A telescopic spray extension rod for use in bark beetle control work

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Material Information

Title:
A telescopic spray extension rod for use in bark beetle control work
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Creator:
Evenden, James C
United States -- Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Publisher:
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine ( Washington, D.C )
Publication Date:

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 030345034
oclc - 781625404
System ID:
AA00017466:00001


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Full Text


March 1939


United States Department of Agriculture
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Qwarantine


A TELESCOPIC SPRAY EXTENSION ROD FOR USE IN BARK BEETLE
CONTROL WORK

By James C. Evenden,
Division of Forest Insect Investigations,



As the life of a tree successfully attacked by bark beetles
can not be preserved, control measures are directed toward the de-
struction of the insect broods beneath the bark to prevent their
emergence and subsequent attack of other trees. One method of con-
trol now practiced for the treatment of lodgepole pine infested by
the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus monticolae Hopk.) is to spray
an inflammable oil upon the infested portion of the bole, which is
then burned. Recent developments indicate the effectiveness of a
penetrating spray which will destroy the insect broods beneath the
bark without the use of fire. With either method it is necessary
to spray the bole to the height of infestation, which ranges from
20 to 40 feet, depending somewhat upon the size of the tree.

The equipment employed in applying these sprays consists of
a small compressed-air sprayer (fig. 1), a special straight-bore
nozzle with an aperture of 0.052 of an inch which thro'.'-s a fine,
solid stream, and a number of 36-inch light steel extensions. As
without extensions the oil or spray can be thrown only to a height
of 23 to 25 feet, they are necessary in order that the desired
height may be reached. During control operations one 36-inch ex-
tension usually becomes a permanent part of the equipment, as it
affords that much additional height and in no way inconveniences
the operator while he is treating the lower portion of the tree.
To avoid the inconvenience and delay associated with the addition
or removal of further extensions to effect the necessary treatment
of tall trees, a telescopic extension has been developed at the
Forest Insect Field Laboratory, Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, which greatly
facilitates the application of either the penetrating spray or the
oil for subsequent burning.


The writer is indebted to T. T. Terrell, Forest Insect
Laboratory, Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, who contributed valuable aid in
the development of this extension.


ET-142







-2-


This extension when contracted is only 5 feet in length
(fig. 1) and can be extended (fig. 2) to a maximum of 13 feet
10 inches. In its construction three 5-foot lengths of 17-gauge
steel tubing were used. The outside diameters of this material
were 0.375, 0.500, and 0.625 of an inch, with inside diameters of
0.259, 0.384, and 0.509 of an inch, respectively. In telescoping
these three tubes (fig. 3) the difference in diameter provided a
clearance of 0.009 of an inch. Although this small clearance
between the telescope tubes seemed sufficient, it is possible that
it should be increased to 0.012 of an inch to reduce the likelihood
of jamming in the event of slight denting. Possibly a lighter
gauge tubing might be used, especially for the telescoped sections.
The present equipment weighs 4 pounds 8 ounces and is difficult to
hold when fully extended.

In constructing the sliding joints of this extension it was
necessary that they be free of movement and still remain leak
proof under a pressure of 30 pounds. The details of the sliding-
joint construction are shown (fig. 4) in the telescoping of the
upper pipe section C within the middle section B, with a clearance
of 0.009 of an inch. The basal portion of the extension carries
section B, with the same joint assembly as shown for the two upper
sections. The basal section is attached to the pressure tank with a
short length of hose (fig. 1). A 3-inch sleeve 0 is soldered to
the end of pipe B and is threaded to receive the cap D. This
sleeve, which protrudes over the end of pipe B, provides a stuffing
box E for the graphite string packing F, which is wrapped around
pipe C to prevent leakage. Two collars G and H are cut from pipe
C and used in the stuffing box as indicated. Collar G is approxi-
mately three-fourths of an inch in length and is placed under the
cap D to compress packing F. Collar H is one-fourth of an inch in
length and is placed at the bottom of the stuffing box to act as a
bumper for the two spring strips I, which are cut in pipe C to
prevent the extension from being pulled apart. The mouth of pipe
B is beveled inside to permit the spring strips I to strike the
collar H. These spring strips are cut about 2 inches from the basal
end of pipe C and are approximately one-fourth of an inch wide and
l1 inches long. They are made by drilling two small holes through
the pipe, then sawing between the two holes and down the sides and
bending the strip outward. When pipe C is inserted in pipe B,
these strips are compressed, but when the beveled or expanded end
of the larger pipe is encountered they spring outward to strike
against collar H. The packing F gives sufficiently to prevent
excessive wear on the ends of the spring strips. A threaded bushing
J is attached to the outer end of the extension to provide for the
nozzle. A small hook is attached to the end of pipe C, which can
be caught over a limb or in the bark in order to lengthen or con-
tract the extension.







-3-


Explanation of Illustrations

Figure l.-Small compressed-air sprayer equipped with a telescopic

extension rod (contracted).

Figure 2.--Telescopic extension rod fully extended.

Figure 3.-Exterior view of the sliding joints of the telescopic

extension rod.

Figure 4.--Diagram showing details of construction of the tele-

scopic extension rod.







































Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2012 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries with support from LYRASIS and the Sloan Foundation


http://archive.org/details/telescop00unit






















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Figure 1


Figure 3


Figure 2
































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Joint Assembly of

Telescopic Extension for Sprayiny


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FIGURE 4




3 1262 08537 0822




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