Roughage fed to milk cows

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Roughage fed to milk cows
Physical Description:
Unknown
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics ( Washington, D.C )
Publication Date:

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 029376122
oclc - 85233442
System ID:
AA00017424:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
--F T~ __


- .:. e-E
2 5


I ~ajhpjoJ1%ITo iX'.U I

-^ 5 H WINTQRa952-5'3


NOV 6 1953


COyS


9SEAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS-U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
xxfXxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
4


Kind of Hay


Kind of


silage


SUMMARY


Ns cowve in dairy reporters' herds were fed an avorage of 2.2 tons of hpy
during the October 1952-1I1,y 1953 'intar feeding soP.son, or about the same as tho
swOrage of recent years. Silage fed per milk cot' totaled 1.9 tons, continuing a
gradual upward trend. The hay equivalent of all roughage amounted to 2.9 tons per
S0w* Alfalfa made up half of the total hay fed to milk cows; clover, clover mix-
tane8, and lespedezasas a group, about one-third; nnd other miscellaneous hays,
oteuixtlh.. Six-sevenths of the hay fed to milk cows was home grown Pnd one-seventh

the value of the hay fed to milk cows on February 1, 1953 was $26.48 per ton,
. th highest for the date in 9 years of records Of the dairymen reporting on hay,
3 reported baled hay fed for every 2 reporting loose hayp, continuing the steady
trend toward increased use of baled hay. Corn silage, representing 70 percent of
the total silage fed to milk cows, continued to be the most important silage, but
grass silage has increased steadily and in the winter of 1952-53 represented 21
percent of the total.

Prepared by John L, Wilson nrind Herbert 14M. Walters, Agricultural Statisticians,
under the general direction of B. H. Bennett, Head, Division of Dairy Statistics.
The 41 State Agricultural Statisticians and members of their staffs collected and
summarized the reports of cooperating farmers upon itlch the series are bn.sed.

Washington, D. C.
.June 1953


<*.;
r ....h" =
r :. .


.-ea-T --.
/ Other i
'* 9%
I i ;
Grass '
210%
Cdrn
7 //

--











Year
m- a -9 S- .'.

1945

1946

1947


1948

1949

1950

1951

1952


Table 1. Amount of hay, silage and other roughage fed per
milk cow., winter feeding period ending in May, and value per
ton of hey fed to milk cows February 1, herds kept by
dairy reporters, United States, .1945-53
~ --- a6 a. -- a 0- -- a-- 0- -
: Amount fed per cow, winter Value per ton of hay fed to
L eadXcA Eigdloe_ef4J Lnl.JC I/. :.241k aoxu. aWbnzX 2-. /- -- +-
S H ey Silage oter oose e Baled All
l---.. -Ke-. a a. a. -A a .--- .,
sTon DT2Rs r* Pollrsp ,1


2.0

2.1

2.1

2.2

2.2

2.2

2.2

2.3


1.4

1.5

1.5

1.5

1.6

1.?

1.6

1.8


.2

.2

.1


20.86

18.43

20.26

22.32

22.19

20.43

20.58

22.41


25.94

23.35

25.81

27.99

27.65

24.5i4

24.89

27.04


19.68

21.o4


15.V- -- .. d1 D L.1.- .3.L62 -- O ..oD-L -
i/Based on tonnages fed or to be fed during the October-Iy winter feeding period
divided by the number of milk cows in herd on lay 1, tLe date on which the figures
were reported.
t/Differences in values of loose and baled hay fed, reflect variations in kinds of
hay represented, proportion 'of hay purchased, etc., as well as cost of baling.

Table 2. Kiid of' hay and silage, fed to milk coiws in herds
kept by dairy reporters, winter feeding period
enilidn in Lay, 1945.-53, United States J/
- -- -- -- -- .- I a---------- -'----------------- -- -- -------- -- -- --aaa
Winter mHa -Si a
feeding : : Clover, :Soybean-,: : 'M.
period Alfalfa: mxaed .CO. ea. Uther C orin Sorghum : Grass and
endng : clover,. .peanut .: : .oth
S___ :es e3:.... A ._
- Je----- .spsz.:..S a --^ ---- a -: a a a a.. a a.
Percent of total :: Percentage of total
1945. 39 34. 2 :X 87 7 1 5

1946 40 .38 2 20 : 85 8. 1 6


20 87

22 :: 86


20 ..
19 ::
@6


83.


19 : ; 79


1 ::


69


1953 50 33 2
a9?- a a2 --3L- --J -
-/Based on tons of hay and silage
feeding period reported in response


15 :: 70 4
fed or to be fed during the
to question asked as of may
-2 --


21 5
- a-a a a- a a
October-lisy -winter
1 each year.


1947
1948

1949

1956
1951

1952


S2.
2


6
5

5






ROUGHAGE FED TO MILK COWS
1952-53 WI-TER FE3DIITG SEASOIT

Daring the October 1952-May 1953 winter feeding season, milk. cows in dairy
reporters' herds were fed an average of 2.2 tons of hay, 1.9 tons of silage, and
0.1 ton of other roughage. These rates of roughage feeding were about in line
with those of other recent years, except that there has been a gradual increase
in amount of silage fed per cow (Table 1).. In the 1952-53 feeding season the
quantity of silage fed per cow was 0.5 ton or 36 percent higher than 8 years
earlier when data on roughage feeding were first collected from dairy reporters.
The hay equivalent of all roughage fed, including silage and other dry roughage
converted to hay equivalent, was 2.9 tons per cow, the same as daring the previ-
ous winter feeding period.

By States, the wide variability in amount of roughage fed per milk cow
reflected the length of the winter feeding season, quantities of concentrates
fed, feed obtained by winter grazirng, and general dairy practices in the area.
The amount of hay fed per milk coy ranged from less. than 1 ton per cow in some
of the Gulf Coast States to-as high as 4 tons per cow in Utah. In the Mountain
States, in uhich milk cows are kept primarily in irrigated areas here alfalfa
is plentiful, rates of hay feeding ranged mostly between 3 and 4 tons per cow.
In the principal Northern, Northeastern,. and Pacific dairy States, from 2 to
tons bf hay per cow were commonly fed during the winter season. In the lower
central Atlantic Coast -and southern -interior States, quantities ranged mostly
from 1 to 2 tons per cow. .

The amount of silage'fed per milk cow likewise varied widely. In Wisconsin,
Minnesota, and most of the Northeast more than 3 tons of silge were fed per
milk cow during the October 1952-May 1953 winter feeding season In several
Other important fluid milk States, including Ohio, Michigan, and Virginia, the
quantity of silage per cow exceeded 2 tons. In most other northern and central
Atlantic Coast States and in the more important M4ountain dairy States, 1 to 2
tone were fed. In the lower Atlantic Seaboard States and much of the South,
silage fed ranged from very little to' about 1 ton per cow.

A little dry roughage other than hay was fed to milk cows rather generally
over the country, but appreciable quantities were limited mainly to the sorghum-
growing areas. Fodder and bundle feed were used extensively to supplement hay
in these areas and constituted most of the "other" roughage fed* The hay equiva-
lent of all roughage fed per milk cow dbiing the winter feeding season exceeded
4 tons in Utah, Idaho, and North Dakota, ranged from 3 to 4 tons in most of the
Northeastern, Great Lake, and important Western dairy States, but fell to a
level of about 1 ton per cow in the States along the Gulf Coast. As shown in
Table 3, this hay equivalent was computed on the basis that 3 tons silage or
2 tons dry roughage other than hay are equivalent to 1 ton of hay.

Legwe Ears Predominate

Alfalfa hay made up about half of the hay that dairy reporters fed to their
milk cows during the 1952-53 winter feeding season. Clover, mixed clover, and
lespedeza made up about one-third and other kinds 'about one-sixth, as shown in
Table 2. Alfalfa. hay constituted three-fourths or more of the total hey ration
fed to milk cows in all Western States except Washington and Oregon. Alfalfa
was also the principal hay fed in the central 'Great Plains States, Minnesota,

S -3-






Iowa, Michigan, and Illinois. Clover,- 7 .. 4t
clover mixtures, and lespedeza as a "",,.
grouo made up about half'or more of the A ,L, LI .
total hay fed in the Nortk'Atlantic \ ... /h
area; Ohio, Missouri,. the lZd.d.e Atan-' /
tic Seaboard States, and Tennessee.' ., / .
The amoybean-cowposea-peanut group of hays -,// /I '
was fed.to'some extent in the Soith, /
withabout 9-percent of the hay fed in; '
these kids, AL.vide variety of other' / '
hays .rere fed rather generally over most -- '--- --J
of the country. The proportion of the
hay fed to milk cows falling in each of
these general groupings is shown by States in Table' 4.

Iore.4etailed data on the kinds of hay fed to milk cows based.on the number
of dairymen feeding them are shown in Table'9; These data underline thie prA4jt-
deranae of alfalfa. In tle Plinas. and. Weetaen States. Among the bays include ia
tlhe general clover group, clover and timothy was the principal dairy.ha 1S thi "*
Northeast and Eastern Great.Lake area. O6her clover bays were fed rather *,w-z
ally over the'country. Leypedesa represehtedfr6f .'one-third to on-half of the
hay fed in many 6f.the southern States. Soybean, cowpea, a peanut ha vlet
also fed locally in the South, Some'soreghum ha, wild hay, eand grain hb ayvr '
fed to milk cows in the Plains and Western States. MIixed and other'hays Weh .s.
,' important in most areas. Vhqre reports in this group were numerous, they usualy
included a variety of mix.e.d grass, ahd leg tme hays fed to milk cows that did not
fall readily iq more specific singg'. hay classification.

As usual, producers .relied principal .dn home-grown hay for feeding thel.
milk cow4. Dairy -reportera purrchased 14 percent of the hay fed during the
1952433 winter feeding period, as. compare& with 11 to 14 percent in recent years,
The proportion of purchased hay, however, varied quite widely. In the more
important North Central States of Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Iowa, only 3 to 4
percentt of -the hay fed tpo i4lk cows was purchased. In northern States farther
- east the proportion purchased was slightly. larger but exceeded 12 percent only inl
"Suthern.N ew, England..- *At the other, extreme, California dairy repbrters boqugt
-" iore than three-fourthp of the hay fed to milk. cows and in Oklahoma, Texas, sat
' Oegon a third or more was purchased. The proortlon o. hay purchased in the
* winter' of 1952-53 wrs up sharply from the average for recent yeahs in Kansas,
Arkanss., .Oklahoma, Texas, and some other Statdes where hay production was cut- by
the drought. Data on proportion of hpy purchased are shown in Table 5.

