archive and republish any material
submitted for publication.
You can submit your letters by:
Email (preferred) to:
letters@dailycommercial.com
By regular mail to:
Voices
PO. Box 490007
Leesburg, FL 34749-0007
By fax to: 325-365-1951


DOONESBURY


Editor's note: Garry Trudeau is on hiatus. This is a collection of some of his favorite strips.


-=qmmw- wiw-;Rpnm


Saturday, November 9, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL




A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, November 9,2013


TODAY




Breezy with variable
cloudiness

HIGH LOW
770 61


SUNDAY




Partly sunny


HIGH LOW
80 620


MONDAY




Comfortable with times
of clouds and sun

HIGH LOW
820 630


TUESDAY




Periods of sun, a couple
of showers possible

HIGH LOW
810 580


WEDNESDAY




Some sun, a shower
possible; breezy, cooler

HIGH LOW
67 50


Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 02013 Key'West 6


Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are today's highs for the
day. Forecast highlow temperatures are given for selected cities.


Yesterday's National High/Low: (for the 48 contiguous states)
High 860 in Pompano Beach, FL Low 100 in Hibbing, MN


4


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10
Very High, 11+ Extreme
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index'
number, the greater the need for
eye and skin protection.


The solunar period schedule allows planning
days so you will be fishing in good territory or
hunting in good cover during those times. Major
periods begin at the times shown and last for
1.5 to 2 hours. The minor periods are shorter.
Major Minor Major Minor
Today 4:43 a.m. 10:57 a.m. 5:10 p.m. 11:24 p.m.
Sun. 5:38 a.m. 11:51 a.m. 6:04 p.m. -


l 66O0


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


Today
6:46 a.m.
5:37 p.m.
12:26 p.m.
11:58 p.m.


Sunday
6:47 a.m.
5:36 p.m.
1:09 p.m.
none


iRrst Full Last New



Nov9 Nov17 Nov25 Dec 2


ITIEI


Homosassa
Day High Feet
Today 8:21 am...1.2
10:21 pm...1.0
Daytona Beach
Day High Feet
Today 12:33 pm.....4.8


Low Feet
4:17 am .....0.4
5:10 pm .....0.0

Low Feet
6:03 am .....0.3
6:52 pm .....0.3


Day High Feet
Sun. 9:41 am......1.1
11:23pm......1.0


High Feet
12:57 am .....4.3
1:33pm.....4.6


Low Feet
5:30 am .....0.3
6:16 pm.....0.1

Low Feet
7:10 am.....0.5
7:53 pm.....0.3


I NAINLCTE


City
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Santa Fe
St. Ste. Marie
Seattle
Shreveport
Spokane
Syracuse
Topeka
Tucson
Tulsa
Washington, DC
Wilmington, DE


Today
Hi LoW
65 49 pc
88 75 pc
63 32s
44 34 sn
48 43 sh
66 4 6 pc
44 35 c
48 40 sh
64 35s
81 55s
69 44s
57 42s
52 40s


Sunday
Hi LoW
63 50 pc
87 75 pc
63 36 s
40 27 pc
51 42 r
72 48 pc
47 36 r
50 32 sh
59 41 s
83 55 s
67 46 s
60 37 s
57 35 s


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.


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City
Albany
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte, NC


Today
Hi LoW
47 36 pc
64 41 s
34 34 c
58 35 s
62 42 pc
52 42 s
54 37 s
46 34 c
64 44 pc
39 20 pc
58 38 pc
49 41 pc
50 39 sh
44 36 pc
67 49 pc
63 40 s
60 38 s


Sunday
Hi LoW
48 30 c
64 41 s
42 33 sn
61 32s
69 45 pc
58 31 s
60 36 s
47 25 c
69 43 pc
41 17 c
62 39 pc
55 36 pc
46 35 sh
47 29 sn
73 49 pc
54 29 s
67 35 s


City
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Concord, NH
Dallas
Dayton
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
El Paso
Fargo
Fairbanks
Flagstaff
Grand Rapids


Today
Hi LoW
55 34s
58 33 pc
62 38s
56 40 pc
64 41 pc
46 29 pc
72 52 pc
61 37 s
63 34s
59 31 s
56 38 c
38 24sf
72 46s
39 24 pc
30 27 c
60 23 s
55 38 c


Sunday
Hi LOW
61 36 pc
48 34 s
51 30 s
48 36 pc
72 41 pc
50 26 pc
72 49 pc
50 32 s
64 38 s
52 35 s
49 33 pc
39 14 sn
74 49 pc
41 13 c
32 18 sn
61 22 pc
48 36 pc


City
Great Falls
Greensboro, NC
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City


Today
Hi LoW
46 28 c
59 40 s
48 35 pc
85 72 pc
74 53 pc
62 35 s
67 47 pc
61 37s
72 50 s
63 45 pc
61 40s
64 46 s
55 34 pc
45 27 pc
63 41 s
73 60 c
50 41 pc


Sunday
Hi LoW
38 23 sn
66 36 s
54 32 pc
84 70 pc
76 54 pc
51 32s
72 44 pc
56 41 s
74 51 pc
66 41 s
55 33s
65 40s
46 34 s
42 21 pc
62 35 s
75 57 pc
56 39 pc


City
Norfolk, VA
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego


Today
Hi LoW
57 44s
69 45 s
57 30 s
52 42s
83 59 s
54 39 pc
47 34 pc
52 43 sh
49 40 pc
60 40 s
64 34s
59 42s
73 41 s
66 40 s
66 39 s
74 57 pc
67 54 pc


Sunday
Hi Lo W
64 43 s
66 48 s
55 34 s
58 38 s
85 61 s
48 32 pc
52 33 r
56 44 r
56 33 pc
68 37 s
65 32 pc
65 36 s
73 42 pc
55 39 s
67 40 pc
73 54 pc
69 56 pc


I FIVE-DAY FORECAST FOR LEESBURG I








Sports
A spcoits,'Vdail~c on-ireic ial.con~i


Seminoles ready for Wake / B2


Bl
DAILY 'O-,INERCIALL
S, i.iiti:ly, NI ve r I :,e ',21, 201:3



W \\\.( dali ly(-coniIe( icI.c (o m
SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY
1352-365-8208


PAUL RYAN / DAILY COMMERCIAL
Mount Dora Bible's Tevin Symonette is gang-tackled for a loss of yardage during Friday's Sunshine State Athletic Conference semifinal
playoff game at Mount Dora Bible.


MDB falls in SSAC _

N ANN


MARK FISHER
Special to the Daily Commercial
The Mount Dora Bi-
ble Bulldogs (7-3, 5-2)
lost a shootout with the
Orlando Christian Prep
Warriors (8-2, 6-1) 68-
55 Friday in the Sun-
shine State Athletic
Conference semifinals.
The Bulldogs trailed
28-13 at the half and
were down 41-13 be-
fore mounting a furi-
ous comeback in which
they traded blow for
blow with the War-
riors. The Warriors


rushing offense was
overwhelming as they
amassed 437 yards on
40 carries with Alex
Marinas rushing for
179 yards on 15 carries
for 5 touchdowns and
a 65 yard kickoff return
for a score.
Chrishon Frazier
added 162 on 18 rush-
es with three touch-
downs.
The Bulldogs relied
on Tevin Symonette,
who managed to gain
52 yards on 13 carries,
punching the ball in
for critical touchdowns


twice and snagging a
60 yard pass from Dan-
iel Johnson for a third.
Johnson was 8 for 15
passing with one in-
terception and two
touchdowns with Jor-
dan McPherson from
16 yards.
Johnson also rushed
for a score. Lamar
Smith was a huge lift
for Mount Dora, rush-
ing for 166 yards on
nine carries and scor-
ing three two-point
conversions to help
SEE MDB I B2


Friday's Scores
*Orlando Christian Prep 68, Mount Dora
Bible 55
*First Academy of Leesburg 32, Seffner
Christian 27
Lake Minneola 42, East Ridge 7
Montverde Academy 36, Wildwood 0
Tavares 49, Deltona Pine Ridge 0
Umatilla 29, Deltona 12
South Lake 33, Kissimmee Gateway 10
South Sumter 30, Leesburg 10
The Villages 44, Hawthorne 22
*Sunshine State Athletic Conference playoffs
Playoffs
Friday
Class 6A-Reg1on 3
Quarterfinals
Daytona Beach Seabreeze at Leesburg
Lake Minneola at Daytona Beach Mainland
Class 5A-Reg1on 2
Quarterfinals
Live Oak Suwannee at South Sumter
Class 1A-Re,1on 4
Semifinals
Wildwood at Cross City Dixie County
SSAC Championship
at First Academy of Orlando
First Academy of Leesburg vs. Orlando
Christian Prep


Celtics hold


off Magic,


win second


straight game

KYLE HIGHTOWER
Associated Press
ORLANDO Brandon Bass had 16 points,
including a pair of free-throws in the closing
seconds to help the Boston Celtics hang on
for a 91-89 victory over the Orlando Magic
on Friday night.
Trailing by three, the Magic had a chance
to tie the game in the final minute, but Arron
Afflalo's jumper came from just a step inside
the 3-point line.
Avery Bradley added 14 points and eight
rebounds for the Celtics.
The win is the Celtics' second straight and
extends their win streak over Orlando to nine
games. They will try to make it three straight
Saturday at Miami.
Afflalo led the
Magic with 23 nn
points. Nik Vucev- Ogl^^ lD
ic added 14 points
and 13 rebounds.
The loss ends
the Magic's three-
game win streak. W
Boston slipped
out at a seven-
point lead to be-
gin the fourth quarter, but the Magic fought
back to tie it at 75.
The cushion grew again when Bradley
stripped Victor Oladipo at midcourt and
sprinted ahead for a dunk and eventual
three-point play to put the Celtics back up
81-77 with under 6 minutes to play.
Afflalo knocked down a 3-pointer and was
fouled by Bradley with 1:38 left. He prompt-
ly completed the four-point play to pull the
Magic within 86-84.
Kelly Olynyk responded with a jumper on
Boston's next possession, but after rebound-
ing a Magic miss on the other end, a floater
by Jeff Green caromed off the rim and land-
ed out of bounds.


No. 19 UCF, Houston


battle for 1st place in AAC


KYLE HIGHTOWER
Associated Press
ORLANDO UCF and
Houston were expected to
play the role of understudy
to more established pro-
grams like Louisville and
Rutgers in the race for the
American Athletic Confer-
ence crown and the cov-
eted BCS berth that comes
with it.
Instead, today's match-
up between No. 19 UCF (6-


1, 3-0 American) and Hous-
ton (7-1, 4-0) could go a
long way in proving lots of
preseason prognostications
wrong.
As welcoming as the na-
tional spotlight might be for
the former Conference USA
rivals, UCF receiver J.J. Wor-
ton said it didn't change the
approach for the Knights
this week.
"We see it, but it doesn't
really mean anything to us,"


he said. "Yeah, it's nice to be
nationally known, but that's
how we feel every year. We
know what we can do, and
we know everybody's got
their own opinion and
they're entitled to it. But like
coach says, the people that
matter are inside the circle,
and that's us inside the foot-
ball group.
"We know that other peo-
ple think of us the way they
SEE UCF I B2


JOHN RAOUX/AP
Central Florida wide receiver Jeff Godfrey, left, runs for a 5-yard touchdown past
Connecticut safety Ty-Meer Brown (15) on a pass play on Oct. 26 in Orlando.
UCF hosts Houston today.


semifinal shootout





DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 9, 2013


SCOREBOARD


BASKETBALL
NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic
W L Pet GB
Philadelphia 3 2 .600 -
Brooklyn 2 2 .500 1/
Toronto 2 3 .400 1
Boston 2 4 .333 11'/
New York 1 3 .250 11h
Southeast
W L Pet GB
Miami 4 2 .667 -
Charlotte 3 2 .600 1/
Orlando 3 3 .500 1
Atlanta 2 3 .400 11h
Washington 1 3 .250 2
Central
W L Pet GB
Indiana 5 0 1.000 -
Detroit 2 2 .500 21h
Milwaukee 2 2 .500 2'/
Cleveland 2 3 .400 3
Chicago 1 3 .250 3'/
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest
W L Pet GB
San Antonio 4 1 .800 -
Houston 4 2 .667 /
Dallas 3 2 .600 1
Memphis 2 3 .400 2
New Orleans 2 3 .400 2
Northwest
W L Pet GB
Oklahoma City 3 1 .750 -
Minnesota 3 2 .600 1/
Portland 2 2 .500 1
Denver 1 3 .250 2
Utah 0 5 .000 31
Pacific
W L Pet GB
Golden State 4 1 .800 -
Phoenix 3 2 .600 1
L.A. Lakers 3 3 .500 11h
L.A. Clippers 3 3 .500 11h
Sacramento 1 3 .250 21h
Thursday's Games
Miami 102, L.A. Clippers 97
Denver 109, Atlanta 107
L.A. Lakers 99, Houston 98
Friday's Games
Boston 91, Orlando 89
Cleveland at Philadelphia, late
Toronto at Indiana, late
Brooklyn at Washington, late
New York at Charlotte, late
Oklahoma City at Detroit, late
Utah at Chicago, late
Dallas at Minnesota, late
L.A. Lakers at New Orleans, late
Golden State at San Antonio, late
Denver at Phoenix, late
Sacramento at Portland, late
Today's Games
Utah at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Orlando atAtlanta, 7:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Houston, 8 p.m.
Golden State at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Portland at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
San Antonio at New York, 12 p.m.
Washington at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Phoenix, 8p.m.
Minnesota at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Men's College
Top 25 Schedule
Today's Games
No. 3 Louisville vs. College of Charleston, 1p.m.
No. 11 Ohio State vs. Morgan State, Noon
No. 15 Gonzaga vs. Bryant, 7 p.m.
No. 16 Wichita State vs. Emporia State, 2 p.m.
No.22 UCLA vs. Drexel, Mid
No. 23 New Mexico vs. Alabama A&M, 10:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
No. 1 Kentucky vs. Northern Kentucky, 4 p.m.
No. 21 Notre Dame vs. Stetson, 1 p.m.
Women's College
Top 25 Schedule
No. 1 UConn vs. Hartford, 4 p.m.
No. 3 Stanford at Boston College, 1 p.m.
No. 5 Louisville vs. Loyola of Chicago, 7p.m.
No. 6 Notre Dame vs. UNC Wilmington, 1 p.m.
No. 10 Baylor vs. Grambling State, 8p.m.
No. 14 Dayton vs. UC Riverside at Carver-Hawkeye
Arena, Iowa City, Iowa, 3 p.m.
Sunday's Games
No. 2 Duke at No. 9 California, 6 p.m.
No. 7 Kentucky at Wagner, 1 p.m.
No. 8 Maryland vs. Loyola (Md.), 2 p.m.
No. 13 Penn State vs. Fordham, 2 p.m.
No. 14 Dayton at Iowa, 2 p.m.
No. 18 Purdue vs. Ball State, 2 p.m.
No. 21 Oklahoma State vs. Texas-Arlington, 2 p.m.
No. 22 South Carolina vs. Louisiana Tech, 2 p.m.
No. 23 Iowa State vs. North Dakota, 6 p.m.
No. 24 Georgia vs. Presbyterian, 2 p.m.
FOOTBALL
College Schedule
Today's Games
EAST
W. Kentucky (5-4) at Army (3-6), Noon
St. Francis (Pa.) (3-5) at Bryant (4-5), Noon
Robert Morris (4-4) at CCSU (4-5), Noon
Princeton (6-1) at Penn (4-3), Noon
Duquesne (5-3) at Sacred Heart (8-2), Noon
Monmouth (NJ) (4-5) at Wagner (2-7), Noon
Brown (5-2) at Yale (4-3), Noon
Harvard (6-1) at Columbia (0-7), 12:30 p.m.
Holy Cross (3-7) at Lehigh (6-2), 12:30 p.m.
James Madison (6-3) at New Hampshire (44),
12:30 p.m.
Villanova (4-5) at Rhode Island (3-7), 12:30 p.m.
Bucknell (4-4) at Fordham (9-0), 1p.m.
Richmond (3-6) at Stony Brook (3-5), 1 p.m.
William & Mary (6-3) at Delaware (7-2), 3 p.m.
Maine (8-1) at Albany (NY) (1-8), 3:30 p.m.
Colgate (3-6) at Lafayette (3-5), 3:30 p.m.




UCF

FROM PAGE B1


want to. We know what
we can do and that's all
that matters."
Unlike in some of
their earlier season
matchups, UCF and
Houston have lots of
history with one an-
other, having met four
times in C-USA.
Most of those match-
ups were buoyed by ti-
tle implications as well.
A victory today would
tie UCF's best start in
school history.
The underdog this
time around, Houston
coach Tony Levine said
he knows what to ex-
pect against a George
O'Leary-coached team.
"When you talk
about a Coach O'Leary


football team and pro-
gram, what comes to
mind nationally is that
they are a well-coached
team," Levine said.
"That's really been a
trademark of his as long
as he's been coaching.
They make you earn
everything, they don't
make mistakes, they


Hawaii (0-8) at Navy (4-4), 3:30 p.m.
Cornell (1-6) at Dartmnouth (3-4), 4 p.m.
Texas (6-2) at West Virginia (4-5), 7 p.m.
Notre Dame (7-2) at Pittsburgh (4-4), 8p.m.
SOUTH
Florida St. (8-0) at Wake Forest (4-5), Noon
Wesley (6-2) at Charlotte (4-5), Noon
Vanderbilt (4-4) at Florida (44), Noon
Missouri (8-1) at Kentucky (2-6), Noon
UAB (2-6) at Marshall (5-3), Noon
Auburn (8-1) at Tennessee (45), Noon
Arkansas (3-6) at Mississippi (5-3), 12:21 p.m.
,i. h, ,, i -, 3 '. ....0. p.m .
._ ll, h I=,I '1_, p.m .
Marist (6-3) at Campbell (27), 1 p.m.
Coastal Carolina (9-0) at Charleston Southern (8-
2), 1p.m.
NC Central (4-5) at Hampton (3-6), 1 p.m.
Savannah St. (1-9) at Howard (3-6), 1 p.m.
San Diego (6-3) at Morehead St. (3-6), 1 p.m.
NC A&T (5-3) at Morgan St. (3-6), 1 p.m.
E. Illinois (8-1) at Murray St. (54), 1p.m.
Gardner-Webb (5-4) atVMI (1-8), 1 p.m.
The Citadel (3-6) at Elon (2-7), 1:30 p.m.
Samford (6-3) at Furman (4-5), 1:30 p.m.
Florida A&M (3-6) at SC State (6-3), 1:30 p.m.
Jackson St. (6-2) at Alabama A&M (3-6), 2 p.m.
Southern U. (54) at Alabama St. (6-3), 2 p.m.
Wofford (5-3) at Chattanooga (7-2), 2 p.m.
W. Carolina (2-7) at Georgia Southern (44), 2 p.m.
Texas Southern (2-7) at MVSU (1-8), 2p.m.
Jacksonville (4-5) at Mercer (8-1), 3 p.m.
Davidson (0-9) at Stetson (1-7), 3 p.m.
Austin Peay (0-9) at Tennessee St. (7-3), 3 p.m.
Presbyterian (3-5) at Liberty (5-4), 3:30 p.m.
Syracuse (44) at Maryland (5-3), 3:30 p.m.
Tulsa (2-6) at East Carolina (6-2), 3:45 p.m.
Norfolk St. (2-7) at Bethune-Cookman (8-1), 4 p.m.
NC State (3-5) at Duke (6-2), 4 p.m.
E. Kentucky (6-3) at Jacksonville St. (7-2), 4 p.m.
FlU (1-7) at Middle Tennessee (54), 4 p.m.
Lamar (4-5) at Northwestern St. (4-5), 4 p.m.
UT-Martin (6-3) at Memphis (1-6), 4:30 p.m.
Southern Miss. (0-8) at Louisiana Tech (3-5), 7 p.m.
Arkansas St. (44) at Louisiana-Monroe (54),
7p.m.
Virginia Tech (6-3) at Miami (7-1), 7 p.m.
Houston (7-1) at UCF (6-1), 7 p.m.
LSU (7-2) atAlabama (8-0), 8 p.m.
MIDWEST
SMU (34) at Cincinnati (6-2), Noon
TCU (3-6) at Iowa St. (1-7), Noon
Penn St. (5-3) at Minnesota (7-2), Noon
Iowa (54) at Purdue (1-7), Noon
Valparaiso (1-8) at Butler (7-3), 1p.m.
W. Michigan (1-8) at E. Michigan (1-8), 1 p.m.
Dayton (6-3) at Drake (5-4), 2 p.m.
N. Colorado (1-8) at North Dakota (2-7), 2 p.m.
Tennessee Tech (3-7) at SE Missouri (2-7), 2 p.m.
Montana (7-2) at South Dakota (4-5), 2 p.m.
Indiana St. (1-8) atS. Dakota St. (54), 3 p.m.
Missouri St. (4-6) atS. Illinois (54), 3 p.m.
Illinois (3-5) at Indiana (3-5), 3:30 p.m.
Nebraska (6-2) at Michigan (6-2), 3:30 p.m.
Illinois St. (54) at N. Dakota St. (8-0), 3:30 p.m.
BYU (6-2) at Wisconsin (6-2), 3:30 p.m.
Youngstown St. (8-1) at N. Iowa (4-5), 5 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
Kansas St. (44) at Texas Tech (7-2), Noon
Tulane (6-3) at UTSA (4-5), 2 p.m.
Nicholls St. (4-5) at Sam Houston St. (7-2), 3 p.m.
Grambling St. (1-8) at Ark.-Pine Bluff (1-7), 3:30
p.m.
UTEP (1-7) at North Texas (6-3), 3:30 p.m.
,i. 4v : , ..* .. i 7.-2), 3:30 p.m.
4 p.m.
McNeese St. (7-2) at Stephen F Austin (3-6), 4 p.m.
SE Louisiana (7-2) at Cent. Arkansas (54), 8 p.m.
FAR WEST
Southern Cal (6-3) at California (1-8), 3 p.m.
S. Utah (6-3) at Weber St. (1-8), 3 p.m.
Montana St. (7-2) at E. Washington (7-2), 3:10 p.m.
Nevada (3-6) at Colorado St. (4-5), 3:30 p.m.
Boston College (44) at New Mexico St. (1-8),
3:30 p.m.
Arizona St. (6-2) at Utah (44), 4 p.m.
Old Dominion (6-3) at Idaho (1-8), 5 p.m.
Portland St. (54) at Idaho St. (3-6), 5:05 p.m.
Utah St. (54) at UNLV (5-4), 8 p.m.
Colorado (3-5) at Washington (5-3), 8 p.m.
Sacramento St. (4-5) at Cal Poly (4-5), 9:05 p.m.
UCLA (6-2) at Arizona (6-2), 10 p.m.
Fresno St. (8-0) at Wyoming (44), 10:15 p.m.
San Diego St. (4-4) at San Jose St. (5-3), 10:30
p.m.
NFL
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pet PF PA
New England 7 2 0 .778 234 175
N.Y Jets 5 4 0 .556 169 231
Miami 4 4 0 .500 174 187
Buffalo 3 6 0 .333 189 236
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 6 2 0 .750 214 155
Tennessee 4 4 0 .500 173 167
Houston 2 6 0 .250 146 221
Jacksonville 0 8 0 .000 86 264
North
W L T Pet PF PA
Cincinnati 6 3 0 .667 217 166
Cleveland 4 5 0 .444 172 197
Baltimore 3 5 0 .375 168 172
Pittsburgh 2 6 0 .250 156 208
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Kansas City 9 0 0 1.000 215 111
Denver 7 1 0 .875 343 218
San Diego 4 4 0 .500 192 174
Oakland 3 5 0 .375 146 199
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 5 4 0 .556 257 209
Philadelphia 4 5 0 .444 225 231
Washington 3 6 0 .333 230 287
N.Y Giants 2 6 0 .250 141 223
South
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 6 2 0 .750 216 146
Carolina 5 3 0 .625 204 106
Atlanta 2 6 0 .250 176 218



don't turn the ball over,
they don't commit pen-
alties...It'll be a great
challenge for us."
The Knights are com-
ing off a bye-week and
remained ranked be-
hind Louisville in the
BCS rankings despite
a lopsided victory over
Connecticut on Oct. 26.
BCS rankings could
potentially come into
play in a tiebreaker sce-
nario should UCF lose
one of its final five con-
ference games.
Still, O'Leary said he
wasn't thinking about
any potential boost
that could come with a
victory this week.
"I think the most im-
portant thing is that you
keep winning," O'Leary
said. "That's the only
control you have in
the polls. Say whatev-
er, but if we keep win-
ning, then we'll end up


where we want to be...
That's the only control
we have over anything,
really."
Here are five things
to watch for in today's
game:

PRESSURE UP FRONT

Look for the Knights


Tampa Bay 0 8 0 .000 124 190
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 5 3 0 .625 217 197
Chicago 5 3 0 .625 240 226
Green Bay 5 3 0 .625 232 185
Minnesota 2 7 0 .222 220 279
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 8 1 0 .889 232 149
San Francisco 6 2 0 .750 218 145
Arizona 4 4 0 .500 160 174
St. Louis 3 6 0 .333 186 226
Thursday's Game
Minnesota 34, Washington 27
Sunday's Games
Detroit at Chicago, 1p.m.
Philadelphia at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Baltimore, 1p.m.
St. Louis at Indianapolis, 1p.m.
Seattle atAtlanta, 1p.m.
Oakland at N.Y Giants, 1p.m.
Buffalo at Pittsburgh, 1p.m.
Carolina at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Denver at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
Houston at Arizona, 4:25 p.m.
Dallas at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Cleveland, Kansas City, N.Y Jets, New
England
Monday's Game
Miami at Tampa Bay, 8:40 p.m.
Thursday
Vikings 34, Redskins 27
Washington 10 14 3 0 27
Minnesota 7 7 14 6 34
First Quarter
Was-FG Forbath 20, 8:16.
Min-Peterson 18 run (Walsh kick), 5:10.
Was-Garcon 8 pass from Griffin III (Forbath kick),
1:17.
Second Quarter
Min-Patterson 2 pass from Ponder (Walsh kick),
12:59.
Was-Reed 11 pass from Griffin III (Forbath kick),
5:02.
Was-Paulsen 1 pass from Griffin III (Forbath
kick), :10.
Third Quarter
Was-FG Forbath 40,9:22.
Min-Carlson 28 pass from Ponder (Walsh kick),
4:32.
Min-Peterson 1 run (Walsh kick), :57.
Fourth Quarter
Min-FG Walsh 39, 9:54.
Min-FG Walsh 40,3:36.
A-64,011.
Was Min
First downs 27 22
Total Net Yards 433 307
Rushes-yards 36-191 24-91
Passing 242 216
Punt Returns 1-0 2-34
Kickoff Returns 3-74 6-98
Interceptions Ret. 1-30 0-0
Comp-Att-lnt 24-37-0 21-27-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 4-39 1-5
Punts 345.0 1-50.0
Fumbles-Lost 1-0 1-0
Penalties-Yards 8-63 1-7
Time of Possession 36:01 23:59
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Washington, Morris 26139, Griffin
1III 744, Helu Jr. 2-8, Young 1-0. Minnesota, Pe-
terson 20-75, Ponder 2-13, Gerhart 14, Cassel
1-(minus 1).
PASSING-Washington, Griffin III 24-37-0-281. Min-
nesota, Ponder 17-21-1-174, Cassel 4-6-0-47.
RECEIVING-Washington, Garcon 7-119, Reed 6-62,
Hankerson 5-61, Helu Jr. 3-23, Paulsen 2-3, Moss
1-13. Minnesota, Carlson 7-98, Simpson 445, Jen-
nings 3-18, Wright 2-34, Patterson 2-22, Peterson
2-2, Ford 1-2.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.
HOCKEY
NHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
TampaBay 15 11 4 0 22 51 37
Detroit 17 9 5 3 21 43 45
Toronto 15 10 5 0 20 48 36
Boston 15 9 5 1 19 42 29
Montreal 17 8 8 1 17 44 38
Ottawa 16 6 6 4 16 50 49
Florida 16 3 9 4 10 32 57
Buffalo 18 3 14 1 7 31 55
Metropolitan
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 16 11 5 0 22 49 38
Washington 16 9 7 0 18 53 44
N.Y Rangers 16 8 8 0 16 35 43
Carolina 16 6 7 3 15 30 45
N.Y Islanders 16 6 7 3 15 47 51
New Jersey 15 4 7 4 12 29 42
Columbus 15 5 10 0 10 36 44
Philadelphia 15 4 10 1 9 22 42
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Colorado 14 12 2 0 24 46 25
Chicago 16 10 2 4 24 56 43
St. Louis 14 10 2 2 22 50 33
Minnesota 17 9 4 4 22 45 38
Nashville 15 8 5 2 18 37 44
Dallas 16 8 6 2 18 44 47
Winnipeg 17 6 9 2 14 40 51
Pacific
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 17 13 3 1 27 57 42
San Jose 16 10 2 4 24 59 36
Phoenix 17 11 4 2 24 56 53
Vancouver 18 11 5 2 24 52 46
Los Angeles 16 10 6 0 20 45 40
Calgary 16 6 8 2 14 45 57
Edmonton 17 4 11 2 10 42 66
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Thursday's Games
Washington 3, Minnesota 2, SO



to try to make Cougars
freshman quarterback
John O'Korn make
quick decisions in the
pocket. O'Korn leads
all FBS true fresh-
men with 22 touch-
down passes this year,
and has thrown only
four interceptions.
UCF ranks third in the
American in passing
defense, surrendering
221 yards per game.

BORTLES' DECISIONS

Since his three inter-
ceptions in two games
against Penn State and
South Carolina, UCF
quarterback Blake
Bortles has settled
down and thrown only
one in his last three
outings. Expect the
Cougars' defense to
make it tough, though.
They have 17 picks on
the season, ranking
second nationally.


HOUSTON'S RUN GAME

The Cougars don't
average 41.1 points
per game just because
of their passing attack.
They also rank second
in the American in
rushing offense, aver-
aging 162.2 yards per


Boston 4, Horida 1
Ottawa 4, Montreal 1
New Jersey 3, Philadelphia 0
Carolina 1, N.Y Islanders 0
N.Y Rangers 4, Columbus 2
Dallas 4, Detroit 3, OT
Tampa Bay 4, Edmonton 2
St. Louis 3, Calgary 2
Los Angeles 2, Buffalo 0
Vancouver 4, San Jose 2
Friday's Games
New Jersey at Toronto, late
Nashville at Winnipeg, late
Calgary at Colorado, late
Buffalo at Anaheim, late
Today's Games
Edmonton at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Forida at Ottawa, 2 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Carolina, 7 p.m.
N.Y Islanders at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh atSt. Louis, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Washington at Phoenix, 8p.m.
Vancouver at Los Angeles, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
N.Y Islanders at Montreal, 6 p.m.
Nashville at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Rorida at N.Y Rangers, 7 p.m.
Edmonton at Chicago, 7:30 p.m.
San Jose at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.
Washington at Colorado, 8p.m.
Vancouver at Anaheim,8 p.m.
GOLF
Turkish Airlines Open
Friday
At Montgomerie Maxx Royal
Belek, Turkey
Purse: $7 million
Yardage: 7,100; Par: 72 (35-37)
Second Round
Justin Walters, South Africa 66-66 132
lan Poulter, England 66-66 132
Victor Dubuisson, France 67-65 132
HenrikStenson, Sweden 64-68 132
Tiger Woods, United States 70-63 133
Richard Sterne, South Africa 69-65 134
Jamie Donaldson, Wales 68-67 135
Alejandro Canizares, Spain 67-68 135
Ross Fisher, England 68-68 136
David Lynn, England 68-68 136
Paul Waring, England 68-68 136
Robert-Jan Derksen, Netherlands 67-69 136
Thomas Bjorn, Denmark 64-72 136
Lee Westwood, England 70-66 136
Julien Quesne, France 67-69 136
Justin Rose, England 70-66 136
Also
Francesco Molinari, Italy 69-68 137
Martin Kaymer, Germany 69-68 137
Padraig Harrington, Ireland 68-70 138
Charl Schwartzel, South Africa 68-70 138
Peter Uihlein, United States 67-72 139
Matteo Manassero, Italy 70-70 140
Paul Lawrie, Scotland 74-70 144
Colin Montgomerie, Scotland 72-72 144
Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain 73-71 144
Louis Oosthuizen, South Africa 72-74 146
PGA Tour
McGladrey Classic
Friday
At Sea Island Resort (Seaside Course)
St. Simons Island, Ga.
Purse: $5.5 million
Yardage: 7,005; Par: 70 (35-35)
Partial Second Round
18 players failed to finish the round
Chris Kirk 66-66 132
Kevin Chappell 65-68 133
Briny Baird 63-70 133
Webb Simpson 65-68 133
JohnSenden 66-67 133
Jason Kokrak 69-65 134
Scott Brown 66-68 134
Ted Potter, Jr. 67-67 134
Tim Clark 67-67 134
Brian Harman 67-68 135
Matt Every 67-68 135
Brian Gay 63-72 135
Jonathan Byrd 66-69 135
Matt Kuchar 68-68 136
Will Claxton 65-71 136
Kevin Stadler 68-68 136
Boo Weekley 67-69 136
D.H. Lee 67-70 137
Scott Langley 66-71 137
Ben Curtis 68-69 137
Martin Aores 70-68 138
George McNeill 62-76 138
Harris English 68-70 138
Heath Slocum 67-71 138
Zach Johnson 70-68 138
Stuart Appleby 68-70 138
Trevor Immelman 67-72 139
Aaron Baddeley 68-71 139
Andres Romero 70-69 139
Pat Perez 68-71 139
Paul Goydos 68-71 139
Cameron Tringale 70-69 139
Kyle Stanley 68-71 139
Rory Sabbatini 66-73 139
Charley Hoffman 66-73 139
Robert Garrigus 65-74 139
Spencer Levin 69-70 139
Darren Clarke 69-70 139
Charles Howell III 69-70 139
YE. Yang 68-71 139
Retief Goosen 68-71 139
J.J. Henry 67-72 139
Troy Matteson 71-69 140
Russell Henley 69-71 140
Carl Pettersson 66-74 140
Scott Piercy 67-73 140
Camilo Villegas 66-74 140
David Hearn 74-66 140
James Hahn 69-72 141
David Toms 68-73 141
Justin Leonard 71-70 141
John Rollins 65-76 141
Blake Adams 73-68 141
Danny Lee 70-71 141



game. UCF's defense
comes in allowing 128
yards per game.

SCOREBOARD

This game could
be an offensive track
meet. Houston has
scored in all 32 quar-
ters this season and
has scored in 39
straight quarters dat-
ing to last year. Hous-
ton is the only FBS
team to score in every
quarter in 2013. UCF
has outscored oppo-
nents 134-41 in the
first half this season,
but just 125-94 in the
final 30 minutes.

ANOTHER CLOSE
AFFAIR?

Three of the four
meetings between the
Knights and Cougars
have been decided by
seven or fewer points.


If it comes down to a
kicking matchup, UCF
has the advantage
with Lou Groza Award
candidate Shawn Mof-
fitt, who is 9 for 9 on
field goal attempts
this season. Houston
kicker Richie Leone is
11 for 17.


TV2DAY
AUTO RACING
11:30 a.m.
FS1 NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for AdvoCare 500, at Avondale, Ariz.
12:30 p.m.
FS1 NASCAR, Nationwide Series, pole qualifying for ServiceMaster 200, at Avondale,
Ariz.
2:30 p.m.
FS1 -NASCAR, Sprint Cup, "Happy Hour Series," final practice for AdvoCare 500, at Avon-
dale, Ariz.
4 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Nationwide Series, ServiceMaster 200, at Avondale, Ariz.
2:30 a.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, qualifying for Auto Club Finals, at Pomona, Calif.
BOXING
9:30 p.m.
HBO Vanes Martirosyan (33-0-1) vs. Demetrius Andrade (19-0-0), for vacant WBO junior
middleweight title; junior featherweights, Nonito Donaire (31-2-0) vs. Vic Darchinyan (39-
5-1); champion Roman Martinez (27-1-2) vs. Mikey Garcia (32-0-0), for WBO junior light-
weight title, at Corpus Christi, Texas
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Noon
ABC -FSU at Wake Forest
ESPN Auburn at Tennessee
ESPN2 Penn St. at Minnesota
ESPNU Missouri at Kentucky
SUN -Vanderbilt at Florida
FOX/WOFL Arkansas at Mississippi
FS-Florida TCU at Iowa St.
CBSSN Western Kentucky at Army
WKCF- SMU at Cincinnati
CSS -UAB at Marshall
12:30
WRBW -Virginia at North Carolina
3 p.m.
FOX/WOFL Southern Cal at California
3:30 p.m.
ABC Nebraska at Michigan
CBS Mississippi St. at Texas A&M
ESPN -BYU at Wisconsin
NBCSN James Madison at New Hampshire
FS-Florida Syracuse at Maryland
CBSSN Hawaii at Navy
CSS UTEP at North Texas


FS1 Tulsa at East Carolina

FS1 Kansas at Oklahoma St.
NBCSN Cornell at Dartmouth
ESPNU -North Carolina State at Duke


3:45 p.m.

4 p.m.



7 p.m.


ESPN Virginia Tech at Miami
ESPN2 Houston at UCF
FOX/WOFL -Texas at West Virginia
CBSSN Southern Mississippi at Louisiana Tech
8 p.m.


CBS -LSU at Alabama
ABC Notre Dame at Pittsburgh
ESPNU -Utah State at UNLV

ESPN -UCLA at Arizona

ESPN2 -Fresno St. at Wyoming


10 p.m.

10:15 p.m.


10:30 p.m.
CBSSN San Diego State at San Jose State
GOLF
1 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, The McGladrey Classic, third round, at St. Simons Island, Ga.
3:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Turkish Airlines Open, final round, at Antalya, Turkey
NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION
7:30 p.m.
FS-Florida Orlando at Atlanta
NBA -Indiana at Brooklyn
SOCCER
9:55 a.m.
NBCSN Premier League, West Bromwich at Chelsea
12:30 p.m.
NBC Premier League, West Ham at Norwich
2:30 p.m.
NBC MLS, playoffs, conference championships, leg 1, teams TBD




MDB

FROM PAGE B1


fuel the comeback hopes of the Bulldogs. Both
Smith and Antoine Dorsett ripped off long kick
returns, both for 85 yards for touchdowns at
key moments in the contest.

FA-LEESBURG TO PLAY FOR SSAC CHAMPIONSHIP

Byron Masoline scored three touchdowns
and rushed for 237 yards to lead First Academy
of Leesburg to a 32-37 win Friday against Seff-
ner Christian in the SSAC semifinals in Seffner.
The Eagles (8-2) will play Orlando Chris-
tian Prep on Friday in the SSAC Championship
Game at First Academy of Orlando.

GIRLS SOCCER

Morgan Shafar scored four goals on Friday to
lead Leesburg to an 8-0 win against Umatilla.
Chelsea Mudd scored two goals for the Yel-
low Jackets.
Sarah McKinney and Jasmine Kasch also
scored.
Shafar, Mudd, Melody Smalley and Sidney
Williams had assists.
The Yellow Jackets managed 26 shots on goal.
Leesburg improved to 6-0.




