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Daily Commercial
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iThe Daily ACommercial

SLEESBURG, FLORIDA Saturday, October 26, 2013 www.dailycommercial.corn

HOME LIFE: Decor comes with built-in technology/ El

RELIGION: Samaritan Inn helps homeless families move on / Cl


GOP hopes website derails health care law


DAVID ESPO
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Con-
gressional Republicans are
waging war against a hapless
website and hoping it leads
to the destruction of "Obam-
acare," the health care pro-
gram they loathe so fervently.
As a tactic, it's no more


likely to succeed than this
autumn's self-wounding de-
cision by Republicans to
force a partial government
shutdown and flirt with de-
fault on the national debt. Or
the dozens of previous GOP
attempts to defeat, defund
or delay the law. Or their un-
successful bid to have the
Supreme Court declare un-


constitutional the signature
program of President Barack
Obama's first term.
Rather than political or le-
gal arguments determining
its fate, it's likely the health
care overhaul will succeed
or fail based on the reaction
of millions of Americans in
search of coverage.
"Let me remind everybody


that the Affordable Care
Act is not just a website. It's
much more," Obama said
this week as he took the lead
in his administration's ef-
forts at damage control over
the major online problems
in the programs' first signup
month. He said that because
of the law, which has been
taking effect in stages for


three years, "preventive care
like mammograms and birth
control are free through your
employers," young people
up to age 26 can remain on
their parents' coverage plans
and some seniors are pay-
ing less for their prescription
drugs.
SEE GOP | A2


Feds approve


funding for


LYNX 55 route
LIVI STANFORD I Staff Writer
livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com
Federal Transit Administration funding has
been approved to restart a Clermont to Osceo-
la County bus route that was cancelled in re-
cent weeks, county officials said.
"Lake County is drafting an agreement with
LYNX to restore the service," County Manager
David Heath said Friday afternoon
The LYNX 55 bus route, which several hun-
dred Lake residents rely on to get to work, runs
from Cagan Crossings along U.S. Highway 192
to the Osceola Square Mall. Along the way it
passes Celebration and Old Town.
Lake County commissioners this week
unanimously voted to approve a major
SEE LYNX I A2


COURTESY PHOTO
A map shows the new 600-mile natural gas pipeline.

State regulators give

OK to FPL pipeline plan
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE State regulators are signing
off on a plan by Florida's largest electric com-
pany to invest in a new 600-mile natural gas
pipeline.
The Florida Public Service Commission on
Thursday approved Florida Power & Light's
contracts to purchase natural gas from the new
$3.5 billion pipeline that will join two existing
pipelines.
SEE PIPELINE I A2


PHOTOS BY THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL
Barber Marty Haney, left, sold the barbershop that he ran for 18 years to Heather Myers, right. Haney still works at the shop as the
only man among four women barber/stylists. Myers also changed the shop's decor to reflect a country western theme.



Cowgirls who can cut it


THERESA CAMPBELL I Staff Writer
theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com
weather Myers is a coun-
try girl at heart. She envi-
sioned years ago the decor
that she wanted for the Coun-
try Barbershop, 1004 W. Di-
xie Avenue, where the coun-
try western theme reigns and
an alligator head is one of a few
wild critters hanging from the
walls.
"This is a bunch of little
dreams compiled into one little
building," Myers, 30, said of the
business she purchased in Jan-
uary from barber Marty Haney
Since then, she has enjoyed
remodeling the former plain
white walls with metal roofing
and tongue-and-groove cedar;
mirrors framed in rough-sawed
cedar; old whiskey barrels for
sinks; and old wooden church
pews for waiting-area seats.
The country feel of the shop
is where Myers and fellow bar-
bers/stylists Beth Sloan, Susan


Barber/stylists Beth Sloan, left, and Naomi White are flanked by an alligator's head as
one of the unique items inside Country Barbershop in Leesburg.


Nelson and NaomiWhite look
right at home in their jeans,
boots and cowboy hats.
Haney, the only man, contin-
ues to work at the shop too.
"I was just lucky to find her,"
Haney said of Myers taking
over the business he ran for 18
years.


The new owner said the coun-
try atmosphere of the shop re-
minds her of her youth, growing
up on 10 acres in Howey-in-
the-Hills.
"We had a bunch of cows,
chickens and pigs and stuff. I
SEE BARBER I A2


Vol. 137, No. 299 | 5 sections
MONEY C5
Il MISSED YOUR PAPER? CLASSIFIED D2 NATIONAL HIGH
Call 787-0600 (Lake County), or COMICS E4 OBITUARIES A4 78
877-702-0600 (Sumter County) CROSSWORDS D6 SPORTS B1 LOW
I NEWS TIP? DEAR ABBY E4 VOICES A7 -1" 54
90994 17001 Call Scott Callahan at 365-8203 LEGALS D4 RELIGION C1 See A8


~22,995 p -


-


I~ SALUTE. ..





DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, October 26, 2013


HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Sat-
urday, Oct. 26, 2013:
This year you often give
mixed messages. Sometimes
you say one thing, but your
actions do not coincide with
what you say. People respond
in frustration and could back
away. Start listening to your-
self in order to see this is-
sue. Be open if someone
mentions this conflict, and
see how he or she experienc-
es it. Nonetheless, if you are
single, others see you as ex-
tremely desirable, especial-
ly through July 2014. If you
are attached, try to involve
your significant other in some
of your outside activities.
Both of you will be happier.
LEO tends to steal the stage,
even from you!
ARIES (March 21-April
19) Finally, your spontane-
ity and sense of fun merge
together. A partner might be
reticent to go along with what
you think are great plans.
You just might be able to per-
suade this person to join you
for some adventure.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
You could be overtired and
wanting to do something very
differently. You could be in
the mood for a lazy day. Your
desires seem to be in con-
flict with a loved one's. Warn
this person that you could be
grumpy if you feel pushed.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
So much is happening that
you would be hard-pressed to
return your messages. Com-
munication is highlighted
right now, which could mean
a day drive to the country or
a trip to see a show or game.
Do whatever pleases you.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
The limelight has been on
you for several days. Consid-
er kicking back. For some of
you, it might mean schedul-
ing a day at the spa. For oth-
ers, your day might involve
going to the gym. What is im-
portant is that you take good
care of yourself.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
Your high energy might be the
envy of others, as just being
around you energizes them.
You have a way about you
that draws many toward you.
Your popularity soars and in-


East dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.
NORTH
+A432
VA97542
*A63
WEST EAST
+Q*
V QI06 VJ83
2 KQJ109
+J9876532 +AKQ104
SOUTH
4KJ1098765
YK
*875 4
4-
The bidding:
East South West North
I 4 Pass 6 4
Opening lead two of diamonds.
There is a vast difference
between playing a hand when you
see all 52 cards, and playing a hand
when you sec only 26. But bridge
being thc kind of game it is, you are
expected to play the great majority of
hands just as effectively seeing only
26 cards as when seeing all 52.
Suppose you're South in this deal
and West leads a diamond. The deuce
is obviously a singleton, and the
problem is that you must escape the
2013 KingFe


LYNX
FROM PAGE Al

update to the Lake-
Sumter Transit Devel-
opment Plan, which
includes reinstating
the bus route by 2014
if the FTA covers most
of the costs. However,
the route will run every
hour as opposed to ev-
ery half hour.
Matt Friedman,
spokesman for LYNX,
said the FTA's approv-
al is good news, but he
emphasized there are
still negotiations to be
ironed out.
"Once everything is
signed and approved,
we will present it to our
board," he said.


vitations flood in, yet you
might feel the need to spend
some time at home.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) You might be in need of
some time for yourself. You
clearly do not appreciate be-
ing out and about right now.
Honor your needs, and oth-
ers will have to understand.
You go overboard for many
people.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Focus on what a group of
your pals might be up to.
You could encounter a con-
flict, as you might have allo-
cated funds on something
other than what you need.
You have a decision to make,
whether you like it or not.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21) You need to touch base
with an older friend or loved
one before you decide wheth-
er you can run off and be
carefree. Don't be surprised
when a conflict develops in-
volving your plans.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21) Any activity that
gets your mind off the here-
and-now fits the bill perfectly.
You might want to rethink a
decision that could be caus-
ing some stress. Right now,
your best bet is to detach. M
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) You can't continue as
you have been without having
a talk with a loved one first.
At this point, you might feel
frustrated. This discord will
end soon enough. Perhaps in
a month or two, a conversa-
tion will be in order. Avoid a
fight at all costs.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18) Others seem to want to
dominate, but they want you
there as an audience. This
implicit demand could be
a source of tension. In any
case, getting out and doing
what you need to do might be
best. Check in with an older
friend or relative.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20) Sometimes, you are im-
mensely practical, as you are
right now. You have to com-
plete a project, whether it is
cleaning the house, raking
the leaves or handling a mat-
ter that involves work. Touch
base with someone at a dis-
tance.


loss of two diamond tricks if you are
to make the slam.
The outlook is certainly not prom-
ising. The only realistic hope would
seem to be that the opposing hearts
are divided 3-3, in which case you
could get rid of your diamonds on
dummy's hearts. Bul that possibility
can' come to fruition unless you can
overcome the problem of finding an
entry to dummy after you've eslab-
lished the hearts.
A litIt ;i,.rvihid;. i.0' iir. ,,,..iL
do the I I I.......... I
lead with the ace, play a heart to the
king and lead a low trump. Then,
after WVest produces the queen, you
let him win it!
This extraordinary play puts the
defense out of commission. If West
returns a heart, you ruff in your hand
and make the rest of the tricks by dis-
carding three diamonds on dummy's
hearts, using the ace of spades as an
entry. And if West returns a club
instead of a heart, the outcome is the
same. In that case, you ruff in
dummyrn and establish the hearts to
make the contract.
All it takes is your willingness to
allow West to win a trick with his
queen of spades. Once you do that.
you are home free. The only real
trick is to think of it.
ure Synd,-t lnc


Once negotiations
are met, the county
would enter into a con-
tract with LYNX using
$95,000 in FTA funding.
Fares of about $61,000
a year will round out
the operating costs of
the route.
T.J. Fish, executive
director of the Lake-
Sumter Metropolitan
Planning Organization,
said in an email Friday
that "progress is being
made to provide need-
ed job access."
Fish added that a for-
mal agreement is re-
quired for the bus ser-
vice to resume.
"There is not a date
certain set at this time,"
he wrote of the pend-
ing agreement.


HOROSCOPES


glitches as an excuse to
defund or repeal Obam-
acare."
Ironically, the roles
were reversed a decade
ago, when the Bush ad-
ministration struggled
to implement a new pre-
scription drug benefit
under Medicare. Many
Democrats had voted
against the change and
harshly criticized it, yet


BARBER
FROM PAGE Al

have always been into
the country things and
4-H," she said. "I always
liked this style. The decor
of the shop is very per-
sonal to me and a lot of
memories hang on the
walls."
She points to a Coven
Construction sign.
"I come from a long
line of contractors and I
have a love for anything
wood," she said. "I owe
that to my dad, Mike Co-
ven, for all the summers
of working with him as
a kid."
So what inspired Myers
to become a barber and
get into doing tapered
cuts, flat tops, scissor
cuts, fades, warm lather
neck shaves and hot
toweled face shaves for
men?
"This was actually an
accident," she said. "I got
halfway through cosme-
tology school and end-
ed up being allergic to a
lot of the chemicals that
they use in hair colors
and the perms."
The chemicals affected
her skin, but she gradu-
ated anyway. She went
off to barber school, and
worked at a barbershop.
Myers is licensed as a
barber and cosmetolo-
gist and has been cutting
hair for 10 years.
"I found I really en-
joyed being in a barber-
shop, and I just stayed
with it," Myers said.
Cutting men's hair is
more to her liking too, as
she found men are usu-
ally not as fussy about
their hair.
"They are more re-
laxed and they're more
fun," Myers said. "They'll
come in and say, 'I just
want it off my ears. I
want it shorter.' Men are
easier to please."
Short hair cuts are My-
ers' niche.



GOP
FROM PAGE Al

Republicans skip over
any well-received ben-
efits the law might have
bestowed. Instead, they
speculate that the web-
site is a gateway not to
health care coverage but
to bigger and more pain-
ful failures in the near fu-
ture.
"Will enrollment
glitches become possible
provider payment glitch-
es? Will patients show up
at their doctor's offices or
hospitals to be told that
maybe they aren't cov-
ered or even in the sys-
tem?" asked Rep. Fred
Upton, R-Michigan, as he
chaired a hearing of the
House Energy and Com-
merce Committee on
Thursday
Democrats were having
none of it, even though
they express their own
frustration and anger at
the debut of the website.
"Here we go again, an-
other cynical effort by
the Republicans to delay,
defund or ultimately re-
peal the Affordable Care
Act," said Rep. Frank Pal-
lone, D-NJ., speaking at
the same hearing. "Their
effort, obviously, isn't to
make this better but to
use the website and the


of those questioned said
Republicans are gener-
ally interested in doing
what's best for the coun-
try, with 77 percent say-
ing the GOP is acting out
of political self-inter-
est. The 20 percent fig-
ure drops to 14 percent
among independents,
who probably hold the
key to victory in next
year's midterm elections.


"Sometimes I get in
trouble and heavy hand-
ed; I like to scalp peo-
ple," she said with a
laugh while cutting Tom
McKane's hair.
"This place reminds
me of when I was young-
er, because I grew up go-
ing to a barbershop with
my dad in South Flori-
da," McKane said, which
sparked a childhood
memory for his barber,
who recalled tagging
along with her brothers
when they went to the
barbershop.
"There is a little barber-
shop in downtown Mount
Dora, and the guy's name
is Bob, and every now and
then he would give me
the clippers and let me
nip at them a little bit and
my brothers would freak
out," Myers said, grinning.
"I used to cut all of my
baby dolls' hair and my
Barbie dolls too. I would
cut all of their hair off."
When Myers takes a
break from running the
shop, it's not surprising
to learn that she can be
found enjoying the great
outdoors.
"Hunting is my pas-
sion," she said, along
with spending time out
on the lakes.
Her passion for cutting
hair is shared by fellow
barbers/stylists at the
shop, who also take care
of a female clientele by
offering style cuts, col-
or, highlights, shampoo,
blow dry and eyebrow
waxing.
"I worked for Marty for
13 years and then Heath-
er came in and bought
the shop; she really went
full force at it with dec-
orating and getting us
busy with advertising,"
said Beth Sloan. "She is
a very hard worker, very
driven."
"I love working for
Heather. She's a great
boss," added Naomi
White.


they failed to turn it into
a winning issue in 2004.
At some point, Obama
may yet find himself
agreeing to major chang-
es in the law.
There is growing Dem-
ocratic sentiment inside
Congress for a one-year
delay in the requirement
for individuals to pur-
chase coverage, given the
difficulty with the website.
Senators on the ballot in
2014 are notably nervous.
Support inside both par-
ties is strong for repealing
a medical device tax con-
tained in the law.
For now, though, the
focus is the website, a
problem the administra-
tion insists it can and will
fix.
Republicans' decision
to seize on the flawed
roll-out comes as the
party is desperate to shift
the public's attention
away from the recent
partial government shut-
down and the clash over
the debt ceiling, and res-
urrect an issue they hope
will benefit them in next
year's elections.
No wonder, since every
new poll seems to bring
more bad news for the
GOP
Among them was a
finding in a recent Wash-
ington Post-ABC sur-
vey that only 20 percent


2 of 5 wins free ticket
4 of 5 wins $137.50


3 of 5 wins $11
5 of 5 wins $202,489.52


The Daily Commercial
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NEWSROOM CONTACTS
BILL KOCH, assistant managing editor
352-365-8208.................................... bill.koch@dailycommercial.com
SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor
352-365-8203 ...........................scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com
FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor
352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com
REPORTERS
ROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County
352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com
MILLARD IVES, police and courts
352-365-8262................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com
THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages
352-365-8209..................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
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PIPELINE
FROM PAGE Al

The "upstream," or northern portion of
the pipeline, will run from the Alabama
town of Benton to a proposed intercon-
nection hub in Central Florida near Or-
lando. The "downstream," or southern
portion, will continue from Orlando to
Martin County, where FPL has facilities
in Indiantown and Riviera Beach.
Proposed corridors for the upstream
portion of the pipeline, to be called Sa-
bal Trail, include portions of Lake, Sum-
ter, Madison, Hamilton, Suwannee, Co-
lumbia, Gilchrist, Levy, Alachua, Marion,
Orange, Polk and Osceola counties. The
downstream portion would include por-
tions of Osceola, Polk, Okeechobee, St.
Lucie and Martin counties.
FPL officials have said contractor Spec-
tra Energy will determine the exact route
of the pipelines, which are expected to
cost more than $3.5 billion. They still need
state and federal regulatory approvals and
would not start operating until 2017.
Regulators concluded that FPL -
which has roughly 4.6 million customers
- can save up to $450 million over the
life of the natural gas contracts.
FPL officials previously said 70 percent
of the pipeline is expected to follow ex-
isting rights of way, such as roads and
pipelines like those owned by the Flori-
da Gas Transmission Co. All of the pipe-
line will be underground with the excep-
tion of some above-ground "compressor
stations" needed to push gas through the
line, officials say.


lFLORIDA

LOTTERY

FRIDAY
CA SH 3 ................................................ 1-7-4
Afternoon ........................................... 4-9-7
PLAY 4 ............................................. 4-8-7-2
Afternoon....................................... 7-8-8-5

THURSDAY
FANTASY 5......................... 19-20-28-30-36


BRIDGE


A Giveaway Plan


she ne is just t click aay!
www.dailycomercial.com!


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, October 26, 2013




Saturday, October 26, 2013


Area Briefs

UMATILLA
Trash to Fashion show
hits the runway today
The Lake County Library System's
4th annual Trash to Fashion show
will be held at 11 a.m. today at the
Umatilla Public Library. This contest
features outfits created by designers
ages 8-19 using a variety of recycled
and repurposed materials.
One of the original designs on the
runway will be the, "Tutti Frutti,"
a party outfit inspired by oranges
and made using a variety of bags,
including plastic, paper and citrus
fruit bags. The hat used to be a card-
board pizza box and the purse was a
mint container.

LEESBURG
Opera Thunder II storms
theater in November
Central Florida Lyric Opera will
present "Opera Thunder II: An
Encore Performance," at 3 p.m.
on Nov. 3, at Paul P Williams Fine
Arts Auditorium, LSSC, 9501 U.S.
Highway 441 and College Dr., in
Leesburg.
Join Maestro Bill Doherty and
the men of the Central Florida
Lyric Opera as they present "Opera
Thunder II: An Encore Performance,"
a performance of the music of
Broadway, with jazz as well as some
of the greatest Italian masterpieces
from opera and Neapolitan songs.
Tickets are available online at
www.centralfloridalyricopera.org or
call 877-211-5346. Tickets are $30 for
adults, $28 for seniors and $15 for
students.

EUSTIS
Police to host drug
take-back event today
The Eustis Police Department will
host a prescription drug take-back
event for the public from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m. today in the Eustis Police
Department lobby, 51 E. Norton Ave.,
in Eustis.
The one-day collaborative effort
with the DEA allows residents to dis-
pose of unwanted or expired pre-
scription drugs in a safe manner.
Liquids and needles will not be
accepted at the event.
For information, call
352-483-5400.

TAVARES
Renaissance fair coming
to Lake County
The Lady of the Lakes Renaissance
Faire, held from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
on Nov. 1-3 at Hickory Point
Recreational Park, 27341 State Road
19 in Tavares, is set in 16th century
England and will encompass seven
non-stop stages full of period co-
medians, musicians, human chess
matches and combat jousting.
Enjoy period food and drink
and renew your marriage vows
in a hand-fasting ceremony per-
formed by King James at 1:45 p.m.
on Sunday.
Participants can register for the
event in advance at 352-326-1265 or
at Lord Edward's Tavern at the event.
Tickets are $15 for adults and $10
for children.
For information, call 352-326-1265
or email cullen-battc@lake.kl2.fl.us.




... and we'll share it with our readers.
Some of our best story ideas and photos
come from our readers. So don't hesitate
to share your youth activities, awards,
accomplishments, festivals, charity
events and other things that make our
communities special. And don't overlook
those family milestones birthdays,
engagements, marriages, business
promotions and military news.


Just email your photos and news to...
pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com


DAILY COMMERCIAL




State&Region
NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN I scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 1 352-365-8208


Dems hold conference,


will rally against Scott


The Associated Press
LAKE BUENA VISTA-
Florida Democrats are
holding a weekend con-
ference that they see as
a rally to defeat Republi-
can Gov. Rick Scott in the
2014 election though
the person many see as
the best hope at defeat-
ing him isn't a candidate
yet.
Former state Sen. Nan
Rich will be the only gu-
bernatorial candidate
speaking at the confer-
ence, unlike a major fun-
draising dinner in June
when the party didn't al-
low her to speak.


Florida leadership sees weekend
meet as start of campaign


But former Gov. Char-
lie Crist, a Republican
turned Democrat, will
be making his presence
known, speaking at cau-
cus meetings and work-
ing the crowd.
Crist has already cre-
ated a website ask-
ing Floridians to share
their thoughts with
him. Along with it is a
video that attacks the
current administration
and counters Rick Scott's
"It's working" catch-
phrase by saying, "It's


networking."
Crist isn't expected to
announce his plans at
the Florida Democrat-
ic Party conference be-
ing held at Walt Disney
World. That will like-
ly come after the month
ends.
The party said the
event is designed to build
off the momentum of the
2012 election year, when
President Barack Obama
carried Florida and the
state's Democrats made
SEE RALLY I A4


PHOTOS BY CINDY DIAN / SPECIALTY THE DAILY COMMERCIAL
ABOVE: Steve Knowles dishes out smoked pork to Sherrie Graham at the Beast Feast festival. Graham,
with United Souther Bank, sponsored a booth at the festival. BELOW: Beast Feast was held outside the
historic Mote Morris House in Leesburg.


Exotic flavors attract



crowd at Beast Feast


Staff Report
The 2013 edition of Beast
Feast brought scores of peo-
ple to the historic Mote Mor-
ris House on Thursday to savor
a feast of exotic and unusual
meats, side dishes and bever-
ages, while enjoying live enter-
tainment.
For those with less adventur-
ous taste buds, the Beast Feast
also featured smoked turkey,
pulled pork, cabbage, a variety
of casseroles, fresh conk peas
and fried green tomatoes.
The annual event is a fun-
draiser for the Leesburg Cen-
ter for the Arts' programs for
youths, including the Big Blue
Bus Mobile Art Studio and art
lessons for the Boys and Girls
Club.


www.dailycommercial.com


Mexican man

accused of

molesting

small child

MILLARD K. IVES I Staff Writer
millardives@dailycommercial.com
A 44-year-old ille-
gal immigrant, alleged-
ly on the run from Mex-
ico after impregnating
a 12-year-old girl there,
was jailed Wednesday af-
ter being accused of mo-
lesting a first-grader in
Leesburg, police said.
Tito Pedraza-Montejo
of Leesburg was charged
with two
counts of
lewd or
lascivi-
ous mo-
lestation
of a child
under 12
years old. PEDRAZA-
He re- MONTEJO
mained in
the Lake County jail Fri-
day without bond, be-
cause of his status as an
illegal immigrant and the
possibility he might flee.
Pedraza-Montejo also
is under investigation
for allegedly molesting
a second child in Lees-
burg, police said.
Detectives showed up
at the Child Advocacy
Center in Leesburg on
Oct. 3, where the first-
grader told them Pedra-
za-Montejo molested
her twice during the past
summer, police said.
The girl said the first
time occurred when Pe-
draza-Montejo alleged-
ly took her into the bath-
room and removed her
clothes, which made her
scream.
She told police Pedra-
za-Montejo then covered
her mouth and molested
her.
The girl said the sec-
ond incident occurred
in a restaurant, when Pe-
draza-Montejo followed
her into the restroom
and molested her.
Police apparently
learned about the inci-
dents while investigat-
ing the alleged molesta-
tion of another child by
Pedraza-Montejo.
The detective working
the case was off Friday
and an official at the po-
lice station said it is not
clear if Pedraza-Montejo
is wanted in Mexico for
allegedly impregnating
a 12-year-old girl there,
as the victim's family is
claiming.
No details were avail-
able on the second Lees-
burg child because of the
ongoing investigation.


Released inmate back behind bars


Staff report
A Florida prison inmate im-
prisoned for theft and burglary
convictions in Lake County is
back in custody after being acci-
dentally released form the Orange
County Jail in May.
John Lanard Baker, 29, was picked
up at his Orlando home on a war-
rant Thursday, a day after the prob-
lem was first discovered, Orange
County Corrections reported. Bak-
er had already been serving a pris-


on sentence with
the Florida Depart-
ment of Corrections
for theft and bur-g
glary convictions
out of both Lake
and Orange coun-
ties when he was
transported to Or- BAKER
ange County in April to face a grand
theft auto charge.
According to Orange County Cor-
rections, its employees failed to
place a detainer on him, so follow-


ing a bond hearing in May, he was
released on $2,500 bail.
Baker returned to court in Sep-
tember, when prosecutors dropped
the grand theft auto charge. And
he was again allowed to leave. Jail
officials finally realized the error
Wednesday, after the Florida De-
partment of Corrections contact-
ed Orange County Corrections be-
cause Baker was missing from the
state's system.
Orange County Corrections Chief
SEE INMATE I A4





DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, October 26, 2013


IN MEMORY


OBITUARIES
William Glen Winkle
William Glen Winkle,
"Bill", 71, of Leesburg,
passed away October
4, 2013. He was born in
Allensburg, Ohio and
moved to Leesburg in
1956. He was preced-
ed in death by his wife,
Judy Gail Harrell Win-
kle. He is survived by
his daughters, Patri-
ciaWinkle Rhodes (Jer-
ry) and Gina Winkle;

* WILDWOOD
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grandson, Billy Win-
kle; siblings, Fay Farn-
er (George), Phyllis
Danyi, Richard Winkle
(Cindy), Larry Winkle
(Kathy), Robert Win-
kle (Charli) and many
nieces, nephews, and
great nieces and neph-
ews. A memorial ser-
vice to celebrate his
life will be held at the
Church of Christ, 1506
South 14th Street, Lees-
burg, on November 2,
2013 at 10 a.m.

DEATH NOTICES
Harry Clark Cheever
Harry Clark Cheever,
62, of Zellwood, died
Tuesday, October 22,
2013. Beyers Funeral
Home.


Pork added to beef fest cookoff


Staff report
A new pork-rib competi-
tion has been added to Sum-
ter County's Beef and Boogie
Festival Nov. 9-10 at the Sum-
ter County Fairgrounds in Web-
ster.
There will be a $1,000 top
prize in this event, along with
competitions for beef brisket
and "Sumter's Best Burger."
This is the third annual festi-
val and will feature musical en-
tertainment, cow chip bingo,
cowboy heritage exhibits, ed-
ucation displays, children's ac-
tivities, crafts, food and mer-
chandise vendors, and 4-H
and Future Farmers of America


booths with live animals.
Gates open at 10 a.m. on Nov.
9 and close at 9 p.m. On Nov.
10, gates open at noon and
close at 6 p.m. Daily admission
to the festival is $10 for adults
and free for children below the
age of 12.
Musical performers sched-
ules to appear include Rain-
ey Berry, the Dan Story Band,
Clemons Road, Kelleigh Ban-
nen, County Line Road and Jim
Van Fleet.
The Miss Beef and Boogie
Pageant will be held a week pri-
or to the festival at 6 p.m. at the
fairgrounds so the queen can
reign at the event. Other di-
visions of the contest include


Baby Miss, Teeny Miss, Tiny
Miss, Little Miss, Junior Miss
and Princess.
The event is presented by
the Sumter County Chamber
of Commerce in cooperation
with the Sumter County Cattle-
man's and Cattlewoman's As-
sociations, the Sumter County
Fair Board and the Universi-
ty of Florida/Institute of Food
and Agricultural Science Sum-
ter County Extension Office.
The fairgrounds are at 7620
State Road 471.
Festival details can be found
at www.beefandboogie.com.
For information, call 352-793-
3099 or email www.sumter-
coc@sumterchamber.org.


Fraudster to repay 92-year-old man


Associated Press
ELLENTON A
92-year-old man re-
ceived $75,000 of his
savings back after his
former investment bro-
ker pleaded guilty on
fraud charges.
The Sarasota Herald-
Tribune reported that
Paul Arnold the man


RALLY
FROM PAGE A3

gains in Congress and
the Legislature.
"This weekend,
1,500 Democrats are
gathering to celebrate
the accomplishments
of our party and get
fired up to defeat Rick
Scott and move Flor-


to whom Joe Forrest
had entrusted his mon-
ey is scheduled for
sentencing Dec. 2.
A prosecutor agreed
to the plea if Arnold
agreed to replenish
some of Forrest's sav-
ings.
For more than two
years, Forrest thought
the money he worked


ida forward in 2014,"
said state party Chair
Allison Tant.
The keynote speaker
Saturday night will be
Ohio Gov. Ed Rendell.
Sen. Bill Nelson and
U.S. Rep. Debbie Was-
serman Schultz, chair
of the Democratic Na-
tional Committee, will
also speak.
Republicans are


so hard for was gone
forever. But prosecu-
tor Erika Quartermaine
made a deal to quick-
ly replenish some of his
savings and send Ar-
nold to prison.
Arnold owes Forrest
another $100,600 in the
case.
Forrest already re-
ceived about $40,000


scheduling several
events in the area to
try to take some at-
tention away from the
Democrats, includ-
ing neighborhood
canvassing in Orlan-
do by Republican vol-
unteers on Saturday.
Scott plans to speak to
a Republican women's
group Sunday morn-
ing.


from Arnold's employ-
er, Raymond James
and Associates. He was
granted nearly $740,000
from Arnold in a law-
suit, but he hasn't re-
ceived any of the mon-
ey
"His assets were basi-
cally debt," Forrest's at-
torney, Ronald Chap-
man, said of Arnold.


"The Florida Dem-
ocratic Convention
will be a great way for
Democrats across the
state to gather and
discuss the future of
their dysfunction-
al, disorganized and
disappointing party,"
party Chairman Lenny
Curry said in a state-
ment.


q:S NOV. 9-10, 2013

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INMATE
FROM PAGE A3

Cornita Riley acknowl-
edged in a statement
that her department
was responsible for the
error.
"This was clearly an
error on the part of our
department and it is
unacceptable," Riley
said. "We are currently
conducting a detailed
inquiry as to exact-
ly how this happened
and will make appro-
priate changes. Appro-


private corrective ac-
tion will be taken for
any staff found to be
responsible for this er-
ror."
Florida Department
of Corrections Secre-
tary Michael Crews
said his department is
also looking into the
mistaken release.
"DOC is continuing
to investigate the mat-
ter and is working with
officials to take steps to
ensure this never hap-
pens again," Crew said.
According to Or-
ange County Correc-


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E


S H E RM A T O R Y

m744 esumgLd ~c-Uail so


tions spokesman Allien
Moore, Baker appar-
ently had no idea that
he was doing any-
thing wrong. There
was no indication Bak-
er would be facing es-
cape charges, though
it was unclear how his
five months of freedom
would affect his pre-
viously scheduled re-
lease date from prison.
Unlike Baker's ac-
cidental release, two
convicted murderers
recently used forged
documents to escape
from a Florida prison.
Charles Walker and Jo-
seph Jenkins were cap-
tured last weekend at a
Panama City motel. Au-
thorities say they used
forged court orders to
get them released from
the Franklin Correc-
tional Institution in the
Panhandle.
The forged orders cut
their prison sentenc-
es from life to 15 years.
The Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforce-
ment is investigating
who wrote the phony
court documents and
how they got into the
judicial system. Both
men were convicted of
murders in the Orlan-
do area.
Baker was arrest-
ed by the Lake County
Sheriff's Office in Jan-
uary, and charged with
burglary of a structure,
grand theft and crimi-
nal mischief. In March
he pleaded no contest
and was sentenced to
two years in prison. His
Orange County convic-
tions gave him addi-
tional time.
In February 2011,
Baker was picked up
and jailed in Lake
County for trespassing,
records show.


My Secret Closet


10% of all sales
in November go to
the American
Cancer Society


Look for the
downtown stores with
the pink V and save!

310A W. Main St., Downtown Leesburg
(Next to God's Cafe)
352-272-7246
Open Tues-Fri 11am to 5pm, Sat 10am to 5pm
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Army ~ Navy- Air Force ~ Marines ~ Coast Guard
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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, October 26, 2013


*%^, 41(raL-g~




Saturday, October 26, 2013


Germany, France want US to agree to curb spying


JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG
Associated Press
BRUSSELS Indig-
nant at reports of U.S.
electronic espionage
overseas, the leaders of
Germany and France
said Friday they will in-
sist the Obama admin-
istration agree by year's
end to limits that could
put an end to alleged
American eavesdrop-
ping on foreign leaders,
businesses and inno-
cent citizens.
German spy chiefs will
travel to Washington to
talk with U.S. officials
about the spying allega-
tions that have angered
European leaders, in-
cluding whether Chan-
cellor Angela Merkel's
own cellphone was
monitored by the Na-
tional Security Agency.
Merkel and French
President Francois Hol-
lande, at the final day of
a European Union sum-
mit in Brussels, did not
offer many specifics on
what they want President
Barack Obama and his


KAY NIETFELD /AP
The acting German Foreign Minister Guido Westerwelle speaks
after his meeting with the US ambassador in Germany in the for-


eign ministry in Berlin.

intelligence chiefs to do.
A former French
counterintelligence
agent told The Associat-
ed Press the European
allies will likely demand
the Americans sign off
on a "code of good con-
duct" for intelligence-
gathering, and could
use the espionage dis-
pute as leverage against
the United States in up-
coming trade talks.
"I think France and
Germany would want
guidelines," said Claude
Moniquet, who now di-


rects the Brussels-based
European Strategic and
Intelligence Center. But
he was dubious there
would be much change
in intelligence agencies'
real-world behavior.
"Everyone swears on
the Bible," Moniquet
said. "And after that it's
business as usual."
This week alone, there
have been headlines
in the European press
about the U.S. scooping
up millions of French
telephone records and
perhaps listening in on


Merkel's calls. A British
newspaper said it ob-
tained a memo indi-
cating that the person-
al communications of
up to 35 foreign leaders
may have been subject
to U.S snooping in 2006.
On Friday, Spanish
Prime Minister Mariano
Rajoy said in Brussels
that he had instruct-
ed his foreign minis-
ter to summon the U.S.
ambassador in Spain to
obtain information on
news reports that Spain
has been a target of U.S.
spying.
In a front-page story,
Spain's leading newspa-
per El Pais cited uniden-
tified sources that saw
documents obtained
by former NSA contrac-
tor Edward Snowden
as saying they showed
the agency had tracked
phone calls, text mes-
sages and emails of mil-
lions of Spaniards, and
spied on members of the
Spanish government.
Hollande, the French
president, said his coun-


try and Germany decid-
ed to seek a "framework
of cooperation with the
United States so that the
surveillance practices
end. We fixed a deadline
by the end of the year."
"They (the Americans)
told us it was in the past
and now there's a will to
organize things differ-
ently," Hollande told re-
porters. "Fine, let's do it."
Economic spying can
affect markets, prices
and mergers and acqui-
sitions as well as affairs


of state, Hollande said.
"It's there that the sur-
veillance can have the
most consequences."
Merkel told a separate
news conference that
"what we seek is a ba-
sis for the cooperation
of our (intelligence) ser-
vices, which we all need
and from which we all
have gotten very much
information ... that is
transparent and clear
and that lives up to the
character of a relation-
ship of allies."


FRANK ELTMAN /AP
Workers prepare to attach a new section of the boardwalk in Long Beach, N.Y, where the entire
2.2 mile long boardwalk had to be replaced after it was damaged in Superstorm Sandy.


A year after Sandy, a slow


recovery for thousands


DAVID B. CARUSO
Associated Press
NEW YORK A year
after Superstorm Sandy
catastrophically flood-
ed hundreds of miles of
eastern U.S. coastline,
thousands of people
still trying to fix their
soaked and surf-bat-
tered homes are being
stymied by bureaucra-
cy, insurance disputes
and uncertainty over
whether they can even
afford to rebuild.
Billions of dollars in
federal aid appropriat-
ed months ago by Con-
gress have yet to reach
homeowners who need
that money to move
on. Many have found
flood insurance checks
weren't nearly enough
to cover the damage.
And worse, new fed-
eral rules mean many


in high-risk flood zones
may have to either jack
their houses up on
stilts or pilings an
expensive, sometimes
impossible task or
face new insurance
rates that hit $10,000 or
more per year.
"It's just been such a
terrible burden," said
Gina Maxwell, whose
home in Little Egg Har-
bor, N.J., is still a wreck
after filling with 4 feet
of water. Contractors
say it will cost $270,000
to rebuild about
double what the in-
surance paid out. The
family doesn't have the
money.
"What do we do with
this house? Just give
them the deed back?"
she said. "My son is
11. He has a little pig-
gy bank in his room. He


said, 'Take it, mom.'"
In blue-collar Union
Beach, N.J., the own-
er of the popular res-
taurant Jakeabob's Bay
has come up with only
a quarter of the $2 mil-
lion she needs to re-
build. In Long Beach,
a barrier-island city
of 33,000 on the coast
of New York's Long Is-
land, residents in some
neighborhoods say half
their neighbors have
yet to return.


Need

Tax Help?

Call
352-787-1040

Open Year Round.


ADVERTISEMENT


Chrysler Dodge Jeep Dealer To Host

Automotive Credit Amnesty Event

Over 430 New and Used Vehicles and Financing
are Available at Advantage Chrysler Dodge Jeep


vehicle affordable.
Rebuilding credit is
based on successfully
taking two steps, accord-





"We understand
that bad credit
happens to
good people."

Tim Moore
Director of Credit Amnesty 2013


ing to Moore. First, a con-
sumer with troubled credit
needs to find and take
advantage of opportuni-
ties and programs spe-
cially designed to meet
the needs of a buyer with
less-than-perfect credit.
"Credit Amnesty 2013 is
that opportunity," he said.
"Secondly, you've got to
set yourself up for suc-
cess. That's why we're able
to help consumers with
troubled credit. We'll allow
them to make payments
as low as $182 in order
to assure their success-
ful repayment. For exam-
ple, we have a 2001 Ford
Taurus stock#12Q062B,
for $182 a month with
$0 down, plus tax, title
and license at 6.99%
APR for 54 months with


approved credit. Other
manufacturers represent-
ed will be Ford, General
Motors, Chrysler, Honda,
Mercedes, Nissan, Volvo,
and Mazda."
Another major benefit
of Credit Amnesty 2013 is
no charge loan and lease
termination. Regardless of
the amount you still owe,
the number of miles you
drove, or the condition of
your vehicle, finance spe-
cialists at Credit Amnesty
2013 can terminate any
loan for possibly no
charge. "If your financial
situation has changed,
or you took on more than
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Call Advantage
Chrysler Dodge Jeep for
complete details, loca-
tion information and to
pre-register for Credit
Amnesty 2013. Ask for
Tim Moore at 352-735-
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place this Friday, October
25th from 9:45 am 7:15
pm, Saturday, October
26th 9:15am 5:45pm and
Sunday, October 27th
from 12:15pm 4:45pm.
"This may be a once-
in-a-lifetime opportunity
for the people of Mt.
Dora to exonerate them-
selves from past credit
problems," said Moore,
"because we understand
that bad credit happens
to good people."


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255 \V\jtiimnAn A\tnIth
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STAFF WRITER CURT LENTZ
MT DORA, FL For three
days only, Advantage
Chrysler Dodge Jeep has
been chosen to host an
automotive credit amnes-
ty event sponsored by
federally insured banks
and regional automotive
retailers. Over $10,000,000
has been secured for this
event to lend to anyone
regardless of credit his-
tory. This test market
event's purpose is two-
fold: to help improve con-
sumer credit ratings, and
to dispose of hundreds of
excess vehicles as new
model year vehicles are
being released.
"This event is something
we've been research-
ing for a long time now,"
said Tim Moore, Director
of Credit Amnesty 2013.
"Over 430 new and used
vehicles are being assem-
bled as we speak, and the
financing is in place."
Pre-owned vehicles at
this event will be priced
from just $2,999* accord-
ing to Moore. "We'll have
cars, trucks, vans and
sport utilities. We've cov-
ered the bases regardless
of what you're looking for."
In addition to the large
inventory allocated for
this event, special finance
programs have been cre-
ated as well. The Credit
Amnesty 2013 event has
not only been designed to
allow anyone who earns
$1,600 or more per month
to qualify for an auto loan,
but also to make buying a
quality new or pre-owned


...-A


DAILY COMMERCIAL








UN Security Council told its Syria appeal was ignored


ALEXANDRA OLSON
Associated Press
UNITED NATIONS A
top U.N. official bluntly told
the Security Council on Fri-
day that its recent appeal for
humanitarian access in Syr-
ia has made little difference
and implored the world body
to exert more pressure on the
warring parties to allow the
delivery of aid to millions of
people trapped in the con-
flict.
The message from Valer-
ie Amos, the under-secretary
general for humanitarian af-
fairs, further laid bare how in-
effective the Security Council
has been in addressing Syria's
2 1/2-year-old civil war amid
divisions between the Unit-
ed States and other Western
powers, which support some
of the rebel groups, and Rus-
sia, which backs the regime


F


I


of President Bashar Assad.
Diplomats had character-
ized the humanitarian appeal
three weeks ago as a hopeful
step toward overcoming the
paralysis. It came immedi-
ately after the council's first
binding resolution on Syria
that ordered the elimination
of its chemical weapons.
Unlike the weapons res-
olution, which threatened
consequences for noncom-
pliance, the humanitarian
statement was nonbinding.
Amos said the Syrian regime
and rebel groups have large-
ly ignored it.
"As we deliberate, people
continue to die unnecessar-
ily," Amos said. "I call upon
the members of the council
to exert influence and take
the necessary action to stop
this brutality and violence."
She said the U.N. has not


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AP PHOTO
Two men treat a civilian child rescued from the wreckage of a building after it
was struck by government forces near Damscus, Syria.


been able to reach 2.5 mil-
lion people trapped in be-
sieged areas, many of whom
have been isolated for more
than a year. But neither the
Syrian government nor reb-
el groups have taken signif-
icant steps to expand access
to key humanitarian routes,


Amos said.
She warned that the cata-
strophic situation will wors-
en as winter descends on
millions living makeshift
shelters. Already, diseases are
spreading because of lack of
access to basic hygiene and
vaccinations, including re-


ports of the first outbreak of
polio in Syria in 14 years.
The U.S. and British am-
bassadors said they were
horrified by Amos' presenta-
tion and that council mem-
bers should urgently consid-
er further action.
Amos told Security Coun-
cil members privately that
Syrian officials have been re-
minding U.N. officials that
the council's statement is not
binding, said U.S. Ambassa-
dor Samantha Power. Power
said that, according to Amos,
Syrian officials have "done
nothing to lift senseless bu-
reaucratic hurdles that hin-
der delivery" of aid.
"This is simply appalling,"
Power said. "Council mem-
bers with influence on the
parties, particularly the re-
gime, must do more to make
a difference on the ground."


Muslim Brotherhood supporters rally


TONY G. GABRIEL
Associated Press
CAIRO Thousands
of supporters of Egypt's
ousted president and
his Muslim Brother-
hood group marched
Friday in Cairo, part of
a plan to pressure the
military-backed gov-
ernment ahead of a
court hearing for the
toppled head of state.
Supporters of Mo-
hammed Morsi, Egypt's
first elected president,
demonstrated in Cai-
ro's southern district
of Maadi. Some held
pictures of their fall-
en members. They
marched on the Con-
stitutional Court there,
calling for Morsi to be


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AP FILE PHOTO
The Giza Pyramids dominate the skyline in Giza, Egypt, Cairo's
sister city..


reinstated and urging
military leader Gen. Ab-
del-Fattah el-Sissi to
step aside.
Other scattered pro-
tests occurred across
Egypt. An umbrel-
la group of Islamist
parties, including the
Brotherhood, said Fri-
day's rallies were the
beginning of a week-
long protest campaign
until Nov. 4 when Morsi
is scheduled to appear
in court. The campaign
has been dubbed the
week of "steadfastness."
Morsi faces criminal
charges accusing him
of inciting the murder
of rallying opponents
while he was in office.
Authorities have not
said whether Morsi will
appear at the hearing.
If he does, it will be his
first public appearance
since the July 3 coup.
Morsi was over-
thrown along with his
Brotherhood-led gov-
ernment after millions
protested against his
leadership, claiming the
Islamist president was


incompetent and over-
stepped his authority
during a year in power.
Since then, Brother-
hood supporters have
staged near-daily ral-
lies around the coun-
try, protesting securi-
ty crackdown in which
hundreds have been
killed and more than
2,000 of group's mem-
bers have been jailed.
Morsi has been held in-
communicado since his
ousting and a court has
ordered an outright ban
on his group.
Authorities appear
to have expanded the
scope of the crackdown.
A police officer was sus-
pended from his du-
ties in the Nile prov-
ince of Gharbiya, north
of Cairo, because he
was suspected of being
a Brotherhood mem-
ber, security officials
said Friday. The officials
spoke on condition of
anonymity because
they were not autho-
rized to talk to journal-
ists.
The decision could


signal that the mili-
tary-backed leadership
will purge Brotherhood
members from the se-
curity forces, a move
that could deepen ten-
sions. Morsi supporters
and those backing the
military already accuse
each other using vio-
lence to advance their
causes.
Although Brother-
hood supporters have
been staging rallies reg-
ularly since the over-
throw, their numbers
have been dwindling on
the streets of Cairo as
the security forces crack
down and authorities
fortify government in-
stitutions and the capi-
tal's major squares.
Egypt's riot police
smashed two protest
camps of Morsi sup-
porters in mid-August,
killing hundreds of pro-
testers and touching off
days of the deadliest vi-
olence since the coun-
try's Arab Spring pro-
tests.
While the Brother-
hood's ranks appear to
have thinned since, the
resolve of those still pro-
testing remains firm.
"I am here protest-
ing because the coun-
try is being stolen," said
Mohammed Kassam,
a university professor
who attended a protest
Friday in Cairo. "There
are people who have the
arms and the tanks and
want to oppress people
and impose their will on
them."


7.3-magnitude quake rocks


Japan; no damage reported


*Employment advertisements are excluded.
Please call 352-314-FAST to speak with a customer service rep.
Lake: 352-314-3278 or Sumter: 352-748-1955


KEN MORITSUGU and MARl
YAMAGUCHI
Associated Press
TOKYO -An earthquake of magni-
tude 7.3 struck early Saturday off Ja-
pan's east coast, the U.S. Geological
Survey said, triggering small tsuna-
mis but causing no apparent damage.
Japan's meteorological agency said
the quake was an aftershock of the
magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsu-
nami that struck the same area in
2011, killing about 19,000 people and
devastating the Fukushima Dai-Ichi
nuclear power plant.
Tsunamis of up to 15 inches were re-
ported Saturday at four areas along the
coast, but a tsunami advisory was lift-
ed less than two hours after the quake.
Japanese television images of har-
bors showed calm waters. The quake
hit at 2:10 a.m. Tokyo time about 170
miles off Fukushima, and it was felt in
Tokyo, some 300 miles away.
"It was fairly big, and rattled quite


a bit, but nothing fell to the floor or
broke. We've had quakes of this mag-
nitude before," Satoshi Mizuno, an
official with the Fukushima prefec-
tural government's disaster manage-
ment department, told The Associ-
ated Press by phone. "Luckily, the
quake's center was very far off the
coast."
Mizuno said the operator of the
troubled Fukushima plant, Tokyo
Electric Power Co., said no damage or
abnormalities have been found.
Japan's meteorological agency is-
sued a 3-foot tsunami advisory for
a long stretch of Japan's northeast-
ern coast, and put the quake's magni-
tude at 7.1. The U.S. Pacific Tsunami
Warning Center did not post warn-
ings for the rest of the Pacific.
The meteorological agency report-
ed tsunamis of 40 centimeters in Kuji
city in Iwate prefecture and Soma city
in Fukushima, as well as a 20-cen-
timeter tsunami at Ofunato city in
Iwate.


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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, October 26, 2013






YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD
BILL KOCH............... ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR
SCOTT CALLAHAN .......................NEWS EDITOR Vi
GENE PACKWOOD ............ EDITORIAL CARTOONIST w dIm c o
< ^^ ^r r ^^www.dailycommercial.com


VOICE


Unacceptable


lapses at US


missile bases

n the Cold War years of the 1950s and '60s
and even into the '70s, America's nucle-
ar arsenal its size, deployment, the air-
craft and rockets that would deliver it and
the Air Force officers and crews who over-
saw it were front and center in the U.S.
defense posture.
But there was a solid consensus among
the major nations against the use of nuclear
weapons for anything but self-defense. Suc-
cessive presidents from Dwight D. Eisen-
hower on rejected any suggestions that nu-
clear weapons be used in South and North
Vietnam.
Russia and the United States, the two
great nuclear powers, maintained their ar-
senals as a matter of mutual deterrence, but
the thawing of the Cold War led to a series
of treaties placing limits on testing and the
size of the arsenals.
Briefly, the peace activists' dream of a
world free of nuclear weapons did not seem
a total stretch. But the acquisition of nucle-
ar weapons by India and Pakistan, which
have fought four wars and often seem just
minutes from a fifth; a bellicose North Ko-
rea constantly threatening their neighbors;
Iran's on-again, off-again pursuit of nucle-
ar weapons; and Islamic terrorists' determi-
nation to get obtain a weapon of mass de-
struction mean the U.S. must maintain its
arsenal to a high standard of readiness.
The Associated Press has detailed two in-
stances this year when Air Force launch offi-
cers failed to secure blast doors intended to
keep terrorists and intruders from gaining
access to the missile bases' underground
command posts.
For security reasons and to avoid embar-
rassment and awkward questions, mishaps
and errors at missile bases and nuclear fa-
cilities rarely become public. One did in
2007, when six armed nuclear cruise mis-
siles were inadvertently loaded aboard a
B-52 and flown from North Dakota to Lou-
isiana. The mistake was not discovered for
36 hours.
As in the case of the blast doors, the Air
Force quickly punished the responsible of-
ficers, but that does not address the broad-
er issue. As the AP put it, "The problems,
including low morale, underscore the chal-
lenges of keeping safe such a deadly force
that is constantly on alert but unlikely ever
to be used."
Inescapably, however, these are problems
that must be faced. Unceasing vigilance in
this case is more than just a platitude; it's a
vital element of our defense against an ene-
my that sees martyrdom as not only a tactic
but a desirable goal.
Distributed by Scripps Howard News Service.


The Daily Commercial

The newspaper of choice for Lake
and Sumter counties since 1875

EDITORIALS
Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board,
not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are
not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday,
Saturday and Sunday.
COLUMNS
Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and
picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reflect
the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a
diversity of views.
If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state
or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom-
mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL
34749-0007.
Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length.
The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published
with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.


I RLb 2al3' PiT"("vFsGA POST- GAzTr-E


OTHERVOICES


US fiscal follies reverberate in Asia


he United States may have
averted a debt default, and
ended the federal govern-
ment shutdown, but costly po-
litical reverberations continue.
The experience of Democratic
and Republican leaders frozen
in unmoving partisan positions
has been unnerving, abroad
and at home.
This is especially significant in
Asia, given the steadily growing
economic power of that region.
Relations with China and Japan,
already challenged, have been
made more difficult.
One bright spot is provided by
South Korea. This particularly
pivotal Washington ally has been
taking steps to add liquidity and
therefore flexibility to financial
markets.
China's government has been
notably negative in public com-
ments on the political merry-go-
round in Washington. Xinhua,
the powerful government news
and information agency, has de-
clared that the uncertainty con-
cerning U.S. government and
fiscal policies means that other
nations should look to develop-
ing a "de-Americanized world"
by means of a reserve currency
alternative to the dollar.
Prime Minister Li Keqiang has
told Secretary of State John Ker-
ry that Beijing is "highly con-
cerned" about the situation in
Washington. China currently
holds $1.28 billion in U.S. Trea-
sury debt, plus with other finan-
cial obligations. U.S. companies
represent a substantial amount
of the rapidly growing foreign in-
vestment in the Asian nation.


Arthur
Cyr

SCRIPPS HOWARD
NEWS SERVICE


The two leaders met for talks
at the East Asia Summit held
in Brunei Oct. 10. This was the
eighth meeting of this increas-
ingly influential body, which
also includes Australia, India, Ja-
pan, New Zealand, Russia and
the ten-member Association of
Southeast Asian Nations (ASE-
AN).
President Barack Obama was
scheduled to participate but
cancelled his trip just before the
summit began. The official ex-
planation for the sudden move
was the government shutdown
and debt-ceiling uncertainty
at home. Given Obama's aloof
stance during that imbroglio,
however, putting additional po-
litical pressure on the congres-
sional Republicans is perhaps
the more likely explanation.
Even after the end of the polit-
ical standoff in Washington, Chi-
na's rulers have continued to ex-
press annoyance and frustration.
The People's Daily newspaper,
an instrument of the commu-
nist party, featured an editori-
al expressing dismay that the
U.S. government only was being
funded through January 15 and
the debt ceiling raised until Feb-
ruary 7, 2014.
Just before the agreement in
Washington was reached, Ja-
pan's finance minister Taro Aso


was uncharacteristically blunt
in echoing China's concerns and
criticism. He warned the politi-
cal problems of Washington di-
rectly threatened global finan-
cial stability.
Aso declared default would
lead to a sudden drop in the cur-
rent triple-A bond rating and the
"U.S. would fall into a fiscal cri-
sis." Japan holds approximately
$1.2 trillion in U.S. government
debt instruments.
Related developments in
South Korea are less prominent,
yet hold potential for facilitat-
ing smoother relations across
the Pacific. On Oct. 13, the cen-
tral bank and finance ministry in
Seoul announced a new $10 bil-
lion currency swap agreement
with Indonesia. Under the terms
of the accord, the two countries
can exchange 10.7 trillion Korea
won for 115 trillion Indonesian
rupiah or vice versa.
Similar financial accords have
also been announced with Ma-
laysia and the United Arab Emir-
ates. South Korea already has
swap agreements with China
and Japan. Swaps can help stabi-
lize volatile markets.
The Republic of Korea now
holds more than $330 billion in
currency reserves, the seventh
largest in the world. Since the
brutal KoreanWar of 1950-1953,
South Korea and the U.S. have
maintained a close alliance.
That partnership remains vi-
tal. International relations in-
volves more than money.
Arthur I. Cyr is Clausen Distin-
guished Professor at Carthage Col-
lege. Email him at acyr@carthage.edu.


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR


Congress is only
working for themselves
If ever there was a need or ar-
gument for term limits for Con-
gress in Washington, it is the way
Congress is handling the affairs
of the country today.
They are no longer working
for their employer, the Ameri-
can people, but are only work-
ing for themselves, the party and


YOUR POINT OFVIEW
big campaign investors. They are
willing to let disabled veterans
go without their checks, they are
willing to furlough 800,000 work-
ers just to get what they want and
the list goes on.
They have forgotten our coun-
try's motto: "United we stand, di-
vided we fall."
When 60 percent of the Ameri-
can people believe all of Congress
should be fired, then a change is


needed. The best change? Term
limits. We have them for the pres-
ident, vice president, governors,
mayors and many other elected
officials. Why not Congress?
I can only hope that voters ed-
ucate themselves and remember
all that is happening in Congress
when It comes time to vote.
JAMES HOLDEN
Howey-in-the-Hills


HAVE YOUR SAY
The Daily Commercial invites you
to write letters to the editor. Letters
should be no longer than 350 words.
They must be original, signed with the
full name of the writer, and include
the writer's address and telephone
number for verification. We reserve
the right to edit for length. Letters
also will be edited for grammar, clarity,
taste and libel. We accept no more
than two letters per month from the
same writer. No open letters, form
letters or copies of letters to third
parties will be published. We do not
publish unsigned letters. Submissions
are not returned. We retain the right
to archive and republish any material
submitted for publication.
You can submit your letters by:
Email (preferred) to:
letters@dailycommercial.com
By regular mail to:
Voices
PO. Box 490007
Leesburg, FL 34749-0007
By fax to: 325-365-1951


DOONESBURY


Editor's note: Garry Trudeau is on hiatus. This is a collection of some of his favorite strips.


Saturday, October 26, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL






DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, October 26, 2013


TODAY
.0



Mostly sunny and
pleasant

HIGH LOW
780 54


SUNDAY

WOA-


Mostly sunny; beautiful
in the afternoon

HIGH LOW
790 580


MONDAY




Mostly sunny and
pleasant

HIGH LOW
820 630


TUESDAY




Mostly sunny and nice;
warm in the afternoon

HIGH LOW
850 640


WEDNESDAY




Warm and more humid
with clouds and sun

HIGH LOW
870 680


Key Waest ' Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 02013 Key West'
W~4 4L


Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are today's highs for the
day. Forecast higMow temperatures are given for selected ci fies.


Cold Front
Warm Front
Stationary
Fmront


Showers[
T-storms=j
RainM
Rurries[u
Snowv
Ice[1


Yesterday's National High/Low: (for the 48 contiguous states)


High 850 in Weslaco, TX


6


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10
Very High, 11+ Extreme
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index-
number, the greater the need for
eye and skin protection.


Low 180 in West Yellowstone, MT


The solunar period schedule allows planning
days so you will be fishing in good territory or
hunting in good cover during those times. Major
periods begin at the times shown and last for
1.5 to 2 hours. The minor periods are shorter.
Major Minor Major Minor
Today 6:04 a.m. 12:16 p.m. 6:27 p.m. -
Sun. 6:49a.m. 12:37 a.m. 7:12 p.m. 1:01 p.m.


I TH SUNAND OOI


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


Today
7:36 a.m.
6:47 p.m.
12:12 a.m.
1:46 p.m.


Sunday
7:36 a.m.
6:46 p.m.
1:04 a.m.
2:24 p.m.


Last New First Full



Oct26 Nov3 Nov9 Nov17


ITIEI


Homosassa
Day High Feet
Today 9:37 am......1.1
11:36 pm......1.0
Daytona Beach
Day High Feat
Today 1:24 am.....3.8
1:47pm.....4.2


Low Feet
5:26 am .....0.4
6:24 pm.....0.2

Low Feet
7:36 am......1.4
8:19 pm......1.4


Day High Feet
Sun. 10:54 am......1.1


Day High Feet
Sun. 2:15 am .....3.8
2:39 pm..... 4.1


Low Feet
6:37 am .,0.4
7:30 pm..... 0.2

Low Feet
8:33 am......1.4
9:11 pm......1.3


City
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Santa Fe
St. Ste. Marie
Seattle
Shreveport
Spokane
Syracuse
Topeka
Tucson
Tulsa
Washington, DC
Wilmington, DE


Today
Hi LoW
69 50 pc
88 78 t
62 35 s
41 30 sn
56 41 c
74 55 pc
59 36 s
50 36 sh
60 29 s
85 57 s
64 43 pc
58 42s
58 41 s


Sunday
Hi LoW
69 51 s
90 77 pc
64 34s
43 32 pc
55 42 c
74 59 c
58 32 r
50 36 pc
65 47 s
87 56 s
69 56 s
59 42 pc
58 37 pc


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.


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City
Albany
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte, NC


Today
Hi LoW
52 36 pc
65 43s
44 36s
55 35s
62 44s
58 43s
59 41 s
63 39s
64 43s
46 28 pc
65 40s
57 44s
50 38 sh
48 37 r
66 42s
56 37 pc
60 36s


Sunday
Hi LOW
51 33 pc
67 45 s
44 39 r
63 39 pc
70 51 pc
58 37 pc
59 36 pc
56 27 c
70 50 pc
49 24 c
66 40 pc
57 40 pc
48 40 sh
49 31 pc
71 48 s
53 33 pc
66 41 pc


City
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Concord, NH
Dallas
Dayton
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
El Paso
Fargo
Fairbanks
Flagstaff
Grand Rapids


Today
Hi LOW
58 39 s
52 34 pc
56 32 pc
50 37 c
64 39 s
54 34 pc
72 57 t
54 31 c
60 39 s
52 30 pc
52 34 sh
40 26 c
77 53 S
42 30 pc
34 20 s
62 29 s
48 35 c


Sunday
Hi LoW
6434s
52 35s
53 33 pc
50 37 pc
71 46s
52 27 pc
72 62 c
50 34 pc
70 38s
58 38s
50 35 pc
43 24 pc
77 55 s
47 25 c
36 27 sn
64 36s
47 35 pc


City
Great Falls
Greensboro, NC
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City


Today
Hi LoW
66 38 s
58 38 s
54 39s
85 71 pc
78 61 pc
56 32 pc
70 47 s
60 29 pc
80 60 s
68 52 pc
60 36 pc
66 50 pc
48 32 pc
44 30 pc
62 42s
73 53 s
56 47 s


Sunday
Hi LoW
47 20 r
64 41 pc
54 33 pc
87 72 pc
81 63 t
51 36 pc
73 52 c
61 48 s
79 63 s
68 54 pc
56 37 s
67 54 pc
49 36 s
52 32 pc
62 44 pc
78 61 pc
57 44 pc


City
Norfolk, VA
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego


Today
Hi LoW
60 45s
68 48c
54 29 pc
59 44s
89 64s
50 35 c
54 39 pc
63 42 c
55 44s
59 39 s
69 36s
60 40s
79 45S
64 33 pc
63 41 s
79 67 c
74 59 pc


Sunday
Hi LOW
62 45 pc
68 55 s
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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, October 26, 2013


.,.NONli NBf .








Sports
sports@dailycommercial.com


NASCAR: Hamlin wins pole / B4


Bl
DAILY COMMERCIAL
Saturday, October 26, 2013



www.dailycommercial.comn
SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY
1352-365-8208


CANES BLOW BY EAGLES IN DARK :


MARK FISHER
Special to the Daily Commercial
MOUNT DORA In
a dark-shortened game
plagued by faulty field
lighting, Mount Dora de-
feated South Lake 15-8 in
a game called by rule after
the first half.
In addition to problems
with lighting on the field,
both teams struggled with
penalties, none more crit-
ical than a block-in-the-
back call that negated an


80-yard kickoff return for
a touchdown by Alex Gon-
zalez that would have given
South Lake the opportunity
to tie or take the lead with
fewer than 3 minutes re-
maining in the first half.
The penalty gave the Ea-
gles a first down at the
Canes' 17 but another per-
sonal foul pushed them
back to the 27. The Canes
ended the threat by stuffing
Kevin Evans at the line and
then sacking Nick Guidetti
on consecutive plays as Ja-


von Spadley and Jacob Kir-
by were able to cut down
the Eagle signal caller in the
backfield to give the Canes
the ball on downs.
Mount Dora took the
lead on its first drive, get-
ting the touchdown from
Charod Weaver on a 6-yard
run and and the point af-
ter by Felipe Malagon. The
score capped an impressive
11-play drive that started at
their 35 yard line with Bry-
ant Mosher going 4-for-5
passing hittingWeaver for a


short gain and connecting
with Jonta Scott on three
passes good for 52 yards.
Scott caught four balls for
99 yards on the night.
Weaver finished the night
with 34 yards on 5 carries
and 2 touchdowns. Jordan
Porter tallied 61 yards on
13 carries for the Canes.
Mosher was efficient, go-
ing 8-for-12 passing on the
night for 140 yards and no
turnovers.
The Eagles got their score
SEE CANES I B2


Friday's Games
Tavares 17, Eustis 13
First Academy of Leesburg 47
Ocoee Legacy Charter 14
Mount Dora Bible 41
Ocala Christian 21
Mount Dora 15, South Lake 8
Winter Garden Foundation 28
Montverde Academy 27
South Sumter 63, Weeki Wachee 20
Winter Springs 28, East Ridge 20
The Villages 43, Wildwood 35
Umatilla 14, Starke Bradford 27
Ocala Trinity Catholic 48
Lake Minneola 21


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Former St. Louis Cardinals player Albert Pujols waves to fans at
Busch Stadium during a parade in celebration of the Cardinals'
11th World Series victory in St. Louis. Pujols' exit had no effect
on the Cardinals, who have not missed the three-time NL MVP

Cards getting by


nicely without Pujols


R.B. FALLSTROM
Associated Press
ST. LOUIS Tony La
Russa was always pro-
tective of his players, so
it comes
as no sur- r
prise that \\ i
the for- A
mer St.
Louis Car-
dinals manager swims
against the current
when it comes to Al-
bert Pujols.
It's been two years
since the three-time
NL MVP played his
last game in St. Louis,


sprayed some cham-
pagne, boarded a pa-
rade vehicle, waved to
adoring fans lining the
streets and then left
town.


The Car-
dinals have
done plenty
of celebrat-


ing with-
out Pujols. It's probably
the biggest reason his
potent bat and larger-
than-life presence have
been largely forgotten
in St. Louis.
But La Russa, who
retired after the 2011
SEE PUJOLS I B2


High-octane offense leads



Raiders to 63-20 victory


FRANK JOLLEY
Staff Writer
frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com
The South Sumter
High School football
team was determined
to have a successful
homecoming.
The Raiders scored
on their first eight pos-
sessions Friday and
had 517 yards of total
offense in the first
half en route to a
63-20 win againstWee-
ki Wachee in a Class
5A-District 6 contest at
Raider Field.
South Sumter was
a machine from the
opening kickoff. Af-
ter forcing the Hor-
nets to punt following
a 3-and-out opening
series, the Raiders re-
turned the ball to the
nine-yard line.
Three plays later,
James Taylor scored
the first of his two
touchdowns to give
South Sumter a lead
it would never relin-
quish.
However, on the en-
suing kickoff, Tyler Wi-


PAUL RYAN / DAILY COMMERCIAL
South Sumter's Ladovick Gibson hurtles toward the Weeki Wachee end zone on Friday night in
Bushnell in a game won by the Raiders 63-20.


ley returned the ball
89 yards for a touch-
downs. It was the first
of two kickoff returns
for touchdowns byWi-
ley in the first half.
Wiley's success on
kickoff returns was the
only demerit for the
Raiders.
South Sumter (9-0


overall, 6-0 in Class
5A-6) scored 28 points
in the first and sec-
ond quarters en
route to a 56-13 half-
time lead and likely
could've surpassed the
60-point mark before
intermission. As the fi-
nal seconds of the first
half wound down, the


Raiders were on Wee-
ki Wachee's six-yard
line, but South Sumter
coach Inman Sherman
chose not to run an-
other play that might
have resulted in an an-
other touchdown.
In the first half, South
Sumter's defense
SEE RAIDERS I B2


No. 21 UCF looks to protect ranking


KYLE HIGHTOWER
Associated Press
ORLANDO There aren't
many players in UCF's lock-
er room who remember what
it was like the first time the
Knights debuted in national
polls in 2010.
The second-youngest team
in the nation, they had only 13
players including four se-
niors- who were on the roster
when the Knights crept into the


rankings only to be promptly
ousted the next week following
a home conference loss.
But heading into today's
American Athletic Conference
home opener against winless
Connecticut, the 21st-ranked
Knights (5-1, 2-0 AAC) are hop-
ing the best remedy to avoiding
another letdown is amnesia.
"We're not really thinking
about the 2010 team," said of-
fensive lineman Torrian Wilson.


UCF running
back William
Stanback rac-
es to the end
zone against
Louisville on
Friday in Louis-
ville, Ky.
GARRY JONES
/AP


"We're just really trying to focus
on this year and not lose that
ranking next (week). That's why
we've got to come out fighting
against UConn and stay focused
and not lose that edge that we
had the first time we did it."
UCF coach George O'Leary
said he thinks his team's late-
game 24-17 escape at Memphis
earlier this month is still fresh
enough in their minds that no
SEE UCF I B2


I IASSIC




DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, October 26, 2013


r- A mi i F.I I'r % A I I-*


0 LLAUINU UI- C i UULLIEI I-UUIBALL

in Sports Penn State freshman QB






W, MnHackenberg won't have it easy


OVERHEARD
"Like any freshman, you're just going to have to
try to get to him and try to get him rattled and
keep bringing pressure."
- RYAN SHAZIER, Ohio State linebacker


RUSTY MILLER
Associated Press

COLUMBUS, Ohio What's
brewing with the 2013 Ohio
State Buckeyes?
Freshman Christian Hacken-
berg gets the start at QB for the
Nittany Lions when they come to
Ohio Stadium at 8 p.m. today.
He'll be stepping into a frosty
reception, both from 105,000
fans and from the weather.
Penn State coach Bill O'Brien
doesn't anticipate any major
problems.
"I think he focuses on his as-
signments," he said of Hack-
enberg. "That's the thing I like


about big games, big stadiums. I
mean, you're playing Ohio State
in the Horseshoe. That's a great
opportunity for everybody. But,
I think when the game starts,
everybody involved is really just
focused on the game, not the
90,000 people, 100,000 people
that are sitting in the stands."
The excitement of the mo-
ment can take over.
"It's just fun, coming from high
school and you're on the big
stage like that," said Ohio State
QB Braxton Miller, who start-
ed as a freshman in 2011. "You
just go out and lean on the guys.
You've got to make the plays and


keep the guys up because you're
a freshman in the huddle so you
have to take command."
But he added that it was diffi-
cult.
"It's hard," he said. "It ain't
easy. It's hard."
Ohio State hopes to rattle
Hackenberg by blitzing a lot.
"He's pretty poised for a fresh-
man quarterback right now," LB
Ryan Shazier said. "He's doing ex-
actly what the team wants him to
do, playing within their scheme.
Like any freshman, you're just
going to have to try to get to him
and try to get him rattled and
keep bringing pressure."


SCOREBOARD


AUTO RACING
NASCAR-Sprint Cup-Goody's Headache Relief Shot
500 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At Martinsville Speedway
Ridgeway, Va.
Lap length: .526 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 99.595.
2. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 99.344.
3. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 99.344.
4. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 99.183.
5. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 99.162.
6. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 99.084.
7. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 99.007.
8. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 98.815.
9. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 98.79.
10. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 98.774.
11. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 98.748.
12. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 98.712.
13. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 98.702.
14. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 98.656.
15. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 98.553.
16. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 98.553.
17. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 98.527.
18. (41) Aric Almirola, Ford, 98.41.
19. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 98.4.
20. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 98.394.
21. (14) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 98.379.
22. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 98.328.
23. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 98.129.
24. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 98.053.
25. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 98.048.
26. (51) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 97.972.
27. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 97.855.
28. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 97.83.
29. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 97.78.
30. (30) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 97.78.
31. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, 97.674.
32. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 97.618.
33. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 97.568.
34. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 97.498.
35. (55) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 97.473.
36. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 97.448.
37. (36) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
38. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford, Owner Points.
39. (33) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
40. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points.
41. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
42. (95) Reed Sorenson, Ford, Owner Points.
43. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, Owner Points.
GOLF
Asia-Pacific Amateur Championship Scores
Friday
At Nanshan International Gold Club
Longkou City, China
Yardage: 7,006; Par: 71
Second Round
Shohei Hasegawa, Japan 72-70 142
Dou Zecheng, China 68-75 143
Lee Soo-Min, South Korea 73-70 143
Kazuya Koura, Japan 74-69 143
Taihei Sato, Japan 73-71 144
Pan Cheng-Tsung, Taiwan 72-73 145
Oliver Goss, Australia 72-73 145
Brady Watt, Australia 71-74 145
Taylor James MacDonald, Australia 72-74 146
Lin Chang-Heng, Taiwan 73-73 146



CANES
FROM PAGE B1

when Weaver fumbled
to give South Lake the
ball at the Cane 45. A
drive-killing intercep-
tion by Jefferson Vea
was negated and the
Eagles kept their drive
alive when the Canes
were hit with a rough-
ing the passer call on
Guidetti. Two plays lat-
er he hooked up with
Trace McEwen on a 25-
yard pass and catch to
take an 8-7 lead on a
short pass to Charles
Hutchinson.
Mount Dora was
able to regain the lead
at 15-8 on a Weav-
er 9-yard run and the
game was called for
darkness soon thereaf-
ter.



PUJOLS
FROM PAGE B1

championship sea-
son and lives in Cali-
fornia, said Pujols' ac-
complishments always
come up whenever he's
in town.
"He's talked about in
heroic terms, he's hon-
ored," La Russa said in
an interview with The
Associated Press.
"They don't have Al-
bert, they don't have


Kenta Konishi, Japan 76-71 147
Nick Voke, New Zealand 75-72 147
Eric Sugimoto, Japan 73-74 147
Poom Saksansin, Thailand 72-75 147
Blair Riordan, New Zealand 74-73 147
Anton Arboleda, Philippines 74-74 148
Zhang Jin, China 72-76 148
Guan Tianlang, China 74-74 148
Kim Nam-Hun, South Korea 76-72 148
Lucas Herbert, Australia 73-75 148
Jin Cheng, China 76-72 148
Sam An, New Zealand 74-74 148
Luke Toomey, New Zealand 74-75 149
Kao Teng, Taiwan 78-71 149
Vaughan McCall, New Zealand 73-76 149
Marc Ong, Singapore 75-75 150
Shinichi Mizuno, Hong Kong 74-76 150
Danthai Boonma, Thailand 76-74 150
Kim Tae-Woo, South Korea 75-75 150
Jerome Ng, Singapore 75-75 150
WangXichen, China 74-77 151
Johnson Poh, Singapore 75-76 151
Jonathan Woo, Singapore 77-74 151
Trishul Chinnappa, India 77-75 152
Daniel Hoeve, Australia 77-75 152
Joshua Shou, Singapore 77-75 152
Mikumu Horikawa, Japan 77-75 152
Chan Tuck Soon, Malaysia 75-77 152
Viraj Madappa, India 80-72 152
Kim Gyu-Bin, South Korea 77-76 153
SaritSuwannarut, Thailand 78-75 153
NattawatSuvajanakorn, Thailand 77-76 153
Tawan Phongphun, Thailand 74-79 153
Khai Jei Low, Malaysia 79-75 154
Rupert Zaragosa, Philippines 77-77 154
Lee Chieh-Po, Taiwan 79-75 154
Vijitha Bandara, Sri Lanka 79-76 155
Liu Yu-Jui, Taiwan 78-77 155
Koo Kyo-Won, South Korea 81-74 155
Chen Zihao, China 75-80 155
Andres Saldana, Philippines 78-77 155
MohdAfifMohdRazif, Malaysia 80-75 155
Wafiyuddin Abdul Manaf, Malaysia 80-77 157
Ned Howard, Cook Islands 81-76 157
Udayan Mane, India 80-77 157
Yang Yinong, China 80-78 158
KaranTaunk, India 80-78 158
Justin Quiban, Philippines 78-80 158
Joshua Munn, New Zealand 80-79 159
Niko Vui, Samoa 79-80 159
European Tour-BMW Masters Leading Scores
Friday
At Lake Malaren Golf Club, The Masters Course
Shanghai
Purse: $7 million
Yardage: 7,607; Par: 72
First Round, Leading Scores
Luke Guthrie 65-71 136
Simon Dyson 70-70 140
Thonchai Jaidee 70-70 140
Paul Casey 70-70 140
Craig Lee 70-70 140
Scott Jamieson 72-68 140
Ricardo Gonzalez 73-67 140
Rafa Cabrera-Bello 73-68 141
John Daly 68-74 142
Gonzalo Fdez-Castano 71-71 142
Brett Rumford 73-69 143
Gregory Bourdy 70-73 143
Pablo Larrazabal 70-73 143


RAIDERS
FROM PAGE B1

limited the Hornets
to 86 yards of total of-
fense, including mi-
nus- 1 yard rushing.
By comparison,
the Raiders' offense
was firing on all cyl-
inders, running 47
plays and gaining 374
yards rushing and 143
through the air.
Anderson Faulk had
134 yards rushing in
the first half with three
touchdowns two
rushing and one re-
ceiving and Tayor
totaled 116 yards on
the ground.
A running clock was
used in the second
half and limited South
Sumter to two posses-


Big Mac, either, but
that doesn't mean
they don't recognize
what they've done and
meant to the city."
Pujols put up 11 Hall
of Fame-worthy sea-
sons to start his career,
becoming part of a vet-
eran core that includ-
ed Jim Edmonds, Scott
Rolen and Chris Car-
penter and made St.
Louis a perennial con-
tender. He quickly blos-
somed into one of the
majors' most danger-


Rory Mcllroy 71-72 :
Lee Westwood 72-71 :
Francesco Molinari 72-71 :
Marcus Fraser 73-70 :
lan Poulter 74-69 :
Also
Graeme McDowell 70-74 :
Padraig Harrington 72-72 :
Miguel Angel Jimenez 74-75 :
LPGA-Taiwan Championship Scores
Friday
At Sunrise Golf and Country Club Course
Yang Mei, Taiwan
Purse: $2 million
Yardage: 6,533; Par: 72
(a-amateur)
Second Round
Suzann Pettersen 68-69 :
Sun Young Yoo 73-69 :
Carlota Ciganda 72-70 :
Katherine Hull-Kirk 73-70 :
Beatriz Recari 72-71 :
HeeKyungSeo 74-70 :
Chella Choi 72-72 :
Caroline Hedwall 71-73 :
Alison Walshe 71-73 :
Mina Harigae 74-71 :
Azahara Munoz 73-72 :
Irene Cho 71-74 :
MiJungHur 75-71 :
Pernilla Lindberg 75-71 :
NaYeonChoi 74-72 :
Candle Kung 73-73 :
Paula Creamer 72-74 :
Catriona Matthew 75-72 :
Pornanong Phatum 74-73 :
Anna Nordqvist 77-71 :
SeRiPak 76-72 :
Hee Young Park 74-74 :
Gerina Piller 74-74 :
Jenny Shin 74-74 :
Lexi Thompson 74-74 :
llhee Lee 73-75 :
Eun-HeeJi 72-76 :
Mariajo Uribe 72-76 :
Juli lnkster 75-74 :
Lindsey Wright 75-74 :
x-Asuka Kashiwabara 73-76 :
Belen Mozo 72-77 :
Haeji Kang 77-73 :
Cindy LaCrosse 76-74 :
Jennifer Johnson 75-75 :
Danielle Kang 75-75 :
Mo Martin 75-75 :
MikaMiyazato 75-75 :
Jane Park 75-75 :
Austin Ernst 74-76 :
Julieta Granada 74-76 :
AiMiyazato 74-76 :
x-Supamas Sangchan 72-78 :
Karine Icher 71-79 :
Dewi Claire Schreefel 78-73 :
Brittany Lang 77-74 :
Hsiu-Feng Tseng 77-74 :
Moriya Jutanugarn 76-75 :
Christina Kim 76-75 :
Huei-JuShih 76-75 :
Meena Lee 74-77 :
Michelle Wie 74-77 :


sions, both of which
reached the red zone.
On their final pos-
session of the game,
South Sumter soph-
omore Isial Flowers
capped off the scoring
with a 19-yard run.
Weeki Wachee (3-6
overall, 1-4 in Class 5A-
6) scored on its only of-
fensive touchdown ear-
ly in the fourth quarter
when quarterback Da-
vid Tinch scored from
two yards out to close
out a long drive that
used more than half of
the third quarter.
Malik Bell stepped
in at quarterback for
South Sumter in the
second half as Sher-
man chose to rest his
starters.
For the game, South
Sumter finished
with 661 yards of of-


ous hitters, clearing a
.300 batting average, 30
homers and 100 RBIs in
each of the first 10 sea-
sons, and just missing
that standard in his fi-
nal season.
La Russa forecasts a
big comeback next sea-
son for Pujols, whose
two post-St. Louis sea-
sons with the An-
gels have been the low
points of his career. He
was shut down this sea-
son in mid-August with
a partially torn plantar


Rebecca Lee-Bentham 73-78 151
Lisa McCloskey 76-76 152
Ji Young Oh 76-76 152
Ryann O'Toole 76-76 152
Paola Moreno 75-77 152
Sarah Jane Smith 80-73 153
Hee-Won Han 77-76 153
Kristy McPherson 77-76 153
Vicky Hurst 74-79 153
Jennifer Resales 77-77 154
Thidapa Suwannapura 77-77 154
YaniTseng 76-78 154
Jee Young Lee 78-77 155
Heather Bowie Young 75-80 155
Caroline Masson 78-78 156
x-Jo-Hua Hung 79-78 157
Sydnee Michaels 78-79 157
Christel Boeljon 77-80 157
Jacqui Concolino 80-78 158
Ya Huei Lu 80-78 158
x-Yi-ChingWu 79-80 159
Moira Dunn 77-82 159
Yi-Chen Liu 82-78 160
x-YuJuChen 81-82 163
x-Ssu-Chia Cheng 78-85 163
Friday's Sports Transactions
BASEBALL
American League
KANSAS CITY ROYALS Named Don Wakamatsu
bench coach and catching instructor and Mike
Jirschele major league coach.
National League
SAN DIEGO PADRES Reinstated RHP Joe Wieland
and LHP Cory Luebke from the 60-day DL. Desig-
nated LHP Tommy Layne and LHP Colt Hynes for
assignment.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
CLEVELAND CAVALIERS Waived C DeSagana
Diop, F Kenny Kadji, G Jermaine Taylor and G El-
liot Williams.
GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS Waived G Seth Curry,
C Dewayne Dedmon and F Joe Alexander.
NEW YORK KNICKS Waived F Ike Diogu, F C.J.
Leslie, FJosh Powell, FJeremy Tyler and G Chris
Douglas-Roberts.
OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER Waived G Diante Gar-
rett and G Rodney McGruder.
PHILADELPHIA 76ERS Waived G Vander Blue, G
Khalif Wyatt, F Royce White and F Mac Koshwal.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BUFFALO BILLS Released CB Brandon Burton.
Signed RB Ronnie Wingo from the practice squad.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
CAROLINA HURRICANES Placed G Cam Ward
on injured reserve. Recalled G Mike Murphy from
Charlotte (AHL).
MINNESOTA WILD Recalled G Johan Gustafsson
from Iowa (AHL).
PHOENIX COYOTES Recalled F Tim Kennedy from
Portland (AHL).
COLLEGE
CONNNECTICUT Announced men's freshman
basketball F Kentan Facey was granted a waiver to
play this season by the NCAA.
NEW JERSEY CITY Announced the resignation of
softball coach Bridgette Quimpo.


fense 493 yards on
the ground and 168
through the air. Start-
ing quarterback Levi
Sapp completed 7-of-
9 passes for 143 yards
and two touchdowns.
Paul Brown was the
Raiders top receiver
with three catches for
100 yards.
Weeki Wachee fin-
ished with 180 yards
of offense 52 yards
on the ground and 127
yards passing.
The win was the 21st
straight win for South
Sumter. The Raiders
not lost since drop-
ping a 13-6 decision to
Leesburg in 2011.
South Sumter does
not play again until
Nov. 8 when it wraps
up its regular season
against Leesburg at
Raider Field.


fascia on the bottom
of his left foot, an inju-
ry that had dogged him
with the Cardinals.
"He's still as perfect
as he's ever been," La
Russa said.
There are two Stan
Musial statues outside
Busch Stadium in trib-
ute to the greatest player
in franchise history and
a Hall of Famer who was
one of the best of all time.
Pujols used to be the
modern-day Stan Mu-
sial.


TV2DAY


AUTO RACING
Noon
FS1 NASCAR, Sprint Cup, "Happy hour Series," final practice for Goody's Headache Relief
Shot 500, at Martinsville, Va.
1:30 p.m.
FS1 NASCAR, Truck Series, Kroger 200, at Martinsville, Va.
2:30 a.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, qualifying for Toyota Nationals, at Las Vegas (delayed tape).
BOXING
9 p.m.
SHO Champion Deontay Wilder (29-0-0) vs. Nicolai Firtha (21-10-1), for WBC Continental
Americas Heavyweight title; champion Peter Quillin (29-0-0) cvs. Gabriel Rosado (21-6-0), for
WBO middleweight title; champion Bernard Hopkins (53-6-2) vs. Karo Murat (25-1-1), for IBF
light heavyweight title, at Atlantic City, N.J.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Noon
ESPN Nebraska at Minnesota
ESPN2 Louisville at USF
ESPNEWS Houston at Rutgers
FSN Oklahoma St. at Iowa State
3:30 p.m.
ABC Regional coverage, Michigan St. at Illinois or N.C. State at Florida St.
CBS Tennessee at Alabama
ESPN Clemson at Maryland
ESPN2 Regional coverage, Michigan St. at Illinois or N.C. State at Florida St.
FOX Texas Tech at Oklahoma
3:45 p.m.


FS1 West Virginia at Kansas State

ESPN -UCLA at Oregon
ESPN2 South Carolina at Missouri

FS1 Texas at TCU

ABC Penn State at Ohio State

FS1 California at Washington


7 p.m.

7:30 p.m.

8:07 p.m.

11 p.m.


GOLF
6a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, BMW Masters, final round, at Shanghai
Noon
TGC LPGA, Taiwan Championship, third round, at Yang Mei, Taiwan
3:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, AT&T Championship, second round, at San Antonio
11 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, CIMB Classic, final round, at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
4a.m.
ESPN2 Asia-Pacific Amateur Championship, final round, at Longkou, China (delayed tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7:30 p.m.
FOX World Series, Game 3, Boston at St. Louis
SOCCER
7:40 a.m.
NBCSN Premier League, Crystal Palace vs. Arsenal, at London
9:55 a.m.
NBCSN Premier League, Stoke City at Manchester United
12:25 p.m.
NBCSN Premier League, Fulham at Southampton
3 p.m.


NBCSN-


- MLS, Kansas City at Philadelphia
5:30 p.m.


NBCSN MLS, Dallas at San Jose



UCF
FROM PAGE B1

extra words were nec-
essary this week in
practice.
"H and H Hum-
ble and Hungry. That's
what we need to be and
that's where we need
to stay," O'Leary said.
"You had a good come-
back win against an ex-
cellent football team.
But it's a long season...I
think we've had a trap
game already. You don't
get by two trap games.
That Memphis game
was really one where I
thought Memphis de-
served the game. We
were just fortunate to
win."
If the Huskies (0-6,
0-2) are going to pull
the upset, they will


have to find a way to
score points. They
are averaging just
16.3 points per game,
which is next-to-last
in the league.
Connecticut's de-
fense, which is allowing
30.7 points per game,
also must contend with
a Knights offense that
is averaging 32.8 points
per contest.
"Facing this team is
our biggest challenge of
the year. It's my job as
a head coach and our
job as a coaching staff
to motivate this team to
play better football and
win a game," Huskies
interim coach T.J. Weist
said.
UConn has shown
specks of cohesion,
pushing Michigan to
the brink in a 3-point
loss last month.


