The Thinker 1944

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Title:
The Thinker 1944
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Language:
English
Publisher:
The La Boca Normal Training School
Place of Publication:
La Boca, Canal Zone
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Yearbook
Canal Zone
La Boca
Training School

Notes

General Note:
MeadowBrook Literary Society
General Note:
Silver City
General Note:
Canal Zone

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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All rights reserved by the source institution.
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AA00017315:00001


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THE


THIN KER


1944


A YEARBOOK

PUBLISHED

BY

THE LA BOCA NORMAL TRAINING SCHOOL


LA BOCA, CANAL ZONE














0!


I HE "1 H1 NKER


FOREWORD

Owing to the shortage and expense of print-
ing material, the publication of The Thinker of
1944 is not so elaborate as we should like it to
be. We have tried, however, to record the re-
flections of four years of hard work and play
spent in the Normal School.

May The Thinker serve as a reminder of the
past and an inspiration for the future.


,PAGE TWO



















I .


TH' THINKER


PAGE THREE

105261


DEDICATION


To our youth of high ideals and
aspirations who are striving to
prepare themselves to render
greater and more efficient ser-
vice to the Isthmian community,
we, the Class of '44 dedicate
this Yearbook.








CLASS SONG


To Normal proud and beautiful

With trusting arms we cling;

Upon thy broad and faithful breast

Thy praises e'er to sing.

Our blending voices join to tell

The zeal with which we pray

For Normal, alma mater dear,

For Normal day by day.


Oh Normal dear, sincere thou art

Thy merits we relay.

Thy guiding and effulgent light

Illuminates our way.

Lead on our youthful sons, we pray,

With virtue bold and true.

Imbue their souls with fervor deep;

Give them a spirit new.

RoY WATKIS


THE THINKER


PAGE FOUR















Aministratiion


anh


-ult


T HE T H I N K E R


PAGE FIVE


















BEN M. WILLIAMS

Superintendent of Schools


MERCER UNIVERSITY, A. B.
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, A. M.


\. '


CALMER A. BATALDEN

Assistant to the Superinten-
dent of Schools

(In Charge of Colored
Schools)

Bradley Polytechnic Institute, B.S.
Pennsylvania State College, M.ED.


THE THINKER


PAGE SIX


















































ALFRED E. OSBORNE

Supervisor of Instruction, Canal Zone Colored Schools
Instructor in Mathematics and Methods
University of Chicago, Ph. B.
Post-graduate work on A. M. at Columbia University
during summer sessions of 1936, 1937, 1939, 1940.


THE THINKER


PAGE SEVEN














LEONOR JUMP
Principal of the La Boca
Normal Training School

Instructor in Academic
Subjects and Methods

National University of Panama, Phm.B.
Graduate of the Normal School for
Girls, Pma. Visiting student of Co-
lumbia University during the summer
session of 1935.







TO THE CLASS OF 1944

The time has now arrived for you to go forth and serve.
Never in the history of our community has there been a period
when the opportunities for service were greater. I' may not
be extravagant to hope that we are on the threshold of a new
cra characterized by an enlightened social reconstruction.
Your instructors have handed to you the torch of knowledge
and ideals to be held on high. By your own lives you shall bear
witness to the power of these ideas and principles. It is hoped
that you will go into the world to feed the flames of lofty
thought and worthy action so as to guide our people into the
brighter ways marked by the higher and more fundamental
values of living. Are you prepared to fulfill this hope?
For the achievements of the past, I congratulate you. In
the challenging work of the future, I wish you success.


TH E THINK ER


PAGE EIG IIT









EMILY E. BUTCHER

Instructor in Music

Graduate of the La Boca Normal
Training School.
Graduate of the Pan-American
Institute, Panama.
Member of the Schola Cantorum,
Panama City.
Student of the National Conservatory
of Music, Panama City.






ROBERT H. BEECHER

Instructor in Academic
Subjects

Graduate of Brown's Town High
School, Jamaica, B. W. I.
Undergraduate work at the
University of Panama.









A. GEORGE COCKBURN

Instructor in Science

Graduate of the La Boca
Normal Training School.









EMILE BENJAMIN

Instructor in Carpentry
and Woodwork

Cintracting and Building Course
Columbia Correspondence School,
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Sub-Foreman, Constructing
Quartermaster (1909-1932).











ASTON M. PARCHMENT

Instructor in Physical
Education

St. George's College,
Kingston, Jamaica.
Cambridge Senior Certificate.


HELEN C. BAKER

Supervisor of Music
in the C. Z. Schools

Special lecturer of Music
in the Normal School.


FRANCES MOOMAW
Supervisor of Penmanship
in the C. Z. Schools
Special teacher of Penmanship
in the Normal School.


THE THINKER


PAGE TEN










MAE L. MALCOM
Instructor in
Household Arts


Wolmer's High School for
Girls, Kingston, Jamaica.
Cambridge Senior Certificate.


FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FACULTY


STANLEY S. HUTCHINSON
Instructor in Academic
Subjects (1941-1943)

Graduate of the La Boca
Normal Training School.
Undergraduate work,
National University of Panama.



ALFRED G. BLAKE
Instructor in Tailoring
(1943)


NORINE JOHNS
Instructor in Music
(1941-1942)

Graduate of the Normal
School for Girls, Panama.
Graduate of the Pan-American Institute,
Panama City.



West Caribbean Training School
Las Cascadas, C. Z.
J. E. Roger's Tailoring
Establishment,
Port Limon, C. R.


THE THINKER


v7z


PAGE ELEVEN








Principal and Teachers of the La Boca School Who Cooperated with the La Boca Normal School in the
Course in Observation and Practice Teachin3.


ta-







Left to r:ght: Front row --
-Miss Clarice Simp- .
son, Miss Hazel Whyte, ',
Miss Sylvia Doran. Back
row-Edward Gaskin, 4
Peter S. Martin, Lionel
Osborne, Principal A.
L. Morgan, Ronald Li-
vingston, Lorenzo Rose.
Teachers not included
in this picture Miss
Louise Dawkins, Mrs.
S Adelle Sealey Bolt, Mrs.

Lillian Rowe Gibson.

















GL AS


ALFRED R GORDON


Pr''L ...L i.':


G\ ENDOLYN E. EASTMOND
I '., P c,, h. I.'


INEZ A HOLDER
S c'i :'airpi


11


\\ILBUR \W BABB
Toi~aiuii








F- 1









L I


r

.~ V
vU#,,~.
4.-





L I


1~ ~1












F 1


4;





L I


BABB, WILBUR W.
CAMP BIERD, C. Z.
A man of few words is Wilbur Babb,
Who seems to lack the gift of gab.








BENNETT, ANNA T.
PANAMA, R. P.
Hard-working Anna without a frown
Is sure to receive a golden crown.








BROWN, VERONA 0.
LA BOCA, C. Z.

Her magnetic personality
Is caused by "Rona's" originality.








BUCKLEY, RUTH C.
LA DOCA, C. Z.

She builds castles in the air
And hopes to marry a millionaire.








~J-J


F *'..~~;]








Lii


CARTER, CECIL L.
LA BOCA, C. Z.
A serious person is 'eLloydie" Carter,
Who for his race would be a martyr.







DAVIDSON, HAROLD L.
RED TANK, C. Z.
"Dadey" is spritely and full of glamour,
Just listen as the girls all clamor.-







DOGUE, EDUARDO L.
SILVER CITY, C. Z.
"Eddie" Dogue, always happy and gay,
Sketches whatever passes his way.








EASTMOND, GWENDOLIN E.
LA BOCA, C. Z.
Pearl Eastmond, a splendid dressmaker,
Someday may be a great heartbreaker.


M60W





















































"r- ^
F














L '1


FORD, CECILIA L.
LA BOCA, C. Z.

Our little "Cessie"--we're proud to tell,
Can butcher and roast a turkey well.









GEORGE, MARY E.
LA BOCA. C. Z.

With her singing she aims to please;
Our "Aaizie" who signs with perfect ease











GORDON, ALFRED R.
RED TANK, C. Z.

"Chokey" the noble, "Chokey" the meek;
"Chokey" the lad who is timid to speak.










GRAHAM, ERIC E.
LA BOCA, C. Z.

A budding writer is Eric Gra'am,
Who'll win a place in the Hall of Fame


..........











GRANT, GLADSTONE L.
GAMBOA, C. Z.

"G" falls within our artist rank.
He's quite outspoken and very frank.









HALL, ALBERT V.
LA BOCA, C. Z.

"Nipple" Hall, outstanding athlete,
Knows how and when to be discreet.








HARRISON, SANDAS L.
LA BOCA, C. Z.

Theology and pedagogy
Are the in-ter-ests of "Patchy."









HOLDER, INEZ A.
GAMBOA, C. Z.

The record keeper-our "Alfalfa"
Smiles like Vinci's "Mona Lisa.)'


SI F ,. z1


AOft


I I













HOWELL, DOROTHY A.
LA BOCA. C. Z.

This noted elocutionist
Is now a budding dramatist.










INNISS, ELEANOR A.
LA BOCA, C. Z.

"Ellen," whose lips asre kept from slip,
Is quite a champ at penmanship.











JONES, SIDNEY S.
LA BOCA, C. Z.

Young "Sid" Jones, the masseur,
Has for every pain, a cure.










JOSEPH, DRESLIN F.
SILVER CITY, C. Z.

"Crima," a pair of slacks to a skirt prefers,
And often, qurte often, to food she refers.








I-


*I Am r -I


LEWIS, LUCILLE F.
GATUN, C. Z.

"Luz" with the School-marm expression
Tries to give a good impression.










LYNCH, ELSINORA L.
SILVER CITY, C. Z.

Why "Elsie," with your culinary art
You'll win a place in any heart.










MACK, ALDA C.
SILVER CITY, C. Z.

Alda, the girl of bright ideas,
Delights in frills and panaceas.











McDONALD, SYLVIA V.
SILVER CITY, C. Z.

Prim "Syl," many applause win,
As she plays her violin.










McINTOSH, ETHLIN L.
LA BOCA, C. Z.
A gay little damsel is "Lulube'le,"
With lots of humor eager to tell.







RILEY, JOHN P.
SILVER CITY, C. Z.
"O'Riley" with the scholarly look,
Reads many a law and history book.







SAMUELS, LINDA R.
GAMBOA, C. Z.
"Frcnny," a pleasant and thrifty miss,
Will LEND a nickle if you INSIST.








SCOTT, MERCELLA C.
GAMBOA, C. Z.


AfMrcella writes good poetry.
We hope she develops th' ability.


;Lot










-1


SIMPSON, MAVIS U.
LA BOCA, C. Z.

In the back with smiles on her face,
Sits this dame of charm and grace.










SKEETE, ROY R.
SILVER CITY, C. Z.

Roy, the boy in the second row,
Delights in tugging any girl's bow.










SMITH, WALTER S.
RED TANK, C. Z.

Beware! Don't heed that awful groan.
It's "Smitty" at his saxophone.









STEVENS, LENA M.
RED TANK, C. Z.

"Mickey" pounds each piano key
And teaches well "a la" McKee.


A


























F -1


TAIT, EVA M.
LA BOCA, C. Z.

A coy little lass is "Mamita" Tail,
With her simple yet charming gait.










THOMAS, DOROTHY M.
LA BOCA, C. Z.

"Dottie" floats around with her googoo eyes,
Surrounded by smiles and wistful sighs.










WATKIS, ROY W.
GAMBOA, C. Z.

lWatkis, with his melodious tones,
Thrills you to the very bones.










WILLIAMS, HILDA G.
GAMBOA, C. Z.

When in a state of apathy
See "Hlildita" for some sympathy.








.... 4ind


were


the


rest


of


CLIFFORD GRAHAM ANDREW SAINTEN


MARGARITA TROTMAN


HARMOND COCKBURN


PAGE TWENTY-FOUR


these


us


THE THINKER











THE THINKER


The La Boca Normal Training School yearbook, The Thinker,

was published in 1938 by the first graduating class of the La Boca

Normal Training School. This year the second graduating class takes

pleasure in producing the second edition of this book.





STAFF


Editor-in-ch;ef Eric Graham
Assistants to Harold Davidson
Dorothy Howell
Inez Holder
Linda Samuels
Dorothy Thomas
Business Manager Wilbur Babb
Assistants to Ruth Buckley
Cecil Carter
Pearl Eastmond
Cecilia Ford
Lorenzo Harrison
Sydney Jones
Elsinora Lynch
Lucille Lewis
Eva Tait
Roy Watkis
Art Editor -- Gladstone Grant
Assistants to Eduardo Dogue
Sylvia McDonald
Music Editor Dorothy Howell
Assistants to -- Mary George
Lena Stevens
Dorothy Thomas


Poetry Editor Sydney Smith
Assistants to Mercclla Scott
Roy Watkis
Spanish Editor Crima Josephs
Assistants to Ruth Buckley
Lucille Lewis
Humor Editor John Riley
Assistants to Aida Mack
Lilybell McIntosh
Snapshot Editor Alda Mack
Assistants to Eleanor Inniss
Roy Skeete
Athletics Ha-old Davidson
Assistants to Albert Hall,
Crima Josephs
Faculty Pearl Eastmond
Anna Bennett
Mavis Simpson
Eva Tait


Typists

Cecilia Ford
Dorothy Thomas



Adviser

Miss L. Jump


PAGE TWENTY-FIVE


THE THINKER











IQ__ass_____

FRESHMEN
On March 6, 1941, forty young men and women, eager to further
their education, entered the La Boca Normal School to form the second
class of Normalites. After getting acquainted with one another, we
were heartily welcomed by Mr. Osborne, Mr. Hutchinson, Miss Jump,
and Mr. Morgan who expressed their wishes for our having a happy
and successful career. On the following Monday, we began our formal
classes with Mr. Hutchinson as home room teacher.
Our first year lasted ten months. During this year the academic
subjects were given. Many extra-curricular activities were initiated. A
class organization, with the object of sponsoring activities both social
and cultural, was formed with Eric Graham as president. A volley ball
team was organized by our girls. The publication of a class magazine,
The Torch, began with Harmond Cockburn as editor. Under the sponsor
ship of Miss L. Jump, who was then our Spanish teacher, the "Circulo
Espafiol" was formed with Harmond Cockburn as president.
Our social activities this year included a Grand Buffet Supper and
Dance for the installation of the officers of the "Circulo Espafiol" and
an outing to San Carlos sponsored by the Class Organization.
We were greatly privileged to have many interesting persons visit
us during the course of our first year, among whom were Captains
Fisher and Hodgson of the Salvation Army, Mr. and Mrs. Manahini
of the Bahai faith, Miss Beaver, Dr. Hackett, Mr. Lawrence Johnson,
and the Rev. Mr. Shirley.
SOPHOMORES
After a two-month vacation, we returned to school happy that we
could share experiences once more. With Mr. Hutchinson remaining
to help us make our decisions, "Eddie" Dogue became class president.
During this year, our academic training was still emphasized.
We were fortunate in having more distinguished persons speak
to us this year, among whom were Mrs. Showtz, a Bahai representative,
and Sefior Gallegos of the National Institute.
Carrying out the patriotic theme, we inaugurated a War Stamp
drive in the La Boca School using a revolving fund.
The major activities of our social life this year were our first
Grand Ball at the Tropical Club in Colon and our Latin-American
party, "Una Noche en Rio." At this party we acted as hosts to some
of the officers and members of the crew of the U. S. Liberty Ship,
Booker T. Washington.
After the Christmas holidays, we took our final examination and
with Mr. Hutchinson's resignation, the second year drew to an un-
certain close.


PAGE TWENTY-SIX


THE THINKER









JUNIORS


Because of the abnormal working conditions brought about by
the present war, the Normal School program of studies was accelerated.
Consequently, the two last years were divided into terms of eight months.
On February 3, we began our third year with Miss L. Jump as our
new home room teacher and Cecil Carter as class president. Our pro-
gram of studies was expanded to include the industrialized arts courses.
In addition, the professional courses were started and given emphasis
in the curriculum. In spite of the pressure of work and the problem of
adjustment, we had some very profitable and pleasant experiences.
Very early in the year we presented Mr. Hutchinson with a memento
"as an index of our appreciation and high esteem." Later, there were
several extra-curricular activities. We published a special edition of
The Torch, commemorating Mother's Day, which elicited favorable
comment from the Administrative Staff of the Division of Schools and
cur friends. Our classroom was transformed temporarily into a library
work shop when we assisted Miss Jump in classifying books and in
making the Card Catalogue for the La Boca School Library. Then we
promoted successfully our second dance at the Tropical Club in Colon.
At an enjoyable "Night of Fun" some of us had our first bridge lessons,
while others danced or played games. Taking the suggestion of Sydney
Smith, we started our "Cultural Hour," a weekly Friday morning pro-
gram, which was characterized by debates, speeches, and lectures. Under
the direction of the household arts teacher, Miss M. Malcolm, our girls,
sponsored a delicious luncheon in honor of the boys and the faculty;
and through the encouragement of Miss Jump, Club Zeta was organ-
ized with the aim of sponsoring programs for community welfare and
enjoyment. It is regretted that after presenting two interesting pro-
grams, this organization suspended its activities.
Many of our classmates enrolled in the Extension Classes which
began in September at the Canal Zone Junior College.
During the course of the year we had the privilege of receiving
some very distinguished visitors, among whom was Mr. Frank Wang,
Executive Secretary of the Panama Canal and at our invitation, Mrs.
0. Tejeira, Mr. Rafael Moscote of the University of Panama, Dr. A. D.
Mastellari, tuberculosis specialist, and Mr. R. Pritchard of Costa Rica
gave interesting lectures to the class.

SENIORS

In November 1943, we began our last and most difficult year.
We had reached the turning point of our course which necessitated
arduous work to make it a success. We continued our professional work
with great zeal and enthusiasm.


PAGE TWENTY-SEVEN


THE THINKER










The time came when we realized that school life in Normal would
coon come to an end. Cadetship, an experience which we eagerly wel-
comed, began in February. Many were the Friday afternoons and
Saturday we spent preparing lesson plans for the following week; and
many were the severe but constructive criticisms which followed every
lesson taught. These criticisms were sometimes dreaded; however, we
soon learned to accept them with the minimum amount of fear, for
we realized that they were for our own benefit.

Due to an overloaded program, The Torch, our school magazine,
was suspended in the early part of this term. However, we hope its
informative pages will again shed light on the numerous activities with-
in the walls of Normal.

It must be remembered that school life was not a bed of roses.
There were times when we provoked the wrath of members of the
faculty, and times when we got tired of lectures, studying, tests, and
quizzes. Nevertheless, it goes without saying that all these experiences
have helped us to develop sound characters.

We, the students of the class of 1944, are most appreciative of
the efforts of our teachers to direct our paths during these four years.
They have steadfastly endeavored to develop our personalities, to guide
us in the solution of difficult problems, and to prepare us for our
future careers.

Our classes came to an end a day in June, 1944; a day when we,
who had lived, loved, laughed and fought together, had- to part. We
.are destined to choose different fields in this troubled world; but we
have the deep and abiding conviction that, although we may never
meet again as a group, we will never forget the wonderful, time we
spent together as classmates.




HOBBIES


M ary ........................
Alda ........................
Verona .....................
Harrison .................
Linda ......................
Gordon ...................
Hilda ......................
Skeete .....................
Sylvia .....................
Eva .........................
Ruth ........................
Hall ........................
Inez ........................
Eddie .......................
Anna .......................
W atkis ....................
Eric .........................
Lena ........................


volleyball playing
snapshot taking
dancing
reading
recipe trying
stamp collecting
scrapbook making
movie going
sketching
baking
swimming
radio
reading
sketching and swimming
singing
crooning
mechanics
piano playing


Crima ..................... movie going
Jones ..................... reading
Lucille .................. singing
Mavis ..................... dancing
Howell ................... reading
Pearl ...................... designing
Elsie ...................... cooking
Dottie ..................... novel reading
Riley ..................... cycling
Smith ........................ sax playing
Cessie ....................... perfume collecting
Lilybell .................. piano playing
Gladstone ... ........... drawing
Eleanor ............ sewing
Carter ..................... volleyball playing
Babb ....................... reading
Davey .................... baseball playing
Mercella .................. reading


PAGE TWENTY-EIGH'


THE THINKER












1941
MARCH
6- Admittance of the second class to the La Boca Normal Train-
ing School.
10- First formal class in session.
APRIL
3- School journey to the observatory at Miraflores.
15- Nomination and Election of Class Officers.
MAY
.8- Girls' Volleyball Team defeated at Silver City. The winning
team graciously sponsored a party for our team.
JUNE
13- First edition of The Torch.
20- Students acted as judges at intramural sports.
25- The Rev. Mr. Shirley visited our class.
JULY
16- Formal singing classes began with Miss Johns as teacher.
17- Mr. and Mrs. Manahini, members of the Bahai faith, called on us.
AUGUST
4- Capt. Fisher and Capt. and Mrs. Hogdson of the Salvation Army
visited our class.
8- Photograph taken of the class in session.
14- Circulo Espahol (Spanish Club) formed.
29- Miss Beaver, kindergarten teacher, visited our class.
30--Officers of Circulo Espafiol installed by Mr. Desmond Byam
at Grand Buffet Supper and Dance.
NOVEMBER
20- Successful Thanksgiving picnic at San Carlos.
24- Dr. Hackett and Mr. Lawrence Johnson visited Normal.
Letter received from Mr. and Mrs. Montanage (Bahais).
DECEMBER
6- First class in sign painting at Cristobal High School.
(Sylvia, Gladstone, and Eddie).
12- First "HOUR OF MUSIC" presented at the La Boca School.