When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to
report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches
of recreational and youth leagues can send game results,
statistics, team and action photos, and we'll publish them
in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can
send us individual photos and accomplishments.

Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com




CONTACTS

SPORTS EDITOR or 352-365-8279.
FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Amateur Listings (cl-
------------- Amateur Listings (col-
FAX 352-365-1951 lege scholarships, meeting

EMAIL announcements, schedule
sports@dailycommercial.com changes, outdoors notices) can

* Schools or coaches can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or
report game results after 6 emailed to sports@dailycom-
p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, mercial.com




Saturday, November 9, 2013


COLLEGE FOOTBALL



FSU can clinch division by beating Wake


JOEDY MCCREARY
Associated Press

WINSTON-SALEM,
N.C. The only thing
standing between surg-
ing Florida State and
another trip to the ACC
championship game is
depleted Wake Forest.
Clinching another
trip to Charlotte would
be nice, but the third-
ranked Seminoles are
thinking much bigger
than that.
Florida State (8-0,
6-0) can wrap up the
Atlantic Division title
and claim their third
league title game berth
in four years with a
victory over the five-
touchdown-underdog
Demon Deacons (4-5,
2-4) on Saturday.
The Seminoles have
won 10 straight since
last year, and are com-
ing off a blowout of
their biggest ACC rival.
None of their final four
opponents have win-
ning records.
But coach Jimbo
Fisher knows that for
his team remain in the
national title chase, it
can't just coast to the
finish line.
"You know the situ-
ations and the media
hype you get," Fisher


said. "The only thing
you can control is how
you play this week.
What's important for us
is to continue to play
well, reach our goals
in the games of get-
ting better each week,
learning to prepare
each week and getting
better as a team. If we
do that, then the re-
sults, we'll take the re-
sults whatever they
may be."
They've been pretty
good so far.
Florida State ranks no
lower than third in the
ACC in any of the eight
main team stat cate-
gories. The Seminoles
are tops in the league
in scoring offense (51.1
ppg), scoring defense
(13.1 ppg), total offense
(549.1 ypg) and passing
offense (339.4 ypg).
The last of the ACC's
unbeatens has beat-
en every team on the
schedule by at least two
touchdowns and only
Boston College (34)
has hung more than 17
points on them.
No wonderWake For-
est coach Jim Grobe
calls Florida State "the
best team we've played
so far."
His Demon Dea-
cons are the only team


PHIL SEARS/AP
Florida State running back James Wilder Jr. (32) celebrates after scoring against Miami on Nov. 2
in Tallahassee. The Seminoles play Wake Forest today in Winston-Salem, N.C.


that drew all three of
the league's national-
ly ranked teams. Wake
Forest was routed by
Clemson 56-7 but led
Miami all day before
falling 24-21 two weeks
ago.
"After Miami, I
thought we can play
with the good teams,
but we've got to play
our best football,"
Grobe said. "If we play
really, really good foot-


ball, I think we can win.
...It's all got to fall right.
You can't turn the ball
over. You can't have any
goofy special-teams
mistakes. You can't give
up too many plays on
defense.... It's really got
to be everybody."
Five things to know
about Florida State's
visit to Winston-Sa-
lem:
WAKE FLORIDA
Wake Forest holds a


surprising 4-3 lead in
the series since 2006,
beat the Seminoles
35-30 in their last vis-
it and have so many
native Floridians (29)
on the roster that
they've been dubbed
"Wake Florida." A few
key Demon Deacons
from that game QB
Tanner Price, RB Josh
Harris and NT Niki-
ta Whitlock are still
around but plenty has


changed for Florida
State. Since that Oc-
tober 2011 loss that
dropped the Semi-
noles to 2-3 the last
time they've been un-
der .500 they're 27-
3. "That seems like a
long time ago," Fish-
er said. "We've evolved
and hopefully we can
learn and continue to
evolve."
FAMOUS JAMEIS
Grobe faced seven
ofhis week's project-
ed NFL starting quar-
terbacks when they
were in college and he
expects Florida State
freshman Jameis Win-
ston to someday join
that club. "We look at
him no different than
Russell Wilson and
Philip Rivers in that
regard," Grobe said.
Winston leads the
ACC in total offense
(331.9 ypg), passing
average (312.8 ypg)
and efficiency rating
(201.1) while being
surrounded by a cast
of talented playmak-
ers. "Somebody was
talking about how he
smiles all the time,"
Grobe said. "I'd smile
too, if I had those guys
around me."


No. 6 Stanford holds off No. 2 Oregon 26-20


RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press

STANFORD, Calif.
- Tyler Gaffney ran
for 157 yards and No.
6 Stanford hammered
No. 2 Oregon for three
quarters, then held off
a furious rally by the
Ducks to crush their
national title hopes for
a second straight sea-
son, this time with a
26-20 victory Thursday
night.
Kevin Hogan ran for a
touchdown and played
a mistake-free game for
Stanford (8-1, 6-1 Pac-
12). The Cardinal put
on a clinic in how to
play keep away from a
team that was averag-
ing 55.6 points. Stan-
ford ran for 274 yards
and held the ball for
421/2 minutes.
Heisman Trophy con-
tender Marcus Mario-
ta was inaccurate and
under pressure much


MARCIO JOSE SANCHEZ /AP
Stanford running back Tyler Gaffney, left, runs against Oregon
linebacker Rodney Hardrick (48) during Thursday's game in
Stanford, Calif.


of the night, but he
threw two fourth-quar-
ter touchdown pass-
es, sandwiched around
a blocked field goal re-
turn for a score by Rod-
ney Hardrick, to pull
the Ducks (8-1, 5-1) to
26-20 with 2:12 left.


Oregon couldn't re-
cover a second onside
kick and Stanford ran
out the clock.
And the biggest win-
ners of all? No. 3 Flori-
da State. The Seminoles
don't have to worry
about the Ducks nudg-


ing them out of second
place in the BCS stand-
ings.
The Seminoles were
in danger of slipping to
third in the BCS if Or-
egon could have regis-
tered a big road victory
against a quality oppo-
nent. Now, Florida State
faces a manageable re-
maining schedule with
a good chance to win its
way to the BCS champi-
onship game at the Rose
Bowl in January.
Stanford won a three-
point game in over-
time at Oregon last year
to deny the Ducks a
chance to play for the
national title. It didn't
look as if there would be
any drama in the return
bout on the Farm. Stan-
ford led 17-0 at halftime
and added three more
field goals by Josh Wil-
liamson in the second
half.
Oregon looked like
dead Ducks, down 26-0
early in the fourth with


Stanford hammering
away behind Gaffney,
who set a school record
with 45 carries. Even
after Oregon finally
broke the seal with a 23-
yard touchdown pass
from Mariota to Daryle
Hawkins, the Cardinal
went on another time
consuming drive and
attempted a long field
goal that would have
sealed it.
Instead, the Ducks
blocked it, Hardrick
scooped and scored
from 65 yards out with
5:08 left and suddenly it
was interesting.
Only 5 seconds later it
was even more interest-
ing when the Ducks re-
covered an onside kick.
They quickly moved in-
side the Stanford 5, but
got pushed back to a
fourth-and-goal from
the 12. Mariota threw
a touchdown pass to
Pharoah Brown with
2:12 remaining, but the
time it took the Ducks


to get in while burning a
timeout was key
Stanford grabbed the
next onside kick and Or-
egon was powerless to
stop the clock.
No. 6 STANFORD 26, No. 2 OREGON 20
Oregon 0 0 0 20 20
Stanford 7 10 6 3 26
First Quarter
Stan-Gaffney 2 run (Williamson kick), 2:36.
Second Quarter
Stan-Hogan 11 run (Williamson kick), 11:26.
Stan-FG Williamson 19, :00.
Third Quarter
Stan-FG Williamson 34,12:34.
Stan-FG Williamson 26,1:31.
Fourth Quarter
Stan-FG Williamson 30,11:40.
Ore-Hawkins 23 pass from Mariota (Wogan kick),
10:11.
Ore-Hardrick 65 blocked field goal return (pass
failed), 5:07.
Ore-Brown 12 pass from Mariota (Wogan kick),
2:12.
A-51,545.
Ore Stan
First downs 17 25
Rushes-yards 24-62 66-274
Passing 250 103
Comp-Att-lnt 20-34-0 7-13-0
Return Yards 25 0
Punts-Avg. 3-38.3 143.0
Fumbles-Lost 4-2 1-0
Penalties-Yards 10-81 2-10
Time of Possession 17:26 42:34
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Oregon, Marshall 1146, D.Thomas 630,
Tyner 1-2, Mariota 6-(minus 16). Stanford, Gaffney
45-157, Hogan 8-57, Wilkerson 6-25, Montgomery
1-14, Wright 2-13, Young 2-11, Seale 2-(minus 3).
PASSING-Oregon, Mariota 20-34-0-250. Stanford,
Hogan 7-13-0-103.
RECEIVING-Oregon, Addison 5-66, D.Thomas 445,
Huff 342, Hawkins 341, Brown 3-17, C.Allen 1-20,
Lowe 1-19. Stanford, Montgomery 2-20, Hewitt
2-15, Rector 147, Gaffney 1-15, Pratt 1-6.


Baylor plays solid defense, beats Oklahoma 41-12


Associated Press

WACO, Texas Bryce
Petty threw for three
touchdowns and ran
for two more, Shock
Linwood ran for 182
yards and fifth-ranked
Baylor stayed unde-
feated by passing its
first big test with a 41-
12 victory over No. 12
Oklahoma on Thurs-
day night.
Baylor (8-0, 5-0 Big
12) scored twice in the
final minute before
halftime and stretched
its school-record win-
ning streak to 12 games
since a loss at Oklaho-
ma last November. The
Bears are 8-0 for the
first time.
Even though Bay-
lor came in leading
the nation in scoring
(64 points per game)
and total offense (718


yards per game) and
was outscoring oppo-
nents by an average
margin of 48 points -
many questioned how
good the Bears were af-
ter getting into Novem-
ber without playing a
ranked team. They have
now, and they respond-
ed with an impressive
victory against a team
that used to routinely
overwhelm them.
Oklahoma (7-2, 4-2)
has a 21-2 lead in the
series, but both loss-
es have come in its last
two trips to Floyd Casey
Stadium for prime-
time games.
With running backs
Lache Seastrunk and
Glasco Martin get-
ting banged up in the
game, Linwood ran 23
times. The Bears also
were missing top re-
ceiver Tevin Reese, who


Baylor quarterback Bryce Petty scrambles out of the pocket be-
fore passing against Oklahoma on Thursday in Waco, Texas.


was without a catch be-
fore injuring his wrist
and spending the sec-
ond half on the sideline
with his arm in a sling.
Baylor trailed 5-3 af-
ter a strange sequence
that started at the end
of the first quarter
when the Bears were


penalized 38 yards on
one play, and had a
player's ejection over-
turned before he made
a touchdown-saving
play.
After Petty scored on
a 1-yard keeper with
a minute to go in the
first half, Oklahoma


gave the ball right back
when Blake Bell threw
an interception right
into the arms of line-
backer Eddie Lackey at
the Sooners 38.
Petty ran 14 yards
on third-and-10 be-
fore a double-pump
throw to Antwan Good-
ley, whose Big 12-lead-
ing ninth TD catch was
a spectacular grab with
both arms fully extend-
ed. He held on for a 24-
yard play that put the
Bears up 24-5 at half-
time.
Petty completed 13 of
26 passes for a season-
low 204 yards. He ran
16 times for 45 yards.
Bell finished 15-of-35
passing for 150 yards
with a touchdown and
two interceptions.
Oklahoma had 237 to-
tal yards.


The Bears are 5-0 at
home against Top 25
teams since the start of
the 2011 season.
No. 5 BAYLOR 41,
No. 12 OKLAHOMA 12
Oklahoma 0 5 7 0 12
Baylor 3 21 10 7 41
First Quarter
Bay-FG A.Jones 29, 7:09.
Second Quarter
Okl-Safety, 13:22.
OkI-FG Hunnicutt 22,12:09.
Bay-Petty 5 run (A.Jones kick), 7:02.
Bay-Petty 1 run (A.Jones kick), 1:00.
Bay-Goodley 24 pass from Petty (A.Jones kick), :13.
Third Quarter
Bay-Norwood 17 pass from Petty (A.Jones kick),
8:14.
Okl-Finch 10 pass from Bell (Hunnicutt kick), 3:20.
Bay-FG A.Jones 40,1:17.
Fourth Quarter
Bay-Goodley 25 pass from Petty (A.Jones kick),
9:03.
A-50,537.
Okl Bay
First downs 16 28
Rushes-yards 34-87 54-255
Passing 150 204
Comp-Att-lnt 15-35-2 13-26-0
Return Yards 1 43
Punts-Avg. 741.1 3-51.3
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 1-0
Penalties-Yards 13-97 12-119
Time of Possession 29:17 30:43
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Oklahoma, Finch 736, Clay 6-19, TKnight
5-17, Dam.Williams 7-13, Bell 8-5, Shepard 1-(mi-
nus 3). Baylor, Linwood 23-182, Petty 1645, Seast
runk 6-19, Martin 6-13, Team 3-(minus 4).
PASSING-Oklahoma, Bell 15-35-2-150. Baylor, Petty
13-26-0-204.
RECEIVING-Oklahoma, Saunders 6-74, Reynolds
3-31, Dam.Williams 2-12, Bester 2-11, Neal 1-12,
Finch 1-10. Baylor, Goodley 6-80, Norwood 4-78,
C.Fuller 346.


DAILY COMMERCIAL






COLLEGE BASKETBALL



Jack Taylor out to prove he's no novelty act


LUKE MEREDITH
Associated Press

GRINNELL, Iowa-
It took 138 points for
the college basketball
world to finally notice
Jack Taylor.
A year removed from
the most prolific scor-
ing binge in NCAA his-
tory, Taylor is eager to
cast aside any linger-
ing doubts about his
health, his skills and
even the way he broke
the record and let
the nation know that
he's no novelty act.
Taylor became an in-
stant celebrity last Nov.
20 when he scored 138
points for Division III
Grinnell College of
Iowa in a 179-104 win
over Faith Baptist Bi-
ble College. The effort
earned Taylor kudos
from LeBron James,
Kobe Bryant and Kevin
Durant, the nickname
"Mr. 138" and derision
from those who brand-
ed him a ball hog.
Taylor's chance to
build off his record-
setting performance
was cut short by a bro-
ken right wrist just 12
games into last season.
He's healthy now, and
determined to lead the
nation in scoring and
his team into the NCAA
tournament.
"I want to show peo-
ple that it really wasn't
a fluke that I scored
138. That it wasn't just
a one-time thing but
that I can put up some
big numbers again, and
against good oppo-
nents," Taylor said.
Until that fateful
night, Taylor had been
so easy to overlook.
Taylor grew up on
an 80-acre farm in
Black River Falls in ru-
ral Wisconsin, the son
of teacher's aide Eliza-
beth Taylor known
as "Lulu" as to avoid
confusion with the
movie star and Jack,
who operates heavy
equipment. Taylor was
the only boy in a house
with three sisters; Cas-
sandra, Tiffany and
Jennifer, and his fa-
ther's busy work sched-
ule meant that Jack had
more than his fair share


CHARLIE NEIBERGALL /AP
Grinnell College guard Jack Taylor shoots during practice on Oct. 30 in Grinnell, Iowa. It took 138 points for the college basketball
world to finally notice Jack Taylor. A year removed from the most prolific scoring binge in history, Taylor, of little-known Grinnell Col-
lege, is eager to cast aside lingering doubts about his size, skills and even the way he broke the NCAA record and let the na-
tion know he's for real.


of the chores.
He'd happily do them
all if the reward was
basketball.
"In the 7th or 8th
grade, he finally looked
and me and said 'You
know what? You don't
need to nag me, Mom.
Just ask me if I want
to play basketball. I
will get up and do any
chore you ask,'" Lulu
Taylor said. "I said, 'OK.
Now I know how to
work you.'"
Lulu bought a back-
board and a hoop at
a rummage sale, and
Jack's dad stuck them
on a pole lying around
the farm. It was there
- and on a rim hung
up in the barn when
the snow got too deep
- that Jack became a
scorer. He used a chair
as a dummy defend-
er and spent countless
hours working on his
offense. He'd dribble
to the wings, use a spin
move to create space
for a 3 or beat the chair
with a crossover for a
jumper.
Always the focus on


honing shots Taylor
would have to make in
real games.
"Having no brother, I
was often by myself and
basketball is a game
where all you need is a
hoop and a ball. My op-
tions were either play-
ing Barbies with them
or going out and play-
ing basketball," Taylor
said.
The 5-foot-10 Taylor
blossomed into a two-
time honorable-men-
tion All-State pick. But
most Division I coach-
es just saw a short,
skinny kid from a small
town. Taylor thought
he could be an impact
player in college and
Grinnell coach David
N. Arseneault agreed
with him.
The Division III Pio-
neers run the nation's
quickest offensive
schemes. They focus
on shooting within 12
seconds on every pos-
session and have won
multiple team and in-
dividual national scor-
ing marks.
To Arseneault, Taylor


wasn't an undersized,
shoot-first point guard.
He was a potential pro-
gram-defining talent
and his top recruiting
target for years.
"He was a scoring
machine," Arseneault
said. "His quickness
and his ability to create
his own shot, those are
the things that make
guards in the Grinnell
system really good."
Taylor got some feel-
ers from Division I
schools, mostly from
Ivy League teams like
Columbia that were in-
trigued in part by his
strong academic re-
sume. But Taylor was
so determined to make
it as a Division I player
that he chose to play at
Mercersburg Academy
in Pennsylvania. Nine
games into his prep
school career, Taylor
tore the ACL and MCL
in his left knee.
He was done for the
season, and Division I
coaches soon stopped
calling.
"It was really tough. I
think it was the hardest


time of my life thus far,
just because you put
so much hope into it,"
said Taylor, who add-
ed that the experience
strengthened his re-
ligious faith. "All your
hopes are just shat-
tered."
Taylor moved on
to Wisconsin-La-
Crosse once is knee
got healthy. But after
one mediocre season
that followed a redshirt
year, Taylor was finally
ready to take a chance
on Grinnell's entertain-
ing but unusual sys-
tem.
Arseneault was
thrilled to finally land
the player he was con-
vinced could be the
program's seventh na-
tional scoring champi-
on.
But Taylor was also
the new guy, and
though he's self-as-
sured he's also soft-
spoken. Teammate and
close friend Cody Ol1-
son describes him as
"quiet by choice."
It was Taylor's poise
in the face of unprec-


edented media atten-
tion and scrutiny that
revealed his true char-
acter to his team-
mates. Some believed
that Taylor had alienat-
ed his new teammates
by shooting 108 times.
But it was actually part
of a plan to break Tay-
lor out of a slump, and
the whole team had
embraced it before the
game.
Teammates were also
moved by how humble
Taylor was about what
he had done and
how quickly he praised
them for his historic
night.
"That really brought
him out of his shell.
He's a quiet guy. Su-
per nice, but quiet,"
teammate Patrick Ma-
her said. "That 138 re-
ally brought him on to
a whole other level as a
leader."
The team's hope that
Taylor's historic night
would be a spring
board to bigger things
ended when Taylor
drove into a defend-
er, lost control in mid-
air and heard a crunch
from his right wrist in
early January.
The Pioneers, who
started 9-2 with Taylor
averaging 38.6 points
a game, finished 17-6.
He's healed up now, af-
ter an offseason that
included throwing out
the first pitch at a Mil-
waukee Brewers game
and being honored on
the floor of the Iowa
Legislature.
The Pioneers will
lean on Taylor more
than ever this winter
after losing eight se-
niors, but Taylor knows
that approaching 138
points in a game again
is highly unlikely.
He's fine with that -
and with the idea that
he'll likely always be
known as "Mr. 138."
"Obviously I won't be
able to do anything as
big as that again, just
because I'm a marked
man now," Taylor said.
"I'm not playing the
game for that. I'm
not seeking to be on
'SportsCenter' again. I
play because I love it."


NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE


Ponder leads Vikings past RG III, Redskins


DAVE CAMPBELL
Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS -
Entering the critical
third year of his career,
Christian Ponder con-
tributed to Minnesota's
three straight losses to
start the season.
Then he broke a rib.
After sitting out a game
to heal, he found him-
self on the bench for
two more weeks. His re-


turn to the lineup didn't
yield much, other than
two more defeats for
the Vikings. This game
Thursday against the
Washington Redskins
wasn't going well, ei-
ther.
So there was Pon-
der, sprinting toward
the goal line late in the
third quarter and sacri-
ficing his body to dive
for the pylon between
two Redskins defend-


mission inn
R ESO0R T & C L U B
HOWEY-IN-THE HILLS


MO & M 8 olsGenFe& ShrdCt
Plvrr lrd lv o s! etRae l aysAvilbl.C


ers. The original touch-
down call was reversed
by replay review, and
Ponder walked off with
a dislocated shoulder
on his non-throwing
left arm.
This story had a
pleasant ending for the
Vikings, though. Adri-
an Peterson scored on
the next play to give
them the lead for good
after Matt Cassel re-
lieved Ponder. The de-
fense, reversing course
after a rough first half,
got Robert Griffin III to
throw three straight in-
completions from the 4
in the closing seconds
to hang on for a 34-27
victory over the Red-
skins.
"Winning is a great
feeling," Ponder said.
"We expect that to con-
tinue to happen. The
year is far from over."
Ponder went 17 for 21
for 174 yards with two
touchdowns and an in-
terception for the Vi-


ANN HEISENFELT/AP
Minnesota running back Adrian Peterson runs to the end zone
on a 1-yard touchdown run during Thursday's game against


Washington in Minneapolis.
kings (2-7), whose only
other win came in Lon-
don over Pittsburgh.
Wearing a sling after-
ward, he said he ex-
pects to be ready to play
Nov. 17 at Seattle. Pon-
der was far from per-
fect, but the moxie he
showed in this game
gave the Vikings rea-
son to want him back


by then.
"When they see that
tape and see that he
extended his body the
way he did, it's going
to increase their appre-
ciation for who he is as
a person and what he
means to our team as
a quarterback," coach
Leslie Frazier said.
Griffin was 24 for


37 for 281 yards, three
touchdowns and no
turnovers, but the Red-
skins (3-6) blew a 27-14
lead they had early in
the third quarter. Griffin
also ran seven times for
44 yards, but the Vikings
took him down for four
sacks for 39 yards in the
second half including
21/2 by Kevin Williams.
This is the same re-
cord the Redskins had
in 2012 before winning
seven games in a row to
earn the NFC East title,
but their defense needs
a major improvement
for them to match last
year's feat.
"We just need it all
to come together, all to
click for us, and the only
way to do that is to keep
pushing forward," Grif-
fin said. "What's a man
to do when he goes to
work every day and puts
his all into it and some-
times comes up short?
He still goes to work the
next day, and we've got
to do that."


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 9, 2013




Saturday, November 9,2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5


CLASS A OR B, CDL
& DUMP TRUCK
DRIVER EXP'D.
With/fork lift exp.,
and able to unload
construction supplies.
Apply at: 4399 CR 156
Wildwood
Call 352-689-0251


DRIVER TRAINEES
NEEDED NOW!
Learn to drive for Covenant
Transport. No experience
needed! New drivers earn
$700-$900 per wk!
Teams $100 -125k!
Plus excellent benefits.
Local CDL Training
1-877-214-3624


DRIVER CDL CLASS A
Experienced. Loading/unloading
truck required. Clean Driving
record/Background.
Th "y mm 1CaWIw
&4 LUMBER a SUPPLY Ino.
722 Duck Lake Rd.
The Villages, FL 32159
352-753-3333
apply@romaclumber.com
FAX 352-787-9632
EOE/DFWP


CLASS "A"

OTR DRIVERS
No NYC. Benefits &
Bonus. Exp'd and new
CDL Grads welcome.
Call Windy Hill at
800-864-3404


RN OPENING FT
FOR MDS/PPS
CO-ORDINATOR
looking for an organized,
professional, knowledgeable
individual. Experience required.
Apply at
LAKE EUSTIS CARE CENTER
8:30am 3:00pm
Monday Friday
411 W. Woodward Ave. Eustis, FL.,
Online amauger@gchc.com
Or Fax 352-357-2874
DFWP/EOE


NOW HIRING
A FULL-TIME
WEB DESIGNER
Outside sales experience
preferred.
Email resume to
design@
silverlinegraphicdesign.com


FRONT OFFICE

POSITION P/T
For Medical Office.
Must have exp.
Fax resume to:
352-323-1894


MAINTENANCE/GROUNDS
PERSON
Fifty five plus community is looking
for a full time year round person
that is physically able to do some
heavy grounds work. Knowledge of
plumbing, irrigation systems and/or
STP plant operations an asset.
Please send resume to
fax 352-343-0100 or bring your
resume to Molokai Co Op, Inc.
1 Hawaiian Way Leesburg,
I1 i7AaR


SCHOOL BUS
DRIVERS
NEEDED
Training provided.
Lake County Schools,
Transportation
352-728-2561 or
Apply online:
www.lake.k1l2.fl.us


MA, LPN &
RADIOLOGY
TECH.
Needed for Busy
Urgent Care.
Email to:
medicalbillingtoday@
yahoo.com


COME JOIN
OUR TEAM!
IF $150-$200 WOULD HELP YOU
Handout free newspapers at
different locations in our delivery
area. 20-25 hrs/wk. Hours +
commission. Good for college
students & retirees. Will train the
right person. Must be clean cut &
not afraid to talk. Sales
experience a plus.
Call Joseph 813-484-3766 or
Ed 352-217-9337


EARN MONEY FOR THE HOLIDAYS
PART TIME SALES
$$$ START IMMEDIATELY $$$
Join a professional marketing
team working in Lake County. I
need mature, professionals that
would like to interact with people
in local stores at a kiosk while
working on commission. Current
representatives average $15-
$20/hr. EARN EXTRA MONEY
working weekends and evenings.
THIS IS THE BEST
PART TIME JOB EVER
CALL OR FAX 800-781-1547


U U U U


FABRICATION
PLUMBER
Experienced needed for
large contractor in
Wildwood. Benefits
available. DFWP, EEO.
NO PHONE CALLS.
Submit resume
jmoser@
nashincp-m.com


ATTENTION
ANYONE
DO YOU NEED
MONEY
Do you need a store,
office, shop, for
anything, any reason,
anytime. No lease, no
utilities, no credit, msg.
305-281-5475


ALL RESTAURANT
POSITIONS/
PIZZA MAKER
EXP'D./
DRIVERS
352-669-2400


We Find


People


For Jobs


U U P U U


NURSERY WORKER
FOR CHURCH PIT
On Sunday mornings, some
Wed. evenings & as needed.
Background check required.
Must be mature & love
children.
Apply in person
M-F 9am 2pmr
First Presbyterian Church
200 S. Lone Oak Dr.
Leesburg


OPTICAL TECH/
DISPENSER
Exp. Lab Tech need for
busy opthamolic practice
in The Villages. Dispensing
experience a plus.
Apply in person:
Beacon Advanced Eye
Care
1128 Bichara Blvd.
Lady Lake, FL 32159


DENTAL

ASSISTANT
Experienced only.
$15/hr.
Fax resume to:
352-787-9036
NO PHONE CALLS


BOOKKEEPER/

HR NEEDED
For small Company.
Send Resume to:
BOOKKEEPINGHR@
YAHOO.COM


U U U U U


SECRETARY P/T
Construction
background
preferred.
Fax resume:
352-728-1746


ENTRY LEVEL
CONSTRUCTION
$35K $40K per year,
Paid medical, vacation &
401k. CDL & travel a
must. DFWP/EOE
Call 352-383-3159
Ext. 229


ELECTRICAL ESTIMATOR NEEDED
FOR COMMERCIAL JOBS
Applicants MUST have electrical and
estimating experience in commercial
industry; $1,000 sign on bonus after
90 days & $1,000 bonus after one
year. Applicants must also have a
clean driving record, high school
diploma or equivalent. Company is an
EOE and Drug-Free Workplace.
Excellent health benefits, 401k and
PTO; MVR & Background checks.
Apply in person at
Pike's Electric Inc.
719 Industrial Drive
Wildwood, FL 34758


DELIVERY
DRIVERS &
PREP
Must have own
transportation.
Apply in person at:
Taki's #2 in Eustis
1600 S. Bay St., Eustis


a a m a a


RECEPTIONIST,
FULL TIME
Needed for busy
dermatology office.
Previous experience highly
preferred. References
required. Will need travel
to Villages Office 2-3
times per/mo.
Please fax resume to
Lake Dermatology
352-365-0932


We Find


People


For Jobs


MAINTENANCE
Scottish Highlands maintenance
position available. Should be
experienced in irrigation, lawn
mowing equipment and pool
maintenance. Excellent starting
pay with insurance package.
Background check required.
Call Chris at 352-483-6054


FRAMERS

W/EXP.
Must be self motivated!
Benefits avail.
PATRIOT BUILDERS
352-516-6563 or
352-307-9671


DELIVERY PERSONNEL
Office equip dealer seeks reliable
person to deliver equip & supplies,
assist in inventory control & light bldg.
maint. Must have neat appearance,
good communication skills, able to
follow written/oral directions, & be
insurable. Must be able to safely
operate a box truck. Heavy lifting
req'd. Please do not respond if you
can't pass a drug test, MVR &
background check. M-F 8am-5pm.
Apply in person at:
Mon.-Fri. 9am -12pm.
2854 West Main St.
Leesburg,FL


TIME DEFINITE SERVICES
Hiring Over The Road Drivers-
Class A CDL required. All late
model equipment- 2012 &
newer. We pull 53' Reefers.
Great Pay & Bonuses. Must be
willing to run 48 states.
Apply at:
www.timedefinite.com
or call
352-399-7900 x 1015


CUSTODIAN PART TIME
Experienced in light
maintenance.
Send resume to:
communityumcfp@
gmail.com
or mail to:
Community United
Methodist Church
309 College Ave.
Fruitland Park. FL 34731


MEDICAL
RECEPTIONIST
F/T, exp. with knowledge
of EMR for Primary Care
Practice in The Villages,
with opportunity for
advancement.
Fax resume to:
407-217-2687


BARTENDER &
SERVER'S FT
MUST be exp'd.
Evenings & Wknds.
Apply in person 3-5pm
VIC'S EMBERS SUPPER
CLUB
7940 US Hwy. 441
Leesburg, FL


U U P U U


COLLISION TECH.
EXPERIENCED
With benefits.


SEE DAVIS COLEMAN
PHILLIPS BUICK
COLLISION CENTER
3320 Hwy. 441, Fruitland
Park, FL


DENTAL

RECEPTIONIST
Professional &
experienced only.
Fax resume to:
352-728-3373


FACILITY SERVICES
POSITION AVAILABLE
Proficiency in all necessary trades
(electrical, plumbing, construction,
carpentry, HVAC, painting, etc.) to
accomplish assigned maintenance
of the physical plant, grounds, and
equipment of all facilities.
Apply at www.lsbc.net
or in person at
515 W Main St Leesburg
DFWP/EOE


RESTORE TELECOM IN LEESBURG
seeks full-time Electronics Tester. Test
functionality of equipment, circuit
boards by following procedures. Mount
components & parts. Document issues &
prepare equipment for final quality
inspection. HS Diploma/GED & working
knowledge of computer operation
required. Exp. with electronic assembly,
soldering, troubleshooting preferred.
Must be able to stand/walk for full shift &
lift/move up to 50 pounds. DFWP/EOE
Submit resumes to 888-420-1861 or
humanresources@restortelecom.com
Or complete application at
912-1 Venture Ave., Leesburg


U U U U


U


DELIVERY PERSONNEL
Office equip dealer seeks reliable person to
deliver equip & supplies, assist in inventory
control & light bldg. maint. Must have neat
appearance, good communication skills,
able to follow written/oral directions, & be
insurable. Must be able to safely operate a
box truck. Heavy lifting req'd. 100+ Ibs.
Please do not respond if you can't pass
a drug test, MVR & background check.
M-F 8am- 5pm.
Apply in person at:
Mon.-Fri. 9am -12pm.
2854 West Main St.
Leesburg, FL


We Find


People


For Jobs


ELECTRICIANS &
ELECTRICAL
APPRENTICES
Applicants must have
experience and a clean
driving record, high
school diploma or
equivalent. Company is
an EOE and Drug-Free
Workplace. Excellent
health benefits, 401 k
and PTO; MVR &
Background checks.
Apply in person at:
PIKE'S ELECTRIC, INC.
719 Industrial Drive
Wildwood. FL 34785


ADVERTISING SALES
REPRESENTATIVE
NEEDED FOR LOCAL
NEWSPAPER IN
CLERMONT
Candidates will maintain
existing account base and
solicit for new businesses in
South Lake County.
We are looking for a highly
motivated and organized
professional individual able to
work independently. Reliable
transportation a must. Outside
sales experience preferred but
will train the right candidate.
Hours are 8am to 5pm. Base
salary plus commission.
Benefits include paid vacation,
sick time, health and dental
insurance available and 401k.
Please email resume and
cover letter to:
maria.cortinas@
dailycommercial.com
or fax resume to:
329-36R-8299q


RETAIL SALES
CONSULTANTS
needed for retail lighting and
fan store located in The Villages.
Applicants must have retail
lighting & fans sales experience,
plus clean driving record; design
and construction knowledge a
plus but not required. We offer
base pay plus commission,
excellent health benefits plus
401k and paid time off.
Company is an Equal
Employment Opportunity
Employer and Drug-Free
Workplace; full-time and
part-time positions available.
Fax resume to:
(352)399-2965 or
Apply in person at:
1115 Canal Street,
Lake Sumter Landing,
The Villages, FL 32162


We Find


People


For Jobs


A AT

JOB!
CARRIERS
Need immediately for
UMATILLA, EUSTIS &
MT. DORA AREA



Daily Commercial
212 E. Main St.
Leesburg or
Email: Carriers@
dailycommercial.com
Candidates must have
reliable transportation,
Drivers License & Ins.
FF


To*dvatseajo*oeaingaera

plea.ecaal .... 0314.327




DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, November 9, 2013
r I


-all Into


A


Cornucopia


of Savings at

i ff --l a


ONT'


E2013FIESTA
starting at $10,400
/or up to $500
up to 60 mo
or drive for $149 per month

[JJ3-LIFU15IN starting at
SO13FusIO

or
~$1,000

up to
_1530 mo
drive for $259**per month

IO[13TAURUS
starting at
$21,400
or $2,250
up to 50 mo
or drive for $329 **per month


2013FDOCUS 2013F-15D
iOl f$ starting at $13,000 l _
" op up to$1,500
SuptoGo 0%
up to 60 mo


or drive for $I69**per month

201IESCAPE


starting at
$20,400
or $1,750
U0%
+-_ r_-n _-


-up
or drive for $59* *per month

2013FLEX


LI oU 1mo


starting at
$22,300


~or $2,500
W up to 60 mo
or drive for $359**per month


starting at
$15,300
or $1,750
Sup to
i Omo


2013EDGE
starting at
or
$2,000
up to
or drive for $309 **per month 50 mo
2013EXPLDRER
Al- starting at
.. $24,500
or 0%
up tO
s0 omo

or drive for $329* *per month


www.MyFordofElermont.com



2005 FORD FOCUS 2005 MERCURY 2006 FORD 2008 MERCURY 2009 TOYOTA
ZX5 SES GRAND MARQUIS MUSTANG CONV. MILAN SCION TC
WAS $8,380 WAS $8,980 WAS $11,980 WAS $10,980 WAS $12,580
NOW NOW NOW NOW NOW
$7,320 $7,980 $9,210 $ 9,940 11,46
2006 JAGUAR 2010 KIA 2013 FORD FOCUS 2012 FORD 2009 AUDI
S$TYPE SOUL SE FUSION SE A4


WAS $12,980
NOW
/$ 1,670
i2009 SATURN
OUTLOOK
WAS $17,980
NOW
16,840 1


WAS $13,980
NOW
S12,630
2011 MINI
COOPER
WAS $18,980
NOW
L. $17,680


SWAS $16,680
^ NOW
'!5,810
2013 DODGE
JOURNEY
WAS $20,980
NOW
19.6B10 ,


WAS $16,980
NOW
15,910


2008 CHEVROLEI
TAHOE LT BLACK ON BLACK
WAS $22,980
trNOW
$19.860


WAS $17,980
NOW
S16,740


2012 VOLKSWAGON
GLI
WAS $21,980
NOW
s20640 f


rForMof
-C ERMONT


1101 E. Hwy. 50 Clermont, FL Highway 50, Just East of 27 f 1
STORE HOURS: M-F 8AM-8PM SAT 9AM-6PM SUN NOON-6PM -Yi.2
SERVICE HOURS: M-F 7:30AM-5:30PM SAT 8AM-2PM ---
I rkA I"I iMVPILELI O MITE NEW WINDSHIELD N W IPER BLADES
,wil Inee o> ( Ji l 44o4 inQ UALIITYnc-CU mWE AATOEcI
lULL FRnEE 8UU- 1 787 1 .i .i ,i2p0IASIiSpTAN N CE 'K OUlLFUFER TA( NATTDEL|ERY
Q] .n 0"-,f.1AJ* *I..11I'1t l, 1 ,"u ,h -,L I P r- -1 III '- lr.,iJ ir I, k.,; '.1, A" 1.101 J IL I, IW
,U W Iwr1K KA 1 M p I'Ad 1, kW rq '344 1 Pa~Ey P'I-911, ,t0W "Ar'pLKILW i.,'I k- VNI,-A


Fard'reoa -
So Nabwa ESJa TRADE-IN MARKETPLACE
^^^^^^^r N


2012 FORD FUSION 2009 FORD EXPEDITION 2012 HONDA 2013 FORD TAURUS 2013 JEEP
SEL NAVIGATION LIMITED BLACK ON BLACK CRV SEL W/NAVIGATION WRANGLER SPORT
WAS $22,980 WAS $23,980 WAS $24,980 WAS $25,980 WAS $25,980
NOW NOW NOW NOW NOW
21,310 s22,930 s23,240 s24,710 24,860
2010 FORD FLEX 2012 HONDA PILOI 2011 LINCOLN 2011 FORD F350 CREW 2013 JAGUAR XF
LIMITED CERTIFIED EX-L NAVIGATOR CAB 4X4 KING RANCH SUPERCHARGED 1,600 MI.
WAS $23,980 WAS $29,980 WAS $38,980 WAS $42,980 WAS $48,980
NOW 22NOW NOW NOW NOWJ
S25,710 $279920 S37,810 )/S41,740 $42,74


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 9, 2013


Iz


I








Faith


Life


352-365-8208 I features@dailycommercial.com


Cl
DAILY COMMERCIAL
Saturday, November 9, 2013


www.dailycommercial.com


What does it mean to robe yourself in Christ?


ave you ever started
getting dressed and
suddenly stopped be-
cause you didn't have a clue
what you would wear?
Wouldn't it be great at
times like that to have a valet
set out the clothes de jour?
If we are Christians we
are never alone. Not that Je-
sus is our personal servant,
though many pray like He is.
No, if we are in Christ then
He abides in us.
To the Colossians Paul
wrote, "To them God chose
to make known how great
among the Gentiles are the
riches of the glory of this
mystery, which is Christ in
you, the hope of glory."