CONTACTS

SPORTS EDITOR or 352-365-8279.
FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Amateur Listings (cl-
------------- Amateur Listings (col-
FAX 352-365-1951 lege scholarships, meeting
EMAIL announcements, schedule
sports@dailycommercial.com changes, outdoors notices) can
* Schools or coaches can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or
report game results after 6 emailed to sports@dailycom-
p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, mercial.com


DA




Saturday, October 26, 2013


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL



Wacha, Beltran help Cards even Series


RONALD BLUM
AP Sports Writer


BOSTON One is 22,
brimming with vigor and
riding a hot streak in the
dawn of his career, the other
is 36, injected with a painkill-
er just to make it on the field
and refusing to succumb to
discomfort during his first
and perhaps last chance to
earn that elusive ring.
Michael Wacha and Carlos
Beltran, both trying to make
the most of their first World
Series, helped lift the St. Louis
Cardinals to a 4-2 victory over
the Boston Red Sox on Thurs-
day night that evened the
matchup at a game apiece.
"It's the World Series, big-
time game," Wacha said.
Wacha bested John Lack-
ey in a matchup of present
and past rookie sensations,
Beltran provided a big hit
and this time it was the Red
Sox who were tripped up by
fielding failures.
"Somebody would have to
kill me in order for me to get
out of the lineup," said Bel-
tran, undeterred by bruised
ribs that landed him in the
hospital a night earlier.
Matt Holliday tripled
and scored on Yadier Moli-
na's fourth-inning ground-
er, but David Ortiz put Bos-
ton ahead 2-1 in the sixth
when he pounced on an 85
mph changeup for a two-run
homer just over the Green
Monster in left field.
That ended Wacha's score-


MATT SLOCUM/AP
St. Louis Cardinals players celebrate after defeating the Boston Red Sox, 4-2, in Game 2 of baseball's World Series


Thursday, in Boston. The series is tied a

less streak at 18 2-3 innings
- a rookie record for a sin-
gle postseason but it was
all he gave up. Selected by St.
Louis last year with the first-
round draft pick received as
compensation when Albert
Pujols signed with the Los
Angeles Angels, Wacha has
been so good lately that a St.
Louis restaurant he walked
into had named a milkshake
after him, the "Wacha Wa-
cha."


Wacha, the NL champion-
ship series MVP after beat-
ing Dodgers ace Clayton
Kershaw twice, threw a ca-
reer-high 114 pitches and al-
lowed two runs, three hits
and four walks in six innings
with six strikeouts. He im-
proved to 4-0 with a 1.00 ERA
in four outings this postsea-
son, matching the amount
of regular-season wins he
has in his brief career.
"They don't swing at bad


pitches, really," Wacha said.
"They did a good job tonight
grinding out at-bats with me
and got the pitch count up."
But then Lackey, who in
2002 with the Angels be-
came the first rookie in 93
years to win a World Series
seventh game, faltered in a
three-run seventh. St. Louis
went ahead when Matt Car-
penter hit a sacrifice fly that
led to a pair of runs, with the
second scoring on errors by


catcher Jarrod Saltalamac-
chia and reliever Craig Bres-
low both making their Se-
ries debuts.
Beltran, an eight-time All-
Star, followed with an RBI
single. He had been sent to
a hospital for scans Wednes-
day night after bruising ribs
while banging into the right-
field fence to rob Ortiz of
a grand slam. Beltran ap-
peared to be wearing protec-
tive padding under his jer-
sey.
"When I left the ballpark
yesterday, I had very little
hope that I was going to be
in the lineup with the way I
felt," he said. "When I woke
up, I woke up feeling a lit-
tle better. And I came to the
ballpark, talked to the train-
er. I was able to get treat-
ment and talk to the doctors,
and find a way to try any-
thing I could try just to go
out there and feel no pain."
He said he took an injec-
tion of Toradol to block the
pain for five or six hours.
"The good thing is tomor-
row I have the day off," he
said.
When the Series resumes
Saturday night in St. Louis,
Jake Peavy starts for the Red
Sox and Joe Kelly for the Car-
dinals. Twenty-nine of the
previous 55 teams that won
Game 2 to tie the Series went
on to take the title.
"Excited to get home. I
know everybody is," Cardi-
nals manager Mike Matheny
said.


TENNIS


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A WTA official speaks with Victoria Azarenka of Belarus after she was injured during her match
with Li Na of China on Friday at the WTA Championship in Istanbul, Turkey. The world's top female
tennis players compete in the championships which runs until Sunday.


Li Na reaches semis



over injured Azarenka


NESHA STARCEVIC
AP Sports Writer
ISTANBUL Li Na
reached the semifinals
of the WTA Champi-
onships with a 6-2, 6-1
victory Friday over Vic-
toria Azarenka, who
was wincing in pain
from a back injury that
brought her to tears.
The fourth-seeded Li
will play 2011 champi-
on Petra Kvitova, who
rallied past Angelique
Kerber 6-7 (3), 6-2, 6-3
in the season-ending
tournament that fea-
tures the top eight play-
ers in the world.
Defending champi-
on SerenaWilliams will
play Jelena Jankovic
in the semifinal today.
Williams, who swept
her group on Thursday,
has a 7-4 career edge
over Jankovic.
Li and Kvitova are tied
3-3 in career meetings.
Azarenka's loss meant
Jankovic advanced to


the semifinals before
she played Sara Errani
later Friday. Errani won
that match 6-4, 6-4.
Azarenka hurt her
back while serving in
the sixth game of the
first set and was clear-
ly in pain the rest of
the match. The sec-
ond-ranked Austra-
lian Open champion
took a medical timeout
and received treatment
during several change-
overs. She stayed on
court despite poor
movement.
"I just wanted to try to
do my best for the fans
who came and watched
our match, for respect
for my opponent," she
said. "It was just about
trying to do the most
you can out there."
Li won the group 3-0,
while Azarenka fin-
ished 1-2.
Despite failing to
reach the semis, Az-
arenka said she was
pleased with her year.


"I'm No. 2 in the
world. I had great re-
sults in the big tour-
naments and I had in-
juries," Azarenka said.
"So, it's that balance of
good and unfortunate.
I think I can learn a lot
from these little things
to prevent maybe some
of the injuries."
Azarenka did win
one game with some
ferocious serving, but
mostly stayed in the
middle of the baseline
and tried to hit quick
winners.
"It's my decision what
I'm going to do," Aza-
renka said.
Azarenka said her
back suddenly seized
up as she tried to serve
hard and the trainers
told her there was no
structural damage.
Li lost to Azarenka in
the final of the Australian
Open and in both previ-
ous round-robin match-
es at the WTA Champi-
onships 2012 and 2011.


GOLF


Paced by ace, Pettersen


widens lead in Taiwan


Associated Press
YANGMEI, Taiwan
- Suzann Pettersen
had a hole-in-one and
increased her lead to
five strokes Friday af-
ter the second round
of the LPGA Taiwan
Championship.
The defending
champion aced the
133-yard second hole
with a pitching wedge
and finished with a
3-under 69 in swirl-
ing wind conditions to
reach 7 under at Sun-
rise Golf and Country
Club.
"I called the shot.
I hit it exactly how I
wanted and was for-
tunate enough that I
had a good break," the
Norwegian star said.
"It was a very good
shot. It's nice to get a
hole in one when you
actually call the shot
in advance and then
pull the trigger."
The second-ranked
Pettersen was the only
player in the 78-play-
er field to break par in
each round.
"Today was a real-
ly tough day," Petters-
en said. "The wind got
stronger and stron-
ger and it's definite-
ly not easy out there.
The wind and the con-
ditions test every as-
pect of the game. I
mean, even an 80-yard
shot, it's challenging
enough to control the
spin and know what
the ball is going to do.
Standing over putts,
you feel the wind on
the body. It's a mental
test out there but it's
a fun challenge. I've
been playing really
solid golf, and I'm ex-
cited to be where I'm
at after two days."


WALLY SANTANA /AP
Katherine Hull-Kirk of Australia tees off the 9th hole during
the second day of the Sunrise LPGA Taiwan Championship
tournament on Friday at the Sunrise Golf & Country Club, in


Yangmei, northeastern Taiwan.
She has three LPGA
Tour victories this
year, winning in Port-
land, Ore., and France
in consecutive starts
last month, and also
won a Ladies Europe-
an Tour event this year
in China.
KENNY PERRY LEADS
IN SAN ANTONIO
SAN ANTONIO -
Kenny Perry birdied
five of the first six holes
and finished with a
7-under 65 to take the
first-round lead Fri-
day in the Champions
Tour's AT&T Champi-
onship.
Charles Schwab Cup
champion birdied
the first three holes,
dropped a stroke on
the par-3 fourth, then
birdied the next two
holes. He added bird-
ies on Nos. 12, 14 and


15.
Perry won the Se-
nior Players Cham-
pionship and U.S.
Senior Open in con-
secutive tour starts
this summer. He en-
tered the regular-sea-
son finale 494 points
ahead of second-place
Bernhard Langer in
the race for a $1 mil-
lion annuity. The top
30 on the money list
Sunday will advance
to the season-ending
Charles Schwab Cup
Championship next
week at TPC Harding
Park in San Francisco.
Perry took the lead
on TPC San Antonio's
AT&T Canyons Course
with a two-putt birdie
after reaching the par-
5 15th in two with a
3-wood. He parred out
to remain one ahead.


DAILY COMMERCIAL





DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, October 26, 2013


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


Backup QBs in spotlight


for Missouri. S. Carolina


JAKE KREINBERG
Associated Press
COLUMBIA, Mo. -
A pair of backup quar-
terbacks will have a
big say in the South-
eastern Conference
East Division race this
weekend.
After defeating Flor-
ida 36-17 in his first
career start, Mis-
souri redshirt fresh-
man Maty Mauk again
leads the No. 5 Tigers
as James Franklin re-
covers from a separat-
ed throwing shoulder.
Opposing him will be
South Carolina junior
Dylan Thompson,
who hopes to save the
No. 20 Gamecocks'
season as Connor
Shaw looks on with a
sprained left knee.
Mauk gave Missouri
a two-game cushion
in the division last
week by throwing for
295 yards against a
Gators defense that
previously allowed
only 152 passing yards
per game.
"If you watched him
play in high school,
that's what he looked
like," coach Gary Pin-
kel said. "The bigger
the game, the better
he played."
Mauk finds himself
as the most tenured
available quarterback
for the Tigers (7-0, 3-0
SEC).
Third-stringer
Corbin Berkstress-


L.G. PATTERSON / AP
Missouri running back Henry Josey, right runs past Florida's
Brian Poole, center, as teammate Bud Sasser, left, runs be-
hind during the fourth quarter on Oct. 19, in Columbia, Mo. Jo-
sey led all rushers with 137 yards in Missouri's 36-17 victory.


er, a sophomore who
played in 10 games
last year, tore his left
medial meniscus in
his knee during prac-
tice Oct. 15 and is out
indefinitely. He con-
tinued practicing un-
til an MRI on Monday
discovered the cause
of his discomfort.
Freshman Eddie
Printz, who is currently
redshirting, takes over
as Mauk's backup.
Down two games
to Missouri with only
three conference
games remaining,
South Carolina (5-2,
3-2) would be virtual-
ly eliminated if it lost
consecutive games for
the second time since
2010 after losing 23-
21 at Tennessee. The


Tigers would need to
lose their remaining
four games to re-open
the door.
Thompson is no
stranger to playing
despite making only
his third career start.
He's participated in
21 games and engi-
neered wins over East
Carolina, Clemson
and Michigan last sea-
son. He's thrown for
421 yards this year af-
ter 1,027 in 2012-13.
"I think it helps, but
it's a new team, new
game," he said. "Mis-
souri's a great team,
they've got a good
crowd. We have to be
ready for that. This
week's the biggest
game we've played
yet."


NASCAR


STEVE HELBER / AP
Denny Hamlin climbs out of his car on Friday after qualifying for Sunday's NASCAR Sprint Cup se-
ries auto race at Martinsville Speedway in Martinsville, Va. Hamlin won the pole.


Hamlin wins pole, glad


he rushed back to Chase


HANK KURZ JR.
AP Sports Writer
MARTINSVILLE,
Va. Denny Hamlin
thinks that he might
have come back too
soon from an injury -
and he's glad he did.
The driver for Joe
Gibbs Racing missed
only four races after
sustaining a compres-
sion fracture of a ver-
tebra in his lower back
in a last-lap accident at
California on March 24.
The perennial se-
ries championship con-
tender rushed back
hoping to defy the odds,
qualify for the NASCAR's
10-race playoffs and
make a run at the cham-
pionship that has elud-
ed him in his career.
Instead, after a hope-
fueling return that in-
cluded second- and
fourth-place finishes
in his second and third
starts, Hamlin's luck es-
sentially ran out. He
didn't make the Chase,
and has struggled
mightily.
Might it have been
better to give up on
the year when he got
hurt and focus on his
health?
"Maybe," he said Fri-
day at Martinsville
Speedway, where Ham-
lin has won four times
in his career.


"It definitely wouldn't
have taken the mental
toll that this year, post
coming back, has, but
the struggles that we're
having now will define
us later down the road.
If we would have just
gotten hurt, sat out, got
healthy and came back
next season, I'm not
sure I would have been
as mentally tough as I
am now."
The Virginia driv-
er will start Sunday's
race 24th in the points,
and with just one top-
10 finish in his last 18
races. It's not the kind
of success he's accus-
tomed to, and it's been
good to experience,
he said, because it has
forced him, through
steady exposure, to
come to accept that
he's not always going to
be great.
It's a lesson he real-
izes now he needed to
learn.
"That was kind of the
fault I had in 2010 in
the championship and
even previous years,"
he said, speaking of
the season he came the
closest to the title, fin-
ishing second. "One
bad race and I would
just kind of freak out
and it would linger on
and on and one with
me for weeks. Now, not
that I'm immune to


bad finishes, but you
just try to find the lit-
tle positive now ver-
sus thinking about the
negatives."
Hamlin hopes to find
a whole bunch more
positives in the last
four races.
He's won at least one
race in every season
since he became a full-
time driver in 2006, but
hasn't visited Victory
Lane yet this year. And
then he'll take the time
in the offseason to as-
sess his health options.
There are three proce-
dures that could help
his back heal, and he's
not sure what he'll do.
He insists his back is
feeling ever better, but
looks forward to simply
having a chance to rest.
"I'm so tight in my
lower back area, that ob-
viously I have to tense
myself up all the time,
so I'm always worn out
when races are over
with," he said. "I'm al-
ways exhausted, men-
tally exhausted, having
to think about how I can
do my best job but not
let the pain bother me
inside the car.
I'm always having to
kind of move around to
make sure I don't sit in
one spot too long. All
that is a pain, but it's
what I've got to deal
with."


National Guard renews its


sponsorship of Earnhardt


Associated Press
CHARLOTTE, N.C.
- The Army Nation-
al Guard has extended
its sponsorship of Dale
Earnhardt Jr. through
the 2014 season with
Hendrick Motorsports.
The Guard will be
the primary sponsor
of the No. 88 Chevrolet
for 20 Sprint Cup rac-
es, including the Day-
tona 500. Hendrick
Motorsports said Fri-
day the Guard will also
have prominent brand
placement during all
non-primary events.
"NASCAR is a criti-
cal marketing platform
for the National Guard,"
said Lt. Col. MichaelWe-
gner, marketing branch
chief for the Army Na-
tional Guard. "NASCAR
fans in our target de-
mographic are twice as
likely to consider the
military as a career op-
tion, and the overall fan
base strongly advocates
for military service. It's
the right place for the


JAY SAILORS /AP
Sprint Cup Series driver Dale Earnhardt Jr. (88) leads a pack of
cars through the tri-oval during the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series
auto race on Oct. 20 at the Talladega Superspeedway in Talla-
dega, Ala.


Guard and has helped
us recruit more than
400,000 citizen soldiers
since 2007."
The guard has been
partnered with NAS-
CAR's most popular
driver since he joined
Hendrick Motorsports
in 2008.
HMS said recent re-
search showed 85 per-
cent of those who en-
listed or re-enlisted
in the National Guard
since 2007 agree that
professional sports are
beneficial to its overall
efforts to attract and re-


tain soldiers. A majori-
ty of respondents were
exposed to recruiting
or retention materials
incorporating NASCAR
and had seen NASCAR
leveraged at a recruit-
ing center or event.
"Sports affiliations
drive engagement, and
we know Citizen Sol-
diers are especially likely
to engage with NASCAR
specifically," team own-
er Rick Hendrick said.
"The guard has recog-
nized the opportunities,
and Dale Jr. has been a
terrific spokesperson."


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, October 26, 2013




Saturday, October 26, 2013


NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE


Newton throws for 2 TDs,



Panthers beat Bucs 31-13


FRED GOODALL
Associated Press
TAMPA Cam New-
ton pranced into the
end zone, placed his
hands over his chest
and did his familiar
Superman pose. He's
says the surging Caro-
lina Panthers are hard-
ly a one-man show,
though.
An efficient Newton
threw two touchdown
passes and ran for an-
other score Thursday
night to pace a 31-13
victory over the win-
less Tampa Bay Bucca-
neers.
The Panthers (4-
3) won for the fourth
time in five games fol-
lowing an 0-2 start and
climbed over .500 for
the first time in five
years. They've won
three straight, with
Newton throwing for
667 yards, six TDs and
no interceptions.
"It's the culmina-
tion of a lot of things,"
said Newton, who also
has two rushing touch-
downs in the past three
weeks.
When you've got
an offensive line that's
protecting the way they
protect, when you've
got a running back
that's running, you've
got receivers making
plays after the catch, it's
really not hard," New-
ton added. "It's just up
to me to make the right
decision and get the
ball into people's hands
that it needs to be."
The Bucs (0-7), one
of two NFL teams yet to
win, have dropped the
first seven games in a
season for the seventh
time in franchise his-
tory. They've lost 12 of
13 dating to last year,
and some fans showed
up at Raymond James
Stadium carrying signs
and wearing paper
bags over their heads
urging that second-
year coach Greg Schia-
no be fired.
"We got licked," Schi-
ano said, adding that
calls for his dismissal
haven't become a dis-
traction for him or his
players.
"It doesn't affect me.
'People are certainly
entitled to their opin-
ion. ... You sit there and
cry about it, but that's
not going to help."
Newton tossed a
1-yard TD pass to Greg
Olsen in the first quar-
ter and added a 3-yard-
er to Mike Tolbert on
the first play of the
fourth quarter for a
28-6 lead. Newton had
his way against the
Bucs in between those
scores, too, setting up
a nifty 12-yard TD run
by DeAngelo Williams
and getting into the
end zone himself with
a 6-yard run midway
through the third quar-
ter.
The third-year quar-
terback completed 23
of 32 passes for 221
yards. He also rushed
for a team-high 50
yards on 11 attempts.
"I just feel as if my
production is off a lot
of other people's pro-
duction," Newton said.


"If you want to solely
say I'm playing great,


PHELAN M. EBENHACK/AP
Tampa Bay running back Mike James (25) catches a pass for a first down and is tackled by Caro-
lina middle linebacker Luke Kuechly (59) during Thursday's game in Tampa.


it also means that a lot
of other guys are play-
ing great behind the
scenes. This is not a
one-man show. I un-
derstand that, and I will
not have that type of at-
titude."
Rookie Mike Glennon
threw for 275 yards,
one touchdown and
no interceptions in his
fourth start for Tampa
Bay, which trailed 31-6
before finally getting
into the end zone on
Tim Wright's 10-yard
reception with just un-
der 3 minutes remain-
ing.
The victory lifted Car-
olina over .500 for the
first time since 2008,
when the Panthers fin-
ished 12-4.
"It's a relief ... but be-
ing .500 is just a small
percentage of it," New-
ton said. "We've just
got to continue to keep
meshing as a team,
keep building and keep
getting momentum in
these upcoming weeks
because we're about
to hit the meat of our
schedule, and we're go-
ing to need every ounce
of every energy that we
will have."
Newton complet-
ed 81.4 percent of his
passes for 446 yards,
four touchdowns and
no interceptions over
the previous two games
- lopsided victories
over Minnesota and St.
Louis. He set the tone
for another efficient
performance, going 7
of 8 for 57 yards on Car-
olina's opening drive
and finishing the near-
ly 9-minute, 15-play,
70-yard march with his
TD pass to Olsen.
The Panthers over-
came second-and-22
following a 12-yard
sack, with Newton
throwing 10 yards to
Steve Smith on sec-
ond down and scram-
bling for 16 yards on
third-and-12. On the
TD pass, Newton stiff-
armed defensive end
Daniel Te'o-Nesheim to
buy time before find-
ing Olsen wide open in
the left side of the end
zone.
Carolina went 80
yards in six plays on its


next possession, with
Newton setting up Wil-
liams' 12-yard TD run
with a 35-yard com-
pletion to Ted Ginn
Jr. Three minutes lat-
er, the Panthers nearly
struck again, with New-
ton throwing deep to
Ginn, who had a couple
of steps on cornerback
Leonard Johnson but
let the ball go straight
through his hands.
Glennon completed
30 of a career-high 51
passes. He has thrown
181 times this season,
a record for a quarter-
back in the first four
games of a career.
Tampa Bay played
without injured run-
ning back Doug Mar-
tin and safety Dashon
Goldson. Martin is
out indefinitely with
a shoulder injury, and
Goldson, one of the
leaders of a defense
that's allowed 31 points
in each of the past three
games, sat out because
of a sore knee.
NOTES: The Bucs are
3-9 at home under Schi-
ano and have lost sev-
en straight at Raymond
James Stadium dating
to last season. That's
their longest home skid
since 1977, when they
won their season fina-
le against St. Louis to
stop a 13-game streak.
...Williams' touchdown
was his first of the sea-
son. He ran through the
grasp of S Keith Tandy,
then made CB Darrelle
Revis miss on his way
to the end zone.... Car-
olina's defense had not
allowed any first-quar-
ter points until Rian
Lindell's 47-yard field
goal got Tampa Bay on
the board. The offense
gave up a safety last
week when Tolbert was
tackled in the end zone.
Panthers 31, Buccaneers 13
Carolina 7 7 7 10 31
Tampa Bay 3 3 0 7 13
First Quarter
Car-Olsen 1 pass from Newton (Gano kick), 4:44.
TB-FG Lindell 47,1:24.
Second Quarter
Car-D.Williams 12 run (Gano kick), 12:42.
TB-FG Lindell 48,4:03.
Third Quarter
Car-Newton 6 run (Gano kick), 6:27.
Fourth Quarter
Car-Tolbert3 pass from Newton (Gano kick),
14:55.
Car-FG Gano 29, 6:14.
TB-Wright 10 pass from Glennon (Lindell kick),
2:53.
A-59,073.
Car TB
First downs 21 19
Total Net Yards 324 297
Rushes-yards 27-129 1448
Passing 195 249
Punt Returns 2-7 3-6
Kickoff Returns 244 3-65


Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0
Comp-Att-lnt 23-32-0 30-51-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 3-26 3-26
Punts 5-43.2 5-43.0
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 3-1
Penalties-Yards 6-59 3-21
Time of Possession 34:33 25:27
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Carolina, Newton 11-50, D.Williams 8-43,
Tolbert 7-35, Barner 1-1. Tampa Bay, James 10-39,
Leonard 1-7, Glennon 3-2.
PASSING-Carolina, Newton 23-32-0-221. Tampa
Bay, Glennon 30-51-0-275.
RECEIVING-Carolina, Ginn Jr. 5-80, S.Smith 4-42,
Tolbert 4-29, LaFell 3-23, Olsen 3-21, Brockel 1-12,
D.Williams 1-8, Hixon 14, Barner 1-2. Tampa Bay,
Leonard 6-32, Jackson 5-79, Wright 548, James
4-25, Underwood 3-47, Williams 3-20, Page 1-13,
Dawson 1-9, Lorig 1-2, Crabtree 1-0.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.


,WAA~O
2' lFM 96.5
WDBO


BOXING

Longtime area


resident inducted


into Florida HoF


STAFF REPORT
Frank Skilbred, a
longtime Leesburg
resident and former
boxing official, was
inducted re-
cently into the
Florida Box-
ing Hall of
Fame during
ceremonies in
Tampa.
Skilbred,
who died in KL
2003, was part
of class of in-
ductees that included
legendary trainer Lou
Duva, was an inter-
national boxing judge


for three organiza-
tions Internation-
al Boxing Federation,
World Boxing Organi-
zation and World Box-
ing Union.
Skilbred was
known for trav-
eling virtual-
ly anywhere to
judge fights.
He coined the
phrase, "Bags
R packed, will
RED travel."
He eventu-
ally was named the
Chief Judge for the
Florida State Boxing
Commission.


mission inn
RESORT & CL U B
HOWEY-IN-THE-HILLS







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et'erydrti iu either s / FoifHotii ,
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DAILY COMMERCIAL






COLLEGE FOOTBALL


Scandal over, Miami set to face Wake Forest


TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press
MIAMI GARDENS -
Finally, the only thing
Miami coach Al Gold-
en has to worry about
is football.
The Hurricanes al-
ready got a big win this
week, in that closure
came Tuesday when
the NCAA released its
long-awaited verdict
about the case involv-
ing a former Miami
booster and a slew of
impermissible bene-
fits. It was a scandal
that hovered menac-
ingly over the program
for each and every of
the 30 games Golden
has coached since tak-
ing the Miami job.
Not anymore. When
Golden runs onto the


field Saturday, the only
haze he'll be dealing
with is the artificial one
caused by the plumes
of white smoke that
accompany the Hurri-
canes as they emerge
for home games.
No longer burdened
by the probe, No. 7 Mi-
ami (6-0, 2-0 Atlan-
tic Coast Conference)
plays host to Wake
Forest (4-3, 2-2) with
nothing to worry about
except the team on the
other sideline.
"I think it's been very
difficult for our coach-
es and for the athletic
program," Miami Pres-
ident Donna Shalala
said this week.
All the more reason
for Saturday to have a
festive feel for the Hur-


ricanes, perhaps the
biggest surprise team
in the very-early na-
tional championship
picture. It's employ-
ee day for the univer-
sity, meaning virtual-
ly all the seats inside
cavernous Sun Life
Stadium have been
sold. This being South
Florida, that typical-
ly doesn't mean much
as far as guaranteeing
a big crowd, but there's
surely an element of
fans who cannot wait
to exhale about the
mess being over.
And Wake Forest
knows that this week
is going to be emotion-
al for the Hurricanes,
too.
"That's a distrac-
tion that's not a part


of the equation any-
more," Wake Forest
coach Jim Grobe said.
"I think with players,
I know our coaches
and coaches through-
out the country worry
about keeping players
focused on just play-
ing football. ... I think
with what they've had
to deal with, with the
NCAA, I think it would
certainly be a relief to
coaches and players
alike that that's behind
them now and they
can really spend more
time focusing on foot-
ball."
Golden and his play-
ers haven't been avail-
able for interviews
since the NCAA de-
cision arrived. Be-
fore the university or-


dered them to remain
tight-lipped, Golden
said Wake Forest's two-
game winning streak
should be more than
enough reason for his
team to focus solely on
the Demon Deacons -
and not the annual ri-
valry game with Flor-
ida State that awaits
next week.
Here are two things
to watch when Wake
Forest plays No. 7 Mi-
ami:
MORRIS' HEALTH
Against North Caro-
lina last week, Miami
quarterback Stephen
Morris had the first ze-
ro-touchdown, four-
interception game
by a Hurricane since
2001, when Ken Dors-
ey did it in the school's


last national-title sea-
son. Bottom line is,
off nights happen, but
Morris looked tenta-
tive at times presum-
ably because of the
ankle issue that has
bugged him all season.
The Hurricanes say the
ankle problem is gone,
so look for Morris to
bounce back.
HOMECOMING WEEK
No, not for Miami.
About a dozen Demon
Deacons have family
ties to the South Flor-
ida area, and since this
is Wake Forest's first
trip to Miami since
2008, this is a game
the players with roots
around Miami have
been waiting their en-
tire collegiate careers
to play.


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Rehab & Nursing Center
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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, October 26, 2013




Saturday, October 26, 2013


COLLEGE FOOTBALL



Vols brings confidence into Bama game


JOHN ZENOR
Associated Press
TUSCALOOSA, Ala.
- The Tennessee Vol-
unteers don't think
facing "the red team"
sounds particularly
scary.
That's what some Vol-
unteers players have
taken to calling the top-
ranked Alabama Crim-
son Tide in an effort to
negate the intimida-
tion factor for today's
game at Bryant-Denny
Stadium.
"When teams hear
that name or when they
come to play against
them, they're mentally
beat already when they
step on the field due
to the fact they're the
No. 1 team," Tennes-
see wide receiver Alton
"Pig" Howard said. "I'll
give them credit, but
we've got warriors on
our team as well."
Nobody has real-
ly challenged Alabama
this season except for
No. 13 Texas A&M.
The Vols (4-3, 1-2
Southeastern Confer-
ence) aren't being giv-
en much of a chance
by oddsmakers either.
They're four-touch-
down underdogs de-
spite coming off a 23-
21 win over then-No. 11
South Carolina and an
overtime loss to then-
No. 7 Georgia.
Alabama (7-0, 4-0)
has outscored its last
five opponents by a
combined score of 201-


Tennessee running back Rajion Neal (20) is congratulated by teammates offensive linesman
Ja'Wuan James (70) and offensive linesman Antonio Richardson (74) after scoring a touchdown
against South Carolina on Oct. 19 in Knoxville, Tenn.


16, including last week-
end's 52-0 victory over
Arkansas, another re-
building SEC team.
The Tide also has
owned this border ri-
valry lately, winning
the last six meetings by
an average of 23 points.
Vols coach Butch
Jones downplayed the
references to Alabama
as the "red team."
"No big deal," Jones
said.
The Tide, meanwhile,
is trying to match the
seven-game winning
streak Tennessee pro-
duced from 1995-2001
that is the longest any


team has produced
against Alabama.
The Vols have built
up some swagger going
into this one, thanks to
the recent success and
Jones. Plus, anything
seems possible after
five ranked SEC teams
fell last weekend with
Alabama and Missouri
remaining comfortably
above the fray.
Tennessee center
James Stone said an
upset "would be in-
credible for this team."
It wouldn't be as big of
a stunner as it seemed
before the South Caro-
lina game, though.


One tradition in this
game is the winners
get victory cigars. It still
caught Alabama safe-
ty Landon Collins by
surprise when he was
handed a stogey as a
freshman last season.
"I'm like, 'What am
I supposed to do with
this?'" Collins said.
"They said, 'You're sup-
posed to smoke it.' I
was like, I'll just keep it
as a souvenir as my first
win. That's what I did."
Here are five things to
watch in this game that
has frequently been
played on the Third
Saturday in October:


HOT RUNNING BACKS
Alabama's T.J. Yel-
don and Kenyan Drake
have been rolling late-
ly, combining for 648
yards in the last three
SEC games. Tennessee
counters with Rajion
Neal and a formidable
offensive line. Neal has
run for 100-plus yards
in two of the last three
games, but was limit-
ed to 42 yards by Flori-
da and Oregon. "This is
probably the best over-
all offensive line we've
had to play against this
year," Tide coach Nick
Saban said.
CONFIDENT VOLS
Tennessee is hop-
ing that ending a 19-
game skid against
ranked teams will lead
to a renewed confi-
dence going into this
one. The Vols have
lost nine straight SEC
road games. "I feel like
there's just a whole
new confidence lev-
el on this football team
as opposed to previous
years," Stone said. "Ev-
erybody just has a dif-
ferent mentality."
RELEVANT RIVALRY
Jones appreciates
"this great rivalry" and
the significance of it to
both schools and fan
bases. But he says the
Vols need to start beat-
ing some of their rivals
to make the games rel-
evant again.


MEASURING STICK
This game will pro-
vide a just-for-fun ba-
rometer of how Ala-
bama stacks up with
Oregon, in case those
teams play for a na-
tional title. There's re-
ally no comparison in
styles, and perhaps in
how Tennessee's de-
fense is playing since
that 59-14 loss. "We've
improved, there's no
question about that,"
Vols defensive coordi-
nator John Jancek said.
"In comparing us to
the Oregon game, Or-
egon gives you a lot of
problems. Their tempo
and the things that they
do, we didn't handle
very well. We've grown.
We've moved on."
JUST FOR KICKS
Some veterans re-
member the 2009
game, when Alabama
continued on its road
to a national cham-
pionship only with
Terrence Cody's two
blocked field goals in
the fourth quarter. Tide
quarterback AJ McCar-
ron'sviewwas obstruct-
ed but he remembers
the "crazy moment." "I
heard everyone cheer
and thought something
must have gone right
and then watched the
replay," McCarron said.
"It was a great moment
for our school and it
led to the first nation-
al championship in a
long time."


Auburn trying to sustain momentum against FAU


JOHN ZENOR
Associated Press
AUBURN, Ala. The
Auburn Tigers are feel-
ing awfully good about
themselves after a sea-
son when the opposite
was often true.
Now, the lth-
ranked Tigers (6-1)
hope to keep the good
times rolling when
heavy underdog Flori-
da Atlantic (2-5) visits
on Saturday.
Auburn is riding


high from a 45-41 up-
set of then-No. 7 Texas
A&M that thrust Gus
Malzahn's team into
Southeastern Confer-
ence title contention.
Part of this game
against the 24-point
underdogs will be
about remaining
grounded amid all
that positive attention.
Owls coach Carl Peli-
ni isn't expecting that
to be a problem for the
Tigers.
"It looks to me like


they are making steady
improvement every
week all year on both
sides of the ball," Peli-
ni said. "When you
see that on tape, that
means one win or one
loss usually isn't going
to affect your progress
very much."
Malzahn told his
players and coaches to
celebrate the big win
Saturday night, but get
back to work promptly
after that. He's turned
the Tigers' fortunes


around quickly after
inheriting a team that
went 3-9 last season.
Malzahn said the Ti-
gers can't let their ap-
proach change based
on the Texas A&M vic-
tory.
"We're happy that
people think that high-
ly of us," he said. "But


we're onto (the) next
week. That's our only
focus."
So far, Auburn has
been good at taking
care of business as
heavy favorites. There
was no apparent drop-
off in play against Ar-
kansas State (38-9) or
Western Carolina (62-


3), when quarterback
Nick Marshall was
sidelined with a minor
knee injury.
That's the challenge
again in facing Florida
Atlantic, which is com-
ing off an open date
after losing 24-23 to
Marshall on a last-sec-
ond field goal.


3WIWWHRESTLIN
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DAILY COMMERCIAL




DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, October 26, 2013


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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, October 26, 2013








Faith


Life


352-365-8208 I features@dailycommercial.com


Cl
DAILY COMMERCIAL
Saturday, October 26, 2013


www.dailycommercial.com


The controversy over nicknames of sports teams


The Washington Redskins'
name controversy involves
the name and logo of the
team. The issue has involved
certain Native American
groups, owners, fans and the
United States government.
In light of the government
shutdown and before last
week's surprise 45-41 victory
over the Chicago Bears, Na-
tive Americans claimed the
name was degrading. Many
wanted to remove "Washing-
ton."
Of course the last part is
mostly fabrication but isn't it


interesting that fans or spe-
cial interest groups don't boy-
cott teams with names such
as Devils, Demons, Predators,
Mystics, Wizards or whatever.
I'm not saying I haven't
pulled for teams with those
names. I'm a big fan of Duke
basketball. Unfortunately,
their nickname is Blue Devils.
I always had a problem
with the Tampa Bay Dev-
il Rays.
I find it interesting that in
the years they were called the
Devil Rays, from their incep-
tion in 1998 to 2008, the first


season after they dropped the
"Devil" before the Rays, Tam-
pa Bay had been last in all but
2004, when they moved up a
notch to fourth.
In 2008, the Tampa Bay
Rays had their first winning
season with a 97-65 record
and won their first American
Leage East championship.
They defeated rival Boston
Red Sox to win the American
League championship, but
lost to the National League
champion Philadelphia Phil-
lies in that year's World Series.
Since then, the Rays won


their second AL East cham-
pionship in 2010 and have
qualified for the postseason
as a wild card team in 2011
and 2013.
I'm not saying the reason
for their success has been the
name change. But I'm also
not saying it wasn't. Just one
of those quirky things that
happens.
Still, what are we supposed
to do with teams named Dev-
ils and Demons?
Even more bewildering
SEE REED I C3


REFLECTIONS


PHOTOS BY THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL
Volunteers check over Samaritan Inn's grounds. The homeless shelter for families in Leesburg is currently serving 11 families of 12
adults and 21 children.


The Samaritan Inn helps



homeless families move on


THERESA CAMPBELL I Staff Writer
theresacampbeIIll@dailycommercial.com
he Samaritan Inn, Lees-
burg's homeless shelter for
families with children, has
served 48 adults and 88 chil-
dren since opening in the sum-
mer of 2010 on the campus of
First Baptist Church.
"Our intent is to give them the
opportunity to move from depen-
dence to self-sufficiency," said
Samaritan Inn Director Chester
Wood, who noted the shelter is
currently housing 11 families of
12 adults and 21 children.
"If the families leave our min-
istry and are paying rent and in-
come taxes, we know they have
moved from the role of being in
need to helping to provide for
their children and be an active
part of making the community
they live in a better place to be,"
he said.
The director said Samaritan
Inn has been blessed with do-
nations from area churches and
the community for much of its
yearly budget of $164,000.
"All this has been made pos-
sible through the community of
faith giving of their time, talent


Samaritan Inn Director Chester Wood mingles in the pavilion area of the homeless
shelter with volunteers Ray Warner, Barbara Blair, and Resident Manager Marty Gnann.


and treasure to the Lord in an
effort to help others less fortu-
nate than themselves," he said.
Wood noted some of the fam-
ilies served through the Samar-
itan Inn have gone on to be
quite successful, while others
have struggled.
"We are not here to guaran-
tee success, but we're here to
provide an opportunity for suc-
cess," he said.
At the corner of Main and
14th streets, the property for
Samaritan (the former Big Bass


Motel) was purchased in 2009
and construction was started in
October of that year.
"I was hired as the project
manager for 90 days," Wood
said, which transitioned to him
becoming the shelter director.
"It has been an adventure; God
has provided for us."
He's thankful for "gracious
donations" that allowed Samar-
itan Inn to finish the last phase
of construction of the north
wing of the complex.
SEE INN I C3


y HURCH


ALENDARI
A LIST OF UPCOMING EVENTS
TODAY
KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS ST. PAUL'S COUNCIL
5644 CRAFT FAIR: From 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the
St. Paul Catholic Church social hall, 1320 Sun-
shine Ave., Leesburg, with handcrafted holiday
items and food items.
FREE STAINED GLASS WINDOW TOURS AT FIRST
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH OF MOUNT DORA:
From 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., today, and from 12:30 to
5 p.m., Sunday, 439 E. Fifth Ave. The sanctuary
windows were created in 1958 by Joseph Llorens
of Decatur, Ga. The narthex windows were cre-
ated by Carl Tucker in 1980. Call 352-383-2005
or go to www.mtdorafumc.org for information.
SHABBAT MORNING SERVICE: At 10 a.m., at the
Synagogue, 315 N. 13th St., Leesburg. A light Kid-
dush luncheon will follow. For information, go
to BethSholomFlorida.org or call 352-326-3692.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN MOUNT DORA
WELCOMES THE PUBLIC DURING MOUNT DORA
CRAFT SHOW: Artisans will be displaying their
works and lunch is available at the corner of 6th
Avenue and Alexander Street.
FALL FESTIVAL AT NEW JACOB'S CHAPEL: From
4 to 8 p.m., 410W. State Road 50 in Clermont.
The event will host a chili cook-off, pie in the
face fun, cake walk and bounce houses for all
ages. For details, call 352-394-4720.
SUNDAY
HEALING PLACE MINISTRY MEETING IN DOWN-
TOWN LEESBURG: At 11 a.m., 1012W. Main St.,
across from Morrison United Methodist Church.
This is the first Sunday for the new congrega-
tion in the renovated two-story location. There
is help, there is hope, there is healing at "The
Healing Place." For information, call facilita-
tor and speaker Phyllis Gilbert at 352-617-0569.
TRUNK OR TREAT AT FAITH LUTHERAN CHURCH:
From4 to 6 p.m., 2727 S. Grove St., Eustis. Games,
face painting and prizes for the best dressed ve-
hicle. Call 352-867-1661 for details.
PAUL TODD AND PAUL TODD JR. IN CONCERTAT ST.
MARK THE EVANGELIST CHURCH: At 2 p.m., U.S.
Highway 42 in Summerfield. Tickets available at
the church. Call 352-347-9317 for details.
UNITED IN PRAISE COMMUNITY CHOIR IN CON-
CERT: at 6 p.m., at Liberty Baptist Church inTava-
res. Proceeds benefit local performing arts. Call
Susan Moss at 207-832-9745 or send an email
to moss. susan6@gmail.com.
MONDAY
FAIRWAY CHRISTIAN CHURCH SINGLES BIBLE
STUDY: From 6 to 7 p.m., at the church, 251 Ave-
nida LosAngelos, The Villages. Call 352-259-9305.
SEE CALENDAR I C2


Vatican's US donors get access for a $500 pittance


NICOLE WINFIELD
Associated Press
VATICAN CITY -
They entered the Sis-
tine Chapel in tuxedoes
and gowns, the clacking
of high heels on marble
competing with the Lat-
in chants of a choir filling
the frescoed hall.
The donors to the Vat-
ican Museums got seri-
ous VIP treatment during
their recent visit to Rome:
lectures on museum res-
toration projects, catered
dinners in museum gal-
leries, a vespers service


in the Sistine Chapel cel-
ebrated by papal prefect
Monsignor Georg Gaens-
wein and even a one-
on-one with Pope Francis
himself.
Such access comes with
a price, but it's not as high
as you might think.
For starters, all it takes
is $500 a year to join
the Patrons of the Vati-
can Museums, the fund-
raising organization that
hosted last week's extrav-
aganza. The events mark-
ing the Patrons' 30th
anniversary did cost sig-


nificantly more $1,900
a head for the entire five
days of Vatican pamper-
ing but even that price
seems a relative bargain
given that a single New
York fundraiser, without
pope or music under Mi-
chelangelo, might run
$1,000 a head or more.
"Are you kidding? You
can't buy your way into
this," marveled Ronald
Poe as he sipped pink
bubbly in the Gallery of
Maps after the Sistine
Chapel vespers.
SEE VATICAN I C4


AP PHOTO
Pope Francis delivers his message to the Patrons of the Arts of the Vatican Museum, a fun-
draising organization for restoring the Vatican's artistic treasures, at the Clementine Hall.





C 2D A IL Y COMMERCIAL Saturday, October 26, 2013


CALENDAR
FROM PAGE C1

DEADLINE FOR SIGN UP FOR
'DISCOVER YOUR MINISTRY'AT
FAIRWAY CHRISTIAN CHURCH:
From 8 a.m. to noon, at the
church, 251 Avenida Los An-
gelos, The Villages. Call 352-
259-9305.
THURSDAY

HALLOWED KING FAMILY
FESTIVAL AT COVENANT LIFE
CHURCH OF GOD: From 6 to
8 p.m., 706 Urick St., Fruit-
land Park. Games, bounce
houses, hayrides, candy and
food. There will also be a gos-
pel presentation at the end
with prize giveaways includ-
ing bikes. For information,
call 352-787-7962.
UNITARIAN UNIVERSAL-
ISTS CONGREGATION HOST


HALLOWEEN DANCE: Masks
and costumes are optional for
this dance event with DI Paul
Collins from 6:30 to 9 p.m.,
7280 S.E. 135th St., Summer-
field. For tickets and informa-
tion, call Bill Coburn at 352-
408-5018 or send an email to
billcoburn@gmail.com. $15
per person. Seating is limited.
FALL FESTIVAL AT FIRST BAP-
TIST CHURCH: Games, family
photos, face painting, cake-
walk and a white elephant
sale with free corn dogs, cot-
ton candy and popcorn from
6 to 8 p.m., Thursday, 402 Ox-
ford St., Wildwood. Friendly
costumes welcome and chil-
dren must be accompanied by
an adult. Call 352-748-1822, or
go to www.fbcwildwood.org.
HALLOWEEN OPEN HOUSE IN
HOWEY-IN-THE-HILLS: Howey
Community Church will
host an evening of fun for


the community with games.
Prizes and treats for all ages
from 5:30 to 8 p.m., at the
church, 420 N. Palm Ave. For
details, call 352-324-2639.
FERNDALE BAPTIST CHURCH
IN CLERMONT: Will host its
"Halleluyah Night" from 6
to 8 p.m., Thursday, 15050
County Road 561A in the
Ferndale community. The
free event will offer food,
games, prizes, and candy for
the community. For informa-
tion, call 407-469-3888.
BEREAN BAPTIST CHURCH
HARVEST TIME FOR KIDS: From
6 to 8 p.m., 5640 County Road
48 in Okahumpka. Call 352-
728-0900 for details.
NOV. 2
FRUITLAND PARK METHOD-
IST CHURCH HOSTS SOUPER
SATURDAY SALE: From 8 a.m.
to 2 p.m. at the church, 309


College Ave. (just off 466 A).
Baked goods, crafts and trea-
sures. Soup and sandwiches
can be purchased for $ 7. Call
Pam Nettelbeck at 753-4871
for details.
CRAFTS, BAKE AND YARD
SALE AT TANGERINE COMMU-
NITY CHURCH: From 8 a.m. to
2 p.m., 7141 Wright Ave., Tan-
gerine (Mount Dora). Pancake
breakfast and hot dogs avail-
able. Details at 352-630-0988.
ANNUAL FALL FESTIVAL AT
FBC RUTLAND: From 4 to
7 p.m., at the church, 6674
County Road 249 in Rutland.
Bounce house, slide, obsta-
cle course and games. For de-
tails, call 52-748-5300.
NOV. 3
UNITED IN PRAISE COM-
MUNITY CHOIR IN CONCERT:
At 6 p.m., at the First Bap-
tist Church in Mount Dora.


