Daily Commercial

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Daily Commercial
Physical Description:
Unknown
Creator:
Halifax Media Group
Publisher:
Rod Dixon ( Leesburg, Floirda )
Publication Date:

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00019282:00029

Full Text


~v


A Ad
& :A V44-C-

a-


LEESBURG,


Daily Commerc al

FLORIDA Monday, October 28, 2013 www.dailycommercial.com


LIVING HEALTHY: Alzheimer's research focuses on 'before'/ Cl

NATION: High court test of surveillance law could be ahead / A4


PHOTOS BY THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL
Thousands of people strolled down Donnelly Street in downtown Mount Dora on Sunday, the last day of the 29th annual Mount Dora
Craft Fair.


Thousands pack


downtown for fair


THERESA CAMPBELL
Staff Writer
theresacampbeIIll@dailycommercial.com
An elbow-to-elbow crowd of
thousands filled the city's
downtown streets on Sun-
day, the second day of the 29th
annual Mount Dora Craft Fair,
where more than 400 vendors
from around the country show-


cased whimsical crafts, jewelry,
baskets, photography, ceram-
ics, paintings and woodwork-
ing.
Judy Reece of Louisville, Ky.,
was one of the first-time visitors
to the craft fair with her friend,
Debbie Evans of The Villages,
and the two women raved about
the event, the large number of
SEE FAIR I A2


Dora Craft Fair.


City addresses power outages


Sebelius to


face tough


questioning


on health law

KEN THOMAS
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Republicans said Sun-
day they intend to press Health and Human
Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius on the
Obama administration's troubled launch of
healthcare.gov, the online portal to buy in-
surance, and concerns about the privacy of
information that applicants submit under
the new system.
The Obama ad- "The way the system
ministration will i
face intense pres- IS designed it IS
sure next week to not secure."
be more forthcom- Rep. Mike Rogers
ing about how many chairman of the House
people have actual- Intelligence Comittee
ly succeeded in en-
rolling for coverage in the new insurance
markets. Medicare chief Marilyn Tavenner
is to testify during a House hearing on Tues-
day, followed Wednesday by Sebelius before
the House Energy and Commerce Commit-
tee. The officials will also be grilled on how
such crippling technical problems could
have gone undetected prior to the website's
Oct. 1 launch.


SEE HEALTH I A2


r ~:;. jrclFXJC


Staff report
New technology is helping the
Leesburg Electric Department to
provide more reliable power ser-
vice with fewer disruptions for
customers.


ANDREW TAYLOR
Associated Press
WASHINGTON On this, GOP
budget guru Rep. Paul Ryan and
top Senate Democrat Harry Reid
can agree: There won't be a "grand
bargain" on the budget.
Instead, the Wisconsin Repub-
lican and the Nevada Democrat
both say the bestWashington can
do in this bitterly partisan era of
divided government is a small-
ball bargain that tries to take the
edge off of automatic budget cuts
known as sequestration.
Official Capitol Hill negotia-
tions start next week, but Ryan
and Reid both weighed in Thurs-
day to tamp down any expecta-
tions that the talks might forge a
large-scale agreement where sev-
eral previous high-level talks have


Advanced equipment addi-
tions to the eastern part of the
electric utility serving the Silver
Lake and Lake Square Mall areas
allow faster response to poten-
tial problems, city spokesman


failed.
Long-standing, entrenched dif-
ferences over taxes make a large-
scale budget pact virtually impos-
sible, according to lawmakers,
their aides and observers who will
be monitoring the talks.
Most Republicans say they
simply won't agree to any fur-
ther taxes atop the 10-year, $600
billion-plus tax increase on up-
per-income earners that Presi-
dent Barack Obama and Demo-
crats muscled through Congress
in January Without higher taxes,
Democrats say they won't yield
to cuts in benefit programs like
Medicare.
"If we focus on some big, grand
bargain then we're going to fo-
cus on our differences, and both
SEE DEAL I A2


Robert Sargent said. Disruptions
that once took hours to address
now take minutes in some cas-
es, utility alerts may take only
seconds.
SEE POWER I A2


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Oct. 11 photo, House Budget
Committee chairman Rep. Paul Ryan, R-
Wis., laughs as he walks to his office on
Capitol Hill in Washington.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius
sits on a panel to answer questions about the Affordable
Care Act enrollment, Friday.


Meteorologists

spy clues to heat

waves weeks away
SETH BORENSTEIN
AP Science Writer
WASHINGTON Meteorologists may have
found a way to predict some killer heat waves
up to three weeks in advance. Now, the best
they can do is about 10 days.
An earlier warning would help cities prepare
for the heat wave, arrange to open up cooling
centers and check on the elderly, said Gerald
Meehl, co-author of a study that describes the
forecasting clue.
"It gives you a little bit of a heads up of what's
coming," he said.
The key may be a certain pattern of high and
low pressure spots across the globe high in the
sky. When that pattern shows up, the chances
double for a prolonged and intense heat wave
SEE HEAT I A2


Vol. 137, No. 301 4 sections
HEALTH C1HI
MISSED YOUR PAPER? CLASSIFIED DlQ NATION A4 HIGH
Call 787-0600 (Lake County), or COMICS C6 OBITUARIES A4 82
877-702-0600 (Sumter County) CROSSWORDS D4 SPORTS B1 LOW
NEWS TIP? DEAR ABBY C7 VOICES A7 .-.- 63
90994 17001 Call Scott Callahan at 365-8203 LEGALS Dl WORLD A6 See A8


Both sides agree: No major

budget deal on the horizon


C IST MAKES PRESENCE KNOWN AT DEM, CONFERENCE / A3





DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, October 28, 2013


HAPPY BIRTHDAY for
Monday, Oct. 28, 2013:
This year you develop a
very gentle side to your per-
sonality that seems irresist-
ible to many people. This
quality, combined with your
innate magnetism, adds to
your ability to draw others to-
ward you. You discover that
your plans, ideas and proj-
ects naturally seem to gain
support. If you are single,
you might need a flyswatter
to chase some of your many
admirers away. Choosing the
right person might not be
possible with all this activ-
ity. If you are attached, your
magic helps enhance your
bond. Be sure to let your
sweetie know how important
he or she is to you. LEO is
as strong-willed as you are,
though you usually come
out on top because you en-
dure difficult situations more
easily.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) It might be Monday, but
that is not enough of a rea-
son to sit on your creativity.
There could be a lot of incon-
sequential hassles that oth-
ers need help resolving. Your
ability to think outside the
box will emerge. They value
that quality in you.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) If you can spend a little
more time at home and on
yourself right now, you will
find that the benefits out-
weigh the problems. Some-
times, you need to slow
down and relax. Invite a fa-
vorite person to join you.
What was a task before now
becomes fun!
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
You speak your mind loudly
and clearly. You might decide
that it's time to get past a
problem that has been slow-
ing you down. Sometimes
just expressing the caring
you feel can help clear up a
hassle.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) Focus on what is impor-
tant to handle. You could be
taken aback by what is go-
ing on and by how undisci-
plined you might be. Realize
that you are a creature of ex-
tremes. You need to let your
moods run their course with-
out reacting to them.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
You are in your element dur-
ing the daytime. Your natural
response points you in the
right direction. You will not
make a mistake by remain-


North dealer.
Neither side vulnerable.
NORTH
*AJ73
VJ 108 76
*A
+754
WEST EAST
4 *10962
VA3 V-
*K987432 Q 10 5
+AQJ8 +K109632
SOUTH
*KQ854
VKQ9542
*J6
4-
The bidding:
North East South West
Pass Pass 1V 3 *
4* 5* 5V 6*
Pass Pass 6 V Dble
Opening lead ace of clubs.
When there's a borderline choice
between which of two bids to make,
you never know when exercising one
choice might lead to tremendous suc-
cess, while exercising the other
might lead to absolute ruin.
This very situation arose in dra-
matic fashion in today's deal from
the 1970 world championship match
between Brazil and the United
States.
At the first table, with Bobby
Wolff and Jim Jacoby North-South
for the U.S.. the bidding went as


ing open to others; in fact,
you can only gain! Maintain
your normal routine, and play
it low-key.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
The daytime hours could be
challenging, and they might
be causing you a lot of ten-
sion despite someone's sup-
port and obvious caring.
Know that you will feel bet-
ter as the day ends. Your en-
ergy changes as the workday
comes to a close.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
A meeting points to the best
path for success. How you
say what you need and how
you express your need for
acknowledgment is very like-
ly to change. Be more forth-
right at times and a little
less charming.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21) You'll assume your nor-
mal role as leader of the
gang. You handle responsi-
bility well, though it takes its
toll on you. Stress needs to
be handled quickly right now,
as you have a lot of ground
to cover. Take a walk or just
take a break.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21) You could be ex-
cited by an upcoming event
or by a visit from someone.
This excitement flows into
every other part of your life,
or so it seems. You might
want to revisit your impres-
sion of a key matter. In a
different mood, everything
could change.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19) Consider getting
feedback from others about
what they feel is necessary.
A brainstorm session easily
could evolve. Let a close as-
sociate take a lead role in a
key matter. You might not re-
alize it, but this person ex-
presses his or her caring by
taking action.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18) You have the ability to
visualize more of what you
want from a situation and ex-
press it, which could affect
your friends. You probably
don't realize the impact that
you have on others. Start
the process of manifesting a
desire through sharing more.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20) You see a great deal of
sensitivity and understand-
ing emerge as others deal
with their daily routines and
events. A sense of well-be-
ing will be contagious, and it
might allow a difficult situa-
tion to be resolved.


shown. Jacoby opened with one
heart, when he could just as easily
have opened with one spade, and this
paid off handsomely when hc cndcc
utip making six hearts doubled for
score of 12 10 points.
There was nothing to the play.
Jacoby ruffed [lie club lead, drove
out the ace of hearts and had the rest
of the tricks.
At the second table, with Gabriel
Chagas and Pedro Assumnpcao hold-
ing the North-South cards for Brazil.
the bidding went:
North East South West
Pass Pass 14 2*
2V 4* 4V 44
Dble Pass Pass 5 *
54 64 64 Dble
Here South opened with a spade
the effect of which was that his side
lost a slam. South eventually wound
up in six spades, which could not be
made after West led a club.
Declarer ruffed Ihe club lead and
played a round of trumps. When
West showed out. South could nol
afford to continue trumps, so he led z
heart, hoping for a 1-1 division. West
thereupon took the ace and returned
heart for East to ruff, and the slami
went down one.
Observe that even if North haL
wound up in six hearts at this table
(North had bid hearts first), the slam
would likewise have failed against
spade lead by East.


HOROSCOPES


POWER
FROM PAGE Al

Smarter communi-
cations among service
components allow the
utility network to better
re-route power and mini-
mize the number of nega-
tively impacted custom-
ers, Sargent said. Electric
workers also get more ac-
curate notifications to lo-
cate where disruptions
started.
"We listened to our cus-
tomers' concerns about
power outages, and we
are working diligently to
make city electric service
better," City Commis-
sioner Bill Polk said.
The utility has worked
for more than a year to
update old equipment
at eight different loca-
tions and bury miles of


DEAL
FROM PAGE Al


sides are going to require
that the other side com-
promises some core prin-
ciple and then we'll get
nothing done," Ryan,
who chairs the House
Budget Committee, said
in an interview Thursday.
But a fellow GOP ne-
gotiator, Oklahoma Rep.
Tom Cole, said Friday
that additional revenue



HEAT
FROM PAGE Al


in the eastern two-thirds
of the United States, ac-
cording to the study pub-
lished Sunday in the jour-
nal Nature Geoscience.
This could predict
some types of heat waves
but not all, meteorolo-
gists said.
The study's authors


FAIR
FROM PAGE Al


vendors, and the chance
to savor a picture-perfect
fall weekend in the Sun-
shine State.
They happily toted
bags of purchases.
"You wouldn't come
here and not buy some-
thing," Evans said.
"I love this show; it's
one of my favorite shows
ever," said vendor Ger-
ri Pizzini of Minneso-
ta, wearing a sundress as
she sold colorful bead-
ed bracelets, anklets and
earrings. "I drive all the
way down here just for
the weekend, and then
I turn around Monday
morning to go back."
She's been coming to
Mount Dora for 10 years.
"This one of my top
10 shows that I do well,"
Pizzini said of partici-
pating in craft shows all
over the country. "Peo-
ple come back year after
year to find me, which is
awesome."
Lady Lake crafter Mary
Jo Niedow, who calls her-
self the "Florida Bas-
ket Lady" sported hand-
made basket earrings as
she demonstrated basket
weaving.
"This has been a fun
show; I have met a lot
of people and have
drummed up some busi-
ness for my basket class-
es," said Niedow, who
teaches traditional style
Indian weaving at her
house or the homes of
her students.
Apopka photographer
Drew Brass was pleased
to sell his Florida coast-
al scenes and collegiate
photos of the Florida
State Seminoles, Uni-


electric distribution lines
formerly strung along
tall roadside poles. This
part of Leesburg's elec-
tric service area includes
more than 4,000 residen-
tial and commercial cus-
tomers, extending from
the intersection of Coun-
ty Road 44 and U.S. High-
way 441 near Sleepy Hol-
low Road east toward
County Road 473.
Some of the utility im-
provements are funded
in part by more than $10
million in federal grants
the city received in 2009
to upgrade the electric
utility, providing more
dependable service and
empowering customers
to conserve energy and
reduce monthly power
bills.


could be part of an agree-
ment.
Added Cole: "Both
sides would like to deal
with the sequester. And
we're willing to put more
revenue on the table to
do that, and we would
like to do it with entitle-
ment savings."
Cole was not talking
about raising tax rates;
one option he men-
tioned would be to give
corporations incentive to
repatriate untaxed over-
seas profits.


said they think the pat-
tern occurred before last
year's heat wave in much
of the central United
States, but they still need
more work to confirm it.
The researchers at the
National Center for At-
mospheric Research in
Boulder, Colo., looked
at heat waves that last-
ed at least a week and
were about 5 to 8 degrees
warmer than normal.


versity of Florida Gators
and University of Central
Florida Knights.
"Along as these college
teams keep winning, it
makes these photos pop-
ular," he said.
Port Orange crafter
Don Kaufman drew at-
tention with his unique
decorative Corian art
pieces of celebrities,
sports and religious fig-
ures, while Alan Traynor
"The Egg Man" generat-
ed a crowd with his origi-
nal art on wooden eggs.
His most popular is the
baby feet egg, a unique
baby gift, that is per-
sonalized with a baby's
name and birthdate.
"Everybody knows
somebody that is hav-
ing a baby," he said.
"I've been coming here
12 years and the Mount
Dora Craft Fair is right
there at the top."
Traynor said he has de-
veloped a legion of loyal
fans over the years; some
of them have been with
him from when he began
his craft 22 years ago.
Robin Short from St.
Petersburg attracted at-
tention for her ability to
sew creative crafts from
fabrics, including insu-
lated water bottles, purs-
es, collegiate items and
baby bibs, to name a few.
"This is an awesome
show and it's so big, and
I found out that people
come from all over the
country specifically for
this show," said Short,
who ranks the Mount
Dora Craft Fair as her No.
1 favorite craft show in
Florida.
The popular event was
hosted by Visit Mount
Dora, with Janet Gain-
ache Craig as the coordi-
nator.


3 of 6 wins $5
5 of 5 wins $5,019


4 of 5 wins $72.50
Rollover


POWERBALL...................... 4-6-34-49-56-29
With Powerball Without Powerball
Powerball alone wins $4........................... 3 of 5 wins $7
1 of 5 w/Powerball wins $4................. 4 of 5 wins $100
2 of 5 w/Powerball wins $7......5 of 5 wins $1,000,000
3 of 5 w/Powerball wins $100............................ Rollover
4 of 5 w/Powerball wins $10,000


The Daily Commercial
THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875
The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for
$77.72 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group
at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is
paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address
changes to The Daily Commercial, RO. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL
34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of
The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of
the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without
written consent from the publisher.


MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER?
h ii I, : [ Ij, T ill :i:LF
IIJ I _^ T1:,)1 JJ 0 1-' 9 .1[.IM 1-1'
Call 787-0600 in Lake Coun-
ty or (877) 702-0600 in Sum-
ter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m.


HOW TO REACH US

365-8200
In Sumter County:
877-702-0600


Monday through Friday. Call 7 ADVERTISING
a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday Retail .................365-8200
and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Classified .............314-3278
GOING ON VACATION CIRCULATION
Call the Cir.lLake Co ..............787-0600
Call the Circulation De- S Co.877702 60
part-ment 48 hours Cumter Co .... 877-702-0600
ahead to stop service. Circulation Billing .787-0600
ACCOUNTING ......365-8216
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 787-0600 (Lake Co.) or
877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail
to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, PO. Box 490007,
Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Billed monthly at the rates shown.
SUBSCRIPTION REFUND POLICY: Subscription refunds will be
calculated at the current basic subscription price, excluding the
current month. All refund requests must be made in writing and
signed. Send to The Daily Commercial, BO. Box 490007, Lees-
burg, FL 34749-0007. (In lieu of a refund, we will transfer any re-
maining time on a subscription to another party or make it avail-
able to students through our "Newspapers in Education" program.)
RECYCLING: The Daily Commercial supports environmental
protection through recycling. Plastic bags may be recycled
at grocery stores. Newspapers may be recycled at the Com-
mercial's Leesburg office, 212 E. Main St., during busi-
ness hours. This newspaper is printed on recycled newsprint.


SUBSCRIPTION
Home


RATES


Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total
Daily/Sunday 26.82
1.88 28.70 47.22 3.31 50.53 85.60 5.99 91.59
7 days a week
Mall Subscription 3 months 6 months One Year


Daily/Sunday
Sunday only
NEWSROOM


CONTACTS


BILL KOCH, assistant managing editor
352-365-8208.................................... bill.koch@dailycommercial.com
SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor
352-365-8203 ...........................scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com
PAUL RYAN, visual editor
352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com
FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor
352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com
REPORTERS
ROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County
352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com
MILLARD IVES, police and courts
352-365-8262................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com
THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages
352-365-8209..................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com
OTHERS
PAM FENNIMORE, editorial assistant
352-365-8256............. pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com
DON HUNSBERGER
352-365-8279........donald.hunsberger@dailycommercial.com
WHITNEY WILLARD
352-365-8258...............whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
E-mail submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com
SPORTS RESULTS
Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call-
ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be e-
mailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.
GOOD FOR YOU/ CELEBRATIONS
To have your club or organization's events printed in the YourCom-
munity calendar listings,just email the information to pamfenni-
more@daily commercial.com.



HEALTH
FROM PAGE Al


"The incompetence in building this
website is staggering," said Rep. Mar-
sha Blackburn, R-Tenn, the second
ranking Republican on the panel.
Democrats said the new system
needed time to get up and running, and
it could be fixed to provide millions of
people with affordable insurance.
Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear, a Dem-
ocrat, said the system was "working in
Kentucky," a state that has dealt with
"some of the worst health statistics in
the country ... The only way we're go-
ing to get ourselves out of the ditch is
some transformational tool," like the
new health insurance system.


lFLORIDA

LOTTERY

SUNDAY
CASH 3 ................................................ 0-5-4
Afternoon ........................................... 3-3-8
PLAY 4 ............................................. 0-9-7-7
Afternoon....................................... 4-3-2-0

SATURDAY
FANTASY 5......................... 13-17-19-30-36
2 of 5 wins free ticket 3 of 5 wins $23
4 of 5 wins $555 Rolldown
LOTTO........................... 10-16-21-25-37-49


BRIDGE


Famous Hand


Tomorrow: Think before you act.
CO 13 lna F-.tu~res S nalate [nc.


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 28, 2013




Monday, October 28, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL




State&Region
NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN I scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 1352-365-8208


www.dailycommercial.com


Area Briefs

TAVARES
Volunteers sought for
'Stuff the Bus' food drive
Volunteers are needed to assist
with the 8th annual "Stuff the Bus"
food drive campaign from 9 a.m. to
5 p.m. on Saturday. The goal of the
food drive is to stuff a bus with do-
nated nonperishable food items,
baby food and pet food.
Volunteers can assist at one of
three locations:
* Walmart, 17030 U.S. Highway
441, Mount Dora
* Walmart at 2501 N. Citrus Blvd.,
Leesburg
* Publix, at 250 Citrus Tower Blvd.,
Clermont
The nonperishable food items col-
lected will help support the Human
Care Network in conjunction with
the United Way of Lake and Sumter
Counties.
For information or to volunteer,
call Amy Bradford at 352-323-5723,
or send an email to abradford@lake-
countyfl.gov, before 5 p.m. on Oct.
31.

ST. PETERSBURG
More than 10,000 answer
boy's plea for a family
A 15-year-old boy who went to a
St. Petersburg church to plead for a
family now has 10,000 people who
want to adopt him.
The Tampa Bay Times reports
Davion Navar Henry Only's story
went viral on social media and was
picked up on news sites and televi-
sion shows around the globe after
the newspaper reported on his visit
to the St. Mark Missionary Baptist
Church.
Strangers from every state have
expressed interest in adopting him.
Case manager Connie Going says
they are following through with
every offer. After adoption special-
ists have narrowed down the inqui-
ries, the 10 best options will be pre-
sented to Davion.
Davion was born in prison and
raised in foster care. He said he is
amazed that "so many people actu-
ally want me."

TALLAHASSEE
Florida pays $800k to
fix governor's mansion
Gov. Rick Scott has repeatedly
pledged to slash government spend-
ing since his 2010 election. Yet more
than $800,000 has been spent for
substantial improvements to the
Greek Revival mansion where he
and his wife live.
Taxpayers have footed the bill for
things like the cleaning of oriental
rugs and refinishing the oak flooring
at "the People's House." The sprawl-
ing edifice at 700 North Adams
Street that serves as the private res-
idence as well as official entertain-
ment venue for the state's chief ex-
ecutive. Some money, though, has
come from lobbyists and corpo-
rate donors with business before
Scott and the Republican-controlled
Legislature.
Nearly $3 million was spent dur-
ing Jeb Bush's eight years in of-
fice. That included some expensive,
post-9/11 security upgrades. What
has been spent under Scott far ex-
ceeds that used while Charlie Crist
was in office.



... and we'll share it with our readers.
Some of our best story ideas and photos
come from our readers. So don't hesitate
to share your youth activities, awards,
accomplishments, festivals, charity
events and other things that make our
communities special. And don't overlook
those family milestones birthdays,
engagements, marriages, business
promotions and military news.


Just email your photos and news to...
pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com


Sheldon: Bondi should have resigned


BRENDAN FARRINGTON
AP Political Writer
LAKE BUENA VISTA Demo-
cratic candidate George Sheldon
criticized Attorney General Pam
Bondi on Sunday for delaying an
execution so she could raise mon-
ey for her re-election.
In his first speech since entering
the race last Monday, Sheldon re-
ferred to Bondi's request to delay
the lethal injection of Marshall Lee
Gore as the "inconvenient execu-
tion."


"When she delayed an execution
because it conflicted with a fund-
raising cocktail party she was host-
ing, she should have resigned,"
said Sheldon, a former Department
of Children and Families secre-
tary who served as deputy attorney
general under Bob Butterworth.
"And when pressed as to why she
delayed an execution to attend a
cocktail party, her response was 'I
made a mistake, it won't happen
again. Next question.' She's right. It
won't happen again."


Gore, who murdered two women
in Miami, was allowed to live an-
other three weeks when Gov. Rick
Scott granted Bondi's request. Bon-
di later said she made a mistake.
The speech came as Democrats
showcased their statewide candi-
dates during a weekend-long con-
ference. House Democratic Leader
Thurston Perry announced Satur-
day that he would also seek the at-
torney general nomination. But he
hasn't filed paperwork to get in the
race, so he wasn't among Sunday's
speakers.


Run for freedom raises money


to fight human trafficking


PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / DAILY COMMERCIAL
From left, Cynthia Baltunis, Roxanne Dausmann, Klaus Dausmann, Gusty Berry and Marie Matala
finish the "walkers" round of the 5K event held Oct. 26 at Waterfront Park to raise money to fight
human trafficking.

..."" .'." ...".. : .- A I.. ."
: : :: ... ". ::. ::.::
..: .. ...:. :':..
: . ..., .. .."".:''"..'"...:.:


Young Zev Jungreis works the bounce house.


April Ragar, a realtor with Keller Williams,
was event organizer for the Run for Free-
dom.


A group of runners disperse after having their photograph taken at
the bounce house.


Crist makes presence known at Dems conference


BRENDAN FARRINGTON
AP Political Reporter
LAKE BUENA VISTA Former
Republican governor-turned Dem-
ocrat Charlie Crist has been work-
ing the Florida Democratic Par-
ty's conference like a candidate as
he builds up to finally announcing
what seemingly everyone in Florida
already knows.
Crist said he will reveal whether
he will run for governor on Nov. 4
in a downtown St. Petersburg park.
He referred to an event as a kickoff;
politicians usually don't kick off a
non-campaign.
"November 4th gives you a year,
one way or the other, and it's time to
reach a conclusion," Crist said Sat-
urday at the conference. "I'm lean-
ing a certain way, I think that's ob-
vious."
Obvious, indeed. Crist didn't have
a speaking role at the conference,
which was wrapping up Sunday, but
from beginning to end, he worked
hallways, caucus meetings and
events. He was mobbed by support-


BARAK *L A C*


AP FILE PHOTO
In this Sept. 8, 2012 file photo, President Obama, left, talks with former Florida Gov. Charlie
Crist at a campaign rally in Seminole.


ers and posed for countless photos.
The fact that the same activists used
to work to try to defeat Crist didn't
seem to matter.


"Everybody seems to be very
warm to him and he's warming
up," said former Senate Democrat-
ic Leader. Dan Gelber.






IN MEMORY 1


OBITUARIES
James 'Jim' Herlong
James "Jim" Herbert
Herlong, 91, of Lees-
burg, Florida, was born
February 15, 1922 in
Leesburg, Florida and
died Saturday, Octo-
ber 26, 2013. He was
a life long resident of
Leesburg. He gradu-
ated from the Citadel
and entered the Army
in 1943 thru 1946. He
married Ruby E. Prevatt
in 1946 and returned
to his family business,
A.S. Herlong Packing
Company in Leesburg.
He was a member of
the Burning Tree C.C.,
Bethesda, MD, Citadel
Alumni Association,
past Chairman of First
Federal Savings and
Loan, past Board of
Suntrust and the Board
of Lake
HRegion
Packing
Associ-
ation.
< ,2 j He was
a mem-
ber of
HERLONG Morri-


son United Methodist
Church, Leesburg. He
is survived by his wife
Ruby P Herlong, Lees-
burg; son Jen and wife
"Peggy" Herlong, Lees-
burg; daughter Cor-
anelle Glass, Mt. Dora;
four grandchildren
Bryan Glass, Rob Glass,
Denise Prudhomme,
Andi Herlong and three
great grandchildren.
Graveside services will
be held Tuesday, Octo-
ber 29, 2013 at 1:00pm
at Lone Oak Ceme-
tery, Leesburg, with Dr.
Rev. McCoy Gibbs offi-
ciating. For those who
wish, memorial contri-
butions may be made
to Morrison Unit-
ed Methodist Church,
Leesburg,FL. Online
condolences may be
left at www.beyersfu-
neralhome.com. Ar-
rangements entrust-
ed to Beyers Funeral
Home and Crematory,
Leesburg, FL.

DEATH NOTICES
PCntu 'Pnt' lHutchisnn


S Cotus E. 'Coty'
10M Hutchison, 54, of Lees-
burg died Thursday,
Oct. 24, 2013. Page-
___ Theus Funerals & Cre-
- -- nations, Leesburg.


AP FILE PHOTO
In this Jan. 21, 2012, file photo a television photographer interviews the next door neighbor of terror suspect Jamshid Muhto-
rov, a refugee from Uzbekistan, in Aurora, Colo., on the day of his arrest at Chicago's O'Hare airport.



Justice: High court test of


surveillance law could be ahead


PETE YOST
Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
The Justice Depart-
ment says for the first
time that it intends
to use information
gained from one of
the National Security
Agency's warrantless
surveillance programs
against an accused
terrorist, setting the





Servi l sA ailale

P!I 're-need Plans


stage for a likely Su-
preme Court test of
the Obama adminis-
tration's approach to
national security.
The high court so far
has turned aside chal-
lenges to the law on
government surveil-
lance on the grounds
that people who bring
such lawsuits have no
evidence they are be-
ing targeted.
Jamshid Muhtorov
was accused in 2012
of providing materi-
al support to the Is-
lamic Jihad Union, an
Uzbek terrorist orga-
nization that, authori-
ties say, was engaging
NATO coalition and
U.S. forces in Afghan-
istan.


According to court
papers in the case, the
FBI investigated Muh-
torov after his com-
munications with an
overseas website ad-
ministrator for the
IJU.
In a court filing Fri-
day, the government
said it intends to of-
fer into evidence in
Muhtorov's case "in-
formation obtained or
derived from acquisi-
tion of foreign intel-
ligence information
conducted pursuant
to the Foreign Intelli-
gence Surveillance Act
of 1978."
Last February, a
sharply divided Su-
preme Court ruled in
a 5-4 vote that a group


of American lawyers,
journalists and orga-
nizations could not
sue to challenge the
2008 expansion of the
law. The court those
who sued could not
show that the govern-
ment would monitor
their communications
along with those of
potential foreign ter-
rorist and intelligence
targets.
Last month, Su-
preme Court Justice
Antonin Scalia, who
had ruled with the
majority in the earli-
er 5-4 decision, said
the courts ultimate-
ly would have to de-
termine the legality of
the NSA surveillance
program.


17thA I*S'

AMRIA CRF EDAVR



Th Ylde ff etvi

(Sans Jt.s


November 2nd & 3rd, 20131 Saturday & Sunday 1 0am-5pm

Located at Spanish Springs in The Villages, FL.


d. si
'"_s ILAR,-.,*,-* .2...'....,:.:


Free Admission
For more information


- "... ......call 561-746-6615
wwArtesivlSo


Clermont Minneola Groveland

Mascotte Montverde Four Corners

*SOUTHAKEMERCHAT DIRECTORY*


13;
:;2!
ip
-plc-


uI~p
ivim
y il 1.


