Modified Berlese funnel for collecting thrips

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Modified Berlese funnel for collecting thrips
Physical Description:
Unknown
Creator:
Bondy, Floyd F
United States -- Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Publisher:
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine ( Washington, D.C )
Publication Date:

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 030345550
oclc - 781639143
System ID:
AA00017501:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text


ET-157 February 1940

United States Department of A- riculture
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine


MODIFIED BERLESF FUNNEL FOR COLLECTTNj-, W'RTPS

By Floyd F. Bondy,
Division of Cotton Insect Inivestigitions




A simple, f.int. and economical method of collecting thrips
from parts of various host plants by the use of mi.-ilfied Berlese
funnels was used at the Florence. S. C., laboratory during the ,'^m-
mer of 1939.

Twelve ordinary 8-inch tin funnels are support. on a home-
made wooden, rack consisting of a top and bottom hnoard held in
place by %oorlpn blocks, similar to the racks used in chemical
laboratories (fig. 1). The top board has 1-inch holes bored
at 8-inch intervals to receive the funnels. It should be of the
proper height so 'he neck of the funri.l will extend into the vial
about an inch. Ordinary wide-mouthed vials that fit snugly, but
not tight enough to stick or break, were found most satisfactory.
Drops of solder are placed at several places around the outside of
each funnel about an inch below the rim to prevent the rubber
band, used for holding the cloth cover, from sliding down.

Operation.-Owing to the size of the funnels, comparatively
small samples of host material must be used. These samples are
carefully clipped from the plants, placed in paper ,ags, and
transferred to the funnels within a short time. The funnels are
then placed in the racks over the vials, which have been partly
filled with 70-percent alcohol, and are covered with pieces of
black cloth extending well down the sides and held in place with
rubber bands. The rack is set in direct sunlight, and 2 clays'
exposure is usually sufficient to dry the plant material and drive
the thrips into the vials. The plant material is then removed
from the funnels and the cloths are w-.hed and repln.ced over the
funnels. The contents of the vials are poured upon the dampened
cloth, where the alcohol strains through, leaving the thrips to be
removed with a camel's-hair brush. Either light or dark colored
thrips :an be seen on ihe black cloth in direct sunlight.





































Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2012 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries with support from LYRASIS and the Sloan Foundation


http://archive.org/details/modifi00unit



















































Figure 1.-A series of modified Berlese funnels set in the
rack ready for operation.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
3 12l 8lll7 -11 044lli 11111iiillll H IIIIII
3 1262 08537 1044





















I



w
tC




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EP1DU75WB_Y5SQH5 INGEST_TIME 2014-04-25T01:27:32Z PACKAGE AA00017501_00001
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID ERHSZUVI4_IJIZBA INGEST_TIME 2014-04-21T22:43:11Z PACKAGE AA00017501_00001
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES