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Daily Commercial
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~The Daily C
!TheoDailigCommercial



LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, October 21, 2013 www.dailycommercial.com

THE LAW: Cops nab alleged molester/ A3


MIDEAST: Signs of rift between Israel, US over Iran / A7


PHOTOS BY THERESA CAMPBELL / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP
Curly Weimer, 55, of Fruitland Park, fixes and restores old pinball machines. He often installs a new playfield in old cabinets, and
is a distributor of new pinball machines.
FRUITLAND PARK



PINBALL WIZARD
Curly Weimer'szz ability to both build and understand his machines makes him a
much-sought-after resource for owners and collectors the world over


THERESA CAMPBELL I
Staff Writer
theresacampbell@
dailycommercial.com
Curly Weimer un-
derstands the appeal
of pinball machines
on young and old
alike; those who relish
the colorful lights and
unexpected sounds
all while being ready
at any moment to
press the flippers and
launch a shiny ball up
a jackpot-activating
ramp.
"This is a great hob-
by," saidWeimer, 55, of
Fruitland Park, who is
one of four people in
the U.S. trained to re-
pair and restore old
pinball machines.
He also sells hard to
find parts to pinball
owners and collectors
all over the world, and
Weimer is a pinball


Approximately 15 different pinball machines are set up at
Curly Weimer's Fruitland Park home, from where he sells and
repairs pinball machines.


distributor through his
Little Shop of Games,
where he does launch-
ing parties for col-
lectors and travels to
pinball expositions
around the country.
Over the weekend,
he hosted a pinball
show in Chicago. His
next big event will be
Southern Pinball Fes-
tival Nov. 22-24 at the


Crowne Plaza at Or-
lando Universal. Ar-
cade businesses and
collectors are among
his top customers.
"I just sold and
shipped a pinball ma-
chine to Karl Urban,
who starred as Dr. Mc-
Coy on Star Trek, in
the last two movies,"
said Weimer, who not-
ed one of the latest


and most popular pin-
ball machines is a lim-
ited edition Star Trek
(priced $4,995), which
is generating a lot of
buzz. Only 799 of these
were manufactured.
"Half of those go
overseas and only
400 are in the U.S.,"
Weimer said while
showing the Star Trek
pinball machine to
one of his regular cus-
tomers, Dario Com-
pain of Tampa, who
was impressed by the
new game.
"I want this Star Trek.
I really like it, I love the
flow of it," Compain
said. "The ramps are
very smooth, the shots
are relatively easy, and
as you get into it, it's a
little more challeng-
ing."
Compain noted the
SEE WIZARD I A2


Cops want


to know: Who


helped you?


BRENDAN FARRINGTON
Associated Press
PANAMA CITY
BEACH Back in cus-
tody after using forged
documents to escape
their life sentences,
two convicted killers
were being grilled on
Sunday by law en-
forcement authorities
who said they expect
to make more arrests
in a case that has given
both court and correc-
tions officials in Florida
a black eye.
Among the questions
being posed to Joseph


Jenkins and Charles
Walker: Who forged the
papers? Who helped
you run from police?
What other prisoners
have gotten away with
this? Who was coming
from Atlanta to whisk
you out of Florida?
"I can tell you, there
will be more arrests,"
Florida Department
of Law Enforcement
Commissioner Ger-
ald Bailey told a news
conference Sunday,
hours after Jenkins and
Walker, both 34, were
SEE HELP I A2


Shutdown must


not be repeated,


Congress warns


PHILIP ELLIOTT
Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
Leaders from both par-
ties insist a sequel to
the government shut-
down must be avoid-
ed although a plan to
dodge it is still elusive.
"This can never hap-
pen again," "There'll
Treasury govern
Secretary
Jacob Lew you can c
said. Senate Rep
Added Mitcl
Senate Re-
publican Leader Mitch
McConnell: "There'll
not be another govern-
ment shutdown, you
can count on that."
The 16-day partial


noc
en
:01
pu
AM


shutdown ended last
week although a pos-
sible repeat may be on
the horizon. Lawmak-
ers approved a budget
that keeps the lights
on through Jan. 15 and
lets Treasury continue
to pay its bills through
Feb. 7.
That's
it be another not to say
t shutdown, there is a
UInt on that." solution
at hand,
blican Leader and no
IcConell and no
one is
rushing
forward with alterna-
tives to a potential re-
peat of the gridlock
that shuttered parts
SEE REALLY I A2


Historian uses ancient map


to trace Florida's oldest trail


SCOTT CARROLL
The News Herald
PANAMA CITY, Fla. Bay County His-
torical Society vice president Bob Hurst
unrolled an 8-foot map, a replica of Brit-
ish cartographer Joseph Purcell's drawing
of the Old Spanish Trail, the oldest road in
Florida.
Slowly, Hurst ran his fingers over the
map, recalling the hundreds of miles along
the trail he has explored since late winter.
"A lot of times the road will be obliterat-
ed," he said in a recent interview. "I'll have
to jump from another place that I have
plotted, where I think it is, and go there.


So, I mean, I bypassed a lot of land. And a
lot of the land is private, unfortunately. I
wish I could get on some of it and check
it out."
In a recently-finished project to defin-
itively map the Old Spanish Trail in Flor-
ida, Hurst covered more than half of the
465-mile route from St. Augustine to Pen-
sacola. Along the way, he used aerial pho-
tographs, topographical maps, and refer-
enced Purcell's map and other historical
documents to plot a more accurate path
of the historic trail, which is also known as
the El Camino Real and the Spanish Royal
SEE TRAIL I A2


Bob Hurst, vice
president of the
Bay County His-
torical Society,
points out fea-
tures on a histori-
cal map of the old
Spanish trail in
Panama City.
ANDREW
JOHNSON / NEWS
HERALD


Vol. 137, No. 293 4 sections
LIVING HEALTHY Cl
J MISSED YOUR PAPER? CLASSIFIED DlQ NATION A6 ........ HIGH
Call 787-0600 (Lake County), or COMICS C6 OBITUARIES A4 87
877-702-0600 (Sumter County) CROSSWORDS D1 SPORTS B1 -A LOW
NEWS TIP? DEAR ABBY C7 VOICES A7 ) 69
90994 17001 Call Scott Callahan at 365-8203 LEGALS Dl WORLD A6 -T See A8





DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, October 21, 2013


HAPPY BIRTHDAY for
Monday, Oct. 21, 2013:
This year you often find
yourself in no-win situa-
tions. Misunderstandings
surround you. Work on your
clarity, and be conscious
of meetings and times. Re-
main authentic, and you will
feel better. If you are single,
you might experience some
difficulty transforming a dat-
ing situation into a more in-
timate relationship. Do not
get frustrated. Time will
prove what is valid. If you
are attached, communica-
tion between you and your
sweetie might not be as in
sync as it previously has
been. You learned to lis-
ten to each other once, and
you can do it again. GEMINI
helps you see the big pic-
ture.
ARIES (March 21-April
19)
You could be as clear as
a bell, but you still will wit-
ness a lot of confusion.
Your intuition will counter
what you are hearing. You
might become irritated and
angry as a result of this
misunderstanding. Know
that everyone is human.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) Be aware of the cost of
not being as thorough as
you could be in a certain
area of your life. You might
feel as if a risk is worth tak-
ing. Make sure you look at
the worst-case scenario be-
fore you commit. You'll be
less likely to make a mis-
take.
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) You'll be ready to pro-
ceed full throttle, but you
could get tripped up by a
misunderstanding. You are
slightly accident-prone, and
you might not be ready to
take off on a physical jaunt.
Relax, and choose to do
only what feels right.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) You might think one
way, but within hours, you
could reverse your direction.
The elements of indecision
and confusion easily could
mark your day, if not the
next few weeks. Try to give
yourself some space to fig-
ure out what you want.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
Confusion starts right
now, whether it is around
you or within you. Be as
succinct as possible. Your
diligence will keep you out
of trouble. Use caution and
good sense before spend-
ing money or committing to
any investments.


South dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.
NORTH
*4 K 9 5 32
YQ9
*AJ6
*4J988
WEST EAST
*84 4,Q76
VK107642 VAJ853
*- *Q72
4105432 +AK
SOUTH
*AJ 10
V-
*K 1098543
4 Q76
The bidding:
South West North East
1 Pass 1 1 NT
2 2i 3V Dble
3 4V 4 Pass
Pass Dble 5 Dble
Opening lead six of hearts.
The United States won the 1993
world women's team championship,
defeating Germany in the 128-deal
linal by a score of 325 IMPs to 272
to capture the Venice Cup. The match
was virtually even at the halfway
point, but the Americans pulled away
in the third quarter and coasted to
victory.
The winners gained one-third of
their final margin on this deal, which
occurred early in the match. The bid-
ding shown took place when Sharon


VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) Your anger flares easily.
The issue is how you han-
dle it. Somehow you could
be involved with a misun-
derstanding today or in the
near future. No one likes be-
ing misrepresented. A part-
ner or associate will seem
vested in not getting it.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
You are all smiles, no
matter which way you look
at a personal matter. At this
moment, you will want to
detach to gain a new per-
spective. Don't let this atti-
tude undermine being sup-
portive. Confirm meetings
and times.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21) Deal with a partner di-
rectly. Even if some tension
ensues, know that you have
done better than anyone
else could. Your imagina-
tion might conjure up a lot
of reasons for the problem
that might not be grounded.
Let them go.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21)
Defer to others, as your
perspective might not be
heard at the present time.
A boss or someone you
look up to could be cantan-
kerous and touchy. Mean-
while, you could be thinking
in other terms and not con-
necting.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19)
Stay focused on what you
are doing. Confirm all plans.
Misunderstandings easi-
ly can happen. Understand
your limits. Let your creativ-
ity emerge in a discussion.
Know that your message
might not be digested and
understood by everyone.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18)
While others are in the
midst of confusion, you
seem to carry on with the
playfulness of the weekend.
Your easygoing attitude
might help you, but it could
aggravate someone close.
Be as clear as you can be
about plans. Others will be
touchy. Tonight: Deal with
someone's ire.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20) Defer to others as
much as you want. Confu-
sion surrounds a partner's
feelings. This person might
not be as clear as he or she
should be, and you might
not be able to read between
the lines. In fact, you most
likely are seeing only what
you want to see.


Osberg and Sue Picus held the
North-South cards for the U.S.
After Picus opened with one dia-
mond, a highly competitive auction
ensued. East-West (Beate Nehineri
and Waltraud Vogt) located their 11-
card heart fit, but the Germans made
a critical minisjudgment when they
elected to double four spades and
then live diamonds, which proved
unbeatable.
Picus ruffed Vogt's opening hear
lead and had no trouble placing the
missing queens, given East's one-
notrump overcall. Picus led a dia-
mond to the ace at trick two and a
spade to the jack at trick three. The
A-K of spades were cashed, followed
by a fourth spade from dummy.
East had to ruff (if she refused tc
ruff either this spade or the next one.
declarer would discard two clubs and
finish with an overtrick). When EasI
ruffed, declarer overmiffed. cashed
i.. .i j ...... i .- crossed to the dia-
mond jack and discarded a club on
duimnmy's remaining spade to make
exactly five for a score of plus 750.
At the other table, the U.S. East-
West pair of Karen McCallum and
Kerri Sanborn pressed on to five
hearts, were doubled and wound up
making six +1,050 when te
defenders failed to cash their twc
spade tricks at the outset. The conm-
binued total of 1,800 points gave the
U.S. a pickup of 18 IMPs on the deal.


Tomorrow: Pressure point.
(,2013 Kn- Featu e, S'nd~cate Ic.


HOROSCOPES


HELP
FROM PAGE Al


arrested without incident
at a motel in Panama City.
"We will be backtracking
to those who helped car-
ry out this fraud and along
the way we will be looking
closely at anyone who may
have helped harbor these
fugitives," Bailey said.
Jenkins andWalker, both
34, were captured Satur-
day night at the Coconut
Grove Motor Inn in Pana-
ma City Beach, a touristy
area of putt-putt courses
and go-kart tracks. Hours
earlier, their families had
held a news conference in
Orlando 350 miles away
- urging them to surren-
der.
The men, who had fled
the Orlando area after
word of their ruse became
public, did not know law
enforcement was on the


REALLY
FROM PAGE Al

of the government and
pushed the nation toward
a default on its debt. The
political price has been
high ahead of 2014's mid-
term elections, especially
for Republicans.
"I think there was some
ground lost from the polit-
ical point of view," said for-
mer Florida Gov. Jeb Bush,
a potential 2016 presiden-
tial contender for the GOP
Democratic House
Leader Nancy Pelosi of
California reiterated the
public's reaction to the
partisan gamesmanship
that played out over more
than two weeks: "I join the
American people in their
disgust at what happened
in terms of the shutdown
of government."
But there's no real way
forward to dodge a repeat
and its chief architect, Re-
publican Sen. Ted of Cruz,



TRAIL
FROM PAGE Al

Road.
Hurst said Purcell's map
has proven to be very ac-
curate over the years, and
that his project was based
"almost totally" on Pur-
cell's route. But Hurst
charted a stretch of the
trail between Quincy and
Marianna that he believes
is older than the route Pur-
cell plotted. It serpentines
north of Purcell's path, and
Hurst said he found evi-
dence of a Spanish cause-
way and bridge on that
section of the trail.
"A lot of people assume
that it's further south than
I show on my map," Hurst
said.
Despite its historical sig-
nificance, little effort has
been made to maintain
the trail, which was first
used by the Spanish circa
1565 for purposes of com-
merce and military de-
fense. It also was heavily
used by Spanish mission-
aries to spread Christian-
ity to Native Americans,


way to Panama City. They
were waiting in the motel
for someone to arrive from
Atlanta to take them out
of state, Bailey said, add-
ing that authorities don't
yet know who that person
was or where the convicts
planned to go. The Flori-
da Department of Law En-
forcement is working with
Georgia authorities to an-
swer those questions, he
said.
"They had to have had
help a lot of help to
get to where they were last
night," Bailey said. He said
the men were unarmed
and didn't have much
money on them.
Bailey's department is
pursuing a tip that some-
one was offering to forge
documents for prisoners
for $8,000. He said there
are at least two other recent
cases where prisoners were
thwarted trying to use fake
documents to escape.


is urging one. Hundreds of
thousands of government
workers were sent home
amid the shutdown and na-
tional parks were barricad-
ed while politicians nego-
tiated. The whole situation
could be repeated com-
bined with economic con-
sequences early next
year, perhaps with more se-
vere consequences.
"The deal this week was
a lousy deal for the Ameri-
can people," Cruz said.
"We just went through
an awful period for our
country," said Sen. Lind-
sey Graham, R-S.C.
A standoff between Pres-
ident Barack Obama and a
group of Republicans over
spending for the budget
year beginning Oct. 1 and
defunding the nation's
health care overhaul led to
the shutdown. Lawmak-
ers also pushed the coun-
try to the edge of econom-
ic default by threatening
the Treasury Department's
authority to borrow.


according to Hurst. Pur-
cell mapped the trail dur-
ing the British coloniza-
tion of America, in which
England occupied Florida
and killed scores of Span-
iards and Native Ameri-
cans over several decades.
Blackwater River State
Forest is the only area of
Florida that has worked
to preserve the trail. That
section is known "The
Jackson Trail." Many other
sections of the trail, Hurst
said, have been lost for-
ever to farming and other
kinds of land cultivation.
"It's just been erased in a
lot of areas," he said.
Hurst hopes his research
will lead to increased pres-
ervation efforts on the Old
Spanish Trail. He has trav-
eled the famous Oregon
Trail, and said its signage,
marked points of interest,
and the historical context
provided to visitors by the
National Park Service offer a
blueprint that could be used
for the Old Spanish Trail.
Hurst also plans to pro-
vide his updated map of
the Old Spanish Trail to
Florida state parks.


2 of 5 wins free ticket
4 of 5 wins $145.50


3 of 5 wins $11
5 of 5 wins $127,038.62


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The Daily Commerial
www.dailycommercial.com


WIZARD
FROM PAGE Al

new Star Trek is the first
with LED lights. It will
mark his 10th pinball
machine to buy for his
home.
Some customers pre-
fer to invest in a new
playfield for around
$550, where Weimer
will take an existing
cabinet and install a
new game.
"You can keep an eye
on your kids, and for
older people like my-


self, it provides great
hand-and-eye coor-
dination. It just keeps
you going," he said.
Weimer also noted
pinball can be a mone-
tary investment.
"This game here, The
Family Guy, came out
maybe four or five years
ago, and that sold new
for $3,695. Right now
as a used machine it's
worth about $5,200,"
Weimer said. "Pinball
machines are better
than the stock market
right now. They go up
in value and I attribute


that to more people
getting into the hobby."
Whenever pinball re-
pairs or restoration
work is needed, Weimer
picks up pinball ma-
chines from business-
es or owners' homes
and does the work at
his shop.
I don't do house
calls because you can't
carry all the parts that
they need for them," he
said, recalling he began
collecting pinball ma-
chines in 1992 and was
spurred by encourage-
ment from his son.


Weimer retired from
construction when the
housing market was at
its peak.
"I got lucky," he said.
"I saw the verge of a
bubble bursting; I saw
it coming."
He now keeps busy
with doing restoration
and repairs for pinball
operators and private
owners.
"We'll do all new art-
work on the sides and
the front for the old-
er machines. We'll strip
the cabinet down to the
wood and put new art-


work and everything
on it. I make them look
new again, and we'll
even change out and
put brand new play-
fields," he said.
Customers find him
from all over the globe,
via the Internet and
for being a supplier of
needed parts to work
on Williams/Bally pin-
ball machines.
"As far as parts that
have sent to different
countries, I think the
only country I haven't
shipped to was China,"
he said. "Right have I


have packages going to
Brazil, and I've shipped
to Argentina, Austria,
Germany, Belgium."
Many new pinball
games Weimer can
supply are still in their
original boxes.
Weimer shows his
Dale Earnhardt Jr. pin-
ball machines from
back in the day when
the NASCAR driver was
known as No. 8.
"He's now No. 88
when he changed
teams and it sort of
killed this machine," he
said.


lFLORIDA

LOTTERY

SUNDAY
C A S H 3 ................................................ 7-9-9
Afternoon ........................................... 4-4-8
PLAY 4............................................. 5-8-9-5
Afternoon....................................... 1-0-6-6

SATURDAY
FANTASY 5........................... 2-17-26-27-32


BRIDGE


Famous Hand


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 21, 2013




Monday, October 21, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL




State&Region
NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN I scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com I 352-365-8208


www.dailycommercial.com


Area Briefs

LADY LAKE
Marine Corps League
issues birthday invitation
The North Lake Detachment
Marine Corps League invites
Marines who have served in the Gulf
War, Iraq, and /or Afghanistan to
be their guests at the 238th Marine
Corps birthday celebration on Nov.
10, with a social hour at 6 p.m. and
dinner at 7:15 p.m., at the American
Legion Hall, Rolling Acres Road and
County Road 466, in Lady Lake.
Tickets for the event should be
purchased on or before Nov. 4.
For information, call Commandant
Bill Bell at 352-589-0454.

MOUNT DORA
Chamber hosts 'Meet
the Candidates' forum
The Mount Dora Area Chamber of
Commerce will host a community
"meet the candidates" for the Mount
Dora mayoral race and city coun-
cil seats at 7 p.m., Wednesday in the
Mount Dora Community Building,
520 Baker St.
Candidates for mayor are Cathy
Hoechst, Andrew Mullen and Randy
Wiseman. Candidates for council
seats are District 1, Ryan Donovan, in-
cumbent versus Brian Payne; District
4, Dennis Wood, incumbent versus
Carla Pepperman; at-large, Michael
Tedder, incumbent, versus Jon Canas.
For information, call Rob English
at the Mount Dora Area Chamber of
Commerce at 352-383-2165 or email
president@MountDora.com.

TALLAHASSEE
Florida Lotto jackpot
rises to $20 million
The jackpot in the Florida Lotto
game has grown to $20 million after
no one matched the six winning
numbers in the latest drawing, lot-
tery officials said Sunday.
Twenty-seven tickets matched
five numbers to win $6,796.50 each;
1,648 tickets matched four numbers
for $78.50 each; and 33,840 tickets
matched three numbers for $5 each.
The winning Florida Lotto num-
bers selected Saturday were
02-03-15-39-44-49.

TAMPA
Two killed in ongoing fight
between 2 Fla. families
Tampa police have arrested a man
they say killed two neighbors during
an argument that ended in gunfire.
Police spokeswoman Laura
McElroy said multiple shots were
fired in Saturday night's dispute be-
tween suspect Juan Molina and his
neighbors.
Authorities said Molina con-
fronted EricaWhite and shot her,
then walked to the home of Percy
Badsen, fired a shot through the
door and killed Badsen. The suspect
tried to break into the house, but
authorities said Badsen's adult step-
son fired at Molina and hit him in
the face. Molina is being treated at
the hospital for his injuries. His con-
dition was not released.
He was charged with second-de-
gree murder and two counts of ag-
gravated assault.




... and we'll share it with our readers.
Some of our best story ideas and photos
come from our readers. So don't hesitate
to share your youth activities, awards,
accomplishments, festivals, charity
events and other things that make our
communities special. And don't overlook
those family milestones birthdays,
engagements, marriages, business
promotions and military news.


Just email your photos and news to...
pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com


Lake to dedicate time capsule


Staff report
The Lake County Library Sys-
tem will have a time capsule
dedication ceremony at 8 a.m.
Tuesday in the Lake CountyAd-
ministration Building, 315 W
Main St., Tavares.
The ceremony commemo-
rates the statewide celebration
of the 500-year anniversary of
Florida's discovery, Viva Flori-
da 500.
The time capsule contains in-
formation and objects repre-
sentative of current culture in
Lake County and information
about its history. The contents


are intended to be a snapshot
for future residents to review
the diverse and significant his-
tory of their community.
Items include memorabilia
from the county's award-win-
ning 2nd annual Wings and
Wildflowers Festival, outstand-
ing accomplishments of local
legends, a list of Lake County's
pioneer families, the 1887 state
resolution establishing Lake
County, a collection of mile-
stone events from cities and a
copy of the script for the 2013
State of the County presenta-
tion.
SEE TIME I A5


PHOTOS BY DAVE SIGLER / SPECIAL TO HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP
Ella Lias, 2, takes over the steering wheel of a 1987 FVL fire engine.


VINTAGE FIRE TRUCKS


BLAZE BY MOUNT DORA


MILLARD K. IVES
Staff Writer
millardives@dailycommercial.com
Bright, shiny red fire
engines roared down the
street with sirens blar-
ing on Saturday, remind-
ing many onlookers of the
firefighting equipment of
their childhood.
A crowd numbering in
the hundreds showed up
outside the Mount Dora
Historical Museum on
Saturday to catch a peek
of the vintage fire trucks
on display. The event
came courtesy of the Flor-
ida Antique Bucket Bri-
gade, a statewide group
of those who specialize
in firefighting apparatus,
tradition and history -
and who love to get to-
gether and talk about all
tings related to firefight-
ing, according to their
website.
They brought with
them several fire trucks
dating as far back as the
early 1900s.
Les Westlake, 53, of
Mount Dora, came with


This early model fire engine came equipped with antique lights. Here,


we see the more modern version.
his 1928 model American
LaFrance fire truck that
came complete with an-
tique soda and acid tanks
- which, back in the
day, provided water pres-
sure. The engine featured
wooden ladders strapped
to the side, but no sirens.
"Back then there were
not so many cars on the
road, so just the sound
of an engine coming was
enough to get people's at-
tention," said Westlake,
a former volunteer fire-
fighter.
The fire trucks and fire


apparatus were part of
fire-safety month as well
as to help celebrate the
90th anniversary of the
first fire station in Mount
Dora, which now houses
the museum.
Accompanied by his
Dalmatian, Oreo, 81-year-
old Bill Perdue, who was a
volunteer firefighter for
20 years, drove his 1938
fire truck to the event
from his home of Merritt
Island.
It included bucket seats,
SEE FIRE I A5


In honor of
Florida's 500th
anniversary,
time capsules
have been
handed out to
all county li-
braries.
SUBMITTED
PHOTO


Cops nab


alleged

molester
MILLARD K. IVES
Staff Writer
millardives@dailycommercial.com
An alleged child mo-
lester wanted in Lake
County was arrested
last week in northern
Ohio.
According to a U.S.
Marshals press release,
Robert Boggs, 33, had
been wanted by the
Lake County Sheriff's
Department on war-
rants charging him
with multiple counts of
sexual battery of a child
under 12 years of age,
lewd and lascivious
molestation of a child
under 12 years of age
and child abuse.
The suspect was ar-
rested without incident

SEE ARREST I A5


Students

honored by

school board
Staff report
More than two dozen
students of Lake Coun-
ty Schools were recent-
ly honored by the Lake
County School Board
for their accomplish-
ments in statewide
competitions for Ca-
reer and Technical Ed-
ucation (CTE) student
organizations.
"Career and Tech-
nical Education stu-
dent organizations
are an important
part of the curricu-
lum for both middle
and high school stu-
dents," said Dr. Maggie
Teachout, director of
SEE HONOR I A6


Special Olympian wins medals, hearts


ANA VECIANA-SUAREZ
Miami Herald
MIAMI At shortstop,
wearing a red jersey with a
black No. 3, Kevin Roundtree
is ready for the ball.
Florida's Special Olympics
athlete of the year stwomps
and stares down the batters
in blue until one finally hits
a grounder. He scoops it up,
pivots, and throws it hard to
first.
It is a scorching October
morning, the sun blowing
briskly from the southwest,


and Roundtree loves where
he's at outdoors and play-
ing for the TMH Stars from
Southridge High School. For
the 21-year-old special needs
student long known as Little
K, the best place to be is on
the softball diamond or the
soccer field.
Earlier this year, Roundtree
beat out 23,000 other Special
Olympians, including 3,000
from Miami-Dade alone, to
be named the organization's
athlete of the year. He was
SEE HEARTS I A4


AP FILE PHOTO
In this Sept. 26 photo, Kevin Roundtree, known as Special
K, the 2013 Special Olympics Athlete of the Year, serves
coffee a teacher at his school, Southridge High, in Miami.




Monday, October 21, 2013


ARREST
FROM PAGE A3

and transported to the
Geauga County jail
pending extradition
proceedings.
Sheriff's detectives
filed the charges on
Oct. 10 after a young
relative of the suspect
allegedly was taken to
a local hospital emer-
gency room. The sus-
pect immediately fled
his residence when
he found out that the
child was in the hos-
pital and the U.S. Mar-
shals Florida Regional
Fugitive Task Force was
called in to assist with
the investigation.
The press release
adds U.S. Marshal's in-
vestigators in Flori-
da conducted an "in-
tense" investigation
and they were able to
identify several friends
and relatives of the sus-


TIME
FROM PAGE A3

The time capsule will
be housed in a glass
case in the wall of the
rotunda in the Lake
County Administration
Building. The retriev-
al date is scheduled
for 2037, which will be
the commemoration of
Lake County's 150-year
anniversary. The time
capsule dedication cer-
emony coincides with


pect who lived in Geau-
ga County. On Wednes-
day, they requested the
assistance of the U.S.
Marshals in northern
Ohio and the task force
immediately respond-
ed to the Middlefield,
Ohio area in an attempt
to locate the suspect.
In the early evening,
a suspect matching
Boggs' description was
seen leaving the house
of one of his distant
relatives and officers
followed him to a Wal-
Mart in Middlefield.
When the suspect got
out of the vehicle offi-
cers were able to clear-
ly identify him and
moved in for the arrest.
More than 15 task
force members from
Lake County as well as
Geauga and Ashtabula
counties, along with the
Middlefield Police De-
partment and Geauga
County Sheriff's Office,
assisted with the arrest.

the opening of a histor-
ical exhibit, "The Story
of Lake County," also in
the rotunda of the Lake
County Administration
Building.
This inclusive display
will follow the time-
line of the county us-
ing items that best rep-
resent its remarkable
history, furnished by
the Lake County His-
torical Society. The
display will be avail-
able for viewing Oct. 22
through January 2014.


FIRE
FROM PAGE A3

lights, open cab and a
V-8 flathead engine, as
well as wooden ladders
strapped to the side.
"It can still go 65
mph," said Perdue,
who is also the father
of former NBA Chicago
Bulls great, Will Perdue.
Jim Briggs, of Win-
ter Gardens, placed
his 1965 Mack diesel
pumper on display. It
boasts a closed cab, but
wooden ladders, too.
He said he likes the at-
tention he gets from it.
"Every kid growing
up wants to be a fire-
fighter at one point and
a lot of it has to do with
seeing fire trucks" he
said.
The event was held
in an alley behind the
museum and also in-
cluded a 1964 red Ford
Galaxy fire car and a
Swan-Neck Village Fire
Engine, the latter a wa-
ter pump variety that
had to be manually
operated by teams on
each side who pushed


and lifted the handle
bars. Patrons had the
opportunity to give it a
try.
'After about five min-
utes, the teams had to
be switched, that's how
hard it was," said a mus-
cular John Debnam,
a fire truck enthusiast
who quit soon after giv-
ing the pump a try.
The museum houses
an antique leather and
metal helmet, along with
other fire apparatus.
Janet Westlake,
Mount Dora Historical
Society president, said
the fire station was built
in 1923 after a fire lev-
eled part of the town. As
the city of Mount Dora
grew, the station was
moved to a larger ven-
ue, allowing the build-
ing to be converted into
what is now the muse-
um.
Lined up in an alley
behind the museum,
the fire trucks which
sparked the event were
intended to help draw
attention to the busi-
ness.
"A lot of people don't
know we're back here,"
said Janet Westlake.


Al l 1=,1 3 1n
[ADVANCEDa


I Thankyoufor reading the local newspaper, the Daily Commercial.


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DAILY COMMERCIAL







Environmentalists,


workers looking for


common ground


KEVIN BEGOS
Associated Press
PITTSBURGH -
The nation's larg-
est labor unions are
ready and willing
to help fight global
warming, but are cau-
tioning environmen-
talists that workers
need new clean-en-
ergy jobs before ex-
isting industries are
shut down.
The four-day Pow-
er Shift conference in
Pittsburgh is training
young people to stop
coal mining, cracking
for oil and gas, and nu-
clear power, but orga-
nizers also want work-
ers to join the battle
against climate change.
"Global warming
is here, and we can
work and get it fixed
together," United
Steel Workers presi-
dent Leo Gerard said
in a Friday night ad-
dress at Power Shift.
But other labor
groups note that
while they share the
same long-term clean
energy goals with en-
vironmentalists, there
are challenges.
"It's not just as sim-
ple as 'No Fracking'"


or other bans, said Ta-
hir Duckett.
Duckett said work-
ers need new jobs to
make a transition to
clean energy, noting
that shutting down in-
dustries such as coal
"can turn entire com-
munities into a ghost
town. We cannot bury
our heads in the sand
and pretend like peo-
ple aren't fighting for
their very survival."
Richard Fowler, a
Power Shift modera-
tor, said that instead
of talking about a
"ban" on a particu-
lar industry, environ-
mentalists should talk
about solutions that
provide jobs.
"That's what is
missing," said Fowl-
er. "It's always a ban,
or a fix, or a cap, or
a trade" instead of
just straight-up cam-
paigns to build clean-
er energy sources like
wind and solar.
The overwhelm-
ing consensus among
top scientists from
around the world is
that they're about as
certain global warm-
ing is a real, man-
made threat.


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PLTIUM BLIN-M R ET


DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, October 21, 2013
+ -


Signs of rift between Israel, US


over possible compromise with Iran


JOSEF FEDERMAN
Associated Press
JERUSALEM Just
days after the first
round of global nucle-
ar talks with Iran, a rift
appears to be emerg-
ing between Israel and
its closest ally, the Unit-
ed States.
Israel's prime minis-
ter on Sunday called on
the U.S. to step up the
pressure on Iran, even
as American officials
hinted at the possibili-
ty of easing tough eco-
nomic pressure. Mean-
while, a leading Israeli
daily reported the out-
lines of what could
be construed in the
West as genuine Irani-
an compromises in the
talks.
The differing ap-
proaches could bode
poorly for Israel as the
talks between six glob-
al powers and Iran gain
steam in the coming
months. Negotiators
were upbeat following
last week's talks, and
the next round of nego-
tiations is set to begin
Nov. 7.
Convinced Iran
is pursuing nuclear
weapons, Prime Min-
ister Benjamin Netan-
yahu believes the Ira-
nians are trying to trick
the West into easing
economic sanctions
while still pushing for-
ward with their nuclear
program. Iran insists its
program is for peaceful
purposes.
"I think that in this



HONOR
FROM PAGE A3

the Career-Technical,
Adult and Communi-
ty Education Depart-
ment.
Recognized were:
Casey Duffy 1st in
state for Citrus Evalua-
tion, Future Farmers of
America; Emily Fuhrer
- 1st in state for Cit-
rus Evaluation (FFA);
Aimee Lewis 1st in
state for Citrus Eval-
uation (FFA); Kaitlyn
Tribble 1st in state


ARIEL SCHALIT/AP
Israel's President Shimon Peres, right, listens to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speak on
Monday during the opening session of the Knesset, Israel's parliament, in Jerusalem. A day be-
fore world powers were to renew talks with Iran over its suspected nuclear program, Israel's prime
minister urged the international community to keep up stiff pressure on the Islamic Republic until
it quits enriching uranium that can be used to produce atomic weapons.


situation as long as we
do not see actions in-
stead of words, the in-
ternational pressure
must continue to be
applied and even in-
creased," Netanyahu
told his Cabinet. "The
greater the pressure,
the greater the chance
that there will be a gen-
uine dismantling of the
Iranian military nucle-
ar program."
Israel considers a
nuclear-armed Iran a
threat to its very sur-
vival, citing Iranian ref-
erences to Israel's de-
struction.
Netanyahu says pres-
sure must be main-
tained until Iran halts


for Citrus Evaluation
(FFA); Emily Brown -
3rd in state for Land
Evaluation (FFA); Mea-
gan Dickson 3rd in
state for Land Evalu-
ation (FFA); Kyle Gar-
ner 3rd in state for
Land Evaluation (FFA);
Katelyn Hernandez -
3rd in state for Land
Evaluation (FFA); 3rd
in state for Ornamen-
tal Horticulture (FFA);
Hannah Kruse 3rd
in state for Ornamen-
tal Horticulture (FFA);
Breann Ellis 1st in
state for Horse Evalu-
ation (FFA); Morghan
Neuhofer 1st in state
for Horse Evaluation
(FFA); Jillian Phillips-
1st in state for Horse
Evaluation (FFA); and
Katie Strickland 1st
in state for Horse Eval-
uation, 2nd in state
for Aquaculture; 3rd in
state for Floriculture
(FFA);
Also: Kailee Fergu-


all enrichment of ura-
nium, a key step in
producing a nucle-
ar weapon; removes
its stockpile of en-
riched uranium from
the country; closes sus-
picious enrichment fa-
cilities and shutters a
facility that could pro-
duce plutonium, an-
other potential gate-
way to nuclear arms.
Despite Netanya-
hu's warnings, there are
growing signs that any
international deal with
Iran will fall short of his
demands.
Over the weekend,
U.S. officials said the
White House was de-
bating whether to of-


son 2nd in state for
Aquaculture (FFA); Eric
Ryan Jensen 2nd in
state for Aquaculture
(FFA); Austin Larson -
2nd in state for Aqua-
culture; 3rd in state
for Tool Identification
(FFA); Tony Clark Jr. -
3rd in state for Food
Science (FFA); Jacob
Mayuski 3rd in state
for Food Science (FFA);
Kyle Newsome 3rd in
state for Food Science
(FFA); Emily Stewart
- 3rd in state for Food
Science (FFA); James
Hunter Patterson -
3rd in state for Tool
Identification (FFA);
Benjamin Scott 3rd
in state for Tool Iden-
tification (FFA); Moi-
ses Villanueva 3rd
in state for Tool Iden-
tification (FFA); Jillian
Phillips 3rd in state
for Floriculture (FFA);
Heather Robinson -
3rd in state for Flori-
culture (FFA); Gillian


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fer Iran the chance to
recoup billions of dol-
lars in frozen assets if
it scales back its nucle-
ar program. The plan
would stop short of
lifting sanctions, but
could nonetheless pro-
vide Iran some relief.
In an interview
broadcast Sunday on
NBC, U.S. Treasury Sec-
retary Jack Lew said it
was "premature" to talk
of easing sanctions. But
he stopped short of en-
dorsing the tough Is-
raeli line and suggest-
ed the U.S. would take
a more incremental ap-
proach in response to
concrete Iranian ges-
tures.


Strealy 3rd in state
for Floriculture (FFA);
Jeremy Odom State
Champion in state
for Diversified Horti-
culture (FFA); Gillian
Strealy Top three fi-
nalist in state for Di-
versified Horticulture
(FFA); Paige Randazzo
- 3rd in state for Res-
taurant Service (Skill-
sUSA).
Lake County Schools
features robust CTE
programs at all of
its high and middle
schools. The curricu-
lum consists of 31 ca-
reer preparatory high
school programs and
five middle school pro-
grams. Lake Coun-
ty's 10 middle schools
and eight high schools
house more than 100
state-of-the-art CTE
laboratories.
Programs of study are
varied and technically
challenging, and include
Plant Biotechnology, En-
gineering, Gaming and
Simulation, Automation
and Production (Robot-
ics), Culinary Arts, Al-
lied Health, Television
Production and Archi-
tectural Drafting (these
are only eight of the 31
high school programs
offered).
Fifty-four high school
programs and three
middle school busi-
ness education pro-
grams are Career and
Professional Acade-
mies. These Acade-
mies provide students
the opportunity to
earn industry certifica-
tions, including Certi-
fied Nursing Assistant
(CNA), Microsoft Of-
fice Specialist (MOS)
Bundle Certification,
Internet Business As-
sociate (CIW) Automo-
tive Service Excellence
(ASE) and Certified
Solidworks Associate
(CSWA).


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 21, 2013






YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD
BILL KOCH............... ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR
SCOTT CALLAHAN .......................NEWS EDITOR Vi
GENE PACKWOOD ............ EDITORIAL CARTOONIST w dIm c o
< ^^ ^r r ^^www.dailycommercial.com


VOICE


Homeland


Security a good


fit for Johnson

When the Department of
Homeland Security was hast-
ily thrown together after the
9/11 attacks, it seemed to fit
that classic description of bad design:
that a camel was a horse designed by a
committee
In short order, 22 separate depart-
ments and agencies from the Secret
Service to the Coast Guard, with re-
sponsibilities ranging from naturaliza-
tion to cyber security-were crammed
into a single bureaucratic colossus.
With 240,000 employees, Homeland
Security is the government's third-larg-
est department after Defense andVet-
erans Affairs. Surprisingly, given the
high turnover in top Washington jobs,
it has had only three secretaries.
Assuming the Senate agrees, the
next head of DHS will be Jeh Johnson,
56, who brings an impressive legal re-
sume in military and national securi-
ty issues. Unlike Janet Napolitano and
the department's first secretary, former
Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Ridge, he has
no background in electoral politics.
Up until he left government in 2012,
Johnson was the Pentagon's top lawyer.
In the Clinton administration, he was
general counsel of the Air Force. Under
President Barack Obama, he has wres-
tled with setting policy for the use of le-
thal drones. He's also been involved with:
the intervention in Libya; repealing the
ban on gays serving openly in the mili-
tary; and the so-far-unsuccessful attempt
to close the Guantanamo Bay prison.
Johnson would take over as the
number of fanatical anti-U.S. terror-
ist groups has metastasized across the
Mideast and North Africa. As the say-
ing goes, terrorists can fail a thousand
times, but the U.S. has to let its guard
down only once for another major
strike to happen.
Johnson would be immeasurably
helped in that safeguarding task if the
White House and Congress would fill
the one-third of key DHS agencies
whose top jobs are either vacant or
held by acting officials.
DHS founder Ridge has urged John-
son not to try to micromanage the
huge agency but to concentrate on a
handful of high-priority national se-
curity issues. The biggest, of course,
is keeping the United States safe from
terrorists advice we endorse.
Provided by Scripps Howard News Service

The Daily Commercial

The newspaper of choice for Lake
and Sumter counties since 1875

EDITORIALS
Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board,
not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are
not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday,
Saturday and Sunday.
COLUMNS
Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and
picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reflect
the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a
diversity of views.
If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state
or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom-
mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL
34749-0007.
Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length.
The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published
with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.


4
44
~4


OTHERVOICES


Washington could learn from


Germany and from Angela Merkel


he maneuvering by Ger-
many's chancellor, Ange-
la Merkel, and other senior
politicians to form a viable new
government is important for Eu-
rope and beyond. Unfortunate-
ly, the alarming partisan bud-
get standoff in Washington has
been preoccupying most related
media attention.
President Barack Obama's ob-
stinate refusal to negotiate with
House Speaker John Boehner, a
Republican, brought the Unit-
ed States to the brink of financial
default. That was averted ear-
ly Thursday, but disturbing im-
ages of extreme partisan rigidi-
ty linger.
In Germany's national elec-
tions Sept. 22, the ruling con-
servative Christian Democratic
Union and partner Christian So-
cial Union won the most seats
in the lower house of parliament
but fell five short of a clear ma-
jority. Their coalition partner,
Free Democrats which advo-
cates for liberal free markets -
lost all seats.
While several weeks have
passed with no new coali-
tion, there is no sense of immi-
nent crisis but rather an order-
ly search for compromise. On
Thursday, Merkel's parties and
the left Social Democrats an-
nounced an agreement to begin
formal negotiations to create a
coalition government.
The other major political par-
ty, the Social Democrats, ad-
vocates a nationwide mini-
mum wage as one price of a new
"grand coalition" government.
Higher taxes on the wealthy are


Arthur I.
Cyr

SCRIPPS HOWARD
NEWS SERVICE


another contentious issue.
Andrea Nahles, the Social
Democrats' general secretary, is
adamant in defending policy po-
sitions but also willing to talk.
German politicians well under-
stand that stressful and unpleas-
ant negotiations are unavoid-
able if democratic politics is to
function.
Talks are scheduled to begin
Wednesday, the day before Merkel
departs for a European Union
summit. Since the severe financial
crash and lingering recession of
recent years, a series of European
summits have featured German
representatives' demands that
Greece and other members hold
to agreed austerity measures. Ger-
many's status as by far the larg-
est and strongest manufacturing
economy on the continent pro-
vides powerful leverage.
Germany has largely succeed-
ed in securing greater finan-
cial discipline within the EU,
especially on heavily indebt-
ed nations of southern Europe.
Merkel is adept at limiting do-
mestic nationalist political pres-
sures to abandon the leadership
role, which includes under-
writing the solvency of nations
many Germans view as profli-
gate. The successful balancing
act reflects her skill in persuad-


ing constituents that Germany
cannot reasonably avoid coop-
erative engagement with the rest
of Europe.
In Greece, fierce public resis-
tance to austerity led to growing
support for the far-right Gold-
en Dawn party, widely viewed as
neo-Nazi. In 2012 elections, the
party received enough votes to
enter parliament, but has since
become mired in controversy
over alleged criminal behavior.
Despite these tensions and oth-
ers, the EU has remained intact
and a eurozone financial melt-
down averted.
Financial services remain a
realm where the United States,
and also the United Kingdom,
are more globally important than
Germany. Predictions years ago
that Frankfurt would supplant
London, and perhaps eventually
NewYork, have not been realized
or even approximated.
However, given the present in-
terconnectedness of the glob-
al financial system, the finan-
cial failures of Greece and other
debt-burdened EU member na-
tions could result in another re-
cession, perhaps even a world
crisis. This reinforces Germany's
role, especially but not exclu-
sively in Europe.
Germany's politicians like-
ly will establish a national gov-
erning coalition soon. Merkel's
disciplined, low-key and sen-
sible style is especially popular
with today's Germans. Washing-
ton politicians should learn from
this example.


Email acyr@carthage.edu.


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR


YOUR POINT OFVIEW


Food banks need
fair share system
I agree entirely with
what Reed Markham
wrote in a recent let-
ter regarding the


shortage of sup-
plies in our area food
banks.
However, there
should be some
cross-communication
among them to help


prevent fraud.
I know of several in-
dividuals who make
a day's excursion
traveling to five area
banks. Two have re-
frigerators overflow-


ing, while others find
their shelves bare.
Isn't there some way
to cross reference, so
everyone gets his/her
fair share?
Amy M. McEwen | Leesburg


HAVE YOUR SAY
The Daily Commercial invites you
to write letters to the editor. Letters
should be no longer than 350 words.
They must be original, signed with the
full name of the writer, and include
the writer's address and telephone
number for verification. We reserve
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By fax to: 325-365-1951


DOONESBURY


Editor's note: Garry Trudeau is on hiatus. This is a collection of some of his favorite strips.


r-


Monday, October 21, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


X. J-,b)


J-ML
lq


-4





DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, October 21, 2013


TODAY




Clouds and sun with a
couple of showers

HIGH LOW
870 690


Pensacola .-'- i i :"
on T1.7


TUESDAY




Partly sunny, a shower
around, mainly later

HIGH LOW
87 700


WEDNESDAY




Clouds and sun with a
shower or thunderstorm

HIGH LOW
820 570


Tallahasse
82/63


Lak
84/1


THURSDAY




Pleasant with sunshine
and patchy clouds

HIGH LOW
760 570
=,= .


e City
67 &t


Panama City- iiii= ....= ;
78/65 _" ....... .:mp,: .....

"786 ,' I Gainesville
i -\ `85166K
F-or up to the minute and detailed "A" ". O Q85/66
weather information, go to: 1 Astor Ocala
1AccuWeathercom
T Villages Altoona
Oxford7 87/0.1 -
I 88/71 Umatilla T ampa
Ilk874714811M ,"7M 4L87f72
Wildwood Frumitland Park Eustis '
88/68 4 '7/71 0O87/70 Sorrento 'St. Peters
te ?l 1 it *a^~fOjIII T
441lem fIn Iug aaes 0.8.7/70 187M7
Lake Panaso ea.a 8 ee69sg Tavares li|rf n:" 8'1
88/69 iSmtervi769 87a/70 NO 1 : Sarasota .
88169 87/70
/ Smten r. i/

ushnella. CnteraHill P'7 ,'
9 *48l6
4 M erde Ft. Uyer
bster A 8
land Clermon Shown is 89/72

869 88/711 today's weather.
Temperatures are Nap
8W72
today's highs and
Tonight's lows.


Kev i


Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 02013


FRIDAY




Sunshine and patchy
clouds

HIGH LOW
77 58


S Jacksonville

ib

SDaytona Beach
85/69

,--(. ;,Titusville

burf^ 5/7
I o1 !'
_JOrtendo .
a 8/70 '.
S Vero Beach
** ,,* ,. 87/71
burg 871 71

Okeechobee
87/69 '.

Palm Beal:
86/74
S Fort Laudaile
aes' 87/75 HI'
2 '.... ii~ii
S . .. I!iami
4 875


Key Largo
West '* 86/77


8/79g L :--


6 O O' O: "
Shown amre noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are today's highs for the
day. Forecast highow temperatures are given for selected cities.
.. ..-


Cold Front
Warm Front
Stationary
Front


106 ^ -Showersa
U Hi=ron .-.--- W... T-tormi
RaInM
-lO. W" .5 U M~ano Rurries[7i
1U' Snow
,.,,' .,:*'. IceES
Yesterday's National High/Low: (for the 48 contiguous states)
High 89 in Opa Locka, FL Low 150 in Sunset Crater, AZ


5
[01235678
0.2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8.10
Very High, 11+ Extreme
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index=
number, the greater the need for
eye and skin protection.


The solunar period schedule allows planning
days so you will be fishing in good territory or
hunting in good cover during those times. Major
periods begin at the times shown and last for
1.5 to 2 hours. The minor periods are shorter.
Major Minor Major Minor
Today 1:42 a.m. 7:55 a.m. 2:07 p.m. 8:20 p.m.
Tue. 2:37 a.m. 8:49 a.m. 3:02 p.m. 9:14 p.m.


I TE UNAND MON


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


Today
7:32 a.m.
6:51 p.m.
8:54 p.m.
9:55 a.m.


Tuesday
7:33 a.m.
6:51 p.m.
9:41 p.m.
10:47 a.m.


Last New RFirst


Oct26 Nov3 Nv9
Oct 26 Nov 3 Nov 9


Full


Nov 17


ITIEI


Homosassa
Day High Feet
Today 6:12 am......1.4
7:31 pm......1.2
Daytona Beach
Day High Feet
Today 10:13am.....4.8
10:33 pm..... 4.2


Low Feet
2:06 am .....0.3
2:45 pm.....0.0

Low Feet
3:51 am .....0.3
4:28 pm .....0.6


High Feet
6:43 am......1.4
8:10 pm......1.1

High Feat
10:54 am .....4.7
11:14pm.....4.0


Low Feet
2:38 am .....0.3
3:21 pm.....0.0

Low Feet
4:31 am .....0.5
5:09 pm.....0.9


INATONAITE


Today Tuesday
City Hi LoW Hi LoW
San Francisco 70 48 pc 71 50 pc
San Juan, PR 88 79 t 90 79 t
Santa Fe 56 33 s 63 30 s
St. Ste. Marie 49 32 sh 45 28 r
Seattle 56 44 c 58 45 pc
Shreveport 76 52 pc 74 50 pc
Spokane 60 39 s 63 38 s
Syracuse 66 46 pc 53 35 r
Topeka 58 39 pc 59 30 pc
Tucson 84 54 s 64 57 s
Tulsa 55 39 c 72 39 s
Washington, DC 68 50 s 68 49 pc
Wilmington, DE 65 50 s 66 41 pc
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.


8:00 to 8:00

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I FIE-A FOEASTFR ESBR


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte, NC


Today
Hi LoW
63 45 s
60 38 s
45 36 sh
66 45 pc
72 55 pc
66 51 s
66 46 s
61 40s
75 53 pc
41 27 c
63 43s
65 50 s
64 42 c
61 46 pc
76 61 pc
70 43 s
71 51 pc


Tuesday
Hi LoW
5832r
65 40s
43 32c
66 43 pc
70 49 c
70 45 pc
66 45 pc
60 38s
72 45 pc
40 28 sn
66 39s
67 41 pc
51 39 sh
55 35r
78 58 sh
58 42 pc
73 48 pc


City
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Concord, NH
Dallas
Dayton
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
El Paso
Fargo
Fairbanks
Flagstaff
Grand Rapids


Today
Hi LoW
51 36 pc
47 34 pc
64 36s
62 40 pc
76 55 pc
64 40s
71 46 pc
62 34 pc
59 36 pc
49 35 pc
57 34 c
31 26 sn
71 46 s
38 24 c
40 23 pc
60 26 s
52 34 sh


Tuesday
Hi LoW
58 34 s
43 32 r
57 36 pc
52 37 c
78 52 c
61 31 pc
74 52 s
53 36 pc
63 39 s
41 27 r
49 34 c
37 27 pc
70 48 s
38 25 c
35 24 pc
62 28 s
47 34 r


City
Great Falls
Greensboro, NC
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City


Today
Hi LoW
62 39 s
68 50 pc
64 46 s
85 69 s
80 60 sh
57 34 pc
76 51 pc
55 40 pc
80 58 s
71 45s
67 41 s
72 49 s
44 33 pc
38 28 c
72 45 s
76 62r
66 53 s


Tuesday
Hi Lo W
63 35s
72 47 pc
62 35 sh
85 70 pc
77 55 pc
55 33 pc
74 48 pc
55 30 pc
77 56s
71 45s
61 38 pc
68 42 pc
43 32 pc
42 29 c
64 40 pc
80 60 sh
67 49 pc


City
Norfolk, VA
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego


Today
Hi Lo W
68 55 s
55 39 c
52 36 pc
66 51 s
87 61 s
66 41 pc
60 46 s
65 45 pc
65 48s
71 51 pc
71 37 s
70 50 s
80 46 s
57 39 c
61 38 s
81 58 c
70 58 pc


Tuesday
Hi LoW
72 55 c
73 43 s
45 29 c
67 44 pc
88 63 s
51 36 c
61 35 sh
67 47 pc
66 37 pc
75 48 c
70 41 s
73 50 c
80 47 s
59 33 pc
63 37 s
77 53 s
74 60 pc


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 21, 2013


[

n








Sports
sports@dailycommercial.com


MLB: Red Sox reach Series / B4


Bl
DAILY COMMERCIAL
Monday, October 21, 2013


\\-\\-\\-.(:ilyCOnlnlercial.conm
SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY
1 352-365-8208


Alabama, Florida State top first BCS rankings


RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press
Alabama and Flori-
da State hold the top
two spots in the first
BCS standings of the
season. Oregon was
a close third behind
second-place Florida
State.
The Seminoles (.9348
BCS average) are com-
ing off their biggest
win of the season, a 51-
14 victory at previously
unbeaten Clemson.


The Ducks (.9320)
have only played one
team that was ranked
at the time, but could
get a boost in the next
two weeks with games
against UCLA and at
Stanford.
Ohio State is a more
distant fourth, fol-
lowed by Missouri in
the standings released
Sunday night.
The top two teams in
the final standings af-
ter the end of the reg-
ular season play in the


Rose Bowl for the na-
tional title in January.
Alabama is a com-
fortable No. 1 on the
strength of being top-
ranked by a wide mar-
gin in both the USA To-
day coaches' poll and
Harris poll. The two-
time defending cham-
pion Crimson Tide is
second in the comput-
er ratings.
If the Tide can stay
unbeaten, it should
reach the BCS cham-
pionship game for the


third straight year and
for the fourth time in
five seasons.
The polls count for
two-thirds of a BCS
grade.
Florida State is No.
1 in the computer rat-
ings and third in each
poll. Oregon is second
in the polls and fourth
in the computers.
The race between
the Ducks and Florida
State is shaping up to
be a close one if both
keep winning. The


Seminoles still must
play unbeaten Miami,
rival Florida and po-
tentially in the ACC
championship game,
which could be a re-
match with Miami or
maybe a game against
Virginia Tech (6-1).
In addition to Ore-
gon's next two tough
games, the Ducks play
Oregon State and po-
tentially the Pac-12 ti-
tle game against per-
haps UCLA or Arizona
State.


Team BCS points
1) Alabama .984
2) Florida State .935
3) Oregon .932
4) Ohio State .855
5) Missouri .822
6) Stanford .741
7) Miami .720
8) Baylor .712
9) Clemson .625
10) Texas Tech .622
Also
23) UCF .139
Note: The top two teams will play
for the BCS National Championship
on Jan. 6 at the Rose Bowl in Pasa-
dena, Calif.


Ryan throws


3 TD passes,


Falcons beat


Tampa Bay

CHARLES ODUM
Associated Press
ATLANTA- Harry Douglas made the most
of his long-awaited opportunity to be more
than a complement to star receivers Julio
Jones and RoddyWhite in Atlanta's offense.
Douglas had seven receptions for a career-
best 149 yards, including a 37-yard touch-
down catch, to lead the Falcons to a 31-20
win over the Tampa Bay Buccaneers on Sun-
day.
Matt Ryan also threw two touchdown
passes to Jacquizz Rodgers as the Falcons (2-
4) snapped a three-game losing streak.
Douglas flourished as Ryan's No. 1 target
with Jones out for the season with a foot in-
jury and White inactive for the first time in
his nine-year career due to hamstring and
ankle injuries.
"I'm the type of person that I never shy
SEE BUCS I B2


DAVID GOLDMAN /AP
Tampa Bay head coach Greg Schiano reacts during Sun-
day's game against Atlanta, a 31-21 loss by the Bucca-
neers, who remain winless this season.


WILFREDO LEE/AP
Miami quarterback Ryan Tannehill attempts to throw Hail Mary pass into the end zone as he is being tackled by Buffalo defen-
sive end Mario Williams on the final play of Sunday's game, in Miami Gardens. The pass was incomplete and the Bills defeated the
Dolphins 23-21.


Williams' key sack helps



Bills knock off Dolphins


STEVEN WINE
Associated Press
MIAMI GARDENS When
the Buffalo Bills needed the ball
back, Mario Williams knocked it
loose.
Williams forced a fumble by
sacking Ryan Tannehill with less
than three minutes left, setting
up the winning field goal to help
Buffalo beat the Miami Dolphins
23-21 Sunday.
Kicker Dan Carpenter, released
in August after five seasons with
the Dolphins, beat his former
team by making a 31 -yarder with


33 seconds to go.
Rookie Nickell Robey returned
an interception 19 yards for a
touchdown on the third play of
the game to help the Bills build
a 14-0 lead. But they had to rally
after Brandon Gibson caught his
second touchdown pass to put
Miami ahead in the third quarter.
The injury-plagued Bills (3-
3) ended a streak of six consec-
utive road losses, including two
this year, while Miami (3-3) lost
its third game in a row. A month
ago, the Dolphins were bask-
ing in their best start since 2002.


