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Daily Commercial
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Le Daily Ciommercial


LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, November 4, 2013 www.dailycommercial.com

LOCAL: Wildlife officials: Watch out for manatees / A3


STATE: Longtime janitor battles 6 types of cancer / A6




Health law causing anxiety, confusion


RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Now is
when Americans start figur-
ing out that President Barack
Obama's health care law goes
beyond political talk, and re-
ally does affect them and
people they know.
With a cranky federal web-
site complicating access to
new coverage and some con-
sumers being notified their



Poll: Older


Americans


nix Social


Security


changes

MATT SEDENSKY
Associated Press
CHICAGO Raise the age
at which you can begin col-
lecting full Social Security
benefits? Older Americans say
no. They also veto reductions
in the cost-of-living increase.
But a poll finds support
among those 50 and older for
raising the cap on earnings
that are taxed to fund the So-
cial Security program so high-
er-income workers pay more.
The survey by the Associ-
ated Press-NORC Center for
Public Affairs Research finds
passionate opposition to any
change in the way Social Se-
curity benefits are calculat-
ed that could result in smaller
annual raises.
Some 62 percent of respon-
dents expressed opposition
to such a proposal, compared
with 21 percent who support-
ed it.
The chained CPI, or con-
sumer price index, has been
proposed as a new way of cal-
culating the cost-of-living
SEE CHANGES I A6


existing plans are going away,
the potential for winners and
losers is creating anxiety and
confusion.
"I've had questions like,
Are they going to put me in
jail if I don't buy insurance?
Because nobody will sell it
to me,'" said Bonnie Burns,
a longtime community-lev-
el insurance counselor from
California. "We have family
members who are violently
opposed to 'Obamacare' and


they are on Medicaid they
don't understand that they're
already covered by taxpayer
benefits.
"And then there is a young
man with lupus who would
have never been insurable,"
Burns continued. "He is on
his parents' plan and he'll be
able to buy his own coverage.
They are very relieved."
A poll just out from the
nonpartisan Kaiser Fami-
ly Foundation documents


shifts in the country in the
month since insurance sign-
ups began.
Fifty-five percent now say
they have enough informa-
tion to understand the law's
impact on their family, up 8
percentage points in just one
month. Part of the reason is
that advertising about how
to get coverage is beginning
to register.
"The law is getting more
and more real for people,"


PHOTOS BY THERESA CAMPBELL DAILY COMMERCIAL
Thousands of spectators turned out to watch the knights battle on the Jousting Field of the 12th annual
Lady of the Lakes Renaissance Faire on Sunday at Hickory Point in Tavares.


Fair brings 17th


century to life

THERESA CAMPBELL I Staff Writer
theresacampbeIIll@dailycommercial.com
The Renaissance history came to life on
Sunday for thousands of children and adults
on the last day of the 12th annual Lady of the
Lakes Renaissance Faire, where all ages es-
caped the 21st century to see knights in ar-
mor, jousting and experience the games, cus-
toms, food, and dress of England in 1606.
SEE LIFE I A2


Adam Richardson, right, portraying Malcom
Gwylleth MacDurron, reacts to being victori-
ous in his human combat chess match for
land and titles.


said Drew Altman, the foun-
dation's president. "A lot
of this will turn on wheth-
er there's a perception that
there have been more win-
ners than losers. .. It's not
whether an expert thinks
something is a better insur-
ance policy, it's whether peo-
ple perceive it that way."
The Obama administra-
tion insists nobody will lose
SEE HEALTH I A6


No leads


in baby's


murder

MILLARD K. IVES
Staff Writer
millardives@dailycommercial.com
After five years, no mur-
der charges have been filed in
the case of 5-month-old Gabri-
el Golden, who died of two skull
fractures he allegedly received in
a home filled with people.
Still, investigators and pros-
ecutors say the case remains
open, with a new lead detective
on the case after former lead de-
tective Mark Knuuttila had too
much on his plate when U.S.
Marshal duties were added to
his job.
"No one has gotten away


PROVIDED PHOTO
Five-month-old Gabriel Golden is pic-
tured at a birthday party shortly before
his murder on Nov. 3, 2008.


Mutai, Jeptoo of Kenya win titles at NYC Marathon


RACHEL COHEN
Associated Press
NEW YORK The New
York City Marathon re-
turned after a one-year
absence with big crowds,
heightened security and a
familiar champion.
Geoffrey Mutai success-
fully defended his title
Sunday, while fellow Ke-
nyan Priscah Jeptoo came
from behind to win the
women's race. Bronx resi-
dent Buzunesh Deba fin-
ished runner-up for the


second straight time in
her hometown event.
Fans again packed the
26.2-mile course, un-
daunted by the events of
the past year. The 2012
NYC Marathon was can-
celed because of the dev-
astation of Superstorm
Sandy, but not before
many New Yorkers were
enraged by initial plans to
hold the race.
After the bombings
at April's Boston Mara-
thon, bomb-sniffing dogs


roamed the course, and
barricades limited access
points to Central Park.
A record 50,740 runners
started the race through
the five boroughs.
Mutai pulled away
around Mile 22 and
beat Ethiopia's Tsegaye
Kebede by 52 seconds.
On a windy morning, Mu-
tai's time of 2 hours, 8
minutes, 24 seconds was
well off his course record
of 2:05:06 set in nearly
SEE MARATHON I A6


Second place
finisher Tsegaye
Kebede, left, of
Ethiopia, and
third-placed Lu-
sapho April, right,
of South Africa,
flank men's win-
ner Geoffrey Mu-
tai of Kenya after
finishing the New
York City Mara-
thon Sunday.
ASSOCIATED
PRESS


Vol. 137, No. 308 4 sections
LIVING HEALTHY Cl
S* MISSED YOUR PAPER? CLASSIFIED QDl NATION A4 HIGH
Call 787-0600 (Lake County), or COMICS C6 OBITUARIES A4 73
877-702-0600 (Sumter County) CROSSWORDS D4 SPORTS B1 LOW
NEWS TIP? DEAR ABBY C7 VOICES A7 I. 63
90994 17001 Call Scott Callahan at 365-8203 LEGALS D4 WORLD A6 See A8





DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 4, 2013


HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Mon-
day, Nov. 4, 2013:
This year you often feel as if
you are navigating in a fog, not
exactly sure of where you are
heading. Nevertheless, you will
make many friends. Your abil-
ity to detach yet empathize be-
comes stronger. If you are sin-
gle, you might meet someone
quite unique and different. You
could learn a lot by relating to
each other. If you are attached,
the two of you often have silly
misunderstandings. Just main-
tain a sense of humor and be
willing to open up. Tune in to
your psychic ability when deal-
ing with others. SAGITTARIUS
can be extremely irritating, es-
pecially when you are in one of
your deep, reflective moods.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
You'll want to be more in sync
with someone. Realize that you
might have to initiate a conver-
sation with this person. It could
seem as though neither of you
is getting the whole story. Main-
tain a sense of humor, and the
process will be a lot easier.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
Deal with a partner or key per-
son directly in the afternoon.
You tend to be on different pag-
es, and you need to bridge the
gap. Try to understand the logic
behind his or her thinking. This
person might wonder where
you are coming from, too.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
Listen to others, but ultimate-
ly know that you need to make
your own decision. How you
handle a personal matter could
change once you clear up an
assumption that you and some-
one else made. If need be,
bring in an expert for another
opinion.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
Your creativity soars early in
the day. Funnel your high en-
ergy into some task that could
be made better through an in-
fusion of this trait. Detaching
from a situation will help you
choose the right direction for
you to head in.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You
might move slowly, but once
you get going, your creativity
seems to soar. Apply some of
your imagination to the tasks
at hand. You will find that they
are more interesting and allow
greater flexibility.


West dealer.
East-West vulnerable.
NORTH
4K 10 4
V6
*AKQJ85
*85


WEST
*9873
VAK932
+7
4942
SOUTH
+AQ62
VQ .1 8 5
10
*AKQ7


4
Y
4
@(


The bidding:
West North East
Pass 1 Pass
Pass 4* Pass
Pass 6 NT
Opening lead king ofi
It certainly seems rea
assume that when two tea
determine the world cha
the caliber of bridge is go
the highest possible level.
While it is true that th
lion is generally met, it i
that there arc always a few
shock the faithful and n
realize that even the expert
be made of clay.
These rare transgressi


VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Go with the flow, and honor
what is happening with some-
one in your daily life. You might
want to stay close to home or
make contact with that spe-
cial person in your life. Don't
assume that you know what
a close friend or loved one is
feeling.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Handle a financial matter in the
morning. Later, you will want to
check in with a key person you
really care about. You might be
confused or overwhelmed by
everything this person shares.
Encourage a discussion with a
new associate in the afternoon.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
You are in your element in the
morning, so use that time to do
anything important. In the af-
ternoon, you will not have the
same energy or charisma to ar-
gue your case or make a good
impression. You also will be
more biased.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.
21) Know that your strong suit
is not dealing with real estate
or any matter involving your
home. There is an underlying
theme of confusion present in
one of the abovementioned ar-
eas. It would be best to play it
low-key today.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Though you might feel you
are being clear and receptive,
you will find out otherwise. You
easily could misread some-
one's message as well. Use
care in your conversations.
You don't want to be misunder-
stood or misunderstand some-
one else.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18) Friendship is more impor-
tant to you than nearly any-
thing else. Use care if you find
yourself mixing money and
friendship in an unconvention-
al manner. Pull back and try to
separate the two. This disen-
gagement could be touchy.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)
Getting a clear vision, much
less being able to verbalize the
idea, takes talent. You could
feel as if you have to take a
stand and lead others with a
project. If you can't establish
clear communication, let the
chips fall as they may.


really surprising when one considers
that each participant plays several
hundred hands and makes several
thousand decisions in the course of a
long championship event. An occa-
2 sional fall from grace must therefore
be accepted as par for the course.
EAST For a good example of how
J 5 bridge should not be played, consider
10 7 4 this deal from the Great Britain-U.S
9 6 4 3 match in 1955. The bidding went a
J 10 6 3 shown when a British pair held the
North-South cards.
Why South jump-shifted in
hearts rather than clubs or spades, oi
whether four notrump was Black-
wood. is not known, but the fact is
that North-South blundered into six
South notrumnp as shown. West cashed the
2 V K-A of hearts, and Uncle Sam rang
4 NT up 50 points on the register.
The bidding was equally odd
hearts. when the U.S. held the North-Southl
cards. North opened the bidding with
sonlable to three notrump, and South raised tc
ins meet to six notrump. The American pair were
mpionship, playing that an opening three-
ing to be at notrump bid showed a long, solid
minor suit with not much on the side.
is expecta- With nothing to go on, East
is also true selected the jack of spades as his
v hands that opening shot, and North made all the
nakc them tricks to score 1,020 points. So, in
rt foot max considerably less than brilliant fash-
ion, the American team gained 1,07C
ons are not points.
Tomorrow: A costly play.


MURDER
FROM PAGE Al


with murder, it's a diffi-
cult case that just hasn't
been solved yet," Knuut-
tila said.
Five years ago, a re-
sponding Lake Coun-
ty Sheriff's deputy found
31-year-old Ashley Bak-
er and his 30-year-old
wife, Tammi, attempting
to perform CPR on the
lifeless body of Gabriel
in his crib at the couple's
home on Picciola Road.
The child, who was
purple when the depu-
ty arrived on the scene,
was taken to Leesburg
Regional Medical Cen-
ter where he was pro-
nounced dead.
There were three adults
in the home, including
Tammi's then 52-year-
old mother, Vickie Labb,
a visiting juvenile and


Tammi's two children
(ages 5 and 12). With so
many potential suspects,
it's difficult to prove who
might have killed Gabri-
el, Knuuttila said.
The Department of
Children and Families
said at the time of the
death that Ashley Bak-
er was responsible. Lake
County courts identified
him as a person of inter-
est in the child's murder
during a custody hearing
for the two other chil-
dren. But Knuuttila and
Assistant State Attorney
Bill Gross, who reviewed
the death for possible
murder or manslaughter
charges, said they need
more concrete evidence.
According to officials
with the DCF, Gabri-
el moved into the Bak-
ers' home after the cou-
ple agreed to take care
of him for his financial-
ly strapped parents, An-
drew and Andrea Gold-


PERFORMER INJURED AT FAIR


PAUL RYAN / DAILY COMMERCIAL
One renaissance performer was injured Sunday afternoon on the
Joust Field at Lady of the Lakes Renaissance Faire and was taken to
Florida Hospital Waterman, according to Sam Prevatt, public informa-
tion officer for Lake County EMS. "A 31-year-old male, who was one of
the jousting participants, fell from his horse and has a possible dis-
located shoulder," said Prevatt, who did not release the performer's
identity.


LIFE
FROM PAGE Al


"Are you the queen?"
several awestruck little
girls asked Rebecca Bea-
voir, when they couldn't
resist touching her jew-
elry and lavishly adorned
dress. Beavoir received
several hugs and posed
for pictures with her
young adoring fans while
she portrayed Lady Ara-
bella Stuart, cousin to
King James the I. Beavoir
welcomed her guests to
the many festivities she
was providing to enter-
tain the king and visiting
nobility.
"This is my 12th year
doing this and I started
when I was 14," said Bea-
voir, who had no trouble
switching from the 17th
century to present day,
while strolling on the
grounds of Hickory Point
Recreational Facility in
Tavares.
"I love the family, the
cast family, the patron
family, and the people
who come here year after
year. It's so much fun,"
Beavoir said, pleased to
be one of the 100 fair per-
formers.
"We enjoy bringing
history to life, especial-
ly for children, who may
not have exposure to this
period of history," added
Michelle Aldridge, por-
traying Lady Elizabeth
DeVere, Countess of Der-
by.
DeVere recalled she
being inspired to get in-
volved in the Lady of the
Lakes Renaissance Faire
after attending one year
with her children.
"The renaissance was
my favorite period of his-
tory so it was not very
difficult to convince me,"
DeVere said.
It wasn't difficult to
persuade other perform-


en. Carrie Hoeppner,
spokeswoman for the
DCF, said in an inter-
view shortly after Gabri-
el's death that her agency
knew Ashley Baker had
an extensive criminal re-
cord and had been the
subject of 14 abuse in-
vestigations.
While the custody ar-
rangement was legal,
there had been concerns,
she said, even though the
majority of those cases
were closed with little or
no indication of abuse.
"I'm not sure if we
had the legal grounds to
do anything else at that
time," Hoeppner said.
Gabriel had fallen
about six inches from a
bouncer on the day be-
fore his death while be-
ing cared for by one of
Tammi's friend. But Med-
ical Examiner Dr. Barba-
ra Wolf said in an inter-
view with detectives that
if the injures were from


ers to act as if were the
17th century.
"I enjoy making peo-
ple laugh, smile and
have a really good time,"
said Vincent Spagno-
la, portraying the king
of gypsies, while Adam
Richardson, who plays
the character as Mal-
colm Gwylleth MacDur-
ron, entertained the fair
crowd by participating in
a human combat chess
match.
Richardson was vic-
torious in his match be-
tween good and bad op-
ponents, where land and
titles were at stake.
"I love performing and
this is my eighth year do-
ing this," said Richard-
son, who relished being
able to play a fighter in
the human chess game.
"It's a lot of fun to do
and I have a good time
performing; I like to
show off and do crazy
stunts," he said.
Richardson travels
from Tampa each year to
participate in the Lady
of the Lakes Renaissance
Faire, which draws an av-
erage of 15,000 attend-
ees.
"This one is a small-
er one, but everything
here is for charity and
it's a fantastic little fair,"
Richardson said. "It was
a fantastic day all the
way around, with a great
crowd. It's a lot of fun to
be able to come here and
do this."
Carman Cullen, exec-
utive director of Edu-
cational Foundation of
Lake County, the orga-
nization that hosts the
three-day event, noted
the fair provides all ages
to learn about history.
"It's fantasy and fun,"
Cullen said. "Our em-
phasis has always been
on making it a fully im-
mersive educational ex-
perience."


the fall, the child would
have symptoms all day.
Ashley Baker eventual-
ly went to prison on pro-
bation violations after
being arrested on unre-
lated burglary and deal-
ing in stolen property
charges.
Knuuttila said sever-
al efforts have failed to
solve the case. One of
the Bakers, he didn't say
which, was the initial
lead suspect, but after
getting tips from a friend
of one of the people in
home at the time of Ga-
briel's death, there is a
new lead suspect.
Knuuttila said they
tried using a taped phone
call with the alleged kill-
er, but the suspect didn't
bite. Knuuttila also said
there were attempts to
get one of the Bakers to
turn on the other and
provide details on what
actually happened


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lFLORIDA

LOTTERY

SUNDAY
C A S H 3 ................................................ 2-1-2
Afternoon ........................................... 5-3-2
PLAY 4............................................. 8-0-9-6
Afternoon....................................... 7-7-9-6

SATURDAY
FANTASY 5......................... 10-18-22-31-32


BRIDGE


-amous Hand


,c, io I j Kin Ftu- SndicaLe I n,


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, November 4, 2013




Monday, November 4, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL





State&Region
NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN I scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com I 352-365-8208


www.dailycommercial.com


Area Briefs

LADY LAKE
Marine Corps League
invites veterans to event
The North Lake Detachment of
the Marine Corps League invites
Marines who have served in the
Gulf War, Iraq and Afghanistan
to be their guests at the 238th
Marine Corps birthday celebration
with a social hour at 6 p.m., din-
ner at 7:15 p.m., on Nov. 10 at the
American Legion Hall, Rolling Acres
Road and County Road 466.
Tickets for the event should be
purchased on or before today
For information, call
Commandant Bill Bell at
352-589-0454.

PANAMA CITY
Osprey nests moved to make
way for Fla. power line
More than 20 osprey nests in the
Florida Panhandle have to be moved
to make way for a new power line.
Gulf Power is moving the nests to
platforms atop new 60-foot wood-
en poles before construction be-
gins this month on the 25-mile line
through Bay andWalton counties.
The new poles were built within 100
feet of the old utility poles.
Spokesman Jeff Rogers tells The
News Herald that moving the nests
will protect the ospreys during
construction.

NAPLES
Man accused of deaths
of 6 involved in jail fight
A southwest Florida man awaiting
trial for the deaths of his wife and
five children has been treated for in-
juries following a fight in jail.
According to Collier County
Sheriff's Office reports, Mesac
Damas was accused by fellow in-
mates of attacking them Oct. 9 in
their housing area at the Naples Jail
Center.
Camera footage shows Damas
punching two inmates. Three other
inmates also were involved in the al-
tercation. All but one were taken for
medical evaluations.
The Naples Daily News re-
ports that Damas told authori-
ties that he was trying to break
up a fight between two other in-
mates. Disciplinary reports were
filed against Damas and two other
inmates.

WEST PALM BEACH
School mourns nurse whose
body was found in field
A South Florida school will re-
name its health clinic after a nurse
whose body was found in a sugar
cane field.
Bak Middle School of the Arts re-
ported Kimberly Lindsey miss-
ing early last week. Days later,
Lindsey's body was found in Hendry
County. Authorities are investigating
Lindsey's death as a homicide.
Bak officials tell The Palm Beach
Post they will rename the clin-
ic at the West Palm Beach school in
Lindsey's memory. Grief counselors
will be at the school Monday to talk
with students and staff.
Palm Beach County Schools
SuperintendentWayne Gent
says Lindsey's death is "such a
tragic event for the school and
community."



... and we'll share it with our readers.
Some of our best story ideas and photos
come from our readers. So don't hesitate
to share your youth activities, awards,
accomplishments, festivals, charity
events and other things that make our
communities special. And don't overlook
those family milestones birthdays,
engagements, marriages, business
promotions and military news.


Just email your photos and news to...
pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com


Longtime janitor battles 6 types of cancer


GREG PARLIER
The Ledger
LAKELAND Warren Bellamy
dedicated more than a decade of
his life to become a teacher, but
when he finally graduated from the
University of South Florida, mop-
ping floors proved to be more lu-
crative than teaching.
Now, four years after graduating,
Warren Bellamy is battling six dif-
ferent cancers, and will be trans-
ferred soon to Moffitt Cancer Cen-
ter in Tampa.
But the man who drives the beat-
up, red, pickup isn't beat quite yet,
although he does plan, a little re-
luctantly, to retire soon.
Bellamy, who turned 55 on Nov.
1, has been the janitor at Jewett


School of the Arts since he was 17,
when he had to work to support
his six siblings, said his wife, Jessi-
ca Bellamy, with whom he has two
children.
Then he got a second custodial
job at New Bethel Baptist Church
in Winter Haven, where he is now a
deacon, to make ends meet.
He considers it his role in life.
"I understand I had a job to do
some kind of way," he recently said
from his room at Lakeland Region-
al Medical Center, where he was
admitted Sept. 15.
But after 20 plus years, he decid-
ed to take a chance, inspired by an
old high school football coach, Cal-
vin Triplett, to go to college and be-
come a teacher.
"He always taught us to be the


best we could be regardless of our
situation. So I decided to take a
challenge and see what I could do. I
ended up being a better person for
it," he said.
Taking classes meant long days
for Bellamy. After work at Jewett
was done, he would have about two
hours to get to class, which last-
ed until 10 p.m. four days a week.
He had to report back to work at
6 a.m. And there was time needed
to study.
He would often talk with teachers
at Jewett about his studies, espe-
cially now-retired art teacher Mary
Ellen Porter.
"We had deep conversations.
And I thought, 'I'm really getting to
know this man, who is a wonderful,
deep person?'" Porter said.


Officials: Watch out for manatees


PHOTO COURTESY OF FLORIDA FISH AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATION COMMISSION
This young manatee, cut several times by a propeller blade, was rescued by Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission workers. He
spent several months in rehab at Tampa's Lowry Park Zoo before being released last year.


Staff report
Wildlife officials are ask-
ing Lake County boaters to
keep an eye out for mana-
tees as they begin their an-
nual migration to warmer
waters their instinctive
response to winter's ap-
proach and surviving the
coming cold weather.
"You can help mana-
tees by slowing down and
following posted speed
zones when operating
boats or personal water-
craf," said Carol Knox,


the Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Com-
mission's Imperiled Spe-
cies Management Section
Leader. "Manatees often
feed in shallow seagrass
beds adjacent to deeper
waters.
"Wearing polarized sun-
glasses helps you spot
a manatee underwa-
ter. Also, watch for circu-
lar wave patterns on the
water's surface called
manatee footprints in-
dicating a manatee's pres-
ence below."


As these slow-moving
aquatic mammals mi-
grate along rivers, canals,
bays and coastlines, the
FWC cautions boaters to
slow down and watch out
for manatees. The aver-
age adult manatee is 1,000
pounds and 10-feet long
but may be difficult to
spot despite its size.
Throughout the state,
many seasonal manatee
protection zones go into
effect Nov. 15. Look for
signs posted on the wa-
ter indicating boat speed


zones. A "slow speed"
zone means a boat should
be completely settled in
the water, not creating an
excessive wake. Go to My-
FWC.com/Manatee, and
click on Data and Maps to
see FWC manatee protec-
tion zones.
Some of these zones
in Lake County include
along the southwest shore
of Lake George, north of
Astor. Zones also exist
along the St. Johns River
dividing Lake and Volusia
counties.


November is hospice awareness month


Staff report
November is Nation-
al Hospice and Palliative
Care Month and Corner-
stone Hospice and Palli-
ative Care is joining hos-
pices across the country
in reaching out to raise
awareness about impor-
tant care issues for peo-
ple coping with life-limit-
ing illness.
"Every year, Corner-
stone Hospice provides
exceptional hospice care
for more than 6,000 Cen-
tral Floridians living with


a life-limiting illness" said
Chuck Lee, CEO of Cor-
nerstone Hospice and
Palliative Care. "Our high-
ly trained professionals
and volunteers provide
more than quality med-
ical care. They work to
make sure patients and
families find dignity, re-
spect, and love during
life's most difficult jour-
ney."
According to a nation-
wide Gallup survey con-
ducted for the Nation-
al Hospice and Palliative
Care Organization, nine


out of 10 adults would
prefer to be cared for at
home rather than in a
hospital or nursing home
if diagnosed with a termi-
nal illness.
"Hospice does provide
the option of being cared
for at a place the patient
calls home," Lee said.
Lake and Sumter coun-
ties have almost 3,100 pa-
tients receiving home and
facility hospice care from
Cornerstone's interdisci-
plinary team of doctors,
nurses, nursing aides, so-
cial workers, chaplains


and trained volunteers.
"Many families feel
alone, frightened and
confused about what to
expect but I have the op-
portunity to explain what
we really do at Corner-
stone, more specifical-
ly what I do," said Isaac
Deas, Interfaith Chaplain
at Cornerstone Hospice.
In fiscal year 2011-12,
Cornerstone Hospice's
876 volunteers provided
more than 43,000 volun-
teer hours. For informa-
tion, to donate, or to vol-
unteer, call 888-728-6234.





DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 4, 2013


IN MEMORY


OBITUARIES
Mary Elizabeth Blake
Mary Elizabeth Blake,
80, of Leesburg, passed
away Friday, Novem-
ber 1st in her home


following a 5 year bat-
tle with cancer. Mary
was the owner of Mer-
le Norman Cosmetics
in downtown Leesburg
and she owned the Ka-
meo Jewelry store in


"Protect and Serve"
Thank a law enforcement professional today for their service.
age-Thens Funeral Home and Cremation Services
|914 West Main St., Leesburg, FL 34748
*352-787-5511
|www.pagetheus.com



Owner, Dr. James Costello, says, "My doctors utilize
modem techniques, and I instill old fashioned values."


NEW PATIENT SPECIAL
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The patent and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed
for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the
advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This
discount does not apply to those patents with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.


downtown Leesburg
with her late husband
Jack. She was a mem-
ber of the BPW in Lees-
burg, was very involved
with the Melon Patch
Players in the 70's and
80's. Mary was active
in the bowling leagues
in Leesburg and had
been a member of the
LRMC Auxiliary for the
last 5 years. Survivors
include her daugh-
ter, Mary E.(Richard)
Blount of Leesburg, 3
grandchildren, Blake
Kelly, Lauren Kelly, and
Danielle Fredericks, 2
great grandchildren,
Lexi and Mackenzie.
She was preceded in
death by her husband
Jack A. Blake, Septem-
ber 9, 2009. A Celebra-
tion of Life will be held
Wednesday, November
6th at 11:00 am at the
Father's House Chris-
tian Center, Leesburg
with Rev's Terry Mah-
an and Issac Deas offi-
ciating. In lieu of flow-
ers memorials may be
made to the American
Cancer Society, 1650
West Main St. Lees-
burg, FL 34748. On-
line condolences may
be left at www.beyers-
funeralhome.co. Ar-
rangements entrust-
ed to Beyers Funeral
Home and Crematory,
Leesburg, FL.


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Jim Gray
Jim Gray was born in
Lima, Ohio, November
25, 1935 to David and
Evelyn Gray. He gradu-
ated from Waynesfield
H.S. and the North-
western Business Col-
lege in Lima, and also
served in the Lima
Branch of the Nation-
al Guard. He moved to
Lady Lake in 1961 to
join the citrus indus-
try and created Grays
Groves Inc., which be-
came Grays Orange
Barn which he owned
and operated until he
retired in 1997. He was
active in the commu-
nity opening 3 new Ki-
wanis Clubs and serv-
ing on the Volunteer
Fire Department. He
enjoyed golf, bowling
and tennis. He is sur-
vived by his wife Emma
Lou, his son Nathan,
his sister Linda Jean
Horn and his moth-
er Evelyn, who is 101
years old. Jim was pre-
ceded in death by his
daughter Rhonda and
his father David. He
was active member of
Morrison United Meth-
odist Church and loved
his volunteer time with
the Opportunity Shop.
Memorial Service will
be Tuesday, November
5, at l:30pm at Morri-
sons United Method-
ist Church, Main Street,
Leesburg. Donations to
your favorite Church
or Charity. Online con-
dolences may be left
at www.beyersfuner-
alhome.com. Arrange-
ments entrusted to
Beyers Funeral Home
and Crematory, Lees-
burg, FL.


Billy "Tiny" Rutter
December 20, 1936 -
October 29, 2013 LEES-
BURG Billy "Tiny"
Rutter. resident of Lees-
burg, Florida. Passed
from this life after a
courageous 2 year bat-
tle with various illness-
es, Billy passed away
peacefully at The Vil-
lages, Florida. Billy was
born and raised in Bris-
tol, Virginia. He was the
Former Sumter County
Commissioner for Dis-
trict Number 3 from
1992 till 2004. He was a
passionate lobbyist for
the needs of his constit-
uents. Following his re-
tirement, in February,
2005, Billy was blessed
with a kidney trans-
plant which took place
at Mayo Clinic, Jack-
sonville, FL. He was the
son to the late William
Rutter and Ellen Cowan
Rutter and was the be-
loved husband of Ro-
cio Rutter for over 12
years. Billy will always
be remembered by his
treasured goddaugh-
ter Natalia Pena, caring
in-laws Mario and Ro-
cio Pena, Mario Pena,
Aurora Fajardo, and the
Menendez Cooley fam-
ily, loved sisters Betty
Conley and Laura Saly-
er and family, grand-
daughter Robin Jen-
kins and family along
with countless oth-
er friends and family
whom were blessed to
know him. Billy loved
traveling, adventuring
on dirt desolated roads,
listening to music sing-
ing and laughing. Pol-
itics was one of his
greatest passions, but


above all, he enjoyed
his life with his devot-
ed wife. Billy touched
the life of many people
with his smile and gen-
erosity. With his vision,
tenacity and the sup-
port of his community

leagues,
a n d c o l- ^ -

he was
able to
bring to
Sumter
County
a much
de-
served RUTTER
pros-
perity. He worked hard
in order to provide great
leadership to the Sum-
ter County residents.
He was an active and
avid supporter of or-
gan donation. Friends
and family are invit-
ed to attend a memo-
rial service on Thurs-
day, November 7, 2013
at the Hiers-Baxley Fu-
neral Services 1511
Buenos Aires Blvd., The
Villages at 4:00 p.m. In
lieu of flowers memo-
rial donations may be
made to the Donate
Life America Founda-
tion. For on-line senti-
ments visit www.hiers-
baxleycom.
DEATH NOTICES
Ralph Leroy Rensel
Ralph Leroy Rensel,
84, of Umatilla, died
Friday, Nov. 1, 2013.
Beyers Funeral Home,
Umatilla.
Jeanne Louise Ross
Jeanne Louise Ross,
86, of Eustis, died Fri-
day, Nov. 1, 2013.
Harden/Pauli Funeral
Home, Eustis.


Angel Flight salutes pilot

David Taisch of Tavares is a --'l S '' E "-
volunteer pilot for Angel Flight '-, .-."l
Southeast, a non-profit organiza- If .,2
tion that arranges transportation 77, 1H
to life-saving medical care across ViT
Florida and the Southeast. He is
seen here with his wife, Ruth.
PHOTO COURTESY OF WWW.
SOUTHWINGS.ORG


Staff report
Three Central Flori-
da men, including one
from Leesburg, will be
recognized for their
generosity and dedi-
cation to people who
need necessary med-
ical care but do not
have the means to get
to their appointments.
The men are volun-
teer pilots with Angel
Flight Southeast, a non-
profit organization that
arranges transporta-
tion to life-saving med-
ical care across Florida
and the Southeast.
David Taisch of Ta-
vares, David Walker of
Ocala and Alan Hoff-
berg of Seminole Coun-
ty will be honored by
Angel Flight Southeast
for their efforts and are
also vying for the "Pilot
of the Year" Award for
the region. The winner
will be announced at
the Angel Flight South-
east Pilot Awards Gala
on Nov. 10 at Arling-
ton Ridge Golf Club in
Leesburg.
For information, call
352-326-0761.


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DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 4, 2013


HEALTH
FROM PAGE Al


coverage as a result of cancellation
notices going out to millions of peo-
ple. At least 3.5 million Americans
have been issued cancellations, but
the exact number is unclear. Associ-
ated Press
checks find that data is unavail-
able in a half the states.
Mainly they are people who buy di-
rectly from an insurer, instead of hav-
ing workplace coverage. Officials say
these consumers aren't getting "can-
celed" but "transitioned" or "migrat-
ed" to better plans because their cur-
rent coverage doesn't meet minimum


standards. They won't have to go un-
insured, and some could save a lot if
they qualify for the law's tax credits.
Speaking in Boston's historic Fa-
neuil Hall this past week, Obama said
the problem is limited to fewer than
5 percent of Americans "who've got
cut-rate plans that don't offer real fi-
nancial protection in the event of a
serious illness or an accident."
But in a nation of more than 300
million, 5 percent is a big number
- about 15 million people. Among
them are Ian and Sara Hodge of Lan-
caster, Pennsylvania, in their early
60s and paying $1,041 a month for a
policy
After insurer Highmark, Inc., sent
the Hodges a cancellation notice, the
cheapest rate they say they've been


able to find is $1,400 for a compara-
ble plan. Ian is worried they may not
qualify for tax credits, and doesn't
trust that the federal website is se-
cure enough to enter personal finan-
cial information in order to find out.
"We feel like we're being punished
for doing the right thing," he said.
Their policy may not have met the
government's standards, "but it cer-
tainly met our minimum standards,"
Hodge added.
"The main thing that upsets us is
the president ... said over and over
and over again: If you like your
health plan, you will be able to keep
your health plan, guaranteed."
Audience members listen during
an federal health care law informa-
tional town hall meeting with Rep.
Matt Cartwright, D-Pa., Friday, Nov.


1, 2013, at the Sovereign Majestic
Theater in Pottsville, Pa. (AP Photo/
Matt Rourke)
There's a chance the number of
people getting unwanted termina-
tions may grow. In 2015, the law's
requirement that larger compa-
nies provide health insurance will
take effect. It's expected that a small
share of firms will drop coverage,
deciding that it's cheaper to pay
fines imposed under the law.
Before the law's online health
care markets launched Oct. 1, the
administration estimated near-
ly 500,000 people would enroll for
subsidized private insurance within
the first month. Despite high con-
sumer interest, a computer system
beset by gremlins has kept most from
doing so.


MARATHON
FROM PAGE Al

perfect conditions two years ago.
He's the first man to repeat in New
York since Kenya's John Kagwe in
1997-98.
Kebede, the London Marathon
champ, clinched the $500,000 bo-
nus for the World Marathon Majors
title. South Africa's Lusapho April
was third.
Jeptoo trailed Deba by nearly 3/2
minutes at the halfway point. But
she started making her move as
the race entered Manhattan and
passed the Ethiopian with just over
2 miles to go.
Jeptoo, the 2012 Olympic silver
medalist and 2013 London Mar-
athon Champ, won in 2:25:07 to
clinch the $500,000 World Mara-
thon Majors bonus.
The women's race played out al-
most identically to the last NYC
Marathon two years ago. But this
time, Deba was the pursued, not
the pursuer.
In 2011, Mary Keitany pulled
away to a big early lead, and Deba
and countrywomen Firehiwot
Dado chased her down. Dado, who
won that day, was 14th Sunday as
the defending champ.
This time, Deba and training
partner Tigist Tufa separated them-
selves right from the start. Deba
wound up finishing 48 seconds be-
hind Jeptoo, while Tufa fell back to


eighth.
Jelena Prokopcuka of Latvia, the
2005-06 New York champ, placed
third at age 37.
Security was tight from the mo-
ment the runners arrived on Stat-
en Island. They were corralled into
long bag-check lines, and officers
and volunteers repeatedly remind-
ed them to keep cellphones out.
"Security is 100 percent tough-
er than what I've seen at other rac-
es," said Chris Patterson of Roch-
ester, N.Y, who was signed up for
New York last year and ran Boston
in April.
Elizabeth Hutchinson of Seattle
recalled the joy at the starting line
in Boston this year. People were
handing out sunscreen, Band-Aids
and energy gels with a smile.
On Staten Island, she said, "the
machine guns are very visible."
"The atmosphere is so different,"
she said, "It kind of makes me sad."
Charles Breslin, who lost his
home in the storm and was volun-
teering at the marathon, welcomed
the race's return.
"I don't know how the rest of Stat-
en Island feels about, but it can only
be a good thing," he said. "You have
to get back to normalcy."
As the professional women ap-
proached Central Park, only a
sprinkling of onlookers stood at the
police barricades. Ginny Smith, a
Manhattan resident who comes to
watch each year, said she felt "very
frustrated."





e Ik



'"t MODERN. SOUTHERN. STYLE.
R6MDERN. SOUTHERN. STYLE.


CHANGES
FROM PAGE Al

adjustment, but it would reduce
raises.
"I really think it's a sacred cow,"
said Margie Nugent, a 55-year-old
farmer from North Umberland, Pa.
"They shouldn't touch it."
Some 58 percent oppose gradual-
ly raising the age when retirees qual-
ify for full benefits, while 29 percent
support it. About one-third believe
people should be eligible for full
benefits before 65. Only 10 percent
say full eligibility should come after
67, the top eligibility age under cur-
rent law.
"I contributed to it. It's my money,"
said Joan McDonald, 65, of Annapo-
lis, Md., who retired as an accoun-
tant this year and began collecting
Social Security. "The plan was, 'Con-
tribute this and you get this.' You
can't change the rules."
Survey respondents showed more
willingness to support Social Securi-
ty proposals that would mostly im-
pact those with higher incomes.
Forty-one percent expressed sup-
port for reducing benefits for seniors
with higher incomes, compared with
44 percent who opposed the propos-
al. Whites were much more support-
ive of reducing benefits for high-
earning seniors than minorities.
Changes to Social Security are on
the horizon because the trust funds
that support the massive retirement
and disability program are project-
ed to run dry in 2033. At that point,
Social Security would only collect
enough taxes to pay about three-
fourths of benefits. If Congress
doesn't act, benefits automatically
would be cut by about 25 percent.
A new round of budget talks un-
derway in Washington could pro-
duce proposals to change Social Se-
curity.


In previous budget talks, Presi-
dent Barack Obama has proposed
adopting the chained CPI, making
it one of the few issues on which he
and House Speaker John Boehner, R-
Ohio, agree. Other groups, includ-
ing Obama's 2010 deficit commis-
sion, have proposed raising the age
when retirees can get full Social Se-
curity benefits.
Among older Americans, the poll
found the most popular idea for im-
proving the program's finances was
raising the cap on income subject to
Social Security taxes. Currently, the
cap is $113,700, meaning those earn-
ing more do not pay Social Security
taxes on wages above that threshold.
Some 61 percent of people favored
raising the cap, compared with 25
percent opposing it. Among Dem-
ocrats, support was at 73 percent;
among Republicans, it was 45 per-
cent.
"If the rich get richer, they should
pay," said Rhonda Rossi, 56, of South
Bend, Ind. "If they're multimillion-
aires, they don't need Social Securi-
ty. They could live off their interest."
Rossi collects Social Security dis-
ability benefits of about $950 a
month due to kidney failure. Even
with that, she struggles to have
enough to buy groceries at the end
of the month. She says any talk of re-
ducing benefits makes her nervous.
"I got sick and if I didn't have the
Social Security, I don't know how I
would live, I really don't. I'm strug-
gling as it is now," she said. The poli-
ticians don't live day by day like I do."
The AP-NORC Center survey was
conducted Aug. 8 through Sept. 10
by NORC at the University of Chica-
go, with funding from the Alfred P
Sloan Foundation. It involved land-
line and cellphone interviews in
English and Spanish with 1,024 peo-
ple aged 50 and older nationwide.
Results from the full survey have a
margin of sampling error of plus or
minus 4.1 percentage points.


Hlzilg^B mo-e time for
r^| family Jun
Tuesday, Nov. 5 *


senior
If you're /
55 &older, I I V
it's your day I A
to save / \


30-50o(f
Better sportswear from Madison,
CYNTHIA Cynthia Rowley & more
Shown: Cable & Gauge sweater
Orig. 68.00, Sale 46.99
Sharagano pants, orig. 58.00
Sale 39.99


30-40off
Women's boots from
Rampage, Bandolino, BareTraps*,
Rock & Candy by ZIGI, Madden Girl,
b.e.cs, Easy Spirits and Unlisted,
a Kenneth Cole Production
Styles shown, orig. 69.00-149.00
Sale 48.30-104.30


TUESDAY, NOV. 5
with your Belk Rewards Card ,

EXTR2OA
X20o .

^*%WOFF
regular, sale & clearance purchases.
15% OFF home and shoes
10% off electrics & coffee
% regular. sale
with any off/ & clearance
other fom | ff purchases"
of prz,,yme 15 ta l I I s
........ ........... ......,....,........ ........


- %D D LE ICBMHU

40-50off
Saddlebrede men's sport shirts
& sweaters. Orig. 24.00-60.00
Sale 13.99-34.99
Also available min Big & Tall at slightly
higher prices


00000000U


Connect with us for special offers and promotions at Belk com/getconnecTed


*If you're 55 or older, take an extra 20% off storewide, or 15% off in out home & shoes, 10% off electrics & coffee departments with your Belk Rewards
Card; 15% off -': off in our home & shoes departments with any other form of payment, on yoL. .i iale and clearance purchases.
'Excludes Red '. ELiC,;:. Night Ovwls. Doorbusters, Bonus Buys. Super Buys, Everyday Values, Alegria, v-.'- .. -Sherman, Better & Designer
Intimates, Brighton Casio. Clansonic. Coacr '. ;.- i nsko; designer sunglasses; Diane Von Furstenrberg; Fine Jewelry watches and
service plans; Gameday. Gear For Sports, j .. ,',. :, "- Spade, Keen, ladies designer, bridge & contemporary sportswear & dresses;
Levi's. Lilly Puiitzer. Lucchese, Mifnetonka V'- M.r- My Flat in London, Nanette Lepore, OrthaheelVionric, Rachel Roy. Roberto Coin,
Spanx. Stuart Weitzman, Thomas Dean. Trna Turhk, Trunk Show. -.'-, ,. Jer Armour, Vineyard Vines. Vitamix. Wusthof, non-merchandise depts, lease
depts. and Bolk gift cards. Frye and Brahmin excluded online. ", j .i prior purchases, phone or special orders or belk.com. Cannot be redeemed
for cash, credit or refund, used in combination with any other discount or coupon offer. Alu Belk Rewards card purchases are subject to credit approval
Valid November 5,2013


ITH s's


SALON

PROFESSIONAL

ACADEMY


all services performed by supervised students.
licensed by the florida commission for
independent education, lic. #3387.
1--l-,C


352.259.6717

11915 cr 103 I the villages, fl 32162 // located next to wal-mart on cr 466
www.thevillagestspa.com I facebook.com/villagestspa


manicure & pedicure 1 Expires11/30/13

+ 61Vj(.
hand & foot 0 99

paraffin treatment
Not valid with any other offers. No substitutions. .
May not be redeemed for cash.

Exie61/01
6.nsa husa vnng 6m-9m

colo & tyle- oly $9.9

Notvaidwih ny oteofr s.osbtttos


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, November 4, 2013






YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD
BILL KOCH............... ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR
SCOTT CALLAHAN .......................NEWS EDITOR Vi
GENE PACKWOOD ............ EDITORIAL CARTOONIST w dIm c o
< ^^ ^r r ^^www.dailycommercial.com


VOICE

Will FAA decision

mean higher rates?


Out of an abundance of caution,
airlines in 1966 began banning
or greatly restricting the in-flight
use of electronic devices. The fear
was that the devices would interfere
with cockpit instrumentation.
But the growing panoply and portabil-
ity of electronic devices smartphones,
laptops, notebooks, e-readers, games
- have become staples of modern life.
Even obnoxiously loud cellphone con-
versations have faded into our everyday
background noise.
The Consumer Electronics Associa-
tion says that a decade ago, 70 percent
of passengers carried electronic devic-
es when they traveled by plane. The most
popular devices were cellphones few
had Internet capability back then fol-
lowed by electronic calculators. An up-
dated survey by the association shows
that 99 percent of passengers travel with
some kind of electronic device, usually a
smartphone, closely followed by a laptop
computer.
The Federal Aviation Administration
this past week cleared the way for "gate-
to-gate" use of most electronic devices if
set to "airplane mode," requiring individ-
ual airlines to submit plans by year's end
to show they can safely manage radio in-
terference from the gadgets.
Foreign carriers, which generally take
their lead from the FAA, are expected to
follow quickly.
Laptops weighing more than 3 pounds
will have to be stowed during takeoffs
and landings as a precaution against the
devices flying around the cabin during
periods of heavy turbulence.
Now, passengers can use electronic de-
vices only when the aircraft is flying at an
altitude of 10,000 feet or higher.
Curiously, the one big exception is cell-
phones that operate through cellular
networks. That ban exists because of the
Federal Communications Commission,
which worries that cellular towers trying
to track phone calls from planes flying
hundreds of miles per hour will impair
service for ground-based users.
More and more airlines are offering
their passengers Wi-Fi to email, surf or
search the net. Wi-Fi works through sat-
ellites, not ground-based towers.
Approving the valuable use of electron-
ic devices aboard aircraft has been a long
time coming. Now, let's hope the airlines
can restrain themselves from trying to
charge passengers extra for playing 'An-
gry Birds."
Distributed by Scripps Howard News Service


The Daily Commercial

The newspaper of choice for Lake
and Sumter counties since 1875

EDITORIALS
Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board,
not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are
not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday,
Saturday and Sunday.
COLUMNS
Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and
picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reflect
the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a
diversity of views.
If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state
or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom-
mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL
34749-0007.
Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length.
The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published
with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.


NOBODY TOLD ME
AO NUT E4 NSA
GGING MERKEL'S
PHONE.. OR ABOUT
PROBLEMS WITH t1
OB ARE ROLLOUT...


I GUESS YOU
COULD SAY MY
PEOPLE KEPT
ME IN IHE
DARK ..,


OTHERVOICES

Ted Cruz and Ben Carson, the dream team


he presidential election
of 2016 will be a defining
moment for the nation
and for the Republican Party.
Not so for the Democrat-
ic Party. There's no controver-
sy among Democrats about
what America should be and
what their party is about: big
government, welfare state so-
cialism and secular human-
ism.
The only question about
the Democratic presidential
ticket is which welfare state
socialist, secular humanist
the party will nominate.
The picture for Republi-
cans is more complex, and
this makes Democrats hap-
py. They see Republican Par-
ty dissension as division and
weakness, which, in their
view, can only help Demo-
crats.
Key issues divide Republi-
cans about principles (what
is America about?) and politi-
cal strategy (what are the best
tactics for electing candi-
dates and advancing the party
agenda?).
So let me say what I see as
the Republican "dream team"
ticket for 2016: Sen. Ted Cruz
of Texas and retired neurosur-
geon Ben Carson.
Yes, I can hear Democrats
saying, "Oh yes, I hope Star is
right. This will guarantee an-
other four years of our big
government socialism. These
tea party whackos could nev-
er win."
And I can hear the Repub-
lican "establishment" saying
basically the same thing (any
chance these folks have more
in common with Democrats
than they do with real conser-
vatives?).
Both parties are being ham-
mered now in the polls, but
Republicans more than Dem-
ocrats. And among Republi-
cans, the tea party is really
being hammered.


Star
Parker

SCRIPPS HOWARD
NEWS SERVICE


.......o.......o.....................o........o.....
POLITICAL LEADERSHIP
IS NO DIFFERENT THAN
BUSINESS LEADERSHIP IN
THIS REGARD. POLLS REFLECT
YESTERDAY. LEADERSHIP
REFLECTS TOMORROW.
WHAT IS THE RELEVANT
INFORMATION WE SHOULD
BE LOOKING AT TODAY?
.......o.......o.....................o........o.....

So how can I seriously say
that a truly conservative tea
party ticket is the answer for
the Republican Party and the
country?
First, looking at polls is the
formula for political failure.
Apple co-founder and tech-
nology entrepreneur Steve
Jobs was widely quoted for
his disdain for market re-
search. Jobs' view was that
leaders and entrepreneurs
don't start by asking people
what they want, and then try-
ing to give it to them. Vision-
aries see what problems need
to be solved and deliver so-
lutions that customers never
dreamed of.
Political leadership is no
different than business lead-
ership in this regard. Polls re-
flect yesterday. Leadership re-
flects tomorrow.
What is the relevant infor-
mation we should be looking
at today?
We should be looking at the
ongoing dismal performance
of the American economy and
of the ongoing dismal state
and breakdown of the Ameri-
can family.
The polling data we should
look at is the deep dissatis-
faction Americans feel about


the state of the country, its di-
rection, and the low levels of
trust they have in their gov-
ernment and political leaders.
It's time for Americans to
have a real choice. We know
what the Democratic Party is
going to put on the table for
them.
A Cruz-Carson ticket would
give Americans a clear, no-
nonsense, honest alternative:
two Americans who are real-
ly committed to what Ameri-
ca is about and what made it
great. That is traditional val-
ues, limited government, free
markets and a strong national
allegiance and defense.
Given the sweeping demo-
graphic changes of the coun-
try, it can't hurt to hear this
from two self-made Ameri-
cans: one of Spanish-speak-
ing roots (Cruz's father em-
igrated from Castro's Cuba)
and one African-American
raised in a ghetto in Detroit.
Both are living examples
that personal success is not
about government programs
but about taking personal re-
sponsibility. That freedom is
about creating and serving,
not about claiming and tak-
ing. And neither has interest
in political game-playing.
Ironically, the tea party was
born when the Affordable
Care Act, otherwise known
as Obamacare, came to life.
Now, as the Obamacare di-
saster unfolds, Americans are
starting to understand what
the tea party saw then.
We shouldn't be trying to
drag the tea party back into
the amorphous masses. We
need the tea party out front
to lead.
I don't see a more power-
ful team to do this than Cruz-
Carson.
Star Parker is an author and presi-
dent of CURE, Center for Urban Re-
newal and Education in Washington,
D.C. Reach her at www.urbancure.org.


HAVE YOUR SAY
The Daily Commercial invites you
to write letters to the editor. Letters
should be no longer than 350 words.
They must be original, signed with the
full name of the writer, and include
the writer's address and telephone
number for verification. We reserve
the right to edit for length. Letters
also will be edited for grammar, clarity,
taste and libel. We accept no more
than two letters per month from the
same writer. No open letters, form
letters or copies of letters to third
parties will be published. We do not
publish unsigned letters. Submissions
are not returned. We retain the right
to archive and republish any material
submitted for publication.
You can submit your letters by:
Email (preferred) to:
letters@dailycommercial.com
By regular mail to:
Voices
PO. Box 490007
Leesburg, FL 34749-0007
By fax to: 325-365-1951


DOONESBURY


Editor's note: Garry Trudeau is on hiatus. This is a collection of some of his favorite strips.


Monday, November 4, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL





DAILY COMMERCIALMonday, November 4, 2013


TODAY




Breezy with times of
clouds and sun


Wir
cloud


HIGH LOW H
770 63 0




4 Pensacola ..... ........ .......
7


7 .... ..........
72154


TUESDAY




idy with intervals of
uds and sunshine

HIGH LOW
81 660


WEDNESDAY
.p*.



Warm with periods of
clouds and sunshine

HIGH LOW
840 670


Tallahassee.
73/52


Panama Cif'' .
73/55 ,.(....


For up to the minute and detailed Astor
weather information, go to: '-0- 86
OAccuWeather.com

The Villages 7/3
I .. U- atilla"
Oxor 77/64 4L77/64
Wildwood .Fmruitland Park Eustis
M7962 4 77/64 77/63 Sorrento
V~63 St^rranttto~l
\ -,clern n Q QL7r '

0. L.77164 hii
Lake Panaso 4L4812U .eeburg Tavares.......
7W2 Pnso 78i2E 7/63 77/63 |BR It DOM JiiJ~i~
78/62 Sumtervin e

/ 78/62 H
ushnell 4. nterHill
W2 40 !2II
Mc erde
batarr Ia 7 Sogn
Coveland Clermoni Shown
72 79/66 today *ea
Temperature
today's high
1 tonignt's Ic
r ^ ^ ^ ^ ljjjjj:::;;'; .................::::


Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ,


THURSDAY




Warm and humid with
periods of sun

HIGH LOW
860 66


FRIDAY

,,,,,. ;.


Not as warm with a
shower possible

HIGH LOW
78 61


SJacksonville
Lake City G L'W57
73/55 0 1||


Gainesville : Daytona Beach
74/57 77/66
... Ocala 4 ..
\77/5aj0h '.
S"' .-- 'Titusville
d-aebur 4 7M/I8
Orlando
S r Tampa 7/8 "!.
T a m 7 6.: Vero Beach
.895 --- ,80/71
: .etersburg -- 4

S Okeechobee .
Sarasota ., 78/69 .
82/65 \
." "" Palm Beaih
1 ; 81175
Ft. Myers. ,, i
is 84166 ^ .-Bl
s 8 Fort Laudule
athor.
te are Naples" 82/76 M t
es are ,,. iiii,
sand 85/67 5.1
'HL LMi~iami
MS. 821" 5I 6


Key Largo
..e Wae, t w 81/77


)2U13


83/78 0. -,,-


I FIV-DAYFOREA ST.O EEBR


Yesterday's National High/Low: (for the 48 contiguous states)
High 840 in Opa Locka, FL Low 150 in Stanley, ID


5
E101245Z678
0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10
Very High, 11+ Extreme
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index'
number, the greater the need for
eye and skin protection.


Flurr,', L-]
SnowV
I09e[3


The solunar period schedule allows planning
days so you will be fishing in good territory or
hunting in good cover during those times. Major
periods begin at the times shown and last for
1.5 to 2 hours. The minor periods are shorter.
Major Minor Major Minor
Today 12:22 a.m. 5:38a.m.11:20a.m. 6:07 p.m.
Tue. 12:22 p.m. 6:41 a.m. 12:56 p.m. 7:11 p.m.


I TE UNAND OON


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


Today
6:42 a.m.
5:40 p.m.
7:46 a.m.
6:48 p.m.


Tuesday
6:43 a.m.
5:39 p.m.
8:49 a.m.
7:45 p.m.


Rrst



Nov 9


Full


Nov17
Nov 17


Last New



Nov25 Dec 2


ITIEI


Homosassa
Day High Feet
Today 4:19 am......1.4
5:53 pm......1.2
Daytona Beach
Day High Feet
Today 8:06 am.....5.1
8:22 pm.....4.6


Low Feet
12:17 am .....0.3
12:57 pm ....-0.2

Low Feet
1:40 am....-0.3
2:22 pm....-0.1


High Feet
4:57 am......1.4
6:40 pm......1.2

High Feet
8:55 am.....5.2
9:12 pm..... 4.5


Low Feet
12:57 am .....0.3
1:41 pm....-0.2

Low Feet
2:26 am ....-0.3
3:10 pm....-0.1


I ATINAITE


City
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Santa Fe
St. Ste. Marie
Seattle
Shreveport
Spokane
Syracuse
Topeka
Tucson
Tulsa
Washington, DC
Wilmington, DE


Today
Hi LOW
65 48 pc
87 74t
58 37 pc
46 38 c
48 42 c
67 57 pc
39 23 c
44 28 s
62 47 c
78 51 s
65 53 c
49 39s
49 37s


Tuesday
Hi Lo W
65 47 s
86 73 t
53 26 sh
52 38 c
52 43 r
74 63t
39 30 sn
51 38 pc
59 41 r
71 45 s
6352r
56 47 pc
56 44 pc


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.


8:00 to 8:00

*same

great


rate

*- % 4-,irL
^^Monday Friday


Only From Munn's:




Evening Service Calls




....at Daytime Rates!


"You don't have to pay extra for an

evening service call. Munn's is the home

of 8 to 8 Same Great Rate. Emergency

services are also available. We're there

when you need us!"








1BO-80 UAR-R IR ^R














AIR CONDITIONING HEATING



...CONSIDER IT DONE


24/7/365


(352)-787-7741


/

FACTORY

AtuItORZeED p

DEALER






turn to the experts -


CACl 81 4363


215 SHw 412 wwmunircm ritad akF


i[ e "S = : U M
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are today highs for the
day. Forecast higMow temperatures are given for selected cities.

COOLOH_
I rInneagoi ,'-' 4
Bihine
709l_6,r S*W32 -
-. ml.^1m .F rib,,. ,'Ig,4M /*** ,EEI *'' ..,...
SSM V 'w a .O ns.Cnicago. 4942 no
n F WI". ,7,40 Cold Front
"6 4b rusCm, Walh.nglon WarmFront
409 6 ,J 4109 --
So i Stamtioary
Front
MS. 1.aAngela ASane
10S EliPao ICE ) ShowersM
"" \ \ T'-stormsa=
_vte,_ ._'.'P MRainaM
-Ib '4 . .711 -,',,, ,. .....


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte, NC


Today
Hi Lo W
43 28 s
61 44 pc
44 33 sh
54 30 s
62 39 s
49 36 s
48 35 s
35 22 c
66 44 s
41 20 c
43 28 pc
44 33 s
45 35 pc
39 23 s
65 45 pc
58 33 pc
58 35 s


Tuesday
Hi LOW
49 34 pc
57 34 sh
42 26 sn
55 39 pc
62 50 pc
56 42 pc
57 43 pc
37 29 pc
67 53 pc
38 20 c
47 31 c
47 41 pc
55 44 pc
46 34 pc
67 55 c
62 39 pc
59 44 c


City
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Concord, NH
Dallas
Dayton
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
El Paso
Fargo
Fairbanks
Flagstaff
Grand Rapids


Today
Hi LoW
41 21 c
55 46 pc
59 44 pc
52 42 pc
63 38s
42 20s
65 59c
56 43 pc
46 25 pc
58 40 c
49 42 pc
45 29r
73 53 pc
46 26 c
29 15 c
51 25 pc
53 43 pc


w^


Tuesday
Hi Lo W
31 23 sn
58 47 r
63 45 pc
58 44 pc
62 47 pc
46 27 pc
73 64 r
60 45 pc
38 23 sn
56 40 r
59 46 c
41 30 r
69 45 s
42 25 c
30 16 sf
47 16 pc
57 46 c


City
Great Falls
Greensboro, NC
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City


Today
Hi LoW
29 19 c
53 35 s
44 26 s
85 71 pc
71 65 c
56 44 pc
70 50 pc
61 48 c
66 47 pc
63 51 pc
62 44 pc
65 51 pc
54 45 pc
50 32 sh
64 42 pc
73 63 pc
47 40 s


Tuesday
Hi Lo W
37 25 c
57 44 c
48 35 pc
85 72 pc
78 68 t
60 47 c
73 54 pc
59 43 r
61 45 s
68 58 t
65 49 pc
70 55 c
55 47 r
46 35 r
66 50 pc
75 66 pc
52 48 pc


City
Norfolk, VA
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego


Today
Hi Lo W
50 47 pc
65 55 c
57 36 c
48 37 s
78 58 pc
49 35 pc
43 26 s
49 44 r
46 29 s
56 35 s
48 26 pc
52 38s
69 39 pc
62 49 pc
41 28 pc
72 66 sh
64 54 pc


Tuesday
Hi Lo W
58 52 c
63 44 r
49 32 r
55 46 pc
75 53 s
58 39 pc
46 34 pc
54 43 r
48 38 pc
59 47 c
56 29 s
57 47 c
69 41 s
61 53 sh
42 31 pc
77 67t
70 54 s


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, November 4, 2013


.,WMWW I
40-


M


R


re,
hs
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Sports
sports@dailycommercial.com


GOLF: Johnson cruises at HSBC / B6


Bl
DAILY COMMERCIAL
Monday, November 4, 2013


www.dailycommercial.comn
SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY
1 352-365-8208


Magic rout


Nets in Kidd's


coaching debut

Associated Press
ORLANDO Nikola Vucevic had 19 points
and 12 rebounds as the Orlando Magic routed the
Brooklyn Nets 107-86 on Sunday in Jason Kidd's
coaching debut.
Magic rookie Victor Oladipo scored 19 points, 14
in the second half, as Orlando won back-to-back
games for the first time since Dec. 19, 2012. An-
drew Nicholson added 17 points and 11 rebounds
for the Magic, who beat New Orleans 110-90 at
home last Friday night.
Brook Lopez led the Nets with 21 points. Paul
Pierce was the only other Net to score in double
figures with 16 points and he grabbed seven re-
bounds. The Nets (1-2) shot 38.2 percent for the
game.
The Magic (2-2) used a 17-4 run early in the third
quarter to break open a close game. They led by 15
points after three quarters, then Oladipo scored
six straight points at the start of the fourth.
His last basket was a steal off Nets' All-Star guard
Deron Williams and a breakaway dunk that put
Orlando up 82-61 with 10:11 left. The Nets never
got closer than 16 points after that.
Kidd was suspended two regular-season games
by the NBA after pleading guilty in a drunken
driving case. His presence didn't do much to in-
spire the Nets, who kept it close for a half, but got
run out of the building by a more aggressive and
SEE MAGIC I B2


JOHN RAOUX/AP
Orlando Magic's Arron Afflalo, right, looks for an opening to the
basket as he is guarded by Brooklyn Nets' Alan Anderson, left,
during the first half on Sunday in Orlando.


SO NEAR


YET SO FAR


STEPHEN BRASHEAR / AP
Seattle Seahawks kick returned Jermaine Kearse, upper left, fumbles the ball as he is tackled by Tampa Bay Buccaneers' Spencer
Larsen on Sunday in the first half of an NFL football game in Seattle. Tampa Bay kicker Michael Koenen recovered the fumble.

Bucs take 21-point lead, then bow to Seahawks in OT


TIM BOOTH
AP Sports Writer
SEATTLE Russell
Wilson and Marshawn
Lynch made the plays
to help the Seattle Se-
ahawks pull off the
greatest comeback
in franchise histo-
ry against the winless
Tampa Bay Bucca-
neers.
It was just anoth-
er ugly win during the
best start in Seattle's
history.
Steven Hauschka
kicked a 27-yard field
goal with 8:11 left in
overtime, and the Se-
ahawks overcame a


21-point deficit to beat
the Tampa Bay Bucca-
neers 27-24 on Sun-
day.
Trailing 21-0, Seattle
improved to 8-1, but
it was far from easy
against the winless
Buccaneers.
Russell Wilson threw
a 10-yard touchdown
pass to Doug Baldwin
with 1:51 left in regu-
lation to pull the Se-
ahawks even. Wil-
son then led Seattle
on a nine-play, 51-
yard drive in overtime
capped by Hauschka's
winner.
Seattle tied the fran-


chise record with its
12th straight home
victory, which coin-
cides with Wilson be-
ing a perfect 12-0 at
home as Seattle's start-
er.
But after being
pushed to the final
yard on the final play
last Monday at St. Lou-
is, the Seahawks had to
fight through another
sloppy effort to knock
off a double-digit un-
derdog.
Tampa Bay fell to 0-8
for the first time since
1985 when the Bucca-
neers started the sea-
son 0-9. They pushed


Seattle around at the
line of scrimmage,
watched Mike Glen-
non manage the game
well and saw Mike
James rush for a ca-
reer-best 158 yards.
But Seattle's defense
started getting stops
in the second half, the
Seahawks overcame
two interceptions
in the red zone and
Lynch overcame a sore
knee to have his best
game of the season.
It was Seattle's first
overtime home game
since losing to San
Francisco 33-30 early
SEE BUCS I B2


Johnson takes Cup lead with


dominating Texas victory


STEPHEN HAWKINS
AP Sports Writer
FORT WORTH, Texas -
Jimmie Johnson led 255 of
334 laps for a dominating
victory Sunday that put the
five-time champion back
in the Chase for the Sprint
Cup lead with two races
left in the season.
Johnson and Matt Kens-
eth arrived at Texas Motor
Speedway tied in points,
though Kenseth was the


leader based on his seven
wins.
Johnson got his sixth vic-
tory this season, becoming
only the second three-time
Cup winner at Texas. The
No. 48 Hendrick Chevrolet
team takes a seven-point
lead to Phoenix next week.
"I've been watching a lot
of MMA fighting lately, and
you'll fall into a rhythm and
think that somebody's got
a fight won, and it doesn't


end that way," Johnson
said. "It's how this is go-
ing to be. Matt didn't have
maybe the best day, but he
still finished fourth. This
thing is going to the last lap
at Homestead. It's going to
come down to mistake."
Kenseth was running
second behind Johnson
for much of the first half of
the race before getting pe-
nalized for speeding. That
SEE NASCAR I B2


Jimmie Johnson (48)
celebrates winning the
NASCAR Sprint Cup
series auto race on
Sunday at Texas Mo-
tor Speedway in Fort
Worth, Texas.
BRANDON WADE / AP


2211 U.S. HIGHWAY 441 LEESBURG
352-326-2327 WWW.DONSGOLFCARTS.NET


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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, November 4, 2013


LEADING OFF I NFL

in Sports Broncos coach needs heart surgery


ARNIE STAPLETON
AP Pro Football Writer


OVERHEARD
"Although I am disappointed I must take some
time away from the team to attend to this pre-
existing health condition, I understand that it's
the right thing to do.""

- JOHN FOX, Denver Broncos head coach


DENVER Den-
ver Broncos coach
John Fox needs heart
surgery and will miss
several weeks, team
spokesman Patrick
Smyth confirmed Sat-
urday night.
The 58-year-old Fox
will undergo aortic
valve replacement sur-
gery early next week at
a hospital in Charlotte,
N.C.
The Broncos did not
immediately name an
interim head coach.
Fox had been told
earlier about his heart
condition and was
hoping to put off the


DAY


operation until Febru-
ary. As part of his trip
to North Carolina over
the Broncos' bye week,
he met with his cardi-
ologist and was told to
seek medical attention
immediately if he felt
any discomfort.
On Saturday, Fox be-
came dizzy playing
golf near his offseason
home and was taken to
a hospital, where tests
revealed he couldn't
wait any longer to have
the surgery.
"I sincerely appre-
ciate all of the sup-
port from friends, Den-
ver Broncos fans and
so many around the
league today," Fox said


in a statement released
by the team Saturday
night. "Although I am
disappointed I must
take some time away
from the team to at-
tend to this pre-exist-
ing health condition, I
understand that it's the
right thing to do. I have
great confidence in our
coaches and players,
who are fully commit-
ted to our goals.
"I look forward to re-
turning to coaching as
soon as possible."
At 7-1, the Broncos
trail the Kansas City
Chiefs (8-0) in their
division, but they're
widely considered Su-
per Bowl favorites in


SCOREBOARD


NASCAR
NASCAR Sprint Cup-AAA Texas 500 Results
Sunday
At Texas Motor Speedway
Fort Worth, Texas
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (3) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 334 laps, 150
rating, 48 points.
2. (7) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 334,115, 42.
3. (12) Joey Logano, Ford, 334,117.7,42.
4. (6) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 334,119.4,41.
5. (11) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 334,105.1,39.
6. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 334,112.5,39.
7. (14) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 334, 93.7,37.
8. (19) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 334, 98.7,36.
9. (13) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 334, 89.4,36.
10. (26) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 334, 96.6,34.
11. (33) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 334, 86.7,33.
12. (18) Greg Biffle, Ford, 334, 86.1,33.
13. (5) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 334,102.3,32.
14. (15) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 334, 90.2,30.
15. (4) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 333, 80.4, 29.
16. (9) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 332, 78.1, 28.
17. (31) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 332, 70.5, 27.
18. (23) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 332, 61.8, 0.
19. (25) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 331, 63.5, 0.
20. (16) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 331,
71.5,24.
21. (10) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 331, 71, 23.
22. (21) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 331, 62.4, 0.
23. (36) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 331,58.5,0.
24. (20) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 331, 61.5, 20.
25. (30) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 331,49.2,19.
26. (28) David Gilliland, Ford, 330,52,18.
27. (17) Aric Almirola, Ford, 330, 63,17.
28. (39) David Reutimann, Toyota, 330,45.8,16.
29. (32) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 330,53,0.
30. (43) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 329,38.4,14.
31. (24) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 329,58.9,13.
32. (38) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 329,38.6,12.
33. (27) Casey Mears, Ford, 328,39.5,11.
34. (37) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 328,36.9,0.
35. (42) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 326,32.5,9.
36. (41) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, rear gear, 190,
27.8,0.
37. (1) Carl Edwards, Ford, engine, 187, 88, 8.
38. (8) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 147, 62.7, 6.
39. (34) Josh Wise, Ford, vibration, 145, 29.4, 0.
40. (22) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, engine, 144,
42.1,4.
41. (40) Timmy Hill, Ford, engine, 125, 27.9,3.
42. (29) David Ragan, Ford, engine, 81,42.2,3.
43. (35) Michael McDowell, Ford, vibration, 27.
Formula OneAbu Dhabi Grand Prix Results
Sunday
At Yas Marina circuit
Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
Lap length: 3.45 miles
1. Sebastian Vettel, Germany, Red Bull, 55 laps,
1:38:06.106,116.046 mph.
2. Mark Webber, Australia, Red Bull, 55,
1:38:36.935.
3. Nico Rosberg, Germany, Mercedes, 55,
1:38:39.756.
4. Remain Grosjean, France, Lotus, 55,
1:38:40.908.
5. Fernando Alonso, Spain, Ferrari, 55,
1:39:13.287.
6. Paul di Resta, Scotland, Force India, 55,
1:39:24.280.
7. Lewis Hamilton, England, Mercedes, 55,
1:39:25.373.
8. Felipe Massa, Brazil, Ferrari, 55,1:39:28.992.
9. Sergio Perez, Mexico, McLaren, 55,1:39:37.304.
10. Adrian Sutil, Germany, Force India, 55,
1:39:39.363.
11. Pastor Maldonado, Venezuela, Williams, 55,
1:39:42.095.
12. Jenson Button, England, McLaren, 55,
1:39:49.873.
13. Esteban Gutierrez, Mexico, Sauber, 55,
1:39:50.401.
14. Nico Hulkenberg, Germany, Sauber, 54, +1 lap.
15. Valtteri Bottas, Finland, Williams, 54, +1 lap.
16. Daniel Ricciardo, Australia, Toro Rosso, 54,
+1 lap.
17. Jean-Eric Vergne, France, Toro Rosso, 54,
+1 lap.
18. Giedo van der Garde, Netherlands, Caterham,
54, +1 lap.
19. Charles Pic, France, Caterham, 54, +1 lap.
20. Jules Bianchi, France, Marussia, 53, +2 laps.


BUCS
FROM PAGE B1

in the 2008 season. But
they had already pulled
out one major come-
back that was capped
in overtime earlier this
season at Houston in
a 23-20 win, and did it
again on Sunday.
The previous best
comeback for Seattle
came in 1995 when the
Seahawks fell behind
20-0 midway through


MAGIC
FROM PAGE B1

energetic Magic team the sec-
ond half.
Orlando outscored New Jersey
66-48 over the last two periods.
The Magic's reserves outscored
Brooklyn's 45-30.
Neither team was able to sus-
tain momentum for more than a


21. Max Chilton, England, Marussia, 53, +2 laps
National Football League
All Times EST
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 7 2 0 .778 234 175
N.Y Jets 5 4 0 .556 169 231
Miami 4 4 0 .500 174 187
Buffalo 3 6 0 .333 189 236
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 5 2 0 .714 187 131
Tennessee 4 4 0 .500 173 167
Houston 2 5 0 .286 122 194
Jacksonville 0 8 0 .000 86 264
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 6 3 0 .667 217 166
Cleveland 4 5 0 .444 172 197
Baltimore 3 5 0 .375 168 172
Pittsburgh 2 6 0 .250 156 208
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Kansas City 9 0 0 1.000 215 111
Denver 7 1 0 .875 343 218
San Diego 4 4 0 .500 192 174
Oakland 3 5 0 .375 146 199
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 5 4 0 .556 257 209
Philadelphia 4 5 0 .444 225 231
Washington 3 5 0 .375 203 253
N.Y Giants 2 6 0 .250 141 223
South
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 6 2 0 .750 216 146
Carolina 5 3 0 .625 204 106
Atlanta 2 6 0 .250 176 218
Tampa Bay 0 8 0 .000 124 190
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Green Bay 5 2 0 .714 212 158
Detroit 5 3 0 .625 217 197
Chicago 4 3 0 .571 213 206
Minnesota 1 7 0 .125 186 252
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 8 1 0 .889 232 149
San Francisco 6 2 0 .750 218 145
Arizona 4 4 0 .500 160 174
St. Louis 3 6 0 .333 186 226
Thursday's Game
Miami 22, Cincinnati 20, OT
Sunday's Games
Dallas 27, Minnesota 23
Tennessee 28, St. Louis 21
Carolina 34, Atlanta 10
N.Y Jets 26, New Orleans 20
Kansas City 23, Buffalo 13
Washington 30, San Diego 24, OT
Philadelphia 49, Oakland 20
Seattle 27, Tampa Bay 24, OT
Cleveland 24, Baltimore 18
New England 55, Pittsburgh 31
Indianapolis at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Arizona, Denver, Detroit, Jacksonville, N.Y Gi-
ants, San Francisco
Monday's Game
Chicago at Green Bay, 8:40 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 7
Washington at Minnesota, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 10
Detroit at Chicago, 1p.m.
Philadelphia at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Atlanta, 1p.m.
Oakland at N.Y Giants, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at Pittsburgh, 1p.m.
Carolina at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Denver at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
Houston at Arizona, 4:25 p.m.
Dallas at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Cleveland, Kansas City, N.Y Jets, New
England

the second quarter at
Denver and rallied for a
31-27 victory.
Wilson finished 19
of 26 for 219 yards and
two touchdowns. He
stood in against count-
less blitzes from the
Bucs defense and made
key completions in the
second half.
Lynch finished with
125 yards on 21 carries.
He missed time in the
first half with a sore knee
then returned to average
6 yards per carry.


Monday, Nov. 11
Miami at Tampa Bay, 8:40 p.m.
National Hockey League
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
TampaBay 14 10 4 0 20 47 35
Toronto 15 10 5 0 20 48 36
Detroit 15 9 4 2 20 38 37
Boston 13 8 5 0 16 36 25
Montreal 15 8 7 0 16 41 31
Ottawa 14 4 6 4 12 42 47
Florida 14 3 8 3 9 28 49
Buffalo 16 2 13 1 5 26 49
Metropolitan
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 15 11 4 0 22 48 33
N.Y Islanders 14 6 5 3 15 45 44
Washington 14 7 7 0 14 44 40
N.Y Rangers 13 6 7 0 12 25 38
Carolina 14 4 7 3 11 27 44
Columbus 13 5 8 0 10 33 36
New Jersey 13 3 6 4 10 26 38
Philadelphia 13 4 9 0 8 21 37
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Colorado 13 12 1 0 24 42 19
Chicago 14 9 2 3 21 50 39
St. Louis 12 8 2 2 18 44 29
Minnesota 14 7 4 3 17 34 34
Nashville 14 7 5 2 16 31 40
Dallas 14 6 6 2 14 37 42
Winnipeg 15 5 8 2 12 35 45
Pacific
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 14 10 1 3 23 53 27
Anaheim 15 11 3 1 23 50 39
Phoenix 15 10 3 2 22 51 46
Vancouver 16 10 5 1 21 46 41
Los Angeles 15 9 6 0 18 43 40
Calgary 13 5 6 2 12 39 47
Edmonton 15 3 10 2 8 36 59
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Saturday's Games
Washington 3, Florida 2, SO
Phoenix 3, San Jose 2, SO
Chicago 5, Winnipeg 1
Anaheim 6, Buffalo 3
Tampa Bay 4, St. Louis 2
Philadelphia 1, New Jersey 0
N.Y Islanders 3, Boston 1
N.Y Rangers 5, Carolina 1
Pittsburgh 3, Columbus 0
Vancouver 4, Toronto 0
Colorado 4, Montreal 1
Detroit 5, Edmonton 0
Nashville 4, Los Angeles 3
Sunday's Games
Dallas 4, Ottawa 3, SO
Calgary at Chicago, late
New Jersey at Minnesota, late
Today's Games
Anaheim at N.Y Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.
Tuesday's Games
Dallas at Boston, 7 p.m.
N.Y Islanders at Washington, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Columbus, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Carolina, 7:30 p.m.
Calgary at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Vancouver at Phoenix, 9p.m.
Buffalo at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
NYC Marathon Results
At New York
Sunday
Men
1. Geoffrey Mutai, Kenya, 2:08:24.
2. Tsegaye Kebede, Ethiopia, 2:09:16.
3. Lusapho April South Africa, 2:09:45.
4. Julius Arile, Kenya, 2:10:03.
5. Stanley Biwott, Kenya, 2:10:41.
6. Masato Imai, Japan, 2:10:45.
7. Jackson Kiprop, Uganda, 2:10:56.
8. Peter Cheruiyot Kirui, Kenya, 2:11:23.
9. Wesley Korir, Kenya, 2:11:34.
10. Daniele Meucci, Italy, 2:12:03.

Glennon was 17 of 23
for 168 yards and two
touchdowns. He man-
aged the game almost
flawlessly in the first
half, but could not sus-
tain drives in the sec-
ond half and gave Seat-
tle a chance to rally.
Glennon hit 10 of his
first 11 passes, includ-
ing touchdown pass-
es of 12 yards to Tim
Wright and 20 yards
to Tiquan Underwood
as the Bucs dominat-
ed the first half. Glen-


few possessions in the first half.
The Magic started the game
with a 5-0 run and that was the
biggest lead of the first half for
either team. There were five ties
and 12 lead changes in the first
24 minutes that ended with Or-
lando squeezing out a 41-28 lead.
Kidd made good on his pre-
game promise to closely moni-
tor playing time, pulling all five
starters by the 2-minute mark of
the first period. Pierce was the


11. Yuki Kawauchi, Japan, 2:12:29.
12. Stephen Kiprotich, Uganda, 2:13:05.
13. Ryan Vail, Portland, Ore., 2:13:23.
14. Jeffrey Eggleston, Boulder, Colo., 2:16:35.
15. Bob Tahri, France, 2:18:16.
16. Khalid En Guady, Morocco, 2:22:03.
17. Radoslaw Dudycz, Poland, 2:22:07.
18. Jovadir Acedo, Brazil, 2:22:34.
19. Tesfaye Assefa Dube, New York, 2:22:38.
20. Christian Thompson, Wyncote, Pa., 2:22:48.
21. Danilo Goffi, Italy, 2:23:22.
22. Michael Cassidy, Staten Island, N.Y, 2:23:46.
23. Meb Keflezighi, San Diego, 2:23:47.
24. Kevin Pool, Folsom, Calif., 2:24:03.
25. Ryan Johns, Princeton, N.J., 2:25:08.
Women
1. Priscah Jeptoo, Kenya, 2:25:07.
2. Buzunesh Deba, Bronx, N.Y, 2:25:56.
3. Jelena Prokopcuka, Latvia, 2:27:47.
4. Christelle Daunay, France, 2:28:14.
5. Valeria Straneo, Italy, 2:28:22.
6. Kim Smith, Prividence, R.I., 2:28:49.
7. Sabrina Mockenhaupt, Germany, 2:29:10.
8. TigistTufa Demisse, Bronx, N.Y, 2:29:24.
9. Edna Kiplagat, Kenya, 2:30:04.
10. Diane Nukuri-Johnson, Iowa City, 2:30:09.
TENNIS
ATP World Tour BNP Paribas Masters Results
Sunday
At Palais Omnisports de Paris-Bercy
Paris
Purse: $4.42 million (Masters 1000)
Surface: Hard-Indoor
Singles
Championship
Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, def. David Ferrer (3),
Spain, 7-5,7-5.
Doubles
Championship
Bob and Mike Bryan (1), United States, def. Alex-
ander Peya, Austria, and Bruno Scares (2), Brazil,
6-3,6-3.
Fed Cup Results
WORLD GROUP
Final
At Tennis Club Cagliari
Cagliari, Italy
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
Italy 4, Russia 0
Singles
Roberta Vinci, Italy, def. Alexandra Panova, Russia,
5-7,7-5, 8-6.
Sara Errani, Italy, def. Irina Khromacheva, Rus-
sia, 6-1,6-4.
Reverse Singles
Sara Errani, Italy def. Alisa Kleybanova, Russia,
6-1,6-1.
Roberta Vinci, Italy, vs. Irina Khromacheva, Russia,
abandoned.
Doubles
. I 1',1 0i1l iI , ,, -1dIIII 1
4-6,6-2,104.
WTA Garanti Koza Tournament of Champions
Results
Sunday
At Armeec Arena
Sofia, Bulgaria
Purse: $750,000
Surface: Hard-Indoor
Singles
Championship
Simona Halep (1), Romania, def. Sam Stosur (4),
Australia, 2-6,6-2,6-2.
Sunday's Sports Transactions
BASEBALL
American League
DETROIT TIGERS Named Brad Ausmus man-
ager and agreed to terms with him on a three-year
contract. Agreed to terms with bench coach Gene
Lamont on a two-year contract.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
DETROIT RED WINGS Recalled D Adam Almquist
from Grand Rapids (AHL).
MINNESOTA WILD -Recalled F Carson McMillan
from Iowa (AHL).
PHOENIX COYOTES Assigned D Brandon Gormley
to Portland (AHL).

non's first two TD pass-
es capped the Bucs'
two longest touchdown
drives of the season.
But Glennon and the
Bucs failed to score af-
ter the opening drive of
the second half and Se-
attle staged its rally.
James ran for a ca-
reer-best 158 yards for
Tampa Bay and threw a
2-yard TD pass to Tom
Crabtree on a jump
pass late in the second
quarter to give the Bucs
a 21-0 lead.


only starter to play more than
27 minutes in the game.
The revolving door made it
difficult to get into a flow offen-
sively, but Brooklyn still man-
aged a 22-22 standoffwith scor-
ing contributions from seven of
the 10 who played.
Vucevic hit a hot streak late in
the second quarter, scoring 10
straight Magic points. The cen-
ter was the only Orlando player
in double figures at halftime.


TV2DAY
NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE
8:25 p.m.
ESPN Chicago at Green Bay
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
NBCSN -Anaheim at N.Y. Rangers


NASCAR
FROM PAGE B1

dropped Kenseth to
16th place and more
than 28 seconds back,
though the No. 20 Joe
Gibbs Racing Toyo-
ta recovered to finish
fourth.
"We were just be-
ing too aggressive.
Honestly, the 48 had
us ... they were just
dominant all week-
end," Kenseth said.
"That speeding pen-
alty got us behind us.
We definitely didn't
need that, but really
don't know if the end
of the day that it real-
ly affected our finish
much."
Johnson got his
66th career victory,
and won at Texas for
the second fall in a
row. He has a record
24 Chase victories.
Last November,
Johnson also left the
Lone Star State with
a seven-point lead.
Brad Keselowski over-
came that the last two
races to give Roger
Penske his first Cup
championship.
Dale Earnhardt Jr.
had his fifth runner-
up finish of the sea-
son, rolling across
the line more than
4 seconds after his
Hendrick team-
mate. Earnhardt has
now finished top 10
in six of the last sev-
en Chase races, but
has still gone 55 races
since he has won.
Joey Logano fin-
ished third ahead of
Kenseth.
At Phoenix, where


the Chase goes next
Sunday, Johnson is a
four-time winner and
finished second. His
average finishing spot
of 6.4 there is signifi-
cantly better than the
17.2 for Kenseth, who
had one victory at
Phoenix and finished
seventh there eight
months ago.
Kenseth was run-
ning second just past
the midway point at
the high-banked 1/-
mile Texas track when
Johnson pulled down
pit road, a lap before
Kenseth came in as
the last to pit on a cy-
cle of green-flag stops.
But Kenseth was
caught speeding on pit
road and had to serve
a drive-through penal-
ty. By time he got back
on the track, he was
the last car on the lead
lap and about 25 sec-
onds further behind
than he had been be-
fore the two had pitted
on consecutive laps.
There was a caution
a few laps later that
got Kenseth up three
spots, and more im-
portantly tightened
up the field.
Within a few laps
after the ensuring re-
start, Kenseth was
back in the top 10 and
within 8 seconds of
Johnson.
By then, Kyle Busch
had moved back into
second, the same spot
he had been before a
right front tire went
down and he went
high to scrap in the
wall on lap 57 to bring
out a caution.


When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to
report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches
of recreational and youth leagues can send game results,
statistics, team and action photos, and we'll publish them
in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can
send us individual photos and accomplishments.

Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com




CONTACTS

SPORTS EDITOR or 352-365-8279.
FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Amateur Listings (cl-
------------- Amateur Listings (col-
FAX 352-365-1951 lege scholarships, meeting
EMAIL announcements, schedule
sports@dailycommercial.com changes, outdoors notices) can
* Schools or coaches can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or
report game results after 6 emailed to sports@dailycom-
p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, mercial.com


the AFC with a high-
octane offense led by
Peyton Manning and
a star-studded defense
that recently was bol-
stered by the return of
All-Pro linebacker Von
Miller from a suspen-
sion.
Their next game is
Nov. 10 against AFC
West foe San Diego.
Although it hasn't
been determined who
will serve as inter-
im head coach dur-
ing Fox's absence, de-
fensive coordinator
Jack Del Rio is a logi-
cal choice because he
spent nine seasons as
the Jacksonville Jag-
uars' head coach.





Monday, November 4, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Chiefs top Bills to remain unbeaten


JOHN WAWROW
AP Sports Writer

ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. -
The Kansas City Chiefs can
thank their opportunistic
defense for keeping their
perfect start intact.
Sean Smith returned an
interception 100 yards for a
touchdown and Tamba Hali
scored on an 11-yard fumble
return in a 23-13 win over
the Buffalo Bills on Sunday.
The defense made up for a
sputtering offense that man-
aged just 210 yards, and for
its own deficiencies.
The Chiefs gave up a sea-
son-worst 470 yards to a Bills
offense that was led by un-
drafted rookie JeffTuel, mak-
ing his first career start.
Kansas City (9-0) remained
the NFL's only undefeated
team and matched the best
start in franchise history set
in 2003. The Chiefs now en-
ter their bye week before a
key AFC West showdown
against Peyton Manning and
the Denver Broncos (7-1) on
Nov. 17.
The Chiefs held an op-
ponent to 17 points or few-
er for the ninth straight time
- matching the NFL record
set by the Atlanta Falcons
in 1977. And they extend-
ed their impressive worst-to-
first turnaround under first-
year coach Andy Reid, who
has transformed a franchise
that finished with a league-
worst 2-14 record last season.
The Bills (3-6) were un-
able to overcome their own
errors despite dominating
nearly every offensive cat-
egory. Buffalo had the edge
in yards and first downs (25-
15), and its 77 plays were 23
more than Kansas City ran.

JETS 26, SAINTS 20

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.
- Nick Folk remained per-
fect this season by kick-
ing four field goals, Rex
Ryan's defense held Drew
Brees and the high-scoring
Saints to six points in the
second half, and NewYork
had seven plays of at least
19 yards in an upset of New
Orleans.
Ryan is now 7-3 against
his brother, Rob, and the
Jets (5-4) maintained their


BILL WIPPERT / AP
Buffalo Bills running back Fred Jackson (22) stiff-arms Kansas City Chiefs strong safety Eric Berry (29) on Sunday dur-


ing the third quarter in Orchard Park, N.Y.

string of alternating wins
and losses. They tied the
2005 New England Patriots
for the longest such string to
begin a season, according to
STATS.
Folk is 23 for 23 on field
goals and 14 of 14 on extra
points.
Interceptions by Demario
Davis and Antonio
Cromartie highlighted New
York's solid defensive per-
formance, and former Saints
running back Chris Ivory
rushed for 139 yards and a
touchdown.

COWBOYS 27, VIKINGS 23
ARLINGTON, Texas -
Tony Romo threw for 337
yards and two touchdowns,
including the go-ahead
score to Dwayne Harris with
35 seconds left, and the
Cowboys beat the Vikings.
Romo's 7-yard pass to
Harris answered an 11-
yard touchdown by Adrian
Peterson that had given
Minnesota a 23-20 lead. The
East Texas kid raised on the
Cowboys (5-4) had 140 yards
rushing in his first game at
their $1.2 billion stadium.
Christian Ponder threw
for a touchdown and ran
for another score against
his hometown team, but it
wasn't enough to avoid a
fourth straight loss for the
Vikings (1-7).


PANTHERS 34, FALCONS 10

CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
Cam Newton threw for one
touchdown and ran for an-
other to overcome a shaky
start, the defense inter-
cepted Matt Ryan three
times and Carolina beat
the Falcons for its fourth
straight victory.
Newton had two first half
interceptions and wasn't
sharp on his deep balls, reg-
ularly overthrowing his re-
ceivers. Yet he bounced back
to throw for 249 yards, in-
cluding a 14-yard touch-
down pass to tight end Greg
Olsen. He also ran for an
8-yard touchdown for the
Panthers (5-3).
Fullback Mike Tolbert
scored his fifth touchdown
in the last four games on a
4-yard burst and cornerback
Drayton Florence intercept-
ed Ryan and returned it 38
yards for a score to seal the
win.

REDSKINS 30, CHARGERS 24,
OT

LANDOVER, Md. (AP) -
Darrel Young scored three
times, including a 4-yard
run in overtime that gave
the Redskins a win over the
Chargers.
Young stormed his way
into the end zone 6:01 into
the extra period, with the


Redskins scoring on their
first drive after winning
the coin toss at the end of
regulation.
Washington blew a 10-
point lead in the final min-
utes of the fourth quarter,
but a goal-line stand at the
1-yard line helped send the
game to overtime.
Robert Griffin III complet-
ed 23 of 32 passes for 291
yards with one intercep-
tion and ran six times for 17
yards, including a 10-yard
ramble that ended when
he was flung to the turf by
Thomas Keiser near the
sideline.

TITANS 28, RAMS 21

ST. LOUIS (AP) --Chris
Johnson ran for 150 yards
and two touchdowns and
the Titans got the best of
Jeff Fisher, who coached
them for 16 seasons, and the
Rams.
Johnson's 19-yard scor-
ing run snapped a tie with
2:54 to go and came a snap
after Jurrell Casey sacked
and stripped quarterback
Kellen Clemens, and Derrick
Morgan recovered.
The Rams (3-6) got a sec-
ond straight 100-yard game
from rookie Zac Stacy, who
had 127 yards on 27 carries
and two touchdowns.
The Titans (4-4) snapped


a three-game losing streak
and won after their bye
against a team on short rest.

EAGLES 49, RAIDERS 20

OAKLAND, Calif. -Nick
Foles tied an NFL mark with
seven touchdown pass-
es and threw for 406 yards
to revitalize Philadelphia
in a 49-20 victory over the
Oakland Raiders on Sunday.
The backup quarterback
connected three times with
Riley Cooper to become the
seventh passer in NFL his-
tory with seven TD tosses
in a game. Peyton Manning
did it for Denver on open-
ing night this season against
Baltimore.
Foles also threw scor-
ing passes to Brent Celek,
Zach Ertz, LeSean McCoy
and DeSean Jackson as the
Eagles (4-5) looked nothing
like the offense that failed to
score a touchdown in each
of the past two weeks.

BROWNS 24, RAVENS 18
CLEVELAND Jason
Campbell threw three
touchdown passes two
to Davone Bess and
the Browns ended an 11-
game losing streak against
Baltimore.
Campbell's 3-yard pass to
Bess on fourth down with
three minutes left helped
the Browns (4-5) seal their
first win over Baltimore
since 2007.
The Ravens (3-5) lost their
third straight and didn't
win in the week following
a bye for the first time in
six tries under coach John
Harbaugh.
Baltimore's Joe Flacco had
a pair of TD passes to rook-
ie Marlon Brown. Flacco fin-
ished 24 of 41 for 250 yards.

PATRIOTS 55, STEELERS 31
FOXBOROUGH, Mass. -
Tom Brady threw for sea-
son highs of 432 yards and
four touchdowns, Rob
Gronkowski had a career-
high nine receptions and
the Patriots racked up the
most points ever scored
against Pittsburgh.
Brady had 252 yards pass-
ing in the first half, more
than he had in five of his
other eight games for New
England (7-2).


Panthers 34, Falcons 10
Atlanta 0 10 0 0 10
Carolina 7 7 3 17 34
First Quarter
Car-Tolbert 4 run (Gano kick), 6:13.
Second Quarter
At-FG Bryant 28,14:09.
Car-Olsen 14 pass from Newton (Gano kick), 4:14.
At-Gonzalez 17 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick), 1:55.
Third Quarter
Car-FG Gano 55,12:00.
Fourth Quarter
Car-Newton 8 run (Gano kick), 9:00.
Car-Florence 38 interception return (Gano kick),
8:30.
Car-FG Gano 20,1:13.
A-73,720.
Atl Car
First downs 12 27
Total Net Yards 289 373
Rushes-yards 20-78 33-131
Passing 211 242
Punt Returns 1-16 1-24
Kickoff Returns 2-59 0-0
Interceptions Ret. 2-0 3-39
Comp-Att-lnt 20-27-3 23-37-2
Sacked-Yards Lost 1-8 1-7
Punts 545.0 3-42.7
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 1-0
Penalties-Yards 7-59 2-15
Time of Possession 23:35 36:25
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Alanta, Jackson 13-57, Rodgers 5-19,
Ryan 2-2. Carolina, Stewart 943, D.Williams 1342,
Tolbert 6-24, Newton 5-22.
PASSING-Atlanta, Ryan 20-27-3-219. Carolina, New-
ton 23-37-2-249.
RECEIVING-Atlanta, Gonzalez 6-81, Rodgers 6-25,
Douglas 3-82, Jackson 3-19, D.Johnson 1-10,
Dr.Davis 1-2. Carolina, LaFell 6-74, Olsen 4-66,
Smith 4-52, Stewart 3-22, Tolbert 3-13, D.Williams
2-12, Ginn Jr. 1-10.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.
Titans 28, Rams 21
Tennessee 7 0 7 14 28
St. Louis 0 7 7 7 21
First Quarter
Ten-Greene 5 run (Bironas kick), 11:53.
Second Quarter
StL-Stacy 3 run (Zuerlein kick), 9:37.
Third Quarter
StL-Stacy 9 run (Zuerlein kick), 9:09.
Ten-C.Johnson 14 run (Bironas kick), 4:58.
Fourth Quarter
Ten-Locker 5 run (Bironas kick), 9:42.
StL-Cook 10 pass from Clemens (Zuerlein kick),
6:15.
Ten-C.Johnson 19 run (Bironas kick), 2:54.
A-54,617.
Ten StL
First downs 22 21
Total Net Yards 363 363
Rushes-yards 35-198 32-160
Passing 165 203
Punt Returns 2-8 3-33
Kickoff Returns 3-85 1-25
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 2-3
Comp-Att-lnt 13-22-2 20-35-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 4-20 2-7
Punts 545.6 5-48.4
Fumbles-Lost 1-0 2-2
Penalties-Yards 3-30 6-44
Time of Possession 27:09 32:51
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Tennessee, C.Johnson 23-150, Greene
9-38, Locker 3-10. St. Louis, Stacy 27-127, Clem-
ens 1-16, Cunningham 3-11, Austin 1-6.
PASSING-Tennessee, Locker 13-22-2-185. St.
Louis, Clemens 20-35-0-210.


