Some phases of the American-Egyptian cotton situation and outlook with statistical supplement

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Some phases of the American-Egyptian cotton situation and outlook with statistical supplement
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Porter, Horace G
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
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United States Department of Agriculture. Bureau of Agricultural Economics ( Washington, D.C )
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, .. L r
a; UNITD STATES
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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Agricultural Economics


PHASES OF TfE A&.ERIOAN-EGYPTIAN COTTON SITUATION AfM OUTLOOK
.. .. .. WITH'
STATISTICAL SUPPLEEMNT

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SUNIV. OF FL LI
DOCUMENTS VIPT.r

U. S ** *DEPOSIT
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1,. U.S. DEPOSITORY
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by-
'*" "" Horace G. Porter

Agricultural Economic Statistician


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Washington, D. C.
December 1943
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SOME PES 01 TPZ AMUION.-EGYPTIAN COTTON SI'UATXOW AM OMOfWK

Table.of.Contanta
.1


Origin and Evolution of American-Egyptian Cotton *.....3...,.,.,,, 3

Sharp Acreage Expansion Since 1939 Without Parallel
Except In World War I Period .................................. 14

Acreage Expansion Encouraged in 1942 ***,....*. ,,..,..*, ..

1943 Goal was Reduced to 160,000 Acres 9......................., 5

support Prices Favored Expanded Production.of
American-Egyptian Cotton in 1942 and 1913 ,.,,...i,,,** 9,,...,8, 5 ..

War Needs for Textiles Caused Sharp Increase in
Consumption of American-Egyptian Cotton ..............,,..... 6

Trend in Consumption has been Downward
for 1-1/2 Years .. ....... ... .. .. .. ....... a a a a a a a 6

Lack of Satisfactory Carry-Over Figure for American-
Egyptian Cotton Makes Analysis Difficult 7.....,..* .......... 7

The Outlook for American-Egyptian Cotton @.., ........,.......... 8

Carry-Over on August 1, 1944, Would Last Until Middle
of 1945-146 at Current Rate of Disappearance .........**...., 8

Need for Bringing Production and Consumption into Line *.,,.ao..a 9.

Tables;

1. Cotton, American-Egyptian: Season average price per
pound received by farmers, selected States and
United States, 1922-42 ............................a...a 9
2. Cotton, American-Egyptian; Price per pound received
by farmers, Arizona and United States, monthly,
August 1929 to date; Texas-New Mexico, monthly,
August 1940 to date ....a..a,....aa...,...............u* 10
3. Cotton, American-Egyptian Grade 2: Average spot price
per pound at New England mill points, by months,
May 1922 to date .....*....a ..,.m ...a.. a..........,,ua 11
14. Cotton, American-Egyptian: Average price per pound
f.o.b. gin yards, Phoenix and El Paso, crop year
averages, 1941 and 1942 .....1...a.....g..S.,,,,.,*,,,, 32
5, Cotton, American-Egyptian; Average price per pound
f.oob. gin yards, average of Phoenix and El Paso.
by months, 1940 to date 13.. ..*,*.*a,.....,,,...s,,,, 13






-3-


Table of Contents (Continued)


Tables:

6. Cotton, American-Egyptian: Acreage, yield,
and production, 1911-43 .... ..... ...... ............ 16
7. Cotton, American-Egyptian: Consumption in United
States, by months, November 1918 to date .............. 17
5. Cotton, American-Egyptian, Egyptian, -and Sea. Island:
Annual consumption in United States, 1906-,2 ........... I1
9, Cotton, American-Egyptian: Stocks in consuming
establishments, in public storage and at compresses,
;- and total, United States, end of month,
1November 1918 to date .................................. 19
10. Cotton, American-Egyptiant. Grade and staple length
of carry-over, production,- and supply, United
States, crop -years, 1928-43 ........................,.. 22
11. Cotton, American-Egyptian: Supply and distribution,
United States, 1919-43 .... .... 28

SOME PHASES OF THE AMERICAN-ZGYPTIAN COTTON SITUATION AND OUTLOOK
: The expulsion of Axis forces from North Africa, end-ing the threat to
3gypto the declining consumption and mounting carry-over of American-Egyptian
Cotton; the high proportion of the 1943 crop which is being sold to the
SCommodity Credit Corporation; and the desirability of shifting some American-
Egyptian cotton acreage to other crops in 1944; all are reasons for reapprais-
ing the American-Egyptian cotton situation before 1944 planting time. (In
addition to the brief treatment which is given here, there are a number of
tables of basic data on acreage, yield, production, consumption, stocks, grade,
staple, and prices at the end of this report.)

Origin and. Evolution of American-
Egyptian Cotton

As the name suggests, American-Egyptian cotton traces its origin to
extra-long staple Egyptian cotton. The first American strain of Egyptian
cotton to be grown commercially in this country was a variety known as "Yuma."
It was first produced commercially in the Salt River Valley in Arizona and in
the Imperial Valley in California about 1911. By 1919 "Yuma" cotton had been
almost entirely displaced by "Pima" cotton, an American-Egyptian variety which
monopolized the field up to the time a new variety, "SxP,"1 was introduced about
1934. "SxP," which is a cross between Egyptian Sakellaridis and American-
Egyptian Pima, gradually displaced Pima and has since become the only variety
of American-Egyptian cotton in commercial production in this country.
At first both Arizona and California produced American-Egyptian cotton
but the abandonment of production in California left Arizona as the only
SAmerican-Egyptian producing State from 1923 through 1938. Since that time







Texas and New 1,-exico have become commercial producers of A-erlcn.n-Zgytirn
cotton Pnd Cplifornia h-s resumed )roductton -',n p sna.ll scai.

Sharp Acreage Exppnsion Since 1'9 Without
Parallel Zxcept in World Wrr I Prriod
U
During the decade of the 1930'1 thW' hiv.isted ncre-'ge of A:lrican-
gyotip.n cotton ranged from. rP. high of 47,000 in .1930 to e lor of 0?,000
acres In the depression yo.r 1932. Ij 1939, the l st ,-err barfore i'*r, the
liarvested acreage of A-nrican-3,ryptic.n cotton ,,s 41,00'? p-crer -In-sucecd-
ing years the acreage vr. increased to 68,000 In 1940., 13-,100- In 1941 A4
130,700 Pcres in 1942. Present indicp.tions ore th-f .t ti!e 1943 hrrvdoted
acrenge will be p.bout 145,900 Pcres. This expansion beers a ntr'ced rees-
blance to the first World War period ,.,he6 thed!prveted pcreage rose ?rem
7,300 io 1916 to 35 .400 in 1517, 73,600 in 1019, 86,50 nl 1S19 Pad to am.
all-time high of 243.000 acres in 1920. : .
With yields having declined edAh'.epr'from 1939 tVroitLh.l942, produc-
tion increased somel-hat less than a.crene. A,vertheless ,5808 3OSrunninfg
ba.les were harvested lr.st sep.son cdm-parpcd 'dt'itth only2.6, 26"in 1539.
Indications on Noveriber 1 "ere that 1943 production would totpl about 67 ooO
bales. .. ...

The expansion In acreage in 1940 and 1941 appears to he.we itvlfld
considerable speculation on the op.rt of aroducerr, P.s to the effect the
,uropean Wrr might have on ithe ricee of Aneric.-2gyot-inM cotto,. They no:.
doubt remembered how the ;price of. Anericp.n-gyptien cotton rose from arohd....
25 cents ner pound in 1915 to over 75 cents in the fpll of 1917, and eveatt-. 1
glly to about $1.25 per pound in the spring of 1920. In the fall of. 14I It '
became r.ppnrent that the supply of 73, '24 b,-les *oi American-SgptiaS cottonota"
(stocks of 15,495 b.les and production of 57,929) is fer in ekxces of con-.
sumption, whichh during the last half of the 1940-41 season was at an nUManl*
rate of only 30,000 bales per year. Furthermore, Egypti-n cotton could still'
be imported and at slightly more favorp.ble nriccs. The Arizona frm rice "
of American-Egyptian cotton dropped front 32.2 cents in Akjist 1941 to 25.1
cents in Novemnber 194l, which ws slightly lover than P. year earlier. Sich'
Sdrop w-s in sharp contrast to t'o 10-nmar!let price of .-.iddling 15/16'
(Upland) cotton which in Uovember 1941 VMs 1/4.cent pbove that of August 14l.
rnd about 6-3/4 cents higher than in November 1940.

Acreage xnansion Encouraged in 1912 UI

Following Penrl Hnrbor it becwie obvious thpt our domestic needs for. .A
extra-long staple cotton would d be sizble. It became less. certain,. -ad em"& .
doubtful, that Egypt would renain in Allied haneBs -nd that sufficient. shimpp
space would be available to insure an aderua.te 'u:n:ly bf E-gyptien cottOa.-':i
Coneeouently, on February 5, 13142, .. 1942 goal of 150,0.00 acres of AaericaM-IL
Egyptian cotton was announced as veil Ps e Oovernment purchase program. O ::::
March 14, the goal was raised to 300o000 acres and more, if the seed
supply permits' and the support prices were raised.







-5--


The araa actually in American-Egyptian cotton on July 1, 1942 totaled
192,900 acres, which was 40 percent higher than in 1941 Pnd second only to
the 1920 acreage. This resulted in a crop of 73,803 running bales, Pnnroxi-
netely 2-3/4 times as large as the 1939 crop.

1943 oal was Reduced to
160,000 Acres

Several factors were responsible for thn 19Q43 acreage goal for
Americ-n-Egyptian cotton being smaller than the 1942 acreage. The d-ngor of
losing access to cotton in Egypt through enemy pggressi-n and the possibility
of a much tighter shipping situation had lessened by the winter of 1q42.
Sizable quantities of Egyptian cotton were then already on this side of the
Atlantic. Another factor accounting in prrt for the s-aller 1)43 gn,-'1 ''s tic.
difficulty experienced in getting the 1942 cron hprvcstod. The supply of
resident labor in the Anerican-Egrtian Prens is insufficient to h,.dls peak
lAbor loads. Normally, lprge numbers of nigratory ,,orknrs are employed, but
the tight gasoline pand tire situation Pnd the rbundant Plternp.tive e-loyent
opportunities in and around Army cnmns -nd wa.r production areas caused the
supply of labor avp.ilpblo for picking cotton to be sap.ller Pnd wpo.es to be
higher than usual. Furtherniorv, there apoep.red to be no rcnsnn to ,.atici'ate
any easing of the lrobor situation P.s lon,7 .-s the war lrst-d. The ne-ds for
amd prices of other crops were such that their conpatition with A-ericp.n-
Egyptian cotton could be rcpdily justified. Besides, consumption of Pnorica;n-
Egyptian cotton had failed to increase -as uch as troductinn p--d the- carry-
over on August 1, 1943 w,-.s ex-pected to be enough to list domestic ills fir
Year. Consequently, the 1943 goal for Americpn-Egrtinn cotton w.Ps set -t
160,000 acres and the actual acrep.-c on July 1 w-s 146,400 ocros. Prcecit
indications arm that the 1943 crop will be about 7,000 runni:--g bales.

The 1944 acreage goal for cotton was not subdivided so Ps to show P
separate goal for Anorican-Eg-otian cotton.

Sup2ort Prices Favored Exoended Production
S of Americcan-Egypttian Cotton in 1942 ,.d 1943

As a meons of actively encouraging the production nf Americ-'n-
Egyptian cotton in 1q42 the Depprtmelnit annUL-ced a purchpose program f'r
Aneicar-Egyptian cotton at the sare ti'o the acror-o a roal wP.s Pnnouni.ced on
February 5, 1942. Under the purchase progrr.n the. Co-modity Credit
Corporation offered to p:y 33 cents per pound, net iveight, for Grnde i'u. 2 -
1-1/2" staple with appropriatc- difforr:'itials for other cualitics. A -onth
later when the goal wps increased, the supoort price wps elso rais.d. The
neow price wP.s 38 cents per pound gross ,.-ight f"r i'No. 2 1-1/2", which '-.'s
couivalent to 39.75 ceats per pound .aet weight. The support price v,-s
later raised to 42.75 cents Pnd finally to 43.25 cents per pound. Duri:-ng
the 1942 picking sep.son n..rket prices generally exceeded the Govor:-'.ent
purchase prices and only 5,572 bples out of the cron of about 74,00n wrrn
sold to the Corinodity Credit Corporption.





k.





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The first stpt.-ic1.t ,b-,ut the su-,ort oric'' fir A-rricnL--r-,.tipa
cotton fir 1913 wAB co.:tai.iod iL the Secret-ry's nnn'u..c,=-'c.tt nf -ovonib,'r 27,
1942. It said in pert thr.t the up)-nrt lov.-l for 10143 cr-1 An.ricr..-Tgyptias
cotton would be "90 percent of the parity oricc cplculpt-d P.s of th? boginzing
of the marketing yopr (L.ugust 1); but i: :.o cvrnt less th4-z 45 ce:-ts per e-rnd
for No. 2, 1-1/2 i.;ch Anmric:.-gy'.tiP3. C-tton., Nr P. *.ric- fnr such cotton
which h beprs the spro relationship to the lnoa. rat. in n.riz'n-p fnr 1-1/16 inch
Middling Uplnd Cotto. -as the suno'rt oricc, f-r -'ericn-Eg3:"-nti-n Citton bnro
to the loan rpto for such Unland Cotton i. 1942."

"ho actual anouiit -f the sur-).rt oricc fnr thi-' snas:. ".'as -Pd. 'n
J,.uary 7, 1943. i.s in 1nh2 it ton-: thi for" of R purchaso nrigrn-. Thao
basic rate fir An. 2. 1-1/2 inch i1 4g cents xor oiuz,.d :ict '-ight. So frr
this season the "ar'cct has f-i.1.d to push a.bnv.: the GOnvr:.'-r.t suonnrt prico
P.d the Corr.odity Crnodit Cor .or.tion hps had to bu. '. subst:ntiA.l orn-)rti.t
of the eoprly opsn.l gi:i; i..gs. Un to Drc,;-b'r 1943, ?urchp.s-s b- the
Co-nodity Credit Cor-oratinn titPilcd. 15,399 bpls.

Lon'ci..g to 1944, it is significprant that th.- :-.c-:d fir high lovol nf
iroduction if this extra long cotton .n longer exists. In f-ct, thi r.ocrd is
rather for snallcr productio-iA.

WPr Needs for Textiles Caused S-hrrn I.crrp.so
In Consu-otion of Ancrica:.-Eg:mtian Cotton

As the Natio:m.ial Defr."so pringrp-i got under wvy, it bcrno. ovido::t that
there would be R.-. increased dcmr.nd for taxtiles rnap.dc fro- cxtr.a-]o.:g staple
cotton. This i::cr-ise w-.s si.rnd i:- by Am-rica:.-Tghmtia- cotton, th-,.
colisunption of which increased frnn less thp:- 2,0" b-lros -':r -vo.th in the
early part of 1940-41 to over 3,000 bnl'-s i: July ln41. T"heo r..uIl consu.-r-
tion rate, based on consun-iotion durinrz th- last "..ths ,f thr 1940-41 snpson1
was 30,000 bales per y.ar. Tho sl-'.d untr-nd in c-):su ttion c--.ti:.urd through
tho first third (tug.-!nv.) of thc 1Y41.-42 wCrs-s: '.,itF the n...upl rpt., ba.sid
on consumption in this o3ri'nd, a.bout.34,OOf bpls, th. higrnnst sine' the
eprly 1920's.

The coisunotion of Arcrican-Eg:.-otip:: cotton rosr 'brurtl;. nftr P-'prl
Harbor, roaching a prwk a.-r.upl rt- of 61,C01 ba.los i:- F.bru-r" 1Q42 rnd P tn-
"'onthly consujiptinn "nf 4,951 b-l's n.;c no-.th lptcr. T -.tly pnrio'3n i:: whic.
the rm.onthlr consa-ptiin of Arnricpn-Eg;".-tia.a cotton h-s cxc'edod this ivnl ,
w,.s from A4,9 1922 through Ja-.uary Iq23.

Tre.id in Consuentio:: hs bor. Doiar:wprd
for 1-1/2 Y.-Trs -

The tro.d in the consu-'ption of .-,crican-E:.ptiPn c.tto-i has been dovn-
,.,.n'rd since the ,P.rtir. po-'.- wvrs r.oechod i. F.~br".ipr:- ---.d Mr.rch 1042. During
thc first ounrt-r of t.h: curr..it s--sn.. (i ,V.-Cct.) c-:.su-')tio-: P/r-rpgod only
3,575 b.los *orr -n..thi, couivn.lr..t to -:-, -:-,..uPl r-t. 'i' '43,rrn b-lac This
decline of m-ore thn-. 114 siic, th.. cprly 9ort of the c-lcnder yopar 1942 is
.abnut double th- percentage d.-cli..o i-i th cn-.-.su -ti: if :ll kinds of cotton,





-.7 -


SThere is sufficient machinery in the United States to consume in the
neighborhood of 130,000 bales of extra-long staple cotton per year. During
the first 3/4 of the 1942-43 season, most mills apparently maintained
production at or very near capacity levels despite difficulties in recruiting
I and training new employees. During the past few months the ti.ht labor situa-
Stion probably has been a more important factor than formerly in the decline of
Consumption of extra-long staple cotton.

The upward trend in the total monthly consumption of extra-long staple
cotton continued for nearly a year after the peak in the consumption of
American-Egyptian cotton was reached. One of the factors which apparently
Splayed an important part in the failure of American-Egyptian cotton to share
Sin the continued increase was the comparative prices of American-Egyptian and
SEgyptian cotton.

During the 1940-41 season American-Egyptian cotton at New England mill
Points (Grade No. 2, 1-1/2 inch) averaged 2.66 cents per pound higher than
Egyptian Giza 7. In 1941-42 the corresponding average spread was 3.39 cents.
q uotations for Giza 7 are not available since April 2, 1943 but for the first
8 months (Aug.-Mar.) of the 1942-43 season American-Egyptian cotton averaged
6.53 cents higher than Giza 7. On a percentage basis the price of Giza 7
averaged 8 percent less than Grade 2 American-Egyptian in 1940-41, 9 percent
Less in 1941-42 and 14 percent less in the first S months of 1942-43. In each
of the seasons, however, there were rather marked fluctuations in the price
differences. Consequently, while on the average Egyptian Giza 7 became
Increasingly less expensive than American-Egyptian, much depended, so far as
Sany individual mill was concerned, on just when the purchases of cotton were
Made.

il, ~ Other factors which also may have played a part in the displacement in
consumption of American-Egyptian cotton by Egyptian are; The kknds of orders
,.. on which the mills consuming extra-long staple cotton were operating, possible
"N differences in the speed with which American-Egyptian and Egyptian cotton
l can be handled, and the supplies of each kind of cotton available to the
mill when it decided to make additional purchases.

In recent months total consumption of extra-long staple cotton has
Fallen off rather sharply. The annual rate based on the Aug.-Oct. average
daily consumption was nearly 30 percent less than the record annual rate
established last winter. This reduction fell more lightly on American-
Egyptian cotton than on the other kinds of extra-long staple cotton.

Lack of Satisfactory Carry-Over .Figure for American-
Egyptian Cotton Makes Analysis Difficult

Inadequate data on end of season stocks is a handicap in making an
S analysis of the supply of and demand for American-Egyptian cotton. The Bureau
of the Census estimate of the carry-over of cotton, made as of August 1 each
year, is broken into three parts -- cotton in consuming establishments, cotton
in public storage and at compresses, and cotton listed as "elsewhere" which
Includes cotton on farms, in transit, at ship's side, etc. The first two
categories, reported monthly, are further broken down to show separately
"American-Egyptian", "Egyptian" and "Other foreign."



" .






E -,

The "elsep.h-re" fi.-urr on tho. nthcr- h.-d is nnt subdivided.
Consequently, -s p ,a.tt-r of corr"on -rp.ctico,- it is usu-lllr tre-ted os thigh
it w-ere -:.tirel" Ulp:-.d cotto;.. In Pny pnalysis .tf Uplnand cotto:. the s'w.1l1
auanatity of othnr kinds of cotton included' in the "?lsc,-hfro" figure- i-s of
little coitequp:nco. As r-latnd to any stud, of. minor kinds of cttnr., hrw-
over, it is fpr morc inmortpnt,.

In genor.l practice the sun of th.' A-cric..- gytion cotto:- in cnsnn-
ing establishments Pnd in -nublic storage. snd pt cnrnnsses on Au--ust 1 is
tra..tcd ns the cprry-ovr. Thus' -n August 1, q1943 the "cp.rry-ovr1r of
A--ricp1i-Eg7-?ptian cotton was re,ortoed to hov- bee: 53A,57 bp.los. Thern is,
ho,.,cv-r, Pn-..th-r way to aps-roxi-t-, tth' rnd-of-s)o.P cp.Try-nvcr, aaoely,.by
subtracting thn disp.-)-.rpr.nco (co:'.:untirn olus Cx-iorts) frr- th-, .suTl'
(carry-ov-r -lus )r,,duction). B3 this method the i-.dicptf.d c-rr7--rr Is
ablut 49,000 bpls, sagJ-sti::g that thi "rls,'hrr" figure night hpv.,
cointa.ined a.bout i/4 of th" total- onun.t nf A-'ricon-XTn tinn cottnr in all
Inoctions on August 1, 1943. 1./

The Outlok!T for A- cricna-Egrrtia Cotton

Cmrr:-rover o:-. Auust 1. 1,44, WVuld Last Unti. Middle
of i9q45-.I at Currmit R-t *-nf* -Disarr-?iranrco

1Iu.-'rous fectors h.qvo pffoctod the outlook for A-cric..i-Eg-ntiPa
cotton duri..g the east tvo yz-rs P-Q ove.r the ipst yo-r. ;.s :-.tqd above.
much of the increase iiu the nroductio: of A.orictn-Egytipa cotton in 190O
Pnd 1941 wps due t, ,ro','ors' a.ticliT.tion of i:.cropsed dcr'rnds Pad higher
prices. The still larger ex nsi-n i:. 1c42 pnd 1943 '",s rncours.g-d by the
Givern-ent in order to P.ssur?. a- Pdcou-tc su.Illy of cxtr--logi stp-le cotton
in the event ilntorts fror Emypt wonr curtailed.

Th" Axis.thrept tn Egyrt h-s :iow subsided nad thorn r-,np..rs to be no
danger of shirtagn of'- gy.tixn enttnn for A-'ricpn mills. The :e.h in the
totpl consuuntion of oxtrp-lnng st-ilo cotton l'os 3.rssed sorc months ago and
the trend of Aricricpn-Ejntipn coisumntion: hs bc-:. douw-nwrd for p Toar qnd
a hRlf with the current r.tc )f coensumptin:Ti pbnut 1/4 belowlnv the "cpk.

So much for thl' dor-ad side which has so, chp.s,,cd P.s to teduci the noted
for Ancrican-E3y ?tipn cotton.

0z the uuooly side' is thn c-rr-o-vor a.t thn bc.ri-ii-gC of the current
season of sorITew'hnrc bti.,n:. 37,fln Pnd 49,000 b?-lcs p:.d r cron nov beiug
h-rvostod which is cstinn.tcd pt about "7,000 b-los. This -i-os a surnly of
wcll ovr 100,000 b-lcs. T-h', if th:-. consu_--tio. of I-'erican-RztaiRn
cotton were to level off at tnhe 'nn'xal rpt- f 47,000n blues oper rcr, bqsed
oni thn .Aug.-Oct. dpily oonnu tion, inwton-6 of co..ti.,ui-.g Ad ,-i-.rd, the
current sup-,ly of Aenricun-.Ecrti'r. cntton wo.ld b'- sufficient to ip.st
do-cstic -ills to th ,niddlo of the 1i0p -4U s,.son.

17 This computaption used th stoc'-s in consumning ost,-boishronts ord in public
storage %::d Pt .coi'rrossne s r.- orted b:' the Thurcr-u of the Cnsus -s the
be, "ini:g-of-se-son ci-rry-ovor, w'ich .,-s nt gc-tly diffr'r-:.t fror that
,bth.ined by subtr-ctigC; disp.ppo-rpnoc from su-.'ly.







-9-

Hl'ocd for Bringilig Productini anpnd
Consurntion into Li "
^- Urnzbss"thc consumption. of Aiorlca:- grtirn cotton i..cr.n.s-ers natorin1l',
4"bove" jirdnjlnvols nd/or production is dr.'sti.c-lly curtailed, production
-.en&pconsum iti'n- wil1 'still *'bo fr: 'out of- it.S ,rith ep.ch- ith'r wh.: the wVr
04'ds. If the dis'-.rity con.tir.uds, th" '-Producbr of .A-ericepa-E'g:rti,.n cotton.
'fla'y face voW] nuct -the o.sno situp.tionn A.s that in 1920 sd the first f..-r
*"yop rs thrr6Pft Cr:.

In zier of the burrcint suipl-" nnd der'p.zd situn.tior.n Pnd 'ith priva.to
nerohats pnd nills holding P11 but 5,572 bale's of the 19q43 c-.rry-over, it is
n:A.iSt .surpri sigt-hat A 'substriti1l .rt pf the 'crop it bei-jg sold to the
ornaodity.Orcdit Cornoration .-t the sup-ort rice oD'04 cents pqr pound for
No.-2, 1-1/2". to'Dco-bcr .the Con-.odiCy'Credit CiroorPtinn had
a,1rpe.7y iirclued 15,399 bales of.Acrican-Egnti.n'cottua. This connres
g-h inngs f. 40,194 bales Dripr to Dece-b6r 1.
,C-u.rren. logisl'ation -..:os L-t 7am,dtor, tht Ar ericn-E;- 3ti.n cotton"
prBi.ces bQ-.supportod Kt v.t-ledsst 9b' 0 >c rc&.t ofp)rity nr it.s 3quivalcnt.
:i.tho C0yont the.1944 sunir'rt price should bd nn hi'ghnr thpn the mininun
Iuippbrt "rovidad.by Coi-grcss, tie iricc rlp.-fionshi- between tbl su'-Aort
..itocs fp-r.eric a... t 'n d.UlnniAd cotton wouldl d tip.bPc' towrprd Upland
cottonn and the conpetitive- position of other crns' such .*,s alfPlf'q. Pnd dry'
beans would i-prove.

... With fp.vorp.blo prices fnr p.ltornpti-o crops -rotty -uch assured,
0.sontiaued tight labor situs.tinn rlrost i., *-vit-Ablc, .n'd n 'rosiective-
.i*liftiag of nrico rclatioshi-s.to the Pdvrznt-ge of U'-ilp.ind cottn;A, the
;&.erpgo. of which .11 nt.-be rzstrictod in-. 1o44, it is both nossiblo and
desirable th't the e be considcrob) roducti-. i:n the acr'Ym of Lr'eric.n-
igyptip.n cottmi. in 1944. .

t "" Table 1.- Cotton, American-Zgyptianr: Season 9.verage price per pound
., .received by farmers, selected States and United States, 1922-42
a'(, .e_ __ _

T.- p M United a Ai ar year: Lro Texas- : United
[[[a; Ar % ... ""iz n 'M x i c
op -ear A .na .States ear -rzn .New Mezic6 States
:, :,- Cents *Cen'.t : F Cents- Cents Cents
Sm n S Ie et
If^,*.. U C 55 U -
1. i:; 19"22 132.'0Q 32.9 193. .-A O .t -- 20.91
S 1923..' '37:00 37.00 193t : 21.80 -- 21.80
: ., 1924 4 7:oo00 47.00 195 21.58 --- 21.58
: 192 1oo;0 4;1'00 1936 27.7S 27.78
K .1926 31:00 31.00 1947 : 24.59 24.59
... '1927 38.00 38.00 : 1938 : 18i.68 --- i8.68
192S : 36". 36.40 : 1939 : 21.85 --- 21v85
: ..1929 : 3,50 32-50 5 :: 19O. : 30.19 28.29 30.03
1930 : 20.00 20.00 : 19l : 30.71 34.53 31,87
1931 1 :5 1942 43.95 43.04 43.72
1952 1 -1,9 14.9
S ; _____ S_ _
S.






- 10-


Tablo 2.- Cotton, American-4gyptian: Price per pound received by f;xmsrs,
Arizona and United States, monthly, August 1929 to date;
Texas-New Mexico, monthly, August 19O40 to date

Year Aug.Sept. Oct. Nov.: Dec.s Jan.: Feb.: Mar." Apr.' May June: JulywiAt rao
I a I a f VW
S U U S I S 0 3__ __ ________
aCents Cents saets Cents Qents Tent Uent Pents Cents Wont. NE u5w
-en -a- a -, E RWV--eT-- OrG w~
____ IArizona --
-- -. -
S m wm~m
S 25.


26.0
20.0
15.0


21.9
25.0
28.5
2496
214,6
18.7
22.0
31.2
38.5
43.5


25.0
22.5
N5.0
1t.5
23.0
21.0
25.0
29.0
214.5
15.6
21.4
31.1
39.3
43,7


25.0
22.2


23.5
21.0
25.0
29.0
22.5
19.0
20.4
30.3
39.7
43.5


25.0
22.5
ii'. 5
14.5
16.0
23.5
20.0
24-. 9
29.3
24.0
19.0
20.2
29.8
410.5
o43.3
)43.3


25.0
21.5
14.5
19.0
23.5
20.0
25.0
29.0
19.0
19.0
22.2
30.0
Z9.7
3.3


24#2
2)1.2
20.5
15,2
20.4
23.5
19.5
25.0
29.0
19.


30,,
43.5


32. 5%;
20.0w'


2041
21,P0




21.S5
3049


1929
1930
1931
1932
1935
1934
1937
1936
193T
1938
1939
1911
1941
1942
1943



1940
1941
1942
1943



1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1935
1939
19140
1941
1942
1943


S35.0
S23.0
17.T
15.M
S20.2
S23.5
: 18-8
S25.0
28,0
: 19.5
S19.2
S214.7
52.2
l40.0
145.7
0


S24.0
* n0.0
:40,0
; 5.0
l__.
:__


30.0

43.0


United States


26.0
20.0
15.0
15.0
24.5
21,0
25.0
28.5
24.6
18.7
22.0
31.2

374


25.0
22*5
15.0
1.5
3. 0
21.0
25.0
29.0

1.6

31.1
38.7
s3. 6


30.0
35.5
43.0


30.5
3 9.0
43.1


31.0
9.0
43.1


- -
- a a


25.0
22.2

tN: I
1 .0
14l.2
23.5
21.0
25.0
29.0
22.5
19.0
20.11
30.3
39-6
'4&.5


25.0
22.5
14.5
16.0
23.5
20.0
24.9
29.3
21.0
19.0
20.2
29.6
40.2
43.3


25.0
21.5
14.5
19.0
23.5
20.0
25.0
29.0
19.0
19.0
S22.2
30.0

3.3


31.0 n.m




a.
39h5


24.2 32.5Q
20.5 20*00.

2095
*23.5 20091
19,5 2. Q
25.0 215
29.0 274-4:
19; S 24,5
19.0 184.
: 24.5 21.8
T30.8T

43.5 43.-


a a -- a -. qs n~ e


35.0
22.0
15.0
15.5
20&0
22.5
17.0
24.8
26.2
18.6
214.0
27.2
30.0
41.,0
46.3


314..8
19.2
14,r g
15.5
20,0
21.0
20,0
25.7
24.9
19.0
22.5
28.1
29.3
44.0
46.3


31.7
19.8
16,2
14.7
20.5
21.0
22.5
26.0
23.0
18.6
21.6
25.5
25.1
41+.7
46.o


29.0
18.2
15.0
13.0
20.5
21.0
22.5
27.5
24.2
18.14
20.8
28.0
28,7
43.5


29.5
18.5
14.5
14.5
21.5
21.0
24.0
28.5
25.1
18,7
22.3
30.3
33.e
41.3


- a


Texas-New Mexico


30,0
37.5
3.0


35.0
23.0
17.5
15.4
20.2
23.5
18.8
25.0
28.0
19.5
19.2
214.7
S2.2

45. 7


27.0
30.0
43.o
47.0


27.0
30.0
4170
47.0


27.0
26.5
43.5
47.0


29.0
29.0
42.5


30,0
37.5
43.0


35.0
22.0
15.0
15.5
20.0
22.5
17.0
24.8
26.2
18.6
24.0
27.2
S0.0
1.0
46.4


314.8
19.2
141.8
15.5
20.0
21.0
20.0
25.7
it*.9
24,9
19.0
22.5
28.0
29.3
43.9
46.6


29.5
1-8.5

14.5
21.5
21.0
24.0
28.5
25.1
18.7
22.3
30.3
37.8
44.1


31.7
19.8S
16,2
14.7
20.5
21.0
22.5
26.0
23.0
18.6
21,6
27.7


46.5


29.0
18.2
15.0
13.0
20.5
21.0
22.5
27.5
a4, 2
18.4
20.8
25.3
25.8
143.1





1#11. points, by months, May 1922 to date


Year; Aug. : Sept. Oct.: Nov. D Bec. Jan. Feb. :Mar. :Apri
: Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents
4
4
--Pima-rade 1- inch~sta e


1921:
1922:
192?:
1924:
1925:
1926:
1927:
1928:
1929:
1930:
.1931:
1932:
193:
193 :
1935:
1936:
1937:
1938:
1939:
1940:
*


36.oo00
34.00
6yoo
43-50
67.00
36.50

44.33
43.00
31.gO0
23.50
20.75
24.17
28.40
24.00
28.75
33.00
23.50
22.50
28.40


36.75
35-00-'
44.00'
54.25
36.50
2/
59.50
0.25
27.12
21.50
20.90
23.40
27.38
21.75
28.50
29.83
21.70
26.75
30.25


34.62
37.62
7.50
55.25
35.70

39.88
38,75
23.90
19.50
20.38
23.75
23.62
23.25
30.50
28.10
21.25
25.94
30.88


37.00
40.90
50.00
51.75
35.75
2.33
42.20
37.00
23.31
19.75
19.52
24.75
22.80
26.30
30.62
26.38
21.08
24.19
5/31.-00


36.70
44.50
56.50
43.80
5.67
1.35
43.50
36.12
21.38
19.55
18.30
24.75
23.25
27.83
32.70
27.00
20.70
24.05


36.62
44.ss
61.33
40.31
55.82
41.88
44.oo
35.50
21.00
19.88
18.62
25.62
23.50
27.95
34.88
28.50
22.00
25.88


37.33
44.oo
65.00
41.3
37-4
41. 88
44.75
35.00
24.69
20.38
19.44
29.12
23.50
28.12
34.25
28.00
22.12
25.50.


37.80
42.75
68.33
39.50
S9.31
5.25
44.oo00
35.00
26.75
20.50
20.38
29.62
23'. 50
29.12
34.75
27.75
22.00
24. g81


38.50
43.50
66.50
37.50
40.85
49.39
45.50
35.00
26.38
20.50
20.83
29.33
23.50
29.50
35.00
27.20
22.50
24.38


May
Cents


35.50
37.00
43.25
65.00
36.50
41.00
52.62
42.60
35.00
27.00
20.50
22.00
29.00
23.50
28.20
35.38
26.88
23.00
24.45


: June :July
Cents Cents


36.25
6. 00
42.88
64.70
6.50
94
51.40
42.00
35.00
25.75
20.75
23.20
29.00
23.50
28.25
35.00
26.00
22.80
26.38


36.50
5.62
2.17
67.38
36.50

50.75
40o.25
33.75
25.20
21.50
25.50
28.50
23.50
29.00
35.00
24.4o
22.88
28.00


- --------------------SxxP Grade 2. 1-1 2-inc stale


1940o:6/28.67
1941:- 35.50
1942: 4.86
1943: 48.20


30.25
33.00
5.30
48.13


30.88
31.30
47.54
49.00


31.6o
28.69
49.56
49.00


33- 50
33.28
7.88


34.4o
41.67
47.20


34.75
42.65
47.30


34.50
43.35
47.29


34.50
43.8
47.10


4.90
4.35
47.23


35.25
47.4


35.50
44.52
47.96


33.22
8.88
7.22


a
1/ Average of Friday's prices, on net weight basis. 27 Comparable data not available. / Av.regefor 11
months. 14/ Average for 9 months. 5/ No quotations since Nov. 22, 1940. 6/ Based on three quotations; no
quotations available for earlier months.
Compiled from records of the Cotton and Fiber Branch, Food Distribution Administration.


Av.
Cents


-a













I-a


6.66
1.S9
58.31
45.02
_37-77
4/6.32
42.71
36.61
25.36
20.65
20.82
26.75
.24.16
-26.93
32.94
27.75
22.13
25.24




121
J2 -.

Table 4.- Cotton. American Egyptian: Average price per pound f.o.b. gin yarse,
Phoenix and El Paso, crop-year averages, 1941l and 1942

41;:4-2 -2
i
Gr-e :1-3-/5 ,--"-- / ,--U-J/6. ,I-3J, 1-7-2 1 1-9-/1
Grade 1-112V~l'^/' !-/ 1'~ T T-T i J 1 9 e 1-1
Inches t inches : inches : inches : inches : inches : inches : inches
: Cents Ctnts Cents Cents Cept Cnta Cents Cents :
,- -. --- -o' +
-""'" -"~"" *P-Phoenix. Arizona *

1 33.16 34.64 36.57 36.87 41.52 42.qg98 45.12 46.74
1-1/2 32.42 33.91 35.53 36.13 o.41s ls.qS 44.13 4571
2: 31.44 32.93 34.93 35,23 39.44 4o.96 -43.10 44.66
2-1/2 29.46 30.98 32.87 33.17 35.40 39.56 42.01 43.62
3 : 27.54 29.01 31.01 31.16 36.32 37.50 39.57 41.46
3-1/2 24.14 26.00 25.15 25.30 31.85 34.04 36.62 36.75
4 21.78 23;76 25.97 26.12 27.01 .0.24 33.15 33.,A4
4-1/2 l/ 20.72 23.59 26.20 26.20 22.38 25.69 25.99 28.99
5 1/ : 1i.69 21.43 24.03 24.03 19.94 22.90 25.58 25.81
S. .El. Paso Txas L -

1 33.03 34.50 36.44 36.74 41.52 4?.99 45.12 46.74
1-1/2 32.42 33.91 35.5 36.15 4o.4s 41.9q 44.13 45.711
2 31.47 32.96 34.90 35.20 39.44 40.96 43.10 44.66
2-1/2 29.4 30.96 32.90 33.20 35,4o 39.57 4?.02 43.62
3 : 27.62 29.05 31.01 31.16 36.32 37.51 39.55 41.46'u
3-1/2 : 24.05 25.75 27.57 28.02 31.84 314.04 36.62 36.71
4 21.52 23.40 25.49 25.64 ?7.01 30.2P4 '33.17 33.25
4-1/2 1/: 19.08 22.05 24.59 24.59 22.35 25.69 25.99 2.99 .
5 i/ : 16.97 19.95 22.4s 22.48 19.94 22.90 25.88 25-.8
:''"' ~Avorg-e Pho-nix-El Paso "

1 33.10 34.58 36.51 36.51 41.52 42.99 45.12 46.7I4
1-1/2 32.42 33.91 35.84 36.14 4o.4s 41.9q 44.13 45.71
2 31.46 32.95 34.92 35.22 3q9.44 o.-q96 43.10 44.66-
2-1/2 29.47 30.97 32.59 33-.19 38.40 39.87 42.01 43.6 Q
3 : 27.55 29.05 31.01 31.16 36.32 37.81 39.85 41.46
3-1/2 24.10 25.59 25.02 25.17 31.55 34.0o4 36.62 36.79
4 21.65 23.58 25.73 25.8S 27.01 30.?4 33.16 33.24
4-1/2 1/: 19.90 22.62 25.39 25.39 22.38 25.69 ?8.99q 2.99
5 i/ 1 17.83 20.69 23.26 23.26 19.94 22.90 25.58 25.85 ,
1/ Data for 19411-42 are average for list 7 months' of season.
Compiled from records of the Cotton and Fiber Branch, Food Distribution
Administration.


U :





- 13 -


Table 5-' Cotton. Americak-4gyptian: Average price per pound f.o.b. gin yards,
average of Phoenix and El Paso, by months, 9Iq40 to date -
___I. t Oct,: Nov.: Dec.: Jan.: Feb.: Mar.: Apr.: May : June: July; Av.
Cents Cents Cent0tbents Gents .Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cent s
3 Grade 81-4/ inches -
-45727.37 7.17 2.5 279 36-' .50 .50 0 8: 8.50 -50 3 8 .50 3.10
$Un. &50 870 41.2$ 42.20 42.20 42.20 2 20 2 20 2 .20 42.20 41.52
3. 46.o 46. oo __
I Grade 1- 16 inches ____
94L 2. 25.57-29979 38.07 38.75 &259 3.8 4-.0 4o -.0 47 _'
9421t4000 4.4 43.23 44.97 43.65 53-25 3.25 35 5 3 .38 3- 4.50 43.50 '42.99
*943k45,7 4.o.0 48.o00 .__ _._ -


I <
:a.94ls50.57 30.38
l9442.-t42.00 42.40
9o050.00


"2r37
'29. 3"1
0.28
5.11
50600


29. 13
27.57
46.97
50.00


Grade 1
31.06 32.03
51.64 39.85
45.67 45.35


- 1-1/2 inches
2. 7- 43275 42
a.250 a0.50 o0.80
45.35 45.35 45.43


F-nl., 1 T = 1 r 4 vf a es


a3.03
2.00
45.84


42.00
46.oo


32.93
42.00
46.oo00


31.31
36.51
45.12


a Q6IOLO J. L' j Qk1%.A 0_C
,91;30.57 3038 30.28 27.57 351.64 9.85 40.50 40.50 IF.0 43-.00 4. 00 00 6. 1
9e,43.oo 44.2o 46.46 47.60 47.45 47.45 47.45 47.45 47.45 47.45 47.45 47.45 46.74
3:49.23 51.0051.00 51.-00 -
~'Grade_1-1/2 1-3/ inches -
9414,27.07 2.8 233 28.24 35.50 j60 36.30 7.50 37.50 7.50 2.42
2,37.50 37.70 40.24 41.15 4.5 41.15 41.15 41.15 1.15 41.15 41.15 41.15 4o.48
3:43.08 45. 00 45.DO -
..... Grade i-72 1-7 n- inch es
1:28J7 27.8-8 27.93 2-9 .85 29.24 37.19 38.25 38.19 38.30 39.00 39.00 39.00 33.91
942:39.00 39.40 42.36'43.97 42.64 42.20 42.20 42.20 2.35 42.43 42.50 42.50 41.98
3:f44.75 47.00 47.00, /- i 2 ih -
_"3 _--" _0"__ Grade -/2 1-12 inches___ ___
941:0.07 29.88 o-29.9 2. 31.09 39.00 o-5 40.00 40. 1.00 41.00 41 00 3
.a.a4.oo 41.4o 44.23 46.10 44.66 44.3o 44.30 44.0 o 4.83 45.00 45.00 44.13
,-3o, .44o o9o 449 45- .oo .1
91134747.00 49.00 149.00 49.--- -
-. _^ _" _Grade 1-1/2 1-9Sl inches
9-1:30.07 29.88 29.93 S-.85 31.09 39.00 4 40.00 4T.90 42.00 42.00 42.00 TTW
112:42.00 43.20 45.43 46.70 46.40 46.40 46.40 46.4o 46.4o 46.40 46.40 46.40 45.71
,3:148.20 50.00 50.00 5r0.00
___ Grade 2- 1-3/S inches __ ___
9 26.5 26.58 2 5 23.01 27.26 375 34.50 7 b 35.30 36.50 31.. 35. 3146
1942.36.50 36.70 .2o 4o.o 4o.1o 4o.1o o.1O 4o.io 0 4o.o04o.io 40.10 39.244
1943: !2.05 44.00 44. 0 0.oo 1.o 1 -
SGrade 2 2776 inches
1941:27.5 27 2. 24.01 232 37:7 38.75 38.82 37.30 o.00 8.o00 0.o00 3.9
_4i2".o-00 38.40 3. 41.235 2.97 41.65 41.15 41.15 14. 15 1 43.1.4 4.1.50 41.50 40.9
1943;43-5.7 46.0_ 46.oo 46.00 ___

oh --
7 Grade 2 2 inches
|94o;-- 68 -27.512 .-29.93 30.85 31-18 30.93 30.93 1-33 1 68 1.93 30.07
|91:29.57 29.38 29.08 26.01 30.11 37.99 38.75 38.82 39.30 o.oo 00 0.00 34.92
.42:4o.oo 4o.40 43.22 44.97 43.65 43.25 43525 43.25 43.38 43.g8 44.oo 44.00 43o10
.943o.46.00 8.0o 4 8.o0o _.o 4s.000
....... Grade-2 1-91& inches
9129.57 129.38 29.08 21M1 30.11 37.99 38.75 38.82 39.90 41.00 41.00 41.00 35.22
942.141.00 42.20 44.39 45.55 45.35 45.35 45.35 45035 45.35 45.35 45.35 45.35 4.66
:s47.18 +49.00 49.00 49.00 -
1 4 oo 4' Coon.. 4 o
Continued -


I






Table 5.- Cotton, American-Egyptian: Average price per pound f.o.b. gin yards.
y__ average of Phoenix and El Paso, by months, 1940 to date -'Continued .
A: :. Sept.. Ot.: Ntov.:.Doc.: Jan.: Feb.: Mar.: r.: j J I
:OCents Cents Cents Cents Centt Cents'ijLs Cents 0. t..CIIgCutwn G
3. Grad^Ts2-1/2-1-315inhese 2.- -1/2
1941:24757 7 375 20o32 25017 3157 Ma7 y 3 37I 55 0' 633W"
1942i5.505"70 .1$ 945 39. 05.39.05. 39D5 39.05 .3 39.05 .5 .0 J
1943t410 .3.00 .3 00 U600.:
SGrade 2-1/2 1-716 inches -t
194:, 2 -5.77 2 4 9 .1 IMI -2 .-OT 0
1941:25.57 25I 24.8f 21.32 26.01 33.3d 34.50 34o5 35. 107 37 .00 37.00 3G f1
1942: 37.0 47.40 40.0 41.97 4o.62. 40.1Q 40.o10 40.10 40.30 40.21 40.25 0
Q7-00~ ~~ .5 374-2.-0,9...
19.044.00 -5 00 .
1941r27.57 27.3 -.2 ? 23.32 27.7X 35.19 -5713 5. 37.10 906'. 01 .0 8
1942: 9.00 ,9.40 42.13 43.97 42.64 12.20 142.20 42.20 2.3542.61 42.75 ;40215 SOQ
1943;44.a8 7 000 4 7.00 4 .00 __ .
..1 L' 1" _Grade 2-_ /2 r-9 -iches a" ..
1941:27.57 27.3I6 7iES 23.32 27.56 3 !1 3613 722 7.70 .305 Ir603 1j78o3j.&
1942:40.00 41.20 43.35 44.53 144.30 4.30 4.30 4 4.30 4 .30 44.30 44.36 4.30 ,6'
1943:46.15 4g.oo 48.oo 4s8,oo ___ __ ....,
___ __ Gtade 3 81i3/8 hes -____ 1-:11!
1 2 2 22.55.1.679 23.23 30.25 29.75 9. 31. 60lo !7 33.50" 33
1942:33.50 33.70 36.09 30.95 36.95 36.95 36.95 36.95 36.95 36.95 36.95 36.9-36.32'
1943:38.98 41.00 41.0o 41.00 .. .__ -_ ..
S -Grade 3 1-7/-16 inches
1941:23.57 23.38 23.5 19.69 24-.3 31.88 32.00 32.13 33.10 35.00 35.00 35i 2961:
1942:35.o00 5.40 37.84 39.85 38.60 38.00 38.00 300 0 38.25 38.19 38.25 38.25-37.S01
.1943:4.63 43.00 43.00 4-.00-- .-- .... ,
246 256 _Grade 3- 1-1/2 inches .
1940: --- C24 5 6 27 733 26.81 27.93 27.93 25.31 23.43 24753 26793 26.45'2fl.7|.
1941:25.57 25.38 25.58 21.69 26.05 33.57 34.00 34.13 35.10 37.00 37.00 37.00 31.01
1942:37.00 37.40 39.86 41.60 40.62 40.10 40 .0 40.10 10.30 40. 40.50 0.50 33b'0a i"
1943:42.75 00.5.00 45.00 1 lb -.^ -
Grade 3- -7 inches -
1941:25.57 25.3 58 2169 26.08 .573 34.100 33 37.50 37.509
1942:37.50 38.90 41.28 4o 40 42.20 42.20 42.26 42.20 42.20 42.20 42.20 20 .46-
1943:44.10 46.oo 46.oo00 46.0 ___ ___ _____


_Grae 31
1941:20.57 20.8 20.158 =575 19.5 25.12
1942:29.00.29.00 30.82 33.00 32.80 32.00
1943:31.00 31.00 31.00 31.00 0 -.
Grade 3-1
1941:T1.57 21.38 21.58 .17.69 20.51 26.75
1942:31.00 31.20 33.00 35.00 34.50 34.00
1943:33.00 33.00 33.00 33.00
Grae 3l1
1941:23.57 23.38 23.5 7 7 2.23- 28-_7&I
1942:33.50 33.70 35.88 38.00 37.50 36.50
1943:35.00 35003500 35.00 -.
: ___ __ __ __ _Grade 3-1'
S-194:2-.57 23.58 9759 22.36 25.T
1942:3.o00 3.o0 36.13 38.00 37.50 36.50
1: 433 l00 37.00 37.00 3Z.00
*


1. -3/8 inches
25.75 26.00 27.50
32.00 32.00 33-00


29.00 29.00
34.00 34.10


inches
30.20
35.50


1~i- i 2 l inches,
31.00 31.00 32.50
36.50 36.60 38.00


31.00 31.00
36.50 36.60


29.00 29.00 29.00-'N.16
33.00 33.90 32.50" .4.
_--_ -- __ .'* :*.r
31.00 31.00 31.00 5.89
35.50 35.50 344.89'$.0..i


33.50
35 *90


inches
32.50 354.00
38.00 38.00


33-50 33.50 *602
38.00 37.25 ;662


38.00 37.75 6.78


Continuped. -.









Table 5.- Cotton, American-Egyptian: Average price per pound f.o.b. gin yards,
average of Phoenix and'El Paso, by months, 1940 to date Continued
la-: Aug.&:Sept.: Oct.: Nov.: Dee.: Jan.: Feb.: Mar.: Apr.: May : June: July: Av.
SCents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents
Grade 4 13/8 inches
:94l18.57 15.38 13.58 14.3 16.96 23.00 22.50 22.82 25.10 26.50 26.50 .50 21.65
942:26.50 26.30 26.50 27.00 27.50 27.00 27.00 27.00 27.00o 27.00 27.00 27.00 27.01
3943:I27.00 27.00 27.00 27.00 ____ _____ _____
-_ _Grade 4 -Z/I6 inches
.94l:91 ,57 19.38 19.55 15.38 17.T9 2W775 25.75 25.82 27.80 29.00 29.00 29.00 23.58
94?29.o00 29.00 29.50 31.00 30.80 30.00 30.00 30.10 31.00 31.00 31.00 30.50 30.24
9943:29.00 29.00 29.00 29.00 ___ __
: Grade 4- 1-1/2 inches ___ ___
194i:21.57 21.38 21.58 17.38 19.96 26-.1 28.00 28.00 30.10 31.50 31.50 31.50 25.73
,9423i3150 31.70.32.57 34.00 33-80 33.00 33.00 33.10 34.00 '34.00 34.oo00 33.25 33.16
94331.00 000 3. 1.00 ___ ___ __ _____
:'___ ____ Grade -19/1 inches ____
291357 213S 21.58 17.-38 19. 26.41 28.00 25.00 30W40 32-.00 32.00 32.00 25.88
.948:32.00 32.20 32.57 34.00 33.-80 33.00 33.00 33,10 34CO 3,0oo 314.00 33.25 33.24
943:31.00 310. 0.00 3 1.00 3 1r, .- -. 0 2, ___--_
141:-- --_ -- 19.14 12grade LW.-4 3, 3 21.0 2. 19.90
19l -. -i.41 19. 29 33.4"' .'0; 1 00p 21-.00 21.00 1 q. 90


F942: 21. 00
43:22.00


5142;24.00
3": 25.00

?2127.00
43127-oo

4; :27.00
.943:27.00

841: ---
5942:19. o00
.943:20.00


942:22.00
|943 21.00

hi4 ---
I42. 25.00
tj:! 2+00
I _o


21.00
22.00


24.oo00
25.00


21.75
22,00


24. 75
25.00


24.00oo
22..00


27.00
25.00


23.80 23.00 23.-0

Grade T 1 -
--- 21,i. 21, 50
26.80 26.00 2S.00


23:00 22,00 22.00

1- G :.-6 -.ches
2i, O 3'O 21.o00
26.00 26.00 26.00


___-_ Grade .T 1-1/2 inYhes
... ....- -- 23.10 23-75 2-. 6 fI-30 27.00
27.00 27-75 30.00 29.50 29.00 29.00.29.10 30.00 30,00


27.00


27.o00


22.00


24.00
26.00


22.00


25.7500
25.75


27.00 27.00
30.00 29.25


27.00


_____ _____Grade 4-1/2 -
.. ... .-- -- 23510 23.75
.00 27.75 30.00 29.80 29.00 29.00.


27.00

19.00oo
20.00


27.00


19.50
20.00


27.00

21.00
20.00


___ Grade
20.0-- T2000T
20.80 20,00


___ ___ ______ Grae
-2200 22-50 24,0 23--- 23,0,
22,00 22a50 214.00 23.80 230C)


21.00


2 1.,00


21,00


____ _____ _____ Grade
-- ~ -r cl -- eO
.i.. .D.0-.. 20-O6
i,00 ?.?E50 27.OC 26.30 2&-00


2>, 0o


1-9/l66 -nches
23.--69 -20 27.00
29.10 30,00 30.00


5 5-j inch-s __
16.25 1b,44 T]So0 19.00
20.00 20, 00 20.00 20.00

. 1- .. 6_ inches ____
r5 ..2 19.32 LE"0 22.00
2.o00 23,00 23.00 23.00
J.]-") '2 tan"'es
2L 52 2-.12 1.20 25.00
2-0.O 26.00 26,00 26.o00


2 oo


fl-. ~


,91 0


2--.50 4'20 25.00


27.00
30.00


19.00
20.00


22.00
23.00


25.00
26.00


25.00


#2:.% .0 2'5.00 23.30 27.00 26.80 26.00 26.00 26.00 26.00 26,00 26.00 ;
437S3;0 2'.2X 23.0C 23.00 ___ ___ ___ ___ _____ ___
piled from records of the Cotton and Fiber Branch, Food Distribution
ministration.


27.00
29.25


i9.0oo
20.00


22.00
22.50


25.00
25.25


25.00
25.25


22.38


22.82
25.69

25.39
28.99


25.39
28.99


17:S2
19.94


20.69
22.90


23.26
25.88


23.26
25.88


27


2F


- 15 -




16 -
Table G.- Cotton, American-Egyptian: Acreage, yield, And production, 1911-43
ro Acreage harvested : Yield per acre : Production
Crop :z Call- : United :. : Call- : United: : Call- : United.I
year Arzona fdria : StAtes Arizona: fornip.: .States:A3'ifl fornia: States .
Acres Acres Acres Pounds Pounds Pounds Balosl/ BtleslI Balesl 7
1911 : 30 30 --- 500 500 --- 30 30
1912 : 400oo 150 550 300 387 324 24o. 116 356
1913 : 4,Qo .62 4,.o62 275 315 276 2,200- 39 2,239
1914 : 12.Q00 .2/550 12..550 258 2/100 251 6,200. 2/110 6*9310..
1915 : 2,6oo00 --- 2.600 222 --- 222 1,150 -- 1.150
1916 7,300 --- 7,300 226 --- 226 3,300 --- 3,300
1917 : 33,000 2,400oo. 35,4oo00 230 206 229 15,200 990 16 ,190
1918 : 72,0.00 6,600 78g.600 .238 22S 237 4,227 3.007 37.2
1919 : 87,000 1,500 ,38500 229 225 229 39,s17 .605 40,492
1920 :200,000 43,000 243.000 205 -. 112 1I9 82,041 9L650. 1.691
1921 : 75,000 9,100 84,100 234 1i1 228 35,032 3,300 35go332.
1922 77.000 100 77.-o00 220 325 220 33.907 "63- 3}9,2..
1923 : 4o0,000ooo --- 40o,000 27 -- 287 22,960 --. 22,960
1924 9,oo000 --- 9,000 252 --- 252 5,000 -- 5.,00 .
1925 41i,ooo --- 41,ooo 247 --- 247 20,586. 20,586-'
1926 : 27,000 --- 27,000 306 --. 306 1.7, On -- l,,000
1927 : 41,oo00o --- 41,000 296 --- 296 25,000 --- 25,000 I.
1923 : 51.,000 --- 51,000 27S --- 273 30,000 -- 30000 :
1929 ; 67.000 -- 67,000 217 --- 217 30,000 -- 30,000 ,
1930 47,000 --- 47.000 260 --. 260 25.000 25,ono0
1931 35,000 -- 35,000 199 -- 199 15,000 15,0. 7"
1932 : 22,000 --- 22,o000 139 --- 19 9.000 -a- 9.000
1933 : 26,oo000 --- 26,000 -- 1 10.0001 --- 10,000 1
1934 : 23,000 --- 28,000 247 -- 247 15,000 --- 15000
1935 : 39,000 --- 39,000 229 --- 229 19,000 19.000
1936 38,000 --- 3, non 230 --- 230 18,000 -- 13, Or
1937 : 21,000 -- 21. 000 269 --- 269 12,000 --- 12, OW
1938 : 44,ooo --- 44. ono 234 -- 234 21,000 -- 21.000
1939 : 41,non V/ 4/ 41,ono 323 31 323 22,000 3j 4/27.700 !
19 o : 65,000 / V/ 68,onn 225 3/ 233 31,00o 31 5/33,300
1941 :101,000 w 3-1 9131, 1On 197 /1 211 41, 500 3-1 /59,-
1942 :125,n000 2,100 on /10,700 2n03 P, 200 56.oo00 500 J/75,3Oo j
19143 V/: 9,n00n 1,non /l145,gnn 205 154 225 41,,rno 3nn /_69,300
1/ Bales of 5n pounds net weight. 1911-26; 50' pounds cross '.eieht, 12P-3. ..
2/ Includes 100 acres of American-EgyFptian grown in Lo'-er Cplifornip, Mexico, whichh
yielded 250 pounds per Rcre, eoual to 50 bap.les, all of which wP.s gin.ied in
California. 3/ Iot separately reported by the Crop Re-orting Board. 4/ Includes %
very snail quantity in California and :e,.w ,.Xxico. 5/ The difference bet'-on the
acreage and production in Arizona and the totr-I for the United States is mostly in
Texas and 'cw Maoxico, with a snall Pinouit in Cplifornip.. 5/ Includes 19,200 acres'
for New Mexico yielding 262 pounds 2er acre and producing 10,500 bales; and for
Texas, 15,600 acres yielding 23. pounds per acre a.id oroduci.:g 7,700 bales.
Ji Includes 26,600 acres for Nei- Mexico yir.lding 157 pounds per acre and producing
B, 700 bales; and for Texps, 23,00" Pcros yioldi:- 210 pounds .er acre and producing
10,100 bales. 8/ Prelininpry estinp.te based on conditions as of D,-enber 1. 1943.
2 Includes 20,900 acres i:n Now Mexico yielding 253 pounds per acre pnd producing
i,000 bales; and for Texas, 28,000 a.cres yielding 274 pounds por acre and producing
16,000 bales.




-uvwauuiF J.u.Lo wu ucaiw j/
..... ....... .... V-' ..... -.-- .- -' "" J l
Yer Ag ep tn-.
Year Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. Peb. Mar. Apr. May June July total
al Bales Bales Bales Bales ales -a-es :ae Jl
Bales Bales Bales Bales Bales Bales Bales Bales Bales
'- 2.1 2L 2L 2L 2L 2L 2/ 2 / 2L2 /2


1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1925
- 1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
193
1936
1935
1936
1957'
1939
1939
1940
1941
1942
19435


3,557
2, 549
2,239
7,794
2,616
2,855
766
1,335
1,057
804
1,395
754
1,130
l.6oo
1, 600
1,128
882
1,957
1,366
769
710
2,123
1,936
2,772
4, 143
3,369


3,674
1,590
2,158
7,783
2,601
2,263
653
1,785

47
1,034
690
1,802
1,811
898
349
1,727
1,682
728
61o
2,121
1, 745
2,430
4, 314
3,633


3,288
1,194
2,277
7,570
2,759
2,258
687
1,838
1,197
913

94
1,322
1,671
1,085
952
2,001
1,750
731
651
2,110
2,076
3,174
4,594
3.723


1,162
2,708
771
2,557
6,652
2,451
1,398
818
1,920
1,3o06
984
1,235
1.041
1, O14I
1, 042
2, 104
940
740
1,764
2,107
594
931
2,296
1,761
2,891
4,4o02
3,559


1, 324
3,218
887
3,240
5,772
2,388
1,298
8536
1,957
1,291
1,022
1,024
1,177
1,315
1,694
1,119
742
1,825
2,029
599
1,353
1,833
1,925
5,679
4,500


1.919
4,225
389
4.029
5,183
3,006
1,785
876
i, 506
1,5o7
19547
1,451
1,109
1,472
l,o4l
1,184
1,143
929
2,242
1,797
377
1, 734
2,208
2,524
4, 534
3.770


1,791
8536
5.761
,.452
2,450
11414
941
1,654
1,426
992
868
1,641
1,o63
1,178
1,210
808
1,922
1,820 .
235
2,037
1,608
2,277
4,667
3,862


9
/ Da-ta are not available prior to November 1918.
2/ Running bales counting round bales as half bales.
3/ Preliminary.
Compiled from records and reports of the Bureau of the Census.


1, 837
4.475
947
4,287
4,637
3,037


1,793
1,365
1,093
849
1,745
1,145
1,207
1,288
817
1,729
2,081
389
2,398
1,280
2,118
4,951
3,821


2,822
4,537
1,557
4, 418
, 794.
4,296
1,272
1,290
1.739
1,14o
1,26
1,054
1,722
713
1,125
1,154
1,097
1,669
1,684
357
2,160
1,226
2,457
4,533
3,912


2,809
4,504

6,663
14,552
3,502
1,o43
1, 451
1,770
1,220
1,308
914
1,3581
612
1,142
963
1,417
1,413
1,497
409
2,222
1,164
2,579
4,209
4,377


3,073
3,527
1,962
7,862
3,964
2,978
l.o61
1.389
1,284
1,152
1.400
761
1,413
457
1,607
996
1,351
1,372
2,2o0
492
2.209
i,560
2,449
4.46
4:,N6


4,334
4,o43
2,471
5,868
3,092
3,914
837
984
1, 088g
1.3o4
1.778
706
1,379
788
1,485
611
1,259
1,755
980
507
1,623
1,875
3,087
4.728
3,524


45,867
16,771
49.359
65,235
35.998
19.018
11,740
19,669
15,137
13.455
12,572
15,-59
12,430
17,808
12,535
11, 343
21,376
20,097
6,187
18,638
21,204
26,937
47.031
49,783


-aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa-




- 15 -


Table 8.- Cotton, American-Zgyptian, Egyptian, and Sea Island.:
Annual consumption. tU UnitudcStates, 1906-42


Crop year : American- : Sea Island :" Tots
an. .t. ain Se Ia Uo
B Dales B 2 Bales 21 Bales JJ "

1906 : // 72,501 --
1907 ,/ 93,015 44,147 .137.162
1905 : 146,027. 67,749 213,776
1909 : 130,72S 75,605 '206,333
I..
1910 3 147,192 64,237 2119429
1911 : 1iso.465 94,856 /
1912 :. 201.269 5',77.' .
1913 151;091 8I67 ,. .
191 : 181.211 79,994 '
1915 : 269.324 82,645 .
1916 : 259,160 9o4291 W/
1917 :r36R,4o1 55,939. 4f
1918 : / 21,071 126,057 51,183
1919 45.87 323.124 42.971 4192.


159,196
226.330
262.53
223.649.
191,544.
20o4,113
239,76s
217,584
232,392-
205,165

104,095
79. 464
88,805
103 4 5
82,249
926 92
66,982
77,958
47.876
53,185
53,903

60o, s84


18.667.
5, 967
6,267
4, 906
*3,970
2,325
1,226
1,251
795
372
41o
327
914
296
566
238
395
1,950
3,226
3,166

3,270
4. 251
5,664


. 194,634 1;
" 284.656
333.0,3.
264.553
214.532
S218.179
260,663"
U33,972
26, 642
*2189.709.

119,7of4
92,221
107,527
116L,28b6
94o!58
88, 596
,99-39
98. 350
56,013
75,0i9
75,273

91,, 091
,_/


SYear beginning September i 1, 0-13; August 1, 1914--42-. 2 Egyptian cotton
in equivalent 500 pound bales; American-Egyptian and Sea Island rurnnin bales
counting round bales as half bales." 3/-Earlier data not available. 41 Total
for last 9' ,onths'of season.- /. No..dita on consumption of American-Egyptian
cotton from beginning of its production in 1911" tInrbugh October .1.918..
"5/ Consumption of Egyptivn cotton eact being published because of the wp.ra
CQmpiled from reports of the Bureau of the Census,


,4
! .
. 1

'I*

-.4






*.1
it!*.*


1920
1921
1922
1925
1924
1925
1926
1927 i
1928
1929

1930
1931
1932
1935
1936
1935
1936-
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942


16,771
49,359
65,235
35, 999
19,018
11,740
19,669
S1.5,137
13,:455
121572

15,359
12,-430
17, 80S
12 5z5
11 343
21, 376
20,097
6,187
18 638
21 204

26,937
47,031
49,783


A







I


I





Table 9-- Cotton, American-Egyptian: Stocks in consuming establishments, in public storage
and at compresses, and total, United States, end of month, November 1918 to date 1/

Year: Aug. : Sept. Oct. Nov.' Dec. : Jan.: Feb. : Mar. : Apr. Mar June' July
Bales Bale Bales Bales Bal Bales Bales Bales Bales Bales -Bales Bales S
: Bales Bales Bales Bales Bales Bales Bales Bales Bales Bales "Bales Balesa
2/ 2j i 2 1 J -L -L -L -Lg/ 2/22'2


*


191L
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
19214
1925
1926
1927
1925
19R9
1930
1931
1932
1932
1934
1938
1939
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
19,3


*

3/:


___ Stocks in consuming establishments


11.904
9,370
8,964
18,042
9,537
9,185
2,267
5,369
3,050
2,229
5,9423
7,791
9,287
5,331
6,020
5, 467
5,665
5,709
3.639

3 115
12,735
19,876
18,1402


11,257
8,694
8,992
16,781
11,517
7,926
-2,055
5,197
2,718
i,982
4,731
7,657
8,170
5,589
6,034
5,226
5, 539
4.930
3,780
5, 768
7,950
11,230
17,911
17,152


11,182
5,896
11,290
15,.527
12,086
6,506
1,978
4.807
2.5o06
2,474

3,581
7,030
7,619
'6,077
5,817
4, 3 i
4, 5 6

4,276
2, 943
3,386
5,129
7,735
10,242
15, 013
15, 761


3,769
ill.146
5,4g6
14, 811l
15,559
12,70o4
7,301
1,804
4,892
3,530
3,032
3,417
7,068
.,912
4,697
5.555
4,437

4,194
9125
785
5,391
7,766
10,874
14,233
15,103


5,591
13,430
6,433
14, 516
17,190
13,053
7,523
.2,730
9.299
a837
4,209
3.8 41
7,025
7,367
5,359
5v288
6,030
5, 149
6,025
3,332

11,112
15,350
17,810


9,169
12,313
6,208
16,888
16,289
13,875
.7,254
3,644
5,689
5,080
5,124
3, 721
6,990
7,321
5,178
7,351
7,893
6,636
6,993
3,521
9,182
l8.56
13,121
23, 748
17,753


13,677
12,582
6,676
18,533
15,716
149156
69758
3,931
5,599
6,017

076
6o570
7,050
5,213
S,393
8,637
7,500
6,713
3,.773
11,582
10,257
14,979
30,639
16,466


16,591
12,161
7,293
18,934
16,264
14,207
5,24
5,675
5,514
5,235
5, 714
5,.195
6,099
6,324
5,481
7,985
8,767
7,761
6,507
4,626
11, 148
11,294
14, 674
29, 646
17,907


17,662
11,576
8,928
17,912
15,963
13.594
5.,0
5,270
5.219
4,779
5,287
5,941
8,151
5,850
6,2)43
7,573
8.564
6,887
s, ,617
785
$33
11,286
10,929
14,956
2S 599
19, 534


17,286
10,262
7,850
i6,638
14.451
1)4,14~l
12 ,527
3,980
5,832
14,894
4,283
7,421
5,583
8,550
5,688
6,)So
7.,89
8,583
4.399
9,837
,763
9,945
10,701
14,303
29,070
18,965


15,081
10,503
9, 594
17,983
12,299
11,025
3,e48
6,559
4,879
.4,275
7,785
5, 3)43
,.191
5,.k88
6,195
6,753
7, b52
5.279
9.742
4,600
9 4
1l4,1413
?6,228
19,646


13,502
.9,289
9,601
20,421
10,524
S,988
2,849
6,387
4,237
3,596
6,546
5,323
8,505
5,717
6,347
5,937
6,676
S,891
4,420
4., 192
8,177
9,859
13,845
22,288
18,736


- n*


Continued -







Table 9.- Cotton, American-Egyptian: Stocks in consuming establishments, in pu
and at compresses, and totally United States, end of month, November 1918 to
COntinUed


Year Aug.
Bales



191$ : -
119 : 6: 7

i. g : 3 *2 .
193a1s 4
I n-)Iry n -


SOct : N D c. e .b
Oct Nov Dec. Jan Feb Ma. Ar My Jn




Year Aug. Sept. 'Oct. :Nov. Dec, : Jan b. Mar. -Apr May :June: July
SBales Bales B Bales Ble alles Bales Bales Bales Bales Bales
__ 2 2_- 2/ 2o a l / 2_/ 4 24
Total stocks


1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1925
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943


S
S
S


S
S

S
S
S
S
S
S
0



S
S
S
S
S
S
0
0

S
S


18,688
17,680
51,871"
50,313
24,581
13'1141
3, 9115
3:945
8,333
5.117
i.69
6,027
11, 147'
17,952
15,174
9, q143'
6,1479
7,561
5,783
.4.610
* 7,856
8,979
11,187
15,397
22,264
36,960


17,018 16,610
16,441l 13,656
49,266 50,512
44,083 43,778
26,688 29,436
11,364 10,707
5,677 6,853
9,047 9,005
5,760 8,68s4
7.933 8,9141
7, 7144 9,249
14,o46 16,951
18,622 19,711
14,469 16,353
0,676 8,359
7,178 7,635
6,481s 6,986
6,573 6,837
5,317- 6,sio.
11,563 12,947
8,951 12,618
13,621 17,1i83
17,542 21,622
23,621 29,010
39,433 46,535


41,367
16,851
29,791
58320
6v.741
33,275
11,325
8,008
9,257.
8,197
11,869
11,8 14
17,500
20,325
14,958
8,496
7,393
6,442
7,617
7,739
16,053
14,943
17,991
23, 358-
36,144
53,463


8,186
19,116
43,943
61, 346
49.439
32,269
12,298
11,207
9,321
9,419
10,736
15,582
17,801
21,360
15,407
7,596
10, 552
8,225
11,327
8g, 108
17,o08
19,057
18,602
24,401
42,285


12,400
17,305
50,661
91,246
47,359
31,190
10.944
12,780
10,7114
10 209
11,321
12,753
18,167
22,529
15,282
9,1449
12,122
11,106
11,866
8s,415
17.,53
18.471
19,568
35 562
48036


17,014
17,244
53,987
92,052
42,810
32,101
11, 454
13, 406
10O,594
10,809
12,744
12,811
18,i 427
21:507
13, 66
9,818
12,637
11,392
11,216
8,278-
19,324'
17,688'
23,778
4o,616
45,139


20,649
18,872
5, 5490
92.123
42,529
27,077
99593
11,687
8,892
9,937
11,965
11,789
19.287
19.639
13,039
9.199
11,256
10,269
9,570
.8,913.
17,155.
17,441l
22,493
37,122
47,449


26,o078
24,517
56,023
81,449.
39,575
22,822
9,1113
.99143.
10,273
7.917
8,873
6,833
10,930
19,264
19,181
13,519
8.,524
11,966
9,080
7,708
9,898
15,932.
16,505
21,663
3, 747
5,603


26,114
23, 234
53.946
69,185
36,1 0
19. 640
5872
99773
7,306
7,098
8,792
10,052
18,874
18, 314
12,039
8,395
11,553
8.21f
79, 19
14.490
15,319
20.400
32, 436
39,705


IT Data not available orior to November 1918.
_2/ Running bales counting round bales as half bales.
/ Preliminary.
Compiled from records and reports of the Bureau of the Census.


24,829
21,800
54, P35
64,102
30,690
17,070
5,137
9,665
7,092
6,819
9.013
9,Ol3
9,030
17, 584
16,209
10,817
7,955
9,.7q
5,697
5,842
8, 64
12,725
13,571
18,235
29,584
34,823


21,746
18,582
55,237
59,533
29,221.
15,198
91446
6,355
5,783
7,204
8,139
16,709
16,532
9,826
7,0111
8,615
6,960
5,.488
7,859
10,289
13,681
15,695
24,859
36,657





-22

Thble 10.- Cotton, American Egyptiani Grade and staple length of carry-over,
2 production, r.nd surely, United States, 1crp Xeas, 128-43 ..
Staple length and r.ade: 28o; 929 0QT'l' 19'J;',O0 1_M 935; A96e 2
;1. 00 i. ,0o0 56o .i1 o 0* .-oop -i .' "ivboo1.0i0o0oo 1,000 1,00


:run-
:ning
Sales


Shorter than 1-1/2"1
1 end 1-1/2 .....,..:
2 end 2-1/2 .....,..:
3 nd -1/2 ......e.s:
4 end 4-1/2 .........:
I- S ..... .
Pelov 5 ... ......0.9 :
1-1/2 and 1-17/32"


run-
ning
bales


run-
ning
bales


run-
ninae
bales


Mrun-
ning
bales


run-
ning
bale&


run-
ning
bales


- Carry-over on Auust 1


.2 --


f.7 I


N.
.1


.2
.4
.1


.1



.2


1 end 1-1/2 .........: .2 --- --- .3 .3 -1 .9
2 end 2-1/2 .........: .6 1 ..1 .o 1.5 1.7 .5
7 and 3-1/2 .........: .4 .3 .1 .9 1.1 1.0 .3
a rd 4-1/2 .....,...: .2 .2 -- .1 .1

Below 5 .... ...... : .2 .1---
1-9/16 snd 1-19/32"
1 anl 1-1/2 .......: .3 1.4.. 2. 4.2 2.5 1.3 1.4
2 end 2-1/2 ...,.....: .1 3-.6 3.0 7.2 7.0 -.0 2.1
Vand 3-1/2 .........: 1.5 .5 1.9 1.9 2.2 .5 .3
4 end 4-1/2 .........: -- -. .1 .3 .7 .3 --
l -........... .....

1-5/8 and 1-23/32"1
1 :nd 1-1/2 ........: .5 .3 .2 .1 .4 .6
Sand 2-1 /? .......: .S .2 V. .g .6 '.6 '.4
Sand. 3-1/2 .........: .g .4 .1 .1 .2 .1 --
4.. nd 4-1/2 ..... ...: .1 .. .. .1 -- --

3. low .. .
i-3/1" and longer
1. and 1-1/2 .........-- -- ---
2 and 2-1/2 .........: .-- --. .
3. eand 3-1/2 3 .: 1 -
14 nd 4-1/2 .,......: -.- -.. 7.4.-



,- / an 1-33i. 1. 1i I 6. o! O I l i 1 i'l 10 1i.1 1.
1e -... l ...: .. --. -- --. -
Starle length ...
Shorter than 1 -1/2" ..1 .3 .--- -- .7 "3
1!-1/2 aund 1-17/2" ...: 1.6 .7 .2 2.0 3.1 2.9 1.9
1-9/16 and 1-19/5,2" ..: 2.4 5.1 7.1 13.5 12.4 5.1 3.8
1-5/s and 1-23/32"...: 1.7 1.1 i2.1 1.0 .If 1.0
1-3/41" and longer ....:
,rade6
land 1-1/2 ...... oleo 1.7 2.4 b.7 2.9 1.3 2.9
2 and 2-1/2 ........ : 1.1 -4.o 3.5 s.6 9.1 5-5 3-1
3 and 3-1/2 .........: 2.7 1.2 2.1 2.9 3.5 2.0 .6
4 end 4-1/2 .........: .4 .2 .1 1.0 .5 .1

Below 5 .............: .1 2 .-- --- --. .2
Below 2 : 2 7 2
Total 11 ..........: :.8 8.1 i-.7 1i.5 9.8 72 .1


run- rvn- run-w
ning ning ning
bal es bales bal.

~-.- in.:."



a-




:.7-
..
*1 I.G -
.2 .-f .5;


,,. 2.L *..5

.- -.0 .2
2.]..2 :1.4,
.7 .
.2 .3' ..


-- ,,,


.7 .2 '.6
.1 .4 *


- a.3
-- a-
a- -


a--w


a--
a-m
a-mm
-a


--a :






a-I
.a


.2 .1 .1
1.9 3.1 2.5
6.5 3.4 2-.2
.4 .9


1.S 1.9 *
4.9 3.7 1.7
1.4 .9 1.2
.3 *71
.1 .1 .3
- p. ____

Continued -

__ A


- --7- -


-- m --




I 23 -
Table 10.- Cotton, American Egyptianl Grade and staple length of carry-over,
Sproductionj a suhpplZ, United Statys, crop_ years, 192s-43 Continued
tayle length and grade : 1922112; 3 : 1-9351@1916: 19
S :l00O L;OOO 1;000 1;000ooo 1,000 1;000 1000 1,000 1,000 1.000
: run- run- run- run- run- run- run- run- run- run-
:;iiig ning nin& ning ning ning ntng ning ning ning
:bales bales bales bales bales bales bales bales bales bales


shorter than 1-1/2"
1 and 1-1/2 ........:
2 and 2-1 ........:12
and 3-1/2 ........
i4 and 4-1/2 .........;
an5 -. ,.. ...,..,::

Below 5 m........."
V-1/2 and 1-17/32"
i land 1-1/2 .......
2'anad 2-1-/2 .........
S3 and 3-112 .........m
1 4 and 4-1-/2 ..........
i"5 b..t..mm.. mam...a.e
Below 5 .... .....
,-9/16 and 1-19/32"
S1 and 1-1/2 .....
2 ard 2-1/2 ..:..,,
3and 3-1/2 .........:
4ad 4-1./2 .1'......:
"5 ..O. .@.. O ....
Below 5 .... ....-a a
-5/8 and 1-23/32"1
1 and 1-1/2 .........:
eand 2-1/2 .........
3 and 3-1/2 ........:
4 and 1/2 ...-ie.:
5 .o.mm .. ...a .aaa
Below 5 a..-..ame a.e- :
3/4" and longer
1 and 1-1/2 .......:
2 and 2-1/2 ........:
a nd 3-1/2 .........
and 1-1/2 .........:
B elow 5 .aa... aaa..aaaaa.....:
a le length
Shorter than 1-1/2" .
1-1/2 and 1-17/32" .m:
-9/i6 and 1-19/32" ..
.-5/s and 1-23/32" .:
41-3/4" and longer ... :

a1
and 1-1/2 .........:
and 2-1/2 .........a
and 3-1/2 ... o.......:
and -1/2 .........:
... I a@..maa maca

elow 5 ... ....*..*.,:
T ,. .....,,


Production


.2
.3
.2




2.2
5-9
4..8
.4
.1


2m7
6.5
3.X
.3




.4
.4





.1





0.7

12.5
1.6
0.1


.6
2.3
2.1
.-3



3.1
10.0
3.9
.1


.4
.7
1.1
a'3



4.1
8.1
3.7
.3


.3
1.1
.7
."3



.6
3.5
3.0
1.2
.1


1.7 1.7 .3
3.8 2.6 1.3
.5 .3 .8
.14


.1
.3


5.3
17.1
6.0
.4


2.5
16.2
4.6


2.4
s.4
2.9


.9

*3
em:

.3

1.b
.9
.1
ml
n-


1.2
1.7
.3


1.3

* .9
* .'6


1.o 3.0 3.4
1.3 2.2 .1
.3 .2 ..6




.7 .7 i.4
*3 ) @7.7
.1 --- -m--


.* --
u^


-5
. 3.5.
.7
.2



2.8
8.0
1.1


,l


.5
4.
fl













it.9
12.0
.7


1.7
2.9
2.6
1.1


.1
3.2
5.4
1.0


4.6
7,.-
2.1


5.5 5.5 6.2 1.2 2.0 4.9 6g1 3.h4 3.5 7.2
13.6 16.4 11.4 5.9 3.7 4.3 5.6. 1.O. 9.1 2.9
8.4 6.5 5.f 4.5 2.2 .5 1.5 1.9. 3.1 .7
.7 .4 .6 1.9 -- .8 .3 1.6 .2
.1 r 2 -6 .. ...3 --

.2.5 28.8 23_t3 137 9.7 1. 11" 11.0
'6 Continued -


-- n-rn rn~- rnrnfl


.2
1.4
1.6
1.2
.2


2.7
6.4
1.3
.3
.1


.6
1.3
.2
.1











4.6
10.-
2.2


.1
.1




1-3
.9
.4
.2



4.6
1.7
.2




1.3
.2













.2
2.8
6.5
1.5




24'--

Table '10.- Cotton, American Egyptian' rate end:staple .leagtb-of carry-over,
S production ndsarplyr, United Statesz, op m '0.139AB-4'" Oontinued.
Stsple length and. -rade 1922: 1929: 1930: 1 91 ;2: 31994 193. 15;. I 19I
: 11,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,-O00 1,000 000 1,000 1,000 1,0001
:run- run- run- run- run- run-- tan- run- run- runm--,
:ning ning ning ning ning ning ning ning ning nin g n
@bales bales bales bales bales bales bales bales bales bale
_'up -- ---
8 Z Z ~ ~ uply i "_ __ i_ ,'
Shorter then 1-1/2" '....
1 and 1-1/2 ........: .2 .2 -- : "-...,-- -- -
2'and 2-1/2 .........: o3 .1 ...5 .i ..-. ,i .1
Pnd 3-1/2 .........: .2 --.-. .9 .4'--- --
4 and 4-1/2 .........: .1 .3 .1 -.w ...--...----
5ela .. ....... .!.....- .2 .S oo


1-1/2 and 1-17
1 and 1-1/2
2-end 2-1/2
3 and 3-1/2
4-Pnd 4-1/2
5 .. .


/32" 3

* U .U .
* S
. ew .


Below 5 ...........:
-0/1 and 1-19/2"
-.,/i1 and 1-10/32"


1 'nd 1-'1/2
2 -and 2-1/2
3 -and 3-11/2
4 bnd 4--1/2
5 ... .......
Below 5' "...
1-5/S end 1-2/
1 and 1-1/2
2 erd 2--1/2
Saftnd 3-1/2
4 and 4-1/2


. 0 .a. 0U.


32"
. mU @
S0SSSSS*oo
00006
650 50 U U *.:


@ .. o. @ ..... ....
5elow 5
i-7/4" and longer
1 ano 1-1/2 .........:
2 and 2-1/2 .........
Snd 3-1/2 .........:
4 and 4-1/2 ..........

Belo-:7 5 .-.... ..... .:
Starle length
Shorter than 1-1/2" ..:
1-1/2 end 1-17/32" ...:
1-9/16 and 1-19/32" ..:
1-5/g end 1-23/32" ...
1-3/14" and longer ....:
ifrade
1 and 1-1/2 .........
2 and 2-1/2 ..U.......
3 and -1/2 .........:
4 -nd 4-1.-/2 .........:
Selow .
9elow 5 ...... ..,....l


Totri.....


a a a a a M5


2.4
6.5
5.2
.6
.1
.2


.6
2.4
2.4
.5
-e
.1


.4 .6 .6 1.3
.8 1.7 3.1 3.4
1.2 1.6 2.0 1.3
.3 .5 .- 51


3.5 4.1 6.2 4.8
6.6 1t.6 11.1 10.7
45 4e4 536 49.
.3 .1 .4 1.5


.7
1.2
1.2
.1
.1



.1


0.8

14.3
3.3
0.1


2.2 2.0 .5
4.x 3.0 2.1
.9 .4 .9
--- ---- *14
.9 1



l --- .
6 __ 4n


.3
6.0
22.2
7.1
.14


-.8 7.'2
l4.7 20.4
11.1 7.7
1.1 .'6
.2 -
.2 .1
. _."7


: .2.2. .1.0
: .2.3- .3.9
*.1.2.. .1.4
. ..7 O. L.,
*9. .I


3.5 4.3 *.Aa.
8.3 5.2 5.2
2.5 .7 .9
.7 -3 ..


* .5
. .a4.1
.ila.14
.1.28

.2


.3 .1. 1..
.8 1.1 .20 ...1
9 .9 .. ... -5
3 ,I -- .i
,]L ---- -- ... ,,' ^^I


..................................r


- -w


1.0
2.6
2.3
* 1.5.
.. .3


3&7
8.5



,,?
.1

.7
1.6
.2
* a.


1.4


1-7
.5
'4


149:
24?
*8
* .2





.2

.* a

-4


a. 1.7 .8 .2 .1
2;7 4.4 6.o 6. 6.S 7.7 54
23.3 22.0 15.0 10.5 11j 18S.5 14.2 8.7-
5.4 '4.0 2.1 2.1 .3.1. .7 2.6 .2A


8.6 5.9 4.9 6.7 :9.Q .5.2 5.4 .0
14.9 14., 12.8 9.8 Z. 3,. 12.8 4.6
7.2 7.4 5.7 2.5 2.j..3.3 4.0 1.9
.7 2.)4. 1.14 .5 ..* .. .. 2.0 .9
--- .2 -- ...1.. .. .. 4 .3
.2 .,

2. .5 215 '0 n2e7 =-
Continued -




- 25 -


Table 10.- Cotton, American-Egyptian: Grade and staple length of carry-over,
production, and supply, United States, crop years, 192--43 Continued
SShorter: 1-1/2 1-915 :6 1-5/ : 1-11/16 : 1-3/4" r All
Grade : than ; and : and : and : and i and : A
: 1-1/2" 1--i7/32": 1-19/32": 1-21/32": 1-23/32": longer lengths
SRunning Running Running Running Running Running Running
Sales bales bales bales bales bales bales
Oard -13- ox- r
Carry-over ; 9 .
O5C .k2-C 7 ICpO/'i ~ ifi^i rl


Santi..-..1 --...
2 and 2-1/2 ....: 189
and 3-1/2 .... 51
and 1l/2 ....-
5 IauoSSS.*i.S.SU
Below 5 .......
All grades ...:___ 20


" Production
1 and 1-1/2 ....: 172
2 and 2-1/2 ....: 81
Sand 3-1/2 ....: 10
and 4-1/2 ....: 21
5 U*UOS SSSSSs I.-
Below 5 .......:___ --_
All grades ...; "- -


Supply
1 and 1-1/2 .... 172
2and 2-1/2 ....: 270
3 and 3-1/2 .... 61
4 and 4-1/2 w...: 21
5 ..............
Below 5 ........ ---
All grades ... :___- 52

3arry-over
1 and 1-1/2 .... 124
2 and 2-1/2 .... 132
3 and 3-1/2 ....: 24
and 4-1/2 ....:
5 ...... ........
Below 5 ........: --__
All grades ..: 280
Production
1 and 1-1/2 ... .: 15
2 and 2-1/2 .... 394
3 and 3-1/2 ....: 521
4 and 4-1/2 -...: 396
5 ........ 36
Below 5 ........ ___ --
All graded ,, 1__3'-2


:


supply
1 and 1-1/2 ....: 139 4,206 5,818 s886 18 .. -- 11,067
2 and 2-1/2 ....: 526 3,879 8g,600oo 1,611 38 21 14,675
3 and 3-1/2 ....: 545 4,27h 3,804 729 44 16 9,412
4 and 4-1/2 ....: 396 710 347 70 .- 1,523
5 ..............: 36 318 12 --- 366
Below 5 ..6...... --- 72 -- -- --- --- 72
All grades ...: 261.4 13,759 18,581 3,296 100 37 37,115
Continued -


1,015 1,221 8g9 -- --- 2,5114
770 561 -- .. 1,532
149 193 -- 342
P-6.... 263
6____N_ 664
3793 _3903-- ___22^ __ 7,-H j85-9

2,861 7,284 4 189 317 .. 143 14,866
1,790 .2,461 678 :67 12 5,089
195 230 34 :.7 --- 476
31 10 --- -.. 62
10 -- ---. -- 10

4,997~" -9 -I- -9617
_7___ i~ ,901 3 5=1720v503

3,493 9,212 4,323 317 43 17,560
2,805 3,682 767 67- 12 7,603
965 791 34 '7-. --- 1,858
180 203 -...--- 4o4
27 --- ---- --- 273
66___ __.__ -- 664
8.380 13,888W 5.^' 31 55 28,362
.19#9-70 __ .

2,842 2,1423 100 .. 5, 49
1,028 2,055 100 .. 3,315
586 291 50 -- .. 951
157 81 -- -.- .... -. 238
22 -- .......---- 22
__72 __ ......-......__ ^ z_ 72
4,909o ,850 25o____ --- -- -1/10,289

1,364 3,395 786 18 .. 5,578
2,851 6,545 1,511 38. 21 11,360
3,688s 3,513 679 44.. 16 8,1461
553 266 70 1,285
94 12 --- 3 1 42

99550 13,7531o-'06 ~IOO 37 1/26,278


q






Table 10.- Cotton, American-Zgyptian: :Grade and staple 'length of carry-over ,.
production, and supply, United States, crop years, 1928-143. -Continued
G-r a : Shorter: :-1T2 and : 1-9716 and : 1-58 a-ad l m-s-A
- -ae__ : thai 1-/2" : 1-17/32"N: 1-19/32": 3.-21/32"g lengths
: running Running! wing Running unnia :
bales balesa. bales bales balesa
.:~~1 41^Jl ^"


Carry-over
1 and 1-1/2 ... 64
2 and 2-1/2 ... : 1,040
Sand 3-1/2 ...: 2,292
and 1-1/2 ...g :
5 9.. 9 ........ -..--
Below 5 ........:
All grades ...:___j39
Production
1 and 1-1/2 ....: 636
2 and 2-1/2 ....: 2,682
and ....: 3,509
and -1/2 .... 1,843
5 .. ..... ....... : 389
Below 5 ........; 2
"All grades ...: g--79,06l
Supply ,
1 and 1-1/2 ...: 800
2 and 2-1/2 ....: 3,722
n3 1n -1/2 ....: 5,801
and 4-1/2 ..,., 1,843
5 .... ........ : 389
Below 5 ........ ___ 2
All grades ...: 12,557

Carry-over
1 and 1-1/2 ....: 58
2 and 2-1/2 ....; 2,251
5 and 3-1/2 ....: 1,367
Sand 4-1/2 4,*; 455
5 ...........: 30
Below 5 -.......: --
All grades ...: ,16l
Production
1 and 1-1/2 ....: ,46
2 and 2-1/2 ... 4,537
' 3 and 3-1/2 ..: 4.,465
Uand L-1/2 .: 911
.5 and below ....: 28S
All grades ..iI /13.707


2,126
2,325
1,136
500

- 6, os._
3,2646
9,117
5,315
I,019
102

-18,799
5,372
11,42
6,451
1,519
102

247,lgo6


3.M
2,790
287
39
9,909

15,5146
15,155
5,g 473
347

=_6 5


855
2,369
689
159



1,617
1,984
657
122
6


26 3,l17:
.73
659
-I ."I,--" a' i$
S, r i ,,6Ir
25 5, 524
11 13.79T4
... 9 9,520
L ., 14
2,~
..Y-r 4.97**
-- 2 1 53.
_:i^>s_ 32siar


2,472 51
S4,353 11
* 1,376 9
281 4
6
-6l .. ..
1941-.42


480so
556
323
266



3,266
* 3,226
822
49


89695
19,528
13. 627

497
*Z~.B2


3,918
, --- 6,220
.... --- 4.480
. --- 1,008
69
... 7. .-- 6


172
S. 159
7


22,470
23,T077
10,?87
1,307
288
57r9!


Supply ..
1 and 1-1/2 ....: 3,544 16,926 3,746. 172 26,38
2 and 2-1/2 ....: 6,783 18,568 3,782 159 29,297
3 and 3-1/2 ....; 5,852 8,263 1,145 .... 7 15,267
Sand 4-1/2 ....z 1,366 634 315 ...... 2,315
5 and. below ..31 39 ..
All grades... 17863 643 8,988 .....
.. ... -. Continued -




w


t 37-
Table 10.- Cotton, Amerioan-Egyptian: Grade and staple length of oarry-over,
__ production, and supply, United States, crop years, 1928-43 Continued
Shrtr t 1-12 t 191
Grade : Shorter : I-1i-1 1i-9/76 T -5/ T All
.P _- than -12" and 1-1 2"; and 1-19/32": and I-.21/32": lengths
Running Running Running Running Running
S bales bales bales bales bales
z 1942r43
Cerry-over
1 and 1-1/2 1.628 13,575 499 --- 15,702
2 and 2-1/2 : 2,108 1,899 18 -- 7,025
3 and 3-L/2 670 805 28 -- 1,503
rand .-1/2 700 119 Big '89
5 and below __ 25 ___ '_____2_
All grades:, .5,31 19,398 52 -------72570-- _
Production
1Ind 1-1/2. : 13,779 24,597 1,892 --- 4Q,268
2 an.d 2-1/2 a 13,446 4,632 124 M-- 8,402
Sand 3-112 10,259 436 2 --- 10,697
3a,84-1 /2 3t883 65 3,9M4
5 and below : 490.. ....3* --- --490 493
All grade-s: 41,857 29,933_ 2,018 --- 1739808 -
Supply : -
1 ad.-./2 15,407 38,172 2,391 -- 55,970
2 and 2-.1/2 156554 9,731 142 25,427
3 and '3-I/2 1 10,929 1,241 30 -- 12,200
4 ana'4-1/2 4,583 184 --- --- 4,767
5 aid blow : _55 ___ ___3 --- ___ 51
All grades: 46,988 493 31 2,54j77-1-. 98,882 __
.. 2 --5/16. 1--379- 1-7/16. 1-7-1[.. 1-9T17. 5---7-
1-7/3211: 1-1/4 a 1-3/8: i-i/TUFT-I72F1J=7 l378:
an d; *: and: and: and and: and: and : All
.:oeand9. / n : 1- I 1- : 1- 1- a 1- a 1- :lengths
.:shor ter; -9/311":
a 11/32I 13/321:' 15/321' 17 32"; 19/2:2 21"1
JBales Bales Bales Bales Bales 2ale"sBales ales--. es

Qarry-over
1 .......... 3 1038 5 9 1,409 --- 8,099
1-1/ .....: 39 1,569 7360 374 2 9344
2 i...u.....: 2 --- 277 1 509 3,075 90 --- 4,953
-2-1/2 ...... 5 l 353 2 71 747 10 3-.-587
3 ,....... 11 2 1,275 2,617 235 --. ..14 o0
1/2 .....: 23 8 2 1,o4 2,551 150 --- --- 377,
S..... 7 5 2 725 885 -- 1,62N
-1/2 ...... -- 1 30 4g6 228 745
5 .....*.. : --- 10 25 171 27 -- --- 253
Below 5 i...: --- 15 --- 26- --.- 41
All grades: 30 __52 ,4,396 12,895 17.51 2-1 1,v8 2 1f754,
, As reported by the Bureau of the Census.
/ Includes 810 bales of 1-3/8 inch and 8,251 bales of 1-7/16 and 1-15/32 inch.
/ Included 180 494 1',400 665 257 bales of 1-3/8 inch and shorter, and
5,306 4,043 3,085 246- 31 of 1-7/16 and 1-15/32 Inch.
Compiled from reports of the Cotton' and' Fiber Branch, Food Distribution
Lkministration.








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