250 Ewy 0




Hde Gdf Center

352-404-8990
1640 East Hwy 50
Suite B
Clermont, FL 34711


1ST MONTH


FREE
CALL TODAY
877-265-2510




1i itre
'kAccounting

co-dtatdU
352-242-9905
15701 State Road 50
Suite #206
Clermont, FL 34711


:PAINTING
INTERIOR &
EXTERIOR
FOCUSED
SOLUTIONS INC. \
262-210-0454
Call Today il alloA samdp ay' -


PalsNusr

Fri0re
83 yr
(Hy 0
Grovelan
352-44-344


MO.- A.I A -7P
Located in the Green Roof Buildings
16129 SR 50, Clermont,
Suite 101-102
407-877-6677
FINANCING NO Credit Check
Se Habla Espahol


Donna Weinheimer, LMT
Massage
Detox Programs
Body Shaping
HalfMoonRetreat@Gmail.com

OutOfTheBlueHalfMoonRetreat. corm
MM12675 MA27125


Gingerbread
INSURANCE
"Experience the Difference"
My name is Tom Marino and I am the owner of Gingerbread Insurance Agency.
I am an 8 year resident of Clermont and I created Gingerbread to answer the
growing need for quality professional insurance services. Today we are
inundated with television commercials, radio advertisements, emails, and mail
about all of the different insurance needs you have. While this is great
information, it does not replace a trained professional agent. I can visit your
home, place of business, or meetyou at a place of your convenience to discuss
your insurance options. Building a relationship with you and seeing your needs
first hand will allow me to truly create an insurance plan that meets your
needs. In addition, our Gingerbread Agents are committed to review your
insurance with you before each renewal to ensure your needs are met. As an
Independent Insurance Agency we can help compare prices and rates from
several insurance carriers and find the most effective combination of coverage
for the best price.
Ask yourself these three questions.
1. Has it been more than a year since you met with your Agent and
reviewed your insurance needs?
2. Did you choose your insurance online?
3. Do you have a nagging feeling in the back of your mind that the online
policy you purchased might cover too much, or worse...not enough?


If you answered yes to any of
these questions, we can help you!
So, if you're looking for the most
knowledgeable advice on quotes,
coverage, and service, please call
us now!
Tom Marino
407.309.9949
www.gingerbreadinsurance.com
Home Auto Collector Car
Collections Business Life


Gingerbread
INSURANCE
"Experience the Difference"
Home Auto Collector Car
Commercial
Tom Marino
407-309-9949
www.gingerbreadinsurance.com


Army ~ Navy- Air Force ~ Marines ~ Coast Guard
Active Duty/Veterans
Thank you for serving our country.
Hamlin Hilbish Funeral Directors
S326 East Orange Ave., Eustis, FL 32726
352-357-4193 www.hanlinhilbish.com


~t~L


mm--


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 28, 2013




Monday, October 28, 2013


101


11111t) A -

U


~Li


OF AMERICA
WITH 25 OFFICES STATEWIDE, WHY WOULD
YOU BUY A HEARING AID ANYWHERE ELSE?
WH E'ETH O.1PACETBYA HARINGAID
TRY ANY HEARING AID FOR 7 DAYS ABSOLUTELY FREE
WITH NO COST AND NO OBLIGATION


* We carry 20 of the world's leading manufacturers so we can select the hearing aid
that is just right for your hearing loss.


oudifon


bernafon*
V&or harifn Ou psoaw


HANSATON
A j .* *iUH


ReSound

'SONIC
) innovations


REXTON PH.NAK
vhmarinq vfitIM


SIEMENS


SEARBOING SYSTEMS
HEARING SYSTEMS


~3unitron


*,9.I PDB4
* ~.
I
~n i~


* No Excessive markups No bait and switch
means better hearing for lower prices to you!


$395
ITE
r, ilhe Eari
SWAS S790

SuFi to 40 'db loss


C


$495
ITC
In-lIr-e-C nali
SWAS $990


'I"I


Fs up To 10 db lOss


$595
Micro-
CIC
010
. Completely ,n
The C.ralt
WAS '1190
Fin; up to 4C d't-, loss


SPECIAL
$49
Hearing Aid
Repair
Any make or model with 6 mo. warranty.
Expires 11/18/13.


SPECIAL
490


Zinc Air
Batteries(4pk)
Limit 2 pk. per person.
Expires 11/18/13.
S-- --------------


FREE
Hearing Aid
Battery Tester
j with every
appointment for your
free, no obligation
hearing test.
_>>-- >-- >>--- >>----------- i-----


FREE
Hearing Aid
Analysis
Analyze your present hearing aid
performance in real life conditions
Switch the state-of-the-art diagnostic
equipment.
(Reg. Value $89)


(E, jAm A o 1




V OF AMERICA


Don't buy a
hearing aid
until you
try one
100% RISK
FREE!


Our Professional staff of Doctors of Audiology, Board Certified
Hearing Aid Specialists and Audioprosthologists


NI


IN T ZC RO-E oticon
PFEOPLF F ,RST


[&I 40h d 4 z


DAILY COMMERCIAL








Banner reflect hard-line backlash in Iran


ALl AKBAR DAREINI
Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran -
Banners that sudden-
ly cropped around Teh-
ran in the past week
depict an American
diplomat dressed in
a jacket and tie, while
under the negotiating
table he is wearing mil-
itary pants and point-
ing a gun at an Iranian
envoy.
The anti-American
images were ordered
taken down Saturday
by Tehran authorities.
But they made their
point.
It was another sal-
vo by hard-liners who
are opposed to Pres-
ident Hassan Rou-


hani's pursuit of better
ties with Washington
and worried that Iran
could make unneces-
sary concessions in its
nuclear program in ex-
change for relief from
Western sanctions.
The banners and
posters were some-
thing of a warm-up to
the main event: Rou-
hani's critics are plan-
ning major anti-U.S.
rallies and amped-
up "Death to America"
chants on the Nov. 4
anniversary of the U.S.
Embassy takeover in
1979 following the Is-
lamic Revolution.
Anti-American mu-
rals have long been
part of the urban land-


scape in Iran, and in-
clude images of the
Statue of Liberty trans-
formed into a creepy
skeleton and bombs
raining down from the
Stars and Stripes. The
storming of the U.S.
Embassy is marked
every year with pro-
tests outside the com-
pound's brick walls.
Now, however, the
images reflect internal
divisions in Iran and
suggest more intrigue
ahead.
Rouhani's ground-
breaking overtures to
the U.S. appear to have
the backing of Iran's su-
preme leader, Ayatol-
lah Ali Khamenei. This
means that at least
for the moment he
has the ultimate politi-
cal cover to try to reach
a nuclear deal and per-
haps find other ways to
cross the 34-year dip-
lomatic no man's land
between the countries.
However, the criti-
cism and protests by
hard-line resisters, led
by the Revolutionary
Guard, are as much
directed at Rouhani's
government as they are
intended as a message
for the supreme leader.
The Guard and oth-
ers know that Khame-
nei does not want to
risk an open confron-
tation that could sow
further discord in Iran.
The subtext of the post-
ers and banners: More
pressure could come if
Rouhani's government
is perceived as moving
too fast toward con-
cessions when nuclear
talks resume next week


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A poster depicting an American negotiator wearing a suit jacket and tie at a negotiating table and
a dog to his side is displayed in Palestine square, Tehran, Iran, Sunday.


in Geneva with the U.S.
and other world pow-
ers.
The signs had an ad-
agency quality that is
rare compared with the
usual anti-American
fare of simple fliers and
hand-lettered placards.
'American Honesty,"
read one in Farsi and
slightly mangled Eng-
lish, showing the U.S.
negotiator with the gun
under the table.
Another depicted an
American negotiator
in a suit, a black attack
dog by his side. The
third one showed an
open hand facing the
open claws of what ap-
peared to be an eagle,
the symbol of the U.S.
On Sunday, with
most of the images tak-
en down, new post-
ers popped up around
Tehran. They con-
tained just one sen-


tence, in Farsi: "We
don't oppress and don't
allow to be oppressed."
The high production
values of the banners
and posters suggest
possible connections
to the powerful pro-
paganda machinery
of well-funded groups
such as the Revolution-
ary Guard or its nation-
wide paramilitary net-
work, known as the
Basij.
Mohsen Pirhadi,
head of Basij's Tehran
branch, said he ordered
the posters put up, but
gave no further details
on the designers or fi-
nancial backers.
"These posters were
in line with the inter-
ests of the (ruling) sys-
tem," the Bahar news-
paper quoted him as
saying Saturday.
A day earlier, protest-
ers trampled posters of
Wendy Sherman, the


chief U.S. nuclear ne-
gotiator with Iran, who
said earlier this month
that past experience
suggests "deception
is part of the DNA" of
the nuclear talks. Iran's
hard-line media, how-
ever, added "Iranian"
to the quote and stirred
outrage.
"Our people have
seen nothing but dis-
honesty, deception of
public opinion, betray-
al and back-stabbing
by Americans during
the past years. ... There-
fore, there is no way
they can trust Ameri-
can promises and de-
ceiving smiles," hard-
line politician Hamid
Reza Taraqi told The
Associated Press on
Saturday.
Israel and others sus-
picious of Iran have
used similar language
to question Rouhani's
sincerity.


ANNUITYY UNIVERSITY"

This is an exclusive, classroom style,
workshop designed to teach you how
annuities work. And YES, we'll put it all in
layman's terms! With all the
controversy and confusion surrounding
these products we are on a mission to
educate YOU and "set the record straight."
The class is FREE and no products will
; be sold or presented.

j THIS IS STRICTLY EDUCATIONAL.


RSVP Today! Call 352-350-1161
*Seating is extremely limited and by RSVP only *
*Complimentary lunch will be served. *


Date & Time: Tuesday, November 5 at 10:00am .
Location: TB Event Center .af
(Located next door to Vie's Embers)
7928 U.S. Hwy 441, Suite 2
Leesburg FL 34748


We'll be doing an in depth study of....


* The history of Annuities
* The different types of Annuities
* How Annuities work


* How Annuities earn interest
* Why Annuities have a bad reputation
* How your advisor or agent gets paid


* How to get money out of your Annuity And more!

Additionally, we'll do a live Q&A session and Answer YOUR Questions!

Visit us Online: www.TBFinancialGroup.com
Office Location: 3261 Us Hwy 441/27, Suite F-2 Fruitland Park, Fl 34731
TB Financial Group Inc. is a licensed insurance agency for life, health, and annuities. We are not securities licensed. We are not tax advisors.
Our seminars are very general in nature and not meant to replace the advice of your CPA, Tax Preparer, Investment Advisor or Attorney. We will
not provide tax or legal advice. Please consult your tax or legal professionalfor these matters.


Congolese army says it


has taken 3 towns in east


Associated Press
GOMA, Congo The Congo-
lese army took three towns in east-
ern Congo Sunday in fresh fight-
ing against the M23 rebels, said the
army spokesman.
The army says it has found two
mass graves in Kibumba, a town it
took on Saturday, according to the
provincial governor.


The army on Sunday gained con-
trol of Rutshuru, Kiwanja and
Buhumba towns in the Rutshuru
area of North Kivu province, near
Congo's border with Rwanda, army
spokesman Lt. Col. Olivier Hamuli
told The Associated Press
It was not possible to indepen-
dently verify that the army holds
those three towns.


f 0
S.is To* 9 A NGC
<2 G I

PANOR 'BU INGDAIM.1
ARTCRVE BROEN R DAAGE JEWLRY



JUITHRPAW UTAL
NOAON O AREO O ML






WATCHES POCKETWATCHE
FOS ILCITZE.-


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 28, 2013






YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD
BILL KOCH............... ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR
SCOTT CALLAHAN .......................NEWS EDITOR Vi
GENE PACKWOOD ............ EDITORIAL CARTOONIST w dIm c o
< ^^ ^r r ^^www.dailycommercial.com


VOICE

When Europe talks,

the U.S. listens, a

little too closely

There is a rich element of hypocrisy in
European outrage over disclosures
that the National SecurityAgen-
cywas eavesdropping on the phone
conversations of world leaders, particu-
larly our European allies and most partic-
ularly German Chancellor Angela Merkel.
Merkel angrily called President Barack
Obama and was assured that she was
not now, and would not be in the future,
a target of U.S. surveillance. Apparent-
ly, Obama has fielded similar calls from
other leaders and made similar assuranc-
es, although in some cases surely with his
fingers crossed.
Merkel is not someone the U.S. wants to
offend. She is the most powerful leader in
Europe and generally more than well-dis-
posed toward the U.S.
Merkel called on the United States to re-
build trust anew: "We are allies. But such
an alliance can only be built on trust." The
White House and the State department
have their work cut out for them, with the
first test being whether negotiations on
a trans-Atlantic free-trade pact can pro-
ceed.
Certainly, the revelations of U.S. eaves-
dropping show the need for some kind
of institutional restraint. Just because we
can do something doesn't necessarily
mean we should. The disclosures of ren-
egade NSA contractor Edward Snowden
have the U.S. sweeping up more than 70
million phone records in France in one
month. What on earth are we going to do
with all that? Absent specifically targeted
conversations, why would we even want
it?
The fuss likely will die down as revela-
tions of Europe's own spying surface. The
French, for example, have been especially
aggressive in trying to ferret out U.S. busi-
ness and technical secrets. Italian Premier
Enrico Letta, whose nation's literature and
theater are filled with tales of agents and
double agents, said, "It is not in the least
bit conceivable that activity of this type
could be acceptable."
Despite the indignation, much of it
surely feigned for domestic consumption,
the NSAs excess of enthusiasm and in-
trusion should not be allowed to disrupt
a valuable network built up over time of
sharing covert information.
To elaborate on a U.S. public service an-
nouncement: Friends don't spy on friends,
but if they do, they do so discreetly
Distributed by Scripps Howard News Service.


The Daily Commercial

The newspaper of choice for Lake
and Sumter counties since 1875

EDITORIALS
Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board,
not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are
not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday,
Saturday and Sunday.
COLUMNS
Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and
picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reflect
the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a
diversity of views.
If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state
or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom-
mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL
34749-0007.
Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length.
The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published
with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.


O 'AV


'.~

GLu~7~~c~TL


OTHERVOICES

Marriage and abortion are economic issues


Political discussions
commonly assume
there are two separate
sets of issues.
There's a social agenda is-
sues like abortion and mar-
riage. And there's an econom-
ic agenda issues like federal
spending, debt, taxes, and
government programs like en-
titlements.
It's usually assumed that
these two agendas don't have
anything to do with each oth-
er.
But it's simply false that we
can consider the challenges
of our federal budget without
thinking about the state of the
American family, our birth-
rates and abortion.
Our massive entitlement
programs Social Securi-
ty, Medicare, and Medicaid -
now make up about 45 per-
cent of our current federal
budget.
These programs are over-
whelmingly driven by the de-
mographics of the country,
mostly directly, but also in-
directly. Their economics are
driven both by how long we
live but also by how many
children we have.
Social Security and Medi-
care focus on our elderly, to
assure they have income and
health care. Because the pro-
grams are financed through
payroll taxes of the working,
their viability depends on how
many are employed com-
pared to the size of our aged,
retired populations.
This picture is changing dra-
matically, for the worse. And
this is the root of our problem.
In 1945, there were about
42 working Americans paying
payroll taxes for every retiree
receiving Social Security ben-
efits. By 1960, the ratio was
about 5-to-1. Today it is about


Star Parker
SCRIPPS HOWARD
NEWS SERVICE


3-to- 1.
Americans are living longer
but having fewer children.
Currently, about 13.3 per-
cent of our population is over
65. Projections from the De-
partment of Health and Hu-
man Services are that by 2040
- in a little over 25 years 21
percent of our population will
be over 65.
Meanwhile, birthrates are
dropping. According to data
compiled by the Pew Research
Center, between 1920 and
1970, birth rates varied from
a high of about 118 births per
1000 women of childbearing
age to a low of about 80. In re-
cent years, this rate has been
a little over 60 births per 1000
women.
A report from the chief ac-
tuary of the Social Securi-
ty Administration discuss-
es factors that have led to the
drop in birth rates. These in-
clude more use and availabili-
ty of birth control, more wom-
en working, postponement
of marriage, increased prev-
alence of divorce, and more
women choosing to remain
childless.
Not surprisingly, the SSA re-
port ignores the impact of le-
gal abortion. But this is a criti-
cal factor. You can look at any
chart showing historical fer-
tility rates in the United States
and see it bottom out after the
Roe v. Wade decision in 1973
and staying around those lev-
els.
Because fewer and fewer are
working for every retiree, our


current level of taxation no-
where near covers what the
requirements for Social Secu-
rity and Medicare will soon
be.
Meanwhile, although Med-
icaid is usually thought of
as health care for the poor,
it's the source of funding for
most long-term care for the
elderly. Today, about 60 per-
cent of Americans in nursing
homes and long-term care in-
stitutions are being covered
through Medicaid.
Just think what this finan-
cial burden will look like as
our aged become an increas-
ingly large portion of our pop-
ulation.
It's why projections for the
shortfalls in Social Security,
Medicare, and Medicaid com-
bined have been as high as
$126 trillion.
A central premise of Obam-
acare is forcing healthy young
Americans to buy health in-
surance to subsidize over-
all premium costs for older
and less healthy parts of the
population. What happens
as the percentage of youth in
our population continues to
shrink?
It should be clear that it is
impossible to separate mar-
riage, children and abortion
from our overall economic
picture. These factors are at
the root of the economic pic-
ture.
A renaissance in Ameri-
can family life restoration
of marriage and children as
central to our culture and
purge of the scourge of abor-
tion can restore a healthy
future that today looks so om-
inous.


Star Parker is an author and presi-
dent of CURE, Center for Urban Re-
newal and Education. She can be
reached at www.urbancure.org.


HAVE YOUR SAY
The Daily Commercial invites you
to write letters to the editor. Letters
should be no longer than 350 words.
They must be original, signed with the
full name of the writer, and include
the writer's address and telephone
number for verification. We reserve
the right to edit for length. Letters
also will be edited for grammar, clarity,
taste and libel. We accept no more
than two letters per month from the
same writer. No open letters, form
letters or copies of letters to third
parties will be published. We do not
publish unsigned letters. Submissions
are not returned. We retain the right
to archive and republish any material
submitted for publication.
You can submit your letters by:
Email (preferred) to:
letters@dailycommercial.com
By regular mail to:
Voices
PO. Box 490007
Leesburg, FL 34749-0007
By fax to: 325-365-1951


DOONESBURY


Editor's note: Garry Trudeau is on hiatus. This is a collection of some of his favorite strips.


YUP. AT THE MP
SCHOOL. PREW5 AB-
5TAN- 501OUT5L.Y BR/lWANT.
FORP' JUST WARAIIO YOU.


Monday, October 28, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL





DAILY COMMERCIALMonday, October 28, 2013


I FVEDA FREASTFO LESUR


144 State Road 44B
Eustis, FL 32726
352-308-8396


Come in for a
FREE A/C
Check
Test vent temperature,
visually inspect for leaks,
Gauge check system
and run performance test,
*Does not include freon or parts.


($1500 Off,

I Lube, Oil &
Filter Service
Includes synthetic
or regular oil,
premium oil filter
and 27pt. safety
inspection. /

SASE Certified
Master
0 Technician
since 1975.
38 Years!


2 year

24,000 mile
warranty on
all repairs


Iwww.ProAutoCareEustis.com


TODAY




Mostly sunny and
pleasant

HIGH LOW
820 630


TUESDAY


*1-

Mostly sunny and
pleasant


WEDNESDAY




Warm with sunshine
and patchy clouds


HIGH LOW HIGH
830 640 850


THURSDAY




Warm with sun and
some clouds


FRIDAY




Remaining warm with
clouds and sun


HIGH LOW HIGH LOW
850 680 870 690


Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 02013 Key West
W76 t


Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are today's highs for the
day. Forecast higMhlow temperatures are given for selected cities.


Cold Front
Warm Front
Stationay
Front


Showers
T-stormsa
RainE
umi rrlesL3
74 SnowVi
' Ice4


Yesterday's National High/Low: (for the 48 contiguous states)


High 860 in Edinburg, TX


6


0.2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8.10
Very High, 11+ Extreme
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index
number, the greater the need for
eye and skin protection.


Low 150 in Stanley, ID


The solunar period schedule allows planning
days so you will be fishing in good territory or
hunting in good cover during those times. Major
periods begin at the times shown and last for
1.5 to 2 hours. The minor periods are shorter.
Major Minor Major Minor
Today 7:32 a.m. 1:21 a.m. 7:54 p.m. 1:43 p.m.
Tue. 8:12 a.m. 2:01 a.m. 8:35 p.m. 2:24 p.m.


IH UN6


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


Today
7:37 a.m.
6:45 p.m.
1:56 a.m.
3:00 p.m.


Tuesday
7:38 a.m.
6:44 p.m.
2:49 a.m.
3:35 p.m.


New First Full Last

3 N o 1
N N N N
Nov 3 Nov 9 Nov 17 Nov 25


ITIEI


Homosassa
Day High Feet
Today 12:39 am......1.0
12:24 pm......1.0
Daytona Beach
Day High Feet
Today 3:10 am.....3.8
3:34 pm.....4.1


Low Feet
7:58 am .....0.4
8:38 pm.....0.2

Low Feet
9:30 am......1.3
10:00 pm......1.1


High Feet
1:35 am......1.1
1:44 pm......1.1

High Feet
4:08 am.....4.0
4:30 pm.....4.2


Low Feet
9:13 am .....0.3
9:39 pm.....0.2

Low Feet
10:25 am......1.2
10:48 pm.....0.9


I AINLCTE


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte, NC


Today
Hi LoW
52 26 pc
69 48s
50 40r
62 45 c
73 51 pc
62 41 s
63 39s
29 20 sn
77 55 pc
35 22 c
55 37 sh
58 37s
50 32 pc
47 24 pc
76 53s
62 40 pc
69 49 c


Tuesday
Hi LoW
47 29 pc
70 44 pc
47 39 r
68 47 s
76 57 s
61 40 s
60 41 s
34 25 sn
79 57 s
36 24 c
50 32 pc
49 39 s
49 36 pc
42 27 pc
79 58 s
66 47 c
74 51 s


city
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Concord, NH
Dallas
Dayton
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
El Paso
Fargo
Fairbanks
Flagstaff
Grand Rapids


Today
Hi LoW
38 28 pc
52 41 pc
61 41 pc
53 36 pc
75 49 pc
54 22 s
81 67 pc
59 39 pc
47 30 pc
54 39 c
53 35 pc
36 21 c
80 57 pc
37 26 c
43 31 r
53 35 s
49 32 pc


Tuesday
Hi LOW
48 32c
52 45 sh
63 50 pc
53 40 pc
7854s
48 24s
80 70 c
61 47 pc
54 33c
55 53r
51 38 pc
38 26c
80 57 pc
39 29c
39 24c
46 22 pc
50 37 sh


city
Great Falls
Greensboro, NC
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City


Today
Hi LoW
24 13 sn
67 48 c
56 30 s
86 72 pc
82 69 c
62 39 pc
78 56 pc
67 53 c
70 52 pc
73 59 pc
66 46 pc
73 58 pc
46 38 c
43 28 c
66 54 pc
82 65 pc
60 46 s


Tuesday
Hi LoW
32 26 pc
69 52 pc
49 31 s
85 71 pc
84 69 pc
62 51 t
82 58 pc
66 62 r
62 48 pc
77 63 pc
68 56t
78 65 pc
49 43 sh
41 36 r
73 56 pc
83 66 s
53 48 s


City
Norfolk, VA
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego


Today
Hi LoW
66 52s
77 64 pc
56 42 c
6343s
8460s
56 35s
54 27 s
57 34 pc
58 35s
68 46s
49 34 sh
68 47s
6343c
68 49 pc
63 42 sh
85 71 c
66 58 sh


Tuesday
Hi LoW
65 52 s
77 65 c
55 51 r
58 43 s
73 53 pc
57 42 pc
47 27 s
57 38 s
50 32 s
70 50 s
55 32 pc
66 50 s
66 42 pc
67 60 r
51 38 sh
84 73 pc
65 55 r


city
San Francisco
San Juan, PR


Today
Hi LoW
60 49 c
91 77 t


Santa Fe 65 41 s
St. Ste. Marie 38 25 pc
Seattle 53 37 s
Shreveport 79 63 pc
Spokane 42 24 pc
Syracuse 48 27 pc
Topeka 70 54 c
Tucson 83 55 s
Tulsa 74 62 pc
Washington, DC 65 46 s
Wilmington, DE 61 41 s


Tuesday
Hi LoW
62 47s
90 75 t


62 48 s
58 41 s


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.


Our experienced physicians know you should


have a partner in your health care. Come


meet the region's most complete team at


Florida Heart and Vascular


Multi-Specialty Group.


Cardiovascular Group


D, FACC, FR
Chairman


SFlorida Heart

0 & Vascular

0 Multi-Specialty Group

Experience Our Integrity For Compassionate Care

511 Medical Plaza Dr., Suite 101, Leesburg 352.728.6808
1560 Santa Barbara Blvd., The Villages 352.750.5000
www.FLHEARTCENTER.com


MD, FACC
Vice Chairman


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 28, 2013





Monday, October 28, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Manning, Broncos thrash Redskins 45-21


EDDIE PELLS
AP National Writer

DENVER In all those
years roaming the sidelines
in Denver, Mike Shanahan
never saw one get so ugly,
so fast.
Not surprisingly, Peyton
Manning had a hand in
turning Shanahan's home-
coming sour.
After being showered with
applause, then staked to a
two-touchdown lead, the
Broncos' old coach watched
Manning and the Broncos
score the last 38 points
Sunday in a come-from-be-
hind 45-21 victory over the
Washington Redskins.
Manning overcame four
turnovers and threw for 354
yards and four touchdowns,
as the Broncos came back
from a 21-7 deficit early in
the third quarter.
Ahead by those two touch-
downs after Manning threw
a pick-6 to DeAngelo Hall
when receiver Demaryius
Thomas fell on an out route,
Shanahan squinted into the
sunlight, rolled-up game
plan in hand, and looked at
a familiar sight on the score-
board in Denver his team
comfortably ahead as the
sun began to set over the
Rockies.
Things changed quickly,
though.
Manning led the Broncos
(7-1) on a 75-yard scor-
ing drive to make it 21-14,
the key play coming when
Knowshon Moreno ran for 5
yards on fourth-and-2 from
the Washington 22.
Then, after the de-
fense forced a punt, it was
Manning picking and pok-
ing again, moving Denver
83 yards in 16 plays for the
tying score, a 1-yard pass
to Joel Dreessen on the first
play of the fourth quarter.

LIONS 31, COWBOYS 30
DETROIT Matthew Staf-
ford's 1-yard lunge over a pile
of linemen with 12 seconds
left and Calvin Johnson's 329
yards receiving lifted the De-
troit Lions to a 31-30 come-
back win over the Dallas
Cowboys on Sunday.
Stafford threw a 22-yard
pass to Johnson, who had
the second-most yards re-
ceiving in NFL history, to


JACK DEMPSEY/AP
Denver Broncos wide receiver Demaryius Thomas (88) celebrates with guard Zane Beadles (68) after scorning a
touchdown against the Washington Redskins in the fourth quarter of an NFL football game, Sunday, in Denver.


set up his winning score.
The quarterback seemed to
catch his hometown Cow-
boys by surprise some of
them appeared to expect
him to spike the ball.
Johnson's total trails only
the 336 yards receiving Flip-
per Anderson had for the Los
Angeles Rams against New
Orleans on Nov. 26, 1989, in a
game that went into overtime.

CHIEFS 23, BROWNS 17
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Alex
Smith threw for 225 yards
and two touchdowns, and
the Kansas City Chiefs held
off the scrappy Cleveland
Browns late in the fourth
quarter to preserve a victo-
ry and remain the NFL's lone
undefeated team.
The Chiefs (8-0), off to
their best start since 2003,
built a 20-7 lead late in the
first half before the Browns
(3-4) made it a game.
Jason Campbell, start-
ing in place of the ineffec-
tive Brandon Weeden, threw
for 293 yards and two touch-
downs for the Browns.
The Chiefs kept stopping
the Browns down the stretch.
They forced a turnover on
downs with just over 2 min-
utes left, and Ryan Succop
kicked his third field goal in
the closing seconds to help
seal the victory

SAINTS 35, BILLS 17


NEW ORLEANS Drew
Brees passed for five touch-
downs and 332 yards, and
the New Orleans Saints
pulled away for a victory
over the Buffalo Bills.
Saints tight end Jimmy
Graham played after miss-
ing practice most of the
week with a left foot injury
and scored on 13- and 15-
yard passes over the middle,
powering through tackles at
the goal line both times.
Rookie Kenny Stills had
touchdowns of 69 and 42
yards for the Saints (6-1) and
Lance Moore snagged a 15-
yard scoring pass in his re-
turn from a hand injury that
sidelined him three games.

PATRIOTS 27, DOLPHINS 17
FOXBOROUGH, Mass. -
The New England Patriots
shook off a dismal first half
and another mediocre per-
formance by Tom Brady to
beat the Miami Dolphins.
Trailing 17-3 after gain-
ing just 59 yards in the half,
the Patriots quickly turned
the game around in the third
quarter with two touch-
downs in a span of seven
plays.
The Patriots (6-2) out-
scored the Dolphins (3-4) in
the third quarter 17-0. Mi-
ami lost its fourth straight
game.
Brady completed 13 of 22
passes for just 116 yards, but


threw a 14-yard touchdown
pass to Aaron Dobson with
6:32 gone in the third quar-
ter that began the comeback.

GIANTS 15, BENGALS 7
PHILADELPHIA Josh
Brown kicked a career-high
five field goals, Eli Manning
played error-free and the
New York Giants beat the
Philadelphia Eagles.
Michael Vick returned for
the Eagles (3-5) after missing
21/2 games with a hamstring
injury, but clearly wasn't
healthy and was removed for
rookie Matt Barkley late in
the second quarter.
The Giants (2-6) snapped
an eight-game road losing
streak while extending Phila-
delphia's home losing streak
to 10 games. The Eagles' last
win at the Linc was over the
Giants on Sept. 30, 2012.
Chip Kelly's high-flying of-
fense that racked up at least
425 yards in each of the first
six games has been ground-
ed. The Eagles followed a
17-3 loss to Dallas with an-
other poor offensive effort.
They had just 201 yards of
offense and have totaled 479
the past two weeks.

BENGALS 49, JETS 9
CINCINNATI Andy Dal-
ton threw a career-high five
touchdown passes, four of
them to Marvin Jones.
Jones set a Bengals record


for touchdown receptions,
scoring on catches of 9, 6,17
and 6 yards.
Dalton's five touchdown
passes gave him 11 in his last
three games, his best such
span. He's the first quarter-
back to throw for five TDs
against the Jets since Dan
Marino in 1988.
The Bengals (6-2) won
their fourth in a row and
padded their AFC North
lead.
New York (4-4) took its
most lopsided loss since
2010. Rookie quarterback
Geno Smith threw two inter-
ceptions that were returned
for touchdowns.