Earlier in the chapter Paul
had reminded the Colos-
sians to continue in their
faith, stable and steadfast,
not shifting from the hope
of the Gospel.
Now, a few verses later he
reminds them the hope of
the Gospel is Christ in them,
and all that entitles them
to, namely His Resurrection
and the power and future
that goes with it.
Hope of glory indeed.
It's important to remem-
ber Paul wrote this letter
while in prison. Paul's cir-
cumstances didn't alter his
hope of glory Let us remem-
ber while we're in the midst
of trials and tribulations. If


Tf o Rick


REFLECTIONS

we are truly in Christ and
Christ is truly in us let us live
that way.
To the Corinthians Paul
wrote: "But thanks be to God,
who in Christ always leads us
in triumphal procession, and
through us spreads the fra-
grance of the knowledge of
him everywhere."
Last week, we began look-
ing at how Paul helped the


Ephesians dress for success
- spiritually. He began with
the belt of truth, on which
everything hangs. He re-
minded the Colossians and
Corinthians about that truth.
Next, he tells them to put
on the breastplate of righ-
teousness.
In his first letter to the
Thessalonians Paul helped
them dress as well. But to
them he called this impor-
tant piece of spiritual cloth-
ing the breastplate of faith
and love. These Christian
virtues protect us like armor
protected soldiers of old.
Let's get back to the Ephe-
sians. Am I the only one un-
comfortable when told to


put on the breastplate of
righteousness? It happens if
I'm putting on my own righ-
teousness, or should I say
self-righteousness. I know
what that looks like and
don't want to depend on it
to protect my heart.
Fortunately, it is Christ's
righteousness God sees
when He looks at me. And
that certainly protects my
heart and spiritual being. I
am not alone.
Let's continue getting (spir-
itually) dressed next week.
Rick Reed is a columnist who
lives in Mount Dora. To reach him,
call 352-383-1458, or send an
email to ricoh007@aol.com.


y1HURCH


CALENDAR
A LIST OF UPCOOMING EVENTS
SATURDAY
'WINTER WONDERLAND' CHRISTMAS BAZAAR AT
FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH: From 8:30 a.m.
to 3 p.m., 201 S. Park Avenue, Apopka. Numerous
gift items, plants, and breakfast and lunch items
also available. For details, call 407-886-3421.
ROCK OF AGES LUTHERAN CHURCH YARD SALE:
From 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the church, 201 Barwick
St., Wildwood. Hot dogs, sodas and baked goods
available.
LIVE AUCTION AT ST. THOMAS EPISCOPAL CHURCH:
Hors d'oeuvres at 5 p.m., auction at 6 p.m., Parish
Hall, 616 Lemon Avenue, Eustis. For details, call
352-357-4348, or go to www.stthomaseustis.com.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF LEESBURG
HOSTS RUMMAGE SALE: From 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., at
the church, 200 S. Lone Oak Drive, Leesburg. Pro-
ceeds benefit the Salvation Army, Joining Hands
Food Ministry and church ministries.
SUNDAY
UNITED IN PRAISE COMMUNITY CHOIR IN CONCERT:
At 6 p.m., at the First Baptist Church in Eustis. Pro-
ceeds benefit local performing arts. For details, call
Susan Moss at 207-832-9745, or send an email to
moss.susan6@gmail.com.
UNITED FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD HOSTS THE COLEMAN
FAMILY SINGERS: At 10:45 a.m., County Road 473 and
Moore St., Leesburg. For details, call 352-742-1838.
MONDAY
'LIFE IN BALANCE-JEWISH PERSPECTIVES ON EV-
ERYDAY MEDICAL DILEMMAS'A 6-WEEK SESSION:
Begins Monday from 11:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m., at
the Chabad Jewish Center, 3509 S.W 34th Avenue,
Ocala and Nov. 12 at the Lady Lake Public Library,
225 W Guava St. For details, call 352-291-2218, or
go to www.myJLI.com.
FAIRWAY CHRISTIAN CHURCH SINGLE BIBLE STUDY
'HOW TO LISTEN TO GOD': From 6 to 7 p.m., at the
church, 251 Avenida LosAngelos, The Villages. For
details, call 352-259-9306.
THURSDAY
EUSTIS MIDDLE SCHOOL MUSTANG BAND FREE WIN-
TER CONCERT: At 7 p.m., First Baptist Church, 3551
Orange Avenue, Eustis. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. For
information, call 352-357-6220.
NOV. 16
FLEA MARKETAT ST. LAWRENCE CATHOLIC CHURCH:
From 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., 320 E. Dade St., Bushnell.
Bake sale, food and drinks available. For details,
call 352-793-7773.


To place a religion event on the calendar, send an
email to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com.


Jan Smith, one of the operators of God
a riding lesson in Orangeburg, S.C.


AP PHOTO
It Made Ranch, assists 10-year-old Kerri Whetstone with preparing her horse Athena for


Nonprofit ministry uses


horses to do Christian work


DIONNE GLEATON
The Times and Democrat of Orangeburg
RANGEBURG, S.C. -A
nonprofit Christian min-
istry is working to im-
prove the lives of young peo-
ple and adults through a
mission that involves a mix of
horses and skills training.
Cope couple Dan and Jan
White started God It Made
Ranch a year ago as the 41st
mission station of Columbia-
based Christ Central Minis-
tries Inc., which was founded
in 1992 by Pastor Jimmy Jones
and had a food ministry as its
first mission. Women and chil-
dren's shelters, men's shelters,
veterans' transitional housing
and clothing distribution are
among CCM's other missions.
"But we're the first horse
ranch. They had been pray-
ing for one of these for a very
long time. I moved to Lexing-


Emotionally, the riders
learn to bond with their
horse, and it builds trust.
Jan White
ton where my dad lives a year
ago, and that's how I found
Christ Central," Jan White said.
"I started volunteering for the
children's shelter, the women's
shelter and the homeless shel-
ter. They also have a GED pro-
gram and a rehab center."
She and her husband are also
students at Christ Central Insti-
tute, a center of Christian higher
education inWagener, which of-
fers missions training, career arts
training and internships among
its programs. Jones and Jason
Conrad, a former CCM intern,
founded the institute in 2002.
"Pastor Jimmy speaks to us
about missions and how they
work and what we need to do


with them," said Mrs. White,
who has been an equestrian
since age 12.
God It Made Ranch is 26
acres located at 292 Kilgus
Street in Cope. The Whites
have built up the property with
the help of friends, volunteers
and neighbors.
It serves as a site where chil-
dren and adults of all ages
can experience equine thera-
py, which usually includes in-
struction in horse care, groom-
ing procedures, saddlery and
basic equitation.
While the couple have spent
the past year building their
herd and paddock and have
just begun using equine ther-
apy, Mrs. White said there are
benefits to it.
"Emotionally, the rid-
ers learn to bond with their
horse, and it builds trust. It
SEE HORSES I C2


CWC opens second location


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Members of Christian Worship Center in Groveland sing praise to the Lord.


THERESA CAMPBELL I Staff Writer
theresacampbeIIll@dailycommercial.com
The ChristianWorship Cen-
ter has expanded with a sec-
ond location in South Lake,
and the Rev. John Christian is
pleased with the communi-
ty support for the Groveland
church at 155 Ivey Avenue.
"Our first service on Sun-
day was magnificent," Chris-
tian said, pleased by the
crowd. "I was ecstatic."
Christian will be preaching


at the church at 9 a.m., Sun-
day, for the church's second
service, while his wife will be
preaching at the same time at
the ChristianWorship Center
in Leesburg.
"She's been doing it for
eight years, and then I will
come back at 11:30 a.m. and
preach at the main church
in Leesburg," said the pastor,
who also serves as a Leesburg
city commissioner.
Christian plans to make the


trips back and forth between
the two Christian Worship
Center sites.
"We are so excited about
the opportunities to minister
in South Lake, and we can't
wait to see what God will do
for this region," he said.
He has been pleased with
the response so far.
"We've had four or five
Hispanic families who have
reached out to us out, so
SEE CWC I C2




C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, November 9,2013


cwc
FROM PAGE C1

we are looking at be-
ing a more multi-cultur-
al church that will be bi-
lingual," he said, where
plans are in the works
to add a Spanish minis-
try and Spanish-speak-
ing service to the church
soon.
The Christian Worship
Center of South Lake has
been meeting for four
months evaluating com-
munity needs and pray-
ing for direction.
"We believe God has
given us a successful
model and approach to
ministry and our reach
will be broad and Spir-
it led. Although we have
a plan on paper, God's
plan is far better and we


will follow his guidance,"
Christian said.
The pastor said he was
looking at the location
for two years.
"The Lord opened the
door so that we were able
to purchase it," he said.
The ministry will be
focused on community
outreach and family in-
volvement.
"We are really looking
to provide family-ori-
ented services, so we are
conscious of time, hope
and mind, body soul," he
said, noting one of the
core components of the
church is accepting peo-
ple as they are and al-
lowing the Lord to make
them become better.
Christian said he and
others did some "street
ministry," where they
walked, knocked on


doors, and met a lot of
people in the Groveland
and Mascotte areas.
Christian said the 9 a.m.
service will be "high ener-
gy with good preaching
and great music."
"We are really looking
forward to an interactive
ministry with the peo-
ple of South Lake. We be-
lieve that we have some-
thing great to offer, and
welcome people who
are looking for a church
that is designed for
them, and it's a cutting-
edge church," he said.
We need help, we need
workers, and we want
to make sure that the
church meets the needs
of the community."
For information, go to
www.christianworship-
centers.org, or call 352-
365-1709.


HORSES
FROM PAGE Cl

also works on social behaviors,
and physically, there's a rhyth-
mic natural motion that works
with your core muscle balance
and posture. Mentally, the riders
develop a very high level of con-
centration and thought process-
ing skills," she said, noting that
ranch safety is a priority.
"It's little things like watching
a horse's ears. When they're for-
ward. he's happy, but if they're
pinned back, he's going to bite or
kick something real soon," she
noted. "Socially, equine therapy
also builds self-confidence and a
sense of independence."
Athena, a pony kids love to
brush and saddle; Spartacus,
a quarter horse/thoroughbred
cross; a couple of paint horses;
and a Percheron foal all make
the ranch home, Mrs. White said.


"We're going to watch a little
baby grow. This is a safe fami-
ly place with no drugs and abso-
lutely no alcohol," she said.
The ranch has a tack room
where kids can play games, color
and watch TV.
"Every child who rides a horse
has to wear a helmet, sad-
dle pads and things like that if
they're under 18," Mrs. White
said, noting that oiling saddles,
painting hooves and brushing
and tacking a horse are all a part
of the ranch experience.
Brianna Strickland, a 9-year-
old student at Edisto Elemen-
tary School, said she also loves
animals, especially horses. She
said she has been around horses
nearly all her life.
"And through that experience,
I've liked dealing with horses. And
Ms. Jan is nice, too," said Strick-
land, who said horseback riding
gives her a feeling "of being free to
do what you want to do."


Weekly Scripture Reading
1 Chronicles 1 Chronicles 1 Chronicles 1 Chronicles Revelation Revelation Revelation
15.1-24 15.25-16.7 16.8-43 17.1-27 4.1-11 7.1-17 14.1-20
SoipturM Selected by the Amerfrun S bole Society
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Come visit our new location!

KIA of LEESBURG
9039 US HWY 441 LEESBURG
352-365-1228
www.KiaofLeesburg.com


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Assisted Living
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460 Newell Hill Rd., Leesburg
352-365-6011
Assisted Living. Independent Living. Day Stay Residency
Combining Independence with Personal Care for over 40 years


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CASON & GASKINSTV
Rbadm iefhaek
DEALER
Established 1951
308 Shopping Center Drive
Wildwood, Florida 34785
SUMTER CO. LAKE CO.
352-748-2021 352-753-1555


? C^^/I~DC' ^7f
I Vvl l' Lll 111 II 11t.i1l I :1ljt.

Rehab foi orthopedics, caidiac, stroke,
surgical patients & generalized weakness
490 S Old Wiie Rd. Wildwood (3521748-3322

Beyers FUNERAL
HOME
AND CREMATORY
Locally/ Ownted and Operated
Leesburg Lady Lake
Umatilla Astor


Dunstan & Son Plumbing Co., Inc.
7 PLUMBING REPAIR & REMODELING
UEst. 1922 CF C057100
(352) 787-4771
1127 W. Main St., Leesburg
John W. Snyder. President


Liberty Baptist Church
11043 True Life Way, Clermont
352-394-0708
Senior Pastor Chris Johnson
Sun. Svc. 10:40am, Family Prayer Svc. 6:00pm
Unashamed Students Service 6:00pm
Sun. Bible Fellowship 9:30am
Wed. Bible Study 6:30pm,
Kids 4 Truth Clubs 6:30pm
Groups for all ages, Nursery provided all services
www.lbcclermont.org



First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Grove and Lemon Avenues, Eustis
352-357-3899
Sunday Service 10:30am
Sunday School 10:30am
Wednesday Testimonial Meeting 12:15pm
Christian Science Reading Room
108 E. Magnolia Ave., Eustis
First United Methodist
Church of Eustis
"A Place where You Matter"
600 S. Grove Street, Eustis
352-357-5830
Senior Pastor Beth Farabee
Coffee and Fellowship 9:00am
Contemporary Worship 9:30am
Traditional Worship 11:00am

St. Thomas Episcopal Church
317 S. Mary St., Eustis (corner S. Mary &
Lemon St.)
352-357-4358
Rev. John W. Lipscomb III, Rector
Sunday Holy Eucharist Services
8:00am & 10:30am
Adult Sunday School 9:20am,
Children's Chapel
Thurs. Holy Eucharist & Healing Service
10:00am
www.stthomaseustis.com



LIFE Church Assembly of God
04001 Picciola Rd., Fruitland Park
352-787-7962
Pastor Rick Welborne
Sunday Deaf Impaired 10:00am
Sunday Evening 6:00pm
Wednesday Prayer and Youth Service
7:00pm
Sunday School 9:00am
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm

Pilgrims' United Church of Christ (UCC)
509 County Road 468, Fruitland Park
www.pucc.info
352-365-2662 or office@pucc.info
Rev. Ronal Freyer Nicholas, OSL, Pastor
Rev. Robert Van Valkenburg,
Pastoral Associate Emeritus
Inclusive Progressive
Sunday Worship 10:00am
Contact us or visit our website for
more info



Mt. Olive Missionary
Baptist Church
15641 Stucky Loop, Stucky
(West of Mascotte)
352-429-3888
Rev. Clarence L. Southall-Pastor
Sunday Worship Service 11:00am
Sunday School 9:30am
Saturday Prayer Service 8:30am
Bible Study-Wednesday 7:00pm &
2nd and 4th Sundays 4:00pm


Bethany Lutheran Church
1334 Griffin Road, Leesburg
352-787-7275
Sunday Service 8:00am & 10:30am
Cont. Praise Thursday Service 6:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 10:00am
Sunday Bible Study 9:15am

Emmanuel Baptist Church of
Leesburg
1710 U.S. Hwy. 441 E., Leesburg
352-323-1588
Pastor Jeff Carney
Sunday Celebration Service 10:30am
Wednesday Men's Prayer Breakfast
8:00am
Wednesday Praise & Prayer 6:30pm
Sunday Bible Study 9:15am
Wednesday Epic Youth Ministry 6:30pm
www.EmmanuelFL.com

First Baptist Leesburg
220 N. 13th St., Leesburg
352-787-1005
Sunday Service 8:15am, 9:30am
& 10:45am
Sunday Bible Study 8:15am,
9:30am & 10:45am
Wednesday Night Activities 6:00pm
www.fbcleesburg.org

First Church of Christ,
Scientist, Leesburg
13th & Line St., Leesburg
352-787-1921
Sunday Service 10:30am
Sunday School 10:30am
Wednesday School 3:30pm

Gloria Dei Lutheran Church
130 S. Lone Oak Drive, Leesburg
352-787-3223
Pastor Roy Stackpole
Sunday Worship October-April
8:00am & 10:30am
Sunday Worship May-September
9:15am
Christian Education October-April
9:15am
www.lutheransonline.com/gloriadeifla

Lakes and Hills Covenant Church
Rev. Ken Folmsbee, PhD, Pastor
Worship Service 10:15am
Bible Study 9:00am
@ Women's Club of Leesburg
700 S. 9th Street, Leesburg
Church Office
106 S. Palm Ave., Howie-in-the-Hills
352-552-0052
www.lakeshillscovenantchurch.org
Seventh Day Adventist
508 S. Lone Oak Dr., Leesburg
352-326-4109
Worship Service 9:30am
Sabbath School Service 11:00am
Wednesday Prayer Meeting 7:00pm

The Healing Place
1012 W Main Street, Leesburg
352-617-0569
Facilitator: Phyllis Gilbert
Sunday Service and Kids Club 11:00am
Wednesday Bible Study and
Kids Club 6:00pm
(Nursey open for all services)
"Come as you are and leave different!"


U*Clrmot*1 L 6sb *


S 'm Is

Congregational Church
650 N. Donnelly St., Mount Dora
352-383-2285
Reverand Dr. Richard Don
Sunday 11:00am
(Communion 1st Sunday of the month)
Monday Bible Study 9:00am & 6:00pm
St. Philip Lutheran Church
1050 Boyd Drive, Mt. Dora
352-383-5402
Pastor Rev. Dr. Johan Bergh
Sunday Service 9:30am
(Childcare Provided)
Fellowship 10:45am
www.stphiliplc.com

S. empk
Corpus Christi Episcopal
Church
3430 County Road 470, Okahumpka
352-787-8430
Sunday Eucharist Service 9:00am
Fellowship following Sunday service
Thursday Morning Prayer 9:30am
Beginning Nov. 10th 4pm Evening service


All Saint's Roman Catholic
Chapel
11433 U.S. 441, River Plaza #11,
Tavares
407-391-8678
352-385-3880
Sunday Latin Mass 8:00am & 10:00am

Tavares First United Methodist
Church (UMC)
Corner of Old 441 & SR 19, Tavares
352-343-2761
Pastor John Barham
Traditional Service 9:00am
Contemporary Cafe Service 10:30am
Children of Light-Youth & Family Service
1st Sunday of each month 6:00pm
www.fumctavares.com


The Final Hour Ministries
P.O. Box 523, Webster
847-912-0596
Email: finalhourminitries@ymail.com
Speaking Engagements Contact:
Kingdom Citizen
Apostle Michael White Jr.
Prophetess Wanda White
Church Planting Travel Ministry
Let Us Pray For You Affiliation Cl
www.thefinalhourministries.org

Lighthouse Foundation
Ministries International INC.
11282 SR 471, Webster
352-793-2631
Pastor Patricia T. Burnham
Sunday Services 8:30am & 6:00pm
Thursday Night 7:00pm
3rd Saturday Food Basket Give-A-Way
www.lighthousefoundationministries.org
Linden Church of God
4309 CR 772, Webster
Pastor Doyle D. Glass
Sunday Morning Worship 10:30am
Sunday Evening Worship 6:00pm
Sunday School 9:45am
Wednesday Night (Family Training Hour) 7:00pm


For information on listing your church
on this page call Michelle at

352-365-8233










Marketss&Moniey
features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8208
www.dailycommercial.com


DOW JONES
15,761.78
+167.8


0


NASDAQ
3,919.23
+61.90


0


S&P500 GOLD
1,770.61 1,284.60
+23.46 -23.90


SILVER
21.32
-0.34


US businesses boost hiring



despite the shutdown


CHRISTOPHER
S.RUGABER
AP Economics Writer
WASHINGTON -
The 16-day government
shutdown didn't seem
to hurt the economy af-
ter all.
U.S. employers add-
ed a surprisingly strong
204,000 jobs in Octo-
ber, the Labor Depart-
ment said Friday. And
they added far more
jobs in August and Sep-
tember than previously
thought.
Activity at service
companies and facto-
ries also accelerated last
month in the midst of
the shutdown.
All of which suggests
the U.S. economy may
be sturdier than many
analysts had assumed.
The unemployment
rate rose to 7.3 percent
from 7.2 percent in Sep-
tember, the Labor De-
partment said. But
that was probably be-
cause furloughed fed-
eral workers were tem-
porarily counted as
unemployed.
"The economy
weathered the govern-
ment shutdown sur-
prisingly well," said Ted
Wieseman, an econo-
mist at Morgan Stan-
ley "Businesses looked
through the shutdown,
remained confident in
the growth outlook and
kept hiring."


AP FILE PHOTO
Job applicants arrives for an internship job fair held by the Miami Marlins at Marlins Park.


One weak link in the
economy recently has
been consumers, who
spent cautiously over
the summer, holding
back growth. But the
solid job gains in re-
cent months, com-
bined with modest in-
creases in hourly pay,
could encourage more
spending.
Other trends have
raised hopes that
the economy will re-
main healthy in com-
ing months: Grow-
ing demand for homes
should support con-
struction. And auto
sales are likely to stay
strong because many
Americans are buying
cars after putting off
big purchases since the
recession struck nearly


six years ago.
Job growth is a ma-
jor factor for the Fed-
eral Reserve in decid-
ing when to reduce its
economic stimulus.
The Fed has been buy-
ing bonds to keep long-
term interest rates low
and encourage borrow-
ing and spending.
Stocks rose sharp-
ly in afternoon trading
as investors assessed
the stronger-than-ex-
pected job growth. But
the yield on the 10-year
Treasury note surged to
2.75 percent from 2.60
percent late Thursday.
That showed that some
investors worry that the
healthier job growth
might prompt the Fed
to pull back on its bond-
buying soon.


For some employers
outside the Beltway, the
government shutdown
scarcely mattered.
Bob Duncan, found-
er and chief executive
of Dallas-based Amer-
ican Leather, said his
company is on track for
a third straight year of
steady revenue gains.
American Leather cus-
tom-builds sofas, reclin-
ers and other furniture
for Crate and Barrel and
many smaller chains.
Duncan has boosted
his 400-member work-
force by about 2 per-
cent in the past three
months.
"I think everyone's
kind of numb to it,"
Duncan said, referring
to the budget battles in
Washington.


a


CRUDE OIL
94.60
+0.40


Q i T-NOTE 10-year
2.75
S+0.14


Dow hits another


high on jobs


surge last month


KEN SWEET STEVE
ROTHWELL
AP Markets Writers
NEW YORK An
unexpectedly strong
jobs report gave stocks
a lift on Friday, pushing
the Dow Jones indus-
trial average back to an
all-time high.
The gains were led by
banks, such as Bank of
America and JPMorgan
Chase, which stand to
benefit from a pickup in
lending as the economy
strengthens. Consum-
er-focused stocks such
as Priceline.com and
Disney also rose after
reporting higher prof-
its, and Gap soared af-
ter raising its earnings
forecast. Losers includ-
ed housing stocks and
Twitter, which dropped
7 percent the day after
its initial public offering.
The jobs survey left
investors grappling
with how to interpret
this week's surprisingly
strong economic data
and what it means for
the Federal Reserve's
economic stimulus
program. On Thurs-
day the government
reported that U.S. eco-
nomic growth acceler-
ated in the third quar-
ter. The Fed's stimulus
has helped power this
year's stock rally
"We're walking a
tight wire with the


CURRENCIES
Dollar vs. Exchange Pvs
Rate Day
Yen 98.85 99.22
Euro $1.3355 $1.3367
Pound $1.6000 $1.6028
Swiss franc 0.9212 0.9206
Canadian dollar 1.0488 1.0432
Mexican peso 13.278513.1403

Fed," said Rob Lutts,
Chief Investment Of-
ficer at Cabot Mon-
ey Management. Lu-
tts said the job survey
was positive because
it showed the econo-
my was improving, but
perhaps not strongly
enough to assure that
Fed policymakers will
pull back on its bond-
buying program before
the end of year.
The Dow gained
167.80 points, or 1.1 per-
cent, to 15,761. The Dow
also closed at a record
high onWednesday
The Standard &
Poor's 500 index ended
23.46 higher, or 1.3 per-
cent, at 1,770.61, just a
point below its record.
The Nasdaq composite
rose 61.90 points, or 1.6
percent, to 3,919.23.
Both the Dow and the
S&P 500 recovered all of
their losses from Thurs-
day, when concern
about the Fed with-
drawing its stimulus
outweighed optimism
about faster economic
growth.


USDA: Corn harvest a record 13.9B bushels


DAVID PITT
Associated Press
DES MOINES, Iowa This
year's corn crop has soared to a
new national record, breaking ex-
pectations in many states that re-
ceived too much rain early on and
a summer dry spell that brought
back drought concerns.
In its first crop supply and de-
mand report since the partial
government shutdown, the U.S.
Department of Agriculture said
Friday it expects 13.99 billion
bushels of corn, more than the


September forecast of 13.8 billion
bushels. The previous record was
13.1 billion in 2009.
Some observers thought there
would be a subpar harvest in
the Midwest, including Iowa and
Nebraska. Heavy rains delayed
spring planting by several weeks,
causing some farmers to give up
planting the wettest fields. Then,
drought conditions returned in
the summer months.
"Better than expected" are the
three most popular words in
Iowa right now, said Chad Hart,
an agriculture economist at Iowa


State University.
"When they started to drive the -
combine in the field they thought,
'Oh this probably isn't good,' butk Gi I i b C h
by the time they got down that o ihelEo
first row they were saying those seinu B Biicin i
magic three words," he said.
Exceptional harvests were Se ia EH
found around the country thanks TedyNo mb
to adequate rain and cooler tem- CicoCrpat
peratures. At least 18 states will allr frsoda
set records for the amount of corn ( 3021
produced per acre, among them i fl__S___E__WIS ._._
are Alabama, Georgia, Illinois, In- 1) IsiN I IM I
diana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mich- l'""
igan, Mississippi, and New Jersey .'l 'ma"t.


German trade surplus


widens to new record high


The Associated Press
BERLIN Germany's
trade surplus widened
in September to a record
high in a development
that underlines criticism
that Europe's largest
economy is not import-
ing enough to boost oth-
er economies in Europe.
The Federal Statisti-
cal Office reported Fri-
day that exports were
up 1.7 percent to 92.8
billion euros ($124 bil-
lion) in September over
August, when adjusted
for seasonal and calen-
dar differences. Imports
dropped 1.9 percent to
73.9 billion euros.


As a result, the trade
surplus in September
hit a record high 18.8
billion euros, up from a
revised 15.8 billion eu-
ros in August.
The United States a
week ago criticized Ger-
many for its large trade
surplus, saying it was
causing problems for its
partners in the 17-coun-
try eurozone import-
ing goods and servic-
es from countries like
Greece and Spain could
help shore up those
economies. It urged Ger-
many to push for more
domestic-led growth.
The International


Monetary Fund has also
joined in the criticism,
saying that a small-
er surplus by Germany
is the only way to even
out the imbalances that
plague the eurozone.
Since the creation of
the euro in 1999, the
currency union has be-
come split between
countries that run up
surpluses and ones that
run chronic deficits -
and gotten into trouble
with excess debt. The
argument is Germany
should buy more from
other countries and
support growth else-
where in the eurozone.


8am

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24


Dalllg Commercial
"Your First Choice" In-Print & On-Line


No matter what time
of the day it is,
you can place
your classified
merchandise ad
online, pay for it and
just wait for the
phone to ring!

Fast, convenient and
on your schedule!


www.,diilyc orrrier e cil.,com

*Employment advertisements are excluded.
Please call 352-314-FAST to speak with a customer service rep.
Lake: 352-314-3278 or Sumter: 352-748-1955


I


Saturday, November 9, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL








The Market In Review


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 9, 2013


Spoiled milk?
Dean Foods has been struggling
because of a decline in sales of
milk.
That trend, along with the loss
of a major customer earlier this
year, has taken a toll on the
nation's largest processor and
distributor of milk. To cope, Dean
has slashed costs, including
taking steps to close as many as
15 percent of its plants. Investors
find out Tuesday how the strategy
affected Dean's bottom line
during the third quarter.


Retail update
Macy's latest
quarterly results
should offer insight r
into how consumer
spending is faring
heading into the
holiday season.
The department store chain, which is due to report
third-quarter earnings on Wednesday, blamed shoppers'
reluctance to spend for a rare slip in sales in the second
quarter heading into the back-to-school selling period.
While jobs are easier to get and the turnaround in the
housing market is showing promise, the improvements
haven't been enough to get most Americans to spend more.


Bigger trade gap?
The Commerce Department reports
its latest tally of the nation's trade
deficit on Thursday.
Economists anticipate that the trade
gap widened for the third month in
a row in September. The trade
deficit grew 0.4 percent in August to
$38.8 billion as U.S. farmers sold
fewer agricultural products
overseas, offsetting the best month
of sales for American-made cars on
record. The bigger the trade gap
gets, the more it can weigh down
the nation's economic growth.


Trade (goods and services)
In billions of dollars

$40 I


20
e







-40
A M J J A S

Source. Fac


1,800 ...........



1,720 10 DAYS

1,800 ......


1,600

1,550 M J


StocksRecap

NYSE NASD

Vol. (in mil.) 3,749 1,921
Pvs. Volume 4,066 2,236
Advanced 1778 1925
Declined 1325 637
New Highs 117 133
New Lows 61 4n


S&P 500 b1,s00
/ Close: 1,770.61 r.--r.),l
Change: 23.46 (1.3%) /\

... i.......... :. 15,900 . .*

.. J 15,600

15,300 Jl

15,0 00 .....
'.
.. ......... ... 14,700 ........


S A S 0 N 14,400 M


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
15764.29
7017.45
503.21
10032.82
3919.23
1770.78
1285.99
18799.76
1101.19


LOW
15579.35
6938.59
493.55
9909.54
3869.12
1747.63
1268.72
18548.79
1079.95


0 DAYS


Dow Jones industrials
Close: 15,761.78
Change: 167.80(1.1%)


J J A S 0 N


CLOSE
15761.78
7017.34
502.46
10032.13
3919.23
1770.61
1285.86
18798.63
1099.97


CHG.
+167.80
+76.51
-1.10
+107.76
+61.90
+23.46
+18.15
+249.84
+20.88


%CHG.
+1.08%
+1.10%
-0.22%
+1.09%
+1.60%
+1.34%
+1.43%
+1.35%
+1.94%


YTD
+20.28'
+32.23'
+10.90/
+18.81'
+29.80'
+24.15'
+26.01'
+25.37'
+29.51'


Stocks of Local Interest


NAME

AT&T Inc
Advance Auto Parts
Amer Express
AutoNation Inc
Brown & Brown
CocaCola Co
Comcast Corp A
Darden Rest
Disney
Gen Electric
General Mills
Harris Corp
Home Depot
IBM
Lowes Cos
NYTimes
NextEra Energy
PepsiCo
Suntrust Bks
TECO Energy
WalMart Strs
Xerox Corp


52-WK RANGE CLOSE
TICKER LO HI


T
AAP
AXP
AN
BRO
KO
CMCSA
DRI
DIS
GE
GIS
HRS
HD
IBM
LOW
NYT
NEE
PEP
STI
TE
WMT
XRX


32.71
70.02
53.02
38.28
24.88
35.58
34.95
44.11
46.53
19.87
39.14
41.08
60.21
172.57
31.23
7.72
66.05
67.39
25.30
16.12
67.37
6.10


-0-

-0
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0
-0-
-0
-0

-0
-0-





-0
-0
-0-


39.00
102.82
83.83
54.49
35.13
43.43
48.90
55.25
69.87
27.19
53.07
63.21
81.56
215.90
50.74
14.56
89.75
87.06
36.29
19.22
79.96
11.15


CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR


YTD 1YR
%CHG %RTN P/E


35.17
96.96
81.78
47.08
31.37
40.05
48.18
52.16
68.58
27.05
50.54
63.62
75.48
179.99
48.72
13.31
87.12
85.85
35.72
17.07
77.96
10.30


New York Stock Exchange


Name Div Last Chg

ABB Ltd 74e 2526 +11
ACE Ltd 200e 98 28 +88


AG
AG
AK
AOC
AR
AU
AVu


SCorp 20f 1421 +51
C 148f 6575+149
CO 40 5803 +56
LRes 188 47 58 -26
Steel ... 5.38 +.27
1L 515e 4242 +74
C Docu ... u8.01 +.83
Option d3 00 -01
GTech ... 16.66 -3.04
ons 08f 298 +36
Labs 88f 3812 +48
bV"en 160 48 03 +79
erFitc 80 3437 +137


AbdAsPac 42 617 -07
Accenture 1 74e 7524 -31
AccessMid 214f 51 70 -1 01
AccoBrds 585 +17
AccretH 900 +31
Actav4s 15673 +232
Actuant 04 3765 + 20
AMD 327 -01
AdSeml 18e 497 +10
AecomTch 3078 -11
Aegon 26e 814 +28
Aeropostl ... 8.75 +.50
Aetna 80 6335 +79
20251 +741
48 5078 +73
88 2931 + 82
300f 9007+200
AirLease .10 u31.83 +1.68
AirProd 284 10945 1 19
192 10828 122
80 7274 213
Albemarle 96 6734 +76
AlcatelLuc 405 +12
Alcoa 12 906 +11
72 3382 + 69
20 8995 +147
190 5042 +28
AIhData 242 86 +5 41


Allstate
AlonUSA
AlonUSA n 2


41a 705 -07
188 5287 +81
1 04u11515 +299
397 +11
48 2407 +09
100 5412 +1 18
.24a 10.24 -.77
276e d1057 -32


Ameren 1 60 36 41
AMovlL 34e 20 89
AmApparel 120
AmAxle 1805
AmCampus 1 44 3348
AEagleOut .50 16.21
AEP 2 00f 4625
AEqlnvLf 15f 21 40
AHm4Rntn 20 1617
AmlntlGrp 40 4854
AResidPr n 1799
AmTower I 12f 7779
AmWtrWks 1 12 4275
Amenprise 2 08u103 12
94f u68 00
24 48 53
Anadarko 72 90 97
17e 1544
303e 10280
Ann Inc 3548
Annaly I 65e d1066
AnteroRs n 55 64
Arworth 60e 4 43
Aon plc 70 u80 60
Apache 80 89 80
Aptlnv 96 2650
ApolloGM 395e 3152
ApolloRM I 60m 1501
AquaAm s 61 24 92
ArcelorMit 20 1724
ArchCoal .12 4.43
ArchDan 76 4144
ArcosDor 24 11 41
ArmourRsd 60m 392
ArmstrWId 5047
ArrowEl u51 20
AshfordHT 48 1224
Ashland 1 36 8868
Aspenlns 72 3951
AsdEstat 76 1457
AssuredG 40 2143
AstoaF 16 1340
AstraZen 280e 5260
AtlPwr g .40 3.87
AtlasRes 2124f 2003
ATMOS 1 48f u45 48
AtwoodOcn 55 40


231 -03
92 3363 +75
233 4426 +38
232e 7186 +45
BPPLC 228f 469 -01
BPPru 905e 7971 +62
BPZRes 206 -03
BRE 158 5396 +13
BRFSA 19e 2304 +19
BabckWil 32 3155 +56
Bacterin ... d.46 -.18
BakrHu 60 5792 +195
BallCorp 52 4950 +14
BallyTech 71 14 +1 38
05e 467 -03
1 62e 52 87 54
55e 1128 -02
51e 1342 -34
BcoSantSA 79e 862 +02
BcoSBrasil 26e 654 -10
BcpSouth .20 u23.29 +1.15
BkofAm 04 1432 +52
BkAm wtA 575 +07
BkNYMel 60 u33 15 +1 14
248f 61 33 +44
1820 +77
BankUtd 84 31 55 +83
Barclay 42e 1646 +36
B iPVlxrs d48 62 -218
Bard 84 13762 +1 11
BarnesNob 1464 -03
Barnes 44 3675 +77
BarnckG 20 1822 +04
BasicEnSv ... u16.67 +1.37
Baxter 196 6513 -09
Beam Inc 90 6812 +58
BeazerHm 1911 -03
BectDck 198 10771 +1 41


Bio
Bi


erkley 40 43 29

19
6rkHB 11588
erryPet 32 50 89
erryPlas 1977
estBuy 68 42 41
Barrett 28 49
oMedR 94 1903
tautoH ... 24.63
ackRock 672 301 59
BldAm 158 1904
MuTTT 1 13 1708
ackstone1 18e 2591


Boeing 194
BoiseCas n ...
BonanzaCE ...
1 00
260
BostonSci
BoxShips .24m
BoydGm
Brandyw 60


+ 04
+205
+1 47
+ 05
+152
+1 01
- 25
+1.23
+491
+07
-06
+06


2785 +,49
13349 +198
24.38 +1.29
50.58 +3.22
101 25 +17
10033 -90
11 88 + 24
3.57 -.28
1007 +21
1340 -19
1872 +26


96 u4594 +1 16
BrMySq 140 5235+105
BristowGp 1.00 u83.81 +6.15
Brixmorn d19 75 -09
S84f 3610 +123
2826 -17
60 3909 -47
56 1889 -07
Brunswick 10f 4504 +43
Buckeye 430f 6738 +64
Buenavent 31e 1387 -20
BungeLt 120 8092 +14
C&J Engy ... 23.85 +1.15
CBIZInc u877 +35
CBLAsc 92 d1820 -16
CBREGrp 2232 +04
CBSA 48 5860+165
CBSB 48 5874+183
CFInds 400f 21936 +860
CITGrp 40 4775 +54
102 27 28 -09
11 19 -04
CNOFindc 12 u1600 +53
80e d1591 -35
06p 3256 +12
CSX 60 2661 +38
300a d3437 +75
120m 21 70 -24

CYSInvest 136 803 -41
Cabelas 5918 +69
CblvsnNY 60 1508 -55
CabotOGs 08 33 60 +97
CalDive 202 +03
Cahix 1005 -24
CallGolf 04 825 + 02
CallonPet ... 6.91 +.54
Calpne 1961 -09
Cambrex ... u19.14 +1.81
CamdenPT 252 d5998 -93
S 40 1913 +15




120 69 59 +74
CaptlSrce 04a u1358 +41
CapsteadM 23e 11655 -25
CardnlHth 1 21 u6230 +148
CareFuson 3765 -57
CarMax 4756 + 04
Carnal a 36 27 +61
Carters 64 6877 +50
CastleBr 91 00
Caterpillar 240 84 24 +59
CedarF 2 80f 46 98 +26
Celanese 72 56 82 +67


Cenveo


IMble224e 5210 -09


Cinemark 1 0
Cltlgroup (
Citigp wtB
1 7
1 7


284 8988
1624
14 20
1 35 51 81
22 48
80 41 32
d10 96
72f 1348
1 36 6483


48 u1905 +
1 6l
1 00 2336 +
1 12f u3724 +1
25e 41 58 +1


ConocoPhil 276
50
246
ConstellA
Constellm n ...
ContalnSt n
ContlRes
Cnvrgys 24
CooperTire .42
Copel 25e
CoreLabs 128

