A power-driven mixer for making emulsions and other sprays in the field

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Material Information

Title:
A power-driven mixer for making emulsions and other sprays in the field
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Creator:
Dean, Fred P
United States -- Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Publisher:
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine ( Washington, D.C )
Publication Date:

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 030345081
oclc - 781626190
System ID:
AA00017464:00001


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Full Text

ET-145 May 1939

United States Department of A.'.riculture
Bureaui of Entomology and Plant Quai rantine


A POWER-DRIVEN MIXER FOR MAKI:;G EMULSIONS
AND OTHER SPRAYS IN THE FIELD

By Fred P. Dean,
Division of Fruit Insect Investigations*




In experimental field spraying it is often desirable to have
a power-driven mixer for making emulsions and for mixing other spray
materials that are difficult to handle with ordinary hand methods.
Spray mixtures can be made at the laboratory where electricity is
available, but it is often desirable to do the mixing in the field.
This is particularly true when working with unstable emulsions that
must be used immediately after mixing, with bulky mixtures that are
not easily transported, or with materials that are incompatible if
mixed together in concentrated form for more than a few minutes.

The apparatus described here has proved satisfactory for the
purpose at the Yakima, Wash., laboratory. It consists of a used
gasoline washing-machine motor mounted in a steel frame, a flexible
power shaft, an agitator, and a mixing container. It is shown in
figures 1 and 2. The motor mounting differs from that of some of
the models which are available in that it is suspended from the
frame rather than resting on a base. However, the frame can easily
be changed to fit any motor. It also has a built-in chain and
sprocket arrangement geared to turn the power take-off at approxi-
mately 1,750 r. p. m. Some motors do not have this feature.
The frame on which the motor is mounted is made of welded 1-inch
angle iron and is 19 inches long, 15 inches wide, and 42 inches
high. The height should be such that the flexible shaft will not
be bent at too sharp an angle.

The flexible power shaft is 42 inches long, although several
units ca, be used if a greater length is needed. This type of
shaft is available in a number of weights for use at various speeds,
is made by a number of manufacturers, and is usually carried in

*The writer is indebted to C. W. Murray, Division of In-
secticide Investigations, for suggesting the construction of a
power-drivenr mixer that could be operated in the field.







-2-


stock by hardware stores. The necessary end fittings may be pur-
chased with the shaft. They include the motor connection which
fits over the end of a 1/4-inch shaft and a chuck that holds the
end of the agitator shaft.

The agitator can be purchased, or a satisfactory one can be
made from sheet metal by cutting it in the shape of a propeller.
For ordinary use an agitator 3 inches long with 1-inch blades,
set to force the spray mixture toward the bottom of the container,
is satisfactory. This is attached to the end of a 1/4-inch steel
rod long enough to reach from the chuck to approximately 1 inch
from the bottom of the container.

This container consists of an ordinary 50-pound bucket, such
as is commonly used for paints and insecticides, to which have been
welded a bracket and clamp to hold the end of the power shaft.
Since this bucket is not readily detachable from the agitator, it
is necessary to pour the contents into a second bucket before trans-
ferring it to the spray tank. One suggested improvement is the
designing of a detachable container to eliminate this inconvenience.

In operation the motor and stand are securely fastened back
of the cab of a 1/2-ton truck, and the mixing bucket rests near the
tail gate where it is readily accessible. However, the entire
apparatus can be removed from the truck if desired.























*














Figure 1.-Power-driven spray mixer.


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Figure 2.-Close-up of motor and frame assembly.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3II 11262 08537 0848ll I I I I
3 1262 08537 0848




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