1942
JANUARY
31-Circulo Espafiol made an enjoyable trip to Chepo.


PAGE TWENTY-NIN


THE THINKER







APRIL
6- Classes resumed after two months vacation.
10- Nomination and Election of Class Officers.
13- Miss Johns resigned. Mr. Batalden addressed the class. Topic:
Gardening.
28- Miss Emily Butcher appointed as singing teacher.
MAY
8- Dramatization of "The Merchant of Venice."
Music Week Program with the Kindergarten as our audience.
15- Installation Party.
21-Nomination and Election of Officers of the Circulo Espafiol.
29- Class visited garden. Girls weeded; boys forked.
JUNE
i5-Sainten decided to leave us.
25---Substitutes feted by Mr. Osborne.
AUGUST
3- Alert practice in La Boca School.
15- Teachers' Midsummer Ball well attended by Normalites.
SEPTEMBER
1-- Rehearsal for Parent-Teacher Program.
3- Mr. Roy Hay spoke to the class on "TROPISM."
7- Normalites were guests at the Rev. Mr. Shirley's picnic at Rio
Abajo.
8- Ensemble sang on Parent-Teacher Program at Cristobal.
9- Field trip to Ice Plant in Colon. Class observed at Silver City
School.
10- Mrs. Showtz (Bahai) visited us on her way to Venezuela from
Chicago.
13- Dorothy Howell won elocution contest on Gold Coast.
26- Grand Ball No. 1 at Club Tropical.
OCTOBER
6-- Mrs. Baker's introduction to class.
7--Ensemble sang at Parent-Teacher Program in Gatun.
8- First lesson in music with Mrs. Baker.
9- The Rev. Mr. Shirley spoke on "SCIENCE AND RELIGION."
19- Nomination and Election of Class Officers. War Bond and
Stamp Drive began.
25---Girls' Volleyball Team was victorious at Gamboa.
NOVEMBER
2- Mr. Carlos Gallegos of the National Institute spoke at patriotic
program sponsored by the Circulo Espafiol.
8---Girls won volleyball game at Gatun.
14- "Noche en Rio." Officers of the Liberty Ship Booker T. Wash-
ington were guests of the Circulo Espafiol at this Latin Amer-
ican "fiesta."
20--Class Officers installed.
23-Ensemble sang on Parent-Teacher Program at Gamboa. This
program was attended by Mr. Frank Wang, Executive Secretary
of the Panama Canal.
29- Ensemble ang lon ISilver Employees Volunteer Committee's
Third Patriotic Program. Guest speaker: Dr. Juan Escobar.


THE THINKER


PAGE THIRTY







DECEMBER
11- Annual "HOUR OF MUSIC" presented. Exchange of gifts.

1943
JANUARY
5--Classes resumed.
12- Photographer Wason took pictures of Ensemble.
27- After final tests Mr. Hutchinson told us of his resignation.
FEBRUARY
1- Miss L. Jump's appointment as home-room teacher. L. B. N. T. S.
8- Vocational classes began.
21--Girls triumphed over Silver City and Gatun in volkyball.
24-- Presentation of memento to Mr. Hutchinson at a program.
26- Mrs. Otilia Tejeira addressed the class in the library. Her topic
dealt with Panamanian literature.
MARCH
2- Regular classes in Physical Culture resumed.
Normal was well represented by Linda at I. N. Y. C.'s debate.
The topic of the debate was: Resolved, That the Negro should
fight for his rights now and not wait until after the war.
APRIL
5- First "Cultural Hour" Program.
10- Mr. Frank Wang, Executive Secretary of the Panama Canal,
visited our school.
13-16-Class assisted in the preparation of Card Catalogue for the La
Boca School Library.
17- Ensemble sang at the Dedicatory Exercises of the La Boca School
Library. Governor's wife unveiled portraits of Governors Goethals
and Burgess.
20- Normalities -attended Teachers' Field Day at Gamboa.
MAY
7-Ensemble participated in Music Week Program.
14- Nomination and Election of Class Officers. Student Council
formed.
21- Faculty and boys feted by girls at a Luncheon in Household Arts
Room.
28- Installation of Class Officers.
JUNE
17-Dr. Amadeo D. Mastellari, tuberculosis specialist of Panama,
addressed the class on "TUBERCULOSIS."
JULY
13- Mr. Pritchard was the guest speaker at our "Cultural Hour"
program.
23- Welcome party for Freshmen.
30- School journey to the Cerveceria Nacional.
AUGUST
25- Mr. Rafael Moscote, Professor of Civilization at the University
of Panama, spoke on "FIFTH CENTURY ATHENS."


PAGE THIRTY-ONE


THE THINKER






AUGUST
29--- Inaugural Program of Club Zeta. Dr. Hackett spoke on "THE
POST-WAR WORLD."
SEPTEMBER
15-Construction of boys' dormitory (El Rancho) by Mr. E. Ben-
jamin's carpentry class.
19- Ensemble sang on I. N. Y. C.'s Program "The Negro as a Soldier."
22---Official photograph taken of class in session and the Boys'
dormitory.
25---Grand Ball No. 2 a success.
OCTOBER
1-Miss Jump appointed Principal of the La Boca Normal School.
9-Extension classes began at Balboa; teachers and students attended.
15-30-School journeys to the Balboa Elementary School.
NOVEMBER
7--Club Zeta sponsored program at the local clubhouse. Mr. Clif-
ford Bolt, National Commissioner of the Boy Scouts of Pan-
ama, spoke on "SCOUTING."
12- Chaplain Palmer Pierce of the Sixth Air Force gave a very in-
teresting talk in a general assembly.
30- Ensemble presented a "PROGRAM OF MUSIC" at the La Boca
Clubhouse.
DECEMBER
7- Palmer penmanship classes began under Miss Frances Moomaw's
supervision.
13-17--Class had first experiences of observation and practice teach-
ing in connection with the observance of Yuletide Appreciation
Week.
17--Celebration of traditional "HOUR OF MUSIC."
23- Ensemble participated in I. N. Y. C.'s Music Festival.

1944
JANUARY
4- End of Christmas Holidays.
14-- Installation of Class Officers.
18-"PROGRAM OF MUSIC" presented at Cristobal under the
auspices of Meadowbrook Literary Society.
21-Observation and Practice Teaching began.
FEBRUARY
15-Lyrics of class song put to music.
Octet sang on I. N. Y. C.'s program featuring Dr. Myron
Shaeffer.
20-Ensemble, with Mrs. Helen Currier Baker directing, sang on
Brotherhood Week Program broadcast from Tivoli U.S.O. Club.
MARCH
6-- Construction of new boys' dormitory on La Boca School grounds
started.
7- Boys' Softball Team played in inaugural game of the Community
Softball League.
14-LL-Mrs. Baker started course in the Methods of Teaching Music in
the Elementary School.


P AG E T H I R T Y-T W 0


THE THINKER











APRIL


5-Ensemble sang on Easter Program at the Tivoli U. S. 0.
25-Mr. Batalden spoke on the "CERTIFICATION OF TEACHERS."


MAY

1---Child's Health Day. Dr. Martin Rodney spoke on "THE CARE
OF THE TEETH."
13-Ensemble sang on Music Week Program at the Esther Witkin
U. S. O.


JUNE

17-Freshman Class Farewell Party for Seniors.
23-Last day of Normal.
24--Graduation Ball.
25-Baccalaureate Service.
28----Graduation.



FAVORITE SAYINGS

L. Harrison: More or less.
I. Holder: If you only knew.
A. Hall: I agree with you, but
S. Smith: But, ah the point is
L. Samuels: You get on my nerves.
R. Watkis: ThaPs clear enough, but ah----
J. Riley: That's foolishness.
H. Davidson: That's right.
E. Graham: Yes, but
L. Carter: There is a limit to everything.
D. Thomas: I don't think-.
A. Gordon: Well, you know how it is.
E. Tait: Really! You don't say!
A. Mack: I hear you knocking.
S. McDonald: Hmm. Hmm. That's it.
C. Ford: Coming to think of it that's another thing.
L. McIntosh: You know what I mean.
M. Simpson: One never knows, does one?
L. Lewis: D'you get it?
C. Josephs: My eye!
P. Eastmond: You don't say!
M. Scott: You are telling me!
G. Grant: Take it easy. Take it easy.
D. Howell: Don't fool with you.
V. Brown: That's just it.
R. Buckley: Well of all things!
W. Babb: Well! Well!
R. Skeete: This is it.
S. Jones: Ah, shucks.
M. George: You don't say!
L. Stevens: What's buzzing cousin?
E. Lynch: No! Stop it.
A. Bennett: Gee! Really?
E. Dogue: "Lord God of host be with us yet."
E. Inniss: Forget about it-do better next time.
H. Williams: What a cute child.


PAGE THIRTY-THREE


THE THINKER















INTRODUCTION: Linda Samuels looked into the future and saw
herself and John Riley as hosts to some of their former classmates
on their tenth wedding anniversary which they were celebrating
on Easter Sunday, 1959.

"Hm-m-mm, these waffles are simply delicious!" exclaimed Wil-
bur. "You know, John, I'm wondering now why I have not decided to
get married and settle down like you."
"Well, Wilbur, you are making such a big success of your busi-
ness career I thought you were quite happy."
"I certainly am not," he answered painfully.
Lilybell, who conducts a personality column in the local newspaper,
patted him briskly on the back and said, "Oh, snap out of it boy. Be
yourself." Smiling, she continued, 'Tis strange but somehow I just
can't forget the fun we made of you and 'Dottie' 'way back in '41."
"For heaven's sake, Lilybell, do you have to remind me of her!
She is the person that's really responsible for the turn my life has
taken. I don't know what might have happened if she and Roy had
remained here after they were married. I............."
"Take it easy, pal," interrupted Professor Carter. "When I went
to the States after winning that scholarship, I saw some of the drug
stores that Roy owns. He is doing a very good business."
I saw that Wilbur was feeling worse every minute so I said, "Let's
go into the garden," and led the way.
"What pretty flowers! If I had only thought of bringing my brush
along what a picture I would take away with me-soft pink roses look-
ing eagerly towards the sun; dazzling white lilies nodding humbly to
the breeze's gentle touch; above a clear blue sky; and the majestic sun,
robed in golden yellow, looking down like a king from his throne-
aa-a-ah!"
"Stop, Sylvia," interrupted Cecilia. "You think art, talk art, sing
art, court art. I suppose you dream art too."
"Speaking of art, whatever became of our artists, Dogue and
Grant?" asked Smith.
"Dogue jilted Eleanor," replied Cecilia, "and he married Eva after
she wrote a 'best seller.' He is doing some work for the Esquire maga-
zine now. Eleanor decided never to love again and she is now one of
the best kindergarten teachers in the Schools. As for Grant, haven't you
read of the oil paintings he did for this year's World's Fair?"


PAGE THIRTY-FOUR


THE THINKER









"Oh, yes," my husband answered. "I remember reading that those
were Grant's best paintings because his wife, Mercella, the distinguish-
ed poet, gave him the inspiration for them. Does that tie up with
your philosophy of life, Dr. Graham?"
"Listen, John, I am no philosopher. I only teach other men's
philosophies," chuckled Eric.
Wilbur and I walked over to the summerhouse and sat there silent-
ly. I surveyed the bright garden and the guests who had come to help
John and me celebrate our wedding anniversary.
Over against the hedge near the fountain stood Lena, who was
now the music instructor of the Normal School Ensemble. She was
talking to Inez, the girls' physical director. I could hear Lena saying,
"Guess whom I saw getting married in the Baptist Church last Wednes-
day! Verona and Judge Skeete! The Rev. Mr. Sandas Lorenzo Harrison
performed the ceremony."
"'Cessie' told me about it," Inez replied. "She knows a number of
things that are happening in La Boca because as secretary to Lorenzo
she comes in contact with the people."
After inspecting the garden, the others joined us in the summer-
house.
"Do you know," I said, "that I never believed Ruth would have
left the Schools for a career as a stage dancer, but one never knows
what will happen."
"That reminds me," began Carter, "this morning after mass, Pearl
gave me some tickets for a Grand Concert to be held at the National
Theater, featuring Mary George, who is touring the Latin-American
Republics. She is going to sing 'Sweet Memories,' Lena's latest compo-
sition, along with some works of the old masters."
Blushing, Lena added, "It might please you to know too, that Mary's
entire wardrobe was designed by Ana; and that she is bringing Alda,
her secretary, with her."
After we had discussed the concert for a while, Dr. Gordon said,
"I don't like gossip, but last month while I was giving anti-tetanus
injections at the Red Tank School, somebody informed me that Al-
bert was in for trouble because Mr. Osborne and Miss Jump went
into the tailor shop and saw the boys making three-piece zoot suits."
"That's a little tough," said Smith. "I'm glad, though, that every-
body is not experiencing difficulties. Pearl is directing the affairs of
the Normal School very efficiently; Lucille isn't having any trouble
as Dean of Women on the Normal School campus; Mavis says she
gets splendid cooperation from the students in her dancing class;
Elsie is to be transferred to the faculty of the Jr. College as home
economics teacher; and Dorothy's dramatics class plans to give 'The
Rivals' soon."
"Crima is Supervisor of Spanish now," added Inez, "but guess
what! She looks as Kate Smith did in 1941!"


PAGE THIRTY-FIVE


THE THINKER









"Crima actually got fat!" exclaimed "Cessie:" "She'd better see
Jones and have him apply some of his latest techniques in massaging,
or come to you, Inez, for reducing exercises."
"By the way," interrupted Eric, "I ran into Hilda at the museum
the other day. She seems to be having financial difficulties because she
asked me to tell you not to forget her Home for Orphans."
Not a word was uttered as everyone took out his checkbook and
quickly scribbled his name so that Hilda could fill in the amount.
"Mr. and Mrs. Riley," said Babb after a while, "I certainly enjoyed
this morning with you. I hope that you may have many more years
of happiness."
"I hope so, too," added Carter.
"I know that they will be happy," remarked Cessie, "because Linda
has always loved John though she was playing hard-to-get when we
were in school."
Everyone smiled while John and I exchanged glances.
"Well, I'm going to fly to New York today to see Davidson in
the first game of the World Series," announced Babb. "Does anyone
want to come? I have two planes that will hold all of us Smith
can fly one and I'll take the other. How~ about it folks?
"Why, certainly," answered everybody in a chorus, and off we
went to get ready for the trip.


Linda R. Samuels
Dorothy M. Thomas


PAGE THIRTY-SIX


THE THINKER











Vass AlpN akbt


A is for Anna, who works at Ancon;
She reaches to school
'Fore dismissal is rung.
B is for Buckley, her first name is Ruth;
You can always detect
When she's telling the truth.
C is for "Crima" small of body and waist;
To get home on week-ends
She is always in haste.
D is for "Dottie," and how she espies
Both the near and the far
With those large, soulful eyes.
E is for Eleanor little and lithe;
Of her speech she is careful;
In her manner polite.
F is for Ford, beware if you please:
She will blow you from here
To Bordeaux with her sneeze.
G is for Gladstone, first male on this li'r.
If he keeps up his work
He will soon be an artist.
H stands for Harold, a staunch baseball fan.
There is no trick in pitching
He doesn't understand.
I is for Inez tall, stately, and bright.
As Librarian she's keeping
The record books right.
J is for John, a garrulous lad.
A keener objector
Could never be had.
K means Kilpatrick, we met in the course.
Which treated of methods -'
Activity with purpose.
L is for Lucille, she hails from Gatun.
Don't ever annoy, or
She'll fall in a swoon.
M is for Mavis who lives just next door.
She seldom falls victim
To lectures that bore


PAGE THIRTY-SEVEN


THE THINKER










N stands for Normal, her standards we'll keep;
And be led by her ideals
Through shallow and deep.
O is Observing the methods and way
A teacher may carry
Her class day by day.
P means Pythagoras, a philosopher no novice.
He expounded the doctrine
Of me-temp-sy-cho-sis.
Q is for Quizzing this method unique
Of checking assignments
Is the Prof's own technique.
R stands for Roy both Watkis and Skeete.
One's head's in the ceiling -
The Other at your feet.
S is for Sylvia, what melody (?) she brings
To those who dare listen
As she plays on the strings.
T is for Tait, quite exotic yet coy,
She is kind and serene
Till you try to annoy.
U is for Upton, his work in arithmetic
Gave definite help
In teaching the subject.
V means Verona, a critic severe;
She follows her methods,
Condemns without fear.
W is for Wilbur meticulously neat.
For instance, just watch
When he brushes his seat.
X marks each answer that's wrong in a test
It tends to embarrass
When you're not at your best.
Y is for Yerkes, and a good deal he has given,
By his study and experiments
With the mouse and the kitten.
Z stands for Zero, by which we are rated
It may either be black,
Red or certificated.

Eilnar 'o FT o0 e


PAGE THIRTY-EIGHT


THE THINKER













We, the Class of '44, being of sound and disposing mind and
memory, do hereby, on this 28th day of June, 1944, make, ordain,
publish and declare this, our last will and testament, in order, as rea-
sonably as may be, to distribute our interests and abilities among
the members of the Freshman Class.
ALFRED GORDON bequeaths with pride his natatorial skill to Ivan
Dowlin.
ANNA BENNETT leaves hopefully her religious inclinations to Mat-
thias Newell.
WILBUR BABB bequeaths his remarkable record as class treasurer to
Audley Webster.
RUTH BUCKLEY wills her pleasing personality and variety of "hair
dos" to Thelma Lee.
CECIL CARTER leaves with pride his mature manner and sleeping
technique to Leon Eastmond.
VERONA BROWN bequeaths gratefully her introspective manner to
Celena Leach.
HAROLD DAVIDSON wills regretfully his winning manner with the
ladies to Gladstone Gordon.
GWENDOLIN EASTMOND bequeaths her compromising attitude
and dressmaking ability to Norma Daley.
ALBERT HALL leaves gracefully his fine running form to Gilbert
Burrows.
INEZ HOLDER wills happily her high-pitched voice and healthy ap-
pearance to Lodiana Ellis.
LORENZO HARRISON leaves his sartorial ability to Gladstone Gor-
don.
CECILIA FORD bequeaths gleefully her screechy sneeze to Pearl
Thompson.
DOROTHY HOWELL, gcld medalist, wills her skill in elocution to
Ruby Thompson.
EDUARDO DOGUE, leaves generously his capacity to chew gum con-
tinuously and his artistic ability to Pearl Simon.
DRESLIN JOSEPHS bequeaths, with no little amount of regret, her
love of fiction and stirring love stories to Agnes Gordon.
ERIC GRAHAM wills sadly his ability to speak long and loud with-
out preparation to Audley Webster.

THE THINKER PAGE THIRTY-NINE









LUCILLE LEWIS leaves with pleasure her perfect penmanship to Olga
Bowen.
JOHN RILEY bequeaths his good sportmanship and rambling speeches
to Pablo Jardine.
ELSINORA LYNCH wills her culinary skill to Pearline Carter.
SYLVIA McDONALD leaves with remorse her squeaky violin and
her art collection to Daphne Watkis.
GLADSTONE GRANT wills his artistic versatility and frank manner
to Clara Wattley.
LILYBELL McINTOSH bequeaths her rare sense of humor and her
skill in watering the six potted plants in our classroom to
Inez Moise.
LENA STEVENS wills deliberately her ability to extract blue notes
from the piano to Ellenora Moore.
MERCELLA SCOTT wills her ambition to write good poetry to Pris-
cilla Hawkins.
ALDA MACK bequeaths her ability to provide an alibi for any situa-
tion to Halden Cockburn.
ROY WATKIS wills his soothing, moving, and satisfying tenor voice
to Gilbert Burrows.
MAVIS SIMPSON bequeaths her contorted dancing steps to Ruby
Jordon.
HILDA WILLIAMS leaves her patient attitude and slow drawl to
Pearl Simon.
LINDA SAMUELS leaves her metallic alto voice and her Monday-
morning orchids to Conzinetta Scott.
SIDNEY JONES sighs as he leaves his ability to object to everything
on principle to Ivan Dowlin.
EVA TAIT bequeaths her gestures and complicated manner of ex-
plaining things to Wilmoth Morrison.
DOROTHY THOMAS wills her magnetic eyes and flowing movements
to Daisy Stone.
SIDNEY SMITH wills sentimentally his enigmatic smile to James
Webster.
ELEANOR INNISS leaves her very neat handwriting and petite sta-
ture to Pearl Thompson.
MARY GEORGE wills her lovely singing voice and rug-cutting ability
to Icylin Smythe.
ROY SKEETE bequeaths his scholarly appearance to Gladstone Gordon.
The Class of '44
Witnesses: Watt A. Sapp
Wee R. Bumms

PAGE FORTY THE THINKER















































































THE THINKER


PAGE FORTY-ONE







TZTTTI


-~


& Ii -


o' tj


-VT









MUSIC IN THE NORMAL SCHOOL


Af;er the Music Week celebrations in 1941, we requested that
music be added to the curriculum. As a result, irregular periods of
free singing were introduced under the direction of Mr. Alfred E. Os-
borne, Supervisor of Instruction in the Canal Zone Colored Schools.
In July of the same year, Miss Norine Johns, former music instructor
in the Junior High School, replaced Mr. Osborne as director-accompa-
nist, and singing became a regular subject in the course of studies.
Under Miss John's direction a vocal ensemble was organized for
the purpose of encouraging our love for good music. Soon we began
to build a splendid repertoire of folk songs, patriotic and religious
music and semi-classical selections. The "Hour of Music," which has
become a traditional Christmas program, was first presented by the
Ensemble in December, 1941.
Early in 1942 Miss Johns resigned her position with the Division
of Schools. Miss Emily E. Butcher, who succeeded her, has encouraged
our interest in good music and has competently carried on the work.
In this same year the Ensemble was invited to sing, on a series
of Parent-Teacher programs sponsored by the Canal Zone Colored
Teachers Association in the larger Silver communities. These appear-
ances revealed the potentialities of the group to the officials of the
Division of Schools who arranged to have Mrs. Helen C. Baker, Super-
visor of Music in the Canal Zone Schools, assist in the musical train-
ing of the Ensemble. Mrs. Bak group and the Ensemble has profited immensely from the expert train-
ing and generous suggestions she has given.
Other appearances of the Ensemble were on the I. N. Y. C.'s pro-
gram, "The Negro as a Soldier;" the Third Patriotic Program of the
Silver Employees' Volunteer Committee; and the Dedicatory Exercises
of the La Boca School Library.
Our "Program of Music," consisting of semi-classic and classic
numbers, which was presented successfully on both sides of the Isth-
mus, will long be a source of pleasure and pride to us.
We were glad to make our music offerings to programs that
were presented for the benefit of the members of the armed forces.
We sang at the Brotherhood Week program which was broadcast
fiom the Tivoli U. S. 0.; the religious observances held during Holy
Week at the same club; and the music program presented at the
Esther Witkin U. S. 0. Club during National and Inter-American
Music Week.
The musical training we have received in the Normal School
makes us keenly aware of the pleasure and benefit to be derived by
studying music in the school. We are glad, therefore, for the musical
knowledge that we have acquired, which will enable us to contribute
in some measure to the opening of a new field of wholesome enjoy-
ment for the boys and girls in the elementary school.


