The dairy industry in the United States

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The dairy industry in the United States
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Bercaw, Louise O ( Louise Oldham ), 1894-
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics. -- Library
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U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics ( Washington, D.C )
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*: g,..U... UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

15J DEPOSITORY Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Oi:. IEPOSITORY

*amic Library List No. 11 Washington", D.C., July 1940



t THE DAIRY INDUSTRY IN THE UNITED STATES
Selected References on the Economic Aspects of the Industry
EE:":: .. .



iCompiled by Louise 0. Bercaw
SLibrary, Bureau of Agricultural. Economics


1This list cpatains references to publications issued during
the period January 1939 through June 1940, including a few is-
sued in 1937 and 1938, which were listed in Agricultural Econo-
mic% 'Literature January 1939 through June 1940. It also con-
tains a number of references to articles in farm papers. The
list contains few references to tho production and market news
repts issued by theo Agricultural Marketing Service. For a
list of such reports see Drury Market Nows and Production Re-
ports .Issued. by Agricultural Marketing Service (itom 48).


GENERAL

1. Albany milk conference, Albany, N.Y., 1939. A record of proceedings..
SJanuay 17, 1939. .61pp. EAlbany? N.Y., 1939) 281.3449 All
r 2. Allen, R.4.. gole.Erling, and Migholl, R.L. Supply responses in milk
production in the Cabot-1, arshfield area, Vermont. U.S.-Dept. Agr.
Tedc. Bu). 709, 60pp. Washington, D.C., 1940. 1 Ag84Tc

3. American institute of cooperation, 14th, Pullman, Wash., and Moscow,
Idaho, 1938. American cooparntion, 1938; a collection of papers
comprising the fourteenth summer session of the American institute
Sof cooperation at State college of Washington and University of
Idaho, Jul- 11 to 15, 1938. 734pp. Washington, D.C. [1938)
280.29 An3A 14th. 1938
Partial contents.: .How. trade ntgrcemonts Rffect the wulfaro of
dairy farmers, by Charles WI. Holman, pp. 143-155; The future out-
lets and outlook for fluid milk under public control, by A.Z.
Engbretson, pp.. 273-281; Advantages and disadvantages of public
milk control, by A.3. Derrick, pp. 282-285; Powers and limita-
tions of public milk control authorities, by Harry Polikoff,
pp. 286-294; Equalizing surplus burdens in a fluid milkshed, by
L.A. Markham, pp. 295-297; Equalizing surplus burdens through









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public control, by W.H. Henry, pp. 298-303; Contrasting marketing
problems of far-western and middle western co-op creameries, by
T.G. Stitts, pp. 307-318; Price returns policies of manufacturing
co-operatives, by T'.G. Grimm, pp. 319-324; The initial establish-
ment of price policies, by C.W. Laughlin, pp. 325-326; Manufac-
tured milk marketing problems, by G.H. Benkendorf, pp. 327-334;
The problem of quality in manufactured milk, by MA.M. Boney, pp.
335-339; The federal government's purchase program for dairy
products, by E.W. Gaumnitz, Oscar Swank, P.A. Cornelius, G.A.
Brown, and E.S. Trask, pp. 340-370.

4. American institute of cooperation, 15th, Chicago, 1939. American co-
operation, 1939. A collection of papers comprising the fifteenth
summer session of the American institute of cooperation at the
University of Chicago, August 7 to 11, 1939. 695pp. Washington,
D.C. [19393 280.29 Am3A 15th, 1939.
Partial contents: The role of a public relations policy in
the management and operation of cooperative dairy marketing
association, by L.W.W. Morrow, pp. 239-247; Report of conferences
on publicity and public relations policies of cooperatives, by
Edwy B. Reid and Val C. Sherman, pp. 254-255; Adjusting sales
policies to market changes, by R.W. Bartlett, pp. 259-270; The
base rating plan in relation to price maintenance, by B.B.
Derrick, pp. 271-278; Plant production changes in the Middle
West: I. by R.K. Froker, pp. 279-290; II, by J.B. Counties,
pp. 291-299; Sales methods of local cooperative creameries, by
Paul E. Quintus, pp. 300-309; Borderline milk and cream market
problems: I. by Matthew M. Wallrich, pp. 310-316; II, by John
Knox, pp. 317-324; Fundamentals of butter price stabilization,
by Don S. Anderson, pp. 325-334; Responsibilities and services
of a cooperative under public milk marketing control: I, by
O.M. Reed, pp. 335-341; II, by E.W. Tiedeman, pp. 342-350; The
development of public control as a permanent policy, by 0.H.
Hoffman, jr., pp. 351-362.

5. Anthony, E.L. Dairying of tomorrow. Hoard's Dairyman 85(2): 35, 61.
Jan. 25, 1940. 44.8 H65
From an address before the American Society of Animal Produc-
tion.

6. Brown, Edward Fisher, compiler. Milk papers. 4 v., printed and pro-
cessed. [New York City, Milk research council, inc., 19393 i
281.344 B81
Arranged chronologically: v. 1, 1910-1935 (documents 1-24);
v.2, 1936-1937 (documents 25-38B); v. 3, 1938 (documents 39-54);
v.4, Appendix to volumes 1, 2, and 3.









p i~ --

h 7. Carncross, J.W., and.Waller, A.G. Production and price trends in the
dairy industry and cost of producing milk in New Jersey. N.J.
Agr. Col. Dept. Agr. Econ. Rutgers Univ. A.E. 39, llpp., processed.
SNew Brunswick, 1940.

8i Dodge, H.E. Organization for the dairy industry. Kans. State Bd. Agr.
Rpt. 59(236): 47-51. Topeka, 1940.

9. Eckles, Combs, and Macy. History and growth of dairying.. Hoard's
Dairyman 83(24): 624. Dec. 25, 1938. 44.8 H65
"This is the continuation of an article that appeared in
March 10 issue. It is reproduced from the new edition of 'Milk
and Milk Products,' by special permission of the McGraw-Hill Book
Company, publisher and holder ot the copyright." Editor's note.

10. Efferson, J.N., and Merrick, Frank. Milk production in southeastern
Louisiana. La. State Univ. Dept. Agr. Econ. La. Rural Econ.
2(2): 10-12. University, Apr. 1940.

11. Evans, R.M. The AAA farm program and the northeast dairyman; excerpts
from an address...at the annual convention of the Vermont dairy-
men's association, Burlington, Vermont, Jan. 18, 1940. 8pp.,
processed. Washington, D.C., U.S. Dept. of agriculture, Agricul-
tural adjustment administration, 1940. 1.42 Ad4Ev

12. Evans, RiM. Dair"ing and the AAA in 1939; address...at Madison, Wis-
consin, January 30, 1939. 17pp., processed. WashingtonA, D.C.,
U.S. Dept. of agriculture, Agricultural adjustment administration,
1939. 1.42 Ad4Ev

13. Florida. Dept. of agriculture. Twenty-fifth biennial report...from
July 1, 1936, to June 30, 1938. 220pp. Tallahassee, 1939.
Dairy industry, pp. 63-111.

14. Fraser, Wilber J. Is dairying a game of chance? Hoard's Dairyman
85(6): 180, 204. Mar. 25, 1940. 44.8 H65

15. Hart, E.B. Milk and science. Hoard's Dairyman 85(3): 68. Feb. 10,
1940.- 44.8 H65
"This article is from an address before the American Society
of Animal Production."

16. Hought, E.EL. A challenge to dairymen. Nation's Agr. 15(2): 1, 8.
Feb. 1940. 280.82 B89
"This article is adapted from an address...at the 1939 con-
vention of the Wisconsin Farm Bureau Federation."








4 -


17. Idaho. Dept. of .agriculture. Tenth biennial report...1937-1938.
68pp. Boise c.19393
Bureau of Dairying, pp. 35-41.

18. Johnson, Sherman E., Mighell, Ronald L., and Hady, Frank T. Probable
effects of the Agricultural conservation program on livestock
production in the midwest dairy region. 4 pts., processed.
Washington, D.C., U.S. Dept. of agriculture, Bureau of agricul-
tural economics, Jan. 1940. 1.941 L6P94
Part I is A Summary of the Studies of Selected Areas; part II
deals with northeastern Iowa; part III, with southeastern and
east central Minnesota; and part IV with four Wiscoinsin areas.

19. Kirkpatrick,. M. Glen. A program for milk. Farm Jour. and 4iyner's
Wife 63(5): 22, 24. May 1939. 6 F2212 .

20. Koller, E. Fred. Recent trends in the Minnesota dairy industry.
Minn. Univ. Dpt. Agr. Divs. Agr. Econ. and Agr. Axzt *Farm Busi-
ness Notes, no. 196, pp. 1-2. Uniiversity Farm, St. Paul, Apr.
1939.

21. Koller, E. Fred, and Jesness, 0.3. Trends in the Minnesota dairy
industry, Minn. Agr. Expt. Sta. Bul. 346, 40pp. University
Farm, St.. paul, 1940.

22. Erauss, W.E. The responsibility of the milk producer to the consumer.
Ohio. Agr..'xpt. Sta. Bimonthly Bul. 25(203).: 31-35. Wooster,
&Mar.-Apr. 1.940.

23. [Lauterbach, Arthur H.) Arthur H. Lauterbach, manager, Chicago Pure
milk assn., outlines a future for milk. Farm Jour. and Farmer's
Wife 64(1): 15. Jan. 1940. 6 F2212

24. Lauterbach, Arthur H. Situation in Chicago milk shed. Hoard's Dairy-
man-84(14). 414. July 25, 1939. 44.8 H65.

25. McInnerney, Thomas H. Statement by...president. National dairy prod-
ucts corporation, before the Temporary national economic committee,
11 Z 3, 1939. 13pp. ENew York, National dairy products corpora-
tion, 1939? 281.344 M18 .

26. Maine, Agricultural experiment station. Report...for year ending
June. 30, .1938.. Maine. Agr. Expt. Sta. 8ul. 391, pp.232-332.
drono, 1938.
Economic studies of the dairy and potato industries and of
land use are noted.









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270. Malott, Deane Waldo, and Martin, Boyce F. The agricultural industries.
Ed. 1, 483pp. New York and London, McGraw-Hill book co., inc.,
1939. 281.12 M29
Bibliography, pp. 463-476.
Oh. 2, The Dairy Industry, pp. 16-66.

28. Massachusetts. Special commission of the laws relating to milk and
milk products. Report of the Special commission established to
investigate and study the laws relating to production, transpor-
tation, sale and distribution of milk and milk products, and cer-
tain related matters, under chapter 68, Resolves of 1937.
January 20, 1938. 81pp. Boston, Wright and Potter print, co.,
1938. (cGeneral court, 19373 Senate [Doc.3 no. 410) 281.344 M38

29. National cooperative milk producers' federation. Educational series,
nos. 9-15. 7 nos. Washington, D.C., 1937-1939. 281.3449 N21
Contents: No. 9. The dairy farmer and the Philippines [1937?3;
no. 10. Dairy problems of 1937. 1937; no.11. Dairy problems of
1938. Nov. 14, 1938; no.12. How trade agreements affect the wel-
fare of dairy farmers, by C.W. Holman. 1938.; no.13. A national
program for dairy farmers. 1939; no.14. Trade agreement with
Argentina, by C.W. Holman. 1939; no.15. Dairy problems of 1939.
Nov. 15, 1939.


30. New


England institute of cooperation. Proceedings of the tenth-
eleventh annual meeting, 1937-1938. 2 nos., processed, cn.p.,
1937r38] 280.29 N44
Partial contents:
10th: Will the milk license solve New England's milk problem?
by SW. Tator, pp. 40-42; A cooperative marketing set-up for New
England milk, by John McGrath, pp. 43-44, discussion, by Quentin
Reynolds, J.E. Carrigan, and D.W. Reed, pp. 45-50.
llth: Promoting fluid milk consumption, by D.M. Frisbie, pp.
68-71; Status of federal milk orders and their relation to dairy
cooperatives, by E.W. Gaumnitz, pp. 98-103; Current problems of
dairy cooperatives, by E.H. Jones, pp. 104-107; Milk inspection
for sanitation or economic protection? by K.E. Geyer, pp. 130-133.


31. New Hampshire. Dept. of agriculture. Rep&rt...for the two years
ending June 30, 1938. 232pp. Concord, 1938.
Dairy industry, pp. 205-210.

32. New York (State)Attorney-generalls office. A report to Hon. Herbert
H. Lehman, governor, and and the honorable, the Legislature of
the state of New York, by John J. Bennett, jr., attorney general,
on the milk industry of the state of New York with particular
reference to the New York metropolitan area. 129pp. [New York,
Case press, inc.3 1938. 280.344 N483




a4bflfltfS~m


. "II.


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33. Noyes, Holton V. Milk situation in New York. Hoard's Dairyman 84
(12): 373. June 25, 1939. 44.8 H65 ,

34. Noyes, Hoiton V. New York miik problems. Hoard's Dairyman 84(13):
399. July 10, .1939. 44.8 H65
Excerpts from an address given before the annual meeting of
the Dairymen's League.

35. Noyes, Holton V. New York milk situation. Hoard's Dairyman 84(18):
506, 515. Sept. 25, 1939. 44.8 H65

36. Perregaux, E.A.'. cDairy situation Conn. (Storrs) Stato Col. Ext.
Serv. Econ. Digest for Conn. Agr. no.75, pp. 621-624. Storrs,
Mar. 1939.

37. Reed, 0.E. What dairying can contribute to the social and economic
life of the South; rermarks...at the 40th annual convention of
the Association of southern agricultural workers, New Orleans,
La., February 1, 1939. 10pp., processed. Washington, D.C.,
U.S. Dept. of agriculture, Bureau of dairy industry, 1939.
1.9 D14A .

38. Rinear, E.H. Dairy problems. N.J. State Col. Agr. Ext. Serv. and
Agr. Expt. Sta. Econ. Rev. no. 129-132, pp. 3-4., processed.
New Brunswick, Dec. 1938-Mar. 1939.

39. Schoenfield, Clarence. 100 years of Wisconsin dairying. Prairie
Farmer 112(4): 1, 16, 19. Feb. 24, 1940. 6 P833B

40. Spencer, Leland. The causes of milk strikes. Amer. Agr. 136(19):
468. Sept. 16, 1939. 6 AA3

41. Spencer, Leland. Dry weather and the milk situation. Amer. Agr.
136(18): 444. Sept. 2, 1939. 6 Am3

42. Spencer, Leland. Milk production control. N.Y. (Cornell) Agr. Col.
Dept. Agr. Econ. and Farm LMangt. A.E. 304, 18pp., processed.
Ithaca, 1940.

43. Spencer, Leland..'. Milk production control from the national view-
point. Amer. Agr. 137(5): 137. Mar. 2, 1940. 6 Am3

44. Spencer, Leland. Ways of increasing-farmers' returns ,for milk.
Amer. Agr. 136(12): 301. June 10, 1939. -.6 Am3
Lists five different ways i n which milk returns might be
increased.









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45. Stine, O.C. The dairy outlook for 1939... Statement made at the annual
meeting of the Maryland-Virginia milk producers' association,
Washington, D.C., February 6, 1939. 12pp., processed. Washington,
D.C., U.S. Dept. of agriculture, Bureau of agricultural economics,
1939. 1.9 Ec752Do

46. Tracy, P.H., and Tuckey, S.L. Accuracy of methods of sampling milk
delivered at milk plants. Il1. Agr. Expt. Sta. Bul. 459, pp. 47-
84. Urbana, 1939.

47. U.S. Dept. of agriculture. Report of the Secretary of agriculture,
1939. 169pp. Washington, D.C., 1939. 1 Ag84
Dairy adjustment and the national farm program, pp. 109-111.
Reports of progress are also issued by the different bureaus
of the Department. See particularly annual reports of the Agri-
cultural Adjustment Adiminstration, the Bureau of Agricultural
Economics, the Agricultural Marketing Service, the Commodity
Exchange Administration, and the Bureau of Dairy Industry.

48. U.S. Dept. of agriculture. Agricultural marketing service. Dairy
market news and production reports issued by Agricultural mar-
keting service. 7pp., processed. Washington, D.C., 1939.
1.942 D3R29

49. U.S. Dept. of agriculture. Bureau of agricultural economics. Agri-
cultural outlook charts 1940. Dairy products. 24pp., processed.
Washington, D.C.. Oct. 1939. 1.9 Ec70dc

49a. U.S. Dept. of agriculture. Bureau of agricu.ural economics. The dairy
situation, Sept. 1931-date.Processed. Washington, D.C., 1931-date.
1.9 Ed7Ds
"Issued about the 16th of each month."

50. U.S. Dept. of agriculture. Bureau of dairy industry. Publications
relating to the dairy industry. lOpp., processed. Washington,
D.C., revised to Nov. 1939. 1.9 An55Pa

51. Vial. E.E. The dairy outlook for 1940. U.S. Dept. Agr. Bur. Agr.
Econ. Agr. Situation 23(11): 22-24; Nov. 1939. 1 Ec7Ag

52. Vial, E.E. Shifts in the dairy industr:-. U.S. Dept. Agr. Bur. Agr.
Econ. Agr. Situation 22(12): 16-18. Dec. 1938. 1 Ec7Ag

53. Wilson, John L. Problems in adopting the milk cow. U.S. Dept. Agr.
Agr. Wktg. Serv. Mktg. Activities 2(5): 11-21, processed. May
1940. 1.942 ABM34
AL -
54. Wisconsin crop -and livestock reporting service. Wisconsin dairying.
Wis. Dept. Agr. Bul. 200, lOOpp., Madison, 1939.
"This bulletin brings together the more recent material on the








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Wisconsin dairying ipdustry, together with the general data for
the United States. Bulletin No. 120, 'Wisconsin DaiTying' was
issued in 1931, and this bulletin may well be used in conjunction
with the earlier ones in 6ase.long-time series of data are
wanted." From foreword by Walter H. Ambling; entitled 100 Years
of Agricultural Statistics.
A selected bibliography on the Dairy Industry in America, by
P.-Marcus Schmidt,.is contained on pp. 91-97.


COOPERATION


55. Gaumnitz, E.W. Effect of federal milk control on cooperatives.
Address...before the annual convention of the National coopera-
tive milk producers' federation, Cincinnati, Ohio, November 14,
1938. 8pp., processed. Washington, D.C., U.S. Dept. of agricul-
ture, Agricultural adjustment administration, 1938. 1.94 D14Ad

56. Geyer, Ken. Surplus stay away from our door U.S. Farm Credit
Admin. News for Farmer Coops. 6(8): 3-4, 19-20. Nov. 1939.
166.2 N47
On the Connecticut Milk Producers' Association.-

57. Heaps, Isaac Wallace. Twenty years of cooperative milk marketing in
.Baltimore. 216pp. rBaltimore, 19383 280.244 H35

58. Lauterbach, Arthur H. Pure milk "goes to towin" via radio. U.S. Farm
Credit Admin. News for Farmer Coops. 6(9): 9, 22. Dec.. 1939.
166.2 N47
Radio shows of the Pure Milk Association of Chicago.

