Variations in the composition and grade of cottonseed produced in the states of Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Te...

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Variations in the composition and grade of cottonseed produced in the states of Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee, seasons of 1934-35 to 1937-38
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United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Meloy, Guy Stanley, 1874-
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s.n. ( Washington, D.C. )
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UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


J UNIV OF FL LIB
j0 Q2ME 7 DEPTH



L S 'EPOSiTORN I


VARIATIONS IN THE COMPOSITION AND GRADE OF COTTONSEED
PRODUCED IN THE STATES OF
ARKANSAS, LOUISIANA, MISSISSIPPI, AND TENNESSEE,
SEASONS OF 1934-35 TO 1937-38


By G. S. Meloy,
Senior Marketing Specialist


Washington, D. C.
June 1939


Jn/,7?


1j-. 2: Csc
















VARIATIONS IN THE COMPOSITION AND GRADE OF COTTONSEED
PRODUCED IN THE STATES OF
ARKANSAS, LOUISIANA, MISSISSIPPI, AND TENIESSEE,
SEASONS OF 1934-35 to 1937-38




By G. S. Meloy, Senior Marketing Specialist





Cottonseed Quality Estimated

The cottonseed-crushing industry has grown rapidly since 1870.
In that year the industry consisted of 26 mills, which crashed only
about 2 or 3 percent of the seed produced. The crush had grown to
about a million tons, or 25 percent of the total production, by 1890;
and by 1914 more than 870 mills crushed more than five million tons,
or 80 percent of the seed produced.

During all of this period of rapid growth in the industry, at-
tention was centered on questions of processing technique and on im-
provements in the quality of the products of cottonseed. Little study
was given directly to the variable composition of the seed. Under
such conditions, it became the general practice for crushing mills to
estimate the average quality of the cottonseed occasionally during
each season and to base their purchase prices on such averages. In
addition, from time to time efforts were made by trade associations in
the industry to set up a basis for discounting, usually based on
adulteration or on exceptional spoilage.


Standard Grades Established

In 1925 the U. S. Department of Agriculture undertook- a study
of the subject. As a result, on May 23, 1932, the first standards of
the United States for the grading of cottonseed intended for crushing
were officially promulgated by the Secretary of Agriculture.

These standards provided not only a basis for equitable dis-
counts for off quality, but also a basis for equitable premiums for
superiority. A basis grade was established, of definite description
both as to the quantity of obtainable products and as to the condi-
tion-of the seed that would affect the costs of processing and the
quality of the products (appendix A).










-2-


Elemrents of mality in Cottonseed

The standard method of grading cottonseed is based, (i) on the
development of the seed, as indicated by the quantity of oil and
protein elaboraTed during growth, oil and protein being the two most
valuable cor'itituents; (2) onr. the deterioration that has token place
in the seed between the maturing of the bolls and the time of sale,
as indicated by the percentage of free fatty acids in the oil; and
(3) on the quantity of moisture and foreign matter, in deleterious
quantities, that have been absorbed by or incorporated in the seed be-
fore sale.

To measure the development of the seed constituents, a method
is provided for determining a quantity index. To measure the deterio-
ration and to take into account the excesses of moisture and foreign
matter, a method is provided for determining a quality index. To
determine the grade or relative value in relation to a base, a method
is provided for combining the quantity index with the quality index,
the result being the grad&. In practice, the grade is used as a value
index related to the price quoted at the time of sale for cottonseed
of the base grade.


Sampling and Analysis Standardized

The necessity for the accurate sampling of cottonseed and for
the accurate chemical analysis of the samples was recognized as a
problem precedent to the establishment of the standard grades. There-
fore, coincident '7ith the promulgation of the cottonseed standards,
approved methods were published for both the drawing and the handling
of samples and for the procedure to be followed in making chemical
analyses and calculating the grade of cottonseed, i/


lJ United States Department of Agriculture. Bureau of Agricultural
Economics. The official standards of the United States for the
grading, sampling, and analyzing of cottonseed sold or offered for
sale for crushing purposes. U. S. Dept. of Akrf. Service and
Regulatory Amnnouncements (B.A.E.) 133. 10pp. 1932.
Meloy, G. S. Development of standa-rds for grades of cottonseed.
31pp. United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricul-
tural Economics, 1935. (Mimeographod.)
United States Departnent of Agr-.culture. Bureau of Agricultural
Economics. Methods of drawing and preparing official samples of
cottonseed. For licensed cottonseed samplers. Approved by the Act-
ing chief... June 7, 1938. 4pp. 1938. (Mimeographed.)
United States Department of Agriculture. Bureau of Agricultural
Economics. Methods of chemical analysis and grade calculations for
cottonseed. For licensed cottonseed chemists. Approved...
June 7, 1938. llpp. 1938. (Mimeographed.)










-.3 -


First Amendment to Standard Grades

The cottonseed standards are what are known as pernmissive
standards in that it is optional whether they be used in the narket-
ing of cottonseed. Nevertheless, since their establishment a l&trgo
number of transactions in cottonpoedh.lve boon based on the stand-
ards. This has been particularly true in the cotton-prrducing
States in the Mississippi Valley. Each season since the establish-
mont of the standards, the grading of cottonseed has become more and
more popular as a marketing practice with producers, middlemen, adt!
managers of crushing mills. During the season of 1936-37, the number
of lots of cottonseed that were marketed on grade in the Misslssipp)i
Valley was practically double that for previous seasons (table 2).
Moreover, the premiums and discounts based on the grades as an index
of relative value, became increasingly important, especially in the
minds of the sellers of cottonseed. It. being demonstrated that full
grades were too broad, the standards were amended on July $0, 1937,
to provide for half grades (appendix B).


Supervision of Saiipling and Grading

Interest in the marketing of cottonseed became so keen that at
the beginning of the season of 1937-38 the Department of Agriculture
undertook the suocrvision of both the sampling and the grading of oall
cottonseed sold for crashing in the Mississippi Valley, including
that portion of Louisiana northeast of the Red River; Arkansas, except
that part contiguous to O01lahoma and Texas; Mississippi; Missouri;
Illinois; Kentuckr; and western Tennessee. This was done by means of
licensed and bondrd samplers and of licensed chloij itss. The work of
both was supervised by a corps of inspectors rcfif.-.rly cnployod by the
Department for tho purpose. Chemists1 licenses ',Lro issued only to
commercial and indLenorndent chemists %;ho could denonotr- te their ability
to analyze sa;rnpl,.q of cottonsoud accurately -.d :-.n-ho ajreo'.. to have
their laboratoritn supervised by qtilified agonts of tihe Department.

This official super-rision apparently gave !.11 p.-rties greater
confidence in the sruipling and gradirn, for the rmiber of lots of seed
that were sampled an-id :r.'iod that season was ire- tly increased--in
fact, was ai'ain practically doubled in some of the States.

The season of 1936-37 in the Mvississippi Vvliey ras c-i.racter-
izod as a late, wt. cnol. c-ring follo::od by ,t hot, r'ry sur.nr, fre-
quently of drought intnr.tii Tien c -.uc a ccJ.C, wet h-.rir.st season,
with a number of storms of hoa'ry rrociuii.: Lci.u n-. aw.vc:r:e condi-
tions of growth and harvest w7ore r.ist iit.&st In s.70Gte-:n -9naiossee and
were least severe in Louisiana. The adverse gro',ing conditions are
reflected in the quantity of oil elaborated in the seed; and the lad-
verse harvest conditions are reflected in the hig,-h percentage of in-
stances in which the quality index was lowered for cause. It is










-4-


interesting that although noirture excesses were high andi were found
in a large percentage of the lots of seed that -ereo :"raded, relative-
ly little deterioration in the oil was found, probably owing; to the
coolness of the harvest season. This is in contrast to tie season of
1937-38 when, with little or no excess seed noisture, but with con-
binations of high atno spheric tenperatures and humidity during the
harvest season, serious deterioration occurred in the oil.


Second Anendnent to Standard Grades

The cottonseed Iarketud in the Mi3.issippi Valley States dur-
ing the season of 1937-38 was of the poorest quality on record. The
intensity of the deterioration contrasted with that of the previous
season, ho.ecver, in that it was most severe in Ieuisiana anml contitg u-
ous counties in Mississippi and least severe in Tennessee. The con-
tinued rains and the warn, h'-mii weather during the harvest period
made it practically impossible to prevent spoilage. Many lots of cot-
tonseed were so badly decoLIposod whon offered for sale to the oil
mills, that it was not possible to process thom. In manyr instances it
was found that whoaen those seed wore grvlded according to the official
standards, the cra.des were no longer true indexes of relative value.
Since this conti:verncy had not been anticipated when the standards
were established, the standard.s were .again avnen'let on Juno 7, 1938, by
providing that all cottonseed which, upon analysis, were found so low
in quality as to result in a crade below 25, shoul.1 not be graded on
the standards but be left the subject of negotiation (appendix C). In
the early part of the 1937-38 season tne industry had recognized that
grade 25 iwas the ninimun that reDresented fair relative values and by
universal consent had adopted this notification in applying the
standards.


Analyses Reportoc to Departnent of Agriculture

Immediately Sfter the establishment of thu standards, in 1932,
arrangements had been nade by the Departnent of Agriculture with all
chemists, both co;.iercinl and private, whereby a copy of each cotton-
seed analysis and grade report, wher.n nm.ie accorlinj to tha official
standards, would be furnished the Dep-rtnent for its stud;,'.