RECEIVING-Tennessee, Wright 3-69, C.Johnson
3-20, Hunter 2-13, Walker 2-13, Greene 1-28,
Mooney 1-22, Williams 1-20. St. Louis, Stacy 6-51,
Givens 4-55, Cook 3-36, Kendricks 3-13, Quick
2-30, Pettis 1-13, Bailey 1-12.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-St. Louis, Zuerlein 44 (WR).
Chiefs 23, Bills 13
Kansas City 0 3 10 10 23
Buffalo 7 3 3 0 13
First Quarter
Buf-Goodwin 59 pass from Tuel (Carpenter kick),
1:52.
Second Quarter
KC-FG Succop 27, 7:30.
Buf-FG Carpenter 26,1:47.
Third Quarter
KC-S.Smith 100 interception return (Succop kick),
10:58.
KC-FG Succop 41, 3:57.
Buf-FG Carpenter 30, :20.
Fourth Quarter
KC-Hali 11 fumble return (Succop kick), 12:47.
KC-FG Succop 39, 2:13.
A-68,159.
KC Buf
First downs 15 25
Total Net Yards 210 470
Rushes-yards 23-95 38-241
Passing 115 229
Punt Returns 1-0 3-27
Kickoff Returns 4-84 1-24
Interceptions Ret. 2-101 0-0
Comp-Att-lnt 19-29-0 18-39-2
Sacked-Yards Lost 2-9 0-0
Punts 6-52.8 3-36.0
Fumbles-Lost 1-0 1-1
Penalties-Yards 5-38 648
Time of Possession 29:46 30:14
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Kansas City, Charles 17-90, A.Smith
4-7, Sherman 1-2, McCluster 1-(minus 4). Buffalo,
Spiller 12-116, Jackson 16-77, Choice 5-17, Tuel
3-17, Johnson 1-10, Summers 14.
PASSING-Kansas City, A.Smith 19-29-0-124. Buf-
falo, Tuel 18-39-2-229.
RECEIVING-Kansas City, Bowe 7-67, Charles 6-6,
Avery 3-22, McCluster 2-9, Fasano 1-20. Buffalo,
Johnson 5-36, Woods 444, Chandler 3-26, Good-
win 2-64, Spiller 2-39, Jackson 1-22, Graham
1-(minus 2).
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.
Cowboys 27, Vikings 23
Minnesota 3 7 7 6 23
Dallas 3 3 14 7 27
First Quarter
Dal-FG Bailey 41, 6:51.
Min-FG Walsh 23, 2:08.
Second Quarter
Dal-FG Bailey 44, 6:35.
Min-Ponder 6 run (Walsh kick), 1:41.
Third Quarter
Dal-Witten 26 pass from Romo (Bailey kick), 11:38.
Dal-Hayden fumble recovery in end zone (Bailey
kick), 11:28.
Min-Rudolph 31 pass from Ponder (Walsh kick),
8:11.
Fourth Quarter
Min-Peterson 11 run (kick failed), 5:40.
Dal-Harris 7 pass from Romo (Bailey kick), :35.
A-85,360.


First downs
Total Net Yards
Rushes-yards
Passing
Punt Returns
Kickoff Returns
Interceptions Ret.
Comp-Att-Int


Dal
20
350
936
314
15
2-60
1-0
3451-1


Sacked-Yards Lost 2-12 3-23
Punts 3-37.7 544.4
Fumbles-Lost 2-1 0-0
Penalties-Yards 4-35 545
Time of Possession 31:27 28:33
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Minnesota, Peterson 25-140, Ponder
4-29. Dallas, Murray 4-31, Romo 1-8, Randle 1-3,
Dunbar 3-(minus 6).
PASSING-Minnesota, Ponder 25-37-1-236. Dallas,
Romo 34-51-1-337.
RECEIVING-Minnesota, Jennings 6-56, Carlson
4-23, Peterson 3-37, Wright 3-31, Patterson 3-13,
Rudolph 2-35, Simpson 2-24, Felton 1-11, Gerhart
1-6. Dallas, Witten 8-102, Beasley 6-68, Bryant
6-64, Murray 6-19, Dunbar 3-17, Williams 2-33, Har-
ris 2-13, Hanna 1-21.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.
Jets 26, Saints 20
New Orleans 7 7 3 3 20
N.Y.Jets 3 17 3 3 26
First Quarter
NYJ-FG Folk 39, 5:41.
NO-Graham 51 pass from Brees (Hartley kick),
2:45.
Second Quarter
NYJ-FG Folk 21,10:04.
NO-Graham 10 pass from Brees (Hartley kick),
7:51.
NYJ-Ivory 3 run (Folk kick), 2:39.
NYJ-Smith 3 run (Folk kick), :37.
Third Quarter
NYJ-FG Folk 47,11:57.
NO-FG Hartley 55,1:46.
Fourth Quarter
NYJ-FG Folk 45,11:56.
NO-FG Hartley 43,3:06.
A-76,957.
NO NYJ
First downs 23 14
Total Net Yards 407 338
Rushes-yards 1341 36-198
Passing 366 140
Punt Returns 0-0 0-0
Kickoff Returns 3-61 5-134
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 2-0
Comp-Att-lnt 30-51-2 9-20-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 2-16 2-0
Punts 241.0 544.4
Fumbles-Lost 1-0 0-0
Penalties-Yards 9-59 8-62
Time of Possession 29:32 30:28
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-New Orleans, Thomas 6-24, Ingram 4-19,
Collins 1-7, Brees 1-(minus 1), Hill 1-(minus 8).
N.Y Jets, Ivory 18-139, Powell 9-29, Smith 6-18,
Cribbs 3-12.
PASSING-New Orleans, Brees 30-51-2-382. N.Y
Jets, Smith 8-19-0-115, Cribbs 1-1-0-25.
RECEIVING-New Orleans, Graham 9-116, Thomas
7-66, Moore 6-70, Meachem 4-93, Stills 3-35,
Sproles 1-2. N.Y Jets, Salas 2-57, Sudfeld 246,
Cribbs 2-6, Nelson 1-19, Bohanon 1-11, Kerley 1-1.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-New Orleans, Hartley 43
(WL).
Redskins 30, Chargers 24 (OT)
San Diego 0 14 0 10 0 24
Washington 0 7 7 10 6 30
Second Quarter
SD-Lissemore 0 interception return (Novak kick),
11:35.
Was-Morris 5 run (Forbath kick), 5:25.
SD-Royal 15 pass from Rivers (Novak kick), :42.
Third Quarter
Was-Young 1 run (Forbath kick), 9:43.
Fourth Quarter
Was-Young 1 run (Forbath kick), 14:17.
Was-FG Forbath 47, 6:59.
SD-Allen 16 pass from Rivers (Novak kick), 4:10.


SD-FG Novak 19, :03.
Overtime
Was-Young 4 run, 8:59.
A-80,115.
SD Was
RFirst downs 25 27
Total Net Yards 410 500
Rushes-yards 16-69 40-209
Passing 341 291
Punt Returns 0-0 1-6
Kickoff Returns 5-114 5-102
Interceptions Ret. 1-0 2-15
Comp-Att-lnt 2946-2 23-32-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 1-0 0-0
Punts 4-40.0 3-41.0
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0
Penalties-Yards 7-63 7-65
Time of Possession 25:58 40:03
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-San Diego, Mathews 7-34, Woodhead
7-21, Rivers 2-14. Washington, Morris 25-121, Helu
Jr. 2-23, Moss 1-18, Reed 1-18, Griffin 1III 6-17,
Young 5-12.
PASSING-San Diego, Rivers 2946-2-341. Washing-
ton, Griffin 1III 23-32-1-291.
RECEIVING-San Diego, Woodhead 9-77, Allen
8-128, Gates 6-53, Royal 4-56, V.Brown 1-17, Green
1-10. Washington, Garcon 7-172, Hankerson 5-55,
Reed 4-37, Paulsen 3-9, Helu Jr. 1-6, Paul 1-6,
A.Robinson 14, Moss 1-2.
MISSED HELD GOALS-Washington, Forbath 25
(BK), 59 (BK).
Eagles 49, Raiders 20
Philadelphia 7 21 21 0 49
Oakland 3 10 0 7 20
First Quarter
Phi-Celek 2 pass from Foles (Henery kick), 5:18.
Oak-FG Janikowski 24, 2:02.
Second Quarter
Phi-Cooper 17 pass from Foles (Henery kick),
14:17.
Phi-Cooper 63 pass from Foles (Henery kick),
11:17.
Oak-Jennings 8 run (Janikowski kick), 7:34.
Phi-Ertz 15 pass from Foles (Henery kick), 4:03.
Oak-FG Janikowski 53, :03.
Third Quarter
Phi-McCoy 25 pass from Foles (Henery kick),
14:14.
Phi-Jackson 46 pass from Foles (Henery kick),
11:33.
Phi-Cooper 5 pass from Foles (Henery kick), 4:28.
Fourth Quarter
Oak-Stewart 2 run (Janikowski kick), :52.
A-51,751.
Phi Oak
First downs 21 29
Total Net Yards 542 560
Rushes-yards 24-128 33-210
Passing 414 350
Punt Returns 3-39 0-0
Kickoff Returns 3-64 3-63
Interceptions Ret. 2-20 0-0
Comp-Att-lnt 24-31-0 29-56-2
Sacked-Yards Lost 2-5 3-25
Punts 6-43.2 7-45.0
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 2-0
Penalties-Yards 7-52 8-70
Time of Possession 22:06 37:54
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Philadelphia, Brown 7-54, McCoy 12-
44, Cooper 0-18, Foles 3-14, Barkley 2-(minus 2).
Oakland, Jennings 15-102, Pryor 10-94, McFadden
5-12, Stewart 2-2, Reece 1-0.
PASSING-Philadelphia, Foles 22-28-0406, Bark-
ley 2-3-0-13. Oakland, Pryor 2241-2-288, McGloin
7-15-0-87.
RECEIVING-Philadelphia, Jackson 5-150, Cooper
5-139, Ertz 542, McCoy 4-36, Celek 3-27, Maehl


1-19, Brown 1-6. Oakland, Jennings 7-74, Streater
5-98, D.Moore 5-82, Rivera 4-36, Criner 3-32, Ford
2-28, Reece 2-22, McFadden 1-3.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.
Seahawks 27, Bucs 24 (OT)
TampaBay 0 21 3 0 0 24
Seattle 0 7 7 10 3 27
Second Quarter
TB-Wright 12 pass from Glennon (Lindell kick),
11:50.
TB-Underwood 20 pass from Glennon (Lindell
kick), 2:55.
TB-Crabtree 2 pass from James (Lindell kick), 2:16.
Sea-Kearse 16 pass from Wilson (Hauschka
kick), 1:40.
Third Quarter
TB-FG Lindell 33, 9:48.
Sea-Wilson 10 run (Hauschka kick), 5:00.
Fourth Quarter
Sea-FG Hauschka 36,14:47.
Sea-Baldwin 10 pass from Wilson (Hauschka
kick), 1:51.
Overtime
Sea-FG Hauschka 27, 8:11.
A-67,873.
TB Sea
First downs 24 26
Total Net Yards 350 415
Rushes-yards 38-205 35-198
Passing 145 217
Punt Returns 1-0 3-92
Kickoff Returns 243 3-56
Interceptions Ret. 2-9 0-0
Comp-Att-lnt 18-24-0 19-26-2
Sacked-Yards Lost 3-25 0-0
Punts 6-44.7 2-42.5
Fumbles-Lost 1-0 1-1
Penalties-Yards 8-99 6-67
Time of Possession 36:37 30:12
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Tampa Bay, James 28-158, Leonard 5-20,
Dawson 1-14, Glennon 4-13. Seattle, Lynch 21-125,
Turbin 8-37, Wilson 6-36.
PASSING-Tampa Bay, Glennon 17-23-0-168, James
1-1-0-2. Seattle, Wilson 19-26-2-217.
RECEIVING-Tampa Bay, Wright 4-58, Leonard
448, Lorig 3-14, Underwood 2-29, Jackson 2-11,
James 2-8, Crabtree 1-2. Seattie, Baldwin 6-75,
Lynch 4-16, Miller 3-49, Tate 3-29, Kearse 2-43,
Lockette 1-5.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.
Browns 24, Ravens 18
Baltimore 3 7 0 8 18
Cleveland 7 7 7 3 24
First Quarter
Cle-Bess 1 pass from Campbell (Cundiff kick),
8:24.
Bal-FG Tucker 51,3:38.
Second Quarter
Cle-Bess 20 pass from Campbell (Cundiff kick),
10:08.
Bal-M.Brown 19 pass from Flacco (Tucker kick),
:09.
Third Quarter
Cle-Barnidge 4 pass from Campbell (Cundiff
kick), 5:11.
Fourth Quarter
Bal-M.Brown 7 pass from Flacco (M.Brown pass
from Racco), 12:15.
Cle-FG Cundiff 22, :14.
A-71,513.


First downs
Total Net Yards
Rushes-yards
Passing
Punt Returns
Kickoff Returns
Interceptions Ret.


Comp-Att-lnt 24-41-1 24-37-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 5-27 3-18
Punts 742.6 748.1
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 1-1
Penalties-Yards 9-80 6-55
Time of Possession 29:10 30:50
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Baltimore, Flacco 3-25, Rice 11-17,
Pierce 6-11, Leach 1-2. Cleveland, McGahee 21-
31, Campbell 3-20, Whittaker 2-11, Gordon 1-10,
Gray 1-1.
PASSING-Baltimore, Racco 2441-1-250. Cleveland,
Campbell 23-35-0-262, Weeden 1-2-0-(minus 2).
RECEIVING-Baltimore, TSmith 5-78, M.Brown
5-54, J.Jones 4-27, Thompson 3-24, Rice 3-21,
Doss 2-29, Clark 1-14, Dickson 1-3. Cleveland,
Little 7-122, Ogbonnaya 5-39, Gordon 344, Bess
3-24, Whittaker 3-13, Edwards 1-10, Barnidge 1-4,
Cameron 14.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.
Patriots 55, Steelers 31
Pittsburgh 0 10 14 7 31
New England 7 17 3 28 55
First Quarter
NE-Amendola 34 pass from Brady (Gostkowski
kick), 4:00.
Second Quarter
NE-Gronkowski 19 pass from Brady (Gostkowski
kick), 10:30.
Pit-FG Suisham 30, 7:36.
NE-FG Gostkowski 20,3:51.
Pit-A.Brown 27 pass from Roethlisberger (Suisham
kick), 1:55.
NE-Ridley 1 run (Gostkowski kick), :10.
Third Quarter
Pit-Cotchery 20 pass from Roethlisberger (Suisham
kick), 11:02.
Pit-Cotchery 8 pass from Roethlisberger (Suisham
kick), 7:10.
NE-FG Gostkowski 32, 2:39.
Fourth Quarter
NE-Dobson 17 pass from Brady (Gostkowski
kick), 13:46.
NE-Ridley 5 run (Gostkowski kick), 9:16.
Pit-Cotchery 6 pass from Roethlisberger (Suisham
kick), 6:15.
NE-Dobson 81 pass from Brady (Gostkowski
kick), 5:15.
NE-Blount5 run (Gostkowski kick), 2:41.
A-68,756.
Pit NE
First downs 24 33
Total Net Yards 479 610
Rushes-yards 20-108 35-197
Passing 371 413
Punt Returns 1-24 243
Kickoff Returns 6-129 5-89
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 242
Comp-Att-Int 28-48-2 23-33-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 5-29 3-19
Punts 346.7 2-50.5
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 1-1
Penalties-Yards 8-96 3-30
Time of Possession 31:12 28:48
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Pittsburgh, Bell 1674, Dwyer 1-30,
FJones 1-5, Roethlisberger 2-(minus 1). New Eng-
land, Ridley 26-115, Blount547, Bolden 3-36,
Brady 1-(minus 1).
PASSING-Pittsburgh, Roethlisberger 2848-2400.
New England, Brady 23-33-0432.
RECEIVING-Pittsburgh, Cotchery 7-96, Sanders
6-98, A.Brown 5-71, Bell 4-65, Miller 4-43, Dw-
yer 1-23, FJones 14. New England, Gronkowski
9-143, Dobson 5-130, Amendola 4-122, Ridley 3-9,
Hoomanawanui 1-17, Edelman 1-11.




Monday, November 4, 2013


Seminoles have easy road for next 3 weeks


KAREEM COPELAND
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE -
Jimbo Fisher did not
vote his Florida State
Seminoles No. 1 in
the Coaches Poll last
week despite beating
N.C. State, No. 8 Clem-
son and Maryland by a
combined 132 points
in consecutive weeks.
Maybe that will change
after beating Miami by
27 points.
Third-ranked Flori-
da State has beaten its
three ranked opponents
by a combined 155-28
this season. Miami en-
tered Saturday ranked
No. 7, Clemson was No.
3 at the time and Mary-
land was No. 25. Fisher
laughed and dodged the
question after the Mi-
ami game when asked if
the team finally earned
his first-place vote.
"This is a very good


football team," Fish-
er said. "That's a very
good football team we
just played. Beating
them by four touch-
downs, you don't do
that very often. That's
doesn't happen.
"I'll say this, I love our
football team. I love our
football team."
The Seminoles (8-0,
6-0 Atlantic Coast Con-
ference) need just one
ACC victory to lock up
the Atlantic division and
secure a berth in the
conference champion-
ship game Dec. 7. They
are likely to be 20-plus-
point favorites at Wake
Forest (4-5, 2-4) and at
home against Syracuse
(4-4, 2-2) considering
they were a 21 /2-point
favorite against a top-10
Miami team.
"I give Florida State
a lot of credit," Miami
coach Al Golden said.
"That's an excellent


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STEVE CANNON /AP
Florida State running back Devonta Freeman (8) celebrates with
tight end Giorgio Newberry (4) and offensive linesman Bryan
Stork (52) on Saturday after scoring on a 5-yard touchdown run
against Miami in Tallahassee.


team and a deep team.
We have to play so
much better than that
and we did not."
The next real chal-
lenge for the No. 3 team
in the BCS standing is
rival Florida (4-4, 3-3
Southeastern Confer-
ence) in Gainesville,
Fla. on Nov. 30. Every-
thing sets up for Florida
State being undefeat-
ed before the Florida


/


game and remaining a
serious contender for a
spot in the BCS cham-
pionship game.
"We've played three
pretty emotional
games in a row," Fish-
er said. "We're going
to see if we can keep
continuing to mature
and preparing well and
growing as a team."
No. 1 Alabama and
No. 2 Oregon might be


the biggest obstacles to
Florida State's cham-
pionship aspirations,
and they're not on the
schedule. Not yet, any-
way. The Crimson Tide
(8-0, 5-0) still have No.
10 LSU and No. 7 Au-
burn on the schedule
before it qualifies for
the SEC championship
game. The Ducks (8-0,
5-0 Pac-12) have yet to
play sixth-ranked Stan-
ford, Arizona (6-2, 3-2)
and Oregon State (6-3,
4-2) before a possible
Pac-12 title game.
Florida State has the
easiest backstretch of
the three teams, but
that doesn't help the
Seminoles leapfrog if
the other two remain
undefeated.
"I feel like it could be
that special season if
we just play one game
at a time and still dom-
inate," Florida State
running back Devonta
Freeman said.
The Seminoles de-
fense has dominated
all season outside of
giving up 34 points to


Boston College, but the
play of Heisman Tro-
phy candidate Jameis
Winston has pushed
the team to elite status.
Fisher was thrilled to
see his team excel even
when Winston struggled
somewhat against the
Hurricanes. The redshirt
freshman still finished
with 325 yard passing
and a touchdown, but
also threw two intercep-
tions and had several in-
accurate throws. Win-
ston did bounce back
from a shaky first half
by completing 12-of-14
passes after halftime.
The defense shut out
the Hurricanes in the
second half, forced two
interceptions and got
off the field on fourth-
and-2 from the Florida
State 26.
"I definitely feel like
we did what we were
supposed to do," Flor-
ida State nose guard
Timmy Jernigan said.
"Miami is a great team;
they have a great rush-
ing attack, one of the
best in the country."


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DAILY COMMERCIAL





DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 4, 2013


TENNIS


Djokovic defeats Ferrer


in Paris Masters tourney


RUNG LATIEULE
Associated Press

PARIS Novak
Djokovic beat defend-
ing champion David
Ferrer 7-5, 7-5 Sun-
day to win the Par-
is Masters for his 17th
straight match victo-
ry and sixth title of the
season.
The second-seed-
ed Serb still has a slim
chance to finish the
season ranked ahead
of No. 1 Rafael Nad-
al. Djokovic improved
to 11-5 against Ferrer,
who was looking to
become the first play-
er to win back-to-back
Paris Masters titles.
Djokovic won the
last four games in
each set, rallying each
time from a 5-3 defi-
cit. Djokovic clinched
the victory when the
Spaniard sent a fore-
hand into the net.
Djokovic hit 34 win-
ners to 15 for Ferrer
and won 15 of 18 net
points.
Ferrer troubled
Djokovic early in the
match with his deep
groundstrokes and
hit a backhand drop
shot to break for a
3-2 lead. But Djokov-
ic started playing
more aggressive-
ly and broke back in
the 10th game with
a forehand winner


REMY DE LA MAUVINIERE /AP
Serbia's Novak Djokovic holds the trophy on Sunday after
winning the final of the Paris Masters tennis against Spain's
David Ferrer in the Paris Bercy stadium.


down the line.
The Serb went a
set up when Fer-
rer's forehand sailed
long. Djokovic, how-
ever, dropped serve
in the opening game
of the second set and
then needed to hit
two straight forehand
winners to save two


break points at 2-0.
Despite numer-
ous backhand er-
rors, Djokovic kept
the pressure on Fer-
rer, who again failed to
serve out the set at 5-4.
Djokovic capitalized
on a long forehand
from the Spaniard to
break back.


Italy beats Russia to win


4th Fed Cup championship


Associated Press

CAGLIARI, Sardinia-Italy won its
fourth Fed Cup title Sunday, sweep-
ing past a Russian team that was
without any of its top players because
of injuries and scheduling conflicts.
No. 7-ranked Sara Errani cruised
past Alisa Kleybanova before Fla-
via Pennetta and Karin Knapp won


the doubles.
Errani needed less than an hour
to win 6-1, 6-1 against the No.
183-ranked Kleybanova, who has
only recently returned to the cir-
cuit following treatment for Hodg-
kin's lymphoma.
Pennetta and Knapp beat new-
comers Margarita Gasparyan and
Irina Khromacheva 4-6, 6-2, 10-4.


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GOLF


PHOTOS BY EUGENE HOSHIKO /AP
Dustin Johnson of the United States, left, and his fiancee Paulina Gretzky, right, embrace after
winning the HSBC Champions golf tournament on Sunday at the Sheshan International Golf Club
in Shanghai.


Big game, big win for



Johnson in Shanghai


DOUG FERGUSON
AP Golf Writer

SHANGHAI It only
took four holes over two
days for Dustin Johnson
to lose a six-shot lead in
the HSBC Champions.
All that mattered was
the high-powered kick
down the stretch Sunday
at Sheshan Internation-
al that brought him the
biggest win of his career.
In what felt like the
end of a long year and
beginning of a new sea-
son, Johnson broke
loose from a three-way
challenge on the back
nine by playing a five-
hole stretch in 5-under
par. He closed with a
6-under 66 for a three-
shot win over Ian Poul-
ter to capture his first
World Golf Champion-
ship title.
"It's the biggest win
I've had in my career
so far," he said. "Those
guys put a lot of pres-
sure on me. I'm really
proud of the way I han-
dled myself."
This one required a
little bit of everything.
One shot behind with
six holes to play, he
smashed his drive over
the corner of a dog-
leg on the 13th hole
that left him a short
wedge into 5 feet for
birdie to catch Poult-
er. Right when it looked
as though he would fall
behind again, Johnson
holed a 20-foot birdie
putt on the next hole.
It was a pitch-in for


Johnson holds the champion's trophy.


eagle that effectively
won the tournament.
With a one-shot lead
playing the par-4 16th,
Johnson hit a 3-iron
about 25 yards short of
the green with a front
pin. The pitch was per-
fect, rolling into the
cup like it was a putt.
Johnson raised his left
hand and pumped his
right fist. And when he
waved to acknowledge
the Chinese fans, they
instinctively waved
back, as if Johnson
were the star attraction
in a parade.
That he was, and
there were plenty of


stars.
For most of the back
nine, the top seven play-
ers on the leaderboards
consisted of Johnson
and half of Europe's
winning Ryder Cup
team from Medinah.
Poulter and Graeme
McDowell, who each
had a share of the lead
at some point, looked
capable of winning un-
til Johnson's late hero-
ics. Right behind them
were Sergio Garcia, Jus-
tin Rose, Rory Mcllroy
and Martin Kaymer, all
firing away with birdies
on a soft course but un-
able to catch up.


EVERY SUNDAY 9AM-2PM WGC-HSBC Champions Par Scores
Sunday
/ k W SAt Sheshan International Golf Club
99 Shanghai
Purse: $8.5 million
Yardage: 7,266; Par: 72
Final
Dustin Johnson (550), $1,400,000 69-63-66-66 264 -24
I lan Poulter (315), $850,000 71-67-63-66 267 -21
Graeme McDowell (200), $480,000 69-69-64-66 268 -20
Sergio Garcia (140), $365,000 70-68-69-63 270 -18
Located in Evans Park Justin Rose (115), $300,000 68-71-65-68 272 -16
Ir e~ D-mW S1,mIl tou k. ra) Graham DeLaet (100), $231,500 71-68-65-69 273 -15
Fresh Veggies, Plants, Seafood, Homemade Rory Mcllroy (100), $231,500 65-72-67-69 273 -15
Jamie Donaldson, $161,667 67-74-66-67 274 -14
Bread, Cheese, Eggs, Local Honey, Bubba Watson (83), $161,667 68-69-69-68 274 -14
Gross fedBeef, Crfts and MORE) Martin Kaymer (83), $161,667 70-74-62-68 274 -14
^ ^ S 67'6 6 6 : 275 13
We are Pet and Familyfriendly! Keegan Bradley (69), $116,667 71-68-68-68-- 275 -13
Ernie Els (69), $116,667 69-69-71-66 275 -13
Boo Weekley (69), $116,667 70-67-69-69 275 -13
Phil Mickelson (62), $100,000 71-68-72-65 276 -12
WC Liang, $93,500 72-67-72-66 277 -11
Louis Oosthuizen (58), $93,500 70-70-70-67 277 -11
Jordan Spieth (55), $90,000 68-71-70-69 278 -10
Tommy Reetwood, $87,000 68-70-69-72 279 -9
Jin Jeong, $87,000 70-69-71-69 279 -9
Paul Casey (51), $84,000 69-73-69-69 280 -8
Gregory Bourdy, $75,100 75-68-67-71 281 -7
Bill Haas (46), $75,100 72-72-69-68 281 -7
Peter Hanson (46), $75,100 70-73-70-68 281 -7
Scott Hend, $75,100 69-74-66-72 281 -7
Mikko Ilonen, $75,100 72-69-72-68 281 -7
Matteo Manassero, $75,100 72-70-70-69 281 -7
Francesco Molinari, $75,100 72-69-70-70 281 -7
Scott Piercy (46), $75,100 72-73-68-68 281 -7
Bo Van Pelt (46), $75,100 77-67-66-71 281 -7
Jaco Van Zyl, $75,100 72-73-68-68 281 -7
Luke Donald (39), $68,000 70-71-70-71 282 -6
Henrik Stenson (39), $68,000 74-76-67-65 282 -6
Nick Watney (39), $68,000 75-74-67-66 282 -6
Mark Brown, $64,000 72-68-72-71 283 -5
Jason Dufner (35), $64,000 73-67-71-72 283 -5
Billy Horschel (35), $64,000 71-69-72-71 283 -5
Wenyi Huang, $64,000 70-74-69-70 283 -5
Kevin Streelman (35), $64,000 70-73-72-68 283 -5
Thomas Bjorn, $58,000 74-72-70-68 284 4
Gonzalo Fdez-Castano (29), $58,000 67-71-70-76 284 4
Branden Grace, $58,000 77-71-67-69 284 4
Haotong Li, $58,000 72-71-74-67 284 4
David Lynn (29), $58,000 74-70-69-71 284 4
Richard Sterne, $58,000 74-73-74-63 284 4
Chris Wood, $58,000 71-71-73-69 284 4
Ken Duke (24), $52,500 70-72-73-70 285 -3
Brian Gay (24), $52,500 71-72-72-70 285 -3
Thongchai Jaidee, $52,500 76-68-68-73 285 -3
urnished by the Office of Jimmy Walker (24), $52,500 73-73-69-70 285 -3
ns, Lake County, Florida. Hiroyuki Fujita, $49,000 75-70-68-73 286 -2
Mike Hendry, $49,000 72-73-73-68 286 -2
Masahiro Kawamura, $49,000 73-72-70-71 286 -2
Ryan Moore (19), $49,000 70-74-69-73 286 -2
SMichael Thompson (19), $49,000 74-72-68-72 286 -2


OFFICIAL SAMPLE BALLOT
CITY OF MINNEOLA ELECTION BALLOT
LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOVEMBER 5,2013


MINNEOLA
CITY COUNCIL
SEAT 3(MAYOR)
(Vote for One)

o( Debbie Flinn

o Pat Kelley

oD David W Yeager


This Sample Ballot was prepared in accordance with Section 101.20, Florida Statutes, and fi
Emogene W. Stegall, Supervisor of Elections, Jerry J. Foster, Assistant Supervisor of Elcctio
237594-November 4,2013


NEWISSUE



7092Y %TM
Thomaston-Upson County Industrial Development Authority
First Mortgage Healthcare Facility Rev Bonds


'T
Monthly Interest Payments


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, November 4, 2013




Monday, November 4, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


CHRIS O'MEARA/AP
Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston throws a pass
before an NCAA college football game against Miami on
Saturday in Tallahassee. The Seminoles won 41-14.



No. 3 Florida St.



gains ground on



leaders in AP poll


RALPH D. RUSSO
AP College Football Writer

No. 3 Florida State
gains ground on No.
1 Alabama and No. 2
Oregon in The Asso-
ciated Press college
football poll, earning
four more first-place
votes than it did last
week.
The Seminoles are
coming off another
easy victory against
a previously unbeat-
en rival. Florida State
beat Miami 41-14 on
Saturday night and
received six-first-
place votes from the
media panel Sunday.
Last month the Sem-
inoles handed Clem-
son its first loss.
Alabama remains
No. 1 with 52 first-


AP Top 25
The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press
college football poll, with first-place votes in
parentheses, records through Nov. 3, total
points based on 25 points for a first-place vote
through one point for a 25th-place vote, and
previous ranking:
Record Pts Pv
1. Alabama (52) 8-0 1,491 1
2. Oregon (2) 8-0 1,418 2
3. Florida St. (6) 8-0 1,409 3
4. Ohio St. 9-0 1,315 4
5. Baylor 7-0 1,234 5
6. Stanford 7-1 1,214 6
7. Auburn 8-1 1,082 8
8. Clemson 8-1 1,059 9
9. Missouri 8-1 956 10
10. LSU 7-2 863 11
11. Texas A&M 7-2 861 12
12. Oklahoma 7-1 816 13
13. South Carolina 7-2 769 14
14. Miami 7-1 737 7
15. Oklahoma St. 7-1 662 18
16. UCLA 6-2 515 17
17. Fresno St. 8-0 493 16
18. Michigan St. 8-1 478 24
19. UCF 6-1 472 19
20. Louisville 7-1 385 20
21. Wisconsin 6-2 342 22
22. N. Illinois 9-0 322 21
23. Arizona St. 6-2 197 25
24. Notre Dame 7-2 164 NR
25. Texas Tech 7-2 102 15
Others receiving votes: Texas 34, Georgia 32,
BYU 28, Mississippi 17, Houston 9, Minnesota
7, Michigan 6, Washington 6, Ball St. 4, Duke 1.


place votes, three less
than last week. Ore-
gon received two first-
place votes, a loss of
one for the Ducks.


O'Brien praises Penn State's resiliency


ANDY ELDER
Associated Press

STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -
Whatever you do, don't talk to
Bill O'Brien about good fortune.
After Penn State's 24-17
come-from-behind, overtime
win over Illinois on Saturday, a
reporter asked the second-year
Nittany Lion coach if he felt for-
tunate to win the game.


"I never feel fortunate to
win. I think our kids battled,"
O'Brien said. "I think we were
a resilient team. We won a foot-
ball game."
For the better part of two
years, O'Brien has repeat-
ed that he has a roster full of
tough, smart, resilient players.
It's almost become a cliche.
With the Nittany Lions' list of


scholarship players dwindling
into the 60s because of NCAA
sanctions, compared to the
85 maximum for other teams,
Penn State has still been com-
petitive.
Penn State is 5-3 and 2-2 in
the Big Ten, with an embarrass-
ing 44-24 loss Oct. 5 at Indiana,
the first in program history to
the Hoosiers.


LATE TOP 25 BOX SCORES


No. 3 FLORIDA ST. 41, No. 7 MIAMI 14
Miami 7 7 0 0 14
Florida St. 7 14 14 6 41
First Quarter
FSU-Freeman 5 run (Aguayo kick), 9:16.
Mia-Hurns 33 pass from Morris (Goudis kick),
2:43.
Second Quarter
FSU-Wilder 1 run (Aguayo kick), 10:42.
FSU-Freeman 48 pass from Winston (Aguayo
kick), 5:08.
Mia-Hurns 14 pass from Morris (Goudis kick), :22.
Third Quarter
FSU-Wilder 5 run (Aguayo kick), 8:33.
FSU-Freeman 12 run (Aguayo kick), 3:41.
Fourth Quarter
FSU-FG Aguayo 25, 6:52.
FSU-FG Aguayo 28,1:03.
A-84,409.
Mia FSU
First downs 17 25
Rushes-yards 29-83 44-192
Passing 192 325
Comp-Att-lnt 16-28-2 21-29-2
Return Yards 8 0
Punts-Avg. 3-53.3 1-38.0
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 1-0
Penalties-Yards 2-5 6-55
Time of Possession 21:27 38:33
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Miami, Du.Johnson 23-97, D.Crawford
2-3, Clements 1-1,
Morris 3-(minus 18). Florida St., Freeman 23-78,
K.Williams 5-46,
Wilder 942, Winston 6-27, Team 1-(minus 1).
PASSING-Miami, Morris 16-28-2-192. Rlorida St.,
Winston 21-29-2-325.
RECEIVING-Miami, Hums 5-84, Walford 446,
D.Crawford 3-16,
Coley 2-36, Sandland 1-9, Waters 1-1. Rorida St.,
Freeman 6-98,
Greene 6-83, O'Leary 345, Shaw 344, Benjamin
2-46, Abram 1-9.
No. 8 AUBURN 35, ARKANSAS 17
Auburn 7 7 14 7 35
Arkansas 0 3 7 7 17
First Quarter
Aub-Mason 9 run (Parkey kick), 2:35.
Second Quarter
Ark-FG Hocker 34,12:52.
Aub-Mason 4 run (Parkey kick), 10:53.
Third Quarter
Aub-Mason 5 run (Parkey kick), 10:52.
Aub-Coates 88 pass from Marshall (Parkey kick),
6:39.
Ark-Hatcher 13 pass from B.Allen (Hocker kick),
6:11.
Fourth Quarter
Ark-Small 2 run (Hocker kick), 14:54.
Aub-Mason 12 run (Parkey kick), 10:17.
A-66,835.
Aub Ark
First downs 18 25
Rushes-yards 46-233 47-222
Passing 133 124
Comp-Att-lnt 8-9-0 12-27-1
Return Yards 12 0
Punts-Avg. 4-44.5 3-40.0
Fumbles-Lost 1-0 3-2
Penalties-Yards 7-66 4-51
Time of Possession 25:46 34:14
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Auburn, Mason 32-168, Marshall 9-59,
Grant 1-5,
Arts-Payne 2-5, Team 2-(minus 4). Arkansas, Wil-
liams 15-104,
A.Collins 18-92, Small 5-16, Hatcher 2-10, B.Allen
6-2,
Derby 1-(minus 2).
PASSING-Auburn, Marshall 7-8-0-118, Johnson 1-1-
0-15. Arkansas,


B.Allen 10-22-0-112, Derby 1-2-1-5, Williams 0-2-0-
0, Buehner 1-1-0-7.
RECEIVING-Auburn, Coates 3-102, Louis 3-22,
Grant 2-9. Arkansas,
Hatcher 4-50, Herndon 447, Henry 1-10, Cowan
1-8, Tate 1-7, Small 1-2.
No. 10 MISSOURI 31, TENNESSEE 3
Tennessee 0 3 0 0 3
Missouri 7 17 7 0 31
First Quarter
Mo-Green-Beckham 9 pass from Mauk (Baggett
kick), 2:20.
Second Quarter
Mo-FG Baggett 24, 6:58.
Mo-Washington 26 pass from Mauk (Baggett
kick), 6:35.
Tenn-FG Palardy 51,4:13.
Mo-Lucas 40 pass from Mauk (Baggett kick), 1:44.
Third Quarter
Mo-Hansbrough 26 run (Baggett kick), 6:44.
A-65,869.
Tenn Mo
First downs 15 24
Rushes-yards 24-94 54-339
Passing 240 163
CompAtt-lnt 26-42-2 12-25-0
Return Yards 19 18
Punts-Avg. 742.7 8-39.1
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 0-0
Penalties-Yards 9-65 5-35
Time of Possession 26:15 33:45
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Tennessee, Dobbs 745, Lane 6-37, Neal
8-8, TSmith 3-4.
Missouri, Mauk 13-114, Josey 16-74, Hansbrough
7-61, Murphy 844,
Steward 6-32, G.White 3-11, Green-Beckham 1-3.
PASSING-Tennessee, Dobbs 2642-2-240. Missouri,
Mauk 12-25-0-163.
RECEIVING-Tennessee, Howard 11-89, North 7-68,
J.Johnson 3-38,
Croom 2-32, Neal 2-4, Jo.Smith 1-9. Missouri, Lu-
cas4-75,
Washington 345, Green-Beckham 2-22, Clark 1-12,
D.White 1-6,
Copelin 1-3.
No. 12 TEXAS A&M 57, UTEP 7
UTEP 7 0 0 0 7
Texas A&M 9 27 21 0 57
First Quarter
TAM-Safety, 11:26.
UTEP-Aa.Jones 4 run (Mattox kick), 5:39.
TAM-Labhart44 pass from Manziel (Lambo kick),
4:36.
Second Quarter
TAM-Carson 1 run (run failed), 9:09.
TAM-Kennedy 15 pass from Manziel (Lambo
kick), 8:32.
TAM-Manziel 10 run (Lambo kick), 3:07.
TAM-Labhart 17 pass from Manziel (Lambo kick),
1:09.
Third Quarter
TAM-Manziel 49 run (Lambo kick), 13:05.
TAM-Evans 26 pass from Manziel (Lambo kick),
7:39.
TAM-TWilliams 14 run (Lambo kick), 2:05.
A-87,126.
UTEP TAM
First downs 10 25
Rushes-yards 44-127 30-234
Passing 71 330
Comp-Att-lnt 9-17-3 21-30-0
Return Yards 22 42
Punts-Avg. 9-36.8 547.2
Fumbles-Lost 3-1 5-1
Penalties-Yards 3-35 4-34
Time of Possession 36:06 23:54
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-UTEPAa.Jones 22-62, Sullivan 1140,
Dowell 3-15,
Jeffery 8-10. Texas A&M, Manziel 7-67, B.Williams


5-59, Malena 445,
Dolezal 5-28, Hill 3-22, TWilliams 2-15, Carson 2-0,
Team 2-(minus 2).
PASSING-UTEPSullivan 9-17-3-71. Texas A&M,
Manziel 16-24-0-273, Hill 5-6-0-57.
RECEIVING-UTEP, Leslie 45, Trail 3-31, Patter-
son 1-32,
Aa.Jones 1-3. Texas A&M, Labhart4-83, Kennedy
4-63, Evans 446,
TWilliams 2-1, Gonzalez 1-57, Holmes 1-38,
D.Walker 1-23,
J.Williams 1-7, Lamascus 1-5, Tabuyo 14, Pope 1-3.
No. 18 OKLAHOMA ST. 52, No. 15 TEXAS
TECH 34
Oklahoma St. 21 7 21 3 52
TexasTech 3 21 7 3 34
First Quarter
OkSt-T.Moore 6 pass from Chelf (Grogan kick),
7:17.
OkSt-Roland 1 run (Grogan kick), 6:04.
OkSt-Roland 1 run (Grogan kick), 4:09.
TT-FG Bustin 32,1:33.
Second Quarter
Tr-E.Ward 38 pass from Webb (Bustin kick), 14:49.
OkSt-Seaton 1 pass from Chelf (Grogan kick),
10:22.
TT-Robertson 21 interception return (Bustin
kick), 5:17.
TT-Ke.Williams 2 run (Bustin kick), 2:00.
Third Quarter
OkSt-Roland 3 run (Grogan kick), 9:58.
OkSt-Chelf 67 run (Grogan kick), 7:50.
TT-Amaro 1 pass from Webb (Bustin kick), 4:31.
OkSt-Chelf 8 run (Grogan kick), 1:44.
Fourth Quarter
TT-FG Bustin 26,13:33.
OkSt-FG Grogan 41,10:43.
A-61,836.


First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-lnt
Return Yards
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


OkSt
24
55-281
211
18-34-2
102
7-34.6
1-0
10-97
29:59


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Oklahoma St., Roland 31-96, Chelf 6-88,
Childs 9-70,
J.Smith 5-28, Stewart 24, Team 2-(minus 5).
Texas Tech,
Washington 10-69, KeWilliams 945, Grant 2-8,
Webb 44,
S.Foster 1-(minus 2).
PASSING-Oklahoma St., Chelf 18-34-2-211.
Texas Tech,
Webb 45-71-2425.
RECEIVING-Oklahoma St., Stewart 6-27, Seales
3-78, TMoore 3-37,
Ateman 2-25, J.Smith 1-17, Glidden 1-14, C.Moore
1-12, Seaton 1-1.
Texas Tech, Amaro 15-174, E.Ward 8-86, Grant
6-69, J.Davis 5-37,
Washington 5-25, Ke.Williams 431, R.Davis 2-3.
No. 16 FRESNO ST. 41, NEVADA 23
Nevada 7 0 9 7 23
Fresno St. 14 10 0 17 41
First Quarter
Nev-Brock 43 run (Zuzo kick), 11:19.
Fre-Adams 5 pass from D.Carr (McGuire kick),
10:11.
Fre-D.Carr 5 run (McGuire kick), :21.
Second Quarter
Fre-FG McGuire 30, 5:41.
Fre-J.Harper 17 pass from D.Carr (McGuire kick),
:35.
Third Quarter
Nev-FG Zuzo 33, 8:41.


Nev-Wimberly 13 pass from Fajardo (kick blocked),
:55.
Fourth Quarter
Fre-J.Harper 32 pass from D.Carr (McGuire kick),
13:09.
Nev-Henderson 32 pass from Fajardo (Zuzo kick),
8:48.
Fre-FG McGuire 40,5:32.
Fre-Waller 3 run (McGuire kick), 1:29.
A-41,031.
Nev Fre
First downs 17 32
Rushes-yards 42-218 33-160
Passing 206 487
Comp-Att-lnt 14-24-1 39-55-0
Return Yards 0 52
Punts-Avg. 643.2 2-34.5
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 1-1
Penalties-Yards 8-74 8-80
Time of Possession 32:24 27:36
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Nevada, Fajardo 17-98, Brock 16-94,
D.Jackson 5-19,
Solomon 3-8, Team 1-(minus 1). Fresno St.,
Quezada 17-115, Waller 1045,
Burse 1-5, D.Carr 5-(minus 5).
PASSING-Nevada, Fajardo 14-24-1-206. Fresno St.,
D.Carr 39-55-0487.
RECEIVING-Nevada, Wimberly 6-74, Henderson
5-82, Bradley 244,
Gipson 1-6. Fresno St., J.Harper 17-253, Adams
8-84, Quezada 540,
Burse 4-58, Waller 3-22, Jensen 1-23, Watson 1-7.
No. 17 UCLA 45, COLORADO 23
Colorado 3 10 0 10 23
UCLA 7 14 14 10 45
First Quarter
Col-FG Oliver 23, :56.
UCLA-Fuller 76 pass from Hundley (Fairbairn
kick), :19.
Second Quarter
Col-Richardson 7 pass from Liufau (Oliver kick),
11:04.
UCLA-Hundley 11 run (Fairbairn kick), 7:49.
UCLA-Fuller 6 pass from Hundley (Fairbairn kick),
Col-FG Oliver 47,1:16.
Third Quarter
UCLA-Hundley 1 run (Fairbairn kick), 10:53.
UCLA-Thigpen 5 run (Fairbairn kick), 1:24.
Fourth Quarter
Col-T.Jones 2 run (Oliver kick), 12:20.
UCLA-FG Fairbairn 45, 9:12.
Col-FG Oliver 37,6:17.
UCLA-Fuller 8 run (Fairbairn kick), 3:36.
A-80,377.
Col UCLA
First downs 26 18
Rushes-yards 40-134 33-139
Passing 247 273
Comp-Att-lnt 25-36-0 19-24-0
Return Yards 0 (-2)
Punts-Avg. 2-35.0 343.7
Fumbles-Lost 2-1 0-0
Penalties-Yards 640 11-122
Time of Possession 35:59 24:01
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Colorado, Powell 22-97, T.Jones 7-15,
Liufau 8-14,
Abron 3-8. UCLA, Hundley 11-72, Thigpen 4-38,
Jones 4-13, Fuller 1-8,
James 6-8, Perkins 4-3, Team 3-(minus 3).
PASSING-Colorado, Liufau 25-36-0-247. UCLA,
Hundley 19-24-0-273.
RECEIVING-Colorado, Richardson 7-70, Spruce
649, Goodson 342,
T.Jones 342, Slavin 3-23, Ross 2-11, Powell 1-10.
UCLA, Payton 4-31,
Fuller 3-99, Evans 3-66, Perkins 2-28, Duarte 2-16,
Ortiz 2-11,James 2-2, Mazzone 1-20.


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Lake: 352-314-3278 or Sumter: 352-748-1955


OFFICIAL SAMPLE BALLOT

CITY OF CLERMONT ELECTION BALLOT

LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA

NOVEMBER 5,2013




CLERMONT CITY COUNCIL
SEAT 4
(Vote for One)


oD Keith E. Mullins


o Frank J. Niemi



This Sample Ballot was prepared in accordance with Section 101.20, Florida Statutes, and furnished by the Office of
Emogene W. Stegall, Supervisor of Elections, Jerry J. Foster, Assistant Supervisor of Elections, Lake County, Florida.


237586-November 4,2013


UMAILLA TAVARES SORFENTO
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I I I


I





DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 4, 2013
U


FROM YOUR DOORSTEP



TO YOUR DOCTOR,

, I PUP has got you covered.


In January you'll be seeing a new vehicle on the roads. Inside, you'll see people who were smart
enough to enroll in a PUP Medicare Advantage plan before December 7th.

Why are they so smart? Because they chose a Medicare plan that not only improves its Members' health
and well-being, but one that actually drives them to their doctor appointments, themselves for free.

And while gas is expensive, joining a PUP plan isn't. In fact, every PUP plan has a $0 monthly plan
premium. Add that to our already low, predictable co-pays and you've got a health plan that helps you
get the most out of your Medicare.




PUP plans offer great benefits like:
* $0 additional monthly plan premium


* $0 deductible
* $0 visits with your Primary Care Physician (PCP)
* Up to $100 rebate of your monthly Medicare Part B premium
* Part D prescription drug coverage
* Comprehensive dental coverage
* Routine vision and hearing coverage
* Free all-access gym membership with SilverSneakers
* Free transportation to and from your health care providers
(New for 2014)
* And much more!


YOUR
PHOTO y
HERE[

Nav~igaeyour MedY~icare bt~oiM*

iI D3 PIcard.
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To lear mor abut ourMedcar AdanagePla6opion, smplaten


EUSTIS
Golden Corral
15810 US Hwy 441
Nov 8 @ 11am & 2pm


LADY LAKE
Perkins
905 Bichara Blvd
Nov 5, 6, 7,8 @ 2pm


Attend a PUP
seminar & receive a
$10 gas gift card.
There is no obligation
to enroll in the plan.
Gift card cannot be
converted to cash.


D**PU P
Navigate your Medicare

PUP is an HMO plan with a contract with Medicare and the Federal Government. Enrollment in PUP depends on contract renewal. For
more information about PUP, please contact us at 1-866-571-0693, TTY/TDD 711 (Mon Sun 8am 8pm). A sales person will be present
with information and applications. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings call 1-866-571-0693, TTY/TDD
711. The benefit information provided herein is a brief summary, not a complete description of benefits. For more information contact
the plan. Limitations, copayments, and restrictions may apply. Benefits, formulary, pharmacy network, premium and/or co-payments/co-
insurance may change on January 1 of each year. You must continue to pay your Medicare Part B premium. Member events are designed
specifically for PUP Members. Free gas card without obligation. Limit one gas card per person from October 1 through December 31.
H5696_PUP1109V2 CMS Accepted


LEESBURG
Best Western Plus
1321 N 14th St
Nov 4, 6 @ 10am & 2pm

Golden Corral
1720 Citrus Blvd
Nov 5 @ 11am & 2pm

Perkins
27811 S Hwy 27
Nov 4 @ 2pm
Nov 6 @ 1pm
Nov 7,8 @ 10am & 2pm

The Plantation Golf Club
4720 Plantation Blvd
Nov 4 @ lOam & 2pm


CLERMONT
Golden Corral
1555 Grand Hwy
Nov 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 @ llam & 1pm

IHOP
2589 US-27
Nov 4 @ 10am & 2pm

South Lake Chamber of
Commerce
620 W Montrose St
Nov 6 @ 10am & 2pm


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, November 4, 2013








Living
Send your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 1352-365-8208


Cl
DAILY COMMERCIAL
Monday, November 4, 2013


www.dailycommercial.com


HIV: Virus suppressed in monkey experiment/ C3


Health

check ,

LAKE COUNTY
AARP driver safety
classes offered
The AARP Driver Safety pro-
gram helps participants refine their
skills and develop safe driving hab-
its. Upon completion of the course,
Florida drivers 50 or older may be
eligible for insurance discounts.
Cost for the classes is $12 for
AARP members and $14 for non
members, and payment must be
made by check to AARP. No cash or
credit cards will be accepted.
The two-day classes will be of-
fered at the following locations:
Monday andWednesday, from
1 to 4 p.m., at the Leesburg Senior
Center, 1211 Penn St. To register,
call 352-326-3540.
Monday and Wednesday, from
9 a.m. to noon at theWT. Bland
Public Library in Mount Dora,
1995 N. Donnelly St. To register call
352-735-7180.
Nov. 12 and Nov. 14, from Ito
4 p.m., at the Harden-Pauli Funeral
Home, 1617 S. Bay St., in Eustis. To
register, call 352-394-0250.
Nov. 18 and Nov. 20, from 6 to
9 p.m., at South Lake Hospital, 1935
Don Wickham Dr., in Clermont. Call
352-394-0250 to register.
Nov. 13, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., at
Hawthorne of Leesburg, South U.S.
Highway 27, Leesburg. To register,
call 402-910-0822.

LEESBURG
New Dimensions support
group holds meeting
The New Dimensions Blind/
Visually Impaired Person Support
Group will meet from 11:30 a.m.
to 1 p.m., on Friday, at the IHOP
Restaurant, 10332 U. S. Highway
441, Leesburg, across from Lake
Square Mall.
Speaker for the meeting is attor-
ney Michael Siefert, who will talk
about wills and trusts.
This event is open to all blind and
visually impaired persons, their
caregivers, and friends and support-
ers of NewVision for Independence.
For information, call
352-435-5040.

BROOKSVILLE
Officials: 2 Hernando High
students contract MRSA
School officials say two
Hernando High School students
have contracted the bacterial infec-
tion known as MRSA.
The Tampa Bay Times reports
Hernando County school officials
sent home letters in October to no-
tify parents.
Superintendent Lori Romano says
she doesn't have information on the
condition of the infected students.
MRSA stands for methicillin-resis-
tant Staphylococcus aureus.


Change can be the key to



spicing up exercise routine


Overcoming boredom can
be the key to a healthier
workout regimen
SALLY ANDERSON
Tampa Bay Times
Boredom can wreak havoc with
exercise-commitment vows, and
it's very easy to become bored when
you fall into an exercise rut, contin-
ually repeating the same exercise
movements over and over. When
this happens, your body begins to
get used to the exercise, and with-
in six to eight weeks, muscular ad-
aptation takes place.
This is not to suggest there is any-
thing wrong with following a con-
sistent, repetitive routine. Some
people are content to remain at
their current level. However, to
stimulate progress and maximize
your workout both physically and
mentally, you need to spice up your
workout routine by changing it up.
VARIATIONS TO ADD TO WORKOUT
1. Changing sequence: Mixing up
the order of the exercises every sev-
eral weeks invites a fresh training
stimulus.
2. Vary intensity: Introduce in-
terval workouts. Alternating high-
intensity bursts of exercise with
recovery periods will boost the cal-
orie burn.
3. Upbeat music: Good for cardio
workouts. Keeping in tempo with
the beat encourages you to change
your pace frequently. A study from
the Research Institute for Sport and
Exercise found that people on sta-
tionary bikes cycled faster and cov-
ered more distance when faster
music was playing.
4. Compound exercises: Isolation
SEE CHANGE I C3


DIRK 5HADD /TAMPA BAYTIMES
Paul Merada demonstrates a standing overhead triceps extension with a medicine ball: arms
bent backward holding the ball.


Senior drivers get safety tips in AAA program


JON SCHMITZ
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
But there he was recently, ardent-
ly accepting instructions from oc-
cupational therapy students at
CarFit, an AAA-sponsored event
designed to make older drivers saf-
er and more comfortable in their
vehicles.
In a recent Pittsburgh-area clinic,
students from a master's program
at the University of Pittsburgh
went through a 12-point check-
list to make sure that drivers were
properly seated and belted, famil-
iar with their vehicles' controls and
safety features, and that mirrors
were adjusted to maximize vision


and minimize blind spots.
The drivers also got information
about gadgets that help older peo-
ple get in and out of their cars more
easily, including a padded swivel
seat and a leverage bar that attach-
es to the driver's door.
"If they fit better, hopefully they'll
be able to drive safer and longer,"
said Terri Rae Anthony, safety ad-
viser for AAA.
Bitner, 78, of Bridgeville, Pa., a re-
tired engineer taking time out from
a shopping trip with his wife, Ju-
dith, said he learned to drive at age
12 on a farm in his native Iowa. His
first vehicle was a 1928 Ford Mod-
elA.
Behind the wheel of his current


ride, a 2008 Volvo SUV, he listened
as grad student Liz Mackay ex-
plained the proper seat position -
not too close to the steering wheel
and airbags and checked on his
knowledge of and ability to reach
the various controls. Bitner earned
brownie points by saying his first
act upon entering the vehicle is al-
ways to buckle up.
"Driving today is more difficult
than ever because of increased
traffic congestion, longer com-
mute distances, new technology
and faster speeds," Anthony said.
'Attending a CarFit event is just
one way older motorists can ease
the stress associated with driving."


*I D.JaWI mes oug ~Lae County (M.I m 's ProstaMte Spcialst ,4~


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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, November 4, 2013


SPECIAL ADVERTISING FEATURE c)2013 UNIVERSAL COMMERCE 8000 FREEDOM AVE., N. CANTON OH 44720



Public gets Free TV with no monthly bills

Federal law makes TV network giants broadcast Free TV signals regionally in crystal clear digital picture in

all 50 states allowing U.S. households to pull in Free TV with a sleek $49 micro antenna device engineered to pull

in nothing but Free TV channels with no cable, satellite or internet connection and no monthly bills


Who Gets Free TV: Listed below are the Leesburg area zip codes that can get Free over

the air TV channels. If you live in one of these areas immediately call: 1-888-874-3480


FLORIDA Today's announcement by
CompTek has the Free TV Hotlines ringing
off the hook.
That's because Leesburg area residents
who find their zip code listed in today's pub-
lication are getting Free TV channels thanks
to an amazing razor-thin invention called
Clear-Cast'.
Leesburg area residents who call the Toll
Free Hotlines before the 48-hour order dead-
line to get Clear-Cast can pull in Free TV
channels with crystal clear digital picture
and no monthly bills.
This announcement is being so widely
advertised because a U.S. Federal law makes
TV broadcasters transmit their signals in
digital format, which allows everyone to
receive these over-the-air digital signals for
free with no monthly bills.
Here's how it works. Clear-Cast, the sleek
micro antenna device with advanced tech-
nology links up directly to pull in the Free
TV signals being broadcast in your area with
crystal clear digital picture and no monthly
bills.
Clear-Cast was invented by a renowned
NASA Space Technology Hall of Fame scien-
tist who currently holds 23 U.S. Gov't issued
patents. For the past 20 years, he has spe-
cialized in developing antenna systems for
NASA, Motorola, XM Satellite Radio and
companies around the world.
His latest patent-pending invention, Clear-
Cast, is a sleek micro antenna device engi-
neered to pull in the Free TV signals through
advanced technology with no cable, satellite
or internet connection and no monthly bills.
"Clear-Cast is being released to the gen-
eral public because we just don't think peo-
ple should keep paying for TV when they can
get it for free," said Conrad Miller, Manager
of Operations at CompTek.
"There's never a monthly bill to pay and
all the channels you get with Clear-Cast are
absolutely free. So you see, Clear-Cast is
not like cable or satellite. It was engineered
to access solely the over-the-air signals that
include all the top rated national and regional
networks, like ABC, NBC, CBS, FOX, PBS,
CW and about 90% of the most watched TV
shows like America's Got Talent, NCIS, 60
Minutes, American Idol, The Big Bang The-
ory, The Bachelorette, Person of Interest,
CSI, The Mentalist, Two and a Half Men,
Sunday Night Football plus news, weather
and more all for free with no monthly bills,"
Miller said.
"That's why Clear-Cast is such a great
alternative for everyone who is sick and tired
of paying expensive cable and satellite bills
every month," he said.
"People who get Clear-Cast will say it feels
like getting an extra paycheck every month.
You see, with Clear-Cast you'll receive free
over-the-air broadcast channels with crystal
clear digital picture, not the cable or satel-
lite only channels. So being able to eliminate
those channels puts all the money you were
spending back in your pocket every month,"
Miller said.
And here's the best part. The sleek micro
antenna device called Clear-Cast is so tech-
nically advanced it pulls in even more of the
channels being broadcast in your area for
Free with no monthly bills.
That way you can channel surf through
the favorite TV shows. The number of shows
and channels you'll get depends on where
you live. People living in large metropolitan
areas may get up to 53 static-free channels,
while people in outlying areas will get less.
That means even if you're in a rural area that
just pulls in NBC, ABC, CBS, FOX and PBS
broadcasts there's hundreds of shows each
year to watch for free.
Consumers report that the crystal clear
picture quality with Clear-Cast is the best
they've ever seen. That's because you get vir-
tually all pure uncompressed signals direct
from the broadcasters for free.
Clear-Cast was engineered to link up
directly like a huge outdoor directional
antenna but in a lightweight, slim-line pack-
age. Its sturdy copper alloy and polymer con-
struction will most likely far outlast your TV.
It just couldn't be any easier to get Free
over-the-air digital TV shows with Clear-
Cast. Simply plug it into your TV, place
Clear-Cast on a window pane and run
autoscan. It works on virtually any model TV
and is easily hidden out of sight behind a cur-
tain or window treatment.
Thousands of Leesburg area residents are
expected to call to get Clear-Cast because it
just doesn't make any sense to keep paying
for TV when you can get hundreds of shows
absolutely free.
So, Leesburg area residents lucky enough
to find their zip code listed in today's publi-
cation need to immediately call the Free TV
Hotline before the 48-hour deadline to get
Clear-Cast that pulls in Free TV with crystal
clear digital picture. If lines are busy keep
trying, all calls will be answered. U


S How to get Free TV: Listed below are the Leesburg area zip codes that can get Free TV channels with
no monthly bills. If you live in one of these areas immediately call 1-888-874-3480 beginning at precisely 8:30am
this morning. Today's announcement photo above shows just a handful of the major over-the-air broadcast net-
works you can receive with Clear-Cast for free. It saves a ton of money by not picking up expensive cable only
channels like ESPN so there's never a monthly bill. This is all possible because a U.S. Federal Law makes TV
broadcasters transmit their signals in digital format, which allows everyone to use Clear-Cast to pull in Free TV
channels with no monthly bills. CompTek is giving every U.S. household a 50% off discount to help cover the cost
of Clear-Cast. Clear-Cast, the sleek micro antenna device is a one-time purchase that plugs in to your TV to pull
in Free TV channels in crystal clear digital picture with no monthly bills. Each Clear-Cast normally costs $98, but
U.S. households who beat the 48-hour deadline are authorized to get a 50% off discount for each Clear-Cast and
cover just $49 and shipping as long as they call the Free TV Hotline at 1-888-874-3480 before the deadline ends
or online at www.clear-cast.com. Trademarks and programs are the property of their respective owners and are
not affiliated with or endorsing Clear-Cast. MSL01581


32159
32162
32195
32702
32726


32735
32736
32757
32767
32776


32778
32784
33513
33514
33521


33538
33585
33597
34484
34491


34705
34711
34731
34736
34737


34748
34753
34762
34785
34788


34797


* NEVER PAY A BILL AGAIN: Floridians will be on the lookout for their postal carrier because thousands of Clear-Casts will soon be deliv-
ered to lucky Leesburg area residents who beat the 48-hour order deadline and live in any of the zip code areas listed above. Everyone is get-
ting Clear-Cast because it pulls in nothing but Free TV channels with no cable, satellite or internet connection and no monthly bills.

HOW It Works: Just plug it in to your TV and pull in Free TV channels in crystal clear
digital picture with no cable, satellite or internet connection and no monthly bills


* NO MORE BILLS: Clear-Cast, the sleek micro antenna device is engineered to pull in nothing but Free TV channels. It was invented
by a renowned NASA Space Technology Hall of Fame scientist, who currently holds 23 U.S. Gov't patents. Clear-Cast links up directly to
pull in Free over-the-air TV channels with crystal clear digital picture and no monthly bills. Ill Illl I||IIlllllll|
1P6411A F1764R1 SLG1581


C2




Monday, November 4, 2013


Weight loss leads to national



honor for Michigan man


SUE THOMS
The Grand Rapids Press
ZEELAND, Mich. -
Pete Pallas didn't set
any big goals when he
started his weight-loss
journey: He just want-
ed to lose 25 pounds.
That, and avoid having
to buy pants with a 50-
inch waist.
Now, 150 pounds
lighter, Pallas recent-
ly was named a winner
in Weight Watchers' 50
Years of Success contest.
And his pants? Size
32.
"I've changed my
life," said Pallas, 51, the
director of operations
at Herman Miller in
Zeeland. "I'll never go
back."
Lifting weights af-
ter work in Herman
Miller's gym, he talk-
ed about how he man-
aged to lose about half
his body weight.
His inspiration came
four years ago, after tak-
ing a couple of weeks
of vacation over Christ-
mas. He was at his home
in Norton Shores, get-
ting ready for work,
when he found it was a
struggle to button his
size-48 pants.
"I said I'm not going
to a size 50," he said.
"Enough was enough."
He also worried
about his health. He
was on medication for
diabetes, cholesterol
and blood pressure.
"I was way too young
to have all that going
on," he said.
Hoping to lose about
25 pounds, he joined a
walking group through
his workplace well-
ness program. At 307
pounds, that was about
the only exercise he
could handle. Just walk-
ing a mile was difficult.
He lost about 40


CHANGE
FROM PAGE Cl

exercises are when you
train only one major
muscle group at a time.
Compound exercis-
es engage multimuscle
groups, such as a squat,
which targets muscles
in the lower body.
5. Cross-training: Per-
forming different activ-
ities will provide new
challenges, as you will
be using your body in
many different ways.
6. Change equipment:
Introduce stability balls,
medicine balls, jump
ropes, resistance bands,
body cords, body bars
and balance boards.
THE PLANK
This basic floor ex-
ercise strengthens the
upper body, lower body
and the core. Lying on
stomach, lift slightly off
floor, supported by low-
er arms and toes. Con-


ANDREW KUHN /THE GRAND RAPIDS PRESS
Norton Shores, Mich. resident Pete Pallas hits the Lat Machine on Oct. 9 at Herman Miller in Zee-
land, Mich. Pallas once weighed 300 pounds, but has now lost a total of 150 pounds.


pounds in the next nine
months. He wanted
to continue dropping
weight, but became
frustrated as he failed
to make progress. His
wife, Sally, encour-
aged him to try Weight
Watchers.
Pallas resisted at first.
He pictured the meet-
ings as a bunch of
women sitting around
talking about emotion-
al stuff.
He laughs about that
now. After he started at-
tending meetings in
Muskegon, he found
there were other men
there. He came to appre-
ciate the fact that differ-
ent people needed sup-
port in different ways.
"And I realized, well,
maybe some of my
eating was emotional.
Maybe it was because
I was bored or whatev-
er," he said.
He took the tips that
made sense and ap-
plied them to his life.
And he lost weight, at a
steady pace of a pound
or two a week.
Exercising in the
company gym became

tract abdominals and,
without arching back,
hold plank position for
30 to 60 seconds, head
relaxed and looking to-
ward floor. Beginners
should hold the posi-
tion for 10 seconds.
STANDING TRICEPS
EXTENSION
Strengthens back of
upper arms. Stand-
ing tall, feet hip-width
apart and abs con-
tracted, hold medi-
cine ball straight over
head. With arms close
to sides of head, bend
elbows to lower ball to-
ward upper back. Slow-
ly extend arms from el-
bows, returning arms
to original position. Do
eight to 16 reps.
KNEE-TUCK TO CHEST
Targets shoulders,
chest, hips, glutes and
abs. Place hands shoul-
der-width apart on a
stability ball, head in
alignment with shoul-
ders, extending legs


a daily end-of-work-
day habit. He used the
weight machines and
began trying the class-
es offered: yoga, spin
and kickboxing.
As he made time for
exercise and changed
his diet, Pallas said
he found tremendous
support from his fami-
ly his wife Sally, and
his kids, Paige, 23, Tom,
21, and Joe, 16.
Now, he weighs about
160 pounds and he
has held that weight
as a lifetime Weight
Watchers member for
two years. His choles-
terol, blood pressure
and diabetes medica-
tions are all in the past.
But Weight Watch-
ers is part of his life-
style. Pallas still records
what he eats every day,
and he never misses a
weekly meeting. The
accountability helps
him stay motivated.
"There is something
about stepping on that
scale every Saturday
morning," he said. "You
can weigh yourself at
home, but it's differ-
ent."

to back, toes on floor.
Contract abdominals,
tucking knee in toward
chest. Pause and return
leg to original position.
Perform eight to 16 reps
and then repeat with
opposite leg. If you need
more stability, place ball
against a wall.
(If you are 50 or old-


Pallas made a point
of saying he felt good
about himself before
starting his weight-loss
campaign.
"It was never about
the weight really, it was
about being healthy," he
wrote in his contest en-
try forWeightWatchers.
Pallas is one of 50
winners chosen in
Weight Watchers' con-
test from more than
4,000 entries.
Pallas remembers sit-
ting in the back of the
room at his first few
Weight Watchers meet-
ings, looking skeptically
at the some of the slen-
der women who attend-
ed and wondering why
they were there. Then
the leader introduced
the lifetime members -
those who had achieved
and were maintaining
their goal weight. He
was surprised to hear
the slender ones listing
weight losses of 50, 80
or 160 pounds.
Now, he is the one in-
spiring others in-
cluding a group of
co-workers who are ex-
ercising.

er and have not been
exercising, check with
your physician before
beginning any exercise
program. Trainer Sal-
lyAnderson is happy to
hear from readers but
cannot respond to indi-
vidual queries. She can
be reached at slafit@
tampabay.rr.com.)


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HIV-like virus


suppressed in


monkey experiment


MALCOLM RITTER
AP Science Writer
NEW YORK Doc-
tors may one day be
able to control a pa-
tient's HIV infection
in a new way: inject-
ing swarms of germ-
fighting antibodies,
two new studies sug-
gest.
In monkeys, that
strategy sharply re-
duced blood levels of
a cousin of HIV The
results also gave tan-
talizing hints that
someday the tactic
might help destroy
the AIDS virus in its
hiding places in the
body, something cur-
rent drugs cannot do.
The study results
"could revolutionize
efforts to cure HIV" if
the approach is found
to work in people,
said a commentary
published Wednesday
by the journal Nature
along with the mon-
key studies.
Antibodies are pro-


teins in the blood
that grab onto spe-
cific germs and mark
them for elimina-
tion. People infect-
ed with HIV natural-
ly make antibodies to
fight the AIDS virus,
but they are general-
ly ineffective. The two
new studies used lab-
made versions of rare
antibodies with un-
usual potency against
HIV
One study of rhesus
monkeys showed a
profound effect from
a single injection of
antibodies, said lead
author Dr. Dan Ba-
rouch of Harvard and
the Beth Israel Dea-
coness Medical Cen-
ter in Boston.
The 18 animals had
been infected with
SHIV, a monkey ver-
sion of HIV. In 13 an-
imals, blood levels of
SHIV became unde-
tectable by standard
tests within a week of
the treatment.


AP FILE PHOTO
This April 12, 2011 electron microscope shows an H9 T cell
infected with the human immunodeficiency virus.




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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, November 4, 2013


Cyclists hit the road to raise awareness for organ donations


DAN BRANNAN
The Telegraph
ALTON, Ill. Cathy Dun-
nagan, a survivor of a rare
bile duct cancer, had an op-
portunity to give back to a
couple of courageous young
bicyclists on a Donate Life
trip across the country
Michael Choppi and Max
Mossier, both 22 and from
Phoenix, became acquaint-
ed with Dunnagan via so-
cial media, and she decided
to invite them to stay at the
Wood River home she shares
with her husband, Jeff, last


week. Choppi and Mossier
are on an 1,800-mile cross-
country cycling journey from
Phoenix to Wrigley Field in
Chicago, where they hope to
release a portion of the ashes
of Choppi's late brother, Joe,
at the historic ballpark. Joe
Choppi committed suicide,
but his liver and two kidneys
were donated to someone,
and it allowed the recipient
to survive.
"I am so honored to be
able to thank them for what
they are doing," said Cathy
Dunnagan, who is a survi-


vor of cholangiocarinoma, a
cancer that has a 99 percent
fatality rateShe has under-
gone two liver transplants
that enabled her to survive
since July 4, 2009.
Choppi and Mossier be-
came close friends while at-
tending Arizona State Uni-
versity in Tempe, a suburb of
Phoenix.
Joe Choppi was a huge
Chicago Cubs fan, so Mi-
chael Choppi and Mossier
came up with the concept
to make the trek to Wrigley
Field to raise awareness for


organ donation and encour-
age people to sign up as do-
nors at the cities and desti-
nations they visited.
Choppi said they were able
to donate his brother's or-
gans because of the time he
was left on life support at
the hospital. He said those
whwo handled the organ do-
nations did a magnificent
job of showing them that
something positive came
from his brother's death.
Ed Ramia, who owns Chem
Dry franchises in the Los An-
geles area and is Mossler's


friend, donated some mon-
ey to help them make the
trip across country. Sever-
al people have let them stay
at their homes and fed them
along the journey.
Anyone wishing to help
out the two young cyclists
may visit wwwdonatelife.
net or www.bronatelife.com,
Michael Choppi and Moss-
ler's website.
Jeff Dunnagan, Cathy's
husband, said without a liv-
er donation, his wife would
not be alive or be with him,
something he can't imagine.


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OF (MPENDING PDOOM!


Woman offering thanks to vets

finds it's not always welcome


DEAR ABBY: Recently I took a
cue from my sister and her ca-
reer Navy husband. They al-
ways make it a point to thank
anyone they see in military
uniform for his/her service
and sacrifice.
I am somewhat shy by na-
ture. But I am so thankful to
these men and women who
fight for our continued free-
dom that I stepped out of my
comfort zone to verbalize my
feelings and encourage those
who cross my path.
Abby, the first and second
thank-yous I offered did not
go well. The first gentleman I
spoke to gave me a scornful
look and proceeded to tell me
I should be thankful for ALL
military personnel not just
him and especially those
who gave the ultimate sacri-
fice of their lives.
I felt 3 inches tall and very
embarrassed, but I chalked
it up to perhaps having said
thanks the wrong way, so
I tried again. This time I
thanked aWorldWar II veter-
an. I recognized him as a vet
by the emblem on the bill of
the cap he was wearing. His
response was, "Didn't have a
choice it was the draft or
jail."
Maybe I'm not cut out for
verbalizing my thankfulness,
or maybe I'm doing it wrong.
Now my shyness has taken
over again. Should I silent-
ly offer a prayer of thanks in-
stead? -TWICE BITTEN IN WASH-
INGTON
DEAR TWICE BITTEN: The first
person you spoke to may have
lost some friends recently,
which is why he spoke to you
the way he did. Your response
to the service member's state-
ment should have been: "Of
course you are right. And I
AM grateful. But you are here,
which is why I'm expressing
my thanks to YOU." Period.
As to the WWII vet who en-
tered the service one jump
ahead of the law give him
marks for honesty in admit-
ting his reason for entering
the military was less than pa-
triotic. But please don't stop
offering thanks. What you ex-
perienced was some bad be-
ginner's luck, but each time


.j Dear
Abby

/ A- JEANNE
PHILLIPS
you express your gratitude,
the odds will improve.
DEAR ABBY: A little over a year
ago, my husband and I were
pulled over after a day on our
boat. We had been drinking.
My husband was charged with
a DUI, went through every-
thing that was required and
decided to stop drinking. I
am very proud of him. Going
to AA meetings has kept him
strong, and he has become a
better person.
I, on the other hand, like
to relax with a beer once in a
while, but if I do, I feel guilty.
My husband says it's OK, but I
feel it might tempt him.
Am I doomed not to be able
to drink anymore to support
his sobriety, or can I have a
beer once in a while and hope
he has learned to cope? Is hav-
ing an occasional beer selfish?
- NEEDS DRINK IN NEWYORK
DEAR NEEDS A DRINK: When
someone describes not imbib-
ing alcohol as being "doomed"
and signs off as "needs a
drink," I suspect that the indi-
vidual may be alcohol-depen-
dent to some degree. If there
is any chance that your sober
husband might crave alcohol
if he sees you having a beer,
then do it when you're not in
his presence. I call that being
considerate and "sacrificing"
for the greater good.
DEAR ABBY: What do you do
when your daughter chooses
to raise her kids entirely dif-
ferently than she was raised,
and when she comes for a vis-
it, there's no regard or respect
for your stuff? UP IN ARMS IN
FLORIDA
DEAR UP IN ARMS:You child-
proof your home, or make
sure to see your grandchildren
only at THEIR home.
Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van
Buren, also known as Jeanne Phil-
lips, and was founded by her moth-
er, Pauline Phillips. Write DearAbby
at www.DearAbby.com or PO. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.


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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, November 4, 2013




Monday, November 4, 2013

S udoku ****** 4puz.corn

4 7 3 5

8 4 3

3 5 8 2

1 9 5 2 6

8 4
6 48 7 3


5 2 1 8

2 6 5

9 81 5 4

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION How to play: Fill in the blank
squares with the numbers 1
2 3 7 6 9 1 8 15 4 through 9 so that each horizon-
9 5 8 2 3 4 7 6 1 tal row, vertical column and nine-
square
4 1 6 5 8 7 2 3 9 sub-grid contains no repeated
5 8 3 4 1 2 6 9 7 numbers.
6 9 2 8 7 3 4 1 5 Puzzles range in difficulty from
1 7 4 9 5 6 3 8 2 one to sixstars.
3 4 1 7 6 5 9 2 8 The solution to today's puzzle
3 will be in tomorrow's paper.

825349176

AXYDLBAAXR
isLONGFELLOW
One letter stands for another. In this sample, A is used
for the three L's, X for the two O's, etc. Single letters,
apostrophes, the length and formation of the words
are all hints. Each day the code letters are different.


11.4


CRYPTOQUOTE


TBV BMA BHBN JZC ICLJ


SVFOC


JZBJ KFTC ZBL JU UTTCV

FL JZC QZBMQC JU HUVE


ZBVA BJ HUVE HUVJZ


- JZCUAUVC


AUFMR.


VUULCXCKJ


Saturday's Cryptoquote: YOU CAN'T EXPECT
TO HIT THE JACKPOT IF YOU DON'T PUT A FEW
NICKELS IN THE MACHINE. FLIP WILSON


WORD S)G))R) DM)M)A)G)EY
BY JUDD HAMBRICK 2013 UFS / Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS
QQQ QQQ 2nd Letter 1d DOWN
+ 6 PTS

00000002M 2n D


r2nd Down



Us
^"V y^ ^/20' 3DOWN
..... 0 0 3 c=^ 2nd Down It



.......... .................................. ................


......X. ........... ..o. ........
FOUR PLAY
TIME LIMIT: 20 MIN AVERAGE GAME 190-200 PTS TO TAL
Directions: Make a 2- to 7-letter word from the letters on each yardline. Add points
to each word or letter using scoring directions. Seven-letter words get a 60-point
bonus. All words can be found in Webster's New World College Dictionary.
11-4.13 JUDD'S SOLUTION TOMORROW
WORD SQIMMAGEC SOLUTION BY JUDD HAMBRICK
|WO~t I MI-11 O 2013 UFS /IDist. by Universal Udick for UFS
(03 (P6 S A E1stDOWN= 84
N2(O (02 02q2(03) A2 Y7 2nd DOWN =100
ID (W (M) K L (K(y) 3- DOWN = 30
NW (W T2 I! 12K)A*)4th DOWN =53
(0D(g B6& 2)(K3)(E)(C ) 03D BONUS DOWN = 86
AVERAGE GAME 225-235 PTS JUDD'S TOTAL = 353
11-3-13


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~rn


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Perkins
27811 Hwy 27
Nov 7 & 21, 10am
Hampton Inn
9630 US Hwy 441


Nov 8, 10am & 1pm
Best Western
1321 N 14th St
Nov 22, 10am & 1pm
Best Western
1321 N 14th St
Dec 3, 10am
Perkins
27811 Hwy 27


Have questions? Our agents have answers.
Call today for one-to-one help and avoid the
last-minute rush.


1-855-272-9557, TTY 711
8 a.m. 8 p.m. local time, 7 days a week


HelloUnitedMedicare.com



I UnitedHealthcarer
Medicare Solutions


You must continue to pay your Medicare Part B premium.
The benefit information provided is a brief summary, not a complete description of benefits. For more information contact the plan.
Limitations, copayments, and restrictions may apply. Benefits, formulary, pharmacy network, provider network, premium and/or co-payments/
co-insurance may change on January 1 of each year.
A sales person will be present with information and applications. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings,
call 1-855-272-9557, TTY 711.
Plans are insured through UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company or one of its affiliated companies, a Nlecdicare Advantage organization with
a Medicare contract. Enrollment in the plan depends on the plan's contract renewal with Medicare.
Y0066_131004_161316_FINALFLDC_1104_ROPAccepted 283442


DAILY COMMERCIAL


O D I C41?

AS K




Monday, November 4, 2013

M9I


PROFESSIONAL
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
BUY 2 SPOTS

AT $45 EACH
AND GET THE 3RD
HALF OFF

ATTENTION
REALTORS
5 LINES 7 DAYS
$30.44*
*Must be a Licensed Realtor


DAILY COMMERCIAL


A M
f fi
> ,


24/7 classified easy fast convenient affordable


Sell your merchandise today at ( ajOGC


Daily Conirmerditl


CHECK OUT OUR SPECI


ssilfied4
iercial.comllassifieds o

aA^^^


I 4LACE. YO_ C LASSE. A N 'U & LU---O C-,-,,Aw.

TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL


352231


Find It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST!
Lake: 352-314-3278 or Sumter: 352-748-1955 Monday Friday 8am 5pm
1^ 11 HJ1J ^^T-^~l~iBtn L JI I^t^B II I-r-^^B-^' /*^^E~n~lj~i~iB#11K^I Nfil HflM^E BB ilI


Classified Index


Legal Notices .
Announcements
At Your Service
Financial .....
Employment ..
Pets/Animals .


.......... 003
5 ......... 100
.......... 200
.......... 300
......... .400
.. m . .. . .500


Merchandise Mart ...
Real Estate/For RENT
Real Estate/For SALE


Manufactured Homes ..
Recreation ...........
Transportation ........


* I*,r


In Lake County
-, 7 7< I.

For Local News Sports Weather
In-Print & On-Line


.1. 1
a- -- u- irt
i m:* Mi
1: S -''i-
L ; -" ..... = i'-l ,
.ii:""- ~ ~--^; ,- i ",, ,E
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www.dailyconmercial.comni
M:,,.. ".4
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._;** .,I '. *. .. . >. *, -' -..
"::. B' l :.i "..*' ":'".ga .', ..'** : ? i ;..


2004 LINCOLN TOWN CAR STK#14079A .....................................................................$6,745
2004 FORD FOCUS ZX3 STK#13422A............................................................................ s6,912
2004 HYUNDAI ELANTRA STK#14069A. AUTO, SUNROOF............................................ 6,985
2000 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX GTP STK#14085A. ONLY 67K MILES, LOADED.......... 7,929
2005 TOYOTA PRIUS STK#13483B................................................................................... 8 ,897
2008 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN STK#14037B......................................................... $9,966
2009 CHEVROLET AVEO LTSTK#13085B. ONLY 11K MILES............................. $10,972
2008 NISSAN SENTRA S STK#8L741680.................................................................. 11,325
2010 CHEVROLET IMPALA STK#13506A................................................................. $11,934
2006 HONDA CR-V EXL STK#14050A. 4WD, SUNROOF, LOADED............................... $12,125
2008 NISSAN ROGUE SL STK#P13-034A1.AWD, SUNROOF................................ $12,435
2008 CHEVROLET IMPALA STK#1401OA1 ...............................................................$12,857
2009 CHEVROLET IMPALA STK#14063QA................................................................$12,957
2007 DODGE RAM 1500 STK#13269B...............................................................1... ... 3,252
2011 CHEVROLET CRUZE STK#13372A................................. ............................ $13,652
2011 HYUNDAI ELANTRA STK#13305A.................................................................... $13,894
2006 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500 STK#13412C. LT, LEATHER, LOADED....... $13,952
2010 CHEVROLET MALIBU STK#13085A.................................................................$1 4,652
2012 CHEVROLET IMPALA STK#P13-076............................................................... $14,858
2010 MERCURY MARINER STK#13054B. LEATHER, LOADED.................................. 4,987
2010 FORD ESCAPE STK#P13-015A. XLT, LOW MILES ...............................................$' 5,798
2013 CHEVROLET CRUZE LT STK#P13-039. ONLY 9K MILES................................1 $5,865
2008 BUICK LUCERNE CXLSTK#14111A................................................................ 15,963
2010 CHEVROLET EQUINOX STK#13478A..............................................................$1 6,489
2010 HYUNDAI TUCSON LIMITED STK#13095A. NAV., LEATHER, LOADED...........$17,968
2009 CADILLAC DTS STK#14067A..............................................................................$20,369
2011 CHEVROLET CAMARO RS STK#13471A..................................................... $20,968
2007 CHEVROLET AVALANCHE LTZ STK#13507A. ONLY 66K MILES.............. ...$23,864
2010 GMC ACADIA SLTSTK#14127A......................................................................$24,958
2012 CHEVROLET SILVERADO LTZ ONLY 4K MILES.......................................... 33,671
1 'I' I r,=wiRn1 T"rM fZ 51ul6
-- -- -FIND ROADS* -T
= 4 Across from the Leesburg AirportS V
LAKECOUNTYCHEV.COM
I |ECI EkGIHE UIH01? 8843 HWY 441 352-787-6888
We'll Ce it for FREE' OPEN MONDAY-FRIDAY 8:30am-8&0pm b # U I
..'.....'.'. ..... '....... -... ------_j SATURDAY 8:3Oam-6:00pm; SUN. CLOSED


'PRICES & PAYMENTS PLUS TAX, TAG, TITLE. AND $599 DEALER ADMIN. PHOTOS FOR ILLUSTRATION ONLY THANK YOU AND HAVE A GREAT DAY,


F


ST


DEADLINES
For Insertion COPY DATE
Friday Thursday, 5pm
Saturday Friday, 3pm
Sunday Friday, 5:00pm
Monday Friday, 5:00pm
Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pm
.^ .T, I:,.]j 1 ...i ,: l .,..,', h.,. .. .l,: I I Mi ., ,,I ,;.i.1 I..,:
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ADJUSTMENTS
first day of pubication. tf y ou find an error ctl the classified
department iet wdlately at 314-3278 a 748-1955
.I 1 1., ... .


. .600
. .800
S.900
.1000
.1100
.1200


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Monday, November 4, 2013


A/


Local, Trusted
A/C Expert
Kalos Services
352-243-7088
KalosFlorida.com
Lic.# CAC 1814620

FloreiaAir & Heat Inc.
tYour Comfort Company
For All Your Air Conditioning
Scccepn & g Heating Ntsfr
SC h 352-326-3202
serving l ake County State Licence #
since 1986 CAC181403

IShaw~n A/ C ^ Heat^
Repairs at great prices.
presidential & Commercial,














ACa#291 Offie:,Na 352-45-51-50
407-617-0450
Lici .CACI 81'7515 State Certiffied J,







Adulum tin Care"
Eustis Senior Care
kS~A Ws~dlI# F"dlityAU 893
Aepting New Clients for our
brand new bedrooms.
Call Rhea, RN at 352-551-5307
for inquiries and a free tour.

Aurora Home Care Inc.
'Illuminating Care"
Cornp anions/Homemakers
Sewving oi of Lake, Sumter, Mortion Counties
Raes start at $18.50/hr "4hr min.'
Aurorahomecareinc.org. Lie/ins
Ahca#23912 Office: 352-435-7751
Toll Free: 866-702-6197


Ir Serving Lake, Sumter

& S. Marion Counties
6We Service All
I Appliance Brands
Licensed/Insured
Free Service Call
w/Repair
15+ Years Exp. 24 Hr. Emergency Svc.
We Don't Want To Be The Biggest
Just The Best
Eric Wolf 352-630-2202






Complete Automotive Care
Transmissions AC Brakes
Tune Ups Body Work Oil Change
Family Owned 26 Yrs 352-326-2400
1406 Emerson St, Leesburg across from Post Office





RE-TILE
352-391-5553
Backsplashes Re-Tile Tub & Shower
Walls Grab Bars Floors
Handicap Baths Repairs
Leaky Shower Pan
Ins./Lic. 30 yrs. exp.




BATHTUBS REFINISHED
ON LOCATION
> f *Renew, on location, your
i* Porcelain Fiberglass
S Ceramic Tiles
LAKESIDE TUB & TILE REFINISHING
(352) 742-9602


iStucky's Carpet
Cleaning
Spring Special
2 Rooms & Hall $50
352.365.9889


I Bacb4'S All-Natural
; ? Cleaning Service
S- Quality Cleaning with
,--., only natural products.
Licensed and Insured
352-348-6576
www.bambisollnaturolcleaning.com


C, ILEANI NG
lTeaning, Sealing & Grout Repair.
[Also Carpet, Upholstery Pressure
Washing, Driveways & Sidewalks.
We do it right! Call Tim
a52-243-1215 or 407-383-878

Simone's Cleaning Services
Commercial/Residential
Reliable/References
SLiBonded-10 Yrs Exp.
] _Immediate Avallibility-
*DW Flexible Hours
Canl: Simone
407-844- 183I

ESP Services
Doctors Visits Cooking & Laundry
Pet Caring General Errands
Housekeeping
Call For A Free In-Person
Consultation
352-348-6408

CLEAN SWEEP
(Clutter Free Cleaning)
lean, Sort, Pack or Spring Clean
Ref's & Yrs. of Experience
V 352-742-0014
Reasonable Rates





Your PC Repair Specialists
Fast friendly service at a
flat rate affordable price.
Education & Repair
n your home or our office.
1Call
352-897-1309






i Concrete FrLs
Q QUALITY CONCRETE & BLOCK
x10 $500.00 10x40 $1200.00
i Includes labor, concrete & cleanup
0Fast turnaround, no hassle & local
S #CRC326327, Ings. & References
BRIAN DEGAGLIA
352-267-5723

A oConcrete For Less
Q, 801101 Slab $450
e"testPNT 1Ox4 Slab $1325
Includes Conrete a Labor
E 79 Blocking/ RfEltlcJlns.
I Phillip 352-504-8372











wwI acroinco
erIT TheTMU T ViCunyAeaFr26Ya, Tmi
We ELIMINATE all trip
hazards due to UNEVEN and
or RAISED concrete.
Commercial/Residential
Concrete Grinding is 1/2
the cost of replacement.
Entry ways Ramps Sidewalks
Driveways Puddling Water, etc.
Insured
(8771454-0113 [toll free]
Alconcretegrinding.com




METAL TILE SHINGLE ROOFING
New Construction or Re-Roofing
B 308 Oak Street
Lady Lake, FL 32159
352-430-2773
www sackroofing.com
Serving the Tri County Area For 26 Years




Do r & LockBC12-,
-"*^OR& LOCK SERVICE
We Repair, Replace and Install
Emergency Services Available!
(352) 3-14-3-169


**- 0Enc[losur
Screening I


*iiiT~iiiiiiinm h M UIEiiiniii EflPIrEI
FREE ESTIMATES
352A08.2142


1~ -


Screein g s1tIII
^^H-U- 0^


l *Triple Crown
S Tile & Wood
Installation & Repairs
Owner does all work.
Free Est. Lie/Ins
3524274825


Screens Ripped?
Call 352-504-0471
SCREEN GENIE
One panel or complete screen
enclosure, lanais, Entyways
Doors- Nojob too small.


W 'E #CBC1252465
11S'GARAGE DOORS
Complete Service & Installation
Lake County's Largest Provider!
We Sell & Program Remotes!
(3521 748-4575


| Repairs &
Garage Door Reepacements
& Locally Owned
Gate All Work
Warranted
Licensed & Insured midfldoor.com
352-630-0292 Shane Blanton




rage door installation/repair svcs



S Sng Replacement. Free Est, LLC
service all of Central FLA.
SLie/Ins. Call 352-615-11294M





Affordable Rome
IP Repair, LLC
Mobile Home Repair Apt. Clean Outs
& Repair Decks & Ramps
Soffits/Siding Doors/Windows
Painting Tile Work* Lic/lns
call Pat 352-551-6073

oDne Hrs Nandymnan PalHUnI
S Door & indow Installion
I Carpentry,
Lf Home Improvement,
Drywall & More! Just Ask!
S Professional Service
SLic./lns. 352-259-5357

VE WMITU EADM T
:-:-:-Home Repair:-:,:-:,
SPressure Washing Painting
* Flooring Carpet Clean Outs I
Clean Ups Hauling Licensed
352-787-7056

SJohn Philibert, Inc
S Floors. Window and Doors,
S Pantries, Cabinets and more.
Your pesky Leaks gone, Your Soffits
we Fix, and Houses We'll Paint From
inside and out, we'll make it great Uc/Ins
JPHandy.com(352) 308-0694


S Mike Shoffstall
Call 352 552 1875'
-,~JUNGLE 14UT1
REPAIRS A
._._, btltGLE I-IU I

Repair everything. Replace anything.


Truted, Quality Craftsmanshipfor 30+ years
Kitchens Bathrooms Windows
Vinyl Siding Decks Painting/Staining
Tile/Marble Lanai Enclosures
Mike Lalonde 352-409-8311
mikeiam nage4nlecomrn









*W I JiII I &lMiiiiii
Hs a uling


HallIuln


BOYDS
You call it, We haul it!
352
460-7186




METAL TILE SHINGLE ROOFING
New Construction or Re-Roofing
B 308 Oak Street
Lady Lake, FL 32159
352-430-2773
www.sackroofing.com
Serving the Tri County Area For 26 Years

D&B RENOVATIONS
352-572-1847
FREE ESTIMATES
"ONE CALL DOES IT ALL"
Ij|IM&k Bathroom Remodels, Flooring,
r- Painting, Pressure Washing,
F Privacy Fence AND MORE
| Insured & Experienced
- -. . .. - __ - - I


ii ii'ira ii L

Local Agent
Long Term Care Ins.
Medicare Supplements
Critical Care Ins.
Cancer Ins.
Call Bill Bell
352.589-0454 or 352.551.3504

Ask Me About
Medicare Insurance
Robert Lange
352-742-2425
lange.rob.lns@gmall.com




Irrigation Tune-Up
$35 Check & Adjust
$, Entire System.
35U Provide Written Est.
To RFix Problems!
Lower Your Monthly Cost
352-409-3163

f Sprinkler
Repairs
Timers, Valves, Heads,
Leaks, etc.
(3S2) 787-9001
Tha's all we do since 1979
Native, 4th Generation




JI.C.C. Bobcat & Tree Svc. Inc.
,A Land Clearing/Excavating
Jb Fill Dirt/Clay
A-i--lauling/Debris Removal
w Stump Grinding
Demolition/Grading/ Driveways
Owner Operator
352-455-7608
CHRIS CNES LANDSCAPE

Lawn Maliteance, HaNdscme, Patios, I
Retalilig Walls, MalL Sodding I
Leeshuna 536-3106
20 fturs 1:I.JIL *1*

Premier Scapes
Vp^ && Services Inc.
Land Clearing Bush Hogging
Debris Removal
Hauling Free Estimates
352-308-5508



Landscaping

Trimming, Mulching,
Sod, Tree Trimming,
Pavers & Much More!
Armando Santamario
352-587-1523




lDon's "MOBILE"
S I Come To You & Repair
S Your: Lawn Mower, Trimmer,
|1 Blower, Chain Saw, etc.
S35+ Yrs. Exp. Res/Com
(352) 450-7661


a I O Lmu. LWE 05131
*- iidsco STreu Tdimg Fure Washi
FiEE ESTIMATES UCJIN&
We TakeA i lt Out Of Ovw PricingI
352-326-8712 / 352406-3354


[? LAWN
SSPRAYING
Fertilizer Weeds Insects


Garag Doo


(352) 345-6923
Tim Mundy Painting
& Pressure Cleang Services, Iba
"Where quality Is Accident"d
N& Licensed &t Insured


CCkMW3AU- 357-ETLAL OU



[ Dn' Srs- Cl T he et
Tree Service At
Reasonable Rates
I can climb the highest trees,
and I can mow the biggest
lawns, but please don't ask me
to leap tall buildings[
Fair Pricing. TrimTrees.
Cut Lawns & Clean Ups
Call Tony for estimate 352-759-2080
Don't Stress Call The Best!
I DtE-Iependable Commercial
Lawn Services


DeedableMComnmercial
Lic/Ins. Designer
Landscaping, Trimming,
Shrubs. We do it all
I Rick 352-427-8919

Howards Lawn
service
Eeiiuial/CommerciaI

(3521
800-9985
i
L--audi Morp;
Now accehiug neu 6ii'mnilal I
Residential customers.MewingLi
LandscapieI lrrigatin aild mre.
Reasonale, Depeidable Exedrencedi
Office 352-552-4556 Caell 352-702-6460J
,B ,',, All Lawn
Mand Tree
Care
0Service
S Natural Land
to ^ learning (Goats)
"BEST PRICES" Free Est
52-460-7186

Servicesvc

~p~J~jjService
Center
*i1t 1ZQ 352-602-1735
At Venetian Gardens
Marina on the
Harris Chain of Lakes.
No Trailer. No Problem.
Boat Repairs & Svc. on water

COVERED BOAT SUPS FOR RENT I
I win Palms Marina located on
ake Griffin. Water& elec. avail.
'Weekly, Monthly or Yearly. BOAT
RENTALS: Pontoons,
Jon Boats, Kayaks & Canoes.
Call 352-787-4514




Bill's Moving
fla. Mover Reg. No: 2095
Owner On Every Job
Fair Rates & 27+ Yrs. EXD.
352-669-4456
Toll Free 88-444-3559

Uttle John's Movers &
Storage 352-812-4889
Serving Lake, Marion,
& Sumter Counties
1-15 items same day delivery
Local & Long distance moves
Loading & unloading pods, rental
trucks, & storage units.
We have trucks going up &
down 195 & 175
"Less Than a POD" "Door to Door"
You're Coming ....Your Neighbor is Going!
Jump on Board and Save
SERVING ALL 50 STATES
One item to a full house!!!
We will get off the interstate for you!
ljm9575@yahoo.com
US DOT #2406621




Quality Assurance Painting, Inc.
1 f^Yl Int~riT-xetu- Ill3ahn
d New ConslacusIcum
U Ucensod/InhmedI
I TIm Grubbs
I^S- 352-483-6915
www.qualilyassurancepaintinginc.com

I^rCO-ED1
Tr: PROPBESiONAIL
I: PAINTINO, INC.
Commercial pS ESInMATEs
&m & Residenial (352) 267-6430
mIR WWF. COOPAINTIN UG& .cOIM
^B ^^-- .UcensedJ and Insured
NTERIORJEXTERIOR PAINTING &, OTHER svcS.


i BrighimanHomelImprovement
Wallpaper, Drywall
Mirsvtgv@kGira ig'Doors Interior Painting, Trim
n-'c.&1epa""rs- EE ESTIMATES
All 11111s & 1*oMls. ^UInsured
BrakonSuin3Rhulacems 8-1
16% eSor UinBIS^.a *\ 352-598.3169
0%2On4w/t4isad 598 -316


i


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Cabinetry

I Services I




Monday, November 4, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


i John Philibert, Inc
For All Your Interior/Exterior
'Painting Needs.
fWe Also Offer
Driveways Patios
And Faux Finishes Lie/Ins
Call John @ (352) 308-0694
JPHandy.com

New England Painter
Semi-Retired
30 Years Exp
Interior, Exterior, Pressure
Washing No Job Too Small
Bob Kelley Painting
352-702-7739

CLAUDE WILD PAINTING
High Quality @ Reasonable Prices
Int. & Ext. Free Est. Lie/Ins
Pressure Cleaning Ret. & 35 yrs. exp.
in Lake County
( c wildpainting@gmail.com



.yLe Affordable Home
I Repair, LLC
Interior/Exterior Painting
Free Pressure Washing with all
Exterior Paints.Driveways and Decks
NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL Lic/Ins
Call pat 352-551-6073

IntarlOr aitExierio
PAINTING Sealants
Comnot Coalngs
Pressure Cleaning
Uc. Ins.- Free Estimates
352-728-4561




/ INDOOR PEST
CONTROL
As low as $20 per mo.
W 'I- 352-357-5905
A Pest Exterminator

American Pest Control
Termites Rodent Exclusions
German Roaches
Property Inspections
Soil Pre-treatment
Lic/Ins 352-446-2318


W n12W. Main St.
(Next to Pep Boys)
352-787-2770
20 Years in Leesburg



Serv1969
Socializing in
Vandas.
RCall for hours
352-787-9001
ORCHS- 2902 South St.
J Leesburg, FL
GoodwinOrchids.com










Sac^ Plumbing, LLC
Il numbing Repairs ComminRes
Kitchens & Bath Reoidels
DISposal, Water Heater, Gas PluiD
Dralm/Sewer Cleaning.
NO Grout Shewers, 24 Hr. Emergency
u-s-fi2B(352] 343-3763




Ace Pool Service
Complete Pool Services
Motor & Pump Repair
Pool & Patio Remodeling
Servicing Commercial & Residential
Properties Since 1969
Licensed/Insured Free Estimates
)352-735-3050
D .ll "MrClen


To haeou

ProesioalServie lste ee

pleae cntat Mihele i th


352.260.7490

All Airports, Cruise Terminals,
Hotels, Casinos & Attractions
Shands-VA and Jacksonville Mayo





F.HJAVENI Providing
No-cost Svcs.
to Lake county
sexual assault victims 24/7/365.
On-Call Rape Advocacy
Counseling, Legal Assistance
Hotline 352-787-1379




Bovsz Pryj
ShingleTile, Lcensed Bonded Insured
Metal, and Rubber Residential/Commercial
Roof Systems RC29027460
(352) 669-6607 I

METAL TILE SHINGLE ROOFING
New Construction or Re-Roofing
B 308 Oak Street
Lady Lake, FL 32159
352-430-2773
www.sackrooflng.com
Serving the Tri County Area For 26 Years

#1 IN ROOFING
Leak Repairs Shingles/Flat Roof
Lifetime Metal Roofs Screen Rooms
Lic. #CCC1329936
Villages Roofing and
Construction, Inc.<-_
FREE ROOF ESTIMATES
3BZ-314-3BZB

Lake Contracting, Inc.
GAF Certified
Shingles, Metal or Flat
Additions, Remodels, Renovations
Roof to Foundation
352-602-8794
fUe. CGC1507556 CCC 1326899


SECURITY TRAINING
* Security "D&"G" Lic.
PLUS: FL. Concealed Lic.
NRA Instructor Training
Ladies Only Classes Avail.
z 352-3502855
jcOsD3i13m www.TheRightTraining.com




Speciazed Storage Sofutons
Now is thee time...
To organize your life!
(Ctuslom Closets, Home Office, Garages
Tailored To Your Needs,
17 Years Exp.
Free IIome Design Consultation
352-383-7058407-718-6818(Cell)




B John Philibert, Inc
For All Your Tile Needs
Pergo, Ceramic Tile,
Travertine, Vinyl & More
Call John 0(352) 308-0694
JPHandy.com Lic/Ins

RE-TILE
352-391-5553
SBacksplashes Re-Tile Tub & Shower
Walls Grab Bars Floors
Handicap Baths Repairs
Leaky Shower Pan
Ins./Lic. 30 yrs. exp.




| Ji~L. -behat a Tree Sue. Enc.
Iinllesidential/Commerclal
Trimming/Removal
I Palms/Hedges/Stump Grinding
Debris removal/Hauling
1Fll DirtiClay/Grading/Driveways
Lic/Ins Insurance Work 24 Hrs.
352-455-7608

A Affordable Tree
rre Service
Tree Trimming & Removal
Lake Cleaning Dead Wooding
Moss Spraying Lic/Ins
Free Est. Senior Discounts
352-459-9428


T\ STUMP GRINDING
I ~ SPECIALIST
i BREE TRIMMING
; W &MORE
352-551-4222

R Premier Scapes
- & Services Inc.
Complete Tree Service
Trimming Debris Removal
Stump Grinding ~ Free Estimates
352-308-5508

WAindowKS'ai

LUc .CBC1252465
q%, WINDOWS
We Install, Replace and Repair I
Most Major Brands Available I
Glass and Screen Repair I
(3521 787-4545

3 352-587-2735
CRC#1330701 Lanai Enclosures
-Glass Window
Replacement
Acrylic Windows
Screen Rooms

352-602-9849
SPARKLING
WINDOWS
MARK ANDERSON
Window Cleaning,
Screens, Tracks. FREE Estimates


: i Complete Automotive Care ::' "Q"

WL~ervices/r :: Comnmiete Care Licensed. Bonded, Insured
Autom tiveMate ER #13014129
:. TuneUp BoyorilCh: Transmissions W AC Brakes ::
* 15+ Years Exp. A 245Hr. EnergencySvcF
SWe Don't Want To Be The Biggest od26Yrs352-326-240 i
JustThe Best 1406 Emerson St, Leesburg across from PostOffice
Eric Wolf 352-630-2202 ___________________
All About Appliances repairs and installs Emerson Street Automotive has been fam- Our mission is to
all brands of major appliances. We are a ily owned and operated for nearly 30 pr d wt
i~~ ~~fe --ervrovieyouwihCqalty



small husband/wife company. Eric has years. Lori and Michael Farfaglia pur-
over 15 years experience repairing appli- chased the business from Lori's family in professional, and a safe

ances and Lavinia (Vinnie) has over 20 : 2010. Lori's father, Terrill Davis stayed as electrical installation at a
years business management experience. the onsite manager. Emerson Street is lo-
yerJi ustin e essmagent eprec.:: fi rc.W nwer our





Together, we strive to offer you prompt, cated at 1406 Emerson Street, right next to rpr
Professionals, courteous and personal serv- the Post Office in Leesburg, Florida. We one 24/7, seek to

ices farbeyondyourexpectations.bothby are opened Monday-Friday 7:30-5:30 and save you money while
icesda 7:3-300 beyon: 35232-200 expetatons both by :
: : provideiyug tth daity,





phone and in your home. We respect you Saturday 7:30-3:00. Phone: 352-326-2400. outstanding
an We do all kinds of automotive repair in- p onl and n
and your time and make every effort to be laudingg light body work. We h, ave state of service thal t meets or
mldm andh outy ofrk you home asat quikl as pos-L yasin and out of your home as qckly pos-ei the art diagnostic equipment that takes the exceeds your expectations.
sible yet provide a thorough diagnosis and guess out of repaying your car". We service Y an nd
: : gile~~~th Pst0ULOffpiceinLesug y ou rida. We phonie 24/7I('I'l 'It', seekto' "




timely repyr We genuinely appreciate all b by
Sy r uin Eall makes and models including SUVs,
a your businesses y ATV's, and RV'so trust us!
i. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ldn .................................. wo........... ............. ve............ .of .. ... . ..... ....that.....m eets... ...or





DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 4, 2013


2
Legal Notices


003 Legal Notices

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF
PERSONAL PROPERTY
Notice is hereby given that the undersigned
will sell, to satisfy lien of the owner, at public
sale by competitive bidding on
November 14, 2013 at the times and loca-
tions listed below.
The personal goods stored therein by the fol-
lowing:
2:30p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility
located at: 1970 S. Hwy 27, Clermont, Fl.
34711 (352) 242-6602
Unit #371 Joey Ingram No description on
original lease, Unit #668 Rebecca Robbins -
Furnature, Household goods,
Unit #684 Robert Perry House Hold Items
3:30p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility
located at: 18286 Apshawa Rd. Minneola, Fl.
34715 (352) 241 8001
Unit #827 Tabernacle Of The Enlightened -
equipment, supplies, furniture, Unit #1007
Roland Sone household items
4:30p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility
located at: 300 E. Division St. Minneola, Fl.
34715 (352) 394 0501
Unit #B70 Floyd Lussier Household Goods,
Unit #D63 Ella J. Benavidez Household
Items
Purchases must be made with cash only and
paid at the time of sale. All goods are sold
as is and must be removed at the time of
purchase. Extra Space Storage reserves the
right to bid. Sale is subject to adjournment.
Thank You, Extra Space Storage.
Ad No.00414143
October 28 & November 4, 2013

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
Ordinance 02013-54 Large Scale
Comprehensive Plan Text Amendment
in the City of Wildwood, Florida
Notice is hereby given that the City of Wild
wood, Florida will hold a Public Hearing on
the transmittal of Ordinance Number
02013 54 to the State Land Planning
Agency pursuant to F.S. 163.3184(3) during
the 7:00 p.m. City Commission Meeting of
November 11, 2013, in the City Hall Com-
mission Chamber, located at 100 North Main
Street, Wildwood, Florida.
ORDINANCE 02013-54
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WILD-
WOOD, FLORIDA; AMENDING THE FUTURE
LAND USE ELEMENT OF THE CITY OF WILD-
WOOD COMPREHENSIVE PLAN IN ACCOR-
DANCE WITH THE COMMUNITY PLANNING
ACT OF 2011; CREATING FUTURE LAND USE
ELEMENT OBJECTIVE 1.7.A AND POLICIES
1.7.A.1 THROUGH 1.7.A.4 CONCERNING RE-
GIONAL ACTIVITY CENTERS; DESIGNATING


003 Legal Notices
THE TRAILWINDS VILLAGE PROJECT AND
THE WILDWOOD COMMONS PROJECT AS
REGIONAL ACTIVITY CENTERS PURSUANT TO
CHAPTER 380.06(2)(B. FLORIDA STATUTES,
.-rii HIL.I-1ti i0-J 1,1A l 1,1 HI F 'hilOjA ADMIN-
.TiIATivEt 'i'lE ArlI H i.'aVIL'ilI FOR AN
EFFECTIVE DATE.
Text amendments designating areas as "Re
gional Activity Centers" and designating the
"Wildwood Commons" and "Trailwinds Vil-
lages" projects as "Regional Activity Cen
ters."
The proposed Ordinance may be inspected
by the public at the Development Services
Department, Wildwood City Hall, between the
hours of 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. weekdays.
Interested parties are encouraged to attend
the hearing and provide comments regarding
the proposed ordinance. Any person require
ing special accommodation under the ADA
should contact the City Clerk at
(352)330 1340.
APPEAL: NECESSITY OF RECORD Notice is
hereby given that any person wishing to ap
peal any decision made by the Commission
on any matter considered during the meeting
will need a record of the proceedings, and
may need to ensure that a verbatim record is
made, which includes the testimony and evi
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Jason McHugh,
Development Services Coordinator
City of Wildwood, Florida
Ad No.00415324
November 4, 2013.

100
Announcement

104 Special
Notices
NOTICE TO
ADVERTISERS
PLEASE CHECK YOUR AD FOR
ERRORS THE FIRST DAY IT APPEARS
SINCE THE DAILY COMMERCIAL WILL
NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
INCORRECT ADS AFTER THE FIRST
DAY OF PUBLICATION. IF YOU FIND
AN ERROR CALL THE CLASSIFIED
DEPARTMENT IMMEDIATELY AT
314-3278 OR 748-1955.
THE PUBLISHER ASSUMES NO
FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY FOR
ERRORS OR FOR COMMISSION OF
COPY. LIABILITY SHALL NOT EXCEED
THE COST OF THE PORTION OF
SPACE OCCUPIED BY SUCH ERROR.
CANCELLATIONS
CANCELLATION FOR ADS RUNNING
SATURDAY MUST BE MADE BY
FRIDAY BY 2:00, CANCELLATIONS
FOR SUNDAY & MONDAY MUST BE
MADE FRIDAY BY 5:00


106 Personals
SINGLE WHITE FEMALE in search of
SWM over 65. Outgoing, enjoys fes-
tivals, visiting Florida sites & more.
Riding motorcycle is a plus. 15 mi.
radius of Mt. Dora. 352-383-8065
124 Professional
Services
COMMUNITY
SEMINAR:
How To Avoid Low
Back and Neck
Fain r :ur Er/!
Learn about DRSTM Protocol, a
breakthrough and successful
nonsurgical treatment for
herniated and degenerative
disc condition.
Featuring: Dr. Jason E. Davis
Davis Clinic of
Chiropractic, Inc.
Discussion of chronic
and severe back and
neck conditions,
treatment options,
respective advantages,
treatment for failed
back or neck surgery.
Q& A Period
Light Refreshments.
Reservations Preferred
3:00-4:00pm Tues.
November 5, 2013
DAVIS CLINIC
OF CHIROPRACTIC
Reservations:
(352) 430-2121
DavisSpinelnstitute.com

You should see what
you are missing daily!


Make your




escape!



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Employment



Listings.



Appearing daily!


200
At Your Service


201 Insurance

205 Adult Care
NOTICE
Florida Statute states, "It is a
misdemeanor for any person willfully,
knowingly, or intentionally to operate
or attempt to operate a family day
care home without a license or
without registering with the
department, whichever is applicable".
Florida Statute states, "No person
shall advertise a child care facility
without including within such
advertisement the state or local
agency license number of such
facility. The statute applies to anyone
with more than 1 unrelated child
in their home.

245 Financial

SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Contact us if your claim has been
denied or if you need help.
Over 30 yrs. exp.No fees or costs
unless your claim is approved.
Cooper Consulting
2228 South St., Leesburg
352-728-5552

250 Handyman
Hard working Lic. Business owner,
seeks to improve your home.
Ability to perform jobs including
Remodeling-TreeTrimming-Drywall-
Tiling, etc. References avail.
Call Robert Plante's
Home Maint. 352-484-3543


LMyCci


268 Moving



Two Brothers Moving
1 Room or a Full House
FL. Reg. #IM1539
Russell & Todd Franks
Lic. & Ins. Call 352-793-8960

275 Plumbing
SINCE
~1987

KILEY&
SONS, INC.
A Full Service Plumbing Company.
Lake 787-1904 Sumter 748-9500
CentralFloridaPlumber.com
VISIT OUR ONSITE SHOWROOM.
24 Hr. Emergency Service
Lic#CFC1426882

281 Roofing
#1 IN ROOFING
Villages Roofing & Construction Inc.
*Leak Repairs *Shingles/Flat Roof.
*Lifetime Metal Roofs. Free Roof Est.
352-314-3625. Lie. #CCC1329936



MCHALE ROOFING INC
Re-Roofs and Repairs, Tile, Metal,
Shingles Flat Roofs & Mobile Homes
Excel. Ref's Lic & Ins. CCC1328197
Call 352-255-2758

288 Tree
Service



*Land Clearing *Tree Removal
*Trimming & Shaping
*Hauling & Stump *Grinding
Free Est. **SPECIALS**
352-267-5720


Stump Grinding, eTree Trimming &
Removal *Box Blading, *Bush
Hogging & Grading. Lic & Insured.
Call 352-504-1597


300
Financial





400
Employment


410 Sales
AUTOMOTIVE SALES
PROFESSIONALS
Phillips Toyota Scion has immedi-
ate openings available for profes-
sional, experienced, automotive sales-
people. We are looking for seasoned
auto professionals to sell both new
and pre-owned vehicles who have ex-
cellent closing skills and a proven
track record.
We are successful because we are
able to offer career and growth oppor-
tunities as well as an aggressive pay
plan, generous bonuses based on
performance, medical benefits, 401 K
and vacation package. We are a fam-
ily owned and operated dealership
where your sales ability will make a
difference in your career and in the
future of the dealership.
We have the traffic and the leads
for a pro to take ownership and take
automotive sales to the next level.
Apply in person at
Phillips Toyota Scion,
8629 Hwy. 441 S. Leesburg
NEEDED HOT SHOT ADVERTISING
SALES PERSON
Experienced self starter. High com-
missions paid. Need car & ambition.
Call Keith 352-250-5076

432 Dental
DENTAL RECEPTIONIST
Professional & experienced only.
Fax resume to: 352-728-3373
GROWING DENTAL OFFICE IS
SEEKING A FT LEAD DENTAL ASST.
AS WELL AS FT DENTAL ASST.
Experience is a must and Dentrix is a
plus. These individuals must be flexi-
ble with days and hours.
Please email your resume to
dawn@tavaresdentist.com or
Call 352-508-4434


I I^ IM IM rr[ Wil I I m B^

C~a--f-e ne s just click aay!
www.dailycomrcial.comj,.!7

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


CROSSWORD
By THOMAS JOSEPH


ACROSS
1 Shut with
a bang
5 Speedy
9 Japanese
cartoon
art
lOSupple
12 Eternal
City
resident
13 Place in
order
14 Takes
care of
the final
details
16 Need to
pay
17- out
(barely
makes)
18 Put on the
line
21 Performed
22 Threw a
party
23Answer
24 Unrefined
26 Kanye's
music
29Attention-
getting
call
30Convoy
truck
31 Commer-
cials
32 Appears
unexpect-
edly
34 Explosive
stuff
37 Baggy
38 Prepare
for
prayer


39AI and
Tipper
40Diploma
holder
41 Colony
insects

DOWN
1 "Jersey
Shore"
star
2 Walked
unsteadily
3 Stockpile
4 List of
choices
5Ga.
neighbor
6 Ventilate
7 Painter's
motion
8 Melted
9 Ready for
battle
11 Looked
over


B L EJW CE D S
LAMIER LIMIT
O X E AnL I-V E
IG CA AD N IP
TRAIN TENS
Y ET TOCOM
TT O

U N EDEON
R E-A-D--TOG O


ANT E R LIP
SaL I IGAnVs E
KOREA EATEN

Saturday's answer


15 Braces
19Land in
the sea
20 Pig's
place
22Valiant
one
23Beam of
light
24Giving up
25 Pearl
producer
26Vacation
spot


27 Entertains
28Voice, in
slang
29Singer
Snow
30 Coffee
stirrer
33Gymnast
Korbut
35Stephen
of "The
Crying
Game"
36Antique


NEW CROSSWORD BOOK! Send $4.75 (check/m.o.) to
Thomas Joseph Book 1, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475
M 1 12 13 14 = 5 16 17-T8 M


I I-*.


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, November 4, 2013




Monday, November 4, 2013


432 Dental

DENTAL ASSISTANT i
Experienced only. $15/hr.
Fax resume to: 352-787-9036
NO PHONE CALLS

435 Medical










LPN/MA
needed part time or PRN. for busy
dermatology practice in Villages &
Leesburg offices. Prefer office exp. &.




ability to cover multi positions.
Fax resume to :352- 365-0932

MA needed for medical office.
Exp. Non Smoker preferred.
Please fax resume to attn. Melanie:
352-787-0370or

OPTICAL TECH /DISPENSER
Exp. Lab Tech need for. busy optha-




molic practice in The Villages. Dis-
pensing experience a plus.
a Apply in person:
Beacon Advanced Eye Care
1128 Bichara Blvd.
Lady Lake, FL 32159
RECEPTIONIST F/i
For Mneedical Office oin Lake County.
Exp. required. Bilingual o preferred.





Fax resume to: 352-742-8305

450 Trades___

CONSTRUCTION LABORERS
Class A or BCDL preferred.
WilPlease fax resume to attn. Must travel.anie:









Paid medical & leave.
DFWP/EOE
Call 352-383-315970
OPTICAL TECHxt. 229DISPENSER
Exp. Lab Tech need for busy optha-
molic practice in The Villages. Dis-
pensing experience a plus.
Apply in person:
Beacon Advanced Eye Care
1128 Bichara Blvd.
Lady Lake, FL 32159

RECEPTIONIST F/T
For Medical Office in Lake County.
Exp. required. Bilingual preferred.
Fax resume to: 352-742-8305

450 Trades

CONSTRUCTION LABORERS
Class A or B CDL preferred.
Will train. Must travel.
Paid medical & leave.
DFWP/EOE
Call 352-383-3159
Ext. 229


ELECTRICAL
APPRENTICES
applicants must have experience and
clean driving record, high school di-
loma or equivalent. Company is an
OE and Drug-Free Workplace. Excel-
ent health benefits, 401k and PTO;
MVR & Background checks.
Apply in person at:
PIKE'S ELECTRIC, INC.
719 Industrial Drive
Wildwood, FL 34785


450 Trades

"COME TRUCK WITH US"
Hiring OTR Drivers current DOT Physi-
cal and Class A CDL required with one
year verifiable experience. Reefer ex-
perience a plus not required. We offer
great pay and bonuses.
Apply at www.walbon.com or
Call at 1-800-328-2499 Ext. 106

FOREMAN /
LOADER OPERATOR/
PIPE LAYERS/ GENERAL LABORERS
Underground pipe utility construction
Exp. pipe sewer, water, storm.
Apply: www.dlcd.com
813-986-1922
EOE/DFWP





HYUNDAI TECHNICIANS
Needed in Leesburg FL. Hyundai/Kia
exp. a plus. Will train. AC Shop
Great benefits, medical, dental, 401 K,
& paid vacations.
Please email your resume to:
FF@jenkinscars.com

LANDSCAPING COMPANY,
ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR
LABORERS & FOREMAN
We do no Lawn Maintenance. 50-55
hrs. per week. Must be legal resident
and have valid Drivers License.
No phone calls please.
Apply in person 8-10 Oam, Tues. Sat.
MANSFIELD LANDSCAPING
8440 CR48 in Yalaha, FL.


DRIVERS

NEEDED!
QUALIFIED CDL A DRIVERS
2 YEARS EXPERIENCE
See what we offer, assigned
equipmentgood home time,
weekly pay, direct dep.,health ins,
paid holidays & vacation.
GREAT
BONUS
PROGRAM!
Call for more details.
800-456-2336 X114


455
Restaurants/
Hotels/Clubs

BALAHI-LNLk-H-I-I
MUST be exp'd. Evenings & Wknds.
Apply in person 3-5pm
VIC'S EMBERS SUPPER CLUB
7940 US Hwy. 441 Leesburg, FL


455
Restaurants/
Hotels/Clubs





NOW HIRING
COOKS, HOSTS, SERVER AND
MANAGER POSITIONS
We are seeking high energy, moti-
vated, committed and creative team
members.
On the spot interviews
8:30am to 11:OOam Nov. 62013
LIGHTHOUSE POINT BAR AND GRILLE
925 Lake Shore Drive
The Villages FL 32162


470 General

SCHOOL BUS
DRIVERS NEEDED
Training provided.
Lake County Schools, Transportation
352-728-2561 or
Apply online: www.lake.kl 2.fl.us

DELIVERY PERSONNEL
Office equip dealer seeks reliable per-
son to deliver equip & supplies, assist
in inventory control & light bldg.
maint. Must have neat appearance,
good communication skills, able to
follow written/oral directions, & be in-
surable. Must be able to safely oper-
ate a box truck. Heavy lifting req'd.
Please do not respond if you can't
pass a drug test, MVR & background
check. M-F 8am -5pm.
Apply in person at:
Mon.-Fri. 9am -12pm.
2854 West Main St.
Leesburg, FL.


COME JOIN
OUR TEAM!









NURSERY WORKER
FOR CHURCH P/T
On Sunday mornings, some Wed.
evenings & as needed. Background
check required. Must be mature &
love children.
Apply in person
M-F 9am 2pm
First Presbyterian Church
200 S. Lone Oak Dr.
Leesburg


470 General

TUTOR
Looking for qualified French tutor.
Call 352-750-2260

480 Legal
MEDICAID PARALEGAL/
LEGAL ASSISTANT
Knowledge of Medicaid application fil-
ing procedures and case management
required.
Submit Resume to
marty@trotterlaw.com
PROBATE PARALEGAL/
LEGAL ASSISTANT
Knowledge of probate pleadings, fil-
ings, and procedures required.
Submit Resume to
marty@trotterlaw.com




500
Pets/Animals



501 Pets
For Sale
BICHON FRISEPOO PUPPIES Male/fe-
male, health cert. $250/$400.
352-669-3649.

560 Pet
Supplies
BIRD CAGES. Asking $35. The Villages.
Call 352-753-1834

DOG CAGE Huge 2 x 2.5 & new large
dog bed. $70. 352-742-0250
DOG CRATE folding 36 x 23 x 25. $50.
352-728-1363
DOG STROLLER up to 30lbs. Cup hold-
ers & carrier. $50. 352-602-7332
DRIFTWOOD for reptile aquarium (2
pc.) for 3ft. $100 407-878-6431




600
Merchandise
Mart



601 Antiques
ANTIQUES, JEWELRY, Old Indian Rug &
Misc. All for $100. 352-348-7490


601 Antiques

CLOCK electric Sail Ship good shape.
Made by Uniter. $95. Cal 793-5741

DOLL 1960's Pollyanna, Walt Disney by
Uneeda. 29" $100 firm. 348-7490

SNUFF BOX antique European solid
sliver. $95 Call 352-314-0923

602 Arts/Crafts

CRAFTS/ SUPPLIES/ BEARS /TABLES
$100 takes all. 352-365-9519

SCROLL SAW Dremel, 15". Moto 6"
Lathe model 700. $50. 315-9324

603 Collectibles

AUGUSTA XII Color Print 25 x 30, '92.
Framed/signed. $65. 330-4484

BUYING Baseball, Football, Basketball,
Non-sports cards 1870 to 1980.
Autographs, memorabilia, bobbin
heads. Sets, singles. No collection to
large. Call: 352-589-7981 or Email:
sportscards4john@aol.com

DIECAST CAR Autographed, '66 Shelby
GT 350R. $100. 352-602-3658

HOLLY HOBBY COLLECTION 45 pieces.
$100. 352-315-1612

RECORD COLLECTION 113 LP's $100
obo Call 352-357-2218

TIN SIGNS, reproductions, Packard &
Chevrolet Truck. $20 874-5418

604 Furniture

BAR STOOLS (4) white wood w/cush-
ion, $40. Call after 9am 259-5629

BED Twin w/frame, mattress, box
spring, excel cond. $100 589-4915

BEDROOM SET includes dresser, mir-
ror, chest of drawers, queen bed, &
nightstands, cream. $400.
352-742-1059

BEDS Twin (2) including spreads if de-
sired. $95. 787-7157 or 552-7248

BOOK CASE Wood, 5 x 3. 6 shelves.
$125. Call 352-748-0702

BUNK BED FRAMES red, excel, cond.
$100 obo. 352-516-7108


604 Furniture

CHAIRS 3 oak counter height, w/woven
seats. $120. 352-728-1363

CHAISE LOUNGE wicker rattan w/cush-
ions. $40. 352-742-1422

COFFEE TABLE Oak, excel cond. $75
Call 352-343-0161

COFFEE TABLE square 38"x38"x15"
inlaid oak. $95 obo. 352-343-6165

COMPUTER DESK. Good cond. $50.
Call 352-396-5739

CORNER TV HUTCH holds 32". $20.
Call 352-735-3776

CORNER TV wood entertainment cen-
ter, 4x4x2, $75. 715-971-8152

DESK / TABLE antique white, solid
wood. excel cond. $95 435-0823

DINETTE SET 5 pieces, solid oak, very
nice. $100 Call 352-460-0472

DINING ROOM TABLE & 4 CHAIRS,
cream. $150. 352-742-1059

DRESSER Antique oak, 3 drawer, 31 "H
x43"Wx21"D. $95. 434-5314

END TABLES (2) & Coffee table w/lift
top. Oak. $100. 352-314-3657

END TABLES (2), golden oak. $50.
352-787-5917

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER, must see,
solid oak, w/lead glass doors, solid
oak cabinet/microwave cart & bur-
gundy recliner. $429 obo takes all.
MUST SEE 352-357-1647

HIDE A BED SOFA fall colored plaid.
$125. 352-742-1059

MATTRESS & BOX SPRING Full. $75.
Call 352-460-0458

MATTRESS Queen w/bed rails. $100.
Call 352-476-3476

MATTRESS Serta full size, clean. Ask-
ing $75. Please call 352-323-8079

MATTRESSES (2) twin, clean. $20 for
both. SOLD!!!!

MEDIUM BROWN LEATHER COUCH,
chair and ottoman, wood/metal
cocktail and 2 side tables.Purchased
from Rooms to Go in July 2012. Still
in brand new condition, sofa is
86"$1150.00. SOLD!!!!

PATIO SET, table w/2 swivel rocking
chairs w/burgundy cushions. New
cond. $150 Call 352-435-0823


WHO'S MAKING NOISE IN TOWN.


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DAILY COMMERCIAL





DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, November 4, 2013


604 Furniture

RECLINER Power, very nice. New Price
$900. Now $200. 352-793-4747

RECLINER tan Microfiber. Good cond.
$100. 262-441-0156

RECLINERS LEATHER (2) Cream both
for$175.352-742-1059

SLEEP SOFA 68" long, 2 cushions, light
color. $50. 352-602-0202

SOFA Black Leather, 3 cushion, full
size. $30. 352-561-1167.

TABLE & 6/CHAIRS Duncan & Phyfe.
Asking $200. Call 352-267-8693

TABLE, Heart Shaped, 3 tier. brown,
good cond. $8 Call 352-504-6689

TWIN BED white laminate, new mat-
tress. $100. SOLD!!!


605 Appliances

Appliances With Warranties
$75 & up! Used Beds all sizes!
*Buy *Sell *Trade *Fast delivery
Call Buzzy's 352-315-9886
www.buzzysbeds.com

DISCOUNT
APPLIANCE
Repair-Sales-Service Most Repairs
$60 Plus Parts





WASHER, DRYER,
REFRIGERATOR
"Don't Toss It
Fix It For Less"
Buying Clean
Washers & Dryers
Days, Evenings & Weekends
Call Now
352-874-1238

DISHWASHER Kenmore, white, used
9mo. $75. SOLD!!!