59. National cooperative milk producers' federation. History series.
no. 1-14. 14 nos., processed. Washington, 1932-38. 280.2449 n21
Nos. 1l, 3, 8-9 typewritten.

60. Roberts, J.B., and Price, H.B. Organization and management of the
Falls Cities.Cooperative milk producers' association. Ky. Agr.
Expt. Sta. Bul. 390, pp. 37-87. Lexington, 1939.

61. Threshtenko, Valery J. Cooperative dairying, by V.J. Tereshtenko and
S Research staff of the cooperative project. U.S. Warks Projects
Admin. New York City. Studies of the Coop. Project. Ser. C., pt.l,
212pp., processed. rNew York? 1940o 280.2 Un382

62. Trologan, Harry C., and Hyre, French M. Cooperative marketing of
dairy products. U.S. Farm Credit Admin. Coop. Res. and Serv.
Div. Cir. no. C-116, 47pp. Washington, D.C., 1939. 1668.2 04926









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63. Trelogan, Harry C. Using your fluid milk co-op. U.S. Farm Credit
Adlmin. Cir. E., no. 14, l3pp. Washington, D.C., 1939.
166.2 C4926

64. Welden, William C., and Stitts, T.G. Cooperative milk marketing in
Louisville and other nearby cities. U.S. Farm Credit Admin.
Coop. Res. and Serv. Div. Bal. 32, 88pp. Washington, D.C.,
1939. 166.2 B87

65. Walden, William C. Organizing fluid-milk marketing cooperatives
in the United States. 'Pan Amer. Union. Div. Agr. Coop. Ser.
on Coop. no. 13, 31pp., processed. Washington, D.C., July
1939. 150.9 C78

66. ,7i1don, Uilliam C. This is the plant that skim built. U.S. Farm
Credit Admin. News for Farmer Coops. 6(12): 6, 24. Mar. 1940.
166.2 N47
On the program of the Chattanooga Area Milk Producers
Association.


DAIRY HERDS


67. Curtiss, W.M. Age of cows in dairy herds. N.Y. (Cornell) gr.
Col. Dept. Agr. Econ. and Farm Mangt. Farm Econ. no. 118, pp.
2930-2931. Ithaca, Apr. 1940.

68. Curtiss, W.M., and Matzen, E.H. Marketing cull dairy cows in New
York state. N.Y. (Cornell) Agr. Col. Dept. Agr. Econ. and Farm
Mangt. A.E. 310, 31pp., processed. Ithaca, 1940.

69. Curtiss, W.M. Number and breed of cows on New York dairy farms, 1939.
N.Y. (Cornell) Agr. Col. Dept. Agr. Econ. and Farm Mangt. A.E.
283, 9pp., processed. Ithaca, 1939.

70. Curtiss, W.M, Origin and destination of New York dairy herd.replace-
ments. N.Y. (Cornell) Agr. Col. Dept. Agr. Econ. and Farm
Xangt. Farm Ec6n. no. 116, pp. 2871-2872. Ithaca, Jan. 1940.

71. Matzen, E.H., and Curtiss, W.M. Marketing replacements for New York
dairy herds. N.Y. (Cornell) Agr. Col. Dept. Agr. Econ. and Farm
Ymigt. A.E. 286, 66pp.. processed. Ithaca, 1939;

72.. Winkjer. Joel G. Cooperative dairy bull associations. U.S. Dept. Agr.
Farmers' 3Bul. 1830, 16pp. Washington, D.C., Oct. 1939. 1 Ag84F







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73. Woodin, M.D. The distribution of dairy cattle in Chautauqua County,
New York, 1937. N.Y. (Cornell) State Col. Agr. Dept. Agr. Econ. .- -
and Farm Mangt. Farm Econ. no. 113, pp. 2704-2795. Ithaca, "
May 1939.


DAIRY PRODUCTS AND CREAMERIES


74. Bell, E.W. Boston cream market hurt more by domestic dumping than
by tariff changes. Mass. State Col. Ext. Serv. Farm Econ. Facts
12(1): 1-2.. Amherst, Jan. 1939.
75. Blanford, Charles. Sales of cream by retail stores in the NewYork
market, June, 1938. N.Y. (Cornell) Agr. Col. Dept. Agr. Econ.
and Farm Mangt. A.E. 244, 14pp., processed. Ithaca, 1939.

76. Blanford, Charles. Sales of evaporated milk by retail stores in the
New York market. N.Y. (Cornell) Agr. Col. Dept. Agr. Econ. and
Farm Mangt. A.E. 245, 10pp., processed. Ithaca, 1939.

77. Buechel, Frederick Anthony, and Johnson, Elmer H. Manufacture of
dairy products in Texas... cPreliminary report) 95pp., pro-
cessed. Austin, Tox., Bureau of business research, University
of Texas, 1938. 281.344 B86M14
In 2 parts: Pt. I. Regional aspects of the Texas dairy indus-
try; Pt. II. Analysis of statistics of Texas dairy maiaufaqtured
products.

78. Commodity research bureau, inc. Commodity year book 1939-1940. New
York, 1939-1940. 286.8 C7392
Includes statistics of dairy products.

79. Cox, R.W., and Waite, W.C. Consumption of butter by Minneapolis fami-
lies. Minn. Univ. Dept. Agr. Divs. Agr. Econ. and Agr. Ext.
Farm Business Notes no. 193, p. 3. University Farm, St. Paul,
Jan. 1939.

80. Dankers, W.H., and Koller, E.F. A survey of cooperative creameries
in Watonwan county,.1937. Minn. Univ. Agr. Ext. Pam. 54, 26pp.,
processed. University Farm, St. Paul, 1938.

81.. Durand, Loyal, jr. Cheese region of southeastern Wisconsin. Econ.
Geog. 15(3): 283-292. July 1939. 278.8 Ec7

82. Foelsch, Gertrude G. Estimates of gross and net weights of butter in
various types of packages at New York, Chicago, Boston and Phila-
delphia. 13pp., processed. Washington, D.C., U.S. Dept. of agri-
culture, Bureau of agricultural economics, May 1939. 1.9 Ec724Est








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83. Broker, R.K., and Colebank, A.W. Large-scale organization in the dairy
industry. U.S. Dept. Agr. Cir. 527, 68pp. Washington, D.C.; 1939.
1 Ag84C

84. Indiana. Agricultural experiment station. Creamery license division.
Twenty-fourth annual report...for the year ending March 31, 1938.
Ind. Agr. Erpt. Sta. Cir. 238, 16pp. Lafayette, 1938.
Includes dairy statistics and a list of licensed manufacturing
plants in Indiana.
The 25th annual report was issued as Cir. 251.

85. Irwin, H.S. Impressions of trading in butter and egg futures. 28pp.,
processed. Washington, D.C., U.S. Dept. of agriculture, Commodity
exchange administration, Feb. 1940. (CEA-21) 1.9 C73C

86. Irwin, H.S. Survey of butter futures, as of August 31, 1939. 36pp.,
processed. Washington, D.C., U.S. Dept. of agriculture, Commodity
exchange administration, Mar. 1940. (CEA-22) 1.9 C730C

87. Jensen, J.M. A study of cream quality from creameries located in
southern Michigan. Mich. Agr. Expt. Sta. Quart. Bul. 22(3): 203-
308. East Lansing, Feb. 1940.

88. Koller, E. Fred. The Minnesota creamery industry, 1934-1937. Minn.
Univ. Dept. Agr. Divs. Agr. Econ. and Agr. Ext. Farm Business
Notes, no. 191, pp. 1-3. University Farm, St. Paul, Nov. 1938.

89. Koller, F.. Irod. Some aspects of creamery operations in Minnesota
in 1S 38. Minn. Univ. Dept. Agr. Divs. Agr. Econ. and Agr. Ext.
Farm Business Notes, no. 202, p.3. University Farm, St. Paul,
Oct. 1939.

90. Mathis, George L. New outlook for National dairy [products corporation
Products and markets broadening for leader of the sprawling milk
industry. Mag. Wall St. 66(1): 44-45, 62. Apr. 20, 1940.
286.8 M27

91. National farm chemurgic council, inc. Research committee. Chemurgic
potentialities, for the consideration of the Research committee
of the National farm chemurgic council, Columbus, Ohio. unpaged,
processed. Columbus? Ohio, 19393 281.12 N217
Discusses very briefly, the potential market, etc., of white pota-
to and sweet potato starch, oils and fats, paint and varnish
oils, flax,, hemp, ramie, yucca, paper from straw, fruit and fruit
by-products; synthetic wools and new spinnable fibres, milk by-
products, etc.









12 :lb

92. Nemaha co-operative creamery association.' 1930-1940 year book cele- :ii
rating the tenth anniversary of the Nemaha co-operative creamery M
association, Sabetha, Kansas. 14pp. rSabetha, Kansas, 19403 :
280.2449 N34 1940 4:

93. Newman, William A. The effectiveness of the butter tariff. Minn.
Univ. Dept. Agr. Diva.Agr. Econ. and Agr. Ext. Farm Business
Notes, no. 191, p.3. University Farm, St. Paul, Nov. 1938.

94. Nicholls, William H. Concentration in cheese marketing. Iowa. State
Col. Agr. and Mech. Arts. Ext. Serv. Iowa Farm Econ. 5(2): 5-6.
Ames, Apr. 1939.

95. Nicholls, William H. Post-war concentration in the cheese industry.
Jour. Polit. Econ. 47(6): 823-845. Dec. 1939.

96. Nicholls, William H. Post-war developments in the marketing of butter,
Iowa. Agr. Expt. Sta. Re's. Bul. 250, pp. 321-384. Ames, 1939.

97. Nicholls, William H. Post-war developments in the marketing of cheese.
Iowa. Agr. Expt. Sta. Res. Bul. 261, 148pp. Ames, 1939.

98. Nicholls, William H. Short-circuiting the butter middleman. Iowa.
State Col. Agr. and Mech. Arts. Ext. Serv. Iowa Farm Econ.
5(1): 13-14. Ames, Jan. 1939.

99. Orton, Vrest. Country industry. Free Amer. 3(8): 8-10. Aug. 1939.
The stor- of C-ot7lc:;-'P choocs factury in Yernaont. "Crovlo-y's
success is the story of a small business run by one family for
six generations, and one that has stoutly resisted the siren call
for expansion."

100. Quintus, Paul E., and Robotka, Frank. Butterfat procurement by
creameries in Butler county, Iowa. Iowa. Agr. Expt. Sta. Res.
Bul. 265, pp. 251-302. Ames, 1939.

101. Quintus, Paul E. "Challenge" means just that. U.S. Farm Credit
Admin. 'fews for Farmer Coops. 6(7): 5-6. Oct. 1939. 166.2 N47
The story of the Challenge Cream and Butter Association, Los
Angeles, Calif.

102. Quintus, Paul E. Cutting butterfat marketing costs. Iowa. State Col.
Agr. and Miech. Arts. Agr. Ext. Serv. and Agr. Expt. Sta. Iowa
Farm Econ.' 5(3): 3-7. Ames, July 1939.

103. Quintus, Paul E. Selecting outlets for butter. U.S. Farm Credit
Admin. News for Farmer Coops. 6(11): 25-27. Feb. 1940.
166.2 N47








ii -13-


I 104. Quintus, Paul E. Using your co-op creamery. U.S. Farm Credit: Admin.
Cir4 E, no.6, 13pp.. Wash.ngton, D.C., 1939. 166.2 04926

105. Quiatus, Paul E. Wholesale 'butter prices and premiums. Jour.- Farm
Econ. 21(3, pt.l): 595-605. Aug. 1939. 280.8"J822

106. Reed, 0.E. New developments in the uses of manufactured dairylprod-
ucts; remarks...at the 23d annual convention of tho National
cooperative milk producers' federation, Chicago, ill., November
16, 1939. 12pp., processed. Washington, D.C.,,U.S. Dept. of
agriculture, Bureau of dairy industry, 1939. 1.973 A2R25

107. Reid, Edwy B. A &airy co-op. leads the way. U.S. Farm Credit Admin.
News for Farmer Coops. 6(3): 12-14. June 1939. 166.2 N47'
On the Dairymen's Cooperative Creamery of Boise Valley.

108. Robotka, Frank, and Shefrin, Frank. 'Cooperative creameries in the
United States. Pan Amer. Union. Div. Agr. Coop. Series on
Coops.. no.14, 34pp., processed. Washington, D.C,, Apr.. 1940.
150.9 C78

109. Robotka, Frank, and Qintus,Paul E. Trucks change cream-marketing
picture. U.S. Farm Credit Admin. News for Farmer Coops. 7(2):
21-23. May 1940. 166.2 N47

110. Speer, Ray P. The hunt for more cream. County Gent. 109(7): 9, 69.
July 1939. 6 0833
Natural boundaries which formerly separated creamery from
creamery have been broken down by the advent of the paved road
and the motortruck. Competition between creameries has become
so great and so many questionable practices have sprung up that
it is thought that consolidation or merger of the cooperatives'
in a district is the solution to the problem.

111. Spencer, Leland. Consumption and prices of canned milk as related to
the demand for fresh milk. N.Y. (Cornell) Agr. Col. Dept. Agr.
Econ. and Farm Mangt. A.E. 303, 25pp., processed. Ithaca, May
1940.
In cooperation with the Bureau of'Agricultural Economics, U.S.
Dept. of Agriculture.
List of reports on surveys pertaining to the consumption of
dairy products, p.25.

112. Spencer, Leland. Evaporated milk. Amer.'Agr. 136(10-11): 249, 273.
May 13, May. 27, 1939. 6 Am3
Discusses the increase in the consumption of evaporated mi3k
wlile the donsumtion of fresh milk has remained practically the
same for the lasi W0 years. ''








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113. Spancer, Loland. How the large dairy companies fared in 1938. Amer.
Agr. 136(8): 197. Apr. 15, 1939. 6 Aznm3
Discusses the reports of the large dairy corporations, espe-
cially those of the Borden Company and the National Dairy Products
Corporation. :

114. Sprague, Gordon W., Foelsch, Gertrude G., and Small, Edward. A survey
of quality of selected brands of butter sold in one-pound cartons
at retail in New York and Chicago. 20pp., processed. Washiftgton,
D.C.,. U.S. Dept. of agriculture, Bureau of agricultural economics,
Feb. 1939. 1.9 Ec724Sq

115. Stitts, T.G. Contrasting problems of butter co-ops. U.S. Farm Credit
Admin. News for Farmer Coops. 6(4): 7, 19-20. July 1939.
166.2 N47

116. The story of American efficiency. The record of the evaporated milk
industry; sales are doubled, prices halved since 1920. U.S. News
7(2): 9. Jan. 9, 1939. 280.8 Un33A
One of a series of articles on efficiency of Americah industry.

117. Tomlinson, Frederick R. World production and international trade in
butter and cheese. 146pp., processed. Washington, D.C., U.S.
Dept. of agriculture, Bureau of agricultural economics, May 1939.
1.9 Ec752Wp


118. U.S.




119. U.S.




120. U.S.


Dept. of agriculture. Agricultural marketing service. Handbook
of official United States standards for quality of creamery butter,
effective April 1, 1939. 29pp., Washington, D.C., Feb. 1940.
1 M341H

Dept. of agriculture. Agricultural marketing service. Production
of manufactured dairy products, 1938, and miscellaneous dairy
statistics, 1939. 82pp., processed. Washington, D.C., Mar. 1940.
1.9 Ec724D

Dept. of agriculture. Bureau of agricultural economics. Dairy
products manufactured in factories 1937, United States and state
data by months. 41pp., processed. Washington, D.C.,r Feb. 1939.
1.9 Ec724Dpm 1937


121. U.S. Dept. of agriculture. Bureau of agricultural economics. Dairy
products: the world war and the 1939 European war. 7pp., processed.
Washington. D.C., Oct. 1939. 1.941 D2D14

122. U.S. Dept. of agriculture. Bureau of agricultural economics. Milk
equivalent of production of manufactured dairy products by states,
1937. 2pp.., processed. Washington, D.C., Nov. 1938. 1.9 Zc7Mil
1937






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j123. U.S. Dept. of agriculture. Bureau of agricultural economics. Stocks
of evaporated and condensed milk in hands of wholesale grocers
in 38 cities. 2pp., processed. Washington, D.C., Nov. 26, 1938.
1.9 Ec724S

124. Vial,Edund E.A monthly index of per capital production oi. the principal
manufactured dairy products. N.Y. (Cornell) Agr. Col. Dept. *
Agr. Icon. and Farm Mangt. Farm Econ. no. ll1, pp. 2704-2706.
Ithaca, Feb. 1939.

125. Vial, Edmund E. Production and consumption of manufactured dairy prod-.
ucts. U.S. Dept. Agr. Tech. Bul. 722, 76pp. Washington, D.C.,
1940. 1 AgB4Te

126. Whittier, E.0. Greater uses for dairy by-products. U.S. Dept. Agr.
Bur. Agr. Econ. Agh' Situation 23(7): 14-16. July 1939. 1 Ec7Ag

127. Wisconsin. fDe'at. of agriculture. Directory of Wisconsin dairy manu-
fvcr ,ring plants in operation August 30, 1939. Wis. Dept. Agr.
Bul. 207, ll9pp. Madison, Sept. 1939.

S128. Wisconsin. University. College of agriculture. Extension service.
What about stabilization of butter prices? Wis. Univ. Agr. Col.
Ext. Serv. Econ. Inform for Wis. Farmers 10(1): 1-14. Madison,
Jan. 1939.


FAR]A MAQAG1EMET.


129. Bennett, K.R. Comparative cost of fixed and variable dairy rations.
N.Y. (Cornoll) Agr. Col. Dept. Agr. Econ. and Farm Mangt.
Farm Econ. no. 155, pp. 2827, 2833-2835. Ithaca, Nov. 1939.
130. Brown, A.A., and Donley, J.S. Product-costs of milk to dealers in the
Sprinsfield area, 1935. Mass. Agr. Expt. Sta. Bul. 365, 28pp.
Axnherst, 1939.

131. Buck, R.K., Malbie, C.C., and Hopkins, J.A. Profit in the dairy busi-
nessi Iowa.State Col. Agr. and Mech. Arts. Agr. Ext. Serv. and
Agr. Expt. Sta. Iowa Farm Econ. 6(4): 8-10. Ames, Apr. 1940.

132. Christensen, Raymond P. Forces causing dairy farmers to make changes
in their farm organizations in Barron county, Wisconsin. 70pp.,
processed. Washington, D.C., U.S. Dept. of agriculture, Bureau
of agricultural-economics, Dec. 1939. 1.941 L6F74








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133. Conklin, C.T. One-crop farming in the Northeast. Country Gent. 108
(12): 14-15, 77. Dec. 1938. 6 0833
Discusses the problems resulting from one-crop milk farming
in the Northeastern States.

134. Cunningham, L .C. Dairy farm management (Revised July, 1939) N.Y.
(Cornell) Agr. Col. Dept. Agr. Econ. and Farm Mangt. A.E. 278,
9pp., processed. Ithaca, 1939.

