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Daily Commercial
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Thi

SLEESBURG, FLC


Dl)ail C(


>RIDA


Monday, October 7, 2013


ninercial


www.dailycommercial.corn


CLERMONT: Hundreds attend Unity in the Community event/ A3

WORLD: Italy migrant death toll reaches at least 181 / A6



GOP: No debt


hike without



concessions

US moves closer to first-ever
default on government's debt


N


Winigs and Wildflf owe"rs


attracts nature lovers


THERESA CAMPBELL
Staff Writer
theresacampbeIIll@dailycommercial.com
thousands of nature
enthusiasts from
Florida as well as other
states flocked to Hickory
Point Recreation Park to
experience Lake County's
natural attractions and
scenic beauty during the
second annual Wings and
Wildflowers Festival.
Guided kayak trips, bird-
watching expeditions, and
a chance to see the Swamp
Brothers, and a tiny bat up
close were part of the appeal
for festivalgoers at the three-
day weekend event that
ended Sunday. More than
100 activities, programs,
and guest speakers were
available.
"We've had people
here from Miami to the


Carolinas," said Park
Ranger Daniel Osborne,
who found many attendees
relished being able to go
out in kayaks for free to
explore bird-watching on
the waterways. Some 250
different species have been
seen here along with an
SEE NATURE I A2


Avery Chan of Oveido, left, listens as La-
von Silvernell, naturalist with Trout Lake
Nature Center, shows a grasshopper.


Elizabeth Heine volunteered her time getting kayaks ready.


DONNA CASSATA and
MARTIN CRUTSINGER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
United States moved clos-
er to the possibility of the
first-ever default on the
government's debt Sunday
as Speaker John Boehner
adamantly ruled out a
House vote on a straight-
forward bill to boost the
borrowing authority with-
out concessions from Pres-
ident Barack Obama.
With no resolution in
sight, Treasury Secretary
Jack Lew warned that Con-
gress is "playing with fire"
as he called on lawmakers
to quickly pass legislation
re-opening the govern-


ment and a measure in-
creasing the nation's $16.7
trillion debt limit.
The government shut-
down precipitated by the
budget brinkmanship en-
tered its sixth day with hun-
dreds of thousands of fed-
eral employees furloughed,
national parks closed and
an array of government
services on hold.
Lew said Obama has not
changed his opposition to
coupling a bill to re-open
the government and raise
the borrowing authority
with Republican demands
for changes in the 3-year-
old health care law and
spending cuts.
SEE DEBT I A4


US government


work is losing


appeal for some


Raids suggest future shape


of counterterror efforts


ROBERT BURNS
AP National Security Writer
WASHINGTON The U.S.
commando raids in Libya
and Somalia suggest the fu-
ture shape of U.S. counterter-
rorism efforts brief, target-
ed raids against highly sought
extremist figures and high-
light the rise of Africa as a ter-
rorist haven.
The strikes also raise ques-
tions about where to interro-
gate and try captured terror-
ist suspects such as Abu Anas
al-Libi, accused by the U.S.
of involvement in the 1998
bombings of two American
embassies in Africa.
Defense Secretary Chuck
Hagel said Sunday that al-Libi
was in U.S. custody; officials
would not say where.
The chairman of the House
Armed Services Committee,
Rep. Howard "Buck" McKeon,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Dec. 8,2008 file photo, armed al-Shabab fighters just outside Mogadishu
prepare to travel into the city in pickup trucks after vowing there would be new
waves of attacks against Ethiopian troops.
said al-Libi has "vast intelli- on to his prosecution. The
gence value." White House seemed to agree,
McKeon, R-Calif., said saying Saturday's raid in Trip-
Obama should "fully exploit oli was specifically designed
this potential" before moving SEE TERROR I A2


SAM HANANEL
Associated Press
WASHINGTON There
was a time when being a
federal employee meant
a steady paycheck, great
benefits and pride in serv-
ing the country.
But these days, many
federal workers are frus-
trated, anxious and grow-
ing tired of being pawns
in a never-ending political
struggle over government
funding.
"The pay has fallen be-
hind, the uncertainty of
having a job from day to


day, the stability which
was a drawing factor for a
large portion of the people
is gone now," said Tommy
Jackson, an Air Force ac-
quisitions manager in War-
ner Robins, Ga., who has
spent 30 years in govern-
ment.
Jackson, 54, is going
through his second fur-
lough of the year. He and
his wife, Debbie, also a
government employee, lost
about $6,000 in wages this
year when they were fur-
loughed for six days each.
SEE WORK I A4


Marcelo del Canto, a budget analyst for the Substance Abuse and Men-
tal Health Services Administration in Rockville, Md., poses for a photo at
the Potomac Community Neighborhood Park in Rockville, Md.


Vol. 137, No. 2801 4 sections LEGALS D1
S MISSED YOUR PAPER? CLASSIFIED Dl NATION A4 ...... HIGH
Call 787-0600 (Lake County), or COMICS C6 SPORTS Bi /188
11 I 877-702-0600 (Sumter County) _oCOSSWORDSAOVOIE A7 LOW
o NESc Can CROSSWORDS D46VOICES-203 A7 73
11,c 1 -3NEWS TIP? DEAR ABBY C7 WORLD ___ A5 7P3 A
90994 17007 Call Scott Callahan at 365-8203-DEAR --BBY- C7 W 5 See A8





DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, October 7, 2013


HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Mon-
day, Oct. 7, 2013:
This year you seem natural-
ly happier to others; you have
a smile for nearly everyone.
You also tend to look at situa-
tions more positively than you
have in the past. Your upbeat
attitude permeates every ac-
tion you take, which results
in success! You are especial-
ly fortunate after June 2014.
Emphasize your work and life
directions. If you are single,
your smile attracts many po-
tential sweeties. Have fun
choosing! If you are attached,
your ease and willingness to
be yourself adds to the di-
mension of your relationship.
SCORPIO can cause you a lot
of emotional stress.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
You are a very independent
sign, yet you demonstrate an
ability to keep your eye on the
big picture. You interact well
with a partner who clearly has
different ideas. The fact that
you are looking for the opti-
mum path to success wins
over others.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
Defer to others, and keep
in mind that you can't force
them to think as you would
like them to. You still can be
involved, but you might not be
the dominant player that you
typically are. Fun opportuni-
ties will open up in response
to this change.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
You believe that a lot can hap-
pen and be established if you
encourage a free exchange
of ideas and let everything
happen as it needs to. By re-
leasing your need for con-
trol, you'll allow more creativ-
ity. You might want to sit on a
problem for now.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
Your playful side emerges
when dealing with others. Re-
member, not everyone feels
as carefree as you do. Though
you might be tuned in to your
feelings, it is important to ex-
amine what is going on with
those around you.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Ten-
sion seems to build at the
slightest setback. You even
might decide to stay home
and work from there, if possi-
ble. You could be off-kilter un-
til you hear from a loved one
or a child. Focus on your foun-
dations and try to remain cen-


South dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.
NORTH
*K64
V A K J S
*KQ3
46 A 10 7
WEST EAST
*J 102 *9 875
V1072 VQ9653
A 1087 7
+942 +'J853
SOUTH
*AQ3
V4
*J96542
4K Q6
The bidding:
South West North East
I Pass 2 V Pass
3 p ass 4 NT Pass
5 Pass 6 *
Opening lead jack of spades.
This remarkable deal appears in
Terence Reese's book "Reese on
Play." South makes six diamonds
even though West's A-10-8-7 appear
to constitute two impregnable trump
Iricks. Even when you study all lour
hands, the slain seems impossible to
make.
Nevertheless, thie contract can be
made with proper play. The hand
starts innocently enough when South
wins the spade lead with the queen
and returns a low diamond. West


tered.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
You will want to understand
what is happening with a
close associate, neighbor or
relative. Instead of playing the
guessing game, make the call.
This person simply might not
want to talk; however, should
you get a response, be sure
not to push.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Do not allow your more pos-
sessive side to take over.
How you see a money matter
might be a lot different from
how someone else sees the
same situation. Try not to get
involved if your views are too
different. You have a unique
style of communicating.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Pull back and distance your-
self from a trying matter. You
will see life from a totally dif-
ferent perspective as a re-
sult. You also might feel much
more together than you have
in a very long time. You have
no need to get involved in an
argument right now.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21) You might want to
revisit a personal matter. Dis-
cussions need to be car-
ing and not forced too much
in someone else's face. You
have witnessed this problem
build up, and you might want
to make a suggestion. In this
case, however, the less said
the better.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Zero in on your priorities
quickly and efficiently. You
know what is reasonable and
what needs to occur in order
to expand and head in a new
direction. You seem so much
more contained and pleased
than you have in the recent
past.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18) As nice as you might want
to be with someone, you could
find that you have a problem.
Understand what is happening
within your immediate circle,
but also recognize the need
for leadership. Are you ready
to step up to the plate?
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20) You see and understand
some of the miscommunica-
tions that are occurring. Your
detachment permits this per-
spective. If you decide to help,
you could lose this objectivity.
Be caring no matter which way
you decide to go.


plays the seven and dummy the
queen, on which East shows out.
Prospects of making the slam, which
a moment before had seemed almost
certain, now appear to be virtually
nil.
But a little thought reveals that
the contract can still be made if West
has precisely a 3-3-4-3 distribution.
The prospects arc not good, but at
least the outlook is not hopeless.
Accordingly, South cashes the ace
of hearts and ruffs a heart, lie then
enters dummy with a spade and rulls
another heart. The purpose of these
ruffs is to reduce South's trump hold-
ing to the same length as West's.
Declarer now cashes his last
spade and three clubs, winding up in
dummy. With everyone down to
three cards at this point, dummy has
the king of hearts and K-3 of dia-
monds, South has the J-9-6 of dia-
monds, and West has the A-10-8.
Declarer leads the king of hearts
from dummy and rulls with the jack,
rendering West helpless. If he over-
ruffs with the ace, he will be forced
to return the ten or eight, and in
either case South scores Ihe nine and
king. If West undcrruffs the jack,
South leads a diamond toward the
king, and again West makes only one
trump trick.
There is no escape for West. One
of his two apparently certain trump
tricks vanishes into thin air.


Tomorrow: Magnificent defense.
1021J13 Kig Fo, c, i IdSnca e ic


Storm, shutdown


hamper sea turtle


monitoring


Associated Press

PENSACOLA BEACH Although Karen lost its
punch before it could strike Florida's Panhandle,
rough surf from the storm and the ongoing feder-
al government shutdown hampered efforts on Sun-
day to monitor sea turtles along some of northwest
Florida's pristine beaches.
"Combined with the government shutdown, that
has sort of compounded the situation because we
don't have access to some portions of the park,"
said DJ Zemenick, a volunteer sea turtle patroller
for Gulf Islands National Seashore, a national park
that features sparkling white sandy beaches and a
historic U.S. military fort. "With the storm coming
and the government shutdown, we weren't keeping
our normal procedures to screen them," she said of
sea turtle nesting.
According to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission, monitoring programs help
document total distribution.


HOROSCOPES


TERROR
FROM PAGE Al


to apprehend, not kill, the
suspect.
"The president has
made clear our preference
for capturing terrorist tar-
gets when possible, and
that's exactly what we've
done in order to elicit as
much valuable intelli-
gence as we can and bring
a dangerous terrorist to
justice," said the White
House National Security
Council's spokeswoman,
Caitlin Hayden.
The outcome of a sec-
ond U.S. commando raid
Saturday, targeting a lead-
er of the al-Qaida affiliated
terror group, al-Shabaab,
was less clear.
A Navy SEAL team swam
ashore in Somali early in
the morning and engaged
in a fierce firefight. A U.S.
official said afterward the
Americans disengaged af-
ter inflicting some al-Sha-
baab casualties, but it was
unclear who was hit. The
official was granted an-
onymity because he was
not authorized to speak
publicly.
The raid in Somalia re-
flected the importance the
Obama administration at-
taches to combating al-
Shabaab, whose leaders
are believed to be collab-
orating more with other
al-Qaida affiliated Islam-
ic insurgent groups across
Africa.
In a speech in May out-
lining his strategy for the
use of drones, President
Barack Obama count-
ed Somalia as among the
places where the U.S. and
its allies face "lethal yet
less capable al-Qaida affil-
iates."
The commando assaults
unfolded against the back-
drop of political paralysis
in Washington, where the
Congress and the White
House are locked in bat-
tle over budgets but have
agreed to keep the mili-
tary operating and paid on
time.
Libya said Sunday it has
asked the United States
for "clarifications" regard-
ing the capture of al-Libi
by U.S. Delta Force com-
mandos.
The Tripoli government
said that al-Libi, as a Lib-
yan national, should be
tried in his own country.
He is on the FBI's most-
wanted list of terrorists
with a $5 million boun-
ty on his head. He was in-
dicted by the U.S. in No-


NATURE
FROM PAGE Al


abundance of wildflowers
in bloom.
"This event has gone
well and I really liked
seeing the variety of ages,
the young kids and the
interaction," said Patricia
Burgos, biologist with
the Lake CountyWater
Authority.
"Kids really just love to
go see the bat lady (Shari
Blisset-Clark) and bats
are part of the 'wings'
part of the festival. People
don't realize that bats are
an important pollinator,
insect eater, and they are
quite influential to our
agricultural community.
"All of the topics have
been fabulous, the trips
have been great, and we
have been getting good
feedback from the public
that they love all of these
things mixed in together."
Ava Foster, 8, and her
sister Sydney, 10, of Mount
Dora took advantage of
the hands-on children's
projects offered by Trout
Lake Nature Center,
including the chance
to see some critters up
close and to take part in
a craft project of making


vember 1998.
In a statement, Libya
also said it hoped the in-
cident would not affect its
strategic relationship with
the U.S., which is evolv-
ing in the aftermath of the
2011 ouster of longtime
ruler Moammar Ghadafi.
Ties were complicated by
the Sept. 11, 2012, attack
on U.S. diplomatic facili-
ties in Benghazi, in east-
ern Libya.
Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-
N.H., a vocal advocate of
placing captured high-val-
ue terrorist suspects in the
U.S. prison at Guantana-
mo Bay, said Sunday that
al-Libi should be treated
as an enemy combatant,
detained in military cus-
tody "and interrogated to
gather information that
will prevent future attacks
and help locate other al-
Qaida terrorists."
Al-Libi was indicted by a
federal court in New York
for his alleged role in the
bombings of the U.S. Em-
bassies in Dar es Salaam,
Tanzania, and Nairobi, Ke-
nya, on Aug. 7, 1998, that
killed more than 220 peo-
ple.
U.S. Secretary of State
John Kerry, in Indone-
sia for an economic sum-
mit, said the U.S. hopes
the raids make clear that
America "will never stop
in the effort to hold those
accountable who conduct
acts of terror." He added:
"Members of al-Qaida and
other terrorist organiza-
tions literally can run but
they can't hide."
It was not immediate-
ly clear whether al-Libi
had been involved with al-
Qaida since or had been
connected to militant ac-
tivities in Libya, where al-
Qaida has a growing pres-
ence since Gadhafi's was
unseated.
His family denied he
was ever a member of al-
Qaida and said he was not
involved in militant activi-
ty since his return.
In a 157-page indict-
ment filed in the Southern
District of NewYork in No-
vember 1998, the U.S. gov-
ernment accused al-Libi
and others of conspiring
to kill American civilians
and military members at
the embassies in Kenya
and Tanzania.
Specifically, prosecutors
said al-Libi helped bin
Laden and al-Qaida plan
the attacks on the U.S.
Embassy in Nairobi by
scouting and photograph-
ing the site in 1993.


butterflies to take home.
"There are some things
that they are able to see
because of this festival, so
we're really glad to have
this opportunity," said
Ashley Salamon, the girls'
mother.
Sumter County nature
photographer Mryna
Erler-Bradshaw of Wahoo
showcased her large
photographs of Florida
wildlife and birds. One of
her most striking photos
is of a white egret that
landed on the back of a
floating alligator.
"I was just at the right
place at the right time,"
she said. "It's just a matter
of being ready. It takes a
lot of patience to do bird
photography."
Erler-Bradsahw was
thrilled by the festival
crowd.
"I looked at this as a
chance to meet other
people, expand my
audience, and I have been
pleasantly surprised and I
have done well," she said
of those who purchased
her scenic nature photos.
"I would do this again,"
she said, praising the
festival. "There is a lot
of information available
here."


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NEWSROOM CONTACTS
BILL KOCH, assistant managing editor
352-365-8208..................................... billkoch@dailycommercial.com
SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor
352-365-8203 ............................scottcallahan@dailycommercial.com
PAUL RYAN, visual editor
352-365-8270 ................................... paulryan@dailycommercial.com
FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor
352-365-8268 .................................frankjolley@dailycommercial.com
REPORTERS
ROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County
352-394-2183 .......................... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com
MILLARD IVES, police and courts
352-365-8262.................... millardives@dailycommercial.com
THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages
352-365-8209...................theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com
OTHERS
PAM FENNIMORE, editorial assistant
352-365-8256.............. pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com
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A FLORIDA
i LOTTERY

SUNDAY
CASH 3 ............................................... 9-4-3
Afternoon ........................................... 2-3-2
PLAY 4 ............................................. 0-7-2-4
Afternoon....................................... 1-8-7-8

SATURDAY
FANTASY 5......................... 13-20-25-27-29
2 of 5 wins free ticket 3 of 5 wins $10.50
4 of 5 wins $117 5 of 5 wins $132,102.93
LOTTO............................. 1-12-22-44-46-52
3 of 6 wins $5 4 of 5 wins $73
5 of 5 wins $4,875 Rollover
POWERBALL.................... 11-12-17-39-40-5
With Powerball Without Powerball
Powerball alone wins $4........................... 3 of 5 wins $7
1 of 5 w/Powerball wins $4................. 4 of 5 wins $100
2 of 5 w/Powerball wins $7......5 of 5 wins $1,000,000
3 of 5 w/Powerball wins $100............................ Rollover
4 of 5 w/Powerball wins $10,000


The Daily Commercial
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BRIDGE


Famous Hand


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 7, 2013









SItatT&R.egion
NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN I scottcallahan@dailycommercial.com 1 352-365-8208 www.dailycommercial.com


Area Briefs
THE VILLAGES
5th annual Give Fore Life
Blood Drive scheduled
Join the Loud Boys of the Villages
as they host the 5th Annual Give Fore
Life Blood Drive in memory of Roy
Bishop, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday at
Seabreeze Recreational Center, 2384
Buena Vista Boulevard.
Donors will receive a commemo-
rative T-shirt, free lunch, gift bag, a
coupon to City Fire Restaurant and a
free round of golf at Eagle Ridge Golf
Course. Donors also enjoy a wellness
check-up.
For information, go to www.one-
blood.org.
EUSTIS
Annual Claude Pepper
Dinner set for Oct. 19
Reservations for the 12th annual
Claude Pepper Dinner and fundraiser
event are open through Saturday for
this annual Lake County Democratic
Party fundraiser that includes a re-
ception ($25) at 5 p.m., and dinner
and entertainment ($65) at 6 p.m., or
enjoy both with an $85 ticket.
Theme for this year's event is "Let's
Get It Done!" Special guest speakers
include Rep. Victor Torres speaking on
"getting done" immigration reform,
and Joe Flynn, who will speak on "get-
ting done" health care access and
coverage, at the Eustis Community
Center, 610 Northshore Dr.
For tickets and information, call
Jane Hepting at 352-250-6771.
LEESBURG
Community Resource and
Career Fair set for Friday
The Lake County Probation Services
Division, Partners Investing in People
and the Goodwill Job Connection
Center will host a Community
Resource and Career Fair from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m., Friday at the Venetian
Gardens Community Building, 201 E.
Dixie Ave.
For information, callWynderlon
Blue at 352-638-2089, or send email
wblue@devereux.org.
LAKE COUNTY
Some Lake County libraries
to close on Columbus Day
Six of the 15 Lake County libraries
will close on Columbus Day as library
staff take part in training.
The following libraries will be
closed: Astor County Library; Cagan
Crossings Community Library
in Clermont; East Lake County
Library in Sorrento; Helen Lehmann
Memorial Library in Montverde;
Marion Baysinger Memorial Library
in Groveland; and the Paisley County
Library.
DESTIN
Shark bites boy in Gulf of
Mexico off Panhandle
Authorities say a shark bit a boy
wading in the Gulf of Mexico off the
Florida Panhandle.
Destin Fire Control District Capt.
Mark Hutchinson says the boy was
bitten on the right forearm Saturday
afternoon.
Hutchinson told the Northwest
Florida Daily News that the boy had
been about knee deep in the water.
He says the bite "was not an ampu-
tation, but a pretty significant-sized
laceration."
The boy was taken to a hospital. His
name was not released. A message



... and we'll share it with our readers.
Some of our best story ideas and photos
come from our readers. So don't hesitate
to share your youth activities, awards,
accomplishments, festivals, charity
events and other things that make our
communities special. And don't overlook
those family milestones birthdays,


engagements, marriages, business
promotions and military news.
Just email your photos and news to...
pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com


U

N

1

T

Y




1

N




T

H

E


C

0

M

M

U

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1

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PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / DAILY
COMMERCIAL
Orthodontist Dr. Keith Alexander works the crowd.
He stands more than nine feet tall.


Three year old Kylie Dewalden, of Oakland, tries out
her first motorcycle, courtesy of the Clermont Police
Department.


Tammi Noel hands out medals to runners as they finish. Noel is one of
many volunteers who worked the event, benefiting Buses 'n Backpacks.

The 2nd annual Unity in the
Community Fest was celebrated Saturday
at Clermont's Waterfront Park.The event
featured hundreds of exhibitors, vendors
and non-profit organizations.


Brianna of the Better Life Worship Band sings the national anthem during
opening ceremonies.


Health officials warn of bacteria


The Associated Press
MELBOURNE Cen-
tral Florida health offi-
cials have issued warnings
about a flesh-eating bacte-
rium that led to the death
of a Flagler County man
last month.
Henry Konietzky's death
Sept. 23 from the rare in-
fection came less than
62 hours after he wad-
ed into the Halifax Riv-
er to fish. Antibiotics and
blood transfusions failed
to stop the bacterial infec-
tion from spreading from
throughout his body.


2i


"He looked like some-
one beat him with a base-
ball bat," his wife, Patty
Konietzky, told The Day-
tona Beach News-Journal.
"The only way I can de-
scribe it was like someone
poured acid all over him."
Konietzky said her fam-
ily has fished for decades
on the river without ever
knowing it might contain
the Vibrio vulnificus bac-
terium that killed her hus-
band. He never thought to
check his body for scrapes
or small wounds that
might lead to infections
after exposure to the wa-


ter, she said.
She now wants signs
posted along the riv-
er warning people about
bacteria in the brackish
water.
"Maybe we would have
crabbed from the bridge
instead. I don't know what
we would have done but at
least we would have been
given a choice," she said.
Health officials say
they're faced with a chal-
lenge in publicizing the
health risk without pan-
icking people over nat-
urally occurring bacte-
ria that seriously affects


only a small percentage of
the millions of people ex-
posed to it.
Posting signs about bac-
teria that are impossi-
ble to detect would be in-
effective, said Dr. Bonnie
Sorensen, director of the
Volusia County Health De-
partment.
"This is naturally occur-
ring, so I'm not sure where
you would start posting
signs," she said. "It's every-
where."
Statewide, 27 cases have
been reported this year.
Henry Konietzky's case
was the nine death.


injured in small plane crash identified


The Associated Press
GAINESVILLE Authorities have
identified the two people injured
when their small plane crash-landed
near tailgaters gathered for the Flori-
da-Arkansas football game.
Witnesses and University of Flori-
da Police Chief Linda Stump say pi-
lot Graham Hill's attempt to make
an emergency landing on Flavet


Field averted disaster. No one on the
ground was injured when Hill's plane
lost power Saturday as it towed a ban-
ner over the campus.
"They were toting a banner when
the plane lost power. They jetti-
soned the banner because it's a big
drag," said Gainesville Fire Rescue
Chief Gene Prince. "They knew they
weren't going to make it so they made
a decision that this might be the best


place they could come down without
hurting anybody"
The banner landed in a residential
neighborhood where it caused some
property damage but no injuries, said
Gainesville Police Lt. Bruce Giles.
Witnesses told The Gainesville Sun
the plane flew low over Pressly Stadi-
um, passed over a residence hall and
flew between two tall light poles be-
fore hitting the ground.


A3


Monday, October 7, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL





DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, October 7, 2013


DEBT
FROM PAGE Al

Boehner insisted that
Obama must negotiate
if the president wants
to end the shutdown
and avert a default that


could trigger a finan-
cial crisis and recession
that would echo the
events of 2008 or worse.
The 2008 financial cri-
sis pushed the country
into the worst recession
since the Great Depres-
sion of the 1930s.
"We're not going to


pass a clean debt limit
increase," the Ohio Re-
publican said in a tele-
vision interview. "I told
the president, there's
no way we're going to
pass one. The votes are
not in the House to pass
a clean debt limit, and
the president is risking
default by not having a
conversation with us."
Boehner also said he
lacks the votes "to pass
a clean CR," or continu-
ing resolution, a refer-
ence to the temporary
spending bill without
conditions that would
keep the government
operating. Democrats
argue that their 200
members in the House
plus close to two dozen
pragmatic Republicans
would back a so-called
clean bill if Boehner
just allowed a vote, but
he remains hamstrung
by his tea party-strong
GOP caucus.


"Let me issue him a
friendly challenge. Put
it on the floor Monday
or Tuesday. I would bet
there are the votes to
pass it," said Sen. Chuck
Schumer, D-N.Y.
In a series of Sun-
day television appear-
ances, Lew warned that
on Oct. 17, when he ex-
hausts the bookkeeping
maneuvers he has been
using to keep borrow-
ing, the threat of default
would be imminent.
"I'm telling you that
on the 17th, we run out
of the ability to borrow,
and Congress is playing
with fire," Lew said.
Lew said that while
Treasury expects to
have $30 billion of cash
on hand on Oct. 17, that
money will be quickly
exhausted in paying in-
coming bills given that
the government's pay-
ments can run up to $60


billion on a single day.
Treasury issued a re-
port on Thursday de-
tailing in stark terms
what could happen if
the government actual-
ly defaulted on its ob-
ligations to service the
national debt.
"A default would be
unprecedented and has
the potential to be cat-
astrophic," the Treasury
report said. "Credit mar-
kets could freeze, the
value of the dollar could
plummet, U.S. inter-
est rates could skyrock-
et, the negative spill-
overs could reverberate
around the world."
Private economists
generally agree that
a default on the U.S.
debt would be extreme-
ly harmful, especially if
the impasse was not re-
solved quickly.
"If they don't pay on
the debt, that would


cost us for generations
to come," said Mark
Zandi, chief economist
at Moody's Analytics.
He said a debt default
would be a "cataclys-
mic" event that would
roil financial markets
in the United States and
around the world.
Zandi said that hold-
ers of U.S. Treasury
bonds would demand
higher interest rates
which would cost the
country hundreds of bil-
lions of dollars in high-
er interest payments in
coming years on the na-
tional debt.
Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Tex-
as, a force in push-
ing Republicans to link
changes to the health
care law in exchange
for keeping the govern-
ment running, spelled
out his conditions for
raising the borrowing
authority.


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WORK
FROM PAGE Al

Now the shutdown,
and he said they are
considering options to
move into the private
sector.
"That six-day fur-
lough cost us a good bit
of money," he said. "I'm
sitting out right now, I
don't know if it'll be for
a day, a month or two
months. I don't want to
operate that way."
Jackson spoke be-
fore the House voted
407-0 Saturday to re-
imburse federal work-
ers for lost pay during
the shutdown. The Sen-
ate has indicated that it
will go along, and Presi-
dent Barack is expected
to sign the bill.
For many, working
for the government has
long been a ticket to a
middle-class lifestyle.
Federal jobs offered
flexibility, security, sol-
id health care and pen-
sions. Raises and pro-
motions were common.
Whatever happened
to the economy, Uncle
Sam never went bank-
rupt or threatened to
close down.
But federal employ-
ees today are working
under a three-year pay
freeze. Earlier this year,
many were furloughed
when automatic spend-
ing cuts took hold, and
about 800,000 were told
not to report the mon-
ey during the current
shutdown. There are
proposals in Congress
to increase retirement
contributions for gov-
ernment workers and
politicians regularly
lash out at federal work-
ers as lazy, overpaid and
unnecessary.
For Marcelo del Can-
to, a budget analyst for
the Substance Abuse


and Mental Health Ser-
vices Administration in
Rockville, Md., working
for the government was
supposed to be a respite
from the ups and downs
of the technology in-
dustry.
"I worked for some
pretty big companies
and a lot of these Inter-
net companies that got
hit by the dot com bust,
so I went through a lot
of bankruptcies, laying
off workers," del Canto
said. "My wife said 'You
really need to get out of
the private sector, the
federal government is
really the way to go.'"
Both del Canto and
his wife, who also works
for the government,
have been furloughed
and they worry about
making the next mort-
gage payment on a
house they purchased
in March. He says he still
loves his job, but "it's a
very uncomfortable and
uneasy situation when
you never know if we're
going to shut down. It's
just not something you
can plan for and it im-
pacts you on a real basis
every day."
Dan Delgado, a fur-
loughed equipment
mechanic at the Min-
neapolis-St. Paul Air Re-
serve Station, wonders
if he should look for a
backup job. Delgado,
49, a military veteran,
said he had assumed
Congress would avert
a shutdown at the last
minute.
"I thought Uncle Sam
never gets broken," Del-
gado said. "I was blind-
ed somehow."
The Minnesota Na-
tional Guard said it was
putting 1,207 of its 2,100
full-time military sup-
port personnel on fur-
lough until further no-
tice.
Rick Swenson, of Ca-


tonsville, Md., said
he retired in 2012 af-
ter spending 38 years
working at the U.S. Ag-
riculture Department
because he was worried
his retirement benefits
would be cut and was
tired of the constant
criticism that was di-
rected at federal work-
ers.
"You hear alot of snide
commentary about gov-
ernment people and
what a cushy job they
have and all that kind of
stuff," said Swenson, 60,
who worked as an ad-
ministrative officer. "It
certainly doesn't help
your morale."
Swenson, said most
federal employees still
have a strong belief in
the mission of the gov-
ernment and want to
do public service. But
"it's getting tougher and
tougher because we've
seen a great erosion in
pay and benefits."
Federal employees
are retiring at a fast-
er rate this year than in
2012, according to the
federal Office of Person-
nel Management. About
82,000 federal workers
have filed retirement
claims since January, up
30 percent from claims
filed last year.
The National Active
and Retired Federal
Employees Association
says many workers are
retiring prematurely be-
cause they worry about
furloughs, the pay
freeze pay and looming
increases in retirement
contributions. The
group argues that these
departures are creating
a brain drain that is sap-
ping the government of
institutional knowledge
needed to for medical
breakthroughs, com-
batting foodborne ill-
nesses or even securing
borders.