PAGE FORTY-THREE


TH E THINKER











EL CIRCULO ESPARIOL


El club "Circulo Espafiol" de la Normal de La Boca fue organi-
zado por la Srta. L. Jump, en el primer afio de nuestros studios, con
el objeto de fomentar y mejorar las relaciones entire nosorros, los pa-
namefios de origen antillano, y nuestros compatriotas de origen la-
tino. Uno de los medios por el cual esperibamos llevar a cabo tal
objeto era el de invitar a eminentes personajes de la sociedad paname-
fia para que nos dictaran discursos acerca de las costumbres paname-
fias y para que supieran al mismo tiempo que existe entire nosotros un
grupo que se interest por lo panameiio. A continuaci6n presentamos
un diario del club que dara una idea poco mis o menos de la labor
que hicimos.


14 de agosto de 1941
30 de agosto de 1941


25 de septiembre de 1941
9 de octubre de 1941
30 de octubre de 1941


1 de diciembre de 1941


13 de diciembre de 1941
31 de enero de 1942
21 de mayo de 1942

23 de julio de 1942

2 de noviembre de 1942

14 de noviembre de 1942
12 de diciembre de 1942
14 de enero de 1943
24 de enero de 1943
26 de febrero de 1943


Organizaci6n del Circulo Espafiol
Inducci6n de la primera directive por el Sr.
Desmond Byam, Director de la Escuela Repu-
blica de Bolivia de Col6n. Gran Buffet y Baile.
Primera sesi6n del Circulo Espafiol.
Primer program (Dia de la Raza).
Debate entire los miembros del club.
Creaci6n de la pigina espafiola en
la revista escolar.
"Dia del Maestro" en Panama. Presentaci6n
de un lindo ramillete a la Srta. Jump, nues-
tra maestra de castellano.
Intercambio de regalos.
Paseo a Chepo.
Elecci6n de una nueva directive del club.
Segundo program del club.
Inducci6n de la nueva directive.
Tercer program (Sim6n Bolivar).
Discurso por el Sr. C. Gallegos, professor del
Institute Nacional. Cuarto Programa del club.
Una tertulia "Una Noche en Rio".
Segundo intercambio de regalos.
Nombramiento del comiti pro-biblioteca.
Elecci6n de la nueva directiva.
Discurso por la Sra. Otilia de Tejeira. Su te-
ma fue: La Literatura Panamefia.


PAGE FORT Y-FOUR


THE THINKER









MY FIRST DAY IN NORMAL


That Thursday morning was a windy, dusty morning as are most
mornings in La Boca. That morning was the beginning of my first
day in Normal. As I entered the school building, I was greeted by the
professor himself. For some reason or the other, without casting as-
persions at that gentleman, I was slowly sinking into the depths of
despair even while he escorted me to Room 19. I felt better as I
entered that room. I was quite pleased with the clean, pleasant faces
I saw around me. Then I saw Lorenzo and was forced to change my
point of view.
I was seated between Sylvia and Lucille, behind Cecilia, and be-
fore Sainten. Looking around, I saw Dottie sitting right opposite
Babb. Many of us still say it started from that first day. Lena was
seated very close to the open door. I was afraid for her because the
wind was maliciously blowing at its best, and I could not tell when
the poor girl, along with Lilybell and the teacher, would be wafted
away from the rest of us.
I could not help seeing Eva stretching her neck over three seats
to whisper some obviously trivial matter to tolerant, if bored, Cecilia.
To make us all become acquainted with one another, our teacher,
Mr. Hutchinson, had each of us tell a story to the rest of the class.
I can truthfully say I never heard any taller tales than those I heard
that morning. How could anyone forget Smith's lengthy account of
how he skillfully escaped from the raging, turbulent waters of a
mighty ocean! While he spoke, he kept glancing at Mary to see
whether she was impressed. From her expression I had a well-found-
ed suspicion that she was anything but favorably impressed. Mavis
strove to outdo Smith by telling of her experience one stormy night
just as the clock struck twelve. She was rudely awakened by a shrill,
blood-curdling cry that sent chills racing up and down her spine.
She broke into a sweat. There followed a deathly silence. Then, she
felt cold, clammy fingers slowly encircling her throat. Surely these
were the hands of Death! Would she have sufficient time to atone
for her numerous sins? The icy hands pressed harder. Her breath-
ing became difficult. She could barely utter a feeble scream. The
household awoke and lights flooded the room. A spider had fallen
from the ceiling into Mavis's bed.
Linda gave a glowing account of her culinary skill which yet
remains to be seen. I heard a heart-felt sigh and I turned to see
Watkis looking as comfortable as one seated on hot nails. On his
face was the desperate look of a bull just before the slaughter. Al-
fred, sitting in the back, teased Sylvia and pulled her black bow.
Needless to say, she was utterly pleased at this, although she tried to
throw some severe, yet encouraging glances at him. From the look
on Anna's face, I could see that she would have liked to question
Harold's veracity when he spoke, in pride-filled tones, of how he
saved an entire family from drowning in a river.


THE THINKER


PAGE FORTY-FIVE









Hilda, the good and faithful, told of the time when, on a gos-
pel tour, she converted a prison filled with sinners into God-fear-
ing Christians. She fervently hoped she would be able to do the
same for the rest of the class and even the teachers. Well, it seems
that either Hilda didn't work hard enough or she hadn't the slightest
cooperation whatsoever. Anyhow, she consoles herself that it is the
latter.
Eric gave a dramatic account of the time when he was ac-
claimed national hero after killing a man-eating shark single-handed.
With knife gripped firmly between his teeth, he dived into the
murky water and was lost from view. There followed a furious
struggle between man and beast. The waters churned wildly and
then slowly changed into a reddish color. Eric, the hero, emerged
victorious. What did it matter that the monster was three weeks
old? Think of the damage it could have done later on!
I thoroughly enjoyed my first day in Normal and I was very
rorry when the bell rang for dismissal. On the whole, I didn't see
anything particularly funny that morning because Cockburn didn't ar-
rive until the following Monday.

-Alda Mack


PAGE FORTY-SIX


THE THINKER










NORMAL'S INVASIONS


It is interesting to note how the gregarious instinct which ex-
ists among the Normalites brings about a number of invasions both
in and out of the community. Owing to the tendency to be always
in a group, we made our first invasions at the La Boca and Ancon
Commissaries, when our boys and girls took over sales jobs. Among
the invaders of La Boca "commy" were Sylvia, Verona, Linda, Elea-
nor, Alda, Mercella, Jones, and Carter. Those who subdued Ancon
"commy" were Dottie, Mary, Anna, Lena, Lilybell, Cessie, Inez,
Lorenzo. Smith, Davidson, and Watkis. One by one, however, they
soon got tired of these sales jobs, and their attention was directed to
other fields. Then an invasion of the "Heavy Equipment Section"
in Balboa was executed by Smith, Davidson, and Babb. Strange to
say, these boys had unique ratings and salaries. Smith was time-
keEper-and-"janitor;" Davidson appeared on the rolls as time-keep-
er-and-"pusher;" and Babb played the part of time-keeper-and-
"plumber-helper." But more unique than the ratings were the sala-
ries paid to these young men. Let us take the case of the time-keep-
er-"janitor," Smith. Suppose the rate of pay was $12.00 for time-
keepers, and $5.00 for janitors. The boss would find the average
of the two amounts, and that average would be Smith's salary for a
month. In similar manner were the other two lads paid, but through
their "stickability," they clung together.
Many other minor invasions were always being made, at some-
time or other, by members of our group. In our last year, five las-
sies, Linda, Alda, Lilybell, Dottie, and yours truly set out to explore
and conquer the Westbank Naval Station Clubhouse, which is two
miles from the ferry. We finally succeeded in landing small jobs;
Lilybell to work as checker; Dottie as saleslady, selling cigarettes and
candy; and the rest of us as waitresses. Every evening at 3 o'clock,
we bolted from the classroom and raced to the ferry landing to
catch the 3:15 ferry in order to reach "Mile 2," which was the
place of this invasion. Knowing that we were supposed to start
working at 3 o'clock, but being able to reach only at about 3:45,
we had to sneak through the front entrance; don our working ap-
parel quickly; and start working, with the hope that the boss did
not notice our late arrival. We worked six hours a day, reached home
about 9:45, and tried to do a little study work before bed-time for
the following day's classes.
In like manner do students of Normal invade parties, concerts,
and athletic meets. Our latest resorts are "Coney Island," and the
"Presidente Theater," Panama's latest addition to the movie pal-
aces. By these invasions do we show our tendency to stick together.

-Mavis Simpson


PAGE FORTY-SEVEN


'THE THINKER





































Keys for two-room quarters for 6 N.S. Boys Presented to Principal, La Boca Normal School,
December, 1943







A SURVEY AND THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE
LA BOCA NORMAL SCHOOL DORMITORY
One of the most pretentious projects of the Class of '44 of the
La Boca Normal School was the making of a survey to determine
the available accommodations in La Boca for students from the
Atlantic Side, who were going to enter the Normal School in July,
1943.
First, a committee drafted a letter stating the aims of the
survey; then questionnaires were made and distributed along with the
letters throughout the community. We divided the class into groups
of three or four. Each group was assigned to a particular area. In this
way every building in the community was canvassed.
The students encountered many situations that demanded a great
deal of tact. In one home we met a woman with tear filled eyes -
her husband had died an hour before we arrived. Many a hospitable
housewife who offered to serve refreshments to the students had to
be turned down in the interest of completing the survey on time.
At other homes, we were told in no uncertain terms to go to the
land of the devil. Besides these situations, we had to deal with the
perennial problems which confront social workers: barking dogs and
busy housewives who did not feel that they should be disturbed.
The majority of the people were willing to cooperate with us.
Many who were unable to give direct aid offered suggestions about
what could be done. Many childless couples were willing to ac-
commodate more than one student A few who could hot take any
more persons into their homes because they were already overcrowd-
ed, were willing to board some of the students.
The results of the survey were the following: Five families were
willing to board students. Three families were willing to provide
lodging for three students. These accommodations were offered at
$10.00 per month. Thirteen families offered room and board for
amounts ranging from $15.00 to $20.00 per month.
This survey revealed that although the residents of La Boca
were willing to cooperate with the Normal School, on account of
poor housing conditions, they were unable to cater to the needs of
our students. Consequently, in October, the Division of Schools
built a two-room dormitory as a wing to House No. 904, La Boca
Road,. which provides lodging for six students. Realizing, however,
the inadequacy of the location and sanitary equipment of the pre-
sent dormitory, which was built as a matter of expediency, the Di-
vision of Schools has recently completed plans for the construction
of a modern dormitory on the La Boca School grounds, which will
accommodate twelve students.
It is important to note this significant step in the development
of the La Boca Normal School. We take this opportunity to ex-
press our sincere appreciation and gratitude to the Division of
Schools and all other officials of the Panama Canal, who made
possible the construction of the La Boca Normal School Dormitory.
-Eric Grahan.


PAGE FORTY-NINE


THE THINKER
































H _jcx-^^ IBIH


Normal School Students using the La Boca School and
Community Library.


THE THINKER


P A G 1 FIFTY



















(ammxenciement


P-A G E P I FT Y-O N E


THE THINKER









I. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND OF THE PUBLIC TEACH-
ER-TRAINING INSTITUTION AND THE FUNCTIONS OF
THE LA BOCA NORMAL TRAINING SCHOOL

A. The Development of the Normal School as a Unit of the Public
School System.
Human evolution does not move in a straight line. The struggle
toward civilization turned abruptly in a new direction when men
discovered metals; the age of stone with all its limitations came to an
end. So it is with education. The great social reforms and scientific
discoveries which had their beginnings in the 16th century changed
the course of education. They brought the era of intellectual conser-
vatism to a close. I shall endeavor to trace briefly the movements in
education insofar as they are related to the establishment of the normal
school as a segment of the public school system.
In the earliest times the responsibility for training the child rested
on the family. What education was needed was imparted in the home
or in the field and was of a very simple type. The father taught the
son the simple skills and crafts that would make him a good fighter,
hunter, or farmer; the mother trained the daughter in the household
duties of a good wife and mother. The young, by participating in the
activities of their elders, learned what they would soon have to do
themselves, and what they would one day teach to their successors. As
society developed and became more complex, it imposed new duties,
responsibilities, and behaviors on the individual. Soon it was realized
that the education supplied by the home was inadequate to meet the
increasing demands of a growing society and the need for a special
institution with the specific function of preparing the child effectively
for social living became pronounced. To satisfy this need society
created the school as that special institution which is responsible for
preparing the individual for the successful performance of his life
activities.
For hundreds of years education was a privilege enjoyed by the
nobility and the clergy; the schools were poorly equipped; and in-
structional methods were confined to the lecture and the "hearing of
re-citations." Then came the Reformation which wrought important
changes in the content of education at the same time that its adher-
ents advocated schooling for the masses. It was left to the scientific
spirit which rose in the 18th century, however, to bring about a funda-
mental revolution in the educational system. It brought about new
concepts of education and led to the development of new types of
educational institutions.
The new concept of the child as a slowly developing personality,
demanding not only subject-matter but method suited to his stage of
development brought in its wake a new conception of teaching;
namely, that teaching is the stimulation and direction of mental, phys-
ical, emotional, and social development. Where before the ability to


PAGE FIF T Y-TWO


THE THINKER









organize and discipline a school and to lecture on a given topic had
constituted the only arts of instruction, now the ability to instruct
systematically took a prominent place among the important profession-
al requisites for teachers. As a result, educational methods began to
take a definite form and secure recognition, and psychology became
one of the giuding sciences for the teaching profession.
In the United States, Horace Mann and his contemporaries or-
ganized the eight year graded elementary school and changed the char-
acter of common schooling. The academies which flourished in the
early part of the nineteenth century disappeared during the seventies
and the eighties, giving place to a new kind of secondary school, the
free public high school.
One can find specific causes which explain the changes in the
American educational system. The free public high school is the result
of the social upheaval which followed the Civil War; the public
graded elementary school is due to the necessity of perpetuating
a democratic society; and without fear of contradiction I can say that
the public teacher-training institution commonly known as the normal
school, is the product of the enlarged conceptions of child-nature and
the new purposes of education. Horace Mann, Henry Barnard, and
other American apostles of education were convinced that the normal
school is the instrument through which a modern elementary school
can be shaped towards its highest goals.
Governor Edward Everett, at the opening of the Normal School
at Barre, Massachusetts, in 1839 announced that the purposes of the
first public teacher-training institution in the United States were:
1. to give additional training; 2. to give instruction in the methods of
teaching; 3. to give instruction in the management of the school; and
4 to provide a school of practice for actual exercise in the business
of instruction. He struck upon three essential factors in the training
of teachers of any school system subject matter, methods, and appli-
cation.
Since then the movement for the creation of normal schools to
train teachers for the modern elementary school increased in public
favor. Other steps in the development of teacher-training institutions
were taken when the universities organized departments of education
to prepare teachers for the secondary school and by the more recent
and rapid change of normal schools to teachers' colleges with the
function of preparing teachers for all levels of the public school sys-
tem. Accompanying the organization of professional instruction for
teachers, important changes in the scope and the nature of the element-
ary school were effected. New subjects and activities were added; better
textbooks were prepared; graded courses of study began to appear; and
the modern system of school management and control took definite
shape. It may be said, therefore, that from the time the normal school
was established as a segment of a modern school system, the element-
ary school has further developed. In like manner, the secondary school
has greatly benefited from the establishment of teachers' colleges.


PAGE FI FTY-THR E


THE THINKER









B. The Special Functions of the La Boca Normal Training School

In the light of the historical background of the normal school as
that teacher training institution which is entrusted with the special
task of preparing teachers for the elementary school, we can see that
the establishment of a normal training school was a logical step in
the development of the Canal Zone Colored Schools. The dearth of
trained teachers caused either by the death or departure of men who
had come from the West Indies, made it highly necessary to extend to
our group training in the art and science of teaching which has for
long been a requirement of the elementary school teacher in Europe,
the United States, and other countries of Central and South America.
When the Columbia University Survey Staff reported in 1930 on
the Canal Zone Colored Schools, it recommended the "establishment
of a teacher-training school for the preparation of teachers for the
Colored Schools." Subsequent efforts by the Division of Schools re-
sulted in the establishment in January of 1935 of the La Boca Nor-
mal Training School.
One may ask, "Has the Normal School justified its existence in
our public school system?" This question may be answered from three
standpoints: From the standpoint of the individual, the standpoint of
the school, and the standpoint of the community.
First, "from the standpoint of the individual." If the normal
school performed no other function than to care for the educational
needs of a small number of our group after the onset of adolescence,
.it would perform a valuable service. The Normal School is partially
satisfying the need for an institution which affords an opportunity to
induct the student into the beginnings of a complete education, and
into a better understanding of society and its institutions; to help
him to realize the meaning, of his individuality; and to develop an
integrated personality.
Since successful living depends to a high degree upon success in
a vocation, there is an insistent social demand that boys and girls be
given an opportunity for vocational training at the secondary school
level. Inasmuch as the normal school prepares students for a noble and
dignified profession, it is more than satisfying this social demand.
Our school, therefore, is performing the dual function of offering
a secondary education at the same time that it prepares men and
women for recognized service of a high order.
Second, "from the standpoint of the school." As I have pointed
out, the normal school and the modern elementary school represent
paralell forces, historically; the former was developed to satisfy the
needs of the latter. This parallel development may account for the
fact that wherever there are normal schools the elementary schools
develop in purposes, scope, curriculum, methods, and organization.
There is good reason to expect, therefore, that as time goes on our
school will make a substantial contribution to the further development
of the elementary school.


PAGE FIFTY-FOUR


THE THINKER









The students of the first graduating class collaborated with the
teachers in service in making the Courses of Study now in use in
our schools. In a similar manner, this class and future classes of the
La Boca Normal Training School can cooperate with experienced
teachers in the service in the deevlopment of 'units 6f work, instruc-
tional materials, special projects, guidance programs, and civic activ-
ities; thus enriching the school life of the pupils in the elementary
school. At this point it is not too visionary to express the hope that
in the not very distant future the La Boca Normal Training School
will extend upward to give room to the public high school that is
bound to come in the logical developmental programs of the colored
schools.
Third, "from the standpoint of the community." Education means
far more than the development of the capacities of each individual.
The extent to which the individual becomes socially efficient, capable
of cooperation, capable of contributing to the constructive forces of
social betterment, is an adequate measure of his success as a citizen.
The school, therefore, must provide direction for social development.
With class organizations, assemblies, music groups, clubs, and student
councils, our school is providing opportunity for training in coopera-
tion, leadership, and fellowshipp."
As students, we realize that a leader must be able to think logic-
ally, that he must be able to distinguish between right and wrong, and
to act promptly for the right. He must have vision to initiate and
work out a positive program for the development of his group. In
this practice of living and working together, we come to realize that
leaders must be supported by loyal followers, that without intelligent
and loyal followers it is impossible to develop the proper school
spirit or the right kind of community. We also come to sense the
fact that good followers will evaluate the actions of their leaders,
work for the success of any plan agreed upon, and that they will co-
operate heartily in all efforts for the common good.
Following wisely the usages of parliamentary procedure has prov-
ed one of the most helpful ways of bringing about this type of train-
ing. In class meetings we are encouraged to cultivate respect for the
opinions of others, and we are led to accept the restraints of our
fellows and to choose lines of thought and action based upon careful
judgment rather than on personal prejudices. In this way' we learn to
cooperate with others for the common good, to select leaders wisely
and to follow them consistently. Through the development of better
social attitudes and behaviors, the students of the La Boca Normal
Training School can work hopefully to aid in the attainment of more
efficient and more harmonious living in our community.
As graduates of the second class of the La Boca Normal Training
School, we hope to live up to the traditions of a noble profession and
to the ideals of our Alma Mater.
A few .-years ago the great poet-playwright, John Drinkwater,
wrote a poem called "A Prayer." These are the two last stanzas-
I commend them to my classmates and I commend them to myself:


THE THINKER


PAGE F IF T Y-F IV E









Grant us the will to fashion as we feel,
Grant us the strength to labor as we know,
Grant us the purpose, ribbed and edged with steel,
To strike the blow.
Knowledge we ask not-knowledge thou has lent,
But, Lord, the will-there lies our bigger need,
Give us to build above the deep intent
The deed, the deed.

CECIL L. CARTER, Chairman
ELSINORA LYNCH
LORENZO HARRISON
SIDNEY JONES



II. THE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY OF EDUCATION AND
THE ROLE OF THE LA BOCA NORMAL TRAINING SCHOOL

The general topic "The Social Responsibility of Education and
the Role of the La Boca Normal Training School" will be discussed
under three major headings: A. The Social Basis of Education. B. The
Objectives of Education. C. The Application of the Philosophy of
Education from the Standpoint of the Objectives of Self-Realization
and the Role of the La Boca Normal Training School.
My specific undertaking, at this time, is to discuss the first.

