East African Professional Hunters Association, Records

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
East African Professional Hunters Association, Records
Alternate Title:
Through British East Africa with the first Russian safari
Physical Description:
Unknown
Creator:
George H. Outram

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00018739:00003

Full Text


S,, Throuh Br tish sa t Africa with 'the First Russian Safari'
i- .Throug .Bri.iah dgstAfrica wiih the First...ussian Safari*


Hunter and guide George H. Outram.


Round the store oT the well known firm of safari outfitters Newland.
Tarlton &Company, one morning in December, 1909, could be seen two quiet,
yet observant gentlemen. Watching a crowd of natives getting their
outfits of the usual blanket, water bottle and jersey. The one watching
but saying little, studying deeply the native Porters and their dress -
maybe thinking in his mind, how darn cold those same porters would be in:
full dress if he could only transfer them to his- own frozen north for:
he who was: watching, was Crown Prince Alexandre Gortchacow Perejaslaw
Government of Poltava, Russia the other who was moving among the porters -
asking a question here or there, of the staff of Kewland Tarlton- & Co. -
and I, hearing an enquiry for the guide, found that his mind was' not
studying the natives, but was keen to know if I would have the safari
ready to catch a special train that was to leave at 3 p.m. that afternoon.-
for Kijabi. The starting point of most safari's who work, what is. knowrr
as the Southern Sotik Route. But having only 16 hours between finishing '.
with the Boyce Balloonograph Safari, and then getting ready to take: the
road again, I had little time to become acquainted with two gentlemen I
had to pilot around for the next 8 or 10 weeks., but in that one- question; I-
"Will you be ready" told me that I was dealing with a man who had handled
men, and so I met Count Theodore Nieroth Col. of the Horse' Guards, -
A.D.C. to H.I.H. the Grand Duke Nicolas of Russia, who like all sportsmen
from the four corners of the earth, had been lured to the World's
Playground of Big Game.

Loads are picked up a rush made to the station. Brake van loaded with
all the necessary kit for a safari. Horses and mules: trucked, tent boys,
gunbearers, syces and porters all bundled into the trucks, and the cook
fired in on top as he can have no excuse for not coming out first the
right away given to the guard and to the accompaniment of the engine's
whistle, the guide flops on the seat with a sigh of relief, for he knows.
that for the next four hours he is at rest, except to answer a question of'
"What natives, are those will we see any game as we go along is it hot
where we are going?" and so on. But after about a ten mile run when the
view unfolds of the Plains, lying .about a thousand feet below, with
Nairobi nestling in the trees the Guide has time to fill his pipe and
have a quiet smoke, before the train has run through Limoru station on to


the Escarpment then a rush to the windows as the magnificent panorama
opens out of the Kedong Valley lying some 2,500 feet below, and as the
sun sinks to rest, throwing its rays on hill and valley, with all the
hues: of a brilliant opal you glide down past Nielson's sawmill to
Kijabi station.




2 -
2-

Then commences the Safari in earnest as far as the Guide is concerned.
After a couple of hours- had work, unloading kit untrucking horses and
mules, everything is made snug for the night no tents to pitch here, as
there is a dak bungalow at the station for passengers. So our first
dinner is served dinner over, we sit and chat until it is time to turn in
- for safari life is conductive to early hours 9 p.m. to bed and 4.30 a.m.
to turn out. So- out it is at daylight, a hasty breakfast, load allowed to
the porters. Our ox waggon loaded up, we hit the track, and down we drop
another thousand feet when the bed of the valley is reached then on to
the sandy river where we wait till evening to make a night march for the
foot of the Mau.

As this is the worst of the dry stage, we march all night, the Prince and
the Count made snug in an empty wagon that we had the good luck to have
travelling, out of our way. So while they slept and maybe dreamed of the
Northern star I know one at least through the midnight march, let his
eyes stray from the track to the Southern Cross, and his thoughts; go
wandering till his mule had done a quick side step from a porter who had
stopped to rest on the track, and had dropped off to sleep, but awoke
seeing more stars than he ever reckoned the Kedong Valley would hold, fon.
the mule wheeled and handed out two of a kind one on the point, the others
did not get home right, but just kicked his ear-ring out. So picking up
his load went trudging along the track, wondering what had happened. Withi
the first streak of daylight found most of the porters up to the waggon -
load generally with 50 loads of posho (native food) and 2,000 gallons of
water. At the foot of the Nau, all the water is served out horses and
mules given a drink which has to do till the Sibi river is reached a
distance of 25 miles with a 3,000 foot climb thrown in. So where I sat
and waited for the straggling porters, I learned from Mr. Ulyate, the.
owner of the waggons; on this track, that the Price and Count had their
first experience with big game for just as the waggon reached the usual
camping ground, 6 lions walked within 30 yards of the leader's team.
Ulyate called the Count, asking him if he would like to see some lions.
Out jumped the Count in his pyjamas to see six pairs of eyes flashing


within 20 yards of him, for after the lions crossed the head of the team,
they turned and travelled back towards the waggon. The Count finding that
none of his lions were missing, got back into the waggon. One of the
natives stood and held a Hurricane lamp over Ulyate's head, while he
fired at them with a revolver not to hit, did he fire Ulyate knows
the game better than that but to scare them off. 8 o'clock saw all the
porternup to the waggon all the water served out then took what shade
we could find, till 1 p.m. when a move is made up the mountain, which is
reached at dusk. Had a dry canp till 4 a.m. next morning, when we. made
a fast dry march and reached water at 11 a.m. 'Twas a sight that would
gladen the heart of a Temperance Lecturer, to see about 90 heads stuck
into the river mopping up water as if they had never tasted it before-.





-3-


Next day saw us at the Ngare Narok river then on to the Guaso Nyiro -
shot 3 head of game, 2 Grant, 1 Thomson. Bade the river on the morning
of the 15th. Started shooting after lunch and got 2 kongoni,
1 Veldtebeeste and 2 zebra. Next morning, saw us away for Webb's farm,
a distance of 8 miles, and got to work early for we had reached the edge-
of the hunting ground, and then the luck started and I want to. say right
here that if ever its my luck to strike a City again, and find Count
Nieroth in the same City, I'll get him to go partners with me in 20
Roubles and him to mark a ticket in a Chinese Lottery It's a sure thing
for him to catch 9 marks and draw seventy two of the Brightest and Best. -
Fancy, the Prince and I go one direction and the Count the opposite we
care home all smiles having got a good Rhino and caught a young one only
to find the Count had bowled over a fine Eland- sent the head back into
camp, then he took a turn round after buck, on making back to camp he had a
look at the dead Bland and found two lions feeding on it, and got. both: -
one a magnificent lion, the skin measuring 11 ft. 6 inches the other-
10 ft. 9 inches and he had been complaining he had no luck big game.
shooting! Next day spent drying skins but the Prince bagged 2 zebra
near camp. The following day made a move in a South Easterly direction
to a spring and got some good shooting on the way, Impala, Thomson and-
Grants- then on to the edge of the Iau Escarpment-. As-. I wasm trying to.
find a track on to the German border. Whilst on the march, we ran into a
fine Rhino the: Prince wounded it badly, but it bolted, went after it,
only to lose it again without getting a shot still following on its'
tracks-, I thought I had got him again, but on stalking through the scrub,
found it was-. a grand bull Eland.

The Prince fired and missed, when away it went. I got the Prince to
follow on his horse, I followed up on the mule the Prince got a long
shot in, and hit, and sticking to it, got close and dismounted. Hearing

4 or 5 shots in quick succession, I thought something was wrong, for as. I
was hustling along to see what was. happening, I saw the Prince's pony
galloping across the veldt on his own started to head him off, only to
find the wounded Rhino coming as if he had urgent biz. near where I
lived slid off the mule and gave the Rhino one in the neck as he went
passed. I went after the pony and caught it, and then went looking for-


the Prince, feeling sure he had had an argument with the Rhino, and that.
the Rhino had won and at last found him lying under a tree beside the:
2nd best Bland shot in B.E.A. 28 inch horn a real beauty. But as. we:
had to make 12 more miles' to where I was. going to camp had to leave the
Rhino with regrets' reached camp at 4.30 to find the luckless one
measuring a 10 ft. 4 inch cheetah, and a 26 inch Eland. I said "No luck
again" "Oh! it's alright here in B.E.A., but in India I was following

buffalo for 16 days and never got one" so I learned that the Count had
shot in India. ChristmasZ Eve found us in a beautiful camp on the
Narosurra River just at the foot of Osubogo Mountains the range that-,




-. 4-


lhas been a stumbling block to several safaris who have tried to cut a
track across it to the Border but as I reckoned I should cut an old
track of mine, between 30 and 40 miles due South I made up my mind that.
I could get through for as long as one knows what in front of you, it
makes all the difference It's when you have to do it praying there is
water in the next Creek- that it gets you thinking. So Christmas Eve.
was spent in thoughts of friends in different parts of the world till
the Prince remarked how strange the Christmas here the sun shining in
all its glory, everything beautiful and green, while as they described the-
conditions in their part of the world at Christmas time. Snow four ft.
deep, everyone wrapped in furs and so on, till I felt that bailey cold, I
had to leave the fire and get a great-coat, to save a fit of the shivers.

Christmas: morning saw all out for a day's shoot, and as the Robetsii are
good here, we had a go at them the Prince getting six and the Count four -
bagging 5 other head making a total of 15 for the day. Back to cnamp for
dinner to find two friends who were out ostrich hunting had struck our
camp a cordial invitation from the Prince and Count, to my friends toa
dine we made a merry party and as our cook had let himself go in
honour of Christmas Day, the dinner was: A.1. The Pudding pronounced one
of the best, and was an eye opener to the Russian nobility, that a native.
cook could make such an excellent pudding. But I had to break it gently
that I brought it from home! And as we sat that night chatting, the
Count relating how one Christmas he had waited in the snow for 7 hours for
a shot at a stag and when the chance came, missed! Hands numbed with the
cold. The Prince relating the pleasures of driving over the Plains of
Southern Russia to the music of the sleigh bells. One of my friends
holding forth on the joys of sitting round the Christmas fire in Old
England, and chasing the Lassies under the mistletoe. Ah yes, Sandford
knows a good game at any rate a quieter one than chasing Rhino under the
African mistletoe. Funny, the latter always makes me think of the
Christmas card "I-cling-to-thee" for cling it does like as it is i
sorry to lose your company as tight as your missus will, to you, if you
tell her you are going to the races to back a cert, and she'll cling to
the fiver if she can get her hands on it just as tight as a native clings
to you for his pay, and so our Christmas night passed with one more glass


to absent friends, and a thought to my last Christmas night at the head of
Natron Lake, in company of Edgar B. Bronson, and good old Billy Judd.

Daylight of the 26th saw us on top of the mountain, just as the sun rose
in all its splendour. The Prince and Count stood spellbound at the
wonderous view looking North of East, one sees nestling in the Valley
Mount Suswa and Longonot and the Limoru Escarpment, while away beyond Donya
Sabok is clearly seen one hundred and twenty miles off. But while they
stand and wonder at the scene, I am straining my eyes to pick out the
hills about 40 miles South West for to me the white top of Helmet Hill
seems more beautiful than the scene in the valley below for I have hit a




-5-

track that will lead me to water and save me a march round the Kountains.
of about 70 miles, and open a new track to me, without the torments of
crossing h.agardi with its burning heat and not running the risk of getting
butted in the rear by Buffalo or Rhino as you push through the dense
jungle, that grows along the West bank of the Guaso Nyiro, where it flows!
in the valley beneath. So it was for the beautiful green grass on the
mountain slopes, the home of herds of Eland a herd of about 200 were
quietly feeding away on our right was an old bull Buffalo shifting camp
to a cool spot in one of the many mountain gully's. So we pitched camp,
and out after Bland We got water at the first creek, so gave the porters
a days spell which they needed after crossing the dry country of the
Kedong Valley and the Limek plains. Off again next day towards the Helmet
Hill, and found a splendid path that ran away South West- so after a
long hard march, made camp at a beautiful clear spring- 10 miles north of
Kar Baibai. Bagged 6 Veldebeeste on the march. Just before reaching
the spring, we saw plenty of lion spoor had a look next day, bout failed
to find. However, the Count got a grand bull Giraffe. That evening we-
laid two baits near the camp for lion went out next morning- onf going to-
the first bait, found it had not been touched but on going to the second
bait, found it had gone but no trouble to say where, for a lion had
dragged it straight into a donga on our left ran the spoor down to the
donga, but could not see the lion was just going into the thick scrub
that grew on the donga edge, and had got within 10 ft. of the scrub, when
a loud angry growl told us he was receiving visitors. The Count and I
both fired a snap shot one told, but he broke straight away, so going
carefully on through the scrub, we found he had turned into another little
donga leading into a low wooded hill. Followed on for about 2 miles, but
had to give it best so put the rest of the day in with buck, getting a
good bag.

Returned bo camp to find the Prince in luck as he was having a quiet day
around the camp with the shotgun working down through the thorn bush
that was growing along the creek, bagging Guinea Fowl, and was returning
at dusk to camp, when he fired as he thought at a small leopard and rolled
it over with the first barrel dead; had it brought to camp, on looking


at it, it had me beat, for I had never seen it before, so asked the
skinnersdid they know it, but later found it was a Lynx, the first ever shot
in B.E.A. Next morning found us out in the direction where the Count shot
hisa giraffe which was lying right out in the open, and there the vultures
sat, waiting for the feast. Putting my glasses on to the dead carcass I
saw 10 lions feeding, 2 lioness and eight cubs, four much bigger than the
others. We dropped and did a long crawl to get to cover and got the wind
right. We had got to within 300 yards but the birds in the trees, waiting
over our heads, gave us away. The lions broke for the jungle just as
they reached it, one of the lionesses tore back again, and tore out a
mouthful of meat and like a flash back to the thick scrub. We waited for




-- 6 --


a full two hours, in the hopes of them returning, but no luck, so had a
go at the Impala, Clipspringer and Duhiiker with good luck.

New Year's Eve found us camped about 4 miles from the cascades on the
Longarnett River. Here the Prince bagged his giraffe after a good long
running fight, and just before he dropped and as the Prince rode up to
give him a finisher, he let go a punch that would have left a vacant
chair on New Year's morning, if it had got home for the giraffe can hand
out a punch with its hind leg a mighty long way. Working back to camp,
we got another fine Eland, also 2 impala. On reaching camp, found the
Count was- still in luck with the cat tribt<, as he had bagged a fine
leopard 9 foot 7 inches when skinned also one serval cat and 4 other
head of game, and a New Year's feast in progress in the porters' camp, for
they were filling up on giraffe, eland, veldebeeste, etc., etc., and
topping up with kombari a fine fresh water fish that is plentiful at the
cascades. And it was here I got to the truth of the Count's idea of his
!bad luck He said I'll tell you about my Ibad luck it is as follows
"I followed Buffalo in India for 16 days and never got it, I have waited
waist deep in the snow for hours for a shot at a stag, then missed where
the chance came. In the Officers' mess it's a standing rule whatever I
back is sure to lose and as I ami a sport, have had to pay up and look
pleased on a good many occasions, but luck has turned at last".

Next morning, we moved down the Valley that runs parallel to the German
border and pitched camp at the end of the valley at Palm Springs the
Count with Borali, his Somali gunbearer, was just entering to rest under
the cool palm shade, when he heard a low growl, so pushed through to the
clearing on the other side of the grove just in time to see a very large
lion bounding away had a snap at him and hit was in the act of firing
with his 2nd barrel when a second lion broke past fired and missed,
then came a third another miss. He told me on getting back to camp
that while he was firing, he thought of a story I had told him of two
Johnnys who came to B.E.A. lion hunting. Meeting old Bob B. they asked
him if there were any lions in the district, as they would like to shoot
a few. Bob told them that he had seen 4 that afternoon down on the Athi


River (Stony Athi). They said they would go at once, but on B's advice
waited till next a.m. Daylight saw them away, one going down the river
bed, the other up stream. The one that went downstream did not show up
to lunch, so at 3 p.m. 2 or 3 whites started out to look for him. They
found him perched up a tree, about 2 miles from camp B. asked him if he
had any luck, or did he see any lions. Lions he replied, I saw any
amount of big onesand hundreds of little oneq and Count Nieroth told me he
was getting ready to count the little ones, but none came past, and worse
still could not find the big one he hit!

The Prince still filling up his bag with anything that came along, put up

the fastest bit of shooting I have ever seen. He had just shot an oribi,




- 7 -


when up jumped a reedbuck and as- it was showing a good head, I wanted the
Prince to get it, but it broke through the scrub too quickly so
followed up in the direction it went, caught sight of an animal through-
the bushes the Prince stalked up and opened fire 3 shots, and as- I
heard the bullets tell, ran up to see 2 kongoni lying on the ground the.
Prince still blazing away, and in-. less than 3 minutes had 8 down within a
space of 40 yards. So putting the oribi with the 8 kongoni, making a
picture of 9 heads under 10 minutes, which is going some. So back to
camp, and as- we had meat to burn, gave the Major a gallop, with 3 kongonis
and the way he answered the question with his jaws satisfied all
concerned. Got away next a.m., travelling West, when about 2 or 3 miles
north of Kobolet, saw the fresh kill of a lion, the spoor leading into a
small donga, and as we had very heavy rain the previous night, the spoor-
showing very plain. We left the horses outside the timber, and in we went.,
the safari meanwhile about 3-of a mile behind. Following on the lion,
spoor we crept silently along the donga bed, with- eyes- peering into every
bush, ears- listening for the growl we expected every moment to hear on
we crept, till we found that the lion tracks had just been crossed by the
hoof prints of a big Buffalo; a whispered conversation which was it to be,
the lion or the buffalo, the Count pointed to the buffalo track. Then
on again, when the tracks turned up the bank, and led across a little open
glade to a donga about one hundred yards' west of the one we had just left.
We had got about halfway across the open space, when the Count's Somali
tent boy raced up on one of the ponies towards the donga we were making
for, but about eighty yards on our right. He almost reached the timber,
when round went the pony and back he went, when out broke two rhino
straight after the horse. I shouted to Abdi to stop. He told me after
he wanted to but the pony objected. I said to the Count to pump the load
into the big rhino, which he did, the first shot got well home. When
round he camae only to receive a second behind the ear, and a third shot
in the same place when he pitched forward on his head and rolled over -
dead. The second rhino stood snorting and for a while looked as if he
wanted trouble, but as its- horn was only nine inches long, we let it go,
but it !look us about five minutes to hunt it away from the dead one.
After the firing the boy came back to say that as he roade along in front
of the safari he saw the buffalo that we were trailing, standing just


cleari.of the donga and he was looking for us, to let us know when he
almost rode on top of the two rhino.

Stopped the safari, had the headskin taken off, feet cut off and some of
the hide for kibokos, then on again only to stumble on top of a fine
bushbuck which was promptly rolled over. Horns measuring fifteen inches
long a beauty. Moved on again about 4 miles and pitched camp in time
to escape a drenching as a fearful thunderstorm broke just as we made all
snug for the night.

5 p.m. Saw the sun out again and as game was plentifull the Prince and I




*". *- 8-


started out to have a short round the camp. Had just got into position
to have a shot at a Veldabeeste when the growl of a lion that sounded
about two hundred yards away. So after them we went and after travelling
sir hundred yards saw two fine lions, clear out in the open getting the-
benefit of the evening sun drying their coats, but in such a position that
to get any nearer than three hundred yards was impossible, but we started
to crawl and trust to luck that they would not see us. Had crawled about
thirty yards when an angry warning growl on our right told us we were: seen,
and away broke a fine lioness, and the two lions- over a ridge. We
followed them up but never got a look at them again, and reached camp again
as night settled in. An exciting day. Then to bed to dream of lions,
buffalo, rhino and wonder what was- in store for us on the morrow.

Noon next day saw us' in camp at the Mara River and everybody on the river:
fishing, and judging by the number of Kombari roasting round the camp fires,
the boys had a good time on the river for two days waiting for our waggon,
which had gone astray somewhere on the Loita Plains, but was: pleased to see,
a Wandrobo came into camp with a letter in a cleft stick and at four that`
afternoon to hear the welcome sound of the Bullock whip telling us our
waggon was' near.

Next morning the Prince and the Count out after waterbuck, I packing up
the heads and reducing down the kits' as we were sending everything in the-
way of trophies, back by waggon so it kept me busy. Evening saw the.
shoaters- return and had good luck on waterbuck 8, the best running up- to
twenty-nine inches, also 3 warthog, one a real good one. AS we- had a goad
climb in front of us up the Usuria Escarpment, crossed the river next day
and moved 8 miles from the river and camped for the day, the Prince and
the Count out again after waterbuck and got 6 more and three Topi.

Daylight saw us climbing the Escarpment en route for the elephant country.
Bagged 2 Chandlers Reedbuck while going up the mountain and made camp at
three p.m.

Away again at daylight, the Count and I jogging along chatting and
smoking when out broke a grand rhino, but for once we were caught: napping
as we had got away from our gunbearers or them from us. The guns


seventy yards behind, yelling for them to come up, the rhino standing
looking at us sitting on our horses and wondering if the sufferagettes
had invaded East Africa, but away he went down the hillside making every-
thing fly from his' path, the Count and I after him with a Wanderobo
running the spoor. At first it was easy to follow but as he steadied up
and took to the jungle, it became more difficult to follow. Mile after
mile we went till it became so dense that it would Push a Lawyer- to find a
loophole in it. But on we crept till the Wandorobo stopped and said he's
just in front. Then back he came with a crash and a snort just missing'
Borali, the Count's- gunbearer. The Count jumped to one side as: the rhino
crashed past. I pushed through the scrub from where I had been standing




0 0 .


to find the Count had landed plumb in a deep hole and had disappeared off'
the face of thb earth, but took it as a joke as he scrambled out again.
And away went the rhino. So tired and downhearted and torn with' thorns,
we turned our faces to hunt for the safari, and as we had left our horses
some miles behind, we had to do it on our flat feet, and were just about
fed up when we reached the top of a small rise, to see the camp pitched
just below us, table laid waiting our return, a good lunch- and all our
troubles forgotten. At 5 p.m. our syces turned up with tha horses. On.
asking where they had been they said following us. One of the syces was
a mission boy and said he thought he could follow us easy as he had been
taught at school, that a camel could pass through the eye of a needle.
The other boy reckoned that was simple, but said would like to see the
darn camel that could pass through the scrub he tried to take the horses
through.

Daylight saw us all out as one of our Wanderobo had returned over night
with the news that some elephants had been seen by some of Tommies menl
near the Maggoro River. So lost no time getting away, and at 11 a.m. wa
crossed the fresh spoor of the elephant mating from the Maggoro towards
the Oyani River. Pitched camp and out after them. Hunted all day but
could not get up to them. Decided to shift camp at daylight and follow
them up.

So off again next morning and after crossing the Oyani we climbed a lone
hill standing in the valley and there down underneath us was a herd of
about three hundred elephants, marching in close order, and making into a
thick clump of timber. We sat watching them move slowly down into the-
timber, and from where we sat if they kept their true course', it would
bring them right out under the bank we were waiting on and within thirty
or forty yards from us. Soon we heard the snapping of branches, and now
and then the shrill trumpet. But not so much as a trunk tip could we see,
so there we sat waiting. I had just sent one of my Lumbwa boys back up
the hill to tell the safari not to move off the hill top. The boy got
had turned
about one hundred yards away when back he came to say the elephants/and
were making away from us, along the other side of the timber, so as the
turn put us right down wind. After them we went and got right up to the
rear guard as they were slowly moving into another clump of trees. So


two blades of grass cut, the Prince and the Count to draw for the first
shot. The Count won. Getting quickly into position, waiting to see if
we could find the bull, the elephants meanwhile moving slowly away from
us till we thought they had all gone again, when a movement in the trees
on our left told us one was still there. Then up went a trunk. Not
feeling for the wind but reaching for the young shoots on the tree top, at
the same time showing what we were looking for his tusks. Thienhe
slowly turned to follow his mates.. But that slow turn was all that was
wanted, for out rang the .465 of Count Nieroth, then. a crash and down went
the Prize that all big Game Hunters covert. Photo taken, then cut the





- 1C -


feet off, and wait till the safari arrived to get axes to cut out the
tusks:, one weighing 69 lbs., the other 66 lbs., 135 lbs. the pai. Tents:

pitched and then let the boys at the meat. The Major down a long working
galloping, making the Count and I shake hands with ourselves about the
good thing we have when we let the 'gger go against the Bear.

A hurried breakfast next morning and away again after the elephant, the
Prince and I on the elephant trails, the Count working a half circle. Mile
after mile we went stumbling over boulders, pushing through the long grass.
Now down in deep ravines and matted jungle. But at last we got a sight of
four about a mile away, feeding from tree to tree, so on we went looking at
the elephant from where we were standing, it looked ideal to get at them.
But on crossing the stream that ran between them and us, Oh! what a treat.
It was as tough as I ever got in Africa. Grass 12 feet high, and every
kind of clinging vine that ever grew had massed itself into that patch.
But through we went to find the elephants- making down the other side of the
ridge. We followed in their tracks. Could hear them but could not see
them, so sent a boy up a tree and I watching him do a wave to the right., to
the right we went. Wihen one must have got our wind, for with a crash it
broke right on top of us. I put both barrels into its head. It stumbled,
then turned and away went about forty more. Found the blood spoor (heavy)
moving with the herd. Still following up we got within eighty yards and
watched them pass but could not see the bulls or the wounded one. Kept
with them for about a mile till they entered some big timber and then
worked up within twenty yards of 6 of them, but not a sight of the tusks
until half an hour had passed when they moved past only to find we had been
watching cows. So back to camp, done up, and curse our bad luck.

Next morning we found that the elephants had moved North towards the Kisii
Hills, so sent the safari on to the Back Huts of the Kisii tribe, we
working out on the flank but no sign of the elephant's. Had just got camp
pitched about 2 p.m. when down came the natives in hundreds to trade,
fowls, eggs, spears, etc. So sent 6 of them to look for the elephants.
They had not gone ten minutes:, when some more Eisii natives came and said
that they could see the elephant from the hill top and that they were:
about a mile away. So horses are saddled up and away again, the Kisit in
front as guides and on reaching the rise, there was the herd feeding. We


made a quick move to try and get in front, we travelling along their flank
down wind but we could not quite head them off but got very near the head of
the herd and moved down the ridge towards. them, only to disappear in the
long grass, and not as much as the tiprof an ear to be seen, and made to
two small trees growing about ten feet apart. Gat there all right and the
Count and I got the Prince and his gunbearer into one tree, then the Count
and Borali into the other tree, I waiting between the two trees. I asked
Count Nieroth if he could see from up there. He said yes, they are about
forty or fifty yards away. And there we waited till I heard a whisper in
Russian, and I knew something was coming but could see nothing. The




:o ll -

Prince fired and then stared the crashing of Bramble, then the Count
fired with the Prince. The Prince's gunbearer said to the two boys
standing with me that the herd was breaking straight: for us. He and the
Prince jumped down and disappeared in the long grass. I said to Count
Nieroth who was' still in his tree What are they doing? He looked down
and said For God's sake, go; They're stampeding right on top of you.
Then two more shots from the Count's rifle and I shifted sudden for about
ten yards, but gave it best knowing that it was useless to run from what
I could not see. Where I stopped was a big stump of a tree that the

elephant had broken off some time previous, with very high grass growing
round it. So with no ambition to sit on ivory, in I dived to awaut-:the
crash and not long did I have to wait- for past they crashed sending trees
flying, breaking the Bramble into matchwood. The sickly swish of their
feet through the tall grass and the hissing sound as their huge bodies'
rubbed together in the mad rush to get away. I waited for a few seconds,
which seemed hours, and then made a rush from the sound as they passed on
my left. I`'. got to a little tree and got into the fork and could just
see over the grass top when I saw the Prince struggling through the grass,
dropped and made to him, and just in time, as the strain had been too much
for him. I took his rifle and was- making to the tree where Count Wieroth-
was, as he was the only one that could see the elephant. But with twoe
heavy rifles and helping the Prince along was not easy going, then a
warning shout from Count Nieroth that there was a wounded elephant behind
me: and one in front of the tree he was- in. But don't think I was trying-
another Light Brigade Charge4 I wanted to see something else besides
grass, and got to the roadway the elephants had made, and if ever a man
wasI pleased on this Earth, it was your Humble Self when he reached it, and
what a roadway it was, where a few minutes before had been trees", bramble
and grass that would try the toughest man to get through, was a road one
hundred yards wide and half a mile long. As' Count Nieroth said a
lovely motor track. We had just reached the clearing when Borali dropped
from the tree and said the elephant in front was down, and those few words;
acted like magic on the Prince, as he thought he had bagged his first
tusker. But it was the Count's second. We had just reached the dead


elephant and congratulating one another on our luck and speculating on
the weight of this one's tusks, when two shots were fired about six
hundred yards away and right in the track the elephants- had made. All
eyes turned to where the shots were fired. Then everybody broke off the:
mark as- if it were a Marathon race and the elephant on the back mark, for'
back they came again, and it was shift and shift quick so as not to give
them our wind. What the two shots meant we did not know, and did not
wait to find out, for it was to make a flank movement to get to camp which
we reached at dark, and round the camp fire the events of the day were
gone over as they oft are on safari.

Daylight seemed slow in coming, but breakfast over we made a move back to




12-

our dead elephant, and found by the tracks that the elephant had broke
back South. So started getting the tusks out, when one of the boys that
we. had sent to look for the other wounded elephant came and said he had
found it, but that a white man was cutting the tusks; out, so a hurried
half mile spin soon brought us to the spot. No need to ask where for where
we had travelled -- of a mile for the rest of the distance we were- gauded
by the yelling of the natives. Dancing like demons, knivesE brandishing in
the air, and meat flying in all directions, and to the appeal of the
white man trying to get to the elephant, we. helped drive them off. But
two took a bit of shifting, one had worked his. passage right inside the
elephant while his mate, game to the last, stood outside collecting the
titbits; his mate passed out, though a white man was' beating a tattoo on
his latter end with a kiboko, but the only effect it seemed to have on him
was to make him saw off about a pound of meat, keeping time to the blows
and now and again stopping to look inside to see that his mate was getting
in a good cross cut. Such is the African (Shenzi) on meat. Introducing
i ourselves we found the elephant was not ours-, but one shot by a
Mr. Clark who is collecting for one of the American Museums and we cleared
up the mystery of the shots over night. Mr. Clark had shot this elephant
two hours before we arrived on the scene, and had waited on the elephant
while his boys had gone to camp for axes to cut the tusks out*. He had
just started when he saw us riding up the rise and knowing there was only
one thing we could be after, climbed up in a tree to watch the fun and see
how we got on. As soon as they stampeded from the firing, they broke
straight for him and as they were getting too close to be pleasant fired
to make them swing away, but his shots stopped them and turned them back
straight towards us. Hence our hurried move to camp. The bull we had
down was a good one, but an old fighter for both his tusks' were broken
@ badly, but still turning the scales at 107 lbs. We had boys, out in every
direction to look for our third elephant, for the Prince and Count were
both certain he was dead. So while the boys were away, we went and
viewed the ground to see what we missed in the rush by or rather how they
missed us. The Prince, myself, Ahedia and Mabruki (the two gunbearers)
were eight feet from the edge of the herd, and the Prince told me that in


the few seconds it took them to pass him, he lived his life over again,
had time to bid his friends goodbye and view his own funeral. While the
Count said he did not know he had so many close acquaintances in Africa.
The boys back but no sign of the wounded elephant. So as time was
precious we- packed up and hauled out for Kisii Boma, where we passed a
most enjoyable evening with Mr. Biggs and Lumley, the two officials in
charge of the Boma, and from whom we learned that if we went out to the
Yaja River about 3 hours march, we were sure of a Hippo at the pools.

Next morning saw us awiay after hippo, and reached the pools at ten a.m.
Pitch camp, but no sign. But down came the Kisii in hundreds, and
perched themselves round the rocks above the pool like vultures awaiting





./13 -


the feast. And it looked a sure disappointment till one of my boys said
that if I let the Kisii sing it would bring the hippo up to see what the
row was about. I told the Prince what my boy said. He must have thought:
I was pulling his leg he said, send them away and when it gets cruiet we
may have a chance-. But send them away, it couldn't be done without a
maxim, so there we sat puffing away, puffing away at our pipes, eyes fixed
on the pool below, but not as much as a bubble to cheer us on. Just then
an old native arrived. One look was enough to say he was a Chief. I told
my boy to ask the Chief, did the Kisii ever sing to bring the hippo up. He-
gave my boy to understand that it was a sure thing if I gave the word. I
told the Prince what he said and as he was' about fed up waiting, consent
was given, but as I had never heard of it before I had my doots. But just
as the boys were getting into their stridge with a tune that sounded like
a cross between Yes, we'll gather at the River, and, we all walked into
the shop when up he came. Head well out of water, mouth wide open and a.
happy smile on his face, like as if he was. pleased to join in the chorus,
when down he went again with a .465 behind the ear. Another shot a few
minutes later and all was over. We strolled back to lunch and waited
till the hippo floated which he did about 4 p.m.. And while in the act of
towing him on to the bank, our good luck staying with us as a native runner
arrived with a note from Mr. Clark to say he had found our 3rd elephan-t
and had cut the tusks out, and sent them to Kisii Boma. No need to say
the Prince was delighted to know he had got his elephant, and at the
Gentlemanly action of Mr. Clark, who has written his name in Big Letters
as a true sport. We just got the hippo trophies off by dusk and whiled
away the evening chatting over our good luck, 3 good elephant and a fine
hippo in 5 days.-

Next morning back to Kisii Boma which we reached by 9 a.m. and as our
shooting was over in this district, our one object was to reach Nairobi as
soon as possible. So after lunch, bade goodbye to our kind friends at.
the Boma, then on towards Kericho and as there is no game on this track,
one is glad. to get it over. Found a little amusement at the camps
bartering with the natives for curios, spears, knives-, native stools,
trinkets, etc., of which we got all we_ needed and on the third day reached
Kericho, where we were received with hospitality by Angus Madden, the


Dis,. Commissioner of Police.

January 29th saw everything entrained at Lumbwa station and at 3 p.m. the
train hauled out for Nairobi. A good dinner at 8 p.m. at the Nakuru
Hotel, and at 8.30 next morning reached Nairobi. But as we were going on
to the Tana River, no time was lost in Nairobi. But as: it was only a
small safari, sent the porters away at noon on February 2nd to
Mr. Mc0illan's farm, Juja, by the low road, a distance of 24 miles.

The Prince and the Count driving down on the following day, were
astonished to see the beautiful homestead of Juja.




C(- .-


14-

The evening of the 4th saw us at the junction of the Athi and Thika
Rivers and a lively time we had crossing as the rivers were up owing to

the late rains-. But all over safe, camp pitched and everything ready forr
an early start next morning after buffalo and rhino.

Daylight found us climbing the low range lying to the North of Donya Sabuk,
and on reaching the top, a magnificent view of mountt Kenya was seen, its
torn and rugged battlements snow clad, glittering in the morning sun. A
few words in Russian between the Prince and Co4A, then silently they stood,
gazing at the first snow they had seen since leaving their far off
Northern home. With a hand wave, the Count turned along the ridge to
the South, the Prince and I started for the valley beneath. Not a word
between them as they parted, but a look at their faces told me they were
not in Africa, but back with their loved ones in Russia*. But one must
not go a dreaming who goes buffalo hunting in B.E.A. We had just
reached a rocky point and had sat down for a rest when I spotted 2 Chandler
Reedbuck a bit lower down the hill. I pointed them out to the Prince

who started after them. I stoppedwgtching them so as not to lose them
in the long grass I waving him the direction with my hands. He had
just got them right in front of him when I saw two buffalo making slowly
along underneath us, so sent a boy to stop the Prince firing at the
Reedbuck. Up we went again to the top of the ridge and started along to
try and get in front of them. We made to where I thought they would
make through a little gap in the hills and when we reached the end of the
ridge, down we went to await events. We had made about halfway down the
hillside when up jumped a bull roan antelope, and the Prince made after
him, but the grass was very long and never got a sight of him. I stopped,
watching for the buffalo, and in a minute or two I saw them about three
hundred yards away, still heading for the gap I thought they would go
through. meanwhile the Prince looking for the Road had got about 50
yards lower down the ridge. I made down at once. I had got within1
tw-eaty yards when he saw the buffalo making up the ridge across the gap.
His first shot missed the leading buffalo, but his next shot stopped the
second buffalo turning it towards us. The third shot hit him very hard
as he almost fell but staggered into a thick clump of jungle, so had to


work up very carefully to the edge of the timber, but could not see him,
so after waiting ten minutes we fired a shot through the timber to stir
him up but he did not show. Got on to his blood spoor and got a sight
of him down, so giving him a safety shot found him dead. Quite a good
bull with a 40 inch spread. When we reached camp found that the Count
had got 2 good bushbuck and crossed a lot of fresh rhino spoor, so
decided to give the rhino a turn if possible next morning.

Away again at daylight after rhino, and had good luck to get two good
ones- and wound a third, but as it was: getting late, and the grass very
high, had to leave him till morning.
I
Next morning, sent boys to see if they could find the wounded rhino. T e




- 15-


Count again after rhino, the Prince hunting for a Roan. Found them but
could not get a decent shot at them, but got a good Bushbuck and as wae-
or
had made out six/seven miles from camp and the going very heavy owing to
the long grass, turn towards camp. We had just reached the ridge we had
to climb to reach our camp. After a delightful few hours; through the:
long grass, stumbling over stones and now and again finding a hole that-
one had to prospect ten or twelve feet to find bottom. We had just
started up the ridge when one of the boys' sighted about twenty buffalo,
about half a mile away, and as it was 5 p.m. thought to leave them till
morning, but leaving game like that takes doing, so after them we went and
reached a point where we could just see the broad black backs of the
buffalo, but not the horns, it was feeding time, all heads down. So
worked round in a half circle to a little rise. This brought us to a
spot about one hundred and twenty yards from the bunch. Where we stood
was in the mouth of a Y with a deep donga on our right hand side, and
another on our left, the dongasl joining about a hundred yards in front of
us. So with one eye on the buffalo and another on the sun who was fast
sinking, it was time to make a move, and the light getting very bad, to
drop down from the rise that we were hidden in. Meant dropping into
grass over our heads. We were just starting to take the risk when a cow
made a move towards the donga on our left hand, and then up came the head
of a grand bull. The Prince fired and hit him and before the report had
died away, up jumped about thirty more buffalo that had been lying in the
long grass and then wheeled towards the sound of the rifle; then with a
snort, turned and broke into the jungle where the dongas joined. The
bull going away near last and disappeared into the left hand side donga.
The Prince fired again but missed. We waited about ten minutes and then-
made down to the spot where the buffalo had stood and found the- bloo-d
spoor, but no sign of the wounded bull. The Prince would have it had
gone on with the herd and was keen to follow up. I wanted to leave it
till morning, but he wanted to find that buffalo and he did. We were
going along the outer edge of the righthand side donga, watching the left
hand one as we saw him go into it. But the buffalo can stalk as well as
the Hunter for after he went into the donga on the left, he made down to;
where the other joined it and then worked up the right hand side don ga, a
distance of about ten yards and waited till we got within about 8 feet of


him, then with a crash he was on top of us. I and Aledia jumped to the
right into the jungle, turning on the instant and throwing my rifle up
for a shot, only to see Juma, another boy, right in front of my rifle.
Just then the Prince fired, he said at 4 feet and before he could snap the
second barrel, the buffalo butted into his rifle and knocked him down and
then jumped over him and down into the donga again, and the whole thing
did not last thirty seconds. The buffalo had trod on: the Prince's left
foot, tore one button off his coat and left a blood smear down one
sleeve. We waited a few minutes longer for the second addition, but it




- 16 -


never came, but one of the boys who had climbed a tree, said he could see
him making down the donga. So turned for cap, and the Count anxious
about us as it was pitch dark. After dinner, the Prince turned and said
yes, it's madness, madness. I know buffalo now. The Count had been
busy with the rhino and had got another one and the boys who went to
follow the wounded one found it dead. 4 rhino and 1 buffalo in two days,
beside 14 other heads, is good going.

February 9th" The last day of the shoot. Out early and found some
impala and got two good heads and some Chandlers reedbuck. After lunch,
the Count thinking of those 16 days in India and did not get his buffalo
said he would like to have a try here. So out we went at 3 p.m. We
crossed the ridge and saw them away across the valley, so down we went
and had got to a point about six- hundred yards from the herd, and sat
figuring out the easiest going to get to them. For once we got to the
bottom of the ridge it meant wading through grass over our heads. We had
almost reached the bottom of the hill when I saw something lying in the
grass below. I stopped to try and make out the object. One move was
enough. So with a low warning whistle to the Count, he stood and waited
till I reached him. Got him into the fork of a small tree, when up
jumped the buffalo. A steady aim and down it went, and so what he hunted
for 16 days in India and failed to get, he got in two hours in B.13.A.

(Homeward Bound) February 10th: Left the buffalo camp and stuck across
the plains and cut the Fort Hall Road at 3 p.m. Reached the junction of
the Thika and Chania Rivers, and camped for the night.

Next morning away early as we expected a waggonnette to meet us on the
road, which we did at the Ruiru Bridge, and 4 p.m. saw us safe back in-
Nairobi, just 2 months to the date for the round trip, which they say was
two of the most enjoyable months of their lives.

So with heads and skins to pack, cases to address and send to the coast;
a bag containing 3 elephant, 7 rhino, 2 buffalo, 1 hippo, 2 giraffe,
2 lions, 1 leopard, 1 cheetah, 1 lynx, 4 eland, 2 roan, 6 zebra, 9 bushbuck,
6 topi, 2 serval cats:, 2 jackals, 4 baboon, 2 hyenas, 6 marabout storks,
2 kavarondo cranes, impala, reedbuck, Chandlers reedbuck, Robertsii Grant,
Thomsoni, dik diks, klipspringers, oribi duiker, waterbuck, veldtabeeste,


steinbuck - pithon, rock rabbit, etc. over 300 heads. And so with a
parting glass. A hearty hand shake, I say goodbye with regret for as
Count Nieroth said - almost every country worth shooting - -
one unfenced zoo and -.




r - r - ar-


COPY: .... Herald, Friday, November 30, 1962.

HIS CHRISTMAS- THOUGHTS ERE "DEEP SEATED"

Salisbury is busily buying its Christmas cards. They come in all sizes,
and they Nativity scenes or Dickensian jollity on them, or perhaps robins
perched on sprigs of holly. Many a Salisbury child who has never seen
real snow will see it this year on a Christmas card.

But I have on my desk at this moment a Christmas card that no money could
buy in any Salisbury shop. It wasn't originally sent to me. It is
historic, unique.

It was sent by a British officer fighting in East Africa during the
Christmas of 1915 to his wife and family back home. And it was written
and drawn on the seat of his khaki drill pants.

The sender was Major George Outram, a fabulous yet genuine character in
his day straight out of a P. C. Wren novel.

It is now in the possession of his daughter, Mrs. E. Longuet-Higgins, at.
present living in Umtali.

SOUGHT ADIVETHIURE
George Outram was one of those men that the world doesn't seem to breed
any more. (He even looked the part see picture). Like Churchill,
Wingate, Lawrence, and their like, he sought adventure so it came to
meet him.

An Australian, just married, he was on a world tour with his bridge when
his ship touched in at Cape Town just as the South African War broke out.
George Outram promptly joined up.

WITH SELOUS
He was one of the Boundary Commission that later sorted out the Kenya-
Tanganyika border, and it was. this job that first took him to East Africa,
where he was to win lasting fame as one of the really great white hunters.

He was in the United States when World War I came along. Already 54, he
still wanted to fight. So back he hurried to London.

Had he been an ordinary man he would have been rejected as over age. But
he knew Rhodesia's own Frank Selous, and both of them (Selous by this time


well over 60) went out to East Africa as officers in the 25th Royal
Fusiliers, then known as' Driscoll's Scouts.

Selous perished during the campaign. Outram was mortally injured by a
lioness in 1922, only a day's march from Mlombasa, saving the life of an
African bearer.






- 2 -


n.. Herald, Friday, November 30 1962


IT PllYhS !
That was the type of man who in the East African bush in 1915 wrote this
verse on the seat of a pair of dkhaki drill trousers, in indelible pencil:
"Only a patch of khaki
From the seat of my pants is torn
Dirty and battered, frayed and tattered
And ripped by many a thorn.
Useless- and old, like the wearer
Worn out, torn and scar'd
So the only use I can find for it
Is a soldier's Xmas card."
He addressed it to "Old Peit" which was his nickname for his wife, and
signed it "Lulga" her nickname for him. And he wrote it from the
"Seat of Wore".

PATTERN LOST
On the other side of the patch of khaki is a masterly little drawing of a
lion, poised on a rock, regarding distant Mount Kilimanjaro.

Soldier and hunter, artist and versifier we seem to have lost the
pattern these days. Certainly we don't see that kind of Christmas card
any more.

Mrs. Longuet-Higgins, his daughter, who was born in Kenya, has lived for
some time in Umtali but is now resident in Salisbury. She and her husband
are going to the South African coast shortly on doctor's advice.




Picture BUSH FIGHTERS -
Major George Outram (right) with Captain Frank Selous during the East
African campaign of 1915. Selous, over 60 and bearded, won the DSO
during this campaign but lost his life. It was at about tllis time that
George Outram sent the "Christmas card" described on this page.







..~ ~ e ,ad gu d .. w g ,$ fi lt^ ,.,. ,. ", ,'. ,..
.. .. ,_.., ._ . ,,1' ..' l.''"

% ..
ThroluiBri-tish gal At0R0c.4 )att A
-wwad e lere H. ,.%



o the oS tore of the Mwellkzo n w flrm etofsae rl ,otf ,tter S ow. d
Tarlt o'i&onirqay, one ziiorni sing inbDeceen 19,b i two quiet1
yet o observant gentlemen# Watehing a rowdo f? n atives et ther
ou-fitA of the ;te ual blnket, water bottle and $0rsey, The one et a:
butz ay ntg little, studying deeplj the native Porters and their dres '0 .0
maybe hiag in s mind, how dan ooldtho' same ote w ul ,e .
ftill dr.- if he could only transfer them to his bwn froWezm nor f .'
he who was watching, was Crown Prince AleUdree Gortchfcow. Psrealaw ,
Govermont of Poltana, Russia the other *wo was movazg nozg the port 3is.-
aoking a question here or there, of the staff of ewlanud Tsrton A Co.*
and T', haring an enquiry for the guide, found that his mind w asot
etudaing the natives, but was keen to know if I would have the. safari .'
ready to Acatcoh a special train that was to leave at 3 p, nM .that afteron't.
for fljabL. The starting point of msat safariI h o work, what ia t
ais- the Sm-therm Sotik Route, But having only 16 hotra betwream .fiWfat *
ith. the Boyce Balloonograph Safari, and then getting read e .to ,
road again I had little time to become acquainted .With. t g. til-e I.
had- to pilot aroundA for the next 8 or 10 weeks., but in Aht 0- 4o'.*UZS:.t"iOW
"W111 you be ready' told me that I wa, dealing with a mat who bad ha cied
ment ad so I et Count Theodore Nieroth Col, of the Horse Oatrds -
A4D)C, to E.I.H* the Grand Duke Ricolas of Iutsia, who like all sportsme .
from the four corners- of the earth, had been lured to the World'.s
Playground. of Dig Qfll

toads are picked. up a rush made to the station. Brake van loaded with
all the necessaey kit for a safari. Horses and mules tracked, tent boye,:
ganbeasrere, gces an.d port.er. all nzadled into the trucks, and the cook
fired in on top as he can have no excuse for not coming out first the
right away given to the guard ana to the aoompaiment of the engine's
whistle, the guide flops on the meat with a sigh of relief, for he knows


that .for the next four hours h.e. is at rest, except to answer a question of"
"What natives are those e will we see any gTame as we go along is it hot
where we are going?" and s on* But after about a ten, mile run when the
view unfolds of the Plains ,vly*g about a thousand feet belcw, with
Kairobl nestling in the treesA- the Guide has time to fill his pipe and
have a quiet smoke* before the train has run tarough Limoru station on to
the eocarpment then, a rush to the windows as the magnificent panorama
opens out of the Kedong Valley- l ying some 2,500 feet below, and as the
sun sinks to rest, throwing ita rays on hill a=d valley, with all the
hues. of a brilliant opal you glide down past Nielson-'s sawmill to
Kijabi station,