Army ~ Navy~ Air Force ~ Marines ~ Coast Guard
Active Duty/Veterans
Thank you for serving our country.
Hamlin Hilbish Funeral Directors
326 East Orange Ave., Eustis, FL 32726
352-357-4193 www.hanlinlhilbish.com


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 7, 2013


.a -.dow
ow




Monday, October 7, 2013


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Egyptian security forces detain a wounded suspected supporter
of ousted President Mohammed Morsi, during clashes Sunday in
Cairo, Egypt.


Egypt: clashes


during national


holiday kill 15
HAMZA HENDAWI
Associated Press
CAIRO A senior Egyptian Health Ministry of-
ficial says 15 people have been killed in clash-
es across the country between security forces and
supporters of the country's ousted Islamist presi-
dent.
Senior ministry official Khaled el-Khateeb said
more than 80 people have also been injured.
The clashes took place as rival crowds of sup-
porters of the military and backers of the ousted
Mohammed Morsi poured into streets around the
country Sunday, as a holiday marking the anniver-
sary of the last war with Israel turned into a show-
down between the country's two rival camps.
Morsi's supporters and security forces fought
pitched street battles for hours in several Cairo lo-
cations that now look like combat zones, with small
fires burning, black smoke rising and the sound of
gunshots piercing the air thick with tear gas.


Quakes hit southern

Mexico, no injuries
JOSE ANTONIO RIVERA
Associated Press
ACAPULCO, Mexico A pair of moderate-
ly strong earthquakes on Sunday shook Acapulco
and much of the Guerrero state coast that was re-
cently hard-hit by deadly rain-induced landslides,
but there were no immediate reports of injuries or
damage.
The country's seismic institute issued a prelim-
inary magnitude of 4.96 after the latest Sunday
morning temblor, which hit at 11:57 a.m. and was
centered about 27 miles south of the Guerrero state
community of Atoyac de Alvarez. There were no
immediate reports of injuries or damage, but the
seismic alarm went off in Mexico City and authori-
ties warned people to stay away from elevators and
windows. The temblor followed a 5.21-magnitude
earthquake that rocked parts of southern Mexico
earlier in the morning.
Mexico's National Seismology Institute said the
first temblor struck at 10:27 a.m. and was centered
less than 3 miles south of Coyuca de Benitez in the
southern state of Guerrero.
Mexico City Mayor Miguel Angel Mancera also
reported both quakes on his official Twitter ac-
count.
The quakes were centered along the stretch of
Guerrero state coast and inland mountains that
were hardest hit last month by Tropical Storm
Manuel.
The second quake, which was felt in Mexico City,
had its epicenter near the most significant popu-
lation center closest to the hamlet of La Pintada,
where dozens died when a massive mudslide hit
the center of town on Sept. 16.


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A5


DAILY COMMERCIAL






YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD
BILL KOCH............... ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR
SCOTT CALLAHAN .......................NEWS EDITOR Vi
GENE PACKWOOD ............ EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Vi
www.dailycommercial.corn


VOICE

Campaign-finance

case tests Supreme

Court again

Those concerned about all the mon-
ey sloshing around in American
politics will want to pay attention
Tuesday, when the Supreme Court
is scheduled to hear arguments in a case
that could open the campaign-financing
spigot even wider.
The court has been asked to strike
down restrictions on how much a per-
son can contribute in each two-year elec-
tion cycle (now limited to $48,600 to
candidates and $74,600 to political par-
ties and political action committees, for
a $123,200 total). Supporters of the lim-
its enacted in the mid-1970s after Wa-
tergate contend these prevent partisan
politics from being dependent on high-
dollar donors. They say Congress has had
the authority to regulate contributions at
least since the court's 1976 Buckley v.Va-
leo decision, which said the public has a
compelling interest in limiting the cor-
rupting influence of money.
However the court rules, this will be the
biggest campaign-finance case since its
2010 Citizens United v. Federal Election
Commission decision, which led to mas-
sive spending by outside groups. Some
are calling it a second Citizens United.
Alabama businessman Shaun McCutch-
eon and the Republican National Com-
mittee have challenged the aggregate
limits, or caps, that citizens can contrib-
ute not the $2,600 limit donors can
make to individual candidates in primary
and general elections.
McCutcheon agrees that large contri-
butions from one source could be a cor-
rupting influence. But the caps limit free-
dom of expression, he says, contending it
doesn't make sense that wealthy donors
like him can give the maximum legal con-
tribution only to a certain number of fed-
eral candidates.
Friend-of-the-court briefs have been
filed on behalf of McCutcheon by Senate
Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, the
National Republican Senatorial and Con-
gressional Committees and the Tea Par-
ty Leadership Fund, which calls the caps
"arbitrary."
Those supporting the caps include
Americans for Campaign Reform, which
argues that the limits encourage "ordi-
nary citizens" to get involved in the polit-
ical process.
If the high court follows the same rea-
soning it did in Citizens United and
strikes down the caps, the result inevita-
bly will be more cash in the system. We'll
want to watch this closely.
Distributed by Scripps Howard News Service.


The Daily Commercial

The newspaper of choicefor Lake
and Sumter counties since 1875
EDITORIALS
Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any
individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Lo-
cal editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.
COLUMNS
Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture
appears with them. They do not necessarily reflect the opinion of
the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views.
If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or na-
tional issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial.com,
or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007.
Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The
writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the
column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.


OTHERVOICES

Tea party is the solution, not the problem


Let's get clear about the
political realities be-
hind the budget im-
passe in Washington
and the government shut-
down.
Nothing captures the dis-
tortions being perpetrated
more than the headline of a
Washington Post column by
Anne Applebaum that reads:
"The GOP Undermines De-
mocracy."
And, according to Presi-
dent Barack Obama, a "fac-
tion" of Republicans (read
"tea party") is holding the
nation hostage to its "ideo-
logical demands."
After all, isn't it true that
the health care law is the law
of the land?
Isn't it also true that it
passed constitutional mus-
ter before the U.S. Supreme
Court?
And isn't it also true that
we have a president, who
champions this health care
law, who has been elected
twice?
All true.
But it is also true that the
brilliant architects of the
U.S. Constitution provided
many checks and balances
and a multitude of channels
through which the will of the
people may, at all times, be
expressed.
The move by the Repub-
lican-controlled House
to pass a bill to authorize
spending for the federal gov-
ernment, but to withhold
spending authorization for
the health care law, is totally
legitimate, appropriate and
constitutional.
The Constitution vests the
power of the purse in Con-
gress. Here is what James
Madison, who drafted the
U.S. Constitution, had to say:
"The power of the purse


Star Parker
SCRIPPS HOWARD
NEWS SERVICE


may, in fact, be regarded as
the most complete and ef-
fective weapon with which
any constitution can arm the
immediate representatives of
the people, for obtaining re-
dress of every grievance, and
for carrying into effect every
just and salutary measure."
The fantastic news is the
system is working.
Ironically, those like Post
columnist Applebaum tell us
that Republicans, who are
boldly exercising their re-
sponsibilities and authority
under our Constitution, are
undermining democracy.
And, ironically, our presi-
dent refuses to sit down and
negotiate with Republicans
who are constitutionally rep-
resenting popular sentiment.
Then he says they are the
"ideologues."
As of Friday, the RealClear-
Politics.com average of polls
showed 51 percent oppose
the health care law and 43
percent support it.
Little has changed since
Obama approved it in March
2010. Polling then showed
49.3 percent were opposed
and 40.1 percent were in fa-
vor of it.
Against prevailing public
sentiment, Congress passed
the 2010 law without a single
Republican vote, using par-
liamentary gymnastics that
few can even explain today.
And yet Republicans are
being accused of hijacking
the system.
Among U.S. households,
an increasing percentage re-


ceives more in government
transfer payments than they
pay in taxes.
The figure rose from 20
percent in 1979 to 60 percent
in 2009, according to Univer-
sity of Dallas economist Mi-
chael Cosgrove.
With all the crocodile tears
about inconvenience that
this shutdown may cause
some nonessential govern-
ment workers, real tears
should be shed for the mas-
sive loss of jobs due to a
barely recovering economy,
larded down with govern-
ment, debt and a welfare-
state culture.
Stanford economist Ed-
ward Lazear has reported in
The Wall Street Journal that
only 58 percent of our work-
ing-age population is em-
ployed today, compared to
more than 63 percent before
the recession.
Last June, Lazear wrote,
"At the present slow rate of
job growth, it will take more
than a decade to get back to
full employment defined by
pre-recession standards."
A new Gallup poll shows
60 percent of Americans say
the federal government has
too much power, the highest
percentage ever recorded by
Gallup.
Obama is intentionally
playing to the cracks in the
Republican Party. He knows
Republican leadership is
weak-kneed.
But if Republican leaders
cave in, the country is lost.
We need principled and cou-
rageous leadership now.
The tea party is the solu-
tion, not the problem.
Star Parker is an author and presi-
dent of CURE, Center for Urban Renew-
al and Education in Washington, D.C.
Contact her at www.urbancure.org.


HAVE YOUR SAY
The Daily Commercial invites you
to write letters to the editor. Letters
should be no longer than 350 words.
They must be original, signed with the
full name of the writer, and include
the writer's address and telephone
number for verification. We reserve
the right to edit for length. Letters
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taste and libel. We accept no more
than two letters per month from the
same writer. No open letters, form
letters or copies of letters to third
parties will be published. We do not
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are not returned. We retain the right
to archive and republish any material
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By regular mail to:
Voices
PO. Box 490007
Leesburg, FL 34749-0007
By fax to: 325-365-1951


DOONESBURY -

LAP15 AMP eHTLeMAI',
IT'9 MY PLeA5URF TO WEL-
COME YOU TO THIS EXTRA-
ORPIMARY PRE55 eVE5T. IT'r
INCRePIBLO THE TURNOUT!
UAPReCBEPENTEP! / _


Editor's note: Garry Trudeau is on hiatus. This is a collection of some of his favorite strips.


SOME PEOPLE SAY IM JUST A
MOYVETY CAMPIPATE, BUT IF
THAT'S TRUE, WHY ARE YOU
AL-L HERE ? IT'S
UNSELEV- \ -
ABLE! y


A7


Monday, October 7, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL





DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, October 7, 2013


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Rather cloudy with a Ash
couple of thunderstorms thun
mair
HIGH LOW H
88 730 8

Lr', ..... '

61157.... ..........
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81/57


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TUESDAY




oweror
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inly later
IGH LOW
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WEDNESDAY




An afternoon shower or
thunderstorm in spots

HIGH LOW
880 69


S------- .

Tallahassee8
... 85/57


THURSDAY




Partly sunny with a
shower or thunderstorm

HIGH LOW
86 68


Lake City
85/63 t


Panama City ... i::! :
82/58 ., ....".. '.
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weather information, go to: -A. o
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Altoona
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S Oxford 88/73 M73
-- .... MI La ao -^.. ,, Umatilla /
A4. L 88173 "88/7 -A-"
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86/67
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87/74


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Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 2013


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VTI
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte, NC


Today
Hi Lo W
75 53 r
73 49s
48 42 r
71 47 t
73 54 c
78 57 r
77 57 r
72 44 pc
73 49 pc
68 40 pc
72 43 pc
74 61 c
66 50 r
75 55 r
83 65 t
67 44t
77 52 r


Tuesday
Hi Lo W
70 42 pc
77 50 pc
50 41 r
69 44s
75 54 s
73 51 pc
73 53 pc
59 39 pc
77 55 s
69 41 pc
59 40 pc
70 51 c
60 46s
66 41 pc
77 60 sh
68 44s
74 49 pc


City
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Concord, NH
Dallas
Dayton
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
El Paso
Fargo
Fairbanks
Flagstaff
Grand Rapids


Today
Hi LoW
73 45s
63 48 pc
63 45 c
64 49 c
80 58 r
72 54 c
84 57 s
60 44c
79 48s
69 49 pc
64 46 sh
61 42 pc
80 56 s
67 48 pc
44 31 pc
70 36s
60 46 c


Tuesday
Hi Lo W
72 43 pc
67 49 s
67 47 s
62 46 s
78 55 pc
69 41 c
86 59 s
65 44s
79 47 pc
74 53s
64 46 s
65 50 pc
83 58 pc
71 51 pc
45 31 sn
66 41 s
64 44s


FRIDAY




Clouds and sun with a
shower or thunderstorm

HIGH LOW
86 670


Jacksonville



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-Jorlando
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87/72 ,A.

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,:i 88/'7 Il
Myers l . |ll..
T5 '-A. a
a ,eFort Laudqwle
NaplesrL M87 d
88/75 |
iliam"



Key Largo
KeyWest = 86/79


87/78 .


Cty
Great Falls
Greensboro, NC
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City


Today
Hi LoW
73 42 pc
77 53r
77 56 c
87 74 pc
84 54s
60 46 c
77 48s
71 49s
85 63 s
77 49s
64 47 pc
73 49s
62 47 pc
67 48 pc
68 47 s
80 58 s
7665r


Tuesday
Hi LOW
58 33 pc
72 48 pc
69 47 pc
86 74 pc
86 59 s
67 48 s
79 52 s
75 52s
83 63s
78 52 s
72 49s
74 55s
64 51 s
71 54 pc
73 49s
80 62 s
72 55 pc


Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are today highs for the
day. Forecast highlow temperatures are given for selected cities.


U *,lingsln ,:
72144
CS nic go
0 scj Denver 34


U Longeles DRY
Z I eon AInGn[
8 8
105 E'u
0 NO
.106

Yesterday's National High/Low: (for the 48 contiguous states)


High 910 in Petersburg, VA


6


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10
Very High, 11+ Extreme
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Indexr
number, the greater the need for
eye and skin protection.


nWo Cold Front
Y Wanrm Front
Stationary
Front

Showers
T-stormsE
RalnM
Flurdes[
Snow i
IceO;


Low 130 in Angel Fire, NM


The solunar period schedule allows planning
days so you will be fishing in good territory or
hunting in good cover during those times. Major
periods begin at the times shown and last for
1.5 to 2 hours. The minor pedriods are shorter.
Major Minor Major Minor
Today 1:46 a.m. 8:00 am. 2:14 p.m. 8:27 p.m.
Tue. 2:47 a.m. 9:02 a.m. 3:16 p.m. 9:30 p.m.


ITHESUNANDMOONI


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


Today
7:24 a.m.
7:06 p.m.
9:57 a.m.
9:05 p.m.


Tuesday
7:24 a.m.
7:05 p.m.
11:00 a.m.
9:58 p.m.


First


Oct 11
Oct11


Full



Oct18


Last New



Oct26 Nov3


I TIDES I


Homosassa
Day High Feet
Today 6:23 am...1.4
7:39 pm...1.2
Daytona Beach
Day High Feet
Today 10:13am.....5.0
10:30 pm.....4.5


Today
Hi LOW
86 64 t
80 50 s
72 47s
81 60 r
94 70s
64 45r
66 57 c
61 48 sh
75 59 c
80 60 r
75 41 s
83 59r
82 49s
68 49 pc
75 50s
88 56 s
74 60 pc


City
Norfolk, VA
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego


Low Feet
2:18 am .....0.3
2:51 pm.....0.0

Low Feet
3:47 am ....-0.1
4:26 pm.....0.2


Tuesday
Hi LOW
75 58 r
80 53 s
77 52 s
73 54 pc
94 70s
65 42 s
67 46 c
60 44 sh
69 50 c
75 51 pc
67 38 pc
76 50 pc
77 49 pc
72 51 s
68 48 pc
89 59 s
69 60 pc


High Feet
6:58 am......1.4
8:28 pm......1.2

High Feet
11:01 am.....5.0
11:18 pm.....4.4


City
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Santa Fe
St. Ste. Marie
Seattle
Shreveport
Spokane
Syracuse
Topeka
Tucson
Tulsa
Washington, DC
Wilmington, DE


Today
Hi LoW
69 52 s
91 78 t
71 41 s
56 42 sh
57 48 r
81 52 s
60 40 pc
71 51 r
74 45s
92 65s
76 49s
76 59r
79 54 r


Low Feet
2:55 am .....0.3
3:36 pm.....0.0

Low Feet
4:31 am ....0.0
5:15 pm.....0.3


Tuesday
Hi LoW
69 52 pc
91 78 pc
74 43 pc
59 45 pc
57 45 sh
82 53 s
53 36 sh
67 40 s
78 51 s
91 62 s
81 56 s
72 53 pc
69 49 pc


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.


8:00 to 8:00

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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 7, 2013


I NTINA CTISS^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^U


w


A


.tIO









Sports
sports@dailycommercial.com


NASCAR: Harvick wins big/ B6


Bl
DAILY COMMERCIAL
Monday, October 7, 2013



www.dailycommercial.comn
SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY
1 352-365-8208


Manning + Romo


= 99 points; E


Broncos win in a record-setter


SCHUYLER DIXON
AP Sports Writer
ARLINGTON, Tex-
as Peyton Manning
and the Denver Broncos
stayed unbeaten after
Tony Romo made one
late mistake in a record-
setting game.


Manning kept up his
torrid pace with four
touchdown passes, and
Matt Prater kicked a 28-
yard field goal as time
expired for a 51-48 vic-
tory over the Dallas
Cowboys on Sunday.
Romo threw for 506
yards and five touch-


downs, the first 500-
yard game in Dallas
history, but was inter-
cepted by Danny Trev-
athan at the Dallas 24
in the final 2 minutes to
set up Prater's winning
kick.
The Broncos (5-0) got
all the way down to the


Dallas 1, then drained
the clock to make sure
Prater's kick was the fi-
nal play in a wild game.
The teams combined
for 1,039 yards of total
offense in the second-
highest scoring game
SEE STATS I B2


TONY GUITERREZ / AP
With Denver Broncos' Britton Colquitt (4) holding kicker Matt
Prater (5) kicks the game-winning field goal against the Dallas
Cowboys on Sunday in Arlington, Texas. The Broncos won 51-48.


Liriano, Pirates


drop Cards, take


2-1 NLDS lead


WILL GRAVES
Associated Press
PITTSBURGH Pe-
dro Alvarez and the Pi-
rates kept that Jolly Rog-
er flapping high above
Pittsburgh.
Alvarez hit a tiebreak-
ing single in the eighth
inning and the Pirates
beat the St. Louis Car-
dinals 5-3 on Sunday to
take a 2-1 lead in best-
of-five NL division se-
ries.
Alvarez pulled a
grounder into right field
that scored pinch-run-
ner Josh Harrison from
second base. Russell
Martin followed with a
sharp RBI single against
reliever Kevin Siegrist,
who took over after Car-
los Martinez (0-1) fal-
tered.
The go-ahead single
was the latest big hit by
Alvarez. He homered in
the first two games of
the series and is 4 for 10
with four RBIs.
Alvarez also kept the
Pirates' famous flag fly-
ing high in October.
"Raise the Jolly Rog-
er!" is the rallying cry
for this wild-card team,


Pirates 5, Cardinals 3
St. Louis Pittsburgh


MCrpnt 2b
Beltran rf
Hollidy If
YMolin c
Freese 3b
CMrtnz p
Siegrist p
MAdms lb
Jaycf
Kozma ss
J.Kelly p
Maness p
SRonsn ph
Axford p
Descals 3b


h bi
0 0 SMarte If
2 3 NWalkr2b
0 0 McCtch cf
1 0 Mornea lb
0 0 JHrrsn pr
0 0 Grilli p
0 0 Byrdrf
1 0 PAIvrz3b
1 0 RMartnc
2 0 Barmes ss
0 0 Tabata ph
0 0 Watson p
0 0 Melncn p
0 0 GSnchz ph-lb
0 0 Liriano p
Mercer ss


ab r h bi
4 0 0 0
4 0 0 0
2 2 2 0
4 1 1 0
0 1 0 0
0 0 0 0
3 1 2 2
3 0 1 1
3 0 1 2
2 0 1 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0


Totals 33 3 7 3 Totals 28 5 8 5
St. Louis 000 020 010 3
Pittsburgh 200 001 02x 5
E-Kozma (1). DP-St. Louis 2, Pittsburgh 1. LOB-St.
Louis 6, Pittsburgh 6.2B-Kozma (1), McCutchen (1),
Byrd (2). HR-Beltran (2). SB-Jay (1), Kozma (1). S-
Liriano. SF-R.Martin.


IP H R ER BB SO
St. Louis
J.Kelly 51/3 5 3 2 4 5
Maness 2/3 0 0 0 0 0
Axford 1 0 0 0 0 0
Ca.Martnez L,0-1 1/3 1 2 2 1 0
Siegrist 2/3 2 0 0 0 0
Pittsburgh
Liriano 6 3 2 2 2 5
WatsonH,1 1 1 0 0 0 0
MelanconW,1-O0BS,l-1 1 2 1 1 0 0
GrilliS,l-1 1 1 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Liriano (M.Carpenter). WP-Liriano.
Umpires-Home, Jerry Layne; First, Sam Holbrook;
Second, Jim Joyce; Third, Paul Nauert; Right, Wally
Bell; Left, Tony Randazzo.
now one victory from
its first postseason se-
ries win since the 1979
World Series.
Mark Melancon (1-0)
picked up the win de-
spite allowing Carlos
Beltran's tying home run
in the top of the eighth.
Jason Grilli worked the
ninth for a save.
Charlie Morton is set
SEE NLDS I B2


GENE J PUSKAR/AP
A pair of Pittsburgh Pirates fans celebrate after the Pirates
beat the St. Louis Cardinals on Sunday in Game 3 of a National
League division baseball series in Pittsburgh. The Pirates won
5-3 to take a two games to one lead in the best of five series.


PHOTOS BY DARRON CUMMINGS /AP
U.S. Team Captain Fred Couples holds the trophy as he is joined by the United States team after winning the Presidents Cup golf
tournament on Sunday at Muirfield Village Golf Club in Dublin, Ohio.



AMERICANS TRIUMPH


Woods delivers the clinching point as

Americans win 5th consecutive Presidents Cup


DOUG FERGUSON
AP Golf Writer
DUBLIN, Ohio -
The Presidents Cup
ended Sunday the
same way it always
goes an American
celebration after Ti-
ger Woods delivered
the winning point.
Woods' back flared
up on him again
in the final hour at
Muirfield Village.
He still managed
to hang on to beat
Richard Sterne, 1 up,
to give the Ameri-
cans the 18 points
they needed to win
the Presidents Cup
for the fifth straight
time.
It was the third
straight Presidents
Cup that Woods won
the cup-clinching
match all three
with Fred Couples as
the captain.
"It was a team ef-
fort this whole
week," said Woods,
who went 4-1 for
the best record of
any player. "We re-
ally played well to
give ourselves a nice
lead."
The biggest sur-
prise was not so


U.S. captain Fred Couples congratulates Matt Kuchar, right front, and Tigers Woods following a four-
ball match at the Presidents Cup golf tournament at Muirfield Village Golf Club.


much the outcome -
United States 181/2, In-
ternational 15 1/2- but
that the matches ended
without going to Mon-
day.
Rain interrupted the
matches all week and
made the course Jack
Nicklaus built so soft
that it was mere tar-
get practice for the best
players in the world
outside Europe. The
fourth session of four-
somes had to be com-
pleted Sunday morning


because of the delays.
That might have been
the end of Internation-
al hopes.
The Americans were
3 down in two match-
es and turned them into
a win and a halve, giv-
ing them a 14-8 lead go-
ing into the final round.
The Americans needed
only to win four of the
12 singles matches to
keep the gold trophy. It
was a little harder than
they imagined, though
it was a long shot for the


Internationals.
"It was a tall order, but
they gave it their best
shot. These guys played
their tails off," Inter-
national captain Nick
Price said. "We're a real
hodge-podge of a team
that came together
from four corners of the
planet. And they gave
the might of America a
run for their money."
Even though the
Americans clinched a
tie with more than an
SEE CUP I B2


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5




DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 7, 2013


LEADING OFF I NBA


in Sports Mayweather takes in Heat practice


DAY


OVERHEARD
"Our guys are obvioulsy in awe of what he's been
able to do for an extremely long period of time, 17
years being on top. That's almost too remarkable
to even fathom."

- ERIK SPOELSTRA, Miami Heat coach, on Floyd Mayweather


TIM REYNOLDS
AP Basketball Writer

MIAMI At 5-foot-8, Floyd
Mayweather Jr. physically looks
up to everyone on the Miami
Heat roster.
Figuratively, the roles were re-
versed Sunday.
Mayweather was a surprise
guest at Heat practice Sunday
morning, sitting courtside with
team president Pat Riley, manag-
ing general partner Micky Arison
and other members of the fran-
chise's brain trust. It's rare for any
outsider to get invited into Heat
practice, though Mayweather's
resume unbeaten in 45 fights
and generally considered the
best fighter of his era certainly
earned him the ultra-VIP access.
"We're trying to defend two


titles. He's been defending for
a long time," Heat star LeBron
James said. "He definitely knows
where we're coming from. It's
exciting at the end of the day to
have someone, one of the great-
est of all-time, to be in the pres-
ence. It's something you can talk
about years from now ... We're
honored and blessed to have
him in the building."
Mayweather, who left just as
practice was ending, gave the
Heat a brief speech, reminding
the two-time defending NBA
champions about the need for
hard work and dedication.
He's been a courtside regular
at Heat games for many years.
"From one champion to an-
other, he just talked about him
being proud of us, how we han-
dled ourselves," Heat guard


Dwyane Wade said. "He knows
as a champion how hard it is
to go out there every night and
compete, when someone can
take you down and take what
you work for. He just kept tell-
ing us how proud he is of us and
that'd he'd be here to support,
just as he was for many years."
Boxing isn't foreign to the Heat.
James and Wade have used it as
a training and conditioning tool
in the past, and Heat coach Erik
Spoelstra is a longtime fan of box-
ing superstar, Manny Pacquiao.
"Champs-to-champ respect,
that's universal and pretty awe-
some," Spoelstra said. "Our guys
are obviously in awe of what he's
been able to do for an extremely
long period of time, 17 years be-
ing on top. That's almost too re-
markable to even fathom."


SCOREBOARD


AUTO RACING
NASCAR Sprint Cup-Hollywood Casino 400 Results
Sunday
At Kansas Speedway
Kansas City, Kan.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (1) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 267 laps, 138.4 rat
ing, 48 points.
2. (19) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 267,101.3,42.
3. (14) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 267,105.8,41.
4. (5) Joey Logano, Ford, 267,118.7,41.
5. (9) Carl Edwards, Ford, 267,102.6,39.
6. (3) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 267,116.2,39.
7. (8) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 267,114.3,37.
8. (6) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 267,120.8,37.
9. (25) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 267, 77.5,35.
10. (20) Aric Almirola, Ford, 267, 82.1,34.
11. (7) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 267,105.2,34.
12. (16) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 267, 78.5,33.
13. (26) Greg Biffle, Ford, 267, 71.4,31.
14. (22) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 267, 81,30.
15. (15) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 267, 82.6, 29.
16. (24) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 267, 84.7, 28.
17. (4) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 267, 89.2, 28.
18. (12) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 267,
90.8,26.
19. (13) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 267, 73.1, 25.
20. (28) A J Allmendinger, Toyota, 267, 62.5, 24.
21. (37) Casey Mears, Ford, 267,58.6,24.
22. (23) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 267, 63.4, 22.
23. (10) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 267, 83.7, 21.
24. (34) David Gilliland, Ford, 267,50.2,20.
25. (41) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 267,51.4,19.
26. (36) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 267,52.7,19.
27. (33) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 267,47.1,18.
28. (35) Timmy Hill, Ford, 267, 43.9,16.
29. (42) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, 267,40.9,0.
30. (2) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 266, 70.8,14.
31. (30) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 260,32.8,0.
32. (11) Brian Vickers, Toyota, accident, 242,
76.4,0.
33. (43) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 235,36.6,0.
34. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, accident, 199,54.6,11.
35. (17) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 188, 57.3, 9.
36. (32) David Ragan, Ford, accident, 168,48.5,9.
37. (27) David Reutimann, Toyota, 157, 31, 7.
38. (31) Michael McDowell, Ford, vibration, 144,
34.5,6.
39. (21) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, accident, 135,
55.1, 0.
40. (38) Josh Wise, Ford, vibration, 108, 29.4, 0.
41. (39) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, engine, 107,
29.9,0.
42. (40) Reed Sorenson, Ford, vibration, 103,
32.2,0.
43. (29) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, accident, 0,
29.3,1.
National Football League
All Times EDT
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 4 1 0 .800 95 70
Miami 3 2 0 .600 114 117
NY.Jets 2 2 0 .500 68 88
Buffalo 2 3 0 .400 112 130
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 4 1 0 .800 139 79
Tennessee 3 2 0 .600 115 95
Houston 2 2 0 .500 90 105
Jacksonville 0 5 0 .000 51 163
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 3 2 0 .600 117 110
Cleveland 3 2 0 .600 101 94
Cincinnati 3 2 0 .600 94 87
Pittsburgh 0 4 0 .000 69 110


CUP
FROM PAGE B1

hour left, it took until
Woods in the ninth of
12 matches to secure
the win.
"There was no inten-
sity. We played and en-
joyed the day and the
people here in Colum-
bus," Phil Mickelson
said after he made four
bogeys in the last five
holes and lost a match
that ultimately didn't
matter to Angel Cabre-
ra. "I thought it was go-
ing to be closed out ear-


NLDS
FROM PAGE B1

to start for the Pirates
in Game 4 on Monday
against rookie Michael
Wacha.
Beltran finished 2 for 3
with three RBIs. His 16th
postseason home run
moved him past Babe
Ruth for eighth place in
postseason history.
Beltran's shot tempo-
rarily silenced a rock-
ing crowd at PNC Park.
It also set the stage for
another dramatic win


W L T Pct PF PA
Kansas City 5 0 0 1.000 128 58
Denver 4 0 0 1.000 179 91
San Diego 2 2 0 .500 108 102
Oakland 1 3 0 .250 71 91
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 2 2 0 .500 104 85
Philadelphia 2 3 0 .400 135 159
Washington 1 3 0 .250 91 112
N.Y Giants 0 5 0 .000 82 182
South
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 5 0 0 1.000 134 73
Carolina 1 3 0 .250 74 58
Atlanta 1 3 0 .250 94 104
Tampa Bay 0 4 0 .000 44 70
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 3 2 0 .600 131 123
Chicago 3 2 0 .600 145 140
Green Bay 2 2 0 .500 118 97
Minnesota 1 3 0 .250 115 123
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 4 1 0 .800 137 81
Arizona 3 2 0 .600 91 95
San Francisco 2 2 0 .500 79 95
St. Louis 2 3 0 .400 103 141
Thursday's Game
Cleveland 37, Buffalo 24
Sunday's Games
Green Bay 22, Detroit 9
New Orleans 26, Chicago 18
Kansas City 26, Tennessee 17
St. Louis 34, Jacksonville 20
Cincinnati 13, New England 6
Indianapolis 34, Seattle 28
Baltimore 26, Miami 23
Philadelphia 36, N.Y Giants 21
Arizona 22, Carolina 6
Denver at Dallas, 4:25 p.m.
Houston at San Francisco, 8:30 p.m.
San Diego at Oakland, 11:35 p.m.
Open: Minnesota, Pittsburgh, Tampa Bay, Washington
Monday's Game
N.Y Jets at Atlanta, 8:40 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 10
N.Y Giants at Chicago, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 13
Carolina at Minnesota, 1p.m.
Oakland at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Houston, 1 p.m.
Green Bay at Baltmore, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y Jets, 1p.m.
Cincinnati at Buffalo, 1p.m.
Detroit at Cleveland, 1p.m.
Tennessee at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Jacksonville at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
New Orleans at New England, 4:25 p.m.
Washington at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Atlanta, Miami
Monday, Oct. 14
Indianapolis at San Diego, 8:40 p.m.

LPGA Reignwood Classic Scores
Sunday
At Pine Valley Golf Club
Beijing
Purse: $1.8 million
Yardage: 6,606; Par: 73
Final
a-amateur
Shanshan Feng $270,000 70-64-64-68-266
Stacy Lewis $165,043 68-66-65-68-267


ly. On 12 or 13, they said,
'Your match is going to
count.'What? We ended
up winning. That's all
that matters."
It looked like the rout
was on early.
Hunter Mahan quick-
ly dispatched of Hide-
ki Matsuyama. Jason
Dufner never trailed
in beating Brendon de
Jonge. Zach Johnson
overwhelmed Bran-
den Grace, keeping the
South African winless
for the week. That gave
the Americans 17 points
and assured them a tie.
But it took more than an


by the Pirates.
Andrew McCutchen
led off the eighth with
his second hit, a double
to left. But the NL MVP
candidate unwisely
tried to advance on Jus-
tin Morneau's grounder
to shortstop and was an
easy out at third.
Harrison ran for Mor-
neau and moved up
when Marion Byrd
walked. The Pittsburgh
slugger tied for the NL
lead with 36 homers in
the regular season, but
hit just .180 against left-
ies.


Inbee Park $119,727
Karrie Webb $92,618
Na Yeon Choi $74,547
Yani Tseng $60,993
Beatriz Recari $45,331
Christel Boeljon $45,331
Pornanong Phalum $45,331
Sun Young Yoo $31,915
Amy Yang $31,915
Chella Choi $31,915
Caroline Hedwall $31,915
So Yeon Ryu $31,915
Hee Young Park $24,216
Anna Nordqvist $24,216
Sandra Gal $24,216
Jessica Korda $24,216
Carlota Ciganda $21,144
Liying Ye $21,144
Brittany Lang $19,699
Paola Moreno $19,699
Lisa McCloskey $16,958
Karine Icher $16,958
Vicky Hurst $16,958
Morgan Pressel $16,958
Mo Martin $16,958
Xiyu Lin $16,958
Caroline Masson $13,915
a-Simin Feng
Moriya Jutanugarn $13,915
llhee Lee $13,915
Azahara Munoz $13,915
Jee Young Lee $12,048
Jennifer Rosales $12,048
Hee Kyung Seo $12,048
Irene Cho $10,229
Lizette Salas $10,229
Eun-Hee Ji $10,229
Kristy McPherson $10,229
Katherine Hull-Kirk $10,229
Thidapa Suwannapura $8,675
Lindsey Wright $8,675
Michelle Wie $8,675
a-Jing Yan
Danielle Kang $7,409
Sarah Jane Smith $7,409
Mina Harigae $7,409
Jane Park $7,409
Cristie Kerr $7,409
Pernilla Lindberg $6,257
Yanhong Pan $6,257
Jenny Shin $6,257
Jiayun Li $6,257
Ryann O'Toole $5,602
a-Yuting Shi
Austin Ernst $5,602
Linyan Shang $5,602
Yuexia Lu $4,970


Toronto
Boston
Detroit
Ottawa
Montreal
Florida
Tampa Bay
Buffalo

Pittsburgh
Carolina
N.Y Islanc
Columbus
Washingto
New Jerse
N.Y Range
Philadelph


69-68-66-68-271
71168-66-67-272
64-71-72-69-276
72-70-70-66-278
73-68-71-68-280
70-71-70-69-280
70-70-69-71-280
72-70-72-67-281
69-71-73-68-281
73-70-68-70-281
71-68-72-70-281
71-69-70-71-281
68-73-74-67-282
69-72-72-69-282
72-73-66-71-282
64-68-76-74-282
69-73-72-69-283
69-74-68-72-283
71-70-71-72-284
69-71-72-72-284
74-72-73-66-285
71-73-73-68-285
73-67-75-70-285
72-73-70-70-285
70-68-75-72-285
72-66-71-76-285
70-73-73-70-286
72-75-68-71-286
72-73-70-71-286
71-71-73-71-286
71-70-73-72-286
74-73-70-70-287
73-71-71-72-287
68-73-73-73-287
74-68-77-69-288
70-71-76-71-288
74-74-68-72-288
72-73-71-72-288
72-70-72-74-288
70-75-73-71-289
75-72-70-72-289
74-70-71-74-289
73-75-73-69-290
74-75-71-70-290
75-69-75-71-290
72-73-73-72-290
69-73-75-73-290
72-75-69-74-290
72-75-70-74-291
77-68-71-75-291
73-69-74-75-291
74-72-68-77-291
71-75-76-70-292
78-71-72-71-292
77-72-71-72-292
78-69-72-73-292
76-69-75-73-293


National Hockey League
All Times EDT
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic
GP W L OT Pts
3 3 0 0 6
2 2 0 0 4
3 2 1 0 4
2 1 0 1 3
2 1 1 0 2
2 1 1 0 2
S 2 1 1 0 2
3 0 3 0 0
Metropolitan
GP W L OT Pts
2 2 0 0 4
2 1 0 1 3
lers 2 1 0 1 3
2 1 1 0 2
on 3 1 2 0 2
y 2 0 1 1 1
ers 1 0 1 0 0
hia 3 0 3 0 0
WESTERN CONFERENCE


hour for them to clinch
the cup thanks to a spir-
ited effort by Price's
team.
Graham DeLaet, who
earlier Sunday chipped
in from in front of the
18th green to help earn
a half-point, holed out
from a bunker on the
18th for birdie to give
him a 1-up win over
20-year-old Jordan Spi-
eth. Ernie Els made a
30-foot birdie putt on
the 16th hole and won
his match when Steve
Stricker missed bird-
ie putts on the last two
holes.


Alvarez responded
with his single between
first and second. Martin
then tried to drop down
a squeeze bunt to score
Byrd from third he
fouled it off, then lined
a hit to left that gave
Grilli more than enough
cushion.
Martin's sacrifice fly off
reliever Seth Maness in
the sixth gave the Pirates
a 3-2 lead and turned the
game over to Pittsburgh's
"Shark Tank" bullpen,
one of the keys to the
franchise's first winning
season and playoff berth


Central
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
St. Louis 2 2 0 0 4 11 2
Colorado 2 2 0 0 4 9 2
Winnipeg 2 2 0 0 4 10 7
Chicago 2 1 0 1 3 8 7
Dallas 2 1 1 0 2 4 5
Minnesota 2 0 0 2 2 5 7
Nashville 2 0 2 0 0 3 7
Pacific
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 2 2 0 0 4 8 2
Calgary 2 1 0 1 3 8 8
Vancouver 2 1 1 0 2 7 6
Phoenix 2 1 1 0 2 5 5
Anaheim 2 1 1 0 2 5 9
Los Angeles 2 1 1 0 2 6 7
Edmonton 2 0 2 0 0 6 11
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Saturday's Games
Toronto 5, Ottawa 4, SO
Columbus 3, N.Y Islanders 2, SO
Tampa Bay 3, Chicago 2, SO
Boston 4, Detroit 1
Montreal 4, Philadelphia 1
Pittsburgh 4, Buffalo 1
St. Louis 7, Florida 0
Dallas 2, Washington 1
Anaheim 4, Minnesota 3, OT
Vancouver 6, Edmonton 2
San Jose 4, Phoenix 1
Sunday's Games
Carolina 2, Philadelphia 1
Anaheim at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.
Vancouver at Calgary, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
New Jersey at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
N.Y Rangers at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Tuesday's Games
Colorado at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at N.Y Islanders, 7 p.m.
Florida at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Carolina at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Nashville, 8p.m.
New Jersey at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
N.Y Rangers at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Presidents Cup Results
Sunday
At Muirfield Village Golf Club
Dublin, Ohio
Yardage: 7,354; Par: 72
UNITED STATES 14, INTERNATIONAL 8
Foursomes
United States 31A, International 11h
Jason Dufner and Zach Johnson, United States, def.
Richard Sterne and Marc Leishman, International,
4 and 3.
Jason Day and Graham DeLaet, International, halved
with Phil Mickelson and Keegan Bradley, United
States.
Webb Simpson and Brandt Snedeker, United States,
def. Louis Oosthuizen and Charl Schwartzel, Inter-
national, 1 up.
Bill Haas and Steve Stricker, United States, def.
Adam Scott and Hideki Matsuyama, International,
4 and 3.
Ernie Els and Brendon de Jonge, International, def.
Tiger Woods and Matt Kuchar, United States, 1 up.
Sunday's Sports Transactions
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BUFFALO BILLS Signed P Brian Moorman.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
WINNIPEG JETS Assigned D Adam Pardy to St.
John's (AHL). Activated D Grant Clitsome from the
injured reserve list.


Adam Scott and Jason
Day won their match-
es, and Marc Leishman
gave the Internation-
als yet another point
when he made a 15-foot
par from the back of the
18th green.
It figured to come
down to Woods, who
won despite not making
a single birdie on the
back nine.
He grabbed his back
after trying to hit fair-
way metal into the par-
5 15th green, though
Sterne missed an 8-foot
birdie putt to halve the
hole.


in 21 years.
Tony Watson worked
around a one-out single
in the seventh before
giving way to Melancon
in the eighth.
Melancon stepped
in capably for a while
when Grilli, the All-Star
closer, went down with
a strained right fore-
arm in July. But Melan-
con struggled down the
stretch and his fourth
blown save in the last
three weeks came cour-
tesy of Beltran, who
knows a thing or two
about such things.


TV2DAY
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m.
MLB ALDS, Game 3, Oakland at Detroit


SNLDS, Game 4, St. Louis at Pittsburgh
6 p.m.
SALDS, Game 3, Boston at Tampa Bay


9:30 p.m.
TBS NLDS, Game 4, Atlanta at Los Angeles
NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE
8:25 p.m.
ESPN -N.Y. Jets at Atlanta


STATS
FROM PAGE B2

in regulation since the NFL-AFL merger in 1970,
according to STATS.
Cincinnati and Cleveland combined for 106
points in the Browns' 58-48 win in 2004.
Dallas (2-3) took a 48-41 lead when Romo
threw 79 yards to Dez Bryant to set up a 4-yard
scoring toss to Cole Beasley.
Manning, who threw for 414 yards, answered
by leading a nine-play, 73-yard drive to Know-
shon Moreno's tying 1-yard score with 2:44 re-
maining.
The Cowboys were on the verge of getting
blown out early in the second half when they fi-
nally stopped Manning and forced a field goal.
They later ended his streak of 227 passes without
an interception when Morris Claiborne picked
him off late in the third quarter.
Dallas converted the turnover into a 41-38 lead
on Romo's 10-yard pass to JasonWitten, who had
121 yards receiving and a touchdown.
The Broncos answered with a drive to Prater's
tying 50-yard field goal.
The biggest momentum swing came on Ro-
mo's 82-yard touchdown to rookie Terrance Wil-
liams that cut Denver's lead to 35-27 in the third
quarter.
The Cowboys jumped ahead 14-0 in the first
quarter.
But the Dallas defenders just couldn't stay with
Denver's receivers, and then Manning fooled
them and the 92,758 watching his first game
at the $1.2 billion home of the Cowboys with a
bootleg for an easy 1-yard score and a 28-17 lead.
Denver lined up for what looked like a run on
third down from the 1.
But Manning had faked the handoff, and the
roar from thousands of orange-clad Denver fans
grew as they realized he was jogging toward the
left corner of the end zone.
Romo got Dallas in position for a 48-yard field
goal by Dan Bailey just before halftime with a 38-
yard completion to Williams, who had 151 yards
receiving.
Bryant had six catches for 141 yards and two
touchdowns.
Julius Thomas led the Broncos with 122 yards
and two scores, Moreno had 93 yards rushing.
Manning broke the record for TD passes
through five games with his 19th on a 9-yard toss
to Thomas in the second quarter.




When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to
report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches
of recreational and youth leagues can send game results,
statistics, team and action photos, and we'll publish them
in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can
send us individual photos and accomplishments.

Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com




CONTACTS


SPORTS EDITOR
FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268
FAX 352-365-1951
EMAIL
sports@dailycommercial.com

* Schools or coaches can
report game results after 6
p.m. by calling 352-365-8268,


or 352-365-8279.


* Amateur Listings (col-
lege scholarships, meeting
announcements, schedule
changes, outdoors notices) can
be faxed to 352-365-1951, or
emailed to sports@dailycom-
mercial.com





Monday, October 7, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


BUTCH DILL/AP

Alabama running back T.J. Yeldon (4) runs for a first down during
the first half of an NCAA college football game against Georgia
State on Saturday in Tuscaloosa, Ala.



No. 1 Bama leads




unchanged top 5




in latest AP poll


RALPH D. RUSSO
AP College Football Writer

NEW YORK For the
fourth straight week,
the top five teams in
The Associated Press
college football poll are
unchanged, led by No. 1
Alabama.
The top-ranked Crim-
son Tide received 55 of
60 first-place votes after
an easy victory and No.
2 Oregon received the
other five after its lat-
est blowout. Clemson is
No. 3, followed by Ohio
State and Stanford.
The Buckeyes and
Cardinal were both test-
ed Saturday night and
stayed unbeaten. Ohio
State rallied to win at
Northwestern, 40-30.
The Wildcats slipped
three spots to No. 19.
Stanford held off Wash-
ington 31-28. The Hus-
kies dropped only one


AP Top 25
The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college
football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, re-
cords through Oct. 5, total points based on 25 points
for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-
place vote, and previous ranking:
Record Pts Pv
1. Alabama (55) 5-0 1,495 1
2. Oregon (5) 5-0 1,424 2
3. Clemson 5-0 1,359 3
4. Ohio St. 6-0 1,305 4
5. Stanford 5-0 1,278 5
6. Florida St. 5-0 1,158 8
7. Georgia 4-1 1,138 6
8. Louisville 5-0 1,051 7
9.TexasA&M 4-1 1,003 9
10. LSU 5-1 993 10
11. UCLA 4-0 844 12
12. Oklahoma 5-0 819 11
13. Miami 5-0 780 14
14. South Carolina 4-1 764 13
15. Baylor 4-0 681 17
16. Washington 4-1 556 15
17. Rorida 4-1 536 18
18. Michigan 5-0 514 19
19. Northwestern 4-1 418 16
20. Texas Tech 5-0 358 20
21. Fresno St. 5-0 258 23
22. Oklahoma St. 4-1 204 21
23. N. Illinois 5-0 138 NR
24. Virginia Tech 5-1 115 NR
25. Missouri 5-0 105 NR
Others receiving votes: Auburn 61, Notre Dame 50,
Nebraska 35, Wisconsin 29, Michigan St. 16, UCF 7,
Arizona St. 3, Mississippi 3, Rutgers 2.
spot to No. 16.
No. 23 Northern Il-
linois, No. 24 Virgin-
ia Tech and No. 25 Mis-
souri moved into the
rankings for the first
time this season. Arizo-
na State, Mississippi and
Maryland dropped out.


K-State, Kansas off to



winless start in Big 12


DAVE SKRETTA
Associated Press

LAWRENCE, Kan. My, how the mighty have
fallen in the Heartland.
It was just six years ago that the Jayhawks went
12-1 and beat Virginia Tech in the Orange Bowl,
capping a dream season under Mark Mangino. But
the program started to slide over the next two years,
Mangino was fired amid accusations of treating his
players poorly and Turner Gill won just five games
in two years before he was summarily let go.
Al Weis has found the going no easier in his first
two seasons. He won just one game last year, and
the loss to the Red Raiders was the 22nd straight
conference defeat for the Jayhawks.
"One thing we're going to do, we're going to have to
critically evaluate everything that happened," Weis
promised. "From coaching and play calling on one
end, to performance on the other end. Then we're go-
ing to have to go down to a nucleus of players that we
believe will all give us the best chance at competing."
The Wildcats (2-3) gave the game away in a 33-
29 loss to the Cowboys, turning the ball over five
times and committing an uncharacteristic 12 pen-
alties for 92 yards.
The loss left the Wildcats, who went 11-2 and lost
in the Fiesta Bowl last year, without a Big 12 win af-
ter two games for the first time since 2004, before
Snyder hung up the headset for a brief retirement.
Kansas State wound up finishing 4-7 that year, 2-6
in the conference.
"In our history, we have not been that kind of
football team," Snyder said after the loss in Still-
water, Okla. "We haven't always been extremely
good, but we haven't turned the ball over and we
haven't gotten penalized and it has always given us
a chance to win."


LATE TOP 25 BOX SCORES


No. 2 OREGON 57, COLORADO 16
Oregon 29 14 14 0 57
Colorado 10 6 0 0 16
First Quarter
Col-FG Oliver 33,12:02.
Ore-Mariota 2 run (Brown run), 10:13.
Col-Goodson 75 pass from Richardson (Oliver
kick), 9:35.
Ore-Tyner 2 run (Wogan kick), 4:55.
Ore-Addison 75 pass from Mariota (Maldonado
kick), 1:54.
Ore-Lowe 17 pass from Mariota (Wogan kick), :56.
Second Quarter
Col-FG Oliver 22,13:24.
Col-FG Oliver 31, 9:48.
Ore-Mariota 1 run (Maldonado kick), 6:04.
Ore-Huff 4 pass from Mariota (Wogan kick), :57.
Third Quarter
Ore-Addison 44 pass from Mariota (Maldonado
kick), 10:39.
Ore-Huff 26 pass from Mariota (Wogan kick), 6:50.
A-45,944.
Ore Col
First downs 31 15
Rushes-yards 62-349 36-94
Passing 406 280
Comp-Att-lnt 19-34-2 12-34-2
Return Yards (1) 5
Punts-Avg. 340.7 8-40.8
Fumbles-Lost 2-1 0-0
Penaltes-Yards 541 2-20
Time of Possession 31:54 28:06
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Oregon, Marshall 23-122, Forde 9-82,
Mariota 743,
Tyner 10-30, Huff 2-23, C.Allen 0-14, Lockie 2-12,
Rodrigues 3-10,
Roseberry 1-7, Cassell 1-6, Bassett 3-1, Team
1-(minus 1). Colorado,
Powell 20-78, Adkins 6-18, T.ones 3-5, Abron 1-1,
Goodson 1-0,
C.Wood 5-(minus 8).
PASSING-Oregon, Mariota 16-27-0-355, Rodrigues
1-4-1-37,
Lockie 2-3-1-14. Colorado, C.Wood 11-33-2-205,
Richardson 1-1-0-75.
RECEIVING-Oregon, Addison 5-158, Huff 5-103,
Tyner 2-29,
Marshall 2-17, C.Allen 1-37, Brown 1-24, Lowe
1-17, Mundt 1-13,
Delaney 1-8. Colorado, Richardson 5-134, Spruce
3-36, Goodson 1-75,
Adkins 1-20, Slavin 1-8, S.Irwin 1-7.
No. 4 OHIO ST. 40, No. 16
NORTHWESTERN 30
Ohio St. 10 3 7 20 40
Northwestern 7 13 3 7 30
First Quarter
OSU-FG Basil 27,12:31.
NU-Colter 9 pass from Siemian (Budzien kick),
8:00.
OSU-Roby 0 blocked punt return (Basil kick), 2:33.
Second Quarter
NU-Colter 2 run (Budzien kick), 13:19.
OSU-FG Basil 20, 8:36.
NU-FG Budzien 23,5:00.
NU-FG Budzien 29, :56.
Third Quarter
NU-FG Budzien 32,10:40.
OSU-Hyde 4 run (Basil kick), 3:54.
Fourth Quarter
OSU-Hyde 2 run (Basil kick), 11:29.
NU-Dickerson 12 pass from Siemian (Budzien
kick), 9:10.
OSU-Hyde 7 run (Basil kick), 5:22.
OSU-Bosa recovered fumble in end zone, :00.
A-47,330.
OSU NU
First downs 25 20
Rushes-yards 48-248 43-94
Passing 203 343
Comp-Att-lnt 15-26-1 25-31-1
Return Yards 16 5
Punts-Avg. 3-38.0 4-27.5
Fumbles-Lost 2-2 1-1
Penaltes-Yards 1-10 442
Time of Possession 29:22 30:38
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Ohio St., Hyde 26-168, B.Miller 17-68,
R.Smith 3-13,
Elliott 1-1, Johnston 1-(minus 2). Northwestern,
Mark 17-60, Green 5-19,
Colter 8-16, Trumpy 3-7, Vitale 1-2, Team 1-(mi-
nus 2),
Siemian 8-(minus 8).
PASSING-Ohio St., B.Miller 15-26-1-203. North-
western,
Siemian 13-18-1-245, Colter 12-12-0-98, Team
0-1-0-0.
RECEIVING-Ohio St., Corey (Philly).Brown 6-127,
Hyde 4-38,
D.Smith 3-31, Spencer 2-7. Northwestern, Lawrence
8-149, Mark 443,
Vitale 4-36, T.Jones 3-23, Jensen 2-37, C.Jones
2-34, Dickerson 1-12,
Colter 1-9.
No. 5 STANFORD 31, No. 15
WASHINGTON 28
Washington 0 7 14 7 28
Stanford 7 10 14 0 31
First Quarter
Stan-Montgomery 99 kickoff return (Williamson
kick), 14:48.
Second Quarter
Stan-FG Williamson 33,14:51.
Wash-Sankey 7 run (Coons kick), 1:03.
Stan-Montgomery 39 pass from Hogan (William-
son kick), :11.
Third Quarter
Wash-Smith 29 pass from Price (Coons kick),
14:01.
Stan-Hogan 4 run (Williamson kick), 9:14.
Wash-Sankey 15 run (Coons kick), 2:26.
Stan-Gaffney 11 run (Williamson kick), :44.
Fourth Quarter
Wash-Mickens 1 pass from Price (Coons kick),
2:38.
A-50,424.
Wash Stan
First downs 30 14
Rushes-yards 40-139 41-179
Passing 350 105
Comp-Att-lnt 33-48-1 12-20-1
Return Yards 15 47
Punts-Avg. 7-39.4 6-44.5
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0
Penaltes-Yards 10-89 7-53
Time of Possession 28:21 31:39
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Washington, Sankey 27-125, Coons 1-19,
Callier 1-1,
Team 1-(minus 2), Price 10-(minus 4). Stanford,
Gaffney 19-72,
Hogan 10-37, Montgomery 2-30, Wilkerson 6-23,
Seale 1-17, Young 1-3,
Team 2-(minus 3).
PASSING-Washington, Price 3348-1-350. Stanford,
Hogan 12-20-1-105.
RECEIVING-Washington, Mickens 9-59, Smith 6-98,
K.Williams 5-89,
Sankey 5-21, Seferian-Jenkins 4-58, Ross 2-15, Cal-
lier 2-10. Stanford,


Montgomery 3-56, Gaffney 2-12, Whitfield 2-11, Ca-
juste 2-7, Sanders 1-7,
Kaumatule 1-6, Wilkerson 1-6.
No. 10 LSU 59, MISSISSIPPI ST. 26
LSU 14 14 3 28 59
Mississippi St. 9 14 3 0 26
First Quarter
LSU-Hilliard 3 run (Delahoussaye kick), 10:02.
MSSt-Prescott 28 run (pass failed), 8:42.
LSU-Hill 69 run (Delahoussaye kick), 7:18.
MSSt-FG Bell 35,3:04.
Second Quarter
LSU-Hilliard 34 run (Delahoussaye kick), 14:51.
MSSt-Lewis 20 pass from Russell (Bell kick),
11:29.
MSSt-Wilson 59 pass from Russell (Bell kick),
6:28.
LSU-Beckham 14 pass from Mettenberger (Dela-
houssaye kick), :17.
Third Quarter
MSSt-FG Bell 22,12:01.
LSU-FG Delahoussaye 29,4:33.
Fourth Quarter
LSU-Beckham 33 pass from Mettenberger (Dela-
houssaye kick), 14:50.
LSU-Hill 5 run (Delahoussaye kick), 14:19.
LSU-Blue 17 run (Delahoussaye kick), 6:46.
LSU-Hilliard 4 run (Delahoussaye kick), 1:21.
A-57,113.
LSU MSSt
First downs 27 23
Rushes-yards 39-223 36-216
Passing 340 252
CompAtt-lnt 25-29-1 16-31-1
Return Yards 40 0
Punts-Avg. 2-46.5 1-42.0
Fumbles-Lost 1-0 1-1
Penalties-Yards 5-27 5-41
Time of Possession 33:32 26:28
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-LSU, Hill 16-157, Hilliard 6-39, Blue
6-31, Magee 6-18,
Copeland 1-0, Neighbors 1-(minus 1), Mettenberger
3-(minus 21).
Mississippi St., Prescott 12-103, Perkins 10-81,
J.Robinson 640,
Holloway 1-1, Team 1-(minus 2), Russell 6-(mi-
nus 7).
PASSING-LSU, Mettenberger 25-29-1-340. Mis-
sissippi St.,
Prescott 9-20-1-106, Russell 7-11-0-146.
RECEIVING-LSU, Beckham 9-179, Landry 8-96, Hill
3-13, Blue 2-19,
Dural 1-21, Copeland 1-6, Dickson 1-6. Mississippi
St., Lewis 7-111,
Morrow 3-30, Wilson 2-80, M.Johnson 2-19, Chap-
pelle 1-8, R.Johnson 14.
No. 11 OKLAHOMA 20, TCU 17
TCU 0 0 10 7 17
Oklahoma 3 10 0 7 20
First Quarter
Okl-FG Hunnicutt 39, 2:45.
Second Quarter
Okl-Millard 8 run (Hunnicutt kick), 2:29.
Okl-FG Hunnicutt 37,:00.
Third Quarter
TCU-FG Oberkrom 25,3:32.
TCU-Boykin 2 run (Oberkrom kick), :08.
Fourth Quarter
Okl-Clay 76 run (Hunnicutt kick), 4:37.
TCU-Boykin 8 run (Oberkrom kick), 2:26.
A-84,992.
TCU Okl
First downs 10 20
Rushes-yards 2744 38-203
Passing 166 152
CompAtt-lnt 16-26-0 20-31-0
Return Yards 16 0
Punts-Avg. 9-43.4 7-36.6
Fumbles-Lost 3-0 2-1
Penalties-Yards 5-25 3-35
Time of Possession 30:02 29:58
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-TCU, James 6-22, Boykin 12-18, Cata-
Ion 8-8,
Team 1-(minus 4). Oklahoma, Clay 9-111, Bell 14-
61, Dam.Williams 11-27,
Millard 1-8, Finch 1-0, Team 2-(minus 4).
PASSING-TCU, Boykin 16-26-0-166. Oklahoma, Bell
20-31-0-152.
RECEIVING-TCU, Slanina 6-38, C.White 4-38, Doct
son 2-18,
Porter 1-45, Catalon 1-21, James 1-5, Story 1-1.
Oklahoma, Shepard 5-37,
Saunders 5-30, Neal 442, Clay 4-21, Bester 1-19,
Finch 1-3.
No. 12 UCLA 34, UTAH 27
UCLA 7 14 3 10 34
Utah 14 3 0 10 27
First Quarter
UCLA-James 1 run (Fairbairn kick), 11:32.
Utah-D.Anderson 54 pass from Wilson (Phillips
kick), 10:12.
Utah-Fitzgerald 6 pass from Wilson (Phillips
kick), :58.
Second Quarter
UCLA-Hundley 7 pass from Fuller (Fairbairn kick),
13:24.
UCLA-Payton 17 pass from Hundley (Fairbairn
kick), 7:46.
Utah-FG Phillips 44,3:47.
Third Quarter
UCLA-FG Fairbairn 33, 6:52.
Fourth Quarter
Utah-McGill 19 interception return (Phillips kick),
13:23.
UCLA-FG Fairbairn 47, 8:28.
UCLA-Hundley 36 run (Fairbairn kick), 3:33.
Utah-FG Phillips 37, 2:04.
A-45,272.
UCLA Utah
First downs 20 22
Rushes-yards 53-186 33-99
Passing 218 288
CompAtt-lnt 18-28-1 2244-6
Return Yards 77 41
Punts-Avg. 7-36.6 5-45.2
Fumbles-Lost 3-1 0-0
Penalties-Yards 13-100 6-60
Time of Possession 33:29 26:31
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-UCLA, Perkins 1692, Hundley 2085,
James 12-39,
Manfro 3-(minus 2), Team 2-(minus 28). Utah, York
13-51, Poole 5-26,
Radley 7-25, Wilson 8-(minus 3).
PASSING-UCLA, Hundley 17-27-1-211, Fuller 1-1-
0-7. Utah,
Wilson 2244-6-288.
RECEIVING-UCLA, Fuller 4-32, Payton 3-68, Per-
kins 249,
Lucien 2-17, Bell 2-16, Mazzone 1-14, Evans 1-11,
Manfro 1-9,
Hundley 1-7, James 1-(minus 5). Utah, D.Anderson
6106, Fitzgerald 553,
Denham 4-61, Norwood 3-24, J.Murphy 2-27, Rad-
ley 2-17.
No. 13 SOUTH CAROLINA 35,
KENTUCKY 28
Kentucky 0 7 0 21 28
South Carolina 14 10 3 8 35


First Quarter
SC-Byrd 62 pass from Shaw (Fry kick), 13:21.
SC-Davis 22 run (Fry kick), 6:36.
Second Quarter
SC-Davis 1 run (Fry kick), 14:20.
Ky-Sanders 2 run (Mansour kick), 7:38.
SC-FG Fry 40, :12.
Third Quarter
SC-FG Fry 41,4:59.
Fourth Quarter
Ky-D.Robinson 4 pass from Whitlow (Mansour
kick), 13:43.
Ky-Timmons 14 pass from Whitlow (Mansour
kick), 11:50.
SC-Shaw 2 run (Jones pass from Shaw), 8:05.
Ky-Whitlow 1 run (Mansour kick), 4:02.
A-82,313.
Ky SC
First downs 19 22
Rushes-yards 36-123 39-178
Passing 178 275
Comp-Att-lnt 17-24-0 18-23-0
Return Yards 0 0
Punts-Avg. 4-39.5 141.0
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 2-1
Penalties-Yards 2-9 5-40
Time of Possession 30:15 29:45
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Kentucky, Whitlow 17-69, Kemp 1240,
Sanders 7-14.
South Carolina, Davis 21-106, Shaw 9-50, PCooper
2-26, Carson 3-7,
Thompson 1-(minus 5), Team 3-(minus 6).
PASSING-Kentucky, Whitlow 17-24-0-178. South
Carolina,
Shaw 17-20-0-262, Thompson 1-3-0-13.
RECEIVING-Kentucky, Blue 4-62, Timmons 4-36,
Aumiller 3-34,
Montgomery 2-16, Kendrick 1-16, Kemp 1-9,
D.Robinson 14, Badet 1-1.
South Carolina, Byrd 5-98, Davis 3-54, Adams 2-50,
Jones 2-21,
Anderson 2-18, PCooper 1-12, K.Smith 1-8, Carson
1-7, Ellington 1-7.
No. 17 BAYLOR 73, WEST VIRGINIA 42
West Virginia 7 7 7 21 42
Baylor 28 28 10 7 73
First Quarter
Bay-Goodley 61 pass from Petty (A.Jones kick),
14:20.
WVU-Joseph recovered fumble in end zone (Lam-
bert kick), 12:32.
Bay-Petty 2 run (A.Jones kick), 8:59.
Bay-Reese 47 pass from Petty (A.Jones kick), 6:25.
Bay-Seastrunk 80 run (A.Jones kick), 4:56.
Second Quarter
Bay-Martin 2 run (A.Jones kick), 14:40.
Bay-Martin 2 run (A.Jones kick), 7:30.
WVU-K.White 39 pass from Trickett (Lambert
kick), 5:49.
Bay-Seastrunk 19 run (A.Jones kick), 4:02.
Bay-Linwood 13 run (A.Jones kick), 1:04.
Third Quarter
WVU-Sims 39 run (Lambert kick), 13:15.
Bay-Chafin 1 run (A.Jones kick), 9:36.
Bay-FG A.Jones 36,5:20.
Fourth Quarter
WVU-Carswell 43 pass from Millard (Lambert
kick), 10:48.
WVU-K.White 1 pass from Millard (Lambert kick),
8:07.
Bay-Russell 7 run (Peterson kick), 5:41.
WVU-Cook 32 interception return (Lambert kick),
3:01.
A-45,467.
WVU Bay
First downs 21 38
Rushes-yards 34-118 62468
Passing 276 396
Comp-Att-lnt 1741-1 20-33-3
Return Yards 89 16
Punts-Avg. 743.7 0-0.0
Fumbles-Lost 3-0 3-1
Penalties-Yards 6-76 10-100
Time of Possession 29:30 30:30
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-West Virginia, Sims 19-92, D.Smith 8-26,
Davis 2-25,
Team 1-(minus 5), Millard 2-(minus 9), Trickett 2-(mi-
nus 11). Baylor,
Seastrunk 15-172, Linwood 14-126, Martin 12-63,
Chafin 10-56, Webb 2-33,
Petty 4-23, Russell 3-6, Team 2-(minus 11).
PASSING-West Virginia, Trickett 9-28-1-161, Mil-
lard 8-13-0-115.
Baylor, Petty 17-25-1-347, Russell 3-8-2-49.
RECEIVING-West Virginia, K.White 7-130, Carswell
2-58, Shorts 2-35,
Thompson 2-20, Myers 2-17, Sims 2-16. Baylor,
Goodley 7-170,
C. Fuller 4-55, Reese 3-75, Coleman 2-31, Rhodes
1-36, Najvar 1-18,
Norwood 1-6, Lee 1-5.

No. 18 FLORIDA 30, ARKANSAS 10
Arkansas 7 0 3 0 10
Florida 0 17 7 6 30
First Quarter
Ark-Williams 4 run (Hocker kick), 2:09.
Second Quarter
Fla-FG Phillips 28,11:11.
Fla-Purifoy 42 interception return (Phillips kick),
8:33.
Fla-Patton 51 pass from Murphy (Phillips kick), :20.
Third Quarter
Fla-Patton 38 pass from Murphy (Phillips kick),
11:23.
Ark-FG Hocker 30, 4:12.
Fourth Quarter
Fla-Showers 9 pass from Murphy (kick failed),
4:47.
A-90,043.
Ark Fla
First downs 17 17
Rushes-yards 29-111 41-115
Passing 164 240
Comp-Att-lnt 1743-1 16-22-0
Return Yards (1) 93
Punts-Avg. 7-45.7 6-37.0
Fumbles-Lost 3-1 0-0
Penalties-Yards 8-57 8-84
Time of Possession 27:38 32:22
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Arkansas, A.Collins 13-54, Williams 8-32,
Small 3-24,
Hatcher 1-9, Marshall 1-8, Team 1-(minus 1),
B.Allen 2-(minus 15).
Florida, Jones 17-50, M.Brown 11-39, Murphy 7-15,
Patton 2-14, Team 2-0,
Showers 1-(minus 1), T.Burton 1-(minus 2).
PASSING-Arkansas, B.Allen 1741-1-164, Derby
0-2-0-0. Rorida,
Murphy 16-22-0-240.
RECEIVING-Arkansas, A.Collins 5-45, Hatcher 4-26,
Herndon 3-32,
Henry 242, Cowan 1-9, Small 1-8, Sprinkle 1-2.
Florida, Patton 6-124,
TBurton 3-56, Dunbar 3-43, Westbrook 1-12, Show-
ers 1-9, M.Brown 1-1,
Robinson 1-(minus 5).
NOTRE DAME 37, No. 22 ARIZONA
ST. 34
Arizona St. 0 13 0 21 34


Notre Dame 0 14 10 13 37
Second Quarter
ASU-FG Gonzalez 40,14:03.
ASU-FG Gonzalez 27, 6:11.
ND-Koyack 19 pass from Rees (Brindza kick), 3:35.
ASU-Strong 36 pass from T.Kelly (Gonzalez kick),
1:30.
ND-T.Jones 8 pass from Rees (Brindza kick), :10.
Third Quarter
ND-FG Brindza 53,10:02.
ND-Niklas 21 pass from Rees (Brindza kick), 3:54.
Fourth Quarter
ASU-Irabor 37 interception return (Gonzalez kick),
14:46.
ND-FG Brindza 33,10:38.
ASU-D.Nelson 21 pass from TKelly (Gonzalez
kick), 8:18.
ND-FG Brindza 25,3:03.
ND-Fox 14 interception return (Brindza kick), 1:08.
ASU-Grice 16 pass from TKelly (Gonzalez kick),
:11.
A-66,960.
ASU ND
First downs 22 23
Rushes-yards 25-65 37-145
Passing 362 279
Comp-Att-lnt 3347-2 17-38-1
Return Yards 37 51
Punts-Avg. 5-38.4 5-36.2
Fumbles-Lost 3-1 0-0
Penalties-Yards 4-45 9-64
Time of Possession 25:22 34:38
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Arizona St., Grice 12-51, Sulka 0-10,
TKelly 12-5,
Team 1-(minus 1). Notre Dame, McDaniel 15-82,
G.Atkinson 18-54,
Carlisle 2-8, Hendrix 1-2, Team 1-(minus 1).
PASSING-Arizona St., TKelly 3347-2-362. Notre
Dame,
Rees 17-38-1-279.
RECEIVING-Arizona St., Foster 9-71, Strong 8-136,
Grice 5-36,
Ozier 4-63, D.Nelson 2-23, Ca.Smith 2-18, Coyle
2-11, R.Smith 1-7,
D.Lewis 0-(minus 3). Notre Dame, T.Jones 8-135,
Daniels 4-67,
Niklas 3-49, Koyack 1-19, Prosise 1-9.
AUBURN 30, No. 24 MISSISSIPPI 22
Mississippi 3 3 10 6 22
Auburn 13 7 7 3 30
First Quarter
Aub-Mason 1 run (pass failed), 10:16.
Miss-FG Ritter 42, 6:42.
Aub-Therezie 78 interception return (Parkey kick),
1:39.
Second Quarter
Aub-Marshall 5 run (Parkey kick), 5:17.
Miss-FG Ritter 44, :41.
Third Quarter
Miss-FG Ritter 22, 9:45.
Aub-Marshall 5 run (Parkey kick), 6:35.
Miss-Moncrief 49 pass from Wallace (Ritter kick),
5:55.
Fourth Quarter
Miss-Moncrief 13 pass from Wallace (pass failed),
8:29.
Aub-FG Parkey 23, 3:02.
A-86,504.
Miss Aub
First downs 24 19
Rushes-yards 39-124 48-282
Passing 340 93
Comp-Att-lnt 26-50-2 11-17-0
Return Yards 5 82
Punts-Avg. 544.2 541.4
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 2-2
Penalties-Yards 4-34 2-23
Time of Possession 32:05 27:55
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Mississippi, J.Scott 6-66, Mathers 4-28,
Brunetti 6-28,
Walton 5-7, Neat 1-3, Wallace 17-(minus 8). Auburn,
Marshall 14-140,
Mason 21-77, Artis-Payne 549, Louis 1-14, Grant
2-9, Bray 1-1,
Team 4-(minus 8).
PASSING-Mississippi, Wallace 2548-2-336, Bru-
netti 1-1-0-4,
Treadwell 0-1-0-0. Auburn, Marshall 11-17-0-93.
RECEIVING-Mississippi, Moncrief 6-122, Logan
5-92, Treadwell 445,
J.Scott 4-28, Engram 2-22, Sanders 2-22, Wal-
ton 2-10,
Mathers 1-(minus 1). Auburn, Mason 3-62, M.Davis
3-11, Coates 2-13,
Fulse 1-5, Bray 14, Louis 1-(minus 2).
No. 23 FRESNO ST. 61, IDAHO 14
FresnoSt. 28 19 7 7 61
Idaho 0 0 0 14 14
First Quarter
Fre-Adams 27 pass from D.Carr (McGuire kick),
11:38.
Fre-Adams 17 pass from D.Carr (McGuire kick),
7:48.
Fre-J.Harper 9 pass from D.Carr (McGuire kick),
7:07.
Fre-Waller 9 run (McGuire kick), 4:43.
Second Quarter
Fre-Burse 2 pass from D.Carr (McGuire kick),
13:17.
Fre-Safety, 11:09.
Fre-Adams 2 pass from D.Carr (McGuire kick),
5:02.
Fre-FG McGuire 21, :01.
Third Quarter
Fre-Waller 2 run (McGuire kick), 4:12.
Fourth Quarter
Id-Epps 16 pass from McCain (Rehkow kick),
13:11.
Fre-Cash 1 run (McGuire kick), 8:37.
Id-Baker 15 pass from Chalich (Rehkow kick), 5:49.
A-14,747.
Fre Id
First downs 39 19
Rushes-yards 50-312 43-98
Passing 422 177
Comp-Att-lnt 38-51-2 17-404
Return Yards 37 0
Punts-Avg. 447.0 7-51.1
Fumbles-Lost 2-1 2-1
Penalties-Yards 4-43 549
Time of Possession 29:36 25:01
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Fresno St., Waller 19-157, Quezada 11-
64, Micenheimer 7-37,
Thomas 3-15, M.Carr 2-12, Cash 5-12, Burrell 1-11,
D.Carr 14,
D.Jones 1-0. Idaho, Baker 16-54, McCain 6-30, Cha-
lich 14-10, Brown 6-3,
Epps 1-1.
PASSING-Fresno St., D.Carr 3748-1419, Burrell
1-2-0-3,
M.Carr 0-1-1-0. Idaho, Chalich 14-32-3-100, Mc-
Cain 3-8-1-77.
RECEIVING-Fresno St., Adams 16-185, Burse 5-68,
J.Harper 5-37,
Quezada 5-18, Watson 449, Jensen 3-65. Idaho,
Epps 4-76, Lovett 4-25,
Runner 3-18, Watson 2-31, LaGrone 2-13, Baker
1-15,


Injuries impacting No. 7 Georgia's title hopes


STEVE MEGARGEE
AP Sports Writer

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. -
Forgive Georgia coach
Mark Richt for not feel-
ing overly enthusias-
tic in the wake of Satur-
day's overtime victory
over Tennessee that pre-
served his team's na-
tional title hopes.
"I'm not really in the
celebrating mood so
much," Richt said after
the Bulldogs rallied for
a 34-31 triumph. The
coach said he was "just
thankful to escape here
with a victory consider-
ing what happened."
Georgia fell from No.
6 to No. 7 in the Top
25 released Sunday af-
ter the escape at Ten-
nessee. The Bulldogs'
bigger concern is a
flurry of injuries that


decimated their depth
chart against Tennes-
see and continued a
season-long trend.
Georgia running back
Keith Marshall injured
his right knee on a hit
from Tennessee cor-
nerback Cam Sutton
while reaching for an
incomplete pass. Mar-
shall was on crutches
after the game.
Wide receivers Mi-
chael Bennett and Jus-
tin Scott-Wesley also in-
jured their right knees
later in the game. A con-
cussion knocked out
punter Collin Barber.
Georgia already was
playing the game with-
out injured running
back Todd Gurley and
safeties Tray Matthews
and Connor Norman.
Richt said he couldn't
remember one of his


teams ever having so
many injuries in one
game.
"It's just such a
shame," Richt said.
"Guys work so hard, and
we really went through
camp overall pretty
good and really had one
of our best camps as
far as injuries are con-
cerned. Now I just don't
know what the carnage
is right now."
So much for the no-
tion that Georgia (4-1,
3-0 SEC) would have
an easier road now that
it had made it through
a brutal Septem-
ber schedule with its
championship hopes
intact.
Georgia already had
faced No. 3 Clemson,
No. 14 South Caroli-
na and No. 10 LSU in
its first four games. All


three of those teams
were ranked in the top
10 when they faced
Georgia. Saturday's
game with Tennessee
was supposed to begin
the easier part of the
Bulldogs' schedule.
But the Bulldogs in-
stead have plenty of
questions as they get
ready for an intrigu-
ing matchup Saturday
with No. 25 Missouri (5-
0,1-0), which is coming
off an impressive 51-28
victory atVanderbilt.
Georgia likely will
have to play better than
it did against Tennes-
see. The Bulldogs forced
overtime against the
Volunteers only after
Aaron Murray threw a
2-yard touchdown pass
to Rantavious Wooten
with five seconds left in
regulation.


B3







Buckeyes still rolling


after difficult victory


CHRIS O'MEARA/AP
South Florida head coach Willie Taggart celebrates with fans after South Florida defeated Cincinnati
26-20 on Saturday in Tampa. It was USFs first win of the season.



Florida teams go 7-0



in Saturday contests


TIM REYNOLDS
AP Sports Writer
MIAMI GARDENS,
- Touchdown, state of
Florida! And some his-
tory, too.
All seven of the Sun-
shine State's Football
Bowl Subdivision teams
played Saturday and
all of them won, with a
couple of teams getting
into the victory column
for the first time.
No. 8 Florida State got
the big day started with
a 63-0 romp over No. 25
Maryland. The rest of the
state followed in win-
ning fashion, and maybe
fittingly, No. 18 Florida
capped the state's per-
fect day with a30-10 win
over Arkansas.
It's the first time the
seven FBS teams from
Florida went 7-0 on a
given day.
"I think that the state
of Florida has some of
the best high school
players in the country,
especially South Flori-
da," Miami quarterback
Stephen Morris told The


Associated Press on Sat-
urday night, after the
last of the seven games
went final. "And it's at-
tracting great coaches
to come coach."
Combined score from
Saturday: Florida teams
249, Opponents 123.
There were some
comeback efforts. Flor-
ida Atlantic (which beat
UAB 37-23), No. 14 Mi-
ami (45-30 winners over
Georgia Tech) and Cen-
tral Florida (a 24-17 vic-
tor over Memphis) all
trailed in their respective
games. So, too, did the
Gators, who gave up the
first touchdown of the
night to the Razorbacks
before scoring 30 of that
game's final 33 points.
The other two were
huge surprises: FIU
stunned Southern Mis-
sissippi 24-23, while
South Florida knocked
off Cincinnati 26-20.
Coming into Saturday,
FIU and USF were a
combined 0-8, having
been outscored 338-81
in those games.
Finally, though, they


had something to cel-
ebrate like everyone
else in the state. Bulls
coach Willie Taggart was
so relieved when his
team held on after wast-
ing most of a 20-point
lead, he slapped high-
fives with fans.
FlU's win came in dra-
matic style, with senior
defensive tackle Isame
Faciane blocking a field
goal attempt as time
expired and send-
ing Southern Miss to its
17th straight loss, even
though the Golden Ea-
gles came into the game
as 17-point favorites.
"It was a huge relief,"
FIU coach Ron Turner
said of getting win No.
1 of his tenure with the
Panthers. "We needed
it. Our guys have been
working hard."
It's obviously a rari-
ty for a state to get sev-
en wins in the same
day. Besides Florida,
only California (seven),
Ohio (eight) and Texas
(12) have the required
amount of FBS teams to
achieve such a feat.


ANDREW SELIGMAN
AP Sports Writer
EVANSTON, Ill. -
Ohio State had its
hands full with North-
western. The Buckeyes
did enough to win.
The Buckeyes ran the
nation's longest win
streak to 18 games, ral-
lying from 10 down
in the second half for
a 40-30 victory over
Northwestern at a wet
and loud Ryan Field on
Saturday.
Whether they helped
their national standing
is another issue, and
that was one receiv-
er Corey Brown really
didn't want to address
afterward.
"We're not worried
about any of the media
stuff," he said. "We're
just going to play for
ourselves and keep
winning and do what
we do."
The Buckeyes (6-
0, 2-0) are unbeat-
en since Urban Mey-
er took over as coach
last season. They won
all 12 games a year ago
but were banned from
a bowl game because
of NCAA sanctions.
Now, they're eye-
ing a championship.
The problem is that
their out-of-confer-
ence schedule lacks a
marquee opponent,
and it's not easy to turn
heads playing in the
Big Ten.
The Buckeyes cleared
two of their biggest
hurdles by beating
Wisconsin and North-
western the past two
weeks and have home


CHARLES REX ARBOGAST /AP
The Ohio State Buckeyes celebrate a 40-30 win over North-
western after a Saturday game in Evanston, II1.


games against Iowa
and Penn State com-
ing next. They don't
play another team cur-
rently ranked until the
regular-season finale
against Michigan.
The Big Ten champi-
onship comes a week
later, and they could go
into the bowl season
unbeaten.
"You'd sit next to a
guy who's throwing a
no-hitter and say hey
dude you've got a no-
hitter going," Meyer
said. "No I'm not even
thinking about that.
We're just going to get
ready for the stretch
run."
The Buckeyes cer-
tainly looked like a
team that could use
some fine-tuning on
Saturday, and they
might have fallen if not
for Carlos Hyde.
All he did was run for
a career-high 168 yards
and three second-
half touchdowns to lift
Ohio State on a rainy
night with a prime-
time audience watch-
ing.

f m --


Northwestern, a
team trying to show it
can beat the Big Ten's
best, looked like it just
might do that with a
23-13 lead in the third
quarter.
Hyde, who was sus-
pended the first three
games for an alleged
conflict with a woman
in a bar this summer,
made sure it didn't
happen.
He scored on a
4-yard run late in the
third and added two
more touchdowns
in the fourth to put
Ohio State up by four.
When Kain Colter got
stopped on a fourth-
and-1 at the Buckeyes'
34 after recovering
his own fumble in the
closing minutes, that
ended a scoring threat
for Northwestern. And
the game ended with
Joey Bosa recovering a
fumble in the end zone
after the Wildcats later-
ailed.
So it was enough for
the Buckeyes. They'll
need more.


LSI q TV


No.


quick work of opponents


ARNIE STAPLETON
Associated Press
BOULDER, Colo. -
Oregon coach Mark
Helfrich doesn't fret the
lack of fourth-quar-
ter play or pressure for
sophomore quarter-
back Marcus Mariota.
"I think every time
you step on the field is a
high-pressure situation.
I think first-and-10 at the
20 in the first quarter is a
high-pressure situation,"
said Helfrich, who took
over the Ducks Dynasty
when Chip Kelly left for
the Philadelphia Eagles.
Behind Mariota, who
accounted for a career-
best seven touchdowns
in Oregon's 57-16 wipe-
out of Colorado on Sat-
urday night, the second-
ranked Ducks (5-0, 2-0
Pac-12) have topped 55
points in all five games.
And it's not a list of
cupcakes or lower-tier
schools, either.
After routing Nich-
olls State in their open-
er, the Ducks put up 59
points on both Virgin-
ia and Tennessee, 55
on Cal and 57 on Colo-
rado all with Mario-
ta a sideline spectator
well before the teams
switched directions for
the fourth quarter.
He insists being a part-
timer isn't a bother.
"There's three other
guys behind me and they
practice their tails off all


DAVID ZALUBOWSKI / AP
Oregon starting quarterback Marcus Mariota jokes with team-
mates on Saturday as he watches the fourth quarter of Oregon's
57-16 victory over Colorado in Boulder, Colo.


week and I think they de-
serve to play," Mariota
said of backups Jeff Lock-
ie and Jake Rodrigues.
"And a lot of us (starters),
our goal is to get those
guys on the field."
They're not all going
to be this easy, though,
and the Ducks are head-
ing into the teeth of
their schedule starting
next weekend at No. 16
Washington (4-1), which
lost to fifth-ranked Stan-
ford 31-28 on Saturday.
The Ducks visit the Car-
dinal (5-0) on Nov. 7.
Helfrich doesn't buy
the naysayers' notion
that the Ducks will wish
they had been in some
close games when they
face the Huskies. He
said the Ducks don't
need to find themselves
in a close game to bur-


nish their abilities to
handle pressure.
"I think you can re-
spond to adversity on
Tuesday at practice,"
he said. "Our guys have
a lot of things going on
with class and all the
things that go on, and
whatever it is guys have
to focus and be dialed
in regardless of the con-
ditions. If we can ar-
range for however many
games we're going to
pay and they're all like
this, we'll take this."
Mariota threw for five
TDs and ran for two
more against Colorado
(2-2, 0-2), which made
a game of it until the
Ducks struck for two
touchdowns in a 58-sec-
ond span late in the first
quarter to take a 29-10
lead.


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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 7, 2013




Monday, October 7, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Ravens edge Dolphins on late FG


STEVEN WINE
AP Sports Writer

MIAMI GARDENS,-
Justin Tucker kicked a
44-yard field goal to put
the Baltimore Ravens
ahead with 1:42 left, and
they withstood a fran-
tic comeback bid by the
Miami Dolphins to win
26-23 Sunday.
Ryan Tannehill com-
pleted a 46-yard pass
to Brandon Gibson on
fourth down to keep
Miami's hopes alive,
but Caleb Sturgis then
missed a 57-yard field
goal attempt wide left
with 33 seconds to go.
The Ravens (3-2)
bounced back from a
loss last week at Buffalo
and won on the road for
the first time this sea-
son. The Dolphins (3-2)
lost their second game
in a row.
Baltimore moved 34
yards to set up Tuck-
er's game-winning field
goal, his fourth of the
day. The Ravens ran for
a season-high 133 yards,
and Joe Flacco threw for
269 yards.
COLTS 34, SEAHAWKS
28
INDIANAPOLIS -
Andrew Luck threw two
touchdown passes and
Donald Brown scored
the go-ahead TD with
8:55 to go.
The Seahawks (4-1)
lost their first regular-
season game since last
Nov. 25.
Delano Howell scored
on a 61-yard return of
a blocked field goal for
Indy (4-1).
Luck led his ninth
career fourth-quar-
ter comeback by going
16 of 29 for 229 yards,
beating Russell Wilson
in their first matchup.


Indy trailed 12-0
early, went ahead after
Howell's return, then
rallied again to take
the lead for good on
Brown's TD. The Colts
sealed it with a 2-point
conversion pass and a
late field goal.
Wilson finished 15 of
31 for 210 yards with
two TDs, one intercep-
tion and ran 13 times
for 102 yards.
SAINTS 26, BEARS 18
CHICAGO Drew
Brees threw two touch-
down passes to Pierre
Thomas, Jimmy
Graham tied an NFL
record with another
100-yard game and the
New Orleans Saints re-
mained unbeaten.
Brees was 29 of 35
for 288 yards in his
first victory in four ca-
reer games at Soldier
Field. Garrett Hartley
matched a career high
with four field goals
as New Orleans (5-0)
picked up its first win in
Chicago since a 31-10
victory on Oct. 8, 2000.
Graham continued
his torrid start for the
Saints (5-0), catching
10 balls for 135 yards
in his fourth consecu-
tive 100-yard game -
matching an NFL re-
cord for a tight end.
Tony Gonzalez was
the first to accomplish
the streak in 2000, and
Graham matched it in
2011.
Jay Cutler threw
for 358 yards and
two touchdowns for
Chicago (3-2), which
has lost two in a row.
BENGALS 13, PATRIOTS 6
CINCINNATI -
BenJarvus Green-Ellis
ran 1 yard in the fourth


J. PAT CARTER/AP
Baltimore Ravens kicker Justin Tucker (9) kicks a 44-yard field
goal during the second half on Sunday against the Miami Dol-
phins in Miami Gardens. The Ravens won 26-23.


quarter for the game's
only touchdown, and
the Cincinnati Bengals
ended Tom Brady's long
streak of touchdown
passes in defeating the
previously unbeaten
New England Patriots.
The Bengals (3-2)
sacked Brady four times
and kept New England
(4-1) out of the end
zone on a first-and-goal
from the 1-yard line late
in the fourth quarter.
Adam "Pacman"
Jones picked off Brady's
desperation pass inside
the 5-yard line with 16
seconds left to clinch it.
Brady had thrown a
touchdown pass in 52
straight games, second-
longest in NFL history
behind Drew Brees. The
Patriots were held out
of the end zone for the
first time since a 16-9
loss to the Jets on Sept.
20,2009.
CHIEFS 26, TITANS 17
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
Jamaal Charles scored a
1-yard touchdown with
6:23 left, and the Chiefs
rallied to keep up their
perfect start.
The Chiefs (5-0) are off
to their best start since


2003, when they won
their first nine games.
This win came despite
blowing a 13-0 half-
time lead in this early
AFC showdown between
these surprising teams
bouncing back after los-
ing seasons.
The Titans (3-2)
couldn't have been
more out of synch in
the first half with Ryan
Fitzpatrick starting for
Jake Locker, sidelined
with his sprained right
hip. He missed his first
five passes and went
three-and-out on his
first five series before
guiding Tennessee to
17 straight points in the
second half.
Charles put the Chiefs
ahead to stay, and they
intercepted Fitzpatrick
twice in the final 6:14.
Ryan Succop kicked
four field goals, includ-
ing a 48-yarder.
PACKERS 22, LIONS 9
GREEN BAY, Wis. -
James Jones caught a
long touchdown pass
from Aaron Rodgers,
and the Packers defense
contained the under-
manned Lions.
Mason Crosby kicked


five field goals. The
Packers' offense strug-
gled to get into the end
zone until Rodgers
found Jones on an 83-
yard completion down
the left sideline for a
16-3 lead late in the
third quarter.
It provided enough of
a cushion for a defense
that had the luxury of
facing the Lions minus
star receiver Calvin
Johnson, out with a
knee injury. Penalties
also bogged down
Detroit.
EAGLES 36, GIANTS 21
EAST RUTHERFORD,
N.J. Nick Foles
threw for two touch-
downs and led four
scoring drives after tak-
ing over for an injured
Michael Vick late in the
second quarter, and
Philadelphia kept the
Giants winless.
Foles threw fourth-
quarter touchdown
passes of 25 yards to
Brent Celek and 5 yards
to DeSean Jackson
as the Eagles (2-3)
snapped a three-game
losing streak by forc-
ing three interceptions
by Eli Manning in the
fourth quarter.
Vick left the game
with a hamstring in-
jury late in the second
quarter.
LeSean McCoy added
a 1-yard touchdown
run and Alex Henery
kicked five field goals
for the Eagles, who
gained 439 yards in
total offense.
David Wilson scored
on a 5-yard run for
the Giants (0-5) and
Manning threw two
touchdowns to Rueben
Randle in the third
quarter to give New


York a 21-19 lead.

CARDINALS 22,
PANTHERS 6
GLENDALE, Ariz. -
Arizona sacked Cam
Newton seven times,
once for a safety, and
intercepted him on
three occasions to over-
come a sluggish offen-
sive performance.
Daryl Washington,
back after serving a
four-game suspension
for violating the NFL's
substance abuse policy,
had two sacks and an
interception for Arizona
(3-2).
Calais Campbell
had two sacks, one for
Arizona's first regular-
season safety in nine
years, the other forcing
a game-clinching fum-
ble. Karlos Dansby also
had two sacks and an
interception.
Carolina (1-3), play-
ing for the first time
since a 38-0 victo-
ry over the New York
Giants two weeks ago,
managed only Graham
Gano's field goals of 22
and 51 yards.
RAMS 34, JAGUARS 20
ST. LOUIS Sam
Bradford threw three
touchdown passes and
Matt Giordano's 82-yard
interception return was
one of several big plays
from the St. Louis de-
fense against winless
Jacksonville.
Austin Pettis' 31-yard
TD catch with 5:45 to go
was his second of the day
and put the Rams (2-3) up
by two scores. St. Louis,
which had trailed by dou-
ble digits in every game,
established control with
a 17-point second quar-
ter after Jacksonville (0-5)
had a pair of early leads.


NFL BOX SCORES


Saints 26, Bears 18
New Orleans 6 14 3 3 26
Chicago 0 7 3 8 11
First Quarter
NO-FG Hartley 47, 7:38.
NO-FG Hartley 19, 6:00.
Second Quarter
NO-Thomas 2 pass from Brees (Hartley kick), 5:57.
Chi-Jeffery 3 pass from Cuter (Gould kick), 2:41.
NO-Thomas 25 pass from Brees (Hartley kick), :23.
Third Quarter
NO-FG Hartley 36, 8:03.
Chi-FG Gould 27,4:56.
Fourth Quarter
NO-FG Hartley 48,3:01.
Chi-Marshall 2 pass from Cuter (Forte run), 2:11.
A-62,361.


First downs 17 20
Total Net Yards 347 434
Rushes-yards 28-66 18-94
Passing 281 340
Punt Returns 1-2 1-17
Kickoff Returns 2-38 249
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0
Comp-Att-lnt 29-35-0 24-33-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 2-7 3-18
Punts 4-48.8 445.3
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 2-1
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-New Orleans, Thomas 19-36, Collins 3-11,
Sproles 3-10, K.Robinson 3-9. Chicago, Forte 12-55,
Cuter 4-27, Bush 2-12.
PASSING-New Orleans, Brees 29-35-0-288. Chicago,
Cuter 24-33-0-358.
RECEIVING-New Orleans, Graham 10-135, Thomas
9-55, Collins 4-17, Sproles 3-31, Colston 2-15, Toon
1-35. Chicago, Jeffery 10-218, M.Bennett5-56, Forte
440, Marshall 4-30, E.Bennett 1-14.
Colts 34, Seahawks 28
Seattle 12 7 9 0 28
Indianapolis 7 10 6 11 34
First Quarter
Sea-FG Hauschka 42,11:40.


Sea-Tate 10 pass from Wilson (Hauschka kick),
6 6:14.
8 Sea-Kearse safety, 4:53.
Ind-Hilton 73 pass from Luck (Vinatieri kick), 1:04.
Second Quarter
Ind-Howell 61 blocked field goal return (Vinatieri
kick), 13:06.
Sea-Kearse 28 pass from Wilson (Hauschka kick),
5:57.
Ind-FG Vinatieri 41, :58.
Third Quarter
Sea-FG Hauschka 36,11:18.
Sea-FG Hauschka 41, 8:12.
Ind-Hilton 29 pass from Luck (pass failed), 4:16.
Sea-FG Hauschka 46, :35.
Fourth Quarter
Ind-D.Brown 3 run (Wayne pass from Luck), 8:55.
Ind-FG Vinatieri 49,1:55.


A-66,608.
First downs
Total Net Yards
Rushes-yards
Passing
Punt Returns
Kickoff Returns
Interceptions Ret.
Comp-Att-lnt
Sacked-Yards Lost
Punts
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


Sea
21
423
34-218
205
1-14
2-39
0-0
15-31-1
2-5
2-38.5
2-1
7-85
31:22


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Seattle, Lynch 17-102, Wilson 13-102,
Turbin 4-14. Indianapolis, Richardson 18-56, D.Brown
6-37, Luck 4-9, Heyward-Bey 1-7.
PASSING-Seattle, Wilson 15-31-1-210. Indianapolis,
Luck 16-29-0-229.
RECEIVING-Seattle, Baldwin 5-80, Tate 5-61, Willson
2-28, Kearse 1-28, Rice 1-8, Lynch 1-5. Indianapolis,
Wayne 6-65, Hilton 5-140, Fleener 2-15, D.Brown 2-3,
R.Hughes 1-6.
MISSED RELD GOALS-Seattle, Hauschka 48 (BK).
Bengals 13, Patriots 6


New England 0 3 0 3 6
Cincinnati 0 3 3 7 13
Second Quarter
Cin-FG Nugent39, 3:12.
NE-FG Gostkowski 42, :08.
Third Quarter
Cin-FG Nugent50, 5:43.
Fourth Quarter
Cin-Green-Ellis 1 run (Nugent kick), 9:21.
NE-FG Gostkowski 19, 6:28.
A-64,259.


First downs 15
Total Net Yards 248
Rushes-yards 18-82
Passing 166
Punt Returns 443
Kickoff Returns 4-93
Interceptions Ret. 1-3
Comp-Att-lnt 18-38-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 4-31
Punts 8-44.1
Fumbles-Lost 4-1
Penaltes-Yards 0-0
Time of Possession 25:44
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS


Cin
21
341
39-162
179
3-17
1-29
1-0
20-27-1
433
6-45.8
1-1
7-59
34:16


RUSHING-New England, Blount 1251, Bolden 524,
Edelman 1-7. Cincinnati, Green-Ellis 19-67, Bernard
13-62, Dalton 6-25, M.Jones 1-8.
PASSING-New England, Brady 18-38-1-197. Cincin-
nati, Dalton 20-27-1-212.
RECEIVING-New England, Bolden 6-40, Amendola
4-55, Thompkins 3-16, Dobson 249, Edelman 2-35,
Hoomanawanui 1-2. Cincinnati, Green 5-61, Eifert
5-53, Gresham 4-24, M.Jones 2-39, Sanu 2-28,
Bernard 2-7.
MISSED HELD GOALS-None.
Packers 22, Lions 9
Detroit 0 3 0 6 9
Green Bay 3 3 10 6 22
First Quarter
GB-FG Crosby 26,1:24.
Second Quarter
GB-FG Crosby 52,11:19.
Det-FGAkers53, :15.


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Third Quarter
GB-FG Crosby 31,5:04.
GB-J.Jones 83 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick),
3:12.
Fourth Quarter
GB-FG Crosby 42,10:16.
GB-FG Crosby 45,3:50.
Det-Durham 13 pass from Stafford (pass failed),
2:06.
A-78,200.
Det GB
First downs 19 16
Total Net Yards 286 449
Rushes-yards 19-64 33-180
Passing 222 269
Punt Returns 0-0 4-14
Kickoff Returns 2-40 0-0
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0
Comp-Att-lnt 2540-0 20-30-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 5-40 1-5
Punts 6-51.8 3-47.0
Fumbles-Lost 1-0 2-0
Penalties-Yards 7-50 10-72
Time of Possession 27:41 32:19
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Detroit, Bush 13-44, Bell 521, Stafford
1-(minus 1). Green Bay, Lacy 23-99, Cobb 2-72, Rod-
gers 5-8, Franklin 3-1.
PASSING-Detroit, Stafford 2540-0-262. Green Bay,
Rodgers 20-30-0-274.
RECEIVING-Detroit, Pettigrew 4-59, Scheffler 4-55,
Bell 4-30, Bush 4-25, Durham 3-30, Broyles 2-27,
Ogletree 2-20, Edwards 2-16. Green Bay, Finley
6-32, Nelson 5-82, J.Jones 4-127, Cobb 4-35, Lacy
1-(minus 2).
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.
Ravens 26, Dolphins 23
Baltimore 3 3 10 10 26
Miami 3 10 0 10 23
First Quarter
Bal-FG Tucker 42,10:24.
Mia-FG Sturgis 37, 2:16.
Second Quarter
Bal-FG Tucker 50,11:52.
Mia-FG Sturgis 25, 8:07.
Mia-Clay 9 pass from Tannehill (Sturgis kick), :46.
Third Quarter
Bal-Rice 2 run (Tucker kick), 12:07.
Bal-FG Tucker 25,4:18.
Fourth Quarter
Bal-Rice 3 run (Tucker kick), 12:06.
Mia-FG Sturgis 48, 9:38.
Mia-R.Jones 25 interception return (Sturgis kick),
8:03.
Bal-FG Tucker 44,1:42.
A-68,342.
Bal Mia
First downs 20 10
Total Net Yards 384 294
Rushes-yards 40-133 11-22
Passing 251 272
Punt Returns 4-50 1-11
Kickoff Returns 4-128 2-49
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-25
Comp-Att-lnt 19-32-1 2140-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 2-18 6-35
Punts 5-34.2 8-52.5
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 1-0
Penalties-Yards 6-64 4-65
Time of Possession 36:16 23:44
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Baltimore, Rice 27-74, Pierce 11-46,
Flacco 2-13. Miami, Miller 7-15, Tannehill 2-6, Dan.
Thomas 2-1.
PASSING-Baltmore, Racco 19-32-1-269. Miami, Tan-
nehill 2140-0-307.
RECEIVING-Baltimore, TSmith 6-121, Rice 6-28,
Doss 3-58, Dickson 2-51, Thompson 2-11. Miami,
Wallace 7-105, Gibson 4-74, Hartine 4-60, Clay 3-52,
Dan.Thomas 2-11, Thigpen 1-5.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-Miami, Sturgis 57 (WL).
Rams 34, Jaguars 20
Jacksonville 10 0 3 7 20
St. Louis 7 17 0 10 34
First Quarter
Jax-J.Blackmon 67 pass from Gabbert (Scobee
kick), 10:31.
StL-Giordano 82 interception return (Zuerlein kick),
3:08.
Jax-FG Scobee 48, :13.
Second Quarter
StL-FG Zuerlein 32,12:03.
StL-Kendricks 16 pass from Bradford (Zuerlein
kick), 11:34.
StL-Pettis 4 pass from Bradford (Zuerlein kick), :27.
Third Quarter


Jax-FG Scobee 34,3:22.
Fourth Quarter
StL-FG Zuerlein 37,14:47.
Jax-Shorts4 pass from Henne (Scobee kick), 10:22.
StL-Pettis 31 pass from Bradford (Zuerlein kick),
5:45.


A-54,266.
First downs
Total Net Yards
Rushes-yards
Passing
Punt Returns
Kickoff Returns
Interceptions Ret.
Comp-Att-Int
Sacked-Yards Lost
Punts
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


Jax StL
16 22
363 351
25-96 36-143
267 208
45 4-15
2-64 2-52
0-0 2-82
16-32-2 19-34-0
2-3 2-14
548.2 7-40.9
3-1 1-0
445 6-53
24:41 35:19


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Jacksonville, Jones-Drew 17-70, Todman
3-16, Gabbert 3-6, Forsett 1-2, Henne 1-2. St. Louis,
Stacy 14-78, Richardson 1348, Cunningham 4-13,
Bradford 54.
PASSING-Jacksonville, Gabbert 9-19-2-181, Henne
7-13-0-89. St. Louis, Bradford 19-34-0-222.
RECEIVING-Jacksonville, J.Blackmon 5-136, Shorts
5-74, Harbor 3-39, Jones-Drew 2-16, Ta'ufo'ou 1-5.
St. Louis, Pettis 4-49, Kendricks 4-37, Austin 3-32,
Cook 3-26, Quick 245, Givens 2-16, Harkey 1-17.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.
Chiefs 26, Titans 17
Kansas City 7 6 0 13 26
Tennessee 0 0 10 7 17
First Quarter
KC-Cooper fumble recovery in end zone (Succop
kick), 11:40.
Second Quarter
KC-FG Succop 29,14:55.
KC-FG Succop 24, :09.
Third Quarter
Ten-C.Johnson 49 pass from Fitzpatrick (Bironas
kick), 12:09.
Ten-FG Bironas 22, 6:37.
Fourth Quarter
Ten-Fitzpatrick 9 run (Bironas kick), 14:52.
KC-Charles 1 run (Succop kick), 6:23.
KC-FG Succop 33,4:10.
KC-FG Succop 48, 2:12.
A-69,143.
KC Ten
First downs 20 19
Total Net Yards 353 339
Rushes-yards 26-120 22-105
Passing 233 234
Punt Returns 5-39 4-18
Kickoff Returns 1-36 2-48
Interceptions Ret. 2-35 14
Comp-Att-lnt 20-39-1 2141-2
Sacked-Yards Lost 2-12 3-13
Punts 6-37.5 6-45.3
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 2-1
Penalties-Yards 9-61 6-35
Time of Possession 31:17 28:43
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Kansas City, Charles 22-108, A.Smith
3-10, Davis 1-2. Tennessee, Fitzpatrick 6-50, Battle
6-38, C.Johnson 10-17.
PASSING-Kansas City, A.Smith 20-39-1-245. Tennes-
see, Fitzpatrick 2141-2-247.
RECEIVING-Kansas City, Charles 5-37, McGrath 4-54,
Bowe 4-35, Avery 3-91, Sherman 2-13, Hall 1-9,
Hemingway 1-6. Tennessee, Wright 6-74, C.Johnson
4-63, Walker 443, Washington 3-30, Battle 1-24,
Britt 1-9, Williams 1-4, Fitzpatrick 1-0.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-Tennessee, Bironas 32 (WR).
Eagles 36, Giants 21
Philadelphia 3 16 3 14 36
N.Y. Giants 7 0 14 0 21
First Quarter
NYG-Wilson 5 run (J.Brown kick), 11:37.
Phi-FG Henery 40, 6:49.
Second Quarter
Phi-FG Henery 27,10:40.
Phi-McCoy 1 run (Henery kick), 8:11.
Phi-FG Henery 29, 2:38.
Phi-FG Henery 36, :00.
Third Quarter
NYG-Randle 26 pass from Manning (J.Brown kick),
6:56.
NYG-Randle 6 pass from Manning (J.Brown kick),
3:46.
Phi-FG Henery 41,1:04.
Fourth Quarter


Phi-Celek 25 pass from Foles (Henery kick), 10:26.
Phi-Jackson 5 pass from Foles (Henery kick), 8:24.
A-80,738.
Phi NYG
First downs 28 21
Total Net Yards 439 383
Rushes-yards 37-140 17-53
Passing 299 330
Punt Returns 3-24 1-8
Kickoff Returns 0-0 3-57
Interceptions Ret. 3-18 0-0
Comp-Att-lnt 22-39-0 24-52-3
Sacked-Yards Lost 1-3 1-4
Punts 647.8 748.3
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 1-1
Penalties-Yards 8-88 12-136
Time of Possession 32:07 27:53
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Philadelphia, Vick 7-79, McCoy 2046,
Brown 5-11, Polk 2-3, Foles 3-1. N.Y Giants, Jacobs
11-37, Wilson 6-16.
PASSING-Philadelphia, Foles 16-25-0-197, Vick 6-14-
0-105. N.Y Giants, Manning 24-52-3-334.
RECEIVING-Philadelphia, Jackson 7-132, McCoy
646, Celek 347, Avant3-33, Ertz 2-38, Brown 1-6.
N.Y Giants, Nicks 9-142, Randle 6-96, Cruz 5-48, My-
ers 2-35, Jernigan 2-13.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.
Cardinals 22. Panthers 6
Carolina 3 3 0 0 6
Arizona 0 3 9 10 22
First Quarter
Car-FG Gano 22, 7:27.
Second Quarter
Ari-FG Feely 42, 8:29.
Car-FG Gano 51, :00.
Third Quarter
Ari-Mendenhall 1 run (Feely kick), 5:48.
Ari-Campbell safety, 5:28.
Fourth Quarter
Ari-FG Feely 50,3:38.
Ari-Dray 7 pass from Palmer (Feely kick), 2:23.
A-60,426.


First downs
Total Net Yards
Rushes-yards
Passing
Punt Returns
Kickoff Returns
Interceptions Ret.
Comp-Att-Int
Sacked-Yards Lost
Punts
Fumbles-Lost


Ari
19
250
28-90
160
2-20
1-18
3-87
19-28-3
2-15
449.8
0-0


Penalties-Yards 9-79 3-30
Time of Possession 31:04 28:56
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Carolina, D.Williams 12-39, Tolbert 4-31,
Newton 4-25. Arizona, Ellington 7-52, Mendenhall 17-
43, Smith 1-(minus 2), Palmer 3-(minus 3).
PASSING-Carolina, Newton 21-39-3-308. Arizona,
Palmer 19-28-3-175.
RECEIVING-Carolina, Olsen 5-79, Ginn Jr. 4-78,
S.Smith 4-60, LaFell 4-47, D.Williams 2-30, Tolbert
1-9, Barner 1-5. Arizona, Floyd 5-61, Ellington 4-31,
Fitzgerald 343, Smith 3-20, Dray 2-13, Menden-
hall 2-7.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.
Broncos 51, Cowboys 48
Denver 7 21 10 13 51
Dallas 14 6 13 15 48
First Quarter
Dal-Bryant 2 pass from Romo (Bailey kick), 8:06.
Dal-Murray 4 run (Bailey kick), 3:18.
Den-J.Thomas 4 pass from Manning (Prater kick),
2:28.
Second Quarter
Dal-FG Bailey 43,12:14.
Den-Decker 2 pass from Manning (Prater kick), 9:06.
Den-J.Thomas 9 pass from Manning (Prater kick),
5:22.
Den-Manning 1 run (Prater kick), :46.
Dal-FG Bailey 48, :00.
Third Quarter
Den-Welker 2 pass from Manning (Prater kick), 8:03.
Dal-Williams 82 pass from Romo (Bailey kick), 7:08.
Den-FG Prater 48, 3:23.
Dal-Bryant 2 pass from Romo (run failed), :14.
Fourth Quarter
Dal-Witten 10 pass from Romo (Williams pass from
Romo), 13:38.
Den-FG Prater 50, 9:37.
Dal-Beasley 4 pass from Romo (Bailey kick), 7:19.
Den-Moreno 1 run (Prater kick), 2:39.
Den-FG Prater 28, :00.


B5




B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, October 7,2013


1.*g~


Harvick victorious in


wreck-filled Kansas race


COLIN E. BRALEY/AP
Driver Kevin Harvick celebrates in victory lane on Sunday after winning the Hollywood Casino 400
NASCAR Sprint Cup series auto race at Kansas Speedway in Kansas City, Kan.


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DAVE SKRETTA
AP Sports Writer
KANSAS CITY, Kan.
- Kevin Harvick won
a wreck-filled race at
Kansas Speedway on
Sunday, keeping out of
trouble all afternoon
and making a big move
in the Chase for the
Sprint Cup champion-
ship.
Harvick pulled away
from Kurt Busch and
Jeff Gordon on a restart
with 19 laps to go for his
third win of the year. It
came after Harvick sat
on the pole for the first
time in 254 races.
The last time he
qualified first, at New
Hampshire in 2006, he
also won the race.
"These guys just did a
great job all weekend,"
Harvick said. "To have a
car fast enough for me
to qualify on the pole
says a lot about how
fast this thing is."
Harvick was chased
across the line by Busch
and Gordon. Joey Loga-
no finished fourth, Carl
Edwards was fifth, and
Jimmie Johnson fin-
ished sixth despite a
slight hiccup with his
engine on the final lap
that cost him one spot
on the track.
Matt Kenseth held
onto his lead in the
Chase for the Sprint
Cup championship
with an llth-place fin-
ish. Johnson narrowed
the gap to just three
points, while Harvick
moved into third place,
just 25 points out of
first with six races left


ORLIN WAGNER / AP
Drivers Jeff Burton (31) and J J Yeley (36) get past Kyle Busch
(18) on Sunday during a NASCAR Sprint Cup series auto race at
Kansas Speedway in Kansas City, Kan.


in the season.
Kyle Busch was the
big loser after crash-
ing for the third straight
time at Kansas Speed-
way, dropping from
third in points to fifth,
35 adrift of the lead.
There were 15 cau-
tions in the race, break-
ing the record of 14 for a
Sprint Cup race at Kan-
sas Speedway The first
came when the race
wasn't even a lap old and
Danica Patrick slammed
into the wall, and most
of them occurred when
cars got loose coming
out of Turn 2.
Busch and Kens-
eth both called the race
"treacherous," point-
ing to the combination
of a repave last year and
Goodyear's new "multi-
zone" tires that made
it seem as if they were
skating across a smooth,
glasslike surface most of
the afternoon.
All of it was com-
pounded by tempera-
tures in the 50s at the
start of the race, more
than 30 degrees cooler
than testing and prac-


tice earlier in the week.
"It's all about restarts
and making sure you
can gain spots, but it's
treacherous," Busch
said. "You had to have a
lot of give and take."
One of the major sto-
ry lines coming into
the race involved Kyle
Busch and Brad Kesel-
owski, who got together
in the Nationwide race.
Keselowski said that
Busch intentional-
ly dumped him and
seemed to indicate
that he would retaliate
in the Sprint Cup race.
Keselowski even asked
NASCAR President
Mike Helton in the pre-
race driver's meeting
about the line between
hard racing and inten-
tional wrecks.
It turned out that
Busch kept going for
spins without Kesel-
owski's help.
The first one came
down the front stretch
when he appeared
to squeeze Juan Pab-
lo Montoya, sending
Busch sideways across
the track.


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Monday, October 7, 2013

GOLF

Feng's late

eagle gives

her title at

Reignwood

Associated Press
BEIJING China's
Shanshan Feng eagled
the par-5 18th hole af-
ter her second shot ap-
proach hit the pin for a
68 Sunday and a one-
stroke victory in the
smog-affected Reign-
wood Classic, the LP-
GA's first tournament in
Beijing.
American Stacy Lew-
is birdied four of her
first six holes to quick-
ly catch overnight lead-
er Feng and led for most
of the final round by
one stroke before the
Chinese golfer thrilled
the local gallery with
her late eagle after Lew-
is had putted out with a
par.
It was Feng's second
career victory she
won last year's Weg-
mans LPGA Champion-
ship, a tour major. She's
had an outstanding
2013, making 14 cuts
in 15 tournaments with
six other top 10 finishes
and earning $800,000.
Feng finished with a
26-under total of 266
on the par-73 Pine Val-
ley Golf Club. Lewis also
shot a final-round 68.
No. 1-ranked Inbee
Park of South Korea fin-
ished third, also after a
68 Sunday, five strokes
behind Feng. Australian
veteran Karrie Webb
shot 67 and was fourth,
another stroke behind.
Feng said that when
she was going up the
18th, she thought Lewis
would go for the green.
"So I thought maybe
she's giving me a chance
for playing off," Feng
said. "I never thought
I would shoot the sec-
ond shot so close that I
could make eagle."
Her approach to the
green was on line for
the pin, causing the gal-
lery to erupt in cheers
when the ball hit the
flag and bounded sev-
eral feet away.
"Suddenly I heard the
noise, the crowd was
excited, so I thought it
must be good," she said.
Despite her first win
being a major, Feng said
Sunday's win in Beijing
was as important.
"I would say I'm as
happy as when I won
last year," she said.


DAILY COMMERCIAL


B7


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


Rays faced with uphill NLDS battle


FRED GOODALL
AP Sports Writer
ST. PETERSBURG
- Evan Longoria
woke up feeling much
better about Tampa
Bay's chances of re-
bounding against the
Boston Red Sox.
Not that it will be
easy to overcome
a 2-0 deficit in the
best-of-5 AL divi-
sion series matchup
that resumes Mon-
day night at Trop-
icana Field. But to
have any chance of
succeeding, the Rays
star said players can't
dwell on being on the
brink of elimination
yet again.
It took winning three
consecutive elimina-
tion games just to get
into the division se-
ries. And now, it will
take three more to beat
Red Sox and reach the
league championship
series against Oakland
or Detroit.
"I don't think we let
our guard down at
all. I think we just got
outplayed," Longoria
said after an option-
al team workout Sun-
day.
"They swung the
bats better, they
pitched better," the
three-time All-Star
added. "At some
point you've got to
be able to admit that
and turn the page
and go to the next
day."
Alex Cobb, who
beat Cleveland last
Wednesday in the
AL wild-card game,
will carry the Rays'
hopes to the mound
in Game 3. Right-
hander Clay Buch-


MICHAEL DWYER/AP
Tampa Bay Rays relief pitcher Jake McGee delivers against the Boston Red Sox in the
eighth inning of Game 2 of baseball's American League division series on Saturday in
Boston. The Red Sox won 7-4.


holz will start for the Red Sox,
who outscored Tampa Bay 19-6
in the opening two games at Fen-
way Park.
History doesn't favor the Rays.
Of the previous 22 AL teams that
have lost the first two games of a
division series, only four rallied


to advance.
Tampa Bay was able to force a
Game 5 after dropping the first
two in the 2010 division series,
however the Rangers went on to
play for the pennant.
Boston has won 14 of 21 games
this year between the AL East rivals.


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"That's been a consistent ap-
proach that we've taken through-
out the course of the year. We
haven't gotten ahead of our-
selves," Boston manager John
Farrell said. "We haven't carried
on a thought or a feeling of what
has taken place the night or the
series before. And I think every-
one is eager to get back on the
field tomorrow."
The Rays made uncharacter-
istic mistakes in the first two
games, and their inability to hit
in key situations undermined
any chance of overcoming gaffes.
Longoria thinks that being
back home after two weeks on
the road will help. When the
team plane landed in Tampa ear-
ly Sunday, it concluded a five-
city, 12-day, 5,631-mile trek.
The Rays won their regular
season finale in Toronto, forc-
ing a one-game tiebreaker at Tex-
as to determine the second AL
wild card. They beat the Rangers
to reach the playoffs, then Cobb
shut down the Indians 4-0 in the
wild-card game.
"I like our chances here. We
played really well down the
stretch. I know our home fans
will be out in full force."


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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 7, 2013


I








Living
Send your health news tog features@dailycommercial.com 1 352-365-8208


Cl
DAILY COMMERCIAL
Monday, October 7, 2013


www.dailycommercial.comn


POUNDS: Social media fueling dangerous weight-loss regimens / C3


Health

check

THE VILLAGES


Oak Hill Hospital
'For Your Health'


to host
series


Oak Hill Hospital in Spring Hill,
will host a "For Your Health" com-
munity education series event
from 5:30 to 7 p.m., Tuesday at
the Comfort Inn and Suites, 1020
Avenida Central.
Admission is free and seating is
limited, with reservations required
by calling 877-442-2362 or 352-628-
6060, or online at wwwoakhillhos-
pital.com/foryourhealth.
LAKE COUNTY
AARP driver safety
classes scheduled
AARP driver safety classes will be
offered for Florida drivers age 50
and older to help them develop safe
driving habits. Completion of the
class could result in insurance dis-
counts. Cost for the classes is $12
for AARP members and $14 for non-
members. Payment can be made
by check to AARP; no cash or credit
cards will be accepted.
The two-day classes will take
place from:
1 to 4 p.m., today and
Wednesday at the Leesburg Senior
Center, 1211 Penn St., in Leesburg.
Call 352-326-3540 to register.
From 9 a.m. to noon, today and
Wednesday at the WT. Bland Public
Library, 1995 N. Donnelly St., in
Mount Dora.
Call 352-735-7180 for registration.
THE VILLAGES
5th annual 'Give Fore Life
Blood Drive' is Oct. 12
Join the Loud Boys of the Villages,
community partners and locals as
they host the 5th annual Give Fore
Life Blood Drive in memory of Roy
Bishop, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Oct. 12, at
Seabreeze Recreational Center, 2384
Buena Vista Boulevard.
Donors will receive a commemo-
rative T-shirt, free lunch, gift bag, a
coupon to City Fire Restaurant and
a free round of golf at Eagle Ridge
Golf Course. Donors also enjoy a
wellness check-up.
For information, go to www.one-
blood.org.
LEESBURG
New Dimensions support
group meets Friday
The New Dimensions Blind/
Visually Impaired Person Support
Group will meet from 12:30 p.m.
to 2 p.m., on Friday at the IHOP
Restaurant, 10332 U.S. Highway
441, in Leesburg, across from Lake
Square Mall.
Guest speaker for the meeting is
Abby Evert, RSVP representative in
Lake County who will speak about
the Lake County RSVP Volunteer
Program.
For information, call 352
435-5040.


