An analysis of the PRA census

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Title:
An analysis of the PRA census
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United States -- National Recovery Administration
Sasuly, Max
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Office of National Recovery Administration, Division of Review, Statistics Section ( Washington, D.C. )
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OFFICE OF NATIONAL RECOVERY ADMINISTRATION


DIVISION OF REVIEW















AN ANALYSIS OF THE PRA CENSUS

By

Max Sasuly


WORK MATERIALS NO. 83




















STATISTICS SECTION
MARCH, 1936



























i












OFFICE O I0ATI"i'AL .EC.-VATY ADhlIIIlST.ATION


DIVISIC:T OF "EVIZ,/












AIT ANALYSIS OF T12 PRA CElISUS

By

Max Sasuly


STATISTICS SECTIO1T

MA&RC1, 1936


0854






By W. P. A.

2^t^'







F 0 R E V 0 RD


This "IAnalysis of the PA Census" was p're--artA. by MIr. Max Sasuly.

In essence, the rIsco-.rt is a taoulation of the results of the PRA

Census which yielded two spot records on employment and payrolls. The

report has interest for several reasons:

First, the analysis throws light apon the degree of success of the

voluntary effort at recovery urged by the President. Such analysis is

not derivable in as clear form from any other existing census procedure

It is true, of course, that auxiliary analysis of price and man-hour

trends is highly desirable.

Second, the analysis provides a unique examin)le of an inexpensive,

prompt densus comprehendin- all industry non-manufacturing and manu-

facturing. The analysis exhibits the most comprehensive pattern extant

on employment and payroll income by regions and industries.

Third, a fruitful approach is indicated to exhibit the patterns

of variation of employment and payroll income by size of establish-

ment.

At the back of this report will be found a brief statement of

the studies undertaken by the Division of Review.







L. C. :.lIarshall
Director, Division of Review





March 23, 1936


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CC.7TE-1TS




Page

Introductory su-..ary ........................................ 1

I. Summary of Tabulatcd an.I Charted Results
Section I Development of PIA Census Project
Industry :roup tand sub-group classification.............. 3
Special tabulation by the Census jureau.................. 4
Early use of tabulated results........................... 4
Extended analysis by 1?A ................................. 5
Section II SuuTary of results
Validity of employment increase under PA ................ 7
Variations and PRA increases of employment and payrolls.. 1.0
Employrment-.)vyroll variations by size of establishment... 16
Economic iplications of PBA employment increase......... 19

II. Detailed. Analysis of Data
Section I Reliability of PA Census
Coliparable results for manufacturing industries, Chart 3. 21
Comparable results for all industries, by states,
PRA. and BLS........................................... 26
weeklyy income per worker, all industries, Chart 6........ 26
All-in9.dustry employment changes, by states, Chart 7...... 28
Relation of PRA ch.rnges to seasonal fluctuations,
Charts 4 and 5 ........................................ 30
Section II Distribution of E.nployment by Industries
and Regions
Distribution by industries, Charts 8 and 9............. 30
Distribution in a sample state-group. ................... 36
Industry distribution in PRA and Census of Occupation.... 38
Extended basis for estimate of PRA employment............ 38
Distribution by geographic regions, Charts 10 and 11..... 39
Section III Variations in Pay, Employment, and Changes,
by Industry Groups
Variations in employment and PRA changes, summary,
Chart 2............................................... 44
Variations by regions, all industry groups, Charts 12
and 13 ............................................... 1. 46
Variation of PRA employment increase by primary
industry groups, Charts 14....................... .... 50
Section IV Variations by Size of Est-blishment
PRA Census all-industry 3-state sample, Charts 15 and 16. 50
Census of Manufactures data, 7-state sample, Charts 17.... 60
Section V Economic Implications o f PRA Employment In-
crease ......... ........................ ....... 60
Section VI Possible Further An"lysis of Data......... 76


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COUTENTS continuede)


III. Appoendixes Deta~iled Data T'T.'b1es

Apendix I
Table XII. By-size variations in census of Manufacturoo -- Ohio
Table XIII. PRA data sw-nnary by )rimrary industries
Table XIV. PRA data regional summaries by industry groups
Ap.'?en.ix II
Exhibit A. Extract from N.RA Insinia Section history
Exhibit B. Copy of minemo S.I.Posnor to Lt. Johnston 9/16/33
Exhibit C. Copy of niemo S.I.Posncr to 2obt. K. Straus 9/25/33
Exiibit D. Code of Industry Classification for PRA








































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9854











LIST OF TABLES


TABLE Pare

1. I PRA Sur.:!!,iary of Major Results Corparison with
Census, LS ............ ..................... 8
2. II PRA SuLiflnary by :.jor Industry trouis U. S.
Totals ................. ........................ 11
3. III PRA Summary by States and R2-ions................... 12


4. IV Check of PRA by Census of .Manufactures 16
Groups............................ # ............ 22
5. V-A Censug of Manufactures Estimate of Total
L-iployment, June, 1933......................... 23
6. V-B Census of Manufactures Computation of
Avera. e Veel-ly Pay ...................... ...... 24
7. VI MLS Sample Employment, Indexes, Changes -
16 :,'fg. Industries............... ............. 25
8. VII Census Seasonal Trend of Enployment, Man-hours,
r:ours. .......... ........................ ........ 31
9. VIII BLS Trend of Manufacturing Employment, 1929-35.... 32


10. IX PRA Distribution by RB:ions and Industry
Groups Establisiments........................ 33
11. X' PRA Distribution by Regionrs and Industry
Groups Employment............................ 34
12. XI PRA Variation by Regions and Industry Groups -
Weekly Income .................................. 47


13. XII Census Variation of Employment, Ohio, by
Size of Industry (4: sheets).................... 94
14. XII-A Census Variations of Employment by size -
Mlassachusetts............. ... ................ 69
15. XII-B Census Variations of Employment by size -
Pennsylvania................................... 70
16. XII-C Census Variations of Employment by size -
Ohio ............ .............. .............. 71
17. XII-D Census Variations of Employment by size -
North Carolina ....................... .. ....... 72
18. XII-E Census Variations of Enmploymnent by size -
Mi ssouri ...... ..................... ... ........... ....... .. 73
19. XII-F Census Variations of Employment by size -
Texas ......................................... 74
20. XII-G Census Variations of Employment by size -
California.... ...... 75



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9854







LIST OF TA..T,7.S (conittiued)


TA3LE PTire

21. XIII P:A Tbu'atin by Inrlustries and Groups -
U. S. Totals ( Sheets) ....................... 98
22. XIV-A PRA Regional Summaries by Industry Groups
New -h' an ... 103
New ] el .............................. 10
23. XIV-B PRA "eJionai Summaries by Industry Grou's
LAid-Atlantic ...... ................. .... 104
3. XIV-C PRA Re-ioial Su-.inaries by Industry Groups
East N. Central ............................... 105
35. XIV-D PfRA gei'r.jna1 Sunmmaries by Industry Grou)s
West 1'. Central............................. .106
26. XIV-E PRA Regional Snummaries by Industry Groups
South Atlantic ............ ..... ............ 107
27. XIV-F PRA Regional Suwrmaries by Industry Groups
East S. Central ....................... ........ 108
28. XIV-G PRA Regional Summnaries by Industry Groups
West S. Central... ....... ........... ....... 109
29. XIV-iK PRA Regional Summaries by Industry Groups
Mountain. ..................................... 110
30. XIV-I PRA Regional Summaries by Industry Groups
Pacific............... ................. ill


9854










L!ST OF C.:.:;_'f5


1. 1 Princi.',al Census G3eojra"'.ic ..ic ions ....... .... 9
2. 3 PRA Zvn.lo .-cnt Census, U. S. Totals by
Inda. try Groups ................................ 13


3. 3 Co ,iparison of PJA Returns with BLS and Census -
ui L- acturing .................................. 14
.4. 4 Seasonal Trend of ':-anufacturin,; E..i-lo.yment -
Census Years ................................... 15
5. 5 Trend of BnSio/'nt BLS ',"0'iufactur'-nj In-
duastries....................................... 30
6. 6 aeekcly Income per workerr All Industry-
BLS, P A .................................... 27
7. 7 June-October C-.1.ioge Enlo.yment, Payrolls -
by States ...................................... 29


8. 8 PRA. U. S. Totals Distribution of Establish-
ments, rmAlo:Tient, Payrolls.................. 35
9. 9 P-A ?e'nresentative 7-State Sample Distributions.... 37


10. 10-A PRA Distribution by Regions Establislhments -
17on-Manufac turinr ......... ................... 4-0
11. 10-B PRA Distribution by Regions E-tablishments -
oManuf acturing .................................. 41
12. 11-A PRA Distribution by Regions Employment -
o"i-Ii .cturing. ......... . ........ 42
13. 11-B PRA Distribution by Regions Znployment -
'LIanuf acturin no .................... .............. 43


14. 12 PRA Employment Chage by Regions................. 48
15. 13 PRA .Teeklj Pay by Rin........................ 49


16. 14-A PPA June-Oct. Change Non-manufacturing,.......... 51
17. 14-B PPJRA June-Oct. Chiange Ion-durable Manufactuaring... 52
18. 14-C PRA June-Oct. Change Darable i anufacturing....... 53


19. 15 V.riation by Size of' Establish-ment PiRA :.-
ployment, Payroll 3 states ................... 55
20. 16-A PRL, 3-states, Variations by Size of E2tablish-
ment -Food Products ............................ 56


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9854








LIST OS C.J3TS (,oitinue.)


C T

21. 16-B -A, 3-,:tates, Variations by Size of 2^t-ujliih-
,ients De:.)art,,,ent Stores. ...... ....... 57
,2. 16-C PiA, 3-states, VTriations .y 3i .e of Establish-
monts Cotton Goods ......................... 58
23. 16-D ?2A, 3-states, Variations by Size of "stiblish-
ments Leat'-er Products. .................. ... 59
24. 17-C Census of Ilanufactures, Variati-r.s by Size of
:ta'bli'd". rts 7-State Co, site ............ 61
35. 17-I Census of I.--.nfact'.tre", Variations by Size of
Establiskhments ;ia.-;cc'usetts................ 62
26. 17-11 Cen.rus of Manufactures Variations by Size of
EstL.1lis'/nents Pennsylvania.................. 63
27. 17-III Census of ::nj-i.factu.-es Variations by Size of
2E t'-blissl-ments Ohio......................... 64
A8. 17-17 Cnsus of lianufactures V.riations by Size of
t-A:.jlishlments orthl Carolina .............. 65
29. 17-V Census of Mlamnfactures Variations Y-r Size of
Establis'-.-.nts Iiszouri..................... 66
30. 17-VI Census of tIanu iac tares Variation3 by Size of
Establis!imentz Texas..................... 67
31. 17-VII Census of Manufactures Variations by Size of
Ejitablisiimnts California ................... 68



32. 18. Census Z.i:lo,7.ient, Min-ho1ur, Hours per Week -
1933.. ........................................ 77
33. 19. Trend of Nezkly Hours 1934-35, 3LS Samnple .......... 78






















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9854








-I-


Al: A:JAL*SIs C. T ]: PRA. C27SUS C5 E.L2LOY::TT

Sio.ni.ricance of Re-',lts for \L.A Policy


The "Post- ar.." Census taken in conrncction with the President's

Reemi-'loyment Agreement (A3k) of Auuist, 19-3, was designed to

detcr:aine the effectiveness of this mcasurxe in jr.-nIting industrial

recovery.(*) The ii.ile questionnaire card., shown below, wPs distributed

shortly afterward by the mail carrier ever place where Joer,-ns were em-

ployed on his route. (**) E senti.lly the inquiry related to the number

emplo-,ed and trie amount of t"'e payroll during tIe .7 period e.-iin,;

nearest to June 17 anl Qctober 14, 13. The -resent resort is an

anr'lysis of the significance for C"A of the returns 2roei this questionnaire

card..

Tile the PEA Census thus gives only two spot records of employ-
71-iileil~ the PR Censur t7fY fundamentalw

ment and payrolls, its results throw light on a number of fundamental

elements and problems of P:. First, t-iey sup-ply fairly conclusive

proof of the effectiveness ag a recovery measure of PIA in its voluntary

pha.es. Second, they supply bench-mark data, which are practically un-

available elsew-here concerning employment and purchasing power, the basic

elements in the taok undertaken by HRA in 1933. Third, the results


(*) See 1.A Bulletin 2-6, Au.st-September 1 ,33, in -articular, the

following reports -repo:red in the 'A Orgnization Studies Section
of the Division of Review: Histor.: of tI.,.e President's Reeemloyment
Agreement by i. Conra4 Hoover. history of the Insignia Division by
A. M. Davall.

(**) For thie mechanics s of t-.e distribution of the questionnaire thr:.ugh
the Post Office, and' District Offices of t-Lie Deatment of 3c.merce,
see Appendix II.


9854













0
SQuestionnaire form distributed by mail carrier to all employers on his route.


ANSWER CAREFULLY AND RETURN IMMEDIATELY IN THIS ENVELOP. NO STAMP REQUIRED. A SEPARATE RETURN
SHOULD BE FILED FOR EACH FACTORY, STORE, OFFICE, MINE, OR OTHER PLACE WHERE PEOPLE WORK

1. Name of concern -------------------------------------- ------------------------ ------------.-
To Every Employer: 2. Address of the factory, office, store, or other place where people work which this report covers-
Two months ago I invited
you to enter into an agreement -- -
with me to aid industrial recov- (Number and street) (City) (County) (State)
ery by shortening hours of 3. Indicate nature of business. ----------------------------------------------------------------..................
work and by increasing wage (Is this a factory, retail store, barber shop, insurance office, or what Is it?)
rates. 4. Principal kinds of products produced or sold or service rendered -------------------------------------------
The time has come to take 5. How many employees worked here during the pay 6. Total amount paid to these employees in salaries add
rstock. The information here period ending nearest- wages for the pay period ending nearest-
requested is necessary to de-
termine the progress we have (a) June 17, 1933 -----.----------------------- (a) June 17, 1933, $ ----..... -----------
made.
(b) October 14, 1933 --------------------------- (b) October 14, 1933, $-.- -- ------- ....
7 Do not write In this spaee
'^ <,/ iV/,,o-- 7. What was the length of your pay period? Put check (V) in proper place for- II i I
El R I] R ---... ........... -------------------
One week Two weeks Half month Month Other (state length of pay period)
THIS IS A CONFIDENTIAL REPORT AVAILABLE ONLY TO SWORN EMPLOYEES OF THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT, AND NO
INDIVIDUAL FIGURES WILL BE DISCLOSED.








disclose t e str-.kin t,-c&nical ..-ssibilities of a mi:niiturj c'.nz.t-,

unusually simple an.l inexpensive, that cin supply indi .noable data

basic to problems suchi as were f,.cc'-l y' iJA, and still 1re-s for

solution.

I Suux- ry of Tabulated_ nnd Charted Results

The an7.l/sis of the PIA data here presented was ',c,,0e in the

spring of 1934 anrid the fall of 19,5. Its essence is e:-.o' ,lied in the

accompanying chart, and the supporting data. T.ese are given in the

tables of A')0ni.-x I. The principal tables are bbase\ on the returns

from the questir.n-rir-: cards as classified and tabulated by the Census

Bureau (*) for .I'^A.

Section I Development of PitA Census Project
Industry >r,. nri *ju-.rA.. cl:-.i'fic; tion. Tlhe primrarj industries

probably numbering several thousand items are *-saall:r grouped into a

smaller number of fundamental groups, some 300 in the case of the manu-

facturing industries covered bj the Census. Most of the latter indus-

tries are canvassed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and classified in

some 90 primary groups. Census .-imiarizes the returns for the primary

groups in 16 .na.jor classes. These major classes are also used essentially

by BLS. In the classification pattern used for PRA, all industries are

grouped into a total of 167 primary classes (to fit a 3-digit code),



(*) The entire work of receiving the returned questionnaire cards,
classifying, punching, machine and hand tabulation of the returns
was done wita notable dis:y'tch by the Special Tabulation Section
of the Cens-.is Bureau. The entire job was completed in about 5
eehs. The working force numbered soiime 250 at its )eak. The
cost of tLe tabulation work proper was about $37,000.00.


9854






-4-


conforming to the established Census and 3LS groulings. The non-

manufacturin5 industries are groaper'. prira'ily in ti'_e classification

of the last censuses (1930) of distribution and occupations. The mranu-

facturing industries are grouped in the 15 census classes with sub-

groups corresponding with the 90-industr-i groupin o01" 3I.S.

Special tabulation by the Cens-is Bureau. The special classification

used was arranged by consultation with the Census Bureau, BLS, and

other Government agencies. The classes, and the coi.prised industries,

are given in Appendix II. MoA :t o t-ie dat. Dn thie nuastionnaire card

could be tabulated directly, o-uvever, a special adjustment h-ad to be

made for the different lengt'i f t.e .- ay Cerio iniic.,te1 in t-Lie re-

turns. For the monthly pay c ric.. t-ie poa.roll 'as divided by 4.34,

for a half month period it was iiv-led by .-2.17, to give the equivalent

weekly.7 pay. Some 900,000 que-'tLonnaire cards were returned. Of these

a number could not be used because t-ley were illegible, also those re-

porting no employment for either J-ine or O'ct-ber were rejected. The

643,000 returned cards that were us,.ble were tabulatedl by the Census

Bureau in the primary 167 industry grouTs, jivin2 a record of the re-

porting establishments, employment, and. tie adjusted weekly payroll

for each state and for all cities over 230,000. In a su)plementary tabu-

lation a breakdown of the employment data was made by size of establish-

ment for M4assaclhusetts, Ohio, and Iorth Carolina, three states consider-

ed representative of the principal economic 'regions.

Early use of tabulated results. T..o m:iin taoul..ti.n by states,

completed in )ecember, 1933, was t.e basis of t-.e r,.-uh estimate of


9834









PRA reenp1ojloiT1nt released soon t'i,.r'- after by lIRA. The June-October

increase in eim.- lo rent reported b6- t.e PEA returns for t' i entire

country wvas as.-'cld to rc )rusent a coverage of 30". This value,

derived by .a crude extrapolation fr.-,i in estimate of total employment
sugge te b T} S, i S too ":
suggested by 3LS, is too higi. A closer estimate of the coverage is

suggested belov: based on a separate consideration of the -rincipal

employment groupss in relation to tie corresprndin., groups of the _ain-

fully e.n;loyr.ble, (see paj;e 17 and T'-.ble I.).

Tli.- su;?lementary tabulation giving a br3akdown by size of

establishment f:r the three selected states became available in

February, 193 _. It served as a basis for the first statistical study

by ITIA of the v--riations of employment conditions by size of enter-

priee effL'ctEd, preF-_uLably by PFA or the codes. (*)

ExtenLded an-Avsi9s byA. In thlt subsequent work by ITRA, here

presented, t.e lata tabulated by Census for indiviIua! states were

summarized b.j .rinary industries and by major grou-.s for the entire

country, and fr r the nine Census geographic divisions. Comnoarisons

w.'ere made of t'.e re prted P3A emplo;.r nt and payroll changes with

the corres -onr1Ai,-< chances snown by the Bureau of' Labor Statistics

and the 19.3 Census of Manufactures.



(*) A comprehensive analytic tabulation of the by-size varia-
tions of eI:Lployment and payroll chan,;s for these three
states was made by MLax Sasuly witi the aid of .rily C.
Pixley, elementt .7inston, and others during -,-boruar-'
i.iarch, 1934. A detailed discussion of the results is
given in a report by Spureon Bell, June, 1934, avail-
able in t.e files of 1RA.


9854





-6-


This analysis supplies measures of significant economic

changes, for which other sources afforded only nmeager information.

BLS covered, in 1933 only some 60,000 establishments for all industries.

Census reports payrolls only as yearly totals. The PRA analysis alone

supplies measures of payroll change over the interval studied; weekly

income in both )eriodcs; change in weekly income all for a fairly

complete all-industry re-resentationri. These dynamic spot indications

of employment and purchasing poiver can also be derived for identical-

firm industries grouped byr size of establishment for other states than

the three selected.

An analysis of similar scoox was also made for a seven-state

composite, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Ohio, North Carolina, iissouri,

Texas, anrl California. This composite is a fair representative sample

for the entire country with respect to the proportions of employment

and payrolls and. tueir variations, in the major industry groups. For

some individual industries, however, this state-group does not afford.

adequate representation.

Significant comparisons were made of tie emnloynent and es-

tablishment coverage by PR.A and 3LS for the o90 manufacturing industry

groups of BLS-CEITSUS. Particularly significant are th-e comparisons

between PBA,BLS, and Census as regards the indicated June-October change

in employment and payrolls, the latter lacking in Census. T.ie PRA, anal-

ysis made available for the first time a measure of tie range of varia-

bility of movements indicated b/ samples like BLS or P-A w.'aen inter-

compared.


9854





-7-


Section II SN. '_ of results
Validityv of o..c t i ;co,,.'e uid,2r P ik. Doubt has bceren

raised. in sundrj critical -quarters 'enardling th.e validity of the

rem.r.heable June-Octobc r increases in emplo:,i.ient. Thj '"r'jssnt arLalysis

shews quite conclusively that the PRA returns are adequately cieocle-d by

BLS ard by the Cen-.us of Manufactures reporting, f)r con-parable industry

groups and regions as shown by Chliarts 3 and 7.

The .7ce.:ly income per worker shown by PBA, BLS, and Census

(for June) are:

PRA, .19.95; 3US, $17.99; Census, ;13.65.

This is a reasonable areement considering, the difference in the type

of coverage and the data re-orted. P2A includes in .;y:-'olls wages and

salaries; BLS includes only wages; for Census only yearly average

values are obtainable of a composite wages-salaries weekly pay. These

were estimated by a special c:m.)atatirn for t-he prince, al groups and

for All manufacturing.

While the diffurence3 for '.-eeC:ly pay shown by Charts 3 and 6

tetween PRA, Census and 3LS are moderate, somewhIat wider ranges of vari-

ation are found for the June-October changes in payrolls and employment.

The magnitude of these differences is seen on Chart 3 for the principal

manufacturing groups as between PRA and Census. The corresponding dis-

crepanecies between PIA and BLS are shown on Chart 7 for the changes by

individual states. however tie average ciiange for All Manufacturing

shown at the top of Chart 3 is slight, considering thie difference in

character of coverage between P9A and BLS-'ensus. The weighIted average

for All Industry shown at t.--e bottom of Chart 7 for t,.e entire United States


9854







8
TABLE 1

PE Juim-001oTO 1933 1B1US 8034.42 or USnC T I/
IlL OU..arleMul OoampetLon Iploj.Il Dtat



l1)33 G.IrAfui Y LplW...ahi. 3 ccuT,.il1..i / IRA Date / )M Cansol of El
MaeHufaeotur. De0tah 1l35


I X ftlormnt
BfI*U~ ________________
"stalr-- P 1rowstl, VueeiW, Par Reportitn
A.z I, Lr ,'1'',c JIMor aujaltr smitL June I/ nceroas Per eorcr Reportling Juns tal ish-
.' .. lMIC DITSlO51l li'.L_ .r.I.c rria m.or,. La..ncm l _____a ____ _g..L.l. t 'L-Oc r ge.atbils- l-bf Wag -b -
.restry f, jeuin.l Tril 0l MUt anerM
ServiLce U oD- Bor- Non- son-
ir-lci~l B f.gS[. If. -f. 11M5.fg. 99A MI lfe I f.

1 3 i 9 10 11 I 13 i1 1!, 16
(CcOO', kOi (OO) IOL') IOC1) 1000) (000) C(000) (000) (000) (00) (000)

I 3T1L (US STABZS Il.713 L..1. 1..27 141.110 552 87 '..l 5.075 12.71% ia.6% 1 23.9 tl9.91 1141.8 p,970 B..7 23.3
WllB I.olb L'.b3l L2.13l l0.065 359 63 3.i49 3,761 I..2 18.5 2k4.75 21.01 102.14 4.398 62.2 I6.7
OUM .6. 50 1..31B9 2.55s 110 13 892 772 18 8 14.6 L8.82 13.69 2.4 1.227 15.6 4.3
IS 1.0.Z. 2 ,.'y 1.151 b6 9 526 756 16.? ?9.3 24.77 21. 15.0 3i' 8 9 2.3


How nilan 235 329 1,358 1,479 47 9 392 671 10.3% 17.4% $24.05 $18.95 14.o 789 11.6 3.1
I Mid-AtlatiO 596 1.035 5.354 3.973 130 27 l.Wo 1.5e12 9.5 16.9 27.66 21.77 43.9 1.705 29.1 5.0

[LI lo North Cmtrul 1.1477 137 4.1 4 3.611 117 20 1,089 1.335 12.3 21.7 22.72 21.35 32.3 1.586 12.3 6.6
l est Nbrth etral 1.70 1429 1.912 1.003 65 7 429 243 15.4 13.5 20.75 20.05 12.2 319 9.2 2.0

SOUTH84 .
1 South Atlantic 2.021 1445 2,126 1.464 44 6 399 493 17.0 14.1 18.82 13.35 12.6 776 8.4 2.6
a s South Cntral 1,805 193 1.o106 633 23 3 192 167 19.0 U.5 16.14 12.64 4.9 264 3.5 .9

I mot South central 1,.55 311 1.557 762 143 4 301 112 21.2 21.6 20.52 16.144 6.9 17 3.4 .8


Z unl, 442 130 568 255 14 1 94 1 18.5 31.-5 20.81 21.60 2.9 56 14.1 .5
Paific 551 399 1,662 932 52 8 433 237 15.7 29.1 25.64 21.64 12.1 29 4.S l.5




eseed on 9341W018 tJ&IUIIO 01 BI DUSTW CUPS eujmarleB and SMUNUP TANULJATIo U. S. TOTALS given below. The mbers of reporting aestabliBsents n md. June employees for
the U. S. S 0TALs lemint 7 seZed the respective totals for all the regions, since the U. S. TOTALS summary includes elso the class All Others, comprising inter-regional or
otherwise non-alLocable industries. Source of Census; Rotoprtnt releases 3-15. 2T-1935; for BLS. 'Employaent and Perolls, December, 1935, p. 27.
QiLnfUllj ap lovable tnclue all persons over 10 years of age assigned to some gainful occupation in the OCensus of Occupations. (See Fifteenth Census: 1930. Occupation
Statistics, United States ummary. p. 5). The grouping by occupation given In Columns 3 and 4 corresponds roughly to the grouping by ndmstrisl comparable with the
iamJact'rli. and o-saa acturlng groups of employed enuTmerated in the PHA end other censsuse, s exemplitfied in column 7 and 8. See Fifteenth ensus: 1930, Population
Bilsltls. Second SerIes, nited States Sumiary, p. 23 for the tabulation of the gainfully employable by inutetries. The numbers for the anufacturtng nid Mechanilcal
lnd-itrle> are .ery similar. to the occupation grouping in column 4. Thme the totale for the principal regions (in thousands) are: North, 10,500; South, 2,7T14; est, 1,103;
toL4l, IL,}!?.

the totss for the reglons in column 5. 6, 7 end 8 are somewhat less than the corresponding values for U. S. TOTALS because the latter comprises also the data for the
A1 vthre class.
a Jone employment ti distributed among the several regions roshly in the same proportions as the Ocetober employment. Oolijae 7 and 8 are comparable in scope with
coluctm 3 la 4. Column S is directly comparable with column 14, Indlcating the employment coverage of PEA with respect taihe regular 1933 oenr of ianuflactures.


X.L.A.
Division of evRiw
si -JUON
March. 1936
.14





CHART I

PRINCIPAL CENSUS GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS


ARIZ.
r


I = NEW ENGLAND
I -MIDDLE ATLANTIC
1ff EAST NORTH CENTRAL
]-=WEST NORTH CENTRAL
Y = SOUTH ATLANTIC
RB-EAST SOUTH CENTRAL
]7= WE ST SOUTH CENTRAL
"7Z7-MOUNTAIN
1X- PACIFIC


IOKLA. ARK.


-
I AR" .

LA.


NORTH -.1LI. .
SOUTH-7 ,VZ,VE.
WEST- imliX.


VISION OF REViEW
.. S., DEC., 1935




-10-


shows a still smaller di -crcny; the aro t between PRA aid 3LS

here is complete within a few percent.

The s'iarnr.ess .-)' tie employment incr< se for the PRA period

is greater than tho change fcr any like interval since 1929. As is

shown in Chart 5, tlis is t'e case for p-ractically each 3LS industry

group. Thry little of this incre-ise can be ascribed to seasonal swing.