A. The Social Basis of Education

In this talk I propose to discuss my topic under the following
heads: the nature and meaning of culture; the individual and culture;
the nature of education as a social function.
What is the nature and the meaning of culture? Culture has been
defined as the "sum total of the accumulated experiences of a par-
ticular group of people or society." It is "that complex whole which
includes knowledge, beliefs, art, morals, law, customs, and any other
capabilities and habits acquired by man as a member of society."
The various elements of culture may be separated into two major
divisions. The first division includes the material or physical elements
such as inventions, machines, tools, weapons, clothing, forms of shel-
ter, and similar material things. The second division includes the in-
tangible or spiritual elements such as beliefs, language, customs, folk-
ways, religion, moral codes, law, government, and similar elements.
Culture in its entirety represents the sum total of the efforts of man
to improve his modes of living.


PAGE FIFTY-SIX


THE THINKER









Now, every individual is born into a culture. The religion he
adopts, the language he learns to speak, the beliefs, the customs, and
even the prejudices that he acquires are all results of his association
with other human beings in that culture. In other words, the culture
is the force that directs and circumscribes his development.
The individual finds cultural elements already existing when he
is born. By contact with the members of his group he acquires the
patterns and modes of behavior of that society. In other words, he
acquires experiences-he becomes educated. In a sense, then, educa-
tion is a social process by means of which the individual is inducted
into the life and culture of his particular group.
Many people think of education as a particular function that
takes place only in a school; and in this narrow sense we speak of
sending our children to school to be educated. I should like to point
our, however, in the broadest sense, education is not restricted to the
school. In our community, for example, the young child begins to be
inducted into the culture of our community long before he reaches
school. He begins to acquire the language of his parents in the home.
As he plays with his young friends in his neighborhood, as he comes
in contact with people in the clubhouse, in the commissary, and on
the playground he learns the modes and the pattern of thinking and
acting of his group. In short, he becomes educated into the life and
culture of his society.
In a previous speech it was pointed out how the school evolved
as that special institution of society to prepare the child for his social
needs. In our modern society, the school is a specialized institution
that has the responsibility of inducting the child in a formal and
deliberate way into the best and most important elements of his
culture.
Organized and deliberate education, as conducted in the school,
signifies a controlled effort of adult members of society "to make of
the young something which if left to themselves and the culture
they would not become."
Three fundamental factors are present in the deliberate education
of the young as conducted by the school: first, a particular culture
with its life activities, its operating social arrangements, its tools, tech-
niques, meanings, and values; second, the child-unique, active-his
individuality in process of formation; third, the agent of the culture-
the teacher-in control of the process by which the child and the
culture interacts.
The work of the school is built around its curriculum, that is to
say, the series of guided educational experiences offered by the school.
The curriculum or the educational program of the school represents
an undertaking of educators to provide experiences which will induct
the child to the most crucial, valuable, and important aspects of the
culture. This undertaking necessarily involves choice, selection, and


PAGE FI FTY-S EVEN


THE THINKER









evaluation of data, principles, and values in its formulation and ad-
ministration. Every educational program, therefore, has its selected
content and emphases which condition the development of the young.
For those who think of deliberate education as a form of social
action and interpretation, this is the inescapable conclusion: that the
educator is responsible for evaluating the surrounding culture and
making positive educational choices.

B. The Objectives of Education

The previous speaker discussed the nature of education as a so-
cial function and developed the philosophy that organized and de-
liberate education is a form of social action and interpretation She
has also shown that the educator is responsible for evaluating the
culture and making positive educational choices in order that the
educational program with its selected content and emphases will con-
dition the development of the young, within a "frame of things deem-
ed necessary, possible, and desirable." The conscious acceptance by the
school and the teacher of responsibility for educational choice is pecul-
iarly important here, on the Isthmus, where various cultures of our
cosmopolitan population meet. In our own communities, as a student
of culture will observe, live peoples from many islands of the Carib-
bean area, who in migrating to Panama brought their cultures here. In
adjacent communities of the Canal Zone live our North American
neighbors, who have brought the culture of a dynamic industrial so-
ciety to this tropical region. Among us and in the terminal cities of
the Panama Canal are our Panamanian neighbors with their Hispano-
American culture. Each of these large culture groups with its sub-
cultures has its characteristic modes and patterns of thinking and act-
ing. Consequently, each inevitably affects and influences the other.
In this sense our communities are passing through a period of cultur-
al transition. They are still in a state of flux.
The significance of all this is evident. The school with its agent,
the teacher, should accept this fact of cultural transition as a challenge
and an opportunity to-assume creative leadership in the preservation
of the very best elements of our culture and in the promotion of the
highest social values.
In applying this philosophy, however, the school must recognize
the broad purposes with which education has always been identified.
Groups of educators have been active in stating the principal aims of
education. As early as 1860 Herbert Spencer made a classification of
educational objectives using human activities as the basis.
Since Spencer's time a great number of these classifications have
been attempted. Some of these include the significant and helpful
statement of two foremost educators, Chapman and Counts, whose
social purposes were given detailed treatment in 1938 at the First
Commencement of the La Boca Normal School. In 1918 the Commis-
sion of the National Association of Education came out with its car-


PAGE FI FTY-EI G H T


THE THINKER









dinal principles of modern education. In 1938 the Educational Poli-
cies Commission of the National Association of Education of the
United States produced an excellent report containing a statement of
the purposes of education. It is significant that most of the classifica-
tions that have appeared in recent years emphasize these facts: that
education is concerned with the development of the learner; that ed-
ucation is concerned with home, family, and community life; that
education is concerned with economic demands; and that education is
concerned with civic and social duties. In short, education in modern
society, and especially elementary education, should be concerned
with the basic or fundamental interests about which human life re-
volves and through which human nature is given expression. This
class is inclined to favor the four great groups of objectives as de-
fined by the Educational Policies Commission: 1. the Objectives of
Self-Realization; 2. the Objectives of Human Relationships; 3. the
Objectives of Economic Efficiency; and 4. the Objectives of Civic
Responsibility. The specific activities necessary to attain these objec-
tives will vary for different types of schools and for different com-
munities. Whatever the activities may be, they should be governed by
a great purpose. This purpose is found in the "four objectives."
Let us summarize what has been accomplished so far. I have just
indicated how education should help students to make adjustments to
persistent fundamental life needs. The previous speaker has already
pointed out that the educator is responsible for evaluating the sur-
rounding culture and making positive educational choices. By using
the broad general objectives as the social purposes and analyzing and
studying our culture and then making deliberate, positive choices, the
school and the teacher will be engaged, therefore, in giving guided
educational experiences to the child which will be meaningful and
serviceable.
The next speaker will show how the principles previously dis-
cussed can be applied by the school to our communities in the develop-
ment of the first broad purpose-the Objectives of Self-Realization.

C. The Application of the Philosophy
(Objectives of Self-Realization)
I shall endeavor to apply the philosophy of education which was
stated by the previous speaker from the standpoint of the objectives
of self-realization. In the words of the Educational Policies Commis-
sion these objectives are:
1. The Inquiring Mind. The educated person has an appetite for
learning.
2. Speech. The educated person can speak the mother tongue
clearly.
3. Reading. The educated person reads the mother tongue effi-
ficiently.
4. Writing. The educated person writes the mother tongue
effectively.


PAGE F I FTY-N INE


T H-E THINKER









5. Number. The educated person solves his problems of counting
and calculating.
6. Sight and Hearing. The educated person is skilled in listening
and observing.
7. Health Knowledge. The educated person understands the basic
facts concerning health and disease.
8. Health Habits. The educated person protects his own health
and that of his dependents.
9. Public Health. The educated person works to improve the
health of the community.
10. Recreation. The educated person is participant and spectator
in many sports and other pastimes.
11. Intellectual Interests. The educated person has mental resources
for the use of leisure.
12. Esthetic Interests. The educated person appreciates beauty.
13. Character. The educated person gives responsible direction to
his own life.
This statement means that the teacher will have constantly in
mind the need for the development of an inquiring mind. He will
be concerned with the intellectual and esthetic interests which children
are developing. He will seek constantly to insure through the organ-
ization of experiences, the full and complete self-realization of all
boys and girls. He will be concerned quite as certainly with their
emotional stability as with their intellectual attainments. He will not
be satisfied with any result less than an individual who is well ad-
justed to his contemporaries and who finds satisfaction and pleasure
in his life activities.
It is not possible here to discuss completely all the objectives of
self-realization, but I wish to call attention to eight of these objectives.
First, Speech. The educated person can speak the mother tongue
clearly. The individual who has the ability to express himself orally
in clear and correct language has a decided advantage in his social.
occupational, and other contacts. The school still has the tremendous
job of teaching English that functions in and out of school. It is
also the job of the school to know what in the speech in our com-
munities is acceptable and worthy of preservation. For example, in
our cosmopolitan Isthmian community, people do not have to speak
with the same accents; but people should speak clear grammatical
English, and use acceptable pronunciations.
Although the curriculum of the school places emphasis on oral
English, it has been recognized that this is a bi-lingual country and
that at least a working knowledge of the fundamentals of Spanish is
necessary for any individual who is to remain on the Isthmus. For
this utilitarian reason, Spanish is included in the curriculum of the
school.
Second, Reading. The educated person reads the mother tongue
efficiently. In addition to the eager search for knowledge which the
educated person always exhibits, he needs to have available every
possible means of satisfying his urge to know the truth. One of the


PAGE SIXTY


THE THINKER









important tools in this quest is an ability to read. When the school
teaches the child to read, it hands him a passport to cross boundaries
of time and space, a letter of introduction to the great minds in all
parts of the world and in all periods of time. However, in addition to
teaching the skills of reading, the school must guide the child in his
selection of reading materials.
Teachers must never be content to declare their objective gained
when a child has merely learned to stumble through words and sen-
tences. They must, as part of the program in reading, show the child
how to select his reading, to read some things carefully, to skim
other books hastily, to reject still others entirely, to comprehend what
he reads and to apply it in the solution of his problems, to use
reading as a means of experience, and to enjoy to the fullest degree
possible the rich domain of his heritage of world literature. Nothing
less than this is a justifiable goal in teaching reading. The school
should realize that the amount, distribution, and quality of reading
done by our community is an excellent index of our cultural develop-
ment and social competence.
Third, Writing. The educated person writes the mother tongue
effectively. Every person should be able to write a simple and straight-
forward statement in concise and legible English. One has only to
look through the contributions from members of our group to the
several newspapers to realize the urgent necessity of acquiring effec-
tive expression. The program in writing should include such func-
tional abilities as letter writing, formulating announcements, report-
ing an experience, writing directions or explanations, and keeping
personal memoranda. These activities are basic to the teaching and
learning of written composition.
Opportunity should also be provided for creative expression, the
artistic translation of personal experience into words. For those per-
sons whose writing will be directly associated with earning a living,
the desirable standards are simplicity, clarity, honesty, legibility, and
brevity.
Fourth, Number. The educated person solves his problems of
counting and calculating. Some acquaintance with numbers and skill
in the fundamental operations of addition, substraction, multiplica-
tion, and division is an educational objective we have come to take
for granted. The selection of the skills to be taught in this field and
the types of problems to which these skills are applied should be
determined by the kinds of arithmetical calculations which the indi-
vidual in our community has occasion to make.
New aspects of applied mathematics are constantly developing
and the educational experiences of children and adults need to be ex-
tended to include them. For example, one has only to pick up the
newspaper to note the presentation of numbers in graphic and tab-
ular form. Children should learn the rudiments of graphic presenta-
tion, particularly since this form of presenting data is so effective and


PAGE S IX T Y-O NE


THE THINKER








so easy to misinterpret. The child should be trained *to understand
the language of graphic presentation and what constitutes a reliable
and honest use of this device.
The ability to deal with number and form, the fundamentals of
mathematics, has always been a basic human need. In this modern
age of ours the appreciation and use of basic mathematical skills and
concepts offer significant assistance for self-realization.
Fifth, Sight and Hearing. The educated person is skilled in lis-
tening and observing. A great deal of our knowledge is acquired by
other methods, particularly by speaking, by listening, by observing,
and finally, by reflecting on what we have read, written, counted,
said and done, heard and seen. With the motion-picture, radio pro-
gram, concerts, and plays adding to the enrichment of our lives, the
task of the school is to help develop those skills so that, its boys and
girls will be able to listen, observe, and reflect skillfully.
Sixth, Health Knowledge and Health Habits. The educated per-
son understands the basic facts concerning health and disease. He pro-
tects his own health and that of his dependents. The modern school
properly places great emphasis on health as an outcome of education.
The educated person is inoculated against superstition, obeah, and
witchcraft. It is the duty of the school to know something of the
wasteful habits of members of our communities who invest thousands
and thousands of dollars on needless illnesses, on useless and harmful
patent medicines, and on questionable superstitious and magical prac-
tices. Knowing what is necessary for maintaining his own health, the
educated person is ready to protect the health of other people. He
knows that all children should be well born, carefully guarded against
avoidable infections, properly nourished in body and mind and given
an environment in which they can grow and live long and well.
Seventh, Recreation. The educated person is participant and
spectator in many sports and pastimes. Under the strain of modern
industrial working conditions, our people stand in urgent need of
learning forms of recreation. The school should attempt to include in
its recreational activities a variety of games and to emphasize more
cooperation and less competition in all its play activities. The games
taught should include a variety of those requiring physical as well
as mental agility. Enjoyment and relaxation are the ultimate aims in
all these recreational activities. Competition, as you know, will do
more harm than good if it centers on a few persons to the neglect
of the majority and if it elevates winning the game above playing the
game. For this reason, recreational training should include less com-
petitive physical activities such as walking, camping, and various
forms of manual and creative arts. When the school gives adequate
attention to the expression of the creative impulse, we shall be amaz-
ed at the contribution which youth will make to the intangible, spir-
itual values which constitute the durable satisfactions.


PAGE SIXTY-TWO


THE THINKER









Eighth, Character. The educated person gives responsible direc-
tion to his own life. Since the public school is the one agency which
has all the children under its jurisdiction at one time or another, it
can and should take a position of leadership in building the character
of our future citizens. Through deliberate education our boys and
girls can be taught to be generous, courageous, friendly, considerate,
to believe in and to have the habit of working well, and to be
accurate and responsible. The school must organize its experiences in
such a manner that it will help to develop men and women who, of
their own volition, will budget their lives intelligently and effectively
among their work, family and friends, recreation and rest, civic res-
ponsibilities, cultural growth, and spiritual life.
In the development of the first broad purpose-the Objectives
of Self-Realization-I have endeavored to give a clear understanding
of the principles of education and have tried to show how these
principles can be applied by the school in deliberately solving many
of the problems of our communities.
In its organization and administration, our school should be
a pattern of the theory which it advocates. The role of the La Boca
Normal School, therefore, is to develop in its students, the future
teachers of our schools, fine and ennobling conceptions and ideals of
life and education, an understanding of social and institutional life,
a knowledge of child nature and growth, and a working skill in the
techniques of aiding learners in carrying forward a continuous pro-
gram of educative activities. As graduates of the La Boca Normal
School, impregnated with the ideals of the philosophy previously dis-
cussed, we hope that when we become teachers, we shall be able to
apply this conception of education to our communities. Certainly by
applying these principles through organized and deliberate education,
the school will be making of the young "something which if left to
themselves and the culture, they would not become." Deliberate edu-
cation can and should develop in each individual "the knowledge, in-
terests, ideals, habits and powers whereby he will find himself and his
place and use that place to shape both himself and society toward ever
nobler ends."


ERIC GRAHAM, Chairman
VERONA BROWN
PEARL EASTMOND
ALFRED GORDON


PAGE S I X T Y-T H R E ,


1 HE THINKER


















































































THE THINKER


PAGE S I XTY-F IV E









GIRLS' ACTIVITIES


About eight months after the opening of our Normal Training
course, the girls of our class began to amuse themselves with the in-
discriminate shooting of arrows. They assured themselves that this
game was archery. The ancient sport of archery offers many appeals
to everyone, but I am afraid that our fair lassies did it an injustice.
During the first days of practice the entire playing field was
converted into a restricted area. The only zone of safety could be found
behind these novice archers who really took careful aim at the target
but shot elsewhere. The leaders in this Robin Hood sport were Margie
Trotman and Mary George.




After convincing themselves that this archery business was not
within their field of competence, our dear classmates decided to try
some other game. Their choice was volley-ball. All the girls practiced
faithfully and carefully. Soon a feminine community league was inau-
gurated and our girls' team entered this league. We were surprised,
however, to note that all the opposition that the girls' volley-ball team
met was easily swept aside. Our girls emerged victorious in the inter-
community league. The team played like any well oiled machine. Each
girl cooperated very nicely in aggressive and defensive action. As a
result of their coordinated action and concentrated effort the efficiency
of the team was maintained on a one-thousand per cent level. The
team was a veritable Rock of Gibraltar to the extent that for the years
'42 and '43 they resisted all attacks and were declared, therefore, un-
disputed champions of girls' volley-ball of the Pacific and Atlantic side
colored, communities.
For having triumphed in the volley-ball series in '43, the girls'
team. received a beautiful silver trophy which, at present, stands proud-
ly on the top of the library shelves in our classroom.


PAGE SIXTY-SIX


THE THINKER








BOYS' ACTIVITIES
Well, that's all from the girls. Let us look at the boys' activi-
ties. Let us turn to the aquatic feats. Scene: Hideaway Beach, La
Boca. A very large cosmopolitan gathering at the Water Sports Car-
nivals .... Over ten individuals are poised for the take-off. All con-
testants submerged together in this 50-yard free style event. The ruf-
fled surface regained its calm. To our surprise we found that the
winner of the race was a calm, unassuming, and dignified fellow
student. This student was our aquatic comet, Alfred Gordon. Fresh
from victory and desirous of adding more laurels to his name, Alfred
entered the 100-yard free style race and won the first place position
easily.

One sunny Friday morning after receiving full instructions from
our physical director, the boys occupied their respective positions on
the field. The umpire disturbed the tranquil air with a shrill, noise
from his whistle, an act which automatically started what turned out
to be a free-for-all. It all started when Riley took the ball in his
hands and started off for the goal of the opposing team. Then came
the fray. Each player was forced to protect himself as he found it
necessary. All the rules of the game were disregarded in about five
minutes of play. Even teeth and claws were employed in the melee
Pnd at times were broken. The umpire blew his whistle, loud and
long, but it was useless. The players were too absorbed in their
rough stuff.
The game continued in this way until nearly all the gladiators
were falling from exhaustion. The game ended and the players were
in no condition to play another game. From this encounter the boys
amused themselves with the thought of developing an invincible soc-
cer team.

The boys' softball team proved to be a chronic headache to
its opponents. This team, under the managership and captaincy of
Hall and Smith respectively, blasted many hopes and aspirations of
various teams in the Metropolitan League. Owing to the umpire-in
chief's questionable decisions at crucial moments, the team lost the
first game of a round of seven games. These decisions were so
erratic that the sympathetic nature of the boys prompted them to
suggest to the umpire that he pay a visit to Scadron's.
Outstanding in defensive play in the various positions were
Skeete and Brathwaite in left field; Headley in short center; David-
son, handling all chances at short stop without a miscue; Smith at
second base; Graham in center field; Dowlin in right field; and
Hall in the pitcher's box.
Before we close we must make special mention of Lady Luck's
protege, Harrison. All members of opposing teams knew that he
was a dead right field hitter. Yet, to their chagrin, whenever he
went to bat, he invariably placed the ball in right field for a hit.
His unequalled feat was that of having connected six hits in as
many trips to the plate.









BOUQUETS FOR NORMAL


(Extracts from letters to Miss Jump.)
From Ben M. Williams, Superintendent of
Canal Zone Schools:

"I was pleased to receive a copy of the October number of
"The Torch" published by the La Boca Normal School, and I wish
to compliment you and the students of the Normal School who took
part in the preparation of this booklet. It is evidence of the fine
cooperative spirit in carrying on a very worthwhile enterprise.
The material included in this number, as well as that of the
preceding numbers, is an indication of the ability of the students.
Their appeal for recognition can rest on the worth of the material
in "The Torch." In fact, this is the only basis on which any publi-
cation can have continued success.
It is requested that you send a copy of each issue to the Balboa
High School library and to the Cristobal High School library, and
also to each of the colored junior high schools."





From Joseph R. Koch, Department Chaplain
of the Panama Canal:

"On behalf of the Brotherhood Council for the observance of
Brotherhood Week, we take this means to express our deep ap-
preciation to you and the young ladies and young men of the La
Boca Normal School Ensemble, for their generous participation in
the Brotherhood Week Program, held at the Tivoli U. S. 0. last
week.
Miss Helen Currier Baker deserves the highest commendation
for her most able and efficient directorship of this ensemble as
well as Miss Emily Butcher for her excellent performance as ac-
companist.
The renditions of the Ensemble were beautifully and efficiently
done and were enthusiastically received both by the seen and un-
seen audience. Kindly extend our heartfelt thanks to Mrs. Baker,
Miss Butcher and the members of the Ensemble not only for their
splendid performance but also for their edifying spirit of coopera-
tion. It was a real privilege to have them with us and we sincerely
hope we shall have the opportunity of hearing them again."


PAGE SIXTY-EIGHT T


THE THINKER













































































THE THINKER


PAGE SIXTY-NINE










SWEET MUSIC


Sweet music, balm to the soul is,
Smooth galleon floating to eternal bliss
The rapture of music-loving souls expressed,
By brass, strings, and voices with emotion expressed.

When burdened with never-ending woes,
When harried by relentless foes,
Sweet music, soft and low, shall be,
The finest friend that one can see.

The peer, the proletariat, and all the world,
Are transported to the heavens where are unfurled
All the tenderness, the good, and the beauty there is,
All the happiness, the love, contentment, and bliss.

-Harmond Cockburn





MUSIC THAT LIVES

Hear the music of the day,
Hear it, feel the throb it gives,
Played a while and cast away,
Only for a while it lives.

Hear the music of this age,
Played for many and many a day,
Yet, its fate the gods presage,
That it live and pass away.

Hear the music of all time,
Played a day, a month, a year,
Music that is more than rhyme,
More than rhythm, lives fore'er.

Lives as long as men will live,
Lives forever, live it can,
Happiness and joy to give
Succor to the ills of man....

-Eric Graham


PAGE SEVENTY


THE THINKER








NOSTALGIA


In Normal three years have I spent
With many of my dearest friends,
And as the time goes swiftly by
I think of parting with a sigh;
But, oh, it is so sweet to know
That soon I'll be returning home.
The first few weeks were all so new,
And homesickness would have its due,
But one glance at my neighbor's face,
And I knew that I'd love this place;
Whenever I was feeling blue
I'd only look, and hum a tune.
Those afternoons so gladly spent
In singing songs we loved so well
As "Jeannie with the Light Brown Hair"
And melodies like "Massa Dear"
Will bring to us where e'er we dwell
Thoughts of the school we love so well.
Can we forget the moon and stars
And planets Jupiter and Mars
Which brought forth such a learned talk
From Smith, who loves to hem and haw;
Or times spent like bright happy larks
Discussing Darwin and Lamarck.
Or Lil'belle with the childish smile,
Or Watkis with all-seeing eyes,
Or Inez with her stately height,
Or Dottie with enchanting wiles?
Oh, no, we could but ne'er forget
The antics of our classroom pets.
I could go on and on and on
And tell you all I'm thinking of;
Of Mary's song, of Alda's poise,
Of Riley's irritating voice,
Of trying to absorb McKee
When others thought 'twas time to sleep.
Of singing classes never missed
Of ciph'ring Bond's arithmetic,
Of Cessie and her feline sneeze,
Of Skeete and his annoying tease,
But all good things must have an end,
And I must soon lay down my pen.
And so the end draws very near,
And brings along nostalgic tears,
Tho' well we know how hard 'twill be
To part with friends so dear as these;
But, yet, it still is sweet to know
That soon I'll be returning home.
-Sylvia McDonaia







A FAREWELL TO NORMAL
Normal, a name I love so well,
On whom my thoughts shall ever dwell,
Like a lighthouse to me shall always be;
Farewell, dear Normal, farewell to thee.
Books of methods and books of facts
You gave to me in numerous stacks;
Some I liked, especially McKee,
Farewell, dear Normal, farewell to thee.
Three years and a half with thee I've spent,
You shaped me each day that came and went.
I'm launching out now as the boat to the sea,
Farewell, dear Normal, farewell to thee.
Can I recall one moment of wrath
Against thee and thy torch that lighted my path?
No! memories of joy alone remain with me.
Farewell, dear Normal, farewell to thee.
Thy grandeur and power both abstract and rare,
A challenge will be for many who'll dare,
Victory and success surely theirs can be,
* Farewell, dear Normal, farewell to thee.
Into the future scurrying I must go
Looking back now and then but not with woe;
For did you not lift me and make me free?
Farewell, dear Normal, farewell to thee.
The time of our parting now is at hand,
Oh, that fore'er side by side we could stand,
The waves of the ocean repeat sadly with me:
Farewell, dear Normal, farewell to thee.
-Ruth Buckley

LABOR
L is for leisure, a period of rest.
After hard work this is best.
is for apprentice who is legally bound
To work for another, more renowned.
B is for barbering; a skilled art indeed
Requiring precision, elegance, and speed.
O stands for obelisk, a pointed-crest pillar
Carved by Egyptians to honor their ruler.
R is for respite when work is suspended
It's glorious to know that a work-day is ended .
-,Eduardo Dogue


fAGE SEVENTY-TWO


THE THINKER






TO MOTHER
Oh humble queen, oh noble soul,
Good shepherd of the human fold,
A rosy crown adorns your head,
The path is sacred where you tread.
In gloomiest day, in darkest night,
When sorrow enters joys take flight,
Our weary heart abounds with love
And pleads with angels from above.
When danger lurks beyond the wall,
When evil softly makes its call,
Your virtuous armor and seasoned sword
Protect us, weaklings, from the hated horde.
When youthful hearts so sullen grow
And helpless feet drift from the shore,
Your sacred lips they part in prayer
Imploring His aid to draw us nearer.
Oh humble queen, oh noble soul,
Whose glorious history remains untold,
We offer our prayers, our hopes, our tears
For you today............ On Mother's Day............
-Sydney Smith

ON MOTHER'S DAY
Dearest mother sits in yon old rocking chair,
A feeling of gladness prevails in the air,
From oldest to youngest her children are gay,
For this Sunday morn is the second in May.
The day set apart to honor the mother
Who bore you knd loves you as never another,
The one to whose sure arms you flee when depressed,
To bury your weary-worn head on her breast.
Today, think of many a bold sacrifice!
Count yourself product of good sound advice!
If only dear mothers with us could but stay,
And not like a frail, wilting flower, fade away.
Don't wait for this one day to show her you care,
But lavish attentions on her. while she is here.
A word of affection, a loving embrace .
Will cheer her and brighten her kind, thoughtful face.
We offer for mothers a prayer sincere,
We ask to be worthy of these creatures dear.
God gave us our mothers to cherish and love
For they are His most precious gifts from above.
Alda Mack


PAGE SEVENTH Y-T H R EE


THE THINKER









SYLVIA


I dream of Sylvia with her large black bow
And of Alfred pulling the thing to and fro,
Sometimes I wondered why she'd wear
That gloomy, depressing bow in her hair.
Many are the wild jeers her bow would invite
As it danced in the wind-a disturbing sight.
At times it sighed and her neck it caressed;
At times it acted like a demon possessed.
I long for Sylvia when the quizzes come,
But sometimes I consider her quite dumb.
For when, after hearing her expound
A well-merited zero on my quiz sheet is found.
I sigh for Sylvia and her weeping violin,
With it she never fails to create a din.
She'd torture, murder, and cruelly torment
The soul of the dying, old instrument.
I wonder if it is Sylvia and her bow exotic
Who have changed the professor into that neurotic
Who quizzes on topics he forgot to teach
And then, on our lack of intelligence, would preach.
I think of Sylvia, of castor oil and spinach;
In answering a question she fills it with verbiage.
If fortunately this lassie you chance not to know,
Then, avoid anybody with a large black bow.
Alda Mack

TO A GIRL
(With Apologies to Joyce Kilmer)

I think that I shall never see
A girl that means as much to me
As you, whose dusky head is pressed
Against my warm and happy breast;
A girl whose smile is like the ray
Of sunlight on an endless day,
A girl who may in summer wear
A bunch of roses in her hair,
A girl whose twinkling eyes so true
Reflect a shade of every hue,
Poems are made by fools like me
But only God makes girls like thee.
Roy Watkis


PAGE SEVENTY-FOUR


THE THINKER









NORMAL'S FAMOUS WRECK


There was joy in the car as it furrowed the road,
With Normalites bound for their peaceful abode.
The lads in the back were happy and free,
Their laughter was heard in most every key.
Behind the wheel sat the proud little driver,
At his side was a damsel his lovely admirer.
They were talking of the past day's affairs,
Without a thought of danger or care.
"How pleasing," said the lads, "to be home for our rest,
After passing a day of quizzes and tests."
"And sewing," said the damsels, "and cooking too,
To home we shall go with nothing to do."
A screech, a bang, and then a loud smash,
An uproar of voices arose from the clash.
'Twas really and truly a pitiful sight,
For Hilda and Linda went out like a light.
Because of his lack of carefulness,
Our cute little chauffeur got into a mess,
Now he rides in the back like a bee in its hive,
And is never again permitted to drive........
Mercella Scott


REMEMBER

Remember the skies looked down on us
And whispered soft and low,
And how we thought-at least this must
Be love that starts to grow.
Remember those very skies so fair
That nursed our dreams of love?
That silvery moon (it seemed so near)
Shone softly from above.
Remember its glow began to wane;
How suddenly my heart grew ill;
How Cupid promised to call again?
Tho' now he never will.
Love died and left us hardly friends;
But, remember the spark and ember
It left to return to burn again,
I do............. but do you remember?
Roy Watkis


PAGE SEVENTY-FIVE


THE THINKER




- FRESHMEN -


"L .'-J -


U '


' ,-i


4t


wl










THE FRESHMAN CLASS


On July 8, 1943, a freshman class of 30 students was admitted to
the La Boca Normal Training School. This is the third class to be ad-
mitted to the La Boca Normal School and is composed of students from
the following communities: La Boca, 11; Miraflores, 1; Red Tank, 3;
Obispo, 1; Gamboa, 5; Gatun, 3; Panama City, 1; Fort Randolph, 1;
Silver City, 2; Colon, 2.
Twenty-four of this group were graduated from the ninth grade
of the Canal Zone colored schools either in 1941 or 1942. Four had
been graduated from grade eight and had been attending Spanish
schools before entering the Normal School. Twenty-five gave up full-
time jobs to come to school.
There are 19 girls arid 11 boys in the class. The average age of
the group is 17 years and 2 months, the lowest age being 15 years and
10 months and the highest, 19 years.
Most of the students are now living in La Boca. Twelve of them
commute daily from Gamboa, Red Tank, or Panama.
We wish the members of the Class of '47 much success in their
scholastic career.


Bowen, Olga
Burrows, Gilbert
Carter, Pearline
Cockburn, Halden
Daley, Norma
Dowlin, Ivan
Eastmond, Leon
Ellis, Lodiana
Gordon, Agnes
Gordon, Gladstone
Hawkins, Priscilla
Jardine, Pablo
Jordon, Ruby
Leach, Celene


Lee, Thelma
Moise, Inez
Moore, Elleanora
Morrison, Wilmoth
Newell, Matthias
Scott, Conzinetta
Simon, Pearl
Smythe, Icilyn
Stone, Daisy
Thompson, Pearl
Thompson, Ruby
Watkis, Daphne
Watley, Clara
Webster, Audley


Webster, James


PAGE SEVENTY-SEVEN


THE THINKER









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PAGE SEVENTY-NINE


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THE THINKER





































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La Boca Normal School Freshmen, Faculty and Junior Classes, December, 1943










NOTES ON THE ALUMNI

It might be of interest to know what the alumni are doing. Of
the thirty-seven graduates, seventeen have positions in the colored
schools. Two who are married, have regular work at the La Boca
School. Twelve of the thirty-seven graduates worked for a short time
in the schools, and then resigned their positions for more attractive jobs
with the Contractors, the Army and Navy. Four migrated to the United
States to pursue advanced studies in colleges and universities. Of this
number one has returned to work in the diocese of the Panama Canal
Zone, after completing successfully a theological course at an Episcopa-
lian seminary. It is also important to note that a former student who
left after his sophomore year, is successfully pursuing a theological
course at a Roman Catholic seminary in the United States.

Following is a list of the alumni in their respective fields of labor:


1. Aubrey Blair

2. Preston Blake

3. Adelle Sealey Bolt



4. Andre Buller

5. Carmen Buller

6. Joseph Burnham

7. Ellsworth Caesar

8. Wilfred Clement


9. Leafy De Sousa

10. Cleveland Ennis

11. Lurlene Fergus

12. Edward Gaskin

THE THINKER


Clerk, Naval Supply Depot, Balboa

Teacher, Gatun Junior High School

Combines a career with marriage.

Teacher, La Boca School

Teacher, La Boca Junior High School

Teacher, Gatun Junior High School

Office helper, Fort Kobbe

Storekeeper helper, Fort Davis

Graduate of a School in Technology, De-

troit, Michigan; R. C. A. F. in Canada

Teacher, Silver City School

Clerk, La Boca Restaurant

Teacher, Silver City School

Teacher, La Boca Junior High School


PAGE EIGHTY-NINE









13. Lilian Rowe Gibson


14. Egla Gooden


15. Alfonso Greaves
16. Kenneth Griffith
17. Hanrow Hartley
18. Hamilton Lavalas
19. Janice Ledgister
20. *Carlos Lewis
21. Edmund Lynch
22. Audley Mamby


23. Emanuel Nolan


24. Beryl Ogle
25. Reynell Parkins


26. Joseph Seales
27. Rev. Mr. L. Shirley
28. *Gladstone Stone
29. Sylvia Hassan Stout


30. 'Drusilla Villiers
31. Henry Watkis
32. Alvin Williams
33. Eustace Williams
34. Louis Williams


Combines teaching with homemaking.
Teacher, La Boca School
Teacher, Red Tank School; graduate of
the University of Panama, March, 1944
Teacher, Silver City Junior High School
Teacher, Silver City Junior High School
Office helper, Cristobal Silver commissary
Teacher, Red Tank School
Teacher, Gamboa School
Student at a Catholic Seminary
Employee, Frederick Snare Corporation
Medical student at the University of Mi-
chigan
Office helper, Municipal Division, Pedro
Miguel
Employee, Panama Canal Press
Student at the University of Oregon; later
Pvt. in the United States Army
Clerk, R. F. A., Cristobal, Canal Zone
Priest, St. Christopher's Church, Rio Abajo
Leaderman, Naval Supply Depot
Former teacher at Silver City School; now
a happy housewife.
Teacher, Silver City School
Storekeeper, Fort Kobbe
Stockman, Naval Supply Depot
Stockman, Naval Supply Depot
Employee, Wunderlick Okes Company


*Former Student


_._ bimwbl .i


PAGE NINETY


'I VI% 14 2 TI Pe ITN I4f 1 -,I-









Autograpv5


PAGE N IN E T Y-O N E


THE THINKER


















































PAGE NINETY-TWO


ACKNOWLEDGMENT


The Staff of The Thinker sincerely thanks the patrons,
and all others who so generously aided in the publication
of this Yearbook.


THE THINKER










S-mp im n ht


and


LumWAor


ALL WASWiAP. UP!


P A S I M -f I TYi-T fI f E f


THE TH INKER












FOTOGRAFIA WALLACE BROS.


Vacation is coming!

Before you leave, there will be various social
obligations which you can best discharge with
an autographed photograph of yourself.

It is the you, of today, that your friends will
want to remember and a visit to our studio
now will avoid much last-minute hurry.


H. P. WALLACE, MASTER PHOTOGRAPHER
GRADUATE, MODERN SCHOOL OF PHOTOGRAPHY,
NEW YORK, N. Y.
MEMBER OF PHOTOGRAPHIC SOCIETY OF AMERICA



DAY & NIGHT SERVICE

No. 33 Mariano Arosemena
(Behind Encanto Theater)

Panama, City


Tel. 1691-J












Heartiest Congratulations

on your success.


Put God first, your
fellow man next and
yourself last, and you
will make the greatest
contribution possible
to life.



T. Stanley Cannon


Compliments of

The Rev. & Mrs.
1. 0. Veitch

Silver City, C. Z.

Best Wishes to
The Class of '44
The Rev. & Mrs.
S. N. Brown
La Boca, C. Z.

Best Wishes to
The Class of '44
The Rev. & Mrs.
J. T. Mulcare


La Boca, C. Z.


Compliments of'

The Rev. & Mrs.
D. A. Osborne

Pueblo Nuevo Heights, R. P.

Best Wishes to
The Class of '44

The Rev. L. B. Shirley

Panama, R. P.

Compliments of
The Girls Friendly
Society
ST. PAUL'S CHURCH
Panama, R. P.


Compliments of



ST. VINCENT'S

CHOIR


St. Vincent's Church




Silver City, C. Z.









BEST WISHES
to the -
CLASS OF 1944

Adjutant & Mrs. Neil C. Fisher
and -
The Staff of the Salvation Army
GATUN, C. Z.


Compliments of
A Student of

The Class of 1938

Gamboa School


Compliments of

Mr. & Mrs.
Phillip A. Grant

Gamboa, C. Z.


Best Wishes to Best Wishes to
The Class of '44 The Class of '44

Spanish Club Gamboa The Carver's Science
School Club
Gamboa, C. Z. Gamboa, C. Z.

Compliments of Compliments of

The Class of 1944 The Charlotte Hawkins
Oamboa School Brown Culture Club

Gamboa, C. Z. Gamboa, C. Z.



Compliments of


CLUB TROPICAL


COLON, R. P.











Compliments of

Dr. Fred Sterling

Colon, R. P.


Best Wishes to
The Class of '44
Mr. & Mrs
C. B. Prescott
Silver City, C. Z.


Compliments of
Beresford L. Stone
(Physiotherapist)
7022-8th. Street
Colon, R. P.


Compliments of


PANAMA RADIO
CORPORATION



Avenida Central No. 29

Panama, R. P.


Compliments of

LEWIS SERVICE

INC.


124 Central Ave. & 18 J St





Books, Magazines, Office

and -

School Supplies


Compliments of
Dr. Uubert C. Edwards

1002 11th Street
Colon, R. P.


Best Wishes to
The Class of '44
Mr. & Mrs
E. A. Robertson
La Boca, C. Z.


Compliments of.

Mr. George Westerman

La Boca, C. Z.


I









JUST "NUTS" AND "NUTTING" ELSE
All about School

Dear Miss Jump:

I can't come to school today because I have a pain in my neck, so
please give the test today. I can't take the test because of this pain in
my neck. I can't twist my neck so I can't take the test. I would gladly
take the test if I could twist my neck-to see my neighbor's paper.
As I won't be there, please don't forget to give the test today,
thus sparing me a zero.

Thanking you in advance,
MARY GEORGE

-Oo---

The teacher had just got through expounding on Italian art, lit-
erature, and music.
Teacher: Now Lilybell, tell us what is the most important contribution
of the Italians to civilization.
Lilybell: Er-ah spaghetti, Sir.

-oOo--

Teacher: According to science what happens when we wet bread?
Eddie: Don't you know it gets soaked?

--oOo--

Miss Jump: When and where was the Declaration of Independence
signed, John?
John: In 1776, and at the bottom, ma'am.



Smitty: (reading from blank paper): The ear is a er--ah--bony set of
bones er--ah--a nervy set of bones er--ah--a bony set of
nerves-that is, I mean .............
Mr. S. P. (interrupting): Say, Smith, will you throw that sheet of paper
through the window and hang on to it?

PAGE NINETY-EIGHT THE THINKER




Full Text

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'''': 'ii"", i-' :0,

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THE T H INK E R 1944 A YEARBOOK PUBLISHED BY THE LA BOCA NORMAL TRAINING SCHOOL LA BOCA, CANAL ZONE

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FOREWORD Owing to the shortag e a nd expense of print ing m a terial the publication of The Thinker of 1944 is no t so elaborate as we should like it to b e We have tried h oweve r to record the reflec tions of four years of h ard work and play spent i n the Normal School. May T he Thinker as a reminder of the past a nd an f o r th e future TWO THE 1H1NKER

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DEDICATION To OM Y011th of high ideals and aspi r ations who are striving to plepare thems elves to render greater and m01"e efficient se1"vice to the I sthmian community, we, the Class of '44 dedicate this Yearbook THINKER PAGE THREE :105261

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C LA SS SONG To Normal prouiand beatttiful W'ith trusting arms we cling; Upon thy broad and faithful breast Thy praises e'er to sing. 01tr blending voices loin to tell The zeal with which we pray For Normal, alma mater dea r For Normal day by day. Oh Normal dear, sinclfre thOlt art Thy merits we relay Thy guiding and effulgent light Ill uminates ottr way. Lead on our yomhfttl sons we pray With virtlte bold and tme. Imb ue their SOltiS with f e r vor deep; Give them a spirit new -Roy WATKIS PAGE FOUR THE THINKER

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atilt n anb: jffarultJ! I -IE THINKER PAGE FIVE

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BEN M WILLIAMS S1Iperiniendent of Schools MERCER UNIVERSITY, A. B. COLUMD I A UNIVERSITY, A. M. PAGE SIX CALMER A. BATALDEN Assistant to the Superinten dent of Schools (In Cha,yge of Colored Schools) Bradley Polytechnic Institute, B.S. Pennsy l vania State College, M.ED. THE THINKER

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ALFRED E. OSBORNE S"per 'viJOr of Imtmction Canal Zone Colored Schools Imtmctor in Mathematics and Methods Unive r sity of C hi cago. Ph. B. Post-graduat" work on A. M. at Columbia Universiry during summer sessions o f 1 936, 1937. 1939. 1940. THE THINKER PAGE SEVEN

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LEONOR JUMP Prilzeipal 0/ the La Boca Normal Training School 1mtmetor in Academic Sttb jeetJ and Methoc/J National University of Panama, Phm.B. Graduate of the Normal Schoo l f or Girls, Pma. Visiting student o f Columbia University dur ing the s um mer session o f 1935. TO THE CLASS OF 1944 The time has now arrived for YOtt to g? forth al7d serve. Never in the history of our community has thlf'1"e been a period when the opporttlnities for service were greater I : may not be extravagant to hope that we are on the tbreshold of a new era characterized by qn enlightened social recamtmction. Yom instructors have handed to YOtt / he torch of knowledge and ideals to be held on high By yottr own lives YOlt shall bear witness to the power of these ideas and princ iples I t is hoped that YOlt will go into the world to feed the flames of lofty thought and worthy action so as to gltide our people into the brighter ways marked by the higher and more f1t1zdamental values of living. Are you prep a red to flilfill this hope? For the achievements of the past, I congratulate you. I n the challengit7 g work of the fttt tlre, I wish you S1tccess. PAGE rIGIlT THE THINKER

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EMILY E. BUTCHER I mtructor in Music Graduate of the La Boca Normal Training School. Graduate of the PanAmerican J nstitute Panama Member of t he $cho1a Cantorum. ranama City. Student o f the National Conse rvatory o f Music, Panama City. ROBERT H. BEECHER I mtructor in Academic Subjects Graduate of Bro wn' s Town High S chool, Jamaica B. W I. Undergraduate work at the lin:vcfsity of Panama. A GEORGE COCKBURN I mtructor in S cience Graduate o f the La Boca Normal Training School. EMILE BENJAMIN I llStmctor in Carpentry and 117 oodwork C incraccing and Building Cou r se Co lumbia Correspondence School, Phi l adelphia. Pennsylvania. SubForeman. Constructing Quarte r master ( 1909-1932),

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HELE N C. BAKER Supervisor o f Mus i c i n the C. Z Schools Specia l tenurer o f Musi c in [he N ormal S c hool. PAGE TEN ASTON M PARCHMENT 111stmctor ill Physical E duca t ioll S t G eorge's Colle ge. K i n gsto n J a ma ica Cambrid ge S enio r C enificatc. FRANCES MOOMAW Supervisor of Pellmamhip ill the C. Z S c hools Special Icac her of P enma nship in the Normal School. THE "l"HINKER

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MA E 1. MALCOM 1 m tmct 01" in Ho1tJehold A rts Wol mer's High Sc hool for Girls, King sto n Jamaica C ambridge Senior Cert ificate. FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FACULTY STANLEY S. HUTCHINSO N 1 mtmcto,. in A cademic Subje cts (1941 1 943) Graduate of t h e La BoC'lL Normal Training School. Undergraduate work, National Univer sity of Panama. ALFRED G. BLAKE 1mt ructor T ailoring (1943 ) THE THINKER N ORI NE JOHNS 1mtmctor in Music (194 1-1942 ) G r aduate of the Normal School fo r Girls, Panama. Graduate of the Pan-Ameri c an Insti tute. Panama City_ \'Vest Car ibbean Training Sc hool Las (ascadas, C. Z. J. E. Roger's Tailoring Escablish mcnt. Port Limon C. R. PAGE ELEVEN

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Left to r:ghr: Front row -Miss Clarice Simpson Miss Haze l \Xfhyte Miss S y lvi a D ora n Ba c k r ow-Edward Gaskin Peter S Marcin Lion el Osborne, Principal A 1. Morgan Rona ld Livingston L o ren zo R ose. T eachers not included in (hi s picture Miss Loui se Dawkins, Mrs. Adelle Sealey Bolt Mrs. Lillian Rowe Gibson. Principal and Teachers of the La Boca School Who Cooperated with the La Bo::a Normal School In the Course in Ob:oervation and Practice Teacli.inJ.