1 02
40
1 10
CorectnCp 1 92


3264 + 28
11020 +440
7369 +1 18
361 + 68
5727 -66
u6676 +1 11
18.85 +1.63
3495 -36
11419 +478
1990 +49
23.82 -3.08
1303 +05
19048 +848
U34 26 +125
526 +06
1658 +27
2352 +08
3533 +02
1505 -26
1499 -12


CousPrp 18 1055
CvantaH 66 1731


66 1 1s 1
Cviden 1 28f 6384
Credcp 260e 12977
1359
u30 66
CSVxShtrs ... d10.04
CredSuiss 11e 2907
CrstwdMid 1 62f d2065


DCT Indl 28 741 -18
DDRCorp 54 1617 -08
DNP Selct 78 964 -06
DRHorton 15 1814 -41
DTE 262 6934 -02
20 1931 +50
10 u7460 +279
22 20 48
5630 + 54


69 61
DeVryEd 34 3581 +81
DeanFdsrs 1939 +08
Deere 204 81 50 -06
De9ek 60a 2396 -15
DelphlAuto 68 5542 +140
DeltaAir 24 2689 +21
DemndMda 516 -21
DenburyR 1935 + 75
DeutschBk 97e 4658 +29
DBGodDS 679 +19
DevonE 88 6011 +35
DIaOffs 50a 61 74 +1 37
DiamRk 34 1126 -10
DianaShip 11 44 +23
50a 5411 +67
115 2939 +14
312 d4581 -82
3470 +12
3850 -161
DxGIdBIIrs 4327 +74
DxFinBr rs ... 25.49 -1.46
DxEBear rs 2197 -1 09
DxEMBr rs 4419 +26
DxSCBr rs ... 20.63 -1.22
Dx30TBear ... 71.74 +4.70
DxEMBIIs 09e 2712 -17
DxFnBull s ... 77.83 +3.98
DirDGdBr s 3314 -51
DxREBuls Ole -3999 -166
DxSCBulls ... 66.68 +3.68
DxSPBulls 5589 +213
Discover 80 5226 +22
Dolan Co 212 -10
DollarGen 5728 +06
DomRescs 225 6541 +07
DoublncSol 180 2079 -25
DEmmett 80f 2368 -40
Dover 1 50 92 24 +2 06
DowChm 128 3967 +100
DrPepSnap 152 4791 +58
DresserR 5869 +91
DuPont 180 6200 +115
DuPFabros 100 2295 -66
DukeEngy 312 7243 -49
DukeR ty 68 1567 -18
DunBrad 160 11145 +323
Dynegy 20 28 + 55
E-CDang ... 8.12 +.42
E-House 15e 903 +03
EMCCp 40 2395 +08
EOGRes 75 17096 -62
EPAMSys 3572 +72
EQTCor 12 8338+234


EastChem 1 20
Eaton 168
EatnVan 88f
EVTxDIver 1 01
EVTxMGIo 98
Ecolab 92
E Csonlnt 135
EducRlty 44
EdwLfSci
Elan
EldorGldg 12e
ElephTalk
ElleMae


7911 +23C
7060 +1 6
4214 + 8
160 -01



980 +6 0
10656 +149
49 05 4;
8 70 -0OE
6426 + 6E
u1746 + 27
646 -0
.80 +.0S
2296 + 4E


EmeraldO 781
EmergBio ... u20.79
EmersonEI 1 72f 6697
Em pStR n 1351
Em ulex 749
EnbrdgEPt 217 2928
Enbnde 1 26 43 76


200 10158 +2
269f 674 -
362f 5268 -
1 08 1728 +
45e 1593 -:
300f 61 48 +1
332 6442 +l
276f 61 81 -
12e 639 +
88 2293 -
197e 51 70 -
80f 7096 +
40 2230 +
20 5146 +
41 1672 +:


rranH 31 68 + 44
1aSpce 60 42 56 -1 08
onMbl 252 9273 +77
BUni 575 +12
CCorp 54 7342+126
CTech 49775 +31
BCpPA 48 1285 +46
Cnst 4250 +125
M 24 1548 +64
mlyDIr 104 6750 -10


FedSignl
Ferrellgs
Ferro
Fibrla~elu
FIdlNFIn
FidNatl nfo
Fifth&Pac
58.com n
FstAFin n
FstBcpPR
FstCwlth


60 13257
312 10503
... u14.97


u1342 +60
1268 +22
72f 2714 +25
88 4832 +67
2984 95
... u28.54 +2.07
48 2519 +19
6.28 +.59
24 u895 +35


9971
20 1130 +39
1063 +16
48 5099+107
175 d2490 -18
36e 2663 +38
07e 1926 +47
220 38 84 +52
36 03 -147
11360 +242


56 69 58
64 77 92
1 60e d90 26
80 35 97
40 1685
1967


FMCG 125a 36 58 +65
Freescale 1486 12
FronUine ... 2.47 +.22
Fuslon-io 1065 + 22
FutureFuel .44 15.85 -1.60


GameStop I
Gannett
Gap
Gartner
Gastar grs
GencoShip
GenCorp
Generac 5
GnCable
GenDynam 2
GenGrPrp
GenMotors
GM cvpfB
Genpact
GenuPrt
Genworth
GeoGrp 2
Gerdau
Grantlnter
GlaxoSKIn 24
GlimchRt
GlobalCash
GIbGeophy
GlobPay
GolLinhas
GoldFLtd
GoldResrc
Goldcrp g
GoldStr g
GoldmanS 2
GoodrPet
GovPrplT
GrafTech
Graingr 3

GrayTelev

GreenDot
GreenbCos
GpFnSnMx
GpTelevisa
Guess


man 1 20
monyG 12e
isTtr 60a
dFn 60
eirasF 2 65e
anEI 1 24
waters
rREIT 3 06


1 40 4701
1 44 1068


10 5548 +166
80 2770 +79
.80f 41.43 +3.68
60 24 +2 42
443 +08
... 2.83 +.17
1753 +39
0e 4866+159
72 2829 +16
224 87 20 +40
56f 20 47 +11
3666 + 74
238 5128 +69
17 80 -43
215 8069 +1 21
1433 + 56
20f 33 49 +02
10e 791 +08
65e 824 -11
41e 53616 +44
40 d972 -14
849 -13
... 2.05 -.21
08 u6082 +87
... 4.59 -.37
20r 446 +06
36 535 -12
60 2457 +16
.52 -.05
20f 16317 +353
... 21.57 +1.21
172 2412 -23
1136 +30
372 26811 +443
761 +12
827 +21
909 +28


49 42 + (
3430 +1
d1715 -6
2667 +
897 +(
60 41 -1
1248 +!
2294 -!
1079 -


HrtldPay 28 41 60 +1 74
HeclaM 02e 309 +04
HeixEn 2292 ++57
HelmPayne 200 7802+235
Herbafe 1 20 62 40 +80
HercTGC 124f u1624 +73
Hersha 24 557 -01
Hershey 1 94 97 55 + 85
Hertz 21 35 -02
Hess 100f 8030 +152
HewlettP 58 2594 +25
942 -12
170 3619 -42
70 3205 + 06
HollyFront 120a 4418 +78
Honwllnt 1 80f 8744 +1 98
Hormel 68 4320 +25
Hornbeck 5353 + 97
Hospa 3889 32

HostHotls 48f 1860 +12
HovnanE 4 95 01
6, 1
6 12
Humana 108 9519 -29
80f u7608 +312
50 2261 + 42
25 4 60 01
75e 34 47 28
ING 1292 +14
ING85cap 213 2551 +01
iNGPrRTr 38 602 -04
1NG USn 04 u3434 +139
ION Geoph ... 3.78 +.20
IShGold 1249 -19
SAsta 144e 2675 +10
iShBrazl 136e 47 02 -30
iShCanada 68e 2932 +18
iShEMU 92e 3926 +25
iShGerm 44e 2908 +12
iShHK 56e 2003 +10

iShltaly 31e 1510 +15
iShJapan 15e 11 72 +09
iShSKor 37e 6251 +11
iSMalasia 37e 1573 +03
iShMexico 63e 6294 -16
59e 1363 -04
205e 4953 +19
iShSoAf 178e 6310 -18
iSTaiwn 27e 1409 +01
iShUK 52e 2031 +17
iShSlver 2069 -14
lShS&P1001 59e 7930 +1 00
69 1
iShSelD 219e 7015 +56
iShTIPS 1 45e 111 49 -96
iShChiaLC 93e 36 84 +21
SCorSP5003 32e 17830 +239
iShCorTBd 3e 10682 -67
iShEMkts 77e 41 16 -09
iShlBoxlG 433e 11329 -1 12

SSP500Gr 72e 9402 +1 17
+37 i


1Val173e 8274 +1 10
yrT 319e 10341 -255


10yTB1886
-3yTB 226

sMCV 1 109
sMCG 886
rSPMidl 55s
xHYB6216
1 951

Val 1 79
KGr 1 206
'lK 1 77I
KVal 1 90'


101 19 -1 15
8446 -06
6522 +38
6386 +75
8005 +1 11
12849 +1 98
9290 -16
11 63 -23
23 36 23
u089 +128
81 85 + 98
98 94 +1731
94 85 +1 57


iShlntCrBd 303e 10803 -45
iShl-3CrBdl 70e 10538 -06
SR2KGr 1 47e 12794 +285
1 1B 10
IShFltRtB 25e 5062 -06
ShR2K 170e 1923 +19
iShCha 102e 4614 +09
iShUSPfd 197e 3785 -16
iSUSAMiV 78e 3496 +22
iShREst 257e 63 99 -87
iShHmCnst 12e 2175 -34
iShCrSPSml 33e 10397 +1 74
iShMedDev 36e 89 39 +94
iShCorEafe 95e 58 94 +30
iShEurope 1 13e 4545 +25
iStar 1223 +03
ITTCorp 40 4042 +122
ITT Ed ... 40.44 +2.01
Idacorp 172 5054 +19
IWv 168 7908 +72
ImmunoCII ... 2.44 -.16
doTel 173e 3981 -06
nfoblox 4314 +83
nfosys 82e 5368 +01
84 6770 +1 11
2365 +53
152 6682 -16
57 1045 -19
InovioPhm ... 1.89 +.11
IntegrysE 272 5664 -48
Intellichk ... .62 +.12
InterXion 2331 01
IntcntlEx u20420 +387
IntlGame 40f 1747 +29
IntPap 140f 4396 +86
IntlRectif 2387 -03
6775 +125
30 1694 +24
IntraLinks ... u10.90 +.91
IntPotash 75e 1617 +02
Intrexon n ... 19.33 +1.68
venSense 1595 -04
nvesco 90 3332 +95
45e 1478 -46
37 5 26
ronMtn 108 2692 +42
iShCorEM 54e 4915 -06
ItauUnlbH 51r 1389 -36


JGWPTn 1282
152 53 96 +2 31


JinkoSolar ...
JohnJn 2 64
JohnsnCtl 76
JonesGrp .20


JnprNtwk
JustEngy g
K12
KAR Auct 1
KB Home
KBR Inc
KKR 1
KKR Fn
KT Corp


KeyEngy
Kevcorp


1co 90
ndME 5 40
1 64


54 28 + 60
25.98 +2.62
9405 +1 36
u4766 +164
13.50 -1.70
844 +27
5760 -40
1927 +59
6.57 -.54
19.53 +1.09
2835 +76
1598 -55


3481 + 42
2335 +55
944 -17
1507 -27
6219 +11
4663 +1 14
8.45 +.75
u1302 +56
10803 + 15
21 00 -12


KindredHIt 48 1379 -05
493 +04
24 623 -16
1226 +40
140 57 03 +49
KosmosEn 1044 +16
KrlspKrm 2508 + 33
66f 41 96 +31
60 1553 -06
L Brands 120 6293 +1 12
L-3Com 220 10150 +64
LDK Solar ... 1.43 +.08
LG Display dl076 -33
LabCp 10497 +64
Lannett ... u27.13 +3.34
LaredoPet 2977 +76
LVSands 140 69 80+134
LaSalleH 112f 3095 +07
LatamAir 02e 1641 -18
754 +04
68 7771 + 65
LeeEnt 338 +02
52 u3955 +97
1 20 29 38 +27
16 3279 -145
LeucNat 25b 2888 +42
Level3 3011 + 38
LexRItyTr 66f 1078 -16


LifeTFIt 4673 +28
LifeLock 1599 +41
LilyElh 196 50 63 +62
LincNat .48 u48.76 +2.62
Linkedln 215117 +370
L 3229 +15
L 1826 +46
493 +19
532f 13811 +1 91
Loews 25 4857 +83
Lorillards 220 51 46 +40
LaPac 1585 +10
LyonBasA 200 7539 +58


M&TBk 280 11387 +273
MBIA 1136 +22
MDC 100 2787 -50
MDURes 69 3016 +47
MFA Fnci 88a 736 -07
MGIC 782 +23
MGMRsts 1909 +51
MRCGlbl 3104 +62
MSCInd 132f 7596 +20
MSCI Inc 41 62 + 99
Macech 248f 56 -39
MackCai 120 d1914 -61
Macys 100 4618 +22
MadCatzg ... .47 -.15
223f 6073 +06
128 84645 +53
'.,1 :jnK ... 7.07 +.67
Mallnck n 4586 +1 11
Manitowoc 08 1904 +44
ManpwrGp 92 8000 +228
52 U1883 +45


MarshM 100
MStewrt ''
MartMM 160
Masco 30
Mastec
MasterCrd 2 40
MatadorRs ...
McCorm 136
McDrmlnt
MU
McDnlds 324f
McGrwH 1 12
McKesson 96
McEwenM
Mead John 1 36
MeadWvco 1 00
Mechel
MedProp 84f
Medifast
Medtrnic 1 12
MeetMe
Merck 172


MerL pfD
MerL pfE
MerL pfF
Methode
MetLife I
MKors
MidAApt ;
MidcstE n
MilenMda
MillerEnR
MindrayM
MitsuUFJ
MoblleTele
Mohawk
MoInaHlth
MolsCoorB
Molycorp
Monsanto
Moodys



MotrlaSolu
MuellerWat
Mvw







MurphO 1
NCR Corp
NQ Mobile


Nabors
NBGrce rs
NatFuGas
NOIIVarco
NatRetPrp
Nationstar
NavideaBio
NavlosAcq
Navlstar
NetSulte
Neuralstem

NewResd n
NYCmtyB
Newcastle
NewellRub
Mn

M
M tB
M wU


4060 + 28
2866 -08
23 89 -23
5300 +58
7446 +132
614 +48
u3.36 +.22
100 70 -24
20 35 02
3098 -08
73447+1315
20.42 +1.43
6910 +19
815 +37
97 01 -19
71 42 +1 55
15856 +227
1 90 +05
8048 +55
3399 +49
3 06 08
12 81 -19

2388 +924
5803 +73
1 88 + 04
4680 + 98
41 92 -1 34
679 +09
25 13 -02
2517 -05
25 22 -07
25.44 +1.64
50.14 +2.55
7940 +149
6183 -80
u1783 + 42
671 -17
591 +22
3613 +12
624 +03


13430 +68
3221 +71
128 53 79 +79
485 +09
72f 107922 +322
521 +11
100 7307 +1 69
20 2944 + 72
2592 05

100 4801 +105
124 6312 +63
07 840 -01
25b 61 04 +1 11
3654 +1 02
1133 +36
48 2832 +34
76 2382 + 08
1 20 u46 03 + 70



104 8220 +179
162 32 44 -1 27
... 36.48 -4.27
... 1.53 +.13
20 390 -05
3982 +1u01
9507+1 73
243 +11
d564 +09
35e 2638 +60
70f 613 -09
100 1630 +26
40 531 -09
60 2901 +32


NewfldExp 2946 + 43
NewmtM 80m 2757 +22
NiSource 100 31 32 -10
NelsenH 80 3977 +66
NkeB s 84 7712 +142
NobleCorp f 3956 +1 47
1 9+261
NobleEn s 56 75 60 +2 95
NokaCp 765 +I11
Nomura 736 +14
NorandaAI 04m 286 -11
Nor cAm 64 843 +124
Nordstrm 1 20 61 02 + 70
NorflkSo 208 8562 +14
NAPallg ... .76 +.04
NoestUt 147 4227 -13
NthnO&G 1637 +66
NthnTEn 466e 2267 -68
NorthropG 2 44u110 73 +206
NStarRIt 84f 935 -02
NovaBayP ... .96 +.05
211 -01
2 53e 77 25 + 36
NovoNord 318e 16847 -177
NuSk 120 11287 +293
Nucor 147 u5462 +1 11
NustarEn 4.38 44.52 +2.10
NvCredStr 70 943 -01
NuvMuVal 44a 905 -06
9 01
NuvQPf2 66 807 -09
NuverraE ... dl.63 -.74
OGEEgys 84 3779 -03
OassPet 5126 +209
OccPet 256 9633 +48
S 88 8476 +231
142e 1294 +03
OcwenFn 4991 -03
OfficeDpt 504 +19
Oi SA 45e 157 +01
OilStates 10670 +1 50
OldRepub 72 1690 +17
Oin 80 2362 +43
192f 31 45 -1 39
56 5655+108
16
Omnicom 160 7040 +02
ONEOK 152 5790 +89
OpkoHlth 1031 +27
Oracle 48f 3435 +35
Orange 97e 1298 +17
Orbitz ... 7.42 +.42
- ^ 820 +37
1476 +16
OrionEngy ... u5.40 +.56
OshkoshCp 4918 +104
OwensCorn 3580 +14
Owenslll 31 92 + 74


120 27 44 +57
182 41 77 -28
PHH Corp 2291 +25
PimcoTR 3 45e 10591 -61
PimShMat 80e 10148 -02
PMCCT 50 858 -07
PNC 176 75 52 +2 62
PPG 244 181 57 +1 93
PPLCorp 147 3051 -15
PVRPtrs 220 2529 -10
1186 -26
160 6054 +176
PallCorp I 10f 8187 +107
PaloAltNet 4099 -30
Pandora 2674 + 46
ParaG&S 1.26 +.06
ParkDrl ... u8.41 +.52
ParkerHan 1 80 11613 +1 60
PeabdyE 34 2087 +81
48 629 +15
895 +40
PennWstg 56 869 +17


2 28 22 09
1 00 676
1 08 1919
61
28 3710
36 u148 75
475e 111 18
77e 1691
27e 1628
431
96 31 32
3 76f 8941
98e 3505
1 56f 6536
909
80 1735
20 21 25
156a 1800
188 2212
1 46 11 98
2331


18983 +367
21 41 +09


umCrk 176 44
yGem n 14
las 1 68 127
36
1 10 2E
ostPrp 1 32 44
otash 1 40 32


PSBuybk 36e
PSEmMom 16e
PSSrLoan 1 13e
PS SPLwV 89e


d2523 14
2488 08
21 90 +13
40 89 +62
1807 -11
2484 +01
3275 +19


PwShPfd 93e 1372 -07
PShEMSov 130e 27 20 24
PSIna 17e 1656 -16
PowerSec 1676 -87
Praxa 240 12449 +31
PrecMxNik 33e 1716 +19
PrecDnll 24f 1007 +10
Prestige 3334 + 51
Preflum g ... 3.35 +.37
PrlnFncl 1 04 u4844 +1 48
1 12 3895 -29
1954 -27
ProShtS&P 2648 -35
ProUltQQQ 22e 8747 +230
PrUShQQQ 1722 -48
ProU)tSP 27e 9379 +243
ProUhD30 3488 -1 13
ProShtEM 2713 +01
ProShtR2K 1797 -34
ProSht20Tr 3272 +75
PUHtSP500 s 08e 84 29 +3 24
PrVixSTF rs d32 59 -1 47
PrUVxST rs ,,, d22.28 -2,07
PrUltShYen 63 10 +1 44

19
PrShtVxST u120 25 +466
PrUltCrude 2994 + 09
PrUShCrde 3453 -10
ProUltSilv 1945 -22
ProUShEuro 1814 +16
ProctGam 241 8251 +19
1 28e 26 58 +42


PUPSR2


QEP Res
Qihoo360
QuantaSvc
QntmDSS

QksilvRes


Quiks


32 68
ow 30 69
L20 78 30
2K 13 63
00 17 46
2K ... 13.00


16 69
pE 21 51
1 60 u86 90
1 44 3351
560f 15991
p 20 1685


-1 28
-66


08 3242 + 61
7931 +136
2986 -01
... dl.21 +.08
120 63 32 -38


silvr ... u8.75
Fin 60f 7 54
S 82 2411
40 1785
space 48 54
anGrp 01 1300
oShk 2 72
ren 1 80f 17342
16 7578


56 4626
Rayonier 96 d44 96
Raytheon 220 85 36
RealD 700
43 12
218 4006
RedHat 4332
RedwdTr 1 12 1801
ReedEIsNVI 22e u41 53
84 1841
1 85 489
188f 2514
RegionsFn .12 9.78
Regis Cp 24 1538
ReneSola ... 4.81
Renren 3 28
RepubSvc 104 34 32
ResMed 1 00 5061
ResoluteEn ... 9.17
ResrceCap 80 6 02
RestorHdw 72 64
RetailProp 66 1392
RexAm Res 29 32
ReynAmer 2 52 51 29
RoTito 178e 5317


RockwlAut
RockColl
RockwdH
Roundys
Rowan


1 40f 95 85
2 32f 111 72
120 7090
1 80 6627
.48 8.63
3719
1035
1 66f 4302
3 60 68 83
3 60 66 07
60O4
n 13 48
1 36 64 58
12 36 67
200 3932


SAP AG 7922 +51

SK Tlcm 2320 +02
SLGreen 200f 9130 -13
10 8741 +234
352e 15749 +164
SpdrGold 12428 -188
SpdrEuro501 12e 3987 +12


drNuBMu 94e 2285 -07
rLe 1-3bll 4578
drS&P RB 63e u3870 +1 46
drRetl 96e 8487 +1 19
rOGEx 82e 6807 +169
drMetM 60e 4037 +98
Micro 40 751 -01
BESPs 39e 1039 -21


Safeway 80 33 02 -1 01
StJoe ... 19.93 -1.06
StJude 100 56 99 +77
Salesforcs 5549 1 14
SallyBty 2619 + 26
SanchezEn 2697 +121
590 +12
11 24 -05
SandstG g ... 5.43 +.31
Sanofl 186e 5245 +26
..... ... 9379 +174
4311 +57
Schwab .24 u24.02 +1.26
SchwitMau 144f 5232 +165
ScorploTk 28f 1205 +30
Sotts 1 75 u57652 -14
ScnppsNet 60 7651 +35
ScppsEW 1865 -31
892 +38
364f 466 +38
SealAi 52 30 82 +32
SelMedHId 40 839 +11
SempraEn 252 8963 -51
SenHous 156 23 40 -50
SensataT 3711 +11
SerceCp 28 1764 +14
ServcNow 51 86 + 07
SherwM 200 18551 +449
Shutterstk ... 72.39 +5.70
SibanyeGn 15p 591 +04
SiderurNac 38e 561 +13
60 7487 +91
04 1576 -10
43e 21 60 -05
10 279 +04
SimonProp 480f 15301 -231
188f 36 60 +04
1 6
48 5269 +85
Smucker 232 10861 +100
SolarWlnds 3406 + 90
SonlcAut 10 21 83 -35
SonyCp 28e 1674 -12
Sothebys 40 51 41 +1 14
SouFun 1.00e 57.19 +5.79
SouthnCo 203 4121 -31
SthnCopper 68e 2809 +25
SwstAil 16 1769 +12
3615 +47
1153 +03
SpectraEn 122 3412 +09
SpitAero 2943 + 38
SpitRC n 66 998 -23
Sprint n 707 + 08
SprottGold 1070 -17
SPMats 1 01e 4419 +81
SPHIthC 82e 5316 +77
SPCnSt 110e 4267 +21
SPConsum 82e 6329 +99
149e 8655 +1 27
32e 2086 +48
SPInds 89e 4938 +66
61 9 7
SPTech 61e 3390 +31
16 9
SP Utl 146e 38 95 07
StdPac 7 34 08
StanBlkDk 200 8088 -17
StarwdHtl 1 35f 7444 +1 37
StarwdPT 184 25 89 -05
StateStr 1 04 u71 86 +2 01
StatoilASA1 16e 2293 -30
SterhngBc 24 u1242 +38
SbfelFin ... u43.20 +2.46
StllwtrM 11 09 + 10
3256 +88
834
Stryker 1 06 73 33 +43
SumitMitsu 964 + 18
SummitHtl 45 880 -01
1 44 u35 28 +62
u21 01 + 45
Suncorgs 80 3523 +74
SunEdison ... u12.55 +1.88
SunstnHtl 20 1299 +09
Suntech ... .54 -.35
, r 2782 +65
668 +06
SwERCmTR 799 +02
SwftEng ... 14.57 +.73
SwiftTrans ... 22.05 +1.22
SymetraF 36 1841 +52
SynergyRs ... 9.73 +.65
Synous 04 335 +11
Sysco 1 12 3313 -01
T-MobUSn 2768 +1 12
TCFFncl 20 1581 +50


JX 58 6172
RWAuto 74 27
ableauA n 64 45
awSem 50e 1801
S 27 1186
293f 4985
1 72 6511
18e 3077
aubmn 200 d6532
[eamHIth 45 00
feckResg 90 2711
ekayTnk 12e 2n63
[eledyne 87 51
lefBrasl 22e d1980
[elefEsp 47e 1660
Data 51 29 36
mpGIb 42a 8 29
[empurSly 44 88
[enarls 86e 46 01


TevaPhrm 128e 37 27 +26
Textron 08 3028 +90
ThermoFis 60 9817 +201
315 -03
130 38 28 + 29
Thorlnds 92a 5240 +91
3D Sys s 70 40 +2 54
3MCo 254u12799+158
Tdwr 100 60 21 +37
Tiffany 1 36 7965 +1 1
TW Cable 260 121 08 +284
TimeWarn 1 15 6765 +227
Timken 92 5310 +83
Titan Int 02 1475 +16
TollBros 31 94 -74
Torchmark 68 7390 +85
340f 9219 +62


S 46 109!
1 99e 127;


TremorV n ... d4.7
- 9 90
1573
Trinity 60f 5248 +
Trulia ... 35.96 +
TumiHIdgs 2245
Tuppwre 248 8651
TurqHilIRs 471
Twitter n ... d41.6
TwoHrblnv 1 42e 93
Tycolntl 64 3640


UGC
URS
USA
USS
UJSG


n 20
AG 16e
94
Corp 1 13
84
kirwy
Ilhca 50


781 9
UnlevNV 140e 385
Unllever 1 40e 3965
UnlonPac 316f 1550
Unsys 2617
UtdContl 35 36
UtdMicro 07e 2 01
UPSB 248 9962-
UtdRentals 63 4
USBancrp 92 380
USNGas 1767
USOiFd 3401
USSteel 20 27 59
UtdTech 236f 1085
UtdhlthGp 1 12 705
UnivHIthS 20a 800
UnumGrp 58 u33 1
Uranium En 1 77


VFCp 420f 2187
VaalcoE 5.93
ValeSA 78e 1598

ValeSApf 78e 141
ValeantPh 1054
ValeroE 90 40 32
Valldus 1 20a u40 1
VlyNBcp 65 1003
Valspar 92 6915


VarlanMed
Vectren 1 44f
VeevaSys n .
Ventas 2 68
VenFone
VenzonCm 2 12f
Vipshop
Visa 1 60f
VishayInt
Visteon
VitaminSh
VMware


Voxeljet n
VulcanM


WaddellR 1 12a
Walgrn 126
WalterEn .04
Walterlnv
WasteConn 46f
WsteMInc 1 46
Weathflntl 6
WebsterFn 60
WtWatch
We1RIt 1 22
Wellcare
WellPoint 1 50
1 20

WestarEn 1 36


918
1624
666
732
4965
405
561
404
974
1 88
27658
7339
3482
40.5
61 57 -
2344
502
74.88 +,
19829 +
1211
7516
5102
7928
347
8808
u44.9
56 60 +
1793
1868
11 52
8636
u641
5970
18.6
3365
41 3
441
1707
287
3367
2991
6558
8728
427
8317 +
31 6


'15 7
324
50 1721
90fu1141


Willbros
W CsCos 147i
WmsPtrs 3511
WmsSon 124
WilhsGp 1 12
Wipro 13r


Wyndham 116 662
XLGrp 56 3125
1966
1 12 2852
XinyuanRE .20 6.4
Xylem 47 3398
YPF Soc 31e 2226
26 934
6338 +
YingliGrn ... 6.46
YoukuTud 25 86
YumBrnds I 48f 705
YuMe n ... d6.26 -
ZaleCp 15 74
Zimmer 80 8859
Zoetis n 26 31 59


Stocks in bold changed 5% or more in price from the previous day.
Si.,,. h ,,1f.:..:...:.


t annual rate, which was increased by
.. .. . s paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or
m Current annual rate, which was decreased by
n
- c T lt P '....I.-Il..I. -
Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


SMarket Review


Every Sunday


In The


Money



Section of The



Daily Commercial

SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 787-0600 (Lake Co.)
or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5
p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months
or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily
Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007.


437 64
260 +41


50e 45 13
210 3963
31e 3331
40e 55 94


32
162e
88f

1 84
72

22


Du 'I]': "q] ,),)1,',,)1": '


I -





Saturday, November 9,2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL CS


Nasdaq National Market


Name Div Last Chg


ACIWwde 5961 +245
AMCNet 6675 -140
ASMLHId 69e 8737 +07
Abiomed u2719+104
AaaT 50 1478 -01
AcadiaPh 2173 +84
Accuray ... u7.70 +.89
AcelRx 7.45 +.73
AcetoCorp .24f u19.77 +3.45
AcMion 249 +05
AordaTh 3180 +05
A lsBz 19f 1707 +2
Acxiom 3202 +66
AdobeSy 5484 +167
Adtran 36 272 +45
AdvEnld 2446 +12
7043 -29
773 +29
AirMethds ... 49.98 +5.96
AkamT 4527 +79
AlaskCom 20 228 +10
Alexion 117438 +333


AlIscnptH
AlnylamP
AlteraCp If
AmTrstFin
Amarin
Amazon
AmbacFn n
Ambarella
3
2

AmSupr
Amgen
AmkorTch
AnacorPh


AngesList
Ansys
ApolloGrp
Apollolnv
Apple Inc 1
ApldMatl
AMCC
Approach
ArenaPhm
AresCap 1
AnadP
ArkBest
ArmHId
A
AM
AM
Arotech
ArrayBio
A
At
Arns
ArubaNet
AsoenaRt-
AspenTech
AssodBano
athenahlth
AtlasAir
Atmel
Autodesk
AutoData
Auxim


AVEO Ph
AvisBudg


1208 -46
1 80 -01
136 980 +66
1447 +2
8440 + 22
2604 + 98
80 858 + 16
220 52056 +807
40 1775 +39
1136 +29
... 25.11 -2.67
4.79 +.71
52a 1758 +17
232 +03
.12 26.70 +1.28
23e 4582 +10
1.96 +.11
5.59 +.29
1719 +23


36f 1695
13367
6825
714
4276
74 7601
1890


BJsRest 27 70
Baidu 151 09
BallardPw 1 27
BncFstOK 1 24f 55 89
BebeStrs .10 5.76
BedBath 7576
Biocryst ... 5.55
23669
6147
BioScrip ... 6.14
BioTelem ... u11.22
BIkRKelso 1 04 947
BlackBerry 6 56
BloominBr 2561
Blucora 28 76
BodyCentrl 3 45
BostPrv .28 11.79
BoulderBr ... 15.28
BreitBurn 1 95f 1987
1504
44 26 50
BroadSoft 25 09
BrcdeCm 8 19
BrklneB 34 887
BrukerCp 1898
BuffaloVW 145 11
CAIn 1 00 31 93
CBOE 72 51 12
CDWCpn 17 2295
CH Robins 40 59 66


CMEGrp
CTC Media
m
CVB Fnd
CadencePh
Cadence
Caesars
CafePress
CalaGDyln
CalAmp
CalumetSp r
CdnSolar
CapFedFnu
CpstnTurb


7781
1225
u1489
5.76
1290
18.15
584
892
22.79
25 94
28.65
1240
1.25


148 92

urMed 218
LA 6
ntAI 8 86
pheid u41 57
rner s 57 04
artlnds 99 67
6rterCm 12806
kPoint 59 72
eesecake 56 48 16


+374
-03
+129
+.67
+27
+.47
+5150
+2 17
+.49
+.79
+ 11
+06
+107
+39
-04
+.58
+.77
+29
+836
+ 19
-36
+ 16
+ 15
+41
+204
+ 27
+174
-03
+06
+3 15
-15
+47
+.57
-08
+1.13
-13
+ 16
+1.13
+41
+2.40
+ 19
+.13


Costa Inc
Critco
CowenGp
Cree Inc
Criteo SA n


4728 -
... 21.51 +1
24 12278
375 +
5648 +
... d29.75 -4
1266 +
36f 2427 -
51 46 +1


65 FairhldS 1215 -06
95 FairwayG n ... 21.10 +1.15
+07 Fastenal 100 4713 +64
+01 FifthStFin 1 15 102 +07
-93 FifthTird 48 u2001 +93
.53 FinclEngin .20 60.00 +3.51
Finsar 200 +26
+06 FinLine 28 2460 +18


+80
4.63
+37
-41
127


CublstPh 6242 +72
CumMed 635 +18
Curis ... 2.75 -.16
CypSemi 44 928 +17
Cytori ... 2.58 -.20


DFC Gbl 1223 +29
Deckrsnut 6829 +139


dELIAs
Dndreon


... 2.57 +.19
25 14781 +66


Digirad .05p 3.81 +21
D talGen 11 98 +53
DireoV 6389 +79
DsComA 8586+11
DFshNet h OOe 4825 +05
DollarTree 5866 +75


DryShips
Dunkin
DurectCp
DyaxCp

E-Trade
eBay
EagleBulk


9 EFI
+ 88 Enc
S06 Emnd
+2 Emnd
+ 77 E
+96 E
2 67 Enr
+ 59 Eng


299 +26
057 +95
172
3 46 + 69


+ 68 CleanEngy
75 CogentC
+69 "'


5979 +09
... 11.93 +.60
.56f u36.01 +2.11
9023 +73
78 4705 + 91
75-76 +23


31 17 -19
... 3.06 +.19
76 4796 74
150 -04
8 11 +22
... u17.76 +.89
5300 +43
... 4.69 +.24
60m 608


t/stBcp 60 34 16 +124
x"n1 1287 -24
1nc 1064 +24
ctArts 2570 +37
1 ... 37.52 +1.96
coreCap U47 45 +1 53
idoPhrm ... u60.50 +3.06
docyte ... 11.64 +1.27
1763 +30
1676 +63
rgyRec ... 5.10 +.36
gyXXI 48 2908 +95
1041 +19


Euronet
ExOne n
Exelixis
Expedza
Expdlntl
ExpScnpts
ExtrmNet
Ezcorp
F51 Newks


d15594 -381
3e 1208 +02
... 44.45 +3.26
... 58.30 +3.74
... 5.00 +.26



629 +28
... d11l.34 -2.24
8202 +163
36 2906 +84
3104 -11
363 -03


stMent 64


FossilGrp
FosterWhl
FrancesMa
Fresh Mkt


1944 +604
12791 +2834
... u30.65 +1.79
1844 +50
4932 +133
40 469 +06


FultonFncl 32 1238 +46


GTAdvTc 947 +16
Gam&Lsr n 4549 -32
Garmin 180 4625 -10
Gentex 56 2880 +34
GeronCp ... 4.61 -.61
GleadScis 6737 +1 74
GIbSpocMet 28 168 +30
GluMobile ... 3.21 +.20
Gogo n ... 18.75 +1.22
GolLNGLtd 180 3754 +93
Goodyear 20 21 06 + 15
101608 +808
5971 +1 53
GreenPIns 16 1597 +2
Groupon ... 10.11 +.61
GulfportE 5699 +1 18
HD Supp n 1983 +13
HMS Hldgs ... d22.95 +4.21
HainCel 8370 +86
Halozyme ... u12.90 +2.03
HanmiFin 28 u1840 +63
HanwhaSol ... 5.13 +.51
Harmonic 732 +14
Hasbro 160 5048 -12
HawHold 827 +07
Healthwys 1209 56
HercOffsh 714 +25
HimaxTch 25e 875 +25
2204 -12
3341 -29
HorizPhm ... u4.86 +1.12
HudsCity 16 918 +27
HuntJB 60 7320 +25
HuntBncsh 20 902 +31
IAC Inter 96 5499 -06
IdeLabs 10961 +1 05
II-VI 1539 -05
IPG Photon 65e 6480 +282
iRobot 3330 +39
iShACWI 1 1e 5594 +55
iShNsdqBio 18e 20418 +636
Icahn Ent 5.00 120.25 +9.98
IconixBr 3788 +61
IdenixPh 435 +08
Identive h ... 67 -.06
Illumina 9605 +306
Immersion 1201 -25
ImunoGn ... 13.64 +.88
Imunmd ... 3.73 +.28


InfinityPh


37 56 + 59
9312 -07
... 14.05 +2.08
3819 +12


Insulet 3643
Intgv 9 77
Intel 90 24 09
InteractB 40a u22 11
InterDig 40a 33 64
InterMune ... 12.65


924 -01
32.79 +1.73


j2Global 1 02f 4508 +1 16
JA Solar rs ... 10.98 +.84


KLA Tnc 180 6480
Kandifech 6 20
Karyoph n d16 24
KraftFGp 210Of 5273
KratosDef ... 7.17
Kulihke 11 96
149
31 19
LPL Fini 76 3985


LexiPhrm
LibGlobA
LibG obC
IibtlntA


+.86 LigandPh


1615
2.38
8045
7613
2743
u7559
4995
... 48.33

1 98
1 04 4097
290 2990
290 3160


+237 My
+2.69 Myr


lululemngs 6900 +67


MSG 5576 +30
MaidenH 44f 1176 +45
MAKOSrg 2970 -07
MannKd ... 5.13 +.45
MarlntA 68 4612 +69
MarvellT 24 1335 +34
Mattel 1 44 4417 -03
MattsonT 267


nation 61 42 +1 92
Crown 3420 +97


chp 1 42f 4289
inT 18 11
oSemi 2887
isoft 1 12f 3778
speed 5 01
x 96 88 60
delez 56f 32 68
strBev 55 16
789
1609
n 4041
adG 26 59
2984
85e 22 98


NPS Phm 24 26 + 60
NXP Semi 41 59 + 87
Nanosphere 2 06 04
NasdOMX 52 3593 +81
NatPenn 40 1070 +40
NektarTh ... 10.84 +1.88
NetApp 60 3991 +46
NetEase IlOOe 66 64 +2 56
Netfohx 884 90 +8 04
Neurcnne 898 +830
1 08 662 06
1708 +85
NewsCpA n 1760 +34
NewsCpBn 1794 +33
NorTrst 124 5840 +217
NwstBosh 52 14 10 +51
Novavax ... 2.90 +.14
NuVasve 31 89 + 64
Nuan1eCm d1558 +06
NuPathe ... 2.11 +.34
NutnSyst 70 1947 +51
Nvidia .34f 15.56 +1.02


d1016 -23
12352 +42
OeanRig 2009 -19
Oclaro ... 2.16 +.14
OldNBcp 40 u1529 +58
Omeros 863 + 12
OmniVisn 1435 -06
OnSm1nd 714 +04
OpenTable 7769 +205
OraSure ... 6.86 +.48
Orexigen ... 4.99 +.27
Outerwall u68 59 +127