More Baled r led .& ,P

Baled hay represents a rapidly increasing proportion of the hay fed to milk"
cows. A count of the frequency of reports on hay fed to milk cots on Pebrnaqr 19
S1953 showed 60 percent :of the reports indicating baled hay fed and 40 percent
loose hayfed. The proportion reporting baled .hay is the highest -in .9 years of
reodrdand omp ires with 53 percent in 1952,'41 percent In 1949," end 24 pelsent
in 1945, the first year. for... which data were avaisble. Increased use of field
balers intreceat years has had a marked influence o the form In which hay is pat
up fop .eding Bilking animals.. '


-4-






Reports on'baled hay bhst ited more than three-fourths of the total bay
reports in New Jersey, Illinois,. Missouri, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Texas, and
California. On the other hand, in northern New England, the western Great Lake
'States, and. the northern Great Plains States, 'loose hay continued to predominate
in feeding milk cows. -In Wisconsin, .North Dakota, Montana, and Wyoming, reports
on loose hay fed to milk cows were about twice as numerous as reports on baled
toy.

I& CostLy Last Winter

,Ti. he hay fed to milk. cows on February 1, 1953 was reported worth more per
I ton than in any other of the 9 years for which records are available* For the
F United States as a whole the hay fed to milk cows was valued by dairy reporters
at $26.48 per ton, compared with $25o06 on February 1, 1952 and from $19.68 to
S$24.28 in the preceding 7 years. -Loose hay fed to milk cows was valued at
S$23*.69 per ton as compared with ba.led hay at $28.08. The difference represented
not only. the cost of baling but also some differences in kinds and quality of
I the hay. The value of hay fed to milk cows was highest in Florida at $48.50 per
t on, and was only a little less than $40 per ton in Oklahoma and Texas. On the
other hand, cheapest hay, was available in the northern Great Plains and western
5 eSat Lake States, mostly from $16 to $19 per tcn. Sharp increases in hay
, Welues as compared to a year earlier were reported in ITebraska, Kansas, Missouri,
SArkansas, and Oklahoma, all in the heart of the 1952 fall drought area. Moder-
` ate increases as compared to a year earlier were recorded in Pennsylvania, Ohio,
'*j and most of the other Central States. In the West, however, the value per ton
Sof hay fed to milk cows on February 1, 1953 mwas generally below a year earlier,
A with decreases ranging from about t3 per ton on the West Coast to e.s much as $14
Super ton in Utah. Data on the valUe of loose, baled, and all hay fed to milk
cows are shown in Table 7.

;i ftass Silage Becoming Im-portt.nt

i| Of the sileg'e fed to milk corws in the 1952-53 winter feeding period, 70 per-
cent was corn silage, 21 percent grass silage, 4 percent sorghum silage, and
j 5 percent mixed ot other silage. Over the 9-year period for which records are
Available, there has been'a rapid increr.se in proportion of grass ailnge fed,
chiefly at the expense of corn and sorghum silage (Table 2). In the 1952-53
winter feeding season, grass silage represented 21 percent of the total, only
slightly more than in the'previous winter but double the prop-oortion in the
1950-51 season and five times as much as in the winter of 19L.7-48. Increasing
interest in grass land farming and machinery to convert the difficult-to-cure
first cutting of hay into silage have clone mach to interest dairymen in the use
of grass Silage. Interest in grass silage has been most active in the Northeast,
North Central and Pacific florthwest sections of the country. As shown in
T able 6, grass silage made up nearly half the total silage in northern New
England, Ohio, and the northern Pacific Coast States, and about one-third of the
total in southern New England, Ponn.ylvania, Indiana, and Iowa.






5
6~5n




A

Table 3. amount of hay, sila5e, and other roughage fed per milk cow in herds
by dairy reporters, winter feeding period ending in ishy, by Statee, /
1952 and 1953 1/


State
and
Division

He.* N.H., Vt.
Mass., R.I.,Conn.
N. Y.
N. J.

-At.i--- --
Ohio


Ind,
111.
ill.
Mich.
Wi,_ _
KB.N.Cent.
;1inn.
Iowa
Mo.
t.Dak.
S.Dak.
Nebr.
KansG&
w._a._Cent.,
Del., Md.
Va.
W.Va.
M.C,
i.C_._ Ga.
s.Atl-._ -
cy.
lenn.
Ala.
Miss,
Ark.
Ia.
Okla.
Tex_,_ _
Tax._Cet
S.Centj. _
Mont.
Idaho
Wyo.
Colo.
Utah


Wash.
Oreg.,
Calii.._ .
West.
_U.S
I/Based on toi
of milk cous in


1952
Tons
2.6
2.1
2.8
2.1
as




2.5
2.2
2.3
2.7
as







---2.5 _
2.9
2.4
2.4
3,8
3.0
2.3
2.10


2.0
2.0
1.8
2.28








. 16.
2.0
1.6
28
.8
1.7
.6
1.7
.2_.

3.1
3.6
3.4
2.5
3.8
2.4
2.4
- 18,
---2.09






_.8_
_.8.