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INEZ A. HOLDER Secfetary WILBUR W. BABB Treamrer ALFRED R. GORDON President GWENDOLYN E. EASTMOND l V"-P,,mkn,

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BABB, WILBUR W CAMP B1ERD C. z. A man of lew worth is Wilbur Bflbb, Who seem! 10 l a c k Ibe gi/I 0/ gab. BENNETT ANNA T. PANAMA. R P. J -IMd.wo rking .AlI'lIn wilbolft (I frown 1J Jllre t o T eccilll: (I golden c rown. BROWN, VERONA O LA BO C A C. z. H er lIIagm:lic '/JcrJ01Jtl/ifY II CflflJcd by "ROllflIJ" originalilY BUCKLEY RUTH C. LA C. z. Sbe bllild! c(llrlc! ill tb e (lir And /Jo pel 1 0 mtlTT)' II millionaire.

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CARTER, CECIL 1. LA BOCA. C. Z A uriOll! PCTS01) if 't Llo ,,/die" Carlin' U ? ho f o r hh rlJce would be a '1/1(Jrl"l', DAVIDSON. HAROLD 1. RED TANK. C. Z. "Dade,," if JprjleJy fwd o f g lamour jlln liuen {IJ 'he g irh al l c!amor,-DOGUE EDUARDO 1. S ILVER CITY. C. Z "Eddit-''' D ogue, alruays happy and gay, Skelc bes whafetl Er panes h i s 1vay. EASTMOND, GWENDOLIN E. LA BOCA. C. Z. Pc",' EaJI1lJOnd, a splendid dreJJmaker, Someday may be a 8 r eal bearlbreaker,

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FORD, CECILIA 1. LA BO C A, C. Z Our lillie "CeJJi6'''--we' e proud / 0 leU bill c her and r oan a ud,ey w ell GEORGE, MARY E LA BO C A, C. Z WitiJ )ur ;ingitJg Jbe ainu 10 p/e 4 Je; O ur Milizi e" 'who J ; gm w i/b pn/eCl GORDON, ALFRED R RED TANK, C. Z r'Cbokey" the lIoble, "Cholu'Y" 'he med,' "Chokey" Ihe lad 1 ubo i f timid 1 0 IfJeak. GRAHAM ERIC E. LA BOCA, C. Z A budding wr;ler if E ri c Gra' am, Wh o 'll tvi,} a plac e the Hall 0 / Pam, __ _1.

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GRANT, GLADSTONE L. GAMBOA, c. Z. "G" /(11/1 111 ;,bi" 01lr tlrliJl ""wk. /-Ie'l qllite olllJpoken fllld f i ery /fllllk. HALL, ALBERT V. L A BO C A, C. Z. "Ni pple l-/tI/J, oNfJ/tlnding alblete, K1101llJ bow and when 1 0 be diJcreel. HARRISON, SAND AS L. LA BOCA, C. Z. T beology (111(1 pedagogy Are rhe iU-Uf"-CJI J of "Pa lcJJy." HOLDE R, INEZ A GAMBOA, c. Z. The rec.ord kc(;per-ollr "AI/al!,," Smi/cJ like Vinc i's ''ilIona L iJa."

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HOWELL DOROTHY A LA BOCA. C. Z TbiJ nOlI/a e l ocution:'! 1 1J 'flOW II blldding druflulliu. INNISS ELEANOR A. L A BOCA C. Z. "Ellel1," wbole lips tlrf! kept /rolll ;Iip, I J flllile II (h(I III/1 I pellmtllllhip JONES, SIDNEY S L A BOCA. C. Z. YOllIIg Sid" Jo n c!, fbI! 11UlJJCII / hl1 lor e ve r y paill, t1 CIIre. JOSEPH, DRESLIN F SILVE R C I T Y C. Z. t'Crima," tJ pair 0/ flack! 10 a skirt p r e l e r I And o/rcl1, qu:' te o/Iell, 10 loott she r e/cY!.

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LEWIS LUCILLE 1,'. GATUN, c. Z. LlIz with tbe Sc/Joo/marm expreIIion TrieI 1 0 gitl e II good im prenioIJ. J. YNCH, ELSINORA 1. SILVER C ITY. C. Z. 1Vhy "Elsie H wil/) 'jOtiT clI/illary art You'll llIilJ II plac e ill all)' hearl. MACK, ALDA C. S ILVER CITY. C. Z. Aida, the girl 0/ brighl ideal, DelightJ itl-/rills and M cDONALD, SYLVIA V 51L VER C ITY. C. Z. P ri1lJ "Syl," lIumy applallJes it1in, As she plays her 1 J ;olill.

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McINTOSH, ETHLIN 1. LA BOCA, C. Z. A gay lillIe damul i1 With /011 0/ humor eager to tell. RILEY, JOHN p, SILVER CITY, C. Z. "O 'Riley" wilh the s c holarly look Rcad! a law and hislory book. SAMUELS, LINDA R. GAMBOA, C. Z. "Frowy," 1/ plCaJdnt alld thrilty mMs, IP'ii l LEND IJ ni ckls i/ YO/l INSI ST. SCOTT, MERCELLA C. GAMBOA, C. Z. ,\tcr e el/a Ivrite! good /Joelry. We hope she de v elops Ih' db;:;ty

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SIMPSON MAVIS U. LA BOCA, C. Z. I" tho ba ck. with smiles 011 her lace, Sils /hiJ dame 0/ cha rm and g r ace. SKEETE ROY R SILVER CITY, C. Z. Roy, 'be bo! in the se cond rofU, Deligb'J ill IlIgging filly girl's bow. SMITH WALTER S RED TANK, C. Z. Bewarc! D on ', heed Ihdl awful 8r04n, J S "Smilly" dl his Jdxopbonc. STEVENS LENA M RED TANK, C. Z. "M i ckey" pOllflds eac h piano key A"d leacbCJ welt "a /a" M c Kee.

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TAIT, EVA M. LA BOCA C. Z. A coy lill!c Ian ;1 "Alamita" Tair Wi/h her Jimple yet c l;armin8 gait THOMAS DOROTHY M. LA BOCA. C. Z. DOllie /loa/! aroutld llI ;t/} her googoo eyes, Surrollnded by Huiles am/. wisl/ul Jigh1. W A TKIS, ROY W. GAMBOA. C. Z. W 'a lkiJ ,uir/) bil meladioll! lonel, Thrills you. 10 the vc ry bones WILLIAMS HILDA G. GAMBOA. C. Z. W bell ;11 a slate 0/ apathy Soc Hildir a" lor lome Jym/Jalby.

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.... And these we r e the rest of us CLIFFORD GRAHAM ANDREW SAINTEN MARGARITA TROTMAN HARMOND COCKBURN PAGE TWENTYFOUR THE THINKI,;II.

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THE THINKER The La Boca Normal Training School yearbook, The Thinker, was published in 1938 by the first graduating class of the La Boca Normal Training S chool. This year the second graduating class takes pleasure in producing the second edition of this book. S T A F F ErJitor ;n-rh ;c! -Eric Graham Al1;;lan'1 10 --Harold Davidson Dorothy Howell Joez: Holder Linda Samuels Dorothy Thomas Businsl1 MAnager -Wilbur Babb AJJiJta!l1/ to --Ruth Buckley Ceci l Carrer Pearl Eastmond Cu:i l ia Ford Lorenzo Harrison S ydney Jones Eisinora Lynch Lucille Lewis Eva Tai[ Roy Watkis Art Editor --Gladstone Grant AuiSIAnlS to -Eduardo Dogue Sylvia McDonald Ilf/Oi, Editor --Dorothy Howell AJJiJIllnts 10 --Mary George Lena Seevens Dorothy Thomas Poetry Editor --Sydney Smith AssiJlttnlJ 10 --Meccdla Scott Roy Watkis SIJttni sh Editor -Crima Josephs AU;Sldnls to --Ruth Buckley Lucille Lewis Hilmor Edrtor --J oh n R iley /fIJiJfant! to -Aida Mack Lilybell McIntosh SnalniJol Edifo r --Aida Mack AJJislant! 10 --Eleanor Jnniss Roy Skeere Alhlelic! ---Ha .. old Davidson AJJiSlants to --Pearl Eascmond Anna Bennecc Mavis Simpson Eva Taic Ford Dorothy Thomas J-fiss L Jump THE THINKER P AGE TWENTYFIVE

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" FRESHMEN On March 6, 1941 forty young men and women eager to further their education, entered the La Boca Normal School to form the second class of Normalites. After getting acquainted with one another, we were heartily welcomed by Mr. Osborne, Mr. Hutchinson, Miss Jump, and Mr. Morgan who expressed their wishes for our having a happy and successful career On the following Monday, we began our formal classes with Mr. Hutchinson as home room teacher. Our first year lasted ten months. During this year the academic subjects were given. Many extra-curricular activities were initiated. A class organization, w ith the object of sponsoring activities both social and cultural, was formed with Eric Graham as president. A volley ball team was organized by our girls The publication of a class magazine, Tbe Toreb began with Harmond Cockburn as editor. Under the sponsor ship of Miss 1. Jump, who was then Our Spanish teacher the "Clrculo Espanol" was formed with Harmond Cockburn as president. Our social activities this year included a Grand Buffet Supper and Dance for the installation of the officers of the "Clrculo Espanol" and an outing to San Carlos sponsored by the Class Organization. We were greatly privileged to have many interesting persons visit us during the course of our first year, among whom were Captains Fisher and Hodgson of the Salvation Army Mr. and Mrs. Manahin.i of the Bahai faith, Miss Beaver, Dr. Hackett, Mr. Lawrence Johnson, and the Rev. Mr. Shirley. SOPHOMORES After a two-month vacation, we returned to school happy that we could share experiences once more. With Mr. Hutchinson remaining to help us make our decisions "Eddie" Dogue became class president. During this year, our academic training was still emphasized. We were fortunate in having more distinguished persons speak to us this year, among whom were Mrs. Showtz, a Bahai representative and Senor Gallegos of the National Institute. Carrying out the patriotic theme, we inaugurated a War Stamp drive in the La Boca School using a revolving fund. The major activities of our social life this year were our first Grand Ball at the Tropical Club in Colon and our Latin-American party, Una Noche en Rio. At this party we acted as hosts to some of the officers and members of the crew of the U. S. Liberty Ship Booker T WaIbin g ton. After the Christmas holidays, we took our final examination and with Mr. Hutchinson s resignation, the seconc\ year drew to an un certain close. PAGE TWENTYSIX THE THINKER

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JUNIORS Because of the abnormal working conditions brought about by the present war, the Normal School program of studies was accelerated. Consequently, the two last years were divided into terms of eight months. On February 3, we began our third year with Miss 1. Jump as our p.ew home room teacher and Cecil Carter as class president. Our pro gram of studies was expanded to include the industrialized arts courses In addition, the professional courses were started and given emphasis in the curriculum. In spite of the pressure of work and the problem of adjustment we had some very profitable and pleasant experiences. Very early in the year we presented Mr. Hutchinson with a memento "as an index of our appreciation and high esteem." Later, there were several extra-curricular activities. We published a special edition of The Torch, commemorating MOther's Day, which elicited favorahie comment from the AdminiStrative Staff of the Division of Schools and cur friends. Our classroom was transformed temporarily into a library work shop when we assisted Miss Jump in classifying books and in making the Card for the La Boca School Library. Then we plOmoted successfully Our second dance at the Tropical Club in Colon. At an enjoyable "Night of Fun" some of us had our first bridge lessons, while others danced or played games. Taking the suggestion of Sydney Smith, we started our "Cultural Hour," a weekly Friday morning pro gram, which ",as characterized by debates, speeches. and lectures. Under the direction of the household arts teacher, Miss M. Malcolm, our girls I sponsored a delicious luncheon in honor of the boys and the faculty; and through the encouragement of Miss Jump, Club Zeta was organ ized with the aim of sponsoring programs for community welfare and enjoyment It is regretted that after presenting two interesting pro grams, this organization suspended its activities. Many of our classmates enrolled in the Extension Classes which began in September at the Canal Zone Junior College. During the course of the year we had the privilege of receIVIng some very distinguished visitors, among whom was Mr. Frank Wang, Executive Secretary of the Panama Canal and at our invitation Mrs. O. Tejeira, Mr. Rafael Moscote of the University of Panama, Dr. A. D. Mastellari, tuberculosis specialist and Mr. R. Pritchard of Costa Rica gave interesting lectures to the class. SENIORS In November 1943, we began our last and most difficult year. We had reached the turning point of our course which necessitated arduous work to make it a success. We continued our professional work with great zeal and enthusiasm THE THINKER PAGE TWENTY-SEVEN

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The time came when we realized that school life in Normal would come to an end. Cadetship, an experience which we e a gerly wel tomed, began in February Many were the Friday afternoons and Saturdays we spent preparing lesson plans for the following week; and many were the severe but constructive criticisms which followed every lesson taught These criticisms were sometimes dre a ded ; however we soon lea rned to accept them with the minimum amount of fear, for we realized that they were for our own benefit Due to an overloaded program, The Torch, our school ma g azine, was suspendcd in the early p ar t of this term However, we hope its informative pages will again shed l ight on the numerous activities with in the walls of N o rmal. It must be remembered th a t school life was nOt a bed of roses There were times when we provoked the wrath of members of the faculty, "nd times when we got tired of lectures studying, tests and quizzes Nevertheless it goes without saying that all "these experien ces have helped u s to develop sou nd characters We, the students of the class of 1944, are most appreciative of the efforts of our tea chers to direct our paths during these f o ur years. The y have steadfastly endeavored to develop our personalities to guide us in the solution of difficult problems, and to prepare us for our future careers. Our classes came to an end a day in June, 1944; a d a y when we, wh o had loved, I"uj!hed and fought together had to part We a re destined to choose different fields in this troubled world; but we have the deep and abiding conviction that, although we may never meet again a s a group, we will never forget the wonderful. time we spent together as classmates. HOBBIES Mary ". volleyball playitlg Aida .... ............... malJJ!JoJ laking Verona ...................... ddncing Harris o n .... reading l i nda recipe ',ying Gordon ........ stamp collecting Hilda ..... scrapbook makjlll; Sk<''e!e ..... S y lvia Eva Ruth Han Jnel; Eddie. Aona ...... Watkis Eric lena tnollie go i" g sketching baking swimming radio reading sketching and Jwimming ... sillging c rooning mechanics piano playing PAGE TWENTY-EIGHT Crima Jones Luc ille Mavis Howell Pearl Elsie ... D o nie Rile y ..... ................ Smith Cessie Lilybell Glads[one ... t .. Eleanor Caner ................. .... Babb .. Davey .. Mercella mOllis going readin. g Jinging dancing r eding deJig"ing cooking nOllel reading cyclin g JdX playing perfume coil ec:iltg piano playing d rawin g Jewing volleyball playing reading baJeba/1 Playing reading THE THINKER

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1941 MARCH 6--Admittance of the sew nd class to the La Boca Norm a l Train ing School. 10--First formal class in session. APRIL 3--School journey to the observatory at Miraflores 15--Nomina tion md Election of Class Officers M'AY :8--Girls' Volleyball Team defeated at Silver City The winning team graciously sponsored a parry for our team JUNE 13--First edition o f The Torch. 20--Students acted as judges at intramural sports. 25--The Rev Mr. Shirley visited Our class. JULY 16--Formal singing classes legan with Miss Johns as teacher. 17--Mr. and Mrs. Manahini, members of the Bahai faith, called on us. AUGUST 4--Capt. Fisher a nd Capt. and Mrs Hogdson of the Salvation Army our class. 8--Photograph taken of the class in session. 14-Circulo Espanol (Spanish Club) formed 29--Miss Beaver, kindergarten teacher visited our class. 30-Officers of Circulo Espanol installed by Mr. Desmond Byam at Grand Buffet Supper and Dance NOVEMBER 20--Successful Thanksgiving picnic at San Carlos. 24--Dr. Hackett and Mr. Lawrence John so n visited Normal. Letter received from Mr. and Mrs. Montanage (Bahais). DECEMBER 6--First class in sign painting at Cristobal High School. (Sylvia, Gladstone, and Eddie) 12--First "HOUR OF MUSIC" presented at the La Boca School. 1942 JANUARY 31--Circulo Espanol made an enjoyable trip to Chepo. THE THINKER PAGE TWENTYN,IN

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APRIL 6--Classes resumed after twO months vacation. 10--Nomination and Election of Class Officers. i3--Miss Johns resigned. Mr Batalden addressed the class. Topic: Gardening. 28--Miss Emily Butcher appointed as singing teacher. MAY 8--Dramarization of The Merchant of Venice. Music Week Program wirh the Kindergarten as Our audience. 15--Installation Party. 21--Nomination and Election of Officers of the Circulo Espanol. 29--Class Visited garden Girls weeded; boys forhd. JUNE i5--Sainten decided to leave us. 25-Substitutes fered by Mr. Osborne AUGUST 3--Alert practice in La Boca School. 15--Teachers' Midsummer Ball well atrended bY' Normalites. SEPTEMBER l--Rehearsal for Parent-Teacher Program. 3--Mr. Roy Hay sp oke to the class on "TROPISM 7--Normalttes were guests ar the Rev Mr. Shirley s picnic at Rio Abajo. 8--Ensemble sang on Parent-Tea c her Program at Cristobal. 9--Field trip to Ice Plant in Colon. Class observed at Silver City School. 10--Mrs. Showtz (Bahai) visited us on her way to Venezuela from Chicago 13--Dorothy Howell won elocution contest on Gold Coast. 26--Grand Ball No. 1 at Club Tropical. OCTOBER 6-Mrs. Baker s introduction to class. 7--Ensemble sang at Parent-Teacher Program in Gatun. 8--First lesson in music with Mis. Baker. 9--The Rev. Mr. Shirley spoke on "SCIENCE AND RELIGION." 19--Nomination and Election of Class Officers. War Bond and Stamp Drive began 25-Girls' Volleyball Team was vicrorious at G a mboa. NOVEMBER 2--Mr. Carlos Gallegos of rhe National Insritute spoke at patriotic program sponsored by the Circ,!lo Espanol. 8--Girls won volleyball game at Gatun. 14--"Noche en Rio. Officers of the Liberty Ship Booker T \IV ashington were guests of the Circulo Espanol at this Larin Amer ican "fiesta. 20--Class Officers installed. 23--Ensemble sang On Parent-Teacher Program at Gamboa. This program was attended by Mr. Frank Wang, Executive Secretary of the Panama Canal. 29--Ensemble Jon ISilv'er EII\ployees Volunteer Committee's Third Patriotic Program. Gue s t speaker: Dr. Juan Escobar PAGE THIRTY THE THINKER

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DECEMBER ll--Annual "HOUR OF MUSIC" presented. Exchange of gifts 1943 JANUARY 5-Classes resumed. 12--Photographer Wason took pictures of Ensemble 27--After final tests Mr. Hutchinson told us of his resignation FEBRUARY 1--Miss 1. Jump's appointment as home-room teacher 1. B. N T. S. 8-Vocational classes began. 21-Girls triumphed over Silver City and Gatun in voll(ybal!. 24-. -Presentation of memento to Mr. Hutchinson at a program. 26--Mrs. Otilia Tejeira addressed the class in the library Her topic dealt with Panamanian literature. MARCH 2--Regular classes in Physical Cul ture resumed. Normal was well represented by Linda at 1. N. Y. C:s deDate. The topic of the debate was: Resolved That the Negro should fight for his rights now and not wait until afrer the war APRIL 5--Firsr "Cultural Hour" Program. lO-Mr. Frank Wang, Execurive Secretary of the Panama Canal, visired our schoo!' 13-16-Class assisted in the preparation of Card Catalogue for the La Boca School Library. 17--Ensemble sang at the Dedicatory Exercises of the La Boca School Library. Governor's wife unveiled portraits of Governors Goerhals and Burgess. 20--Normalities attended Teachers' Fie l d Day ar Gamboa MAY 7--Ensemble participaredin Music Week Program. 14--Nomination and Election of Class Officers. Student Council formed. 21--Faculty and boys feted by girls at a Luncheon in Household Arts Room. 28-Insrallation of Class Officers. JUNE 17-Dr. Amadeo D. Mastellari, tuberculosis spec i alist of Panama, addressed the class on "TUBERCULOSIS JULY 13--Mr. Pritchard was the guest speaker at our Cultural Hour" program. 23--Welcome party for Freshmen. 30--School journey to the Cerveceria Nacion.!' AUGUST 25--Mr. Rafael Moscote, Professor of Civilization at the University of Panama, spoke on "FIFTH CENTURY ATHENS THE THINKER PAGE THIRTYONE