They haven't won since.
The Bills won with Thad Lew-
is at quarterback in his sec-
ond consecutive start since be-
ing promoted from the practice
squad to replace injured EJ Man-
uel. Lewis was sacked four times
and threw an interception, but
helped the Bills convert 9 of 19
third downs.
The 99th meeting between
the AFC East rivals had one of
the wilder endings in the se-
ries. With Miami nursing a 21-
20 lead, Tannehill tried to throw
SEE BILLS I B2


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U U




DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 21, 2013


SCOREBOARD


AUTO RACING
NASCAR
Sprint Cup
Camping World RV Sales 500
Sunday
At Talladega Superspeedway
Talladega, Ala.
Lap length: 2.66 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (9) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 188 laps, 115.2
rating, 47 points, $236,345.
2. (8) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 188,119.3,
43, $180,210.
3. (21) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 188,105.5,42,
$187,596.
4. (34) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 188, 98.9,40,
$154,726.
5. (27) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 188, 79,40, $162,068.
6. (7) David Ragan, Ford, 188, 74,39, $133,618.
7. (24) David Gilliland, Ford, 188, 68.9,37,
$122,293.
8. (4) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 188, 91.1,36,
$128,235.
9. (17) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 188, 64.5,35,
$128,493.
10. (20) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 188, 85.7,35,
$132,793.
11. (6) Greg Biffle, Ford, 188, 90.9,34, $106,710.
12. (33) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 188, 65.6,32,
$134,071.
13. (11) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 188,119.2,
33, $140,346.
14. (19) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 188, 70.5,31,
$131,671.
15. (36) Michael McDowell, Ford, 188, 70.4, 29,
$90,310.
16. (18) Joey Logano, Ford, 188, 97.2, 29,
$115,343.
17. (5) Carl Edwards, Ford, 188, 82.6, 28,
$121,660.
18. (30) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 188, 98.1, 27,
$113,030.
19. (38) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 188, 66.2, 25,
$108,468.
20. (12) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 188, 94.4, 25,
$122,076.
21. (2) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 188, 85.5,24,
$98,460.
22. (1) Aric Almirola, Ford, 188, 81.7, 23,
$122,046.
23. (26) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 188, 73.2, 0, $84,735.
24. (35) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 188, 69.1, 0,
$104,018.
25. (39) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 188,54.2,20,
$94,057.
26. (16) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, accident, 187,
81.5,0, $127,535.
27. (10) Casey Mears, Ford, accident, 187, 63,
18, $96,510.
28. (37) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 187,43.3,16,
$83,360.
29. (13) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 187, 72.3,15,
$133,651.
30. (14) Josh Wise, Ford, 187,37.6,0, $84,035.
31. (31) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 187,47.6,0, $79,880.
32. (22) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 187,41.9,12,
$87,660.
33. (23) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 187, 64.6,11,
$79,510.
34. (29) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 187,42.5,11,
$87,310.
35. (40) Terry Labonte, Ford, 187,34.1,10,
$79,135.
36. (28) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 186,32.5,9,
$96,980.
37. (43) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 183,44,0,
$78,846.
38. (15) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, engine, 142, 66.3,
6, $93,625.
39. (3) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 134, 71,5,
$97,039.
40. (25) David Reutimann, Toyota, engine, 119,
46.3,4, $65,825.
41. (32) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, accident,
78,40.6,3, $89,039.
42. (42) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, engine, 60, 25,
0, $57,825.
43. (41) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, engine, 2,25.3,
0, $54,325.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 178.795 mph.


BILLS
FROM PAGE B1

from midfield but fum-
bled when sacked by
Williams. Kyle Williams
recovered at the Mi-
ami 34, and Carpenter
kicked the winner sev-
en plays later.
Marcus Thigpen
nearly broke the ensu-
ing kickoff for a touch-
down, but was tripped
up by Carpenter af-
ter a 44-yard return
to the Miami 46. Tan-
nehill then threw four
consecutive incomple-
tions, his final desper-
ate heave landing in
the end zone among
a cluster of players as
time ran out.
Along with his fum-
ble and interception
returned for a touch-
down, Tannehill threw
another intercep-


BUCS
FROM PAGE B1


away from it," Douglas
said. "Julio went down.
Roddy wasn't playing. I
wanted the challenge.
I've always been like
that my whole life."
Ryan completed 20 of
26 passes for 273 yards
with three touchdowns
and no interceptions.
Ryan said he expected
a big game from Doug-
las, a fifth-year receiver
who has never reached
500 yards receiving or
had more than one
touchdown catch in a
season.
"I don't think any-
one in our locker room
was surprised by his
play," Ryan said. "It's
what he's capable of do-
ing. You may not know
that about him because
we've had those other
guys."
Atlanta managed only
18 yards rushing as run-


Time of Race: 2 hours, 47 minutes, 49 seconds.
Margin of Victory: Under Caution.
Caution RFlags: 3 for 10 laps.
Lead Changes: 52 among 20 drivers.
Lap Leaders: A.Almirola 1; J.Burton 2; A.Almirola
3-7; J.Burton 8-10; M.Kenseth 11-14; G.Biffle 15-
18; J.Logano 19-24; G.Biffle 25; M.Kenseth 26-
41; J.Logano 42; B. Labonte 4344; J.Gordon 45;
T.Labonte 46; K.Kahne 47; D.Earnhardt Jr. 48-49;
J.Johnson 50-54; D.Earnhardt Jr. 55-57; M.Kenseth
58-68; J.Johnson 69-77; D.Earnhardt Jr. 78-80;
Ku.Busch 81-82; J.Johnson 83-84; M.Kenseth
85; J.Johnson 86-93; C.Bowyer 94; J.Johnson 95-
97; C.Bowyer 98; J.Johnson 99-101; D.Earnhardt
Jr. 102-103; J.Johnson 104; D.Earnhardt Jr.
105; J.Johnson 106-110; R.Stenhouse Jr. 111-
113; J.Johnson 114-120; R.Stenhouse Jr. 121;
J.McMurray 122; C.Mears 123; J.Gordon 124-
125; A.Almirola 126-127; D.Earnhardt Jr. 128-131;
J.Johnson 132-135; D.Earnhardt Jr. 136-146;
Ky.Busch 147; R.Stenhouse Jr. 148; D.Earnhardt
Jr. 149-160; R.Stenhouse Jr. 161; Ku.Busch 162;
D.Ragan 163; D.Blaney 164; Ky.Busch 165-170;
C.Edwards 171; Ky.Busch 172-173; J.McMurray
174-188.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led):
J.Johnson, 10 times for 47 laps; D.Earnhardt Jr., 8
tmes for 38 laps; M.Kenseth, 4 tmes for 32 laps;
J.McMurray, 2 times for 16 laps; Ky.Busch, 3 tmes
for 9 laps; A.Almirola, 3 times for 8 laps; J.Logano,
2 times for 7 laps; R.Stenhouse Jr., 4 times for 6
laps; G.Biffle, 2 times for 5 laps; J.Burton, 2 times
for 4 laps; J.Gordon, 2 times for 3 laps; Ku.Busch,
2 times for 3 laps; C.Bowyer, 2 times for 2 laps;
B.Labonte, 1 time for 2 laps; D.Ragan, 1 time for 1
lap; C.Edwards, 1 time for 1 lap; D.Blaney, 1 time
for 1 lap; C.Mears, 1 time for 1 lap; T.Labonte, 1
time for 1 lap; K.Kahne, 1 time for 1 lap.
Top 12 in Points: 1. J.Johnson, 2,254; 2.
M.Kenseth, 2,250; 3. Ky.Busch, 2,228; 4.
K.Harvick, 2,228; 5. J.Gordon, 2,220; 6.
D.Earnhardt Jr., 2,202; 7. G.Biffle, 2,201; 8.
C.Bowyer, 2,197; 9. Ku.Busch, 2,193; 10.
C.Edwards, 2,186; 11. R.Newman, 2,182; 12.
J.Logano, 2,179.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
The AP Top 25
The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college
football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses,
records through Saturday, total points based on 25
points for a first-place vote through one point for a
25th-place vote, and previous ranking:
Record Pts Pv
1. Alabama (55) 7-0 1,495 1
2. Oregon (3) 7-0 1,427 2
3. Florida St. (2) 6-0 1,395 5
4. Ohio St. 7-0 1,309 4
5. Missouri 7-0 1,197 14
6. Baylor 6-0 1,189 12
7. Miami 6-0 1,130 10
8. Stanford 6-1 1,118 13
9. Clemson 6-1 927 3
10. Texas Tech 7-0 904 16
11. Auburn 6-1 867 24
12. UCLA 5-1 832 9
13. LSU 6-2 739 6
14. Texas A&M 5-2 683 7
15. Fresno St. 6-0 550 17
16. Virginia Tech 6-1 509 19
17. Oklahoma 6-1 501 18
18. Louisville 6-1 428 8
19. Oklahoma St. 5-1 382 21
20. South Carolina 5-2 381 11
21. UCF 5-1 345 NR
22. Wisconsin 5-2 258 25
23. N. Illinois 7-0 220 23
24. Michigan 6-1 169 NR
25. Nebraska 5-1 117 NR
Others receiving votes: Arizona St. 108, Notre
Dame 82, Oregon St. 79, Michigan St. 73, Georgia
30, Mississippi 27, Florida 17, Utah 4, Washington
4, Texas 2, BYU 1, Ball St. 1.
USA Today Top 25 Poll
The USA Today Top 25 football coaches poll, with
first-place votes in parentheses, records through
Oct. 19, total points based on 25 points for first
place through one point for 25th, and previous
ranking:
Record Pts Pvs
1. Alabama (57) 7-0) 1,544 1
2. Oregon (4) 7-0) 1,482 2
3. Florida State (1) 6-0) 1,410 5
4. Ohio State 7-0) 1,382 3
5. Baylor 6-0) 1,255 12
6. Miami (Fla.) 6-0) 1,186 11


tion when Miami was
threatening.
Tannehill, who came
into the game on pace
to set an NFL record
for being sacked, in-
creased his total to 26
with two both by
Mario Williams, who
has 10 this year.
Tannehill almost off-
set his mistakes with
three touchdown pass-
es. Gibson turned one
short throw into an ac-
robatic score, leaping
over one defender at
the goal line and split-
ting two others as he
tumbled airborne into
the end zone.
His spinning limbs
made him look like a
helicopter, and the 13-
yard score with 21 sec-
onds left in the first half
cut Buffalo's lead to 17-
14.
Gibson made his
second TD catch just


ning back Steven Jack-
son missed his fourth
straight game with a
hamstring injury.
The loss left the Buc-
caneers (0-6) still look-
ing for their first win.
"Nobody wants to be
in this situation," said
Tampa Bay defensive
end Adrian Clayborn.
"We've got to deal with
it."
Trailing 31-17, the
Buccaneers held the ball
for 18 plays and over 9
minutes in a marathon
fourth-quarter drive
that produced a first
down at the Falcons 5.
Four penalties on the
possession, including
a facemask call against
Jackson that pushed
the Bucs back to the 15,
helped force Tampa Bay
to settle for Rian Lin-
dell's 41-yard field goal
with 5 minutes remain-
ing.
Lindell added his third
field goal of the game,
from 36 yards, with 2
minutes remaining.


7. Missouri 7-0) 1,184 14
8. Stanford 6-1) 1,117 13
9. Texas Tech 7-0) 981 15
10. Clemson 6-1) 913 4
11. UCLA 5-1) 710 10
12. Oklahoma 6-1) 695 18
13. Oklahoma State 5-1) 688 17
13. LSU 6-2) 688 8
15. Texas A&M 5-2) 622 7
16. Louisville 6-1) 571 6
17. Auburn 6-1) 537 NR
18. Fresno State 6-0) 532 19
19. Virginia Tech 6-1) 499 20
20. South Carolina 5-2) 468 9
21. Nebraska 5-1) 385 21
22. Northern Illinois 7-0) 298 23
23. Michigan 6-1) 268 24
24. Wisconsin 5-2) 195 NR
25. Central Florida 5-1) 151 NR
Others receiving votes: Michigan State 102; Or-
egon State 91; Notre Dame 62; Arizona State 51;
-. I I II | , I I H. I I .. 1 6 ;
: F" I. J i .... .. F i 1 [ '1 .
State 1; Louisiana-Lafayette 1; Rutgers 1; Ten-
nessee 1.
BASEBALL
MLB Postseason
LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES
(Best-of-7)
American League
Boston 4, Detroit 2
Saturday, Oct. 12: Detroit 1, Boston 0
Sunday, Oct. 13: Boston 6, Detroit 5
Tuesday, Oct. 15: Boston 1, Detroit 0
Wednesday, Oct. 16: Detroit 7, Boston 3
Thursday, Oct. 17: Boston 4, Detroit 3
Saturday, Oct. 19: Boston 5, Detroit 2
National League
St. Louis 4, Los Angeles 2
Friday, Oct. 11: St. Louis 3, Los Angeles 2,13 in-
nings
Saturday, Oct. 12: St. Louis 1, Los Angeles 0
Monday, Oct. 14: Los Angeles 3, St. Louis 0
Tuesday, Oct. 15: St. Louis 4, Los Angeles 2
Wednesday, Oct. 16: Los Angeles 6, St. Louis 4
Friday, Oct. 18: St. Louis 9, Los Angeles 0
WORLD SERIES
(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
St. Louis vs. Boston
Wednesday, Oct. 23: St. Louis (Wainwright 19-9) at
Boston (Lester 15-8), 8:07 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 24: St. Louis at Boston, 8:07 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 26: Boston atSt. Louis, 8:07 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 27: Boston at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
x-Monday, Oct. 28: Boston at St. Louis, 8:07 p.m.
x-Wednesday, Oct. 30: St. Louis at Boston, 8:07
p.m.
x-Thursday, Oct. 31: St. Louis at Boston, 8:07 p.m.
HOCKEY
NHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Detroit 9 6 3 0 12 24 23
Toronto 9 6 3 0 12 30 22
Boston 7 5 2 0 10 20 10
Montreal 8 5 3 0 10 26 15
TampaBay 8 5 3 0 10 26 21
Ottawa 8 3 3 2 8 21 24
Florida 9 3 6 0 6 20 32
Buffalo 10 1 8 1 3 13 28
Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 8 7 1 0 14 31 19
Carolina 9 4 2 3 11 22 26
N.Y Islanders 8 3 3 2 8 25 23
Washington 8 3 5 0 6 21 25
New Jersey 8 1 4 3 5 17 26
N.YRangers 7 2 5 0 4 11 29
Columbus 7 2 5 0 4 16 21
Philadelphia 8 1 7 0 2 11 24
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Colorado 8 7 1 0 14 27 12
Chicago 8 5 1 2 12 23 19
St. Louis 7 5 1 1 11 27 19
Nashville 8 4 3 1 9 16 21
Minnesota 9 3 3 3 9 19 22
Winnipeg 8 4 4 0 8 21 22
Dallas 7 3 4 0 6 17 22
Pacific GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 8 7 0 1 15 39 16


as entertaining. After
catching a 4-yard pass
in the back of the end
zone, he flipped the
ball aside, leaped over
a barricade and was
mobbed by more than
a dozen happy fans
watching from field
level.
The crowd was more
subdued when Robey
jumped a short route to
intercept Tannehill and
somersaulted across
the goal line for a 7-0
Bills lead. Tannehill
cost the Dolphins again
when his ill-advised lob
was intercepted at the
goal line by Aaron Wil-
liams.
Miami rookie Don
Jones was penalized
when he came from
out of bounds to down
a punt at the 15, and
the mistake cost Mi-
ami 40 yards when they
were forced to re-kick.


The Falcons ran out the
clock after recovering an
onside kick.
Tampa Bay run-
ning back Doug Mar-
tin left the game ear-
ly in the third quarter
with a shoulder injury
and did not return. Mar-
tin had 11 carries for 47
yards before he was in-
jured while attempting
to catch a 16-yard pass
near the left sideline.
A side judge threw a
penalty flag for an ap-
parent unnecessary
roughness on Falcons
safety William Moore,
but referee Walt Ander-
son withdrew the flag.
Martin lay on his back
for several minutes be-
fore walking off the field
under his own pow-
er. He said X-rays "look
fine" and the shoulder is
not separated.
"We're still evaluating
what it is," Martin said.
He said he is "not sure
yet" if he would play in
Thursday night's game
against Carolina. "Just


Anaheim 7 6 1 0 12 24 16
Phoenix 9 5 2 2 12 27 26
LosAngeles 9 6 3 0 12 24 22
Vancouver 9 5 3 1 11 26 26
Calgary 7 3 2 2 8 23 26
Edmonton 9 2 6 1 5 26 36
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Saturday's Games
Pittsburgh 4, Vancouver 3, SO
Rorida 2, Minnesota 1, SO
Edmonton 3, Ottawa 1
Colorado 4, Buffalo 2
Nashville 2, Montreal 1
Boston 5, Tampa Bay 0
New Jersey 4, N.Y Rangers 0
Carolina 4, N.Y Islanders 3
Washington 4, Columbus 1
Chicago 3, Toronto 1
Phoenix 5, Detroit 2
San Jose 6, Calgary 3
Los Angeles 5, Dallas 2
Sunday's Games
Vancouver at Columbus, late
Nashville at Winnipeg, late
Dallas at Anaheim, late
SOCCER
MLS
EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA
x-NewYork 16 9 8 56 53 39
x-Sporting Kansas City 16 10 7 55 45 29
Montreal 14 12 7 49 50 48
Chicago 14 12 7 49 45 47
New England 13 11 9 48 48 38
Houston 13 11 9 48 39 40
Philadelphia 12 11 10 46 41 42
Columbus 12 16 5 41 42 45
Toronto FC 5 17 11 26 29 47
D.C. 3 23 7 16 21 57
WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA
x-Portand 13 5 15 54 49 33
x-Real Salt Lake 15 10 8 53 55 40
Los Angeles 15 11 6 51 52 37
Seattle 15 12 6 51 41 41
Colorado 14 10 9 51 45 35
San Jose 13 11 8 47 33 41
Vancouver 12 12 9 45 50 45
FC Dallas 11 11 11 44 47 50
ChivasUSA 6 18 8 26 29 60
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
x- clinched playoff berth
Wednesday's Games
Los Angeles 1, Montreal 0
Friday's Games
Sporting Kansas City 1, D.C. United 0
Saturday's Games
Montreal 2, Philadelphia 1
FC Dallas 2, Seattle FC 0
Colorado 3, Vancouver 2
New England 3, Columbus 2
Chicago 1, Toronto FC 0
Portland 0, Real Salt Lake 0, tie
Sunday's Games
New York 3, Houston 0
San Jose at Los Angeles, late
BASKETBALL
NBA
Preseason
Saturday's Games
New Orleans 93, Washington 89
Dallas 89, Charlotte 83
Miami 121, San Antonio 96
Indiana 102, Cleveland 79
L.A. Clippers 118, Denver 111, OT
Sunday's Games
Memphis 90, Atlanta 82
Detroit at Orlando, late
Boston vs. Minnesota at Montreal, Quebec, late
Utah at Oklahoma City, late
Sacramento at Portland, late
Today's Games
New York at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia vs. Cleveland at Columbus, OH, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Chicago, 8p.m.
Dallas at Houston, 8 p.m.
Tuesday's Games
Indiana atAtlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Orlando at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Utah at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.


Buffalo took advantage
of the break in field po-
sition to score six plays
later for a 14-0 lead.
The Dolphins' Ca-
leb Sturgis missed a 51-
yard field goal when his
kick hit the right up-
right, which ultimately
made the difference in
the game.
Lewis, who grew up
near the Dolphins' sta-
dium, exemplified the
Bills' resilience. He
completed one pass
for a first down even
as a blitzing lineback-
er knocked Lewis' hel-
met off his head, and
the quarterback got up
hollering and throwing
punches at the air.
The Bills won for only
the third time in their
past 18 road games.
They won for the first
time in three games
this season against di-
vision opponents.


have to hope for the
best," he said.
Moore sacked Mike
Glennon to force a fum-
ble on Tampa Bay's
first possession. Safe-
ty Thomas DeCoud re-
turned the fumble re-
covery 30 yards for a
touchdown.
Glennon, making his
first road start, com-
pleted 26 of 44 passes
for 256 yards and two
touchdowns to Vincent
Jackson.
"He went on the road
and showed he can han-
dle the pressure on the
road," said Tampa Bay
receiver Mike Williams
of Glennon. 'As a team,
we've got to help him
and make more plays
for him."
Jackson, targeted on
22 passes, had 10 catch-
es for 138 yards, includ-
ing touchdown recep-
tions of 59 yards in the
second quarter and 1
yard in the third quar-
ter.


TV2DAY
NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE
8:25 p.m.
ESPN Minnesota at N.Y. Giants
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE
7:30 p.m.
NBCSN Colorado at Pittsburgh
SOCCER
2:55 p.m.
NBCSN Premier League, Crystal Palace vs. Fulham, at London


AUTO RACING


McMurray wins



largely clean race



at Talladega


PAUL NEWBERRY
Associated Press

TALLADEGA, Ala. Jamie McMurray won at
Talladega Superspeedway in a nearly clean race
until rookie Austin Dillon lost control on the final
lap Sunday, allowing the winner to coast across
the line under caution.
McMurray won for the first time in the NASCAR
Sprint Cup Series since 2010, not even having to
worry about an expected charge from Dale Earn-
hardt Jr. after Dillon spun coming out of the sec-
ond turn. The only other driver collected in the
crash was Casey Mears, who slammed into Dil-
lon's car and sent it flying into the air before it
came back down upright.
A race known for massive crashes was essen-
tially trouble free. There was a minor wreck ear-
ly on when Marcos Ambrose got loose in front
of the main grandstand and took out Juan Pablo
Montoya, and 103 consecutive laps under green
until the yellow and checkered flag waved togeth-
er at the end.
"I was a little discouraged I couldn't get to the
front earlier in the race," McMurray said. "I felt if I
could get there, I had enough speed that it would
be hard to pass me."
He was right.
Earnhardt settled for second, followed by Ricky
Stenhouse Jr., Paul Menard and Kyle Busch.
Dillon, who was filling in for injured Tony Stew-
art in the No. 14 car, wound up 26th after going to
the final lap in third.
"Every race here, we have a wreck on the last
lap," Earnhardt said. "For some reason, though, it
was a lot calmer the last few laps. Everybody was
pretty good about staying in line."
Jimmie Johnson steered around trouble and
finished 13th, emerging from the race with the
lead in the Sprint Cup standings. The five-time
Cup champion passed Matt Kenseth for the top
spot and has a four-point edge with four races re-
maining.
Kenseth finished 20th. Busch and Kevin Har-
vick are tied for third, 26 points behind Johnson,
with Jeff Gordon who had hoped Talladega's
unpredictable nature might help him make a big
push made up only two points and is 34 off the
lead.
After running strong early in the 188-lap race,
Kenseth dealt with an ill-handling car and lost
several spots when he attempted to make a move
late in the race.
"It was really bizarre," he said. "Typically han-
dling is a non-issue here. We just got loose and
I couldn't even hang on to it. I pretty much had
to run in the back for two runs, which was disap-
pointing. We finally got it fixed that last run, but
we only had 20 laps to get back up there. I really
needed to be up there like we were early and feel-
ing I was controlling the race more."
McMurray, who isn't part of the Chase, won for
Earnhardt Ganassi Racing and took a phone call
in victory lane from car owner Chip Ganassi, still
in California celebrating Scott Dixon's champion-
ship in the IndyCar series the previous night.
Earnhardt, a huge fan favorite at Talladega, had
hoped to make his move going down the back
straightaway on the final lap.
He never got the chance.
"Our car was a rocket," Earnhardt said. "I was
moving around a little bit to see where I thought
the 1 (McMurray) might be going. You've got to
sort of fake him out. But I looked in the rearview
mirror and I saw guys all over the place.
"I guess if we're in that situation next time," he
added, "we'll try to go a lap sooner."



When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to

report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches
of recreational and youth leagues can send game results,
statistics, team and action photos, and we'll publish them
in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can
send us individual photos and accomplishments.

Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com




CONTACTS

SPORTS EDITOR or 352-365-8279.
FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Amu tn c-
------------- Amateur Listings (col-
FAX 352-365-1951 lege scholarships, meeting
EMAIL announcements, schedule
sports@dailycommercial.com changes, outdoors notices) can
* Schools or coaches can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or
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p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, mercial.com





Monday, October 21, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3


NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE


AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div
New England 5 2 0 .714 152 127 3-0-0 2-2-0 2-2-0 3-0-0 2-1-0
N.Y. Jets 4 3 0 .571 134 162 3-1-0 1-2-0 2-3-0 2-0-0 2-1-0
Miami 3 3 0 .500 135 140 1-2-0 2-1-0 2-2-0 1-1-0 0-1-0
Buffalo 3 4 0 .429 159 178 2-2-0 1-2-0 2-4-0 1-0-0 1-2-0
South
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div
Indianapolis 4 2 0 .667 148 98 2-1-0 2-1-0 2-2-0 2-0-0 1-0-0
Tennessee 3 4 0 .429 145 146 2-2-0 1-2-0 3-2-0 0-2-0 0-1-0
Houston 2 5 0 .286 122 194 1-2-0 1-3-0 2-2-0 0-3-0 1-0-0
Jacksonville 0 7 0 .000 76 222 0-3-0 0-4-0 0-5-0 0-2-0 0-1-0
North
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div
Cincinnati 5 2 0 .714 148 135 3-0-0 2-2-0 3-1-0 2-1-0 1-1-0
Baltimore 3 4 0 .429 150 148 2-1-0 1-3-0 3-3-0 0-1-0 1-1-0
Cleveland 3 4 0 .429 131 156 2-2-0 1-2-0 2-2-0 1-2-0 1-1-0
Pittsburgh 2 4 0 .333 107 132 1-2-0 1-2-0 2-2-0 0-2-0 1-1-0
West
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div
Kansas City 7 0 0 1.000 169 81 4-0-0 3-0-0 4-0-0 3-0-0 1-0-0
Denver 6 0 0 1.000 265 158 4-0-0 2-0-0 3-0-0 3-0-0 1-0-0
San Diego 4 3 0 .571 168 144 2-1-0 2-2-0 2-3-0 2-0-0 0-1-0
Oakland 2 4 0 .333 105 132 2-1-0 0-3-0 2-3-0 0-1-0 1-2-0


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


Dallas
Philadelphia
Washington


East
PA
155
196
184


Home
3-1-0
0-3-0
1-2-0


N.Y. Giants 0 6 0 .000 103 209 0-2-0 0-4-0 0-4-0 0-2-0 0-2-0
South
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div
New Orleans 5 1 0 .833 161 103 3-0-0 2-1-0 4-0-0 1-1-0 2-0-0
Carolina 3 3 0 .500 139 83 2-1-0 1-2-0 3-2-0 0-1-0 0-0-0
Atlanta 2 4 0 .333 153 157 2-2-0 0-2-0 2-1-0 0-3-0 1-1-0
Tampa Bay 0 6 0 .000 87 132 0-3-0 0-3-0 0-4-0 0-2-0 0-2-0
North
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div
Green Bay 4 2 0 .667 168 127 3-0-0 1-2-0 2-1-0 2-1-0 1-0-0
Detroit 4 3 0 .571 186 167 2-1-0 2-2-0 3-2-0 1-1-0 2-1-0
Chicago 4 3 0 .571 213 206 3-1-0 1-2-0 2-3-0 2-0-0 1-1-0
Minnesota 1 4 0 .200 125 158 1-2-0 0-2-0 0-3-0 1-1-0 0-2-0


Seattle
San Francisco
St. Louis
Arizona


West
PA
116
135
184
161


Home
3-0-0
3-1-0
2-1-0
2-1-0


Thursday's Game
Seattle 34, Arizona 22
Sunday's Games
Atlanta 31, Tampa Bay 23
Washington 45, Chicago 41
Dallas 17, Philadelphia 3
N.Y. Jets 30, New England 27, OT
Buffalo 23, Miami 21
Carolina 30, St. Louis 15
Cincinnati 27, Detroit 24
San Diego 24, Jacksonville 6
San Francisco 31, Tennessee 17
Kansas City 17, Houston 16
Green Bay 31, Cleveland 13
Pittsburgh 19, Baltimore 16
Denver at Indianapolis, late
Open: New Orleans, Oakland
Today's Game
Minnesota at N.Y. Giants, 8:40 p.m.

Chargers 24, Jaguars 6
San Diego 7 7 3 7 24
Jacksonville 0 3 3 0 6
First Quarter
SD-Woodhead 2 run (Novak kick), 7:23.
Second Quarter
SD-Royal 27 pass from Rivers (Novak kick), 12:36.
Jax-FG Scobee 30,4:50.
Third Quarter
SD-FG Novak 20, 6:48.
Jax-FG Scobee 23,3:54.
Fourth Quarter
SD-Mathews 3 run (Novak kick), 14:08.
A-59,550.
SD Jax
First downs 27 18
Total Net Yards 434 353
Rushes-yards 40-158 17-78
Passing 276 275
Punt Returns 1-11 1-0
Kickoff Returns 1-18 2-62
Interceptons Ret. 1-26 0-0
Comp-Att-lnt 22-26-0 23-36-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 1-9 6-43
Punts 344.7 3-50.0
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0
Penaltes-Yards 8-61 6-45
Time of Possession 37:30 22:30
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-San Diego, Mathews 21-110, Woodhead
9-29, R.Brown 3-14, McClain 24, Rivers 24, White-
hurst 3-(minus 3). Jacksonville, Jones-Drew 9-37,
Forsett 2-19, Robinson 1-9, Todman 1-8, Henne 4-5.
PASSING-San Diego, Rivers 22-26-0-285. Jackson-
ville, Henne 23-36-1-318.
RECEIVING-San Diego, Gates 6-31, Royal 4-69,
Woodhead 447, Allen 3-67, Green 240, V.Brown
2-26, Phillips 1-5. Jacksonville, Shorts III 8-80,
J.Blackmon 6-58, Brown 5-120, Jones-Drew 2-19,
Lewis 1-31, Forsett 1-10.
MISSED HELD GOALS-None.
Redskins 45, Bears 41
Chicago 10 7 7 17 41
Washington 3 21 7 14 45
First Quarter
Was-FG Forbath 38,11:28.
Chi-FG Gould 47, 7:03.
Chi-Forte 2 run (Gould kick), 6:02.
Second Quarter
Was-Helu Jr. 14 run (Forbath kick), 13:44.
Was-Orakpo 29 interception return (Forbath kick),
13:27.
Chi-Hester 81 punt return (Gould kick), 5:52.
Was-Reed 3 pass from Griffin III (Forbath kick), :27.
Third Quarter
Chi-Forte 50 run (Gould kick), 6:34.
Was-Helu Jr. 3 run (Forbath kick), 3:19.
Fourth Quarter
Chi-Forte 6 run (Gould kick), 12:44.
Was-A.Robinson 45 pass from Griffin III (Forbath
kick), 10:55.
Chi-FG Gould 49, 8:39.
Chi-M.Bennett 7 pass from McCown (Gould kick),
3:57.
Was-Helu Jr. 3 run (Forbath kick), :45.
A-83,147.


First downs
Total Net Yards
Rushes-yards


Chi Was
21 28
359 499
22-140 43-209


Passing 219 290
Punt Returns 3-85 0-0
Kickoff Returns 7-105 3-53
Interceptions Ret. 1-28 1-29
Comp-Att-lnt 17-28-1 18-29-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 2-13 1-8
Punts 349.0 543.6
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 2-0
Penaltes-Yards 5-30 547
Time of Possession 26:04 33:56
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Chicago, Forte 16-91, McCown 4-33,
Jeffery 2-16. Washington, Morris 19-95, Griffin
III 11-84, Helu Jr. 1141, Young 1-0, A.Robinson
1-(minus 11).
PASSING-Chicago, McCown 14-20-0-204, Cuter
3-8-1-28. Washington, Griffin III 18-29-1-298.
RECEIVING-Chicago, Marshall 6-75, Jeffery
4-105, E.Bennett 3-24, Forte 2-18, M.Bennett
1-7, M.Wilson 1-3. Washington, Reed 9-134, Gar-
con 5-58, A.Robinson 2-75, Hankerson 1-26, Helu
Jr. 1-5.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-Chicago, Gould 34 (WR).
Panthers 30, Rams 15
St. Louis 2 3 7 3 15
Carolina 7 10 10 3 30
First Quarter
Car-Munnerlyn 45 interception return (Gano kick),
14:39.
StL-Sims safety, 5:23.
Second Quarter
Car-FG Gano 37,14:12.
StL-FG Zuerlein 28,5:25.
Car-Tolbert i1 run (Gano kick), 1:05.
Third Quarter
Car-FG Gano 31, 6:46.
StL-Stacy 4 pass from Bradford (Zuerlein kick),
5:22.
Car-S.Smith 19 pass from Newton (Gano kick), :19.
Fourth Quarter
Car-FG Gano 50,11:32.
StL-FG Zuerlein 42, 9:09.
A-72,686.
StL Car
First downs 15 21
Total Net Yards 317 282
Rushes-yards 21-63 38-102
Passing 254 180
Punt Returns 3-26 1-(1)
Kickoff Returns 3-73 2-54
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 145
Comp-Att-lnt 23-34-1 15-17-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 4-20 2-24
Punts 4-39.8 3-51.3
Fumbles-Lost 4-2 1-0
Penaltes-Yards 8-68 7-59
Time of Possession 26:40 33:20
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-St. Louis, Stacy 17-53, Richardson 3-9,
Bradford 1-1. Carolina, D.Williams 1540, Tolbert
13-36, Newton 10-26.
PASSING-St. Louis, Bradford 21-30-1-255, Clemens
24-0-19. Carolina, Newton 15-17-0-204.
RECEIVING-St. Louis, Austin 5-39, Stacy 4-34,
Cook 4-33, Quick 2-97, Pettis 2-17, Harkey 2-14,
Kendricks 2-7, Givens 1-24, Richardson 1-9. Caro-
lina, S.Smith 5-69, Olsen 447, LaFell 3-35, Ginn Jr.
2-34, D.Williams 1-19.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.
Bengals 27, Lions 24
Cincinnati 7 7 10 3 27
Detroit 7 3 7 7 24
First Quarter
Cin-Green 82 pass from Dalton (Nugent kick),
10:59.
Det-Pettgrew 3 pass from Stafford (Akers kick),
3:02.
Second Quarter
Det-FG Akers 36,11:43.
Cin-M.Jones 12 pass from Dalton (Nugent kick),
:41.
Third Quarter
Cin-Eifert 32 pass from Dalton (Nugent kick),
10:42.
Det-Johnson 27 pass from Stafford (Akers kick),
8:17.
Cin-FG Nugent 48, 3:37.
Fourth Quarter
Det-Johnson 50 pass from Stafford (Akers kick),
11:59.
Cin-FG Nugent 54, :00.
A-63,207.
Cin Det
First downs 18 22
Total Net Yards 421 434


Rushes-yards 18-57 25-77
Passing 364 357
Punt Returns 1-8 2-1
Kickoff Returns 1-21 1-35
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0
Comp-Att-lnt 24-34-0 28-51-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 1-8 0-0
Punts 447.3 443.3
Fumbles-Lost 1-0 0-0
Penalties-Yards 6-50 4-30
Time of Possession 25:29 34:31
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Cincinnati, Bernard 7-27, Green-Ellis 10-
24, Dalton 1-6. Detroit, Bush 20-50, Bell 5-27.
PASSING-Cincinnat, Dalton 24-34-0-372. Detroit,
Stafford 28-51-0-357.
RECEIVING-Cincinnati, Green 6-155, Bernard 5-32,
Gresham 4-64, M.Jones 4-57, Eifert 345, Sanu
1-12, Sanzenbacher 1-7. Detroit, Johnson 9-155,
Durham 541, Bush 344, Bell 3-29, Pettigrew 3-7,
Ogletree 2-50, Broyles 2-16, Fauria 1-15.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-Cincinnat, Nugent47 (WL).
Detroit, Akers 34 (BK).
Cowboys 17, Eagles 3
Dallas 0 3 7 7 17
Philadelphia 0 0 0 3 3
Second Quarter
Dal-FG Bailey 38,3:17.
Third Quarter
Dal-Tanner 1 run (Bailey kick), 9:17.
Fourth Quarter
Phi-FG Henery 31,14:57.
Dal-Williams 9 pass from Romo (Bailey kick), 9:25.
A-69,144.
Dal Phi
First downs 22 19
Total Net Yards 368 278
Rushes-yards 26-74 23-84
Passing 294 194
Punt Returns 5-23 1-5
Kickoff Returns 249 1-23
Interceptions Ret. 3-33 2-36
Comp-Att-lnt 28-47-2 2249-3
Sacked-Yards Lost 2-23 3-15
Punts 9-38.6 946.6
Fumbles-Lost 1-0 0-0
Penalties-Yards 12-75 5-33
Time of Possession 36:13 23:47
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Dallas, Randle 19-65, Harris 1-6, Romo
4-2, Tanner 2-1. Philadelphia, McCoy 18-55, Foles
3-25, Brown 24.
PASSING-Dallas, Romo 2847-2-317. Philadelphia,
Barkley 11-20-3-129, Foles 11-29-0-80.
RECEIVING-Dallas, Bryant 8-110, Williams 6-71,
Beasley 6-53, Witten 448, Randle 3-28, Tanner 1-7.
Philadelphia, Cooper 6-88, McCoy 6-26, Ertz 3-33,
Avant 3-32, Jackson 3-21, Celek 1-9.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-Philadelphia, Henery 60
(WL).
Bills 23, Dolphins 21
Buffalo 14 3 0 6 23
Miami 0 14 7 0 21
First Quarter
Buf-Robey 19 interception return (Carpenter kick),
13:27.
Buf-Jackson 3 run (Carpenter kick), 5:47.
Second Quarter
Mia-Clay 7 pass from Tannehill (Sturgis kick),
10:59.
Buf-FG Carpenter 39,3:14.
Mia-Gibson 13 pass from Tannehill (Sturgis
kick), :21.
Third Quarter
Mia-Gibson 4 pass from Tannehill (Sturgis kick),
6:46.
Fourth Quarter
Buf-FG Carpenter 20,14:16.
Buf-FG Carpenter 31, :33.
A-60,592.
BuT f Mia
First downs 15 19
Total Net Yards 268 293
Rushes-yards 30-90 25-120
Passing 178 173
Punt Returns 2-14 4-11
Kickoff Returns 249 2-59
Interceptions Ret. 2-22 1-0
Comp-Att-lnt 21-32-1 19-37-2
Sacked-Yards Lost 4-24 2-21
Punts 745.4 647.0
Fumbles-Lost 2-0 1-1
Penalties-Yards 6-53 4-32
Time of Possession 30:12 29:48
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Buffalo, Jackson 11-36, Choice 6-16,


Summers 2-14, Lewis 5-13, Spiller 6-11. Miami,
Dan.Thomas 12-60, Miller 943, Wallace 1-12, Tan-
nehill 3-5.
PASSING-Buffalo, Lewis 21-32-1-202. Miami, Tan-
nehill 19-37-2-194.
RECEIVING-Buffalo, Johnson 6-61, Jackson 449,
Woods 3-24, Spiller 3-(minus 4), Graham 2-36,
Chandler 2-18, L.Smith 1-18. Miami, Hartine 6-69,
Wallace 5-76, Gibson 540, Clay 1-7, Miller 14,
Dan.Thomas 1-(minus 2).
MISSED HELD GOALS-Miami, Sturgis 51 (WR).
Jets 30, Patriots 27, OT
New England 14 7 0 6 0 27
N.Y. Jets 7 3 17 0 3 30
First Quarter
NYJ-Kerley 12 pass from Smith (Folk kick), 9:43.
NE-Bolden 1 run (Gostkowski kick), 5:58.
NE-Ryan 79 interception return (Gostkowski
kick), 1:32.
Second Quarter
NYJ-FG Folk 37,11:11.
NE-Ridley 17 run (Gostkowski kick), 5:15.
Third Quarter
NYJ-Allen 23 interception return (Folk kick), 14:27.
NYJ-Smith 8 run (Folk kick), 4:33.
NYJ-FG Folk 37,1:30.
Fourth Quarter
NE-FG Gostkowski 39,12:58.
NE-FG Gostkowski 44, :16.
Overtime
NYJ-FG Folk 42, 5:07.
A-76,957.
NE NYJ
First downs 21 27
Total Net Yards 295 383
Rushes-yards 20-90 52-177
Passing 205 206
Punt Returns 3-58 344
Kickoff Returns 4-96 1-17
Interceptons Ret. 1-79 1-23
Comp-Att-lnt 2246-1 17-33-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 4-23 4-27
Punts 8-50.5 640.2
Fumbles-Lost 2-0 2-0
Penaltes-Yards 7-100 945
Time of Possession 23:40 46:13
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-New England, Ridley 11-50, Bolden 8-36,
Blount 14. N.Y Jets, Ivory 34-104, Smith 6-32, Bo-
hanon 6-21, Cribbs 3-14, Powell 3-6.
PASSING-New England, Brady 2246-1-228. N.Y
Jets, Smith 17-33-1-233.
RECEIVING-New England, Gronkowski 8-114, Edel-
man 544, Dobson 3-34, Thompkins 2-16, Ridley
2-3, Collie 1-10, Bolden 1-7. N.Y Jets, Kerley 8-97,
Nelson 4-80, Cumberland 341, Hill 1-17, Ivory
1-(minus 2).
MISSED HELD GOALS-None.
Falcons 31, Buccaneers 23
TampaBay 0 10 7 6 23
Atlanta 7 17 0 7 31
First Quarter
At-DeCoud 30 fumble return (Bryant kick), 11:54.
Second Quarter
At-Rodgers 19 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick),
13:23.
TB-Jackson 59 pass from Glennon (Lindell kick),
11:54.
At-FG Bryant 23, 7:38.
At-Douglas 37 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick), 5:32.
TB-FG Lindell 36, :00.
Third Quarter
TB-Jackson 1 pass from Glennon (Lindell kick),
9:03.
Fourth Quarter
At-Rodgers 8 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick), 14:06.
TB-FG Lindell 41, 5:00.
TB-FG Lindell 35,1:55.
A-69,522.
TB Atl
First downs 23 15
Total Net Yards 337 291
Rushes-yards 28-111 18-18
Passing 226 273
Punt Returns 3-27 1-0
Kickoff Returns 2-56 1-21
Interceptons Ret. 0-0 0-0
Comp-Att-lnt 2644-0 20-26-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 3-30 0-0
Punts 5-37.6 448.0
Fumbles-Lost 2-1 1-1
Penaltes-Yards 11-103 9-101
Time of Possession 37:49 22:11


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Tampa Bay, Martin 1147, James 1445,
Glennon 1-13, Leonard 2-6. Atlanta, Rodgers 8-16,
Snelling 7-14, Ryan 3-(minus 12).
PASSING-Tampa Bay, Glennon 2644-0-256. At-
lanta, Ryan 20-26-0-273.
RECEIVING-Tampa Bay, Jackson 10-138, Williams
4-32, Owusu 3-27, James 3-8, Wright 2-15, Crab-
tree 1-14, Leonard 1-9, Martin 1-7, Underwood 1-6.
Atlanta, Rodgers 846, Douglas 7-149, Gonzalez
2-30, D.Johnson 2-24, Dr.Davis 1-24.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.
49ers 31, Titans 17
San Francisco 3 14 7 7 31
Tennessee 0 0 0 17 17
First Quarter
SF-FG Dawson 44,5:19.
Second Quarter
SF-Kaepernick 20 run (Dawson kick), 6:42.
SF-Gore 1 run (Dawson kick), 2:07.
Third Quarter
SF-Gore 1 run (Dawson kick), 7:20.
Fourth Quarter
Ten-FG Bironas 31,12:23.
Ten-C.Johnson 66 pass from Locker (Bironas
kick), 7:07.
SF-Osgood fumble recovery in end zone (Dawson
kick), 6:16.
Ten-Walker 26 pass from Locker (Bironas kick),
3:17.
A-69,143.
SF Ten
First downs 19 15
Total Net Yards 349 368
Rushes-yards 41-153 13-70
Passing 196 298
Punt Returns 2-0 2-(-1)
Kickoff Returns 1-21 4-73
Interceptions Ret. 1-10 0-0
Comp-Att-lnt 13-21-0 2541-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 2-3 3-28
Punts 646.7 643.8
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 1-1
Penalties-Yards 542 10-100
Time of Possession 35:46 24:14
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-San Francisco, Gore 24-70, Kaepernick
11-68, Dixon 1-8, Hunter 4-6, Miller 1-1. Tennessee,
C.Johnson 9-39, Locker 3-29, Greene 1-2.
PASSING-San Francisco, Kaepernick 13-21-0-199.
Tennessee, Locker 2541-1-326.
RECEIVING-San Francisco, Boldin 5-74, V.Davis
4-62, Gore 2-34, V.McDonald 1-20, Miller 1-9. Ten-
nessee, Wright 9-98, C.Johnson 4-71, Washington
3-62, Walker 3-52, Williams 3-25, Britt 1-8, Battle
1-6, Reynaud 14.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.
Steelers 19, Ravens 16
Baltimore 3 3 0 10 16
Pittsburgh 7 3 3 6 19
First Quarter
Pit-Miller 3 pass from Roethlisberger (Suisham
kick), 5:24.
Bal-FG Tucker 46, :05.
Second Quarter
Pit-FG Suisham 34, 9:59.
Bal-FG Tucker 38, :08.
Third Quarter
Pit-FG Suisham 28, 2:56.
Fourth Quarter
Bal-FG Tucker 32,13:04.
Pit-FG Suisham 38, 9:59.
Bal-Clark 1 pass from Racco (Tucker kick), 1:58.
Pit-FG Suisham 42, :00.
A-62,295.


First downs
Total Net Yards
Rushes-yards
Passing
Punt Returns
Kickoff Returns
Interceptions Ret.
Comp-Att-lnt
Sacked-Yards Lost
Punts
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


Pit
17
286
29-141
145
1-18
3-97
0-0
17-23-0
3-15
1-36.0
1-1
7-50
31:01


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Baltimore, Rice 1545, Racco 2-14,
Pierce 6-13, Leach 3-10. Pittsburgh, Bell 19-93,
Roethlisberger 3-25, FJones 5-16, Dwyer 1-4,
A.Brown 1-3.
PASSING-Baltimore, Racco 24-34-0-215.


Pittsburgh, Roethlisberger 17-23-0-160.
RECEIVING-Baltimore, J.Jones 4-32, Rice 4-27,
M.Brown 4-22, T.Smith 3-61, Clark 3-9, Doss
2-35, Dickson 2-17, Pierce 1-9, Leach 1-3. Pitts-
burgh, A.Brown 6-50, Cotchery 441, Miller 2-17,
Moye 1-19, Paulson 1-17, Sanders 1-7, Bell 1-6,
FJones 1-3.
MISSED HELD GOALS-None.
Chiefs 17, Texans 16
Houston 3 7 6 0 16
Kansas City 7 7 3 0 17
First Quarter
Hou-FG Bullock 48, 8:12.
KC-Charles 1 run (Succop kick), 2:43.
Second Quarter
Hou-Hopkins 29 pass from Keenum (Bullock
kick), 14:54.
KC-A.Smith 5 run (Succop kick), :56.
Third Quarter
Hou-FG Bullock 21, 9:24.
KC-FG Succop 22, 6:07.
Hou-FG Bullock 47,4:21.
A-74,118.
Hou KC
First downs 14 20
Total Net Yards 294 357
Rushes-yards 24-73 32-126
Passing 221 231
Punt Returns 1-6 4-32
Kickoff Returns 1-22 4-123
Interceptions Ret. 14 0-0
Comp-Att-lnt 15-25-0 23-34-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 5-50 2-9
Punts 549.8 443.5
Fumbles-Lost 2-1 1-1
Penalties-Yards 440 5-24
Time of Possession 27:48 32:12
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Houston, Tate 15-50, Foster 411, Kee-
num 3-10, G.Jones 2-2. Kansas City, Charles 21-86,
A.Smith 6-28, Davis 2-5, McCluster 24, Gray 1-3.
PASSING-Houston, Keenum 15-25-0-271. Kansas
City, A.Smith 23-34-1-240.
RECEIVING-Houston, Johnson 4-89, Hopkins 3-76,
Graham 3-38, Jean 2-21, Tate 2-5, Posey 142. Kan-
sas City, Bowe 5-66, McCluster 4-70, Fasano 4-27,
Charles 3-37, Avery 3-33, Sherman 2-10, McGrath
1-1, A.Smith 1-(minus 4).
MISSED HELD GOALS-None.
Packers 31, Browns 13
Cleveland 0 3 3 7 13
Green Bay 14 3 0 14 31
First Quarter
GB-Finley 10 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick),
12:22.
GB-Lacy 1 run (Crosby kick), 3:44.
Second Quarter
Cle-FG Cundiff46, 5:11.
GB-FG Crosby 26, :03.
Third Quarter
Cle-FG Cundiff 44, 5:03.
Fourth Quarter
GB-Nelson 1 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick),
8:30.
Cle-Cameron 2 pass from Weeden (Cundiff kick),
6:09.
GB-Boykin 20 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick),
3:44.
A-77,804.
Cle GB
First downs 17 26
Total Net Yards 216 357
Rushes-yards 23-83 29-104
Passing 133 253
Punt Returns 1-0 1-18
Kickoff Returns 4-189 245
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-11
Comp-Att-lnt 1742-1 25-36-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 3-16 1-7
Punts 344.3 3-30.0
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 1-0
Penalties-Yards 12-106 10-97
Time of Possession 26:40 33:20
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Cleveland, McGahee 11-39, Weeden
2-20, Ogbonnaya 4-15, Whittaker 5-11, Gray 1-(mi-
nus 2). Green Bay, Lacy 22-82, Rodgers 4-12, Frank-
lin 2-6, Kuhn 14.
PASSING-Cleveland, Weeden 1742-1-149. Green
Bay, Rodgers 25-36-0-260.
RECEIVING-Cleveland, Cameron 7-55, Little 449,
Gordon 2-21, Whittaker 2-13, Bess 2-11. Green Bay,
Boykin 8-103, Finley 5-72, Nelson 542, Lacy 5-26,
White 1-9, Kuhn 1-8.
MISSED HELD GOALS-Green Bay, Crosby 52 (SH).


Charles, Smith help keep Chiefs unbeaten


Associated Press

KANSAS CITY, Mo.-
Jamaal Charles ran for
86 yards and a touch-
down, Alex Smith also
ran for a score and the
scrappy Chiefs held off
the banged-up Hous-
ton Texans 17-16 on
Sunday to remain un-
beaten.
The Chiefs were
forced to punt the ball
to Houston with 1:46
left in the game. But
after Case Keenum
threw an incomple-
tion on first down, the
young quarterback was
stripped by lineback-
er Tamba Hali at his 2.
Derrick Johnson recov-
ered the fumble for the
Chiefs.

REDSKINS 35, BEARS 41

LANDOVER, Md. -
Roy Helu's third touch-
down, a 3-yard run
with 45 seconds to play,
lifted the Redskins.
Robert Griffin III
completed 18 of 29


ED ZURGA/AP

Kansas City quarterback Alex Smith directs his receivers during
Sunday's game against Houston at Arrowhead Stadium in Kan-
sas City, Mo.


passes for 298 yards
with two touchdowns
and one interception
for the Redskins (2-4),
who have both of their
wins against back-
up quarterbacks. This
time it was Josh Mc-
Cown, who entered in
the second quarter af-


ter Jay Cutler left with a
groin injury.
Griffin also ran 11
times for a season-high
84 yards against a de-
fense depleted by in-
juries, but the break-
out performance came
from rookie tight end
Jordan Reed, who


caught nine passes
for 134 yards and one
touchdown.

JETS 30, PATRIOTS 27, OT

EAST RUTHERFORD,
N.J. Nick Folk kicked
a 42-yard field goal
with 5:07 left in over-
time. Folk got a sec-
ond chance after he
missed a 56-yarder mo-
ments earlier. But Chris
Jones was called for un-
sportsmanlike conduct
for pushing a team-
mate forward to try to
block the kick, a new
NFL rule.
New York, given new
life, ran the ball three
times to set up Folk's
winner.
Geno Smith threw a
touchdown pass and
ran for another score
as the Jets (4-3) topped
Tom Brady and the Pa-
triots (5-2). New Eng-
land tied it at 27 with
16 seconds left in regu-
lation on Stephen Gos-
tkowski's 44-yard field
goal.


STEELERS 19, RAVENS 16
PITTSBURGH -
Shaun Suisham drilled
a 42-yard field goal
with no time remain-
ing. Suisham's fourth
field goal of the day
pushed the Steelers
(2-4) to their second
straight win.
Ben Roethlisberg-
er completed 17 of 23
passes for 160 yards
and a touchdown. He
hit Antonio Brown for
a pair of big gains on
Pittsburgh's final drive,
putting Suisham well
within range to win it.
Running back Le'Veon
Bell ran for a season-
high 93 yards on 19 car-
ries.

PACKERS 31, BROWNS 13

GREEN BAY, Wis. -
Aaron Rodgers guid-
ed an undermanned
offense with 260 yards
and three touchdowns,
and Eddie Lacy ran for
another score.
Lacy finished with 82


yards, while tight end
Jermichael Finley had
a 10-yard touchdown
catch in the first quar-
ter before leaving with
a neck injury. The team
said he had movement
in his extremities.
Green Bay (4-2) won
its third straight game.

49ERS 31, TITANS 17

NASHVILLE, Tenn.
- Colin Kaepernick
threw for 199 yards
and ran for 68 and a
touchdown. The 49ers
(5-2) won their fourth
straight before heading
to London for a game
with winless Jackson-
ville by jumping out to
a 17-0 halftime lead.
Frank Gore also ran for
a pair of 1-yard TDs as
San Francisco cruised.
Tramaine Brock also
intercepted a pass, Jus-
tin Smith had two of
the 49ers' three sacks
and Kassim Osgood re-
covered a muffed punt
for aTD.






MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


Red Sox beat Tigers to advance to World Series


JIMMY GLEN
Associated Press
BOSTON When
Shane Victorino signed
with the Boston Red
Sox as a free agent in
the offseason, they
were coming off a last-
place finish that was
their worst in almost
half a century. They
had fired their manag-
er for the second year
in a row.
He believed they
could turn it around.
And quickly.
Victorino brought the
Red Sox one big step
closer to completing
their comeback, send-
ing them to the World
Series with a seventh-
inning grand slam that
gave Boston a 5-2 vic-
tory over the Detroit Ti-
gers in Game 6 of the
AL championship se-
ries Saturday night.
The Red Soxwill open
the Series on Wednes-
day night against the
St. Louis Cardinals,
the team they swept
in 2004 to end their
86-year title drought.
The Cardinals won the
NL pennant on Friday
night by eliminating
the Los Angeles Dodg-
ers in six games.
"It's one of those mo-
ments you live for,"
Victorino said as he
wandered around the
Fenway Park infield
while Red Sox fans
serenaded him with
his theme song, Bob
Marley's "Three Little
Birds," and its chorus,
"Don't worry about a
thing, 'Cause every lit-


tie thing is gonna be all
right."
"Just listen to the
crowd," Victorino
said, referring then to
the Boston Marathon
bombings that left the
city reeling during the
first month of his first
season in town. "The
one thing I came here
to do is to be a part
of this city. With all
we went through as a
city, there's definitely a
bond."
Detroit took a 2-1
lead in the sixth and
21-game winner Max
Scherzer protected it
until the seventh, when
Boston loaded the bas-
es on a double, a walk
and an error by rookie
shortstop Jose Iglesias,
traded by the Red Sox
in July.
Victorino fell behind
Jose Veras 0-2 but loft-
ed a hanging curveball
over the Green Monster
to set off a celebration
in the Red Sox dugout
and in the Fenway Park
stands.
"It's been a special
ride, and we're still go-
ing," second baseman
Dustin Pedroia said.
"We're not going to
stop. We knowwhat our
goal is. We want to win
the World Series."
Junichi Tazawa got
one out for the win,
Craig Breslow pitched
a scoreless eighth and
series MVP Koji Ue-
hara got the last three
outs before the Red Sox
poured out of the dug-
out to begin their now-
familiar celebration on
the mound.


CHARLES KRUPA/AP
Boston's Shane Victorino hits a grand slam against Detroit in the seventh inning of Game 6 in the
American League Championship Series Saturday, at Fenway Park in Boston. The Red Sox won 5-2
to advance to the World Series.


"The way I would
sum it up is that I
thought their start-
ers were good," Tigers
manager Jim Leyland
said. "I thought their
bullpen was great."
Uehara, who inher-
ited the closer job af-
ter the team's first two
choices were injured,
posted three saves and
a win in the series.
Then he joked about
pitching so well under
pressure.
"To tell you the truth,
I almost threw up," Ue-
hara kidded through a
translator.
It's the 13th AL pen-
nant for the Red Sox
and their first since
2007, when they swept
the Colorado Rockies


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Yo""!


to win it all for the sec-
ond time in four sea-
sons. Boston swept the
Cardinals in '04, win-
ning Game 4 in St. Lou-
is to clinch the title that
put an end to gener-
ations of disappoint-
ment.
The latest trip comes
one year after a 69-win
season that prompt-
ed the team to jettison
its high-priced stars,
rebuild the roster and
bring in manager John
Farrell to replace Bob-
by Valentine. Victorino
was one of the biggest
additions, and he deliv-
ered on Saturday as he
did for much of the sea-
son.
"Since the first day of
spring training, there
wasn't one person more
important than the
next," said outfielder
Jonny Gomes, another
newcomer, who dou-
bled to lead off the sev-
enth, missing a homer
over the Green Monster
by no more than a foot.
"We're all pulling in the
same direction."
Scherzer got one out
in the seventh but left
after walking rookie
Xander Bogaerts to put
runners on first and
second. Drew Smyly
got Jacoby Ellsbury to
hit a grounder up the
middle, but it popped
out of Iglesias' glove
behind second base
and everyone was safe.
Veras came in and
quickly got ahead of
Victorino. But he hung
a curveball and Victo-
rino sent it toward the
37-foot left-field wall,
which had already
knocked down two Red
Sox line drives.
This one left no
doubt.


9am
Time to sell
that bed!


Ellen picked her price,
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It was the second ca-
reer postseason slam
for Victorino, who also
had a record-setting
hit-by-pitch in the sixth
but failed to get a bunt
down in the third.
"He's come up big a
number of times this
season, none bigger,"
Farrell said. "Proba-
bly the last thing we're
thinking of, that he's
going to hit a ball out
of the ballpark, and
thankfully the curve-
ball stayed (up)."
Scherzer and Clay
Buchholz also matched
up in Game 2, when
the Tigers right-hand-
er took a no-hitter
and a 5-0 lead into the
sixth. The Red Sox ral-
lied against the Detroit
bullpen, tying it on Da-
vid Ortiz's eighth-in-
ning grand slam and
winning it in the ninth
on Jarrod Saltalamac-
chia's walk-off single
through a drawn-in in-
field.
Both starters gave up
hits in the first inning
in the rematch, but it
remained scoreless un-
til Bogaerts doubled
off the Green Monster
with two outs in the
fifth and scored on Ells-
bury's single.
But the Tigers took
the lead in the bottom
half, chasing Buchholz
with a walk and Miguel
Cabrera's single be-
fore Franklin Morales
walked Prince Fielder
on four pitches to load
the bases with nobody
out.
Victor Martinez lined
one high off the Green
Monster to make it 2-1,
holding at first with a
two-run single.
Brandon Workman
came in and got jhon-


21


ny Peralta to hit a hard
grounder to Pedroia,
who chased down
Martinez in the base-
path for one out and
then threw home to get
Fielder in a rundown.
Saltalamacchia ran
him back to third and
dove, somersaulting
over him while making
the tag.
Workman struck out
Alex Avila looking to
end the inning.
Scherzer worked out
of a jam in the bottom
half after putting run-
ners on second and
third with one out. He
allowed three runs on
four hits and five walks,
striking out seven in 6
1/3 innings.
Buchholz gave up
two runs on four hits
and two walks, striking
out four in five-plus in-
nings.
Scherzer walked the
first two batters in the
third, but Victorino
popped up a bunt and
Scherzer made a slid-
ing catch for the first
out.
Pedroia hit a high
drive that was just foul
of the Carlton Fisk pole
above the Green Mon-
ster. After it was con-
firmed by replay, he hit
a hard grounder down
the line that Cabrera
fielded, easily stepping
on third base before
throwing to first for the
double play.
NOTES: It will be the
first World Series be-
tween the teams with
the best record in each
league since 1999. ...
Detroit C Alex Avila,
who absorbed a body
shot and a foul ball off
the mask in Game 5,
took another ball off
the mask in the fourth
but remained in the
game.
Red Sox 5, Tigers 2
Detroit Boston
ab r h bi ab r h bi
TrHntrrf 3 1 1 0 EIIsurycf 3 1 1 1
MiCarr3b 4 1 1 0 Victornrf 3 1 1 4
RFielder Ib 3 0 0 0 Pedroia2b 3 0 1 0
VMrtnzdh 4 0 1 2 D.Ortizdh 3 0 0 0
JhPerltlf 3 0 0 0 Napolilb 4 0 0 0
D.Kellypr-lf 1 0 0 0 SItlmchc 4 0 0 0
Avilac 4 0 0 0 JGomslf 4 1 1 0
Infante2b 4 0 1 0 Drewss 3 0 0 0
AJcksncf 3 0 2 0 Bogarts3b 1 2 1 0
Iglesiasss 4 0 2 0
Totals 33 2 8 2 Totals 28 5 5 5
Detroit 000 002 000 2
Boston 000 010 40x 5
E-Iglesias (2), Workman (1). DP-Detroit 1, Boston
2. LOB-Detroit 7, Boston 5.2B-J.Gomes (1), Bo-
gaerts (3). HR-Victorino (1). CS-Ellsbury (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
Detroit
Scherzer L,0-1 61/3 4 3 2 5 8
Smyly 0 0 1 1 0 0
VerasBS,-1 1/3 1 1 1 0 1
Coke 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
Alburquerque 1 0 0 0 0 3
Boston
Buchholz 5 4 2 2 2 4
FMoralesBS,-1 0 1 0 0 1 0
Workman 1 2/32 0 0 0 1
TazawaWlO0 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
BreslowH,3 1 0 0 0 0 1
UeharaS,3-3 1 1 0 0 0 2
Buchholz pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
EMorales pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
Smyly pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
HBP-by Scherzer (Victorino). WP-Scherzer.
Umpires-Home, Dan lassogna; First, Joe West; Sec-
ond, Rob Drake; Third, Ron Kulpa; Right, Dale Scott;
Left, Alfonso Marquez.
T-3:52. A-38,823 (37,499).


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7 of the day it is,
you can place
your classified
merchandise ad
4, online, pay for it and
just wait for the
phone to ring!


Fast, convenient and
on your schedule!


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*Employment advertisements are excluded.
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Lake: 352-314-3278 or Sumter: 352-748-1955


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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 21, 2013


I ,_j4.in1 Ir pleI d




Monday, October 21, 2013


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


Ranked SEC teams fall in crazy day for league


STEVE MEGARGEE
Associated Press

KNOXVILLE, Tenn.
- It may rank as the
craziest weekend in
recent Southeastern
Conference history.
Five conference
teams in the Top 25
lost in league play Sat-
urday, including three
defeated by unranked
opponents. The stun-
ning results represent-
ed the latest indication
this isn't a typical sea-
son for the league that
has produced the last
seven national cham-
pions.
While top-ranked
Alabama remained
steady in its pursuit of
a third straight nation-
al championship, the
rest of the SEC strug-
gled.
"I think the fans
and media are sur-
prised, but I'm never
surprised," Mississip-
pi coach Hugh Freeze
said. "Never surprised.
And I don't think any
of the coaches in our
league are ever sur-
prised at what hap-
pens on Saturday."
Freeze's Rebels won
27-24 over No. 6 LSU.
No. 7 Texas A&M lost
45-41 to No. 24 Au-
burn. No. 11 South
Carolina fell 23-21 to
Tennessee. Vanderbilt
defeated No. 15 Geor-
gia 31-27. In each of
these games, the loser
was favored by at least
seven points.
Even No. 14 Mis-
souri's 36-17 victo-
ry over No. 22 Florida
qualified as an upset.
The Gators were fa-
vored by three points.
The flurry of upsets
caused a shake-up in
the Top 25 released
Sunday. Missouri
soared to No. 5, and
Auburn rose to No. 11.
LSU tumbled to No.
13, Texas A&M fell to
No. 14 and South Car-
olina slipped to No.
20. Georgia and Flori-
da dropped out of the
rankings entirely.
It's unclear wheth-
er five ranked SEC
teams had lost on the
same day before, but it
hadn't happened in the
last 20 years, according


WADE PAYNE/AP
Tennessee kicker Michael Palardy (1) and wide receiver Tyler Drummer (3) celebrate after Saturday's upset win against South Caro-
lina in Knoxville, Tenn.


to STATS. Four ranked
SEC teams fell the
week of Oct. 20, 2007.
This marked the first
time Florida, LSU and
Georgia all lost on the
same day since Sept.
20,1986.
Vanderbilt beat a
ranked foe for the first
time since 2008. Ten-
nessee ended a 19-
game losing streak
against Top 25 oppo-
nents. Missouri beat
ranked teams in back-
to-back weeks for the
first time since 1973.
The rise of Missouri
and Auburn exempli-
fied how much things
have changed in the
SEC.
One year after go-
ing 3-9 and failing to
win any conference
games, Auburn is 6-1
under new coach Gus
Malzahn. Missouri has
gone from 5-7 in 2012
to 7-0 this season. Mis-
souri has a command-
ing lead in the Eastern
Division, where every
other team has at least
two conference losses.
"I thought we were
going to have a good
football team," Mis-
souri coach Gary Pin-


kel said. "I don't know
why everybody else
thought we weren't
going to have a good
football team."
Injuries have shak-
en up the Eastern Di-
vision.
Florida lost quarter-
back Jeff Driskel and
star defensive tack-
le Dominique Easley
for the season. Geor-
gia is dealing with sea-
son-ending injuries
to running back Keith
Marshall and wide
receivers Malcolm
Mitchell and Justin
Scott-Wesley. The Bull-
dogs have played their
last three games with-
out star running back
Todd Gurley.
That takes a toll, par-
ticularly when a team
is on the road. Of the
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five ranked teams that
fell this week, only Tex-
as A&M was at home.
It's worth noting that
injuries to their start-
ing quarterbacks didn't
prevent Missouri and
Vanderbilt from win-
ning.
"I don't care who you
are, you can get beat
any Saturday," Freeze
said. "That's especial-
ly true with any of the
home crowds in the
SEC. If you're on the
road, the home crowd


can pick up a team
and carry them. Then
you throw in the in-
juries. Everybody in
this league has inju-
ries, and the injuries
change everything you
do and what your op-
ponent can do."
Alabama has re-
mained immune to
upsets. After edging
Texas A&M 49-42 on
Sept. 14, Alabama has
won its last five games
by a combined 201-16,
including Saturday's


52-0 blowout of Arkan-
sas.
Next up for Alabama
is Tennessee, which
would love to pull off
the biggest stunner
of all in this season of
SEC surprises.
'Alabama, they put
on their shoes the
same way we put on
our shoes," Tennessee
offensive tackle An-
tonio "Tiny" Richard-
son said. "We've just
got to go in there with
confidence, execute in
practice that's the
biggest thing and
believe that we can
win. It's all about belief
at this point."
How the AP Top 25 Fared
No. 1 Alabama (7-0) beat Arkansas 52-0. Next: vs.
Tennessee, Saturday.
No. 2 Oregon (7-0) beat Washington State 62-38.
Next: vs. No. 9 UCLA, Saturday.
No. 3 Clemson (6-1) lost to No. 5 Rorida State 51-
14. Next: at Maryland, Saturday.
No. 4 Ohio State (7-0) beat Iowa 34-24. Next: vs.
Penn State, Saturday.
No. 5 Rorida State (6-0) beat No. 3 Clemson 51-
14. Next: vs. N.C. State, Saturday.
No. 6 LSU (6-2) lost to Mississippi 27-24. Next: vs.
Furman, Saturday.
No. 7 Texas A&M (5-2) lost to No. 24 Auburn 4541.
Next: vs. Vanderbilt, Saturday.
No. 8 Louisville (6-1) lost to UCF38-35, Friday.
Next: at South Rorida, Saturday.
No. 9 UCLA (5-1) lost to No. 13 Stanford 24-10.
Next: at No. 2 Oregon, Saturday.
No. 10 Miami (6-0) beat North Carolina 27-23,
Thursday. Next: vs. Wake Forest, Saturday.
No. 11 South Carolina (5-2) lost to Tennessee 23-
21. Next: at No. 14 Missouri, Saturday.
No. 12 Baylor (6-0) beat Iowa State 71-7. Next: at
Kansas, Saturday.
No. 13 Stanford (6-1) beat No. 9 UCLA 24-10. Next:
at Oregon State, Saturday.
No. 14 Missouri (7-0) beat No. 22 Florida 36-17.
Next: vs. No. 11 South Carolina, Saturday.
No. 15 Georgia (4-3) lost Vanderbilt 31-27. Next:
vs. No. 22 Florida at Jacksonville, Nov. 2.
No. 16 Texas Tech (7-0) beat West Virginia 37-27.
Next: at No. 18 Oklahoma, Saturday.
No. 17 Fresno State (6-0) beat UNLV 38-14. Next:
at San Diego State, Saturday.
No. 18 Oklahoma (6-1) beat Kansas 34-19. Next:
vs. No. 16 Texas Tech, Saturday.
No. 19 Virginia Tech (6-1) did not play. Next: vs.
Duke, Saturday.
No. 20 Washington (4-3) lost to Arizona State 53-
24. Next: vs. California, Saturday.
No. 21 Oklahoma State (5-1) beat TCU 24-10. Next:
at Iowa State, Saturday.
No. 22 Rorida (4-3) lost to No. 14 Missouri 36-17.
Next: vs. No. 15 Georgia at Jacksonville, Nov. 2.
No. 23 Northern Illinois (7-0) beat Central Michigan
37-17. Next: vs. Eastern Michigan, Saturday.
No. 24 Auburn (6-1) beat No. 7 Texas A&M 45-41.
Next: vs. FAU, Saturday.
No. 25 Wisconsin (5-2) beat Illinois 56-32. Next:
at Iowa, Nov. 2.


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DAILY COMMERCIAL







COLLEGE FOOTBALL



Winston, No. 5 FSU crush No. 3 Clemson


RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press

CLEMSON, S.C.-Ja-
meisWinston and Flor-
ida State didn't take
long to hush Death
Valley, making a state-
ment that that could be
heard from Alabama to
Oregon.
The Seminoles' re-
markable redshirt
freshman threw for 444
yards and three touch-
downs and No. 5 Flor-
ida State crushed No.
3 Clemson 51-14 Sat-


urday night. When the
first BCS standings of
the season come out
Sunday, Florida State
should be right there
with the top-ranked
Crimson Tide and sec-
ond-ranked Ducks,
fighting for the top
spots.
"Do we deserve to be
in the top two? We de-
serve to be No. 1," Flor-
ida State linebacker
Telvin Smith said.
The Atlantic Coast
Conference's game of


the year, billed as may-
be the league's big-
gest game ever, quick-
ly became a Seminoles'
seminar on how to take
apart a top-five op-
ponent on its hostile
home turf in front of
83,428.
"We don't play
against noise. We're
playing against the
Clemson Tigers," Win-
ston said. "It was amaz-
ing, when we were out
on the field that first
snap. It was loud and


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we started smiling be-
cause we don't play
against noise."
The game started
with two Heisman Tro-
phy contender quar-
terbacks. It ended with
one.
Playing in one of the
loudest stadiums in the
country, Winston was
unfazed, going 22 for
34 for Florida State (6-
0, 4-0). His first throw
was a 22-yard touch-
down to Kelvin Benja-
min, and he scrambled
for a 4-yard touchdown
that made it 41-7 with
4:04 left in the third
quarter.
"They took advan-
tage of our mistakes,"
Clemson coach Dabo
Swinney said. "They
might be the best team
in the country."
Tajh Boyd threw two
interceptions for Clem-
son, and his first-quar-
ter fumble was re-
turned 37 yards for
touchdown by Mario
Edwards. Clemson (6-
1, 4-1) turned it over a
season-high four times,
the first one on the first
play from scrimmage.
"We know we're bet-
ter than how we played,
but nobody cares about
that," Swinney said.
Rashad Greene
caught eight passes
for 146 yards and two
scores, including a 72-
yard sprint that made
it 24-7 Florida State in
the second quarter.
The Seminoles
broke a five-game los-
ing streak at Memorial
Stadium, scored more
points than any oppo-
nent ever has in Death
Valley and gave fourth-
year coach limbo Fish-
er his biggest victo-
ry since taking over for
Bobby Bowden.
Florida State is also
perfect through six
games for the first time
since 1999, the last time
Bowden's 'Noles won
the national champi-
onship.
Maybe after all these
years, the Seminoles
are finally back to that
level?
"They're mature,
they're growing, they're
older, they understand
the moments," Fisher
said of his team.
As for Clemson, the
Tigers can't be accused
of 'Clemsoning' this
one away. They were


MIKE STEWART/AP
Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston (5) embraces offen-
sive linesman Bryan Stork (52) during Saturday's game against


Clemson in Clemson, S.C.

simply outclassed.
Florida State tight
end Nick O'Leary
punctuated the beat-
down in the third quar-
ter, running over Clem-
son's Travis Blanks
as he tried to make a
tackle. Seminoles by a
knockout. O'Leary fin-
ished with five catches
for 161
The game marked
only the fourth time
that the conference
better known for bas-
ketball has matched
two top-five football
teams, and the first
time since 2005.
Not long after Clem-
son made its grand en-
trance, sprinting past
Howard's Rock and
down the hill onto
the field, orange bal-
loons filling the sky
above Memorial Stadi-
um, Florida State took
control. On the first
play from scrimmage
Smith stripped Stan-
ton Seckinger and Ter-
rence Brooks recovered
for the Seminoles at the
Clemson 34.
Two plays later, Win-
ston lofted deep down
the sideline to the
6-foot-5 Benjamin,
who went up high for
the perfectly thrown
ball and landed with it
inside the pylon for a
touchdown.
Winston has been
even better than ad-
vertised in his first sea-


son as a starter, hard
to believe considering
the hype. But this op-
ponent and this set-
ting represented by far
the biggest challenge of
his young career. Turns
out, it was just another
showcase for Florida
State's defense, too.
The last sounds heard
booming from Memo-
rial Stadium were from
the Florida State band,
playing that familiar
Seminole war chant
with its fans chopping
away.
No. 5 FLORIDA ST. 51,
No. 3 CLEMSON 14
Florida St. 17 10 14 10 51
Clemson 7 0 0 7 14
First Quarter
FSU-Benjamin 22 pass from Winston (Aguayo
kick), 13:38.
FSU-FG Aguayo 28,4:18.
FSU-Edwards 37 fumble return (Aguayo kick), 3:07.
Clem-S.Watkins 3 pass from Boyd (Catanzaro
kick), :51.
Second Quarter
FSU-Greene 72 pass from Winston (Aguayo kick),
7:08.
FSU-FG Aguayo 24, :03.
Third Quarter
FSU-Greene 17 pass from Winston (Aguayo kick),
13:33.
FSU-Winston 4 run (Aguayo kick), 4:04.
Fourth Quarter
FSU-Freeman 2 run (Aguayo kick), 12:17.
FSU-FG Aguayo 20,4:41.
Clem-Stoudt 2 run (Catanzaro kick), :13.
A-83,428.
FSU Clem
First downs 30 26
Rushes-yards 38-121 41-123
Passing 444 203
Comp-Att-Int 22-35-1 22-45-2
Return Yards 51 74
Punts-Avg. 244.0 5-37.8
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 2-2
Penalties-Yards 12-104 7-96
Time of Possession 35:21 24:39
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Florida St., Freeman 21-84, K.Williams
3-19, Wilder 5-12, Abram 1-3, Winston 7-2, R.Green
1-1. Clemson, McDowell 11-61, Howard 7-26,
Brooks 6-18, Boyd 14-8, Stoudt 2-7, S.Watkins 1-3.
PASSING-Rorida St., Winston 22-34-1-444, Team
0-1-0-0. Clemson, Boyd 17-37-2-156, Stoudt 5-8-
0-47.
RECEIVING-Rlorida St., Greene 8-146, O'Leary
5-161, Shaw 5-64, Benjamin 3-62, Freeman 1-11.
Clemson, S.Watkins 8-68, Bryant 346, McDowell
3-11, M.Williams 2-35, Brooks 2-8, Humphries 1-12,
Leggett 1-10, Seckinger 1-9, Hopper 14.


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mm--


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 21, 2013








LiviMn


Cl
DAILY COMMERCIAL
Monday, October 21, 2013


SSend your health news toL/ features@dailycommercial.comrn 1352-365-8208 www.dailycommercial.com


HELPING HANDS: Chef gives time to terminal patients / C2


Health

check ,

LEESBURG
Advance care directives
always need second look
Advance directives documents are
meant to ensure health care choices
are known and followed in the event
a person is unable to communicate
or make their own choices.
The Spiritual Care Services team
at Leesburg Regional Medical
Center is hosting an Advance
Directives informational opportuni-
ty from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the hos-
pital cafeteria on Thursday.
For information, call the
LRMC Spiritual Care office at
352-323-5020.

THE VILLAGES
Essential tremor support
group meeting scheduled
This support group will allow
guests to share information with
others who have the disease and
learn methods of coping, informa-
tion on medications and helpful
hints at 2 p.m., Wednesday at the
St. Timothy ministry building, 1351
Paige Place.
For information, call Ken Taylor at
352-787-3866 or email kstaylor62@
usa2net.net.

MOUNT DORA
Health care for elders
program set for Thursday
"Serving Health Insurance Needs
for Elders" program will be at the
WT. Bland Public Library, 1995 N.
Donnelly St., for a free seminar
about understanding Medicare at
10:30 a.m.,Thursday
For information, call the library at
352-735-7180, option 5.

TAVARES
Holiday survivor course
scheduled for Wednesday
EZ Nutrition 101 in Tavares will
host a holiday survivor course that
will meet at 10 a.m. or 5:30 p.m. on
Wednesday at EZ Nutrition, 10320
E. Alfred St.
The course will include healthy
recipe makeovers, samples, nu-
tritional information and weekly
weigh-ins, lasting for nine weeks at
a cost of $30
For information, call
352-516-9855.

TAVARES
Program on aging well in
Lake County scheduled
The University of Florida IFAS
Extension will host a new educa-
tional series for older adults begin-
ningWednesday. The cost for each
program is $5.
Registration is due by Tuesday at
www.successfulaging.eventbrite.com.


Surgery sparks eye-opening debate


ELLEN HUET
San Francisco Chronicle
SAN FRANCISCO -
"It felt funny because
my eyes were so differ-
ent," she said. "I saw more
light."
She waited eight days
for the redness and puff-
iness to fade before she
made the big reveal. She
posted a self-portrait on
Facebook that highlighted
her newly creased eyelids.
"I put, 'Oh yeah, it feels
good to have big eyes,' "
she said. "One of my best
guy friends said, 'Oh, my
God, what did you do?'
I told him I got my eye-
lids done. He said, 'Before,
you looked like a peasant,
and now you look like a
princess.'"
Duong, 28, a hair and
makeup stylist from San
Jose, Calif., has no qualms
telling friends and clients
about her surgery.
Cosmetic eyelid surgery
has long been popular in
Asia, particularly in South
Korea. Patients whose
eyelids don't have a crease
or whose crease is hard
to see can get an incision
along the eyelid to make a
new crease, so the eye ap-
pears bigger.
The procedure, pop-
ular in the U.S. over the
past several decades, re-
mains a touchy, racially
charged subject. Among
Asian Americans who've
grown up in the United
States and live in the San
Francisco Bay Area, opin-
ions are split on the mat-
ter: Some say they should
avoid the surgery and em-


Julie Chen, host of CBS' "Big Brother," acknowledged recently that she'd had


brace their heritage, while
others say it is less of a ta-
boo.
Debate over the proce-
dure flared up again re-
cently when "Big Brother"
television host Julie Chen
said she had the surgery
18 years ago after her
boss in Ohio said her eyes
looked too heavy for her
to be a news anchor.
The surgery's stigma
- that those who get it
abandon their heritage -
makes it hard to find peo-
ple who admit they had
it but easy to find people
with opinions on it.
"Nobody ever talks
about it when they have
it," said Lisa Wang, 24, a
San Franciscan who grew
up in Plano, Texas. When
one girl from her high
school came back from
a summer in China with
different-looking eyelids,


some classmates who
weren't familiar with the
surgery asked what hap-
pened. "She told people
it must have been some-
thing in the water," Wang
said.
It's difficult to pin down
statistics on the surgery
among Asian Americans
because plastic surgery
statistics don't often cat-
egorize patients by race.
But in a 2012 national sur-
vey, a smaller percentage
of surgeons 44 percent,
down from 61 percent in
2008 listed eyelid sur-
gery as the most popular
procedure among their
Asian American patients.
"Patients used to come
in and they would want
Westernized eyelids 'I
want the fold,'" said Car-
olyn Chang, a San Fran-
cisco surgeon. "I don't
get that request nearly as


MONTY BRINTON / CBS
cosmetic eyelid surgery years ago.


much as I used to 10 years
ago."
The procedure used to
be "more aggressive" in
the '70s through the '90s,
said Chase Lay, a San Jose
surgeon whose practice
is almost all eyelid sur-
geries on Asian American
patients. Surgeons used
to remove more skin, or
creases were made deeper
and were set farther from
the eyelid's edge.
In 2012, blepharoplasty
- any kind of eyelid lift -
was the third-most-pop-
ular facial plastic surgery
procedure in the Unit-
ed States, the American
Academy of Facial Plastic
and Reconstructive Sur-
gery reports. A surgeon
cuts open the eyelid where
the crease will be creat-
ed and removes some
skin, and occasionally fat,
SEE EYES I C2


Organ donor's decision ease farewells


MARYJANE SLABY
Journal & Courier
INDIANAPOLIS It
was Aug. 25, a Sunday
morning, and the popu-
lar 23-year-old was driv-
ing north on Interstate 65
to West Lafayette from an
Indianapolis hotel, where
he had stayed after cele-
brating his cousin's 21st
birthday.
About four miles from
the Indiana 38 exit near
Dayton, Daniel's 2006
Hyundai ran off the east
side of the road and down
a steep and heavily wood-
ed embankment. The ve-
hicle rolled at least once.
A semi driver stopped to
call 911.
Five minutes later, Indi-


MICHAEL HEINZ / JOURNAL & COURIER
Stewart Kline listens to his son-in-law Gordon Weliky talk about his
late son Daniel on Aug. 28, in Lafayette, Ind. Daniel passed away
Aug. 25 and his family decided to donate his organs.


ana State Trooper Darrick
Scott responded. It took
five more minutes for
him to find the Hyundai
with Daniel inside his


license, money and Pur-
due University student ID
scattered on the ground.
A preliminary blood test
would later establish that


his blood-alcohol con-
centration was well over
the legal limit of 0.08 per-
cent.
At that early hour, Dan-
iel, an assistant man-
ager at Discount Den,
should have been pre-
paring to open the near-
campus store, where
customers knew him as
"Discount Dan" or "Dan
from the Den." Instead,
state troopers escorted
his parents, Stewart and
Suzanne Kline, to IU Ar-
nett hospital.
Shortly after 8 a.m.,
Stewart called Adrienne
Weliky, Daniel's sister. She
and her husband, Gor-
don, were in Indianapolis,
SEE DANIEL I C3





C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, October 21, 2013


Ohio won't ask drivers

about organ donations


Associated Press
COLUMBUS, Ohio
- Drivers renew-
ing their licenses in
Ohio will no longer
be asked if they want
to remain on the list
of organ donors in a
move designed to in-
crease the state's do-
nation registry.
Donors still can take
themselves off the list
by requesting a change
when they renew their
licenses.
The change comes
after a state lawmaker
added an amendment
to the state budget
signed by Republican
Gov. John Kasich.
Rep. Cheryl Gross-


man, a Republi-
can from Grove City,
said the goal was to
cut time at the BMV
counter and add to
the donor registry.
About 5.24 million
Ohioans are registered
organ donors, up from
5.19 million last year.
Ohio joins nine oth-
er states that don't
ask registered donors
about continuing.
Lifeline of Ohio,
which maintains
Ohio's organ donor
registry, pushed for
the policy switch be-
cause it wanted peo-
ple to gather more in-
formation first, said
Lifeline spokesperson
Marilyn Pongonis.


E =~A 10%A IIIn
Owner, Dr. James Costello, says, "My doctors utilize
modem techniques, and I instill old fashioned values."


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Hospice chef gives food, time,


comfort to terminal patients


LAURA REILEY
Tampa Bay Times
ST. PETERSBURG-
With a shock of white
hair and a dancer's
build, Fred Campagna
is not a big man. Wear-
ing three bathrobes at
once doesn't hide his
slightness. Nonethe-
less, Campagna, 92,
is a person of strong
opinions. Abandoning
the walker festooned
with a tiny American
flag, he leaned against
the kitchen island and
made a pronounce-
ment.
Suzanne Kennedy's
spaghetti sauce was as
good as -- nay, better
than -- his own moth-
er's. And he should
know. He's Italian. He
has lived at Bay Pines
Hospice for three
months and has had
ample opportunity to
scrutinize Kennedy's
work. A retired profes-
sional chef who lives in
Redington Shores, Ken-
nedy, 61, volunteers ev-
ery Wednesday to cook
for hospice residents
and their families.


EYES
FROM PAGE C1

before closing the in-
cision. Another option
involves making a se-
ries of small slits along
the eyelid that are then
tightened and closed.
An eyelid lift costs


Come S mpg e t e gEg







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Sample Signature Dishes & Products from Area Restaurants
and Businesses Throughout South Lake County

Tickets Are Limited $20 Advance $25 at the Door

Tickets Available at the South Lake Chamber of Commerce
620 W. Montrose Street Downtown Clermont
Phone: (352) 394-4191 or online at www.tasteofsouthlake.com
or at BankFIRST 1000 East Highway 50




I L I // ll






More than 25 Area Restaurants
Sampling their Signature Dishes

More than 35 Chamber Member Businesses
will be Showcasing their Products & Services


bright house
NETWORKS


JAMES BORCHUCK/ IAMPA BAYT TIMES
Volunteer chef Suzanne Kennedy serves Fred Campagna, 92, at
the Bay Pines VA Medical Center's hospice.