6004 +276
'L'L bE.:. .60 U8.48 +.40
PGT Ino 932 +27
PMCSra 576 +13


PaciraPhm
Pactera
PainThers
anASIv


u3814 +91
80a 5684 +80
411 + 19
... 51.44 +3.70
710 +05
.75e 3.85 +.35
50 1042 +20
16692 -08


PattUTI 20 2479 +81
Paychex 140 4221 +42
PnnNGm ... 13.68 +.84
PeopUtdF 65 1461 +27
PeffectWId 45e 1705 +70
Perffech ... 2.81 -.29
Performnt 950 -06
PernixTher ... 2.81 +.83
PetSmart 78f 7254
1419 +27
426 -13
Polyoom 1074 +05
Popular 2778 +70
PortfRec s 570 -10
PwShsQQQ98e 8254+110
PremExhb d 124 -02
PnoeTR 152 7880+218
pncehine 1073820+50831
PnlateB 04 u2554 +1801
ProUPQQQ 10215 +;88
PrUPShQQQ 1769 --74
ProspctCap 182 1180 +17
QIAGEN 2260








9 67
QhkTech 2586 +57
e 1245 +21
140 6745 +36
Questcor 1.00f 61.60 +3.26
Qunarn 2564 +45
RDAMiorol 10e u1753 +29
RF MioD 508 +03
Rambus 846 +28
Randgold 50f 7668 -56
RaptorPhm ... 12.41 -1.06
RealPage ... 25.89 +1.85
28307 +608
1334 +34
RentACt 84 3381 +30
u1195 +44
1092 +36
Responsys 1596 +39
1930 +48
287 +11
RiverbedT ... 17.54 +2.43
RocketF n ,,, d37.86 -9.49
RockwIlM ... 12.11 +.96
RosettaR 5356 +77


BossStrs 68 7809 +1 17
Ro, Corp 1647 -20
RoyGId 80 4775 +122
Ryanr 221e 4611 +27


SBA Corn 91 60 + 14
SEI Inv 40f 3350 +1 08
SLM Cp 60 25 10 + 17
SalixPhm ... u84.00+12.69
SanDisk 90 6805 +1 15
SangBio ... 9.69 +.51
Sanmina 1536 +20
Sanofi rt ... d.77 -1.23
Santarus ... u31.95 +8.73


SeattGen
SelCmfrt
Sequenom
SvcSource
ShandaGm
ShoreTel
Shutterfly
SierraWr
Ad
SigmaAld
SilicGrin


Sinclair
SirusXM


SpirntAir
Sphknk
Spreadtrm
Sprouts n
Staples
StarScient
Starbuks
Starz A


5672 +34
... 38.92 +1.91
1902 +59
... 2.11 +.41
929 + 18
4 13 + 11
740 + 11
... 48.26 +3.14
1709 -03
86 8478 + 10
... 12.20 +.60
5 16 +07
624 +24
7604 -206
.60 33.97 +2.11
05e 366 +06
71 28 -37
16 1575 +39


19O00
2 97
5e 942
60830
40 30 49
4569
48 15738
,,, 1.62


StDynam 44 u1916 +65
SMadden s 87 54 +90
Stratasys 11905 +90
SunPower ... 31.87 +1.61
Supernus 698 +28
SusqBnc 32 1211 +35
Symantec 60 23 16 +833
Symetcm 717
Synaptios 4534 +79
Synchron 33 17 + 16
SyntaPhm 4 O00
tw telecom 28 90 -836
TakeTwo 1751 +11
Tangoe 1578 -27
TASER ... 16.87 +.86
Tellabs 08a 244 -01
TeslaMot 13795 -1 82
TesseraToh 40a 1812 +02
TxCapBsh 52 98+153
Texlnst 1 20 41 98 + 33
TexRdhse 48 2801 + 62


TwerG If 66 393


21stCFoxA
21stCFoxB
Ubiquiti


8448 +60
741 +07
1297 +45
25 3884+104
25 3361 +93
.18e u41.25 +4.07
127-89 +105


Umhlfe 262 +04
UtdCmBks 1590 +23
UtdOnln rs .60 u17.92 +1.42
UtdTherap u9046+283
UnivDisp ... 36.61 +7.46
UrbanOut 3948 +101


VCA Ant
ValueClick
VandaPhm


Velti h


21.86 +1.33
6.24 +.40
7998 -13
51 25 +28
3056 -48
.14 +.02


h 61 06
66
A 120 8228
iB 120 8229
dl 14
ICm 159e 1349
rm +9 8
8 60
one 1 57e 6 54
o 1963
nRs 3 09
Fed 40f 22 86
om 26 94
D 3529


WestellT 4,06 --05
100 71 67+144
d2244 -19
829 +05
WholeFds 48f 5855+129
WilshBcp .12 8.97 +.70
Windstrm 100 802 -14
W FsdomTr 1405 +32
Wix omn 1730 +74
Wynn 400a 16371 +420
XOMA 388 -14
XenoPort 5 11 +21
Xlinx 100 4463 + 14
YRCWwde 898 -06


Zagg
ZeltiqAes
Zillow
ZionBcp


47 47 -26
33812 +101
3635 +26
4.01 +.34
u16.01 +2.46
7728 +252
.16 29.64 +1.40
266 +06
346


Mutual Funds


12-mo
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
AQR
DiArbtl 1120-03 +24
MaFtStrl 1007 +02 +85
MaFtStrN b 1000+02 +82
MIStrAtl 1004-07 +24
Acadian
EmgMkts d 1854 -03 +52
Alger Group
CapAplnsI 2824+40 +326
CapApprA m 21 16+30 +325
Alliance Bernstein
GIblBdA m 827 -04 -15
GrthlncA m 517 +07 +343


Mll.,..!dl
NFJAIICpVaA m 1544C
NFJAIIpVallns1548
NFJSmCVAd b83584.
NFJSmCV-s 3789
NFJSmCVA m8586
Amana
Growfi b 31 35
Income b 4292
American Beacon
26466
2796
2818 .
American Century
DivBdlnstl 1068
DivBdlnv 1068
EqGrowlnv 3073
EqlncA m 906
Eqlnclnst 907
Eqlncln 906
GinMaeln 1069


Selectlnv 52 92
Ultralnv 8350 .
Valuelnv 795
Vistalnv 2259
American Funds
AMCAPA m 2744
BalA m 2371
BondA m 1248


04 06 +21 9
59 6+30 9
63 05 +171
34 +55+32 9
38+ 53 +31 9
35 08 +7 6
36 05 -2 6
33 + 10 +186


+ 43 +306

+46

+ 78 +456
105+437

-01 +104
-07 -26

+ 11 +277
+ 08 +331
+ 84 +885
+ 69 +88 9
+ 47 +44 8
+ 26 +31 9

+ 80 +460
+ 37 +254
+ 87 +250

+ 01 +09
+ 18 +256

-03 +49
+ 28 +862
-04 -1 8
+02

-06 -1 1
-06 -1 2
-01 +1 4
106+372
+ 18 +325


824 -02 +99
4276 +70 +419
1097 -09 -76
11 13 -08 -73
974-01 +10
1040 -04 -39


Brown Advisory
GrEqlnv d 1817+27
Brown Cap Mgmt
SmCols b 7177+152
Buffalo
Flexiblno d 1425 +07
SmallCap d 3941 +73
CG Capital Markets
21 15 +832
1211 + 17
CCCM
Focus 3661 +44
Realty 3001 -28
CRM
MdCpVllns 3820+56
Calamos
GrIncA m 3583+45
GrowA m 5850+92
MktNeul 1299+04
MktNulnA m 1312+04
Calvert
EqutyA m 4723 +64
Causeway
IntlVllns d 1573 + 11
Clipper
Clipper 8808 +93
Cohen & Steers
CSPSI 1297 -04
Realty 6618 -72


Columbia
AcornA m
Acorn lntA m
AcornlIntZ
Acorn USAZ
AcornZ
AModA m


ComlnfoA m
DivlncA m
D'vlncZ
DivOppA m
DivrEqlnA m
H YldBdA m
IncOppA m
ntmBdA m
ntmBdZ
IntmMuniBdZ
LgCpGrowA m


4780+09 +221
47 48 +09 +22 !
661 +59 +4
3731 +50 +31!
1230+06 +14;
m 1313+09+177
2087+883 +34 !
47388+52 +211
1803 +21 +27 (
1804 +20 +27;
10438+12 +26!
1308+22 +296

965
298-01 +74
1001-04 +6(
906 -04 -2!
906 -04 -2;
1050 -08 -2
99
661 18+49+29
825+13 +31!
3326+46 +310


TaxExmptA m 1332 -05
ValRestrZ 56 53 + 87
Community Reinvest
Quallnv b 1063 -06
Constellation
SndsSelGr 1697 +29
SndsSelGrll 1659 +28


195 -04 +49
2844 +52


EmMtSmCpl 2063
2619
1520
GlEqlnst 1729
GIblRIEstSes. 983
InfPrtScl 11 69


-03 +59
-05 +41
+07 +175
+ 19 +315
-06 +80
- 11 -83
+ 05 +291
-08 -82
+01 +92
+ 06 +386
+ 02 +81 6
+10 +298
+ 10 +290
+ 10 +260
-88 +73
-01 +04
+09 +285
+41 +399
+ 39 +401
3+ 28 +332
+59 +448
+ 69 +441
+ 25 +361
+ 26 +374


3002 +57 +399
1975 + 40 +464
34 7 + 71 +43


DWS-Scudder
EqDivB m 41 25
GMAS 1436
GrlnoS 2348
GvtSo m 818
HilnoA m 497
m 886
887
G
G

2498
TeohB m 1348
Davis
NYVentA m 41 04
NYVentC m 3931
NYVentY 4155
Delaware Invest
DiverlncA m 889
OpFixncl 947
USGrowls 2347
Value 1591
Diamond Hill
LngShortl 2210
Dodge & Cox
Bal 9517+
GIbStook 11 42
Income 1356
IntlStk 41 85
Stock 160592
DoubleLine
CrFxdlncl 1088
TotRetBdN b 1097
Dreyfus
Appre aln 50 64
BasSP500 3634
FdMn 1218
IntlStkl 1554
MdCapldx 36738
MuniBd 1121


Driehaus
Actbelnc
EmMktGr d


Eaton Vance
FIRtHIA m
FloatRateA m
IncBosA m
m Z
m
FMI
CommStk 3
LgCap
FPA
Capital d 4
Cres d 8
Newcno d 1
Fairholme Fu
Fairhome d 4
Federated


MuniUShlS
MunUltA m
StrValA m
StrVall
To~etls
Ultrals
Fidelity



BlChGrow
CAMuInc
Canada d
CapApr


22 +296

65 +259
11 +226
-01 +09

f 53 +363


anAm 661 +14+97
anRm 662+14 +99


50-01 +49
06+ 06 +1386
30 +20 +19 2
77 + 94 +3881


lnc 57 29 + 68
lnc 1 2879 +29
(pMulNat d 2368+35


9 9 + 59
1585 -09
7668+152


tMu d 1069
mBond 859
apDisc d 31 06
CapStk d 20 83
CpGr d 1901
CpOpp 13801
C~al d 1989


Value 9964
Worldwvd d 25 15
Fidelity Advisor
AstMgr70 2008


299 G


S9 +08 +164
331 + 10 +194
9 6
25+ 10 +198
3 52 + 92 +85 9
7 30 +62 +484


LeverA m 50 94
Mid-Cplll 2280
NewlnsA m 28 60
NewlnsC m 2685
Newlnsl 29 01
NewlnsT m 28 16
SmCaVA m 29 76


StratlnoA m 1227 -06 +11
StratlnoC m 1224 -06 +03
Stratlnol 1248-06 +13
StratlnoT m 1227 -06 +1 1
Fidelity Select
Bioteoh d 164 14+4338+607
Chemical d 143882+2 49+3382
ConsStpl d 9877+89 +282
Energy d 63822+ 104 +28 4
9 9 t
/ d 8812+190+410
S 18999+429+502
Industry d 32 68 + 52 +38 9
Maternals d 82 88+1883+226
MedEqSys d 3719 +47+99
SoftwCom d 11299+ 1 9+449


Fidelity Spartan


5001dxlnv 6287
d 5176
I 51 76


First Eagle
GIbA m 54 83 +830
OverseasA m 2415 +05 +
USValueA m 2034 + 17 +
First Investors
GrowlncA m 21 48 +0
Forum
AbStratl 11 14 -03
FrankTemp-Frank
FedTFA m 1177 -05
FedTFC m 1177 -04
FedlntA m 1201 -05
FedTxFrIA 1178 -04
FrankTemp-Franklin
BallnA m 5479+87
CATFA m 694 -03
CATFC m 693 -03
CAInTFA m 1213 -05
EqlnA m 226+24
FLRtDAAdv 921
FIRtDAooA m 920
FIxCpGrA m 6056 +94
GrowthA m 62 22 + 69
HYTFA m 988 -04
m 209 -01
210
m 241
InIomeA m 2 39 + 01 +
IncomeAdv 2 37
InsTFA m 1173 -04
LoDurT~eA m 1016 -01
NYTFA m 1122 -03
OHTFA m 1215 -05
HisDivAdv 47 56 + 45 +
sDC m 46 61 + 44
sDA m 475+45
SmCpValA m 6009+108
SmMdCpGrA m 44 23+60
StrlnoA m 1056 -02
Strnno C m 10 55 03
TotalRetA m 997 -06
USGovCm 648 -03
USGoLA m 652 -06
UtlsA m 1517 -01
FrankTemp-MutualI
Diso C m 3 82 +24 +
DIs ov Z 4 84 + 26
DsoAm 4 29+25
Euro Z 26+09+03
QuestA m 1959+12 +
Ques7 1981 +12 +
SharesC m 271+0
Shares Z 2780+31
SharesAm 2752+30
FrankTemp-Templeton
DvMkA m 2A07 -14
FgnAm 847 -03 6
838 -03 +
m 1313+03
GIBondA m 1311 +04
GIBondAdv 1306 +03
GrowthA m 2447 +12 +
WorldA m 1982 +09
Franklin Templeton
FndAIIA m 1323 +07 +
FndAIIC m 1301 +07 +
HYIdTFInA 992 -04
ModAlIoA m 1585+05
GE
ElfunTr 56 28 + 79 +
ElfunTxE 11 41 -05
IslntlEq d 1290 + 12
6 9
IsSmCaplv 20 97+834.
S&Slno 1140 -06
S&SUSEq 5739 +88.
GMO
2703 +29 +
d 997 -08
j 11 20 -02
d 11 15 -02
3885 +15 +
IntVIIII 2504 + 11 +
IntltVIIV 2502 + 12 +
Quill 2671 +21 +
QulV 2674+21 +
QuVI 26 73 +20
StFxinVI d 1619 -03
USCorEqVI 1683 + 19 +
Gabelli
Asset AAA m 6547 + 68
EqlncomeAAA m 2775+ 28
SmCpGAAA m 47 34+ 48
Gateway
GatewayA m 2862 + 13
Goldman Sachs
GrOppAm 28 75 +44 +
GrOppls 31 12 +47 +
HIYdMunls d 864 -08
HIYleldls d 736 -01
M 63
MIdCapVaA m 49 20+63
MI dCpVals 49 70+6
ShDuTFIs 1051
SmCpValA m 5532+83
SmCpValls 5842+88
GuideStone Funds
BIoAIloGS4 1382 +03 +
IntEqGS4 1474 +05 +
Harbor
Bond 1218 -06
CapAplnst 5443 +82 +
CapAprln. b 5354+80 +
Hi Bdinst d 11 16 -03
IntlAdm b 6916 +23
Intllnsti 6976 +2, +
Intlln. b 6890 +2
Harding Loevner
d 49 52
1754
Hartford
BalHLSIA 2460 + 17 +
BallnoA m 1305 +03 +


prA m 4576
Aprl 4586
prY 4989
sBalsA m 11 77
pHLSIA 698
rowA m 2564
Srowl 25 56
thY 2604
rHLSIA 26 57
V\ 6
A m 180
tRtA m 9 02
tRtC m 901
ttl 9m

pHLSIA 1423


SA K596 +54+360


MidCapA m
Sm~oHLSIA
SHLSIA
LA
TRBdHLSIA
Heartland


Henderson
IntlOppA m 2569+11 +31
Hennessy
GsUtlldxlnv 2657+03 +26
Hotchkis & Wiley
MidCpVall 3917+65+474
Hussman
StratGrfi d 1016 -01 -78
ICM
SmCo 3646+51 +390
ING
CorpLeadB 3019+329+26 8
GIREstA m 1843 -01 +99
INVESCO
CharterA m 2229 + 24 +286
ComstokA m 22 85+41 +5
DeMktA m 21-07 +2
DivDiyA m 1664 +18 +302
DivDivlnv b 1668 +19 +802
EqlnoomeA m 1098+13 +241
EqlncomeC m 1082+ 18 +281
GrowlncA m 2665 +47 +32 E
HiYldMuA m 912 -04 -52
IntlGrA m 284+02 +206
IntlGr1 3337 +02 +21 1
MidCapGrA m 6 4+62 +36
MidCpCrA m 2680+8 +317
MunilnA m 1296 -05 -38


A m 027 + 29
trC m 2934 +28
tf b u033+29


LtdTmBdA m
MdCpGrA m
MdCpGrthl
SoTeohA m
JPMorgan
CoreBdUlt
CoreBondA r


2263 -13
34026+5
m 1267+16
qlncSelect 1284 + 17
820 -02
819 -08
1499 +06
A 96
mdTFSI 1093 -03
trAmerS 333 9 + 44
vBalA m 1444 +08
vConGrA m 1246 +03


1092
ShMuniBdl 1057
ShtDurBdU 1092
SmCapSel 49I55

SmRt20201 1781
SmRt20301 1848.
TxAwRRetS 1002
USEquit 14- 1
USEquityl 1434 +
USLCpCrPS 2863
ValAdvSel 26938
James Advantage
GoldRainA b 2352
Janus
BaIT +002
Fortys b 46686
Gr&lncT 4297.
HYldT 95
OerseasT 37 09
PerknsMCVT 2608.


+ 66 +368


TwentyT 77
Jensen
QualtyGrl 37
QualtyGrJ b 37
John Hancock
BondA m 16
IncomeA m 6


USLCGr d 1819+33
Lazard
d 199 -09
m 1982-10
1408+01
Legg Mason/Western
m 171 88+2 44
18527+2 64
m 1759 +24
AppreoA m 1939+24
CrPIBdFI b 1125 -06
CrPIBdlns 11 25 -07
EqlnoA m 1771 + 14
SmCpGrA m 2752 +45
ValueC m 5555 +94
Litman Gregory
Maslntllntl 1753 +07
Longleaf Partners


405 LoomisSayles
299 BdlnstI 152


GIbBd Instl 165
Lord Abbett
AffhiatA m 151
BalA m 123
BondDebA m 82
BondDebC m 82
DevGrowA m 298


DevGrowl 3229+85
m 1688+29
951
MidCpStoA m 22 28 +
NatlTaxFA m 1059 -04
hDurlncA m 457
ShDurlncC m 460
ShDurlnol 456 -01
SmCpValA m 4085 +81
SmCpVall 4350 +86
ValOppA m 2149 +35


MFS
BondA m
ConAlocA r
GrAooA m
GrowA m
Growl
IntDiA m
IntlNDisA r
IntlNDE I
IntValA m
IslntlEq
MAInvA m
MAInGrAm
MAInvl
ModAILooA
MuHilnoA f
ReslntA m


6 MainStay
89 HYIdCorA n
2 6 Intll


6221+1 01
6496+105
1614 +01
2759 -06
2839 -06
3335 +08
2202 +08
2687 +84
2207 +22
2634 84
1607 +07


19+06


606-02 + 66
3477 -01 +253
998 +17 +346
4444 +52 +31 8
4154 +55 +309


SelEql 47 62'+ 74
Mairs & Power
Grilnv 10816+137
Managers
BondSvc 2734 -14
1065
1926 +26
Manning & Napier
WrIdOppA 894+01
Matthews Asian
China d 2411 +09
Divlnv d 1600 +04
Grln1 d 1941 +02
PacTiger d 2504 +03
Merger
Merger b 1628 +03
Meridian
MerdnGr d 482 +62
Metropolitan West
Hi-YIdBdM b 1056 -01
LowDurBd b 880
LowDurBdl 880 -01
Tot~etBdl 1065 -05
TotRtBd b 1065 -05
Morgan Stanley


IntlEqA m 164I
IntlEql d 1666
MdCpGrA m 404
MdCpGrl 44 8
SmCoGrl d 21 16
Munder Funds
MdCpCrGrA m404
MdNp rGrY 41 57
Mutual Series
Beacon Z 166C
Nations
LgCplxZ 3457
Nationwide


Natixis
LSInvBdA


LSStratlnoA m 1628 01 +124
LSStratlncC m 1638 +01 +115
LSValY 2712 +40 +346
Neuberger Berman
Genesslnst 6327 +85 +339
Genesslnv 4411 +59 +337
GenessTr 6567 88 +336
Partnrlnv 3523 +82 +328
Nicholas
Nihol 6286 +69 +381
Northern
Bdlndx 1055 -17
F 1xed n 1024 -0n7
GIbREIdx d 939 +88
HYFixlnc d 762 +87
IntTaxE 1038 -20
Intllndex d 1213 +260
MMIntlEq d 1065 +186
MdCaplndx 1657 +309
SmCapVal 20 88 +34 4
Stkldx 21 73 +279
Nuveen
HiYIdMunA m 1546 -07 -42
HiYldMunC m1545 -07 -46
HiYldMunl 1546 -07 -40
IntMunBdl 895 -03 -19
LtdTmMuA m 110 -02 -04
LtdTmMunl 1098 -02 -02
RIEstSecl 2133 -23 +67
Oak Associates
PInOakEq 4387 +78 +380
RedOakTeF 1399 + 18 +455
VVIteOak 5456 +86 +316
Oakmark
Eqln1l 3414 +33 +231
GISell 1604 +08 +391
Global I 3009 +03 +415
Intll 26 18 15 +41 1
IntlSmCpl d 1741 -13 +352
Oakmark I 6287+843+57
Select I 8981 +61 +368
Old Westbury
GIbSmMdCp 1721 +06 +268


Oppenheimer
AMTFrMunA m654 -03
AotAllooA m 1149
CapApAm 5860+93
CaplncA m 949
DevMkt m 3710 -12
DevMktY 3677 -12
DevMktsC m 3537 -11
DiscoverA m 8175+1 7C
EqlnoA m 31 59 +39
EquityA m 1180 18
GlobA m 7743 +41
GlobOpprA m 8 28 +80
GlobY 7765 +41
IntlBondA m 608 -0
IntlBondC m 606 -02


ntlDiyA m 1425
tlGrY 3663
tlGrowA m 3674
mtTmMunA m 141
-mtTmMunC m 140


MainSSMCA
MainStrA m
QuBalA m
RisDwA m
RisDwyY
RoFMuniA m
RoohNtlMC r
RoohNtlMu mT
SmMidVaA
SrFltRatA m
MAM




SrFltRatC m
StrlncA m
GA




StratlnoC m
A



Osterweis
OsterStrInc d
PIMCO
AAstAAutP
AIIAssetA m
MAe



AIIAssetC m
AIIAssetl
AIIAstP
AIIAuthA m
AIIAuthC m
AIIAuthIn


811 -01 -56
12914+836 +34 5
46 09 +68 29 6
17 07 +18 1
21 04+832 +268

1475 -05 -86
671 -03 -63
673 -08 -56
42 69 + 64 +38 6
840 +63


tslns 11 16
PARInst 719
nl 878
Instl 1063
ndl 1012
s 959
eP 1230
dins 1059
A m 1036
rls 1036
,rD b 1086
urP 1036


ShTermAdm b 987 -E
ShtTermA m 987 -
ShtTerms 987 -
To~tlllls 956 -C
ToRtllls 1032 -C
TotetA m 1085 -C

'LA
Tot~etAdm b 1085 -C
Tot~etC m 1085 -C
Tot~etls 10 85 C
Tot~etrnD b 1085 -C
TotlRetnP 1085 -C
PRIMECAP Odyssey
PRIMECAP Odyssey


73 Parametric
40 TxMgEMInstl d49
Parnassus
29 Eqlnclnv 37
32 Pax World
Bal b 268
03 Permanent
Portfolho 471
1 1 Pioneer
CoreEqA m 141
31 HYIdA m 11(
76 PioneerA m 40!
12 StratlnA m 10!
StratlncC m 10i
1 6 StratlnoY 10 !
09 Principal
1 9 10;


MGIIIInst 1372
MidCapA m 1962
PrSeolnst 1021
AMBalA m 1548
SAMConGrA m 1735
SCGrllnst 1454
SCValll 1358
Prudential
GblRealEstZ 2224 -03
JenMCGrA m 3849 +59
Prudential Investmen
2020FooA m 1915 + 31
GovtlnoA m 947
HeldA m 570 -02
JenMidCapGrZ 40 07+ 61
JennGrZ 27 87 +42
MuniHInoA m 947 -04
NaturResA m 50 60 +97
ShTmCoBdA m 11 36-02


TotRetBdA m
UtlityA m
Putnam
CATxEIncA m
D'rlnA m
DynAstAIGrA r
EqlncomeA m
GrowlnA m
InestorA m
MultCapGrA r
VoyagerA m
M GA
RS
GINatResA m
PartnersA m
RidgeWorth


SmCapEql
USGovBndl
Royce
Opportlnv d
PAMutlnv d


+ 96+33 8
+39 +409


6 ue + Z 6 +46y
1468 + 22 +36 3


Russell


3596+
S108 -
1097 -
Russell LifePoints
BalStrC b 11 70 +
Rydex


A d 991 +07+249
xlA d 1119 -07 -16
dBdAd 777 -02 +79


SSCM
S&P5001dc
Schwab


I 1972 +08
S&P5OOSel d 28 02+837
SmCapldx d 2762 +53
TotStkMSI d 3274+44
Scout
Intent 618 + 18
Selected
AmerShS b 49 72+55
Amecan D 49 75 + 56
Sentinel
CmnStkA m 4261 +63
Sequoia
Sequoia 21462+223
Sound Shore
SoundShor 4667 +68
Spectra
SpectraA m 1736 +26
State Farm
Balanced 6149 +24
GrowVf 6668 + 64
SteelPath
MLPIncA m 1082 -04
SunAmerica
FocDvStrC m 1751 + 18
T Rowe Price
Balanced 249+ 13
BIChpGAdv b 59 92 +99
BhpGr 6019+10
CapApprec 26 44 + 20
DivGrow 32 638+42
EmMktBdd 1258 -08
EmMktStk d 3233 -12


' b 3269+42 802
d 2049 +06 74
952 -07 -18
Ad b 4846 +67 +360
n0 2831 +36 +309
Stk 4907 +68 +363
Sol 5779+1 21 +479


991 -02
1826 +26
955 -08


nAm d 226 -2
TaxFBd 1044 -04
diaTele 69 56 + 62
dCapE 89 88 + 55


vAmGro 4637
VAsa d 1649
Era 4740
Honz 4655
Income 941
eaStk d 995
8trBal 2851
;trGr 3067
8trlnc 1861
15 1445
25 1529
99
G ,46


mBond 479
CpStk 4469
CpVal d 49343
CpValAd m4901
eoGrow 2380
eolno 1293
mMulnt 11 55
FHiYld d 1096
FlnA 986
FShlnt 565


688+20 +26'


T.Rowe
ReaAsset
TCW


TFS
MktNeut d
TIAA-CREF


68 -09 -8
11 +07 +27(
36 +04 +29;,


MidValRmt 2;
SCEq d 1i
SPIndxIn 2(
Target
SmCapVal 27
Templeton
InFEqSeS 2r
Third Avenue


976+39
008+26

778+45 +
256 -09


Thompson
Bond
Thornburg
IncBldA m
IncB dC m
IntlValA m
IntlValC m
IntlVall
LtdTMuA m
LtdTMul
LtdTmlncl
Thrivent


Tocqueville
Dlfld m 3718+51
Gold m 3621 -13
Touchstone
SdCaplnGr 22789+3
Transamerica
AstlMdGrA m 1441+ 12
AstlMdGrC m 1431+ 1
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 2719
U.S. Global Investor
Gd&Prec m 660 -01
GlobRes m 977 +08
G 9-
WrdPrMnr m 616 -01
UBS PACE
d 2363 +38
d 2583 +83
USAA

HYOpp 8 888 -02
Income 18 07 0
IncomeStk 17 04 + 18
IntermBd 1071 -04
Intl 2966 + 11
S&P5M 2498
ShTmBond 921 -01
TaxEInt 1319 -03
.... 1306 -06
1072
Value 1939 +28
Unified
Winlnv m 1717 -03
VALIC Co I
MdCpldx 26 67 +38
Stockldx 32 89 + 4
Vanguard
500Adml 16858+216
5001ny 16357+217
Balldx 26 89 + 1
BalldxAdm 26 89 + 15
Balldxns 2690 +16
2660+14


gyAdm 12829 +145 19
gylnv 68;1 +77 +19
0 2975 82 29
Adml 627 68 29
xAdm 701518291
51 47 +78 8+9+


6O3
CorAdml 603
E 1058
rAdml 796+
Care 18870+
ond 11 29
ondAdm 1129


36 +329


p 9232+124+391
Adml 95 83+129+392


dxAd 94


mCpldAdm 50 62 + 81
mCpldlst 5062 +81
CplndxSgn14561 +73
Gthldx 280 55
Gthlst 32 89 +55
mValldx 22 47 35
mVlldlst 2254 +94
ar 2 955 09
ratgEq 2867+ 55
gtRe2010 25 938 04
tRe2015 1481 +05
tRe2020 2692+ 12
tRe2030 2729+ 19


Alnt[Adm 1298+05
ISCAdm 41 69 + 7
Gro 2691 +35
GroAdml 6973 +91
dxAdm 28 89 + 41
dxlns 28 89 + 41
30 06 + 42
28 89 + 41


Virtus
971 -05
487
MulSStC b 492 -01
Waddell & Reed Adv
A umA m 1040+16
AssetrA m 11 57 + 11
BondA m 634 -04
CorelnvA m 797+12
HilncA m 776 -02
NewCnptA m 1237+ 17
SoeohAm 1579+31
VanguardA m 1101 +17
Wasatch
IntlGr d 2903 -03


Weitz
ShtlntmIno
Wells Fargo
AdvCoBdl
AstAIIIoA f
AstAIIIoC m
EmgMktEqA f2
GrI H
Growlnv 5
GrowthAdm !


UISTMInA f 482 +01
UISTMInl 41 82 +04
Westcore
PlusBd 1079 -06 -14
Western Asset
m 1594 -05 -44
m 641 -02 -35
William Blair
InsllntIG 1672 -13 +20
IntlGrI d 2576 -20 +206
IntlGrN m 25 12 -20 +202
World Funds
EpG oEqShYI 19 17 +04 +254
Yacktman
Focused d 2565+20+291
Yaoktman d 2398 +21 +297


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CaplncBuA m 57
CaplnOBuB m 58
CapWIdBdA m 2C
CpWldGrlA m 43
A


CpWldGrlB m43
EurPacGrA m 470
FnlnvA m 50H
GIbBalA m 301
GrthAmA m 43:
GrthAmB m 41K
HiIncA m 11 :
HilnoMuA m 143
IncAmerA m 20:
IntBdAmA m 13,
IntlGrlnA m 35
InvCoAmA m 375
LtdTmTxEA m 15
MuUalA m 345
NewEconA m 388
NewPerspA m 37
NwWrldA m 58 :
STBdFdA m 9!
SmCpWIdA m 49
TaxEBdAmA m 12
TaxECAA m 16
USGovSeoA m 13
WAMutlnvA m 388
Arbitrage
Arbtragl d 12B
Ariel
Appreclnv b 56
Anellnv b 69,
Artio Global
GlobHiYldl 10
TotRtBdl 18
Artisan
Intl d 29
IntVal d 37
MdCpVal 27
MidCap 48
SmCap 28
SmCapVal 181
GA-V~
G


Aston Funds
MidCapN b 4571
2902.
b 2888.
MH
BrdMktFxl 1086
TaxEfEq d 21 28
BNY Mellon
999
'1447
NtllntM 1340
NtlShTM 1292
Baird
1048
1085
ShTmBdIns 973
Baron
Asset b 638o +
Growfi b 7096
SmCap b 3420.
Bernstein
DiversMul 1436
2756
1346
IntlPort 16 18 +
NYMuni 1402
TxMIntI 1629 .
Berwyn
Income d 1477.
BlackRock
BasoValA m 3389
BasioVall 69
CapApplnA m 2902.
CorBdlnstl 9 48
EqDiA m 2944


888

86

26
40+

1D1
32

)26
81
738
370
301
84


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Mileage
Restrictions!
Model Year Restritionst


2005 HYUNDAI SONATA
PL1943A
$3,991
2006 SUZUKI FORENZA
L11467B
$5,891


2010 HYUNDAI ACCENT
4b PL1941A
$10.491


2007 HONDA ACCORD
LOL11046D
$10,493
2007 MERCURY MONTEGO
LT11885A
$10,891
2009 TOYOTA COROLLA
L11687A
$10,891


4 -2009 HYUNDAI SONATA


2012 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
MED L10724A
$12,994


2009 HYUNDAI SONATA
4amf LT11757A
$13,391
2009 CHEVROLET MALIBU
L9228A
$13,391
2011 HYUNDAI SONATA
4MD L9408B
$13,391


2013 KIA RIO
LMLT11230A


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2012 HONDA CIVIC
LOT6611A
$15,871


2008 CHRYSLER SEBRING 2008 HYUNDAI TUCSON 2011 CHEVROLET CRUZE 2009 HYUNDAI AZERA
L11658A LT11739A LT11587A ot L11663A
$7,391 $10,991 $13,394 $15,891
2009 HYUNDAI ACCENT 2008 HYUNDAI SONATA 2008 HYUNDAI AZERA 2008 HONDA CR-V
LT11670A L11018B1 L10190B LT11757A1
$7,991 $10,991 $13,891 $16,591
2011 HYUNDAI ACCENT 2009 HYUNDAI SONATA 2012 FORD FIESTA 2008 CADILLAC DTS
4twD L11106A. D L11682A L11399A L11139B
$7,991 $10,991 $13,891 $16,991
2007 HYUNDAI TUCSON 2011 NISSAN VERSA 2010 HYUNDAI SANTA FE 2011 KIA SORENTO
L11525A LT11756A 4WMD L11092A1 L11694A
$7,991 $11,991 $13,891 $16,991
2006 MAZDA TRIBUTE 2010 HYUNDAI ELANTRA 2008 HYUNDAI SANTA FE 2012 HYUNDAI VELOSTER
PL1948 41D L11627A L11612A 4 L11639A
$8,991 $11,991 $13,891 $17,791
2007 HYUNDAI TUCSON 2009 HYUNDAI SONATA 2009 HONDA CR-V 2013 HONDA CIVIC
LT11841A 4 ED L9412A PL1940A LT11678A
$9,391 $11,991 $13,991 $17,891
2007 KIA SORENTO 2010 HYUNDAI SONATA 2010 MERCURY MILAN 2009 HYUNDAI GENESIS
L11124A IED PL1949 L11403A WE PL1947A
$9,991 $12,391 $13,991 $18,891


2010 HYUNDAI ACCENT
4oIED L11707A
$9,991





2009 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
UD L11692A
$10,213
2010 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
4HmED L9156A
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2008 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
L11118A
$12,591
2010 NISSAN SENTRA
L11658A1
$12,891


2009 HYUNDAI TUCSON
L11456A
$12,891


2010 FORD FOCUS
L11529A
$12,891
2010 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
4-D L11608A
$12,991


*


2006 TOYOTA AVALON
L11412A
$13,991
2012 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
48MD L10107A
$13,994


2010 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS
L11360A
$14,291


2012 HYUNDAI ACCENT
4mD L11572A
$14,891
2012 FORD FOCUS
L11582A
$14,891


2007 NISSAN 350Z
L11363A
$18,891
2013 NISSAN ROGUE
4WF LM1290A
S19.851


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DAILY COMMERCIAL





Inside:

Classifieds

D2-D6


Cruisin'
352-365-8208 I features@dailycommercial.com


Dl
DAILY COMMERCIAL
Saturday, November 9, 2013



www.dailycommercial.com


Student to


hang on to


vintage van

STEVE HUFFMAN
Times-News of Burlington
ELON, N.C. Volkswagen an-
nounced earlier this year it's halting
production of its van, 63 years in the
making.
The iconic vehicle carried a gen-
eration of surfers to beaches, hauled
Forrest Gump's girlfriend to San
Francisco, and, in "Field of Dreams,"
led Kevin Costner and James Earl
Jones on a search for a baseball dia-
mond where ghosts still suit up.
The vans have been disappearing
for quite some time.
Brazil is the last place they're built,
and Volkswagen officials said the
country's newly mandated safety
regulations an insistence on fri-
volities like air bags and anti-lock
brakes have forced them to sound
the death knell for the vehicle.
Not to worry, insists Matt Eastman.
As long as he and like-minded aficio-
nados have a say, their beloved "bus"
will endure.
"My dad's pushing me to get a more
realistic vehicle," Eastman said, "but
I can't see myself selling it."
Eastman, 22, is a senior at Elon
University. He'll be graduating in De-
cember with a double major in me-
dia art and environmental studies.
Eastman played football at Elon until
last year, when knee injuries forced
him to give it up.
His VW van is a '77 model, just a
hair darker than lime green. It's a
Westfalia edition meaning it's a
camper. It has a stove and refriger-
ator, and a pop-up camper top. The
van is designed to sleep two.
Eastman's camper is a common
sight around Elon, cruising much as
it did when it was young and disco
music was the rage. The reaction of
other college students to the vehicle
typically goes one of two ways.
"Some people are like, 'Oh, yeah!'"
Eastman said. "Others are sort of
standoffish."
Eastman, a native of Tampa,
bought the van when he was just 16.
While his friends were longing for
late-model Hondas or Toyotas, East-
man pined for an old VW van.


AP PHOTO
Elon University senior Matthew Eastman, 22, poses atop his his 1977 Volkswagen camper in Elon, N.C.