For the All :.Lnfacturin, corvposite of Censis the percentage Juno-October

changes for recent Cen,.us ye:.r. are, as s.ownv on Chart 4:

1925, 5.4.S; 1929 2.0;S 191 -2.8/; 1933 13.7,.

Variations .n.. P A,_ incr:,cr.;'- f *:n, I1 c., n,.nt ori .. jrcll- Te vari-

ation of establisilments (enterprises) from region to region and b:,; in-

dustry groups is sharply revealed in the charts 2-3 and tables I-III.

The regional distribution of tie various major in.,!u--try groups can serve

as a basis for economical analysis of Census results, when it is desired

to study only the dominant industries of particular regions. Tie varia-

tions of weekly pay by regions can serve a similar arose.

Characteristic variations of compliance with. the President' s

Reem]loyment Agree.aent may be noted for the larger industry group by

Charts 2 and 12, for the primary ind-a'-.tr.- groxp by Chiarts 14-A 14-C.

as checked by the 1930 Census of Occupations data it appears that manu-

facturin, industries returned a considerably l.rrg,.-r coverage than non-

manufacturing industries, 75," against perhaps 500. Likewise manufactur-

ing industries were more able, or willing, to increase employment and

payrolls than the distribution and service industries. T',hu? the June-October


9854









11
TABLE T
IVA "I I USBOA WTAULC3 UDUMVT OGRP8 S
Elertla Uatehllaluaemta, Iployuaat, Payroll.
Jose October, 1933 V. 5. TOIALS


I-lrl hoMwt | lEployment


-vow per ant
of Total


All ho"UUse


I 4m3 October
Bport- 'P Cant Somber be be
la oi Total


o100.00 64,o66 .00o 10,867.o024


12,564.e43


per COant
OM-we


ee.k1 Payroll


Juno
por CaoL Amunt
of Ts'.a.1 ______

100.00 238.457.075


October
UQW,- L


212,615,X98


iM50UU IUWA M 85.79 551.752 50.60 5,499,804 6,197,175 12.7 55.10 131,398.786 151.500,08 15.3 23.89 .145

A. AWtvoar (WIhU) .67 4.308 .50 54,395 59,676 9.7 .54 1.283.8,77 1.418,05B 10.5 23.60 23.76
a. a101- & SUaaelaf 4,9 %.47 I .S 7.11.871 14.Ml.227 .'-- __.99 aliB
I. oal .28 1.773 '.12 2. 52 -..42 i 19.1 1 3.,39- 294 5,302..77 --- .3 15.E8 19.33
II. O~rOther a m in .:41 2.662 1.35 l4.'9 I 1B1.974 24.1 1.8 3,W.'s9 4.358.850 23.1 214.17 23.95
5. Oantrsuci 2.76 17.,737 1.93 209,390 23.804 14.0o 1.64 4,385.983 5.387.208 22.8 20.95 22.56
D. labile Utlelsl. 7 n 4 1. 2B.70I-.W7 1. .2.i06, 34
I. TromlortaUai. ate. 1.52 11.9 m T2.li 6.1 l.1 3.13 14.q19 8.1.: 2q 18.0 23. 23.91
11. Othlr Pbl, 1iltis 1.11 F.125 6.-43 b99.304 733,72 -4.9 7.98 19.027.-21 19,891,800 4.6 n7.21 27.1
1 Vl. itrtbtlou 5-.a 42.611 21.95 3. .7138 2.766.10 1t.0 22.419 l..14 5.25 63.7"77.'l. 2..0 2l.. .28 231.0
I. Bisla), 7..3 40 .33.1 .-s5 la, l 724,169 31.9 7.7l 1,374,900 ,.10C.35b -14.8 2.90 29.1v
II. RtaLl 4%.4% g 2Ke. 275 b..)L Lq.?4'.a8 1 .64e1.bl 1C.7 14.4d 7 7.O.A5 4.:.1;b j^ 22.7 19.67 20390
] wi, Dnfq[, *to. 17.79 114,177 3.94* 1*28,61A 99,l It.5 1.^ 8.080,872 9,.., 20.' LS.85 19.55
h. DvI 8ofo. eta. 18.58 55.180 6.35 r8',5cQ 610.1W 17.e L..i lI,2b.0GW 13.854.049 24. Ib.113 t.0
a. Other eteall 19.08 122.718 5.81 631.777 71.940 15.9 b.14 S. 63,1,35 19.053.252 22.5 2.6k B65

I. -m< a.17 ,1 8.q 9.08 g .2g 10 97 210900. 14.5 2D.70 a1.33
I. Dommeot 11.06 71.099 4.60 499.301 554196 11.0 3.04 7.260,991 8,521,997 17.4 17.07 15.-39
12I. reemut. 70 4 4 4,30,9 .5 .9E .709
lr.suioal 4.3 15.2 1.701
IT. Sutasr 3-01 29.361 1: 180,856 .134 7.3 2.13 5.080.7 5.511.637 8-5 25.09 28.39
II.1' i14 Il 4 IT 8.11 52,209 3.59 390,777 430,042 10.0 4.69 11.162,814 12.534,108 12.3 21.57 29.15
a. n 6.2 An47 s.22 S67.646 1as.q68 3.4 n.4q4.qq6 4.7 1;6.16 Cki
1. Safcac. ate. 1.3 7.939 1.35 1M936 1 o62 1 4.2 2.12 =.Obi,331 249,086 3-7 3.19
II. I'irnu. hera' ;5.06 32,540 3.87 20,70 436,90 3.8 6.49 1.1t,; 1 ,24,910 5.1 37.19


i. I WIAcU3Ma 13.5 87.29g 46.71 5,o075.493 6,017.102 18.6 42.53 1o01,408.o025 124,169.o064 22.4 19.95 20.64

1. zoo" 2.68 17.253 5.71 620,642 777.733 25.3 5.64 13.457.459 16,069,016 19.4 a.68 2D.66
11. xt~le 1. _1.4 l. 1.24.465 q.6 7.42 17.6.744 22.87q.088 9j iO3L ?.JO16,88
a. par 1.03 6.65 4.70 510.3580 557,994 9.3 3.05 7.261,017 10,183,935 14.o 14.23 18.25
'. Other textile .14 5.387 6.66 724.085 797,392 10.1 4.37 10,429,727 12,695,153 21.7 14.40 15.92
IX. omest Product. 1.20 7,698 3.08 335,096 405.069 20.9 2.20 5,256,748 6,985.832 32.9 15.69 17.25
IT. Paper Products .29 1,874 1.43 155,014 185.194 19.5 1.-34 3.184.962 3,756,204 17.9 20.55 20.28
T. Printlmi-Peh llbmn 2.2 1l4.64o 2.93 318.637 355,610 11.6 3.81 9.073.375 10.140,560 11.5 28.48 28.52
TI--ni. Ohblce l .80 5,168 2.70 293.285 354,543 20.9 3-.9 7.829,972 .947,180 14.3 26.70 25.24
V1I.Inbber Product. .06 388 .62 67,093 80,408 19.8 .65 1,541,224 1.735.913 12.6 22.97 21.59
I&. Leather Prodct. .34 2,205 2.15 233.585 251.145 7.5 1.72 4,108.158 4,678.760 13.9 17.59 18.63
1. Stoma, C 01 aw .62 3.980 1.14 161.074 185,118 14.9 1.38 3.278.867 3.791.145 15.6 20.36 20.48
X. Irnna Ste e .66 4.2J 4.Sl '.'.o: r. L ..4s o.' ;.'. __i 1.6. 9.<-i. .0.9 6.o6 ,"1 .)
a. steel alum, .08 4"6 :-.-4 7.633 315.94w 35.-. 2.3i 8,Ei% C.13? e7.1 20.01 21.7?
Sb. Oher Ire Steal .58 3,724" 2.Y, 255.14, 3?i i3.L4 -.15 5,137.414 .473,392 i. .3 M. .1 20.'3
XI. Zine-rsou tala ew .57 3.631 1.69 183.467 226,245 23.3 1.65 3,935,660 ,4.828,766 22.7 21.4 21.34
UII.laclery 1.10 7,086 4.39 476,644 6o04.00o4 26.7 4.67 11,125,868 14.058.730 26.4 23.34 23.28
In. TrIln ortation S. ip. .20 1,249 2.31 251,435 295,331 17.5 2.64 6.298,206 6,727,409 6.8 25.05 22.78
St. llroad Repailr a"op 16 .01 1.353 1.,407 4.o .01 30, 514 32.072 5-1 22.55 22.79
x11. Ii.cellmanson .91 5.849 1.-94 o,210.66o0 2a48.721 18.1 1.64 3.902.720 1 4,97,965 25.5 18.53 i19.69


AmcllaOfihr
ill Other 3J


.0 246 .07 7.069 9,275
-59 37'70 2.62 284.668 3141.291


31.2 .07
19.9 2.30


172.940 216,328 25.1 1 24.46
5.477.324 6,7301418 1 22.9 | 19.24


/ Soure"I Special tabulation, for MA of PsA qoastionoalre returns by Bureau of Censs. December 1933. employment and payroll dlata ae for the reeks of June 17 and
October 11. 1939.
j/ *A1 OtherI' coven data for questloanaires which 4o not clearly Ln l-:.'.e tonat a breakeown has been mae on a proper geora 1.al base; data for etabllshbament
operating In two or sue States, suoch as, railroads, steamboats, ipe iLiLoe, telephone and telervaph, and power companies; the reports of companies having plants
In vailoua States for which individal reports were not submitted but for which a master report was supplied; and data from returns received for a State after the
State had been aent to the Tabulatioon Section for punching and tabulating.
I.R.A.
Division of Raerlow
US:JW
D3oember. 1935
9854


Per Cant|
0-1ff |1uz


Octobr


23.32
19.72


Tooek.a inom
Ifor lWork


7ig.5T| a.9k(a,.4q9








12
TABLE "E
"iS OIIM PaRu 1


T.soa ltt -t,.hnns----s-- -y .
a13siom sd $#o tat& 11atiis -sat. 3m i-Tg
Per cod Numbr L r Par -t For 3mb: j- MEOW
of Ts" 10I45ZILU Pet emat M m.: p .n .:e *
of ttal ok-f *f Votal tI1.i

aUtra STaffi 100.-00 643,060 100.00 10.86g.0011 12.%64.3Wj 15.6 100.00 PM.WlAXi Saa-6l3.b7D U.;5 sa.
UT nCG.,lr 3.74 5.l9S 10.99 o,096.i6h 1.26o.i g 15.0 9.56 ae.797.o037 26.919.011 1,.2 m.W
.do 16 7 6 439 9.0 3 .361 .2.2 IL6 I.2
1.31. :5? 36 :6 b3 77.35 u.- :.09.75 i:S;3 .L 115.i
2.251 :is OD.04. 22.997 114.7 1376: i.690 17.1 111.81 ILI
Mar L t b.5 4".1 5.:I 517.705 671.62 14.3 5.o 1 A 19, 16.7 .
RUoe Island .72 ,,o00 1. u 109.9.09 126.119 15.8 .90 2.150.266 2,6.1.633 2.5 IL9.7% a
O* r nct I.-u% 1.7 10.724 2.17 235.805 277."09 17.8 2.10 5,011520. 6.027.971 20.3 n.5 a
UImLE A3JZTIC 24.416 15L.979 27.29 2.964.5914 3.360.7a2 13.4 30.63 73.049.165 85.586.*3 17.2 z 1.f 21.
New York .2.93 g3,:5B 13.49 1.4ob.b061 1.b57.o6 13.1 17.26 41,1 .60,9 %LIN.77 1k4.5 21.07 a
New J.1rey 3.41 2l.951 3.62 393.431 446.235 13.1 4.0H ;6 .358 1 1Ia712 15:6 S2k0 0
9.wzsy1vula 8.07 51,970 10.11 1.105,102 1,256.780 13.1 9.33 22.25., 11 4 27.285.5 29 22.6 0.14 2
PAST NORTH CEMA.& 21.4. 137.725 22 59 2.454.151 2.683.975 17.5 2.V64 53.990.135 as. .MOM5 19.2 a.g9 a
Cho .10 40.508 6.53 710.017 634.2z4 17.5 6.26 14,925.99 17.809,925 19.3 a.0B Z
lndl..na 2653 19,208 Z.37 258.083 310,991 20.5 2.01 4.B?4,915 6.013.177 23.3 15.19 1
Ill nois -30 40.41 7.64 830.5B 974.1&7 19.7 8.5 i9.90.034 24,529.56 23.1 23.9
Wt hl mn 3.3' 21.u37 4.06 441.,?73 500,78? 13}.- 4.4 9.870.239 10.888,345 10.3 22.37 2
lt ecneuin 2.5 1,-034 1.98 211.881 243,896 13.5 1.814 4,399,.u4 5,134.023 16.7 21.)7 Z
,Z7 .GM *s cMA. 11.?23 72.231 0.42 09;.955 00.115 114.7 5..98 14.267.17, Ib.7 6.957 17.2 aa.4 a
11 Uline:o 0 ta 2.4j 15i.59 1.54 16D.923 195..,-9 1e.9 1.52 3.125. 4,354.797 20.0 21.71 2
Iowa 2.1] l3.5cC 1.01 109.,3M 125.7L. 11 4.9 .88 ?2.07.833 2,:4 ,X.518 17.3 19.10 1
911i.1 3.01 19, ; 2-47 2A-8.211 -95.01 l11.1 2.31 5.519.4218 6.5.969 15.6 20.57
!1Dat .141 2.l .1 lI'i5 l15,18iv 25-3 .10 24LI )47 539 Z-5.1 2D 116 a
S. `tla .1 3 .1 ,-,,Y 1,1 ;3.7 .15 351.993 M. 12.1 M 21.5
.lebra&kg 1.23 .- ,. 7 I' c,2;- 15.o .4" l,156.1.0 1. 47.9587 6Ib.b 0.19 a
092i :-.o09 .&2 7,30'. 7 7,r.ri- lr.11 .53 1.273.692 1.4Z6b.814 16.7 1.8.92
SOUTH Ar..TTL'IC 3* ).'7 ., ,., ?". .?:,i 15. ,.51 15.'31. .92 19.544.174 25.- 15.914 1'
Dela,,jr .t19 l,,.'j.1 i 11 .4 .5, ) .14 333.17B 790 ,483 17.2 20.93 z
UM.Z lId 1.0 i.-(i 1..5 11:,0.. 1 7,04. 17. 1.20 2,d,2.137 -,14..,- 1 20.7 20.11l
Die%. Col1mbl& 43 .4.7 fi 3- .cN;: i?:0 I 1.09.47 .43.72 .
l. Coln bL .1 ? ', : 1. 55 1,. 1,413.,772 7.9 25.7 7
WT Lir gin l.; d' 'o7 I .;; l.7, 4. -..4 l, .9 9,l:C. -12 2, ;Or,9i. 6 23-9 1%.94 1
W Virgn! 577 -, ": 2?. 1.06 "13,174 0. ?,r,9 3 17.55 1'
N Carolinf. ).On 9,,&j 1 .9 1',,. .,793 l ..1.02 2.42.64.v5 }3. 2O.C 5 32.4 12.417 1
I. Caro ]in. .ce' J, r... .iL 9 ,'3K I2,20 .e, .4} 1,034,2}2 1,;! .P01 33.7 U.01. 1
Gorela 01. ,": .?r, I)..'.2 11.0 l 1.5 .81 1.919.801 2.415,897 25 S 14.16 1'
Morlda L.l4 ;, 1 -1,77 ?P,-75 1'.0 .4o 9"1,9 ) 2...75,0 -.0 15.5-
EAST !iUi CLMnRAL .9 3.99 '5,70 3- .ui) 47?,,1 1c.u 2.37 1.34.4h15 T,?.930. 27.5 14.0o3 1
Er.^ntuc l. O 7, ?u7 .?: :o,,,ig .^?,9l-) 20.2 .77 1.629,279, 2,;24.7.l 27.1 17.S 1,
Tanesef 1.19 7, /1- iL 2-1, ;. t ,uj 14 .1 .l 1,:?7,8 P2,A .3-2.98 21.6 14.90 1
Alabama 1.05 ..r43 I.u7 l11.3 132.9-1 14.3 .b2 1,461.l.-A 1.9j33231. 2.9 12.714 1
Mt~el.i4r:;1 .5,5 1.35 *1 3.'3..i "-.0)'. f'.8 .17 4.1;d, g 8,25- 4l.9 12.09 1
,'ZT SOUT CEiT.J.L 7.39 47.23 3-.97 4.71.700 b?0,.49 *'0., 3 47 i,?722.90 10,.33t.,912 24.9 19.19, 1'
uniear .r.7 4.339 .2 34.,99' l4 -.,di ? ..i 504.9W? I -7S.31. 3.4. 14.43 1
oulilana .79 5,u73 .72 75,217 91.3-4- lb.? .5S, ,.3,,>4 1,1S.1Tg472 24.0 16.." 1
Okilsho 1.55 10.11'" .70 7.90t 935,s 1 23b. .-. 1.U, 7-,1 1.93-.9?23 ,.6 20.48 a
lemas 4.34 27.927 2 2- 22.51 241.,. 13 0.2 2.0 14.917.0(X9 ,.10;.201 Z4.1 2D.27 2
uo0'1.11INI r.4.Q 1,,9t2 1.17 127.5:-- 1C -10 21.1 1.1. 2.u,7, 58 3. 91,857 2t.7 21.00 2
Inntai& .3t- .:473 .1; 13.:'7S .7':! 49.b .13 31-.'04 395,15 2A.6 23.52 2
iho .3 2 1.. l4' 1-.15 7 i9.33 ?27.9 .12 295.a 17 390.';r 32.9 19.39 2
iryialaj .13 1.i88 'jl 1,yui l?.-i cS.0 .09 2?3.', 30g.5i 37.0 22.55 2
Oolor-do .I. ..-.1 '. -... 9. i 2 37 573.191 1.111.072 2. 20.75 2
e.e A iCo .17 ,109 .5 ..;'' ).4, :" I.5 .,, 11.',907 i 204.0c4 2 1.39 1
Aro.25F 1. .12 -T 14. '! I. .1 2785.35 319.-44- 14.7 21.93
*.rlseB .25 1. ? 4 .. ; k.,.4 19 7 .19 450.9g3 517.7146 2b.7 20.142 2
..va.. .06 393 .0.3 t T 57 1 .7 .03 ;2.808, .157 18.3 24.29 I
ACI-.Ic 9.34 1bO.082 3..0 ._ ; .03o 20.! o.95 lb.5'r4.744T 20,004.g32 20. 24.11 I 2
I ani ogtiD 1.,2 1O,07 1.0 .i...-4 13i,815 20.7 .98 2.31,184 2.80,7 M 23.0 20.3b 2
Oregon 1.31 ..7 7,: 9 93.020 2 1 ., 1 745 1,906,6902 29 20.15
Or. "I .71 43.14.8 4.57 .a'3 2.L03 19.2 5.35 12.749.056 15.217.164 194 25"66
AT- W E IJ j 3-05 19. 01 i~m 1.00o.j62 1.453-.918 12.5 l0.7b -5.b50.39 28,495.62 111.1 24.43


/ Dt for astioamnnalree which do not clearly iiicate that broakdou has ben msade an proper georaphi.oal busimi da ta f tar l m 1sla-Mte 6p--tuaa 1 tamo r "I
States. such M, rail*roads, stem boats, pipe lines. telephone and telegraph, and power cmpaule; the reports of copanloes hativ plast. In various States for hiL4
itlndI.Idual rortt w TabulatLon SoctloA folr unchlni and ttabulati. N A
54 C1NRA
; 0DIVISION 'OF REVI
KS., dCT.,193







11
CHAP" 2


PRA EMPLOYMENT CENSUS*


ULS. TOTALS BY INDUSTRY GROUPS

ESTABLISHMENTS, WEEKLY PAY, EMPLOYMENT- PAY ROLL CHANGES.

JUNE-OCTOBER, 1933
JUNE1 ARIRAGI
KIORT IN tS"13~NIT S aKLY INCOME PR WORtR PeACENIMSA I.CRtAS, JUNII- OCTO
nB eiY OF TOTAL 501,1.8 A It81440'78115 PAY R5Ck
t ,0 yO ) -) 9 ,I io 42 3* .,, S1; *9 7' 5 0 5 'p '
4 I I C. ., .. i .. T


1 l i *' r I S 1 T '!


NON-MANUFACTURING


A- AGRICULTURE m0 0r)
*-MIaN A QA ARR IOMG
a- Cami
a-ouri M MIH

C- CONSTRVTttON

-PUIBLIC UTIIUTIes



Bt-ome PUBLICu 41nLITIll
1-I04RSAUYRIt.0


C-DI3TR18UTION


W+ KTAK.
A a -"aot, 0RUSS. TiC,


DBb-alt GOOs. tc .


NC -ORl C[nIC
11C.O"Of1t gfEn


F- SERVICE
a1WM1I1mC4 80i81.StlTC.

lEOW~lt aS BwOE


*-FINANCE







1- FOODS

*-TEXTILES
b-APPAREL


b-PABRIcs

JI-PART. iMC60
m-PmPeR PROcUCTS


1_ PRINTIIGO-PUBISHIIG1 I


U-0-CHEMICALS
-RUmEIRe PRODUCTS
-UEATIHSER PRODUCTS


PEA CIA' Ql T'T
I 5 .0 .5i d



JI


I


I


]I


MANUFACTURINGCNON-DURABLE GOODS
5 20 so 0 c L5 A


$204100





724,.0.


MANUFACTURING,


3i8,Ci0

253,400

07 40O
273,500~


~1tI,


K-FOREST PRODUCTS 7,7" 0.3 l.

-51sTOE. CLAY, G8SS | 4,040 11,100
J1-I00 & STREL
I-R' I I T TL
a. "mlC I.'" O5 277,t00







b- oCNImER7 a 7 ,70. '*5 *c

-TRANkS. EQUIPMENT 1,o0 2 ____

0 5 10 '5 20 ..
IISf CfiTI?1 7'OTL 041,~S4
*OURCEI: NRA ANALYSIS (M.S.) OF TABULATION OF PSA P 0U0STt6 f0R0
RETURNS DECEMBER 1933, By BUREAU OF CEASUS P2ON OSTA T0 CENSS.
IN*CUDES ALSO 'UNCLASSIFIEOD' PAW' 544bC .i-N: '50 5675E5 511045
gill
99" `67 Of BARS PROPOIfMONAL To juhE 6imoO IE 1


.1 I 4 75




7S Is 11










As*


so


NRA
mUaIviioN oF RftevieW
kt.a, DEC, 193.

Bno SI6IO, o 4I7. eSP.


I,, 8 ... 1,4
lOt
~Ii ~JW


0 t0 6t


S9 73


as as
at 54














04 07
s *


** eJ













slo


T' o






is as
l T4




























ALL MANUFACTURING








I- FOODS




1- TEXTILES
Ca) APPEAR EL







(1 FABRICS, ETC.




XgrPAMn-TOBACCO PRODS


nr- PAPER PRODUCTS



V-PRINTING -PUBLI SHI MG




SIMf- CHEMICALS


fM-RUBBER PRODUCTS


IX-LEATHER PRODUCTS


n-FOREST PRODUCTS



X-STONE,CLAY, GLASS


fl-IRON STEEL
(a) 3TEEL MILLS



(b)OTHER IRON 4 STEEL


14
CHART 3



COMPARISON OF PRA RETURNS WITH BLS AND CENSUS'


ANALYSIS OF MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT, JUNE-OCTOBER. 1933


COVERAGE: EMPLOYMENT WEEKLY INCOME PERCENTAGE INCREASE, JUNE- OCTOBER
CENSUS 100 4 PER WORKER EMPLOYMENT PArROLL -.

I[^! _J ^", i -,. .. -** i.! ." ,, I --' .. ,- -*'., .. -

] I B .. AA.D
NON-DUPABLE GOODS


"I













































.1


DURABLE GOODS


fl-NON-FER, METALS ...... 'l_ ,,ln



/_ ^ -I/w **:*
h,-MAC.INERY.




Mr-TRANS. EQUIPMENT '! .. ... .



X-R.R.REAIR SHOPS Laa L l LL U


D 20 *b 3 0 5 0 ,5 20 25 31
E cS LOOtLL S E II T
*SOURCE: B.L.S, CENSUS REPORTS, NRA ANALYSIS M 5.) OF TABULATION OF PRA QUESTIONNAIRE
RETuRNSi DECEMBER 1933, BY BUREAU OF CENSUS.
INDUSTRY GROUPING' CENSUS-BL.S CLASSIFICATION OhlITMING 22L EXCEPT TOBACCO PRODUCTS
WiDTrm OF BARS PROPORTIONAL TO CENSUS JUNE EMPLOYMENT.
**CENSUS WEEKLY INCOME IS YEARLY AdERAGE COJEPING WAGES AND SALARIES, BLS COVERS AOAGES ONLY
***PRA COVERAGE FOR U iS 0 6% N 4* GROUPS 17-V COMBINED IN B Lb

9854


It


.

0 5 10 1i 520 25 30 35
PER CENT


NRA
DIVISION OF REVIEW
PAS DEC. i935


SfT.!r.c- SEC.O.,NO 482, &O ..


j 1 -, .





AC C5
* ;*. *. !-'/:. ",









4c i :

7 2 5C
5.-,




IJ.C 0
+ ( SO

i.,Z41



0 020












19. a o
14 S40B



1.470
,1'0
I.I0
239


.B5"














2 ,2 ,("
&Do
5'.10






32 'a So


100
T, N O
I. .40

*,530
J 80d
1,310

.ro




500
hIO

4,A 70




9 PIG
3.090
3.610

1 .0 J






'.0
g.o
30(i


L, I I I,,,





CHART 4


SEASONAL TREND


OF MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT


SELECTED


CENSUS YEARS


UNIT. 1,000,000 WAGE EARNERS


SOURCE: CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES, 1931 ,PAGE 45; ROTOPRINT RELEASE MARCH 27, 1935.


NRA
DIVISION OF REVIEW
M.S., DEC., 1935
STATISTICS SECTION No. 553 tPI-


9854







increases are:

l5:. r o ,".' r t Payr lI 1
All Industry 5. 18.5
ITon-I:.'nufiac tari ng 12.7 5.3,
lvianu factur,.-, 18.6 I S.46

In mnianuifactaring industries aroer, a comparison of PRA and

Census reveals a market difference in cc .pliar.co. The June-October

change in employment is s.ialler by Census, for every industry group

(except Tobacco), as seen in Chart 5. For Al1 Industries the change is:

Census, 14.36; PRA, 1384,; BLS, 181 9

Census does not re r'crt monthly payrolls, hence only conjrison of PRA

with BLS is opssible. Th3 June-October c.wroll. chan, is:

PRA, 22.3%; BLS, 25.8,1

The greater degree of compliance shown by the industries in the BLS

sample appear highly significant. It emphasizes the need for indepen-

dent checking of the current employment-payroll movements indicated by

the BLS sample.

Employment- 'Yroll v.-rirti-n3 b' si.-e :f .t'-blishient. A

special supplementar-r three fold tabulation summarized the returns, by

establishment size groups, for 80 of the principal industries out of the

primary 167. These sunmnaries were mad& for each of the three selected

states; for Boston; and for a composite of the five Ohio cities of more

than 250,000 population. The establishment groups were ordered in the

following interval classes, namely, establishments for which the average

number of employees was:

0, 1-5, 6-20, 21-50, 51-100, 101-500, 501-1000, 1001--2500, over 2500.


9854


-16-




-17 & 18-


The range of size of establi",`:.i .,-t T -eos it sCo'.what difficult to follow

the variation patternn by ordinary ^ra.'iical pr 'el.tation. The size

patterns may be presented in a si ,i ficant forI by .ljuItim the data tO

"equal-ratio" size intervals:

0, 1-2, 2-4, 4-3, 8-16, 16-32, J-64,....

The anal.',sis by number of .2. .o':..s reveals clearly the

marked preponde:'-ence of small ent-r:,r.lses aon;r the establishments ro-

prti-i. in an all-industry census. Some 60' of all establishments in

the three selected states had five or less employees. On the other hand,

only about 85 of thle emilo.ojent and. payroll is concerned with the size

group 5 or less emplo o.c. The analysis t.irew mo.t interesting. light on

the rrmot question of whether tie "little" or "bi2'0 entero)rise fared

better under PRA and codes. The tiree-state saml].e shows clearly that,

as rcards the er..ploymont-payroll increase under PRA, the "little fellow"

complied to about the same degree as the "big fellow". A similar

analysis by size groups of the 1935 Census data, w'hen they become avail-

able, should show by changes in t*ie distribution patterns of Cart 15

what effects may be ascribed to the codes and t..eir passing in 1935.

Among other interesting, results of the analysis a.re the char-

acteristic p-.tterns of variation of -ci/ pay by size of establishment

for different states. These characteristic o.-.,tterns apopar also in Census

data Df different periods (1929,1931,1933) for each state, as slown in

Charts 17-I to 17-VII. Presumably similar c .aracteristica patterns would be

found for larger regions and. f-r "-tDi r in'i.a.tr.7 :rous.This is vmon ] several


9854






-19-


other interesting; problems su,_, .*.sted by this :-izClysic for future research.

Ecc^'ro.iic i jiic 2i tion3 Co PRA clo,*mmnt increase. The theory of
'I-RA re." ir' ,i._, re rn !lonent i lies -. l;u tentss and ca nmges in sundry

oxonomric factors in the fields of fn.1-ince, prices and production. In

some criti(u3s of `-A theory a -r'c .i )rofi was advannced that these

factors would )r.cvent any emplo-. ,o.it increase. it is of interest accord-

in.ly to consider the changes in man-hours andl heurs por '-iee-.:, two of the

variables directlyT influ.iincd by P1A employment increases, for which some

statistical data -.re available. At the request of BSA, BLS and Census

made an an lysiss of t..e -ian-hour returns of 35 Census manufacturing

industries in 1933. Tiese cover some 1,600,000 workers (out of 6,000,000

in All '.ian1iacturing). The analysis of the-c3 returns show t-ie interesting

trcnd of man-hours by months during 1933, shown in Chart 18. The general

contour of this trend agrees with the stee) rise in production noted in

current indexes for May and June and thie decline after August. If the

man-hour trend is assumed to be adequately representative of All

manufacturing, it :-ir.j be rriated tc the trend of wane earners by months.

From this may be derived tLie corres..'.idirig trend in hours )er week. The

trend of vieelk:ly hours can be estimated for the 35 industries orooer by

dividing tle man-hours er v-.je earner given for each month by an assumed

number of working weeks in eac i month. (see Table VII). The latter trend

is shown on Chart 18. A clear indication is given of the increase in

emplo.ynent, for an assumed trend in output, that :.isey be effectuated by a

decrease in average vwekly hours.


9854









to


TREND OF EMPLOYMENT, 1929-1935


B.L.S. MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES*

MONTHLY INDEXES. AVERAGE. 1929 100


C.OMPO t


am-URAIl" G4OODS
D.URAN" 400005

DUMAMUI tOOMS


*SX IM. rlt N. *1, H.o mW Ow LAIEkT, C. %4, WC. -I&
0* wtirW DAgS *A OTICNMU 1 Ce L c rANUFAC1TUCS,JUIMI A.OatisW4, ,ES*.


NRA
lVIlmC or 3 rWvW
%Ml,(. -
SA9n~bK ew l f.





-21-


UI. .7 tt i1 .d I' -].. I." o ) .

In this .art some e.:o'--.-i.'.n in detail will be given of the

summer: of the nnailysis results y.resontod abovo. In Section I the

reliability of the PRA Census will be discussed. In Section II the

dist-ibution of employment will be t'ikc.n up by industries and regions.

In SBction ILL the variations in pay and PRA changes will be considered

by iniustry Lroups. The variations of employment anC -ayroll changes

by size of establishment in the s-rPole studies '-ill be considered in

Section IV. In Section V some further consideration "ill be given to

the economic implications of tae PEA emplcyment increases. Finally, some

fruitful -1furthicr work that mihLt be done on the PEA data is noted in

Section VI.

Section I Reliability of PA Census

The validity of the PPA Corsus results is fairly well established

by chock coT.roarison with BLS and Census, in so far as the data are com-

parable in character and scope.

Comparable results for manufacturing industries, Chart 3. This

chart shows the principal comparable elements in Census, PEA and BLS. Column

1 shows the employment coverage of BLS and PEA, June 1933, using the com-

parison base, Census = 100. The data are given in Tables II, IV and VI.

Column.2 gives the weekly income per worker, while columns 3 and 4 shovr

the Junie-October employment changes by each Census. The supporting data

are given in Tables noted, also in V-A and V-B.


9854










22
TABLE 39

SOF "IA OaMi IT r010 MruA U j/
OWDa rIm Of IJWbrUA# lot1&UIll- net 1.580481 SqAMi t. Jew. October 1933


L. 16144
II. fotusea



YLW1. >rtmI La


VMS~ i ivew m"ot





UII. laixt tlmoate
Z. steme. r, aLa>
a. Zio~tal
Ln. imfmus Msbls
JUL asthiBUT

UT. Wmaspet. Upapmat,
Lv. Z U. Iu t Ibeaps


4O."
19,266

2.697

193.s




3.26"


12.295
4.5a
5,133

4.919
9.713
1,51
1,901


T3+.1~43
1.56.272
921,103


333.617



ai, ,3
402.169
5M167
305.103




k193.92D

197.456
604.130


625.303

3"5.908
A4.312


916,03

1.707.479
zle,61q
UW,261

407.T76
140,671
321.461


572.362
216,032
729,329
257.003

770.713
363,2S0
26T7,765


2oW4Piumbl#
17,325
12.o*1

1.184




38
2,205


Durabl*-!
7,636
73,695
3.900
4,220

3.631
7.086
1.24+9
16


'62o.642
1,234,465,
155.oi4

316.637
293,285

67.093
233.5&5


335,096
161,o74

533,033
183,467
476,614

251.435

1.353


777.733
1,355,366

165.194
355.610
354.543
80,1408






405.069
195.118
691.1a
226,245
6<*,oo4

295,331
1.407


4.4
4.0

7.5
0.1
2.9
11.6

- 16.7


{Isereel' M ia J ls. (Mo.S.) of M OensuA resultf .; Csus of Maufactuwre Wage al.q OMploymeut estimated as by Table Y-A
Sf I oefO Ot Octob cotera o Sptmber covrae is 1d ,o t.o tifferen.c In thuarater between tib establlsheunti reporting under PR and the regular Oefta of
aIntitaMre.. So letter sw a m s1Mlncrase in mployant between Jsw and October %tan 'PA or B.L.S. See TablSI or Chart 3
so .4"5N3b X01Goup in the DursaL of Labor statistics Clssificatlon lnctodes also Tobacco Vauufactures..
To foesro m ith wa I. L.I-. uraile aOup IT?, Micsllaneous. mnut be excluad.


ViUlM *f MyIt
illU
beet, 135
9854







23
TABLE y-A
Z8juaA TOTAL InW u 07 NA faa en,
oi* M.. October, 1933


TotWl mnafuotarlki



1, rooas
1I. 701t;10














1. $tome, clay. $less
U. I w steel
ZI1. LRuutlorrt Astwluc




III. ?odimareon ?]t
a1. 111CaZsm


UXT. Tfattport. Zquipvact
91. 16 3. Bq..r Shops


ML. wialoIlanso"u




Tobaec. M'fctlx* !y


Steel Mills al


--- -- SIM __ Id i m ___ _. __
- ---_ ufluti -nfiatffnl -jui~ __
Sept. Ot0. I Per Ceot Juno Sep I .utesAed
Rollo Out
(L; (-)i I1' ID) l5) (bl

6,70.1127 6,6s3,7 98,W7 5.910.49 6.99,527 6,W.9aM


6 9. t *E i V
311.523 1 76,i1(4 93.263 63a.14691 Iq82.066 813.311


1.567.916

217.645

251.328
378.054

26.1752
zu.817


1,552.829
aT.940
256.B51

386.8514

123.936
253.1i


506.341 504.3l4

197..,13 193.083
C5.926 652.036
216.6a 220.530
603,646 40,41-5

343.i5C I 13.397
252.89 250.05T


272.47$ 21d.W442


99.038
lOr. 1.35

101,.79
102.321


96.M2




99.605

97.710
99.091
101.7S9
310C.617

91.,ad
100,.478


102, 1a


74.605I 75.7?? 101)'X91

35.74 352125

352.7 352 15


18T.060

256.96
323.144
101.3614

M5.247


Terlag

l" -- enn-y (


902.474 W.



90.144 97.675


, i, 1.637.31? i 1 ,621.563 2,.070


22.971
271.452

35M.605

127.335
306.611


Dazai-bi 2
457.677 53631

176.275 202.493

541.057 669,065
18c.633 223,31
510,.86 633,692
317.5"2 353.. 4

2M1.316 252.gi9


256.3l4ll 293,2S5


87,338


2g1.g20


352.974


223.272

276.553
*397.6cl
125.100

300.575




534.238
197.56


227?A9


322.097
2 '5.09T


2k.239
137.275
79.404

14.8T4
19.951




36.417

19.273
63.376

27.819
115.0414

3.59C
13.256


61,678
*.123

136.69

79.025
114.803

19.056




36.2143

-9.181
63.073

27.16
114.1495

18,4o9
1P.954


299.713 32.912 32,755


93.78 3.465


352.125 2124.474


,24.357


L~*~ -I __________ ____


*0.079



102.743


25.375
I143.700
63.125
15.571
20,86




38.124
20.176


29154
120.1435

40o.398
13.66s


U54.1(43
1.596.27
211,16T
393.61?

402 ,1
18,167








m,iB
305.103






197.149
W+1.130

20A.39







29.099




90.76


25,621 306.177


11- SmICA: Canic.1 Bada rat'ad W,. 1933 Rotoprint Bt-e,. Jen. 23, 9ar L 7.1935
J- E9 ;on-Durablc Qroup = the luos. of LobOr Statistics ciassiflcatn niuclua also Tobacco iw'fotfe treg.
51- To correspord with 1o B.L.13 urh. .ble aroup. Ml. Miz aeou., anst be excluded
- inchdge tbu Comuu. taasutrieu Cigar,. Cmere.; es, Tobasco Produlct.
- Include the Cae"a -ttIse Blaet furnace&, steel lorkB.
51- u e.tlo.t, of alarled ewolaoie.a for Ju.e mad Dctober Is m ade azet Ing 1/3 of th. incre.me shown for wW answers for tbh ame =onthl. IV te Stind zd (aMe)
Schie.se, tie naubr of w'o tw-ners wer: Ju a, 5,723.,94; October 6.623.1S7: acreage for the year, 5,806,"6. jAcor6oglr. the Jum. an October esttmtes
for salaried wupL;y'es wore obtAled by nltipl Ing the yearly average value gven by the Census by the factors:

Juno factor = 4 () 9

October factor = ( ,1 6" '1-i -1.01l6 eol


II~S~E of Review
December, 1935
9&54


Jbme OOtohin

(II) 4 CI) (6) C9)

(U


96.o0

5Z.3279






*7e,614e







eZL8032
729-329
3T.o.671

3.4617



334.16?
S21.362

729.359
257.003


363.250

26I.769


337.16T




.97,1409


377.7146











TABLE 7-B
OOIUPTA2l 1eO OF A7EVA3 IBCO. PME IOCXB
1MUSTR YGHWUPS, 933 ClUES CF RAM.UACTURhI I3/


Yearly Averceu Bployment Yearly Asverae Payroal Income Par Vorer
Mniti U1.000

Salaried Vage Total sSalarie Waes Total Tearlj W weekly
iplojees Zarnars Eployees S 1 Payroll (61/03 (7).._
52
M- -mw ---(5T (a)


Al Groups / $6,733.769 86,530,250 $ 969.50 15.605
I. Food 95,l)l 666,237 74,3a1 151,271 620,55r 771.823 1,009.70 19.42
II. Textiles I2L070 1.474.2-3 i.,'5 .ig 16ME 1.017. I1 l.la.. Al.:-_ 269
(a) Apparel 3/ 32.,94 462,857, 495,751 4,g084 322.913 3T1.597 750.20 IV.23
(b) Fabrics, etc. 49,176 L,01i,469 1,O,60,4, 97,01 694,.48 752,289 737.60 14.18
ZVI. (part) lobacco Prod. 3.465 87.325 90,790 8,412 50.933 59.345 653-70 12.57
IV. Paper Producta -14,239 196,.390 2X0, .19 46,195 172,g521 219,037 992.80 19.09
V. Printing, PdallasOlg 137.275 254,106 401,3E1 226,805 355.625 512,430 1451.10 27.91
VI. CbeLncale 79,404 347,933 427.337 147,539 365,420 513.259 1,201.10 23.10
Vii. (part) Petroleum Beflning 9,815 69.0o4 78,562 21,567 59.793 111,360 1,412.10 27.61
fIll. Rubber Products 14,74 o106,293 121,157 26,323 99,117 125,41|0 1,035.40 19.91
21. Leather Products 19,951 22,0CW0 301.951 31,584 222,457 254,071 841.40 16.1.


III. Joret Procruote 36,1417 454.1i "06,M 52,585 289,097 341,982 697.10 13.41
1. Stone, Clay, Glass 19,273 1,3.,'- 192.273 33.676 14.,142 175,518 914.40 17.58
L1. Iron and Steel 6.7 37 j.109 617.48l4 41.z17 i00.i7j 612.2q6 l..n OM.0
(a) Steel Mlle 3/ 214,474 289,945 313.419 47,50b 270,367 317.573 1,014.20 19.50
(b) OUther Iron a Steel 35,90? 265,163 304,065 4,411 230,012 294.423 96&.30 15.62
III. lonlerroue Metals 27,549 188,271 216,120 46,co001 166,722 212,723 984.30 18.93
XIII. Machinery 115,04'L4 535,593 653.637 193.779 501,770 695.549 1,04.10 o 2o.46
XIV. Transportation 38.590 307.37 345,53 69.430 319.316 359.746 1,123.70 2a.6.
XV. RaIlroad Repair Shape 13,056 241,875 254.931 27.729 284.145 312,179 i.224.60 23.55


yj Source: Cousus 1933, Rotoprtnt Release January 23, 1935, Long Schedule.
?J Exelnaes part of ZVI, Miscellaneous; and part of VII, Petraleum, Coal ProductB.
3] Apparel includes Census iens deal Ln" wetL Wearir.e Apparel and utnlshbiAnge, f#OS-211,213.215,223,224,2,228,2.239,243,245;
Blast Furnaces and BRolling M i.ll, Itm t1110.1112.


22.3.A.
Division of Review
lUS: FA
December. 1935
9854


Steel Mills ionldme








25
TABLE 7I
CoMparilon Dats for PRA Census

BLS MPLEU MU'nDjn. PFju ll. JIXU-CeC uLR 1.13 Li


legs larer Payroll weekly Isnilag
EsPOrTlHg _^______________ ________________________ _-_____ ---- -_______
IElahlaiBts lasez I5 es---'"--s
limber V/ 192)-25 = 100 Amour? L' I
1l MIR kF._er Oset er Cest
Per Cont Ilomber Jbe Oober June ctobbor ChMane S OcLoaber Ju.a October Crhane June October


An eaqe 100.0 17,952 2.02.7T11 3.358.960 66.9 79.6 18.9% 1 ,50 10.132 6,
sMA --


19'


I I I I


9.6b5 | "7.2 59.14 25.8% J 17.95 [18.M1


&. Fm za 1. 3.013 25?. 4U9 322.300 B9.7 ll'.9 19.Q 5.1B7.093 6.5,.g.6g5 73.5 91.1 17.2 2.55 20.26
n3 6 twumi/ 17. _m1 7za.jfal TmJB5_ 8a.L ^T. ^ 9.17 ..i 1.p^.M; 5i. 77.4 Ml.5 11,.04 i1.26
a. avpra 69 1.2" 14.16 5.2P2 B9.0 95. 7.1 ltbb.2X3 E.ftl' *T 7.7 ^. 1.0 71
t ra 1. 1.94 574,419 162.243 Ba.n 96.7 9.6 ,..-e.. C,:-r. b.5 .5 13.7 .

RmY. (part) Tobacco 1.3 237 53.025 55.6998 61.2 64.6 5.? 677,935 180.962 34.7 51.2 17.3 12.79 13.97
IT. owe ?nmat. 3.9 705 99.951 129.736)./ 1.W.55. 2. .85,Cl ?g 16.11 1B.39
) U.3 91.5 11.7 1 66.' 76.0 14.2
I. lrlatIB&aer lUbLsa 6.8 1.229 1fl.416 119.085) 3.193.732 %.1106.280) 28.66 28.62
Tl-ZU.Lmll>s A Ntroim 6.1 1.101 152.7m 1.1.,9 87.9 109.1 25.1 3.428.13? .015.109o 71.3 85.5 20.6 22. a.22T
YX- kflar l roedmw 0.9 153 S.,13 96I,36 69.3 68.7 26.6 1.85g. 2o 1,934.86 53.3 62.9 15.. 22.09 20.07
E. Lather roftat. 2.7 483 139.164 153.033 83 L 8.9 6.6 2.297.32 O 2.646.,b16 64.8 72.3 11.7 16.51 17.29

Vm~s
11. Ler.ot Proidamtl 8.6 1.541 126,789 167.364 112.7 55.2 29.8 1.6",403 :..5lll8 21.s 38.1 53.7 12.89 15.18
L. them. aLM. lauM 7.3 1.312 95.362 105.477 45.9 51.6 12.2 1.593.451 1.631.971 :-3.6 33.6 18.0 16.71 17.37
a. ie t I teel .6C 1..6 J .7T4 4,17.76 .7 6q.gs 2.n u.70. ag 7.9.7 9 %6. 417.6 U.4 17.97 1j.01
0. 3t1l E1lli 1. 205 199,580 254.363 5.,6 70.2 zs.6 3.657).l0 5.012.99 311.8 48.0 31.9 18.33 19.69
b. OthMr Irn A teMl 6.5 1,163 127.154 163.363 -9 1.9" 2.212,928 .,926,98e 19.7- 17.:0 17.91
SIX. lm-erfoia Mtal. 3.3 599 79.667 108,188 5.4. 7n.6 30.8 l.1i6,6o6 2.02,11n 10.0 53.8 33.5 17.71 1s.69
Mlt. ldmmLaaq 9.9 1.771 266,298 359.680 54.2 73.0 32-. 5.135.608 7.207.029 3.6 50.2 39.3 19.29 20.04
ZIT. tI qfrtatlam Squip. 2.3 .07 227.422 270.106 51.7 59.1 14.0 5.16b.260 5.697.293 .0.6 13.3 5.6 22.72 21.09
LT. RlU d Repair Shop. 5.0 999 86,965 96.065 4.4 55.0 13.3 2.004.t99 2.,.35.699 38.1 4S.9 26.1 23.05 25.35



Ij eremai 3. aied of plomeut. Jem. October. 1933: Bulletin #610.
j COerp l lidA s a few reporting eetablisbente not identl al in both J nd October.
3/ flnepelTmdA T re combined in Totals for separate grops were derived from data .tvun for ccopor.,nt BLB LcujtrtLe.
OcatAd -s ilted average based on BLB values for group total and obr sub-groump. weights ,ro.orLionaeL t reported etployseut.
Li S o ssma tmmrq between th adi msabers for the group and [or its cmpon-nts is due to separate adjuetoabt to Census.
U.J.'
iUvianm of Reviewl
einber, 1935.




- -6 ,-


It may be not-d th-it the ,.reement between the throe cInzvscs

is quite cloF,a, coisiderinrj tho ciffoe.-tco in character and coverna of

the Oata. Greeter increases arc '- ovn in the BLS sscrile for the 2PRA

period than ii the more com-nrehonsive PEA, Census samples.

Conno!arable results for all inv.strios, by states, ?'A and BLS. The

choc': co:.?erisons for -1ll industries, manufacturing and non-manufacturing

combined, arc shown for weekly income and for June-October chan-es, by

states in Cha.rts 6 and 7. The supporting data are given in Table III,

and in tI.; results by states in the BLS Trend of Employment for June-

October, 1SD3. The totals by states in Table III are taken directly from

tne sumnma-:y supplied by the Census. There are t.li~ht discrepancies bet-ccn

these and the totals given in Table II which were computed separately from

the di-ta sL:?-plied by Census for tha primary industries.

Weekly income per worker, all industries, Chart 6. For BLS the in-

come figures apply primarily to factory wages. Fcr PRA the figures represent

the average *"aJes and salaries, manufacturing, distribution, service and

the professionals being about equally represented,

In the F ranh of Chart 6 BLS and PRA values are shown as suoer-

posed bars coinciding in width. A black bar terminated by a white tip

shows that PA exceeds BLS. A white bar is terminated by a black tip

when 3LS exceeds PlA. The tip bar represents the difference between the

two values.

The ,idth of the bars is proportional to the population of the

state represented. The average for the United States is computed by


9854







27

CH9AWU *

cwc or BL& N R AD"A. Wai or lOm1, P Iw,0iLi JUNE OCTnW 19S

WEEKLY INCOME ut WORKER


S.& l.C Sm WAGC ES1 --
st" S3mw WAGWS a UALA"It ..


JUNE
IL.I Sa.W 42 r4 F~r 4 0" 000 WU
P. RA 31"W M S 060 Frna l0 000 Wskn


OCTOBER

8.LS 5 61 *Sm Fr.i- 4-a gooe t
P ftA ; > *300 Tu 1 W 400 lkr


1--A

N.. .km/




to I- co"




Om








nmml




ain Afilfm
C lml,



Or, Id Clubd






moT.
M~ln v qpi









01w~
.M..




HI*
WM"
Naa
raft-



oIwoI
CA"1ml


S 5 10
--to. W4th.4 oI ,N I4UlVM ""Intim of Sta


5 20 25 Dowb


N. R.A.
SDi of i ad .w..
W& LIV | 16|U c.,A,


-I.


JIJN[
IkL Slilm IZN4r m 414S000
RIIIJ qmll l143080F;tll iOiMllO00


11111011





- 3 -


woi11ti c the values for t.he !r.co'ate states, usinj the PRA employmcnit

valur-s for 'ctober 1933, as weiL.itz. (T lattol 'uros wore the o.'-ly

data on all-iJrstry employment available in kiorch 19-., 'hen this -art

of the analysis was done). The split in the uars for the total United

States values indicates that it is not possible to present the full

width proportional to the total population.

The excess of the average PRA income value over the BLS value

indicates the reliability of PRA and BLS as samples. That each gives

a valid reo7resentation of wage-salary conditions in general is shown

by the similarity of the ratios of "3LS wages" to "PPA wages and

salaries" and the corresponding ratios of "wa'es" to "wages and sal-

aries" in. the Cenisuses of Lianufactures of 1927 and 1922, Iresented

at the bottom of Chart 6.

All-industiry e mlo;frat ch os:tes, b:, -tat:s, 'hart 7. The changes

during the '-.A period presented in Chart 7 show wider variations between

corespon.ding BLS and the PTA measures than those found for weekly income,

Chart 6. This is due presumably to the meager coverage of BLS for many

states. The agreement for the United States average, shown by the bottom

bars, is foir]%, close.

T'-e-c BLS change in employment and payrolls is computed as a

month-to-month ratio for the returns of identicalfirms, coverage vary-

ing slightly each month. The change over the 4-month span is comnTout-

ed by chainiwn the monthly ratio links. For PEA the June-October chn; e

is given directly, for identical firms.


9854










29
CHART 7
.ecn o, 5 L3 O Pit R A Um"f or [IPivvAT A*o W,*Ls JUN(- OCTOSCR 1053


PER CENT CHANGE


June to Ocf ober


SL 1 S- Q PA 1014V Ct JTCIWNr-WAGCS -
PPA F A C t f 1 or0 cc 1 M1 tO Cf Eu.L GtlP..4 T-W S *Pu l: 3A


EMPLOYMENT CHANGE


PAYROLLS CHANCE


0 0 <* 2 0
.t'. *.l*l f l, C ,B. *'*.


wft m P K RA Sti lrw,-" 1 ., C- M,
9654


;1 4IS 20 25


k=_ .-.^ 3J


N. R.A.
D"'^'" "^"^ ^c.w.w.




-':C0-


L2T -' 'if.c'eren .e :, i: tn. ::o--.'t of ,'.i'- e by PRA i B.' 3LS for

individj.C l states inoic-tes t:'e "r"',d difference in type of cov '.,' ,.o

These (iL.' rc'c1,es rna, be takec i., random .'nli-."; variations. The

weiLighted ?"A avra' fL .-rloymct exceeds BLS slightly, 16.2 vs.

16.0 c-" cent. 3ut for payroll, LLS excoo2Ls PPA, 31.2 vs. 20.2 per

cent. 'is ._ .llcr chal'n e sl- ',n ,; PRA may be due to its wage-salary

cornmpositic.i, office payroll)., Trosvu.ibly snowing a s:rallcr increase than

wajocs.

-clatl' oef PRA c:'-aroes to sn.ao,.1. fluctuations, Charts 4 anc 3.5

The season.l '_'iin. of rny i.,-,strios is upward during the summer months.

Tne -'i. s. i-, ..o..v'v", uito independent. This ,s clearly shown

for .-. ct.rin, i. ,.'utrLos C,.ring several cen' -s years in Chart 4,

Table VII. 'T!. s'.', ccGiclusioV'. is im.icated by the trends of the several

BLS m-p. ...ct'... -o., an'-.,st.': r'uoc. chiown in Chart 5.

S.-ct-io. II DiEtributo.ion of Thnloymcnint by Industries and Re;;ions

The Cistributions of c-n.ployment by industries and regions 4iven

belo'. :civc from tn-.:' tobuilatio,, cl the 643,000 us-able PRA returns. -The

distributi,?.>"s ;; iva rF.ro. n.tiv.' picture of the employment variations

by inLustr,,- ?nm region. f:is is shovrn by the comparisons with corres-

pondin.. -.str'ib-Atir-ns .-iv--n by,- BLS, anid the Census of Manufactures and

Occur2tions az shovn iri TablDs I, II and IV.

Distribution by, industries, '.Charts 8 and 9. The distributions of

establishr.'-nts, ormploynmc:nt anim. -oayrolls are each shown by a vertical

bar -e.o-"-E.,tinA 100 C. The -)roper portion of each bar is allocated to


9854





31
TABLE VII




Average Hours per Month and per 'eek I/

35 Manufacturing Industries, 1933


J F M


165


159 165


26 23 27


S8.1 41.5 36.7


A M J


J A S


U -~


169 187 195


25 27 26


40.6


41,6 45.0


182 171 155


25 27 25


43.7 38.0 37.2


0 N D


151 148 140


26 26 25


34.8


34.2 33.6


t
2/ Monthly Labor Review, October 1935, Table 5. In computing the working
days, a six day week was assumed. The assumption was made also that no
work was done on the following days: January I; February 22; July 4,
Labor Day, and December 25. The number of weeks in the month was
computed as the quotient of the number of working days divided by six.



Seasonal Trend of Manufacturing Employment

Selected Census Years 3/
Unit: 1000 Employees


8125 8231 8343

8493 8678 8835

6583 6697 6798

5015 5077 4932


8324


8260 8230


8903 8898 8912


6802

5087


6730 6573

5351 5724


8255 8405 8612


8956 9094


6469

6095


9189


6513 6566


6519


6703


8674


8622 8532


9086 8681 8341

6386 6151 6008

6623 6354 6203


2/ Biennial Census of Manufactures, 1931, page 1177; Rotoprint Release
March 1927-1935.

9854


IMflthiy
ours


by.

Weekly
Bear


Yearly
Average


165.1


8384

8839

6523

5807












TABLE 2nr

THEM OF U uAT'- UROIG aIpLOfltaT, 1929 1935 j

BLS IIDIUSTRUIES, ONiTHI.Y INDEXES, 1929 100


0en0su PYe
yearly
IlDSTRI GLaoS Aierae e 1I:
1923-25 100

..0-..:-i2hLF. *Xl,6'L 10).1


I. Foods

II. a.jpparel

II. b.lebrlce

XV. (pcrt) lobacco

IT-V. Fapor-Prlntlng

VI- II. Chemical e-Petroleuc

VIII. Rubber

IX. Leather


DDRBLZB GOODS
DOWI O0003


III. Porect Product.,

X. Stone, clay. Olives

XI. Iron & Steel
XII. Nonu-ferrous etals

XIII. Machinery

XIV. 2runsportation Zqulp.

XT. Railroad Rpepair Shop


1929

Mar. Jun. Sep. Dec.

9.- 91 ikv, 0


90 96 120

104o 100 102

101 101 100

103 100 i0I

98 99 102

ioi 14 103

105 106 100

98 95 107


1930 1931

Mar. Jun. Sep. Dec. Mar. Jun. Sep. Dec.


1932 1933 1934 193,5
S.. Jun. Sop. Dec. Jao. Jun. Sep. Dec. Mar. Jun. Sep..Dec. Mar. Tei. Sop. Dec.


;7 63 76


95 118

91 914

S8 82

95 94
97 94

91 93

82 73
91 92


88 82

85 94
82 814

91 89

93 89
90 814

69 66

so 89


100 103 103 92 90 86 78 72


97 102 105

97 10o4 104

99 101 102


96 103. 106

110 105 10C

100 99 99


85 102

86 91

82 81

86 s6

86 84

81 s0

69 66

85 89


70 67 62 58


54 49 46 46


87 83 74 67

88 92 84 76

95 90 81 76


91 8k 79 72

85 83 71 66

:>3 91 86 84


70 ? =, : d4 ,


68 S0 109

76 79 85
71. 89 99

63 73 74

72 74 84

74' 76 92

54 62 80o

81 84 92


42 49 61 59


S7 103

79 88

500 93

69 70
86 97

93 96

72 73
CIL 9o


65 6g 62 62 68 67 69 73


36 45 57 52 50 52 51

39 49 57 52 55 61 57
146 55 69 65 68 74 64

46 52 66 63 67 68 66

37 43 56 57 61 64 62
43 50 62 59 90 92 71

6p 58 67 65 68 73 68


60 60

60 59

73 75

78 83

72 74

73 100
64 6S


FL: IH IiJI VAUiO'i lOlC'l-;Ai.r.UTAC'Illl; lh.';,J;; ]hI)

1929 = 100o

1933
J .


welehtI


Anthrulte oI1 .J
O 1tr ot.mie.. t L I 8 1

Q Mik tL.IJ.1ia let, *-'1i,
U illlHer'.an P I1
^Ufirri & ri~r-. 3 17 J.1
Crude Nt.roLeuo. 2 50 ;L "
&.~b U- z UI kk Lm
gl~k_Bil~il~i 1 11
relprl.aoe a 9eLa,.rarb 9 41u 10
PotWur t Light 71? 8P

WIleniol 70 A. I7
Re all *711 lj *)3

11 Soarce: 31l.. Bulletln fi.1O, rp.?7-89., Trend of .loy.me.. Juon-October. 193,., Docmor 1934., p. 14.. r.ploym.net .. P,4rolls. D -comber 1j, p1 9. 2, 0ut.. "he BIS iL.,IrY,. Inr ._,-lm, .'.. i heia tera olj,:',. so I I 1':!L
Ceoari. they ajre ubjtl to revisiton ritur the adJum.'LnL to Mro 1)3, Onmm r.ill hove been mclo.
I' Gr.up lr.io:xp computed so sel'd.ld aver.-eo nf crupr,...,,uts.

:*J.P.&.
Ltutltlln of BRlelm
iY5:jsla
Dc1 : JT B
Decemmor. 1335


hi' 1 i.,UrS






33
TABLE 3X
PBA QiL3US Jvlu, Cwwaa, 193
DUlmIUTlOY ST M1IO811 OQRT1 O0 .STABLI.M TS

UWKMW 8ean 01 TOTAL


Lw. 7 8at.No. WCet. South U .t So. Vas o. 2 nwatain Paclfic "All ToWl
f~lmoa* AtlxittI ontral e ,tral Atlantlic Cotra! Central 1:12. 11---i
-'ust'r G"x i n.' ILL [I7. -. 1, VII. Till_._ 1"-,-. *. _r-
'.. rp t Pp.r w..t Peg CTer Per 1.' Ce ^e. Per 4^.L JTer C.. t or "

4AU qUSttu 28. ; 24.9l 21.42 11.23 7.95 3.99 7.39 2.4a 9.34 3.05 63,066

__ AUUWUO7aMR2 8.47 23.52 21.23 11.69 8.02 24.08 7.62 2.61 9.40 3.16 551,752

A. Ag1eo3.1axe (minor) 11.44 26.:L4 19.75 9.224 5.48 2.58 4.64 3.46 13.11 4.16 4.308
S* main wa r ^ yingi
1. Coal 28.77 'l.M 7-90 15.91 10.32 1.92 6.93 0.96 6.71 1
1I. OtBhe l4taIoral 3.87 18.52 A.So 8.98 4.36 2.89 1. 14 5.26 11.1 6 ii s62
3. Ctntractioi Y2.24 28.97 21.34 9.13 7-.60 2.90 4..31 1.90 9.02 2.39 17.737
N. 1io Mtil.ti a
I. Taporttrtla,etc. 6.78 18.61 21.15 14.29 5.64 3.98 12.11 2.21 9.40 5-83 11.79
11. CLI.rr p.blItz
u'.. .:.. 5.72 14.43 19.52 13-79 10.67 3.79 12.65 3.65 7.64 8.84 7.125
. DistrWutioi
I. WBoleal, 1.3O 2.0o4 20.09 10.05 7.76 3.69 7.64 2.18 9-59 3-.6 50.336
II- Bet&.1 |
(W loois. Dru2 etz. 10.10 23.69 22.g5 1i0.96 s.4 4.07 6.77 -'.3 7.:C 3.13 114.377
;tl Dr, ood, *to. .-08 21.8 | 20.07 12.29 10.35 5.33 8.35 )." 6.99 2.62 55.180
N Oter rtli 8.53 ?1.S6 I 22.12 | 12.93 7.80 3.97 9.14 2.89 8.95 3.01 12,7318
P. Serlce I
1. wuetitc,S Xto24c.- .C.17 2 Z.5C 19.85 11.09 7.39 3.80 8.02 2.58 1.46 3.14 71.099
II. Othor Service 7.10 23.95 21.12 11.61 7.07 3.32 7.23 2.27 13-26 3.04 52,1209
C. r eare 7.19 25.39 20. 48 i2.96 S.2 8 4.2 8.07 2.49 9.89 2.63 40,479

R. .U2 iN. 10.34 396 2 5 6.2 5.17 4.56 1.29 9.01 2.35 37.298


1. Foods 6.2o 19.554 I .31 .2.42 9.30 4.4o 7.n1 2.S0 o0.-0 3.52 17.25;
iM. 2er1ilee
(a) ipprel 7-.83 62.5 1;0.6 .37' -*.4, .6g 1.16 5.97 0.88 6.654
(b) Other tex..lee 15.36 9o.3, .9) 3.56 11.34 2.14 1.37 0.22 4.55 1.41 5.387
II:. Yo-ect Products 13.4, 1.25 20.41 5-.48 12.74 7.09 6.57 1.21 15.63 3-21 7.698
7. Per Products 17.34 '3170 ;-63 U-.9 *0.64 0.85 6.19 1.50 1.874
V. Prietl~r,-t2ublishti 7. !U 25-43 23.59 '13.2 o.73 .1g 6.12 2.4,3 9.42 1.99 .4,61C
VI -Vi. Chemical 7 16 2.7 22.29 7.35 7.339 3.1 7.35 0.14 8.98 3.58 5,168
1111. Rubber rrodct- c 21.13 26.2 34.o2 4.89 0.52 11.60 1.55 388
Ii. S~ter 'roducto 3.o: 36 5.5 | 5.26 2.13 0.45 0.35 4.15 0.64 2,205
X. Ston, Clr,. oleos C.62 yC.4g 25.58 7.59 7.41 3.19 3.69 1.05 8.77 3.62 3.980
XS. T ron nd Stol
(a) Steol ..Ills t 33..7 k.. ?.92 5.0& 2.82 1.21 b.05 1 1496
F() C.Ion& Stel 13.27 ..53 .-. 4 9.7 1.42 1.93 1.21 9.53 1.26 3. 72P4
XI2. Son-ferrmus aiste 15.GI 32.83 29. 10 5.73 1.35 i.1.0, 1.7 o.49 9.09 2.23 3,631
ill1. Machinery 90.64 97.32 ;-95 7.17 3.51 )..7 3.33 0.88 9.40 2.13 7,086
xIV. Brzna... Eao~ipmant 9.37 ).1'-, 35227 4.8 2 3.68 0.40 1.52 0.56 10.49 3.12 12249
XV. L.. Repair 5.4p ..00 50.00
.__ f' 1. Jlr-e IM- ....__ ij... '-.^ :?..^_L ";_!_ _' *.*''_ _*-*" __ _+ _-L__ **1, *+, *4

7.I- ,:. .. L-' .. -7 7-
J Son=,,: g'.eclel tao.etlc n for )1?A of PkA quetlanalre rettus oy Suree ot Coons,, Dacember 1j33. Maoloyment aol Payroll data are for the oes of
J .;o -7 ned October !4, 1933.
2 -/ 'All (tl .rz covers note ;'r qzesticsatlres w,ich do not elearl- y io+oe tiA. a trh-a..-on .i.. beon elie or. a pro er guo?>' raica hbasir; data for elab-
lislhenta eperatina tn to or more States, .uch a-, rr.1Iroas3, steam boat, ;ipe fiies, telephone and telo"r.,h a n po'er oocenies; the reports
o0 comf les ha7ig poazntse in vorloios Staoes for *.ica S.adtv l il r'yorts 0rex not submitted hut for rich a master re-.ort ae amp filed ; neA
data fr-. returns receive, f+r a stets after the Stata xaL 42eeu u.eat ti the -.bal.atioz Sec,'n 3for aonchl'. and tabutlati.
i.H. A.
E ..en. .of Devieo
Ill: |
9scefa..er, 19.5
9854











34
TABLE X

pa UISUi., 11 HsE. OdU ., 1i03i

DISThUTh09 BT RKEIONS J.101 uIpin[0T


i2M.'r.T,. 4 U.re


lee hLd
Lr..end Atlentlo
I. II.


Per Cern.


Al ;:IJ:"!irnS


7.1


A. ,-rlcultu (minr') 9.4

B. UlnLO^
I. Cval
I1. Other Minerals 2.5

C. COetrIcti.tAon .6

1. Tranopartatint, etc. 5.0
II. COther I,, L t c uIIt I6en 3.1


1. Larale 7.1*
II. RatoJll
a. F'oode. Drifs, etc. 0.:3
b. Dry :code. etc. 9.3
c. tjitor retell B.6

P. Servlt...
1. DomestLc. Hotole. etc. 8.2
71TI. Other 3ervlce 8.O

,u. Fenen ce 8,0


H. MiAu!Af2mlva 17.2


I. F.:c.da 5.7

II. Teztilel
a. App real 8.
b. Other Le.ttlos 31.3

III. Eoreoc Provd:te 6.2
IV. Plpmr Prolucte 1..3
V. Prltr,.t.,-Puhlinehlng 8.3

TI-VII. C emlcmlm 4.3
VlII.Fhibber Prlucte 20.8
I1. Leatrer Pradurt 31.-

1. Btone. Cla. Uaees 5.7

Xi. Irin ond SLeet
6. Steel LdIB 0.7
.. ODler Ircn .& steel 16.4

Yll. ro'D-lInIro, WuWII 24.
1JI1 M.ictl ery 12.1

CIK. TrnnsorL.v.Lcn Lojp. 2.4

21. RlLlrao Faep&Ir Shop


it. Ultrellaneoue


10.4


UnclaeIlfted 5.8
Al! therr 3 11-.7


;er Cent





26.2


30.9


.31.3
9.0

271.2


28.8

25.3
26.3
21.1.

29.0
30.6

37.6


29.8







11.9
111-9
34.7

26.8
17.4
30.0

42.9


37.1
30.3

29.7

33.-
13.9


si .o.
C tra.O
III.

Per Cent


22.6


14..5
8.1

22.2


20.3

23.1.
25.3
28.8


19.7
22.14
J'.B.


26.3


25.4





20.0
32.1

25.2-

29.0
48.6
19.5

26.1A

63.6
41.9

33.3
37.0
51.4

351.
19.4


West No.
Un Lral
IV.

For Cent


6.14


South
Atlantic
v.

Per Ceant


3a1t So.
Dentral
VI.

Per Cert


vast so.
Ceniitral


Per Cent


Montlat Plar e
F i!l. P .

Per Cenlt Per Cent


19.1 7.8 7.3 3.5 5.5 1.7 1.9


8.2


1.5
9.2

10.".


*S.d

9.1
9.3
8.8

9.0
7.7

6.7


6h.


1:.0
3.4
0.9
6.6
3.8

7.2

3.0

3.0
11.6
4.4

0.9
2.5

i.1
3.0
0.6


5.0


21.Z
2.9

9.3


6.6

E.2
8.7
7.8


5.4
5.5

6.6


1.e


L2.9
3.6

2.9


7.2
1.3


3.5






3.9
3.0

2.4


3.3

.3
23.0

6.2


'4.1L.
3.4


5.6

6.0


6.6
..2

.0


2.1 IL.


6.6 .2
bO 5.
6.0

1.2 7.9


.4 10.1
.7 .5


1.4.

2.0
1.9
2.0

2.2
1.3

1.0


f--I 1 t r


9.7


L.5


11.0
28.6

i1.7
2.0

5.9
4.5
0.0
2.6
9.4


13.6
0.8

1.7
1.2
2.1


11.3


3.3


2.7


6.1
5.5

8.2
o.6

2.6

2.2


. I

2.3


2.1
2.9
-.3

0.8
0.1


5.0


50.3 29.6 .6 1.2 0. 1
5,3 0 2 8. 9. 6.


8.6

7.'
6.0
8.0

11.0
12.6

8.3


O.'t I.7


1.3 10.3


2.4
o.o 0.7

1.3 17.7
b.

1.2 6.3

0.1 4.3
- 6.5
0.9

0.I. 4.6

1.7
2.8

0.1 1.6
0.1 2.3
0.0 1.4


0.2 2.3


5.3
5.2 4.9


All


70 tLa
lwber
Reported


l ter Cast


9.7


13.3


2.9


6.9
30.3

4.1


26.1
55.0


6.0

4.9
1.8
6.1


2.1

9.8
9.8


5.7


3.9

1.8
3.7

4.8
2.3
2.2

21.0
3.7
0.3

2.0

0.1
2.2

U.2
9.3
27.9

1.6
1.6


3-7
IIL1.0


L~~I


Io0. 67.0b


635.757

48.04
689.560
631.777


499.302
390.77

567.S"6


5.OT5.43

6a),642

51o.3mO
6M,&2



?S,;5
335,09
155.01h

318.637

293.20

67.093
233.585
.161,074


277.633
255.%W
183.476

,k6.614

P51.1435

1.353
no.66o


7,069
20,66'


2J Si.rIs: ,?.>ctal ta l Li or. for MIA of PHk questionnaire returns by Bur iur oft Cenus, December 19.3. BploBment and payroll data are for the weaBl of JaB 17 in
1.: tot.r 1.', 1 33.
.j IZ CtLe-e" c',r lftr t-ttioa1.ire-. 'hch do not clearly itndicate tiat a breakdown has been made on a proper Esographtoal basis: data for eltIlolosiatl
operntile In, tw.u or more Ciat"n. .-ca &.i. atl road. steam bolts, pipe lines. telephone and tel.graph ald power aooponles: the report, of companies having P t1 "
L.. vart.ne States for welch idll zual reports were not obmitted but for *tch a aster report waO sppliedl; and data fron return received for a State efter .
5t. bt6 h-2 Men 8eL to thin :eatijri'vLvc 6, nIi6 for punching and& tabulazting.


L. .A.JU
L'Iijnii ( ie in
LE,;Aoer. i935

9654


------I-----


2,.9 .15- L.- \.5
II4.9 11.0 4.0 5.1


6.3







3A
CHAMT a


PRA EMPLOYMENT CENSUS
U.S. TOTAL. ALL INDUSTRY

PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION,*JUNE. 1933


PER CENT


* SOURCE: NRA ANALYSIS (MS.) OF TABULATION OF PRA QUESTIONNAIRE
RETURNS, DECEMBER 1933, BY BUREAU OF CENSUS
NOTE:-'ALL OTHERS: ..'FSE ,. STBL'S.MWNTS, CC'O.ERD BY MASTER REPORT.'
i95NC;I'T.TPtS *>OT A_.Lr'ABLE TCO A SPECIFIC REGION
9b54


NRA
DIVISION OF REVIEW
M.S., DEC..1935

SWJrS,,CS SEcTIoN, NO. 473,


PeR CENT







th.. several -)rincip.-l *i,'ustry _rnUos. It is seen that the relative

procportions of the total for a ,iven irnid-.tr:,' .rmup vary in the c6r.ac-

teristic ima.nner for each industry. For ,-xarple, ,,holesale distribution

has oobout S of th.; total establishments, 6,. of the total employment aand.

0,, of the -)ayroll. The corresponding portions of retail distribution

h',,.v.,r, arc rar':edly different The su-nportinL data are given in

Table II.

Linos of varying thickMess connect the portion allocated in

each colum-ir ir.n cci industry. T-he .caviest line se-oerates Ivlanufacturing

fro.. ~o'-.. miifacturi- Lines of secondary thickness separate cormposite

gr-cps li'-e Distri'utio. and Servico. Social su-d-divisions of con-

ventional. census rou-os medad in this sturly arv indicated by dashed

lines. T"his is the case in Gro-rus B, E-II, F, H-II and H-XI.

Distribution in a sarmic statc-.rouip. Tae distribution oho, 7 in

Chart 9, of a r.-resentative 7-state sai-)le, are very similar to tho

corresi)Qnding distributions for the United. States totals shown in

Chart 8. The principal differences are in the proportions of the total

payrolls and the total employment allocable to :Linufacturing and Ton-

rnanLfacturingc. The 7 selected states represent about a third each of

the establish-cnts, emrployyment and payrolls for the entire country. For

these 7 states, _Ton-mirTnufacturing has some 47-S of the employment and

51,S of the payrolls. In the United States total however, Non-maf.-infcturin:

has 51, of the employment and 55,. of the payrolls. Similar conspicuous

differences for the principal groups can be seen in the case of Iron

and Steel, Public Utilities and Coal M..ining.


9854










37
CHART 9


REPRESENTATIVE SAMPLE

PRA EMPLOYMENT CENSUS

SEVEN SELECTED STATES,* ALL INDUSTRY

PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION, JUNE, 1933


PR CENT
ESTABLISHMENTS
(219,078)




S "......._-. ;...--
100- ^0



F ^S'^


- 90-




















-so-
-70-












- 40--
-40






- 30-






-20-









--0-



- 0


\1 ^




..': j '/* i





1i 1
'++ +/ : +. ++











I I







' / +






- ,- ,


/
7


EMPLOYMENT
(3.592.000)




IA


............

o... ...... .. .


__


rER CENT PAYROLLS
($75,675,00O) NQN- ,A
--_1, -,.-oc r,.- ..L3 gg ^r.Q. JL V?^ (.,li'
"' .... D* M~riii.E Q^m Ia-..
`T, l1 l .. G*
II. SEOTC M0SERU
,, .I I, ,, L CONSTRUCTION
.-.: :-: ,:,: ., .'- PUBLIC UTILITIES
TA IASPORTATON
90 "-'.,'';''' S 'S ^- (1 *SOfTT0


-3C0 -


j4 ,


,----ID OTHER PUBLIC UTLITlOU


E- DISTRIBUTION
-1 WHOLESALE

D-RETAIL

4- T a D- OO S, DRUGS, TC.

--- (b)-Do GOODS, ETC



-- CD-OHER RETAIL


r SERVICESr
I ESTF.C. HOTELS, ETC

..- Ii ERV.CE



- F- FINA 1CE


H MANUFrCTURING
- ---I t ...D=-

B- TEXxT,LES
- :)-PAREI.


r-- E-c.I-EP TEXTILES


S'---- a7 ..l-' T PRODUCTS
_ 4 :';'J. CiJiL hJJ 1-- E --'i PRODUCTS


TT


0. NT NO-PUBLISHING

- ]--CHEMICALS
M RUBBER PRODUCTS
r- LEATHER PRODUCTS

-- -- STONE-CLAY-GLASS
XI- IRON & STEEL
--- (a)-STEEL MILLS

- J l., ,. *^ ,, ,- .&STEEL


X- fN R E TALS,.,L

:-- rEL.MCM NE 3- '
11:1 SS 5 1:-- -t C1 +C


*MASSACHUSETTS, PENNSYLVANIA, OHIO, No CAROLINA MISSOURI, TEXAS, AND CALIFORNIA.
*-GROUP XV, RAILROAD REPAIR SHOPS, WAS NOT COVERED FOR THESE SEVEN STATES
+-U IMCLASSIFIED CONTAINS "ALL OTHERS'
SOURCE. NRA ANALY-'I OF TABULATION OF PRA QUESIIONNAIRE
RETURNS, DL'- C," t 1933, BY BUREAU OF CENSUS!
9854


NRA
DIVISION OF REVIEW
M S., DEC.1935

STATISTICS SECTION,NO 474? '


. :. '::*;s -. .'


. . .


3.

'...... .'.' ...








I:I -.- .;triuLtic" i.c-L PnA C, v' 1 s of Occrm t.ionrs. By C,.-rt 3

the 7aj.-- I v..t rou. s sho si_ nifi'."-it 8ifferenice from the -oatto-n

in t.: C.- t-s of O0ccu.tiont3. I1 tio latter, see T-ble I,

tilv. 's-s. av'il-bl' for -7vi)loy ient, ail ovcr 10 yoers of ate who

decea .c.c.lvc ?ttci, to s. ccL,,a tion, ,ere distributed iA

19 .0, ::.':in.f'icturi -, 1- --illion; Ton-,- .rafacturin ,

24 million; :. ricj.lturo, 10 million. In tre ind-.strios reporting to
PRA, t _.. cc, tit I? on-manufacturinL is representea to a markedly

smnall,- c'-:r,- thar. T nufact'urin The proportions indicated in

Chart G -_'. a..' I'a.- II are,1 51 and 47. Yut th,. Census of Occupations

ratio is .'-. o 14; i.'., 80 to 47, instead of 51 to 47.

2_:t ."c, Lasis for estimate of. PRA renp)loymcnt. A comparison

wit. t-i. C a'-.u of 0ccu)ations suggests a deficiency of representation

in t- ?-A 'l,-.is.s of 3-51 for tho Non-manufacturing relative to the

Iviarn.i'hc:".:'i' in*'stries. As shovwn below, the iI.iaus'cturirng industries

have a. 7. ,ov ri,- i PA for e.r1loyment. Henc 3 -a lau;ible measure

of T.on-ma:.Wi'ct':ri.- ,roloyrfent coverag-. is of 3, or about 50b. ?er-
8 4
hars Lt oo.ilc L ;,or- accurate to co.'noare L4anufacturing with the trade

an ,' o.2cr-. .rc. occu.,ati.cns of columnn 3, Table I, i.e., omittinS the Public

Service ',.. P-.rof _ssional groups as having no relevance to PPA. The

corr I.:o- i ratio is 20 to 14 or 67 to 47. These considerations pffoid

a b3.si -o--" ...or-- r liable esti2pat. of t1iE actual PEA emnlQyym--nt incr,7-se

than thi. ,,u.,h a )'-roximation a earlv i'-. 1974.


9854







Distribution by to,raphic r F ions, Charts 10 -nd 11. The dis-

tributions of establishments and of Jun, nmoloymlnt* are shown by th

principal g&ogranhic r Eions for the major industry groups. For the

distributions by r;-ion, Charts 10, 11, the horizontal bars r oressnt

100,,. The width of th, bars is proportional to th-. nurrber of establish-

ments. The graphical indication of reporting, establishments is supple-

mented by the actual number shown in the right-hand columns. SEparate

width scales are used in Charts 10-A and 10-B, b-cause of th3 markedly

greater number of establishm-ents in the 'Ton-manufacturing industries.

The relative proportions are indicated by comparing the widths of

Construction in the non-manufacturing industries and of Foods in the

manufacturing industries, both having approximately the same number

%f establishments. In each chart the distribution of the total is shown

at the top, by the split horizontal bar. The. split indicates that the

total width corresponding, to the number of establishments cannot be

shown. At the top of each chart there is a special bar showing the dis-

tribution of the total population among the several regions. The length

of this special bar corresponds to the ag regate percentage allocable to

tne 9 geogajdiic regions. This aggregate is 97/o in the case of the Non-

manufacturing, 98j. in the case of manufacturingng industries, the remainder




* The distribution for June is closely similar to th- distribution
for October; likewise the distributions of payrolls are similar
to the distributions of employment. The differences are given
in the detailed summary tables, Table II, and the tables in
Appe.ndix I.


9854





CHART IOA


PRA CENSUS- REPORTING ESTABLISHMENTS*

JUNE-OCTOBER. 1933

PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION BY GEOGRAPHIC REGIONS
NON-MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES


REGION
510 POPULATION
U181- 1,00o,0o0



1DTOL N0W-UAN'F'G.


1 l0 02f0 40 50 7o. 80 9. -G0 PER CENT

NeW 0D', (rAT !TT OVTM T 3i1T tMViMyN ACifiC
ENGLAND A ..,C NO CeNTWAL NO C -NTN ATLANTIC 1O, N 0 C AL


I I ., T I IS I rEIORTING SIAo A;
Nj fe...ff' W Tsr*T


A AGIuCULJUR..N.oI
I .- MINING & QuIIN




llu'TI uf~s
C- CONSTRUCTION

D- PUBIC UTILITIES


a- m n. KO-.


"...... ...... ... .... .. ...I ..... .. I ..ll II 1111


- __ ,, II',

.' ...

/


] l l l :, .-L.....m [


4,300 0.7

1,800 0.3

2.700 OA

17,700 28


11,700 1 8

7,100 1.1I



50,300 7.6







114,400 17.8


0 10 20 30 40


50 60 70 BO go90


55,100 8.6







122.700 19.1




o




S71,100 1.0






S52,200 8. ;




40,500 6_3


J00 PER CENT
,00 PER CENT


"Xt-PERTAINS TO INTER-REGION OR OTHER NON-ALLOCABLE INDUSTRIES.
*SOURCE; NRA ANALYSIS (MS,) OF TABULATION OF PRA QuES5 foNmjAE
RETURNS, DECEMBER 1933, BY BUREAU OF CENSt.
WIDTH OF BARS PROPORTIONAL TO NUMBER OF ESTABLISHMENTS.


9654


NRA
DIVISION OF REVIEW
MS., DEC 1935

STATISTIS SECTION, N0.475, '&5?


I :Qz::-r


3e


fIZ 1 mm-- mz







41
,HART O0B


PRA CENSLIUS- RE ;OR TIr F STAB' 15HMENTS
J I11 E: r,. 1 '' i4 1
PERCENTAGE rlSTRiL'lTIOCM iy iF .tli-,?. Pil- F.lolflI'i.r
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES

0. ,C 2O ,,: -.- ,. '* .._ .P .-. -r (00 PER CENT

LrnT~ir TIT CAt FAST W MtS tfl MI PACIFIC
REGION ENGLI, *,I L"' ,e >.CIIRAl 11115.1 ACL AI W OCIFIRAL mONw
j T -- -- r -"* mnr-r -.pIXofl
19.0 POPULATION r____ ..
U ,..- ... ...i --~ PORIN ISTAW .

i-MANurACTuRIMG 67,300 13.6
,o o "' I, ; I t1t1,o~ o f,,t
A /_____ IIII ItWW*



S- FOODS I.... _" -:EAiv:.o 17,300 2.7.


-'......X ~
TIrEN TILES
,IA*~~~-- SPRSI 1Z-~ 6,700 L0


l' bla= i. ,ZS;'-, -y'.... 'f '"-" T---- ----- -----^^ '.' '-"'' li[jI iIi iI 5,400 0.8


M FOR_,L..EST IZ."C SZ-Zillhll .lll 7,700 1.A


NY- PAPER PROD'5 5 ... ,, 1,900 0.3
.." -- I"", "

v- PciTNG '0 __.___". _PRINTIN__G-j___ I .r iiu.g._ 1460 2
PUBLISH ING g 2- iI *II

-7 'UU
V TMA.I 5,200 086

uE-PLanBER PRcOD -- 11- -400 0.1

U LEATF lP ROD .... 2,200 0.3

I- STONE.CLAY. -- -. ....7... 4,000 0.6
GLASS 4 0.
Z IRON&STEEt

{b" I-"-S'IL -- --- ---- 3,700 0.4





bS ona e ,no, r/HOPBRW 1,ll/ '.1/.',".. L __ JL _'- ,^ ... .-- *- ^-.- "^ Jr-n..L..^IA.J'J.j..JLL JlUm 3.70 0.
a bI-MENO ROS. nzE."_L& PM.TL- 3,700 0.6










[ L ,,] iv T J a, '.'
-0 MA 20 C. ERY -.:, r. g 100 1.1 ENT
fY N t;uiPT 1,200 0.2







0 .0 20 C '0 '0 9 l G P C-i

'S'- PERTAIN' '0 qII1 .51 -nER NON-AU.OCA8L NO4STBIES NRA
%r-uR;L NRA .I -.. ATION Of PR A ''t DANAPE DIVISION OF REVIEW
9E6U5T4S fl.t.PrI ;: 8VRAU Or CENSUS. MS. DEC. 1935
9654 WIT" OF 6 O .-.- *I*c-r SIECTMEB OF ESTABLISHMENT $ 9F
sTATrICSie Stcale,, No- 476, sy2.







42
CHART II A

PRA CENSUS-JUNE 1933 EMPLOYMENT*

PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION BY GEOGRAPHIC REGIONS
NON-MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES
PEB CC(kT
0 o10 ? _o 30 C, s .50 60 70. ..... o ....


IT -7 7 I I I II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 -1 1tKI
HER~~~~Ef UOIEf'EN PAIfIC
--ODLE AS, pl_________ rS ^ ^ Sou rm so -^ JUNE EIMPLOViIENT
G.0ATLA.TIC 1O CE~NTRAL. NO CENTRAL VLAIVYNCE x PCJy OrN TOTAL~N
TOTAL MANUFACTURING Ys. 015.50 1.


TOTAL NON-MAN'FG Jl irillllllI

\i \. N .\ li


s,499,aoo 50.7


A-AGRICULTURE (MINOR) ---- .... 54.400 0.5
0- MINING & QUARRVING -----00---
I COAL22,50 .

{- OThER MINERALS 144,600 IA

C- CONSTRUCTION 203A41.
D- PUBLIC UTILITIES 317,100 2.9
I-TRANSPORTATION /


U-0'"R ueu vL,699,300 GA


N -


E- DISTRIBUTION -3SAC 5.9
t- W, O LESA!LE 3,0 5.


'-RE.TAIL
,a-FOODORuS,ErTC


0i 11 x


b-oRY GooDS ETC.



C-OTHER RETAIL


F- SERVICES
{ D-OOMESrC. OIELS.ETC


IL-OTHER SERVICE


G'PINANCE


~7YA


K.


420,600 3A


K EME 1III m m I 69.6m "


N.


/
/ /


I I rm 61,.00


499,300


I N


NN 39%aoo 3.0


44/r~wy~q~wwuu


h ~ B


T I 1 m 7 m iB ix *
I I I I I I _lt I I I I I I ILL I ,n I I I II l


11111m557,600 5


U I0 if(2 30 4a 5U su
PE.A ,.ENT
'*X"Z'- PERTAINS 0TO INTER-REGION OR OTHER NON-ALLOCABLE INDUSTRIES.
*SOURCE: NRA ANALYSIS '(M.S.)OF TABULATION OF PRA QUESTIONNAIRE
RETURNS, DECEMBER 1933. BY BUREAU OF CENSUS.
WIDTH OF BARS PROPORTIONAL TO NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES,


9854


a0 8, 90 ioo

NRA
DIVISION OF REVIEW
MS, DEC. 1935
STrATIrSCs SEc'rO.No. 477, r-. 9


lh


i


I




































(Ib-TEN TEXTL.S



N-PAPER PRODUCTS


V- PRINTING -UBLISHING


S3-UI-CHEMICALS

U- RUBBER PRODUCTS

EL-LEATHER PRODUCTS


X- S rONE.C LAY, GLASS

11-IRON & STEEL
(a)-SITl. MILLS

(b-OTW4E ION & STEEL


J3-NOM-SERROUS METALS


ZI-MACHINERY



Mr-TRAms. EQjIRPMENr

1f-RR. REPAIR 5HOP

X=I-MISCELLA NEOUS


-FORlEST PRODUCTS


ALL OT.ER


43
CHART II B

PRA CENSUS-JUNE 1933 EMPLOYMENT*

PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION BY GEOGRAPHIC REGIONS

MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES
PER CENT
', .1 -, ,., U. ,., '. i,.


~DI6


mI


9>" 100


Ii ,II:III ':1 i T
..rAs wS AOT NPNZ- JUNE EMPLOYMENT
E "EN- I I&E4w V5,70 orTo
- 4 \~ *>'' ~ ~~~ 5,075,600 4".7


dl-- \ f i I 1 Ii
-_,_a. '\,, J 7l 1I




7 ----- .. -


20.600


510,400


7z4, 100 8.7


I55,000


318 600


293,300


67,100

23.,600


161,100


277,600


255,400


163,500


476,600 4.4-


/ ** -- -r --- -- -. .* j .x ^ --.^.-y^< ^ -.x- ....f y




m~~"'',"' '' ^ /* ^ *^ r ^ i' "" \-"iiiii





















0.. m xz A"" _


0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100
1X'-PERTAINS TO INTER-REGION OR OTH'R NON-ALLOCABLE INDUSTRIES, NRA
*SOURCE NRA ANALYSIS (MS.) OF TABULATION OF PPA CLUESTIONNAIRE DIVISION F REVIEW
RETURNS DECEMBER 1933 2 BUREAU OF CENSUS DIVISION OF REVIEW
WIDTH OF BARS PROPORTIONAL O |B, OF EMPLOYEES. M.S, DEC- I93

STATSisCS SECTION, No. 478, ig


9854


0 "1


IT- I 1 II l

H-TOTAL MANUrACTURING [. '.. -
41 I-t'. .-.'-----


[-FOODS



I-TYEIT7L ES
6ja-APMPZL


.4.
', : ,, ,, ,,
.., L. : .., .., ... .. .. .


25 1,400

1,400

210,700


335,100



284,700


[Hill


S' L. n fl. "" "" D ";I- r







b-.ing the Group "X", portainina to inter-rt :ion or oth;r non-llocable

industries. As in th xr: cedin. ch-a.rto, thin lines to -lid-, the eye

conn.-ct the proportions of the total allocn-ble to a given reion.

Charts 11-A and 11-B show the same tpe of distribution for

Jun.- employment. Th. distribution of rnloyment arnrr the several

r Scions shows a greater range of variation than th corresponding dis-

tributions of establishments. The conspicuous differences are seen in

the case of Peblic Utilities, Chemicals and Transportion Equipment, and

in "X" or inter-regional classes. Similarly conspicuous are the unusual

proportions allocated to c,&rtain regions for Textil.s, Leather Products,

Machinery, and Finance,, It is intjr stin.- to compare the distributions

of manufacturing with Non-man---facturing totals on Chart 11-A. The

g-ographic distribution of Ion-manufacturing industries is seen to be

roughtly similar to the distribution of total population shown on

Chart 10-A.

Section III Variaticns in Pay, Emoloyment, and Changes, by Industry
Groups

Thz. variations in weekly pay and the PRA increased by regimas

and industries are of particular interest. Thz.y constitute the sole

source for data that are of prime importance to 17_FA policy.

'Trriations in employment and PRA c._ar.es, oumnry Chart 2. The PRA

Census -ives a corpr-:hrnsive picture of the variations in pay and employ-

ment-payrolls for Ion-manufacturing as well as 1Manufacturing industries.

In Chart 2, the principal variation patterns in ell industries are shown

in four groups. In column 1 is shown the percentage distribution of


9854





-45-

re-ortinL establishments in all industries. In column 2 is shown thr

av.?rage wAly incorr. : per worker in th.} different i, ductry groups as

a spot picture fer June 1933. I-i the 3rd and 4th columns are shown

the percenta-e increases from June tc October of employment ar.d -!ayrolls

respectively. Th'.se variation patterns ar! given for the principal

industry groups separated in three major classes: the durable manufac-

turing class in 7 groups; the non-durable manufacturinK class in 9

groups; and the nonr-::rn'.ifa-turing class in 13 groups. Sunmaries for

each of these classes and for all industry are shown at the top of the

chart.

The length of the bars indicates the per cent change of dis-

tribution, and, in the case of the average income, dollars. The width

of the bars is proportional to the June employment by the PRA Census.

In the case of the summary groups at the top, the torn lower edge of the

bar indicates that it is not possible to show on the graph the full width

proportional to the June employment. In each case the graphical indi-

cation of employment in the industry is supplemented by the rounded

numerical value for June, shcwn in the middle space. Supplementary

information is also given of the rounded number of reporting establish-

ments in each industry .roun.

At the right of the Chert, the BLS index of employment is

shown for three significant dates for each industry, where available.

The index numbers are converted to the base, average 1929 = 100. The

index for June 1933 indicates the depression level at the beginning of

NRA. For .iarch, 1935, the index would indicate roughly the recovery up


9854





-46-


to tne tim orrc-.-ding the Sch:.chter decision. Th ind..x for Deccrr;bLr,

1935, marks the last r.h:s- cor.sid-red in this study.

Variations. r. :! in.1jrv.ros. Charts 12 and 13. The

variations in ustablishmonts and employm nt patterns for industry s and

regions ar, given in detail in the regional summraries of the data,

Tftbl,-s VIII, IX and in the tables of Akopendix I. It must suffice at

present to show only two groups ,f the variables given in the data, the

PRA incr.-as: in rrploymont and the June weekly income..

The variations in employment increase, Chart 12, show the

varyin, rcso.,nse elicited in different r-_Lions and for different

industrik-s by the PPA drive. Th. same device is used as in Chart 2 to

indicat- tha size of the industry t,roup by ,.king the width of the scale

bars proportional to the employment at some base period, June, 1933 in

this case. Because of the large range of variation of size in the

sev.,ral regions, it was necessary to employ three size measures for

thr-.;:- groups of r 6ions, as indicated by tho- FJ scale bars at the top

of -ach r-gion group. Th-- rrugh. indication of size is supplemented by

th- ro'ind:d valu-s of th- PPRA Jun- m.orrloym.nt for fach industry group

shown in each EJ column. In th- E'UTrary sections at the top of the

chart both the -mployment and the reporting establishments are given.

Th.: variations of weekly pay income shown in Chart 13 afford

thM most comprehensive statistical pictur:7 available concerning the

much discussed subject of wag3 differentials. The representation form

used is th: same as in Chart 12.


9854















47
TABLE XI

PRA Csus X-IfY Pa PLA WCFCRU

SBY GOOLRaFnIC DIVISIONS MLL DINISThT ItUPS /

EopioyBeT.L. 9j. sn4I Averavw leeldWIY r.C1,01. JNi., 1933


Ml L'13.Of


CIameI" PIU J
lndustr7 Groups (0C0'


ALL I1MEis ?J 1.096
NC-MIW4ICFI4LTTJIUNO j/. 392
MSG mACTORING h 392

MAI'o TMDO.m b L l
NoeDuroble 467

Dutable 182


wuOuxihiCTURING

3. Mlnize A Quarnr7Ln

C. Cons ruction

D.I. Trusportatilo

SD.11. Other Public Utilities

3.1. mrleesle

I-.II-.a.-ta.Ll Food, Drugs

3I.II.b.Dry good.

c.Otber Bet aill

P. Service

a. Inamos


NAM-1AC'I70ao
Von-Durable

E.I. Foods

1I.&AJparel

II.b. Fabrics

17. Psaper Prodote

V. Print La-Publ i hbIng

TI-ni.Chaalcals
YR-Ill. Ob esitele

lh1.R-ubber Products

UX. Leather product.


Du~rble

III Forest ProducIts

1. Stone. Cliq. GlassI

U. Iron A Steel

XII. Son-ferrous Metals

ShI.M achtnrb r

lIT. Traonportatlon Iquip.


t20.SO0

24.05

1.95

15.0?


I1

ULD-A-AiT 1:

P



:.9615 24.64



61.77

851 21.43


21.24 537 22.69


521.53

25.51

26.1.7

30.2-

25.66

19 314

16.62

24.73

21.71.

33.24.





$22.01

14.42

15.92

20.37

?28.96

25.1.9

19.54

18.52




1.21

29 77

20.51A

20.33

22. 1

22.11


s1e.s6
-25.57?

23.B7

30.05

33.36

21.57

17 86

27.00

23.73

W4.32





!2;. 59

170.45


iit.L
20.'2

31.16



23.'Irt

19.17




27.29

21 i.,W

19.28

23.-2

?5.73

22.96


EAST :"C.?-.H
U XE T'RAL






2.455 SH' 93

i.Oq ;O .

..'3 21.35

590 21.15

704 21.65


$21.22

12.99

14.69

2u.39

26.99

28.15

24. 14

1..55


\1


Ii P

(xii
r~x: I


b? t20.''

2 4 20. 15

2'13 '0.05

L52 20. :l

50 20.2"


i7 "1

P'^.J-

?4. '?

25.84

16.76

14.?'4

22.39

17.39

30 23





S12.94

11.48

1-.85

18.93




24. 1,

I';,. I


15.65 1' 17 '"

19.-3 7 .93

20.45 CA,,

2 .;'2 >l. '

22..51 14 21.-.

26.-:,A 1 Lb.0


v
Suv "I
Ar L' "I1

;. r


10.9'
0o7'.' L .q'+

3991 182.2

12'13 13.35

4 12.61

It.. 1 >2


54 :1..26

1 1i 6r

14 ..46

22 ?-.'3

42 OS..1?"

35 15.81,

60 13.76

"9 0.23

63 1.C5

37 3'. 1.





10 it.41l

5b 10.?:<

207 10. b.

3 17.;-,

131 |1.29

1 1;. ;"



c. HI '.I






1* 6.41

;. 01.2?

0

0 20.21

'. 18.16


LX
PACIFIC

IJI P



b8', S?4.1l,

4633 S?".

137 21.6"

136 22.60


] O.'j,5



20.05

529.37


2".S


299.67



21.00

19. ?4

'5.76

25.69

32.03





$2..96

1. 10

1).28




?:s. 52
29.52



1i.).'2


:) 1?.





3 2-.

li 25.
11 21.
4 21.


VI
EAST S U-P?
a: 7UL

1'! P
fic." )|lI


7:1
WEST &Z-d"


F
I 00C
C3T5'"ll
C;.. [ ,il

Io; 'I
----'i l,


3s6 '1.63 1.32 ;1? 0

192 16.l~it 501 ?J*

167 129.1 112

A. 12. SO 71 i 4 1

2 12..o 39 13.77


!1 i.79

1i". 50
?1}.?9

1'.


24. 16

14.03



Ic.19



. %c.



















0. t 3
is.




13.42
;..,,. i,
















14.t I

1q.5O

1".67
14. ",


"1:1



" I







t i..j

*1 1
I :."?










1'
- 1
















1. .79

"1.-'
























i .
r .,


[ 1 I

1- -4


/ oro : m, IA an.lse of tabulation of PEA qusstLtonire retuoe aof Decoember, 19373. by Pwreau of Crenus Derived from EI6":.&A. TAbULAT:;CIJ 3BI IrJUS'Il KT4LUPS '.n-i.rlee.
ihs reported smibere of June eaplokeent are rounded to the nearest tho.sand.
Z/ Lnacudee also Agr citnre (minor), ZVI mtecelleneos., Un'j.clisled, Ali C ter;.
J Includse alo Arlculture tmo.or.
Sincludei also VI lileceallaeoum.

The aAk () indicates loees that, 506 employees reported. Thde w&r (-j InolcEreS no seeable retuMrn: :Ce,'ed.


I.RiA.
DivlsLon of Revlew

December. 19"1.

9854


^----------__--------------------------- L_--







8
tecA. 2z

PRA CENSUS- EMPLOYMENT CHANGE BY

PERCENTAGE CHANGE OF EMPLOYMENT, JUNE-OCTOBER.
I 0 ID 3 IX
PEW E~c.ANO SPOOLE oT1LAjdIC LAST M100h tLoA.L ms-I mo~m tCEN1RL U~urtI *11..omr,*d~i
tij- at ML i u.. C- .r. .... ..... .0,D .,_ T.. R..UL..O *t.fl L *P'.. 0 Ca
EjJ n flAL = 00b U S | C, SCTN SCALE ] = = 0 OI'OlM E


URGING. NON-DUR
... ,, *.. .i .,


MING, DURABLE




Igmm-
2^ _3 *


GOODS


,e.,
l1 ^ i si


REGIONS'

1933

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL WST O TH ICC NTRAtL MOUNTMN

C.s.., SCAL.P- 25,600 IO.CLPm L


,,flO -^ 0A. '^ ^


.d.~ MUA SaLONS fMnj OP EASLTAI 0 NA ailC ilk.UI RfipJ C'O~'t
ulcckm .6 T DuawO acllu.ft, Ii cLASi'.CAviOk. Seddl.
*goal d5. ONF bUS 'SN... t0 i lPr1iU
j.d SMA JUNE EUfljOTSET. *NNJ SflOSS*C ITSS..a1nT
9561 mosS (r UMM mPNSnSSI0N 'I MMO Wianun. Eu


0 ~ DO US SO


.... .." it.i"^" ",
NRA
OwviON OF meiw
a. 00.. .55
**aaTo.WC .e 5 C*% 71&


N R.. .. F. .. ...... .. ...


i n0t


. .. ..-


J
i ro Ds


Niw


l "" 1t" '


[ E---





iL


PRA CENSUS- WEEKLY PAY BY REGIONS


ii m
NOW LNOIAWO Nfl0~t ATCAR1!( 0*3? oome OINYRAL
1~ M.4.~ At C At N 4. 00.0. Uo it. 04,. *4
~. ~*~'- ~ ~ oceaN i..to.ir,


- I it f
1, BT l
!1" pr'TT IT"1

^ i.: iii i:i-ii -i, .. I in i + !.iiiiil i .ii .iiiiiiiiiiiiiii.i.A. i -


aY INDUSTRY GROUPS
AVERAGE EMPLOYEE WEEKLY INCOME, JUNE, 1933
wv Ix
W -X NO WAM tow" ""07m .



*IT. ,iN, 4 .,*b, S ., .t0 -,.C7
I _____ I--J --. .r10 ItT --5 0I.0 *




-------- ?;-~ ki~ifTi~ir. -------


'N ,,,,,,,,,,,' ^ :: -- -- ..., ,,. >* 'Sunnnnnnnnnn .-.---- -J ^ l ~- ___
I, nf ,LL .m hr3~xo fou


t ". --3 I n -" 1

L **.-* *-** ] :^-"*= -3"


9 ..,* J.I


* A. -4n


*r..Ah ~ u I., EU**fyrj 0..A Iulll*u*It.,

I. -. ANE 90 .* ', I *t.-. T -:, I
WD. ofl *OIII oOmIAL (0t JUN# -UtlbN"It,


*


'N


* 0

-XA -N-
NRA1- IM^
=3o J n.


AU INDUS1!

TOW NOMEOiMNEO




001.1*4.009*4"
I~il m.Mlo.MONOU*

Hblnd MFQ3 OUMAOM


- -' 1 ,M I '


^.IJ


A'












s1
CoMTT 1,A



PRA CENSUS, NON- MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES*


PERCENTAGE CHANGE. JUNE-OCTOBER, 1933

EMPLOYMENT .Nr PAYROLLS


sm.

11,30 *1m -43
f"M I- A &OAD*





f. -.' e -"rp ijI i -m|



#00 MMOU *\J)& [^
*I- Tm"As&, STUOAGI -I
ain as"mlt~t

00 OWF4 1KN0 WAOIt.




tin+ eK CARTONa $FO

OiB-amMp PueaInniL.^

At" *K.K Uwt a 0mm

0Am vo0H64 Y0.00
VIA A- iN0400.0.S -




TOO
OJF" OIAk, Am 1Cum
so#? oTm. 0=000s & ao.


















flol Coo"AM. -.".To
F~nF vrmm t0oo a""to



.a,. AUTJ MIS 0PO0m
05006 *4.4.03 00iW




















jff1- OVAPm&l cau mru



3.m0 o-.#N 4 I mIo. I


SOURCEC; kkRf 'LVI5, (u Sj OF tABULA'IOC OF PRA QJESTIONAIRE
W E-qNS, OCJeMAR 9 %5l 6O BUREAU Of CESUS.
INDUSTRY GJAOP006; CENSUS CIA&SL5 FOR MAO OGOMUPS; Ofrla Aft BRAI C4. A TSl*ON RP
SuB- G4OU5 E0LE' 45 MARRED '
wQfN r BARA Bq0oOl.. TO JUNE EMPLOONEW OF 1.0 00TOO, OR


NRA
msDIVIoN O ReviEW
Mo, meC, Io

SYAOt0co Socno., NO.400, O'tJ


*6ooo
t,?000


01000


*1.000









030,S44
t.*oeo
I .,00











311+200

l*0.0l
0,1000

36,000




*0.7000






0,00




CHAR" 149


PRA CENSUS-MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES

NON-DURABLE GOODS

PERCENTAGE CHANGE, JUNE-OCTOBER, 1933


EMPLOYMENT JUNE
"1 1i., E MP.'U-f
I i .c 0', 9..,. ," .> .,, ,,* '' 39 *' f "'

.I aJoW ,


P 20. o:
** I *- *,-- J ---


*SOURCE: NRA ANALYSIS (S.) OF TABULATION OF PRA OJJESTIONNAIRE
RETURNS, DECEMBER 1933, BY BUREAU OF CENSUS.
INDUSTRY GROUPING: CENSUS CLASSES FOR MAJOR GROUPS; CENSUS-LLS. CLASSIFICATION FOR
SUB-GROUPS EXCEPT AS MARKED (3).
WIDTH OF BARS PROPORTIONAL TO JUNE EMPLOYMENT OF 10,000-40,000 OVER O0,000
9854 ]


NRA
DIVISION OF RE6IEV
M S, OEc., isb

S, ..a SECT-.o.,o 479. .jo





-r


53
CHA PT I(


PRA CENSUS-MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES'

DURABLE GOODS

PERCENTAGE CHANGE,JUNE -OCTOBER, 1933


xH I I' l 4 fi
,.. it ,h t r. + .^


EMPLOYMENT
C ,'ti*1

"zT __
*-' I -- : "- -- / '---[


, _


I-
- SL~L 7'


r L
F' i ,.j ,A-r '. '!. ,d




.0* '^.'- 7.s.., S E CA A




1,c .. :CE .
STL A T'- 1 E'

47." 7 .7-1"'. C s.fss ____ _____ ^ _____ "



l3r' f (...:r, *l s-'l-r. k ^P
....... _----. .
I Ir.,.




''F ... C.S). Oi. 5. *
^ .. p: 1 ]


*-* -- =1 --r----,



A,, t ~- ,-. .:< fs .rr. I
.. l..... 5..... .....T.,U C 7



.,7..'~m *.,75.Ajn i- [ '


JUNE
WE IEK L


JLme1
CMII1 il MFN '
' I 41 1u N.

.7, & 5 ,


1 I


4, |t6i



7. I.:':


"" ,+ 1 +... ^| .V...



L .. T.t C E. C I Co "

lTsL E E i -, fl u

- & NA1 L LCD E 4
I I I : Loo

* J. 0E .0 SI ^w l f b







%44
usi11. "Fl^fl SouCTS ________\_____________________._______I; ______
37 T..[ s, 5000 ,,



*' C -2 35 40 7 J


mi c
B)D = "' : T ,vB LE E P0 0 C F 1 9 C L 1. a ... |

'I. C'. *7 *- iI' .
_F-:. .- ;T-,2 -* .. .. *C..





-I'..... I ; .. ... eI
L __ I i -



23 A H-'----- "-- -

[,-a--r ''', --- 7^ ;. .s ^ tjT 35 4.)-J 1--L
S *JI"E NQlt NAN1iSi15 3.7SJ 21i TaavL-i.CN OF OQlA ^..E 5iCNss4,.5
prrl,.Ni.i Df'E.E'.i4: 4.1' 4' 2uPFAu OF 24" bUSu
ii.i .7:7 C.RC,.~iiC CENS~US Ci:i..5E 5 r..-, 1.751014 GBOUP3 CENDU7,-4fL5 C-L 0i3j Ai,-.-;.. 0.a
bu65;2a:..oRS ECECC' Ais MA')I'E (s) -"-"---7-'
*,*' **B-'1S E4OR'*CT'0..4i -0 JI.NC IIPLC,,MCNT a; iC.300-40.COO;I I-.7) i g.. J
i,(i4 ~ --_ _-- .


NRA
DIVISION OF REVIEW
M-S. DEC 1035
%rmxcJ Stc noN, No a00o. 97'g


, 1


I






-.4-

-rr,',o y. s th crsall st i'iclvd, ', firm. TlI s ciunl r..tio siz

in r v.! n obtq.ir d b:. r.urt ti.-,- "(.u.jU t nt r.,' t-n siz rou)..

giv-n by th C.nr.sus tab alb ti,-n, n:.ly:

C, 1-5, 6-2C, *2i-'C, &1-ICO, 101-b', .... ,C'1-v', r.

Th configuration in "ci.n .-ott.rn is d t nirin C Li'y siz ana

alio by th- ch'ii-ct ristic tyo s nf ind-'.:stry r. c,.".li" r to ti s v r.l.1

stat..s. Thus th r tt rn.- -I' 'v kly inconm r- r vw-.rk r h7w-jvn ?t th.:

ritht of th chart an- .. finit ly cisc rrnibl also in tiL 19'tcD C.-nsus

of ktanufacturin& c.,e t,. Tiiis iL'- .f int r st, cine onl;, a rou, h tabula-

tion by siz.- c~n b- *-,Ltin 6, by. -srAinin .ach lr.dustry to sin-l::

size class, b--cauc C i-.:-W 1 .w nn L.r P2Cjr. r! .-,f ..) yrnllr oy niz- nf

*?stablishri nt. Ho,' v :', s--'. rirm-ons c or. ti.i *f-'und.,rr: nt 'l r?.tt -.rn is the

distinct incoa- chant ratt rn of Jun--Octnu r n9culiar to .-ach state,

and Dr-suriably varyin; v.itU t, tim, arid. ,2h-nri':L .conr nmic policy.

Th- r:.Eularity of f-rrr. n f -:;cii op tt..rn ou._-_'- sts th 9nprc.ximate

adequacy of r--pr.s2ntation of tii- m cl : s. Th crr.n, -s.itK. samTpl (r,f the

3-stq.t- totals) -rarh;-d in Cih- rt Io c. v-r': tn- f-,llov'in.t -mplryirrn.nt

r- turns:

4EC,CCO -.ut of ?1C,C.C PTA to.t-l fc.r Cuir
356,0'-0 out rf 58&.C00 PA total f-r IU;i:aciU-,tt-
159,C..C ,-.ut rnf 194,000 P:A tnt?.l for i'nrtir, Carolinq

The patt-.rrs rf '.-.riatir-n by/ .. iz fnr indi-.-idual industri-s

are shovm by th r,,op rf Cri-rt.- nur:b r-d 16-A, ..., 16-D. Th supr nrt-

ing tabulat-d data amr- in th P_ by-siz-' of c-ncmrn study, in th.:-

fil-.-s of BIPA.


9854







-a c!~ n m.i .4.4

i-. m .t. .0 J

I J


-K To) i B4 '


EMPLOYMENT id PAYROLL CHANGES
R-- T 8,P Pl A 1"10 UTA AIMUIMp
[F [ '- "--]----:7--- B SI1 OF ESTA*LISNMENT .CC.OiMD., TO NUMBER EMPOVED lk JUNE
I ac [aim, nc>. I ... in s aa, u *. I h~~ 16 oam.V~rSSn
1' IT *-.^ ** T acS? ... o5,.a' na ', t. Oiio BR
.. r s- -.. -... N E 0.. C.LO

fI IaC' ,:I I II


June October 19M


I 4 '4 K f hK >


MIJTV


& i c iC ?C QC


ma,.n .0- 4
I 4--i I
I I 'H-1

17 'K -

LI T* L:V~. ,. '.~.


Three


I r ,._ *i


4J4?~ it S ~4 3 -I


4'*.c.. J -


ann .r..~.. 4.v. 3' cia
a .* .a a.. ,...oo .0. '.0. *n,-15 a .c.-.-C14)
i0 tia 4a asarlo ,o I.,. ,mI..L.
,a a-.. c-a a-,.. .*u aa*~. 44 .*t .*.,I.S..,,fl.


CHART 15


NW. LA.
w ha w4 -%--
s+o -.


1, i
o i 5 n o to


R4M


- ftr .. ..












FOOD PRODUCTS (WHOLESALE).
P R A DA A, JUNE-OCrOBER, 1933
NORTH CAROLINA.


PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION IN JUNE.
EMPLOYEES L WEEKLY PAYROLL


TOTAL EMPLOYED
43i


SPECIFIC PERCENTAGE CHANGE, bUE- OCTOBER.
EMPLOvMET WEEKLY PAYROLL


PER CENT


TOTAL PAYROLL
129,290.


80-

60-


TOTALM CHARGE
ac7 67.9%


d40 -


20-




MASSACHUSETTS.


('OrOTArnL CHANGE
1S,4,77. (IS.7K


WEEKLY INCOME
PEI ftOo-R.


DOLLARS
25-


-0 r
0-



Re


DOLLAO.S
35-


AVERAGE FOR ALL FIRMS

OCTOSE~~.136




"JR
z o
z lo
0

3 1p


PER CENtr

Do- rorAL FIRMS




jo-

ID-


1w -
A1- 1 inn i



,,,i6. to'.9 "7 ,a o o


TorAL EMPLOYFO
8, 80


TOTAL PAYROLL
ti t7j,4S.


J7)~iL-OS ~


PE CEMrT
so


PER CE'T

TOTALL CMA&GE
2 '. .


(iTrOAL CHANGE
f aoa0 ,HS.if.f


30-

2a-

20-



S- 0
Si
ID a


iJ 00 SO '00 106


OHIO.


DOLLARS
AO-


PER CiM"


A.AQAGE AW ALL

JUNE S 2d 02
cn







F





1 0 -40 10 100W


so- rTOTAL iNai

do-

so-

so-
10-





d*roman -An -v as #J'o"ea
IA-&
Ad5.E.U-aj I M 't


ITAL a."PLOYVE
ala..


TOTAL PAyROLL
'f alptw0.


(1TRTAL CHANGE
ofl ./ e.?/


Ohr O4AL CMAE
fs.i2.Se. 6fx)i


2I-


*0 -10E--

10- .I -




:' '':, i
so.- no-





:.. Hi:- .:..:.. ::::: Hi.::. .... :..... ..... .. ...


PRA CENSUS


ESfrABLISMEwTs


PER CE T
50-


TOTAL FIRMS
173


CHART 16 A


7 a


AVERAGE OII A"L
FiRMS









5 m
M- ?,.a4Mi
E[f


34 1


I I I


-1






PRA CENSUS


DEPARTMENT STORES.
P i A 0A,'. JUN '-OCTOBIG. 1131
NORTH CAROLINA


PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION IN JUNE.
EmPLOTEESe. WEEtLY PATROL.


CHART IS B


SPECIFIC PERCENTAGE CHANGE, JUNE-OCTOBER
EtLorMENTr W E a.r PAriOLL.


PCR CNTr


WEEKLY INCOME
Prl WoMfftll





DOLLAiS.


PER CENT.


TOTAL. filmss,
1 II


TOTAL EMPLOYED,
,AOj ri-l


TOTAL M04o.L,
* lS,14O.


AW4wi'.F'nlI I0 7 4


PER CEtr.


I0-


40- rTOrAL FIRMS,
6S


TOrAL PA/ROLL,
I sio, 430.


S isi /i t


o- "mrTOTAL CNANS,


*o-





0-MASSACHUSETTS



MASSACHUSETTS.


PER CENT.


a, o o CA"*N )


'"TOrAL CAdNGE
$ *,,E,. .-.a.%)


DOLARS.


1hwr.4. cwwMoe,
$ 4sose. fl9 a v


-60-


OHIO.


Pt CENT.


OOLUARS


xa- *


I.- [
5.- I
I-
I a


NRA (.Cr|
WS.MA.UV* tfw


E TAJL ISaNMErS.


PER CENT


A1'1RAS FOMR
ALL AFRM4
Ouue sO, IQ 9
JorunE ja aS


TOTAL FIRMS,
IIs


TOTAL EMPLOYreo,
'5,l4)


TOTAL AOIFROLL,
I n.01497.


DTroTA cm4ANsE,
o00 f"


TOTALTL CRANSE,
ArI f,MI. ("ssw


AviiRAt FOR
ALL FIRMS.
6 F ra,
84'1111I i
I&fn re


- qI-ifi is


-7..T Prnn .











PRA CENSUS


COTTON GOODS. CHART ISC
P. R.A- DATA, JUNE-OCTOBER, 1933-.
NORTH CAROLINA.


PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION IN JUNE.
ESTASF-I#MwiTS EMPtorsES


SPECIFIC PERCNMAGE CHANGtE ,JUN-OCTOBER.
EwMfopw, er W9w" P, rouL


WEdary PAVROi.


WEEKLY INCOME
PER WORkER


PER cWr

to-

T4TAL FARMS

4o-

30-

20-





^1~ ~~ J2.Tl /i J2 IIU I

pfiw MIT
0


554 s15n? 1


YOTAL FfRMfS
Ph


a 9 Z? *


PER CENT
#20-


TOTAL. EMPLOMEO


ToT PARWOLL
t 064r 73.


O-T"oTiAL CHANE

so- 7,zs tasfil
90-


f'7TAL aNucE,
, 4... 44as5f.)


I I- s r [1DM 1mloo

MASSACHUSETTS.
PER cufT


TOTAL EMPLOYEE
3s, #Oa


TOTAL PAYROLL
/ si5t,Jo.


120o -

00 -

60




40

to -


(2)=a CHANGE
ifles,121 aAUz


DOLLARS
D0-




25-

sO-

to- af
uS-
0
0


DOI.LA$
40-

35-

.30-

2s-

20-

's--i


AVE540E fop ALL Fl*MS
juiuE I Se





"0oarzA IL0











AVERAGE FOP ALL FIRA



cn
dB


48- fJJWTA CRAA .
2O (..s%)
100-
I00-

641-


/TOTAL CIAME
A JotO IT..)


DOLL405
40-

3s-
AVWERAE d% ALL FIRMS
30- WJ)ORE1 n.

as-


m-wk,,'erms 3

PER CENT
*0o-


mAr4L FIR S
a


TOTAL cAfPLOYo
55s


OHIO.
PES CENT
1o0-


f


30-







PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION IN JUVE
EmPLOVES



'n


TOTAL EMPLOYED
?Il


PER CENT


80-

40-

*0-

to-

IO-


S .w e,^ 'a r ,F ,, a o


WIV LrL PAYRO


'"n


5O-


P D. A. ATA*, JUNE-OC- IER. Itea.
NORTH CAROLINA.

SPECIFIC PERCENTAGE CHANGE, JUNE
L EMPLOvMENT WEEcLr PAfROLL



PERi CNr


TOtAL AYROLL
$ F,.,..


(ITrorAL CRANE
17TO ,SJ.eI%)
SO-
so -
40-

40-


20- n



MASSACHUSETTS.


(4 TOTAL CHmAm
f4DE7. (49.1%)










--- 00y-


WEEKLY INCOME
PER WO*XER


OOLLAtS


AEWA.AG MR ALL PfM~
a.- ( n n
ZO" IvOC 12 n|S



IVA
'*-


PER CENt


JDtAL FI/RMS
IJ


rM4L EMPLOYED
w4r


40-

30-

20- f F

10-


IKu j~frHij 1 94 IS SO 1

PEP GfAfT

B0-

70-

60-

20-
TOTAL IRMS TOTAL EMPLOYED
40-


30-
20-



IO-

S10 0 n 10
JW, 0 I0tf 00 I r'" ,tO W, 19000


TOTAL PAYROLL
/ Sj?'ofj.


f &S,42&.
?OTAL PAYROLL











n
I ED No moo


PER CENT
140-
i TOTAL CAAAe
120- -a?/ -l

100-

o80-

so-

40-

20-


I S 0 j00


O00lAS


TOTAL CHANGE
/-,sSIS-I.I^


AVERA"E R ALL F/rlw
JUNE If 5.5S
(f) ocnue..t* 4









U -S

0


0 0 o 0 W 5


OHIO.


PER CENT

(")TOTA4. CHANGE
/4S 1l.Sv


(J) TOTAL CHANGE
1 1o,0r. (.4-)


DOLLARS
25-

20-

Is-

IO-
Ul
-I


40-

207

EPY
MANSl f I.W^S^r L


AW-R.A4E OW ALL FIRms
U5 ES Os m


r I NRA

u1111ro
| | II U QI C H a


.1. -~-s... ~ -


ESr-ALISAWeTS

M K-n


TOTAL. FIRMS


to0 'Jo00


Soo


So






-60-

C-.nsus of I..anufactur-sdfta, 7-stat sarinnl Cihrts 17. In th.

analysis of' th. s dat'. a uroc dur- vaL u..;-d diftf ring in sorr r.spr-cts

from that follow-d in tI,- study of to P?.A casnml Tnii-, v..-s n c ssitat-d

by th-, lack of "id nticl firm" data in tii avnil-bl C nscus r cords for

1931-1933.

ThD analysis r suits ar d.-pict-o in Cl.erts 17-.I, ..., 17-VII,

17-C. Th. su.rortinL data illustr.t Ad in Tabi XII for Ohio, surrmnriz-

publish-'d C-nsus of i.'tnufactur s r cults, 1929, I1:31, 1933 (Rotoorint

Rcl.'as---s of 193u).

Section V 7cnnomic Inrnllcations of PPA _Th:ic.:,'mmnt Incr as

Thi:, s-ction is conc-.rn d with inf-r'nc-s flo''ing,: fro,: an

examinations of th:i. tr-nds rf -'m-,'lyn,,n-nt qnd v-' kly ,c'urr, th-- form r

shorn in Chart 5 an(, t,-: latt-r* ir. Ciart 19. In '- -11. consid-rd

judgm nt of tn-: indications of th_- trirnds cn- rould Lav: to tak.

account also of th- r lat-d -'conornic variables r f T,_,lo.,rM nt, man-hours,

re:.kly hours d:-nictUd in Chcrt 18. For th- latt-r ti.: surporting data

derive from a C ucnsus-BLS stuay of thI man-hour rt:turns for 35 industry

groups, of thc 1933 O-:nsu of :..anuactur z Ti_- mnan-hour data ar:- slum-

marized in Tabl VII.








The_ BLS ind.'xL.s of vr-.._kly hours for th: rajor .y roups ,wrz
computed from th: w-.kly hour data civ--n for t, primary.
industri -s in BLS "Thnrlny.nt rn] Payrolls" z.ach i.onth. Thi
conmput,.d indcxLr shorn in Chuart 19 r-r ch-?ckAd against un-
publishd BLS vlus.


9854








61
CHART 07-C

WAGES AND WAGE EARNERS IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES

BY AVERAGE SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT, 1929, 1931, 1933

7 STATE COMPOSITE ""


RATIOS TO 1929


ESTABLISHMENTS
PEA CENT PER CENT
Of T IaL.L Of 1929
20 1,o

.5 so os !
11 W.,1mi- ,1S
160
*IS t 0I
*.3, 45.21i' I
10 40

5 20


p









k H2


ER CENT
OF 1929
0)

0

0

0
0


LII I =i5 10 20 I50 1 00 42 0 5C iIUC0'CUY,
SIZE OF ESTABUSHMENT

WAGE EARNERS
PER CENT PER CENT PEr CENT
Of T07AL OF '929 OF 1929


'29 2.14..000 ` 51
20 So BO -so -- ---- -- ^ 8
"5 1 '', ~ co-1 I 1 -



10 ,..o 40 I l I I I 40o



5 20o ,20
I ,

,0 5 20 OrnLenX100 600-0E

WAGES
PER CENT PER CENT PER CENT
OF TOTAL OF 1929 OF 1929
25 -O.*0 '---'-- I o00
29- 4,153.000.000
20 I" O .0O' 80 _.-=--- o 80
*li *2,BI 000"000i 0 ... -" If"19 ql
,5 60' 60
33. I1.8421 .000 (| '933
10 40 40

0 I I ,|20
I ,' i I i i I i I!,:


- 1 5 10 20 50 00 200400 0 1600 .OVEr 1 5 i 20 50 100 200400 90010 OVtF


'O

n


S RATIOS TO 1929 PER CENT
Of 1929
0 _-i00
,-- .-931
1o "----' Bo


,0 I !4
60 0 i I *i o






I 5 '0 20 50 100 200400900 1600WI
JIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT


*DISTRIBUTION BV SIZE IS MADE BY ALLOCATING EACH CENSUS INDUSTRY ACCORDiNO
TO THE AVERAGE NUMBER OF W1iE EARNERS PER ESTABLISHMENT IN 1929
massS, PENN., OHIO, N C MO .TEX ,CAL
SOURCE CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES, 1929, i931, 193.
9S54


NRA
DIVISION OF REVIEW
STATISTICS SECTION
NO 546
MS. OCT., 193


DISTRIBUTION


PlE CENT
O TOTAL.
S


PER CENT
OF TOTAL
25

20

'5

10









62
CHART 17-I


WAGES AND WAGE EARNERS IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES
BY AVERAGE SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENt* 1929 1931 1933


MASSACHUSETTS


ESTABLISHMENTS
PER GENT PER CEF
OF TOTAL. OF 132a
2 "1t


RATIOS TO 1929


WAGE EARNERS


PER CENT 8E
Of: TOVAL I OP
I ,--- --,--1
I 193 I I
I0--20






100
I -] --- 1


ID5 1 20 ac Oc U Si'.0 1800

AVERAGE INCOME .

PER CENT Is29F il
OF TOTAL I'01
es I----|-J I=-.. ... .,--- -- e!
20 __ '193 ...... -'-'3

20 2is I (

IIf

10 t


WAGES
R CENT P
TO7AL


WEEKLY INCOME
PER WORKER


RATIOS TO 1929


"DISTRIBUTION BY SIZE IS MAOE BY ALLOCATING EACH CENSUS INDUSTRY ACCOROINO
TO THE AVERAGE NUMBER OF WAGE EARNERS PER EbTABLIUSHMENT IN 1920

SOURCE' CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES, 1929, 1931, 1933.
a&54


NRA
DIVISION OF REVIEW
STATISTICS SECTION
NO 340
M.S., OCT., 931


PER CENT
,F ,UTAL
25

20

IS

IC


DiSTRIBUTION

r-4


PER CENT
Sl8o "


80
SO
go

40

to


d




PER GENT
OF 1929
100

100

SO

-40


PER GENT
OF 1929
100

80


60

40


20

0




PER CE T
OF Ion
100

BO
so


40

40








63
CHART 17-I


WAGES AND WAGE EARNERS IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES
BY AVERAGE SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT, 1929, 1931, 1933.

PENNSYLVANIA
DISTRIBUTION RATIOS TO 1929
ESTABLISHMENTS
PEI GENT PER GENT PER CENT P" OINT
OF TOIL OF TOTAL OF IlS OF im


D -_20 So s. IO
'B3
s ., o --.60 ~

flii 1i .790
0I 40
1929-
'-F i -i ^' 'to-

I I 0 20 O 100 200400. 00 0 I 10 100 2040 MO 0

WAGE EARNERS
PE CNT PER CENT` PU ER
a POPE TOTAL OF 1ee9 OF
me t [ .. oo -- oo
y a 93 SFTO* 0*?gr a

IS -2- i 39 1014048-
1931...9 I .U- 19 1-

1o so2 ,__ --So.O i I1--
13 33. 690.973
,o ---- .,,o --- *eo -* -- L eo
'- 't 3i n e *? -
10 ----- |- -- 40 40

B, 5 20 1 20

1 5 10 20 50 '00 200 400S0000 W O 20 80 o200 400 6001600

WAGES
PER GENT PER CENT PER CENT PR CENT
OF T9B |- OF TOTAL OF 1929 I29


DOLLARS -.....


*DIImIUTION BY SIZE IS MADE BY ALLOCATING EACH CENSUS INDUSTRY ACCORDING NRA
TO THE AVERAGE NUMBER OF WAOE EARNERS PER ESTABLISHMENT IN 1929 DIVISION OF REVIEW
STATISTICS SECTION
NO. 339
SOURCE CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES. i929, 1931, 1933 M.S OCT., 1935
9654




F


64
CHART 17-m


WAGES AND WAGE EARNERS IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES
BY AVERAGE SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT 1929, 1931, 1933

OHIO

DISTRIBUTION RATIOS TO 1929
ESTABLISHMENTS
CENT PER CENT PER CENT PER C
TOTAL OF TOTAL, OF I929 OF II
25 25 26 .100 I-------------- 100
I .UMBE IB .
20 20 29- n.055 GO8 go
S1B33
,,, 193 '31,, %F" e Gr-
15 --- 113 ----- 5 so -- do--
'33. 09
... "" I B 4

10 40 40

5 20 20
-5 o0 50 19290 00 P

SIZE OF ESTALISMMENT' 5 1- -- 0 wau AuRNER

I WAGF FARNFRA


PER CENT
OF W29
100

^-1931 a
soa

60

40

eo


I a o 504 n 120
SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT


l993







- -I


I 5 10 M0 50 100 200 800 ISO0-OV


WAGES
PER CENT PER CENT
OF TOTAL OF 1929
25 100
AMOUNT
20 29. it1102.i66.499 60

31. ,.IS49Nf r O
IS 60
430.144,197

10 40

5 20

R0 0


AVERAGE INCOME WEEKLY INCOME
344 PER WORKER
9 __ 0PER CENT
DOLLARS DOLLARS OF _92


20 20 I--- 20i ,9 .so so




to to -o
40

a 20


5L a 0 20 200 2ot0 B WO. OVEiP 5
SIZE El ESiFLiSH0MENT


DISTRIBUTIONN BY SIZE IS MNB BY ALLOCATING EACH CENSUS INDUSTRY ACCORDING
TO THE AVERAGE NUMBER OF WAGE EARNERS PER ESTABLISHMENT IN 192f9

SOURCE CENSUS OF MANUFACUREE, 1929, 1031, 1933.
9554


RATIOS TO 1929


NRA
DIVISION OF REVIEW
ISTATISTIO SCT110N
NO. 342
M.S., OCT. 1935


PER
OF


PER CENT
OF T01'L
25


20

16

10




0


PER "CENT
OFbal
100

so




40

20
to






PER CENT
OF 1929
100









to
SO



40

(0


i


r"


r--93 -,









bIAWR 17-N


WAGES AND WAGE EARNERS IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES
BY AVERAGE SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT" 1929. 1931, 1933


NORTH CAROLINA


RATIO TO 1929


los-


1 0 20 PO I0
SIZE OF E


DISnR


PER CEN
Of IOi


PEA CENT-
OF TOTAL
to --

10K

1K-

10Ivj~f


ESTABLISHMENTS
PER CENT PER CENT
or TOTAL OF 1929
25 u.,n O I fIII
-,~. "" I '2 7-11
I II** ?

'SI. 2.922 2 o


9L 1040.


5 ~20,
19,.I 0 0.I



-~~~~-. ----- O4


0 200400 MCO 16000vE9 1 1 20 1
STABLIGHMENT SIZE 0
l 2'7, WAGE EARNERS
--' PER GENT PER CENT
OF TOTAL OF 1920
25-- 00 oor--
.-UMBE 1931
20 so -


IS I--
to0 40

aj 2:- 1

0 lyO0400 IO1O600Ot.ER I 8 10 20 I
*5-BLISHMENT SIZE 0


Sl 00 20040019001g00o01
lF ESU BlJISMENT


AVERAGE INCOME


PER CENT
OF TOTAL


WORK R
PER CENT PER CENT
OF TOTAL OF 1929


RATIOS TO 1929


*bBTRIUllON OY SIZE IS MADE BY ALLOCATING EACH CENSUS INDUSTRY ACORIOG
10 THE AVERAGE WMIER OF WAGE EARNERS PER ESTABLISHMENT IN 1929.

SOUmE CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES, 1929, 1931, 1911.
9854


NRA
DIVISION OF REVIEW
STATISTICS SECTION
NO. 337
M.S., OCT., 1935


i I
i i

I i
I i


IBUTEWN


PLR GENT
OF 192S
-too


* 0


-40

-20


PER CENT
OF 1929



IO0


ISO
40

20


I











66
CHART 17-T


WAGES AND WAGE EARNERS IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES

BY AVERAGE SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT. 1929, 1931, 1933


MISSOURI

DISTRIBUTION RATIOS TO 1929


1931..
---


_ I IS9


I 0 10 20 60 100 200 ADO Boo
SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT


ESTABLISHMENTS
PER CENT PER CENT
OF TOTAL OF 1929


WAGE EARNERS
ER CENT PER CENT
F TOTAL OF 1929


WAGES
PER CENT PER CENT
OF TOTAL OF 1929


25 100
A I ERA
AVE[RAIE.

20 '30 *3 1T so

I S i. S DO
'I 009

'33 6.6
10 40


DISTIBUTION Bl SIZE IS MADE BY ALLOCATING EACH CENSUS INDUSTRY ACCORDING
TO THE AVERAGE NUMBER OF WAGE EARNERS PER ESTABLISHMENT IN 19H9

SOURCE- CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES, 192, 1931, I933
9654


SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT


DIVIsION OP REVIEW
STATISTICS SECTION
NO. 343
MtS, OCT., 193IS


PER CENT
OF TOTAL


PER CENT
OF TOTAL
25


20

15

10

S

0


PER CENT
OF TOTAL
ES

20

I1

10


PER CENT
OF 12900
-1100


PER CENT
OF 1929
100


90

60


40




S0


.- ='- ...... L- .L- -L-









CHART 17-W


WAGES AND WAGE EARNERS IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES

BY AVERAGE SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT,* 1929, 1931. 1933

TEXAS


PER CENT
OF Ise*
o 100


*'0

- O

S40

S20

0


WAGE EARNERS


WAGES


AVERAGE INCOME


RATIOS TO 1929


DISTRIBUTION BY SIZE IS MADE BY ALLOCATING EACH CENSUS iNDUSTRY ACCORDING
TO THE AVERAGE NUMBER OF WAGE EARNERS PER ESTABLISHMENT IN 1929.

SOURCE' CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES. i9E9. I9SI3, 1933
9854


DIVISION OF REVIEW
STATISTICS SECTION
NO. 44
M.S., OCT., ia35









68
CHART 17-M


WAGES AND WAGE EARNERS IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES

BY AVERAGE SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT* 1929, 1931, 1933


CALIFORNIA


DISTRIBUTION











-1933
L



5 10 20 50 i00 200400 800
SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT


ESTABLISHMENTS
PER CENT PER CENT
OF TOTAL OF 1929
25 ,.100
NUMBER I
20 '29. I i.9i 80
'31 9.821
15 33. .10 6O

10 40


RATIO TO 1929


193- -- -,.











1 5 1O 20 50 100 20
SZE OF T E LSTA'IBU


*TgiT





20
25


IS



I0
IS



0




PER CENT
OF TOTAL


PER CENT PER CENT PER CENT
OF TOTAL OF TOTAL OF 1929
25 25 100-
AMOUNT
20 20 29, 403.116.046 80

"31 ^ 259.,U Il7
15s 15 60 -
33' $ 14,425,095
10 10 40
-- -f-1931
5 5 20
0 "'1990-

I 5 10 20 B0 100 200400 500 I 5
AVERAGE INCOME WEEKLY INCOME

---- -1929 r---- PER WORKER
DOLLARS DOLLARS PER CENT
t ,.L... 931 DOLLARS OF 1929

254 25 _-- -- -- ---- '00
9 AVERASE
o 20 27.43 s

at,. 24.93 I.
15 -- 5.1 60

10 10 40

5 5 20 ^ --- 0 1


I 5 10 20 50 100 200 4800 0 0 l
o1 5
SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT

*DISTRIBUTION BY SIZE IS MADE BY ALLOCATING EACH CENSUS INDUSTRY ACCORDING
TO THE AVERAGE NUMBER OF WAGE EARNERS PER ESTABLISHMENT IN 1929

'SURCE: CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES, 1929, 1931, 1933.
9554


PER CENT
OF IWO
100

to

60

40

20

0




PER CENT
OF 19MB
100

60

60

40


ho

0



PER CENT
OF 190
TOO


RATIOS TO 1929

PER CENT
OF 1929
1I00


933 so

60

40


20

10 20 50 100 200 400 goo
SIZE OF ESTABUSNHMENT


NRA
DIVISION OF REVIEW
STATISTICS ,SECTION
NO. aI41
M.S OCT., 1935


WAGE EARNERS
PER CENT PER CENT
OF TOTAL OF 1929



























TABLE T,-A
SMART VA IATII0S O 8 i0LnOThBf AD WAGoSO BY A18AG 8 SIZ Or ZFr IABLZSMIw
IE MAJUAOTURING INDUBSTRIBS, 1929. 1931, 1933

AIIA2a agRi 1T


,/ lubor of Oenus
It 19929 w


1-5
6-10
11-20
21-50
51-100
101-200
201-400

801-1, 600

Total


10 9
27 25
33 32
47 45
31 30
21 21
5 .5
4 4
1 1

179 172


rex uen%


Is... U.


- -


Prr UOe


o1 9*2t i I M 3b rI of To1 I lu b r
1929 1929 195 5 13 1929 1 1929 1931 1933


1.83
20.96
21.80
27.67
10.08
13.26
2.16
2.14
0.10

100.00


181 168 134
2,069 1,968 1,705
2,152 2,064 1,739
2,732 2,621 2,158
995 788 786
1,309 1,207 1,167
213 189 170
211 185 158
10 4 5

9,872 9,194 8,022


0.14
3.14
5.84
16.50
13.11
30.28
9.82
19.15
2.00

99.98


800 681 529
17,529 15,666 15,703
32,558 26,895 a21,882
92,010 81,999 63,306
73,094 47,913 50,186
168,828 135,119 12918:
54,773 37,101 30,487
106,739 77,228 76,223
11,163 6,277 6,678

557,.494 428,879 394,177


por G0n6
of Total 0o1U 1I."'-Oj
1929 192. 1931 195i

o.14 S t 90? $ 'li
3.46 ?a ,53 20o. '5? 17.?,p
7.57 52,570 140,509 26,306
16.89 117,330 90,700 55,933
13.43 93,2e8?, 5 ,700 47,496
y,..'5 210,19 I.42, io 110,551
10.99 76,329 43,980o 30,m2
15.35 106,618 68.996 56,379
1.95 13,522 6,93 5,740o

100.03 694,905 468,742 350,227


I I -- ______________________


Weekly Income Per
Fix- 1031 IQ.!

?22 7? 622?.6A 51.9.
26.39 25.1 20.8A
31.06 29.96 e3.12
24.52 21.27 16.99
24.54 21 .95 18.20
2-.94 20.24 16.16
26.81 22.80 18.98
19.al 17.1' 14.22
23.29 19.59 16.53

23.96 21.02 17.09


R t to t o 1 9 2 9
haIH kg.lll !j ~gkeAir~r JM.8k ~ H'rc.
----t--llb~ --RAU -T---- E T s
191 191 M 19" 1i. 1n 9;l 1,v ___l193! 1933

92.4? 7-.'.03 95-.13 '6.13 Sa.fA '4.72 "9.1.7 0. 7T
95.12 52.41 89.37 so ^* 50. r. .!. 7! nl?
95.91 8o.8o 8s.61 67.21 77.06 50.04 96.46 7k.t
95.94 77.29 89.12 68.-0 77.30 47.67 6.75 69.29
79.20 78.99 65.5 68.66 5.64 50.92 9.45 74.16
92.21 89.15 o.o03 76.052 67.67 52.60o 14.5 68.76
8.73 79.81 67.74 55.66 57.62 39-.42 8 5.C4 70.79
87.68 74-.88 72.35 71.41 64-.71 5Z. 891.k3 714.02
140.00oo 50.00 56.23 5.-2 4 7.28 12.15 84.11 70.97

93.13 Bl.? 76.93 70.71 67.46 50.41 87.73 71.5


8our0oe0 0in, of D fatu 1929, Vol. III, pp. 232-35; 1931, pp. 1223-27; 1933, Rotoprint rles., of March 12, 1935.
J/ Each Oensus Ind4utry In allocated to a site range Interval determined by the Average Imuaber of Wage Earnero per letabllshment In 1929.


2 11 1 4 h































TABLE "IL-B
* TAMUVZOIA o FIMOTHNT AID WAGES BY AiVA OZ SIZI or iBS.L SUeEWN
n IT iNUiFWATURi IIDTSTR2IB 1929, 1931, 1933

I ______________ .. I' IE T_ __ Wo __ __ __A_ _

? Icbn of Com reto a'. Per oent Weekly Inofe ____F___ R a to 19 29
815 "nfa.ii Bt of total tn T at mOt b e r Of Totsi 1m" l(Unito rBe UIIa19 huaM
_uo__" 1929 9113
La ~ 13 199 92 92 13 1935 199 1929 '1931 1f9 33 1929 199 13V93 12 91 13 13413


1,223 9gm 611
1,30 1,170 857
5,706 .,916 3,945
2,593 2,508 2,011
3,016 2,666 2,199
1,857 1,676 1,526
582 521 S .70
,1 35 33
161 151 135

16,947 111,50 11,790


4,414 3,775 2,4419
10,8144 ,335 6,831
718,306 67,104' 59,534
110,513 519,15 66,213
209,442 159,41 131,88411
263,421 207,156 198,019
165,313 115,390 90,783
22,426 13,735 11,191
19,.267 o101,059 10,069


100.00 014,o44 765,793 690,973


0.46
1.05
5.20

9.09
18.94
23.110
17.59
2.51


100.00


* 6,323 $ 1,091 $ 2,250
14,91, 10,176 6, k53
113,112 89,795 63,.17
125,1111 87,194 66,303
261,236 15e,832 97,115
322,519 205,104 157,968
246,761, 110,221 83,43
3A,566 16,031 9,912
25k,977 l25,10 57,,37

1,379,1111 531,939 5711,113


527.36
26.46
27.77
21.81
23.99
23.56
25.71
29.65
32.75

e6.16


$24..8
23.K11
25.73
18.73
19.43
19.07
23.37
22.44
23.51

80.99


$17.91
18.17
20.50
12.79
14.16
15.35
17.68
17.05
16.15

15.99


77.19 50.EO20
11.36 59.60
86.15 69.14
56.69 69.51
58.40 72.91
U1.12 0.587
9.52 : 0.76
92.68 50.49
93.79 03.5

06.09 69.57


A-.95 55.11
76.06 63.01
85.69 74.33
81.22 77.95
76.12 62.97

78.64 75.17
69.0 54..92
61.26 49.90
67.70 tfi.T
75.52 65.14.


77.25 36.06
65.23 13.27
79.35 54.93
69.77 52e.7
58.50 37.15
63.63 41.93
56.2 33." t
46.36 U.74
119.2 34.30
60.31 41.64


0o.9 65.46
5.74 68.67
92.65 73.82
89.U 67.11
76.52 59.0e
so0-91 65.l15
si ,'o 61.50
75.65 57.1 a

7e.7To ".31

.79-95 si1t'


1-5
6-10
11-20
21-50
51-100
101-DOO


4101-6m
501-1,600

Total


7.22
9.49
33-67
17.07
17.50
11.13


0. 0.A
0.95

100.00


* 0.44
1.07
7.72
10.91
20.65
25.98
16.30
2.21
111.72


$M5 I OO: "- haIfN.*., 1929, Tol. III, pp. 46-51; 1931. pp. 1259--; 1933, Ittopr*st roloat of Moch 9, 1935
,j nok Oam Isomitry 1t alloeaste to a *its rans, Intereul Uto ui'ied by the Aurage Nmber atoW IWe inrmelr per 2tk1 leetalt In 1929.




















TABLO 33I-C

0 SUMMAX VARIATION OF MPLCYWEVT AXD WAO8S BY AVERAO U SIZE OF 51 t ,I ,rKr.--
M
L' IN MUAUFACTUBIhG 11DUS'TRIS, 1929, 1931, 1933.
20 1 0

E E r wages___
... neu 7r ... v.. .. PeI -fn

Site .r 1 177 e 7 -i41 1 -
"- ? ,^ 7 + ; 'T ? ^ L : -
in lc ,J .17.. -4 ;.'1. 4 1929.

1-5 6 6 4 4.02 477 N16 116 O.4CQ 2,2eiO 1,,y7 0,'4 -*.o 3*,i 1, e.73 S 1,")'
-10 24 24 23 23.50 2,766 '?67 1,768 *.35 24.796 20,123 19,014 3.02 33,277 25,018 18,717
11-20 47 42 40 23.86 2,829 1,10 1,817 5.86 43,462 34,464 30,942 6.02 66,399 49,026 34,226
21-50 41 37 34 14.07 1,665 1,454 1,092 7.79 57,741 42,737 39,05 7.01 77,227 47,410 33,762
51-100 37 30 32 16.94 2,?45 1,815 1,535 21.32 158,044 103,020 84,615 19.76 217,757 111,562 70,066
101-200 29 25 P7 12.00 1,42! 1,246 1,182 ?8.75 213.073 141,451 133,953 ?7.57 303,818 160.199 124,337
201-400 a 8 7 2.30 ?72 229 191 9.26 66A,65 48,218 46,811 9.20 101,356 55,976 41,426
401-o800 -
801-1,600 2 2 2 1.04 123 99 76 15.90 117.850 73,020 71,224 19.15 211,110 89,493 68.322
1,600 And Ove 1 1 1 0.27 32 is 15 7.46 55.307 32,180 35,621 8.00 86,165 41,933 37,686

Total 197 175 170 100.00 116.85 9,729 7,694 100.00 741,143 496.740 462,718 100.00 1,102,166 532,494 430,144

source; nenas of M eatures: 1929, Vol. III U. 404-406; 1931, Chapter V, n. 1252-1256; 1933 Rotoprint release or Mrch 18, 1935.
/ 'ech Census Induetry is allocated to a size ronse Interval determined by the Avera6e Number of Wage Earnere per Estebllshment In 1929.


.!eckly Zncome Per
9- l -l-.. -


? 6 Vr)/ -I1 ',I
25.81 23.91 18.93
29.38 27.36 21.27
25.72 21.33 16.61
26.50 20.83 15.92
27.42 21.78 17.85
28.39 22.33 17.02


34.44 23.57 18.45
30.65 25.06 20.46

28.60 22.55 17.86


, at I 0 to 1929


^c -L t -?-. -if

6t "-. "5 7"j
81.37 63.46
g1.46 64.23
87.17 65.47
80.85 66.37
87.56 83.06
64.19 70.22


60.49 61.79
56.25 46.68

82.07 66.59


H ?*- "iTT,,-*~-e *et9o ~ ca
-- -- --~'^"" J. "
'I I
58 9. 6i.60 61.7? d 7 88 a8 69.74
81.15 76.68 75.18 56.'5 92. T3.'31
79.30 71.19 73.84 51.55 93.12 72.-0
74. 1I 67.69 61.39 43.72 62.93 0.56
65.18 53.54 51.23 32.18 76.60 60.06
f.39 62.67 51.68 40.92 79.435 5.10
70.23 68.16 55.23 40.67 78.65 59.95


61.96 60.44 42.39 32.3- 66.SO 53.57
56.16 64.41 47.56 42.97 81.76 66.75

67.02 62. 43 52.85 39.03 78.85 62.52


- ----- -T




































TABLE =n- D
SUIART TVARTIONS O0 XPLOTirN AND WAGES BY AVERAGOI IZE OF BTABLIGSMI8T

IN imiUFAcTRoii INDiSTRIES, 1929, 1931, 1933.


S bo__aB____ __ _Ir____o _____ I I a
wbit bhpet e Xen Ear neta i it Vase a a j atio t o 1929
Nb of tcomui For Can% Per cePt k Weely Ioan e Per Ht l o l 9
Sl 880848/ Indutries of Total br of Total I u a b r of Total .$ount nit 1.._.___0ker ZatablihMgent |JI razer>g. NImway IMOM
S199 1929 1931 1933 1929 1929 1931 1933 192 199 93 933 1929 1929 1931 1933 1929 1931 1933 1931 1 19] 31 1933 93 1931193 19 1933


:-5 9 a 5
6-M 12 12 10
11-20 15 13 11
a-5o 17 15 i5
51-lto 2 1 1


2 0q1-4 2 2 2
801i-i.t. -
I,600 nda OTre 1 1 1

Total 6 60 53


0.67
1.90
11.79
4.75
14.91
23.71
115.71



6.57

100.01


,.1410 1,229 1,130
3.990 3,327 2,693
214,738 14,263 12,999
9,967 7,186 6,736
10,295 10,729 11,029
19,75 419,355 59,1105
95,903 76,863 90,696



13,775 15,501 14.899

09,826 178,453 199,324


0.99
3.03
12.10
K4.71
5.57
214.78
41.50



7.32

100.00


$ 1,593
4,,70

19,471
7,590
8,958
39,858
66,754



11,784

160,868


t 1,278 # 956
3,783 e,583
8,795 6,373
4,698 3,058
7,047 7,187
35,134 35,443
46,510 49,435



10,821 8,934

118,066 112,969


121.73 $20.00 l16.27
23.48 21.86 18.45
15.13 11.86 9.43
14.63 12.57 8.73
16.73 12.63 12.53
15.40 13.69 11.53
i3.38 11.64 10.27



16.44 13.42 11.53

14.75 12.72 o10.90


64.35 41.27
82.95 64.58
18.33 31.22
79.014 70.06.
76.47 84.56'
88.62 92.06
87.43 83.06



87.50 50.00

66.42 54.10o


87.16
83.38
57.-66
72.10
104.e22
99.22
80.15



112.51
85.05


80.14
67.49
52.54
67.58
107.13
118.89
94.57



o108.114
94.99


80.23
77.68
115.17
61.99
78.67
88.15
69.67



91.83
73.39


60.00oo
53.04
32.73
40.34
80.23
88.92
72.56



75.82
70.22


I A & I S I .


92.04
93.10
79.39
85.92
75.9
88.90
07.00



81.63
16.24


7. 7
714.57
78.53
62.67
59.67
74.90 to


76.76



70.1)
73.90


-zoew Oonm.. of Mamnuf.tig.: 1929, Vol. i1, p. 388; 1931, pp. 1l250-51; 1933, Rotoprlut release of llRuob 16, 1935.
/ Nash Oune lndustrz I1 allocated to a else range Inter al deterlned b1 the Average ltuber of Wag* Eafrner per Etabliehment in 1929.


i.694
13.91
k3.27
8.80
3.51
9.)6
9.64



0.91

100.01


a 7

3,797 2,522

























TABLE XIl-E
B5UMAR* VACATIONS Of MLTMINT AD WAEMS BY AVERAGE SINN Orf 1mLIs9MU7 t~
IN MAZWAOTnUUSG INDUSTRniS, 1929, 1931, 1933
A iIit2 AI


tglrlfber of I r*eolu
la l 7,a9 ;? IndrnI'To !


1-5 | 5 5 3
6-10 26 22 20
11-20 37 A) 3t
2-50o 0 35 o30
51-100 18 16 15
101-200 10 9 9
201-00 3 2 2
401-800 3 2 2

TOIBa 195 125 115


Pa Bt b 1 l a ha a a S a
I !, 1 b en.tj
Per 'leot
of TOtal A u I t 1_l 1
n?9 Mg9? 1931 197i'

1.16 68 91 I21
1i4-5 833 705 522
98.55 2.799 2,19 1,727
17.5o 1,oo009 51 650
11.03 636 593 503
5.53 319 255 07
0.43 25 17 16
1.32 76 57 56

100.00 5,765 4.736 3,708


Per ei
_ll ., .i ,.. ...
o f T o L N a a 1 a X
1929 1929 I1i31 1i33

0.12 2t40 1174 il
3.42 6,942 5,412 4,535
1733 35,159 29,375 24,773
16.56 33,604 23,630 19,92
21.96 43,569 91,98)4 37,563
20.47 41,519 27,446 24,741
3.67 7,446 2,791 2,249
16.95 3)4,95 22,214 24,117

oo100.00 202,74 153.02 137,594


. .. g- W. 1 i_ -
Per ,?el~ti
of Total AMDo"uM n 1. L.0I.O0l-
19-9 Iq?9 Mi1 1i3t

0.14 )4 I 2?3 I 103
3.58 8,610 6,439 3.,966
19.P4 46,238 37,006 26,134
17.28 91,549 25,197 16,030
16.84 45,292 39,953 31,367
21.29 51,167 29,090 20,716
4.27 10,274 3,053 2,043
15.35 36,900 16,925 16.662

100.00 240,369 159,638 117,021


'a


U.ekly Inome Per
1929 191 13F M

t?7.59 2'P 68 117 31
23.g5 22.68 16.82
25.29 24.23 20.29
23.77 20.47 15.82
19.99 16.30 16.05

23.70 20.-3 16.10
26.54 21.04 17.47
20.63 16.38 13.29

22.79 20.09 16.36


60 29 39 71
64.63 62.67
79.26 61.70
89.39 64.k2
943.24 79.09
79.94 69.9
68.00 6W.oo
75.00 73.66

62.19 64.32


la t i o o 19 9 ______
1411 IQ'15 M 'Il 1915 19 1 9
--'---- --' ,'fn -- S i II T P-- -'T -

7?'. 5 IC A %!. &'. 29. 0j .c. 6P 7?
77.96 65.33 74.76 46.06 95.93 70.52
83.55 70.6 o0.04 56.52 95.1 S0.O
30.-32 57.98 60.53 38.59 66.12 66" 55
96.26 66.26 6.21 6 2 9 91.55 80.29
66.11 59.59 56-.5 40.9 I 5".99 67.93

37.6 30.20 29.72 19.6 79-.5 65.63
.6)4.5 70.12 51.29 45,15 79.90 6k.42

75.3 67.62 66.50 M6.68 68.15 71.79


8ouroe: O-am. of Manfacture., 1929, vol. III, pp. 292-94; 1931, pp. l23 1-37; 1933, IRotoprlnt release of Ma.robh 11, 1935.
A/ lonh Cenu Industry 1i ellocalte to a els. o # Interval deteratlned by the Ave rge umber of lWge Earners per Establihmeent In 1929.


- :.i : s -' ,s:: :,^ c- -. r. ,11 111., I. IIIIIIIIII.I i -N



















TABLE lM-F
SUOMI TVRIATIOI8 OF BIPLOT1I AID 1BIB BY AUtnOA 8IZI Of XBTIBLIO/IET"
IN lNuiACTUI I]MDoSTRI3B, 1929, 1931, 1933


--*J.. lt1 huo --Ttrs .s 2. a T. --- 1 ----- ^-- I I ----- ^' '! l t t 1 t
_S I o_ at_ Tr o_ t |Per ent_ PeT Oet eeBkly Isonm Per__________
of gotai per e' Pool' 1101 A mr n
per 2uabo If r0.uRi 1929a P?0i 192 31o T93 9I Vooklyreu~zRa o 12
ft1)9 192 9 35 2929 29F931 133 19 29 19-311i9 192 19 1931w 1193~3 1 "93L3 193- 1932,:
Zltl W zmer f lt f Tta
623.9 62.00 7.1


568 86 371
2,527 2.172- 1,746
S61 237 343
919 659 625
362 312 307
128 123 131
83 82 90

5,198 4,95 3,613


2,635 2,218 1,870
19,2"5 15,391 13,284
8,476 5,947 5,678
38,%212 20,513 22,492
23,627 17,619 16,k96
22,.,99 16,217 14,789
19,13k 16,099 15,795
3. 28 9.0 90.39


2.13
16.77
5-42
25.16
13.95
18.59
17.97
100.00


* 3,233 S 2,422 $ 1,670
25,156 19,067 13,278
8,228 5,2z6 3,T776
38,206 16,3 1 13,574
21,186 13,529 9,537
28, M 18,300 12,066
27,286 23."9 18,700

151,87 98, t 72,60"1


023.59 $2.10- 07.-17
25.20 23.82 19.22
18.67 16.97 12.79
19.13 15.36 11.61
17.24 14.77 11.12

2.13 21.24 15.69
27.00 28.03 22.78.
21.71 20.09 15.25


85?56 65:31 ;
86.03 69.09
77.90 61.14
69.4 65.86'

86.74 82.ft
96.62 88.51
98.80 10 o8.3,

80.30 69.11


84.7 707b.97
79.23 68.39
70.16 66.99
53-21 58.52
72.57 69.82
72.97 5.73
82.81 81.28
- 62.92, 67.21


74.3 51!"
74.90 52.16
63.76 45.89

42.87 35.53
63.86 25.01
64.82 21.74
86.01 68.5)
58.31 47.85


S9.02 72.1b79.
94.52 76.27
90.89 68.51
80.29 60.69 ,
85.07 64.50

88.85 65.01
103.81 82.37
9t.63 71.17


1-5

11-20
60-10
U-EO
21-5P
51-100
101-200
291-2100
stal-
2"Alt


I 15 11
M r M$
21 19 1i

121 12 13
14 14 11

14 14 1


I0.93
21.61
10.79
18.26
6.96



100.00


1.96

6.30
28.55
17.57
16.73

10.45
IL00.00


00rcei Bom f tnaf a-tf -: 1929, Vol. XII, pp. %i3-.1i; 93l, pp. 126-71; 1i933, Btoprtlnt X&le0 of XMzoh 13, 1935.
A Iooh O sNP IMOStrr 1,, 01loo0to to a lmo rams Inmtervl, dolterlnud by tho Average mliber of loge Riere per atabllu she t In 1929.











TABLE =K-G
t oU VTIXUATION or aaL0m1N AnB WAU NT 5 a Y ss or M7imiamf
on
A n XaOiAORiM ZiWiHinM, 199, 1931, 1933

A&, lItZOlA


at.abliaka-ato


r o nt F or o Mt
of total N*->a of Total I**go
1929 19 1939 1 l99 1929 i 3


I WaRe 2.2xs0r


rfe 0@1 t
pf Total
1929


ICE S


J 4 I 4 4 4 -


_______________ _____________________ I


6.9?
M.04

15.47
21.19
7.i

3.11
0.90
0.06

100.00


ON
53A








1 0
7

12,01


6 5,96
14.500 3,696
1,1463 l.191
2,075O 1,2
732 64.

350 142
96 90
5 5

9, .M,190


1.30

1.U
9.56
214.88
20.145
L'O.Wk

15.56
S.90

1.814

100.00


.3,753 2,5d7 3,025
42,113 36,116 32,49
E27,54 20,968 17,152
7t.390 49,83 144,239
5,55 410,125 41,695
53,997 39,14d M6
15,597 17M237 1,99
5.339 3756 3.1"5

20,191 210,09 155,150


1.36
16.33
9.3S
214.55
15-.92
M.04
9.14s
1.93


* 5,741 $ 4,059 6 3,375
69,077 56,593 40,101
39,65 26,373 17,16
103,590 62,477 4.,611
67,373 41,92 32.592
9,.03 101,563 29,555
40,ll 23,93S 15,557
5,172 4.931 3,115

U3,09 30E,156 l294,4"


29.11 S 27.23 $ 21.45
31.54 30.29 23.75
27.43 24.19 19.27
27.60 24.09 15.52
21.75 20.05 15.03
31.7t 14.9 20.00
29.79 26.71 20.37
29.44 25.24 19.06

27.97 29.37 19.16


79.47 59.19
03.514 6.56
75.70 64.07
1t5" 71.69
1. 61 71-79
93.58 6.71
a." 53.33
2.42 7-.l43

52.30 64.114


7T6.U 79.75
05.76 77.09
75.36 41.<1
65.91 61.11
67.36 69.9
74.00 52.65
".56 57.92
70.35 56.91

72.50 63.<


a,36 55.05
66.45 43.30
60.14 41.0
62.14 4S.38
1114.06 33,19
59." 39.6.
60.314 35.19

76.114 143.59
ll.B( t.!
yi.U .to


7< .l .


96.99 75.30


57.25 7.10 -*





55.73 6144k

155.01 65."


A __________________ ______ J. = 4 4 .4


-m at U* aafdtuea 9l3E9, T o0. II. pp. 66- n; 1931, pp. 119n-95; 1933 lNOeptlt olue*. of mao* 15, 1935.
Al Imah uomma IXusotryt Is asMasloe to a lan Interal, r.t0 lu1364 17 tWU Averae tmbor of Wass straws par 2StoloabI t Ia 1929.


Indoor *, ouau
l11u1til9 1
l29 1931 29"


else R..UW
o 1929


1-5
(A-18



51-100
e101-to




towa






-76-

It is vi.d-nt b,. Ch-rt 5 that mploy:. nt rose only i ncdort-Jly

in tn- o :riou 1i4-li;,. Tn? infernce, is warranted that a ar .ter

incr.'as-, in n loyr. int v.-.ul havw occurred if tho trend of Lhour. had

-5t l-ast rirr.ain .d ktation.r;,'. moreover th, rising trend of vv. lr-ly hours

snov'n in Cnart 19 .. r -ir'r-.-nt mild,.'r conditions thi-n those obtaining

in th.- int'ustri-s jutji th: snrll ?LS sample. Th-- latter, it was

E n abjv., r. -,r. s nt.'d ? roupn of industries showing a much mor: liberal

-m.uloymr-nt policy tzin incu.itry as a whol e, at 1 -st durinn- the r, riod

of PRA.

S-ctioi, VI -.Po.-.i0l ur-th-r Analysis of Data

Cnsid--rabl ... ".ticr-,. L information may be derived from the

data at oress'nt a,.-iirl 1 Th- following, analyses would iold results

rji substantial int rct:

a.. Sur-.-ia:r. t-iultions by major industry gruups for the
individual st.t--s. Those would entail computations
similar to thos-- surmarized in Table II,

b. SwTii:r.ary t'&-rlk.tiuns for the major g- ographic r 'gijns,
hrt., So.Ath and W-est. (See- Chiart 1). If this were
dqjn for ti:-: principal industry groups, the computa-
tij:.s .j1ul:' ir.vo-ive combininL the. regional summaries
in Acio :ndix i.

c. Analysis of variation uf Pay Pe.riocls by indust-ry and
r.:&iun. This \"'-ild supply extrem-nly valuabl> infor-
r ati in, h- rdl. avaviil: ble els where, of the frequency
.,f jccur-nc-: of ve-;.:ly, by-we- kly, r.monthly, and half
rjntly pa'. D ri.jds in different industries and
localiti s. Th* data may be. obtained from the
sU;- ar s furni- .d by the Census Bureau for each
sta..- :nd fo: t,- cities over 2bo0,00.

d. Com ?ris.:- for '.cn- -. ufacturing industries of PRA,
BLS -.ICL C *nsuF r.f American Business. This would
sup-"l m int t, c,..:oarisons made- for Mianufacturing
Fhovwn in Ch- -,t 3 and in Tables IV.


9354






77
CHART


MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT, MAN-HOURS, HOURS PER WEEK


CENSUS DATA, 1933


CENSUS EMPLOYMENT, MANUFACTURING, COVERS ABOUT 6,00,OOO WORKERS.
MAN-HOURS ARE REPORTED FOR 35 INDUSTRIES COVERING 1,600,000 WORKERS, CENSUS RETURNS.
SOURCE: CENSUS 1933 SUMMARY; MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW, OCTOBER, 1935.
9654


NRA
DIVISION OF REVIEW
M.S., DEC, 1935
Smiwsrcs SECrION No 5'51 of





78
CHART If


TREND OF WEEKLY HOURS, 1934-1935


B.LS. SAMPLES, MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES*

MONTHLY INDEXES, MARCH, 1934=100


COMPOSITES

NON-DURABLE GOODS




DURABLE GOODS








NON-DURABLE GOODS
I-FOOD


la -APPAREL





B FABRICS



MSLrart)TOBACCO

F-V-PAPER-PRINTING


M-VI CHEMICALS


In-RUBBER


1X-LEATHER


DURABLE GOODS 1

M-FOREST PRODUCTS 34 io-


Z-STONEC.LAY,JLASS 3. s 10---


S-IRON I STEEL 34 -





mI-NON-FERROUS 37.s 10


M-MACNINERT 35 v--




ZD'- TR ANS.. EQJLHPT. 1*7 \



^0r-




ZI-R.R.REPAIRSHOP"S 33-. z




I J S 1 5 M d a D M


6I0l~: LJ,. DATA (UNPUBLISHED).
ft -3 w OP BAR& PfOIPWroONAL TO CENSUS OF MANUIIrA Ki JUI!9lNPtU"MIT. WAM 11I3


NRA
DIVISION OP RIVEW
M.L, DEC., IS35
smiAGea ssIcTm. ML r S..





-79-


III. App-ndix.'-s DLetail-d Lat Tubl.

In th- A'-n ndix I ar given the detailed basic tables of th-

PRA d"ta compil d from the C ensus smmaris. Included also is Table

XII giving the groupings by-size of th-. Census of Li4nufactures, 1929-

19,3, data for Ohio.

In Appendix II ar-: given several Exhibits bearing on the

me-chanics of execution of the PEA C -nsus questionnaire distribution.


APPZIDIX I

Table XII. Tabulation of establishments, employment, and payrolls for
thz primary Census of MIanufactur3s of industries, grouped in size
categories, 1929, 1931, 1933, State of Ohio.

Table XIII. Summary by individual industries of U. S. Totals, PRA Census.

Table XIV. Summaries of tabulation by regions, for the principal industry
groups, K7on-rmanufacturing, IManufacturing, unclassified, All Others.


APPENDIX II

Exhibit A. Extract from History of Insignia Section, NRA report,
August 28, 1935, by 7. vi. Duvall.

Exhibit B. Memorandum from S. I. Posner to Lieutenant Johnston of
September 16, 1933 concerning mechanics of PBA questionnaire
distribution.

ExhJibit C. v,,r-orandum from S. I. Posner to Robert K. Straus,
September 25, 1933 concerning mechanics for the distribution and
return of the PRA questionnaire.

Exhibit D. Sumrrary Code for Industrial Classification for PRA Census.


9854







TABLE XI
VARIATIOI1 OF EB3%0VWMT WAVES BY Avz7RaLV SIZE 0 F5TABLZSKgT!'r

BABIFACMtUAZ>' IZDUSTRIFS, 1929, 193i, 1933.


ite
lea.
.nK


1929:6-10
Artificial, preserved flowers, eipte 5
BeltinC leather 14
Beveragee 229
Br-ed and other bakery noAducts 1,.321
Brooms 26
Butter 11
Clepning and polishing preparetlonr 52
Condensed and evaporated milk 4
Embroideries 7
Flavoring extracts and es~rups 45
Fur goods 3
Hand stamped, etc. 25
Ice Cream 174
Ice, manufactured 178
Jewelry
Lubricating oils, greases, etc. 25
Lumber & timber products, etc. 259
Mucilage, prste, glue, etc. 8
Patent medicines, etc. 103
Poultry killing, etc. 15
Saddlery end harness 12
Theatrical scenery and stage equlpt. 4
Trimmings, etc. 14
Window shades and fixtures

1929:11-20
Awnings, tents, etc. 46
Bookbinding, etc. 57
Boxes, cigar-wooden 13
Carriages, wagons, sleighs, sleds 6
Clothing, man'l, button holes 5
Cloth, sponging and finishing
Coffee and spicee
Compressed and liquified gases 35
Cooperage2
Druggiat preparations 25
Electroplating 46
Fngreving, steel, etc. 25
Explosives 9
Fancy & misoel. articles. n.e.c. 16
Feed, prep. for animals & fowl 34
Food preparations, n.e.c.3
Foundry supplies 14
Galvanized and other cestings, etc. 6
Glees products, etc., mirrowe 36
Grease & tllow, not lubricating 32
Hats, caps, etc. felt, straw, men'se 31
Hats, fur-felt 5
House furnishing goods, n.e.c. 36
Iron end steel, processed 9
Macaroni, spaghetti, etc. 15
Marble, granite end slate 75


*^ss- ---va 1-29 ---T^_-.--_M1i.....
of Estab- Wage Iome of Estab- Wage
.llshment Earners Wages ear We 1 01 ailments arne Wage
.... .. .. ... .... ... .. r -t e w ~ ,..