Then commenoes the Safart in earnest as far as the (hide is coa.ernted*
After a couple of hours had work, uittoadinge kit -.ntruotlns horses eand
mle1 everything is made snug for the night no tents to pitch hore# a
there is a dak buIngalow at the s-tation for passengers, our firsi
dinnuc is served. dinner over, we sit emand chat until it is time to turn -in
- for safari life is coniductive to early hours u 9 pm.p .to bed and 4.30 an.m.
to turn Aut, So out it is at daylight, a hasty breakfast, load allowed. to
the porters. Our ox waggon loaded up, we hit the track, and down vwe dtp
another thousand feet when th-., bed of the valley is reached then on. to
the sandy river where we wait till evening to make a ni.it march for tie
foot of the Man,

As this is the worst of the dry stage1 we march all aight1, tae Prince and,
tae Count made snug in an empty wagon that we had thoe good luck to have
travelling, out of our way, So while they slopt and maybe Ireamed of he
Northeorn staw I know one at least through the midnight march., let hi.r
eyes. stray from the track to the Southern Croes, and his thou&hts go
wandering a till his mule had clone a quick side step from a porter who had
stopped to rest on the track, and had dropped c.fT to sleep, mbut awoke
seeing more stars than ho ever reckoned the Kedong Valley would hold, for3
the mule wheeled and handed out two of a kind one on the point, the othr-:
did not get h.me right, bua just kicked his ear-aring out, So picking up
his load went trudging along the track, wondering what had happened* Wiith!.
the first streak of daylight found most of the porters up. to the waggon -
load genpialy with 50 loads of posabo (native food) and 2.1000 gallons of
water. At the foot of the Mlau, all the water is served out horses and
mules given a drink which has to do till the Sibi. river is reached a
distance of 25 miles with a 31000 foot limb thrown in, So where I sat
and waited for the straggling porters, I learned from Mr Ulyate, the
owner of the wggns on this track, that the Price and. Count had their
first experience i.th big game for just as the waggon reached the usual
*camping ground, 6 lions walked within 30 yards of' the loadw'z teamn,
Ulyate called the Gount, asking him if he would like to roe .some lions.
Cut jumped the Count in his pyjamas to see six pairs of eyes flashing
within 20 yards of him, for after the lions crossed the head of the team,
they turned and travelled back towards the wagon, The Count finding that


none of his. lions wore mission1 got back into the wogg., One of the
natives stood and held a Tharriano lamnp over Ulyate's head., while he
fired at them with a revolver not to hit, did he fire Ulyate lmows
the game better tha that b- but to scare them off. 8 o'clock s.aaw all the
porta sup to the waggon all the water served out then took what shade
we could find, till I pm. when a move is made up the mountain, which is
reached at dusk. Had a dry camp till 4 asm. next morning, when we made
a fast dry march and reached water at I1 aom 'Twas a sigit that would
laden the heart of a Temperance Lectuer, to see about 90 heads stack
into the river mopping up water as if they had never tasted it before.


IM 2





-3-


Net day saw us at theo Ugare oaroklc river then. on to the G aso yiro -.
shot 3 head of ganet 2 Grant, I Thomson, lHade the river on the morning
of the 15th. Started shooting after lunch and got 2 kongoni,
I Veldtebeeste and 2 zeira,. Next m'mixntug, saw us away for hlebbs famt
a distance of 8 miles, and got to wfork early for we had reached the. edge.
of the hunting ground, and then the luck started and I want to say rlihft
here that if ever its my luck to strike a City again, and fiad Count
Nieroth in the same City, I11 get him to go partners wi^th me in 20
Roubles and him to mark a ticket in a Chinese Lottery It-'s a sure thing
for htm to catch 9 marks nd .adraw seventy two of the Brightest and Best
Fazacy, the Prince and I go one direction n thie Count the opwos.eite we
came hoxore all ril.o having got a good Rhino and caught a young one only
to find the Count had. bow-led over a fine Elanda sent the head back intto
camp, then he took a turn round after buck, on making back to camp AG had a.
look at the dea.d Bland and found t-,eo lions feeding on it, and cot both -;
one a magnificent lion, the sk-in measuring 11 ft. 6 inches the other
10 ft. 9 inches and he had been complaining he had no luck big game
shooting Next day spent dryiAg skins but the Prince bagged 2 zebra
near camp, The following day made a move in a South Easterly directionM
to. a spring and got some good shooting on the way, Impala, Thomsonand
Grants then on to the edge of the IaUn fscarpment. As I w as trying to
find a track on to the Ierman border. Whilst on th march, we ran into a
fine Rhino *- thi Prince wounded it badly1 but it bolted, went after it,
only to lose it again without getting a shot still following on it-
tracks, I thought I had got him again', but on stalking throu.gj the scrub,
found it IrllSA a grand bull Bland,*

.The Prince fired and missed1 when away it went. I got the Prince to
follow on his horse$ I followed up on the mule the Prince got a long
shot in and hit and sticking %to it, got close and dismounted. Rearing
4 or 5 shots in quick succession1 I thought something was .crong, for as I
was hustling along to see what was happening, I saw the Prince's pony
galloping across the veldt on his own- started to head him off, only to
find the wounded Rhino coming as if he had urgent ti.z. near where I
lived- slid off the rule and gave the Rhino one ira the neck as he went
passed. I went after the pony and caught it, and then aent looking for


the Prince, feeling sure he had had an, argUment with the Rhino, and that
the Rhino had won and at last found him .lying under a tree beside the
2nd best Eland shot in B*fl.4A 28 inch horn a real bed.y But as we
had to make 12 more miles to where I was going to crt:- 0 Led to leave the
Rhino with xreets reached camp at 4*30 to flnd. the luc.kless one

measuring a 10 ft. 4 inch cheetah1 and a 26 inch Blrd, I sai d"No luck
again" "Oh) it's alright here in B]EXA, but in India I w as followring-
tuffalo for 16 days anld never got one" so I learned that the Count had
shot in India. Christmas iveo found us in a bemntiitl camjp on the
Narosurra River just at the foot of Otubogo pounxtains the range that




-.44-


has been a stumbling blcck to several safarsis who have tried to cut a
track across it to the Border but as I reckoned I should cut an old
track of mine, between 30 aet 40 miles due South I made up my mind that'
I could get thrcul for as long as rue knows hate in front of you, it
makes all the difference- Itt when you have to do it praing there is
water in the next Creek that it gets you thinming, So Christtas Sve
wa-s spent in thoutts of frltends in different parts of the w world till
the Prince x emarked how strain the Christcias here the sun shining in
all its glory, everything beaat.Zt1l1 and green, while as they described the
oonditionI in their part of the world at Christmas time. Snow four ft#
deep, everyone wrapped in furs and so on, till I felt that valley cold, I
had to leave the fire and e get a great-coat, to save a fit of the shi.z e

Chrittmes morning saw all out for a days shoot, and. as tloe Robdtsii are
good h3ere, we had a g e t therm -. the Prince cettinc six and the Count four
bsefinc 5 oilither head making a total of 1.5 -for the Lay Back to camp for
dinner to fin4 two friends who were cut ostrich hunting had struck our
camp a cordial invitation from the Prince and Count, to my friends to
dine we made a merry party -* and a. our cook had lot himself go in
honour of Christmas Day, the dinner was Al, The hPudding pronounced one
of the best, and was an eye opener to the Russian nobility that a native
cook oould ma2e such, an excellent pudding, .h.it I had to break: it gmly
that I brought it from home And as we sat that nihAt chatting, the
Count relating how one Christmas- he had waited in tin, snow for 7 hours for
Sahot at n stag and whlien the chance came1 missed.! Hands numzbed with the
cold. The Prince relating the plec..ur-es of driving ovor the Plains of
SoutvLern. SrRsiA %to the music of the sleigi bells. One of my friends
holding forth on the .joys of sitting round the Chrinstas fire in Old
Inrglandt and chLs. ing the Xa sfie under the mistletoe. Ah yes, Sandford
nows a. good game at any rate a qieter one than chasing Lihino under the
African mistletoe. liumy, the latter always makes me think of the
Christmas card. "I-olini to-thwe" for cliwn it does 4 like as it is ^
ro;r y to lose your company as tligt as yorur missus wllI, to you, if you
tell her you are going to the races to back a cert, antid she'll cling to
the fiver if she can got her hands on it just as tight s a native clings.
to you for his pay, and so our Chris tmas night passed 'with ono more glass
to absent friends an~ thoutt to mvy last Christmasa nlt at the head of


Nation Lake, in company of .dZa-r x, Bronzon, and 0ood old Billy Judd,

Daylight of the 26th saw us on top of the mountain1 just as. the ut rose
in all its splen&our., The Prince and Count stood Y LQbou&a at the
won deroe view loo.k,ng North, of ast, one saees nestling in the Valley
rount Sufoaa and Longonot ad the Limoru fscearpment, while way beyondd Donyo
Sa1bok- is clearly seen one handred and. atonty miles off. But while they
staned and wonder at the scone, I am training my eyes to pi0ck out the
hills about 40 miles South West for to me the Uphte top of helmet Hill
sece- more beautiful than, the scene in the valley belom for I have hit a




-5-


track: th at will load me to water and save me a march round the Mountainsm
of about 70 miles, and open a .ne. track to me, without the torments of
crossing ard3.di .lith its burning heat and not running the rinx of getting
butted in the roar by Buffalo or RhWno as you push through the dense
junglet thlt% prTows alone, the Weast barltk of the uaso ;yi4ro, ihre. It flow
in the valley beneath, So it was-for the beautiful green crass on Whe
mountain slopes the home of herds of land herd of about 200 were
quietly feeding aieay on omr rit was an old bn41 Buffalo shifting cap
to a oool spot in one of tyhe mc,m.y mountain Slly's. So we pitched car ,
andi out after land ..e t water at the first creek, sO r ae the porters

a days spell which they needed after crossing the dry country of the
!2edong V%'lley and. the Limek plains. Off again nett d-ay tow rds the eTlm.et

Hill., md foundS a splendid path that ran awny South West so after a
long hard march, rma..e camp at a beautiful clea spring 10 miles north. of
zrt Biabat, Be.de 6 Veldebeeete on the march, Just before reaching
the spring, we saw plen-ty of lion spoor had a look rexzt day, but failed
to fin"d However, the Count got a grand bull Giraffe*, That evening we
laid two baits near the camp for lion w ent out next morning on.wgoing to
the first baitf found it had not been touched but on going to the second
bait, found it lhad gone but no trouble to say k here, for a lion had
draggemad it strai.ft into a donaa on our left ranm the. spoor dlown to the
don.ga. but could not see the lion was just going into the thick scmb.
that row on the donpa edre, anrd had. got iithiin 10 ft. of the scrub, when
a loud angry growl told us he ,wa CreOeiving visitorno, The Count and I
both fired a snarp shlot one told f but he broke straight awsay, so going
ca-refully on through t the scr b, we found he had turned into another little
donga leading ninto a low wooded hill Followed on for avbcut 2 miles, but
had to give it best so put the rest of the day in with. tbuck, getting a
good bSg.

Setu1rneC to carp to find the Princo in luck he ras having a quiiet day
3?ound, the camp itfh the shotgn working dowm through the Tbhorn bush
that was ^yot~nrg alone; the creek, ^ flig Guiinac ThUy and~ ^as re-turning
Otdukc to cam, ~hen o fired as he thought at a sm.ll leopard end rolled
it over with the first barrel &lueat; had it brot it to ,a,,, on looking
at it, it had rre be.at, for I hail never seen it before, rso a cde. the
sdnnesedit they kvnot. it, .bu later found. it -as, a iirnx, the first ever shot


in BB .A. r'ext morning feinO. u out in the direcOton 1heror tha Count shot
is graffe which as lying ri Iht out in t)he or,,en, r "there the vultures
sat, waiting for the feast, Putting my gl"saes on +to the lead carcas I
saw 10 lions feeding, 2 lionoeso and eigct. cubs, four enrich bigrr than the
othe.orsa, "e droppOed and did a long craw-l to gOt to cove, and ,gmt the wind
right* eo had got to %tMn 300 yards Ibt the birds in the trees, waiting
over our hoads., rve ti a. y. Tie, lions .broke for the Jungle- just as
they rea.cched it, one of the lionesses. tore back again and tore out a
mouthful of moat and like a flash bac? tDo the thick socntb. We waited for





- c -


a full two hrxars, in the hopes of them rottrnint I bt no lu-okn so had a
70 at the Thpala, Clipoprinetruier l Nikor tith coed Iuck1L

New Year"s Eve found u. camped about 4 miles from the cascades on t.he
Lon arnett Rivers Here the Prince bagged hiM jiraffe after a good long
ruling. fight, and just before he dropped and as the Pri-ce rode up to
give him a finisher, he let go a punch that would hare left a vacant
chair on New Year's crni.ne if it had l. ot hoe for the giraffe can hand
out a punch ti-Ai. its hind. leg a ,inity lonc way, orkw: brck to0 cwp-
e got other fine lan, also 2 impala. COn reaching carp, found the
we 6v t .m o t tf--11la [. a s 2 i .a z

Count. wa still in luck 0.ith the oat tribeC, as he had haged a fine
leopard r foot 7 inches TIhen sTkined also one t:orval cOatM axd 4 other
head. of g aao, M nd.. a New 7eari s feast in prcwe. in the p. rtero camp, for
they were filling up on giraff ellad, l vel.elteseeto etc-, etc,, and
top:Uing up wJith k1ombari a fine fresh. -:ater fish ttat is pentiful a' the
cascades .And it w -.s here I rot to the truth of the Couint's idea of his
2U.tad luck F!e said I'll toll you n bovt rny Il.d luck it it as follow
"I followed Thffalo in Ir ia for 16 days and never got it, I have waited
waist deep in the snow for hours for a shot at a stag then missed when.
the chance canme, In the Officers' mess itts a standing rule whatever
back is sure to lose and as I am a sport, have. had to pay up and look
pleased on a good may occ-.ionsa but luck has t urned at last%"

Next mnorming, we moved d ow. the Valley that runs parallel to the Cerman
border and pitched camp at the end of the valley at Palr springg the
Count with Borali, his $omali g=bearor, was just entering to root under"
the cool pslm shade, when he head a low growl), so pushed through to .,the
clearing on the other side of the rwove just in tire. to see a very large
lion bounmding away had a snap at him mand hit was in the at of firing,
rith his 2nd barrel when a second lion broke past fired and missed,
then cane a third another miss. He told rae on getting back to camp
that while he was firing, he, thought of a story had to ld him of two
Johunys who came to Bi.,.A, lion bunting, I.eeting old bo.b 4 they asked
him if there were any lions in, the (istric t, as they would like to shoot
a few, Bob told ithem that he had ^seen 4 that af'texrnoon down on the Athi
tiver (stony Atii), They said tbhey would go at once, hut o.w. 's advice
waited till next am, yltght -aw thew way1 one Qotng down the rivor


bed., the other up stream, hTe one that wont dowrstreea. did not show fup
to lunch, so at 3 p~m. 2 or 3 titns started out to look fo r him They
found him perched up a tre-e, about 2 miles from cazmp .4 arf:ed him if he
h ary- lu;ck, or did he see any lions, Lions he replied., I saw any
amount of big oneSzacd hundreds of little onwj and Count rieroth told me he
was getting ready to count the little ones1 bt i onQe care patt, Xand worse
still could not find, the big one hIe i.tt

The Prince still filling up his bag with anything that came along, put up
the fastest bit of shooting I have ever semen, He had just shot an oribi,







then up A.unreod a reedfb-mok atnv as it was sho .fing Ca ood heald, I wanted the
Prince to get it, bat it icokc throt the scrub too sickly -f so
followed -iup in the direction it wernt, caught slight of an -rimanl thou*u
the bushes the Prince stalked up and opened fire- 3 shots, and asa I
head the bullet tell, ran up to ree 2 konnco lying on the ground the
Prince still bltaing a.,ay, and in les than 3 mites had \ down within a
space or 40 yamrde. So putting the oribi ith the 8 kongoni, na.ingc a
picture of 9 heads under 10 mi.tmes, hich is going some,. o back to
carpm and as we had. meat to brn, gave the Major a gallop, with 3 ongonmis
and the way he answered the ctuestion with his jaws satisfied all
concerned, Got away next a.a,, travelling 'West, f43rn about 2 or 3 mile-s
north of obolet, saw the fresh kill of a lion, tha spoor leaading into a
small donga, and as we had very heavy rain the previous ni,tt, the spoor
shown very plain. We left the horses outside the timber, and in we went),
the safari meanvhile about of a mile behind. Following on the lion
spoor we crept silently along the dongs bed, with eyes peering into evexy
bush, earna listening for the growl we expected every moment to hear on.
we crept, till we found that the lion tracks had just been crossed byr the
hoof prints of a big Buffalo; a whispered conversation which was it to be,
the lion or the buffalo, the Count pointed to the b..ffalo track. %%en
on again, whan tho tracks turned up the bank, and led across a little open
glfade to a donga about one hundred yirds west of t1he one wc had just loft.-
,e had got about halfway across the open space, wh.en the Count*' Somali
tent boy raced up, on one of the ponies towards the donria we ere na in&:
for, but about eighty yarIs on our riht. He al-ost reached to timbor,
,hden round. went the pony and 'back he went, when out broke two rhino
.ttraihit after the horse I shouted to Abdi to stop. He told me after
he wanted to but the pony objected., I raia to the Count to pump the loaS.
into the big rhino, which he di&d the .first shot got well home, Nhen
rounxdl ho came only to receive a second behind the dar, tu a third shot

in the same nlace when hbe pitched forward on his heal anAd. rolled over -
dead.: The second rhino stood snorting and for a while looked as if he
wanted trouble, but as it lhorn was only nine inches long, we let it go.,
but it took us about five minutes to hunt it away from thze dead one.
After the firing the boy came back to say that as he rode along in front
of the safari he saw the buffalo that we were trailing, standing just


lear-tof the donga and he was looking for us9 to let us Lnow when be
almost rode on top of the twuo rhino,

Stopped the safari, had the headskin taken off, foet cut off anda some of
the hide for ki'bokos, ,hen on aain only to qt-hutbleo on top of a fine
bushbuok vhich was promptly rolled. over, Horns eamswring fifteen inches
long a beauty, Mover? on a^ain about 4 miles and pitcher camp in time
to escape a drenching as a fearftll thtiderotorm broke just as ve made all
snug for the nirht,

5 po* Sa the sun out again aid as gne .as plantiafull the Prince and I


-7-






started out to have a short round the car HTI& just it into position
to have a sot at a Veldabeoste tehen the gr h il of a lion that omnudad
about two hundred yards away. So aftor then vie went nmd after tro-volling
six, hunded yazse saw two fine lions5 t clear out in the open getting the
benefit tof the evening sun .lrtw their coater, but in such a position that
to get eny nearer than three hundred yards w in Qpc sti sblc. 1but we started
to craw? antd trmist to luck that they wo uld. not see. uo, .lad crawled about.
thirty yards- when ewv=rrTy wamin growl on our rirtt told us we were seen9
and away broke a fine lioness & ad the two lions over a ri-ce. We
followed them up but never ot a look at the again, and reached co.&p aMin
as nisxt settled in* A n exciting day. Then to be&" to dream of lions,
buffalo, rhino and w on-der what was in- store for us on the morrow.,

Noon next day saw us in cazmp at te Vmra River an=, evearyb-dy ..on "the river
fiashlg, and jud .ng byi the member of Yombarl roaetin.t round the coaj% f)res#
the boys had a good time on the river for two dsm-' vatting. for our waggo
which had gone astray eomewhere on the Loita Plains. 'bIat as pleased to see
a Wanmdrobo coae into camp vrith a letter in a cleft sotick and at four that
afternoon to hear the welcome sound of the Bullo.k whip telling us our
waon w aS. near,#

Next morninA the Prince and the Count out after w.atrbvo. I pc..k i.up
the hoceiad and reducing ffovn the kiAtci c1 we were 1oac)irw% evorytaing in the
iqay of trophies back by aon so it kept m busy vin a the
shooters return amd had god ldck on Voatorb.c l C, the boest running up to
twenty-nine inches, al^o 3 varthog one a ral good one, As e ad a o

climb in front of us uvp the Vzcria car:-nnt cros.0fod tVhe river next day
and moved 8 miles from the river and camped for tie day, the Prince and
t.e Count out again after waterbu.cl; and gt 6 more and three Topi.

DaQligi.t sawe us olimtbing the &saozpmoni en route for the elahrant country,
Bfleed 2 Chandlers Reedhuck rhilo going up the mountain and mad.e camp at
three pfm4

Away again at rliylltt, tho rcunt raid I jog;i1ng avlonrt &hati~ir eaAe
s,,ol4ng ...en out broke a uandrl rhino, but fTh2 onsoe ve w ,o'ee cmrht n" ping
as w-e had got ax-amy from our gunbearcro or them fr, om u s. The puns
seventy yards bleind, yelling for them to come up the rhinto tanMing


looking at us sitting on our hocrse and .ondeting if the stfffergettoee
had invaded Eaet Africa$ but away he wont Coaln the hillside T t evey-
thing fly from his path, the Count and I after him with a .banderobo
running the spoore At first it las easy to follow but as he steadied up

and took to the junigle. it became more difficult to follow, Nile after
mile we went till it became S o dense that it would Fust: a Law,,.yer to find a
loophole in it. But on -a crept till the vezd.orobo stopped ,and said heos
jut in front en c he Care with a crash and a ictt jcsd missing-
Boreali, the Countcs .nibeaer, The Count jumped to one ,sid aa the rhino
crashed past. I pushed throupi the rcmab from Tb ore I bhad ben standing




W 0


to find the Count had landed plumb in a daep Iwle and had d oppeare& :
the fae of the earth, hut took it as a joke as he scrambled out er.
adaway awent the rhino* So tired an downhearted and. torn with to--:
we ta=ed our faces to hunt -for the safari, and as we had left our .
wome iles behind, we had to do it on our flat fee, an=d were just :-.
fed up when we reached the top of a emall rise, to see the camp pict.e:P
nust below uso table laid vwatin our return, a good lunch and all o2rz
trOUbles forgotten. At 5 p.om or syces turned up with the horsoz,
ng ^where they hod been they said following uBo One of tie sycco ..
a mission lboy and aiAd he thought he could follow us ewa.y as he had boo:.
t=Shit at sacool, that a camel could pass through the eye of a needle.
to other boy reckoned that wai s iplej Int said- would like to scee "&
dam camel that ooul passe txg the .cub he tried to take the hro:r


Plight saw us all out as one of our Wanderobo had returned over ni:t.t2
with the neows that me elephants- had been seen by some of Tommmiors en
near the Eagro River, So lost no time getting awVay, and at 11 an. .m
crossed the fresh spoor of the elephant making from the laggoro toward v
the Qyani River, Pitched camp and out after than, Hunted a1ll day b'utI
could not g t up to taem. Decided to shlft camp at daycliIt anmd follov-
that up,-

So off again next moeiting and after crossing the Cyai we climbed a lonic
hill standing in the valley a=d there down undereath us waas a herd of
about three hundred elephantes, (Mn in close order, and making into .
thick olump of timber. We sat watching them move slowly dowmn into the
tiber,. and from ere we sat if thr' kept their true course, it wouIld
bdrzW them right out under the bank we wore waiting on and within thirty
or forty yards frm us. Soon we heard the snapping of branches, and. CIno-
ad tfhen the shrill % pet, flt not so mzch as a trnk tip could ez o o,
so ther we at wait ing, I had jut Bent one of r3y Lumbwa boys back up
the bill to tell the safai not to move off the hill top., The boy got
had ti'%ned
about one hundred yards away when b.ac he caene to sy tli' elehantos/asi
were making awoy frm us, along the other side of the timber1 so as the
turn put us ight down wind, After them we vent and got ri tt up to the
rear goard as they wroe slowly moving into another clump of trees. So


two. blades of gaes m.ut tthe Prince and the Count to draw for the first
sho, T he Count won3, Getting. quickly into position, waiting to see if
we could find the bullt, the elephants meanwhile moving slowly awiay from
us till we thought t hey had all gone again, when a movement in the trees
on our left tola us one was still there Then up went a truko. Not
feeling for the wind but reaching for the young shoots on the tree top, at
toe saie time showing .aot we were looking fr o his tusks. Thenhe
slowfly t=ed to follow his mates But that slow turn was .all that ^ae
wanted. for out rang the .465 of Count N.iroho. then a crash and down .cnt
the Prize. that all big Game Huntera covert, Po.tP o talcen, then cut the





- 1C -


feet ?ff., and wait till the safari arrived to get axes to cut caot the:
tus-tke one weii ing 69 lIbe the other 66 Ibs,, 135 Itbs, the pair, '.
pitched ad, then let the 'boys at the meat, The rajor dow., a long v:--'
galloping making the Cmot and I abake hands 4ith ourselves about -:
good thiAg we have when we let the *igger go against the Bear,

A hrried breakSfast next morning and aWay again after the eleph.c.t, tlh.I
Pince and I on the elepheat trails, the Count workim; .a half circle. .
after mile we weat. tuambling over boulders, pushing through the Ion::- ...
Now down in deep ravines and matted jungle But at last vie got a -'K.
ftur about a mile awtzc feedeiag from tree to tree, so on we aeont looh- 4-.
the elephant from where we were standing, it looked ideal to get at tl.-.
Dt on crossing the stream that ran between them and us, Oht Clal a a ; aL
It was as tou* as I ever got in Africa, orase 12 feet hich, and over:
kw of clinging vine that ever grew had massed itsolf into *that patch.
But Smh$i we. went to find the elephants making down the other side cf--.
ridge. We followed in their tracks#, Could hear them bu t could not ", .
them, so sent a boy up a tree and I watching him do a wave to -the rint'2t,-
the right Twe iwent, When one must have got our wind, for with a crash iz-
broke right on top of us.* I put both bwtrels into its head, It stt.r;I ::
then turned and away went about forty more, Foumnd the blood .spoor (hoc-
moving with the herd. Still followving up we got within eiity yarfcT .'
watched them pass but could not see the bulls or the wounded one, Q:cr%
ith tahem for about a mile till they entered some big timber and theI n
worked up within, twenty yards .of 6 of them, but not a sight of the t-s..:
until half an hour had passed when they moved past only to find we had be,-
watchL$ng cow, Bo back to cap1 done up, and curse our bad luck,

Next morning we found that the elephants had moved North towards tle Xici.
Hills, so sen t the safcaMi on to the Back Huts &f the Misii tribe, we
work-ing out on the flank but no sign of the elephanats, Ed just got car,:;
pitched about 2 pm. whehn down came the natives in hundreds to *rade
fowls,i e $ pears0 etc. So sent 6 of them to look for the elephants.
They had not gone ten minutes1 when soam more i.sii natives came zicn said.
that they could see the elephant from the hill top and that they were
about maile away. So horses are sa..ddled up and away again, the Kisii ir
fr-ont as g.ides and on reaching the rise, there vIes the herd feeding. i-


made a quiek move to try and get in front, we travelli.ng along their flaChk
down wind but we could not quite head them off. but got very near the head o"
the herd ad m oved down the ridge towards t.hem only to disappear in the
long grass and not a, much as the tipl.of an ear to be seen, and made to
tw small trees growing about ten feet apart,. Got there all right and tt.eo
Count and I gDt the Prince and hBis gunbearer into one tree, then, the Cour.t
and Borali into the other tree1 I waiting between the two trees, I asoec.
Count Nieroth if he could see from up there. He said yes, they are abcort
forty or fifty yards away* And there we waited till I heard a whisper in
Russian, and I knew somethin.g was coming but could see nothing. Tihe




* 11 -


Prince fired and. then started the crashing of Bramble, then the Cox-u.I
fired with the Prince, The Prince'es bearer eaid to the two bc:;:
standing with me that the herd was breaking straight for us, e o K-.-:
Prince j"med down and disappeared in the long gases I .aid to (........
ieroth who was still in his tree What are they doing? !e .oo:- --
aad. said o wFor God's sake,# go;tThey'ro staenpeding right on top of yv.
Then two more shots from the Count'a rifle and I shifted sukeon for fr
ten yards, but gave it beet knowing that it was useless to run frc ,--: "
I could not see, Where I stopped was a big stuap of a tree tiat -e
elephant had broken off Borne time previous, with very hieh grace gro;: :
round i-t So w-ith no ambition to sit on ivory, in I dived to ca kt p '.-.t
cash and not long did I have to wait for past they crashed sending :-,-.-
flying. breaking the Dramble into matchwood, The sickly stish of -tci::
feet through the tall grass asn the hissing sound as their huge bodies
rubbed together in the mad rush to got away, I waited for a few asecor-,-.
which seemed hours, and then made a rush from the sound aes they pawso. r .
my left I- got to a little tree and got into the fork and could ju.-:t
see over the grass top when I saw the Prince struggling through the ..
dropped and mate to him, and j ust in t ime as the strain had been too,:;.
for him, I took his rifle and was making to the tree whore Count iie.:
was. as he was the only one that could see the elephant 3But with t"*o
heavy rifles and helping the Prince along was not easy going then a
warning g out from Count Nieroth that there was a wounded elephant 0'-.--
me and one in front of the tree he was in. But don'It think I ws tryi
another Light Brigade Charge.* I wanted to see something else besiCes
grass, and gt to the roadway the elephants had made, and if ever a m-an
was pleased on this earth# it was your Humble Self when he reached it, :':
what a roadway it was9 where a few minutes before had been trees, brnli
and grass that would try the toughest man to get through, as a road one
hundred yards wide end half a mile long. As Count ^icroth said a
lovely motor track. We. had just reached the clearing then Borali drop ..
from the tree and. aid thae elephant in front was &ot:n, and those few worc,'s
acted like magic on the Prince, as he thought he hac ba gcd his first
tasker. But it was the Count's second, We had just roched the dea.
elephant and congsatulating one mother on our luck and speculating on
the weight of this one's ti.asks1- when two shots were fired about six


humdred yards aay and right in the track the elephants had made, All
eyes turned to where the shots were fired. Then everybody broke of'f the
mark as if it were a Narathon race and the eleph-ant on the back mark, for
back they camoe again, and it was shift and shift cquick so as not to give
them our wind. What the oti shots meant we did not know1, and did not
wait to find out, for it was to make a flank movement to get to caop whic"k
we reached at dark1 and round the camp fire the events of the day wrore
gone over as they oft are on safari*

Daylight seemed slow in coming, but breakfast over we noiale a. move bec:-




- 12-


our dead elephant, and found by the tracks- that the elephant had broke
back South, So started getting the tusks out, hen one of the boys that
we had sent to look for the other wounded elephant came and said he had
found it, buot that a white man was cutting the tuskso out, so a hurried
half mile spin soon brought us to the pot. No need to ask t*hore for %hen
we had travelled I of a mile ftor the rest of the distance we wore guided
by the yelling of the nativeso, Dancing like demons, knives brandishing in
the air, and meat flying in all directions, and to the appeal of the
white man trying to get to the elephat, we helped drive them off But
two took a bit of shifting, one had worked his passage right inside the
elephant while his mate, gme t the last, stood outside collecting the
titb-!t his mate passed out, though a white man was beating tattoo on.
his latter end with a kibotoo, but the only effect it seemed to have on him
was to make him saw off about a pound of meat, keeping time to the blows
and now and again stopping to look inside to see that his mate was getting.
in a good cross cut, Rach is the African -(Shesi) on meat. Introducing
ourselves we found the elephant was not ours, but one shot by a
PrW Clark who is collecting for one of the American Dineueus end we cleared
up the mystery of the shots over night* r. Clark had shot thise elephe-nt
-two hours before we arrived on the scene, and had waited on the elephant
while his. boys had. gone to camp for axes to cut the tusks out* He had
Just asrted when he saw uc riding up the rise and knowing there waat only
one thing we could be after, climbed np in a tree to watch.the fuan id see
how we got on. As soon as they stampeded from the firing, they broke
straight for him and as they were getting too close to be pleasant fired
to make them swing away, Nmt his shots stopped them and turned them back
straight towards- us, Hence our hurried move to cam*. The bull. we had
down was a good one, $bu an old fighter for both his tuask were broken
badly, but still turning the scales at 107 lbs. Wa had boys out in every
direction to look for our third elephant9 for the Princ, and Count were
both certain he was dead, So wile the beys were awoy9 we went and
viewed. the ground to see what we missed in, the rush by or rather how they
missed us, The Prince, myself, Ahedia and abNruki (the two gnbearers)
were eight feet from the edge of the herd, and the Prince told me that in
the few seconds it to-ok,. then to pass him, he lived his life over sagai
had time to bid his friends goodbye and view his own funeral. While the


Count said he did not kmow he had so afMAy close acu.aintances8 in Africa.
The "boys back but no eign ofhe -? wounded. elephant. So as time was
previous we packed up and hauled out for Kitit BoMan where we passed.a
most enjoyable evening with Kr, sBiggs and Luminley, the tw officials in
charge of the Boma, .nd from whom we learned that if we uent out to -the
I3ja River about 3 hours marwh we were ure of a Hippo at the pools.

Nexrt morning saw us away after hippo, and reached the pooIs at ten aMi,
Pitch camp, btut no e.igo BTt down came the- Kisii in hundreds, and
perched themselves roud the rocks above the pool like vultures awaiting




S13


-the fast. And it looked a msre disappointment till one of my boys said
that if I let the Kisi4 sing it wouid "bring the hippo up to see what.zhe
roe was about I told the Prince what my boy said. He must have thought
I was pulling his leg- he eaid, send the aw ay and when it gets qCiet we
may have a hance Butt sead th%.em away, it couldnt. be done without a
maxim, so there we sat putffing awayt ptffing a a at our pipes, eyes fixed
on the pool below, but not as much as a bubble to cheer us on. Just then
an old native arrived, te look was-enough to say he was a Chief, I told
ay boy to ask the Chief 2did the Kisii ever sing to bring the hippo up, He
gave my boy to understand that it was a sure thing if I gave the word&. X
told the Prince hat heo said an as he tas about fed. tip waiting, consent
was given but aIa X had never heard of it before I had my doota, But xjust
as the boys were getting into their stridge with a tune that sounded like
a croes between Ye, we')11 gather at the River, andA, we all walked into
the shop when up he oame f1ead .eIll out of water, mouth wide open and a
happy smile on his faoe# like as if he was pleased to join in the chorus,
when down he went again ith a *465 behind the ear. Another shot a few
mimtOes later and all was over, We strolled back to lunch and waited
till the hippo floated which he did about 4 Pora, And while in the act of
towing him on to the bank$ our good luck staying with us as a native runner
arrived with a note from Mr. Clark to say he had found our 3rd elephant
ad had cut the tusks out, and sent them to XIii Boma,* No need to0 sa
the Prince was delisted. to kmo-I he hcd. got his elephant, and at the-
Gentlemanly action of Mr. Clark, who has written his name in Big Letters
as a true s3ort. We just got the hippo trophies off by duesk ad tiled

away the evening chatting over our good luck, 3 good elephant and a fine
hippo in 5 days.

Next morning back to itisii Boma which bwe reached by 9 am, a-nd as our
shooting was over in this district-, our one object ^as to reah Nairobi as
soon as possible, So after lunch, bde. goodbye to our kindl friends at.
the Boma, then on towards Kerioho and as there is no game on this track,
one is glad to got it over, Found a little amusement at the camps
bartering with the natives for curios, spears, knives i native stools
trinkets, et.o, of which we got all we needed and on the third day reached
Kericho, where we were received with hospitality by Anigus ?adden, the


Dims, Commissioner of Police,

January 29th saw everything entrained at Lumbwa station and at 3 p~m. the
train hauled out for Nairobi, A good dinner at 8 p, at the Nakru,.
Hotel, and at L830 next morning reached Nairobi, But as we were going on
to the Tana River, no time was lost in Nairobi, Bu.t as it was only a
small safari, seat the porters away at noon on Febraary 2nd to
Ur. MIoRillan~s farm, Juja, by the low road, a distance of 24 miles,

The Prince and the Count driving domn on the followingC day, were
astonished to see the beautiful homestead of tuja,




m 14 -


The evening of the 4tA saw us at the junction of the AtMhi and Thika
Rivers and a lively time w e had crossing as the rivers .-ere up o,,ing to
tle late rains TDat all over oafa, camp pitched ane everything ready for.
an earlr start next morning after buffalo and rhino.

Daylight found ius climbing, the low range lying to the North of )onya Salmk,
and on reaching the top, a magnificent view of Mount Xenya as seen9 its
torn and rugged battlements snow clad, glittering in the morning sun. A
few nordz in Russian between the Prince and. Cou, then silently they stood1
gazing at the first snow they had.seen since leaving their far off
bortbern home* With a hand wave$ the Couxnt turned along the ridge to
the South th e Prince and I started for the valley beneath. Not a word
between them as they% parted, but a look at their faces told me they were
not in Africa, but back with their loved ones in aussia, But a one mst
not go a dreauing who g os buffalo hunting in B]31,A. te had just
reached a rocty point ant bad sat do-n for a roast .ihen I spotted 2 Chandler

Reedbuok a -bit lower down the hill. I pointed them out to the Prince
who estar ted after them, I stopped, witching them so as not to lose them
in tle long graass I waing him the direction with my.h hands. He had
just got them right in front of him when I eaw two buffalo making slowly
along underneath us1 so sent a boy to stop the Prince firing at the
Reedbuok Up i we went again to the top of the ridge and started along to
try and et in front of them-io., We made to where I thought they would
make through little gap in the h Mills and when we reached thoe end of the
ridge, down we went to await Yevents We had made about halfway down the
hillside whaen up Jumped a bull roa an telope1 and the Prince made after
him, but the grass was very long and never got a sight of him. I stopped,
watching for the buffalo., and in a. mimte or tw I saw them about three
hundred yards away, still hein .for the go I thought they would go
rou.h. Meanwhile the Prince looking for the Ro oad had got about 50
yards lower down the ridge. I made dowa. at once. I had got within
twvtty yards when he saw the buffalo making up the ridge across the gap.
His first shot misea t.he leading buffalo, but his next shot stopped the
second buffalo turning it towards ua. The third shot hit him very hara
as he almios fell but sat red into a thick clump of jungle, sO had to
work up very carefully to the edge of the timber, but could not see him,


so after waiting ten minutes we fired a shot through the timtber to stir
him up but he did not show, Got on to his blood spoor and got a sighi
of him down, so giving him a safety abshot found Uhim dead. Quite a good
bull with a 40 inch ppread. When we reached camp found that the Count
had got 2 good bushbuck and crossed a lot of fresh rhino spoor, so
decided to give the rhino a turna if possible next morning,

Away again at daylight after rhino, and had good luck to get tw good
ones and wound a third, buta as it Was getting late, and the grass very
high, had to leave him till morning.

lNext morning, sent boys to see if they could find the wounded. rhino* The




- 15-


Count again after rhino, the Prince htnting for a Roan Found them but
could not get a decent shot t them, '-t got a god tuahbuck andr as we
or
had made out six/seien miles from camp and the going very hoavy owing to
the long grass1 turn towards camp, We had just coached the ridge we had
to climb to reach our camp* After a deolittful tow hours ttrc.nou the
long gras stumnbling over stones and now and again finding a hole that
one had to prospect ten or twelve feet to find bottom. We had just
started up th+e ridge ,ihen one of the boys sighted about twenty buffalo,
about half a mile away, and as. it wIas 5 p.sm. thou-it to leavc then till
morning, buti leaving game like that takes doing, so after them we went =nd
reached a point where we could just see the broad blfck backs of the
buffalo, abut not the horns, it was foerdiing time, all heads do-m. So
w ,ok round in a half circle to a little rise, This brouebt ue to a
spot about one. hutrrdred. rnnw twenty yards from the bunch. Were we stood
res in the mmnith of a Y T ith a deep donna or. our right haad side, and
another on our left, the dongas joining about a hundred yards in front of
us, &ko with one eye on the buIffalo and another on the msun ho was fast
sinking, it was tine to make a move, and the lUirt eating very badj. to
drop down, from the rise that we were hidden in* Meant draop.ig into
grass over oxr heads,. We were just starting to take the risk when a cow
made a move towards the donga on our left hand, and then up came the head
of a grand bull. The Prince fired and hit him ind before the report had
died vay, up jumped about thirty moroe buffalo that had been lying in the
long grass and then wheeled towards the sound of the rifle; then with a
snort, turned and broke into the Jnngle where the dongas joined# Tihe
bull going away near last and disappeared into the left hand side donmga
The Prince fired again but missed, We waited about ton minmtes and then:
made dowm to the .spot where the buffalo had stood and found the blood.
spoor, but no sign of the wounded bull, The Prince would have it had
gone on with the herd and was keen to follow up. I wanted to leave it
till morning, but he wanted to find that buffalo and he did. We wore
going along the outer edge of the rilithandc side clonga, watching the left
hand one an we saw him go into it, iBut the buffalo can stalk, as well as
the THunter for after he went into the donga on the left, he made down to
where the othsr joined it and then worked up the rigid hand side donga, a
distance of about ten yards and waited till w got within about S feet of


him, then wi-th a crash he was on top of us, I and Aledia jumped. to the
rit -into the jungle, turning on A-'Ie instant and tarofwing y rifle up
for shot, only to see Jtua another boy, right in front of my rifle,
Just then the Prince fired he said at 4 feet and before he could snap the
second, barrel, the buffalo butted into his rifle and knocked him. dowm anm
then jwnumped over himn and dowm into thie donga ag in, aand ,ie hliole thing
did not last thirty seconds, The buffalo had trod on the Prince's left
foot, tore one button off his coat and left a blood smear down one
sleeve. We waited a few minutes longer for the second addition, but it






never came, but one of the boys who had climbed a tree, said he coC1:-
hlim making down the donga, So turned for canp, and. the Coun-t mS-.
about us as it was pitch dark, After dinner, .the Prince turned :.m..
yeSt it' s madness, madness, I know buffalo no, The Count hraId l..-L:t.
busy with the rhino md had got another one a.d t*fhe boys who wfjent t,
follow ta wounded one found it dead, 4 rhino and 1 buffalo in t;o .-.. .
beside 14 other heads, is good going,

February 9th: The last day of the ehoot. Out early e2.d found so3m
impala and got two good head- aad some Chandlera reedbuck, After hr-."
the Co ut thintng of those 16 days in India and did not get his. b'uffS-
said he would liCe to have a try here, So cut we Gent at 3 p,:, o
crossed the ridge and saw .them away across the valley, so do wnwe went
agd had got to a point aou-t sihx hundred yards from the herd, and xaat
firing out the easiest going to get to them, For once we got t.o h
bottom of the ridge it meant wading Ihrou.% grass over our heads,. O.
almost reached the bottom of the hill when I saw something lying in t"c2
grams below. I stopped to try and make out the object* One move we
enough, So with a low warning whistle to the Count, he stood and wa.ito.
till I reached him, Got him into the fork of a small tree, thxen uip
jumped the buffalo. A steady aim and down it went, and so wIhat he Lusb "
for 16 days in India and failed to get, he got in two hours in BXA.

(Hosewacd. Boiumd) Fob nvary 10th: Left the mbuffalo c uinp au'd hickl- acrou:w-
the plains and cut thio ?ort I-,all oad at 3 p.m, Heachedi the junction o-
the Thika and Chania Rivers, and oa nr.ed for the night,

ext morning away early as we expected a waggonnette to meet us on the
road., which we did at the auiru Bridge, and 4 pom. saw us safe back in
NIairobi, juet 2 months to tlhe date for the round trip, which tey soay
two of the moat .njoyable montJis of their lives,

8o with heads and skins to pack, .cases to address and send. to the cooat-
a bag containing 3 elephant, 7 rhino, 2 buffaloa hip-o, 2 giraffe,
2 lions, i leora3rd, I chee th, 1 lynx, 4 elanM, 2 roan, 6 zcbra, 9 burhtvc'",
6 topi, 2 serval cats, 2 jackals, 4 baboon, 2 hyenas, 6 marabcvut asorks,
2 kavarondo cranes, imala, reedbuaek, Chandlers reedhbuck, Robertsii Oranti
Thonsoni difc cliks1 klipspsringers, oribi dutker w w.aterback, veledtabeotc^,
steianbuk *^ pithon,. rock rabbit, ett, over 300 heeds, And so with a


parting glass, A hearty hand shake, I say goodbye with revrot for as
Counmt Nieroth said almost every country worth shooting - a .-
one unfenced zoo and -


- 1 -







,. lerald, Friday, Hiovembor 30, 1962.


tia eImSI "IS THOUGI4LtS 44IF;

,)alistL-ry is "busily buying --ite Chrisitas card, They coSe in all sizes
and they 1aHtivity scenes or Dickensiau jollity on then, or perhaps robins
perched on sprigs of holly. 14ar a Salisbury child o ha r.z :over seoon
real sno taill see it this year on a Christmas card.

i.ut I havo on my desk at thi s moment a Christmas card that no money could
buy in axy S-allsbry shop, It wasn't originally sent to me, It is
historic f unique*

It was sent by a British officer fitting in ahst Africae during the
Chritrms. of 1915 to 1i 3e toz .d ?n0a0ily bacl: honoe rd it waswritten
and dran on t4e seat of his khakld !rill pants

The st. moer wj Miajior George Cutresn, a fanblous yt %enuine chc;racter in
rhis dav straight oOut of a P.C, Uren novel,

14 is now in the possession of his daughter, Mrs* L on aet-4liggins at
present living in Umtali.

MIJGIT A"voamwru
Ceorre OCntran teas one of thoso men, That the world doesn't san to breed
any more. (He even looked the a-t ar see picture), Like Churchill,
Winrate, Lawrence, and their like, he sought adventure- sO it can o
meet him,

An Australian, just married, he -was on a worldd tour with hin b pidge when
his ship touched in at Cape Town just as the South Africsn War broke out*
George Cutrzw promptly joined up,

Wyi'H Y$JLOVS
He was one of the Boundary Commission that later sorted out the Kenyar
Tanmanyika border9 and it was this job that first took him to Eaot Africa$
where he wjas to win lasting fame as one of the really sroeat white hunters,
Ho was in the Vnited States vhen World War I c"te alone. Alresay 54-, he

still :anted to fight. %o back he hurried to London,

Had he beon an ordinary nan he would heave been rejected as over aego. But
he knew i.hodeais' own Franke Solouns andd both of them (Zelous by this time
well over 60) w ent out to Est Africa as officers in the 25th ioyal


-'asiliers, then kztown as Driscoll's Scouts.

Selous perished during the campaigat Outram was mortally injured, by a
lioness in 1922, only a day's march from Mombasa, saving the lifv, of an
African bearer.
I





C. 2


* erads ritay* Triov~mber 3,C 1c%6,


IT mr;
That a Ps the type of man Xho in tho hast African bnsh in 1V15 wrote this
verse o thle seat of a pair of .hahE.i drill troxeres, in indelible pencils:
"Only a watchh of kh.kil
From the seat of my pants is torn
Dirty end. bettered, frayed a.nd, tattered
And ripp-ed by many a thorn,
Useless end old,. like the wearer
Wora out, torn and scared
So the only use I can find for it
Is a soldierts 3Xmas card-,t"
lTe a...c..s.o .. it to vI. Fei-V which was his nickname for his wife, aad

sise. it "ITul"a her rioknaIe for him* And he wrote it from the
,'"eat of Wore%

kAT'2L-I 3%LON''2
On the other side of the patch of khaki i sa iav-sterl& little rawirg of a
lion, poised on a rock, regarding distant Mount Kilinanjaro.

Soldier and huImvter, artist and versifier we secm to have lot the
pattern these days. Certainly .we don't see that kind of Christmas card
any more.

.r,. hoget-Hingus dhis -atzter, 'ho was born in Kenya, has lived for
somo time in Umtali but is now resident in Salisb ury, She and her husband
are oin V to the South African coast shortly on doctor' advice,



Picture J3-ISFIGl rSR$-
Ilajor George Outran (right) with Captain Frank Selo=us rurinr the taest
African campaign of 1915.s Solous, over 60 and bearded, won the D30
durtnu this campaign but lost his life. It was at about this time that
Georce C utram sent the "Christmas card" described on this page.