RAIDERS 21, STEELERS 18

OAKLAND, Calif Ter-
relle Pryor ran 93 yards on
the first play from scrim-
mage for the longest touch-
down run by a quarterback,
and the Raiders won follow-
ing a bye week for the first
time since 2002.
Darren McFadden added
two touchdown runs and the
defense did the rest for the
Raiders (3-4), who had been
outscored by more than 13
points a game in losing their
last 10 games out of the bye.

CARDINALS 27, FALCONS 13

GLENDALE, Ariz. Rook-
ie Andre Ellington rushed for
154 yards on 15 carries, in-
cluding an 80-yard touch-
down run, and the Cardinals
intercepted Matt Ryan four
times.
Ellington's big run, tied
for third longest in Cardi-
nals history, was part of a
21-point second quarter
that put the Cardinals (4-4)
in control for good.
Arizona's Larry Fitzger-
ald caught four passes for
48 yards and a touchdown,
in the process becoming
the youngest player at 30
years, 57 days in NFL his-
tory to reach 800 career re-
ceptions.
Ryan had thrown three in-
terceptions total in the first
six games of the season for
the Falcons (2-5). Rashad
Johnson had two of Arizona's
interceptions.
The Cardinals picked off
Ryan five times when the
teams played last season.


Patriots 27, Dolphins 17
Miami 7 10 0 0 17
New England 0 3 17 7 27
First Quarter
Mia-Gibson 4 pass from Tannehill (Sturgis kick),
6:32.
Second Quarter
Mia-Dan.Thomas 5 pass from Tannehill (Sturgis
kick), 9:55.
NE-FG Gostkowski 34,3:43.
Mia-FG Sturgis 52, :30.
Third Quarter
NE-Dobson 14 pass from Brady (Gostkowski
kick), 8:28.
NE-Bolden 2 run (Gostkowski kick), 6:42.
NE-FG Gostkowski 48, :08.
Fourth Quarter
NE-Ridley 3 run (Gostkowski kick), 7:14.
A-68,756.
Mia NE
First downs 23 19
Total Net Yards 301 252
Rushes-yards 31-156 37-152
Passing 145 100
Punt Returns 3-28 3-13
Kickoff Returns 3-52 2-46
Interceptions Ret. 1-2 2-2
Comp-Att-Int 2242-2 13-22-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 6-47 3-16
Punts 440.3 5-43.4
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 0-0
Penaltes-Yards 7-61 5-35
Time of Possession 34:59 25:01
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Miami, Miller 18-89, Dan.Thomas 947,
Tannehill 1-12, Wallace 1-8, Clay 1-1, Thigpen 1-(mi-
nus 1). New England, Ridley 14-79, Blount 11-46,
Bolden 8-22, Brady 4-5.
PASSING-Miami, Tannehill 2242-2-192. New Eng-
land, Brady 13-22-1-116.
RECEIVING-Miami, Clay 5-37, Hartline 4-37, Wal-
lace 341, Matthews 3-30, Miller 3-23, Egnew 1-11,
Dan.Thomas 1-5, Gibson 14, Sims 14. New Eng-
land, Dobson 4-60, Amendola 3-15, Gronkowski
2-27, Bolden 2-7, Edelman 2-7.
MISSED HELD GOALS-Miami, Sturgis 46 (WR),
39 (BK).
Chiefs 23, Browns 17
Cleveland 0 10 7 0 17
Kansas City 6 14 0 3 23
First Quarter
KC-FG Succop 42,11:22.
KC-FG Succop 35, 4:46.
Second Quarter
KC-Sherman 12 pass from A.Smith (Succop kick),
10:26.
Cle-Gordon 39 pass from Campbell (Cundiff
kick), 2:44.
KC-McCluster 28 pass from A.Smith (Succop
kick), 1:11.
Cle-FG Cundiff 44, :10.
Third Quarter
Cle-Whittaker 17 pass from Campbell (Cundiff
kick), 9:58.
Fourth Quarter
KC-FG Succop 40, :17.
A-74,307.
Cle KC
First downs 13 20
Total Net Yards 340 331
Rushes-yards 15-57 29-136
Passing 283 195
Punt Returns 4-19 5-38
Kickoff Returns 3-76 2-52
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0
Comp-Att-lnt 22-36-0 24-36-0


Sacked-Yards Lost 1-10 6-30
Punts 6-46.7 5-48.0
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 1-0
Penaltes-Yards 9-70 5-31
Time of Possession 23:55 36:05
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Cleveland, McGahee 9-28, Campbell
3-17, Ogbonnaya 3-12. Kansas City, Charles 18-74,
A.Smith 6-40, Davis 3-13, McCluster 1-5, Avery 1-4.
PASSING-Cleveland, Campbell 22-36-0-293. Kan-
sas City, A.Smith 24-36-0-225.
RECEIVING-Cleveland, Gordon 5-132, Cameron
4-81, Bess 3-27, Ogbonnaya 3-15, Whittaker 2-22,
McGahee 2-0, Little 1-8, Gray 1-5, Barnidge 1-3.
Kansas City, McCluster 7-67, Charles 546, Avery
3-31, Sherman 3-23, McGrath 2-25, Fasano 2-14,
Davis 1-12, Bowe 1-7.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-Kansas City, Succop 52
(WL).
Saints 35, Bills 17
Buffalo 0 10 0 7 17
New Orleans 7 14 7 7 35
First Quarter
NO-Moore 15 pass from Brees (Hartley kick), 4:44.
Second Quarter
Buf-Johnson 13 pass from Lewis (Carpenter kick),
10:44.
Buf-FG Carpenter 37,4:35.
NO-StIlls 69 pass from Brees (Hartley kick), 3:43.
NO-Graham 15 pass from Brees (Hartley kick), :30.
Third Quarter
NO-Graham 13 pass from Brees (Hartley kick),
5:15.
Fourth Quarter
Buf-Jackson 1 run (Carpenter kick), 14:20.
NO-StIlls 42 pass from Brees (Hartley kick), 7:34.
A-72,405.
Buf NO
First downs 20 21
Total Net Yards 299 386
Rushes-yards 25-88 26-77
Passing 211 309
Punt Returns 14 1-0
Kickoff Returns 0-0 2-51
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-12
Comp-Att-lnt 22-39-1 26-34-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 4-23 4-23
Punts 3-45.7 4-46.8
Fumbles-Lost 4-2 0-0
Penaltes-Yards 6-45 8-59
Time of Possession 27:30 32:30
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Buffalo, Jackson 1545, Choice 7-35,
Lewis 2-5, Summers 1-3. New Orleans, Thomas 14-
65, K.Robinson 7-9, StIlls 1-4, Brees 4-(minus 1).
PASSING-Buffalo, Lewis 22-39-1-234. New Orleans,
Brees 26-34-0-332.
RECEIVING-Buffalo, Chandler 7-72, Johnson 7-72,
Goodwin 3-56, Graham 2-19, Jackson 2-8, Woods
1-7. New Orleans, Sproles 4-0, StIlls 3-129, Wat
son 345, Graham 3-37, Moore 3-34, Thomas 3-29,
Colston 3-18, Hill 2-17, Meachem 1-15, Collins 1-8.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-Buffalo, Carpenter 50 (WR).
New Orleans, Hartley 47 (WL), 38 (WL).
Giants 15, Eagles 7
N.Y. Giants 6 6 0 3 15
Philadelphia 0 0 0 7 7
First Quarter
NYG-FG J.Brown 40, 7:30.
NYG-FG J.Brown 44, 2:59.
Second Quarter
NYG-FG J.Brown 33,10:22.
NYG-FG J.Brown 46, 2:24.
Fourth Quarter
NYG-FG J.Brown 27,12:23.
Phi-Goode 2 fumble return (Henery kick), 4:11.


A-69,144.
NYG Phi
First downs 16 15
Total Net Yards 325 201
Rushes-yards 31-88 1948
Passing 237 153
Punt Returns 2-9 1-16
Kickoff Returns 14 2-56
Interceptions Ret. 2-1 0-0
Comp-Att-lnt 25-39-0 23-35-2
Sacked-Yards Lost 1-9 4-36
Punts 543.8 644.3
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 5-1
Penalties-Yards 11-92 448
Time of Possession 38:05 21:55
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-N.Y Giants, Hillis 20-70, Cox 9-19,
Weatherford 1-0, Manning 1-(minus 1). Philadelphia,
McCoy 1548, Vick 1-1, Brown 3-(minus 1).
PASSING-N.Y Giants, Manning 25-39-0-246. Phila-
delphia, Barkley 17-26-1-158, Vick 6-9-1-31.
RECEIVING-N.Y Giants, Cruz 7-86, Nicks 7-51, My-
ers 3-42, Jernigan 3-29, Hillis 3-15, Conner 1-12,
Cox 1-11. Philadelphia, Jackson 8-63, McCoy 4-18,
Avant 3-54, Celek 2-17, Cooper 2-13, Casey 1-11,
D.Johnson 1-6, Ertz 1-5, Brown 1-2.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.
49ers 42, Jaguars 10
San Francisco 14 14 7 7 42
Jacksonville 0 3 7 0 10
First Quarter
SF-Gore 19 run (Dawson kick), 11:42.
SF-Kaepernick 12 run (Dawson kick), 2:36.
Second Quarter
SF-V.Davis 2 pass from Kaepernick (Dawson
kick), 11:52.
SF-Kaepernick 9 run (Dawson kick), 7:49.
Jax-FG Scobee 38, :10.
Third Quarter
Jax-Brown 29 pass from Henne (Scobee kick),
3:00.
SF-Gore 2 run (Dawson kick), :52.
Fourth Quarter
SF-Skuta 47 fumble return (Dawson kick), 13:24.
A-83,559.
SF Jax
First downs 25 20
Total Net Yards 398 318
Rushes-yards 38-221 25-90
Passing 177 228
Punt Returns 24 1-16
Kickoff Returns 3-73 7-136
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0
Comp-Att-lnt 11-17-0 29-45-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 0-0 0-0
Punts 1-61.0 444.5
Fumbles-Lost 3-1 1-1
Penalties-Yards 4-35 6-76
Time of Possession 28:29 31:31
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-San Francisco, Hunter 9-84, Gore 19-71,
Kaepernick 7-54, K.Williams 1-10, Dixon 1-2, Miller
1-0. Jacksonville, Jones-Drew 19-75, Robinson
4-15, Henne 1-1, J.Blackmon 1-(minus 1).
PASSING-San Francisco, Kaepernick 10-16-0-164,
McCoy 1-1-0-13. Jacksonville, Henne 2945-0-228.
RECEIVING-San Francisco, Boldin 4-56, V.Davis
3-52, Miller 2-56, K.Williams 1-7, Gore 1-6. Jackson-
ville, Shorts 1III 7-74, Jones-Drew 647, J.Blackmon
4-31, Brown 343, Forsett 3-6, Ta'ufo'ou 3-3, Sand-
ers 1-11, Harbor 1-7, Lewis 1-6.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.
Lions 31, Cowboys 30
Dallas 0 10 3 17 30
Detroit 7 0 0 24 31
First Quarter


Det-Johnson 2 pass from Stafford (Akers kick), :54.
Second Quarter
Dal-FG Bailey 53,5:39.
Dal-Bryant 5 pass from Romo (Bailey kick), :46.
Third Quarter
Dal-FG Bailey 53,3:02.
Fourth Quarter
Det-FG Akers 20,13:13.
Dal-Williams 60 pass from Romo (Bailey kick),
11:32.
Det-Bell 1 run (Akers kick), 7:38.
Dal-Bryant 50 pass from Romo (Bailey kick), 6:45.
Det-Bush i1 run (Akers kick), 3:33.
Dal-FG Bailey 44,1:02.
Det-Stafford 1 run (Akers kick), :12.
A-64,379.


First downs
Total Net Yards
Rushes-yards
Passing
Punt Returns
Kickoff Returns
Interceptions Ret.
Comp-Att-Int
Sacked-Yards Lost
Punts
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


Dal Det
13 29
268 623
26-62 29-143
206 480
2-25 1-4
4-126 1-44
2-89 0-0
14-30-0 3348-2
0-0 1-8
7-44.7 4-50.8
1-0 2-2
2-31 8-61
24:49 35:11


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Dallas, Randle 14-26, Dunbar 5-16, Tan-
ner 2-8, Romo 3-6, Williams 1-5, Bryant 1-1. Detroit,
Bush 21-92, Bell 4-32, Stafford 3-12, Riddick 1-7.
PASSING-Dallas, Romo 14-30-0-206. Detroit, Staf-
ford 3348-2488.
RECEIVING-Dallas, Bryant 3-72, Randle 3-18, Wil-
liams 2-64, Witten 2-15, Hanna 2-12, Tanner 1-17,
Beasley 1-8. Detroit, Johnson 14-329, Bush 8-30,
Durham 4-54, Pettigrew 3-31, Bell 1-22, Broyles
1-8, Riddick 1-7, Ross 1-7.
MISSED HELD GOALS-None.
Bengals 49, Jets 9
N.Y.Jets 0 6 3 0 9
Cincinnati 14 14 14 7 49
First Quarter
Cin-M.Jones 9 pass from Dalton (Nugent kick),
9:59.
Cin-Gresham 4 pass from Dalton (Nugent kick),
4:21.
Second Quarter
NYJ-FG Folk 45, 9:09.
Cin-M.Jones 6 pass from Dalton (Nugent kick),
6:13.
NYJ-FG Folk 47,1:08.
Cin-M.Jones 14 pass from Dalton (Nugent kick),
:16.
Third Quarter
Cin-Crocker 32 interception return (Nugent kick),
14:45.
NYJ-FG Folk 50, 4:49.
Cin-M.Jones 6 pass from Dalton (Nugent kick),
1:13.
Fourth Quarter
Cin-A.Jones 60 interception return (Nugent kick),
13:09.
A-62,576.
NYJ Cin
First downs 15 20
Total Net Yards 240 402
Rushes-yards 24-93 25-79
Passing 147 323
Punt Returns 2-10 4-20
Kickoff Returns 6-139 4-133
Interceptions Ret. 1-6 2-92
Comp-Att-lnt 23-37-2 19-30-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 4-29 1-2


Punts 54
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards -
Time of Possession 33
INDIVIDUAL STATI
RUSHING-N.Y Jets, Simms 3-35
Powell 10-19, Ivory 6-11, Smith
Green-Ellis 11-33, Bernard 5-18
Peerman 6-11.
PASSING-N.Y Jets, Smith 20-3C
0-17. Cincinnat, Dalton 19-30-1
RECEIVING-N.Y Jets, Nelson 8-8
4-20, Kerley 3-27, Sudfeld 2-10,
Green 1-7. Cincinnati, M.Jones 8
Eifert 2-23, Sanzenbacher 2-18,
Sanu 1-24, Bernard 1-9.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.
Cardinals 27, Fal
Atlanta 3 3 0
Arizona 0 21 3
First Quarte
AtI-FG Bryant 24, 3:23.
Second Quart
Ari-Fitzgerald 10 pass from Pamir
14:55.
AtI-FG Bryant 30, 7:38.
Ari-Ellington 80 run (Feely kick),
Ari-Royd 15 pass from Palmer (
Third Quarte
Ari-FG Feely 39, 7:07.
Fourth Quarte
Ari-FG Feely 38, 8:40.
Atl-Dr.Davis 4 pass from Ryan (B
A-60,671.


First downs
Total Net Yards
Rushes-yards
Passing
Punt Returns
Kickoff Returns
Interceptions Ret.
Comp-Att-Int
Sacked-Yards Lost
Punts
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


2
14



34-6
4
44
10
34


INDIVIDUAL STATI
RUSHING-Atlanta, Ryan 1-13, Ro
son 11-6. Arizona, Ellington 15-1
Palmer 1-9.
PASSING-Atlanta, Ryan 34-614-
Palmer 13-18-1-172.
RECEIVING-Atlanta, Douglas 12
D.Johnson 440, Gonzalez 3-26,
3-6, DiMarco 2-13, Rodgers 2-11
aid 448, Floyd 3-30, Ellington 2
Housler 1-14, Peterson 1-13, Re
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.
Raiders 21, Stee
Pittsburgh 0 3 0
Oakland 14 7 0
First Quarte
Oak-Pryor 93 run (Janikowski ki
Oak-McFadden 7 run (Janikowsk
Second Quart
Pit-FG Suisham 47,14:14.
Oak-McFadden 4 run (Janikowsk
Fourth Quarti
Pit-Sanders 9 pass from RoethI
kick), 12:11.
Pit-Bell 2 run (Sanders run), 1:2
A-52,950.
First downs


49.6 3-53.7 Total Net Yards 276 279
0-0 2-0 Rushes-yards 1935 38-197
4-69 445 Passing 241 82
3:17 26:43 Punt Returns 447 1-14
STICS Kickoff Returns 1-25 346
5, Green 3-20, Interceptions Ret. 2-20 2-1
2-8. Cincinnati, Comp-Att-lnt 2945-2 10-19-2
J.Johnson 3-17, Sacked-Yards Lost 5-34 2-6
Punts 742.7 846.5
0-2-159, Simms 3-7- Fumbles-Lost 0-0 2-1
1-325. Penalties-Yards 3-12 6-39
80, Hill 4-23, Powell Time of Possession 29:59 30:01
Cumberland 1-9, INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
8-122, Green 3-115, RUSHING-Pittsburgh, Bell 13-24, Dwyer 3-9,
Gresham 2-14, A.Brown 1-2, Roethlisberger 1-1, FJones 1-(minus
1). Oakland, Pryor 9-106, McFadden 24-73, Reece
3-10, Jennings 2-8.
cons 13 PASSING-Pittsburgh, Roethlisberger 2945-2-275.
7 13 Oakland, Pryor 10-19-2-88.
3 27 RECEIVING-Pittsburgh, A.Brown 9-82, Sanders
7-88, Bell 5-27, Cotchery 3-39, Miller 3-19, FJones
2-20. Oakland, Streater 445, D.Moore 2-32, McFad-
den 2-5, Mastrud 1-9, Ford 1-(minus 3).
ter MISSED FELD GOALS-Pittsburgh, Suisham 34
ner (Feely kick), (WR), 32 (WR).
Broncos 45, Redskins 21
7:25. Washington 0 7 14 0 21
Feely kick), 1:55. Denver 7 0 7 31 45
First Quarter
Den-Welker 6 pass from Manning (Prater kick),
e 10:02.
Second Quarter
Bryant kick), 4:38. Was-Hankerson 7 pass from Griffin III (Forbath
kick), :19.
Atl Ari Third Quarter
20 17 Was-Morris 1 run (Forbath kick), 11:34.
292 348 Was-Hall 26 intercepton return (Forbath kick),
4-27 30-201 11:25.
265 147 Den-Ball 4 run (Prater kick), 7:48.
2-27 2-(4) Fourth Quarter
2-54 0-0 Den-Dreessen 1 pass from Manning (Prater kick),
1-1 444 14:56.
614 13-18-1 Den-Moreno 35 pass from Manning (Prater kick),
4-36 3-25 14:19.
45.8 5-46.4 Den-FG Prater 19,11:14.
0-0 1-0 Den-D.Thomas 35 pass from Manning (Prater
0-55 8-52 kick), 6:35.
4:19 25:41 Den-Rodgers-Cromarte 75 intercepton return
STICS (Prater kick), 2:07.
dodgers 2-8, Jack- A-77,031.
154, Taylor 14-38, Was Den
First downs 22 29
301. Arizona, Total Net Yards 266 446
Rushes-yards 28-112 34-107
-121, Dr.Davis 5-77, Passing 154 339
Jackson 3-7, Toilolo Punt Returns 2-36 1-10
1. Arizona, Fitzger- Kickoff Returns 0-0 1-30
-8, TWilliams 1-51, Interceptions Ret. 342 4-97
oberts 1-8. Comp-Att-Int 20-394 30-44-3
Sacked-Yards Lost 3-26 2-15
lers 18 Punts 7-39.1 349.0
Fumbles-Lost 3-1 1-1
15 18 Penalties-Yards 1-5 6-57
0 21 Time of Possession 28:00 32:00
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
ck), 14:41. RUSHING-Washington, Morris 17-93, Helu Jr. 5-11,
ki kick), 7:28. Griffin III 5-7, Cousins 1-1. Denver, Moreno 14-44,
er Ball 11-37, Anderson 4-22, Holliday 1-7, Manning
4-(minus 3).
ki kick), 1:55. PASSING-Washington, Griffin III 15-30-2-132, Cous-
er ins 5-9-248. Denver, Manning 3044-3-354.
isberger (Suisham RECEIVING-Washington, Reed 8-90, Garcon 746,
Moss 2-20, Helu Jr. 1-14, Hankerson 1-7, Morgan
24. 1-3. Denver, D.Thomas 7-75, Moreno 6-89, Welker
6-81, Decker 442, J.Thomas 3-29, Dreessen 2-9,
Pit Oak Tamme 1-15, Caldwell 1-14.
20 13 MISSED HELD GOALS-None.




Monday, October 28, 2013


NBA seems heavy at top


TIM REYNOLDS
AP Basketball Writer
MIAMI The NBA
this season figures to
be especially crowd-
ed at the top, with a
number of teams in the
championship mix.
There will be an even
bigger crowd at the bot-
tom of the league.
Even in an era where
salary caps and luxury
taxes are helping small-
market teams, the di-
vide between the haves
and the have-nots in the
NBA seems particularly
copious this season.
Few would argue
that Miami, Chicago,
Brooklyn, Indiana, San
Antonio, Oklahoma
City, Houston, Mem-
phis and the Los Ange-
les Clippers are all le-
gitimate contenders to
finish this season hoist-
ing the trophy named
for Larry O'Brien next
June.
And cases could also
be made that just about
every other club might
have a chance to draft
Andrew Wiggins a few
days later.
"It's the first time I've
ever been in the league,
14 years, where if you
fast-forwarded to July
and said one of nine
teams won the cham-
pionship, I wouldn't be
surprised," Memphis
guard Mike Miller said.
"That doesn't happen
very often. That's what
makes the league excit-
ing this year. Obviously,
the favorite is Miami.
But if you did fast-for-
ward it, barring inju-
ries or anything like
that, there's eight or
nine teams that have a
chance."
As for everyone else,


BILL HABER/AP
Miami Heat shooting guard Dwyane Wade (3) drives to the bas-
ket in the second half of a preseason NBA basketball game
against the New Orleans Pelicans on Wednesday in New Or-
leans. The Heat defeated the Pelicans 108-95.


the future might not
necessarily be now.
Philadelphia, Orlan-
do, Boston, Charlotte,
Phoenix, Utah and Sac-
ramento look to be
in rebuilding modes,
mostly around young
cores with plenty of po-
tential. The New York
Knicks look like a play-


off team, though per-
haps a step below the
clear top four in the
East. So that would fig-
ure to leave Milwau-
kee, Atlanta, Cleve-
land, Detroit, Toronto
and Washington as the
six most logical candi-
dates for the final three
East playoff spots.


CASON & GASKINS TV
C RadioShack. Dealer Established 1951
748-2021 CasonGaskinsTV.com
SWildwood Mon-Fri 8am-5:30, Sat 8am-4pm .


i,

4}


THERMOCOOL
AIR CONDITIONING & HEATING


A WIN, WIN
SITUATION!





7AM TO 7PM
7 DAYS A WEEK!


Factory trained technical
service advisors
Fast, same day service-fully
stocked trucks
Next day installation on
system replacements
FREE 2nd opinion on any
repair
We service all makes &
S Emodels
FREE detailed, written


201 W Miller St, Fruitland Park, FL 34731 estimates on system
352-326-5530 replacements
www.ThermoCoolAir.com
-- ---- --- ----- --------- .---
RquI air 785 New Bryanl 3 Ton New Bryant 3 Ton. MobileI
You Save M1.208 1Ali Condilioning System IHome, Heal Pump Package
Now s3,777 Just s2,977 IUnil Installed
Just s3,577

3 ori-AC Heal Pump Installel' I
10 Year Warranty! 10 Year Warranty! 10 Year Warranty!
OflrlpisO oter31s213 aOffer expires Oclober 31sA 2013 1 OfferwxpirsmOctober 31st,2013
1I ----- --p -- -+ --- -- -
iA


S27-Step Precision II
A/C System Tune-Up
~& Professional Cleaning
1 '1s57.77
S50 discounUcrediw W I ,
t oward any of our I
I services. P ,, ..., I *.th approved credit I
._ __'-._ ...-_ -._ ,_ .......................... .
HALLMARK OF MY CUSTOMER COMMITMENT
My Promise: 100% Satisfaction, Unconditional Money Back Guarantee!
I Call it My One Year Test Drive.
If you are not completely satisfied for any reason, simply contact me within one year of your purchase date and I will remove
the system you purchased al my expense. You will then receive a prompt refund of the products purchase price This promise is
:n wring and is good toward any service I offer, including repairs and system replacements You are either absolutely delighted
My name is Michael Raffensberger and I took forwardS to offering you exceptional service for years to come
'4^-- ---- --
A 1ll m IIile W idnn arI al P 1 v ip i'o 'Wiwix w si M i1rinq rnnl rfaii II1M dd n urnwa d 'lih I In "x i IT,' i 1ai 1 l ,al oil, l mn P 1,,l Ia o ., U "' rn,,e- av.U-,T.'g elr in ,lTn Ir iili
losing exlng g is rr~iE Offer.cannim ecrjii~inidi xc Py iDi 1 fimiraoiNi rCwain i navfi r v,** rinrr-i.KvoAli lWain.'nimi4 wni.-f mr., a-tai>m (mom'r einir 51 pl-ibi sID AI
I Servicing our Central Florida Customers for over 21 years.
S| | Llcrd, Bonded&Ir.,ured CACII"I B


A WORw-CLAsS MEDICAL TEAM


...right here at home _


Delivering premier medical care with compassion and
understanding has been the gold standard for almost 2 decades at
PREMIER MEDICAL ASSOCIATES & URGENT CARE. ., _


SWE OFFER THE FOLLOWING SERVICES:
CT Scans Nuclear Stress Test Echocardiograms @ Ultrasounds @ Holter Monitor Coumadin Clinic
Xrays @ Glucose Monotoring Polysomnography (Sleep Studies) Nerve Conduction Studies
Pulmonary Function Testing e Shingles Vaccine 9 Bone Densitometry Full Laboratory
IN-HOUSE PHARMACY FOR OUR PATIENTS LRMC & VRMC PRIVILEGES
We are providers for the following Medicare Plans:
Freedom, Optimum, Preferred Care Partners, PUP, United Health Care.
Most Other Insurances Accepted Including BCBS, UNH, PHP, Cigna, Medicare and other Medicare HMOs.
1 DISCOUNTS TO PATIENTS WITHOUT INSURANCE

COMPREHENSIVE MEDICAL CARE & MANAGEMENT OF:
Heart Disease Hypertension Diabetes Pulmonary Disease Arthritis Digestive Problems Geriatric Care @ Allergies
Kidney Disease Stroke Management Joint & Heel Injections Minor Surgeries Skin Biopsies Skin Cancer Screening
Men's Health Vascular Disease Erectile Dysfunction e Sleep Apnea @ Women's Gynecological Screening


PREMIER
MEDICAL ASSOCIATES
AND

PREMIER URGENT CARE
URGENT CARE OPEN 365 DAYS!


THE VILLAGES OCALA
352-259-2159

LEESBURG
352-728-3939


S ONES N LCAIOS

1580 Santa Barbara Blvd., The Villages Urgent Care Center
910 Old Camp Rd., Suite 196, The Villages
1004 N. 14th St., Leesburg (Next to Wolfy's & McDonalds) Urgent Care Center
2403 SE 17th St., Suite 101, Ocala
411 N. West Street, Bushnell


vvw maphs iia s Swwpmnoid.com


DAILY COMMERCIAL





DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, October 28, 2013


Fernandez-Castrano wins BMW Masters


DOUG FERGUSON
AP Golf Writer

SHANGHAI-
Gonzalo Fernandez-
Castano called it the
perfect win, even
though his final hole
Sunday to win the
BMW Masters was
anything but perfect.
Fernandez-Castano
chipped in from across
the green for birdie on
the tough 17th hole at
Lake Malaren to build
a three-shot lead.
Then, he let mem-
ories of Jean Van de
Velde's collapse creep
into his head, and only
when the 33-year-
old Spaniard holed a
2-foot putt for double
bogey did he exhale.
"I made it a little


more complicated,"
Fernandez-Castano
said.
He still closed with
a 4-under 68 for a
one-shot win over
Francesco Molinari
(64) and Thongchai
Jaidee (66). Luke
Guthrie, the 23-year-
old American play-
ing in Asia for the first
time, didn't make a
birdie until the 13th
hole and closed with
a 71 to finish alone
in fourth, two shots
behind.
Fernandez-Castano
gave Spain its first
European Tour win
this year, extending
the streak to 20 years
of at least one Spanish
victory.
But this was more


NEWMENUS

NICKER'S
LUNCH DAILY 1 1AM 4PM

DINNER THURSDAY & FRIDAY 5PM 9PM
&


LA HACIENDA
DAILY LUNCH BUFFET 1AM 1:30PM




mssoin
R F 0 T C U

Reseratios Acepte


for him than country.
The victory gets
Fernandez-Castano
into the HSBC
Champions next week
in Shanghai, criti-
cal for him to stay in
the hunt for the Race
to Dubai. He moved
up from No. 35 to No.
4 in the standings,
and the World Golf
Championship offers
$8.5 million in prize
money.
He won 851,346
euros at the BMW
Masters, putting him
well ahead on the
European Points por-
tion of the Ryder Cup
standings.
It also puts him
into the top 50 in the
world, which is criti-
cal for the Spaniard as
he embarks on his first
full season on the PGA
Tour. He will get in at
least two WGCs, and
staying in the top 50
would get him into the
majors. Fernandez-
Castano is moving his
family to Miami in
December.
"Just at the perfect
time," he said. "There's
never a bad time for a
victory, let's put it that
way. But this has been
just the perfect one."
Lake Malaren was
set up for low scor-
ing, with only a mild
wind and several
tees moved forward.
Defending champion
Peter Hanson had the
low round of the tour-
nament, making bogey
on the last hole and
still posting a 63.
Molinari played
the final six holes in
6 under, including an


Spain's Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano poses with his trophy at the
award ceremony of the BMW Masterson Sunday in Shanghai,


China.
eagle on the 13th hole,
and he was tied for the
lead at one point.
Everyone seemed to
take advantage except
the last two groups, set-
ting up endless pos-
sibilities. Fernandez-
Castano started to seize
control with a wedge
into 3 feet for birdie on
the par-5 seventh, and
another wedge to short
range for birdie on the
next hole.
That gave him a
two-shot lead, and he
kept his distance from
Guthrie by matching
the American's birdies
on the two par 5s on
the back. The chip-in
for birdie on the 17th,
a hole that Hanson de-
scribed as the tough-
est in the final round,
sealed the victory.
At least that's how it
looked.
Fernandez-Castano
felt a little too com-
fortable, deciding to
play it so conservative-
ly down the 18th hole
that it nearly cost him.
His tee shot cleared
the water and went
into a bunker, and he
blasted out some 30
yards to avoid a bad
shot that might hit the
lip. That left him 168
yards for his third shot,
and he aimed so far
away from water and
the flag that he wound
up in another bunker.
PETTERSEN HOLDS OFF
MUNOZ, WINS TAIWAN
YANGMEI, Taiwan -
Suzann Pettersen shot
a 3-under 69 Sunday
and held off a furious


rally from Azahara Mu-
noz to win her second
consecutive Taiwan
Sunrise LPGA champi-
onship.
Pettersen finished at
9-under 279, beating
Munoz by five shots.
The Spaniard had a fi-
nal-round 70.
Pettersen birdied
Nos. 13, 14 and 18 to
pull away after her bo-
gey on the par-5 No. 9
allowed Munoz to close
within one stroke.
Earlier, Munoz had
birdies on Nos. 4, 7
and 8, to continue
her strong run of play
from Saturday's round,
when her 3-under 69
put her in competition
for the first time. She
went on to birdie the
12th before bogeys on
Nos. 13 and 16 allowed
Pettersen to pull away.
Despite falling short,
Munoz expressed sat-
isfaction with her play.
"I was 4 under
through 12 holes, and
I was really playing re-
ally well," she said. "I
made two bogeys com-
ing in but I hit two real-
ly good shots and one
came up short and one
came up long, just mis-
judged the wind a little
bit but I played really
well."
By winning the $2
million Taiwan event,
Pettersen puts herself
in strong position to
challenge South Ko-
rea's Ingbee Park for
the overall 2013 LPGA
crown, with two tour-
naments remaining.
Park did not compete
in Taiwan.


Lady of the Lakes Renaissance Faire

Food Staff

November 1st 3rd 9am 4pm

Interview October 30th 10am
Under the Big Tent

Hickory Point, Tavares


Ask for Mike theLaks


PGA/Asian Tour-CIMB Classic Scores
Sunday
At Kuala Lumpur Golf & Country Club, West
Course
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Purse: $7 million
Yardage: 6,924; Par: 72
Final Round
(x-Playoff to be held Monday)
x-Ryan Moore 63-72-69-70 274
x-Gary Woodland 68-70-67-69 274
Kiradech Aphibarnrat 67-69-69-70 275
Chris Stroud 67-69-68-71 275
Aaron Baddeley 73-67-70-66 276
Jimmy Walker 74-68-67-68 277
Charles Howell III 69-72-69-68 278
Harris English 71-67-71-69 278
Graham DeLaet 72-67-68-71 278
Keegan Bradley 65-66-76-72 279
Billy Horschel 72-69-72-67 280
Sergio Garcia 66-71-71-72 280
Stewart Cink 70-68-69-73 280
K.J. Choi 68-71-70-72 281
Bryce Molder 73-69-67-72 281
Jeff Overton 73-67-72-70 282
Bill Haas 72-67-71-72 282
Shiv Kapur 69-70-71-72 282
Rickie Fowler 71-72-73-67 283
Kevin Stadler 71-69-73-70 283
Bo Van Pelt 72-77-69-65 283
Phil Mickelson 71-70-68-74 283
Kyle Stanley 73-67-68-75 283
Jerry Kelly 71-69-66-77 283
Siddikur Rahman 75-70-69-70 284
Brendan Steele 74-70-72-68 284
Kevin Chappell 73-71-72-68 284
Chris Kirk 67-71-72-74 284
Hideki Matsuyama 70-68-72-74 284
Jonas Blixt 72-70-68-74 284
Bubba Watson 78-69-65-73 285
Tim Clark 72-69-70-74 285
Boo Weekley 67-74-72-73 286
Gaganjeet Bhullar 72-70-71-73 286
Michael Thompson 75-71-68-73 287
Richard H. Lee 70-73-72-72 287
Roberto Castro 74-70-70-73 287
Nick Watney 75-69-70-73 287
Anirban Lahiri 74-70-75-68 287
Matt Jones 73-71-71-73 288
Nicholas Thompson 69-71-76-72 288
Patrick Reed 74-71-72-71 288
Scott Hend 74-72-71-71 288
Marc Leishman 72-65-77-75 289
Camilo Villegas 70-71-73-75 289
Prayad Marksaeng 74-71-71-73 289
Retief Goosen 72-74-69-75 290
Ernie Els 76-71-69-74 290
Berry Henson 74-71-72-73 290
Matt Every 72-77-68-73 290
Brian Gay 72-72-74-72 290
ScottStallings 73-70-78-69 290
John Huh 71-74-69-77 291
Charley Hoffman 69-72-74-76 291
Ryan Palmer 76-68-71-76 291
Brendon de Jonge 72-71-73-75 291
Rory Sabbatini 67-74-75-75 291
Kevin Streelman 72-73-71-75 291
Josh Teater 74-66-72-79 291
Daniel Summerhays 75-69-73-74 291
European Tour-BMW Masters Leading Scores
Sunday
At Lake Malaren Golf Club, The Masters Course
Shanghai
Purse: $7 million
Yardage: 7,607; Par: 72
Final, Leading Scores
Gonzalo Fdez-Castano 71-71-67-68 277
Thonchai Jaidee 70-70-72-66 278
Francesco Molinari 72-71-71-64 278
Luke Guthrie 65-71-72-71 279
Thomas Bjorn 73-72-69-66 280
Pablo Larrazabal 70-73-69-68 280
Peter Uihlein 69-75-69-67 280
Rafa Cabrera-Bello 73-68-67-73 281
Paul Casey 70-70-71-70 281
Peter Hanson 79-68-71-63 281
Scott Jamieson 72-68-71-70 281
Marcus Fraser 73-70-70-69 282
Gregory Bourdy 70-73-67-73 283
Martin Kaymer 75-71-70-67 283
lan Poulter 74-69-72-69 284
Brett Rumford 73-69-75-67 284
Also
Rory Mcllroy 71-72-71-73 287
Padraig Harrington 72-72-70-73 287
John Daly 68-74-78-73 293
Graeme McDowell 70-74-76-74 294
Miguel Angel Jimenez 74-75-75-73 297
LPGa-Taiwan Championship Scores
Sunday
At Sunrise Golf and Country Club Course
Yang Mei, Taiwan
Purse: $2 million
Yardage: 6,533; Par: 72
(a-amateur)
Final
Suzann Pettersen, $300,000 68-69-73-69-279
Azahara Munoz, $186,096 73-72-69-70-284
Caroline Hedwall, $135,000 71-73-72-70-286
Eun-Hee Ji, $104,433 72-76-69-70-287
Mina Harigae, $70,132 74-71-75-68-288
Irene Cho, $70,132 71-74-72-71-288
Se Ri Pak, $70,132 76-72-69-71-288
Mi Jung Hur, $45,680 75-71-72-71-289
Beatriz Recari, $45,680 72-71-73-73-289
Sun Young Yoo, $45,680 73-69-72-75-289
Moriya Jutanugarn, $30,986 76-75-72-68-291
Chella Choi, $30,986 72-72-76-71-291
Candie Kung, $30,986 73-73-74-71-291
Paula Creamer, $30,986 72-74-73-72-291
Anna Nordqvist, $30,986 77-71-71-72-291
Hee Kyung Seo, $30,986 74-70-74-73-291
Na Yeon Choi, $30,986 74-72-71-74-291
Carlota Ciganda, $30,986 72-70-72-77-291
Mika Miyazato, $23,841 75-75-70-72-292
Lexi Thompson, $23,841 74-74-70-74-292
Alison Walshe, $21,804 71-73-79-70-293
llhee Lee, $21,804 73-75-71-74-293
Pernilla Lindberg, $21,804 75-71-72-75-293
Michelle Wie, $19,817 74-77-72-71-294
Catriona Matthew, $19,817 75-72-74-73-294
Juli Inkster, $18,391 75-74-72-74-295
Katherine Hull-Kirk, $18,391 73-70-77-75-295
Hee-Won Han, $15,399 77-76-72-71-296
Haeji Kang, $15,399 77-73-73-73-296
Rebecca Lee-Bentham, $15,39973-78-71-74-296
Ai Miyazato, $15,399 74-76-72-74-296
Julieta Granada, $15,399 74-76-70-76-296
Gerina Piller, $15,399 74-74-72-76-296
Belen Mozo, $15,399 72-77-70-77-296
Jennifer Johnson, $12,023 75-75-74-73-297
Austin Ernst, $12,023 74-76-73-74-297
Jane Park, $12,023 75-75-72-75-297
Lindsey Wright, $12,023 75-74-73-75-297
Hee Young Park, $12,023 74-74-71-78-297
Yani Tseng, $9,985 76-78-72-72-298
Karine Icher, $9,985 71-79-73-75-298
Meena Lee, $9,985 74-77-72-75-298
Pornanong Phatlum, $9,985 74-73-73-78-298
Vicky Hurst, $8,660 74-79-72-74-299
Brittany Lang, $8,660 77-74-73-75-299
Paola Moreno, $8,660 75-77-71-76-299
Mariajo Uribe, $8,049 72-76-78-74-300
a-Asuka Kashiwabara 73-76-74-77-300
Sydnee Michaels, $7,590 78-79-74-70-301
Lisa McCloskey, $7,590 76-76-74-75-301
a-Supamas Sangchan 72-78-74-77-301
Sarah Jane Smith, $7,131 80-73-73-76-302
Ji Young Oh, $6,623 76-76-76-75-303
Danielle Kang, $6,623 75-75-77-76-303
Mo Martin, $6,623 75-75-76-77-303
Dewi Claire Schreefel, $6,623 78-73-75-77-303
Ryann O'Toole, $6,011 76-76-77-75-304
Thidapa Suwannapura, $6,011 77-77-72-78-304
Heather Bowie Young, $5,706 75-80-78-73-306
Jacqui Concolino, $5,222 80-78-76-74-308
Huei-Ju Shih, $5,222 76-75-81-76-308
Hsiu-Feng Tseng, $5,222 77-74-78-79-308
Kristy McPherson, $5,222 77-76-72-83-308
Ya Huei Lu, $4,687 80-78-78-73-309
Jee Young Lee $4,687 78-77-77-77-309
Christina Kim, $4,687 76-75-79-79-309
Jennifer Rosales, $4,687 77-77-74-81-309
Cindy LaCrosse, $4,687 76-74-75-84-309
Caroline Masson, $4,382 78-78-73-82-311


LSTV
LS.TV


LAKE SUMTER TELEVISION


In our October episode we'll
bring you the latest in medical
news and information including
stories on Breast Cancer Awareness,
the Importance of Screenings
nnrl n Fresh Fnre for Frill


For production inquiries or
programming comments contact us at
LakeSumferTV@gmail.com


O 0 YmterTVucom


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 28, 2013




Monday, October 28, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Marshall's 3 TDs lead Oregon past UCLA


Associated Press

EUGENE, Ore. By-
ron Marshall ran for
133 yards and three
touchdowns and Ore-
gon wore down UCLA's
stout defense.
Marcus Mariota
threw for 230 yards and
a score and De'Anthony
Thomas returned from
a three game absence
to run in another for
the Ducks (8-0, 5-0 Pac-
12).
The Bruins (5-2, 2-2)
went into halftime with
the score knotted at 14
but were shutout by the
Ducks in the second
half.
Brett Hundley com-
pleted 13 of 19 pass-
es for 64 yards and a
touchdown but also
threw two intercep-
tions, including one
early in the fourth
quarter that led to an
Oregon touchdown.
He also ran for 64 yards
and a score.
NO. 4 OHIO STATE 63,
PENN STATE 14
COLUMBUS, Ohio -
Braxton Miller passed
for three touchdowns
and ran for two and
Carlos Hyde rushed
for 147 yards and two
more scores to lead
Ohio State.
It was the most points
surrendered by Penn
State (4-3, 1-2 Big Ten)
and its worst beating in
114 years.


The Ohio State (8-0,
4-0) victory stretched
its nation's best win-
ning streak to 20 in a
row, two behind the
school mark which in-
cluded the 1968 na-
tional championship
season. That team was
recognized during the
opening half as the
Buckeyes streaked to a
42-7 lead.
NO. 20 SOUTH CAROLINA
27, NO. 5 MISSOURI 24,
20T
COLUMBIA, Mo. -
Connor Shaw came off
the bench in the sec-
ond half and threw for
201 yards and three
touchdowns and Elliott
Fry kicked the game-
winning field goal to
help No. 20 South Car-
olina stun No. 5 Mis-
souri 27-24 in two over-
times Saturday night.
After missing the first
half with a sprained
left knee, Shaw entered
the game in the third
quarter and helped the
Gamecocks score the
final 17 points of reg-
ulation. He then threw
a 15-yard touchdown
pass on fourth down
in the Gamecocks' first
overtime to match the
Tigers' Marcus Mur-
phy's 1-yard scamper.
Fry then kicked a
40-yarder before Mis-
souri's Andrew Baggett
missed a 24-yard at-
tempt off the left goal
post.


THOMAS BOYD /THE OREGONIAN
Oregon running back Byron Marshall (9) evades tackle and runs
for a touchdown against UCLA on Saturday in Eugene, Ore.


NO. 6 BAYLOR 59,
KANSAS 14
LAWRENCE, Kan. -
Bryce Petty threw for
430 yards and three
touchdowns in few-
er than three quar-
ters, Lache Seastrunk
ran for 109 yards and a
score and Baylor won
its school-record llth
straight.
The Bears (7-0, 4-0
Big 12) piled up 500
yards of offense in tak-
ing a 38-0 lead by half-
time, and then re-
laxed as coach Art
Briles pulled many of
his starters in the third
quarter.
The nation's highest-
scoring offense still fin-
ished with 743 yards,
and eight of its nine
scoring drives took
fewer than 2 minutes.
Four different Baylor
players had touchdown
runs Petty among


them -while Tevin Re-
ese hauled in two of his
three TD tosses.
NO. 8 STANFORD 20,
OREGON STATE 12
CORVALLIS, Ore. -
Tyler Gaffney ran for
three touchdowns and
Stanford held off Or-
egon State's fourth-
quarter comeback bid.
Gaffney ran 22 times
for 145 yards and
scored on runs of 4, 9
and 32 yards to high-
light a slow offensive
night for Stanford (7-1,
5-1 Pac-12). The Cardi-
nal totaled 276 yards on
offense, as quarterback
Kevin Hogan complet-
ed just 8 of 18 passes
for 88 yards.
Stanford held Oregon
State to 288 yards, well
off the Beavers' season
average of 515 yards.
OSU quarterback Sean
Mannion, the national
leader in yards passing


and touchdown pass-
es, was 41 of 57 for 271
yards and one touch-
down.
NO. 17 OKLAHOMA 38,
NO. 10 TEXAS TECH 30
NORMAN, Okla. -
Blake Bell threw for
249 yards and a pair
of touchdowns, and
Damien Williams add-
ed two more scores as
Oklahoma handed Tex-
as Tech its first loss.
Jalen Saunders add-
ed six catches for 153
yards receiving and
both of Bell's touch-
down passes for the
Sooners (7-1, 4-1 Big 12
Conference), who ral-
lied after falling behind
in the third quarter.
NO. 11 AUBURN 45, FAU
10
AUBURN, Ala. Jer-
emy Johnson threw two
long touchdown passes
to Sammie Coates after
replacing injured start-
er Nick Marshall and
Auburn overwhelmed
Florida Atlantic.
Johnson, a freshman,
threw a 36-yard scor-
ing pass to Coates on
his first snap after re-
placing Marshall, who
was taken to the locker
room with a shoulder
injury early in the sec-
ond quarter. Marshall
returned to the Au-
burn sideline, but not
the game, as Johnson
threw a 67-yard touch-
down pass to Coates


later in the quarter.
Auburn (7-1) avoid-
ed a letdown one week
after a 45-41 win over
then-No. 7 Texas A&M.
The Tigers had 628 to-
tal yards, including 440
in a lopsided first half.
NO. 13 LSU 48, FURMAN
16
BATON ROUGE,
La. Odell Beckham
Jr. caught six passes
for 204 yards and two
scores, Terrance Magee
added two second-half
touchdowns, and No.
13 LSU turned a tenu-
ous halftime lead into
a romp.
Jeremy Hill rushed
for 143 yards and two
touchdowns for LSU
(7-2), which led 20-16
at halftime before out-
scoring the Paladins (3-
5) 28-0 in the second
half.
NO. 15 FRESNO STATE
35, SAN DIEGO STATE
28, OT.
SAN DIEGO Mar-
teze Waller's 1-yard
touchdown run on
Fresno State's first pos-
session in overtime lift-
ed the 15th-ranked
Bulldogs to a 35-28
victory over San Di-
ego State on Saturday
night.
Fresno State held on
for the win when Quinn
Kaehler's fourth-down
pass to Dylan Denso
was knocked away by
Derron Smith.


LATE TOP 25 BOX SCORES


No. 2 OREGON 42, No. 12 UCLA 14
UCLA 7 7 0 0 14
Oregon 7 7 7 21 42
First Quarter
UCLA-Hundley 4 run (Fairbairn kick), 11:58.
Ore-D.Thomas 1 run (Maldonado kick), 7:58.
Second Quarter
Ore-Marshall 40 run (Wogan kick), 13:10.
UCLA-Duarte 11 pass from Hundley (Fairbairn
kick), 1:35.
Third Quarter
Ore-Marshall 11 run (Maldonado kick), 2:57.
Fourth Quarter
Ore-Addison 8 pass from Mariota (Wogan kick),
12:41.
Ore-Marshall 3 run (Maldonado kick), 8:47.
Ore-Tyner 2 run (Wogan kick), 2:25.
A-59,206.
UCLA Ore
First downs 15 30
Rushes-yards 52-219 53-325
Passing 64 230
Comp-Att-lnt 13-19-2 21-28-0
Return Yards 0 51
Punts-Avg. 7-37.0 3-28.0
Fumbles-Lost 3-0 3-2
Penalties-Yards 5-59 5-50
Time of Possession 32:10 27:50
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-UCLA, Perkins 22-93, Hundley 15-72,
Jones 12-58,
Manfro 1-1, Team 1-(minus 1), Fuller 1-(minus 4).
Oregon,
Marshall 19-133, Tyner 14-77, Hardrick 1-66,
D.Thomas 10-31,
Mariota 7-18, Addison 1-4, Greig 0-3, Team 1-(mi-
nus 7).
PASSING-UCLA, Hundley 13-19-2-64. Oregon, Mari-
ota 21-28-0-230.
RECEIVING-UCLA, Fuller 4-18, Evans 3-21, Payton
2-16, Duarte 2-10,
Mazzone 1-2, Ortz 1-(minus 3). Oregon, Huff 6-76,
Addison 6-66,
D.Thomas 3-17, Brown 2-21, Marshall 1-23, Lowe
1-13, Hawkins 1-7,
Tyner 1-7.
No. 4 OHIO ST. 63, PENN ST. 14
PennSt. 0 7 0 7 14
Ohio St. 14 28 14 7 63
First Quarter
OSU-Hyde 2 run (Basil kick), 12:43.
OSU-B.Miller 39 run (Basil kick), 1:10.
Second Quarter
OSU-B.Miller 6 run (Basil kick), 13:00.
OSU-Fields 3 pass from B.Miller (Basil kick), 8:24.
PSU-Felder 12 pass from Hackenberg (Ficken
kick), 4:12.
OSU-Hyde 39 run (Basil kick), 3:16.
OSU-Corey (Philly).Brown 25 pass from B.Miller
(Basil kick), :03.


Third Quarter
OSU-Wilson 26 pass from B.Miller (Basil kick),
8:52.
OSU-Guiton 2 run (Basil kick), 4:01.
Fourth Quarter
OSU-Guiton 11 run (Basil kick), 8:24.
PSU-A.Robinson 65 pass from Ferguson (Ficken
kick), 7:33.
A-105,889.
PSU OSU
First downs 20 32
Rushes-yards 40-120 51-408
Passing 237 278
Comp-Att-lnt 19-34-2 20-26-0
Return Yards 0 0
Punts-Avg. 6-37.0 3-46.7
Fumbles-Lost 2-1 0-0
Penalties-Yards 2-10 649
Time of Possession 26:39 33:21
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Penn St., Belton 22-98, Lynch 11-35,
Zwinak 3-8,
Hackenberg 4-(minus 21). Ohio St., Hyde 16-147,
J.Hall 8-81,
B.Miller 11-68, Jones 5-52, Guiton 3-23, Elliott
2-17, Wilson 1-12,
R.Smith 4-10, Team 1-(minus 2).
PASSING-Penn St., Hackenberg 12-23-2-112, Fer-
guson 7-11-0-125.
Ohio St., B.Miller 18-24-0-252, Guiton 2-2-0-26.
RECEIVING-Penn St., A.Robinson 12-173, Felder
442, Lewis 2-13,
Belton 1-9. Ohio St., D.Smith 5-90, Corey (Philly).
Brown 4-67,
Spencer 4-37, Fields 4-35, Wilson 2-35, Hyde 1-14.
No. 6 BAYLOR 59, KANSAS 14
Baylor 21 17 14 7 59
Kansas 0 0 7 7 14
First Quarter
Bay-Reese 62 pass from Petty (A.Jones kick), 9:17.
Bay-Seastrunk 29 run (A.Jones kick), 7:15.
Bay-Martin 14 run (A.Jones kick), 3:57.
Second Quarter
Bay-Petty 5 run (A.Jones kick), 12:49.
Bay-FG A.Jones 30,4:34.
Bay-Reese 25 pass from Petty (A.Jones kick), 2:00.
Third Quarter
Bay-Coleman 49 pass from Petty (A.Jones kick),
11:18.
Kan-Bourbon 22 run (Wyman kick), 4:51.
Bay-Linwood 4 run (Peterson kick), 1:00.
Fourth Quarter
Kan-Coleman 30 pass from Heaps (Wyman kick),
11:14.
Bay-Linwood 68 run (Peterson kick), 6:03.
A-32,264.
Bay Kan
First downs 31 16
Rushes-yards 44-306 50-154
Passing 437 154


Tammy, Angela & Mike
Now at the Hair Caboose

We want to thank afll our old & new customers...

10% OFFICE

Manicure Pedicure Silk Solar Pink & White Gel Shellac
Gel Powder Hair Cuts Highlight Color Waxing Deluxe Spa


19IBM Ml!UI M

Please call for an appointment
Mike Tammy
352-613-3616 352-426-2815

4223 E. CR 466, Oxford, FL
(Next to Murphy Gas Station, in front of Bargins & Treasures)
Monday to Saturday 9am-7pm


Comp-Att-lnt 21-38-0 11-33-0
Return Yards 38 24
Punts-Avg. 441.3 1146.8
Fumbles-Lost 5-2 3-1
Penalties-Yards 4-30 9-80
Time of Possession 22:07 37:53
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Baylor, Seastrunk 13-109, Linwood
9-106, Martin 11-55,
Petty 4-22, Russell 3-15, Team 1-0, Chafin 3-(mi-
nus 1). Kansas,
Sims 19-70, Bourbon 748, Miller 14-38, Cozart
8-17,
Heaps 2-(minus 19).
PASSING-Baylor, Petty 20-32-0-430, Russell 1-6-
0-7. Kansas,
Heaps 7-19-0-85, Cozart 4-14-0-69.
RECEIVING-Baylor, C.Fuller 644, Reese 4-110,
Norwood 4-66,
Coleman 2-66, Lee 2-56, Goodley 243, Rhodes
1-52. Kansas, Mundine 4-36,
Parmalee 3-30, Coleman 2-75, Matthews 1-14,
Sims 1-(minus 1).
No. 8 STANFORD 20, OREGON ST. 12
Stanford 0 7 6 7 20
Oregon St. 0 3 6 3 12
Second Quarter
OrSt-FG Romaine 50,12:48.
Stan-Gaffney 4 run (Ukropina kick), :07.
Third Quarter
Stan-Gaffney 9 run (kick failed), 14:08.
OrSt-Cooks 8 pass from Mannion (kick blocked),
:46.
Fourth Quarter
Stan-Gaffney 32 run (Ukropina kick), 12:01.
OrSt-FG Romaine 39,3:00.
A-44,519.
Stan OrSt
First downs 13 23
Rushes-yards 33-185 24-17
Passing 88 271
Comp-Att-lnt 8-18-0 41-57-0
Return Yards 21 74
Punts-Avg. 740.0 4-39.3
Fumbles-Lost 2-2 2-1
Penalties-Yards 543 6-50
Time of Possession 21:27 38:33
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Stanford, Gaffney 22-145, Young 2-23,
Hogan 5-10,
Montgomery 1-9, Sanders 1-6, Team 1-(minus 3),
Lloyd 1-(minus 5).
Oregon St., Ward 3-39, Woods 8-21, Cooks 3-18,
Team 1-n(minus 1),
Mannion 9-(minus 60).
PASSING-Stanford, Hogan 8-18-0-88. Oregon St.,
Mannion 41-57-0-271.
RECEIVING-Stanford, Montgomery 3-55, Whitfield
2-21, Hewitt 1-6,
Dudchock 14, Young 1-2. Oregon St., Cooks 9-80,
Clute 8-37,
Mullaney 6-68, Ward 5-33, Cummings 4-20, Woods
4-15, Anderson 2-13,
Perry 2-9, Smith 1-(minus 4).
No. 11 AUBURN 45, FAU 10
FAU 0 7 3 0 10
Auburn 21 17 7 0 45
First Quarter
Aub-Mason 8 run (Parkey kick), 12:57.
Aub-Grant 43 run (Parkey kick), 11:24.


Aub-Marshall 10 run (Parkey kick), 6:54.
Second Quarter
Aub-Coates 36 pass from Johnson (Parkey kick),
13:55.
Aub-FG Parkey 43,4:28.
Aub-Coates 67 pass from Johnson (Parkey kick),
3:10.
FAU-J.Johnson 29 run (Anderson kick), 2:13.
Third Quarter
FAU-FG Anderson 31,11:45.
Aub-Artis-Payne 1 run (Parkey kick), 8:35.
A-85,517.
FAU Aub
First downs 10 27
Rushes-yards 25-97 59-422
Passing 150 206
Comp-Att-lnt 11-26-0 12-18-1
Return Yards 0 70
Punts-Avg. 1046.2 3-39.7
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 2-0
Penalties-Yards 5-34 6-55
Time of Possession 24:25 35:35
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-FAU, J.Johnson 9-58, Wallace 8-37, Fort
ner 1-1, Warren 3-1,
TMoore 4-0. Auburn, Artis-Payne 13-93, Grant 7-75,
Marshall 6-73,
Mason 10-60, Wallace 6-36, J.Ford 4-28, Frazier
6-26, Johnson 4-21,
Shakespeare 2-8, Louis 1-2.
PASSING-FAU, J.Johnson 9-20-0-133, Hankerson
2-6-0-17. Auburn,
Johnson 10-16-1-192, Marshall 1-1-0-10, Wal-
lace 1-1-04.
RECEIVING-FAU, McKinney 5-64, Dukes 3-53, Dor-
vilus 1-12,
TMoore 1-11, Stoshak 1-10. Auburn, M.Davis 4-30,
Coates 3-113,
Uzomah 2-33, Reed 2-24, Bray 1-6.
No. 13 LSU 48, FURMAN 16
Furman 10 6 0 0 16
LSU 13 7 14 14 48
First Quarter
Fur-Thomas 74 interception return (Early kick),
10:52.
LSU-Hill 55 run (Delahoussaye kick), 9:47.
Fur-FG Early 46,3:57.
LSU-Hill 4 run (kick failed), 2:57.
Second Quarter
LSU-Beckham 37 pass from Mettenberger (Dela-
houssaye kick), 13:34.
Fur-FG Early 31, 6:48.
Fur-FG Early 23, :00.
Third Quarter
LSU-Magee 1 run (Hairston kick), 11:12.
LSU-M.Jones 7 pass from Mettenberger (Hairston
kick), 1:56.
Fourth Quarter
LSU-Magee 39 run (Hairston kick), 14:15.
LSU-Beckham 63 pass from Mettenberger (Hair-
ston kick), 9:10.
A-92,554.
Fur LSU
First downs 13 26
Rushes-yards 35-92 36-332
Passing 106 340
Comp-Att-lnt 17-29-1 17-26-2
Return Yards 78 22
Punts-Avg. 8-35.3 1-37.0
Fumbles-Lost 2-0 1-1


Tax.Free Income Explore the Potential.

Golden Corral Restaurant
Tuesday, November 5th 10:30 AM
15810 US Hwy. 441, Eustis
Light Lunch Served -




INVESTMENT BANKERS-SECURITY BROKERS
FL1ORIDA ARIZO\NA USA* INNCF 1984

Call today for reservations:
727.572-6864 or 1-800-888-4082
We don't spend your time we invest it!

si,_1)(


Penalties-Yards 3-18 7-75
Time of Possession 35:18 24:42
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Furman, McCloud 1679, M.Anderson
9-15, Hayes 5-5,
Skogen 1-0, Hannon 4-(minus 7). LSU, Hill 14-143,
Magee 7-108,
Hilliard 848, Blue 4-24, Jennings 3-9.
PASSING-Furman, Hannon 16-28-1-104, Hayes
1-1-0-2. LSU,
Mettenberger 16-24-2-328, Jennings 1-2-0-12.
RECEIVING-Furman, Culbreath 4-24, McCloud 4-14,
Suttles3-21,
Scott 2-23, Snellings 2-13, Cain 1-9, Mason 1-2.
LSU, Beckham 6-204,
Landry 5-87, Gordon 2-9, Blue 1-22, Dural 1-12,
M.Jones 1-7,
Magee 1-(minus 1).
No. 15 FRESNO ST. 35, SAN DIEGO ST. 28, OT
Fresno St. 7 0 7 14 7 35
San Diego St. 0 7 7 14 0 28
First Quarter
Fre-Burse 10 run (McGuire kick), 7:46.
Second Quarter
SDSU-Muema 10 run (McMorrow kick), 7:38.
Third Quarter
SDSU-Muema 1 run (McMorrow kick), 5:45.
Fre-Adams 11 pass from D.Carr (McGuire kick),
1:50.
Fourth Quarter
Fre-Adams 16 pass from D.Carr (McGuire kick),
11:39.
Fre-Ederaine 78 fumble return (McGuire kick), 9:51.
SDSU-Boesch 1 run (McMorrow kick), 8:54.
SDSU-Young 27 run (McMorrow kick), 6:15.
Overtime
Fre-Waller 1 run (McGuire kick).
A-32,707.
Fre SDSU
First downs 20 22
Rushes-yards 1943 48-170
Passing 298 337
Comp-Att-lnt 35-57-0 21-39-1
Return Yards 0 23
Punts-Avg. 7-47.1 5-40.8
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 2-1
Penalties-Yards 5-50 8-80
Time of Possession 24:49 35:11
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Fresno St., Quezada 422, Waller 8-22,
Burse 1-10,
D.Carr 6-(minus 11). San Diego St., Muema 27-
111, Pumphrey 12-37,
Young 2-30, Boesch 1-1, Kaehler 6-(minus 9).
PASSING-Fresno St., D.Carr 35-57-0-298. San
Diego St.,
Kaehler 21-39-1-337.
RECEIVING-Fresno St., Adams 12-87, Burse 10-
74, Waller 5-56,
J.Harper 4-67, Quezada 2-12, Watson 2-2. San Di-
ego St., Ruffin 10-181,
Roberts 3-20, Judge 2-51, Young 2-5, Muema 2-2,
Vizzi 1-60,
Pumphrey 1-18.
No. 17 OKLAHOMA 38, No. 10 TEXAS TECH 30
Texas Tech 7 0 17 6 30
Oklahoma 0 14 14 10 38
First Quarter
Tr-E.Ward 3 pass from KeWilliams (Bustin kick),
3:38.


NEWISSUE




7*90Y %TM
The Medica' Clinic Boar] of The City of Moi)fe (Sucorld). AL
First Mortgage Healthcare Facility Rev Bonds
11 N i 1 -, I 1 1, .:
-F Di,,E ',431
7 111, -O- F1' D
Monthly Interest Payments





J F


Second Quarter
Okl-Saunders 15 pass from Bell (Hunnicutt kick),
5:55.
Okl-Saunders 76 pass from Bell (Hunnicutt kick),
3:55.
Third Quarter
Okl-Dam.Williams 3 run (Hunnicutt kick), 9:37.
T-iE.Ward 23 pass from Webb (Bustin kick), 8:37.
TT-FG Bustin 34,3:59.
TT-Grant 17 pass from Webb (Bustin kick), 3:08.
Okl-Bester 35 run (Hunnicutt kick), :33.
Fourth Quarter
Okl-Dam.Williams 3 run (Hunnicutt kick), 11:04.
1 -1 I1,- ,, ,I,- 7:13.
OkI-Fu Iluiui u [l 1.1[.
A-84,734.
TT Okl
First downs 24 25
Rushes-yards 25-72 50-277
Passing 388 249
CompAtt-lnt 34-54-2 14-22-0
Return Yards 57 3
Punts-Avg. 3-34.0 449.5
Fumbles-Lost 2-1 2-1
Penalties-Yards 342 640
Time of Possession 25:45 34:15
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Texas Tech, Washington 10-56,
KeWilliams 7-24, Grant 1-14,
S.Foster 2-8, Webb 5-(minus 30). Oklahoma, Dam.
Williams 19-97,
Finch 8-55, Bell 944, Clay 11-42, Bester 1-35,
Millard 1-6,
Team 1-(minus 2).
PASSING-Texas Tech, Webb 33-53-2-385,
Ke.Williams 1-1-0-3.
Oklahoma, Bell 14-22-0-249.
RECEIVING-Texas Tech, E.Ward 9-106, Amaro
8-119, Grant 8-99,
Marquez 4-23, KeWilliams 2-19, Washington 2-5,
J.Davis 1-17. Oklahoma,
Saunders 6-153, Shepard 5-43, Dam.Williams 1-30,
Millard 1-14,
Bester 1-9.
No. 20 SOUTH CAROLINA 27, No. 5 MISSOURI
24, 20T
South Carolina 0 0 0 17 7 3 27
Missouri 7 7 3 0 7 0 24
First Quarter
Mo-Murphy 11 run (Baggett kick), 1:23.
Second Quarter
Mo-Washington 96 pass from Mauk (Baggett
kick), 4:16.
Third Quarter
Mo-FG Baggett 27, 6:46.
Fourth Quarter
SC-Ellington 6 pass from Shaw (Fry kick), 12:13.
SC-FG Fry 20,5:03.
SC-Jones 2 pass from Shaw (Fry kick), :42.
First Overtime
Mo-Murphy 1 run (Baggett kick).
SC-Ellington 15 pass from Shaw (Fry kick).
Second Overtime
SC-FG Fry 40.
A-67,124.
SC Mo
First downs 28 17
Rushes-yards 35-75 41-155
Passing 423 249
CompAtt-lnt 35-56-1 10-25-1
Return Yards (-11) 0
Punts-Avg. 344.7 7-33.7
Fumbles-Lost 2-2 0-0
Penalties-Yards 9-65 6-50
Time of Possession 34:27 25:33
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-South Carolina, Davis 19-51, Carson
7-27, Thompson 2-5,
Shaw 7-(minus 8). Missouri, Josey 15-79, Murphy
12-53, Mauk 10-12,
Hansbrough 4-11.
PASSING-South Carolina, Shaw 20-29-0-201,
Thompson 15-27-1-222.
Missouri, Mauk 10-25-1-249.
RECEIVING-South Carolina, Ellington 10-136, Davis
10-99, Byrd 4-76,
Adams 348, Anderson 3-38, Carson 2-14, Jones
2-8, Roland 14. Missouri,
Lucas 3-89, Sasser 2-26, Washington 1-96, J.Hunt
1-20, Josey 1-15,



Need


Tax Help?

Call

352-787-1040

Open Year Round.


STAX-RE MUyNICIPALesonDS







World Series fans now know all about obstruction


BEN WALKER
AP Baseball Writer
ST. LOUIS The Cardi-
nals rushed to the plate to
congratulate Allen Craig.
The Red Sox stormed home
to argue with the umpires.
The fans, well, they seemed
too startled to know what to
do. Who'd ever seen an ob-
struction call to end a World
Series game?
No one.
In perhaps the wildest fin-
ish imaginable, the rare rul-
ing against third baseman
Will Middlebrooks allowed
Craig to score with two outs
in the bottom of the ninth
inning and lifted St. Lou-
is over Boston 5-4 Saturday
night for a 2-1 edge.
A walk-off win? More like a


trip-off.
"I'm in shock right now,"
St. Louis catcher Yadier Mo-
lina said.
So was most everyone at
Busch Stadium after the
mad-cap play.
"Tough way to have a game
end, particularly of this sig-
nificance," Red Sox manager
John Farrell said.
After an umpire's call was
the crux of Game 1 and a
poor Boston throw to third
base decided Game 2, the
key play on this night com-
bined both elements.
Molina singled with one
out in the ninth off los-
ing pitcher Brandon Work-
man. Craig, just back from a
sprained foot, pinch-hit and
lined Koji Uehara's first pitch
into left field for a double


that put runners on second
and third.
With the infield in, Jon Jay
hit a grounder to diving sec-
ond baseman Dustin Pe-
droia. He made a sensa-
tional stab and threw home
to catcher Jarrod
Saltalamacchia,
who tagged out
the sliding Moli-
na.
But then Salta- A
lamacchia threw
wide of third trying to get
Craig. The ball glanced off
Middlebrooks' glove and
Craig's body, caroming into
foul territory down the line.
After the ball got by, Mid-
dlebrooks, lying on his stom-
ach, raised both legs and
tripped Craig, slowing him
down as he tried to take off


L:


for home.
"I just know I have to
dive for that ball. I'm on the
ground. There's nowhere for
me to go," Middlebrooks
said.
Third base umpire Jim
Joyce immedi-
ately signaled
obstruction.
inu '6 "With the de-
fensive player
L C L A SS on the ground,
without in-
tent or intent, it's still ob-
struction," Joyce said. "You'd
probably have to ask Mid-
dlebrooks that one, if he
could have done anything.
But that's not in our deter-
mination."
Craig kept scrambling.
"He was in my way. I
couldn't tell you if he tried to


trip me or not. I was just try-
ing to get over him," he said.
Left fielder Daniel Nava re-
trieved the ball and made a
strong throw home, where
Saltalamacchia tagged a slid-
ing Craig in time. But plate
umpire Dana DeMuth sig-
naled safe and then point-
ed to third, making clear the
obstruction had been called.
"I was excited at first be-
cause we nailed the guy at
home. I wasn't sure why he
was called safe," Middle-
brooks said.
"We're all running to home
to see why he was called safe.
We didn't think there was
any obstruction there, obvi-
ously As I'm getting up, he
trips over me. I don't know
what else to say."


,___,g CHIA
CTACLEANING EPEDEALS
LM1'r, one GC upulr.o i p-rrep+ ,r ~n'Ma C nage






Lr!1As~ pfcts *~~~I1p of Daentsr noeinl
SpeciaF', "htz g" inDuctE-fl 90
'io1at 5,neyS m E-p-as V5036
CARPET UPHOLSTERY TILE &GOT HRW D








LEADING EDGE-DENTAL



All Aspe~ofenitynoe Friendly Locato


Specializing iM enos


FREE

CONSULTATION


$85 Value


L ww.Led!ng iDffraIrBom


Dr. Vaziri & Staff


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 28, 2013








Living
Send your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 1 352-365-8208


Cl
DAILY COMMERCIAL
Monday, October 28, 2013



www.dailycommercial.com


MARSHALL: Where autistic kids find haven / C2


Health

check
LEESBURG


NASW meeting set for
today at the library
The National Association of Social
Workers, Lake/Sumter Unit, will
meet from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. today, at
the Leesburg Public Library, 100 E.
Main St.
The workshop will provide one
CD which is free to members, and
$15 for non-members. Community
resources available for caregivers
and persons with dementia will be
provided.
The public is invited.
For information, call 800-352-6279,
or email wingslcsw@comcast.net.

LAKE COUNTY
AARP driver safety
classes offered
The AARP Driver Safety pro-
gram helps participants refine their
skills and develop safe driving hab-
its. Upon completion of the course,
Florida drivers 50 or older may be
eligible for insurance discounts.
Cost for the classes is $12 for
AARP members and $14 for non-
members. Payment must be made
by check to AARP, no cash or credit
cards accepted.
The two-day classes will be of-
fered at the following locations:
Nov. 4 and Nov. 6 from 1 to 4 p.m.,
at the Leesburg Senior Center,
1211 Penn St. To register, call
352-326-3540.
Nov. 4 and Nov. 6, from 9 a.m.
to noon at theW.T. Bland Public
Library in Mount Dora, 1995
N. Donnelly St. To register, call
352-735-7180.
Nov. 12 and Nov. 14, from Ito
4 p.m., at the Harden-Pauli Funeral
Home, 1617 S. Bay St., in Eustis. To
register, call 352-394-0250.
Nov. 18 and Nov. 20, from 6 to
9 p.m., at South Lake Hospital
(NTC), 1935 DonWickham Dr., in
Clermont. Call 352-394-0250 to
register.
Nov., 13, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., at
Hawthorne of Leesburg, South U.S.
Highway 27, Leesburg. To register,
call 402-910-0822.

LEESBURG
New Dimensions support
group meeting set for Nov. 8
The New Dimensions Blind/
Visually Impaired Person Support
Group will meet from 11:30 a.m.
to 1 p.m., on Nov. 8, at the IHOP
Restaurant, 10332 U. S. Highway
441, Leesburg, across from Lake
Square Mall.
Guest speaker for the meeting is
Michael Siefert, attorney, who will
speak about wills and trusts.
This event is open to all blind and
visually impaired persons, their
caregivers and friends and support-
ers of NewVision for Independence.
For information, call 352
435-5040.


Old-fashioned treatment



is well worth its salt


ALLIE SHAH
Minneapolis Star Tribune
This total sensory ex-
perience is called salt
therapy, a homeopathic
remedy meant to help re-
spiratory problems. The
age-old alternative ther-
apeutic remedy, some-
times called halotherapy
or speleotherapy, is said
to alleviate symptoms of
asthma, allergies, anxiety
and other ailments.
There are no U.S. clini-
cal studies examining the
effectiveness of salt ther-
apy, but its adherents
swear by it.
Lori Danielson is one
of them. Danielson, who
suffers from allergies, is
a regular at the cave in
south Minneapolis.
"I get energy and more
oxygen into my body. I've
noticed my nasal passages
clear up," said the Bloom-
ington resident. "The big-
gest benefit is I know I can
breathe."
Co-owner Scott Wert-
kin said his Salt Cave -
which opened a year ago
in a former chiropractor's
office is one of only 30
or 40 businesses nation-
wide offering this treat-
ment. Other centers have
opened in NewYork, Flor-
ida, California and Chica-
go in recent years.
Although new here, salt
therapy's use in mod-
ern history dates back to
19th-century Poland.
In 1843, a physician


7L
-. .. L .


RENEE JONES SCHNEIDER / MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE
A placed called "The Salt Cave" in Minneapolis is celebrating its one year anniversary. Scott Wertkin, owner


of The Salt Cave, built the cave hims
named Dr. Feliks Bocz-
kowski noticed that work-
ers at a salt mine, un-
like other miners, did not
have respiratory or lung
problems. He attribut-
ed their healthy lungs to
the air climate inside the
salt mine. Salt is known
to have anti-bacterial and
anti-inflammatory prop-
erties. Soon, spas opened
in the salt caves and to-
day the therapy is popular
in Eastern Europe, Russia
and Canada.
Wertkin became inter-
ested in salt caves when
he and his wife were re-
searching remedies for
their son, Jack, now 13,


who has asthma. They vis-
ited a salt room in Flor-
ida and were amazed at
the difference it made for
their son. They decided to
open their own business
after learning that Chi-
cago was the closest city
with a comparable salt
room.
They sought to emu-
late the look of a real salt
mine by transforming
the chiropractor's exam
room into an otherworld-
ly space.
Wertkin constructed the
cave out of 12,000 pounds
of rock salt shipped from
a mine in Pakistan on the
edge of the Himalayas.


(The most popular salts
used in salt therapy are
Himalayan and Dead Sea
salts.)
Wertkin compares the
salt room's effect on cus-
tomers' nasal passages to
"a dry Neti pot." He said
more than 3,000 people
have visited the Salt Cave,
located in a tiny strip mall
next to a yoga studio.
Does it work?
Doctors remain skepti-
cal about the health ben-
efits of inhaling dry salt
particles.
"There is no science be-
hind it," said Dr. Scott
Davies, a pulmonologist
SEE SALT I C2


Alzheimer's research focuses on 'before'


GARY ROTSTEIN
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
The Indiana, Pa., hos-
pice volunteer has no
signs of Alzheimer's dis-
ease and no way of know-
ing if she'll get it, but
she's aware that she car-
ries a gene that increas-
es her risk. It means she
spends more time than
her peers thinking about
the disease, and she's
joined a national registry
of healthy people willing
to be studied long-term in
trials aimed at preventing
Alzheimer's.
Kolesar and her sis-
ter "inspect ourselves mi-
nutely to make sure that


we haven't got it yet. I
know that's the way all
children of all Alzheimer's
sufferers are you're just
waiting for it to hit."
Kolesar, who is mar-
ried and has an adult son,
supports a growing trend
in Alzheimer's research,
which until now has been
dominated by studies of
people already diagnosed
with some level of the dis-
ease that gradually and
devastatingly robs them
of their memory and cog-
nitive function.
So little has come of ef-
forts to undo those effects
in drug trials that more
money and emphasis is
being put into lengthy


monitoring of adults with-
out any dementia symp-
toms, to see if drugs can
postpone their getting the
disease or even prevent
it. For such studies to be
practical and cost-effec-
tive, researchers need par-
ticipants who, like Kolesar,
are known to be at higher
risk than the general pop-
ulation.
The primary risk fac-
tor for Alzheimer's is age,
with an estimated 5 mil-
lion Americans over age
65 carrying the disease.
Kolesar knows from par-
ticipation in a prior study
in New York, however,
that she inherited a gene
known as ApoE4, which


increases her risk by about
fourfold.
That makes her a rel-
atively valuable person
among some 20,000 na-
tionally who have signed
up for the Alzheimer's Pre-
vention Registry since its
creation in May 2012. The
Banner Alzheimer's In-
stitute, based in Phoenix,
coordinates the registry,
hoping ultimately to cre-
ate a list of 250,000 people
making themselves avail-
able for study by research-
ers across the nation.
Jessica Langbaum, Ban-
ner associate director, said
people 18 or older can join

SEE BEFORE I C3


KI I Dr JaesYoug ~Lae County ~IW1!I l'sI Prostat~l1e Seiaist 1i


Prostiva RF Therapy

for an Enlarged Prostate
Eliminate the need for major surgery or medications


Prostate Cancer

Screening & Treatment
Second opinions for treatment options


For ^^more nforatio andactul paienttestmonials, please visit:^^^^^^



.3. I i *IS E *i E
The Prosate Center Eustis Dr JmsYugi at ion all eonzd

(32)75-490(32)57676in ae *ont*ine1982.
AOSEBJ*l 9 uf*


"AfF




DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 28, 2013


Autistic students finding


a haven at Marshall


CITY OF
K M'I.^OR &Theflalit
MOUNT IQ USwD
D 0 R A LAKE COUNTY
F LOR IDA


VOTED

VOKE (352) 383.088
BE5T
SPECIAL Nancy@MountDoraCenterForTheArs.org
E V EN T! www.MountDoraCenterForTheArts.org ,,,_",___


sponsored by

Daily Commercial
"lout First (:hoke" In-Print & On-Line


DaitlyCommerial
I1Nr I f fi lolf ', I.,I .... l .. IS. Jh
Your Town Your News
N'


"My first choice
everyday either
in-print or. on-line."


www.dailcummcrcial.coum





-_I" 'L b. t,,


"-T Deliv;ery Call,
5 787-0600
.. .....~.... .......ii


MARK ROTH
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Her son Joseph, 17
and 6 feet 5, has a high
IQ and a fascination
with aeronautical engi-
neering.
He is also someone
who was so anxious
about shopping for a
suit for the prom that he
paced around the fami-
ly car for 20 minutes to
get up the courage to go
into the mall. And he is
a young man who fin-
ished his high school
coursework at Marshall
after he was beat up at
his Ohio high school.
The assault says a lot
about the social diffi-
culties of autistic stu-
dents and the ways in
which they unwittingly
play a role in their own
rejection. As Marshall
training center interim
director Marc Ellison
recalled it, Joseph was
walking through the
school cafeteria when
he stepped on a condi-
ment packet. He picked
it up, and looking for a
way to wipe the gooey
liquid off his hand, he
spotted a jacket over a
chair nearby, and used
that, not recognizing
how inappropriate that
behavior was.
The jacket belonged
to a school athlete,
who naturally took of-


SALT
FROM PAGE C1

at Hennepin County
Medical Center.
Ingesting salt does
have therapeutic prop-
erties. A 2006 study in
the New England Jour-
nal of Medicine found
that saline therapy was
an effective and safe
supplemental treat-
- mWwNVEM*IT9DR'


JULIA RENDLEMAN / SHNS
Hillary Brown, a student support specialist at the Autism Train-
ing Center, talks with Evan Badesch during lunch at Marshall


fense, and proceeded
to punch Joseph.
Galloway, a regis-
tered nurse, said the
Autism Training Cen-
ter program not only
allowed Joseph to es-
cape those kind of inci-
dents, but will now give
him an opportunity
to get a college degree
and a possible gateway
to work.
"I feel like God put
us here," she said. "You
have to surround your
child with people who
see his value and see
his strengths and weak-
nesses."
Marshall's program
is the oldest in the na-
tion to award college
degrees to higher func-
tioning students with
autism, and it has only
been around since 2002.
It was started with


ment for patients with
cystic fibrosis.
But Dr. Charlene
McEvoy, another pul-
monologist and head
of the Asthma Center
at HealthPartners, said
there is a difference be-
tween sitting in a salt-
covered room and in-
gesting a solution of
salt and water directly.
She also cautioned that
patients with conditions
such as asthma should


E =~~A 10%A IIIn
Owner, Dr. James Costello, says, "My doctors utilize
modem techniques, and I instill old fashioned values."


NEW PATIENT SPECIAL
COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210)
CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110)
EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) Reg. $ 59
SECOND OPINION (INABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE)


CROWNS Consultation UDEiTURES
S399Each andI 749Each
... . .: /\ D051210
or
,/ Second Opinion 020
A No Charge!

LEESBURG MT. DORA
Sunrise Dental Tri-Dental
1380 N. Blvd. W. Leesburg 18515 Hwy. 441 Mt. Dora
326-3368 383-5377
The patent and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed
for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the
advertsement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This
discount does not apply to those patents with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.


a donation of $50,000
from Alexandria, Va.,
businessman Larry
Austin, whose son Low-
ell became the first stu-
dent and now works at
the training center.
"Marshall's program is
unheralded," the elder
Austin said. "I think it's
one of the great unsung
stories in America."
The program rests
on three principles: the
45 students each have
graduate student men-
tors who make sure
they get their class work
done and help them
learn how to navigate
the social world of col-
lege; each student lives
independently in a
dorm; and each student
takes the same class-
es as non-autistic stu-
dents.


not replace their medi-
cations with salt therapy.
"If by doing the salt ther-
apy they couldn't afford
their medications, ab-
solutely not. I have data
on their inhalers. I know
they help. Mortality for
asthma has dropped sig-
nificantly using our cur-
rent medical treatment,"
she said.
Davies acknowl-
edged there's a history
of "people using (salt)
as a homeopathic rem-
edy," and said he knew
of no harm that could
come from sitting in a
room full of salt. Rath-
er than a medical treat-
ment, Davies said, he
would put salt therapy
in the same category as
a spa treatment.
Maybe that's a good
comparison.
The last time Valerie
Petit, another salt-ther-
apy enthusiast, made
a trip to the Salt Cave,
she fell asleep. Pe-
tit said she goes to the
cave mainly to unwind
in the beach-like envi-
ronment. "I don't have
any health issues," she
said. "I'm just doing it
because it feels good."
And even McEvoy said
there could be value
in asthma patients do-
ing anything that allows
them to relax and slow
down their breathing.
A 45-minute session
of salt therapy costs
$30. The cave also is
used for groups do-
ing yoga, meditation
or story times for chil-
dren. Terri Peterson,
a pharmacist, leads a
breathing class once a
month inside the cave.
She said her sinuses
open up, an effect that
can last for a few days.
Eric Christopher, a
member of Peterson's
class, said he's been
to the cave more than
eight times since first
reading about salt ther-
apy in an alternative
health newspaper.


C2




Monday, October 28, 2013


Hospitals use mannequins



to train medical personnel


KEVIN MCKENZIE
Scripps Howard News Service
Luckily, the patients
were life-imitating
mannequins that have
heart, breath and bow-
el sounds, can cry, have
a seizure, perspire, show
blood pressure and com-
municate themselves or
with the help of some-
one sitting in a control
room. And their perfor-
mances were supported
by humans, actors hired
to play mothers.
"It really made it real;
it put that anxiety and
really kind of fear in the
room," said Teresa Britt,
director of the UTH-
SC simulation center in
Memphis, Tenn.
Le Bonheur was the
first health care orga-
nization to send front-
line health care profes-
sionals to train at the
University of Tennes-
see Interprofessional
Education and Clinical
Simulation Center.
Started with a near-
ly $3 million grant
awarded in 2011 by the
BlueCross BlueShield
of Tennessee Health
Foundation, the sim-
ulations usually help
educate students from
the medical, nursing,


BEFORE
FROM PAGE C1

the registry, and they
will be emailed up-
dates on Alzheimer's
findings and studies.
The target population,
however, is anyone
50 and older who has
shown no problems yet
with memory or men-
tal functioning.
About 70 percent of
those who have signed
up for the registry thus
far have some family
history of Alzheimer's.
"People certainly feel
a personal connection
to the disease, and that's
often what's motivating
them to get involved,"
Langbaum said.
The registry has not
been used for any stud-
ies yet. One of the first
will be for a Banner-
led trial funded in part
by $33 million from the
National Institutes of
Health that will begin
tracking the progress in
2015 of some 650 peo-
ple who carry two cop-
ies of the ApoE4 gene.
Only 2 to 3 percent of
the population are in
that category, and such
individuals have about a
20 times higher risk than
the rest of the popula-
tion of developing Al-
zheimer's, said Eric Re-
iman, a brain imaging
researcher who is Ban-
ner's executive director.
The idea is to be-
gin following those 650
people when they're
still healthy after age
65 and track them for a
five-year period, while
administering a drug
that has shown poten-
tial in preliminary tri-
als to inhibit formation
of amyloid plaque. The
presence and growth
of amyloid in the brain
has been linked to Al-
zheimer's, though re-
searchers have not
concluded whether
amyloid causes the di-
minishing mental abil-


ities or are just a visible
sign of them.


Zina Nunnally, left, Lauren Ikerd, and Lindsey Bird treat "Baby
Boy Smith" for pulmonary hyper tension during a training exer-
cise at the UTHSC Interprofessional Education and Clinical Sim-
ulation Center.


dental, allied health
and other colleges on
the Memphis campus.
Britt said more area
hospitals, doctors' of-
fices and clinics should
use the center. Stud-
ies are producing ev-
idence that the sim-
ulations can improve
medical reasoning,
self-confidence, team-
work, communication
and ultimately the safe-
ty and care of patients
and families, she said.
"There's nothing else in
Memphis that has been
done to have an impact
on patient safety in that
kind of way," Britt said.
Dr. Maybe Figueroa,


In a separate long-
term prevention tri-
al where the registry
won't be needed, Ban-
ner is heading a study
of hundreds of mem-
bers of an extend-
ed family in Colom-
bia who have a genetic
mutation far more se-
rious than carrying the
ApoE4 gene. The mu-
tation virtually guar-
antees that individuals
will develop the ear-
ly-onset version of Al-
zheimer's in their 30s,
40s or 50s. The family
members participating
in the study will receive


medical director for Le
Bonheur's cardiovascu-
lar intensive care unit,
said that 55 people, in-
cluding nurses, respira-
tory therapists, pediatric
cardiology and pediatric
critical care fellows, par-
ticipated in teams of six
in the simulations in late
September.
"We thought being
a young unit and with
a lot staff that may be
new to the cardiac in-
tensive care setting, it
would be a great op-
portunity to help de-
velop communication
skills among all the
team members and re-
duce anxiety a little


an anti-amyloid drug
called crenezumab, or
a placebo, while mon-
itored for five years for
any preventive effects.
"The hypothesis is
that some of these
treatments may need
to be started before
amyloid ravages the
brain in order to have
the most effect," Re-
iman said. "It's been
suggested that even
a modestly effective
treatment could have a
profound public health
effect.... A procrastina-
tion treatment that de-
lays onset of the dis-


CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES
SaWc *0 '.... W7


577 Pharmacy Prices!
Generic Medicines Save on gas! Use Mail order!
Cialis 20mg. 24 count..... 89.95 Save without sacrificing
Viagra 100mg. 20 count..65.95 safety, quality or service
Actonel 35mg. 12 count..... 69 Order anywhere in the
Flomax 4mg. 90 count..... 68 Country, so tell your family &
Nexium 40mg. 90 count..... $74 friends about us!
NO SHIPPING COST! CALL NOW! START SAVING TODAY!!

CNDADISCOUNTSERIE
1011M 1 SE HW 44.1, Belleview FL 34420^r^
(1/4 mjgi. lNorhf KMart o Hy. 441)cI
(352) 347TTT403/fx (352) 347-2034^


bit," Figueroa said.
As a "center of excel-
lence" ranked by U.S.
News and World Re-
port, this was the third
round of simulation
training for the Le Bon-
heur cardiovascular in-
tensive care teams, she
said. The site for the
first year was the hospi-
tal's neonatal intensive
care unit. The Medical
Education & Research
Institute in Memphis
hosted the second year.
Emergencies af-
ter heart surgery don't
happen very often. But
when they do, they re-
quire well-trained
team members who
respond appropriate-
ly. The emergency re-
sponse was practiced,
videotaped and studied
during the simulations.
Figueroa said such sim-
ulations, an idea bor-
rowed from the aviation
industry, are growing
more common. Partic-
ipants in the exercise
have suggested doing
it more often, perhaps
twice a year.
"I think in this area
it's been a little bit
slower to kind of devel-
op, but I think it's to be
the wave of the future,"
she said.


AirWay A
Respiratory
Solutions i


905 E, Alfred, Street
Tavares, FL 327780
352-.343 3006


At AirWay Respiratory
CATHETER KITS are now available
with Medicare billing and local delivery.

Please contact us with any questions
you may have,

AirWay has over 80 Years of Combined
Experience in the Home Health Industry


ASSISTED LIVNG &
SADULTDAYCAREHOMES
Leesburg Lady Lake* Fruitland Park
-* 25 Years helping &
Icaringforfrail elderly
-- Delicious home cooked
meals &snacks
A real homejfor you or someoneyou love
Daily, weekly, monthly, yearly accommodations
-* Personal one on one care
- Wheelchairs, Alzheimers, Dementia, Parkinson's, etc.
Please Call

Uc#AL 10397 (3352) 787-3,04


ease by five years could u l d
cut the number of peo- I LW
pie diagnosed with Al- | c finditer
zheimer'sinhalf." ..fl
To get more infor- F\ .in h
nation or join the Al-
zheimer's Prevention ct i
Registry, go to www.en-
dalznow.org. For the l
Alzheimer's Associa-
tion Trial Match, visit
www.alz.org/ I
I


Join the



chorus!


M-- -------


Nov. I& 2





TM
SUN DOME

USF Sun Dome Box Office
800.745.3000
ticketmaster.com


DAILY COMMERCIAL


'NMI,^




Monday, October 28, 2013


Cardiovascular Group


David C. Lew,
MD, FACC, FSCI
Chairman


Jose R. Rosado
MD, FACC
Vice Chairman


Joseph G. Sahab, Leonardo
MD, FACC Victores, MD


Patrick Kevin John R. Hurt,
Williams, MD MD, FACC


I


Ronnie
Sabbah, MD


Marwan Mihyu,
MD, FACC


Sanjeev Bhatta, Ilie T.
MD, FACC Barb, MD


Multi-Specialty Group


Maria Bello, MD
Family Medicine


David Moskowitz, MD
Internal Medicine


Tanya Diaz, MD Larry Foster, MD
Family Medicine Family Medicine


Robert T. Meade, MD Frank Pellegrino. MD Jeffery Robinson, MD
Family Medicine Family Medicine Family Medicine


David L. Sustarsic,
MD, FACS Surgery


Services Offered
* Angioplasty: Coronary,
Peripheral and Renal
* Atherectomy
* Bone Density
* Cardiac Catheterization with
Private Recovery Suites
* Cardiac Rehab
* Coumadin Clinic
,CT
* CT Angiography
* PET/CT
* Echocardiography: Carotid,
Traditional, Transesophageal
* EECP
* Holter & Event Monitoring
* Laboratory Services
* Nerve Conduction Studies
* Pacemaker Clinic
* Pulmonary Function Test
* Sleep Study Lab
* Stenting: Cardiac, Carotid
and Peripheral
* Stress Testing : Nuclear and
Traditional
* Ultrasound: Abdominal,
Carotid, Peripheral Arterial,
Peripheral Venous, Renal
* Urology Services
* Varilase
* Vascular Ultrasound


Youssef Khodor. DO
Family Medicine


Fouad Shami. MD
Urology


SFlorida Heart

S& Vascular

Multi-Specialty Group
Experience Our Integrity For Compassionate Care


C4


DAILY COMMERCIAL




Monday, October 28, 2013


At UnitedHealthcare our goal is to make
health care work for you. We've designed
our products around what you've told us is
important. We've created programs to help
you live a healthier life. And we surround
you with people who are there for you.