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AUGUST 29--' Inaugural Program of Club Zeta. Dr. Hackett spoke on "THE POST-WAR WORLD." SEPTEMBER 15--Consrruction of boys' dormitory (El by Mr. E. Ben jamin's carpentry class. 19--.tinscmble sang on 1. N. Y. C:s Program "The Negro as a Soldier." 22-Official photOgraph taken of class in session and the Boys' dormitOry. 25--Grand B all No. 2 a success. OCTOBER I--Miss Jump appointed Principal of the La Boca Normal School. 9--Extension classes began at Balboa; teachers and students attended. 15-30-School journeys to the Balboa Elementary School. NOVEMBER 7--Club Zeta sponsored program at the local clubhouse. Mr Clif ford Bolr, National Commissioner of the Boy Scouts of Pan ama, spoke on "SCOUTING." 12--Chaplain Palmer Pierce of the Sixth Air Force gave a very in teresting talk in a general assembly. 30--Ensemble presented a "PROGRAM OF MUSIC" at the La Boca Clubhouse DECEMBER 7--Palmer penmanship classes began under Miss Frances Moomaw's supervision 13-17-Class had first experiences of observation and practice teach ing in connection with the observance of Yuletide Appreciation Week. H--Celebration of traditional "HOUR OF MUSIC." 23--Ensemble participated in 1. N. Y. C:s Music Festival. 1944 JANUARY 4--End of Christmas Holidays. 14--Installation of Class Officers 18--"PROGRhM OF MUSIC" presented at Cristobal under the auspices of Meadowbrook Literary Society 2l--0bstrvation and Practice Teaching began. FEBRUARY 15--Lyrics of class song put to music Octef sang on 1. N. Y. c. s program featuring Dr. Myron Shaeffer. 20--Ensemble, with Mrs Helen Currier Baker directing, sang .on Brotherhood Week Program broadcast from Tivoli U.S.O. Club. MARCH 6--Construction of new boys' dormitory on La Boca School grounds started. 7--Boys' Softhall Team played in inaugural game of the Community Softball League 14\-Mrs. Baker started course in the Methods of Teaching Music in the Elementary School. PAiGE TH'IRTYTWO THE THINKER

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APRIi 5--Ensemble sang on Easter Program at the 'Tivoli U. S O 25--Mr. Batalden spoke on the "CERT IFICATION OF TEACHERS." MAY l-Child's Health Day. Dr. Martin Rodney spoke on "THE CARE OF THE TEETH." 13--Ensemble sang on Music Week Program at the Esther Witkin U. S. O. JUNE 17--Freshman Class Farewell P arty for Seniors. 23--Last day of Normal. 24--Graduat ion Ball. 25--Baccalaureate Service 28--Gradua tion FAVORITE SAYINGS 1. Harrison: 1. Holder: A Hall: S. Smith: 1. Samuols: R. Watkis: ]. Riley: H. Davidson: E. Graham: 1. Carter: D. Thomas: A. Gordon: E. Tait: A. Mack: S. McDonald: C. Ford: 1. McIntosh: M. Simpson: 1. Lewis: C. Josephs: P. Easrmond: M. SCOtt: G. Grant: D. Howell: V. Brown: R. Buckley: W. Babb: R. Skeete: S. Jones: M. George: 1. Stevens: E. lynch: A. Bennett: E. Dogue: E. Inniss: H. Williams: THE THINKER Mot'e or leI!. I! y011-only knew. 1 tlgree with you, b,,,,,'!:., ===== Bill, ab the point ;1-y get on my nerves. That's clear enollgh, bta ah---. That's fooliJhneu Thai's right. Yes, bllt -------. There ;1 a limit 10 everything. I don'e Well, y011 know how it is. Really.' Y011 don'l Jay! 1 hear you knocking. Hm1ll. Hmm. That'J il. Coming to think of it that'J another thing, YOtt know whal 1 mean, O'Je never knowJ, does one? D'yott get it? My eyel You don't Jay! You a,.e telling me! Take it ellJy. Take it eaJy. Dotl .' t fool with you. Thal 'I ;flJl it. WeI/ 0/ aIJ thingJ! Weill WeJl! Thi! iJ it. Ah, JhttckJ. Yo!' donlt Jayl What'J btlzzing cOflJin? No! Stop it. Ge6'! ReaJly? "Lord God of hOJI be fvith lit "let." Forget about it-do better next time. What a wte child. PAGE THIRTYTHREE

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INTRODUCTION: Linda Samuels looked into the future and saw hefSelf a .nd J o/m Riley as hosts to some of their former classmates on their tenth wedding annivefSary which they were celebrating on Easter Sunday, 1959. "Hm-mmm, these waffles are simply delicious!" exclaimed \'V'ilbur. You know John I'm wondering now why I nOt de cided to get married and settle down like you." "Well, Wilbur, you are making such a big success of your busi ness career I thought you were quite happy." "I certainly am not," he answered painfully. Lilybell, who conducts a personality column in the local newspaper, patted him briskly on the back and said, "Oh, snap our of it boy. Be yourself." Smiling, she continued, "Tis strange but somehow I just can t forget the fun we made of you and DOttie 'way back in '41." "For heaven's sake, Lilybell do you have to remind me of her! She is the person that's really responsible for the turn my life has taken. I don't know what might have happened if she and Roy had r emained here after they were m a rried. 1.. ........... "Take it easy, pal," interrupted Professor Carter. "When I went to the States after winning that scholarship, I saw some of th e drug stores that Roy owns. He is doing a very good business. I saw that Wilbur was feeling worse every minute so I said, Let's go into the garden," and led the way. "What pretty flow ers! If I had only thought of bringing my brush along what a picture I would take away with me-soft pink roses look ing eagerly towards the sun; dazzling white lilies nodding humbly to ,he breeze's gentle touch; a bove a clear blue sky; and the majestic sun, robed in golden yellow, looking down like a king from his throneaa-a-ah!" Stop Sylvia, interrupted Cecilia. "You think art, talk art, sing nrt, court art. I suppose you dream art roo." "Speaking of art, whatever became of Our artsts, I Dogue and Grant? asked Smith. "Dogue jilted Eleanor," replied Cecilia, "and he married Eva after she wrote a 'best seller.' He is doing some work for the Esquire maga zine now. Eleanor decided never to love again and she is now one of the best kindergarten teachers in the Schools. As for Grant, haven t you read of the oil paintings he did for this year's World's Fair?" PAGE THIRTYFOUR THE THINKER

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"Oh, yes," my husband answered. "1 remember reading that those were Grant's best paintings because his wife, Mercella, the distinguish ed poet, gave him the inspiration for them. Does that tie up with your philosophy of life, Dr. Graham?" "Listen, John, 1 am no philompher 1 only teach other men's philosophies," chuckled Eric. Wilbur and 1 walked over to the and sat there silently. I surveyed the bright garden and the guests who had come to help John and me celebrate our wedding anniver:ary Over against the hedge near the fount a in stOod Lena, who was now the music instructOr of the Normal School Ensemble. She was talking to Inez, the girls' physical directOr. I could hear Lena saying "Guess whom I saw getting married in the Baptist Church last Wednesday! Verona and Judge Skeete! The Rev. Mr. S a ndas Lorenzo Harrison performed the ceremony." 'Cessie tOld me abour it," Inez replied. "She knows a number of things that are happening in La Boca becau:e as secretary to Lorenzo she comes in contact with the peo ple." After inspecting the garden, the others joined us in the summer house. "Do you know," I said, that I never believed Rurh would have left the Schools for a career as a s tage dancer, bur one never knows what will happen. "That reminds me," began Carrer, this morning after mass, Pearl gave me some t i ckets for a Grand Concert 10 be held a t the National Theater, featuring Mary George who is tOuring the Latin-American Republics. She is going to sing Sweet Memories,' Lena's latest compo sition, along with some works of the old rr:asters." Blushing Lena added, "It might please you to know tOo, that Mary's entire wardrobe was designed by Ana ; a nd that she is bringing AIda, her secretary, with her." Aftn we had discussed the concert for a while, Dr. Gordon said, "I don t like gossip, bur last month while I was giving anti-tetanus injections at the Red Tank School, somebody informed me that Al bert was in for trouble because Mr. Osborne a nd Miss Jump went into the tailor shop and saw the boys making three piece ZOOt suits." That's a little tOugh," said Smith. ''I'm g lad though, that every body is nOt experiencing difficulties. Pearl is direct ing the affairs of the Normal School very efficiently; Lucille isn t having any trouble as Dean of Women on the Normal School campus; Mavis says she gets splendid cooperation from the students in her dancing class; Elsie is to be transferred to the faculty of the Jr. College as home economics teacher; and Dorothy's dramatics class plans to give 'The Rivals soon." "C rim a is Supervisor of Spanish now, added Inez "bur guess what! She l ooks as Kate Smith did in 1941!" THE THINKER PAGE THIRTYFIVE

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' ''Crima actually got fat!" exclaimed "Cessie : "She'd better see Jones and have him apply some of his latest techniques in massaging, Or come to you, Inez, for reducing exercises." "By the way," interrupted Eric, "I ran into Hilda at the museum the other day. She seems to be having financial difficulties beCause she asked me to tell you nOt to forget her Home for Orphans." Not a word was uttered as everyone took out his checkbook and quickly scribbled his name so that Hilda could fill in the amount. "Mr. and Mrs. Riley," said Babb after a while, "I certainly enjoyed this morning with you. I hope that you may have many more years of happiness." "I hope so, toO," added Carter. "I know that they will be happy," remarked Cessie, "because Linda has always loved John though she was playing hard-to-get when we were in school." Everyone smiled while John and I exchanged glances. "Well, I'm going to fly to New York today to see Davidson in the first game of the World Series," announced Babb. "Does anyone want to come? I have two planes that will hold all of us Smith can fly one and I'll take the other. How about it folks? "Why, certainly," answered everybody in a chorus and off we went to get ready for the trip. PAGE Linda R Samuels, Dorothy M. Thomas THE THINKER

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A is for Anna, who works at Ancon; She reaches to school 'Fore dismissal is rung B is for Buckley, her first name is Ruth; You can always detect When she's telling the truth. e is for "Crima" small of body and waist; To get home on week-ends She is always in haste D is for "Dorrie," and how she espies Both the near and the far With those large, soulful eyes. E is for Eleanor little and lithe; Of her speech she is careful; In her manner polite F is for Ford, beware if you please : She will blow you from here To Bordeaux with her sneeze. G is for Gladstone, first male on this If he keeps up his work He will soon be an artist. H stands for Harold, a staunch baseball fan. There is no trick in pitching He doesn't understand is for Inez tall, stately and bright. As Librarian she s keeping The record books right. J is for John a garrulous lad A keener objector Could never be had. K means Kilpatrick, we met in the ccrurse. Which treated of methods J Activity with purpose. L is for Lucille, she hails from Gatun Don' t ever annoy, or She ll fall in a swoon M is for Mavis who lives just next door She seldom falls victim To lectures that bore THE THINKER PAGE THIRTYSEVEN

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N stands for Normal, her standards we'll keep; And be led by her ideals Through shallow an d deep. o is Observing the methods and way A tea c her may carry Her class day by day. P mea ns Pythagoras, a philompher no novice. He expounded the doctrine Of me-temp-sy-cho-sis. Q is for Quizzing this method unique Of checking assignments Is the Prof's own te c hnique. R stands for Roy both Watkis and Skeete. One's head's in the ceiling The Other at your feet. S is for Sylvia, what melody (?) she brings To those who dare list e n As she plays on the strings. T is for Tait, quite exotic yet coy, She is kind a n d serene Till you try to annoy. U is for UotOn, his work in arithmetic Gave de-finite help In teaching the subject. V means Verona, a critic severe; She follows her methods Condem n s without fear W is for Wilbur n1{ticulously neat For instance, just watch When he brushes his seat. X marks each answer that's wrong in a test It tends to embarrass When you're n ot at your best. Y is for Yerkes, and a good deal he has given By his s tudy and {xperiments With the mouse a nd the kitten. Z stands for Zero, by which we a re rated It may either be black, Red or certificated. -EI1inr .. 'o T:o/!'!Ie PAGE THIRTYEIGHT THE THINKER

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Qtl&55 ltttlill We, the C lass of '44, being of sound and disposing mind and memory, do hereby, on this 28th day of June, 1944, make, ordain, publish a nd declare this our last will and testament, in order, as reasonably as may be to distribute our interests and abilities among the members of the Freshman Class. ALFRED GORDON btqueaths with pride his natatOrial ski ll to Ivan Dowlin ANNA BENNETT leaves hopefully her religious inclin a ti ons to Matthias Newell. WILBUR BABB bequeaths his tern ark a ble record as class treasurer to Audley Webster. RUTH BUCKLEY wills her pleasing personality and variely of hair dos to Thelma Lee. CECIL CARTER leaves with pride his mature manner a nd sleeping technique to Leon Eastmond VERONA BROWN bequeaths gratefully her introspective manner to Cdena Leach HAROLD DAVIDSON wills regretfully his winning m a nner w ith the ladies to GladstOne Gordon. GWENDOLIN EASTMOND bequeaths her com promising attitude and dressmaking a bility to Norma Daley. ALBERT HALL leaves gtacefu ll y his fine running form to Burrows INEZ HOLDER wills happily hn high pitched voice an d he a lthy ap pearance 10 Lodiana Ellis. LORENZO HARRISON leaves his sartoria l a bility to G l a dstOne GOtdon CECILIA FORD bequeaths gleefu lly her screechy sneeze to Pearl Th o mpson DOROTHY HOWELL ge l d medalist, wills her skill in e l ocution to Ruby Thompson. EDUARDO DOGUE, leaves generously his capacity to chew gum con tinuously and his artistic ability to Pearl Simon DRESLIN JOSEPHS bequeaths, with no little amount o f regret, her l ove of fiction and stirring love stOries to Agnes Gordon. I ERIC GRAHAM wills sadly his a bility to s peak long and l oud with out prep a r a tion to Audley W' T H E T H I N K E R PAGE THIRTYNINE

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LUCILLE LEWIS leaves with pleasure her perfect penmanship to Olga Bowen. JOHN RILEY bequeaths his good sportmanship and rambling speeches to Pablo Jardine ELSINORA LYNCH wills her culinary skill to Pearline Carter. SYLVIA McDONALD leaves with remorse her squeaky violin and her art collection to Daphne Watkis. GLADSTONE GRANT wills his artistic versatility and frank manner to Clara Watdey. LILYBELL McINTOSH bequeaths her rare sense of humor and her skill in watering the six po tted plants in our classroom to Inez Moise LENA STEVENS wills deliberately her ability to extract blue notes from the piano to Ellenora Moore. MERCELLA SCOTT wills h er ambition to write good poetry to Pris cilla Hawkins. ALDA MACK bequeaths her ability to provide an alibi for any situa tion to Halden Cockburn. ROY W A TKIS wills his soothing, moving, and satisfying tenor voice to Gilbert Burrows. MAVIS SIMPSON bequeaths her contorted dancing steps to Ruby Jordon HILDA WILLIAMS leaves her patient attitude and slow drawl to Pearl Simon. LINDA SAMUELS leaves her metallic alto voice and her Monday morning orchids to Conzinetta SCOtt. SIDNEY JONES sighs as he leaves his ability to object to everything on principle to Ivan Dowlin. EVA TAIT bequeaths her gestures and complicated manner of ex plaining things to Wilmoth Morrison DOROTHY THOMAS wills her magnetic eyes and flowing movements to Daisy Stone. SIDNEY SMITH wills sentimentally his enigmatic smile to James Webster. ELEANOR INNISS leaves her very neat handwriting and petite sta ture to Pearl Thompson. MARY GEORGE wills her lovely singing voice and rug-cutting ability to Icylin Smythe. ROY SKEETE bequeaths his scholarly appearance to Gladstone Gordon Witnesses: Watt A. Sapp Wee R. Bumms I PAGE fORTY The Class of '44 THE THINKER

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+ U 5 t THE THINKEIl PAGE FORTY-ONE

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MUSIC IN THE NORMAL SCHOOL ALer the Music Week celtbrations in 1941, we requested th a t music be added to the curriculum. As a result, irregular periods of free singing were introduced und"r the direction of Mr. Alfred E. Os borne, Suptrvisor of Instruction in the Canal Zone Colored School5. In July of the same year, Miss Norine Johns, former music instructOr in the Junior High School, replaced Mr. Osborne as directOr-accompa nist, and singing became a regula! subject in the course of studies. Under Miss John's directicn a vocal ensemble was organized for rhe purpose ot encouraging our love for good music. Soon we began to build a splendid repertoire of folk songs, patriotic and religious music a nd selections. The "Hour of Music, which has become a traditional Christmas program, was firsr presented by. the Ememble in Dec emb
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EL CIRCULO ESP El club "Circulo Espaiiol" de la Normal de La Boca fue organi zado por la Sera. L. Jump, en el primer aiio de nuestros estudios, con d objeto de fomentar y mejorar las relaciones entre nosotros, los pa nameiios de origen antiIIano, y nuestros compatriotas de origen laUno de los medios por el cual espenibamos IIeva r a cabo tal objeto era el de invitar a eminentes personajes de la sociedad paname iia para que nos dictar an discursos ace rca de las costumbres panameiias y para que supieran al mismo tiempo que existe entre nosotros un grupo que se interesa por 10 panameiio. A continuacion presentamos un diario del club que dani un a idea poc o mas 0 menos de la labor que hicimos. 14 de ag asto deo 1941 30 de agono de 1941 25 de s eptiembre de 1941 9 de oc tubre de 1941 30 de octubre de 1941 1 de d ici embre de 1941 13 de diciembre de 1941 31 de enero de 1942 21 de mayo de 1942 23 de julio de 194 2 de Daviembre de 1942 14 de navicmbre de 1942 1 2 de diciembre de 1942 14 de enero de 1943 24 de enero de 1943 26 de ftbreco d e 1943 PAGE FORTYFOUR Ocganizacion del Circulo Espanol lnduccion de la primefa direc(iva por el Sr. Desmond Byam, Direct o r de la Escuela Repu blica de B olivia de Colon. Gran Buffet y Baile. Primera sesion del Circulo Espanal. Primer programa (Oia de la Rau). Debate entre los miembros del club. Creacion de l a pagina espanola en la revista escolar. "Dia del M aest ro" en Panama. Prescntacian de un lind o ramillere a la Sna. Jump, nuesrra maescra de caste llano. Intercambio de regal os. Paseo a C hep o. Eleccian de una nueva directiva del dub. Segundo programa del dub. Induccian de la nueva dir ectiva. Tercer programa (Sim o n Bolivar). Discurso por el Sr. C. Gallegos. profesor del Instituto Nacional. Cuano Programa del dub. Una tenulia "Una Noche en Ri o" Segundo intcrcambio de regalos. Nombramiento del comite pro-bibliotfca. Eleccian de la nueva directiva. Discurso por la Sra. Otilia de Tejeira Su (e ma fue : La Literatura Panamena THE THINKER

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MY FIRST DAY IN NORMAL That Thursday morning was a windy, dusty morning as are most mornings in La Boca. That morning was the beginning of my first day in Normal. As I entered the school building, I was greeted by the professor himself For some reason or the other without casting aspersions at that gentleman, I was slowly sinking into the depths of despair even while he escorted me to Room 19. I felt better as I entered that room I was quite pleased with the clean, pleasant faces' I saw around me Then I saw Lorenzo and was forced to change my point of view. I was seated between Sylvia and Lucille, behind Cecilia, and before Sainten. Looking around, I saw Dottie sitting right opposite B a bb. Many of us still say it starred from that first day. Lena was ;eated very close to the open door I was afraid for her because the wind was maliciously blowing at its best, and I could not tell when the poor girl, along with Lilybell and the teacher would be wafted away from the rest of us. I could not help seeing Eva stretching her neck over three seats to whisper some obviously trivial matter to tolerant, if bored Cecilia. To make us all become acquainted with one another, our teacher, Mr. Hutchinson, had each of us tell a Story to the rest of the class. J can truthfully say I never heard any taller tales than those I heard th at morning. How could anyone forget Smith's lengthy account of how he skillfully escaped from the raging, rurbulent waters of a mighty ocean! While he spoke, he kept glancing at Mary to see whether she was impressed. From her expression I had a well-founded suspicion that she was anything but favorably impressed. Mavis strove to outdo Smith by telling of her experience one stormy night JUSt as the clock struck twelve. She was rudely awakened by a shrill blood-curdling cry that sent chills racing up and down her spine She broke into a sweat. There followed a deathly silence. Then she felt cold, clammy fingers slowly encircling her throat Surely these were the hands of Death! Would she have sufficient time to atone for her numerous sins? The icy hands pressed harder. Her breath ing became difficult. She could barely utter a feeble scream. The household awoke and lights flooded the room A spider had fallen from the ceiling into Mavis s bed Linda gave a glowing account of her culinary skill which yet remains to be seen I heard a heart-felt sigh and I rurned to see Watkis looking as comfortable as one seated on hot nails On his face was the desperate look of a bull just before the slaughter. AI-. fred, sitting in the back, teased Sylvia and pulled her black bow Needless to say, she was utterly pleased at this, although she tried to throw some severe, yet encouraging glances at him From the look on Anna's face, I could see that she would have liked to question Harold s veracity when he spoke, in pride-filled tones, of how he saved an entire family from drowning in a river THE THINKER PAGE FORTY-FIVE