"I began searching the Internet for
one when I was 14," he said.
Why, Matt, why?
Eastman shrugged. How do you ex-
plain why some people order Rocky
Road when everyone else is getting
vanilla?
"I'm more of a modern hippie,"
said Eastman, who sports a beard
and wears his hair long. "I've always
been interested in the hippie era of
the 1960s. The love and romantic as-
pect of it all appealed to me."
Eastman purchased his van
through eBay, an Internet auction
site. The vehicle was a one-own-
er, belonging to a German who relo-
cated to Las Vegas and had the van
shipped to him.
The camper was produced for a
German market, back when the Cold
War was alive and well. Its odometer
reads in kilometers, not miles. The
writing on the instrument panel is in
German.
Eastman and his mother flew to
Las Vegas to inspect the van before
he bought it.
"For its condition, it was a lot bet-
ter price than any of the other vans I
looked at," Eastman said.


After placing the winning bid, East-
man had the vehicle trucked to his
home in Florida. He and the van have
since been pretty much inseparable.
Eastman can't count the number
of times he drove the Volkswagen
across Florida, from his home on the
west coast to the beaches on the east.
"They have waves over there," East-
man said.
The fact that the van was a camp-
er appealed to Eastman, an admitted
"free spirit."
"I remember thinking, 'Wow, I
could really go camping in this
thing,'" he said.
He's done so plenty of times, pull-
ing his van into numerous camp-
grounds up and down the East Coast,
and also setting camp in remote
wooded stretches.
Of how he came about his inde-
pendent ways, Eastman said much
comes from his mother. His parents
are Mike and Loretta Eastman.
"My mother is a free spirit," East-
man said. "My father is a cop."
After mulling his declaration for
a moment, Eastman chuckled be-
fore deciding, "My father, he's pretty
much a free spirit, too."


Most booster

seats do well

in testing
DEE-ANN DURBIN
AP Auto Writer
DETROIT More than half of
child booster seats that went on
sale this year earned a top rating
from the Insurance Institute for
Highway Safety.
The institute, which is funded
by insurers, ranked 31 new mod-
els. Nineteen earned the top rat-
ing of "best bet," which means
they correctly position a 4- to
8-year-old child to use the regu-
lar shoulder and lap belts in al-
most any car.
Britax, Evenflo, Ferrari, Gra-
co, Harmony, Recaro and Safety
1st all had seats on the institute's
"best bet" list. Both booster seats
with high backs and those with-
out backs performed well.
One seat the Ferrari Be-
line SP got a "good bet" rat-
ing when used in its high-back
mode. That means the fit is ac-
ceptable in most vehicles. Elev-
en seats got a "check fit" rating,
which means the seats may pro-
vide a good fit in some vehicles
but parents should make sure.
A belt fits correctly when the
lap portion lies flat across the
child's upper thighs and the
shoulder portion crosses snug-
ly over the middle of the shoul-
der. The institute said children
in booster seats are much more
likely to escape serious inju-
ry in a crash than those without
boosters. Children should use
boosters until they're big enough
for adult belts to fit properly.
The cheapest "best bet" was
the Graco Connext backless
seat, which costs $18. The most
expensive, the Ferrari Beline SP,
which has both high-back and
backless modes, is $300.
The institute said seats have
made big improvements since it
began testing them five years ago.
In all, there are 58 seats ranked on
its website, including seats that
weren't new in 2013. The group
tested the boosters based on
how they positioned a child-
sized test dummy to use a car's
seat belts.


US safety agency probes Tiguan lighting problem


Associated Press
DETROIT U.S. safety
regulators are investigating
thousands of Volkswagen
SUVs because the headlam-
ps and other outside lights
can fail with little warning.
The probe, announced Fri-
day by the National High-
way Traffic Safety Adminis-
tration, affects an estimated
61,000 VW Tiguans from the
2009 through 2011 model
years.
The safety agency said in


documents posted on its
website that 26 drivers have
complained about head-
lights, tail lights and turn
signals going dark. Many
said they found an over-
heated and melted fuse un-
der the hood. The agency
said the fuse controls sever-
al exterior light circuits. The
complaints say the problem
gets worse over time.
NHTSA said the prob-
lem hasn't caused any fires,
crashes or injuries. Investiga-
tors will determine if it's bad


VW TIGUAN INVESTIGATION
THEVEHICLE: An estimated 61,000 Volkswagen Tiguan compact
SUVs from the 2009 through 2011 model years.
THE PROBLEM: The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
has received complaints from 26 drivers that exterior lights such as
headlamps, tail lights and brake lights fail with little warning. Many
of the drivers report finding melted fuse boxes. No fires, crashes or
injuries have been reported. VW says it's cooperating in the probe.
THE SOLUTION: None yet. NHTSA investigators will determine if the
problem is big enough to cause a recall.


enough to prompt a recall.
Volkswagen said it's com-
mitted to building safe vehi-
cles and will comply with the


NHTSA investigation.
In one complaint from
August, a driver told NHT-
SA that the headlights and


brake lights stopped work-
ing. "The danger is that this
has happened three times,
and once at night, to where
my car was like a Christmas
tree blinking on and off,"
the driver wrote. "I almost
got rear-ended when brake
lights don't work."
The driver said the Tiguan
was taken to a dealership,
where mechanics couldn't
find the source of the prob-
lem. Many other drivers re-
ported melted fuse boxes af-
ter the lights failed.


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9~j 44" i


Classified Index


Legal Notices ..

Announcements

At Your Service.

Financial ......

Employment ...

Pets/Animals ..


......... 003

......... .100

u. .. .. .. 200

..... .. 300

....... .. .400

......... 500


Merchandise Mart ....... 600

Real Estate/For RENT .... 800

Real Estate/For SALE .... 900

Manufactured Homes .. .1000

Recreation ........... .1100

Transportation ........ 1200


2
Legal Notices


003 Legal Notices

IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE FIFTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE No.13 CC 127
VILLAGE ESTATES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIA
TION, INC., a not for profit Florida corpora
tion,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JAMES A. KILGORE AND SHEILA A. KILGORE,
HUSBAND AND WIFE, HUNTINGTON NEIGH
BORHOOD ASSOCIATION INC., UNKNOWN
PARTIES IN POSSESSION
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 2 day
of DECEMBER 2013 at 11:00 a.m. at the first
floor lobby of the Lake County Courthouse,
550 W. Main Street, Tavares, Lake County,
Florida, the undersigned Clerk will offer for
sale the following described real property:
LOT 19, VILLAGE ESTATES, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 46, PAGES 15 AND 16, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
with the property address of 596 Timber Run
Lane, Groveland, FL 34736
Together with all structures, improvements,
fixtures, appliances, and appurtenances on
said land or used in conjunction therewith.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to a
Summary Final Judgment entered in Civil No.
13 CC 127 pending in the COUNTY Court of
the fifth Judicial Circuit in and for Lake
County, Florida.
Any person claiming a right to funds remain
ing after the sale must file a claim with the
undersigned Clerk no later than 60 days after
the sale.
DATED this 28 day of October, 2013
NEIL KELLY
CLERK OF THE COURT
By:/s/W.TILLMAN
Deputy Clerk
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS
WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons with dis-
abilities needing a special accommodation
should contact the ADA Coordinator at 550
W. Main Street, Post Office Box 7800, Ta=
varies, Florida 32778, Telephone
(352)742-4150, at least seven (7) days prior
to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD)
1-800-955-8771, or VOICE (V)
1 -800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.

Ad Number:00415116
November 2 & 9, 2013


Great Classified


deals every day!


003 Legal Notices

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR LAKE COUNTY,
FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2013 CP 1442
Division Probate
IN RE: GEORGE P. FOSTER
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of GEORGE
P. FOSTER, deceased, whose date of death
was October 12, 2013, is pending in the Cir
cuit Court for Lake County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is Post Office
Box 7800, Tavares, FL 32778. The names
and addresses of the personal representative
and the personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other per
sons having claims or demands against de
cedent's estate on whom a copy of this no
twice is required to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their claims with
this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
NOVEMBER 9, 2013.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/DENNIS L. HORTON
ATTORNEY FOR:
KATHRYN G. THEE
Florida Bar No: 187991
Dennis L. Horton, P.A.
900 WEST HIGHWAY 50
CLERMONT, FL 34711
Telephone:(352)394 4008
Fax:(352)394 5805
E-Mail:
dennishorton@aol.com
Secondary E Mail:
kay.dennislhorton@yahoo.com
Personal Representatives:
KATHRYN G. THEE
548 Narrow Pond Lane
Polk City, Florida 33868
Ad.No.00416124
November 9 & 16, 2013

Has your job become extinct?


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Emplymen itns


003 Legal Notices

IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE FIFTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE No.2012 CC 004026
VILLAGE ESTATES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIA
TION, INC., a not for profit Florida corpora
tion,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DERRICK POWELL, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
DERRICK POWELL, AND UNKNOWN PARTIES
IN POSSESSION
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 4 day
of DECEMBER 2013 at 11:00 a.m. at the first
floor lobby of the Lake County Courthouse,
550 W. Main Street, Tavares, Lake r-..'t
Florida, the undersigned Clerk will u., i ,i
sale the following described real property:
Lot 3, Villages Estates, according to the map
or Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 46,
Pages 15 and 16 of the Public Records of
Lake County, Florida with the property ad
dress of 432 Timber Village Road, Groveland,
FL 34736
Together with all structures, improvements,
fixtures, appliances, and appurtenances on
said land or used in conjunction therewith.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to a
Summary Final Judgment entered in Civil No.
2012 CC 004026 pending in the COUNTY
Court of the fifth Judicial Circuit in and for
Lake County, Florida.
Any person claiming a right to funds remain
ing after the sale must file a claim with the
undersigned Clerk no later than 60 days after
the sale.
DATED this 30 day of October, 2013
NEIL KELLY
CLERK OF THE COURT
By:/s/W.TILLMAN
Deputy Clerk
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS
WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons with dis
abilities needing a special accommodation
should contact the ADA Coordinator at 550
W. Main Street, Post Office Box 7800, Ta
vares, Florida 32778, Telephone
(352)742 4150, at least seven (7) days prior
to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD)
1 800 955 8771, or VOICE (V)
1 800 955 8770, via Florida Relay Service.

Ad Number:00415376
November 2 & 9, 2013


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE N0.2012 CA 000299
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COM
PANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR AMERIQUEST
MORTGAGE SECURITIES INC.,
ASSET BACKED PASS THROUGH CERTIFI
CATES, SERIES 2005 R8
Plaintiff,
vs.
RENEE M. GALIPO A/K/A RENEE GALIPO AND
ROBERT GALIPO, SR. A/K/A ROBERT GALIPO
A/K/A ROBERT J. GALIPO, SR. A/K/A ROB


003 Legal Notices
ERT J. GALIPO A/K/A ROBERT JOSEPH
GALIPO, SR. A/K/A ROBERT JOSEPH GALIPO,
et.al.
Defendant.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 1,
2013, and entered in 2012 CA 000299 of
the Circuit Court of the Fifth Judicial Circuit in
and for I ... Florida, wherein DEUT
SCHE II II 11 ,I TRUST COMPANY,
AS TRUSTEE FOR AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE
SECURITIES INC., ASSET BACKED
PASS THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES
2005 R8, is the Plaintiff and RENEE M.
GALIPO A/K/A RENEE GALIPO AND ROBERT
GALIPO, SR. A/K/A ROBERT GALIPO A/K/A
ROBERT J. GALIPO, SR. A/K/A ROBERT J.
GALIPO A/K/A ROBERT JOSEPH GALIPO, SR.
A/K/A ROBERT JOSEPH GALIPO; OAK VAL
LEY HOMEOWNER'S ASSOCIATION, INC.;
AMERICA'S FIRST HOME LLP; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF JASON W. ARMSTRONG AS OF
8/30/05 N/K/A UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF AN
GELINA L. ARMSTRONG; UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF ANGELINA L. ARMSTRONG AS OF
08/30/05 N/K/A JASON W. ARMSTRONG,
UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT
#2 are the Defendant(s). Neil Kelly as the
Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the high
est and best bidder for cash at the Lake
County Courthouse 550 W. Main St. 1st Fl,
Near Information Desk, Tavares, FL 32778,
at 11 AM. on DECEMBER 5, 2013, the fol
lowing described property as set forth in said
Final Judgment, to wit:
LOT 155, OAK VALLEY PHASE 1 B, ACCORD=
ING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 43, PAGES) 76-77,
PUBLIC RECORDS OF LAKE COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA.
Any person claiming an interest in the sur
plus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pen
dens must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.
Dated this 7 day of OCTOBER, 2013.
Neil Kelly
As Clerk of the Court
By:/s/S.HOLEWINSKI
As Deputy Clerk
IMPORTANT
If you are a person with a disability who
needs an accommodation in order to partici-
pate in a proceeding, your are entitled, at no
cost to you, the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator
for the Courts at least 7 days before your
scheduled court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the time be-
fore the scheduled appearance is less than 7
days. Court at, Lake County, Laurie Crews:
(352)0250-0990 x1 00
Submitted by:
Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
3010 N. Military Trail
Suite 300
Boca Raton, FL 33431
Telephone: 561 241 6901
Fax: 561 241 9181
11-15992
Ad No.: 00416172
November 9 &16, 2013

L814i"A$T 1748.l55

SDailEOYiCAn7fW 0
TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY CAL 787.0600


003 Legal Notices

NOTICE OF FICTITIOUS NAME PURSUANT TO
865.09, FLORIDA
STATUTES
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the under
signed, desiring to engage in business under
the fictitious name of Exit Realty Tri-County
". ,-it, Iv,',j,.-. Division, located at
SI11i III I III Mount Dora, Florida
32757, in the County of Lake, in the City of
Mount Dora, Florida 32757, intends to regis
ter the said name with the Division of Corpo
rations of the Florida Department of State,
Tallahassee, Florida.
DATED at Eustis, Florida this 6th day of No-
vember, 2013.
J. Whitney Real Estate, LLC
18610 US Highway 441
Mount Dora, Florida 32757
Ad No.: 00416127
November 9, 2013

The St. Johns River Water Management
District (District) gives notice
of receipt of the following
permit applicationss:
ERP Permit Applications Indian Hills Produce,
130 Sampy Rd, Groveland, FL 34736, appli
cation #IND 069 42231 2. The project is lo-
cated in Lake County, Sections: 19 and 20,
Township: 22 South, Range: 25 East, and in
eludes 5.54 acres. The Environmental Re
source Permit application is for construction
of a stormwater management system to
serve a development known as Indian Hills
Produce Expansion. The files) containing the
permit applications) are available for inspect
tion Monday through Friday, except for Dis
trict holidays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Dis
trict's Headquarters, 4049 Reid St., Palatka,
FL 32177 2529. You may also view files at
one of the District's Service Centers, but you
should call Service Center staff in advance to
make sure that the files are at a specific
Service Center. Service Center contact infor
mation is available online at
floridaswater.com/contactus/offices.html. Ad
ditionally, most permit application file docu
ments can be viewed online at
floridaswater.com/permitting/index.html. To
obtain information on how to find and view
permit application file documents, go to the
HELP tab in E Permitting and click on Sup
port and FAQs and then follow the directions
provided under "How to find a Technical Staff
Report (TSR) or other application file docu
ments." The decision on permit applications
will be made at the District's Service Center
where the application is processed. A sub
stantial objection to a permit application must
be made in writing and filed with (received
', i I Bureau Chief, Bureau of Regulatory
"...l P.O. Box 1429, Palatka, FL
32178 1429, or by e mail at applicationsup
port@sjrwmd.com, within 14 days of notifi
cation of the application. Please include ei
their the Permit Application number or the
Project Name in the objection. Notification of
the application is either the fifth day after the
date on which the written notice is deposited
in the U.S. mail (for those persons who re
ceive actual notice by U.S. mail), the day the
notice is emailed (for those persons who re
ceive actual notice by email), or the date the
notice is published in the newspaper (if ac
tual notice is not provided by U.S. mail or
email). A "substantial objection" means a
written statement directed to the District that
identifies the objector, concerns hydrologic or
environmental impacts of the proposed active
ity, and relates to applicable rule criteria. If
the District receives a timely substantial ob
jection from you, then you will receive written
notice of the District's intended decision on
the permit application. You are advised to no
tify the District within 14 days of notification


003 Legal Notices
of the applications) if you have questions,
objections, comments, or information regard
ing the activity proposed in the permit appli
cation. If you make a written request to the
District for additional information regarding a
specific permit application, you will be pro
vided an opportunity to obtain the available
information. Please note that filing a written
objection does not entitle you to a Chapter
120, Florida Statutes, administrative hearing.
Notice of intended (proposed) District Deci
sion will be provided to persons who have re
quested individual notice. A request for indi
vidual notice of intended (proposed) District
Decision on the application must be received
by the District's Bureau Chief, Bureau of
Regulatory Support prior to the date the no
twice of intended (proposed) District Decision
is generated.
Margaret Daniels, Bureau Chief
Bureau of Regulatory Support
St. Johns River Water Management District
4049 Reid Street
Palatka, FL 32177 2529
(386) 329 4570
Ad No.00416121
November 9, 2013


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
ORDINANCE 2013H
AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF ASTA-
TULA, LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA, AMENDING
ARTICLE II OF THE CHARTER OF THE
TOWN OF ASTATULA, FLORIDA, PERTAIN-
ING TO TOWN COUNCIL ELECTIONS; PRO=
HIDING FOR TOWN ELECTIONS TO BE HELD
ON THE FIRST TUESDAY AFTER THE FIRST
MONDAY IN NOVEMBER COMMENCING NO-
VEMBER, 2014, IN ORDER TO COOR-
DINATE TOWN ELECTIONS WITH LAKE
COUNTY ELECTIONS; PROVIDING THAT
COUNCIL SEATS #1 AND #2 BE ELECTED IN
DECEMBER, 2013, FOR THE INITIAL YEAR
AND SERVING FROM DECEMBER, 2013,
THROUGH NOVEMBER, 2015; PROVIDING
THAT COUNCIL SEATS #3, #4, AND #5
(MAYORAL SEAT), BE ELECTED IN NOVEM-
BER, 2014, AND SERVING FROM NO-
VEMBER, 2014, THROUGH NOVEMBER,
2016; REQUIRING THAT THE TOWN
COUNCIL APPOINT A COUNCIL MEMBER
TO ACT AS LIAISON FOR EACH OF THE AR-
EAS OF TOWN OPERATIONS; REMOVING
THE PROVISION FOR THE POTENTIAL AP=
POINTMENT OF A TOWN MANAGER; RE-
MOVING THE PROVISION FOR THE POTEN-
TIAL APPOINTMENT OF A FINANCE DIREC-
TOR; AMENDING ARTICLE III BY REQUIRING
NOTIFICATION TO CITIZENS IN ACCOR-
DANCE WITH THE LAND DEVELOPMENT
REGULATIONS IN THE EVENT THE TOWN
COUNCIL MODIFIES POLICIES GOVERNING
THE PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE
TOWN OF ASTATULA, FLORIDA; PROVID-
ING FOR SEVERABILTY; AND PROVIDING AN
EFFECTIVE DATE.
A final public hearing of Ordinance 2013H
will be held November 18th, 2013. The hear
ing will be held at 7:00 p.m. at the Town Hall
located at 25019 County Road 561, Astatula,
Florida. Ordinance 2013H proposes to
Amend The Town Charter of the Town of As
tatula, Florida.
Unless made at the hearing on the case, all
oral and written communications concerning
the case, between the Town Council on the
one hand, and the applicant or the public on
the other hand, are prohibited by Florida Law.
The staff report on the case shall be sent to
the Town Council and will be available to the
general public at least five (5) days prior to
the hearing on the case.
Anyone other than the applicant, the staff,
and those who are entitled to receive written


iii ,:;iiiiA
.i1.i



a...


DEADLINES
For Insertion COPY DATE
Friday Thursday, 5pm
Saturday Friday, 3pmr
Sunday Friday, 5:00pmrn
Monday Friday, 5:00pmr
Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pmr
l r, iri. {,. 1.1 i .i.,-i,;, l.j i ,l ,i i ,.il t- l i : f
lg .T, Fr h.]. Id, ,: I ,.'n ,,. :l'.;h .'. .. .,, ) ,T..l. ;I I,
Vir I -, L i,(, F. i
ADJUSTMENTS
I ..... I, I,. ,h- I I ,I ... It d
first day of publication If you fird an error cal the dassifithed
department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955-
* The publisher assumes no tirranct responsibility a foar errors or for


r /


dompolop-





Saturday, November 9, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


003 Legal Notices
notice of the case under applicable law, who
wishes to present testimony at the hearing or
cross examine other witnesses, must file a
Notice of Appearance which must be re
ceived by the Town of Astatula not later than
five (5) days prior to the hearing. The Notice
of Appearance must include the name and
address of the party seeking to appear. Any
Notice of Appearance filed by a person or en
tity shall include the right to appear in person
or by a lawyer or other appropriate represent
tative, whether or not any representative is
mentioned in the Notice. Those filing a Notice
of Appearance shall be considered partici
pants in the hearing, subject to a determine
tion of standing if challenged on that point.
The Town Council may allow participation in
the hearing by persons filing a Notice of Ap
pearance after the five day deadline, upon a
showing of excusable neglect. If such a late
appearance is allowed, the Applicant shall
have the right to an automatic continuance of
the case as its option and without cost.
Persons who either do not file a Notice of Ap
pearance or who file late and do not, in the
opinion of the Town Council, demonstrate ex
usable neglect, are not entitled to seek any
delay in the proceedings. Anyone who does
not file a Notice of Appearance may at the
beginning of the hearing request an opportu
nity to speak. Those who do so may be called
as witnesses by the staff during its present
tion, whether they support or oppose the staff
position, subject however to the rights of par
ticipants in the hearing to object to the testi
mony and to cross examine these witnesses.
The Town of Astatula shall have automatic
standing in every case.
A person who decides to appeal any decision
made by any board, agency, or council with
respect to any matter considered at such
meeting or hearing, will need a record of the
proceedings. For such purposes, any such
person may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which in
cludes the testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is based (Florida Statutes,
286.0105).
The proposed ordinance file may be exam
ined during normal working hours from 8:30
a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at the Town Administration
Building, 25019 County Road 561, Astatula,
Florida. For further information call (352)
742 1100.
The Town of Astatula Land Development
Regulations are available for inspection at the
Town Hall, located at 25009 County Road
561, Astatula, Florida during normal working
hours 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Interested parties may appear at the meeting
and be heard with respect to the proposed
ordinance.
PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES NEEDING AS-
SISTANCE TO PARTICIPATE IN ANY OF
THESE PROCEEDINGS SHOULD CONTACT
MARY KATHLEEN COOPER, TOWN CLERK AT
(352) 742-1100 AT LEAST 48 HOURS BE-
FORE THE DATE OF THE SCHEDULED HEAR-
ING.
Ad No.00416078
November 9, 2013

100
Announcement

104 Special
Notices
NOTICE TO
ADVERTISERS
PLEASE CHECK YOUR AD FOR
ERRORS THE FIRST DAY IT APPEARS
SINCE THE DAILY COMMERCIAL WILL
NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
INCORRECT ADS AFTER THE FIRST
DAY OF PUBLICATION. IF YOU FIND
AN ERROR CALL THE CLASSIFIED
DEPARTMENT IMMEDIATELY AT
314-3278 OR 748-1955.

THE PUBLISHER ASSUMES NO
FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY FOR
ERRORS OR FOR COMMISSION OF
COPY. LIABILITY SHALL NOT EXCEED
THE COST OF THE PORTION OF
SPACE OCCUPIED BY SUCH ERROR.

CANCELLATIONS
CANCELLATION FOR ADS RUNNING
SATURDAY MUST BE MADE BY
FRIDAY BY 2:00, CANCELLATIONS
FOR SUNDAY & MONDAY MUST BE
MADE FRIDAY BY 5:00


106 Personals
SINGLE WHITE FEMALE in search of
SWM over 65. Outgoing, enjoys fes-
tivals, visiting Florida sites & more.
Riding motorcycle is a plus. 15 mi.
radius of Mt. Dora. 352-383-8065

134 Cemetery
Lots/Crypts
HILL CREST MEMORIAL GARDENS 2
lots side/side. $2000 obo Call
352-753-3370




200
At Your Service


201 Insurance

205 Adult Care
NOTICE
Florida Statute states, "It is a
misdemeanor for any person willfully,
knowingly, or intentionally to operate
or attempt to operate a family day
care home without a license or
without registering with the
department, whichever is applicable".
Florida Statute states, "No person
shall advertise a child care facility
without including within such
advertisement the state or local
agency license number of such
facility. The statute applies to anyone
with more than 1 unrelated child
in their home.


230 Cleaning
Service
DO YOU WANT A
STRESS FREE DAY.....
You deserve it!! I will clean your house
or office to make your life less stress-
ful. Relocated from PA. Servicing Lake


County area Very Dependable.
Reasonable Rates. Yrs. of Exp.
Pet sitting available.
Contact Denise
@717-574-1956


245 Financial

SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Contact us if your claim has been
denied or if you need help.
Over 30 yrs. exp.No fees or costs
unless your claim is approved.
Cooper Consulting
2228 South St., Leesburg
352-728-5552


250 Handyman

Hard working Lic. Business owner,
seeks to improve your home.
Ability to perform jobs including
Remodeling-TreeTrimming-Drywall-
Tiling, etc. References avail.
Call Robert Plante's
Home Maint. 352-484-3543




uF:R; t'Ij')H HArILMMN cE -Xvi:E
Reliable, Dependable! One call does it
all! Lic/ins. 352-409-4059


268 Moving





Two Brothers Moving
1 Room or a Full House
FL. Reg. #IM1539
Russell & Todd Franks
Lic. & Ins. Call 352-793-8960


275 Plumbing

SINCE
1987

KILEY&
SONS, INC.
A Full Service Plumbing Company.
Lake 787-1904 Sumter 748-9500
CentralFloridaPlumber.com
VISIT OUR ONSITE SHOWROOM.
24 Hr. Emergency Service
Lic#CFC1426882


281 Roofing

#1 IN ROOFING
Villages Roofing & Construction Inc.
*Leak Repairs *Shingles/Flat Roof.
*Lifetime Metal Roofs. Free Roof Est.
352-314-3625. Lic. #CCC1329936





MCHALE ROOFING INC
Re-Roofs and Repairs, Tile, Metal,
Shingles Flat Roofs & Mobile Homes
Excel. Ref's Lic & Ins. CCC1328197
Call 352-255-2758

288 Tree
Service




*Land Clearing 'Tree Removal
*Trimming & Shaping
*Hauling & Stump 'Grinding
Free Est. **SPECIALS**
352-267-5720


Stump Grinding, *Tree Trimming &
Removal *Box Blading, *Bush
Hogging & Grading. Lie & Insured.
Call 352-504-1597





300
Financial



301 Business
Opportunities

I RESTAURANT
150 SEATS WITH FULL LIQUOR
North Lake County,
Serious buyers only. 352-250-7813





400
Employment



410 Sales

ADVERTISING SALES
REPRESENTATIVE NEEDED FOR
LOCAL NEWSPAPER IN CLERMONT
Candidates will maintain existing
account base and solicit for new
businesses in South Lake County.
We are looking for a highly motivated
and organized professional individual
able to work independently. Reliable
transportation a must. Outside sales
experience preferred but will train the
right candidate.
Hours are amrn to 5pm. Base salary
plus commission. Benefits include
paid vacation, sick time, health and
dental insurance available and 401 k.
Please email resume and
cover letter to:
maria.cortinas@dailycommercial.com
or fax resume to: 352-365-8229

EARN MONEY FOR THE HOLIDAYS
PART TIME SALES
$$$$ START IMMEDIATELY $$$$
Join a professional marketing team
working in Lake County. I need ma-
ture, professionals that would like to
interact with people in local stores at
a kiosk while working on commission.
Current representatives average
$15-$20/hr. EARN EXTRA MONEY
working weekends and evenings.
THIS IS THE BEST
PART TIME JOB EVER
CALL OR FAX 800-781-1547


415 Technology

NOW HIRING A FULL-TIME
WEB DESIGNER
Outside sales experience preferred.
Email resume to
design@silverlinegraphicdesign.com


415 Technology

RESTORE TELECOM IN LEESBURG
seeks full-time Electronics Tester.
Test functionality of equipment, circuit
boards by following procedures.
Mount components & parts. Docu-
ment issues & prepare equipment for
final quality inspection. HS
Diploma/GED & working knowledge of
computer operation required. Exp.
with electronic assembly, soldering,
troubleshooting preferred. Must be
able to stand/walk for full shift &
lift/move up to 50 pounds. DFWP/EOE
Submit resumes to 888-420-1861 or
humanresources@restortelecom.com
Or complete application at
912-1 Venture Ave., Leesburg


423 Accounting

i BOOKKEEPER/HR NEEDED
For small Company.
Send Resume to:
BOOKKEEPINGHR@YAHOO.COM

425 Clerical

SECRETARY Ffr
Construction background preferred.
Fax resume: 352-728-1746

430 Retail

RETAIL SALES CONSULTANTS
needed for retail lighting and fan store
located in The Villages. Applicants
must have retail lighting & fans sales
experience, plus clean driving record;
design and construction knowledge a
plus but not required. We offer base
pay plus commission, excellent health
benefits plus 401k and paid time off.
Company is an Equal Employment Op-
portunity Employer and Drug-Free
Workplace; full-time and part-time
positions available.
Fax resume to: (352)399-2965 or
Apply in person at:
1115 Canal Street,
Lake Sumter Landing,
The Villages, FL 32162


432 Dental

i DENTAL ASSISTANT
Experienced only. $15/hr.
Fax resume to: 352-787-9036
NO PHONE CALLS

DENTAL RECEPTIONIST
Professional & experienced only.
Fax resume to: 352-728-3373

435 Medical

FRONT OFFICE POSITION P/T
For Medical Office. Must have exp.
Fax resume to: 352-323-1894

MA, LPN & RADIOLOGY TECH.
Needed for Busy Urgent Care.
Email to:
medicalbillingtoday@ yahoo.com

MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST
F/T, exp. with knowledge of EMR for
Primary Care Practice in The Villages,
with opportunity for advancement.
Fax resume to: 407-217-2687

OPTICAL TECH /DISPENSER
Exp. Lab Tech need for busy optha-
molic practice in The Villages. Dis-
pensing experience a plus.
Apply in person:
Beacon Advanced Eye Care
1128 Bichara Blvd.
Lady Lake, FL 32159

RECEPTIONIST, FULL TIME
Needed for busy dermatology office.
Previous experience highly preferred.
References required. Will need travel
to Villages Office 2-3 times per/mo.
Please fax resume to
Lake Dermatology 352-365-0932

RN OPENING FT
FOR MDS/PPS CO-ORDINATOR
looking for an organized, professional,
knowledgeable individual. Experience
required.
Apply at
LAKE EUSTIS CARE CENTER
8:30am 3:00pm
Monday Friday
411 W. Woodward Ave. Eustis, FL.,
Online amauger@gchc.com
Or Fax 352-357-2874
DFWP/EOE


450 Trades

CLASS "A" OTR DRIVERS
No NYC. Benefits & Bonus. Exp'd and
new CDL Grads welcome.
Call Windy Hill at 800-864-3404

DRIVER CDL CLASS A
Experienced.
Loading/unloading truck required.
Clean Driving record/Background.
^_"Bu Whrs he ~f/ereBuy'
R PLY In.

722 Duck Lake Rd.
The Villages, FL 32159
352-753-3333
apply@romaclumber.com
FAX 352-787-9632
EOE/DFWP

DRIVERS WITH CLASS A OR B, CDL
& DUMP TRUCK DRIVER EXP'D.
With/fork lift exp., and able to unload
construction supplies.
Apply at: 4399 CR 156 Wildwood
Call 352-689-0251



*I1 S11[IS! *-l~-'lSl m11iI


6 uo 616 mimloo l .tT1 F ,'' ],


TIME DEFINITE SERVICES
Hiring Over The Road Drivers Class
A CDL required. All late model equip-
ment 2012 & newer. We pull 53'
Reefers. Great Pay & Bonuses. Must
be willing to run 48 states.
Apply at:
www.timedefinite.com
or call 352-399-7900 xd1015


450 Trades


ELECTRICAL
APPRENTICES
Applicants must have experience and
a clean driving record, high school di-
ploma or equivalent. Company is an
EOE and Drug-Free Workplace. Excel-
lent health benefits, 401k and PTO;
MVR & Background checks.
Apply in person at:
PIKE'S ELECTRIC, INC.
719 Industrial Drive
Wildwood, FL 34785

ENTRY LEVEL CONSTRUCTION
$35K $40K per year, Paid medical,
vacation & 401 k. CDL & travel a must.
DFWP/EOE
Call 352-383-3159 Ext. 229

FABRICATION PLUMBER
Experienced needed for large contrac-
tor in Wildwood. Benefits available.
DFWP, EEO. NO PHONE CALLS.
Submit resume
jmoser@nashincp-m.com

FRAMERS W/EXP.
Must be self motivated! Benefits avail.
PATRIOT BUILDERS
352-516-6563 or
352-307-9671

MAINTENANCE
Scottish Highlands maintenance posi-
tion available. Should be experienced
in irrigation, lawn mowing equipment
and pool maintenance. Excellent start-
ing pay with insurance package.
Background check required.
Call Chris at 352-483-6054

MAINTENANCE/GROUNDS PERSON
Fifty five plus community is looking for
a full time year round person that is
physically able to do some heavy
grounds work. Knowledge of plumb-
ing, irrigation systems and/or STP
plant operations an asset.
Please send resume to
fax 352-343-01 00 or bring your
resume to Molokai Co Op, Inc.
1 Hawaiian Way Leesburg, FL 34788

455
Restaurants/
Hotels/Clubs

BAK I ENIJEK & bI-HVLK'5 1- I
MUST be exp'd. Evenings & Wknds.
Apply in person 3-5pm
VIC'S EMBERS SUPPER CLUB
7940 US Hwy. 441 Leesburg, FL

DELIVERY DRIVERS & PREP I
Must have own transportation.
Apply in person at: Taki's #2 in Eustis
1600 S. Bay St., Eustis

470 General

SCHOOL BUS
DRIVERS NEEDED
Training provided.
Lake County Schools, Transportation
352-728-2561 or
Apply online: www.lake.kl 2.fl.us



,405 VAr


COLLISION TECH. EXPERIENCED
With benefits.




SEE DAVIS COLEMAN
PHILLIPS BUICK
COLLISION CENTER
3320 Hwy. 441, Fruitland Park, FL

CUSTODIAN PART TIME
Experienced in light maintenance.
Send resume to:
communityumcfp@gmail.com
or mail to:
COMMUNITY UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
309 College Ave.
Fruitland Park. FL 34731

DELIVERY PERSONNEL
Office equip dealer seeks reliable per-
son to deliver equip & supplies, assist
in inventory control & light bldg.
maint. Must have neat appearance,
good communication skills, able to
follow written/oral directions, & be in-
surable. Must be able to safely oper-
ate a box truck. Heavy lifting req'd.
100+ Ibs. Please do not respond if
you can't pass a drug test, MVR &
background check. M-F 8am 5pm.
Apply in person at:
Mon.-Fri. 9am -12pm.
2854 West Main St.
Leesburg, FL.

DELIVERY PERSONNEL
Office equip dealer seeks reliable per-
son to deliver equip & supplies, assist
in inventory control & light bldg.
maint. Must have neat appearance,
good communication skills, able to
follow written/oral directions, & be in-
surable. Must be able to safely oper-
ate a box truck. Heavy lifting req'd.
Please do not respond if you can't
pass a drug test, MVR & background
check. M-F 8am 5pm.
Apply in person at:
Mon.-Fri. 9am -12pm.
2854 West Main St.
Leesburg, FL.

NURSERY WORKER
FOR CHURCH P/T
On Sunday mornings, some Wed.
evenings & as needed. Background
check required. Must be mature &
love children.
Apply in person M-F 9am 2pm
First Presbyterian Church
200 S. Lone Oak Dr.
Leesburg


470 General

COME JOIN









5OUR TEAM








Pets/Animals



501 Pets
For Sale

BICHON FRISE/POO PUPPIES Male/fe-
male, health cert. $250/$400.
352-669-3649.

CHIHUAHUA PUP 8 wks., male, health
cert. parents on premises. Pure
bred, no papers. $250 Cash. Grove-
land. 352-429-2505

KITTENS Free to a good home. 7
weeks old pl ease call (352)702-5591
THREE PUPPIES LEFT. 150.00 dep. and
750.00 due. Available @ 8 weeks
NOV 18. 352-748-0912

560 Pet
Supplies

BIRD CAGE, Excel. cond. white w/toys,
16"x1l4"xl 7" tall. $45.360-1209

BIRD CAGES. Asking $35. The Villages.
Call 352-753-1834
DOG CRATE folding 36 x 23 x 25. $50.
352-728-1363





o00
Merchandise
Mart



601 Antiques

DOLL 1960's Pollyanna, Walt Disney by
Uneeda. 29" $100 firm. SOLD!!!

DOLL HOUSE wooden, w/39 accesso-
ries. Very nice. $100. 602-1055

602 Arts/Crafts

RUG HOOKING EQUIPMENT Traditional,
$100. 352-748-3580

603 Collectibles

AUGUSTA XII Color Print 25 x 30, '92.
Framed/signed. $65. 330-4484

BUYING Baseball, Football, Basketball,
Non-sports cards 1870 to 1980.
Autographs, memorabilia, bobbin
heads. Sets, singles. No collection to
large. Call: 352-589-7981 or Email:
sportscards4john@aol.cornm
TIN SIGNS, reproductions, Packard &
Chevrolet Truck. $10. 874-5418

604 Furniture

BED Queen size, small pillow top. Great
shape. $99. 352-408-5357

BEDROOM SET 6 piece Ethan Allen, 2
twin beds. $800 obo Call
352-793-4160

CHAIR barrel style, swivels, white. $50.
352-326-8127
CHAIRS 3 oak counter height, w/woven
seats. $120. 352-728-1363

CHAIRS 4 French Provincial, maple.
Like new. $100. 343-0587

CHAISE LOUNGE wicker rattan w/cush-
ions. $40.352-742-1422
COFFEE & END TABLES, inlaid woods,
ball & claw feet, elegant, gold trim,
sacrifice $475. 787-7048

COFFEE TABLE Oak, excel cond. $75
Call 352-343-0161

COFFEE TABLE square 38"x38"x15"
inlaid oak. $95 obo. 352-343-6165
COMPUTER DESK. Good cond. $50.
Call 352-396-5739
CORNER TV CABINET, bi-fold doors
wood. 75.715-671-8152
DINING ROOM TABLE rattan, 4 chairs
like new. $500. 352-406-5419
END TABLES (2) & Coffee table w/lift
top. Oak. $50.352-314-3657
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER, 5'Lx3'H, 2
glass doors. $60 352-561-1167

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER, vintage
claw foot legs, solid oak, w/lead
glass doors, solid oak cabinet/mi-
crowave cart & burgundy recliner.
$375 obo takes all. MUST SEE
352-357-1647

ETHAN ALLEN 6 pcs Dining table
$1,000. Oriental rug 4X6 Genuine
$600. Hammock and frame LL Bean
new in box $100. Lawn Mower Gas


Powered $50. Electric edger new
$75.352-735-8084
LOVESEAT 58" Double recliner, beige
cloth. Wall hugger. Like new. $400.
Call 352-728-4847

MATTRESS & BOX SPRING Full. $75.
Call 352-460-0458

MATTRESS & BOX SPRING King, clean.
$100. SOLD

MATTRESS & BOX SPRING Queen Pil-
lowtop. $130. 352-787-3249
MATTRESS & box spring, double, Serta
perfect sleeper. $85. 330-0874


604 Furniture

MEDIUM BROWN LEATHER COUCH,
chair and ottoman, wood/metal
cocktail and 2 side tables.Purchased
from Rooms to Go in July 2012. Still
in brand new condition, sofa is
86"$1150.00. SOLD!!!!

PATIO SET 44" square glass top table,
w/4 swivel rockers. Excel. cond.
$275. Call 352-446-9846

ROCKER/RECLINER, beige, great
shape. $30 Call 352-753-1170

SOFA BED Cream color. $100.
352-561-4940

SOFA by Lane, brown leather. Good
cond. $100 Call 337-501-2198

SOFA with skirting, floral with wood
trim. $99. Call 352-321-4019

SOFA, England, full size. good cond.
$99. Call 352-385-7359

TABLE & 6/CHAIRS Duncan & Phyfe.
Asking $200. Call 352-267-8693

TABLE 45" glass top, & 4 wrought iron
chairs. $75. Like new. 460-0728

TABLE, Heart Shaped, 3 tier. brown,
good cond. $8 Call 352-504-6689

TELEVISION STAND, good cond. $25.
Call 352-636-1352

VANITY Girls, w/bench. $10. Call
352-742-2716

WICKER CHAIR w/seat cushion, excel
cond. $25. Call 352-357-2218

WICKER ROCKER w/metal legs & cush-
ion, very nice $100 352-409-6691

605 Appliances

Appliances With Warranties
$75 & up! Used Beds all sizes!
*Bui *,',I *Trade *Fast delivery
Call Buzzy'S 352-315-9886
www.buzzysbeds.com

CHEST FREEZER 5'. Works good.
$100.352-669-6742

DISCOUNT
APPLIANCE
Repair-Sales-Service Most Repairs
$60 Plus Parts





WASHER, DRYER,
REFRIGERATOR
"Don't Toss It
Fix It For Less"
Buying Clean
Washers & Dryers
Days, Evenings & Weekends
Call Now
352-874-1238

DISHWASHER GE, White, built-in, new
cond. $75 Call 352-357-5941

DRYER gas, works great, white, used.
$99. 352-315-9886

FREEZER Avanti, 20Wx20 1/4Dx33H..
works good. $100 715-520-7156

REFRIGERATOR 21 cuft. Whirlpool,
stainless steel, 2 yrs. old. $485. Call
337-501-2198 Fruitland Park

REFRIGERATOR Kenmore, side/side, ice
& water in door. Excel. cond. $300
obo Call 352-751-0552

STAND MIXER new, 5 quart, 10 speed,.
3 blades. $75. SOLDIII'

606 Electronics

DISH NETWORK RECEIVER w/remote &
manual. $10 352-988-7004

GAME PSP Sony brand new in box.
$100 Call 352-455-3342

GARMIN GPS Nuvi 50. New in box.
$75. After 4. 352-793-7982

PALM ORGANIZER Sony, w/keyboard &
accessories. $20 352-324-2559

PRINTER Brother MFC495CW. Extra
ink. $50. 224-356-6857

SPEAKERS (4) Boston, acoustics. Micro
11 Ox. $50 Call 352-385-7359

TELEVISION 27", works great $50 Call
352-326-5527

TELEVISION 55" Hitachi. $100. obo.
Call 863-287-1468

TELEVISION RCA 32" not flat screen.
$25. Call 352-735-1647

TELEVISION, 51", Hitachi, big box style.
$100. Works great. 352-383-0043
TOUCH BOOK READER Sony, Red, ex-
cel. cond. $50 Call 352-516-5364

624 Children's
items

BABY BATHTUB, toddler potty & sassy
seat. $15. 352-455-7557.

PACK N PLAY & WALKER almost new.
$49 will split. 352-253-9236

VIDEO PLAYER VHS, & 25 Disney
tapes. Great gift. $25. 793-1285

626 Farm
Equipment


BUSH HOG 6', not rusty, needs work.
$250.352-242-1038

630 Garage Sales

ASTATULA
Huge Sale! Sat. Only! 8 -?. 24845
Ranch Rd. off 48 East. ALOT of Chil-
dren & Adult clothes $1. unless
marked. 5 drawer oak dresser,
tools, misc.

BELLEVIEW
12332 SE Hwy. 301 Sat. Nov. 9th
7am-1 pm. Huge Variety! Over 30 ta-
bles! Food available! Find a treasure!
12332 SE HWY. 301





DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, November 9, 2013


630 Garage Sales
BUSHNELL
Massive, 30 yrs. worth of collecting.
Fri. Mon. 8 2pm. 7461 CR. 627.
off 476, west of 1-75. Kitchen, an-
tiques, farm, Christmas, art, wicker,
tools, contemporary furn. Cash only!

BUSHNELL
Sat. 8am 5. Sun. 11 3. HUGE
MOVING SALE! Look for BIG signs
@ 313 W. Seminole Ave. Next to
Karate Center on W. HWY 476.

CLERMONT
Fri. & Sat., 8am 2pm. 1634 Third
St. SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE.

CLERMONT
Arrowhead Estates Community Semi
Annual Sale. Nov. 9th & 10th. 8am
to 4pm CR 455 and old CR 50

CLERMONT
Sat. Only! 8 ?. 9911 Janette Ln.
Household, camping, clothing & etc.

CLERMONT,
Fri. & Sat. 8am noon., 13600 Cas-
pian Way at Shepherd of the Hills
Church.

EUSTIS
Moving Sale! Sat. Sun. 9 4pm.
3151 Brighton Rd. Dining room set,
antique glassware, dishes, pool
items, oriental rug, collectors knives,
Hess Trucks, odds & ends & more!

EUSTIS
Sat. 8:30am 1pm. 34800 Lemon
Ave. Household items, '76 Corvette
project car, bicycle, portable
crib/playpen, microwave & more.
LEESBURG
ART & CRAFT FAIR at "Hawthorne"
Hwy. 27 S. at blinking light.
Sat. 9am 2pm


Rural Kingj
Aawmer's Farm S Ham SMmr I^


~ ~L. LJ... J..DJhh .1 ~


630 Garage Sales
EUSTIS
Sat. 9am 1 pm. & Sun. (if needed)
501 West Charlotte Ave. Next to
Lake Tech School. YARD / ESTATE/
GIFT SALE. Lg. unique group of new
unopened gifts to antiques. TV's,
video camera, books, computer,
china hutch, FL room table & chairs,
kitchen appl. & glassware. Bed-
spreads, art, jewelry, quality clothing
& knick-knacks. Garden, lawn mow-
ers, trimmers & tools. Auto, includ-
ing 3 sets 18" chrome rims in box.
Perfect gifts for you or someone you
love. NO EARLY BIRDS PLEASE.

EUSTIS,
Sat. 8am 2pm. 35714 Panther
Ridge Rd. (Lakewood Ranches).
Large variety of item's, teaching
supplies, children's toys, games,
household items & much more.

FRUITLAND PARK
Rummage & Bake Sale. Nov. 8th &
9th, Fri. Sat. 9 3pm. Lakeside
Terrace Clubhouse, Picciola Rd.

FRUITLAND PARK
2915 Arbor Ridge Blvd. Friday -
Sunday 8 am until 3 pm.
Indoor/Outdoor Furniture, Kitchen
Items, Home Decor, Clothes, Craft
Supplies, Handcrafted Items More!

FRUITLAND PARK
Fri. Sat. 8 4pm. 34233 CR. 468.
Clothing, dishware, entertainment
center credenza style, lamps and
various items.


FRUITLAND PARK
FAMILY YARD SALE! Fri. Sat. 8 ?
Wilmington Rd. & Haynes Rd. Lot's
& lot's of old stuff, glassware, furn.,
pictures and man tools, toys & lot's
more.


630 Garage Sales
FRUITLAND PARK
Fri. & Sat. 8am ??1107 W. Miller
St. (466A). Household, furn., books,
camping, collectibles, baby items,
vintage sewing machines & much
more. Ready to deal. DON'T MISS

FRUITLAND PARK
Fri. & Sat. 8am ?? 1624 Myrtle
Lake Ave. MULTI FAMILY SALE.

FRUITLAND PARK
Sat. 8am ?? 838 Berry Hill Circle.
Household items & lots of misc.

GRAND ISLAND
MOVING SALE!
Sat. 9am 4pmr 13606 Berkshire
Ct. SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE!

GRAND ISLAND
Sat. Nov. 9th. 8 ?. Biscayne Hts.
Community Yard Sale! Something
for Everyone!

GROVELAND
Sat. 8am ?? 5830 Heritage Drive,
Woodlands off 27. Nice things, col-
lectibles including Disney, tools &
lots more.

LADY LAKE
367 Sunny Oaks Way November 8 &
9th 8am-2pm. 2nd Annual Commu-
nity Multi-family Yard Sale at Car-
mendy Square Clothes, Toys, Decor,
and much more.


LADY LAKE
Fri. Sat. 8 3pm. 38630 Sulen
Rd. Turn off 441 @ Sunoco Station,
end of Griffinview Dr. Follow signs.
BIG Multi-Family Garage Sale! Furn.,
golf cart, clothing, household items,
old iron cookware, generator & lots
of misc.


RURAL KING FARM & HOME STORE
IS COMING TO LEESBURG!

Rural King is the fastest growing farm
and home store in the Midwest.
We have 67 stores in 8 states.
www.ruralking.com


All Retail Positions OPEN:
Cashiers, Sales Associates, Receiving Associates, Loaders, and
Managers at all levels including Department Managers

COME JOIN OUR TEAM!!! We have competitive wages and excellent benefits!

APPLY:
ONLINE AT www.ruralking.com/careers
EMAIL resume to careers@ruralking.com
OR APPLY AT THE STORE:
1715 North Citrus Blvd
9AM-4PM M-F


CROSSWORD PUZZLE


CROSSWORD
By THOMAS JOSEPH

ACROSS 44 Lip
1 Strong
wind DOWN
5 Outstand- 1 Long-
ing tailed
9 Kick back pengu
10 "American 2 Star in
Buffalo" Aquila
playwright 3 Comfy
12 Caper home
13Durance 4 Remo\
of "Small- surgicE
ville" 5 Last
14 Being letter
rude, 6 Kids' c
in a way game
16Writer 7 Clarke
Deighton "Game
17 Luau dish Throm
18 Flying 8 Respe
high able
20 Icy 9 Gratin(
dessert sounds
22 Feedbag 11 Distinc
fill flavors
23 Threw in NEW CROS
251975 Thomas Josep
Wimble- 1 2
don 9
champ 12--
28 Like some
training 14
32 Frugal 1T7
34 Narc's
org. 20
35 Shoe hue
36 White-hot m
38 Collectible 25 26 2
car 32-
40 Silly one
41 "Super- 35
man" star 38-
42 Computer __
key 41
43 Louver 443
piece


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ANT IM I N YOU
SCOF FAT ODD
ENOLA FREY


K E E-L P A R-K-S
E L Lm C HIA NT I

LATEHTT T lON
SPI RIO UNCLE



Yesterday's answer


29 Block-
heads
30 Past,
present,
and
future
31 Raring to
go
33 Key
37 Writer
Jaffe
39 Longoria
of
TV


15 Contrary
to good
manners
19 Reactor
parts
21 Boxer
Buddy
24 Hires
25 Showy
flower
26 Black suit
27 Ginger-
bread
eater


.SWORD BOOK! Send $4.75 (check/m.o.) to
)h Book 2, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475
m13 14 5 16 17 1


630 Garage Sales
LADY LAKE
Sat. Only! Multi-Family Sale! 7 -
3pm. 37607 Leggett Lane. Elec.
wheelchair, Nu-wave oven, guitar
hero & more!

LADY LAKE
Fri. 7-4pm & Sat. 7-1 pm. Oakland
Hills Subd. 7789 CR 109D off CR
109 & 441. Annual Homeowners
Assoc. Sale.

LADY LAKE
Sat. -Mon. 8am-?? 912 Jacaranda
Dr. April Hills Subd. Power tools,
grill, adult clothing, & misc.

LADY LAKE
Sat. 7am Noon, 4038 Griffin View
Dr. Office desk, file cabinet, Inkjet
printers, bookcase, monitors, table
& chairs, gliding rockers, Ikea ta-
bles, nail tech. table with power
strip, computer components, Christ-
mas decorations, clothes, toys and
lot's of misc.

LADY LAKE,
Sat. 8 ? 305 West Rose Lane.
Furn. tools. Lot's of stuff!

LADY LAKE,
Sat. 8am 1pm. Oakgrove Commu-
nity, Ivanhoe Circle off Griffinview
Road.

LAKE PANASOFFKEE
Fri. & Sat. 8am 2pm. 1042 CR 463.
Books, sewing, & many items.

LEEBURG,
HUGE YARD SALE
Sat. 8am 4pm. 408 S. Lone Oak
Dr. Christmas decor & much more!

LEESBURG
100 Shangri-La Blvd. 11/8 9 Sev-
eral homes in Shangri-La By The
Lake with items for sale. Lunch and
bake sale in the clubhouse.

LEESBURG
Estate Sale! Fri. Sat. 8:30 2pm.
Corner of 441 & Sleepy Hollow Rd.
Retro, modern, vintage. Entire con-
tents of home.
LEESBURG DOWNTOWN
128 Orange Ave. Sat. only 7-3pm.
HUGE Yard Porch & Indoor Sale.
300+ antiques, hand painted bed &
vanity. All kinds of tables, buffet -
chandeliers. Lots of odd & unusual
home & yard decor. Low prices.
LEESBURG
Fri. & Sat. 8 3pm. Neighborhood
Sale. Silverwood Community. Off
Radio Rd. Look for signs!!

LEESBURG
Fri. & Sat. 8am ?? 30830 Chero-
kee Ave. MOVING SALE. Follow the
yellow signs.

LEESBURG
Fri. & Sat. 9am 3pm. 617 Sand
Piper Dr. Sand Piper Mobile Home
Park, off 452, 5 mi N. of the Fair-
grounds.

LEESBURG
Fri. Sat. 8 2pm. 10343 Joanies
Run, Quail Point Subdivision off Ra-
dio Rd. Jewelry, antiques, plus size
clothing &furn.

LEESBURG
Rained out last week. HUGE SALE
Sat. 8-2pm. 915 N. Blvd. Hwy. 441
East.

LEESBURG
Sat. 8am 2pm. MULTI FAMILY
SALE. Tecumseh. Ave.

LEESBURG
Sat. 8am 4pm. 33800 Secret Hill
Dr. Lawn mower, new built-in dbl.
oven & lots more.

LEESBURG
Thur. -Sat. 8am ? 11741 S. Shel-
ley Dr. HUGE SALE, many items new
or like new. 18' RV & collectibles.

LEESBURG
Thur., Fri. & Sat. 8-3pm. 1100 Lee
St. Good variety, something for eve-
ryone!

LEESBURG
Thurs Sat. 8am ? 7430 Sun-
nyside Dr. Like new utility trailer,
ammo, tools & knives, fishing
equip., ladders, Craftsman routers,
electric heaters, Equalizer hitch,
largE- dr a L'l, lIC : 0. i'...r-.

LEESBURG,
Fri. & Sat. 8am 1pm. 200 S. Lone
Oak Dr. First Presbyterian Church on
church grounds, fpcl@comcast.net.
To benefit the Salvation Army, Join-
ing Hands Food Ministry & Church
Ministry.
LEESBURG,
Sat. 8am 2pm 2503 South St.
Peppertree Apts. Community Sale.


630 Garage Sales
MT DORA
Bonanza Yard Sale! 2 Families.
Thur. & Fri. Nov. 7th & Nov. 8th.
8am 3pm. SW. corner of W. 11th
St. & Overlook. Collectibles, jewelry,
clothing, shoes, purses, Magnetic
mattress & more.

TAVARES
611 N Rockingham Ave November 9
& 10. Two Family. Toys, Dishes,
Furniture, Appliances, Tools, Col-
lectibles. Priced to sell.

TAVARES
Fri. & Sat. 8am 3pm. 855 Hilltop
Rd. Tools, generator, trolling motor,
portable picnic table, clothes,
household items & much more.

TAVARES
Thur. & Fri. 8am 2pm. 2381 Teal-
wood Circle. Household, tools, etc.

UMATILLA
HUGE SALE! Sat. 8 ?. 16845 SE
249th Ave. Between Altoona & 450
off 42. follow signs. Lots of tools,
dolls, scrubs, furn., quilts, house-
hold & new & gently worn + size
clothing. Good Deals! Make offer.

WILDWOOD
Fri. Sat. 8 2pm. 7246 E. SR. 44.
Rails End.

WILDWOOD
Parkwood Oaks Park Wide Sale! Sat.
11/9, 8 1 pm. On 44 by 301.

WILDWOOD
Sat. 8 1pm. 4400 CR. 121D, Fox
Hollow. Golf clubs, clothing, paint
ball guns, rugs & more!
635 Garden
CONCRETE FOUNTAIN, no pump. Good
cond. $100 Call 352-735-1570

DUMP TRAILER Craftsman, steel, box is
30"Wx48"Lxl12"D. $75.357-3293

GRILL Members Mark. 4 burner + side.
$99 obo. 352-308-7474

LAWN MOWER elec. w/bag. Used 3
times, like new. $95 307-9462

LAWN MOWER Troy Bilt self propelled
w/bagger. $100 352-636-6374

LAWN TRACTOR, Craftsman 22.5hp,
50" cut, runs great. $200.
352-406-5419

MOWER 22" & GAS TRIMMER $95 for
both. Call 352-250-1467

MOWER Murray Briggs & Stratton 20"
cut. 3.5hp classic. $65 343-4445

ROTOTILLER Rally, 3.5hp, 14" CRT,
$75. Call 352-669-8833
TRACTOR LIFT, Craftsman, nearly new.
$100 Call 352-365-2297
TREE SALE
*Oaks, Sycamores, Cypress, Fig,
Mulberry, Cherry Laurel, etc.
Palms, Queen, Pindo or Sago
*Special 6' +/- Oaks $10 or 15/$100
*Cypress or Oaks up to 12'
CATT'S TREES
352-669-1618
WEED EATER Feather weight gas,
String trimmer. $50. 352-552-7942

640 Guns
ARMAS BOST, 12 gauge double barrel,
3" magnum shot gun. Excel cond.
$400.352-793-2303

COLT Agent .38 revolver, 6 shot. Excel
cond. $425 Call 352-324-4125

COLT M-4, model 6920 (AR-15). Never
fired, in box. $1250. 321-0482

ITHICA Mod. 72 Saddle gun 22 WMRF
$500, Browning 12 GA Pump $500,
Savage 22 Over 20 GA $350.
352-748-3571

MILLET RED DOT SIGHT w/ rings, excel
cond. $40. Call 352-357-2880

MUZZLE LOADER Wolf Mag. 50 Cal.
Breach brake, camo syn stock. Ano-
dized finish. Fiber optic sites, raised
scope rings. Tasco 3-9 scope.
$200. 352-638-8476

REMINGTON Model 770 .30 caliber
w/scope & carry case. Brand new,
never fired. $375. 352-459-8724

SEARS WINCHESTER .22 caliber bolt
action, excel. $150. SOLD!!!!

SMITH & WESSON snub nose, 38 spe-
cial revolver. Like new, $425 FIRM.
Call 352-793-4019


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640 Guns
TAURUS ULTRALITE REVOLVER, .38
spec. $375. Sterling stainless steel
.22 pistol (pocket size)- $225. Wood
stock single shot .22 bolt action rifle-
$100. Taurus TCP .380 cal.- $325.
Cases. Others. Ammo included
with each. Prices are firm.
Call Dave (716) 949-0408.

649 Medical
PICK UP TRUCK LIFT for Scooter.
$1500 obo. 352-793-4970

WHEELCHAIR red motorized Jazzy, 2
covers, car lift, small metal ramp
$1,500. 352-326-2557
WHEELCHAIR, Portable. Like new. $50.
352-217-4809
650 Computers
& Equip
PRINTER HP office jet 4315, all in one.
Good cond. $50 Call 352-272-9770
652 Articles
For Sale
BED SPREAD Queen, beautiful. Good
backing. $65. 352-536-1744

BORDEN'S ICE CREAM SIGN, neon light
1950's. $70. 352-343-3436

CANISTER SET, 4 pcs. w/cookie jar,
Ducks. $35.352-753-8361

CHINA service for 8, includes serving
pieces.. $70 Call 352-455-6427

CHINA service for 8, includes, serving
pieces, excel. $100 357-1363

CHRISTMAS DISHES Service for 8, plus
serving pieces. $60. 352-750-0552

CHRISTMAS TREE 7' LED, pre-lit, in
box. 2yr. old. $50. 742-7256

CHRISTMAS TREE and beautiful hand-
made tree skirt. $45. 787-0410

CHRISTMAS TREE Pre-lit, 5.5'. $35.
Call 352-324-0583.

CHRISTMAS TREE, 7', (Mountain King)
w/storage bag. $75. 352-748-9611

CHRISTMAS TREES (2) & other Christ-
mas items. $75 all. 989-284-2966

CIVILIAN GAS MASK, new, 3 extras fil-
ters. $100. 407-310-6628

COFFEE MAKER KitchenAid. New. Paid
$189. Sell for $100. 352-978-7461

DESIGNER CLOTHING Chicos/Cache,
10/pcs. $100. obo 321-246-4371

DISNEY VHS TAPES & Player. (25).
$50. Call 352-250-4711

FLEA MARKET ITEMS Jeans, tops, Holi-
day decor & more. $79. 793-8102

GAS GRILL Weber, 2 burners w/gas
bottle & cover. Good cond. $250
Call 352-446-9846

GAS GRILLE w/side burner, used once
w/cover. $65. Call 352-636-1352

HOT TUB Leisure Bay, w/lounger, 2
seats, & cover. Works excel.. you
must move. $600 obo Call
352-365-2906

JACKET Florida State men's Ig., heavy,
$25. Call 352-589-8064

JACKET Harley Davidson blk, XL. New,
not leather. $100. 352-243-1458

JACUZZI TUB used twice, $2,500 Call
352-365-1724

JEWELRY BOX, 46"Hx15"Dx17"W.
lined drawers $100. 352-603-4113

LEATHER JACKET BLACK, MEN'S size
40-44. $75. 352-742-2856

MAILBOX w/key lock, large, white
w/post. $35. SOLD!!

MANNEQUIN female, 5'6". $50. Call
904-673-3727

MEN'S CLOTHING XLg shirts 40-44W
shorts. 10 pcs. $20. 321-246-4371

MODEL TRAIN N-Scale layout, w/track
84X64X38. $99 Call 407-733-3022

ORNAMENTS for Christmas tree. Large
box. $25. Call 352-324-0583

PAPER CUT-ER 18" brand new in box.
$40.352-728-1363


7 No matter what time
of the day it is,
S you can place
your classified
merchandise ad
online, pay for it and
just wait for the
phone to ring!

Fast, convenient and
on your schedule!


I SJUiSI i
trlol simple, .


*6


Daill Qomieira
"Your First Choice" In-Print & On-line


vv vv vv i '- ii1Y } I I I I I I -I i 1.-i 1. 1. 1 i1

*Employment advertisements are excluded.
Please call 352-314-FAST to speak with a customer service rep.
Lake: 352-314-3278 or Sumter: 352-748-1955


I


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 9, 2013




Saturday, November 9, 2013


A picture is worth a thousand words....


-~---.


'-'-gt: ...Add an exciting photo to your '
...-.-_-v_ advertisement and see howi


L4 fast the phone rings.



SThe Dail Commercial Classifieds (352) 314-FAST (3278)


652 Articles
For Sale
PICTURE Erte, Art deco, 34 x 45, gold
frames. $65. Call 352-324-3274

RUG like new, sunlight yellow,
cotton/wool. 8' x 10'. Was $800.
Now $150. 352-728-1363

SHAMPOOER Bissell, works good. $75.
352-365-1437

SINGING, DANCING SANTA 5'. Excel
cond. $30. Call 352-348-9946

SKECHERS shape ups 10 wide men's,
NEW. $50 Call 352-347-7350

SMOKER gas, Masterbuilt, never used.
$75.352-446-9846

TRAIN Radio control, large, battery op-
erated. $25. Call 352-324-0583

TUXEDO Men's, Coat/Pants/Shirt, size
48-42. $65. 352-217-4809
VACUUM Orick XL upright, like new
$100 obo. Call 321-246-4371
655 Musical
Instruments
BANJO 5 string, Kay. W/accessories.
$225. Call 352-343-6608

GUITAR acoustic Hohner (case &
stand, great shape. $100 323-3518

KEYBOARD Yamaha PSR730 w/stand.
Excel cond. $100. 343-9279

KEYBOARD Yamaha, Excel. cond. Ask-
ing $195. Mt Dora. 419-308-6345

ORGAN Hammond electric, Cedarwood.
Excel. cond. $100. 352-617-0398

ORGAN Lowrey C300, manuals. $100.
Eustis. 207-650-9838

TRUMPET & CASE good cond $70.
352-343-1037

VIOLIN w/case. Full size. Excel cond.
$45.SOLD
674 Exercise Equipment
AB DOER. New. $65. Call
352-460-4741

RECUMBENT BIKE Weflo. Pursuant
2.OR. $65. SOLD!

TIIGH MASTER & GUT BUSTER, new.
$25 for all. 352-669-1163

TREADMILL Proform, works good. $80
Call 352-366-0225
675 Sports/
Recreation
BICYCLE 26" girls, Sears, 1 speed,
fenders, basket, A1 $49. 728-6835

BICYCLE Diamond Back, Sorrento
Sport, Men's 26", 21 speed, excel.
cond. $75.352-259-0633

BICYCLE Men's Schwinn, Trail Way Hy-
brid, alum. $95. 434-5314

BICYCLE Schwinn men's, 27" multi
speed. $30. SOLD!!!!

BICYCLES 3 Wheel, rebuilt. Large Seat
& Basket. $150. 1-352-343-6608

CORN HOLE BOXES (2). New w/8 bags.
$60. Call 859-512-8009

GOLF BAG ladies, brand new. $50 Call
352-323-8031

GOLF CLUBS brand new Ladies over-
sized in box $90. 352-735-6927

GOLF CLUBS Rawlings, bag plus pull
cart. $60 obo. 352-787-1539

GOLF SET irons, oversized woods,
w/bag. Like new. $50. 729-2595

GOLF SHOES LADIES, Foot Joy, 7.5
narrow. $75 obo. 352-323-8031

LIFE VESTS (2) Inflatable comfortable,
easy to store. $90. SOLD

TREADMILL Ride Strider 3360. $100.
352-406-3988
WET SUIT Men's large. Excel cond.
$50. Call 352-242-0152
685 Tools/
Machinery
CHAIN SAW Poulan Pro, 35cc, 16" bar,
2 chains (1 is new). $55.
352-343-1037

CHAINSAW 16" Echo. Like new. $200.
352-728-1363


685 Tools/
Machinery
DRILL PRESS on stand. Craftsman
15.5". Excel. $98. 352-250-1515

GENERATOR DEK 5650 watts, 2hr. List
$629. Now $380.352-483-6120

GENERATOR Porter Cable. 5250watts.
$450.. Call 352-343-6608

LADDER Extends 12'6". Excel. cond.
$50. 352-553-8364

LADDER Metal, 3 step, w/tray. $65.00.
Call 352-748-0702

SAWZALL Makita model 2RVT3000.
$70. Cell 305-215-4463

TOOLS Yard & Workshop. Variety $100.
Call 352-748-2415

WORK BENCH 35H x 72W x 26D. $40.
352-874-2806



800
Real Estate
For Rent


802 Vacation
Rentals
FLORIDA Winter Vacation, lease to
own at Lake Weirs Big Lake Village
in Weirsdale. A 55 senior community.
Lease for 3mo or more. 2 people,
1 sm. pet, park rules apply.
$950/mo with lease money going on
purchase of homes.
Priced at $9500. up.
12701 SE Sunset Harbor Rd.
Gate Open Wed. & Sat. 9am 5pm
Go to biglakevillage.com
By owner 352-434-7276

806 Houses
Unfurnished
CENTER HILL 5/2/2 house, $1,000/mo
1st, last + security. 352-568-7486,
CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
LEESBURG 2/1, $590. Lease/purchase.
352-269-4051

LEESBURG 4/1.5 all appl. No Pets. 1st
mo. & security. $750/mo.
352-267-5989

LEESBURG, Legacy 55+, 2/2.
$975/mo. Call 352-638-3046

LEESBURG, Sunnyside area 1/1 Cot-
tage on Lk. Harris. $550/mo. $200
dep. 352-551-4222

MT DORA HANDYMAN $200/mo, 1/1.
321-244-6555
RENT IALS
LONG TERM & UNFURN. RENTALS IN
SOUTH LAKE COUNTY.
ROCKER REALTY 352-394-3570
Ask For Janet or Emily
RockerRealtylnc.com
SILVER LAKE FOREST 3BR 2BA
2055sf, 2 car garage 10041 Silver
Bluff Dr. $1100. 352-314-2668.
GunnPropertyServices.com
UMATILLA HANDYMAN $200/mo. 2/1.
321-244-6555
807 Apartments
Unfurnished
AZALEA HILL APARTMENTS STUDIOS,
1, 2, 3 BEDROOMS $400 $925.
352-431-3790
CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375

LEESBURG downtown 1/1, all utilities
incl. $645/mo + $250 damage dep.
Call 352-552-0181


- Eustis
S1 Bedroom Private Patio I
I 1 Story, Walk to Publix
Bring This Ad To Receive
$100 OFF r
I First Full Month Ren
I 1651 N. County Rd 19A, I
I Eustis Fl 32726 I
\ 352-357-7332 -


807 Apartments
Unfurnished

DOWNTOWN TAVARES 1/1 small,
quiet apt bldg 2 blks from Lake Dora
riverwalk with restaurants and
parks, $330/biweekly, $400 dep,
incl elec, water, Sat TV, Wi-Fi, Hard-
wood floors, Cent AC. Old Dogs,cats
OK. 352-669-0961
EUSTIS
All remodeled Apts!
3 Bedrooms
Special starting at
$675 Only $350 Dep. Pet OK.
352-357-5675



VILLAGE
LEESBURG MOVE-IN SPECAIL
2 BRS. 1.5 BA, TOWNHOUSES
352-728-1955
LEEbSBUHG
1ST MO. FREE!
SPANISH VILLAGE
Pool, great location!
Furn. Efficiency, incl.
util. & cable $700/mo.
2/1 apt. $600/mo.
Furn. $700/mo + util.
352-728-5555

LEESBURG
FIRST MONTH $99
MOVE IN SPECIAL!
o2/1 $500/dep.
*2/1 w/W/D hookup $550/dep.
*2/2 w/W/D hookup $600/dep.
Call 352-516-1244
Ask for Tina
LEESBURG, 1/1, with W/D, CHA, car-
port. $450 plus security. 787-2715
Ext. 225

LEESBURG,
*2/1 $595/mo. + dep.
o2/1.5$625/mo.+dep.
No Pets. Call 352-787-5885
LEESBURG, a cute 1br unit w/window
NA/C 315 South 2nd St. Apt C.
$425/mo. 787-2700 ext. 225

LEESBURG, Duplex VERY CLEAN 2/1,
no pets $550/mo + dep. 551 -6772
LYN TERRACE
Eustis
352-357-7332
www.lynterrace.com
Great Move-In
Specials & Free Gifts!
*1 & 2 Bedroom Units
*All 1st Floor- No Stairs!
PALM BROOK APTS.
LEESBURG
1 br's starting @ $470
Payment on security deposit.
Call 352-787-1912 TDD 711


EQUAL HOUSING FIX
OPPORTUNITY _j

808 Apartments
Furnished

EUSTIS clean 1/1, util. & cable incl.
Adults only. No pets. Background
check. $200 dep. & $160 weekly.
Call 352-357-9169
LEESBURG
1ST MO. FREE!
SPANISH VILLAGE
Pool, great location!
Furn. Efficiency, incl.
util. & cable. $700/mo.
2/1 apt. $600/mo.
Furn. $700/mo + util.
352-728-5555

809 Roommate
Wanted

FRUITLAND PARK in 55+ park, util. in-
cluded Male or female. $500/mo
Call 352-455-6794

810 Duplexes

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
LEESBURG 3/2 with garage. $770 mo.
+ $600 dep. Ref's req'd. Call Mike
352-223-5300

811 Condos
Townhouses

CLERMONT, 2/1, $750/mo. Vacation
Village #74, 10301 Hwy. 27.
352-223-3493

LEESBURG 2br/2ba, bonus room,
patio villa, gated community,
pool/gym. NO PETS or SMOKERS,
references required. $850/month.
352-978-3724
LEESBURG
SUNNY SIDE VILLAS
FOR RENT 2/2. $650 MO.
PLEASE CALL
352-459-9300
LEESBURG W. Main St. 2/2 Condo.
Avail. $700/mo. Call 352-455-5095


812 Rooms to
Rent
LOOKING TO RENT A ROOM in Lake
Cnty/Tavares. Professional male,
clean. Call Tim 352-217-7069

813 Homes
To Share
FRUITLAND PARK in 55+ park, util. in-
cluded. Male or female. $500/mo
Call 352-455-6794

816 Commercial
Property

LEESBURG
Warehouses w/Offices
2315-25 Griffin Rd. 1,150 up to
12,400sf. Starts at $300/mo.
Office/Showroom
1607 Hwy. 441 $850/mo
Small Shop or Office
2204 Citrus Blvd (441)
$320/mo., includes utilities
352-787-0004
SABAL PROFESSIONAL SUITES II
The Villages/Lady Lake
New all inclusive office suites.
Receptionist, conference room,
full kitchen, deskw/chairs, phones,
copier/fax, internet, wi-fi, all office
needs in one low payment.
JUST SIT DOWN, PLUG IN,
GO TO WORK.
Conveniently located on CR 466
East of Rolling Acres.
Contact Preferred Realty Mgmt. Group
(352)633-1900

819
Manufactured
Homes Rental

ALTOONA SPECIAL!!
3/2 $560 plus $300 dep.
2/1 $475/mo. w/$300 dep.
And RV Lot $290/mo. w/$1 00 dep.
352-735-2071 or 352-636-6800

ATTENTION SENIORS AND ADULTS
Never lived in. Brand New 66x14, 3/2,
in nice quiet park in Eustis.
$650/mo + utilities. Sorry NO KIDS.
Call 352-589-4407
CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
EUSTIS on 44A East of Eustis 2/1 for 1
or 2 people w/experience in han-
dling horses. $350/mo. + elec. &
approx. 1 hr work in barn, early am
daily. Background check is req'd.
Call Jan for details. 589-5825
FRUITLAND PARK 3/2 great area,
fenced yard. $825/mo + security.
Call 352-874-8880
LEESBURG 3/2, beautiful & clean on
dead-end street W/D hookup
$750/mo. Call Bill 603-858-1160
LEESBURG 6 mi. West. 2/1, CHA.
$525/mo. + security. 409-2492
i WILDWOODAREA 1
2/2 $650/mo dbl. wide (Adult Park)
Call 352-745-8620




900
Real Estate
For Sale



902 Open Houses
For Sale


903 Homes
For Sale
MT DORA HANDYMAN $200/mo, 1/1.
321-244-6555

6UNUAY NUV 1U; 1-3 PM IHILU(jYV
55+ 2012 2/2 Energy Efficient w/ Liv-
ng & Dining Rms, Den, Lg. upgraded
Kitchen, 42" Cabinets, Granite.
$239,900. Terri Orr Kuebbeler Real
Estate 321-299-3189 _


903 Homes
For Sale
FLORIDA WINTER VACATION, lease to
own at Lake Weirs Big Lake Village
in Weirsdale. A 55 senior community.
Lease for 3/mo or more. 2 people,
1 sm. pet, park rules apply.
$950/mo with lease money going on
purchase of homes.
Priced at $9500. up.
12701 SE Sunset Harbor Rd.
Gate Open Wed. & Sat. 9am -5pm
Go to biglakevillage.com
By owner 352-434-7276




LEESBURG
Home for sale $3500. Great buy!
2br 2ba, remodeled bathrooms,
modern day accents in kitchen.
Age Qualified
Call 352-234-8369

LEESBURG 2/1, $590. Lease/purchase.
352-269-4051




LEESBURG
Home for sale $7,500. Won't last!
2br 2ba, new carpet, freshly painted.
Waterview
Age Qualified
Call 352-234-8369
UMATILLA HANDYMAN $200/mo. 2/1.
321-244-6555
WATERFRONT HOMES LEESBURG
Immaculate 2/2 almost new on Lake
Harris Lagoon. $259,900
FRUITLAND PARK
3/2 canal front, Lake Griffin
$144,900
Call 352-787-4584
GalbreathRealty.com

910 Condos/Townhouses
CLERMONT
FOR SALE BY OWNER (352)
394-1574 2-BEDROOM 2-BATH
2-CAR GARAGE TILE AND CARPET
THROUGHOUT, NEW APPLIANCES
INCLUDING WASHER AND DRYER.
A/C RECENTLY UPGRADED. PER-
FECT FOR YEAR ROUND LIVING OR
SNOWBIRD. MOVE IN READY. IM-
MEDIATE OCCUPANCY. ONE STORY
WITH VAULTED CEILING @ GREAT
ROOM. LOW MONTHLY H.O.A. FEES
OF $130.00 INCLUDES LAWN CARE
AND IRRIGATION. CLUBHOUSE WITH
POOL AND TENNIS COURT. BRING
YOUR GOLF CART AND CLUBS AND
ENJOY GREEN VALLEY'S 18 HOLE
CHAMPIONSHIP GOLF COURSE.

MULTIPLE ADORABLE/ AFFORDABLE
CONDOS FOR RENT! DON'T MISS
OUT!
4- 2/2'S $699
1-1/1 $625
1-2/2 $750. 407-359-9500



1000
Manufactured
Homes


1001 Mfd Homes
For Sale
EUSTIS 2/1 in 55+ park. Shed & car-
port & A/C porch. $2,500. Call
352-357-5556

LEESBURG, 14'-60', '91, 55+ commu-
nity, 2/2, newly remodeled. $4,000.
352-348-7376


1001 Mfd Homes
For Sale
CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375

LEESBURG Completely renovated park
model. New appliances and floors.
Lots of shade. Partially furnished.
AC/Heat, Washer/Dryer. Pet friendly
park located on Haines creek where
fishing is great. Dock access. Lot rent
$310.00 a month. $11,500 OBO. Call
for appointment. 906-440-1020
LEESBURG, Haines Creek, leading to
Chain of Lakes, fish from your dock,
work on the old boathouse. Enjoy
the 3/2 on 2 ac. Call Adelee Richey
Vangie Berry Realty 352-242-7907

MT. DORA, dbl. wide 2/2, w/Ig. carport,
son porch, den, W/D, shed, new
CHA. 407-399-4491
SENIORS AND ADULTS
NEW and NEWER
Homes in a nice quiet part in Eustis.
$25,000 -'45, 0 -ir, ,r,,:ir,,j avaii.
Only 3 left! Lot rent $350 per mo.
Call 352-589-4007

1002 Mfd
Homes
W/ land
For Sale
LEESBURG, 2/2 in 55+ park. Only
$32/mo. fees. Incl. land, porch,
shed, new roof, a/c, windows.
$46,900. 352-360-0028
1012 RVLots
ALTOONA- SPECIAL!!
3/2 $560 plus $300 dep.
2/1 $475/mo. w/$300 dep.
And RV Lot $290/mo. w/$100 dep.
352-735-2071 or 352-636-6800




1100
Recreation


1101 Boats
BAYLINER '09, 17.5' Model 175 Bow-
rider, I/0 Merc Cruiser, bimini top
plus accessories & trailer. Low time.
$9,400. Tavares SOLD!!!