0 15~ 7,
36 76 99,517
205 976 1,34,,290
7 20 36,737
200 1,062 1,16 1,480
6 19 38,079
6 4 7,540
41 61, V751l
174 T' 1721'366


33
65

-,567
210
1,195
267
412
55
299
196
175
1,432
1,281
420
232
2,007
50
so
96
134
2V,7969


756
691
242
114
86
57
890
369
459
417
676
478
1S4
234
464
494
"64
709
556
368
66
584
110
179
1,353


27,6B0
l41,705
2,009.792
18,496,979
219, 552
1,530,296
322,002
518,164
69,776
415,5P5
753,096
269,249
2,272,029
2,027,41l
662,567
147,241
1,991,659
70,161
827,840
125,o00
110,577
52,394
1U1,689
253.5 .6
35,276,726


827,137
1,136,315
163,957
152,035
92,079
84,365
994,862
629,151
53,296
40,158
1,058,544
608,007
236,526
190,337
631,966
4 0,679
294,719
94,086
S5?, 401L
791,255
,339
105,163
52,953
i16,545
166,131
2,149,340


n=STRY
(Average Size)
1929:1-5
Blacking, stains and dreessings
Cheese
Concrete products
Engraving, other than, etc.
Flour and other grain-mill produce
Motion picture not projection th
Printing & pubiehing, mislo
Printing materials, not type or I


27 91 $ 115,982
9 471 541,015
5 19 32, 21
151 909 1,122,034
5 8 12,993
10 29 14s622
W3 1,527 737,06-%7


$





1,380 26.54






















1,7342 25.81


27
40
1,167
12,162
155
671
263
335



1,056
1.086
1,036
"79
o06
,'06
28
521
100
62
73
'10
156
pC ;i 2'


19,360
61,188
1,1V9,237
15,036,1?2
1'9,550
1,077,807
292,438
379,692
52,921
"29 7r5
252:600
209,636
1,603 157
1,64' 61P
444 97
29, 506
2h,0d'
28 :287
91, 240
45,390
122,081

50617, 515


---- ';' Aa~ 'A
SI"ber e-
In2oome I Size of Setb- Wade Ingo
Yeer wee- |in 19)7 11_ ment1 TE'roere t'6ee Stpr1 "


1,227 23,59






















1,P4' 2'.91


42 r96 6r1,259
56 927 1,049,601

3 45 53,50o
3 67 62,436
5 46 6-,7-0
51 51 .-9,983
314 310 4l2,230
36 451 41i,370
21 76F '5,935
9 407 5,600
16 152 171,462
8 18 1 143,074,
14 159 127, "0
32 124 609,1i7
38 279 271,754
1' 100 115,33
5 51 70,518
P3 245 -.r09, ?4?
1i ?19 191,160
71 424 w54,7903
16 140 111,027
i;% i,4i,8O0


5




8
4


6
14
9
10
9
14

7





9

10
8
6
1A
19


2 104 4 U1.19
5 271 04,456
13P l'OrI 1,04-,115


r,- 7 72 _Z'-
T4o 35


14
12
176
A60
14
100
'0

7
21
17
'0
113
162

27
7e


i
19

T;1dTl


i: 1
.5




9 6
6


19
12 1-


'0
7
779
12'
976
266
46
1-9

^i-I
^il
^15



6'7

9i


1-~ /-5
'~06
77 0
12,072, 7
1, i7
9 4'
-'79
,. 10
I -,~'
124, ~
165,3.A9
94% -
11~-
20,7 -
4
1.

6 .6.77
~~,0
~, ~l
".~ '20
r7 i~yT


S963 .51


963 (>5


94. 1 .9'


,9 7,' ~
6- 7 61

'1,' 1
74 ., 77
'6 *.11, 6
1. 277
7',
0
1 ,735
4 ~0"
-'-4 --
-.7
47
~~ ,i I

1 -'
'1,


21 7 ,
10 lL 70
15 7 9 ,176


9654


5

1,0 O4
16
106
41
33
7
39
31
21
160
202
31
26
100
6
85
15
9
5
10
2,
2-,267-


4 SHEETS


(tont'd)






TABLE 3a

VARIATION OP XWLOfYL=T AH) :;AJP 5 Y AV' E 3IZ7 OF WSTABLI.4'T
MAFiAOTURniG ITOUSTRIOS, 1929,-1931, 1933.




Number maber --------
ID'JbTRI of Estab- Wage Income__ of Estab-" Wage Incone Size of E
(Average Size) llshments Earners Wagee Year "Wee-k lishments Earners Wges -ee-Y ei- in 1933 lish
1929:11-PO. (Cont'd)
Mattress and bed spring, n.e.o. 42 701 833,483 32 440 501,449 17
Minerals and earth, etc. 9 103 149,506 6 40 45,038 7
Mirrows, framed and unframed 16 209 112,159 -
Models & patterns, not pepper 112 1,186 2,266,550 83 636 1,074,920 8
uesloal instruments, ore-ns 6 99 146,115 5 64 75,760
Optical zoods 7 82 116,083 6 64 10,567 20
Paving materials, etc. 29 570 902,587 10 172 270,760
Perfumes, cosmetics, etc. 36 469 529,704 22 438 340,776 17
Photo-engraving, not in printing est. 54 1,020 2,M47,666 52 785 1,?7,
Plenlng mill products 268 4,508 6,404,400 179 2,319 2,68, 126 12
Printing & pub. book ana job 639 10,183 16,183,746 71 9,466 13,"37,612 14
I I news and period. 552 11,069 19,400,115 46 10,049 17o,04:699 26


Pulp goods
Sausage, meat puddings, etc.
Smelting & refining, not gold
Surgical & orthopedic appli. etc.
Trunks, suitcases, bass
Waste
Window & door screens, etc.
Flags, banners
Gas, mfg. and illuminating

1929:21-50.
Asbestos products, etc.
Bags, other than paper, etc.
Baskets and rattan, etc.
Boots, shoes, findings, etc.
Boxes, wooden, except cigar
Brushes, other than rubber
Canning & preserving, Fruit,vege.
Car & gen. const. Eleo. RR.
Card cutting end designing
Caskets, coffins, etc.
Leather goode, n.e.c.
Chewing sm
Clothing, women'e, n.e.c.
Confectionery
Copper, tin, etc.
Dyeing and finishing, textiles
Emery wheels, etc.
Fertilizers
Gas machines, meters, etc.
Ink, printing
Instruments, prof., scientific
Machine tool access., etc.
Meat packing, wholesale
Millinery
Mirror & picture frames
Nails, spikes, etc.
Non-ferrous metals, etc.
Paints and varnishes
Pocketbooks,'purses, etc.
Refri3erators, etc.
Roofing, etc.
Saws
Signs & advertisements, etc.
Statuary end are goods
Steam and other packing, etc.
Stereotyping and electrotyping
Unbrellas, parasols and canes
Wire work, etc.
Wood turned and shaped, etc.


5
33
10
25
P7
16
16
5
10



7
9
23
12
46
19
106
43
7
35
11
4
147
122
142
12
9
23
6
14
12
127
120
22
5
3
112
106
7
9
7
109
4
11
31
4
49
48
1,668


86
476
146
422
401
144
325
99
207
T-11131


99,901
724, 984
197,708
311,042
533,169
120,582
472,097
102,669
26'5.249&
?573'929"5


1,528 29.38


230 316,231
28a 285,762
484,090
31 455,078
1,406 1,567,115
564 711,302
2,460 1,890,076
1,879 3,003,545
256 269,612
1,755 2,433,646
229 22", 277
103 85,193
6,035 6,528,593
2,973 2,711,397
4,486 6,097,090
586 764,051
325 321,907
969 1,264,397
396 579,573
11 673,165
377 435,226
5,313 9,986,018
5,825 8,265,999
807 791,500
168 234,326
127 165,117
4,769 7,585,093
.,103 4,645,604
3 14 268,274
237 291,474
30 606,145
15 23,950
2,593 3,264,083
120 172,268
462 789,389
819" 1,593,274
143 139,209
1,462 2,102,732
1.206 1.37i.63
57,741 77,227,242


9
35
9
20
17
9
10
4
9
2, FC05'



8
20
9
40
17
ill
3-4
36
9
4
111
101
126
13


14
16
116
115
12

3
103
100
8
6
8
82
6
10
25
0
46
TP4*


1,337 25.72


64-
474
105
P97
278
i93

191
34,4M4


a?4,975
715,408
116,992
239,676
25', 725
116,619
202,072
17,999
2'7 764
1U,-52o'6 64$"


1,4?3 27.?o


26 2!"L',794+
265 20,"I
9'3 .;7, 516

2,539 1,70-,,67
1,170 1,745,45
2p4 211,179
1,593 1,91,9o
10oS 95,67:
66 51,0b3
4,995 4,909,845
2,562 1,971,465
2,734 3,206,161
559 601,411
2,7 176,915
730 832,412
190 '09,950
59g 622,106
2,826 3,526,216
5,260 6,795,309
420 373,995
83 100,602
S,493 4,199,201
2,391 3,1181,954
271 179,182
130 174,751
368 492,296
1,347 1,551,705
62 98,353
96 111,289
660 1,325,975
89 66,713
1,011 1,306,425
1051 39 027
3tP7T37*WR^ *


I1,


4 SHEETS


1913
bar I .- T 3 .. ... ...'
ber
rtub- Wage Incomie
ments !'rnere WrYeee -ew .'


30
7


6
9





33
10
17
1-
10
9
4
710
17
1.2-
Il0


7


6
15
2L




71

10
22
6
13
11
95
113
11

3
87
91
4




11
22

4g6
T709


1,109 21.33


505
51
468

7-,

635
412
613
1,122
3,0ui
9,&i6
920
415

169
X25
148
z8
94




274
52'

4690
2,305
1,122
207
1,6o5
77
4,l4
2,411

247
635
195
151
244
2,352
5,908

4-g
7t
4 i
?,21.5
72

,73
1,392
36
105
536
1,640
1.000
39,085


416,864
39,73?
596,5 15

101,75 1





2Ol, 67
261, 9Ol
1,0O-" 61q







19,75
19, 12





13,38,79''1
505, 9o
l?4,g70

















20J1
17O, 1-6O
].2*!, 22
l6S, 60
12S. 573



2,75
09, 150



496,56
375, 0?
1,'0o 52
l, '6S,<.12
-; 072


2,637,730
l,49d, 326

147,578
519,157
192,9.7
203, 111
i74. 163

u,lo3.?7T<
267,115

73,779
4,140,713
40,770

397,035
1,157,394
29,256
69,517
91,179
1,377,06 5
_681 .136


1,106 21.27








1,106 21.27


864 16.61


(Cont'd)


-iF --Mft1W="WM
D 2' 4.A TFAT" W'97 'r


9854




TAULt x1
VARiATc.:' COF -JLCfILi" .-,D W'AG:S P' AVERAGZ SIZC Cr FAsYTB[.SHUZlT A SHEETS #3.
iLUlIIFCTURT:Q r:aM USTRIES, 1929, 1931, 1933.
OHIO

--- -.-1929 .,- --- -.-- .- --- -
-Tbtr "- tuber .. .-_.-i ber. .
rT'US"r of Letab- Wgre Ir,cor.A of FtaLb- Wage Ircmi. Size of r b- *:cse Income
SrAVer.r& Sitre) ilBments Ear'nere Weges Year Wc: 11 amer n t a Eprnere a ae ye.r & e s eck In ,19:. lis',ent -rns.r W e r Y-ar X Week


1929;51-100.
Agricultural timplemenrts
Aircraft and parts
Bags, paper, etc.
Boxes, paper, n.e.c.
Chemical, n.e.c.
Cignre, cigarettes
Clay products, etc.
Clocks, etc.
Clothing, work, menrs
Cutlery and edge tools
Dairymen's supplies
Dental good and equlptment.
Files
Foundry & mach. shop products
Furnishing goods, ments. n.e.c.
Furniture, store and office
GasB and .el'-ctric fixtures
Leets and related products
Leather, tanned, etc.
LinP
Lithography
Oleomargarine, etc.
Paper goods, n.e.c.
Plated ware
Plumbers supplies
Rubber goods other than Ures
Ship and boat building
Bhirts
Sportinge and athletic goods
Stamped ware
Stationery goods, n.e.o.
Steel barrels, etc.
Struck. & orna. Iron and steel
Sugar, best
Wall plaster, etc.
Wood preserving
Woolen goods


19291i01-200.
Aluminum smanruf. 28
Cu & genl.const. Steam RR repr.shop 137
Core, eleo. & steam RR., eto. 11
Clothing, except work, menis,n.e.c. 130
Onke, not gas-house 6
Cordage and twine 5
Doors, shutters, etc. 8
Else. maohinery, eto. 211
Engines and turbines, etc. 25
Envelopes 12
Forglngs, Iron and steel, eto. 38
Gloves and mittens, etc. 20
Hardware, n.e.c. 36
Knit goods 33
Labels and tags 8
Maohine tools 66
Paper 53
Pottery Inol. porcelain ware 92
Pumps (hand and power), etc. 36
Regalia, Badges & Emblems 7
Safes and vaults U3
Salt 5
Borew-machine products, eto. 42
Soap 22
Steae fittings, ete. 21
Btoves A& ranges, not sleot. ho. 8t
Tin omsn, etO. 19
Washing aolhines, sto. 10
Other Industries r3


19
10
l4
P9
107
238
6
21
18
12
6
6
857
16
211



3

19
177
4
't5
A1
21
23
19
77
11
S13.
105
5
9
12
2,u45


*
1,674 2,165,926
966 1,559,597
1,075 1,1C6,677
3,946 4,227,200
4,322 6,o07,95&
6,193 ?.955,792
17,060 19,615,470
431 60F,0'9
1,682 1,276,861
1,026 1,052,875
676 5?0,5d3
436 563,064
-4e 552,100
61A, 53 c,7,224,406
865 798,373
10,707 1'4067,942
3,202 4 060,qlS
224 305,579
1,529 2,197,662
1,044 1,5'o,503
?,478 3,946,U47
292 430,6'32
2,846 3,21i,4o5
224 24e,17
2,983 4,042,o46
6,707 8,047,174
2,105 3,185,929
1,881 1,569,619
l,415 1,86,573
6,95V 9,112,501
64 84i,083
1,0 o44 1,569,020
7,:464 12,1249,145
311 399,183
553 613,417
636 868,461
606 557.348
158,044 217,757,364


3,!33 5,020,092
25,523 45,076,646
1,291 1,984,5,25
13,216 16,553,057
2,967 5,62,549
675 611,591
1,003 1,614,020
36,267 46,170,298
4 742 7,527,276
1,648 1,100,401
4,854 7,754,237
2,191 1,380,335
3,927 5,332,685
4,15 3 ,819,563
964 1,446,582
11,857 20,397,277
9,321 13,160,017
11,642 13,663,72
3,841 5,229,28Z
720 740,173
1,826 2,753.961
526 743,o63
5,248 7,715,889
2,723 3,691,126
3,916 5,369,896
9,776 13,994,059
2,551 2,957,553
1,188 1,509,539
4 1 60.3 .l
P0.M17..


27

102
15
6
7
157
26
10
37
17
33
28
68
4g
77
37
6
5
41
17
21
84
16
10
1, 2H


1,426 27.42


$ 6





























1,378 26.50


12 658 745,049
10 1,071 1,736,9c4
14 1,134 1 ,0o 4s9
68 3,373 1274,776
52 3,376 4,634,214
61 ,17 2,490,505
177 9,73 9,175,37
6 468 g8074:
15 1,349 805,786
12 731 582,417
6 349 348,101
"729 36,704 42,a93,577
1 677 '4;7,095
163 7,158 7,682,320

17 1,361" 1,692,Ti31
19 1,110 1 090,09c;
37 2,437 3 46, 201
5 209 279,294
25 1,854 2,103,491
33 1,966 2,288,201
81 6,151 5,948,046
16 1,083 1,540,987
20 1,895 1,373,295
14 1,517 1,75',353
72 4,895 5,365,862
10 470 617,228
14 .967 950,668
90 4,712 6,288,815

13 417 429,656
37 70 ,.672
1 103,020 111,562,122


$ 2





























1,083 20.83


1,991 2,465,736
20,074 28,964,256
11,536 10,627,27s
1,916 3,00,541
825 431,079
466 593,373
20,128 22,277,646
2,346 3,156,254
1,251 1,257,104
2,281 2,411,237
1 754 597,745
2 449 2,P83,369
3, 100 2,414,787
5 Or; 6,361,651
8,343 9,949,400
7,770 7,171,682
2,031 2,369,099
494 399,669
550 800,662
2,753 2,797,470
2,294 2,794,027
2.900 2,887,431
6,711 6,666,380
2,017 2,234,064
950 890,849
29.863 34.291.92
41;,gI 160,199,316


$ S


10
9
15
49
44
124
18
12
6
5
615
9
128


16
32
3
29
32
,66
13
12
14'
76
6
16


12
__8
T335


24
126
6
50
14
5
7
152
23
9
31
12
31
28
60
4S
66
34
4
10
5
42
17
2Q
64
13

2 1z


1,067
3,802
4,189
2,696
5,549
1,883
735


27,931
489
6,167
1854
1,38
1,079
1: 79
82
1,874
1,679
5,274
536.
2,021
1,053
7,088
80
1,461
1,865
422
269
48
Kill1


26N,476
54,765
823,361
1,155,077
4:603,115
1,207,966
3,324,261
895,278
497,912
241,335
25,A6
25,764,409
232,008
4,637,400
171,840
1,303,364
806,141
1,772,129
77,115
1,751,173
1,445,902
4,132,042
598,56s
1,125,553
878,791
5,783,978
g,258
1,031.034
179.234
177,s;5
370.06:440


2,675 2,591,238
15,202 19,993,537
261 242,956
10,744 8,237,505
2,105 2,442,162
643 422,5
326 250, 6
19,692 17,300,186
1,760 1,809,971
1,042 775,43
1,312 1,685,174
1,614 674,258
1,776 1,392,012
4,303 3,045,4Z2

3,371 3,5o8,721
7,728 7.4l,050
6,176 4,4a81509
1,745 1, 478,563N
1, ,281 56.
588 409,240
610 727,691
2,545 2,225,075
2,538 2.1402,925
2,199 1,695,247
5,913 5,160,257
1,703 1,567,485
14 32.04]20
3M 124,337.034


928 17.85


(Ooant'd)


828 15.92


9854


.. ........ .. .. .... .... ..... ..... .








TABLE IME
SHEETS t.
VARIATION ? OFP EMPOMNT AXD WAGES BY AVERAGE SIZE OF ESTABLISHIIENT .*
34
IMA rFACTURING INDUSTRIES, 1929, 1931, 1933.


12 ."1931 -... __ :___._
N um b er ... "--u m b er Nu mb er
INDUSTRY of Eetab- Wage Inoome of Estab- Wage Income Size of Estab- Waee Income
(Average Size) lilahmente Earners Wagee Year Weeik liahmento Earners Wases Yea-r Tfel in 1933 libBmente Eamrners Wage -Y3Ca K
19291201-g00. 4 t $ 4
Bolts, Nuts, Washers., Ito. 24 5,738 7,935,972 20 3,757O09 183 19 3.76 2,919,998
Carriage anda sleds, child 6 2,083 2 707,535 6 ;:;7 156,106 1 -3, ,1,99
Glass 25 9,491 12,328,922 24 7,661 8,777,715 388 22 8,53 7,948,780
Iron & Steel, blast furnaces 26 5,880 11143,535 19 3,27 4,753,704 191 19 3,627 3,56632
Motor vehicles, bodies & part 128 28,a4 48107,530 10 17,907 23,513,882 203 80 16,246 15,47 ,720
Petroleum refining 12 2,510 3 863,448 14 2,370 3,473,243 193 12 2,310 2,902,251
Wire, drawn from pur. rods or bar 8 1,811 2,970,539 7 1,a16 1,5086152 21 6 1,411 1,381,1
Boots and shoes, not rubber 4 812.00, "4 283 8 1,16 2 1 172.
FN .....9..'55 5515-M ,7 8394-M 7,97,Mo 116 22.-33 6 1S 70
1929=801-1.60c.
Iron and steel, steel works, eto. 88 89,123 167,200,199 14f 58,088 74,593,57 62 64,28B6 61,683,9214
Motor vehicle., not motorcycle. 2 8 2 1,791 314.141 1 23.5 69.8 6-J
TO9,I95 53 17993.4 1,226 23.57 7r.M 63,W,092 959 2s.45IP Go
192911.601 and Over.
Rubber tires and inner tubes s L1.594 30.65 Y 31 2375 6i 37.0 16. n.
iNTOTAL 11,855 71.,13 1102,166,99 1,5947 28.60
SU 55 74 43 66499,877 506,960 593,024,626 1,170 22.50 Total 7,894 462,718 430,1,44,397 (930) (17.8)
Not Inol.
In 1929 _207 9 .98 9.608.276
Grand Total 8,101 472,706 439,752,673



* Includes toys and tools.
9S54







5 SHEETS G


TABLE -fa

PR&L 0s8sS nAmiLaIOs BT nIDuSTERiS AID 13iusTm avEOuPS
3SINTXNG ESTAMISJSEITS, MP0111ST, PAYROLLS

JThne October, 1933 V. S. OTAI3


W eekly lIscon
stabllsments lployment Weekly Payroll Per Worker


Per Cent
of Total


number
Report-
Ing


.T"n


Per Cent
of Total


Number


October


.1 I -- I 111-1 I I .I 1I 1,. -


Per Cent Iumber
of Total


Per Cent
change


J.me


Per Cent
of Total


Amouat


I -


October


Per Cent Aounct
of Total


Per Cent
Obeuge


October


Per Cent
Chag


U. S. T00AL 100.00% 643,066 loo.oo0% o0,67,021t o100.00% 12,564,843 15.6% I0o.00% $238,457,075 100.00% $282,615,898 1s.5% $21.94 $22.49 2.5

1-u1A1ACTOJ10a 85.79 551.752 50.60 5,499.8o4 49.32 6,197,175 12.7 55.10 131,398,786 53.61 151,500,088 15.3 23.89 24.45 2.3

A. rAGIUCLTURZ, 102oBMB & ANN"A RIUSBA IT 0.67 4.305 53 0.00.47 59.676 9.7 0.54 1.283,877 0.50 1.418,058 10.5 23.60 23.76 0.7
2. t cult~ir -,'o 52,065 o~ a-- 56,639 0.47. 1,230.o9 1,342^4ef 9.1 23.b4 7.h --0.
2. Belaed ndntrtee 207 2,330 3,037 30.3 53,186 75.194 41.4 22.83 2.76 .5
urz o a quA Iu 0.69 4.4A35 3.7 376.112 3.63 56.6 21.3 2.99 711.7. 9.661.22 35 18.99 21.18 11

A nthri oail 69 42.207 56.255 33.3 1,002,572 1.537,717 53.:4 23.75 27.33 15.1
5. Mltvioa coal 1,70 187,315 217,987 16.4 2,596,712 3.761.6o 5. 13.86 17.27 21.6
6. 1.02 6,79 81,060 25.1 1,95655 2,313,395 18.9 30.03 2.54 -5.0
7. Other Mining 1.275 9,_______3593 ,975 16.1 738,200 ____ 837,335 13.4 1864 18.21 -2.3


I. ColL = (4),(5)
II. Other Mineral = (B) (I)

C. CO0STBOCTIOi
8. Idg. & construe. aboe* arond
9. Other conetrac.-dergrouand & on surface
10. Paying & road building
D. TWASPOmATION AID OTXR PUBLIC OTILITIrS
I. Transporttion. Storage, Other
11. Stem railroads
12. Weter tane. & related induAtrtie
S1-. irla2 transportation
I Auto bus lines & stret rallemrn
15. to t raeur.,slgbtseing, rent. care
16. Cartagee & etorg
17. Wooa storage.packipg (not meat), shipping

II. Other Public Utilitiee
18. Electric light & power companies
19. Telephoua & telegraph companles
20. Radlo broadeasttna companies
21. Public utilltleM. n.e.c.
X. DI3lTRIBOTIO
I. wholeale Trade
22. Chemoial drugs. & a-llid prod.
21. Dry goods & apparel
24. Food products
25. Intomotive
26. Petrolei a petroleum prod.
27. All othar concern
28. Colmiton hbIejlS. ad/or retail agents

II. Retail trade
29. Grocrie
30. Other food groupI
31. Jntomative group
32. Departmmlt atores
3). srlety. 5-d 10-cent stores
34. Other geeral *merchadis store.
35. Apiare1
36. puriturs & houe aold
97. Cigar stores dr g tore.
31. Lumber & building matrials
39. Other retail trade
a. ood, Iruge. etc. (29), (30). (37)
b. Dry good. etc. (32),(33).34,1(35)
Ce. Other retail ( (II) (a) (b)

.... 96,54


1.773
2,6b2


,229.522
1146,590


274.242
181.974


3.599.284
3.542,589


5.302.377 47.3 | ,.6s 19.33 23.3
i,358.50 23.o 2 .17 1 23.95 -0.9


2.76 17.737 1.93 209.390 1, 238.80h 14.0 1.81 41185.983 1.91 5.387.288 22.8 20.95 22.56 7.7
15.791 122.53917956 .7-965.7"5 --3.722,95 25.5 2.20 V.5.0 -.
1.076 ?5.255 30.374 20.3 520,802 b54.596 25.7 o20.62 21.55 ".5
8r70 ,59b 60,'47 1.8 899.436 1.010,397 12.3 14.bO lb.71 14.5 0

2.93 18.874 9.35 S,01b,4 8.7 1,IO2.143 8.4 11.11 26.493,704 IO.lb 28,705.097 2. b o.07 26.04 -0.1-
1. 1.729 2.9 317, 11 2.93 341 1b.2 J.3 7b 93 3.12 8 297 80 23. 2391 --.b
229 89,749 101.369 12.9 2.192.0b7 2.5814.256 179 2U.42 25.49 U.4
418 38.775 1,783 15.5 179.957 9e18.31 17.8 20.11 20.52 2.0
26 298 342 14.s 9.980 11.1,l 11.9 33.49 32.64 -2.5
455 b7.648 68,827 1.7 1.672,150 1.731.932 3.6 24.72 25.16 1.8
34 8.679 9.033 4.1 129,535 168I,759 30.3 14.93 13.63 25.1
7.722 91.015 117,108 23.7 2,23449 2.832.882 26.8 24.55 24.19 -1.5
2.535 20.,977 26,959 28.5 47.955 562.490 25.6 21.35 20.36 -2.3
1.11 7.125 6.44 b99.304 5.14 733.722 4.9 7.98 19.027.21 7.04 19.894.800 4.6 27.21 27.11 -0.4-

1.1 9 00 2 .5 .
2,602 326.860 349,740 7.0 9,48,o4 9,959,104 5.1 29.oo 29.489 -3.-
36250 348.252 2.4 8.586.928 8.886.92 25.24 25.52 1.1
S6,2 '012 12.4 216,306 249,517 15.1 34.66 35.58 2.7
25.95 ,718 10.7 743,931 799,217 7.4 28.67 27.83 -2.9
53.28 21.95 2.385.738 22.01 2.766130 15. 22. 53.1.255 22.6 63.77731 20.0 22.28 23.06 3.5
jai02 7.5 291 .
.83 ~ 50 .336 5.85 b35,757 25.15 724.169 1 1.9 7.71 1 ,374 900 3.4t 1 .:1o0.3525 14.4 2 .9. 2 O-- 2.3-
2.720 1, 4M g4352 9 983.350 -- Luc.10 43- F3? -2:-
3.347 3.027 .4371 12.4 1,265.711 1,525.624 20.5 29.2 31.54 7.2
13.14 181.520 201,693 11.1 4,757.256 5.365.387 12.7 26.21 26.60 1.5
01 35604 40,509 13.8 1.077.122 1.22 8.862 14.1 30.2 30.34 0.3
2.39.773o.1
4:215 85.723 101,862 18.8 2,514.825 2.69,077 124.1 29.3 28.17 -4.0
17,96 211.040 244,983 16.1 6.090.392 7.116.774 16.9 23.86 29.05 0.7
5. 4742 52,399 10.5 1,686,244 1.892.200 12.2 35.56 36.11 1.5
45.45 22,275 16.10 1.79.9g1 16.29 2.041.961 16.7 114.58 34,770.3 i 15.10 42.676,961 22.7 19."7 20.90 5.2


17.79
3.58
9.08
9.08 |


181737
511.510
1.696
1999
27.679
13-.5
27:236
27.vs21


2bb,244
79.2681
260.934
&U6.879
120,887
.151.235
170.9

8.132
114 .663
17h-7rNM


316.251
90.210

14,135
1111.135

200.291
911,266
132.16
196.67


18.8
13.8
11.2

21.9
17.11

11.3
1S.9
12.?


]lIN.3T7 394 42i86'4i T 3.97 -- IMg 1 .W ~ : 3T
55.1280 b.35 6B9.S6O 6.10 810.602 17.6 | 4.66
122.718 1 5.81 631.777 5.83 1731.9110 15.9 I 6.53


4,907.661
1,620.1114
6,960.252
4.1126.911
992,032

3:34l!4:
2,365,51.0

1.920 997
1.553.090
2.672.4M8
4.10g.7M


3,080.172
11.126.048
15.563.1135


3. 4
11.90
6.74


b.000.231
1.937.352
B.759.206
5.213.505
1.11.0.156
.030.830
2.345.23B
1.827.077
1, BIT OTt
3.als.3Ts
h.7W.WO


9,7614,660
13.85.049
19.058.252


22.3
19.6
27.7
19.3
15.2
2B.1
22.7
22.1
17.6
20.11
2q.2


20.;2
26.29
17.93
5.21
15.611
19.96
19.59
23.59
13.68
23.31
21. M


1B.97
21.117
8I.55
10.20
16.111
20.47
211.60
2U.U
19.66
24.30
A2.m


13.35 19.55 3.7
16.13 I17.09 1 6.0
24&.63 26A0 5.7


industry Groupa


6.0
5.7


I


--g i F mg gJ




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