New invention has people



dancing in their seats


STEPHANIE HAYES
Tampa Bay Times
TAMPA The kids released their
wheelchairs and leg braces, the sticks
that help them see and the iPads that
help them speak, and piled them in
a corner.
They went to Merry Lynn Mor-
ris, with her twisting blond hair and
legs like a ballerina in a jewelry box.
She helped them stretch and rubbed
their bellies.
"Reach your arms all the way up,"
she said. "Look to the sky, and say
thank you!"
Morris is a dance professor at the
University of South Florida, and more
recently, an inventor. She was intro-
ducing kids with spina bifida and ce-
rebral palsy to a chair she dreamed
up. On this weekend in their class,
the chair would let them dance. Not
pretend to dance, not be pulled by a
dancer, but actually dance.
The kids peered at it, standing tall
in the corner of the studio.
Anybody in any body should have
the right to dance, Morris said. An
accident or a disability needn't rel-
egate the people you love to your
back, pushing you, telling you where
to go.
If her father had been able to use
this chair, he might have danced
again, too.
The Rolling Dance Chair was born
from the brain of a dancer, not an en-
gineer. It has taken seven years and
$150,000 of grant money to get to
this point, evolving from a stripped-
down Segway those rolling devic-
es that tour groups ride through cit-
ies to a sleek, elegant design.
It's getting closer to what Morris
imagined, getting more attention
from the world each year. U.S. Rep.
Tammy Duckworth of Illinois, a dou-
ble amputee, tried the chair on a vis-
it to USF in 2010. This month, Morris
is scheduled to present her invention
at the Smithsonian Institution dur-
ing a conference for innovators.
The chair is stately with a synthet-
ic round seat that's clear, designed
to almost disappear under the danc-
er. It is sturdy enough for a second


TAMPA TIMES
Merry Lynn Morris, a dance professor at the University of South Florida, shows Jessica Hendricks,
7, how to use the electronic dance wheelchair Morris invented during a mixed-ability dance class in
Tampa.


dancer to stand on, spinning, leg ex-
tended in full arabesque.
The most important feature of
the chair is the person sitting in it.
He is in control. When he leans, the
chair moves. The wheels can propel
the chair in any direction using the
slightest movement of a body.


It's an extension of dance, Mor-
ris said, not an obstacle. No one
thinks twice about a tap shoe, or a
ballet shoe with a wooden block on
the end. Think of Broadway dances,
the rolling desk chairs and elaborate
sets. Think of the hoops and flames
SEE DANCE I C3


Doctor's cell phone diagnoses diseases


MATTHEW PIPER
Salt Lake Tribune
When an outbreak of ebola virus
struck the Ugandan district, Joel Eh-
renkranz was studying the effects of
iodine deficiency near the border be-
tween Uganda and the Congo. He
rushed in to help, and what he found
horrified him.
"People were dying because of a
lack of point-of-care diagnostics,"
said Ehrenkranz, director of diabe-
tes and endocrinology at Intermoun-


tain Medical Center. "People would
be triaged into 'Sick' and 'Not sick'
quarantines. Some people had ebo-
la, some didn't. But by the time they
went out (of the building), everybody
had ebola."
The outbreak-which affected 149
people and cost 37 lives, according to
the Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention inspired Ehrenkranz
to think about how they could avoid
such "death sentence" scenarios. He
noted that the one thing that worked,
even in Uganda, was his cellphone. A


seed was planted.
Some six years later, Ehrenkranz
and his company, i-calQ, are among
12 finalists in the Nokia Sensing
XChallenge for his brainchild, a
smartphone device that aims to pro-
vide professional-quality testing and
analysis for a variety of conditions,
including thyroid disease, HIV, syph-
ilis, diabetes and kidney disease. It
can also test cortisol in saliva, a key
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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, October 7, 2013


Double take


Twins galore on Havana street


ANDREA RODRIGUEZ
Associated Press
HAVANA Some say
it could be something in
the water. Others point
to a tree with mystical
significance for locals.
Maybe it's just chance.
But neighbors all
marvel at the 12 sets of
twins living along two
consecutive blocks in
western Havana, rang-
ing in age from new-
borns to senior citizens.
"We were the first
ones," said Fe Fernan-
dez, 65, who wears
her gray hair closely
cropped.
"It's incredible!" said
her identical sister, Es-
peranza, who shares
the same features but
whose black-dyed hair


falls to shoulder length.
At first blush there
isn't much about 68-A
Street to mark it as dif-
ferent from anywhere
else in the city. Chil-
dren play ballgames in
the rugged road nearly
free of traffic, as tropical
music floats out from
behind graceful porch-
es and balustrades.
But if you spend any
amount of time here,
before long you might
think you're seeing dou-
ble.
"Hi, I'm Carla, and
this is my sister Camila,"
said Carla Rodriguez,
a smiley, bespectacled
9-year-old. "We're twins
and we love living on
this block because we
have twin friends."


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RAMON ESPINOSA/AP
Six-year-old twin sisters Asley and Aslen Velazquez prepare for
school on Wednesday in Havana, Cuba. The sisters are just one
set of twins out of 12 sets living along two consecutive blocks in
western Havana, ranging in age from newborns to senior citizens.


"I never expect-
ed it. No fertility treat-
ments. It was my first
pregnancy, and at five
weeks they did an ultra-
sound and I was carry-
ing twins," said Tamara
Velazquez, who's been
busy raising 6-year-old
identical sisters Asley
and Aslen.
"It's a lot of work. It re-
quires a lot of patience,"
Velazquez said. "They
are very active and


dominant, although
each has a different
character."
Ten of the twin sets
here are identical, and
the other two fraternal.
None of the mothers in-
terviewed by The Asso-
ciated Press
said they had re-
ceived fertility treat-
ments. None of the fam-
ilies are related to each
other.
All but one of the sets


were born into these
homes, and the lone
newcomers moved into
a house that was vacat-
ed by twins who moved
to Spain. Others have
died or moved away
over the years.
"Twins leave, twins
come," Fe Fernandez
joked.
The 70 or so hous-
es on these two short
blocks are home to
around 224 people, ex-
trapolating from na-
tional statistics on aver-
age household size.
That works out to
about one set of twins
for every 20 people.
Historically the rate has
been about one per 80
live births, though ex-
perts say that's rising
globally, primarily in
developed countries
where fertility treat-
ments are more readily
available.
It's impossible to say
what could be behind
the high number of
twins here, or whether
there is any cause at all.
Scientists say a vari-
ety of factors play into
twin births, such as


race, the mother's age
and diet. Western Africa,
from where many Afro-
Cubans can trace their
ancestry, has significant-
ly elevated rates of twin-
ning.
Meanwhile statisti-
cians caution against
the human tendency
to seek patterns of ser-
endipity in a random
world.
"Something could
definitely be there, it
could be a combina-
tion of various factors,"
Andrew Gelman, a sta-
tistics professor at Co-
lumbia University, said
via email. "In addition,
opportunistic counting
can make a small and
natural pattern appear
larger."
For example focus-
ing on these two blocks
without consider-
ing other surrounding
ones, he added, "puts
the spotlight on a small
subset."
While there's been no
scholarly study of the
twins on 68-A Street,
they nonetheless con-
sider themselves part of
a special community.


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C2


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 7, 2013




Monday, October 7, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Social media fueling possibly



dangerous weight-loss regimens


JIM SALTER
Associated Press
BALLWIN, Mo. Ex-
perts in eating disorders
are concerned about an
Internet-fueled trend
in which teenage girls
and young women pur-
sue an elusive and pos-
sibly dangerous weight-
loss goal: to become so
slender that their thighs
don't touch even when
their feet are together.
Specialists say achiev-
ing a so-called thigh gap
is risky and virtually im-
possible. But some ex-
ceptionally thin models
have the gap, which is up-
held as a beauty achieve-
ment on countless Tum-
blr pages, blogs and other
social media sites.
"The issue of focusing
on a particular body part
is very common," said
Claire Mysko, who over-
sees teen outreach and
digital media for the Na-
tional Eating Disorders
Association, an advoca-
cy group. "What is new
is these things have tak-
en on a life of their own
because of the Internet
and social media."
When the vast major-
ity of people stand with
their feet together, their
thighs touch. A tiny per-
centage of people have
thighs so slim that they
don't come together.
The "thigh gap" refers to
this space.
Studies suggest that
peer pressure from so-
cial media plays a sig-
nificant role in eating
disorders. A 2011 study


JIM SALTER/AP
Castlewood Treatment Center therapist Kim Callaway, rear, speaks
with Sara, a 22-year-old client recently at the center for eating dis-
orders in St. Louis.


at the University of Hai-
fa found that adolescent
girls who spent the most
time using Facebook
had a greater chance of
developing a negative
body image and an eat-
ing disorder.
"The intrusion and
presence of social me-
dia in our lives really
does make it very diffi-
cult," said Nancy Albus,
chief executive officer of
Castlewood Treatment
Center, a suburban St.
Louis facility that focus-
es on eating disorders.
"The important distinc-
tion about thigh gap
is it gives you an actu-
al visual to achieve, this
visual comparison of
how your body does or
doesn't stack up."


Dr. Vonda Wright, a
Pittsburgh-based or-
thopedic surgeon and
fitness expert, said the
spacing between a per-
son's legs is based most-
ly on genetics. And even
extraordinarily thin
people may not have
a body type that can
achieve a gap. You have
to be both skinny and
wide-hipped, she said.
Besides, Wright said,
it isn't a goal worth
chasing. Most fit people
won't have a thigh gap
because their thighs are
muscular enough that
they touch, she said.
"Skinny does not
mean fit or muscular,"
said Wright, who works
with Division I athletes.
"I cannot think of one


athlete I deal with" who
has a thigh gap.
Experts say it is im-
possible to know if the
pursuit of a thigh gap
has caused any deaths,
nor is it known how
many eating disorders
are blamed on the phe-
nomenon. But Mysko
said experts believe that
"exposure to online im-
ages of extreme beauty
standards and the drive
to compare does in-
crease the risk of devel-
oping eating disorders."
Sara, a 22-year-old
Castlewood client, said
thigh-gap sites were a
contributing factor in
her struggle. She spoke
on the condition that
she be identified only by
her first name to avoid
the stigma associated
with eating disorders.
Always a high achiev-
er, Sara was captain of
her high school swim
team in Minnesota and a
straight-A student. In col-
lege, she graduated near
the top of her class, even
while hiding her secret.
It was in high school
that Sara developed an-
orexia. By college, she
was purging and exces-
sively exercising. She
was a frequent visitor to
thigh-gap sites.
"It helped to normal-
ize what I was doing to
myself," Sara said. "I
never knew before that
I wanted a thigh gap. It
felt like it was some type
of accomplishment that
people would want to
achieve."


C3


More West Nile


deaths in Oklahoma
Associated Press
OKLAHOMA CITY Three more Oklahoma
residents have died after being infected by the
West Nile virus, bringing the total number of
victims this year to five, the state Department of
Health said Friday.
Statistics provided by the agency indicate that
two of the latest victims were Oklahoma County
residents, a man who was more than 80 years old
and a woman between the age of 60 and 70. The
third victim was an Ellis County man who also
was more than 80 years old.
The agency said two women and three men
have died from the West Nile virus in 2013, in-
cluding three Oklahoma County residents and
one each from Garfield and Ellis counties. All
were more than 60 years old and were hospital-
ized at the time of their deaths. The Health De-
partment said another 33 Oklahomans have
been sickened by the mosquito-borne virus this
year.


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DANCE
FROM PAGE C1

of Cirque du Soleil.
People have a hard-
er time getting past a
wheelchair.
"You create these de-
vices and people are
frightened of them,"
said Morris, 38. "Get out
of the way; here comes
the wheelchair user."
Reality doesn't have to
be so black and white,
and dance doesn't have
to be so exact. It's some-
thing she has learned
over the years.
"The manifestation of
this project is sort of my
whole way of being in
the world," she said. "It
has been shaped by the
desire to bring multiple
realities together."
Morris was a dancer
from the start. She had
strong ankles and un-
canny leg extension. She
also loved to take things
apart, ride her bike with
no hands and try every
piece of equipment on
the playground.
She enjoyed the rigid
instruction of ballet, the
structure it provided.
But she also loved when
her dad danced silly
with her, tossed her in
the air, threw his head
back and let loose one
of his wild belly laughs.
Bill Morris was a man
of God, his family said,
a Gideon who distrib-
uted free Bibles, a Navy
veteran. He was start-
ing a marketing busi-

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whose name was Cath-
erine but whom he
nicknamed Sonshine
when they first met at
a prayer meeting. They
said he rescued animals
and people, bringing
in those who needed a
place to stay.
When Merry Lynn
Morris was 12, she and
her father painted her
room in their Tam-
pa home a sunny yel-
low. She remembers him
leaving to go get more
paint, but he didn't re-
turn. His car was hit
head on, his family said.
He was in a coma, and
the doctors didn't think
he would survive. The
accident left him with
a severe brain injury, a
blind eye, a broken hip
and a shattered knee.
After seizures set in, he
had intermittent paraly-
sis and was mostly con-
fined to a wheelchair.
They took him ball-
room dancing for ther-
apy and got him to try


standing between bal-
let bars.
"The dancing stim-
ulated him the most,"
said Sonshine Morris.
"He was beaming. He
would smile."
He didn't understand
basic things that you
need an umbrella in the
rain, for example. But he
could answer obscure
questions on "Jeopar-
dy!" or say something
deeply philosophical.
They tried every chair
they could find, from
power chairs with joy-
sticks to simple soft-
shell models. The chairs
all had drawbacks, ele-
ments that felt cagelike
and separate.
Merry Lynn Mor-
ris danced in a profes-
sional ballet company
and studied at USF and
Florida State. She rare-
ly meshed her dance
world and home life.
The crisp rules of dance,
the exacting finger posi-
tions and postures, were
a respite from the com-


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"They didn't really feel
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C4


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 7, 2013


eta
4
STARTS
OCTOBER



L611,.- _;




Monday, October 7, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Woman manages both


pregnancy and cancer


MEGAN STUKE
The Lawrence Journal-World
LAWRENCE, Kan. Michelle Pe-
terson and her husband, Travis, had
their hands full with two children un-
der the age of 5 at home, two more
children coming and Travis' new
business when they found out in July
2012 that Peterson had breast cancer.
In late 2011, Michelle Peterson, then
30 years old, got happy news: She and
her husband, Travis, were expecting.
Just a few weeks later, they got the
news that they'd be having twins.
Both happy and a little over-
whelmed, she and Travis set about
preparing for their third and fourth
children to join their family. With a
young daughter and son already at
home, their lives were busy.
In July 2012, when Peterson was
28 weeks pregnant, she discovered a
lump in her breast.
The twins were born six weeks ear-
ly and had to stay in a neonatal inten-
sive care unit in Overland Park for a
month. At this point, Peterson had
had the port inserted, three chemo
treatments and a cesarean section.
In January, Peterson elected to un-
dergo a double mastectomy and recon-


PHONE
FROM PAGE C1
interprets saliva, blood
or urine samples on ei-
ther a strip similar to
a take-home pregnan-
cy test or a glass vial,
and then, using the cell-
phone's flash and cam-
era, uploads the image
for instant analysis us-
ing algorithms devel-
oped by Ehrenkranz.
"It works unbeliev-
ably well," Ehrenkranz
said. "It's a combina-


EARL RICHARDS /THE LAWRENCE JOURNAL-WORLD
Michelle Peterson and her husband, Travis, pose
for a photograph recently in Lawrence, Kan.
struction. While her oncologist, Dr. Sha-
ron Soule, said she could have had just a
lumpectomy, because of family medical
history she decided to be proactive and
reduce her chances of recurrence.
After the surgery, Dr. Mark Prae-
ger said there was no trace of cancer
left. As of May, she was "almost back
to normal" and was awaiting the fi-
nal surgery to get her permanent im-
plants in just a few weeks.


tion of a field lab, plus a
medical specialist."
Ehrenkranz says he
believes the technolo-
gy, which he patented in
2011, has the potential to
become ubiquitous not
only in the developing
world, but in clinics, ICUs
and emergency rooms
around the United States.
He uses thyroid dis-
ease as an example: You
might spend days wait-
ing on tests, months
waiting on doctor ap-
pointments and hun-
dreds of dollars to pay


for it all. Using i-calQ's
smartphone device, Eh-
renkranz says, it will cost
you 20 minutes and $10.
Ehrenkranz is current-
ly collaborating with the
veterinary program at
Colorado State Univer-
sity (yes, it works for an-
imals, too), the Harvard
School of Public Health
and the government of
Tanzania. His company,
which was co-founded by
CEO Pamela Turbeville,
has six employees spread
between Arizona, Utah,
England and Tanzania.


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In-law will be outlaw if she

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DEAR ABBY: My son and his
wife, "Carole," have been mar-
ried for two years. I was re-
cently introduced to her father,
"Ted," who has been alone for
13 years. Carole told me later in
no uncertain terms that I can-
not have a romantic relation-
ship with her father. Then she
repeated the same thing to him.
Do you think it's right for
adult children to dictate to
their parents who they can and
cannot see? Ted and I are per-
plexed. We really like each other
and would like to see where this
relationship could go. We laugh
easily together, cook in the
kitchen well together, can talk
for hours and generally are very
compatible. We have both dis-
cussed our pasts and have been
honest with each other. What's
your opinion? DESERVES TO BE
HAPPY IN FLORIDA
DEAR DESERVES: Before the re-
lationship goes further, you and
Ted should step back and ask
yourselves what might happen
if this romance doesn't work
out. Would the hurt feelings dis-
rupt the family dynamic? If this
can be handled thoughtfully,
with grace and maturity, I agree
that you deserve to be hap-
py. While adult offspring may
try to dictate what their par-
ents can and cannot do, as ma-
ture adults, you do not have to
blindly accept it.
DEAR ABBY: I have been friends
with "Kurt" for many years. We
met during Little League, and
as we got older we stood up in
each other's wedding. He was
my best man.
Kurt's marriage is in trou-
ble because he has a gambling
problem. I feel guilty because
I never said anything to him
about it when we were together
at the casino and he was spend-
ing more money than he could
afford. I was with him only a
handful of times, but I still think
I should have spoken up.
Should I have? Or wouldn't it
have mattered if I did? Kurt is
going to Gamblers Anonymous
meetings now, trying to save his
marriage. GUILTY IN WISCONSIN
DEAR GUILTY: You could have


Dear
Abby

JEANNE
PHILLIPS


i"AIR


said something to your friend,
but the question is, would Kurt
have listened and accepted
what you were trying to convey?
People who have addictions are
usually in denial until they have
no other choice but to face it.
Your feeling guilty won't help
this situation. Being support-
ive of your longtime friend and
making sure that when you're
together there is no wagering
happening (i.e., on sporting
events) would be helpful. The
rest is up to him.
DEAR ABBY: I recently ended a
two-year relationship with my
boyfriend. We are both 20. He
was a great boyfriend always
patient, kind, gentle and loving.
However, I was often impatient,
short-tempered and control-
ling. These issues were my per-
sonal problems. I always tried
to work on them, but although
it got better, I knew I wasn't
treating him the way I should. I
ended things with him because
I felt guilty.
It has been a month now, and
I'm having second thoughts
about having ended it with an
almost-perfect person. I miss
him. Would it be unwise to
reach out to him again? BRO-
KEN UP BUT NOT OVER IT
DEAR NOT OVER IT: Not neces-
sarily. But before you do, allow
yourself a period of introspec-
tion during which you focus
less on your missing him and
concentrate on why you were
abusive to him. A man with his
qualities deserves to be treat-
ed with more respect than you
showed him. The truism, "If you
don't value what you've got, you
will lose it," applies to relation-
ships.
Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren,
also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was
founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips.
Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or
PO. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.


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Monday, October 7, 2013


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to each word or letter using scoring directions. Seven-letter words get a 60-point
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10-7-13 JUDD'S SOLUTION TOMORROW

WOnR PIMMAIp SOLUTION BY JUDD HAMBRICK
lWORD SCRIMIMAUL 2013 UFS / Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS
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DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, October 7, 2013


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st~iles
Smmercial.comassifieds









I CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL





-3j14 FAST


SBuy It, Sell It, FAST!

or Sumter: 352-748-1955 Monday Friday 8am 5pm


Legal Notices ..
Announcements
At Your Service.
Financial ......
Employment ...
Pets/Animals ..


Classified Index

........ 003 Merchandise Mart ...
....... 100 Real Estate/For RENT
....... .200 Real Estate/For SALE
....... 300 Manufactured Homes
. ....... .400 Recreation ....... ..
........m500 Transportation ......


2
Legal Notices


003 Legal Notices
PUBLIC NOTICE
U Haul Company of Gainesville Notice is
hereby given that on October 21,2013,
U Haul of Gainesville hereby
publishes notice, as required by Florida
"Self Storage Act", section 83.806 and
83.807, of a public sale of the property listed
below to satisfy a landlord's lien. All sales are
for cash to the highest bidder and are con
sidered final under the Judicial Lien process
by public auction of the following storage
units. The goods to be sold are generally de
scribed as household goods. The terms of
the sale will be cash only. U Haul Company
does reserve the right to refuse any
bid.
The sale will begin at 8:00 AM and will con
tinue until all units are sold.
U-Haul Storage of Eustis,1 5519 US Hwy 441,
Eustis, FL 32726
115 Michael Holland
130 David McNealy
220 Leigh Codding
427 Melanie McKnight
627 Tanisha Darby
U-Haul Center of Leesburg, 10128 US Hwy
441 South, Leesburg, FL 34788
E121 Hope Brown
E130 Hazel Berry
RV 003 Yu Bang
U-Haul Storage of
Leesburg, 29008 HWY 27, Leesburg, FL
32726
10060 James Sager
10078 Linda Dowdy
Ad No.00410651
September 30 & October 7, 2013
Has your job become extinct?




10V_. I
NOW I
EmplomnLitns
Updaed*dily


II I __ _ _ _ _


003 Legal Notices
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF PERSONAL
PROPERTY
Notice is hereby given that the undersigned
will sell, to satisfy lien of the owner, at public
sale by competitive bidding on October 17,
2013 at the times and locations listed below.
The personal goods stored therein by the fol-
lowing:
2:30p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility
located at: 1970 S. Hwy 27, Clermont, Fl.
34711 (352) 242 6602
Unit # 317 Henry Cantrell Jr. Junk House
hold stuff.
Unit # 164 Christina Taylor No description
on original lease. Unit # 135 Laura L Bishop
Original lease does not ask for a description,
Unit # 323 Ryan Meaux furniture mixed
items
3:30p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility
located at: 18286 Apshawa Rd. Minneola, Fl.
34715(352) 241 8001
4:30p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility
located at: 300 E. Division St. Minneola, Fl.
34715 (352) 394 0501. Unit# E23 Keith W.
Edwards Junk, Unit# C81 Trudy P. Reese
Furniture, Unit# E29 Scotty Coleman Tool
boxes, TVs, Household Items, Unit# C53 Stu
dio D Demetrius Isom Gymnastics Equip
ment.
Purchases must be made with cash only and
paid at the time of sale. All goods are sold
as is and must be removed at the time of
purchase. Extra Space Storage reserves the
right to bid. Sale is subject to adjournment.
ThankYou, Extra Space Storage.
Ad No.00410494
September 30 & October 7, 2013

NOTICE OF SALE
FRUITLAND PARK MINI STORAGE LLC
2394 U.S. Highway 27/441
Fruitland Park, FL 34731
352 787 9777
As required by Florida "Self Storage Act",
Section 83.806 and 83.807, notice is hereby
given that on October 30, 2013, at 10 AM
there will be a public sale at the above ad
dress to dispose of household goods and
miscellaneous items.
The tenants below have been given proper
notice at least fourteen days prior to the first
publication of this Notice of Sale, that the
Owner will enforce a statutory lien on the
property located in their respective unit(s) of
the above mentioned self storage facility.
UNIT # /TENANT
1011 -Mary Harps
2048-Jackie Henry
4013-Crystal Whitmer
8021-Debra Cosine
Ad No.:00412016
October 7 & 14, 2013


003 Legal Notices
CITY OF MINNEOLA
P.O. BOX 678
MINNEOLA, FL 34755
(352) 394 3598
NOTICE OF
PUBLIC HEARING
Notice of Intent to Consider Amendment to
Development Agreement
The City of Minneola City Council will hold
public hearings on Tuesday, September 17,
2013 and Tuesday, October 1, 2013 at 6:30
p.m. at the Minneola City Hall located at 800
North U.S. Highway 27, Minneola, FL, to con
sider an amendment to an existing Develop
ment Agreement for the residential subdivi
sion located on approximately 87.46 acres of
property known as "Overlook at Grassy Lake"
generally located on the west side of North
Grassy Lake Road, south of Turkey Farm
Road.
The proposed amendment to the Develop
ment Agreement would, among other things,
establish a Development Options Matrix
which includes residential, institutional, and
commercial uses. The proposed amendment
contains a maximum gross density of 2.80
dwelling units per acre, a limit of two hun
dred and forty five (245) residential units,
and all buildings constructed on the property
may not exceed thirty five (35) feet in height..
Copies of the proposed amendment to the
Development Agreement are available for in
section at the City of Minneola Planning De
apartment at 800 North U.S. Highway 27,
Minneola, Florida, during normal working
hours of 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
A person who decides to appeal any decision
made by any board, agency, or council with
respect to any matter considered at such
meeting or hearing, will need a record of the
proceedings. For such purposes, any such
person may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which in
cludes the testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is based (Florida Statutes,
286.0105).
The City of Minneola Land Development Code
is available for inspection at the City Hall, lo-
cated at 800 North U.S. 27, Minneola, FL,
during normal working hours 8:30 a.m. to 5
p.m.
PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES NEEDING AS
DISTANCE TO PARTICIPATE IN ANY OF
THESE PROCEEDINGS SHOULD CONTACT
JANET McDANIEL, CITY CLERK AT (352) 394
3598 AT LEAST 48 HOURS BEFORE THE
DATE OF THE SCHEDULED HEARING.
Ad No.00407069
August 28 & October 7 2013
Dailg Conmmecial
"Your First Choice"
In-Print & On-Line


I I I I I


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CHECKl, E11 UIGHT r LAKECOUNTYCHEV.COM APPIT
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DEADLINES
For Insertion COPY DATE
Friday Thursday, 5pm
Saturday Friday, 3pm
Sunday Friday, 5:00pm
Monday Friday, 5:00pm
Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pm
T ,, -. I ,-'. ,,1- ..... .. u'.,. . ,,,. ,.u ', ,
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* The pblbhsher ass imes no financial esponsiblty fri errrs or for


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DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, October 7, 2013


A/


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A/C Expert
Kalos Services
352-243-7088
KalosFlorida.com
Lic.#CAC 1814620

IFl ida Air & Heat Inc.
Your Comfort Company I
For All Your Air Conditioning I
ri 352-326-3202 I
| Serving Lake County State Licence #
since 1986 CAC18l4030




Eustis Senior Care
Assisted living FaciltyAL 8993
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Call Rhea, RN at 352-551-5307
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Transmissions AC Brakes
Tune Ups Body Work Oil Change
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Backsplashes Re-Tile Tub & Shower
Walls Grab Bars Floors
Handicap Baths Repairs
Leaky Shower Pan
Ins./Lic. 30 yrs. exp.




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t 'l 1Renew, on location, your
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2 Rooms & Hall $50
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Quality Cleaning with
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Commercial/Residential
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Flexible Hours
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ESP Services
Doctors Visits Cooking & Laundry
Pet Caring General Errands
Housekeeping
Call For A Free In-Person
Consultation
352-348-6408
CLEAN SWEEP
S(Clutter Free Cleaning)
lean, Sort, Pack or Spring Clean
ef's & Yrs. of Experience
352-742-0014
'- Reasonable Rates

\S Amy's Cleaning
Service
e lI personally clean your home'
Weekly Bi-Weekly Monthly
I Ref. Available. Serving Lake &
Sumter Counties
352.536.3846




Your PC Repair Specialists
Fast friendly service at a
flat rate affordable price.
Education & Repair
In your home or our office.
WCall
352-897-1309

CK Custom Computer
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Main office 352-435-7309
Mobile store 352-254-0104.
We have a program to m
fix your computer for
$ 10/hr labor piu.s part.




QUALITY CONCRETE & BLOCK
8x10 $500.00 10x40 $1200.00
SIncludes labor, concrete & cleanup
l Fast turnaround, no hassle & local
4*1#CRC1326327, Ins. & References
BRIAN DEGAGLIA
S352-267-57231

QS^ Concrete For Less
4 8x10 Slab $450
1iWV'M 10x40 Slab $1325
Includes Concrete & Labor
Blocking/ ReII JI cJlns.
IM Phillip 352-504-8372


We ELIMINATE all trip
hazards due to UNEVEN and
or RAISED concrete.
Commercial/Residential
Concrete Grinding is 1/2
the cost of replacement.
Entry ways Ramps Sidewalks
Driveways Puddling Water, etc.
Insured
(877 454-0113 (toll free)
Alconcretegrinding.com




METAL TILE SHINGLE ROOFING
New Construction or Re-Roofing
B 308 Oak Street
Lady Lake, FL 32159
352-430-2773
www.sackrooflng.com
Serving the Tri County Area For 26 Years




697__a__"_e- Lic.#CBC1252465
jOOR & LOCK SERVICE
We Repair, Replace and Install
Emergency Services Available!
(352) 314-3169


Daniel Byars
Rescreens
Palo, Poaol Enclsurs a
All Alumlnum iRepairs
FREE ESTIMATES
352.408.2142


S*eScreens, Inc,
SIl-Rescreens Screen Room &
Pal closures Wilndow Rescrmens
* Vlfll Mi dnl SrGutms IlMulm Rihair
407-413-6130


; 1 Triple Crowni
Tile & Wood
Installation & Repairs
Owner does all work.
Free Est. Lie/Ins
S3524274825


Trusted, Quality Craftsmanship for 30+ years
Kitchens Bathrooms Windows






aa-rS
Vinyl Siding Decks Painting/Staining
Tile/Marble Lanai Enclosures
Mike .Lalonde 352-409-8311
I _mikeC~image4me.com__


















BOYDS
You call it, We haul it!
n352
460-7186


Rl G^ifcjiiM in I mprovement
All akes a Models. METAL TILE SHINGLE ROOFING
|Broken SpWlngRehloacom u 1 New Construction or Re-Roofing
10% Ofwi/tllS ad l 308 Oak Street
S352-347-6411 Lady Lake, FL 32159
A! 352-430-2773
www.sackroofing.com
i# ii_ iLic. cBC1252465 Serving the Tri County Area For 26 Years


^. GARAGE DOORS
Complete Service & Installation
Lake County's Largest Provider!
We Sell & Program Remotes!
(352) 748-4575


|. P Repairs &
age Door RepaIcements
S| Locally Owned
Gate All Work
1 ww I warrantedf
Warranted
Licensed & Insured midfildoor.com
352-630-0292 Shane Blanton




SAffordable Home
S Repair, LLC
Mobile Home Repair Apt. Clean Outs
& Repair Decks & Ramps
Soffits/Siding Doors/Windows
Painting Tile Work* Lic/Ins
Call Pat 352-551-6073

Dave HIlls Haniman & Painting
Door & Window Installion
,-V Carpentry,
Home Improvement,
y Drywall & More! Just Ask!
Professional Service
I Lic./lns. 352-259-5357



-:-:-:Home Repair:.:::.J
* Pressure Washing e Painting
* Flooring Carpet Clean Outs
Clean Ups Hauling Licensed
352-787-7056

John PhiUibert, Inc
e do Everything from Ceilings to
Roors. Window and Doors,
WPantries, Cabinets and more.
Your pesky Leaks gone, Your Soffits
we Fix, and Houses We'll Paint From
inside and out, we'll make it great. Lie/Ins
JPHandy.com(352) 308-0694


Mike Shoffstall
cSCall 352 552 1875
~,JUNGLE HUm
~~ REPAIRS.1
Repair everything. Replace anything

M. Lucie Carpentry
Lic./Ins. Res./Comm.
Repairs & Renovations
Drywall, Trim & Rotted Wood
I Call Mick
W 1.386-523-5015


/


Local Agent
Long Term Care Ins.
Medicare Supplements
Critical Care Ins.
Cancer Ins.
Call Bill Bell
352.589-0454 or 352.551.3504

Ask Me About
Medicare Insurance
Robert Lange
352-742-2425
lange.rob.its@gmall.com



Irrigation' Tune-Up

35 Check & Adjust
'Jk Entire System.
1 I Provide Written Est
STo Fix Problems!
Lower Your Monthly Cost
352-409-3163

s Sprinkler
r Repairs
STimers, Valves, Heads,
2OLeaks, etc.
e352) 787-9001
Tha's all we do since 1979
S Native, 4th Generation 5




J.C.C. Bobcat & Tree Svc. Inc.
S Land Clearing/Excavating
1 ~ RFill Dirt/Clay
Ij--- auling/Debris Removal
SStump Grinding
Demolition/Grading/ Driveways
Owner Operator
352-455-7608

,/,CHRIS CANES LANDSCAPE
t ersing hiChill
Lawn Malnteice, ianlsc.e, PaiosI
Retaulig Walls. ant. Sodding
Leeshurg 536-3708
M rs VN ff 15
261.1 eg'tl wiSmt ^ l.a
Men IW1us amhtusIa


A-1 IPremier Scapes
^V W i& Services Inc.
Land Clearing Bush Hogging
Debris Removal
Hauling Free Estimates
352-308-5508




Landscaping

U Trimming, Mulching,
^ Sod, Tree Trimming,
Pavers & Much Morel
Armando Santamario
3 52-587-1323

/ilalfhan .ape.. Designs
S-Sodl, Mulching, Rock Walls
S Removal & Installation,
Trimming and Much More
Free Estimates Lic. & Ins.
David Vidal, Owner
352-396-8499 or 352-396-8459


A Tidal rLanSimee
*lIMMMUMIbTruTdomoiubg P ess i aa
FIE ESTIAIES UCJIN&.
We Take A Bite Out Oft Over PrIcing
352-326-8712 / 352-406-3354


pLawn Maintenance
352-357-5905
I A est Exterminator
RND


Tree Service At
Reasonable Rates
I can climb the highest trees,
and I can mow the biggest
lawns, but please don't ask me
Sto leap tall buildings!
SFair Pricing. TrimTrees.,
.m Cut Lawns & Clean Ups
Cal|Tony for estimate 352-759-208

Don't Stress Call The Best!
Dependable Commercial
Lawn Services
Lic/Ins. Designer
Landscaping, Trimming,
Shrubs. We do it all
Rick 352-427-8919

Howards Lawn
Service
sidentlal/Commrcial
Lic/Ins
(3521
800-9985

B ylawncarle
a Mome
New accepti ew iMTmeruia1 &
esiu al cu s. eeowing
LnscapIn l atien andM mr.
seasonal, pilabl Expetienced
MrIN 352-552-4556 Cel 352-702-U6460

LAll Lawn
, j and Tree
Care
mJ Service
t u ~Natural Land
Clearing (Goats)
"BEST PRICES" Free Est
352-460-7186


iric Service
mL1L%7~-. Service
Center
*W*-M *352-602-1735
At Venetian Gardens
Marina on the
Harris Chain of Lakes.
No Trailer. No Problem.
Boat Repairs & Svc. on water





Bill's Moving
Fa. Mover Reg. No: 2095
Owner On Every Job
Fair Rates & 27+ Yrs. Exp.
352-669-4456
Toll Free 888-444-3559

A TOSS Movers
S Serving Lake,
M Marion & Sumter
Load/Unload Your Truck or Mine
Pack/Unpack Cleaning &
Painting Svc Avail. Free Estimates
352-409-3114 tomsmovers.org

Little John's Movers &
Storage 352-812-4889
Serving Lake, Marion,
& Sumter Counties
1-15 items same day delivery
Local & Long distance moves
SLoading & unloading pods, rental
trucks, & storage units.
We have trucks going up &
down I 95 & I 75
"Less Than a POD" "Door to Door"
You're Coming ....Your Neighbor is Going!
Jump on Board and $ave
SERVING ALL 50 STATES
One item to a full house!!!
We will get off the interstate for you!
ljm9575@yahoo.com
US DOT #2406621




quality Assurance Painting, Inc.
"tf you want quality, you want us!"
ln INhrw- Ilem- lalim
r~il New Constructlon
~~t Asurance PintigmIc
;_- Ucoisdlnsurel
STim Grumbs
I 352-483-6915
www.qualityassurancepaintinginc.com


0- 0
PROFESSIONALS
PAINTING, INC.
a Residentiol (352) 267-6430
C m m ~e r c ia .l F lN E E S nM M I
-! eWu CO-IDPEIWOAUFMCOM
o s ,Licensd and Insured
NERIORIEXTERIOR PAIMNTIMS & OTHER SVC


1i11 - --|-- -- -


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 7, 2013




Monday, October 7, 2013


(352) 348-6923
Tim Mundy Painting
& Pressure Cleaning Services, Ie.
t"hen quality Is No Accident"
\ License & Insured

John Philibert, Inc
f For All Your Interior/Exterior
Painting Needs.
We Also Offer
Driveways Patios
And Faux Finishes Lic/Ins
Call John @ (352) 308-0694
JPHandy.comn

New England Painter
Semi-Retired
30 Years Exp
Interior, Exterior, Pressure
Washing No Job Too Small
Bob Kelley Painting
352-702-7739

B rhtman Home Improvement
Wallpaper, Drywall
In ior Painting, Trim
,REE ESTIMATES
Insured
2M5983169

CLAUDE WILD PAINTING
High Quality @ Reasonable Prices
Int. & Ext. Free Est. Lic/lns
Pressure Cleaning Ref. & 35 yrs. exp.
Sin Lake County
cwildpainting@gmail.com





1/ INDOOR PEST
jm CONTROL
k As low as $20 per me.
I 352-357-5905
A Pest Exterminator


Amric Pest Co ntrol
Termites Rodent Exclusions
German Roaches
Property Inspections
Soil Pre-treatment
Uc/Ins 352-446-2318




Since 1969
L H| lSpecializing in
Vandas.
ly ^ Call for hours
sfS1~ l ~352-787-9001
SORCHIDS 2902 South St.
...... Leesburg, FL
GoodwinOrchids.com






Family Owned & Operatedi
Residential & Commercial
www.PrimePlumbinginc.com
(352) 383-3440 #CFC1426750

& Plumbing, LLC
AM Plumblg Repairs Comm/Bes
Klichens& Bath Remodels
DisPOsaL Water Heater Gas Piplng,
Draln/Sewer Cleaning
No Gron Showers, 24 Hr. Emergency
u.i, mm (3521343-3763




Ace Pool Service
Complete Pool Services
Motor & Pump Repair
Pool & Patio Remodeling
Servicing Commercial & Residential
Properties Since 1969
Licensed/Insured Free Estimates
352-735-3050

Prs s r
Cleani ngS~I lJ


352.260.7490

All Airports, Cruise Terminals,
Hotels, Casinos & Attractions
Shands-VA and Jacksonville Mayo





Q -HAVEN Providing
No-Cost Svcs.
to Lake county
sexual assault victims 24/7/365.
On-Call Rape Advocacy
Counseling, Legal Assistance
Hotline 352-787-1379





l8ot'*#Pryl
ShnoTle nO~fi e LLZ
Shin le, Tile, Licensed Bonded Insured
Metal, and Rubber Residential/Commercial
Roof Systems RC29027460
(352) 669-6607

METAL TILE SHINGLE ROOFING
New Construction or Re-Roofing
F 308 Oak Street
Lady Lake, FL 32159
352-430-2773
www.sackrooflng.comn
Serving the Tri County Area For 26 Years

#1 IN ROOFING
Leak Repairs Shingles/Flat Roof
Lifetime Metal Roofs Screen Rooms
Uc, #CCC1329936
Villages Roofing and
Construction, Inc.<:>
FREE ROOF ESTIMATES
31BR~ U.-.14 3 2


D3


SECURITY TRAINING
Lj6||^- Security "D"&"G" Lic.
SPLUS: FL. Concealed Lic.
NRA Instructor Training
Ladies Only Classes Avail.
352-350-2855
Ls 3 www.TheRightTraining.com



Speazed Storage Solutions
Now is the time...
To organize your life!
Custom Closets. Home Office. Garages
Tailored To Your Needs,
17 Years Exp.
Free Iome Design Consultation
352-383-7058 407-718-6818 (Cell)




John Philibert, Inc
For All Your Tile Needs
Pergo, Ceramic Tile,
Travertine, Vinyl & More
Call John @(352) 308-0694
JPHandy.com Uc/Ins


RE-TILE
352-391-5553
SBacksplashes Re-Tile Tub & Shower
Walls Grab Bars Floors
Handicap Baths Repairs
Leaky Shower Pan
Ins./Lic. 30 yrs. exp.




ILLC. 1111cat a Turee Sue. IM&
ldential/Commerclal
Trimming/Removal
I PralmmsledgeslStump Grinding
Debris removal/Hauling
Fill DirtClay/Grading/Driveways
Lic/Ins Insurance Work 24 Hrs.
352-455-7608


Premier Scapes
& Services Inc.
Complete Tree Service
Trimming Debris Removal
Stump Grinding ~ Free Estimates
352-308-5508




A1 Ill^^S [slSiS

hd~b..~B 1252465
-- S WINDOWS
We Install, Replace and Repair
Most Major Brands Available
Glass and Screen Repair
(3521 787-4545


352-587-2735
CR#330701 Lanai Enclosures
f Glass Window
Replacement
Acrylic Windows
Screen Rooms


352-602-9849
SSPARKLING
WINDOWS
MARK ANDERSON
Window Cleaning,
Screens, Tracks. FREE Estimates


e Contracting, Inc. A Affordable Tree
GAP Certified 2W Service
Shinigles, Metal or Flat e Trimmin Rm al
Additions, Remodels, Renovations Tree Trimming & Removal
Roof to Foundation iLake Cleaning Dead Wooding
S352-602-8794 Moss Spraying Lic/Ins
UC 0 CFree Est.o Senior Discounts
CGC1507556 CC1326899 352-459-9428


To hae you

Proesioal* eric lite hre

pese contSactMihll n. h

CasfeDea rtment. .at

(352 36-823 orby mai
6 S S S ~aiycmmrcal~o


We're Proud of Our Service
.... and you will be too!





HUNr ER Roori Nt.
Free Estimates
Metal, Tile & Shingle Re-roofs
Serving all Lake &
Sumter Counties.
Mike Hunter
Fl License #RC29027482
Office (407) 947-2223
Fax (407) 347-3472
mike@hunterroofingLLC.com


Serving Lake, Sumter
S&S Manon Counties
SWe Service All
| Appliance Brands
Licensed/Insured
1 Free Service Call
Sw/Repair
15+ Years Exp. 24 Hr. Emergency Svc.
We Don't Want To Be The Biggest
Just The Best
SEric Wolf 352-630-2202
All About Appliances repairs and installs
all brands of major appliances. We are a
small husband/wife company. Eric has
over 15 years experience repairing appli-
ances and Lavinia (Vinnie) has over 20
years in business management experience.
Together, we strive to offer you prompt,
professional, courteous and personal serv- :
ices far beyond your expectations, both by
phone and in your home. We respect you
and your time and make every effort to be
in and out of your home as quickly as pos-
sible yet provide a thorough diagnosis and
timely repair. We genuinely appreciate all
your business.


Complete Automotive Care
Transmissions AC Brakes
Tune Ups Body Work Oil Change
Family Owned 26 Yrs 352-326-2400
1406 Emerson St., Leesburg across from Post Office

Emerson Street Automotive has been fam-
ily owned and operated for nearly 30
years. Lori and Michael Farfaglia pur-
chased the business from Lori's family in
2010. Lori's father, Terrill Davis stayed as
the onsite manager. Emerson Street is lo-
cated at 1406 Emerson Street, right next to
the Post Office in Leesburg, Florida. We
are opened Monday-Friday 7:30-5:30 and
Saturday 7:30-3:00. Phone: 352-326-2400.
We do all kinds of automotive repair in-
cluding light body work. We have state of
the art diagnostic equipment that takes the
guess out of repairing your car. We service
all makes and models including SUVs',
ATV's, and RV's.


352-978-7015
PremierPowerlnc.com
Licensed, Bonded, Insured
Master ER #13014129


Our mission is to

provide you with quality,

professional, and a safe

electrical installation at a

fair price. We answer our

phone 24/7, seek to

save you money while

providing outstanding


service that meets or

Exceeds your expectations.

You can depend and

trust us!


---------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ........................


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Tree
Service


... .. ... .. ... ... .. ...


*
*
*
*
*


**
**0





DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, October 7, 2013


003 Legal Notices

NOTICE OF PUBUC SALE
The following personal property of MARY
JANE GRAVENOR AND CHARLES DALE
GRAVENOR, AND IF DECEASED, ALL UN
KNOWN PARTIES, BENEFICIARIES, HEIRS,
SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS OF MARY JANE
GRAVENOR AND CHARIEFS DALEF GRAVENOR
AND ALL PARTIES HAVING OR CLAIMING TO
HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE, OR INTEREST IN
THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED will on
the 15th day of October 2013, at 10:00
a.m., on property at 110 Magnolia Drive, Lot
#0085, Lady Lake, Lake County, Florida
32159, be sold for cash to satisfy storage
fees in accordance with Florida Statutes,
Section 715.109:
1983 PRIN Mobile Home
VIN #'s 3B40P41127A/B
Title #'s:
20557245/20231955
And All Other Personal Property Therein
PREPARED BY:
Rosia Sterling
Lutz, Bobo, Telfair,
Eastman, Gabel & Lee
2155 Delta Blvd,
Suite 210 B
Tallahassee, Florida 32303
Ad No. 00410286
September 30 & October 7, 2013
100
Announcement

104 Special
Notices
NOTICE TO
ADVERTISERS
PLEASE CHECK YOUR AD FOR
ERRORS THE FIRST DAY IT APPEARS
SINCE THE DAILY COMMERCIAL WILL
NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
INCORRECT ADS AFTER THE FIRST
DAY OF PUBLICATION. IF YOU FIND
AN ERROR CALL THE CLASSIFIED
DEPARTMENT IMMEDIATELY AT
314-3278 OR 748-1955.
THE PUBLISHER ASSUMES NO
FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY FOR
ERRORS OR FOR COMMISSION OF
COPY. LIABILITY SHALL NOT EXCEED
THE COST OF THE PORTION OF
SPACE OCCUPIED BY SUCH ERROR.
CANCELLATIONS
CANCELLATION FOR ADS RUNNING
SATURDAY MUST BE MADE BY
FRIDAY BY 2:00, CANCELLATIONS
FOR SUNDAY & MONDAY MUST BE
MADE FRIDAY BY 5:00




200
At Your Service


201 Insurance

205 Adult Care
NOTICE
Florida Statute states, "It is a
misdemeanor for any person willfully,
knowingly, or intentionally to operate
or attempt to operate a family day
care home without a license or
without registering with the
department, whichever is applicable".
Florida Statute states, "No person
shall advertise a child care facility
without including within such
advertisement the state or local
agency license number of such
facility. The statute applies to anyone
with more than 1 unrelated child
in their home.


245 Financial

SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Contact us if your claim has been
denied or if you need help.
Over 30 yrs. exp.No fees or costs
unless your claim is approved.
Cooper Consulting
2228 South St., Leesburg
352-728-5552


250 Handyman
Hard working Lic. Business owner,
seeks to improve your home.
Ability to perform jobs including
Remodeling-TreeTrimming-Drywall-
Tiling, etc. References avail.
Call Robert Plante's
Home Maint. 352-484-3543


268 Moving
Two Brothers Moving


1 Room or a Full House
FL. Reg. #IM1539
Russell &Todd Franks
Lic. & Ins. Call 352-793-8960

275 Plumbing
^ SINCE
_1987
KILEY&
SONS, INC.
A Full Service Plumbing Company.
Lake 787-1904 Sumter 748-9500
CentralFloridaPlumber.com
VISIT OUR ONSITE SHOWROOM.
24 Hr. Emergency Service
Lic#CFC1426882

281 Roofing
#1 IN ROOFING
VILLAGES ROOFING & CONSTRUC-
TION INC.
352-314-3625
Leak Repairs
*Shingles/Flat Roof *Lifetime Metal
Roofs
Free Roof Estimates
Lic. #CCC1329936

Tired of the slow pace?


a' -.me,


281 Roofing


288 Tree
Service


300
Financial


400
Employment


405 Professional




FREELANCE
PHOTOGRAPHER
The Daily Commercial is looking for
a Freelance Photographer with
experience shooting features, spot
news and sports. Ideal job for
someone who wants to build a
portfolio or have their work seen by
a large audience. Must have own
equipment, reliable transportation
(no mileage paid), and a flexible
schedule that could include nights
and weekends.
Send resume to and examples
of work to:
editorialjobs@
dailycommercial.com
Or Daily Commercial
212 East Main Street
Leesburg, FL 34748
Attn: Editorial Jobs
No phone calls please.
EOE


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The Dailyg Commercial
Lrk it,-_d'UitIi i.,3,\r C.f,-.'


www.dai lyconmmniercial.com



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405 Professional




FREELANCE
WRITER
The Daily Commercial is looking for
a Freelance Writer who is equally
comfortable with feature stories
and spot news. Work will be assigned
on an as-needed basis, but
story suggestions welcomed. Must
have prior newspaper experience,
reliable transportation (no: riiiiiege
paid), and a flexible schedule that
could includes nights and weekends.
Send resume to and
examples of work to:
9daiIii' D ,0b '.i
dailycommercial.com
Or Daily Commercial
212 East Main Street
Leesburg, FL 34748
Attn: Editorial Jobs
No phone calls please.
EOE


Excellent
Opportunity
FREELANCE
WRITER
The South Lake Press is looking for
a Freelance Writer who is equally
comfortable with feature stories
and spot news. Work will be assigned
in South Lake on an as-needed basis,
but story suggestions welcomed. Must
have prior newspaper experience,
reliable transportation (no: riiiimlge
paid), and a flexible schedule that
could includes nights and weekends.
Send resume to and
examples of work to:
ar' hiliilODI'
dailycommercial.com
Or Daily Commercial
212 East Main Street
Leesburg, FL 34748
Attn: Editorial Jobs
No phone calls please.
EOE

You're Reading

1w LOCAL


PAPER
ThDA Commdal_


ACROSS
1 Plant part
5 Like
cupcakes
9 First Lady
before
Michelle
1OThesaurus
author
12Top floor
13Seeing
red
14 Painter's
motion
16Wee bite
17 Verve
18Tried hard
21 Stimpy's
pal
22 Fall guy
23"Keen!"
24 Fra-
grances
26 Rented
out
29Walked
with
purpose
30Capitol
top
31 Mine rock
32 Flashing
light
340 Obama's
veep
37 Roused
from
slumber
38 Chapel
topper
39Tusk
material


405 Professional
LAKE COMMUNITY ACTION
AGENCY, INC.
Has the following position open:
FINANCIAL ANALYST
Duties:
The Financial Analyst is responsible
for helping the Director of Financial
Services maintain financial and ac-
counting records for the Agency's
projects. Performs routine accounting
functions, which require fundamental
knowledge of, and general familiarity
with, basic accounting practices and
procedures.
Requirements:
Community Action/Non-Profit Corpo-
ration 5013(c) (3) experience. At least
a bachelor degree in Accounting
and/or Business Administration with
two years experience in accounting or
fund accounting. Applicable experi-
ence may be considered in lieu of for-
mal education. Proficiency in data en-
try and in the use of Microsoft Word &
Excel spreadsheet applications.
Apply online www.lakecaa.org
Fax 352-483-2298, or in person
501 N Bay St., Eustis.
Call Human Resources for more info
352-357-5550
Equal Opportunity Employer
DFWP/M/F/







wesie.T,,,,,e1 ;il'succTessu cnidate wil










S m talLIfInsura nile, 401k










SYour First Choice"
portfol- i to e Il
ormi l to:l.Idlq
2'1 2 E l.' Jl Main S11itreett.







"Your irstCboice"
In-Prinit & On Line


Daily Cominmeial
"Iowr flst Choice" In-Prilnt & Oh-line

Your Town Your News



"My first choice
everyday either
in-print or. on-line.'


40Baseball
card no.
41 Wallet
bills

DOWN
1 Baby's
toy
2 Beat at
the track
3 Hunter in
the stars
4 Carpet
fastener
5 Writer
Levin
6 Swindle
7 Seasonal
drink
8 Infer
9 Focused
beam
11 Sort


405 Professional
REPORTER
The Daily Commercial of
Leesburg, FL, has an immediate
opening for an experienced
reporter. We are a 25,000 circulation
AM daily in sunny Central Florida -
just one hour north of Orlando and
Tampa with unlimited recreational
opportunities at our doorstep. We are
looking for an aggressive reporter
with a strong work ethic and a
passion for local news.
Responsibilities include government
and community coverage, in-depth
stories and personality profiles.
The ideal candidate will be able to
write tight, compelling, focused
articles; and turn around stories
quickly. Strong research and
investigative skills, and the ability
to create compelling, succinct
stories about complex issues are
a must. This is not an entry-level
position. We offer paid time off, along
with a competitive benefits package.
There are no relocation dollars
available for this position.
No phone calls please.
EOE
Qualified candidates
should email a cover
letter, resume and six
solid clips to
editorialjobs@
dailycommercial.com
or Daily Commercial
212 East Main Street
Leesburg, FL 34748
Attn: Editorial Jobs

410 Sales

Exceptional
Opportunities












FALL WORK -GREAT PAY
FT/H T Immediate openings
Customer Sales/Service



will train, Apply, all ages 17+.
Call ASAP! 352-404-5183
Eusis, akean
Sute outyad. el eal




FALL WORK -GREAT PAY
FT/PT Immediate openings
Customer Sales/Service
will train, Apply, all ages 17+.
Call ASAP! 352-404-5183


/.FoPHome ..
- Delivery Call)

'9..5. 787-0600"-...


CROSSWORD PUZZLE


U II
AROAR PEDAL
DONNE UNITED



EBE R I


Saturday' M-BEwR
L, E.SE
tA QE TAP




Saturday's answer


15 Fancy
homes
19Young
ones
20Aussie
hopper
22 Dispatch
23"The
Matrix"
hero
24 Disrobes
25College
unit


26Watch
27Glowing
coals
28 Miniature
29Weeps
30Took the
wheel
33Ninny
35 Memo-
rable
time
36Volleyball
need


NEW CROSSWORD BOOK! Send $4.75 (check/m.o.) to
Thomas Joseph Book 1, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475
= 1 12 13 14 = 5 16 l 17 8-


*^ 6 ; 1 +' "; t "


In Lake County
,___ ,I"_ I ll, L- 1 -1
ii- L- L' '. L 17 -_

For Local News Sports Weather

In-Print & On-Line


CROSSWORD
By THOMAS JOSEPH


Th Dil Cm meria

Em ly et itns


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 7, 2013




Monday, October 7, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


410 Sales













| *I: I I II



Suprme Team





FOUR STAR
c3* 3 ^S. 36 3
















UPCOMING PROJECT
Looking to hire experienced & skilled
sales agents for a manufactured
home community. Licensed Real Es-

















tate agents preferred, but not a re-
quirement. Looking for agents to work

E-mail resumes to:
resumes@fourstarhomes.com

415 Technologyao o l


RESTORE TELECOM IN LEESBURG
seeks full time Computer Technician.
















Install software, map network drives,
set up hardware, maintain asset in-
ventory and user system access lists.
HS Diploma/GED required. Exp. with
computer setup/troubleshooting & ba-
sic networking required.
in3udeme icadntlif,41 .3



PO B-e ox 490007





























Email resume to
humanresources@restortelecom.com
or fax to 888-420-1861
Applications accepted at
912-1 Venture Ave.
___ DFWP/EOE ___
homecom nity.Le se as




















Emaily esumes4to
TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY CALL 787-0600E
homeks ulotmeCmunityrLi cnsedcRalnE
Intatelagentsareferrpedbtwnotarkdies
qetupihremn.wokigfreagentansseto wor
vethey ModunteDrayApopkaccesAlitamnt
areiloas. Drqied x.wt
Email resumes to:
huaresoumes@forstarhoesecomco


seeksfulltimomputer- Tchnician
ventory atindsercsystem accs its
912- Di Vm E eqtuiredAv.Ex.wt

si eworingrequied.
'OSBCIEmTDA ail resume0t


420 Customer Service
Employment

HARDWARE CUSTOMER SERVICE
Part time. Exp. a plus. Lifting required
Email resume to
Joinourteam80@yahoo.com

425 Clerical

RECEPTIONIST WANTED
Phone, basic computer & filling skills
a must. Willing to clean. Experience
preferred. DFWP
Call 352-728-6053

432 Dental

DENTAL ASSISTANT
Experienced for busy office. Must
have expanded duties & radiology
certified. Looking for outgoing
dependable, professional person must
be able to multi task.
352-751-1178
Lady Lake Area
DENTAL ASST./INSURANCE CLERK
EXP'D. THE VILLAGES
PH: 321-945-9545 or
Fax 407-302-9799

435 Medical

EMT/PARAMEDIC, NURSE,
MA with X-ray
For Busy Urgent Care.
Must have Phlebotomy, IV skills &
medication administration.
Email to:
medicalbillingtoday@ yahoo.com
FRONT DESK -
For busy Urgent Care. Computer ori-
ented typing skills a must. Profes-
sional appearance & well groomed.
Fax resume to:
352-315-1703

INSURANCE BILLING &
COLLECTIONS FT
For busy Chiropractic office. College &
coding experience required. Must be a
team player, competent and persis-
tent.
Fax resume to: 352-589-5549 or
Email to: ddimura@gmail.com

MEDICAL BILLING
Needed for a physicians office.
Must have experience.
Fax resume to: 352-323-1894

Has your job become extinct?


Evlv intsmethn e
wih heDilyomerca
Em lyet itns
Updte daly


435 Medical

NEEDED LICENSED THERAPIST
Program Asst., and Recovery Coach
for an exciting new in-home Family
Behavior Therapy program serving
Lake County at risk families. Training
will be made available in this evidence
based practice.
Apply at




515W Main St. Leesburg or
online at www.lsbc.net
DFWP/EOE

















PRACTICE ADMINISTRATOR FOR
THRIVING MEDICAL PRACTICE P/T
Must be go-getter willing to work with
medical director and staff to fulfill
God's vision for the practice.
Fax resume to: 352 259-5540















450 Trades

APPLICATIONS BEING ACCEPTED FOR
*LANDSCAPE FOREMAN'S &
*SUPERVISOR,
*ALSO OFFICE/SALES/RETAIL
NURSERY PERSON
Bilingual a plus. English a must. Must
be prepared to work 20-22 days per
month. 50-55 hrs per week.
No Phone Calls Please.
Apply in person 9-11am Tues.-Sat.
at 8440 CR 48, Yalaha,
4 blocks past the Yalaha Bakery
MANSFIELD LANDSCAPING LLC
WE DO NO LAWN MAINTENANCE,
STRICTLY LANDSCAPING.