BOAT V BOTTOM ALUMINUM. $400.
Call 352-217-9937

COBIA BOW RIDER 15'. 50hp Johnson,
magic tilt trailer. $1200 obo. Call
352-999-2654
1120 Marine
Equip/
Supplies
OUTBOARD MOTOR 1952, 15hp evin-
rude, for parts. $99. 589-4712
1150 RV&
Campers


CAR TOTE for Motorhome. $900. Call
352-748-2415


AUTO





LOAN





888





26S




8409


DAILY COMMERCIAL


!
%


l,,,,;i





DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, November 9, 2013


1150 RV&
Campers
FLEETWOOD FLAIR '04, 34', w/2
slides. 6,800 actual miles. Excel.
cond. $34,000 obo Call
352-617-0078
FORD-250 2203. Super Duty Crew
Cab, 7.3L Powerstroke diesel, 161K
miles, 4x4, automatic, air, power
windows, power doors, power seats,
sliding 5th wheel hitch with goose
neck adapter, power programmer,
5" exhaust, roof mount wind deflec-
tor, accessory tailgate. Kelley Blue
Book $14,300. 2005 Keystone
Montana M3400RL, 37', 4 slides,
washing machine, dryer, central
vacuum system, electric fireplace, 2
a/c units. NADA average retail
$32,875. Will sell as package
$42,000. 402-926-6177.
PORTABLE TANK of Gray water. 15 gal-
lon. $50. 352-728-1363
1200
Transportation

1205 Autos
BUICK LeSabre Limited '04, loaded ex-
cel. cond. well maintained 98K mi.
$6,000. 352-394-2275


1205 Autos
CAMERO RS 67, 327, auto, ps, pb.
$15K. 352-603-1883
CASH PAID FOR JUNK CARS!
$300 and up. Call 352-771-6191








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1205 Autos



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TOYOTA COROLLA

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1206 Aviation

1210 Mcycles/
Mopeds
DUCATI S2R 1000. 2006, Red 10.5k
miles adult owned $5,000.
352-568-1415
HARLEY DAVIDSON 2005. FLHTCUI
Ultra Classic Electra Guide; EC 15k
loaded with chrome upgrades
w/security. A steal at $12,000.
Call 352-750-9305 Lady Lake.
HARLEY DAVIDSON 2010. FLHTCUTG
Tri Glide Ultra Classic, Trike, black,
low miles, extended warranty,
$11200, AmaMyers77@yahoo.com
415-553-2192

HELMETS (2) HJC full face silver/blk.
$100 for pair. 352-589-1384

HONDA 4 wheel '08, Foreman 500
4x4, elec. shift/ps, retiree owned,
garage kept, 147 hrs used, excel
cond. $4,900. Mike/Clermont
352-396-9797

HONDA GOLD WING w/trailer. '96.
1500cc. New tires, battery, alterna-
tor. $4999 Firm. 856-371-3556


1210 Mcycles/
Mopeds
SCREAMING EAGLE Harley Davidson
'01 FLTRSEI2, touring bike, blue in
color. 1550cc. Clean, chromed out
and priced to sell at $10,500 OBO.
Saddlebags and trunk with multiple
CD changer, cruise. 352-516-2172
TAIL LIGHTS for Honda Gold Wing, $80.
Call 352-552-0114
1230 Vans
CHEVROLET CONVERSION VAN '93.
Runs good. $550.352-552-7999
1240 Trucks
Light Duty
DODGE DAKOTA '07, 4 door, 6 cylin-
der, 60K, $11,300 Call 365-6238
DODGE RAM 1500 SXT. 2004. 41,000
miles. $8000. Contact John.
SOLD!!!!!
1247 Trailers
LANDSCAPE TRAILER, new used once.
12'x6'. $1000 352-406-2864
TRAILER, 2005, 18'-20' for Pontoon
boat, excel cond. used very little.
$800 obo. SOLD 1ST DAY.


1264 Auto
Parts
Accessory

CAR WHEEL DOLLY'S (4) $100 Call
352-636-1352

REESE HITCH for Ford. Class 5 w/ball &
plug. $50 Call 352-460-6409

TIRES (4) Michelin Hydro Edge,
225/60R/17 low milage. $125
352-383-0855

TIRES 185-65-15 & 4 mag rims. $80
Call 608-347-1483

TRUCK TOOL BOX Husky, full size, as
new. $100. 352-242-1038

1275 Golf
Carts

CLUB CAR '95, gas w/lift kit, great
shape. $3400 obo 989-780-2653

TIRES for golf cart (4), like new. $100
Call 336-817-7509


A picture is worth a


thousand words....


Lake & Sumter On Vte
ASTO St. Johns River

AUTOMOTIVE


LOCATOR MAP R


* Jenkins Hyundai a Cecil Clark
9145 US Hwy. 441 Chevrolet
Leesburg 8843 US Hwy. 441
(Across from the Airport) Leesburg
352-326-3585 352-787-6888


E Prestige Ford
17701 U.S. Hwy. 441
Mount Dora
352-357-5522


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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 9, 2013








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DAILY COMMERCIAL
Saturday, November 9, 2013


\www\.(dild eoi lUllll i-i.:til.(;oi


-ALLERGIES: Avoid pollen triggers while gardening/ E3



Style with a twist? Home bar gear gets swanky


KIM COOK
Associated Press
Home beer and spirit-
making have become popu-
lar hobbies. Bars and bever-
age stores feature a growing
range of artisanal spirits and
craft brews. Cocktail parties
are back in vogue.
And retailers are respond-
ing to all this imbibing by


offering furniture, barware
and accessories with cos-
mopolitan flair. All you need
are a few invitations, snacks
and some good music for the
party to begin.
Let's pop the cork on
what's new:
"Nowadays, entertaining
does not have to mean hav-
ing a glitzy full bar. Bar carts
have become more deli-


cate, refined, and smaller in
scale, so you can tuck them
into a corner of a room or
blend them in with the rest
of the furniture," saysVeran-
da magazine's market editor
Catherine Lee Davis.
West Elm's Parker slim-
profile cart in acorn-stained
walnut veneer with brass rail
trim has a mid-century vibe.
The walnut-stained Dod-


son cart features a flip-down
front concealing a mirror-
lined interior with plenty of
storage. And a cart in pol-
ished nickel with two foxed
mirror shelves evokes Art
Deco glamour.
If you want the look of a
built-in bar, consider Pottery
Barn's modular collection
of wine grids and drawered
cabinets. In black or mahog-


any finish, the pieces can
be configured to look like a
hutch or buffet.
Davis says that with bar-
ware, the trend is toward
shaking it up. "We see lots
of different materials like
hammered silver, tortoise, or
shagreen," she says. "It's all
about mixing and matching.
SEE BAR I E6


To ensure the outdoor living space of his mountain house stays warm and welcoming during the colder months, designer Brian
Patrick Flynn chose woven blend upholstery for his seating, a wool and acrylic blend indoor-outdoor area rug, and throw pillows
and blankets to keep guests feeling cozy.


Simple steps to a cozy,


cost-efficient home for fall


MELISSA RAYWORTH
Associated Press
As temperatures drop
and daylight is in short-
er supply, we fight back:
We crank up the heat
in our homes and turn
on lights earlier and
earlier. And yet we also
want to keep our heat-
ing and electric bills as
low as we can.
Can you keep your
home warm and invit-
ing all winter while still
conserving energy?
Here, three home
design experts offer
advice on how to keep
things cozy while min-
imizing energy use
this winter. Their sug-
gestions range from
the traditional (there's
a reason why your
grandmother hung
those heavy curtains
in winter) to the high-
tech, including a ther-


Flynn keeps sculptural heaters standing by his covered
outdoor living and dining spaces.


mostat that can talk to
your iPad.
TRY NEW TECH
Maxwell Ryan, found-
er of the popular home
decor website Apart-
mentTherapycom, is a
designer. John Colane-
ri, co-host of HGTV's
"Kitchen Cousins," is
a construction expert
who builds and re-
models homes.
Both offer identical
pieces of advice about
staying warm while
conserving power and
saving money: Swap
out your old incandes-
cent bulbs (and those
swirly compact fluo-
rescent bulbs, too) for
the new Cree brand
LED bulbs.
"They can last lon-
ger than 10 years
and they use 84 per-
cent less energy than
SEE HOME I E2


Yellowing leaves


can mean mites,


poor nutrition


QThe lower leaves on
my lemon tree are
turning yellow and
some of the leaves are
curling and brownish.
What is wrong with it?
I was told mites were
causing the problem
and sprayed a neem oil
for them, but the tree
is not recovering.
A There could be sev-
eral problems with
your tree. Curled, de-
formed leaves are of-
ten caused by leaf
miners. Check the
curled leaves to see if
you can find the tun-
nels between the leaf
layers. Leaf miners eat
between the layers of
leaves, leaving a vis-
ible whitish curving
line in the leaves that
also causes the leaves
to curl up around the
damage. Leaf miners
are hard to treat be-
cause they are protect-
ed between the leaf
layers. Insects parasit-
ize the larvae and help
to control them natu-
rally, and they usual-
ly do not cause enough
damage to hurt a tree.
The yellowing old-
er leaves are more of


Juanita
Pop enoe
LAKE COUNTY
EXTENSION


a problem. This could
indicate a root rot from
too much water in the
root zone or too much
mulch right around
the roots and base of
the tree. You may also
notice the bark peel-
ing off at the base of
the tree, leaf drop, and
dieback caused by
root rot. To reduce this
problem avoid wet ar-
eas when choosing a
place to plant a cit-
rus tree; reduce irriga-
tion and avoid irriga-
tion on the bark; and
keep the area under
the tree canopy free of
tall weeds and mulch
that can hold the mois-
ture in.
There are other dis-
eases and disorders
that can cause leaf yel-
lowing. Nutritional de-
ficiencies can cause
yellowing as well as a
devastating disease,
citrus greening or
SEE POPENOE E2

. -. .


SUBMITTED PHOTO
The air potato vine produces small tubers at each leaf that can
get as large as a softball.


llI H INCHOOSE SOMETHING IN STOCK

URY1! OR DESIGN YOUR OWN.,

EITHER WAY, YOU'LL
ENJOY SAVINGS AND
BEAUTIFUL LEATHER

FURNITURE.





DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, November 9, 2013


Bidet toilet seats
ED DEL GRANDE
Scripps Howard News Service
QWe are planning a bathroom renovation. I
want to add a separate bidet plumbing fix-
ture next to our toilet, but my wife says that a
bidet will take up too much space. I have seen
that many high-end master bathrooms fea-
ture a bidet, and for resale value I want to in-
clude all the bells and whistles in our new
bathroom. Can you please help us decide and
give us more information about including a bi-
det in a bathroom? JEFF, NEW JERSEY
A I've never installed "bells and whistles" in
a bathroom, but with all the new electronic
plumbing technology available today, I guess
actual bells and whistles are possible!
As far as bidets, I can tell you that for many
decades in Europe, installing a separate bidet
fixture has been pretty common. Here in Amer-
ica, for some reason, we have not gone that "bi-
det crazy."
But a fairly new plumbing accessory is start-
ing to change all that.
Bidet toilet seats are getting a lot of attention.
First, they save space because a bidet toilet
seat allows one fixture to function as both a bi-
det and a toilet. Second, even though they are a
high-end accessory, they can be a little more af-
fordable to install over a separate bidet fixture
that requires extra plumbing work. Finally, be-
cause they use electricity, you can add comfort
"bells and whistles" like a remote control, warm-
water wash cycles, nightlights and a heated seat.


Over Even Item
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On the corner of Hwy. 27/441 & Water Oak Blvd.
Lady Lake, (Across from Race Trac)


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*Fiday and Saiury only


POPENOE
FROM PAGE El

huanglongbing (HLB).
To distinguish between
nutritional problems
and HLB, look close-
ly at a leaf with the yel-
lowing symptom. If
you can fold the leaf
down the mid-vein,
and the yellowing on
both sides is a mirror
image, then the prob-
lem is most likely nu-
tritional. If the yellow
pattern is not the same
on both sides and
more like a blotchy
mottle, you may have
HLB. It will be best to
bring a leaf sample
into the plant clinic for
more diagnosis, or you
can go to http://edis.
ifas.ufl.edu/hsl41 for
more information.
QA vine with heart-
shaped leaves is


HOME
FROM PAGE El

incandescents," Ryan
says. "They also are
dimmable" and give a
warm-looking light -
a big change from the
energy-saving compact
fluorescents.
"If you do the math
on the LED," he says,
the bulbs save you so
much on electricity
that they pay for them-
selves within a year and
then last about nine
more years.
Colaneri and Ryan
also both advise home-
owners to replace
old thermostats with
new Nest brand mod-
els. "They take 30 per-
cent off your bill each
month," Colaneri says.
"And they look very
high-tech and cool to
display."
Nests are program-
mable "learning ther-
mostats," which means
they track your habits
and adjust accordingly.
They also connect via
Wi-Fi to check weath-
er reports online, and
you can control them
remotely from an iPad.
There is new outdoor
technology, as well. On
your deck or patio, de-
signer Brian Patrick
Flynn suggests add-
ing a new propane-
powered space heater.
The newest models are
cost-effective and styl-
ish, says Flynn, execu-
tive producer of HGTV
come's Holiday House.
"They look like mod-
ern sculpture," says Fly-
nn, "and many of them
are under $500. To en-
sure my outdoor spac-
es stay warm during
the winter, I keep mod-
ern, 7-foot tall space


It" Almost




That Time!













Individuals or Groups

Please Call 365-0079 ext: 25
Ask for Barbara


taking over the woods
in back of my yard.
What can I do?
Alt sounds like you
have air pota-
to vine. The air pota-
to has heart-shaped
leaves and tubers that
look like potatoes
growing from the vine.
The tubers vary in
size from a marble to
a softball, both under-
ground and in the air,
and will each produce
a new plant that can
grow 70 feet in length.
The tubers are not ed-
ible. It is a noxious
weed that can quickly
take over an area and
smother trees, espe-
cially in natural areas.
We have many parks
in Lake County that
are battling this inva-
sive species. Control is
best attempted in the
winter months when
plants are dormant.


Pull the vines down,
collect any tubers and
destroy all parts, pref-
erably by burning. If
you cannot easily pull
the vines down, at least
cut them off at about
waist level. The cut off
tops will dry up and
die and eventually fall
to the ground.
Any remaining air
potato plants can be
sprayed with a herbi-
cide like glyphosate
when they start to re-
grow or sprout in the
spring. Several follow
up applications of her-
bicide will be needed
to catch all the tubers
as they start to grow.
Follow the herbicide
label and never try to
spray up into a tree. No
matter how well you
try to control the spray,
some drift will occur
when you spray up
into the air and non-


L~.'~'


Brian Patrick Flynn uses timers on outdoor table lam
ensure they're turned off nightly and preserve energy


heaters in my covered
outdoor living room.
They're on wheels, so
it's easy to move them
around to wherev-
er people are seated.
And once lit, the glass
tubes which contain
the flame from the pro-
pane tank put on a gor-
geous show."
EMBRACE UPHOLSTERY
Warm, cozy uphol-
stery fabrics work on a
practical level by hold-
ing your warmth when
you touch or sit on
them. But Ryan points
out that they also work
visually: A room full of
soft, warm fabrics will
give you a psycholog-
ical sense of warmth
that adds to your en-
joyment.
So add thick throw
blankets to chairs and
sofas, and swap out


silk-covered
and even lan
for ones cox
thicker, nubbiE
like muslin an(
Ryan also
mends using t
tains in winter
cade ago, h
"curtains we
sidered fusty
fashioned anc
sive." But with
beautiful, ine
curtains avail
day, they've
popular again.
Besides adc
or or a bold
to a room,
also block col
might leak in
windows. Ar
muffle sound f
side, which R
helps make rc
more insulate(
ter.
"Curtains,"


target plants will suffer.
A beetle that eats only
air potato vine has been
released in several plac-
es and hopefully will
help to control this pest
in natural areas in the
future. The beneficial
beetle is not yet avail-
able for residential cus-
tomers, but you may see
it at work in our parks.
If successful it will only
be a matter of time be-
fore they start to work in
your yard too.
Visit the Discovery
Gardens and our plant
clinic with your plant
problems and ques-
tions from 9 a.m. to
4 p.m., weekdays, at the
ag center, 1951 Wood-
lea Road, Tavares.
Juanita Popenoe is the di-
rector of the UF/IFAS Lake
County Extension office
and environmental horti-
culture production agent III.
Email jpopenoe@ufl.edu.


i"aren't just for your
grandparents any-
more."
The same technique
can help warm up out-
door spaces. Flynn rec-
ommends Sunbrella's
outdoor velveteen fab-
ric for chairs and sofas.
He also likes thick, wo-
ven blends.
"Velveteen is amaz-
ing for the outdoors,"
he says, "since it's warm
and fuzzy"
S LIGHT THE FIRE
Crackling flames in
an indoor fireplace
can change the feel of
a room instantly. And
outdoors, they bring
a welcome infusion of
heat and light on a win-
ter evening.
"Outdoor fireplac-
,,1% es are increasingly
t more and more popu-
lar, coast to coast," Fly-
AP PHOTO nn says. "They're not
ps to all that much of an ex-
pense like an outdoor
kitchen would be."
pillows If you're building a
npshades new outdoor fireplace,
vered in leave ample room for
er fabrics seating. "Many times
d burlap, homeowners have out-
recom- door fireplaces built,
hick cur- but there's only enough
er. A de- room for a small table
he says, or two chairs. What's
re con- the point, people? The
and old- whole idea is to gath-
d expen- er and stay cozy out-
so many doors," Flynn says.
-xpensive He suggests planning
able to- "at least 12-by-14 feet
become of space around the
front of the fireplace to
ling col- ensure a sofa and lo-
pattern veseat as well as a cof-
curtains fee table and end tables
d air that will fit."
i around LAY DOWN RUGS


id they
'rom out-
yan says
)oms feel
d in win-

he says,


Celebrate the holiday festivities while enjoying our
delectable selection of traditional cuisine. A perfect
meal accented with our breathtaking views.
HOLIDAY GRAND BRUNCH BUFFETS
Thanksgiving, Thursday, November 28, 2013
Christmas, Wednesday, December 25, 2013
11 am 5:45pm La Hacienda & Nicker's
Serving Endless Champagne & Live Music
S36.99* p est
*Serice charge a tax are additional.

Resrvtioseqire
Z OF 52 -32 -393
miso n


Gleaming hardwood
or tile floors are lovely
in spring and summer.
But in cold weather,
add a thick rug or swap
out a thin one for some-
thing heavier. This will
not only warm your
feet, but also change
the look and sound of
your space.
"When acoustics are
dampened," Ryan says,
"the room feels warm-
er."
An outdoor rug can
have the same impact.
"Thick outdoor area
rugs are made of acryl-
ic/wool blends," Fly-
nn says. "The wool
feels great on your feet
and definitely locks in
warmth."


-1


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 9, 2013




Saturday, November 9, 2013


Smart gardening can help NOV. 9*10, 2013

allergy sufferers avoid triggers SUMITER COUNTY 2013 SMTER COUMN
DEANFOSDICK P-- .. FAI WfRO9BHS
Associated Press fit f R 7620 STATE ROAD 4El WWM L, F


Allergies can put a se-
rious crimp in garden-
ing: A runny nose, itchy
eyes, or a wheezing and
persistent cough can
drive allergy suffer-
ers indoors during the
growing season.
But there are many
things you can do to re-
duce those irritations
and remain a dedicat-
ed gardener.
Start by determining
what's causing your al-
lergies. See an aller-
gist for tests to define
the problem. Then you
can garden smarter by
avoiding plants that
give off harmful pollen,
and working only when
fewer spores are in the
air.
An estimated 50 mil-
lion Americans have
seasonal allergy prob-
lems, according to the
Asthma and Allergy
Foundation of Amer-
ica. The cause is pol-
len from plants, trees,
grasses, weeds and
mold spores.
Peak season usually
is March through Oc-
tober, but that varies by
region. Tree pollen can
be a problem for aller-
gy sufferers as early as
January in the South.
The degree of distress
ranges from annoying
to life threatening.
"For most individu-
als, the gardening al-
lergies do, in fact, affect
their quality of life, es-
pecially during the sea-
sons," said Dr. Clifford
Bassett, director of Al-
lergy and Asthma Care
of New York. "Howev-
er, some folks with al-
lergic asthma may ex-
perience a flare or
exacerbation of their
respiratory symptoms
that may become more
serious, and necessi-
tates them to refrain
from or curtail garden-
ing activities."
Some allergy avoid-
ance tips:
* Gear up.
Medications suggest-
ed by a doctor or phar-
macist usually relieve
the symptoms, said
Leonard Perry, an ex-
tension horticultur-
ist with the University
of Vermont and an al-
lergy sufferer. "Those
should be begun a cou-
ple of weeks prior to


AP PHOTO
Allergy sufferers will have fewer pollen concerns by choosing
plants for their garden that produce little or no airborne pollen.


the onset of a particu-
lar allergy season so the
body can adjust and be
ready," he said.
* Wear a mask. Simple
paper masks leak, said
Dr. Richard Weber, an
allergist and president
of the American College
of Allergy, Asthma and
Immunology. For more
sensitive allergy suffer-
ers, he said, "it makes
more sense to get the
more sophisticated
masks with respirators
on each side of your
face."
* Planting sites: Be
careful where you grow
things. "It's a common
practice to use ever-
greens as foundation
plants, yet they're pretty
allergy-making," Weber
said. "Imagine some-
body sensitive having
a juniper outside their
bedroom window in
summer. They'd have
lots of trouble."
* Check the daily pol-
len count. Avoid di-
rect outside exposure
on high pollen days
when it is sunny, dry
and windy, Bassett
said. Pollen levels gen-
erally are lower in early


morning and late eve-
ning, as well as on
cloudy, windless and
wet days.
* Eliminate prob-
lem plants, especially
weeds that can aggra-
vate late summer and
fall allergies, Bassett
said. Choose plants
that are less likely to
cause allergies, such
as azalea, bulbs, cacti,
daisies, dahlia, pan-
sies and petunias, dog-
wood trees, hibiscus,
boxwood and yucca
shrubs.
* Clean up when
done. "Drop your cloth-
ing in a utility room
and go shower," Weber
said. The pollen is "in
your hair, eyelashes
and nose. Do a saltwa-
ter wash in your nose
and get it out. That
probably helps more
than any other item."

WILDWOOD
(T CYCLERY
Bikes for Every Terain & Budget
Sales Service
WD Plaza 352-399-2983
www.wildwoodcyclery.com


Hours: Saturday 10am-9pm, Sunday Noon-6pm
Admission: $10 for adults, FREE ages 12 and under.
IBring Your Folding Chairs!
4 L MIAMC "Son), on the Rocks singer Kelleigh Bannen,
Jim Van Fleet, Clemons Road and more.
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& COW CHIP BINGO
Sw BEEM GARDEN
d ^ FOOD, ORAfr & FLEA MARKETr VENDORS8
BEAY PAGEANT
Sat, November 2, 6pm, Sumter Co. Fairgounds.
|r M HPresenting Sponsors


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,. This event has been funded in part by a Tounst Development Tax Grant from the Sunger County Board of
4 County Commissioners in conuncon wth ithe Sumier Counry Tounst Development Courncil For more
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FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT Mj] [0]

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.. OR CALL THE SUMTER COUN CHAMBER OF 0M W
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Summer County
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$1.00 Off Daily Admission
Coupon applicable to up to Six Adult Admissions.
Children ages 12 and under are admitted free.
May not be combined with any other offer.
,.-DC


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Gingerbread
INSURANCE
"Experience the Difference"
Home Auto Collector Car
Commercial
Tom Marino
407-309-9949
www.gingerbreadinsurance.com


Paul's Nursery

Fi0t Trees
83 yr
(Hy 0
Grovelan
352-44-344


MO.- A.I A -7P
Located in the Green Roof Buildings
16129 SR 50, Clermont,
Suite 101-102
407-877-6677
FINANCING NO Credit Check
Se Habla Espahol


Donna Weinheimer, LMT
Massage
Detox Programs
Body Shaping
HalfMoonRetreat@Gmail.com

OutOfTheBlueHalfMoonRetreat.corm
MM12675 MA27125


Mattress Market of Florida
Where Quality Meets Affordability
If you have ever been to Mattress Market of Florida, located at
16129 SR 50 in the "Green Roof" buildings in Clermont, then you
know they have a diverse and large inventory of top brand name
mattresses and their quality home furnishing line is direct from
Macy's, Ashley Furniture and American Manufacturing.
If you have ever bought from local owner, Danny, then you know
he offers high-end merchandise at low end prices and his
reputation is honest, fair and educated. Danny has more than
twenty years experience in the industry, having started out in
assembly at a mattress facility He really knows what is in a
mattress and how it is intended to last.
Mattress Market of Florida offers three showrooms in one
location. You may call and speak to Danny at 407.340.3751 /
407.877.6677 or visit the location Monday Saturday O10AM -
7PM and Sundays closed.
In any economy, affordable quality is a necessity and Danny has
built his business to offer that daily, to the community Twin
mattress sets start at $99 and sofa & loveseat combos at only $589.
Financing is available and no credit checks eliminate the hassle
between your desire and purchase. Mattress Market of Florida
also offers delivery, removal of your old mattress and set-up of
your new one.
If you have ever thought you would benefit from a quality mattress
or wanted an upgrade to your living room or dining room
furniture, stop in to Mattress Market of Florida and see how easy
and attainable that can happen.
More information is available at www.MattressMarketFL.com
Se Habla Espanol.


4&ESniem a n
352-569-0233l


I


DAILY COMMERCIAL


wi -







Comics&Diversions www.dailycommercial.com


LUANN


MUTTS


ZITS


GARFIELD


FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE
I W1E. 1 RPlPUC Fb g -'So-B fjLI IrtS- FOLL OF SE-LLING
EL. UOfmlIGoit4- MIStAKES. Ffr_- fH.
To COOSE-ONeouTr ONE, Is WRI1TE-N4
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@2013 John L Hart FLP
ROSE IS ROSE


HEATHCLIFF


"'I P -FER WHOL- WHKEAT BIZREAD."


Independent woman sets bar

high in search for Mr. Right


DEAR ABBY: I'm a single wom-
an who has had a string of un-
successful relationships. When
a man is into me, I'm not into
him and vice versa.
I know the problem is most-
ly mine. I'm very independent.
I don't want a man to consume
my life just be a part of it. It
seems like the men I date want
to smother me.
My friends tell me that most
women enjoy this. I hate it. I
need a certain amount of time
alone. I am attracted to manly
men, but the ones who are at-
tracted to me are either emo-
tionally needy or they take lon-
ger to get ready to go anywhere
than I do. It's frustrating.
I have met some men who
would have been wonder-
ful catches, but I felt nothing.
I know friendship is the basis
of all relationships, but physi-
cal attraction is important to
me. A relationship won't work
if I can't bring myself to be inti-
mate with the person.
In all my years of dating, I
have been in love only twice.
Any help would be appreciat-
ed. LOST IN WASHINGTON STATE
DEAR LOST: I wish I had a mag-
ic lamp that would give you
what you're looking for in a
puff of smoke, but I don't. What
I can offer is that you need to
continue looking for someone
who is as independent as you
are, so you can find an attrac-
tive man whose needs are simi-
lar to yours.
Some couples find the pro-
cess of dating a smooth and
easy one. For others it's com-
plicated, but not impossible. I
agree that the basis of strong
relationships is friendship and
compatibility.
DEAR ABBY: How does one
stop family and old friends
from going on and on about
their aches, pains, symptoms,
conditions, doctor visits and
medications in excruciating
detail? Aside from my moth-
er (who is 85), I don't care to
hear about this from others. It
has taught me a lesson I wish
people would follow: While I
do have back issues, I speak of
them only to my doctor.
I try to be patient, but some


Dear
1U,: .Abby

m ~JEANNE
'PHILLIPS
folks seem to need someone
to vent to. I don't want to be
the one they "tell all" to. I try to
tune it out, but I wish there was
an easy way to let them know
enough is enough.
Any ideas on the best way to
handle these people? Or am I
stuck being a good listener for-
ever? NOBODY'S THERAPIST IN
CROFTON, MD.
DEAR NOBODY'S THERAPIST: Try
this: Say, "Really, I'm sorry to
hear that." Then change the
subject to something you read
in the newspaper, saw on tele-
vision or that's happening in
your community.
DEAR ABBY: Tell me what you
would have done in this situ-
ation. While dining at an ex-
pensive restaurant on a rare
night out, we were seated di-
rectly across from a nice-look-
ing family. As I was eating my
meal, I had a nauseating view
of their child's butt crease. The
boy was about 12 or 14, and I
didn't want to embarrass him
in a public place, but it put a
damper on my enjoyment of
the meal.
Would it have been appro-
priate to approach his mother
and quietly tell her? Obviously,
the kid didn't know or care that
he was exposed. The restaurant
was full, so I couldn't request
another table. LOST MYAPPE-
TITE IN MYRTLE BEACH, S.C.
DEAR LOST YOUR APPETITE: The
first thing I would have done
was resist the urge to walk over
and plant a stalk of celery in the
great divide. And then, because
moving to another table wasn't
possible, I would have moved
my chair so that the view of the
young man's cleavage wouldn't
have been "head on."
Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren,
also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was
founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips.
Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or
RO. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.


-1 Fr- C-1
LL VACUUM SERVICE/
VACUUMS TUNE-UP

20%* NOW $19.99l
S With Coupon. Validthrough 11/30/13 DC
SOFF r 0a 0=
ALL VACUUM CLEANERBAGS'


SWith Coupon.Vad hough 303 DC
Not valid on previous purchases or with other coupons or discounts.


990 Alverez Aye, Spanish Springs, The Villages
Golf Cart | iE 'O flf Acos from Mc0^ all8's Tavern
MAccessib le oI U UU I Mon-Sat 10-6




WHAT'S HOPPIN' AROUND TOWN
MagneSubscribe today and find out!.
Valid through0O F
11/30/13. DCO F

WtCopn,.Valid through 11/30/13. DO
*Nt alid on previous purchases or with other coupons or disc-ounts-.--
990 Alverez Ave, Spanish Springs, The Villages
GolfCart 35 25 380 Across from McCall's Tavern
Accessible 1352-259-3Sat010-

WHAT'S HOPPIN' AROUND TOWN?
Subscribe today and find out!


SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION:
Call 787-0600 (Lake Co.) or
877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8
a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Daily Commercial


I


41



OIJJ

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PEANUTS


11-9 R,/ "HAVE A

"'^ > ~~


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 9, 2013




Saturday, November 9, 2013

S udoku ****** 4puz.com

6 4 7 5

79 61

4 91 2_6 3

38 46



25 83

3 62 57 8

13 95_
9 7 8 1

Fill in the squares so that each row, column, andi
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION How to play: Fill in the blank
squares with the numbers 1
3 8 5 1 2 6 9 4 7 through 9 so that each horizon-
7 6 9 3 5 4 1 2 8 tal row, vertical column and nine-
square
4 1 2 9 7 8 5 6 3 sub-grid contains no repeated
2 586 1 9 7 3 4 numbers.
6 3 4 7 8 5 2 1 9 Puzzles range in difficulty from
9 712 4 3 6 8 5 one to six stars.
5 2 7 4 3 1 8 9 6 The solution to today's puzzle
_____ ___ will be in tomorrow's paper.

1938 6745 2

AXYDLBAAXR
isLONGFELLOW
One letter stands for another. In this sample, A is used
for the three L's, X for the two 0's, etc. Single letters,
apostrophes, the length and formation of the words
are all hints. Each day the code letters are different.
11-9 CRYPTOQUOTE


XGRKG NA

UHZHXXRKA;

SQXXLNBH; R


TQLUM

GDHU TQ


FDRG'X

FDRG'X


UT XWTTHUBA


RKH TQLUM GDH

- IKRUZLX 01


AQW


LOSQXXLNBH.

RXXLXL


Yesterday's Cryptoquote: TO FIND OUT WHAT
ONE IS FITTED TO DO, AND TO SECURE AN
OPPORTUNITY TO DO IT, IS THE KEY TO
HAPPINESS.- JOHN DEWEY


.0000030c =201DOWN


0000000 DOWN
.....^ D.n ^


3rd Down
+ 40 PTSU

QOQQQQQ 2nd Letter 41 DOWN
COCOCKO,o + 6 PTS fI


FOUR PLAY
TIME LIMIT: 20 MIN AVERAGE GAME 215-225 PTS TOTAL
Directions: Make a 2- to 7-letter word from the letters on each yardline. Add points
to each word or letter using scoring directions. Seven-letter words get a 60-point
bonus. All words can be found in Webster's New World College Dictionary.
11-913 JUDD'S SOLUTION TOMORROW 3

W RD RIMMf ~SOLUTION BY JUDD HAMBRICK
WORD SCRIMMAGE' 2013 UFS / Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS
S2 A(2 T2 A2 P6 1st DOWN 66
S2~~~~ E1 2 2 0 K Y flDJ6 1
". .... ... .. '.. .. .. .. .. ... .. . ....................................2 n D W N. ....................1 1


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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....................................ro o .. .................... .
". .... ... .. '.. .. '.. .. .. .'.. .. .. ....................................4 t D W N. .................... 8 4
E1 N T 7 12 N2 E1 4th DOWN = 84
AVERAGE GAME 235-245 PTS JUDD'S TOTAL = 371
11-8-13


DAILY COMMERCIAL
I DENNIS THE MENACE


FAMILY CIRCUS


,-9 5v
2013 BiiKoane,lInc ,^el.^^ "J T
Dist by King Features Synd ^ ^ \f At
www fa~mycics corn l I 01J
"Okay, Daddy, it's time for Henry
to go home. We'll be in the car."


"OPEN UFP, MR-WILsON. I PROMI6EP THE
D- IVBE T7 '.LJC^AI 'CMA r VtA I i/1 7
DILBERT


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BEETLE BAILEY


SHAGAR THE HORRIBLE,
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH
WHAT IN TH' WORLD TI HATE TO BREAk
DO WOMEN FIND TO IT TO YA, LUkEY,
TALK 'BOUT UT...
EV'RY DAY?. 1 7.-.-


I LIKE MY JOB.
BUT I DON'T LIKE
ANY OF THE TASKS
... OR ANY OF THE
PEOPLE.


I DON'T LIKE THE
COMMAUTE... AND I'M
PAID LESS THAN I'M
WJORTH... AND I'M
NOT MAKING THE
WORLD A BETTER
PLACE.


i-


WORD S)G)R)DM)M)A)G)EY
BY JUDD HAMBRICK 2013 UFS / Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


1" DOWN
1st Down
+ 20 PTS y


I


0000000




EG DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, November 9, 2013


L


S, TV


LAKE SUMTER TELEVISION



^. In our November episode we'll
bring you the latest in medical
Hometown" news and information including
Health. stories on Diabetes Awareness,
migraines and avoiding
Good Things for Those Who Wait holiday tummy troubles


Tune in for features on
Interior Designer Leah D. Conner,
h Dr. John Burress and RF<
Face2Face Medical Spa, plus ROFILES
much more in November's Episode
1 1 11 1 1! Il:I III1

SWe invite you to be an informed
member of our community and
view the most recent
LAKE COUNTY Lake County Commission
FO L 0RIDAand School Board meetings


LKeep up-to-date and informed
about the news and headlines Daily Comnl.rcial
shaping our community as ", 9Coke" n'.-Print & o.4IJ
Sww.dallycommercial.com
LSTV and the Daily Commercial "News in 90"
bring you "News in 90".



For production inquiries or
programming comments contact us at
LakeSumterTV@gmail.corn

O Ve mtero""I!


BAR
FROM PAGE El
After all, entertaining
should be about having
fun."
Gent Supply Co. has
a natty collection of
coasters, glassware and
flasks printed with il-
lustrations of turn-of-
the-century gentle-
men duelers, narwhals,
anchors, and ani-
mals dressed in distin-
guished garb.
Artist Richard E. Bish-
op, known for wildlife
etchings in the 1930s,
'40s and '50s, has his
work on an array of bar
glasses and decanters.
Ducks, trout, foxes and
horses set a "country
house" tone.
A punchbowl that
rests in the clutches
of an octopus, and a
sculpted shell held by a
delicate coral stand are
part of an aluminum
barware collection at Z
Gallerie. There's also a
faux crocodile service
tray in rich eggplant,
studded with silver riv-
ets, that makes a so-


AP PHOTO
This photo provided by West Elm shows the Parker cart in an


acorn finish with brass rail trim.
up a bar in a small space.
phisticated statement.
Silver cocktail picks
and stir sticks topped
with airplanes evoke
the Second World
War. And a mirrored
sign with phrases like
"Stirred" and "Straight
Up" printed in a gold
retro font would make
great wall art.
IC Penney has a


Bar carts are a great way to set

whimsical yet elegant
wine decanter from
Michael Graves Design
that features his sig-
nature bird as built-in
aerator.
At Homegoods, there
are hammered metal
cocktail shakers with
handy drink recipes
printed on the side.
Standing wine buckets
are useful accessories,
leaving more room on
dining tables and buf-
fets for nicely-sized
tools small mud-
dlers, sieves, scoops
and tongs, for example
that will have ama-
teur bartenders look-
ing like experts.
Making a good mar-
tini may be an art, but
how about making your
own gin? No bathtub
is required, just a kit
like one from Uncom-
mon Goods containing
all the spices, juniper
berries and accesso-
ries needed to turn gar-
den-variety vodka into
a custom gin.


isplaedtowlcmeD. oudS ha o urne uolgydearmet


Dr. Fouad Shami is a urologist who has spent 41 years
proudly servicing patients in Lake and Sumter counties.
Throughout the years, he has developed an excellent
reputation for his bedside manner, genuine concern,
and medical expertise. A graduate of Saint Joseph's
University, Dr. Shami is a board-certified urologist.
This experienced and skilled urologist is excited to be a
member of the leading medical team in Central Florida
at Florida Heart and Vascular Multi-Specialty Group.


a


"It has been an honor and a privilege to serve my
patients and I appreciate the special bonds and
relationships we have made over the last 41 years.
- Fouad Shami, M.D.


Florida Heart

*y & Vascular
Multi-Specialty Group
Experience Our Integrity For Compassionate Care


E6 DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, November 9, 2013


4 A