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Daily Commercial
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I KAE IIIHS L TR ANNSCNELD/A


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vLEE SBi pS RG, FLORI-D)A Sunday. October 6. 2013 w dai lycomnm ere ia I. com

STATE: Excitement merges with frustration over Obamacare / A4

MIDDLE EAST: Arab world searches for democratic future / A8


OBAMA TO PUBLIC:


Don't give


up on health


sign-ups

JULIE PACE
AP White House Correspondent
WASHINGTON Defending the
shaky rollout of his health care law,
President Barack Obama said frustrat-
ed Americans "definitely shouldn't give
up" on the problem-plagued program
now at the heart of his dispute with Re-
publicans over reopening the federal
government.
Obama said public interest far ex-
ceeded the government's expecta-
tions, causing technology glitches that
thwarted millions of Americans when
trying to use government-run health
care websites.
"Folks are working around the clock
and have been systematically reducing
the wait times," he said.
The federal gateway website was tak-
en down for repairs over the weekend,
again hindering people from signing
up for insurance.
Obama, in a wide-ranging interview
with The Associated Press, also dis-
closed that U.S. intelligence agencies
believe Iran continues to be a year or
more away from having the capabili-
ty to make a nuclear weapon. That as-
sessment is at odds with Israel, which
contends Tehran is on a faster course
toward a bomb.
He expressed optimism about the
blossoming diplomacy between his
administration and Iran's new presi-
dent, but said the U.S. would not ac-
cept a "bad deal" on the Islamic repub-
lic's nuclear program.
The president spoke to the AP on
Friday, four days into a partial shut-
down of the federal government that
has forced 800,000 people off the job,
closed national parks and curbed
many government services.
Obama reiterated his opposition to
negotiating with House Republicans to
end the shutdown or raise the nation's
SEE INTERVIEW I Al


And the bands


played on


Lake Minneola High School's Marching Green and Gold performed a routine by playing music
from the Dave Matthews Band during the annual Central Florida Marching Arts Invitational at
Leesburg High School on Saturday.

Local teams perform at Central Florida
Marching Arts Invitational on Saturday


* ~ I

~-.,


MILLARD K. IVES I Staff Writer
millardives@dailycommercial.com
J 7 almost 30 high school bands
made their way to Leesburg
High School on Saturday for
the annual Central Florida March-
ing Arts Invitational.
The day-long competition fea-
tured music from a wide variety of
instruments, a bevy of high-step-
ping majorettes and twirlers, high-
strutting drum majors and show-
stopping dance routines from high
school students dressed in colorful


South
Lake
High's
Screaming
Eagles
band go
through
their
routine.


uniforms.
Music included tributes to science
fiction films, James Bond movies
and the Dave Matthews Band.
Officials said the 2,500 students
who participated marks the event
as one of the two largest high school
band festivals in the state.
"It's a way to bring out some of the
best high school band music in the
region," said Leesburg band director
Gabriel Fielder, who helped coordi-
nate the event.
SEE BANDS IA2


Government

still closed
Congress, president:
Workers will get paid
ANDREW TAYLOR
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Their govern-
ment has failed to keep the doors
open and has told federal workers
to stay off the job as the political
parties fight over spending and
health care in austere times.
Now Congress and President
Barack Obama are sending this
message to the 800,000 sidelined


government
employees: We
don't know when
the impasses will
end but you will
get reimbursed
for lost pay once
the government
reopens.
With the par-
tial shutdown
entering its
fifth day, the
GOP-run House
passed a bill
Saturday that
would make sure
the furloughed
workers get paid
for not work-
ing. The White
House backs the
bill and the Sen-
ate was expected
to OK it, too, but
the timing was
unclear.


"They have
child care
expenses, house
payments to
make, kids that
are in college,
and while the
president refuses
to negotiate,
while he's
playing politics,
they shouldn't
worry about
whether or not
they can make
ends meet."
Rep. Michael
Turner
R-Ohio


The 407-0 vote in the House was
uniquely bipartisan, even as law-
makers continued their partisan
rhetoric.
"This is not their fault and they
should not suffer as a result," Rep.
Elijah Cummings, D-Md., said of
federal workers. "This bill is the
least we should do. Our hard-
working public servants should
not become collateral damage
in the political games and ideo-
logical wars that Republicans are
waging."
Rep. Michael Turner, R-Ohio,
SEE CLOSED I A2


Students charged with using stun gun at school


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama speaks during an exclu-
sive interview with The Associated Press in the
White House library in Washington.


MILLARD K. IVES I Staff Writer
millardives@dailycommercial.com
Two Lake Minneola High School
students were arrested Friday af-
ter one allegedly brought a stun gun
to school and the other used it on a
willing schoolmate.
According to the Lake County
Sheriff's Office, Dallas Blanchard,
18, brought the electronic gun on


campus and gave it to Joshua Cor-
tez, 17, who allegedly used it on a
friend's left arm in the boy's locker
room sometime before 8:30 a.m. Fri-
day.
Another schoolmate apparently
videotaped the incident.
Sheriff's spokesman Sgt. JamesVa-
chon said no one was injured.
Deputies responding to the inci-
dent said they searched Blanchard


and found the stun gun as well as a
large pocket knife the suspect said
he brought for protection.
Blanchard was arrested on two
counts of possession of a weap-
on on school grounds and released
from the Lake County jail after
posting a $4,000 bond. Cortez was
charged with discharging a weapon
on school grounds and turned over
to his parents.


Vol. 137, No. 279 I 4 sections
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tlk





DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, October 6, 2013


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This undated publicity photo released by The Hartman Group shows Kate Baldwin, right,
and Norbert Leo Butz during Act II of "Big Fish," at the Neil Simon Theatre in New York.



Kate Baldwin talks



about motherhood,



Broadway, 'Big Fish'


MARK KENNEDY
AP Drama Writer

NEW YORK Kate Baldwin's
dressing room on Broadway may
be small but there's something
special about it.
Her window looks out at the
last huge lit-up N in the Neil Si-
mon Theatre's marquee. "I kind
of like that. That feels very Broad-
way to me," she says happily.
Little can get Baldwin down
these days. Her new musical -
"Big Fish" is about to make
a splash on Broadway and she
works just a few blocks away
from her husband, who per-
forms in "Mamma Mia!" Both are
giddily raising their first child, a
toddler named Colin.
"It feels like a flush period,"
says Baldwin.
"Big Fish," opens Sunday with


INTERVIEW
FROM PAGE Al


debt ceiling.
"There are enough votes in the
House of Representatives to make
sure that the government reopens
today," he said. "And I'm pretty will-
ing to bet that there are enough
votes in the House of Representa-
tives right now to make sure that
the United States doesn't end up
being a deadbeat."
On other points, Obama:
* Contrasted his tenure as a sen-
ator with the current crop of first-
term Republican senators, saying
he "didn't go around courting the
media" or "trying to shut down the
government" while he was in the
Senate.
* Said he's considering keep-
ing some American forces in
Afghanistan after the war formal-
ly ends in late 2014, if an agree-
ment can be reached with the
Afghan government. He tried to
do the same in Iraq but was un-
able to reach an agreement with its


music by Andrew Lippa and co-
stars two-time Tony Award win-
ner Norbert Leo Butz. It's a touch-
ing tale of a son who is about to
start his own family and is deter-
mined to find the truth behind
his father's epic tales. Baldwin
plays the wife and mother stuck
in the middle.
Baldwin appeared in the
Broadway casts of "The Full
Monty," "Thoroughly Modern
Millie" and "Wonderful Town"
before getting noticed in "Fini-
an's Rainbow," which earned her
a Tony nomination.
She sat down to talk about the
show, family life and the crazy
thing that happens just before
the curtain goes up every Satur-
day night between the actors in
"Big Fish" and the ones across
the street in "Jersey Boys."


government.
* Suggested that the owner of the
Washington Redskins football team
consider changing its name be-
cause, the president said, the cur-
rent name offends "a sizable group
of people."
With no sign of a breakthrough
to end the government shutdown,
Obama said he would be will-
ing to negotiate with Republicans
on health care, deficit reduction
and spending but only if House
Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio,
holds votes to reopen the govern-
ment and increase the nation's bor-
rowing limit.
Some House Republicans are
seeking health care concessions
from Obama in exchange for ap-
proving government financing and
want more spending cuts before
raising the debt ceiling.
The Treasury Department says
the nation will hit its borrowing
limit around Oct. 17. Obama didn't
specifically rule out taking action
on his own if Congress fails to in-
crease the debt ceiling, but said he
doesn't expect to get to that point.
Obama, who successfully ran


BANDS
CONTINUED FROM Al


Held in the school's stadium, the
bands came from all over the region.
Five were from Lake and Sumter coun-
ties.
Each band presented certain themes
in a performance that took about 15
minutes. South Sumter High School's
Marching Raiders held an "Inflight"
theme, where its majorettes dressed as
flight attendants and took on personas
of airplanes, gliding across the field.
"We've been practicing since Au-
gust," said South Sumter band director
Pete Perrone, who brought 39 students.
Called "A 2013 Space Odyssey,"
Mount Dora High School's Marching
'Canes' theme was devoted to space
films, including E.T., StarWars and Star
Trek. Their props included a space gal-
axy.
"It was definitely something differ-
ent," said Jodie Watts.
Each band marched out onto the
field when it was their turn.
"Breathe through your nose," shout-
ed Janet Cruz, one of the directors with
South Lake High's Screaming Eagles as
they prepared to go onto the field.
Vehicles brought marchers with
heavier instruments such as giant xylo-
phone and percussions.
Dressed in blue uniforms, South Lake
became theatric with their routine with
a theme devoted to various human
emotions, which included denial, an-
ger and depression. The band's dancers
came on the field dressed in all black.
Lake Minneola High School's March-
ing Green and Gold conducted a rou-
tine by playing music from the Dave
Matthews Band.
"It took a lot of energy to do it," said
Lauren Schonaerts, a Lake Minneola
junior, who played the mellophone, a
brass instrument.
Leesburg High School band played
last around 9:30 p.m. but wasn't
part of the competition.
"We're the host, so we didn't think it
would be right," Fielder said.
Names of the winners were unavail-
able late Saturday.


for president as a first-term sena-
tor, also spoke critically about first-
term Republican senators, such as
Ted Cruz of Texas, who have been
leading efforts to shut the govern-
ment if Republicans can't extract
concessions from the White House.
The president said that when
he was in the Senate, he "didn't go
around courting the media. And I
certainly didn't go around trying to
shut down the government."
"I recognize that in today's me-
dia age, being controversial, taking
controversial positions, rallying the
most extreme parts of your base,
whether it's left or right, is a lot of
times the fastest way to get atten-
tion and raise money," he said. "But
it's not good for government."
The deadline for keeping the gov-
ernment open coincided with the
Oct. 1 start of sign-ups for the in-
surance markets at the center of the
health care overhaul Obama signed
into law during his first term. Gov-
ernment websites struggled in the
first week to keep up with high de-
mand for the new marketplaces. It's
not clear that more than a few man-
aged to enroll the first day.


rFLORIDA

I LOTTERY

SATURDAY
C A S H 3 ................................................ 9-6-4
Afternoon ........................................... 7-3-9
PLAY 4 ............................................. 9-3-7-3
Afternoon........................................5-5-4-0

FRIDAY
FANTASY 5......................... 14-15-29-32-35
2 of 5 wins free ticket 3 of 5 wins $12.50
4 of 5 wins $136 5 of 5 wins $229,974.43

The Daily Com(mercial
THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875
The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for
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at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals post-
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352-365-8203 ............................scottcallahan@dailycommercial.com
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352-365-8270 ................................... paulryan@dailycommercial.com
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REPORTERS
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352-394-2183 .......................... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com
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352-365-8256.............. pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com
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CLOSED
FROM PAGE Al

said federal workers
shouldn't have to worry
about paying their bills
while Congress and the
White House fight over
funding the govern-
ment.
"They have child care
expenses, house pay-


ments to make, kids
that are in college,
and while the presi-
dent refuses to negoti-
ate, while he's playing
politics, they shouldn't
worry about whether or
not they can make ends
meet," Turner said.
But even as Congress
and the White House
rallied around the bill,
one outside group said


it "demonstrates the
stupidity of the shut-
down."
Making the shutdown
less painful for 800,000
federal employees will
encourage Congress
and the White House to
extend it even longer,
driving up the cost, said
Steve Ellis of Taxpayers
for Common Sense.
Ellis said "essen-
tial" federal workers
who stayed on the job
"will feel like suckers
because they've been
working while the oth-
ers essentially are get-
ting paid vacations."
The White House has
opposed other piece-
meal efforts by House
Republicans to restore
money to some func-
tions of government
during the partial shut-
down. White House of-
ficials have said the
House should reopen
the entire government
and not pick agencies
and programs over oth-
ers.


In the 1995-96 gov-
ernment shutdowns,
furloughed workers
were retroactively given
full pay.
Also Saturday, the
Pentagon said it was or-
dering most of its ap-
proximately 400,000
furloughed civilian em-
ployees back to work.
The decision by De-
fense Secretary Chuck
Hagel is based on a Pen-
tagon legal interpreta-
tion of a law called the
Pay Our Military Act,
which Congress passed
and Obama signed
shortly before the shut-
down began.
The Pentagon did not
immediately say exact-
ly how many workers
will return to work. The
Defense Department
said "most" were being
brought back.
The law ensured that
members of the mil-
itary, who have re-
mained at work
throughout the shut-
down, would be paid


on time. It also left
room for the Pentagon
to keep on the job those
civilians who provide
support to the military.
Despite the White
House's declared ap-
preciation of the es-
sential the role of fed-
eral workers, there
appeared no sign of a
breakthrough in getting
them back to work.
Lawmakers keep re-
playing the same script
on Capitol Hill: House
Republicans pass
piecemeal bills to re-
open popular and po-
litically sensitive pro-
grams on Friday,
disaster relief and food
aid for the poor -
while Democrats insist
that the House vote on
a straightforward Sen-
ate-passed measure to
reopen all of govern-
ment.
"We know that there
are enough members
in the House of Rep-
resentatives Demo-
crats and Republicans


- who are prepared to
vote to reopen the gov-
ernment,' Obama said
in an Associated Press
interview Friday.
"The only thing that
is keeping that from
happening is Speak-
er (John) Boehner has
made a decision that
he is going to hold out
to see if he can get ad-
ditional concessions
from us."
Flinching by either
side on the shutdown
might be seen as weak-
ening one's hand in an
even more important
fight looming just over
the horizon as the com-
batants in Washing-
ton increasingly shifted
their focus to a mid-
month deadline for
averting a first-ever de-
fault.
At issue in the shut-
down is a temporary
funding measure to
keep the government
fully open through
mid-November or mid-
December.


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Sunday, October 6, 2013




Sunday, October 6, 2013


Area Briefs

MOUNT DORA
Grand opening set for today
at Modernism Museum
The opening of the Modernism
Museum Mount Dora, 145 E. Fourth
Ave., home to a unique and expansive
collection of Modernist art by influ-
ential American masters of the craft is
set to open today.
Festivities commence with a "Meet
the Experts" session, at 11 a.m., where
participants will have the rare oppor-
tunity to have a conversation with
Wendell Castle, American sculptor
and designer and other luminaries.
Guests attending this session will re-
ceive a "Modernism 101" certificate,
good for free entry into the museum
when it opens at 1 p.m.
For information, call 352-385-0034,
or go to www.ModernismMuseum.org.

EUSTIS
Florida Central track
rehabilitation project updated
The Florida Central Railroad will be
unloading new rail for the next phase
of the rail rehabilitation project be-
tween Lake Jem and Eustis over the
next few weeks.
During this time there will be tem-
porary and intermittent disruptions
where the crossings will be inaccessi-
ble between these locations.
For information, email Dennis
Maples at sisrailrehab@fcrr.com.

LEESBURG
Retired and senior volunteer
program seeking volunteers
Local seniors who have a lifetime
of experience to share and desire to
make a real difference in the commu-
nity are needed as volunteers.
Volunteers tutor elementary grade
students, mentor low-income high
school students who are college
bound, participate in after-school ed-
ucational and enrichment programs,
deliver meals and /or make telephone
reassurance calls to homebound se-
niors and provide transportation for
cancer patients.
For information, call the program
office, 1211 Penn St., at 352-365-1995.

SUMMERFIELD
SHINE presents program at
Trinity Lutheran Church
SHINE volunteers with the Florida
Department of Elder Affairs will offer
information regarding Medicare,
Medicaid and health insurance at
10 a.m., Tuesday, at Trinity Lutheran
Church, 17330 S. U.S. Highway 441, in
Summerfield.
This program is free.
For information and reservations,
call Trinity Church at 352-307-4500.

LEESBURG
"Write Your Life" course
offered at LSSC-Leesburg
The noncredit course for senior
adults, "Write Your Life," will begin
on Tuesday at Lake Sumter State
College, Leesburg campus and on
Wednesday at the South Lake campus
in Clermont.
The course is designed for senior
adults who have little or no writing
experience.
For details and registration, call
352-323-3610.




... and we'll share it with our readers.
Some of our best story ideas and photos
come from our readers. So don't hesitate
to share your youth activities, awards,
accomplishments, festivals, charity
events and other things that make our
communities special. And don't overlook
those family milestones birthdays,


State&Region
NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN I scottcallahan@dailycommercial.com 1 352-365-8208


Associated Press
PENSACOLA Emer-
gency management offi-
cials in Florida's Panhan-
dle said Saturday that they
expected the effects of a
weakening Tropical Storm
Karen to be minimal, but
they still urged residents
and visitors to beware
rough surf and prepare for
emergencies.
No evacuations were or-
dered in the Panhandle,
though shelters and emer-
gency responders were on
stand-by, officials said.
"Expected impact from
the storm has been re-
duced from 'minor' to
'minimal,'" according to
an update from the Es-
cambia County Division
of Emergency Manage-
ment.
Karen's forward prog-


engagements, marriages, business
promotions and military news.
Just email your photos and news to...
pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com


GARY FINEOUT
Associated Press
ORLANDO Charlie
Crist still hasn't declared
that he's challenging Flor-
ida Gov. Rick Scott in next
year's election.
But the growing expec-
tation that Crist will run
against the incumbent gov-
ernor loomed over a big
fundraising dinner and
meeting of state Republi-
cans held at the posh Con-
temporary Resort at Walt
DisneyWorld.
There were jokes about
Crist, there were warnings
about Crist, and there was


JAY REEVES/AP
Lynn Walls of Shepherdsville, Ky., collects shells as a big wave churned
up by Tropical Storm Karen crashes into a seawall at Dauphin Island,
Ala., on Saturday. Tropical Storm Karen continues to move toward the
northern Gulf Coast and is expected to decrease in speed as it brings
rain and potential flooding to the U.S.


ress has slowed and the
weather system's winds
and rains probably would
not be felt in northwest
Florida until Sunday af-


ternoon or evening, said
Mark Bowen, Bay Coun-
ty's chief of emergency
services.
Okaloosa County offi-


DAVID SIGLER / DAILY COMMERCIAL
Father and son, both named Joe Morreale adjust the spine of their scarecrow.




Scarecrows rule




downtown roost


MILLARD K. IVES
Staff Writer
millardives@dailycommercial.com
It's weeks before Hal-
loween, but freshly made
scarecrows already are
frightening downtown
Leesburg passers-by.
The 5th Annual Scare-
crow Expo & Build-off was
held Saturday in Towne
Square to encourage resi-
dents to create their own
straw men.
More than 60 entries
included such appari-
tions as the Grim Reaper,
a plowing horse, firefight-


ers, dogs, doctors and
other creations. Spon-
sored by the Leesburg
Partnership, the event re-
warded the top three en-
tries with prizes.
Chuck Novak, an art ma-
jor at Beacon College, con-
tructed a homeless man
that he placed on the edge
of the City Hall fountain -
complete with food stains
on his shirt and a sign "I
will bathe for money."
"I wanted to make
something different," No-
vak said. He succeeded.
By early evening, the
creation had made its way


into the fountain, cre-
ating plenty of bubbles
from a shampoo bottle
carried in its hand.
As usual, the Leesburg
Fire Department took in-
novation to new heights
when building their
scarecrows. This year, the
firefighters built three -
a firefighter with an end
of rope lying on the roof
of the Galbreath Realty
building on Main Street,
and a second firefight-
er rapelling to rescue a
trapped victim.
SEE SCARE I A4


sharp criticism of the one-
time Republican gover-
nor who is now a registered
Democrat.
Crist was mentioned
more than President Barack
Obama despite the ongoing
federal government shut-
down and wrangling over
Obama's health care over-
haul that has divided Re-
publicans at the national
level.
The focus on Crist comes
as some polls show Crist
winning a head-to-head
matchup with Scott. Dur-
ing his three years in
SEE CRIST I A4


www.dailycommercial.corn


cials said none if its three
airports would close.
Rough surf seemed to
be the biggest threat along
the Panhandle's sugary
white beaches, where red
flags warned swimmers
about dangerous rip cur-
rents.
Dozens of surfers took
advantage of the swells off
Pensacola Beach, "but it is
definitely not the sort of
day for someone to learn
how to surf. It is just too
rough," said senior life-
guard Alexander Johnson.
Mark Butler and his wife
from nearby Gulf Breeze
fished off a pier instead
of taking out their boat
as they had planned. The
couple have weathered
numerous hurricanes and
said they were happy Kar-
en doesn't appear to be
too much of a threat.


Ashes of

killer who

died on

Death Row

scattered

DAN SULLIVAN
Tampa Bay Times
ATLANTIC BEACH -
On a recent Sunday af-
ternoon, a quiet room
inside a small office at
the end of a strip mall
shone bright with light
cast off a golden Bud-
dha statue. Below it,
the face of a dead man
stared from a photo-
graph.
The mourners were
husband-and-wife law-
yers, Bill Sheppard and
Betsy White. The de-
ceased was their cli-
ent, Gary Alvord, who
40 years ago choked the
life out of three women
in Tampa.
Just before 2p.m.,
Sheppard hobbled into
the Maitreya Kadampa
Buddhist Center near
Jacksonville, leaning on
a black cane, and took
a seat in the first of 12
chairs. His wife, clad in
a blue flowered dress,
her long gray hair held
back with a green clip,
sat next to him. They
stared at the jaundiced,
distrustful gaze of the
murderer whose life
they dedicated their ca-
reers to save.
SEE DEATH I A5


BRUCK ACKERMAN / OCALA STAR-BANNER
Former Florida Gov. Charlie Crist goes table-to-table greeting peo-
ple on Sept. 8 during the 5th annual Marion County Democratic
Club's "Proud to be a Democrat" dinner in Ocala.


Minimal impact from tropical


storm Karen expected in Panhandle


Florida Republicans wary of Charlie Crist


A3


DAILY COMMERCIAL





DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, October 6, 2013


OBITUARIES
Doris PR Banks
Doris P Banks passed
away on September
25, 2013 at the age of
84. She was born on
November 12, 1928 to
the late John and El-
sie Koenig. Doris had
lived most of her life
in the New Hamp-
shire and Massachu-
setts area, but moved
to the central Florida
area in 2004. Locally
she attended services
at Holy Trinity Episco-
pal Church in Fruitland
Park, FL. Doris was a
very active outdoors
person who enjoyed
swimming and just be-
ing in the sunshine. She
also enjoyed ceramics.
Doris is survived by her


SCARE
FROM PAGE A3

built a scarecrow rais-
ing an American flag at
Ground Zero as a trib-
ute to those lost during
the 9/11I attacks.
"We're always look-
ing to get people's at-
tention," said Lt. James
Ricketson.
Another innova-
tive idea came from a
Leesburg High School
FFA alumni group
which built a scare-


CRIST
FROM PAGE A3

office, Scott has failed
to claim the support of
a majority of Floridians
in independent polls.
Republican Party of
Florida chairman Len-
ny Curry said that "any
poll with any Demo-
crat in it right now is
pretty irrelevant."
But Curry himself
called Crist "unfit to
govern'" and stressed to
rank-and-file members
to remain united behind
a message that Scott has
helped turn the state's


IN MEMORY
loving husband Don-
ald Banks, two sons;
John Moulton of New
Mexico, Donald Banks
Jr. of Dracut, MA, two
daughters; Joanne
Moulton of Santa Fe,
NM, and Brenda Land
of Swampscott, MA, a
brother; Bill Koenig of
Tewksbury, MA, along
with eight grandchil-
dren and many niec-
es and nephews. A Me-
morial Service will be
held for Mrs. Banks on
Tuesday, Oct. 8th. at
2:00 p.m. in the Page-
Theus Funeral Home
with Rev. Theodore
F. Koelln 'Fr. Ted' of
Holy Trinity Episcopal
Church officiating. In
lieu of flowers memori-
als have been request-
ed in Doris' honor be


crow plowing using a
horse to plow a field -
a creation made of hay,
straw and vines.
The event was held
during the Leesburg
Saturday Morning
Market where for $10,
residents could bring
their own scarecrow;
or for $20 build one
onsite with free hay,
as well as clothing and
other attire provided
to help dress their cre-
ation.
"It can be a lot of
fun," said Sadie Shipes
while building a scare-


economy around.
"The Democrats
want this state badly
and we have to remain
focused," Curry said.
"This election is going
to be won on the re-
cord: the very clear re-
cord of Rick Scott and
the Republican Legis-
lature and we have to
preach that message.
So don't be distracted."
Crist, reached by
email, did not respond
to Curry's comments.
Republicans have
controlled state govern-
ment since 1998, but
Democrats have fared
well in the past two
presidential election


made to Cornerstone
Hospice. Page-Theus
Funeral Home And
Cremation Services.
Page Theus Funerals &
Cremations
914 West Main St..
Leesburg, FL 34748
352-787-5511
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DEATH NOTICES
Patricia A. Evans
Patricia A. Evans, 81,
of Coleman, died Mon-
day, Sept. 23, 2013.
Banks/Page-Theus Fu-
nerals and Cremations,
Wildwood.
Ann F. Hagar
Ann F. Hagar, 74, of
Eustis, died Friday, Oct.
4, 2013. Hamlin & Hil-
bish Funeral Directors,
Eustis.


crow dog made of
socks and other arti-
cles of clothing.
Sharon Leemaloof
thought she spot-
ted the best entry a
scarecrow dressed in
pink in recognition
of National Breast Can-
cer Awareness Month.
"That has to be No.
1," said Leemaloof, a
seven-year breast can-
cer survivor.
The scarecrows
will remain in place
through the end of Oc-
tober.


years. Obama won Flor-
ida in both 2008 and
2012, and Florida Dem-
ocrats picked up seats
in Congress last year.
But GOP leaders cite
their own advantag-
es heading into 2014:
disorganization within
the Florida Democratic
Party as well as a strong
money advantage.
GOP leaders several
times cited missteps by
the Democratic Party,
including the decision
by the party to back a
candidate for statewide
office who pulled out
of the race days after
it was revealed he had
filed for bankruptcy.


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Velicia Martin, 53, of Miami, left, talks with employees with the Jesse Trice Community Center about
insurance options under President Barack Obama's health care law, Thursday, during a meeting in
Miami Gardens. Due to technology problems with a federal government website, many were unable
to enroll online for the first few days of the program.



Excitement merges



with frustration over



'Obamacare' in Florida


KELLI KENNEDY
Associated Press
MIAMI The feder-
al website that offers a
key provision of pres-
ident Obama's health
law launched this week
with a sputter, a crash
and a lot more web
traffic than anyone ex-
pected. But by week's
end, with most Florid-
ians still unable to ac-
cess the online market-
place and sign up for
health insurance, orga-
nizations were trying
to build on momentum
even though there was
little they could do.
Most of the counsel-
ors hired through fed-
eral grants to help sign
people up for health in-
surance quickly went to
Plan B when the website
failed Tuesday morn-
ing. Several communi-
ty health centers around
the state, fearing the
worst, printed paper ap-
plications in advance,
even translating them
into other languages.
Other groups took down
consumers' contact in-
formation, promising to
schedule appointments
when the website begins
to work better.
There was an odd mix
of excitement that the
Affordable Care Act was
garnering so much at-
tention and frustration
that it wasn't accessible.
John Foley, an attorney
and certified counsel-
or for Legal Aid Society
of Palm Beach Coun-
ty, said he's tried unsuc-
cessfully to log into the
system almost non-stop
since 5a.m. Tuesday A
frustrated Foley said his
navigators would not try
again to enroll anyone
until Monday.
"I am too worried to
even involve a consum-
er at this point. I would
hate to see a problem in
the middle of the pro-
cess," he said. "I am
very worried that peo-


ple will lose faith in the
system. Clearly we are
losing most, if not all,
of the momentum that
was built up leading to
open enrollment."
But federal health of-
ficials cautioned this
was just the first week
in a six month enroll-
ment process. Con-
sumers don't need to
sign up until Dec. 15 to
get coverage on Jan. 1.
They have until the end
up March to sign up to
avoid tax penalties.
"This has never been
done before and this is
a historic moment... we
think that's a tremen-
dous beginning to this
program and we're off
to a good start," said Ju-
lie Bataille of the Cen-
ters for Medicare and
Medicaid Services.
Federal health officials
played up the high vol-
ume traffic, noting 7 mil-
lion visits to HealthCare.
gov in the first two days.
Employees were work-
ing around the clock to
fix issues and by Thurs-
day had increased ca-
pacity to the server and
cut down wait times by
one-third. But it's un-
clear when the problems
will fully be resolved.
Most people were still
unable to access the site
on Friday. Key parts of
the website were to go
dark between 1 a.m. and
5 a.m.Saturday, Sun-
day and Monday as pro-
grammers work to fix
glitches.
Cigna, which of-
fers several insurance
plans through the ex-
change, said it had suc-
cessfully enrolled a
small number of con-
sumers Thursday using
the website. Counsel-
ors at a Miami Gardens
enrollment event that
night with Sen. Oscar
Braynon were also able
to access the website
long enough to enroll a
few people on the spot.
"There have been a


lot of successful mo-
ments and every event
we attend has been over-
crowded with people
who want to learn more
and get a better under-
standing of the pro-
cess," said Jerson Dulis, a
counselor with Broward
Community & Family
Health Centers, Inc.
Turnout has been un-
even at events to sign
up in-person with a
counselor. Counselors
sat alone at a Pensac-
ola office Tuesday and
also at a Fort Lauder-
dale library for much of
Thursday. But at Borin-
quen Health Care Cen-
ter in Miami, more than
400 people wanted to
sign up for a plan and
asked for more infor-
mation about their op-
tions.
Valerie Carr, a 46-year-
old Kendall resident,
hasn't had insurance in
years. She doesn't quali-
fy for Medicaid because
she doesn't have chil-
dren so she pays about
$170 a month for med-
ication for her men-
tal illness, plus regular
psychiatrist and thera-
py appointments. Un-
der the new health law,
insurers are required to
cover certain essential
benefits, including men-
tal health, and they are
barred from charging
more for having those
pre-existing conditions.
Carr tried to sign up at a
community health cen-
ter in South Miami this
week and counselors
said they'd contact her
when the website was
working again.
Federal health offi-
cials declined to say
how many signed up for
health insurance this
week and likely won't re-
lease those figures until
mid-November. It's also
unclear whether the
problems are only be-
cause of high traffic or
a combination of pro-
gramming errors.
The delays come three
months after the Gov-
ernment Accountabili-
ty Office said a smooth
and timely rollout could
not be guaranteed be-
cause the online system
was not fully complet-
ed or tested. Experts said
the Obama administra-
tion may have rushed to
meet the Oct. 1 deadline.
"If there's not a gen-
eral trend of improve-
ment in the next 72
hours of use in this is
system ... then it would
indicate the problems
they're dealing with are
more deep seated."


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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Sunday, October 6, 2013




Sunday, October 6, 2013


JOHN MINCHILLO/AP
Amy Carey-Jones, sister of Miriam Carey, speaks to the media on Friday outside the home of her sis-
ter Valarie in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn. Law-enforcement authorities have
identified Miriam Carey, 34, as the woman who, with a 1-year-old child in her car, led Secret Service
and police on a harrowing chase in Washington from the White House past the Capitol Thursday,
attempting to penetrate the security barriers at both national landmarks before she was shot to
death, police said. The child survived.


Use of force to be



studied in DC chase


LARRY NEUMEISTER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Po-
lice in Washington are re-
viewing the use of officers'
deadly force in the kill-
ing of a woman who tried
to ram her car through
a White House barrier, a
shooting her family says
was unjustified.
The investigation
will reconstruct the car
chase and shooting,
which briefly put the
U.S. Capitol on lock-
down, and explore how
officers dealt with the
driver and whether pro-
tocols were followed.
Senate Sergeant at
Arms Terrance Gainer
said he was confident
the officers "did the best
they could under the
situation." Police guard-
ing national landmarks
must make fast deci-
sions without the luxury
of all the facts, especial-
ly when a threat is per-
ceived, he said.
"This is not a routine
highway or city traf-
fic stop. It is simply not
that," Gainer said Sat-
urday. "The milieu un-
der which we're operat-
ing at the United States
Capitol and I suspect at
the White House and at
icons up in New York is
an anti-terrorism ap-
proach, and that is a
difference with a huge,
huge distinction."
Capitol Police Chief
Kim Dine maintained


DEATH
FROM PAGE A3

"We felt a need to give
him peace," White said.
"He paid dearly for his
crimes, as he should
have. But fundamental-
ly, he was still a human
being."
A dozen others, Bud-
dhist students and cen-
ter volunteers, took oth-
er seats. A few others sat
on floor pillows.
No one in the dead
man's family came. Nor
did friends. In the end, his
attorneys were all he had.
Although Alvord was
a nonreligious Catho-
lic, the lawyers chose to
have a Buddhist service
because they liked the
idea of him transcend-
ing to a place of peace
free of negative karma.
But the ceremony was
not about honoring a
murderer who escaped
capital punishment,
the attorneys insisted.
It was about paying re-
spects to his victims


that his officers acted
"heroically" to protect
the community.
Still, the family of
34-year-old Miriam
Carey called the shoot-
ing unjustified, and
some deadly force ex-
perts agree it merits
scrutiny.
"We're still very con-
fused as a family why
she's not still alive," Amy
Carey-Jones said in New
York late Friday after
traveling to Washing-
ton to identify Miriam
Carey's body "I really
feel like it's not justified,
not justified." Another
sister, retired New York
City police officer Vala-
rie Carey, said there was
"no need for a gun to be
used when there was
no gunfire coming from
the vehicle."
Secret Service agents
and Capitol Police of-
ficers fired shots dur-
ing the Thursday after-
noon encounter, which
began when Carey in
a black Infiniti with her
1-year-old daughter -
rammed a White House
barricade and was pur-
sued by police toward
the Capitol during a
high-speed chase.
D.C. Police Chief Cathy
Lanier said she was con-
fident after the shoot-
ing that Carey's actions
were "not an accident,"
but the department's in-
ternal affairs division is
investigating as part of
standard protocol.
Carey struck a Secret


and marking the end of
a very long and very sad
story.
"He was in our life for
35 years," White said.
"There was not a day
that went by that we did
not think of Gary. And
there was not a day that
went by that we did not
think of Gary's victims."
When he died in May
at age 66 of brain can-
cer, Gary Alvord held the
distinction of being the
longest-serving death
row inmate in Ameri-
ca. He was sentenced
to die for the 1973 mur-
ders of Ann Herrmann,
36; her daughter, Lynn
Herrmann, 18; and Ann's
mother, Georgia Tully, 53.
His heinous acts, and
the four decades he spent
in a single-man, non-air
conditioned cell, are well-
known. So was his men-
tal condition, the schizo-
phrenia that plagued him
since childhood, a men-
tal illness that some be-
lieved was the force be-
hind his violence.
Much less talked
about are the two law-


Service agent with her
car at the White House
and reversed her vehi-
cle into a police car, au-
thorities say. A Capitol
Police officer was also
injured. Both are ex-
pected to recover.
Experts in the use of
deadly force said there
were more questions
than answers at this
point. Many police de-
partments direct their of-
ficers not to fire at mov-
ing vehicles even if the
driver is using the car as
a weapon or permit it
under extremely limited
circumstances. And ex-
perts wondered whether
police should have relied
on other options, such as
establishing a roadblock,
to diffuse the situation.
"I think the question
we have to ask is, 'What
threat did she cause?"
said Geoffrey Alpert,
an expert on police use
of force at the Univer-
sity of South Carolina.
"What threat was she to
the officers, to the pub-
lic, to the politicians?"
Chuck Drago, a for-
mer Oviedo, Fla., police
chief who now works as
a police consultant, said
he was concerned offi-
cers approached the ve-
hicle on foot while the
conflict was still unfold-
ing. That kind of direct
contact can elevate the
tension of an already
dangerous scenario and
leave an officer feeling
anxious and vulnerable,
he said.


years who made it their
life's work to block his
execution.
Sheppard and White,
by their own account,
were young and naive
when they volunteered
to take on Alvord's ap-
peals. To put a man to
death, they believed,
was to continue the cy-
cle of violence. They
wanted to stop that.
And, repeatedly, they
did.
"Every day of his life
since he was 25 years
old, someone wanted
to kill him," White said.
"We felt that killing Gary
was in no way going to
bring back the three
women he killed."


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Police: Man who set


himself ablaze on Mall dies


ERIC TUCKER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON A man who
set himself on fire on the National
Mall in the U.S. capital has died of
his injuries, which were so severe
that authorities will have to use
DNA and dental records to identi-
fy him, District of Columbia police
said Saturday.
The man died Friday night at a
Washington hospital where he had
been airlifted, Officer Araz Alali, a
police spokesman, said.
The man poured the contents of
a red canister of gasoline on him-
self in the center portion of the
mall Friday afternoon. He then set
himself on fire, with passing jog-
gers taking off their shirts to help
put out the flames. Police had said
he was conscious and breathing
at the scene, but he was airlifted
to MedStar Washington Hospital
Center with life-threatening inju-
ries.
Police are investigating the man's
possible motives. Lt. Pamela Smith
of the U.S. Park Police said Friday
she was not aware that he had car-
ried any signs with him or had ar-
ticulated a cause.
One witness, Katy Scheflen, said
she did not hear the man say any-
thing intelligible before he set him-
self on fire. But she said she did no-
tice that another man with a tripod
was standing nearby and had dis-
appeared by the time the police
had arrived. It was not immediate-
ly clear whether a recording exists.
"He appeared to be waiting for
something to happen. After it hap-
pened, he was gone," Scheflen, a


ALEX BRANDON /AP
Law enforcement officers investigate the scene
on the National Mall in Washington, where, ac-
cording to a fire official, a man set himself on
fire on Friday. The official said the man was
flown by helicopter to a hospital where he later
died.
Justice Department lawyer, said Sat-
urday of the man with the tripod.
"I can't say what the connection
was between them or whether there
was a connection," she added.
The fire occurred in a city with jan-
gled nerves following a Sept. 16 mass
shooting at the Washington Navy
Yard that left 13 dead, including the
gunman, and a high-speed car chase
outside the U.S. Capitol on Thursday.
The chase ended with a woman be-
ing shot dead by police with a young
child in the car.


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DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, October 6, 2013


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ABDI GULED and
JASON STRAZIUSO
Associated Press
MOGADISHU, Soma-
lia International mil-
itary forces carried out
a pre-dawn strike Sat-
urday against foreign
fighters in the same
southern Somalia vil-
lage where U.S. Navy
SEALS four years ago
killed a most-wanted
al-Qaida operative, of-
ficials said.
The strike was car-
ried out in the town of
Barawe in the hours be-
fore morning prayers
against what one of-
ficial said were "high-
profile" targets. The
strike comes exactly
two weeks after al-Sha-
bab militants attacked
Nairobi's Westgate
Mall, a four-day terror-
ist assault that killed
at least 67 people in
neighboring Kenya.
The leader of al-Sha-
bab, Mukhtar Abu
Zubeyr, also known
as Ahmed Godane,
claimed responsibility
for the attack and said
it was in retaliation for
Kenya's military de-
ployment inside Soma-
lia. In Kenya, a military
spokesman released
the names of four men
implicated in the mall
attack.
A resident of Barawe
- a seaside town 240
kilometers (150 miles)
south of Mogadishu -
said by telephone that
heavy gunfire woke up
residents before dawn
prayers. An al-Shabab
fighter who gave his
name as Abu Mohamed
said "foreign" sol-
diers attacked a house,
prompting militants
to rush to the scene to
capture a soldier. Mo-
hamed said that effort
was not successful.
The international
troops attacked a two-
story beachside house
in Barawe where for-
eign fighters lived, bat-
tling their way inside,
said Mohamed, who
said he had visited the
scene. Al-Shabab has a
formal alliance with al-
Qaida, and hundreds
of foreign fighters from
the U.S., Britain and


Middle Eastern coun-
tries fight alongside So-
mali members of al-
Shabab.
A Somalia intelli-
gence official said the
targets of the raid were
"high-profile" foreign-
ers in the house. The
intelligence official
also said the strike was
carried out by an inter-
national military. A sec-
ond intelligence offi-
cial also confirmed the
attack. Both insisted on
anonymity to discuss
intelligence matters.
Foreign militaries -
often the U.S. but not
always have carried
out several strikes in-
side Somalia in recent
years against al-Sha-
bab or al-Qaida lead-
ers, as well as criminal
kidnappers. A West-
ern intelligence official
said it appeared like-
ly that either U.S. or
French forces carried
out the attack. The of-
ficial insisted on ano-
nymity to discuss intel-
ligence matters.
In Washington, Pen-
tagon spokesman
George Little said: "I
decline comment."
In Kenya, military
spokesman Maj. Em-
manuel Chirchir on
Saturday confirmed
the names of four fight-
ers implicated in the
Westgate Mall attack
last month. Chirchir
named the attackers as
Abu Baara al-Sudani,
Omar Nabhan, Khat-
tab al-Kene and Umayr,
names that were first
broadcast by a local Ke-
nyan television station.
"I confirm those are
the names of the ter-
rorist," he said in a
Twitter message sent to
The Associated Press
Matt Bryden, the for-
mer head of the U.N.
Monitoring Group on
Somalia and Eritrea,
said via email that al-
Kene and Umayr are
known members of al-
Hijra, the Kenyan arm
of al-Shabab. He add-
ed that Nabhan may be
a relative of Saleh Ali
Saleh Nabhan, the tar-
get of the 2009 Navy
SEALs raid in Barawe.


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DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, October 6, 2013


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, right, attends a graduation ceremony of army cadets,
while he is accompanied by the Revolutionary Guard commander Mohammad Ali Jafari, center,
Senior Advisor to Supreme Leader in Military Affairs, Yahya Rahim Safavi, second left, and De-
fense Minister Hossein Dehghan, in Tehran, Iran, on Saturday. Iran's top leader says some as-
pects of Hassan Rouhani's trip to New York last month were "not appropriate," but has reiterated
his crucial support for the president's policy of outreach to the West.


Iran leader hints at his


disapproval over Obama call


But Khamenei reasserts his support for
Rouhani's policy of outreach to the West


ALl AKBAR DAREINI
Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran -
Iran's top leader hinted
Saturday that he dis-
approved of the phone
call between Presidents
Hassan Rouhani and
Barack Obama dur-
ing the Iranian leader's
trip to New York last
month, but he reiterat-
ed his crucial support
for the president's pol-
icy of outreach to the
West.
Ayatollah Ali Khame-
nei's comments came
after hard-liners crit-
icized the 15-min-
ute phone conversa-
tion between Rouhani
and Obama, a gesture
aimed at ending three
decades of estrange-
ment between the two
countries.
Hard-liners, includ-
ing commanders in the
powerful Revolution-
ary Guard, have said
the president went too
far in reaching out to
the U.S.
Khamenei, whose
speech was broadcast
on state TV, also said
the U.S. was "untrust-
worthy." He previous-
ly has said he's not op-
posed to direct talks
with the U.S. to resolve


Iran's nuclear standoff
with theWest but is not
optimistic.
"We support the gov-
ernment's diplomat-
ic moves including
the New York trip be-
cause we have faith (in
them)," Khamenei told
commanders and grad-
uating military cadets
in Tehran. "But some of
what happened in the
New York trip was not
appropriate," a thinly
veiled reference to the
phone call.
Iran is at loggerheads
with the U.S. over its
disputed nuclear pro-
gram, which the West
says aims at developing
weapons technology.
Iran says its program
is for peaceful purpos-
es and geared toward
generating electricity
and producing radio-
isotopes to treat cancer
patients.
"We are skeptical of
Americans and have
no trust in them at all.
The American govern-
ment is untrustworthy,
arrogant, illogical and
a promise-breaker. It's
a government captured
by the internation-
al Zionism network,"
Khamenei said.
Rouhani said before
and after his trip to


New York that he had
"full powers" to nego-
tiate a deal with the
West, an indication
that he had received a
mandate from the su-
preme leader, who has
final say on all mat-
ters of state. His out-
reach has also received
broad support from
Iranian legislators and
it appears popular, but
some including the
Guard seem rattled by
the pace of develop-
ments.
The Guard's chief
commander, Gen. Mo-
hammad Ali Jafari,
praised Rouhani re-
cently but called the
phone call a "tactical
mistake" and said he
should have avoided it.
"The respected pres-
ident, who adopted a
powerful and appro-
priate position in the
trip ... would have been
better off avoiding the
telephone conversa-
tion with Obama in
the same way he didn't
give time for a meeting
with Obama and left
such measures until af-
ter practical, verifiable
steps by the U.S. gov-
ernment and a test of
their good will," he said
in an interview earlier
this week.


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Arab world searches



for democratic future


DAN PERRY
Associated Press
CAIRO "For too
long, many nations, in-
cluding my own, toler-
ated, even excused, op-
pression in the Middle
East in the name of sta-
bility... We must help the
reformers of the Mid-
dle East as they work
for freedom, and strive
to build a communi-
ty of peaceful, demo-
cratic nations." Pres-
ident George W Bush
in a speech to the U.N.
General Assembly, Sept.
21,2004
Almost a quarter-cen-
tury ago, a young Amer-
ican political scientist
achieved global academ-
ic celebrity by suggest-
ing that the collapse of
communism had ended
the discussion on how
to run societies, leaving
"Western liberal democ-
racy as the final form of
human government."
In Egypt and around
the Middle East, after
a summer of violence
and upheaval, the dis-
cussion, however, is still
going strong. And al-
most three years into
the Arab Spring revolts,
profound uncertainties
remain.
That became shat-
teringly clear on July 3,
when Egyptian gener-
als ousted the country's
first freely elected presi-
dent, Mohammed Mor-
si, installing a techno-
cratic government in the
wake of massive street
protests calling for the
Islamist leader to step
down. He had ruled in-
competently for one year
and badly overstepped
his bounds, they argued.
A crackdown on his Mus-
lim Brotherhood has put
more than 2,000 of its
members in jail and left
hundreds dead, and a
court has ordered an out-
right ban on the group.
Although new elections
are promised, the plans
are extremely vague.
All this happened
with strong public sup-
port, especially among
the educated classes
where one might expect
a strong yearning for
democracy. Foreigners
in Egypt were frequent-
ly stunned at how little
many Egyptians cared
that Morsi had been
democratically elected.
How could that be?
Around the region peo-
ple are asking the ques-
tion, and the stirring
of a rethink, subtle but
persistent, are starting
to be felt.
Few people not
even the absolute rulers
who still cling to power
in some places would
openly argue against
democracy as a worthy
goal. And people bristle
at any suggestion that


r(L5LJI
-6LI=D


MUSTAPHA HOUBAIS /AP
Anti-government protesters shout as they in front of parliament on
Thursday as they hold a portrait of Morocco's editor Ali Anouzla who
is arrested for posting al-Qaida video last week in Rabat, Morocco.
Morocco editor Ali Anouzla's Lakome.com site is known for its tren-
chant criticism of the government similar to the secular Feb. 20
movement that protested for greater democracy in 2011 during the
Arab Spring. Placard in arabic reads" Freedom for Ali Anouzla."


"Democracy is not a
matter of principle or
faith for most people" in
the region, said political
scientist Shadi Hamid,
director of research at the
Brookings Doha Center.
"It is something they
believe in to the extent
that it brings good results.
...If democracy does not
bring those things, then
people lose faith in the
democratic process."
the region's culture is
somehow at odds with
freedom. But with the
most populous Arab na-
tion having stumbled so
badly in its first attempt,
there is now an audi-
ence for those saying
total democracy must
grow from the ground
up, needs time to evolve,
and need not be the
same everywhere.
"Democracy is not a
matter of principle or
faith for most people" in
the region, said political
scientist Shadi Hamid,
director of research at the
Brookings Doha Center.
"It is something they be-
lieve in to the extent that
it brings good results. ...
If democracy does not
bring those things, then
people lose faith in the
democratic process."
"That's part of the story
in the past three years,"
he said. "When push
comes to shove, many
say, democracy is fine in
theory, but is not actual-
ly improving our lives. If
the generals can prom-


|2s;W.'j|


ise us a greater degree of
security and stability, we
prefer that instead."
Oil-rich Gulf coun-
tries, meanwhile, have
largely avoided the Arab
Spring as the wealthy
ruling families offered
what has essential-
ly been a swap gen-
erous handouts such
as state jobs and dis-
count-rate housing in
exchange for political
passivity. The exception
is Bahrain, where an up-
rising has been led by
majority Shiites seek-
ing greater rights in the
Sunni-ruled kingdom,
which is home to the
U.S. Navy's 5th Fleet.
Hamid, for example, is
based in the Gulf state of
Qatar, where no one ex-
pects democracy any-
time soon. That's more or
less the situation in the
entire Arabian Peninsu-
la and Persian Gulf area,
where emirs and mon-
archs are for the most
part firmly in charge.
The same goes for Jor-
dan, where officials of-
fer learned explanations
about democratic re-
forms that do not extend
to relieving King Abdul-
lah II of his executive
power anytime soon.
"Most of the Arab rul-
ers are trying very hard
to give the impression to
the West that their peo-
ples are not prepared
for democracy because
these rulers are afraid
that they are going to
lose in any fair demo-
cratic elections," said
Adel al-Baldawi, a histo-
ry professor at Mustans-
iriyah University.


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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Sunday, October 6, 2013


n




Sunday, October 6, 2013


Kenya police officers guard the Nakumatt Ukay Centre, in Nairobi, Kenya on Friday. Investigators have
recovered a vehicle believed to have been used by the terrorists who killed at least 67 people in an at-
tack Saturday at Nairobi's Westgate Mall, a top Kenyan government official said Friday.


Military spokesman



names attackers

Despite statement, government seems unclear about
whether or when assailants might have escaped


RUKMINI CALLIMACHI
Associated Press
NAIROBI, Kenya A
military spokesman on
Saturday confirmed the
names of the four fight-
ers implicated in the
attack on the upscale
Westgate Mall in Kenya's
capital last month, an as-
sault that turned into a
four-day-long siege, kill-
ing at least 67 people.
Major Emmanu-
el Chirchir said the at-
tackers were Abu Baara
al-Sudani, Omar Nab-
han, Khattab al-Kene
and Umayr, names that
were first broadcast by
a local Kenyan televi-
sion station. "I confirm


those are the names of
the terrorist," he said, in
a Twitter message sent
to The Associated Press
The identities of the
men come as a private
television station in
Nairobi obtained and
broadcast the closed
circuit television foot-
age from the Nairobi
mall. The footage shows
no more than four at-
tackers. They are seen
calmly walking through
a storeroom inside the
complex, holding ma-
chine guns. One of the
men's pant legs ap-
pears to be stained with
blood, though he is not
limping, and it is un-
clear if the blood is his,


or that of his victims.
The footage contra-
dicts earlier govern-
ment statements which
indicated that between
10 to 15 attackers were
involved in the Sept.
21 attack, although the
footage may not show
all of the assailants that
took part in the attack.
It's not yet known if the
attackers managed to
escape after the attack.
Terrified shoppers hid
behind mannequins,
inside cardboard box-
es, in storage rooms, in
ventilation shafts and
in the parking lot un-
derneath parked cars,
many hiding for hours
before help arrived.


Migrant coffins lined



up at Italian airport


ANDREA ROSA
Associated Press
LAMPEDUSA, Italy The cof-
fins of African migrants killed in a
shipwreck off the Italian island of
Lampedusa were lined up in long
rows inside an airport hangar where
survivors of the tragedy paid their
respects Saturday. All of the caskets
had a single white rose on top ex-
cept for the four of the youngest vic-
tims, which had stuffed animals.
The 111 coffins were numbered -
a teddy bear wearing a smile and a
blue shirt with a heart was placed
above casket No. 92. The ceremony
took place hours after Italian fisher-
men threw a bouquet of yellow flow-
ers near the exact spot where the
migrant boat sank, honking their
foghorns in tribute to the dead and
up to 250 migrants who may still be
missing.
The search to recover more bod-
ies, meanwhile, was called off for a
second day because of choppy wa-
ters and strong currents.
A parliamentary delegation visit-
ed the survivors amid reports that
a boat may have violated the "law
of the sea" by failing to help the
migrant ship packed with 500 mi-
grants, nearly all from Eritrea, about
600 meters (650 yards) from shore.
"To come to rescue is a duty. Not to
come to rescue is a crime," Laura Bold-
rini, the Italian house speaker who
previously and for manyyears was the
U.N. Refugee Agency spokeswoman
in Italy told reporters in Lampedusa
after visiting the survivors.
The 20-meter (65-foot) migrant
boat sank Thursday after a fire
was set onboard to attract atten-
tion of any passing boats or people
on shore when they ran into trou-
ble. They had traveled for two full
days and thought they had reached
safety when they saw the lights of
Lampedusa.
Instead, at least 111 drowned and
155 survived, some of whom were in


-


nst


LUCA BRUNO/AP
A teddy bear and a flower are seen on a white
coffin of a child migrant on Saturday inside an
hangar of the Lampedusa, Italy airport.
the water for three hours, clinging
to anything buoyant even empty
water bottles.
Boat captains in Italian waters
have been dissuaded in the past
from helping migrants in distress
because they fear prosecution un-
der an Italian law aimed at curbing
illegal migration. But Boldrini said
the law of the sea requires assis-
tance to be given to anyone in need.
Reports that a boat didn't help
the stranded migrants prompted a
Dutch lawmaker to call for an inves-
tigation. While survivors have told
authorities that a boat passed, there
has been no single vessel identified
nor have prosecutors launched a
formal investigation.
Italian lawmaker Pia Locatelli,
part of the delegation, told The As-
sociated Press the migrants report-
ed that a boat circled them with a
light and then went away. They also
saw one or perhaps two more boats
in the distance before the fire.


Ireland voters reject



plan to abolish Senate


SHAWN POGATCHNIK
Associated Press
DUBLIN Irish vot-
ers rejected a govern-
ment plan to abolish the
country's much-criti-
cized Senate, a surprise
result Saturday that
dealt a blow to Prime
Minister Enda Kenny.
Kenny had personal-
ly campaigned for the
proposed constitution-
al amendment to elim-
inate Ireland's upper
house of parliament,
arguing the Senate was
undemocratic, politi-
cally toothless and ex-
pensive in an era of
brutal budget cuts. All
opinion polls during
the monthlong cam-
paign had pointed to
easy passage.
Instead, voters re-
jected Friday's referen-
dum question on abol-
ishing the Senate with
a 51.7 percent "no"
vote. Turnout was just
39 percent, a typical-
ly weak figure for Irish
referendums, when
anti-government vot-
ers often come out in
droves.
Still, the rejection was
widespread across Ire-
land's constituencies. It
suggested a nationwide
failure by Kenny's Fine
Gael party to win the
trust of voters, who had
strongly backed his party
when he rose to power in
2011 following Ireland's
international bailout.
Analysts particularly
faulted him for refusing
to debate the measure
on national television.


Instead, Fine Gael staged
informal media events
and plastered Ireland
with posters arguing a
"yes" vote would mean
"fewer politicians" and
annual taxpayer savings
of $27 million. Many an-
alysts branded the fig-
ure an exaggeration and
insignificant, given Ire-
land's $187 billion na-
tional debt.
"Sometimes in poli-
tics you get a wallop,"
Kenny told reporters.


Asked why he hadn't
agreed to a TV de-
bate, Kenny said he
had wanted to avoid "a
shouting match with
political leaders."
Supporters of keeping
the Senate argued the
government now must
strengthen the institu-
tion. They called for the
Senate to gain the power
to block legislation, not
merely debate and on
rare occasions delay it.


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Q.S" '"Grace Unplugged PG 10:40 1:15 4:05 6:35 9:10*
pp g Wf^__ Frday and Satuirday nly
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A9


DAILY COMMERCIAL




DAILY COMMERCIAL


Sunday, October 6, 2013


I FI E-DYFRCS FRLEBR


Partly sunny with a
couple of thunderstorms

HIGH LOW
88 730


MONDAY


77


Mainly cloudy with a
shower or thunderstorm

HIGH LOW
88 720


TUESDAY





Partly sunny with a
thunderstorm possible

HIGH LOW
86 620


Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 02013


WEDNESDAY





Intervals of clouds and
sunshine

HIGH LOW
84 62


THURSDAY





Beautiful with periods of
clouds and sunshine

HIGH LOW
850 65


Key West
87178 -'


Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are today highs ftr the
day. Forecast higMow temperatures are given for selected cities.


Cold Front
Wann Front
Stationary
Front


Showers
T-storms=
RainE
FlurdesnE3
SnowE*l
tceeI


Yesterday's National High/Low: (for the 48 contiguous states)


High 930 in Fentress, VA


I UVINE TDA


0111 2 3 4 5 6 7
0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6.
Very High, 11+ Ex
The higher the AccuWeather
number, the greater the
eye and skin prote


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


Low 70 in Berthoud Pass, CO


EBI A.E I


8 The solunar period schedule allows planning
days so you will be fishing in good territory or
hunting in good cover during those times. Major
periods begin at the times shown and last for
6-7 High, 8-10 1.5 to 2 hours. The minor periods are shorter.
xtreme
r.com U ndex Major Minor Major Minor
eneedfor Today 12:48 a.m. 7:02a.m. 1:15p.m. 7:28p.m.
action. Mon. 1:46 a.m. 8:00 a.m. 2:14 p.m. 8:27 p.m.


I TE SN AD MON6


Today
7:23 a.m.
7:07 p.m.
8:55 a.m.
8:17 p.m.


Monday
7:24 a.m.
7:06 p.m.
9:57 a.m.
9:05 p.m.


iRrst Full Last New



Oct 11 Oct18 Oct26 Nov3


ITIEI


Homosassa
Day High Feet
Today 5:51 am......1.4
6:54 pm......1.3
Daytona Beach
Day High Feet
Today 9:27 am.....4.9
9:44 pm..... 4.6


Low Feet
1:43 am .....0.2
2:10 pm.....0.0

Low Feet
3:05 am .....0.0
3:40 pm.....0.2


Day High Feet
Mon. 6:23 am......1.4
7:39 pm......1.2


High Feet
10:13 am.....5.0
10:30 pm.....4.5


Low Feet
2:18 am .....0.3
2:51 pm.....0.0

Low Feet
3:47 am ....-0.1
4:26 pm.....0.2


I NAINLCTE


Today Monday
City Hi LoW Hi LoW
San Francisco 78 54 s 71 54 s
San Juan, PR 89 77 t 91 78 t
Santa Fe 67 38 s 71 41 s
St. Ste. Marie 60 53 r 63 52 pc
Seattle 67 51 pc 60 48 r
Shreveport 78 51 s 83 49 s
Spokane 66 43 pc 61 40 pc
Syracuse 75 65t 73 65r
Topeka 61 42 pc 71 45 s
Tucson 88 58 s 92 61 s
Tulsa 69 46 s 76 46 s
Washington, DC 88 68 pc 79 66 c
Wilmington, DE 82 65 pc 81 68 c

Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, st-snow flurmes, sn-snow, i-ice.


AIO


PANDORA
UNFORGETTABLE MOMENTS


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte, NC


Today
Hi LoW
68 61 sh
68 43s
48 40r
76 62 c
80 68 t
79 64 pc
86 66 pc
69 43 pc
81 61 t
59 35 pc
70 47s
63 59 c
75 66 t
64 58 sh
86 75t
87 66 c
85 68 pc


Monday
Hi Lo W
7565 c
73 49s
50 41 r
71 49 r
75 53 t
80 63 c
80 62 c
72 48 pc
76 50r
67 40 pc
72 43 pc
77 64c
68 59 r
75 66 sh
83 65t
70 49 r
77 63 r


City
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Concord, NH
Dallas
Dayton
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
El Paso
Fargo
Fairbanks
Flagstaff
Grand Rapids


Today
Hi LoW
61 38s
63 45 pc
75 53 r
81 63 t
89 73 t
60 52 sh
78 52s
74 53 r
72 42 s
53 45 r
74 58 r
51 43 r
73 48s
58 42 r
42 32 c
63 29s
69 52 r


Monday
Hi LoW
71 44 s
63 48 sh
64 45r
64 51r
81 59 t
73 63 c
86 58 s
61 47 c
77 46 s
65 51 pc
64 50r
61 44 pc
79 55 s
65 45 pc
44 33 pc
70 36 s
60 50 c


City
Great Falls
Greensboro, NC
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City


Today
Hi LoW
74 42 pc
85 68 pc
68 60 c
86 72 c
81 52 pc
66 49 r
77 51 r
58 43 c
80 58 s
75 51 s
74 53 r
71 53 r
62 48 pc
58 47 r
77 53 r
85 66 t
75 66 c


Monday
Hi LOW
73 42 pc
77 60 r
77 64 c
87 75 pc
84 54 s
63 46 c
77 49 s
68 49 s
85 62s
77 52 s
67 47 pc
73 52 s
62 51 sh
67 4 pc
73 47 r
80 61 s
78 66 c


City
Norfolk, VA
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego


Today
Hi LoW
86 68 pc
72 45s
55 44r
81 67 pc
90 67 s
83 64t
58 52 sh
71 51 pc
68 60 c
87 68 pc
76 44s
88 66 pc
83 46 s
66 46 pc
65 45s
83 53S
86 60 s


Monday
Hi LOW
82 71 t
80 51 s
69 45 s
78 67 c
94 71 s
68 52 r
69 61 c
62 48 sh
76 65 c
80 67 t
75 40s
81 70 r
82 49s
64 49 pc
75 47s
89 55 s
74 60 pc








Sports
sports@dailycommercial.com


GOLF: Team USA leading / B2


Bl
DAILY COMMERCIAL
Saturday, October 6, 2013


www.dailycommercial.comn
SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY
1352-365-8208


KAREEM COPELAND
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Ja-
meis Winston reaf-
firmed his Heisman
Trophy candidacy with
the best performance
of his short career Sat-
urday. The Florida State
redshirt freshman put
up career-highs with
393 yards passing and
five touchdowns during
a 63-0 victory over No.
25 Maryland.
The 63 points were
the second-most scored


by No. 8 Florida State
during coach Jimbo
Fisher's tenure. Satur-
day was the most lop-
sided win against a Top
25 program in school
history. The Seminoles
beat No. 15 South Caro-
lina 59-0 in 1988.
The lopsided score
also tied the point-dif-
ferential for the worst
loss by a Top 25 team
all-time. No. 11 Tex-
as lost 66-3 to UCLA in
1997.
Winston's weekly
highlight came late in


the third quarter when
the pocket collapsed
and Maryland line-
backer Yannik Cudjoe-
Virgil jumped on his
back. The quarterback
ducked and slid out of
the sack, rolled right
and threw a 12-yard
touchdown pass to tight
end Nick O'Leary.
Winston became the
first FSU quarterback to
throw five touchdowns
since Christian Pon-
der in 2009. He's now
SEE FSU I B2


STEVE CANNON/AP
Florida State's Rashad Greene picks up extra yards after a catch against Maryland in the second
quarter of Saturday's game in Tallahassee.


NO. 14 MIAMI 45, GEORGIA TECH 30


Hurricanes pull away


late, top Yellow Jackets


mA








J PAT CARTER / AP
Miami's Stacey Coley (3) and Phillip Dorsett (4) celebrate after Dorsett scored during the first half of
Saturday's game against Georgia Tech in Miami Gardens.


TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press
MIAMI GARDENS -
Stephen Morris threw
for three touchdowns,
Duke Johnson rushed
for 184 yards and No.
14 Miami remained un-
beaten after shaking off
a problematic opening
quarter to beat Georgia
Tech 45-30 on Saturday.
Phillip Dorsett, Clive
Walford and Allen
Hums caught scoring
passes for Miami (5-0,
1-0 Atlantic Coast Con-
ference), which scored
21 points in the final
7:15. Dallas Crawford
ran for two scores in
the fourth quarter, and
Ladarius Gunter add-
ed a 30-yard intercep-


tion return for anoth-
er touchdown with 1:08
left.
David Sims had two
rushing touchdowns
for Georgia Tech (3-2,
2-2), which wasted a
17-point lead against
Miami last season and
blew another double-
digit advantage Sat-
urday plus missed
a fourth-quarter extra
point that would have
tied the game. The Yel-
low Jackets led 17-7 af-
ter controlling the first
quarter, then wound up
losing to Miami for the
fifth straight time.
It's Miami's best start
since opening 6-0 in
2004.
Crawford got his sixth


rushing TD of the sea-
son midway through
the fourth, then added
an 18-yarder to seal the
win for the Hurricanes,
who dominated the sec-
ond half and now get 12
days off before heading
to North Carolina on
Oct. 17.
Hums' 69-yard catch-
and-run put Miami on
top for good, on a play
that had a high level of
difficulty. Morris threw
the ball from the sunny
side of the field to the
shadowed side. Hurnms
controlled it, beat one
defender and took off
down the left sideline,
pulling up only while
waiting for Dorsett to
SEEM I B2


BOSTON 7, TAMPA BAY 4

Ortiz hits 2 HRs, BoSox lead Rays in ALDS


JIMMY GOLEN
Associated Press
BOSTON David Or-
tiz homered twice, the
second shot chasing Da-
vid Price in the eighth in-
ning on Saturday night,
and the Boston Red Sox
beat the Tampa Bay Rays
7-4 to take a 2-0 lead in
the AL division series.
It was the first two-
homer postseason game
for the Red Sox designat-
ed hitter, who was a star


for the 2004 Boston team
that won the franchise's
first World Series title in
86 years and is the only
player remaining from
that club.
"When he hits two
home runs, things are
going to revolve around
him," Red Sox manag-
er John Farrell said. "He's
the main cog in our line-
up."
Jacoby Ellsbury had
three hits and scored
three runs for the AL East


champions and Dustin
Pedroia drove in three
runs.
The Rays will need a
victory in Game 3 on
Monday in St. Peters-
burg, to avoid a sweep
in the best-of-five se-
ries. They won three win-
or-go-home games this
week just to reach this
round, including Price's
complete game in the
tiebreaker against Texas
to determine the second
AL wild-card team.


But with the situation
not yet desperate, Price
allowed seven runs on
nine hits and two walks,
striking out five. He took
the mound for the eighth
inning, but Ortiz hit his
second pitch high over
the Pesky Pole, and right-
field umpire Chris Guc-
cione signaled it fair.
There was no such sus-
pense for Ortiz's other
homer, which went into
Boston bullpen in the
first inning.


CHARLES KRUPA/AP
Boston designated hitter David Ortiz celebrates his solo home
run off Tampa Bay starting pitcher David Price in the first inning of
Game 2 of the American League Division Series Saturday at Fen-
way Park in Boston.


Monday Night Fish fry at Frultland Park Cafe

^^ ^ Jumbo Shrimp, Catfish or Cod golden brown &

delish with Hush Puppies, Pineapple Cole Slaw,


Great Food 6ig tSmile


Asiago Cheese Grits, Baked Beans, and Berries

& Ice Cream for dessert!


$9 All you care to eat & drink

Served JoepiL to tPp

ll/Bliliii^EiiMllifft"Bll, I AkL-KffLwL-


NO. 8 FLORIDA STATE 63, NO. 25 MARYLAND 0


Winston propels


Seminoles past Terps


0M1


6TO2
EAST




DAILY COMMERCIAL


Sunday, October 6, 2013


* r LEADING OFF I GOLF


in Sports us seizes control in Presidents Cup


DAY


The Americans are assured of being in the lead
going into today's final round of the rain-plagued
Presidents Cup.


DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

DUBLIN, Ohio The Amer-
icans are assured of being in the
lead going into the final round of
the rain-plagued Presidents Cup.
Zach Johnson holed out from
the 15th fairway for eagle to com-
plete a swift turnaround in four-
somes and give the Americans
yet another point toward winning
the Presidents Cup for the fifth
straight time.
Johnson and Jason Dufner won
six of eight holes to go from 2
down to a 4-and-3 win over Rich-
ard Sterne and Marc Leishman.
That was the only foursomes
match that finished before it be-
came too dark to play Saturday at
Muirfield Village.
But this much was clear the
Americans are in control and


have been the whole way.
Another rain delay kept the
matches from finishing for the
second straight day, this time be-
cause of the work needed to drain
the saturated golf course. The
four matches were to resume to-
day, followed by an early start to
the 12 singles matches because of
more rain in the forecast.
The win by Johnson and Duf-
ner gave the Americans an 111/2-
61/2 lead, meaning they were as-
sured at least a one-point lead
going into singles. Since the Presi-
dents Cup began in 1994, no team
has ever trailed going into singles
and won outright. The Americans
were three points behind in 2003
and rallied for that infamous tie in
South Africa.
"The U.S. has really been un-
relenting," International cap-


tain Nick Price said. "They have
just played superbly the last three
days. Any slip from us and we find
ourselves one or two down very
quickly."
Early in the foursomes session,
the board was filled with blue In-
ternational scores on the front
nine. Steve Stricker and Bill Haas
warmed up their putters and
went from 1 down to a 2-up lead
through 10 holes. Phil Mickel-
son and Keegan Bradley, who ral-
lied earlier in a fourballs match to
win, were 3 down through seven
holes when Mickelson made two
big putts that led to them squar-
ing the match through 14 holes.
Tiger Woods and Matt Kuchar,
undefeated in all three matches
they have played this week, were 2
down against Ernie Els and Bren-
don de Jonge through nine holes.


SCOREBOARD


AUTO RACING
NASCAR
Sprint Cup
Hollywood Casino 400 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race today
At Kansas Speedway
Kansas City, Kan.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 187.526
mph.
2. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 187.48.
3. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 187.162.
4. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 186.233.
5. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 186.168.
6. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
186.072.
7. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 185.893.
8. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 185.874.
9. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 185.669.
10. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 185.433.
11. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 185.42.
12. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
185.261.
13. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 185.204.
14. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 185.141.
15. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 184.982.
16. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 184.925.
17. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 184.628.
18. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 184.603.
19. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 184.477.
20. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 184.382.
21. (51) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 184.106.
22. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 183.73.
23. (14) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 183.667.
24. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 183.38.
25. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 183.069.
26. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 182.803.
27. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, 182.685.
28. (47) A J Allmendinger, Toyota, 182.531.
29. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 182.039.
30. (30) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 182.02.
31. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 181.971.
32. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 181.959.
33. (36) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 181.953.
34. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 181.892.
35. (32) Timmy Hill, Ford, 181.843.
36. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 181.83.
37. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, Owner Points.
38. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, Owner Points.
39. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points.
40. (95) Reed Sorenson, Ford, Owner Points.
41. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
42. (40) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, Owner
Points.
43. (33) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, Owner
Points.
SOCCER
MLS
EASTERN
W L T Pts GF GA
New York 15 9 7 52 48 37
Sporting Kansas Cityl4 10 6 48 43 29
Houston 13 10 8 47 39 37
Montreal 13 10 7 46 48 45
Chicago 12 12 7 43 41 45
Philadelphia 11 10 9 42 38 39
Columbus 12 14 5 41 40 41
New England 11 11 8 41 42 34
Toronto FC 5 15 11 26 29 45
D.C. 3 22 6 15 20 55
WESTERN
W L T Pts GF GA
Real Salt Lake 15 10 6 51 54 39
Seattle 15 8 6 51 39 29
Portland 12 5 13 49 46 31
Los Angeles 13 11 6 45 46 37
Colorado 12 9 9 45 37 31
San Jose 12 11 8 44 32 41
Vancouver 11 11 8 41 42 39
FC Dallas 10 10 10 40 42 46
ChivasUSA 6 17 8 26 29 55
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point
for tie.
Friday's Games
Chicago 3, D.C. United 0
Houston 1, Montreal 0


FSU
FROM PAGE B1


thrown for 1,441 yards,
17 touchdowns with
two interceptions and
a 73.3 completion per-
centage this season.
"It felt like a little
league football game
out there," Winston
said. "It was 12 o'clock,
the sun was out. I don't
think I saw a cloud in
the sky. It was a beauti-
ful day."
The Florida State de-
fense was the concern
throughout the week af-
ter giving up 34 points
to Boston College seven
days ago. Defenders got
out of their lanes and
missed tackles some-
thing the Seminoles
couldn't afford against
a Maryland offense that
averaged 498.5 yards
per game.
That was not a prob-
lem.
The Terrapins were
held to 121 first-half
yards and Florida State
gave up a season-low 11
yards rushing on 10 at-


Saturday's Games
New England at New York, 7 p.m.
Toronto FC at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Sporting Kansas City at Columbus, 7:30 p.m.
FC Dallas at Real Salt Lake, 9 p.m.
Seattle FC at Colorado, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Chivas USA at Los Angeles, 5 p.m.
Portland at Vancouver, 8 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 9
Sporting Kansas City at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Seattle FC, 10 p.m.
Colorado at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 12
New England at Montreal, 2:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at D.C. United, 7 p.m.
Chicago at FC Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 13
Seattle FC at Portland, 9 p.m.
HOCKEY
NHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Toronto 2 2 0 0 4 7 4
Detroit 2 2 0 0 4 5 3
Boston 1 1 0 0 2 3 1
Florida 1 1 0 0 2 4 2
Ottawa 1 1 0 0 2 1 0
Montreal 1 0 1 0 0 3 4
Tampa Bay 1 0 1 0 0 1 3
Buffalo 2 0 2 0 0 1 3
Metropolitan
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 1 1 0 0 2 3 0
N.Y. Islanders 1 1 0 0 2 4 3
Washington 2 1 1 0 2 9 10
Carolina 1 0 0 1 1 2 3
New Jersey 2 0 1 1 1 3 7
Columbus 1 0 1 0 0 3 4
Philadelphia 1 0 1 0 0 1 3
N.Y Rangers 1 0 1 0 0 1 4
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Colorado 2 2 0 0 4 9 2
Winnipeg 2 2 0 0 4 10 7
Chicago 1 1 0 0 2 6 4
St. Louis 1 1 0 0 2 4 2
Minnesota 1 0 0 1 1 2 3
Dallas 1 0 1 0 0 2 4
Nashville 2 0 2 0 0 3 7
Pacific
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Calgary 2 1 0 1 3 8 8
Phoenix 1 1 0 0 2 4 1
San Jose 1 1 0 0 2 4 1
Los Angeles 2 1 1 0 2 6 7
Edmonton 1 0 1 0 0 4 5
Vancouver 1 0 1 0 0 1 4
Anaheim 1 0 1 0 0 1 6
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Thursday's Games
Washington 5, Calgary 4, SO
Los Angeles 3, Minnesota 2, SO
Boston 3, Tampa Bay 1
Pittsburgh 3, New Jersey 0
St. Louis 4, Nashville 2
Florida 4, Dallas 2
Phoenix 4, N.Y Rangers 1
San Jose 4, Vancouver 1
Friday's Games
N.Y Islanders 4, New Jersey 3, SO
Ottawa 1, Buffalo 0
Detroit 3, Carolina 2, OT
Calgary 4, Columbus 3
Winnipeg 5, Los Angeles 3
Colorado 3, Nashville 1
Saturday's Games
Detroit at Boston, late
Ottawa at Toronto, late
Philadelphia at Montreal, late
Columbus at N.Y Islanders, late
Buffalo at Pittsburgh, late
Tampa Bay at Chicago, late
Florida at St. Louis, late


tempts in the first half.
Maryland punted on its
first three possessions
of the game, a Florida
State first this season.
The Terps converted
just 1-of-7 third downs
in the first 30 minutes
and 2-of-15 all game.
"As good as the of-
fense played today, I
thought the defense
played better," Fish-
er said. "The defense, I
thought, was the story
of the day. They really
took the show."
Things became even
worse for Maryland
when starting quarter-
back C.J. Brown went
down late in the sec-
ond quarter with the
Terrapins trailing 14-
0. Brown released a
pass downfield just be-
fore Dan Hicks hit him
around the waist and
Jaccobi McDaniel fol-
lowed with a blow to the
chest. Brown lay on the
turf for several minutes
before he immediate-
ly headed to the locker
room with a member of
the medical staff.
Maryland coach Ran-
dy Edsall said Brown


Washington at Dallas, late
Anaheim at Minnesota, late
Edmonton at Vancouver, late
Phoenix at San Jose, late
Today's Games
Philadelphia at Carolina, 5 p.m.
Anaheim at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.
Vancouver at Calgary, 8 p.m.
BASEBALL
MLB Postseason
DIVISION SERIES
(Best-of-5; x-if necessary)
American League
Boston 2, Tampa Bay 0
Friday, Oct. 4: Boston 12, Tampa Bay 2
Saturday, Oct. 5: Boston 7, Tampa Bay 4
Monday, Oct. 7: Boston (Buchholz 12-1) at
Tampa Bay (Cobb 11-3), 6:07 or 7:07 p.m.
(TBS)
x-Tuesday, Oct. 8: Boston (Peavy 12-5) at
Tampa Bay, 8:07 or 8:37 p.m. (TBS)
x-Thursday, Oct. 10: Tampa Bay at Boston,
5:37 or 8:07 p.m. (TBS)
Detroit 1, Oakland 0
Friday, Oct. 4: Detroit 3, Oakland 2
Saturday, Oct. 5: Detroit (Verlander 13-12) at
Oakland (Gray 5-3), late
Monday, Oct. 7: Oakland (Parker 12-8) at De-
troit (Sanchez 14-8), 1:07 p.m. (MLB)
x-Tuesday, Oct. 8: Oakland (Straily 10-8) at
Detroit (Fister 14-9), 5:07 or 7:07 p.m. (TBS)
x-Thursday, Oct. 10: Detroit at Oakland, 6:07
or 9:07 p.m. (TBS)
National League
St. Louis 1, Pittsburgh 1
Thursday, Oct. 3: St. Louis 9, Pittsburgh 1
Friday, Oct. 4: Pittsburgh 7, St. Louis 1
Today, Oct. 6: St. Louis (Kelly 10-5) at Pitts-
burgh (Liriano 16-8), 4:37 p.m. (TBS)
Monday, Oct. 7: St. Louis (Wachia 4-1) at
Pittsburgh (Morton 7-4), 3:07 or 3:37 p.m.
(TBS)
x-Wednesday Oct. 9: Pittsburgh at St. Louis,
5:07 or 8:07 p.m. (TBS)
Los Angeles 1, Atlanta 1
Thursday, Oct. 3: Los Angeles 6, Atlanta 1
Friday, Oct. 4: Atlanta 4, Los Angeles 3
Today, Oct. 6: Atlanta (Teheran 14-8) at Los
Angeles (Ryu 14-8), 8:07 p.m. (TBS)
Monday, Oct. 7: Atlanta (Garcia 4-7) at Los
Angeles (Nolasco 13-11), 9:37 p.m. (TBS)
x-Wednesday Oct. 9: Los Angeles at Atlanta,
8:37 p.m. (TBS)
GOLF
Presidents Cup
Saturday
At Muirfield Village Golf Club
Dublin, Ohio
Yardage: 7,354; Par: 72
UNITED STATES 11%, INTERNATIONAL 6%
Foursomes
United States 1, International 0
(four matches incomplete)
Jason Dufner and Zach Johnson, United
States, def. Richard Sterne and Marc Leish-
man, International, 4 and 3.
Jason Day and Graham DeLaet, International,
all square through 13 holes with Phil Mickel-
son and Keegan Bradley, United States.
Louis Oosthuizen and Charl Schwartzel, Inter-
national, 3 up through 12 holes over Webb
Simpson and Brandt Snedeker, United States.
Bill Haas and Steve Stricker, United States,
2 up through 10 holes over Adam Scott and
Hideki Matsuyama, International.
Ernie Els and Brendon de Jonge, International,
2 up through 9 holes over Tiger Woods and
Matt Kuchar, United States.
Fourballs
United States 4, International 1-
Phil Mickelson and Keegan Bradley, United
States, def. Ernie Els and Brendon de Jonge,
International, 2 and 1.
Jason Day and Graham DeLaet, International,
def. Steve Stricker and Jordan Spieth, United
States, 2 up.


suffered a concussion
and will be evaluated
Sunday.
The Maryland offense
was held to 234 yards
and 33 yards rushing on
25 attempts.
"They have great ath-
letes. They always do,"
Maryland backup quar-
terback Caleb Rowe
said. "They were good,
but we also could have
taken advantage of a
few things and we didn't
do that."
It was the Florida State
offense that started slow
this week, but that didn't
last long. The Seminoles
scored on their first
drive, a Karlos Williams
1-yard touchdown run,
and then punted on the
next three consecutive
drives. That's when the
Winston show began.
The Seminoles scored
touchdowns on their
next eight consecutive
possessions.
O'Leary had four re-
ceptions for 55 yards
and two touchdowns.
Receiver Kelvin Benja-
min had five receptions
for 60 yards and two
touchdowns. Receiver


Bill Haas and Webb Simpson, United States,
def. Angel Cabrera and Branden Grace, Inter-
national, 4 and 3.
Brandt Snedeker and Hunter Mahan, United
States, def. Louis Oosthuizen and Charl
Schwartzel, International, 2 up.
Tiger Woods and Matt Kuchar, United States,
def. Adam Scott and Hideki Matsuyama, Inter-
national, 1 up.
Foursomes (completed from Friday)
International 3, United States 3
Phil Mickelson and Keegan Bradley, United
States, def. Jason Day and Graham DeLaet,
International, 4 and 3.
Ernie Els and Brendon de Jonge, International,
def. Bill Haas and Hunter Mahan, United
States, 4 and 3.
Steve Stricker and Jordan Spieth, United
States, def. Branden Grace and Richard
Sterne, International, 2 and 1.
Angel Cabrera and Marc Leishman, Interna-
tional, def. Webb Simpson and Brandt Snede-
ker, United States, 2 and 1.
Tiger Woods and Matt Kuchar, United States,
def. Louis Oosthuizen and Charl Schwartzel,
International, 4 and 2.
Adam Scott and Hideki Matsuyama, Interna-
tional, def. Jason Dufner and Zach Johnson,
United States, 2 and 1.
LPGA
Reignwood Classic
Saturday
At Pine Valley Golf Club
Beijing
Purse: $1.8 million
Yardage: 6,606; Par: 73
Third Round
a-amateur
Shanshan Feng 70-64-64 198
Stacy Lewis 68-66-65 199
InbeePark 69-68-66 203
Karrie Webb 71-68-66 205
Na Yeon Choi 64-71-72 207
Jessica Korda 64-68-76 208
Pornanong Phatlum 70-70-69 209
Xiyu Lin 72-66-71 209
So Yeon Ryu 71-69-70 210
Sandra Gal 72-73-66 211
Chella Choi 73-70-68 211
Liying Ye 69-74-68 211
Christel Boeljon 70-71-70 211
Caroline Hedwall 71-68-72 211
Yani Tseng 72-70-70 212
Brittany Lang 71-70-71 212
Beatriz Recari 73-68-71 212
Paola Moreno 69-71-72 212
Anna Nordqvist 69-72-72 213
Amy Yang 69-71-73 213
Mo Martin 70-68-75 213
Jiayun Li 74-72-68 214
Carlota Ciganda 69-73-72 214
Katherine Hull-Kirk 72-70-72 214
Sun Young Yoo 72-70-72 214
Azahara Munoz 71-70-73 214
Hee Kyung Seo 68-73-73 214
a-SiminFeng 72-75-68 215
Moriya Jutanugarn 72-73-70 215
Morgan Pressel 72-73-70 215
Jennifer Rosales 73-71-71 215
Michelle Wie 74-70-71 215
llheeLee 71-71-73 215
Hee Young Park 68-73-74 215
Vicky Hurst 73-67-75 215
Eun-Hee Ji 74-74-68 216
Cristie Kerr 72-75-69 216
Kristy McPherson 72-73-71 216
Yanhong Pan 77-68-71 216
Caroline Masson 70-73-73 216
Jenny Shin 73-69-74 216
Mariajo Uribe 74-74-69 217
Jee Young Lee 74-73-70 217
Pernilla Lindberg 72-75-70 217
Lindsey Wright 75-72-70 217
Meena Lee 72-74-71 217
Haeji Kang 74-71-72 217
Karine Icher 71-73-73 217
Jane Park 69-73-75 217
Lizette Salas 70-71-76 217
Mina Harigae 72-73-73 218


Rashad Greene had 108
yards receiving, but saw
his streak of five games
with a touchdown come
to an end.
Williams added an-
other touchdown from
17 yards out in the
fourth quarter and
backup quarterback Ja-
cob Coker ran for a 24-
yard touchdown in the
fourth quarter.
"Not really much to
say today," Edsall said.
"We weren't very good.
... I take full responsi-
bility for this. We didn't
play well offensively, de-
fensively, special teams.
"I know the guys in
the locker room. I know
who they are and I know
the resolve that we have
and we will go back and
we will look at this and
get better."
Florida State has a bye
week before it travels to
No. 3 Clemson on Oct.
19.
Maryland hosts Vir-
ginia next week.
Notes: Florida State
starting center Bryan
Stork suffered a concus-
sion in the second quar-
ter and did not return.


TV2DAY
AUTO RACING
1 p.m.
NBCSN IRL, IndyCar, Grand Prix of Houston, race 2
2 p.m.
ESPN NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Hollywood Casino 400, at Kansas City, Kan.
8 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, Auto-Plus Nationals, at Reading, Pa.
GOLF
Noon
NBC PGA Tour, Presidents Cup, final round, at Dublin, Ohio
TGC European PGA Tour, Seve Trophy, final round, at Paris
3 p.m.
TGC LPGA, Reignwood Classic, final round, at Beijing
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
4:30 p.m.
TBS NLDS, Game 3, St. Louis at Pittsburgh
8 p.m.
TBS NLDS, Game 3, Atlanta at Los Angeles
NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE
1 p.m.
CBS -Jacksonville at St. Louis
FOX -New Orleans at Chicago


Denver at Dallas

- Houston at San Francisco


4:25 p.m.

8 p.m.

11:30 p.m.


NFL San Diego at Oakland
SOCCER
8:25 a.m.
NBCSN Premier League, Chelsea at Norwich
10:55 a.m.
NBCSN Premier League, Arsenal at West Bromwich
WNBA
8:30 p.m.
ESPN Playoffs, finals, game 1, Atlanta vs Minnesota


UM
FROM PAGE B1


block Louis Young. Dorsett did his job, Hums
scored and the Hurricanes had their first lead.
After Dorsett fumbled a punt away to open the
fourth, Georgia Tech answered with Sims' second
score of the game. But Trevor Stroebel's snap on
the point-after attempt was low, Harrison Butker's
kick went left, and Miami held a 24-23 lead.
After that, it was all Miami, which overcame four
turnovers for the second straight week and still
scored plenty.
The teams were tied at 17-all after an odd first
half in which the Yellow Jackets held the ball for al-
most 22 minutes and were outgained anyway. The
Yellow Jackets got 243 yards on 43 first-half plays,
while Miami got 254 yards on only 19 plays.
Sims' 7-yard run opened the scoring, marking
the first time since the Virginia game last season -
47 calendar weeks ago that Miami faced a defi-
cit. It lasted a mere 32 seconds.
Johnson returned the ensuing kickoff to the Mi-
ami 27, ran 33 yards on the Hurricanes' first snap,
and Morris found Dorsett for a 40-yard score on
the very next play
Two-play drives would be an early trend for Mi-
ami, and that wasn't necessarily a good thing. The
Hurricanes' next two possessions were capped by
second-play giveaways, with Johnson fumbling
the ball away on one leading to a touchdown
that gave Georgia Tech a 17-7 lead on Charles Per-
kins' 31-yard run and Morris having a pass in-
tercepted on the final play of the opening quarter.




When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to
report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches
of recreational and youth leagues can send game results,
statistics, team and action photos, and we'll publish them
in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can
send us individual photos and accomplishments.

Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com




CONTACTS


SPORTS EDITOR
FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268
FAX 352-365-1951
EMAIL
sports@dailycommercial.com
* Schools or coaches can
report game results after 6
p.m. by calling 352-365-8268,


or 352-365-8279.


* Amateur Listings (col-
lege scholarships, meeting
announcements, schedule
changes, outdoors notices) can
be faxed to 352-365-1951, or
emailed to sports@dailycom-
mercial.com





Sunday, October 6, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


SATURDAY'S SCORES
EAST
Albright 52, FDU-Florham 7
Alfred 39, Buffalo St. 33
American International 31, Stonehill 10
Amherst 37, Middlebury 16
Bates 14, Williams 10
Bentley 32, St. Anselm 27
Bloomsburg 38, Gannon 14
Boston College 48, Army 27
Bowdoin 13, Tufts 10
Bridgewater (Mass.) 49, W. Connecticut 26
Buffalo 42, E. Michigan 14
CCSU 38, St. Francis (Pa.) 29
Carnegie-Mellon 34, St. Vincent 7
Coast Guard 41, W. New England 38
Colgate 41, Cornell 20
Cortland St. 17, Kean 7
Curry 26, MIT 21
Duquesne 27, West Liberty 14
Edinboro 31, Lock Haven 6
Endicott 53, Maine Maritime 28
Fitchburg St. 40, Mass. Maritime 17
Fordham 52, Lehigh 34
Framingham St. 21, Mass.-Dartmouth 14
Franklin & Marshall 35, Dickinson 14
Gallaudet 7, Mount Ida 6
Gettysburg 50, McDaniel 28
Grove City 24, Westminster (Pa.) 21
Hartwick 21, Ithaca 9
Harvard 41, Holy Cross 35, 30T
Hobart 41, WPI 7
Husson 34, Castleton St. 3
Indiana (Pa.) 62, Millersville 3
Johns Hopkins 65, Juniata 10
King's (Pa.) 41, Misericordia 40, 20T
Lebanon Valley 17, Wilkes 6
Louisiana College 42, Howard Payne 39
Louisville 30, Temple 7
Lycoming 19, Delaware Valley 16
Maine 62, Delaware 28
Navy 28, Air Force 10
Penn 37, Dartmouth 31, 40T
Princeton 53, Columbia 7
Villanova 20, William & Mary 16
SOUTH
Alabama 45, Georgia St. 3
Alcorn St. 57, Warner 0
Ball St. 48, Virginia 27
Bethune-Cookman 21, Delaware St. 7
Campbellsville 23, Kentucky Christian 6
Carson-Newman 43, Mars Hill 27
Charleston Southern 28, North Greenville 14
Charlotte 53, Gardner-Webb 51
Elizabeth City St. 26, St. Augustine's 25
Elon 28, Furman 25
FAU 37, UAB 23
Ferrum 31, Greensboro 21
Florida St. 63, Maryland 0
Georgia 34, Tennessee 31, OT
Glenville St. 35, WV Wesleyan 32
Hampden-Sydney 39, Catholic 27
Jacksonville St. 41, UT-Martin 27
James Madison 40, Albany (NY) 13
Lenoir-Rhyne 41, Brevard 0
MVSU 28, Alabama A&M 9
Marshall 34, UTSA 10
Maryville (Tenn.) 48, Averett 0
Miami 45, Georgia Tech 30
Miles 27, Benedict 13
Millsaps 48, Hendrix 37
Morgan St. 34, Florida A&M 21
Norfolk St. 26, Savannah St. 24
North Alabama 41, Shorter 0
Randolph-Macon 45, Emory & Henry 20
Reinhardt 21, Union (Ky.) 18
Samford 44, Georgia Southern 34
Sewanee 31, Birmingham-Southern 28
The Citadel 31, Appalachian St. 28, OT
Thomas More 61, Geneva 0
Troy 34, South Alabama 33
UCF 24, Memphis 17
Valdosta St. 52, Florida Tech 14
Virginia St. 14, Shaw 10
Virginia Tech 27, North Carolina 17
Virginia Union 32, Livingstone 25
Wofford 55, Presbyterian 14
MIDWEST
Adrian 17, Hope 14
Ashland 62, Lake Erie 10
Aurora 84, Maranatha Baptist 41
Baker 37, Mid-Am Nazarene 20
Benedictine (Kan.) 58, Graceland (Iowa) 13
Bethel (Minn.) 31, Augsburg 28
Bowling Green 28, UMass 7
Briar Cliff 12, Hastings 7
Butler 35, Stetson 15
Cent. Michigan 21, Miami (Ohio) 9
Coe 21, Buena Vista 7
Concordia (III.) 38, Rockford 28
Concordia (Neb.) 32, Dordt 0
Concordia (Wis.) 28, Benedictine (III.) 27
Dayton 40, Davidson 8
Defiance 43, Earlham 7
Denison 42, DePauw 21
Drake 27, Jacksonville 17
Dubuque 23, Central 21
Emporia St. 52, Lincoln (Mo.) 14
Eureka 42, Westminster (Mo.) 28
Evangel 34, Culver-Stockton 28
Findlay 38, McKendree 21
Grand View 48, St. Xavier 21
Greenville 21, Crown (Minn.) 20
Gustavus 52, Hamline 7
Hillsdale 27, N. Michigan 17
Illinois College 26, Lawrence 6
Illinois St. 35, W. Illinois 21
Illinois Wesleyan 35, Millikin 21
Indiana 44, Penn St. 24
Kalamazoo 38, Trine 31
Kenyon 21, Oberlin 14
Manchester 34, Bluffton 7
Marian (Ind.) 21, Robert Morris-Chicago 19
Martin Luther 68, Iowa Wesleyan 51
Menlo 30, Lindenwood (III.) 22
Michigan 42, Minnesota 13
Michigan St. 26, Iowa 14
Minn. Duluth 34, St. Cloud St. 7
Minn. St.-Mankato 27, Concordia (St.R) 7
Minn.-Crookston 16, Bemidji St. 14
Missouri Valley 48, Cent. Methodist 17
Momingside 32, Midland 7
Mount Union 58, Ohio Northern 7
Muskingum 35, Wilmington (Ohio) 28
N. Dakota St. 24, N. Iowa 23
Nebraska 39, Illinois 19
Ohio 43, Akron 3
Ohio Wesleyan 50, Allegheny 7
Olivet 20, Alma 13, OT
Ottawa, Kan. 34, McPherson 7
Peru St. 24, Avila 7
Pittsburg St. 28, Abilene Christian 20
Rose-Hulman 38, Hanover 14
S. Illinois 27, S. Dakota St. 24
Saginaw Valley St. 31, Ferris St. 28
St. Joseph's (Ind.) 35, Kentucky Wesleyan 9
St. Norbert 22, Monmouth (111.) 14
St. Scholastica 42, Mac Murray 6


St. Thomas (Minn.) 65, Carleton 6
Sterling 54, Bethany (Kan.) 27
Texas Tech 54, Kansas 16
Tiffin 34, Malone 30
Toledo 47, W. Michigan 20
SOUTHWEST
Austin 31, Southwestern (Texas) 0
Henderson St. 42, NW Oklahoma St. 0
Mississippi College 49, Hardin-Simmons 35
Okla. Panhandle St. 62, Wayland Baptist 21
Ouachita 31, SW Oklahoma 14
Rutgers 55, SMU 52, 30T
FAR WEST
Dickinson St. 27, Jamestown 7
Mesa St. 22, NM Highlands 17
Pacific 31, Whitworth 21
Rocky Mountain 23, Montana St.-Northem 13
San Diego 45, Mercer 13


No. 1 ALABAMA 45,
GEORGIA STATE 3
Georgia State 0 0 3 0 3
Alabama 21 17 7 0 45
First Quarter
Ala-Ch.Jones 8 pass from A.McCarron (C.Foster
kick), 11:46.
Ala-Yeldon 4 run (C.Foster kick), 3:08.
Ala-White 10 pass from A.McCarron (C.Foster
kick), 2:55.
Second Quarter
Ala-Drake 23 pass from A.McCarron (C.Foster
kick), 13:48.
Ala-Fowler 1 pass from A.McCarron (C.Foster
kick), 6:11.
Ala-FG C.Foster 27, :36.
Third Quarter
GaSt-FG Lutz 53,11:20.
Ala-Black 10 pass from B.Sims (Griffith kick),
6:18.
A-101,254.
GaSt Ala
First downs 9 31
Rushes-yards 22-15 30-181
Passing 160 296
Comp-Att-lnt 12-22-0 29-34-0
Return Yards 0 37
Punts-Avg. 7-41.1 1-42.0
Fumbles-Lost 3-1 0-0
Penalties-Yards 10-60 4-30
Time of Possession 26:22 33:38
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Georgia State, Evans 1419, Jean-Bart
2-4, Jeppesen 1-1, Bell 4-0, K.Hill 1-(minus 9). Ala-
bama, Yeldon 6-51, Henry 5-50, Drake 5-40, Fowler
3-23, B.Sims 2-10, Tenpenny 4-10, Hart 4-0, Team
1-(minus 3).
PASSING-Georgia State, Bell 11-20-0-146,
McLane 1-2-0-14. Alabama, B.Sims 14-18-0-130,
A.McCarron 15-16-0-166.
RECEIVING-Georgia State, Wilson 4-60, Ro.Davis
- Il m lih I I 4 I,,h- 4 4" I1 I ,,,, _
H.Jones 1-12, Freitag 1-11, Vogler 1-9, Barrineau
1-6, Tenpenny 14, Reed 1-3, Fowler 1-1.
No.3 CLEMSON 49, SYRACUSE 14
Clemson 21 14 7 7 49
Syracuse 0 7 7 0 14
First Quarter
Clem-Humphries 60 pass from Boyd (Catanzaro
kick), 14:22.
Clem-Brooks 1 run (Catanzaro kick), 4:07.
Clem-Humphries 42 pass from Boyd (Catanzaro
kick), :15.
Second Quarter
Syr-Smith 66 run (Norton kick), 14:51.
Clem-Seckinger 17 pass from Boyd (Catanzaro
kick), 9:49.
Clem-Bryant 40 pass from Boyd (Catanzaro
kick), 7:37.
Third Quarter
Syr-Gulley 28 run (Norton kick), 12:31.
Clem-S.Watkins 91 pass from Boyd (Catanzaro
kick), :40.
Fourth Quarter
Clem-Davidson 2 run (Lakip kick), 3:56.
A-48,961.
Clem Syr
First downs 27 13
Rushes-yards 45-158 48-323
Passing 466 74
Comp-Att-lnt 23-32-2 12-29-4
Return Yards 50 15
Punts-Avg. 7-39.1 9-46.4
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0
Penalties-Yards 3-30 8-60
Time of Possession 28:52 31:08
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Clemson, Brooks 9-46, Davidson 8-41,
McDowell 1341, Kelly 2-28, Hopper 2-7, Howard
2-2, Team 1-(minus 2), Boyd 8-(minus 5).
Syracuse, Smith 18-125, McFarlane 3-95, Hunt 13-
57, Gulley 944, G.Morris 4-7, Estime 1-(minus 5).
PASSING-Clemson, Boyd 20-27-2455, Stoudt 24-
0-5, Kelly 1-1-0-6.
Syracuse, Hunt 8-24-3-52, Allen 3-4-1-17, Bro-
yld 1-1-0-5.
RECEIVING-Clemson, Seckinger 348, Hopper 3-6,
M.Williams 2-35, McDowell 2-11, Brooks 1-24,
Cooper 1-13, Rodriguez 1-6. Syracuse, Broyld 5-64,
Gulley 3-(minus 12), Estme 1-6, G.Morris 1-6,
Hunt 1.5 Parris 1-5


No. 6 GEORGIA 34,
TENNESSEE 31, OT
Georgia 10 7 0 14 3 34
Tennessee 0 3 14 14 0 31
First Quarter
Geo-FG Morgan 56,12:12.
Geo-Conley 1 pass from Murray (Morgan kick),
3:53.
Second Quarter
Tenn-FG Palardy 26,10:15.
Geo-Wooten 4 pass from Murray (Morgan kick),
5:09.
Third Quarter
Tenn-North 19 pass from Worley (Palardy kick),
7:10.
Tenn-Swafford 15 blocked punt return (Palardy
kick), 1:25.
Fourth Quarter
Geo-Douglas 3 run (Morgan kick), 14:55.
Tenn-Neal 1 run (Palardy kick), 11:15.
Tenn-Neal 7 run (Palardy kick), 1:54.
Geo-Wooten 2 pass from Murray (Morgan kick),
:05.
Overtime
Geo-FG Morgan 42.
A-102,455.
Geo Tenn
First downs 22 18
Rushes-yards 37-238 41-189
Passing 196 215
Comp-Att-lnt 19-35-0 17-31-0
Return Yards (-2) 15
Punts-Avg. 5-34.0 6-51.2
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 1-1
Penalties-Yards 6-41 9-67
Time of Possession 29:16 30:44
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Georgia, Green 17-129, Murray 3-53,
Marshall 5-33, Douglas 10-25, Hall 1-(minus 1),
Team 1-(minus 1). Tennessee, Neal 28-148, How-
ard 646, Team 1-(minus 1), Worley 6-(minus 4).
PASSING-Georgia, Murray 19-35-0-196. Tennes-
see, Worley 17-31-0-215.
RECEIVING-Georgia, Wooten 6-38, Conley 5-64,
Scott-Wesley 2-22, McGowan 2-13, Douglas 1-32,
Bennett 1-14, R.Davis 1-9, Green 14.
Tennessee, Neal 5-19, Howard 4-70, North 447,
Croom 2-25, Branisel 1-28, Jo.Smith 1-26.
No. 7 LOUISVILLE 30, TEMPLE 7
Louisville 10 14 3 3 30
Temple 0 0 0 7 7
First Quarter
Lou-Christan 1 pass from Bridgewater (Wallace
kick), 9:23.
Lou-FG Wallace 22, :59.
Second Quarter
Lou-Do.Brown 2 run (Wallace kick), 10:36.
Lou-E.Rogers 15 pass from Bridgewater (Wal-
lace kick), :37.
Third Quarter
Lou-FG Wallace 20,:42.
Fourth Quarter
Lou-FG Wallace 25, 6:32.
Tem-Fitzpatrick 9 pass from Walker (Visco kick),
:38.
A-21,709.
Lou Tern
First downs 26 13
Rushes-yards 34-177 28-48
Passing 348 207
Comp-Att-lnt 25-36-0 13-26-1
Return Yards 5 4
Punts-Avg. 2-22.5 4-51.3
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 2-1
Penalties-Yards 8-72 3-40
Time of Possession 34:01 25:59
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Louisville, Do.Brown 11-74, Perry 1053,
Dyer 6-40, Copeland 1-15, Radcliff 1-2, Bridgewa-
ter 3-2, Team 1-(minus 4), Gardner 1-(minus 5).
Temple, Walker 12-33, Harper 9-28, Z.Williams
5-(minus 1), Reilly 1-(minus 5), Fitzpatrick 1-(mi-
nus 7).
PASSING-Louisville, Bridgewater 25-35-0-348,
Gardner 0-1-0-0.
Temple, Walker 10-19-1-182, Reilly 3-7-0-25.
RECEIVING-Louisville, E.Rogers 5-74, De La Cruz
447, R.Clark 3-49, Christian 3-30, Hubbell 2-46,
Parker 244, Do.Brown 2-18, Perry 2-12, Copeland
1-24, Harris 14. Temple, Alderman 4-61, Anderson
3-73, Fitzpatrick 3-20, Z.Williams 1-29, Coyer 1-13,
Harper 1-11.


No. 8 FLORIDA ST. 63,
No. 25 MARYLAND 0
Maryland 0 0 0 0 0
Florida St. 7 14 21 21 63
First Quarter
FSU-KWilliams 1 run (Aguayo kick), 8:14.
Second Quarter
FSU-Freeman 5 run (Aguayo kick), 6:15.
FSU-Benjamin 5 pass from Winston (Aguayo
kick), :28.
Third Quarter
FSU-O'Leary 8 pass from Winston (Aguayo kick),
12:18.
FSU-Shaw 21 pass from Winston (Aguayo kick),
9:47.
FSU-O'Leary 12 pass from Winston (Aguayo
kick), 1:50.
Fourth Quarter
FSU-Benjamin 21 pass from Winston (Aguayo
kick), 14:56.
FSU-K.Williams 17 run (Aguayo kick), 11:28.
FSU-Coker 24 run (Aguayo kick), 9:49.
A-74,909.
Md FSU
First downs 9 33
Rushes-yards 25-33 43-183
Passing 201 431
Comp-Att-lnt 15-32-0 26-39-0
Return Yards 0 50
Punts-Avg. 11-38.2 442.0
Fumbles-Lost 3-1 1-0
Penalties-Yards 440 4-26
Time of Possession 25:45 34:15
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Maryland, Veii 8-15, Rowe 5-9, Diggs
15, Reid 44, C.Brown 33, B.Ross 3-(minus 1),
Team 1-(minus 2). Florida St., Freeman 17-63,
Wilder 6-40, K.Williams 5-29, Coker 1-24, Win-
ston 7-24, R.Green 4-16, Stevenson 2-10, Team
1-(minus 23).
PASSING-Maryland, Rowe 9-17-0-119, C.Brown
6-14-0-82, Diggs 0-1-0-0. Florida St., Winston 23-
32-0-393, Coker 3-7-0-38.
RECEIVING-Maryland, Long 3-77, King 3-46,
B.Ross 3-17, Diggs 2-24, Stinebaugh 1-13,
L.Jacobs 1-10, K.Goins 1-9, Veii 1-5. Florida St.,
Shaw 5-96, Benjamin 5-60, Greene 4-108, O'Leary
4-55, Freeman 3-35, C.Green 2-39, I.Jones 1-16,
K.Williams 1-15, Broxsie 1-7.
No. 14 MIAMI 45, GEORGIA TECH 30
Georgia Tech 17 0 0 13 30
Miami 7 10 7 21 45
First Quarter
GaT-Sims 7 run (Butker kick), 9:04.
Mia-Dorsett 40 pass from Morris (Goudis kick),
8:32.
GaT-FG Butker 45, 2:47.
GaT-Perkins 31 run (Butker kick), :53.
Second Quarter
Mia-Walford 4 pass from Morris (Goudis kick),
8:22.
Mia-FG Goudis 24, :29.
Third Quarter
Mia-Hurns 69 pass from Morris (Goudis kick),
1:44.
Fourth Quarter
GaT-Sims 6 run (kick failed), 10:38.
Mia-D.Crawford 3 run (Goudis kick), 7:15.
Mia-D.Crawford 18 run (Goudis kick), 1:46.
Mia-Gunter 30 interception return (Goudis kick),
1:08.
GaT-Byerly 15 run (Butker kick), :10.
A-47,008.
GaT Mia
First downs 23 22
Rushes-yards 62-335 31-227
Passing 66 324
Comp-Att-lnt 6-19-2 17-22-2
Return Yards 76 52
Punts-Avg. 4-37.3 149.0
Fumbles-Lost 2-1 2-2
Penalties-Yards 3-15 7-54
Time of Possession 35:59 24:01
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Georgia Tech, Sims 16-77, Hill 347, Per-
kins 3-39, Godhigh 7-39, Byerly 3-33, Laskey 5-28,
Andrews 4-27, Lee 12-26, Days 2-8, Ju.Thomas
3-8, Bostic 1-5, Team 1-(minus 1), Zenon 2-(minus
1). Miami, Du.Johnson 22-184, D.Crawford 5-31,
Hums 1-13, Hagens 1-7, Team 1-(minus 1), Mor-
ris 1-(minus 7).
PASSING-Georgia Tech, Lee 5-13-1-63, Byerly
1-3-0-3, luThomas 0-3-1- Miami Morris


17-22-2-324.
RECEIVING-Georgia Tech, Waller 241, Smelter
2-9, Godhigh 1-13, Connors 1-3. Miami, Hums
4-108, Dorsett 4-66, Coley 3-74, Walford 3-28,
Du.Johnson 1-27, Hagens 1-15, D.Crawford 1-6.
No. 19 MICHIGAN 42, MINNESOTA 13
Minnesota 7 0 3 3 13
Michigan 7 7 14 14 42
First Quarter
Mich-Toussaint 8 run (Gibbons kick), 10:36.
Minn-M.Williams 7 pass from Mi.Leidner (Haw-
thorne kick), :52.
Second Quarter
Mich-Funchess 24 pass from Gardner (Gibbons
kick), 1:25.
Third Quarter
Mich-Green 2 run (Gibbons kick), 10:08.
Minn-FG Hawthorne 44,4:26.
Mich-Toussaint 12 run (Gibbons kick), :11.
Fourth Quarter
Minn-FG Hawthorne 27,10:07.
Mich-Gardner 2 run (Gibbons kick), 2:36.
Mich-Countess 72 interception return (Gibbons
kick), 1:19.
A-111,079.
Minn Mich
First downs 16 17
Rushes-yards 41-136 35-113
Passing 145 235
Comp-Att-lnt 14-21-1 13-17-0
Return Yards 18 85
Punts-Avg. 3-38.3 3-51.7
Fumbles-Lost 2-1 1-0
Penalties-Yards 6-35 2-10
Time of Possession 33:48 26:12
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Minnesota, Mi.Leidner 18-66,
R.Williams 8-33, Cobb 7-22, Gillum 2-9, Kirkwood
5-6, D.Jones 1-0. Michigan, Toussaint 17-78,
Green 10-23, Gardner 7-17, Team 1-(minus 5).
PASSING-Minnesota, Mi.Leidner 14-21-1-145.
Michigan, Gardner 13-17-0-235.
RECEIVING-Minnesota, M.Williams 5-54, Wolitar-
sky 2-27, Engel 2-22, Cobb 2-6, Kirkwood 1-14,
Mezzenga 1-12, R.Williams 1-10. Michigan,
Funchess 7-151, Chesson 3-33, Gallon 2-39,
Dileo 1-12.
No. 20 TEXAS TECH 54, KANSAS 16
TexasTech 0 20 17 17 54
Kansas 10 0 0 6 16
First Quarter
Kan-FG Wyman 36,12:13.
Kan-Mundine 25 pass from Heaps (Wyman
kick), 7:18.
Second Quarter
TT-FG Bustin 23,11:20.
TT-KeWilliams 1 run (Bustin kick), 7:46.
Tr-Mayfield 19 run (Bustin kick), 5:13.
TT-FG Bustin 25, :00.
Third Quarter
TT-Washington 4 run (Bustin kick), 14:42.
TT-FG Bustin 28,11:46.
TT-Washington 5 run (Bustin kick), 7:51.
Fourth Quarter
Tr-E.Ward 25 pass from Webb (Bustin kick),
14:49.
TT-FG Bustin 31,12:16.
TT-Cantrell 4 pass from Webb (Bustin kick),
10:30.
Kan-Turzilli 28 pass from Cummings (kick failed),
7:43.
A-25,648.
TT Kan
First downs 31 15
Rushes-yards 43-114 37-53
Passing 404 220
Comp-Att-lnt 36-57-1 18-35-1
Return Yards 59 39
Punts-Avg. 545.6 843.4
Fumbles-Lost 3-0 4-3
Penalties-Yards 9-76 12-81
Time of Possession 31:31 28:29
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Texas Tech, KeWilliams 12-42, S.Foster
3-34, Q.White 4-25, Mayfield 6-23, Washington
10-16, Hall 2-12, Grant 1-11, Brewer 1-(minus 6),
Team 4-(minus 43). Kansas, Miller 12-67, Sims
9-28, Bourbon 2-8, Pierson 1-3, Pardula 1-0, Heaps
4-(minus 16), Cummings 7-(minus 16), Team
1-(minus 21).
PASSING-Texas Tech, Mayfield 33-51-1-368, Webb
3-6-0-36. Kansas, Heaps 16-32-1-189, Cummings
2-3-0-31


RECEIVING-Texas Tech, Amaro 9-96, E.Ward 7-122,
Grant 7-92, S.Foster 5-27, Marquez 2-23, Edwards
2-20, Washington 2-13, Cantrell 2-11. Kansas,
Pierson 6-118, Mundine 3-33, Bourbon 3-17,
Turzilli 1-28, Coleman 1-9, Embree 1-7, Parmalee
1-7, Shelley-Smith 1-3, Sims 1-(minus 2).
No. 21 OKLAHOMA ST. 33,
KANSAS ST. 29
Kansas St. 7 7 7 8 29
Oklahoma St. 7 10 6 10 33
First Quarter
KSt-Gronkowski 67 pass from Sams (Cantele
kick), 1:47.
OkSt-J.Smith 2 run (Grogan kick), 1:06.
Second Quarter
OkSt-FG Grogan 30,12:04.
KSt-Daily 65 blocked field goal return (Cantele
kick), 2:45.
OkSt-Walsh 3 run (Grogan kick), :50.
Third Quarter
KSt-Miller 17 pass from Sams (Cantele kick),
8:20.
OkSt-FG Grogan 34,4:40.
OkSt-FG Grogan 23, 2:44.
Fourth Quarter
KSt-Sams 3 run (Miller pass from Sams), 6:09.
OkSt-C.Moore 6 pass from Walsh (Grogan kick),
4:13.
OkSt-FG Grogan 28, 2:24.
A-58,841.
KSt OkSt
First downs 19 19
Rushes-yards 38-144 25-85
Passing 192 245
Comp-Att-lnt 18-28-3 24-40-0
Return Yards (1) 97
Punts-Avg. 443.5 4-39.5
Fumbles-Lost 3-2 1-1
Penaltes-Yards 12-92 1-7
Time of Possession 35:32 24:28
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Kansas St., Sams 27-118, Hubert 7-30,
Lockett 1-6, Team 2-(minus 4), Waters 1-(minus 6).
Oklahoma St., J.Smith 11-56, Walsh 11-31, Roland
2-1, Team 1-(minus 3).
PASSING-Kansas St., Sams 15-21-3-181, Wa-
ters 3-7-0-11.
Oklahoma St., Walsh 24-38-0-245, Chelf 0-2-0-0.
RECEIVING-Kansas St., Cu.Sexton 6-43, Miller
4-35, Klein 3-34, Hubert 2-7, Lockett 2-6,
Gronkowski 1-67. Oklahoma St., TMoore 6-52,
Sales 4-87, Sheperd 3-28, Stewart 2-20, Good-
lett 2-14, Ateman 2-10, Seaton 2-9, Glidden 1-14,
C.Moore 1-6, J.Smith 1-5.
UCF 24, MEMPHIS 17
UCF 3 0 7 14 24
Memphis 7 0 3 7 17
First Quarter
Mem-Hayes 16 run (Elliott kick), 11:25.
UCF-FG Moffitt 26,1:46.
Third Quarter
UCF-Stanback 1 run (Moffitt kick), 5:48.
Mem-FG Elliott 48, 2:19.
Fourth Quarter
Mem-Craft 13 run (Elliott kick), 12:59.
UCF-Martn recovered fumble in end zone (Mof-
fitt kick), 2:05.
UCF-D.Johnson 12 fumble return (Moffitt kick),
1:56.
A-30,274.
UCF Mem
First downs 16 25
Rushes-yards 30-110 35-118
Passing 160 279
Comp-Att-lnt 17-36-0 20-39-3
Return Yards 36 10
Punts-Avg. 6-52.2 547.2
Fumbles-Lost 1-0 2-1
Penaltes-Yards 6-46 5-39
Time of Possession 29:32 30:28
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-UCF, S.Johnson 16-86, Stanback 7-27,
Bortles 5-1, Team 2-(minus 4). Memphis, Hayes
12-73, Craft 4-28, Warford 6-23, Hornsey 1-14,
Steib 3-(minus 2), Lynch 9-(minus 18).
PASSING-UCF, Bortles 17-36-0-160. Memphis,
Lynch 20-38-2-279, Hayes 0-1-1-0.
RECEIVING-UCF, Perriman 7-107, S.Johnson 3-15,
Godfrey 3-11, Hall 2-19, Reese 1-8, Thompson 1-0.
Memphis, Craig 5-61, TJones 4-63, Frazier 2-50,
Craft 2-30, Malone 2-18, Cross 1-26, Steib 1-14,
Huird 1-9 Henderson 14 Warford 1-4


Alabama, Clemson send messages





to conference rivals with blowouts


Associated Press

Top-ranked Alabama and
No. 3 Clemson sent messages
that they are the superpowers
of the Southeastern Confer-
ence and Atlantic Coast Con-
ference, respectively.
After Clemson won at Syr-
acuse 49-14 and Alabama
had beaten Georgia State 45-
3, Clemson began looking
towards a huge showdown
in Death Valley on Oct. 19
against No. 8 Florida State.

NO. 1 ALABAMA 45,
GEORGIA STATE 3

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. AJ
McCarron completed 15 of 16
passes for 166 yards and four
touchdowns in the first half
and Alabama rolled.
The Crimson Tide (5-0)
jumped ahead 38-0 by half-
time against the Panthers (0-
5), a first-year Football Bowl
Subdivision team.
McCarron led Alabama to
touchdowns on each of his
five possessions before leav-
ing the game. He complet-
ed his first 12 passes, putting
him in a three-way tie for the
Tide's third-longest streak.
The four touchdown pass-
es tied his career high and
was the seventh time McCar-
ron has reached that number.
Alabama outgained the Pan-
thers 477-175 and held them
to 15 yards rushing.
The Tide hasn't allowed a
touchdown in the past three
games, giving up only three
field goals.
Georgia State ended Ala-
bama's shutout bid with Wil
Lutz's school-record 53-yard
field goal to cap the second
half's opening drive.

NO. 3 CLEMSON 49,
SYRACUSE 14

SYRACUSE, N.Y. Tajh
Boyd kept his Heisman Tro-
phy aspirations intact, throw-
ing for 455 yards and five


BUTCH DILL/AP

Alabama running back Kenyan Drake (17) dives into the end zone for a touch-
down as Georgia State cornerback Demarius Matthews (5) tries to knock him
out of bounds during the first half of Saturday's game at Bryant-Denny Stadium
in Tuscaloosa, Ala.


touchdowns in three quarters
of work, and Clemson spoiled
the Orange's Atlantic Coast
Conference debut.
Boyd, who matched his
school record in TD passes,
hit Adam Humphries with
scoring passes of 60 and 42
yards in the first quarter to
help stake the Tigers to a big
early lead, and they held the
Orange at bay.
Clemson (5-0, 3-0 ACC)
entered the game as one of
just 20 undefeated teams re-
maining in the Bowl Subdi-
vision, and the Tigers made
sure they wouldn't slip up
against the Orange (2-3, 0-1)
and their raucous Homecom-
ing crowd of 48,961 by taking
a 21-0 first-quarter lead.
The Tigers entered the
game with 12 straight wins
by double digits against un-
ranked teams.

NO. 7 LOUISVILLE 30,
TEMPLE 7

PHILADELPHIA Ted-
dy Bridgewater threw for 348
yards and two touchdowns to


keep Louisville undefeated.
Bridgewater made it look
easy against the overwhelmed
Owls (0-5, 0-2 American Ath-
letic Conference). He threw
for 228 yards in the first half
to help the Cardinals roll to a
24-0 lead.
The Cardinals (5-0, 1-0) lost
a bid for their second straight
shutout when Temple scored
with 38 seconds left.
Louisville receiver DeVante
Parker, who has six touch-
down catches this season,
left in the first half with an
injured right shoulder. With-
out one of his favorite tar-
gets, Bridgewater was still
impressive, completing 25 of
35 passes. He threw a TD pass
for the 17th straight game.
Under first-year coach Matt
Rhule, the Owls remained
winless in program history
against top-10 teams.

NO. 19 MICHIGAN 42,
MINNESOTA 13

ANN ARBOR, Mich. -
Devin Gardner threw a 24-
yard, go-ahead touchdown


pass to Devin Funchess late
in the first half and Michigan
pulled away.
TheWolverines (5-0, 1-0 Big
Ten) relied on their running
game to take pressure off the
turnover-prone Gardner. He
didn't throw an interception
for the first time since mak-
ing his first start as a quarter-
back last year at Minnesota.
The Golden Gophers (4-2,
0-2) were without coach Jer-
ry Kill for an entire game for
the first time because of his
epilepsy. He had a seizure
Saturday morning, when he
planned to travel to Michigan
to coach in the game, and re-
mained home to rest in Min-
nesota.
TheWolverines have won 18
straight games at home, the
longest active streak among
BCS conference schools and
their longest since winning
28 in a row in Ann Arbor from
1969-73.

NO. 20 TEXAS TECH 54,
KANSAS 16

LAWRENCE, Kan. Fresh-
man sensation Baker May-
field passed for 368 yards but
was helped off the field with
an apparent leg injury in the
third quarter of Texas Tech's
victory.
Mayfield, a true freshman
walk-on who has started ev-
ery game, was hurt at the
end of the third quarter when
tackled while passing. There
was no penalty. He hobbled
very slowly off the field with
someone helping him under
each arm.
He was 33 of 51 with one in-
terception.
After falling behind in the
first quarter 10-0, the Red
Raiders reeled off 54 straight
points, going to 5-0 (2-0 Big
12) under first-year head
coach Kliff Kingsbury for the
first time since 2008.
It's the 22nd straight Big 12
loss by Kansas (2-2, 0-1).


B3





DAILY COMMERCIAL


Sunday, October 6, 2013


AMERICAN CONFERENCE


New England
Miami
N.Y. Jets
Buffalo


Indianapolis
Tennessee
Houston
Jacksonville


Cleveland
Baltimore
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh


Denver
Kansas City
San Diego
Oakland


NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE


Pct
1.000
.750
.500
.400

Pct
.750
.750
.500
.000

Pct
.600
.500
.500
.000

Pet
1.000
1.000
.500
.250


PA
57
91
88
130
South
PA
51
69
105
129
North
PA
94
87
81
110
West
PA
91
41
102
91


Home
2-00
1-00
2-00
2-1-0

Home
1-1-0
2-0-0
1-1-0
0-2-0

Home
2-1-0
2-0-0
2-0-0
0-2-0

Home
3-00
2-00
1-1-0
1-1-0


Dallas
Philadelphia
Washington
N.Y. Giants


New Orleans
Carolina
Atlanta
Tampa Bay


Detroit
Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota


Seattle
San Francisco
Arizona
St. Louis


LEA
SCORING
NONKICKERS
TD Rus Rec Ret X2 Pts
J. Graham, NOR 6 0 6 0 0 36
A. Peterson, MIN 6 5 1 0 0 36
WelkerDEN 6 0 6 0 0 36
Cameron, CLE 5 0 5 0 0 30
Royal,SND 5 0 5 0 0 30
D.Bryant,DAL 4 0 4 0 0 24
J. Charles, KAN 4 2 2 0 0 24
Cruz,NYG 4 0 4 0 0 24
F Jackson, BUF 4 4 0 0 0 24
Cal. Johnson, DET 4 0 4 0 0 24
Lynch, SEA 4 3 1 0 0 24
De. Thomas, DEN 4 0 4 0 0 24
Ju. Thomas, DEN 4 0 4 0 0 24
PASS RECEIVERS
RECEPTIONS
No Yds Avg Long TD
And. Johnson, HOU 34 368 10.8 27 0
Edelman, NWE 34 319 9.4 44 2
Ju.Jones, ATL 33 481 14.6 81t 2
Cameron, CLE 33 396 12.0 53 5
An. Brown, PIT 32 412 12.9 45 2
De. Thomas, DEN 29 393 13.6 78t 4
Garcon, WAS 29 339 11.7 44 2
J. Graham, NOR 27 458 17.0 56t 6
B. Marshall, CHI 27 348 12.9 41 2
Cruz, NYG 26 425 16.3 70t 4
Shorts, JAX 26 337 13.0 59 0
A.. Green, CIN 26 300 11.5 45t 3
Welker, DEN 26 266 10.2 33 6
A. Gates, SND 25 364 14.6 56t 2
YARDS
Yds No Avg Long TD
Ju. Jones, ATL 481 33 14.6 81t 2
J. Graham, NOR 458 27 17.0 56t 6
To. Smith, BAL 435 21 20.7 74 1
Cruz, NYG 425 26 16.3 70t 4
An. Brown, PIT 412 32 12.9 45 2
Cameron, CLE 396 33 12.0 53 5
De. Jackson, PHL 393 21 18.7 61t 2
De. Thomas, DEN 393 29 13.6 78t 4
Boldin, SNF 372 24 15.5 43 2
And. Johnson, HOU 368 34 10.8 27 0
A. Gates, SND 364 25 14.6 56t 2
B. Marshall, CHI 348 27 12.9 41 2
Simpson, MIN 342 19 18.0 51 0
Decker, DEN 340 24 14.2 61 1
Garcon, WAS 339 29 11.7 44 2
Shorts, JAX 337 26 13.0 59 0
N. Washington, TEN 332 19 17.5 77t 2
Edelman, NWE 319 34 9.4 44 2
Cal. Johnson, DET 312 21 14.9 72t 4
Gordon, CLE 303 18 16.8 47t 2
A.. Green, CIN 300 26 11.5 45t 3
Wayne, IND 300 22 13.6 31 2
RUSHERS
Att Yards Avg Long TD
L. McCoy, PHL 78 468 6.0 41t 2
A. Peterson, MIN 92 421 4.6 78t 5
D. Murray, DAL 72 356 4.9 41 1
D. Martin, TAM 100 342 3.4 28 1
Forte, CHI 69 320 4.6 55 3
F Jackson, BUF 65 309 4.8 59 4
Lynch, SEA 79 308 3.9 43 3
A. Morris, WAS 56 296 5.3 32 2
Spiller, BUF 74 296 4.0 54t 1
Gore, SNF 61 295 4.8 34t 2
A. Foster, HOU 76 292 3.8 16 1
B. Powell, NYJ 66 292 4.4 27 1
De. Williams, CAR 62 291 4.7 27 0
J. Charles, KAN 70 289 4.1 24 2
Chr. Johnson, TEN 84 277 3.3 23 0
Re. Bush, DET 48 254 5.3 37t 1
Moreno, DEN 46 238 5.2 25t 3
Be. Tate, HOU 34 228 6.7 60 0
Vick, PHL 26 228 8.8 61 2
Ry. Mathews, SND 64 226 3.5 20 0
D. McFadden, OAK 53 215 4.1 30 2
T. Richardson, IND 64 200 3.1 12 2
YARDS FROM SCRIMMAGE
Total Rush Rec
L. McCoy, PHL 608 468 140
J. Charles, KAN 502 289 213
D. Murray, DAL 494 356 138
Ju. Jones, ATL 488 7 481
Forte, CHI 480 320 160
A. Peterson, MIN 473 421 52
F Jackson, BUF 462 309 153
J. Graham, NOR 458 0 458
To. Smith, BAL 435 0 435
Re. Bush, DET 433 254 179
An. Brown, PIT 426 14 412
Cruz, NYG 425 0 425
B. Powell, NYJ 400 292 108
Lynch, SEA 399 308 91
A. Foster, HOU 398 292 106
Cameron, CLE 396 0 396
De. Jackson, PHL 393 0 393
De. Thomas, DEN 393 0 393


FoRnPRESS t
L- n DI


<4K niaj
AriingtMil~n


DERS
D. Martin, TAM
Boldin, SNF
Sproles, NOR
And. Johnson, HOU
A. Gates, SND
Gore, SNF
Garcon, WAS
B. Marshall, CHI
Simpson, MIN
Decker, DEN
J. Bell, DET
Shorts, JAX
N. Washington, TEN
Gordon, CLE
Spiller, BUF
Edelman, NWE
A. Morris, WAS
Cal. Johnson, DET
Moreno, DEN
Wayne, IND
De. Williams, CAR
A.. Green, CIN
Colston, NOR
Cobb, GBY
V. Jackson, TAM
Ry. Mathews, SND
Chr. Johnson, TEN
J. Nelson, GBY
D. Bryant, DAL
R. Woods, BUF
Hartline, MIA
De. Hopkins, HOU
PUI
No


Doss, BAL
McCluster, KAI
Benjamin, CLE
Holliday, DEN
Dw. Harris, DA
G. Tate, SEA
Edelman, NWE
Ginn Jr., CAR
Spurlock, DET
PAdams, OAK
Sproles, NOR
Reynaud,TEN
Leonhard, BUF
Page, TAM
An. Brown, PIT
Hilton, IND
R. Randle, NY'
Br. Tate, CIN
Royal, SND
Kerley, NYJ

C. Patterson, I
Hester, CHI
K. Martin, HOI
Thigpen, MIA
Dam. Johnsor
Whittaker, SNI
D. Wilson, NY(
F Jones, PIT
B. Cunninghar
J. Ford, OAK
Br. Tate, CIN
Reynaud,TEN
Spurlock, DET
C. Thompson,
C. Gates, NYJ
J. Ross, GBY

Verner, TEN
Alonso, BUF
Talib, NWE
R. Sherman, S
Levy, DET
Chancellor, SE
Quin, DET
Ward, CLE
M. Wright, CHI
Tillman, CHI
D. Smith, BAL
Greenway, MINl
Henderson, M
P Peterson, AF
Leonhard, BUF
E. Thomas, SE
A. Williams, BU
H. Smith, MIN
Delmas, DET
D. Patterson, I
E. Reid, SNF
Ch. Harris, DE
Mundy, NYG
M. Foster, TAM
Umenyiora, AT
Se. Lee, DAL
B. Carr, DAL


9
N 16
E 17
1;
1"
4L 6
14
S 11
4

11
1 13

(
!
G 11
(
(


NT RETURNS
o Yards A
9 167 18
6 246 15
7 256 15
3 191 14
6 80 13
4 172 12


342
0 3
93
0 3
0 3
295
10 :
0 3
0 3
0 3
131
0 3
0 3
22
296
4
296
0 3
238
5
291
0 3
0 Z
6 Z
0 Z
226
277
0 Z
0 Z
16
0 :
0 :
vg Long
8.6 82t
5.4 89t
5.1 79t
4.7 81t
3.3 38
2.3 33
2.1 17
0.5 12
9.5 57
9.4 30
9.3 28
9.1 35
9.0 25
8.6 28
'.5 40
'.2 23
6.2 14
6.0 14
5.8 12
5.7 12


KICKOFF RETURNS
No Yards Avg Long TD
MIN 12 406 33.8 105t 1
14 453 32.4 80 0
S 12 327 27.3 46 0
8 213 26.6 38 0
n, PHL 12 317 26.4 33 0
S 6 156 26.0 42 0
S 8 206 25.8 31 0
8 194 24.3 34 0
n,STL 8 191 23.9 32 0
6 143 23.8 28 0
8 188 23.5 32 0
5 113 22.6 32 0
5 100 20.0 23 0
WAS 8 160 20.0 28 0
5 99 19.8 28 0
6 75 12.5 21 0
INTERCEPTIONS
Int Yds Long TD
4 62 34 1
4 38 32 0
4 12 14 0
SEA 2 86 58t 1
2 75 66t 1
A 2 62 32 0
2 57 42 0
2 57 44t 1
2 46 38t 1
2 41 41 0
2 38 37t 1
1 2 23 23 0
IN 2 19 10 0
RI 2 16 11 0
S 2 14 14 0
EA 2 11 11 0
UF 2 6 6 0
2 4 4 0
2 2 2 0
MIA 2 2 2 0
2 1 1 0
N 2 0 0 0
1 91 91 0
1 1 85 85t 1
L 1 68 68t 1
1 52 52t 1
1 49 49t 1


Angel Fligh

S 0 U T H F I


17th Annual:' : '

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November 10&11,2013
Were raising enough money so 250 children nd
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naba a the Air ChaNy N k

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This Week
Thursday's Game


Cleveland 37, Buffalo 24

Detroit at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
New England at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at Miami, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m.


Ne


N.Y. Giants at Chicago, 8:25 p.m.


Today's Games


Carolina at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
Denver at Dallas, 4:25 p.m.
Houston at San Francisco, 8:30 p.m.
San Diego at Oakland, 11:35 p.m.
Open: Minnesota, Pittsburgh, Tampa Bay, Washington
Monday's Game
N.Y. Jets at Atlanta, 8:40 p.m.


Carolina at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
Oakland at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Houston, 1 p.m.
Green Bay at Baltimore, 1p.m.
Philadelphia at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Cleveland, 1p.m.
Tennessee at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Jacksonville at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
New Orleans at New England, 4:25 p.m.
Washington at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Atlanta, Miami

Indianapolis at San Diego, 8:40 p.m.


ext Week
Oct. 10

Oct. 13
















Oct. 14


NFL Week 5: Browns for real? Bills for real?

The Browns might be for real. So might the Bills. Or neither of them should be believed.
Hard to tell, and regardless of their credentials, Cleveland and Buffalo enter Thursday
night's game with 2-2 records and off impressive victories.


MATCH UP


STORYLINE


PICK


(Thur.) BUF at CLE .I Injuries to Bills' RB duo should give Browns third straight victory CLE 20-17

DEN at DAL -- Can't see the Cowboys slowing down Peyton and gang DEN 33-23

NE at CIN j 1U Brady coming off an excellent performance at Atlanta last week NE 27-20

NO at CHI 511*^ Great at home, Saints must show they are at least good on road NO 31-26

SEA at IND f Delicious matchup of Luck vs. Wilson, but D decides this one SEA 20-16

HOU at SF R" First Seahawks beat Texans, now Niners match it SF 23-20

KC at TEN use, Chiefs need to be better than in last week's win KC 20-19

BAL at MIAf- ^ Don't like how Ravens have played away from Baltimore MIA21-17

DET at GB ( Back from bye, time for Pack to assert itself in division GB 37-34

CAR at ARI o r Back from bye, Panthers do not assert themselves ARI 17-13

PHI at NYG _e.I_ Giants have to win at some point ... NYG 24-21

SD at OAK .l'j Baseball playoffs force change in kickoff time; not in result, though SD 30-13

JAC at STL Rams were awful last week; Jaguars wish they could get to awful STL 27-9

(Mon.) NYJ at ATL 5^ A loss here makes Falcons an also-ran; they aren't ATL 24-13

Barry Wilner AP


SEIZE THE DAY'S
SPORTS NEWS.,

ThewDailfyCoennuriI
www.dailycommercial.com


Sponsored by


NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS at CINCINNATI
GALS PATRIOTS: OUT: RB Stevan Ridle
(knee). DOUBTFUL: WR Matthew Slater (,
QUESTIONABLE: WR Danny Amendola (gr
RB Brandon Bolden (knee), WR Aaron Do
(neck), TE Rob Gronkowski (back, forearm
LB Dont'a Hightower (knee), LB Jerod Ma
(ankle), WR Kenbrell Thompkins shoulde
Sebastian Vollmer (foot), RB Leon Washin
(thigh), S Tavon Wilson (hamstring). PROD
ABLE: CB Kyle Arrington (groin), T Will Sv
(knee). BENGALS: DOUBTFUL: CB Brando
Ghee (thigh), CB Leon Hall (hamstring), G
Pollak (knee). QUESTIONABLE: DE Micha
Johnson (concussion), CB Dre Kirkpatrick
(hamstring). PROBABLE: LB Vontaze Burf
(neck), LB James Harrison (knee), S Regg
Nelson (hamstring).
DETROIT LIONS at GREEN BAY PACKERS
LIONS: OUT: WR Nate Burleson (forearm
QUESTIONABLE: CB Chris Houston (ham-
string), WR Calvin Johnson (knee), S Glov
Quin (ankle). PROBABLE: DE Ziggy Ansah
(abdomen), S Louis Delmas (knee), WR F
rick Edwards (ankle), T Jason Fox (groin),
Israel Idonije (hamstring), CB Rashean MI
(head), LB Ashlee Palmer (ankle), G Rob
(shoulder). PACKERS: OUT: CB Casey Ha
(hamstring), RB James Starks (knee), G C
Van Roten (foot). PROBABLE: S Morgan B
nett (hamstring), CB Jarrett Bush (hamst
TE Jermichael Finley (concussion), RB Jo
than Franklin (foot), RB John Kuhn (hams
RB Eddie Lacy (concussion), LB Clay Mat
(hamstring).
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS at INDIANAPOLIS CC
- SEAHAWKS: OUT: T Breno Giacomini (
DT Jordan Hill (biceps), RB Spencer Ware
kle). DOUBTFUL: CB Jeremy Lane (hamst
QUESTIONABLE: TE Zach Miller (hamstrir
C Max Unger (arm). PROBABLE: DE Micha
Bennett (back), DE Chris Clemons (not in
jury related), S Jeron Johnson (hamstring
RB Marshawn Lynch (not injury related), E
Brandon Mebane (knee), CB Walter Thurr
(shoulder), LB K.J. Wright (shoulder). COL
OUT: RB Ahmad Bradshaw (neck), RB Sta
Havili (ankle), DT Ricky Jean Francois (gro
LaRon Landry (ankle), LB Bjoern Wemrner(I
PROBABLE: CB Vontae Davis (foot), S De
Howell (toe), G Hugh Thornton (shoulder)
BALTIMORE RAVENS at MIAMI DOLPHINS
RAVENS: DOUBTFUL: NT Terrence Cody (I
C Ryan Jensen (foot). QUESTIONABLE: LB
Arthur Brown (shoulder), WR Marion Brov
(thigh), RB Shaun Draughn (ankle), WR Ja
Jones (knee), LB Albert McClellan (should
DT Marcus Spears (knee), WR Brandon S
(thigh), WR Deonte Thompson concussiono
CB Lardarius Webb (thigh). DOLPHINS: 0
CB Dimitri Patterson (groin). QUESTIONA
WR Brandon Gibson (ankle), S Don Jones
(elbow), LB Jason Trusnik (rib), DE Camel


INJURY REPORT FOR TODAY'S GAMES
BEN- Wake (knee). PROBABLE: CB Nolan Carroll Moore
ly (ankle), S Chris Clemons (glute), LB Dannell ness),
wrist). Ellerbe (knee), LB Jonathan Freeny (shoulder), QUES
oin), LB Koa Misi (shoulder), DT Paul Soliai (knee). G Dar
bson NEW ORLEANS SAINTS at CHICAGO BEARS- (groin)
m), SAINTS: OUT: NT Brodrick Bunkley (calf), S Ro- Minter
iyo man Harper (knee), RB Mark Ingram (toe), WR ley (wr
er), T Lance Moore (hand), DE Tyrunn Walker (knee). DENVF
igton QUESTIONABLE: DE Tom Johnson (hamstring), BRI
3- CB Keenan Lewis (hip). PROBABLE: G Tim Bailey
itek Lelito (calf). BEARS: OUT: S Anthony Walters ABLE:
on (hamstring). QUESTIONABLE: DT Stephen Paea Joel D
G Mike (toe), CB Charles Tillman (groin, knee). PROB- K Mat
el ABLE: TE Martellus Bennett (shoulder), WR (ribs),
S Brandon Marshall (foot), CB Sherrick McManis rein (n
ict (quadriceps), LB D.J. Williams (illness). Austin
gie PHILADELPHIA EAGLES at NEW YORK GIANTS DE Ed
EAGLES: QUESTIONABLE: S Patrick Chung Dwayn
(shoulder). PROBABLE: CB Brandon Boykin cussic
). (shoulder), DE Fletcher Cox (quadriceps). GI- CB M(
ANTS: OUT: C David Baas (neck), CB Jayron Ware (
ver Hosley (hamstring), DT Linval Joseph (ankle, SAN D
S knee), TE Adrien Robinson (foot), CB Aaron ERS-
Pat- Ross (back). DOUBTFUL: CB Corey Webster cussic
DE (groin). QUESTIONABLE: DT Cullen Jenkins QUES
lathis (knee, Achilles), WR Louis Murphy (ankle). C Rich
Sims PROBABLE: LB Mark Herzlich (toe), DT Shaun (chest
yward Rogers (back), CB Terrell Thomas (knee). PROBD
Greg KANSAS CITY CHIEFS at TENNESSEE TITANS Mathe
Bur- CHIEFS: OUT: T Eric Fisher (concussion), RAIDE
ring), TE Travis Kelce (knee). QUESTIONABLE: TE An- DOUB
hna- thony Fasano (ankle, knee), CB Brandon Flow- C Stef
string), ers (knee), S Kendrick Lewis (ankle). PROB- DT Sti
thews ABLE: G Jeff Allen (groin), G Jon Asamoah kle),T
(knee), RB Jamaal Charles (toes), P Dustin (knee)
OLTS Colquitt (right knee), CB Marcus Cooper (knee, DE Ja,
knee), thigh), C Rodney Hudson (shin), LB James- ter (rit
e (an- Michael Johnson (thumb), TE Sean McGrath Charle
ring). (knee), RB Anthony Sherman (knee). TITANS: HOUS
ig), OUT: RB Shonn Greene (knee), DT Sammie Hill TE>
ael (ankle), QB Jake Locker (hip, knee). QUESTION- Tim Do
n- ABLE: LB Patrick Bailey (hamstring), DE Ropati Duane
g), Pitoitua (shoulder), T David Stewart (calf), CB PROBi
DT Blidi Wreh-Wilson (hamstring). PROBABLE: WR shouk
nond Kenny Britt (neck, ribs). Owen
LTS: JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS at ST. LOUIS RAMS back),
anley JAGUARS: OUT: WR Mike Brown (back), Jones
)in), S WR Stephen Burton (concussion), CB Dwayne injury
(foot). Gratz (ankle), TE Marcedes Lewis (calf), S ChrisM
lano Dwight Lowery (concussion), DE Jeremy Mincey S Edd
(concussion). QUESTIONABLE: WR Cecil Posey
S Shorts (groin). PROBABLE: CB Alan Ball (groin), LB Da
knee), LB Geno Hayes (hip flexor), DT Roy Miller (knee)
3 (shoulder), WR Denard Robinson (hamstring). (groin,
wn RAMS: OUT: T Rodger Saffold (knee). DOUBT- (foot).
acoby FUL: CB Cortland Finnegan (thigh), DE William (knee)
der), Hayes (knee). QUESTIONABLE: DT Matt Con- Davis
Stokley rath (concussion), CB Trumaine Johnson (ill- RB Bri
in), ness). PROBABLE: CB Brandon McGee (thigh), ers (ki
UT: LB Will Witherspoon (thigh). PatricI
BLE: CAROLINA PANTHERS at ARIZONA CARDI- cus Di
S NALS -PANTHERS: OUT: DT Dwan Edwards Joe St
ron (hamstring), S Quintin Mikell (ankle), CB D.J. liams


e (knee). PROBABLE: DE Greg Hardy (ill-
DT Kawann Short (ankle). CARDINALS:
TIONABLE: LB Jasper Brinkley (groin),
yn College (shin), DT Darnell Dockett
i, S Rashad Johnson (finger), LB Kevin
r (hamstring). PROBABLE: DE Ronald Tal-
rist).
ER BRONCOS at DALLAS COWBOYS
ONCOS: QUESTIONABLE: CB Champ
(foot), LB Paris Lenon (thigh). PROB-
WR Eric Decker (shoulder, ankle), TE
reessen (knee), G Chris Kuper (ankle),
t Prater (right calf), C Manny Ramirez
LB Danny Trevathan (knee), DT Mitch Un-
ieck). COWBOYS: DOUBTFUL: WR Miles
(hamstring), LB Justin Durant (groin),
gar Jones (groin). QUESTIONABLE: WR
ie Harris (hip), DE George Selvie (con-
in). PROBABLE: LB Bruce Carter (foot),
irris Claiborne (shoulder), DE DeMarcus
back).
IEGO CHARGERS at OAKLAND RAID-
- CHARGERS: OUT: T King Dunlap (con-
in). DOUBTFUL: G Chad Rinehart (toe).
TIONABLE: G Jeromey Clary (clavicle),
ih Ohmberger (groin), CB Johnny Patrick
), CB Shareece Wright (hamstring).
ABLE: CB Derek Cox (knee), RB Ryan
ws (hamstring), LB Manti Te'o (foot).
RS: OUT: S Tyvon Branch (ankle).
TFUL: RB Darren McFadden (hamstring),
en Wisniewski (knee). QUESTIONABLE:
acy McGee (shoulder), G Lucas Nix (an-
Tony Pashos (groin), RB Marcel Reece
, T Menelik Watson (knee). PROBABLE:
son Hunter (quadriceps), CB Tracy Por-
is), QB Terrelle Pryor (concussion), S
es Woodson (not injury related).
TON TEXANS at SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS
XANS: OUT: G Brandon Brooks (toe), LB
obbins (hamstring). QUESTIONABLE: T
e Brown (toe), WR Andre Johnson (shin).
ABLE: LB Bryan Braman (hamstring,
ler), LB Brian Cushing (concussion), TE
Daniels (knee), RB Arian Foster (thumb,
TE Garrett Graham (hip, groin), RB Greg
(foot, groin), CB Johnathan Joseph (not
related), CB Brice McCain (knee), C
Myers (biceps), T Derek Newton (knee),
ie Pleasant (hamstring), WR DeVier
(Achilles), S Ed Reed (hip, abdomen),
rryl Sharpton (foot, hip), G Wade Smith
, RB Ben Tate (shoulder), DE J.J. Watt
, nose). 49ERS: OUT: WR Quinton Patton
QUESTIONABLE: CB Nnamdi Asomugha
, T Anthony Davis (shoulder), TE Vernon
(hamstring), DT Ray McDonald (ankle),
uce Miller (quadriceps), CB Carlos Rog-
inee), DT Justin Smith (shoulder), LB
k Willis (groin). PROBABLE: TE Demar-
obbs (calf), G Mike lupati (shoulder), T
aley (hamstring, ankle), WR Kyle Wil-
(knee).


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


Pct
.500
.250
.250
.000

Pct
1.000
.333
.250
.000

Pct
.750
.750
.333
.250

Pet
1.000
.500
.500
.250


East
PA
85
138
112
146
South
PA
55
36
104
70
North
PA
101
114
88
123
West
PA
47
95
89
121


Home
2-00
0-2-0
0-2-0
0-1-0

Home
3-00
1-1-0
1-1-0
0-2-0

Home
2-0-0
2-0-0
1-0-0
1-0

Home
2-0-0
1-1-0
1-0-0
1-1-0


Away
0-2-0
1-1-0
1-1-0
0-3-0

Away
1-0-0
0-1-0
0-2-0
0-2-0

Away
1-1-0
1-1-0
0-2-0
0-2-0

Away
2-00
1-1-0
1-2-0
0-2-0


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DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, October 6, 2013


Crafts Activities

Face Painting

Tuesday 5:30-7:30pm

10/8 "Be Healthy"
10/15 "Bingo" Night / ,
10/22 Races & Story r
10/29 "Cow"loweeen
Costume Party


catering


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JULIE PACE
Associated Press
WASHINGTON
- President Barack
Obama says he would
"think about changing"
the Washington Red-
skins' name if he owned
the football team as he
waded into the contro-
versy involving a word
many consider offensive
to Native Americans.
Obama, in an inter-
view with The Associ-
ated Press, said team
names such as the Red-
skins offend "a sizable
group of people." He
said that while fans get
attached to the names,
nostalgia may not be a
good enough reason to
keep them in place.
"I don't know wheth-
er our attachment to a
particular name should
override the real legiti-
mate concerns that peo-
ple have about these
things," he said in the
interview, which was
conducted Friday at the
White House.
An avid sports fan who
roots for his hometown
Chicago Bears, Obama
said he doesn't think
Washington football
fans are purposely try-
ing to offend American
Indians. "I don't want to
detract from the won-
derful Redskins fans that
are here. They love their


team and rightly so," he
said.
But he appeared to
come down on the side
of those who have sharp-
ly criticized the foot-
ball team's name, noting
that Indians "feel pretty
strongly" about mascots
and team names that
depict negative stereo-
types about their heri-
tage.
The team's owner,
Dan Snyder has vowed
to never abandon the
name.
NFL Commissioner
Roger Goodell said last
month that the league
should pay attention to
those offended by the
name a subtle change
in position for Goodell,
who had more strongly
supported the name in
his previous statements
this year.
Lanny J. Davis, an at-
torney for the Redskins,
said the team's fans don't
intend to "disparage or
disrespect" anyone.
"The name 'Washing-
ton Redskins' is 80 years
old. It's our history and
legacy and tradition,"
Davis said in an emailed
statement in which he
also identified himself
as an Obama supporter.
"We Redskins fans sing
'Hail to the Redskins' ev-
ery Sunday as a word of
honor, not disparage-
ment."


Other profession-
al sports teams have In-
dian names, including
football's Kansas City
Chiefs and baseball's At-
lanta Braves and Cleve-
land Indians. Davis re-
ferred to fans of those
teams and hockey's Chi-
cago Blackhawks in his
statement, saying Red-
skins fans "love our team
and its name and, like
those fans, we do not in-
tend to disparage or dis-
respect a racial or ethnic
group."
Numerous colleg-
es and universities have
changed names that ref-
erence Native Ameri-
cans. St. John's changed
its mascot from the Red-
men to the Red Storm,
Marquette is now the
Golden Eagles instead of
the Warriors and Stan-
ford switched from the
Indians to the Cardinal.
The Redskins' name
has attracted a fresh
round of controversy in
recent months, with lo-
cal leaders in Washing-
ton calling for a name
change and some me-
dia outlets refraining
from using the name.
The name is the sub-
ject of a long-running
legal challenge from a
group of American Indi-
ans seeking to block the
team from having fed-
eral trademark protec-
tion.


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NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE


Obama open to


name change for


Washington Redskins


It 7An-" i I i o etRest,


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Sunday, October 6, 2013




Sunday, October 6, 2013


EARLY DETECTION


SAVES LIVES & TIME
Women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer may have an option for treatment
that significantly reduces treatment time and interruption to their life.


Women diagnosed with early-
stage breast cancer have a treatment
option that may significantly reduce
healing time and interruption to the
demands of everyday life. Florida
Hospital Waterman Cancer Institute
is on the forefront of offering
compassionate care and state-of-the-
art technologies for those seeking a
team of cancer specialists.
When Kathy Pio first learned she
had breast cancer in early March, she
immediately thought of the worst-case
scenario. "I kept thinking about losing
my hair and what I would have to go
through," she says. "I was scared of
the unknown until I went to the Florida
Hospital Waterman Cancer Institute."
After diagnosis, Kathy says Drs.
Maen Hussein, medical oncologist, and
Borys Mascarenhas, Lake County's
only fellowship-trained surgical
oncologist, completely put her mind
at ease. "They explained everything
to me," she says. "Dr. Hussein went
over my numbers and my lab report



JOIN

THE

PINK

ARMY!


with me. He explained that everything
would be fine because the cancer was
caught early."
Kathy was educated about her
options to fight the disease and
underwent breast-conserving
therapy incorporating the state-of-
the-art SAVI treatment. SAVI
is an advanced form of radiation
therapy that only delivers radiation
to the tissue where the cancer
is most likely to recur with fewer
side effects. Drs. Robert Purdon
and Jeffery Brabham, radiation
oncologists at Florida Hospital
Waterman, performed the treatment
and instead of weeks of radiation or a
mastectomy, Kathy only had to have
five days of radiation treatment. "It
wasn't that bad. It only took me away
from work for two weeks," says the
48-year-old Eustis resident, "and that
was important because I'm a dog
groomer."
At Florida Hospital Waterman
Cancer Institute, Kathy says all of the


doctors and staff made her feel at
home. Even with her follow-ups, Kathy
does not dread the visits because of
the friendly atmosphere and caring
employees. "They are all very nice and
you can see the camaraderie, which
is wonderful," she says. "I just feel so
blessed my cancer was caught early,
and I feel even more blessed that the
Florida Hospital Waterman Cancer
Institute was there to help me."
Dedicated to providing the most
cutting-edge care available, Florida
Hospital Waterman Cancer Institute
(FHWCI) is home to Drs. Robert
Purdon and Jeffrey Brabham. Both


are board-certified in radiation
oncology and represent the best of
the best in their field. They are not
only highly regarded professionals
with years of practical experience,
they are dedicated to using state-
of-the-art technologies in the
prediction, detection, and treatment
of cancer.
In the month of October, join
the Pink Army! Florida Hospital
Waterman is leading the fight against
breast cancer and is recognized as a
Breast Imaging Center of Excellence,
providing comprehensive breast care
services.


Join Dr. Mascarenhas for lunch and an educational seminar to
learn more about new treatments for breast cancer 1-2 p.m.


SFLORIDA HOSPITAL
WATERMAN
6 * A a* "g a a a


B7


DAILY COMMERCIAL






COLLEGE FOOTBALL


Fans happy to attend Air Force-Navy game


DAVID GINSBURG
Associated Press
ANNAPOLIS, Md. -
On a beautiful fall day,
the parking lot at Navy-
Marine Corps Memorial
Stadium was filled with
fans and tailgate par-
ties. A record crowd of
38,225 showed up Sat-
urday for the football
game between Navy
and Air Force.
Navy athletic director
Chet Gladchuk looked
at the activity around
him and smiled. After
tumultuous week, he
was right where he was
supposed to be Satur-
day.
The Air Force-Na-
vy game was in serious
jeopardy on Tuesday,
when the Department
of Defense suspend-
ed athletic competi-
tion at the nation's ser-
vice academies because
of the U.S. government
shutdown. At that point,
Gladchuk took action to
convince the DOD that
the game should be
played because it was
funded by non-appro-
priated money.
His effort paid off.
Late Wednesday night,
the DOD relented.
Game on.
"First thing that
comes to mind is grati-
tude to the Secretary of
Defense and the Navy
leadership for allow-
ing it to happen," Glad-


Football fans arrive and tailgate
Force in Annapolis, Md.

chuk said before kickoff.
"It's a vision that comes
to fruition in this me-
morial that happens to
be a stadium every time
we play a home football
game."
The late morning
kickoff meant some tail-
gaters featured bacon
and eggs on the grill in-
stead of burgers and hot
dogs.
Mimosa in one hand,
spatula in the other, re-


NICK WASS/AP
in the parking lot before Saturday's game between Navy and Air


tired Air Force officer
Charlie Lang was de-
lighted to be among
friends following a
stressful week.
"There was some con-
cern, but I was hope-
ful it would happen be-
cause they've never
canceled a Navy foot-
ball game during a gov-
ernment shutdown,"
Lang said.
Jerry Elliott drove
from Fort Worth, Texas,


to watch his first Navy
football game. Elliott,
72, and 71-year-old Jeff
Miles (Navy, Class of
'63) served together on
the U.S.S. Nimitz from
1978-80.
"I was coming either
way, but of course I'm
glad they're playing the
game," Elliott said.
Miles was certain it
would happen.
"Navy athletics is pri-
vately funded," Miles


said. "The idea of them
trying to cancel a game
between two service
academies is appalling."
Gladchuk felt the
same way.
Asked if he had any
doubts that the game
would go off as sched-
uled, Gladchuk replied,
"Just about every day."
That's why he worked
so hard to make it hap-
pen.
"The exercise was to
remove emotion and
just try to convey the
facts: What the game
means, not only to the
Naval Academy but to
the community, the re-
gion, the city of Annap-
olis," Gladchuk said.
"The economic impact
that it makes is so criti-
cally important.
"If this was something
that was year from now
and we could plan for it
and there were no ex-
pectations, that would
be one thing," Gladchuk
said. "But you have the
concessionaires, the ca-
terers, the people who
bought tickets, 200 re-
cruits, people who have
come from all over the
country. To pull the
plug days before the
event would have been
a tough one to swallow."
Pam Alderson, 53, was
delighted to be at a tail-
gate, even one that be-
gan well before noon.
Her plate was filled with
egg casserole, French


toast and cheese grits.
"Definitely a relief,"
she said. "They were
talking about resched-
uling this thing for De-
cember, and that's crazy
talk because in Decem-
ber the only thing we
think about is beating
Army"
What would she have
done if the Air Force
game was postponed, or
worse, canceled?
"If we didn't play
I would have stayed
home and written my
congressman," Alder-
son said. "We give a lot
of money to this team."
Chet Whitley, who
drove up for North Car-
olina for the game, won-
dered whether Navy's
game at Duke next week
would be impacted by
the government shut-
down. A home game is
one thing, but traveling
to Duke?
"Not sure how that's
going to work," Whitley
said.
Gladchuk was ready to
make it work.
"There wouldn't be
any money that's part
of government funding.
It would be exclusively
non-appropriated," he
said. "We're hopeful, and
right now the Secretary
of Defense has not told
us we can't go. So we're
just remaining open-
minded. We're prepar-
ing for it."


PAID ADVERTISEMENT


Don't Buy A Car Until


You Read This...

$57.00 Auto Acquisition Event Opens To Public Cars
Starting At $1,995.00


Staff Writer Curt Lentz
Mt. Dora, FL Due to
the national increase in
defaulted automotive loans,
banks are having to store
and stock pile vehicles that
at one point and time had
owners with good credit.
Tim Moore, General
Manager of Advantage
Chrysler Dodge Jeep was


"Vehicles may be
sold for
pennies on
the dollar!"

Tim Moore
General Manager


from 9:15am 5:45pm and
Sunday, October 6th from
12:15pm 4:45pm. It will
be open to the public, and
promises to be the biggest
thing Mt. Dora has ever
seen!
"If anyone has doubts
I will be more than happy
to show them the N.A.D.A.
value on the vehicle that


asked for help in storing fee and start making they are interested in."


and disposing of the
desired inventory, "Helping
the banks is the right thing
to do. After all, I can't count


lease program."
"The banks are making
buy of a lifetime offers, thus


inspected car or truck."


warranty on many of these
cream puffs, at no charge
to the buyer. Last, but not
least, huge discounts will


only sales event, cars that
normally sell for five to
ten thousand dollars will


the number of times that making it very attractive be sold for three to five
they have loaned money for the person who wants thousand, even cars for


a super clean safety $1,995.00.


Bank Reps will be on


to customers of ours that
were turned down all over
town."


Vehicles included in of all we mark down all
this three day event will prices up to $1800 below
be domestic and imported Blue Book value and also


sports cars, vans, sport
utility vehicles, and trucks,
many still under factory
warranty.
Moore, explained, "This
is a great deal for bargain
hunters. Simply pick out


one of the 239 vehicles to pay cash."


that have been traded,


This three day sales


you before the sale. Moore
went on to say, "Even with
slow, no or bad credit, the


it takes to loan good
people with bad credit
money, provided they are
currently employed."


Dodge Jeep located at
18311 US HWY 441 in Mt.


repossessed or purchased event runs Friday, October Dora. Any phone calls


from around the country,
pay a $57 acquisition


0 Copyright 2013 FLP, LLC. All Rights Reserved. All sales plus tax, title, lag and $689.50 dealer fee, with approved credit.


L .1 ^^^^^


G --yI/he news jut click ay'

www.dailyco rcial.com


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


BEN MARGOT / AP
Detroit reliever Joaquin Benoit shouts after striking out the last batter in the ninth inning of a 3-2
win against Oakland on Friday in Game 1 of the American League Division Series in Oakland, Calif.



Scherzer dazzles as Tigers


take Game 1 from A's


JANIE MCCAULEY
Associated Press
OAKLAND, Calif. It
doesn't matter all that
much to Max Scherz-
er when or where he
pitches, or exactly how
he goes about piling up
his victories.
Pitching the opener of
the playoffs still meant
plenty and his spec-
tacular Game 1 perfor-
mance provided quite
an October jolt for the
Detroit Tigers as they
chase a return trip to
the World Series.
Given the ball from
manager Jim Leyland
ahead of Justin Verland-
er, Scherzer struck out
11 and dazzled with an
array of effective pitch-
es as the Tigers grabbed
the lead in their AL divi-
sion series against the
Oakland Athletics with
a 3-2 win Friday night.
"It was the same as al-
ways. I don't get caught
up in the hoopla, wor-
ry about where I'm
pitching or if I'm pitch-
ing Game 1 or Game 5,"


Scherzer said. "When
you're pitching against
a postseason team like
the As, you have to bring
your game. And tonight
I was able to pitch ef-
fectively and pitch well
against their left-hand-
ed hitters, and that's the
reason why I had suc-
cess tonight."
A lot of it, in fact.
Yoenis Cespedes was
the only As player to
have success against
Scherzer, who retired
16 of the first 18 batters
he faced. Cespedes hit a
two-run homer but also
a triple that didn't pro-
duce a run in the sec-
ond.
Scherzer overpowered
the A's with his blazing
fastball, then baffled
them with his off-speed
stuff. The As struck out
16 times in all, a fran-
chise record in a post-
season game.
"He was awful deter-
mined," Leyland said.
"He was thrilled to
get Game 1. I think it
meant a lot to him, even
though he said it didn't


matter which game he
pitched. And I think he
responded like we ex-
pected him to respond."
Miguel Cabrera
helped stake Detroit to
an early lead before the
banged-up slugger left
in the eighth as a pre-
caution. He insists he
is just fine, saying: "For
us, it's not an issue. It's
no time to complain, no
time to worry."
Tigers 3, Athletics 2


Detroit


Oakland


ab r h bi ab r h bi
AJcksncf 4 1 1 0 Crispcf 10 0 0
TrHntrrf 3 1 1 0 Lowriess 4 0 0 0
MiCarr3b 4 0 1 1 Dnldsn3b 4 0 0 0
RSantg3b 0 0 0 0 Mossdh 4 1 1 0
RFielder lb 4 0 1 0 Cespdslf 4 1 2 2
VMrtnzdh 4 1 2 0 Reddckrf 4 0 0 0
Avilac 40 2 1 Vogtc 3 0 0
Infante2b 4 0 2 0 Barton lb 3 0 0 0
Dirks If 3 0 0 0 Sogard2b 2 0 0 0
JhPerltph 1 0 0 0 Callasp ph-2b 1 0 0 0
D.Kellylf 0 0 0 0
Iglesiasss 4 0 0 0
Totals 35 3 10 2 Totals 30 2 3 2
Detroit 300 000 000 3
Oakland 000 000 200 2
E-Cespedes (1). DP-Oakland 1. LOB-Detroit 6, Oak-
land 4.2B-A.Jackson (1), V.Martinez (1). 3B-Ces-
pedes (1). HR-Cespedes (1). CS-Tor.Hunter (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
Detroit
Scherzer W,1-0 7 3 2 2 2 11
SmylyH,1 2/3 0 0 0 1 2
BenoitS,1-1 1/3 0 0 0 0 3
Oakland
ColonL,0-1 6 10 3 3 0 4
Otero 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
Doolittle 12/3 0 0 0 0 3
HBP-by Colon (TorHunter). WP-Scherzer.
Umpires-Home, Mark Wegner; First, CB Bucknor;
Second, Gary Darling; Third, Jim Reynolds; Right,
Mike DiMuro; Left, Tom Hallion.
T-3:24. A-48,401 (35,067).


payments. This is not a During this one time


Moore continues, "First hand to help pre-approve


include up to a 100,000 mile banks will do whatever


be given to whoever wants Advantage Chrysler


4th from 9:45am 7:15pm, should be directed to Tim
Saturday, October 5th Moore at 352-735-3777.


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Sunday, October 6, 2013











OutdoorsFishing
352-365-8268 I sports@dailycommercial.com .dailycommercial.com


* SANDY'S BAIT AND TACKLE I TAVARES
Sandy's bass tournament is
held on the third Saturday of each
month at the Buzzard Beach ramp.
Sandy's next regular bass tourna-
ment will be an open tournament
held Oct. 19 with the weigh in at
Buzzard Beach at 2:30 p.m. Any
questions about the tournament
call Bill at 352-742-0036.
* PINE ISLAND CAMP I FRUITLAND PARK
Shellcracker are being caught
on red worms and grass shrimp in
Haynes Creek. Bass are biting on
worms. Pine Island has a full sup-
ply of live baits including grass
shrimp as well as a variety of artifi-
cial baits. RV sites, camp sites boats
and slips are available for rental.
Check out the restaurant before go-
ing out or coming off the lake.
* PALM GARDENS I TAVARES
The locals are catching bass ear-
ly in the morning flipping dark col-
ored artificial worms up under
docks and along the weed lines. A
few bream and bluegill are biting
on red worms and grass shrimp.
* NELSON'S BAIT-TACKLE I WEIRSDALE
Specks are starting to hit on
minnows. Bass have been hitting
strong, biting on white frogs, artifi-
cial worms and shiners.


* BLACK BASS RESORT AND FISH CAMP
The spillway has been opened
again briefly clearing the waterway
of vegetation. The moving water
also spurs the fish into biting. Folks
have been catching fish from the
Black Bass dock. The cooler weath-
er has been improving the fish-
ing. Red worms and night crawlers
have been selling. Minnows will be
stocked near the end of October.
* SORRENTO BAIT AND TACKLE
Crappie have begun to bite in
area lakes in the deeper water. Fish
are being caught on jigs and min-
nows and a combination of both by
drifting the channels and open wa-
ter. Oranges, pinks and a gold Cap-
tain Joe's jig have been the notably
productive colors for jigs. Several
nice bass have been caught. They
are schooling in Lake Monroe. They
are biting on spinner baits that are
white with chartreuse and a gold
and silver blade, shiners and plas-
tic worms preferably the darker
colors like June bug, June bug blue
and red shad. The larger bass are
hanging in the deeper water. A few
bluegill are still being caught. Mul-
let are being caught on worms. Sor-
rento Bait & Tackle stocks supplies
for catching gators and fish. Stop in
and get the latest daily report.


SOLUNAR TABLES



HOMOSASSA
DAY 1st high 1st low 2nd high 2nd low
Today 6:16 a.m. 1:00 a.m. 7:23 p.m. 2:23 p.m.
Monday 6:45 a.m. 1:18 a.m. 7:56 p.m. 2:57 p.m.
Tuesday 7:20 a.m. 1:40 a.m. 8:34 p.m. 3:34 p.m.
Wednesday 7:59 a.m. 2:10 a.m. 9:21 p.m. 4:26 p.m.
Thursday 8:46 a.m. 2:48 a.m. 10:23 p.m. 5:55 p.m.
Friday 9:41 a.m. 3:38 a.m. 11:47 p.m. 7:36 p.m.
Saturday 10:49 a.m. 4:44 a.m. ------ 8:50 p.m.
Sunday 1:17 a.m. 6:09 a.m. 12:16 p.m. 9:45 p.m.
DAYTONA BEACH
DAY 1st high 1st low 2nd high 2nd low
Today 9:15 a.m. 2:55 a.m. 9:33 p.m. 3:33 p.m.
Monday 9:59 a.m. 3:36 a.m. 10:18 p.m. 4:20 p.m.
Tuesday 10:47 p.m 4:21 a.m. 11:07 p.m. 5:09 p.m.
Wednesday 11:40 a.m. 5:10 a.m. ---- 6:04 p.m.
Thursday 12:01 a.m. 6:06 a.m. 12:37 p.m. 7:04 p.m.
Friday 1:03 a.m. 7:08 a.m. 1:40 p.m. 8:08 p.m.
Saturday 2:10 a.m. 8:18 a.m. 2:48 p.m. 9:14 p.m.
Sunday 3:21 a.m. 9:30 a.m. 3:54 p.m. 10:17 p.m.

m k m
DAY Sunrise Sunset Moonrise Moonset
Today 7:23 a.m. 7:07 p.m. 8:56 a.m. 8:18 p.m.
Monday 7:24 a.m. 7:06 p.m. 9:58 a.m. 9:06 p.m.
Tuesday 7:25 a.m. 7:05 p.m. 11:00 a.m. 9:58 p.m.
Wednesday 7:25 a.m. 7:04 p.m. 12:01 p.m. 10:55 p.m.
Thursday 7:26 a.m. 7:03 p.m. 12:59 p.m. 11:56 p.m.
Friday 7:26 a.m. 7:02 p.m. 1:53 p.m. 12:58 a.m.
Saturday 7:27 a.m. 7:01 p.m. 2:42 p.m. ------
Sunday 7:28 a.m. 7:00 p.m. 3:27 p.m. 2:01 a.m.


As bears bulk up in fall, FWC asks public to share sightings


STAFF REPORT
In fall, the world is an
all-you-can-eat buffet
for Florida black bears.
Programmed to pack
in extra calories be-
fore winter, bears can
smell food a mile away
and will eat almost any-
thing. Bears may de-
cide an overflowing
trash can is easier pick-
ings than searching for
acorns and berries.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) re-
minds the public this is
a critical time of year to
properly store garbage,
pet food and birdseed to
keep bears out of places
where people live and
work. During the fall,
bears with big appetites


are less likely to linger in
neighborhoods if peo-
ple don't give them ac-
cess to food.
"People can prevent
problems with Florida
black bears by safely se-
curing garbage, putting
out garbage cans the
morning of pickup rath-
er than the night be-
fore, and using bear-re-
sistant garbage cans or
dumpsters." said David
Telesco, the FWC's bear
management coordina-
tor.
Surveys of Florida
communities with ac-
cess to bear-resistant
trash cans or dumpsters
show the overwhelm-
ing majority are pleased
with the results.
"The FWC is com-
mitted to helping the


public keep bears out
of garbage and out of
neighborhoods," said
Telesco. "Now, we're
asking the public to
help us better under-
stand the range of the
Florida black bear in the
wild."
As bears become more
active in fall, more peo-
ple are also going out-
doors for hunting, fish-
ing, hiking, biking and
wildlife viewing. The
FWC is asking the pub-
lic to report their sight-
ings of Florida black
bears or their tracks to
a new website: https://
public.myfwc.com/
fwri/blackbear/. Biolo-
gists are especially in-
terested in sightings of
a female bear with cubs.
The bear sightings


website will help biolo-
gists update the map of
where bears live in Flor-
ida. However, the Web
page is only for sharing
bear location informa-
tion. FWC regional of-
fices remain the places
for people to call for ad-
vice on how to resolve
human-bear conflicts.
The website has the
option for people to
upload photos of bears
or their tracks. But
please do not approach
bears to take photos of
them. Black bears are
generally not aggres-
sive, but approaching
them can make them
defensive. Adult males
typically weigh 250 to
400 pounds and can be
as large as 600 pounds.


Extra caution is appro-
priate when a mother
bear and her cubs are
sighted. Photos from
game cameras are wel-
come.
"We know about
prime bear habitats
such as the Apalachic-
ola National Forest,
Ocala National Forest
and Big Cypress Na-
tional Preserve. While
bear subpopulations
are mainly centered
on large public lands,
bears also occur else-
where, and those lo-
cations have been un-
derreported," said
FWC bear research bi-
ologist Brian Scheick.
"Our bear range data
is 11 years old, and we
are excited about get-
ting the public's help in


identifying all the plac-
es where bears now live
in Florida.
"What we learn from
the new bear sightings
website will inform the
FWC's efforts to docu-
ment bear distribution
and help with future
bear management de-
cisions," Scheick said
The black bear is a
conservation success
story in Florida, with
the population grow-
ing from as few as 300
bears in the 1970s to an
estimated population
of more than 3,000 to-
day.
Go online to learn
how bear-resistant
trash cans work and
what to do if you en-
counter a black bear at
MyFWC.com/Bear.


COLLEGE BASKETBALL


Late Night in the Phog one to remember for Kansas fans


GEOFFREY CALVERT
Associated Press
LAWRENCE, Kan. -
Even for a school like
Kansas, where excite-
ment and hype sur-
rounds every season, this
29th Late Night in the
Phog was one to remem-
ber.
With perhaps the
most-heralded class in
school history making
its debut, led by fresh-
man Andrew Wiggins,
fans started gathering
en masse Friday morn-
ing outside Allen Field-
house.
"You're a little bit ex-
cited because how many
places in America can
there be 25,000 peo-
ple waiting to get into a
16,300-seat building oth-
er than Lawrence, Kan-
sas," coach Bill Self told
the audience.
Many fans, some who
drove for hours, didn't


Kansas senior Justin Wesley, left, watches as freshman Andrew
Wiggins breaks into a dance move during the skits and perfor-
mance portion of Friday's "Late Night in the Phog" at Allen Field-
house in Lawrence, Kan.


even make it into the are-
na. Others, such as Kan-
sas senior David Pow-
ell, got in line at 7 p.m.
Thursday and slept in a
tent.
"I like to get the cen-


ter court, front-row seats
so we want to make sure
we're the first ones here
always," Powell said. "I
didn't have a tent last
year. I was just in a sleep-
ing bag last year, so it was


better than last year."
The Fieldhouse crowd
broke into loud applause
whenWiggins' name was
mentioned for the first
time. The evening con-
tained its usual pomp
and circumstance, com-
plete with highlight vid-
eos, a Simon Says com-
petition among fans and
dances by the players
and coaches.
KU fan and comedi-
an Rob Riggle emceed
the event, being carried
by Kansas cheerleaders
on an easy chair onto the
court, dressed in a white
tuxedo.
"This is madness,
baby," Riggle said. "You
have no idea how much
I love Allen Fieldhouse. I
used to sit up there and
dream that one day I
would be carried into Al-
len Fieldhouse in a white
tuxedo on a white throne


to 'Thunderstruck.'"
The most popular vid-
eo spoofed "Old School"
and featured Self yelling
at the current transfers
and freshmen plus
former announcer Max
Falkenstien, dressed in
gym shorts and a jersey
for practice.
During the dance fea-
turing Wiggins, set to
Justin Timberlake's "Suit
and Tie," Wiggins was
the first to do a short solo
number, drawing huge
cheers.
The first skit from the
women's team was an
80's themed dance, com-
plete with neon head-
bands, T-shirts and
socks. The second group
donned jeans, black T-
shirts and leather jack-
ets, while the final group
of players wore old Kan-
sas baseball jerseys and
began their routine by


dancing to 'NSYNC's
"Bye Bye Bye." The
coaching staff may have
topped all the other per-
formances, leading the
team in a dance down
the runway to Robin
Thicke's "Blurred Lines."
Both the men's and
women's teams cele-
brated their respective
round-of-16 runs in the
NCAA tournaments, as
well as the men's ninth
straight Big 12 title. But
basketball trophies and
banners weren't the only
hardware or cause for
celebration in the house.
The women's track and
field team unveiled its
2013 outdoor national
championship banner
and received its rings.
It was the Jayhawks'
first national title in any
women's sport. Self also
recognized PGA Tour
and former Jayhawks
golfer Gary Woodland,
who was in attendance.


SEND US YOUR TROPHY CATCHES!
We want to show off your trophy catch. Make sure you identify the angler,
give details about the fish, where it was caught and what bait was used. Then
mail your photo and story to: trophytales@dailycommercial.com. Good
luck!


B9


Sunday, October 6, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL




BIO DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, October 6, 2013


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2009 TOYOTA 2006 JAGUAR 2009 PONTIAC 2010 KIA 2010 VOLKSWAGON
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YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD
BILL KOCH............... ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR
SCOTT CALLAHAN .......................NEWS EDITOR
GENE PACKWOOD ............ EDITORIAL CARTOONIST


Voices


Cl
DAILY COMMERCIAL
Sunday, October 6, 2013


www.dailycommercial.corn


OURVOICE


Eustis' plan


will grow city

DECISIONS, DECISIONS:
City makes annexation choice easier.
......................................................

Traditionally, local city lead-
ers have sought to annex sur-
rounding properties as a way
to bolster tax rolls and show-
case what their municipalities
have to offer.
City officials tag their sales pitch-
es to city services, often touting en-
hanced fire and police coverage.
But Eustis city commission-
ers have taken the campaign to
the next level by offering proper-
ty owners an annexation incentive
that waives application fees.
Property owners who qualify can
save $1,225 to $2,275 in fees by
submitting an application during
the fee-free annexation incentive
period.
"This is an excellent opportunity
for enclave property owners to be-
come part of the city of Eustis and
benefit from city services," said Di-
anne Kramer, director of Develop-
ment Services. "The program will
also benefit the city by providing
more cost effective services to a
compact area."
Officials are taking the long view
of expanding their city's coffers
and are hoping to generate near-
ly $200,000 annually by extending
this offer to owners of 450 eligible
tracts of land. The annexation re-
quests have to be submitted this
month.
The program primarily targets
enclaves in unincorporated Lake
County and which are in the Eu-
stis/Lake County Joint Planning
Area. An enclave is a parcel that is
surrounded or nearly surrounding
by incorporated land.
Kramer said Eustis already pro-
vides municipal water and sewer
service to many of the sites.
Other property owners who are
eligible to participate in the pro-
gram include those who own land
adjacent to parcels within the city
limits.
City commissioners have dis-
cussed during workshops and
planning meetings ways to expand
the city's tax and population bas-
es. If all the property owners an-
nex, estimates indicate the city's
land valuation would increase by
$28 million and the annexations
would add more than $187,000 to
the city's budget.
A decision to annex into a city is
not easy. But Eustis officials have
made the decision considerably
more enticing and established an
admirable annexation model for
other city leaders.


The Daily Commercial

The newspaper of choicefor Lake
and Sumter counties since 1875
HAVE YOUR SAY
The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the
editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public
interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They
must be original, signed with the full name of the writer,
and include the writer's address and telephone number
for verification. We reserve the right to edit for length to
make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited
for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more
than two letters per month from the same writer. No open
letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will
be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submis-
sions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and
republish any material submitted for publication.
You can submit your letters by:
Email (preferred) to:
letters@dailycommercial.com
By regular mail to:
Voices
pRo. Box 490007
Leesburg, FL 34749-0007
By fax to:
325-365-1951
EDITORIALS
Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial
board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial
staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published
Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.


COLUMNS
Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and
picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reflect
the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent
a diversity of views.
If you would like to submit a guest column on a local,
state or national issue, email your submission to letters@
dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Voices, PO. Box 490007,
Leesburg, FL 34749-0007.
Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length.
The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published
with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.


N FNAX
TO EXPAND ITS TAXRBASE
THE CITY OF EUJS WANT
TO ANNX ENLAV PROPEM1S
WITHIN THE iTY, ANP OTH.R
CONTIGUOUS WrfliN CIIIV LIMIT.
TAlO,: PITI7&NI


I LTTR o te WEK7


Republicans began
use of paper cash
A Republican named Abraham
Lincoln invented paper money
with his secretary of treasury.
It was to be an IOU paid to the
Union soldiers in place of gold
and silver until taxes were collect-
ed to redeem the "greenbacks," as
they were called.
People began using them to pay
debts because taxes were slow in
coming. Republicans saw this,
and printed more greenbacks to
pay other debts, thus driving the
value of the greenbacks down to
as low as 10-cents on the dollar.
Veterans marched on
Washington and were met by fed-
eral troops, and men who had
just saved the Union were shot
and killed by Lincoln's troops and
arrested. That is how we start-
ed using paper as gold and giving
politicians the ability to bankrupt
this nation.
Every president has continued
to print worthless paper (tongue
in cheek, money). Worthless
paper money became so popu-
lar to politicians that they start-
ed the greenback party in 1874,
which became known as the
Independent Party Their goal was
to do away with gold and silver
currency
Working together, the three par-
ties have done away with the gold
standard, the gold exchange stan-
dard and the gold reserve stan-
dard ending in 1933 with that
good communist wannabe dic-
tator Democrat Franklin D.
Roosevelt.
I thank God for pouring out
his blessing on America by stop-
ping F.D.R. with a good old case


WWW. BIOG RAPH Y.COIVM
President Abraham Lincoln first used paper money to pay Union soldiers.


of polio. Now if God will be so
gracious as to send another me-
teor like the one that killed the
dinosaurs.
It is apparent to anyone that the
republic, like all republics before
it, has failed. No country has ever
tried pure democracy before. All
other types of government have
been tried and failed. Those with
common sense pay heed to these
words, or continue to believe
the mistakes of the past. Pray
fervently.
Stop the presses! Money is
becoming worthless fast. The
printing presses are running at
capacity.
When the public servants re-
lease the currency held in ware-


houses, your money in your pock-
et will be worthless. The economy
will crash within one month.
Stores will not be able to restock
shelves because their suppliers
won't be able to afford help. The
help won't be able to afford their
families' essentials. Inflation will
destroy all wealth.
It happened in the Weimar re-
public and catapulted Hitler into
power. It happened in Argentina
and Peron became dictator.
Don't you think a politician
in America has a group of han-
dlers working on this right now?
As soon as they get their ducks in
a row, they are going to pull the
trigger. You will lose.
VERNON HALL I Umatilla


YOURVOICES
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR


School board should
reinstate bus service
At a recent South Lake
Democratic Club meeting, mem-
bers unanimously agreed the
school board decision to rein-
state bus service to students liv-
ing less than two-miles from school
in areas the board deems hazard-
ous, is not satisfactory. Charging $2
per day to others, if there are seats
available, is discrimination based
on the wrong standard. Safety of
all children must be a higher pri-
ority than budget concerns. Use
the $85K that is available to re-
store service immediately instead
of wasting time debating this issue.
Ending this service due to poor
budget planning is blatantly wrong.
The governor is on a listening
tour to determine where he can cut
taxes. Millions of dollars are allo-
cated for a roundabout on Route


561 and other road work. Fight
for the children and get some of
that money allocated to restore
bus service, reinstate impact fees.
Tod Howard thinks it is sudden-
ly not the school board's responsi-
bility to get the children to school.
That may be true in areas that have
paved sidewalks, schools built near
residential areas, have traffic lights
and crossing guards, but not in
rural Lake County.
What the life of a child is worth
should be your primary concern!
MARY O'HANLON I Clermont


Don't forget the lessons of
Sept. 11, 2001 with Syria
Wednesday morning, 12 years
after 9/11,1 sat in front ofmyTV
watching replays of the bringing
down of the towers, tears flowing
from my eyes.


It seemed so real, like it was hap-
pening all over again. How can we
ever forget that day, yet it seems
like we forget so quickly as our
president considers moving us into
another war, seemingly bent on de-
stroying our country as we know it.
It is time for religious leaders to
speak out. I beg the heads of our
churches to stand up and be heard.
Your silence in regards to what is
happening in our world is destroy-
ing us. God is watching and you
will be judged.
I am also asking all patriotic citi-
zens of the United States to speak
out and make their voices heard.
As a mother and grandmother I
am in a fight to save our country,
not for me, but for the loves of my
life, my grandchildren, Jessica, Will,
Anthony and Maddie.
God bless and save America.
JUANITA EADS I Leesburg


&24o I




DAILY COMMERCIAL


Sunday, October 6, 2013


oSUBMIT YOUR OWN GUEST COLUMN: If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue,
email your submission to letters@dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Voices, PO. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-
V b0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to
SG be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch, www .dailycommercial. con


OTHERVO CES


Using cracking for natural gas is bad for the future


e've all seen the
professionally
dressed lady as-
suring us that "the fu-
ture is bright" with the
new "safe" natural gas
that is being produced
by cracking. Well, that
just isn't true!
It was reported in the
Gasland II documen-
tary that 20 percent of


the pipes carrying the
gas and contaminated
cracking water leak their
contents into the wa-
ter-supply levels when
the pipes are first put
into service. More than
50 percent leak after 20
years of use. Many resi-
dents of cracking areas
have found their water
faucets catch on fire be-


Bill Lorson
GUEST
COLUMNIST
cause of the methane
flowing from them.
A new issue brief
from the Food and Wa-
ter Watch reports, "Live-
stock exposed to frack-
ing chemicals either


accidentally or inciden-
tally are dying by the
scores!" One hundred
forty cattle in Pennsyl-
vania were exposed to
cracking wastewater
when an impoundment
pond was breached.
Half the animals died,
and among the remain-
ing herd, only 11 calves
were born, of which just


three survived. Simi-
lar stories occurred in
North Dakota and Wyo-
ming.
It is not only our meat
that is at risk. Frack-
ing has started in Cali-
fornia and is slated for
massive expansion in
the Central Valley and
Salinas Valley, where
much of the nation's


fruits and vegetables
are grown.
Most shocking is the
lack of control over the
cracking process. This
must change! Become
informed while we
can still do something
about controlling the
process. America's food
supply depends on it.
Bill Lorson lives in Leesburg.


OTHERVOICES

School board focuses on
business, not students
I applaud your opinion, "Board's bus-
ing plan falls short," from Sept. 15.
The major problem with the Lake
County School Board is we keep electing
people to the board that seem to want
to represent and appease business in-
terests over the interest of students, par-
ents, teacher and volunteers to the edu-
cation effort.
The board has turned down proper
funding opportunities so often that it is
now far in the hole of red ink. It is scram-
bling to keep the tea party faithful happy
to the detriment of education in Lake
County.
With the exception of Rosanne
Brandeburg who has a stellar history
in education, most others are pawns of
business. This is like electing an Amish
person to run your computer and tech-
nology department.
The board's charge is to provide qual-
ity education for Lake County students.
I am appalled that they have not done
more to keep our students safe and pro-
vide for a quality education experience.
Hint: When electing persons to the
school board look for people who want
to set policies that make education bet-
ter. Reject those who want only to kill
education.
Money alone will not make everything
better but lack of money is sure to doom
it in Lake County.
CHOICE EDWARDS I Clermont


Democrats only want to take
your guns and blame Bush
Within minutes of the shooting at
the Naval base in Washington, D.C.,
Democrats were calling for more gun
control. They don't care about the facts
of it, or anything but taking our (we the
people) constitutional rights away. Any
and all!
In the Illinois Senate, Obama voted to
allow the prosecution of people who use
a firearm for self-defense in their own
home. He supported a ban on most rifle
ammunition and a ban on all handguns.
This is what wanna be dictators do.
The kids and grandkids who can't get
employment or are being reduced to
part-time employment or laid off or fired
while the unaffordable care act wrecks
the nation and the financial reform act
of Congress with total Democrat control
doesn't scare you, nothing will.
Look in the mirror Democrats and
say, "It's Bush's fault, or Calvin Coolidge,
maybe Lincoln?"
Never the fool in the mirror, or is it ever
Obama's fault!
The nonexistent economic recovery
is actually worse than the recession it
was supposed to remedy. Find the truth.
Worst in history.
Recession? This is a depression.
Wake up America!
DAVID R. MARTIN I Leesburg



CALLING ALL VETERANS
If you know of
a veteran living in
Lake, Sumter or
Marion counties
whose name
Should be added

Sto the Lake County
Veterans Memorial,
call 352-314-2100,
~~or go towww.
-~lakeveterans.com.


VN*4
-fpil^

-ORiE
I-

11 01
IB

Alji

A4


YOURGOVERNMENT
HOW TO CONTACT THOSE WHO REPRESENT YOU


PRESIDENT
BARACK OBAMA (D)
* 1600 Pennsylvania
Ave. N.W.
Washington, D.C.
20500
202-456-1111
Web address:
whitehouse.gov
U.S. SENATE
BILL NELSON (D)
0716 Hart Senate
Office Building
Washington, D.C.
20515
202-224-5274
Fax:202-228-2183
Web address:
billnelson.senate.gov/
contact
0225 E. Robinson St.,
Ste 410
Orlando, FL 32801
407-872-7161
Fax: 407-872-7165
MARCO RUBIO (R)
0317 Hart Senate
Office Building
Washington DC,
20510
Phone: 202-224-3041
E Orlando Office:
201 South Orange
Avenue
Suite 350
Orlando, FL 32801
Phone: 407-254-2573,
or toll free 1-866-630-
7106
Web address:
rubio.senate.gov/
public

U.S. HOUSE
FIFTH DISTRICT
CORRINE BROWN
(D-JACKSONVILLE)
*2111 Rayburn House
Office Building
Washington, DC
20515


202-225-0123
Fax:202-225-2256
Web address:
corrinebrown.house.
gov
* Orlando Office:
455 N. Garland Ave.,
Suite 414
Orlando, FL 32801
407-872-2208
Fax:407-872-5763
10TH DISTRICT
DANIEL WEBSTER
(R-WINTER GARDEN)
* 1039 Longworth HOB
Washington, DC
20515
Phone: 202-225-2176
Fax:202-225-0999
Web address:
webster.house.gov
* Lake County Office:
122 E. Main St.
Tavares, FL 32778
Phone: 352-383-3552
1 TH DISTRICT
RICHARD NUGENT
(R-BROOKSVILLE)
* 1727 Longworth HOB
Washington, DC
20515
202-225-1002
Fax:202-226-6559
Web address:
nugent.house.gov
SBrooksville office:
16224 Spring Hill Dr.
Brooksville, FL 34604
352-799-8354
Fax:352-799-8776

GOVERNOR
RICK SCOTT (R)
E The Capitol
400 S. Monroe St.
Tallahassee, FL 32399
850-488-7146
Web address:
www. flgov. com


FLORIDA SENATE
8TH DISTRICT
DOROTHY L. HUKILL
(R)
0210 Senate Office
Building
404 S. Monroe St.
Tallahassee, FL 32399
850-487-5008
SOcala office:
110 S.E. Watula Ave.
Ocala, FL 34471
352-694-0160
Email address:
hukill.dorothy.web@
flsenate.gov
SITH DISTRICT
ALAN HAYS (R)
0320 Senate Office
Building
404 South Monroe
Street
Tallahassee, FL
32399-1100
850-487-5011
Email address:
hays.alan.web@
flsenate.gov
LOCAL OFFICES:
0871 South Central
Ave.
Umatilla, FL 32784-
9290
352-742-6441
* 1104 Main Street
The Villages, FL
32159
352-360-6739
Fax: 352-360-6748
18TH DISTRICT
WILTON SIMPSON (R)
0322 Senate Office
Building
404 South Monroe
Street
Tallahassee, FL
32399-1100
850-487-5018
Email address:
simpson.wilton.web @
flsenate.gov
DISTRICT OFFICE:
SP.O. Box 787
New Port Richey, FL


34656
727-816-1120

FLORIDA HOUSE
31ST DISTRICT
BRYAN NELSON (R)
S303 House Office
Building
402 S. Monroe St.
Tallahassee, FL
32399-1300
850-717-5031
Email address:
bryan.nelson@
myfloridahouse.gov
DISTRICT OFFICE:
* 301 West Ward Ave.
Eustis, FL 32726-
4033
352-742-6275
32ND DISTRICT
LARRY METZ
(R-YALAHA)
0417 House Office
Building
Tallahassee, FL
32399-1300
850-717-5032
Email address:
larry.metz@
myfloridahouse.gov
LOCAL OFFICE;
* 193 Cherry Valley
Trail.
Groveland, FL 34736-
3645
352-989-9134
33RD DISTRICT
H. MARLENE
O'TOOLE (R)
0313 House Office
Building
402 S. Monroe St.
Tallahassee, FL
32399-1300
850-717-5033
Email address:
marlene. otoole@
myfloridahouse.gov
LOCAL OFFICE:
* 916 Avenida Central
The Villages, FL
32159


C2




Sunday, October 6, 2013








PROFESSIONAL

SERVICE

DIRECTORY

BUY 2 SPOTS


AT $45 EACH
AND GET THE 3RD

HALF OFF



ATTENTION

REALTORS
5 LINES 7 DAYS

$30,44*
*Must be a Licensed Realtor


DAILY COMMERCIAL


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C3


1400I .zI+// I bbi b iaby p iabL 0 L.UIIV IIIIIlL aiiuiuau.r..i

Sell your merchandise today at 3oQ


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t Ar1


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'I.


TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL


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Lake: 352-314-3278 or Sumter: 352-748-1955 Monday Friday 8am 5pm


1 1 1 I I
qP n111 Tf**1 'l 11111, 11 m 11 > I vllm '\rBInsiHi'^il~hiii-'i'i'll~}^


DEADLINES
For Insertion COPY DATE
Friday Thursday, 5pm
Saturday Friday, 3pm
Sunday Friday, 5:00pm
Monday Friday, 5:00pmr
Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pmr
pl.Tn fnl,] i i n' ,l1il,'..'n I n I iinnnn ,l 4, r .1ln'n 1 C 1 1 I'n,-
7,,,1 1 ', 111 r, F4 ,'.1 ,
ADJUSTMENTS
........r. i. ,, ""'.....
frs" day of publication If you find an error call the dclassdie
department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955
* The publhsherassumes no financial responsibility forerrors or for


Legal Notices ..........

Announcements........

At Your Service .........

Financial . . . . . . ..

Employment ...........

Pets/Animals ..........


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Recreation ...........

Transportation ........


e news s iut click a




heenev~s j*uit click a avl


SUNDAY CROSSWORD PUZZLE


Crossword answers are on page C6.
No. 0929


OVERHEARD IN NEW ENGLAND By Norm Guggenbiller / Edited by Will Shortz


Across
1 Boxes up
8 Hidden
14 Astronomer Halley
20 Sheer, informally
21 Individually
22 Not get gratis
23 Clan garb
24 A "Star Trek"
officer and a
physician are going
to board a plane?
26 Attack, as ramparts
27 Cracker topper
29 German Dadaist
Hannah
30 Makes stronger?
31 Kind of court
34 Without in the
world
36 Atlantic fishery
auditors?
39 "Galatea of the
Spheres" and
others
41 Comcast media
holding
44 Ones giving their
addresses
45 Hedge shrub
47 Dog command
48 Non-Eur. U.S. ally
49 Baseball features
53 French article
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
hone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


54 To boot
56 Minute
59 Work agreeably in a
greenhouse?
62 It's opposite julio
on a calendario
63 "No challenge at
all"
64 "Dat ___" (classic
jazz song)
65 Called the shots
67 Dead--doornail
connection
68 Delicate first-date
topic
72 Moon feature
73 Aristocratic practice
75 Bacteriologist Julius
76 "Happy Birthday"
on a cake, e.g.?
80 Naysayer
81 Reproductive parts
of flowers
82 Folk rocker
DiFranco
83 Ball game
85 Quebec place name
starter
86 Buster Brown's dog,
in old comics
87 Verizon competitor
90 Positions oneself to
hear better, say
93 Wood-shaping tool
94 Reagan attorney
general
95 Sexy operators?
99 Cell part
101 Femmes fatales


102 Bank heist, e.g.
104 Lion portrayer
107 Word with sea or
seasoned
108 Bar, legally
112 Where frogs shop?
115 Religious recluse
117 Consternation
118 O.K. to serve
119 Medication for a
narcoleptic
120 Cabernet
Sauvignon
alternative
121 Ran out
122 Immediately

Down
1 They're probably
close: Abbr.
2 Undiluted
3 Large sport fish
4 Draw
5 Hotel amenity
6 Directional suffix
7 Hitchcock genre
8 Common aquarium
feature
9 Show up
10 Grp. in a 1955 me
rger
11 "Wag the Dog"
actress
12 Fashion designer
Marc
13 Family tree listing:
Abbr.
14 Prefix with dermis


15 Longtime home of
the Cotton Bowl
16 Reflective material
17 Unbalanced
18 Florida State player,
casually
19 Prohibitionists
25 Oil source
28 Model Carol
32 Clutch, e.g.
33 Recipe amt.
35 Stronghold
36 Tortile
37 Italian princely
family name
38 Sand ___ (perchlike
fish)
39 Drab-looking
40 Bygone Chevrolet
42 Salve
43 Engine
specification:
Abbr.
46 Drinks now, pays
later
47 Make more enticing
50 Footless creature
51 Barnyard sound
52 Enters furtively
55 Chevron
57 Exhibit fear, in a
way
58 Quarter
60 Green spot
61 1960s-'70s pitcher
Blue Moon
63 Ticked (off)
66 Locked?


68 One 60-trillionth of
a min.
69 "True"
70 Dimwit
71 Charmers
73 Start of a choosing
rhyme
74 "Can ___ now?"
76 "___ light?"
77 "Metamorphoses"
poet


78 Sight at many a
barbecue
79 Setting of the 2012
film "John Carter"
80 Combine name
84 Hoarders' problems
88 Rinds
89 Fourth Arabic letter
91 Go along with
92 "WKRP in
Cincinnati" news
director Les


94 To a greater extent
96 Reduced
97 Got emotional, with
up
98 Baseball's Bando
100 Mountainous land
101 Postal symbol,
once
102 Bud
103 Super-duper
105 Uncle of Enoch


106 "I ___ thought"
109 Part of a space
shuttle's exterior
110___ & Carla (1960s
duo)
111 Cooped (up)
113 No longer playing:
Abbr.
114 They may improve
in crunch time
116 Birthplace of the
bossa nova


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assifie

nmercial.com classified ,


Classified Index


S.600

..800

. .900

.1000

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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Sunday, October 6, 2013


A/


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www.bamblsgllnaturalcleaning.com


Simone's Cleaning Services
CommerciallResidential
Reliable/References
SLic/Bonded-10 Yrs Exp.
/ /Immediate Availibility-
Flexible Hours
4 3 Call: Simone
407-844--1183

ESP Services
Doctors Visits Cooking & Laundry
Pet Caring General Errands
Housekeeping
Call For A Free In-Person
Consultation
352-348-6408
ILEA
S(Clutter Free Cleaning)
Clean, Sort, Pack or Spring Clean
S Ref's & Yrs. of Experience
\ 352-742-0014
I Reasonable Rates

Amy's Cleaning
KService
S personally clean your home"
Weekly Bi-Weekly Monthly
SRef. Available. Serving Lake &
Sumter Counties
352.536.3846




Your PC Repair Specialists
Fast friendly service at a
flat rate affordable price.
g Education & Repair
Inyour home or our office.
Call
352-897-1309

CK Custom Computer
& Security Inc.
Main office 352-435-7309
Mobile store 352-254-0104.
We have a program to !
fix your computer for N
$10/hr labor plus parts.




SQUALrTY CONCRETE & BLOCK
x10 $500.00 10x40 $1200.00
Includes labor, concrete & cleanup
ilFast turnaround, no hassle & local
---K #CRC1326327, Ins. & Refernces
BRIAN DEGAGLIA
['',.t#CRC1326327, Ins. & References

352-267-5723

QE Concrete For Less
8x10 Slab $450
'M1e"P 10x40 Slab $1325
Includes Concrete & Labor
C -" Blocking/ ReJLlc/JIns.
% Phillip 352-504-8372


We ELIMINATE all trip
hazards due to UNEVEN and
or RAISED concrete.
Commercial/Residential
Concrete Grinding is 1/2
the cost of replacement.
Entry ways Ramps Sidewalks
Driveways Puddling Water, etc.
Insured
(877 454-0113 (toll freely
Alconcretegriniding.com




METAL TILE SHINGLE ROOFING
New Construction or Re-Roofing
B 308 Oak Street
Lady Lake, FL 32159
352-430-2773
www.sackroofing.com
Serving the Tri County Area For 26 Years




147MSF"-AMC- l-c #CBC1252465
SDOOR & LOCK SERVICE
We Repair, Replace and Install
Emergency Services Available!
(352) 314-3169


BDaniel Byars
Rescreens
Pato, Pool Enclsurms &
All Alundmnum Reairs
FLE ESTIMATES
352.408.2142


04lecScfeens, 'flc
*fAII-lRscrun Sreen Room at
Pool Enclsurms Winmow RescrOns
IlnIl SWIN tItm. I l U IuIMnum 11pir1
407-413-6130


; D Triple Crown
S Tile & Wood
Installation & Repairs
Owner does all work. I
Free Est. Lic/Ins l
3524274825.


ini i srag IuDoor


Mrasted, Quality Craftsmanship for 30+ years
Kitchens Bathrooms Windows
Vinyl Siding Decks Painting/Staining
Tile/Marble Lanai Enclosures
Mike Lalonde 352-409-8311
1 mrike~qimage4me.com I












S _I I- F I I





SBOYDS
Youcall it, We haul it!
m352
H460-7186


MlfMaksMouls METAL TILE SHINGLE ROOFING
Broken Spring Replacemue 1 New Construction or Re-Roofing
r 10% OffwthlilS ad 308 Oak Street
352-347-6411 Lady Lake, FL 32159
352-34-541 352-430-2773
~____~__________^ www.sackrooflng.com
r .. LU. #CDC1252465l Servinq the TrI County Area For 26 Years


. GARAGE DOORS
CompleteService & Installation
Lake County's Largest Provider!
We Sell & Program Remotes!
(3521 748-4575


--^ Repairs &
Garxage Door Replacements
& Locally Owned
Gate All Work
Warranted
Licensed & Insured midfldoor.com
352-630-0292 Shane Blanton




-Affordable Bome
i Repair, LLC
Mobile Home Repair Apt. Clean Outs
& Repair Decks & Ramps
Soffits/Siding Doors/Windows
Painting Tile Work* Lic/Ins
Call Pat 352-551-6073

Bve Hill's Hsa yman & Paintingi
Door & Window Installion
Carpentry,
wHome Improvement,
Drywall & More! Just Ask!
Professional Service
ic./lns. 352-259-5357

VDIJMTU IADIyRI 74
::: Home Repair:::::
Pressure Washing Painting
Flooring Carpet Clean Outs
Clean Ups Hauling Licensed
352-787-7056

I John Philibert, Inc
Wfe do Everything from Ceilings to
Floors. Window and Doors,
SPantries, Cabinets and more.
Your pesky Leaks gone, Your Soffits
we Fix, and Houses We'll Paint. From
inside and out, we'll make it great. Lic/Ins
JPHandy.com(352) 308-0694


Mike Shoff1tall : i
Call 352 552 1875 I
.,,JU GLE HUTrI

REPAIR'S ~
Repair everything. Replace anything.

M. Lucie Carpentry
Lic./Ins. Res./Comm.
Repairs & Renovations
Drywall, Trim & Rotted Wood
i Call Mick
.386-523-5015


I

I
I
I *


K


1mI^ultumi.1^

Local Agent
Long Term Care Ins.
Medicare Supplements
Critical Care Ins.
Cancer Ins.
Call Bill Bell
352.589-0454 or 352.551.3504

Ask Me About
Medicare Insurance
Robert Lange
352-742-2T25
lange.rob.ins@gmail.com




Irrigation o Tune-Up
35e Check& Adjust
$ Jk Entire System.
$J5 Provide Written Est.
To Fix Problems!
Lower Your Monthly Cost
352-409-3163

)"Sprinkler
Repairs
STimers, Valves, Heads,
(352) 787-9001
That's allwe do since 1979
S Native, 4th Generation




J.C.C. Bobcat & Tree Svc. Inc.
I Land Clearing/Excavating
llf S Fill Dirt/Clay
j ikFl&auling/Debris Removal
/ ^ w Stump Grinding
Demolition/Grading/ Driveways
Owner Operator
352-455-7608

/ CHRIS CANES LANDSCAPE
taeiyeillni~iId
l mep~nelleviliit
Lawn Mainmaunce, Hlardscape, Patios,
i Relainlg Watlls, Mit, Sadiing
Leesbum no -M -
ad~x. L^ ~a&

A--J Premier Scapes
U j & Services Inc.
Land Clearing Bush Hogging
Debris Removal
Hauling Free Estimates
S352-308-5508




SLandscaping

Trimming, Mulching,
Sod, Tree Trimming,
ayrs & Much Morel
Armando Santamario
352-587-1323
ilal Lan cape Desiens
/ 'Sod, Mulching, Rock Wails
/ Removal & Installation,
Trimming and Much More
Free Estimates Lic. & Ins.
David Vidal, Owner
352-396-8499 or 352-396-8459


LAWN
SPRAYING
FertnlIzer-Weeds Insects
Lawn Maintenance
352-357-5905
A Pest Exterminator





W-A1% A 11 4 I &I

i ,r-mn- kiqA:*
ad 9


Tree Service At
Reasonable Rates
I can climb the highest trees,
and I can mow the biggest
lawns, but please don't ask me
to leap tall buildings
k Fair Pricing. Trim Trees,
5a,>Cut Lawns & Clean Ups
CallTony for estimate 352-759-2080
Don't Stress Call The Best!
Dependable Commercial
S Lawn Services
Lic/Ins. Designer
Landscaping, Trimming,
1 Shrubs. We do it all
Rick 352-427-8919


I Waoyiw. Laurncare
As an I M ore ,
S oew accelping ew Cesmercial&
lesllmliail custmiems. howli,
LaUdscapin, Iigation amd more.
ReasonaikleDeliMdaile.bmierenced
I fflce 352-552-4556 gel 352-702-6460
[- -.) ~ All Lawn
I =' 1-' / and Tree
r'SI l z9, Care
rQJ, ^ < Service
[ ^ I Natural Land
[ W -Clearing (Goats)
"BEST PRICES" Free Est.
352-460-7186



.o T tServic, Service
v~i,~~/~. Service
IM i Center
*&UMMaa *- 352-602-1735
At Venetian Gardens
Marina on the
Harris Chain of Lakes.
No Trailer. No Problem.
Boat Repairs & Svc. on water




Bills Moving
Fla. eMover Roeg. No: 2095
Owner On Every Job
Fair Rates & 27+ Yrs. Exp.
352-669-4456
Toll Free 888-444-3559

i Toms Movers
Serving Lake,
M Marion & Sumter
Load/Unload Your Truck or Mine
Pack/Unpack Cleaning &
Painting Svc Avail. Free Estimates
352-409-3114 tomsmovers.org

Little John's Movers &
Storage 352-812-4889
Serving Lake, Marion,
& Sumter Counties
1-15 items same day delivery
Local & Long distance moves
Loading & unloading pods, rental
trucks, & storage units.
We have trucks going up &
down 95& 175
"Less Than a POD" "Door to Door"
You're Coming ....Your Neighbor is Going!
Jump on Board and Save
SERVING ALL 50 STATES
One item to a full house!!!
We will get off the interstate for you!
ljm9575@yahoo.com
US DOT #2406621





I tAssurance Painting, Inc.


qualifyassura!cepainh'nginc.com
T you want u u want us!"






PAINlING. INC.
commercial IEE ExtrliltES
& Rewdentiol (352) 267-6430
WWt O-EDU PMNI OMn
LUcensed/l and Insured
1EqREXTEIO PAINTING & OTHER483-6915
www.qualityassurancepaintinginc.com


PROPrICOSIONAL.
PAINTING, INC.
Commercial FIWE ESTINMAE
&Residential (352) 267-6430
license'd'and "Insaured C
HTEMRI/EXTERIOR PAINTING &, OTHER VS


C4


Lawn
Services


I




Sunday, October 6, 2013


(352) 348-6923
Tim Mundy Painting
&Presu leanng Services, Inc
#t MWhu"re qwalty is No Accidentt"
\ License & Insured

John Philibert, Inc
For All Your Interior/Exterior
Painting Needs.
We Also Offer
Driveways Patios
And Faux Finishes Lie/Ins
Call John @ (352) 308-0694
JPHandy.com

New England Painter
Semi-Retired
30 Years Exp
Interior, Exterior, Pressure
Washing No Job Too Small
Bob Kelley Painting
352-702-7739

Brhtman Home Improvement
Wallpaper, Drywall
In tir Painting, Trim
REE ESTIMATES
Insured
32.598-3169

CLAUDE WILD PAINTING
High Quality @ Reasonable Prices
Int. & Ext. Free Est. Lic/Ins
Pressure Cleaning Ref. & 35 yrs. exp.
I in Lake County
cwildpainting@gmail.com






I INDOOR PEST
CONTROL
As low as $20 per me.
Aa 352-357-5905
Pest Exterminator


A Pe rican Pest Contrql

Termites Rodent Exclusions
German Roaches
Property Inspections
Soil Pro-treatment
Uc/Ins 352-446-2318




Since 1969
L\ Specializing in
Vandas.
I --, Call for hours
3 52-787-9001
ORCHIDS- 2902 South St.
I-~ Leesburg, FL
GoodwinOrchids.com






Family Owned & Operatedmodel
Residential & Commercial
www.PrimePlumbinginc.comni
(352) 383-3440 #cFC142675

Ae Plumbing, LLC
AM Phla u g Repairs CommlRes
Kitchens Bato Remodels
DIsposal. Water HNeatr, Gas Piping.
S raln/SgC erCleanlag.
No Groit Siowers. 24 Hr. Emergecy
urc i^452(3521343-3163




Ace Pool Service
Complete Pool Services
Motor & Pump Repair
Pool & Patio Remodeling
Servicing Commercial & Residential
Properties Since 1969
Licensed/insured Free Estimates
352-735-3050

Prss r
Cl1J14eaning


352.260.7490

All Airports, Cruise Terminals,
Hotels, Casinos & Attractions
Shands-VA and Jacksonville Mayo

YesWe o Thre.. J[sIEt Gv U1Cl



Rq AV XI Providing
No-Cost Svcs.
to Lake county
sexual assault victims 24/7/365.
On-Call Rape Advocacy
Counseling, Legal Assistance
Hotline 352-787-1379





k. ovtz- Pryg
Shinlle Tihe Licensed Bonded Insured
Metal, and Rubber Residential/Commercial
Roof Systems RC29027460
(352) 669-6607

METAL TILE SHINGLE ROOFING
New Construction or Re-Roofing
B 308 Oak Street
Lady Lake, FL 32159
352-430-2773
www.sackrooflng.comr
Serving the Tri County Area For 26 Years

#I1 IN ROOFING
Leak Repairs Shingles/Flat Roof
Lifetime Metal Roofs Screen Rooms
Lic. #CCC1329936
Villages Roofing and
Construction, lnc.<:
FREE ROOF ESTIMATES
3B2--31-302B


SECURITY TRAINING
Security "D"&"G" Lie.
PLUS: FL. Concealed Lic.
NRA instructor Training
Ladies Only Classes Avail.
352-350-2855
liu# ss131 www.TheRightTraining.com




SpecazedStoge Sofutions
Now is the time...
To organize your life!
Customi Closets, lomie Office. Garages
Tailored To Your Needs,
17 Years Exp.
Free Home Design Consultation
352-383-7058 407-718-6818 (Cell)




John Philibert, Inc
For All Your Tile Needs
Pergo, Ceramic Tile,
Travertine, Vinyl & More
Call John (352) 308-0694
JPHandy.com LiUc/Ins


RE-TILE Q(
352-391-5553
Backsplashes Re-Tile Tub & Shower
Walls Grab Bars Floors
Handicap Baths Repairs
Leaky Shower Pan
Ins./Lic. 30 yrs. exp.




JC. Bobcat Tree Svc. red
lillesidential/Commercial
TrimmIng/Removal
| Palms/Hedges/Stump Grinding
Debris removal/Hauling
| ill Dirt/Clay/Grading/fDriveways
[Lic/Ins Insurance Work 24 Hre.
352-455-7608


VA TUMP GRINDING
I SPECIALIST
i.iJtREE TRIMMING
w &aMORE
S352-551-4222


i Premier Scapes
4 & Services Inc.
Complete Tree Service
Trimming Debris Removal
Stump Grinding Free Estimates
352-308-5508



Window I SIAi

"00 U BC1252465
WINDOWS
We Install, Replace and Repair
Most Major Brands Available
Glass and Screen Repair
(3521 787-4545


|32-587-2735
CR330701 Lanai Enclosures
HGlass Window
rReplacement
Acrylic Windows
V Screen Rooms



352-602-9849
SPARKLING
WINDOWS
MARK ANDERSON
Window Cleaning,
Screens, Tracks. FREE Estimates


I Lake Contracting, Inc. I A Affordable Tree
GAFP Certified Service
Shingles, Metal or Flat Serrvi Te o v
SAdditions, Remodels, Renovations -Tree Trimming & Removal
Roof to Foundation I Lake Cleaning e Dead Wooding
52-602-8794 Moss Spraying Lic/Ins
Un. 0 nC15076556 f13899n f Free Est. Senior Discounts
IN. 15o756 19 352-459-9428


(35) 35-833 rb mi

michllefllerdailcommrcia~co


We're Proud of Our Service
.... and you will be too!


HUNTHERRoovjc.
Free Estimates
Metal, Tile & Shingle Re-roofs
Serving all Lake &
Sumter Counties.
Mike Hunter
Fl License #RC29027482
Office (407) 947-2223
Fax (407) 347-3472
mike@hunterroofingLLC.com


Serving Lake, Sumter
& S.Maron Counties
fWe Service All
Appliance Brands
Licensed/Insured
SFree Service Call
w/Repair
15+ Years Exp. 24 Hr. Emergency Svc.
We Don't Want To Be The Biggest
Just The Best
Eric Wolf 352-630-2202

All About Appliances repairs and installs
all brands of major appliances. We are a
small husband/wife company. Eric has
over 15 years experience repairing appli-
ances and Lavinia (Vinnie) has over 20
years in business management experience.
Together, we strive to offer you prompt,
professional, courteous and personal serv-
ices far beyond your expectations, both by
phone and in your home. We respect you
and your time and make every effort to be
in and out of your home as quickly as pos-
sible yet provide a thorough diagnosis and
timely repair. We genuinely appreciate all
your business.


Complete Automotive Care
Transmissions AC Brakes
Tune Ups Body Work Oil Change
Family Owned 26 Yrs 352-326-2400
1406 Emerson St., Leesburg across from Post Office

Emerson Street Automotive has been fainm-
ily owned and operated for nearly 30
years. Lori and Michael Farfaglia pur-
chased the business from Lori's family in
2010. Lori's father, Terrill Davis stayed as
the onsite manager. Emerson Street is lo-
cated at 1406 Emerson Street, right next to
the Post Office in Leesburg, Florida. We
are opened Monday-Friday 7:30-5:30 and
Saturday 7:30-3:00. Phone: 352-326-2400.
We do all kinds of automotive repair in-
cluding light body work. We have state of
the art diagnostic equipment that takes the
guess out of repairing your car. We service
all makes and models including SUVs',
ATV's, and RV's.


Our mission is to

provide you with quality,

professional, and a safe

electrical installation at a

fair price. We answer our

phone 24/7, seek to

save you money while

providing outstanding

service that meets or

exceeds your expectations.

You can depend and

trust us!
.... ......... .... ... ................ ... ...


---------------------------------------------------------- --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


C5


DAILY COMMERCIAL


.... .... ... .... ... .... ... .... ...


*




DAILY COMMERCIAL


Sunday, October 6, 2013


2
Legal Notices


103 Legal Notices

Public Notice
HE SCHOOL BOARD OF LAKE COUNTY,
ORIDA WILL MEET FOR A REGULAR MEET
IG OCTOBER 14, 2013 AT 6:00 P.M. IN
HE COMMISSION CHAMBERS OF THE LAKE
COUNTY ADMINISTRATION BLDG. 315 W.
AIN ST., TAVARES, FL
D No.00412090
ctober6, 2013


NOTICE OF SALE
) satisfy owners lien for rent due in accor
mnce with Florida Statutes, "The Self Stor
je Facility Act (Sections 83 ' 1 .
)ntents of the leased storage ,, .11I
Leased outside spaces (individuals identi-
,d below) including all personal property
insistingg of miscellaneous household items,
rniture, clothing, boxes, motor vehicles,
)ats, trailers, and other items, will be sold
Public Auction to the highest bidder (or
herwise disposed o) at the following loca
)n and time.
Florida Discount Self
Storage
17420 State Road 50
Clermont, FL 34711
Date: October 25, 2013
Time: 10:00 AM
II units are sold "as is", and must be paid
,r in CASH immediately following the auc
)n. All units advertised may not be available
the time of the auction in the event of set
,ment between owner and obligated party.
nit# 207
Imedo Vasquez
I No.: 00411812
ctober 6 & 13, 2013

00
Announcement


04 Special
Notices

NOTICE TO
ADVERTISERS
PLEASE CHECK YOUR AD FOR
ERRORS THE FIRST DAY IT APPEARS
3INCE THE DAILY COMMERCIAL WILL
NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
INCORRECT ADS AFTER THE FIRST
DAY OF PUBLICATION. IF YOU FIND
AN ERROR CALL THE CLASSIFIED
DEPARTMENT IMMEDIATELY AT
314-3278 OR 748-1955.
THE PUBLISHER ASSUMES NO
FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY FOR
ERRORS OR FOR COMMISSION OF
COPY. LIABILITY SHALL NOT EXCEED
THE COST OF THE PORTION OF
SPACE OCCUPIED BY SUCH ERROR.
CANCELLATIONS
CANCELLATION FOR ADS RUNNING
SATURDAY MUST BE MADE BY
FRIDAY BY 2:00, CANCELLATIONS
FOR SUNDAY & MONDAY MUST BE
MADE FRIDAY BY 5:00


200
At Your Service


101 Insurance


105 Adult Care

NOTICE
Florida Statute states, "It is a
misdemeanor for any person willfully,
knowingly, or intentionally to operate
or attempt to operate a family day
care home without a license or
without registering with the
Department, whichever is applicable".
Florida Statute states, "No person
shall advertise a child care facility
without including within such
advertisement the state or local
agency license number of such
facility. The statute applies to anyone
with more than 1 unrelated child
in their home.


245 Financial


SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Contact us if your claim has been
denied or if you need help.
Over 30 yrs. exp.No fees or costs
unless your claim is approved.
Cooper Consulting
2228 South St., Leesburg
352-728-5552


250 Handyman

Hard working Lic. Business owner,
seeks to improve your home.
Ability to perform jobs including
Remodeling-TreeTrimming-Drywall-
Tiling, etc. References avail.
Call Robert Plante's
Home Maint. 352-484-3543




LARRi rI.H
HANDYMAN SERVICE
Reliable & Dependable! One Call Does
It All!
Lic/Ins 352-409-4059


268 Moving

Two Brothers Moving



1 Room or a Full House
FL Reg. #1M1539
Russell & Todd Franks
Lic. & Ins. Call 352-793-8960

275 Plumbing

SINCE
1987
KILEY&
SONS, INC.
A Full Service Plumbing Company.
Lake 787-1904 Sumter 748-9500
CentralFloridaPlumber.com
VISIT OUR ONSITE SHOWROOM.
24 Hr. Emergency Service
Lio#CFC1426882

281 Roofing

#1 IN ROOFING

VILLAGES ROOFING & CONSTRUC-
TION INC.
352-314-3625
Leak Repairs
*Shingles/Flat Roof *Lifetime Metal
Roofs
Free Roof Estimates
Lic. #CCC1329936


288 Tree
Service


300
Financial


301 Business
Opportunities
RESTAURANT
150 SEATS WITH
FULL LIQUOR
North Lake County,
Serious buyers only.
Call 352-250-7813




400

Employment


405 Professional


FREELANCE
PHOTOGRAPHER
The Daily Commercial is looking for
a Freelance Photographer with
experience shooting features, spot
news and sports. Ideal job for
someone who wants to build a
portfolio or have their work seen by
a large audience. Must have own
equipment, reliable transportation
(no mileage paid), and a flexible
schedule that could include nights
and weekends.
Send resume to and examples
of work to:
editorialjobs@
dailycommercial.com
Or Daily Commercial
212 East Main Street
Leesburg, FL 34748
Attn: Editorial Jobs
No phone calls please.
EOE



^CAUPGAINS^

FREELANCE
WRITER
The Daily Commercial is looking for
a Freelance Writer who is equally
comfortable with feature stories
and spot news. Work will be assigned
on an as-needed basis, but
story suggestions welcomed. Must
have prior newspaper experience,
reliable transportation (no mileage
paid), and a flexible schedule that
could includes nights and weekends.
Send resume to and
examples of work to:
editorialjobs@
dailycommercial.com
Or Daily Commercial
212 East Main Street
Leesburg, FL 34748
Attn: Editorial Jobs
No phone calls please.
EOE


Excellent
Opportunity
FREELANCE
WRITER
The South Lake Press is looking for
a Freelance Writer who is equally
comfortable with feature stories
and spot news. Work will be assigned
in South Lake on an as-needed basis,
but story suggestions welcomed. Must
have prior newspaper experience,
reliable transportation (no mileage
paid), and a flexible schedule that
could includes nights and weekends.
Send resume to and
examples of work to:
editorialjobs@
dailycommercial.com
Or Daily Commercial
212 East Main Street
Leesburg, FL 34748
Attn: Editorial Jobs
No phone calls please.
EOE


405 Professional
LAKE COMMUNITY ACTION
AGENCY, INC.
Has the following position open:
FINANCIAL ANALYST
Duties:
The Financial Analyst is responsible
for helping the Director of Financial
Services maintain financial and ac-
counting records for the Agency's
projects. Performs routine accounting
functions, which require fundamental
knowledge of, and general familiarity
with, basic accounting practices and
procedures.
Requirements:
Community Action/Non-Profit Corpo-
ration 5013(c) (3) experience. At least
a bachelor degree in Accounting
and/or Business Administration with
two years experience in accounting or
fund accounting. Applicable experi-
ence may be considered in lieu of for-
mal education. Proficiency in data en-
try and in the use of Microsoft Word &
Excel spreadsheet applications.
Apply online www.lakecaa.org
Fax 352-483-2298, or in person
501 N Bay St., Eustis.
Call Human Resources for more info
352-357-5550
Equal Opportunity Employer
DFWP/M/F/


















PO------ RPRTER/'.














The Daily Commercial of
Leesburg, FL, has an immediate
opening for an experienced
reporter. We are a 25,000 circulation
AM daily in sunny Central Florida -,
just one hour north of OrlaoilI m and
Tampa with unlimited recreational








opportunities at our doorstep. We are
looking for an aggressive reporter
with a strong work ethic and a
passion for local news.
Responsibilities include government


and community covmmerage, inodepth





stories and personality profiles.
The ideal candidate will be able tote
opwrite tight, comr an experlling, focused
reporter. We are a 25,000 circulation





articles; and turn around stral Floriesda --
quickly. Strong research of Orland





investigative skills, and the ability
Tampa -- with unlimited recreationalnct
opportunities about complex issues are
looking for an aggressive reporter





with a mustro. This is not an entry level
passion for local news.





Resposition. We offer paid timbilities include off algovernmentn
with a commupetity coverage benefits package.pth





There are no relocation dollars
available for this position.
stories and pershone calls proflease.






EQE
The ideQualified candidate wll be able to
write tight, compelling, focused







articles; anhould turemail around stories
quickly. Strong resume and six
investigative skills, and the ability






solidto create cmpelling, succinct to
edstories about complex issues are
a must. This is not an entry-level












dailycommercial~com
osition. We offer paid tiCommeoffrcialong
with a competitive benefits package.







212There are no relocation dollaStreet
available for this position.
No phone calls please.
EOE





Leesburg, FL 34748candidates
should email a cover
letter, resume and six
solid clips to
editorial jobs@
dailycommercial.com
or Daily Commercial
212 East Main Street
Leesburg, FIL 34748
Attn: Editorial Jobs






1ke DaklgCiumime
flArd dalOT.rr~r atlMT-I .


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Lake 787-0600 Sumter 877-702-0600



The Dailig Commercial

www.dailycommercial.com


405 Professional

THE CITY OF GROVELAND
CITY MANAGER
Groveland is located in Lake County,
approximately 30 minutes west of Or-
lando, easily accessible from Florida's
Turnpike, State Road 50, U.S. Hwy
19, U.S. 27 and Interstate 75. It has a
population of less than 8,700 and
provides the following City services:
police, fire, water, wastewater, and
reuse water. The City Manager is the
chief administrator in a City Manager
Council form of government with an
elected mayor and four elected coun-
cil members. The City employs ap-
proximately 86 people with an annual
budget of $21,144,652 for FY
2013/2014. City departments consist
of: police, fire, utilities, public works,
finance, city clerk, and community de-
velopment. The City created a Com-
munity Redevelopment Agency man-
aged by a CRA manager who works
for the CRA Board but collaboratively
with the city manager.
The City desires an experienced pro-
fessional who has served as a city
manager or assistant city manager in
a comparable or larger local govern-
ment. Strong leadership and commu-
nication skills are essential qualities.
Council seeks a leader who promotes
an open collaborative environment, is
a consensus builder, and who em-
powers staff, while remaining ap-
prised of the ongoing operations of all
departments. Important attributes are
the ability to develop and maintain a
strong cooperative team atmosphere
with staff and an open, transparent
dialogue with Council and the public.
Experience in financial management
with proven fiscal responsibility, eco-
nomic development, redevelopment,
and community engagement is
strongly desired.
A Bachelor's degree in public admini-
stration, business administration or
related field with eight or more years
of progressively responsible profes-
sional experience in municipal govern-
ment is required. Candidates with a
Master's degree in public or business
administration is preferred.
Salary range is $67,715 to $117,915.
Beginning salary negotiable but is ex-
pected to be in mid-90's dependent
on experience.
Send resume, cover letter, applica-
tion, salary history, and no less than
four work-related references with
contact information to:
Anita Geraci-Carver, Esq.
1560 Bloxam Avenue
Clermont, Florida 34711
or anita@agclaw.net.
City employment application may be
obtained at groveland-fl.gov.
Deadline to submit is Oct. 18, 2013.

THE TOWN OF LADY LAKE
COMMUNITY SERVICE AIDE PT
General duty non sworn patrol work in
the community. Works under the
close supervision of the shift Police
Sergeant. Performs a variety of rou-
tine and administrative tasks in sup-
port of law enforcement activities. Op-
erates a motor vehicle to assist in car-
rying out the business of the depart-
ment and the Town. H.S. Diploma or
GED. Must meet all entrance require-
ments as established by the Depart-
ment. Possession of a valid Florida
Driver's License.
All interested applicants must submit
a application and resume.
Salary: $8.00/hr. and $11.54/hr after
training is complete.
Applications and resumes will be
accepted in the Human Resource
Office or fax to 352 751 -0230 or
e-mail to: tdelee@ladylake.org
Applicants are advised that all submit-
ted materials are subject to public dis-
closure per Public Records Act. Equal
Opportunity Employment/Drug-Free
Workplace/ADA. www.ladylake.org

WILDWOOD POLICE DEPT.
COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER
(DISPATCHER)
$13.51/hr. Candidate must be com-
puter literate & type 30 correct wpm.
Dispatch exp. preferred, shift & wknd
rotations. Must possess & maintain a
valid FL Driver's License to access the
DAVID system.
Applications available via the website
www.wildwood-fl.gov, or at
City Hall, 100 N. Main Street,
Wildwood, FL.
Direct any questions, to
Deanna Cox-HPF '",S.i 330-1340,
dcox-wildwood@cfl.rr.com
Applicants are advised that all submit-
ted materials are subject to public dis-
closure per Public Records Act.
EEO/AA/V/H/M/F/ Drug-Free Work-
place


410 Sales

Exceptional

Opportunities













FALL WORK -GREAT PAY
FT/PT Immediate openings






Customer Sales/Service
will train, Apply, all ages 17+.





Call ASAP! 352-404-5183


















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sae Gents for ar manuacture
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willthe Mount Dorain, Apply, all ages 17+.monte

























areas.
Call ASAP! 352-404-5183


















































E-mail resumes to:
resumes@fourstarhomes.com

415 Technology
RESTORE TELECOM IN LEESBURG

























seeks full time Computer Technician.
Install software, map network drives,
set up hardware, maintain asset in-
ventory and user system access lists.
hS Diploma/GED required. Exp. with
computer setup/troubleshooting & ba-
FOURSTAR



































sic networking required.
Email resume to
humanresources@restortelecom.com
or fax to 888-420-1861a
qireet .okngfrgn stowr






















Applications accepted at







912-1 Venture Ave.
DFWPIEOE

Tired of the slow pace?

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Aplcain ac.c*pted*t

91- e Vaentue Ave.
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SUNDAY CROSSWORD ANSWERS
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Speed things up with somc
new einployecs.
The Daily Commercial
Employment Listings.
Ligh Ming fast response!




Sunday, October 6, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


420 Customer Service
Employment

HARDWARE CUSTOMER SERVICE
Part time. Exp. a plus. Lifting required
Email resume to
Joinourteam80@yahoo.com


423 Accounting

BOOKKEEPER

Outstanding opportunity at Umatilla
area Continuing Care Retirement
Community for detailed orientated
individual with prior Bookkeeping
experience.
Email or fax resume to:

Jjjv.euie
f^errace

Retirement Community
Altoona, FL
Fax: (407) 645-5890
Email: john@d-s-i.com
Equal Opportunity Employer


425 Clerical

RECEPTIONIST WANTED
Phone, basic computer & filling skills
a must. Willing to clean. Experience
preferred. DFWP
Call 352-728-6053


432 Dental

DENTAL ASSISTANT
Experienced for busy office. Must
have expanded duties & radiology
certified. Looking for outgoing
dependable, professional person must
be able to multi task.
352-751-1178
Lady Lake Area

DENTAL ASST./INSURANCE CLERK
EXP'D. THE VILLAGES
PH: 321-945-9545 or
Fax 407-302-9799


435 Medical

EMT/PARAMEDIC, NURSE,
MA with X-ray
For Busy Urgent Care.
Must have Phlebotomy, IV skills &
medication administration.
Email to:
medicalbillingtoday@ yahoo.com

FRONT DESK
For busy Urgent Care. Computer ori-
ented typing skills a must. Profes-
sional appearance & well groomed.
Fax resume to:
352-315-1703 I


435 Medical


INSURANCE BILLING & I
COLLECTIONS FT
For busy Chiropractic office. College &
coding experience required. Must be a
team player, competent and persis-
tent.
Fax resume to: 352-589-5549 or
Email to: ddimura@gmail.com

I MEDICAL BILLING I
Needed for a physicians office.
Must have experience.
Fax resume to: 352-323-1894


NEEDED LICENSED THERAPIST
Program Asst., and Recovery Coach
for an exciting new in-home Family
Behavior Therapy program serving
Lake County at risk families. Training
will be made available in this evidence
based practice.
Apply at




515 W Main St. Leesburg or
online at www.lsbc.net
DFWP/EOE



















| PRACTICE ADMINISTRATOR FOR I
THRIVING MEDICAL PRACTICE P/T
Must be go-getter willing to work with
medical director and staff to fulfill
God's vision for the practice.n
Fax resume to: 352 259-5540


PSYCHIATRIST/PSYCH ARNP/
LICENSED THERAPIST
Dynamic organization is seeking quali-
fied medical staff to work in outpatient
& inpatient settings. Duties include
working with patients on psychiatric
evaluations, medication management
and direct patient care. Come join us
for a rewarding career. NHSC loan
forgiveness eligible employer.
Apply at


l~feW grv

515 W. Main St., Leesburg or
online at www.lsbc.net
DFWP/EOE


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450 Tradesl g c

*.TEMPORARY POSITION*..
CITY OF WILDWOOD
PUBLIC WORKS MAINT. WORKER
$1.2194/hr. Semi-skilled manual la-
bor position that requires Candidate to
perform equipment operation, mow
ing, trimming, assisting journey level
workers in concrete, asphalt, drain-
age, right-of-way maintenance and/or
other trade work that may involve the
use of misc. hand tools, power tools
or heavy equipment. High School Di-
ploma or General Education Degree
(GED) required. Schedule is Mon-Fri
7am-4pm and may include weekends
and/or holidays if necessary. Candi-
date must possess and maintain a
Valid Florida Driver's License through-
out employment.

Applications available via the website
www.wildwood-fl.gov, or at
City Hall, 100 N. Main Street
Wildwood, FL.
Direct any questions, to
Deanna Cox-HR (352) 330-1340,
dcox-ildwood@cfl.rr.com
Applicants are advised that all submit
ted materials are subject to public dis-
closure per Public Records Act.
EEO/AAND/H/M/F/ Drug-Free Work-
place

AIR/HEAT INSTALLER EXP'D
Apply in person 16445 SE 138th Ave.
Corid r too -fl.g -o-ra
Weirsdale, FL 32195
or Call 352-821-1700

*DRIVER MANAGER EXPERIENCED
for OTR Refrigerated Carrier
Night Shift position available.
Full Time. McLeod Exp. a Plus.

*UTILITY FLEET MAINT. TECHNICIAN
for OTR Refrigerated Carrier. Full
Time, 2nd Shift. Responsible for yard
checks, trailer washouts & moving
pallets. CDL license a plus, but not re-
quired. Entry level.
*FLEET MECHANICAL TECHNICIAN
2-3 years mechanical experience.

"WE'RE GROWING!"
These 3 positions are due
to expansion.
Time Definite Services, Inc.
Sumterville, FL.
No Phone Calls!
Send Resume in confidence to:
HR@TimeDefinite.com


C7


450 Trades

APPLICATIONS BEING ACCEPTED FOR
*LANDSCAPE FOREMAN'S &
*SUPERVISOR,
*ALSO OFFICE/SALES/RETAIL
NURSERY PERSON
Bilingual a plus. English a must. Must
be prepared to work 20-22 days per
month. 50-55 hrs per week.
No Phone Calls Please.
Apply in person 9-11am Tues.-Sat.
at 8440 CR48, Yalaha,
4 blocks past the Yalaha Bakery
MANSFIELD LANDSCAPING LLC
WE DO NO LAWN MAINTENANCE,
STRICTLY LANDSCAPING.

DRIVER
Needed for OTR, 5 yrs. exp. w/some
reefer. Good driving record & ref's.
Very nice truck. NON SMOKER.
Call 352-516-1986



[WRLKER]
STAINLESS EQUIPMENT
FIELD SERVICE TECHNICIAN
Join a team based, leading
manufacturer of stainless steel
equipment for food, pharmaceutical
and chemical industries
We are looking for a Field Service
Technician, dispatched from our Ta-
vares, Florida location. This position
operates on an on-call capacity with
extensive travel. Candidate must be
proficient in MIG & TIG welding, and
possess mechanical aptitude with the
ability to install, repair, and maintain
equipment. Responsibilities include
ensuring equipment runs at optimal
levels, and performing routine repairs
and maintenance of custom manufac-
tured stainless steel equipment for the
chemical, food, dairy and pharmaceu-
tical industries. We offer a competitive
salary and full benefits, including
401K, health, dental and flexible
spending account. If you are qualified
and interested in joining our team,
please send your resume to:
Walker Stainless Equipment Co. LLC
625 State Street,
New Lisbon, Wl 53950
Attn: Human Resources/Jim Arzt
Email: jarzt@walkerstainless.com
www.walkerstainless.com
No Phone calls please
EEO/Drug/Smoke Free Work Place

LAKE SUMTER ELECTRIC, LLC
Now Hiring!
Experienced Electricians & Helpers.
Call 352-793-8092 for more info.





NEW CONSTRUCTION
Residential Electricians Exp. preferred.
Rough & Trim. Slab, lintel & service.
Full benefits, paid holidays & vac. EOE
Apply at:
Exceptional Electric
3042 CR 124A, Wildwood


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450 Trades

CONSTRUCTION LABORERS
Class A or B CDL preferred.
Will train. Must travel.
Paid medical & leave.
DFWP/EOE
Call 352-383-3159
Ext. 229

PLUMBERS & PLUMBERS HELPERS
for commercial work. Must have
experience. Drug free work place.
Call 352-728-6053

DRIVERS
Loudon County Trucking is looking for
OTR Flatbed Drivers. We Offer: No
Tarping!!! Great Miles, Pay-up to
.60cpm, Great Benefits & Home Time!
CDL-A, 2yr OTR Exp, Good MVR.
Frank Donnelly at:
1-800-745-7290 x22

DRIVERS
Guaranteed Home EVERY Weekend!
Company: All miles PAID (Loaded or
Empty)! Lease: To Own NO Money
down, NO Credit Check!
Call 1-888-880-5916

DRIVER TRAINEES
NEEDED NOW!
Learn to drive for Covenant Transport.
No exp. needed! New drivers earn
$700 -$900 per wk! Teams
$100-125k! Plus excellent, benefits.
Local CDL Training
1-877-214-3624

POOL SERVICE NIGHTS
No exp. required.
Apply in Person
POOL CONTROL 2191 Hwy. 441/27


DRIVERS

NEEDED!
QUALIFIED CDL A DRIVERS
5 YEARS EXPERIENCE
See what we offer, assigned
equipmentgood home time,
weekly pay, direct dep.,health ins,
paid holidays & vacation.
Call for more details.
800-456-2336 X114

TRAILER MECHANIC
Sunstate Carriers has an opportunity
for an experienced Trailer Mechanic.
Excellent benefits paid vacation, paid
sick days, health insurance, overtime
pay. Work in a clean & well equipped
shop. Must have own tools, able to do
PM inspections, repairs such as brake
jobs & electrical wiring/lights, ability to
weld & tractor PM a plus but not re-
quired.
Apply in person


SilPsate
726 Southridge Industrial Dr.
Tavares, FL
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

TRIM/STAIR INSTALLERS
Doctor Phillips Orlando area.
Contact Mike 352-267-8965

455
Restaurants/
Hotels/Clubs
BAH IIENDI-EH -I-I
MUST be exp'd. Evenings & Wknds.
Apply in person 3-5pm
VICE'S EMBERS SUPPER CLUB
7940 US Hwy. 441 Leesburg, FL

SERVERS & CASHIER
Apply within between 2pm & 5pm
TAKI'S RESTAURANT
1324 N. Blvd. W., Leesburg
I SLHVLHS &UO0IKS
Apply in person: O'Keefe's Irish Pub
Downtown Tavares

470 General

ALUMINUM / INSTALLERS / HELPER
Experienced Driver license required
Apply in Person
Aluminum Contractors
1203A West Main St., Leesburg
352-323-0068

BE YOUR OWN BOSS
JANITORIAL CONTRACTS AVAILABLE
Visit www.imageonejanitorial.com
Call 352-504-4744




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CITY OF FRUITLAND PARK
Part Time Recreation Aide
Help supervise all recreational
programs, and special events.
This position is seasonal and hours
vary depending on activities.
Experience with recreation programs
preferred. Salary $10.00/hr.
physical., drug test and background
check required.
Apply at City Hall
506 W. Berckman St.
Fruitland Park, FL
8:30-4:30 Mon.-Fri. EOE DFWP







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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Sunday, October 6, 2013


470 General

FIELD REPRESENTATIVE I
2 Positions available. FT 40 hrs/wk.
$10.15 per hour plus benefits
High school diploma or GED required.
Submit resume to
jbuzbee@youthranches.org

SCHOOL BUS
DRIVERS NEEDED
Training provided.
Lake County Schools, Transportation
352-728-2561 or
Apply online: www.lake.k12.fl.us
ULTIMATE CONTRACT
CLEANING COMPANY
We have two part time cleaning posi-
tions avail, in the Tri-County area. The
hrs are 6pm 10pm on Mon., Wed.,
Fri. and Sat. or Sun. 6pm 9pm, ex-
actly. 15 hrs per wk. Starting wage
$9/hr. Must have commercial clean-
ing exp., great attitude and clean, ma-
ture appearance. Drug free workplace
and background check req'd.
Contact Dan @ 352-753-8653

480 Legal

PARALEGAL ASSISTANT FIT
Experienced required. Excellent pay.
Bilingual/Spanish a must
The Cardona Law Firm
Call 352-728-5557
Fax: 352-323-0087




500
Pets/Animals



501 Pets
For Sale
JAPANESE CHIN 9 mo old beautiful
boy. $200 SOLD

KITTENS FREE (3) left females, to good
homes only. Tavares area. 13 weeks
old, call or text 352-308-7926
ROTTWEILER puppies both male & fe-
male. AKC. Sire @ 155 Ibs. & Dam
on site. Asking $1000. Call Kami
352-636-4935
SHORKIE 10/mo. Black/White, all shots.
Free to good home. ADOPTED

560 Pet
Supplies
DOG CRATE Large, hard plastic. 25W x
29D x37L. $50 obo. 352-321-2174

PET KENNEL chain link w/gate 6'x9'
$99 Call 352-728-5911




GOO
Merchandise
Mart



601 Antiques
CLOCK electric Sail Ship good shape.
Made by Uniter. $95. Cal 793-5741

CROCK BUTTER CHURN 3 gallons, In-
dian Head on side. Complete w/top
& paddle. Excel. cond. $250 Call
352-793-3877.
WOODEN WAGON w/wooden spokes &
metal bands. $175. 352-343-5986

602 Arts/Crafts
CHRISTMAS FABRICS cotton, approx.
50 yards + scrapes. $30 315-1033

603 Collectibles
AUGUSTA XII Color Print 25 x 30, '92.
Framed/signed. $65. 330-4484

BUYING Baseball, Football, Basketball,
Non-sports cards
(pre 1980) autographs, memorabilia,
bobbin heads. Sets, singles. No col-
lection to large. Call: 352-589-7981
or E-mail:
sportscards4john@aol.com
DOLL Boyd's Yesterdays Child, Laura
w/box & cert. $45. 352-360-0028

ORNAMENTS (15) Hummingbirds by
Lucy Liu, Original cost was $375
sell for $150. 352-357-0225
RECORD COLLECTION 113 LP's $100
obo Call 352-357-2218
STAMP COLLECTION World War II 100
canceled stamps. $5 Call 406-9405


Daily comicall
"Your First Choice" In-Print & On-Line


604 Furniture

BAR STOOLS (3) Alex-Sheridan Aloha
Rattan swivel sienna 30". $225.
352-409-0400

BUNK BEDS like new. $250 obo.
352-343-5256

COUCH, Loveseat & Chair, 2 end tables
& coffee table. Good heavy furniture.
$400 obo. Call 352-360-5787

CREDENZA, 46 x 18 x 26. Asking $50.
Call 352-787-8217

DINETTE SET Rattan glass top w/4
chairs on rollers. $99. 753-3914

FUTON, Black cloth, has arms, good
cond. $35. Call 352-483-2664

MATTRESS Queen w/bed rails. $100.
Call 352-476-3476

RECLINER La-Z-Boy. Tan Good cond.
$100. Call 352-589-6626

RECLINER tan Microfiber. Good cond.
$100. 262-441-0156

ROCKING CHAIR glider, White wood,
excel cond. $100 352-250-8832

SOFA Black Leather, 3 cushion, full
size. $30. 352-561-1167.

SOFA Hunter Green & Cranberry stripe.
Good cond. $100. 728-3802

TABLE, Heart Shaped, 3 tier. brown,
good cond. $8 Call 352-504-6689

TWIN BED white laminate, new mat-
tress. $100. 352-250-4711

TWIN BEDS (2), complete w/linens.
$400. Call 352-589-1787

WICKER TABLE 40" round, glass top.
w/2 chairs. $75 352-753-1834

605 Appliances

Appliances With Warranties $75
& up! Used Beds all sizes!
*Buy Sell Trade
Fast delivery
Call Buzzy'S 352-315-9886
www.buzzysbeds.com

DISCOUNT
APPLIANCE
Repair-Sales-Service Most Repairs
$60 Plus Parts





WASHER, DRYER,
REFRIGERATOR
"Don't Toss It
Fix It For Less"
Buying Clean
Washers & Dryers
Days, Evenings & Weekends
Call Now
352-874-1238

DISHWASHER KitchenAid, almond.
Works good. $35 obo. 669-1163

DISHWASHER, Whirlpool. Asking $100.
Call 352-728-5256

DRYER GE gas, white, good cond. $50
Please call 352-404-8288

FREEZER Frigidaire "Commercial" up-
right. Like new. $275 obo.
352-314-2717

REFRIGERATOR dorm size, good cond.
$100 Call 352-702-6860

REFRIGERATOR 16.5 cu.ft. White, Excel
cond. $100 obo SOLD!

REFRIGERATOR Whirlpool, with ice
maker. $350. 352-728-5256

STOVE Elec. Propane water heater,
window A/C. $75. 865-789-6393

STOVE, Whirlpool, electric, self clean-
ing. $350. 352-728-5256

WASHER & DRYER LG Front loaders,
steam washer/dryer w/matching ped-
estals. Color: Wild cherry. Elec.
Comes w/2yr. transferable warranty.
$1100. Excel cond. 352-787-6366

606 Electronics

DIGITAL TV CONVERTER BOX Zentih.
Like new. $35. 352-365-2301

GAME PSP Sony brand new in box.
$100 Call 352-455-3342

RECEIVER Denon with remote. Very
good cond. $99. 352-323-4862


606 Electronics
TELEVISION 27" Sony Trinitron, very
good picture. $60 352-589-8363

TELEVISION Hitachi 60" HD, floor
model, with built in speakers. $275.
352-314-2717.
TELEVISION, Emerson 32" color w/re-
mote. $50 obo Call 352-728-2668

608 A/C & Heat
AIR CLEANER UV light for A/C. Kills
mold/bacteria. $100. 267-1711

AIR CONDITIONER window unit, 5000
BTU's. $50 Call 352-753-7075
DUCTLESS Mini Split System. AC/Heat.
1 ton. $265. 352-267-1711

624 Children's
items
BARBIE TOWNHOUSE, good cond. $60.
Please call 352-669-4789

625 Building
Supplies/
Materials
BOARDS 2X4 (60) 9 ft. long. $75 for
all. Call 352-360-8406

PRESSURE TREATED 2X4. $100 obo.
352-484-3650

629 Flea Markets/Auctions

THE "LEESBURG SATURDAY
MORNING MARKET"
VENDORS WANTED
www.leesburgsaturdaymorningmarket.com
The weekly market is open from
8am to 2pm.
Please contact
Sandi@leesburgpartnership.com

630 Garage Sales
FT- FRUITLAND PARK 1
809 Clear Brook Ct. Oct 4, 5, 6.
1 p 8am-2pm.
TANGERINE,
Fri. Sun. 8am 4pm. 5722 Pine
St. Multi Family. Too much to list.

635 Garden
LAWN MOWER Briggs engine, runs
great. 20" cut. Only $50 728-4913

PATIO TABLE & 4 CHAIRS, glass top,
square, taupe. $100.
301-788-6361
PLANT Crown of Thorns, red blossoms
all year 3 gallon. $25. 357-3293
PONY TAIL PALM 4' tall, large bulb.
Call after 8am. $35. 352-787-0811
TREE SALE
6' +/- Oaks Etc. $10 or 15 for $100
*Oaks- 8'-10' $39 or3/$105
*Larger trees 12' +/- $95. to $275.
*12' +/- Bald Cypress
*Nice Sago Palms
CATT'S TREES
352-669-1618

640 Guns
AMMUNITION 10 boxes 22 long rifle
shells. $55. Call 352-324-2236

CVA 50 caliber black powder, good
cond. $75. 259-0461. No Sun. calls
RIFLE Springfield, 22 long w/scope.
Bolt action. $150.1-352-346-1434
SMITH & WESSON 12 ga. 30"
barrel/full choke, semi-auto. Excel
cond. Deer/Turkey $325. Call
352-259-0461. No Sunday Calls!

649 Medical
SCOOTER/POWERCHAIR CARRIER
NEW, fits into hitch, 60" fold out
ramp. $195. 352-217-3437

650 Computers
& Equip
PRINTER HP PSC500, w/7 ink car-
tridges $60. 352-728-3273

652 Articles
For Sale
AREA RUG 5'X8'. excel, cond. $50
SOLD

BRACELET Pandora, sterling silver 7.5,
no charms. $40. Call 324-2559
CAST IRON POT, indoor/outdoor 3
quart w/lid $35. 748-0702
CERTIFIED PRINCESS DIANA DOLL
CLOTHES, 4 for $100. 217-4221
CHRISTMAS TREE 7', no lights, storage
bag. $35 Call 352-314-3254


*Employment advertisements are excluded.
Please call 352-314-FAST to speak with a customer service rep.
Lake: 352-314-3278 or Sumter: 352-748-1955


652 Articles
For Sale

CLEANING MACHINE Steam Bullet, no
chemicals, like new $45. 787-7048

DESIGNER CLOTHING Chicos/Cache,
10/pcs. $100. 321-246-4371

DISHES 12 piece setting w/extra serv-
ing pieces. $50. 352-365-0109

FIESTAWARE DISHES cups & saucers,
assorted colors $99 Call 250-8290

GARMENT BAG bi-fold, like new. $20
Call 352-385-1830

GRILL CHAR-BROIL 3 burners, stainless
trim. $55. Call 352-326-3581

HALLOWEEN COSTUME adult ladies,
$15. Call 352-434-9855

HALLOWEEN COSTUME Michael Jack-
son, w/accessories. $50. 742-2668

MEN'S CLOTHING XLg shirts 42W
shorts. 10 pcs. $20. 321-246-4371

MOVING BOXES 36 various sizes, $40
Call 352-223-3678

MUSICAL CANDLES (2) battery oper-
ated. $35 Call 352-753-3974

PORCH BENCH 4', wooden w/wrought
iron sides. $40. 352-406-9405

RUBBER BOOTS men's, 4 pairs, size 8
USA, excel cond. $27. 348-9946

SHOES men's, size 10 1/2, 20 pairs for
$50.SOLD

SINGING PARAKEET ON STAND sensor
& batteries, new. $15. 360-1209

SUITCASE, SAMSONITE w/wheels, Ig.
excel, cond. $30. 352-343-1050

TEAPOT SET PLUS w/utensil holder,
Hummingbird. $50. 352-357-0225

TOOTHBRUSHES (2) SONIC CARE. New
$70 for both. Call 352-508-4786

TUXEDO Men's, Coat/Pants/Shirt, size
48-42. $65. 352-217-4809

655 Musical
Instruments

KEYBOARD YAMAHA PSR-6, excel
cond. $75. Wildwood, 653-3199

PIANO Bungalow Mission Style. Attrac-
tive oak finish. $100. 383-9132

660 Office
Furniture/
Supplies

COMPUTER DESK w/hutch. Good cond.
Heavy, Umatilla $100 771-2310

COMPUTER DESK, 3 drawers, very
good cond. $70 Call 750-5604

CORNER COMPUTER DESK, glass
w/chrome. $75 obo. 360-5787

DESK CHAIR w/arms, plus home office
supplies. $40. 352-787-0410

DESK teak, matching filing cabinet,
chair, mat. $100 352-253-0887

OFFICE DESK, CHAIR & RUG 50"x70".
$80. 352-314-0505


4:..


674 Exercise Equipment

EXERCISE BIKE Good cond. $25. Call
after 5pm. 352-323-1753

EXERCISE MACHINES. (2) Tony Little.
Both $70. 352-874-0352

675 Sports/
Recreation

BICYCLE 26" men's, single speed,
coaster brakes. $35 352-360-7049

BICYCLE 26" Men's. Very good cond.
$65. obo. Call 352-460-4449

BICYCLE 3 wheeler, new. $275 obo
Call 352-357-3728

BICYCLE Diamond Back, Sorrento
Sport, Men's 26", 21 speed. $75.
352-259-0633

BICYCLES 3 Wheel, rebuilt. Large Seat
&Basket. $150. 1-352-346-1434

BOFLEX PR3000 GYM, new. Over $900
new, asking $450 obo. Call
352-323-3482

GOLF CLUBS (3) w/Izzo Shag Bag ball
dispenser. $25. 352-702-7632

GOLF CLUBS men's complete set
w/bag. $25. 502-750-0512

GOLF CLUBS, 3 iron thru SW, driver, 3
wood, putter. $75 352-245-0716

GOLF SET left-handed, irons, oversized
woods, bag. $60. 352-729-2595

GOLF SET, oversized graphite woods,
irons. New. $80. 352-735-6927

685 Tools/
Machinery

PRESSURE WASHER, Craftsman 850,
New $400, sell for $100. 357-2771

PROFESSIONAL GANG BOX metal.
$100. 352-750-0367

ROUTER Craftsman 1.5hp w/table plus
accessories. $40 firm. SOLD

VACUUM PUMP 110 volts, full size.
$75 Please call 352-406-9405





800
Real Estate
For Rent



806 Houses
Unfurnished

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick
407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 &2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375


806 Houses
Unfurnished

CLERMONT Newly built home for rent!
Located in the Verde Ridge neigh-
borhood w/a Community pool, ca-
bana and playground. 2,375sf with
a 3 car garage $1,750/month. Call
Dierdra "Dee" Thomas, owner/real-
tor 813-690-3030

EUSTIS waterfront 2/2, carport, Pet OK.
$700/mo. Call 352-589-0749

LADY LAKE Furn. 3 rm Cottage, 5611
Berts Rd. for couple. $450/mo. 1st,
last & security Will sell for $40,000.
Please call 317-446-9063

LEESBURG, 3/2.5/2 built as a model
home with upgrades. $1,200 per
mo., $1,000 deposit and first
month's rent to move in. Call
Heather at 352-308-9426

MOUNT DORA 3/2, CHA, Ig. fenced
yard. $750/mo + dep. 978-1696
RENTALS
LONG TERM & UNFURN. RENTALS IN
SOUTH LAKE COUNTY.
ROCKER REALTY 352-394-3570
Ask For Janet or Emily
RockerRealtylnc.com


807 Apartments
Unfurnished

BUSHNELL 1/1, 1 year lease, all apple +
W/D No pets. $500 mo. + $500 se-
curity dep. 352-793-6887 or
352-303-5112

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick
407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 &2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375

EUSTIS
All remodeled Apts!
1, 2 & 3 Bedrooms
Special starting at
$475 Only $350 Dep. Pet OK.
352-357-5675

LAKEFRONT 1 br cottage, screened
porch incl. elec., water, sewer &
Wi-Fi. Starting at $695/mo. Travel
Trailer $500 mo. 386-747-7119


SIQ.,j ziff 1011 j


LEESBURG MOVE-IN SPECAIL
2 BRS. 1.5 BA, TOWNHOUSES
352-728-1955

LEESBUH -
1ST MO. FREE!
SPANISH VILLAGE
Pool, great location!
Furn. Efficiency, incl.
util. & cable $700/mo.
2/1 apt. $600/mo.
Furn. $700/mo + util.
352-728-5555


In Lake County

,- -, _,'/ '-C LU I ,' h,. f


For Local- News Sports Weather '

In-Print & On-Line


-tas *


rm orwwl.TTI I, ,-.-,,.
www~daiy~ l mly C rT : T IDI. > m


The Daily Commercial




www.dailycomnimercial.com


: v*fp
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Sunday, October 6, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


807 Apartments
Unfurnished

EUSTIS
2/1 including water/trash
Starting at $650/mo
Near Downtown
Call 352-735-0597
LEESBURG 2/1, males preferred. Pool,
$500/mo Must pass background
check. Call 352-504-7189

LEESBURG Downtown
area. The Enclave at
Cauthen Circle. A new
apartment home
community of 1 BR,
1 BA Luxury apts.
Call 352-702-2949
~ Fully Equipped -
LEESBURG
FIRST MONTH $99
MOVE IN SPECIAL!
e2/1 $500/dep.
e2/1 w/W/D hookup $550/dep.
92/2 w/W/D hookup $600/dep.
Call 352-516-1244
Ask for Tina
LEESBURG, Duplex VERY CLEAN 2/1,
no pets $550/mo + dep. 551-6772
LEESBURG,
PEPPERTREEAPTS.
2503 South St.
Now Avail. 1 & 2BR 62+. Handi-
capped or disabled. Spacious units,
quiet, A/C community rm. Staring at
$450. Hurry, before they are gone!
Equal Housing Opportunity
Call Christina
352-728-1500
LYN TERRACE
Eustis
352-357-7332
www.lynterrace.com
Great Move-In
Specials & Free Gifts!
*1 & 2 Bedroom Units
*All 1st Floor -No Stairs!
AFFORDABLE RENT
Accepting applications for
Leesburg & Mt. Dora: Turtle Oaks,
Little Turtle, Oakwood.
HUD-subsidized. Rent based on
Income. Credit, Criminal, & Housing
History checked.
787-1990, 787-1441
or 383-4040 TTY-711


EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

808 Apartments
Furnished

FRUITLAND PARK
TWIN PALMS MARINA
NEWLY RENOVATED
1 BR. MOBILES FULLY FURNISHED
ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED,
CABLE TV. FREE USE OF KAYAK &
CANOES. CONVENIENCE STORE
ON PROPERTY. NO SECURITY
DEPOSIT WITH PROOF OF INCOME.
GREAT FOR SENIORS.
WEEKLY & MONTHLY RATE.
SMALL PETS WELCOME.
CALL 352-787-4514
LEESBURG
1ST MO. FREE!
SPANISH VILLAGE
Pool, great location!
Furn. Efficiency, incl. util. & cable
$700/mo.
2/1 apt. $600/mo.
Furn. $700/mo + util.
352-728-5555
LEESBURG nice l1br, incl. all utilities,
$600/mo, Social Security wel-
comed. Call 813-781-9540
TAVARES $495/mo.
Furn or 1/2 off homes.
352-343-7780
riverestwaterfrontresort.com

809 Roommate
Wanted
LEESBURG female to share 3/2 w/pool.
Must have job & car. $450/mo
w/$400 dep. 1/2 util. & cable.
352-348-4750

810 Duplexes

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick
407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 &2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
EUSTIS
2/1 including water/trash,
Near Downtown
Starting at $650/mo
Call 352-735-0597
EUSTIS lake & dock, large 1/1 2230 W.
CR 44, W/D, tile floors, $600/mo.
Good ref's, non-smoker. Call
305-970-5379

LEESBURG, 1 br, 2br & 3br. Great price.
$599+. Call 352-350-7109
LEESBURG,
Beautiful Remodeled
2br/1 ba
only $500/mo.
1721 Birchwood Circle
Call 352-325-1289
now!
MT. DORA, Desirable 2/2/1
Fenced/shaded yard. Quiet dead


end St. No Smoking or Pets
321-689-4529


811 Condos
Townhouses

LEESBURG
Sunny Side Villas for rent 2/2. $650
mo. Call 352-459-9300

816 Commercial
Property

LEESBURG
Warehouses w/Offices
2315-25 Griffin Rd
1,150 up to 12,400sf
Starts at $300/mo.
Office/Showroom
1607 Hwy.
441$850/mo
Small Shop or Office
2204 Citrus Blvd (441)
$320/mo., incl. utilities
352-787-0004

















819
Manufactured
Homes Rental ___

ATTENTION SENIORS AND ADULTS
Never lived in. Brand New 66x14, 3/2,
in nice quiet park in Eustis.
$650/mo + utilities. Sorry NO KIDS.
Call 352-396-2042

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
BLDG. SIZE:
























Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick
407-547-9394
eRemodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE'
From $1,000 down
-$$500/month$$-
Also Avail.
MaHandyman Special's
1Homes Rental&2brfrom
ATTENTION SENIORS AND ADULTSi
Never lived in. Brand New 66x1 4, 3/2,1
in nice quiet park in Eustis. I






-$350/m$650/mo + utilities. Sorry NO KIDS.th$$-






For other rentals only
Call 352-396-2042 7375
LADY LAKE, 2RMONT2, $450HWmo. small de50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale












posit. No pets. 352-267-6358

LADY LAKEIFRUITLAND PARK 2/1
w/carport Lg. prch & feinanced yard.
Call$550/mo. Just off 441. CaRick
352-407-547-939462

LEESBURG 6 mi. West. 2n1, CHA.
---$525. + uri$$500/month$$---0546
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
1 & 2br from






---TAVAES $495$350/month$$---
Furn other 1/2rentals onlymes.
Call352-87343-7780






riverestwaterfrontresort.oom
WILOWOOD AREA
LADY LAKE, 2/2, $450/mo. small de-
posit. No pets. 352-267-6358

LADY LAKE/FRUITLAND PARK 2/1






w/carport Lg odbl. rchwide (Adult Pard.k)
$5501/1 $500mo. Just off 441. Call
352-408Call 352-745-862062

2LEESBURG 6 mi. West. 2/n, CHA.
$525/mo. + security. 455-0546







TAVARES $495/mo.
Furn or 1/2 off homes.
352-343-7780
riverestwaterfrontresort.com
WILDWOOD AREA
3/2 $7001mo. single wide.
2/2 $6501mo dbl. wide (Adult Park)






911 $500m.







Real Estate
FOCall 352-745-8620Sale


902 Opent-T Houses-Own
iTAVARS $45/o I
Furn or 1/2 off homes.
352-343-7780
riverestwaterfrontresort.com



900

Real Estate



For Sale
902 Open Houses
Fop Sale

FOR SALE BY OWNER
ROYAL HIGHLANDS
ADULT GOLF
COMMUNITY
This community is
located with access
within a mi. of the
Florida Turnpike North
and within 15-20 mi.
south to Disney/
Universal and many
other attractions.
We are a gated 55+
adult community that
offers Golf and Tennis
Courts; Bocceball;
Shuffleboard; Indoor
and Outdoor
Swimming Pools;
Ping Pong and
Pool tables and
many numerous
amenities/too many
to mention here.
We conduct
OPEN HOUSE from
11:00am thru 4:00pm
on the first and third
weekend of every
month and would love
to help you find a
home in our
community.
We are located on Rte.
27 & Monarch Blvd.
(1 mi. from the
turnpike north exit).


www.RoyalHighlandsByOwnerResales.
corn (352-360-1196)


-Eustis -
IIll
S1 Bedroom Private Patio ,
I 1 Story, Walk to Publix
Bring This Ad To Receive
$100 OFF
I First Full Month Rent
I 1651 N. County Rd 19A,
I Eustis Fl 32726
_ 352-357-7332


903 Homes
For Sale

LEESBURG Terrace Green, 2/2/2,
great neighborhood, New carpet, paint
&appl. A/Clanai. $119,900
Call 352-787-4584
GalbreathRealty.com

LEESBURG, Nice house for sale. Nor-
mandy wood subd. 3/2/2 1593sf
$59K cash!! Call Kevin for viewing
727-515-5860
OCKLAWAHA, 9+ ac. Horse farm w/2
homes, Ig. barn. New price $230K.
Possible Owner Finance or Lease.
Call 352-259-7756




1000
Manufactured
Homes



1001 Mfd Homes
For Sale

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick
407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 &2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
EUSTIS 2/1 in 55+ park. Shed & car-
port & A/C porch. $2,500. Call
352-357-5556

LEESBURG, 2/2, split plan 14'x66', in
Family park, Ig. master br & bath,
walk-in closet. Lot's of upgrades.
$9,000. 352-321-0583
LEESBURG, a Palm Harbor 2/2 dbl.
wide, partially furn. Located at Lake-
side Village on the Chain of Lakes.
Nice sized landscaped yd. backing up
to Sable Bluff Preserve. Move in
ready. $23,900. Call 352-409-1393
SENIORS AND ADULTS
NEW and NEWER
Homes in a nice quiet part in Eustis.
$25,000 4,. 000' Financing avail.
Only 3 left! Lot rent $350 per mo.
Call 352-589-4007
TAVARES $495/mo.
Furn or 1/2 off homes.
352-343-7780
riverestwaterfrontresort.com

1002 Mfd
Homes
W/ land
For Sale




1100
Recreation



1101 Boats
ALUMINUM FISHING BOAT 14' w/trailer
& title. $500. 352-638-0731.

BASSTRACKER PRO-160.
2013. Brand New!
Lots of Extras!
Paid $13+.
Sell for $9000.
Umatilla area
Call 618-889-8011
BOAT 14' alum. V-bottom, 7.5hp Even-
rude motor. $1200 352-446-6039

HANDCRAFTED 16' fiberglass,
w/trailer. & 7.5hp Mercury. Foot
control trolling motor. $1800. Call
352-630-5189
JON BOAT 10' Alum., Polar Kraft, 30lb.
thrust, trolling motor, battery. $375.
352-408-0296
PONTOON Aloha 20' all alum. deck
28hp Johnson SPL, extras, clean.
$4,000. 352-742-9487


C9


1120 Marine
Equip/
Supplies
BOAT SEATS padded, (2) w/6" swivel
pedestals. SOLD 1ST CALL.

1150 RV&
Campers
FLEETWOOD SOUTHWIND '00, Class A,
gas, 32' w/slide out. Low miles.
$21,000 obo. 352-324-2488

TOW DOLLY '04, Mastertow, new tires.
$500. SOLD
TRAILER HITCHES :'7. 1 adjustable, 1
w/stabilizer bars 2;,_. 603-0005

1200
Transportation

1205 Autos

CASH PAID
FOR JUNK CARS!
$300 and up.
Call 352-771-6191
DODGE 2003 RAM 2500
#SP2269A
$9,992
CADILLAC SRX 2008
#S14094A
$15,442
KIA SEDONA 2012
#S14077A
$19,882
CHRYSLER PACIFICA 2006
#SP212B
$6,882
HONDA CIVIC 2007
#S14090A
$7,982
BILL BRYAN SUBARU
8730 US Hwy. 441
Leesburg, Florida
352-240-7480
FORD Taurus '93, 171K, runs good.
$775. Please call 352-636-9141

KIA OPTIMA EX, V6, 4 door w/sunroof.
New tires, 66,000 miles. Very good
condition, one owner. $5,000 or
obo. (352)223-5510
OLDSMOBILE CUTLASS CIERA 1992
Runs Great! Must see. $1300 obo.
Call 352-636-9719

1206 Aviation

1210 Mcycles/
Mopeds
HONDA CL350 1970, 8,500 miles.
Perfect condition. $2,600 obo.
SOLD!!

YAMAHA '96, Virago 750, 9,700 mi.
excel. Garage kept. $2,500.
352-383-8786


1230 Vans
CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY Touring
Edition, '09. Near perfect cond.
79,483 mi. Mostly HWY. driven.
Blue book $13,500 obo. Located in
the Villages. Call 352-751-4055 or
727-481-1207

1250 Antique
Cars

AUTO SWAP-CORRAL
SHOW OCT 6th
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
Sumter Swap Meets.
800-438-8559

1264 Auto
Parts
Accessory
CAR BRA for 2002 Mazda Miata. $50.
352-589-6107

TIRE Michelin/Alloy wheel. 225/60
R16. 75%. $100. 352-324-2173
TOW BAR w/wiring kit & safety chains.
$100. Call 352-771-1307


NITI f lM ALI-G SriU 1uC


1264 Auto
Parts
Accessory
TRANSMISSION JACK 800 lb. capacity.
$100 Call 352-250-1199

1275 Golf
Carts
CLUB CAR '97, 48V, 3 yr. old batteries.
Has rear seat. $1800 obo Call
419-236-9574
CLUB CAR'97,
new batteries. 48V,
1 owner. Rain cover,
ights, turn signals, & mirrors.
Like new.
$1850
SOLD!
E-Z-GO '01, 36 volt 2012 batteries,
lights, rain enclosure, fold down
windshield, turn signals. Excel
shape, Asking $1,950. Please call
352-357-6638 or 352-205-3066

E-Z-GO '01, new batteries, 2 yr war-
ranty, well equip. $1,850.
352-978-1352


AUTO






LOAN









261









809S


Spccd things illy with Some
new employecs.
The Daily Commercial
Employment Listings.
I ightningfast response!




DAILY COMMERCIAL


Sunday, October 6, 2013


I LI


5 YEAR/1O0,000 MILE
_WARBRANTY
Available On
Pre-Owned Vehicles*
Mileage
Restrictions!
Ms
Model Year Restritlons!


I I k I 1 1


2008 HYUNDAI ACCENT
LI0574A
$7,991


2007 HYUNDAI SONATA
L11571A
S7.991


2009 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
4wu LT11594A
$12,891


200 SUAR LEAC- I -


2009 SUBARU LEGACY
L10894A
$12,891


41- --I -4- I-


2008 HYUNDAI AZERA
L11203B
$S12,991


-41- -4-- I"


2008 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
LT11548B
$13,391


2011 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
^UD L11373A
$15,891


2009 HYUNDAI AZERA
4d" L10190A
$15,991


2012 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
4d" L10724A
$15,991


2013 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
44 L11512A
$15,991


2012 BUICK VERANO
LT11485A
$18,291


2012 HYUNDAI VELOSTER
IEDu LT11595A
$18,291


2013 HYUNDAI SONATA
EUD L11025A
$18,291


2011 HYUNDAI VERACRUZ
IED L10667A
$18,791


2011 HYUNDAI SONATA 2013 HYUNDAI SONATA 2012 HYUNDAI TUCSON
$13,993 $16,293 $18,891


2011 HYUNDAI 929SONATA
$14,553
2012 NISSAN VERSA
L11158B1
$10,894


2010 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
qE L9156A
$11,391
2011 FORD FOCUS
L11393A
$11,543


2009 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
0" L10926B
$15153


I


2012 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
1ID L11209A
S16,551


2013 HYUNDAI SONATA
LV0997A
$19,175


2013 KIA FORTE 2009 HYUNDAI GENESIS
LT11519B 14MD LT11331B
$16,791 $19,291


2012 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
s" L10107A
$16,891
2011 CHEVY CRUZE
LT11587A
$16,891


2008 BUICK LUCERNE 2012 HYUNDAI SONATA 2012 HYUNDAI SONATA
LT11452A 40 L11274A L11457A
$11,891 $15,463 $16,991


2008 HYUNDAI SONATA
IfIE LT11509A
$11,891
2010 HYUNDAI ACCENT
401ED PL1937
$12,391


2010 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
L10976A
$15,494
2011 HYUNDAI SONATA
L11319A
$15,593


2011 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
<0UD L11467A
$16,993
2011 HYUNDAI SONATA
^H L11435A
$17,353


2012 HYUNDAI SONATA
4MED= L10950A
$19,391
2011 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
M"ED L11008A
S19.833


IIIiI~'
L


I l l


2011 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
rED L10469A
$20,243


2008 HYUNDAI SANTA FE 2013 HYUNDAI ELANTRA 2011 HONDA CR-V 2012 HYUNDAI TUCSON
4mm LT11129A 0"' LT11441B L11182A L10810A
$12,391 $15,683 $17,494 $20,991
2012 HYUNDAI SONATA 2010 HYUNDAI SANTA FE 2010 HYUNDAI TUCSON 2010 TOYOTA TUNDRA
L11438A i in L11272A M L9101A L10940A
$12,444 $15,691 $17,591 $20,991
2007 TOYOTA CAMRY 2012 HYUNDAI ELANTRA 2011 HYUNDAI SONATA 2012 HYUNDAI SONATA
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MDn
DAILY COMMERCIAL
Sunday, October 6, 2013


billkoch@dailycommercial.com ywww.dailycommercial.com

WALGREEN'S: September sales rise, top estimates / D2






New thrift store set to open in November


THERESA CAMPBELL I Staff Writer
theresacampbeIIll@dailycommercial.com
A spacious, new thrift
store, operated by Sher-
iffs Ranches Enterprises
Inc., will open next month
at 27900 U.S. Highway 27 in
Leesburg and bring eight
new jobs to town.
Lisa Mills, director of busi-
ness development for Sher-
iffs Ranches Enterprises Inc.,
also known as SRE, a sub-
sidiary of the Florida Sher-
iffs Youth Ranches, said the
store will provide a wide ar-
ray of merchandise.
Mills said once inspections
are complete and fix-
wures are installed, the
"*'-. Leesbuirg store
.\. ma lha\ e a


soft opening the last week of
this month. However, the of-
ficial ribbon cutting is set for
9 a.m. Nov. 1, and SRE in-
vites the community to join
Lake County Sheriff Gary
S. Borders, Sumter County
Sheriff Bill Farmer, SRE and
Youth Ranches staff to the
event.
The new store will be
staffed by four full-time po-
sitions and four part-time
jobs.
"We're happy to bring new
jobs and opportunities to
Lake County, and we still
have positions open," Mills
said, adding the thrift store
will occupy five units for a
total of 7,511 squtiare feet of
space of the comllllercial
LbuIldnII-g


lv
w C- -


I


Coming Soon

A New Thrift Store !

filled with

SGreat Bargains'
Gre ^^at l-aaIfA.1


"Sheriffs Ranches Enter-
prises has four other thrift
stores in Florida, and we
have been looking for loca-
tions in this area, and this
one came available and it's a
good fit for us and a great lo-
cation," Mills said.
"We are going to feature
high-end thrift store items
of clothing, shoes, house-
wares, books, furniture," she
said. "We certainly welcome
donations and we can go



T .. '., .


ahead and pick up items now
if somebody has something
to donate, whether they are
downsizing or getting new
furniture, cleaning out their
closets or garage. We certain-
ly can take those items."
Mills encourages residents
with items that they wish to
donate to call 1-800-338-0377.
"We sell the donated mer-
chandise and use the pro-
ceeds from the sale to sup-
port the youth ranches,
which are a not-for-profit


residential childcare facility
for homeless, neglected and
troubled youths," she said.
The Florida Sheriffs Youth
Ranches Inc. was founded in
1957.
Since its founding, the pro-
gram has helped more than
122,000 children and their
families. This year, the youth
ranches expect to serve more
than 5,000 boys and girls.
"We are excited to be in
Leesburg," said Mark David,
vice president for Sheriffs
Ranches Enterprises. "The
new store will be an active
and positive influence in the
community by providing op-
portunities for individuals to
be involved in helping Flori-
da's needy boys and girls."
For information, go to
www.youthranches.org.


44


I


-. ..

*--;ia,


Hope for America found in 'The Liberty Amendments'


I have just finished
reading one of the
most thought-provok-
ing books in my life-
time. The book entitled
"The Liberty Amend-
ments" is written by
one of America's most
brilliant legal minds,
Mark R. Levin.
Levin is a national-
ly syndicated talk-radio
host, president of Land-
mark Legal Foundation
and author of sever-
al previous best selling
books.
What is so meaning-
ful about this book is
that it does more than
identify the self-de-
structive growth of an
all-consuming federal
government but it spe-
cifically gives Amer-
icans a blueprint to
reestablish the funda-
mentals of our consti-
tution as designed by
our founding fathers.
Levin's solutions for
returning America to


its original principles
of limited government,
respecting the rights of
states and individuals is
spelled out in adopting
11 well-crafted amend-
ments to our constitu-
tion and all of them de-
signed to refocus the
documented intent of
the framers of our con-
stitution based upon
the notes, recorded de-
bates, letters and spo-
ken word of our found-
ing fathers.
It is a book that ought
to be used as a supple-
mental text in every
high school and college
class dealing with Amer-
ican history.
It also is a book that I
wish had been unneces-
sary to have been writ-
ten. But we have strayed
so far from the wis-
dom and thinking of our
founding fathers that
most Americans today
have no single reference
point to orient them-


Russ Sloan
THE BOTTOM LINE
Russ Sloan is former director
of Entrepreneurial Services at
Lake-Sumter State College.
selves as to how far off-
course we have sailed
our ship of state.
The survival of our
republic hangs in the
balance. This is not an
overstatement, it is bru-
tal reality. Numbers are
neither Republican nor
Democrat. As we close


in on $17 trillion of na-
tional debt accompa-
nied by $100 trillion of
unfunded entitlement
program liabilities, we
are rapidly approach-
ing the point at which
our people can no lon-
ger afford to pay for this
amount of debt and ob-
ligations and also pay
for our other govern-
mental responsibilities.
While space does not
allow me to discuss in
any meaningful detail
the specifics of the 11
proposed amendments,
let me simply peak your
interest by identify-
ing them so as to give
you some feel for the
breadth of Levin's well
thought out and rea-
soned documented
proposals as follows:
1) Establish term lim-
its for members of Con-
gress.
2) Restoring the U.S.
Senate representation
as originally designed


and implemented by
our Constitution.
3) Establish term lim-
its for members of the
Supreme Court with a
provision to override a
Supreme Court deci-
sion with a super-ma-
jority legislative vote.
4-5) Two amend-
ments to limit federal
spending and taxing.
6) Limiting the size of
the federal bureaucracy.
7) Amendment to
promote free enter-
prise.
8) Protecting private
property rights.
9) Granting states
the authority to direct-
ly amend the Constitu-
tion with two-thirds of
states agreeing.
10) Granting states
the authority to check
Congress with three-
fifths of state legisla-
tures agreeing.
11) An amendment to
protect the integrity of
the vote.


As you read Levin's
book and see the docu-
mentation he furnish-
es for each amendment
two things will capture
your attention. First,
how far we have devi-
ated and the resulting
dangers we now face
and second, how much
common sense backs
up each proposed
amendment.
For the past 100-plus
years the liberal pro-
gressive termites have
slowly eaten into the
posts and beams of the
structure of our Con-
stitution. We desper-
ately need to restore
America's fundamental
framework not "funda-
mentally change Amer-
ica" as advocated by
President Obama.
Mark Levin's book
furnishes the exact blue
print of how we can ef-
fectively restore our
Constitution and save
our republic.


\;1 mEegel
iU@ ,' .. ". i, .... i u~a':: w .. ; '."e'




DONATE TODAY! You might need us TOMORROW!
-A


We certainly welcome donations and we can go
ahead and pick up items now if somebody has
something to donate, whether they are downsizing
or getting new furniture, cleaning out their closets
or garage. We certainly can take those items.
Lisa Mills,
director of business developmentfor ,I..'.. 1 Ranches Enterprises Inc.





DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, October 6, 2013


Walgreen's September


sales rise, top estimates


TOM MURPHY
Associated Press
Walgreen Co.'s reve-
nue from established
stores climbed 7.4 per-
cent last month, or
higher than Wall Street
expected, thanks in part
to more prescriptions
and flu shots and a cal-
endar shift.
The Deerfield, Ill.,
company said Thursday
that pharmacy reve-
nue from stores open at
least a year jumped 10.2
percent, while revenue
from the front end, or
rest of the store, rose 2.9
percent.
Analysts had forecast
7 percent growth in to-
tal revenue from estab-
lished stores, and they
expected pharmacy and
front-end sales to rise
9.4 percent and 2.5 per-
cent, respectively, ac-
cording to Thomson Re-
uters.
Revenue from stores
open at least a year is
a key indicator of a re-
tailer's health, because
it excludes the poten-
tially distorting impact
of recently opened or


I I hIi


Wae"44eea


The nation's largest
drugstore chain said
prescriptions filled
at its established
stores climbed 9.6
percent, helped by
an increase in flu
shots administered
to 1.9 million from
1.6 million last year.
closed stores.
The nation's largest
drugstore chain said
prescriptions filled at
its established stores
climbed 9.6 percent,
helped by an increase in
flu shots administered
to 1.9 million from 1.6
million last year.
Last month had one
additional Monday and
one fewer Saturday
compared to September
2012, which also helped
results. Drugstores get
more business on week-
days, when customers
are more likely to see
a doctor and fill a pre-
scription, than they are
during the weekend.
Walgreen's revenue
was hurt last year by a
business split with the
nation's largest phar-
macy benefits manager,
Express Scripts Hold-
ing Co., and that has
helped comparisons
with the company's per-


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Walgreen said ear-
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earned $657 million, or
69 cents per share, in
its fiscal fourth quarter.
That represented an 86
percent jump from last
year's quarter, large-
ly due to an inventory-
related gain and Wal-
green's acquisition in
2012 of a stake in Euro-
pean health and beauty
retailer Alliance Boots.
Revenue climbed 5
percent to $17.94 billion
in the quarter.
Walgreen also said
Thursday that it has
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Fee-only and the fiduciary


standard for advisors


PART ONE INA SERIES
investors who are in-
terviewing potential
advisors are doing
so with an increasing-
ly impressive knowl-
edge of the difference
between "fee-only" vs.
fee-based advisors.
As many investors
now know, a "fee-on-
ly" advisor accepts no
commissions of any
kind from any source
and is compensated
solely by his clients. A
fee-based advisor or
stockbroker can ac-
cept a commission for
placing a client's assets
in a mutual fund, and
thus, part of the rev-
enue generated does
not come directly from
clients.
Another basic differ-
ence between the two
is that "fee-only" ad-
visors do not sell any
products of any kind.
A fee-based advisor or
stockbroker may sell
annuities, life insur-
ance policies or other
financial products and
receive a commission.
Most investors are fa-
miliar with the term
'fiduciary'. "Fee-On-
ly" advisors, like phy-
sicians, CPA's and
attorneys, serve as a fi-
duciary to their clients.
Fee-based advisors and
stockbrokers do not.
Savvy investors who
are interviewing poten-
tial advisors often be-
gin with the question,
"Do you serve as a fi-
duciary to me?"
Many investors re-
alize that all advi-
sors occasionally face


Margaret
McDowell
GUEST COLUMNIST
Margaret R. McDowell, a syn-
dicated economic columnist,
chartered financial consultant
and accredited investment fi-
duciary, is the founder of Arbor
Wealth Management, LLC, a
fee-only registered investment
advisory firm near Destin.
conflicts of interest,
such as telling a client
whether it is in their
best interests to pay
off a mortgage, which
may mean fewer as-
sets under manage-
ment for the advisor.
But the "fee-only" ad-
visor, acting as a fidu-
ciary, is charged with
a legal, moral and eth-
ical obligation to act
in the client's best in-
terests and to disclose
any conflicts of inter-
est, regardless of the fi-
nancial implications
for the advisor.
"Today, in effect, in-
dividual investors must
be their own invest-
ment professionals,"
says Phyllis Borzi of
the Department of La-
bor, "and most of them
don't have the train-
ing necessary to make
the best decisions re-
garding important in-


Mark Cuban takes stand


in insider-trading trial

DAVID KOENIG testified that he told Cuban about the
AP Business Writer planned stock offering in a phone
DALLAS Mark Cuban told ju- call. Cuban, who owned 6 percent
rors in federal court that he became of the company, was angry because
angry in 2004 when he learned of a he realized he couldn't sell his shares
angry in 2004 when he learned of aunithcopyanucete
pending development that would until the company announced the
reduce the value of his investment stock offering, the CEO said.
in an Internet search company. Cuban has at times jousted with
The CEO of Mamma.com told the Jan Folena, the SEC lawyer ques-
billionaire and Dallas Mavericks own- tioning him. At other times, he has
er that the company planned to sell smiled and made a few jokes, ap-
more shares to the public. That would pearing relaxed on the witness
dilute the value of Cuban's stake. stand. Experts say jurors' impres-
"I was upset," Cuban testified sion of Cuban could factor into the
Thursday in federal court in Dallas. outcome of the trial.
But he said he couldn't recall other Cuban was still on the stand and
details of the conversation, hadn't been asked about the CEO's
The Securities and Exchange claim when U.S. District Judge Sid-
Commission is suing Cuban, charg- ney Fitzwater called a brief break in
ing him with insider trading for the testimony.
dumping his stock after learning The case is a civil lawsuit. The SEC
confidential information, wants Cuban to pay a fine, but he
The CEO of Mamma.com Inc., a isn't charged with a crime. Cuban
Canadian search-engine company, denies doing anything wrong.



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IEADERS IN '""Ayll
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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Sunday, October 6, 2013


--l


IL


vestment decisions....
That means investors
are increasingly reliant
on the advice they re-
ceive, and while an in-
vestor may assume his
advisors are putting his
interests first, we know
that's not always the
case."
"We know that there
are many good, hon-
est advisors who pro-
vide excellent advice,"
Borzi says, "but we
also know that today's
investors are more reli-
ant on that advice than
ever before, and the
old laws don't provide
adequate protection in
the current investment
marketplace. Our goal
is, first and foremost,
to ensure that Ameri-
ca's workers and their
families can enjoy
the retirement they
worked and saved for.
"Assuming that all
things are equal. I
think the average per-
son would prefer to
work with people who
are legally required to
provide unbiased in-
vestment advice and
put the client's inter-
ests first."
According to a re-
cent article in the Wall
Street Journal, the
CFP (Certified Fi-
nancial Planner)
Board's standards of
professional conduct
dictate that the term
"Fee-only" can be used
(by an investment ad-
visor) only if all the ad-
visor's compensation
comes from client fees.
More on this in next
week's column.


iW -WlOTT








Yardsmart: Great whites in the garden!


MAUREEN GILMER
Scripps Howard News Service
Do you love white decor? Does your
heart race when natural wood grain
stands out in an all-white setting? Do
you find that a beloved painting liter-
ally pops in the neutrality of a white
room? As long as our culture's depen-
dence on electronics rushes each day
to breakneck speed, white will re-
main more than a color; it is a formu-
la for simple living spaces in an in-
creasingly complex world.
There is an equally important role
for white in the garden as an exten-
sion of interiors. When windows of
your white rooms look out into the
yard, you'll want that view to dovetail
with what you're doing inside.
To best transform next year's gar-
den to feature more white flowers,
start now with bulbs. You can plant
them any time before the soil freez-
es. But don't delay in shopping be-
cause supply, either local or online,
may run out quickly due to the pop-
ularity of this neutral color palette. If
you can't plant right away, store your
bulbs in the refrigerator until you're
ready.
Despite being associated with sim-
plicity, white has a million different
shades. White can be warmer when
it's mixed with red and cooler when
mixed with blue. Whites with a yel-
low cast are creamy and soft, with less
punch.
Designers love to use white flowers
as problem-solvers. White pops in ar-
eas of a garden that are too green or
where there's dark shade in the back-
ground. White flowers also draw
the eye to certain parts of the gar-
den where other things are going on.
White is ideal around outdoor din-
ing areas used in the evening because
white flowers are the last to fade away
into the darkness.
The great whites come from narcis-
sus, tulips, hyacinth, snowdrops and
crocus. Narcissus and hyacinth also
are highly fragrant, offering heavily
scented cut flowers to bring indoors
at winter's end. Concentrate these
bulbs in parts of the garden seen


through critical window views. Sprin-
kle them into existing planting for a
more subtle effect. For a bold com-
position, use quantities of bulbs to
form larger swaths of white that con-
trast strongly with existing green foli-
age plants.
Selecting white spring bulbs in-
dividually can be difficult and ex-
pensive if you're not an experienced
gardener. Fortunately, bulb-sellers
have put together some collections
that take the guesswork out of shop-
ping these neutral hues. Collections
bloom together and are compatible,
so it's impossible to make a mistake.
At DutchBulbs.com, you'll find the
White Passion Blend, which is a col-
lection of creamy tulips with a wide
diversity of forms ranging from urn-
shaped flowers to exotic twisted par-
rot tulips. These are not snow-white,
so they'll lend an antique or vintage
feel. Warmer whites or those best de-
scribed as ivory also may feature sub-
tly colored edges or stripes as well.
These make a fine choice for gardens
in older homes where old-fashioned
elegance is desired.
At WhiteFlowerFarm.com, you'll
find the White Flower Collection of
100 bulbs among the earliest bloom-
ers. These are bright white varieties,
handpicked for their hardiness and
longevity, as well as the purity of col-
or. This group contains smaller plants
and flowers, including crocus, snow-
drops, muscari and scilla, all of which
take hard winters in stride. Most are
little-known to new gardeners, so
planting this group will offer a learn-
ing experience. Best of all, they have
a long life, so your effort to plant this
fall will repeat year after year.
The beauty and simplicity of all-
white flower displays in a garden is a
great way to blend your interior de-
sign with outdoor spaces through a
compatible color palette. Plant bulbs
to get great results every spring. Stick
with green foliage and these great
white flowers for an elegant result.
Maureen Gilmer is an author, horticulturist and
landscape designer. Learn more at www.Mo-
Plants.com. Contact her at mogilmer@yahoo.
corn or PO. Box 891, Morongo Valley, CA 92256.


All white narcissus and jonquils are reliable, easy to grow and gopher-proof.


SHNS
Many tulip varieties feature subtle-colored striping to the white background for more visual interest.

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Sunday, October 6, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL





DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, October 6, 2013


Beet farmer Mark Nyquist harvested sugar beets in the early morning on his Moorhead, Minn., farm,
pulling them from the ground and dropping them in a truck driven by Bob Monson.


Slumping sugar prices


cost taxpayers $53.3 M


Sugar beets harvested by Mark Nyquist on his Moorhead, Minn., farm.


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Shopping Cart Relay Race


JIM SPENCER, MIKE
HUGHLETT
Minneapolis Star Tribune

SHNS Slumping sugar pric-
es cost U.S. taxpayers
$53.3 million Monday
as the government was
Forced to buy more than
272 million pounds of
refined beet sugar and
sell it at a huge loss to
biofuel producers.
The transaction
sought to limit the
amount of sugar that
processors give the gov-
ernment to pay off near-
ly $203 million in gov-
AA) ernment loans, which
S were due by midnight
,,y Monday
S By law, sugar compa-
nies may repay govern-
ment loans with sug-
ar instead of cash if
prices fall below cer-
S' tain levels. The govern-
ment, meanwhile, can
cut taxpayers' losses by
buying and selling as
much sugar as possible
for ethanol rather than
paying the costs of stor-
age and disposal.
Among sugar pro-
cessors owing large
amounts to the gov-
ernment is Moorhead-
based American Crystal


Sugar. The 4,000-mem-
ber sugar beet cooper-
ative on the border of
Minnesota and North
Dakota had borrowed
$71,790,000 offering 300
million pounds of beet
sugar as collateral. Min-
nesota is the nation's
largest beet sugar pro-
ducing state.
Asked Monday wheth-
er American Crystal in-
tended to forfeit sug-
ar in lieu of paying its
loans, co-op lobbyist
Kevin Price declined to
comment. "We are not
putting out a statement
today," he said.
The beet sugar loans
and biofuel sales are
part of the nation's
complicated and con-
troversial sugar price
support system. That
system guarantees rev-
enues to sugar produc-
ers by limiting imports,
fixing prices and allow-
ing forfeitures of sugar
to pay off loans in de-
pressed markets.
In the purchase an-
nounced Monday, the
U.S. Department of Ag-
riculture bought 272
million pounds of re-
fined beet sugar "for ap-
proximately $65.9 mil-


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lion, then immediately
resold that sugar to bio-
energy producers for
approximately $12.6
million," the USDA re-
ported.
It was the second time
this year that the gov-
ernment has had to
head off unwanted sug-
ar inventories by us-
ing the sugar-to-biofuel
program. But Monday's
loss was huge in com-
parison to an earlier,
smaller purchase that
led to a loss of less than
$3 million.
Including anoth-
er USDA sugar buyout
initiative, overall loss-
es to taxpayers due to
the U.S. sugar program
seem likely to top $100
million in 2013.
Kurt Wickstrom, CEO
of the Minn-Dak Farm-
ers Cooperative of sug-
ar beet growers in Min-
nesota and the Dakotas,
blamed increased ex-
ports of Mexican sug-
ar into the United States
under the North Amer-
ican Free Trade Agree-
ment for driving down
sugar prices. Mexico
"has been exporting re-
cord levels of sugar into
the U.S.," Wickstrom
said.
U.S. beet producers
had a good crop last
year, and so did Mex-
ican producers, leav-
ing a lot of sugar on the
market. Another good
beet sugar crop appears
in the offing in Mexi-
co, which could reduce
prices even more.
The government put
in place the sugar-to-
biofuel program to soft-
en the blow of market
crashes to taxpayers.
But Monday's loss is
sure to reignite a con-
gressional debate about
the usefulness of the
sugar program, which
dates to the 1930s and
leaves American con-
sumers paying much
more than the world
market price for sugar.
Contact Star Tribune report-
ers at jim.spencer@startribune.
corn and mike.hughlett@star-
tribune.com. Distributed by
Scripps Howard News Service.


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I


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Sunday, October 6, 2013




Sunday, October 6, 2013


With government shut down, food cart owners fear losses


ZAHRA FARAH
Scripps Howard Foundation Wire
Many of this city's 300 food cart
owners purveyors of hot dogs,
chips and sodas to the capital's hun-
gry government and private workers
- are immigrants from the Middle
East or Africa who arrived in search of
the American dream.
Many started families and moved
to the suburbs with earnings from the
carts they haul onto sidewalks every
morning and take away every night.
Now the possibility of a federal gov-
ernment shutdown Tuesday threat-
ens the dreams they've worked so
hard to obtain.
Aziz Sadozai, 48, operates his cart
for 14 hours daily at Ninth and G
streets NW. His business relies on em-
ployees headed to the city's main li-
brary, the FBI headquarters and a lo-
cal electric company's offices.
"If the government shuts down,
then my business shuts down," Sado-
zai said, who lives inWoodbridge,Va.
Sadozai has owned his hot dog
stand for more than 20 years. He said
he used to make $200 a day; now he
barely makes $80. The financial crisis
in 2008 and 2009 slowed business to
a near standstill, but in the past two
years it was gradually recovering.
While setting up his cart about 8:30
one morning this week, Sadozai an-
grily threw his hands up in the air. "In
two years if things don't change, I'll
go back to my home country, Afghan-
istan," he said.
The government could shut down
Tuesday if Congress doesn't agree on
a budget. That's also the opening day
for D.C. street vendors to apply for
newly required $1,200, two-year site
permits.
But Nick Majett, director of the D.C.
Department of Consumer and Reg-
ulatory Affairs, said vendors would
face additional problems with a gov-
ernment shutdown. Because of its
unusual relationship with the federal


government, the District government
previously has had to halt nonessen-
tial services when the federal govern-
ment closed.
"If we were shut down, then peo-
ple like the vendors would not be li-
censed and could not work," Majett
said.
Mayor Vincent C. Gray on Wednes-
day deemed all District government
employees to be essential. As a result,
their offices would remain open.
For many owners, this new regula-
tion is not a surprise. But for Almaz
Tadesse, a 50-year-old from Ethiopia,
the cost is a burden.
"I don't even make a $100 a day,"
said Tadesse, who lives in New Car-
rollton, Md.
For 14 years, she has parked her
cart at Judiciary Square, near the lo-
cal courthouse, a D.C. government
building and the U.S. Department of
Labor. In the past, Tadesse said she
could pay for her license because she
would sell out, refilling her cart three
or four times a day.
But the city's burgeoning food-truck
scene large, kitchen-equipped mo-
bile vehicles that sell cupcakes, lob-
ster rolls, pizza and more has cut
into her business. Now she refills her
cart once a week. "I don't know if it's
worth it anymore," Tadesse said.
For 23 years, Meraf Belay has
parked her cart at the intersection
of 12th and E streets NW, near a big
law firm. It's a block from Pennsylva-
nia Avenue, where there are dozens of
government agencies.
Customers, who know the 50-year-
old by name, waved to her one recent
morning as she set up. A native of Er-
itrea, in the Horn of Africa, she lives in
Silver Spring, Md., and owns the cart
with her husband.
"I don't have another job," Belay
said. "If the government shuts down,
my business is dead."
Reach reporter Zahra Farah at zahra.farah@shns.
corn. Distributed by Scripps Howard News Service.


m


LSTV


LAKE SUMTER TELEVISION



In our October episode we'll
bring you the latest in medical
Hometown news and information including
Health Jstories on Breast Cancer Awareness,
the Importance of Screenings
Good Things for Those Who Wait and a Fresh Face for Fall

x~iMST..To =*a0111A *5 -lrw0.

Watch for features on
the Leesburg Partnership,
Cancer Specialist Dr, Maen Hussein ROFILES
and Joanne Keller, ARNP in
October's episode of Profiles



pWe invite you to be an informed
member of our community and
view the most recent
LAKECOUNTY Lake County Commission
FLO RID Aand School Board meetings


Keep up-to-date and informed
about the news and headlines Wail c mercial
shaping our community as coraMW Chom...In-.P.nt &.
www.dallycommercial.com
LSTV and the Daily Commercial "News in 90"
bring you "News in 90".



For production inquiries or
programming comments contact us at
LakeSumteriV@gmail. corn






he news just click a*ay!
www.d ilycon rcial.com


SHNS
Aziz Sadozai stocks his cart with food in the morning. Sadozai, who immigrated from Afghanistan,
has owned his cart for more than 20 years.




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Daily Commercial
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D5


DAILY COMMERCIAL




DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, October 6, 2013
E q


7th Annual Clennrmont Kiwanis
Oakley Seaver
Memorial Golf Tournament




Friday, October 11, 2013

1:00 PM Shotgun Start

Legends Golf & Country Club

1700 Legendary Blvd.

Clermont, Florida

The purpose of this Annual Memorial Golf Tournament
will be to provide a major 4-year scholarship to a deserving
high school senior who has made a significant contribution
to his/her school activities and to the community a trait
that emulates the life of Oakley Seaver.

The late Oakley Seaver spent a lifetime giving his time,
energy, and skills toward the Clermont Area. The youth
of the community, and in particular their education and
development, always had a special place in his heart.


Available Sponsorships
Title Sponsor $5000
Presenting Sponsor $3000
Meal Sponsor $1000
Putting contest Sponsor $1000
All In One Sponsor $600
Hole Sponsor $200
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Contact Information
Harold Cummings
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ANALYSIS



Things won't be easy


for next Fed leader


ANDREW S. ROSS
San Francisco Chronicle
Should Janet Yellen become the
next chair of the Federal Reserve
Board, as is now being predicted, this
is what she faces.
"Fiscal policy is restraining growth.
... The tightening of financial condi-
tions observed in recent months, if
sustained, could slow the pace of im-
provement in the economy and la-
bor market." That's the Fed explain-
ing why it did a U-turn last week on
whether to "taper off" its $85 billion
per month bond-buying contribution
to keep the economy on an even keel.
The stock market soared to new
highs on the news cheered by
cheap money that will continue to
flow even though the Fed's reversal
was far from good news. It meant the
economy is not recovering as well as
the Fed thought. And the future isn't
looking a whole lot better: The Fed's
forecast of growth over the next four
years, already anemic, was lowered.
Unemployment, though coming
down, is expected to remain as high
as 6 percent past 2016. That's the out-
er edge of what the Fed says it consid-
ers the "normal unemployment rate."
ForYellen, former University of Cal-
ifornia, Berkeley economist and one-
time head of the Federal Reserve
Bank of San Francisco, this should be
no surprise.
"The gap between the actual and
the predicted path of real output
(GDP growth) gives a sense of how
much economic performance has
lagged in this recovery," she said in a
speech in February.
A major cause: Unlike earlier reces-
sions, "fiscal policy this time has ac-
tually acted to restrain the recovery. I
expect that discretionary fiscal policy
will continue to be a headwind for the
recovery for some time, instead of the
tailwind it has been in the past."


She was referring in part to Wash-
ington-imposed spending cuts, in-
cluding sequestration, which went
into effect a month after her speech
and is supposed to cut spending by
$1.1 trillion between now and 2021.
The House insists on further cuts,
such as defunding Obamacare and
slashing food stamps by $40 billion.
A government shutdown and debt
default are once more in the cards,
which of course will do wonders for
an economic recovery.
"The weak recovery has made
the past five years the toughest that
many of today's workers have ever
experienced," Yellen added. "The ef-
fects of the recession and the subse-
quent slow recovery have been harsh-
est on some of the most vulnerable
Americans. The poverty rate has ris-
en sharply. Even those today who are
fortunate enough to hold jobs have
seen their hourly compensation bare-
ly keep pace with the cost of living."
So, what might she do, if chosen to
lead the Fed? Likely stay the course,
judging from her speech. That means
the Fed keeping its promise to main-
tain short-term interest rates near
zero, and continuing its monthly
bond-buying program until the econ-
omy gets demonstrably better -
meaning unemployment dips below
6.5 percent while inflation stays be-
low 2.5 percent.
Tapering off? "By all means stop
talking about it before you know you
can really do it," said Jesse Rothstein,
an economist at UC Berkeley's Rich-
ard & Rhoda Goldman School of Pub-
lic Policy, whose research on labor
markets Yellen cited in her speech.
Rothstein, formerly chief economist
at the Department of Labor, suggest-
ed, as have others, that the Fed's "un-
conventional" policies be retained
until unemployment is below 6 per-
cent, and that the inflation limit be
lifted to 3 percent.


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No


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Sunday, October 6, 2013











Diversions
352-365-8208 I features@dailycommercial.com www.dailycommercial.comn


Skeletons in family's closet cause turmoil among siblings


BRIDGE


DEAR ABBY: Iam the
oldest of four children.
I grew up in a family
that looked perfect from
the outside, but was far
from it. My parents tried
to shield us from most
of the problems, but be-
cause I'm the oldest, I
remember a lot.
My parents both had
affairs. My siblings re-
cently learned about the
affair Dad had because
Mom told them, but
they have no idea about
the one Mom had. Be-
cause of this, my broth-
er hardly speaks to Dad.
Mom was diagnosed
with a mental disor-
der when I was a child.
I remember her violent
outbursts. I know Dad
stayed only for us. We're
all adults now, and my
parents are divorced.
My mother plays the
victim and my broth-
er blames Dad for ev-
erything. It breaks my
heart.
I have tried to con-
vince Mom to stop try-
ing to hurt Dad through
my brother, but she
won't. I want my fam-
ily to be able to attend
milestones without tur-
moil. I don't know how


to make this better.
Please help. DOESN'T
WANT THE TURMOIL
DEAR DOESN'T: Making
this better may take the
help of a licensed pro-
fessional and some fam-
ily counseling pro-
vided everyone is willing
to cooperate. But don't
count on your moth-
er. She doesn't appear to
be interested in healing
any breaches. I do think,
however, that because
you are all adults, your
siblings should know the
entire story about your
parents' infidelities -
particularly your brother,
so his relationship with
Dad can be repaired.
DEAR ABBY: Our son re-
cently told us he will be
proposing to his girl-
friend before Christ-
mas. We're happy for
him, but concerned that
he'll want to get married
next year, which will be
our 25th anniversary.
We can't afford to cele-
brate our 25th the way
we want to and help
with their expensive
wedding. We have been
planning this for years,
and we don't want to
sacrifice our celebration
for their plans.


Sr Dear
ft bAby

JEANNE
PHILLIPS

We think they should
either postpone the
wedding or pay for it
themselves. We have al-
ways taken care of our
son, but we feel 2014
is "our" time. Are we
wrong, and how can we
tell him without feeling
guilty? PARENTS OFTHE
FUTURE GROOM
DEAR PARENTS: While
you have always tak-
en care of your son, he
is an adult now and you
should be able to com-
municate with him on
an adult level. Tell him
how pleased you are
that he and his girl-
friend are planning to
be married, but that you
will be unable to con-
tribute financially be-
cause you're celebrating
your 25th in 2014 and
can't afford to do both.
Not all couples marry
soon after becoming en-
gaged. Some wait year
or longer, and more and
more couples pay for


their own weddings these
days, so don't feel guilty
DEAR ABBY: I have been
dating a man for the last
three years who is very
much my senior. His
children are also much
older than I am, and
there is a mutual awk-
wardness when we in-
teract. My boyfriend
does the best he can to
ease the situation, but it
is painfully obvious that
they are uncomfortable
with our relationship
and my presence. What
can I do to show them
I want to be viewed as
family, too? UNWEL-
COME IN ONTARIO, CANADA
DEAR UNWELCOME:
There is nothing you
can do. But there is
something your boy-
friend can do. He can
make it clear to his
adult children that un-
less they make you feel
more welcome than
they have done, they
will be seeing less of
BOTH of you.

DearAbbyis written byAbi-
gailf Van Buren, also known as
Jeanne Phillips, and was found-
ed by her mother, Pauline Phil-
lips. Write Dear Abby at www.
DearAbby.com or PO. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Sun-
day, Oct. 6, 2013:
This year you often will
come up with fun ideas. You
also will be more open to
sharing and relating with oth-
ers. You have insecurities,just
like everyone else, but you will
decide to take on one of them
and change your perspective.
If you are single, count on an
unusual seductiveness that
will attract more than one po-
tential sweetie. You will have
a choice to make. If you are
attached, be sure to dote on
your partner. You do not want
to cause yourself any prob-
lems. SCORPIO can be quite
possessive.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) You'll see how worth-
while many of your efforts
have been as a dear loved
one makes every attempt to
be open and share his or her
feelings with you. You might
decide to change how you
view an older friend or rela-
tive.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
You might find it difficult to re-
main serious with so many
people coming in and out of
your life. Others continue to


Bigar's
Stars

.I^I UILI[JI
Elh I ;'


seek you out. Your popularity
soars, yet the person you care
most about seems distant.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
Your levelheaded approach,
matched with an unusually
creative idea, could make the
afternoon fun not only for
you, but also for others. This
combination is a recipe for a
wonderful escape from reality.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
If you hit a roadblock, count
on your imagination. You also
might want to consider revers-
ing course and heading in an
entirely new direction. Others
seem to reach out to you, as
they want your time and at-
tention. Stay focused on your
goals.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) If
you wanted a quiet, peaceful
day, give up or run away now!
Others, specifically a grim


WORD S)C)R)DM)M)A)G)EI
BY JUDD HAMBRICK


3rd Letter
+ 6 PTS


1" DOWN


2"' DOWN


2nd Down
+ 40 PTS


3- DOWN


.......... ............ ..................WM. ......._.....................
41" DOWN
.... 72 4th Down
+ 30 PTS

BONUS DOWN


.. . .. . ..I. . .. . .. . . .. . .. . . .. . .. . ....... ........ ....... . .. . .
TIME LIMIT: 20 MIN AVERAGE GAME 190-200 PTS FIVE PLAY TOTAL
DIRECTIONS: Make a 2- to 7-letter word from the letters on each yardline. Add points
to each word or letter using scoring directions. Seven-letter words get a 60-point
bonus. All words can be found in Webster's New World College Dictionary.
JUDD'S SOLUTION TOMORROW
10-6-13 2013 UFS / Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS

WORD SCRIMMfAE SOLUTION BY JUDD HAMBRICK
WOR SCI MMA " 2013 UFS / Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS

V A 2 ) 2 1 StDOWN = 47
". .. . '. .. .. .. .' .. . '. .. . '... .. ....................................2 n D W N. ....................8 3
03Ef F7JA2 C 6 1)02nd DOWN = 83
. . .... ... .................... ... ...... o ........
1.2 03 (S ) E '1''''3rd DOWN ='60

03A 120 E4th DOWN 13
v A. E A. E'125 135'S ''''''''''''''' ; ''3................ S0.......
AVERAGE GAME 125-135 PTS
10-5-13 JD OA 0


family member, will seek you
out. This person will ask you
for a favor, and you will feel
obligated to say "yes." You
need to put limits on what is
being asked.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
You could be rethinking a deci-
sion you recently made. Trust
that you will know which way
to head when you are at a crit-
ical juncture. Whatever you do
today will be done to excess,
whether it is worrying, eating
or simply visiting with friends!
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Check out the cost of a pur-
chase that you feel would add
to the quality of your life. Un-
derstand that the price might
not be within your budget and
that there could be a lot of ex-
tra expenses you haven't yet
considered.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21) Plans you made yester-
day might no longer be suit-
able. You could decide that
you want to head in a differ-
ent direction, simply because
you feel so good today. Be un-
derstanding, but do not allow
anyone to rain on your parade!
Reach out to a friend.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-


Sudoku


YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION


Dec. 21) Honor a need to
slow down and perhaps han-
dle several personal matters.
This even might include taking
a lengthy snooze or making a
phone call. Allow your day to
flow with your innate needs
and desires.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) You have more options
than you realize. You might be
overwhelmed by all of the pos-
sibilities around you. Count
on making the right choice
for you. You seem to be able
to enjoy yourself no matter
where you are.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18) You could be full of fun
and energy, yet those around
you might not be in the same
light mood. Consider pitch-
ing in with a friend's project to
help him or her finish it. Once
it is done, you will have a rea-
son to celebrate.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20) You'll long for a change of
scenery. Invite a loved one to
join you on a drive out of town
to a favorite spot on a lake or
some other scenic area. You
will be happiest if you choose
a setting near water. You will
have a good time.


-*-- 4puz.com


How to play: Fill in the
blank squares with the
numbers 1 through 9 so that
each horizontal row, vertical
column and nine-square
sub-grid contains no repeated
numbers.

Puzzles range in difficulty
from one to six stars.

The solution to today's puz-
zle will be in tomorrow's paper.


South dealer.
North-South vulnei
NOR'
*1062
YAJ5
*986
+A74
WEST
*J
V109862
*KJ4
49653
soUl
4AK8
T4
*A10
*KQJ
The bidding:
South West
1 4 Pass
44
Opening lead tcr
Assume you're
spades, playing rub
make your contract
points; if you go dc
100 points.
It is therefore cle
presented with ar
score an overtrick,
grasp that opportu


jeopardize the contract. It would be
able. downright foolish to run the risk of
TH suffering a 920-point loss for the
2 sake of gaining an extra 30 points.
Nowv let's apply this principle to
3 today's hand. You win West's heart
lead with dummy's ace and play a
EAST low trump to the ace, on which West
*Q 9 75 produces the jack.
V K Q 7 3 If you continue with the king of
Q 7 2 trumps, hoping West started with the
+82 Q-J doubleton in which case
TH you'd finish with 11 tricks you
8 4 3 wind up down one, losing two trump
tricks and two diamonds.
5 But that would be the wrong way
10 to proceed. Once West's jack
appears, it is far better to play safe by
North East leading a low spade toward dummy's
2 Pass ten at trick three. This provides you
with 100 percent protection against
n of hearts, the possibility of losing more than
one trump trick. In the actual deal,
declarer in four East wins the ten with the queen, but
ber bridge. If you his 9-7 of trumps later succumb to
t, you score 820 your K-8-4 when you lead a trump
)own one, you lose from dummy.
It is true that the recommended
ear that if you are play gives up all chance of scoring an
n opportunity to overtrick (if West has the Q-J alone),
, you should not but this is one of those ltLxuries you
unity if it might can easily afford to do without.


Today is Sunday, Oct.
6, the 279th day of 2013.
There are 86 days left in the
year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Oct. 6, 1927, the era
of talking pictures arrived
with the opening of "The
Jazz Singer," starring AI Jol-
son, a movie that featured
both silent and sound-syn-
chronized sequences.
On this date:
In 1536, English theolo-
gian and scholar William Tyn-
dale, who was the first to
translate the Bible into Early
Modern English, was execut-
ed for heresy.
In 1683, thirteen families
from Krefeld, Germany, ar-
rived in Philadelphia to begin
Germantown, one of Ameri-
ca's oldest settlements.
In 1884, the Naval War
College was established in
Newport, R.I.
In 1928, Chiang Kai-shek
became president of China.
In 1939, as remaining mil-
itary resistance in Poland
crumbled, Adolf Hitler deliv-
ered a speech to the Reich-
stag blaming the Poles for
the Nazi-Soviet invasion of
their country.


4223 E. CR 466
Oxford, FL


In 1949, U.S.-born Iva
Toguri D'Aquino, convicted of
treason for being Japanese
wartime broadcaster "To-
kyo Rose," was sentenced in
San Francisco to 10 years in
prison (she ended up serv-
ing more than six).
In 1958, the nuclear sub-
marine USS Seawolf sur-
faced after spending 60
days submerged.
In 1973, war erupted in
the Middle East as Egypt and
Syria attacked Israel during
the Yom Kippur holiday.
In 1976, in his second
debate with Jimmy Carter,
President Gerald R. Ford as-
serted there was "no Sovi-
et domination of eastern Eu-
rope." (Ford later conceded
he'd misspoken.)
In 1979, Pope John Paul
II, on a week-long U.S. tour,
became the first pontiff to
visit the White House, where
he was received by President
Jimmy Carter.
In 1981, Egyptian Presi-
dent Anwar Sadat was shot
to death by extremists while
reviewing a military parade.
In 1989, actress Bette Da-
vis died in Neuilly-sur-Seine,
France, at age 81.


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352-613-3616


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Sunday, October 6, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL








WE CAN DO IT!R.

DECLARE WAR ON BREASTCANCER.


N,


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DAILY COMMERCIAL


Sunday, October 6, 2013




















Aso ataeEstsLd Lak Mt Dor Sot Lake Tavre Umatilla
hosted by

LakSumter
State College

Thursday, October 10th 2pm 6pm
FREE Admission Open to the Public







SGreat rates,

- VGreat service,

Great reliability!


Sumter Electric Cooperative (aka SECO Encrgy) is .a no.t-f'or.
profit, customer-owned electric service provider Ibr much f Lake
(County. SECO Energy serves over 182,000 residential and business
accounts in its service territorn with over 60,000 of those accounts
Being in Lake County.
The co-op is widdlv rCC(ogi/ed for competitive rates and
exceptional customer service. In fact, both J.D. Power and Associ-
ates and N Il(-.:A Market Research Srenices have consistently ranked
SE(CO Energ. as one of the very best utilities in the United S.tatcs
when it comes to overall customer satisfaction!
SECO Energy member/customers benefit from:
"k A flexible and friediv business environment to help boost
the bottom line.
Single point of contact 24/7 tbr large commercial accounts.
A consistently high degree of electric system reliability.
The return to customers of excess co-op margins each
November.
Free programs such as home and commercial site energy
audits & infrared inspections.
A track record of swift response to outages that might occur
during natural disasters like hurricanes and tornados.
7 Award winning customer communications programs.
At SE('() Energy the focus is solely on our customers and providing
them %ith the lowest cost, most reliable power possible while
maintainillng a great customer service program. If you are thinking
about locating a business in Lake County or buying a home here,
we'd be delighted to welcome you to our co-op member family.
Call Barbie at
(352) 793-3801 X9787 '^A
uw.secoenergy.com

LUA----j^c*!


DAILY COMMERCIAL / Business Expo 2013


WELCOME
to the LEESBURG AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE'S

8th BUSINESS EXPO!

We thank you for participating as a vendor and as an at-
tendee to the largest Business EXPO in Lake County and
the second largest in Central Florida!
The purpose of this Business EXPO is to provide an
opportunity for the business community to grow their
businesses through new prospects and for the attendees
to find new and exciting businesses that can fulfill their
needs, both personally and professionally. Last year over
2500 folks came through the doors at Lake Sumter State
College in 4 hours!
We have a variety of vendors again this year. We hope
all the attendees take advantage of these folks that are
spending their time and efforts to be of service to our
community. Stop and speak with them and see what they
can do for you!
Once again, the LEESBURG AREA CHAMBER had a
fabulous year. The Business Wellness Challenge (a pro-
gram to help the community get healthy), the Job Read-
iness Program (which we do with Leesburg High School
to help the Seniors learn soft skills for getting and keep-
ing a job), and our many, many other successful events all
to help promote our businesses and our community. We
added Lake Golf Scramble this year. We golfed on Lake
Harris a way to show off our Lakes, Venetian Gardens
and how incredibly divine it is to live in Leesburg!
We are the voice of the business community! Please go
to our website at www.leesburgchamber.com and see
ALL that we offer our members and the community.
THANK YOU so much for your support! Be INVOLVED!
in the LEESBURG AREA CHAMBER and your business
community!
Looking forward to meeting you!
Sincerely,
Polly Watson, President Board of Directors





Sponsors of
A Zing Zap Cleaning DG Promotions, Inc.
Service Daily Commercial
Advanced Rehab Spe- David Knowles Allstate
cialties DCO Flooring
Alada's China & Gifts Debbie Davis Catering
BatteryWeb.com Doggibags
Beacon College Downtown Leesburg
Belk Department Business Association
Store EGP
Beyers Funeral Home Electrical Services,
Bogin, Munns & Inc.
Munns ERA Tom Grizzard Re-
Bloom's Baking House alty
& Restaurant Ford Press
Bonnie Whicher Pho- Foot Solutions
tography Glover Chiropractic
CenterState Bank Hampton Inn
City Of Leesburg Hometown Health TV
Classic Tents & Events Infinity Fitness & Medi
COMCAST BUSINESS Spa / Omni Fitness
CLASS Insight Credit Union
Cornerstone Hospice Kiley & Sons
Culligan Water L & J Liquors
Cutrale Lake County Depart-


2013 Events


ment of Economic De-
velopment & Tourism
Lake County Sheriff's
Department
Lake-Sumter State
College
Leesburg Center for
the Arts
Leesburg Partnership
Leesburg Regional
Medical Center
Leesburg Self Storage
Miss Daisy's Flowers &
Gifts
Miss Leesburg Schol-
arship Program
Moore Awards
Nelson's Tents &
Events
Noble's Marine
Outback Steakhouse
Padgett, Wetz, &
Young, CPAs
Page Theus Funeral
Home


Pennbrooke Fairways
Play It Again Sports
Plaza Cadillac
Restor Telecom Inc.
Sign Crafters
Simon Seed Farm &
Garden Center
Steel of the Night
Style Magazine
Subway
The Home Depot
The Land Planning
Group
Two Old Hags
Victory Casino Cruises
Waste Management
Wayne Densch
White Aluminum
WORKFORCE
CENTRAL FLORIDA
xclntdesign


DAILY COMMERCIAL / Business Expo 2013




Golf Classic winners


mmqw Wmhs @[P=m


DAILY COMMERCIAL / Business Expo 2013




Congratulations to our 2013 award winners


Good Egg

Reverend Dr. Issac Deas


Barbara Glatt

Katie Holler


EVERY


MONTH.


EVERYWHERE.


You are reading the area's #1 read print
publication in Lake, Sumter and Marion counties.
www.lakeandsumterstyle.com


reaching


Our numbers say it all...


readers
'jajimr _V1 B A '',kfl Aw u ul ull, R1, r 18. I uI it e,- fJcisori.--


DAILY COMMERCIAL / Business Expo 2013


Golden Hammer

Newman & Associates






What the chamber does for YOU

WHAT THE LEESBURG AREA .'
CHAMBER DOES:


We are a very diverse Chamber
and we are a certified Chamber.
There are over 400 Chambers in
Florida and less than 40 cham-
bers are certified. We are proud
to be in this elite group knowing
we meet these high standards
of operation and programs. We
are NOT all things to all people.
We ARE a professional business
organization that provides many
opportunities for the business
community. Take advantage of
these opportunities and grow
your businesses and be involved
with the many issues in our com-
munity.

Our MISSION STATEMENT is:
The Leesburg Area Chamber of
Commerce serves as the voice
for member businesses, repre-
senting, advocating and working
to enhance the business environ-
ment.

LIST BOARD OF DIRECTORS
FOR 2012

President, Polly Watson with
Newman and Associates
Past President, Kim Allman with
First National Bank
President Elect, Gary Maitland
with Daily Commercial
Treasurer, Jose Zamperlini with
Cutrale Citrus Juices, Inc
Past President Advisor, Greg
Yager with Plaza Cadillac

Phyllis Baum with Central Flori-
da Health Alliance
Roger Beyers with Beyers Funer-
al Home


Al Cardiello with Infinity Fitness
& Spa/ Omni Fitness
Jon Cherry with LifeStream Be-
havioral Center
Nan Cobb with Classic Tents &
Events
Karen Crumrine with Regions
Bank
Regina Curry with Advanced
Rehab Specialties
Jay Evans / Ray Sharp with City
of Leesburg
Jean-Paul Galbreath with Main
Street Antiques
Jerry Galbreath with Galbreath
Realty
Tessa Hibbard with Center State
Bank
Rhonda Marden with United
Southern Bank
Melanie Melvin with COMCAST
BUSINESS CLASS
Billy Nendza with xclnt Design


Azim Saju with Hampton Inn
Joseph Shoemaker with Bogin,
Munns & Munns, PA
Lisa Somerville with Restor Tele-
com
Greg Thorpe with Blue Moon
Pool & Spa
Walter Zielinski with Beacon
College

PROJECTS/COMMITTEES

Ambassadors, Job Readiness
Program, Membership, Social
Media, Events Golf Classic,
Lake Golf Scramble, Business
EXPO, Business Boutique, Annu-
al Chamber Leadership Salute,
Business Wellness Challenge


All of our events are open to the
public and they include:


Business EXPO, The Golf Clas-
sic, Lake Golf Scramble, the An-
nual Chamber Leadership Salute,
What Will You Do To Bring In A
Member, Business Wellness Chal-
lenge, Job Readiness Program,
Monthly Sunrise Breakfast and
Sunset Connection, Tuesday's
Connection, Business Boutique
Luncheons, and Job Fair with
Daily Commercial. We have
many opportunities for advertis-
ing: sponsorships for all events
and programs, website, E-Calen-
dar, email blasts, Facebook page,
and many others.

We thank the community for
your support. If you would like
to be involved in the Leesburg
Area Chamber please call us at
352-787-2131 or email admin@
leesburgchamber.com


DAILY COMMERCIAL / Business Expo 2013


* 44





1'.. Kiley & Sons Inc.
753-5301
A A Full Service Plumbing Company
"Water Solutions for Today and Tomorrow"
| Remodels/Alterations Service & Repair
ADA/Handicap Fixtures & Accessories
C .. Tub & Shower Enclosures
': Bath & Kitchen Remodeling
Water Heater Sales & Repairs
Natural Gas & Propane Repairs & Installation
Water Filtration Systems
Irrigation System Repairs
.... y Sewer Camera Service

Professional-Residential & Commercial Plumbing
Sales & Service
Family Owned & Operated Same Day Service Never an Overtime Charge
Visit Our New Showroom Conveniently Located at:
320 S Hwy 27/441 in Lady Lake
Same Location Since 1987
24 Hour Emergency Service
Licensed & Insured Lic#CFC1426882 CentralFloridaPlumber.com


LEESBURG
Self Storage


All Units On
Ground Level
For Easy Access
, I -1 I I


* Kesiaent Manager un Premises
* Open 7 Days A Week
* Video Monitored
* Electronic Gate Access
* Sizes From 25 Sq. Ft. To 800 Sq. Ft.


1435 Center St.
Leesburg, FL 34748
Just Off 27 South Of 441
W V .Im


ASK ABU U
3E MOT OFFE


* Auto, Boat & KV storage
" 24 Hour Access Available
* Drive Up A/C Units
* Month-To-Month Rentals
* Packaging Materials Available


www.leesburgselfstorage.com




fax 352-314-0995


For FREE professional assistance,
Call 352-356-8127 Today!

i0
W Transition,
C21 ssse raston L wwAsstdrnit^^ ^ ^ ^ B ionBcom/T ^hei~gsohe ^^u^f


SO MANY REASONS TO STAY!
* Free Hot Breakfast #1 on Trip Advisor


* Free Wireless Internet
* 32 Inch Flat Screen TVs
* Premium HD Channels
* Homemade Cookies


* 24/7 Fitness Center
* 24/7 Business Center
* Nearby Dining & Shopping
* Special Company Rates


Leesburg & Tavares
352.315.1053
www.leesburgtava reshotel.com


DAILY COMMERCIAL / Business Expo 2013


A






'I F WATER RUNS LAKETE, .,o .
Accounting Ops, Admin. Office Specialist
IEAC, Refrigeration t Heating Technology
THROUGH IT, Automotive Repair E Refinishing
Automotive Service Technology
Correctional Officer, Cosmetology
Culinary Arts, Culinary Apprentice
TDiesel, Digital Design 1 ft 2, EMT
s.. REarly Child Care Education, ESOL
Facials Specialty, Nails Specialty
Fire Fighter, GED, Law, CNA/HHAi
Medical Assisting, Patient Care Tech
I Paramedic, Pharmacy Tech, Phlebotomy
Practical Nursing, Welding









prgr. .. ..' ;i ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ H H R I M HM ^ ^ ^
Training now for a Career in a Year!
Short-term, Affordable Career and Technical Education
2001 Kurt St. Eustis, FL 32726 oe 352.589.2250 a www.laketech.org
Institute of Public Safety: 1565 Lane Park Cutoff, Tavares, 352.742.6463 F
A Lake Technical Center South: 513 Albrook Street, Mascotte, 34753 I
Lake Technical Center is a public, postsecondary institution that is accredited by the Council on Occupational Education, 7840
Roswell Road, Building 300, Suite 325, Atlanta, GA 30350, 770.396.3898. Financial Aid may be available to those who qualify.
Some programs are approved for VA. Eligible veterans may be certified through the Fi nancial Aid Office. No person shaltE, on
the basis of race, color, creed, religion, sex, age, handicap, marital status, or national origin, be excluded from participation
in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any educational program or activity under the direction
of Lake Technical Center Board of Directors. Lake Technical Center is an Equal Opportunity Institution.



DALLAKE COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE- ,s
LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA Gary S. Borders, SheriffPUCAEFR
0% AP
TEEN DRIVER CHALLENGE a ,.-
OUTNEWENTDRIV RCHA LLEONGOR EY As your Sheriff, I am dedicated to
OURNEWESTPROGRAM SPONSOREDBY reducing the number of teen deaths and
SHERIFF GARY S. BORDERS
IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE Injuries in our community. Please A
FLORIDA SHERIFF'S ASSOCIATION, consider taking advantage of this free 2 C L CLT
program.
TEEN DRIVERS ARE PROVIDED WITH THE KNOWLEDGE AND HANDS- prga.a.., P M
ON EXPERIENCE TO REDUCE THEIR CHANCES OF BEING INVOLVED IN Sheriff of Lake County
A CRASH. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT THE
TRAINING BUREAU AT 352.343.3791. 2013 ATS 2.OL TURBO 2013 CTS SPORT SEDAN LUXURY COLLECTION
-VISIT OUR WEBSITE- ULTRA-LOW M LEAGE LEASE FOR WEL QUALIFIED LESSEES ULTRA-LOW MILEAGE LEASE FOR WELL-OVAIFID LESSEES
TO.LEARN. $299 $299
TO LEARN ABOUT ADDITIONAL COMMUNITY r PER MONTH3 ONA PER MONTH ONA
PROGRAMS OFFERED BY THE LAKE COUNTY I 36-MONTH LEASE 36-MONTH LEASE
SHERIFF'S OFFICE. -N -fON4kAS
*HURRICANE RAIE $2,699 DUE AT LEASE SIGNING AFTER ALL OFFERS. $2,999 DUEAT LEASE SIGNING AFTER ALL OFFERS.
"LURRICANEREADINESS NScuR O TREQUIrRED TAX, TITLE, LICENSEANDODEALERFEESXTRA, MILEA5 NOSECURITYPIEPOSTEQUIRETAX, TITLE, LICENSE ANDEALERFEESEXTRA MILEAGa
S *D N IYT ETCHARGE OF$. 25 PER MILEOVER 30,000 MILES. AT PARTICIPATING DEALERS ONLY. CHARGEOF$.25 PER MILE OVER30,0OOOMILES. AT PARTICIPATING DEALERS ONLY.
O FFEN DER W ATCH ... .... .... ..... ..... ......... ...... .... ...........
*PROJECT LIFESAVER SALES................ ..... .............
*CRIME WATCH o.FiS:0an-7p
*CITIZENS ON PATROL
*SHERIFF'S CITIZENS ACADEMY

DAILY COMMERCIAL Business Expo 2013






JOB READINESS PROGRAM MAKING A DIFFERENCE!


And, a difference this program is making at
Leesburg High School! Principal Bill Miller is
thrilled with how the business community is
working for the high school seniors. For two
mornings the Chamber members hold class-
es for the seniors at Leesburg HS and talk to
them, coach them and help them understand
what the employers of Lake County are look-
ing for in new hires.

The jobs needed in Lake County are not
just full time employment for college grads.
Employers are looking for summer help, part
time help and those not going on to college,
tech or vocational schools after graduation.
Information is POWER! And, the business
community wants to empower our high
school graduates so they will have a better
chance of getting hired.

We have done this program for 4 years at


LHS. This year it was mandatory for all se-
niors to take advantage of this opportunity.

The Leesburg Area Chamber understands
that we have an obligation and a respon-
sibility to help educate our young adults.
And, how to get a job is right up our alley!
Many of our members, that are part of this
program, do the hiring for their companies -
who better to help these seniors? Rosanne
Brandeburg, Executive Director LSCC Foun-
dation and Chairman, is the Chair of this
program.

Ms. Brandeburg says, "I would like to thank
our business leaders who give their time to
help educate the seniors at Leesburg High
School. The Job Readiness Program is de-
signed to provide the soft skills that the stu-
dents need in order to apply for a job. These
skills include:


First Impressions: Putting Your Best Foot
Forward
Interview Skills: Planning and Preparing for
the Interview
Meeting Employer Expectations: Knowing
What Employers Really Want
Job Retention and Advancement: Success
that Lasts
This program is extremely important be-
cause it gives the students an opportunity, to
not only hear the info but to ask questions
and understand the importance. Thank you
to the Leesburg Area Chamber for leading
this effort".

The Chamber is very proud of this successful
program. If you would like to be involved
next year please call the Chamber at 352-787-
2131 or email admin@leesburgchamber.com


ADVANCED IMAGING CENTERS
CLERMONT LEESBURG THE VILLAGES

MEIA IAGIGI A PUZL




MRI, CT Scan, X-Ray, Ultrasound,

Mammogram, DEXA Bone Densitometry





22 M.UHai ters2cmI

www.aicenters.com


TRI-CO _.
Communications, Inc.


Tri-Co Communications is a locally
owned Motorola Service Center serving
the needs of central Florida since 1979.

Tri-Co offers a full range of two-way
radio communication services reaching
from sales, service, and LTR & Motorola
trunking systems.

We specialize in Sales, Service and
Installation of a wide range of wireless
products, BDA systems, GPS tracking
and video systems.

Need radios for a short time? Tri-Co
also has a Radio Rental program that
allows you to rent two-way radios for
just a day or for a year.


MOTOROLA
Authorized Two-Way
Radio Dealer
Alachua County
(352) 376-8501
Citrus County
(352) 726-9389
Hernando County
(352) 799-6180
Marion County
(352) 629-5357
Sumter County
(352) .:'.r .I i. ",
Lake County
(352) 74"-,ir:r:i

Corporate Office
P.O. Box 2319
Inverness, FL 34451
1-888-726-7234
Fax (352) 344-4142


DAILY COMMERCIAL / Business Expo 2013




For More Information Call (352) 787-2131 or
Visit Our Website at www.leesburgchamber.com


Gymnasium

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94 93 92 91 90


73 74 75 76 77
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51 52 53 54 55
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12 11 10 9 8 7


Booth #
1 SCORE
2 Advanced Imaging Centers
3 Morris Realty & Investments
4 Tri-Co Communications Inc.
6 Dominos Pizza
7 Hometown Health TV
9 H&R Block
11 Assisted Transition
13 Kiley & Sons, Inc.
14 Style Magazine
15 Style Magazine
16 Mid-FL Heating & Air


18
19
21
22
24
25
26
27
31
32
36
39


Daily Commercial
Daily Commercial
Lake County Sheriff's Office
EGP
Cutrale Citrus Juices USA, Inc.
Cutrale Citrus Juices USA, Inc.
Hampton Inn
Lake Technical Center
Webster University
ExpressCare of Leesburg
Harbor Hills
BB&T


DAILY COMMERCIAL / Business Expo 2013


2013 Business I




~ZmmmSumm mw


rP@-


~ww


RWw win


28 29 30 31 air vent 32


100 101 102 103 104 105
89 88 87 86 85 84


78 79 80 81 82 83
67 66 65 64 63 62


56 57 58 59 60 61
45 44 43 42 41 40


6 5 4 3 2 1


Beyers Funeral Home & Crematory
Edible Arrangements
Lake Port Square
Laurel Oaks Apartments
Ro-Mac Lumber & Supply, Inc.
Ro-Mac Lumber & Supply, Inc.
Victory Casino Cruises
St. Paul's Catholic School
Restor Telecom
Retriever Payment Systems
Mike Scott Plumbing, Inc.
Airway Respiratory Solutions LLC


86
87
88
92
95
98
102
103
104


-7


Downtown Leesburg Business Association
Leesburg Partnership
Leesburg Center for the Arts
Ford Press
Cousin Vinnie's Family Sports Restaurant
PAL Realty
Plaza Cadillac
Classic Tents & Events
Sumter Electric Cooperative, Inc.


DAILY COMMERCIAL / Business Expo 2013


win-E


ESS '13


33
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35
36
37
38
39




Enter


40
41
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46
47
51
56
61
81
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For More Information Call (352) 787-2131 or
Visit Our Website at www.leesburgchamber.com


2013 Business


xp@


Ea..umm m.Km minm


rn--rn


Wuwl


MwMww w


Gymnasium

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23 air vent 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 air vent 32


95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105
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72 71 70 69 68 67 66 65 64 63 62


51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61
50 49 48 47 46 45 44 43 42 41 40


12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1


7


Booth #
1 SCORE
2 Advanced Imaging Centers
3 Morris Realty & Investments
4 Tri-Co Communications Inc.
6 Dominos Pizza
7 Hometown Health TV
9 H&R Block
11 Assisted Transition
13 Kiley & Sons, Inc.
14 Style Magazine
15 Style Magazine
16 Mid-FL Heating & Air


18
19
21
22
24
25
26
27
31
32
36
39


Daily Commercial
Daily Commercial
Lake County Sheriff's Office
EGP
Cutrale Citrus Juices USA, Inc.
Cutrale Citrus Juices USA, Inc.
Hampton Inn
Lake Technical Center
Webster University
ExpressCare of Leesburg
Harbor Hills
BB&T


40
41
44
45
46
47
51
56
61
81
82
83


Beyers Funeral Home & Crematory
Edible Arrangements
Lake Port Square
Laurel Oaks Apartments
Ro-Mac Lumber & Supply, Inc.
Ro-Mac Lumber & Supply, Inc.
Victory Casino Cruises
St. Paul's Catholic School
Restor Telecom
Retriever Payment Systems
Mike Scott Plumbing, Inc.
Airway Respiratory Solutions LLC


86
87
88
92
95
98
102
103
104


Downtown Leesburg Business Association
Leesburg Partnership
Leesburg Center for the Arts
Ford Press
Cousin Vinnie's Family Sports Restaurant
PAL Realty
Plaza Cadillac
Classic Tents & Events
Sumter Electric Cooperative, Inc.


rleesbUg ^
_sArea- *
BUSINESS '
XPO 13

33
34
35
36
37
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Enter





B Y R FUNERAL HOME
JB EYE E R Sand CREMATORY
__ Locally Owned and Operated since 1920


EXPRESS I~
BELLE VIE W / LEESBURG t^H
URGENT CARE & FAMILY ATICE


LEESBURG
2500 Citrus Blvd
Leesburg, FL 34748
(352) 728-5335


BELLEVIEW
10762 SE US HWY 441
Belleview, FL 34420
(352) 347-5225


DAILY COMMERCIAL / Business Expo 2013


CUTRALE
CUTRALE.


The Mission statement of Cutrale
Citrus Juices USA, Inc. is to be a
worldwide consistent high quality
source of orange juice, its products
and services, adding value to the
citrus business, respecting the
community and environment.


.INTP Jws
CAHLIC SCHOOL
cIU




In addition to a Christ-centered environment that is safe
and secure, St. Paul Catholic School offers:
An environment that integrates advanced classroom
technology.
An enriching fine arts program, including music.
A state of the art science lab.
Standardized testing scores in the top 25% in the nation.
A thriving sports program
(Member of the Tricounty Athletic Association).
Small class sizes
Bus service to Clermont, Tavares, Eustis and Mt. Dora areas.
352-787-4657


s






THE CHAMBER'S


BUSINESS WELLNESS


CHALLENGE....

dropped almost a TON of weight! For the third year the Lees-
burg Area Chamber presented an opportunity for the business
community and EVERYONE to participate in a life style
change challenge. Twenty-three teams (5 members per team)
committed to a 12 week program of kick starting a healthier
way to live, to eat and a new self esteem.

Every week 118 folks got weighed and every month had their
BFI checked for progress. They heard speakers that educated
them on how to eat, what to eat... and the different effects that


food has on their bodies. They learned how to exercise with-
out injury and how to change how they think about themselves
while they got healthy! The program is a well rounded program
that LRMC sponsors and helps to educate the participants to
increase their success!
There was tons of fun and a lot of good natured rivalry between
teams. After all, there were fabulous prizes at stake, not to
mention bragging rights! What everyone enjoyed the most was
the camaraderie and meeting new and long last friendships.
The top 3 teams were: Team LifeStream, "C-4" Cutrale Citrus
Calorie Counters, and Total Nutrition (TNT).
Thank you so much to all that have contributed to make this a
very successful program: LRMC, Infinity Fitness, Victory Casi-
no Cruises, Foot Solutions, DG Promotions, Daily Commercial,
Ford Press, Subway, EGP, xclntdesign, Leesburg Self Storage.
For more information on next year's program please contact
the Leesburg Area Chamber at 352-787-2131 or email admin@
leesburgchamber. com


MID-FLA
r:-.
HEA Ya AI
(866) MID-FLA1
www.mid-fla.comi
Senr ice Repair
Replacement Electrical
Maintenance
H *131' L.L'U' .i lM


STOP BY OUR BOOTH
and ask how you can get a
FREE Window
Thermometer

Complimentary Q&A
with our Highly Trained
Comfort Advisors.
On-site and ready to
answer your questions
about saving energy
and heating your home!

rI^rC.B ENERGY
L saver
4o., 'Pwcnpfoh dot Lower 6.,rgti &" f*


Webster University educates professionals in the Ocala
area with accredited master's degree programs.


4 Continents, 8 Countries,
60 Cities-1 University
I Webster University is the
only Tier 1, private, nonprofit
university with canpus
locations around the world.


DAILY COMMERCIAL / Business Expo 2013 1


Webster
UNIVERSITY

Be a part of what's next,





-- :-=- What will the Chamber

do for a membership?




At Lake Harris Health Systems, we've been making a difference in the lives of seniors
for more than 23 years. From the compassionate support of people who care to the
comfort of a homelike environment, you'll find everything you need to live the life
you love, even as your needs evolve.
LAKE HARRIS INN ^^^BB,'jH..BI.~Bill'JJli^
If you are planning a surgery or experience an unexpected illness. Lake Harris Inn is here to help t hlp =iJ lllM Il lMKHA
ease your recovery. Whether you need short-term rehabilitation or Medicare-certified skilled
nursing care. every effort has been made to promote positive outcomes.
LAKE HARRIS HEALTH CENTER k .
Our assisted living residence offers an enriching lifestyle with a blend of services and 24-hour :g. .:.
on-site nursing supervision. Our services are based upon a person-centered care philosophy to .
bring out the best in our residents each day. 4 .i :
LAKE HARRIS HOME CARE
NOW, you can experience our special blend of hospitality, service and care in the comfort of your .
own home. Our Medicare-certified and private duty home health services are available throughout
Lake Sumptile and Marion counties. Ask your physician for a referral to Lake Harris Home Care!
Lake Port Square offers distinctive amenities, spacious apartment homes, attentive services,
enriching programs, interesting neighbors and the peace of mind of a Life Care guarantee.
It all adds up to a lifestyle that will support your quest for active living.
For more information call 1-877-217-8634. ,'
LAKE PORT A Life Care Community
-SQUARE 600 Lake Port Boulevard I Leesburg. Florida 34748
SQ A- lakeportsquare.com I brookdale.com
^- c_............. Walter Zl~ ~ ie^ilinsi rc ivn luso


Come see us at the Business Expo! BOOK Y U HDA

The Life You've Waited Your AR TODA
Whole Life For.. eics ig A B


6~L REAL *40

Large & Small Homes, Golf Course, 2
Lake & Pool homes + Rentals BA DN DN G
Something for everyone! Open House Anytime! AN $10 IFRES
Call, email or stop by for a tour or an info packet PA
We have information on the surrounding areaS NO ICU TASO
including Family Homes! **EXIE 1/5

25327 US Hwy. 27 South, Suite 202, Leesburg, Fl. 34748 8 5 G VI C
(352) 326-3626 (800) 234-7654 ic8Bl < Tie
web: www.PALREALTY.net ~ email: resale@theplantation.com PR C VLE R
14 DAILY COMMERCIAL / Business Expo 2013











Do You Have the
Lowest
Rates for Your
Credit Card Processing?
We do, plus a whole lot more!
Your hometown
processor!


Come visit our
booth and ask
about our new
services &
technologies
available.



r Switch to Retriever and i
get $100 Credit towards
membership to one of
your area Chambers of
Commerce.
S Offer expires 10/31/13. .


Cal Jef on
You Lak Cont Rersenatv


(35) 25-561 IletPievep --db
(3 2 2554 061 Aquwras Paymew Systems A, y- NPC



QY(orris?/sealty
& INVESTMENTS





115UHW.441 St 3 eebrg L 48
Inegit IIIxpreneReut
Irisi us atth
Buins Exp Booth13
35mI5H S463


DAILY COMMERCIAL/Business Expo 2013


Affordable Luxury Homes...
Starting in the 200's.
Call 753-7000 to learn more about Harbor Hills New Green Homes Program.
Weddings & Receptions Seminar & Corporate Meetings
Anniversary & Birthday Parties Golf Tournaments & Outings
Private Luncheons & Dinners Business Meetings & Special Occasions
Off Premise Catering, "We will bring our kitchen to your table"
Call Angela Rogers at 753-7000for details.
Harbor Hills Country Club
6538 Lake Griffin Road, Lady Lake
www.harborhills.com 800-822-5558


The Document Imaging People


l Copiers a m
^'-^--^^a^ Printers r'- M
- HScanners
Network Solutions
i ~Document Solutions
S-K1 KYOrERa
AUTHORIZED DEALER

www.egp.com

(352) 787-4521


i




Lake Golf Scramble

A w.
E ~i', ,,t" "" : : C


4jt


Welcome to Laurel Oaks......where you'll find comfort and value far beyond
your expectations in a conveniently located setting! Striking architectural
details, spacious apartments and numerous community amenities are just a
few of the features you will enjoy in this inviting environment that's beautifully
maintained and professionally managed.
Visit us at the Business Expo Booth 45
W 2700 Laurel Hollow Drive
A9 ,a Leesburg, Florida 34748


Ya a, e/d a c6


Phone: 352-504-4420 Fax: 352-504-4421
Pmail aiirolnalQ('rirhmianmn nm


DAILY COMMERCIAL / Business Expo 2013


. . .b ...


#4 TN




76th Annual Chamber Leadership Salute

I A,, .


To order, please call or visit: .
352-391-1334 c t 6i ble"
3509 Wedgewood Ln., Southern Trace Plaza A11 AKKANG1M E1NT5
The Villages EdibleArrangements.com
-iler ald pal ili.apibnq IrcatOnL ihowin Valid in arrnanr e n and *pped Inho bomes oni Ofler eiprs10/31/11 Oerf cope Inu.si be
iwed wtien rjaicw order Cirilnemrs m ,jrir Del(er rej iairlabii 61i areas, Cannoi We (ocribned winh OV otheilir C i jirer p i, (ccy.in
o r rinjpril cnde FzrkIM [I i and dpehbr. Notr v.lll on ppJpipy p.ichawed .Im. ArreSpaie o and uw rof riunn i% wbpip to all afipJiable
Lurn Vod weie rp'otileed See Hoie f' delili [DIBLE AARANGEMENTS'1 8 Det.;n and all DO,, rlk 10 nied are tademarti ol [aOb.
Anjngremer, l LI ?( 13 Edible Aurangemenli LLC AM..Fnu tiewe'd


AirWay A
R respiratory
S solutions


905 E. Alfred Street
Tavares, FL 32778
352.343.3006


At AirWay Respiratory
CATHETER KITS are now available
with Medicare billing and local delivery.

Please contact us with any questions
you may have,

AirWay has over 80 Years of Combined
Experience in the Home Health Industry,


DAILY COMMERCIAL / Business Expo 2013





A Special

thanks

to our

volunteers

Ambassador
Committee:
Joe Braga
Lil Shelton
Charlotte Merriam
Polly Watson
Karen Shafar
Betty Richardson
Karen Lee
Barbara Glatt


Carol Rock
Carlton Collar
Diane Burns
Frank Burns
Gayle Teerman
Joe Price
Jeanne Thorpe
Kathy Bauer
Katie Holler
Katie Moberg
Mary Cochran
Shirley Edwards

We couldn't have done
it without you!


At H&R Block, we believe you should never have to settle for anything less than the best
tax preparation. That's why we require our tax professionals to take more than 84 hours
of specialty tax training. And then require them to pass hours of continuing education on
all of the tax law changes each year. So you can feel confident you're claiming every credit
you can and taking advantage of every deduction you have coming.

H&R BLOCK*
NEVER SETTLE FOR LESS-
If you discover an H&R Block error on your return that entitles you to a smaller tax liability, we'll refund the tax prep fee for that return. Refund claims
must be made during the calendar year in which the return was prepared. 2011 HRB Tax Group, Inc.


H & R Block Leesburg
1328 W. North Blvd.
Leesburg, Fl 34778
Phone: 352-787-3273


H & R Block Tavares
438 E. Burleigh Blvd.
Tavares, Fl 32778
Phone: 352-343-8080


H & R Block Mount Dora
18846 A US Hwy 441
Mount Dora, Fl. 32757
Phone: 352-383-2105


L.URAMBg 4 6W PLYV Inc.
SLicense No CBC 1252465


StAp y Bhis 7

R^hM^Wvhr*^BukWiinbWM-~


"'4U"
....V


"" nj i


RO-MAC
WINDOWS
Check out
the newest in
vinyl window
products.


THE VILLAGES
722 Duck Lake Rd.
(352) 753-3333
www.romaclumber.com I


I Sv



RO-MAC DOORS
Check out the most
up-to-date door catalogs.


Stop by our booth and
pick up a coupon good
for 10% Off your
next door order.


I.
Doo Prz
Drawin


MOUNT DORA
2411 W Old Hwy. 441
(352) 383-4111


LEESBURG
700 E. Main St.
(352) 787-4545


DAILY COMMERCIAL / Business Expo 2013


Stop by our booth and pick up
a coupon good for $50 Off your
next window order.
RO-MAC GARAGE DOORS
Get information on the most
modern styles in garage doors.


EXPO SPECIAL!
Half Off Garage Door Remotes
Garage Door remotes will be
sold at our booth. /
Expo Price $14.99 .e
(Regular $29.95)





2012 Business Expo


III;!


Th Ar o I lihPrfrac Pitn

SUPPORTING LAKE COUNTYf

Ower Rch Kely&Daimn



Buins C ard Letrha Notpad Su **
Cabnls Log Deig PotarsMalr **
Buins Fom Maget Potr Tickets - 9
Catlog Maln evcs Porm eil ant

Checs Meus romoiona Itms Wb Baner

Door .gr Nes ettr Prsntto Folders
6 ~ 6 creative


SCOREg#
TMFOR THE LIFE OF YOUR BUSINESS
FOR THE LIFE OF YOUR BUSINESS


Ask SCORE for Business Advice


From starting your business
to growing it, your SCORE
counselor can help you:
* Develop your business plan
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business idea
* Determine the best solution
to a business problem


DAILY COMMERCIAL/Business Expo 2013


Lake/Sumter Chapter 414
Lake Technical Center
2001 Kurt Street
Eustis, FL 32726
Office: (352) 357-1476
Appts: (352) 365-3579
www.lakesumter.score.org


U


, /








Hpjr '1





aIn Comercia
'bour First Choice" In-Print & On-Llne '
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DAILY COMMERCIAL / Business Expo 2013




SVOL. 53 ISSUE 3 OCTOBER 2013

THE ANGLER
^y THE STUDENT PUBLICATION OF LAKE-SUMTER STATE COLLEGE


iiL



-4I


www.theangleronl ine.com


Photo by: Jeremy Van Cise








THIE ANGLERk


2013
Editor-In-Chief
Media Editor
Graphic Designer
Clayton Chak
Mark Valentino
Kenneth Yarbrough
Brandon Antonelli
Angie Tibbetts


Editorial Staff
Jeremy Van Cise
Jesus Hernandez
Patrick Endicott
Reporters
Leesburg Writer
Leesburg Writer
Leesburg Writer
Leesburg Writer
Office Manager


The Angler is the student publication of Lale-Sumter State
College. Published monthly, it is a student forum for the
opinions of the student body. Opinions expressed in The Angler
are those of the student publication staff and do not necessarily
reflect the views of the Board of Trustees, administration,
faculty, staff, administration or students of the College
Contact
To contact The Angler please send us an e-mail at
Staff@theangleronline.com
We appreciate your questions and feedback!
Adviser
Heather Elmatti ElmattiH@LSSC.EDU


As an institution of
learning Lake-Sumter
State College strives to
guarantee an exceptional
education to everyone who
walks its hallowed halls.
In trying to maintain this
goal, we must look at just
how accessible some of our
resources and tools are for
those with disabilities. If
we were to ask a student
whether or not we were
truly accessible to all stu-
dents they'd likely answer
yes. But if we dig a little
deeper, are we really?
While discussing this
topic as a staff, we quickly
realized that perhaps the
college isn't as accessible
as we dubiously may have
initially thought. There
are many things that
quote unquote "normal"
students take for grant-
ed that aren't as readily
available for those with
disabilities. We see the
buttons to open doors, but
never question how many
of them on campus are
actually functional. Do we
rush to report them when
they do not work? We see
the many signs around
campus that tell us where


we are, but do we see the
Braille on them for those
who are blind? Do we even
have Braille on most of
our signs?
For all students on
campus, we have com-
puter stations within our
library. However, do we
have tablet pcs for those
students with severe
motor disabilities? We
couldn't confidently an-
swer that question. These
are all questions that
popped up during our con-
versations, and for many
it was an eye opening.
Like many other students
we ourselves had unin-
tentionally turned a blind
eye to the many dispari-
ties that exist in not just
the world, but on our own
campus. The intention of
this editorial isn't to give
you all the answers to
these questions. Instead,
it is to push you to ask
questions like these. Let
these questions mean
more than just a question
mark, forge your own
answers. Dig further and
deeper to provide a fully
accessible academic expe-
rience for all students.


$iFAIIF IF


IFIIDII1VIRAIL


Join The Angler Online!
The Angler is proud to be technologically savy...
*Official News Site @
www.theangleronline.com
*Network with us!
Find us on Twitter or Facebook
*Podcasting!
Be on the look out for our podcast where campus, domestic
and international topics will be discussed by our editorial
staff and guests!


[Tu






A word from

i I By: Gianna Gonzalez
667 Leesburg Campus


Gianna Gonzalez a student at LSSC poses for a picture. Gianna is the
founder of LSSC's newest club 'No Holds. No Limits.'
Photo By: Jeremy Van Cise
Adversity is a word that has been, and will always be
a part of my life. I was born at 26 weeks gestation, so
early that most babies at that age do not survive, and
those that do usually have extreme mental and physi-
cal disabilities that keep them from having any type of
normal life.
As a toddler I was diagnosed with Cerebral Palsy,
and have been unable to walk unassisted my entire
life. While most people diagnosed with Cerebral Palsy
are unable to speak or function normally, I am fluent
in English and Spanish, I graduated High School at
the top of my science class, and am now a freshman at
Lake Sumter Community College with aspirations of
becoming a radio broadcaster.
I am confined physically to a motorized wheelchair,
and need assistance with normal things that others
take for granted, but I have never believed that the
word "Can't" applies to me.


6tm Y o*urFture
a Sai6 rnt LeoUn *iv s


I *I*


SAINT LEO
jS UNIVERSITY.
U N I V E RS I TY


sa^^^^^intle




C IIBIIEIR ?120)113i


By: Brandon Antonelli
Leesburg Campus
The smell of popcorn
the air once more in t
Magnolia Room as an
ence of over 80 attend
another Lake-Sumter
movie night present
the Leesburg SGA. Fi
popped popcorn, cold
and gummi bears gre
students as they sat c
and watched the film
on the classic novel "1
Great Gatsby" by F. S
Fitzgerald.
Though the 1920's v
ages ago, that didn't s
LSSC students from c
ing up in their best 2(
inspired garb. After n
than two hours of lau
gasps and even a few
the movie concluded i
hopefully with a shar


Movie night features 1920s style with
'The Great Gatsby'


i filled ing of nostalgia the students
he headed home. While most of
audi- us can recall reading "The
led yet Great Gatsby" during our
SState high school career, students
d by and guests of all ages en-
resh joyed revisiting this timeless
drinks, classic updated by director
eted Baz Luhrman.
town With Halloween just
based around the corner, the ap-
Phe pearance of everyone's favor-
cott ite movie monster is finally
here, ZOMBIES! The next
fere film slated to be shown by
stop the Leesburg SGA on Octo-
Iress- ber 11 is the zombie horror
Y's film "World War Z" starring
lore Brad Pitt.
ghs, The film event will also ,
tears, host early registration for
ind a LSSC tradition, Humans
ed feel- VS. Zombies, essentially a


ABOVE: Ian Long adjusts his tie in his dapper 1920s suit and
fedora oustide the Magnolia Room.
LEFT: Kenny Rafael, Payton Pallitteri and Hunter Robson (left to
right) stop and pose outside the movie in their best roaring 20s.
Photos by: Brandon Antonelli

giant game of tag where you must survive the growing
hordes of the undead. If that wasn't enough to get you
in the undead spirit this cinematic experience has a
twist. A costume contest will be held, so come in your
best zombie attire, there will be prizes for the best
dressed corpse.







Soap and Suds raise funds for SGA


By: Mark Valentino
Leesburg Campus


When most students are
worried about starting a
new year, the last thing on a
student's mind is getting his
or her car washed. Well, the
S.G.A. had that problem all
sorted out on Sept. 18. While
you were worried about if
you had brought your text
book to class The S.G.A., for
a donation, would wash and
dry your car.
Some passers-by even
stopped in to give their car
a bath. One such passerby
was Eric Prenzlow "My car
was dirty and seemed like
a good place to get my car
washed. It makes me feel
good to give to the school.
Even some faculty got in
on the deal. "There are a
lot of love bugs out there".
Debra Seaman, the web
designer for Lake-Sumter
remarked "I drive a long
way to work, and my car


gets dirty quick".
All proceeds will go direct-
ly back to the school through
direct donation or through
grants to other clubs. So for
you, the student, it's a win/
win situation. Get your car
washed and donate to the
S.G.A. To have them put the
money back into the school.
"The S.G.A. Thought it
would be an easy fundraiser
to make money and at the
same time make the student
life fund as a whole a little
bit fatter". Mat Guy the
V.P of the S.G.A. said while
cleaning a Ford Fusion. "It's
all about students helping
students. It feels good to
help and give back." Joelle
Watkins said.
Huge thanks to all the stu-
dents who helped with the
wash and thanks to all those
who donated.


Top :Gerard Cruz, Jeremy Van Cise, lan Long, Angie Tibbetts, Matt Guy,
Cindy Lackey, and Ginny Blackmore stop to show off at the Car Wash
Bottom :Students Wash Cars cleaning off the Love Bugs
Photos by: Mark Valentino


UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST
CONGREGATION OF LAKE COUNTY


SUNDAYS AT 11:00 AM
THE WOMEN CLUB, .7. N CENTER STREET, EUSTIS, FL

LEARN MORE: -Iill 352-728-1631 ..r -,,ii www.lakecounlyuu.org


SCI[IIBIEII ?O 21113










By: Mark Valentino
Staff Writer

By now, most of you
familiar with the stud
center and its location
the Leesburg Campus
building is nestled wii
oak hammock toward
back of the school.
Inside, the cafeteria
ample tables for you t
a bite to eat and stud'
a friend. The dining I
are big and accommoc
The cafeteria can give
good meal and has a c
ful staff that will do v
ever they can to make
meal awesome. Duri
lunch rush it seems li
are going to have to w
a minute to get throu
line.
There are quite a fe
trical outlets so if you
is running low on pow
plug it in and get it p
back up.
While most students
about the cafeteria an
bookstore, What a lot
dents do not realize is
Student Center is an
some place to unwind
tween classes and pla
games No the best ke]
secret in the student
is the amazing common
of garners. This large
varied gamer commute
that is alive and thriv
front of the cafeteria.


Leesburg Student Center a great place to
relax and play .


are From pool to air-hockey
[ent there is something to do
i on rest assured. And most days
. The someone has their Playsta-
thin a tion, Wii, or X-Box hooked
s the up and gaming on the tele-
vision in the corner. Video or
has classic games not your style?
o grab Bring your best deck
V with and see if you can hack it
)ooths against some of the most
rating. fierce magic decks i've seen
you on those tables. So no mat-
;heer- ter what your style, you can
That- connect with someone else
your just as gamer as you. ..... ., D C.... 9 4 49 ..^. C ,A ..I t-m;,.'


ig the
ke you
'ait for
gh the

w elec-
r tech
cer
)wered

; know
d the
of stu-
the
awe-
be-
y some
pt
center
inity
and
lity
ing in


ntJ .Vc ~I,1,I~ UCI .TV OI ~ IIO~,l~l. 11,,11 .UfI III II1C .JIf~t,,lIl SCI111C1 fJIt, ylll
pool, card, and video games all while relaxing and being social.
Photos by: Mark Valentino


CI IIBIIEII ?20113








Nurses collect clothes for House c


By: Clayton Chak
Staff Writer


The nursing transition stu-
dents at Lake-Sumter State
College have volunteered to
establish a clothing drive
in collaboration with the
House of Hope, a nonprofit
Christ-centered residential
program for troubled teens.
Beth Rettig, a nursing stu-
dent, is heading the clothing
drive and partnered with
Linda Mobley, an associate
with the House of Hope,
who does other fundraisers
for Orange, Lake, Sumter


counties.
Donations have come from
various sources including
Mount Dora Middle School's
football team. The clothing
drive is seeking a variety
of donations in both chil-
dren and adult sized shirts,
trousers, shoes, hats, winter
apparel, blankets and suit-
cases.
The donation pile is set up
in the HSC building near
the front desk of the Lees-
burg campus.


Clothing piles up in the Health Science Center as students contribute to
the nusring students clothing drive for House of Hope.
Photo by: Clayton Chak


Veterans lounge opens October 7


By: Mark Valentino
Staff Writer
The all new Veterans
Lounge will be opening for
use on Oct. 7. The ceremony
will feature a speech by the
president of Lake-Sumter
State College, Dr. Charles
Mojock. The opening cer-
emony will be held in the
Leesburg Campus Student
Services building from 3-4
p.m. The Lounge will be
located in Lake Hall.
It is a great place to play a
quick game of pool, and to
spend a few minutes during
a long day to unwind, and
get a quick study session in
with a few friendly faces.
During an interview with


Doreen Murphy (Senior
Program Specialist, and
the head of Veterans and
International Services for
Lake-Sumter) she explained
that the center is for all
veterans and active duty
students only. "We just re-
cently were able to open-up
a classroom to transform it
into the visitor's center."
At the moment the hours
of the Lounge will be from
7 a.m. till 8 p.m. Monday
through Friday.
With a sign in sheet to
track the student use to help
them shape the hours of the
center. Currently there is
not a a veterans Lounge at
the South Lake Campus but
could happen eventually.So


ias on Tne wani snow appreciation ror rne service or L..O%. VeTerans.
Photo by: Mark Valentino


far the pad has a pretty com-
fortable couch, a few tables
and chairs with a full size
regulation pool table.
Currently the center does
not have a television but
that is being considered.


There is a suggestion box
(hint, hint!!) is located by the
door and is open to any and
all constructive suggestions
are welcome.


Hope


I[lnmIIrI O1mm







This October roll over the competition


By: Brandon Antonelli
Leesburg Campus


While most students have
grown out of the traditional
ritual of carving pumpkins
for Halloween it doesn't
mean they can't enjoy some
fun with these abnormally
shaped fruits.
October and with it Fall
has finally arrived. At LSSC
there is no better way to
kick off this time of year
than putting your athletic
skills to the test bowling
with pumpkins.
On Oct. 23 expect friend-
ly competition, plenty of
laughs, and a truly unique
experience happening from
10 to 1 p.m. in the quad.
That's right! Pumpkin
Bowling is making its an-
nual return to Lake-Sumter
State College on both the
Leesburg and South Lake
campuses this month.
With the overwhelming
success of last year's event,
the Student Government
Association on the Leesburg
Campus is determined to
make the event even better


than before by paring with
the Career Development
Center who will host a job
fair for students in the quad
during the same time.
Pumpkin Bowling will
not be the only thing going
on that day as Halloween
themed treats will be served
and the top three teams
will earn specially themed
Pumpkin Bowling medals to
commemorate their achieve-
ment.
Teams should form in
groups of three and come
to the quad to compete. All
three members must be
present when bowling and
teammates will each bowl
three frames.
Last years winners from
the Math Department will
be there defending their
pumpkin performance, and
faculy and staff are welcome
to come try their hand at the
fruit filled event.
For more information
check out the Student Life
Facebook Page.


Nursing Student Adam Blackstock sifts through the pumpkin patch to
find the perfect orb to roll down the makeshift lane last fall.
Photo By: Jeremy Van Cise


HOSTED BY S.A.F.I.R.E.
^Early Registration October 11 @ SGA Movie Night
SRegular Registration October 14 18

& K ... IM The invasion begins October 21 and runs through
HUMANSVSZOMBIES October 31, with prizes, mini missions, and more. See
a S.A.F.I.R.E. officer or stop by SC108 to sign up.


(nKfWIIRIFID ?7)a11







Ghostly Gala set to be a fright
By: Angler Staff


The Magnolia Room will
be transformed October 31
to a ghoulishly delightful
dance called the Ghostly
Gala. The event hosted by
the Student Government
Association will be on the
Leesburg Campus from 7:00
- 10:00 p.m.
This year the Ghostly
Gala will feature a DJ,
games, prizes, drinks, food
and more. The Humanities
Preservation Society will


also be getting into the spir-
it and during the dance it
will host a Costume Contest
with prizes for the winners.
As a special treat for stu-
dents who attend the Gala,
commemorative photos will
be available via a Photo
Booth free of charge. The
event is set to be the key-
note event of the semester
and all LSSC students are
invited to dance the night
away. In the spirit of Hal-


loween, free candy will be in
abundance at the event for
those who wish to indulge
their sweet tooth in addition
to other tasty temptations.
Students are reminded
that the event is a school
function, and while cos-
tumes are encouraged Gala
event guests should dress
appropriately.
The Humanities group
last year hosted a costume
contest that inspired stu-


dents to reach for the stars
and the winning costume
included stilts, making this
years potential entries sure
to bring even more exciting
attempts to take away the
title of best contest.
For more information and
to keep up to date on all the
Ghostly Gala event news,
check out the Student Life
Facebook Page.


CII IBIIEI ?20113




CIIIBIIEIR ?O 20113


Chocolate
Karaoke


By: Kenneth Yarbrough
Staff Writer


Chocolate Karaoke an
event hosted by the Youth
Outreach Department Alum-
ni Association, will taking
place Tuesday October 15
between 1-4 p.m. in the stu-
dent center.
The event doubles as their
information session about
the organization and a
recruitment opportunity.
The event will raise
student's awareness of
leadership opportunities,
roles and responsibilities
of officers and the election,


THE NEXT
DEGREE
OF YOU


nomination and interview
process.
The Chocolate Karaoke
will consist of singing (ka-
raoke) for fun as well as a
competition for those who
want to compete.
There will be ice breaker
games to help meet other
students, as well as door
prizes available.
There will also be tons of
chocolate, cake, candy, and
there will be a fondue foun-
tain.as well.


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SLake-Sumter State College
Student Government Association


Upcoming Leesburg Campus Events
Breast Cancer Luncheon
Part of the Student Government Education
series, this Luncheon features a guest
speaker and free lunch for event attendees.
ome gather and check out this event on
October 10 from noon to 2 p.m. in the Health
Science Center Lobby.
SGA Movie Night
The third installment this semester, SGA will
be showing World War Z on Friday October
11, at 7p.m. The event will be a special sign
up day for the S.A.F.I.R.E. led Humans vs.
Zombies event. Come see a movie, get free
popcorn, and sign up to survive theZombie
Invasion.
Humans vs. Zombies
Join this massive campus wide game of tag.
Complete with prizes and mini missions
this annual game is sure to get your blood
pumping. Registration is October 14 18,
and game play will go from October 21 31.
Pumkin Bowling
An update from last issue. Pumkin Bowling
will no be held in the Quad on October 23,
from 10 1 p.m. Come enjoy free food, drinks,
and bowling while winning fabulous prizes.
Candy-ween
SGA will be partnering with the Science
and Math department for Candy-ween. On
October 31 from 10 2 p.m. come see science
demos, get free candy, and refreshments
while your going to class.







Upcoming South Lake Campus Events

Duck Hunt
Find a hidden duck around the South Lake
Campus and you will find yourself the recipient
of a fabulous prize. Redeem ducks with Linda
Karp in the Student Lounge. The duck hunt
begins October 14
Pool Tournament
Sign up now Pool Sharks for a Tournament
with first and second place prizes for the
winners. With first chalk happening at 10 a.m.
on October 15, come out and test your skills.
Video Game Tournament
The South Lake SGA is hosting a video game
tournament as a fundraiser for the Students
Helping Students scholarship program. Stop
by the SGA Officer for more information. The
tournament starts October 21.
SGA Communily Service
Interested in serving your community? The
South Lake SGA will be working at Youth with
a Mission Ranch in Mineola doing repairs and
yardwork. Check with the South Lake SGA to
sign up, the event will start on October 25 at 10
a.m. at Mission Ranch.
Boo Bash
October 29 treats for night students will be
distributed celebrating the festive fall season.
The event will take place from 5 6:30 p.m.
Pumpkin Bowling
October 30 test your skills with fruit and
bowling. Your nerves and skills will do you no
good as you take on the task of scoring a strike
to win.
Multi-Culture fest
The South Lake Diplmats are hosting a
cultural education session on Latin America.
Join them for free cultural food, and learn
all about the culture of Latin America. All
happening on November 4 from 11 1 p.m.


SGA


MOVIE NIGHT


PRESENTS

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CIIIIBEIIR 2)0113


'Curse of Chucky' slashes direct to video


By: JeremyVan Cise
Editor In Chief


Sorry Jack, Chucky's back.
The menacing killer doll
from the hit horror "Child's
Play" franchise unleashed
another hair raising entry
in the series hitting retail
stands on DVD/Blu-ray Oc-
tober 8.
The new film, "Curse of
Chucky" finds the fran-
chise returning to it's hor-
ror roots whereas the last
two previous entries "Bride
of Chucky" and "Seed of
Chucky" ventured into more
comedic waters.
The life blood of the series,
creator Don Mancini, is back
as both writer and director.
Mancini is of course more
widely known for being the
creator and writer of the
pivotal Chucky character,
but also has started to ven-
ture into directing. "Curse of
Chucky" is the second film
that Mancini has directed,
the other being the previ-
ous installment "Seed of
Chucky".
The "Child's Play" fran-
chise started in 1988 with
the first installment which
went on to spawn five se-
quels, as well as tapping
into other medias such as
comics. The films focus on
Chucky, an infamous serial
killer whose soul is trapped
in a "Good Guy" doll after a


voodoo ritual to avoid death. Howell) and their nanny Jill


In "Curse of Chucky" we
meet Nica (Fiona Dourif),
a parapelegic who is ag-
gressively sheltered by
her mother, who receives a
mysterious package with no
return address. Inside the
ominous package is a "Good
Guy" doll, which is no or-
dinary doll as the audience
knows. After a seemingly
tragic accident kills Nica's
frail mother, her immediate
family come in to town to
pay their last respects and
get their issues in order.
This introduces her sister
Barbara (played delicious-
ly bitchy by Danielle Bi-
sutti), Barbara's husband
Ian (Brennan Elliot), their
daughter Alice (Summer H.


(Maitland McConnell). It
becomes very apparent that
there are things bubbling
under the surface of this
family, with secret tensions
and feelings reaching their
boiling points. These ten-
sions and inability to trust
are intensified by the fact
that one by one members of
the family are turning up
dead all around Nica.
The movie goer is puzzled
wondering if the family
some how connected to the
infamous pint sized killer or
are they just in his way.
The true beacon of this
film is Fiona Dourif, who is
interestingly the real life
daughter of Brad Dourif who
lends his voice to the focal


killer doll. What some may
have thought to be an effort
of "stunt casting" quickly
turned into a case of solid
acting providing some great,
tense moments.
Fiona Dourif provided a
great sense of vulnerability
and strength to showcase
how being paraplegic has
made her character tougher
willed, but ultimately still
physically limited. On the
other end of the spectrum
Danielle Bisutti delivered
an amazingly fun perfor-
mance as the tightly wound
and uber bitchy "Barb".
She becomes the character
you love to hate, who you're
waiting anxiously to see bite
the big one. Admittedly, her
snark was a big part of what


Images Courtesy of Universal Home Video










I liked about the film. This
film was a really good mix of
straight up horror with just
the right dose of humor and
edge.
The film, which is mostly
set in the family's home,
is really a return to form
for the series. Having the
film set mostly in one place
allowed Mancini to not only
dabble in slasher territory
but also gave way to a more
Gothic horror atmosphere
that is very different than
the previous films. Mancini
provides an almost hitch-
cockian feel to a seemingly
played out slasher film fran-
chise. There is great diver-
sity in the film, as Mancini


doesn't feel bound by being in
the slasher genre. He bal-
ances his known humor with
moments of tense horror
most akin to the intensity of
a Hitchcock film.
For fans of the series, this
is a hit out of the ballpark.
It's back to what made the
franchise scary, and had
stellar performances. For
those newer to the series,
this is a great introduction
as you see the carnage un-
fold right before you. Even
if you've never seen any of
the films, you know from the
get-go there is something off
about that "Good Guy" doll,
and the film doesn't try to
hide that from you.





C IIBIIEIR ?10) 113i


By: Clayton Chak
Staff Writer


Humanities Preservation Society gives

gives students cultural experiences


Lake-Sumter State Col-
lege's mission statement
states that "Lake-Sumter
State College will be a lead-
er in higher education and
the destination of choice for
education, training and cul-
tural activities in Florida."
One group on campus, the
Humanities Preservation
Society (HPS), is fulfilling
the college's vision to be
the destination for cultural
activity.
The Humanities Pres-
ervation Society is a club
dedicated to viewing and
discussing arts that range
from ancient Egyptian stat-
ues to today's live theater
performances. The groups
advisers are Michael Morse
and Melinda Simmons,
professors at Lake-Sumter
State College. Their purpose
for the club is to "preserve
and promote the humanities
and to make the humanities
a college-wide presence by
educating the campus com-
munity."
The club gives students a
chance to visit museums,
cultural events and historic
locations while travelling in
a group with similar in-
terests. HPS also provides
students the opportunity to
visit these activities at more
affordable prices a goal of
the groups.


"Sometimes, people want
to go and do things, but they
don't want to do it alone",
Simmons stated. "Like going
to a play. You can go with a
group, and possibly go talk
about it afterwards. The
club is designed to help stu-
dents have the opportunity
do things that they might
not otherwise have..."
Morse went on to discuss
the meaning of the human-
ities and its significance in


societies throughout histo-
ry."The humanities are the
study of what it means to
be human. Human beings
create art, music, politics,
religion... Basically it's a
study of what defines us as
human versus the animals."
In previous years, the
group has visited the Apple-
ton Museum, the Hoggetown
Medieval Faire, the Salva-
dor Dali Museum and St.
Augustine.Possible upcom-


ing trips involve going to the
Ringling Brothers Circus
and Art Museum, the Harn
Museum, the Field Museum,
the Florida Aquarium and
various live theater perfor-
mances.
The club is open to all
students and faculty with no
membership fee. The meet-
ings are held every other
Wednesday beginning Sept.
4 at 2 p.m. in room SC 108.


Photo of the Salvador Dali Mustache sculpture located at the Salvador Dali Museum in Tampa Florida
during the Humanties Preservation Society Trip from last year.
Photo by: Katie McKay





31135


Five feet of fresh water raise lake level


By: Mark Valentino
Staff Writer


If you were one the unlucky
students who were at the
Leesburg campus on Friday,
September 27, you may have
noticed that the Water was
shut off in some buildings
across campus. The reason
for the outage was a wa-
ter main behind the Fine
Arts Hall. The Broken pipe
was gushing at over 20,000
gallons an hour of drinking
water into the pond on cam-
pus, turning the pond into
image of its former glory
back before the water table
in Florida lowered.
With all the rain that the
campus has endured during
the week, the lakes dramat-
ic influx of water skipped
the minds of many students
and faculty members. But to
those that were observant
the change was dramatic
with the lake raising over 5
feet.


With the situation resolved
the lake slowly has been
receeding however a prom-
inent water line now rings
the body of water showing
just how much water flowed
from the river of run off.
The exact cost of the dra-
matic leak has yet to be
determined, but the school
chose to not interupt class-
es during the week as the
water poured out starting
on Tuesday, September 24
and for those students who
left campus after their night
classes they may have seen
Don Ball the head of facili-
ties digging in the Student
Center parking lot looking
for one of the schools many
shut off valves.
In the end the school could
not contain the leak without
shutting off water service to
the entire school leading to
Friday's outage.


A spring of perpetual water pushes thousands of gallons of water out from
below the sand up and on as they move drain off into the awaiting lake.
Photo by: Patrick Endicott


ABOVE : Cattails once at the edge of the water line now almost lost as the
water level rises over 4 feet swallowing lilly pads and cattails alike.
LEFT: Water and sand move through the drain system on their way to the
awaiting lake.
Photos by: Patrick Endicott




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DiRECT@BJBR@5T g 4P
Easy. Worry-Free. Guaranteed. Admission to UCF is guaranteed
for LSSC students when you sign up for DirectConnect to UCF at
directconnecttoucf.com. Questions? Call 352.536.2113.


WWW. PHDCOMICS. COM


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