Daily Commercial

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Daily Commercial
Physical Description:
Unknown
Creator:
Halifax Media Group
Publisher:
Rod Dixon ( Leesburg, Floirda )
Publication Date:

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00019282:00007

Full Text






171


M LEESBURG, FLO


Daily Commercal

RIDA Monday, September 30, 2013 www.dailycommercial.com


THERE SHE IS: Emily Pelton crowned Miss Leesburg/ A3

IRAN: More needed than Obama call for full ties / A6


Who'll blink?
With less than 24 hours to avert a
government shutdown, Democrats,
Republicans exchange blame
ANDREW TAYLOR
Associated Press
WASHINGTON As the government teeters
on the brink of a partial shutdown, congressio-
nal Republicans vowed Sunday to keep using an
otherwise routine government funding bill to try
to attack "Obamacare."
Congress was closed for the day after a post-
midnight vote in the GOP-run House to delay by
a year key parts of the new health care law and
repeal a tax on medical devices, in exchange for
avoiding a shutdown. The Senate is slated to con-
vene Monday afternoon just hours before the
shutdown deadline, and Majority Leader Harry
Reid, D-Nev., has already promised that majority
Democrats will kill the House's latest volley.
Since the last government shutdown 17 years
ago, temporary funding bills known as continu-
ing resolutions have been noncontroversial,
with neither party will-
ing to chance a shut- The House will get
down to achieve legis- ogtei eo
lative goals it couldn't t n e
otherwise win. But with time, send another
health insurance ex- provision not to shut
changes set to open on the government down,
Tuesday, tea-party Re-
publicans are willing but to fund it, and it
to take the risk in their will have a few other
drive to kill the health options in there for the
care law.
The action in Wash- Senate to look at again.
ington was limited U.S. Rep. Kevin McCarthy
mainly to the Sunday California Republican
talk shows and bar-
rages of press releases
as Democrats and Republicans rehearsed argu-
ments for blaming each other if the government
in fact closes its doors at midnight Monday.
"You're going to shut down the government
if you can't prevent millions of Americans from
getting affordable care," said Rep. Chris Van Hol-
len, D-Md.
"The House has twice now voted to keep the
government open. And if we have a shutdown,
it will only be because when the Senate comes
back, Harry Reid says, 'I refuse even to talk,'" said
Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, who led a 21-hour broad-
side against allowing the temporary funding bill
to advance if stripped clean of a tea party-backed
provision to derail Obamacare. The effort ulti-
mately failed.
The battle started with a House vote to pass
the short-term funding bill with a provision that
would have defunded implementation of the
health care overhaul. The Senate voted along
party lines to strip that out and lobbed the mea-
sure back to the House. The latest House mea-
sure, passed early Sunday by a near party-line
vote of 231-192, sent back to the Senate two key
changes: a one year delay of key provisions of the
health insurance law and repeal of a new tax on
medical devices that partially funds it, steps that
still go too far for The White House and its Dem-
ocratic allies on Capitol Hill.
SEE GOVERNMENT I A2


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This image provided by CBS News shows Rep. Chris Van Hol-
len, D-Md., speaking with Bob Schieffer on "Face the Nation"
Sunday in Washington.


PHOTOS BY THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL
Don and Dottie Brown of Eustis were the last of 400 people who brought items to be appraised, including this Indian blanket, at the
Antiques Appraisal Clinic on Sunday at the Eustis Community Center.




Looking for treasures


THERESA CAMPBELL I Staff Writer
theresacampbeIIll@dailycommercial.com
ottie and Don Brown were the last of
400-some people who stood in line
Sunday eager to hear what their prized
heirlooms and yard-sale finds might be
worth during the Antiques Appraisal Clinic.
The Eustis couple, who have been mar-
ried 60 years, were no different than anyone
else at the event, each hoping that one spe-
cial piece of furniture, art piece, unique coin,
postcard or jewelry, was a rare item worth
big bucks.
"This is just a print," Dottie sighed af-
ter she learned from an appraiser that her
framed vintage art piece of two young girls
was not a valuable painting.
The Browns also brought their colorful Na-
vajo Chief Indian blanket to the antiques ap-
praisal clinic, but they arrived too late as the
expert most knowledgeable about antique
blankets had just left. However, the Browns
said they will be back in six months for the
next appraisal clinic. The twice-a-year event
is hosted by the Eustis Historical Museum
and Preservation Society as a fundraiser for
the Clifford House, home of the Eustis His-
torical Museum.
"We saw a blanket just like this one on the
Antique Roadshow and it had some rips in
it, and he (appraiser) said that it was worth
$6,000," Don said, recalling seeing a simi-
lar blanket on TV "He said if it were in good
shape, it would be worth $16,000."
SEE ANTIQUE I A2


Frank Bartle, of 3rd Generation Antiques in Eustis, uses a diamond-grad-
ing telescope to check the value of a man's ring. Bartle was one of sev-
eral appraisers at Sunday's Antique Appraisal Clinic at Eustis Community
Center.


Vol. 137, No. 273 I 4 sections
LIVING HEALTHY Cl
MISSED YOUR PAPER? CLASSIFIED DlQ NATION A4 .**- HIGH
Call 787-0600 (Lake County), or COMICS C6 OBITUARIES A4 87
877-702-0600 (Sumter County) ,CROSSWORDS D5 SPORTS B LOW
CROSSWORDS D5 SPORTS B13, v. -LO
NEWSTIP? DEAR ABBY C7 VOICES A7 71
90994 17001 Call Scott Callahan at 365-8203 LEGALS Dl WORLD A5 See A8


UrJi 7PTy:


^lllllL~t^1I





DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, September 30, 2013


To have your club or organization's events printed in the YourCommunity calendar
listings, just email the information to pamfennimore@daily commercial.com.


GOVERNMENT
FROM PAGE Al


Senate rules often make it difficult
to act quickly, but the chamber can
act on the House's latest proposals
by simply calling them up and kill-
ing them on a nondebatable motion.
Eyes were already turning to the
House Sunday for its next move. One
of its top leaders vowed it would not
simply give in to Democrats' de-
mands to pass the Senate's "clean"
funding bill.
"The House will get back together
in enough time, send another pro-
vision not to shut the government
down, but to fund it, and it will have
a few other options in there for the
Senate to look at again," said the
No. 3 House Republican leader, Rep.
Kevin McCarthy of California. "We
are not shutting the government
down."
McCarthy wouldn't say what
changes Republicans might make.
He appeared to suggest that a very
short-term measure might pass at
the last minute, but GOP aides said
that was unlikely. And rumors Satur-
day night that GOP leaders might in-
clude a provision to deny lawmakers


ANTIQUE
FROM PAGE Al


The Browns hope
their blanket is worth
big bucks.
"We'll back in
March," said Dottie,
who has enjoying at-
tending previous clin-
ic appraisals where
she walked away with
good news.
"I brought a ring here
once that I found at
a yard sale and it ap-


and staff aides their employer health
care contributions from the govern-
ment had cooled by Sunday after-
noon. Lawmakers and congressio-
nal aides are required to purchase
health insurance on the Affordable
Care Act exchanges but the adminis-
tration has taken steps to make sure
they continue to receive their 72 per-
cent employer contribution.
Republicans argued that Reid
should have convened the Senate on
Sunday to act on the measure.
"If the Senate stalls until Monday
afternoon instead of working today,
it would be an act of breathtaking
arrogance by the Senate Democrat-
ic leadership," said House Speak-
er John Boehner, R-Ohio. "They will
be deliberately bringing the nation
to the brink of a government shut-
down."
In the event lawmakers blow the
Monday deadline, about 800,000
workers would be forced off the job
without pay. Some critical services
such as patrolling the borders, in-
specting meat and controlling air
traffic would continue. Social Secu-
rity benefits would be sent and the
Medicare and Medicaid health care
programs for the elderly and poor
would continue to pay doctors and
hospitals.


praised for $4,200 to
$5,000," she said.
Participants paid $5
for each item to be ap-
praised.
"This was a fabu-
lous event," said Frank
Bartle of 3rd Genera-
tion Antiques in Eus-
tis. He was one of the
guest appraisers for
the event, using a di-
amond-grading tele-
scope to inspect and
grade gemstones and
jewelry. Bartle said he
looks forward to par-
ticipating in each ap-


praisal event since it's
a fundraiser for the his-
torical museum.
John Blankenship,
treasurer for the mu-
seum, touted Sunday's
event as a success.
"People were lined
up out here starting
at 12:30 and we didn't
open until 1 p.m.," he
said.
He expects the next
clinic in six months to
draw a crowd, includ-
ing the Browns return-
ing with their prized
Navajo blanket.


belkl
I :iMDERN. SOUTHERN. STYLE.


Tuesday, Oct. 1 0



semor


TUESDAY, OCT. 1 '
wth your Belk Rewards Card


EXT 2 O/

'%WOFF
sale purchases
15% OFF home and shoes
*S below for dat fll. In w itoe nly

woth anuy YchaeO
other form sale purchases*
&f payment "'15 off oni Si


Stcp by yojr Estee Lauder counter to reserve
yojr gift now & receive a bonus sample!
ESTEE LAUDER
Our best sellers
Choose your gift free with any
Estee Lauder purchase of 35.00 in
or more. Worth over 100.00
Offer good while supplies v '
Quantities limited


( ict miore!
Choose your lure Color
EyeShadows, subtle or
bold, in our exclusive
Trael case. Free.


30-40of 50,f
Career sportswear from ND Men's pants by Louis
New Directions*, Kim Rogers*, Raphael, HaggarO
Choices, Alfred Dunner and and Chaps
Ruby Rd. Orig, 24.00-79.00 Orig. 65.00-75.00 J
Sale 15.99-54.99 Sale 32.50-37.50


I


www.dailycommercial.com


HOROSCOPES

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Sept.
30, 2013:
This year will be pleasant for you, es-
pecially if you enjoy your friends and fulfill
your long-desired goals! You seem to be
fortunate in nearly every area of your life.
Your career blooms in July 2014. You'll
start to see the results of your efforts in
the period that follows. If you are single,
let others know of your decision to main-
tain that status. Some of you will meet
several potential life mates. If you are at-
tached, the two of you will need to deal
with a certain amount of the unexpected.
Stay goal-oriented and focused. LEO can
be a strong personality.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) The unex-
pected continues to make daily life excit-
ing for anyone around you. Whether you're
working on a love letter or coming up
with a new business idea, your creativity
seems to be at work.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You will
want to spend more time at home than
you have in a while. Pressure could build,
and you might feel more comfortable stay-
ing at home. However, be aware that a
family member likely will lose his or her
cool as a result. Just do your thing.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) So many
people seek you out that you easily could
be overwhelmed by all of the requests
and invitations. Listen to what people are
sharing. Try to avoid getting into a tiff, if
possible. Screen your calls in order to ac-
complish what you want.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) Be aware of
others' needs. Recognize that you have a
tendency to go overboard. You might not
worry about the damages now, but you
will later. Be careful if you become angry
or frustrated, as you could be accident-
prone.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Others will be
delighted to have you around, at least un-
til they realize the level of your energy. In
fact, if you can't express yourself the way
you want to, you could become difficult.
Be open to positive changes. Someone's
reaction might surprise you.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Trust your
sixth sense about what is going on behind
the scenes. You might want to rethink a re-
cent decision you've made once you either
confirm or deny what your intuition is tell-
ing you. Don't swallow your anger; make a
point to choose your words with care.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Understand
that someone you care about suddenly
could become difficult. You do not have to
react or do anything. Stay calm and cen-
tered. You will see this person realize the
error of his or her ways. A neighbor could
be on the warpath.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Someone
you look up to seems to be bent out of
shape. You might be taken aback by this
person's behavior at the moment. If you
are smart, you will keep your opinion to
yourself. This person will calm down, and
you will feel more relaxed as a result.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) At
first, you might be upset by what is go-
ing on. The unexpected could throw your
S plans in several different directions. You
will be forced to gather your own facts,
and as you do, you will notice that you are
detaching considerably.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You ab-
sorb a lot of information, and quite quickly
at that. Nevertheless, you might feel chal-
lenged by someone you look up to. Your
limits could be tested, as well as your
ability to handle someone else's less-
than-perfect behavior.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Someone
you know quite well might come barreling
toward you like an enraged animal. How you
handle this person's behavior could deter-
mine the long-term durability of this bond.
Think carefully about the ramifications.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You might
be trying to do so much that you could
be accident-prone as you speed from one
person or activity to another. You might
need to take some time to sit down, dis-
cuss what needs to get done immediately,
and revamp your schedule.


I


Add these to your gift with
any Estee Lauder purchase
of 70,00 or more. Both gifts
together worth over 165.00


Connect with us for special offers and promotions at Belk.com/getconnected 8 0001300 19
If you're 55 or older, lakean extra20%off storewde, or j" ,' 1. r..,'. .1 .I.. 3t I .'. ,rr ,. 3. : j : r i :- ..
our home & shoes departments with any other form of pi-,-.-I .- :- :. .r_ ,i- :, ,. -.- 1,1- I ..,- ':
=1^, .,-" ., r, ,l, E. . -. .. l.- < i ^ *,, :,l- =,-1, d 6,"1l ;r:ir. '=. -.-a. r,^.., [*:. r .L ,-"r I,1..^.3l- : ? ,;,Lr ... .ir:.i .~!. ,- Chlp-& Peipper. Oitizens Of
Donald J Pliner, Dooney & Bourke, Eileen Fisher; Fine Jewelry watches and service plans; Free People, Furla, Gameday, Gear '. LL 1 : r.-, ,

non.merchandise depts, lease depths and Belk gift carcis. Not valid on prior .-,:' .. : : ". i- Cannot be redeemed for
'r :. .,. ...-j j .. .: .- sr ,, :r1. J 3.- ,. I Valid OCTOBER I 1, 2 'I EDOI 1 ...'.L ". .: t .
F. ; ..11, ,:. r:. ..-. -.. .. ..-. . ery HomeStorer .., .. ...- i
COUPONS NOT "'ALD o RER DOT


BRIDGE


Famous Hand


South dealer.
East-West xvulnerahle.
NORTH
*9 5 4
VQ 1074
A Q 1094
465


WEST
*AKJ 10
VK65
*K75 3
+106


EAST
4632
V9832
*82
* J8 4 3


eight high-card F
would have show
bidding thereafter
South wound up
The Australi
spade ace and sh
diamonds. Decla]
prospect of losing
to East and gettir
he went up with
heart to the jack
to win thc hart


SOUTH six club tricks,
Q 8 7 heart with the ki
VA J of diamonds and
J 6 and South ever
A K Q 972 two.
The bidding: At the second
South West North East tralian South bid
1 + Pass 2 Pass West made a nor
3 + Pass 3 V Pass North bid two di
3 NT jumped to three
Opening lead ace of spades, wanese West als.
This deal occurred during the and shifted to a d
1979 world championship match table declarer w
between Taiwan and Australia. It that West had bo
illustrates how artificial bidding double and tha
minethods can sometimes unpre- unlikely to break
dictably affect the outcome of a the diamond willth
hand. played the A-J of
At the first table, where Taiwan West ducked
was North-South, the bidding went South cashed the
as shown. South's one-club bid was the diamond jack
artificial and guaranteed at least 16 and cashed the
high-card points (it was coincidental bring himself to
that South happened to have a club led the queen of
suit). North's two-diamond response to win and yield t
indicated a diamond suit and at least to South's queen
Tomorrow: A very costly blunder.
-01 K3in F c sS ynca-t hc


Community
Send your community news to PAM FENNIMORE I pamfennimore@dalycommercial.com 1352-365-8208


2 of 5 wins free ticket
4 of 5 wins $100


3 of 5 wins $9.50
5 of 5 wins $52,126.31


The Daily Commercial
THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875
The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for
$77.72 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by HarborPoint Media at
212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is
paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address
changes to The Daily Commercial, O20. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL
34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of
The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws
of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden with-
out written consent from the publisher. (Copyright 2007, Harbor-
Point Media LLC.)


MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER?
FI L ,L' LI I 'i I' J,:',T IL ELE ill
4 i:,i :, ,:, i ,I, EI-'
Call 787-0600 in Lake County
or (877) 702-0600 in Sumter
County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Mon-
day through Friday. Call 7 a.m.
to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7
to 10 a.m. on Sunday.
GOING ON VACATION

Call the Circulation Depart-
ment 48 hours ahead to stop
service.


HOW TO REACH US

365-8200
In Sumter County:
877-702-0600
ADVERTISING
Retail ................... 365-8200
Classified ............. 314-3278
CIRCULATION
Lake Co...............787-0600
Sumter Co. ....877-702-0600
Circulation Billing .787-0600
ACCOUNTING ......365-8216


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-
702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through
Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept.,
The Daily Commercial, PO. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007.
Billed monthly at the rates shown.
SUBSCRIPTION REFUND POLICY: Subscription refunds will be
calculated at the current basic subscription price, excluding the
current month. All refund requests must be made in writing and
signed. Send to The Daily Commercial, P0. Box 490007, Leesburg,
FL 34749-0007. (In lieu of a refund, we will transfer any remaining
time on a subscription to another party or make it available to stu-
dents through our "Newspapers in Education" program.)
RECYCLING: The Daily Commercial supports environmental
protection through recycling. Plastic bags may be recycled at grocery
stores. Newspapers may be recycled at the Commercial's Leesburg
office, 212 E. Main St., during business hours. This newspaper is
printed on recycled newsprint.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home
Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1Yr. Tax Total
Daily/Sunday 25.54 1.70 27.33 44.97 3.00 48.12 81.52 5.44
87.23
7 days a week
Mall Subscription 3 months 6 months One Year


Daily/Sunday
Sunday only


155.39
88.20


NEWSROOM CONTACTS
BILL KOCH, assistant managing editor
352-365-8208...........................billkoch@dailycommercial.com
SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor
352-365-8203 ................. scottcallahan@dailycommercial.com
PAUL RYAN, visual editor
352-365-8270 ........................ paulryan@dailycommercial.com
FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor
352-365-8268 ...................... frankjolley@dailycommercial.com
REPORTERS
ROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County
352-394-2183................ roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com
MILLARD IVES, police and courts
352-365-8262........... millardives@dailycommercial.com
THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages
352-365-8209......... theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com
GREG JONES, Lake County government, education
352-365-8257............ gregjones@dailycommercial.com
OTHERS
PAM FENNIMORE, editorial assistant
352-365-8256r...... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com
DON HUNSBERGER
352-365-8279.....donhunsberger@dailycommercial.com
VICE PRESIDENT OF ADVERTISING
KEVIN AUSTIN
352-365-8287.......... kevinaustin@dailycommercial.com
PRESIDENT. HARBORPOINT MEDIA
RICH PINDER
352-365-8214.............. rpinder@harborpointmedia.com
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
E-mail submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com
SPORTS RESULTS
Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by
calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also
can be e-mailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.
GOOD FOR YOU/ CELEBRATIONS
Email submissions to pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com.


"'peed things lip 7vith Some
new ('111ployces.
The Daily Commercial
Erriployment Listings.
I ightningfast response!


points (one diamond
wn a poor hand). The
er was natural, and
in three notrumrnp.
an West led the
lifted to the seven of
rer did not relish the
g a diamond finesse
ig a spade return, so
he ace and led a low
. South was hoping
lincssc and then run
but WVest won the
ng, cashed the king
exited with a heart,
itually went down
table, after the Aus-
Sone club (natural),
mnal takeout double.
iamnionds, and South
notrump. The TLai-
o led the spade ace
liamund. But at this
as virtually certain
ith red kings for his
at the clibs wcrc
3-3. So South won
h dummy's nine and
hearts.
the heart jack, but
A-K-Q of clubs, led
k to dummy's queen
ace of diamonds to
eight tricks. Ile then
hearts, forcing West
he game-going trick
of spades.


A FLORIDA
I LOTTERY

SUNDAY
CASH 3 ................................................ 7-6-3
Afternoon ........................................... 5-5-8
PLAY 4 ............................................. 5-7-7-5
Afternoon........................................ 4-1-5-6

SATURDAY
FANTASY 5........................... 8-14-17-27-30


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, September 30, 2013




Monday, September 30, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL




State&Region
NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN I scottcallahan@dailycommercial.com 1I 352-365-8208


A3


www.dailycommercial.com


Area Briefs
EUSTIS
Habitat for Humanity hosts
25th anniversary ceremony
In honor of World Habitat Day and
Habitat for Humanity Lake-Sumter's
25th Anniversary, the local group will
host a ribbon cutting ceremony for
the new Domestic Global Village, at
5 p.m., Oct. 7 at 1810 S. Bay St.
Special guests for the event in-
clude U.S. Rep. DanielWebster;
Kress Muenzmay, mayor of Eustis;
and International Habitat spokesman
and host of "This Old House" Steve
Thomas.
Door prizes and hors d'oeuvres will
be provided.
For information, call 352-484-0434.

CLEARWATER
2 dead after watercraft
collides with tour boat
Two tourists are dead after their per-
sonal watercraft collided with a tour
boat near a Clearwater causeway.
The Tampa Bay Times reports that
a 51-year-old man and a 49-year-
old woman on a rented water scoot-
er crashed into a double-decker tour
boat on a dolphin-sighting cruise
Saturday. No one on the tour boat was
injured.
Investigators with the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission are trying to determine
what happened to cause the collision.
Authorities said the incident should
serve as a reminder of the hazards of
personal watercraft.
The incident is the second fatal ac-
cident this month involving a water
scooter in the area. Fifteen-year-old
Katie Yale of Seminole died after a
Labor Day collision between her inner
tube and a personal watercraft.

TALLAHASSEE
7 members of Congress ask
Fla. AG to back merger
Seven Democratic members of
Congress from Florida are asking
Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi
to drop her opposition to a proposed
airline merger.
Florida is one of six states that
joined with the U.S. Department of
Justice to stop the proposed merger of
American Airlines and US Airways.
Democratic members primari-
ly from South Florida wrote Bondi on
Friday. The letter contends that the
merger is needed to keep the two air-
lines competitive. They contend the
lawsuit could negatively impact thou-
sands of jobs.
Bondi has previously called the
merger "anti-competitive."
She said 20 percent of the "prob-
lematic" flight routes associated with
the merger would affect Florida. She
said the lawsuit could save consumers
from potential multi-million dollar in-
creases in prices and fees.

MIAMI
4th execution date set
Tuesday for convicted killer
Convicted killer Marshall Lee Gore
is set to be executed Tuesday, the
fourth time this year his execution
date has been scheduled.
The 49-year-old Gore is set to die by
injection for the March 1988 killing
of Robyn Novick, a 30-year-old exot-
ic dancer whose nude body was found
in rural Miami-Dade County. Gore
was also sentenced to die for the mur-
der of another woman a few months
earlier.




... and we'll share it with our readers.
Some of our best story ideas and photos
come from our readers. So don't hesitate
to share your youth activities, awards,
accomplishments, festivals, charity
events and other things that make our
communities special. And don't overlook
those family milestones birthdays,


engagements, marriages, business
promotions and military news.
Just email your photos and news to...
pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com


Sponsors needed for fundraiser


Staff report
Jeb Bolivar of Eustis has had more
than 300 operations in his 34 years
of life.
Born with a condition that affect-
ed his jawbone, Bolivar's latest treat-
ment requires periodic visits to the
University of Arkansas for Medical
Sciences in Little Rock, where he has
undergone reconstructive surgery
and where doctors are now focusing
on opening his airway.
Each visit for the Eustis man be-
gins at Leesburg International Air-
port where he boards a private plane
for the first leg of the three leg trip
to Arkansas. The Angel Flight South-
east pilots who fly him on his jour-
ney donate their time and aircraft.


His next medical appointment at
UAMS is scheduled in November.
"If it weren't for them, I wouldn't
be able to do this," said Bolivar of
the volunteer pilots. "Most of the pi-
lots I've flown with have become my
friends and we talk often."
While pilots donate their air-
planes, fuel and flight hours to help
Angel Flight Southeast complete
more than 3,000 flights each year,
the non-profit organization is reli-
ant on donations to pay for support
services and to keep their passen-
gers and pilots in the air. The Harp-
er Family Charitable Foundation
has helped underwrite Angel Flight
Southeast's expenses since 2007 but
recently agreed to be the title spon-
sor of the upcoming Pilot Awards


PROVIDED PHOTO
From left, Annagrace Hall, Junior Miss; Alexis DeLand, Tiny Miss Leesburg; Emily Pelton, Miss
Leesburg; Ella Ugarte, Little Miss Leesburg; Savannah Zuk, Teen Miss Leesburg.




Emily Pelton crowned


Miss Leesburg for 2014


THERESA CAMPBELL
Staff Writer
theresacampbeIIll@dailycommercial.com
avares High School junior Em-
ily Pelton, 17, of Leesburg was
crowned Miss Leesburg Satur-
day night for which she received a
$5,000 college scholarship during
the 27th annual scholarship pro-
gram at Leesburg High School au-
ditorium.
The daughter of Eveyln and Da-
vid Pelton, the new Miss Leesburg
follows in the footsteps of her sis-
ter, Kaylee Pelton, 22, who was
Miss Leesburg in 2008.
Throughout her year-long reign,
Pelton will be joined by her young-
er pageant sisters: Alexis De-
Land, the daughter of Maile and
Derek DeLand, who was crowed
Tiny Miss Leesburg; Ella Ugarte,
the daughter of Kelly and Chris
Ugarte, who is the new Little Miss
Leesburg; and Savannah Zuk, the
daughter of Sheila and Rau Zuk
who was chosen Teen Miss Lees-
burg.
"The pageant was great; I loved
it," said Pelton, who has been com-
peting in the Miss Leesburg Schol-
arship Program pageants since
she was a 5-year-old. "I really had
a good feeling about it from the
opening number, and my interview


went well... It all just felt right."
Pelton won the Teen Miss Lees-
burg title in 2010, and last year she
received a $2,000 scholarship as
the first runner-up.
"I'm looking forward to the com-
munity service and the experience
of being Miss Leesburg," Pelton
said. "And I'm definitely looking
forward to spending time with my
other pageant sisters."
The Miss Leesburg titlehold-
ers will devote a year of providing
community services, be involved
in volunteer projects and serve as
young ambassadors for the city.
The girls' first event will be partic-
ipating in a downtown Leesburg
Halloween event.
Pelton's goal after high school is
to attend the University of Florida
and earn a master's degree in busi-
ness.
"I want to take over my mom's
business one day," Pelton said of
Tri-City Dance Twirlers.
Other winners Saturday night
were Taylor Pelfry, the first runner-
up, who received a $2,000 schol-
arship; and McKenzie Parrish, the
second runner-up, who was award-
ed a $1,000 scholarship. The oth-
er Miss Leesburg winners in the
younger age divisions each won
$500 scholarships.


2 dead after tour boat crash


Associated Press
CLEARWATER Two tourists
are dead after their personal water-
craft collided with a tour boat near
a Clearwater causeway
Authorities said 50-year-old Ra-
mana Godabiraju and 49-year-
old Shubhada Kulkami were rid-
ing a rented water scooter when it


crashed into a double-decker tour
boat on a dolphin-sighting cruise
Saturday.
The Tampa Bay Times reports that
no one on the tour boat was injured.
"Our thoughts and our prayers
are with the family affected by this
tragic accident," said Trisha Ro-
driguez, owner of the Tropics Boat
Tours boat.


Gala and 17th Annual Golf Tourna-
ment on Nov 10 and 11 at Arling-
ton Ridge Golf Club, 4463 Arlington
Ridge Boulevard, in Leesburg.
Volunteer pilots from across Flori-
da are recognized at the Nov. 10 gala
for their dedication to Angel Flight
passengers. Golfers participating in
the tournament are paired with a
sports celebrity or community VIP
for the day on Nov. 11 and will have
the opportunity to win prizes or
have a chance to win $1 million for
a hole-in-one.
Angel Flight Southeast seeks spon-
sors and attendees for the Pilot
Awards Gala and 17th Annual Golf
Tournament.
For information, call 352-326-
0761.


City fire


department


gets award

Staff report
The Clermont Fire Department
was recently presented with a Life
Safety Achievement Award for its
fire prevention accomplishments
in 2012.
The award was handed out by
the National Association of State
Fire Marshals Fire Research and
Education Foundation in partner-
ship with Grinnell Mutual Rein-
surance Company.
"When we hear the fire truck
coming down the street and see its
lights, we
know fire-
fighters are
responding
to someone
in trouble. r v
What we r
don't know
is that these ,
unsung he-
roes are doing a lot of things be-
hind the scenes that save lives,"
said Alan Clark, assistant vice
president of Special Investigations
at Grinnell Mutual.
"The Life Safety Achievement
Award recognizes fire departments
for their fire prevention programs
that have been proven to save lives
year after year."
Since 1994, the Life Safety
Achievement Award has recog-
nized local fire prevention efforts
that have contributed to reduc-
ing the number of lives lost in res-
idential fires.
Clermont Fire Department is
one of 117 fire departments across
the United States to receive the
award this year for recording zero
fire deaths in 2012 or reducing fire
deaths by at least 10 percent dur-
ing the year.
In addition, award recipients
documented active and effective
fire prevention programs as well
as a clear commitment to reduc-
ing the number of house fires in
the community.
Although residential fires in the
U.S. account for only 20 percent of
all fires, they result in 80 percent
of all fire deaths.
The NASFM Fire Research and
Education Foundation is commit-
ted to reducing that number.
"Experience tells us that fire pre-
vention activity and public educa-
tion can significantly reduce life
and property loss from residential
fires," Degnan said.
"Prevention and education are
very cost effective compared to
the traditional approach of relying
on fire suppression.





DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, September 30, 2013


OBITUARIES
Barbara J. Hipsley
Barbara J. Hipsley, age
74, a resident of Lakes of
Leesburg passed away
on Friday, September
27, 2013. She was born

16, 1938
October ^


land,
OH and
moved
to Lees-
burg in
2001 HIPSLEY
from
Naples, FL. She was a
retired administrative
assistant. She loved to
play Bridge and was an
avid golfer. She is sur-
vived by her husband,
George C. Hipsley of
Leesburg, FL; daugh-
ter and son-in-law, Pau-
la Payne Burcham and
Milo Burcham of Cor-
Steverson-Hanmlin Hilbish
Funerals & Cremations
4r) 226 East Burleigh Blvd,
Tavares, FL 32778
352-343-4444
www.steversonhamllnhilbish.com


Need

Tax Help?

Call
352-787-1040

Open Year Round.


dova, AK; nieces, Cin-
dy Secora, Jenny Ma-
lotte and Lori Witham.
She was preceded in
death by her sister, Car-
olyn Sharp. A Memori-
al Service will be held
on Tuesday, October 1,
2013 at 1:00PM at the
Lakes of Leesburg club-
house. In lieu of flow-
ers, memorial contri-
butions may be made
to Alzheimer's Assoc.,
378 Center Pointe Cr.,
Suite 1280, Altamonte
Springs, FL 32701. Ar-
rangements have been
entrusted to Stever-
son, Hamlin & Hilbish
Funerals and Crema-
tions, 226 E. Burleigh
Blvd., Tavares, FL 32778,
(352)343-4444. Online
condolences maybe left
at www.steversonham-
linhilbish.com
Eugene Lee Jenkins
Eugene Lee Jenkins,
81, of Leesburg, FL en-
tered into eternal life
on Sept. 26, 2013.He is

by his
survived ^

wife of
59 years,
Helen
Jenkins,
sister;
Geral-
dine Le- JENKINS
onhardt,
brother; Jerry (Mar-
garet) Jenkins, chil-
dren; Terial "Ann" (Rob-
ert) Morris, and Russell
Jenkins. He is also sur-
vived by grandchildren;
Stephanie (Joe) Pope,
Jessica (Roger) Morris,
Samantha, Joshua and
John Jenkins, and great-
grandchildren; Hally
and Chevy. The family
will receive friends on
Wed. Oct 2, 2013 from
4:00 until 8:00p.m. at
the Page-Theus Funer-
al Home, Leesburg, FL.
A Memorial Service will
be held on Oct. 5, 2013
at the Kingdom Hall
of Jehovah Witness on
Sunnyside Dr. Leesburg,
FL. Eugene's final rest-
ing place will be Flori-
da National Cemetery,
Bushnell, FL at a lat-
er date. Page-Theus Fu-
neral Home. And Cre-
mation Services. www.
pagetheus.com.
Page Theus Funerals &
d Cremations
rjr 914 West Main St.,
Iw3 Leesburg, FL 34748
352-787-5511
www.pagetheusfuneralhome.com


IN MEMORY


JOHN LANTIGUA
The Palm Beach Post
WEST PALM BEACH If Ne-
beth Carbajal's claim is true, he
is living a life just the opposite of
so many Latino immigrants to-
day. He is a legal, U.S.-born citi-
zen who has been forced to live
as if he were undocumented.
Carbajal, 33, whose Mexican
parents came to the U.S. ille-
gally, claims he was born in a
house in Belle Glade on Dec. 6,
1979, delivered by his aunt and
another woman. No birth certif-
icate was issued, and 14 months
later, his mother took him and
his baby brother back to Mexi-
co because she had to care for a
sick relative.
In 1995, when Nebeth was 15,
all three crossed back into the
U.S. and have lived in Texas ever
since. The brother, Junior, 32,
was born in Everglades Memo-
rial Hospital in Pahokee and has
always had a U.S. birth certifi-
cate.
But Nebeth is now trying to
prove his citizenship, in part to
acquire a U.S. passport so he
can travel legally to Mexico to
visit his father, who he said he
has not seen in 14 years.
In June 2012, his mother and
aunt testified in Palm Beach
County Circuit Court about the
day of his birth and they pre-
sented documents to support
their case. On Sept. 28, Judge
Lisa Small ordered the county to
file a "delayed birth certificate"
for Carbajal with the Florida De-
partment of Vital Statistics.
He applied for expedited ser-
vice from the U.S. Passport
Agency, but instead, a State De-
partment investigator showed
up to question Carbajal at his
job in Texas, where he does
painting and construction. Al-
most a year later, he still doesn't
have a passport.
"I understand that they have
to be careful about this kind of
thing," Carbajal said. "We have


-^ ^ ^ ^S^ ^ Bi H| l. I jjjljiij


i- -'li~ti*


Nebeth Carbajal shows his birth certificate.

shown the government all kinds
of documents, but it has been
impossible to get them to re-
spond."
His attorney, Elizabeth Ricci
of Tallahassee, said U.S. citizens
have to show only a valid birth
certificate to acquire a passport,
and Carbajal now has one.
"He is being made to prove his
citizenship more than other cit-
izens would need to, and that
isn't right," she said.
The State Department would
not comment on Carbajal's
case, but spokeswoman Beth Fi-
nan provided a list of documen-
tation, "secondary evidence,"
that must be submitted in cas-
es where a birth certificate is-
sued within a year of birth is not
available.
One such piece of evidence is


a baptismal certificate. Carbajal
has one, showing he was bap-
tized Jan. 31, 1981, at St. Philip
Benizi Catholic Church in Belle
Glade. The document notes the
child was born in Belle Glade
and that the Rev. Vincent Vil-
lar performed the sacrament. A
church secretary confirmed that
Villar had served at the church.
Another document sought
by the State Department was
a "doctor's record of postna-
tal care." Ricci gave the Circuit
Court judge and the State De-
partment a registration card is-
sued to his mother, Elizabeth
Carbajal, in 1980 by the Florida
Department of Health's Women,
Infant and Children program,
which provides low-income
mothers with food and nutri-
tional counseling.


I
BEER Heewe o

FU EAII N adCRV A OY ed s


"Protect and Serve"
Thank a law enforcement professional today for their service.
Page-Theus Funeral Home and Cremation Services
914 West Main St., Leesburg, FL 34748
~ 352-787-5511
www.pagetheus.com


ASSOCIATED PRESS
The shoreline of Bay Jimmy, which was heavily impacted by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, is seen Friday in an area that has tar
mats and oozing crude oil on the marsh platform, in Plaquemines Parish, La.


Judge set to preside over 2nd phase of BP trial


MICHAEL KUNZELMAN
Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS Top kill.
Junk shot. Cofferdam. Top hat.
Capping stack. Those terms -
obscure industry jargon before
BP's massive 2010 oil spill-be-
came familiar buzzwords as the
company scrambled to find a
way to plug its blown-out well
in the Gulf of Mexico.
More than three years lat-
er, the methods that BP em-
ployed during its 86-day strug-
gle to stop the gusher will be the
focus of a trial resuming Mon-
day in the high-stakes litigation
spawned by the nation's worst
offshore oil spill.
BP insists it was properly pre-
pared to respond to the disas-
ter, but plaintiffs' attorneys will
argue the London-based global
oil company could have capped
the well much sooner if it hadn't


ignored decades of warnings
about the risks of a deep-water
blowout.
The plaintiffs' lawyers, who
are teaming up with attorneys
for the five Gulf states and two
of BP's contractors for the sec-
ond phase of the trial, also say
BP repeatedly lied to federal of-
ficials and withheld informa-
tion about the volume of oil that
was flowing from the well
"It should pay the price for its
choices. BP should be held ac-
countable for the lengthy delay
caused by its fraud," they wrote
in a pretrial court filing.
BP maintains that its spill
preparations complied with ev-
ery government requirement
and met industry standards. But
the April 20, 2010, blowout of its
Macondo well a mile under the
surface of the Gulf of Mexico 50
miles off the Louisiana coast


presented "unforeseen chal-
lenges," the company's attor-
neys wrote.
"With these uncertain and
unique conditions, one over-
arching principle governed
the team's work: 'Don't make
it worse,'" they wrote, saying
BP deserved "recognition, not
condemnation" for its spill re-
sponse efforts.
The federal judge presiding
over the case without a jury has
set aside exactly 120 hours over
16 days for the trial's second
phase, which he divided into
two segments.
The first part, lasting four
days, focuses on BP's efforts to
seal the well. The second seg-
ment, lasting 12 days, is de-
signed to help U.S. District
Judge Carl Barbier determine
exactly how much oil spilled
into the Gulf.


Florida man claims he is documented


as citizen but lives as if he's illegal


Spe hnsli 1ihSm
111'11 O lplo tT m


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, September 30, 2013




Monday, September 30, 2013


Russian court jails 8 more Greenpeace activists


LYNN BERRY
Associated Press
MOSCOW A court in
the northern Russian city of
Murmansk on Sunday sent
all eight remaining Green-
peace activists to jail for two
months, showing no lenien-
cy toward any of the 30 peo-
ple detained for a protest at a
drilling platform in Arctic wa-
ters.
Twenty activists and two
journalists were ordered
jailed for two months during
a marathon court session on
Thursday that stretched late
into night, but the court had
ruled to hold the remaining
eight only until new hearings
could be held on Sunday.
No charges have been
brought against any of the ac-
tivists, who are citizens of 18
countries, including Russia.
Russian prosecutors are con-
sidering whether to charge


them with piracy, among oth-
er offenses, and the activists
are being held pending the
investigation.
The Russian Coast Guard
disrupted an attempt on
Sept. 18 by two of the activists
to scale a platform owned by
Russian state-controlled en-
ergy giant Gazprom to call at-
tention to the environmental
risks of drilling in Arctic wa-
ters. The next day, the Coast
Guard seized Greenpeace's
ship, the Arctic Sunrise, and
towed it to Murmansk with
the crew and activists aboard.
Greenpeace Russia cam-
paign director Ivan Blokov
has described the seizure of
the ship as "the most aggres-
sive and hostile act" against
the environmental organi-
zation since French govern-
ment agents bombed the
Rainbow Warrior ship in
1985, killing one man.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this photo provided by Greenpeace International, a Russian Investigation Committee, inspects the Greenpeace Interna-
tional ship, Arctic Sunrise, in a closed part of Murmansk port, Russia, Saturday.


Israel's Netanyahu

warns White

House about Iran
JOSEF FEDERMAN
Associated Press
JERUSALEM Mortified that the world may be
warming up to Iran, Israeli Prime Minister Benja-
min Netanyahu is taking an unpopular message to
the White House and the United Nations this week:
Don't be fooled by Tehran's new leadership.
Netanyahu contends Iran is using conciliatory
gestures as a smoke screen to conceal an unabated
march toward a nuclear bomb.
He will deliver those strong words of caution
- and fresh intelligence in an attempt to per-
suade the U.S. to maintain tough economic sanc-
tions and not allow the Islamic republic to develop
a bomb or even move closer to becoming a nucle-
ar threshold state.
With the White House cautiously optimistic
about its dialogue with Iran, Monday's meeting be-
tween Netanyahu and President Barack Obama
could be tense.
"I will tell the truth in the face of the sweet talk
and the onslaught of smiles," Netanyahu said be-
fore boarding his flight to the U.S. on Sunday. "Tell-
ing the truth today is vital for the security and peace
of the world and, of course, it is vital for the security
of the state of Israel."
Israeli leaders watched with great dismay what
they derisively call the "smiley campaign" by Iran's
new president, Hassan Rouhani, last week. Rou-
hani delivered a conciliatory speech at the United
Nations in which he repeated Iran's official position
that it has no intention of building a nuclear weap-
on and declared his readiness for new negotiations
with the West.
Capping off the visit, Rouhani and Obama held
a 15-minute phone call as the Iranian leader was
traveling to the airport. By the end of the call, the
first conversation between the nation's leaders
in 34 years, Obama was suggesting that a break-
through on the nuclear issue could portend even
deeper ties between the U.S. and Iran. U.S. and Eu-
ropean diplomats hailed a "very significant shift"
in Iran's attitude and tone.
For Netanyahu, such sentiments are nothing
short of a nightmare.
For years, he has warned that Iran is steadily
marching toward development of nuclear weap-
ons, an assessment that is widely shared by the
West because of Iran's continued enrichment of
uranium and its run-ins with international nucle-
ar inspectors.
The Israeli prime minister contends Rouhani's
outreach is a ploy to ease international sanctions
and buy time. Iran says its nuclear program is for
peaceful purposes only.


0 COME SEE US.
Free delivery and
installation for
new sets over 32",

CASON & GASKINS TV
C RadioShack. Dealer Established 1951
748-2021 CasonGaskinsTV.com
Wildwood Mon-Fri 8am-5:30, Sat 8am-4pm


Dr. John McElmurry
Doctor of Audiology

sona: otico
<;SONIC PH")NAK Quoalic
vivatone


Do you BELIEVE you can
find a hearing aid for LES-
money anywhere else?


SCheck Us Out on
B Angies list







S-OF AMERICA


www.hearingaidtruth.com


Now "LY3
during this event


We Fit Over


5,000

of the Worlds

Leading

Hearing Aids

Each Year.


)r




S


I1 ReSound REXTON
e C -x ...... ... s


bernafon'
IEMENS


F&We an t
We Accept: I th ,"uofel and most HMOs


Our Professional staff of Doctors of Audiology,
Board Certified Hearing Aid Specialists
and Audioprosthologists


Virtually
Invisible


ONLY available at Advanced Hearing Centers of America


Real Ear Measurements allow the clinician to
measure and record the patient's hearing aids'
performance while they are actually being worn.
FREE


FREE


Our Video otoscope can detect if
ear was may be the reason you are
experiencing hearing difficulty.
FREE


LEEBUG/ USISI
FUTADPR 291DvdWleDr THVILLGS'H VLAGSOCL
352-14-064 in uxPaa) 3225704 3229555 322105
1 352308-318


Do you BELIEVE that anyone
else KNOWS more about
hearing aids than us?


We're not the BEST because we're the BIGGEST,
we're the BIGGEST because we're the BEST


I hsMnhSpecil .


Introducing the

New Xylo 4


A5


DAILY COMMERCIAL








Iran: more needed than Obama call for full ties


NASSER KARIMI
Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran Iran
sought Sunday to calm hard-
liners worried over ground-
breaking exchanges with
Washington, saying a sin-
gle phone conversation be-
tween the American and Ira-
nian presidents is not a sign
that relations will be quickly
restored.
The comments by Depu-
ty Foreign Minister Abbas
Araghchi appeared tailored
to address Iranian factions,
including the powerful Rev-
olutionary Guard, that have
grown uneasy over fast-paced
outreach last week between
the White House and Presi-
dent Hassan Rouhani, which
was capped by a 15-minute
phone call with President
Barack Obama.
"Definitely, a history of high
tensions between Tehran and
Washington will not go back
to normal relations due to a
phone call, meeting or nego-
tiation," Araghchi was quoted
by the semi-official Fars news
agency as saying.
Rouhani seeks to restart
stalled talks over its nuclear


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A protester, left, approaches President Hassan Rouhani's car Saturday leaving Mehrabad airport after his arrival from the
U.S. in Tehran, Iran.


program in the hopes of eas-
ing U.S.-led sanctions. Iran,
however, has not clarified
what concessions it is willing
to make with its nuclear pro-


gram in exchange.
Araghchi also reiterat-
ed statements by Iran's Su-
preme Leader Ayatollah Ali
Khamenei, who said he no


longer opposes direct talks
with Washington but is not
optimistic about the poten-
tial outcome. Khamenei ap-
pears to have given Rouhani


authority to handle the nu-
clear talks with world powers,
scheduled to resume in Ge-
neva in two weeks, and seek
possible broader contacts
with the Obama administra-
tion.
"We never trust America
100 percent," said Araghchi.
'And, in the future, we will re-
main on the same path. We
will never trust them 100 per-
cent."
The divisions over Rou-
hani's overtures were on
display Saturday when he
returned from NewYork. Sup-
porters welcomed him with
cheers, but a smaller pocket
of protesters shouted insults.
The U.S. and Iran broke ties
after the 1979 Islamic Revolu-
tion when mobs stormed the
U.S. Embassy in Tehran. A to-
tal of 52 hostages were held
for 444 days.
A hard-line lawmaker, Ha-
mid Rasaei, criticized the
phone call as "breaking the
resistance brand" of Iran a
reference to the self-promot-
ed idea that Iran is the an-
chor for opposition to Israel
and Western influence in the
region.


Chemical weapons inspectors outline Syria plan


TOBY STERLING
Associated Press
THE HAGUE, Nether-
lands Inspectors who
will oversee Syria's de-
struction of its chemical
weapons said Sunday
their first priority is to
help the country scrap
its ability to manufac-
ture such arms by a Nov.
1 deadline using ev-
ery means possible.
The chemical weap-
ons inspectors said that


may include smashing
mixing equipment with
sledgehammers, blow-
ing up delivery missiles,
driving tanks over emp-
ty shells or filling them
with concrete, and run-
ning machines without
lubricant so they seize
up and become inoper-
able.
On Friday, the U.N.
Security Council or-
dered the Organiza-
tion for the Prohibition
of Chemical Weapons


RSVP Today! Call 352-350
*Seating is extremely limited and by RSVP only *
*Complimentary lunch will be served. *


We'll be doing an in depth study of....
* The history of Annuities
* The different types of Annuities
* How Annuities work


to help Syria destroy its
chemical weapons by
mid-2014.
On Sunday, inspectors
met with media in The
Hague to explain their
current plan of action,
which is to include an
initial group of 20 leav-
ing for Syria on Monday.
The organization al-
lowed two inspec-
tors to speak on con-
dition of anonymity
out of concern for their
safety amid Syria's civ-


-1161


* How Annuities earn interest
* Why Annuities have a bad reputation
* How your advisor or agent gets paid


* How to get money out of your Annuity And more!

Additionally, we'll do a live Q&A session and Answer YOUR Questions!

Visit us Online: www.TBFinancialGroup.com
Office Location: 3261 Us Hwy 441/27, Suite F-2 Fruitland Park, Fl 34731
TB Financial Group Inc. is a licensed insurance agency for life, health, and annuities. We are not securities licensed. We are not tax advisors.
Our seminars are very general in nature and not meant to replace the advice of your CPA, Tax Preparer, Investment Advisor or Attorney. We will
not provide tax or legal advice. Please consult your tax or legal professional for these matters.


il war; both are veteran
members of the OPCW
Spokesman Michael Lu-
han said the men "are
going to be deeply in-
volved in Syria."
"This isn't just ex-
traordinary for the
OPCW This hasn't been
done before: an inter-
national mission to go
into a country which
is involved in a state of
conflict and amid that
conflict oversee the de-
struction of an entire
category of weapons of


mass destruction which
it possesses," Luhan
said. "This is definitely a
historical first."
Syria acknowledged
for the first time it has
chemical weapons after
an Aug. 21 poison gas at-
tack killed hundreds of
civilians in a Damascus
suburb and President
Barack Obama threat-
ened a military strike in
retaliation. A U.N. in-
vestigation found that
nerve gas was used in
the attack but stopped


^^^^Jf~pus on I %c .# Vf

(OfiST TO (ON r f -AGC^^



Hi<11 Je^^*^eLrd- "-BB~rtnpTaTTTuiTr FLM Cj WHH
cao cjeweiryanci.M NUMBMHBB ISH MXALC'
PANDORA 'fiB (M N SelOL oeprecdA icsedaler'

ARKAMDPCw B ROKEN ORDAMAGEDJEWEL'R Y?
JU~T iPKA WE BUY I^H^M}T ALL
NO AMUNT OO LRGE O TOOSMAL

^^B ~ CON & CURRENCY^^ ^^^^ *^^^^^^^
WE BUY GOLD ILVE L0) "EB







ThePATNU BULLION brkeaMwetAReacing

SOTrs KAY tINEJWLRY DIAONDS s!
Sundays ~ ~ ~ 1 10:3 A~.&60pm

ESTTE/ ATIUE EWLR
FB^OSSCCIIENBATHS POCKT WAT 55'NESM,


short of blaming it on
Syrian President Bashar
Assad's regime.
After a flurry of diplo-
matic negotiations in-
volving the U.S., Syria,
and Syrian ally Russia,
Syria made an initial
voluntary disclosure
of its program to the
Hague-based OPCW
Under organization's
rules, the amounts and
types of weapons in Syr-
ia's stockpiles, and the
number and location
of the sites, will not be
publicly disclosed.
The U.S. and Rus-
sia agree that Syria has
roughly 1,000 metric
tons of chemical weap-
ons agents and precur-
sors, including blister
agents such as sulfur
and mustard gas, and
nerve agents like sa-
rin. External experts
say they are distributed
over 50 to70 sites.
One of the OPCW ex-
perts with a military
background said the
"open source" infor-
mation about the Syri-
an program is "reason-
able."
Timothee Germain, a
researcher at the Cen-
ter for International Se-
curity and Arms Control
in Paris, who is not in-
volved with the OPCW
project, said that in
the early phases of Syr-
ia's civil war, chemical
weapons were consoli-
dated into a small num-
ber of sites in order to
keep them from falling
into the hands of rebels.
But when the prospect
of a U.S. military strike
emerged, the weapons
may have been redis-
tributed over a larger
number of sites to pre-
serve them.
He added that he
is skeptical the cur-
rent timeline can be
achieved. "From a tech-
nical standpoint, it's re-
ally a long-shot," he
said.
The investigators said
members of the initial
group of 20 will meet
with counterparts from
Syria's Foreign Ministry
on Tuesday and begin
planning. A week later,
the OPCW mission will
be expanded to a larger
number of investigators
who will arrive in waves
and begin visiting sites
and disabling equip-
ment.


"ANNUITY UNIVERSITY"

This is an exclusive, classroom style,
workshop designed to teach you how
annuities work. And YES, we'll put it all in
layman's terms! With all the
controversy and confusion surrounding
these products we are on a mission to
educate YOU and "set the record straight."
The class is FREE and no products will
'be sold or presented.

H THIS IS STRICTLY EDUCATIONAL.


Date & Time: Tuesday, October 1 at 10:00am
Location: TB Event Center
(Located next door Vic's Embers)
7928 U.S. Hwy 441, Suite 2
Leesburg FL 34748


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, September 30, 2013


4113tUt-*^^

TBfiW






YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD
BILL KOCH............... ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR
SCOTT CALLAHAN .......................NEWS EDITOR Vi
GENE PACKWOOD ............ EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Vi

www.dailycommercial.corn


VOICE

George Washington

finally has his own

presidential library

The library of our 42nd president, Bill
Clinton, opened in 2004 in Little
Rock, Ark.
Those are our two most recent ex-
presidents. The library of our first presi-
dent opened this weekend and it is long
overdue.
In contrast to most presidential librar-
ies, which are generally government-run,
the $106 million FredW. Smith Nation-
al Library for the Study of George Wash-
ington is privately owned, as is the Mount
Vernon mansion and its grounds, by the
Mount Vernon Ladies' Association.
By 1853, when the association was
formed to rescue Washington's home,
Mount Vernon was nearly derelict, its
paint peeling, the grounds overgrown, the
portico partially propped up by an old
ship's mast.
Washington's collection of some 900
bound volumes and other materials had
been allowed to scatter, in contrast to
Thomas Jefferson's, which became the
nucleus of the Library of Congress.
Pride of place at the library's dedica-
tion went to Washington's 1789 annotat-
ed copy of the Acts of Congress, two of
which were the Constitution and the Bill
of Rights.
The association has patiently restored
the Mount Vernon property, rebuilding
Washington's gristmill and his rye whis-
key distillery (bottles of which are on sale
at the gift shop) and offering a relative-
ly clear-eyed view of the lives of the slaves
who made the estate run.
The new library is a three-story building
of limestone, wood and glass on 65 acres
across the suitably named MountVernon
Parkway from the mansion. It has stacks
and vaults for the especially rare acquisi-
tions and quarters for visiting scholars.
The association hopes to make Mount
Vernon a center of scholarship as well
as a tourist destination. Library Director
Douglas Bradburn told The Washington
Post, 'Anybody writing anything on Wash-
ington or his era we want them to feel
like they need to come here."
Washington would be pleased since he
loved having guests, constantly enter-
tained and eventually had to add a wing
so he and Martha could have a little pri-
vacy. The wing contained his office and
rapidly expanding library. He wrote to a
friend that he wanted a building to house
"my Military, Civil & private Papers, which
are voluminous and may be interesting."
Washington died in 1799 before the project
could be started. Nw, 214 years later, our first
president finally has his library and the in-
terest is greater than ever.
Distributed by Scripps Howard News Service.


The Daily Commercial


The newspaper of choice for Lake
and Sumter counties since 1875


EDITORIALS
Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any
individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Lo-
cal editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.
COLUMNS
Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture
appears with them. They do not necessarily reflect the opinion of
the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views.
If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or na-
tional issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial.com,
or mail it to Voices, PO. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007.
Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The
writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the
column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.


'^THERE XV JA#\S AVM ^L I6K
^kteaIAaa- -roe l& IA.v.


OTHERVOICES


Compromise in politics? No, confront


mong the pearls of wis-
dom conveyed in Ecclesi-
astes is that everything has
its time.
"A time to be born ... a time
to die, a time to plant ... a
time to uproot, a time for war
... a time for peace."
The founders of the Unit-
ed States drew up a Constitu-
tion to serve as an operating
manual, in its checks and bal-
ances, for peaceful, delibera-
tive government. They under-
stood human nature and set
up a system in which com-
peting interests would have
to give in. Compromise, they
understood, is a necessary lu-
bricant for the wheels of gov-
ernment "of the people, by
the people, and for the peo-
ple" to turn and allow us to
move forward.
But compromise is meant
for those competing interests
- not for the core principles
of the country that the Con-
stitution exists to protect and
secure. When the principles
of our free nation under God
are under siege, it is a time
for confrontation, not com-
promise.
The other day, I watched a
short video of Rafael Cruz's
presentation at a July event
by FreedomWorks, a Washing-
ton, D.C.-based political ac-
tion committee that usual-
ly supports tea party causes.
Cruz is the father of the ju-
nior Republican senator from
Texas, Ted Cruz, who is now
in the spotlight.
Rafael Cruz is a self-made
businessman, an immigrant
from Casto's Cuba, and a
born-again evangelical Chris-
tian pastor.
Most of the time when
someone cites the Declara-
tion of Independence, they
mention its famous opening
sentences. But Rafael Cruz,


Star Parker
SCRIPPS HOWARD
NEWS SERVICE


in this brilliant summation of
what America is about, quot-
ed the signers' closing words:
"... with a firm reliance on the
protection of divine Provi-
dence, we mutually pledge to
each other our lives, our for-
tunes and our sacred honor."
Take a walk around Wash-
ington any evening. The fan-
cy restaurants are filled with
lobbyists and legislators.
Try to find anyone who
would pledge his or her life
and fortune for anything.
The American government
is no longer about doing the
business of the people while
preserving and protecting the
principles of a free nation.
The principles of freedom
have been drowned out by the
power elite whether politi-
cians, big business lobbyists
or big media who use their
influence to feather their own
beds.
A Jeremiah-like Ted Cruz,
ringing the alarm that things
are not OK, is an annoyance
to the comfortable establish-
ment. As the class of "haves"
protects its interests, it as-
sures a dismal future for our
young and for our poor. Its
members play while the ship
sinks.
There is no more powerful
predictor of economic growth
and prosperity than a nation's
economic freedom.
The just-published "2013
Economic Freedom of the
World Report" shows that the
United States has dropped
from being the world's sec-
ond-most economically free


in 2000 to number 17 in this
year's report. The report
comes from the Fraser Insti-
tute, a Canadian public-poli-
cy think tank.
Our economic arteries are
clogged because of excessive
government, which is drag-
ging us down and ruining ev-
erything that made America
great.
The Affordable Care Act is
just the latest huge incursion
into the freedom of American
citizens in a long process of
deterioration.
Every year, the trustees of
Social Security and Medicare
provide a report showing the
dismal financial state of these
huge entitlement programs.
And every year, the political
class in Washington ignores
it, not having the courage to
fight for real change, while
things continue to worsen.
Now big business, unions
and Congress are getting
themselves exempted out of
Obamacare, ready to leave the
rest of country to be shep-
herded into socialized medi-
cine.
But Sen. Cruz, like his brave
father Rafael, is putting his
life, his fortune and his sacred
honor on the line to save our
beleaguered country.
When Abraham Lincoln took
office, he still believed that
slavery could be purged from
America through deliberation.
But soon it became clear that
only war would do it.
America must stand by Cruz
and other brave tea party Re-
publicans who understand the
message of Ecclesiastes: that
there is a time for everything,
and that today is the time for
confrontation.
Star Parker is an author and presi-
dent of CURE, Center for Urban Renew-
al and Education in Washington, D.C.
Contact her at www.urbancure.org.


HAVE YOUR SAY
The Daily Commercial invites you
to write letters to the editor. Letters
should be no longer than 350 words.
They must be original, signed with the
full name of the writer, and include
the writer's address and telephone
number for verification. We reserve
the right to edit for length. Letters
also will be edited for grammar, clarity,
taste and libel. We accept no more
than two letters per month from the
same writer. No open letters, form
letters or copies of letters to third
parties will be published. We do not
publish unsigned letters. Submissions
are not returned. We retain the right
to archive and republish any material
submitted for publication.
You can submit your letters by:
Email (preferred) to:
letters@dailycommercial.com
By regular mail to:
Voices
PO. Box 490007
Leesburg, FL 34749-0007
By fax to: 325-365-1951


DOONESBURY


A7


Monday, September 30, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL





DAILY COMMERCIALMonday, September 30, 2013


Eustis, FL 32726
352-308-8396


Come in for a
FREE A/C
Check
Test vent temperature,
visually inspect for leaks,
Gauge check system
and run performance test.
*Does not include freon or parts.


1$1500 Offi
SLube, Oil &
Filter Service I
Includes synthetic I
or regular oil, I
premium oil filter
and 27 pt. safety I
inspection. /

_i _ASE Certified
1AL Master
V Technician
since 1975.
38 Years!


2 year
24,000 mile
warranty on
oalt repairs


www.ProAutoCareEustis.com


TODAY


.-4

Some sun, at-storm in
spots in the afternoon

HIGH LOW
87 710


F

0:


TUESDAY




Some sun with a
thunderstorm in the
afternoon
HIGH LOW
87 710


... .. .... ..... ...
Pensacola' -
85170


i.


WEDNESDAY




Partly sunny


HIGH LOW
89 720


Tallahasseoa
85/66


THURSDAY




Cloudy with
thunderstorms possible

HIGH LOW
84 72


Lake City
83/66 at


Panama Ci ........... iiii .
83/70 ,' \,llii .


Sup to the minute and detailedsto
weather information, go to: -A As
WAccuWeather.com '
.... IAltooan
Th e Vllages Aton \
.. ....... O. uxioro 7// l 7- : :
Oxford 87/70 86170
'._. ... I L. .. Umatilla \
4- (. e87171
\ Wildwood. Fruitland Park Eustis i
88169 t / fO 408701 Sorrentoii
r Colemin 87171 alw
Lake Panaso 7/68 Leesburg Tavares ...
88/68 4L 87M 1 87M7
8 / / S u m te rv i le 1 .. l l ...... .
S 87/68 ; 8
ushnell 4 C nter Hill '-.4.
1111.8 /168
Mc: I erde
ter 8 a87 .
roveland Clermon Shown .s
1V68 8o 7/70 l today weather
I Temperatures ai
| 1 today's highs an
tonight's lows.
...... o.t;;w.


Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. @2013


I


Gainesville
83/65
Ocala t


ee bur

'Tampa I
*89173
:ft. Petersburg
A74
e.
Sarasota .. .........
19/71 \ A,


Ft. Myerse4
89/72
Naplese
89/73


r.
re
nd


Key West
87/79 a


FRIDAY

,' N


Some sun with a couple
of thunderstorms

HIGH LOW
880 72


Jacksonville




S Daytona Beach
85170
4..
-. J4 itueville


Orlando I
.. Vero Beach
S87/71

Okeechobee .
86&70 .

Palm Beah
87/77 l

FortLaudeiile
86/78
.:' ......... 4 iL iami
.7 ,Iiillii87/78
..i. ,illl'


Key Largo
S ...... F 86f79


Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are today's highs for the
day. Forecast higMow temperatures are given for selected cities.


,,.S. e> '*, | .IIIng
I ', 67/43 BREEZ
709 Minf III~p
! n rSan Fnisc '

408
Ba 7Hj D ewRY

aos
871615 R
8740


)II; D7I'o 14" Yom
C l.cago 7 2
74j 4 "^
70d Cold Frontt
ii f ,7S.nqc. Wam Front
Stationary
Fmnt


ShowereD
T-storms=
RalnM
Flures[Z3
Snowp
tceKa


Yesterday's National High/Low: (for the 48 contiguous states)
High 880 in Plant City, FL Low 190 in Angel Fire, NM


7


0 1 234567 878


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10
Very High, 11+ Extreme
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index'
number, the greater the need for
eye and skin protection.


The solunar period schedule allows planning
days so you will be fishing in good territory or
hunting in good cover during those times. Major
periods begin at the times shown and last for
1.5 to 2 hours. The minor periods are shorter.
Major Minor Major Minor
Today 8:47 am. 2:36 a.m. 9:09 p.m. 2:58 p.m.
Tue. 9:26 a.m. 3:15 a.m. 9:49 p.m. 3:38 p.m.


I TE UNANDMON6


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


Today
7:20 a.m.
7:14 p.m.
3:14 am.
4:28 p.m.


Tuesday
7:21 a.m.
7:13 p.m.
4:07 a.m.
5:04 p.m.


New First Full Last



Oct4 Oct11 Oct18 Oct26


ITIEI


Homosassa
Day High Feet
Today 2:39 am......1.0
2:20 pm......1.2
Daytona Beach
Day High Feet
Today 4:48 am.....4.0
5:15 pm.....4.3


Low Feet
9:51 am .....0.4
10:41 pm.....0.2

Low Feet
11:02 am......1.0
11:33pm.....0.9


Day High Feet
Tue. 3:20 am......1.1
3:17 pm...1.3


High Feet
5:41 am.....4.1
6:04pm....4.4


Low Feet
10:47 am .....0.3
11:23 pm.....0.2

Low Feet
11:52 am .....0.9


I NTOALCTE


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte, NC


Today
Hi LoW
72 48 pc
81 53s
48 35 pc
72 52 pc
78 60 pc
72 51 pc
75 52 pc
67 43 pc
83 63 pc
78 44 pc
68 46 c
65 54 pc
71 57 c
72 49 pc
79 58 s
75 56 c
79 57 pc


Tuesday
Hi LoW
74 54 pc
82 53 s
47 39s
76 53 pc
83 63 pc
78 57 pc
80 56 pc
65 42s
84 65 c
70 40s
65 43 pc
72 61 pc
72 59 pc
73 53 pc
83 60 pc
78 57 pc
82 59 pc


City
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Concord, NH
Dallas
Dayton
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
El Paso
Fargo
Fairbanks
Flagstaff
Grand Rapids


Today
Hi LoW
80 46 s
74 54s
75 58 c
70 55 c
80 55s
69 43 pc
87 69 pc
75 57 c
84 50s
78 58s
72 54 pc
71 52s
87 61 s
76 50 pc
38 30 c
71 38s
72 52 pc


Tueda
Hi LoW
73 46s
81 61 s
80 61 c
75 61 s
85 58 pc
75 48 pc
91 73 pc
79 61 pc
78 49s
82 61s
76 60s
75 46 s
89 65 s
72 44s
37 26 c
70 38 s
78 59 s


City
Great Falls
Greensboro, NC
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City


Today
Hi LoW
60 41 pc
76 58 pc
71 50 pc
88 71 sh
87 69 t
76 58 pc
83 64 t
79 60 s
86 65 s
80 66 t
77 60 c
79 67 sh
73 55 s
78 58 s
79 60 c
82 71 t
72 56 pc


Tuesday
Hi LoW
62 36 C
81 60 pc
75 54 pc
88 72 sh
89 71 t
80 62 pc
87 64t
82 62s
90 69 s
84 68t
8365 c
85 69 c
80 58 s
76 51 s
85 63 c
85 72 t
76 60 pc


City
Norfolk, VA
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego


Today
Hi LoW
73 59 s
83 60 s
81 57s
74 58 pc
94 69 s
72 55 c
65 49 pc
61 49 r
69 52 pc
78 59 s
73 46 pc
78 57 s
75 52 c
79 61 pc
78 55 pc
90 71 t
73 61 s


Tuesday
Hi LoW
78 63 pc
88 67 pc
82 57s
79 60 pc
95 71 s
74 57 pc
72 50 pc
61 47 r
73 56 pc
82 61 pc
74 47s
83 60 pc
77 50 s
83 66 pc
77 51 s
91 73 pc
72 62s


City
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Santa Fe
St. Ste. Marie
Seattle
Shreveport
Spokane
Syracuse
Topeka
Tucson
Tulsa
Washington, DC
Wilmington, DE


Today
Hi LoW
71 56 C
90 80 t
78 46 s
72 49 pc
59 49 r
86 69 t
57 41 sh
74 54 pc
81 57 s
92 62s
83 61 s
77 62 pc
74 54 pc


Tuesday
Hi LoW
67 54 s
90 80 t
80 44 s
70 50 pc
59 48 sh
87 70 t
55 38 c
73 54 pc
84 61 s
92 62 s
85 66 pc
82 65 pc
79 58 pc


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.


I PiADCA


I F


DUCT CLEANING PE1IA
LM n~_ ~u p'V us, r d n Mu ? -.' 1.r'nr "umchage .r
R lce n h.3 1 o r, ly C a . u O ,D Ic l ea n in g o r ,y
Sn Sty3ieV ,er ,r _res9f 912 6 ,a"A

----CARPET UPHOLSTERY TILE & GROUT HARDWOOD
...... .....


,a-4


Clermont Minneola Groveland


Mascotte Montverde Four Corners


*SOUTH AKEAERCT DIRECTORY*


Matres Make


MO.-ST I A -7P
Located in the Green Roof Buildings
16129 SR 50, Clermont,
Suite 101-102
407-877-6677
FINANCING NO Credit Check
Se Habla Espahol






Gingerbread
INSURANCE
"Experience the Difference"
Home- Auto- Collector Car
Commercial
Tom Marina
407-309-9949
www.gingerbreadinsurance.com


Hole Golf Center


352-404-8990
1640 East Hwy 50
Suite B
Clermont, FL 34711


I1S MONTH



FREE
CALL TODAY
877-265-2510


1i ,itre


'-Accounting
coytbt Us

352-242-9905
15701 State Road 50
Suite #206
Clermont, FL 34711


)PAINTING
INTERIOR &
EXTERIOR
FOCUSED p
SOLUTIONS INC.
262-210-0454
Call Today -I ,vdllall ba,A anieja! day'












GMTlroveland
B32443
0:7 =1 vl:-


I FVEDY ORC STFRLEB GI


Talk. Ahoiuit


Mattress Market of Florida
Where Quality Meets Affordability

If you have ever been to Mattress Market of Florida, located at 16129
SR 50 in the "Green Roof' buildings in Clermont, then you know
they have a diverse and large inventory of top brand name mattresses
111. i i. 11 jil ii ia..11 iiiiii ,iii,.: hiii. is direct from Macy's, Ashley
Furniture and American Manufacturing.
If you have ever bought from local owner, Danny, then you know he
offers high-end merchandise at low end prices and his reputation is
honest, fair and educated. Danny has more than twenty years
experience in the industry, having started out in assembly at a
mattress facility He really knows what is in a mattress and how it is
intended to last.
Mattress Market of Florida offers three showrooms in one location.
You may call and speak to Danny at 407.340.3751 / 407.877.6677
or visit the location Monday- Saturday 10OAM 7PM and Sundays
closed.
In any economy, affordable quality is a necessity and Danny has built
his business to offer tli ii 1i ,i to the community Twin mattress sets
start at $99 and sofa & loveseat combos at only $589. Financing is
available and no credit checks eliminate the hassle between your
desire and purchase. Mattress Market of Florida also offers delivery
removal of your old mattress and set-up of your new one.
If you have i., i dli,,i.-ii ',ii would benefit from a quality mattress
or wanted an upgrade to your living room or dining room furniture,
stop in to Mattress Market of Florida and see how easy and attainable
that can happen.
More information is available at www.MattressMarketFL.com
Se Habla Espanol.


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, September 30, 2013


.= M&








Sports
sports@dailycommercial.com


ALVAREZ ends with no-hitter / B4


Bl
DAILY COMMERCIAL
Monday, September 30, 2013


www.dailycommercial.com


SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY
1 352-365-8208


JACK DEMPSEY / AP
Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning (18) rolls out of
the pocket looking to pass against the Phildadelphia Eagles
on Sunday in the third quarter in Denver.


Manning: 4 TDs,


327 yards to


humiliate Eagles

ARNIE STAPLETON
AP Pro Football Writer
DENVER Peyton Manning made quick work
of the Philadelphia Eagles in a game that was
billed as fast-break football at its finest.
The Denver Broncos scored more points than
they ever had in their 54-year history on Sunday,
blowing out the Eagles 52-20 behind Manning's
four touchdown throws and two special teams
scores.
With two TD passes each to Demaryius Thom-
as and Wes Welker, Manning completed all but
a-half dozen of his 34 throws for 327 yards. He
didn't even step on the field in the fourth quar-
ter and cooled his cleats on the sideline for a
12-minute stretch in the first half, too.
Ho hum.
Just another day in the life of Manning, whose
16 TD passes are the most in the first month of
a season, besting the previous mark of 14 set by
Don Mere- dith in 1966
and tied by Kurt War-
ner in 1999. Manning also
joined Milt Plum in 1960
as the only quarterbacks
to throw that many touch-
down passes without an interception.
In a game billed as a warp-speed matchup be-
tween teams that like to snap the ball quickly,
Manning got off to a rather slow start but drove
the Broncos (4-0) on a trio of long touchdown
drives in the third quarter to make this one an-
other laugher.
The Eagles also (1-3) surrendered two TDs on
special teams in losing for the third straight time,
all to AFC West opponents: Trindon Holliday's
105-yard kickoff return and Steven Johnson's
SEE NFL I B2


RAYS, RANGERS FINISH



SEASON IN DEAD HEAT

Teams to meet tonight in Texas in all-or-nothing playoff matchup


BEN WALKER
AP Baseball Writer
The Tampa Bay
Rays and Tex-
as Rangers are
pushing this
regular season to
game No. 163.
On a Sunday punctu-
ated by Miami's Hen-
derson Alvarez pitch-
ing a no-hitter, Tampa
Bay and Texas both won
and wound up even,
forcing a tiebreaker for
the second AL wild-
card spot.
The Rays will play at
Texas on Monday night,
with the winner visiting
Cleveland on Wednes-
day night in another
all-or-nothing match-
up.
Rangers rookie Mar-
tin Perez starts against
reigning AL CyYoung
winner David Price.
Texas gets a boost, too
-All-Star slugger Nel-
son Cruz will be active
after his 50-game pen-
alty from Major League
Baseball in the Biogen-
esis drug scandal.
"He's served his sus-
pension," Rays star
Evan Longoria said. "It
is what it is. Justice has
been served."
Asked if he expect-
ed to play, Cruz said: "I
think so."
It will be baseball's
first tiebreaker of-
ficially, this is a regu-
lar-season game and
the stats count since
Minnesota beat Detroit
6-5 in 12 innings for the
2009 AL Central title.
What was supposed
to be the final day of
the regular season be-
gan with the possibili-


FRANK GUNN /THE CANADIAN PRESS
Tampa Rays shortstop Yunel Escobar, left, and first baseman James Loney celebrate after turning
an inning-ending double play during the seventh inning of a baseball game against the Toronto Blue
Jays on Sunday in Toronto. With the win, the Rays finished in a dead heat with the Texas Rangers for
the final American League wild-card position. The two teams will play each other tonight in a single
game to decide who will travel to Cleveland on Wednesday to take on the Indians.


ty of a three-way tie for
a pair of AL wild-card
spots.
Instead, Cleveland
clinched its first post-
season berth since
2007, winning 5-1 at
Minnesota to finish at
92-70 and one game
ahead of Texas and
Tampa Bay as the top
wild card.
Nick Swisher hom-
ered as the Indians
became the first big
league team to win
their final 10 regular-
season games since
Baltimore closed with
11 straight victories in
1971, STATS said.
"I'm telling you, we're
bringing that wild-card
game back to the 216


and that place is going
to be packed out and
rockin', baby!" Swisher
said, citing Cleveland's
area code.
Rookie Danny Sala-
zar is set to start for the
Indians against either
Texas or Tampa Bay.
The NL playoff scene
is settled. Johnny Cue-
to starts for Cincinnati
against Francisco Liria-
no and the Pirates at
Pittsburgh on Tuesday
night in the NL wild-
card playoff.
In the best-of-five di-
vision series, the NL
wild-card winner is at
St. Louis and the Los
Angeles Dodgers start
at Atlanta. The Dodg-
ers will be minus center


fielder Matt Kemp for
the postseason because
of swelling in a bone
in his left ankle, an in-
jury that caused him
to missed 52 in the last
two months.
In the AL, Detroit
opens at Oakland and
the wild card visits Bos-
ton.
Texas won its sev-
enth in a row, downing
the visiting Los Angeles
Angels 6-2. Tampa Bay
held on for a 7-6 win at
Toronto.
To the Rays, this tie-
breaker is a chance for
payback. Texas beat
Tampa Bay in the divi-
sion series in 2010 and
SEE RAYS I B2


Jimmie Johnson wins for record


8th time at Dover International


JAY WAAS /AP
Jimmie Johnson, center, celebrates in Victory Lane after winning a
NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race on Sunday at Dover Interna-
tional Speedway in Dover, Del.


DAN GELSTON
AP Sports Writer
DOVER, Del. Jimmie John-
son held off teammate Dale
Earnhardt Jr. down the stretch
to win for a record eighth time at
Dover International Speedway.
Johnson had shared the mark
of seven wins on the concrete


mile with Bobby Allison and
Richard Petty. Led by Johnson,
the entire top 10 Sunday was
made up of Chase for the Sprint
Cup championship drivers.
"To do anything that Richard
or Bobby has done is quite an ac-
complishment," Johnson said.
Joey Logano, Jeff Gordon and


Kyle Busch rounded out the top
five. Kevin Harvick, Matt Kens-
eth, who won the first two Chase
races, Ryan Newman, Greg Biffle
and Clint Bowyer completed the
top 10.
Earnhardt had one of the fast-
est cars, but he missed pit road
SEE NASCAR I B2


/2

at








LEADING OFF I WINTER OLYMPICS


in Sports Olympic flame readied for relay


DAY


11 XD:L2.

OVERHEARD
"There is no greater privilege than to stand
the spiritual homefo the Olympic Movemet
is the beginning of an epic journey..."

- DMITRY CHERNYSHENKO, chief organizer of Sochi 2


DEREK GATOPOULOS
Associated Press


ANCIENT OLYMPIA, Greece -
-- Using the sun's rays, the Olym-
pic flame lighting for the Winter
J Games in Sochi went off without
a hitch in southern Greece Sun-
.I l day, ahead of its journey across
Russia's nine time zones and
1 even a trip to space before the
:, Feb. 7-23 games.
The ceremony was held with
i actresses dressed as ancient
_- priestesses at the birthplace of
---- the Greek games held in antiq-
uity, with the flame lighting us-
ing a parabolic mirror.
here in Actress Ino Menegaki, in the
nt. This role of high priestess, called out
to the ancient god of the sun,
2014. Apollo, before the flame was lit
and passed to 18-year-old Greek


alpine skier loannis Antoniou.
NHL star Alex Ovechkin will be
the first Russian involved in the
torch relay.
Newly elected International
Olympic Committee President
Thomas Bach was present at
the 20-minute ancient re-enact-
ment, which involved 21 priest-
esses dressed in cream-colored
pleated dresses.
"The Olympic Games... should
inspire the people of the world
and especially the political au-
thorities by showing them that
quarrels and conflicts can be ad-
dressed with peaceful means,"
Bach said before the ceremony.
"I think it will have a very posi-
tive effect on Russia. It will show
a new Russia to the world and
also open up civil society."
Some 2,800 athletes from


more than 80 countries are due
to compete at Sochi.
The Russian leg of the torch
relay is set to cover more than
40,000 miles before the Winter
Games, carrying the torch by
hot-air balloon, dog sled and a
nuclear-powered ice breaker be-
fore its scheduled trip to space
on Nov. 7.
Sochi organizers promised the
torch route would be within an
hour's travel of an estimated 90
percent of Russia's population
"There is no greater privilege
than to stand here in the spiri-
tual home of the Olympic Move-
ment," Dmitry Chernyshenko,
chief organizer of Sochi 2014,
said at Ancient Olympia. "This is
the beginning of an epic journey
for the Olympic Torch, a journey
that will change Russia forever."


SCOREBOARD


NASCAR Sprint Cup-AAA 400 Results
Sunday
At Dover International Speedway
Dover, Del.
Lap length: 1 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (8) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 400 laps, 145.4
rating, 48 points.
2. (1) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 400,126.3,43.
3. (11) Joey Logano, Ford, 400,108.3,41.
4. (16) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 400,110.3,41.
5. (14) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 400,113.8,40.
6. (12) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 400, 91.4,38.
7. (2) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 400,118.3,38.
8. (3) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 400,106.7,37.
9. (19) Greg Biffle, Ford, 400, 93.2,35.
10. (23) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 400, 99.3,35.
11. (7) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 400, 94.4,33.
12. (22) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 400, 82.9, 0.
13. (20) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 399, 79.6,31.
14. (25) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 399, 74.1,30.
15. (10) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 399, 82.7, 29.
16. (24) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 398, 65.9, 28.
17. (15) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 398, 74.8, 27.
18. (21) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 398, 68.5, 26.
19. (29) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 397, 62.6, 25.
20. (18) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 397, 77.3, 24.
21. (9) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 397, 73.5, 23.
22. (5) Aric Almirola, Ford, 397, 68, 22.
23. (13) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 397,
70.7,21.
24. (26) Casey Mears, Ford, 395,57.7,20.
25. (27) David Ragan, Ford, 395,54.6,19.
26. (17) A J Allmendinger, Toyota, 395, 61.3,18.
27. (33) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 394,47.2,0.
28. (39) David Reutimann, Toyota, 394, 49.9,16.
29. (31) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 394,42.8,15.
30. (28) David Gilliland, Ford, 393,52.1,15.
31. (30) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 392,43.9,13.
32. (36) Ryan Truex, Chevrolet, 392, 43.5, 0.
33. (40) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 391,40.4,11.
34. (32) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 390,35.9,10.
35. (4) Carl Edwards, Ford, 385, 74.7,9.
36. (42) Timmy Hill, Ford, 381, 27.8,8.
37. (6) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 355, 82.3, 7.
38. (37) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, suspension,
275,46.6,0.
39. (41) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, suspension, 168,
30.4,0.
40. (43) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, vibration, 154,
28.5,0.
41. (35) Reed Sorenson, Ford, brakes, 139, 28, 0.
42. (38) Josh Wise, Ford, brakes, 128, 26.7, 0.
43. (34) Michael McDowell, Ford, brakes, 107,
32.7,1.
National Football League
All Times EDT
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 3 0 0 1.000 59 34
Miami 3 0 0 1.000 74 53
N.Y Jets 2 2 0 .500 68 88


RAYS
FROM PAGE B1

2011. The Rangers are
hosting this game be-
cause they won the sea-
son series, 4-3.
"We have some-
thing to prove in Texas,"
Longoria said. "We've
left that place too many
times with our heads


NFL
FROM PAGE B1

blocked punt, which he
scooped up himself and
returned for a 17-yard
score.
Matt Prater's 53-yard
field goal capped Den-
ver's 15th straight regular


NASCAR
FROM PAGE B1

and gave up the lead
early in the race. He had
a strong enough No. 88
Chevrolet to get back
into the race and con-
tend for his first win of
the season but couldn't
pass Johnson.
"We left everybody
in the mirror. We were
clicking off some laps,"
Earnhardt said. "But
just not fast enough to
get to Jimmie."
Kenseth kept his
points lead even as he
fell short in trying to


Buffalo

Indianapolis
Tennessee
Houston
Jacksonville

Baltimore
Cleveland
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh

Denver
Kansas City
San Diego
Oakland


Dallas
Philadelphia
Washington
N.Y Giants

New Orleans


2 2 0 .500


South
W L T Pet
3 1 0 .750
3 1 0 .750
2 2 0 .500
0 4 0 .000
North
W L T Pet
2 2 0 .500
2 2 0 .500
2 2 0 .500
0 4 0 .000
West
W L T Pct
4 0 0 1.000
4 0 0 1.000
2 2 0 .500
1 3 0 .250
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pet
2 2 0 .500
1 3 0 .250
1 3 0 .250
0 4 0 .000
South
W L T Pet
3 0 0 1.000


Carolina 1 2 0 .3
Atlanta 1 2 0 .3
Tampa Bay 0 4 0 .(
North
W L T Pet
Detroit 3 1 0 .75C
Chicago 3 1 0 .75C
Green Bay 1 2 0 .333
Minnesota 1 3 0 .25C
West
W L T P
Seattle 4 0 0 1.0(
San Francisco 2 2 0 .5(
Arizona 2 2 0 .5(
St. Louis 1 3 0 .25
Thursday's Game
San Francisco 35, St. Louis 11
Sunday's Games
Kansas City 31, N.Y Giants 7
Seatte 23, Houston 20, OT
Buffalo 23, Baltimore 20
Arizona 13, Tampa Bay 10
Indianapolis 37, Jacksonville 3
Cleveland 17, Cincinnati 6
Detroit 40, Chicago 32
Minnesota 34, Pittsburgh 27
Tennessee 38, N.Y Jets 13
Washington 24, Oakland 14
San Diego 30, Dallas 21
Denver 52, Philadelphia 20
New England at Atlanta,late
Open: Carolina, Green Bay
Today's Game
Miami at New Orleans, 8:40 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 3


88 93
PF PA
105 51
98 69
90 105
31 129
PF PA
91 87
64 70
81 81
69 110
PF PA
179 91
102 41
108 102
71 91


.33
.33
00
ct
0
0
3

ct
)0
O0
O0
50


down and disappoint-
ed. I feel like now is the
time to be able to turn
that page."
The Tigers also are
ready to move on. Al-
varez threw a no-hitter
against the AL Central
champs, and the Mar-
lins won 1-0 on a two-
out wild pitch with the
bases loaded in the bot-
tom of the ninth inning.
Before the wrapup in


season win, which best-
ed the franchise mark of
14 set in 1997-98 and also
broke the previous fran-
chise scoring record of 50
points set against San Di-
ego on Oct. 6,1963.
Only the 1966 Dal-
las Cowboys, with 183
points, scored more
than the Broncos' 179 in


become the first driv-
er to win the first three
Chase races. He holds
an eight-point lead over
Johnson as the Chase
shifts to Kansas.
"I know that 20 is go-
ing to be awfully strong
for the rest of the
stretch," he said.
Johnson dominat-
ed as he usually does
at Dover and led 243 of
the 400 laps to help ex-
tend his Chase record
with his 23rd career win
in 93 starts in NASCAR's
version of the playoffs.
He swept Dover in 2002
and 2009 and won races
in 2005, 2010 and 2012.