$0 monthly premiums for
medical and Part D coverage

$0 copay for primary care visits


Proudly serving more than
763,000 members in Florida


Attend a neighborhood meeting to learn
more about your Medicare Advantage and
Part D options.


Leesburg
Oct 30, 9:30am
Royal Highlands MeetRoom
5350 Monarch Blvd
Mt Dora
Oct 29, 2:30pm
Perkins
17080 Hwy 441
Summerfield
Oct 28, 2pm
Taverna Red
17770 S US Hwy 441


The Villages
Oct 28, 10am & 2pm
Comfort Suites
1202 Avenida Central
Oct 30, 2pm
UHC MedicareStore
979 Del Mar Dr, Spanish Springs
Oct 30, 3pm
Santa Barbara Care Ctr
1575 Santa Barbara Blvd


Have questions? Our agents have answers.
Call today for one-to-one help and avoid the
last-minute rush.


( 1-855-765-0481, TTY 711
8 a.m. 8 p.m. local time, 7 days a week


HelloUnitedMedicare.com



J UnitedHealthcarer
Medicare Solutions


You must continue to pay your Medicare Part B premium.
The benefit information provided is a brief summary, not a complete description of benefits. For more information contact the plan.
Limitations, copayments, and restrictions may apply. Benefits, formulary, pharmacy network, provider network, premium and/or co-payments/
co-insurance may change on January 1 of each year.
A sales person will be present with information and applications. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings,
call 1-855-765-0481, TTY 711.
Plans are insured through UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company and its affiliated companies, a Medicare Advantage organization with
a Medicare contract.
Y0066_130722_111854_FINALFLDC_1028_ROP Accepted 240761


DAILY COMMERCIAL


OIDIC m







Comics&Diversions www.dailycommercial.com


LUANN


MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
HELLO, COSTUME SHOP? I 501 OT rHIM A NEV' GRIMM, TH1 -e HE.P ,n
IMY OGC DIDN'T W E. I COSTUME, BUT H I MAN SVS HC IB- KA SNOB
THE "HELLO KITW" % VN'T (I( THAT O hiEl M AV EAN YOU'RE Mq 0NL HOPE
COSTUME I BOUGHT. EIl-ER. W HAVE BI-WAN KENOBI
-GT" ANGT-I ELSE?_COSTUME.


MUTTS


ZITS


GARFIELD


FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE
lOSTCAINEM Y
P'I~^I M INNOCENT LaTLE [ DS
BE A IALL DRESSED UPiN
1ECITPlNNE. L-EflF"FER f1ND BIIARR -







B.C.






I- H r r t . 'a

Ff 2013 John L Hart FtP ______ D by Creators


HEATHCLIFF


PEANUTS
tEIE'll;NOT ENOUC44
i '' '(M WONDER HERE P FOR
S : !, : ALL7THREE Of 0! !


q,! ii ,I,


Girlfriend living rent-free

racks up bill of resentment


DEAR ABBY: I am divorced,
successful, and the father of
two teenage girls. I have been
seeing my girlfriend, "Stella,"
for a year and a half. She also
has two teenage daughters.
When we met, Stella's divorce
was becoming final, and her
house was near the tail end of
a foreclosure. The sheriff re-
moved her from her home a
few months later.
I bought a couple of con-
dos and let Stella choose one
she wanted to move into. She
agreed she would pay the bills
and some rent once she set-
tled in.
Two weeks after she moved
in, she quit her job. It has been
almost a year, and she hasn't
gone on one job interview. I
pay all her bills now, and I'm
getting resentful.
It's not the money (I've got
plenty), but I feel she contin-
ues to see me only so she can
live rent-free. Our communi-
cation isn't the greatest, and
she gets angry if this topic is
brought up. How should I ap-
proach her without sounding
like a cheapskate? DON'T WANT
TO BEA SUGAR DADDY IN CHICAGO
DEAR SUGAR DADDY: Of course
she gets angry! Have you nev-
er heard the saying, "The best
defense is a strong offense"?
If you want to resolve this,
you must be prepared for Stel-
la to react negatively. Start the
conversation by saying, "When
you moved into my condo,
you agreed to pay your own
bills and some rent. It's been
a year, and you haven't even
looked for a job." Then give
her a date by which you want
her to move out.
Because she has been living
there for some time, she may
have certain tenant's rights
that will have to be respect-
ed. It doesn't take a crystal ball
to see that you will probably
have to evict her so talk to
your attorney before you dis-
cuss this with Stella.
DEAR ABBY: I am the moth-
er ofa 31-year-old son, "Jo-
hann," who is in the Navy. He
just posted a picture of himself
in his uniform on Facebook. I
am praying it's not his official
photo, because he made an in-


credibly stupid face on it.
He used to do this when
he was a child. Even his high
school photos look like this. It
is embarrassing to me! I could
never show it to anyone and
proudly say, "This is my son."
Johann is an accomplished
young man, a supervisor. But
I can't reconcile this picture
with the man he is. What can I
do? FREAKED OUT IN GERMANY
DEAR FREAKED OUT: Your son
is an adult. If he is making this
expression in photographs on
purpose, perhaps it's time you
asked him why. While it may
be a display of immaturity on
his part, it could also be that
he is uncomfortable in front of
a camera. (Many people are.
It's referred to as "deer-in-the-
headlights" syndrome.)
Explain that you would love
to have a picture of him that
depicts how he REALLY is, and
ask if he would be willing, as
a favor to his mother, to sit for
a session with a professional
photographer when he comes
home for a visit. If he isn't,
then perhaps he'd be more re-
laxed posing for a photo that
YOU take.
DEAR ABBY: My fiancee,
"Tina," and I made a reso-
lution to lose weight for our
wedding. Everything has
been going great except for
one thing. Because men lose
weight faster than women, I
now weigh less at 6 foot 1 than
she does at 5 feet 4.
Tina already has self-esteem
issues. I want to look good for
our wedding, but not at the
cost of my fiancee's hurt feel-
ings. What can I do? AT A LOSS
IN MICHIGAN
DEAR AT A LOSS: Continue be-
ing supportive and help Tina to
maintain her self-esteem. But
her weight issue is her respon-
sibility, not yours. If she be-
comes frustrated or depressed
that she isn't losing quickly
enough, suggest she consult
her doctor or a registered dieti-
tian about the reason why
Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van
Buren, also known as Jeanne Phil-
lips, and was founded by her moth-
er, Pauline Phillips. Write DearAbby
at www.DearAbby.com or PO. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.


Why Consign?
* Easy No yard sales or expensive ads
* Hassle-free We price and display your furniture
* Safe No strangers in your home
* Convenient Never wait for "maybe" buyers
Now Accepting Up-Scale Furniture
Located in back of Main Street Antiques

(352) 460-4806
201 W, Main Street In Historic Downtown Leesburg
Open Mon.-Fri, 10am to 5pm, Sat, 10am to 3:30pm
*I facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburg

I paI I n oa Is
Sports Iinju'ri% Spinal StInof.4%
Osteoarthrits Peripheral Neuropathy
By covering up pain, swelling, or others, you
may be making a deeper problem.

Acupuncture is a time-tested,
safe, natural and drug free
treatment that can provide
immediate relief and long
-V lasting benefits.
James N Georgiades AP


NowAccepling Nei Patients Most Insurances Accepted


I


x 0
44
4










CC
ugJ









IM8


Hlk $aIrtI


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 28, 2013




Monday, October 28, 2013

S udoku ****** 4puz.com

4 91 63 7



37 4 5 92

748_ _269



692 513

81_ 2 3 45



9 57 46 8

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION How to play: Fill in the blank
squares with the numbers 1
7 3 24 19 6 95 8 through 9 so that each horizon-
5 1 6 8 3 9 7 2 4 tal row, vertical column and nine-
square
9 4 8 7 2 5 3 1 6 sub-grid contains no repeated
1246875 3 9 numbers.
6 5 3 9 4 2 1 8 7 Puzzles range in difficulty from
8 9 7 1 5 3 6 4 2 one to sixstars.
3 6 5 2 9 8 4 7 1 The solution to today's puzzle
- __ __ will be in tomorrow's paper.
271564893
489371265

AXYDLBAAXR
isLONGFELLOW
One letter stands for another. In this sample, A is used
for the three L's, X for the two 0's, etc. Single letters,
apostrophes, the length and formation of the words
are all hints. Each day the code letters are different.


10-28


CRYPTOQUOTE


CND PZYSFID

TFGFBZSRZP OT


WDOTSK TDSOCDG,


GFHHFBZSC


OWG CND


D RHCDW


PR


CNOC FC FP


CR BSOPP


PDJOTOCDSK. CNRIOP


CNDI

JOFWD


Saturday's Cryptoquote: GOD GAVE US THE GIFT
OF LIFE; IT IS UP TO US TO GIVE OURSELVES THE
GIFT OF LIVING WELL. VOLTAIRE


WORD s)G)R) DM)M))A)G)EY
BY JUDD HAMBRICK 2013 UFS / Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


....0 0 2nown DOWN
+440 PTS 0

0300 DOWN



Q1St Letter 411 DOWN
.( ) 0), + 7PTS 0

FOUR PLAY
TIME LIMIT: 20 MIN AVERAGE GAME 225-235 PTS TOTAL
Directions: Make a 2- to 7-letter word from the letters on each yardline. Add points
to each word or letter using scoring directions. Seven-letter words get a 60-point
bonus. All words can be found in Webster's New World College Dictionary.
10-28-13 JUDD'S SOLUTION TOMORROW )

WORD SCRPDIMMAGE SOLUTION BY JUDD HAMBRICK
WORD SCRIMIMAG 02013 UFS/Dist. by Universal Uclck for UFS
P6 rA2 0(!'2 AK) 1StDOWN= 27
P6 R2IQT 2 2nd DOWN= 16
". .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..- - .. .. .....................................3r ..W N :.................1 2
03 E1 A(2)S2(Ei(S2) 3rd DOWN =124
(B6Q 03 S2 ( 4th DOWN =127
C6 E1 ) ( F. ) R()2 BONUS DOWN = 82
AVERAGE GAME 240-250 PTS JUDD'S TOTAL = 376
10-27-13


DAILY COMMERCIAL
I DENNIS THE MENACE


FAMILY CIRCUS


"Daddy, which comes first,
autumn or fall?"


DILBERT
ACCORDING TO STUDIES,
EMPLOYEES WILL WORK
HARDER IF THEY THINK
THEIR MANAGERS CARE
ABOUT THEM.


PHANTOM


BLONDIE
TESNO RUSH ON THIS
PROPOSAL, 6UMSTEAD...O)
IT WHENEVER YOU WANT^



_"-'s '-" I
- ,, -- _- - .


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


Ai AND DON'T WORRY A5OUTL L
ACCURACY OR GET. STRESSED
^ OUT OVER SILLYV DETAILS




... : s_ :.


YOU REALLY SEEM FOCUSED,
DAG...WHAT'S UP?
U:-T.2S jus
SKLET'JUST SAY I
^KNOW A 5TlS %TING
(^OPERATION \ T
WHEN I
^^ ^SEE ONE! ^
Ic.
_ l ""-'-' '-- i f-


BUT THAT'S HARD
FOR IME BECAUSE
YOU'RE BASICALLY A
SAUSAGE CASING FULL OF
COFFEE AND ROTTING
ORGANS.


1 DOWN
1st Down
+ 50 PTS


'-I L 3 I NEW I I -


0000000
(Dm






DEIA ILY COM ERICIAIMARyIctbrE8S21


The prescription drugs


YOU NEED


*, .1


The over-the-counter items


YOU WANT


Uods Cug


With PUP, you'll get Part D prescription drug coverage and a quarterly allowance for over-the-counter items
included in your plan without the additional cost of drug coverage. Plus, all the benefits listed below.
How can you beat that?


PUP plans offer great benefits like:
* $0 additional monthly plan premium
* $0 deductible
* $0 visits with your Primary Care Physician (PCP)
* Up to $100 rebate of your monthly Medicare Part B premium
* Part D prescription drug coverage
* Comprehensive dental coverage
* Routine vision and hearing coverage
* Free all-access gym membership with SilverSneakers
* Free transportation to and from your health care providers
(New for 2014)
And much more!


NowH afB~llyu need to
NaviateyourMedcar
is on, itl P PIDcad


Attend an easy-to-understand seminar to learn more about PUP.

We have more than 1L4 free seminars this month for you to learn l
about PUP's Medicare Advantage plans. There's one right around the corner


from you. Simply give us a call to RSVP.

Plus, if you attend a PUP seminar,
you'll receive a $10 gas gift card.
There is no obligation to enroll in the plan.
Gift card cannot be converted to cash.


PUP-

Navigate your Medicare


PUP is an HMO plan with a contract with Medicare and the Federal Government. Enrollment in PUP depends on contract renewal. For more information
about PUP, please contact us at 1-866-571-0693, TTY/TDD 711 (Mon Sun 8am 8pm). A sales person will be present with information and applications.
For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings call 1-866-571-0693, TTY/TDD 711. The benefit information provided herein is a
brief summary, not a complete description of benefits. For more information contact the plan. Limitations, copayments, and restrictions may apply.
Benefits, formulary, pharmacy network, premium and/or co-payments/co-insurance may change on January 1 of each year. You must continue to pay
your Medicare Part B premium. Member events are designed specifically for PUP Members. Free gas card without obligation. Limit one gas card per
person from October 1 through December 31. H5696_PUP1108NS CMS Accepted


o^^TI *


^^^Call Kto sekwt iffce^KnsedBenefitsM
Nai gtradrsreyusettd !


1-5 -3157 TY 1


MEMEMMA


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 28, 2013


Adhes^^^iv
BANDAGESI


oool


Xc-2-




Monday, October 28, 2013


P I

PROFESSIONAL
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
BUY 2 SPOTS

AT $45 EACH
AND GET THE 3RD
HALF OFF


ATTENTION
REALTORS
5 LINES 7 DAYS

$30.44*
*Must be a Licensed Realtor


DAILY COMMERCIAL


S ZY-Fi/ I L lsIdletU 9 e by IO9 L LUIIV0III IIL OIIUiUOUIe
Sell your merchandise today at


Daily Commnercil

a \.


CHECK OUT OUR SPECL



ssifie
ercial.comlclassifieds, .


tS4


TO PLACE YOUR




352

Find It,
Lake: 352-314-3278 c


CLASSED AD IN PMRNT & ONLINE CALL




"3j14 FAST


, Buy It, Sell It, FAST!
)r Sumter: 352-748-1955 Monday Friday 8am 5pm


Legal Notices ...
Announcements.
At Your Service..
Financial .......
Employment ....
Pets/Animals ...


Classified Index
.........003 Merchandise Mart ..
........100 Real Estate/For RENT
........200 Real Estate/For SALE
........300 Manufactured Homes
........400 Recreation ........
.........500 TransDortation ......


.... 600
.... 800
.... 900
.. 1000
..1100
.. .1200


2
Legal Notices

003 Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR LAKE COUNTY,
FLORIDA GENERAL CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 35-2013-CC 336
SUNRISE LAKES COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION,
INC., a Florida corporation not for profit,
Plaintiff,
V.
DORIS LEWIS, THERESA THOMAS, UN
KNOWN TENANT NO. 1, and UNKNOWN
TENANT NO. 2,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO
S45.031, FLORIDA STATUTES
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to
the Final Judgment entered in the case of
SUNRISE LAKES COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION,
INC., and DORIS LEWIS, THERESA THOMAS,
UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1, and UNKNOWN
TENANT NO. 2, 'n.l; ;.,-,ll .t- Dn.-fi.n.-h, nt-
in the ChircuitC 1oi 1,, ,i i, i hi, ,h,,,'1 .......
in and for Lake County, Florida, CASE NO.
35 2013 CC 336, the undersigned Clerk will


003 Legal Notices
sell at public sale to the highest and best bid
der for cash that certain real property situate
and being in Lake County, Florida, described
as follows:
Lot 43, SUNRISE LAKES PHASE I, according
to the plat or map thereof described in Plat
Book 48, Pages 37 39, of the Public Records
of Lake County, Florida.
Street Address: 16651 Rising Star Drive,
Clermont, Florida 34714
This sale will be held by the Clerk of this
Court at 11:00a.m. (Eastern Time) at LAKE
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1st Floor Lobby, 550
West Main Street, in Tavares, Florida on the
8th day of November, 2013 to the highest
bidder for cash, in accordance with Section
45.031, Florida Statutes.
Any person claiming an interest in the sur
plus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pen
dens must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.
DATED this 8 day of October, 2013
NEIL KELLY
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By:/s/W.TILLMAN
Deputy Clerk
Attorneys for Plaintiff
Usher L. Brown
Gregg A. Johnson
Brown, Garganese, Weiss & D'Agresta, P.A.
111 N. Orange Ave, Suite 2000
Orlando, FL 32801
Ad No.: 00413553
October 21 & 28, 2013


003 Legal Notices
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF
PERSONAL PROPERTY
Notice is hereby given that the undersigned
will sell, to satisfy lien of the owner, at public
sale by competitive bidding on
November 14, 2013 at the times and loca-
tions listed below.
The personal goods stored therein by the fol-
lowing:
2:30p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility
located at: 1970 S. Hwy 27, Clermont, Fl.
34711 (352) 242 6602
Unit #371 Joey Ingram No description on
original lease, Unit #668 Rebecca Robbins -
Furnature, Household goods,
Unit #684 Robert Perry House Hold Items
3:30p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility
located at: 18286 Apshawa Rd. Minneola, Fl.
34715(352)241 8001
Unit #827 Tabernacle Of The Enlightened -
equipment, supplies, furniture, Unit #1007
Roland Sone household items
4:30p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility
located at: 300 E. Division St. Minneola, Fl.
34715 (352) 394 0501
Unit #B70 Floyd Lussier Household Goods,
Unit #D63 Ella J. Benavidez Household
Items
Purchases must be made with cash only and
paid at the time of sale. All goods are sold
as is and must be removed at the time of
purchase. Extra Space Storage reserves the
right to bid. Sale is subject to adjournment.
Thank You, Extra Space Storage.
Ad No.00414143
October 28 & November 4, 2013


Wg W rn ~$14,986 wgm r
11 MALIBU
LEASE LEASE
FOR299 1348A FOR$239

$O DOWN 1- $0 DOWN


# 13487 '
STARTING @

1970.$19,917


I 1101 Il '.2.
t $24,298


DEADLINES
For Insertion COPY DATE
Friday Thursday, 5pm
Saturday Friday, 3pm
Sunday Friday, 5:00pm
Monday Friday, 5:00pm
Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pm
Cancellation for ads running Saturday must be made by
3pm Friday. Cancelations for Sunday & Monday must be
made by 5:00pm Friday.
ADJUSTMENTS
..,,hb,........,h h,,,. ...,
first day of publication It you nd an erroi call the classified
department immediately at 314-3278 o 748-1955
* The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for
S ..... i .*- . .ii ,i ,h ,


WHO'S MAKING NOISE IN TOWN?
Subscribe today and find out!


Call for home delivery
Lake 787-0600 Sumter 877-702-0600

The Daily Commercial
www.dailycommercial.com


*ll~lil~iilJ^M~lli~llUIiyV


(I ,1 "H ( j ^ -> i ( - - ^ . . ^ ^ - ( ^ s i^ i'.= ^* 1


.' .7

ig


--bomooll


T T T




Monday, October 28, 2013


A/


Local, Trusted
A/C Expert
Kalos Services
352-243-7088
KalosFlorida.com
Lic.# CAC 1814620

Florida Air & Heat Inc.
Your Comfort Company
For All Your Air Conditioning
& Heating Ne'dCs
F 352-326-3202
ering lake County State Licence f
LL.. since 1986 CAC1814030

Shawn A/C EZ Heats
j I Repairs at great prices. !
Residential & Commercial
407-617-0450
U. Li.CAC1817515 State Certified '




'k Eustis Senior Care
Assist#4 l.kg acilit), A 8 93
Accepting New Clients for our
brand new bedrooms.
Call Rhea, RN at 352-551-5307
for inquiries and a free tour.

Aurora Home Care Inc.
"Illuminating Care"
Companions/Homemakers
Serving all of Lake, Sumter. Marion Counties
Rates stort at $18.50/hr *4hr min.
Aurorahomecareinc.org. Lc/IAns
Ahca#23912 Office: 352-435-7751
Toll Free: 866-702-6197


Serving Lake, Sumter
& S. Marion Counties
n We Service All
Appliance Brands
Licensed/Insured
Free Service Call
w/Repair
15+ Years Exp. 24 Hr. Emergency Svc.
We Don't Want To Be The Biggest
Just The Best
Eric Wolf 352-630-2202


AutoSeric


Bajmthroomm
Remodeling


-attu
Refnisin


I BlnsSc s I


Cabinetry


Clenin[ g Sile rv1i 'Lces

iStucky's Carpet
Cleaning
Spring Special
2 Rooms & Hall $50
352.365.9889


ScKreening IH


Simone's Cleaning Services
Commercial/Residential
Reliable/References
SLiciBonded-10 Yrs Exp.
J pImmediate Availibility-
Flexible Hours
4 11 Call: Simone
407-844-1183S

ESP Services
Doctors Visits Cooking & Laundry
Pet Caring General Errands
Housekeeping
Call For A Free In-Person
Consultation
352-348-6408

CLEAN SWEEP
(Clutter Free Cleaning)
lean, Sort, Pack or Spring Clean
Ref's & Yrs. of Experience
\ 352-742-0014
Reasonable Rates
Computer



Your PC Repair Specialists
Fast friendly service at a
flat rate affordable price.
g Education & Repair
'In your home or our office.
Call
352-897-1309




QUALITY CONCRETE & BLOCK
8x10 $500.00 10x40 $1200.00
Includes labor, concrete & cleanup
ast turnaround, no hassle & local
#CRC1326327, Ins. & References
BRIAN DEGAGLIA
[352-267-5723

is Concrete For Less
A 8x10 Slab $450
Me MINT 10x40 Slab $1325
Includes Concrete & Labor
* Blocking/ RefL/licJIns.
: Pbillip 352-504-8372


We ELIMINATE all trip
hazards due to UNEVEN and
or RAISED concrete.
Commercial/Residential
Concrete Grinding is 1/2
the cost of replacement.
Entry ways Ramps Sidewalks
Driveways Puddling Water, etc.
Insured
(8771 454-0113 (tOll free]
Alconcretegrinding.com




METAL TILE SHINGLE ROOFING
New Construction or Re-Roofing
B 308 Oak Street
Lady Lake, FL 32159
352-430-2773
www.sackroofing.com
Serving the Tri County Area For 26 Years




104LVI Lic'#CBC1252465
%,DOOR & LOCK SERVICE
We Repair, Replace and Install
Emergency Services Available!
(352) 314-3169




352-978-7015
PremlerPowerlnc.com
Licensed, Bonded, Insured



ER #13014129



B Daniel Byars
Rescreens
Ps.Pauo.ol Elclosaas
All Ahmlnumin Reairsi
EESTIMATES
.4A08.2142


I Triple Crown
STile & Wood
Installation & Repairs
Owner does all work.
Free Est. Lie/Ins
3524274825
.. . ...... .


.^u^ *Bcu^Jb'c7
All-Natural Cleaning Service
jwants to clean your cobwebs!
11f^ Quality Cleaning with
\ only natural products.
352-348-6576 Uc/Ins
www.bambisollnaturalcleaning.com


I' `ffl^ki Mb- D&B RENOVATIONS
t. er ILcepfolm- 352-572-1847
Mal *FREE ESTIMATES

All Makes &M1ls. 11"ONE CALL DOES IT ALL"
Broken Spring Belfacomi f ^ Bathroom Remodels, Flooring,
I 10%Of w/tlisad i Painting, Pressure Washing,
Privacy Fence AND MORE
75 352-347-64 11 Insured & Experienced


L' #CBC1252465
Amr-"211dae'
'% GARAGE DOORS
Complete Service & Installation
Lake County's Largest Provider!
We Sell & Program Remotes!
352 1 748-4575 1


Repairs &
Garage Door Replacements
& Locally Owned
Gate Afl Work
Warranted
Licensed & Insured midfldoorcom
352-630-0292 Shane Blanton



rage door installation/repair svcs
Spring Replacement. Free Est.
e service all of Central FLA.
J Uc/Ins. Call 352-615-1294




i Affordable HRome
t Repair, LLC
Mobile Home Repair Apt. Clean Outs
& Repair s Decks & Ramps
Soffits/Siding Doors/Windows
Painting Tile Works Lic/Ins
Call Pat 3524-51-6073

Dave Hillrs Handyman & Painting
Door & Window Installion
yCarpentry,
LL-1 Home Improvement,
SDrywall& More! Just Ask!
Professional Service
L/Icns. 352-259-5357

VIkMfMTU IfiiDM Jj
:-:-:-Home Repair:::::::
SPressure Washing Painting
Flooring Carpet Clean Outs
Clean Ups Hauling Licensed
352-787-7056

-~ John Philibert, Inc
f e do Everything from Ceilings to
Floors. Window and Doors,
Pantries, Cabinets and more.
Your pesky Leaks gone, Your Soffits
we Fix, and Houses We'll Paint From
inside and out, we'll make it great UcL/Ins
JPHandy.com(352) 308-0694


Mike Shoffstall
Call 352 552 1875
1.__AOUNGLE HU 3
REPAIRS AI
Repair everything Replace anything.

M. Luci Carpentry
Lic./lns. Res./Comm.
Repairs & Renovations
Drywall, Trim & Rotted Wood
HCall Mick
,,386-523-5015



Tru ied, Qua/ity Craftsmanship for 30+ years
Kitchens Bathrooms Windows
Vinyl Siding Decks Painting/Staining
Tile/Marble Lanai Enclosures
Mike Lalonde 352-409-8311
mike(arimnage4rne.coms




H~i a ul'ingw si S


Service


Local Agent
Long Term Care Ins.
Medicare Supplements
Critical Care Ins.
Cancer Ins.
Call Bill Bell
352.589-0454 or 352.551.3504

Ask Me About
Medicare Insurance
Robert Lange
352-742-2425
lange.rob.ins@gmail.com




Irrigation'7 Tune-Up
$35A Check & Adjust
$= J Entire System.
3J5 Provide Written Est.
To Fix Problems!
Lower Your Monthly Cost
352-409-3163

r 3 Sprinkler
Repairs
Timers, Valves, Heads,
Leaks, etc.
(352) 787-9001
That's all we do since 1979
S Native, 4th Generation




I.C.C. Bobcat a Tree Svc. Inc.
S Land Clearing/Excavating
0i- RFill Dirt/Clay
*."J auling/Debris Removal
^ Stump Grinding
Demolition/Grading/ Driveways
Owner Operator
352-455-7608

CHRIS CANNES LANDSCAPE
1c l hin mutl
Lawn Maliitiunce, Haudscue, Patios. I
Ietalilg Walls, NalIL, Sodding
Loeshurn 536-3106


j bPremier Scapes
VFW'' & Services Inc.
Land Clearing Bush Hogging
Debris Removal
Hauling Free Estimates
352-308-5508





Landscaping
rimming, Mulching,
Sod, Tree Trimming,
Pavers & Much Morel
Armando Santamario
352-587-1323




SDon's "MOBILE"
S Lawn Mower Repair
I^. I Come To You & Repair
S Your: Lawn Mower, Trimmer,
S Blower, Chain Saw, etc.
I 35+ Yrs. Exp. Res/Com
(352) 450-7661


a IfI gnLam* GUI EW
-loubco -Tro@Tdrigflg-Prr Wasninni
FREE ESTIMTES UCIN&.
We Take A Bits Out Of Ovw Prticlng
352-326-8712 / 352-406-3354


rar LAWN I
FeSPRAYING
I Feizerv-Weeds-Insects


- it: iI^iI.