1.3_-


inages
herds


Hay


ft
*
a
-a


1953
*


Tons
2.8
2.2
2,7
2,3
._ _2 2_
2j5__
2.2
2.2
2.5
2.9
_ 2.5_ _
_ 2.5_ _.
2.8
2.3
2.1
3,6
2.5
2.3
_ _IL5_ _
__ _2. 4_ _
2.0
1.9
1.9
1.8
_ _1*3_ _
_ _1.6_ _
109
1.9
1,4
.9
1.0
1.4
.8
1.7

I 3_ __
2.9
3.7
3.4
3.0
4.0
2.8
2.5
_ -2._ _
_ _2.2_ -_


.:R
Slag Other 7
: -ro uha i : r
1952 : 1953 : 1952 1953 : 1952 : 19S3
a
Tons Tons Tons. Tons Ton
2.5 2.4 -- 3.5 306
3.8 4.1 ,1 .1 3.4 341
3.1 392 *I 91 3.9 308
3.0 3.1 a1 .1 361 3s4
90a 3.9 -2 _- -__=- -3.3 _
1_9 2 -- ---- a.__ -_
1.3 2.1 .2 .2 3.0 3
1.2 1,6 .1 .1 236 2,8
1.6 1.6 .1 -- 2.8 36
2.2 2.4 .1 .1 3.5 3,7
ge.7 S.8_ _.1 3_f. _
.2_._ 2.7_ ...._.3 _.!.1_ z_3. _
2.9 3.1 .2 .1 3.9 B49
1.6 1.7 .1 2.9 2
1.5 1.7 .1 .1 3,0 3&7
1.6 1.5 .4 .5 4.5 443
1.8 1.0 .3 .5 3.7 350
.7 1.0 .2 .2 2.6, 27
.. _.3_ _.4 -s
_ 1.2 __ _19__ __ _2 _. _2. _.._ 3
2,6 2.0 .1 3.0 38
1.8 2.3 .1 .1 2,6 367
1.0 1.6 .3 .2 2,5 2,5
1,4 1.3 .2 .2 2.3 203
_ 1o0 ...9 .. __ -. __A 2.1-A_
_ 1.5 1. ^._ .,._ _23__ __ -2
1.2 1.0 .2 .2 2.5 2j3
.4 .4 .1 .2 1.8 46
.1 -- ,1 .1 .9 360
a! 1 if a/ 1.0 Iwl
.1 .3 .1 .1 1.8 1,5
.2 .1 .1 .1 .7 ..9
1.0 .9 .4 .3 2.2 241
1.0 _.3 _. _.. i.Z 1.7
_s -6 _.2 .2_ 2 J.7
.2 .1 .1 .2 3.2 330
.8 1.2 .1 -- 3.9 41
a/ &i A/ a/ 3.9 3,8
2.0 1.7 .4 ,2 3.3 3,7
1.9 1.8 .1 -- 4.4 4.6
1.4 2.1 .1 .2 2,9 3,6
a/ a/ a/ A/ 2.9 2,9
_.4 _- -- _. 3_2 M .
!.o _1^.1_. ^ _.2 _.l 3.2 3
_1._8 _1.,9_ _.l _.!. 2.9_ 2.9


fed during the October-'iay winter feeding period


May 1, the date on w-hich the


figures were reported.


and numba


2/In computing total hay equivalent, 3 tons of silage or 2 tons other roughage
considered equal to I ton of hay,
a/Data not show-n where reports are insufficient to establish a stable average,


-6-


ers
were


i m






STable 4.- Kind of hay fed to milk cows in herds kept by dairy reporters,
winter fseding period ending in May, by States, 192 r:.nd 1953 I/
Hf State : jlfelf a : Clover, tixed : Soyboan, Other
and. -' Jcloxver, an~d leBe.za:_caw~ea, jp2inu.t:-- --
I a d, .. ov F ar. .e~~~za _co n :, nu .. .
D.1iv.i952 1i53 1952 19530 1952 1952. 1?.53
R| i~iiAA.iaL J -&_- -'--- -- -a --- .-- .- *- --
Percentage of Total

*N.H. Vt. 8 3 45 2/86 7 ..11
ss., R.I., Conn. 14 8 41 2/68 45 .
17 22 45 49 1 37 29
0J 44 42 37 39 3 1 16 .18
----- -60 1 21 _
2o _21_ 5_ ._5 __ .l -3__ _321_
to 39 43 49 48 3 9 9
a. 42 48 46 46 5 2 7 4
l 61 57 35 37 1 4 3 2
ch-. 64 60 28 30 8 10
-.2 _1.2___7_ 41 __ 7.-_
QCent- 55_ _52 38 40 16 _. _
.izm, 68 74 14 16 1 1 17 9
wa 61 66 30 29 ? 5
S37 32 '5 47 1 3 17 .18
ak. 37 4o0 1 6 -5 62 45
D3ak. 58 60 1 2 40 37
br. 73 75 7 9 20 16
.....- --- -Z6_ 68 5 1-9_ _.1 __
gCent_ -_ 1 _L. 21 22 _12
*, Md., 28 32 58 52 4 2 .0 14
44 52 41 37 5 2 10 .9
]Va. 30 28 47 49 1 2 22 21
.Co 30 26 52 53 6 3 12 .13
.* i. -6_ ':8 l -_ 17_ -. 3?._ _3 _
At __ -_ _- --_31 __ _0 7_ 6 4 3_ 6 __
39 31 47 41 6 14 8 14
Din. 19 24 65 57 8 10 8 9
a. 22 9 29 36 30 21 19 34
Ik, 10 19 68 .1 4. 5 18 .35
:kla. 49 52 12 10 5 3 34 .35
-_- -_3_ --_ 2 64
~_Cent-- 3-_ -J_ 296 9 _.32 _
%nt. 72 76 12 7 16 .17
".aho 76 92 14 5 10 3
o, 93 87 1 6 6 7
6 92 2 2 8
|ah 89 90 3 4 8 6
Wlsh. 1" 32 28 22 1 31 45
eo. 4 45 18 19 36 .36
lif. 93 90 1 2 6 8
i : "
...... 79 78 8 7 __ 13 .15 _
S_----------1-_-5._ '-3 33-.. 1_. 2 _-18 _
'N/'or October.-May winter feec.n;:h peric'. as reported 'e.y 1.
f' .. j&.#k "


./Includes mixed hays other than clover.


- 7 -







Tablo 5.- Purchased hay as percentage-of all hay fed t .mtilk cows
'in herds' kAp.-t by 'Pdiry reporters, winter feeding etasonf
Stenaine:ad 1946-53 I/
State' ; 1


Sand
-- 1 '"lixi in 1


: 1946 :- 19k?
_ S. _


L
- U
*


11948 2 194 t l^
r taie Tot
Percentage ofToa


S1951
* _


: 1952 I 1953 1
_a _


Me., N.H., Vt."
Mass,, R.I,, Cornn.
N.Y.
N.J.
--.,I__ _
S-.-At-._ --_ _
Ohio
Ind,

Ifich.
Ili.
Minn,
Iowa
Mo.
N.Dfak.
S.Dak,
NIebr,
_Kan,_s --- -------
WaAC fl._ __ --- -
Del., Md.,
Va.
W.Va,
N.C.
_S..A ______
_.At3._ _
ICy.
Tenn.
Ala.
Miss.
Ark.
La,
Okl .3
_TJx _._ .
Te~xt---------
_SCent.-_ -__-----
Mont.
Idaho
'*y'o.
Colo.
rtr i u.
Utah
1-:7 sh.
Ore.-.

Went. __
- -..--S.


2- 5






S
6' 9
2 1
12 10
2J47
7 14
6 6
7 9
5 6
_3 '_ -_5-
-5- 8_.-8
3 5
5 5
15 24
2- 4
3- -11
10 9
-12 -12







_i 22 -
2 __~2
7 3
13 4
3 7
7 10
-8_ -7
_6
6 n
6 4
25 12
5 12
24 37
27 31
23 2:'
28 _32
-12 _22
17 18
1 (. 29
35 15
21' 26
37 44
13 10
23 38
1 5 24
~ 64,

-10J>_ 1


2 7
7 4-i. 3
2 4
12 11
4 4 _

6 6
12 10 3
10 11 3
3 ,

6
5 9
7 9
19 20
1 2
9 5
10 143
o 10 _
5 3
S 3
5 5
15 8
. .. -21 _12
10 6_
2 7
7 6
10 11
6 12
14 10
35 37
?4 38
- 6_ 9__ -
19-_ -22 _
18 19
23 24
14 31
24 22
55 61 :
13 19
34 25
29 23
--_ _7. _2,6_ __ j
-7-.. -
- __ -
L8_ _12.6 2.35!_ -


7
.9
5
2
3.--
6
.0
.0
L4
7
6-_
8_ _
6
L8
5
7
L4

2--
4
L5
3
7


7
5.
?6
5
6




22
L8
7
36
3

35,
32

.6 _
L~,Ll-.


6
6
3
12
3








9
4; _
7
6
12
7
-.5-

8
7
18
2
6
12
-8-

3
9
2
8


* 1)4


9
19
--- 4-'
---5I-
9
13
9
9.


4
3

34
2
10


2
8
6
9


-12
-91
14
7
26
I1'
12
14
22
48
22
12
23
11
33
39
19
35
41
_72
-52
_u.21


I/Based on quantities fed, or to be fed, during& the October-4ay 'winter fee
season, reported in response to question asked ac of Ifay 1 each year.


7
3.9

19
* 5 0
9

S- 7-U.
8
8
12 1
.6 _


-3
24
*4
.9
12
-32h-
6
10
'10
''*8


13
S19
3~21
8
31
18





-'4
44n
13 4
19
21
.281
53 1
14
211
34
_-_.28_
d-i-

ding


-8-


_1L -.
8
7.1
6
13
6
12
31
?7
42
21_

13
22
9
31
56
20
27
35.
-7_2 .
_u.5 _







Table 6.- Kind. of silage fed to milk cows in herds kept by dairy reporters,
winter feeding period ending in lay, selected States, 194(-50
average, 1951-52 average, and 1953 I/


a- -- a -- -


SState
Sand
Division


: Con

:1946-
:1950


! ). -- a LfS-
j:. .
.,|:MBw N.H.,. Vt. 81
:,se., R.I1., Conn. 87
4.?,. 86
J84
------- .86_

86
111. 95
.'I oh. 96
llifi- -- ----25-
m.AN. Lent.
ann, .96
aIdwa 93
'NO 49
XDak. 96
S, Dak, lou
_.a -- 18

Del., m., 86
Va 7 ?8
1. Va. 81
_--a. _9 ._
.._.0l._ k.._
80
r@ .85
,e.- -- --P. .5-
fc-P~l".- -- I'.4
Idaho .56
,Polo. 82
Vtah 71
Vash, .. 17

t.. ------
U, 'S. 85


- -- -- -- ------ ---------- r r--- r
1.-silage Sorghum silage Grass silage : Axed and
-: otheY silac.e
:1946---- ----5-------4(--_ ,1,- -
:1 9 5 1 : 1 9 4 t : 1 9 5 1 : 9 4 6 19 5 1 .T 4 ( 1 9 5 l .
:1952 :1953a1950 :1952 :1953:1959 :1952 :1953:1950 :1952 :1953
a .av av_ --.a, :. .-av. -_
'Percentage of total


1 72
, 64
. 78
78
--66
--72
50
S77
72
94
86
-82
89
74
S54
96
86
--2
--7.9
81
90
77

82
67

-.32
90
98
86
14

--7Q
'7k


53
.63
72
.84
62

.40
63
80
90
-.-72
--75
83
67
48
,I00
S96


76
86
75
--i9
81
72

--5.2
82
100
93
11


70


3


-~s
7
2


II11


2
45




_..Zt...


-3-
2





13
-wL









4--

6
- .A. -
--V



:3

13
4 _

6


13 28
-- 8 34
S 12 19
7 4 13 14
-- -- -5 ._22
.- -A -A- 12 22
1 ,-- 6 45
4 8 .3 19,
2 7 ..1 16,
.- .2 6.


-i-

8
28
2_L


24-.



4
A-
4









C,


33



10-






21






1-
4


--12


4
.2


- .2_
-" 1-
5
3
4


2

i-
2




40
-327-
-15-
.4


46
37
26
12
-3L,
-31
47
n9
13
9


1^1 _18
14... _21L
9. 15
15. 33
5. 6
3. -
2 4
--2- -
- -9- -13
13- 22
8 3
23. 25

a "8 10'
--2s--it

- 262
a.. 12


69. 6o
i8 402
_ .26a 12o
14 21_ a


6
5
2
6_

-4
3
4
2
2
_4
--3-
4




1
4
4

- 4T
--3-


13-

15
29
-14_



13
---3-

244
15
29
_28...
32
5


1
2 --
3. 2
1 -
12 .2

4 13
I0 -
.10
1
--3--.2
--3--3-
2 2
3 -
13 13
A --

1. 2-






_!- 17^_1
--56-s
6 2
2 11
-11? -
- -7- -.1Q

27. 21


o. 6
2 --
14 7
17 29
--8, 26
- 18 621
6 5


tlData are shovm only for those States where the amount fed during the October-Iay
winter feeding season averaged more than 3/4 ton*.er cow,