Buffalo at Cleveland, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 6
Detroit at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville atSt. Louis, 1 p.m.
New England at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at Miami, 1p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y Giants, 1p.m.
Carolina at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
San Diego at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.
Denver at Dallas, 4:25 p.m.
Houston at San Francisco, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Minnesota, Pittsburgh, Tampa Bay, Washington
Monday, Oct. 7
N.Y Jets at Atlanta, 8:40 p.m.
Alfred Dunhill Links Championship
Leading Scores
Sunday
At St. Andrews and Carnoustie, Scotland
s-St. Andrews (Old Course): 7,305 yards, par-72
c-Carnoustie (Championship Course): 7,412 yards,
par-72
k-Kingsbarns Golf Links: 7,181 yards, par-72
Final round played at Old Course
Purse: $5 million
Howell won on second playoff hole
David Howell 67c-68k-63s-67 265
Peter Uihlein 71c-60k-65s-69 265
Tom Lewis 64k-65s-73c-64 266
Shane Lowry 68k-66s-64c-68 266
Tommy Fleetwood, 65s-66c-69k-67 267
Garth Mulroy 66k-69s-65c-68 268
Chris Wood 66k-69s-69c-65 269
Charl Schwartzel 68c-68k-66s-67 269
Thomas Leve 68s-64c-68k-69 269
Ricardo Gonzalez 67s-69c-63k-70 269
Martin Kaymer 69c-66k-63s-71 269
Morton Madsen 66s-74c-66k-64 270
Bernd Wiesberger 70c-65k-67s-68 270
Darren Clarke 69c-66k-66s-69 270
Hennie Otto 68k-63s-69c-70 270
Chris Paisley 72c-62k-66s-70 270
Scott Jamieson, 70s-68c-63k-68 271
Pablo Larrazabal 70s-68c-63k-70 271
Ernie Els69c-65k-64s-73 271
Also
Padraig Harrington 76c-66k-64s-71 277
Brooks Koepka 69k-66s-70c-73 278
Paul Casey74c-67k-62s-75 278
Major League Soccer
All Times EDT
EASTERN
W L T Pts GF GA
New York 15 9 6 51 47 36
Sporting Kansas City 14 10 6 48 43 29
Montreal 13 9 7 46 48 44
Houston 12 10 8 44 38 37
Philadelphia 11 10 9 42 38 39
New England 11 11 8 41 42 34
Chicago 11 12 7 40 38 45
Columbus 11 14 5 38 36 39


Miami, Detroit manag-
er Jim Leyland said his
team already was look-
ing ahead.
"I want to play this
game, I want to win this
game, but I want to get
this over with and get
home," Leyland said.
"Guys are anxious. They
want to get to the post-
season."
Alvarez sent them on
their way, all right.


their first four games.
Holliday, the former
NCAA track champi-
on who has run sub-
10-second 100-me-
ter dashes, tied his own
franchise record with a
105-yard touchdown re-
turn on a kickoff in the
first half. It was his sixth
TD return in 21 career


Johnson has his sights
set on a bigger piece of
NASCAR history. He's
in the hunt for his sixth
Cup championship,
which would put him
one behind Petty and
Dale Earnhardt Sr. for
most in series history.
He caught a huge
break when Earnhardt
slowed during a green-
flag pit stop and missed
the entrance to pit road.
He went from holding a
3.7-second lead on John-
son to trailing by more
than 9 seconds after he
finally made his stop.
Johnson took the lead
1- and took off. Even


Toronto FC 5 15 11 26 29 45
D.C. 3 21 6 15 20 52
WESTERN
W L T Pts GF GA
Real Salt Lake 15 10 6 51 54 39
Seattle 15 8 5 50 38 28
Portland 11 5 13 46 45 31
Los Angeles 13 10 6 45 46 36
Colorado 12 9 9 45 37 31
Vancouver 11 11 8 41 42 39
San Jose 11 11 8 41 31 41
FC Dallas 10 9 10 40 40 42
ChivasUSA 6 16 8 26 29 54
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
Friday's Games
Philadelphia 1, Sporting Kansas City 0
Saturday's Games
Toronto FC 4, D.C. United 1
Real Salt Lake 1, Vancouver 0
New England 1, Houston 1, tie
Chicago 2, Montreal 2, tie
Sunday's Games
Portland 1, Los Angeles 0
Columbus at FC Dallas, late
New York at Seattle FC, late
San Jose at Chivas USA, late
Friday, Oct. 4
Chicago at D.C. United, 8 p.m.
Montreal at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 5
New England at New York, 7p.m.
Sporting Kansas City at Columbus, 7:30 p.m.
Toronto FC at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
FC Dallas at Real Salt Lake, 9 p.m.
Seattle FC at Colorado, 10 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 6
Chivas USA at Los Angeles, 5 p.m.
Portland at Vancouver, 8 p.m.
Sunday's Sports Transactions
BASEBALL
National League
MIAMI MARLINS Promoted Michael Hill to presi-
dent of baseball operations and Dan Jennings to
general manager.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Reinstated OF Casper
Wells from the 15-day DL and LHP Antonio Bastardo
from the restricted list. Transferred RHP Kyle Kend-
rick to the 60-day DL.
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS Agreed to terms with OF
Hunter Pence on a five-year contract.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS Assigned F Kyle Beach to
HV71 (Sweden).
DALLAS STARS Assigned G Cristopher Nilstorp, C
Travis Morin and RW Colton Sceviour to Texas (AHL).
DETROIT RED WINGS Assigned Fs Mitch Callahan,
Luke Glendening, Calle Jarnkrok, Tomas Jurco, Teemu
Pulkkinen and Riley Sheahan; D Adam Almquist,
Xavier Ouellet and Ryan Sproul; and G Jared Coreau
to Grand Rapids (AHL).


It was the fourth sea-
son-ending no-hit-
ter ever, and first since
Mike Witt of the Angels
threw a perfect game at
Texas in 1984.
"I knew I was pitch-
ing a no-hitter early in
the game, that it was
a gem," Alvarez said
through a translator.
"I really wanted to fin-
ish it."


games.
It oddly worked in
Philadelphia's favor,
keeping Manning on
the sideline for more
than 12 minutes on the
game clock, and Mi-
chael Vick capitalized
on a tiring Denver de-
fense to keep it close -
for a while.


smart pit strategy that
included a late four-tire
stop wasn't enough to
boost Earnhardt past
his Hendrick Motors-
ports teammate.
"The mistake I made
coming on to pit road
and missing pit road
completely (cost us),"
Earnhardt said. "If I
had not given up that
track position and had
a smart enough race
to keep the lead when
it counted, right at the
end we might have won
the race. It would have
been hard to get by us
just like it was hard to
get by Jimmie."


TV2DAY
BOXING
9 p.m.
FS1 Welterweights, Sadam All (16-0-0) VS. Jay Krupp (17-5-1), at Brooklyn, N.Y.
NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE
8:25 p.m.
ESPN -Miami at New Orleans
SOCCER
2:55 p.m.
NBCSN Premier League, Newcastle at Everton


AP FILE PHOTO
Miami Heat coach Erik Spoelstra speaks at a 2012 news
conference in Miami. On Sunday, the Heat signed their head
coach to a multiyear extension.


Heat signs Spoelstra


to mutiyear extension


TIM REYNOLDS
AP Basketball Writer

MIAMI Erik Spoelstra has been with the Mi-
ami Heat for nearly two decades, and their rela-
tionship won't be ending anytime soon.
Spoelstra has signed a multiyear extension to
remain as coach of the two-time defending NBA
champion Heat, the team said Sunday after-
noon. The move comes one day after the Heat an-
nounced several other front-office moves, includ-
ing promoting Andy Elisburg to general manager
and hiring Juwan Howard as an assistant coach.
A person familiar with the talks between the
sides, speaking on condition of anonymity ear-
lier Sunday because the deal had not been an-
nounced, told The Associated Press that the
Heat has never had any intention of letting
Spoelstra go. He had one season remaining on
his existing contract, a deal that the sides agreed
to in 2011.
"I want Spo here for a long, long time," Heat
President Pat Riley said last season.
Spoelstra is 260-134 in his first five seasons
with Miami, going to the playoffs in each of
those years, the NBA finals in each of the last
three and winning the title in 2012 and 2013. His
resume suggests that he's already well on a Hall
of Fame path: Only 12 other men in NBA histo-
ry multiple championships as a coach, and only
seven others have collected rings in back-to-
back years.




When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to
report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches
of recreational and youth leagues can send game results,
statistics, team and action photos, and we'll publish them
in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can
send us individual photos and accomplishments.

Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com



CONTACTS

SPORTS EDITOR or 352-365-8279.
FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Amateur Listings (-
------------- Amateur Listings (col-
FAX 352-365-1951 lege scholarships, meeting
EMAIL announcements, schedule
sports@dailycommercial.com changes, outdoors notices) can
* Schools or coaches can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or
report game results after 6 emailed to sports@dailycom-
p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, mercial.com


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, September 30, 2013





Monday, September 30, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


The skinny on the Big Leagues



BOX SCORES AND RESULTS FOR GAMES ENDING AFTER 10 RM. WILL APPEAR IN OUR NEXT EDITION


AMERICAN LEAGUE
East
GB WCGB LIO
-- 5-5

6 82
12 6 4-6
12 6 5-5
23 17 46
Central
GB WCGB LIO
-- 5-5

1 100
7 5 6-4
27 25 1-9
30 28 3-7
West
GB WCGB L1O
--- 7-3
5 -- 82
18 13 4-6
25 20 4-6
45 40 0-10


x-Atlanta
Washington
New York
Philadelphia
Miami


x-St. Louis
y-Pittsburgh
y-Cincinnati
Milwaukee
Chicago


x-Los Angeles
Arizona
San Diego
San Francisco
Colorado
x-clinched division
y-clinched wild card


w L
97 65
94 68
90 72
74 88
66 96

w L
92 70
81 81
76 86
76 86
72 88


NATIONAL LEAGUE
East
GB WCGB L10
--_ 6-4
10 4 55
22 16 6-4
23 17 2-8
34 28 6-4
Central
GB WCGB L10
-- 8-2
3 73
7 4-6
23 16 6-4
31 24 3-7
West
GB WCGB L10
--_ 5-5
11 9 46
16 14 5-5
16 14 6-4
20 17/2 4-6


Saturday's Games
Texas 7, L.A. Angels 4
Cleveland 5, Minnesota 1
Toronto 7, Tampa Bay 2
Seattle 7, Oakland 5
Baltimore 6, Boston 5
Miami 2, Detroit 1,10 innings
Chicago White Sox 6, Kansas City 5
N.Y. Yankees 2, Houston 1


Sunday's Games
Tampa Bay 7, Toronto 6
Miami 1, Detroit 0
Baltimore 7, Boston 6
Cleveland 5, Minnesota 1
Kansas City 4, Chicago White Sox 1
N.Y. Yankees 5, Houston 1,14 innings
Texas 6, L.A. Angels 2
Oakland 9, Seattle 0
End of Regular Season


Saturday's Games
Pittsburgh 8, Cincinnati 3
San Diego 9, San Francisco 3
Milwaukee 4, N.Y. Mets 2,10 innings
St. Louis 6, Chicago Cubs 2
Miami 2, Detroit 1,10 innings
Philadelphia 5, Atlanta 4
Washington 2, Arizona 0
Colorado 1, L.A. Dodgers 0


Miami 1, Detroit 0
N.Y. Mets 3, Milwaukee 2
Pittsburgh 4, Cincinnati 2
Atlanta 12, Philadelphia 5
St. Louis 4, Chicago Cubs 0
San Francisco 7, San Diego6
Colorado 2, L.A. Dodgers 1
Arizona 3, Washington 2


Sunday's Games






6


End of Regular Season


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Leaders
BATTING-MiCabrera, Detroit, .347; Mauer, Minnesota, .324; Trout, Los Angeles,
.323; ABeltre, Texas, .315; Cano, New York, .313; DOrtiz, Boston, .308.
RUNS-Trout, Los Angeles, 108; MiCabrera, Detroit, 103; CDavis, Baltimore, 103;
AJackson, Detroit, 99; AJones, Baltimore, 99; Crisp, Oakland, 93.
RBI-CDavis, Baltimore, 138; MiCabrera, Detroit, 137; AJones, Baltimore, 108;
Cano, New York, 106; Fielder, Detroit, 106; Encarnacion, Toronto, 104.
HITS-ABeltre, Texas, 196; MiCabrera, Detroit, 191; Pedroia, Boston, 190; Mach-
ado, Baltimore, 189; Trout, Los Angeles, 189; Cano, New York, 188; Hosmer,
Kansas City, 187.
DOUBLES-Machado, Baltimore, 51; Lowrie, Oakland, 44; CDavis, Baltimore,
42; Pedroia, Boston, 42; Cano, New York, 40; Saltalamacchia, Boston, 40; Al-
Ramirez, Chicago, 39; Trout, Los Angeles, 39.
HOME RUNS-CDavis, Baltimore, 53; MiCabrera, Detroit, 44; Encarnacion, To-
ronto, 36; Trumbo, Los Angeles, 34; ADunn, Chicago, 33; AJones, Baltimore, 33.
STOLEN BASES-Ellsbury, Boston, 52; RDavis, Toronto, 45; Rios, Texas, 42; An-
drus, Texas, 41; LMartin, Texas, 36; Altuve, Houston, 35; JDyson, Kansas City,
33; Trout, Los Angeles, 33.
PITCHING-Scherzer, Detroit, 21-3; Colon, Oakland, 18-6; CWilson, Los Angeles,
17-7; MMoore, Tampa Bay, 16-4; Tillman, Baltimore, 16-7; Lester, Boston, 15-8;
Guthrie, Kansas City, 15-12.
ERA-AniSanchez, Detroit, 2.64; Colon, Oakland, 2.65; Iwakuma, Seattle, 2.66;
Darvish, Texas, 2.82; Scherzer, Detroit, 2.90; FHernandez, Seattle, 3.04; Sale,
Chicago, 3.07.
STRIKEOUTS-Darvish, Texas, 269; Scherzer, Detroit, 240; Sale, Chicago, 226;
FHernandez, Seattle, 216; Verlander, Detroit, 207; Shields, Kansas City, 196;
AniSanchez, Detroit, 194.
SAVES-JiJohnson, Baltimore, 48; GHolland, Kansas City, 46; MRivera, New York,
44; Nathan, Texas, 43; AReed, Chicago, 39; Balfour, Oakland, 38; Frieri, Los
Angeles, 37.


TONY AVELAR / AP

Cleveland Indians starting pitcher Ubaldo Jimenez (30) delivers to the Minnesota Twins
during the first inning on Sunday in Minneapolis.


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Leaders
BATTING-Cuddyer, Colorado, .333; CJohnson, Atlanta, .324; MCarpenter, St.
Louis, .321; Werth, Washington, .319; FFreeman, Atlanta, .317; McCutchen,
Pittsburgh, .317; YMolina, St. Louis, .316.
RUNS-MCarpenter, St. Louis, 126; Choo, Cincinnati, 106; Goldschmidt, Arizona,
103; Holliday, St. Louis, 102; Votto, Cincinnati, 100; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 96.
RBI-Goldschmidt, Arizona, 124; Bruce, Cincinnati, 107; FFreeman, Atlanta, 107;
BPhillips, Cincinnati, 102; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 100.
HITS-MCarpenter, St. Louis, 199; DanMurphy, New York, 185; McCutchen, Pitts-
burgh, 183; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 180; Votto, Cincinnati, 176.
DOUBLES-MCarpenter, St. Louis, 55; YMolina, St. Louis, 43; GParra, Arizona, 43;
Bruce, Cincinnati, 42; Rizzo, Chicago, 39; Desmond, Washington, 38; McCutchen,
Pittsburgh, 38; DanMurphy, New York, 38.
HOME RUNS-Goldschmidt, Arizona, 36; PAIvarez, Pittsburgh, 35; Bruce, Cincin-
nati, 30; DBrown, Philadelphia, 27; CGonzalez, Colorado, 26; Pence, San Fran-
cisco, 26; JUpton, Atlanta, 26; Zimmerman, Washington, 26.
STOLEN BASES-Segura, Milwaukee, 44; EYoung, New York, 44; SMarte, Pitts-
burgh, 41; ECabrera, San Diego, 37; CGomez, Milwaukee, 37.
PITCHING-Zimmermann, Washington, 19-9; Wainwright, St. Louis, 18-9; JDe La
Rosa, Colorado, 16-6; Liriano, Pittsburgh, 16-8; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 16-9; Gre-
inke, Los Angeles, 15-3; SMiller, St. Louis, 15-9; Lynn, St. Louis, 15-10.
ERA-Kershaw, Los Angeles, 1.83; Femrnandez, Miami, 2.19; Harvey, New York,
2.27; Greinke, Los Angeles, 2.67; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 2.77; CILee, Phila-
delphia, 2.87; Ryu, Los Angeles, 2.97.
STRIKEOUTS-Kershaw, Los Angeles, 232; CILee, Philadelphia, 222; Wainwright,
St. Louis, 214; Samardzija, Chicago, 210; AJBurnett, Pittsburgh, 209; Hamels,
Philadelphia, 202; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 199; HBailey, Cincinnati, 199.
SAVES-Kimbrel, Atlanta, 50; RSoriano, Washington, 42; AChapman, Cincinnati,
38; Romo, San Francisco, 38; Mujica, St. Louis, 37; Cishek, Miami, 34; Street,
San Diego, 33; Grilli, Pittsburgh, 33; Gregg, Chicago, 33.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Rays 7, Blue Jays 6
Tampa Bay Toronto
ab r h bi ab r h bi
DeJesscf-lf 5 0 0 0 Reyesss 4 1 2 1
WMyrsrf 4 1 2 1 Gosecf 4 0 2 1
Loneylb 4 1 1 1 Lawrie3b 3 1 2 1
Longori3b 4 1 1 1 Sierrarf 3 1 1 0
Zobrist2b 4 0 0 0 DeRosadh 3 1 2 2
DYongdh 3 1 2 1 Lindph-dh 2 0 1 0
Joycel If 3 1 0 0 ERogrspr 0 0 0 0
Fuldcf 0 0 0 0 Lngrhnlb 4 1 1 0
Loatonc 4 1 1 2 Arenciic 2 0 0 1
YEscorss 4 1 2 1 Kawskph 1 0 0 0
Thole c 1 0 0 0
Goins2b 5 0 0 0
Pillar If 4 1 1 0
Totals 35 7 9 7 Totals 36 6 12 6
Tampa Bay 600 100 000 7
Toronto 000 003 120 6
DP-Tampa Bay 2. LOB-Tampa Bay 3, Toronto 11.
2B-W.Myers 2 (23), Longoria (38), Lobaton (15), Law-
rie (18), DeRosa (12). SF-Arencibia.
IP H R ER BB SO
Tampa Bay
M.MooreW,174 51/3 6 3 3 3 4
McGee 1 2 1 1 1 0
Jo.Peralta H,41 1/3 1 2 2 2 1
RodneyS,37-45 11/3 3 0 0 1 2
Toronto
RedmondL,4-3 2/3 4 5 5 1 1
Wagner 2 2 1 1 1 2
L.Perez 1 1 1 1 0 1
Jenkins 1/3 1 0 0 0 0
Jeffress 2 1 0 0 0 2
Oliver 1 0 0 0 0 2
Delabar 1 0 0 0 0 0
S.Santos 1 0 0 0 0 2
Umpires-Home, Paul Schrieber; First, Jeff Kellogg;
Second, Eric Cooper; Third, Chad Fairchild.
T-3:22. A-44,551 (49,282).
Yankees 5, Astros 1,14 innings
New York Houston
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Nunez3b 7 2 3 2 Villarss 6 1 1 0
JMrphyc 7 0 1 1 Altuve2b 5 0 0 0
Grndrscf 7 0 2 1 MDmn3b 6 0 1 1
V.Wellslf 6 0 0 0 Carter ib 4 0 0 0
MrRynll b 6 1 1 1 JDMrtn rf 5 0 1 0
Overaylb 0 0 0 0 B.Lairddh 4 0 0 0
Hafnerdh 4 0 0 0 Wallacph-dh 1 0 0 0
DAdms2b 6 0 1 0 Crowecf 5 0 0 0
Ryanss 6 1 2 0 Corprnc 5 0 1 0
ZAImntrf 6 1 2 0 Elmorelf 2 0 0 0
Totals 55 5 12 5 Totals 46 1 4 1
New York 000 000 010 000 04 5
Houston 100 000 000 000 00 1
E-Villar (16). LOB-New York 10, Houston 5.2B-
Nunez 2 (17), Granderson (13), Villar (9). 3B-D.Ad-
ams (1). HR-Mar.Reynolds (21).
IP H R ER BB SO
New York
Huff 5 3 1 1 0 7
B.Marshall 2 1 0 0 1 3
Betances 2 1/30 0 0 0 4
Claiborne 2/3 0 0 0 0 1
D.Phelps 1 0 0 0 1 2
DaleyW,1-O 2 0 0 0 0 2
D.Robertson 1 0 0 0 0 0
Houston
Bedard 7 3 0 0 0 9
ZeidH,6 2/3 1 1 1 0 2
K.Chapman BS,34 0 1 0 0 0 0
R.Cruz 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
Fields 1 1 0 0 0 1
HarrellL,6-17 42/3 5 4 4 0 4
DeLeon 1/3 1 0 0 0 0
K.Chapman pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP-by Bedard (Hafner, Hafner). WP-De Leon.
Umpires-Home, Bill Miller; First, Gary Cederstrom;
Second, Kerwin Danley; Third, Vic Carapazza.
T-3:52. A-40,542 (42,060).
Royals 4, White Sox 1
Kansas City Chicago
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Loughlf 5 0 1 0 DeAzalf 4 0 1 0
GiavlI2b 3 1 2 0 AIRmrzss 3 1 2 1
S.Perezlb 4 1 3 2 Konerklb 1 0 0 0
BButlerdh 4 0 0 0 Gillaspilb 3 0 0 0
LCaincf 4 0 0 0 AGarcirf 4 0 1 0
MaxwIlrf 3 1 0 0 JrDnkscf 3 0 0 0
Hayesc 4 1 1 2 Viciedodh 3 0 1 0
Ciriacoss 4 0 1 0 GBckh2b 3 0 1 0
Falu3b 4 0 1 0 Semien3b 4 0 0 0
Pheglyc 3 0 0 0
Totals 35 4 9 4 Totals 31 1 6 1
Kansas City 000 200 200 4
Chicago 000 100 000 1
E-S.Perez (8). DP-Kansas City 2, Chicago 1. LOB-
Kansas City 7, Chicago 7.2B-Giavotella (3). HR-S.
Perez (13), Hayes (1), AI.Ramirez (6).
IP H R ER BB SO
Kansas City


B.ChenW,94 62/3 4 1 1 3 4
K.Herrera H,20 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
HochevarH,9 1 0 0 0 0 2
G.HollandS,47-50 1 2 0 0 1 2
Chicago
QuintanaL,9-7 7 6 4 4 2 4
Petricka 1 1 0 0 1 1
Troncoso 1 2 0 0 0 0
Umpires-Home, Chris Conroy; First, Gary Darling;
Second, Jerry Meals; Third, Paul Emmel.
T-2:34. A-22,633 (40,615).
Rangers 6, Angels 2
Los Angeles Texas
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Shuck dh 4 0 2 0 Kinsler2b 4 0 1 1
Aybarss 4 1 1 0 Andrusss 4 0 0 0
Troutcf 3 1 1 1 Riosrf 4 0 1 0
JHmltnhlf 4 0 1 1 ABeltre3b 4 2 2 1
HKndrc2b 4 0 0 0 Przynsdh 4 1 2 0
Calhonrf 3 0 1 0 G.Sotoc 3 2 2 2
Trumolb 3 0 0 0 Morlndlb 4 0 0 0
Congerc 2 0 0 0 Gentry If 3 1 2 2
Cowgillph 1 0 0 0 LMartncf 2 0 0 0
Totals 31 2 7 2 Totals 32 6 10 6
Los Angeles 100 001 000 2
Texas 000 021 12x 6
E-Vargas (1). DP-Los Angeles 1, Texas 3. LOB-Los
Angeles 4, Texas 5.2B-Rios (32), Pierzynski (24),
G.Soto (9). HR-Trout (27), A.Beltre (30), G.Soto (9).
SB-Calhoun (2), Gentry 2 (24). S-L.Martn.
IP H R ER BB SO
Los Angeles
VargasL,9-8 61/3 7 4 3 2 4
J.Guterrez 1/3 1 0 0 0 0
D.DeLaRosa 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
Frieri 1 2 2 2 0 2
Texas
Darvish 52/3 4 2 2 2 8
CottsW,8-3BS,34 1/3 1 0 0 0 1
R.RossH,16 1 1 0 0 0 2
Scheppers H,27 1 1 0 0 0 0
Nathan 1 0 0 0 0 0
Umpires-Home, Alfonso Marquez; First, Ted Barrett;
Second, Mike DiMuro; Third, Scott Barry.
T-2:57. A-40,057 (48,114).
Athletics 9, Mariners 0
Oakland Seattle
ab r hbi ab r hbi
CYoungcf 3 1 1 2 BMillerss 4 0 2 0
Choicecf-rf 2 0 0 0 Frnkln2b 3 0 0 0
S.Smithlf 5 2 3 1 Seager3b 3 0 1 0
Dnldsn3b 0 0 0 0 KMorlsdh 3 0 0 0
JWeekspr-2b-cf 4 1 1 0 Ibanezl If 4 0 0 0
Mossdh 2 0 1 1 AAImntlf 0 0 0 0
Vogtph-dh 2 1 0 0 Smoak Ib 3 0 1 0
Callasp2b-3b 3 1 1 1 MSndrsrf 4 0 0 0
Reddckrf 3 1 1 1 Zuninoc 4 0 0 0
Parrino ss 20 1 1 Ackleycf 4 0 1 0
DNorrs c-lb 4 1 0 0
Barton Ib 21 1 2
KSuzukc 10 0 0
Sogard ss-2b 4 0 0 0
Totals 37 9 10 9 Totals 32 0 5 0
Oakland 040 040 001 9
Seattle 000 000 000 0
LOB-Oakland 7, Seattle 9.2B-S.Smith 2 (27), Moss
(23), Reddick (19), Parrino (2).
IP H R ER BB SO
Oakland
GrayW,5-3 5 3 0 0 3 8
J.Chavez 1 0 0 0 0 2
Figueroa 2/3 1 0 0 0 0
Otero 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
Cook 1 0 0 0 1 0
Balfour 1 1 0 0 0 0
Seattle
E.Ramirez L,5-3 11/3 3 4 4 4 3
Noesi 3 4 4 4 1 2
LaFromboise 22/3 1 0 0 0 3
Capps 1 0 0 0 0 0
Wilhelmsen 1 2 1 1 1 1
WP-Wilhelmsen.
Umpires-Home, Marvin Hudson; First, Jerry Layne;
Second, Hunter Wendelstedt; Third, Alan Porter.
T-3:08. A-17,081 (47,476).


Bourn cf 5
Stubbs cf 0
Swisher lb 5
Kipnis 2b 4
CSanth dh 5
Raburn rf 4
MCarsn rf 0
AsCarr ss 3
Brantly If 4
YGoms c 3
Aviles3b 4
Totals 37
Cleveland
Minnesota


Indians 5, Twins 1
Cleveland Minnesota
b r h bi ab r h bi
5 1 2 0 Presleycf 3 0 1 0
) 0 0 0 Dozier2b 3 0 1 0
5 1 2 2 Plouffe3b 4 0 0 0
1 1 2 0 Doumritdh 4 0 0 0
5 1 1 1 Parmellb 4 0 0 0
1 1 1 0 CHrmnrf 4 1 1 0
) 0 0 0 Thomslf 4 0 1 0
3 0 1 0 Fryerc 3 0 1 1
1 0 0 0 Rormnss 2 0 0 0
3 0 1 1 Colaellph 1 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 Bernierss 0 0 0 0
7 5 10 4 Totals 32 1 5 1
200 002 100 5
000 000 100 1


E-Plouffe (13), Rorimon (18), Diamond (2).


LOB-Cleveland 8, Minnesota 6.2B-Swisher (27),
C.Santana (39). HR-Swisher (22). SB-Kipnis (30),
Presley (1). CS-Bourn (12). S-As.Cabrera. SF-Y
Gomes.
IP H R ER BB SO
Cleveland
U.JimenezW,13-9 62/3 5 1 1 1 13
Rzepczynski H,6 2/3 0 0 0 0 1
Masterson 12/3 0 0 0 0 2
Minnesota
Diamond L,6-13 6 7 4 2 0 3
Tonkin 1 1 1 1 1 0
Fien 1 0 0 0 0 2
Duensing 1 2 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Masterson (Dozier). WP-Duensing.
Umpires-Home, Greg Gibson; First, Brian Gorman;
Second, Tony Randazzo; Third, Larry Vanover.
T-2:48. A-30,935 (39,021).
Orioles 7, Red Sox 6
Boston Baltimore
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Ellsurycf 5 1 2 1 BRortsdh 4 1 1 0
Bogartsss 4 0 0 0 Markksrf 3 1 1 0
D.Ortizdh 5 2 2 0 Hardyss 5 1 1 2
Napolilb 4 0 2 1 C.Davislb 0 0 0 0
BrdlyJrpr 0 0 0 0 Rahrtylb 3 1 2 2
Carp If 5 0 2 1 Pearcelf 2 0 0 0
Mdlrks3b 5 0 0 0 McLothcf 4 0 1 2
SItmchc 2 1 1 0 Valenci3b 4 0 1 0
Lvrnwyph-c 2 0 0 0 Clevngrc 4 1 1 0
JMcDnl2b 2 1 2 0 Schoop2b 4 2 2 0
Totals 39 6 13 5 Totals 33 7 10 6
Boston 220 100 001 6
Baltimore 000 052 OOx 7
E-Clevenger (1). DP-Boston 1, Baltimore 1. LOB-
Boston 9, Baltimore 8. 2B-Napoli (38), Carp (18),
B.Roberts (12), Markakis (24), Hardy (27), Raherty
(11), McLouth (31). HR-Ellsbury (9), Berry (1). SB-
Berry (3).
IP H R ER BB SO
Boston
Webster 3 0 0 0 3 2
Doubront 11/3 5 5 5 3 2
R.De La Rosa L,0-2 2/3 1 1 1 0 0
Thornton 1/3 1 1 1 0 0
Dempster 2/3 1 0 0 0 0
Breslow 1 1 0 0 0 1
Uehara 1 1 0 0 0 1
Baltimore
Tillman 5 8 5 4 1 5
McFarlandW,4-1 1 1 0 0 2 0
HammelH,1 2 1 0 0 0 2
Ji.JohnsonS,50-59 1 3 1 1 0 1
R.De La Rosa pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
WP-Thornton, Tillman, Ji.Johnson.
Umpires-Home, Brian O'Nora; First, RFieldin Culbreth;
Second, Adrian Johnson; Third, Bill Welke.
T-3:23. A-44,230 (45,971).
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Pirates 4, Reds 2


Pie cf
Tabata If
Lambo If
Snider rf
PAIvrz3b
GSnchz 3b
Buckc
GJones lb
Mercer ss
JHrrsn 2b
Cumptn p
Pimnr p
JGomz p
TSnchz ph
Frnswr p
Totals


Pittsburgh
ab r h bi
5 0 0 0
3 1 2 0
2 0 1 0
5 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
4 0 1 1
4 1 1 1
4 2 3 1
4 0 2 1
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
34 4 10 4


Pittsburgh 110 1(
Cincinnati 000 0(


h Cincinnati
ab r h bi
Choocf 2 0 0 0
BHmltncf 10 0 0
Ludwcklf 2 0 0 0
Paul If 1 0 0 0
Dukep 0 0 0 0
Votto lb 2 0 0 0
N.Sotolb 2 0 0 0
Brucerf 10 0 0
Heiseypr-rf 2 0 1 0
Frazier3b 2 0 0 0
Hannhn3b 2 0 0 0
Cozartss 2 0 1 0
HRdrgzpr-2b 2 0 0 0
Mesorcc 2 0 0 0
Partchp 0 0 0 0
Totals 30 2 6 2
)0 010 4
)0 020 2


E-Cozart (15). DP-Pittsburgh 2, Cincinnati 2. LOB-
Pittsburgh 8, Cincinnati 4.2B-Cozart (30), C.lzturis
(8), C.Miller (5). 3B-Mercer (2). HR-G.Jones (15),
Mercer (8). S-Cumpton 2, B.Hamilton.
IP H R ER BB SO
Pittsburgh
CumptonW,2-1 5 2 0 0 1 3
PimentelH,1 2 0 0 0 0 1
J.Gomez 1 3 2 2 1 0
Farnsworth S,2-2 1 1 0 0 0 1
Cincinnati
G.Reynolds L,1-3 5 7 3 3 1 4
Partch 2 0 0 0 1 1
Christiani 1 2 1 1 0 0
Duke 1 1 0 0 0 1
HBP-by G.Reynolds (PAIvarez).
Umpires-Home, Mike Winters; First, Laz Diaz; Sec-
ond, Mark Wegner; Third, Tim Timmons.
T-2:53. A-40,142 (42,319).
Mets 3, Brewers 2


Milwaukee New York
ab r h bi ab r h b
Aokirf 3 0 0 0 EYonglf 4 1 1 :
Bianchiss 4 0 1 0 Dudalb 3 0 0
Lucroyc 4 1 2 0 Germnp 0 0 0
CGomzcf 3 1 1 0 Blackp 0 0 0
YBtncr3b 3 0 0 0 JuTrnrph 1 0 0
Haltonib 3 0 0 1 Frncscp 0 0 0
ArRmrph 1 0 0 0 DWrght3b 2 0 0 :
LSchfrlf 3 0 1 1 DnMrp2b 3 0 1 1
Gennett2b 3 0 1 0 Baxterrf 3 0 0
Estradp 2 0 0 0 Lagarscf 3 1 0 1


Gindlph 1 0 0
Kintzlrp 0 0 0
Totals 30 2 6
Milwaukee 000
New York 100
E-Bianchi (10), Lucroy
1. LOB-Milwaukee 4, N
(40), E.Young 2 (46), D
SF-D.Wright.

Milwaukee
Estrada
Kintzler L,3-3 BS,4-4
New York
Niese
Germen
Black W,3-0
FFrancisco S,1-1
Umpires-Home, D.J. Re
ond, Dale Scott; Third,
T-2:23. A-41,891 (41
Diamondba
Wash
ab r h
Koerns If 4 0 0
Rendon3b 3 0 2
Hairstnrf 4 0 0
TMoorelb 4 1 1
ZWltrs ss 4 1 1
Lmrdzz2b 4 0 2
JSolanoc 4 0 0
EPerezcf 3 0 1
Leonph 1 0 0
Roarkp 3 0 1
Matthsp 0 0 0
XCedenp 0 0 0
CBrwnph 1 0 0
Totals 35 2 8
Washington 000
Arizona 100


C.Jimenez
De Fratus
Savery
Cloyd
Atlanta
Teheran W,14-8
Avilan H,27
Ayala
A.Wood
D.Carpenter
Kmbrel
WP-C.Jimenez.


0 Centen c 3 0 1 0 Umpires-Home, Mike Everitt; First, Tim Welke; Sec-
0 dnDkkr pr 0 1 0 0 ond, Dan Bellino; Third, Bruce Dreckman.
2 Totals 27 3 3 2 T-3:27. A-42,194 (49,586).
200 000 2 Giants 7, Padres 6
000 02x 3 San Diego San Francisco
(10), Black (1). DP-New York ab r h bi ab r h bi
New York 2. SB-C.Gomez Denorfi cf-rf 5 1 3 0 GBlanc cf-lf 2 2 0 0
an.Murphy (23). S-Tovar. JGzmn If 3 1 0 0 FPegur If 1 1 1 1
Forsythlf 0 0 0 0 Abreu2b 5 2 2 0
IP H R ER BB SO Gyorko2b 4 1 1 4 Beltilb 3 1 2 2
Headly3b 2 1 0 0 Poseyc 3 0 1 0
7 2 1 1 0 8 Medicalb 4 0 1 1 Pencerf 5 0 2 3
1 1 2 0 0 0 Kotsayrf 4 0 0 0 Sandovl3b 4 0 2 1
Fuentscf 0 0 0 0 BCrwfrss 2 0 0 0
6 6 2 2 2 2 Hundlyc 4 1 1 1 Adrianzss 2 0 1 0
1 00 0 0 2 Amarstss 3 1 0 0 J.Perezlf 3 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 1 0 TRossp 3 0 0 0 Paganph-cf 1 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 0 2 Stauffrp 0 0 0 0 Moscosp 1 0 0 0
ey ;r st C r c Vincentp 0 0 0 0 Dunnngp 0 0 0 0
yburn; First, CBBucknor; Sec Grgrsnp 000 0 Kschncph 1 0 0 0
,Todd Tichenor. Venaleph 1 0 1 0 Kontosp 0 0 0 0
922). .Alonso pr 0 0 0 0 Monell ph 0 1 0 0
cks3, Nationals 2 Streetp 0 0 0 0 Hemrep 0 0 0 0
ington Arizona Totals 33 6 7 6 Totals 34 7 11 7
bi ab r h bi San Diego 001 140 000 6
0 Blmqstss 4 1 1 0 San Francisco 100 110 202 7
10 Eaton If 3 1 1 0
0 GIdsch lb 3 0 1 1 No outs when winning run scored.
0 Cadsnh l 0 1 1 L E-Hundley (10), Sandoval (18). DP-San Diego 1,
0 Campn pr 0 1 0 0 San Francisco 2. LOB-San Diego 4, San Francisco
1 Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 10. 2B-Denorfia (21), Medica (2), Abreu (12), Belt 2
1 Prado 3b 4 0 2 1 (39). 3B-Venable (8). HR-Gyorko (23), Hundley (13),
0 APoHllock cf 4 0 1 10 FPeguero (1). SB-G.Blanco (14). CS-Headley (4).
.O0Pollock cf 4 0 1 1 H E B
0 GParrarf 4 0 1 0 IP H R ER BB SO
0 Gswschc 3 0 0 0 San Diego
0 Mileyp 2 0 0 0 TRoss 6 7 3 3 1 7
0 Nievesph 1 0 0 0 StaufferH,7 2/3 0 2 2 2 0
0 DHrndzp 0 0 0 0 VincentH,10 1/3 1 0 0 0 0
2 Totals 31 3 7 3 GregersonH,25 1 0 0 0 0 1


002 000 -
000 02x -


E-Roark (1), Rendon (16), Bloomquist (1), Prado
(10). DP-Arizona 2. LOB-Washington 7, Arizona 7.
3B-Z.Walters (1). SB-Lombardozzi (4). S-Eaton.
SF-Goldschmidt.
IP H R ER BB SO
Washington
Roark 7 3 1 0 1 3
Mattheus L,0-2 BS,3-3 2/3 4 2 2 0 1
X.Cedeno 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
Arizona
Miley 7 8 2 1 1 2
D.HernandezW,5-6 1 0 0 0 0 1
ZieglerS,13-15 1 0 0 0 0 2
Braves 12, Phillies 5
Philadelphia Atlanta
ab r h bi ab r h bi
CHrndzcf 5 0 1 1 Heywrdcf-rf 4 1 0 0
Rollinsss 4 0 0 0 J.Uptonrf-lf 5 0 1 0
Utley2b 4 1 2 0 FFrmnlb 5 2 2 1
DBrwnl If 3 1 1 0 Trdslvclb 0 0 0 0
DeFrtsp 0 0 0 0 Gattisl If 5 2 3 2
Saveryp 0 0 0 0 BUptoncf 0 0 0 0
Mayrryph 10 0 0 G.Lairdc 4 4 4 0
Cloydp 0 0 0 0 Smmnsss 4 3 3 1
Frndsnlb 4 1 1 1 Janishss 0 0 0 0
Asche3b 0 0 0 0 EIJhns3b 3 0 2 5
Galvis3b 4 0 1 0 Uggla2b 2 0 0 0
Kratzc 3 2 1 3 Tehern p 2 0 1 0
Berndnrf 4 0 1 0 Constnzph 1 0 1 2
Miner p 10 1 0 Avilanp 0 0 0 0
JCRmrp 10 0 0 RJhnsnph 0 0 0 0
CJimnzp 0 0 0 0 Ayalap 0 0 0 0
Mrthzl If 2 0 1 0 A.Woodp 0 0 0 0
Totals 36 5 10 5 Totals 36 12 17 11
Philadelphia 000 400 100 5
Atlanta 302 023 02x 12
E-C.Hernandez 2 (6), Uggla (14). DP-Philadelphia
3, Atlanta 2. LOB-Philadelphia 5, Atlanta 10. 2B-
Simmons 2 (27). 3B-EI.Johnson (2). HR-Kratz (9),
Gattis (21). SB-Simmons (6). CS-EI.Johnson (2).
SF-EI.Johnson.
IP H R ER BB SO
Philadelphia
MinerL,0-2 21/3 7 5 5 3 1
J.C.Ramirez 21/3 4 2 2 2 2


StreetL,2-5 BS,2-35 0 3 2 2 2 0
San Francisco
Moscoso 41/3 4 5 5 4 4
Dunning 2/3 1 1 1 0 0
Kontos 2 1 0 0 0 1
Hembree 2/3 0 0 0 0 1
Zito 1/3 0 0 0 0 1
RomoW,5-8 1 1 0 0 0 1
Street pitched to 5 batters in the 9th.
HBP-by Stauffer (Monell), by TRoss (Belt). WP-
Street, Moscoso. PB-Hundley.
Umpires-Home, Quinn Wolcott; First, Andy Retcher;
Second, Rob Drake; Third, Joe West.
T-3:17. A-41,495 (41,915).
Rockies 2, Dodgers 1
Colorado Los Angeles
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Blckmncf 4 1 2 1 Puigrf 2 0 0 0
Rutledg2b 4 0 1 0 Capuanp 0 0 0 0
Heltonib 4 0 1 0 Buteralb 1 0 0 0
Tlwtzkss 4 0 1 1 Crwfrdlf 2 0 0 0
Cuddyrrf 5 0 1 0 Nolascop 0 0 0 0
Arenad3b 4 0 0 0 ACstnsph-rf 2 0 0 0
Culersnlf 3 1 1 0 MYongss-3b 3 0 0 0
Pachecc 4 0 2 0 AdGnzllb 3 0 0 0
Francis p 1 0 1 0 Withrwp 0 0 0 0
JHerrrph 1 0 1 0 DGordnss 1 0 0 0
Oswaltp 0 0 0 0 M.Ellis2b 3 1 1 0
Ottavinp 0 0 0 0 Uribe3b 3 0 1 0
RWhelrph 1 0 0 0 BWilsnp 0 0 0 0
Bettsp 0 0 0 0 Howellp 0 0 0 0
Brothrsp 0 0 0 0 Jansenp 0 0 0 0
Bussph 0 0 0 0
A.Ellisc 2 0 1 0
Fdrwczc 2 0 0 0
Schmkrcf 4 0 1 1
Ryup 1 0 0 0
VnSlyklf 2 0 1 0
Totals 35 2 11 2 Totals 31 1 5 1
Colorado 100 100 000 2
Los Angeles 000 010 000 1
DP-Colorado 1, Los Angeles 2. LOB-Colorado 12,
Los Angeles 7.2B-Francis (1), A.Ellis (17). SB-Rut
ledge (12). CS-Van Slyke (1). S-Francis.
IP H R ER BB SO
Colorado


FrancisW,3-5 5 3 1 1 2 6
OswaltH,1 1 0 0 0 0 1
OttavinoH,8 1 0 0 0 0 2
BettsH,3 1 1 0 0 0 1
Brothers S,19-21 1 1 0 0 2 3
Los Angeles
RyuL,14-8 4 8 2 2 1 4
Nolasco 1 1 0 0 0 1
Capuano 1 2 0 0 0 1
Withrow 1 0 0 0 1 1
B.Wilson 1/3 0 0 0 1 1
Howell 2/3 0 0 0 0 0
Jansen 1 0 0 0 2 2
PB-Pacheco.
Umpires-Home, Bob Davidson; First, John Hirsch-
beck; Second, James Hoye; Third, Jim Reynolds.
T-3:08. A-52,396 (56,000).
Cardinals 4, Cubs 0
Chicago St. Louis
ab r h bi ab r h bi
StCastrss 4 0 0 0 MCrpnt3b 4 0 0 0
Watkns2b 4 0 1 0 Jaycf 3 1 2 1
Rizzolb 4 0 1 0 Beltranrf 2 0 0 0
Schrhltrf 3 0 2 0 Chamrsrflf 2 0 0 0
DMcDnph 1 0 1 0 MAdmslb 4 1 2 0
Sweenycf 4 0 0 0 YMolinc 0 0 0 0
DMrph3b 2 0 0 0 TCruzc 4 0 1 1
Bogsvclf 3 0 0 0 Descalsss 3 1 1 1
Boscanc 3 0 0 0 Kozmaph-ss 1 0 0 0
Smrdzjp 2 0 0 0 SRonsnlfrf 3 0 1 1
HRndnp 0 0 0 0 Wong2b 3 0 1 0
Lakeph 1 0 0 0 Westrkp 0 0 0 0
Stropp 0 0 0 0 J.Kellyp 2 1 1 0
Rosscpp 0 0 0 0 Choatep 0 0 0 0
BPtrsnph 0 0 0 0
CMrthzp 0 0 0 0
Siegristp 0 0 0 0
Totals 31 0 5 0 Totals 31 4 9 4
Chicago 000 000 000 0
St. Louis 001 200 Olx 4
DP-Chicago 1, St. Louis 1. LOB-Chicago 5, St. Louis
5.2B-Watkins (1), Rizzo (40), Schierholtz 2 (32),
Ma.Adams (14), T.Cruz (6), Descalso (25), J.Kelly
(1). CS-Jay (5).
IP H R ER BB SO
Chicago
Samardzija L,8-13 6 8 3 3 0 4
H.Rondon 1 0 0 0 1 2
Strop 2/3 1 1 1 1 1
Rosscup 1/3 0 0 0 0 1
St. Louis
Westbrook 1 1 0 0 0 0
J.KellyW,lO-5 51/3 3 0 0 0 5
ChoateH,15 2/3 0 0 0 0 0
Ca.Martnez H,3 1 0 0 0 0 0
Siegrist 1 1 0 0 0 0
HBP-by J.Kelly (Do.Murphy).
Umpires-Home, Dan lassogna; First, Gerry Davis;
Second, Brian Knight; Third, Mark Carlson.
T-2:34. A-44,808 (43,975).

INTERLEAGUE
Marlins 1, Tigers 0
Detroit Miami
ab r h bi ab r h bi
D.Kellycf 4 0 0 0 Pierrelf 4 0 1 0
Dirks rf 3 0 0 0 Lucas2b 4 0 1 0
Fielder Ib 1 0 0 0 Ruggincf 4 0 1 0
Tuiassplb 2 0 0 0 Stantonrf 4 1 1 0
JhPerltlf-ss 3 0 0 0 Morrsnlb 4 0 1 0
Infante 2b 2 0 0 0 Hchvrrss 4 0 0 0
HPerez2b 1 0 0 0 Coghln3b 2 0 1 0
B.Penac 3 0 0 0 K.Hillc 3 0 0 0
Iglesiasss 2 0 0 0 Dobbs ph 0 0 0 0
NCstnslf 1 0 0 0 HAIvrzp 3 0 0 0
RSantg3b 3 0 0 0
Verlndrp 2 0 0 0
RFisterp 0 0 0 0
Totals 28 0 0 0 Totals 32 1 6 0
Detroit 000 000 000 0
Miami 000 000 001 1
Two outs when winning run scored.
E-Verlander (2), Hechavarria (15). LOB-Detroit 3,
Miami 7.
IP H R ER BB SO
Detroit
Verlander 6 3 0 0 1 10
Faster 1 1 0 0 0 1
Porcello 1 0 0 0 0 2
PutkonenL,1-3 2/3 2 1 1 1 0
Miami
H.AlvarezW,5-6 9 0 0 0 1 4
HBP-by H.Alvarez (Fielder). WP-Putkonen 2.
Umpires-Home, Ron Kulpa; First, Chris Guccione;
Second, Tom Hallion; Third, Lance Barksdale.


x-Boston
Tampa Bay
Baltimore
New York
Toronto



x-Detroit
y-Cleveland
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago



x-Oakland
Texas
Los Angeles
Seattle
Houston


I I










Marlins' Alvarez no-hits Tigers


STEVEN WINE
AP Sports Writer
MIAMI Henderson Alva-
rez pitched one of baseball's
most bizarre no-hitters, cel-
ebrating in the on-deck cir-
cle when the Miami Mar-
lins scored on a two-out wild
pitch in the bottom of the
ninth inning to beat the AL
Central champion Detroit Ti-
gers 1-0 Sunday.
After Alvarez finished off
the ninth with the game
scoreless, he had to wait to
see if it would become an offi-
cial no-hitter. A Major League
Baseball ruling in 1991 said
only complete games of nine
or more innings with no hits
would count.
The Marlins loaded the
bases and with pinch-hitter
Greg Dobbs at bat, Luke Put-
konen threw a wild pitch that
let Giancarlo Stanton score.
Alvarez was on deck, and
he took off his batting hel-
met and started to celebrate
while still wearing his batting
gloves.
Later, Alvarez went into the
stands to hug his pregnant
wife and kiss her belly.
Alvarez (5-6) struck out
four, walked one and hit a
batter against a patchwork
Tigers lineup on the last day
of the season.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
ORIOLES 7, RED SOX 6
BALTIMORE -Ryan
Flaherty had two hits sub-
bing for Chris Davis after
baseball's home run champ
left with a sprained wrist,
and the Baltimore Orioles
wrapped up their season
Sunday with a 7-6 victo-
ry over the playoff-bound
Boston Red Sox.
With Davis' season ending
a couple of hours earlier than
expected, Flaherty hit an RBI
single in a five-run fifth and
a run-scoring double when
the Orioles took the lead for
good in the sixth.
Davis was hurt in the
fourth inning when his arm
got in the way of Jacoby
Ellsbury on a play at first.
The player who accepted
the Orioles' MVP award be-
fore the game walked off to
a standing ovation, finishing
tops in the majors in both
homers (53) and RBIs (138).
INDIANS 5, TWINS 1
MINNEAPOLIS -The
surging Cleveland Indians
earned their first postseason
berth since 2007, beating the
Minnesota Twins 5-1 Sunday
to clinch an AL wild card as
Ubaldo Jimenez tied a career
high with 13 strikeouts.
Nick Swisher homered in
the first inning for the Indians,
who ended the regular season
with 10 straight wins.
Cleveland will host Tampa
Bay or Texas in the one-
game AL wild card playoff on
Wednesday night.
Jimenez (13-9) gave up one
run and five hits in 6 2-3 in-
nings for the Indians, who
mobbed each other on the
diamond in a jubilant cele-
bration after the final out.
Scott Diamond (6-13) gave
up four runs two earned
- and seven hits for the
Twins (66-96).
RANGERS 6, ANGELS 2
ARLINGTON, Texas The
Texas Rangers forced a one-
game tiebreaker for the sec-
ond AL wild-card spot, win-
ning their seventh in a row
Sunday when Geovany Soto
hit a tiebreaking RBI double
and later homered to beat
the Los Angeles Angels 6-2.
The Rangers (91-71) added
game No. 163 to the regular
season, and will host Tampa


Bay on Monday night. The
winner plays two days later
at wild card leader Cleveland
in another win-or-be-done
matchup.
About the same time
Tampa Bay wrapped up its
7-6 win at Toronto to ne-
cessitate a victory by the


ALAN DIAZ / AP
Miami Marlins' Henderson Alvarez, center, celebrates with teammates after pitching a no-hitter against the Detroit Tigers after an interleague baseball game,


Sunday, in Miami. The Marlins won 1-0.
Rangers to keep playing,
Craig Gentry hit a two-run
single in the fifth for a 2-1
lead.
Los Angeles quickly tied
the game against major
league strikeout leader Yu
Darvish in the sixth, but the
Rangers went ahead to stay
in the bottom half on Soto's
two-out double.
ATHLETICS 9, MARINERS 0
SEATTLE Sonny Gray
threw five shutout innings
in his final start before the
playoffs, Oakland had a pair
of four-run innings and the
Athletics closed out the regu-
lar season with a 9-0 win over
Seattle in Eric Wedge's final
game as Mariners manager.
The A's now turn their at-
tention to the AL Division
Series against Detroit that
will begin Friday in Oakland,
while Seattle enters the off-
season with another mana-
gerial search on the docket.
Oakland gave a few of its
starters the finale off, while
some others made cam-
eos before getting a rest be-
fore beginning the post-
season. Jed Lowrie, Coco
Crisp and Yoenis Cespedes
all sat Sunday, while Josh
Donaldson, Brandon Moss
and Chris Young were lifted
early
It didn't matter who was
hitting against the Mariners.
The A's scored four times
in the second inning, all
charged to Seattle starter
Erasmo Ramirez, and four
more times in the fifth.
YANKEES 5, ASTROS 1 (14)
HOUSTON Mark
Reynolds hit a tiebreaking
homer in a four-run 14th
inning, and the NewYork
Yankees went into an offsea-
son of uncertainty Sunday
with a 5-1 victory over the
Houston Astros, whose 15-
game losing streak was the
longest at the end of the sea-
son in more than a century.
Mariano Rivera didn't pitch
in the final game of a ca-
reer that started in 1995, and
Robinson Cano and Curtis
Granderson were among the
players unsure whether they
had played their final games
for the Yankees (85-77).
Bothered by sore legs, Alex
Rodriguez also didn't get into
the game. The appeal of his
211-game drug suspension
starts Monday.
NewYork finished with its
fewest wins in a non-strike
season since 1992 and failed
to make the playoffs for only
the second time in 19 years.
Houston (51-111) seta
team record for losses and
had the most in the majors
since Arizona lost the same


amount in 2004. The Astros
finished with the lengthiest
season-ending losing streak
since the 1899 Cleveland
Spiders dropped their last 16,
according to STATS.
ROYALS 4, WHITE SOX 1
CHICAGO Bruce Chen
pitched four-hit ball into the
seventh inning and Kansas
City beat the Chicago White
Sox 4-1 on Sunday in the fi-
nale of the Royals' best sea-
son in 24 years.
Kansas City won three of
four in Chicago and went
17-10 in September for its
most successful month of
the season. The Royals' 86-76
record was their best mark
since they went 92-70 in
1989.
Chen's sharp outing put a
damper on what might have
been the last major league
game forWhite Sox captain
Paul Konerko, who is eligi-
ble for free agency and isn't
sure if he will play again next
year. The veteran first base-
man is second in franchise
history with 427 homers and
1,361 RBIs, and third with
2,249 hits.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BRAVES 12, PHILLIES 5
ATLANTA Evan Gattis
had a two-run homer among
his three hits, Elliot Johnson
drove in five runs and the
NL East champion Atlanta
Braves beat the Philadelphia
Phillies 12-5 on Sunday to
cap their best regular season
in nine years.
The Braves won their first
division title since 2005.
Atlanta will have home-
field advantage against the
Dodgers in the NL divi-
sion series, which begins
Thursday at Turner Field.
Atlanta (96-66) finished
with its best record since also
winning 96 games in 2004.
After the victory, players
gathered for a photo around
a 2013 banner that was
placed on a stand in front of
the mound.
D-BACKS 3, NATIONALS 2
PHOENIX -A.J. Pollock
beat out a run-scoring in-
field single in the eighth
inning and the Arizona
Diamondbacks sent
Washington manager Davey
Johnson into retirement on
a losing note with a 3-2 win
over the Nationals on Sunday.
After losing the se-
ries' first two games, the
Diamondbacks scratched
out a pair of runs off Ryan
Mattheus (0-2) in the eighth
inning to finish the season
at .500 (81-81). Martin Prado
had a run-scoring single in


the inning and Pollock dove
into first safely after hitting
a comebacker that bounced
off Mattheus.
David Hernandez (5-6)
pitched a perfect eighth
and Brad Ziegler closed out
the ninth for his 13th save.
Arizona played 1,538 innings
this season, breaking the
major league record set by
the 1964 Yankees.
Washington failed in the
final game of a career by
Johnson that spanned six de-
cades, but still finished 11
games above .500 at 86-76.
GIANTS 7, PADRES 6
SAN FRANCISCO -
Hunter Pence singled in the
winning run with no outs in
the ninth inning to give the
San Francisco Giants a 7-6
victory over the San Diego
Padres on Sunday.
Francisco Peguero hit his
first career home run lead-
ing off the ninth to tie it as
Huston Street (2-5) blew his
second save in 35 chances.
Tony Abreu followed with
a single and advance to sec-
ond on Street's wild pitch.
Brandon Belt walked and
both runners advanced on a
passed ball.
After Buster Posey was in-
tentionally walked, Pence
singled to center to end the
game.
Sergio Romo (5-8) pitched
the ninth for the win as the
Giants finished in a third place
tie with the Padres, 16 games
behind the NLWest champion
Los Angeles Dodgers.
ROCKIES 2, DODGERS 1
LOS ANGELES Jeff
Francis came out of the bull-
pen to win his first start in
more than three months,
Michael Cuddyer won his
first batting title, and Todd
Helton singled in the final
game of his career to help
the Colorado Rockies beat
the Los Angeles Dodgers 2-1
Sunday.
The NLWest champion
Dodgers, who lost four of
their last five games to fin-
ish 92-70, will open the NL
division series at Atlanta on
Thursday.
Colorado (74-88) its their
first winning record against
the Dodgers since 2007,
going 10-9.
Cuddyer went 1 for 5 with
three strikeouts and finished
the season with a .331 bat-
ting average to win the bat-
ting title by 10 points over
Atlanta's Chris Johnson, who
was held out Sunday to rest
his right shoulder.
CARDINALS 4, CUBS 0
ST. LOUIS -Matt
Carpenter and the St. Louis


Cardinals clinched home-
field advantage throughout
the National League playoffs
when they beat the Chicago
Cubs 4-0 Sunday for their
sixth straight win.
With the top seed, the
NL Central champions will
host the wild-card winner in
Game 1 of a NL division se-
ries on Thursday.
Joe Kelly (10-5) pitched 5
1-3 innings of three-hit ball
in relief of Jake Westbrook
as the Cardinals matched a
season high winning streak
to finish 97-65, their most
since reaching 100 in 2005.
St. Louis also won six straight
from April 30-May 5.
The Cubs finish last in the
Central at 66-96.
METS 3, BREWERS 2
NEWYORK Eric Young
Jr. won the National League
stolen base crown and
helped the NewYork Mets
rally past Milwaukee 3-2 on
Sunday when the Brewers
botched two bunts in the
eighth inning.
Young swiped two bases in
the first, scored on a shallow
sacrifice fly and later threw
out a runner at the plate
from left field. He began the
day tied for the NL lead in
steals at 44 with Milwaukee
shortstop Jean Segura, who
sat out for the 10th time in 11
games.
Playing in front of their
third sellout crowd this year,
the Mets prevented a four-
game sweep by Milwaukee
and finished 74-88 in their
fifth straight losing season
since moving into Citi Field.
PIRATES 4, REDS 2
CINCINNATI -Jordy
Mercer had a triple and
an inside-the-park homer,
and the Pirates complet-
ed a three-game sweep of
the Cincinnati Reds with a
4-2 victory Sunday that was
mostly an afterthought fo
teams looking ahead to a re-
match in Pittsburgh.
They'll open the postsea-
son on Tuesday night at PNC
Park, the Pirates' first playoff
game in 21 years.
There was little at stake
Sunday, and the Pirates
played mostly backups.
Pedro Alvarez was in the
lineup, trying to win the NL
home run crown outright.
He walked, was hit by a pitch
and popped out, leaving
him tied with Arizona's Paul
Goldschmidt with 36 homers.
Reds manager Dusty
Baker started his regu-
lars but began substituting
after the third inning. The
Reds dropped their last five
games, matching their sea-
son high.


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, September 30, 2013




Monday, September 30, 2013


DARRON CUMMINGS /AP
Notre Dame head coach Brian Kelly watches during the first half
of an NCAA college football game against Oklahoma, Saturday, in
South Bend, Ind. The Irish lost to fall out of the AP Top 25 poll.




Notre Dame drops



out of AP Top 25;



Arizona State in


RALPH D. RUSSO
AP College Football Writer

Notre Dame has
dropped out of The As-
sociated Press
college football poll
after losing its second
game of the season, and
Arizona State moved
in after the Sun Devils'
win prompted Southern
California to fire coach
Lane Kiffin.
Alabama remained
No. 1 as the top five held
their spots for the third
consecutive week. The
Crimson Tide received
55 of 60 first-place
votes, and No. 2 Oregon
got the rest from the
media panel, one more
than last week. Clem-
son is third, followed
by Ohio State and Stan-
ford.
Georgia moved up to
No. 6 after its 44-41 vic-
tory against LSU, which
slipped four spots to
10th.
Notre Dame (3-2),
coming off a loss in
the BCS championship
game, began the season
No. 14 but is now out of


AP Top 25 Poll
The Associated Press Top 25 football poll, with first-
place votes in parentheses, records through Sept.
28, total points based on 25 points for first place
through one point for 25th, and previous ranking:
Record Pts Pvs
1. Alabama (59) 4-0 1546 1
2. Oregon (2) 4-0 1479 2
3. Ohio State 5-0 1397 3
4. Clemson (1) 4-0 1352 4
5. Stanford 4-0 1325 5
6. Georgia 3-1 1148 10
7. Louisville 4-0 1147 7
8. Rorida State 4-0 1129 8
9.TexasA&M 4-1 1072 9
10. Oklahoma 4-0 964 12
11. LSU 4-1 931 6
12. South Carolina 3-1 860 13
13. UCLA 3-0 812 14
14. Miami 4-0 727 15
15. Northwestern 4-0 620 16
16. Baylor 3-0 573 18
17. Michigan 4-0 546 17
18. Washington 4-0 545 20
19. orida 3-1 515 19
20. Oklahoma State 3-1 330 11
21. Fresno State 4-0 270 23
22. Texas Tech 4-0 231 25
23. Northern Illinois 4-0 131 NR
24. Arizona State 3-1 118 NR
25. Nebraska 3-1 71 NR
Others receiving votes: Mississippi 69, Virginia Tech
54, Wisconsin 47, Maryland 45, Notre Dame 29,
Missouri 21, UCF 15, Michigan State 10, Rutgers 9,
Oregon State 7, Arizona 1, Cincinnati 1, East Carolina
1, Iowa 1, Utah 1.
the Top 25 after losing
35-21 at home to Okla-
homa, which moved up
three spots to 1lth.
The Fighting Irish
next play No. 22 Arizo-
na State. The Sun Dev-
ils (3-1) beat USC 62-41
on Saturday night, and
the Trojans fired Kiffin
hours later.
Maryland moved into
the poll at No. 25, and
Wisconsin fell out.


Winston has No. 8



Seminoles at 4-0



with room to grow


JIMMY GOLEN
AP Sports Writer

BOSTON Florida
State quarterback Ja-
meis Winston is unde-
feated through the Sem-
inoles' first four games,
with 12 touchdown
passes and an efficiency
unmatched in the Atlan-
tic Coast Conference.
Seminoles coach lim-
bo Fisher sees room to
grow.
"He's only four games
in," Fisher said after
Winston threw for four
touchdowns to lead
Florida State to a 48-34
victory over Boston Col-
lege. "We'll wait. He's got
a good grasp of things. I
like the way he's playing.
And there's some things
he's got to get better at.
He'll be the first one to
tell you. But he's still
making great reads and
great plays. He's devel-
oping very well."
Winston complet-
ed 17 of 27 passes for
330 yards on Saturday,
rallying the Seminoles
(4-0, 2-0 ACC) from a
14-point deficit in the
first half with touch-
down passes of 56 and
10 yards. With the score
tied and time running
out in the first half, he
connected with receiv-
er Kenny Shaw on a 55-
yard heave to give Flor-
ida State the lead for


good.
The closer-than-ex-
pected victory over a BC
(2-2, 1-1) team that lost
to Southern California
by 28 points in its previ-
ous game left the Sem-
inoles at No. 8 in The
Associated Press Top
25 released on Sunday.
And Fisher saw plenty of
mistakes, starting with
his young quarterback.
"He made a bunch of
them," Fisher said. "I
thought he got caught
up with the momen-
tum of the game and
trying to keep making
big plays. I think that's
part of youth and part
of growing."
It was Fisher's de-
fense that had the prob-
lems early, spotting BC
a 14-point lead in the
first half before Win-
ston threw a pair of TD
passes to tie it. After the
Eagles failed to run out
the clock in the second
quarter, Florida got the
ball back at its own 40
with 50 seconds to play.
Winston was sacked
for a 9-yard loss, Devon-
ta Freeman ran for 14
yards and the time
ticked away as the Sem-
inoles hurried to get off
one more play. Winston
received the snap just
before the clock hit 0:00,
but the pocket quickly
collapsed around him.


USC fires Lane Kiffin


GREG BEACHAM
AP Sports Writer

LOS ANGELES -
Southern California
fired Lane Kiffin ear-
ly Sunday morning,
ending the coach's
tumultuous tenure
a few hours after the
Trojans lost 62-41 at
Arizona State.
USC posted a short
news release on its
sports website say-
ing athletic director
Pat Haden informed
Kiffin of the deci-
sion "upon the team
charter's arrival back
in Los Angeles" af-
ter the ugly defeat.
The Trojans (3-2, 0-2
Pac-12) matched the
most points allowed
in school history in
their seventh loss in
11 games.
USC spokesman
Tim Tessalone de-
clined to confirm ES-
PN's report that Ed
Orgeron, Kiffin's as-
sistant head coach
and the former Mis-
sissippi head coach,
would take over in an
interim role. Orgeron
didn't return a mes-


RICK SOUTERI/AP
Southern California coach Lane Kiffin talks to Arizona State coach
Todd Graham on Saturday before their game in Tempe, Ariz. USC
fired Kiffin a few hours after the Trojans lost 62-41, their seventh


defeat in the past 11 games.

sage from the AP
Kiffin addressed his
eroding job security af-
ter Saturday's loss.
"I'm fine with that,"
he said. "I have been
dealing with that for
12 months. That's fine.
That's the last thing I'm
worried about. We have
to find a way to coach
better and play better


and get our backups
ready."
Instead, USC must
finish an already disap-
pointing season with-
out Kiffin while looking
for another coach to re-
boot its proud program.
The Trojans have a bye
this week before return-
ing Oct. 10 at the Colise-
um against Arizona.


Kiffin went 28-15 in
parts of four seasons
in his self-described
dream job, but USC is
0-2 in conference play
for the first time since
2001 after losses to Ar-
izona State and Wash-
ington State.
The Trojans also were
unimpressive on of-
fense for most of their
three victories, stok-
ing discontent around a
school with sky-high ex-
pectations even at the
tail end of heavy NCAA
sanctions. Kiffin re-
ceived withering crit-
icism for persisting in
calling the Trojans' of-
fensive plays himself
well into the school's
second straight poor of-
fensive season.
Haden will hold a news
conference later Sun-
day. The firing comes
less than five months af-
ter Haden said Kiffin had
"been as good as he can
be" in the face of USC's
sanctions. Before this
season began, Haden
said he was "100 per-
cent" behind the embat-
tled Kiffin.


LATE SATURDAY TOP 25 BOX SCORES


No. 2 OREGON 55, CALIFORNIA 16
California 0 3 7 6 16
Oregon 27 14 14 0 55
First Quarter
Ore-Marshall 14 run (run failed), 13:27.
Ore-Huff 19 pass from Mariota (Wogan kick), 8:56.
Ore-Hawkins 14 pass from Mariota (Maldonado
kick), 7:16.
Ore-Marshall 25 run (Wogan kick), 2:57.
Second Quarter
Ore-Mariota 2 run (Maldonado kick), 12:22.
Ore-Addison 75 punt return (Wogan kick), 6:08.
Cal-FG D'Amato 46, :00.
Third Quarter
Ore-Addison 67 punt return (Maldonado kick),
13:14.
Ore-Tyner 21 run (Wogan kick), 10:49.
Cal-Coprich 1 run (D'Amato kick), 6:48.
Fourth Quarter
Cal-Grisom 7 pass from Nine (kick failed), 3:02.
A-56,987.
Cal Ore
First downs 20 21
Rushes-yards 51-149 48-264
Passing 176 117
CompAtt-lnt 2144-1 12-26-0
Return Yards 0 140
Punts-Avg. 8-38.8 642.7
Fumbles-Lost 44 6-2
Penalties-Yards 11-97 9-83
Time of Possession 32:01 27:59
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-California, Bigelow 18-61, Lasco 15-52,
Coprich 14-51,
Muhammad 1-2, Nine 1-(minus 6), Goff 2-(minus
11). Oregon,
Marshall 19-130, Tyner 13-94, Mariota 6-33, Addi-
son 1-11, Bassett 5-0,
Huff 1-(minus 2), Roseberry 3-(minus 2).
PASSING-California, Nine 18-37-1-165, Goff
3-6-0-11,
C.Harper 0-1-0-0. Oregon, Mariota 11-25-0-114,
Lockie 1-1-0-3.
RECEIVING-California, Lasco 5-35, Lawler 3-17,
C.Harper 3-15,
Rodgers 2-38, Treggs 2-31, Bouza 1-19, S.Anderson
1-8, Grisom 1-7,
Ervin 14, Bigelow 1-3, Coprich 1-(minus 1). Oregon,
Addison 3-13,
Marshall 3-12, Huff 2-44, Mundt 1-28, Hawkins
1-14, Stanton 1-3,
Tyner 1-3.
No. 4 OHIO ST. 31, No. 23 WISCONSIN 24
Wisconsin 7 7 0 10 24
OhioSt. 14 10 7 0 31
First Quarter
OSU-Spencer 25 pass from B.Miller (Basil kick),
12:18.
Wis-Abbrederis 36 pass from Stave (French
kick), 3:52.
OSU-D.Smith 26 pass from B.Miller (Basil kick),
:44.
Second Quarter
OSU-FG Basil 45,4:33.
Wis-Arneson 11 pass from Stave (French kick),
1:30.
OSU-Corey (Philly).Brown 40 pass from B.Miller
(Basil kick), :01.
Third Quarter
OSU-Corey (Philly).Brown 1 pass from B.Miller (Ba-
sil kick), 2:18.
Fourth Quarter
Wis-White 17 run (French kick), 13:47.
Wis-FG French 42, 2:05.
A-105,826.
Wis OSU
First downs 20 21


Rushes-yards 27-104 43-192
Passing 295 198
Comp-Att-lnt 20-34-1 17-25-0
Return Yards 3 21
Punts-Avg. 540.4 6-39.8
Fumbles-Lost 2-0 1-0
Penalties-Yards 8-54 6-43
Time of Possession 29:42 30:18
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Wisconsin, Gordon 15-74, White 8-31,
Stave 4-(minus 1).
Ohio St., Hyde 17-85, B.Miller 22-83, Wilson 2-21,
J.Hall 1-5,
Team 1-(minus 2).
PASSING-Wisconsin, Stave 20-34-1-295. Ohio St.,
B.Miller 17-25-0-198.
RECEIVING-Wisconsin, Abbrederis 10-207, White
4-16, Arneson 3-39,
Erickson 2-25, Duckworth 1-8. Ohio St., Corey
(Philly).Brown 8-85,
D.Smith 4-50, Heuerman 2-13, Spencer 1-25, Wil-
son 1-21, Hyde 14.
No. 5 STANFORD 55, WASH ST. 17
Stanford 10 7 21 17 55
Washington St. 3 0 0 14 17
First Quarter
Stan-FG Williamson 28,10:55.
WSU-FG Furney 36, 6:03.
Stan-Cajuste 57 pass from Hogan (Williamson
kick), 2:49.
Second Quarter
Stan-Cajuste 33 pass from Hogan (Williamson
kick), 14:25.
Third Quarter
Stan-Richards 30 interception return (Williamson
kick), 10:42.
Stan-Rector 45 pass from Hogan (Williamson
kick), 8:45.
Stan-T.Murphy 30 interception return (Williamson
kick), 6:41.
Fourth Quarter
Stan-FG Williamson 27,11:40.
Stan-Wright53 run (Williamson kick), 10:58.
WSU-Marks 47 pass from Apodaca (Furney kick),
8:24.
Stan-Sanders 22 run (Ukropina kick), 6:29.
WSU-Galvin 8 pass from Apodaca (Furney kick),
:27.
A-40,095.
Stan WSU
First downs 20 22
Rushes-yards 40-238 13-51
Passing 322 322
Comp-Att-lnt 17-28-1 39-65-2
Return Yards 70 2
Punts-Avg. 4-37.8 7-39.3
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 3-0
Penalties-Yards 9-57 4-35
Time of Possession 31:35 28:25
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Stanford, Wright 2-56, Gaffney 14-54,
Wilkerson 10-47,
Sanders 3-34, Hogan 6-34, Seale 3-9, Lloyd 1-6,
Team 1-(minus 2).
Washington St., Laufasa 4-23, Mason 3-22, Apo-
daca 3-10, Caldwell 1-3,
Halliday 2-(minus 7).
PASSING-Stanford, Hogan 16-25-1-286, Crower
1-3-0-36.
Washington St., Halliday 24-36-1-184, Apodaca
15-29-1-138.
RECEIVING-Stanford, Montgomery 6-54, Cajuste
4-115, Rector 2-93,
Young 1-36, Sanders 1-16, Kaumatule 1-5, Cum-
mings 1-2, Gaffney 1-1.
Washington St., Mason 7-28, Marks 6-75, Cracraft
4-52, Galvin 4-34,
D.Williams 3-27, Brooks 3-2, K.Williams 2-61,


Caldwell 2-10,
Laufasa 2-8, Ratiff 2-7, Thompson 2-6, Myers 1-7,
Mayle 1-5.
No. 10 TEXAS A&M 45, ARKANSAS 33
TexasA&M 17 7 14 7 45
Arkansas 7 13 13 0 33
First Quarter
TAM-Evans 9 pass from Manziel (Lambo kick),
12:21.
Ark-Hatcher 12 pass from B.Allen (Hocker kick),
7:43.
TAM-Malena 2 run (Lambo kick), 5:11.
TAM-FG Lambo 39,1:47.
Second Quarter
Ark-FG Hocker 28,14:44.
TAM-Evans 7 pass from Manziel (Lambo kick),
11:14.
Ark-Williams 19 pass from B.Allen (Hocker kick),
6:02.
Ark-FG Hocker39, :00.
Third Quarter
TAM-Everett 34 interception return (Lambo kick),
14:19.
Ark-A.Collins 9 run (Hocker kick), 12:43.
TAM-TWilliams 17 run (Lambo kick), 4:42.
Ark-Williams 19 pass from B.Allen (pass failed),
1:09.
Fourth Quarter
TAM-Malena 1 run (Lambo kick), 10:08.
A-72,613.
TAM Ark
First downs 26 23
Rushes-yards 44-.262 30-201
Passing 261 282
Comp-Att-lnt 23-30-0 17-36-2
Return Yards 40 0
Punts-Avg. 442.0 3-39.7
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 1-0
Penalties-Yards 545 1-5
Time of Possession 31:43 28:17
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Texas A&M, TWilliams 9-83, Carson
9-64, Manziel 9-59,
Malena 1240, B.Williams 4-18, Team 1-(minus
2). Arkansas,
A.Collins 14-116, Williams 10-53, Marshall 1-16,
Hatcher 1-9, Small 1-3,
Herndon 1-2, B.Allen 2-2.
PASSING-Texas A&M, Manziel 23-30-0-261. Ar-
kansas,
B.Allen 17-36-2-282.
RECEIVING-Texas A&M, D.Walker 7-81, Evans
6-116, Kennedy 4-24,
Holmes 3-24, TWilliams 2-12, Malena 14. Arkan-
sas, Henry 4-109,
Williams 4-67, Herndon 2-36, Hatcher 2-27,
Hawkins 2-21, Small 2-18,
A.Collins 14.
No. 16 WASHINGTON 31, ARIZONA 13
Arizona 0 6 7 0 13
Washington 8 3 14 6 31
First Quarter
Wash-Smith 7 pass from Price (kick failed), 12:44.
Wash-Safety, :22.
Second Quarter
Wash-FG Coons 42,14:11.
Ari-Carey 3 run (kick failed), :06.
Third Quarter
Wash-Seferian-Jenkins 1 pass from Price (Coons
kick), 10:19.
Ari-Denker 7 run (J.Smith kick), 5:14.
Wash-Sankey 1 run (Coons kick), 1:25.
Fourth Quarter
Wash-Callier 2 run (kick failed), 3:34.
A-65,815.


Ari Wash
First downs 19 24
Rushes-yards 49-199 61-244
Passing 119 165
Comp-Att-lnt 14-37-2 14-25-1
Return Yards 19 12
Punts-Avg. 6-31.5 5-40.6
Fumbles-Lost 2-0 2-0
Penalties-Yards 7-56 7-75
Time of Possession 29:38 30:22
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Arizona, Carey 30-132, Denker 11-56,
Jenkins 4-13,
J.Allen 2-10, Grant 1-0, Team 1-(minus 12). Wash-
ington, Sankey 40-161,
Callier 11-54, Price 6-29, Washington 2-11, Team
2-(minus 11).
PASSING-Arizona, Denker 14-35-2-119, J.Allen 0-1-
0-0, Team 0-1-0-0.
Washington, Price 14-25-1-165.
RECEIVING-Arizona, Carey 449, Phillips 3-25,
Grant 3-22,
J.Jackson 2-7, TMiller 1-8, Wharton 1-8. Washing-
ton, K.Williams 5-51,
Smith 4-68, Seferian-Jenkins 2-21, Callier 2-10,
Mickens 1-15.
No. 25 FRESNO ST. 42, HAWAII 37
FresnoSt. 14 7 21 0 42
Hawaii 0 3 14 20 37
First Quarter
Fre-J.Harper 30 pass from D.Carr (McGuire kick),
12:08.
Fre-Waller i1 run (McGuire kick), 6:01.
Second Quarter
Fre-D.Carr 1 run (McGuire kick), 13:05.
Haw-FG Hadden 48, 3:16.
Third Quarter
Fre-J.Harper 9 pass from D.Carr (McGuire kick),
11:01.
Fre-Waller i1 run (McGuire kick), 6:57.
Fre-L.Jones 56 interception return (McGuire kick),
6:15.
Haw-Lakalaka 3 run (Hadden kick), 5:54.
Haw-Nirkwood 23 pass from Schroeder (Hadden
kick), 3:22.
Fourth Quarter
Haw-Haynes 16 pass from Schroeder (Hadden
kick), 14:16.
Haw-Stutzmann 35 pass from Schroeder (pass
failed), 11:59.
Haw-Lakalaka 1 run (Hadden kick), 7:51.
A-28,755.
Fre Haw
First downs 31 21
Rushes-yards 45-206 35-54
Passing 324 377
Comp-Att-lnt 3347-2 24-46-2
Return Yards 82 26
Punts-Avg. 7-37.6 9-41.3
Fumbles-Lost 4-3 0-0
Penalties-Yards 5-61 10-95
Time of Possession 34:17 25:43
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Fresno St., Waller 22-95, Quezada 13-78,
Micenheimer 4-22,
D.Carr 6-11. Hawaii, Lakalaka 13-66, Woolsey 124,
Saint Juste 7-1,
Haynes 1-(minus 1), Schroeder 2-(minus 16).
PASSING-Fresno St, D.Carr 3347-2-324. Hawaii,
Schroeder 17-27-1-321, Woolsey 7-19-1-56.
RECEIVING-Fresno St., J.Harper 9-123, Adams
5-22, Peck 3-53,
Watson 346, Jensen 3-31, Waller 3-24, Quezada
3-9, Burse 2-9,
J.Johnson 14, Micenheimer 1-3. Hawaii, Haynes
5-64, Harding 5-62,
Gant 4-133, Evans 4-35, Stutzmann 346, Nirk-
wood 1-23,


License #CBC1252465

Ad k .isAbout Our
MOUNT DORA FinnPgram"
-A Division of Ro-Mac Lumber & Supply, Inc. 4



PuAing n A New Rod?


hL


Only ^ $Per Square


Shingle Pce for Residents
In Lake & Sumter Counties
Offer Expires 10/31/13



*Lake County Orders 11 Squares or More


Gives A Clean, Warm, And Inviting Look
e A Step Up From Traditional Three-Tab Shingles
o Architectural Shingle Contractor Grade
e Lifetime Limited Warranty
9 110 MPH-Wind Resistance Limited Warranty
* 10-Year Algae Resistance Limited Warranty
* Many Popular Colors To Choose From
e Coverage Per Square 100 sq. ft.


www.romaclumber.com


*Shingles Available At Above Location Must Ship On or Before 10/31/13
**If You Qualify Home Improvement Retail Instalment Seller License #HI9900545


[ Timberline HD- Shingles

0 A6H i&.


B5


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Ph. (352) 383-4111 9 2411 W. Old Hwy. 441 in Mt. Dora I


Spr hnsil ihSm
new emloyces





DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, September 30, 2013


Seahawks beat Texans in OT for 4-0 start


Associated Press

HOUSTON Steven
Hauschka kicked a 45-
yard field goal in over-
time to give the Seattle
Seahawks a 23-20 win
over the Houston Tex-
ans on Sunday and the
first 4-0 start in fran-
chise history.
Houston (2-2) failed
to score on two posses-
sions in overtime. The
Seahawks got the win
on their second drive in
overtime after rallying
from a 20-3 deficit.
A key play on the win-
ning drive came when
Doug Baldwin caught a
7-yard pass and Kareem
Jackson was penalized
for unnecessary rough-
ness for dumping him
into the ground. That got
Seattle in field goal range
and Hauschka's kick
came four plays later.
The Seahawks rallied to
tie it at 20-20 on an inter-
ception return for a touch-
down by Richard Sher-
man in the fourth quarter.

LIONS 40, BEARS 32
DETROIT Reggie
Bush's 37-yard touch-
down run helped De-
troit score 27 points in
the second quarter and
he accounted for 173
yards of offense to help
the Lions beat Chicago.
Detroit (3-1) moved
into a first-place tie
with Chicago (3-1) in
the NFC North. The Li-
ons scored 24 straight
points, including three
TDs in a span of 3 min-
utes, 26 second, after
Matt Forte's 53-yard TD
run gave the Bears 10-6
lead early in the second
quarter.
Jay Cutler, who had
four turnovers, threw
a pair of touchdown
passes and 2-point con-
versions in the final 4
minutes to pull Chica-
go within eight points
to make the score look
respectable.


Vikings 34, Steelers 27
Pittsburgh 7 3 7 10 27
Minnesota 10 10 14 0 34
First Quarter
Min-FG Walsh 54,12:08.
Min-Jennings 70 pass from Cassel (Walsh kick),
8:06.
Pit-Bell 8 run (Suisham kick), 4:02.
Second Quarter
Min-Peterson 60 run (Walsh kick), 12:42.
Pit-FG Suisham 26,3:39.
Min-FGWalsh 37,:39.
Third Quarter
Pit-Bell 1 run (Suisham kick), 11:28.
Min-Peterson 7 run (Walsh kick), 7:52.
Min-Jennings 16 pass from Cassel (Walsh kick),
5:11.
Fourth Quarter
Pit-Cotchery 15 pass from Roethlisberger (Suisham
kick), 12:42.
Pit-FG Suisham 28,3:37.
A-83,518.
Pit Min
First downs 29 16
Total Net Yards 434 393
Rushes-yards 21-77 25-145
Passing 357 248
Punt Returns 1-3 1-0
Kickoff Returns 4-92 5-144
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-0
Comp-Att-lnt 36-51-1 16-25-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 5-26 1-0
Punts 4-35.8 441.8
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 1-0
Penaltes-Yards 4-50 5-89
Time of Possession 36:27 23:33
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Pittsburgh, Bell 16-57, A.Brown 1-10, Dw-
yer 2-7, FJones 2-3. Minnesota, Peterson 23-140,
Cassel 2-5.
PASSING-Pittsburgh, Roethlisberger 36-51-1-383.
Minnesota, Cassel 16-25-0-248.
RECEIVING-Pittsburgh, A.Brown 12-88, Miller 6-70,
Cotchery 5-103, Sanders 4-57, Bell 4-27, Wheaton
3-26, D.Johnson 1-8, FJones 14. Minnesota, Simp-
son 7-124, Jennings 3-92, Rudolph 2-6, Patterson
1-9, Gerhart 1-7, Wright 1-6, Carlson 1-4.
MISSED HELD GOALS-Minnesota, Walsh 44 (WL).
Browns 17, Bengals 6
Cincinnati 0 3 3 0 6
Cleveland 7 0 3 7 17
First Quarter
Cle-Cameron 2 pass from Hoyer (Cundiff kick), 2:13.
Second Quarter
Cin-FG Nugent 25,10:48.
Third Quarter
Cle-FG Cundiff 51, 5:10.
Cin-FG Nugent 43, :37.
Fourth Quarter
Cle-Ogbonnaya 1 pass from Hoyer (Cundiff kick),
4:59.
A-71,481.
Cin Cle
First downs 16 18
Total Net Yards 266 336
Rushes-yards 20-63 30-89
Passing 203 247
Punt Returns 2-15 1-7
Kickoff Returns 4-60 2-60
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-5
Comp-Att-Int 2342-1 25-38-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 2-3 3-22
Punts 4-38.8 542.8
Fumbles-Lost 2-1 0-0
Penalties-Yards 3-25 5-80
Time of Possession 28:51 31:09
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Cincinnat, Bernard 10-37, Green-Ellis
6-13, Dalton 4-13. Cleveland, McGahee 15-46, Og-
bonnaya 5-27, Rainey 6-9, Hoyer 4-7.
PASSING-Cincinnati, Dalton 2342-1-206. Cleveland,
Hoyer 25-38-0-269.
RECEIVING-Cincinnat, Green 7-51, Bernard 6-38,
Gresham 3-53, Eifert 3-39, Sanu 3-19, Sanzenbacher
1-6. Cleveland, Cameron 10-91, Ogbonnaya 5-21,
Gordon 4-71, Bess 2-25, Rainey 2-20, Benjamin
1-39, Barnidge 1-2.
MISSED HELD GOALS-Cleveland, Cundiff 37 (WL),
49 (WR).
Colts 37, Jaguars 3


VIKINGS 34, STEELERS 27
LONDON-- Greg Jen-
nings made two touch-
down catches, Adri-
an Peterson ran for two
scores and the Vikings'
defense made a big stop
with time running out
to preserve a win over
the Steelers.
Playing at Wemb-
ley Stadium, Everson
Griffen stripped Ben
Roethlisberger on the
6-yard line with 19 sec-
onds left. Kevin Wil-
liams recovered to seal
the victory
Jennings made a 70-
yard catch-and-run for
a touchdown and Peter-
son had a 60-yard score
to help offset two scores
by Pittsburgh rookie
running back Le'Veon
Bell and give Minnesota
(1-3) some hope of turn-
ing its season around.
The Steelers fell to 0-4
for the first time since
1968.
Vikings quarterback
Matt Cassel, starting in
place of injured Chris-
tian Ponder, finished 16
of 25 for 248 yards and
two touchdowns.
CHARGERS 31, COWBOYS 20
SAN DIEGO Philip
Rivers threw for 401 yards
and three touchdowns,
including a 56-yarder to
Antonio Gates.
The Chargers (2-2)
had blown late leads
in their two losses this
season. On Sunday,
they scored the final 20
points to beat Dallas (2-
2).
Rivers short-armed a
pass over the middle to
Gates, who slid behind
linebacker Sean Lee to
haul it in and score with
6:54 to go.
Lee had intercepted
Rivers on a deflected
pass and returned it 52
yards for a touchdown
and a 21-10 lead late in
the second quarter. Dal-
las didn't score again.
Tony Romo moved


Indianapolis 0 20 14 3 -
Jacksonville 3 0 0 0 -
First Quarter
Jax-FG Scobee 53, 8:14.
Second Quarter
Ind-FG Vinateri 22,14:43.
Ind-Buter 41 interception return (Vinateri kick),
11:48.
Ind-Richardson 1 run (Vinateri kick), 5:54.
Ind-FG Vinateri 46,1:34.
Third Quarter
Ind-Reener 31 pass from Luck (Vinateri kick),
12:15.
Ind-Wayne 5 pass from Luck (Vinatieri kick), 1:22.
Fourth Quarter
Ind-FG Vinateri 28,1:53.
A-59,695.


First downs
Total Net Yards
Rushes-yards
Passing
Punt Returns
Kickoff Returns
Interceptons Ret.
Comp-Att-lnt
Sacked-Yards Lost
Punts
Fumbles-Lost
Penaltes-Yards
Time of Possession


Ind Jax
26 14
437 205
29-154 1840
283 165
5-19 1-10
2-45 4-87
3-48 1-1
24-39-1 17-32-3
2-14 4-14
3-46.0 6-48.3
1-0 0-0
7-58 9-65
36:38 23:22


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Indianapolis, D.Brown 3-65, Richardson
20-60, Luck 2-26, Hilton 1-3, Havili 3-0. Jackson-
ville, Jones-Drew 13-23, Gabbert 2-10, Todman 2-4,
Forsett 1-3.
PASSING-Indianapolis, Luck 22-36-1-260, Hassel-
beck 2-3-0-37. Jacksonville, Gabbert 17-32-3-179.
RECEIVING-Indianapolis, Wayne 5-100, Fleener 5-77,
Hilton 548, Heyward-Bey 3-33, D.Brown 2-11, Havili
2-1, Jones 1-21, Richardson 1-6. Jacksonville, Shorts
7-61, Sanders 4-59, Harbor 2-39, Forsett 2-10, Ebert
1-5, Jones-Drew 1-5.
MISSED RELD GOALS-None.
Chiefs 31, Giants 7
N.Y. Giants 0 7 0 0 7
Kansas City 0 10 7 14 31
Second Quarter
KC-McGrath 5 pass from A.Smith (Succop kick),
14:47.
NYG-Cruz 69 pass from Manning (J.Brown kick),
13:53,
KC-FG Succop 51,1:55.
Third Quarter
KC-McCluster 89 punt return (Succop kick), 1:34.
Fourth Quarter
KC-Charles 2 pass from A.Smith (Succop kick),
5:43.
KC-Bowe 34 pass from A.Smith (Succop kick), 3:06.
A-73,386.
NYG KC
First downs 11 21
Total Net Yards 298 390
Rushes-yards 21-98 28-102
Passing 200 288
Punt Returns 4-35 4-113
Kickoff Returns 3-74 1-22
Interceptons Ret. 2(4) 1-17
Comp-Att-lnt 18-37-1 2441-2
Sacked-Yards Lost 3-17 1-0
Punts 8-49.9 5-44.6
Fumbles-Lost 3-2 1-1
Penalties-Yards 7-65 7-62
Time of Possession 24:04 35:56
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-N.Y Giants, Wilson 13-55, Scott 5-26,
Manning 2-12, Jacobs 1-5. Kansas City, Charles 18-
65, A.Smith 7-37, Davis 1-2, Daniel 2-(minus 2).
PASSING-N.Y Giants, Manning 18-37-1-217. Kansas
City, A.Smith 2441-2-288.
RECEIVING-N.Y Giants, Cruz 10-164, Nicks 3-33, Wil-
son 2-8, Randle 1-7, Jacobs 1-5, Scott 1-0. Kansas
City, McGrath 5-64, Charles 5-62, McCluster 5-48,
Bowe 4-58, Brock 2-27, Avery 2-23, Sherman 1-6.
MISSED FELD GOALS-N.Y Giants, J.Brown 44 (WL).
Cardinals 13, Buccaneers 10
Arizona 0 0 0 13 13
Tampa Bay 7 3 0 0 10
First Quarter
TB-Williams 8 pass from Glennon (Lindell kick),


Seattle Seahawks' Steven Hauschka (4) is congratulated by team-
mates Heath Farwell (55) and JR. Sweezy (64) after kicking the
winning field goal against the Houston Texans during overtime of
on Sunday in Houston. Seattle won 23-20.


the Cowboys to the San
Diego 7 and hit Terrance
Williams, who fumbled
at the 1. San Diego's
Richard Marshall re-
covered in the end zone
with 2:42 left.
TITANS 38, JETS 13
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
Jake Locker threw a ca-
reer-high three touch-
downs before being
taken to the hospital
with an injured right
hip. Locker was hurt
early in the third quar-
ter when hit first by
Muhammad Wilker-
son after throwing an
incomplete pass, then
popped by Quinton Co-
ples. He grabbed at his
hip as he went to the
ground and was carted
off the field before be-
ing loaded into an am-
bulance. The Titans had
no immediate word on
the severity of his injury.
The Jets (2-2) couldn't
overcome Smith's rook-
ie mistakes.

REDSKINS 24, RAIDERS 14
OAKLAND, Calif. -
Robert Griffin III threw
a go-ahead touchdown




NFL BOX
6:17.
Second Quarter
TB-FG Lindell 50, :27.
Fourth Quarter
Ari-FG Feely 42,11:16.
Ari-Fitzgerald 13 pass from Palmer (Feely kick), 3:06.
Ari-FG Feely 27,1:29.
A-44,956.
Ari TB
First downs 17 20
Total Net Yards 296 253
Rushes-yards 20-56 31-80
Passing 240 173
Punt Returns 1-5 2-22
Kickoff Returns 0-0 3-69
Interceptions Ret. 2-16 2-3
Comp-Att-lnt 21-38-2 2443-2
Sacked-Yards Lost 1-8 2-20
Punts 745.7 8-40.3
Fumbles-Lost 2-1 1-1
Penalties-Yards 10-90 8-73
Time of Possession 25:55 34:05
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Arizona, Ellington 4-29, Mendenhall 12-21,
Palmer 4-6. Tampa Bay, Martin 2745, Goldson 1-22,
Demps 1-14, Glennon 2-(minus 1).
PASSING-Arizona, Palmer 21-38-2-248. Tampa Bay,
Glennon 2443-2-193.
RECEIVING-Arizona, Fitzgerald 6-68, Floyd 5-87, El-
lington 3-22, Mendenhall 3-13, Housler 1-23, J.Brown
1-19, Dray 1-10, Roberts 1-6. Tampa Bay, Wright
5-41, Ogletree 5-30, Williams 4-38, Martin 3-16,
Jackson 2-27, Leonard 2-11, Lorig 1-20, Demps 1-8,
James 1-2.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.
Lions 40, Bears 32
Chicago 3 10 3 16 32
Detroit 3 27 7 3 40
First Quarter
Chi-FG Gould 34, 8:34.
Det-FG Akers 23, 2:38.
Second Quarter
Det-FG Akers 31,14:28.
Chi-Forte 53 run (Gould kick), 13:44.
Det-FG Akers 41,10:19.
Det-Stafford 1 run (Akers kick), 6:09.
Det-Johnson 2 pass from Stafford (Akers kick), 5:47.
Det-Bush 37 run (Akers kick), 2:43.
Chi-FG Gould 28, :00.
Third Quarter
Chi-FG Gould 25, 9:05.
Det-Fairley 4 fumble return (Akers kick), :20,
Fourth Quarter
Det-FG Akers 43, 8:57.
Chi-Jeffery 14 pass from Cutler (Jeffery pass from
Cutler), 4:00.
Chi-E.Bennett 10 pass from Cuter (Marshall pass
from Cutler), :43.
A-64,552.
Chi Det
First downs 18 23
Total Net Yards 417 387
Rushes-yards 16-131 30-159
Passing 286 228
Punt Returns 2-17 1-57
Kickoff Returns 6-147 3-62
Interceptions Ret. 1-8 344
Comp-Att-lnt 2747-3 23-35-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 3-31 1-14
Punts 540.2 3-50.0
Fumbles-Lost 2-1 4-2
Penalties-Yards 4-30 3-25
Time of Possession 28:11 31:49
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Chicago, Forte 14-95, Jeffery 1-27, Cutler
1-9. Detroit, Bush 18-139, Bell 7-12, Stafford 5-8.
PASSING-Chicago, Cuter 2747-3-317. Detroit, Staf-
ford 23-35-1-242.
RECEIVING-Chicago, M.Bennett 8-90, Marshall 7-79,
Jeffery 5-107, Forte 5-22, E.Bennett 2-19. Detroit,
Pettigrew 7-54, Johnson 444, Bush 4-34, Bell 4-30,
Durham 3-58, Scheffler 1-22.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.
Seahawks 23, Texans 20 (OT)
Seattle 3 0 3 14 3 23
Houston 0 20 0 0 0 20
First Quarter
Sea-FG Hauschka 48,11:11.
Second Quarter
Hou-Graham 31 pass from Schaub (Bullock kick),


pass late in the third
quarter to help Wash-
ington overcome an
early 14-point deficit for
its first win of the sea-
son.
David Amerson re-
turned an interception
for another score for the
Redskins (1-3).
Washington looked
ready to extend the
worst start for the fran-
chise since 2001 when
they fell behind 14-0
after the first quar-
ter thanks to a blocked
punt touchdown and a
scoring pass from Matt
Flynn.
But the much-ma-
ligned Washington de-
fense allowed the Raid-
ers (1-3) no more points,
taking advantage of an
offense that was with-
out starting quarter-
back Terrelle Pryor the
entire game and start-
ing running backs Dar-
ren McFadden and Mar-
cel Reece for most of it.
BILLS 23, RAVENS 20
ORCHARD PARK, N.Y.
Buffalo rookie line-
backer Kiko Alonso's
second interception of




SCORES
14:55.
Hou-Foster 5 pass from Schaub (Bullock kick), 6:11.
Hou-FG Bullock 22,3:51.
Hou-FG Bullock 42, :01.
Third Quarter
Sea-FG Hauschka 39, 3:54.
Fourth Quarter
Sea-Lynch 3 run (Hauschka kick), 7:43.
Sea-Sherman 58 intercepton return (Hauschka
kick), 2:40.
Overtime
Sea-FG Hauschka 45, 3:19.
A-71,756.
Sea Hou
First downs 15 29
Total Net Yards 270 476
Rushes-yards 30-179 35-151
Passing 91 325
Punt Returns 4-60 1-1
Kickoff Returns 3-55 2-52
Interceptions Ret. 2-58 1-1
Comp-Att-lnt 12-23-1 3149-2
Sacked-Yards Lost 5-32 4-30
Punts 646.3 7-45.3
Fumbles-Lost 3-1 2-1
Penalties-Yards 9-62 6-86
Time of Possession 31:48 39:53
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Seattle, Lynch 17-98, Wilson 1077, Turbin
3-4. Houston, Foster 27-102, Tate 744, Schaub 1-5.
PASSING-Seattle, Wilson 12-23-1-123. Houston,
Schaub 3149-2-355.
RECEIVING-Seattle, Lynch 3-45, Baldwin 3-39, Tate
3-17, Rice 1-11, Miller 1-7, Coleman 14. Houston,
Johnson 9-110, Daniels 6-72, Foster 6-69, Gra-
ham 5-69, Hopkins 2-27, Martin 1-6, G.Jones 1-1,
Tate 1-1.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.
Bills 23, Ravens 20
Baltimore 0 7 7 6 20
Buffalo 6 14 3 0 23
First Quarter
Buf-FG Carpenter 27, 6:11.
Buf-FG Carpenter 27,3:03.
Second Quarter
Bal-M.Brown 10 pass from Racco (Tucker kick),
13:55.
Buf-Woods 42 pass from Manuel (Carpenter kick),
8:40.
Buf-Jackson 16 run (Carpenter kick), 6:52.
Third Quarter
Bal-T.Smith 26 pass from Flacco (Tucker kick), 7:17,
Buf-FG Carpenter 22,1:56.
Fourth Quarter
Bal-FG Tucker 35, 7:12.
Bal-FG Tucker 24, 4:04.
A-68,296.


First downs
Total Net Yards
Rushes-yards
Passing
Punt Returns
Kickoff Returns
Interceptions Ret.
Comp-Att-Int
Sacked-Yards Lost
Punts
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


Bal Buf
15 19
345 350
9-24 55-203
321 147
4-31 4-34
3-73 0-0
2-1 5-12
25-50-5 10-22-2
4-26 2-20
747.3 8-43.3
0-0 4-1
8-59 11-99
23:34 36:26


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Baltimore, Rice 5-17, Pierce 4-7. Buffalo,
Jackson 16-87, Spiller 23-77, Graham 1-14, Woods
1-13, Choice 3-11, Manuel 11-1.
PASSING-Baltmore, Racco 25-50-5-347. Buffalo,
Manuel 10-22-2-167.
RECEIVING-Baltimore, TSmith 5-166, Thompson
4-50, Doss 447, M.Brown 4-34, Clark 4-34, Dickson
2-12, Leach 1-2, Pierce 1-2. Buffalo, Woods 4-80,
Graham 2-32, Chandler 2-28, L.Smith 1-28, Johnson
1-(minus 1).
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.
Titans 38, jets 13
N.Y. Jets 0 6 0 7 13
Tennessee 10 14 0 14 38
First Quarter
Ten-Walker 1 pass from Locker (Bironas kick), 11:57.
Ten-FG Bironas 26,4:20.
Second Quarter


the game with 57 sec-
onds remaining sealed
a win over Baltimore.
Converted safety Aar-
on Williams also inter-
cepted Joe Flacco twice,
while Fred Jackson had
87 yards rushing and a
touchdown for Buffalo
(2-2).
Robert Woods scored
on a 42-yard touch-
down reception. Buffalo
totaled 203 yards rush-
ing against a stout Ra-
vens defense that had
allowed just 224 in its
first three games.
Joe Flacco threw a ca-
reer-worst five intercep-
tions, and finished 25 of
50 for 347 yards passing,
and two touchdowns.
The Ravens' last
chance to tie the game
ended when Flac-
co forced a pass over
the middle intended
for Dallas Clark. Safety
Da'Norris Searcy got a
piece of the ball, which
bounced into the air
and was intercepted by
Alonso.

CARDINALS 13, BUCS 10
TAMPA Carson
Palmer threw a 13-yard
touchdown pass to Lar-
ry Fitzgerald, then Jay
Feely kicked a 27-yard
field goal with 1:29 re-
maining and Arizona
rallied to beat Tampa
Bay.
Patrick Peterson had
two interceptions, one
setting up Arizona's first
TD in six quarters, the
other to ruin any chance
of rookie Mike Glennon
pulling off a comeback
in his first NFL start for
the winless Bucs (0-4).
Feely also kicked a 42-
yard field goal for the
Cardinals (2-2), who
trailed 10-0 at halftime.
Starting in place of the
benched Josh Freeman,
Glennon was steady -
if not spectacular for
most of the game. But it
all unraveled after Pe-
terson stepped in front


NYJ-FG Folk 45,14:55.
Ten-Washington 4 pass from Locker (Bironas kick),
6:46.
NYJ-FG Folk 47, 2:26.
Ten-Hunter 16 pass from Locker (Bironas kick), :02.
Fourth Quarter
Ten-Kug fumble recovery in end zone (Bironas
kick), 11:45.
NYJ-Cumberland 34 pass from Smith (Folk kick),
8:49.
Ten-Washington 77 pass from Fitzpatrick (Bironas
kick), 7:06.
A-69,143.
NYJ Ten
First downs 16 17
Total Net Yards 330 322
Rushes-yards 23-91 31-78
Passing 239 244
Punt Returns 2-7 2-36
Kickoff Returns 346 0-0
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 2-39
Comp-Att-lnt 23-34-2 21-32-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 5-50 2-13
Punts 549.0 741.9
Fumbles-Lost 2-2 0-0
Penalties-Yards 10-66 4-30
Time of Possession 29:22 30:38
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-N.Y Jets, Powell 14-66, Bohanon 4-17,
Smith 3-7, Green 2-1. Tennessee, Battle 1142,
C.Johnson 15-21, Locker 3-17, Fitzpatrick 2-(mi-
nus 2).
PASSING-N.Y Jets, Smith 23-34-2-289. Tennessee,
Locker 18-24-0-149, Fitzpatrick 3-8-0-108.
RECEIVING-N.Y Jets, Winslow 6-73, Kerley 4-65,
Powell 342, Gates 3-24, Bohanon 3-17, Cumber-
land 1-34, Holmes 1-25, Obomanu 1-8, Green 1-1.
Tennessee, Wright 5-56, Williams 5-53, Washington
4-105, Walker 3-14, C.Johnson 2-10, Hunter 1-16,
Mooney 1-3.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.
Broncos 52, Eagles 20
Philadelphia 3 10 0 7 20
Denver 14 7 21 10 52
First Quarter
Den-Welker 6 pass from Manning (Prater kick),
10:19.
Phi-FG Henery 35,6:03.
Den-Holliday 105 kickoff return (Prater kick), 5:50.
Second Quarter
Phi-FG Henery 25,14:18.
Phi-Polk 4 run (Henery kick), 11:06.
Den-Moreno 4 run (Prater kick), 5:05.
Third Quarter
Den-D.Thomas 1 pass from Manning (Prater kick),
9:54.
Den-D.Thomas 15 pass from Manning (Prater
kick), 5:10.
Den-Welker 4 pass from Manning (Prater kick), :22.
Fourth Quarter
Den-Johnson 17 blocked punt return (Prater kick),
13:54.
Den-FG Prater 53, 6:53.
Phi-Maehl 6 pass from Foles (Henery kick), 4:35.
A-77,002.


First downs
Total Net Yards
Rushes-yards
Passing
Punt Returns
Kickoff Returns
Interceptions Ret.
Comp-Att-Int
Sacked-Yards Lost
Punts
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


Phi Den
21 35
450 472
35-166 33-141
284 331
1-21 2-0
1-26 1-105
0-0 0-0
17-31-0 30-37-0
3-13 1-6
5-38.2 246.0
0-0 0-0
8-62 2-25
26:38 33:22


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Philadelphia, McCoy 16-73, Vick 841, Polk
3-33, Brown 8-19. Denver, Moreno 12-78, Hillman
11-36, Ball 8-24, Osweiler 2-3.
PASSING-Philadelphia, Vick 14-27-0-248, Foles 340-
49. Denver, Manning 28-34-0-327, Osweiler 2-3-0-10.
RECEIVING-Philadelphia, Celek 3-57, Maehl 2-43,
Brown 241, Jackson 2-34, Cooper 2-25, Polk 2-19,
Ertz 1-38, McCoy 1-21, Casey 1-12, Avant 1-7.
Denver, D.Thomas 9-86, Welker 7-76, Decker 5-88,
J.Thomas 443, Hillman 2-21, Moreno 1-13, Caldwell
1-5, Green 1-5.


of a pass for Vincent
Jackson.
Fitzgerald beat cor-
nerback Darrelle Revis
on the next play for his
80th career TD recep-
tion.
BROWNS 17, BENGALS 6
CLEVELAND Brian
Hoyer, the local kid who
always dreamed of be-
ing Cleveland's quarter-
back, threw two touch-
down passes in his first
start at home to lead the
Browns to a win over
Cincinnati.
Hoyer's 1-yard TD
pass to Chris Ogbon-
naya with 4:54 left
gave the Browns (2-2)
an 11-point lead and
Cleveland turned it over
to its vastly improved
defense.
In his second start in
place of injured Bran-
don Weeden, Hoyer fin-
ished 25 of 38 for 269
yards. He threw a 2-yard
TD pass in the first half
to Jordan Cameron,
who had 10 catches for
91 yards.

CHIEFS 31, GIANTS 7
KANSAS CITY, Mo.
- Alex Smith threw
three touchdown pass-
es, Dexter McCluster re-
turned a punt 89 yards
for another score and
unbeaten Kansas City
kept New York winless
at 0-4.
Eli Manning connect-
ed with Victor Cruz on a
69-yard scoring play for
New York's only score.
The Kansas City defense
sacked Manning three
times. Smith was inter-
cepted twice, the first
giveaways by the Chiefs,
who also lost a fumble.

COLTS 37, JAGUARS 3
JACKSONVILLE -
Andrew Luck threw
two touchdown passes,
Trent Richardson ran for
a score and Indianap-
olis became the latest
team to beat Jackson-
ville by double digits.


MISSED FIELD GOALS-Philadelphia, Henery 46 (WR).
Redskins 24, Raiders 14
Washington 0 10 7 7 24
Oakland 14 0 0 0 14
First Quarter
Oak-Stewart blocked punt recovery in end zone (Jan-
ikowski kick), 10:40.
Oak-Rivera 18 pass from Flynn (Janikowski kick),
3:06.
Second Quarter
Was-FG Potter 25,14:21.
Was-Amerson 45 interception return (Potter kick),
10:59.
Third Quarter
Was-Garcon 5 pass from Griffin III (Potter kick), 2:58.
Fourth Quarter
Was-Helu Jr. 14 run (Potter kick), 6:59.
A-53,549.
Was Oak
First downs 15 14
Total Net Yards 339 298
Rushes-yards 32-122 26-104
Passing 217 194
Punt Returns 2-11 3-24
Kickoff Returns 0-0 249
Interceptions Ret. 145 0-0
Comp-Att-lnt 18-31-0 21-32-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 1-10 7-33
Punts 8-35.0 744.9
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 2-1
Penaltes-Yards 3-29 4-25
Time of Possession 27:38 32:22
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Washington, Morris 1671, Helu Jr. 1341,
Griffin 1III 3-10. Oakland, Jennings 1545, McFadden
5-29, Jones 1-19, Flynn 3-4, Olawale 14, Ford 1-3.
PASSING-Washington, Griffin III 18-31-0-227. Oak-
land, Flynn 21-32-1-227.
RECEIVING-Washington, Garcon 6-59, Hankerson
449, Paulsen 2-46, Helu Jr. 2-43, Paul 2-20, Morgan
1-6, Young 14. Oakland, Jennings 8-71, D.Moore
4-66, Rivera 244, Streater 2-18, Olawale 1-11, Mas-
trud 1-8, Butler 1-6, Stewart 1-5, Reece 1-(minus 2).
MISSED FIELD GOALS-Oakland, Janikowski 52 (WL).
Chargers 30, Cowboys 21
Dallas 0 21 0 0 21
San Diego 7 6 7 10 30
First Quarter
SD-Woodhead 26 pass from Rivers (Novak kick),
7:05.
Second Quarter
Dal-Bryant 5 pass from Romo (Bailey kick), 13:10.
SD-FG Novak 36, 5:11.
Dal-Bryant34 pass from Romo (Bailey kick), 2:36.
Dal-Lee 52 intercepton return (Bailey kick), 1:19.
SD-FG Novak 42, :00.
Third Quarter
SD-Woodhead 13 pass from Rivers (Novak kick),
9:32.
Fourth Quarter
SD-FG Novak 23,14:46.
SD-Gates 56 pass from Rivers (Novak kick), 6:54.
A-68,601.
Dal SD
First downs 21 27
Total Net Yards 317 506
Rushes-yards 16-92 27-112
Passing 225 394
Punt Returns 1-38 1-12
Kickoff Returns 3-85 1-18
Interceptions Ret. 1-52 0-0
Comp-Att-lnt 27-37-0 35-42-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 3-19 1-7
Punts 540.6 4-39.8
Fumbles-Lost 2-1 0-0
Penaltes-Yards 5-33 7-85
Time of Possession 25:57 34:03
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Dallas, Murray 14-70, Romo 1-15, Dunbar
1-7. San Diego, Mathews 19-62, Woodhead 5-32, Mc-
Clain 2-11, R.Brown 1-7.
PASSING-Dallas, Romo 27-37-0-244. San Diego, Riv-
ers 3542-1-401.
RECEIVING-Dallas, Williams 7-71, Bryant 6-81, Wit-
ten 543, Murray 5-20, Beasley 3-16, Harris 1-13.
San Diego, Gates 10-136, VBrown 7-41, Allen 5-80,
Woodhead 554, Mathews 441, Royal 342, Phil-
lips 1-7.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-Dallas, Bailey 56 (WL).




Monday, September 30, 2013


SOCCER


PHOTOS BY SCOTT HEPPELL / AP
Liverpool's Daniel Sturridge, left, vies for the ball with Sunderland's Craig Gardner, right, during their
English Premier League soccer match on Sunday at the Stadium of Light, Sunderland, England.


Suarez makes explosive


return to Premier League


STEVE DOUGLAS
Associated Press
MANCHESTER, Eng-
land Luis Suarez re-
turned to the Premier
League in explosive
fashion on Sunday,
teaming up with strike
partner Daniel Stur-
ridge to propel Liver-
pool to a 3-1 win at Sun-
derland that inflicted
more misery on the di-
vision's managerless
bottom team.
Liverpool climbed
to second place in the
standings, two points
behind Arsenal, after
Suarez added to Stur-
ridge's contentious
opening goal that came
off his arm by scoring
twice at the Stadium of
Light.
After serving a
10-match ban for bit-
ing Chelsea defender
Branislav Ivanovic dur-
ing a league match in
April, Suarez made his
comeback in a frustrat-
ing League Cup loss to
Manchester United on
Wednesday.
He found the cutting
edge against Sunder-
land, though, to help
Liverpool earn a fourth
win in six games and
provide another dem-
onstration of his bur-
geoning partnership
with Sturridge that was
cut short by Suarez's act
of folly five months ago.
"He's getting the re-
ward for his hard work
over the period that
he was off," Liver-
pool manager Bren-
dan Rodgers said of Su-
arez. "Him and Daniel
up front are a real, real
handful. They com-
bined very well."
Norwich beat Stoke
1-0 in Sunday's other
match, with Jonny How-
son scoring the winner


Liverpool's Luis Suarez celebrates after scoring his goal against
Sunderland.


from long range in the
34th minute to secure
his team's second victo-
ry of the season.
Suarez couldn't have
asked for more com-
pliant opposition in his
comeback match in the
Premier League, with
Sunderland having now
lost five of its six games
and being stranded at
the foot of the table on
just one point.
Interim manager Kev-
in Ball, who is in charge
following the firing
of Paolo Di Canio last
weekend, was unable
to shore up the league's
leakiest defense in the
face of one of the lead-
ing strike partnerships
in English football.
Sturridge climbed to
the top of the scoring
charts with his fifth goal
of the campaign, inadver-
tently bundling the ball
in with his upper arm af-
ter misjudging the flight
of Steven Gerrard's corner
in the 28th minute.
Sturridge then turned
provider, cutting in
from the right and
crossing for Suarez to
poke in at the far post
in the 36th. After Eman-
uele Giaccherini had
halved the deficit in the
52nd, the same combi-


nation struck for Liver-
pool again to seal victo-
ry in the 89th, Sturridge
making inroads down
the left flank this time
and crossing for Suarez
to hook home a left-
footed finish.
"It's great to have him
back in, he gives us op-
tions and he's one of
the best forwards in the
league," Sturridge said
of Suarez. "We form a
good partnership."
Liverpool went above
third-place Tottenham
on goals scored and is
now six points above
arch-rival Man United,
which sits in 12th place
after losing 2-1 to West
Bromwich Albion on
Saturday.
United is level on sev-
en points with Stoke
and Norwich, who
served up poor fare at
Britannia Stadium ex-
cept for Howson's bril-
liant effort that separat-
ed the sides.
"It was a disappoint-
ing performance and
we were poor," said
Stoke manager Mark
Hughes, whose team
outplayed Man City in
its last home game. "We
never got any pace or
power into our game,
which is unlike us."


GOLF


David Howell wins Alfred


Dunhill Links championship


BERNIE MCGUIRE
Associated Press
ST. ANDREWS, Scot-
land England's Da-
vid Howell ended a
seven-year winless
drought with a playoff
victory over American
Peter Uihlein to cap-
ture the Alfred Dunhill
Links Championship
on Sunday.
The former Ryder
Cup player birdied the
second extra hole with
a 12-foot putt.
Both players had
ended regulation play
at 23-under par on the
Old Course, with How-
ell shooting 5-under
67 and Uihlein a 3-un-
der 69.
"To nail that bird-
ie putt to win is pret-
ty sweet," Howell said.
"I was 0-5 in playoffs
so I felt as though I de-
served one."
Howell beat Tiger
Woods in 2006 to win
the inaugural HSBC
Champions event and
has played more than
200 tournaments since
his last victory in the
BMW Championship
later that year.
England's Tom Lew-
is (64) and Ireland's
Shane Lowry (68)
shared third place at
22 under.
Howell began the fi-
nal round two strokes
behind Uihlein, but
then burst into con-
tention with five bird-
ies in his opening
seven holes, includ-
ing four in succession


DAVID CHESKIN /AP
David Howell, right, with partner actor Hugh Grant after How-
ell was presented with the trophy after winning the 2013 Al-
fred Dunhill Links Championship on Sunday at St Andrews Golf
Course, St Andrews, Scotland. Howell was partnered by actor
Hugh Grant for the Pro-Am Dunhill Team Event played alongside
the individual Links Championship which Howell won. England's
Howell ended a seven-year winless drought with a playoff victo-
ry over American Peter Uihlein to capture the championship.


starting at the fourth.
However, Howell
played the back nine
in even par while Ui-
hlein, competing in
the event for the first
time, also stalled in
completing his inward
nine at 1 under.
Both players parred
the first extra hole be-
fore Howell sealed a fifth
European Tour victory.
"Hats off to Da-
vid, (he) played great,
made a nice birdie,"
Uihlein said. "He made


more putts than I did
at the end of the day."
Howell's win moves
him back into the
world's top 100 and
also to 12th in the Race
to Dubai, qualifying
him for the European
Tour's end-of-season
final series for the first
time in his career.
"It's a dream to be
back in the big time,
as it's been a long, long
road from the depths
of despair to get here
today," Howell said.


12 noon


Time to sell that
lawn mower!
9 J;A


DaYil Co niercial
"Your First Choice" In-Print & On-Line


24
7


Time to sell Time to sell
that ir,. that washer!


No matter what time
of the day it is,
you can place
your classified
merchandise ad
online, pay for it and
just wait for the
phone to ring!

Fast, convenient and
on your schedule!


v v v vV V yll " 1 1 11 1 1 Il l 1 1 I I
*Employment advertisements are excluded.
Please call 352-314-FAST to speak with a customer service rep.
Lake: 352-314-3278 or Sumter: 352-748-1955


THEME

Ua Avntr
Auut rae


For advertising information contact '
your Daily Commercial or South Lake
Press Media Sales Representative
at (352) 365-8200. lie


I


I


B7


DAILY COMMERCIAL








Living
Send your health news tog features@dailycommercial.com 1 352-365-8208


Cl
DAILY COMMERCIAL
Monday, September 30, 2013



www.dailycommercial.comn


INNOVATION: Dancer invents wheelchair/ C2


Health

check V

THE VILLAGES
Prostate cancer support
group meets Wednesday
The Villages Prostate Cancer
Education and Support Group will
meet at 7 p.m., Wednesday at the
Laurel Manor Recreation Center,
1985 Laurel Manor Dr., off County
Road 466 and BuenaVista Blvd.
Guest speaker is Dr. Heather
Simpson-Rader, DPT, BCA-PMD,
physical therapist with Florida
Hospital Waterman in Tavares.
Meetings are free and open to all
men and their family members.
For information, call Dan Bard
at 352-259-9433, TomVajda at
352-446-4194 or Fred Neilson at
352-365-1483.

TAVARES
Waterman Village hosts
neuropathy support group
Peripheral Neuropathy results
from damage to the peripher-
al nerves and can cause weakness,
pain, loss of coordination, and sen-
sory loss in the arms and legs. The
Peripheral Neuropathy Support
Group will meet offering support for
the disease from 10 to 11:30 a.m.,
on Saturday in the Brain Gym at
Bridgewater, 500 Waterman Ave., in
Mount Dora.
For information, call Jack Koehler
at 352-735-2077.

LAKE COUNTY
Driver safety classes could
result in insurance discounts
AARP driver safety classes will be
offered for Florida drivers age 50
and older helping drivers develop
safe driving habits and upon com-
pletion of the class could offer in-
surance discounts. Cost for the
classes is $12 for AARP members
and $14 for non-members. Payment
can be made by check to AARP
The two-day classes will take
place from:
* 1 to 4 p.m., Oct. 7 and 9, at the
Leesburg Senior Center, 1211
Penn St., in Leesburg. Call 352-
326-3540 to register.
* 9 a.m. to noon, Oct. 7 and 9 at the
WT. Bland Public Library, 1995 N.
Donnelly St., in Mount Dora. Call
352-735-7180 for registration.

LEESBURG
Blind/visually impaired
support group set for Oct. 11
The New Dimensions Blind/
Visually Impaired Person Support
Group will meet from 12:30 p.m. to
2 p.m., on Fri., Oct. 11 at the IHOP
Restaurant, 10332 U.S. Highway
441, in Leesburg, across from Lake
Square Mall.
Guest speaker for the meeting is
Abby Evert, RSVP representative in
Lake County who will speak about
the Lake County RSVP Volunteer
Program.
For information, call 352
435-5040.


DIRK SHADD /TAMPA BAYTIMES
Ray Vickery demonstrates wrist curls.


Eliminate flab by



building arm muscles


SALLY ANDERSON
Tampa Bay Times
Meet your biceps, triceps and forearms
The biceps are involved in many dai-
ly upper-arm movements, such as carry-
ing and picking things up. They are locat-
ed in the front of the upper arm, between
the shoulder and the elbow. The triceps,
the "flabby muscle" that women love to
hate, are in back of the upper arm, direct-
ly behind the biceps. Whenever you push
anything, you are using your triceps. The
biceps and triceps work as a pair; when bi-
ceps contract, the arm bends, and when
the triceps contracts, the arm will length-
en. You need to strengthen both muscle
groups. When one muscle group is stron-
ger or weaker than the other, you create a
vulnerability for developing injuries to the
arm and shoulder. The muscles of the fore-
arm, located between the elbow and wrist,
extend and flex the wrist, plus rotate the
forearm. They play a big role in providing
you with a strong grip.
Do's and don't
Vary weights: Your biceps muscles are


relatively small, so you will not be able
to use as much weight as you do for your
chest and back.
Avoid jerking and swinging: The prop-
er way to perform any isolated arm exer-
cise is to not move the lower body, chest
or back; you want to move from the elbow
joint only.
Don't rock and roll: Rocking back and
forth while lifting the weight generally in-
dicates the weight is too heavy and could
strain your back.
Use the right weights: For beginners,
women should use 3- to 5-pound weights.
Men should use 8- to 10-pound weights.
Increase weight gradually, performing 1-3
sets of 8-15 repetitions.
Don't rush the moves: Lift and lower
weights with a controlled motion, rath-
er than using momentum, as this will add
more muscle power by maintaining ten-
sion on the muscle. It also protects the el-
bow joint.
Contract abdominals: And relax your
knees to prevent injuries to your lower
back.
SEE ARMS I C2


Obamacare

options can

confuse
LEE BOWMAN
Scripps Howard News Service
Aside from the enroll-
ment period for Obam-
acare, which begins
Oct 1 and runs through
March, many employ-
ers offer workers the
chance to sign up for
or change benefits this
time of year. And the
annual enrollment or
change period for Medi-
care benefits runs Oct.
1-Dec. 15.
But many of us have
trouble understanding
options and terms in-
cluded in health plans,
whether we're covered
through employer-sub-
sidized or private in-
surance, through the
new exchanges set up
to help an estimated 32
million Americans find
coverage or by govern-
ment plans like Medi-
care, mainly for the el-
derly and disabled, and
Medicaid, primarily for
the poor.
"Half of Americans
would fail Health In-
surance 101," said Er-
nie Almonte, who chairs
a financial literacy com-
mission for the Ameri-
can Institute of CPAs.
Almonte made that
statement in announc-
ing results of a new sur-
vey of people with pri-
vate insurance. Of 1,008
adults surveyed, 51 per-
cent could not correct-
ly identify at least one
of three common terms:
premium, deductible
and co-pay. Nine out
of 10 respondents said
they knew little or noth-
ing about the health re-
form law.
A survey of 25- to
64-year-olds the
age group targeted for
Obamacare found
only 14 percent could
correctly define a de-
ductible, a co-payment,
co-insurance and out-
of-pocket maximum.
Many more claimed
they did know in the
survey conducted by
Carnegie Mellon Uni-
versity economists.
For instance, all re-
spondents said they
knew what a co-pay
was, but just three out
of four correctly defined
it as the fixed cost an in-
sured person must pay
for a service such as
$20 for a physician visit
- with insurance pick-
ing up the rest.
And a new survey
SEE HEALTH I C3


Dr.Wi~ JamesYong Lae ounty.~ {ii~Il's.1Pros*1tate1 Spec 1iaist


Prostiva RF Therapy

for an Enlarged Prostate
Eliminate the need for major surgery or medications


Prostate Cancer

Screening & Treatment
Second opinions for treatment options


PAC

I S I C I ANS
***, *1 :sI u s-ionxom **
TePottCetrE sti D Jme Yug isa natioallyreonzd

"0 lin cesR .0te 0 8 1N rts eDrv oadCrifidUoogs h-hsbe


-.





C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, September 30, 2013


YMCAs offering


diabetes prevention


KRISTEN V. BROWN
San Francisco Chronicle
With high blood pres-
sure, high cholester-
ol and trouble keep-
ing her weight in check,
it was apparent to An-
drade that if she wanted
to avoid diabetes her-
self, something needed
to happen.
"I really want to learn
to live healthy," said An-
drade, 52, a Gilroy resi-
dent.
To address her con-
cerns, Andrade signed
up for a new diabetes
prevention program at
her local YMCA. The
program, set to kick off
this month within the
YMCA of Silicon Val-
ley network, is part of
an expansive effort by
Y's across the coun-
try to address the grow-
ing problem of diabe-
tes. Eventually, the Y's
will offer the prevention
program as well.
The program, which
merges exercise and
diet with group behav-
ior counseling, could
serve as a model for how
widespread community-
based organizations can
significantly address na-
tional health issues.
In the program, life-
style coaches work with
small groups of people
identified as at-risk for
diabetes for a year. They
meet once a week for 16
weeks and then once
a month for the dura-
tion. The class discuss-
es topics such as nutri-
tion, physical activity
and weight loss. Each
participant's goal is to
shave off 7 percent of
their body weight in the
first 16 weeks and grad-


ually work up to at least
150 minutes of physical
activity every week.
The design of the
classes is based on a
2002 diabetes preven-
tion study by the Na-
tional Institutes of
Health, which found
that participants in a
lifestyle-intervention
program who lost at
least 7 percent of their
body weight reduced
their risk of develop-
ing diabetes significant-
ly more than those who
took a diabetes drug,
metfomin.
Those in the NIH pro-
gram lowered their risk
by 58 percent over three
years, compared to 31
percent for those on the
drug.
"It's a lifestyle change
they can maintain over
the long haul to reap
the benefits," said John
Remy, director of YMCA
of Silicon Valley.
Individuals consid-
ered prediabetic have
blood glucose levels
higher than normal,
but not high enough to
be considered diabet-
ic. The condition puts
them at risk for devel-
oping Type 2 diabetes
and heart disease and
having a stroke. Losing
5 to 10 percent of body
weight over a six-month
period lowers the risk
for Type 2 diabetes and
heart disease, among
other things, according
to the NIH.
Working with re-
searchers at Indiana
University, YMCA of the
USA developed a ver-
sion of the NIH's life-
style-intervention pro-
gram, and a handful of
Y's offered it in 2010.


I'a ho plle like hom ,,.








ASSISTED LIVING &
ADULTDAYCAREHOMES
Lesburg Lady Lake Fruitland Park
--* 25 Years helping &
Bcaringfor jfiail elderly
--* Delicious home cooked
meals & snacksd
A real bomefor you or someone you love
Daily, weekly, monthly, yearly accommodations
--* Personalone on one care
-- Wheelchairs,.Alzheimers, Dementia, Parkinson's, etc.
Please CaRl

A10397 (3A2) 787w3,34


Dancer invents wheelchair


STEPHANIE HAYES
Tampa Bay Times
TAMPA-They went
to Merry Lynn Mor-
ris, with her twisting
blond hair and legs like
a ballerina in a jewelry
box. She helped them
stretch and rubbed
their bellies.
"Reach your arms all
the way up," she said.
"Look to the sky, and
say thank you!"
Morris is a dance
professor at the Uni-
versity of South Flori-
da, and more recently,
an inventor. She was
introducing kids with
spina bifida and ce-
rebral palsy to a chair
she dreamed up. On
this weekend in their
class, the chair would
let them dance. Not
pretend to dance, not
be pulled by a dancer,
but actually dance.
The kids peered at
it, standing tall in the
corner of the studio.
Anybody in anybody
should have the right
to dance, Morris said.
An accident or a dis-
ability needn't relegate
the people you love
to your back, pushing
you, telling you where
to go.
If her father had
been able to use this
chair, he might have
danced again, too.
The Rolling Dance
Chair was born from
the brain of a danc-
er, not an engineer. It
has taken seven years
and $150,000 of grant
money to get to this
point, evolving from a
stripped down Segway
- those rolling de-
vices that tour groups
ride through cities -
to a sleek, elegant de-
sign.
It's getting closer to
what Morris imagined,
getting more attention
from the world each


EVE EDELHEIT /TAMPA BAYTIMES
USF Dance Professor Merry Lynn Morris works with students during her mixed ability dance class
in Tampa at USE Morris has invented an electronic wheelchair that gives dancers with limited mo-
bility the opportunity to make fluid dance motions.


year. U.S. Rep. Tam-
my Duckworth of Illi-
nois, a double amputee,
tried the chair on a vis-
it to USF in 2010. In Oc-
tober, Morris will pres-
ent her invention at the
Smithsonian Institution
during a conference
for innovators, speak-
ing alongside the press
secretary from NASA
and the deputy director
of the U.S. Patent and
Trademark Office.
The chair is stately
with a synthetic round
seat that's clear, de-
signed to almost disap-
pear under the danc-
er. It is sturdy enough
for a second dancer to
stand on, spinning, leg
extended in full ara-
besque.
The most important
feature of the chair is
the person sitting in it.
He is in control. When
he leans, the chair
moves. The wheels can
propel the chair in any
direction using the
slightest movement of
a body.
It's an extension of
dance, Morris said, not
an obstacle. No one
thinks twice about a tap


Better Hearing...
Better Living!!!

8602 S.W. Hwy 200, Suite E
Ocala, FL 34481
10601 US Hwy 441, Suite E-1
Leesburg, FL 34788
2721 S. Woodland Blvd
Deland, FL 32720
1216 Mt. Homer Rd.
Eustis, FL 32726
10935 SE 177 Pl. Suite 203
Summerfield, FL 34491
www.hearingworksflorida.comnn4 i lg W

Change your life, Call us today at (888) 403-2779


shoe, or a ballet shoe
with a wooden block
on the end. Think of
Broadway dances, the
rolling desk chairs and
elaborate sets. Think of
the hoops and flames
of Cirque du Soleil.
People have a hard-
er time getting past a
wheelchair.
"You create these de-
vices and people are
frightened of them,"
said Morris, 38. "Get out
of the way, here comes
the wheelchair user."
Morris was a danc-
er from the start. She
had strong ankles and
uncanny leg exten-
sion. She also loved to
take things apart, ride
her bike with no hands
and try every piece of
equipment on the play-
ground.
Bill Morris was a man
of God, his family said,
a Gideon who distrib-
uted free Bibles, a Navy
. He was starting a mar-
keting business with his
wife, whose name was
Catherine but whom he
nicknamed Sonshine
when they first met at
a prayer meeting. They
said he rescued ani-


ARMS
FROM PAGE Cl

HAMMER CURLS
Targets both biceps
and forearms; adding a
squat to the movement
will strengthen lower
body and core. Stand-
ing with feet hip width
apart, hold weights at
your sides with palms
facing inward. Begin
with weights slightly be-
hind you. As you lower
into the squat position,
begin to curl weights
upward, elbows point-
ing downward. Holding
that arm position, stand
up, then slowly lower
the weights. Repeat 1-3
sets of 8-15 reps.


HAS YOUR0, ,
DOCTOR RECENTLYPRME UGNTC E
LEFT THE AREA ? DOES YOUR
DOCTOR NO LONGER ACCEPT YOUR
INSURANCE? WE ARE HERE FOR YOU!
IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE!
COMPREHENSIVE MEDICAL CARE & MANAGEMENT OF: A TRUSTED HEALTH CARE TEAM PROVIDING THE
Heart Disease Hypertension Diabetes Pulmonary Disease Arthritis 9 Digestive Problems A TRUSEVH OFPATH NCARETA RVDNIH
Geriatric Care Allergies Kidney Disease Stroke Management Joint & Heel Injections HIGHEST LEVEL OF PATIENT CARE WITH COMPASSION.
Minor Surgeries Skin Cancer Screening Skin Biopsies Men's Health Vascular Disease Pictured above left to right Not pictured
Erectile Dysfunction Sleep Apnea Women's Gynecological Screening Florian Gegaj, MD Dinesh Khanna, MD


WE OFFER THE FOLLOWING:
CT Scans Nuclear Stress Test Echocardiograms UltrasoundsHolter Monitor
Coumadin Clinic Xrays Glucose Monotoring Polysomnography (Sleep Studies)
Nerve Conduction Studies Pulmonary Function Testing Shingles Vaccine
Bone Densitometry Full Laboratory



IN U P M F O P RSI IftVJ lHll =1 111 [ ,I C& PRVLG
I .,!553 B .f I*ll SS SS



I I*I**.B


S- .
Board Certified Internal Medicine
Ayesha Butt, MD
Board Certified Internal Medicine
Hazem EI-Arousy, MD
General Practice & Surgery
Michelle Hornstein, MD
Board Certified Family Practice
Amir Etemadnia, MD
Board Certified Internal Medicine
Sundeep Shah, MD
Board Certified Internal Medicine, Nephrology


Board Certified Internal Medicine
Eldar Bagabatov, MD
Board Certified Internal Medicine
Michelle Madonna, ARNP
BS. and M.S. in Nursing
National Board Certified in Adult Health
Patricia Jones, MD
Board Certified Family Practice


mals and people, bring-
ing in those who need-
ed a place to stay.
When Merry Lynn
Morris was 12, she and
her father painted her
room in their Tampa
home a sunny yellow.
She remembers him
leaving to go get more
paint, but he didn't re-
turn. His car was hit
head on, his family
said. He was in a coma,
and the doctors didn't
think he would survive.
The accident left him
with a severe brain in-
jury, a blind eye, a bro-
ken hip and a shattered
knee. After seizures set
in, he had intermit-
tent paralysis and was
mostly confined to a
wheelchair.
They took him ball-
room dancing for ther-
apy and got him to try
standing between bal-
let bars.
"The dancing stim-
ulated him the most,"
said Sonshine Morris.
"He was beaming. He
would smile."
He didn't understand
basic things that you
need an umbrella in
the rain, for example.


Frontal raise with
overhead triceps exten-
sion
This is a compound
move working both the
front of the shoulders
and the triceps (back of
the upper arms). Sitting
with back straight and
abdominals contract-
ed, hold light-medium
weights with palms fac-
ing inward. Raise arms
shoulder height, el-
bows slightly relaxed,
pause, continue to raise
straight arms overhead,
pausing once again.
Bending elbows, low-
er weights behind head,
elbows framing face
and chin lifted. Repeat
pattern 1-3 sets for 8-15
repetitions.
LATERAL RAISE
Strengthens shoulder
muscles and the traps
(upper part of back).
Sitting or standing, con-
tract abdominals and
maintain a straight
back. Holding light-me-
dium weights at your
sides, raise arms with
elbows slightly bent and
pointing to the back, to
shoulder height, not al-
lowing wrists to bend
down. Raise and low-
er arms with a feeling
of control, repeating 1-3
sets of 8-15 repetitions.


lhf:/wwG rffIi. Io


I


C2


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, September 30, 2013




Monday, September 30, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Rising Alzheimer's creates



strain on caregivers


LAURAN NEERGAARD
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Da-
vid Hilfiker knows what's
coming. He was diag-
nosed with Alzheim-
er's so early that he's had
time to tell his family
what he wants to hap-
pen once forgetfulness
turns incapacitating.
"When it's time to
put me in an institu-
tion, don't have me at
home and destroy your
own life," said the re-
tired physician, who is
still well enough that
he blogs about the in-
sidious progress of the
disease. "Watching the
Lights Go Out," it's ti-
tled.
Nearly half of all se-
niors who need some
form of long-term care
- from help at home
to full-time care in a fa-
cility have demen-
tia, the World Alzheim-
er Report said Thursday.
It's a staggering problem
as the global population
ages, placing enormous
strain on families who
provide the bulk of that
care at least early on,
and on national econo-
mies alike.
Indeed, cognitive im-
pairment is the stron-
gest predictor of who
will move into a care fa-
cility within the next two
years, 7.5 times more
likely than people with
cancer, heart disease or
other chronic ailments
of older adults, the re-
port found.
"It's astonishing," said
Marc Wortmann, execu-
tive director of Alzheim-
er's Disease Internation-
al, which commissioned
the report and focused
on the problems of care-
giving. "What many
countries try to do is
keep people away from
care homes because they
say that's cheaper. Yes it's
cheaper for the govern-
ment or the health sys-
tem, but it's not always
the best solution."
And dropping birth
rates mean there are few-
er children in families to
take care of aging par-
ents, too, said Michael
Hodin of the Global Co-
alition on Aging.
"Very shortly there will
be more of us over 60


CLIFF OWEN/AP
Retired physician David Hilfiker, of Washington, leaves the National Press Club on his bike on Sept.
19 after talking about his life with Aalzheimer's in Washington. Hilfiker, was diagnosed in September
2012, and has been writing about the experience of losing his mental capacity in his blog "Watch-
ing the Lights Go Out." Nearly half of all seniors who need some form of long-term care, from help at
home to full-time care in a facility, have dementia, the World Alzheimer Report said Thursday.


than under 15," he not-
ed.
Today, more than 35
million people world-
wide, including 5 million
in the U.S., are estimat-
ed to have Alzheimer's.
Barring a medical break-
through, those numbers
are expected to more
than double by 2050.
This week, the U.S.
National Institutes of
Health announced $45
million in new Alzheim-
er's research, with most
of the money focused
on finding ways to pre-
vent or at least delay
the devastating disease.
The Obama administra-
tion had hoped to invest
$100 million in new Al-
zheimer's research this
year, a move blocked by
the budget cuts known
as the sequester. Overall,
the nation has been in-
vesting about $400 mil-
lion a year in Alzheim-
er's research.
But the disease's fi-
nancial toll is $200 bil-
lion a year in the U.S.
alone, a tab expected to
pass $1 trillion by 2050
in medical and nurs-
ing home expenditures
- not counting unpaid
family caregiving. The
world report puts the
global cost at $604 bil-
lion.
Thursday, families af-


HEALTH
FROM PAGE C1

from the insurance firm Aflac found three out of
four workers think health care reform is too com-
plicated, and that they know little or nothing about
the new federal and state health care exchanges or
marketplaces. Just more than half- 53 percent -
said they don't know enough to adequately manage
their family's health insurance coverage.
Although plans offered through the exchanges
are required to summarize benefits and coverage
in plain language, experts say finding optimal cov-
erage out of a long list of possibilities is daunting
even for highly educated adults.
The CPAs offer suggestions for choosing health
insurance at www.360financialliteracy.org.
* Review your health history and behavior. Con-
sider whether you routinely or seldom use medi-

CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES
S "'et ".. f K"



r Pharmacy Prices!
Generic Medicines Save on gas! Use Mail order!
Cialis 20mg. 24 count.,89.95 Save without sacrificing
Viagra 100mg. 20 count,.., '65.95 safety, quality or service
Actonel 35mg. 12 count.. $69 Order anywhere in the
Flomax 4mg. 90 count,.. 68 Country, so tell your family &
Nexium 40mg, 90 count.,, 74 friends about us!
NO SHIPPING COST! CALL NOW! START SAVING TODAY!!


101 SE WY41SBleieFL 42
(/mi. Nrho -MatonHy.41


fected by Alzheimer's
and aging advocates
said it's time for a glob-
al push to end the brain
disease, just like the
world's governments
and researchers came
together to turn the
AIDS virus from a death
sentence into a chronic
disease.
"We need a war on Al-
zheimer's," said San-
dy Halperin, 63, of Tal-
lahassee, Fla., who was
diagnosed with early-
stage Alzheimer's three
years ago. He now finds
himself stumbling for
words, but still visits
lawmakers to urge more
funding.
Meanwhile, the world
report focuses on care-
giving, stressing how the
needs of people with de-
mentia are so different
than those of other ail-
ments of aging, such as
cancer and heart dis-
ease. People with de-
mentia begin need-
ing some help to get
through the day ear-
ly on, to make sure they
don't leave the stove on
or get lost, for example.
Eventually, patients lose
the ability to do the sim-
plest activities of dai-
ly life, and can survive
that way for a decade
or more. Often fami-
ly members quit their


jobs so they can provide
round-the-clock care,
and the stress can harm
their own health.
The world report said
families need early ed-
ucation about what ser-
vices are available to
help before they're in a
crisis, plus training in
how to handle the be-
havioral problems of the
disease such as not to
argue if their loved one
thinks Ronald Reagan
is still president, or how
to handle the agitation
at dusk known as sun-
downing, or how to re-
act when the patient hits
someone.
Two-thirds of the calls
that Home Instead Se-
nior Care, which pro-
vides in-home person-
al care services, receives
are from families that
did no planning until
the patient had a crisis,
such as wandering or a
fall, said its president,
Jeff Huber.
Hilfiker, the blogger
with early Alzheimer's,
takes that education
idea a step further. He
tells everyone he knows
that he has Alzheimer's
as a way to break some
of the stigma, "so when
I make dumb mistakes, I
don't need to be embar-
rassed," he said.


cal services, and what changes you expect in the
next year.
* Compare the premiums you'll have to pay
against the services that are covered.
* Compare the coverage features, such as what
doctors and hospitals take part in a plan, what
benefits of each plan are important to you, and
any limits or restrictions.
* Compare what sort of deductibles, co-pays
and other fees you'll have to pay, and what out-
of-pocket maximum per year the plan has.
The independent National Institute of Medicine
offers "The New Health Care Law and You," an on-
line guide that describes health coverage options
and gives rough cost estimates.
The government also provides information on
all types of insurance not just Obamacare at
www.healthcare.gov.


C3


Sweeping shift in

treatment of anorexia

KRISTEN V. BROWN
San Francisco Chronicle
SAN FRANCISCO A quartet of studies to be
published in the November issue of the Journal
ofAdolescent Health offers evidence in favor of a
new approach and suggests an emerging shift
in the way hospitals approach treating the dis-
order.
Anorexia, an eating disorder typified by re-
lentless pursuit of thinness, affects about 1 per-
cent of adolescent girls in the United States, by
some estimates. Weight gain is crucial in revers-
ing medical complications of anorexia, such as
confusion, sensitivity to cold and even failing
organs, and in enabling the trying psychological
recovery that must accompany a physical one.
In refeeding, calories traditionally are doled
out with caution, new patients starting with a
low number that is then gradually increased.
Pushing too much, too quickly could be danger-
ous, so the old wisdom goes, the sudden surge
of nutrients putting a malnourished body at risk
for a potentially fatal metabolic imbalance.
The standard is rooted in post-World War II
studies of Americans held by the Japanese as
prisoners of war and reinforced in clinical guide-
lines from organizations like the American Psy-
chiatric Association. It is typical for initial cal-
orie intake to begin somewhere around 1,200
calories a day, about half of the recommended
daily intake for an average healthy teenager.
Then in 2011, researchers at University of Cal-
ifornia, San Francisco, Benioff Children's Hospi-
tal issued a challenge to that long-standing stan-
dard, suggesting instead that the "start low, go
slow" method was inefficient, unnecessary and
out of date. They proposed instead that most pa-
tients can start at much higher calorie levels.


AirWay
Respiratory
Solutions


905 E. Alfred Street
Tavares, FL 32778
352,343,3006


At AirWay Respiratory
CATHETER KITS are now available
with Medicare billing and local delivery.

Please contact us with any questions
you may have,

AirWay has over 80 Years of Combined
Experience in the Home Health Industry




Owner, Dr. James Costello, says, "My doctors utilize
modern techniques, and I instill old fashioned values."


NEW PATIENT SPECIAL
COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) 4
CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D010)
EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) Reg. $5 9
SECOND OPINION (IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE)


CROWNS Consultation PDENTURES
3y99Each and $749Uach
0 D051 10
D 5 120or
Second Opinion \ D0 /
No Charge!

LEESBURG MT. DORA
Sunrise Dental Tri-Dental
1380 N. Blvd. W. Leesburg 18515 Hwy. 441 Mt. Dora
326-3368 383-5377
The patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed
for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the
advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This
discount does not apply to those parents with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICESARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.




C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, September 30, 2013


CARDIOVASCULAR GROUP


David C. Lew, Jose R. Rosado, Patrick Kevin,
MD, FACC, FSCAI MD, FACC Williams, MD, FACC
Chairman Vice Chairman


Joseph G. Sahab, Leonardo, Victores,
MD, FACC MD


John R. Hurt, Sanjeev Bhatta,
MD, FACC MD, FACC


Ronnie, Sabbah, Marwan Mihyu,
MD MD, FACC


Ilie T. Barb,
MD, FACC


MULTI-SPECIALTY GROUP


Maria Bello, MD
Family Medicine


Robert T. Meade,
MD, Nephrology


Fredric Davis, DO Tanya Diaz, MD
Internal Medicine Family Medicine


Larry Foster, MD Youssef Khodor, DO
Family Medicine Family Medicine


Frank Pellegrino, Jeffrey Robinson. David L. Sustarsic, David Moskowitz, MD,
MD, Family Medicine MD, Family Medicine MD, FACS, Surgery Internal Medicine &
Nephrology


SERVICES OFFERED

* Angioplasty: Coronary Peripheral and Renal
* Atherectomy
* Bone Density
* Cardiac Catheterization with Private Recovery Suites
* Cardiac Rehab
* Coumadin Clinic
*CT
* CT Angiography
* Echocardiography: Carotid, Traditional & Transesophageal
*EECP
* Holter & Event Monitoring
* Laboratory Service
* Nerve Conduction Studies
* Pacemaker Clinic
* Peripheral Angioplasty
* Pulmonary Function Test
* Sleep Study Lab
* Stenting: Cardiac, Carotid, and Peripheral
* Stress Testing: Nuclear and Traditional
* Ultrasound: Abdominal, Carotid, Peripheral Arterial,
Peripheral Venous, Renal
* Varilase
* Vascular Ultrasound




Florida Heart & Vascular

Multi-Specialty Group


511 Medical Plaza Dr., Suite 101, Leesburg 352-728-6808
1560 Santa Barbara Blvd., The Villages 352-750-5000
www.FLHEARTCENTER.com


C4


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, September 30, 2013










Comics &Diversions www.dailycommercial.corn


LUANN


MUTTS


ZITS


GARFIELD


FOR BETrER OR FOR WORSE


IM TRtF-PF. TAAT Yo'LI, 'PAY'' ATTEJioN To
THIS'YEA'SC cLJUi-IcLILU4', I'VF
PEI TC oS F<3Rc




2013 John L. Hart FLP Dist. by Creators
ROSE IS ROSE


PEANUTS
THERE WA$ A REAL
LESSON TO BE LEARNED
| ycIA FROMEEING SNOOP?
ACLP HOOE B6RNDO(WN


I w D^ roE c~ 'i
',11|~~~~ 30S^isi'1'^


(r ATETH1N6s?



TMEOOCToA


ADVERWT' BUILDS CHARACTER...
WiTHOUT ADVER5T A PERSON COULD
NEVER MATURE AND FACE UP TO
ALLOFTHEtINES IN LIFE!






,MORE ADVERITq!



-T( = lOKr R
-rMe DOCTORu
slw f ~ e""


I


rT Facebk.cor/BCcomic juohnHarts tudos comf H
ql'SK <\vo Facebook~com/BCcomic ___ johnHartStudios corn


HEATHCLIFF


Family won't pay deadbeat

dad's cremation expenses


DEAR ABBY: I was divorced 14
years ago. Afterward, my ex,
"Tom," hid from me because he
was afraid I'd have him arrested
for not paying child support.
Our son is a Marine, and the
Red Cross notified him that his
father was dying in a hospital on
the East Coast. My ex's aunt had
contacted them to notify my son
as next of kin. Tom had remarried,
divorced again and had a girl-
friend. He died a few days later.
Nobody is willing to pay for
his cremation. I asked his sis-
ter and aunt if we could split the
bill three ways, even though I re-
alize I'm not obligated. They re-
fused, even after being told the
remains would be deemed "un-
claimed." The county would dis-
pose of him as an indigent drift-
er. Their excuse was they hadn't
heard from him in several years.
I told them they were preaching
to the choir, since I was the one
he hid from.
I do not resent my ex because
I realize his death was as un-
predictable as his life. But I do
feel bitterly taken advantage of.
When I accused his relatives of
false concern, they got angry
at me. How can I demonstrate
honor to my son by dishonor-
ing his father that way? ON THE
SPOT IN CALIFORNIA
DEAR ON THE SPOT: You are not
the next of kin; your son is. Ask
him what he thinks would be
the appropriate way to handle
his deadbeat dad's remains. You
made the effort to have the fam-
ily pay for the burial, and that
should show your son that you
tried to honor his father.
I don't know how long it has
been since your ex passed, but
this is a case where the body
could have been donated to a
medical school. There is nothing
dishonorable about that.
DEAR ABBY: A friend who lives
out of town asked me if she can
stay with me for a few days. We
often host each other. However,
she also mentioned that she has
a bedbug infestation.
I could take precautions, but
some friends have said it was
nervy of her to even ask because
it put me in an awkward posi-
tion. I honestly would prefer she
not come, but I feel guilty Any


u fr Dear

ee, Abby

JEANNE
PHILLIPS
advice? POSSIBLE HOST IN NEW
YORK
DEAR POSSIBLE HOST: Yes. Tell
your friend you would love to
see her, but in light of her revela-
tion, you think it would be bet-
ter if she stays in a hotel dur-
ing this visit. And unless you are
absolutely sure that her home
and clothing are insect-free,
entertain her away from your
dwelling. Bedbugs can cling
to EVERYTHING suitcases,
clothing, you name it. Hostess,
protect thyself.
DEAR ABBY: My husband died
three years ago and I'm still
grieving deeply. Time hasn't
made it easier; in fact, it's getting
more difficult. No one around
me understands or even cares,
for that matter.
How do I find a good thera-
pist? I don't know what ques-
tions to ask to see if I can trust
him or her with my thoughts,
and if we would get along. Any
suggestions? DYING OFA BROKEN
HEART
DEAR DYING: A way to find a good
therapist would be to ask friends
and/or your doctor for referrals
and explain that since your hus-
band's death your grief hasn't less-
ened. Your state psychological as-
sociation can also provide the
names of members who special-
ize in grief counseling.
Interview several prospec-
tive therapists. A question you
should ask is how many patients
with your problem he or she
has successfully treated. How-
ever, the bottom line is wheth-
er you feel the therapist listens
well and has the compassion
to help you, which is as impor-
tant as any diploma hanging on
the wall. You'll know when you
meet someone you are comfort-
able with.
Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren,
also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was
founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips.
Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or
PO. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.


Why Consign?
* Easy No yard sales or expensive ads
* Hasle-.free We price and display your furniture
* Safe No strangers in your home
* Convenient Never wait for "maybe" buyers
Now Accepting Up-Scale Furniture
Located in back of Main Street Antiques

(352) 460-4806
201 W. Main Street In Historic Downtown Leesburg
Open Mon.-Fri. 10am to 5pm, Sat. 10am to 3::3iipm
E facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburg



Sports Injuries Spinal Stenosis
Oiteouartinrit% Peripheral Neuropathy
By covering up pain, swelling, or others, you
may be making a deeper problem.


114















-14






~umm

41 C
UK C


Acupuncture is a time-tested,
safe, natural and drug free
treatment that can provide
immediate relief and long
lasting benefits.
James N Georgiades AP


HeafIngLars Center


315-8305
Now Accepting New Patients Most Insurances Accepted


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, September 30, 2013


"CV09e09TW AMP./
ON fOc VLL.




Monday, September 30, 2013


S udCoku ***** 4puz.com

2 6 3 5

4 7 6 8

3 4

64 8 _2 51



38 4 5 96

6 8

7 5 3 2

9 5 8 4
Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION How to play: Fill in the blank
squares with the numbers 1 through
1 5 7 3 6 4 2 9 8 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical
3 9 8 2 1 5 7 6 4 column and nine-square
sub-grid contains no repeated num-
642789513 bers.
463978152
Puzzles range in difficulty from one
2 7 9 5 4 1 3 8 6 to six stars.
8 1 5 6 3 2 9 4 7 The solution to today's puzzle will
5 8 4 1 2 7 6 3 9 be in tomorrow's paper.
731896425
926453871

AXYDLBAAXR
isLONGFELLOW
One letter stands for another. In this sample, A is used
for the three L's, X for the two O's, etc. Single letters,
apostrophes, the length and formation of the words
are all hints. Each day the code letters are different.
9-30 CRYPTOQUOTE


KIL GVWU


GVCSU


"ITNNQRLDD"


SVDL QKD BLTRQRF


QX QK GLWL

HO DTURLDD


RVK HTSTRELU

ETWS ZCRF


Saturday's Cryptoquote: AS FOR A FUTURE
LIFE, EVERY MAN MUST JUDGE FOR HIMSELF
BETWEEN CONFLICTING VAGUE PROBABILITIES.
CHARLES DARWIN



WORD S)C)R) 1)DM)M)DA)O)E
BY JUDD HAMBRICK 2013 UFS/Dist. by Universal Uclickfor UFS
QQQQQQQ 5th Letter 1m DOWN
.000 =+ 7 PTS



..... Q 2nd Down
^-^ ^^ ^-^ ^-^ -^ ^- ^-^2nd Downy |
~JJJ 6B~ J2+ 40PTS 4


000 =~^^ 3" DOWN
A3rd Down
..... + 30 PTS ,



0000000Y~ 4thDOWN
...00004th Down


FOUR PLAY
TIME LIMIT: 20 MIN AVERAGE GAME 260-270 PTS TOTAL
Directions: Make a 2- to 7-letter word from the letters on each /.:idi i-, Add points
to each word or letter using scoring directions. Seven-letter words get a 60-point
bonus. All words can be found in Webster's New World College Dictionary.
9-3013 JUDD'S SOLUTION TOMORROW 0
WORD RMMA SOLUTION BY JUDD HAMBRICK
W R V O IMM O I 2013 UFS / Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS
M6 E )1 T2 H7 A2)N 1s tDOWN =101
03 ~ ~ C E1S K 2 2P 2nd DOWN= 128

R(2 EL22E1V 3rd DOWN 136

M6 A2 T2 6 H7 E1 J14th DOWN = 93
T2 H12THBONUS DOWN = 83
AVERAGE GAME 345-355 PTS JUDD'S TOTAL = 541
9-29-13


DAILY COMMERCIAL

DENNIS THE MENACE


FAMILY CIRCUS


"Maybe. I'll let you know when I
get home from school."


DILBERT
I HEARD THAT MARKET-
ING'S OPTOGENETIC
DEVICE TWEAKED SOME
OF YOUR PREFERENCES.
I ) YUP.


SHOE
rYVOU WERE DRIVING
SALL OVER THE ROAD.


PICKLES


PHANTOM


BLONDIE
I FOUND THIS LETTER LAST
FOR YOU IN THE NIGHT.?!
0OT-TOM --, .:
OF M/ M ,IL'' ',
BA6 LAST
'r"16 H .. -. ,- "
,'.[- .-" ', -. "-' l -1 '--.. -
.... ... J ] I
*\ -,r I

_^ ~ s-'----< *
BABY BLUES. ,
BABY B LU ES


' YEAN... YOU SURE TOOK
APPARENTLY YOUR SWEET TIME
IT WAS DELIVERING IT
MAILED TO 'TOME J
SYOU '-
2YEAS -'


w wi~LE WE WC2E oeo
002 FFKN-E-CLl)
It~lTe) OUV PWP!2tt>
vw\ >OV *] -
F- -^


WM\M k^ T 5TWE lime
ThA COPS DEPT.J
,, v .
,1 '
w :\i'~ \ o ?.


GIMME A BREAK! YOU THINK ,
YOURS WAS THE ONLY !
"v -> ,LETTER <, .
L -", IN THE BOTTOM If^"-/
,<-- \ ^- O- -- i--r- ;
-- I-:, E i,- E
, '-. -',' -, '
_,r ., _' > -: I
(-3. .-,_ ? ',-.C


T,. .RE'S NE IT
SOMSTVU16 WS &E
,OO ._l- OT WrWIUT

D -..- ps,


BEETLE BAILEY


E
S NOW I'M A GAY
S ANARCHIST WJHO
S LOVES FOOTBALL AND
STRING CHEESE.
0
0
car


SOUNDS
LIKE A WELL,
BIG THE CHEESE
ADJUST- PART CAME
MENT. EASILY...

'c.0


C7




DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, September 30, 2013


If you're turning 65 or are ready,
, to retire, you should know that at
\ UnitedHealthcare our goal is to make
health care work for you. We've designed
our products around what you've told us
is important. We've created programs
i to help you live a healthier life. And we
surround you with people who are there
for you.


S$0 monthly premiums
for medical and Part D coverage

$0 copay for primary care visits

$0 copay for Tier 1 generic drugs


Call today.
If you're new to Medicare, ready to retire
or losing your employer plan, find out how
you can enroll today.


( 1-855-226-7930, TTY 711
8 a.m. 8 p.m. local time, 7 days a week


(9 HelloUnitedMedicare.com


J UnitedHealthcareU
Medicare Solutions


You must continue to pay your Medicare Part B premium.
The benefit information provided is a brief summary, not a complete description of benefits. For more information contact the plan. Limitations,
copayments, and restrictions may apply. Benefits, formulary, pharmacy network, provider network, premium and/or co-payments/co-insurance may
change on January 1 of each year.
Plans are insured through UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company and its affiliated companies, a Medicare Advantage organization with a
Medicare contract.


Y0066_130722_113429 Accepted


OVICAP

^^pT^T^^

LEARNs


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, September 30, 2013


FLDC_0805




Monday, September 30, 2013







PROFESSIONAL I

SERVICE

DIRECTORY

BUY 2 SPOTS


AT $45EACH 1
AND GET THE 3RD

HALF OFF


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Dl


24/7 classified easy fast convenient affordable 'k

Sell your merchandise today at Mo- a.a


TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL


352-3


A


ot A


Find It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST!

Lake: 352-314-3278 or Sumter: 352-748-1955 Monday Friday 8am 5pm


m.^~~~ ~~ ~ ~ ~~P l 1 0111 .i R.. *i off*. *1 .1Lj11 m* nj u g^~ ^ ifm M i~ujJiu~~
*i~iiial~ili~jl^[i~1i54yilil|ef11 111M 1


Classified Index


Legal Notices ..

Announcements

At Your Service.

Financial ......

Employment ...

Pets/Animals ..


.............003

. . .. .100

.............200

.............300

.............400

. . . .500


Merchandise Mart .....

Real Estate/For RENT ..

Real Estate/For SALE .
Manufactured Homes ..

Recreation ...........

Transportation ........


2
Legal Notices


003 Legal Notices

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF PERSONAL
PROPERTY
Notice is hereby given that the undersigned
will sell, to satisfy lien of the owner, at public
sale by competitive bidding on October 17,
2013 at the times and locations listed below.
The personal goods stored therein by the fol-
lowing:
2:30p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility
located at: 1970 S. Hwy 27, Clermont, Fl.
34711 (352) 242 6602
Unit # 317 Henry Cantrell Jr. Junk House
hold stuff.
Unit # 164 Christina Taylor No description
on original lease. Unit # 135 Laura L Bishop
Original lease does not ask for a description,
Unit # 323 Ryan Meaux furniture mixed
items
3:30p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility
located at: 18286 Apshawa Rd. Minneola, Fl.
34715(352) 241 8001
4:30p.m. at the Extra Space Storage facility
located at: 300 E. Division St. Minneola, Fl.
34715 (352) 394 0501. Unit# E23 Keith W.
Edwards Junk, Unit# C81 Trudy P. Reese -
Furniture, Unit# E29 Scotty Coleman Tool
boxes, TVs, Household Items, Unit# C53 Stu
dio D Demetrius Isom Gymnastics Equip
ment\.
Purchases must be made with cash only and
paid at the time of sale. All goods are sold
as is and must be removed at the time of
purchase. Extra Space Storage reserves the
right to bid. Sale is subject to adjournment.
Thank You, Extra Space Storage.
Ad No.00410494
September 30 & October 7, 2013




PUBUC NOTICE
U Haul Company of Gainesville Notice is
hereby given that on October 21,2013,
U Haul of Gainesville hereby
publishes notice, as required by Florida
"Self Storage Act", section 83.806 and
83.807, of a public sale of the property listed
below to satisfy a landlord's lien. All sales are
for cash to the highest bidder and are con
sidered final under the Judicial Lien process
by public auction of the following storage
units. The goods to be sold are generally de
scribed as household goods. The terms of
the sale will be cash only. U Haul Company
does reserve the right to refuse any
bid.
The sale will begin at 8:00 AM and will con
tinue until all units are sold.
U-Haul Storage of Eustis,15519 US Hwy 441,
Eustis, FL 32726
115 Michael Holland
130 David McNealy
220 Leigh Codding
427 Melanie McKnight
627 Tanisha Darby
U-Haul Center of Leesburg, 10128 US Hwy
441 South, Leesburg, FL 34788
E121 Hope Brown
E130 Hazel Berry
RV 003 Yu Bang
I.1 H iul C'i. .i, r,,
Lr^r,u',,i ", H. ." Leesburg, FL
32726
10060 James Sager
10078 Linda Dowdy
Ad No.00410651
September 30 & October 7, 2013


003 Legal Notices



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR LAKE COUNTY,
FLORIDA GENERAL
JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO.11 CA 001656
THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON TRUST
COMPANY, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FKA
THE BANK OF NEW YORK TRUST COMPANY,
N.A. AS SUCCESSOR TO JPMORGAN CHASE
BANK N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR RAMP
2003RS9,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
STANLEY I FLEEK, ET AL.,
DEFENDANTS)
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated September
12, 2013 and entered in Case No.
11 CA 001656 in the Circuit Court of the 5th
Judicial Circuit in and for Lake County, Flor
ida wherein THE BANK OF NEW YORK MEL
LON TRUST COMPANY, NATIONAL ASSOCIA
TION FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK TRUST
COMPANY, N.A. AS SUCCESSOR TO JPMOR
GAN CHASE BANK N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR
RAMP 2003RS9 was the Plaintiff and STAN
LEY I FLEEK, ET AL, the Defendant(s). I will
sell to the highest and best bidder for cash,
beginning at 11:00 a.m. at the First floor of
the Lake County Courthouse, 550 W. Main
St., Tavares, FL 32778 on the 20 day of No
vember, 2013, the following described prop
erty as set forth in said Final Judgment:
LOT 9 IN SUNNY DELL MANOR, A SUBDIVI-
SION IN THE CITY OF CLERMONT, FLORIDA,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 12, PAGE 90, PUB-
ULIC RECORDS OF LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH ALL THE TENEMENTS,
HEREDITAMENTS AND APPURTENANCES
THERETO BELONGING OR IN ANYWISE AP-
PERTAINING.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS OF THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER, AS OF THE
DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A
CLAIM WITH SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
DATED: September 16, 2013.
NEIL KELLY
Clerk, Circuit Court
/s/S. Holewinski
Deputy Clerk
10-07896 CTT
If you are a person with a disability who
needs any accommodation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of certain as-
sistance, Please contact Nicole Berg, the
ADA Coordinator at the Office of the Trial
Court Administrator, Lake County Court-
house, P.O. Box 7800/550 W. Main Street,
Tavares, Florida 32778, Telephone
(352)253-1604, at least 7 days before your
scheduled court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving notification if the time before
the scheduled appearance is less than 7
days; if you are hearing or voice impaired,
call 711.
Ad NO: 410010
September 23 & 30, 2013


003 Legal Notices

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR LAKE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.
12 -CA -000755
U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
Plaintiff,
V.
KEVIN N. MANWARREN A/K/A KEVIN MAN
WARREN; EDDIE A. MANWARREN; UN
KNOWN SPOUSE OF KEVIN N. MANWARREN
A/K/A KEVIN MANWARREN; UNKNOWN TEN
ANT 1 UNKNOWN TENANT 2;; AND ALL UN
KNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST THE ABOVE NAMED DE
FENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ARE) NOT KNOWN TO
BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN
KNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS; COLLEGE PARK OF
CLERMONT HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION,
INC.; FLORIDA HOUSING FINANCE CORPO
RATION
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the
Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure en
tered on September 11, 2013, in this cause,
in the Circuit Court of Lake County, Florida,
the clerk shall sell the property situated in
LIAKE County, Florida, described as:
LOT 21 COLLEGE PARK PHASE I, ACCORD-
ING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 46, PAGE 11, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LAKE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
a/k/a 1026 PRINCETON DR., CLERMONT, FL
34711
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder,
for cash, inside the front door, of the Lake
County Courthouse, 550 W. Main Street,
First Floor, Tavares, FL 32778, on November
20, 2013 at 11:00 AM.
Any person claiming an interest in the sur
plus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pen
dens must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY
WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN OR-
DER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING,
YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU,
TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSIS-
TANCE. WITHIN TWO (2) DAYS WORKING
DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE,
PLEASE CONTACT (352) 253-1604; IF YOU
ARE HEARING IMPAIRED, CALL
1-800-955-8771; IF YOU ARE VOICE IM-
PAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8770.
Dated at Tavares, Florida, this 17 day of Sep
tember, 2013.
Neil Kelly
Clerk Of The Circuit Court
By:/s/D. MATTSON
Deputy Clerk
Douglas C. Zahm, P.A.
12425 28th Street North, Suite 200
St. Petersburg, FL 33716
(727) 536 4911
(727) 539 1094 fax
Ad No.: 410208
September 23 & 30. 2013


013 CHEVY SILVERADO 2011 CHEVY SILVERAD O Z71 4X4 M
013 HEVY SILVERADOl '. "'1 ppI ,cE.-



BI ^14,P^ iE 13-059^
3,696 $22,750
2012 CHEVY COLORADO 13CEVSILV. O


TRADE. ONLY 7800 M CERTIFIED, #13700A
$34,900 $77MA- i 013"073

co1m E2512 CHEVY CAN=O.,- 2012 CHEVY CORVETTE


FIND NEWROADS" 1A E O
Across from the Leesburg Airport
CN 1 i T uLAKECOUNTYCHEV.COM A N
CIECI ENGI E LIGHT OPI?
S e'i Chec I hr FiEE' 8843 HWY 441 352-787-6888
OPEN MONDAY-FRIDAY 8:30am-8:0Opm
-----------.--.-..-:-- SATURDAY 8:30am-6:00pm; SUN. CLOSED
*PRICES DO NOT INCLUDE STATE TAXES, STATE FEES, AND $599 DEALER ADMIN.


DEADLINES
For Insertion COPY DATE
Friday Thursday, 5pm
Saturday Friday, 3pm
Sunday Friday, 5:00pm
Monday Friday, 5:00pm
Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pm
-,|T'rll r ,,', ,',, n 1,1" ,,j,',,',,,, j1,,r,1 i. r i, r., i- ,ni- I...
I ,.Ti, I .,]1 I[ l ,i.',-I- h,.', lj I ..-. 1 ,,', t .'. P<.,.'1 ,,1 -1 r..J b -
made by 5:00pm Friday.
ADJUSTMENTS
first day of publicaton I you find an error call the classified
deparrinentifrmmediately at 314 3278 a 748 1955
* The publisIher assnmes no financial respoursiblty for errors oor or
...... i, I .,., ,,l..,iv,,


- .600

. .800

. .900

.1000

.1100

.1200


Great Classified


deals every day!





DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, September 30, 2013


A/


Local, Trusted
A/C Expert
Kalos Services
352-243-7088
KalosFlorida.com
Lic.#CAC 1814620

FlQrida Air & Heat Inc.
For All Your Air Conditioning
& Healing Needs
352-326-3202
Seeing Lake County State Licence #
since 1986 aC1814030





M& Eustis Senior Care
= Assisted Uving FalityAL 8993
Accepting New Clients for our
brand new bedrooms.
Call Rhea, RN at 352-551-5307
for inquiries and a free tour.







Serving L ake, Sumter
& S. Marion Counties
We Service All
Appliance Brands
Licensed/Insured
Free Service Call
w/Repair
15+ Years Exp. 24 Hr. Emergency Svc.
We Don't Want To Be The Biggest
Just The Best
Eric Wolf e 352-630-2202





lrg"!rsoff-S/-/ OW
Complete Automotive Care
Transmissions AC Brakes
STune Ups Body Work Oil Change
Family Owned 26 Yrs 352-326-2400
1406 Emerson SL, Leesburg across from Post Office



Gutter Serices^

352-205-6453
Village Gutters
a Seamless Gutter Lifetime
S Guarantee Free Estimates
Serving the Tri-County Area
IFully Insured
S"Quality and Integrity
Goes into Every Job"





RE-TILE CX
352-391-5553
Backsplashes Re-Tile Tub & Shower
Walls Grab Bars Floors
Handicap Baths Repairs
Leaky Shower Pan
Ins/Lic. 30 yrs. exp.





BATHTUBS REFINISHED
SN LOCATION
S-: | Renew, on location, your
Porcelain Fiberglass
Ceramic Tiles
SShower Stalls
LAKESIDE TUB & TILE REfiNISHING
(352) 742-9602


Cemipetille Prices
l Quami Products
109 B lake View S. lady lake
BehhnS Morv & iDc's Hostaurmnt
m~i d dS~zbnsofes


CleaningSerie

Stucky's Carpet
Cleaning
i1 Spring Special
2 Rooms & Hall $45
352.365.9889


UI[*1I1 i11s


All-Natural Cleaning Service
awnts to clean your cobwebs!
f Quality Cleaning with
\ only natural products.
352-348-6576 Uc/Ins
www.bambisallnaturalcleaning.com


JimAUUaU n 9 ^.CaaIg I C1Vice3
Commercial/Residential
Reliable/References
LicBonded-10 Yrs Exp.
Immediate Availibility-
4 Call: Simone
407-S44- 1183

ESP Services
Doctors Visits Cooking & Laundry
Pet Caring General Errands
Housekeeping
Call For A Free In-Person
Consultation
352-348-6408


(Clutter Free Cleaning)
lean, Sort, Pack or Spring Clean
Ref's & Yrs. of Experience
352-742-0014
SReasonable Rates

SAmy's Cleaning
S Service
On personally clean your home"
Weekly Bi-Weekly Monthly
Ref. Available. Serving Lake &
Sumter Counties
352.536.3846




Your PC Repair Specialists
Fast friendly service at a
flat rate affordable price.
Education & Repair
l In your home or our office.
Call
352-897-1309

CK Custom Computer
& Security Inc.
Main office 352-435-7309
Mobile store 352-254-0104.
We have a program to *
fix your computer for
$ 10/hr labor plus parts.





Q~UALIY CONCRETE & BLOCK
x10 M$500.00 10x40 $1200.00
SIncludes labor, concrete & cleanup
L Fast turnaround, no hassle & local
S#CRC1326327, Ins. & References
BRIAN DEGAGLIA
352-267-5723

Q Concrete For Less
* 810 Slab $450
Me":"T 10x40 Slab $1325
Includes Concrete & Labor
* Bleockng/ RefJlic.lns.
a Philllip 352-504-8372


We ELIMINATE all trip
hazards due to UNEVEN and
or RAISED concrete.
Commercial/Residential
Concrete Grinding is 1/2
the cost of replacement.
Entry ways Ramps Sidewalks
Driveways Puddling Water, etc.
Insured
(8771454-0113 (toll free)


METAL TILE SHINGLE ROOFING
New Construction or Re-Roofing
I j 308 Oak Street
Wir I Lady Lake, FL 32159
I K__ I 352-430-2773
www.sackroofing.com
Serving the Tri County Area For 26 Years




Uc. 5c8.# 252465W
%%,DOOR & LOCK SERVICE
We Repair, Replace and Install
Emergency Services Available!
(352) 314-3169


Enclosure
Screening IH


Aill MU MI.. niniPrs
FREE ESTIMATES
I 352A08.2142


SReScreens, In
1I-noscreems Scm Room &
Pol Enclosures iindow lescreens
HiM SMli.e Gutmrs lunium leaiua
407-413-6130


Dench Flooring & Tile
ile. Laminate & Hardwood
BtFloors Installed
Bathroom Remodeling,.
FInC 10% Off
Installation w/ad
E EST. 352-552-2979


3....... ...
I 7 Triple Crown
M ie & ood
Installation & Repairs4
Tile & Wood
Owner does all work.
Free Est. Lic/lns
3524274825



Carpet & Laminate
Sales & Service
For Every Budget & Lifestyle



Repairsic & Installation
GqraiT DooTraeDs


Mol Makes & Models.


352-347-6411


U LICBC01252465
[Nk. GARAGE DOORS
Complete Service & Installation
Lake County's Largest Provider!
We Sell & Program Remotes!
13521 748-4575



Repirs.rs |
J-'3vragC Door Replceets
& Locally Owned
G!te All Work,va,,,,


. Affordable Home
Repair, LLC
Mobile Home Repair Apt. Clean Outs
& Repair o Decks & Ramps
Soffits/Siding Doors/Windows
Painting Tile Work* Lic/Ins
Call Pat 352-551-3073


ae Hill's Handilyman & Painting
Door & Window Installion
Carpentry,
Home Improvement,
SDrywall& More! Just Ask!
Professional Service
LIc/lns. 352-259-5357


ICUM IMOMAM IT
:-:-:-Home Repair:-::-:.
/ Pressure Washing e Painting
Flooring Carpet Clean Outs
Clean Ups Hauling a Licensed
352-787-7056


John Philibert, Inc
We do Everything from Ceilings to
Floors. Window and Doors,
Pantries, Cabinets and more.
Your pesky Leaks gone, Your Soffits
we Fix, and Houses We'll Paint From
inside and out, we'll make It great Lic/Ins
JPHandy.com(352) 308-0694


Mike Shoffstall --'
Call 352 552 1875
JUNGLE HU']
REPAIRS ~
Repair everything .Replace anything.


M. Lucie Carpentry
Lic./lns. Res./Comm.
Repairs & Renovations
Drwall, Trim & Rotted Wood
jCall Mick
1W -386-523-5015


Trusted, Quafitr Craftsmanship for 30+ years
Kitchens Bathrooms Windows
Vinyl Siding Decks Painting/Staining
Tile/Marble Lanai Enclosures
Mike Lalonde 352-409-8311
mike(@ image4me.com













6
Hauin










BOYDS
You call it, We haul it!
352
460-7186


- [.1mm Il
Home
Improvement
METAL TILE SHINGLE ROOFING
New Construction or Re-Roofing
B 308 Oak Street
Lady Lake, FL 32159
352-430-2773
wwww.sackroofing.comn
Serving the Tri County Area For 26 Years




Local Agent
Long Term Care Ins.
Medicare Supplements
Critical Care Ins.
Cancer Ins.
Call Bill Bell
352.589-0454 or 352.551.3504

Ask Me About
Medicare Insurance
Robert Lange
352-742-2-25
lange.rob.Ins@gmail.com




Irrigation' Tune-Up
$35 Check & Adjust
5 Entire System.
3 Provide Written Est.
To Fix Problems!
Lower Your Monthly Cost
352-409-3163


i.C.C. Bobcat a Tree Svc. Inc.
M Land Clearing/Excavating
( Fill Dirt/Clay
4,---auling/Debris Removal
WW Stump Grinding
Demolition/Grading/ Driveways
Owner Operator
352-455-7608

N CHRIS CANNES LANDSCAPE
I/ C IESia eapcal
c-^.w/w^/ Gt~sSursl SIe
tctupitlmm hChllt
Lawni Mal0mnce, hNardsca. Pratios
BRmitalnlmn Wanlls, M nl., SoddIng
l eesburm 536-3708
n uTaws 3'%~W' 0uS.6


Premier Scapes
IW NW & Services Inc.
Land Clearing Bush Hogging
Debris Removal
Hauling Free Estimates
352-308-5508




SLandscaping
Trimming, Mulching,
Sod, Tree Trimming,
Pars & Much Morel
irmando Santamario
352-587-1323

{idal Lhand6cape (, Designi
7 "Sed, Mulching, Rock Walls
S Removal & Installation,
Trimming and Much More
Free Estimates Lic. & Ins.
David Vidal, Owner
352-396-8499 or 352-396-8459


Lawn ce
S m W erv ces

I. lwss~Iu.TselnUg* Ptssslm wn
i EFEE ESTIMATES UCJINS. i
(We Take A Brl Out Of rk) Peo
a352-326-8712 1352-406-3354


Ferlurtl- Wterfs- Ioncts
Lawn Maintenance
352-357-5905
I APest Exterminator






EP-3


Tree Service At
Reasonable Rates
I can climb the highest trees,
and I can mow the biggest
lawns, but please don't ask me
Sto leap tall buildings
lit Fair Pricing. Trim Trees.
Qi^H Cut Lawns & Clean Ups
Cal Tony for estimate 352-759-2080
SDon't Stress Call The Best!
I 1. Dependable Commercial
a., Lawn Services
cR Lic/Ins. Designer
Landscaping, Trimming,
S| Shrubs. We do it all
Rick 352-427-8919

Howards Lawn
Service
esidenuial/Commercial
Uclns
(3521
W800-9985

W *Wayna. aware,
Now 'accepg Mew Commeral &
ResMelual customer Mowing,
Unidscam~lg rrigatlenand more.
Reasenahbe BDepete ir
IOfice 352-552-4556 CellN 352-702-6460
S L All Lawn
Jand Tree
[Care
0LJ o Service
Natural Land
^Clearing (Goats)
"BESTPRICES" Free Est
352-460-7186


S v Service

ovfa&l ly Center
gWiA0aS* 352-602-1735
At Venetian Gardens
Marina on the
Harris Chain of Lakes.
No Trailer. No Problem.
Boat Repairs & Svc. on water




Bill's Moving
la. Mover Reg. No: 2095
Owner On Every Job
Fair Rates a 27+ Yrs. Exp.
352-669-4456
Toll Free 888-444-3559

AL Toms Movers
.^- .,' Serving Lake,
^^M a^ Marion & Sumter
Load/Unload Your Truck or Mine
Pack/Unpack Cleaning &
Painting Svc Avail. Free Estimates
352-409-3114 tomsmovers.org

Little John's Movers &
Storage 352-812-4889
Serving Lake, Marion,
& Sumter Counties
1-15 items same day delivery
Local & Long distance moves
Loading & unloading pods, rental
trucks, & storage units.
We have trucks going up &
down 195 & 175
"Less Than a POD" "Door to Door"
You're Coming ....Your Neighbor is Goingi
Jump on Board and $ave
SERVING ALL 50 STATES
One item to a full housell!
We will get off the interstate for you!
ljim9575@yahoo.com
US DOT #2406621




FOway, Assusance Painting, Inc.
"If you want quality, you want us!"
'*^'Vl lim"M-Rbor-Mllols
r? I ~New Constructlen
*t Ass Ucened/Insunred
S l TIm Grubbs
-- 352-483-6915
www.qualityassurancepaintinginc.com

CO-ED
PROFESSIONAL
PAINTING, INC.
J Commercial FRE ES** ITCSm
mm& Ro sidenial (35) 267-6430
II WWIWCO-aiaM OM
14 wi Ucesc, dand Insured
IOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING & OTHER SVCSI


352-978-7015
PremierPowerinc.com
Licensed, Bonded, Insured
Master ER #13014129

0
amr -^^


I - - - - - -- -- - - - I


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, September 30, 2013


I


I I




Monday, September 30, 2013


Plam ntsFlori


nlateera Exterir Sin ce 1969
Roni Coating Specializing in
SealansIN G -Vand os. -
Cincrete Coautlngs o Call for hours
Pressuraw Cleaning 352-787-9001
& Ins.Free Estimates OHD 2902 South St.
352-28-4561 Leesburg, FL
| 521 8456 GoodwinOrchids.com


- i Pl ingli
Servicess^


(352) 348-6923
Tim Mundy Painting
& Pressure Cleam.g Services, Inc.
^(K "1here k aNityo isAccidet"
SLicensed & Insured
John Philibert, Inc
For All Your Interior/Exterior
'Painting Needs.
j We Also Offer
Driveways Patios
And Faux Finishes Lic/Ins
Call John @ (352) 308-0694
JPHandy.com
New England Painter
Senii-Retired
30 Years Exp
Interior, Exterior, Pressure
Washing No Job Too Small
Bob Kelley Painting
352-702-7739
Brightman Home Improvement
Wallpaper, Drywall
Interior Painting, Trim
Ir REE ESTIMATES
UInsured
I352-598-3169
CLAUDE WILD PAINTING
High Quality @ Reasonable Prices
Int. & Ext. Free Est. Lic/Ins
Pressure Cleaning Ref. & 35 yrs. exp.
in Lake County
cwildpainting@gmail.com

lrlx^c wm
Mt^^^^


QAHAVEN Providing
r*Uii: : ~No-Cost Svcs.
to Lake county
sexual assault victims 24/71365.
On-Call Rape Advocacy
Counseling, Legal Assistance
Hotline 352-787-1379

Roofing^ jI
Services^^


Shing Ti Licensed Bonded-- insured
Family Owned & Operated' %i stingleig ^ f t^8 n^C
Residential & Commercial Metal, and Rubber Residential/Commercial
www.PrimePlumbinginc.com Roof Systems RC29027460
(352)383-3440 cFC142750 (352) 669-6607


^&, Plumbing, LLC
M IPlumbing Repairs Comm/Res
Kitchens a Bath Remodels
uDisposal Water Heater, Gas Piping.
Brain/Sewer Cleanig.
No Grout Showers. 24 Hr. Emergencv
ucI-MFcM 72[352)1343-3763



Ace Pool Service
Complete Pool Services
Motor & Pump Repair
Pool & Patio Remodeling
Servicing Commercial & Residential
Properties Since 1969
Licensed/Insured Free Estimates
352-735-3050
Prs s r
Cl1 14.eanin


SAs low as $20 per me.
S352-357-5905
A Pest Exterminator


352.260.7490
oil :Z1[KI :-R.] =1 :171 [ ]:
All Airports, Cruise Terminals,
Hotels, Casinos & Attractions
Shands-VA and Jacksonville Mayo


LUc/lS- ---44D-----H-_I--







Cl~assfid eartm ntat
(352) 365-823 or by emai
mfichellef dilSES *iaL^
a a ^^5iia *l 5^ ^


METAL TILE SHINGLE ROOFING
New Construction or Re-Roofing
B 308 Oak Street
Lady Lake. FL 32159
352-430-2773
www.sackroofing.com
Serving the TrIn Counly Area For 26 Years
#1 IN ROOFING
Leak Repairs Shingles/Flat Roof
Lifetime Metal Roofs Screen Rooms
Lic. #CCC1329936
Villages Roofing and
Construction, Inc.<:
FREE ROOF ESTIMATES
352P-142-3525


ILake Contracting, Inc.
GAF Certified
Shingles, Metal or Flat
Additions, Remodels, Renovations
Roof to Foundation
S352-602-8794
UI CGC1507568 CCC(1328899


Piat
Shutle/Arpor


Painting
Services


SECURITY TRAINING
j Security "D"&aG" Lic.
PLUS: FL Concealed Lic.
NRA Instructor Training
Ladies Only Classes Avail.
33523502855
p ms130e13 www.TheRightTraining.com

^I (61t [S [

SpedaizedSiomge Sohuions
Now is the timte...
To organize your life!
CuIstom Closets, 11ome Office, Garages
Tailored To Your Needs,
17 Years Exp.
Free Home Design Consultation
352-383-7058 407-718-6818 (0ell)



John Philibert, Inc
For All Your Tile Needs
Pergo, Ceramic Tile,
Travertine, Vinyl & More
Call John @(352) 308-0694
JPHandy.com Lic/Ins

RE-TILE
352-391-5553
Backsplashes Re-Tile Tub & Shower
Walls Grab Bars Floors
Handicap Baths Repairs
I Leaky Shower Pan
InsiLic. 30 yrs. exp.



S hat& aTree Svc. Inc
idential/Commercial
Trimming/Removal
t almslaedges/Stump Grinding
Debris removal/Hauling
Hill Dirt/Clay/Grading/Driveways
Lficns Insurance Work 24 Hrs.
52455-7608


SECURITY TRAINING
SSecurity "D&"G" Lic.
)PLUS: FL. Concealed Lic.
NRA Instructor Training
Ladies Only Classes Avail.
352?35042855
LicD0S13M13 www.TheRightTraining.com

Since 2007, The Right Training
has been providing Lake, Mar-
ion, and Sumter counties with
the BEST firearms training pos-
sible.
Chief Instructor, Paul "Mac"
McIntyre (former Military, Law:
enforcement, and Private Inves-:
tigator) and his associate in-
structors are dedicated to
educating, not just the public,
but up-and-coming NRA In-
structors and the
dedicated men and women in
Private Security.


C*putiltve MPes
QUIallNt Products
ProlIssional

109 W. Lake View SL L Lake
Behind Mom a& Dad's Restaurant
mwwwlilsfoless.iz blindftorlss.comu
35 :2.7
Steve and Brenda Rizer

have owned Blinds 4 Less

since 2000. The business

is still in it's original

location in Lady Lake.

The company focuses on

strong customer service

and also selling the best

brand names in the indus-

try at very competitive

prices.


S CHRIS CARNESLANDSCAPE
:olutr'slnSlah el
iiAclPung Howlil
Lawn Malinteiance, Hanrdscape, Pages,
1Retaliing Wal Ils Maint Sodding
: Leesburg 536-3708
20YTars I 5%Ml | 15%Uf a-u
is,,cap with this Desig
'1 w/a dI atl Landscape

Chris Carnes Landscape has been in
business since 2005 along with over
30 yrs experience in everything
from hardscapes such as patios,
retaining walls, to sod repair and
S installations, to ripout of old
landscapes and design. We also can
provide maintainence to your newly
installed landscape or even mowing
maintainence services to even
sprinkler repairs. We serve all
S projects big or small" create
landscapes one lawn at a time".
Mention this bio ad and receive 15
percent off when you call for your
estimate on any of our services.


-U


American Pest CoQntrol
Termites Rodent Exclusions
German Roaches
Property Inspections
Soil Pre-treatment


352-602-9849
.. SPARKLING
WINDOWS
MARK ANDERSON
Window Cleaning,
Screens, Tracks. FREE Estimates


We're Proud of Our Service
.... and you will be too!





Free Estimates
Metal, Tile & Shingle Re-roofs
Serving all Lake &
Sumter Counties.
Mike Hunter
Fl License #RC29027482
Office (407) 947-2223
Fax (407) 347-3472
mike@hunterroofingLLC.com


w ,A3TUMP GRINDING
\I' SPECIALIST
LV JREE TRIMMING
^a& MORE
1352-551-4222

1 Premier Scapes
*1 & Services Inc.
Complete Tree Service
Trimming ~ Debris Removal
Stump Grinding ~ Free Estimates
352-308-5508




U #CBC1252465
WINDOWS
We Install, Replace and Repair
Most Major Brands Available
Glass and Screen Repair
(3521 787-4545


D3


DAILY COMMERCIAL


I


I





DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, September 30, 2013


003 Legal Notices

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LAKE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 12 CA 001632
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COM
PANY AS TRUSTEE FOR AMERICAN HOME
MORTGAGE ASSETS TRUST 2007 5 MORT
GAGE BACKED PASS THROUGH CERTIFI
CATES, SERIES 2007 5,
Plaintiff
vs.

PARAMDIALSAMARRO, et al.
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a fi
nal judgment dated September 12, 2013,
entered in Civil Case Number
12 CA 001632, in the Circuit Court for Lake
County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK
NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE
FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE ASSETS
TRUST 2007 5 MORTGAGE BACKED
PASS THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES
2007 -5, Is the Plaintiff, and PARAMDIAL SA
MARRO et al, are the Defendants, Lake
County Clerk of Court will sell the property
situated in Lake County, Florida, described
as:
ALL THAT CERTAIN LAND SITUATE, LYING
AND BEING IN THE COUNTY OF LAKE, STATE
OF FLORIDA, AND MORE FULLY DESCRIBED
AS: LOT 4, VILLAGE ESTATES, ACCORDING
TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 46, PAGE(S) 15-16,
PUBLIC RECORDS OF LAKE COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA.

at public sale, to the highest and best bidder,
for cash, at Right Inside the Door of the
Courthouse, 550 West Main Street, Tavares,
FL 32778 at 11:00 am on the 20 day of No
vember, 2013. Any person claiming an inter
est in the surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the date of the
lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.

Dated: September 17, 2013
NEIL KELLY
Lake County Clerk of Court
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By:/s/D.MATTSON
Florida Foreclosure
Attorneys, PLLC,
4855 Technology Way,
Suite 500
Boca Raton, FL 33431
727 446 4826
File No.: CA11 06874/AJ

"In accordance with the Americans With Dis
abilities Act, persons in need of a special ac
commodation to participate in this proceed
ing shall, within seven (7) days prior to any
proceeding, contact the Administrative Office
of the Court, Lake County Courthouse, 550
West Main Street, Tavares, FL 32778 tele-
phone (352) 253 1604, TDD,
1 800 955 8771 or
1 800 955 8770 via
Florida Relay Service."
apre ako ki avek Americans With Disabilities
Act, tout moun kin ginyin yun bezwen spesi
yal pou akomodasiyon pou yo patisipe nan
program sa a dwe, nan yun tan rezonab an
ninpot aranjman kapab fet, yo dwe kontakte
Administration Office Of The Court i nan ni
mero Lake County Courthouse, 550 West
Main Street, FL 32778 telefon nam se (352)
742 4148 oubyen TDD
1 800 955 8771 oubyen
1 800 955 8770 i pasan pa Florida Relay
Service.
En accordance avec la Loi des "Americans
With Disabilities". Les personnel en besoin
d'une accommodation special pour partici
per a ces procedures doivent, dans un temps
raisonable, avante d'entreprendre aucune
autre demarche, contractor I'office adminis
trative de la Court situe au Lake County
Courthouse, 550 West Main Strret, FL 32778
le telephone (352) 742 4148 TDD
1 800 955 8771 ou
1 800 955 8770 via
Florida Relay Service.

"De acuerdo con el Acto o Decreto de los
Americanos con Impedimentos, Inhabilitados,
personas en necesidad del servicio special
para participar en este procedimiento de
bran, dentro de un tiempo razonable, antes
de cualquier procedimiento, ponerse en con
tracto con la oficina Administrativa de la
Corte Lake County Courthouse, 550 West
Main Street, FL 32778, Telefono (352)
742 4148, TDD
1 800 955 8770 o
1 800 955 8771 Via
Florida Relay Service."
Ad No.: 410013
September 23 & 30 2013


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH1 JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR LAKE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CASE No.12 CA 1134
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COM
PANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR MORGAN STANLEY
STRUCTURED TRUST I 2007 1
ASSET BACKED CERTIFICATES 2007 1,
Plaintiff,

vs.
Robyn Stack Mitchell a/k/a Robyn Stack, Un
known Spouse of Robyn Stack Mitchell a/k/a
Robyn Stack, Brian Schumann,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER
45
NOTICE OF SALE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant
to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated September 12, 2013, and entered in
Case No 12 CA 1134 of the Circuit Court of
the 5th Judicial Circuit in and for Lake
County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK
NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE
FOR MORGAN STANLEY STRUCTURED
TRUST I 2007 1 ASSET BACKED CERTIFI
CATES 2007 1, is Plaintiff and Robyn
Stack Mitchell a/k/a Robyn Stack, Unknown
Spouse of Robyn Stack Mitchell a/k/a Robyn
Stack, Brain Schumann, are Defendants, I
will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash on the 1st Floor of the Lake County
Courthouse, 550 West Main Street in Ta
vares, Florida 32778 at 11:00 o'clock A.M.
on the 19 day of November 2013, the follow
ing described property as set forth in Said
Summary Final Judgment, to wit:
Lot 52, of Beach-Grove, according to the plat
thereof, recorded in Plat Book 12, at Page
80, of the Public Records of Lake County,
Florida.
Street Address: 1110 Lee St., Leesburg, FL
34748
and all fixtures and personal property located
therein or thereon, which are included as se
curity in Plaintiff's mortgage.


Any person claiming an interest in the sur
plus funds from the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of the date of the lis
pendens must file a claim within 60 days af
ter the sale.
Dated at Tavares, Lake County, Florida, this
18 day of September, 2013
Neil Kelly
Clerk of said Circuit Court
By: /s/D. MATTSON
As Deputy Clerk
Clarfield, Okon, Salomone & Pincus, P.L
Attorney for Plaintiff
500 South Australian
Avenue, Suite 730
West Palm Beach, FL
33401
(561) 713 1400
Ad No. 410142
September 23 & 29, 2013


003 Legal Notices

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LAKE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 2012 CA 000069
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR
SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST
2007 OPT5, ASSET BACKED CERTIFICATES,
SERIES 2007 OPT5,
Plaintiff
vs.

KAREN BOUTIN, et al.
Defendants)
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a fi
nal judgment dated September 12, 2013,
entered in Civil Case Number
12 CA 000069, in the Circuit Court for Lake
County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO
BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW
HOME LOAN TRUST 2007 OPT5,
ASSET BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES
2007 OPT5 Is the Plaintiff, and KAREN BOU
TIN et al, are the Defendants, Lake County
Clerk of Court will sell the property situated in
Lake County, Florida, described as:

LOT 241, Orange
Tree-Phase 2, according to the plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 46, at Pages 9 &
10, of the Public Records of Lake County,
Florida.

at public sale, to the highest and best bidder,
for cash, at Right Inside the Door of the
Courthouse, 550 West Main Street, Tavares,
FL 32778 at l11:00 am on the 20 day of No
vember, 2013. Any person claiming an inter
est in the surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the date of the
lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.
Dated: September 16, 2013
NEIL KELLY
Lake County Clerk of Court
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By:/s/D. NEAL
FLORIDA FORECLOSURE
ATTORNEYS, PLLC,
4855 Technology Way,
Suite 500
Boca Raton, FL 33431
727 446 4826
File No.: CA1 1-05077/BT
"In accordance with the Americans With Dis
abilities Act, persons in need of a special ac-
commodation to participate in this proceed
ing shall, within seven (7) days prior to any
proceeding, contact the Administrative Office
of the Court, Lake County Courthouse, 550
West Main Street, Tavares, FL 32778 tele
phone (352) 742 4148, TDD,
1 800 955 8771 or
1 800 955 8770 via
Florida Relay Service."
apre ako ki avek Americans With Disabilities
Act, tout moun kin ginyin yun bezwen spesi
yal pou akomodasiyon pou yo patisipe nan
program sa a dwe, nan yun tan rezonab an
ninpot aranjman kapab fet, yo dwe kontakte
Administration Office Of The Court i nan ni
mero Lake County Courthouse, 550 West
Main Street, FL 32778 telefon nam se (352)
742 4148 oubyen TDD
1 800 955 8771 oubyen
1 800 955 8770 i pasan pa Florida Relay
Service.
En accordance avec la Loi des "Americans
With Disabilities". Les personnel en besoin
d'une accommodation special pour partici
per a ces procedures doivent, dans un temps
raisonable, avante d'entreprendre aucune
autre demarche, contractor I'office adminis
trative de la Court situe au Lake County
Courthouse, 550 West Main Strret, FL 32778
le telephone (352) 742 4148 TDD
1 800 955 8771 ou
1 800 955 8770 via
Florida Relay Service.
"De acuerdo con el Acto o Decreto de los
Americanos con Impedimentos, Inhabilitados,
personas en necesidad del servicio special
para participar en este procedimiento de
bran, dentro de un tiempo razonable, antes
de cualquier procedimiento, ponerse en con
tracto con la oficina Administrativa de la
Corte Lake County Courthouse, 550 West
Main Street, FL 32778, Telefono (352)
742 4148, TDD
1 800 955 8770 o
1 800 955 8771 Via
Florida Relay Service."
Ad No.: 410206
September 23 & 30 2013



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LAKE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.
352011CA000719XXXXXX
FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIA
TION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
BERNICE RENEE BOYSEN, ET AL.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Or
der or Summary Final Judgment of foreclo
sure dated August 12, 2013, and entered in
Case No.
352011CAOOO719XXXXXX of the Circuit
Court in and for Lake County, Florida,
wherein FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE
ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and BERNICE
RENEE BOYSEN; JOSHUA L BOYSEN; QUAIL
VALLEY LOT OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.;
KEYBANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION; UN
KNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT
NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM
ING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS
ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE
ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE
PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defen
dants, I will sell to the highest and best bid
der for cash the First Floor Information Desk
at the Lake County Courthouse, 550 W. Main
Street, Tavares, Florida, i i i, , /i ,i
ida, at 11:00 a.m. on N.r-mu-b, ,. -1,
the following described property as set forth
in said Order or Final Judgment, to wit:
LOT 10, QUAIL VALLEY, PHASE 1, PARTIAL
REPLAT, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 50,
PAGE(S) 97 98, PUBLIC RECORDS OF LAKE
COUNTY, FLORIDA..

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE
DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A
CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

In accordance with the Americans with Dis
abilities Act of 1990, persons needing special
accommodation to participate in this pro


ceeding should contact the Clerk of the Court
not later than five business days prior to the
proceeding at the Lake County Judicial Cen
ter, Telephone
352 742 4100 or
1 800 955 8770 via Florida Relay Service.
DATED at Tavares, Florida, on August 13,
2013.

NEIL KELLY
As Clerk, Circuit Court
By: /s/C. WOODRUFF
As Deputy Clerk

SHD Legal Group P.A.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
PO BOX 11438
Fort Lauderdale, FL
33339 1438
Telephone: (954) 564 0071
1440 101516

AD NO.: 410192
September 23 & 30, 2013


003 Legal Notices

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LAKE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.
352011CA000357XXXXXX

FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIA
TION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CARLOS JIMENEZ, et al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Or
der or Summary Final Judgment of foreclo
sure dated September 12, 2013, and en
tered in Case No.
352011CA000357XXXXXX of the Circuit
Court in and for Lake County, Florida,
wherein FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE
ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and CARLOS JIME
NEZ; MARIBEL JIMENEZ; MORTGAGE ELEC
TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.,
ACTING SOLELY AS A NOMINEE FOR GREEN
POINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC., MIN NO.
100013800863415671; EAGLERIDGE
HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UN
KNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT
NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM
ING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS
ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE
ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE
PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defen
dants, I will sell to the highest and best bid
der for cash the First Floor Information Desk
at the Lake County Courthouse, 550 W. Main
Street, Tavares, Florida, at Lake County, Flor
ida, at 11:00 a.m. on November 19, 2013,
the following described property as set forth
in said Order or Final Judgment, to wit:

LOT 255, EAGLERIDGE PHASE III, ACCORD
ING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RE
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 43, PAGE 39
THROUGH 41, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE
DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A
CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

In accordance with the Americans with Dis
abilities Act of 1990, persons needing special
accommodation to participate in this pro
feeding should contact the Clerk of the Court
not later than five business days prior to the
proceeding at the Lake County Judicial Cen
ter, Telephone
352 253 1604 or
1 800 955 8770 via Florida Relay Service.
DATED at Tavares, Florida, on September 17,
2013.

NEIL KELLY
As Clerk, Circuit Court
By: /s/D. MATTSON
As Deputy Clerk
SHD Legal Group P.A.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
PO BOX 11438
Fort Lauderdale, FL
33339 1438
Telephone: (954) 564 0071
1440 94533

AD NO.: 410184
September 23 & 30, 2013


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LAKE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.
352012CA001955XXXXXX
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
LISA K. TEXTOR A/K/A LISA K. WHIPP A/K/A
LISA K. KARDOS; ET AL.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Or
der or Summary Final Judgment of foreclo
sure dated September 12, 2013, and en
tered in Case No.
352012CAOO1955XXXXXX of the Circuit
Court in and for Lake County, Florida,
wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff
and LISA K. TEXTOR A/K/A LISA K. WHIPP
A/K/A LISA K. KARDOS; UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UN
KNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED
DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING
OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR
INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DE
SCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash the First
Floor Information Desk at the Lake County
Courthouse, 550 W. Main Street, Tavares,
Florida, at Lake County, Florida, at 11:00
a.m. on November 20, 2013, the following
described property as set forth in said Order
or Final Judgment, to wit:

THAT PART OF THE WEST 1/2 OF THE NE
1/4 OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH,
RANGE 24 EAST, LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT
THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE WEST
1/2 OF THE NE 1/4 RUN NORTH 00'29'35"
WEST ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID
WEST 1/2 OF THE NE 1/4 A DISTANCE OF
1706.82 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89"35'15"
EAST, 537.53 FEET TO THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING, FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING
CONTINUE NORTH 89"35'15" EAST, 254.99
FEET; THENCE NORTH 0018'46" WEST,
935.51 FEET TO THE NORTH UNE OF THE
WEST 1/2 OF THE NE 1/4; THENCE SOUTH
8915'29" WEST ALONG SAID NORTH LINE
255.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00"18'46"
EAST 934.05 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING; LESS THE NORTH 33.0 FEET THEREOF
FOR ROAD RIGHT OF WAY.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE
DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A
CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

In accordance with the Americans with Dis
abilities Act of 1990, persons needing special
accommodation to participate in this pro
feeding should contact the Clerk of the Court
not later than five business days prior to the
proceeding at the Lake County Judicial Cen
ter, Telephone
352 742 4100 or
1 800 955 8770 via Florida Relay Service.

DATED at Tavares, Florida, on September 16,
2013.
NEIL KELLY
As Clerk, Circuit Court
By: /s/D. NEAL
As Deputy Clerk
SHD Legal Group P.A.


Attorneys for Plaintiff
PO BOX 11438
Fort Lauderdale, FL
33339 1438
Telephone: (954) 564 0071
1463 111578

AD NO.: 410077
September 23 & 30, 2013



.iN eed A
Car?




Find Great Deal/

in Our Classifieds!


003 Legal Notices

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LAKE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.:
2007 CA 003280
DIVISION:

DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COM
PANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOME
LOAN TRUST 2006 WF2,
Plaintiff,

RONALD C. RAMDAS, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE
SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Or
der Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated
September 17, 2013 and entered in Case
NO. 2007 CA 003280 of the Circuit Court of
the FIFTH Judicial Circuit in and for LAKE
County, Florida wherein DEUTSCHE BANK
NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE
FOR SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST
2006 WF2, is the Plaintiff and RONALD C
RAMDAS; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RON
ALD C. RAMDAS N/K/A AGNES RAMDAS;
LAKEVIEW POINTE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIA
TION, INC.; TENANT #1 N/K/A LORENZO
TORREZ; TENANT #2 N/K/A ELAINE TORREZ
are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court
will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at INSIDE THE FRONT DOOR OF THE
LAKE COUNTY JUDICIAL BUILDING, 550
WEST MAIN STREET, TAVARES at 11:00AM,
on the 17 day of October, 2013, the follow
ing described property as set forth in said Fi
nal Judgment:

LOT 99 OF LAKEVIEW POINTE, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 52, PAGE(S) 52 THROUGH 56,
OF THE PUBUC RECORDS OF LAKE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
A/K/A 832 NORTH JACKS ROAD, CLER-
MONT, FL 34711

Any person claiming an interest in the sur
plus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pen
dens must file a claim within sixty (60) days
after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court
on September 19, 2013.
Neil Kelly
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/D.MATTSON
Deputy Clerk

Ronald R Wolfe &
Associates, P.L
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida
33622 5018
F07061880
WELLSLPS CONV R nrodriguez-Team 1 -
F07061880
**See Americans with Disabilities Act
NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES

(For case information, please call
(352) 742-4100)
If you are a person with a disability who
needs any accommodation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of certain as-
sistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator at the
Office of the Clerk of Courts, 550 West Main
Street, Post Office Box 7800, Tavares, Flor-
ida, 32778-7800, Telephone: (352)
742-4100, within two (7) working days of
your receipt of this pleading. If you are hear-
ing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771; if you
are voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8770.
Ad No.00410253
September 23 & 30









NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE

The following personal property of MARY
JANE GRAVENOR AND CHARLES DALE
GRAVENOR, AND IF DECEASED, ALL UN
KNOWN PARTIES, BENEFICIARIES, HEIRS,
SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS OF MARY JANE
GRAVENOR AND CHARLES DALE GRAVENOR
AND ALL PARTIES HAVING OR CLAIMING TO
HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE, OR INTEREST IN
THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED will on
the 15th day of October 2013, at 10:00
a.m., on property at 110 Magnolia Drive, Lot
#0085, Lady Lake, Lake County, Florida
32159, be sold for cash to satisfy storage
fees in accordance with Florida Statutes,
Section 715.109:
1983 PRIN Mobile Home
VIN #'s 3B40P41127NAB
Title #'s:
20557245/20231955
And All Other Personal Property Therein

PREPARED BY:
Rosia Sterling
Lutz, Bobo, Telfair,
Eastman, Gabel & Lee
2155 Delta Blvd,
Suite 210 B
Tallahassee, Florida 32303

Ad No. 00410286
September 30 & October 7, 2013


CITY OF MINNEOLA
P.O. BOX 678
MINNEOLA, FL 34755
(352) 394-3598
NOTICE OF
PUBLIC HEARING

ORDINANCE 2013-12
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF
THE CITY OF MINNEOLA, AMENDING THE
CITY CODE OF ORDINANCES SECTION 46-76
ENTITLED 'PROHIBITED RESIDENCES FOR
SEXUAL OFFENDERS"; ADDING FLORIDA
STATUTE SECTION 847.0135(5) TO THE LIST
OF STATUTES DELINEATING THE CRIMES
WHICH SUBJECT AN INDIVIDUAL TO CER-
TAIN PROHIBITED RESIDENCES AND RE-
QUIREMENTS; AMENDING SECTION 46-77
OF THE CODE OF ORDINANCES REGARDING
APPUCATION OF ARTICLE 46; PROVIDING
FOR EXCEPTIONS; PROVIDING FOR SEVER-
ABIUTY; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF CON-
FUCTING ORDINANCES; PROVIDING FOR AN
EFFECTIVE DATE.
A first reading and Public Hearing on Ordi
nance 2013 12 will be held on Tuesday, Oct.
1, 2013 at 6:30 p.m. in the City Hall, 800 N
Hwy 27, Minneola, Florida. A second reading
and Public Hearing on Ordinance 2013 12
will be held on Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2013 at
6:30 p.m. in the City Hall, 800 N. Hwy 27,
Minneola, Florida.
Any person interested in Ordinance 2013 12
may appear at the public hearing and be
heard with respect to the ordinance. A per
son who decides to appeal any decision


made by any board, agency, or council with
respect to any matter considered at such
meeting or hearing, will need a record of the
proceedings. For such purposes, any such
person may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which in
cludes the testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is based (Florida Statutes,
286.0105).
The proposed ordinance may be examined
during normal business days from 8:30 a.m.
to 4:00 p.m. at the City Hall, 800 N. Hvwy 27,
Minneola, Florida. For further information
call (352) 394 -3598.
The City of Minneola Code is available for in
section at the City Hall, located at 800 N.
Hwyv 27, Minneola, Florida, during normal
business days from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES NEEDING AS-
SISTANCE TO PARTICIPATE IN ANY OF
THESE PROCEEDINGS SHOULD CONTACT
JAN McDANIEL, CITY CLERK AT (352)


003 Legal Notices

394-3598 AT LEAST 48 HOURS BEFORE
THE DATE OF THE SCHEDULED HEARING.
Ad No.00410660
September 30, 2013






100
Announcement


104 Special
Notices

NOTICE TO
ADVERTISERS

PLEASE CHECK YOUR AD FOR
ERRORS THE FIRST DAY IT APPEARS
SINCE THE DAILY COMMERCIAL WILL
NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
INCORRECT ADS AFTER THE FIRST
DAY OF PUBLICATION. IF YOU FIND
AN ERROR CALL THE CLASSIFIED
DEPARTMENT IMMEDIATELY AT
314-3278 OR 748-1955.

THE PUBLISHER ASSUMES NO
FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY FOR
ERRORS OR FOR COMMISSION OF
COPY. LIABILITY SHALL NOT EXCEED
THE COST OF THE PORTION OF
SPACE OCCUPIED BY SUCH ERROR.

CANCELLATIONS

CANCELLATION FOR ADS RUNNING
SATURDAY MUST BE MADE BY
FRIDAY BY 2:00, CANCELLATIONS
FOR SUNDAY & MONDAY MUST BE
MADE FRIDAY BY 5:00


106 Personals

LOOKING FOR Jenny L. Searcy. Car ti-
tle, reward. 750-4339 or
352-350-3723


124 Professional
Services

COMMUNITY
SEMINAR:
How To Avoid Low
Back and Neck
Pain Surgery!

Learn about DRSTM Protocol, a break-
through and successful nonsurgical
treatment for herniated and
degenerative disc
condition, Featuring:
Dr. Jason E. Davis
Davis Clinic of
Chiropractic, Inc.
Discussion of chronic
and severe back and
neck conditions,
treatment options,
respective advantages, treatment for
failed
back or neck surgery.
Q & A Period
Light Refreshments.
Reservations Preferred
3:00-4:00pm Tues.
OCTOBER 1,2013
Davis Clinic
of Chiropractic
Reservations:
(352) 430-2121
1 DavisSpinelnstitute.com





200

At Your Service




201 Insurance


205 Adult Care

NOTICE
Florida Statute states, "It is a
misdemeanor for any person willfully,
knowingly, or intentionally to operate
or attempt to operate a family day
care home without a license or
without registering with the
department, whichever is applicable".
Florida Statute states, "No person
shall advertise a child care facility
without including within such
advertisement the state or local
agency license number of such
facility. The statute applies to anyone
with more than 1 unrelated child
in their home.


245 Financial


SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Contact us if your
claim has been
denied or if
you need help.
Over 30 yrs. exp.
No fees or costs
unless your claim
is approved.
Cooper Consulting
2228 South St.
Leesburg
352-728-5552



250 Handyman

Hard working Lic. Business owner,
seeks to improve your home.
Ability to perform jobs including
Remodeling-TreeTrimming-Drywall-
Tiling, etc. References avail.
Call Robert Plante's
Home Maint. 352-484-3543


268 Moving

Two Brothers Moving




1 Room or a Full House
FL. Reg. #1M1539
Russell & Todd Franks
Lic.& Ins. Call 352-793-8960


275 Plumbing


^ SINCE
1987

e a KILEY &
SONS, INC.
A Full service
Plumbing Company.
Lake 787-1904
Sumter 748-9500
CentralFloridaPlumber.com
VISIT OUR ONSITE
SHOWROOM.
24 Hr. Emergency
Service
Lic#CFC1426882


281 Roofing


#1 IN ROOFING

VILLAGES ROOFING & CONSTRUC-
TION INC.
352-314-3625
Leak Repairs
*Shingles/Flat Roof *Lifetime Metal
Roofs
Free Roof Estimates
Lic. #CCC1329936






McHALE ROOFING INC.
Re-Roofs and Repairs
Tile, Metal, Shingles
Flat Roofs &
Mobile Homes
Excel. Ref's Avail.
Licensed & Insured
CCC1328197
Call: 352-255-2758


288 Tree
Service


MICHAEL'S TREE
& TRACTOR SERVICE

a FREE
l^*kSTIMATES


Stump Grinding, *Tree Trimming &
Removal *Box Blading, *Bush Hog-
ging & Grading
Lic & Insured
Call 352-504-1597
or 352-315-9010






300
Financial


400

Employment




401 Management







STV.:E MAjA,>ER
for Pike's Electric Lighting & Fans,
Inc. Applicants must have managerial
experience as well lighting & sales ex-
perience; design and construction
knowledge a plus but not required.
We offer excellent health benefits,
401(k), and PTO. Company is an
Equal Employment Opportunity Em-
ployer and Drug-Free Workplace, MVR
& Background checks.
Fax resume to:
(352)399-2965


405 Professional







FREELANCE
PHOTOGRAPHER
The Daily Commercial is looking for
a Freelance Photographer with
experience shooting features, spot
news and sports. Ideal job for
someone who wants to build a
portfolio or have their work seen by
a large audience. Must have own
equipment, reliable transportation
(no mileage paid), and a flexible
schedule that could include nights
and weekends.

Send resume to and examples
of work to:
editorialjobs@
dailycommercial.com

Or Daily Commercial
212 East Main Street
Leesburg, FL 34748
Attn: Editorial Jobs

No phone calls please.
EOE


PRESCHOOL TEACHER
ASSISTANT PT
40 hr. training & exp preferred. Must
be dependable, energetic, and
child-friendly.
Apply in person at:
1005 W Main Street
Leesburg between
9:00 5:00.
Call 326-5942
for directions.

TEACHERS F/T
Needed at New
Daycare Center in Eustis, FL.
Must have 45 hr DCF training
352-357-8005




Monday, September 30, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


405 Professional


(99G
%fP~lAUS0NS/

FREELANCE
WRITER
The Daily Commercial is looking for
a Freelance Writer who is equally
comfortable with feature stories
and spot news. Work will be assigned
on an as-needed basis, but
story suggestions welcomed. Must
have prior newspaper experience,
reliable transportation (no mileage
paid), and a flexible schedule that
could includes nights and weekends.
Send resume to and
examples of work to:
editorialjobs@
dailycommercial.com
Or Daily Commercial
212 East Main Street
Leesburg, FL 34748
Attn: Editorial Jobs
No phone calls please.
EOE

Excellent
Opportunity
FREELANCE
WRITER
The South Lake Press is looking for
a Freelance Writer who is equally
comfortable with feature stories
and spot news. Work will be assigned
in South Lake on an as-needed basis,
but story suggestions welcomed. Must
have prior newspaper experience,
reliable transportation (no mileage
paid), and a flexible schedule that
could includes nights and weekends.
Send resume to and
examples of work to:
editorialjobs@
dailycommercial.com
Or Daily Commercial
212 East Main Street
Leesburg, FL 34748
Attn: Editorial Jobs
No phone calls please.
EOE














---o-o------

The Daly Commerial:o
PHOTOGRAPHER/















Leesburg FLT has 113 Ian. immediate
r .. We ar a l5,000 3irclaion

I 6.AM Ida i I a enitra loia -












Rjust an Paid noThiof O ffn and
mone. *I
oporuite 63 our doo3step. Wear






looknd your aagressiverpre
withafsren okethi and a
p s i f itori local ls .







dand communtoeragein-ept
or mail "3 lto:J
212. .. .ainS.ree










REPORTER
The Daily Commercial of
Leesburg, FL, has an immediate
opening for an experienced
reporter. We are a 25,000 circulation
AM daily in sunny Central Florida --
justione hour north of Orlando and
Tampa -- with unlimited recreational
opportunities atour doorstep. We are
looking for an aggressive reporter
with a st i rong work ethic and a
passion for local news.
Responsibilities include. e government
and community coverage, in-depth
stories and personality profiles.
The ideal candidate will be able to
write tight, compelling, focused
articles; and turn around stories
quickly. Strong research and
investigative skills, and the ability
to create compelling, succinct
stories about complex issues are
position. We offer paid time off, along
with a comn:etitive benefits package.
41 Sae



r ae nc ationdol I









avial fporthispoitiesn |
Tohoe Dailys Comeralsof
LesurgliFiha candimmdiates
r epo ter. Waresm an2500 circlto
AMdaily insunymenrialFlorid
jutonhor north CofOrliandl n



TapE wtx ulmiee rceti onal
Opportunitiesatordose.Wae


FALL WORK -GREAT PAY
FT/PT Immediate openings
are.









will train, Apply, all ages 17+.
Call ASAP! 352-404-5183


410 Sales














LEASING SPECIALIST-1
Peppertree Apts. in Lady Lake/The
Villages Area. Wants Professional
w/lyr Sales Exp. Must be able to plan,
report, and meet deadlines. FT &
Wknds required. $11/hr (more w/exp.)
+ Commission & Bonus. Benefits.
Apply at

POSITION FILLED!
EOE/Drug &
Smoke Free WP





































415 TechnologyS I

RESTORE TELECOM IN LEESBURG
seeks full-time Electronics Tester.
Test functionality of equipment, circuit
boards by following procedures.
Mount components & parts. Docu
ment issues & prepare equipment for
final quality inspection. HS
Diploma/GED & working knowledge of
computer operation required. Exp with
electronic assembly, soldering, trou-
bleshooting preferred. Must be able to
stand/walk for full shift & lift/move up
to 50 pounds. DFWP/EOE
Submit resumes to 888-420-1861 or
humanresources@restortelecom.com
Or complete application at
912-1 Venture Ave., Leesburg


432 Dental

DENTAL ASSISTANT
Experienced for busy office. Must
have expanded duties & radiology cer-
tified. Looking for outgoing depend-
able, professional person must be
able to multi taskI
352-751-1178
WoLady Lake Arealy I

435 Medical


EMT/PARAMEDIC, NURSE,
MA with X-ray
For Busy Urgent Care.
Must have Phlebotomy, IV skills &
medication administration.
Email to:
medicalbillingtoday@ yahoo.com


INSURANCE BILLING &
COLLECTIONS FT
For busy Chiropractic office. College &
coding experience required. Must be a
team player, competent and persis-
tent.
Fax resume to:
352-589-5549 or
Email to:
ddimura@gmail.com

LICENSED DISPENSING
OPTICIAN,
EXPERIENCED
needed for ophthalmic practice lo-
cated in Lake County Florida. Come
join our staff in providing the finest
eye care and be a part of our contin-
ued growth. Excellent hours, pay and
benefits.
Apply online at
www.LakeEye.com
or fax resume to
352-750-2105

NEEDED LICENSED THERAPIST
Program Asst., and Recovery Coach
for an exciting new in-home Family
Behavior Therapy program serving
Lake County at risk families. Training
will be made available in this evidence
based practice.
Apply at



515 W Main St. Leesburg or
online at www.lsbc.net
DFWP/EOE


435 Medical

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST
NEEDED IN MOUNT DORA:
NeuLife Rehab is an innovative
post-acute facility offering specialized
services to individuals with TBI, SCI,
amputation and other diagnoses.
Services are provided in untimed seg-
ments, allowing for a fun atmosphere
and maximum recovery.
Call Janet @352-409-7477
OPHTHALMIC
TECHNICIAN



for technicians with a growing medical
practice. Certification a plus. Experi-
ence with retinoscopy and refracto-
metry, complete history and work up
desired. Come join our staff in provid-
ing the finest eye care available. Great
benefits package.

















450 Trades ___





ELECTRICAL
APPRENTICES
Applicants must havonline experience and












a clean driving record, high school di-
ploma or equivalent. Company is an
ElE and DrugkFreeye.o Workplace. Excel
Fax resume to
352-750-2105

















lent health benefits, 401k and PTO;








MVR & Background checks.
Apply in person at:
Pike's Electric, Inc.
719 Industrial Drive
45 TaWildwodesFL 3485
ELECTRICIANS &





ELECTRICAL
APPRENTICES





Applicants must hacover & experience andstall




awnings. Valid FL. Dr.
Li.a clean driving record, high school di-





Apply in person
240 SR 44, Leesburg

LOCAL SOD COMPANY
LOOKING FOR CLASS A CDL DRIVERS
plomafor loequival runs. CoHrly pany is an







Apply in person
EE and16929 CR 48, Mt. Dug-Free Workplace. Excel-









MECHANIC EXPERIENCED
lent healthid dri benefits, 401kse required.PTO
MVR & Background checks.









Apply in person at:








Eisenbrandt Automotive
1990CR 452, Eustis




NEW CONSTRUCTION
Residential Electriciansc.












Exp. preferred.
Ro719 Industrim.al Drive
Wildwood, FIL 34785

HELPER











Slab, lintel & service.nstall











Full benefits,
awnings. Vaholidays FL. Dr.
Lic. Clean record.






















vacation. EOE
Apply in personal:











Exceptional Electric
40 SR 44, Leesburg124A












___ Wildwood ___
LOCAL SOD COMPANY
LOOKING FOR CLASS A CHELPERS
for commercial workuns. Must have expay.
Apply in person












16929perience. Drug free work place.











Call 352-728-6053
DRMECHANIC EXPERIENCED












Loudon County Trucking is looking for
OTR Flatbelid Drivers. Wlice Offer: Noed.