BOYDS
You call it, We haul it!
352
460-7186




METAL TILE SHINGLE ROOFING
New Construction or Re-Roofing
| 308 Oak Street
Lady Lake, FL 32159
352-430-2773
www.sackrooflng.com
Serving the Tri County Area For 26 Years


(352) 348-6923
Tim Mundy Painting
& Pressurme Cleaning Services, n,.
Sere Quality Is Nso Accident"
\ Licensed & Insued


I


- I


i


Tree Service At
Reasonable Rates
I ran climb the highest trees,
and I can mow te. biggest
Ilawvns, but please don't ask me
Sto leap tall buildings[
Fair racing. TrimiTrees,
i hrbs e do l
Cut Lawns & Clean Ups
CalTronv for estimate 352-759-2080
|Don't Stress Call The Best!
De-^S pendable Commercial
SLawn Services
Ra Lis/Ins. Designer
land Landscaping, Trimming,
a ns, b Shrubs. We do it all
ai ,,Rick 352-427-8919T
Cwawrds Lawn

deendUal/Commercial


800-9985




LandscpingIndsgailn aimid Ion.
Reasonale, DepedaSle. Exirtaenced
Office 352-552-4556 Cell 352-702-6460
C Alls Lawn
~and Tree
E < a haCService
6Natural Land
O I Clearing (Goats)
&BEST PRICES" Free Est
352-460-7186




TW^ IS^n~r^,;Service
i & It Center
.SaESS 352-602-1735
At Venetian Gardens
Marina on the
Harris Chain of Lakes.
No Trailer. No Problem.n i
Boat Repairs & Svc. on water

COVERED BOAT SUPS FOR RENT
ifwnPalms Maria locaed onI
Irake Griffin. Water & elec. avail.
weekly, Monthly or Yearly. BOAT
RENTALS: Pontoons,
Jon Boats, Kayaks & Canoes.
CallI 352-787-4514
ServServc











Bill'rs Moving
Fla. Mover Rgot NO: 2095
Owner On Every Job
Fair Rates & 27+M ,s. Exp
352-669-4456
Toll Free 888-444-3559

Uttle John's Movers &
Storage 352-812-4889
Serving Lake, Marion,
& Summer Counties
1-15 items same day delivery
Local & Long distance moves
SLoading & unloading pods, rental
trucks, & storage units.
We have trucks going up &
down195 &175
"Less Than a POD" "Door to DoW"
You're Coming ....Your Neighbor is Going[
Jump on Board and Save
SERVING ALL 50 STATES
One item to a full house!3
We will get off the interstate for youl
ljm9575@yahoo.com
US DOT #24406621


t assurance Paintin g,
Serv "I you want quality, you want us!"
Ip'wYl Inmt-E teCnte-s In
I^ New Coasuucusa
* Ucongsd/isn e ov
t ks sto rubs.
I -- 352-483-6915 I
"w~ulesyssThanaepODintinDonc tomDor








ry PROFW[~aIONAL.
g- :=PAI N'llN O, INC.
Y ommercil urS NEioSGing
&m Residenial(^352) 267-6430
Jum p o n Boarl d and &naTred
STRO/XERVIORPING AL&5 STATERStf


DAILY COMMERCIAL




Monday, October 28, 2013


John Philibert, Inc
For All Your Interior/Exterior
fPainting Needs.
SWe Also Offer
Driveways Patios
And Faux Finishes Lie/Ins
Call John @ (352) 308-0694
JPHandy.com

New England Painter
CLA Semi-Retired
Hg 30 Years Exp
Interior, Exterior, Pressure
Washing No Job Too Small
Bob Kelley Painting g
352-702-7739

CLAUDE WILD PAINTING
High Quality Reasonable Prices





I Affordable Home
r Repair, L1C
Interior/Exterior Painting
Free Pressure Washing with all
ExeirPaints.Driveways and Decks
NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL Lic/Ins
Call Pat 352-551-6073

Intener a Exlenle1
Inoe Coaungi
Sealanlts i
c mantel coming
Pressure Cleaning
Uc. Ins.I Free Estimates
352-728-4561I




O JBINDOOR PEST
CONTROL
As low as $20 per me.
352-3571-5905
Pest Exterminator


1312 W. Main St.
(Next to Pep Boys)
352-787-2770
20Years in Leesburg



nSince 969
Specializing in
Vandas.
l7r3-V1 _Call for hOurs
F Wvln, 352-787-9001
1 im o2902 South St.
---- Leesburg, FL
GoodwinOrchids.com

Pluming161 ~


Family Owned & Operated\
Residential & Commercial
www.PrimePlumbinginc.com
(352) 383-3440 CFIcI142675

;c Plumbing, LLC
MAl PlumDIng Repairs Comm/Res
KItcheos a Bath Remodels
Disposal, Watr HNeater, Gas Piing,
Draln/Sewer Cleaning,
No Grout Showers, 24 Hr. Emergency
u- lcn. s [(3521 343-3763




Ace Pool Service
Complete Pool Services
Motor & Pump Repair
Pool & Patio Remodeling
Servicing Commercial & Residential
Properties Since 1969
Licensed/Insured Free Estimates
352-735-3050
Prss r
CleanjTingUI -


AniericajuPesj Control i ,
Termites Rodent Exclusions i I
German Roaches -
Property Inspectionsrs os I S,*S S **
Soil Pre-treatment
Lic/Ins 352-446-2318t'.Is
wS0 nt ii -.11



Tohae your





(352 36-823 orby mai


352.260.7490
0 4[; MWOK W1=1: IN I[H
All Airports, Cruise Terminals,
Hotels, Casinos & Attractions
Shands-VA and Jacksonville Mayo


-Professionam

SLHAME T Providing
N No-Cost Svcs.
to Lake county
Sexual assault victims 24/7/365.
On-Call Rape Advocacy
Counseling, Legal Assistance
SHotline 352-787-1379




S0*vt e Pry
RoofL LLC
iShingleTile Licensed Bonded Insured I
SMetal and Rubber esidential/Commercial
Roof Systems RC29027460
(352) 669-6607 I

METAL TILE SHINGLE ROOFING
New Construction or Re-Roofing
B 308 Oak Street
Lady Lake, FL 32159
352-430-2773
www.sackrooflng.com
Serving the Tri County Area For 26 Year

#1 IN ROOFING
Leak Repairs Shingles/Flat Roof
Lifetime Metal Roofs Screen Rooms
Lic. #CCC1329936
Villages Rooling and
Construction, Inc.<:
FREiE ROOF ESTIMATES
3B2-314-3B2BI

L Lake Contracting, Inc.
GAF Certified
Shingles, Metal or Flat
Additions, Remodels, Renovations
Roof to Foundation
3 52-602-8794
**B c.WCC15075S6 CCC1326899


SECURITY TRAINING
Security "D'&-G" Lic.
PLUS: FL. Concealed Lie.
^ gNRA Instructor Training
Ladies Only Classes Avail.
352-350-2855
1L SsOanll www.TheRightTraining.com



Speda~ze4Storage Sofutions
Now is tlie time...
To organize your life!
Custom Closets, Iome Office, Garages
Tailored To Your Needs,
17 Years Exp.
Free Hlonme Design Consultation
352-33-7058 407-718-6818 (Cell)



John Philibert, Inc
For All Your Tile Needs
Pergo, Ceramic Tile,
Travertine, Vinyl & More
Call John @ (352) 308-0694
JPHandy.comrn LicInsi

RE-TILE
352-391-5553
Backsplashes Re-Tile Tub & Shower
Walls Grab Bars Floors
Handicap Baths Repairs
Leaky Shower Pan
Ins./Lic. 30 yrs. exp.





i '-fService
| JAC. Bobcat a Tree Se. mIncl
lintosldential/Commercial
-Trimming/Removal
SPalmsal/Hedges/Stump Grinding
Debris removal/Hauling
Fill DirtlClay/Grading/Driveways
Aliens Insurance Work 24 Hirs
352-455-7608
A Affordable Tree
Service
WTree Trimming & Removal
Lake Cleaning Dead Wooding
Moss Spraying Lic/Ins
Free Est. Senior Discounts
352459-9428


U\ STUMP GRINDING
NW SPECIALIST
BJBEE TRIMMING
VIII MORE
352-551-4222
SPremier Scapes
W & Services Inc.
Complete Tree Service
Trimming Debris Removal
Stump Grinding Free Estimates
352-308-5508

Window KI''i

LU #CBC1252466
NwS WINDOWS
We Install, Replace and Repair I
Most Major Brands Available
Glass and Screen Repair
(3521 787-4545 I

I 352-587-2735
CRC# 1330701 Lanai Enclosures
HGlass Window
Replacement
Acrylic Windows
1 Screen Rooms

352-602-9849
SPARKLING
WINDOWS
MARK ANDERSON
Window Cleaning,
Screens, Tracks. FREE Estimates


SECURITY TRAINING
S Security "D"&-G" Lic.
q PLUS: FL. Concealed Lic.
NRA Instructor Training
Ladies Only Classes Avail.
35*3504"5 :

uc#DS1M13 www.TheRightTraining.com

Since 2007, The Right Training
has been providing Lake, Mar-
ion, and Sumter counties with
the BEST firearms training pos-i
sible.
Chief Instructor, Paul "Mac"
McIntyre (former Military, Law:
enforcement, and Private Inves-i
tigator) and his associate in-
structors are dedicated to
educating, not just the public,
but up-and-coming NRA In-
structors and the
dedicated men and women in
Private Security.
.... .......... .. .... .... .......


Compmoetlitive Prices
Quait Products
Proesseioa
Pidwll~lwuomp

Service
109 W.lake mVewSt.Lad Lake
Behind Mom & Dad's Restaurant
www.bindlstdoess.kiz blindsforlss.com
352.75
Steve and Brenda Rizer

have owned Blinds 4 Less

since 2000. The business

is still in it's original

location in Lady Lake.

The company focuses on

strong customer service

and also selling the best

brand names in the indus-

try at very competitive

prices.


/ CHRIS CAINESLANDSCAPE
htMurisln!iw
Icueptjni Clonts
Lawn Maintenance, Hanscape, Patoes,
letalulig Walls, Manl., Sodding
LeeshurM 536-308
_..h.,.115%Off
'1IwUIII s
1 9*M W/Od I 58df a i LBOREscON10


Chris Carnes Landscape has been in
business since 2005 along with over
30 yrs experience in everything
from hardscapes such as patios,
retaining walls, to sod repair and
installations, to ripout of old
landscapes and design. We also can
provide maintainence to your newly
installed landscape or even mowing
maintainence services to even
sprinkler repairs. We serve all
projects big or small" create
landscapes one lawn at a time".
Mention this bio ad and receive 15
percent off when you call for your
estimate on any of our services.


I


DAILY COMMERCIAL





DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, October 28, 2013


003 Legal Notices

City of Wildwood
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
COLEMAN WATER TREATMENT PLANT
FLOOD REPAIRS
Notice is hereby given that the City of Wild
wood, Florida, will accept sealed bids until
2:00 p.m. November 27, 2013 for the follow
ing project:
City of Wildwood
COLEMAN WATER TREATMENT PLANT
FLOOD REPAIRS
Project # 142173088
At 2:05 p.m. November 27, 2013, the bids
will be opened and read aloud in the City
Commission Chambers at the Wildwood City
Hall located at:
City of Wildwood
lOONorthMain Street
Wildwood, Florida 34785
Pre Bid Conference
A mandatory Pre Bid Conference will be held
on November 6, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. in the
City Commission Chambers at the Wildwood
City Hall at the address shown above.
Please submit one (1) original and two (2)
copies of your bid in a sealed envelope re
fleeting on the outside thereof the bidder's
name and "Sealed Bid for Coleman Water
Treatment Plant Flood Repairs, City of Wild
wood, Project #142173088. The City will
consider all bids properly submitted at its
scheduled Bid Opening. The City of Wildwood
shall be the sole judge of the bid and the re
suiting agreement that is in its best interest
and its decision shall be final. All persons and
firms wishing to submit bids must obtain a
complete copy of the Bidding documents.
Prospective Bidders may obtain a complete
electronic (.pdf) copy of the Bidding docu
ments (no charge) via email by request to the
Engineer (contact information below). Pro
spective Bidders may purchase a complete
copy of the Bidding document at a cost of
$50.00 (pick up at engineer's office, non re
fundable) or $100.00 (Fed Ex 2 day delivery,
non refundable) from:
Kimley-Hom and Associates, Inc.
1'V .E F,.n i ,,,,'i '.rjr 1 ....i ..,1 t'
,,, -E l F I ,, ej I1
352-438-3000
City of Wildwood,
Bill Ed Cannon, City Manager
Ad No.00414335
October 28, 2013


100
Announcement


104 Special
Notices

NOTICE TO
ADVERTISERS
PLEASE CHECK YOUR AD FOR
ERRORS THE FIRST DAY IT APPEARS
SINCE THE DAILY COMMERCIAL WILL
NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
INCORRECT ADS AFTER THE FIRST
DAY OF PUBLICATION. IF YOU FIND
AN ERROR CALL THE CLASSIFIED
DEPARTMENT IMMEDIATELY AT
314-3278 OR 748-1955.
THE PUBLISHER ASSUMES NO
FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY FOR
ERRORS OR FOR COMMISSION OF
COPY. LIABILITY SHALL NOT EXCEED
THE COST OF THE PORTION OF
SPACE OCCUPIED BY SUCH ERROR.
CANCELLATIONS
CANCELLATION FOR ADS RUNNING
SATURDAY MUST BE MADE BY
FRIDAY BY 2:00, CANCELLATIONS
FOR SUNDAY & MONDAY MUST BE
MADE FRIDAY BY 5:00


105 Positions Wanted
HONEST, DEPENDABLE hard worker
looking for work. 352-508-9584

124 Professional
Services
COMMUNITY
SEMINAR:
How To Avoid Low
Back and Neck
'air ;ur, y!
Learn about DRSTM Protocol, a
breakthrough and successful
nonsurgical treatment for
herniated and degenerative
disc condition.
Featuring: Dr. Jason E. Davis
Davis Clinic of
Chiropractic, Inc.
Discussion of chronic
and severe back and
neck conditions,
treatment options,
respective advantages,
treatment for failed
back or neck surgery.
Q & A Period
Light Refreshments.
Reservations Preferred
3:00-4:00pm Tues.
OCTOBER 29, 2013
DAVIS CLINIC
OF CHIROPRACTIC
Reservations:
(352) 430-2121
DavisSpinelnstitute.com

134 Cemetery
Lots/Crypts
HILLCREST MEMORIAL 2 lots, opening
& closing w/2 vaults. Serenity sec-
tion. Worth 9,070 sell for $6,800.
Call 352-793-8102



200
At Your Service


201 Insurance

205 Adult Care
NOTICE
Florida Statute states, "It is a
misdemeanor for any person willfully,
knowingly, or intentionally to operate
or attempt to operate a family day
care home without a license or
without registering with the
department, whichever is applicable".
Florida Statute states, "No person
shall advertise a child care facility
without including within such
advertisement the state or local
agency license number of such
facility. The statute applies to anyone
with more than 1 unrelated child
in their home.


245 Financial

SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Contact us if your claim has been
denied or if you need help.
Over 30 yrs. exp.No fees or costs
unless your claim is approved.
Cooper Consulting
2228 South St., Leesburg
352-728-5552


250 Handyman
Hard working Lic. Business owner,
seeks to improve your home.
Ability to perform jobs including
Remodeling-TreeTrimming-Drywall-
Tiling, etc. References avail.
Call Robert Plante's
Home Maint. 352-484-3543



LAkkr .1')''IjHAHIJ~n MikA: ER 411.E
Reliable, Dependable! One call does it
all Lic/Ins. 352-409-4059

268 Moving
Two Brothers Moving


1 Room or a Full House
FL Reg. #1M1539
Russell & Todd Franks
Lie. & Ins. Call 352-793-8960

275 Plumbing
SSINCE
1987
KILEY&
SONS, INC.
A Fulii :,r ., Fij hinQ G .ij.rnv.
Lake 787-1904 Sumter 748-9500
CentralFloridaPlumber.com
VISIT OUR ONSITE SHOWROOM.
24 Hr. Emergency Service
Lic#CFC1426882

281 Roofing




MCHALE ROOFING INC
Re-Roofs and Repairs, Tile, Metal,
Shingles Flat Roofs & Mobile Homes
Excel. Ref's Lic & Ins. CCC1328197
Call 352-255-2758

SEIZE THE DAY'S
LOCAL AREA NEWS.
IThe Day Coi mum1I
www.dailycommercial.com


281 Roofing

#1 IN ROOFING
Villages Roofing & Construction Inc.
*Leak Repairs *Shingles/Flat Roof.
*Lifetime Metal Roofs. Free Roof Est.
352-314-3625. Lic. #CCC1329936

288 Tree
Service

1aAlrflfl'! & 11


MICHAEL'S TREE
& TRACTOR SERVICE
a FREE
l~kSYIMATES

Stump Grinding, *Tree Trimming &
Removal @Box Blading, @Bush
Hogging & Grading. Lic & Insured
Call 352-504-1597




300
Financial





400
Employment


405 Professional
BARBERS NEEDED
Great shop / location.
.ail nmig.,: ` -2-250-2881
MOBILE HOME PARK MANAGER
55 plus Community- Lake County,
Florida. Experienced on site property
manager responsible for overseeing
maintenance personnel, collection of
rents, communication with residents
and HOA matters and leasing and
selling of park owned homes. Quali-
ties include computer skills (excel) or-
ganized, self-starter, and good at
creative problem solving and market-
ing.
Please forward resumes to:
DiroU Ag:i):rno
dino@rangeconsulting.com


CROSSWORD
By THOMAS JOSEPH


ACROSS
1 Coped
6 Number
part
11 Church
sight
12 Remove,
as a
mistake
13 Fierce fire
14 National
bird
15 Puppy
sound
17Capitol
Bldg.
worker
18Take in
again
22Singer
Guthrie
23Joined
forces
27 Makes
headway
29Took the
wheel
30Think
highly of
32 Divisible
by two
33 Makes like
a bulldog
35TV spots
38 Matador's
foe
39 November
birthstone
41 Battery
end
45Green
hue
46 Earth's
neighbor
47Wendy's
friend


410 Sales













SALES /MARKETING P/T
$$$$ START IMMEDIATELY $$$$$
Join a professional marketing team
working in Lake County. I need ma-
ture, professionals that would like to
interact with people in local stores at
a kiosk while working on commission
basis. Current representatives average
$15.00 to $20.00.hr. Candidates
MUST BE SELF-SUFFICIENT and able
to workA as an independent contractor
with a car, computer, and a cell
phone. This is an extremely well pay-
ing part-time job. This is not customer
service. Possibilities for management
and full time for committed achievers.
CALL OR FAX 800-781-1547

425 Clerical

RECEPTIONIST / OFFICE ASST.a
Self-starter w/organizational skills &
computer experience. Full Time.
Email resume to:w




DENTAL ASSISTANT T-
Expedincd only.$15/hr.
Fax resume to: 352-787-9036
NO PHONE CALLS
DENTAL ASSISTANT --
Experienced for busy office. Must
have expanded duties & radiology
certified. Looking for outgoing
dependable, professional person must
be able to multi task.
352-751-1178
Lady Lake Area

435 Medical

- LPN/MA
needed part time or PRN. for busy
dermatology practice in Villages &
Leesburg offices. Prefer office exp. &
ability to cover multi positions.
Fax resume to :352- 365-0932
I I
Needed P/l in Leesburg.
Fax resume 352-323-9507


435 Medical

OPTICAL TECH/ DISPENSER
Exp. Lab Tech need for busy optha-
molic practice in The Villages. Dis-
pensing experience a plus.
Apply in person:
Beacon Advanced Eye Care
1128 Bichara Blvd.
Lady Lake, FL 32159

450 Trades




CDL CLASS "A" OTR
*BLUE CROSS/BLUE SHIELD
*AFLAC
*GREAT PAY/HOME TIME
*REGIONAL/OTR
CALL TODAY!! 352-357-1300 X200

CONSTRUCTION LABORERS
Class A or B CDL preferred.
Will train. Must travel.
Paid medical & leave.
DFWP/EOE
Call 352-383-3159
Ext. 229


ELECTRICAL
APPRENTICES
Applicants must have experience and
a clean driving record, high school di-
ploma or equivalent. Company is an
EOE and Drug-Free Workplace. Excel-
lent health benefits, 401k and PTO;
MVR & Background checks.
Apply in person at:
PIKE'S ELECTRIC, INC.
719 Industrial Drive
Wildwood, FL 34785

LEAK TECHNICIAN -
F.oo .n. rlunr.inr.. Clean background &
drivers lic. req'd. Exp. preferred.
Call Phil 352-536-9300

DRIVERS
Home EVERY Weekend, Dedicated
Southern Lanes & OTR! All miles PAID
(Loaded or Empty)! Or Walk Away
Lease: NO Money down, NO Credit
Check! Call 1-888-880-5916

TIMBERWOOD PROPERTIES
is currently looking for a shop em-
ployee to learn the cabinetry business
from the ground up. No experience
necessary, just a general knowledge
of tools. Must be 18, have a valid
driver license, and be willing to work.
Please apply at 1735 Tally Box Road,
Leesburg. Call 352-435-4657
for directions only.


CH AMP HARP
REV E TER
ELAT ENISECE


DETR ASATER



ASSUME WI E

JUNIPER NYE
ERAF R V IANE

T RUCE I E ME


Saturday's answer


19 Important
times
20Stepped
down
21 Unembel-
lished
24Chess
turn
25At any
time
26 Bears'
lairs
28 Fizzy drink
31 Cow call


34 Opera
cheer
35 Resting on
36 Portion
(out)
37 Rotisserie
part
40 Broad st.
42 "Not
dare!"
43 Used a
spade
44 Language
suffix


NEW CROSSWORD BOOK! Send $4.75 (check/m.o.) to
Thomas Joseph Book 1, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475
1 12 13 14 15 6 17 I8 19 110


10-28


CROSSWORD PUZZLE


48Missouri
tribe


DOWN
1 Bit of
ointment
2 Building
wing
3 One


time
4 Loafer
5 Kilmer
poem
6 Ruby
7 Writer
Levin
8 Jokes
9 Cruise
stop
10 Freshman,
usually
16Auction
unit
18 Fury


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 28, 2013




Monday, October 28, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


455
Restaurants/
Hotels/Clubs

BARI ENUHEK-1-F-I
MUST be exp'd. Evenings & Wknds.
Apply in person 3-5prn
VIC'S EMBERS SUPPER CLUB
7940 US Hwy. 441 Leesburg, FL

DELIVERY DRIVERS & KITCHEN HELP
Apply in person at: Taki's #2 in Eustis
1600 S. Bay St. Eustis

NOW HIRING -
SERVERS, COOKS CASHIERS
Experienced Preferred.
ALSO DISHWASHERS & HOSTESSES
Apply within: TAKI'S RESTAURANT
1324 N. Blvd. W., Leesburg


470 General

DELIVERY PERSONNEL
Office equip dealer seeks reliable per-
son to deliver equip & supplies, assist
in inventory control & light bldg.
maint. Must have neat appearance,
good communication skills, able to
follow written/oral directions, & be in-
surable. Must be able to safely oper-
ate a box truck. Heavy lifting req'd.
Please do not respond if you can't
pass a drug test, MVR & background
check. M-F 8am -5pm.
Apply in person at:
Mon.-Fri. 9am -12pm.
2854 West Main St.
Leesburg, FL.


COME JOIN
OUR TEAM









KENNEL/ASSISTANT P/T
Exp. preferred but not required.
May fax resume to 352-589-0764
or fill out application at office
M-F 8-12pm or 2-4pm.
610 0 DoraAve., Eust s, Fl. 32726

MAINTENANCE WORKING
SUPERVISOR
Requires HS diploma, exp. in indus-
trial Maint., welding, fabrication & 3
phase electrical. Work is in mfg. envi-
ronment, doing general Maint. duties.
Work hrs. & days vary. FT, 1 st shift
w/benefits. Pay depending on exp.
$12-$17 hr.
Apply at Global Tire Recyling
1201 Industrial Drive
Wildwood or fax resume to:
352-330-2214


470 General

MARINE ACCESSORIES MGR. FT
Experienced in boat parts, accesso-
ries, phones & cash drawer.
Email resume to:
SharonNobles@NoblesMarine.com
DFWP/EOE

SALES CLERK
9am -5:30pm, 2 days/wk. Health
Food Store. Call 352-365-6477

SCHOOL BUS
DRIVERS NEEDED
Training provided.
Lake County Schools, Transportation
352-728-2561 or
Apply online: www.lake.kl 2.fl.us

SEASONAL HOUSEKEEPER
FOR HOTEL
Apply in person at
Microtel, Lady Lake

VETERINARY TECHNICIAN/ASSISTANT
Small animal practice looking for a
new team member to fill a full time
position. Must have at least 2 years of
technician/assistant experience. Job
duties include everything from lab
work and surgery to dentistry and cli-
ent education. Salary negotiable de-
pending on experience. Microscope
skills & venipuncture a must!
Please email resume to:
Vetassistantjob@gmail.com





500
Pets/Animals



501 Pets
For Sale

AUSTRALIAN BOXER female approx. 2
yrs. Good w/kids. Free. 267-1711

GREAT PYRENEES/LAB MIX. Very Ig.
Shots & wormed. Free. 630-4272

560 Pet
Supplies

DOG CAGE Huge 2 x 25 & new large
dog bed. $70. 352-742-0250

DOG CRATE Large, hard plastic. 25W x
29D x37L. $50 obo. 352-321 -2174

DOG STROLLER up to 30lbs. Cup hold-
ers & carrier. $50. 352-602-7332

DRIFTWOOD for reptile aquarium (2
pc.) for 3ft. $100 407-878-6431

PET CARRIER 24"Wx36"L 30"H,
w/wheels. $40 Call 383-9589

PET KENNEL chain link w/gate 6'x9'
$99 SOLD!!!!


6oo00
Merchandise
Mart



601 Antiques

ANTIQUES, JEWELRY, Old Indian Rug &
Misc. All for $100. 352-348-7490

CLOCK electric Sail Ship good shape.
Made by Uniter. $95. Cal 793-5741

COKE BOTTLE old 1915, from Quincy,
FL, straight sided, $40 793-3877

DESK, 7 drawers w/chairs, solid wood.
1950's. $175 obo Call 483-1772

GLIDER w/cushions. Coverts to bed,
vintage. $100 Call 352-383-7607

PLAYER PIANO 1929, Schumann
w/bench & paper rolls. Electrification
installed. $600 Call 352-568-1354

SNUFF BOX antique European solid
sliver. $95 Call 352-314-0923

TOY TRAIN SET, Marx "0" gauge, 9pcs.
$40. Leesburg 352-874-5418

602 Arts/Crafts

CRAFTS/ SUPPLIES/ BEARS /TABLES
$100 takes all. 352-365-9519

SCRAPBOOK RACK 12X12 paper rack,
60 shelves. $50 352-742-1527

SCROLL SAW Dremel, 15". Moto 6"
Lathe model 700. $50. 315-9324

603 Collectibles

AUGUSTA XII Color Print 25 x 30, '92.
Framed/signed. $65. 330-4484

BUYING Baseball, Football, Basketball,
Non-sports cards 1870 to 1980.
Autographs, memorabilia, bobbin
heads. Sets, singles. No collection to
large. Call: 352-589-7981 or Email:
sportscards4john@aol.com
DOLL Boyd's Yesterdays Child, Laura
w/box & cert. $45. 352-360-0028

HOLLY HOBBY COLLECTION 45 pieces.
$100.352-315-1612

RECORD COLLECTION 113 LP's $100
obo Call 352-357-2218

604 Furniture

BAR STOOLS (2) 30", light wood, cloth,
swivel seat. Excel. $50. 365-1896

BAR STOOLS (4) white wood w/cush-
ion, $60. Call after 9am 259-5629


604 Furniture

BED King, w/mattress & frame. Good
cond. $150. 352-431-3952

BED Solid Iron, 100 yrs. old. $95. obo.
SOLD

BED Twin w/frame, mattress, box
spring, excel cond. $100 589-4915

BEDS Twin (2) including spreads if de-
sired. $95. 787-7157 or 552-7248

BUNK BED FRAMES red, excel, cond.
$100 obo. 352-516-7108

CHEST OF DRAWERS 5 drawers, no
smoking. Excel. $80. 246-9948

COMPUTER DESK. Good cond. $50.
Call 352-396-5739

CORNER TV wood entertainment cen-
ter, 4x4x2, $75. 715-971-8152

DESK / TABLE antique white, solid
wood. excel cond. $95 435-0823

DINETTE SET 5 pieces, solid oak, very
nice. $100 Call 352-460-0472

DINETTE SET Rattan glass top w/4
chairs on rollers. $99. SOLD

DRESSER Antique oak, 3 drawer, 31 "H
x43"Wx21"D. $95. 434-5314

END TABLES (2), golden oak. $50.
352-787-5917

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER 4 dr. 3 ad-
justable shelves. $50. 233-0464

MATTRESS Queen w/bed rails. $100.
Call 352-476-3476

MATTRESS Serta full size, clean. Ask-
ing $75. Please call 352-323-8079

MATTRESSES (2) twin, clean. $20 for
both. Call 352-357-1012

MEDIUM BROWN LEATHER COUCH,
chair and ottoman, wood/metal
cocktail and 2 side tables.Purchased
from Rooms to Go in July 2012. Still
in brand new condition, sofa is
86"$1150.00 352-586-1266

PATIO CHAIRS (4) w/cushions, like
new. $50. Call 352-636-1352

PATIO SET table, 4 chairs & 2 rockers
w/cushions. $50 obo Call 357-4169

PATIO SET, table w/2 swivel rocking
chairs w/burgundy cushions. New
cond. $150 Call 352-435-0823

RECLINER tan Microfiber. Good cond.
$100.262-441-0156

RECLINER, Swivels & Rocks. Marroon.
$45. 352-408-4711


604 Furniture

ROCKER/GLIDER Oak matching foot
glider. Excel. cond. $35 435-0888

SIDE SERVING TABLE w/wine rack &
granite shelves. $74.50 989-0222

SLEEP SOFA 68" long, 2 cushions, light
color. $50. 352-602-0202

SOFA & LOVESEAT, Sage, overstuffed.
$250. Good cond. $250.431-3952

SOFA 9', It. beige, excel cond. Wash-
able cushions. $50. 315-1908

SOFA BED Cream color. $100.
352-561-4940

SOFA Black Leather, 3 cushion, full
size. $30. 352-561-1167.

SWIVEL ROCKER full size green, good
cond. $25. Cell 608-347-1483

TABLE, Heart Shaped, 3 tier. brown,
good cond. $8 Call 352-504-6689

TWIN BED white laminate, new mat-
tress. $100. 352-250-4711

TWIN BEDS (2), complete w/linens.
$300. Call 352-589-1787

WICKER LOVE SEAT w/cushions, excel
cond. $40. SOLD

605 Appliances

Appliances With Warranties
$75 & up! Used Beds all sizes!
*Buy *Sell *Trade *Fast delivery
Call Buzzy'S 352-315-9886
www.buzzysbeds.com

DISCOUNT
APPLIANCE
Repair-Sales-Service Most Repairs
$60 Plus Parts





WASHER, DRYER,
REFRIGERATOR
"Don't Toss It
Fix It For Less"
Buying Clean
Washers & Dryers
Days, Evenings & Weekends
Call Now
352-874-1238

DISHWASHER GE motor is only 3 yrs.
old. $45 Call 352-603-9604

DISHWASHER KitchenAid, almond.
Works good. $35 obo. 669-1163

DRYER GE gas, white, good cond. $50
Please call 352-404-8288

STOVE Elec. Propane water heater,
window A/C. $75. 865-789-6393


Four IN sFtChoke"


In-Print & On-Line




rrnrr nw^ U-mw tAiiJii 2M J
-,w 1 O1 l rt-111a A^^WtW11niire^^rrt:f,


:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::I T


m^rl


ti/i.
-


., .,.


S.- t T.
.... '* *\ *"

:. : 4 ..,


605 Appliances

MICROWAVE Emerson Professional se-
ries. $30 obo. 352-431-3975

MICROWAVE GE under cabinet, like
new. $55 Call 352-603-9604

MICROWAVE GE. Model JES1451BJ02.
Black. $55. Call 352-589-1629.

MICROWAVE Samsung, over stove, blk.
Used 2 yrs. $80 Call 352-742-3445

OVEN White Whirlpool, glass top. $100.
Call 352-483-5504.