Proceeds benefit local perform-
ing arts. Call Susan Moss at 207-
832-9745 or send an email to
moss.susan6@gmail.com.
NOV7

UNITED METHODIST WOMEN
FALL COVERED DISH LUN-
CHEON: At 11:30 a.m., Juan-
ita Gregg Family Life Center,
at Morrison United Method-
ist Church, 1005 W. Main St.,
downtown Leesburg. Reser-
vations at 352-787-3786.
'WINTER WONDERLAND'
CHRISTMAS BAZAAR AT FIRST
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH:
From 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., 201
S. Park Ave., Apopka. Gift
items and plants with break-
fast and lunch items also
available. Call 407-886-3421
for details.
To place a religion event on the
calendar, send an email to
pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com.


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C2


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, October 26, 2013




Saturday, October 26, 2013

INN
FROM PAGE C1

"Now we are just working on try-
ing to find the right people," he said
of additional occupants for the fa-
cility with 17 individual units. "The
right people are people who are
pretty much doing what they are
supposed to be doing, but they find
themselves homeless. We do have
some openings and we are primar-
ily taking referrals from other social
service agencies, and trying to get
the people who are coming here to
come here with services in tow."
He said the families need more
than just a place to stay.
"We are not here just to provide
housing for somebody; we are here
to intentionally interfere with their
lives in a positive way and that
is what God would have us to do -
intentionally interfere with some-


REED
FROM PAGE Cl

to me are the shows
American Idol and the
Bachelorette. We're
told we're to have no
idol before God. And
yet I've heard plenty of
talk on Christian radio
about the show and
the winners.
Maybe it's just that I
don't like so-called re-
ality shows. But I won-
der what message it
sends when we buy
into such things.
And what about
movies and television
series about zombies
and vampires?
I've watched some
iffy shows but I draw
the line at zombies and
vampires. What type
of society have we be-
come that shows like
Criminal Minds be-
come popular, and I'll
admit I like that show.
I think I need to take


DAILY COMMERCIAL


body's life who is broken and try to
help them into restoration ... the
best thing that we can do to improve
the lives of the children and to help
the parents learn how to succeed."
Among Samaritan Inn's latest
projects was the construction of the
courtyard, pavilion and splash pad.
"The courtyard area with land-
scaping, pavilion and splash pad is
to enhance the transition time here
for the children and their parents,"
Wood said. "We have completed a
dedicated children's activity room
where they can participate in arts
and crafts, have activity time with
some of our volunteers and have an
appropriate location for tutoring."
Wood said Samaritan Inn is "hum-
bly thankful" for the community
and churches' support for the min-
istry. Those who wish to contribute
to the cause or want more informa-
tion may send an email to Wood at
chesterwood@fbsleesbrg.org.


a hard look at how I
spend my time.
Paul challenged
the Colossians writ-
ing, "If then you have
been raised with
Christ, seek the things
that are above, where
Christ is, seated at the
right hand of God. Set
your minds on things


that are above, not
on things that are on
earth. For you have
died, and your life is
hidden with Christ in
God."


Join the



chorus!


A VEE CORPORATION PRODUCTION




DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, October 26, 2013


VATICAN
FROM PAGE C1

In fact, you can.
There are currently about
2,500 patrons and each year
the Vatican can count on
about $5 million from them
- averaging $2,000 a head
- with gifts added to reve-
nue from the annual mem-
bership fee, said the Rev.
Mark Haydu, the program
director and priest of the Le-
gion of Christ, a religious or-
der known for its fundrais-
ing prowess. Most of the
patrons hail from the U.S.,
where the program began af-
ter a traveling exhibit of Vat-
ican treasures caught the at-
tention of some art-loving


philanthropists.
Over the years, their gener-
osity has funded, among oth-
er things, the restoration of
the Sistine Chapel and three
of the four Raphael Rooms
in the Apostolic Palace- a
point raised by Pope Francis
when he greeted each of the
350-plus patrons and fami-
ly members who gathered on
Saturday in the palace for a
private audience.
"Over the past three de-
cades, the patrons have
made an outstanding con-
tribution to the restoration
of numerous treasures of art
preserved in the Vatican col-
lections and to the broader
religious, artistic and culture
mission of the museums,"
he said. "For this I thank you


most heartily."
Each year the Vatican Mu-
seums offers up a "wish list"
of the works that need atten-
tion in hopes of finding a lo-
cal chapter or individual pa-
tron to adopt the project.
The 2014 wish book in-
cludes cleaning an 18th
century silk embroidered
Manchurian dress (10,000
euros/$13,800); sponsoring
an outside archaeologist to
work on the necropolis dig
underneath the Vatican's
parking lot (40,000 euros)
and buying new display cas-
es for the Egyptian Museum
(930,000 euros).
During the anniversa-
ry week in Rome, patrons
were treated to demonstra-
tions by laboratory restorers


about their craft, dinners in
Museum galleries and a rare
question-and-answer ses-
sion with a top official in the
Secretariat of State about the
Vatican's reform and rela-
tions with the media.
Basic membership,
though, has its priceless
privileges: Patrons can jump
the line at the Vatican Muse-
ums and go straight to the
Sistine Chapel before any-
one gets in in the morning.
They can get private tours of
off-limit galleries and resto-
ration labs, special access to
St. Peter's Basilica and the
Vatican gardens. They get
priority seating at the pope's
weekly general audience and
have an "in" to score coveted
tickets to Midnight Mass.


Patrons aren't necessarily
Catholic, but they tend to be
art buffs eager for behind-
the-scenes access that mem-
bership provides.
"We saw an ad in a trav-
el magazine about the ben-
efits of being a patron," said
Esther Milsted, an attorney
from Hoboken, New Jersey.
She and her husband Mark
Villamar wanted to see the
Pauline Chapel inside the
Apostolic Palace, which is
not normally open to the
public. They got in after join-
ing and have since taken ad-
vantage of membership to
visit restoration labs and
participate in the anniversa-
ry festivities.
"It's a good deal and tax
deductible," Villamar said.


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Marketss&Money
features@dailycommercial.com I 352-365-8208
www.dailycommercial.com


DOW JONES
15,570.28
+61.07


NASDAQ
3,943.36
+ 14.40


O S&P00
: 1,759.77
|3 + 7.


GOLD
1,352.50
+ 2.20


SILVER
22.64
-0.183


Factory goods orders rise 3.7%


CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER
AP Economics Writer
WASHINGTON A jump in
demand for commercial air-
planes boosted orders for long-
lasting U.S. factory goods last
month. But orders for most
other goods fell as businesses
cut spending, a possible sign of
concern about the partial gov-
ernment shutdown that began
Oct. 1.
The Commerce Department
said Friday orders for durable
goods rose 3.7 percent in Sep-
tember, above the 0.2 percent
gain in August. But a 57.5 per-
cent jump in aircraft orders ac-
counted for nearly all the gain.
Durable goods are meant to
last at least three years.
Orders for core capital goods,
which include industrial ma-
chinery and electrical equip-
ment, fell 1.1 percent. August's
1.5 percent gain was revised
sharply lower to 0.4 percent.
Economists pay particular at-
tention to core capital goods,
which exclude aircraft and de-
fense-related goods, because
they are a sign of business con-
fidence.
The figures echo other eco-
nomic data that suggest com-
panies were reluctant to
expand or invest in new equip-
ment in September, as bud-
get battles in Washington in-
tensified. Hiring also slowed


TOBY TALBOT /AP


Appliances are on display at a Sears store in Berlin, Vt.


last month. Employers added
just 148,000 jobs, down from
193,000 in August.
Paul Ashworth, an economist
at Capital Economics, said the
drop in core capital goods or-
ders points to weaker growth in
the October-December quarter.
Shipments of core capital goods,
which are used to calculate eco-
nomic growth, also dipped last
month, a sign that growth in
the July-September quarter will
also be weak. Ashworth cut his
growth estimate for the third
quarter to an annual rate of 1.8
percent from 2 percent.
Commercial aircraft is a vol-
atile category that can swing
widely from month to month.
Boeing says it received orders


for 127 planes in September,
up from just 16 in August.
In September, demand fell
for machinery, fabricated met-
als, electrical equipment and
autos. Orders rose for com-
puters and communications
equipment and defense-relat-
ed goods.
Excluding aircraft, autos and
other transportation goods, or-
ders fell for the third straight
month.
The report contrasts with
other recent data that pointed
to a healthier factory sector.
The Institute for Supply Man-
agement, a trade group, said
factory activity expanded in
September at the fastest pace
in 2 V years.


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T-NOTE 10-year
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Stocks rise on


profit gains from


Microsoft, others


BERNARD CONDON
Associated Press
NEW YORK Strong
third-quarter results
from technology com-
panies drove inves-
tors into stocks on Fri-
day, giving the market
its third straight week-
ly gain.
After reporting results
that topped expecta-
tions, Microsoft rose 6
percent and Amazon.
com rose 9 percent. The
Standard & Poor's 500
index hit a record. The
Nasdaq is the highest
it's been in 13 years.
The gains were broad.
All 10 industry groups
in the S&P 500 rose, led
by telecommunications
with an increase of 1
percent.
Most companies that
have reported third-
quarter earnings are
beating financial ana-
lysts' estimates. Even so,
earnings for companies
in the S&P 500 index
are expected to grow
just 4.5 percent over the


CURRENCIES
Dollar vs. Exchange Pvs
Rate Day
Yen 97.35 97.34
Euro $1.3792 $1.3802
Pound $1.6185 $1.6202
Swiss franc 0.8942 0.8922
Canadian dollar 1.0445 1.0425
Mexican peso 12.9330 12.9597

same period a year ago,
according to S&P Capi-
tal IQ, a research firm.
At the start of the year,
earnings were expect-
ed to rise at more than
twice that pace.
Some market watch-
ers are calling for cau-
tion, saying that a sig-
nificant part of the
profit growth has come
from cutting expenses,
not increasing revenue,
as the global economy
remains sluggish.
"The question is:
What is the outlook for
earnings?" Steven Ric-
chiuto, chief economist
at Mizuho Securities,
said. "There is only so
much you can do with
cost-cutting."


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jB |~ ft1 | R|______________________________Llianwd B.-,nirac...6 *CA iar'itill


Saturday, October 26, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL








The Market In Review


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, October 26, 2013


Home price monitor
Standard & Poor's releases its
S&P/Case-Shiller index of home
prices for August on Tuesday.
The July index showed that
U.S. home prices increased 12.4
percent from the same month last
year, the most since February
2006. An increase in sales on a
limited supply of available homes
drove the gains. The month-over-
month price gains shrank in 15
cities in July compared with the
previous month, indicating prices
may be peaking.


Case-Shiller home price ir




150.


125

100


75"

50
M A M J J
Source. Fa


idex The Fed speaks '

est. Will the Federal '
164 Reserve maintain its
bond-buying program
to offset the negative
impact on the
economy of a 16-day
partial shutdown of the
U.S. government?
Economists think
so. They'll find out for
sure on Wednesday, when the central bank's policymakers
finish a two-day meeting. The $85-billion-a-month in bond
A purchases are intended to keep long-term interest rates low,
actSet including mortgage rates.


Auto sales
The partial federal government shutdown may have cut into
sales of new cars and trucks this month.
J.D. Power and LMC Automotive forecast that the shutdown
constrained sales of
autos and trucks during
the first half of the
month. Despite the
drag from the
shutdown, U.S. auto
sales are expected to
rise to an annual rate
of 15.4 million units in
October, up from 14.2
million a year earlier.


1,760 .......... ....... S&P500 15,600.................. Dow Jones industrials
Close: 1,759.77 -.. Close 1557028
Change: 7.70 (0.4%) Change: 61.07 (0.4%)
1,680 ........10 DAYS .... .1 10 DAYS
1 ,8 0 0 . .............. ............ ............................ ............ ........... 1 5,9 0 0 ..: ............. ............ ............... .............- ............ ...........
1,750 ............................. .............. ................... 1 ............6 0... ... ............... .......... .... ............

1 7 0 0 . . . . . . . . . . . .... ... . 1 5 3 0 0 .o '' -.' --. . ."

1 6 50 .... ..... ..... ........ 15,0 00 ................... ....... .... ..... ...


1 ,6 0 0 ............ ... . ........................ ............ ........... 1 4,70 0o ............. ....... ........................... .......................
1 0 r0 ,_ 14,400 -..... ............ .................. ... .'. .. .
1440iJ A S 0


StocksRecap

NYSE NASD

Vol. (in mil.) 3,099 2,123
Pvs. Volume 3,574 1,954
Advanced 1781 1193
Declined 1297 1341
New Highs 250 240
New Lows 13 1I


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
15570.60
7030.78
506.69
10053.89
3961.10
1759.82
1295.10
18795.50
1121.92


LOW
15512.96
6985.82
499.22
10012.69
3927.50
1752.45
1288.22
18718.70
1114.25


CLOSE
15570.28
7009.05
506.57
10053.84
3943.36
1759.77
1295.10
18794.46
1118.34


CHG.
+61.07
-13.74
+5.11
+24.65
+14.40
+7.70
+3.77
+62.11
-0.51


%CHG.
+0.39%
-0.20%
+1.02%
+0.25%
+0.37%
+0.44%
+0.29%
+0.33%
-0.05%


YTD
+18.82%
+32.08%
+11.80
+19.07%
+30.60%
+23.39%
+26.92%
+25.34%
+31.67%


Stocks of Local Interest

52-WK RANGE CLOSE


TICKER LO


AT&T Inc
Advance Auto Parts
Amer Express
AutoNation Inc
Brown & Brown
CocaCola Co
Comcast Corp A
Darden Rest
Disney
Gen Electric
General Mills
Harris Corp
Home Depot
IBM
Lowes Cos
NY Times
NextEra Energy
PepsiCo
Suntrust Bks
TECO Energy
WalMart Strs
Xerox Corp


T
AAP
AXP
AN
BRO
KO
CMCSA
DRI
DIS
GE
GIS
HRS
HD
IBM
LOW
NYT
NEE
PEP
STI
TE
WMT
XRX


32.71
64.36
53.02
38.28
24.88
35.58
34.95
44.11
46.53
19.87
39.14
41.08
59.44
172.57
31.17
7.72
66.05
67.39
25.30
16.12
67.37
6.10


--- 39.00
-4 99.84
-4 81.17
-"-- 5449
- 35.13
--- 43.43
-4 47.99
-"-- 5525
- 69.20
-4 2635
- 53.07
-4 61.14
- 81.56
- 215.90
- 050.48
-4 13.90
-0- 88.39
- 8706
-0- 36.29
--- 19.22
--- 79.96
-" 11.15


HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK


35.19
102.67
82.61
49.16
32.68
39.03
48.17
51.70
69.26
25.88
50.06
59.61
76.25
176.85
50.59
13.55
85.95
83.35
33.71
17.61
76.08
9.71


YTD 1YR
MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV


A +4.4 +5.0
A +41.9 +49.1
A +44.2 +48.0
V +23.8 +2.9
A +28.4 +32.6
A +7.7 +8.2
A +28.9 +33.2
A +14.7 +2.7
A +39.1 +37.8
A +23.3 +25.6
A +23.8 +29.7
A +21.8 +32.0
A +23.3 +27.7
V -7.7 -4.9
A +42.4 +58.3
A +58.9 +28.4
A +24.2 +26.2
A +21.8 +23.9
A +18.9 +24.3
A +5.1 +3.7
A +11.5 +4.6
V +42.4 +51.6


New York Stock Exchange


Name Div Last Chg

ABB Ltd 74e 2584 +06
ACELtd 200e 9614 -60
ADTCorp 50 4217 -01
AESCorp 16 1431 +24
AFLAC 140 6630 + 16
AGCO 40 6333 -86
AK Steel 427 +02
AMN Hlth 1249 -40
AOL 515e 3667
AU Option 325 -04
AVGTech ... 22.14 -1.25
Aarons 07 2835 -105
AbtLabs 88f 3725 +04
AbbVien 160 u4930+137
AberFito 80 3581 -71
AbdAsPao 42 657 +08
Aoenture 1 74e 7361 + 11
AccoBrds 714
Aotavis 14815 +1 73
AotiveNet 1440
Actuant 04 3817 -11
AMD 334 + 11
Ae omTIh 3211 + 13
Aegon 26e 797 -16
Aeropostl 942 + 14
Aetna 80 61 82 + 12
Agilent 48 5187 +75
A pq pq


Ann Inc
Annaly 1 65
AnteroRs n
Ar
Anworth 60'
Ar
A
Ann plc 71
Apache 8
Aptlnv 9
ApolloGM 334
AquaAm s 6
ArcelorMit 2(
ArhCoal 1
ArchDan 7
ArcosDor 2,
A 6 2
ArmourRsd 60
ArmstrWd
ArrowEl
As buryA
A -A
Ash rdHT 4
Ashland 1 36
Aspenlns 72
AsdEstat 7
Assurant 1 0
AssuredG 4'
AstonaF 11
AstraZen 2 80.


200 9189 -25
428 13147 +297
1.16 u47.74 +3.69
60 3877 -02
24 21 99 + 23
32 4149 + 18


55e 1201 -36
51e 1476 -03
SA 79e 397 -09
sll 26e 702 + 14
hlelOe 5e 2470 -89
04 1426 +09


Barnes
BarckG
BasicEnSv


1479 -03
.44 35.83 -2.22
20m 2014 +07
... 13.79 +.82
196 6549 +05
90 6 665 +47
1954 + 13
198 10555 -46


BenchElec ... 23.31 +1.14


BoMedR
BitautoH


BlueLinx
BdwlkPpl


3701 + 36
u2308 + 63
2030 +28
24.23 -1.61
u30761 + 66


67 u3 09
13e 2671
80 2343
1.96
2 13 3125
1 94u131 19
72e 1254
51 92
60 10627
260 10964
11 62
13386


1 20 u82 39 +2 23
24 1976 +01
2242 -14
7A9 -07
CBLAs 92 2046 +1
CBREGrp 2372 + 19
CBSA 48 u5966 -04
CBS B 4 u590 +20
CFInds 400f 20962 -51
CIT Grp 40 4925
102 2803 +19

CNOFinol 12 1482
CSX 60 2661 +16
CVREngy 300a 396 -57
CVR Ptrs 1.88e d17.21 -2.30
5 40 24 04 54
90 61 41 -66
CYS Invest 136 876 + 08
Cabelas 60 98 -1 63
CblvsnNY 60 1581 -01
CabotOGs .08 36.98+2.14
Cahx 11 87 -34
CallGolf .04 u8.70 +1.44
CallonPet 720 +01
Calpine ... 20.92 +1.35
AMACEn 109 -02
CamdenPT 252 6507 +72
"^ 40 1841
53 25 60

66
CampSp 125f 4256 +16
CampusCC 66 1027 +02
72 11022 -50
50 3135 +14
40 14337 +1 65
Canon 3187 -39
CapOne 120 7038 -27
CapitSrce 04a u1289 +01
Caplease 31 852 +01
CapsteadM1 23 1130 -03
Cardero g .12 -.01
CardnlHIth 1 21 5495 -07
CareFuson 3894 -54
CarMax 4776 -03
Carnival 1 0a 34 63 -06


Cmera 36
ChiMarFd ...
ChiMYWnd ...
CinaMble224e


1688 + 14
307 -01
.22 +.03
2.95 -.18
5201 -01
1 85 -09
30 +01
1550 -62


ClaudeRg 19 +00
CliffsNRs .60 24.99 +1.41
CffspfA 175 22 47 +63
Clorox 284 8864 +25
CloudPeak 1531 +21
Coach 135 49 89 + 80


CovantaH 66 1727 -45
Cowin 128f 64 10 -17
CSVInvNG ... 12.90 -.73
CSVLgNGs ... 16.90 +.81
CSVellVST 2922 +09
CSVxShtrs 11 17 -05
CredSuiss 1e 3235 -18
CrSuilY 32 314
CrstdMid 162f 2140 -17
CwnCstle 76 11 47
CrownHold 4140 +65


Howrshd s 45 2435 +21
Flowservs .56 u71.22 +7.73
Fluor 64 7631 -57
FEMSA 1 6 94 40 +2 75
FootLokr 0 3420 + 01
FordM 40 1760 -16


FMCG 1225a 37 44 +03
Freescale ... 15.55 -'86
DCT Ind 28 793 +03 Fronthne 229 +01


Ma 496


irSPBr rs d39 54
xGldBIIrs 5604 +
xFinBrrs 2530
xSCBrrs 1976
xEMBII s 0 30 59
G 6
xFnBulls 79 11
irDGdBr s 27 14
xSCBull s 70 32
xSPBull s u54 73
rEnBull +405
isover 0 51 0
oleFood u1396
ollarGen u59 50







69
om resos 225 6466
ominos 80 6751
220 u8892'
52 40 62
oublnoSol 1830 21 61
Emmett 72 25 54
over I150f 90 95
owChm 1 28 39 52
rPepSnap 1 52 46 67
resserR 61 02
uPont 1 80 u61 90
uPFabros 100 u2767


EMCCp 40
EMCOR 24
EOG Res 75
EPR Prop 316
EQT Corp 12
EagleMat 40
EastChem 1.20
Eaton 16u
EatnVan M f
EVTxMGIo 9
Ecolab 92u


7686 +15
77.94 -4.24
u71 64 +314
4235 +29
993 +03
10513 +26
43880 -11


+65


d lsonlnt 1 35 49 41
ducRlty 44 9 30
dwLfSc 7706
IPasoPp1 260f 41 16
lan 16 12
12e 695
3053 +
meraldO u8 90


Endvrlntl


... 6.73 +.35
485 -03


nWks 27 59
Res 20 6 79
s 41 1637
n 1 24 2796
Space 1 60 u48 65
nMbl 252 8797


Fusion-io d954 -28

MAC 44 184 2536 -03
NC 60 u58 90+233
afsaSA 21 -04
1 40 47 70 +03
1 44 1072
GameStop 1 10 5488 +08
Gannett 80 2777 -05
Gap 0f 3666 -40
astargrs 453 -15
GencoSip 266 -04
enCorp 1659 +58
Generac 5.00e u50.44 +3.00
nCable 72 3345 +62
enDynam 224 26+1 14
nenGrPrp 52f 21 34 +01
enMotors 3559 -04
GMcvpfB 238 5067 +03
GenuPrt 215 7909 +25
Genworth u1425 +01
Gerdau 03 768 -01
lantlnter 65e 924 -21
3321 + 14
241e 5205 +31
GhmchRt 40 1061 -07
GlobPay 08 5970 +06
GbXUranrs ... 15.38 +.88
GoLinhas 521 -15
GoldFLtd 20r 480 + 12
GoldResrc 36 534 +10
60 2674 +12
50 -01
220f 16209 +213
GoodrPet 2560 -91
v Grace 9235 -09
GrafTeoh 8312 -09
GramrwyP 468 + 04
760 +07
868 +02
GtPiainEn 87 2369 + 28
GreenDot 2032 -19
Group 6f 6457 -29
pFnSnMx 1341 +23


HartfdFn 60 33 57
HatterasF 265e 1977
HawanEI 1 24 2665
Headwatrs ... 9.69
HItCrREIT 306 6647


HollyFront 120 4406 +30
HomexDev 1 66 -04
Honwilllntl 1 80f 3750 +22
Hormel 68 4362 -14
Hornbeck 58u30 -12
Hosira 41 37 + 21
HospPT 92f 2957 + 08
HostHotls 48f 1878 + 12
HstnAEn 27 -01
Hovn6anE 536 -01
Humana 1 08 9154 +21
40 7194 -48
50 2235 -12
25 545 +08
75e 3500 -03
IDT Corp .68e u22.22 +1.11
ING 1289 -10
INGPrRTr 38 609 +07
ING US n 01p 3082 +32
ION Geoph d4 75 -04
iShGold 13 12 + 05
iSAstla 144e 2705 + 12
iShBrazil 136e 5024 +25
iShCanada 68e 29 32 +08
iShEMU 92e 4012 -05


Sh SKor 37e 64,
SMalasia 37e 16:
MexIco 63e 65
59e 131
2M05e 50
STaiLwn 27e 14
Sh UK 52e 20!
SEMMnVol 01e 60
ShS9lver 21
ShSelDiv 219e u70l
ShTIPS 1 62e 113,
ShChinaLC 93e 36.
SCorSP5003 32eu176 !
ShCorTBd 305e 1081
h^^, Abtc* 77 49


SMarket Review


Every Sunday


In The


Money



Section of The



Daily Commercial

SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 787-0600 (Lake Co.)
or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5
p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months
or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily
Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007.

afe 176e 6646 -20 LifeLock 1414 +04 NewellRub 60 u294
sMCV 1 63 +37 994 -0 NewfldExp 31
rSPMid55e 12921 +35 196 5066 +11 NewmtM 100m 27
xHYB627e 9363 +03 LiNat 4 4466 +22 NewpkRes 12


'*^ 272 5913 +59
19600 -20
IntlGame 40f 1363 +39
IntPap 1 40f 45 57 + 59
IntlRectif 2347 +56
IntTower g .50 +.08
InterOilg ... 68.62 +3.39
Interpubic 30 16 15 +24


JPMChpfD 133 21P69 +14
1 52 52 77 + 29
224 4616 +04
Jabil 32 2252 +11
6056 14
28 972 +18
Jarden s 52 43 + 42
JinkoSolar ... 23.00 -2.39
JohnJn 264 9209 -26
JohnsnCtl 76 4301 +02
JonesGrp 20 1531 -08
JonesLL 44f 8457 +41
JoumalCm 879 -06
JoyGlbl 70 5809 +97
JnprNtwk 1870 +11
KARAuot 76 2957 -29
KBHome 10 1790 -07
KBR Inc .32 33.75 -1.95
KKR 163e 2365 +29
KKRFn 88f 1008 -03
KTCorp 1685 +13
KCSouthn 86 12349 -97
164 6243 +30
72 4643 +22
749 +07
22 u1269 +06
KilroyR 1 E40 534 +70
KimbClk 324 10551 +130
Kimco 84 2161 +39
KindME 540f 8402 -06
470 -05
KindMM 540t 7731 -53
518 +04
9050 +16
24a 1721 -06
1333 -26
140 5474 -18
KornFer 2330 +16
KnspKrm u2400 -54
66f u4342 +41
60 1602 +02
6 6 j
L Brands 120 u6154 -40
L-3Com 220 uG9753+124
LDKSolar 1 52 -02
LG Display 11 50 -27
LIN Media u25 79 -26
LSBInds 3539 -132
LabCp 10022 -03
Lannett ... u23.72 +2.22
LaredoPet 3336 +02
LVSands 140 7190 -70
LaSalleH 1 12f u31 64 +34
Latamr 02e 165 +02
Lazard 1 O0 u40 O0 + 29
884 -35
68 u7720 +1 04
52 u3791 +104
120f 3035 +51
40 u3406 +38
LennarA 16 699 -22
LeucNatl 25b 2915 -20
Level3 2691 -13
LexRItyTr 66f 1174 +04
Lexmark 120 3561 +19
LbtyASE 33e 576 +03
L-tProp 190 3812 +60


LumberLiq 11404 -1 64
LyonBasA 200 7710 -95

M&TBk 280 11255 +21
MBIA 1105 -04
MDC 100 3075 -03
MAU
MDURes 69 3026 +49
MFAFnol 774 +05
MIN 49 531 +0
MGIC 29 +09
MGMRsts 2031 -33
MI Homes 21 +0
MRC Glbl 2872 -07
Macench 248f 59 76 +25
MaokCahi 120 2130 +06
Mays 1 00 44839 21
MGl



223f u6014 +34
128 84 58 -37
775 -08
4326 -62
ManohUtd 1608 -05
Manitowo, 08 2048 +74
MA
ManpwrGp 92f 7900 +29
52 1726 -07
76f 3559 -01
MarathPet 16f 699 +68
MVJrGId rs 41C4 +34
MktVGold 46e 2632 +19
MVOilSvc 41e 4938 +43
MVSemi 70 4042 +17
MktVRus 73e 2972 +19
MarkWest 3 40f u7334 +53
MarshM 100 u4656 +53
MartMM 160 9975 +125
M 12

M MM 36 +99
Masco 30 2099 -03
MastThera 50 O0
Master 32 49 26



Mc~so 96 5 9+9
MasterCrd 24072373 -91
MatadorRs 1941 -+13
MeClatchy 300 -12
McCorm 136 6915 +53
McDrmlnt 730 -11
McDnlds 324f 9478 +10
MoGrwH 1 12 7135 -07
McKesson 96u154 99 +499
McEwenM 247 + 02
Mead John 136 1 09 + 77
MeadWvco 100 3931 + 19
Mechel 328 -12
MedProp 80 1334 +07
Medtrnio 1 12 57 36 -14
MeetMe 209 -03
MensW 72 4453 -13
Merck 172 4654 +32
4606 -32
771 -29
MerLpfD 175 2525 -05
MerLpfE 178 2527 -01
MerLpfF 182 2529 -04
Methode 28 u2961 +132
MetLife 1 10 4863 +06
MKors 7624 -70
MidAApt 278 6731 +153
MidstsPet 578 -03
MllenMda 695 + 12
MillerEnR 789 -19
MindrayM 50 4023 -69
MitsuUFJ 63 -06
MobileTde 94e 2329 -01
M,
Modlne 1390 -51
Mohawk 13178 + 05
MolsCoorB 128 5389 +55
Molycorp 523 -15
Monsanto M 72f 10300 +69
MonstrWw 4 24 04
Moods 1 0 71 56 -1 64
MA s 107 16


MotrlaSolu
MuellerWat
M,

MurphO 1
NCR Corp
NQ Mobile
NRG Egy


20 2923 -16
100 45 94 +30
124 6299 +48
07 36 +18
25b 61 75 + 10
... 36.25 -4.28
... 10.63 -1.46
.48 30.11 +1.92
195
76 23- 7 08
120 4459 02
16 1676 07
588 +03
150 7193 +57


NustarGP
NuvMuVal
NuverraE


120 11576
147 51 40
438 4466
218 2649
44a 9 05
,,, 2.39
84 37 09


88 8369
1 29e 1257
cwenFn u59 97
fficeDpt 5 65


' 97e 1395 -05
867 -20
Organovo ... 6.76 -.60
OnentEH u1393 + 31
OshkoshCp u5354 +38
OwensCom 3780 +01
Owenslll 3035 +13

120 2567 -68
192 4212 +62
PHH Corp 2509 -11
PimShMat 82e 10150 +02
PMCCT 50 896 -19
PNC 176 75 36 +54
PPG 244u181 92+246
PPLCorp 147 3079 +19


ney 6 79
naRE 72 13 95

9air 1 00 u66 67
colloid 1 03 19 50
kElm 28 38 59
36 13061
475e 11370
brsA 77e 17 06
bras 27e 15 91
er 96 30 61
pMor 376f 88360
psNV 93e 35 57
lps66 I156f 63 40
NMda 10 65
dmOfc 80 18390
1 20 21 19


PortGE
PortglTel
Potash
PwshDB


1 10 2956 +34
.42e 4.54 -.31
140 31 19 +13
2586 +09


1 66
24e 29 20
PwSCInEn 03e 660
PSBuybk 36e u4091
PSSrLoan 1 13e 2473




PSSPLwV g 8 3265
PShNatMu 1 0% 2319
PwShPfd 93e 1374
PShEMSovy130e 2799
PSIndia 17e 1723
Praxair 2 40 125 24
PrecMxNik 33e 1736
PrecCastpt 12 25431
PrecDnll 24f 1060
Pretium g ... 3.65
PnnFncl 1 04 u4685
1 12 4092
2800
ProShtS&P d2663


PrUltCrude 3215 +61
PrUShCrde 3232 -61
ProUltSilv 21 47 -29
ProUShEuro 1699 -02
ProotGam 241 8000 -61
128e 2645 -39
d 3321 -28
PrUShDow 3155 -27
ProUShL20 7207 -50
ProUSR2K 1324 -03
PUSSP500 d1791 -20
PUPSR2K 1247 + 03
ProNYBo 24 u1152 + 16
Prudent 160 81 41 + 04
PSEG 144 3432 +34
Q 5 00u17426+238
20 104 +319
PutHilnSeo 47 820 + 11
PPrIT 31 534 +01
QEPRes 08 3314 +15
1 95 1813 +12
3474 -426
QuanexBId 16 121 +06
QuantaS 2915 -07
QntmDSS 128 -05
120 5859 +32
72 2342 +27
QksilvRes 229 -11
Quiksilvr 756 -25
82 u2527 +30
40 u1772 +38
RPM 96f 3830 +09
Rackspace 52 69 21
Rad+anGrp 01 1428 + 10
RadioShk 292 +04
RLauren 1 60 16454 16
RangeRs 16 7473 +1 53
210 -01
56 4585 +1 12
Rayonier 1.96 d46.98 -7.98
Raytheon 220 7996+1388
4416 -05
218 4293+144
RedHat 4340 -35
RedwdTr 1 12 1822 +06
80 7269 -92
84 1908 -24
185 5329 +46
188f 2593 + 13
12 949 -05
ReinsGrp 120f 7043 +03
RelStlAI 1 32f 7315 -1 12
RenaisRe 1 12 9211 +71
ReneSola ... 4.50 -.37
Renren 371 -02
RentechN 2.37e d23.56 -5.76
RepubSvc 1 04f 3374 + 16


Saks 1602
Salesforos 5456 + 13
SallyBty 26 60 07
SamsO&G 51 +O00
SanohezEn 29 48 48
SandRdge 646 -16
SandRMiss2.45e 13.06 -1.15
SandRMs22.31e 12.18 -2.44
SandRdP235e 1494 -25


SimpsnM .50 u35.82 +1.87
1,80 3714 -26


SmithAO s 48
Smucker 232
SooQ&M 1 23e
Solar~inds
SonioAut 10
SonyCp 23e
Sothebys 40
SouFun 1.00e
SouthnCo 2 03
SthnCopper 68e
SwstAirl 16
A


SouFun 1.00e

ALAr


1926 + 12
u5309 +13
50.03 -3.23
42 46 + 45
23 97 27


SPConsum 32e u6331 +47
149e 3660 +52
32e 2036 +09
SPInds 39e u4876 +25
SPTeoh 61e u3350 +17
9 6

SPUtfl 146e 3920 +41
6 9 1
StdPac 829 -01
StdRegis rs ... 9.39 -3.82
StanBlkDk 200 7846 +71
StawdHtl 1 35f u7456 +95
StawdPT 184 2539 +20
StateStr 1 04 6 74 + 0
StateStpfC 21 08 05
StatollASA 16e 24 18 +54
StlfelFin 41 83 + 28
StillwtrM 11 60 -02
3578 -12
915 +09
Stryker 1 06 u74 61 + 59
642e 62 6 -4
967 -19
SummitHtl 45 930 -03
SunCokeE u1918 +15
80 3599 +43
940 -25
SunstnHtl 20 u1406 +10
Suntech ... 1.35 -.08
- 2598 -24


ResMed 1.00 49.55 -6.76 wRCmAI


FesoluteEn 952 -40
ResroeCap 80 623 +06
RestorHwn 7000 -21
RetalProp 66 1453 +9
RexAmRes ... 29.95 -1.99
RexahnPh 43 -01
ReynAmer 252 5062 -07
RioTinto 1 78e 5226
RitchieBr 52f 1964 +25


APAG 7945 +99
SCANA 203 4762 +60
SKTlom 2459
SLGreen 200f u9809 +1 49
10 8627 +100
352e 15545 +65
SpdrGold 13046 +56


pdrSTCpBd32e 3076
pdrS&PRB63e u3781
pdrRetl 96e 396
pdrOGEx 82e 7144
pdrMetM 60 3968
TMiro 40 7 60


u21 73 + 16
Synovus 04 332 +02
Syso 1 12 3299 +16


TAr 6
T-MobUSn 27 56 -02
TALEduM 50 u1869 +26
TCFFncl 20 15 27 -16
TCWStrat 39a 538 +01
TDAmentr 36a 2792 +27
TE Connect 100 5360 -14
TIM Part 74e 2565 -60


TataMotors 18e 3083;
Taubmn 200 6802
TeamH Ith 4334






90 28 96

S 26e 9 34
Teledyne 90 28
TelefBrasil 1 22e 22 5
TelefEsp 47e 17 52
TelData 51 u30 9C







1 36 3531
42a 8 4C
TempurSly 3912
Tenans 32e 48 08
TenetHlth 45 93
Tenneco 52 8
Teradata 44 47
Teradyn 1732
Terex 35 57
Tesoro 100f 46 9
TetraTeh 12176
TevaPhrm 1 21e 41 7C
Textron 08 29 07
TherapMD u4 53
ThermoFis 60 97 81
3 4E
1 30 35 34
3D Sys s u58 64
3MCo 254 12442
Tidwtr 1 00 59 9E
Tiffany 1 36 79 32
TW Cable 260 11944


TrCda9 184 4494 +60
Transoon 224 49 50 +48
Travelers 200 663 -40
Trex ... u67.12+13.25
Tnan9Pet 1042 -45
TrinaSolar ... 16.10 -1.18
Trinity 60f 4727 + 16
Trulia 4336 -222
Tuppwre 248 8893 -64
TurqHlIRs 49 +09
TwoHrblnv 142e 971 -07
Tycolntl 64 3649 +28


ViolnMn
Vipshop
VirnetX
Visa
VishayInt
VzstaGold
VitaminSh
VMware


... 66.66 -6.64
2261 +53
60fu20306 + 15
1304 +03
46 +01
4446 +04
83 39 -1 39


MteConn 46f
eMInc 1 46


+94 Yelp
+93 YingliGrn


5e 1668 +09
7978 -16
16 u6735 +29




6 31 6 -.927
2280 -27
12 2910 +22
20 677 -16
47 2399 +30
le 2200 +02
26 1026 +07
8e 9 93 05
6800 -52
.. 6.56 -.92
2334 -37
3f 66 57 +57
1529 -20
80 8691 +125


Stocks in bold changed 5% or more in price from the previous day.
Si..1, b ,:,:, |, ,:.l..
issue
last year vj Company in bankruptcy or receivershp, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law Appears in frc
Dividend Footnotes: a- Extra ddends were pa d but ar.
declared or paid in last 12 months f- Current annual rate.
s paid this year Most recent divdend was omitted or
m Current annual rate. which was decreased by
ann(
t P t .....-...i.
PE exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


|rAr b:a 4





Saturday, October 26, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7


Nasdaq National Market


Name Div Last Chg


AMCNet 7036 + 68
ASMLHId 69e 9431 +22
Abengoan ... d11.78 -.64
AcaciaTc 50 1558 -19
AcadiaPh 2407 -66
Accuray 707 -16
AcelRx 766 -22
Achllon 250 11
14 400 +14
19f 1734 +03
A)xiom u3279 -10
AdobeSy 5381 -40
Adtran 36 2424 +02
90 96 +134
1061
Affymetrix u718 -10
AkamaiT 4588 -18
Akorn 2073 +13
Alexion ... 125.17 +8.47


AllsorptH
AlnylamP
AlteraCp If
Amarn
Amazon
Ambarella
ACapAgy 3
AmCapLtd
2

AmensBc
Amgen
AmkorTch
AnacorPh
AnalogDev
AngiesList
ApolloGrp
Apollolnv
Apple Ino 1
ApldMatl
AMCC
Approach
ArQule
ArenaPhm
AresCap 1
AriadP
ArmHId
ArrayBio
Ars
ArubaNet
AsoenaRtl
AscentSol
AsscdBanc
athenahlth
Atmel
AudCodes
AutoNavi
Autodesk
AutoData
Auxilium


AVEO Ph


BBCN Bop
B/E Aero
BG Med h
BGC Ptrs
BJsRest


...u363.39+31.18


1429 +07
0m 2074 -16




9 169
91 1364 +28
1790 -03
188 11632 +12
477 +03
12386 -50
136 4675 -20
... 13.41 -1.23
2763 -62
80 858 -01
220 52596 -595
40 1771 -12
... 11.98 -1.04
3004 -18
2.39 -.14
475 +18
52a 1759 +03
3.56 +.21
23e 4795 +129
552 -04
1665 -09
1828 -19
1952 +08
100 -02
36f 1649 +01
14060 -215
667 -01
7.25 +.37
... 16.62 -1.06
3987 -33


60 -02
43 5 45 -07
... d26.25 -2.94
15936 -1 98


BallardPw 1 37 -02
BncFstOK 1 24f 5638 + 03
BncpBnk ... 16.93 -1.61
3550 +07
7675 -03
BenefMut 981 +06
Biocryst 656 + 19
252 26 +3 04
6624 -272
BioScrip ... d7.52 -.44
BiostrPhh ... ul.24 +.27
BioTelem ... 9.22 -.59
BIkRKelso 1 04 964 +04
BlackBerry 823 -02
BloominBr 2349 +66
BonaFilm ... 5.95 -.34
BreitBurn 1 92f 1899 -16
Brightcove ... u15.71 +2.13
Broad1om 44 2641 + 12
BroadSoft 34 87 -80
BrdeCm 733 +02
BrklneB 34 392 -24
BrukerCp 2063 +05
BuffaloWW u12507+396
BldrFstSrc ... u7.23 +.70
CA Inc 1 00 u31 40 +1 01
CBOE 72 5064 +36
CH Robins 1 40 6076 -36
CMEGrp 180a 7650 -47
CVBFnol 40 u1456 +05
Cadence 12 79 -22
Caesars 1903 + 06
Calhdus ul 09 ++32
CdnSolar 23 55 -1 13
CapProd 93 929 +22
CapFedFn 30a u1316 +06
CpstnTurb 1 35 +05
CareerEd ... u5.98 +2.18
Carnzo 44 19 -1 02
Catamaran 49 10 -65


2465
urMed 647
ntAI 9 06
pheid 40 48
rners 56 13
rusCp 6 77


ChiBAK h
ChinaSun h
ChiCache
ClenaCorp
CInnFin

Cirrus
Cisco
CitrxSys
CleanEngy
ClovisOno
CognizTech
Come spcl
CommScp n
CommVlt
Compuwre
Conns
ConstantC
Copart
CorinthC
CostGo
CoweinGf)


77f u5391 +29
2504 +27
63 22-46 +0
5793 -91
11 72 -11
56 93 +2 30
3663 +07

1499
83395 -1 12
50 1073 + 21
61 64 -14
... u27.18 +4.16
3267 +22
... 2.50 +.18
124 11644 +20


1368 +01
52f 31 04 -82
36f 2607 -66
5572 -60
6355 +65


Cynosure 2489 + 15
CypSem 44 916 -06


DFCGIbl 1237 + 19
Dataink 1032 -27
DeckrsOut u69.99+11.89
DellIno 32a 1334 -01
Dndreon ... 2.53 +.12
Dentsply 25 45 00
Depomed 749 -15
DiamondF 2333 +69
DiambkEn u5332 -63
DireoTV 6281 -16
DisComA 566 +71
DishNe l h e 467 -61
DollarTree 59i70 +0
DonllevRR 104 1795 +05


eHealth
EV Engy 3
E
E
ErthLink
EstWstBcp
EchoGLog
EducMgmt

ElectArts


76 u4860 +94
1 48
697 +17
1731 +50
51 64 -71
... u44.14 +5.37
08f 3672 -46
582 -12
88 726 -25
20 516 -10
60 u3439 +28
... 19.11 -1.89
... u14.86 +.72


EndoPhrm 4592 +35
Endurlntn 11 25
EngyXXI 48 31 81 +107
Enphase ... 7.90 -.83
Entegns 1026 + 14
EntropCom 424 -16


16 u1668
32 11 13
52 8(
64 23 13


33 Intuit 76t u70 44 + 62
19 IntSurg 369 13 -1 16
14 InvBncp .20 u24.32 +1.36
06 IrdiumCm 630 19


GT AdvTc
GTx Inc
Gam&L wi
Garmin
Gentex
GeronCp
G I
GlacierBc
GluMobile


HanwH
Hanse
Hanwh


... 8.17 -.48
1 74 -0
4442 + 53
30 4390 +07
56 30 04 -32
4.12 -.26
170 -03
u6968 -15


rpfA 294 6293 +0
101520-1035
61 78 -1 17
ins 16 14 4 -56
SA 26e 3000 -19
on 90 + 16
es 220 + 09
ortE 6275 -49
ppn 2216 +49
2123 +33
463 +129
yme 11 0 -42
id 96 3304 +46
nMed 207 +07
haSol ... 4.40 -.58


HawHold
Healthwys


7 79 -15
60 u52 05 +1 48
789 +02
... 11.41 -5.13
716 -01
25e 954 -14
2216 -26


HudsCty 16 99 -04
HuntJB 60 7477 -42
HuntBncsh 20 393 -01
IAC Inter 96 5629 -31
IdeLabs 10460 + 65
Robot ... 35.59 -2.08
iShAsiaexJ 106e 6021 +21
iShACWI 1 1e 5633 +06
iShsSOX 81e 6725 +21
iShNsdqBio 18e 21151 +21
Icahn Ent 5.001 u99.03 -5.44
IdenixPh 367 -08
Illumina 9329 +48
ImunoGn 1763 +43
Imunmd 440 +19
nyte 4059 +77
Inhnera 1026 -14
InfinityPh ... 13.70 -.75
Informant u36 78 -1 55
IntgDv 967 -14
Intel 90 2424 +46
Inteliquent 25a 1093 +05
InteraotB 40a 2020 + 08
InterDig 40a 3531 -27
Interface 12 u21 45 + 12
InterMune 1419 +02
InterNAP ... 7.22 +.48


Ixia ... 14.94 -.78


JA Solar rs ... 10.13 -1.00
JDS Uniph 1530 +01
JkksPao 6 98 + 11
JamesRKg 1 99 -.02
JazzPhrm 9270 -183
JetBlue u758 -02
JiveSoftw 1308 +18
KLATnc 180f 6388 +15
KandiTech ,,, 7.13 -.51
KiOR 261 -03
KnightT 70e 375 +30
KongZhg 9.76 -.63
KraftFGp 21 Of 5496 +35
Kulicke 13 15 -01
139 +01


LamarAdv
Landstar
Lattice
LeapWirlss
LexiPhrm
LibGlobA
G DA
LibMed A
LbtylntA


LifePtH 4992 +1 9
LinoEleo 80 6844 -16
LinearToh 1 04 3907 + 12
290 2634 -1 29
290 2972 -152
Liquidity 2582 11
Logitech 23e 1028 -09
LogMeln ... u33.09 +2.47
lululemngs 7266 +08


MKSInst 64 3066 +55
MSG 6129 +56
MadenH 36 1135 -08


Market n
MarlntA
MarvellT
Mattel
MattsonT
Maximlntg
MaxwellT
MediCo
Medidata
Med ivation
MelcoCrwn
Mellanox
MemonalP
MentorGr
MentMed
MerrimkP
Methanx
Micrel
Microchp
Micron T
Micros~ys
MicroSemi
M
M

M Nn
M",





M
M


68 u4449
24 1196
1 44 4405
293
104 3010
8.19


Microsoft 1.12f 35.73 +2.01
ModusLink ... u4.21 +.31
Molex 96 360 +02
MolexA 96 347 +02
Mondelez 56f 3343 + 23
MonPwSysl.00e u32.29 +4.70
MonstrBev 58 15 + 79
Mylan 33 43 06
MynadG 2531 + 15
NETgear ... 29.08 -3.06
Nil Hldg 505 -13
NPS Phm 2960 -104
NXP Semi 3990 +32


qatPenn 40 10 46
atusMed u1952

ektarTh 10 39
etApp 60 39 39
etEase 1 00e 7285
qetfhx 328 03
eurcnne 1065
1 08 659


OReIllyAu 12536 +7
OceanPwh ... 2.75 -.63


OldNBcp 40 1490 +04
OmAVisn 1375 -16
OnSmcnd 694 +07
Onconova n ... d15.69 -.97
OraSure 627 -27
U6545 -12
u64 62 +264


16 +06


19 PacSunwr


PnnNGm
PenNGm wi
PeopUtdF 65
PerfectWld .45e
PelonNwk


... 2.83
4937


I llI ITheravnce ... 39.07 +2.92
qRAc' iiR 9 -lp Thorate ,c u3999 +38


B( Ent n 9 32
HFL Ent 23 16
IM Cp 60 2573
B FnGp u9639
aixPhm 74 33
anDisk 90 6902


5539
attGen 40 71
Cmfrt 1379


+18 ShandaGm ...