She gets "last sup-
per" requests regularly,
memories pulled from
deepest childhood that
involve sloppy Joes,
mac and cheese, meat-
loaf She has even ac-
commodated dying
veterans who have
craved that much-ma-
ligned military staple,
"S.O.S."
Kennedy calls it the
worst September ever.
She had just been diag-
nosed with breast can-
cer, her sister-in-law
was in the hospital and
her brother-in-law en-


around $3,800.
Parents sometimes
guide their children to-
ward the procedure, es-
pecially young men.
"They'll say, 'I be-
lieve that he'll do bet-
ter in college or in the
workforce,' Lay said.
"Some parents are very
up-front about wanting
their children to have
the best shot possible


tered Bay Pines Hos-
pice, where he died of
congestive heart fail-
ure.
For people like Ada
Lewis, what the vol-
unteer chefs at Bay
Pines Hospice pro-
vide is time. She de-
scribed how, when her
husband was sick last
year, she never want-
ed to run out to get
something to eat. She
didn't want to leave
Greg alone, didn't want
to risk missing his last
moments. So Kenne-
dy and her fellow vol-


at the best spouse pos-
sible."
Women who told The
Chronicle about get-
ting the surgery dis-
missed the racial con-
notation. Many said it
helped with makeup
application; almost all
said they wish they'd
gotten it sooner.
Julianne Chai, a
39-year-old Kore-


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unteers stock the fridge
with meals the families
can nuke.
When Campagna
came in for lunch, Ken-
nedy gave him a big
hug. She leaned toward
his good ear and recit-
ed the day's menu be-
fore helping him get a
plate of shells.
While he dined he
told his story. Started
work for Ford Motors
at age 14. Drafted, end-
ing World War II in the
1,269th Engineer Com-
bat Battalion, among
the first troops to come
upon the concentra-
tion camp at Dachau,
Germany.
It's a long story. Look-
ing down, his plate
is still full, his plastic
fork idly skating shells
across tomato sauce.
For all of Kennedy's
professional chops, for
all her carefully vet-
ted recipes, sometimes
what she's doing at
Bay Pines is not feed-
ing people, but giving
them the sights and
smells and rituals of
one of life's small joys.


an American from El
Cerrito, said she "al-
ways had double-eye-
lid envy" growing up
in Milpitas. She would
wear a tiny piece of
tape on her eyelid a
quick-fix way to add a
crease and carried a
roll of Scotch tape and
little scissors in her
purse at all times. She
had the surgery while
studying abroad in
South Korea.
Bigger, creased eyes
may be considered
more beautiful, but
no one wants them to
make themselves look
more Caucasian, said
D. Nguyen, 36, from
Sunnyvale, who had
the procedure last year.
"Believe me, Viet-
namese people don't
want to look like a white
person," she said. "We
don't want to look Cau-
casian. We just want to
look more beautiful."


tnaisantt.


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HICKORY POINT EDUCATION DAY 1
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C2


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 21, 2013


WTOi


".. ( y.




Monday, October 21, 2013


Rules for Dot industry approved


GENE JOHNSON
Associated Press
OLYMPIA, Washing-
ton Mexico, Uru-
guay, Poland and other
countries and states al-
ready are reviewing the
new regulations, which
cover everything from
the security at and size
of licensed marijuana
gardens, to how many
pot stores can open in
cities across the state,
said Alison Holcomb,
the Seattle lawyer who
drafted Washington's
marijuana initiative.
Washington will tax
pot highly and cap total
production in the state
at 80 metric tons. Sales
are expected to begin
by the middle of next
year.
"We feel very proud of
what we're doing," said
Sharon Foster, chair-
woman of the Wash-
ington Liquor Con-
trol Board, as she and
her two colleagues ap-
proved the rules. "We
are making history."
Washington and Col-
orado last year legal-
ized the possession of
up to an ounce of pot
by adults over 21, with
voters deciding to set
up systems of state-li-
censed growers, pro-
cessors and sellers. The
measures put state offi-
cials in the difficult po-
sition of crafting rules
for a fledgling indus-
try barred by federal
law for more than sev-
en decades.
The board devised
Washington's regula-
tions after nearly a year
of research, debate and
planning, including
public hearings that



DANIEL
FROM PAGE C1

too, and stayed at the
hotel with Daniel and
friends.
All Stewart said was
that Daniel had been in
a "serious accident."
Instead of going to
breakfast, Adrienne
and Gordon drove
straight to the hospital.
And so began an or-
deal for which no fam-
ily is ever prepared but
many must eventual-
ly confront: the ago-
nizing, yet ultimately
liberating, decision to
donate Daniel's organs.
Daniel was the third
person in Tippecanoe
County to give a live
donation in August -
something Coroner
Donna Avolt said is ex-
tremely rare.
Even more rare was
Daniel's blood type -
AB negative. And that
meant a longer-than-
usual process to find
recipients. The 36-hour
journey became a deli-
cate passage from Dan-
iel's life to the lives he
would save.
Once they arrived at


TED S. WARREN/AP
Shy Sadis, left, owner and founder of The Joint, a medical marijuana cooperative in Seattle, talks
about different varieties of medical marijuana with patient Samantha Rough, right, a law student at
the University of Washington, who uses marijuana to treat eating disorders, Wednesday, in Seattle.


drew hundreds of peo-
ple around the state.
Supporters hope
taxed pot will bring the
state tens or hundreds
of millions of dollars,
with much of the reve-
nue directed to public
and drug-abuse pre-
vention.
Colorado approved
its pot industry rules
last month, and sales
are expected to start in
some cities there at the
beginning of 2014.
The two states' laws
are largely similar, al-
though Colorado voters
are considering wheth-
er to tax marijuana at a
much lower rate, with
no limit on total pro-
duction.
Colorado also will
let stores sell both rec-
reational and medical
marijuana. Both states
will require such mea-
sures as seed-to-store
tracking, background
checks for license ap-



the hospital, Gordon
and Adrienne began
calling Daniel's close
friends and co-work-
ers. It was not a short
list, and several soon
came to the hospital.
Daniel left surgery
in a coma and was
wheeled to the inten-
sive care unit. His brain
was swollen and the
pressure was danger-
ously high. His lung
had collapsed, oth-
er organs were bruised
and early indicators
showed potential brain
damage.
Although Daniel had
never talked about it,
the red heart on his li-
cense signifying his
desire to donate his or-
gans in the event of his
death didn't surprise
his family It was just
like Daniel, a sensitive
and sincere young man
who stopped to talk
with everyone.
When family mem-
bers brought up the
idea to Daniel's nurses,
it didn't surprise them
either. They already had
been in touch with the
Indiana Organ Procure-
ment Organization.
Any time a patient


plicants, and child-re-
sistant packaging.
Washington liquor
board members said
they tried to make
marijuana accessi-
ble enough that legal
pot would undermine
the black market, but
not so accessible that
it would threaten pub-
lic or safety. The board
hopes the sale of le-
gal marijuana will cap-
ture about one-quarter
of the state's total pot
market, for starters.
Under the rules, the
board will licenses for
up to 334 marijuana
stores across the state,
with 21 of them in Se-
attle a figure some
have questioned as too
low, considering the
city estimates about
200 medical marijua-
na dispensaries already
are operating there.
The City Council has
passed zoning regula-
tions for pot business-
es that would require



scores lower than 5
on the Glasgow Coma
Scale a neurologi-
cal assessment to test
a person's conscious
state hospitals are
required to notify
IOPO, said Jen Hittle, a
charge nurse at the IU
Arnett ICU.
Hours before Dan-
iel's brain scan, IOPO
waited, knowing that if
the unthinkable hap-
pened, Daniel had reg-
istered as an organ do-
nor.
In a consultation
room, Daniel's family
met Clyde Spann.
A family services co-
ordinator from IOPO,
Spann, an unassum-
ing and warm man, has
worked with families
in distress like this for
years.
In Indiana, anyone 13
and older can register
to be an organ donor.
IOPO meets with fami-
lies to explain the pro-
cess and make choices
about what organs will
be donated.
Once the donation
process begins, IOPO


medical marijuana dis-
pensaries to obtain a
state license or stop do-
ing business by 2015.
The rules limit the
number of licenses
that anyone can hold
to three an attempt
by the board to stamp
out any monopolies
before they start. They
also prohibit out-of-
state investment in pot
businesses and require
quality-control testing
of marijuana by third-
party labs.
Hilary Bricken, a Se-
attle lawyer who is ad-
vising businesses that
hope to obtain mari-
juana licenses, said her
clients largely are con-
tent with the regula-
tions, though some are
disappointed by the
three-license max and
the ban on out-of-state
money.
"It's a huge undertak-
ing, and the board has
been extremely fair,"
she said.


takes over clinical care
of the patient and picks
up the bills. A flag in
honor of the organ do-
nor is hoisted outside
the hospital.
Spann told Dan-
iel's family that there
is a critical shortage of
available organs be-
cause not enough peo-
ple agree in advance to
be donors.
"When you know the
information, it's hard
to say no," Spann said.
"Most people want to
save a life."
Daniel's family chose
to donate his organs.
It's a donation for
which only about 5
percent of deaths qual-
ify because it involves
a patient with massive,
nonsurvivable brain
damage, Spann said.
The family wouldn't
be able to be by Dan-
iel's side as his heart
stopped beating, but
they were no longer
tasked with having to
decide when to end his
life support.


Brain's 'music'


might help spot


potential seizures


KRISTEN V. BROWN
San Francisco Chronicle
SAN FRANCISCO
- The music is eerie,
if not altogether aes-
thetically pleasing.
Like a soundtrack mo-
ments before a film's
horrifying twist, the
sounds of the brain in
a state of seizure be-
trays the plot with lit-
tle more than a skin-
prickling crescendo.
This music, the
electrical activity
of the seizing brain
translated to sound,
is a merger of art and
medicine, the work
of Stanford's Dr. Josef
Parvizi, an epilepsy
specialist, and Chris
Chafe, a composer
and music researcher.
Their initial idea
was to take recordings
of epileptic patients'
brain activity, turn
them into music, and
see what they sound-
ed like. What began
as a curiosity project
then quickly evolved
into something more:
"sonifying" a seizure in
real time, they found,
could be a way to more
quickly and easily di-
agnose a patient in the
midst of a seizure.
"Imagine that you
have a device that is
playing the sounds of
the brain in action," Par-
vizi said. "From a clin-
ical perspective, that's
invaluable. You can't see
inside the brain, butyou
can listen."


They described that
device as a "brain
stethoscope," a porta-
ble headset with elec-
trodes feeding infor-
mation to a mobile
app that would then
convert the brain's
electrical signals into
audio in real time.
The esoteric music
made from a seizure
was as valuable to sci-
ence as it was art.
One piece of mu-
sic begins as a woman
with epilepsy sits in
her hospital bed, her
brain activity normal
in the moments be-
fore a seizure. Twen-
ty seconds into the
recording, a seizure
begins in the right
hemisphere of the
brain, in the medial
temporal lobe.
The right side of the
brain, represented by
a feminine-sounding
synthesized singing
voice, begins to os-
cillate wildly The left
side, a lower, mascu-
line sound, is steady
and percussive, its
neurons firing off as
usual.
This particular re-
cording, or electro-
encephalogram,
was made while the
woman was await-
ing surgery to remove
problematic, seizure-
causing brain tissue.
The sequences of data
from that recording
then became the mu-
sic.


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Monday, October 21, 2013


Navigators help more Native


Americans get health insurance


Associated Press
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. -
Insurance enrollment
helpers are encouraging
Native Americans to sign
up for coverage under
the nation's new health
care law, saying it will
help them better access
X-rays, mammograms,
prescription drugs and
trips to specialists not
covered under Indian
Health Service.
American Indians are
exempt from the Af-
fordable Care Act's re-
quirement that people
carry insurance, but
the law opens up re-
sources that for years
have been limited
through IHS, said Jeri-
lyn Church, executive
director of the South
Dakota-based Great
Plains Tribal Chair-
men's Health Board.
"There's a huge gap in
access to services, so be-
ing enrolled in the mar-
ketplace is going to make
a big difference in terms
of accessibility to health
care," Church said.
The Indian Health
Service, a branch of
the U.S. Department
of Health and Human
Services, provides free
health care to enrolled
members of tribes,
their descendants and
some others as part of
the government's trea-
ty obligations to Indi-
an tribes dating back
nearly a century.
Critics long have
complained of insuffi-
cient financial support
that has led to constant
turnover among doc-
tors and nurses, under-
staffed hospitals, sparse


AP FILE PHOTO
In this Sept. 18 file photo, former Health and Human Services
Secretary Mike Leavitt participates in a news conference near
the steps of the Utah State Capitol in Salt Lake City. Insurance
enrollment helpers are encouraging Native Americans to sign
up for coverage under the nation's new health care law, saying it
will help them better access to medical care.


specialty care and long
waits to see a doctor.
The Great Plains
Tribal Chairmen's
Health Board received
$264,000 in South Da-
kota and $186,000 in
North Dakota to assist
with Native American
signups on the states'
reservations and urban
areas.
The new law health
care law will especial-
ly benefit people who
seek treatment at ur-
ban Indian health clin-
ics, which collective-
ly are funded by just 1
percent of the IHS bud-
get, said Ashley Tuomi,
executive director of
the American Indian
Health and Family Ser-
vices clinic in Detroit.
"Our resources are
extremely limited,
even more so than the
tribes," Tuomi said.
"What we have with-
in our walls is what we


can offer for free."
The clinic has seen a
lot of patient interest
in the health care mar-
ketplace, but "naviga-
tors" helping with sign-
ups have had to cancel
many appointments
because of continued
issues with the federal
healthcare.gov website,
Tuomi said.


The Ponca Tribe of
Nebraska has received
about $38,000 in federal
grant funds to encour-
age signups for tribal
members scattered in
12 counties in Nebras-
ka, two in Iowa and one
in South Dakota.
The tribe's IHS-con-
tracted clinic in Oma-
ha, Neb., has a medical
doctor and two nurse
practitioners, but the X-
rays, specialists and pre-
scriptions that are out-
sourced are not covered,
said Jan Henderson, the
tribe's navigator proj-
ect director. "And if they
don't have insurance,
they have to pay for it
themselves," she said.
Tribes across the
country get some fed-
eral money for refer-
rals, but the small pools
run out quickly, Hen-
derson said.
She views the new
health care law as a great
step for Native Amer-
icans, but the greatest
challenge is educating
tribal members who are
weary from decades of
promises.


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TATIVE IN MASSACHUSETTS
DEAR TENTATIVE: Tempting as
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When a person has been emo-
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accepted and validated again,
the result can be euphoria a
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What I think about your
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DEAR ABBY: My 86-year-old
dad buys all his food from the
markdown "quick sale" tables,
then lets it sit in the fridge for
weeks or even months before
he eats it. He insists the mold
is penicillin and good for you.
He eats moldy cheese, bread,
fruit and meat I wouldn't feed
to my dogs. He has a turkey
in the freezer that expired
in 2008, and he can't under-
stand why I won't cook it for
my pets.
Dad reads your column ev-
ery day, so please give me
some input. By the way, he
isn't poor and can afford good,
fresh food. PERPLEXED DAUGH-
TER IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
DEAR PERPLEXED DAUGHTER:
Your father is a product of his
upbringing during the Great
Depression, a time when
many people were starving.
The habits people form when
they are young can be hard to


shake.
One reason that perish-
able products have a "sell by"
date is that the food begins to
lose its nutritional value. As to
your father's excuse that he's
ingesting "penicillin" when he
eats moldy fruits, vegetables,
baked goods and dairy prod-
ucts I'm sure his doctor
would prefer he get it by pre-
scription only.
Spoiled food can cause se-
rious illness, which is why
the U.S. government publish-
es pamphlets on the impor-
tant topic of food safety. Visit
www.foodsafety.gov and print
out some of the "Food Safety
at a Glance" charts for him. If
he refuses to take your advice
and mine, perhaps he'll be
more receptive to what Uncle
Sam has to say.
DEAR ABBY: My boyfriend of
two years, "Jesse," has sud-
denly changed. He's pushing
me away. We are both 17 and
have a 9-month-old baby.
Jesse spent the first six
months of our son's life in
state custody. Since he has
been back, he has been real-
ly distant. He ignores me and
isn't affectionate anymore.
When I get upset about it, he
denies it and says I have no
reason to be upset.
I'm scared our relationship
isn't as strong as I thought. My
son deserves a family, but it's
falling apart. What should I
do? TROUBLED IN TENNESSEE
DEAR TROUBLED: You have no
idea what might have hap-
pened to Jesse after he was
sent away, so give him some
space, but let him know that
if he wants to talk about it,
you are willing to listen and
be supportive. Don't push
and don't be clingy. You may
have to be strong for all three
of you. Complete your edu-
cation, take parenting class-
es, and encourage Jesse to do
it, too. Do this and your son
WILL have a family, whether
or not it's the one you thought
you'd have with Jesse.
Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van
Buren, also known as Jeanne Phil-
lips, and was founded by her moth-
er, Pauline Phillips. Write DearAbby
at www.DearAbby.com or PO. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.


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Monday, October 21, 2013


S udoku ****** 4puz.com

6 1

21 5

5 7 9

8 5

19 68

3 5

7 6 4

7 39
2 8

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION How to play: Fill in the blank
squares with the numbers 1
9 2 4 1 6 8 5 3 7 through 9 so that each horizon-
8 7 5 9 3 2 4 1 6 tal row, vertical column and nine-
square
3 1 6 5749 8 2 sub-grid contains no repeated
5 9 2 7 83 64 1 numbers.
1 4 7 6 5 9 3 2 8 Puzzles range in difficulty from
6 8 3 2 4 1 7 5 9 one to six stars.
7 5 1 3 2 6 8 9 4 The solution to today's puzzle
4 396__ __Z_ _will be in tomorrow's paper.

268495173
5^5













AXYDLBAAXR
isLONGFELLOW
One letter stands for another. In this sample, A is used
for the three L's, X for the two O's, etc. Single letters,
apostrophes, the length and formation of the words
are all hints. Each day the code letters are different.


10-21

TGIGZF


CRYPTOQUOTE

BYFA JXG RNAI RJ


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AJZVTIUJ


- QXRNQI


MXQ


IX


YIA HNSTJ.


RQXBFYFO


Saturday's Cryptoquote: EQUIPPED WITH HIS
FIVE SENSES, MAN EXPLORES THE UNIVERSE
AROUND HIM AND CALLS THE ADVENTURE
SCIENCE. EDWIN HUBBLE


WORD S)G))R) D)M)M)A)G)EY
BY JUDD HAMBRICK 2013 UFS / Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS
4th Letter DOWN
+ 7 PTS


20000000 nDOWN
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FOUR PLAY
TIME LIMIT: 20 MIN AVERAGE GAME 250-260 PTS TOTAL
Directions: Make a 2- to 7-letter word from the letters on each yardline. Add points
to each word or letter using scoring directions. Seven-letter words get a 60-point
bonus. All words can be found in Webster's New World College Dictionary.
10-2113 JUDD'S SOLUTION TOMORROW
W0I QIMMAeE o..,SOLUTION BY JUDD HAMBRICK
W D SORIMMAG 2013 UFS / Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS
(W (A(D03 K) 1( 1-tDOWN= 149
........... .... ........ ..... ........... ................... .nd .o .e : 1 o ; ..........
( (K) () (NK)2)A(1)CK 3 2dDOWN =1105
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(S (T)( ( () 03( 4th DOWN = 13
(2) (B (C)E)( (C ) (S BONUS DOWN = 30
AVERAGE GAME 260-270 PTS JUDD'S TOTAL = 410
10-20-13


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-I~~~~ ~ 111 11EM *I41NA 11114R111 ^* il j' llrl B^11 ^w 1*i^^E^mnIBB^ uf~^I~w


DEADLINES
For Insertion COPY DATE
Friday Thursday, 5pm
Saturday Friday, 3pm
Sunday Friday, 5:00pm
Monday Friday, 5:00pm
Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pm
.,,,n I', , ,,:,, I
ADJUSTMENTS
..........'., ",''"',',," ,'," ,H ',
department mmuediately at 314 3278 o 748 -1955
* The publisher assumes nro financial responsibility tfor errors or fur


Legal Notices ..
Announcements
At Your Service.
Financial ......
Employment ...
Pets/Animals ..


........ 003
........ 100
........ 200
........ 300
........ 400
........ 500


____________________ I I I


CROSSWORD

CROSSWORD
By THOMAS JOSEPH


ACROSS
1 Tortoise's
rival
5 Soda
fountain
orders
10 Country
singer
Jackson
11 Kind of
musical
wonder
13Crooner
Crosby
14Cash, in
slang
15Some
piano
keys
17 European
peak
18 Defensible
19Summit
20 Horse
healer
21 Bride's
wear
22 Bed cover
25Captain
Nemo's
creator
26 Bad actors
27Knight's
title
28Chest
bone
29Windfall
33 George
Gersh-
win's
brother
34Some
piano
keys


35 Infuriate
37 Owed
amount
38Frat party
39Land unit
40Horn
sounds
41 Listen to

DOWN
1 Custom
2 Full of
energy
3 Talked at
length
4 Carves
into metal
5 Early Ford
60 Ouzo
flavor
7 Writer
Deighton
8 Usher's
place


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A L T 0 B 0 G I E
L I E 'S E L A I N E
E N DIS NIN E R
Saturday's answer


9 Steak
choice
12 Knock
over
16Skeptic's
comment
21 Roofed
porch
22Cry of
terror
23Snood
24Shipping
ban


251n -
veritas
27Gets
serious
29 Produce
30 Brother's
daughter
31 Horse's
cousin
32 Showy
flower
36 In the
past


NEW CROSSWORD BOOK! Send $4.75 (check/m.o.) to
Thomas Joseph Book 1, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475
m 12 13 4 7 5 16 17 18 19


10-21


2
Legal Notices

003 Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR LAKE COUNTY,
FLORIDA GENERAL CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 35-2013-CC 336
SUNRISE LAKES COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION,
INC., a Florida corporation not for profit,
Plaintiff,
V.
DORIS LEWIS, THERESA THOMAS, UN
KNOWN TENANT NO. 1, and UNKNOWN
TENANT NO. 2,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO
S45.031, FLORIDA STATUTES
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to
the Final Judgment entered in the case of
SUNRISE LAKES COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION,
INC., and DORIS LEWIS, THERESA THOMAS,
UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1, and UNKNOWN
TENANT NO. 2, individually, etc., Defendants,
in the Circuit Court of the Fifth Judicial Circuit
in and for Lake County, Florida, CASE NO.
35 2013 CC 336, the undersigned Clerk will
sell at public sale to the highest and best bid
der for cash that certain real property situate
and being in Lake County, Florida, described
as follows:
Lot 43, SUNRISE LAKES PHASE I, according
to the plat or map thereof described in Plat
Book 48, Pages 37 39, of the Public Records
of Lake County, Florida.
Street Address: 16651 Rising Star Drive,
Clermont, Florida 34714
This sale will be held by the Clerk of this
Court at 11:00a.m. (Eastern Time) at LAKE
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1 st Floor Lobby, 550
West Main Street, in Tavares, Florida on the
8th day of November, 2013 to the highest
bidder for cash, in accordance with Section
45.031, Florida Statutes.
Any person claiming an interest in the sur
plus from the sale, if any, other than the



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003 Legal Notices
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pen
dens must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.
DATED this 8 day of October, 2013
NEIL KELLY
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By:/s/W.TILLMAN
Deputy Clerk
Attorneys for Plaintiff
Usher L. Brown
Gregg A. Johnson
Brown, Garganese, Weiss & D'Agresta, P.A.
111 N. Orange Ave, Suite 2000
Orlando, FL 32801
Ad No.: 00413553
October 21 & 28, 2013

PUBULC NOTICE
Humanities and Fine Arts Charter School, Inc.
Board of Directors Meeting will be held on
October 28, 2013, at 6:00 p.m., at 213 N.
Lee Street, Leesburg, FL 34748.
Ad No.: 00412691
October 21, 2013
100
Announcement
102 Lost
CAT Ig. black male. Small white spot on
chest. Treasure Island Road
area..REWARD Call 352-787-8165
104 Special
Notices
NOTICE TO
ADVERTISERS
PLEASE CHECK YOUR AD FOR
ERRORS THE FIRST DAY IT APPEARS
SINCE THE DAILY COMMERCIAL WILL
NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
INCORRECT ADS AFTER THE FIRST
DAY OF PUBLICATION. IF YOU FIND
AN ERROR CALL THE CLASSIFIED
DEPARTMENT IMMEDIATELY AT
314-3278 OR 748-1955.
THE PUBLISHER ASSUMES NO
FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY FOR
ERRORS OR FOR COMMISSION OF
COPY. LIABILITY SHALL NOT EXCEED
THE COST OF THE PORTION OF
SPACE OCCUPIED BY SUCH ERROR.
CANCELLATIONS
CANCELLATION FOR ADS RUNNING
SATURDAY MUST BE MADE BY
FRIDAY BY 2:00, CANCELLATIONS
FOR SUNDAY & MONDAY MUST BE
MADE FRIDAY BY 5:00

134 Cemetery
Lots/Crypts
HILLCREST MEMORIAL 2 lots, opening
& closing w/2 vaults. Serenity sec-
tion. Worth 9,070 sell for $6,800.
Call 352-793-8102


.... .800
.... 800
.... 900
.. 1000
S. .1100
. ..1200


200
At Your Service

201 Insurance
205 Adult Care
NOTICE
Florida Statute states, "It is a
misdemeanor for any person willfully,
knowingly, or intentionally to operate
or attempt to operate a family day
care home without a license or
without registering with the
department, whichever is applicable".
Florida Statute states, "No person
shall advertise a child care facility
without including within such
advertisement the state or local
agency license number of such
facility. The statute applies to anyone
with more than 1 unrelated child
in their home.

245 Financial
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Contact us if your claim has been
denied or if you need help.
Over 30 yrs. exp.No fees or costs
unless your claim is approved.
Cooper Consulting
2228 South St., Leesburg
352-728-5552

250 Handyman
Hard working Lic. Business owner,
seeks to improve your home.
Ability to perform jobs including
Remodeling-TreeTrimming-Drywall-
Tiling, etc. References avail.
Call Robert Plante's
Home Maint. 352-484-3543


L4A 'I-.1JA
LAFF~l .r*ri~J."jH
HANDYMAN SERVICE
Reliable & Dependable! One Call Does
It All!
Lic/Ins 352-409-4059

268 Moving
Two Brothers Moving


1 Room or a Full House
FL Reg. #1M1539
Russell & Todd Franks
Lic. & Ins. Call 352-793-8960


siul
lews



*s IFoIPHome .
e." .- Delivery Call'
S352787-0600
Hs..... -ii^ M i -- i ....l:-


CHECK OUT OUR SPECL

nssi riecjS


merdial.comilclassifieds







PRINT & ONLINE CALL


ST


Classified Index


Merchandise Mart ...
Real Estate/For RENT
Real Estate/For SALE
Manufactured Homes
Recreation .........
Transportation ......


F + I ~




Monday, October 21, 2013


A/


Local, Trusted
A/C Expert
Kalos Services
352-243-7088
KalosFlorida.com
Lic.#CAC 1814620

Fl rdlaAir & Heat Inc.
Your Comfort Company
For All Your Air Conditioning
Hl 5 f& leading Needs
WK352-326-3202
| Seeing Lake County Slate Licence #
since 1986 CAC1814030

IShawn A/C 8& Heart
hi Repairs at great prices. |
Residential & Commercial
407-617-0450
I c.* CAC181M7515 State CertIfied




Eustis Senior Care
A~ssted Uviug FacilityAL 8993
Accepting New Clients for our
brand new bedrooms.
Call Rhea, RN at 352-551-5307
for inquiries and a free tour.







Serving Lake, Sumter
&S. Marion Counties
cWe Service All
Appliance Brands
Licensed/Insured
Free Service Call
S w/Repair
15+ Years Exp. 24 Hr. Emergency Svc.
We Don't Want To Be The Biggest
Just The Best
Eric Wolf 352-630-2202






Complete Automotive Care
Transmissions AC Brakes
Tune Ups Body Work Oil Change
Family Owned 26 Yrs 352-326-2400
1406 Emerson St, Leesburg across from Post Office





RE-TILE(
352-391-5553
SBacksplashes Re-Tile Tub & Shower
Walls Grab Bars Floors
Handicap Baths Repairs
Leaky Shower Pan
Ins./Lic. 30 yrs. exp.




ATHTUBIS REFINISHED
SON LOCATION
Renew, on location, your
i *Porcelain Fiberglass
*Ceramic Tiles
" Shower Stalls
LAKESIDE TUB & TILE REFINISHING
(352) 742-9602




Blin Scins.eillc
Prossional
Service
109W. lakeView St.Lady lake
Behind Mom a Bad's Restuaunt
WV M[ nM1b S b11illdolss c















^Stucky's Carpet
SCleaning
I Spring Special
ooms & Hall $50
35.365.9889


All-Natural Cleaning Service
wantss to clean your cobwebs!
Quality Cleaning with
I'\ only natural products.
352-348-6576 Lic/Ins
www.bambisallnaturalcleaning.com


Enclosur


i7 T)iple Crown
STile & Wood
Installation & Repairs
Owner does all work. *
Free Est. Liclnns
3524274825
1606666066666***^K


Simone's Cleaning Services
Commercial/Residential
Reliable/References
Lie/Bllonded-10 Yrs Exp.
Immediate Availibility-
]Flexible Hours
4 Call: Simone
407-844- 1183

ESP Services
Doctors Visits Cooking & Laundry
Pet Caring General Errands
Housekeeping
Call For A Free In-Person
Consultation
352-348-6408

CLEAN SWEEP
(Clutter Free Cleaning)
lean, Sort, Pack or Spring Clean
Ref's & Yrs. of Experience
352-742-0014
i Reasonable Rates




Your PC Repair Specialists
Fast friendly service at a
flat rate affordable price.
.T Education & Repair
In your home or our office.
Call
Q 352-897-1309





QUALITY CONCRETE & BLOCK
8x10 $500.00 10x40 $1200.00
Includes labor, concrete & cleanup
ast turnaround, no hassle & local
#CRC1326327, Ins. & References
BRIAN DEGAGLIA
352-267-5723

.A Concrete For Less
On 8x10 Slab $450
NOMMFNT 10140 Slab $1325
Includes Concrete & Labor
V Blocklngl ReflJLlcJlIns.
I Phillip 352-504-8372


We ELIMINATE all trip
hazards due to UNEVEN and
or RAISED concrete.
Commercial/Residential
Concrete Grinding is 1/2
the cost of replacement.
Entry ways Ramps Sidewalks
Driveways Puddling Water, etc.
Insured
(877] 454-0113 (toll free]
Alconcretegrinding.com




METAL TILE SHINGLE ROOFING
New Construction or Re-Roofing
B 308 Oak Street
Lady Lake, FL 32159
352-430-2773
www.sackroofing.com
Serving the Tri County Area For 26 Years




A719'r-j 1me- Lic #CBC1252465
%%DO0R & LOCK SERVICE
We Repair, Replace and Install
Emergency Services Available!
(352) 314-3169


ElectricalH
Services^^


iii: 11111116


BOYDS
You call it, We haul it!
352
460-7186



I poem ent
METAL TILE SHINGLE ROOFING
New Construction or Re-Roofing
B 308 Oak Street
I II Lady Lake, FL 32159
352-430-2773
www.sackroofing.com]
Serving the Tri County Area For 26 Year


hMT WD s D&B RENOVATIONS
u sea sea --- 352-572-1847
FREE ESTIMATES
AMl Makes hi Mod"LONE CALL DOES IT ALL"
BinkenSpring Rllwacmii |Bathroom Remodels, Flooring,
10%0fw/thisad Painting, Pressure Washing,
32-3 4 Ie Privacy Fence AND MORE
3 7 ) Insured & Experienced


,gp> uLpci #CBC1252465
i- GARAGE DOORS
JComplete Service & Installation
Lake County's Largest Provider!
We Sell & Program Remotes!
1352) 748-4575


Repairs &
age Door Replacements
& Locally Owned
Gate A Work
Warranted
Licensed & Insured mldfldoor.com
352-630-0292 Shane Blanton











i Affordabie Eomo.
arage door epnstallair, LLC
oh Spng Replacement. Free Est s








l & Repair Decks & Ramps
1Soffits/Siding Doors/Windows
Painting e Tile Work- Lic/Ins FLA.
LiIns. Call Pat 352-615-1294073







Door & Window Iystallion
fHom e Improvement,




F'L Drywvall & More! Just Ask!
I P professional Service
Lic./Ins. 352-259-5357
I : John R repair, LLC
& Repair Decks & Rampsiing
Sofflts/Siding Doors/Windows
Painting s* Tile Work* Lic/ns
Call Pat 352-77-6073

S 1o's Pahian& abintIng






D Floor &s. Window and Doorsstallion






We- doaverthis aingfoCeiliangs tor
CYou r pesky Leaks gone, Your Soffy, ts
we Fix, and Houses We'll Paimrovement. From
inside and out, we'll & make it gre! Just Ask!







JPHandy~com(352) 308-0694
PrMike Shofessionall Service
ICall 352 552 18759-537
*:-::Home Repair:-*-*-,-
*Pressure Washing e Painting
*Flooring & Carpet Clean Outs
*Clean Ups Hauling Licensed



REPAIRS 352-787-7056







.JUNGLE HUfT ]
JoRepair everything Replace anychin.
Me do Everything from Ceilings to
Floors. Window and Doors,
WPantries, Cabinets and more.
Your pesky Leaks gone, Your Soffits
we Fix, and Houses We'll Paint. From
inside and out, we'll make it great Lic/lns
IJPHandy~comC352) 308-06941


8Mke Shoffstall :-; ^>all 352 552 1875^


Reareerything. Replace anything


M. Lucie Carpentry
Lic./lns. Res./Comm.
Repairs & Renovations
Drywall, Trim & Rotted Wood
-Call Mick
.386-523-5015


Trusted. Quality Craftsmanship for 30+ years
Kitchens Bathrooms Windows
Vinyl Siding Decks Painting/Staining
Tile/Marble Lanai Enclosures
Mike Lalonde 352-409-8311
mnikea@iinage4me.com I


Local Agent
Long Term Care Ins.
Medicare Supplements
Critical Care Ins.
Cancer Ins.
Call Bill Bell
352.589-0454 or 352.551.3504

Ask Me About
Medicare Insurance
Robert Lange
352-742-2425
lange.rob.ins@gmall.com





IrrigatlonlF Tune-Up
$35 Check &Adjust
OLU Provide Written Est.
To Rx Problems!
Lower Your Monthly Cost
352-409-3163

^ ~Sprinkler
SRepairs
I Timers, Valves, Heads,
S Leaks, etc. ]
362) 787-9001
That's all we do since 1979
IO Native, 4th Generation -i


La nd

.C.C. Bobcat a& Tree Svc. Inc.
AM Land Clearing/Excavating
lI Fill Dirt/Clay
I M..tlauling/Debris Removal
- Stump Grinding
Demolition/Grading/ Driveways
Owner Operator
352-455-7608

,CHRIS CUANES LANDSCAPE
Accoodil~lsoCliol
Lawn Malite.nce, ardscaie., Patios I
I Retaalg Walls, Malt Sodding
Leeshing 536-3701
nunhs Ir W tlls8
M I Ra.w It j. t~ S

A-J Premier Scapes
,i d & Services Inc.
Land Clearing Bush Hogging
Debris Removal
Hauling Free Estimates
352-308-5508


Landscaping
ff Landscaping
Trimming, Mulching,
Sod, Tree Trimming,
P'avers & Much Morel
Armando Santamario
352-587-1323


SDon's "MOBILE"
Lawn Mower Repair
I Come To You & Repair
S Your: Lawn Mower, Trimmer,
S Blower, Chain Saw, etc.
S35+ Yrs. Exp. Res/Com
(352) 450-7661


^^^Lawn^^
Services^^^


e LAWN
SPRAYING
Fertilizer Weeds Insects
Lawn Maintenance
352-357-5905
SA Pest Exterminator








W A



Do'*Srs alTe et.
'1 21 De.peda Co





Tree Service At
Reasonable Rates
I can climb the highest trees.
and I can mow the biggest
llawns, but please don't ask me
to leap tall buildings
JL Fair Pricing. Trim Trees,
Ho%.Cut Lawns & Clean Ups
Cal Tonv for estimate 352-759.T080

Don't Stress Call The Best!
I ^- Dependable Commercial
Lawn Services
Lic/Ins. Designer
Landscaping, Trimming,
Shrubs. We do it all
I ^Rick 352-427-8919

Howards Lawn
Service
esldointlCoinmnorclal
UDcln
(352)
800-9985



Noeu accem Noe duiiercai a
1Isiutlal custemeri =1ll,
Ladmsufim, Inigain and mere.
ResMnale, Depeidable, EieNced
=f0e 352-5524556 CON 352-782-646I

FC C LAll Lawn
I.>and Tree
r a z Care
SService
Natural Land
9 Clearing (Goats)
I"BESTPRICES" Free Est.
352-460-7186



Services

WANiA 352-602-1735
At Venetian Gardens
Marina on the
Harris Chain of Lakes.
No Trailer. No Problem.
SBoat Repairs & Svc. on water





Bill's Moving
Fa. Mover lReg. No: 2095
Owner On Every Job
Fair Rates & 27+ Yrs. Exp.
352-669-4456
Toll Free 888-444-3559

Uttle John's Movers &
Storage 352-812-4889
Serving Lake, Marion,
& Sumter Counties
1-15 items same day delivery
Local & Long distance moves
SLoading & unloading pods, rental
trucks, & storage units.
We have trucks going up &
down 195 & 175
"Less Than a POD" "Door to Door"
You're Coming ....Your Neighbor is Going!
Jump on Board and Save
SERVING ALL 50 STATES
One item to a full house!!!
We will get off the interstate for you!
ljm9575@yahoo.com
US DOT #2406621




QualityAssurance Painting, Inc.
'V If you want quality, you want us!"
[ lierlif- merretahinlts
e NewCouslrucuih I
[ Ucensei/linsureI
TIm Brubbs
ww yassurancepaintinginc.com

[s~7 CO-ED1
I27W PROPESSIONALI-
[PAINTING, INC.
Commercial p STIMATES i
& &ResRodential (352) 267-6430
Ww* WWCO-EDRPUIUWITMG.COM4
5W Licensed and Ised
NTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING & OTHER SVC


Enclosur


Su lIuminIuiimepiinrsii
FREE ESTIMATES
352.408.2142


Hauling
Services


A Ttal Lawn se ce
ianIscapngTree Trmndig Presn Wasing
FI ESTIMESS UCJINS.
We Take A Bite Oum 01 vw Pricing
352-326-8712 / 352-406-3354


I I


DAILY COMMERCIAL




Monday, October 21, 2013


(352) 348-6923
Tim Mundy Painting
&- Presure Cleaning Services, ZUc.
S"Where ulity Is No Accident"
\ Licensed & Insured

S John Philibert, Inc
For All Your Interior/Exterior
WPainting Needs.
SWe Also Offer
Driveways Patios
nd Faux Finishes Lic/Ins
Call John @ (352) 308-0694
JPHandy.com

New England Painter
| Semi-Retired
I 30 Years Exp
Interior, Exterior, Pressure
Washing No Job Too Small
Bob Kelley Painting
352-702-7739

CLAUDE WILD PAINTING
High Quality Reasonable Prices
Int. & Ext. Free Est. Lic/Ins
Pressure Cleaning Ref. & 35 yrs. exp.
in Lake County
wildpainting@gmail.com





INDOOR PEST
CONTROL
S As low as $20 per me.
352-357-5905
A Pest Exterminator


APerstPe (Control
Termites Rodent Exclusions
German Roaches
Property Inspections
Soil Pre-treatment
Lic/ins 352-446-2318|




Since 1969
Specializing in
Vandas.
Call for hours
F*i5WV1I 352-787-9001
SRCHIDS, 2902 South St.
.... Leesburg. FL
GoodwinOrchids.com





Family Owned & Operatedi
Residential & Commercial
www.PrimePlumbinginc.com
(352)383-3440 .cFc142oI

i; g Plumbing, LLC
All Plumbling Repairs Comm/Res
Kitchens & BaBth Remodels
Disposal, Water Heater, Gas Pipling,
Draln/Sewer Cleaning,
No Grout Showers, 24 Hr. Emergency
u-ei.am i 1(3521343-3763




Ace Pool Service
Complete Pool Services
Motor & Pump Repair
Pool & Patio Remodeling
Servicing Commercial & Residential
Properties Since 1969
Licensed/Insured Free Estimates
352-735-3050

Prss r
C J leaning


352.260.7490

All Airports, Cruise Terminals,
Hotels, Casinos & Attractions
Shands-VA and Jacksonville Mayo





JHAVEhl Providing
'(^^ 7 No-Cost Svcs.
to Lake county
Sexual assault victims 24/7/365.
On-Call Rape Advocacy
Counseling, Legal Assistance
Hotline 352-787-1379



*hlRoofing jC
5ovtw Pryj
Shingle Tile, Licensed-Bonded-Insured
Metal, and Rubber Residential/Commercial
Roof Systems RC29027460
(352) 669-6607

METAL TILE SHINGLE ROOFING
New Construction or Re-Roofing
B 308 Oak Street
Lady Lake. FL 32159
352-430-2773
www.sackroofing.com
Serving the Tri County Area For 26 Years

#1 IN ROOFING
Leak Repairs Shingles/Flat Roof
Lifetime Metal Roofs Screen Rooms
Lic. #CCC1329936
Villages Roofing and
Construction, 1nc."n
FREE ROF ESTIMATES
362--314-3625


Lake Contracting, Inc.
GAF Certified
Shingles, Metal or Flat
Additions, Remodels, Renovations
Roof to Foundation
S352-602-8794
UcJB.CLe GC1507556 CCC132g99


SECURITY TRAINING
j Security "D"&"G" Lic.
PLUS: FL. Concealed Lic.
SNRA Instructor Training
Ladies Only Classes Avail.
352-350-2855
1a DS13M13 www.TheRightTraining.com




SpeciafizdStorage Solutions
Now is the tite...
To organize your life!
Custom Closets, Home Office, Garages
Tailored To Your Needs,
17 Years Exp.
Free Iome Design Consultation
352-383-7058 407-718-6818 (Cell)



SJohn Philibert, Inc
For All Your Tile Needs
Pergo, Ceramic Tile,
Travertine, Vinyl & More
Call John @ (352) 308-0694
JPHandy.com Lic/Ins

RE-TILE <
352-391-5553
SBacksplashes Re-Tile Tub & Shower
Walls Grab Bars Floors
Handicap Baths Repairs
Leaky Shower Pan
Ins./Lic. 30 yrs. exp.




c. Bobcat a Tree svc. rei
linIResidential/Cognmercial
Trimming/Removal
1 Palms/Hedges/Stump Grinding
Debris removal/Hauling
Fill Dirt/Clay/Grading/Driveways
Li2/Ins Insurance Work 24 Hrs.
352-455-7080


Premier Scapes
& Services Inc.
Complete Tree Service
Trimming Debris Removal
Stump Grinding Free Estimates
352-308-5508




iUc #CBC1252465
%S^ WINDOWS
We Install, Replace and Repair
Most Major Brands Available
Glass and Screen Repair
(3521 787-4545

| 352-587-2735
RC#330701 Lanai Enclosures
IGlass Window
fReplacement
Acrylic Windows
iScreen Rooms

352-602-9849
SPARKLING
WINDOWS
MARK ANDERSON
Window Cleaning,
Screens, Tracks. FREE Estimates


# A Affordable Tree
i Service
I' rTree Trimming & Removal
Lake Cleaning Dead Wooding
Moss Spraying Lic/Ins
Free Est. e Senior Discounts
36=-459-9428


IN * a a S Valwa I
I 0 5 5 555 Iic








Cla ssifiedDpartmentat


SpeiazedSlorage Sotions
Now is the time...
To organize your life!
Custom Closets, Homie Office, Garages
Tailored To Your Needs,
17 Years Exp.
Free Home Design Consultation
352-383-7058 407-718-6818 (Cell)

SNow is the time to organize
your life with Specialized Stor-
age Solutions. With 17 years of
experience ranging from luxury:
homes across the state to your
:neighbor down the street, atten-.
tion to detail and high quality
finished product are the memo-
ries I wish to leave with my cus-

S tomers. Our in home
consultation will pinpoint your
specific needs, and tailor a stor-:
age solution that you have al-
ways dreamed of.


*Ago

1 ^C me DesignServing Lake, Sumter
SWeb Design & S. Marion Counfties
S Web Design. Web Hosting .. WeServiceAll
W .g Appliance Brands
Facebook Integration Licensed/insuredl
Starting at $25/month Free Servie Call
w/Repair
352-205-2420 15+ Years Exp. 24 Hr. Emergency Svc.
Image W Design We Don't Want To Be The Biggest
At Image Web Design, Just The Best
: we've been building Eric Wolf 352-630-2202
we've been buildingI *^ I
websites for over 20 years. All About Appliances repairs and installs
And, because we love what all brands of major appliances. We are a
we do, we want to give you small husband/wife company. Eric has
w pt a w over 15 years experience repairing
a web presence that will ., /.
b c t : appliances and Lavinia (Vinnie) has
build your business at an
e a over 20 years in business management
affordable price. You will experience. Together, we strive to offer
find that our services are you prompt, professional, courteous and
second-to-none and your personal services far beyond your
costs can be broken down expectations, both by phone and in your
into monthly, quarterly, or home. We respect you and your time and
annual payments that are make every effort to be in and out of your
a comfortable fit for home as quickly as possible yet provide a
your budget thorough diagnosis and timely repair. We
S" genuinely appreciate all your business.


We're Proud of Our Service
.... and you will be too!





HUN rERRotr,
Free Estimates
Metal, Tile & Shingle Re-roofs
Serving all Lake &
Sumter Counties.
Mike Hunter
Fl License #RC29027482
Office (407) 947-2223
Fax (407) 347-3472
mike@hunterroofingLLC.com


Tree
Service


DAILY COMMERCIAL




DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 21, 2013


275 Plumbing

^ SINCE
1987
KILEY&
SONS, INC.
A Full Service Plumbing Company.
Lake 787-1904 Sumter 748-9500
CentralFloridaPlumber.com
VISIT OUR ONSITE SHOWROOM.
24 Hr. Emergency Service
I Lic#CFC1426882

281 Roofing





McHALE ROOFING INC.
Re-Roofs and Repairs
Tile, Metal, Shingles
Flat Roofs &
Mobile Homes
Excel. Ref's Avail.
Licensed & Insured
CCC1328197
Call: 352-255-2758


288 Tree
Service



.Land Clearing
*Tree Removal
*Trimming & Shaping
*Hauling & Stump
*Grinding & Free Est.
**SPECIALS**
352-267-5720


Stump Grinding, eTree Trimming &
Removal *Box Blading, *Bush
Hogging & Grading. Lic & Insured.
Call 352-504-1597





300
Financial






400
Employment



405 Professional

ASSISTANT FIRE CHIEF -
ADMINISTRATION
CITY OF CLERMONT
Please visit our website
for additional details:
www.cityofclermontfl.com
EOE, M/F, V/P, DN, DFWP

PRESCHOOL TEACHER PT
CDA required. Must be dependable,
energetic, and child-friendly.
Apply in person at:
1005 W Main Street Leesburg
between 9:00 5:00
Call 326-5942 for directions.

UMATILLA POLICE DEPARTMENT
has opening for police officer.
Requires HS diploma or GED,
Fl LEO certification. $16.00 hr
Apply 251 N. Central Ave. EOE


410 Sales


Exceptional
Opportunities



























425 Clerical

OFFICE ASST./ RECEPTIONIST Fr
Must have bookkeeping exp w/back-














ground for construction company.
Must to be able to mult-task. Lady












Lake area.
Ema to: tyoung@sacltoofino.corn

432 Dental

-- DENTAL ASSISTANT --
Experinced only. $15/ir.















Fax resume to: 352-787-9036
__ NO PHONE CALLS __
-- DENTAL ASSISTANT --
Experienced for busy office. Must
have expanded duties & radiology
certified. Looking for outgoing
dependable, professional person must
be able to multi task.
352-751-1178
Lady Lake Area
OFIEAppyat77T.ReCgePTIal-ONITRF



Must have bookkeeping exp w/back-
ground for construction company.
Must to be able to multi-task. Lady
Lake area.
Email to: tyoung@sackroofing.com

432 Dental

DENTAL ASSISTANT
Experinced only. $15/hr.
Fax resume to: 352-787-9036
NO PHONE CALLS

DENTAL ASSISTANT
Experienced for busy office. Must
have expanded duties & radiology
certified. Looking for outgoing
dependable, professional person must
be able to multi task.
352-751-1178
Lady Lake Area


435 Medical




MI&TUNITY
CONTRACT LPN OR PARAMEDIC
To assist with mobile nuclear stress
tests. Must have experience with IVs,
EKGs and able to assist moving and
transporting camera and equipment.
Fax resume to: 352-728-2529

EKG TECH I
Needed immed. FT in The Villages.
Fax resume 352-323-9507

EMT/PARAMEDIC, NURSE,
MA with X-ray
For Busy Urgent Care.
Must have Phlebotomy, IV skills &
medication administration.
Email to:
medicalbillingtoday@ yahoo.com

MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST &
AUTHORIZATION SPECIALIST
For internal medicine
office in Leesburg. Exp. preferred
Please fax resume to
352-315-0578

450 Trades

ELECTRICIAN
EXPERIENCED SERVICE ELECTRICIAN
Please call Carol at:
352-748-5818 or
email resume to
Carol@lenhartelectric.com
8618 NE 43rd Way, Wildwood




ELECTRICIANS &
ELECTRICAL
APPRENTICES
Applicants must have experience and
a clean driving record, high school di-
ploma or equivalent. Company is an
EOE and Drug-Free Workplace. Excel-
lent health benefits, 401k and PTO;
MVR & Background checks.
Apply in person at:
PIKE'S ELECTRIC, INC.
719 Industrial Drive
Wildwood, FL 34785





QUALIFIED CDL A DRIVERS
2 YEARS EXPERIENCE
See what we offer, assigned
equipment,good home time,
weekly pay, direct dep.,health ins,
paid holidays & vacation.
GREAT
BONUS
PROGRAM!
Call for more details.
800-456-2336 X114


450 Trades

FOREMAN / LOADER OPERATOR/
PIPE LAYERS/LABORERS
Walk-in interviews
Monday 10/21 9:30-3:30
1307 Nichols Dr., Tavares
Underground pipe construction Exp.
sewer/water/storm req.
Apply: www.dlcd.com
or contact 813-986-1922
EEOE/DFWP

QUICK LUBE TECH. NEEDED
Exp'd. preferred. Tire exp. a plus.




Ask for Tom Zion
PHILLIPS BUICK
2160Hwy..441
Fruitland Park, FL 34731
DFWP

TIMBERWOOD PROPERTIES
is currently looking for a shop em-
ployee to learn the cabinetry business
from the ground up. No experience
necessary, just a general knowledge
of tools. Must be 18, have a valid
driver license, and be willing to work.
Please apply at 1735 Tally Box Road,
Leesburg. Call 352-435-4657
for directions only.

TIME DEFINITE SERVICES
Hiring Over The Road Drivers Class
A CDL required. All late model equip-
ment 2012 & newer. We pull 53'
Reefers. Great Pay & Bonuses. Must
be willing to run 48 states.
Apply at:
www.timedefinite.com
or call 352-399-7900 xl1015

TRAILER MECHANIC
Sunstate Carriers has an opportunity
for an experienced Trailer Mechanic.
Excellent benefits paid vacation, paid
sick days, health insurance, overtime
pay. Work in a clean & well equipped
shop. Must have own tools, able to do
PM inspections, repairs such as brake
jobs & electrical wiring/lights, ability to
weld & tractor PM a plus but not re-
quired.


Sdi"%te
Apply in person
72 uri i,,d u.lrili D .
Tavares, FL
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE


455
Restaurants/
Hotels/Clubs

13AHTI-ENIE- F I
MUST be exp'd. Evenings & Wknds.
Apply in person 3-5pm
VICE'S EMBERS SUPPER CLUB
7940 US Hwy. 441 Leesburg, FL


455
Restaurants/
Hotels/Clubs

FRONT DESK CLERK/NIGHT AUDITOR
for Hotel in Lady Lake. Hotel or retail
experience okay.
Forward resume to
nishcoinvest@cfl.rr.com


470 General

CLEANING
Must LOVE to clean. Detail oriented,
non-smoker. Great work environment.
Email noslkrs@gmail.com

COLLISION TECH. EXPERIENCED
With benefits.




SEE DAVIS COLEMAN
PHILLIPS BUICK
COLLISION CENTER
3320 Hwy. 441, Fruitland Park, FL

SCHOOL BUS
DRIVERS NEEDED
Training provided.
Lake County Schools, Transportation
352-728-2561 or
Apply online: www.lake.k12.fl.us

WINDOW TREATMENT INSTALLER
Highly motivated w/drivers license.
Will train the right person.
POSITION FILLED

480 Legal

LAW FIRM IN THE VILLAGES
Seeks a probate paralegal for very
busy department. Probate experience
is required & computer expertise es-
sential. Excellent pay & benefits.


POSITION FILLED




500
Pets/Animals



560 Pet
Supplies

DOG CAGE Huge 5' x 3' & new large
dog bed. $70. 352-742-0250

DOG CRATE Large, hard plastic. 25W x
29D x37L. $50 obo. 352-321-2174

DOG STROLLER up to 30lbs. Cup hold-
ers & carrier. $50. 352-602-7332


560 Pet
Supplies
DRIFTWOOD for reptile aquarium (2
pc.) for 3ft. $100 407-878-6431

PET KENNEL chain link w/gate 6'x9'
$99 Call 352-728-5911




6oo00
Merchandise
Mart



601 Antiques
ANTIQUES, JEWELRY, Old Indian Rug &
Misc. All for $100. 352-348-7490

CLOCK electric Sail Ship good shape.
Made by Uniter. $95. Cal 793-5741
COKE BOTTLE old 1915, from Quincy,
FL, straight sided, $40 793-3877
GLIDER w/cushions. Coverts to bed,
vintage. $100 Call 352-383-7607
SNUFF BOX antique European solid
sliver. $95 Call 352-314-0923
TOY TRAIN SET, Marx "0" gauge, 9pcs.
$40. Leesburg 352-874-5418

602 Arts/Crafts

CRAFTS/ SUPPLIES/ BEARS /TABLES
$100 takes all. 352-365-9519

SCRAPBOOK RACK 12X12 paper rack,
60 shelves. $50 352-742-1527

603 Collectibles
AUGUSTA XII Color Print 25 x 30, '92.
Framed/signed. $65. 330-4484

DOLL Boyd's Yesterdays Child, Laura
w/box & cert. $45. 352-360-0028
HOLLY HOBBY COLLECTION 45 pieces.
$100. 352-315-1612
RECORD COLLECTION 113 LP's $100
obo Call 352-357-2218

604 Furniture
BED FRAME Queen size $35 obo. Call
352-396-5739

BED Queen, electric. Excel cond. $350.
352-435-0888.
BED Solid Iron, 100 yrs. old. $95. obo.
Call 352-751-4227
BEDROOM SET Queen, Tommy Ba-
hama type, Dresser, mirror, night
stand & mattresses. Excel. cond.
$500. 352-735-8095


604 Furniture

BED w/frame & mattress/box spring
queen size. $50. 352-536-4023

BEDS Twin (2) including spreads if de-
sired. $95. 787-7157 or 552-7248

BISTRO SET, table w/2 swivel rocking
chairs w/burgundy cushions. New
cond. $150 Call 352-435-0823

BUNK BED FRAMES red, excel, cond.
$100 obo. 352-516-7108

CHAIRS (2) Black & gold, designer ac-
cent chairs. $24.50 for the pair. Call
352-989-0222

CHEST OF DRAWERS 5 drawers, no
smoking. Excel. $80. 246-9948

CHINA CABINET Ethan Allen, Maple, 2
piece w/glass shelves. $295 Call
352-314-2717

COMPUTER DESK. Good cond. $50.
Call 352-396-5739

CORNER TV wood entertainment cen-
ter, 4x4x2, $75. 715-971-8152

DESK / TABLE antique white, solid
wood. excel cond. $95 435-0823

DINETTE SET 5 pieces, solid oak, very
nice. $100 Call 352-460-0472

DINETTE SET Rattan glass top w/4
chairs on rollers. $99. 753-3914

DINETTE TABLE w/6 chairs/leaf. Ivory,
excel cond. $300 obo. 787-5776

DINING ROOM TABLE, Oak, Octagon, 4
Upholstered swivel captains chairs
on casters. $160. 435-0888

END TABLES _'). golden oak. $50.
352-787-5917

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER 4 dr. 3 ad-
justable shelves. $50. 233-0464

GLIDER Large, oak. W/foot stool, wheat
color cushions. New cond. $175.
Call 352-435-0823

HUTCH & CREDENZA Lighted w/4
doors. $300. 352-434-4093

LAMPS, Collection Quality. $10. Call
352-787-7157 or 552-7248

MATTRESS Queen w/bed rails. $100.
Call 352-476-3476

MATTRESS Serta full size, clean. Ask-
ing $75. Please call 352-323-8079

MATTRESSES (2) twin, clean. $20 for
both. Call 352-357-1012

PATIO FURNITURE Table, square
5.5x3.5 tile top 6 chairs/2
swivel/rocker. $150. 551-5845


iNirit & On-LCoicne

In-Print & On-Line


armuLmr


* ... ~vli*j...
-'S..
S. S.
-s~ ~*




Monday, October 21, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


604 Furniture

PATIO SET table, 4 chairs & 2 rockers
w/cushions. $50 obo Call 357-4169

PATIO TABLE 48" round glass w/4
chairs. $50 SOLD

RECLINER tan Microfiber. Good cond.
$100.262-441-0156

RECLINER, Swivels & Rocks. Marroon.
$45. 352-408-4711

RECLINERS (2) Leather, matching. 7
mo. old. $350. 352-435-0888

ROCKER/GLIDER Oak matching foot
glider. Excel. cond. $35 435-0888

ROCKING CHAIR glider, White wood,
excel cond. $50 352-250-8832

SIDE SERVING TABLE w/wine rack &
granite shelves. $74.50 989-0222

SOFA 9', It. beige, excel cond. Wash-
able cushions. $50. 315-1908

SOFA BED Cream color. $100.
352-561-4940

SOFA BED w/matching back pillows.
$50. 787-7157 or 552-7248

SOFA Black Leather, 3 cushion, full
size. $30. 352-561-1167.

SWIVEL ROCKER full size, green, good
cond. $25. Cell 608-347-1483

TABLE & CHAIRS 42" Round, wood.
$150. 352-360-9047

TABLE, Heart Shaped, 3 tier. brown,
good cond. $8 Call 352-504-6689

TELEVISION STAND Glass & wood w/3
shelves. $50. 407-614-4174

TELEVISION STAND, Dark glass. Paid
$125. Now $35.352-552-7248

TWIN BED white laminate, new mat-
tress. $100. 352-250-4711

TWIN BEDS (2), complete w/linens.
$300. Call 352-589-1787

WICKER TABLE 40" round, glass top.
w/2 chairs. $75. SOLDH!

605 Appliances

Appliances With Warranties
$75 & up! Used Beds all sizes!
*Bu' Ill1*1Trj.E *Fa# i rloI,-y
Call Buzzy's 352-315-9886
www.buzzysbeds.com

DISCOUNT
APPLIANCE
Repair-Sales-Service Most Repairs
$60 Plus Parts



e^AA4

WASHER, DRYER,
REFRIGERATOR
"Don't Toss It
Fix It For Less"
Buying Clean
Washers & Dryers
Days, Evenings & Weekends
Call Now
352-874-1238

DISHWASHER KitchenAid, almond.
Works good. $35 obo. 669-1163

DRYER elec. Whirlpool, heavy duty, Ig.
capacity. $70 Call 352-729-6604

DRYER GE gas, white, good cond. $50
Please call 352-404-8288

MICROWAVE Emerson Professional se-
ries. $30 obo. 352-431-3975

MIXER, KitchenAid wall attachments,
mint con. $85 352-343-1050

REFRIGERATOR dorm size, good cond.
$100 Call 352-702-6860

REFRIGERATOR Frigidaire, side by side.
Stainless/black w/ice maker & in
door water dispenser, w/on door
user interface display to choose op-
tions, ice water, etc. Like new Only
2.5 yrs. old. $550 Call
352-729-2160

REFRIGERATOR Whirlpool, w/ice
maker. $150. 352-728-5256

STOVE elec. Maytag, like new. $100
SOLD!!!!

STOVE Elec. Propane water heater,
window A/C. $75. 865-789-6393


'-4"I


7am


Time to sell tho.t
camera'




Michael picked his price,
uploaded a photo and
paid for his ad.


It's just that simple!


Dal ic l InnurcitWL
"Your First Choice" In-Print & On-Line


605 Appliances

STOVE Whirlpool, elec. White. $75. Call
352-483-4462

STOVE, Whirlpool, electric, self clean-
ing. $150 must sell. 352-728-5256

WASHER Whirlpool, heavy duty. XL ca-
pacity. $65. SOLD

606 Electronics

GAME PSP Sony brand new in box.
$100 Call 352-455-3342

RECEIVER Denon with remote. Very
good cond. $99. 352-323-4862

STEREO SYSTEM Panasonic, CD, w/5
CD changer. $30 obo 357-3728

TELEVISION Sharp color, works good.
$50 Call 352-365-6075

TELEVISION 19" color. Cable ready.
$30. 352-874-2806.

TELEVISION 27" Sony Trinitron, very
good picture. $60 352-589-8363

TELEVISION, Emerson 32" color w/re-
mote. $50 obo Call 352-728-2668

608 A/C & Heat

AIR CLEANER UV light for A/C. Kills
mold/bacteria. $100. 267-1711

AIR CONDITIONER Whirlpool window
unit. 8000 BTU $95. 728-2534

AIR CONDITIONER window unit, 5000
BTU's. $50 Call 352-753-7075

624 Children's
items

BABY BATHTUB, toddler potty & sassy
seat. $22. 352-455-7557.

BARBIE TOWNHOUSE, good cond. $60.
Please call 352-669-4789

ROCKING HORSE hand crafted. $95.
Call 352-406-6122

625 Building
Supplies/
Materials

JACUZZI Whirlpool Bath. No pump. $75
obo. Call 352-314-2123.

KITCHEN SINK stainless steel, 8" deep,
W/Delta faucet. $40 253-2357

PATIO DOORS Sliding glass. White
Frame. $75. Call Dave. 255-7623

SHOWER DOOR opaque glass. 27
1/4"x 69 1/4". $50. 446-7849

SLIDING GLASS DOORS Set of 3. 47"W
x78"H.$60.352-617-9000.

STUDS (20) 2X4'x104", grade 2. &
other wood. $100 obo. 484-3650

WOOD -8/4 solid, mahogany, maple,
oak for lathe turning. $2. 357-2708

630 Garage Sales

LEESBURG
Thur. Sat. 8am-lpm. 33110 CR
473, Haines Creek Care Center.

635 Garden

CONCRETE FOUNTAIN, no pump. Good
cond. $100 Call 352-735-1570

GLIDER COUCH & 2 CHAIRS alum.,
vintage. $100 Call 352-617-5498

LAWN MOWER Briggs engine, runs
great. 20" cut. Only $50 728-4913

LAWN TRACTOR Yard Man 42", 0
Turn. Works great. $800. 728-4913

PATIO TABLE & 4 CHAIRS, glass top,
sq., taupe. $100. SOLD!!!!

PLANT Crown of Thorns, red blossoms
all year 3 gallon. $25. SOLD!!!!

RUBBER TREE PLANT. Beautiful, sym-
metrical. $20. 352-735-1647

TREE SALE
*Oaks, Sycamores, Cypress, Fig,
Mulberry, Cherry Laurel, etc.
Palms, Queen, Pindo or Sago
*Special 6' +/- Oaks $10 or 15/$100
*Cypress or Oaks up to 12'
CATT'S TREES
352-669-1618

640 Guns

RIFLE CVA .50 caliber, Black & Nickel
w/scope. New $400 352-753-7692


640 Guns

RIFLE Springfield, 22 long w/scope.
Bolt action. $150.1-352-343-6608

SHOT GUN SHELLS Vintage 410. $6.00
Call 352-728-2692

TAURUS ULTRALITE REVOLVER, .38
spec. $375. Sterling stainless steel
.22 pistol (pocket size)- $225. Wood
stock single shot .22 bolt action rifle-
$100. Taurus TOP .380 cal.- $325.
Cases. Others. Ammo included
with each. Prices are firm.
Call Dave (716) 949-0408.

649 Medical

BED ALARM for patients who try to get
out of bed. $20. 352-793-7027

SCOOTER/POWERCHAIR CARRIER
NEW, fits into hitch, 60" fold out
ramp. $195. 352-217-3437

SHOWER CHAIR, PVC $30.
352-728-5256

WALKER w/seat & basket. Good cond.
Blue. $100 Call 352-217-3195

650 Computers
& Equip

CARTRIDGES for Dell Printer Series # 5,
4 color/5 black. $90 all. 326-8111

LAPTOP CONNECTION Sprint Broad-
band. $50.352-217-4221

MONITOR Samsung flat screen 20".
$100.352-459-0899

PRINTER HP Office Jet 7310, all in one.
Great cond. $99 Call 589-1234

PRINTER HP PSC500, w/7 ink car-
tridges $60. 352-728-3273

652 Articles
For Sale

AMERICAN RIFLEMAN MAGAZINES
(220+ issues). $65. 352-742-1409

BOOKS New, 22+ on the Kennedy's &
the Royals. $50. 352-516-2893

BRACELET Pandora, sterling silver 7.5,
no charms. $40. Call 324-2559

BREAD MACHINE Farberware, Auto-
matic. Like new. $25. 874-1862

CAMERAS (2) Cannon & Polaroid. $50.
for both. Call 352-787-1539

CAST IRON POT, indoor/outdoor 3
quart w/lid $35. 748-0702

CERTIFIED PRINCESS DIANA DOLL
CLOTHES, 4 for $100. 217-4221

CHANDELIER FRUIT Red, beautiful.
$50. 352-536-1744

CHESS SET hand carved oriental
pieces. $100 Call 704-530-4305

CHRISTMAS TREE 7' Silver blue spruce
w/container. $40. 352-365-0376

CHRISTMAS TREE 7', no lights, storage
bag. $35 Call 352-314-3254

CIGARETTE MACHINE Powermatic, $75
Please call 352-800-1455

CLEANING MACHINE Steam Bullet, no
chemicals, like new $45. 787-7048

COFFEE MAKER KitchenAid. New. Paid
$189. Sell for $100. 352-978-7461

COMFORTER SET King, 8 pc. Blue ta-
persty w/drapes. $80. 750-4828

CURTAINS, lace, dusty pink. 45"W. 3
sets. ($400). $99. obo. 589-8515

DESIGNER CLOTHING Chicos/Cache,
10/pcs. $100. 321-246-4371

DISHES 12 piece setting w/extra serv-
ing pieces. $50. 352-365-0109

END TABLE new, solid natural Oak, $45
Please call 352-347-7350

FAUX LEATHER JACKET size 3X med.
brown. $30. 352-343-3459

FIESTAWARE DISHES cups & saucers,
assorted colors $99 Call 250-8290

FIREPLACE w/2" fire brick wall. glass
doors. $95 Call 352-787-1134

FIREWOOD FREE, Please call
352-391 -5331


124
I 7 No matter what time
of the day it is,
you can place
your classified
, merchandise ad
Sonline, pay for it and
just wait for the
.____ phone to ring!


Fast, convenient and
I on your schedule!


wwwdailycc',rnrercial corm

*Employment advertisements are excluded.
Please call 352-314-FAST to speak with a customer service rep.
Lake: 352-314-3278 or Sumter: 352-748-1955


652 Articles
For Sale

FUR CAPES 1/Red & 1/Black, Susan
Lucci. $100. 352-409-8264

GARAGE DOOR OPENER Genie, com-
plete 1.5hp. $40. 435-0809

GARMENT BAG bi-fold, like new. $20
Call 352-385-1830

HALLOWEEN COSTUME adult ladies,
$15. Call 352-434-9855

HALLOWEEN COSTUME Michael Jack-
son, w/accessories. $50. 742-2668

HOT TUB COVER Dark tan. Brand new.
6'7" x 5'. $80. 352-321-8606

HOT TUB Older, works great. 3-4 seats.
$250.obo. Call 352-552-4217

JACKET Black Leather size S/M cost
$100 sell for $35. 407-310-6628

JEANS, name brands (30 + pairs) size
12-14 &10 tops. $75 793-8102

JUKEBOX 1963 Seeburg, glass &
chrome,. $100 352-307-8289

LAWN CHAIRS (2) white, plastic w/blue
pads. $40. Call 352-742-2856

LUGGAGE Samsonite, hard sides, 3
piece set. $35 Call 352-357-1363

MEN'S CLOTHING XLg shirts 40-44W
shorts. 10 pcs. $20. 321 -246-4371

MEN'S DESIGNER CLOTHES, Pants 32
x 32. Shirts M-L. $75. 787-7348

MOVING BOXES 36 various sizes, $40
SOLD!!!!

MUSICAL CANDLES (2) battery oper-
ated. $35 Call 352-753-3974

OIL PAINTING beautiful sailing ship,
24"x30". $65 352-357-3043

ORIENTAL RUG 7.5 x 7.5 round. $35
Call 352-989-0222

POCKET NOVELS 37 Spencer series
mysteries. $30. 352-343-4633

PUNCH BOWL W/24 Cups. Gold trim &
white leaf pattern. $39. 742-5074

MATTRESS TOPPER 4" thick, king size
new cond. $99.352-636-9358

RUBBER BOOTS men's, 4 pairs, size 8
USA, excel cond. $27. SOLD!!!

SEWING MACHINE Singer. New in box..
Asking $90. Call 321-262-5485

SINGING PARAKEET ON STAND sensor
& batteries, new. $15. 360-1209

SLACKS Ladies size Med. petite. Bon
Worth, 6/pair. $25. 352-777-0045


652 Articles
For Sale

SUITCASE, SAMSONITE w/wheels, Ig.
excel, cond. $30. 352-343-1050

TEAPOT SET full size w/utensil holder,
Hummingbird. $50. 352-357-0225

TOOTHBRUSHES (2) SONIC CARE. New
$70 for both. Call 352-508-4786

TUXEDO Men's, Coat/Pants/Shirt, size
48-42. $65. 352-217-4809

TYPEWRITER Smith-Corona, Elec. XE
5100 w/5 ribbons. $30. SOLD!!!!

WALKER 4 wheels w/seat & pouch, like
new. $30 Call 352-383-2093

WEDDING DRESS altered size 1.
Beaded, w/veil. $95. 787-7132

Wll BEATLES ROCK BAND GAME &
DRUM SET. $60.352-343-9279

655 Musical
Instruments

PIANO Bungalow Mission Style. Attrac-
tive oak finish. $100. 383-9132

660 Office
Furniture/
Supplies

COMPUTER DESK w/hutch. Good cond.
Heavy, Umatilla $100 771-2310

COMPUTER DESK, 3 drawers, very
good cond. $70 Call 750-5604

CORNER COMPUTER DESK, glass
w/chrome. $75 obo. 360-5787

DESK CHAIR w/arms, plus home office
supplies. $40. 352-787-0410

DESK, ADJUSTABLE CHAIR, CARPET
PROTECTOR $40 352-460-7646

MIDDLE DESK 60"Wx29"Hx30"D,
6/drawers, $75. 352-406-1253

OFFICE DESK, CHAIR & RUG 50"x70".
$80. 352-314-0505

674 Exercise Equipment

ELLIPTICAL MACHINE like new, $325.
Call 352-751-4912

EXERCISE MACHINES. (2) Tony Little.
Both $70. 352-874-0352

675 Sports/
Recreation

BICYCLE 26" men's, very good cond.,
rebuilt $50 obo Call 352-343-8898

BICYCLE 26" Men's. Very good cond.
$65. obo. Call 352-460-4449

BICYCLE 26", 18 speed. Good cond.
$25 Call 352-821-2801

BICYCLE 3 Wheel, Easy Glide. Needs
work. $35. SOLD


675 Sports/
Recreation

BICYCLE Diamond Back, Sorrento
Sport, Men's 26", 21 speed. $75.
352-259-0633

BICYCLE girls 24" Huffy, 1 speed, foot
brake, fenders, A-1 $45. 728-6835

BICYCLE vintage from the 30's, $100
Call 352-504-6406

BICYCLES 24" Ladies 7 speed
Schwinn. Used twice. 24" Mens 7
speed Schwinn, used less then 10
mi. $150. Includes floor rack &
pump. 352-250-4743

BICYCLES 3 Wheel, rebuilt. Large Seat
& Basket. $150. 1-352-343-6608

BOWFLEX PR3000 GYM, new. Over
$900 new, asking $250 obo. Call
352-323-3482

CABIN TENT 3 rooms. $75.
352-787-1865

GOLF CLUBS (3) w/Izzo Shag Bag ball
dispenser. $25. 352-702-7632

GOLF CLUBS men's complete set
w/bag. $25. 502-750-0512

GOLF CLUBS Wilson, Ladies. New in
box. Pink. $95. 352-483-4762

GOLF CLUBS, 3 iron thru SW, driver, 3
wood, putter. $75 352-245-0716

GOLF SET irons, oversized woods,
w/bag. Like new. $50. 729-2595

GOLF SET, oversized graphite woods,
irons. New. $80. 352-735-6927

NIKE JAWBONE UP $100 obo. Size
med. Brand new. 352-409-6011

PUTTER Ping, excel, cond. 50 yrs. old.
$30 Call 352-735-6927

SADDLE Brown Leather, English. Good
cond. $60. 352-326-2432.

TREADMILL Ride Strider 3360. $100.
352-552-3000

685 Tools/
Machinery

CIRCULAR SAW 7 1/4" Black & Decker,
good cond. $35 352-391-5833

DRILL PRESS Delta 12", good cond.
$100 SOLD

GENERATOR Porter Cable. 5250watts.
$450.. Call 352-343-6608

PLANER Delta 12" w/stand. Good cond.
$80 SOLD

PRESSURE WASHER needs some work
1750psi. $50 Call 352-348-9973

PRESSURE WASHER, Craftsman 850,
New $400, sell for $100. 357-2771


Prow




DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 21, 2013


685 Tools/
Machinery
PROFESSIONAL GANG BOX metal.
$100. 352-750-0367

RADIAL ARM SAW 8 1/4 Craftsman,
w/stand. $100 352-391-5833
ROUTER 1.5hp, 8.8 amps. Craftsman.
$25. Call 352-343-1286
ROUTER Sears, 6.5 amp. w/router ta-
ble. $50. 352-343-1286
SCROLL SAW Ryobi, w/link arms + 6
pkg. blades. $80. 352-391-5833
TOOL CART Craftsman 10 drawers, like
new. $200 Call 352-391-5833
VACUUM PUMP 110 volts, full size.
$75 Please call 352-406-9405
WINDOWS aluminum frame. Asking
$20. Call 352-396-5739




800
Real Estate
For Rent



802 Vacation
Rentals
WATERFRONT CABIN, scrn. porch, ca-
ble & all util. $225-$275 per wk.
352-314-2123

805 Houses
Furnished
LEESBURG rent to own 3/2 w/carport.
$750/mo + util. 352-753-5414

806 Houses
Unfurnished

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 &2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
EUSTIS waterfront 2/2, carport, Pet OK.
$700/mo. Call 352-589-0749

FRUITLAND PARK 3/2/1 Duplex, quiet
family area. Lawn care included.
$745/mo. 352-874-5966
MOUNT DORA 3/2 $725/mo incl. wa-
ter. Requires 1st, last + security.
Non-smoker. Call 352-357-3457
OCALA Handyman Hunt Cabin. Low
down pay 352-269-4051
RENT to own $590/mo w/down pay-
ment assistance. 352-269-4051
RIENIALS
LONG TERM & UNFURN. RENTALS IN
SOUTH LAKE COUNTY.
ROCKER REALTY 352-394-3570
Ask For Janet or Emily
RockerRealtylnc.com

807 Apartments
Unfurnished
AZALEA HILL APARTMENTS STUDIOS,
1, 2, 3 BEDROOMS $400 $925.
352-431-3790

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 &2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
DOWNTOWN TAVARES 1/1 small,
quiet apt bldg 2 blks from Lake Dora
riverwalk with restaurants and
parks, $330/biweekly, $400 dep,
incl elec, water, Sat TV, Wi-Fi, Hard-
wood floors, Cent AC. Old Dogs,cats
OK. 352-669-0961

EUSTIS
2/1 including water/trash
Starting at $650/mo
Near Downtown
Call 352-735-0597

EUSTIS
All remodeled Apts!
2 & 3 Bedrooms
Special starting at
$575 Only $350 Dep. Pet OK.
352-357-5675
--- LEESBURG ---
1ST MO. FREE!
SPANISH VILLAGE
Pool, great location!
Furn. Efficiency, incl.
util. & cable $700/mo.
2/1 apt. $600/mo.
Furn. $700/mo + util.
352-728-5555
LEESBURG Cute 2/1, good location,
$575/mo + $350 dep.
352-552-0181

LEESBURG Inexpensive 3/1, $575/mo
+ $350 dep. Please call
352-552-0181


LEESBURG Palmora Park, 2 br. garage
apt. Covered parking. 1 block to
lake. $595/mo. 352-255-6002
LEESBURG, 1/1, with W/D, CHA, car-
port. $450 plus security. 787-2715
Ext. 222
LYN TERRACE
Eustis
352-357-7332
www.lynterrace.com
Great Move-In
Specials & Free Gifts!
*1 & 2 Bedroom Units
*All 1st Floor No Stairs!


808 Apartments
Furnished
FRUITLAND PARK
TWIN PALMS MARINA
NEWLY RENOVATED
1 BR. MOBILES FULLY FURNISHED
ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED,
CABLE TV. FREE USE OF KAYAK &
CANOES. CONVENIENCE STORE
ON PROPERTY. NO SECURITY
DEPOSIT WITH PROOF OF INCOME.
GREAT FOR SENIORS.
WEEKLY & MONTHLY RATE.
SMALL PETS WELCOME.
CALL 352-787-4514
LEESBURG
1ST MO. FREE!
SPANISH VILLAGE
Pool, great location!
Furn. Efficiency, incl. util. & cable
$700/mo.
2/1 apt. $600/mo.
Furn. $700/mo + util.
352-728-5555

TAVARES
$595/mo. Furn.
352-343-7780
riverestwaterfrontresort.com

809 Roommate
Wanted

EUSTIS AREA furn. room, util paid..
$80 week. Call 352-250-5012

810 Duplexes

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
EUSTIS
2/1 including water/trash,
Near Downtown
Starting at $650/mo
Call 352-735-0597
LEESBURG, 1 br, 2br & 3br. Great price.
$599+. Call 352-350-7109

LEESBURG,
Beautiful Remodeled
2br/1 ba, $450/mo.
1721 Birchwood Circle
Call 352-325-1289 now!

811 Condos
Townhouses
LEESBURG
SUNNY SIDE VILLAS
FOR RENT 2/2. $650 MO.
PLEASE CALL
352-459-9300
ROYAL OAKS 1 MO. FREE 2/2.5 all
appl., pool, clubhouse, etc. Call
352-516-2657

816 Commercial
Property

LEESBURG
Warehouses w/Offices
2315-25 Griffin Rd. 1,150 up to
12,400sf. Starts at $300/mo.
Office/Showroom
1607 Hwy. 441 $850/mo
Small Shop or Office
2204 Citrus Blvd (441)
$320/mo., includes utilities
352-787-0004

819
Manufactured
Homes Rental

ATTENTION SENIORS AND ADULTS
Never lived in. Brand New 66x14, 3/2,
in nice quiet park in Eustis.
$650/mo + utilities. Sorry NO KIDS.
Call 352-396-2042

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
o1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
LADY LAKE 3/1 CHA, $550/mo + se-
curity. Call 352-787-9236

TAVARES
$595/mo. Furn.
352-343-7780
riverestwaterfrontresort.com

825 Rent-To-Own
TAVARESI
$595/mo. Furn.
352-343-7780
riverestwaterfrontresort.com


900
Real Estate
For Sale


903 Homes
For Sale

LEESBURG
Home for sale $7,500. Won't last!
2br 2ba, new carpet, freshly painted.
Waterview
Call 352-504-2260

LEESBURG
New home for sale $59,900.
Must See! 3br 2ba, gorgeous,
waterview home, screened lanai.
Call 352-504-2260


903 Homes
For Sale
LEESBURG 7.5 acres w/house, work-
shop & barn. Close to mall.
$175,000. 352-728-1227 or
352-250-9415
LEESBURG, Nice house for sale. Nor-
mandy wood subd. 3/2/2 1593sf
$59K cash!! Call Kevin for viewing
727-515-5860
LEESUBRG, rent to own $590/mo
w/down payment assistance.
352-269-4051
OCALA Handyman Hunt Cabin. Low
down pay 352-269-4051
WATERFRONT HOME
FRUITLAND PARK
3/2 canal front, Lake Griffin
$144,900 Call 352-787-4584
GalbreathRealty.com

910 Condos/Townhouses
MULTIPLE ADORABLE/ AFFORDABLE
CONDOS FOR RENT! DON'T MISS
OUT!
4- 2/2'S $699
1-1/1 $625
1-2/2 $750. 407-359-9500

932 Res Lots
Acreage
FRUITLAND PARK three quarter acre
corner lot lover looking picturesque
valley scene. Nicely treed lot. Corner
of Blue Moon and Valley Rd. Owner
highly motivated to sell. Priced at
$21,900. Call Joyce for more info
321-960-7533.




1000
Manufactured
Homes


1001 Mfd Homes
For Sale
CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick 407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 & 2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
EUSTIS 2/1 in 55+ park. Shed & car-
port & A/C porch. $2,500. Call
352-357-5556
SENIORS AND ADULTS
NEW and NEWER
Homes in a nice quiet part in Eustis.
$25,000 $45,000 Financing avail.
Only 3 left! Lot rent $350 per mo.
Call 352-589-4007
SUMTERVILLE 1/1 BRECKENRIDGE
2006, w/FL rm. & cart barn, furn.
W/D at Shady Brook Golf & RV.
$49,900 obo Call 810-820-1419
TAVARES
$595/mo. Fum.
352-343-7780
riverestwaterfrontresort.com

1002 Mfd
Homes
W/ land
For Sale

1012 RVLots




Become a
annual guest
by 12/31/13
and receive
FREE*
Shed, Driveway,
Landscape Pkg!

$50/mo. Site
Rent Savings!









1100
Recreation


1101 Boats
COVERED BOAT SLIPS FOR RENT
Twin Palms Marina located on
Lake Griffin. Water & elec. avail.
Weekly, Monthly or Yearly.
BOAT RENTALS
Twin Palm AdPontoons, Jon Boats,
Kayaks
& Canoes.
Call 352-787-4514

1150 RV&
Campers
SALEM LA BY FOREST RIVER, 2009
M262FLS. 1 Slider, full bath, awn-
ing, luggage rack, queen bed,
sleeps 6, fiberglass ext. Excel cond.
Weight 60401bs. $15,000.
352-787-3987


TRAILER HITCH Reese leveling & sway
bars. $99. Call 352-233-0408

1200
Transportation

1205 Autos
CADILLAC DEVILLE 4 dr. 2002. 108K
mi.. $2300.352-429-1387
CASH PAID
FOR JUNK CARS!
$300 and up.
Call 352-771-6191


1205 Autos
CORVETTE '94 LT1 MUST SELL Red,
71K miles. Nice $8,700 Call
352-255-4877
FORESTER'04
50K mi. Like new.
#S14170A
*$5,488.
VOLKSWAGEN JETTA SEL'08
1 Owner. Low mi.
#S14169A
*$7,888.
AUDI Tr 2.0T
40K mi. Auto Power Top
#140319B
*$21,444.
CHEVROLET CORVETTE '08
20K mi. Loaded
#SP2272
*$28,888.
DODGE DAKOTA 4x4. '04
6cyl. Club Cab, Low miles.
#SSSP2320
*$6,888.
*With $3000 cash or trade and are
plus tax, tag and $599 dealer fee.
BILL BRYAN SUBARU
8730 US Hwy. 441
Leesburg, Florida
352-240-7480
PLYMOUTH ACCLAIM '93, good cond.
139K mi., $1300 352-406-5918
PLYMOUTH BREEZE 1997. 4 door. Ex-
cel cond. $1900. SOLD

1206 Aviation

1210 Mcycles/
Mopeds
MOTORCYCLE CARRIER w/ramp. Ver-
sahaul VH-SPORT-RO. Never used.
$250 Call 352-728-1051
MOTORCYCLE JACKET U.S made. Like
new 3XL. $100. 352-669-7544
SPORTSTER 883, Black, 9K miles,
Great cond. 2nd owner, Some extra
$4400. 352 360-3335

1240 Trucks
Light Duty
DODGE DAKOTA '07, 4 door, 6 cylin-
der, 60K, $11,300 Call 365-6238

1241 Trucks
Heavy Duty
DODGE RAM 2500 '98. A/C, tilt/cruise.
Auto, w/towing package. 8' bed. Ex-
cel cond. 76K mi. No Rust. $5500.
Call 812-431-8828

1247 Trailers
TRAILER heavy duty, 5.5' x 9' w/15' 6
ply tires, Used once. Pd $1400 sell
for $1000. Call 352-250-3343
UTILITY TRAILER heavy duty, 5'xl 0', tilt
top, side rails, new 15" tires, ideal
for golf carts. $775. obo Call
352-343-8898


1247 Trailers
UTILITY TRAILER 5'x8' w/ramp, mesh
bottom & tongue jack. 13" tires
w/spare. $550 Call 352-314-0145

1264 Auto
Parts
Accessory

CAR BRA for 2002 Mazda Miata. $50.
352-589-6107

CAR COVER Like new. $45. Call
352-383-8219
HUB CAPS (4) new for Toyota. $50
Please call 352-728-3928
MAG WHEELS Alum., Chevrolet. 15"
w/tires. $395 obo. Call 217-4221
TIRE Michelin/Alloy wheel. 225/60
R16. 75%. $100. 352-324-2173

TIRES & RIMS 34 x 10 x 50 x 15. Super
Swampers for Toyota. Like new.
$875. 352-303-3798
TIRES (4) 245/60-R18. $60. Call
352-326-9105


1264 Auto
Parts
Accessory
TOOL BOX Alum. Diamond Plate for
small Pick up. $75. 323-8805

TOOL BOX for pickup front. Alum, like
new. $100 Call 352-396-2511
TOW BAR w/wiring kit & safety chains.
$100. Call 352-771-1307
TRANSMISSION JACK 800 lb. capacity.
$100 Call 352-250-1199

1275 Golf
Carts
CLUB CAR '96, 48V, batteries 2013, all
lights, turn signals & enclosure.
$1350 Call 352-455-1999

CLUB CAR batteries 2011, all lights,
36V.$850 Call 352-455-1999
COOLER Playmate for Golf Cart. Good
cond. $10 Call 352-259-3522
GOLF CART Yamaha, 2007., 48V, Red,
like new. $1995. 336-817-7509


LOAN




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