REFRIGERATOR dorm size, good cond.
$100 Call 352-702-6860

REFRIGERATOR Frigidaire, Gallery
side/side. Stainless/blk, ice/water in
door. Like new. $550. 729-2160

REFRIGERATOR GE 18.3, no frost. Runs
good. $80 Call 352-742-3445

STOVE, electric, Frigidaire, white, self
cleaning. $150. Call 352-455-0215

WASHER & GAS DRYER SET GE. Good
cond. $175. 352-516-1556

606 Electronics

GAME PSP Sony brand new in box.
$100 Call 352-455-3342

RECEIVER Denon with remote. Very
good cond. $99. 352-323-4862

STEREO SYSTEM Panasonic, CD, w/5
CD changer. $30 obo 357-3728

TELEVISION Toshiba color, works
good. $50 Call 352-365-6075

TELEVISION 19" color. Cable ready.
$30.352-874-2806.

TELEVISION 27" Sony Trinitron, very
good picture. $60 352-589-8363

TELEVISION 55" rear projection. Hi-
tachi. $100. 407-800-6699

TELEVISION, Emerson 32" color w/re-
mote. $50 obo Call 352-728-2668

608 A/C & Heat

AIR CLEANER UV light for A/C. Kills
mold/bacteria. $100. 267-1711

AIR CONDITIONER Whirlpool window
unit. 8000 BTU $95. 728-2534

AIR CONDITIONER window unit, 5000
BTU's. $50 Call 352-753-7075

624 Children's
items

BABY BATHTUB, toddler potty & sassy
seat. $22. 352-455-7557.

BARBIE TOWNHOUSE, good cond. $60.
Please call 352-669-4789

CLOTHING for girls, size 7-8, great se-
lection. All very nice. Over 200
pieces. $150 Call 352-253-0245

ROCKING HORSE hand crafted. $95.
Call 352-406-6122

625 Building
Supplies/
Materials

JACUZZI Whirlpool Bath No pump. $75
obo Call 352-314-2123.

KITCHEN SINK stainless steel, 8" deep,
W/Delta faucet. $40 253-2357

PATIO DOORS Glass. (2) 80" x 35.5".
$20. both. 352-365-0191

PATIO DOORS Sliding glass. White
Frame. $75. Call Dave. 255-7623

SHOWER DOOR opaque glass. 27
1/4"x 69 1/4". $50. 446-7849

SLIDING GLASS DOORS Set of 3. 47"W
x 78"H. $60. 352-617-9000.

STUDS (20) 2X4'x104", grade 2. &
other wood. $100 obo. 484-3650

WOOD -8/4 solid, mahogany, maple,
oak for lathe turning. $2. 357-2708

630 Garage Sales

BUSHNELL
Thur. Sat. 8 4pm. 107 S. Hop-
kins St. Collectibles, tools, Christ-
mas, household, lotsa good stuff!

635 Garden

CHIPPER / SHREDDER Craftsman, 9hp,
cuts up to 3" $195. 352-434-5395

CONCRETE FOUNTAIN, no pump. Good
cond. $100 Call 352-735-1570

GLIDER COUCH & 2 CHAIRS alum.,
vintage. $100 Call 352-617-5498

LAWN MOWER Briggs engine, runs
great. 20" cut. Only $50 728-4913

PATIO SET Small, 2 chairs, glass top.
$40.352-431-3952

PLANTS (10 Century) $100 Call
352-638-2246

RUBBER TREE PLANT. Beautiful, sym-
metrical. $20. 352-735-1647

STAG HORN FERN extra nice. $100.
Call 352-603-4113


TREE SALE
*Oaks, Sycamores, Cypress, Fig,
Mulberry, Cherry Laurel, etc.
* Palms, Queen, Pindo or Sago
*Special 6' +/- Oaks $10 or 15/$100
*Cypress or Oaks up to 12'
CATT'S TREES
352-669-1618

640 Guns

BOND ARMS DEFENDER 45 & 410 cali-
ber, 2 barrel over/under. Stainless.
Shot once. $345.352-988-4668

PISTOL 22 long rifle, model RG4 w/side
holster & 2 boxes of 22 long. As Is.
$99. SOLD!!!!


ww"%.Ij Ulu j E-1 MJ Ah




DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 28, 2013


640 Guns

AMERICAN RIFLEMAN MAGAZINES
(220+ issues). $65. 352-742-1409

REMINGTON Model 1903 Custom Rifle.
.30-06. $325. Firm. 352-408-2468

RUGER Mini 14 tactical. 2 Mags.
$1000. Call 352-751-5170

SHOT GUN SHELLS Vintage 410. $6.00
Call 352-728-2692

SHOULDER HOLSTER, leather.
Bugheimer 520A. 3 x 5. $15.
352-988-4668

SMITH & WESSON 38, Used once.
Stainelss. Excel. cond. $420.
352-272-8203

TAURUS ULTRALITE REVOLVER, .38
spec. $375. Sterling stainless steel
.22 pistol (pocket size)- $225. Wood
stock single shot .22 bolt action rifle-
$100. Taurus TCP .380 cal.- $325.
Cases. Others. Ammo included
with each. Prices are firm.
Call Dave (7 i.-' 949.'J0'8.

649 Medical

BED ALARM for patients who try to get
out of bed. $20.352-793-7027

CARRIER for power chairs or scooter
with fold out ramp. $75 SOLD

CARRIER FOR SCOOTER/POWERCHAIR
NEW, fits into hitch, 60" fold out
ramp. $195. 352-217-3437

SCOOTER 3 wheel, elec. new batteries,
looks & runs like new. $300
SOLD

SHOP RIDER 4 wheels, 24V w/charger.
$300 Call 352-343-6608

WALKER w/seat & basket. Good cond.
Blue. $1 00 Call 352-217-3195

650 Computers
& Equip

CARTRIDGES for Dell Printer Series # 5,
4 color/5 black. $90 all. 326-8111

COMPUTER TOWER HP, Pavilion 533W.
$60. SOLD 1ST CALL!

MONITOR Samsung flat screen 20".
$100. 352-459-0899

PRINTER CARTRIDGES KODAK 2 color
& 2 black. $30 Call 352-516-0999

PRINTER HP Office Jet 7310, all in one.
Great cond. $99 Call 589-1234

PRINTER HP PSC500, w/7 ink car-
tridges $60. 352-728-3273

652 Articles
For Sale

BACK THERAPY MACHINE Back Tech
2000, good cond. $100. 383-9589

BATH TOWELS 24, large, Excel cond.
All colors. $49. obo. 352-793-8102

BOOKS New, 22+ on the Kennedy's &
the Royals. $50. 352-516-2893

BRACELET Pandora, sterling silver 7.5,
no charms. $40. Call 324-2559

BREAD MACHINE Farberware, Auto-
matic. Like new. $25. 874-1862

CAMERAS (2) Cannon & Polaroid. $50.
for both. Call 352-787-1539

CERTIFIED PRINCESS DIANA DOLL
CLOTHES, 4 for $100. 217-4221

CHANDELIER FRUIT Red, beautiful.
$50.352-536-1744

CHESS SET hand carved oriental
pieces. $100 Call 704-530-4305

CHINA W.Dalton Imperial #5671, 41
pieces. $75 Call 352-455-6427

CHRISTMAS TREE 7' LED, pre-lit, in
box. 2yr. old. $75. 742-7256

CHRISTMAS TREE 7' Silver blue spruce
w/container. $40. 352-365-0376

CHRISTMAS TREE 7', no lights, storage
bag. $35 Call 352-314-3254

CIGARETTE MACHINE Powermatic, $75
Please call 352-800-1455

CLEANING MACHINE Steam Bullet, no
chemicals, like new $45. 787-7048

COFFEE MAKER KitchenAid. New. Paid
$189. Sell for $100. 352-978-7461


9am

Time to sell
that bed!


Ellen picked her price,
uploaded a photo ci-


It' |iisl thrI sil'plIe'


Dai Cmimercial
"Your First Choice" In-Print & On-line


652 Articles
For Sale

CURTAINS, lace, dusty pink. 45"W. 3
sets. ($400). $99. obo. 589-8515

DESIGNER CLOTHING Chicos/Cache,
10/pcs. $100. 321-246-4371

DISHES 12 piece setting w/extra serv-
ing pieces. $50. 352-365-0109

END TABLE new, solid natural Oak, $45
Please call 352-347-7350

EXERCISE CYCLE, gas blower & mirror
clock. $100. 352-323-1297

FAUX LEATHER JACKET size 3X med.
brown. $30. 352-343-3459

FIESTAWARE DISHES cups & saucers,
assorted colors $99 Call 250-8290

FIREPLACE w/2" fire brick wall. glass
doors. $95 Call 352-787-1134

FLOOR CLEANER Shark, cleans wood &
tile. New. $50. 352-326-5527

FUR CAPES 1/Red & 1/Black, Susan
Lucci. $100. 352-409-8264

GARAGE DOOR OPENER Genie, com-
plete 1.5hp. $40. 435-0809

GARMENT BAG bi-fold, like new. $20
Call 352-385-1830

HALLOWEEN COSTUME adult ladies,
$15. Call 352-434-9855

HALLOWEEN COSTUME Michael Jack-
son, w/accessories. $50. 742-2668

HOT TUB COVER Dark tan. Brand new.
6'7"'x 5'. $80. 352-321-8606

HOT TUB w/cover, steps & electrical
box, 13 jets. Excel cond. $500.
352-787-3987

ICICLE LIGHTS 190', light clips, & tim-
ers. NEW. $60. 352-504-0407

JACKET Black Leather size S/M cost
$100 sell for $35. 407-310-6628

JACKET Florida State men's Ig., quilted.
$25. Call 352-589-8064

JEANS, name brands (30 + pairs) size
12-14 &10 tops. $68 793-8102

JUICE EXTRACTOR Black & Decker.
Like new. $25. 352-385-7215

JUKEBOX 1963 Seeburg, glass &
chrome,. $100 352-307-8289

LADIES HATS & CLOTHING Summer &
Fall, good cond. $23 357-2248

LAWN CHAIRS (2) white, plastic w/blue
pads. $40. Call 352-742-2856

LUGGAGE Samsonite, hard sides, 3
piece set. $35 Call 352-357-1363

MAGAZINES (90) Bass Master. from
80's & 90's, excel. $50 360-6865

MATTRESS TOPPER 4" thick, king size
new cond. $99. 352-636-9358

MEN'S CLOTHING XLg shirts 40-44W
shorts. 10 pcs. $20. 321-246-4371

MEN'S DESIGNER CLOTHES, Pants 32
x 32. Shirts M-L. $75. 787-7348

MOTORCYCLE JACKET U.S made. Like
new 3XL. $100. 352-669-7544

MUSICAL CANDLES (2) battery oper-
ated. $35 Call 352-753-3974

OIL PAINTING beautiful sailing ship,
24"x30". $65 352-357-3043

POCKET NOVELS 37 Spencer series
mysteries. $30. 352-343-4633

PUNCH BOWL W/24 Cups. Gold trim &
white leaf pattern. $25. 742-5074

SEWING MACHINE Singer Feather-
weight, Excel cond. $325 Call
352-751-0369

SEWING MACHINE Singer, recently re
conditioned. $35 352-751-0369

SEWING MACHINE Singer. New in box..
Asking $90. Call 321-262-5485

SINGING PARAKEET ON STAND sensor
& batteries, new. $15. 360-1209

SLACKS Ladies size Med. petite. Bon
Worth, 6/pair. $25. 352-777-0045


<-


Fast, convenient and
on your schedule!


\A/\A/\A/ "lflhl, ri ,ri ,-,r l'l r


*Employment advertisements are excluded.
Please call 352-314-FAST to speak with a customer service rep.
Lake: 352-314-3278 or Sumter: 352-748-1955


652 Articles
For Sale

SUITCASE, SAMSONITE w/wheels, Ig.
excel, cond. $30. 352-343-1050

TEAPOT SET full size w/utensil holder,
Hummingbird. $50. 352-357-0225

TOOTHBRUSHES (2) SONIC CARE. New
$70 for both. Call 352-508-4786

TUXEDO Men's, Coat/Pants/Shirt, size
48-42. $65. 352-217-4809

VACUUM Bissell, pet hair eraser, like
new. $70 Call 742-9568

VACUUM Orick XL upright, like new &
Orick Air Purifier both for $175 obo.
Call 321-246-4371

WEDDING DRESS altered size 1.
Beaded, w/veil. $95. 787-7132

Wll BEATLES ROCK BAND GAME &
DRUM SET. $60. 352-343-9279

655 Musical
Instruments

BANJO 5 string, Kay. W/accessories.
$225. Call 352-343-6608

PIANO Bungalow Mission Style. Attrac-
tive oak finish. $100. 383-9132

660 Office
Furniture/
Supplies

COMPUTER DESK w/hutch. Good cond.
Heavy, Umatilla $100 771-2310

COMPUTER DESK, 3 drawers, very
good cond. $70 Call 750-5604

CORNER COMPUTER DESK, glass
w/chrome. $75 obo. 360-5787

DESK 40"xl 8", wood, 7 drawers $20.
Call 352-636-1352

DESK CHAIR warms, plus home office
supplies. $40. 352-787-0410

DESK Metal 60"Wx29"Hx30"D,
6/drawers, $75. 352-406-1253

DESK, ADJUSTABLE CHAIR, CARPET
PROTECTOR $40 352-460-7646

OFFICE DESK, CHAIR & RUG 50"x70".
$80. 352-314-0505

674 Exercise Equipment

EXERCISE MACHINES. (2) Tony Little.
Both $70. 352-874-0352

WEIGHT MACHINE Power Pro
w/weights. $100. 352-516-7920

675 Sports/
Recreation

BICYCLE 26" Men's. Very good cond.
$65. obo. Call 352-460-4449

BICYCLE 6 sp. 26" girls w/basket. Excel
cond. $100. 352-508-5335.

BICYCLE Diamond Back, Sorrento
Sport, Men's 26", 21 speed, excel.
cond. $75. 352-259-0633

BICYCLE girls 24" Huffy, 1 speed, foot
brake, fenders, A-1 $45. 728-6835

BICYCLE vintage from the 30's, $100
Call 352-504-6406

BICYCLE Yellow, M18 GT saddle back,
multi speed, exceptional cond. $175
Call 352-568-1354

BICYCLES 3 Wheel, rebuilt. Large Seat
& Basket. $150. 1-352-343-6608

CABIN TENT 3 rooms. $75.
352-787-1865

CANOE 14' Swayer, fiberglass, 2 pad-
dles. $100 obo SOLD!!!

GOLF CLUBS (3) w/Izzo Shag Bag ball
dispenser. $25. 352-702-7632

GOLF CLUBS men's complete set
w/bag. $25. 502-750-0512

GOLF CLUBS, 3 iron thru SW, driver, 3
wood, putter. $75 352-245-0716

GOLF SET irons, oversized woods,
w/bag. Like new. $50. 729-2595

GOLF SET, oversized graphite woods,
irons. New. $80. 352-735-6927

NIKE JAWBONE UP $100 obo. Size
med. Brand new. 352-409-6011


675 Sports/
Recreation

PUTTER Ping, excel, cond. 50 yrs. old.
$30 Call 352-735-6927

SADDLE Brown Leather, English. Good
cond. $60. 352-326-2432.

TREADMILL Ride Strider 3360. $100.
352-552-3000

685 Tools/
Machinery

GENERATOR Coleman 1850 Sports-
man, nice $90.352-314-2717

GENERATOR Porter Cable. 5250watts.
$450.. Call 352-343-6608

PRESSURE WASHER needs some work
1750psi. $50 Call 352-348-9973

PROFESSIONAL GANG BOX metal.
$100.352-750-0367

ROUTER Sears, 6.5 amp. w/router ta-
ble. $50. 352-343-1286

SAW elec. 6 1/2", 1/2 elec. drill & belt
sander. $30 for all. 352-753-1170

SCREWS, self tapping. 8,000. $50.
352-728-1015

TRANSMISSION JACK 800 lb. capacity.
$100 Call 352-250-1199

VACUUM PUMP 110 volts, full size.
$75 Please call 352-406-9405

WINDOWS aluminum frame. Asking
$20. Call 352-396-5739





800
Real Estate
For Rent



802 Vacation
Rentals

WATERFRONT CABIN, scrn. porch, ca-
ble, $225-$275 per wk. no dep.
everything included. 352-314-2123

806 Houses
Unfurnished

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375


806 Houses
Unfurnished

CENTER HILL 5/2/2 house, $1,000/mo
1st, last + security. 352-568-7486,

CLERMONT Newly built home for rent
Located in the Verde Ridge neigh-
borhood w/a Community pool, ca-
bana and playground. 2,375 sq. ft
with a 3 car garage $1,750/month.
Call Dierdra "Dee" Thomas,
owner/realtor 813-690-3030

FRUITLAND PARK 3/2/1 Duplex, quiet
family area. Lawn care included.
$745/mo. 352-874-5966

FRUITLAND PARK Nice little 1 br,
house, 400 sf. Close to everything.
W/D hookup. $450. + $450 dep.
Call 603-858-1160

LEESBURG 2/1, $690. Lease/purchase.
321-244-6555.

LEESBURG 4/3, over 2400sf, 2 story
house, ready 11/1/13. $1200/mo +
security. Call 352-636-4935

MOUNT DORA 3/2, CHA, fenced yard.
$725/mo+ dep. 352-978-1696
| -RENIALS
LONG TERM & UNFURN. RENTALS IN
SOUTH LAKE COUNTY.
ROCKER REALTY 352-394-3570
Ask For Janet or Emily
RockerRealtylnc.com

SILVER LAKE FOREST 3BR 2BA 2055
sq. ft., 2 car garage 10041 Silver
Bluff Dr. Please Call 352-314-2668.
GunnPropertyServices.com

TAVARES 3/1 beautifully remodeled,
paint, new cabinets, tile floor, Ig.
fenced yard. $850/mo. Call
352-343-1004 or 407-227-9810

UMATILLA HANDYMAN $200/mo. 2/1.
321-244-6555


807 Apartments
Unfurnished

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375

DOWNTOWN TAVARES 1/1 small,
quiet apt bldg 2 blks from Lake Dora
riverwalk with restaurants and
parks, $330/biweekly, $400 dep,
incl elec, water, Sat TV, Wi-Fi, Hard-
wood floors, Cent AC. Old Dogs,cats
OK. 352-669-0961


807 Apartments
Unfurnished

AZALEA HILL APARTMENTS STUDIOS,
1, 2, 3 BEDROOMS $400 $925.
352-431-3790

EUSTIS
2/1 including water/trash
Starting at $650/mo
Near Downtown
Call 352-735-0597

EUSTIS
All remodeled Apts!
2 Bedrooms
Special starting at
$575 Only $350 Dep. Pet OK.
352-357-5675


wNwuuo
V11LLAGE
LEESBURG MOVE-IN SPECAIL
2 BRS. 1.5 BA, TOWNHOUSES
352-728-1955
LEESBURG
1ST MO. FREE!
SPANISH VILLAGE
Pool, great location!
Furn. Efficiency, incl.
util. & cable $700/mo.
2/1 apt. $600/mo.
Furn. $700/mo + util.
352-728-5555

LEESBURG downtown 2/1,
efficiency apt $550/mo + security.
Call 352-787-4584
GalbreathRealty.com

LEESBURG
FIRST MONTH $99
MOVE IN SPECIAL!
o2/1 $500/dep.
o2/1 w/W/D hookup $550/dep.
*2/2 w/W/D hookup $600/dep.
Call 352-516-1244
Ask for Tina
LEESBURG, 1/1, with W/D, CHA, car-
port. $450 plus security. 787-2715
Ext. 222

LEESBURG, Duplex VERY CLEAN 2/1,
no pets $550/mo + dep. 551-6772

LYN TERRACE
Eustis
352-357-7332
www.lynterrace.com
Great Move-In
Specials & Free Gifts!
*1 & 2 Bedroom Units
*All 1st Floor No Stairs!

808 Apartments
Furnished

FRUITLAND PARK
TWIN PALMS MARINA
NEWLY RENOVATED
1 BR. MOBILES/COTTAGES
FULLY FURNISHED
ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED,
CABLE TV. FREE USE OF KAYAK &
CANOES. CONVENIENCE STORE
ON PROPERTY. NO SECURITY
DEPOSIT WITH PROOF OF INCOME.
GREAT FOR SENIORS.
WEEKLY & MONTHLY RATE.
SMALL PETS WELCOME.
CALL 352-787-4514


24 No matter what time
7 of the day it is,
you can place
^ your classified
S merchandise ad
I online, pay for it and
just wait for the
phone to ring!


.m




Monday, October 28, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


808 Apartments
Furnished

EESBURG STUDIO nice, clean,
$125/wk. Incl. util. 813-781-9540

LADY LAKE Clean 1 bedroom/1 bath
Call 352-396-1152 or 352-750-0030
LEEI-SBURG
1ST MO. FREE!
SPANISH VILLAGE
Pool, great location!
Fum. Efficiency, incl.
util. & cable. $700/mo.
2/1 apt. $600/mo.
Furn. $700/mo + util.
352-728-5555

809 Roommate
Wanted

EUSTIS AREA furn. room, util paid..
$80/wk + $80 dep. 352-250-5012

810 Duplexes

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
EUSTIS
2/1 including water/trash,
Near Downtown
Starting at $650/mo
Call 352-735-0597
LEESBURG 2/2 Very clean, near down-
town. No smoking. $650/mo. Call
407-967-1502

LEESBURG 3/2 with garage. $770 mo.
+ $600 dep. Ref's req'd. Call Mike
352-223-5300
LEESBURG, 1 br, 2br & 3br. Great price.
$599+. Call 352-350-7109
LEESBURG,
Beautiful Remodeled
2br/1 ba, $450/mo.
1721 Birchwood Circle
Call 352-325-1289 now!

811 Condos
Townhouses

LEESBURG
SUNNY SIDE VILLAS
FOR RENT 2/2. $650 MO.
PLEASE CALL
352-459-9300
ROYAL OAKS 1 MO. FREE 2/2.5 all
appl., pool, clubhouse, etc. Call
352-516-2657

816 Commercial
Property

LEESBURG
Warehouses w/Offices
2315-25 Griffin Rd. 1,150 up to
12,400sf. Starts at $300/mo.
Office/Showroom
1607 Hwy. 441 $850/mo
Small Shop or Office
2204 Citrus Blvd (441)
$320/mo., includes utilities
352-787-0004

819
Manufactured
Homes Rental

ATTENTION SENIORS AND ADULTS
Never lived in. Brand New 66x14, 3/2,
in nice quiet park in Eustis.
$650/mo + utilities. Sorry NO KIDS.
Call 352-396-2042

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
LADY LAKE 2/2 $750/mo $750 dep.
No smoking, no cats. Very clean,
w/very Ig. lot. 407-967-1502

LADY LAKE, 2/1, $450/mo. small de-
posit. No pets. 352-267-6358
WILDWOOD AREA --
2/2 $650/mo dbl. wide
(Adult Park)
Call 352-745-8620


900
Real Estate
For Sale


903 Homes
For Sale




LEESBURG
Home for sale $3500. Great buy!
2br 2ba, remodeled bathrooms,
modern day accents in kitchen.
Age Qualified
Call 352-234-8369
LEESBURG 2/1, $690. Lease/purchase.
321-244-6555.




LEESBURG
Home for sale $7,500. Won't last!
2br 2ba, new carpet, freshly painted.
Waterview
Age Qualified
Call 352-234-8369
UMATILLA HANDYMAN $200/mo. 2/1.
321-244-6555

910 Condos/Townhouses
MULTIPLE ADORABLE/ AFFORDABLE
CONDOS FOR RENT! DON'T MISS
OUT!
4- 2/2'S $699
1-1/1 $625
1-2/2 $750. 407-359-9500



1000
Manufactured
Homes


1001 MId Homes
For Sale
CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
EUSTIS 2/1 in 55+ park. Shed & car-
port & A/C porch. $2,500. Call
352-357-5556
SENIORS AND ADULTS
NEW and NEWER
Homes in a nice quiet part in Eustis.
$25,000 $45,000 Financing avail.
Only 3 left! Lot rent $350 per mo.
Call 352-589-4007
TAVARES
$595/mo. Furn.
352-343-7780
riverestwaterfrontresort.com

1002 Mtd
Homes
W/ land
For Sale
UMATILLA 1/1 w/add on's. $30,000
obo. Call 352-669-1879

1012 RV Lots
ALTOONA
2/1 $495/mo. w/$300 dep.
And RV Lot $300/mo. w/$1l00 dep.
352-735-2071 or 352-636-6800
ALTOONA
2/1 $495/mo. w/$300 dep.
And RV Lot $300/mo. w/$1 00 dep.
352-735-2071 or 352-636-6800




1100
Recreation


1101 Boats
FIBERGLASS BOAT Antique. 1968. Lap
siding type w/33hp Johnson engine
& trailer w/new tires. Nice & Very
clean! Will have to see to believe.
$4000. Call 352-751-3523 or cell
352-603-5493
PONTOON Suntracker '91. 18', 40HP,
$3500 obo. Call 352-315-0390


1101 Boats
WELL CARED BAYLINER IN EXCELLENT
CONDITION INSIDE AND OUT.
PORT-A-POTTY, STEREO, BIMINI
TOP, SINK, PLENTY OF STORAGE
W/TRAILER AND DEPTH FINDER.
RETAILS AT $14,000.00 WILL SELL
FOR $10,500.00. CALL TODAY!
352-267-4020

1120 Marine
Equip/
Supplies
BOAT LIFT barely used, $450 obo Call
352-742-9487
TROLLING MOTOR 47 lb. thrust, Tran-
som mount $85 SOLD

1150 RV&
Campers
BIG COUNTRY FIFTH WHEEL. '11.
29RK, Elite Edition, 2 slides, Queen
bed. Asking $25,000. 409-3806
CANOPY & FRAMING for Travel Trailer.
12W x 30L x 18'H. New in box.
$800.352-787-3987
TRAILER HITCH Reese leveling & sway
bars. $99. SOLD!!!

1200
Transportation

1205 Autos
CASH PAID
FOR JUNK CARS!
$300 and up.
Call 352-771-6191
DODGE RAM '09
4x4 Loaded, Clean Car Fax
#ST2324
*$25,400
AUDI FT '08
Low Miles, Turbo, Automatic
Leather, Clean Car Fax
#SP2323
*$22,800
NISSAN 350z '07 Convertible
1 Owner Only, 16,000 mi.
Clean Car Fax
#2325
*$21,400
FORD F150 XL '10
Low Miles, Clean Car Fax
#SP2329
*$14,882
FORD FUSION SE'11
Low Miles, 1 Owner, Full Power
Clean Car Fax
#S213A
*$11,900
*With $3000 cash or trade and are
plus tax, tag and $599 dealer fee.
BILL BRYAN SUBARU
8730 US Hwy. 441
Leesburg, Florida
352-240-7480
MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS '99. Full
power. 90K mi. Runs Great. Cold
A/C. $1950. 352-324-6095
TOYOTA Camry '98, 4 door, power, sun
roof. $3500 obo 352-636-0263
TRIUMPH 1976 convertible spit fire.
Needs works, many spare parts.
$600 Call 352-323-0973

1206 Aviation

1210 Mcycles/
Mopeds
SUZUKI 300 ATY, Rebuilt carburetor &
front end. New gel battery. Runs
great! $800 obo. 787-3987

1235 S U V
GMC JIMMY '97. 4 dr., power, 4 x 4.
Many new parts. Invested $5200.
$4500 obo. 352-345-3232

1240 Trucks
Light Duty
CHEVROLET 2500 HD, '09. Pick Up.
V-8, towing package, bed liner, CD
player, fifth wheel hitch, 18K mi.
$21,000.352-409-3806
DODGE DAKOTA '07, 4 door, 6 cylin-
der, 60K, $11,300 Call 365-6238
DODGE RAM 1500 SXT. 2004. 41,000
miles. $8000. Contact John.
352-455-9557
FORD PICK UP '92, short bed. 6cyl., 5
speed. $1200. 352-504-2014

1247 Trailers
UTILITY TRAILER heavy duty, 5'xl0', tilt
top, side rails, new 15" tires, ideal
for golf carts. $775. obo Call
352-343-8898
1250 Antique
Cars
AUTO SWAP-CORRAL SHOW =
NOV,3rd Sumter Cnty. Fairgrounds
Sumter Swap Meets.
800-438-8559


1264 Auto
Parts
Accessory

ENGINE STAND used once, new $100,
now $50 Call 352-636-1352

TIRE Michelin/Alloy wheel. 225/60
R16. 75%. $100. 352-324-2173

TIRES (4) 245/60-R18. $60. Call
352-326-9105

TIRES, 3 used. Free. Mascotte area.
Call 352-366-0225

TOOL BOX Alum. Diamond Plate for
small Pick up. $75. 323-8805

TOOL BOX for pickup front. Alum, like
new. $100 Call 352-396-2511

TOW BAR w/wiring kit & safety chains.
$100. Call 352-771-1307

TRUCK RAMPS top quality. Mint cond.
$100 obo. 352-323-3518

1275 Golf
Carts

CLUB CAR rear seat, new charger, 3yr.
old battery. $1100. 352-360-1178

CLUB CAR, excel shape, loaded, lights,
windshield. $995 336-817-7509

COOLER Playmate for Golf Cart. Good
cond. $10 Call 352-259-3522


AUTI





IOAN




888




S..




840S


U cebook







wfoai




DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, October 28, 2013


THE NEW FACE OF


Time to
Choose a
Medicare
Plan.
CALL
US
NOW!


www.careplushealthplans.com


V


Evelyne
ACTUAL
CAREPLUS
MEMBER
"CarePlus wants
you to take care
of your health -
and I do!"


Like to save money

at the pharmacy?

CAREPLUS HAS A PLAN THAT
MAY HELP YOU SAVE.


See why over 68,000* Floridians have chosen CarePlus.



* $ 0 co a .., Te 1ad2 rsciton* drugs

$0 oS. fo0 Sta cverge.auSdat$10 00
I,* $0 o0Sforpreentie sree ing

S6ve Snekrs inesPrga


For more information about benefits,
call today.
1-855-379-2450 (TTY: 711)


CarePlus
HEALTH PLANS, INC.
Keeping the HEALTH in health care.


From 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., 7 days a week. From February 15th to September 30th, we are open Monday Friday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Lake, Marion and Sumter Counties. CarePlus is an HMO plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in CarePlus depends on contract
renewal. The benefit information provided is a brief summary, not a complete description of benefits. For more information contact the
plan. Limitations, copayments, and restrictions may apply. Benefits, formulary, pharmacy network, provider network, premium and/or
copayments/coinsurance may change on January 1 of each year. CPHP Benefit Value Determination Report 2013. Based on the average
usual and customary retail price before insurance for dental services in Florida. *The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS)
Medicare Advantage (MA) Membership Reports October 2013.
H1019_MKFNPR323027 Accepted


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 28, 2013