Beinning with the season of 1934-.5, fairly co;pl3te records
have been kept of the factors of gra-deo of the cottonseed produced in
Arkansas, Louisia na., Mississippi, and Tennessee. In most instances
these data are available for each cotton-proilucing, county in these
States; but in this report, the data are i;iven on a State-wide basis
for the seasons of 1934-35, 1935-35, 1936-37, and 1937-38 (tables 1, 2,
3, and 4). In ad?-ition to the ;radle reports considered in these tables,
other reports were received, giving the analysis and grade of seed be-
lieved to have been grovn in Arkansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, or










-5-


Tennessee, but these data were so incomplete with respect to point of
origin of the seed in question, that it was thought best to. omit then
from the tables. There were 900 of these reports for 1534-35, nore
than 1,800 reports for 1935-36, and 787 reports for 1936-37, All
reports for the season of 1937-38 contained the identification of the
State and county in which the seed were produced. A tabulation of the
omitted data from these reports has been nade, but they are not in-
cluded herewith, since it was found that they would make no material
change in the results as given.

Although the seasonal variations and the averages of the grades
are of interest for general comparisons, it is believed that, from the
producers standpoint, the distribution of the grades are of even
greater interest. Such data are extended in tables 5, 6, 7, and 8;
but, since the bulk of the graded lots was classified between grade 80
and grade 120, all lots falling below 80 in grade are grouped. Pro-
ducers should be particularly interested in the evidence that, in
spite of seasonal difficulties that result in reducing the general
quality of the cottonseed, a large number of shipments sold each nonth
of each season had been sm carefully harvested and handled as to be
classified in the prenmiun grades.

For the information of those, who nmay wish to estimate the'
quantity of cottonseed covered by these reports, it nay be said that
each sample presumably represents an average carlet or its equivalent;
that is to say, approximately 25 tons of cottonseed.


Explanation of Tables

In brief explanation ef the tables, it nay be pointed out that
the yields of oil and cake given are the expected yields under stand-
ardoauacturing efficiency. Actual 71yields, therefore, nay be slightly
lightly less than the figures given in the tables; but the averages
are believed to be fairly close to the actual averages.

Referring to table 1, it will be seen, for example, that in
Arkansas 305 lots of cottonseed were sampled and graded during the
month of August 1934. The oil content varied front 14.2 percent to 21.1
percent and averaged 17.65 percent. The yields of oil varied, front 224
pounds to 366 pounds and averaged 294 pounds per ton of seed. The an
nonia varied front 3.04 percent to 4,48 percent and averaged 3.77 per-
cent which when converted into protein represented 15.63 percent, 23.03
percent, and 19,38 percent protein respectively, Fron these oamnonia
contents it is possible to produce cake of 41.13 percent protein conw
tent, ranging front 714,1 pounds to 1052,8 pounds and averaging 885,9
pounds per ton of seed. According to the official standards, the
quantity index varied front 82.2 to 109.5 and averaged 98.22. The
quality index of 148 lots was lowered for Cause. These were divided
as to cause as follows: 7 lots were found to contain excesses of free


_________ 'Ii










-6-


fatty acids in the oil, one lot containing 13.1 percent of free fatty
acids and averaging 4.14 percent, resulting in an average reduction in
the quality indexes of the 7 lots of 11.70 units for this cause; 143
lots contained nore than 12 percent moisture, the highest moisture
content being 20.4 percent, and the quality indexes of these 143 lots
being reduced an average of 2.77 units because of excesses of moisture;
3 lots contained more than 3 percent foreign matter; the foreign
matter content in one of these lots being 11.2 percent, and the average
reduction in the quality indexes of the 3 lots, because of foreign
matter, being 3.50 units. It is evident that the quality indexes of
at least 5 of'the 148 lots were reduced for two or more causes.

Out of the 305 lots that were smnpled and graded, 7 were classi-
: field as of Superior Quality. The range of the'grades was from 48 to
.110, and the average of the grades was 96.6.

The number of lots of cottonseed that were sampled, analyzed,
and graded increased materially as soon as the Department of Agri-
culture undertook the supervision of the sampling and grading. In
Arkansas (table 1) the number'of lots tht'itere sampled and graded rose
from 10,093 in the season of 1934-35 to 15,748 in 1937-38. In Louisi-
ana, tho number was 2,220 in the season of 1934-35 and 8,577 in the
season of 1937-38 (table 2). In Mississippi, 12,760 lots were sampled
and graded during the season of 1934-35, contrasted with 36,445 lots
; during the season of 1937-38 (table 3). In Tennessee 5,477 lots were
graded during the season of 1934-35 contrasted with 7,105 lots during
the season of 1937-38 (table 4).

SUI&AARIZING STATEMENT: "

Both the ranges and the averages for oil and amnmohio. contents of
cottonseed varied from month to month and from season to season in each
of the States included in this'study as shown in text and.tables.
These variations resulted in variations in recoverable oil of more than
250 pounds and in cake (of 41.13 percent protein) of more than 500
pounds per ton of seed processed.

The reduction in the quality index of the various lots of cotton-
seed sold on the basis of grade during the Woason of 1936-37 was great-
est in'Tennessee and least in Louisiana; in contrast with the season of
1937-38, when it was greatest in Louisiana and least in.Tennessee.

In Tennessee and Arkansas, the grade of cottonseed is lowered
most frequently because of excesses of moisture and foreiTn matter;
whereas in Louisiana and Mississippi and in Southeastern Arkansas, the
Greatest reductions in grade are caused by excesses of free fatty acids
in the oil in the seeds

The tables giving the distributions of the grades show that the
grades of cottonseed produced become progressively lower as the season










- 7-


progresses, particularly during, the seasons of 1936-37 annl 1937-38 in
the States of Arkansas,. Louisiana, and Mississippi. They sho\ also
that, regardless of generally unfavorable seasonal conditions during
harvest, many shipments of seed are so carefully handled that they
are classified in the preniun grades when offered for sale. This is
notable in Mississippi where the average grade of the seed marketed
each nonth feloil below basis rapidly during the season of 1937-38, be-
ginning with November. Durrinr October, out of 8,405 shipu onts, 5,408
were classified in the prenmiun grades; and the average grade of all
ihipn ents was 100.4, or four-tenths abovo basis. During November,
out of 5,422 shipments, 2,434 rere of premium grades, and thb avornco
grado of all shipments was 94.3. During December, out of 4,285 ship-
mnents, 651 were found in the premiun grados; -and the aversire grade of
all shipments was 85.5. Even during Fobr.unry, when the average rade
of 2,600 shipnonts was 72.3, or 27.7 units below basis, 182 shipments
were classified in the premnlun grades.









Appendix A
-8-


ORDER OF PROMULGATION


PUBLIC NOTICE ESTABLISHING THE GRADES, METHODS OF SAMPLING,
ANALYZING, AND GRADING COTTONSEED SOLD OR OFFERED FOR
SALE FOR CRUSHING PURPOSES WITHIN THE UNITED STATES

I
By virtue of the authority vested in the Secretary of Agriculture
by the act of Congross entitled "An act making appropriations for the
Department of Agriculture for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1932, and
for other purposes," approved February 23, 1931 (Public, No. 717, 71st
Cong.), I, Arthur l. Hyde, Secretary of Agriculture, do hereby fix,'
establish, and pronulgate the following standards of class, quality, and
condition for cottonseed, which shall become the official standards 6f
the United States for the grnding and analysis of cottonseed sold or of-
fered for sale for crushing purposes, on the 1st day of June, 1932, and
be in force and effect as long as Conress shall provide the necessary
authority therefore, unless amended or superseded by standards hereafter
proscribed and promulgated under such authority.

SECTION 1. The grade of cottonseed shall be determined from the
analysis of samples, and it shall be the result, stated as the nearest
whole number without fractions, obtained by multiplying a quantity in-
dex by a quality index, as hereinafter provided.
(a) The basis grade of cottonseed shall be grade 100.
(b) High grades of cottonseed shall be those grades above 100.
(c) Lou grades of cottonseed shall be those grades below 100.

SEC. 2. The following equations shall be used in determining
the quantity index of cottonseed:
(a) For cottonseed, that by analysis contain not less than 17
per cent of oil, thi quantity index shall equal 4 tines the percentage
of oil, plus 6 tines the percentage of ammonia, plus 5.
(b) For cottonseed, that by analysis contain less than 17 per
cent oil, the quantity index shall ecual 5 tines the percentage of oil,
plus 6 tines the percentage of oaumonia, ninus 12.

SEC. 3. The quality index of cottonseed shall be a percentage
of purity and soundness, and shall be determined as follows:
(a) Superior quality cottonseed.--Cottonseed that, by analysis,
contain less than one-half per cont foreign uattor, and nore than 8 per
cent but less than 10 per cent moisture, and less than three-fourths
per cent free fatty acids in the oil in the seed shall be Imkown as
superior quality cottonseed and shall have a quality index of 102 per
cent.
(b) Prime quality cottonseed.--Cottonseed that, by analysis,
contain not nore than 3 per cent foreign natter, not more than 12 per
cent moisture, and not more than 1,8 per cent free fatty acids in the
oil in the seed, shall be mo'rn as prime quality cottonseed and shall
have a quality index of 100 per cent.







- 9 -


(c) Subquality cottonseed.--Cottonsdod that, by analysis, contain
foreign matter, moisture, and/or free fatty acids in the oil in the seed
in excess of the percentages shown in section 3-b, or arc seed from seed
cotton that has been processed in a boll breaker, or other device for
preparing snapped cotton or bollies for ginning, shall be known as sub-
quality cottonseed; and the quality index of such cottonseed shall be
found by reducing the quality index of prime quality cottonseed as
follows:
(1) Not to exceed five-tenths of a unit for each 0.I1 per
cent of free fatty acids in the oil in the seed in excess of 1.8
per cent; provided that this reduction shall not exceed 50 units
of the quality id:ex of prine quality cottonseed.
(2) Not to exceed I unit for each 1 per cent of foreign
matter in excesn of 3 per cent.
(3) Not to exceee4 1 -nit fop each 1 par cent of moisture in
excess of 12 poe cent.
(4) Not to exced. 8 unite when the age cotton has been
processed as maqpod cotton or bellies before ginning.

(d) Off quality cottonseed.-Cottonseed that have been treated
by either mechanical or chemical process other than the usual cleaning,
drying, and ginning (except such sterilization as nay be required by
the United States Department of Ariqulture for quarantine purposes) or
that are hot or fermented, or that upon analysis are found to contain
more than 25 per cent foreiMn matter, o0 more than 25 per cont moisture,
or more than 40 per cent conblaed poistire and foreign matter, shall be
known as off quality cottonseeod a a ny not be graded.

SEC. 4. Sampling of cottonseed.--In the application of these
standards the following methods shall be observed in the drawing and
handling of samonples of cottonseed.
(a) Sampling before unloading.-Portions shall be drawn at dif-
ferent points in each end and in the middle of the car with a suitable
cottonseed trier or sampling device. In drawing sqnples with a trier,
cross sections shall be taken from the top to the bottom of the car, if
possible, In the absence of a trier, holes shall be dug at various
points at least 30 inches deep with a small (8-tino) fork and portions
taken from the bottom and sides of these holes.
(b) Sampling during unloading.-For this purpose the sampler
shall be provided with a suitable receptacle which ho shnll place in the
center of the unloading chute at regular intervals, as the seed are be-
ing ejected from the car, to receive portions of the seed.
Whether drawn before or during unloaving, the several portions
drawn from car lots shall total not less thnn 50 pounds in weight.
(c) Sanpling of truck or wagon seed.--In drawinr- samples of truck
or wagon loads of cottonseed, the sone methods shall be used as in sanmpl-
ing car lots before unloading. The total weight of the portion drawn
shall be not less than 2 1/2 pounds for each ton of sooed in the load.
(d) Handling samploes.--Samplers shall be provided with metal con-
tainers with close-fitting covers large enough to hold 60 or 70 pounds of
cottonseed. Each portion of a sonmple as drawn shall be immediately
placed in such a receptacle and the cover promptly replaced. Aa soon as









-10-


the full snnple has been- takon it shall be carefully weighed, then
cleaned of foreign natter, and carefully roweighed. The loss in weight.
shall be calculated as foreign natter. After the sample is cleaned the
seed shall be nixed either by moneans of a suitable mechanical mixer or
by heaping together and nixing by passing the hands or a small shovel
up through the hoap, repiling and spreading by pressin. Finally not
les' than 2 quarts shall be packed in an air-tight tin can or Mason Jar
and sent to the laboratory for analysis and. grading. All cleaning, nix-
ing, and handling of samples shall be done expeditiously and without un-
due exposure.

SEC. 5. Analysis.-The methods for analyzing cottonseed rocon-
nended front tine to tine by the interburoau committee of this department
on standard methods of sampling and analyzing cottonseed shall be used.

In testimony thereof I have hereunto set my hand and
(SEAL) caused the official seal of the Department of Agriculture
to be affixed in the City of Washington, this 23d day of
May 1932.


s) ARTHUR M. HYDE

Secretary.


(S. P. A.-B, A. E. 133)


(Issued Au/-ust, 1932)






Appendix B
11 -


PUBLIC NOTICE ESTABLISHING STANDARDS FOR GRADES OF
COTTONSEED SOLD OR OFFERED FOR SALE FOR
CRUSHING PURPOSES WITHIN THE UNITED STATES


By virtue of the authority vested in the Secretary of Agriculture
by the Act of Congress entitled "An act making appropriations for the
Department of Agriculture for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1938,
and for other purposes," (Public No. 173, 75th Congress), I,
M. L. Wilson, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, do hereby fix, establish,
and promulgate the following official standards of the United States
for grades of cottonseed sold or offered for sale for crushing purposes,
the same to supersede the standards for6QtRsOOd promulgated May 23,
1932, and to be in force and effect as/ mgress shall provide the neces-
sary authority therefore, unless onmended or superseded by standards here-
after prescribed and promulgated under such authority.

SECTION 1. The grade of cottonseed shall be determined from the
analysis of samples, and it shall be the result, stated in the nearest
whole or half numbers, obtained by multiplying a quantity index by a
quality index and dividing the result by 100 as hereinafter provided.
(a) The basis grade of cottonseed shall be grade 100.
(b) High grades of cottonseed shall be those grades above 100.
(c) Low grades of cottonseed shall be those grades belorr 100.

SEC. 2. The following foanulae shall be used in determining the
quantity index of cottonseed:
(a) For cottonseed, that by analysis contain 17 per cent of oil
or more, the quantity index shall equal 4 times the percentage of oil,
plus 6 times the percentage of amnnonia, plus 5.
(b) For cottonseed, that by analysis contain less than 17 per
cent oil, the quantity index shall equal 5 tines the percentage of oil,
plus 6 times the percentage of ar.imonia, minus 12,

SEC. 3. The quality index of cottonsueed shall be a percentage
of purity and soundness, and shall be determined as follows:
(a) Superior quality cottonseed.--Oottonseed that, by analysis,
contain not less than 18.7 per cent oil, nor more than one-half of mno
per cent foreign matter, 8 per cent but not more than 10.0 per cent
moisture, and not nore than one-half of one per cent free fatty acids
in the oil in the seed shall be known as superior quality cottonseed
and shall have a quality index of 102.
(b) Prime quality cottonseed.--Cottonseed that, by analysis,
contain not more than 3 per cent foreign matter, not more than 12 per
cent moisture, and not more than 1.8 per cent free fatty acids in the
oil in the seed, shall be known as prime quality cottonseed and shall
have a quality index of 100 per cent.
7c) Subquality cottonseed.--Cottonseed that, by analysis, con-
tain foreign matter, moisture, and/or free fatty acids in the oil in
the seed'in excess of the percentages shown in section 3-b, shall be
known as sub-quality cottonseed; and the quality index of such cotton-







- 12-


seed shall be found by reducing the quality index of prime quality cot-
tonseed as follows:
(1) Not to exceed five-tenths of a unit for each 0.1 per
cent of free fatty acids in the oil in the seed in excess of 1.8
per cent.
(2) Not to exceed 1 unit for each 1 per cent of foreign
-matter in excess of 3 per cent.
(3) Not to exceed 1 unit for each 1 per cent of noisturo
in excess of 12 per cent.

(d) Off quality cottonseed.--Cottonseed that have been treated
by either mechanical or chemical process other than the usual cleaning,
drying, and ginning (except such sterilization as nay be required by
the United States Department of Agriculture for quarantine purposes) or
that are "hot" or fermented, or that upon' analysis are found to contain
13 per cent or more free fatty acids in the oil, or more than 25 per
cent foreign matter, or more than 25 per cent moisture, or more than 40
per cent combined moisture and foreign matter, shall be designated as
"Off Quality Cottonseed, approximate grlau o."

SEC. 4. Sanjpling, analysis, and certification of samples and
grades.--The drawing and preparation and certification of samples of
cottonseed and the analysis and certification of grades of cottonseed
shall be performed in accordance With methods approved frnn time to tine
by the Chief of the Bureau of agricultural Economics.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the
official seal of the Department of A,;riculture to bo affixed in the City
of Washington, this 30th day of July, 1937.


(SEAL) (s) 14.. L. WILSON.
Acting Secretary.
















(F. R. Doc. 37-2430; Filed, July 30, 1937; 12:31 p.m.)
(Taken from Federal Register, July 31, 1937,
pp. 1611-12.)






Appendix C
~- 13 -


UNITED STATES DWARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Washington, D. C.

Public Notice Establishing Standards for Grades of
Cottonseed Sold or Offered for Sale for Crush-
ing Purposes Within the United States.

By virtue of the authority vested in the Secretary of Agriculture
by the Act of Congress entitled "An Act waking appropriations for the
* Department of Agricultare for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1938,
S* *and for other purposes" (Public No, 1.73, 75th Congress), I,
H, A. Wallace, Secretary of Agriculture do hereby fix, establish, and
promulgate the following official standanfe of the United States for
grades of cottonseed sold or offered for s ole for crushing purposes the
same to supersede the standards for cottonseod promulgated July 30,
1937, 1/ and to be In torce and effect as long as Congress shall provide
the necessary authority therefore, unless amended or superseded by
standards hereafter prescribed and promulgated under such authority,

SECTION 1, The grade of cottonseed shall be determined from the
analysis of samples, and it shall be the result, stated in the nearest
whole or half numbers, obtained by nUltiplying a quantity index by a
quality index and dividing the result by 100 as hereinafter provided.
(a) The basis grade of cottonseed shall be grade 100.
(b) High grades of cottonseed shall be those grades above 100.
(c) Low grades of cottonseed shall be those grades below 100.
SEC. 2. The following formulae shall be used in determining the
quantity index of cottonseed:
(a) For cottonseed that by analysis contain 17 percent or more
of oil, the quantity index shall equal 4 tines the percentage of oil,
plus 6 tines the percent of nemonia, plus 5.
(b) For cottonseed that by analysis contain less than 17 percent
oil, the quantity index shall equal 5 tines the percentage of oil, plus
6 tines the percentage of annonia, ninus 12.

SEC, 3. The quality index of cottonseed shall be an index of
purity and soundness, and shall be deterninod as follows:
(a) Superior quality cottonseed.--Cottonseed that, by analysis,
contain not less than 18.7 percent oil, nor more than one-half of one
percent foreign matter, 8 percent but not more than 10.0 -ercent nois-
ture, and not more tLhan one-half of one percent free fatty acids in the
oil in the seed shall be known as superior quality cottonseed and shall
have a quality index of 102.
(b) Prime quality cottonseed.--Cottonseed that, by analysis,
contain not noro than 3 percent foreign matter, not more than 12 per-
cent moisture, and not more than 1a8 percent free fatty acids in the
eoil in the seed, shall be known as prine quality cottonseed and shall*
have a quality index of 100.

S2 F. R. 1608 (nDI)







- 14 -


(c) Subquality.cottonseed,--The quality index of cottonseed
that, by analysis, contain foreign matter, moisture, and/or free fatty
acids in the oil in the seed in excess of the percentages shown in
section 3-b shall be found by reducing the quality index of prime
quality cottonseed as follows:
(1) Not to exceed five-tenths of a unit for each 0.1 per-
J cent of free fatty acids in the oil in the seed in excess of
1.8 percent.
(2) Not to exceed 1 unit for each 1 percent of foreign
matter in excess of 3 percent.
(3) Not to exceed 1 unit for each 1 percent of moisture
in excess of 12 percent,
Such cottonseed shall be kngwn as subquality cottonseed,
except as hereinafter provided.
*e
(d) Off quality cottonseed.--Cottonseed tnat have been treated
by either mechanical or chemical process other than the usual cleaning,
drying, and ginnirng (except such sterilization as nay be required by
the United States Department of Agriculture for quarantine purposes) or
that are fermented and hot, or that upon analysis are found to contain
12 percent or more free fatty acids in the oil, or more than 10 percent
foreign matter, or more than 18 percent moisture, or more than 25 per-
cent combined moisture and foreign matter, shall be designated as Off
Quality Grade.
(e) Below grade cottonseed.--Cottonseed the grade of which when
calculated according to section 3-c above is below Grade 25 shall be
designated as "Below Grade Cottonseed." A grade shall not be indicated.

SEC. 4. Sampling, analysis, and certification of samples and
grades.--The drawing and preparation and certification of samples of
cottonseed and the analysis and certification of grades
of cottonseed shall be performed in accordance with methods approved
from tine to tine by the Chief of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set ny hand and caused the
official seal of the Department of Agriculture to be affixed, in the
City of Washington, this 7th day of June 1938.


(SEAL) (s) H. A. WALLACE.,
Secretary







(F. R. Doc. 38-1600; Filed, June 7, 1938; 12:37 p.m.)
(From Federal Register, Volume 3, Number 111, June 8, 1938, pp. 1343-44).


























, i I
4 43 58
4.3D 3.79


16}20.5 11.47
15.6 16, 75
S. 9 21.9 19.09
13.0 2.I 17.50
11 1 21.e x6.76
12.4 20.7 16.66
12.1 2D.?l 16.60
19.6 16.?7

16.:3 16 15
16.9 Sa.9 17.90
li.9 11.9 la.90


269 350 3
Z 370 31.0
1 35? 323.6
373 293.0
167 36 276.2
19, 359 276.2
191 33 276.4
222 310 266.0
38 311 3130


4.10 3.66
14.32 3,66


4.17 3.60
4.10 3.61
4.36 3,69
4.11 3.65


3.91 3.91


U. 6.~~~~~ 6 .6,


963.5 660,1 91.1 110.5 100,B4 10
1015.2 60.1 9. 3 112.2 101.96 1b06
1017.5 676.5 63.2 115.9 103.74 560
1010.5 646,0 73.1 112.5 96.60 1,977
9.9 946.o bO03 111.3 93.140 1,447
l.| l83 7. 109.7 9,26 l97
10214.6 667.1 b9.6 107.5 914.114 |
962.3 657.7 71.1 06.3 93.50 7
9D,6 6148.3 79.5 90.6 90.41 5
975.2 1S7 81:3 1 6079 04 5
918.4,6 9 16, 1 104 1 9 I0


16.5 a1.5
14.1 20,9
13.5 21.0
13.6 20.4
12.7 19.5
n.6 19.6
14.1 19,6
14.7 20.6
114.5 19.2
15.1 21.1
16.5 .o


wC0 1936-37


4.46 3.92
14.514 3:60
14.50 3.62
14.75 3.62
4.46 3.79
14313
1437 3.6
4.00 3.69
4.00 3.70
4.16 3.714
4.36 3.67


T75,5 1046.1 921.2
.0 1066.9 693.0
W.3 1J.95 *97,7
730.9 1113 97,7
723,8 1052.6 690.6
761.4 1012.8 663,6
770.6 1026.4 667.1
71.3 923.5 667.1
796,0 940.0 669.5
060,o 977.6 768.
817. 1024.6 909,z


113.SB
Ill.iH
lll.6
7.
111.18
109,96
107.30
10?.08
109.96


110.92


lo4.68
99.16
0.12
97.142
97.140

967.2*
100.60
100.26
99,lt





100,.ll


5
MT

1.279
45a
209
12
42
22
7
13


2.1 -
12.1 1.6
0.6 1.1
2LO 16

242..9
t 1.95


10.0 11:1
20.0 {6
5.9 2.9


I
1

1
I

I
1
1


b7.5 113.5 104.6
60o0 o i.o 991 6
O.5 113.0 96.6
71.0 110.0 97.0
54.0 107.5 9.1
50.0 107.0 ;.1
y. t 106.5 9C

.4.0 103.0 6.6
a.5 1031100.9 0
44.5 107.0 %10
-.o i. li


3WONo 1937-39

"c1ut l 15.1 2D.0 18.10 242 345 305.0 2.79 4.01 3.M 655.6 9142,3 617. S 3.774 104,56 9.26 31 2 3.9 9.00 30 20,5 3.09 1 6.9 3.90 77.0 105.5 914.1
ft-bou 1,7M 13-. 22.0 13.3 222 363 309.4 2.65 4.40 3.55 622.6 1034.0 834.2 75.30 116.92 99.55 2,131 300 17.0 3.36 2,076 24 1 3 3 5.0 0.7 1 6 2.a. 117.0 57.3
Oob 4,240 15.6 220 1907 254 304 371 714 1022.2 871. 2.2 115.26 1.54 1.672 276 10.5 5.53 1.477 9 0 6 16.7 1 00 44.0 115.5 102.8
Sm1w 2.624 13-6 22-5 19-2 20 W 32-6 3.29 4- 3 S 770t.6 1041.o 5.3.6 77 U5.76 0 1.6 T9 43 10.5 7.T 45 1 5.6 o.6 o1 0 -.9 I.ST 56.5 115.5 102.9
d r a.11 14. 21.7 18.52 23- 376 32,24 3.12 432 36 .67 83.a i0i .o6 .i ao 5 15.0 6. 6.6 12.o4 .1 i5.o' .so ia 1. 4 i.i 27 2.01 1 96.0 111.5 7
JIamUr 1,569 1.2 307 11 .29 3.62 7t 1 .1 50 .6 1 o 99.6o 1.3 51 27.5 1266 14, 21.6 2.02 569 20.2 2.24 .. 1114. 9
z ei~ II.6 ]O 3.11 i4.29l ] 1 7, 3 a e16 11.0 ggt 13
riu*r1 13.7 21-4 a. 5 216 a 6 '322-2 3,214 14,19 3.64 76l.' 9814.6 655.4 76.60 n4.514 io1, 635 5614 35*5 21,.k 52L92 19.4 1 3 16 2. 26 12 1.6*3 1114.5 5.7
Mi-ob 15X1 21,2 16.69 243 365 315.6 3.25 4.18 3.67 T63.7 962.3 662.1 5.914 S+.54 101.7T 277 272 35.5 299.0 a14 17.3 1,09 111 .1 3-45 1 .o. 110.0 62.141
Apri 169 I7.2 21. 19.1 2514 33 35.0 3.22 4.03 3.70 756.7 9147.0 669.5 96.90 112.46 10 114,1 137 33.0 26.-2 TO A145 0.90 31 19.4 5.36 6 0. 1 0,0 623
S1 16.9 a.1 278 372 330.6 3.27 .21 3.69 766.4 969.14 s67T1 96,31 112.91 104.90 a2 g9 11.0 11.06 7 14.2 0.61 7 1.9 411 n .5 113.0 99:1
A-. ION 16.5 21.2 19.421 270 366 330.4 3.35 1422 3.72 7.7,2 991.7 6714.2 914114 111. 105.0o 63 63 12.5 9.66 14 12. 0.14 6 2 2.02 T.0 111.5 993
J l 0 17.7 21.2 19.10 292 366 330 1.337 4.29 3.T7l 791.9 1008.2 T71.6 98.54 111.66 106.46 j9 9 3.! 4.9 11.5 1.5 91. 109.5-1.9

Alston
1934-35 10.093 4.0 21 16.17 366 303.14 3.0 4.59 3.91 705.0 107, 916.6 6.5 113.0 101.14 2,937 297 3.6 7.60 2671 20.14 1.46 405 14.9 2.36 24 3 113 IM.
193-36 10.66 11 2.9 1.01 6 362 302.6 2.60 1.36 3.65 656.0 1024.6 657,7 60.3 115.9 99.06 ?.25 51 6.6 4.62 5,102 22.4 1.74 690 4 2-.14 71 11s 96.0
1936-37 .13761 11.6 .5179 177 371 296,1 3.00 1475 3.61 705.0 1116., 695.3s 65.66 113.50 99.02 14557 41 22.0 10.301 3:954 30.2 1.2 933 34.6 2.59 2 3 113.5 96.1
yfr 'j~fJ15 22.5 1a.a 3 1 6 394 316.6 2.65 4.43 3.66 b22.6 104.10 660.1 68.66 116.92 101.5S 6,6 3 4 5,5 1. 6 7,3.6 2145 2.1, 3..7 1.3T 90 11 3.C6. 117.0 100.01
193-39L3OT 3. 3-5 3-Q 7 36 4-1 2-6 15013n. 2.7u1 9


Alipse


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mispo
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aOtele
Nov or



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prU 0
a 0
Ja. 6
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15-7 tj is





17.0 214. 19.10
16-3 20.7 16-6
17.0 21.1 1$."




18.0 a1.1 19.10


15314-35
r I .-~ --


316.0
319-8
317,14
321.8
317.2
3M15
p5.6


3M 383 3& 1 $0.30 3.91 340


05.0 1OZ2.2 M95I 9e
709.7 1031,.6 890.6 9.

719.1 1003.14 593-0 91.9
7sc,6 1A5,7 198.3 M.I1
893.0 96..2 940.0 00. 5



7.5 535,3 C69.5 99.9


110.0
111.5
108.4l
112-3
1*6.6


102.50
103-50
103.14
103.9n

103.04
10.12


112 4 103.60


6.0 11.25



5.0 4.15
33.0 13:75
4.0 11.00


1 6.0 21.00


- 11. -


9 6.1 1.71
* 4.4 0.90




8.3 -j


-MSC 1935-36


n16.8 103.6 g66.,
705.0 1010,5 861.3
7233.. 10341, 904.7
702.6 99614 907.1

514.3 1031. *h97.7
773.1 556.8 935.3
T12.0 951.7 876.5
89553 932.9 9IS8,

9 1.7 .T8O7
W6.0 SBB.9 n*4


B5.1 in.0
6.3 1182.3
9D.,7 114.2
9D.5 110.1
56.5 2O ,i




11117 105.1
108 110,3


99732 171

1 02. l



101.82 2
102.26 1


13 2.6 8237 11 22.14 .91
14 4:5 3:37 176 17.5 1.19
23 6s 5.06 17 17.0 0o.5
to 14.0 7,.76 4 13.8 055
2T 6.0 5.I0 15 22.0 3-00

S 3.1 5.50 1 12.4 0.40
3 80 128.00 ii.7 -


t 376 1-2.0 11, 1 X.19 260 380
ob 1,|M 1'4.4 217 .2 9 379
or, I2140 2.5 19.688 31 375
Wa 1. 2.1 is.0 61 36

bi 391 14.7 21.4 1 85 37 373
w Mj 16.9 2M 19.66 278 387
1 3 17.9 19.2 IA ) 300 6

0
3 16.9 19-. 19-47 3M- 0
7 16.719.7T18., 278 336


399
70


*Wt
$apt*.%r

JOeTe
o-asor


Aprtrur


310 311 310.0
350 363 357.0


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- I.O












muuza11M oournin. OcMOSInI An a EIa


SMASON 19314-35


n16.8 951.7 813.1
695.6 1012.9 841.3
7142.6 996.4 867.1
737.9 982.3 883.6
763.7 979.9 883.6
787.2 970.5 876.5
808.4 940.0 8711.2
822.5 837.7 850.7

827.2 897.7 867.1
110.7 949.4 895.3
761.k 9149.4 87.2
11775.5 818.9 816.6


110,3 10.28
111.4 103.216
110.9 103l.10
111.3 103.:6
110.4 101.92
110.0 103.98
110.7 103.76
106.0 103.36

109.2 105.46
106.9 103.30
116.2 10.20


1644
1296
538
271
118
47
4

14
18
I


sEAuon 1935-36


6 351 3o6.6
S375 315.6
272 37 321.6
200 372 311.0

252 365 308.0
256 s87 311.0
268 364 31-.6
273 341 304.6
286 326 310.8
285 38 327.2
287 364 323.8
M86 A 1 125-


2.96 4.37 3.56 695.6 1026.9 836.6 86.3
2.78 4.28 3.64 653.3 1005.6 855.4 58.3
2.94 4.27 3.80 6'.9 r,3.-1 893.1 92.9
3.00 4.26 3.78 705.0 lC'1.1 8"8.3 72.4

3.15 1.21 -.76 710.3 q84.L 88}.6 18.9
2.99 4,23 3.CO 702O4 9*-0 8)13.0 86.2
3.40 4.20 3.82 791.0 987.0 8917.7 6.
3.53 4.18 3.69 829.5 982.3 911'.1 9b.3

3.75 4.06 3.93 883. 954.1 923.5 98.0
3.20 41.08 3-6.9 752.0 958. 8bT7.l 59.1
3 4.12 3.77 775.5 968.2 885.9 97.6
ll. ii 80.1 972.9 8'.I 7.1


109.6 99.08
110.1 101.76
114.8 103.92
110.4 101.68

110.3 100.96
110.5 101.60
109.2 101.14
108.0 o101.26

106.4 102.74
1131, 104.18
113.2 10-.18
1101.4 104.112


3.9 .014 415 20.7 3.36
7.5 3.5 1589 20.7 1.114
8.5 3.96 96 15.3 0.59
8.0 5.57 370 21.0 1.20

5.0 5.99 t6I 14.8 0.91
8.0 6.5b 47 16.3 0.78
5.0 6.04 13 13.5 o.61
4.4 7.46 7 13.2 0.61

2.2 2.00 11.9 -
11.0 6.50 11.2 -
8.5 9.02 11.7 -
10 I" l l _1 11-I


19 20.5 0.66 4 10 96.1
96 16.6 %.o1 56 112 01.4
S 41.5 2.69 1396 62 115 104.1
56 42.6 1.86 189 55 112 101.1

50 39.8 1.75 59 49 113 100.1
12 28.2 3.96 19 59 113 100.1
U.2 1.52 6 77 111 t100.
27.4 6.90 66 106 99.1
1.7 96 to6 102.t
2.8 6 92 113 1011.1
13 72 115 103.;
1 1.1 0.o 1 91 112 104.1


- r I -T


16.3 21.0 18.23
15.3 21.1 18.5o
12.1 22.0 18.31
11k.o0 21.6 18.33

A.4 20.6 18.21
15.0 20.4 18.26
15.1 20.2 11.42
15.0 1.2 18.20

15.1 19.4 18.12
16.; 19.8 18.13
17.0 20.7 18.77
17.6 20.3 18.51L



15.9 20." 18.18
14.5 22.7 18.61
11.9 22.2 19.1#
15.6 22.4 19.36

15.1 a.? 19-00
.0 21.7 11.75
15.5 21.5 18.F7
15.2 21.8 18.92

15.6 21.5 18.70
15.2 22z.3 19.01
16.5 23.5 19.)a


26? 363 3o6.6
246 319 311.0
183 386 307.8
222 376 307.b

229 551 305.2
242 351 306.2
242 348 310.41
239 361 305.0
2.2 332 303.4
26. 339 309.6
280 359 316.14
.M 5o0 310.2



261 353 313.6
21 395 315.2
3 386 326.8
252 393 328.-2
112 377 322.0
236 376 317.0
S373 319.4
IT 1 37 1 319:4

250 373 315.0
244 387 321.2
268 410 33)2.6
o0 178 1M2.6


j.1 4.0o 3.69
3-' 4,61 3.7j
3.16 4.79 3.71
2.98 4.-38 3.75

3.12 U1.a 3.76
3.23 L.'2 3.75
). 22 U.6 3.71
3..29 Lb.-e 3.73

3.33 4-.20 3.7IL
1.5 1.07O 3.78
3.28 4.33 3.73
1.48 4.01 3.81



2.90 0.41 3.1.5
2.61 4-2; 3.4
3.04 43.;6 3.71
2.09 4.57 3.74
3.00 k4.4 3.72
3.00 4.28 ).71c
3.02 4.30 3.19
3.25 4.38 3.7b

3.25 4.23 3.77
3.22 A.37 3.79
3.e 4.29 3.71
1-3 4.3 3I .7T


7.03 958.8 867.1
7111.0 10o3}.4 76.5
712.0 1125.7 868.9
700.3 1029.3 1. 2

733.2 989.4 853.6
r'7-. 991.7 881.2
756.7 10211.6 an.8
73.1 10i5.11 876.5
78 .5 97.-1 876.9
810o.7 95Lt. 88M.3
770.5 1013.5 888.3
81.i .117.0 90).0



41.' 1003b.4 81C.7
Q1. 991.1 91-1. 3
61 G10 ^.6 871.9
702.6 1 8.71.0 87,9

705.0 99b.1 8711.2
705.0 1.5.8 eb9.-,
7r.7 101 2.8 667.1
7E3.7 1029.3 8j3.6

7b).7 10l)5.8 85.9
7c.. 7 1026.9 d80.6
M4.5 1008. 185.3
8031.7 1011.6 88,.9


SIA 1936-37

91.60 110.10 10,).Or
8-.58 113.2-u 1013.38
811.12 112.12 1.,0.1II
0.1.4 111.68 100.62
82.56 109.54 100.40
55.08 108.o8 130.51.
35.07 108.03 100.94
371.48 116.44 96.18

87.90 10.114 91.92
93.32 105.7L 101.40
95.98 103.18 102.76
98.68 107.98 12.02
SO8 1937-38

87.54 I6d.!0 9).62
S2.,4 118.30 100.92
82.18 115.92 loW.:,e
89.8 116.56 104.78

86.16 115.12 103.32
85.9d- 115.I12 1u2.iV
8a.48 113.06 Oltl.62
S7.82 1146.4 103.24
57.50 112.24 102.L2
J7.LO 117.12 103.78
95.22 123.12 o6b..V
Q3.02 114.416 105.9J4


113
1175
1034
b13

380
198
159
82

20
11
24.
I1


1
72
155
110



n

is
61o




18
10
21
_I


2.0 1.00 113 18.6
5.0 3.50 I1t9 13.0
B.O 5.00 872 18.1
b.0 5.-k 1T7 19.7

1.o 6.50 2i 18.9
9.0 8.50 156 17.7
21.6 17.00 123 13,0
18.0 33.00 53 15.2
23.0 51.00 6 11.2
33.5 28.00 1 12.5
11.5 9.50 2 12.5
2.0 1.00 1__ 'l.


to '.6 1.3 --56
31169 .1.0 4.t A1 c'56
3870 21.' l.18 2W04
41.o 17.5 13.09 1102
3637 20.5 11.143 2227
2(85 3Y.0 52.5 1480
2"9 38." 5.0u 170
11136 37.0 31.71 506
519 31.5 27.941 187
511 33J.o0 2 3 .' 7
O45 36,- ?1.78 8
lM. 1'~.0 10.17 2


2.5 1 11.2 1.e 1 8.5 110.0 98.2
1. 25 9.2 1.1 24 82.0 113.0 101.2
0.9 123 21.5 1.4 80 68.5 112.0 100.6
0.9 132 5.0o .8 .6 21 73.0 111.5 100.5

1. 7?4 20.7 2.2 2 68.5 109.5 99.8
0.1 37 26.5 2.0 60.0 108.0 99.7
1.6 36 10.8 1.5 8 45.0 110.0 98.3
1.0 26 12.1 2.9 38.5 116.5 814.5

0.6 12 9.8 3.2 113.0 104.0 7?.j
0.8 4 10.4 2.7 41.0 105.5 95.6
.3.4 5 7.8 2.3 50.5 109.5 101.7
- 0.9 918.5 108.0 101.9


21.9 3.78
2il 1.1,7


aB.3 Lao
23.4 3.b7
20.1 .140
19.7 0.95

23.5 0."
13.9 0.1'
11.7 0.7T3
13.7 1.1f.


1 io 3.C0
69 16.P 1.96
186 18.9 1.47
299 19.7 1.28

604 27., 1.72
f42 33.64 2.82
1171 1-5.8 3.70
426 3.9 3.56
70 23.1 3.43
40 10.3 1.66
27 12.8 2.17
12 1q.- .7-2


79.0 109.0 95
17.5 117.0 96.
31.5 116.0 100.
B.G. 114.5 94.3

.G. 1114.0 85.5
1.0. 110.5 76.9
3.0. 110.0 72.3
3.0. 112.0 82.0

N.G. 110.0 83-.5
2.0. 111.5 85.2
P.9. 115.0 89.0


1934-35 12,76n 11"1 2?"- "9"07 166 391 323.4 2.06 4.31 1.66 60q. Io-12.9 :b.1 58.1 116.2 101.24 14 IP2 11."0.3 317" 45a I ON 200 16.0 1-2 g g9 6 1:f
1935-36 114.722 12.8 22.0 18.75 200 387 317.0 2.78 4.'7 3.73 653.3 1026.9 876.5 7.4 114.8 102.38 3386 696 8.5 1.7 2703 21.0 I1.1 31 42.6 2.12 1 102.11

1936-37 a2.785 12.1 22.0 18.38 183 386 3o08.6 2.98 L.79 1.71 700.3 1125.7 878.9 80.1 116.44 100.96 3810 T701 3.5 11.30 318) 19.7 1.19 173 26.5 1.85 76 38.5 116.l 100.1
1937-3 36,45 11.5 23.5 18.9 231 10 3a.6 2.61 4.'7 3.68 t-13.1 Ir,7-.0 8.8 [2.18 123.12 103.00 29313 23269 39.0 2.79 16369 2-.8 2.11 3747 L5.8 2.79 1511 11 8.0. 117.0 911


fable 3.


Au-
luptcubar
Debor
October
Doeabor
binary
FebromS,
vawob

Marc
3"W
JIM"
Audi


4442
a257

271
91
5
6
22
46


16.2 21.0 18.63
15.5 21.4 19.19
11.1 21.0 18.99
16.6 22.2 19.03
14.1 20.9 19.09
17.2 20.8 19.15
17.1 20.7 19.11
18.4 20.0 19.16

18.9 20.5 19.58
17.7 20.0 18.86
1.-n 2211 19.22
18.9 1.0O lq.1',


264 365 316.-
251 373 36.8
166 364 121.8
277 368 321.6
22 361 322.5
84 360 3240i
292 355 324.2
309 343 326.2
319 352 313.6
291. 312 318.2
301 391 326.4
V10 114, 126.0


3.05 1.05 31.46
2.96 4.51 3.58
3.16 1-.24 3.69
3.14 4.18 3.76
3.25 L.17 3.76
3.5 4.13 3.73
3.44 4.00 3.72
3.50 3.82 3.62

3:5 3.2 3.69
3.46 4.04 ;,81
3. 11.04 3.72
1.50 .74 1.,56


Aiusut
Sptebter

DeOtober

Janum
lebtruMr
March
rIbruiy

uey
MAW
Jo.
jI -_


16 8.6 5.80
185 11.0 3.00
281 5.0 3:15
425 7 f) .60
a4 7.0 .75
75 8.0 5.05
41 6.0 5.40
3 3.8 5.15

2 3.2 3.75
13 5.0 3.60o
17 7.0 7.40
1. -


15.6 20.5 18.18
15.4 21.4 18.73
16.5 21.8 19.03
12.8 21.3 18.50

15.5 21a. 1 18.35
15.6 a.9 18.50
16.3 20.9 18.18
16.5 20.0 18.23

17.3 19.3 18.54
17.3 22.0 19.26
17.3 1.1 19.14
Ij 2 n-.1Q4


18.9 1.74
19.5 1.35
45.1 0.67
14.9 0.49
26.2 0.94
14.6 o.60
14.0 0.87
12.6 0.80

12.2 0.20
12.4 0.U0
12.2 0.20
l.I 0.-0


2.7
7.1 1.05
14.0 1.14
16.0 1.4
10.9 1.52
4.6 0.67
4.0 0.72
41, 1.40

2.1 -
1.2 -
2.5 -
1.6


oteahor
0optober
Octoter
Nowsaaor


Irobtl




Demetentr
Febuubor
lunacy

March

DMn'
NC
June





September
Octoets
November

Oft~bTW

hibnoay
Mue

April
Nal
J's


160
7,*1179
6.920
3.1'15

1.917
901.
577
150

26
41
io



6b?
10



7b7

5122




1650

S58
571
735


July 301 34S 16,')
2 W.0 19,15


102. 1


n


V E6 1 ... ..


.-


22 2.72
- 19 2 .,


mh i .. .. ii ----


--- '. It


162 16 1 Z1 8 1945 260 375 329 6









gmsma OOfIDi oNSZ1fiM i AND MISS

Pr .iH OIL T13DI OIL 122W! aaua TrLu OI amULa waaivz Ijax L 0 5
Poonds Pr to. oois PeT lto
___ __ of sed ___ _____ ___ __ ____ .1 useS itab. PT
--- 9 4 fof

HIm. Vwx. Aver. His. MAL. A.or. NIs. HOE. Aver. KIu. Nw. Aver. His. US. Aver. Le o
MIL--ON ________ 1e9 1
lani 1931-3


74.. 937.6 I50.7
730.-0 1038.7 176.,
79., 10o2.6 197.7
99.0 101S.2 916.5
O770. 991.7 397.7
787.a 95.1 678.9
S06.0 969.h 3711.2
311I.3 993.3 331.2
395.1 91,910 911.l
120.1 972.9 97T.7
122., 987.0 90P.1-
01:.T 977.6 sqO.6


5.1 107.2 96.01
14.2 11U.5 100.06
89.1 111.2 107.03
91.2 111.1 103.32
39.0 103.0 101.A
35.1 106.8 99.61
33.1 10.6 91.6o
17.1k 16.6 99.7TU
o101.2 105.6 1.6o
101.9 107.8 lo04.41
96.0 108.3 1X4,ok
100.4 107.- 101.66


36

299
290
120
71


2
15
17


2 31.0 21.29
6 2.k 1.60
5 7.1 6.50
5 2.2 1.30
1k 31..5 5.9S
26 1.8 1.45
1 5" 5 .45
19 5.0 6,4"
1 3.2 7.00
I 2.,
Lo I0.
15 1.0 10.0
15 11.0 7.30


3h 13.9 3.03
537 26.5 1.53
..67 20. 1.62?
233 13.6 0.77
223 ?3.3 1.-"
110I 11.8 1.91
65 17.0 2.40
19 15.7 l.95
1 12.1. 0.00
1 12 .2 0.10
1 12.7 O.I3)
1 12.1 0.10


1 6.5 3.5m
a14 7.2 1.36
62 18.1 2.16
66 6.1 2.09
120 11.7 1.67
72 21 2.
51 4a: N 4.1.0
19 36.5 7.96
2.9 -
2. -
2. -
5 5.5 1.72


70 107 93.6
S70 1 91.9
2 7 111 it0.
- r- 'LL 10.P

1- 109 59.
lg 106 1o

,- 01 101.1
Ol o? loba
72 1oo 103.1
SE 107 MOah


slua 1935-36

k33t 1 9.1 13.9 17. 2 311 2 1.0 3.90 4.28 ".09 9e6.5 100z.1 961.1 92.7 OM0.0 3.o9k 1 1 116.9 50.00 10.9 1 6.o 00 %6 II* 79.0
lenak~iJ 318 16.3 '~ 1 29** 3 3: 313.1 3.22 '.)30 3.73 756.1 .; 7 6.6 11.7 we.k 136 S Is.1 6.79 1)1 1.2 1.3 9 W. 7 11 "
0Olebe | l. 1 6.3 N2.6 19.29 I 39 326.1 3.06 1 19..1 1 90.6 90.9 ll7.1 104.0 3 1 .3 9.17 6.1 1.17 5 9.7 1.1 1 1 i .
er l.Iti17 13.o a3.9 11.40 M29 37 251.0 3.07 411.21 3. 721.k1 1003.3 350. 7. 113.1 6.31 923 3 1.0 7.5 915 3.2 2.06 97 30.1 .36 3 115 9.
BeM r 671 11.0 0.1 16.27 166 35 2.1 3.0i 4,. 3i 1.7 9*.k 1931.l 9 9 62. 110.3 90s77 hbO 3 5. 0 19.9 1.17 279 31.5 LW 41 1 3.1
u 5.1 1. 19.1 1101 336 0 2.99 3.1 7 .1 11 22 6.0 19 1.6 1y 1 3 *
p2 13.5 17.323" 3.2 3'M2 #50-19 9 2:2 1. k 91 19 3.6 1. 7. 21. 0 6 I L 10 1.
Nesb i7 11.2 B0.o) 16.g 172 V 70. 3.02 .3 3.70 109.7 1017.9 669.9 61.1 ll.I 5.10 6 19 6.0 .7 36 1.9 1.06 9H 3.1 3.9 2 .1
il l 1. 19.1 ".7 322 61.1. 3. 99 1 7 .6 97.6 6. 10 .66 .0 13.2 0. 11 .0 6.13 16 100 %.6
3.51., 1 6 b 120's 9,-7. oo,3 ZO b3 Y g9 Il

E- 6 1 17.2 13.37 2% 3ku 31.k Isf 1.09 92.3 1009.3 561.1 99. 109.9 105.02 2 3 6.5 14.B0 10.3 3.9 0 110 10%.2
5.,118 25 "a ,. 29. 9 93. 15 .k,
JM150 3 3 7 6 01 9 1 o ."U j i.0 16 log 101. 3
i 11 7.6 2.6 10 3 1 9.1' 3. 1.3 3.94 N 60.1 1012.3 5 9 3 103.72 3 6 4. .4 10.7 6 N 1.3i 10.1
AM%._, ____ 1 2. 20__ .0 __33.0 3.33 3. 3i6 79.3 97.7 136.6 107.9 1o9.0 10.36 ,l 6 1.6 -5 0. 1 10.3

mOle 1936-37

mesaS 1313u.5 10.7 19.39 310 357 319.11 3.k3 4.02 3.69 5117.3 94k.y. 167.1 I01.32 103.36 l04.70 0.6 11.6 0.9 I 1 0. 109.0 lo .
11 h 1,.0 30.1 17.641 )Le N31 .4 1 3.17 19.a6 3.72 75. 1001.1 1.2 65.9 1 .0 97.1 676 3 12.0 13.9 63 i6.1 1. 7 9.6 1.6 b 6.% 110.0 l.T
JU mD 6,066 1 .9 11.1 1 97.2 1.3 3.10 71.9 103.0 693.0 i 7.61 113.32 9.05 1,175 3 3.' 3.001.059 1.5 11 1.1 0 11. .
lem19er 1,03 12. 19. 17.09 1? 1 31.3 3.33 3.7 79. 1019.9 909.2. 70.66 110.24 96.9. 170 3 .9 3.W0 399 17.1 I.8 a0 A:. 65 0 110.0 10.l

iM-r 39 11.3 19.3 16.91 197 33k* 373.2 ),411 h.2g 3.16 317.3 991.7 907.1 711.50 103.91 9.7P WI 1! 7.0 3.00 339 1.1 1. 117 1".3 1.7 fl.1 1M.O 911.l
9.I090 9.36 1 9 103. 1.

13. 7 1 9. 7 9716.9S7 1 31306 3. 1 3.2 h .1 3.16 03.7 91.3 193.0 77.02 t6.76 ..9 6 11.00 1. 3 .


:- -: .- __ _
ARM&T 11 W.5 10..1 IoTo 1 1 3,

Miw7 1 3.37 4.293-.7 1 11.19" 1 1. 190.6 196 96 217.1o 0.1 9 10 9 S20
Dmfber 331 11s.7 10.3 19.g1 17 1 3 3 111.3 3.a9 1A.1 1 3 12 2 7 5.3 1001 3.1 1 10.70 101.91 91.10 3 4 9.0 3.93 11 .1 15 10 9.11 11.0 9.0 11.0 3.3
letl 10S 1S 1.11*~k 11.91 1412 6 3 911 10.3 3 .10 3.913 173.5 9 95 .3 13.9. 107.10 103.73 1:640 31.2 1.7 1.1 1. 6 1 .1 C.l 5. 3.0 110.5 15.1
*.WO 1439 16.11 3.0 1 3.1 27 0 3713 317.12 3.031 1 3.10 1 711111 940.07 119.3 91.62 113.931v 0 .1- 1. 1 3.3 e 1.3 1 1.0. 18.9 1 .6
ee4er 1 19.0 23.1 119 2k? 36 p6.0 3.36 11.30 3.9 I 113.1 93 1.0 111.3 90 .14 11.6 53. 9.06 10 1 3.1 1.0 3 1. 0 31 3.93 91. 110.19 10.6
U~a 1971





999 10 La .7 1 1.9 3 1 61 1 97 3 0t1.6 1 .1 0 b 11.1 3.51 693. 969.3 31.3 33.30 109.94 973A1 10 05t 9. 3.0 956 6.3 3.710 |.k 1.' U 33 1 8.0 1 q09. 56.
ShniI 3i. 19.3 11.50 16.71 all M-3 30.0 I.t 8037 3.9 3.3 31 13.7 0
*nraw I l a M34 31.1 3 710. 1.0 j 93.0 113.9 23.1
Mt0 1 9.I 3 .7 1 .0 1.4:Ul*0 I Ig M1 1. 1 .0












bob 150 13.3 3.1 131.46 f22 369 311.3 3.19 11.19 3.9' 7119.7 597.1 95.11 76.111 113. 100.63 136 119 19.9 17.99 131 19.7 I1. 6 7. 4K iI* 111I~
Apr11 91 17.0 21.4 19.M3 Sf 363 36.6 1. 1 .10 3.31 79'.) 963.5 359.3 93.06 1111.f 1011.91 39 i 12 kl11.9 13.3 3 13.6 0.66 13 1.5114.99 1 .S. 113.0 56.3
I L. 2 1 .0 2 3 3 12 0.6 3.16 1 1.0 3 3.71 319.5 9117.0 9M .) 3 sDO 111.16 90.56 1s 1 I 1 5.0 l 3j. 9 1.03 M A 1.10 1.0 111.0 91.1
A1 1 1 %..11 1?." 1 9 V 11.c ) 4.19 .1.7 7 9. 6 91 3 19. 9 91. 11. 3 1s ..3 3 35 0. 9 4.1 I6 L1 37.9 Ue 1? 19. 0 33. i 00.2. 10. 5 53.7
c __ 11 16.9 123.i? 0 2 k 34 4.0 14.04 3.37 3711.3 511.1 9.11 93.51 "107.7 03.02 3 7 7. 10.73 1 i i. 0.193 1 6.. sm. __._ 7.3 1.9 101. .6
16- 2 2 )D39 MO5 gl.e L1.60 3-.1 NBC. ao 0. ,.e. .
I!.o IIaI -

















S .I11.1 1 .6n.0 13.111A 1 im m. 3.11 .1 3.1 730.9 1035.1 .9. w atml U. 1 3.1*6 1 1p 3U27 2.k1 1.S 1 6 11 A. 0781.9 3..B .1 I0 3 119 10S.1
}iUI 1.7*9 9.3 1.6 1 7. TY21 3b] 391.9 3 10.11 9.61 JNI 9911.0 33I311 51 9.y1 117.58 91.3 I 33 01.91.7 6.B.*9 1. 5..: I.1 1.61 I W9 11.0 U
19 137 1 5. j .7 17.93, 17 A .17 kb j., i 599.3 10. 1133 97* T .o W1" lI.l.ll ).7 .1 ",.T 99 11 : o 6.5oo w%. S,
3.o-33 -j13.3 m i i, mt., 1.6 3.61 60.6 j5.6 1 6. 1 1. 7 B a 9.1 B1 w 393 31 u I0 30.9 1 9
Awl h 9i 1,.0 21.4 19. s, o 36 31Tq 30.6 NO E b-10 3-81 7 .306. 9..%10.8051.s N INbI '" :-I66 13'IlZZ 1- 1b ; 1O-46 111. "


1: n ~ )na~ i .o 3.11 4.5 3.87 171.2919 %T, 909. 9 k).9% 10.7 103.0 N '1 .9. 1879
,5 ," ,o,".-'""10- ,- 1i, 7i ." Ia. Is A 1161 0.'! 1' 6 ,,,.6 ..,. ,,o .


5 .151 19.1, 1. s* g )7 .L n 3.1 1119 1 y0 6 U4 M61 336 0L. *,l st EL o V6 .312 I t
II~~~~ ~~ 'bsm :'.om ol.e ).8'1 r3. 10.4 M ). I, 1:6Tl 30 ,61 As. J'el I m5 o. A +







. .. .... .... ... ........ : .... .................................... .. ...... :. .. ... .. .. .. ......


vsai. 11



30.2511


ma-'
leptober

1*nt~.r~

Treruwr

April
Eq
Ha.a
AWL.


15.2 10.2 17.54
15.5 21.6 13.22
16.0 10. 13.*.5I
16.4 2D.3 13.73
15.1 20.1 11.206
15.9 19.8 17.12
15.' 19.6 11.06

15.% 19.1 13.13
17.2 20. 19.00
11.0 nli 111.01


24 41 7 219.3
24 372 3:.11
263 3 521:61.
261 349 11.6
352 30b.6
3 1 302.2
26 339 293-h
157 3)2 302.2
311 322 316.6
301 33 )323.6
3T.0
vi i w..0


1.11 .1 ].7}
3.6 .36 5.92
" .H 3.90
3.B L.22 3.12
3.35 10.06 3.7
3.p1 U.04 3.72
3.48 1b.011 3.75
3.111 0 11.011 3.38
3. 19 .1k 3.32
11.0 4.:0 :1.
1.b 1 4.i 7qt~






ABI&XB&8
DIhSI13VUIOl Of Glass$ O O002O0PllD
st. emmb or sho ioimine ai. to a.m a ie mouhi. mo emmmm


sum3 193I-37 BU&NO 1935-36 MaImN 1%&-37 I 1a937-36


Wam A a a 2 a a p
1,W IR.. 1 1 5 7 24
0.0... 3 2 1 3
10.5 ......
11.0 ....... 3 1 3 1 6

IA .. 3. 1 1 3 5
833.0.. a a. 2 1 1 11
3. 3 1 11 1 3
66.5 ......
.S..
47.0...... 2 13 1 4 k


36.5..
5.0...... 2 19 1 1 2 6
U.5 ......

87.0 ...... 3 1 -6 9 1
97.5......
.0 ...... 6 19 1 1 9 4 -
P. ......
19.0...... 1 29 1 1 5 b1
39.5 ......

90 ...... 7 by 1 13 5 5
90.5......
9.0...... 10 46 6 T 9 7 1
91.5......
93.o...... 13 67 13 5 10 7 14
92.5 ......
93.0...... 19 59 10 7 16 1 3

9.0 ...... 12104 1 13 13 4
9.5 ......
9.o ...... 13 11] 1 19 22 13 3
96.0.:::13 1411M 19 8 33 141 3

9.0.:':::: 177 39 37 3 19 16
97.5......
91.0 ...... 13 260 1341 57 45 16 7
91. ......
9.0 ...... 23239 UO 0 63 T17 5
99.5 ......
100.0...... 40119 k 19 152 7?9 2 1

100.5......
101.0 ...... 16 3645A 1 717 16 6
101.5.....
10. ...... a }559a S 91 16 *
Wo.5 ......
103.0 ...... 13 27 432 221 91 12 6
103.5 ......
104.0 ...... 1053 31 7 13 56 10 3
10.5......
105.0. .. 6 159 251 11 35 a a
105.5....
106.0..... 10723 95 1 1 1
106.5 ......
107.o ...... 1 4 101 U 16 I
107.9......
1o0o...... l } 49 47 1
103.5......
109.0 ...... 16 3o 1S1 1 -
109.5......
110.0...... l 3 1it 11 I -
Uo.5......
111.0...... 9 5 -
111.5....
112.0...... 1 -
112.5 ......
113.0...... -

1.I ......
114.0...... -e -
]i.14 ...,


11.0. ,
L16.9. ....... .
116.5. -
117.0 ...... -
127.5.
111.0. -. -

305 3.361
SNOW 3.511 1 .54w


N A I a i a.-


I 1.231


7in 14 13 I5
02 39 25 22


A S 0 J D J


* N A


u .i .T I-.


- 2 60176 96 11 10 1 356
---13 16 3 a 14
- 15 33 10 1 2 6- 1
- 2 M 35 155 3 1 1
1 1 33 1 16 5 i 101
- 317 13 3 1 91

- 437 43 16 b 1 l

- 1 3 5 54 23 6 13
- -6 5 63 23 1 11 15!

- 1 3 10 66 13 3 -1 151
4 6 75 n 4 1 191

- 9 710 i A,3 5 9 11 25
1 7 11101 9 3o 7 5 51
- 13 12 9 91 30 9 9 15S
2 22 1175 103 32 7 1 35S
- 27 a 152 116 2T b 3 35

- 49 J30 1 113 23 2 6 1 370

1 70 45 T17 129i 32 7 N6
- 17 561 5 71O6 30 5 6 17
a100 3 148 n1 19 9 6 I mg

4 U 92 147 67 25 10 7 1 167

233019815.9 66 i 10 6 1 710


2 Ras o0

S236 263
124M 323
-196 36j

1 173 3w1
-12931


- 63196
- e516


Maths
A 1 0 3 0 .1 F A 1 j.. Mmm
1 2 14 A n 36 y 16 5 4 5o

T 2 2 .. q
---351

2 2 | 2 1 1 .
a a 1 -
7 i 1 a 7. .
1 1 3 1 0
b I k I I 21
-- 7 1 -
3 6 -- 1 -- 11
25 14 2 1 al
S- a 1 4 .. .. .- 7
,8 12 -
20 7 3 3 1 36
161 1 3 1 .-. 3
11 209-, --. 1
35 16 11I .
12 17 a 7 -
N is 21 4 1 fi
12 31 1312 6 1 -- .. -- 93-
17 22 15 1 3 1
21 23 5 117
18 51 3b 17 5 .. --9
33 6b 36 Ai 6 2 1 1 166
N 1> 53 116 13 b : 185
5- 3u 7 69 26 t11 3 .2 52
1 57 106 05 2 3 i 270
60o 123 b 27 16 5 97
72 U6 7 26 11 2 .. 326
73 136 95 32 b 36
91 173 0 13 15 I 2 19
anklglo8a57am 3111- 5-
125i 17137 11 00
Plhi w)6 13 4 63- 1-1- e63
-152 11 6 a 1 5 555
o a a99 143 a 15 9 2 1 3 b66
-156 230 132 6 19 5 3 1 1 5 593
5 191 256 10M 39 11 6 2 41 2 6%.
2 179 190 136 38 15 7 1 I 1 573
5 k44 297 14 56 12 2 1 3 970

1 305 235 U1 h6 z2 6 21 3 I1N
5 272 217 36 11 1 )- 1
6sW5o 21 9k 36 10 7 k- 6
6 16 195 13 11 7 2 -
12139157 60 9 2 1 4o5
7 139 in 69 14 9 5 I a
20 10 1,03 16 10 I 327
17 94119 36 6 6 5 1 3 299
15 5 7 6 9 2 1 205
16 o 54 16 6 3 1 1 -
12 63 1 T a 2 1 2 1
2 37 36 11 3 1 1 01
9 32 2 R 1 --- 77
11 31 17 9 2 1 -- 72
5 17 1 7 1 w- ---- 41
15 15 -3 .- ..- -37
1 9 7 3 --
1 1 5 1 ------ ----------
S 1 15

1 I------------ 6
-- 1- .- --


i ... ..
1----------- -. .- --------i
-- ---------- --------- ------------


loathe
30313.2..


1122 k 25 139 197 0I 1P2
-19 3 5 4 9 3
- 12 6 5 6 3
-21 i 3 7 7 5
- 3 10 u -
S16 1 9 11 10 1
-30 3 12 7 5
-I16 7 6 11
137 1 3 6 1i 1 11
-311 3 2 71611i 1
-29 43 % 1 11 2
-M k 10 14 5 a
-19 3 1 o 1 9 11
236 5 111
333 3 7 13 11 -
-316 11 16 4
1 29 3 1 20 1 3
1 37 1 6 16 4 9 5
1 51 1 312 10 5
1 59 5 7 34 16
-? 3 b 12 43 9 1
- 39 17 2 9 91
3 57 1 25 31 17 2
- W 6b 22 27 12 3
- 64 31 34 6 2
- 71 12 1 215 3 15 3
1 0 15 9 33 0 12 1
- 55 22 319 11 6
1 72 26 U1 331 42 13
1 63 32 11 39 O 10 1
-66 36 16 43 4 12 1
1 1; 4 16 50 3 13 I
I go 1 27 51 37 14 1
1 75 b 27 5 37 10 3
1 70 b9 35 59 44 7
1 80 B2 33 ?1 36 10
4 1 79 35 55 6 6
-31110 50 65 35 11
2 n 113 6 65 1 13 6
2393 92 54 71 56 6
2 95 2018 79 69 51 1 7
i I i162 I n 2 o10 7
212 147 89 58 31 I I
1 92 131 817 72 2 6 3
-ID 111 103 71 21 10 9
-78X no 12 27 5 7
3I3; 174 121 7n 19 7 1
1 9 185117 79 1b 7 9
-10 126 61 17 5 6
-11 19 11 59 11 3 6

-191201 I 35 7 3 5
1 211 102 3 10 9 3
-97 Ell 134 15 5
-76 1i4 99 eq 6 4
- 7f166119 21 3 1 3
-55 o 9 U 2 2 3
- 4 t11 99 4 4 1
- fe 6 9 1 2 1
-3 55 63 7 -
-n2 51 47 1 -

-0 33 32 -
-13 22 32 -. .
- 16 17 l -
- I 10 9 1 1 -
- 9 8 7 -. .- .
" 4 9 l -
-3 12 -
S- 3 1 -
- 3 1 1 -
- 1 1- -
-1 .
- ---


-S 4
10.093 IL 762 15.1111


15 3.299 1.941 146
2.461 2.,09 661 123


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