450 Trades

AIR/HEAT INSTALLER EXP'D
Apply in person 16445 SE 138th Ave.
(Corner of 25 & 42)
Weirsdale, FL 32195
or Call 352-821-1700

DRIVER MANAGER EXPERIENCED
for OTR Refrigerated Carrier
Night Shift position available.
Full Time. McLeod Exp. a Plus.
*UTILITY FLEET MAINT. TECHNICIAN
for OTR Refrigerated Carrier. Full
Time, 2nd Shift. Responsible for yard
checks, trailer washouts & moving
pallets. CDL license a plus, but not re-
quired. Entry level.
*FLEET MECHANICAL TECHNICIAN
2-3 years mechanical experience.
"WE'RE GROWING!"
These 3 positions are due
to expansion.
Time Definite Services, Inc.
Sumterville, FL.
No Phone Calls!
Send Resume in confidence to:
HR@TimeDefinite.com

DRIVER
Needed for OTR, 5 yrs. exp. w/some
reefer. Good driving record & ref's.
Very nice truck. NON SMOKER.
Call 352-516-1986



WAULKER]
STAINLESS EQUIPMENT
FIELD SERVICE TECHNICIAN
Join a team based, leading
manufacturer of stainless steel
equipment for food, pharmaceutical
and chemical industries
We are looking for a Field Service
Technician, dispatched from our Ta-
vares, Florida location. This position
operates on an on-call capacity with
extensive travel. Candidate must be
proficient in MIG & TIG welding, and
possess mechanical aptitude with the
ability to install, repair, and maintain
equipment. Responsibilities include
ensuring equipment runs at optimal
levels, and performing routine repairs
and maintenance of custom manufac-
tured stainless steel equipment for the
chemical, food, dairy and pharmaceu-
tical industries. We offer a competitive
salary and full benefits, including
401K, health, dental and flexible
spending account. If you are qualified
and interested in joining our team,
please send your resume to:
Walker Stainless Equipment Co. LLC
625 State Street,
New Lisbon, WI 53950
Attn: Human Resources/Jim Arzt
Email: jarzt@walkerstainless.com
www.walkerstainless.com
No Phone calls please
EEO/Drug/Smoke Free Work Place


450 Trades

LAKE SUMTER ELECTRIC, LLC
Now Hiring!
Experienced Electricians & Helpers.
Call 352-793-8092 for more info.





NEW VCON.,-T.LIC l101i
Residential Electricians Exp. preferred.
Rough & Trim. Slab, lintel & service.
Full benefits, paid holidays & vac. EOE
Apply at:
Exceptional Electric
3042 CR 124A, Wildwood

PLUMBERS & PLUMBERS HELPERS
for commercial work. Must have
experience. Drug free work place.
Call 352-728-6053

DRIVERS
Loudon County Trucking is looking for
OTR Flatbed Drivers. We Offer: No
Tarping!!! Great Miles, Pay-up to
.60cpm, Great Benefits & Home Time!
CDL-A, 2yr OTR Exp, Good MVR.
Frank Donnelly at:
1-800-745-7290 x22

DRIVERS
Guaranteed Home EVERY Weekend!
Company: All miles PAID (Loaded or
Empty)! Lease: To Own NO Money
down, NO Credit Check!
Call 1-888-880-5916

POOL SERVICE NIGHTS
No exp. required.
Apply in Person
POOL CONTROL 2191 Hwy. 441/27


DRIVERS

NEEDED!
QUALIFIED CDL A DRIVERS
5 YEARS EXPERIENCE
See what we offer, assigned
equipmentgood home time,
weekly pay, direct dep.,health ins,
paid holidays & vacation.
Call for more details.
800-456-2336 X114

TRAILER MECHANIC
Sunstate Carriers has an opportunity
for an experienced Trailer Mechanic.
Excellent benefits paid vacation, paid
sick days, health insurance, overtime
pay. Work in a clean & well equipped
shop. Must have own tools, able to do
PM inspections, repairs such as brake
jobs & electrical wiring/lights, ability to
weld & tractor PM a plus but not re-
quired.
Apply in person


Su~nstate
726 Southridge Industrial Dr.
Tavares, FL
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE


tcotce


In-Print & On-Line


I C 4- W", LW


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*


D5


450 Trades

CONSTRUCTION LABORERS
Class A or B CDL preferred.
Will train. Must travel.
Paid medical & leave.
DFWP/EOE
Call 352-383-3159
Ext. 229
TRIM/STAIR INSTALLERS
Doctor Phillips Orlando area.
Contact Mike 352-267-8965

455
Restaurants/
Hotels/Clubs
BAH II-EN!EH- FI--I
MUST be exp'd. Evenings & Wknds.
Apply in person 3-5pmn
VIC'S EMBERS SUPPER CLUB
7940 US Hwy. 441 Leesburg, FL

SERVERS & CASHIER
Apply within between 2pm & 5pm
TAKI'S RESTAURANT
1324 N. Blvd. W., Leesburg
SERVEHR&U COOKS
Apply in person: O'Keefe's Irish Pub
Downtown Tavares

470 General

ALUMINUM/INSTALLERS/HELPER
Experienced Driver license required
Apply in Person
Aluminum Contractors
1203A West Main St., Leesburg
352-323-0068

BE YOUR OWN BOSS
JANITORIAL CONTRACTS AVAILABLE
Visit www.imageonejanitorial.com
Call 352-504-4744







Nedimetly fo












FILDEPESBURG IE
APPLY IN







21 .oiti Mait.S FT

$10.15 Ip S hourpLuseneit
I.I]







2 t aailSable rs@








High school diploma or GED required.
jbuzbee@youthranches.org

SCHOOL BUS
DRIVERS NEEDED
Training provided.
eLake County Schools, Transportation





352-728-2561 or
Apply online: www.lake.k12.fl.us
ULTIMATE CONTRACT






CLEANING COMPANY
We have two part time cleaning posi-
tions availa, in the Tri-County area. The







hrs are 6pmo l0pm on Mon., Wed.,
Fri. and Sat. or Sun. 6pmo 9pmo, ex-
actly. 15 hrs per wk. Starting wage
$9/hr. Must have commercial clean-







ing exp., great attitude and clean, ma-
ture appearance. Drug free workplace







and background check req'd.
352-7Contact Dan @ 352-753-8653







480 Legal
PARALEGAL ASSISTANT F/T
Experienced required. Exellent pay..
UILTIMAEPRCONTRACTIV













Etions avai 'lrin Frt n t3 aeu. Ih
H The Cardona Law F eirm d.






Call 352-728-5557
Fax: 352-323-0087





Pets/Animals



501 Pets
Fradaor S unale.6 9p
JAPANESE CHIN 9 mo old beautiful













boy. $200 SOLD
KITTENS FREE (3) left femadles, to good













homes only. Tavares reea. 13 weeks
Land bCkgoundy checksreq'd.ttio



















old, call or text 352-308-7926














SHORKIE M0/ro. Black/White, all shots.
Free to good homeue. ADOPTED
Th a e 6 Card0pmona MoLaw Firm




P9h.Ms aemets/A imalscen
























560 Pet
JAeSupplies.gHiN9 ldeau
homesapearnly. TaDrusarea.wo13plweek
Coldtactallortet352-7308-792


560 Leta

Sup piesdrqie.Ecletpy


DOG CRATE Large, hard plastic. 25W x
29D x37L. $50 obo. 352-321-2174

PET KENNEL chain link w/gate 6'x9'
$99 Call 352-728-5911




6oo00
Merchandise
Mart



601 Antiques

CLOCK electric Sail Ship good shape.
Made by Uniter. $95. Cal 793-5741


C y-he news s just a click away! ]
www.dailvcomntercial.com'




DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, October 7, 2013


601 Antiques

CROCK BUTTER CHURN 3 gallons, In-
dian Head on side. Complete w/top
& paddle. Excel. cond. $250 Call
352-793-3877.

WOODEN WAGON w/wooden spokes &
metal bands. $175. 352-343-5986

602 Arts/Crafts

CHRISTMAS FABRICS cotton, approx.
50 yards + scrapes. $30 315-1033

603 Collectibles

AUGUSTA XII Color Print 25 x 30, '92.
Framed/signed. $65. 330-4484

BUYING Baseball, Football, Basketball,
Non-sports cards
(pre 1980) autographs, memorabilia,
bobbin heads. Sets, singles. No col-
lection to large. Call: 352-589-7981
or E-mail:
sportscards4john@aol.com
DOLL Boyd's Yesterdays Child, Laura
w/box & cert. $45. 352-360-0028

ORNAMENTS (15) Hummingbirds by
Lucy Liu, Original cost was $375
sell for $150. 352-357-0225

RECORD COLLECTION 113 LP's $100
obo Call 352-357-2218

STAMP COLLECTION World War II 100
canceled stamps. $5 Call 406-9405

604 Furniture

BAR STOOLS (3) Alex-Sheridan Aloha
Rattan swivel sienna 30". $225.
352-409-0400

BUNK BEDS like new. $250 obo.
352-343-5256

COUCH, Loveseat & Chair, 2 end tables
& coffee table. Good heavy furniture.
$400 obo. Call 352-360-5787

CREDENZA, 46 x 18 x 26. Asking $50.
Call 352-787-8217

DINETTE SET Rattan glass top w/4
chairs on rollers. $99. 753-3914

FUTON, Black cloth, has arms, good
cond. $35. Call 352-483-2664

MATTRESS Queen w/bed rails. $100.
Call 352-476-3476

RECLINER La-Z-Boy. Tan Good cond.
$100. Call 352-589-6626

RECLINER tan Microfiber. Good cond.
$100. 262-441-0156

ROCKING CHAIR glider, White wood,
excel cond. $100 352-250-8832

SOFA Black Leather, 3 cushion, full
size. $30. 352-561-1167.

SOFA Hunter Green & Cranberry stripe.
Good cond. $100. 728-3802

TABLE, Heart Shaped, 3 tier. brown,
good cond. $8 Call 352-504-6689

TWIN BED white laminate, new mat-
tress. $100. 352-250-4711

TWIN BEDS (2), complete w/linens.
$400. Call 352-589-1787

WICKER TABLE 40" round, glass top.
w/2 chairs. $75 352-753-1834

605 Appliances

Appliances With Warranties $75
& up! Used Beds all sizes!
*Buy Sell Trade
Fast delivery
Call Buzzy's 352-315-9886
www.buzzysbeds.com
DISCOUNT
APPLIANCE
Repair-Sales-Service Most Repairs
$60 Plus Parts





WASHER, DRYER,
REFRIGERATOR
"Don't Toss It
Fix It For Less"
Buying Clean
Washers & Dryers
Days, Evenings & Weekends
Call Now
352-874-1238

DISHWASHER KitchenAid, almond.
Works good. $35 obo. 669-1163


8am


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Dailr Comenrin Li
"Your First Choice In-Print & On-Line


605 Appliances

DISHWASHER, Whirlpool. Asking $100.
Call 352-728-5256

DRYER GE gas, white, good cond. $50
Please call 352-404-8288

FREEZER Frigidaire "Commercial" up-
right. Like new. $275 obo.
352-314-2717

REFRIGERATOR dorm size, good cond.
$100 Call 352-702-6860

REFRIGERATOR 16.5 cu.ft. White, Excel
cond. $100 obo SOLD!
REFRIGERATOR Whirlpool, with ice
maker. $350. 352-728-5256
STOVE Elec. Propane water heater,
window A/C. $75. 865-789-6393

STOVE, Whirlpool, electric, self clean-
ing. $350. 352-728-5256
WASHER & DRYER LG Front loaders,
steam washer/dryer w/matching ped-
estals. Color: Wild cherry. Elec.
Comes w/2yr. transferable warranty.
$1100. Excel cond. 352-787-6366

606 Electronics

DIGITAL TV CONVERTER BOX Zentih.
Like new. $35. 352-365-2301

GAME PSP Sony brand new in box.
$100 Call 352-455-3342

RECEIVER Denon with remote. Very
good cond. $99. 352-323-4862
TELEVISION 27" Sony Trinitron, very
good picture. $60 352-589-8363

TELEVISION Hitachi 60" HD, floor
model, with built in speakers. $275.
352-314-2717.

TELEVISION, Emerson 32" color w/re-
mote. $50 obo Call 352-728-2668

608 A/C & Heat

AIR CLEANER UV light for A/C. Kills
mold/bacteria. $100. 267-1711

AIR CONDITIONER window unit, 5000
BTU's. $50 Call 352-753-7075

DUCTLESS Mini Split System. AC/Heat.
1 ton. $265. 352-267-1711

624 Children's
items

BARBIE TOWNHOUSE, good cond. $60.
Please call 352-669-4789

625 Building
Supplies/
Materials

BOARDS 2X4 (60) 9 ft. long. $75 for
all. Call 352-360-8406

PRESSURE TREATED 2X4. $100 obo.
352-484-3650

635 Garden

LAWN MOWER Briggs engine, runs
great. 20" cut. Only $50 728-4913

PATIO TABLE & 4 CHAIRS, glass top,
square, taupe. $100.
301-788-6361

PLANT Crown of Thorns, red blossoms
all year 3 gallon. $25. 357-3293

PONY TAIL PALM 4' tall, large bulb.
Call after 8am. $35. 352-787-0811
TREE SALE
*6' +/- Oaks Etc. $10 or 15 for $100
*Oaks- 8'-10' $39 or3/$105
*Larger trees 12' +/- $95. to $275.
* 12' +/- Bald Cypress
*Nice Sago Palms
CATT'S TREES
352-669-1618

640 Guns

AMMUNITION 10 boxes 22 long rifle
shells. $55. Call 352-324-2236

CVA 50 caliber black powder, good
cond. $75. 259-0461. No Sun. calls

RIFLE Springfield, 22 long w/scope.
Bolt action. $150. 1-352-346-1434

SMITH & WESSON 12 ga. 30"
barrel/full choke, semi-auto. Excel
cond. Deer/Turkey $325. Call
352-259-0461. No Sunday Calls!

649 Medical

SCOOTER/POWERCHAIR CARRIER
NEW, fits into hitch, 60" fold out
ramp. $195. 352-217-3437


24


650 Computers
& Equip

PRINTER HP PSC500, w/7 ink car-
tridges $60. 352-728-3273

652 Articles
For Sale

AREA RUG 5'X8'. excel, cond. $50
SOLD

BRACELET Pandora, sterling silver 7.5,
no charms. $40. Call 324-2559

CAST IRON POT, indoor/outdoor 3
quart w/lid $35. 748-0702

CERTIFIED PRINCESS DIANA DOLL
CLOTHES, 4 for $100. 217-4221

CHRISTMAS TREE 7', no lights, storage
bag. $35 Call 352-314-3254

CLEANING MACHINE Steam Bullet, no
chemicals, like new $45. 787-7048

DESIGNER CLOTHING Chicos/Cache,
10/pcs. $100. 321-246-4371

DISHES 12 piece setting w/extra serv-
ing pieces. $50. 352-365-0109

FIESTAWARE DISHES cups & saucers,
assorted colors $99 Call 250-8290

GARMENT BAG bi-fold, like new. $20
Call 352-385-1830

GRILL CHAR-BROIL 3 burners, stainless
trim. $55. Call 352-326-3581

HALLOWEEN COSTUME adult ladies,
$15. Call 352-434-9855

HALLOWEEN COSTUME Michael Jack-
son, w/accessories. $50. 742-2668

MEN'S CLOTHING XLg shirts 42W
shorts. 10 pcs. $20. 321-246-4371

MOVING BOXES 36 various sizes, $40
Call 352-223-3678

MUSICAL CANDLES (2) battery oper-
ated. $35 Call 352-753-3974

PORCH BENCH 4', wooden w/wrought
iron sides. $40. 352-406-9405

RUBBER BOOTS men's, 4 pairs, size 8
USA, excel cond. $27. 348-9946

SHOES men's, size 10 1/2, 20 pairs for
$50.SOLD

SINGING PARAKEET ON STAND sensor
& batteries, new. $15. 360-1209

SUITCASE, SAMSONITE w/wheels, Ig.
excel, cond. $30. 352-343-1050

TEAPOT SET PLUS w/utensil holder,
Hummingbird. $50. 352-357-0225

TOOTHBRUSHES (2) SONIC CARE. New
$70 for both. Call 352-508-4786

TUXEDO Men's, Coat/Pants/Shirt, size
48-42. $65. 352-217-4809

655 Musical
Instruments

KEYBOARD YAMAHA PSR-6, excel
cond. $75. Wildwood, 653-3199

PIANO Bungalow Mission Style. Attrac-
tive oak finish. $100. 383-9132

660 Office
Furniture/
Supplies

COMPUTER DESK w/hutch. Good cond.
Heavy, Umatilla $100 771-2310

COMPUTER DESK, 3 drawers, very
good cond. $70 Call 750-5604

CORNER COMPUTER DESK, glass
w/chrome. $75 obo. 360-5787

DESK CHAIR w/arms, plus home office
supplies. $40. 352-787-0410

DESK teak, matching filing cabinet,
chair, mat. $100 352-253-0887

OFFICE DESK, CHAIR & RUG 50"x70".
$80. 352-314-0505

674 Exercise Equipment

EXERCISE BIKE Good cond. $25. Call
after 5pm. 352-323-1753

EXERCISE MACHINES. (2) Tony Little.
Both $70. 352-874-0352


No matter what time
of the day it is,
you can place
your classified
merchandise ad
online, pay for it and
just wait for the
phone to ring!


Fast, convenient and
on your schedule!





I | : :
.. \'-* '"


www.dailycommlercial .com

*Employment advertisements are excluded.
Please call 352-314-FAST to speak with a customer service rep.
Lake: 352-314-3278 or Sumter: 352-748-1955


675 Sports/
Recreation

BICYCLE 26" men's, single speed,
coaster brakes. $35 352-360-7049

BICYCLE 26" Men's. Very good cond.
$65. obo. Call 352-460-4449

BICYCLE 3 wheeler, new. $275 obo
Call 352-357-3728

BICYCLE Diamond Back, Sorrento
Sport, Men's 26", 21 speed. $75.
352-259-0633

BICYCLES 3 Wheel, rebuilt. Large Seat
& Basket. $150. 1-352-346-1434

BOFLEX PR3000 GYM, new. Over $900
new, asking $450 obo. Call
352-323-3482

GOLF CLUBS (3) w/Izzo Shag Bag ball
dispenser. $25. 352-702-7632

GOLF CLUBS men's complete set
w/bag. $25. 502-750-0512

GOLF CLUBS, 3 iron thru SW, driver, 3
wood, putter. $75 352-245-0716

GOLF SET left-handed, irons, oversized
woods, bag. $60. 352-729-2595

GOLF SET, oversized graphite woods,
irons. New. $80. 352-735-6927

685 Tools/
Machinery

PRESSURE WASHER, Craftsman 850,
New $400, sell for $100. 357-2771

PROFESSIONAL GANG BOX metal.
$100. 352-750-0367
ROUTER Craftsman 1.5hp w/table plus
accessories. $40 firm. SOLD

VACUUM PUMP 110 volts, full size.
$75 Please call 352-406-9405





800
Real Estate
For Rent



806 Houses
Unfurnished

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick
407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
.1 &2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375


806 Houses
Unfurnished

CLERMONT Newly built home for rent!
Located in the Verde Ridge neigh-
borhood w/a Community pool, ca-
bana and playground. 2,375sf with
a 3 car garage $1,750/month. Call
Dierdra "Dee" Thomas, owner/real-
tor 813-690-3030

EUSTIS waterfront 2/2, carport, Pet OK.
$700/mo. Call 352-589-0749

LADY LAKE Furn. 3 rm Cottage, 5611
Berts Rd. for couple. $450/mo. 1st,
last & security Will sell for $40,000.
Please call 317-446-9063
MOUNT DORA 3/2, CHA, Ig. fenced
yard. $750/mo + dep. 978-1696
RENIALS
LONG TERM & UNFURN. RENTALS IN
SOUTH LAKE COUNTY.
ROCKER REALTY 352-394-3570
Ask For Janet or Emily
RockerRealtylnc.com

807 Apartments
Unfurnished

BUSHNELL 1/1, 1 year lease, all apple +
W/D No pets. $500 mo. + $500 se-
curity dep. 352-793-6887 or
352-303-5112

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick
407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
.1 &2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
EUSTIS
2/1 including water/trash
Starting at $650/mo
Near Downtown
Call 352-735-0597

You should see what
you are missing daily!

-^- ^ -a, "'M-


Subscribe Today!
Call (352) 787-0600
The Daily Commercial
Yw aHIlomt k e. nPt&lOn--e"

www.dailycommercial.com


807 Apartments
Unfurnished

EUSTIS
All remodeled Apts!
1, 2 & 3 Bedrooms
Special starting at
$475 Only $350 Dep. Pet OK.
352-357-5675

LAKEFRONT l1br cottage, screened
porch incl. elec., water, sewer &
Wi-Fi. Starting at $695/mo. Travel
Trailer $500 mo. 386-747-7119





LEESBURG MOVE-IN SPECAIL
2 BRS. 1.5 BA, TOWNHOUSES
352-728-1955
LEESBURG
1ST MO. FREE!
SPANISH VILLAGE
Pool, great location!
Furn. Efficiency, incl.
util. & cable $700/mo.
2/1 apt. $600/mo.
Furn. $700/mo + util.
352-728-5555
LEESBURG 2/1, males preferred. Pool,
$500/mo Must pass background
check. Call 352-504-7189
LEES[BURG
FIRST MONTH $99
MOVE IN SPECIAL!
*2/1 $500/dep.
92/1 w/W/D hookup $550/dep.
92/2 w/W/D hookup $600/dep.
Call 352-516-1244
Ask for Tina
LEESBURG, Duplex VERY CLEAN 2/1,
no pets $550/mo + dep. 551-6772

LEESBURG,
PEPPERTREE APTS.
2503 South St.
Now Avail. 1 & 2BR 62+. Handi-
capped or disabled. Spacious units,
quiet, A/C community rm. Staring at
$450. Hurry, before they are gone!
Equal Housing Opportunity
Call Christina
352-728-1500

LYN TERRACE
Eustis
352-357-7332
www.lynterrace.com
Great Move-In
Specials & Free Gifts!
*1 & 2 Bedroom Units
*All 1st Floor No Stairs!

808 Apartments
Furnished

FRUITLAND PARK
TWIN PALMS MARINA
NEWLY RENOVATED
1 BR. MOBILES FULLY FURNISHED
ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED,
CABLE TV. FREE USE OF KAYAK &
CANOES. CONVENIENCE STORE
ON PROPERTY. NO SECURITY
DEPOSIT WITH PROOF OF INCOME.
GREAT FOR SENIORS.
WEEKLY & MONTHLY RATE.
SMALL PETS WELCOME.
CALL 352-787-4514


SU'sMAY AKS NDMOEL




Monday, October 7, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


808 Apartments
Furnished
L==EESBURG
1ST MO. FREE!
SPANISH VILLAGE
Pool, great location!
Furn. Efficiency, incl. util. & cable
$700/mo.
2/1 apt. $600/mo.
Furn. $700/mo + util.
352-728-5555
LEESBURG nice lbr, incl. all utilities,
$600/mo, Social Security wel-
comed. Call 813-781-9540

TAVARES $495/mo.
Furn or 1/2 off homes.
352-343-7780
riverestwaterfrontresort.com

809 Roommate
Wanted

LEESBURG female to share 3/2 w/pool.
Must have job & car. $450/mo
w/$400 dep. 1/2 util. & cable.
352-348-4750

810 Duplexes

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick
407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 &2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375

EUSTIS
2/1 including water/trash,
Near Downtown
Starting at $650/mo
Call 352-735-0597

EUSTIS lake & dock, large 1/1 2230 W.
CR 44, W/D, tile floors, $600/mo.
Good ref's, non-smoker. Call
305-970-5379

LEESBURG, 1 br, 2br & 3br. Great price.
$599+. Call 352-350-7109

LEESBURG,
Beautiful Remodeled
2br/1 ba
only $500/mo.
1721 Birchwood Circle
Call 352-325-1289
now!
MT. DORA, Desirable 2/2/1
Fenced/shaded yard. Quiet dead
end St. No Smoking or Pets
321-689-4529

811 Condos
Townhouses

LEESBURG
Sunny Side Villas for rent 2/2. $650
mo. Call 352-459-9300

816 Commercial
Property

LEESBURG
Warehouses w/Offices
2315-25 Griffin Rd
1,150 up to 12,400sf
Starts at $300/mo.
Office/Showroom
1607 Hwy.
441$850/mo
Small Shop or Office
2204 Citrus Blvd (441)
$320/mo., incl. utilities
352-787-0004


LOCATN S :
197 Wendell Ave.








Mneruf lved andN
BLD. S S I: U
elstBd. i a*80




Nevr ledg. BranNe6x4s 2
Hoes etal bidn

Neverplved prin.gBrandNenew office





in nice quiet park in Eustis.
$650/mo + utilities. Sorry NO KIDS.
Call 352-396-2042


819
Manufactured
Homes Rental

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick
407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 &2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
LADY LAKE, 2/2, $450/mo. small de-
posit. No pets. 352-267-6358

LADY LAKE/FRUITLAND PARK 2/1
w/carport Lg. porch & fenced yard.
$550/mo. Just off 441. Call
352-408-8562
LEESBURG 6 mi. West. 2/1, CHA.
$525/mo. + security. 455-0546
TAVARES $495/mo.
Furn or 1/2 off homes.
352-343-7780
riverestwaterfrontresort.com
WILDWOOD AREA
3/2 $700/mo. single wide.
2/2 $650/mo dbl. wide (Adult Park)
1/1 $500/mo.
Call 352-745-8620

825 Rent-To-Own
TAVARES $495/mo.
Furn or 1/2 off homes.
352-343-7780
riverestwaterfrontresort.com




900
Real Estate
For Sale


903 Homes
For Sale

LEESBURG Terrace Green, 2/2/2,
great neighborhood, New carpet, paint
& appl. A/C lanai. $119,900
Call 352-787-4584
GalbreathRealty.com

LEESBURG, Nice house for sale. Nor-
mandy wood subd. 3/2/2 1593sf
$59K cash!! Call Kevin for viewing
727-515-5860


1000
Manufactured
Homes


1001 Mfd Homes
For Sale

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick
407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 &2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
EUSTIS 2/1 in 55+ park. Shed & car-
port & A/C porch. $2,500. Call
352-357-5556

LEESBURG, 2/2, split plan 14'x66', in
Family park, Ig. master br & bath,
walk-in closet. Lot's of upgrades.
$9,000. 352-321-0583
LEESBURG, a Palm Harbor 2/2 dbl.
wide, partially furn. Located at Lake-
side Village on the Chain of Lakes.
Nice sized landscaped yd. backing up
to Sable Bluff Preserve. Move in
ready. $23,900. Call 352-409-1393
SENIORS AND ADULTS
NEW and NEWER
Homes in a nice quiet part in Eustis.
$25,000 $45,000 Financing avail.
Only 3 left! Lot rent $350 per mo.
Call 352-589-4007
TAVARES $495/mo.
Furn or 1/2 off homes.
352-343-7780
riverestwaterfrontresort.com


1002 Mfd
Homes
W/land
For Sale




1100
Recreation


1101 Boats
ALUMINUM FISHING BOAT 14' w/trailer
& title. $500. 352-638-0731.
BASSTRACKER PRO-160.
2013. Brand New!
Lots of Extras!
Paid $13+.
Sell for $9000.
Umatilla area
Call 618-889-8011
BOAT 14' alum. V-bottom, 7.5hp Even-
rude motor. $1200 352-446-6039
HANDCRAFTED 16' fiberglass,
w/trailer. & 7.5hp Mercury. Foot
control trolling motor. $1800. Call
352-630-5189
JON BOAT 10' Alum., Polar Kraft, 30lb.
thrust, trolling motor, battery. $375.
352-408-0296
PONTOON Aloha 20' all alum. deck
28hp Johnson SPL, extras, clean.
$4,000. 352-742-9487

1120 Marine
Equip/
Supplies
BOAT SEATS padded, (2) w/6" swivel
pedestals. SOLD 1ST CALL.

1150 RV&
Campers
FLEENTWOOD SOUTHWIND '00, Class A,
gas, 32' w/slide out. Low miles.
$21,000 obo. 352-324-2488
TOW DOLLY '04, Mastertow, new tires.
$500.SOLD
TRAILER HITCHES (3) 1 adjustable, 1
w/stabilizer bars. $225. 603-0005

1200
Transportation

1205 Autos
CASH PAID
FOR JUNK CARS!
$300 and up.
Call 352-771-6191
DODGE 2003 RAM 2500
#SP2269A
$9,992
CADILLAC SRX 2008
#S14094A
$15,442
KIA SEDONA 2012
#S14077A
$19,882
CHRYSLER PACIFICA 2006
#SP212B
$6,882
HONDA CIVIC 2007
#S14090A
$7,982
BILL BRYAN SUBARU
8730 US Hwy. 441
Leesburg, Florida
352-240-7480
FORD Taurus '93, 171K, runs good.
$775. Please call 352-636-9141
KIA OPTIMA EX, V6, 4 door w/sunroof.
New tires, 66,000 miles. Very good
condition, one owner. $5,000 or
obo. (352)223-5510
OLDSMOBILE CUTLASS CIERA 1992
Runs Great! Must see. $1300 obo.
Call 352-636-9719

1206 Aviation

1210 Mcycles/
Mopeds
HONDA CL350 1970, 8,500 miles.
Perfect condition. $2,600 obo.
SOLD!!
YAMAHA '96, Virago 750, 9,700 mi.
excel. Garage kept. $2,500.
352-383-8786

1230 Vans
CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY Touring
Edition, '09. Near perfect cond.
79,483 mi. Mostly HWY. driven.
Blue book $13,500 obo. Located in
the Villages. Call 352-751-4055 or
727-481-1207


1264 Auto
Parts
Accessory

CAR BRA for 2002 Mazda Miata. $50.
352-589-6107

TIRE Michelin/Alloy wheel. 225/60
R16. 75%. $100. 352-324-2173

TOW BAR w/wiring kit & safety chains.
$100. Call 352-771-1307

TRANSMISSION JACK 800 lb. capacity.
$100 Call 352-250-1199

1275 Golf
Carts

CLUB CAR '97, 48V, 3 yr. old batteries.
Has rear seat. $1800 obo Call
419-236-9574

CLUB CAR '97,
new batteries. 48V,
1 owner. Rain cover,
ights, turn signals, & mirrors.
Like new.
$1850
SOLD!

E-Z-GO '01, 36 volt 2012 batteries,
lights, rain enclosure, fold down
windshield, turn signals. Excel
shape, Asking $1,950. Please call
352-357-6638 or 352-205-3066

E-Z-GO '01, new batteries, 2 yr war-
ranty, well equip. $1,850.
352-978-1352


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