5799 -01
1350 -45
1471 + 15
17.59 -1.07
1286 -01
7300 +36
1445 +06
452 -21
4034 -19


PwShsQQQ 93e u32 90 +59
PloeTR 1 52 7575 +29
prcehine 1070385 -955
PrvateB 04 2495 -27
ProUPQQQ u10362 +203
PrUPShQQQ d1754 -36
Prospot~ap 1 32 11 47 + 05
QIWI n 61e 4051 -29
QlikTech ... 27.11-6.37
Qlogic ... 12.29 +1.51
Qualoom 140 6827+133
QuatySys 70 2372 -30
Questcor 100f 6840 -16
r 365 +05
531 -06
RTISurg d317 -10
Rambus 855 -16
Randgold 50f 7673 +109
RaptorPhm 1441 -17
Regenrn 30224 -218
RenewEn ... 11.34 -1.79
RentA-t 84 3468 + 13
RepubAir 1223 -17
Responsys ... 16.99 -.91
2266 -01
334 -15
d1389 -23
RookwIM 1176 -57
RosettaR 6006 -01
RossStrs 68 7587 +57
Rov"Corp 1934 +09
RoyGId 80 5280 +85
RubiconTc 925 -46


36 706 +36
56 4461 -04
50+ -13
3934 +13
SilicnMotn .60 12.50 +.76
SIvStdg 624 +05


SkywksSol 2386 + 15
SmithWes 10 62 20
SodaStrem 6206 + 04
Sohum 81 42 -13
Solarity n 5303 -257
Solazyme 11 12 -31
SoltaMed 1 99 -07
SomcCorp u1902 +34
Sons 333 -06
Spectranet ... 20.17 +1.57
SpirtAir 41 91 -12
Splunk 61 96 -1 81
Spreadtrm 40 30 44 + 01
Staples 48 1601 -04
StarSoient 1 92
LA9 1

Starbucks 34 7996 +91
Star A 30 03 45
StlDynam 44 1795 -28
Stencycle 116385 +231
SMadden s 35 00 04
Stratasys 108301 -1 80
SunPower 32 72 -35
SusqBnc .32 11.78 -.71
Symantec 60 2203 +54
Synaptics ... 44.82 -8.22


6.40 -.44


SyntaPhm
twtelecom
TakeTwo


Tan
TAS


ngoe ... 23.29 -1.50
SER 1509 -26
abs 03a 2 43 -01
aMot 16966 -349


TowerGp If .66 3.82 -.27
TractSups 52 u7322 -72
TriMas h 41 88 + 03


TnmbleN s
TnpAdvis
TiQuint
TrstNY
Trustmk
21stCFoxA
21stCFoxB
21Vianet
UTiWrldwd


2934 +39
7698+213
717 +03
26 u676 -0
92 27 59
25 u3486 -32
25 u3464 -21
... 17.00 -1.39
06 1563 +11


60a 167


VCA Ant ... u29.00 +1.93
ValVis A ... 5.34 +.30
ValueChiok 1952 -35
VandaPhm 850 + 12
Veeoolnst 31 35 +27
Veltn h 27 -00

Vensk 6"39 +37
VertxPh 7633 -03
ViacomA 120 35 09 +44
ViacomB 120 u8494 +55
Vioal 1 44 -04
VimpelCm 1 94e u1424 +23
ViroPhrm 3912 +08
VisnChina 7.99 -1.61
VitesseS 2 86 -11
Vvus 939 -10
Vodafone 57e 3659 40
Web comn 29 44 63
WebMD 3549 +05
WendysCo 20f 868 +01
WernerEnt 20 2333 -09
WDigital 1 00 u7263 +209


Wl-LAN g
Windstrm
WisdomTr
Wynn
XOMA


Y ML WWde
YYIncn
Yahoo
Yandex
Zillow
ZionBcp 16
Zix Corp
Zogenix
Zoltek
Zynga


u65 24 +65
3 13 +08
856 +01
u14.01 +.77
168 18 -467
471 -13
594 +04
4464 -19
2302 -1 13
11 25 -25
46.22 -2.96
3225 -83
38.19 -2.60
7986 -185
2851 +04
449 -12
u3.04 +.80
1673 +05
u3.73 +.19


Mutual Funds


12-mo
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
AQR
DivArbtl 11 23 -01 +26
MaFtStrl 1010 -01 +85
MaFtStrN b 1003 -01 +82
MIStrAItl 1002 -03 +25
Acadian
EmgMkts d 1912 -11 +73
Alger Group
CapAplnsl 28 20 + 05 +29 0
CapApprA m 2120 +03 +293
Alliance Bernstein
GIblBdA m 8333+01 -03
GrthlncA m 511 +02 +288
m 953 +01 +85
m 963 +77
ti,*,,n:CI
NFJAIICpVaA m 1535+11+243
NFJAIICpVal ns 15 42+10 +246
NFJSmCVAd b 35 97+03 +31 5
NFJSmCVis 303+-03+318
NFJSmCVA m 35 99+03 +312
Amana
Grow b 3125+06+195
Income b 4236+22 +23
American Beacon
2620 + 13 +305
2768 + 13 +309
SmCaplnst 2826+096+398
American Century
DivBdInstI 1076 -1 0
DivBdInv 1076 -12


nT xFBIns 11 26
nTTxFBInv 11 26 +
ncGrlnv 3463 +
fAdj 1229
ItlGrlnv d 1362
MICpVallnv 1626-


Valuelnv 7 90 + 04 +27 2
Vistalnv 22 70 + 02 +31 9
American Funds
AMCAPA m 2756 +06+342
BalA m 236+16 +199
BondA m 1261 +01 -02
CaplncBuA m 53 +1 +154
CaplnoBuB m 5846 + 18 +145
CapWldBdA m2064 -05
CpWIdGrIA m4421 +05 +260
CpWldGrlB m 43 93+04 +251
EurPacGrA mm403 -25 +226
FlnA m 50 69 + 27 +29 5
GIbBalA m 3035 +06 +175
GrthAmA m 4337 + 15 +325
GrthAmB m 4236 + 15 +31 5

HllnoMuA m 1440 +01 -18
IncAmerA m 2036 +06 +175
IntBdAmA m 1353 -03
IntlGrlnA m 3585 -14 +230
InvCoAmA m 3741 + 15 +281
LtdTmTxEA m 1599 00
MutualA m 3426 +17 +242
NewE1onA m 3 45 -01 +415
NewPerspA m 33 04 + 03 +271
NwWrldA m 5967 -29+149
STBdFdA m 999 -03
SmCpWldA m 50 22 07 +30 4
TaxEBdAmA m 1247+01 -19
TaxECAA m 1676+01 -15
USGovSeoA m 1339+01 -13
WAMutlnvA m 38 64+27 +272
Arbitrage
Arbitragi d 1285 +40
Ariel
Apprednv b 5641 +38 +435
Anellnv b 6960 +64 +430
Artio Global
GlobHiYldl 1014 +01 +101
TotRtBdl 1319 +01 -1 0
Artisan


MdCpVal 2715 + 10
MidCap 49 95 06
SmCapVal 1876 05
Aston Funds
MidapN b 4567 09
23 75 +09
b 257 09
BBH
BrdMktFxl 1036
TaxEffEq d 2128+07
BNY Mellon


NtllntM
NtlShTM
Baird
x

x
ShTmBdlns x
Baron
Asset b
Grown b
-mCap b
Bernstein
DiversMui
EmgMkts
IntDur
IntlPort
NYMuni
TxMIntl
Berwyn
Income d
BlackRock
BasValA m
BasoVall
CapApplnA r
CorBdlnstl
EqDivA m


x 973 -01 +16

6416 +24 +356
7191 +56 +394


6 Davis
NYVenA


Brown Advisory
GrEqlnv d 1813 -0
Brown Cap Mgmt
SmCo Is b 7292 -1
Buffalo
Flexiblno d 1419 +0
SmallCap d 39 49 + 1
CG Capital Markets
2124 +0
1199 +0
(CC
Focus 3749 -1
Realty 31 76 + 1
CRM
MdCpVllns 3796 + 1
Calamos
GrlncA m 3605+
GrowA m 5922 -1
MktNeul 129+
MktNulnA m 1311 +A
Calvert
EquityA m 4649 +
ShDurlncA m 1638 +
Causeway
IntlVllns d 1594 -C
Clipper
Clipper 8729 +9
Cohen & Steers


Columbia
AcornA m
Acorn ntA m
AcornlntZ
AoornUSAZ
AcornZ
CAModA m
CAModAgrA
CntrnCoreZ
ComlnA m

DivlncA m
DivlncZ
DivOppA m
DivrEqlnA m
HildBdA m
IncOppA m
IntmBdA m


m8316 +04
3364+07
MdCapldxZ 1497 +04
MdCpVa 13723+09
SManoZ 997
ShrTrmMuniBdZR10i48
SmCaValIZ 1924 -06
SmCapldxZ 2340+01
m 1364+07
1907+06
StratlncA x 627 -01
TaxExmptA m 1336+01
ValRestrZ 55 93 +13
Community Reinvest
Quallnv b 1074 +01
Constellation
SndsSelGrl 17 35 +10
SndsSelGrll 1697+10


EmMktVall 2914 -05 +62
EmMtSmCpl 2123+02 +86
26 95 -03 +60
1530 +02 +173
GlEqlnst 1739+02 +299
InfPrtScl 11 89 + 03 -50
IntGovFII 1253 +01 -1 3
IntRIEstl 556 +01 +112
IntSmCapl 2031 11 +386
IntlValu3 1800 -06 +294
2237 -05 +253
2360 +32 +133
STMuniBdl 1022 +03
TMIntlVal 1612 -06 +284
TMMkWVal 2244 +07 +366
TMMkWVal2 2162+06 +367
TMUSEq 1925 +07+295


DWS-Scudder
EqDivB m 41
GNMAS 14
GrnSc m 23
Gtom 82


19 + 14 +194


cA m 497
m 889
891


NYVentC m 3907 +06 +2
NYVentY 4123+07 +293
Delaware Invest
DiverlnoA m 393+01 -0;
OpFAlnol 956+01 -0!

USGrowls 2351 +28;
Value 15591+09 +29
Diamond Hill
LngShortl 21 96 + 06 +20
Dimensional Investme
IntCorEql 1266 -03 +290
IntlSCol 1955 -06 +317
IntlValul 1962 -06 +292
Dodge & Cox
Bal 9438+28 +25
GIbStock 1144+01 +325


DoubleLine


Driehaus
Aoteln


EmMktGr d
Eaton Vance
FIRtHIA m
FloatRateA m
IncBosA m
m Z
m
StrlncA m
FMI
CommStk Z
gCap
FPA
Capital d 4
Acres d
Newlnc d 1
Fairholme Fu
Fairhome d 4
Federated


nA m 661
nR m 662


Fidelity


ond 1093
Muninc d 1026
Disc d 39 90
A 90
GrdBd 7 77


M n 9
geCap 26 10
nAm d 4079
vCoSt d 41 59
wPnStk d 43 53
Mulnc d 11 90
93 67
d 23 44
;pSto 14 96
Cap d 33 49


Overseas d 39 39
Puritan 20 96
Reallnv d 34 91
RelEst-nc d 11 57
Senesldx 11 61
ShIntMu d 1069
ShTmBond 359
SmCapDisc d 30 96
SmapStk d 21 12
SmCpGr d 1923
9






1\ 6
Sm~pOpp 13 24
SmCpVal d 1933
StkSelec 36 06
StrDiAMno 1404
Stratino 11 11
TaxFrB d 11 06
TotalBd 1057
Trend 93 19
USBdldx 11 54
USBdldx 11 54
USBdldxlnv 11 54
Value 10015
Worldwd d 25 62
Fidelity Advisor
AstMgr70 20 22


5A m 1325+01 149
OA m 1405+01 +158
5A m 1343+02 +15
OA m 1438+01 +13
)ppT m 54552 -11 +335
Cm 2713+09+420
Am 5129 + 10393
pIll 2241 +04 +334
sA m 2910+11 303
sCm 2733+ 10+293
sl 2952+12 +307
sT m 2 66+ 11 300
A m 29 94 -02 373
pl 31 63 -03 +377
SmCp d2611 -01 +335


Fidelity Select
BioteP h d 17544
Chemical d 14377
ConsStpl d 9313
Energy d 63 72
EnergySyco d 36 27
Gold d 22 26
HealtCar d 13902
Materials d 83 40
MedEq~ys d 3636
6i
Gj 6


SoftwCom d 111 89 + 23 +39 9
Tech d 12302-138 +255
Fidelity Spartan


First Eagle
GIbA m 5498 -0
OverseasA m 24 34 -1
USValueA m 20 40 + 1
First Investors
GrowlncA m 2133
Forum
AbStratl 1107
FrankTemp-Frank
FedTFA m 1186+0
FedTFC m 1185 +0
FedlntA m 1205 +0
FedTxFrIA 1186
FrankTemp-Franklin
AdjUSA m A 73
BallnA m 53 94 + 2
CATFA m 699
CATFC m 69+0
CAInTFA m 1219
EqlnA m 2223+
FLRtDAAdv 9 20 + 0
FIRtDAA m 919
FIxCpGrA m 60 +0
GrowthA m 61 9 + 2
HYTFAm 994+0


NYTFA m 1128 +01
OHTFA m 1223 +01
RisDivAdv 4717 + 17 +
RisDvC m 4624 +16 +
RisDA m 47 14 + 17 +
A+
SmCpValA m 60 09 + 08
SmMdCpGrA m 4454+19
StrlncA m 1064 +01
Strno C m 1064 +01
TotRetAdv 10 083+01
TotalRetA m 10 06 + 01
USGoC m 653
USGovA m 657
UtilsA m 1534 + 15
FrankTemp-MutualI
Dis ov C m 33 75 + 11 +
Dis ov Z 34 75 + 11 +
DIsoovA m 34 21 + 11 +
Euro Z 2596 -05
QuestA m 1954 +08
QuestZ 1976+08 0
SharesC m 2704 + 11 +
SharesZ 2769 +11
SharesA m 27 42 + 11 +
FrankTemp-Templeton
DvMkA m 2379
Fgn A m 8 62 -03
353 -03 +
m 1325+03
GIBondA m 13231+04
GIBondAdv 1313+03
GrowthA m 2460 -05+
WorldA m 1995 -02
Franklin Templeton
FndAIIA m 1323+03 +
FndAIIC m 1302+03 +
HYIdTFInA 997
ModAIIcA m 1594 +01
GE


GMO


3442 -12 +297
IntGEqlV x 2567-284 +263
IntlVIIII 2550 11 +294
IntltVIIV 2547 12 +29 5
Quill 2614 +06 +193
QuIV 2617 +06 +194
QuVI 2616 +05 +194
StFxinVI d 1619 +34
USCorEqVI 1653 +07 +223
Gabelli
AssetAAA m 6566 +25 +31 1
EqlncomeAAA m 2785+ 10 +27 6
SmCpGrAAA m 47 55+ 03+383
Gateway
GatewayA m 28 57 +06 +6
Goldman Sachs
GrOppA m 2899 + 15 +335
GrOppls 31 38 + 17 +341
HiYdMunls d 865 -32
HYfeldls d 737 +01 +86
MdCapVaA m 4946+16 +317
M+dCpVals 4996+17 +323
ShDuTFIs 1050 -04
SmCpValA m 5568 +14 +373
SmCpValls 579+15 +37
GuideStone Funds
BIA loGS4 1395 +118
IntEqGS4 1500 -06 +221
Harbor
Bond 1223 +01 +04
CapAplnst 5517 +17 +33
CapAprln. b 5428 +17 +330
HiYBdInst d 11 17 +62
IntlAdm b 7158 -16 +244


Harding


Hartford
BalHLSIA
BallnA rM
BallnoC rr
CapApr C
CapAprA
pAr


CapAprl
CapAprY
ChksBals/
CpApHLSI
DiGrowA
DivGrowl
DivGthY
DvGrHLSIA


7219
71 31
Loevner
d 5097
1806


InOpHLSIA
MdCpHLSIA
MidCapA m
SmCoHLSIA
S HLSIA
TRBdHLSIA
Heartland


2476 -04
5611 + 27
11 39 +01

51 19 -06


ValuePlus m 3767 +01 +313
Henderson
IntlOppA m 2596 -16 +304
Hotchkis & Wiley
MidCpVall 3898 + 15 +424
Hussman
StratGrhi d 10 14 -03 -64
ICM
SmCo 3694 +04 +382
ING
CorpLeadB 2995 02 +22 9
GIREstAA m 1920 +06 +13
INVESCO
CharterA m 22 24 +09 +26,
ComstockA m 22 43 +07 +29
DeMktAm 3469 +13 +6
DiDv\A m 1651 +11 +26
DivDivlnv b 1650 12 +26E
EqlncomeA m 1097 03 +21
EqlnoomeC m 1081 03 +21 C
GrowlncA m 2656+ 10 +28
HYldMuA m 916 01 -43
IntlGrA m 3364 03 +213
IntlGrl 34 19 +04 +21 8
MidCapGrA m3655 06 +352
MidCpCrA m 26 5 07 +291
MunklnoA m 1302 02 -2
RealEstA m 2647 23 +128
SmCapValA m2204 12 +467
Summit b 1657 06 +298


Ivy
Asse
Asse
AssM
Hiln
Hiln
LtdT
MdC


etStrA m 3059
etStrC m 2966
etStrY b 30 65
cA m 76
cC m 8 76
TBdA m 11 00
CnGrA m 22983


MdCpGrthl
SoTeohA m
JPMorgan
CoreBdUt
CoreBondA r


A MktE 2360
ncA m 1256-


09
;hMuniBdl 1057
hDurBdU 1093-
mCapSel 4961
mRt20201 1796
mRt20301 1864


ValAdvSel 265+04
James Advantage
GoldRainA b 236+05
Janus
BaIT 3010+04
Fortys b 4700 -25
Gr&lnoT 4296+16
HYldT 940
OverseasT 37 25 -22
PerkwnsMCVT 2605+12
RsrchT 41 22 + 06
ShTmBdT 3 03
Mn 6

T 3946 -02
TwentyT 77 65
Jensen
QualtyGrl 36382 +24
QualtyGrJ b 3630 +23
John Hancock
BondA m 1601 +01
IncomeA m 6 62


m2059 +93
1433 -06 +302
Legg Mason/Western
AggGrowA m 17431+73 +412
13339+73 +417
m 1750+06 +266
ApprecA m 1920+05+228
CrPIBdFI b 1135+01 +02
CrPIBdIns 1136+02 +05
EqlnA m 1760+0 +221
SmCpGrA m 2792 -04 +433
ValueC m 5495 + 18 +339
Litman Gregory
Maslntllntl 1803 -11 +23
Longleaf Partners
Intl 1753 -08 +31 6
LongPart 3353 +04 +277
SmCap 3602 +29+290
Loomis Sayles
BdlnstI 1541 +02 +79
BdR b 1534+02 +76
dlnol 1530 +02 +83
GIbBdlnstl 1684 +01 -03
Lord Abbett
AffliatA m 1493+07 +283
BalA m 1241 +01 +193
BondDebA m 829 +87


SmCpValA m 4105 +06 +327
SmCpVall 43 70 + 06 +331
ValOppA m 2148 +03+350
MFS
BondA m 1387 +01 +06
ConAlocA m 1447+02 +97
GrAllocA m 1771 +02 +206
GrowA m 6254+12+32
Growl 6530+13 +331
IntDivA m 1647 -05 +21
IntlNDisA m 229 -07 +226
IntlNDisl 2911 -06 +229
IntlValA m 3366 -19 +27
IslntlEq 2237 -05 +244
MAInvA m 2674 +05 +22
MAInvGrA m 219 -02 +25
MAInvl 2620 +04 +2 5
ModA\ ocA m 1620 +02 +151
MuHlnoA f 751 -47
ReslntA m 1794 -0 +234
Reslntll 1854 -08 +236
ResearchA m 35 65 +05 +274
TotRetA m 1728 +04 +169
UtlA m 220+16 +219
ValueA m 320212+296
ValueC m 31 71 + 11 +286
Value 3217 +11 +299
MainStay
HYfdCorA m 610 +63
m 1008 +02 +333
4426+09 +236
S&Pldxl 4124 +18 +263
SelEql 46 +0 +263
Mairs & Power
GrtIlnv 1001 +2 +351
Managers
BondSvc 2766+03 +27
1062 -03
1915 +04 +316
Manning & Napier
WrIdOppA 916 -01 +246
Matthews Asian
China d 2436 -09 +102
Divlnv d 1604 -05 +166
GrInc d 1957 +109
PacTigerd 25 60 +05 +88
Merger
Merger b 1627+01 +49
Meridian
MerdnGr d 4355 +02 +268
Metropolitan West
Hi-YIdBdM b 1055 +01 +74
LowDurBd b 30 +23
LowDurBdl 80 +24
TotRetBdl 1072 +01 +26
TotRtBd b 1072 +01 +22
Morgan Stanley
EmgMktsl d 2600 -06 +71
FocGrA m 5278 + 19+45
IntlEqA m 1655 -06 +226
IntlEql d 167 -07 +229
MdCpGrA m 4325 -12 +358
MdCpGrh 4508 -12 +361
SmCoGr d 2106 -13 +593
Under Funds
MdNp rGrA m 40 57+ 10+31 3
MdCpCrGrY 4169+11 +317
Mutual Series
Beacon Z 1652 +06 +278
Nations
LgCplxZ 3432a+15 +271
Nationwide


Natixis
LSInvBdA


460 +06


LSStratlnoA m 1646+(
LSStratlnoC m 16 55
LSValY 26384 +
Neuberger Berman
Genes6slnstl 638 +
Genesslnv 4454 + +
GenessTr 66 30 +
Partnrlnv 34 69 + (
Nicholas
Nichol 6333 +o
Northern


Nuveen
HYldMunA m 1552
HiYdMunC m 1551
HiYldMunl 1552
IntMunBdl 897
LtdTmMuA m 11 03
LtdTmMunl 1098
RIEstSeol 2272
Oak Associates


Oakmark
Eqln1l 3405 + 11
GISell 1628 -,08
Global I 3076 -06
Intll 2693 17
IntlSmCpl d 1766 -12
Oakmark I 62 45 + 24
Select I 4002 +17
Old Westbury
GIbSmMdCp 1739 +03
1213 -03
1193 +01
RealRet 822 +02
Oppenheimer
AMTFrMunA m 657+01
AcAllocA m 1169
CapApAm 5900+12
CaplncA m 951 +02
DevMktA m 3841 -05
DevMktY 3806 -05
DevMktsC m 3663 -04
DiscoverA m 82 68 -11
EqlncA m 3156 +13
EquityA m 1181 +03
GlobA m 7870 -02
GloOrA m3830 -15


IntlDivA m
IntlGrY

IntlGrowA m
LmtTmMunA
LmtTmMunC
LtdTmNY m
LtdTmNY m
MainSSMCA
MaInStrA m
QuBalA m
RisDivA m
RisDivY
RocMuniA m
RohNtlMC
RochNtlMu mT
SrFltRatA m
SrFltRatC m
StrlnoA m
StratlnoC m
Osterweis
OsterStrInc d
PIMCO
AAstAAutP
AIIAssetA m
AIIAssetC m
AIIAssetl
AIIAstP
AIIAuthA m
AIIAuthC m
AIIAuthIn


39+01 +6


RtStA m 5 68
RStP 576
IRSt 577
snst 11 71
;url 1037
ktslns 11 46
PIARInst 714


RealRet 11 39 + C
RealRetAd b 11 39 + C
RealRetD b 1139 + C
RealRtnA m 11 39 +
RealRtnC m 11 39 + C

RIEstStRetl 4 52 + C
ShTermAdm b 937
ShtTermA m 97
ShtTerms 97
ToRtlllls 961 +C

ToRtlla 1037 +0
TotRetA m 1091 +
TotRetAdm b 1091 +C
TotRetC m 1091 +C
TotRetls 1091 +C
TotRetrnD b 1091 +C
TotlRetnP 1091 +
PRIMECAP Odyssey
AggGr 2356 -0
Growth 2319+0
Stock 20 65 + 1
Parametric
TxMgEMInstl d5066-C
Parnassus
Eqlnclnv 3709 + 1
Pax World
Bal b 26384 + C
Permanent
Portfolio 4882 +C
Pioneer
CoreEqA m 1492+
HYIdA m 1108+C
ioneerA m 4066 + 1
A
StratlncA m 11 07
StratlnoC m 1084+ C
StratlncY 11 07 + C
Principal
BdMtglnst 1080 +
DNIlntI 11 83 -C
HYJdA m 793


.o MGIIIInst 1404 +02
-16 MidCapA m 1994+04
+272 PrSeolnst 1025
+29 SAMBalA m 1563+03
+343 SAMConGrA m 1763+04
+354 SCGrllnst 1500 -05
+27 SCValIII 1391
Prudential
M2 GblRealEstZ 2322+0A
-37 JenMCGrA m 3855 +14
-30 Prudential Investmen
-1 2020FocA m 1956 +09
00 GovtlnoA m 954
+ G2 HfieldA m 573
+10JenMidCapGrZ4012+ 15
JennGrZ 23 25 +09
+313 MuniHInoA m 951 +02
396 NaturResA m 5194+30
+ ShTmCoBdA m 13


UtltyA m
Putnam
CATxEIncA m
DArlnA m
DynAstAIGrA r
EqlnoomeA m
GIbHltCrA m
Growl noA m
InvestorA m
MultiCapGrA r
VoyagerA m
RS
GINatResA m
PartnersA m
RidgeWorth


Royce
Opportlnv
PAMutlnv
Premierlnl
SpecEqlnv
TotRetlny
Russell


11 +01 +439
76 +02 +362
24 + 13 +27 9


19 09 -
4194 +
11 15
655 -
1091 +
11 05 +
Russell LifePoints
BalStrC b 11 80
Rydex


SSCM
S&P5001dc
Schwab


S30+09 +2
365 +06 +297
0 09 05 +27z


TotStkMSI d 3265
Scout
Interntl 36 90
Selected
AmerShS b 4954
American D 4956
Sentinel
CmnStkA m 4221
Sequoia
Sequoia 21689
Sound Shore
SoundShor 4642
Spectra
SpectraA m 1738
State Farm
Balanced 6134
Growtl 65 91
SteelPath
MLPIncA m 1102
SunAmerica
FocDvStrC m 1733
T Rowe Price
Balanced 23 65
BIChpGAdv b6053
BIChpGr 604
CapApprec 26 35
DivGrow 32 36
EmMktBd d 1296
EmMktStk d 3336
Eqlndex d 4745
Eqtylnc 32 54
EqtylncAd b 3247
EurStock d 2103
M 6

GNMA 962
GrStkAdv b 4912
Growlnc 23 20
GrowStk 49 73
HealthSoi 58398
H ield d 715
InSmCpStk 2013
25b75
9G94
1819
930


09 +29(


pGr 732+33+363
AmGro 466 +19 +346
Asia d 1671 -11 +42
Era 433 +46 +163
Honz 4671 13 +456
Income 9 49 + 01 -09
eaStk d 1012 -03 +253
'trBal 2372 +05 +185
trGr 3095 +07 +249
-trlnc 1,77 +03 +126


TrRt2020Ac
TrRt2030Ac
TrRt2030R
TrRt2040Ac
TrRt2040R
Value
T.Rowe
ReaAsset
TCW


TFS
MktNeut d 1620
TIAA-CREF
BdPlns 1057
Bondln 1044
Eqlx 1370
Gr&lncln 1267


SPIndxIn 1994+09 +272
Target
SmCapVal 2787 +03 +368
Templeton
InFEqSeS 2293 -06 +246
Third Avenue
IntlVal d 2015 -03 +256
RealEsVal d 29 7 + 04 +213
Value d 5812 -12 +217
Thompson
Bond 1135+01 +32
Thornburg
ncBIdA m 2093+02 +172
ncBIdC m 2093+02 +164
ntlValA m 3064 -17 +169
ntlValC m 265 -15 +160
IntlVall 31 30 -17 +173
LtdTMuA m 1442 00
LtdTMul 1442 +03
LtdTmlncl 1350+01 +15
Thrivent


Tocqueville
Dlfld m 3736 +04
Gold m 3934 +36
Touchstone
SdCaplnGr 2329 + 13
Transamerica
AstAIMdGrA m 1445+ 02
AstAIMdGrC m 14 36+ 03
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 2727 +05
U.S. Global Investor
Gld&Prec m 720+04
GlobRes m 1005+02
WrldPMnr m 66+01
UBS PACE
LrCoGrP d 2600 + 06
USAA
CorstnModAgrsy 25 22+ (
Growlnc 20 52+ 0
HYOpp d 889 +0;
Income 1319+02
InoomeStk 1691 + 1;


S&P500M
ShTmBond
TaxEInt

Value
Unified
Winlnv m
VALIC Co I
NMdCpldx
Stockldx
Vanguard


266 +14 +269


500Adml 16240
5001nv 162139
Balldx 2694
alldxAdm 2695
alldxns 2695
2666
11 35
;AITAdml 11 35
;ALTAdml 11 35
;ap~p 45 77
;apOpAdml 10576
;apVal 1509


rgyAdm 12975 +91 +169
ergylnv 6910+49 +169
nC 2945+19 +256
IcAdml 6172+39 +256
dxAdm 7173 +295
5226 +04 +390


ExtdldAdm 602


A 99
Extdldlst 603
ExtdMktldxlP 15013

FAWeUSIns 99 47
GNMA 1062
G 5 6

GMA
GNMAAdml 1062
GIbEq 2232
GrlncAdml 6152
Grolnc 3767
Growthldx 4555
GrthldAdm 4555
Grthlstld 4554
4217
604
HYCorAdml 604
HYT/E 1061
HItCrAdml 7927


4214 +295
43 +15 +29 6
56 -03 +3138
03 -07 +26 0
31 23 +261


86 + 16


pGr 2582 +06 +31 1
pldxlP 14373 +49 +349
2904 + 10 +347
DAdml 131 91 +45 +349
Ist 2914 +10 +349
4162 + 14 +349
2528 +09 +306
7843 +27 +308
1061 +01 -21
1381 + 01 -1 1
dml 1381 +01 -10
dml 11 11 +01 -22
11 04 +04
Adml 11 04 +05
1586 +05
Adml 1586 +05


xAdm 7636 -53
Vlls 1097 +05
' 92 12 + 51
Adml 9562+53
pCorl 1951 +08
dx 23 60 + 26
dxAd 10071+1 13
Ixlnst 1559 + 18
26 + 30
S 105601
ndAdm 1056+01
1056+01


99 + 11 +362


2261 06 +357
6 60
22 63 06 +36 0
2373 03 +179
2 67 07 +40 1
2606+03 +93
14338 02 +13 4
2706+04 +160
27 42 05 +20 3
1679 03+22
27 39 +05 +23 3
1751 03 +238
27 73 06 +2338
126 01 +66
156 02 +181
1073 +01 -06
1073 +01 -06
1073 +01 -08
1073 +01 -06
1677 -03 +209


Virtus


MulSStC b 494 +21
Waddell & Reed Adv
AP umA m 1043+05 +297
AssetStrA m 1171 -03 +247
BondA m 638 +01 -14
Corelnv A m 796 +02 +294
Hin A m 777 +121
NewCnptA m 1236+04 +30
SoiTeohA m 1578 -06 +491
VanguardA m 11 13+01 +312
Wasatch
IntlGr d 2927 -19 +304
L/Slnv d 1639+ 11 +205
SmCapGr d 51 65 -16 +294
Weitz
Shtlntmlnc 1254 +15
Wells Fargo
AdvCoBdl 1258 +01 -03
AstAIIIcA f 14 13 +132
AstAIIIcC m 1357 +124
EmgMktEqA f2173 -09 +60
GrI 56 17 + 14 +341
Growlnv 5164 + 12 +334
GrowthAdm 5451 + 13 +338
f 1383+05+326
997 +07
ShTmBdlnv 879 +09
UISTMInA f 482 +01
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Westcore
PlusBd 1086+01 00
Western Asset
m 1599+01 -35
m 643 +01 -27
William Blair
InsllntlG 1720 12 +226
IntlGrI d 2650 19 +226
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Saturday, October 26, 2013


Z6


AkES


I I





Inside:

Classifieds

D2-D8


Cruisin'
352-365-8208 I features@dailycommercial.com


Dl
DAILY COMMERCIAL
Saturday, October 26, 2013



www.dailycommercial.com


Vintage restoration business turns to school bus


LEE HOWARD
The Day
NEW LONDON, Conn. -
A circa 1948 Nash school bus
that made its way from Min-
nesota to Vintage Motorcars
in Westbrook a few weeks
ago is one of only two known
to exist.
Rich Willard, owner of the
vintage-car restoration busi-
ness, said he began restoring
the rare vehicle last month at
the request of a Nash collec-
tor from France for whom he
has worked previously.
"We're going to bring it
back to life," Willard said.
"It's going to be labor-inten-
sive. It's a lot of time."
Willard, who has been
known to restore antique
and classic cars as well as
old fire engines, said this
is his first bus project. The
restoration likely will take
more than 3,000 man hours
to complete and easily will
cost in the $150,000 range,
he said.
The most difficult part, he
said, is the initial research to
try to figure out how the bus
looked when it first came off
the assembly line. The ve-
hicle, which was not opera-
tional when it came into the
shop, has gone through a se-
ries of alterations through
the years, he said, and may
have once been used as a
"hippie bus."
Making the restoration
more problematic, he said,
is that no one has pictures
of the original look of the
bus, including such specif-
ics as handle and upholstery
styles.
"The factory that made the
body burned down, and they
didn't save the records, so
this is going to be difficult,"


AP PHOTOS
ABOVE, RIGHT: Kyle Turner of
Vintage Motorcars works to
dismantle a 1949 Nash school bus
in Westbrook, Conn. The school bus,
which owner Richard Willard believes
to be the last surviving of its kind, is
being restored to like-new condition.
Willard said. "We want it to
be authentic and original."
The Nash bus, stored out-
side of Vintage Motorcars
when it first came in, has at-
tracted a lot of interest, Wil-
lard said. The bus had been
parked for only a day or two
when one woman, a bus
driver herself, came in to get
a closer look.
Women rarely come into
his business, he said, be-
cause vintage cars are more
of a guy thing.
"I have cars in here that are
half-million-dollar cars that
didn't get such interest," Wil-
lard said. "I'm assuming it's
because we all remember
being on a bus (in the past)
and we don't see them (now).
No one brings a bus to a car


show. There's no bus show."
Nash Motors dates back to
1916, when a former Gener-
al Motors executive named
Charles W Nash started the
company in Kenosha, Wis.
The company, later pur-
chased by American Mo-
tors Corp., became a success
thanks to a guiding philoso-
phy of providing good value
as well as a series of innova-
tions that included the first
compact, subcompact and


muscle car.
Even Nash aficionados,
who are most prominent in
Wisconsin, were largely un-
aware that the company had
manufactured school bus-
es until the first vehicle was
saved from a Minnesota sal-
vage business in 1993.
The Nash bus hauled to
Connecticut reportedly was
found near a farm in Glyn-
don, Minn., where it had
been used for alcohol-fueled


hunting and fishing trips be-
fore being abandoned, its
windows apparently shat-
tered by gunfire. An Ohio
member of the Nash Car
Club of America discov-
ered the bus in 2010, short-
ly before it was to be sold as
scrap, and did some initial
work on it, including a paint
job that covered a previous-
ly red exterior with the more
traditional yellow.
Willard said the collector
who is paying to restore the
bus, Thomas Harrington of
Paris, intends to bring it to
Nash shows and perhaps lat-
er to donate it to a museum.
But first the tedious work
will have to be completed.
Willard figures hundreds of
phone calls will be necessary
to track down all the parts
required to do a faithful res-
toration of the Nash bus.
"We capture dreams for
people," Willard said. "We
want somebody to be able to
look at a photo ... (of) when
this bus was new and say,
'Geez, that looks identical.'"


Nissan 360 features diesel in addition to electric vehicles


FRANK A. AUKOFER
Scripps Howard News Service
It's almost like a qua-
drennial world conven-
tion, an automotive ex-
travaganza they call the
Nissan 360, which fea-
tured a self-driving au-
tomobile and a couple
of astonishing electric
performance cars.
For the third time
since 2004, Nissan
gathered nearly every
vehicle it sells around
the world to demon-
strate its reach and
grasp of the automo-
tive industry.
The 360 was con-
ducted for six weeks at
the old El Toro Marine
air base near Irvine,
Calif. The event intro-
duced 900 journalists
and assorted custom-


Now in its third model year, the highly innovative, industry
leading Nissan LEAF pure electric vehicle features an extensive
list of important enhancements for 2013.
ers, financial analysts cations, said the 360s
and selected others to were held to build
140 of Nissan's vehicles, awareness of the Japa-
Jeff Kuhlman, Nis- nese company's confi-
san's vice president dence and strength on
for global communi- the world stage, along


with its dedication to
consumers and ad-
vanced environment-
conscious technology.
Vehicles arrayed
at El Toro ranged in
size from the Moco, a
tiny but roomy four-
door hatchback with
a 51-horsepower, 660
cc three-cylinder en-
gine and a continuous-
ly variable automat-
ic transmission, to the
Civilian diesel stick-
shift bus and the brut-
ish NT450 Atlas truck,
which can haul two to
four tons of cargo. The
vehicles are not sold in
the United States.
Because some vehi-
cles did not meet U.S.
safety and emission
regulations, they were
driven exclusively on
the El Toro grounds.


Others could be driv-
en on city streets and
highways around Ir-
vine.
Power plants ranged
from gasoline and die-
sel engines to an assort-
ment of non-polluting
electrics, including a
semi-autonomous Nis-
san Leaf that is a pre-
cursor to the self-driv-
ing cars of the future.
On a demonstra-
tion course, the electric
Leaf, on its own, passed
a moving car, avoid-
ed construction barri-
ers, and slammed on
the brakes and stopped
when a pedestrian -
actually a dummy -
ran into its path from
between parked cars.
It also found a space
in a simulated shop-
ping center parking lot


and backed in, all on its
own.
All of this is accom-
plished with forward
radar and a high-res-
olution camera, laser
scanners on the sides,
four around-view cam-
eras and a dozen sonar
sensors six in front
and six in the rear.
Nissan says its semi-
autonomous car, still
in development, will be
ready for public use by
2020. However, along
with others of its kind
from different manu-
facturers, it will have to
be integrated into the
existing vehicle pop-
ulation, which totals
nearly 250 million cars
and trucks in the Unit-
ed States. There are
many unknowns about
how it all will work.


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Fire Extinguisher ., ---. SAe I ::-.. I *-- 5-Pk., 30-Gal.
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S While supplies last. u1 Aa m, U Kdc I GaI. Bar, Chiain &I -J 1 J l d| IM ~ W 694 33 F ,1
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DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, October 26, 2013


A/


Local, Trusted
A/C Expert
Kalos Services
352-243-7088
KalosFlorida.com
Lic.#CAC 1814620

Florida Air & Heat Inc.
YourComfort Company
For All Your Air Conditioning
Ulk~k & Heating Ne(xs I
,m 352-326-3202
I Serving Lake County State Licence #
LL since 1986 CACg184030

4~hawn A/C. 8 Heat^
I Repairs at great prices. I
residential & Commercial
407-617-0450
SLi .*CACt8175155 'State Certifiedr




Eustis Senior Care
Assisted Wg aclit~yAL8993
Accepting New Clients for our
brand new bedrooms.
Call Rhea, RN at 352-551-5307
for inquiries and a free tour.

Aurora Home Care Inc.
"Illuminating Care"
Companions/Homemakers
Serving olaof Lake, Sumter. Marion Counties
Rotes sort at $18.50/hr *4hr mm.
Aurorahomecareinc.org. Llciuns
Ahca#23912 Office: 352-435-7751
Toll Free: 866-702-6197






Serving Lake, Sumier
& S. Marion Counties
We Service All
/ | Appliance Brands
Licensed/Insured
Free Service Call
w/Repair
15+ Years Exp. 24 Hr. Emergency Svc.
We Don't Want To Be The Biggest
Just The Best
Eric Wolf 352-630-2202


AutoSeric


fiMxHursau~i.f 1a
Complete Automotive Care
Transmissions AC Brakes
STune Ups Body Work Oil Change
Family Owned 26 Yrs 352-326-2400
1406 Emerson St, Leesburg across itrm Post Office





RE-TILE %.
352-391-5553
Backsplashes Re-Tile Tub & Shower
Walls Grab Bars Floors
Handicap Baths Repairs
Leaky Shower Pan
Ins./Lic. 30 yrs. exp.




BATHTUBS REFINISHED
ON LOCATION
Renew, on location, your
W Porcelain Fiberglass
"* Ceramic Tiles
LAKESIDE TUB & TILE REFINISHING
(352) 742-9602
ShwrSal



~.~ Cuuustlle Paces


109 W. Lakel Vie S t.Lady Lake
Belhhid Earn & Dlads Ebstaurant


iStucky's Carpet
Cleaning
iw Spring Special
i2 Rooms & Hall $50
352.365.9889


CleaningI

All-Natural Cleaning Service
antss to clean your cobwebs!
Quality Cleaning with
r\ only natural products.
S 352-348-6576 Lic/Ins
www.bambisallnaturalcleaning.com


Simone's Cleaning Services
Commercial/Residential
Reliable/References
SLic/Bonded-10 Yrsa Exp.
S.Immediate Availibility.
,,n Flexible Hours
14 Call: Simone
407-844- 183i

ESP Services
Doctors Visits Cooking & Laundry
Pet Caring General Errands
Housekeeping
Call For A Free In-Person
Consultation
352-348-6408
CLEAN SWEEP
(Clutter Free Cleaning)
lean, Sort, Pack or Spring Clean
Ref's & Yrs. of Experience
.352-742-0014
Reasonable Rates




Your PC Repair Specialists
Fast friendly service at a
flat rate affordable price.
Education & Repair
SIn your home or our office.
: | Call
352-897-1309






bConcreteFotes
QUALITY CONCRETE & BLOCK
$500.00 10x40 $1200.00
Includes labor, concrete & cleanup
Fast turnaround, no hassle & local
# CRC1326327, Ings. & References
BRIAN DEGAGLIA
352-267-57237

oS Concrete For Less
Q W 8010 Slab $450
"19 1T1 10x40 Slab $1325
Includes Concrete a Labor
d Blocking/ We/,IcJlc.n
W Phillip 352-504-8372


We ELIMINATE all trip
hazards due to UNEVEN and
or RAISED concrete.
Commercial/Residential
Concrete Grinding is 1/2
the cost of replacement.
Entry ways Ramps Sidewalks
Driveways Puddling Water, etc.
Insured
(8771454-01131[toll free!
Alconcretegrinding.com




METAL TILE SHINGLE ROOFING
New Construction or Re-Roofing
B 308 Oak Street
Lady Lake. FL 32159
352-430-2773
S www.sackroofing.com
Serving the Tri County Area For 26 Years




1069 r-1m lLe,#CBCI252465
%%,,SDOR & LOCK SERVICE
We Repair, Replace and Install
Emergency Services Available!
(352) 314-3169


Electrical
Services^^^


lDaniel Byars
IRescreens
,Paos. PoIl Enclosres &
IAlI uminum Repairs
FREE ESTIMATES
352A08.2142


Enclsua
Screening IB


'7K Triple Crown
STile & Wood
Installation & Repairs
Owner does all work.
Free Est. Lie/Ins
3524274825





MiopteM Serviceh Istaai oni
All Makes a Models.
frekeeSpringu ehhlaceimse
10%OffRw/l a s &ad
352-347-6411

L caCBC12246e
%*%, GARAGE DOORS
CompleteService &Sne Installation
Lake County's Largest Provider!
We Sell & Program Remotes!'
1(3521 748-4575


Reai Des &Repairs &
garage Door Repile"ents
& Locally Owned
Gate AWWInork









I D laveils Hnya & Paminting
Gt Ca Warranted
Licensed & Insured midfldoor.com
352-630-0292 Shane Blanton




rae or installation/repair svcsH


epiacement. Free Est.
lesrice all of Central FLA.B









i Serviessioa ev
Liclns.352-6259-5357
Affordable Home
.t Repair, LLC
Mobile Home Repair Apt. Clean Outs
& Repair Decks & Ramps
Soffits/Siding Doors/Windows
Painting *a Tile Work Lice/Ins
Call Pat 352-581-6073

111 e do EyHa.n dY ma Painting
FlDoor & Window Installion
Carpentry,
K w ,Home Improvement,
Drywall& ore! Just Ask!
Professional Service
icalIns. 352-259-5357

V[ tMMITU IEADRWM 1
:-:-:-Home Repair:-:,:-:,
Pressurer Washing Painting i
Flooring Carpet Clean Outs
Clean Ups Hauling Licensed
352-787-7056

John Philibert, Inc
IjLWe do Everything from Ceilings to
Kihn aFloors. Window and Doors,
Pantries, Cabinets and more.
Your pesky Leaks gone, Your Soffits
we Fix, and Houses We'll Paint From
inside and out, we'll make It great Lcie/ns
JPHandy.com(352) 308-0694


i Mike Shofnstall 3 9 83
eCall 352 552 1875E
,JUNGLE HU'I
REPAIRS I
Repair everything. Replace anything

N. Lucie Carpentry
Lic./Ins. Res./Comm.
Repairs & Renovations
IDr all, Trim & Rotted Wood
Call Mick
WO.*386-523-5015



Trusted, Quality Crqftsfnanship for 30+ years
Kitchens Bathrooms Windows
Vinyl Siding Decks Painting/Staining
Tile/Marble Lanai Enclosures
Mike Lalonde 352-409-8311I
__mike~iitnage4me.com__I


* H*ll II i'~ llllll
HaulS~wwsing SI


BOYDS
You call it, We haul it!
352
460-7186


- i rail ,1B
Home

METAL TILE SHINGLE ROOFING
New Construction or Re-Roofing
I 308 Oak Street
Lady Lake, FL 32159
352-430-2773
www.sackrooflng.con
Serving the Tri County Area For 26 Years

D&B RENOVATIONS
352-572-1847
FREE ESTIMATES
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL"
^Hk Bathroom Remodels, Flooring,
SPainting, Pressure Washing,
Privacy Fence AND MORE
SInsured & Experienced





Local Agent
Long Term Care Ins.
Medicare Supplements
Critical Care Ins.
Cancer Ins.
Call Bill Bell
352.589-0454 or 352.551.3504

Ask Me About
Medicare Insurance
Robert Lange
352-742-2425
lange.rob.ins@gmail.com





Irrigation'F Tune-Up
$35 Check & Adjust
*P= k Entire System.
1J3 Provide Written Est.
w To Fix Problems!
Lower Your Monthly Cost
352-409-3163

^ ^Sprinkler
Repairs
Timers, Valves, Heads,
Leaks, etc.
352) 787-9001
That's all we do since 1979
Native, 4th Generation W




JI.C.C. Bobcat & Tree Svc. Inc.
, | Land Clearing/Excavating
(Fill Dirt/Clay
II .^kl.J auling/Debris Removal
W W Stump Grinding
Demolition/Grading/ Driveways
Owner Operator
352-4553-7608

SCHRIS C NES LANDSCAPE

L Lawn Malntonnce, Hadnscone, Patios,
IRe0ainig Walls, MaIL, Sodding
LeSSOn 536-3708
2Yewu~ns ,a
Bp"nMic /f I aq |Ur sab


____ Premier Scapes
IEM i* & Services Inc.
Land Clearing Bush Hogging
Debris Removal
Hauling Free Estimates
352-308-5508




Landscaping

Trimming, Mulching,
Sod, Tree Trimming,
Pavers & Much Morel
Armando Santamario
352-587-1323





Don's "MOBILE"
| Lawn Mower Repair
P^I Come To You & Repair
Your: Lawn Mower, Trimmer,
jJ Blower, Chain Saw, etc.
U35+ Yrs. Exp. Res/Com
S(352) 450-7661


a I UM hlE La m IIaU
*Lal'indc-pim r e inMg ruftmnW8aq
FREE ESTIMATES UCJINS.
We Take A Bite Out Of Ovw Pricing
352-320-8712 / 352-406-3354


SLawn Maintenance
352-357-5905
A Pest Exterminator














Tree Service At
Reasonable Rates
I can climb the highest trees,
and I can mow the biggest
lawns, but please don't ask me
to leap tall buildings
Fair Pricing. Trim'Trees,
&acCut Lawns &* Clean U s
IralT.ony foir estimate 552-75908
Don't Stress Call The Best!
I|cyDependable Commercial
Lawn Services
R oLi/Ins. Designer
a Landscaping, Trimming,
Ila1 Shrubs. We do it all
^Rick 352-427-89191
Cowards Lawn
Service
L icn /ins
L ndsaping Trmminga



13521
800-9985

F^&Waynes l-awncar
fl-laudi orq,
Now accePtll oiw litiBreal
Residential customs. Mwilg.
Laiiscagpil, Ilrrgatg and more.
Reasokablt DePeldalei Elertenced
Office 352-552-4556 Cell 352-2-6460

All Lawn
I X and Tree
LiA'-SC, Care
^ ~Service
I h /Natural Land
i W 9 Clearing (Goats)
"BEST PRICES" Free Est.
352-460-7186




S cService
119W9 y Center
*M?/AliBf* 352-602-1735
At Venetian Gardens
Marina on the
Harris Chain of Lakes.
No Trailer. No Problem.
Boat Repairs & Svc. on water

COVERED BOAT SUPS FOR RENT
Wwin Palms Marina located o
[Make Griffin. Water & elec. avail.I
""Weekly, Monthly or Yearly. BOAT
RENTALS: Pontoons,
SJon Boats, Kayaks & Canoes.
Call 352-787-4514




Bill's Moving
fla. Mover Reg. No: 2095
Owner On Every Job
Fair Rates & 27+ Yrs. Exp.
352-669-4456
Toll Free 888-444-3559

Uittle John's Movers &
Storage 352-812-4889
Serving Lake, Marion,
& Sumter Counties
1-15 items same day delivery
Local & Long distance moves
Loading & unloading pods, rental
trucks, & storage units.
We have trucks going up &
down l95 & 175
"Less Than a POD" "Door to Door"
You're Coming ....Your Neighbor is Going!
Jump on Board and Save
SERVING ALL 50 STATES
One item to a full house!!!
We will get off the interstate for you!
ljm9575@yahoo.com
US DOT #2406621




Quality Assurance Pain tig, Inc.
"If you want quality, you want us!"
lstIner~- ExtBrl- I ti
aNew Constucflao
L | Uconsed/lnurd
Tim Grubbs
ht-- 352"483-6915
www.qualityassurancepaintinginc.com

^tfCO-ED
rPROPiESIONAL-
-f PAINTING, INC.
Commercial FR ESTIMATES
& Realdentiol (352) 267-8430
-* WWW CO-HIaPh~mPATGCON
^11 ^^-- Licensed and Insured
!ITERIOA/EXTERIOB PAINTIUC & OTHER StICS


(352) 348-6923
Tim Mundy Painting
& Pressure Cleanig Services, Ic.
"W re QualIs I o Acoldent"
\ Licensed & Insured


a. I


Lawn
Services


-j


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, October 26, 2013




Saturday, October 26, 2013


John Philibert, Inc
For All Your Interior/Exterior
1Painting Needs.
V1. We Also Offer
Driveways Patios
And Faux Finishes Lic/Ins
Call John @ (352) 308-0694
JPHandy.com

New England Painter
If Semi-Retired
30 Years Exp
Interior, Exterior, Pressure
Washing No Job Too Small
Bob Kelley Painting
352-702-7739

CLAUDE WILD PAINTING
High Quality @ Reasonable Prices
Int. & Ext. Free Est. Lic/Ins
Pressure Cleaning Ref. & 35 yrs. exp.
in Lake County
cwildpainting~gmaii.comn


SAffordable Home
P Repair, LLC
Interior/Exterior Painting
Free Pressure Washing with all
Exterior Paints.Driveways and Decks
NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL Lic/Ins
Call Pat 352-551-6073

Bi et&r a Exterior
Roof Coating
Sealants
Coancrte eCmaings
Pssure Cleaning
Uc.a InS.- Fre Estimates
352-728-4561I




INDOOR PEST
CONTROL
As low as $20 per mo.
352-357-5905
A Pest Exterminator


inSince969
Specializing in
Vandas.
I i .N Call for hours
Ilfl,! 352-787-9001
I ORCHIDS- 2902 South St.
| "--" Leesburg, FL
GoodwinOrchids.com





Family Owned & Operated \^^%
Residential & Commercial
www.PrimePlumbinginc.com
1(352) 383-3440 OFC42675

8c Plumbing, LLC
ANl Mumbling Repairs Comm/Res
KltcheOs a Bath Remodels
DIsPasol, Water Deater, Gas PIINGi
Draln/Sewer Cleaning,
No Grout Showers, 24 Hr. Emergency
uc-i.,. -ccm (3521 343-3763



Ace Pool Service
Complete Pool Services
Motor & Pump Repair
Pool & Patio Remodeling
Servicing Commercial & Residential
Properties Since 1969
Licensed/Insured Free Estimates
352-735-3050
Prss r
Clean1dd ing-


Americ~an Pest Cntol i00
Termites Rodent Exclusions |
German Roaches i g -
Property Inspections
Soil Pre-treatment
Lc/Ilns 352-446-2318 5- 97

Tha ve yu










mih le. erd iyom ecil6o


Pet Grooming
Services I


352.260.7490

All Airports, Cruise Terminals,
Hotels, Casinos & Attractions
SShands-VA and Jacksonville Mayo

Professionals


, EJ-AVEN Providing
l ." No-Cost Svcs.
to Lake county
I sexual assault victims 24/7/365.
On-Call Rape Advocacy
Counseling, Legal Assistance
I Hotline 352-787-1379



^ Roofing jC

S !ing *-z Pry
Sh i'tl, Tle, Libcensed Bonded Insured I
Metal, and Rubber ResidenBal/Commercial
Root Systems RC29027460
(352) 669-6607

METAL TILE SHINGLE ROOFING
New Construction or Re-Roofing
B 308 Oak Street
Lady Lake, FL 32159
352-430-2773
www.sackrooflng.com
Serving the Tri County Area For 26 Year

#1 IN ROOFING
Leak Repairs Shingles/Flat Roof
Lifetime Metal Roofs Screen Rooms
Lic. #CCC1329936
Villages Roofing and
Construction, Inc.<:
FREE ROOF ESTIMATES
362-314-36261

Lake Contracting, Inc. I
GAF Certified
Shingles, Metal or Flat
Addfitions, Remodels, Renovations
Roof to Foundation
352-602-8794
Ue. CGC1507556 CCC 1326899

We're Proud of Our Service
.... and you will be too!





Free Estimates
Metal, Tile & Shingle Re-roofs
Serving all Lake &
Sumter Counties.
Mike Hunter
Fl License #RC29027482
Office (407) 947-2223
Fax (407) 347-3472
mike@hunterroofingLLC.com


IiA lj*.-ecat a Tree Sue. mmcl
|Jlnlesidental/Gommerciala
N Trimming/Removai
| Palms/Hedges/Stump Grinding |


Debris removal/Hauling
Fill Dirt/Clay/Grading/Drlveways
Lic/Ins Insurance Work 24 Hrs.
352-455-76081
A Affordable Tree
SService
I 'Tree Trimming & Removal
Lake Cleaning Dead Wooding
Moss Spraying Lic/Ins
Free Est. Senior Discounts
352-459-9428


SECURITY TRAINING
j Security "D'&"G" Lic.
L .PLUS: FL. Concealed Lic.
SNRA Instructor Training
Ladies Only Classes Avail.
352-350-2855
i.SIoMi3a www.TheRightTraining.com



Specalzed'Storage Solutons
Now is tihe time...
To organize your life!
Cusloui n Clusets, Homne Office, Garages
Tailored To Your Needs,
17 Years Exp.
Free Home Design Consultation
352-383-7058407-718-6818 (Cell)



J ohn Philibert, Inc
For All Your Tile Needs
Pergo, Ceramic Tile,
Travertine, Vinyl & More
Call John @ (352) 308-0694
JPHandy.comrn Lic/Ins

RE-TILE X
352-391-5553
Backsplashes Re-Tile Tub & Shower
Walls Grab Bars Floors
Handicap Baths Repairs
Leaky Shower Pan
Ins./Lic. 30 yrs. exp.


SECURITY TRAINING
wSecurity D"&'&G" Lic.
____PLUS: FL. Concealed Lic.
0 NRA Instructor Training
Ladies Only Classes Avail.
3523504255
Lic# DS1300013 www.TheRightTraining.com

Since 2007, The Right Training
has been providing Lake, Mar-
ion, and Sumter counties with
the BEST firearms training pos-i
sible.
Chief Instructor, Paul "Mac"
McIntyre (former Military, Law
enforcement, and Private Inves-i
tigator) and his associate in-
structors are dedicated to
educating, not just the public,
but up-and-coming NRA In-
structors and the
dedicated men and women in
Private Security.


Competitve Pices :
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since 2000. The business

is still in it's original

location in Lady Lake.

The company focuses on

strong customer service

and also selling the best

brand names in the indus-

try at very competitive

S.prices.


S/ CHRIS CAURNES LANDSCAPE
:/1ce(titngulwCiehmu
AMNUINUIhIC
Lawn Malntenance, Hanrdscapow Pas,
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Chris Carnames Landscape has been in
business since 2005 along with over
30 yrs experience in everything
from hardscapes such as patios,
retaining walls, to sod repair and
S installations, to ripout of old
landscapes and design. We also can
provide maintainence to your newly
installed landscape or even mowing
maintainence services to even
sprinkler repairs. We serve all
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landscapes one lawn at a time".
Mention this bio ad and receive 15
percent off when you call for your
estimate on any of our services.


f STUMP GRINDING
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6 Premier Scapes
& Services Inc.
Complete Tree Service
Trimmning ~ Debris Removal
Stump Grinding Free Estimates
352-308-5508




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We Install, Replace and Repair I
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SPARKLING
WINDOWS
MARK ANDERSON
Window Cleaning,
Screens, Tracks. FREE Estimates


I


DAILY COMMERCIAL


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Lake: 352-314-3278 or Sumter: 352-748-1955 Monday Friday 8am 5pm


U^1 *_!_ **. 1_. W lfi if ff M ii flmq*ni if *lfi^m~~iiiiijjj,~jj~iiiii


Classified Index


Legal Notices ..

Announcements

At Your Service.

Financial ......

Employment ...

Pets/Animals .


......... 003

..... . .100

......... 200

......... 300

......... 400

......... 500


2
Legal Notices


003 Legal Notices

Notice of Public Sale
Notice is hereby given that on November 14,
2013, at 2:00 p.m. or thereafter, Leesburg
Self Storage, LLC, whose facility is located at
1435 Center Street, L. I.,. Florida,
34748, (352) 365 0199,ii ii it a public
sale by competitive bidding, at the aforemen
tioned address, the personal property hereto-
fore stored with Leesburg Self Storage, LLC
by:
Kenedria Mackey Unit#1026 Clothing.
Danielle Cooper Unit#301 Boxes.
Sharnice Harris Unit#1166 Household
goods, furniture.
Raymond Carris Unit#1180 Furniture.
Beverly Green Unit#821 Household goods
Ad No.00414000
October 26 & November 2, 2013


GOLDEN TRIANGLE SUMMIT MEETING
Notice is hereby given that the Eustis City
Commission, the Mount Dora City Council
and the Tavares City Council will conduct a
Golden Triangle Summit Meeting on Tuesday,
October 29, 2013 at 5:30 p.m. in the Ta
vares City Council Chambers, located at 201
E. Main Street, Tavares, to discuss issues of
mutual interest.
If a person decides to appeal any decision
made by the board, agency or commission
with respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing, he or she will need
a record of the proceedings, and that, for
such purpose, he or she may need to ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is
made, which includes the testimony and evi
dence upon which the appeal is based (Flor
ida Statutes, 286.0105).
Persons with disabilities needing assistance
to participate in any of these proceedings
should contact the office of the City Clerk at
(352) 483 5430, at least 48 hours before the
date of the scheduled meeting.
Mary C. Montez, City Clerk
10 North Grove Street Eustis, FL 32726
Ad No.00414042
October 26, 2013


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LAKE
COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.2013 CP 870
IN RE: JOSEPH J. MARRA, SR.
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of JOSEPH J.
MARRA, SR., deceased, whose date of death
was April, 2013, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Lake County, Florida, Probate Divi
sion, the address of which is 550 West Main
Street, Tavares, FL 32778. The names and
addresses of the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other per
sons having claims or demands against de
cedent's estate on whom a copy of this no


003 Legal Notices
twice is required to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE 0 SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decent and other
persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their claims with
their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
OCTOBER26, 2013.
Jennifer Isaksen, Esq.
Attorney for Jo Ann TenHoeve
Florida Bar Number:
519081
450 East Hwy. 50, Suite 4
Clermont, Fl 34711
(352) 394 7408 (telephone)
(352) 394 7298 (facsimile)
service@mnagellaw.com
E-Mail: Jennifer.lsaksen@MNagelLaw.com
Personal Representative:
Jo Ann TenHoeve
10 Bracken Road
West Milford, New Jersey 07480
Ad. No:00414341
October 26 & November 2, 2013

IN THE CIRCUfT COURT OF THE FIFTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE No. 2010 CA 003759
WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIA
TION AS TRUSTEE FOR SECURITIZED ASSET
BACKED RECEIVABLES LLC 2005 FR5
MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH CERTIFICATES,
SERIES 2005 FR5,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
GWEBDOLINE MONFORT, ET AL.
DEFENDANTSS.
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Fi
nal Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 16,
2012 in the above action, I will sell to the
highest bidder for cash at L ,i .1 'lor
ida, on November 19, 2013, 1 i .. at
First Floor lobby at Lake County Courthouse
(near info desk) 550 W. Main St., Tavares,
FL 32778 for the following described prop
erty:
LOT 150, GREATER GROVES, PHASE I AC-
CORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 32, PAGE 79 & 80,
PUBLIC RECORDS OF LAKE COUNTY FLOR-
IDA
Any person claiming an interest in the sur
plus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pen
dens must file a claim within sixty (60) days
after the sale. The Court, in its discretion,
may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice of
the changed time of sale shall be published
as provided herein.
Dated: October 16, 2013
NEIL KELLY
By:/s/D.NEAL
Deputy Clerk of the Court
Prepared by:


003 Legal Notices
Gladstone Law Group, P.A.
1499 W. Palmetto Park Rd, Suite 300
Boca Raton, FL 33486
If you are a person with a disability who
needs any accommodation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of certain as=
distance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator
Lake County, Trial Court Administrator at
352-253-1604, Lake County Judicial Center,
550 W. Main St., Tavares, FL 32778 at least
7 days before your scheduled court appear-
ance, or immediately upon receiving this no=
tification if thie time before the scheduled ap-
pearanc:- ;z I-,.' ih-. ,-, T if you are hear-
ing orv,,.,- lTl -i, I 1 ," II- 11
Ad No.00413532
October 19 & 26, 2013




IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE FIFTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE No.2011 CC 1987
KINGS RIDGE COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION,
INC., a not for profit Florida corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GUY P. SPENCER, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
GUY P. SPENCER, UNKNOWN PARTIES IN
POSSESSION AND MANCHESTER AT KINGS
RIDGE NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION, INC.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 20 day
of November 2013 at 11:00 a.m. at the first
floor lobby of the Lake County Courthouse,
550 W. Main Street, Tavares, Lake County,
Florida, the undersigned Clerk will offer for
sale the following described real property:
Lot 63, Manchester at Kings Ridge Phase I,
according to the plat thereof, recorded in Plat
Book 41, Pages 67 and 68, of the Public Re-
Ir.]v 1.1 L 'i I I.urj.i Florida. with the prop-
-ny .rr ,..I :.,r Eversholt Street, Cler-
mont, FL 34711
Together with all structures, improvements,
fixtures, appliances, and appurtenances on
said land or used in conjunction therewith.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to a
Summary Final Judgment entered in Civil No.
2011 CC 1987 pending in the COUNTY
Court of the fifth Judicial Circuit in and for
Lake County, Florida.
Any person claiming a right to funds remain
ing after the sale must file a claim with the
undersigned Clerk no later than 60 days after
the sale.
DATED this 15 day of October, 2013
NEIL KELLY
CLERK OF THE COURT
By:/s/W.TILLMAN
Deputy Clerk
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS
WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons with dis-
abilities needing a special accommodation
should contact the ADA Coordinator at 550
W. Main Street, Post Office Box 7800, Ta-
vares, Florida 32778, Telephone
(352)742-4150, at least seven (7) days prior
to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD)
1-800-955-8771, or VOICE (V)
1 -800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.

Ad Number:00413527
October 19 & 26, 2013


003 Legal Notices

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR LAKE
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2012 CA 000618
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
LEOPOLDO ALICEA; COURTNEY PARK
HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC; ISMAEL
MONTALVO; MAGDALENA MONTALVO; UN
KNOWN SPOUSE OF ISMAEL MONTALVO;
UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION OF THE
SUBJECT PROPERTY,
Defendants.
RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Or
der Resetting Foreclosure Sale Date dated
the 21 day of October, 2013, and entered in
Case No. 2012 CA 000618, of the Circuit
Court of the 5TH Judicial Circuit in and for
i..... i Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO
Ii Ii is the Plaintiff and LEOPOLDO
ALICEA; COURTNEY PARK HOMEOWNERS
ASSOCIATION, INC; ISMAEL MONTALVO;
MAGDALENA MONTALVO; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF ISMAEL MONTALVO; UNKNOWN
TENANT IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT
PROPERTY, are defendants. I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at THE
LOBBRRY ON THE FIRST FLOOR OF THE LIAKE
COUNTY COURTHOUSE AT 550 W. Main
Street, in Tavares, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on
the 14 day of January 14, 2014, the follow
ing described property as set forth in said Fi
nal
LOT 162, COURTNEY PARK PHASE III, AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN BOOK 47, PAGE 9 AND 10, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LAKE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE
DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A
CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
If you are a person with a disability who
needs any accommodation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of certain as-
sistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator
at the Office of the Trial Court Administrator,
550 West Main Street, Post Office Box 7800,
Tavares, Florida, 32778, Telephone: (352)
253-1604, within two (2) working days of
your receipt of this Notice. If you are hearing
or voice impaired, call
1-800-955-8771.
Dated this 24 day of October 2013.
Neil Kelly
Clerk Of The Circuit Court
By: /s/H.SIED
Deputy Clerk
Submitted by:
Law Office of Choice Legal Group, P.A.
1800 NW 49th Street,
Suite 120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33309
Telephone: (954) 453 0365
Facsimile: (954) 771 6052
Toll Free: 1 800 441 2438
11-15725
Ad No.: 00414406
October 26 & November 2, 2013


003 Legal Notices

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR LAKE
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION:
Case No.:2012 CA 002824
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSO
CIATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
WAYNE R. RITTORNO; THE CASCADES OF
GROVELAND HOMEOWNERS' ASSOCIATION,
INC.; MARIE J. RITTORNO; UNKNOWN TEN
ANT IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT
PROPERTY,
Defendants.
RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Or
der Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 23
day of October, 2013, and entered in Case
No. 2012 CA 002824, of the Circuit Court of
the 5TH Judicial Circuit in and for Lake
County, Florida, wherein JPMORGAN CHASE
BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is the Plain
tiff and WAYNE R. RITTORNO, THE CAS
CADES OF GROVELAND HOMEOWNERS' AS
SOCIATION, INC., MARIE J. RITTORNO and
UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION OF
THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants.
The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the high
est and best bidder for cash at the, THE
LOBBY ON THE FIRST FLOOR OF THE LAKE
COUNTY COURTHOUSE AT 550 W. MAIN
STREET, Tavares, Fl 32778 11:00 AM on the
9 day of January, 2014, the following de
scribed property as set forth in said Final
Judgment, to wit:
LOT 34, OF THE CASCADES OF GROVELAND
- PHASE 2, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 56,
PAGE 17, THROUGH 31, OF THE PUBLIC RE=
CORDS OF LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE
DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE
CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
If you are a person with a disability who
needs any accommodation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of certain as-
sistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator at the
Office of the Trial Court Administrator, 550
West Main Street, Post Office Box 7800, Ta-
vares, Florida, 32778, Telephone: (352)
253-1604, within two (2) working days of
your receipt of this (describe notice). If you
11- I-., ll.;..o n," yrn'.- ;.Tlin.'-. . al|
t 9 "., .'* ; ;'i: "
Dated this 24 day of October, 2013.
NEIL KELLY
Clerk Of The Circuit Court
By:/s/S. Holewinski
Deputy Clerk
Submitted by:
Choice Legal Group, P.A.
1800 NW 49th Street,
Suite 120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33309
Telephone; (954) 453 0365
Facsimile: (954) 771 6052
Toll Free: 1 800 441 2438
12-06079
October 26 & November 2, 2013


003 Legal Notices

IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE FIFTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.:2012 CA 4166
INSIGHT CREDIT UNION F/K/A INSIGHT FI-
NANCIAL CREDIT UNION
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOSEPH M. PRICE, individually; et al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE is hereby given pursuant to a Final
Default Judgment of Foreclosure, Reforma
tion of Mortgage and Award of Attorneys
Fees and Costs, dated October 10, 2013,
and entered in Case Number:
2012 CA 4166, of the Circuit Court in and
for Lake r-.,n Florida, wherein INSIGHT
CREDIT iii'll F/K/A INSIGHT FINANCIAL
CREDIT UNION are the Plaintiff, and JOSEPH
M. PRICE, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JOSEPH
M. PRICE, NORTH STAR CAPITAL ACQUISI
TION, LLC, UNKNOWN TENANT #1 N/K/A
RYAN PRICE and UNKNOWN TENANT #2
N/K/A BRIDGET BALIDO, are the Defendants,
the Lake County Clerk of the Court will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash at the
Lake County Courthouse, 550 W. Main
Street, Main Lobby, Tavares, Florida 32778,
at 11:00 o'clock A.M. on the 21 day of No
vember, 2013, the following described prop
erty as set forth in said Final Default Judg
ment of Foreclosure, Reformation of Mort
gage and Award of Attorneys Fees and Costs,
to wit:
Property Address: 1511 Hampton Road,
Leesburg, Florida 34748
Property Description:
LOT 65, SHERWOOD HIGHLANDS, according
to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book
15, page 36, Public Records of Lake County,
Florida.
If you are a person with a disability who
needs any accommodation in order to partici
pate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of certain as
distance.
Please contact: Clerk's Administration, Lake
County Courthouse, P.O. Box 7800, Tavares,
Florida 32778, Telephone: (352) 253 1604
within two (2) working days of your receipt of
this document; if you are hearing or voice im
paired, call (800) 955 8771.
DATED on this 11 day of October, 2013.
NEIL KELLY
LAKE COUNTY CLERK OF THE COURT
By:/s/S.HOLEWINSKI
Deputy Clerk
Ad No.:00413551
October 19& 26, 2013

IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE FIFTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE No.2013 CC 000213
KINGS RIDGE COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION,
INC., a not for profit Florida corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DOUGLAS E. BAKER AND BONNIE L. BAKER,
HUSBAND AND WIFE, HUNTINGTON NEIGH
BORHOOD ASSOCIATION INC., UNKNOWN
PARTIES IN POSSESSION
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 25 day


DEADLINES
For Insertion COPY DATE
Friday Thursday, 5pm
Saturday Friday, 3pm
Sunday Friday, 5:00pmr
Monday Friday, 5:00pm
Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pm
i ii.. h ,,',,-, i. i .1 ,u, -,',,i il, ,-,,, I I'- ,T| 1 r n
I[-.,T, *i ,,1 ,j, I" i,',, ,:l1 lr,,.,v. ,, ,,-,,1 ,, y ,,',- !j ,TI,- 1 ,
made by 5:00pm Friday,
ADJUSTMENTS

firs day of publication If you ind an error call the declassified
departmenn innedlately at 314-3278 o 748-1955
h, ,,n h, ........ I.........h.... "r, i....,r


Merchandise Mart .......600

Real Estate/For RENT .... 800

Real Estate/For SALE .... 900

Manufactured Homes .. .1000

Recreation ............1100

Transportation ......... .1200


Thank you for reading
The Daily Commercial.





Saturday, October 26, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


003 Legal Notices
of November 2013 at 11:00 a.m. at the first
floor lobby of the Lake County Courthouse,
550 W. Main Street, Tavares, Lake County,
Florida, the undersigned Clerk will offer for
sale the following described real property:
Lot 125, of Huntington at Kings Ridge, ac
cording to the plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 37, Pages 32 and 33, of the Public
Records of Lake County, Florida. with the
property address of 3717 Hasting Lane, Cler
mont, FL 34711
Together with all structures, improvements,
fixtures, appliances, and appurtenances on
said land or used in conjunction therewith.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to a
Summary Final Judgment entered in Civil No.
2011 CC-1987 pending in the COUNTY
Court of the fifth Judicial Circuit in and for
Lake County, Florida.
Any person claiming a right to funds remain
ing after the sale must file a claim with the
undersigned Clerk no later than 60 days after
the sale.
DATED this 23 day of October, 2013
NEIL KELLY
CLERK OF THE COURT
By:/s/W.TILLMAN
Deputy Clerk
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS
WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons with dis-
abilities needing a special accommodation
should contact the ADA Coordinator at 550
W. Main Street, Post Office Box 7800, Ta-
vares, Florida 32778, Telephone
I,". 17"1 1" i [ in.i :r r,1 (7) days prior
ii in- ,,..,rij r,.,ri,,j npaired, ( DD)
1-800-955-8771, or VOICE (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.

Ad Number:00414352
October 26 & November 2, 2013

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR LAKE COUNTY,
FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 22013CP001319
Division PROBATE
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DANIEL DESGALIER
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of DANIEL
DESGALIER, deceased, whose date of death
was FEBRUARY 9, 2013 is pending in the
Circuit Court for Lake County, Florida, Pro
bate Division, the address of which is 550
West Main St., Tavares, FL 32778. The
names and addresses of the personal repre
sentative and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other per
sons having claims or demands against de
cedent's estate on whom a copy of this no
twice is required to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their claims with
this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
OCTOBER 26, 2013.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/Carolyn H. Sawyer, Esq.
Attorney for petitioner
Florida Bar No. 0004073
Sawyer & Sawyer, P.A.
8913 Conroy Windermere Rd.
Orlando, FL 32835
Telephone: (407) 909 1900
Fax: (407) 909 1992
Personal Representative:
/s/Lance D. Desgalier
12315 Caminito Mira Del Mar
San Diego, California 92130
Ad No.: 00414345
October 26 & November 2, 2013

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE N0.35 2009 CA 000125
FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE CORPO
RATION,
Plaintiff(s),
VS.
JOSE MEDINA; et al.,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PURSUANT
TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sale will be
made pursuant to an Order or Final Summary
Judgment. Final Judgment was awarded on
October 6, 2009 in Civil Case No.:
35 2009 CA 000125, of the Circuit Court of
the FIFTH Judicial Circuit in and for LAKE
County, Florida, wherein FEDERAL HOME
LOAN MORTGAGE CORPORATION, is the
Plaintiff and JOSE MEDINA; ESPERANZA AV
ILA; BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.; SIENA RIDGE
HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; AND
UNKNOWN TENANTS) IN POSSESSION are
Defendants.
The clerk of the court will sell to the highest
bidder for cash at the LAKE COUNTY COURT
HOUSE on the FIRST FLOOR near the INFOR
MATION DESK located at 550 West Main
Street, Tavares, FL 32778, beginning at
11:00 AM on November 13, 2013, the fol
lowing described real property as set forth in
said Final Summary Judgment, to wit:
LOT 16, SIENA RIDGE, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 42, PAGES 58, 59 AND 60, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE
DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A
CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court
on October 16, 2013.
CLERK OF THE COURT
Neil Kelly
/s/D.NEAL
By: Deputy Clerk
Aldridge / Connors, LLP
7000 West Palmetto Park Road
Suite 307
Boca Raton, FL 33433
Phone 561 392 6391
Fax 561 392 6965
1092 478
Ad No.: 00413541


October 19 & 26, 2013


003 Legal Notices

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LAKE
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 35 2013 CA 000497
DIVISION: 10
REGIONS BANK DBA REGIONS MORTGAGE,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JASON MOORE, et al,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated
October 23, 2013 and entered in Case No.
35 2013 CA 000497 of the Circuit Court of
the FIFTH Judicial Circuit in and for LAKE
County, Florida wherein REGIONS BANK DBA
REGIONS MORTGAGE is the Plaintiff and JA
SON MOORE; BRANDI WYLIE MOORE;
JANICE MOORE; KINGS RIDGE COMMUNITY
ASSOCIATION, INC.; CAMBRIDGE AT KINGS
RIDGE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.;
are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court
will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at INSIDE THE FRONT DOOR OF THE
LAKE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 550 WEST
MAIN STREET, TAVARES, FLORIDA 32778 at
11:00AM, on the 9 day of January, 2014,
the following described property as set forth
in said Final Judgment:
LOT 93 OF CAMBRIDGE AT KINGS RIDGE,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 41, PAGES 43, 44
AND 45, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LAKE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 4179 NEWLAND STREET, CLERMONT,
FL 34711
Any person claiming an interest in the sur
plus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pen
dens must file a claim within sixty (60) days
after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court
on October 24, 2013.
Neil Kelly
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/D.NEAL
Deputy Clerk
Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622 5018
F12018853
UNIONPLANTER SPECFHLMC R pschriber
Team 4 F12018853
-See Americans with Disabilities Act
NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES
(For case information, please call (352)
742-4100)
If you are a person with a disability who
needs any accommodation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of certain as-
sistance. Please contact the ADA Coordina-
tor at the Office of the Clerk of Courts, 550
West Main Street, Post Office Box 7800, Ta-
vares, Florda, 32778=7800, Telephone:
(352) 742-4100, within r,. 71- ,,r,r,,j ,Jv
of your receipt of this .'- ,iiry 1r y,.u .irir
hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771; if
you are voice impaired, call
1-800-955-8770.
Ad No.00414354
October 26 & November 2, 2013

100
Announcement

104 Special
Notices
NOTICE TO
ADVERTISERS
PLEASE CHECK YOUR AD FOR
ERRORS THE FIRST DAY IT APPEARS
SINCE THE DAILY COMMERCIAL WILL
NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
INCORRECT ADS AFTER THE FIRST
DAY OF PUBLICATION. IF YOU FIND
AN ERROR CALL THE CLASSIFIED
DEPARTMENT IMMEDIATELY AT
314-3278 OR 748-1955.
THE PUBLISHER ASSUMES NO
FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY FOR
ERRORS OR FOR COMMISSION OF
COPY. LIABILITY SHALL NOT EXCEED
THE COST OF THE PORTION OF
SPACE OCCUPIED BY SUCH ERROR.
CANCELLATIONS
CANCELLATION FOR ADS RUNNING
SATURDAY MUST BE MADE BY
FRIDAY BY 2:00, CANCELLATIONS
FOR SUNDAY & MONDAY MUST BE
MADE FRIDAY BY 5:00

105 Positions Wanted
HONEST, DEPENDABLE hard worker
looking for work. 352-508-9584

124 Professional
Services
COMMUNITY
SEMINAR:
How To Avoid Low
Back and Neck
Pain Surgery!
Learn about DRSTM Protocol, a
breakthrough and successful
nonsurgical treatment for
herniated and degenerative
disc condition.
Featuring: Dr. Jason E. Davis
Davis Clinic of
Chiropractic, Inc.
Discussion of chronic
and severe back and
neck conditions,
treatment options,
respective advantages,
treatment for failed
back or neck surgery.
Q& A Period
Light Refreshments.
Reservations Preferred
3:00-4:OOpm Tues.
OCTOBER 29, 2013
DAVIS CLINIC
OF CHIROPRACTIC
Reservations:
(352) 430-2121
DavisSpinelnstitute.com

134 Cemetery
Lots/Crypts
HILLCREST MEMORIAL 2 lots, opening
& closing w/2 vaults. Serenity sec-
tion. Worth 9,070 sell for $6,800.
Call 352-793-8102


&IES




The Daily i Coineial
www.dailycommercial.comi


200
At Your Service


201 Insurance


205 Adult Care
NOTICE
Florida Statute states, "It is a
misdemeanor for any person willfully,
knowingly, or intentionally to operate
or attempt to operate a family day
care home without a license or
without registering with the
department, whichever is applicable".
Florida Statute states, "No person
shall advertise a child care facility
without including within such
advertisement the state or local
agency license number of such
facility. The statute applies to anyone
with more than 1 unrelated child
in their home.