DRYER gas, works great, white, used.
$99.352-315-9886

DRYER GE. Electric, heavy duty. Works
good. $50.352-630-4822

FREEZER Avanti, 20Wx20 1/4Dx33H..
works good. $100 715-520-7156

FREEZER Frigidaire, upright, 8.7 cu.ft.,
$200 Call 352-568-7861

MICROWAVE Emerson Professional se-
ries. $30 obo. 352-431-3975

MICROWAVE GE under cabinet, like
new. $55 Call 352-603-9604

MICROWAVE Samsung, over stove, blk.
Used 2 yrs. $80 Call 352-742-3445


605 Appliances

OVEN White Whirlpool, glass top. $100.
Call 352-483-5504.

STAND MIXER Euro Prep. New, 10 spd.
$75.352-483-6120.
WASHER Whirlpool, heavy duty, 2
speed, 8 cycles. $50. SOLD

WASHER Whirlpool, heavy duty. $45
SOLD

WASHER Whirlpool, very clean & good
cond. $125 obo. 352-343-0161

606 Electronics

GAME PSP Sony brand new in box.
$100 Call 352-455-3342

GARMIN GPS Nuvi 50. New in box.
$75. After 4. 352-793-7982

STEREO SYSTEM Panasonic, CD, w/5
CD changer. $30 obo. SOLD!!!!

TELEVISION Toshiba color, works
good. $50 Call 352-365-6075

TELEVISION 19" color. Cable ready.
$30.352-874-2806.

TELEVISION 27" Sony Trinitron, very
good picture. $60 352-589-8363

TELEVISION 27", works great $50 Call
352-326-5527

TELEVISION Magnavox, 40" floor
model. $80. 352-989-0027

607 Comm Merchandise

CONCESSION EQUIPMENT 4 sink unit
w/water heater, Self contained wa-
ter tank & waste water tank. $800.
obo. Hot table & cold table $400.
Call 352-304-0561

608 A/C & Heat

AIR CLEANER UV light for A/C. Kills
mold/bacteria. $100. 267-1711

AIR CONDITIONER window unit, 5000
BTU's. $50 Call 352-753-7075

624 Children's
items

BARBIE TOWNHOUSE, good cond. $60.
SOLD

ROCKING HORSE hand crafted. $95.
Call 352-406-6122

625 Building
Supplies/
Materials

JACUZZI Whirlpool Bath. No pump. $75
obo. Call 352-314-2123.

KITCHEN SINK stainless steel, 8" deep,
W/Delta faucet. $40 253-2357


625 Building
Supplies/
Materials

PATIO DOORS sliding glass (2) 80" x
35.5". $20. both. 352-365-0191

PATIO DOORS Sliding glass. White
Frame. $75. Call Dave. 255-7623

SHOWER DOOR opaque glass. 27
1/4"x 69 1/4". $50. 446-7849

STUDS (20) 2X4'x104", grade 2. &
other wood. $100 obo. 484-3650

WOOD -8/4 solid, mahogany, maple,
oak for lathe turning. $2. 357-2708

626 Farm
Equipment

BUSH HOG 6', not rusty, needs work.
$250.352-242-1038

635 Garden

CONCRETE FOUNTAIN, no pump. Good
cond. $100 Call 352-735-1570

GLIDER COUCH & 2 CHAIRS alum.,
vintage. $100 Call 352-617-5498

LAWN MOWER Briggs engine, runs
great. 21" cut. Only $50 728-4913

LAWN MOWER elec. w/bag. Used 3
times, like new. $95 307-9462

LAWN MOWER Toro, self propelled.
Very nice. $100. 352-383-0462

PATIO SET Small, 2 chairs, glass top.
$40.352-431-3952

PLANTS (10 Century) $100 Call
352-638-2246

RUBBER TREE PLANT. Beautiful, sym-
metrical. $20. 352-735-1647

SMOKER GRILL COMBO Brinkman Dura
Flame, 48", side fire box, wheels &
cover. Used 5 times. $150.
321-537-2920

STAG HORN FERN extra nice. $100.
Call 352-603-4113

TREE SALE
*Oaks, Sycamores, Cypress, Fig,
Mulberry, Cherry Laurel, etc.
Palms, Queen, Pindo or Sago
*Special 6' +/- Oaks $10 or 15/$1 00
*Cypress or Oaks up to 12'
CATT'S TREES
352-669-1618
WEED EATER Feather weight gas,
String trimmer. $50. 352-552-7942

640 Guns

PISTOL Jimene .32 caliber, Model
JA32, w/2 6 round clips, new in box
w/org. paperwork. $215
SOLD


640 Guns

AMERICAN RIFLEMAN MAGAZINES
(220+ issues). $65. 352-742-1409

SHOT GUN 410 Single shot. $50 firm.
3- 6pm. SOLD

SHOT GUN SHELLS Vintage 410. $6.00
Call 352-728-2692

TAURUS ULTRALITE REVOLVER, .38
spec. $375. Sterling stainless steel
.22 pistol (pocket size)- $225. Wood
stock single shot .22 bolt action rifle-
$100. Taurus TCP .380 cal.- $325.
Cases. Others. Ammo included
with each. Prices are firm.
Call Dave (716) 949-0408.

64 9 Medical

CARRIER FOR SCOOTER/POWERCHAIR
NEW, fits into hitch, 60" fold out
ramp. $195. 352-217-3437

HOSPITAL BED Complete, like new.
Electric. $150. obo. 352-460-0458

SHOP RIDER 4 wheels, 24V w/charger.
$300 Call 352-343-6608

WALKER w/organizer bag. $40.
352-989-0776

650 Computers
& Equip

CARTRIDGES for Dell Printer Series # 5,
4 color/5 black. $90 all. 326-8111

COMPUTER HP, Windows XP 15" flat
screen. $100. SOLD

PRINTER CARTRIDGES KODAK 2 color
& 2 black. $30 Call 352-516-0999

PRINTER HP Office Jet 7310, all in one.
Great cond. $99 Call 589-1234

PRINTER HP PSC500, w/7 ink car-
tridges $60. 352-728-3273

652 Articles
For Sale

BATH TUB Claw foot. Asking $100.
Please call 352-459-9856

BED SPREAD Queen, beautiful. Good
backing. $65. 352-536-1744

BOOKS New, 22+ on the Kennedy's &
the Royals. $50. 352-516-2893

BRACELET Pandora, sterling silver 7.5,
no charms. $40. Call 324-2559

BREAD MACHINE Farberware, Auto-
matic. Like new. $25. 874-1862

BUCK STOVE Cast Iron, (fireplace insert
w/blower). $450. 352-323-1943
Evenings Only.

CAMPING CHAIRS (2). $20. both. 3 -
6pm.SOLD


652 Articles
For Sale

CANISTER SET, 4 pcs. w/cookie jar,
Ducks. $35. 352-753-8361

CERTIFIED PRINCESS DIANA DOLL
CLOTHES, 4 for $100. 217-4221

CHANDELIER FRUIT Red, beautiful.
$50. 352-536-1744

CHESS SET hand carved oriental
pieces. $100 Call 704-530-4305

CHINA service for 8, includes, serving
pieces, excel. $100 357-1363

CHRISTMAS DISHES Service for 8, plus
serving pieces. $60. 352-750-0552

CHRISTMAS TREE 7' LED, pre-lit, in
box. 2yr. old. $75. 742-7256

CHRISTMAS TREE 7' Silver blue spruce
w/container. $40. 352-365-0376

CHRISTMAS TREE and beautiful hand-
made tree skirt. $45. 787-0410

CHRISTMAS TREE, 7', (Mountain King)
w/storage bag. $75. 352-748-9611

CIGARETTE MACHINE Powermatic, $75
Please call 352-800-1455

COFFEE MAKER KitchenAid. New. Paid
$189. Sell for $100. 352-978-7461

CURTAINS, lace, dusty pink. 45"W. 3
sets. ($400). $99. obo. 589-8515

DISHES 12 piece setting w/extra serv-
ing pieces. $50. 352-365-0109

DISNEY VHS TAPES & Player. (25).
$50. Call 352-250-4711

END TABLE new, solid natural Oak, $45
Please call 352-347-7350

EXERCISE CYCLE, gas blower & mirror
clock. $100. 352-323-1297

FAUX LEATHER JACKET size 3X med.
brown. $30. 352-343-3459

FLOOR CLEANER Shark, cleans wood &
tile. New. $50. SOLD

FUR CAPES 1/Red & 1/Black, Susan
Lucci. $100. 352-409-8264

GARMENT BAG bi-fold, like new. $20
SOLD!!!!!

HALLOWEEN COSTUME adult ladies,
$15. Call 352-434-9855

HALLOWEEN COSTUME Michael Jack-
son, w/accessories. $50. 742-2668

ICICLE LIGHTS 190', light clips, & tim-
ers. NEW. $60. 352-504-0407


.--Ch voice



& On-Line


Imap


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ii.


652 Articles
For Sale

IRON MILL-RITE Flour & cereal grain.
Elec. or handle. 3 grain 301b. hard
winter wheat. $275. 748-0702

JACKET Black Leather size S/M cost
$100 sell for $35. 407-310-6628

JACKET Florida State men's Ig., heavy,
$25. Call 352-589-8064

JEANS, name brands (30 + pairs) size
12-14 & 10 tops. $68 793-8102

JUKEBOX 1963 Seeburg, glass &
chrome,. $100 352-307-8289

LADIES HATS & CLOTHING Summer &
Fall, good cond. $23 357-2248

LADIES SHOES 3 pr. Size 11 m. 1 pr.
Van Eli flat. $90. 352-787-4989

LUGGAGE Samsonite, hard sides, 3
piece set. $35 Call 352-357-1363

MAGAZINES (90) Bass Master. from
80's & 90's, excel. $25. 360-6865

MAILBOX w/key lock, large, white
w/post. $35 Call 352-383-9589

MATTRESS TOPPER 4" thick, king size
new cond. $99. 352-636-9358

MEN'S CLOTHING XLg shirts 40-44W
shorts. 10 pcs. $20. 321-246-4371

MEN'S DESIGNER CLOTHES, Pants 32
x 32. Shirts M-L. $75.SOLD

MODEL TRAIN N-Scale layout, w/track
84X64X38. $99 Call 407-733-3022

MOTORCYCLE JACKET U.S made. Like
new 3XL. $100. 352-669-7544

OFFICE DESK 62", new cond. Asking
$75.SOLD

OIL PAINTING beautiful sailing ship,
24"x30". $65 352-357-3043

PAPER CUTTER 18" brand new in box.
$40.352-728-1363

RUG like new, sunlight yellow,
cotton/wool. 8' x 10'. Was $800.
Now $150. 352-728-1363

SEWING MACHINE Singer, recently re
conditioned. $35 352-751-0369

SEWING MACHINE Singer. New in box..
Asking $90. Call 321-262-5485


Cringer halirn-.,igri :,vwr, rig ,,rnre
Excel cond. $325. Call 751-0369

SINGING PARAKEET ON STAND sensor
& batteries, new. $15. 360-1209

SINGING, DANCING SANTA 5'. Excel
cond. $30. Call 352-348-9946

SKECHERS shape ups 10 wide men's,
NEW. $50 Call 352-347-7350

SLACKS Ladies size Med. petite. Bon
Worth, 6/pair. $25. 352-777-0045

SMOKER GRILL COMBO Brinkman Dura
Flame, 48", side fire box, wheels &
cover. Used 5 times. $150.
321-537-2920

SNAKE BOOTS 1 pr. Size 12. $35.00
firm. 3 -6pm. 352-787-4884

SUITCASE, SAMSONITE w/wheels, Ig.
excel, cond. $30. 352-343-1050

TELEVISION 51" Plasma 3D Smart TV.
New. Warranty. Asking $495.
SOLD

TUXEDO Men's, Coat/Pants/Shirt, size
48-42. $65. 352-217-4809

VACUUM Bissell, pet hair eraser, like
new. $70 Call 742-9568

VACUUM Orick XL upright, like new
$125 obo. Call 321-246-4371

WEDDING DRESS altered size 1.
Beaded, w/veil. $95. 787-7132

WOOD BURNING HEATER For Fireplace.
Forester. Fan forced air w/thermo-
stat. Double door glass front. 120V.
24Hx27Wx30D. $250. 383-9589

655 Musical
Instruments

BANJO 5 string, Kay. W/accessories.
$225. Call 352-343-6608

GUITAR acoustic Hohner (case &
stand, great shape. $100 323-3518

GUITAR acoustic, elec. Ovation Ap-
plause, Summit Series AE28. $100
Call 352-383-9589

KEYBOARD, CASIO, CTK-5000, AC
adapter, stand, built-in songs,
tones, rhythms, user guide, fun to
play. Used very little like new. $200.
352-793-3663

ORGAN Hammond electric, Cedarwood.
Excel. cond. $100. 352-617-0398

ORGAN Lowrey C300, manuals. $100.
Eustis. 207-650-9838

PIANO Bungalow Mission Style. Attrac-
tive oak finish. $100. 383-9132


660 Office
Furniture/
Supplies

COMPUTER DESK w/hutch. Good cond.
Heavy, Umatilla $100 771-2310

COMPUTER DESK, 3 drawers, very
good cond. $70 Call 750-5604

CORNER COMPUTER DESK, glass
w/chrome. $75 obo. 360-5787

DESK 40"x18", wood, 7 drawers $20.
Call 352-636-1352




Monday, November 4, 2013


660 Office
Furniture/
Supplies
DESK CHAIR w/arms, plus home office
supplies. $40. 352-787-0410

DESK, ADJUSTABLE CHAIR, CARPET
PROTECTOR $40 352-460-7646
OFFICE DESK, CHAIR & RUG 50"x70".
$80. 352-314-0505

674 Exercise Equipment
EXERCISE MACHINES. (2) Tony Little.
Both $70. 352-874-0352

STEPPER, XL, hydraulic w/meter & Bike
glider, $60 both. 352-383-5846
TREADMILL PROFORMA 484P1. $100.
Excel cond. SOLD!
WEIGHT BENCH & Weights. $99. Call
352-446-7153

675 Sports/
Recreation

BICYCLE 26" Men's. Very good cond.
$65. obo. SOLD!!!!

BICYCLE 6 sp. 26" girls w/basket. Excel
cond. $100. 352-508-5335.
BICYCLE 8 speed Terra Trike, 3 wheels,
1 yrs old. $600. SOLD!!!!
BICYCLE Diamond Back, Sorrento
Sport, Men's 26", 21 speed, excel.
cond. $75.352-259-0633
BICYCLE girls 24" Huffy, 1 speed, foot
brake, fenders, A-1 $45. 728-6835
BICYCLE Schwinn men's, 27" multi
speed. $30 Call 859-404-3838
BICYCLE vintage from the 30's, $100
Call 352-504-6406
BICYCLE, Ladies Schwinn, purple, pad-
dle brakes. $65. 352-343-2973
BICYCLES 3 Wheel, rebuilt. Large Seat
& Basket. $150. 1-352-343-6608
GOLF CLUBS (3) w/Izzo Shag Bag ball
dispenser. $25. 352-702-7632
GOLF CLUBS men's complete set
w/bag. $25.502-750-0512
GOLF SET, oversized graphite woods,
irons. Like new. $50. 735-6927
GOLF SHOES LADIES, Foot Joy, 7.5
narrow. $75 obo. 352-323-8031
NIKE JAWBONE UP $100 obo. Size
med. Brand new. 352-409-6011
PUTTER Ping, excel, cond. 50 yrs. old.
$30 Call 352-735-6927
SADDLE Brown Leather, English. Good
cond. $60.352-326-2432.

685 Tools/
Machinery

CHAINSAW 16" Echo. Like new. $200.
352-728-1363


*V


Dalg Conlu kial
"Your First Choice" In-Print & On-Line


685 Tools/
Machinery
GENERATOR DEK 5650 watts, 1 hr. List
$629. Now $380.352-483-6120

GENERATOR Porter Cable. 5250watts.
$450.. Call 352-343-6608
HEDGE TRIMMER Craftsman 18". $25.
Call 352-728-1363
LADDER Metal, 3 step, w/tray. $65.00.
Call 352-748-0702
MITER BOX manual hand operated,
24" saw blade. $25. SOLD
PRESSURE WASHER needs some work
1750psi. $50 SOLD
ROUTER Sears, 6.5 amp. w/router ta-
ble. $50. 352-343-1286
SAW elec. 6 1/2", 1/2 elec. drill & belt
sander. $30 for all. 352-753-1170
SCREWS, self tapping. 8,000. $50.
352-728-1015
WINDOWS aluminum frame. Asking
$20. Call 352-396-5739




800
Real Estate
For Rent


802 Vacation
Rentals
EUSTIS, FIFTH WHEEL FOR RENT, 28'
w/slide, on Country site. No smok-
ing. $450/mo. 352-483-3331 or
321-689-5907
FLORIDA Winter Vacation, lease to
own at Lake Weirs Big Lake Village.
A 55 senior community. Lease for 3
months or more. 2 people, 1 sm. pet.
park rules apply. $950/mo with lease
money going on purchase of homes.
Priced at $9500. up.
Go to biglakevillage.com
By owner 352-434-7276

805 Houses
Furnished
LEESBURG Family Park rent to own 3/2
w/extras. $700/mo + util.
352-753-5414

806 Houses
Unfurnished
CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375


806 Houses
Unfurnished

CENTER HILL 5/2/2 house, $1,000/mo
1st, last + security. 352-568-7486,

EUSTIS waterfront 2/2, carport, Pet OK.
$700/mo. Call 352-589-0749

EUSTIS, PENDRY VILLAS APTS.
Senior 62+ handicapped & disable, 1
& 2 br, USDA subsidized. 2728
Ruleme St. Call 352-589-0192




FRUITLAND PARK 4/3, fenced, $850 +
1st, last & security. 352-396-2262

FRUITLAND PARK Nice little 1 br, house,
400sf. Close to everything. W/D
hookup. $450. + $450 dep. Call Bill
603-858-1160

LEESBURG 4/1.5 all appl. No Pets. 1st
mo. & security. $750/mo.
352-267-5989

LEESBURG 4/3, over 2400sf, 2 story
house, ready 11/1/13. $1200/mo +
security. Call 352-636-4935

LEESBURG, Legacy 55+, 2/2.
$975/mo. Call 352-638-3046
H---HNIALS
LONG TERM & UNFURN. RENTALS IN
SOUTH LAKE COUNTY.
ROCKER REALTY 352-394-3570
Ask For Janet or Emily
RockerRealtylnc.com

SILVER LAKE FOREST 3BR 2BA
2055sf, 2 car garage 10041 Silver
Bluff Dr. $1100. 352-314-2668.
GunnPropertyServices.com

TAVARES 3/1 beautifully remodeled,
paint, new cabinets, tile floor, Ig.
fenced yard. $800/mo. Call
352-343-1004 or 407-227-9810

UMATILLA HANDYMAN $200/mo. 2/1.
321-244-6555

807 Apartments
Unfurnished

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 &2br from
---$350/montti$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375

DOWNTOWN TAVARES 1/1 small,
quiet apt bldg 2 blks from Lake Dora
riverwalk with restaurants and
parks, $330/biweekly, $400 dep,
incl elec, water, Sat TV, Wi-Fi, Hard-
wood floors, Cent AC. Old Dogs,cats
OK. 352-669-0961


No matter what time
24 of the day it is,
7. you can place
a your classified
":*:;l merchandise ad
online, pay for it and
just wait for the
phone to ring!

Fast, convenient and
on your schedule!











www.ww dily:C,7,,1rrnn e rCib ,Cm

*Employment advertisements are excluded.
Please call 352-314-FAST to speak with a customer service rep.
Lake: 352-314-3278 or Sumter: 352-748-1955


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how fast the phone rings.


The Daily Commercial Classifieds

(352) 314-FAST (3278)


807 Apartments
Unfurnished
AZALEA HILL APARTMENTS STUDIOS,
1, 2, 3 BEDROOMS $400 $925.
352-431-3790
EUSTIS
All remodeled Apts!
3 Bedrooms
i i)"i ,Lat ning t i
$675 Only $350 Dep. Pet OK.
352-357-5675



V~tIAGE
LEESBURG MOVE-IN SPECAIL
2 BRS. 1.5 BA, TOWNHOUSES
352-728-1955
LEESBURG.
1ST MO. FREE!
SPANISH VILLAGE
Pool, great location!
Furn. Efficiency, incl.
util. & cable $700/mo.
2/1 apt. $600/mo.
Fum. $700/mo + util.
352-728-5555
LEESBURG Cute 2/1, good location,
$575/mo + $350 dep. Call
352-552-0181
LEESBURG
FIRST MONTH $99
MOVE IN SPECIAL!
*2/1 $500/dep.
o2/1 w/W/D hookup $550/dep.
*2/2 w/W/D hookup $600/dep.
Call 352-516-1244
Ask for Tina


807 Apartments
Unfurnished

LEESBURG, 1/1, with W/D, CHA, car-
port. $450 plus security. 787-2715
Ext. 222

LEESBURG, a cute lbr unit w/window
A/C 315 South 2nd St. Apt C.
$425/mo. 787-2700 ext. 225

LEESBURG, Duplex VERY CLEAN 2/1,
no pets $550/mo + dep. 551 -6772

LYN TERRACE
Eustis
352-357-7332
www.lynterrace.com
Great Move-In
Specials & Free Gifts!
*1 & 2 Bedroom Units
*All 1st Floor- No Stairs!

808 Apartments
Furnished

FRUITLAND PARK
TWIN PALMS MARINA
NEWLY RENOVATED
1 BR. MOBILES/COTTAGES
FULLY FURNISHED
ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED,
CABLE TV. FREE USE OF KAYAK &
CANOES. CONVENIENCE STORE
ON PROPERTY. NO SECURITY
DEPOSIT WITH PROOF OF INCOME.
GREAT FOR SENIORS.
WEEKLY & MONTHLY RATE.
SMALL PETS WELCOME.
CALL 352-787-4514


808 Apartments
Furnished

LEE;SBUHG
1ST MO. FREE!
SPANISH VILLAGE
Pool, great location!
Furn. Efficiency, incl.
util. & cable. $700/mo.
2/1 apt. $600/mo.
Furn. $700/mo + util.
352-728-5555

LEESBURG nice 1 br, incl. all utilities,
$600/mo, Social Security wel-
comed. Call 813-781-9540


810 Duplexes

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 &2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375

LADY LAKE 2/1 includes water & trash.
$575/mo + $575 dep. Call
352-267-2845


A picture is worth a


thousand words....


The Daily Commercial

Classifieds


DAILY COMMERCIAL




DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, November 4, 2013


810 Duplexes
LEESBURG 2/2 Very clean, near down-
town. No smoking. $650/mo. Call
407-967-1502

LEESBURG 3/2 with garage. $770 mo.
+ $600 dep. Ref's req'd. Call Mike
352-223-5300
LEESBURG, 1 br, 2br & 3br. Great price.
$599+. Call 352-350-7109
LEESBURG,
Beautiful Remodeled
2br/1 ba, $450/mo.
1721 Birchwood Circle
Call 352-325-1289 now!

811 Condos
Townhouses

LEESBURG 2br/2ba, bonus room,
patio villa, gated community,
pool/gym. NO PETS or SMOKERS,
references required. $850/month.
352-978-3724

LEESBURG
SUNNY SIDE VILLAS
FOR RENT 2/2. $650 MO.
PLEASE CALL
352-459-9300

816 Commercial
Property
LEESBURG
Warehouses w/Offices
2315-25 Griffin Rd. 1,150 up to
12,400sf. Starts at $300/mo.
Office/Showroom
1607 Hwy. 441 $850/mo
Small Shop or Office
2204 Citrus Blvd (441)
$320/mo., includes utilities
352-787-0004
SABAL PROFESSIONAL SUITES II
The Villages/Lady Lake
New all inclusive office suites.
Receptionist, conference room,
full kitchen, deskw/chairs, phones,
copier/fax, internet, wi-fi, all office
needs in one low payment.
JUST SIT DOWN, PLUG IN,
GO TO WORK.
Conveniently located on CR 466
East of Rolling Acres.
Contact Preferred Realty Mgmt. Group
(352)633-1900

819
Manufactured
Homes Rental

ALTOONA
3/2 $560 plus $300 dep.
2/1 $475/mo. w/$300 dep.
And RV Lot $290/mo. Lv i"'' '1.4..
352-735-2071 or 352-636-6800

ATTENTION SENIORS AND ADULTS
Never lived in. Brand New 66x1 4,;.
in nice quiet park in Eustis.
$650/mo + utilities. Sorry NO KIDS.
Call 352-589-4407

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
LEESBURG 2/2 unfurn. w/addition, CHA
$500/mo + security. No pets.
352-787-5493

LEESBURG 6 mi. West. 2/1, CHA.
$525/mo. + security. 409-2492
WILDWOOD AREA
2/2 $650/mo dbl. wide (Adult Park)
1/1 Duplex. $4501mo.
Call 352-745-8620


900
Real Estate
For Sale


903 Homes
For Sale

FLORIDA WINTER VACATION, lease to
own at Lake Weirs Big Lake Village.
A 55 senior community. Lease for 3
months or more. 2 people, 1 sm. pet.
park rules apply. $950/mo with lease
money going on purchase of homes.
Priced at $9500. up.
Go to biglakevillage.com
By owner 352-434-7276


903 Homes
For Sale




LEESBURG
Home for sale $3500. Great buy!
2br 2ba, remodeled bathrooms,
modern day accents in kitchen.
Age Qualified
Call 352-234-8369
LEESBURG 1/1 in 55+ park. Shed, Car-
port, Screen porch, New Floors.
$3000.352-460-0458




LEESBURG
Home for sale $7,500. Won't last!
2br 2ba, new carpet, freshly painted.
Waterview
Age Qualified
Call 352-234-8369
LEESBURG Terrace Green, 2/2/2,
great neighborhood, New carpet, paint
& appl.A/ NC lanai. $119,900
Call 352-787-4584
GalbreathRealty.com

SUNDAY NOV 10; 1-3 PM I'ILOGY|
5+ 2012 212 Energy Efficient w/ Liv-
ing & Dining Rms, Den, Lg. upgraded
Kitchen, 42" Cabinets, Granite.
$239,900. Terri Orr Kuebbeler Real
Estate 321-299-3189|
UMATILLA HANDYMAN $200/mo. 2/1.
321-244-6555

910 Condos/Townhouses

MULTIPLE ADORABLE/ AFFORDABLE
CONDOS FOR RENT! DON'T MISS
OUT!
4- 2/2'S $699
1-1/1 $625
1-2/2 $750. 407-359-9500




1000
Manufactured
Homes



1001 Mfd Homes
For Sale

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
EUSTIS 2/1 in 55+ park. Shed & car-
port & A/C porch. $2,500. Call
352-357-5556

SENIORS AND ADULTS
NEW and NEWER
Homes in a nice quiet part in Eustis.
$25,000 $4:. FClnf Firnariri a. ii.
Only 3 left! Lot rent $350 per mo.
Call 352-589-4007

TAVARES
$595/mo. Furn.
352-343-7780
riverestwaterfrontresort.com

1002 Mfd
Homes
W/ land
For Sale

1012 RVLots

ALTOONA
3/2 $560/mo. plus $300 dep.
2/1 $475/mo. w/$300 dep.
And RV Lot $290/mo. w/$100 dep.
352-735-2071 or 352-636-6800


1100
Recreation


1101 Boats

BOAT V BOTTOM ALUMINUM. $400.
Call 352-217-9937


1101 Boats

CANOE 15' $78. Afternoons. Call
352-669-7800

DECK BOAT '97 Sea Pro, 22', 115hp
Mercury. $6K obo. 352-343-4418
FISHING BOAT, 14' alum. with electric
motor. $325. 352-365-9661
MERER CRUISER Stingray 190RX, Flor-
ida 8407JD, w/trailer $1500 Call
352-243-5028

PONTOON 24' Grumman 1990. 90hp.
Johnson. No trailer. $3,500 obo.
352-348-1766

TRACKER PONTOON '07, 21', w/50Ohp
Mercury, 55 thrust trolling motor, 3
fold down seats, changing room, 2
live wells, rod storage, fish locator,
No trailer. $8,600. 352-460-4190
WELL CARED BAYLINER IN EXCELLENT
CONDITION INSIDE AND OUT.
PORT-A-POTTY, STEREO, BIMINI
TOP, SINK, PLENTY OF STORAGE
W/TRAILER AND DEPTH FINDER.
RETAILS AT $14,000.00 WILL SELL
FOR $10,500.00. CALL TODAY!
352-267-4020

1150 RV&
Campers

DUTCH-STAR Newmar, '99, Class A, 2
slides, low miles, gas engine, 30',
incl. tow dolly. $25,000 Call
443-944-4702

PORTABLE TANK of Gray water. 15 gal-
lon. $50. 352-728-1363

TRAVEL TRAILER 30'. Tracer Ultra Lite,
Traveling package. 2 slides, elec.
awning, leveling jacks, screen room,
hitch. $24,000. 912-506-3600

1200
Transportation

1205 Autos

CAMERO RS '67, 327, auto, ps, pb.
$15K. 352-603-1883

I-CASH PAID FOR JUNK CARS! I
$300 and up. Call 352-771-6191
DODGE RAM 2007. 1500 2wd quad
cab sx 46500 miles perfect cond.
$15250.00. 352-497-4437

INFINITY G 35. 2006
#SP2291
$11,888
SATURN VUE 2005
#SP2285
$6,882
JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO
2006
#SI14095A
$7,442
MAZDA MIATA 2010
#SP2247
$12,888
NISSAN 350Z ROADSTER
CONVERTIBLE 2007
#SP2295
$16,992
BILL BRYAN SUBARU
8730 US Hwy. 441
Leesburg, Florida
1 352-240-7480

1206 Aviation

1210 Mcycles/
Mopeds

ARTIC '05. Not suitable for Hwy. Good
for hunting use. $1,800.
352-787-5831

DUCATI S2R 1000. 2006, Red 10.5k
miles adult owned $5,000.
352-568-1415

HARLEY DAVIDSON 2005. FLHTCUI
Ultra Classic Electra Guide; EC 15k
loaded with chrome upgrades
w/security. A steal at $12,000.
Call 352-750-9305 Lady Lake.
HARLEY DAVIDSON 2010. FLHTCUTG
Tri Glide Ultra Classic, Trike, black,
low miles, extended warranty,
$11200, AmaMyers77@yahoo.com
415-553-2192

1240 Trucks
Light Duty

DODGE DAKOTA '07, 4 door, 6 cylin-
der, 60K, $11,300 Call 365-6238

DODGE RAM 1500 SXT. 2004. 41,000
miles. $8000. Contact John.
SOLD!!!!!


1264 Auto
Parts
Accessory

COLD AIR FILTER AFE for '04-'07 6.0
diesel. Super chips slashpaq tuner.
'99-'07 7.3 & 6.0 power stroke.
$190.352-728-1363

TIRES (4) 245/60-R18. $60.
SOLD!!!!!!!!
TIRES 185-65-15 & 4 mag rims. $80
Call 608-347-1483

TIRES, 3 used. Free. Mascotte area.
Call 352-366-0225

TOOL BOX Alum. Diamond Plate for
small Pick up. $75. 323-8805

TOOL BOX for pickup front. Alum, like
new. $100 Call 352-396-2511

TOW BAR w/wiring kit & safety chains.
$100. Call 352-771-1307
TRUCK TOOL BOX Husky, full size, as
new. $100. 352-242-1038

1275 Golf
Carts

CLUB CAR rear seat, new charger, 3yr.
old battery. $900. 352-360-1178

CLUB CAR, excel shape, loaded, lights,
windshield. $995 336-817-7509
COOLER Playmate for Golf Cart. Good
cond. $10 Call 352-259-3522
TIRES for golf cart (4), like new. $100
Call 336-817-7509


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