Tarping!!! Great Miles, Pay-up to
.60cpm, Great Benefits & Home Time!
CDL A, 2yr OTR Exp, Good MVR.
FrApply in persnk Donnelly at:
1E-800-745-7290senbrandt Automotivex22
1990 CR 452, Eustis




NEW CONSTRUCTION
Residential Electricians
Exp. preferred.
Rough & Trim.
Slab, lintel & service.
Full benefits,
paid holidays &
vacation. EOE
Apply at:
Exceptional Electric
4042 CR 124A
Wildwood
i PLUMBERS AND i
PLUMBERS HELPERS
for commercial work. Must have ex-
perience. Drug free work place.
Call 352-728-6053

DRIVERS
Loudon County Trucking is looking forI
OTR Flatbed Drivers. We Offer: NoI
Tarping!!! Great Miles, Pay-up toI
.60cpm, Great Benefits & Home Time!I
CDL-A, 2yr OTR Exp, Good MVR.
Frank Donnelly at:
1-800-745-7290 x22


455
Restaurants/
Hotels/Clubs

BARTLNDERP-RSON
MUST be experienced.
Evenings & Weekends
Apply in person 3-5pm
VC'S EMBERS SUPPER CLUB
7940 US Hwy. 441 Leesburg, FL

HIRING ALL POSITIONS
Taki's #2 in Eustis
Apply in person at:
1600 S. Bay St., Eustis

NOW HIRING!
Starvos Pizza in
Fruitland Park.
*Exp'd Sever iCook & *Pizza Maker
Call 352-315-0028


455
Restaurants/
Hotels/Clubs

SERVER F/T
Experience required
Apply in person,
Harbor Hills Country Club,
6538 Lake Griffin Rd. Lady Lake
No Phone Calls Please

470 General

ALUMINUM / INSTALLERS/ HELPER
Experienced Driver license required
Apply in Person
Aluminum Contractors
1203A West Main St., Leesburg
352-323-0068 I
APPOINTMENT -
SETTER F/T
To setup appt. for estimates on win-
dow treatments. Must have good
phone skills.
Call 352-266-9067

AVANTE SKILLED
NURSING & REHAB
Is currently seeking
MAINT. DIRECTOR FT
Mon. Fri.
Apply on line at:
www.avante
centers.com
or fax resume to:
352-787-5935



.r JOBZ




APPLY IN
DiRufI i


SCHOOL BUS
DRIVERS NEEDED
Training provided.
Contact: Lake County
Schools, Transportation
352-728-2561 or
Apply online:
www.lake.k12.fl.us


CROSSWORD
By THOMAS JOSEPH


ACROSS
1 "The
Hobbit"
hero
6 Severe
11 Porpoise's
place
12 Boise's
state
13 Succotash
half
14Jingle
writer
15 Boat part
17 Maturity
18 Laughed
gleefully
22Valiant
person
23 City on
the Rio
Grande
27 Russian
range
29 One of
the Great
Lakes
30 Croquet
need
32 Factory
33Without
equivoca-
tion
35 Buddy
38 Computer
"take
back"
command
39 Greatly
impressed
41 Some
singers
45Smithy
sight
46 Move
smoothly
47Accom-
plishments


S H A SAP E

TO ESV



BLL IMPS


PEGLEG MIT
AFLFA NA

REF SLINGS
I5NT I D IOT
A G RN0LTE
NSGLE SS

Saturday's answer


21 Dramatic
percussion
intros
24 One of
the Great
Lakes
25Toy store
buy
26Just
28Second
stories
31 Large cask
34Wise
saying


35 Singer
Edith
36Writer
Rice
37Volcano
flow
40 Humor
42 "My
country
-of
thee"
43 Poem of
praise
44 Gender


NEW CROSSWORD BOOK! Send $4.75 (check/m.o.) to
Thomas Joseph Book 1, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475
11 12 13 14 15 = 6 17 l8 19 110


9-30


D5


470 General



















PRESS OPERATOR
Needed for the Daily Commercial.es








Minimum 3 yrs. experience.
FULL TIME!
NIGHTS & WEEKENDS.
Apply in person with
Press Room work history at
the Daily Commercial
Mon-Fri., Bam-pmt








212 E. Main Street
Fax resume to:
352-365-1951
Sorry, No phone
calls please. EOE
PRESSURE WASHER
Needed for the Daily Commercial.












TECH.
Avai, to work nightmum 3 yrs. Valid dexperivers ince.
FULL TIME/






cense & background check req'd.S.
Apply in person with





TPCounty area.ss Room work history at
the Daily Commercial
Mon.-Fri., 8am-Eprn
212 E. Main Street
Leesburg or
Fax resume to:




Call 352-36751-2325
Sorry, No phone





BAlls please. EEl




T~pUSTh'E INC
PRWE ASSURE HIRING!ER





Immediate Openings
TECH.I





AvaOutside Builder Sales with s. Vales iexpe-
riense & background cuals with 2020 exq'd




perience for our Design/Quote team
Must be reliable & have a clean driv-
ing reord. Benefits pkg.





Fax resume to:
Call352-751-2326-3630






E-mail resume to
INDUSTRIES, INC
WE ARE HIRING!



HRBaImmediate Oleyindcons
Outside Builder Sales with sales expe-



orrienc apply in perdividuals with 20/20 ex-



1107 Thomas Ave.
Experience for our Design/Quote teamrg
Must be reliable & have a clean driv-
ing record. Benefits pkg.
Fax resume to:
352-326-3630
Email resume to:
HR@Baileyind.oom
or apply in person at:
1107 Thomas Ave.
Leesburg


SEIZE THE DAY'S
SPORTS NEWS.

IThDailyCmenndal
www.dailycommercial com


500
Pets/Animals


501 Pets
For Sale
CAT female, approx. 1 year old. All
shots and spayed to a good home.
Found 7/15 and have been caring
for her. Affectionate and people
friendly. 352-702-0902

KITTENS (3) 8 weeks old. FREE TO
GOOD HOME. Call 352-504-9120


SPRINGER SPANIEL male, 10 yrs. old,
great health. FREE 352-272-7112


560 Pet
Supplies
AQUARIUM 4 ft. long, 1 ft, wide, 20"
high. $50 Please call
352-365-0191

BIRD CAGE small. Like new $25. Call
352-603-9604

CAT CONDO TREE 4'H, 3 levels. Car-
pet. Good cond. $80.
352-409-6691

DOG STROLLER up to 30lbs. Cup hold-
ers & carrier. $50. 352-602-7332

DRIFTWOOD for reptile aquarium (2
pieces) for use in 3ft. $100
407-878-6431

FERRET CAGE, extra large on wheels.
New cond. $100. Call
352-242-7909

ROTTWEILER puppies both male & fe-
male. AKC. Sire @ 155 Ibs. & Dam
on site. Asking $1000. Call Kami
352-636-4935



600
Merchandise
Mart


601 Antiques
CHAIR early 1900 Queen Anne style.
Green/gold w/beige wood $99
742-1939


CROSSWORD PUZZLE


48 Baltimore
suburb


DOWN
1 Move up
and down
2 Bar "rocks"
3 Grazing
spot
4 Funds
5 Beginning
6 Florida
racetrack
city
7 Find a sum
8 Hindu hero
9 Carpet
type
10 Sharpen
16Building
wing
18 Buddy
19 Zeus'
wife
20Vaccine
type




DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, September 30, 2013


601 Antiques
CROCK BUTTER CHURN,





DESK well over 100 yrs. old. Dark
wood, inlayed leather. $100 Call
352-742-2856


ROCKER Mission Style antique Oak.
Asking $90. Please call
352-326-0131

603 Collectibles
BOOK "Hidden Treasures" by HA Lewis.
1887. $15. 352-205-0408
BUYING Baseball, Football, Basketball,
Non-sports cards
(pre 1980) autographs, memorabilia,
bobbin heads. Sets, singles. No col-
lection to large. Call: 352-589-7981
or E-mail:
Airl';.i or d i |(iiJjoji jO'rl

DOLL Boyd's Yesterdays Child, Laura
w/box & cert. $45. 352-360-0028

FIGURINES Jim Shore's, Santa/bag,
Santa/cat & Santa/birdhouse. $50.
352-326-8490


RECORDS 15 ARS ALL JAZZ. Book
value $685 asking $300.
352-315-1612

STAMP COLLECTION World War II 100
canceled stamps. $5 Call 406-9405



YARD ORNAMENT heavy concrete,
Squirrel on Stump. Asking $65.
352-357-3043

604 Furniture
AMMUNITION 10 boxes 22 long rifle
shells. $55. Call 352-324-2236

ARMOIRE small w/drawers. oak color,
55.5"x15.5". $25. SOLD

BAR STOOLS (2) swivel, upholstered
seats & backs. Like new. $95 Call
352-408-4711

BAR STOOLS (2) upholstered w/swivel
backs. Good cond. $75
352-728-6581

BOX SPRING & MATTRESS full size.
$45 Please call 352-787-2745

CHAIR Wing back, as new w/matching
ottoman. No smoke. $65 435-0888

CHAIR, Victorian. Upholstered light
blue. Good cond. $60.
352-728-6608

CHINA CABINET Maple, excellent condi-
tion. $85 .352-319-9967

COFFEE TABLE & 2 END TABLES. glass
top, metal frame. NEW. $50.
352-483-4462

COFFEE TABLE & SIDE TABLES. wood
Excel cond. $95. 352-455-2224

COFFEE TABLE 24.5" glass top, 4
beautiful brass legs. $19. Call
352-748-0702

COFFEE TABLE Kidney shaped from the
1950's. $100 Call 704-530-4305

COFFEE TABLE Maple, crate furn. Good
cond. $35 Call 352-250-8832

COFFEE TABLE square 38"x38"x15"
oak very good cond. $95 obo.
352-343-6165

CURIO CABINET 20"w x 6' tall. Excel.
cond. Oak. $30 Call 352-323-1777

CURIOS (2) Whitewash, glass shelf, 6'.
Paid $300. Asking $40.
352-787-0102

DINETTE SET, Rattan glass top table
w/4 swivel chairs, cushions & roll-
ers. $150. 517-458-6163

DINING ROOM TABLE w/4 chairs. 40",
wood, almond color. $35.
SOLD

DINING ROOM TABLE w/6 Chairs, leaf
& buffet. Dark maple. $100.
753-5915

DINING TABLE w/6 chairs & leaf. Light
Oak, excel cond. $400. 561-4962

DRESSER 8 drawers. Solid, dark, all
wood. $100. Call 352-793-1285

DRESSER Lg. solid oak, w/mirror. Sac-
rifice $100. Call 352-365-2699


604 Furniture
DRESSER W/MIRROR & NIGHTSTAND,
light wood like new. $75.
352-735-0519

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Dark Oak.
50"Wx2l1 "Dx54"H. $50. 589-9237

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER w/32" TV.
Light wood. $75 Call
352-314-3292

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER, corner unit,
oak from Babettes. $100.
352-406-5969

FUTON Black cloth, has arms, good
cond. $35. Call 352-483-2664

HUTCH Glass doors on top, w/lighting.
Light Oak $400 Call 352-561-4962

KITCHEN TABLE Hi-top marble top w/2
stools. Excel cond. $100. SOLD

LOVE SEAT floral, good cond. $50.
excl. buy. Call 352-365-1487

LOVESEAT diamond tufted back excel.
fabric. $60. Call 352-508-9415

LOVESEAT Reclines. Good Cond. $70.
352-793-7027 leave message.
Lake Pan.

MATTRESS Serta full size, clean. Ask-
ing $100 Please call 352-323-8079

MATTRESS, full size. Good cond. $30
obo Please call 352-460-6626

RECLINER black leather. Asking $100.
Please call 352-589-8515

RECLINER La-Z-Boy. Tan Good cond.
$100. Call 352-589-6626

ROCKERS (2) swivel, pink taffeta. Good
cond. $45 for both. Call
352-314-2419

SOFA & COFFEE TABLE, RATTAN Nice
$65.787-0792

SOFA & LOVE SEAT brown leather, both
dual reclining. $100 Call
321-278-4083


TABLE white tile top w/2 chairs. Good
cond. $40 Please call
352-408-5357

TABLE, Heart Shaped, 3 tier. brown,
good cond. $8 Call 352-504-6689

TELEVISION STAND 3 tiered black. Ask-
ing $100. Please call
301-788-6361

TELEVISION STAND White Wicker,
29"W x 18"D x 29.5" H. $50.
352-728-3571

WICKER SET, love seat, coffee table,
plant stand. $60 Call
352-233-0464

605 Appliances

Appliances With
Warranties $75 & up!
Used Beds all sizes!
*Buy Sell Trade Fast deliv-
ery
call Buzzy's
352-315-9886
www.buzzysbeds.com

COFFEE MAKER Hamilton Beach, single
cup, 2 sizes. $40 Call
352-343-5003

CONVECTION OVEN Countertop. Black
& Decker used once. $35.
352-589-5860
DISCOUNT
APPLIANCE
Repair-Sales-Service Most Repairs
$60 Plus Parts





WASHER, DRYER,
REFRIGERATOR
"Don't Toss It
Fix It For Less"
Buying Clean
Washers & Dryers
Days, Evenings & Weekends
Call Now
352-874-1238

DISHWASHER GE, beige, works good,
$40. Please call 352-357-4117

DISHWASHER Kitchenmaid, almond.
Works good. $35 obo. Call
352-669-1163


R DRYER, electric. I
Asking $95.
Call 352-350-0499


605 Appliances

DRYERS (2) both gas, Good cond. Ask-
ing $100. Please call
352-404-8288

MIXER KitchenAid, classic w/accesso-
ries. $90 Call 352-348-2389

REFRIGERATOR side/ side, stove, mi-
crowave, dishwasher. Maytag,
White. $600 for all. Call
352-360-1740

WASHER Maytag,
good cond. $95
Call 352-303-2708

606 Electronics

DIGITAL TV CONVERTER BOX Zentih.
Like new. 1/2 price $40.
352-365-2301

NINTENDO GAME CUBE Nintendo 64 &
Sony Playstation One. All for $100.
357-2771

PALM ORGANIZER Sony Clie w/key-
board & accessories. $25 Call
352-324-2559

RECEIVER Denon with remote. Very
good cond. Asking $99.
352-323-4862

RECORD PLAYER Emerson Swingmate,
3 speed, 1960's. $75 Call
352-787-4388

SPEAKERS (4) for home theater. New in
box. Sony Platinum. $100 Call
352-568-7871

TELEVISION Sony FD Trinitron, Wega.
32", not flat. Villages. $25
828-260-3868.

TELEVISIONS Emerson, 32" w/remote.
$50 obo. Call 352-728-2668

608 A/C & Heat

AIR CONDITIONER window unit. 8000
BTU's, Frigidaire, 1 yr. old. 2 yr. ex-
tended warranty. $100 Call
352-460-4962

AIR CONDITIONER, Window unit, 5200
btu, 110 power. $45. Call Dave
255-7623

HEAT PUMP PERMANENT AIR FILTER
18 x 20 x 1. $35. Call
352-323-8168

624 Children's
items

SAUCER like exercycle, used 3 times.
$20 Please call 352-742-1527

SHOES girls size 4, Nike. brand new in
box. $20. Please call
352-455-7557

SHOES New Balance, boys. New in box.
Size 12. $17. SOLD

625 Building
Supplies/
Materials

CABINETS (3) White.
$60 for all.
Call 32-874-2806
HOT WATER HEATER Tankless. Natural
gas, high output. $100. 638-2246

PAINT 5 gallon, interior, VAIspar, light
Gray. $45. Please call
352-408-4190

SHOWER DOOR tempered opaque
glass. 27 1/4"x 69 1/4". $100.
446-7849

SINK large pedestal, bisque color. Like
new. $35 obo. 352-404-9460

SLIDING WINDOW for mobile home.
61Wx39H. FREE. 352-728-6493

WATER HEATER USED electric, 60 gal-
lons. Asking $60. 352-314-9065

630 Garage Sales

MINNEOLA 819 Elm Forest Drive Octo-
ber 4 8-1. Furniture, Tools, Lawn
Mower, Garden, Misc.

635 Garden

CONCRETE FOUNTAIN, no pump. Good
cond. $100 Call 352-735-1570

CONCRETE ROCKS hand size for bor-
der, approx. lcu.yd $40 Call
352-455-8755

GLIDER COUCH & 2 CHAIRS alum.,
vintage. $100 Call 352-617-5498

GLIDER PORCH SWING Wooden. Amish
made. Excel cond. $65. SOLD


I No matter what time
of the day it is,
you can place
your classified


I0:7n r',-j merchandiseie ad
his rwir, online, pay for it ar
Spn,:, ,:, ,-i Jjust wait for the

r,,:,j 1:,r ",phone to ring!


Fast, convenient ar
Won your schedule


Itc, i$1c Ih I i










wwwdaoilyc,, mMle'r,"IlD ,",:,m

*Employment advertisements are excluded.
Please call 352-314-FAST to speak with a customer service rep.
"Your First Choice" In-Print & On-Line Lake: 352-314-3278 or Sumter: 352-748-1955


id






nd


635 Garden
LAWN MOWER Husqvarna 42" cut, 8
months old. $950 FIRM. 753-9637

LAWN TRACTOR Craftsman, 46" cut. 1
yr. new. $995. FIRM 352-408-4084



MOWER 22" 3.5 Briggs. & Stratton De-
pendable. $65. Call 352-396-8938

SPREADER, pull behind, Brinly-Hardy.
New. $100 Call 352-728-6189

STAGHORN FERN in wire basket. 3'
wide. $30. Call 352-787-0811

STRING TRIMMER Troy Bilt, WEEDE-
ATER EDGER. $100 obo.
352-508-9642
TREE SALE
*6' +/- Oaks Etc.
$10 or 15 for $100
*Oaks- 8'-10'
$39 or 3/$105
*Larger trees 12' +/-
$95. to $275.
*12'+/- Bald Cypress
*Nice Sago Palms
CATT'S TREES
352-669-1618


640 Guns
AMMUNITION Bulgarian, 7.62x54R,
147 grain, 440 rounds, steel core,
in sealed tin. $95. 324-4125

CLOCK MAGAZINES (2) Clock car plate
speed loader. $80. Call
352-205-2925

RIFLE Springfield, 22 long w/scope.
Bolt action. $150. Call
352-346-1434

SMITH & WESSON, 38 snub nose re-
volver, like new, rare no longer
made. $500. 352-793-4019

649 Medical
DIABETIC SUPPLIES, Easy Max monitor,
with all supplies. $80.
352-728-8289

SLIDING BATH TRANSFER BENCH.
Swivel seat, long version. $100.
326-5296
WALKER (2) w/wheels. f
$20 for both.
Call 352-536-1744

WHEELCHAIR RAMP alum. good cond.
$50 Please call 352-430-3911

652 Articles
For Sale
AREA RUG, Neutral color, 8'x10'. $25
Please call 352-385-1830

BATHTUB Whirlpool w/12 jets & heater.
Excel. cond. $200 obo. SOLD!

BEADED NECKLACES (36) w/matching
earrings. Assorted colors. $75
633-0641


BEDDING (2) pink spreads, shams &
toss pillows, 84" drape & pink doll
lamp. Good cond. $30.
352-404-8288

CHANDELIER Dining Room, unique style
$65 Please call 352-314-0677

CLOTHING men's large bag, Large &
XL. $25 Please call 352-821-2801

CLOTHING women's wide variety. All
items like new $100. takes all.
459-3721

COFFEE MAKER Kitchen Aid. Brand
new. Paid $189. Sell for $100.
352-978-7461

CROWN MOLDING 39' x 3.5". White.
$25. Call 352-435-0055

DESIGNER CLOTHING Chicos/Cache,
10/pcs. $100. 321-246-4371

DISHES Noritake Affection, 8 place set-
tings. Never used. $100. 602-7522

DISHES Pfaltzgraff Heirloom, 12 place
settings. New cond. $100.
242-1609

DRESS & MATCHING SWEATER Misses
size 6-8. Never worn. $10
357-1363

DRESS size 12 Brides Maid/Prom.
Brand new. Apple Red. $65 obo.
352-455-8225

EASY SPIRIT ATHLETIC SHOES never
worn white w/laces. 11M. $25.
352-360-1209

FIESTAWARE DISHES cups & saucers,
assorted colors $99 Call
352-250-8290

FURBY (Electronic) Pink & Grey. Still in
box. $30 obo. Call 352-742-4584

GAS GRILL 4 burner, heavy duty w/tank
& cover, 60K btu. $95.
352-365-1710

HAND MIXER portable, 200 watt. GE, 6
speed. Excel cond. $40.
352-748-9611

HANGING LAMP Tiffany style w/chain &
electrical. $50 Please call
352-365-6075

HOT TUB Good cond. Contractor Only.
$100. Call 386-405-8346


LION PICTURE on blk background,
w/silver. $100 obo. Call
352-394-6204

MATTRESS 1 & 1/2 yr old, King size.
Serta Pillow Soft. Clean. $60.
352-461-8586

MEN'S CLOTHING XLg shirts 42W
shorts. 10 pcs. $20. 321-246-4371
METAL 4 SHELF UNIT 5'Hx30Wx16D.I
$20. 352-391-1668

MIRRORS (6) beveled with hangers
8"W x 6'L. Asking $25.
SOLD


MORPHSUITsizeMed.W$35. |
Call 352-978-8467


652 Articles
For Sale
MOVING BOXES all sizes, including 3
wardrobe boxes. $75 Call
352-435-7784

ORIENTAL RUG room size, Blue flow-
ered. $95, Please call after 5pm
352-460-4213


OTTER BOX for IPhone 3. Black & pink,
w/clip. $30. Call 352-409-8264

PORCH BENCH 4', wooden w/wrought
iron sides. $50. 352-406-9405



POTS & PANS (11 pieces) black, T-FAL
Good cond. $25 Call 352-343-8964

PURSE Isaac Mizrahi Live Yellow color.
New Paid $174. Sell for $40.
638-1344
REMOTE CONTROL CAR w/extras.
$65.
352-343-7820
RING gold, Tanzanite w/small dia-
monds. Size 5-6 $100. Call
352-357-5365

ROOSTER & SUNFLOWER DISHES Good
cond. $75 for all. 352-435-4520

SEAWORLD STROLLERS (3) 1960's,
hard, looks like a jeep, all for $100.
504-6406

SEWING MACHINE Singer. New in box..
Asking $90. Call 321-262-5485

SHAMPOO ATTACHMENT FOR RAIN-
BOW used 1 time. $75.
352-394-2678

SILVERWARE Rogers, Eternally Yours.
1950's, 57 pieces. $100. SOLD

SLACKS Ladies size Med. petite. Bon
Worth, 6 pair. Like new. $25.
777-0045

SLEDGE HAMMER 10 Ibs. Asking $10
obo. Please call 352-323-4903

SUEDE WESTERN JACKET w/fringe.
Size 14 ladies. $100 obo.
352-460-5044

TABLE folds dual leaf, solid butcher
block for RV or home. $100
347-7350

TOASTER OVEN Breville. Top Of The
Line. 1/2 Price $99. Call
321-947-4746

TYPEWRITER Brothers, elec. New,
Originally $200 Asking $99 Call
352-750-3984


WIG, new $10 Please call
352-638-0300.


655 Musical
Instruments
ORGAN Hammond electric, Cedarwood.
Excel. cond. $100. 352-617-0398

PIANO 1955, upright w/bench. Good
cond., tuned. $250 Call
352-201-6249

VIOLA, w/case, 2 bows, need hairs.
$99. Please call 352-209-5546

660 Office
Furniture/
Supplies
DICTAPHONE, complete w/headphones
& peddles. $100 obo.
352-702-7939

OFFICE DESK WITH 2 CHAIRS. Asking
$20. Please call 352-589-0469

TIME CLOCK Amano, #TCX11 & 25 slot
time card holder. $60.
352-455-4886

STENOGRAPH MACHINE WITH CASE.
Asking $50. Please call
352-259-2769

674 Exercise Equipment
EXERCISE BIKE Gold Gym, 2010 model.
Asking $85 Call 352-633-2457

EXERCISE MACHINES (2) designed by
Tony Little. ALL FOR $70.
352-874-0352

NUBAX TRIO & TONY LITTLE GAZELLE.
Excel cond. $100 352-516-3596

STATIONARY EXERCISE AIR BIKE Good
cond. Asking $60. 352-446-7467
TREADMILL Weslo, excel cond. $60
FIRM. Please call 352-460-0208

675 Sports/
Recreation
ADULT TRICYCLE 36V. Electric. As
new. Large seat & basket, battery
pack w/new batteries & charger.
Cost $1100 new, Now $400. Call
352-346-1434 or 352-343-6608

BICYCLE (2) ladies Schwinn, needs mi-
nor restorations. $60 for both.
343-2711


BICYCLE comfort, men's, 7 speed. High
handle bars, gel seat. $69.
728-6835


BICYCLES 3 Wheel, rebuilt. Large Seat
& Basket. $150. Call
1-352-346-1434

BICYCLES men's (1) 26" 21 speed, &
(1) 24", 18 speed. $50 Call
352-874-4535

BIKE RACK Thule, bumper carrier.
Holds 2 bikes. $60 obo.
352-343-0332


GOLF CLUBS Lady Cobra, full set. $100
obo. Call 352-409-5889

GOLF CLUBS men's complete set
w/bag. $25 Please call
502-750-0512


675 Sports/
Recreation
GOLF CLUBS Wilson, Ladies. Brand
new in box. Pink. $95. Call
352-483-4762

GOLF CLUBS, 3 iron thru SW, driver, 3
wood, putter. $75 352-245-0716

GOLF SE, graph, woods, 3-PW irons,
bag. Like new. $50 Call
352-735-6927

GOLF SET ladies set, brand new Wil-
son. Asking $85. Please call
352-217-4012

ROD & REEL 8ft. rod w/penn 6500SS
reel. $100 Please call
352-728-5704
TRAMPOLINE ReBounder 4'. $50.
obo.
Call 352-217-5104


685 Tools/
Machinery
AIRLESS SPRAY PAINTER, Wagner,
used once. $95 Call 352-343-5773

ELECTRIC MOTOR explosion proof, like
new. $85 Please call
352-793-5741

GENERATOR Porter Cable, lOhp, 5250
watts. As new w/wheels. $499
352-343-6608

GENERATOR, Coleman Portable. 6250
watt. Like new, used once. $350.
391-2522

LADDER heavy duty alum. Multi posi-
tion, Versa 17' $99. Call
815-210-3117

LADDER Warner 12' alum. fold to 3'.
Like new. $65. Please call
352-307-9462

PRESSURE WASHER HOSES 50 feet.
Asking $40. Call 352-217-0586

RADIAL ARM SAW 10" Craftsman with
stand. Asking $99. 352-552-1313

RADIAL ARM SAW Craftsman 10".
$90. Call 352-357-9694

SAW elec. 6 1/2", 1/2 elec. drill & belt
sander. $30 for all. 352-753-1170
TABLE SAW
Runs good. $60.
Call 352-459-9856

TOOL CHEST w/desk, Craftsman. Good
cond. $75 Call 352-742-3472




800
Real Estate
For Rent



806 Houses
Unfurnished
CLERMONT 3/2, Vista's, scrn porch, Ig.
yard. $1150/mo + security dep.
$1150. Call 352-394-0001
CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick
407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 &2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375

FRUITLAND PARK 3/2/1 Duplex, quiet
family area. Lawn care included.
$745/mo. 352-874-5966


LADY LAKE Furn. 3 room Cottage,
5611 Berts Rd. for couple.
$450/mo. 1st, last & security Will
sell for $40,000. Please call
317-446-9063

LEESBURG, 3/2.5/2 built as a model
home with upgrades. $1,200 per
mo., $1,000 deposit and first
month's rent to move in. Call
Heather at 352-308-9426

MOUNT DORA 3/2, CHA, Ig. fenced
yard. $750/mo + dep. Small pets
allowed. Please call 352-978-1696
--- ILN IALS --
LONG TERM &
UNFURN. RENTALS IN
SOUTH LAKE COUNTY
ROCKER REALTY
352-394-3570
Ask For Janet or Emily
RockerRealtylnc.com

807 Apartments
Unfurnished
CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick
407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 &2br from
---$350/month$$---


For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375

EUSTIS
2/1 including water/trash
Starting at $650/mo
Call 352-735-0597

EUSTiS
All remodeled Apts!
1,2 & 3 Bedrooms
Special starting at
$475 Only $350 Dep.
Pet OK.
352-357-5675

LEESBURG nice lbr, includes all utili-
ties, $600/mo, Social Security wel-
comed. Call 813-781-9540


.- $$....,
-" .,,""


7pm 24
Timrre tu, sell thort 7
m :: unrti r- ike) i ..t-...




Monday, September 30, 2013


DAILY COMMERCIAL


807 Apartments
Unfurnished

LAKEFRONT 1br cottage, screened
porch incl. elec., water, sewer &
Wi-Fi. Starting at $695/mo. Travel
Trailer $500 mo. 386-747-7119
LEESBURG -
1ST MO. FREE!
SPANISH VILLAGE
Pool, great location!
Furn. Efficiency, incl.
util. & cable $700/mo.
2/1 apt. $600/mo.
Furn. $700/mo + util.
352-728-5555
LEESBURG 2/1.5, fully remodeled, town
home style, very large. $650/mo +
$350 security dep. incl. water &
trash. Call 352-552-0181

LEESBURG
FIRST MONTH $99
MOVE IN SPECIAL!
e2/1 $500/dep.
*2/1 w/W/D hookup
$550/dep.
*2/2 w/W/D hookup
$600/dep.
Call 352-516-1244
Ask for Tina
LEESBURG Palmora Park, 2 br. garage
apt. Covered parking. 1 block to
lake. $595/mo. 352-255-6002

LEESBURG, Duplex VERY CLEAN 2/1 no
pets $550/mo + dep Call
352-551-6772

LEESBURG,
PEPPERTREEAPTS.
2503 South St.
Now Avail. 1 & 2BR 62+. Handi-
capped or disabled. Spacious units,
quiet, A/C community rm. Staring at
$450. Hurry, before they are gone!
Equal Housing Opportunity
Call Christina
352-728-1500

LYN TERRACE
Eustis
352-357-7332
www.lynterrace.com
Great Move-In
Specials & Free Gifts!
*1 & 2 Bedroom Units
*AII 1st Floor-
No Stairs!

808 Apartments
Furnished

FRUITLAND PARK
TWIN PALMS MARINA
NEWLY RENOVATED
1 BR. MOBILES FULLY
FURNISHED ALL
UTILITIES INCLUDED,
CABLE TV. FREE USE
OF KAYAK & CANOES.
CONVENIENCE STORE
ON PROPERTY. NO
SECURITY DEPOSIT
WITH PROOF OF
INCOME. GREAT FOR
SENIORS WEEKLY &
MONTHLY RATE.
SMALL PETS
WELCOME.
CALL 352-787-4514
LEESBURG
1ST MO. FREE!
SPANISH VILLAGE
Pool, great location!
Furn. Efficiency, incl. util. & cable
$700/mo.
2/1 apt. $600/mo.
Furn. $700/mo + util.
352-728-5555
TAVARES $495/mo.
Furn or 1/2 off homes.
352-343-7780
riverestwaterfront
resort.com

809 Roommate
Wanted

LEESBURG female to share 2/1 apt.
House privileges. $400/mo incl. util.
$100 dep. Call 352-460-5668


810 Duplexes
CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick
407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 &2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
EUSTIS Cloverleaf
2/1 including water/trash
Starting at $650/mo
Call 352-735-0597
EUSTIS lake & dock, Large 1/1 2230
W. CR 44. W/D, tiled floors,
$600/mo. Must have good ref's
305-970-5379

LEESBURG 3/2, all appl. incl. W/D
hookup. Fenced back yard.
$800/mo RENTED

|LEESBUR, 1brC2brall 3br 5reat price |
| $599+. Call 352-350-7109 |


810 Duplexes
LEESBURG,
Beautiful Remodeled
2br/1 ba
only $500/mo.
1721 Birchwood Circle
Call 352-325-1289
now!

811 Condos
Townhouses
LEESBURG 2br/2ba, bonus room,
patio villa, gated community,
pool/gym. NO PETS or SMOKERS.
First/last/security deposit and refer-
ences required, online application.
$850/month. Call for access to appli-
cation, no application fee.
352-978-37241
LEESBURG
Sunny Side Villas for rent 2/2. $650
mo. Call 352-459-9300

816 Commercial
Property
LEESBURG
Warehouses w/Offices
2315-25 Griffin Rd
1,150 upto 12,400sf
Starts at $300/mo.
Office/Showroom
1607 Hwy.
441$850/mo
Small Shop or Office
2204 Citrus Blvd (441)
$320/mo., incl. utilities
352-787-0004


81 9 W llAve.

















Manufactured
Homes Rentalbuld
CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
b ildng i di



















wAOwner Finance
fece, offices and,












Call ltRisck






407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
-$$500/month$$-
Also Avail.
810






MaHandyman Special's
*1Homes Rental&2brfrom
CLER-$350/month$$-WY. 50
Before Groveland





For other rentals only
w/Owner Finance




Call Rick3528435





LADY LAKE/FRUITLAND PARK 2/1
w carport Lg. porch & fenced yard.
$550/mo. Just off 441. Call
352-407-547-939462







LEESBURG 6 mi. West. 2/1, CHA.
R$525emo. + security. Call/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down












352-455-0546
---TAVARES 495$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
1 & 2br from
--- $350/month$$---





Furn othr rental/2 off homes.nly
Call352-87343-7780





riverestwaterfront
LADY LAKE/FRUITLAND PARK 2/1




w/carport Lg. pesortch & fenced yard.om
$550/mo. Just off 441. Call
352-408-8562

LEESBURG 6 mi. West. 2/1, CHA.




8$525/mo. + security. CalRent-To-Own
352-455-0546




TAVARES $495/mo.
Furn or 1/2 off homes.
352-343-7780
riverestwaterfront
resort.com
825 Rent-To-Own
TAVARES $495/mo.
Furn or 1/2 off homes.
352-343-7780
riverestwaterfront
resort.com


KEEP A PLtUMBEI
Use Our Service Directory
for All Your Needs!

For all of your
recreation,
camping
and boating )
needs, see
classification
#1100.
Call our circulation
team at (352) 365-8200
n to start your
subscription
today.
T1e Daily Commercial


900
Real Estate
For Sale



902 Open Houses
For Sale

FOR SALE BY OWNER
ROYAL HIGHLANDS
ADULT GOLF
COMMUNITY
This community is
located with access
within a mi. of the
Florida Turnpike North
and within 15-20 mi.
south to Disney/
Universal and many
other attractions.
We are a gated 55+
adult community that
offers Golf and Tennis
Courts; Bocceball;
Shuffleboard; Indoor
and Outdoor
ivniirin. Poori:
Ping Pong and
Pool tables and
many numerous
amenities/too many
to mention here.
We conduct
OPEN HOUSE from
11:00am thru 4:00pm
on the first and third
weekend of every
month and would love
to help you find a
home in our
community.
We are located on Rte.
27 & Monarch Blvd.
(1 mi. from the
turnpike north exit).
www.RoyalHighlandsByOwnerResales.
corn (352-360-1196)

903 Homes
For Sale

LEESBURG, Nice house for sale. Nor-
mandy wood subd. 3/2/2 1593sf
$59K cash!! Call Kevin for viewing
727-515-5860
TAVARES, 3/2, w/office CHA, 1,498sf,
2 car garage, corner lot, 1/4 ac.
Built '06, lists as $219,900, asking
$195K, for more info. call
954-261-1801.

UMATILLA, For sale, owner financing,
needs some work. 352-702-8613

WATERFRONT HOME
FRUITLAND PARK
3/2 canal front, Lake Griffin
$144,900 Call 352-787-4584
GalbreathRealty.com

910 Condos/Townhouses

LEESBURG 2/2 in 55+ community,
Chesterbrook. 1st floor, all appl.,
new hotwater heater, mostly furn.
Lg. rec. rm., pool. MUST SELL
$19,000 Call 352-241-8030


1000
Manufactured
Homes


1001 Mfd Homes
For Sale

CLERMONT HWY. 50
Before Groveland
Mobile Homes For Sale
w/Owner Finance
Call Rick
407-547-9394
*Remodeled 3br/2ba
"LAST ONE"
From $1,000 down
---$$500/month$$---
Also Avail.
Handyman Special's
*1 &2br from
---$350/month$$---
For other rentals only
Call 352-874-7375
EUSTIS 2/2 dbl. wide. 24'x48', scrn
rm. & utility rm. $16,500 Call
352-589-5639

LEESBURG, a Palm Harbor 2/2 dbl.
wide, partially furn. Located at Lake-
side Village on the Chain of Lakes.
Clean inside, with a nice sized land-
scaped yd. backing up to Sable Bluff
Preserve. Move in ready price to sell
$23,900.
Call 352-409-1393
SUMMERFIELD 2/2 dbl. wide, furn. You
own the land. Painted inside & out.
New appl. Big backyard. $49,999
negotiable. 352-347-8024 or
352-259-4430

TAVARES $495/mo.
Furn or 1/2 off homes.
352-343-7780
riverestwaterfront
resort.com


1002 Mfd
Homes
W/ land
For Sale
SUMMERFIELD 2/2 dbl. wide, furn. You
own the land. Painted inside & out.
New appl. Big backyard. $49,999
negotiable. 352-347-8024 or
352-259-4430



1100
Recreation


1101 Boats
BASSTRACKER PRO-160.
2013. Brand New!
Lots of Extras!
Paid $13+.
Sell for $9000.
Umatilla area
Call 618-889-8011
BOAT POWER CORD END 50amp.
120v. 3 wire. $50. Call
352-603-1046

BONITA 15' needs work. Asking $100.
Call 352-267-6358
PONTOON 20'.
1996 Low.
Fish & Fun.
50hp Johnson,
Lots of extras!
No Trailer.
$3500. SOLD

ROW BOAT 12' alum. Deep V, w/oars.
Older, no leaks. $95.
352-223-1498

1120 Marine
Equip/
Supplies
PROPELLERS (2) 40hp Yamaha, 1 at
5000 rpm & 1 at 4600 rpm. $50.
552-2584


I.a 1KLIOOaaZB


KIM
Lpu m


2 STSUAR11SOGA

MONOF CL OA


t ~pw e.A


1150 RV&
Campers
FURNACE DOOR Attwood, for RV. New.
Colonial white. $60. 352-330-2557
TRAILER HITCH,
Like New. $60.
Call 352-343-9168
TRAILER HITCHES (3) 1 adjustable, 1
w/stabilizer bars. $225. Call
352-603-0005

1200
Transportation

1205 Autos
AUTO TESTING EQUIPMENT. Variety of
pieces. $100. Call 352-787-9197
CASH PAID
FOR JUNK CARS!
$300 and up.
Call 352-771-6191
FORD Taurus '93, 171K, runs good.
$875. Please call 352-636-9141

GRAND AM '03, white, runs great regu-
lar oil changes. $1,300 obo.
352-272-3082

HYUNDAI SONATA SE '2011, 35K mi,
all power. Carfax. $16,300.
431-1653

LINCOLN CONTINENTAL 1982 Mark III.
Garage kept. Second owner last 25
yrs. Ready to drive & show. Lots of
chrome. Beautiful. $4750. Call
407-443-6669
Get the paper





delivered to qou!
Call 787-0600 (Lake Co.) .or 877-702-0600
(SmterCo.)bwen 8 am ad 5 pm
Monday through Friday.
Daily Commercal


D7


1205 Autos

SHOW AD FOR
DISCOUNTED PRICE
2008 SATURN
ASTRA XR
Sporty, 16K mi.
$11,999
2011 FORD MUSTANG
Stylish, Clean
$16,888
2010 FORD FOCUS
Leather, Sunroof
$13,995
2010 CHEVROLET
SILVERADO 1500
1 Owner, Must Sell
$25,788
2012 CHEVROLET
TAHOE
Leather, Heated Seats
$34,500
VANN GANNAWAY
CHEVROLET INC.
2200 U.S. Hwy. 441
Eustis, FL 32726
1 352-343-2400

1206 Aviation

1210 Mcycles/
Mopeds

HARLEY SPORTSTER '08. 883, Black.
5400 mi.
Many extras.
As New Cond.
1 female owner. $4,800.
Call 352-391-2597
JACK for motorcycle or 4 wheeler.
Works, asking $50 Call
352-250-9514

SUZUKI 2004 Volusia, 23K mi, hard
bags, incl. trip pack. 2 matching
helmets. Was $3500, 1st $2500
cash takes it. 352-552-5953


a


I STKILTIO6A


VS2253


Add an exciting photo


to your advertisement


and see how fast the


phone rings.


op


The Daily Commercial Classifieds (352) 314-FAST (3278)


PAYMENTS UNDER /At..


250 PER MONTH" 16


4w.35-1


195D


11


Plus More To Choose From!
For The Best Price Text.JENKINS5 to 35555


/


I


I I


V-1 7 8-


t^




DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, September 30, 2013


1210 Mcycles/
Mopeds
TRIKE Handsome red Gold Wing,
25,000 miles. Loaded, with extras,
reverse, heated seat & grips, etc.
Looks new.
Asking $26,000
Call 352-787-7279

1230 Vans
FORD FREESTAR MINI VAN '05, 85K
mi. Great cond. One owner. $5,500.
Call 352-638-2330
1247 Trailers
LAWN TRAILER 5'x8'x14", 12" wheels,
ramp. $350 Call SOLD


1250 Antique
Cars
AUTO SWAP-CORRAL
SHOW -OCT 61h
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
Sumter Swap Meets.
800-438-8559

1264 Auto
Parts
Accessory
CAR COVER New, fits up to SUV size.
$100 obo. Call 352-460-0458
TIRES (2) 205-55-R16.70% tread
left. $60. 352-323-3587


1264 Auto
Parts
Accessory
THUNDERBIRD MANUAL 1957, factory
issued, used complete $50 Call
352-399-2237
TIRES (2) good shape, 215/55/17. Ask-
ing $90 Please call 352-742-0894
TIRES (2) Goodyear, P225/55R17.
Good tread. $100. Call
352-343-7748
VAN (2) BACK BUCKET SEATS for '04
Kia, gray leather. Prefect $75.
352-728-2265
WEATHER TECH WINDOW DEFLEC-
TORS for Ford Flex. $25.
352-323-1999
1275 Golf
Carts
CLUB CAR
Runs good.
Looks good.
Good batteries.
$1095.
Call 352-638-0731
CLUB CAR 2001.48V, high speed.
remanufactured. 2012 batteries,
lights, turn signals, sunbrella, seat
covers, windshield, mirrors & floor
mats, $2350.
352-978-1352
CLUB CAR '97,
new batteries. 48V,
1 owner. Rain cover,
ights, turn signals, & mirrors.
Like new.
$1850
Call 352-978-1352
E-Z-GO '01, 36 volt 2012 batteries,
lights, rain enclosure, fold down
windshield, turn signals. Excel
shape, Asking $1,950. Please call
352-357-6638 or 352-205-3066
GOLF CART TIRES mounted on 8"
Rims. Good for spares. $45.
352-314-3458
PAR CAR 2005
48V Excel cond.
New batteries, tires,
side curtains.
On board charger.
$2,500
Please call
352-399-2126
MAT for golf cart,
good cond. $15
Call 352-552-7509


The Daily Commercial
www.dailycommercial.com


~I






AUTO



LOAN


888O




26.
8409S
in* S


m


5





h.


TAVARES Garage sale, Selling
to the bare walls, Sofa, Chairs,
Kitchen utensils, Childrens
games, Area rugs, Much more.


II S iuppU~lement you 1r b def~ 7t wthaC sif~9~1ired Ad I-.


IN LAKE COUNTY CALL 314-FAST

IN SUMMER COUNTY CALL 748-1955


The Daily Commercial


I


wool


DAILY COMMERCIAL


Monday, September 30, 2013