-9-




h
Table 7 Value per ton of hay fed to milk cows in herds kept by dairy
reporters, February 1, 1945-49 average, and 1952-53 iI
State :_ --; "&Loasa kz&- j e -- -B...j1A Jy.d -a A .a -UY. -- .
and :1945-49 :945-49 :1945-49 1953
a.PJ.'v9o -:A a1, Av3 eA : 1952 pl 1952, i
_~~~~~~ l] l~o .&~ra A--- ___ Aerasme_._ .L _s ,~ ze .
-D o I a r a
_Dollar._
mB., NH., Vt. 21.20 22.00 22.00 29.33 29.00 28.00 23.81 25S00 24.5P
ass.,aI.,Conm. 28,41 30.50 30.00 37?52 36,50 35.50- 32.5 34.00 34.00
N. Y. 17.98: 18,50 20.00 22.76 22.0u 24.00 19.28 20.50 22,5P
N. Ji, 29.93 29.50 27.50 35.33 37.00 36.00- 32.65 35.50 34,00
a.. _. A- Z21S..75. O.,Zo. .6o_ .97.S% 3.29 .'5... LU D5.,1 ...9 9.
. es -. ..17 22.a7. 27L0@ a 262..2 22 -4
Ohio 20.17 21.0 2.00 '. 6 266 26.00 29.50- 21.62 23i.50 27.0)
Ind. 21.29 21.50 24.00 24.37 24.00 26.50 22,38 23.00 25,.D
111. 21.29 20.50 23.50 24.61 22.50 26.00 23.o6 .22,00. 25.51P
Mchb. 20.21 18.00 19.50 24,42 20.00 23.50 .21.10.. 19.00 21.,50
i._ --.--- -.9_ _1.9 .0_ 1_2,0o_ 26a22 61 x(0. 0_ _12 .- JO_ _JIS.
2._0 ent.. 128.822 0&.68 _D.464_ -_ ,4 42 k.22.._ g.86 9.39- -a -
Minn. .15.95. .16.50 17.00 ..-21.76 19.00 .20.00 16.71 17.50 1-.,0
Iowa 18.08 17.00 19.50, 21.69 18.50 21.50 18.98 18.00 33a40
Mo. 19.61 22.00 28.00 22.70 27.0') 32.00 20.86 25.50 32,00
N. Dak. 9.75 14.00 14.50 15.05 20.00 20.00 9.99 15.50 16.I0
S. Dak. 12.16 15.00 18.00 19.10 17.50 20.50 12.73 16.0o0, 19.00
Nebr. 16.30 16.00 23.00 22.43 22,00 29.00 17.64 18.00 2.00
ajn f -..- .1. 6&Z.SAO.,L _2.00. 2 7_ 38.2*0_ 1870.6 00 J-39 P.
M.AN egt. a ___J.17 2 32_o._. -A21o.2 A ._A0.o2 ..2Z4 1l712 .19a1Z -.64-
Del., Mh. 25.27 27.00 30.50 29.58 31,50 35,00 26.65 30.00 33.0
Va. 28.76 35.50 37.00 35.10 38.50 40,00 30.21 37.00 38.,0
11. Va. 27.10 28.00 30.00 36.98 35.50 35.50 28.24 29.00 *31.0
N. C. 29.97 31.00 34.50 34.50 36.00 34.50 31.32 33(50 3 0
S. C.. Ga, 30.52 32.50- 3350o 34.62 37.50 37.00 32.33 35,50 36.,q
Fla. -- 46.o v022#
F1e- ---- -- -- a- 46.1 444
-Al128.3 330.^ 3J2.0. a6742 3L.81 .1j.2- .23,%9.131
Ky. 24.78 28.50 30.00 23.23 32.50 34.50 26.27 30.50- 33.00
Term, 27.57 31.50 34.00 30.L2 34,50 37. 90 28.52 33.00 -36.00
Ala. 27.72 32.0U 3J.50 31.20 35.50 34.00 29.53 34.90 32,50
Miss. 23..9.6 24.00 .26.00 27.10 31.50 32.00 25.45 27.50 29.00
Ark, 21.92 24.00 27.50. 25.11 28.50 34,00 23,57 2650. 32,0
La. 22.15 29.00 26.5) 32.44 37.00 36.00 28.90 24.50 -34JO
Ok.Ia. 18.83 24.00. .29.0.0. 23.54 3300 4Jo.50 22.12 30.50 39.QO
Tea'. -27-.D_2. __. o_ ._22C.. -? 0 0 J2S4 .
--------- -u%, .4 _I------ *jE hlL
.Cent. 2_ _.5_ .._6 ..g. 7.9o 14-.48 _.40.0_ .225., & 3 6.
S.-.G~nl... .^ _23.5_ ..2^,2I -^^ Al _3L^ ..5- 33^ -J^^Sf^
iont. 17.31 32,00 24.50 24.36 38.50 30.50 17.97 34.00 26.50
Idaho 20.92 33.50 23.O0 .26,83 37.00 26.00 21.65 35.00 24.40
Uyo. 18.16 27.00 24.50 .224- 34.5: 31.50 19.03 29,50 26450
Cold. 18.39 33.00 28a00 27.21 41.00 33.50 19.56 3.0o 31.00
Utah 23.21 35.50 23.00 291.6 42.00 26.00 24.41 38S.50 24,50
rash. 224.16 29.50 26.50 35.21 40.50 34.50 27.00 33.5Q, 30.0
Oreg. 22.90 30.50 30.00 31.66 39.00 35.00 25.13 36.50 33.00
Calif. 2.74_ _22.0_ .30.o00 221 000 Q_.3_6._o 2A__ 00- 8,5Z 35.
lest. -_ 22.5- -31.12_ _28.04 2o92 29-2 .23._3_652 .7.i.20 -32.o.9.
U -.s._ _20.81_ 22.41_ _22.69_ 221. 2 6297- .8.6. 32a3A5 2 _-2.
I/Averages of reports by farmers in reply to the question '".hat is the value per
ton of hay being fed to milk cows on your farm? (If feeding purchased hay report
delivered cost; if feeding home-gromwn hay estimate the price it would bring at
your farm; if feeding both home-grown and purchased, give your beat estirrte of
average value.) Give value only for the type of hay being fed." Annual figures for
individual States have been rounded to the nearest half dollar.







Table 8.-Reports on baled hy as percentage of all reports on hey fed to
milk cows in herds kept by dairyreporters, February 1, 1945-53 j1/


* -
st~.t. a a -


and :
_Plvleloa

lie., NOHO, Vt.
lasse, R.I.,Conri.
4 Y.
1Ji


Sa. --

iio
Ando
Ills


--- ---


nn.,
0owa
S
Dak.
D ak.

&J ~- -
bro
B=.
,Va.



190 aa.



Ir.k
~~11^.---


as.
lUk.
Ola.

Snt.- -
Ifnt o


L945 1946 : 1947 : i948 : 1949 :
-P- e n- --..-------------- -e e
Perc ent


41
18
23
16
24
39
8
-2
12
6
18
36
1


7
7
26
16

25
11
28
-32
26
39
32
54
43
55
56
59
6o
-56
6


27
35
30
46
--18-
26
15
31
45
17
- -_10
--923-
8
17
36
3


7


10

-16-
26
17
12
21

-9.5-
35
31
57
45
51
63
70


6
9


ash., 19
Peg. 19
--------------5.--
SAt _.1 2
Pa&------- 24.i _
1SJ Ak


29
25
.59--
.25--
6.?9._q-


20

25
35
53
17


14
-28
9
22
37
4


23
--42
22
"31
18
8
33
44
26
37
24
44


54
48
67
67
-76_
-52-
12
10
8
13
15
30
21
_66_
-25
361-1


56
24
32
27


-14
- 22_

15
30
46
3
8
28
.44
28
34
26
17
34

-22L
51
36


53
51
57
61
78
.-22- -
.9
6oT

18
13
12
39
37
29
66_
-352.-.
325A9.*


41
53
35
J1


* S
* .


1950 : 1951 :


* *


31
42

51
40
52
49
52
76
-9


14
24
33


44
---42
38
.58
83
47
26

34
56
65
21
31
34

46
57
51
29


39
-5A_
--32-
4L
44
59
40
55
89
75

21

34
18


23 27
23 35
39 38
34 52
.69- _7. _
.5_ 42.
41.4 6.1 _


42
-A2
49
47
54
45
56
85
73
-92
20
47
24
41
43
44
45
81_


,45
58
55
79


48
C7
81
44


29- -36
1 (i. -4A2
33 42
51 59
68 73
35 33
D3 24
41 46
24 28
38 48
55 58
8 14
10 23
30 31
05L 52
J.4L_ 41.
45 52
26 32
10 14


70
84

27
44
30
45
44
35
66
S864 -
_- 34__
2- 1U4_


'44
69
60
80
60

58
71
86
51


265,
.59--
47
66
76
34
39
38

57,
72
61
28
5
A0-
67
59
62
,48


73
86
.89
-.213L
-22 _
36
50
30
54
52
-53
57
86
g_16_
_ 02_


1952 : 1953


jI/Based on hay on which values were reported, see footnote 1/, Table 7.


- 11 -


State


29_
--.29---
4lj.
59
71 .
24 .
34
31
_ %
- .lo_ -
65
48
13
44 .
46
54

51
65
46







Table 9.- Relative frequency of reports on different kinds of hay fed


State
and
_ filllalf_


Me. ,N.H. ,Vt.
Mass. ,RI.,Conn.
N.Y.
N.J.
-Pa._ -

Ohio
Ind.
Ill.
Mich.
Wi,-E.Ct.. _
Mlnn.
Iowa
Mo.
N.Dak.
S.Dak.
Neb'r.
_Kan -
WNC-ent.- _-_ -
Del., Md.
Va.
W.Va.
N.C "
S.C., Ga.,
"Fla^.
-SAAtlt"

Ky.
Term
Ala.
Miss.
Ark.
La.
Okla.
Tex
aS ---nt. -
Mont.
Idaho
WyO.
Colo.
Utah
WO.sh.
Ureg.
_C~alif.
-'-tL.-C-to-
/a ott._

I/Based on the


to milk cows, by States, February 1, 1953 1/
--- -
: Al- : Clover.:Clo-:Lespe-:Soy-:Cew-v a :
:falfa: and :ver : deua :bean:pea :Peanutfrain:Sdrghum
c-da,.bhw. to tl -
___P:rcentase _. total
Percentajre of total


.5
19
21
22
13-
D-
12
29
26
23
166_
20_
6o
51
29
38
47.
72
59-
51-
27
22
19

6
17-
18-
21
13
3
1
5
2
41
16-
17-.
53
92
79
74
90
21
42
813
^3-.
33]1


37
26
52
26

-42
29
.2/53
10
23
2.
26
-lg
13
11
16


1

I_ 8
17
8
28
3
2


15
8
3
5
3
2



3
1
6
6
4
16



-_ -15,2


reporters'


6
4
11
4

---7----
9

2o
6
--3---

9
24
22 2
2


6

17 1
5 1
9 1
4 4
2 -.4
.11-
-6 2
11 3
6 3
3 2
8 4
3 3
14 2
5

-6
2
2

4
2
1
24-
4'

5-I
in-8di5t
indicatii


4 6 6.


2 2 -





3_ _2"__ __
_I_ : X r :Z = ZZ.C
6 ft 1-


- 5 5



7 .3 1
0 1 I -
5 12 2 I1-
S 5 3 4 7


_-. -= _5_0 *= _- __
56 2 2 _-_1
3- 8 -
8 16 2 3
3 8 21 -
1 21 3 3 -
3 4 1 1 3 _
2 2 -
6 2 4 4 6
3 a .o
-- -- 2=- -0 a









2 2. -3
-_. _- 1- _
13

3 5 a 2





719- _2 26_ 0-3_ 8_ _1-0_
on of kind of hav upon which the v


shown in table 7 were reported.
.2/"Mixed and other" Includes all kinds except alfalfa, clover,
clover,
/"Clover and timothy" includes some straight lover.
12 -


r ":Mix.s*.
:Vild: and"
L aa:dtha
S..- .:..eaZra..


5

2
18
9
7
-12
-6




1






11

20
-1
4
8

3
2
2



-2
-2,


52.


'44

3 1 ...
1o




49.
8
40



47.
13
14

39
44..
19 .

ZIL
S-a
44
32
8
25
--22

11
14 .
39
18
36
58
11

-26 .
21
4
4.
6'


27


2 _2&.Z


slues per ton


and timothy and





I




I... d







UmTD STATES D3IPAR Mh O AGRICULTURE
NBZEAU Of ASICULTURAL ECONOMICS
VASHINGTON 25.D. 0a

OFFICIAL BUSINESS

BA Milk Cows 6/9/53
Permit No, 1001


Penalty for privte ue !
panrant of postaeo $

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 1262 08928 2049


L,- .. Li ryr Ar. Exp. Stat. AIi
-: ;i- S K Cr'si:. Lib.
Li:,.."-.-- -..- / or'ti-.L^ '.t^ rs L~dg ,,

535'b Uaitn-_svilI, Fla Fi
P.

R ..::
am ai 41f ioi


S..?



I


it
I




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E2DO2CCDP_TSRXMK INGEST_TIME 2014-04-21T22:19:54Z PACKAGE AA00017424_00001
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E8KHYHABY_WM4OBA INGEST_TIME 2014-04-25T00:09:09Z PACKAGE AA00017424_00001
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES