Incorporating contemporary pottery approaches into a high school ceramics course

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Title:
Incorporating contemporary pottery approaches into a high school ceramics course
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Project in lieu of thesis
Language:
English
Creator:
Moran, Kimberly D.
Publisher:
College of Fine Arts; University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla
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Abstract:
This research project involved introducing contemporary ceramics to students in a level two public high school ceramics/pottery class. A lesson plan was developed and implemented in which students examined how pottery progressed through history along with specific contemporary potters whose technical and conceptual accomplishments influenced the pottery world. Students were given the opportunity to develop a list of current environmental, social and cultural issues relate to their lives and to consider creating a contemporary ceramic artwork that expressed their voices around an issue. Through research on each of their topics, a brief written synopsis, and a series of sketches, students developed their ceramic artworks. Students were encouraged to develop their voices through their contemporary pottery piece. Action research was used and photographs, a personal reflective journal, several pre and post project reflections, and interviews were collected and analyzed. A final exhibition was held where the public was given an opportunity to see the artwork and talk with students. A survey was used at the exhibition in order to document and analyze the impact of the artwork on the students and audience.
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College of Fine Arts; University of Florida

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University of Florida Institutional Repository
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University of Florida
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All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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AA00017328:00001


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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 1 INCORPORATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE By KIMBERLY D. MORAN A CAPSTONE PROJECT PRESENTED TO THE COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS OF THE UNIVERS I TY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 2013

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 2 2013 Kimberly D. Moran

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 3 Acknowledgements I would like to thank Dr. Michelle Tillander and Anna Calluori Holcombe for their encouragement, guidance, support and expertise in a rt education. I would also like to thank Dr. Elizabeth Delacruz for her influence and knowledge I gained from her teachings. A special thank you to my husband, M. G., for his patience, encouragement, and support in helping me achieve this life long dream. To my children, Jamie and Nathaniel, thanks for your support; I hope you see one is never too old to further one's education. I would also like to thank my entire family, friends, and colleagues for all their support and patience. I would thank the Arts an d Design Society Art Gallery and their staff for hosting the student exhibition. Many thanks to my church family at First Presbyterian Church of Fort Walton Beach who gave me a scholarship and a great deal of encouragement and support to achieve this life long dream.

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 4 ABSTRACT OF CAPSTONE PROJECT PRESENTED TO THE COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS INCORPORATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL C ERAMICS COURSE By Kimberly D. Moran August 2013 Chair: Dr. Michelle Tillander Committee Member: Anna Calluori Holcombe Major: Art Education Abstract This research project involved introducing contemporary ceramics to students in a level two public high school ceramics/pottery class. A lesson plan was developed and implemented in which students examined how pottery progressed through history along with specific contemporary potters whose technical and conceptual accomplishments influenced the pottery wor ld. Students were given the opportunity to develop a list of current environmental, social and cultural issues relate to their lives and to consider creating a contemporary ceramic artwork that expressed their voices around an issue. Through research on ea ch of their topics, a brief written synopsis, and a series of sketches, students developed their ceramic artworks. Students were encouraged to develop their voices through their contemporary pottery piece. Action research was used and photographs, a person al reflective journal, several pre and post project reflections, and interviews were collected and analyzed. A final exhibition was held where the public was given an opportunity to see the artwork and talk with students. A survey was used at the exhibitio n in order to document and analyze the impact of the artwork on the students and audience.

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 5 Table of Contents Title Page ............................................................................................................................. .. ..... 1 UF Copyright Page............................................................................................................ .... ...... 2 Acknowledgments ...................................................................................................... .......... ...... 3 UF Formatted Abstract........................................................................................................ .. ...... 4 Table of Contents .................................................................................... .................................... 5 9 Statement of the Problem ................................................................................................ 9 Purpose or Goals of the Study ............. .......................................................................... 9 Research Questions ............................................................... ........................... ...... ....... 9 Rationale and Significance of the Study .............. .............. ......... ............................. .... 10 Assumptions .................................................................................................. ....... ....... 10 Definition of Terms ................................................ ........................................ .............. 10 Limitations of the Study ........................................................................................ ..... 11 Literature Review .......................................................... ........................................................... 11 Pottery's Beginning ................................................................................................ ...... 12 Developments in Pottery ........................................... .............................................. .... 13 Impacts and Movements in the Pottery World 13 21st Century Contemporary Potters ....... 15

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 6 Methodology 18 18 Research Site 19 Data Collection Procedures and Instrumentation 19 Data Analysis Procedures 20 Limitations .................................................................................................... 21 Findings 21 First Discovery: High School Students Aware if Current Issues in Their World 22 Second Discovery: Stu dents were sympathetic and helpful to each other during the creative/production process 24 Third Discovery: Students were able to successfully express current issues and develop voice through their contemporary ceramic artwork 25 Fourth Discovery: The art exhibition provided a platform for the students and the community to dialog 26 Implications and Recommendations 28 References 30 Appendix A 34 Appendix B .................................. 37 List of Figures with Figure Captions 47 Author Biography 48

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 7 Ceramics has existed since people discovered the ability to take clay, form it into a vessel or sculptu re add color, and fire it to make it permanent. Contemporary pottery is marked by characteristics of the material and ideas of the period in which it is created. T oday potters are creating and developing new techniques along with traditional methods to c reate aesthetically compelling visual statement s in response to present day culture. Ceramic artists rely on their individual skills and dedicate their time and energy to master a variety of techniques and materials. H owever, they also include concepts in the making of their work Contemporary ceramic artworks often accommodate ceramic traditions, cultures, and history as well as the influence of contemporary art avant garde. Traditionally pottery has been viewed as an art form made to serve a function. H owever, today's potters are creating pieces where the form of traditional pottery is being rethought as an art form serving more than just functionality. Contemporary potters are developing new clay techniques, which combined with traditional methods creat e an aesthetically compelling visual statement in response to pre sent day culture. Their ceramic artwork often juxtaposes ancient ceramic techniques with modern symbols and imagery or provides insight into political, cultural, and environmental issues from around the world. Contemporary pottery has an exciting appeal to it because potters are pushing the limits and possibilities in how clay can be used to capture themes about the world through the ir eyes Many contemporary potters derive inspiration for th eir work from an array of social, cultural, and environmental issues as seen in Tammie Rubin's work, "Messages" (O'Donnell, 2012). In Rubin's "Messages" large clay forms depict a variety of communication devices leaving the viewer somewhat confused as her hybrid forms speaking in a coded language Expecting to hear sound, the viewer is left with silence. Rubin sends a message of how

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 8 communication in our world can be a visual transmission through metaphoric mechanisms The shift in contemporary pottery away from functionality is not without criticism, however, as observed by Hluch (2001), "There are some who would trim the role of function from utilitarian pottery to acquire enhanced respect or prestige that currently exists in the fine art culture for non ut ilitarian art objects. But this diminishes the distinct and valuable service pottery performs and obfuscates its original historical role in societies ." (p. 11) My research does not aim to lessen the role of function from utilitarian pottery or to acquire enhanced respect or prestige for it, but is interested in conjoining how levels I and II high school ceramic s and I might engage contemporary issues through a ceramic voice. For my capstone research project the lesson plan identified artists and approach es to contemporary ceramics and examined some different techniques that today potters use. Action research method was used to make visible the process of classroom transformation and to show how contemporary ceramics could be used as a vehicle for contem porary dialogues about our world Action research was also used to study a unit of the curriculum I created and taught over a ten week period in which students created a contemporary piece of pottery that spoke to their issue. Through this process, the hop e was to use ceramics as a way for students to gain a greater understanding of themselves, their world, and how their art could be used to make a personal statement about their world. Statement of the Problem I believed students in a contemporary high sch ool studio pottery class need ed to be exposed to techniques, concepts, skills, and ideas in order to develop a voice for contemporary issues. The problem is how do we afford the time, and what techniq u es can be used to engage student s in exploring contempo rary issues with ceramic arts.

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 9 Purpose or Goals of the Study The purpose of my research was to explore how my students in Ceramics/Pottery II class created and developed a contemporary piece of pottery they conceptualized in response to researching a cur rent issue that affected them and their world. In addition, the use of action research w as a way to creatively and critically reflect on a method to document and record classroom practice. Action research enabled me to study how my students became familia r with contemporary ceramic forms using different types of techniques and material s often used by contemporary potters. Another goal was to consider how my students and the community might began to understand how c eramic arts could be used to make a statem ent and develop a voice for reflecting on social, cultural, or environmental issue s i n our lives Research Questions To explore the use of ideas and themes in a high school ceramics art class my main research question was: How can high school art students engage contemporary ceramics and issues in their ceramic artwork? Additional questions considered throughout this research were: How can high school students bridge the gap between traditional/historical and contemporary pottery? In what ways do high sc hool students make a connection with social, cultural, or environmental issues that affect them through the study of contemporary pottery? What kinds of pottery do students in high school in a contemporary pottery class create in order to show how their wo rld and issues affecting them might be conveyed through this art form?

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 10 Rationale and Significance of the Study The rationale for this study was to identify strategies to help students look at their world closely and find out more about how they can use t hemes and current issues to develop a voice thr ough ceramic art. I believe if the students are able to make a connection with a current issue that affects them and create a piece of contemporary pottery that speaks to the issue, the student s will hopefully develop a voice that speaks loud and clear for those who view their art piece. This study is significant in that the research project engages student s and the community in communicating current issues through art. Assumptions Through the study of contem porary pottery and the creation of personally meaningful ceramic forms, I assumed that students would be interested in understanding their world and how issues affect them and their peers. I assumed that students would be able to convey their thoughts and feelings into a contemporary pottery piece I assumed that when the completed ceramic artworks viewed by the public in an exhibition the artwork w ould stimulate conversations around the issues students explored Definition of Terms Traditional pottery ar e objects which has been formed by hand, painted with natural pigments, and fired with an organic fuel (Mackey, 2003, p. 26). Contemporary means marked by the characteristics of the present period; happening, existing, living, or coming into being during the same period of time (Merriam Webster, 2012). Pottery are articles, vessels, etc. made from earthenware and baked in a kiln (Collins, 2012). Ceramics are objects made from clay that permanently retain their shape after they have been heated to specifi c temperatures (Mackey, 2013, p. 190). Also defined as: of or relating

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 11 to the manufacture of any product (as earthenware, porcelain, or brick) made essentially from a nonmetallic mineral (as clay) by firing at a high temperature (Merriam Webster, 2012). Li mitations of the Study In using action research, the amount of time to do the study played a major role in the study (May, 1993; Stout, 2006). The study was conducted over a course of ten weeks due to different stages of making a clay piece. For example, once the students finished their clay piece, the amount of time it took to dry completely varied from one to three weeks. Once the clay pieces were dry, the clay pieces were bisque fired in a kiln Upon completion of the firing and cooling of th e kiln, the clay pieces were returned to the students to be glazed or painted. Glazed pieces went through a second firing in order to complete the piece at Literature Review Contemporary pottery (ceramics), created b y twentieth century potters, h as an appeal and a uniqueness of its own that sets it apart from traditional pottery. Contemporary is defined by Webster's New World Dictionary as "living or happening in the same period of time; of about the same age; and of or in the style of the present of recent times; modern" (1994, p. 300). In her book, Art History Stokstad clarifies several terms, ". 'pottery' and 'ceramics' may be used interchangeably and the two often are" (2008, p. 20). She goes on to explain that the word ceramics "covers all baked clay wares" whereas pottery "includes all baked clay wares except porcelain" (2008). It was not until the nineteenth century the word ceramics began being used (Stokstad, 2005). In order to get a clearer understanding of what contemporary potte ry is or is not, one must look at the history of pottery. In her book, Experience Clay Mackey observes, "Of all the arts, ceramics has perhaps the longest history, dating back to when people learned to control fire"

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 12 (2003, p. 5). In looking at ceramic tim elines, one can gain an appreciation of how humans from all over the world have invented and utilized various types of clay bodies, firing methods, and decorative techniques in order to create a variety of pottery used to serve many functions. These functi ons have ranged from simple drinking cups to grain storage containers, from beautifully designed teapots to ornamental burial urns and effigy jars. The potter's role in societies around the world has been to satisfy the never ending need for useful object s as observed by Hluch in his book, The Art of Contemporary American Pottery (2001, p. 25). Pottery's Beginning If one looks at the historical aspect s of pottery making in various parts of the world, the many forms pottery has taken are somewhat phenomen al. Mackey (2003) discusses how the idea of taking clay from the ground and mixing it with water to create a substance with a plasticity allowing humankind to shape and mold it into a beautiful vessel was rather ingenious. Historians and archeologists who have studied shards of pottery have discovered an abundance of information about cultures and societies all over the world. Since pottery disintegrates very slowly, "pottery fragments serve as a major key in dating sites and reconstructing human livi ng and trading patterns" (Stokstad, 2008, p. 20). Historians note the importance of pottery to societies throughout time repeatedly In his article, "The Importance of Pottery in Human Development," Petty (2010) indicates how pottery was an important aspec t of Ancient Greek and Roman civilizations. He comments on how their usage "of geometric design s and images to depict stories and events" was placed on pottery items, indicating how important the role of pottery was to these societies. As Greek potters con tinued to produce their beautifully decorated vessels potters in other parts of the world were creating pottery for their own culture.

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 13 Developments in Pottery With the establishment of major trade routes across Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas potter y became an important commodity used for trading. This also allowed for the sharing of information and items such as glazing techniques and pottery created by diverse cultures (Mackey, 1996). With the expansion of the Roman Empire, a number of technologica l innovations developed in Northern Europe. Mackey states in her timeline, "They introduced the potter's wheel, produced relief decorated ware from molds, and developed large, parallel flue kilns. Workshops were turned into factories as great quantities of pottery were mass produced for their growing cities and large armies" (1996). Chinese invented porcelain over 1000 years ago and the Europeans began using it 300 years ago. Between 1400 and 1900 potters around the world were developing new kinds of glazi ng techniques and firing methods. For example, the Japanese learned to Raku fire while German potters were throwing salt into the kilns to achieve a strong, hard glaze on their high fired stoneware French potters had learned the technique of tin glazing f rom Italian potters creating their own style known as Faience Dutch potters were creating strong, hard surfaces on their wares by adding a second firing with a lead glaze. Impacts and Movements in the Pottery World The pottery world has gone through man y changes and continues yet today. One of the major impacts on the pottery world was the Industrial Revolution. The inexpensive, mass produced pottery took the place of the handmade pottery forcing some potters to stop producing their work only to take a j ob in the pottery factories. Potteries known as Stoke on Trent, North Staffordshire in England became a very prominent production center by 1800. With the introduction of Plaster of Paris, slip casting, and the string throwing wheel the individuality of

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 14 p ottery making was practically lost, therefore causing the culture that was once captured in clay to start to dwindle and fade (Stoke Museums, 2012) nearly a century of Ceramics Today, 3). It thrived for more than seventy years. Another movement that impact ed the pottery world was the Modern Movement. This movement began around 1900 and lasted for f orty years. Walter Gropius, a pioneer of modern design, taught the dictum that form follows function at the Bauhaus in Germany (Mackey, 1996) Through his teachings, many ceramic factories in Germany set up studios for their designers in response to the Ba uhaus precept. Other men who had a major impact on the pottery world were Bernard Leach and Shoji Hamada. Leach, a British potter, "pushed for the revival of clay as a handcraft in the 1940's and 1950's through the Studio Potter Movement (Mackey, 2003, p. 169). Hamada, a Japanese potter, traveled around the world with Leach teaching fundamental principles of clay design. While touring in the United States in 1952, they met Peter Voulkos, a functional potter and teacher (Mackey, 2003) who also became part o f the movement to establish ceramics as a craft. In 1953 after meeting artists involved in the Avant garde and Abstract Expressionist movement, Voulkos spent the next decades "pushing the boundaries of functional clay beyond handcraft to art and setting th e tone for a whole new generation of mid to late twentieth century clay artists" (Mackey, 2003, p. 169). Voulkos succeeded in blurring the lines between craft and art. "As a result, a whole new concept ceramic art came into being. A clay object could now be valued solely for its sensory and aesthetic properties" (Mackey, 2003, p.169). Women have also played a major role in the making of pottery. In Women's Contribution to the Ceramic Field, Jayne Shatz (2008) observes that women worked as potters in ancie nt

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 15 times "producing high quality ceramic work" over 25,000 years ago ( 3). With the invention of the potter's wheel, men took over the production of pottery, which slowly evolved into a mass production business. By the start of the 19th century, women beg an to re emerge onto the ceramic scene becoming leaders in applying the Arts and Crafts principles to social reform. Wanting to represent and contribute their ideas, women began working in art potteries, schools, private studios, and industry making their mark in the ceramic field. In the article, Examining the First Women Potters in America and their Influence on Contemporary Ceramic Art, Mark states, "During the early 1900's, women in America were becoming artists, teachers, business owners" (2007, p. 7 1). His research involved twelve women potters whose professional and artistic developments and achievements had a major impact on American pottery in the twentieth century, on each other, and future generations of ceramic artists. Two women potters whose professional and artistic developments and achievements that impacted the pottery world were Louise McLaughlin and Adelaide Alsop Robineau. 21st Century Contemporary Potters Contemporary potters continue to explore new and inventive ways of combining tra ditional methods and modern day ideas into an array of intriguing and compelling pieces of artwork "While three dimensional form arises almost magically from the potter's hand, the dynamic range of surface possibilities offer further enchantments" (Hluch, 2001, p. 87). Potters and ceramicists are taking the basic form and putting a new twist on it, creating not only compelled to become expert in all phases of pot tery production. This requires a tremendous amount of discipline Contemporary potter, Mark Hewitt states, I am a maker of mugs, pitchers, and plates, among other things. I do not want to

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 16 make non functional pots; I tried it once and I did not like it, neither the process nor the outcome I am neither a ceramic artist nor a sculptor: I am a potter and I am proud. My pots are expressions of my individuality; they illuminate the world; they rage against it; they fascin ate me with myriad details. My reasons for making pots are complicated and keep changing, but make them I do, and make them I will. My soul is at stake each time I squeeze eloquence out of dirt. (2007, 1) In his article, Hewitt discusses how the world of ceramics has been divided in way s such as arts and crafts, functional pottery and ceramic sculpture, the academy and the marketplace as well as Imperial ceramics and folk ceramics, yet the connecting element is quality. According to Hewitt, this is wha t all potters and ceramic artists work toward and what good pottery criticism encourages (2007) Contemporary potters such as Katie McBride and Linda Lighton create pieces with a sculptural flair and delicacy. Influenced by the work of the ceramists from the Precious Potteries, their pieces, which I then give a modern (p. 54). Her pieces have a delightful yet mischievous and playful look to them. Even though her pieces are functional the sculptures she adds to the form give it a quality of fine art. 2011, p. 24). Her pieces of porcelain are delicate with a rhythmic flow. Polansk y goes on to state,

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 17 sculptures have a feel that mesmerizes the viewer. Wheth er incorporating traditional methods or developing new styles, combining functional form with sculptural tendencies or using technology to give their work a different edge, or even just creating a coffee cup potters have the ability to embrace their world with beauty and/or functionality permanently leaving a bit of their soul in every piece they create. I have not even scratched the surface of the variety of artwork being produced by contemporary potters and ceramicists. For many contemporary potters, th e idea of utilizing traditional methods in new and inventive ways gives substance and validity to their work. Incorporating their world as they see and experience it allows them to embed themselves in their work in order to give the viewer an emotional exp erience of looking at their world through a different set of eyes. Examples of contemporary pottery/ceramics can be found in books such as : Shifting Paradigms in Contemporary Ceramic : The Garth Clark and Mark Del Vecchio Collection by Garth Clark and Cindi Strauss ; Confrontational Ceramics by Judith S. Schwartz ; Contemporary Ceramic Techniques by John W. Conrad; and The Encyclopedia of Pottery Techniques : A Comprehensive Visual Guide to Traditional and Contemporary Technique s by Peter Cosentino Journals su ch as Ceramics Monthly; Ceramic Review; Ceramics Today; and Ceramics Art and Perception are additiona l resource information about contemporary ceramics Methodology A ction research ( Lewin, 1944; Whitehead & McNiff, 2006; Kemmis & McTaggart 1988) was us ed to study students in a high school Ceramics/Pottery II class where curriculum was designed to introduce students to contemporary pottery techniques.

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 18 Action research is a form of collective self reflective enquiry undertaken by participants in social si tuations in order to improve the rationality and justice of their own social or educational practices, as well as their understanding of those practices and the situations is collaborative, though it is important to reali z e that action research of the group is achieved through the critically examined action of individual grou p members. (Kemmis and McTaggart, 1 988 pp. 5 6) Using action research method, I used a spiral of st eps to plan, document, and reflect on what happened as students created a piece of contemporary pottery developed from their research of the current issue they had selected and sketches they created reflecting this information. A ction research allows the r esearcher/educator to improve on their practices through reflection thus gaining a better understanding of their practices in order to enhance student learning (May, 1993; Stout, 2006) Through action research, documentation of the process of students enga ged in working with the clay to creating their contemporary piece involved photographing students, class discussions and critiques, student interviews, and student surveys. Subjects The subjects in my research were high school students of various ages ra nging from tenth t o twelfth grade. Students were from different ethnic backgrounds consisting of Caucasian, African American, Asian, and Hispanic. The study took place in a level two Ceramics/Pottery class with a population of 20 students consisting of thr ee males and seventeen females The research was voluntary with UF Institutional Review Board ( IRB ) approval ( see Appendix A) to protect the participants Students were offered an opportunity to volunteer to participate in the

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 19 research Participation or no n participation in this study did not have an effect on the student's grade; however students were required to complete all class assignments as they were graded. Research Site Upon approval of the UF IRB, school district approval and administrative appr oval, the study took place in a public high school pottery classroom in an urban community in Florida with a student population of 1,697. The school is located in a major military town where there is a strong military influence. The area is situated along the Gulf Coast where many retirees move to and become volunteers in the schools. Data Collection Procedures and Instrumentation Through action research, teaching strategies could be enhanced as well as improve student learning i n the classroom T eachers can investigate, reflect, and improve on their own teaching methods by becoming researchers. Collection of data can help the teacher develop strategies in order to promote student learning as well as enhance understanding (May, 1993; Stout 2006) With th s, parent and student permission forms, approval permission data was collected for this study. I collected data through the following artifacts and process : interviewing each s tudent ; direct conservations with students ; daily journaling ; student project sketchbooks and reflections ; daily observation of the process as students engaged in creating their contemporary piece ; photographing the process over a period of eleven weeks ; s tudent survey ; artist statement ; exhibition ; and audience survey. Data Analysis Procedures Data was analyzed and classified into categories to show how students made connections between their research and their contemporary pottery piece Data analysis wa s ongoing

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 20 throughout the research. Daily conversation with the students was vital in helping students to reflect and evaluate their contemporary piece in order to make needed changes or develop a solution to a problem. By keeping a daily journal, I was abl e to reflect on my teaching skills as well as the students' creative process. Upon completion of the contemporary clay pieces, an exhibition was held where students and the audience could dialogue about these current issues, the effects on society, and how the student's contemporary piece reflected this issue. Limitations The limitations of this research was a combination of limited access to information and resources for student research, the short amount of time the study was conducted over a period of eleven weeks and only having two days to exhibit the students work in a public gallery Because the research took place in a real world public high school studio art classroom using action research unforeseen issues and a level of unpredictability occur red. Students were limited to accessibility to technology for research because the media center was closed for testing and there was only one student computer in the classroom. Drying time of the clay pieces was crucial to avoid possible breakages because of the limited time to complete the clay piece. Another limitation w as only having two days to exhibit the contemporary pieces for the audience t o vie w the show. Findings The main purpose of my study was to observe my high school students engage d in usin g contemporary pottery techniques to create a contemporary ceramic piece with voice of a current issue. My main research question through the study was : How can high school art students engage contemporary cer amics and issues in ceramic art work? The follow ing t hree sub questions also informed my research. How can high school students bridge the gap between

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 21 traditional/historical and contemporary pottery? In what ways do high school students make a connection with social, cultural, or environmental issue tha t affect them through the study of contemporary pottery? Finally, W hat ki n ds of potter y do high school students in con temporary pottery class create in order to show how their world and issu es affecting them might be conveyed through ceramic art form? In the following section, I will explain some of my findings I discovered in conducting this research share some implications and reflect on future projects that resulted from this research. Students were shown a variety of contemporary pottery to illustrate how contemporary pottery could speak with voice. I observed students as they discussed and created a list of current issues they felt strongly about and then sub divided the issues into three categories. Student's research of the issues selected showed man y of the students had feelings about the same issues. One issue that seemed to have an impact overall was keeping the water and the beaches free of pollution. The students were very concerned with their environment. However, students were very vocal in pic king an issue that other students had not selected. The student interviews I conducted showed that students felt strongly about the issue they had selected and for some it involved personal experience. Sketches created by the students illustrated their ide a of the issue in a variety of ways. As students began the process of creating their contemporary piece out of clay, photographing students to document the process helped the students to reflect on their skills and techniques as their piece developed. Firs t Discovery: High school students aware of current issues in their world Students were given the task of developing a list of current issues in a brainstorming session during class. Students spent two days working together in groups to create a list of cu rrent issues Students then sub divided the issues into social, cultural, and environmental

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 22 issues. (See Figure 1 ) Many of the issues were controversial and polarizing f or example, abortion, racial p rofiling, sexual orientation gun control and terrorism. It was very educational to listen and observe the students as they discussed issues relevant to their lives, as well as how they defende d their views on their issues Figure 1 A student's list of current issues gathered by the class.

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 23 Once students completed their research, I interview ed each student individually in o rder to understand the reason for the student's selection and their concept for creating their contemp orary ceramic piece It was surprising to discover how many of the students had personally been affected by the issue they had chosen to explore in their art Some of the students' comments from the interviews were as follows: "The reason I chose cancer awareness is because my mother and father are cancer survivors and one of my grandparents died from cancer." (Reflection response, Kory F., April, 201 3) "I am choosing to do my contemporary piece about teenage suicide because two relatives in my family committed suic ide, one just this year." (Reflection response, Meagan H. April, 2013) "I want to do my contemporary piece on how people discriminate a gainst and judge people unfairly because of the music they listen to. People judge me because of the music I listen to and it isn't fair. I am not a bad person becasue of the music I listen to." (Reflection response, Courtney B. April, 2013) "As a victim of sexual abuse, I want to make people aware of how this issue is kept quiet and many times overlooked. Victims need to speak out." (Reflection response, Caitlin S., April, 2013) T reflections helped me to gain an under standing of ho w the student sees their world and how these issues affected them, whether directly or indirectly.

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 24 Second Discovery: Students were sympathetic and helpful to each other during the c reative/production process After students had select ed the issue to explo re for their contemporary piece and completed the research, the next phase involved developing the ir concept through a series of sketches. (See Figure 2 ) Students engaged in class discussions and critiques of the sketches in order to give each other feedba ck and ideas to help one an other (See Figure 3 ) Figure 3. Students engaged in conversation about the issues and the sketches they have created. Figure 2. Students developing their concept for the is sue they selected through sketching their ideas.

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 25 Once the students began working with the clay in creating their piece, I observed several times students engaging in conversation about their clay piece. On occasion, I noted how student s became aware of their peers having difficulty with an area of their piece, even to the point of start ing over. Students would offer suggestions or help to the student and many times encourage d the ir fellow student s to not give up (See Figures 4 and 5) I t was interesting to watch how the class became a large working cooperative unit, not just individuals. Third Discovery: Students were able to successfully express current issue s and develop voice through thei r contemporary ceramic artwork Afte r eleven weeks students completed their contemporary ceramic piece. All the contemporary pieces were exhibited at the Arts and Design Society G allery for two days for public viewing. The art exhibition was juried by two art teachers from Okaloosa County. J udges were asked to judge based on how well the piece had voice in addressing the issue the student had researched. Judges were also asked to consider the pieces on the content, quality, and technique used to create the piece. Having the show juried was ou tside the context of my Figure 5. Student helping another student with glazing. wwithggglglaz glazingglazing Figure 4. Student (left) engaged in conversation with the student (right) about her c ontemporary piece

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 26 research but it allowed students the opportunity of having their work viewed in a competitive/professional setting. juried before the art can be exhibited. During th e exhibition, the audience also juried the student artwork T he audience participated in select ing a piece for the "People Choice" award The contemporary piece selected (see Figure 6 ) addressed the issue of teenage suicide, titled Choice of Life Fourth Discovery: The art exhibition provided a platform for the students and the community to dialogue about art and current issues. The exhibition took place over a two day period. Students contemporary pieces were exhibited throughout the galler y where the audience could view the pieces (See Appendix B). Students and members of the audience participated in dialogue s about the artwork. S tudents were complemented on the quality of their artwork and how well they had communicated their ideas Figure 6. Student's contemporary piece on teenage suicide, titled Choice of Life was selected by the audience for the People's Choice Award.

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 27 In ad dition, m embers of the audience also responded to the students' contemporary pieces through an audience survey consisting of four questions. Using ceramics as a vehicle to express current issues, 98% of the audience felt the students expressed and were cle ar in their interpretation of the issue they had chosen This addressed Questions 1 and 2 The audience was asked to select the piece they felt had the strongest voice in conveying the issue the student explored to create their contemporary piece. The surv eys revealed 26% of the audience selected Choice of Life 10% selected L ookout! with 9% selec ting each, The Choice ? Silently Spoken, and Color Blind (s ee Appendix B) The last question asked the audience to select the piece that spoke directly to them. 1 6% of the audience selected Choice of Life. This question bought an array of comments from the audience with many who had faced this issue themselves or a loved one. Other pieces selected were Silently Spoken with 12%, The Choice ? with 10%, Color Blind and Never Let Go, each with 9%. Some of the audience comments to the contemporary pieces were as follows: "Teenage suicide is more common than realized." (Audience survey, June, 2013) "Choice of Life spoke to me because not only teens and young adults deal with this issue but also persons of all ages and stages of life. Personal experiences with issue as a health care provider." (Audience survey, June 2013) "I volunteer at a pregnancy help center. I see many young pregnant women and no men 'manning up' Bring back Fatherhood!" (Audience survey, June, 2013) "My concerns for young women who have lost the good thoughts of their own body and life." (Audience survey, June, 2013) "Children are unable to help themselves. Their powerlessness is demonstrated by the 'tape over the mouth in the head figure. Both Silently Spoken and Lookout! convey the

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 28 plight of these children. Why is there abuse? What de sensitizes the kind spirit? Why would another human enslave another ore abuse another?" (Audience survey June, 2013) Many m embers of the audience were visibly moved by the students' artwork and many of the students experienced seeing how their contempora ry piece spoke to the audience. I was surprise d when a ceramics colleague of mine who teaches at a local college commented on the value of the artist statement, which was printed in the program. He was impressed with what the students had accomplished and commented on how college students struggle with knowing why they create their art. He felt this was a vit al step in the creation of artwork (Journal reflection, K. Moran, 2013) This research has given me great insight into using conte mporary pottery approaches in a high school ceramics class Students gained a greater understanding of how ceramics as an art form could be used to engage the public as well as themselves through issues affecting society. Student learning was enhanced as they became engaged in making connections with their world through creating a piece of contemporary pottery with voice They ex perienced how their art could speak to members of the audience about issues in their world. In the next section, I will share my im plications and future endeavors. Implications and Recommendations As a reflective practitioner, action research was a good m ethodology for my research study. It bought new insights to my teaching methods by helping me to capture and evaluate my methods and to modify them in order to promote student learning and achievement. It is interesting to note that the lesson had the be nefit of being therapeutic for many students. Students were able to express some of the emotional trauma they had carried inside themselves by researching, designing, and creating their contemporary ceramic piece s

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 29 According to the audience survey, the ar twork made a deep impression on the audience Many members of the audience made a personal connection with a particular piece that spoke directly to them due to their past with that topic This allowed the students and the audience to connect and dialogue about the issues. Students advance experience with ceramics and their age further facilitate conversation with the audience at the exhibition. Art educators can use this research to help students in a ceramics studio class become engaged in issues in thei r world By utilizing c ontemporary ceramics as a vehicle, art educators can help students become aware of techniques and materials used in creating a contemporary piece. Contemporary ceramic techniques can help students develop voice in creating their clay pieces and through this art form can help students make a connection with the audience through dialogue as well as evoking a reaction. In looking ahead, future endeavors include incorporating contemporary pottery approaches into future Ceramics/Pottery II III and Sculpture I classes. I also plan to continue to use action research informally in continuing to improve my teaching practices. As a goal I plan to create summer workshops for art teachers in my school district to share this research in using cont emporary potte ry approaches in the classroom.

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 30 Reference s About.com. (2012). What is contemporary art? Art History. Retrieved from http://arthistory.about.com/od/current_co ntemporary_art/f/what_is.htm Adlin, Jane. (1998). Contemporary ceramics: Selections from the M etropolitan M useum of A rt. Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY: Metropolitan Museum of Art. Art 21, Inc. (2012). Contemporary art in context. Retrieved from http://www.art21.org/print/2959 Artspan. (2012). Introduction to ceramics. Artspan Contemporary Art, Artspan Portal: Ceramics Retrieved from http://www.artspan.com/ceram ics Bandelier National Monument Museum Collections. (2012). Contemporary p ueblo. Retrieved from http://www.nps.gov/museum/exhibits/band/contemporary.html Bowers, S. (2008). The cult ure of manual and thinking skills: The 2007 south Australian ceramics award. Ceramics: Art and Perception, 71, 47 50. Brown, G. (2009). Contemporary ceramics and critical theory: Prestige, professionalism and perspective. Ceramics: Art and Perception 75 1 07 110. Cardew, M. (2011/2012, Winter/Spring). Why make pots in the last quarter of the 20 th century. Studio Potter, 40 (1), 64 69. Ceramics (n.d.) In Merriam Webster online dictionary. Retrieved from http://www.merriam webster.com/dictionary/ceramic Ceramics Today. (2006.). The arts & crafts movement in Europe and America, 1880 1920: Design for the modern world. Ceramics Today. Retrieved from http://www.ceramicstoday.com/articles/cleveland.htm

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 31 Contemporary. (n.d.). In Merriam Webster online dictionary. Retrieved from http://www.merriam webster.com/dicti onary/contemporary Eklund, P. (2012, May/June). Country life and contemporary pots. Ceramic Review, 255, 40 68. Green, N. (2012). Reawakenings: Modern and contemporary ceramics from the Shatzman collection. Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell Univer sity. Retrieved from http://museum.cornell.edu/exhibitions/view/reawakenings shatzman.html Hewitt, M. (2007, June). Functional pride: Putting the fun back into functional pottery. Ceramics Monthly 55 (6), 64. Hluch, K. A. (2001). The art of contemporary American pottery. Iola, WI: Krause Publications. Karle, L. (2012, September). The impact of daily elegance. Ceramics Monthly, 40 43. Kemmis, S. and McTaggart, R.., (1988). The action research planner. Victoria, Australia: Deakin University Press. Kleiner, F. S. & Mamiya, C. J. (2005). (12 th ed.). Belmont, CA : Thomson/Wadsworth. Lewin, K. (1946) Action research and minority problems. Journal o f Social Issues 2 (4): 34 46. Mackey, M. (1996). Global art timeline: Ceramic innovations Worcester, MA: Davis Publications, Inc. Mackey, M. (2003). Experience cla y. Worcester, MA: Davis Publications, Inc. Mark, M. (2007). Examining the first women potters in America and their influence on c ontemporary ceramic art. In Proceedings: 3rd Annual Symposium: Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects Wichita, KS: Wich ita State University, p.71 72. Retrieved from http: //hdl.handle.net/10057/708

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 32 as for art education? Studies in Art Education, 34 (2), 114 126. McBride, K. (2012, March/April). The story at the heart of it. Ceramic Review 254, 52 54. McNiff, J. & Whitehead, J. (2006) All y ou n eed t o k now a bout a ction r esearch London; Sage. Merino, A. (2011). Soaring voices: 26 contemporary Japanese women. Ceramics: Art and Perceptions, 85, 75 79. messages. Ceramics: Art and Perception, 89 38 41. Koreana, 19 (2), 24 29. Ceramics: Art and Perception, 83, 22 25. Pottery. (2012) In Collins online dictionary. Retrieved from http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/pottery Pretty, T. (2010, March 23). The i mportance of p ottery in h uman d evelopme nt Ezine Articles, Retrieved from http://ezinearticles.com/?The Importance of Pottery in Human Development&id=3980794 Seckler, J. (2011). Life in ceramic s: Five contemporary Korean artists. Ceramics: Art and Perceptions, 85, 90 94. http://www.jayneshatzpottery.com/WOMEN.ht ml Sindelar, S. (2001). Ruskins: Wearable jewels of the arts & crafts movement. Retrieved from http://www.modernsilver.com/ruskin.htm Stoke Museums. (2012). The industrial revolution and the pottery i ndustry. Retrieved from http://www.stokemuseums.org.uk/collections /browse_collections/ceramics/research_reso

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 33 urces/general/industrialrevolution_pottery/index.html?sid=dfd758cfd688b5ec3b55aca27a 991b7e Stokstad, M. (2005), Art h istory (Rev. 2 nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc. Stokstad, M. (2008). Art h istory. (3 rd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc. Stout, C. J. (2006). With all due respect: A second look at action research. Studies in Art Education, 47 (3), 195 197. The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art. (2011). Arts and cr afts. Retrieved from http://www.morsemuseum.org/collection/arts and crafts Whitehead, J. & McNiff, J. (2006) Action Research Living Theory, London; Sage.

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 34 Appendix A IRB Research Permis sion Letters.

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 35

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 36

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 37 Appendix B Contemporary Ceramic Artwork s and Statements by Research Participants Issue: Teenage Suicide Ti tle: Choice of Life My piece shows how teens with depression everyday have to make a choice whether to live or die. In my piece I have the young teen reaching out to the angel who resembles life and the reaper which resembles death. The young teen is faced with the decision of whether to live and move on in life or to choose a different route which affects everyone around them. (Artist statement, Meagan H., June 2013) Issue: Abortion Title: The Choice? I chose abortion because I feel it is a great debate that continues in our world today. Pro life thinks abortion is wrong (represented by the blue chips) and Pro choice (represented by the red chips) believes it is up to the mother to decide. Personally, I think it's your body, it is your choice. (Artist sta tement, Amber B., June, 2013) Incised statement on the piece, Every breathe is a choice" (Amber B., June, 2013)

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 38 Issue: Sexual Abuse Title: Silently Spoken My piece is about sexual abuse. The tape over the mouth conveys this issue without words being spok en. It shows how much something can hurt a person. I feel very strongly about this issue because I was a victim of sexual abuse and I feel that it is an issue that is often kept hidden or "looked over". (Artist statement, Caitlyn S., June, 2013) Issue: Dr ug Abuse Title: Never Let Go I chose Drug Abuse as the issue to create my contemporary piece because of how it directly affected me, personally. A family member who had been prescribed a drug used for ADD/ADHD had become addicted while on the drug for seve n years. When the economy took a turn for the worst, they lost their job. I hope the public understands what I am trying to portray through my piece. Drug abuse can cause one to lose not only members of their family but themselves as well. (Artist statemen t, Courtney F., June, 2013)

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 39 Issue: Teenage Pregnancy Title: Life at a Fast Pace I chose to make my contemporary piece about teenage pregnancy because this is one of the problems of young girls being mischievous. Teenage pregnancy is starting to become com mon because it is not frowned upon like it was years ago. It is merely accepted. I chose to make three girls to represent how common it has become. This problem can have many effects on you ng teenage girls. Many do not finish their education. They have to grow up and take on a parent role, one they really are not ready for. Teenage moms give up their youth in order to raise their child by themselves or by their parents. Many end up as single parents with no high school diploma. (Artist Statement, Mylana B., June 2013) Issue: Human Trafficking Title: Lookout! My piece is about human trafficking. This issue is worldwide and affects people of all walks of life. My piece is a half globe and it shows some of the countries where human trafficking occurs. The chil dren are from different countries that are in constant fear because they have been abducted. They are surrounded by a chain that has them bound into a life of misery. Their hands cover their eyes because they live in fear. (Artist statement, Deja B., June, 2013)

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 40 Issue: Global Warming Title: The Beginning of the End My piece is a half melting earth, melting in on itself. I was influenced by the amount of people that aren't concerned with this issue, "global warming." I perceive it as a literal translation for the earth, "melting" from global warming. I think and hope the audience understands the message I have tried to convey through my contemporary piece. (Artist statement, Ian B., June, 2013) Issue: BP Oil Spill Title: Sheet of Destruction My contempor ary piece deals with the Gulf Coast oil spill that occurred two years ago. It caused a lot of problems for the people who lived on the water. I created my piece with animals covered in the oil and a barrel pouring oil. I did this to show that we weren't th e only ones who were affected, the animals were to. I hope the public sees that the oil spills affect different kinds of animals in and near the water. I hope my piece will influence the public to be more cautious around the water and help prevent an incid ent like this. (Artist statement, Katie F., June, 2013)

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 41 Issue: Breast Cancer Title: The Beautiful Ribbons When I made this piece I wanted to represent all the brave women struggling with breast cancer as well as all the women who are breast cancer survivo rs. (Artist statement, Austin B., June, 2013) Issue: Hunger in the World Title: The Empty Feeling My piece is about child hunger in America. I chose to do this because it is a problem that most people don't know about or even aware of. My piece has childr en trying to get into the bowl to see if there is any food left for them. The mirror represents you and what you see as you peer into the empty bowl. Hopefully, you will feel what it is like to be in that situation. (Artist statement, Brittany C., June, 20 13)

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 42 Issue: Animal Abuse Title: Silently Abuse The issue I have chosen is animal abuse. Animal abuse is one of my pet peeves. I think animal abuse is one of the most disgusting things in the world. Animals are defenseless. Animals cannot stop the abuse. Th ey can't tell anyone or even do anything about it. So please, don't abuse animals. It is not right. (Artist statement, Kayla S., June 2013) Issue: Animal Abuse Title: Napoleon's Story My contemporary piece focuses on animal abuse. Napoleon, the dog, grows up and suffers from abuse. He is rescued and taken to a doctor and eventually becomes healthy again. My piece shows the life of an animal who suffered from abuse and through awareness of this issue becomes a survivor. I hope my piece speaks to the heart o f others. (Artist statement, Payton L., June, 2013)

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 43 Issue: BP Oil Spill Title: Death of Many, Known by Few I chose the BP oil spill that occurred here in the Gulf of Mexico as my issue. I chose this issue because the beach and the ocean are my home away f rom home. I created my piece this way because I wanted to show the great amount of oil that spilled into the Gulf of Mexico and the death of many sea creatures. I hope people see how devastating the oil spill really was and how it not only affected the peo ple but how it affected the animals and the cycle of the ocean life. (Artist statement, Emma G., June, 2013) Issue: Littering Title: Don't be Bitter, Clean up Your Litter My piece deals with the issue of littering. With the growth of populations, litterin g has become more of an issue. I chose this because one night a bear was eating out of our garbage can right outside my window. The bears are attracted because of the trash around my neighborhood. It was a scary experience and making this contemporary piec e would be a memory my mom and I could never forget. (Artist statement, Jamie H., June, 2013)

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 44 Issue: Speeding Title: Don't put the Pedal to the Metal There were so many topics I could have chosen from, but speeding spoke the loudest to me. I'm currently e nrolled and active in a leadership class as well as SGA Student Government Association. In March our school's SGA team attended the state SGA in West Palm Beach, FL. During our weekend stay we were listened to motivational speakers, one being Cara Filler. She travels to spread her story of how she her identical twin sister was killed the day after their eighteenth birthday due to a person speeding. Her speech really changed me, making me aware of how serious speeding is. Speeding puts our life on the line a s well as others. Being a teenager and entering the driving world, I felt this topic would relate to many people regardless of age. (Artist statement, Alexa R., June, 2013) Issue: Discriminated Against for Music Style Title: The Sound of Metal Music is m y life. I chose to create my contemporary piece based on the music I listen to. I always find it ridiculous and somewhat sad when people judge others on such small things, music choice being one. I don't believe people should be treated different or seen i n a negative way simply because of what they like. (Artist statement, Courtney B., June, 2013)

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 45 Issue: Online Dating Title: Love from a Distance Online dating has become a major issue among young people. Seven words describe my contemporary piece. Lonelin ess, the feeling of being along and not being able to physically touch the person. Upset, the tear on her face shows it. Longing, her hand reaching out to the computer screen. Imagery, images in her mind about her and her significant other kissing, holding hands, and being able to spend time together. Regrets, for taking a chance with the online dating experience. Focus, especially with teen online dating because one can become unfocused on school and things they need to get done. Online dating can be an em otional roller coaster. (Artist statement, Antonia H., June, 2013) Issue: Inter racial relationships Title: Color Blind I chose the issue of inter racial couples/marriage because I have chosen to date guys of different races. I hope that people perceive m y piece as a bi racial family. The hands of the parents cradle their baby, protecting it from the criticism and harshness of the world. I perceive my piece as my possible future. (Artist statement, Mahaley R., June, 2013)

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 46 Issue: Cancer Awareness Title: Yo u nity I chose to look at the issue of how cancer affects many people from all walks of life. I named my piece "You nity" because it focuses on how cancer is an ever present issue. My piece has a balled fist, which is an internationally known symbol for "u nity" with a purple ribbon, which is used by the American Cancer Society to symbolize cancer. The base of my piece is a bluish color to represent the world and the importance of cancer and its effect on the world. This issue has an ever present effect on m y family because both of my parents are cancer survivors. (Artist statement, Kory F., June, 2013) Issue: Water Pollution Title: Toxic Waves For my contemporary piece I chose to look at water pollution and how it affects me and where I live. Marine life is greatly affected and many marine animals end up getting harmed or even die due to people polluting the water. I hope that through my contemporary piece people gain an understanding of the negative impact water pollution has on our environment. (Artist statement, Lauren S., June, 2013)

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 47 List of Figures with Figure Captions Figure 1. 22 Figure 2. Students developing their concept for the issue they s elected through sketching their 24 Figure 3. Students engaged in conversation about issues and the sketches they have create 24 Figure 4. Students (left) engaged in conversation with student (right) about her contemporary pie ................................................................................................... 25 Figure 5. Student helping another student with g lazing. ................ ......................... ................. .. 25 Figure 6. Student's contempora ry piece on teenage suicide, titled Choice of Life, was selected by ... 26

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INCORPO RATING CONTEMPORARY POTTERY APPROACHES INTO A HIGH SCHOOL CERAMICS COURSE 48 Author Biography Kimberly D. Moran has been teaching art in Fort Walton Beach, Florida since 1989. Her teach ing experience includes teaching art in four elementary schools, two middle schools and two high schools in Florida, Tennessee, and Vir ginia. Kimberly grew up in Kingsport, Tennessee where she attended Sullivan West High School. In 1981, she graduated from East Tenness ee State University where she earned a Bachelor of Science degree in art education. She also received a certification in General Science and has also taught 7 th grade science and Biology I. Kimberly currently lives in Fort Walton Beach, Florida with her husband two sons, and five shih tzus. She loves to spend time with her family, go for walks on the beach, walks with her dogs, and play her hammer dulcimer. She loves working in watercolor and building. She and her husband enjoy amateur photogr aphy, photographing weddings, pets, events, and portraits. Kimberly participates and work to the public.