Farm poultry feed ration and feed consumption per layer and per dozen eggs, as of Jan. 1, 1944

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Title:
Farm poultry feed ration and feed consumption per layer and per dozen eggs, as of Jan. 1, 1944
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Creator:
United States -- Crop Reporting Board
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Crop Reporting Board
Publisher:
s.n. ( Washington, D.C. )
Publication Date:

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Resource Identifier:
aleph - 028447243
oclc - 63921874
System ID:
AA00017344:00001


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UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE .
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS H UME LIBRARY


Univ. of Florida


Commercial masb::i:counts for one tl
Cots. Is the i.Sdtng grain fed, exc
0a1ts is almost!:r-popular a scratch
North Central States. Commercial
States wnere .Ltiaes up almost a
In the North .W.tral States is mixe
so important&.w"Barley is an import
portant as 4lt.ken feed only in abc
to less thS :.1l percent of the pou


of the feed fed to chickens three months old and over.
in the Western States where wheat is more important.
!ain as wheat and is most important as a feed in the
Tch is most important as a feed in the North Central
I of the poultry ration. About half of the mash fea
I the farm, but in other areas home-mixed mash is not
icken feed only in the West. Sorghum grains are im-
alf dozen States. Otter feeds, each of which amount
ration, are included with home-mixed mash or scratch.


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UN TITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
BUREAU 07 AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
WASHINGTON, D. C.


7ARM POULTRY FEED RATION AND FEED CONSUMPTION
PER LAYER AND PE DOZEN EGGS

Information covering the kinds and relative amounts of feed fed to laying
flocks on farms throughout the United States has long been needed by farmers and
others interested in the management of poultry flocks, the cost of producing eggs
and poultry meat, and by those faced with the responsibility of meeting war time
feed requirements.

In order to meet this need for more factual information about the feed being
fed to laying flocks on farms in the United States, the Bureau of Agricultural
Economics conducted an extensive survey in February of this year. Reports were
S returned by over 30,000 farmers who were keeping chickens. Every section of the
country was represented. These reports show that commercial mash is the leading
poultry feed and makes up about 1/3 of the poultry ration, followed by corn,
home-mixed mash, wheat and oats, ranking in importance in the order named. These
56 feeds make up about 90 percent of all feed fed to laying flocks. The amount
of fooeed required to produce a dozen eggs generally decreases as the size of the
f lock Increases because the larger the flock the more efficient are those
management practices which are conducive to more eggs per layer for the same
mount of fooeed. Light bred chickens eat slightly less fooeed per layer than
c chickens of the heavy breeds, but they produce more eggs for the same amount of
feed.

'FanrnPoultry Teed Ration

llh The United States farm poetry ration fed during Janunry this year consisted
lri!: of 33.4 percent commercial math, 12.4 percent home-mixed mesh, 6.3 percent
: commercial scratch end grains-fed as scratch whole or cracked as follows: Corn
*i:., 23.8 percent of ration, wbheatj10.6 percent, oats 9.8 percent, sorghum grain 2.3
.. percent, barley 1,3 percent, jnd buckwheat 0.1 percent. Other feeds reported
which amounted to only a frao ion of one percent of the poultry region for the
country as a whole were incided with home-mixed mash or scratch grains.

Corn is the most popularigrain in the poultry ration in all parts of the
country except the West vhes wheat is the leading feed grain. Corn fed as
scratch makes up 29.0 perce of the poultry ration in the East North Central
States, 28.3 percent in the uth Central States, 28.1 percent in the West North
SCentral, 22.5 percent in the south Atlantic, 10.7 percent in the North Atlantic
and 5.4 percent in the We steL States.

In the Western States, w'i very little corn is grown, wheat is grown
extensively and is the leading poultry scratch grain. In this area, wheat makes
up 27 percent of the poultry ion and for every 100 pounds of wheat only 2C
pounds of corn is fed to poult In Nevade, over half of the poultry ration is
wheat fed as scratch. In Mont Idaho, Wyoming and Utah, wheat makes up a
large part of the ration. In er geographic regions, wheat fed as scratch
amounts to 8 to 10 percent of ration.

Oats is almost as popular a eat for feeding poultry. In the North Central
States oats make_up a l.argre r o rtion of the ration than_ in other arts8 of the

i Prepared by Z. S. Kimball, Paul Smith and Robert F. Moore, Agricultural
f Statisticians; R. D. Jennings a ,. 0. Engebretson, Agricultural Economists,
I Bureau of Agricultural Economic







country. In this area, more oats than wheat are fed and almost a fifth of the
poultry ration is whole oats fed as scratch. Whole oats make up only from 3 to
5 percent of the ration in the regions outside the Nforth Central States.
i
The Vest i.s the leading barley feeding area of the United States. In the
Western States, 5.1 percent of the poultry ration Is whole barley fed as scratch ," ,
Other parts of the country feed very little barley to poultry. Sorghum grain fed, :i
as scratch makes up 6.3 percent of the poultry ration in the South Central States. I
3.5 percent in the Vest North Oentral and 1.9 percent in the West. la all other I
areas, sorghum are only a fraction of 1 percent of the ration. Buckwheat is fed. r
only In small amounts. New TYork, Pennsylvania, Vest Virginia. and Michigan are ki:
the leading buckwheat feeding States. ..'I

Commercial mash makes up the largest portion of the poultry ration for the
country as a whole and leads all poultry feeds In the NBrth Atlantice South p
Atlantic, South Central and Western States. Corn leads a11 other feeds ain the
North Central States. Ralf of the poultry ration In the North Atlantic States tI
commercial mash. Commercial mash makes up 47.7 percent of the ration in the
South Atlantic, 44.1 percent In the Vest and 40.7 percent in the South Central
States. The composition of mash varies in different parts of the country. Nash
fed in North Central and South Central States has more ground coern and oats than
mash fed in other parts of the country. The WVest uses moacre wheat and barley to
replace corn in the mash and in Xansas, Teos. Oklahoma, and iwv Mexico, the
quantity of sorgthu Ie Increased to replace part of the corn and wheat. Durig
the last 2 years, there has been considerable subetitutlon of vegetable protein
for alnmal protein In poultry mashes because of the wartime shortage of animal
proteins. In many areas, the comnpositlon of the ration has been determined 1W
necessity from the grains, mill feeds and protein concentrates available.

Wartime poultry rations contain less corn and. animal protein and have a smaller
total protein content thaa prewar rationed. Before the war, many farmers bought
concentrates asad mined their own mash, using home grown grains. During the yaw,
however, It has been difficult for individual poultry. to get the coacenatrate
needed for poultry mash ana less mash has been mixed on ahe farm. armers in the
North Central States, however, still mix about half of e poultry mash they use
on the tam. In other parts of the country most of the aeh fed io purchased. a
coamerelal mash, only a mall part being mixed on the fa.

Commercial scratch is the leading form of scratch f In the North Atlantic
States. In florida, Louisiana, Georgia, West Virginia a Washington it is an
Important part of the poultry ration.

Teed Conoumvtion Per Larer "A Per Dozen Zr$

There Is little relationship between the size of the l ng flock and the
amount of feed fed per layer, but there is a definite rela lonship'between the
mise of the flock ad the amount of feed oonsuaed per dosei eggs produced. As the
size of the flock increases the feed consumed per dozen eggsk decereases. There
are exceptions, of course, but the general tread is quite striking. As the flocks
get larger, management practices generally Improve, flock, are better culled,
better balanced rations are fed, and more attention Ie paid to breeding. All
these Improvements are conducive to the profedtion of more egg for a given
mount of feed. In Wiseconsien, for inetaaea. the fee4 .oonsemed per dozen egg@s in
January of this year was' 7.7 poutA in floS vwith oepr 400 layers or 25 percent
less feed than was consumed to produce a det eggs flocks with less than 50
layers. In Iowa, where flocks are quite uiforms, required 18 percent less
feed in the large flocks. In Washington. erme egg actionn is highly
commercialized, it required 11 percent La fefed pem Josen eggs in large flocks
thaa in small flocks. i
==







gABIN 3.


PouLT ram NATION, .JAUARY 1944 1/


I r :AfOIN 0? RAT10IK
8I 1O- Rome- OoEj So r-
|ma f minercil xed mareal orn m Wheat Oats Barley b Duck-
.szIT[O moib -Mh ecrwoh grain h-teat
1iP a r a a n t
Ned 63.5 .5 23.9 3.5 3.9 4.0 .7 -
1 I.X 73.7 .9 20.1 2.0 1.4 1.5 ..4
0t. 64.0 1.1 27.5 1.4 3.9 1.7 .4 -
E ,e. 67.3 .j 27.1 1.4 2.4 1.5 .1
IxI. 53.7 l 3l.1 7.0 4.4 1.8 .1
|B 64. .1 30.9 1.4 1.5 1.5 .4 -
T, "i 40.6 1.8 33.4 8.0 10.5 3.9 1.5 1.3
..48.0 30 7.2 11.4 8.7 6,.7 1.0 -
A34.6 3. 9.8 18.0 13.3 6.9 1.0 -.8
*B:B 50.4 3.7, 19.4 10.7 9.5 4.9 1.0 .6
3 7.1 34. 3.3 26.7 9.6 8.3 .1 -
8.8 7.7 1.3 33.2 5.7 8.1 .2 -
S16.2 227. .9 37.8 4.6 17.3 .3 2-
l. 8A6 30.9 6.1 21.3 16.7 9.1 .7 .6
3som6.0 81.9 8.7 1.6 10.0 16.8 1.0- -
V. 3 .7 2.5 29.0 8.7 13.2 4 .1
17.7 19.2 2.3 23.1 13.7 3.2 1.8 -
156. 16.9 .9 37.7 3.7 25.3 .1 .1
'369 7.9 3.8 36.0 8.4 8.7 .6 .8
S10.4 13.8 6.1 6.7 24.9 27.1 9.3 .3 -
S9.4 1654 5.2 24,4 14.6 33.5 5.2 2.3 -
S 15.5 36.5 1.1 27.8 8.7 16.0 2.9 1.4 -
3,.1 18.0 1. 14.6 16.1 10.0 1.8 15.8 -
"1 i. 19.5 16.8 3. 28.1 10.4 18.6 1.8 .5 6
S5.00 3.4 31 35.4 8.7 3.0 1".4 -
l ..1. a. ." 3.6 7. 2.6 10.3 3.8 1.3
43.6 7.4 9.; 20.6 12.4 6.1 .6 -
'.39.1 3.4 11. 30.4 10.6 3.8 .1 1.0
47.9 4.8 8. 25.4 8.8 4.0 .3 -
46.1 6.4 7. 26.1 7.2 6.1 .5 -
253.0 3.0 18. 17.7 5.1 2.6 .1
Sm.... 53.2 2.9 23. 8.1 5.3 8.1 .2--
8 AtM. 47.? 4.8 11, 22.5 8.7 4.5 .4 .1
;. .5 8.6 4. 43.9 6.2 1.6 .8 -
IIL. 33.8 5.6 9 43.8 8.7 2.5 .5 .3
am. 46.1 6.5 36.5 2.2 1.6 .1 -
Al ,. 47.6 3.9 9 33.3 1.4 4.0 .1 -
Ark. 46.0 5.1 9 26.2 10.9 %.0 .1 .6 -
1a. 41.4 3.9 19. 29.5 1.2 3.8 .6 -
Od. 33.7 11.2 4. 14.0 16.3 9.9 1.3 10.6 -
:.aa!441 6.6 2.t 19.5 9.2 1.9 .3 15.5 -
8.. m. 40.7 6.8 6. 28.3 8.1 3.4 .4 6.3 -
MaSt. 14.9 14.6 2.1 7.1 46.7 9.5 5.1 -
Iahm 29.5 14.8 2.9i 1.7 39.2 6.7 5.2 -
11o. 20.1 1.0 4.7 12.7 37.3 6.3 5.9 -
0ole. 20.0 14.2 5.1 20.1 23.7 5.1 6.2 2.6 -
.AMN. 47.9 6.0 2.7 11.0 14.7 1.0 1.4 15.3 -
Arts. 41.7 7.0 8.9 3.2 27.4 .6 4.5 6.7 -
Utah 46.6 4.0 6.4 2.2 33.3 1.9 5.6 -
NOT. 32.3 13.9 50.9 .1 2.8 -
Vms. 52.0 2.9 11.1 2.1 24.1 7.2 .6 -
DOre 50.7 2.7 9.7 2.0 25.5 8.0 1.4 -
Calif. 54.36, 5.1 3.1 3.5 23.3 .3 7.7 2.7 -
: VBM. 44.1 7.3 5.4 5.4 27.0 J.8 5.1 1.9 -
U.8* 33.4,. 13.4 6.3 23.8 10.6 9.8 1.3 2.3 .1


V/ Other fee. mot dbovn eparately and. aOu g to only a fraction of 1 percent
stion aen ialue with either the grains ofn mash. In Stateu where eorghum
ao ulDpoflat feed. the smail amounts fed.f included. with corn and. wheat.
-3-


of the U.S. average
grain and. buckwheat







As a general rule, chickens of the light brecis consume loes feed per layor
than do chickens of the heavy breeds, the reason being that the larger the bittd
the more feed required to maintain the body weight of the bird. For the Unitsed '
States as a whole, it required about 3 percent sore feed per bird in JanuaWy Lm '
the average heavy breed layer than it did for the storage light breed layers. t: 1
Pennsylvania, where light and heavy breed chickens are about equal In number, I
required 7 percent more feed for the average heavy breed layer than for th e...
average light breed layer. In Illinois and ansase, where heavy breed chiakesm i
predominate, the average heavy breed layer consumed 1 percent more fee d. In 14a
and Oklahoma. the average heavy breed layer consumed 4 percent more feed. In l: :!
Wisconsin and Colorado, the difference was 6 percent, and in North Carolin=a i...w
most of the chickens are of the heavy breeds, the diftferenoe was also 6 peenSt '' I
In Idaho, where both light a4d heavy breeds are veil represented, the heavy b..reedt. :
consumed only 1 percent more feed per bird than the light breeds. :'Ili

Ohickens of the light breed, the most Important of which Is the White Le i ...........
are raised primarily for their egg producing qualities, while dcikens of the vm ..I
brooeeds are dual purpose types raised for meat as well -s for qge. Ohickens ef U i
light breeds, on the average, lay more eggs per layer than Mchickens of the heavy i I
breeds, and, because they eat less feed per bird. there is a greater differe e ift::. :i
feed consumed per dozen eggs. e,, ,,,
.. :: +.. ......
The average layer of the heavy breeds in the United Staties consumed 30 pere inmt:::::::
more feeood per dozen eggs than the light brooeed layers in January of thOis year. ba :t '
Pennsylvania, layers of the heavy breed consumed 17 percent more feed per" sdom .....' .
eggs than the light breeds, in Ohio and Indiana, 13 percent more, in Iowa, 9 ;
percent more, in North Carolina, 29 percent more, in Oklahoma. 19 percent sore* :i
Colorado, 21 percent more, and in Oregon, 22 -percent more. ..,,.:

Poultry flocks in the United States were fed an average of 9.8 gallons of a ..i*iiin
milk, buttermilk or whey per 100 layers during Jan7uary of this year. North Dhblta
led all States with 26.8 gallons per 100 layers followed by Iowa with 24 gallon,
Wyoming with 22.7 gallons, Montana with 21.6 gallons, d South kota with 17
,:ion'5, d South IDmkota. with 178 .3+
gallons. Poultry in the West North Central States wer fed almost twice as m i
of these milk by-products per 100 layers as in any other region. .
S o u r e o f D a t a ., .,j+ i +

The data for this report werd obtained in february 44 by a mailed inquiry to"s A
100,000 livestock farmers distributed throughout the ed States. These fames
were selected from a list of about 16,000 farmers who Iorted chickens onca- :m;
January 1, 1944. The questions covered (1) number of kens 3 months old and '
over on farms January 1, 1944, (2) eggs laid by flock in.act 30 days, (3) light
or heavy breed. (4) amount of feed consumed, separated l o the various clashes
shown in table 2, with the addition of a question cover other grains fed and so1 H.,
covering all other feeds fed. Many feeds not Aown in ta e 2 were reported bat 1
each amounted to less than 0.1 percent of the total feed so they were included I
with home mixed mash or scratch. All of theme feeds together amounted to onlj a
fraction of 1 percent of the total feed fed.: A question was included covering the "
amount of skimmilk, buttermilk or whey fed to chik
The cards were edited carefully in order to el. nate impossible and unreason- !I
able figures from the tabulation. In listing the d the cards were separated
into 5 size groups as shown in table 3. fe ed layer and per dozen eggs was
computed by States and weighted according ...O the apr of layers in each State on
January 1, 1944 in order to get geographict: and Un States averages. Listins 3
were also made for light and heavy breeds.". Teed f per layer mad per dozen eg gs
was computed for each group by States end ,elghte wording to the estimated 1
number of layers in each State, both of the heavy of the light breeds, in order ,1
to get geographic and United States aveagss.
-4 "
U ::I. -








0ND CONSUME( PE LAYER AND PER DOZEN EGGS IN JANUARY 1944
BY SIZE 07 LOCK


Me.
N.H.
Vt.
Mass.
R.111
Conn.
N.T.
N.J.
Pa.
H.A n..
Ohio
In&.
Ill.
Kioh.
WiNs.-
.N.0CENT.
Minn.
Iowa
No.
N.Dak.
.Dak.
Nebr.

V.1.0Wn
Del.
Xd.
To.
W.Va.
1.0.
$X.C
Ga.

8.A2L.
17.
Tenn.
Ala.
] oB.







Ris..
Ark.
TLa.
Okla.
hwa-
8.0T.
Mont.
Idaho
Nyc.
Cola.
N.Kez,
Ari.
Utah
Nwr.
lev.
Vash.
Oreg.
Calif.
WIST.


9.0
8.6
8.8
9.1
8.9
9.5
8.6
8.1
9.4
8.9
7.7
7.0
8.0
8.8
7.4
7.8
7.0
5.7
7.1
9.3
6.9
6.6
i..6
6.7
8.1
7.6
6.8
7.2
5.8
7.3
5.4
6.4
6.4
7.0
6.3
6.9
5.2
5.6
6.2
5.0
8.4
6.7
7.5
9.2
6.9
7.4
8.0
6.8
7.0
11.3
8.5
6.6
10.0
8.6


U.S. 7.3


9.4
8.8
9.0
6.6
9.0
10.8
9.6
11.2
12,2
10.3
13.2
11.4
9.2
12.1
10.2
10.9
10.5
12.1
8.7
12.2
14.2
11.6
9.1
10.8
13.2
14.1
10.4
11.4
11.4
16.5
13.6
9.8
12.1
12.2
11.9
13.4
11.1
10.9
11.6
8.2
10.1
10.7
11.5
18.2
13.9
15.9
14.4
10.3
18.0
18.2
9.3
10.9
14.5
13.6
11.1


9.2 9.5
9.0 8.3
9.0 8.8
8.6 7.5
8.4 8.0
9.5 10.1
8.6 8.6
8.4 11.7
8.6 9.6
8.7 9.3
8.3 10.4
7.4 9.4
8.2 10.9
8.9 11.5
9.1 10.1
8.3 10.4
8.3 10.2
8.0 11.6
7.6 9.4
9.0 13.6
8.8 12.5
6.3 9.4
7.2 9.8
7.8 10.5
8.7 12.0
7.9 13.6
6.7 9.4
6.6 10.0
6.2 10.8
6.0 13.0
6.2 14.1
5.8 11.0
6.5 11.3
6.1 9.6
5.8k 11.3
6.1 11.2
4.7 10.6
5.9 110.9
5.2 10.1
7.1 12.4
7.2 1
6.3 1.1
6.9 1).0
7.3 .6
6.8 .6
7.2 6
8.8 5
7.0 9
7.7 ]7
8.2 1.
7.8
7.2
6.9
7.2 10M
7.5 10


I


P 0 u n
10.3 9.1


9.3
8.8
8.4
8.7
9.0
8.4
8.3
8.7
8.7
8.1
8.0
7.9
8.6
7.9
8.1
8.5
7.8
7.6
8.5
8.3
7.8
7.2
7.9
8.3
8.0
6.8
7.2
6.6
6.1
5.9
7.1
6.7
6.3
5.4
6.2
5.0
6.3
5.1
7.6
6.2
6.1
6.9
7.5
7.0
6.9
6.1
7.2
7.6
7.2
8.1
7.7
6.7
7.1
7.5


8.2
8.2
8.3
8.2
8.5
8.0
10.3
10.1
9.1
9.4
9.5
10.2
9.8
9.0
9.6
8.4
9.3
9.4
12.0
12.4
9.1
8.8
9.3
11.4
11.6
9.6
10.8
9.8
10.5
11.1
10.1
10.4
9.2
11.0
9.1
11.5
9.1
10.8
11. 8
10.5
10.5
10.5
9.4
10.5
10.6
8.8
9.7
9.8
13.4
8.1
8.4
9.1
9.2
9.5


,, B
9.2 8.3
9.3 9.0
9.2 7.9
9.3 8.1
8.1 8.0
9.5 9.3
8.5 8.1
8.1 9.9
8.2 9.2
8.5 8.8
8.2 8.8
7.9 9.3
7.3 9.3
8.2 8.9
8.3 8.1
7.9 8.9
8.0 7.9
7.6 9.6
7.1 8.5
7.7 10.7
6.3 9.4
7.4 8.4
7.0 7.9
7.4 8.7
8.0 11.5
7.7 U.1
7.4 10.7
7.1 8.7
7.6 9.6
7.1 10.0
6.6 9.5
8.2 10.2
7.3 10.1
6.1 9.3
5.6 10.3
6.0 8.6
4.8 13.6
6.8 9.2
4.9 11.6
6.6 9.4
5.9 9.4
5.9 9.8
6.5 8.0
7.3 8.4
7.4 11.2
7.0 11.1
7.6 5.9
6.8 8.6
7.2 9.3
5.4 7.4
7.9 7.0
8.4 8.2
6.2 9.0
7.0 8.6
7.3 9.0


-5-


8.8
9.5
8.8
8.9
9.0
8.5
8.5
7.9
8.2
8.6
7.9
7.4
7.5
7.6
8.0
7.7
7.9
7.7
6.9
7.8
7.2
7.6
6.7
7.4
9.5
9.1
9.0
8.7
8.0
5.3
8.5
7.6
8.2
6.1
7.0
6.2
6.5
3.0
6.8
5.6
5.9
5.9
6.8
7.6
6.2
6.9
7.5
6.7-
7.6
9.5
8.1
7.8
7.2
7.4
7.4


7.6
7.8
6.6
7.6
9.0
9.5
7.8
8.2
8.7
8.4
7.8
7.6
7.8
7.7
7.7
7.7
7.4
9.9
8.0
7.7
10.1
8.2
8.2
8.5
10.4
11.3
12.6
10.9
7.8
6.4
8.0
7.6
9.9
9.0
8.9
9.3
8.9
5.8
7.7
9.8
9.7
9.1
5.9
9.0
8.0
11.4
7.5
10.5
9.2
7.9
8.3
7.0
8.2
8.4
8.5


9.0
9.4
8.9
8.9
8.8
8.6
8.5
7.9
8.3
8.6
8.1
7.8
7.6
8.3
8.5
8.0
8.1
7.7
7.3
8.3
8.0
7.5
7.0
7.6
8.5
8.2
8.0
7.2
7.0
6.2
6.8
7.3
7.2
6.2
5.7
6.2
5.2
5.6
5.3
6.9
6.0
6.0
6.9
7.5
7.0
7.0
7.2
6.8
7.5
8.0
8.1
7.8
7.2
7.4
7.4


8.0
7.9
7.4
7.7
8.7
9.5
7.9
8.4
9.1
8.6
8.8
9.1
9.6
9.3
8.4
9.0
8.0
9.6
8.8
11.3
11.8
8.6
8.3
9.0
11.2
11.5
11.2
10.2
9.4
10.2
9.7
8.4
10.3
9.4
10.8
9.7
10.7
9.1
10.3
10.6
9.8
10.0
9.2
9.6
10.8
11.4
8.4
9.0
9.5
9.3
8.2
7.7
8.3
8.7
9.1


I


r


J


11.1


7... 10








FED OOSOXED PB LATS AID PS OZE SG8
NI LIST AND aKn uBZII


II JAUAm 1944


ff1 Sk5lk.
8TATB liht B r e a A I e a T v r a d mbuttermilk,
andi Per Per Per Per or whey per
DIVISION I&TI Isem -,r,, leer dozma eams 100 hliekma
P o u n da G allows
Me. 9.0 8.5 9.0 7.7 2.2
I.E. 9.0 7.8 9.5 7.9 1.8
Vt. 8.1 7.5 9.0 7,4 1.3
Maass. 7.3 7.4 9.3 7.8 1.3
R. I. 7.2 8.5 8.8 9.0 .8
Oonn. 7.4 8.8 8.9 9.6 2.6
N. T. 8.0 7.3 9.0 8.3 2.2
N. J. 7.8 7.5 8.2 9.3 1.3
Pa- 8.1 8.4 8.7 9.8 2.0
N. AIL. 8.4 8.3 8.9 8.7 1.9
Ohio 8.1 8.2 8.3 9.3 4.7
Ind.. 7.6 8.2 8.0 9.3 8.9
Ill. 7.5 7.9 7.6 10.4 9.9
Mich. 8.1 8.5 9.2 10.8 9.3
Via. 8.4 8,. 8.9 10.1 4.2
1. 3. 0CET. 8.1 8.2 I8. 10.0 7.3
Kinn. 8a1 7.5 8.3 9.5 17.5
Iowa 7.6 9.2 7.9 10,0 24.0
No. 7.1 8.1 7.7 9.8 9.0
N. Dak. 8.1 9.0 8.2 13.1 26.8
S. Dak. 7.7 10.6 8.3 12.2 17.8
Nebr. 7.4 7.5 7.6 9.2 15.3
Kanas. 69 8.5 7.0 8.8 13.9
W. N. CENT* 7.6 8.3 7.8 9.9 17.4


Del.
Nd.
Ta.
W. Ta.
N. C.
S. 0.
Ga.
yV~a,
S. ATL.
Ky.
Temn.
Ala.
miss 88.
Ark.
La.
Okla.
Texas .
S. RNT.
Mont.
Idaho
Ityo
Colo.
N. 3ex.
Arzs.
Utah
Nev.
Vash.
Oreg.
Calif.
VWST.
U. S.


9.0
8.1
7.3
7.1
6.9
5.8
7.0
6.5
7.2
6.5
6.4
6.8
6.2
5.3
5.3
6.5
6.0
6.1
7.1
7.5
6.9
6.8
6.9
7.2
7.5
8.1
7.6
7.7
7.0
7.2
7.4


10.3
10.4
7.6
8.6
7.8
5.9
8.6
7.0
8.5
8.9
9.9
8.0
9.9
7.9
6.5
9.2
9.2
9.2
7.8
9.0
10.6
9.8
7.8
8.5
9.1
8.3
7.4
7.2
7.7
8.0
8.3


8.4
8.5
8.6
7.4
7.3
6.9
6.8
8.2
7.6
6.2
5.7
5.8
4.5
5.7
5.5
7.0
601
5.9
7.0
7.6
6.8
7.28
7.6
7.2
7.5
8.6
8.0
8.0
8.3
7.8
7.6


11.4
12.3
34.1
31.8
10.1
10.8
i1.7
11.9
9.2
11.2
10.9
12.4
11.3
12.5
11.8
Ill.
10.8
10.0
10.7
10.8
11.9
11.8
9.9
11.9
9.8
7.9
8.8
11.5
10.1
10.0


2.6
2.1
4.9
8.1
4.6
6.5
6.0
4.7
5.2
9.3
9.1
7.0
7.5
12.2
4.7,
12.4
8.3
9.0
21.6
11.9
22.7
11.6
15.8
6.1
5.7
13.0
8.3
9.0
3.2
8.2
9.8


-6-


U. S.










COMMERCIAL MASH FED TO CHICKENS ON FARMS IN JANUARY 1944
PERCENT OF TOTAL FEED
(BY CROP REPORTING DISTRICTS)


PERCENT
UNDEI 10
10-19
20-29
30-39
40-49
50-59
60 ,.ND OVER


33.4 PERCENT


.S DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
FIUHE 1 COMMERCIAL VASH MAKES UP THE LARGEST PORTION OF THE TOTAL FEED FED TO LAYING FL03KS FOR TI-E COUNTRY AS A hHOLE AND LEADS
ALL P3LLTRY FEEDS IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC, SOUTH ATLANTIC, AEST AND SOUTH CENTRAL STATES.


UN I TED















I -,-- A2











COMMERCIAL SCRATCH FED TO CHICKENS ON FARMS IN JANUARY 1944
PERCENT OF TOTAL FEED
(BY CROP REPORTING DISTRICTS)


1 -
2 -
3 -
4 -


PERCENT
UNDER 5
5-9
10-19
20 AND OVER


UNITED


U S DEPARTMENT OF AGfCULTURE
FIGURE 3 ':O.MENCIAL SCRATCH IS TkE LEADING FORM OF SCRATCH FED IN ThE NORTH ATLArNTIC STATES. IN FLORIDA, LOUI5IANA, GEORGIA,
.EST VIRGINIA, AND WESTERN 'VASHlM.TCN IT IS AN IMPORTANT PARiT OF THE POULTRY RATION.


m : .. .. .. "









































































U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
F'lGUHE 4 CORN IS THE MOST POPULAR GRAIN FED TO POULTRY IN ALL PARTS OF THIE COUNTRY EXCEPT T"E WEST WHERE WHEAT IS THE LEADING

FEEO GRAIN. CORN LEADS ALL OTHER FEES IN THE NORTH CENTRAL STATES AND IN THE SOUTH CENTRAL AND SOUTH ATLANTIC STATES
IT FOLLOWS ONLY COMMERCIAL MASH IN IMPORTANCE.



... :. ... .


:ii::.............i






. ...--...-.-.-....


IJ WHEAT FED TO CHICK-ENS .l4:A.RMS IN JANUARY 1944
.3- P PERCENT OF TOTAL FEED
1f -,,.1 ) (BY CROP REPOITJI4i DISTRICTS)


PERCENT
UNDER 5
5-9
10-19
20-29
30-"9
50 AND OVER


UN I TED


U%. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICj.IJRE
FIGURE 5 -rlHEAT IS THE LEADING SCRATCH GRAIN IN THE VVESTERN STATES, WHERE LITTLE CORN IS GROWN. IN VONTANA, IDAHO, WYOMING. AND
UTAH WHEAT MA(ES UP A LARGE FART OF THE POULTRY RATION. IN OT-ER PARTS OF THE COUNTRY WHEAT FED AS SCRATCH AMOUNTS
L O0 B TO 10 PERCENT OF THE RkTION.








N It 'OATS FED TO CHICKENS 0.14 ARMS :IN JANUARY 1944
PERGAT OF TOTAL FEED
(BY CROP REPORTIRG DISTRICTS)
2 2 2 2 4


2 2 2

2 '4 3
3 3
2
4
2 AL


4
3

3 3
2 2 3
3 3
2 2 3 3
2
3 3,
3



...... ....
2- 2




...... ....
3

4
'VEO STA 9 A' RA




X 'J
ai ILL!




ut 0

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