135. Ellenberger, H.B. Lower production costs a vital factor. Hoard's
Dairyman 83(11): 335, 354. June 10, 1939. 44.8 H65

136. Fowler, H.C. Statistical approach to the feed-milk production prob-
lems. New England Res. Counc. on Mktg. and Food Supply. Proc.
1939: 44-46, processed. Boston, Mass., 1939. 252.004 N443M

137. Gkin, Marvin. An economic study of dairy farming in Oktibboha and
Lowndes counties, Mississippi, 1936-1937. Miss. Agr. Expt. Sta.
Bul. 324, 27pp. State College, 1938.

138. Hitchcock, J.A., and Paquette, L.D. Changes on a group of Vermont
dairy farms, 1935-1938. Vt. Agr. Col. Ext. Serv. Vt. Farm
Business 6(3): 1-2. June 1939; (4): 1-3. Aug. 1939.
Burlington, 1939.

139. Hitchcock, J.A. Milk production per cow and feed costs. Vt.
Agr. Col. Ext. Serv. Vt. Farm Business 6(1): 2-3. Burlington,
Feb. 1939.

140. Hitchcock, J.A.., and Paquette, L.N. Studies in Vermont dairy farming.
XI. Labor as a cost of production. Vt. Agr. Expt. Sta. Bul. 442,
16pp. Burlington, 1938.
Third of a series reporting the results of a study of the
business operations during the year ending March 31, 1933, of a
group of dairy farms in Addison and Chittenden counties.

141. Hoecker, R.W., and Misner, E.G. Labor incomes on dairy and cash crop
farms in southern Onondaga county, ..N.Y.(Cornell) Agr. Col.
Dept. Agr. Econ.-and Farm Mangt. Farm Econ. no. 117, pp. 2899-
2900. Ithaca, Feb. 1940.

142. Huff, K.B. Milking parlor for small dairy farms. Hoard's Dairyman
85(5): 145, 174. Mar. 10, 1940. 44.8 H65
From an address before a sectional meeting of the American
Society of Agricultural Engineers.

143. Jensen, Einar. Determining input-output relationships in milk produc-
tion. Jour. Farm Econ. 22(1): 249-258. Feb. 1940. 280.8 J822







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S144. Jensen, Einar. Determining input-output relationships in milk produc-
tion. Feed input and milk output preliminary results. 12pp.,
Processed. Washington, D.C., U.S. Dept. of agriculture, Bureau
Sof agricultural economics, Jan. 1940. (Farm management reports
no.5) 1.941 L6F22

145. Jensen, Einar. Some results of the United States Department of agri-
culture experiments in dairy feeding. New England Res. Counc.
on Mktg. and Food Supply. Proc. 1939: 39-42, processed. Boston,
Kass., 1939. 252.004 N443M

146. Maryland. Agricultural experiment station. Fifty-first annual report
..;for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1938. 88pp. College Park,
Md., 19387
Animal and dairy husbandry (Input as related to output in milk
production), p.37.

147. Miley, D.O. A summary of 12 dairy farm records, Jacksonville area,
for the two-year period from July 1, 1937 to June 30, 1939. 25pp.,
processed. Gainesville, Florida agricultural college, Extension
service, 1939. 275.29 F661S

148. Misner, E.G. Relation of size of cow to production and cost of milk
on 94 grade A farms in the Tully-Homer area.. N.Y.(Cornoll) Agr.
Expt. Sta. Bul. 719, 25pp. Ithaca, 1939.

149. Putnam, P.L. Profit factors on Connecticut dairy farms. Conn. (Storrs)
State-Col.Ext. Serv. Econ. Digest for Conn. Agr. no. 74, pp. 615-
bi6. Storrs, Jan. 1939.

150. Reed, 0.E. Reducing costs of producing milk. Hoard's Dairyman 85(5):
140, 159. March 10, 1940. 44.8 H65
The latter half of an address before the recent convention of
the National Milk Producers' Federation.

151. Space, Ralph. "A penny saved How I try to cut the cost of pro-
ducing milk. Amer. Agr. 136(16): 394. Aug. 5, 1939. 6 Am3

152. Spencer,.Leland. Two alternatives for dairymen. Amer. Agr. 136(26):
636. Dec. 23, 1939. 6 Am3

153. Williamson, Paul. Costs and returns from dairy cows on selected New
York state farms. Based on cost-account records for the years,
1935, 1936 and 1937. N.Y.(Cornell) Agr. Col. Dept. Agr. Econ. and
Farm Mangt. A.E. 248, 8pp., processed. Ithaca, Jan. 1939.

154. Wright, T.K., and Baltzer, A.C. Profitable dairy management. Mich.
Agr. Eapt. Sta. Spec. Bul. 297, 57pp. East Lansing, 1939.







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MARKETING .


155. Andes, James. Problems in7 the basic-surplus plan in the Philadelphia
milk shed. 166pp. Philadelphia, 1937. 281.344 An2
Thesis (Ph.D) University of Pennsylvania. I
Bibliography, pp. 162-166.

156. Bartlett, R.W. Increasing milk consumption through use of quantity
discounts. Ill. Agr. Expt. Sta. Dept. Agr. Econ. Ill. Farm Econ.
no.58, pp. 329-331. Urbana, 1940.

157. Bartlett, R.W. Prospects for exports of dairy products. Ill. Agr.
Expt. Sta. Dept. Agr. Econ. .111. Farm Econ. no.56, pp. 301-303.
Urbana, 1940.

158. Bell, E.W. Adapting pooling plans to milk markets. A comparison of
dealer pool and market-wide pool operations. Mass. State Col.
Ext. Serv. Farm Econ. Facts 13(1): 2-3. Amherst, Jan. 1940.

159. Bishop, George R. An analysis of dealers' sales of milk and cream in
the Buffalo market on December 9, 1937. N.Y. (Cornell) Agr. Col.
Dept. Agr. Econ. and Farm Mangt. A.E. 253, 18pp., processed.
Ithaca, 1939.
In cooperation with Division of Milk Control, New York State
Department of Agriculture and Markets.

160. Bishop, George R. Milk sales by stores in Buffalo. N.Y. (Cornell)
Agr. Col. Dept. Agr. Econ. and Farm Mangt. Farm Econ. no.113,
pp.2791-2793. Ithaca, May 1939.

161. Blanford, Charles. Day-of-the-week variations in the store sales of
milk and cream in the New York market. N.Y. (Cornell) Agr. Col.
Dept. Agr. Econ. and Farm Mangt. Farm Econ. no. 112, pp. 2755-
2756. Ithaca, Apr. 1939.
Based on a study in cooperation with the Bureau of Agricul-
tural Economics, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.

162. Blanford, Charles. The milk supply for the New York market. N.Y.
(Cornell) Agr. Col. Ext. Bul. 396, 23pp. Ithaca, 1938.

163. Blanford, Charles. Relation of family income to prices and sales of
fresh milk, cream, and evaporated milk by stores in the New York
market. N.Y. (Cornell) Agr. Col. Dept. gr. Econ. and Farm Mangt.
Farm Econ. no. 111, pp. 2720-2723. Ithaca, Feb. 1939.

164. Blanford, Charles. Sales.of milk by retail stores in the New York
market. June 1938. N.Y. (Cornell) Agr. Col. Dept. Agr. Econ. and
Farm Mangt. A.E. 237, 18pp., processed. Ithaca, 1938.





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165. Bressler, R.G., jr. The proposed study of country milk stations and
country station operations. New England Ros. Counc. on Mktg.
and Food Supply. Proc.,Apr. 27, 1938, pp. 1-5, processed.
Boston, Mass. C19383 252.004 N443M 1938

166. Bressler, R.G., Jr. Review of work completed con New England milk
marketing) and present status of the country plant study. New
England Res. Counc. on IMktg. and Food Supply. Proc., Apr. 24
and 25, 1940, pp. 25-28, processed. Boston, Mass. r19403
252.004 N443M 1940

167. Bressler, R.G., jr. Transportation and country assembly of milk.
four. Farm Econ. 22(1): 220-224. Feb. 1940. 280.8 J822

168. Brown, A.A., and Donley, J.E. Milk cartage in the Southwick-Agawam
area of the Springfield milkshed. Mass. Agr. Expt. Sta. Bul.
363, 26pp. Amherst, 1939.
Summarized in Farm Economic Facts (Massachusetts), v.12, no.8,
Aug.-Sept. 1939, pp. 1-2.

169. Brubaker, D.D. Adjusting deliveries to class sales cmilk3. U.S. Farm
Credit Admin. News for Farmer Coops. 5(10): 16-17. Jan. 1939.
166.2 N47

170. Christian, C.F. Can we banish abuses and unfair practices in Ohio's
dairy markets? Ohio Farmer 184(5): 8, 25. Aug. 26, 1939. 6 0h3

TI7l. Colvin, Esther M., comp. Transportation of agricultural products in
the United States, 1920-June 1939; a selected list of references
relating to the various phases of railway, motor, and water car-
rier transportation. U.S. Dept. Agr. Bur. Agr. Econ. Econ.
Bibliog. 81, 3 pts., processed. Washington, D.C., 1939. 1.9 Ec73A
Dairy products, pp. 105-121 of Pt. 1. Consult also the index
(Pt. 3) under subject, Milk.

172. Dankers, W.H. Surplus problems in dairying. Minn. Univ. Dept. Agr.
Divs. Agr. Econ. and Agr. Ext. Farm Business Notes, no.199, p.3.
University Farm, St. Paul, July 1939.

173. De Paul university. Research bureau. Report on milk survey, city of
Chicago, Illinois. 22pp., processed. [Chicago, Ill., 1938j
281.344 D44
Report signed: L.M. McDermott.

174. Dickey, Roger C. The middleman's profit. Haywards believe it belongs
to the farmer and get it by selling direct from producer to con-
sumer. New England Homestead 112(18): 5, 11. Sept. 23, 1939.
6 N442







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175. Donley, J.E. Toward a perfect milk market. Mass. Agr. Expt. Sta.
Bul. 366, 28pp. Amherst, 1939.
A study of the Worcester market. "The data were collected
by Chester Smith for his thesis entitled Some Economic Aspects
of Marketing Fluid Milk in Worcester, Massachusetts, submitted
for the Master's degree at Massachusetts State College in 1937."

176. Douglas, Jean E. Headed right. The way out lies in a more practical
attitude toward the milk market. New England Homestead 113(6):
16, 17. Mar. 23, 1940. 6 N442

177. Dow, George F. An economic study of milk distribution in Maine mar-
kets. Maine. Agr. Expt. Sta. Bul. 395, pp. 519-674. Orono, 1939.

178. Dow, George F. Reducing cost of distributing milk in Maine. Jour.
Farm Econ. 21(1): 309-314. Feb. 1939. 280.8 J822

179. Farmer relations need more cultivation. Food Indus. 11(12): 667-668.
Dec. 1939. 389.8 F737
Urges the need for educating the farmer in the various costs
incurred in getting the milk to the consumer.

180. Flynn, John T. The milk monopoly. New Ropub. 98(1270): 250. Apr. 5,
1939. 280.8 N
Calls attention to the testimony of Dr. Frederic. Howe, Mr.
Kemper Simpson, and Mr. George A. Johnson before the TNEC in
Washingtbn showing the results of selling milk by monopoly con-
cerns. The writer particularly condemns the practice of delivery
of milk to the home instead of buying it direct from the store.

181. Hammerberg, D.0. Allocation of milk supplies among contiguous markets.
Jour. Fp.rm Econ. 22(1): 215-219. Feb. 1940. 280.8 J822

182. Howe, Frederic C. The milk market muddle. South. Planter 100th year
(7): 22. July 1939. 6 So89

183. Hughes, E.M. Milk retailing by producer-distributors in New York
state. N.Y. (Cornell) Agr. Col. Dept. Agr. Econ. and hFarm &Mangt.
A.E. 239, 18pp., processed. Ithaca, 1939.

184. Klinefeltor, H.E. Missouri's filled milk case. Missouri Farmer 31(6):
8. Aug. 15, 1939. 6 M696

185. Mclntyre, E.R. Temporary snarl in milk markets. Price tangles arouse
producers to action. Wis. Agr. and Farmer 66(7): 6.27. Apr. 8,
1939. 6 1751

186. MacLeod, Alan. Plans for preparation of a report on the supply side
of New England milk markets. New England Ros. Counc. on Mktg. and







-21-


i Food Supply. Proc., Apr. 24 and 25, 1940, pp. 29-30:, processed.
Boston, Masse c19403 28004 14443M 1940.

S187i Massachusetts& -State. college, Extension service. Report of the Sub-
committee on marketing milk in Masbachusetts, arranged by Ells-
worth W. Bell, extension economist, and prepared at the request
of the Committee on problems affecting the dairy industry of
Massachusetts. 55pp. Amherst, 1938.
An earlier edition, processed, wag issued.
This edition has 20 additional pages including the report of
the Committee on Milk Production Problems.

188. Milk chiefs deny monopoly. Business Week, no. 505, p.16. May 6, 1939.
280.8 Sy8
A review of the testimony of the presidents of the National
Dairy Products Corporation (Mr. Thomas H. McInnernoy) and of the
Borden Co. (Mr. Theodore G. Montague) before the Temporary
National Economic Committee, in which they tell "their side of
the argument over the causes of distress in the dairy industry."
Primary causes of the dairy problem as listed by the company
presidents are given.

189. Montague, Theodore G. Is there a milk monopoly? A statement by...
president of the Pprden company, presented to the Temporary
national economic committee, constituted pursuant to joint reso-
lution of Congress. 41pp. cNew York? N.Y., 19393 281.344 M1476

190. Moon, H.A. The truth about a quart of milk. Rural Noe Yorker
99(5469): 35, 50i 51. Jan. 27, 1940. 6 R88.

191. Mortenson, W.P. Legal possibilities and-limitations of milk distri-
S-button as a public utility. 'Jour. Land. & Pub. Util. Econ.
15(4): 438-447. Nov. 1939; 16(l): 61-71. Feb. 1940. 282.8 J822

192. New York (State) Commissioner of agriculture and markets. Report...
regarding the audit of milk dealers and cooperative associations.
632pp. Albany, N.Y., 1038. (Legislative document 1938, no.100)

193. New-York (State) Dept. pf agriculture and markets. Annual report...
for the year 1937. 257pp. Albany, 1938.
ii Partial contents:-Marketing, pp. 94-112; Milk control, pp. 113-
168.

194. Nicholson, Arnold. Breaking the bottleneck. Country Gent. 110(6): 13,
41-42. June 1940. 6 C833
Relates how "producers, distributors and consumers are all get-
ting a break in the market placo,through the introduction of paper
containers, two-quart bottles, gallon glass jugs, and quantity
discount schemes such as the Elwell plan" for milk in certain cities.









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195. Pollard, A.J. Duplication in delivery of milk to stores in New York
City. N.Y. (Cornell) Agr. Col. Dept. Agr. Econ. and Farm Mangt.
Farm Econ. no. 116, pp. 2863-2865. Ithaca, Jan. 1940.

196. Rinear, E.H. Milk distribution costs of producer-distributors and
sub-dealers in New Jersey. .j. Agr. Expt. Sta. Bul. 663, 56pp.
New Brunswick, 1939.

197. Rowe, Harold B. Should the emphasis of the New England milk marketing
research program be changed? New England Res. Counc. on Lkltg.
and Food Supply. Proc., Apr. 24 and 25, 1940, pp. 33-36, pro-
cessed. Boston, Mass. C19403 252.004 N443M 1940.

198. Sharman, R.W., and.McBride, 0.0. Ten years of farm sales of milk in
four Ohio markets. Ohio Agr. Expt. Sta. Bul. 609, 38pp. Wooster,
1939.

199. Spencer, Leland, and Kling, Herbert. Tho distribution of milk by sub-
dealers in New York City. N.Y. (Cornell) Agr. Col. Dept. Agr.
Econ. and Farm Mangt. A.E. 320, lOpp., processed. Ithaca, May
1940.
"A report to Dr. John L. Rice, Commissioner of Health of the
City of New York, based upon a study...in cooperation with the
Bureau of Agricultural Economics. United States Department of
Agriculture."

200. Spencer, Leland. and Blanford, Charles. The distribution of milk
through health and welfare depots in New York City, N.Y.
(Cornell) Agr. Col. Dept. Agr. Econ. and Farm Mangt. A.E. 273,
17pp., processed, Ithaca,, 1939.
"A report, to Dr. John L. Rice... based upon a study...in co-
operation with the United States Burdau of Agricultural Econo-
mics."
Presents facts concerning the operation of the "8 cent" milk
plan in New York City in 1934, "together with a brief appraisal
of its effects on prices and consumption of fluid milk."

201. Spencer, Loeland. Family incomes and milk consumption. Amer. Agr.
1.37(8): 249. Apr. 13, 1940. 6 Am3
Tells of a study made by Dr. Charles Blanford of consumers'
purchases of milk, cream and evaporated milk in New York City.
rIt was found that people with low incomes used less milk than
those with higher incomes and purchased a cheaper grade of milk
at the stores.

202. Spencer, Leland. Ways of reducing costs of distributing milk in New
York r. Jour. am Econ. 21(): 291-298. Feb 1939. 280.8 J822







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203. Stevenson, Jordan & Harrisonk A study of milk distribution in New Haven,
with recommendations. June 26th, 1939. 76pp., processed. New
Haven, Conn. c19393 280.344 St4

204. The struggle to raise milk prices. A statement of the present dairy market-
ing situation in the New York milk shed. Aner. Agr. 136(18): 439,
442. Sept. a, 1939. 6 An3

205. Tinley, J, N. Reducing cost of distributing milk in California. Jour.
Farm Ecohn. 21(l): 299-308. Feb. 1939. 280.8 J822 .
: '
206. Ulrey, Orion. The Kalamazoo milk market. Mich. Agr. Expt. Sta. Special
Bul. 300, 44pp. East Lansing, 1939.

207. U. S. Dept. of agriculture. Agricultural adjustment administration. Con-
suners1 counsel. Boston drinks "surplus" milk. A new plan sponsored
by the Department of agriculture opens up the sitlice gates to let 'more
milk flow into the homes of needy families and to build up farmers'
income from surplus milk. U. S. Dept. Agr. Agr. Adjust. Admin. Con-
sumnerst Counsel. Consumers' Guide 6(10): 3-4. Nov. 1, 1939.1.94 Ad422C


208. U. S.


Dept. of agriculture. Extension service. Low-cost milk programon
seeks wider outlets. U. S. Dept. Agr. Ext. Serv. Ext. Serve. Rev.
11(3): 42. Mar. 1940. 1 Ex892Ex
MPli a nf tnhA I nuL'tno-t rnllr rirn nrnne +lift+ n2a in affot+. in thi *Rnotnn


and Chicago milk markets.
209. Wichern, Arthur. Single-trip containers attract attention. Will Wisconsin
adopt new milk bottle used in New York for eight years? Wis. Agr. and
Farmer 66(2): 5,. 17.:. Jan. 28, 1939. 6 W751


MARKET ING CONTROL

210. Agricultural marketing agreement act.... case of] C.C.A. 2 (Chase, C. J.);
United States v. Adlerts Creamery, inc., Nov. 13, 1939. U. S. Law
Week 7(23, sect. 2): 596-597. Nov. 28, 1939. 274.008 Un32
Decision in case affecting the New York metropolitan marketing
area.

211. Anti-trust case involving milk industry. U. S. Law Week 7(20, sect. 3):
528-530. Nov. 14, 1939. 274.008 Un32
In this case entitled United States v. The Borden Company et al.,
No. 397, two questions are presented: "(l) Whether the holding of the
District Court that the Agricultural Marketing Agroement Act of 1937
has removed the production and marketing of milk from the purview
of the Sherman Act involves a construction of the Sherman Act so that
a direct appeal lies to the Supreme Court under the Criminal Appeals
Act. (2) Whether the Agricultural Marketing Agreenent Act and other


b









- 24-


agricultural legislation operates to exempt combinations in the milk
industry from prosecution under the Sherman Act."

212. Bartlett, R. We Considerations in governmental price, control of dairy
products. Ill. Agr. Expt. Sta. Dept. Agr. Econ. Ill. Fam Econo,
no. 45, pp. 222-227. Urbana. Feb. 1939.

213. Bentley, Julian. Changes asked in cChicago0 milk order. Prairie Farmer
112(7): 12, 13. Apr. 6, 1940. 6 P833B

214. Bentley, Julian. U. S. control for Chicago milk shed. Prairie Fanrer
111(18): 6. Sept. 9, 1939. 6 P833B

215. Brown, Betty. Oregon milk control. Oreg. Law Rev., Dec. 1939, pp. 38-50.
Not seen.

216. Butz, Verlo. Indiana milk law tries to solve market ills. Combines best
parts of other states' laws into local committee control. Prairie
Farmer 111(l): 5. Jan. 14, 1939. 6 P833B

217. California. Dept. of agriculture. cGeneral order) nos. 27-28, 38, 44-45,
47-48. Sacramento, 1937-1938. 281.010 0122
Contents: No. 27. Amended stabilization and marketing plan for
fluid milk. San Francisco marketing area. 12pp.; No. 28. Amended
stabilization and marketing plan for fluid riilk. Alameda County market-
ing area. 13pp.; No. 38. Findings and order for the establishment of
minimum wholesale and minimum retail prices for fluid milk for the
Alameda County marketing area. 8pp.; No. 44. Amendment to the amended
stabilization and marketing plan for fluid milk. San Francisco market-
ing area. 5pp.; No. 45. Anendnent to the amended stabilization and
marketing plan for fluid milk. Alamneda County marketing area. 5pp.;
No. 47. Amended stabilization and marketing plan for fluid milk.
Sacramento marketing area. 13pp.; No. 48. Findings, order and regu-
lations for the establishment of minimum wholesale and minimum retail
prices for fluid milk for the Sacramento marketing area. 8pp.

218. Christian, C. F. Plan now for milk legislation. Dairy leaders mast agree
before program can be passed. Ohio Farmer 183(11): 19. June 3, 1939.
6 Oh3

219. Connecticut. Dairy and food commission. Dairy laws...and rules and regu.
lations of the Milk regulation board, revised to July 1, 1937. Conn.
Dairy and Food Corn. Bul. 12, 102pp. Hartford, 1938?

220. Copeland, Clarence J. Chicago milk pact hearings reveal strong opposition
to AAA practices. Food Field Reporter 7(14): 1, 24. July 10, 1939,
286.83 F73








- 25 -


221. Copeland, Clarence J. Chicngo milk pack seen wrecking the industry.
Dairymen are now milking everything but beef cows in order to cash
in on higher prices. Food Field Reporter 8(7): 3, 9. Apr. 1, 1940.
286.83 F73

222. cDigest of opinion of United States District Court for the northern district
of Illinois in the case of United States v. Borden Co., July 13, 1939.3
U. S. Law Week 7(3, sect. 1): 61. July 18, 1939. 274.008 Un32
"Sherman Act is not applicable to conspiracy to restrain trade by
fixing and maintaining prices of milk in view of subsequent statutes
providing for regulation by Secretary of Agriculture."

223. Eastman, E. R. Farmers urge passage of Nunan-Allen Bill. Amer. Agr. 136(9):
215. Apr. 29, 1939. 6 Am3

224. Grigsby, It. M. Federal regulation in the New Orleans milk market. La.
State Unlv. Dept. Agr. Econ. La. Rural Econ. 2(2): 8-10. University,
Apra 1940.
225. Harmon, E. M. How the cNew York] milk m-rketing agreement works. Amer.
Agrq 136(3): 65. Feb. 4, .1939. 6 Ar3

226. Harris, E. S, and Miller, P. L. Statement concerning the Calumet, Indiana&-
Illinois, milk market and the proposed marketing agreement and order.
59pp., processed. Washington, D. C., U. S. Dept. of agriculture, Di-
vision of marketing and marketing agreements, Dairy section, Mar. 1940.
1.94 D14Sta

227. Harris, E. S., and Hanson, J. R. Statement concerning the Sioux City milk
market and the proposed marketing agreement and order. 92pp. Wash-
ington, D. C.,'U. S. Dept. of agriculture, Division of marketing aMd
marketing agreements, Dec. 19, 1939. 1.94 D14Sta

228. Hunrickhouse, C.W. The milk control law in Indiana. tissouri Farmer
31(14): 3, 7. July 15, 1939. 6 M696

229. Indiana. Milk control board. Report of the activities of the Milk control
board of Indiana. 16pp., processed. cIndianapolis, 19383
280.3449 In2

230. Kansas. State board of health. United States Public health service standard
milk ordinance, approved by Kansas State board of health and Bureau
of dairy industry, U. S. Department of agriculture. 15pp. Topeka,
Kans. c19383 (Bul. May 1938. 2a ad.) 280.344 Kl3

231. Kelly, Ernest. Supervision and inspection of milk. U. S. Dept. Agr.
Food and Life. Yearbook of Agr. 1939: 360-363. 1939. 1 Ag84




Hi'


26 I


232. Kladekis, Ei.e. Cladakisj N.J. Milkl: administrator rChicagojexplains :,::
his plans. Prairie Farmer 111(19): 15. Sept. 23, 1939, 6 P883B .

233. Klein, Jack. Milk control laws dIscussed.' Caif. Cult. 86(5): 123.
liar. 11, 1939. 6 012 -

234. Kanig, Wrthan. Six years of marketing agreements III. Dairy products.
U.S. Depto Ar. A uS r Agr.( Econ: Agr, Situation 24(3): 21-23.
Lar. 1940. 1 Ec7Ag

235. Layson, S.'V. Milk laws then and now. Hoard's D.iryman 84(8): 248.
Arr. 25, 1939. 44.8 H65
Beginning with 1858, when the State of Massachusetts enacted a law
designed to prevent the adulteration of milk with water (which was the
first milk control law enacted by any governing body in America), the
writer describes laws and regulations with reference to milk and milk
distribution.

236. Milk bill [Chicago, fits anti-trust pattern. Business Week, no. 508,
pp. 25, 26. May 27, 1939. 280.8 Sy8

237. Moffett, W.K. Milk regulations in Pennsylvania. Rural New Yorker 98(5444-
5445): 86, 119. Feb. 11. 25,.1939. 6 R88

238. New acts don't void trust law. Business Week, no. 536, pp. 13, 14. Dec. 9,
1939. 280.8 SyS
Discusses the Supreme Court decision in the Chicago 'milk monopoly'
case

239. New Jersey. Milkl: control board. Report...July 1, 1935-June 30, 1938.
35pp. Trenton, N.J., 1939. 280.3449 N46

240. New York (State) Legislature. Committee to investigate the milk control law.
Report...March 22, 1937. 31pp. Albany, J.B. Lyon co., printers,
1937. (Legislative Document (1937) no. 81. State of New York)
280.344 N485

241. Nos. 771, 826, 827 and 828 October term, 1938. rOpinion of the Supreme
Court in the Rock Royal Co-operative, Inc., case U.S. Law Week
6(4, sect. 2): 1459-1470. June 6, 1939. 274.008 Un32

242. Nos. 772, 809 and 865- October term, 1938. (Opinion of the U.S. Supreme
Court in the cases of H.P. Hood & Sons, Inc., the Whiting Milk
Company, and E. Frank Branon.j U.S. Law Week 6(4, sect. 2): 1470-
1475. June 6, 1939. 274.008 Un32

243. Pilgcr, A.C. IWhat does 'iMayor LaGuardia want? Now York City can dictate
sanitary regulations, but producers must set milk prices. Amer.
Agr. 137(6): 175. Mar. 16, 1940. 6 Am3







S27 a-


244. Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. Dept. of agriculture and conserva-
tion. Fourth annual report...for the year 1938. 173pp. Providence,
1939.
Board of Milk Control, pp. 151-163.'

245. Rinear, E. H. Some contents on milk control. IN. J. State Col. Agr. Ext.
Serv. and Agr. Expt. Sta. Econ. Rev. no, 133-135, pp. 2-3, processed..
New Brunswick, Apr.-June 1939.

246. Smith, C. W., Miller, P. L., and Forest, H. L. Economic statement concern-
ing the Providence, Rhode Island, milk market, and the proposed market-
ing agreement and order for that market. llSpp., processed. Wash-
ington, D. C., U. S. Dept. of agriculture, Division of marketing and
marketing agreements, Dairy section. Nov. 1939. 1.94 D14Sta

247. Spencer, Leland. Health regulations and the milk supply. Amer. Agr.
137(2): 47. Jan. 20,'1940. 6 A63

248. Spencer, Leland. Public regulation of the milk industry. State Govt.
12(10): 179-180, 186-190. Oct. 1939. 280.8 St2

249. Spencer, Leland. Subsidized distribution. Amer. Agr. 136(24): 587.
Nov. 25, 1939. 6 An3s
Discusses subsidized distribution particularly as applied to milk.
The writer thinks that fluid milk producers are not being treated
fairly under the federal milk order for ITew York, and that until more
is known of the effects of cheap milk plans "the government should foot
the entire bill for milk subsidies as it has for the stamp plan and
all the other activities of the F.S.C.C."

250. Spencer, Leland. Subsidized distribution of milk and other products.
Amer. Agr. 136(22): 536, 537. Oct. 28, 1939. 6 An3

251. State regulation of milk industry. U. S. Law Week 7(2, sect. 1): 37.
July 11, 1939. 274.008 UnS32
"Cal.fo---i' statute providing for regulation of milk industry by
Director of Ajric. liure is constitutional exercise of police power;
statee' is nob uw.conctitutional discriminatory legislation; it does
not c..ig-lto'lepj 01aiive power to Director of Agriculture; invalidity
of t.'ion on ;round that it confers judicial power on Director,
if rho pro-ision is invalid on such ground, does not affect validity
of other-provisions of statute."

252. Tetro, Robert C., Hanson, J. R., and Miller, P. L.' Statement concerning
the Louisville milk market and a proposed marketingg agreement and
order. 147pp. Washington, D. C., U. S. Dept. of agriculture, Divi-
sion of marketing nand marketing agreements, Jan. 1940. 1.94 D14Sta








- 28 -


253. Tetro, Robert C., and Miller, P. L, Statenent concerning the Washington
milk market and a proposed marketing aireenent and order, 94ppp,
processed., Washington, Do 0., U, S. Dept. of agriculture. Division
of marketing and marketing agreements, Dairy section, Nov. 1939.
1,94 DI4Sta


254. Tinley, James Maddison, Lessons from public control in milk marketing.
Jour. Farm Econ. 20(4): 807-822. Nov. 1938. 280.8 J822

255. Tinley, Jpmes Maddison. Public regulation of milk marketing in California.
213pp. Berkeley, Calif., University of California press, 1938.
280.344 T49

256. U. S. Dept, of agriculture. Agricultural adjustment administration. The
federal-state program for the New York milk market. l6pp. Washington,
D. Co., Oct. 1938. (nM-8) 1.4 Ad47D no. 8

257. U. S. Dept. of agriculture. Agricultural adjustment. administration.
Order..,regulating the handling of milk in the Lowell-Lawrence,
Massachusetts, marketing area. Effective February 12, 1939. 12pp.
Washington, D. C., 1939. (Order No. 34) 1.4 Ad470


258. U. S.


259. U. S.




260. U. S.




261. U. S.




262. U. S.


Dept. of agriculture. Agricultural adjustment administration.
Order regulating the handling of milk in the New Orleans, Louisiana,
marketing area. Sept. 28, 1939. lOpp. Washington, D. 0., 1939.
(0-42) 1.4 Ad470
Amendment no. 1 (4pp.) issued by the Division of Marketing and
Marketing Agreements, Apr. 26, 1940.

Dept. of agriculture. Division of marketing and marketing agreements.
Amendment no. 1 to order regulating the handling of milk in the New
York metropolitan marketing area. Sept. 12, 1939. 2pp. Washington,
D. Co,, 1939. (0-27-2) 1.4 Ad470

Dept. of agriculture. Division of marketing and marketing agreements.
Compilation of order no. 34, as amended, regulating the handling of
milk in the Lowell-Lawrence, Massachusetts marketing area. Feb. 1,
1940. llpp. Washington, D. C., 1940. (0-34) 1.4 Ad470

Dept. of agriculture. Division of marketing and marketing agreements.
Compilation of statistical material covering order no. 27 and the
New York metropolitan milk marketing area. Feb. 1940. ll8pp.
Washington, D. C., 1940. 1.944 D2C73

Dept. cf agriculture. Division of marketing and marketing agreements.
Order, as amended, regulating the handling of milk in the Cincinnati,
Ohio, marketing area. May 1939. 10pp. Washington, D. C., 1939.
(0-22, as amended) 1.4 Ad4?0
Amendment no. 1 (4pp.) issued November 1939.







- 29 -


263. U




264. U





.265. U




266. U




S267, U




268. U




269. U





270. U




271. U





S272. U


r, S.




I. S.





,. S.


Dept. of agriculture. Division of marketing and marketing agreements.
Order, as amended, regulating the handling of milk in the Dubuque,
Iowa, marketing area. June 1939. 9pp. Washington; D. 06, 1939,
(0-12,. as amended) 1.4 Ad470

Dept. of agriculture. Division of marketing and marketing agreements.
Order, as amended, regulating the handling of milk in the Fort Wayne,
Indiana, marketing area. Aug. 24, 1939. llPp, Washington, D. Co.,
1939i (0--32) 1.4 Ad47O
Amendment no. 1 (2pp.) issued Feb. 12, 1940.

Dept. of agriculture. Division of marketing and marketing agreements.
Order, as amended, regulating the handling of milk in the Greater
Boston, Massachusetts, marketing area. Jan. 19, 1940. 16pp. Wash-
ington, D. C., 1940. 1.4 Ad470


* S. Dept. of agriculture. Division of marketing and marketing agreements.
Order, as amended, regulating the handling of milk 'in the Kansas City,
Missouri, marketing area. Aug. 28, 1939. 12pp. Washington, D. C.,
1939, (0-13I) 1.4 Ad470

* S. Dept. of agriculture. Division of marketing and marketing agreements.
Order, as amended, regulating the handling of milk in the La Porte
county, Indiana, marketing area. Aug. 3, 1939. l2pp. Washington,
D. C., 1939. (0-20-1) 1.4 Ad470

. S. Dept. of agriculture. Division of marketing and marketing agreements.
Order, as amended, regulating the handling of milk in the New York
metropolitan milk marketing area. Issued Mar. 30, 1940. 16pp.
Washington, D. C., 1940. (Order no. 27, as amended) 1.4 Ad470

" S. Dept. of agriculture. Division of marketing and marketing agreements.
Order, as amended, regulating the handling of milk in the St. Louis,
Missouri, marketing area. Effective April 5, 1939. lOpp. Washington,
D. C., 1939. (0-3, as amended) 1.4 Ad470
Amendment no. 1 (5pp.) issued Jan. 11, 1940.

'. S. Dept. of agriculture. Division of marketing and marketing agreements.
Order, as amended, regulating the handling of milk in the Toledo,
Ohio, marketing area. Issued Apr. 25, 1940. 14pp. Washington, D. C.,
1940. (Order series no. S0) 1.4 Ad470

. S. Dept. of agriculture. Division of marketing and marketing agreements.
Order...making effective the order, as amended, regulating the handling
of milk in the New York metropolitan milk marketing area. Issued
Apr. 25, 1940. Ip. Washington, D. C., 1940. (Order no. 27-1)
1,4 Ad470

. S. Dept. of agriculture. Division of marketing and marketing agreements.
Order regulating the handling of milk in the Chicago, Illinois.
marketing area. Ang. 28, 1939. llpp. Washington, D. C., 1939.
(0-41) 1.4 Ad470








- 30 -


273. U. S. Dept. of agriculture. Division of marketing and marketing agreeetiiiI
Order regulating the handling of milk in the Louisville, Kentucky,
marketing area. Issued Mar. 29, 1940. 12pp. Washington, D. C,p
1940, (Order no. 46) 1.4 Ad470

274. U. S. Dept, ef agriculture, Division of marketing and. marketing agreements.
Order regulate ing. the handling of milk in the Omaha-Council Bluff 8
marketing area. Effective April 5, 1939. lOpp. Washington, D. C.,
1939, (0-35) 1,4 Ad470

275. U. S. Dept. of agriculture. Division of marketing and marketing agreements.
Order regulating the handling of milk in the Quad Cities marketing
area, Jan. 10, 1940. 14pp. Washington, D. 0., 1940. (0-44)
1,4 Ad470

276. U. S. Dept. of agriculture. Division of marketing and marketing agreements..:
Order regulating the handling of milk in the Sioux City, Iowa,
marketing area. Issued Apr. 3, 1940. llpp. Washington, D. 0., 1940.
(Order no, 48) 1.4 Ad470

277. U. S. Dept, of agriculture. Division of marketing and marketing agreements.
Order regulating the handling of milk in the Washington marketing
area, Jan. 29, 1940. 12pp. Washington, D. C., 1940. (0-45)
1.4 Ad470

278. U. S. Dept. of agriculture. Division of marketing and marketing agreements.
Order...suspending section 934.8 (a) (2) (ii) of the order regulating
the handling of milk in the Lowell-Lawrence, Massachusetts, marketlag
area. May 1939. Ip. Washington, D. C., 1939. (0-34-1) 1.4 Ad470O

279. U. S. Dept. of agriculture. Division of marketing and marketing agreements,
Order...terminating certain provisions of order no. 27 regulating the
handling of milk in the New York metropolitan marketing area. 2pp.
Washington, D. C., Nov. 1, 1939. (0-27-4) 1.4 Ad470

280. U. S. Supreme court. H. P. Hood & sons, inc., and Noble's milk company,
petitioners, vs. the United States of America, and Henry A. Wallace,
secretary of agriculture. Whiting milk company, petitioner, vs. the
United States of America...E. Frank Benson, petitioner, vs., the
United States of America. *.on writs of certiorari to the United States
Circuit court of appeals for the First circuit... The opinion of the
Court. 16pp. EWashington, 19393 280.344 Un35
"These cases involve the constitutionality of the Agricultural
Marketing Agreement Act of 1937 as applied in an order of the Secre-
tary of Agriculture, regulating the handling of milk in the Greater
Boston, Massachusetts Marketing Area." p. Cl1

281. The United States of America, appellant, vs. Borden company, Charles L.*
Drossel, Harry M. ReBaser, et al. Appeal from the District court of the
United States for the Northern district of Illinois. Dec. 4, 1939.
cOpinion of the Supreme court U. S. Law Week 7(24, sect. 4): 665-
669. Dec. 5, 1939. 274.008 UnS2







- 31-


'3. Weynonth, George. Shall the cIndianaj milk control law. be continued?
Ind. Farmers Guide 95(1): 4. Jan. 14, 1939. 6 In2

283. Wise, W. S. Pennsylvania's milk marketing problem. Pa. Farmer 122(9);
336, 337, 352, 360. Mayv 4, 1940. 6 P383
A discussion of the problems connected with marketing milk in
Pennsylvania under Pennsylvanials Milk Control Law.


PRICES

284. Bartlett, R. W. Price control of dairy production. Hoardl s Dairyman 84(12):
372, 383. June 25, 1939. 44.8 H65
"From the viewpoint of farmers the underlying purpose of milk price
control is to help them obtain the highest possible income from their
dairy enterprises year after year. In order to evaluate whether this
objective is being realized, careful consideration should be given to
the effect of price-fixing upon: (i) consumption of market milk,
(2) milk production, and (3) the use of substitute products."
Each of the three subjects noted above is discussed in the article.

285. Brown, Edward Fisher. The truth about milk prices. Nation's Business
28(2): 78-79, 80. Feb. 1940. 286.8 N212
Critical of the article on the milk situation in the November 1939
issue of Fortune.

286. Cosline, H. L. Producers fight for a living price for milk. Amer. Agr.
136(6): 127. Mar. 18, 1939. 6 Am3

287. Donham, Balph A. Is there a milk tprice3 conspiracy? Consumers in
Indianapolis making a survey to bring old issue to a show-down. The
Farmers Guide 96(1): 19. Jan. 13, 1940.

288. Eastman, E. R, Congratulations to dairymen for $2.2?. Highest October
milk price in nine years. Amer. Agr. 136(24): 575. Nov. 25, 1939.
6 An3

289. Eastman, E. R. Fair milk prices depend on dairymen themselves. Amer@
Agr. 136(2): 42. Jan. 21, 1939. 6 An3

290. The milk bottle on the U. S. doorstep: reasons for wide variations in
prices. U. S. News 7(46): 1, 7. Nov. 13, 1939. 280.8 Un3SA

291. Milk in Chicago. When Meadowmoor dairies cut the price of milk two cents,
the bombs began to burst. Then. came the U. S. Government with charges
of conspiracy. Fortune 20(5): 80-81, 124, 126, 128. Nov. 1939.
This article is followed on pp. 83-84, 128, 131-132, 134, 136, by
an article entitled: Let 'em drink Grade A. The milk industry sells
service. Most of its customers would rather have milk...at 4 cents
less





.1'.

-32-
-32 :,Ifii]

The following is quoted from p. 81 of the first article: "But ,B*:t
big and so complex is the milk business that we shall here consider
it in two ways. In the article that appears on page 83, the reader
will find a discussion of some of the larger problems of the dairyi- ::
business and a practical suggestion as to how milk night be brought
to the consumer cheaper. Here we shall be looking at a specific
city to see how the forces operate that today tend to keep the price
of milk so high."

292. Milk price reduction. Business Week, no. 498, p. 31. Mar. 18, 1939. :
280.8 Sy8
"On March- 1 the enterprising Northland Milk & Ice Cream Co. of
Minneapolis, Minn. instituted a new retail price .plan which gives the
volume purchaser of creamery products an irnediate cash discount.
The plan works this way: milk costs 11A a quart, aWy additional
quarts bought at the sane delivery cost 9A and the two cent re-
duction on additional units is also available on cheese, cream, and.
every Northland product except butter."

293. Noyes, Holton V. "Crash" go milk prices! With marketing order in effect
April price would have been about $1.50. Aner. Agr. 136(12): 294.
June 10, 1939. 6 Am3

294. Reynolds, Howard C. An analysis of milk classification. Manipulations
under Pa. control law increase dealer profits. Rural New-Yorker
99(5468): 20. Jan. 13, 1940. 6 R88

295. Spencer, Leland. The effect of price fixing upon milk consumption. Amer@
Agr. 136(14-15): 352, 376. July 8, 22, 1939. 6 Am3

296. Spencer, Leland. Milk prices in New York under federal and state orders.
N. Y. (Cornell) Agr. Col. Dept. Agr. Econ. and Farm Mangt. A.E. 234,
19pp., processed. Ithaca, 1938.

297. Spencer, Leland. A new proposal for pricing milk. Amer. Agr. 136(17): 421,
Aug. 19, 1939. 6 Am3

298. Spencer, Leland. New York milk prices under Federal-State control. Amer.,
Agr. 135(23): 641. Nov. 5, 1938. 6 Am3

299. Spencer, Leland. The outlook for milk prices. Amer. Agr. 136(3-6): 79,
113, 145, 141. Feb. 4, 18, Mar. 4, 18, 1939. 6 AmS

300. Spencer, Leland. The outlook for milk prices in New York. Amer. Agr.
135(24): 669. Nov. 19, 1938. 6 Am3

301. Spencer, Leland. Raising milk returns by fixing prices. Amer. Agr. 136(13)
325. June 24, 1939. 6 Am3

302. Spencer, Leland. A revised series of milk prices for New Ybrk. N. Y.
(Cornell) Agr. Col. Dept. Agr. Econ, and Farm Mangt. Farm Econ. no.
111, pp. 2707-2710. Ithaca, Feb. 1939.








33

Si 33. Spencer, Leland. Supply and demand prices for milk. Amer. Agr. 137(l):
l 15. Jan. 6, 1940. 6 Asm3

I 34. Stitts, T. G, and others. Relative prices to producers under selected
types of milk pools. U. S. Farm Credit Admin. Coop.. Div. Bul. 25,
127pp. Washington, D. 0., 1938. 166.2 B87 no. 25
IBibliography, p. 113.
3D5. Whitney, Caroline. What price milk? 79pp. cNew York, Caroline Whitney
memorial fund, 19393 281.344 W61

306. Wisconsin. University. College of agriculture. Stabilizing dairy prices.
Wis. Agr. Col. Econ. Inform, for Wisconsin Farmers 10(2): 1-4.
Madison, Feb. 1939.


STATISTICS

307. Allred, C. E., Luebke, B. H., and Crawford, W. S. Shipments of dairy
products into Knoxville, Tenn. Tenn. Agr. Col. Agr. Econ. and Rural
Sociol. Dept. Monog. 103, 24pp., processed. Knoxville, 1940.

308. Connecticut. Dairy and food commissioner. Thirty-second report...for the
fiscal period, July 1, 1936 to June 30, 1938. 13pp. Hartford, 1938.
Milk statistics, pp. 6-8.

309. New York. Dept. of agriculture and markets. Statistics relative to the
dairy industry in New York state 1936-1938. N. Y. Dept. Agr. Bul.
324, 376pp. Albany, 1939.

310. Pollard, A. J., and Champlin, L. F. Receipts of milk and cream at the
New York market. 12pp., processed. Washington, D. C., U. S. Dept.
of agriculture, Bureau of agricultural economics, June 1939.,
1,9 Ec724Rem

311. Shepard, J. B. Mere adequate, uniform statistics, sought on city milk
consumption. U. S. Dept. Agr. Agr. Mktg. Serv. Marketing Activities
1(1): 5-6. July 1939. 1.9 A8M34

312. U. S. Dept. of agriculture. Agricultural marketing service. Dairy and
poultry market statistics, 1939 annual sunmary. 41pp., processed.
Washington, D. C., Apr. 1940. 1.9 Ec724An 1939
The 1938 annual summary was issued in March 1939.

313. U. S. Dept. of agriculture. Agricultural marketing service. Disposition
and value of milk produced on farms 1937 and 1938. 5pp., processed.
Washington, D. C., 1939. 1.942 D22 M59








-34-
E" 'E:"" .i:. EE:':
.. .-.. d .
!: i1


314. Vermont. Dept. of agriculture. Nineteenth biennial report.. .1937-1938 ..i ,
196pp. Montpelier, 1938.
Includes statistics of the dairy industry by counties.

315. Vial, E. E. Production, consumption of dairy products. U. S. Dept. Agr.
Bur. Agr. Econ. Agr. Situation 23(5): 21-23. May 1939. 1 Ec7?Ag
Includes a table which shows per capital production and conmuwption
of all dairy products, 1924-29 average and annually 1930-38.

316. Wisconsin crop and livestock reporting service. Wisconsin agriculture.
Wise Dept. Agr. and Markets. Bul. 188, 101pp. Madison, 1938.
Wisconsin Department of Agriculture and Markets and U. S. Bures.
of Agricultural Econonics cooperating.
Includes a brief review of the major trends in Wisconsin crop
production in 1934, 1935, 1936, and 1937, together with county esti-
mates for the major crops during this period; county tables showing
estimates of livestock numbers for January 1, 1935, 1936, 1937, and
1938, and marketing, milk production, and dairy manufactures for
recent years.


TRADE AGREMENTS

317. U. S. Dept. of state. The trade-agreements program benefits the dairy
industry. 16pp., processed. [Washington, D. C.3 1938. 150.1 T673

318. Wisconsin. University. College of agriculture. Extension service.
Reciprocal trade agreements and Wisconsin dairying. Wis. Agr. Col.
Ext. Serv. Econ. Inform. for Wis. Farmers 9(12): 1-4. Madison,
Dec. 1938.


TRADE BARRIERS

319. Bercaw, Louise 0. State trade barriers: selected references. U. S. Dept.
Agr. Bur. Agr. Econ. Econ. Library List no. 1, rev., 60pp., poocessed.
Washington, D. C., June 1940.
Consult the index under subjects Dairy products; Milk.


320. Dairy


ban under fire. Business Week, no. 528, p. 30. Oct. 14, 1939.
280.8 Sy8
Last week a newly organized Regional Conference on Dairy Problems
assembled in Chicago, with sixty delegates from nine Midwestern
States. The conference was called by the Council of State Govern-
ments, at Indianal s behest. The delegates heard from several federal
officials "that some of their sanitary laws did fall short of per-
fection," and the delegates concluded that the Midwestern States had
better adopt reasonablyy uniform standards of quality and inspection.'"
A definite program was set up, the purpose being to bleak down the
barriers that prohibit dairy products of the Middle West from enter-
ing the eastern markets.










- 35 -


321. Melder, F. E. Trade barriers and dairy products. ?pp., processed.
Chicago, Ill., Council of state governments, 1939. (Trade barrier
research bulletin series) 286 0832

322. Miller, .Ivan C. Laws forced by farm groups halt trade in processed foods.
Food Indus. 11(9): 500-503. Sept. 1939. 389.8.F737
Discusses mainly, state trade barriers in the milk industry and
other food manufacturing industries.

323. U. S. Works progress administration. Marketing laws survey. Comparative
charts of state statutes illustrating barriers to trade between states.
Prepared by members of Survey staff under direction of Charlotte A.
Hankin o..S. Chesterfield Oppenhein. 88pp. Washington, D. C., 1939.
173.2 W89Con
Includes a section on dairy products.






- 36 -


INEX


Item


Adler's creamery, inc... .... .......210
*.Agricultural Marketing. Agreement
Actcourt cases......... 210-211,280
Albany milk conference. Record
of proceedings.. ............. ...1
Allen, R.H. Supply responses in
milk production in the Cabot-
Marshfield area. With others...... 2
Allred, C.E. Shipments of dairy
S products into Knoxville,
Tenn. With others..............307
American institute of cooperation.
American cooperation............3-4
Anderson, D.S. Fundamentals of
butter price stabilization........ 4
Andes, James. Problems in the
basic surplus plan in the Phila-
dolnhia milk shed. ............... 155
Anthony, E.L. Dairying of tomorrow..5
Argentina.......**...... O .* **...... 29

Baltzer, A.C. Profitable dairy
management. With T.K. Wright....154
Bartlett, R.W.
Adjusting sales policies to
market changes........,........4
Considerations in governmental
price control of dairy
nroducts.e............* .....212
Increasing milk consumption
through use of quantity
discounts........ ......... ..156
Price control of dairy produc-
tionfl ............ .. ... .284
Prospects for exports of dairy
products... ...............157
Bell, E.W.
Adapting pooling plans to
mill: markets...****...........158
Boston cream market hurt more
by domestic dumping than
by tariff changes.............74
Report of the Subconmmittee on
marketing milk in Mass-. .....187


o i o
Benkendorf, G.H. Manufactured
milk marketing problems.*... :*.& 3
Bennett, J.J.,jr. Report...
on the mil2: industry........ ..3
Bennett, K.R. Comparative cost
of fixed and variable dairy
rations...... ... ..........6...6129
Benson, E.F............... .. .. .280
Bentley, Julian.
Changes asked in Chicago
milk order... ..................213
U.S. control for Chicago
milk shed......... ......600214
Bercaw, L.O. State trade bar-
riers... ........................319
Bishop, G.R.
Analysis of dealers' sales of
milk and cream in the
Buffalo nmarket........ .....159
Milk sales by stores in
Buffalo... ... ........ ......160
Blanford, Charles.
Day-of-the-week variations in
the store sales of milk and
cream in the New York
market............ .......6.. 161
Distribution of milk through
health and welfare depots
in New York city. With
Leland Spencer..............200
Milk supply for the New York
market.. ........ .e.... e e .162
Relation of family income to
prices and sales of fresh
milk, cream and evaporated
milk in the New York market.163
Sales of cream by retail stores
in the New York market,
June, 1938...................75
Sales of evaporated milk by
retail stores in the New
York market..........6.49996976
Sales of milk by retail stores
in the New York market......164






- 37 -


Item


SMlanford, Charles Qontinued
: study of consumer purchases
of milk, cited......:.......
Done, M.LLM.' Problem of quality
-n manufactured milk............. 3
Borden company....Z113,183,211,222,281
Branon, E.F........................242
Bressler, L.G.,jr.
Proposed study of country milk
station and country sta-
*tiofi operations............*165
Review of work completed and
present status of the
country plant study..........166
Transportation and country
assembly of milk..............167
Brown, A.A.
Miltc cartage in the Southwick-
Agawa h'area of the Spring-
field milkshed. With J.E.
Do loy. ......................168
Product-costs of milk to dealers
in the Springfield area,1935.
With J.E. Donley.............130
Brown, Betty. Oregon milk control.215
Brown, E.F.
Milk papers........ ... ......*.. .6
Truth about milk prices..........285
Brown, G.A. Federal government I's
purchase program fdor dairy
products. With others............3
Brubaker, D.D. Adjusting deli-
veries to class sales...........169
Buck, 3.K. Profits' i'the dairy
business. With otheis.......*...15
Buechel, F.A. Manufacture of
'dairy products in Texas.
With E.H. Johnson.............. ..77
Butter
consumption', Minneapolis.........79
cooperative marketing.......... .115
Los Angeles, Calif...........101
futures.... ..... ........... ...85-86
gross and net weights in
various packages.........0.....82
marketing; post-war develop-
ments..00 ......................96


Item


Butter Continued
middleman....... ............ ,.98
* outlets...... ............ ......103
prices
and premiums, wholesale.....105
stabilization......... 6.,00e..4
production and trade, world....117
quality of brands sold at
retail......................114
standards.......*..........118
tariff... ...................... .93
Butterfat....... ..............100,102
Butz, Verlo, Indiana milk law
tries to solve market ills.....216

California..,.eq...olO1,205,217,25li255
California. Dept. of agriculture.
General orders regarding sta-
bilization and marketing plans
for milk............. 60.......217
Carncross, J.W. Production and
price trends in the dairy in-
dustry an. .cost of producing-
milk in New Jersey. With
A.G. Taller. .......... ...........7
Carrigan, J.E. discussion of
McGrath's Cooperative marketing
set-up for.New.England milk.... .30
"Challenge" cream and butter
association.... ..*..........oIl01
Chamnplin, L.F,..Receipts of .
milk and cream at the N.Y.
market...With.A.J. Pollard.....310
Chase, C.J...6. ...................210
Chattanooga area.rmilk producers
association. ..60..........666
Cheese
factory, Vermont................99
marketing ,
concentration.............94-95
post-war, developments........97
production and trade, world....117
quantity discount, Minneapolis.292
region, Wisconsin,.0..**.*..***. .81
Chicago pure milk association......23





- 38 -


Item


Christ3nsen, R.P. Forces causing
dairy farmers to make changes
in their farm organizations
in Barron county, Tis...........132
Christian, C.F.
Can we banish abuses and
unfair practices in Ohio
dainry markets? ............... 170
Plan now for milk legislation...218
Cladakis, N.J. ....................232
Colebank, A.W. Large-s4al9 organi-.
zation in the dairy industry.
With R.E. Froker............... .83
Colvin,.E... Transportation of
agricultural products in the
U.S.. .... ........ ..... ...... .171
Commodity research bureau,i -inc.
Commodity year book.........*....**78
Conklin, C.T. One-crop farming
.in the Northeast................ 133
Connecticut..... .36,56,149,203,219,308
Connecticut. Dairy and food com-
mission. Dairy laws.......... .219
Connecticut. Dairy and food com-
Smissioner.. Thirty-second
report... .... ..... ...... .* *.... .308
Connecticut. Milk control board.
rules and regulations............219
Connecticut (Storrs). State col-
Slege. .Extqnsion service.
Dairy situation.............. 36
Profit factors on Connecticut
dairy farms............... 149
Connecticut milk producers'
association ......... ...... ..... ..56
Copeland, C.J.
Chisago milk pact hearings
reveal strong opposition
to AAA practices ............220
Chicago milk pact seen
wrecking the industry.... .221
Cornelius, P.A. Federal govern-
ment's purchase program for
dairy.products. With others.......3
Cornell university. State college
of agricultureSee New York
(Cornell) State college of
agriculture


Cosline, H.L. Producers fight
for a living price............ JI
Council of state governments.
Trade barrier research bulle-
tin aeries..*............. .:. .1
Counties, J.B. Plant production
changes in the Middle West.....,04
Cox, R.W. Consumption of batter
by Minneapolis families. With
W.C. Waite...............*.79
Crawford, W.S. Shipments of
dairy products into Knoxville,
Tenn. With others............307
Cream
consumption and family in-
comes, New York city....163,201
cooperative association,
Los Angeles, Calif.... ....,101
market hurt by domestic dump-
ing, Boston, Mass............74
marketing.... ............... ....4
motor truck transportation.109-110
quality, Michigan...............87
quantity discount, Minneapolis,
Minn ....................... ..292
receipts, New York... ..e*.....310
sales, New York
Buffalo...... ............. ..159
New York.................75,161
statistics, New York...........310
Creameries
butterfat procurement, Butler
County, Ia.................ee100
cooperative.............eoee04s108
effect of motor truck on....llO
Idaho, Boise Valley.........107
Kansas..... ... ...... .. .e.92
marketing methods and
problems...............3-4
Minnesota, Watonwan County,. 80
Michigan......... ..... ..........87
Creamery industry, Minnesota....88-89
Crowley's cheese factory, Vermont..99
Cunningham, L.C. Dairy farm
management.... ........... .... 134




a


- 39 -


r Item

Onr1 Vtiss, W.V.
I Age of cows in dairy herds.......67
Marketing.cu.ll dairy cows in
New York state. With E.H.
"', J at zen. .......................68
Marketing. replacements for New
York dairy herds. With .E.H.
Matzesn .....cce.e .71
Number and breed of cows on
.New York dairy farms, 1939....69
Origin "and destination of New
York dairy herd replace-
meats. .... ............. ...... .70

Dairy bull associations, coopera-
tive.................. ... ...... .72
Dairy companies
large-scale.......... .........e83
See also names of dairy
companies
DIiry farm management..........129-154
Dairy ho'es.'.. ...... ....... 72
New York State.67-71,73,129,136,148
Dairy industry.......................27
and the Philippines.............29
and the AAA................ 11-12,27
bibliographiess .. ...............50,54
by-products. e....... eeee.91 ,126
Connecticut................... ..36
S..contribution to social and
economic life of the South....37
cooperative....,. ..... ...........61
effect of agricultural conser-
vation program on livestock,
Midwest dairy region..........18
effect of trade agreements on......3
29,317-318
Florida..........................13
game of chance..................14
history
and growth...c.. ............ 9 9
Wisconsin......gee......e.e.c o .39
Idaho.......... ................ .17
large-scale.......... ....... ..... 83
laws, Connecticut............ ..219
S Maine ee26
Maine.... ....... ...... c .. ...2
i: Minnesota........... 20-21


Item

Dairy industry -Continued
Now Hampshire*.....*.......*.*..30
New Jersey.*..m.... **.*,@38
organization for............. ....8
outlook ...................5,45,51
problems of 1937-1939...........29
production and price trends...,..7
profits.......... *... ........131
program,. national...*.. .....*.29
shifts... .... .... .. ... ...52
situation .................. .,.49a
statistics..... ...... ...49a,312
New York.... :..............309
Vermont.... ........ ...... 314
surplus, problems............. a .172
Texas....... .. ..... ......
Wisconsin. 54.*
Wiscnsi...............m ........5
Dairy products
conlunption
List of reports on, sur-
veys ofs.................lll
per capita.........*.....*315
cooperative marketing... ..4,32,62
export prospects. .............157
imports, Knoxville, Tenn.......307
manufactured
consumption.**.......... *.*125
production......... ll9rl2p0,125
milk equivalent..........122
per capital, index.e.g....124
Texas..... e........... ee*........77
uses..... ........ ..... ..,,I*06
Wisconsin.. ..........ses.00316
manufacturing plants
Indiana... c 84
Wisconsin... ............*... 127
market news reports............ .48
marketing agreements...........234
outlook charts.............*....49
prices,.....eoe..c*.e............7
control... e...*.. ..........212
policies.....0................3
stabilizing....... ee........306
production............e...e. e....47
legislation, Mass...........28
per capita.e....e.e.. oeee..315
reports ...* ... .....,.. *48






-40-


Item

Dairy products Continued
'" purchase program, Fede.ral. a a .3
sale and distribution, legis-
lation, Mass.............*...28
sales policies, .adjusting to
market changes................4
'btatistics.......,.?78,119,307-316
Indiana........................ 84
Knoxville,. Tezm .......... .307
'.exas...... ........ .. 677
Wisconsin. *... ....... *...54
trade barriers.... .... .....320-322
bibliography...... .... ..... 319
laws........ .. ........... ..323
transportation
bibliography, ........ ......171
legislation, Mass.............28
world wars...................... 121
See also names of dairy products
Dairymen's cooperative creamery....107
Dankers, W.H.
Surplus problems in dairying....172
Survey of cooperative cream-
erios in Watonwan county,
1937 .. ........ ... ...... .. 8 680
De Paul university. Research
bureau. Rebftt on milk survey,
city ofChidcgo.................173
Derrick, 'E.B.
Advraitgcs and disadvantages
of public milk control.........3
Base rating plan in relation
to price maintenance...........4
Dickey. R.C. Middleman's profit...174
Dodge, H.E. Organization for the
dairy industry.* ................. 8
Donham, R.A. Is there a milk
conspiracy?.. s s .............. ..287
SDonlby, J3.S
S Milk cartage in the Southwick-
S Agawam area of the Spring-
Sfield milkshed. With A.A.
.Brow'na o s se e s s w eo168
*' '* B ow ...... .........e. ue...... 6
Prbduct-costs of milk to deal-
ers in the Springfield
area, 1935. With A.A.Brown...130
'Toward a perfect milk market....175


Douglas, J.E. Headed right..... 411I
Dow. G.F. .
Economic study of milk dis- l
tribution in Maine markets ,lf
Reducing cost of. distributing..
milk in Maine........ .....178
Dressel, C.L. .........6.u@o es N.0286
Durand,.Loy4al, jr. Cheese re-.....
gion of southeastern Wiscon-
sin.............. .....6 ..... .81

Eastman, E.R.
Congratulations to dairymen..*.288
Fair milk prices depend on
dairymen themselves..*,.,,.289
Farmers urge passage of
Nunan-Allen bill.!.. ..... ..223
Ebling, W.H. 100 years of agri-
cultural statistics..... ......54
Eckles, Combs, and Macy.
History and growth of dairy-
ing......... ............. .. 6 .9
Milk and milk products...e.... .9
Efferson, J.:N Milk production
in southeastern Louisiana.
With Frank Merrick..............**10
Ellenberger, H.B. Lower produc-
tion costs a vital factor....,*135
Elwell plan for milk............ 6 194
Engbretson. A.E. Future outlets
and outlook for fluid milk
under public control..6.......,..3
Evans, R.M.I.
AAA farm program and the north-
east dairyman. .......* ...I1
Dairying and the AAA in 1939....12

Falls Cities cooperative milk
producers' association....,..e..60
Florida. Agricultural college.
Extension service. Summary of
12 dairy farm records, Jackson-
ville area. ........ 147
Florida. Dept. of agriculture .
Dairy industry...............6613
Flynn, J.T. Milk monopoly........18o








- 41 -


ITem


Foelsch, G.G.
Estimates of gross and net
weights of butter in
various types of packages....
Sat New York, Chicago,
Boston, and Philadelphia......82
Survey of quality of selected
brands of butter sold in one-
. pound cartons. With others...114
Forest, H.L. Economic statement
concerning the Providence,
...R;I. milk market. With others...246
Fowler, H.C. Statistical approach
to the feed-milk production
problems......*........... .....136
'raser, W.J. Is dairying a game
of chance?. ....... ..... ... ..*..14
Frisbie, D.R. Promoting fluid
milk consumption.................30
Froker, R.K.
Large-scale organization in the
....dairy industry. With A.W.
Colebank........ ..............83
Plant production changes in
the Middle West................4

Gaumnitz, E.W.
Effect of federal milk control
S....on cooperatives .........8......55
Federal government's purchase
program for dairy products.
With others........ ............3
SStatus of federal milk orders
and their relation to dairy
.... --cooperatives..................30
Geyer, Z.E.
SMilk inspection for sanitation
or economic protection?.......30
Surplus stay away from our
doorl..... ....... .............56
Grigsby, R.Y.. Federal regulation
in the New Orleans milk market..224
Grimm, WG. Price returns poli-
cies of manufacturing coopera-
tives....s. *6.. ...U........... .. *3
Gain, Marvin. Economic study of
dairy, farming in Oktibbeha and
S Lowndes counties, Miss ....9..0..137


Item


Hady, F.T. Probable effect of
the Agricultural conserva-
tion program on livestock
production in the midwest
dairy region. With others.......18
Hammerberg, D.O.. Allocation of..
milk supplies among conti-
guous markets.6....6...........181
Hankin, C.A.............. .323
Hanson, J.R.
Statement concerning the Sioux
City milk market. With E.S.
Harris... ...9 .e 227
Statement concerning the
Louisville milk market.
With others.................252
Harmon, E.M. How the New York
milk marketing agreement works.225
Harris, E.S.
Statement concerning the Calu-
met, Indiana-Illinois milk
market. With P.L. Miller....226
Statement concerning the Sioux
City milk market. With
J.R. Hanson.. **.......227
Harrison See Stevenson, Jordan
& Harrison -
Hart, E.B. Milk and science...,...15
Haywards, on middleman's profit...174
-Heaps, I.W. Twenty-years of
cooperative milk marketing
in Baltimore...... 9a aa. .me .*57
Henry, W.H. Equalizing surplus
burdens-through public con-
trol..... .... ................... 3
Hitchcock, J.A.
Changes on a group of Vermont
S dairy farms. With L.D.
Paquette................. ** 138
-Milk production per cow and
feed costs............ ......139
Studies in Vermont dairy
farming. XI. Labor as a
cost of production. With
-... L.N. Paquette...............140
Hoocker, R.W. Labor incomes on
dairy and cash crop farms in
southern Onondaga county.
With E.G. Misner...............141









- 42-

Item


Hoffman, O.H. ,jr. .Development
of public control as a per-
manent policy.....................4
Hole, 3rling. Supply respornses
in milk production in the.........
Cabot-Marshfield area, Vt.
With' others *......................2
H l6 maih C.. .. .
How trade agreements affect the.
welfare of dairy farmers....3,29
Trade agreement with Argontina...29
Hood,"H.P., & sons, inc........242,280
Hopkins, J.A. Profits in the
dairy business. With others.....131
Hboihtby' E.E. Challenge to
dairymen...... ................... 16
Howe. F.C.
Milk market muddle..............182
testimony before TIEC,,,,,,,,,, ,180
Huff, E.B. Milking parlor for
small dairy farms .............*142
Hughes, E.MI. Milk retailing by
producer-distributors in New
.'York state......................183
Humrickhouse, C.UT. Milk control
law in Indiana.......... ........228
Hyre, P.M. Cooperative marketing
of dairy products. With H.C.
T relogan........ ...... .... .... .62

I d a h o . ..". 1 7 1 0 7
Idaho. Dept. of agriculture.
Bureau of dairying...............*17
Illinois
butter
gross and net weights,
Chicago......me... .... ....82
quality, sold at retail,
Chicago............em.....114
milk
control..............214,232,236
court case, Chicago..222,238,281
low-cost, for needy fami-
lies, Chicago ......... 208 '
market and marketing agree-
ment and order, Calumet...226


Illinois Continued
milk- continued :
order
Chicago..... ....,2l3,273
opposed..*S.. ......??Q""221
Quad Cities..............2 5
prices, Chicago.**....*..*.*291
situation, Chicago.e. ......24 -
survey, Chicago,*......:..* 17
radio shows of the Pure Milk
Association of Chicago.e.see@58
Illinois. Agricultural experiment
station. Accuracy of methods
of sampling milk delivered at
milk plants ...... .46
Illinois .Agricultural experiment
station. Dept. of agricultural
economics.
Considerations in govern-
mental price control
of dairy products.....,,.212
Increasing milk consawnptm
tion through use of
quantity discounts....**** .156
Prospects for exports of
dairy products...... ....157
Indiana
dairy statisticsm*........e*.*S*84
milk .. ..,
control.... ....*216.228,229,282
market aud marketIng asgroov
ment and order. Calumet*.226
orders
Fort Wayne............., .264
La Platte county.........267
prices, Indianapolis........287
Indiana. Agricultural experiment
station. Creamery license
division. Twenty-fourth an-
nual report....................,.84
Indiana. Milk control board.
Report......... ..... .*........., .2 9
Iowa
-butterfat procurement ,'by
creameries in Butler
County............ ***,**,1001O









- 43 -


Item


Iowa Continued
effect of agricultural con-.....
servation program on
livestock..... ...... 18
milk
market and marketing agree-
merit, Sioux City....*.....227
orders
Dubuque.ee*......gmgsoo ... .263
Quad Cities...............275
Sioux City............227,276
Iowa. Agricultural experiment
station.
Butterfat procuerment by..
creameries in Butler
County. Iowa..eeeee...eel00
Post-war developments in
the marketing of butter....96
Post-war developments in
the marketing of cheese....97
Iowa. State college of agriculture
and mechanic arts. Extension
service.
Concentration in cheese
marketing.... m...........e.94
Cutting butterfat marketing
costs....... ..............102
Profit in the dairy business.131
Short circuiting the butter
ntddleman.......*.......*****98
Irwin, H.S.
Impressions of trading in butter
and egg futures... .....e.....85
Survey of butter futures........86
*
Jensen, Einar.
Determining input-output rela-
tionships in milk produce' .:
tion.....................143-144
Some results of the United
States Department of agri-
culture experiments in
dairy feeding.......... .. e..145
Jensen, J.M. Study of cream
quality from creameries located
in southern Michigan...me...... 6 87
Jesness, O.B. Trends in the Minne-
sota dairy industry. With E.F.
Koller.e..e....em...m.....a.eeee*21


Item


Johnson, E.H. Manufacture of
dairy products in Texas.
With F.A. Buechel............8.?77
Johnson, G.A. testimony before
TNEC.... .... .................180
Jones, E.H Current problems of
dairy cooperatives............30
Jordan See Stevenson, Jordan
& Harrison.

Kansas.. ..... ...U.... .........8,92,230
Kansas. State board of agricul-
ture. Organization for the
dairy industry..............S....8
Kansas. State board of health.
U.S. Public health service
standard milk ordinance.....e.e230
Kelly, Ernest. Supervision
and inspection of milk.........231
Kentucky........ ...... ..60,64,252,273
Kentucky. Agricultural experi-
ment station. Organization
and management of the Falls
Cities cooperative milk
producers' association......*,..60
Kirkpatrick, M.G. Program for
milk...........................e 19
Kladakis, N.J..eee...................232
Klein, Jack. Milk control laws...233
Klinefelter, H.E. Missouri's
filled milk case...............184
Kling, Herbert. Distribution of
milk by sub-dealers in New
York City. With Leland
Spencer. .....................199
Knox, John. Borderline milk and
cream market problems....9....,..4
Koenig, Nathan. Six years of
marketing agreements...,..e..e.234
Koller, E.F.
Minnesota creamery industry,
1934-1937............. ......88
Recent trends in the Minnesota
dairy industryeee......e..e.e20
Some aspects of creamery opera-
tions in Minnesota in 1938.a89
Survey of cooperative cream-
eries in Watonwan county,
1937.............m.. .........80








-44-


Item


Koller, E.F. Continued
Trends in the Minnesota
dairy industry. With
.. 0 B* ***- O B esness .* *
Eraiiss, W.E. Responsibility o.f.
the-. milk producer to. the con-
sumer. "ee es. see m s 2

La Guardia, Mayor................24
Laughlin, C.W. Initial estab-
lishment of price policies........
Lauterbach, A.H.
future for milk..................2
Pure milk "goes to town" via
. radio.-. .... .... ............ 5
Situation in Chicago milk shad...2
Layson, S.V. Milk laws then and
no wnOW. ..... ...... ...*.*. ...... 3
Livestock, effect of agricultural
-..conservation program on Mid-
west dairy region................I
Loui s i ana...................10,224,25
Louisiana. State university.
Dept. of agricultural economics.
Federal regulation in the
New Orleans milk market...22
Milk production in south-
eastern Louisiana....... 666.
Luebke, B.H. Shipments of dairy
products into Knoxville, Tenn.
With others.................. e.30

McBride, C.G. Ten years of farm
sales of milk in four Ohio
markets. With R.W. Sherman......19
McDermott, L.M.- Report on milk
survey, city of Chicagoe........17
McGrath, John. Cooperative mar-
keting set-up for New England
mil .. ...... ................... .3
McIlnnerney, T.H. Statement be-
fore TNEC....... .... ........ 25,18
McIntyre, .R.- Temporary snarl
in milk markets ........ ..em....18
SMacLeod, Alan. Plans for prepara-
tion of a report on the supply
side of New England milk i
markets.. ....... ............ ..m 18


Maine.. .......... s.......ees6,177 .
Maine. Agricultural experiment il
station..
1 Economic study of milk
.....distribution in Maine
markets. ..... s eese.......,7
2 Economic study of the
-dairy industry........ ....JBi
3 Malone, C.C. Profits in the
dairy-business. With others.,..131
3 Malott% D.W. Agricultural
industries. With B.F. Martingz,,,27
Z Markham, L.A. Equalizing surplus
burdens in a fluid milkshed.....*3
18 Martin, B.F. Agricultural indus-
4 tries. With D.W. Malott.........27
Maryland........................57,146
'5 Maryland. Agricultural experi-
ment station. Fifty-first
annual report.s.ms.m......m.s..146
8 Massachusetts.
18 Boston cream market hurt by
domestic dumping........*..o.74
butter, gross and net weights
in packages, Boston.m....,...82
4. milk
adulteration...........* .*.235
0 cartage in the Southwick-
Agawam area, Springfield
milkshed..ss....e.... o*168
'7 .. control, Boston.e...se..sms.280
cost to dealers, Spring-
field area....... 6.......130
.. low-cost for needy famir.
8 lies.....m..mm..........B207-S08
marketing.sm.....s...sa......187
3 Worcester. essma.ses.175
orders
Boston area..s...e......265
0 .Lowell-Lawrence
area. .. ..257,260,278
8 pooling... oo...mseemm.a...*158
Massachusetts. Agricultural
5 .... experiment station.
Milk cartage in the South-i
wick-Agawam area of the
S..... .. Springfield milkshed....168i
6
i









- 45 -


Item


IMassachusetts. Agricultural
:. experiment station -.Cont'd
Product-costs of mi1Jk.t...
dealers in the Spring-
field area, 1935...........130
Toward a perfect milk
market........ .. 175
Massachusette.Committee on prob-
leame affecting the dairy
industry............ ... .... ......187
Massachusetts. Special commnission...
of the laws relating to milk
and milk products. Report........28
Massachusetts. State college.
:-........................ .
U''ttension service............
, Adapting pooling plans to
milk markets..............158
Boston cream market hurt
; more by domestic dumping
than by tariff changes.....74
Massachusetts. State college. Exten-
"sion service. Subcommittee on
marketingg milk in Massachusetts.
Report......... ............"..18
'..Mathis, G.L. New outlook for
National dairy.............. ...90
Matzen, E.H.
Marketing cull dairy cows in
New York state. With W.M.
Curtis.... *.ma. a ......... ..68
Marketing replacements for New.....
York-dairy herds. With W.M.
Curt-iss .............. .. .. ..56 71
Meadowmoor dairies...............9291
e4046r, P.E. Trade barriers and
.dairy products................. ..321'
Merrick, Frank. Milk production
in southeastern Louisiana....
With J.N. Efferson. ............... 10
K. iehigana Agricultural experiment
......... station.
Kalamazoo milk markmt.... .'..' .206
Profitable dairy management.:.154
Study of cream quality from
creameries located in
S' southern Michigan.......... 87
Middle West............ ...3 -4.330 "=


Item


Mighell, R.L.
Probable effects of the Agri-
cultural conservation pro-
......gram on livestock produc-
tion in the midwest dairy
..... region.'With others....o.....18
Supply responses in milk pro-
duction in the Cabot-
Marsh-field area. With others..2
Miley, D.G. Summary of 12 dairy
farm records, Jacksonville
area..-. 66.... ... eeemos@9147
Milk
adulteration, Massachusetts...,235
and science..........., ... b15

base rating plan........m66601664
basic-surplus plan, Phila-
delphia. ....................155
by-products..... ............ ...91
canned, consumption and prices
as related to demand for
fresh milk. ........ .....*.111
cartage, Southwick-Agawam
area, Springfield milkshed..168
condensed stocks, wholesale
grocers........ ........ in..123
conferences. Albany. N.Y........,1
consumer, responsibility of
producer toQm..mmm.....m.....22
consumption
and family incomes, New York
City.......s .............201
..... city. .................311
compared with consumption
of evaporated milk.e.....112
effect of 8-cent milk plan
on, New York.............200
'effect of price fixing
on...................284,295
increasing through use of
*' quantity discounts.......156
....... promotingo****.o... 666090030
Scontainers. i.......e s..... ....194,209
COtrol m...m....ms..&...... 210283
advantages and disadvan-
tages..*. .ma....... .me..@..3
California.. .........251,255









- 46 -

Item


Milk Continued
control continued
Connecticut... ....... .......219
development as a permanent
policy. .. ?, .4
federal effects on .....
cooperatives.............. .55
prices..........*0..60 296,298
Illi.ois, Chicago...... 214,220-
221,232,236
Indiana....... .216.22-22??9,282
Louisiana, New. Orlens. .224,258
Massachusetts,. Boston........280
New Jersey. .. 6.0*.*e...s.s 239
New York.., ........1993,223,240,
....... 256,259,261
Oregon.... *. .......... 215
Pennsylvania.........237,283,294
powers and limitations.***........3
responsibilities of a co-
operative ..*..............4
bhode Island...... .... .... .245
cooperative associations
audit, New York..............192
affect of federal control on..55
Kentucky.....*.......... .......60
organizing...606.*.6 .........S65
relation to milk orders.......30
responsibilities under milk
marketing control.........,.4
cooperative marketing.......... ..63
Connecticut........... ..... 6.56
history...666.. 0.*....6....6.6.59
Kentucky, Louisville and
nearby cities. .*........64
Maryland. Baltimore........... 57
New England..............66.66 30
Tennessee. Chattanooga area... 66
cost of production.....135,150-151
feed costs...............129,139
labor costs......... ......0..140
Yew Jersey. .*******... ... ...7
New York.................148,153
cost to dealers, Springfield
area, Mass......6.666666666.6 130
court cases...... .210-211,238,
241-242,280


Milk Continued..
court cases continued '
California............... 5
Ill inois................2282,281...
dealers
audit, New York............192
Buffalo, N.Y............159-160
deliveries
adjusting to class sales...,169
home, versus store buying.*6180
to stores, duplication in,
New York City........ 6..195
demand, as related to consump-
tion and prices of canned
n1lk.... 6 ............ .*6 .111l
disposition and value, on
farms.... 060066.6.6 6...60 313
distribution See Milk,
marketing
8-cent, New York...............200
equivalent of manufactured
dairy products......... 096.122
evaporated *..*116
compared with consumption
of fresh mi'k...........112
consumption and family.. '
incomes, New York
City.......666...........163,201
sales, retail stores, New
York.... ...oe.. me .. ..76
stocks, wholesale grocers...123
filled. .... ...... 60 00......184
inspection........666 *.*..30,231
labor incomes, Onondago
county, N.Y...... 600 60..0..141
laws, discussed..e06.66606060B.235
license, solution of New
,England milk problem0..00000.30
low-cost plan, needy
families............ ....207-208
manufactured...66000066666000660063
markets and marketing6....176,180,
182,185
agreements
Calumet, Indiana-
Illinois market.......226
Louisville, 2y*......-...25S









-47 -


Item


Milk Continued
markets and marketing- cont'd .
.... -agrements .continued.....
'. .. New Yopk .Gity,. .., 225
.Providenoe R.I.-. T,,, :,.246
... Sioux City, *a.. 227
.Waahimoton, D.C.,. : O ,, ..3
as a publo. utility......,: ,191
borderline problems.... .., .4
Calumet, Indiana-Illinois. ..226
Connecticiti,iNew Haven. ...203
control Se& t4ik, control.
Co-t.. Calfornia.... ... '... 179,205
....cdL~ amla. e.. O a. gee 696205
Man.........6m.*6.6.. 6..6.6.178
New'Jersey........0.......196
New York.......... ........202
direct.*6....4 3.....33.... 3 174
health and. welfare, depots,.
.New York City.........;~,.2O0
Iowa, Sioux City.............. 227
Kentucky, Louisville......252
lair,. Jaaeachuaotts. ...... ...28
4 .ne...... .....0...........177
!kssachusetts... 363036...0 .187
... .Worcestero. .......... .175
Michigan, Kalamazoo.:....e...206
New England..............165-166
New York.............193,204,261
Ohio..0........6 ........... ,.170
research. New England..*......197
retail, New York......... ...183
Bhode Island, Providence...,.246
sub-dealers, New York City...199
Washington, D.C........... .253
monopoly......6......... 180,188-189
..Chicago........ ... 236,238,291
Indianapolis. .... ...36360 6 6 287
orders
Calumet, Indiana-Illinois
market336............6 .226
effect on prices........293,296
.Illinois, Chicago........213,272
Indiana
S Fort Wayne....6.....6....264
La Porte County.... ......267


Item


Milk Continued
orders continued
Iowa .. ..... ..
Dubuque.I s*e es 64.263
Sioux City...........227,276
Kentucky, Louisville..*..252,273
Massachusetts
Greater Boston area...,..265
Lowell-Lawrence
area.. ........257,260,278
Missouri '
Kansas City.......,....266
St. Louis.*.............269
Nebraska, Omaha-Council
Bluffs...................274
New York..,..249-250,268,271,279
Ohio
Cincinnati...............262
Toledo...............me..270
Quad Cities.................275
Rhode Island;,Providence...*246
status and relation to
cooperatives........... 6..30
Washington, D.C.........253,277
outlets. ...3....m..63* 6.0.6.*** 3
outlook. .... ....... *.........3.23
papers, New York..... ........ ..6
plants, Middle West.......e...e...4
pooling. .".... m e *3.'* .158,304
price fixing...............243,301
court decision...s.,.0,,*s222
effects'..e... .......... .284,295
prices............... *.185,284-306
and sales and family in-
Scome. New York...s.......163
Chcagooo ....................291
classification, Pennsyl-
.vania....................294
control......... ............284
effect of control on,
New York............ ,296,298
effect of 8-cent milk plan
on, New Yorke........a....P200
effect of marketing order
*index, New York...............302
index, New York...........*302


. 0 .









48 -

Item


Milk Continued
prices continued
Indianapolis.......... :. ...?287
maintenance, relation to
bae rating plana..... .....4
minimm wholesale: and retail,
Establishment, California.217
New York.............288-289,303
outlook, New York...... .. 299-300
producer, under milk pools...304
raising, New York......... 9. 204
producer, responsibility to
consumer.. ..... ............ .. 22
producer-distributors.......... 196
production
control................... 42-43
effect of price fixing on....284
input-output relationships. .136,
.. 143-146
laws, Massachpsetts. ..... ... 28
Louisiana.... ......n ..10 s
per cow, Vermont.............139
relation of size of cow to,
New York.... ...... ,.....148
supply responses in Cabot-
Marshfield area, Vt..o.......2
Wisconsin................316
profit factors, Connecticut.....149
program,..**.... *.. ........ .... .19
quantity discounts......156,194,292
radio advertising, Chicago,Ill...58
receipts, New. York........... ..310
returns, ways of increasing......44
sales
dealers', Buffalo, N.Y...159-160
farm, Ohio markets......... 198
retail, New York.... ....... 164
store, New York..*...........161
sampling methods, accuracy.......46
sanitary regulations.......*247,320
Kansas. ................... ..230
New York City........... ... 243
situation........ .....660660 0.. 285
Chicago 66............... ..24,291
effect of weather on..........41
stabilization and marketing
plans, California............217
stations, country...........165-167


Milk Continued "e 9:
statistics I
Connecticut.......o...,,3ft
New York................261,.30.
uniform .......*31
strikes.. 086 0 .
sub-dealers.... ..........196g19p
subsidies........ 0 6 *..249-250
supplies
allocation among con- ...
tigaou!.markets.....,. *9181
S New England................ o 186
New York........6... ... .162
surplus, equalizing..... -,o ,.3
survey, Chicago, Ill........,.,173
trade barriers See Dairy
products
transportation........ .... .*167
bibliography........... ...8171
laws, Massachusetts......e...28
Milk research council. Milk
papers. 6060606660.600 60.....6.0 6
Milking parlors...... 006006....606142
Miller, I.C. Laws forced by farm
groups halt trade in pro-
cessed foods.................*,322
Miller, P.L.
Economic statement concerning.
the Providence, R.I. milk
market. With others......246
Statement concerning the
Calumet, Indiana-Illinois
milk market. With E.S.
Harris............. 6..6066666060226
Statement concerning the
Louisville milk market.
With others...... o.o.oe .**252
Statement concerning the
Washington milk market.
With B.C. Tetro........... .253-:
Minnesota
consumption of butter by
Miifnieapolis families..0...,.*7l
cooperative creameries in
Watonwan County....... ......*
creamery industry.......s... e88-
dairy industry tronds..*.....20-o..
I.








- 49 -


Item


Minnesota Continued
effect of agricultural con-
servation program, on live-
K stock.... ..... ......... ... 18
quantity discount scheme,
Minneapolis. ..so..... s ....... 292
Minnesota. Agricultural experiment.
station. Trends in the
Minnesota dairy industry.........21
Minnesota. University. Dept. of
agriculture. Divisions of agri-
cultural economics and agricul-
tural extension.
Consumption of butter by
Minneapolis families.,. ...79
Effectiveness of the butter
tariff.....................93
Minnesota creamery industry,
1934-1937...60...... ......88
Recent trends in the Minne-
sota dairy industry........20
Some aspects of creamery
operations in Minnesota
in 1938.6......... ...... .. ..89
Surplus problems in dairy-
ing... .......... ...... ..172
Survey of cooperative
creameries in Watonwan
county, 1937...............80
Misner, E.G.
Labor incomes on dairy and
cash crop farms in southern
Onondago county, With R.W.
Hockor..........0..... ....* .141
Relation of size of cow to pro-
duction and cost of milk on
94 grade A farms in the
Tully-Homer area........... .148
Mississippi. Agricultural experi-
ment station. Economic study
of dairy farming in Oktibbeha
and Lowndes counties, Miss.....**137
Missouri..............6....... e266,269
Moffett, 1.-X. Milk regulations
in Pennsylvania....... .........237
Montague, T.G.
Is there a milk monopoly?.......189
testimony before TNEC...r...188-189


Item


Moon, H.A. Truth about a. quart
of milk... ............* q..o, 190
Morrow, L.W.W. Role of a public
relations policy in the manage-
ment and operation of coopera-
tive dairy marketing associa-
tion. ......................,.....4
Mortenson, W.P. Legal possibili-
ties and limitations of milk
distribution as a public
utility.. ........... .........191

National cooperative milk pro-
ducers' federation., .
Educational series....,.....29.
History series.....0.....000.*.0.59
National dairy products corpo-
ration...............25,90,1139188
National farm chemurgic council,
inc. Research committee.
Chemurgic potentialities...03.0.91
Nebraska................... .......0 274
Nemaha co-operative creamery
association. 1930-1940
year book...... .......... 0.0 .92
New England
cooperative marketing set-up
for milk.....................30
milk marketing....... .165-166,197
milk problem and milk license...30
supply side of milk markets...186
New England institute of ooopera-
tion. Proceedings............ .630
New England research council on
marketing and food supply.
Proceedings
1938..... ............... .165
1939...... ...... ....136,145
1940.............166,186,197
New Hampshire. Dept. of agricul-
ture. Dairy industry.......*...31
New Jersey............... ..7,38,196,239
New Jersey. Milk control board.
.Report........ .... ......... ,, 239
New Jersey. St.at6 college of agri-
culture. Agricultural exten-
.siQn service and agricultural
experiment station..
Dairy problems..........6.0.38








-50-


Item


_Hew Jersey. State college of agri-
culture. Agridiltural exten-
sion service and agricultural
experimentt statiQon. -.OQnt'd....
Some comments on milk
control................... 245
New Jersey. State college of agri-
culture. Dept. of agricultural
economics. Production and price
... trends in the dairy industry
and cost of producing milk in
New Jersey...*. .. ...........67 ...
New York .. ...
..... Albany milk conference...... ..1l
.... audit of milk dealers and co-
operative associations.......192
butter
gross and net weights in...
packages.... ... ....... .....82
****... quality. sold at retail.......114
Cost and returns from dairy
cows.. ....... ......... .......153
dairy herds................ 67-71,73
..... dairy products, index of pro-
duction..... "....... ... .124
dairy statistics... .......... ....309
Labor incomes on dairy and cash
Scrop farms, southern Onondaga
* *county.......*.C..........B.. 141
milk
consun.ption .. .
and family incomos&...163,201
offoct of price fixing
on.. b............... .295-296
containers.,............... .209
...... control..193,223,240,256,259,261
,... costs.. .. .. 148
decision in court case.......210
duplication in delivery of,
.... .., to stores. ......... .... ...195
industry...::: ... .B...32
0,.* .eees e .
marketing..:................. .193
..... agreement.......... ...... 225
by sub-dealers....I...**..199
costs..............B...... 202
retailing by producer-
distributors.,........183
.* orders..,....249-250,268,271,279


New York Continued ....
milk continued......
papers.. ,.. .. ... ,9,.99
prices............ .28-289,30:;
index................. 9 302
outlookB.... ......... 299-300
raising..................204
under control.., ..... .;298
production controls& .......*42
receipts...**.............R.0310
sales...... .. .....159-161,164
situation.............33-35,243
supply for New York marketp.162
sales of cream by retail
stores......*........ .....*y75T.
sales of evaporated milk by
retail stores...B......** 76
New York. Agricultural experiment
station. Milk distribution
costs of producer-distributors
and sub-dealers in New Jersey.*196
New York (Cornell) State college
of agriculture. Dept. of
agricultural economics and
farm management.
Age of cows in dairy
herds.S...................67
Analysis of dealers' sales
of milk and cream in
the Buffalo market..e....159
Comparative cost of fixed
and variable dairy
rations...... ..ROB....S..129
Consumption and prices of
canned milk as related
to the demand for fresh
milk..... B.. ....... ..,111
Costs and returns from ....
dairy cows: on selected .
N1:; York state farms .. l53 I
Dairy farm management. .... 134
Day-of-the-week variations
in the store sales of .
milk and-cream in the
New York market..........161
Distribution of dairy
cattle in Chautauqua
County, New York, 1937.....73









- 51 -


Item


New York (Cornell) State college
of agriculture. Dept. of
agricultural economics and
farm management. Continued
Distribution of milk by
sub-dealers in New
York City... ... .........199
Distribution of milk
through health and
welfare depots in
New York City.............200
Duplication in delivery
of milk to stores in
New York City............195
Labor incomes on dairy and
cash crop farms in south-
ern Onondago county..@.,. 141
Marketing cull dairy cows
in New York state..........68
Marketing replacements for
New York dairy herds.......71
Milk prices in New York
under federal and state
orders....................296
Milk production control.......42
Milk retailing by producer-
distributors in New
York state................183
Milk sales by stores in
Buffalo,..................* 160
Milk supply for the New
S York market...............162
Monthly index of per capital
production of the prin-
cipal manufactured dairy
produce .ts. .e............. 124
Number and breed of cows on
New York dairy farms,
1939. .o.. c ...... ........69
Origin and drstination of
New York dairy herd re-
placements......0........... 70
Relation of family income
to prices and sales of
fresh milk, cream and
evaporated milk in the
New York market..s. ....163


Item


New York (Cornell) State college
of agriculture. Dept. of
agricultural economics and
farm management. Continued
Relation of size of cow
to production and cost
of milk on 94 grade A
farms in the Tully-
Homer area......... .0148
Revised series of milk
prices for Now York...... 302
Sales of cream by retail
stores in the New York
market, June, 1938.....****.75
Sales of evaporated milk by..
retail stores in the Nev
York market.... ....'?** *76
Sales of milk by retail
stores in the New York
market... ......... .666164
New York (State).Attorney-7
general's office. Report...
on the milk industry........,.,,32
New York (State). Commissioner
of agriculture and markets.
Report...regarding the audit
of milk dealers and coopera-
tive associations...0000.00600.192
New York (State). Dept. of agri-
culture and markets.
Annual report .... O........*193
Statistics relative to
the dairy industry.......309
New York (State).Dept. of agri-
culture and markets. Division
of milk control. Analysis
of dealers' sales of milk
and cream in the Buffalo
market.. ..... .............. ..*159
New York (State). Legislature.
Committee to investigate the
milk control law. Report.,....,240
Newman W.A. Effectiveness of
the butter tariff............. 93
Nicholls, W.H.
Concentration in cheese mar-
keting. ............ .........94









- 52 -

Item


Nicholls, W.H. Continued
Post-war concentration in
the cheese industry,..........95
Post-war developments in
the marketing of butter.......96
Post-war developments in
the marketing of cheese......,97
Short-circuiting the butter
middleman............. .....aa.98
Nicholson, Arnold. Breaking the
bottleneck...... ...... ....... 1l94
Noble's milk company......... .....280
Northeastern States. ..... ... .11,133
Northland milk & ice cream co......292
Noyes, H.V. .... .
"Crash" go milk pricesJ...,.....293
Milk situation in New York...'..S33
New York milk problems..maa.s 1.34
New York milk situation. ...a..a. 35
Nunan-Allen bill................ a.e 223

Ohio.ae,,.a e .22,170,198,262,270
Ohio. Agricultural experiment
station.
Responsibility of the milk
producer to the consumer....22
Ten years of farm sales of
milk in four Ohio mar-
kets......................198
Oppenheim, S.C.........a..... ......323
Oregon ....... .aa a aa..... .... ..aaa215
Orton, Vrest. Country industry.a..a99

Past, W.Re, Jr. Butter and
oleomargarine.....a.....,...*** .167
Pan American union. Division of
agricultural cooperation.
Cooperative creameries in
the U.S...................108
Organizing fluid-milk mar-.
keting cooperatives in
the United States...**a..aa65
Paquette, L.D. Changes on a group
of Vermont dairy farms. With
J.A. Hitchcock.. a a...,a a ,a.138
Paquette, L.N. Studies in Vermont
dairy farming. XI. Labor as a
cost of production. With J.A.
Hitchcock.........a a...... a. ...140


Pennsylvania.... .82,155,237,?83,294I
Perregaux, E.A. Dairy situa-
tion.flaaaaaaa... am. .*... ..e.. 3
Philippine Islands...0.........0,, 29
Pilger, A.C. What does Mayor
La Guardia want?......*.....ee*243
Pollard, A.J..
Duplication in delivery of.
milk to stores in New
York City. ...am.... ms....eam 195
Receipts of milk and cream .
at the New York market.
With L.F. Champlin.....im,,0310
Polikoff, Harry. Powers and
limitations of public milk
control authorities.....uaa ...3
Price, H.B. Organization and
management of the Falls Cities
cooperative milk producers'
association. aammaaa..aaa..a sae.60
Pure milk association of Chicago..58
Putnam, P.L. Profit factors on
Connecticut dairy farms.....*e.149

Quintus, P.E.
Butterfat procurement by
creameries in Butler
county, Iowa. With
Frank Robotka. .......*9.. .100
"Challenge" means just that.,101
Cutting butterfat marketing
costsa..aa.a. a........a..,..102
Sales methods of local co-
operative creameries*...a.,.4
Selecting outlets for butter.,*103
Trucks change cream-marketing..
picture. With Frank Robotka.109
Using your co-op creamery.,...O104
Wholesale butter prices and
premiumsm...aaa...a.a......lO.105

Reed, D.W. discussion of
McGrath's Cooperative market-
ing set-up for New England
milk. ....a ........... .. a a .30
Reed, O.E.
New developments in the uses
of manufactured dairy
products.... aa... a a a ....106:








- 53 -


Item


Reed, 0.E. Continued
Reducing costs of producing
milk..... ................. ...150
What dairying can contribute
to the social and economic
life of the South.............37
Reed, O.M. Responsibilities and
services of a cooperative
'under public milk marketing
control. .... .... ....,.......***4
Regional conference on dairy
problems..... .................. .320
Reid, E.B.
Dairy co-op leads the way.*.....l07
Report of conference on publi-
city and public relations ......
policies.9f cpoperatyives....
With V.C. Sherman..............4
Reser, H.M.........................281
Reynolds, B.C. Analysis of milk
classifications.............. ... .294
Reynolds, Quentin, discussion of
McGrath's Cooperative marketing
set-up for New England milk......30
Rhode Island........ ... .......244,246
Rhode Island and Providence Planta-
tions. Board of milk control...244
Rinear, EBH.
Dairy problems................38
Mil-r distribution costs of
producer-distribators and
sub-dealers in New Jersey....196
Some comments on milk control...245
Roberts, J.B. Organization and
management of the Falls Cities
cooperative milk producers'
association....... ...... .... ...60
Robbtka, Frank
Butterfat procurement by
creameries in Butler county,
Iowa. Tith P.E. Quintus......100
Cooperative creameries in the
United States. With Frank
Shefrin.................. .108
Tracks change cream-marketing
picture. With P.E. Quintus...109
Rock royal co-operative, inc..*.....241l


Item


Rowe, H.B. Should the emphasis
of the Eew England milk mar-
keting researchprogram be
changed?... ......... .... ......197
Rutgers university See New
Jersey. Agricultural college.

Schmidt, P.M. Selected biblio-
graphy on the dairy industry
in America........ .......*...*.54
Schoenfield, Clarence. 100 years
of Wisconsin dairying.......*...39
Shefrin, Frank. Cooperative
creameries in the United
States. With Frank Robotka,....108
Shepard, J.B. More adequate,
uniform statistics, sQught
on city milk consumption.......***311
Sherman, J.E. Probable effects
of the Agricultural conserva-
tion program on livestock
production in the midwest
dairy region. With others.......18
Sherman, R.W. Ton years of farm
sales of milk in four Ohio
markets. With C.G. Mc3ride,,...198
Sherman, V.C. Report of confer-
ence on publicity and public
relations policies of coopera-
tives. With E.B. Reid............4
Simpson, Kemper, testimony before
TN3C............................ 180
Small, Edward. Survey of quality
of selected brands of butter
sold in one-pound cartons.
With others....... ....... o..s..,114
Smith, C.W. Economic statement
concerning, the Providence,
R.I.. milk market. With others..246
Smith, Chester. Some economic
aspects of marketing fluid
milk in Worcester, Mass........175
Southern States.......,,,.... ..*37
Spencer, Leland.
Causes.of.milk strikes.........*40
Consumption and prices of
canned milk as related to
demand for fresh milk....,.lll








- 54 -


Item


Spencer, Leland Continued
Distribution of milk by sub-.
dealers in New York City.
...W. ith Herbert Kling...........199
Distribution of milk through
health and welfare depots
in Now York City. With
Charles Blanford........... 200
Dry weather and the milk
situation ........ ... ...a* ...41
Effect of price fixing. upon
Silk constunption.............295
Evaporated milk..... ........ .....112
Family incomes and milk con-
.... sumption......... ........ .?.201
Health regulations and the
nilk supply........... ...... 247
.How. the large dairy companies
fared in 1938................113
Hunt for more cream............. 110
Milk prices in N.Y. under
federal and state orders.....296
.Milk production control..........42
Mil-t production control from
the national viewpoint........43
New proposal for pricing milk...297
New York milk prices under
federal-state control........298
Outlook for milk prices.........299
Outlook for milk prices in
New York....... ........... .300
Penny saved..................... 151
Public regulation of the milk
industry..... ............... ...248
Raising milk returns by
S. fixing prices................301
Revised series of milk prices
for Yew York................. 302
Subsidized distribution.........249
SSubsidized distribution of
milk: and other products......250
Suooly and demand prices for

Two alternatives for dairy-
men....... .. ....... .. a ..152
Ways of increasing farmers'
returns for milk............944


Spencer, Leland Continued ;
Ways of reducing costs of
distributing milk in
New York......... 3 ...... ...e o20
Sprague, G.W. Survey of quality
of selected brands of butter. :
sold in one-pound cartons.
With others.......... ..... .*114
Stevenson, Jordan & Harrison.
Study of milk di-stribution
in Now Haven..ws............... 203
Stine, O.C. Dairy outlook for
1939......i... .......... .... ..... 45
Stitts-, T.G.
Contrasting marketing problems
of far-western and middle
western co-op creameries......3
Contrasting problems of butter
co-ops,*....*.... ....... 115
Cooperative milk marketing
in Louisville and other
nearby cities. With W.C.
elden..................... 603 64
Relative prices to producers.
With others......... ..,.3***304
Swank, Oscar. Federal govern-
ment's purchase program for
dairy products. With others,...3*3

Tator, S.17. Will the milk license
solve New Ergland's milk
problem?.3,3.3333.,........ ,O.e30
Temporary national economic com-
mittee See U.S. Temporary
national economic committee.
Tennessee. .............. .* 66,30?
Tennessee. Agricultural college.
Dept. of agricultural econo-
mics aEnd rural sociology.
Shipments of dairy products
into Knoxville, Tenn.a.........307
Tereshtcnko, V.J. Cooperative
dairying........................ 61
Tetro, R.C.
Statement concerning the Louis-
villo-milk market. With
... e **thers..... ........ .....,.,..252

I








- 55 -


Item


Tetro, R.C. Continued
Statement concerning the .....
Washington milk market.
With P.L. Miller...........**253
Texas University. Bureau of
business research. Manufacture
of dairy products in Texas.......77
Tiedeman, E.W. Responsibilities
and services of a cooperative
Sunder public milk marketing
control... ....... .................4
Tinley, J.M.
Lessons from -ublic control in
milk marketing........ ......254
Public regulation of milk mar-
keting in California.........255
SReducing cost of distributing
milk in California...........205
Tomlinson, F.R. World production
and international trade in
butter and cheese...............117
Tracy, P.R. Accuracy of methods
.of sampling milk delivered at
... mil plants. With S.L. Tuckey....46
Trask, E.S. Federal government's
purchase program for dairy
... products. With others............ 3
Trelogan, H.C.
...Cooperative marketing of dairy
products.With P.M. Hyre.......62
Using your fluid milk co-op......63
Tuckey, S.L. Accuracy of methods
of sampling milk delivered at
milk plants. With P.H. Tracy.....46

.Trey, Orion. Kalamazoo milk
market.6..... *. *..* .******.....206
U.S. Dept. of agriculture........2,280
Cooperative dairy bull asso-
ciations.e ... ..... 6 .6 72
Food and life ....... ...........231
Large-scale organization in the
dairy industry**.............***..83
Production and consumption of
manufactured dairy products..125
Report of the Secretary of
Sagriculture...................47
[i : .


Item


U.S. Dept. of agriculture. Agri-
cultural adjustment adminis-
S tration.
AAA farm program, and the.
northeast dairyman........ll
SAnnual report 4..............4?
'" Chicago milk pact -
opposed........... ..220-221
Dairying and the AAA in
1939 ............. ....... .12
Effect of federal milk
control on cooperatives...55
Federal-state program for
the New York milk market.256
Order regulating the hand-
ling of milk in the
Lowe 11-Lawrence, Mass.,
area... .....*........ ... 257
Order regulating the hand-
ling of milk in the New
Orleans, La., area......*258
U.S. Dept. of agriculture. Agri-
cultural adjustment adminis-
tration. Consumers' counsel.
Boston drinks surplus milk.....207
U.S. Dept. of agriculture. Agri-
cultural marketing service.
Annual report.................47
Dairy and poultry market
stati sti cs... ... .......312
Dairy market news and re-
ports issued by Agricul-
tural marketing service...48
Disposition and value of
milk produced on farms...313
Handbook of official United
States standards for
quality of creamery
butter.............. .....118
More adequate, uniform sta-
tistics, sought on milk
consumption. ........ 666.311
Problems in adopting the
milk cow... ...... .. 666 ..52
Production of manufactured
dairy products, 1938...,.119









- 56 -

Item


U.S. Dept. of agriculture. Bureau
of agricultural economics......161,
S.199-2Q0,316
..... Agricultural outlook charts.
Dairy products.............49
Annual report. ............. ...47
.Consumption and prices of
canned milk as related to
the demand for fresh milk.1ll
Dairy outlook for 1939........45
Dairy outlook for 1940........51
Dairy products manufactured
in factories 1937.........120
Dairy products: the world
war and the 1939. Europe9n.
war... .. ......... a a .....121
Dairy situation..............49a
Determining input-output
relationships in milk
production.............. ..144
Estimates of gross and net
weights of butter in
various types of packages..82
Forces causing dairy farmers
to make changes in their
farm organizations in
Barren county, Wis........132
Greater uses for dairy by-
products.. .......... .... .126
MiJl equivalent of produc-
tion of manufactured
dairy products by
states..... ..... ......... .122
Probable effects of the
Agricultural conserva-
tion program on livestock
production in the midwest
dairy region........ .69... 18
Production, consumption of
dairy products............ 315
Receipts of milk and cream
at the New York market....310
Shifts in the dairy industry..52
Six years of marketing
agreements................ 234
State trade barriers.........319
Stocks of evaporated and con-
densed milk in hands of
wholesale grocers in 38
cities..... .... ..........123


U.S. Dept. of agriculture. Bureuauil
of agricultural economics- i
Continued
Survey of quality of
selected brands of......
butter sold in one-
pound cartons.**...*....*114
Transportation of ngricul-. !
tural products in the
United States..........*..171
World production and inter-.
national trade in butter
and cheese............ .*117
U.S. Dept. of agriculture. Com-
modity exchange administra-
tion.
Annual report......... .06e.4?
Impressions of trading in
butter and egg futures....85
Survey of butter futures... .86
U.S. Dept. of agriculture. Bureau.
of dairy industry.
Annual report.............,*47
approves milk ordinance.....230
New developments in the
uses of manufactured
dairy products...... ee..106
Publications relating to
the dairy industry........50
What dairying can contri-
bute to the social and
econoLic life of the
South..... ......... s. .37
U.S. Dept. of agriculture. Exten-
sion service. Low-cost milk
program seeks wider outlets.,..208
U.S. Dept. of agriculture. Divi-
sion of marketing and market-
ing agreements.
S Amendment no. 1 to order
regulating the handling. .
of milk in the New York..
area....... ...* *9
Compilation of order no.34..260
Compilation of statistical.
material covering order i
no.27.. .m...... .... 261:
Economic statement concern-.
ing the Providence, R.I,
milk market.E..L... .,,..246








- 57 -


Item


U.S. Dept. of agriculture. Divi-
sion of marketing and market-
ing agreements -.ContinnLed
Order.. .malng.. effective ...
the. order...regulating
*..milk in...New York.....271
Order... suspending section
[of milk order for
Lowel1-Lawrence, Mass.
area a e ...................278
Order.. .terminating certain
provisions of order no.
27......................... 2 9
Orders as amended, regula-
ting the handling of
milk. .
Cincinnati area........262
Dubuque area...........263
Fort Wayne area........ 264
Greater Boston area....265
....... Kansas City, Mo.,area..266
La Porte County, Ind.,
area.................2267
New York area..........268
St. Louis area.........269
Toledo, Ohio, area.....270
Orders regulating the hand-
ling of milk.
Chicago area...........272
Louisville area.......273
Omaha-Council Bluffs
area................274
S Quad Cities area...,...275
Sioux City area.......276
Washington area..*...,.277
Statement concerning the
Calumet, Indiana-Illinois
milk market...... ....3...226
Statement concerning the
Louisville milk market....252
Statement concerning the
Sioux City milk market. ..227
"'Statement concerning the
Washington milk market....253
U.S. Dept. of state. Trade agree-
ments program benefits the
dairy industry..................317


Item


U.S. District court. Northern
district of Illinois...........222
U.S. Farm credit administration.
Adjusting deliveries to
class sales .... ...0 .169
"Challenge" means just that..101
Contrasting problems of*'
butter co-ops.............11.5
Cooperative marketing of
dairy products...... .....3.e62
Cooperative milk marketing in
Louisville and other near-
by cities.... ..... .60.....64
Dairy co-op leads the way.?..,.107
Pure milk "goes to town" via
radio. .............. .... ..58
Relative prices to producers...304
Selecting outlets for butter...103
Surplus stay away from our
door .3............. ...* 6 .6.56
This is the plant that skim
built....,..... &............. 66
Trucks change cream-marketing
picture............ .... 3.0109
Using your co-op creamery*......104
Using your fluid milk co-op.....63
U.S.; Public health service,
standard milk ordinance.....,,e230
U.S. Supreme court decisions.....*238,
241-242,280-281
U.S. Temporary national economic
committee.0.........25,180,188-189
U.S. Works progress administration.
Marketing laws survey. Comzhpa-
rative charts of state
statutes.......... 3333'6'. ,6323
.... e.. eme ... .... 32
U.S. Works proje..ta administra-
tion. New York City. Coopera-
tive dairying. ws........., **,61

Vermont ...... ... .2,99,138-140,314
Vermont. Agricultural college.
Extension service..
Changes on a group of
Vermont dairy farms.,.o..138
Milk production per cow
and feed costs.......006139








- 58 -


Item


Vermont. Agricultural experiment
station. Studies in Vermont ....
dairy farming. XI. Labor as
a cost of production........... 140
YVer nbnt'. Dept. of agriculture.
SNineteenth biennial report..... 314
Vial, .E.
]Da'izy outlook for 1940...........51
Monthly index of per capital
Production of the principal
manufactured dairy products.,124
Production and consumption of
manufactured dairy. products..125
Production, consumption of
dairy products........... ..315
Shifts in the dairy industry.....52

Waite, W.C. Consumption of butter
by Minneapolis families. With
'R.W Col ................ ... 79
Waller, A.G. Production and price
... trends in the dairy industry
and cost of producing milk in
New Jersey. With J.W. Carncross...7
Wallrich, M.M. Borderline milk
Sand cream market problems..... ....4
Washington, D.C ...............253,277
Weldon; W.C.
Cooperative milk marketing in
Louisville and other near-
by cities. With T.G. Stitts...64
Organi zing flul d-mi lk market ing
cooperatives in the United
States............... ....... **.65
This is the plait that skim
built. ;;;;;. ; ... .. ..... 66
Western States ...... ..63 **6.3
Weymouth, George. Shall the
S~LftIndifana* milk control law be
continued?.... ............... ..282
Whiting milk' b6otpany...... ..242,280
Whitney,' Ca.roline. What price
milc?,.... ..... ..... ........ .. 305
SWhitney memorial fund.,.............305
'Whittier, E.O. Greater uses for
dairy by-products.. *..........*126
Wibhern,'Arthur. Single-trip con-
tainers attract attention...3...209


Williamson, Paul. Costs and re-.
turns from dairy cows on .,(
selected New York. state farms.;*,
Wilson, J.L. Problems in adopt-
ing the milk cow.ae ..........fel
Tinkjer, J.G. Cooperative dairy I
bull associations. *...*.*...'* i
Wisconsin ......... .... ii
cheese region......m.e......m...8
dairy statistics............ .56
dairying............ a .,,, a o a
directory of dairy manufac-
turing plants.-..-........ ** 127
effect of agricultural conser-
vation program on livestock..186
forces causing farmers to .
mako changes in B..rron.
County. *..... .,., .1.32
prices, stabilizing........128,306
single-trip milk containers..,.209
trade agreements and dairying,,318
,Wisconsin. Dept. of agriculture.@*316
SDirectory of Wisconsin dairy
-..manufacturing plants.. ......127?
S-Wisconsin dairying...06......,..54
Wisconsin. University. College of
agriculture. Extension service.
Re ciprocal trade agreements
.......... and Wisconsin dairying..*318
...... Stabilizing dairy prices....306
What about stabilization
.......of -butter prices?.......,128
.-Wisconsin crop and livestock..
reporting service.
'.Wisconsin agriculturew.....,316
Wisconsin dairying...........54
Wise, W.S. Pennsylvania's milk
Marketing problem.......... ...283
,Toodin, M.D. Distribution of
Sdairy cattle in Chautauqua
County, New York, 1937?.... ....7.
"Wright, T.K. Profitable dairy :
management. With AC.
.. Baltzer............ 3363333.36. 3615I




-^2
...4








- 59 -


ECONOMIC LIBRARY LISTS

No. 1. State trade barriers; selected references. March 1939; Revised,
June 1940.

No. 2. The frozen food industry; selected references, January 1937 to
March 1939. April 1939.

No. 3. High drafting in cotton spinning; selected references. April 1939.

No. 4. Rgg auctions; selected references. July 1939.

No. 5. Acts administered by Agricultural Marketing Service. October 1939.

No. 6. Periodicals relating to shipping. October 1939.

No. 7. Electrical properties of cotton; some references to the literature,
1931-date. November 1939.

No. 8. Sea island cotton; selected references. November 1939.

No. 9. Cotton picking machinery; a short list of references. March 1940.

No.10. The tomato industry in Puerto Rico and Cuba; a short list of refer-
ences. June 1940.

No.11. The dairy industry in the United States; selected references on the
economic aspects of the industry. July 1940.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3li 1262 08926llhIiiL~II 1Nillllll!rIlll
3162 08926 6562



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