245 Financial

SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Contact us if your claim has been
denied or if you need help.
Over 30 yrs. exp.No fees or costs
unless your claim is approved.
Cooper Consulting
2228 South St., Leesburg
352-728-5552


250 Handyman

Hard working Lic. Business owner,
seeks to improve your home.
Ability to perform jobs including
Remodeling-TreeTrimming-Drywall-
Tiling, etc. References avail.
Call Robert Plante's
Home Maint. 352-484-3543

Hard working Lic. Business owner,
seeks to improve your home.
Ability to perform jobs including
Remodeling-TreeTrimming-Drywall-
Tiling, etc. References avail.
Call Robert Plante's
Home Maint. 352-484-3543




LAFY' 111IJ.-H HArD/MArj FVi: F
Reliable, Dependable! One call does it
all! LicAns. 352-409-4059


268 Moving

Two Brothers Moving



1 Room or a Full House
FL Reg. #1M1539
Russell & Todd Franks
Lic. & Ins. Call 352-793-8960

275 Plumbing

SINCE
1987

KILEY&
SONS, INC.
A Full Service Plumbing Company.
Lake 787-1904 Sumter 748-9500
CentralFloridaPlumber.com
VISIT OUR ONSITE SHOWROOM.
24 Hr. Emergency Service
Lic#CFC1426882

281 Roofing

#1 IN ROOFING
Villages Roofing & Construction Inc.
*Leak Repairs *Shingles/Flat Roof.
*Lifetime Metal Roofs. Free Roof Est.
352-314-3625. Lie. #CCC1329936


Re-Roofs and Repairs, Tile, Metal,
Shingles Flat Roofs & Mobile Homes
Excel. Ref's Lic & Ins. CCC1328197
Call 352-255-2758


288 Tree
Service

H1ft


Stump Grinding, @Tree Trimming &
Removal *Box Blading, *Bush
Hogging & Grading. Lie & Insured.
Call 352-504-1597





300
Financial



301 Business
Opportunities
RESTAURANT --
150 SEATS WITH FULL LIQUOR
North Lake County,
Serious buyers only. 352-250-7813


400
Employment



405 Professional
ASSISTANT FIRE CHIEF -
ADMINISTRATION
CITY OF CLERMONT
Please visit our website
for additional details:
www.cityofclermontfl.com
EOE, M/F, V/P, WV, DFWP
BARBERS NEEDED
Great shop /location.
Call evenings 352-250-2881

MOBILE HOME PARK MANAGER
55 plus Community- Lake County,
Florida. Experienced on site property
manager responsible for overseeing
maintenance personnel, collection of
rents, communication with residents
and HOA matters and leasing and
selling of park owned homes. Quali-
ties include computer skills (excel) or-
ganized, self-starter, and good at
creative problem solving and market-
ing.
Please forward resumes to:
Dino D'Agostino
dino@rangeconsulting.com


410 Sales
















SALES /MARKETING P/'T
$$$$ START IMMEDIATELY $$$$$
Join a professional marketing team
working in Lake County. I need ma-
ture, professionals that would like to
interact with people in local stores at
a kiosk while working on commission
basis. Current representatives average
$15.00 to $20.O0.hr. Candidates
MUST BE SELF-SUFFICIENT and able
to workA as an independent contractor
with a car, computer, and a cell
phone. This is an extremely well pay-
ing part-time job. This is not customer
service. Possibilities for management
and full time for committed achievers.
CALL OR FAX 800-781-1547


425 Clerical

RECEPTIONIST/ OFFICE ASST.
Self-starter w/organizational skills &
computer experience. Full Time.
Email resume to:
gailinwildwood@gmail.com


432 Dental
DENTAL ASSISTANT
Experinced only. $15/hr.
Fax resume to: 352-787-9036
NO PHONE CALLS
DENTAL ASSISTANT
Experienced for busy office. Must
have expanded duties & radiology
certified. Looking for outgoing
dependable, professional person must
be able to multi task.
352-751-1178
Lady Lake Area

435 Medical
LPN/MA
needed part time or PRN. for busy
dermatology practice in Villages &
Leesburg offices. Prefer office exp. &
ability to cover multi positions.
Fax resume to :352- 365-0932
MA
Needed P/T in Leesburg.
Fax resume 352-323-9507
MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST &
AUTHORIZATION SPECIALIST
For internal medicine
office in Leesburg. Exp. preferred
Please fax resume to
352-315-0578
OPTICAL TECH /DISPENSER
Exp. Lab Tech need for busy optha-
molic practice in The Villages. Dis-
pensing experience a plus.
Apply in person:
Beacon Advanced Eye Care
1128 Bichara Blvd.
Lady Lake, FL 32159

450 Trades


CONSTRUCTION LABORERS
Class A or B CDL preferred.
Will train. Must travel.
Paid medical & leave.
DFWP/EOE
Call 352-383-3159
Ext. 229




ELE:.Tli:lANj- S
ELECTRICAL
APPRENTICES
Applicants must have experience and
a clean driving record, high school di-
ploma or equivalent. Company is an
EOE and Drug-Free Workplace. Excel-
lent health benefits, 401k and PTO;
MVR & Background checks.
Apply in person at:
PIKE'S ELECTRIC, INC.
719 Industrial Drive
Wildwood, FL 34785

LEAK TECHNICIAN
Pool & plumbing.la, 'n hici'gr'Xind
drivers lic. req'd. Exp. preferred.
Call Phil 352-536-9300


450 Trades
TIMBERWOOD PROPERTIES
is currently looking for a shop em-
ployee to learn the cabinetry business
from the ground up. No experience
necessary, just a general knowledge
of tools. Must be 18, have a valid
driver license, and be willing to work.
Please apply at 1735 Tally Box Road,
Leesburg. Call 352-435-4657
for directions only.

455
Restaurants/
Hotels/Clubs
BAR I ENDLEH -I-FI
MUST be exp'd. Evenings & Wknds.
Apply in person 3-5pm
VIC'S EMBERS SUPPER CLUB
7940 US Hwy. 441 Leesburg, FL
NOW HIRING
SERVERS, COOKS CASHIERS
Experienced Preferred.
ALSO DISHWASHERS & HOSTESSES
Apply within: TAKI'S RESTAURANT
1324 N. Blvd. W., Leesburg

470 General
DELIVERY PERSONNEL
Office equip dealer seeks reliable per-
son to deliver equip & supplies, assist
in inventory control & light bldg.
maint. Must have neat appearance,
good communication skills, able to
follow written/oral directions, & be in-
surable. Must be able to safely oper-
ate a box truck. Heavy lifting req'd.
Please do not respond if you can't
pass a drug test, MVR & background
check. M-F 8am -5pm.
Apply in person at:
Mon.-Fri. 9am -12pm.
2854 West Main St.
Leesburg, FL.
HANDYMAN Pfr
Must have driver's lic. Great Pay.
Call Troy 352-383-0424 DFWP


COME JOIN

OUR TEAM
10111 1ITS I I
SS I I s e






KENNEL/ASSISTANT P/T
Exp. preferred but not required.
May fax resume to 352-589-0764
or fill out application at office
M-F 8-12pm or 2-4pm.
6100 Dora Ave., Eustis, Fl. 32726
VETERINARY TECHNICIAN/ASSISTANT
Small animal practice looking for a
new team member to fill a full time
position. Must have at least 2 years of
technician/assistant experience. Job
duties include everything from lab
work and surgery to dentistry and cli-
ent education. Salary negotiable de-
pending on experience. Microscope
skills & venipuncture a must!
Please e-mail resume to:
Vetassistantjob@gmail.com


You should see what



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DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, October 26, 2013


470 General
MAINTENANCE WORKING
SUPERVISOR
Requires HS diploma, exp. in indus-
trial Maint., welding, fabrication & 3
phase electrical. Work is in mfg. envi-
ronment, doing general Maint. duties.
Work hrs. & days vary. FT, 1st shift
w/benefits. Pay depending on exp.
$12-$17 hr.
Apply at Global Tire Recyling
1201 Industrial Drive
Wildwood or fax resume to:
352-330-2214
MARINE ACCESSORIES MGR. FT
Experienced in boat parts, accesso-
ries, phones & cash drawer.
Email resume to:
SharonNobles@NoblesMarine.com
DFWP/EOE
SALES CLERK
9am -5:30pm, 2 days/wk. Health
Food Store. Call 352-365-6477
SCHOOL BUS
DRIVERS NEEDED
Training provided.
Lake County Schools, Transportation
352-728-2561 or
Apply online: www.lake.k12.fl.us
SEASONAL HOUSEKEEPER
FOR HOTEL
Apply in person at
Microtel, Lady Lake




500
Pets/Animals


501 Pets
For Sale
AUSTRALIAN BOXER female approx. 2
yrs. Good w/kids. Free. 267-1711
GREAT PYRENEES/LAB MIX. Very Ig.
Shots & wormed. Free. 630-4272
560 Pet
Supplies
DOG CAGE Huge 2 x 2.5 & new large
dog bed. $70. 352-742-0250
DOG CRATE Large, hard plastic. 25W x
29D x37L. $50 obo. 352-321-2174
DOG STROLLER up to 301bs. Cup hold-
ers & carrier. $50. 352-602-7332
DRIFTWOOD for reptile aquarium (2
pc.) for 3ft. $100 407-878-6431

PET CARRIER 24"Wx36"L 30"H,
w/wheels. $40 Call 383-9589

PET KENNEL chain link w/gate 6'x9'
$99 SOLDHH!!!!


CROSSWORD

By THOMAS JOSEPH


ACROSS
1 Title
holder
6 Keen
11 Variety
show
12 Horse
opera
13 Delight
14 Sister's
daughter
15 Hampers
17 Had
something
18 Words
with pickle,
stew or
jam
19 Kram-
den's
portrayer
22 Road
sealer
23 Bacon
slice
24 Free
tickets
25 Take for
granted
27 "-geht
es dir?"
30 Aromatic
evergreen
31 Some
amount of
32 Historic
stretch
33 Gorge
35 Parlor
seats
38 Fleet-
based
39 Armistice
40"-
kangaroo
down ..."


41 Daughter
of Barack
and
Michelle
42 Beginning


DOWN
1 College
unit
2 Western
state
capital
3 Online
icon
4 Remote
button
5 Source
of
pressure
6 Heir, at
times
7 "Bali


8 Com-


600
Merchandise
Mart


601 Antiques
ANTIQUES, JEWELRY, Old Indian Rug &
Misc. All for $100. 352-348-7490
CLOCK electric Sail Ship good shape.
Made by Uniter. $95. Cal 793-5741
COKE BOTTLE old 1915, from Quincy,
FL, straight sided, $40 793-3877
DESK, 7 drawers w/chairs, solid wood.
1950's. $175 obo Call 483-1772
GLIDER w/cushions. Coverts to bed,
vintage. $100 Call 352-383-7607
SNUFF BOX antique European solid
sliver. $95 Call 352-314-0923
TOY TRAIN SET, Marx "0" gauge, 9pcs.
$40. Leesburg 352-874-5418
602 Arts/Crafts
CRAFTS/ SUPPLIES/ BEARS /TABLES
$100 takes all. 352-365-9519
SCRAPBOOK RACK 12X1 2 paper rack,
60 shelves. $50 352-742-1527
SCROLL SAW Dremel, 15". Moto 6"
Lathe model 700. $50. 315-9324
603 Collectibles
AUGUSTA XII Color Print 25 x 30, '92.
Framed/signed. $65. 330-4484
BUYING Baseball, Football, Basketball,
Non-sports cards 1870 to 1980.
Autographs, memorabilia, bobbin
heads. Sets, singles. No collection to
large. Call: 352-589-7981 or Email:
sportscards4john@aol.com
DOLL Boyd's Yesterdays Child, Laura
w/box & cert. $45. 352-360-0028
HOLLY HOBBY COLLECTION 45 pieces.
$100. 352-315-1612
RECORD COLLECTION 113 LP's $100
obo Call 352-357-2218
604 Furniture
BAR STOOLS (2) 30", light wood, cloth,
swivel seat. Excel. $50. 365-1896
BAR STOOLS (4) white wood w/cush-
ion, $60. Call after 9am 259-5629
BED King, w/mattress & frame. Good
cond. $150. 352-431-3952
BED Solid Iron, 100 yrs. old. $95. obo.
SOLD
BED Twin w/frame, mattress, box
spring, excel cond. $100 589-4915


604 Furniture
BEDS Twin (2) including spreads if de-
sired. $95. 787-7157 or 552-7248
BUNK BED FRAMES red, excel, cond.
$100 obo. 352-516-7108
CHEST OF DRAWERS 5 drawers, no
smoking. Excel. $80. 246-9948
COMPUTER DESK. Good cond. $50.
Call 352-396-5739
CORNER TV wood entertainment cen-
ter, 4x4x2, $75. 715-971-8152
DESK / TABLE antique white, solid
wood. excel cond. $95 435-0823
DINETTE SET 5 pieces, solid oak, very
nice. $100 Call 352-460-0472
DINETTE SET Rattan glass top w/4
chairs on rollers. $99. SOLD
DRESSER Antique oak, 3 drawer, 31 "H
x 43"Wx 21 "D. $95. 434-5314
END TABLES (2), golden oak. $50.
352-787-5917
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER 4 dr. 3 ad-
justable shelves. $50. 233-0464
MATTRESS Queen w/bed rails. $100.
Call 352-476-3476
MATTRESS Serta full size, clean. Ask-
ing $75. Please call 352-323-8079
MATTRESSES (2) twin, clean. $20 for
both. Call 352-357-1012
MEDIUM BROWN LEATHER COUCH,
chair and ottoman, wood/metal
cocktail and 2 side tables.Purchased
from Rooms to Go in July 2012. Still
in brand new condition, sofa is
86"$1150.00 352-586-1266
PATIO CHAIRS (4) w/cushions, like
new. $50. Call 352-636-1352
PATIO SET table, 4 chairs & 2 rockers
w/cushions. $50 obo Call 357-4169
PATIO SET, table w/2 swivel rocking
chairs w/burgundy cushions. New
cond. $150 Call 352-435-0823
RECLINER tan Microfiber. Good cond.
$100.262-441-0156
RECLINER, Swivels & Rocks. Marroon.
$45. 352-408-4711
ROCKER/GLIDER Oak matching foot
glider. Excel. cond. $35 435-0888
SIDE SERVING TABLE w/wine rack &
granite shelves. $74.50 989-0222

SLEEP SOFA 68" long, 2 cushions, light
color. $50. 352-602-0202

SOFA & LOVESEAT, Sage, overstuffed.
$250. Good cond. $250. 431-3952

SOFA 9', It. beige, excel cond. Wash-
able cushions. $50. 315-1908


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D E E R E S|A|Y|
Yesterday's answer


9 Parish
leader
10 Hog the
mirror
16 Jail, in
slang
20 Artificial
language
21 Contented
sounds
24 Vegas-set
series
25 Dawn


26 Major
muddles
27 Dispenses
with
28 Titularly
29 Grommet
30 Isn't
serious
34 Egotistic
36 German
cry
37 Pose-
idon's


fortable goddess place
NEW CROSSWORD BOOK! Send $4.75 (check/m.o.) to
Thomas Joseph Book 2, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475
1 12 13 14 15 6 17 l8 19 110 I


10-26


604 Furniture
SOFA BED Cream color. $100.
352-561-4940
SOFA Black Leather, 3 cushion, full
size. $30. 352-561-1167.
SWIVEL ROCKER full size green, good
cond. $25. Cell 608-347-1483
TABLE, Heart Shaped, 3 tier. brown,
good cond. $8 Call 352-504-6689
TWIN BED white laminate, new mat-
tress. $100. 352-250-4711
TWIN BEDS (2), complete w/linens.
$300. Call 352-589-1787
WICKER LOVE SEAT w/cushions, excel
cond. $40. SOLD
605 Appliances
Appliances With Warranties
$75 & up! Used Beds all sizes!
*Buy *Sell *Trade *Fast delivery
Call Buzzy's 352-315-9886
www.buzzysbeds.com
DISCOUNT
APPLIANCE
Repair-Sales-Service Most Repairs
$60 Plus Parts




WASHER, DRYER,
REFRIGERATOR
"Don't Toss It
Fix It For Less"
Buying Clean
Washers & Dryers
Days, Evenings & Weekends
Call Now
352-874-1238
DISHWASHER GE motor is only 3 yrs.
old. $45 Call 352-603-9604
DISHWASHER KitchenAid, almond.
Works good. $35 obo. 669-1163
DRYER GE gas, white, good cond. $50
Please call 352-404-8288
STOVE Elec. Propane water heater,
window A/C. $75. 865-789-6393
MICROWAVE Emerson Professional se-
ries. $30 obo. 352-431-3975
MICROWAVE GE under cabinet, like
new. $55 Call 352-603-9604
MICROWAVE GE. Model JES1451BJ02.
Black. $55. Call 352-589-1629.
MICROWAVE Samsung, over stove, blk.
Used 2 yrs. $80 Call 352-742-3445
OVEN White Whirlpool, glass top. $100.
Call 352-483-5504.
REFRIGERATOR dorm size, good cond.
$100 Call 352-702-6860
REFRIGERATOR Frigidaire, Gallery
side/side. Stainless/blk, ice/water in
door. Like new. $550. 729-2160
REFRIGERATOR GE 18.3, no frost. Runs
good. $80 Call 352-742-3445
STOVE, electric, Frigidaire, white, self
cleaning. $150. Call 352-455-0215
WASHER & GAS DRYER SET GE. Good
cond. $175. 352-516-1556
606 Electronics
GAME PSP Sony brand new in box.
$100 Call 352-455-3342
RECEIVER Denon with remote. Very
good cond. $99. 352-323-4862
STEREO SYSTEM Panasonic, CD, w/5
CD changer. $30 obo 357-3728
TELEVISION Toshiba color, works
good. $50 Call 352-365-6075
TELEVISION 19" color. Cable ready.
$30. 352-874-2806.
TELEVISION 27" Sony Trinitron, very
good picture. $60 352-589-8363
TELEVISION 55" rear projection. Hi-
tachi. $100. 407-800-6699
TELEVISION, Emerson 32" color w/re-
mote. $50 obo Call 352-728-2668
608 A/C & Heat
AIR CLEANER UV light for A/C. Kills
mold/bacteria. $100. 267-1711
AIR CONDITIONER Whirlpool window
unit. 8000 BTU $95. 728-2534
AIR CONDITIONER window unit, 5000
BTU's. $50 Call 352-753-7075
624 Children's
items

BABY BATHTUB, toddler potty & sassy
seat. $22. 352-455-7557.

BARBIE TOWNHOUSE, good cond. $60.
Please call 352-669-4789


624 Children's
items
CLOTHING for girls, size 7-8, great se-
lection. All very nice. Over 200
pieces. $150 Call 352-253-0245
ROCKING HORSE hand crafted. $95.
Call 352-406-6122
625 Building
Supplies/
Materials
JACUZZI Whirlpool Bath. No pump. $75
obo. Call 352-314-2123.
KITCHEN SINK stainless steel, 8" deep,
W/Delta faucet. $40 253-2357
PATIO DOORS Glass. (2) 80" x 35.5".
$20. both. 352-365-0191
PATIO DOORS Sliding glass. White
Frame. $75. Call Dave. 255-7623
SHOWER DOOR opaque glass. 27
1/4"x 69 1/4". $50. 446-7849
SLIDING GLASS DOORS Set of 3. 47"W
x 78"H. $60. 352-617-9000.
STUDS (20) 2X4'x104", grade 2. &
other wood. $100 obo. 484-3650
WOOD -8/4 solid, mahogany, maple,
oak for lathe turning. $2. 357-2708
630 Garage Sales
CLERMONT
8202 Jameson Farm Rd Fri Sat
(25 & 26th) 9-3. Furniture: bed-
room, book cases, entertainment
center. Books, clothing, '95 Dodge
2500 ($500) a lot of miscellaneous
items. Player piano ($200).
CLERMONT
Moving Sale! Sat. 10/26. 8 12
noon. 12536 Scottish Pine Ln.
Patio, tools, furn & household.
EUSTIS
809 Donnelly Street Sat. Oct. 26
(8-2) Inf./Toddler Girl Clothes, Toys,
Furniture, Women's/Junior's Sized
Clothing (0-12), Tools, Twin Sized
Mattress/Box Spring, Round Glass
Patio Table and Chairs, Misc. Items,
TV, Glass Top Table, etc...
EUSTIS
Fri. Sat. 7 3pm. Eustis Sands
Apts. 701 Mount Homer Rd. In
Community Rm. Lots of Everything!!!
FRUITLAND PARK
05440 E. Harbor Drive Oct. 25 & 26
8:00 until 4:00. Moving Sale.. furni-
ture, household items, cookbooks,
kitchen items, tools and much more.
FRUITLAND PARK
1826 Spring Lake Road 10/26/13
from 9:00 am to 2:00 pm. Everything
must go!!! Lots of everything thing
and a lot of everything!!! Everything
priced to go!!! Do not miss this sale or
you will miss out on the great bar-
gains!!! Estate Sale is this Saturday,
October 26th, No early birds, Estate
Sale starts at 9:00 a.m. but don't too
late or you will miss out
on the best stuff.
FRUITLAND PARK
Fri. Sat. 8 -3pm. 36912 Skycrest
Blvd. Something for Everyone!
FRUITLAND PARK
Lake Idlewild Estates
off Lake Unity Rd.
9th Annal Neighborhood Sale.
Oct 26th, 8am -?
FRUITLAND PARK
Sat. 8am ?? Huggs & Giggles Day
Care. 207 E. Berckman St. Chil-
dren's toys, clothing, knick knacks,
furn., pictures, glassware & lots of
misc.
FRUITLAND PARK
Sat. 9am ?? 4705 Eagles Nest Rd.
Big Sale. Tons of Christmas, tools,
truck boxes, gun cases, deep fryer,
gas blower/weed eater, hunting,
fishing & household items. DON'T
MISS THIS ONE no Junk.
FRUITLAND PARK,
705 Elm Ave. and 707 Mike Ave.
Friday and Saturday, Oct. 25 & 26.
Yard Sale Fruitland Park 2 loca-
tions: 705 Elm Ave. and 707 Mike
Ave. Furniture, Golf Clubs, Tools,
DVDs, Clothing, Household Items,
and much more! Friday and Satur-
day, starting at 8:00 AM
GROVELAND
BIG YARD SALE! Fri. Sat. 8 ?.
1248 S. Main Ave. Lots of misc.
LADY LAKE
820 Truman Ave. 10/25- 10/26
9am to 3pm. Huge sale, something
for EVERYONE- Furniture all kinds
of stuff. Too much to list. Please no
early birds 9am to 3pm Fri., 10/25
Sat. 10/26.
LADY LAKE
Fri. & Sat. 8am 4pm. Oakland Hills
Subdv. CR 109 & 441. Annual
Cruise Through Community Sale.
LEESBURG
Fri. Sat. 32820 Lewis Court. An-
tiques, furn., collectibles, spreads
(queen) kitchen items, lamps & etc.


630 Garage Sales
LEESBURG
2303 Osceola Street 10-25-13 to
10-26-13. Huge estate sale with
over 60 years accumulation. Lots of
antique tools, fishing gear, collecti-
bles, furniture, fragrances, house-
wares, linens and books.
LEESBURG
2306 Edgewood Ave. 10/25-26
8:30am-?. Everything goes! Furni-
ture/household items/patio & MORE!
LEESBURG
30326 Springwater Circle 10/26/13
8 am noon. Computers, printers,
household, electronics, kero htr, gas
edger. Hwy. 441, S. on Sleepy Hol-
low, L. Sunnyside, L. Waterline, L.
Froglog, L. Springwater Circle.
LEESBURG
Fri. & Sat. 8am -3pm. 615 S. Whit-
ney Rd. HUGE SALE. Toolbox for
truck,, furn., spreader, tools, glass-
ware, Christmas, lots of stuff.
LEESBURG
Moving Sale! Sat. 8 2pm. 1511
Terrace Green Dr. Furn., household,
Holiday. All Must Go!
LEESBURG
Sat. Only! 8 2pm. 1301 Peters Dr.
Vintage, toys, furn., tools & more!
LEESBURG,
Oct. 26th, 8am 2pm. Lake Square
Presbyterian Church, 10200 Morn-
ingside Dr. Arts & Crafts Bizarre.
SUMMERFIELD
Fri. & Sat. 8am -?? 8732 SE 157th
St. North of The Villages off 42.
TAVARES
Multi-Family Big Sale! Fri. Sat.
8:30 -1pm. 2366 Foxtree Rd.
TAVARES
Fri. & Sat. 7am ?? STREET SALE,
Bluegill & Perch off 441..
TAVARES
Fri. Sat. 8 4pm. 1314 Apache
Circle. Lake Francis Estates. Col-
lectibles, Matchbox Cars, Trains,
Misc. RC. Too much to list!
TAVARES
MEGA SALE 2451 Dora Avenue Sat-
urday Oct. 26th 9am Noon. DO NOT
MISS North Lake Resale Market Day
where you can shop over 100 tables
filled with awesome merchandise for
pennies on the dollar! North Lake Re-
sale is an online Facebook Group that
buys and sells 24/7 right online! We
meet weekly to exchange items but
once a month we hold a MARKET DAY
when members come and set up ta-
bles with their fabulous items! Then,
YOU come and peruse the rows of
goodies and shop til' you drop! Don't
miss North Lake Resale Market Day,
normally the last Saturday of each
month but holiday dates do apply for
Nov. & Dec. Find more details by
searching for North Lake
Resale on Facebook!
TAVARES
Thur. Sat. 9am-lpm 108 Baytree
Blvd. Lots of stuff.
THE VILLAGES
Huge Downsizing Sale! Fri. Sat.
10/25 & 10/26, 8 2pm. 777 Les-
lie Ln., Amelia Villas, Summerhill.
ANTIQUES, glassware (Carnival,
pressed, pattern), 8 svc. Haviland
China w/water glasses, collectibles,
(beer taps, shot glasses,
crocks/jugs, cups, saucers, Dept.
56 Villages, Barbie, Dolls), Christ-
mas (Santas, Snowmen), 50th anni-
versary decor, party theme decor,
lots of good clothing for Women, line
dance shirts w/glitter.
UMATILLA
Fri. Sun. 7am 3pm. 552 Sunset
Ave. Lots of children's clothes &
toys. Newborn to 3T & much much
more.
635 Garden
CHIPPER /SHREDDER Craftsman, 9hp,
cuts up to 3" $195. 352-434-5395
CONCRETE FOUNTAIN, no pump. Good
cond. $100 Call 352-735-1570
GLIDER COUCH & 2 CHAIRS alum.,
vintage. $100 Call 352-617-5498
LAWN MOWER Briggs engine, runs
great. 20" cut. Only $50 728-4913
PATIO SET Small, 2 chairs, glass top.
$40.352-431-3952
PLANTS (10 Century) $100 Call
352-638-2246
RUBBER TREE PLANT. Beautiful, sym-
metrical. $20. 352-735-1647
STAG HORN FERN extra nice. $100.
Call 352-603-4113
TREE SALE
Oaks, Sycamores, Cypress, Fig,
Mulberry, Cherry Laurel, etc.
Palms, Queen, Pindo or Sago
*Special 6' +/- Oaks $10 or 15/$100
*Cypress or Oaks up to 12'
CATTiS TREES
352-669-1618


No matter what time
of the day it is,
you can place
your classified
merchandise ad
online, pay for it and
just wait for the
phone to ring!

Fast, convenient and
on your schedule!


Dai lComidral
"Your First Choice" In-Print & On-Line


www.doilyC',rr, ercial. ccm

*Employment advertisements are excluded.
Please call 352-314-FAST to speak with a customer service rep.
Lake: 352-314-3278 or Sumter: 352-748-1955


CROSSWORD PUZZLE


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, October 26, 2013




Saturday, October 26, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


640 Guns
AMERICAN RIFLEMAN MAGAZINES
(220+ issues). $65. 352-742-1409
BOND ARMS DEFENDER 45 & 410 cali-
ber, 2 barrel over/under. Stainless.
Shot once. $345. 352-988-4668
PISTOL 22 long rifle, model RG4 w/side
holster & 2 boxes of 22 long. As Is.
$99. SOLD!!!!
REMINGTON Model 1903 Custom Rifle.
.30-06. $325. Firm. 352-408-2468
RUGER Mini 14 tactical. 2 Mags.
$1000. Call 352-751-5170
SHOT GUN SHELLS Vintage 410. $6.00
Call 352-728-2692
SHOULDER HOLSTER, leather.
Bugheimer 520A. 3 x 5. $15.
352-988-4668
TAURUS ULTRALITE REVOLVER, .38
spec. $375. Sterling stainless steel
.22 pistol (pocket size)- $225. Wood
stock single shot .22 bolt action rifle-
$100. Taurus TCP .380 cal.- $325.
Cases. Others. Ammo included
with each. Prices are firm.
Call Dave (716) 949-0408.

640 Medical
BED ALARM for patients who try to get
out of bed. $20.352-793-7027
CARRIER for power chairs or scooter
with fold out ramp. $75 SOLD
CARRIER FOR SCOOTER/POWERCHAIR
NEW, fits into hitch, 60" fold out
ramp. $195. 352-217-3437
SCOOTER 3 wheel, elec. new batteries,
looks & runs like new. $300
SOLD
SHOP RIDER 4 wheels, 24V w/charger.
$300 Call 352-343-6608
WALKER w/seat & basket. Good cond.
Blue. $100 Call 352-217-3195

650 Computers
& Equip
CARTRIDGES for Dell Printer Series # 5,
4 color/5 black. $90 all. 326-8111
COMPUTER TOWER HP, Pavilion 533W.
$60. SOLD 1ST CALL!
MONITOR Samsung flat screen 20".
$100.352-459-0899
PRINTER CARTRIDGES KODAK 2 color
& 2 black. $30 Call 352-516-0999
PRINTER HP Office Jet 7310, all in one.
Great cond. $99 Call 589-1234
PRINTER HP PSC500, w/7 ink car-
tridges $60. 352-728-3273

652 Articles
For Sale
BACK THERAPY MACHINE Back Tech
2000, good cond. $100.383-9589
BATH TOWELS 24, large, Excel cond.
All colors. $49. obo. 352-793-8102
BOOKS New, 22+ on the Kennedy's &
the Royals. $50. 352-516-2893
BRACELET Pandora, sterling silver 7.5,
no charms. $40. Call 324-2559
BREAD MACHINE Farberware, Auto-
matic. Like new. $25. 874-1862
CAMERAS (2) Cannon & Polaroid. $50.
for both. Call 352-787-1539
CERTIFIED PRINCESS DIANA DOLL
CLOTHES, 4 for $100. 217-4221
CHANDELIER FRUIT Red, beautiful.
$50. 352-536-1744
CHESS SET hand carved oriental
pieces. $100 Call 704-530-4305
CHINA W.Dalton Imperial #5671, 41
pieces. $75 Call 352-455-6427
CHRISTMAS TREE 7' LED, pre-lit, in
box. 2yr. old. $75. 742-7256
CHRISTMAS TREE 7' Silver blue spruce
w/container. $40. 352-365-0376
CHRISTMAS TREE 7', no lights, storage
bag. $35 Call 352-314-3254
CIGARETTE MACHINE Powermatic, $75
Please call 352-800-1455
CLEANING MACHINE Steam Bullet, no
chemicals, like new $45. 787-7048
COFFEE MAKER KitchenAid. New. Paid
$189. Sell for $100. 352-978-7461
CURTAINS, lace, dusty pink. 45"W. 3
sets. ($400). $99. obo. 589-8515
DESIGNER CLOTHING Chicos/Cache,
10/pcs. $100. 321-246-4371
DISHES 12 piece setting w/extra serv-
ing pieces. $50. 352-365-0109
END TABLE new, solid natural Oak, $45
Please call 352-347-7350
EXERCISE CYCLE, gas blower & mirror
clock. $100. 352-323-1297
FAUX LEATHER JACKET size 3X med.
brown. $30. 352-343-3459
FIESTAWARE DISHES cups & saucers,
assorted colors $99 Call 250-8290
FIREPLACE w/2" fire brick wall. glass
doors. $95 Call 352-787-1134
FLOOR CLEANER Shark, cleans wood &
tile. New. $50. 352-326-5527
FUR CAPES 1/Red & 1/Black, Susan
Lucci. $100. 352-409-8264

GARAGE DOOR OPENER Genie, com-
plete 1.5hp. $40. 435-0809

GARMENT BAG bi-fold, like new. $20
Call 352-385-1830


652 Articles
For Sale
HALLOWEEN COSTUME adult ladies,
$15. Call 352-434-9855
HALLOWEEN COSTUME Michael Jack-
son, w/accessories. $50. 742-2668
HOT TUB COVER Dark tan. Brand new.
6'7" x 5'. $80. 352-321-8606
HOT TUB Older, works great. 3-4 seats.
$250.obo. Call 352-552-4217
HOT TUB w/cover, steps & electrical
box, 13 jets. Excel cond. $500.
352-787-3987
ICICLE LIGHTS 190', light clips, & tim-
ers. NEW. $60. 352-504-0407
JACKET Black Leather size S/M cost
$100 sell for $35. 407-310-6628
JACKET Florida State men's Ig., quilted.
$25. Call 352-589-8064
JEANS, name brands (30 + pairs) size
12-14 &10 tops. $68 793-8102
JUICE EXTRACTOR Black & Decker.
Like new. $25. 352-385-7215
JUKEBOX 1963 Seeburg, glass &
chrome,. $100 352-307-8289
LADIES HATS & CLOTHING Summer &
Fall, good cond. $23 357-2248
LAWN CHAIRS (2) white, plastic w/blue
pads. $40. Call 352-742-2856
LUGGAGE Samsonite, hard sides, 3
piece set. $35 Call 352-357-1363
MAGAZINES (90) Bass Master. from
80's & 90's, excel. $50 360-6865
MATTRESS TOPPER 4" thick, king size
new cond. $99.352-636-9358
MEN'S CLOTHING XLg shirts 40-44W
shorts. 10 pcs. $20. 321-246-4371
MEN'S DESIGNER CLOTHES, Pants 32
x32. Shirts M-L. $75. 787-7348
MOTORCYCLE JACKET U.S made. Like
new 3XL. $100. 352-669-7544
MUSICAL CANDLES (2) battery oper-
ated. $35 Call 352-753-3974
OIL PAINTING beautiful sailing ship,
24"x30". $65 352-357-3043
POCKET NOVELS 37 Spencer series
mysteries. $30. 352-343-4633
PUNCH BOWL W/24 Cups. Gold trim &
white leaf pattern. $25. 742-5074
SEWING MACHINE Singer Feather-
weight, Excel cond. $325 Call
352-751-0369
SEWING MACHINE Singer, recently re
conditioned. $35 352-751-0369
SEWING MACHINE Singer. New in box..
Asking $90. Call 321-262-5485
SINGING PARAKEET ON STAND sensor
& batteries, new. $15. 360-1209
SLACKS Ladies size Med. petite. Bon
Worth, 6/pair. $25. 352-777-0045
SUITCASE, SAMSONITE w/wheels, Ig.
excel, cond. $30. 352-343-1050
TEAPOT SET full size w/utensil holder,
Hummingbird. $50. 352-357-0225
TOOTHBRUSHES (2) SONIC CARE. New
$70 for both. Call 352-508-4786
TUXEDO Men's, Coat/Pants/Shirt, size
48-42. $65. 352-217-4809
VACUUM Bissell, pet hair eraser, like
new. $70 Call 742-9568
VACUUM Orick XL upright, like new &
Orick Air Purifier both for $175 obo.
Call 321-246-4371
WEDDING DRESS altered size 1.
Beaded, w/veil. $95. 787-7132
Wll BEATLES ROCK BAND GAME &
DRUM SET. $60. 352-343-9279

655 Musical
Instruments
BANJO 5 string, Kay. W/accessories.
$225. Call 352-343-6608
PIANO Bungalow Mission Style. Attrac-
tive oak finish. $100. 383-9132
660 Office
Furniture/
Supplies
COMPUTER DESK w/hutch. Good cond.
Heavy, Umatilla $100 771-2310
COMPUTER DESK, 3 drawers, very
good cond. $70 Call 750-5604
CORNER COMPUTER DESK, glass
w/chrome. $75 obo. 360-5787
DESK 40"xl 8", wood, 7 drawers $20.
Call 352-636-1352
DESK CHAIR w/arms, plus home office
supplies. $40. 352-787-0410
DESK Metal 60"Wx29"Hx30"D,
6/drawers, $75. 352-406-1253
DESK, ADJUSTABLE CHAIR, CARPET
PROTECTOR $40 352-460-7646
OFFICE DESK, CHAIR & RUG 50"x70".
$80. 352-314-0505

674 Exercise Equipment
EXERCISE MACHINES. (2) Tony Little.
Both $70. 352-874-0352
WEIGHT MACHINE Power Pro
w/weights. $100. 352-516-7920
675 Sports/
Recreation
BICYCLE 26" Men's. Very good cond.
$65. obo. Call 352-460-4449


675 Sports/
Recreation
BICYCLE 6 sp. 26" girls w/basket. Excel
cond. $100. 352-508-5335.
BICYCLE Diamond Back, Sorrento
Sport, Men's 26", 21 speed, excel.
cond. $75. 352-259-0633
BICYCLE girls 24" Huffy, 1 speed, foot
brake, fenders, A-1 $45. 728-6835
BICYCLE vintage from the 30's, $100
Call 352-504-6406
BICYCLES 3 Wheel, rebuilt. Large Seat
& Basket. $150. 1-352-343-6608
CABIN TENT 3 rooms. $75.
352-787-1865
CANOE 14' Swayer, fiberglass, 2 pad-
dies. $100 obo SOLD!!!
GOLF CLUBS (3) w/Izzo Shag Bag ball
dispenser. $25. 352-702-7632
GOLF CLUBS men's complete set
w/bag. $25. 502-750-0512
GOLF CLUBS, 3 iron thru SW, driver, 3
wood, putter. $75 352-245-0716
GOLF SET irons, oversized woods,
w/bag. Like new. $50. 729-2595
GOLF SET, oversized graphite woods,
irons. New. $80. 352-735-6927
NIKE JAWBONE UP $100 obo. Size
med. Brand new. 352-409-6011
PUTTER Ping, excel, cond. 50 yrs. old.
$30 Call 352-735-6927
SADDLE Brown Leather, English. Good
cond. $60. 352-326-2432.
TREADMILL Ride Strider 3360. $100.
352-552-3000

685 Tools/
Machinery
GENERATOR Coleman 1850 Sports-
man, nice $90. 352-314-2717
GENERATOR Porter Cable. 5250watts.
$450.. Call 352-343-6608
PRESSURE WASHER needs some work
1750psi. $50 Call 352-348-9973
PROFESSIONAL GANG BOX metal.
$100.352-750-0367
ROUTER Sears, 6.5 amp. w/router ta-
ble. $50. 352-343-1286
SAW elec. 6 1/2", 1/2 elec. drill & belt
sander. $30 for all. 352-753-1170
SCREWS, self tapping. 8,000. $50.
352-728-1015
TRANSMISSION JACK 800 lb. capacity.
$100 Call 352-250-1199
VACUUM PUMP 110 volts, full size.
$75 Please call 352-406-9405
WINDOWS aluminum frame. Asking
$20. Call 352-396-5739




800
Real Estate
For Rent


802 Vacation
Rentals
WATERFRONT CABIN, scrn. porch, ca-
ble, $225-$275 per wk. no dep.
everything included. 352-314-2123
806 Houses
Unfurnished
CENTER HILL 5/2/2 house, $1,000/mo
1st, last + security. 352-568-7486,
CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
CLERMONT Newly built home for rent
Located in the Verde Ridge neigh-
borhood w/a Community pool, ca-
bana and playground. 2,375 sq. ft
with a 3 car garage $1,750/month.
Call Dierdra "Dee" Thomas,
owner/realtor 813-690-3030
FRUITLAND PARK 3/2/1 Duplex, quiet
family area. Lawn care included.
$745/mo. 352-874-5966
FRUITLAND PARK Nice little 1 br,
house, 400 sf. Close to everything.
W/D hookup. $450. + $450 dep.
Call 603-858-1160
LEESBURG 2/1, $690. Lease/purchase.
321-244-6555.


806 Houses
Unfurnished
LEESBURG 4/3, over 2400sf, 2 story
house, ready 11/1/13. $1200/mo +
security. Call 352-636-4935
LEESBURG rent to own $590/mo
w/down payment assistance.
352-269-4051
MOUNT DORA 3/2, CHA, fenced yard.
$725/mo + dep. 352-978-1696
OCALA Handyman Hunt Cabin. Low
down pay 352-269-4051
HIENTIALS
LONG TERM & UNFURN. RENTALS IN
SOUTH LAKE COUNTY.
ROCKER REALTY 352-394-3570
Ask For Janet or Emily
RockerRealtylnc.com
SILVER LAKE FOREST 3BR 2BA 2055
sq. ft., 2 car garage 10041 Silver
Bluff Dr. Please Call 352-314-2668.
GunnPropertyServices.com
TAVARES 3/1 beautifully remodeled,
paint, new cabinets, tile floor, Ig.
fenced yard. $850/mo. Call
352-343-1004 or 407-227-9810
UMATILLA HANDYMAN $200/mo. 2/1.
321-244-6555

807 Apartments
Unfurnished
AZALEA HILL APARTMENTS STUDIOS,
1, 2, 3 BEDROOMS $400 $925.
352-431-3790
CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
DOWNTOWN TAVARES 1/1 small,
quiet apt bldg 2 blks from Lake Dora
riverwalk with restaurants and
parks, $330/biweekly, $400 dep,
incd elec, water, Sat TV, Wi-Fi, Hard-
wood floors, Cent AC. Old Dogs,cats
OK. 352-669-0961
EUSTIS
2/1 including water/trash
Starting at $650/mo
Near Downtown
Call 352-735-0597

EUSTIS
All remodeled Apts!
2 Bedrooms
Special starting at
$575 Only $350 Dep. Pet OK.
352-357-5675



VjIiAGE
LEESBURG MOVE-IN SPECAIL
2 BRS. 1.5 BA, TOWNHOUSES
352-728-1955
LEE-SBURG
1ST MO. FREE!
SPANISH VILLAGE
Pool, great location!
Furn. Efficiency, incl.
util. & cable $700/mo.
2/1 apt. $600/mo.
Furn. $700/mo + util.
352-728-5555
LEESBURG downtown 2/1,
efficiency apt $550/mo + security.
Call 352-787-4584
GalbreathRealty.com
LEESBURG
FIRST MONTH $99
MOVE IN SPECIAL!
92/1 $500/dep.
e2/1 w/W/D hookup $550/dep.
*2/2 w/W/D hookup $600/dep.
Call 352-516-1244
Ask for Tina
LEESBURG, 1/1, with W/D, CHA, car-
port. $450 plus security. 787-2715
Ext. 222
LEESBURG, Duplex VERY CLEAN 2/1,
no pets $550/mo + dep. 551-6772
LYN TERRACE
Eustis
352-357-7332
www.lynterrace.com
Great Move-In
Specials & Free Gifts!
*1 & 2 Bedroom Units
*All 1st Floor No Stairs!

808 Apartments
Furnished
EESBURG STUDIO nice, clean,
$125/wk. Incl. util. 813-781-9540
| --- LEESBUHG ----
1ST MO. FREE!
SPANISH VILLAGE
Pool, great location!
Furn. Efficiency, incl.
util. & cable. $700/mo.
2/1 apt. $600/mo.
Furn. $700/mo + util.
352-728-5555


SEustis %

S1 Bedroom Private Patio I
I 1 Story, Walk to Publix
Bring This Ad To Receive
S$100 OFF
I First Full Month Rent I
I 1651 N. County Rd 19A, I
I Eustis Fl 32726
'. 352-357-7332 -
'~~~~T~'~


808 Apartments
Furnished
FRUITLAND PARK
TWIN PALMS MARINA
NEWLY RENOVATED
1 BR. MOBILES/COTTAGES
FULLY FURNISHED
ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED,
CABLE TV. FREE USE OF KAYAK &
CANOES. CONVENIENCE STORE
ON PROPERTY. NO SECURITY
DEPOSIT WITH PROOF OF INCOME.
GREAT FOR SENIORS.
WEEKLY & MONTHLY RATE.
SMALL PETS WELCOME.
CALL 352-787-4514
LADY LAKE Clean 1 bedroom/1 bath
Call 352-396-1152 or 352-750-0030

809 Roommate
Wanted
EUSTIS AREA furn. room, util paid..
$80/wk + $80 dep. 352-250-5012
810 Duplexes
CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
EUSTIS
2/1 including water/trash,
Near Downtown
Starting at $650/mo
Call 352-735-0597
LEESBURG 2/2 Very clean, near down-
town. No smoking. $650/mo. Call
407-967-1502
LEESBURG 3/2 with garage. $770 mo.
+ $600 dep. Ref's req'd. Call Mike
352-223-5300
LEESBURG, 1 br, 2br & 3br. Great price.
$599+. Call 352-350-7109
LEESBURG,
Beautiful Remodeled
2br/1 ba, $450/mo.
1721 Birchwood Circle
Call 352-325-1289 now!

811 Condos
Townhouses
LEESBURG
SUNNY SIDE VILLAS
FOR RENT 2/2. $650 MO.
PLEASE CALL
352-459-9300
ROYAL OAKS 1 MO. FREE 2/2.5 all
appl., pool, clubhouse, etc. Call
352-516-2657

816 Commercial
Property
LEESBURG
Warehouses w/Offices
2315-25 Griffin Rd. 1,150 up to
12,400sf. Starts at $300/mo.
Office/Showroom
1607 Hwy. 441 $850/mo
Small Shop or Office
2204 Citrus Blvd (441)
$320/mo., includes utilities
352-787-0004

819
Manufactured
Homes Rental
ATTENTION SENIORS AND ADULTS
Never lived in. Brand New 66x14, 3/2,
in nice quiet park in Eustis.
$650/mo + utilities. Sorry NO KIDS.
Call 352-396-2042


819
Manufactured
Homes Rental

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 &2brfrom
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
LADY LAKE 2/2 $750/mo $750 dep.
No smoking, no cats. Very clean,
w/very Ig. lot. 407-967-1502

LADY LAKE, 2/1, $450/mo. small de-
posit. No pets. 352-267-6358
WILDWOOD AREA
2/2 $650/mo dbl. wide
(Adult Parki
Call 352-745-8620




900
Real Estate
For Sale



903 Homes
For Sale




LEESBURG
Home for sale $3500. Great buy!
2br 2ba, remodeled bathrooms,
modern day accents in kitchen.
Age Qualified
Call 352-234-8369
LEESBURG 2/1, $690. Lease/purchase.
321-244-6555.




LEESBURG
Home for sale $7,500. Won't last!
2br 2ba, new carpet, freshly painted.
Waterview
Age Qualified
Call 352-234-8369
LEESUBRG, rent to own $590/mo
w/down payment assistance.
352-269-4051

OCALA Handyman Hunt Cabin. Low
down pay 352-269-4051
UMATILLA HANDYMAN $200/mo. 2/1.
321-244-6555

910 Condos/Townhouses
MULTIPLE ADORABLE/ AFFORDABLE
CONDOS FOR RENT! DON'T MISS
OUT!
4- 2/2'S $699
1-1/1 $625
1-2/2 $750. 407-359-9500

\,ii Vrnra i


A picture is worth a thousand words....


SAdd an exciting photo to your
:. .. advertisement and see how


fast the phone rings.



SThe Daily Commercial Classifieds (352) 314-FAST (3278)


LOAN





888





261




8409





DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, October 26, 2013


1000
Manufactured
Homes


1001 Mfd Homes
For Sale
CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 &2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
EUSTIS 2/1 in 55+ park. Shed & car-
port & A/C porch. $2,500. Call
352-357-5556
SENIORS AND ADULTS
NEW and NEWER
Homes in a nice quiet part in Eustis.
$25,000 $4 000 Firan(irng avaii.
Only 3 left! Lot rent $350 per mo.
Call 352-589-4007
TAVARES
$595/mo. Furn.
352-343-7780
riverestwaterfrontresort.com


1002 Mfd
Homes
W/ land
For Sale
UMATILLA 1/1 w/add on's. $30,000
obo. Call 352-669-1879

1012 RVLots
ALTOONAI
2/1 $495/mo. w/$300 dep.
And RV Lot $300/mo. w/$100 dep.
352-735-2071 or 352-636-6800
ALTOONAI
2/1 $495/mo. w/$300 dep.
And RV Lot $300/mo. w/$100 dep.
352-735-2071 or 352-636-6800



1100
Recreation


1101 Boats
FIBERGLASS BOAT Antique. 1968. Lap
siding type w/33hp Johnson engine
& trailer w/new tires. Nice & Very
clean! Will have to see to believe.
$4000. Call 352-751-3523 or cell
352-603-5493
PONTOON Suntracker '91. 18', 40HP,
$3500 obo. Call 352-315-0390


1101 Boats
WELL CARED BAYLINER IN EXCELLENT
CONDITION INSIDE AND OUT.
PORT-A-POTTY, STEREO, BIMINI
TOP, SINK, PLENTY OF STORAGE
W/TRAILER AND DEPTH FINDER.
RETAILS AT $14,000.00 WILL SELL
FOR $10,500.00. CALL TODAY!
352-267-4020
1120 Marine
Equip/
Supplies
BOAT LIFT barely used, $450 obo Call
352-742-9487
TROLLING MOTOR 47 lb. thrust, Tran-
som mount $85 SOLD
1150 RV&
Campers
BIG COUNTRY FIFTH WHEEL. '11.
29RK, Elite Edition, 2 slides, Queen
bed. Asking $25,000. 409-3806
CANOPY & FRAMING for Travel Trailer.
12W x 30L x 18'H. New in box.
$800. 352-787-3987
TRAILER HITCH Reese leveling & sway
bars. $99. SOLD!!!

1200
Transportation

1205 Autos
TOYOTA Camry '98, 4 door, power, sun
roof. $3500 obo 352-636-0263


J4itted




Weissi~iuds.


1205 Autos

CASH PAID
FOR JUNK CARS!
$300 and up.
Call 352-771-6191
DODGE RAM '09
4x4 Loaded, Clean Car Fax
#ST2324
*$25,400
AUDI TT '08
Low Miles, Turbo, Automatic
Leather, Clean Car Fax
#SP2323
*$22,800
NISSAN 350z '07 Convertible
1 Owner Only, 16,000 mi.
Clean Car Fax
#2325
*$21,400
FORD F150 XL '10
Low Miles, Clean Car Fax
#SP2329
*$14,882
FORD FUSION SE'11
Low Miles, 1 Owner, Full Power
Clean Car Fax
#S213A
*$11,900
*With $3000 cash or trade and are
plus tax, tag and $599 dealer fee.
BILL BRYAN SUBARU
8730 US Hwy. 441
Leesburg, Florida
352-240-7480


1205 Autos
MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS '99. Full
power. 90K mi. Runs Great. Cold
A/C. $1950. 352-324-6095
TRIUMPH 1976 convertible spit fire.
Needs works, many spare parts.
$600 Call 352-323-0973
1206 Aviation

1210 Mcycles/
Mopeds
SUZUKI 300 ATV, Rebuilt carburetor &
front end. New gel battery. Runs
great! $800 obo. 787-3987
1235 SUV
GMC JIMMY '97. 4 dr., power, 4 x 4.
Many new parts. Invested $5200.
$4500 obo. 352-345-3232
1240 Trucks
Light Duty
CHEVROLET 2500 HD, '09. Pick Up.
V-8, towing package, bed liner, CD
player, fifth wheel hitch, 18K mi.
$21,000.352-409-3806
DODGE DAKOTA '07, 4 door, 6 cylin-
der, 60K, $11,300 Call 365-6238
DODGE RAM 1500 SXT. 2004. 41,000
miles. $8000. Contact John.
352-455-9557
FORD PICK UP '92, short bed. 6cyl., 5
speed. $1200.352-504-2014


1247 Trailers
UTILITY TRAILER heavy duty, 5'xl10', tilt
top, side rails, new 15" tires, ideal
for golf carts. $775. obo Call
352-343-8898
1264 Auto
Parts
Accessory
ENGINE STAND used once, new $100,
now $50 Call 352-636-1352
TIRE Michelin/Alloy wheel. 225/60
R16. 75%. $100. 352-324-2173
TIRES (4) 245/60-R18. $60. Call
352-326-9105
TIRES, 3 used. Free. Mascotte area.
Call 352-366-0225
TOOL BOX Alum. Diamond Plate for
small Pick up. $75. 323-8805
TOOL BOX for pickup front. Alum, like
new. $100 Call 352-396-2511
TOW BAR w/wiring kit & safety chains.
$100. Call 352-771-1307
1275 Golf
Carts
CLUB CAR rear seat, new charger, 3yr.
old battery. $1100. 352-360-1178
CLUB CAR, excel shape, loaded, lights,
windshield. $995 336-817-7509
COOLER Playmate for Golf Cart. Good
cond. $10 Call 352-259-3522


Nothing stops them from making their deliveries!



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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, October 26, 2013


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El
DAILY COMMERCIAL
Saturday, October 26, 2013


www.dailycommercial.com


GARDENER: Transplant trees, shrubs in fall for best results / E2


'Steppable' plants for walkways, patios


DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press
Plants you can walk on
are attractive additions to
pathways. These low-ly-
ing perennials can with-
stand heavy foot traffic,
release pleasant odors
when crushed, smother
weeds, and cushion your
step in the narrow spac-
es between bricks or flag-
stones.
"You can use 'steppa-


bles' for all kinds of ap-
plications," said Kathy
Gurnee, owner of Green
Thumb Landscaping in
Clinton, Wash.
"You can use them as
groundcover in lieu of
bark," she said. "On pati-


os, pathways, rock walls
and crevices. I like them
around the bottoms of
trees. They're also good
for living roofs and liv-
ing walls. They deliver a
beautiful resilience."
Walkables generally


are defined as creeping
plants that don't exceed
12 inches in height, said
John Schroeder, presi-
dent of Valleybrook In-
ternationalVentures Inc.,
a family-owned horticul-
tural operation in Ab-
botsford, British Colum-
bia. The company's line
of "Jeepers Creepers" in-
cludes around 100 variet-
ies of low-to-the-ground
SEE PLANTS I E2


AP PHOTO
Several flats of potted, walk-on plants are laid out
alongside the flagstones of a pathway in Langley, Wash.


AP PHOTO
In this photo provided by SYMBOL Audio, a new version of a retro hi-fi system has a walnut cabinet outfitted with a hand built
turntable, amplifier and built-in wireless router.


Decor with built-in tech


KIM COOK
Associated Press
It's one thing to have a beau-
tiful, comfy bed. But what if
it also included a TV screen,
game console and dimmable,
color-changing lights?
Or say you've got just enough
room in your apartment for a
credenza or speakers, but not


both. How about one piece that
includes both and a whole
media system?
The integration of technolo-
gy into home decor has come
a long way since clunky TV
screens peered out of armoires
and media cabinets; today's su-
per-thin screens can come em-
bedded in the bathroom mir-
ror or attached to the wall like
pieces of art.
7 The "wallpaper"
mode on Sharp's


new, high-definition Aquos TV
lets you display photos, paint-
ings or other images as wall art
when you aren't watching tele-
vision. You can set a clock for
display times, and the light lev-
el is reduced to get rid of glare.
Samsung's four-door fridge
has a Wi-Fi enabled screen
that you can load with photos,
news, calendar, notepad and
recipes.
Want to stay on top of the
morning news? Seura's TV
screens embed in the bath-
room vanity mirror. Rob-
Sern's embed in the medi-
cine cabinet.
TV manufacturers are
moving into OLED organ-
ic light emitting diode tech-
niiology, which can be linked to
computers and other tech de-
vices. It's thin as a pencil and
able to be curved.
As for sound systems, Sym-
bol Audio of Nyack, N.Y, has
a New Audio Desk that incor-
porates high-quality speakers
into a slim writing desk crafted
SEE TECH I E2


Tips for dealing


with oleander


caterpillars


QI have a vine with
a red berry in the
pod. What is it and is it
dangerous?
A Rosary Pea is the
vine you have and
it is poisonous. It is a
perennial, climbing,
woody vine that can
get to be about 20 feet
tall. It has flat, broad,
rectangular pods
about two inches long
that curl open when
dry and reveal beau-
tiful red seeds with
black tips. The seeds
may have been used
for rosary beads in the
past, but just one seed,
if eaten, is powerful


Juanita
Popenoe
LAKE COUNTY
EXTENSION


enough to kill a per-
son, horse or cow.
What is this insect
that is eating my
oleanders?
A Oleander caterpil-
lars are bright or-
ange with tufts of long
black hairs and they
can defoliate olean-
ders pretty quick-
ly once they become
SEE POPENOE I E7


An oleander caterpillar feeds on a leaf.


Tillers improve garden

soil with minimal effort
MAUREEN GILMER
Scripps Howard News Service
After a photo of my vintage Ariens tiller ran in
the local newspaper here in California, a friend
announced that she had acute "tiller envy." I un-
derstood her perfectly because a good tiller can
help manage a fabulous food garden each year
with minimal effort. For years I, too, had such
envy because my soil conditions ate lesser tillers
for breakfast.
Anyone who grows a vegetable garden should
have a tiller. It's not only essential for preparing
SEE TILLERS I E7


-^^ tjtk'AI I B ^^
AI LY
FURNITURE


HURRY IN! CHOOSE SOMETHING IN STOCK

OR DESIGN YOUR OWN,


EITHER WAY, YOU'LL
ENJOY SAVINGS AND
BEAUTIFUL LEATHER
FURNITURE.


You can use 'steppables' for all kinds
of applications. You can use them
as groundcover in lieu of bark.
Kathy Gurnee,
owner of Green Thumb Landscaping





DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, October 26, 2013


Transplant trees in fall for best results


JOE LAMP'L
Scripps Howard News Service
When is the best time
to plant or transplant
trees and shrubs? Al-
though these can be
planted any time the
ground isn't frozen,
the absolute best time
is fall. The cool air and
warm soil tempera-
tures are the perfect
combination for estab-
lishing roots in a new
environment.
Imagine for a mo-
ment that you are a
plant or tree being re-
located. Most of your
roots were severed
when you were dug
up, and now you have
to find a way to pro-
vide water and nutri-
ents to all your parts,
even though you've lost
most of what you need
to make that happen.
Now imagine it's sum-
mer. The sun is beating
down on your leaves,
there's no rain in sight,
yet the normal environ-
mental conditions call
for you to grow, grow,
grow. It's like being told
to run a marathon in
July while you're bat-
fling a terrible flu.
But what if you were
provided cool temper-
atures, just the right
I EVERY SUNDAY 9AM-2PM I


SHNS PHOTO


The best time to plant or transplant trees and shrubs is the fall.


hydration and all the
nutrients to endure
the 26-mile race? Your
chances would be
much better, right?
The cooler air is kind
to plants and trees, es-
pecially those that have
just lost a major por-
tion of their roots dur-
ing digging. In addition,
soil temperatures are
still warm, creating an
excellent environment
for new root growth.
Perhaps the great-
est benefit to fall trans-
planting is that many
plants and trees are en-
tering a period of dor-
mancy. Energy normal-
ly required to sustain
existing foliage and


produce more can in-
stead go into root de-
velopment and storing
nutrients and resources
during the cool months.
By the spring, when de-
mand for new growth
above ground starts
again, the root system
should be well estab-
lished so the plant can
handle the upcoming
demands of summer.
Here are a few addi-
tional tips to ensure the
success of all your fall
transplants.
When transplant-
ing, advance work can
make the difference be-
tween those trees and
shrubs just surviving
and thriving. Make the


planting hole two to
three times wider than
the current root ball,
but no deeper than the
plant was growing in its
previous environment.
If you're planting a
container-grown plant,
don't assume that the
soil level in the con-
tainer indicates the
proper depth for plant-
ing. Many times grow-
ers add more soil to the
container, ultimate-
ly putting too much
above the root level. At
planting time, scratch
away the soil to find
where the roots really
start. That's the proper
level for planting in the
ground.


PLANTS
FROM PAGE El

herbs, mints, evergreens, ivy, moss and more.
"I like them for lawn repair or replacement,"
he said, adding that he stripped 900 square
feet of turf grass from his own front yard and
replaced it with creeping mazus, a dense,
ground-hugging plant.
"It's just a gorgeous lawn application," Schro-
eder said. "I set out some 1-inch plugs at 12-
inch spacings in September, and by July, they
were one solid mass.
"They give me an inch-thick, lawn-like cover
with purple flowers for a few weeks out of the
year and no more mowing. Just some trimming
and weeding around the edges."
Many walkable plants are drought-resistant,
while others perform well in shade, on hard-to-
maintain slopes, covering bulb gardens, spilling
from containers or protecting high-use areas.
A sampling:
* For areas with moderate to heavy foot traffic:
Corsican sandwort has moss-like foliage with
white flowers in spring. Does well in damp, dry
or shaded settings. Celestial spice pratia has
tiny green leaves covered by deep blue flowers
all summer.
* For fragrance: Corsican mint, the smallest of
the mint family. It delivers a pleasant creme-de-
menthe fragrance when crushed. It also does
well in shade. Creeping thyme is a fast-growing
groundcover that gives off a spicy scent. Most
thyme varieties are drought-tolerant and can
survive moderate traffic. Their flowers are at-
tractive to butterflies.
* As a lawn substitute: Alpine moss ear grows
into a dense carpet with white flowers in sum-
mer. It thrives in dry climates. Blue star creep-
er is a dark green perennial producing soft blue
flowers through summer. Turkey tangle fog-
fruit has gray leaves with white to lavender
blooms from spring to fall, and is deer-resis-
tant. Creeping mazus, with its low mat of green
leaves studded by small lavender flowers, toler-
ates hot, humid summers.


Located in Evans Park
(fake Donelty St south to Lake 0ora)
Fresh Veggies, Plants, Seafood, Homemade
Bread, Cheese, Eggs, Local Honey,
Grass fed Beef, Crafts and MORE!
We are Pet and Family friendly!


CIIA OI
I L I IRMON I
C-..RA_ VI.n '


TECH
FROM PAGE El

from maple, walnut,
oak or cherry.
Baby boomers may
remember the fami-
ly's old hi-fi system.
While iPhones and


iPads can now hold
the equivalent of hun-
dreds of Mitch Miller
albums, there are still
those among us who
like the mid-century
chic of a retro-styled
system. Symbol Audio
pays homage to the hi-
fi with the Modern Re-


& BUSINESS EXPO L'_Lc-LL W LLL L'L ILL

_L__ KL-LLLL LLi_ L:L
SOUTH! LAKE
l.ILiHOJtLj ,- JILUMM U[

Sample Signature Dishes & Products from Area Restaurants
and Businesses Throughout South Lake County

Tickets Are Limited $20 Advance $25 at the Door

Tickets Available at the South Lake Chamber of Commerce
620 W. Montrose Street Downtown Clermont
Phone: (352) 394-4191 or online at www.tasteofsouthlake.com
or at BankFIRST 1000 East Highway 50


More than 25 Area Restaurants
Sampling their Signature Dishes

More than 35 Chamber Member Businesses
will be Showcasing their Products & Services


bright house


SHUNT
* Jn
I INDUSTRIA A
Wehcyu[a]hresaies


cord Console, a walnut
cabinet outfitted with
a hand-built turntable,
amplifier and built-in
wireless router.
"The act of remov-
ing an album from its
sleeve, cleaning and
placing it on the turn-
table is interactive and
physical. There is an
undeniable charm to vi-
nyl that's more than just
a fascination with the
past," said Blake Tovin,
Symbol's founder.
Designer Chris Cush-
ingham of Brooklyn,
N.Y., crafts his own ver-
sion of the hi-fi con-
sole out of walnut and
corrugated cardboard.
He'll also make you a
custom one using your
record player, audio
gear and LP collection.
Bloomfield, Ct.-
based Salaman-
der Designs conceals
high-performance
loudspeakers in elegant


cabinetry. The Chicago
model is clad in striat-
ed black oak, evoking
the prairie grass of the
Midwest. There are ver-
sions in walnut, Amer-
ican cherry and high-
gloss white lacquer.
Italian designer Edo-
ardo Carlino's spacy-
looking Hi Can canopy
bed incorporates a the-
ater screen, integrated
PC and game consoles,
and built-in lights to
create a self-contained
bedroom/playroom.
Replace ceiling, floor
or table lamps with IAV
Lightspeaker's wireless
fixtures and run your
music through them.
You get lighting, sur-
round sound and no ex-
pensive wiring to deal
with. For rentals and va-
cation homes, there's an
outdoor version built
into a faux rock you
could put on a patio.
Kohler's Moxie show-


erhead has a Bluetooth
speaker attachment
so you can sync radio
or playlists for bathing
music. Disengage the
speaker and carry it to
another room, or the
beach. Colors include
white, cherry red, navy
and chartreuse.
Ready for entertain-
ing? Just hit "party" on
Lutron's new Home-
works system. It sets
the mood of a room
with spotlights, dim-
mable overheads, mu-
sic and thermostat set-
tings. The company
offers customized light-
ing options for a variety
of moods and rooms.
If you'd just like to
disguise outlet and
vent covers, check out
Trufig's marble, wallpa-
per, wood or concrete
flush-mounted op-
tions, which make the
connection disappear
into the wall.


47th Annual Board of Directors Dinner

Meeting & Scholarship Fundraiser


Fr[ 1'~~OXLi ida o e b rI s tin* 6:30I Pm




For Information or to RSVP Call (352)357-7070 or (352) 357-5550
The Event is Open to the Public and a Donation of $25/person is Being Requested

Guest Speaker: Mrs. Kathleen Butler-Gordon
Orange County School Board Member District 5

Sponsorship's Available Please Call (352)357-5550 for Information
Gold Sponsorship .......................$500 (One Full Student Scholarship)
Silver Sponsorship....................$.... 250 (One Half Student Scholarship)
Bronze Sponsorship ...................... $100 (Siarier Scholarship for One Student)
All Proceeds Raised Will Be Used To Provide Scholarships To Former lake Co. Head Start Students


Thank You for


"Helping People..JHelp Themselves"
ponsoredby


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Saturday, October 26, 2013


Midcentury home, renovated, comes back from the 1950s


KIM PALMER
Minneapolis Star Tribune
When Ed Charbon-
neau and Erica Berven
decided to buy their
first home, they had a
vision in mind: Atom-
ic Ranch, as in the
Space Age-era hous-
es that have become
the height of retro chic
to a new generation of
homeowners.
"I had a subscription
to Atomic Ranch maga-
zine," said Berven, who
also remembers ad-
miring the interiors on
TV's "The Jetsons" and
"The Brady Bunch" and
thinking, "That's the
coolest thing ever."
The couple found
their own Atomic
Ranch-style house in
St. Louis Park, a Min-
neapolis suburb. Built
in 1954, the house had
some distinctive orig-
inal features, includ-
ing a butterfly roof with
dramatic eaves and a
tapering stone fireplace
in the living room.
But the house also re-
tained some not-so-de-
sirable relics from the
'50s, including a tiny
kitchen.
After living in the
house for several years,
the couple decided it
was time to make some
major improvements.
Fortunately, they had
an expert in the family:
Charbonneau's uncle
is architect Daryl Han-
sen.
Charbonneau, a mu-
ralist and instructor at
the Minneapolis Col-
lege of Art and Design,
had collaborated with


SHNS PHOTO
A view of the Charbonneau/Berven home from the backyard.


his uncle on art proj-
ects in the past and had
commissioned one of
Hansen's distinctive
custom rugs, in pastel
hues inspired by '50s
tiles Berven had col-
lected.
Hansen appreciat-
ed the vintage home's
quality construction
and '50s aesthetic. "I'm
more of a modernist,
and that was the be-
ginning of modernism
and open floor plans,"
he said.
The couple had a
large lot, with plenty
of space for a big rear
addition, but decided
against it. "I didn't want
a gigantic kitchen,"
Berven said. "I wanted
to work within the ex-
isting footprint."
Fortunately, ranch-
style houses lend
themselves to creative
reworking of space be-
cause their floor plans
are more free-flowing,
less compartmental-
ized than houses from
earlier decades, said
Hansen. He developed
three different schemes
for remodeling the


house.
"I didn't know how
far they wanted to go,"
he said. "They picked
the most open of the
three," which includ-
ed removing two interi-
or walls. "That changed


the relationship of ev-
erything."
Hansen decided to
"bring the dining area
out into the living
space," by designing a
custom table and built-
in bench. To produce
it, he turned to wood-
worker Chad Johnson,
a trusted longtime col-
laborator. With John-
son on board, Hansen
felt confident adding
detail to his design, in-
cluding inlays of deco-
rative leopard wood.
The cabinets are
"customized Ikea" -
stock beech cabinets
to which Johnson add-
ed curved corner piec-
es for displaying some
of the couple's colorful


Fiestaware and vintage
collectibles.
Hansen also added
a skylight in the work
area to bring light into
the kitchen, and de-
signed a modernist
metal railing to replace
the wall that once sep-
arated the living area
from the stairs to the
lower level.
To complete the up-
dated vibe, the couple
added vintage lighting
and furniture, abstract
paintings by Charbon-
neau and retro collect-
ibles.
The makeover has
dramatically changed
the way the couple
live in their home,
they said. They used to


spend a lot of time in
their basement. "Now
we live here" on the
main level, Berven said.
They cook a lot more
often. And their home
has become a gather-
ing spot for the extend-
ed family. Even with
a crowd, there's now
space to maneuver in
the kitchen, Berven
marveled.
Planning a renova-
tion?
Take your time. "Live
with the floor plan you
inherit" before under-
taking a major remod-
eling, suggested Mi-
chelle Gringeri-Brown,
founding editor of
Atomic Ranch maga-
zine.


I 'II


Dr. Fouad Shami is a urologist who has spent 41 years

proudly servicing patients in Lake and Sumter counties.

Throughout the years, he has developed an excellent

reputation for his bedside manner, genuine concern,

and medical expertise. A graduate of Saint Joseph's

University, Dr. Shami is a board-certified urologist.

This experienced and skilled urologist is excited to be a

member of the leading medical team in Central Florida

at Florida Heart and Vascular Multi-Specialty Group.


"It has been an honor and a privilege to serve my
patients and I appreciate the special bonds and
relationships we have made over the last 41 years.
- Fouad Shami, M.D.


Florida Heart

& Vascular
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Experience Our Integrity For Compassionate Care


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Son's long hair brings out

worst in mom's abusive clan


DEAR ABBY: I have a 10-year-
old son. "Zack's" a great kid,
creative, funny and athlet-
ic. He has decided to grow his
hair long. My husband and I
figure it's not illegal or immor-
al, so why fight it?
My family does not share
our opinion. My mom and
sister are cruel in their op-
position to Zack growing his
hair. They tell him he looks
like a girl and call him names.
There have been bribes, bul-
lying and instances of utter
insanity on their part, trying
to make him cut it.
My sister's son has been
physically and verbally cru-
el to Zack, and she thinks it's
funny She's repeating a pat-
tern from when we were chil-
dren of being the "tough-
est" if you can't handle the
abuse, you're a "baby."
I need to know how to stand
up to these family members
for my son. It's a struggle for
me to speak to them face-
to-face, and they have called
me a coward for sending
email messages. My moth-
er lives alone and sometimes
has suicidal thoughts. Zack
is stressed because he loves
his grandma, but can't deal
with her harassment. Can
you help? GUILT-RIDDEN AND
STRESSED IN ONTARIO, CANADA
DEAR GUILT-RIDDEN AND
STRESSED: I'll try. Some-
how, for your son's sake, you
must find the courage to tell
your mother and your sis-
ter to their faces that if they
don't knock it off immediate-
ly, they'll be seeing a lot less of
you and Zack.
The dynamics in your fam-
ily are unhealthy but you
are an adult now and no lon-
ger have to tolerate it. Be-
cause Zack is athletic, enroll
him in self-defense class-
es and make sure he knows
he does not have to tolerate
physical abuse from anyone
and that includes his cousin.
As to "Grandma," your son's
emotional health must take
precedence over hers. I seri-
ously doubt she'll kill herself
if she doesn't have your son to
make miserable, so don't feel
guilty about it.
DEAR ABBY: I was on a bus

The Original



IPresents the 4th Annual


Dear
Abby
JEANNE
PHILLIPS


yesterday and a woman seat-
ed near me complained about
how long the trip was taking
for so long and so loudly that I
ended up "catching" her nega-
tive energy Because I couldn't
find a nice way to shut her up,
I finally put on earphones and
turned on my music.
When there is a toxic person
in a public place, what is the
best way to get them to stop
spewing their hateful sewage
onto everyone else? -ALLISON
IN BROOKLYN
DEAR ALLISON: The most obvi-
ous way would be to put phys-
ical distance between you and
the person, if that's possible. If
it isn't, then the way you han-
dled it was appropriate. In
the interest of safety, I would
not recommend confronting
a possibly emotionally dis-
turbed individual.
DEAR ABBY: My wife and I
are retired and financially se-
cure. Our three adult chil-
dren shower us with costly
gifts on Christmas, birthdays,
and Mother's Day and Father's
Day. Most of them end up on
our closet shelves.
How can we tell them that
what we would really prefer is
just a kind, handwritten (not
store-bought) note with pos-
sibly a recent picture of them
or our grandchildren en-
closed? DAD WHO HAS ITALL
DEAR DAD: Why not say it the
same way you expressed it
to me? You are financially se-
cure. Your closets are filled.
You don't have room for any
more "things," and this is the
kind of gift you would prefer.
If they disregard your wish-
es and give you more gifts you
can't use, you can always do-
nate them to a needy family.
Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van
Buren, also known as Jeanne Phil-
lips, and was founded by her moth-
er, Pauline Phillips. Write DearAbby
at www.DearAbby.com or PO. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.


"PURPLE PASSION EVENT" if W
HELD AT: Al's Landing I
111 W. Ruby St. Tavares
352-742-1113 (For VIP Reservations only)
ALL PROCEEDS TO BENEFIT: "THE HAVEN"
An Abuse Shelter For Women & Children
NOVEMBER 7, 2013 7PM 10PM
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as we go back in time and celebrate the 70's. Live Speakers
Live 70's band Costume Contest Prizes Silent Auction
Tuesday: Ladies Cut $10 Wednesdays: Men's Cut $10
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Saturday, October 26, 2013


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Saturday, October 26, 2013


S udoku ****** 4puz.corn

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2 84

2 36

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YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION How to play: Fill in the blank
squares with the numbers 1
9 3 8 6 4.5 2 7 1 through 9 so that each horizon-
5 4 2 7 8 1 3 6 9 tal row, vertical column and nine-
square
6 7 1 2 9 3 4 5 8 sub-grid contains no repeated
4 1 9 37 6 5 8 2 numbers.
7 8 3 5 2 4 1 9 6 Puzzles range in difficulty from
2 5 6 91 8 7 3 4 one to six stars.
8 2 7 4 5 9 6 1 3 The solution to today's puzzle
__ -- __ __ _will be in tomorrow's paper.
5F 5
165832947

AXYDLBAAXR
isLONGFELLOW
One letter stands for another. In this sample, A is used
for the three L's, X for the two 0's, etc. Single letters,
apostrophes, the length and formation of the words
are all hints. Each day the code letters are different.
10-26 CRYPTOQUOTE


JMZ JTKR YC LQR


JVIL MI


OVIR; VL VC YF LM YC LM


JVKR MYXCROKRC


MI OVKVAJ


SROO


LQR


JVIL


- KMOLTVXR


Yesterday's Cryptoquote: BE COURTEOUS TO
ALL, BUT INTIMATE WITH FEW, AND LET THOSE
FEW BE WELL TRIED BEFORE YOU GIVE THEM
YOUR CONFIDENCE. GEORGE WASHINGTON


WORD s)G)R) 1)M)M)A)G)EY
BY JUDD HAMBRICK 2013 UFS /Dist. by Universal Ucliek for UFS


Ooo ooo 1st Letter 20d DOWN
..... 0003ct+ 7 PTS


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.....CO OCx O4th Down -%
..... w +40 PTS 4
FOUR PLAY
TIME LIMIT: 20 MIN AVERAGE GAME 165-175 PTS TOTAL
Directions: Make a 2- to 7-letter word from the letters on each yardline. Add points
to each word or letter using scoring directions. Seven-letter words get a 60-point
bonus. All words can be found in Webster's New World College Dictionary.
10-26-13 JUDD'S SOLUTION TOMORROW

WOI RD .IMMAGI SOLUTION BY JUDD HAMBRICK
S1 MllGiPll l O I@III UL 2013 UFS / Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS
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AVERAGE GAME 295-305 PTS JUDD'S TOTAL = 459
10-25-13


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"I bet Daddy would be happier if
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YOU NEED I'M GONNA THROW
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SOMETHING WIN! NEW rIT IS!'
NEW!. --y



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Saturday, October 26, 2013

TILLERS
FROM PAGE El

the spring garden; owning
one allows you to till again
whenever you want. Tilling
can turn under weeds in the
spaces between rows dur-
ing the growing season. It
chops and buries weeds in
a few minutes time. Close
the garden for winter by till-
ing remnants of this year's
crop so fewer insects over-
winter there and plant debris
decomposes much faster.
Above all, a tiller keeps your
garden looking neat and tidy
even when it's fallow.
Before satiating your tiller
envy with a new machine,


note which kind of tiller is
the best for your garden.
Electric tillers don't involve
small engines. No gas, oil or
carburetor adjustments are
necessary. Above all, these
lightweight machines can be
lifted easily into a raised bed.
You'll also be pleased that
the smaller size fits nice-
ly into the garage or storage
area.
I have been testing an elec-
tric tiller and find it does well
in the soft potting soil used
to fill raised beds or in san-
dy ground. Try it in heavy
ground, and it either skitters
across the top or bogs down.
The only thing you need to
worry about is tilling over


your power cord.
Front-tine tillers


with gas


DAILY COMMERCIAL

engines are the most com-
mon design, made un-
der a dozen different brand
names. The right choice di-
rectly relates to your soil
type. Good agricultural soils
are predominately clay,
which can become heavy
and hard as concrete. Your
tiller must be strong enough
to stand up to these.
What matters most is the
engine's size, which can
range from 98 ccs to a more
versatile 300 ccs. You'll nev-
er regret selecting the stron-
ger model.
Weight is another indicator
of a good tiller. Those built
well with quality steel and
few, if any, plastic parts will
weigh considerably more
than a weaker machine with


the same size engine. Some
of this weight translates to
thicker steel tines. Light-
er tines are prone to break if
they encounter rocks or oth-
er objects deeper down.
Rear-tine tillers are the
easiest to use and the
most expensive because of
the transmission. They are
less compact, because the
tines are behind the engine,
not underneath it. Rear-tine
models need a lot of room
to turn around at the end
of each pass, so they're not
well suited to smaller gar-
dens. A great rear-tine til-
ler is a wise investment for
a large family garden in any
soil.
Learn more about tillers at
TillersDirect.com; it breaks


down various brands and
models by their features. The
site also contains how-to
videos with a buyer's guide
that explains how tillers vary
in design and tells how to se-
lect one.
Used tillers can be an af-
fordable option, but you
risk buying one that has not
been properly cared for. An-
other option is a rental tiller,
but this is difficult to trans-
port in the car.
Buying a tiller is an invest-
ment that will yield con-
siderable return in food for
the entire family. Best of all,
it satiates tiller envy with
a strong machine that lets
even those who aren't as
strong keep up the garden in
a fraction of the time.


POPENOE
FROM PAGE El

large. They are na-
tive to the Caribbean
region. The adult is a
pretty moth that is of-
ten called the "pol-
ka-dot wasp moth"
because they look
somewhat like a fan-
cy wasp with an iri-
descent blue/green
body and wings, a red
tip of the abdomen,
and small white dots
on the body, wings,
legs and antennae.
You may have admired
them and not realized
they were laying eggs
on your oleander.
The cream colored
eggs are laid in clusters
on the underside of
the leaves in new shoot
tips. Small caterpillars
hatch from the eggs
and start to eat, work-
ing their way down the
stems, at first eating
just the undersides of
leaves and then whole
leaves. If you catch


them when they are
small, they are easier
to control. Once they
are large enough to de-
foliate the plant, they
become much more
difficult to control.
The plants can with-
stand being defoliated,
but if it occurs repeat-
edly, it may make the
plant more susceptible
to pests like scale in-
sects. Birds cannot eat
these caterpillars be-
cause of their poison-
ous diet (the oleander
is poisonous). Natu-
ral predators include
predatory stink bugs,
parasitic tachinid flies,
wasps and fire ants.
You can also just snip
off the damaged leaves
with the feeding cater-
pillars if they are still
small and clustered.
Large caterpillars can
be hand picked.
Be sure to wash your
hands carefully after
handling the oleander
plant because the tox-
ins are in the sap. Ba-
cillus thuringiensis, a


microbial insecticide
in various brand name
products, can be used.
It selectively kills only
butterfly and moth cat-
erpillars and not the
beneficial insects, but
care should be used so
that only the targeted
pest is destroyed. Al-
ways read and follow
label directions.
When is it safe to
prune crape myr-
tles?
A Pruning crape myr-
tles is best done in
late winter or early
spring before growth
begins. Crape myr-
tle bark is beautiful,
so pruning should be
done to showcase the
bark as well as the
summer flowers. Low-
er branches are often
thinned to show off
the colorful, smooth,
peeling bark, and the
spent flower heads can
be removed immedi-
ately after flowering
to encourage a second
flush of flowers and to
prevent the formation


of the brown fruit.
Cultivars should be
selected for mature
size as well as flower
color to avoid severe
pruning to maintain
size. Severe pruning
or topping can stimu-
late suckers from the
base, but some culti-
vars just naturally form
lots of suckers, requir-
ing maintenance to re-
move. It is not neces-
sary to prune crape
myrtles at all if you like
the look of the dry fruit
in the winter. Crape
myrtles certainly do
not need to be cut back
to stubs.
Visit the Discovery
Gardens and our plant
clinic with your plant
problems and ques-
tions from 9 a.m. to
4 p.m., weekdays, at the
ag center, 1951 Wood-
lea Road, Tavares.
Juanita Popenoe is the di-
rector of the UF/IFAS Lake
County Extension office
and environmental horti-
culture production agent II1.
Email jpopenoe@ufl.edu.


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The Counselor R 10:151:30 4:30 7:15 10:00'
Ca-tain M ----n 10:05 1:05 4:05 7:05 10:00"
Pillips Tmo.i lPG13 10:05 1:05 and 405 only
G ravit y PG613 12:45 3:00 7:30 t45'
SuLaetr 6raint 2D PG13 10:30 and 5:15 only
Landing Escape PtaB 10:40 1:20 4:40 72 10:00"
Market The Family R 10:30 1:40 4:20 7:00 9:40'
,Square Cloue* With a Chaence
S Couyf MeatCls 2 PG 10:15 12:30 2:45 5:00 7:15 t30'
Rushi RR 10:25 1:10 4:05 650 9:35"
The Heat R 10:35 1:45 4:25 7.10 950
,ng, '__"Fridayaml Saturdayonly


R 1.35 12:50 3:05 535 7:50 10:051


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Brownwood Gravty a
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PG13 10:05 1:10 4:15 7.15 10:15'
P613 10:30 5:15 7:30 U45P
P613 12:45 and 3:00 only
R 10:00 12:25 2:45 5:20 8:00 1020;
R 10:30 1:45 5:00 815'
R 10:15 12:30 3:15 530 7:45 10:00'
R 10:20 1:15 4:30 7.00 9:30'
PG13 10.00 12:20 2:35 5:05 7:30 91'
*Friday and Saturdlav onIly


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LS'TV


Noveumber 10ak 11tk

Arlington Ridge Golf Club f1
4463 Arlington Ridge Blvd.
Leesburg, FL 34748 FOUNDATION, NC.

We're raising enough money so 250 children
and adults can get the flights they need to the
doctors that can save their lives.


(352)S2MV761

www.AngelFlightSE.org/Events
Member of the Air Charity Network
4 Players will get a Each Foursome will get a
MLB or NFL Celebrity as
chance to shoot for their 5th player.
1 MILLION DOL ARS! Register Now to Lock in your
Celebrity Team Member


S- -
1E1ELiU~
kll-i


Arlington|Ridge"
GUIl I ( LB


=> I xo N3 golf


FORD PRESS

INSIGHT
CREDIT UNION


Bay Sireei rain & Buuy --
Dr. Susan G. Caddell, DDS .
-iJ C(hellllllTalW Albert L. Brown Foundation Inc. w
"Youir f'&f ;/hoitf "' hln-P'rin & Ohl-lim ^^ft-^l^ -1 J j


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Gr Os(yWorld.
G 0 1, F
lo--


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6NUW;~ 6
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LAKE SUMTER TELEVISION




In our October episode we'll
bring you the latest in medical
Hometown news and information including
Health stories on Breast Cancer Awareness,
the Importance of Screenings
Good Things for Those Who0Wait and a Fresh Face for Fall



Watch for features on
the Leesburg Partnership,
Cancer Specialist Dr, Maen Hussein R0FILES
and Joanne Keller, ARNP in
October's episode of Profiles



We invite you to be an informed
member of our community and
view the most recent
LAKECOUNTY Lake County Commission
F L 0 gRI D A and School Board meetings



Keep up-to-date and informed
about the news and headlines Daily 2omineial
shaping our community as .. O N C om'rIa...Pe,,&o,,.,,
www.dallycommercial.com
LSTV and the Daily Commercial 90"
bring you "News in 90".




For production inquiries or
programming comments contact us at
LakeSumterTV@gmail.com

S Yo""!




DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, October 26, 2013
U


F YOU'RE UP AT


2 IN THE MORNING,


SO ARE WE.


Km4


You can't predict when you'll have a health concern.
That's why with your PUP Medicare Advantage plan,
you'll have certified nurses available to answer your
questions, 24/7.


Days, nights, even weekends, reassurance
phone call away.


is just a


As a PUP Member, you'll sleep better...
because we're awake.





PUP plans offer great benefits like:
* $0 additional monthly plan premium
* $0 deductible
* $0 visits with your Primary Care Physician (PCP)
* Up to $100 rebate of your monthly Medicare Part B premium
* Part D prescription drug coverage
* Comprehensive dental coverage
* Routine vision and hearing coverage
* Free all-access gym membership with SilverSneakers
* Free transportation to and from your health care providers
(New for 2014)
And much more!


Now ll0yu ned 0
NaviateyourMedcar
is o e,-lttlePUPID ar.0


YOUR
PHOTO V
HERE
PUPt

& .Wm ., ,.
.... . -:Il.-,- .
'"*f "I~ i. ** ye


To larn ore boutyourMediareAdvantge Pa. otinssiplyaten
onSo or@re, S 0t-udesta noraioalsmias li.sted elow


Attend a PUP
seminar & receive a
$10 gas gift card.
There is no obligation
to enroll in the plan.
Gift card cannot be
converted to cash.


. S ~ j I -I ~S


P UP

Navigate your Medicare

PUP is an HMO plan with a contract with Medicare and the Federal Government. Enrollment in PUP depends on contract renewal. For more information
about PUP, please contact us at 1-866-571-0693, TTY/TDD 711 (Mon Sun 8am 8pm). A sales person will be present with information and applications.
For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings call 1-866-571-0693, TTY/TDD 711. The benefit information provided herein is a brief
summary, not a complete description of benefits. For more information contact the plan. Limitations, copayments, and restrictions may apply. Benefits,
formulary, pharmacy network, premium and/or co-payments/co-insurance may change on January 1 of each year. You must continue to pay your Medicare
Part B premium. Member events are designed specifically for PUP Members. Free gas card without obligation. Limit one gas card per person from October
1 through December 31. H5696_PUP1110 CMS Accepted


LEESBURG
Best Western
1321 N 14th St
Oct 30 @ lOam & 2pm
Golden Corral
1720 Citrus Blvd
Oct 29 @ 11am & 2pm
Perkins
27811 S Hwy 27
Oct 28, 30 @ 2pm
Oct 31 @ lOam & 2pm
The Plantation Golf Club
4720 Plantation Blvd
Oct 28 @ lOam & 2pm


LADY LAKE
Perkins
905 Bichara Blvd
Oct 29,30 @ 2pm


CLERMONT
South Lake Chamber of Commerce
620 W Montrose St
Oct 29 @ 10am & 2pm
Golden Corral
1555 S Grand Hwy
Oct 28, 29,30,31 @ 11am & 1pm
IHOP
2589 US-27
SOct 28 @ 10am & 2pmr


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Saturday, October 26, 2013


-0