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Hilda, the good and faithful, told of the time when, on a gos pel tour, she converted a prison filled with sinners into God-fear ing Christians. She fervently hoped she would be able to do the same for the rest of the class and even the teachers. Well, it seems that either Hilda didn't work hard enough or she hadn't the slightest cooperation whatsoever. Anyhow, she consoles herself that it is the latter Eric gave a dramarlc account of the time when he was acclaimd n a tional hero after killing a man-eating shark single-handed. With knife gripped firmly between his teeth, he dived into the murky water and was lost from view. There followed a furious struggle between man and beast. The waters churned wildly and then slowly changed intO a reddish color. Eric, the hero, emerged victorious. What did it matter that the monster was three weeks old? Think of the damage it could have done later on! I thoroughly enjoyed my first day in Normal and I was very wrry when the bell rang for dismissal. On the whole, I didn't see 'my thing particularly funny that mc;rning because Cockburn didn't ar rive until the following Monday. -Aida Mack PAGE FORTY-SIX 1HE THINKER

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NORMAL'S INVASIONS It is interesting to note how the gregarious instinct which ex ists among the Normalites brings about a number of invasions both in and out of the community. Owing to the tendency to be always in a group, we made our first invasions at the La Boca and Ancon Commissaries, when our boys and girls took over sales jobs. Among the invaders of La Boca "commy" were Sylvia, Verona, Linda, Elea nor, Aida, Mercella, Jones and Carter. Those who subdued Ancon commy" were Dottie, Mary, Anna, Lena, Lilybell, Cessie, Inez, Lorenzo. Smith, Davidson, and Watkis. One by one, however they soon got tired of these sales jobs, and their attention was directed to other fields. Then an invasion of the "Heavy Equipment Section" in Balboa was execured by Smith, Davidson, and Babb Strange to say, these boys had unique ratings and salaries. Smith was timeper-and-"janitor;" Davidson appeared on the rolls as time-keep er-and "pusher;" and Babb played the part of time-keeper-and plumber-helper." But more unique than the ratings were the sala ries paid to these young men. Let u s take the case of the time-keep er-"janitor," Smith. Suppose the rate of pay was $12.00 for time keepers, and $5.00 for janitors. The boss would find the average of the twO amounts, and that average would be Smith's salary for a month. In similar manner were the other two lads paid, but through their "stickability," they clung together. Many other minor invasions were always being made, at some time or other, by members of our group. In our last year, five las sies, Linda, Aida, Lilybell Dottie and yours truly set out to explore and conquer the Westbank Naval Station Clubhouse, which is twO miles from the ferry. We finally succeeded in landing small jobs; Lilybell to work as checker; Dottie as saleslady, selling cigarettes and candy; and the rest of us as Every evening at 3 o'clock we bolted from the classroom and raced to the ferry landing to catch the 3 : 15 ferry in order to reach "Mile 2," which was the place of this invasion. Knowing that we were supposed to start working at 3 o'clock, but being able' to reach only at about 3:45, we had to sneak through the front entrance; don our working ap parel quickly; and start working with the hope that the boss did not notice our late arrival. We worked six hours a day, reached home about 9:45, and tried to do a little smdy work before bed-time for the follow ing day's classes. In like manner do students of Normal invade parties, concerts, and athletic meets. Our latest resorts are "Coney Island," and the "Presidente Theater, Panama's latest addition to the movie palaces. By these invasions do we show our tendency to stick together. -Mavis S impson ,THE THINKER rPAGE FORTY-SEVEN

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...... Keys for two-room quarters for 6 N.S. Boys Presented to Principal, La Boca Normal School, December, 1943

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A SURVEY AND THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE LA BOCA NORMAL SCHOOL DORMITORY One of the most pretentious projects o f the Class. of '44 of the La Boca Normal School was the making of a survey to determine the available accommodations in La Boca for students from the Atlantic Side, who were going to enter the Normal School in July, 1943 First, a committee drafted a letter stating the aims of the survey ; then questionnaires were m a de and distributed along with the letters throughout the community We divided the class into groups of three or four. E a ch gr o up was assigned to a particular a rea In this way e v ery building in the community was canvassed The students encountered m any situations that demanded a great deal of tact. In one home we met a woman with tear filled eyes her husband had died an hour before we arrived Many a hospitable housewife who offered to serve refreshments to the students had to be turned down in the interest of completing the survey on time. At other homes, we were told in no uncertain terms to go to the la nd of the devil. Besides these situations, we had to deal with the perennial problems which confront social workers : barking dogs and busy housewives who did not feel that they should be disturbed The majority of the people were willing to cooperate with us. Many who were unable to give direct aid offered suggestions about what could be done. Many childless couples were willing to accommodate more than one student A few who could nOt take any more persons into their homes because they were already overcrowded, were willing to board some of the students The results of the survey were the following: Five families were willing to board students. Three families were willing to provide lodging for three students. These accommodations were offered at $10.00 per month. Thirteen families offered room and board for amounts ranging from $ 15.00 to $ 20 00 per month. This survey revealed .that although the residents of La Boca were willing to cooperate with the Normal School, on account of poor housing conditions, they were unable to cater to the needs of our students. Consequently in October, the Division of Schools built a two-room dormitory as a wing to House No. 904, La Boca Road, which provides lodging for six students. Realizing, however, the inadequacy of the location and sanitary equipment of the pre sent dormitory which was built as a matter of expediency the Di vision of Schools has recently completed plans for the construction of a modern dormitory on the La Boca School grounds, which will accommodate twelve students It is important to note this significant step in the development of the La Boca Normal School. We take this opportunity to express our sincere appreciation and gratitude to the Division of Schools and all other officials of the Pan a ma Canal, who made possible the construction of the La Boca Normal School Dormitory : -Eric Grahan THll THINKER PAGE FORTYNINE

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Normal School Students using the La Boca School and Community Library. PAGE FIFTY THE THINKER

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at n m m t n !t m tnt THE THINKER P "AGE FIFTY-ONE

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1. HISTORICAL BACK(jROUND OF THE PUBLIC TEACH ERTRAININ(j INSTITUTION AND THE FUNCTIONS OF THE LA BOCA NORMAL TRAININ(j SCHOOL A. The De v elopment of the Normal School as a Unit of the Public S c hool S y stem Human evolution does not move in a straight line The struggle toward civilization turned abruptly in a new direction when men discovered metals; the age of stone with all its limitations came to an end. So it is with education The gre a t social reforms and scientific discoveries which had their beginnings in the 16th century changed the course of education. They brought the era of intelleCtual conser vatism to a close. I shall endeavor to trace briefly the movements in education insofar as they are related to the establishment of the normal school as a segment of the public school system In the earliest times the responsibiliry for training the child rested on the family What education was needed was imparted in the home or in the field and was of a very simple type The father raught the son the simple skills and crafts that would make him a good fighter, hunter, or farmer ; the mother trained the daughter in the household duties of a good wife and mother. The young, by participating in the activities of their elders, learned what they would soon have to do themselves and what they would one day teach to their successors As society developed and became more complex, it imposed new duties, responsibilities, and behaviors on the individual Soon it was realized that the education supplied by the home was inadequate to meet the increasing demands of a growing society and the need for a special institution with the specific function of preparing the child effectively for social living became pronounced. To satisfy this need sociery created the school as that special institution which is responsible for preparing the individual for the successful performance of his life activities For hundreds of years education was a privilege enjoyed by the nobility and the clergy ; the schools were poorly equipped; and in structional methods were confined to the lecture and the hearing of re-citations." Then came the Reformation which wrought important changes in the content of education at the same time that its adher ents advocated schooling for the masses It was left to the scientific spirit which rose in the 18th century, however, to bring about a funda mental revolution in the educ a tional system It brought about new contepts of education and led to the development of new rypes of educational institutions The concept of the child as a slowly developing personaliry demanding not only subject-matter but method suited to his stage of development brought in its wake a new conception of teaching; namely, that teaching is the stimulation and direction of mental phys ical, emotional, and social development. Where before the abiliry to PAGE FIFTYTWO THE T H INK E R

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organize and discipline a school and to lecture on a given topic had constituted the only arts of instruction, now the ability to instruct systematically took a prominent place among the important professional requisites for teachers. As a result, educational methods began to take a definite form and secure recognition, and psychology became one of the giuding sciences for the teaching profession. In the United States, Horace Mann and his contemporaries or ganized the eight year graded elementary school and changed the char acter of common schooling. The academies which flourished in the early part of the nineteenth century disappeared during the seventies and the eighties, giving place to a new kind of secondary school, the free public high school. One can find specific causes which explain the changes in the American educational system. The free public high school is the result of the social upheaval which followed the Civil War; the public graded elementary school is due to the necessity of perpetuating a democratic society; and without fear of contradiction I can say that the public teacher-training institution commonly known as the normal school, is the product of the enlarged conceptions of child-nature and the new purposes of education. Horace Mann, Henry Barnard, and other American apostles of education were convinced that the normal school is the instrumenr through which a modern elementary school can be shaped towards its highest goals Governor Edward Everett ; at the opening of the Normal School at Barre, Massachusetts; in 1839 announced that the purposes of the first public teacher-training institution in the United States were: 1. to give additional training; 2. to give instruction in the methods of tcaching; 3. to give instruction in the management of the school; and 4 to provide a school of practice for actual exercise in the business of instruction. He struck upon three essential factors in the training of teachers of any school system subject matter, methods, and appli cation Since then the movemenr for the creation of normal schools to train teachers for the modern elemenrary school increased in public favor Other steps in the developmenr of teacher-training institutions were taken when the universities organized departments of education to prepare teachers for the secondary school and by the more recent and rapid change of normal schools to teachers colleges with the function of preparing teachers for all levels of the public school system Accompanying the organization of professional instruction for teachers, important changes in the scope and the nature of the element ary .school were effected. New subjects and activities were added; better textbooks were prepared; graded courses of study began to appear; and the modern system of school managemenr and control took definite shape. It may be said, therefore, that from the time the normal school was established as a segment of a modern school system, the elementary school has further developed. In like milnner, the secondary school has greatly benefited from the of teachers' colleges. THE THI'NKER PAGE FIFTYTHREB

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B.' The Special F tmctiom of the La Boca Normal Train in g School In the light of the historical background of the normal school as that teacher training institution which is entrusted with the special task of preparing teachers for the elementary school we can see that the establishment of a n o rmal training school was a logical step in the development of the Canal Zone Colored Schools. The dearth of trained teachers caused either by the death or departure of men who had come from the West Indies made it highly necessary to extend to our gro up training in the art and science of teaching which has for long been a requirement of the elementary school teacher in Europe, the United States, and other countries of Central and South America When the Columbia University Survey Staff reported in 1930 on the Can a l Zone Colored Schools, it recommended the establishment of a teacher-tr a ining school for the preparation of teachers for the Colored Schools." Subsequent efforts by the Division of Schools re sulted in the establishment in January of 1935 of the La Boca Nor mal Training School. One may ask, Has the Normal School justified its existence in our public school system?" This question may be answered from three standpoints: From the standpoint of the individual. the standpoint of the school and the standpoint of the community First "from the standpoint of the individual." If the normal school performed no other function than to care for the educational needs of a small number of our group after the onset of adolescence, it would perform a valuable service. The Normal School is partially satisfying the need for an institution which affords an opportunity to induct the student into the beginnings of a complete education, and into a better understanding of society and its institutions ; to help him to realize the meaning of his individuality; and to develop an integrated personality Since successful living depends to a high degree upon success in vocation, there is an insistent social demand that boys and girls be given an opportunity for vocational training at the secondary school level. Inasmuch as the normal school prepares students for a noble and dignified profession, it is more than satisfying this social demand. Our school, therefore, is performing the dual function of offering a secondary education at the same time that it prepares men and women for recognized service of a high order Second from the standpoint of the school. As I have pointed out, the normal school and the modern elementary school represent paralell forces, historically; the former was developed to satisfy the needs of latter. This parallel development may account for the fact that wherever there are normal schools the elementary schools develop in purposes, scope, curriculum, methods and organization There is good reasqn to expect therefore, that as time goes on our school will make a substantial contribution to the further development of the elementary school. PAGE FIFTYFOUR THE THINKER

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The studentS of first graduating class collaborated with the teachers in service 'iri' making the Courses of Study now in use in our schools, In a similar manner, this class and future classes of the La Boca Normal Training School can cooperate with experienced teachers in the service in the deevlopnient of units d f work, instruc tional materials, special projects, guidance programs, and civic activ ities; thus enriching the school life of the pupils in the elementary school. At this point it is not tOO visionary to express the hope that in the not very distant future the La Boca Normal Training School will extend upward to give room to the public high school that is bound to come in the logical developmental programs of the colored schools. Third, "from the standpoint of the community." Education means far more than the development of the capacities of each individual. The extent to which the individual becomes socially efficient, capable of cooperation, capable of contributing to the constructive forces of social betterment, is an adequate measure of his success as a citizen. The school, therefore, must provide direction for social development. With class organizations, assemblies, music groups, clubs, and student councils, our school is providing opportunity for training in coopera' tion leadership, and "followship." As students, we realize that a leader must be to logically, that he must be able to distinguish between righ t and wrong, and to act promptly for the right. He must have vision to initiate and work our a positive program for the development of his group In this practice of living and working tOgether we c011)e to realize that leaders must be supported by loyal followers, that without .i,rltelligent and loyal followers it is impossible to develop the proper school spirit or the right kind of community. We also come to sense the fact that good followers will evaluate the actions of their leaders, work for the success of any plan agreed upon, and that they will cooperate heartily in all efforts for the common good. Following wisely }he usages of parliamentary procedure has prov ed one of the most helpful ways of bringing about this type of train ing. In class meetings we are encouraged to cultivate respect for the opinions of others, and we are led to accept the restraints of our fellows and to choose lines of thought arid action based upon careful judgment rather than on personal prejudices. In this way we learn to cooperate with others for the common good, to selec t leaders wisely and to follow them consistently, Through the development of' better social attitudes and behaviors, the students of the La Boca Normal Training School can work hopefully to aid in the attainment of more efficient and more harmonious living in our community. As graduates of the second class of the La Boca Normal Training School, we hope to live up to the traditions of a noble profession and to the ideals of our Alma Mater. A few years ago the great poet-playwright, John Drinkwater, wrote a poem called "A Prayer." These are the two last stanzasI commend them to my classmates and I commend them to myself: THE THINKER PAGE FIFTYFIVE

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Grallt 1t.r the will to fa.rhioll a J we feel Grallt tt.r the .rtlellgth to l abor a.r tile kllow, Gl'tJlIt 1tJ the pttrpoJe, ribbed alld edged with Jteel, To Jtrib e the blow. Knowledge we aJk 1I0t-knowledge thott haJ lent, BM L ord, the wilf..--there lies ottr bigger need, G ive ttJ to bttild above the deep intent The deed, the deed. CECIL L. CARTER Chairman ELSINORA LYNCH LORENZO HARRISON SIDNEY JONES II. THE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY OF EDUCATION AND THE ROLE OF THE LA BOCA NORMAL TRAINING SCHOOL The general topic "The Social Responsibility of Education and the Role of the La Boca Normal Training School will be discussed under three major headings: A. The Social Basis of Education. B. The Objectives of Education C. The Application of the Philosophy of Education from the Standpoint of the Objectives of Self-Realization and th7 Role of the La Boca Normal Training School. My specific undertaking at this time, is to discuss the first. A The S ocial BaJiJ o f Edttcation In this t a lk I propose to discuss my topic under the following heads: the nature and meaning of culture; the individual and culture; the nature p f education as a social function. What is the nature and the meaning of culture? Culture has been as the "sum total of the accumulated experiences of a par ticular group of people or sociery." It is "that complex whole which includes knowledge, beliefs, art, morals, law customs, and any other capabilities and habits acquired by man as a member of sociery." The variou s elements of culture may be separated into two major divisions The first division includes the material or physical elements such as machines tools weapons, clothing, forms of shel ter and similar material dlings. The second division includes the in tangible or spiritual elements such as beliefs, language, customs, folkways, religion, moral codes law government, and similar elements. Culture in its entirery represents the sum total of the effort& of man to improve his modes of living. PAGE FIFTYSIX THE THINKER

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Now, every individual is born into a culrure. The religion he adopts, the language he learns to speak, the beliefs the customs, and tven the prejudices that he acquires are alI results of his association with other human beings in that culrure. In other words, the culrure is the force that directs and circumscribes his development. The individual finds culrural elements already existing when he is born. By contact with the members of. his group he acquires the patterns and modes of behavior of that society. In other words, he acquires experiences-he becomes educated. In a sense, then, educa tion is a social process by means of which the individual is inducted JntO the life and culrure of his particular group. Many people think of education as a particular function that takes place only in a school; and in this narrow sense we speak of sending our children to school to be ed1tcated I should like to point our, however, in the broadest sense, education is not restricted to the school. In our community for example, the young child begins to be inducted into the culrure of our community long before he reaches school. He begins to acquire the language of his parents in the home As he plays with his young friends in his neighborhood, as he comes in cont a ct with people in the clubhouse, in the commissary, and on the playground he learns the modes and the pattern of thinking and acting of his group In short, he becomes educated into the life and culture of his society. In a previous speech it was pointed out how the school evolved as that special instirution of society to prepare the child for his social needs In our modern society, the school is a specialized instirution that has the responsibility of inducting the child in a formal and deliberate way into the best and most important elements of his culrure. OrganIzed and deliberate education as conducted in the school signifies a controlled effort of adult members of society "to make of the young something which if left to themselves and the culrure they would not become Three fundamental factors are present in the deliberate education of the young as conducted by the school: first, a particular culrure with its life activities its operating social arrangements, its tools tech niques, meanings, arid values; second the child-unique, active-his individuality in process of formation; third, the agent of the culturethe teacher-in control of the process by which the child and the culture interacts. The work of the school is built around its curriculum, that is to say, the series of guided educational experiences offered by the school. The curriculum or the educational program of the school represents an undertaking of educators to provide experiences which will induct the child to the most crucial, valuable, and important aspects of the culture. This undertaking necessarily involves choice, selection, and THE THINKER P AGE FIFTYSEVEN

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evaluation of data, principles, and values in its formulation and ad ministration. Every educational program, therefore, has its selected content and emphases which condition the development of the young For those who think of deliberate education as a form of social action and interpretation, this is the inescapable conclusion: that the educator is responsible for evaluating the surrounding culture and making positive educational choices. B. The ObjectiveJ of Ed1tCation The previous speaker discussed the nature of education as a social function and developed the philosophy that organized and de liberate education is a form of social action and interpretation She has also shown that the educator is responsible for evaluating the culture and making positive educational choices in order that the educational program with its selected content and emphases will con dition the development of the young, within a "frame of things deemed necessary, possible, and desirable." The conscious acceptance by the school and the teacher of responsibility for educational choice is pecul iarly important here, on the Isthmus, where various cultures of our cosmopolitan population meet. In our own communities, as a student of culture will observe, live peoples from many islands of the Carib bean area, who in migrating to Panama brought their cultures here. In adjacent communities of the Canal Zone live our North American neighbors, who have brought the culture of a dynamic industrial society to this tropical region. Among us and in the terminal cities of the Panama Canal are our Panamanian neighbors with their Hispano American culture Each of these large culture groups with its sub cultures has its characteristic modes and patterns of thinking and act ing. Consequently, each inevitably affects and influences the other. In this sense our communities are passing through a period of cultural transition. They are still in a state of flux. The significance of all this is evident. The school with its agent, the teacher, should accept this fact of cultural transition as a challenge and an opportunity to assume creative leadership.in the preservation of the very best elements of our culture and in the promotion of the highest social values. In applying this philosophy, however, the school must recognize the broad purposes with which education has always been identified Groups of educators h!'ve been active in stating the principal aims of education As early as 1860 Herbert Spencer made a classification of educational objectives using human activities as the basis. Since Spencer's time a great number of these classifications have been attempted Some of these include the significant and helpful statement of two foremost educators, Chapman and Counts, whose social purposes were given detailed treatment in 1938 at the First Commencement of the La Boca Normal School. In 1918 the Commis sion of the National Association of Education came out with its car-PAGE FIFTY-EIGHT THE THINKER

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dinal principles of modern education. In 1938 the Educational Poli cies Commission of the National Association of Education of the United States produced an excellent report containing a statement of the purposes of education It is significant that most of the classifica tions that have appeared in recent years emphasize these facts: thac education is concerned with the development of the learner; that ed ucation is concerned with home, family, and community life; thac education is concerned with economic demands; and that education is concerned with civic and social duties. In short, education in modern society, and especially elementary education, should be concerned with the basic or fundamental interests about which human life re volves and through which human nature is given expression This class is inclined to favor the four great groups of objectives as defined by the Educational Policies Commission: 1. the Objectives of Self-Realization; 2 the Objectives of Human Relationships; 3. the Objectives of Economic Efficiency; and 4. the Objectives of Civic Responsibility. The specific activities necessary to attain these objec rives will vary for different types of schools and for different com munities. Whatever the activities may be, they should be governed by a great purpose This purpose is found in the "four objectives." Let us summarize what has been accomplished so far I have just indicated how education should help students to make adjustments to persistent fundamental life needs. The previous speaker has already pointed out that the educator is responsible for evaluating the sur rounding culture and making positive educational choices. By' using the broad general objectives as the social purposes and analyzing and studying our culture and then making deliberate, positive choices, the school and the teacher will be engaged, therefore, in giving guided educ ational experiences to the child which will be meaningful and serviceable. The next speaker will show how the principles previously dis cussed can be applied by the school to our communities in the develop ment of the first broad purpose-the Objectives of Self-Realization C. The Application of th e PhiloJophy (ObjectiveJ of Self-Real i zat i on) I shall endeavor to apply the philosophy of education which was stated by the previous speaker from the standpoint of the objectives of self-realization In the words of the Educational Policies Commis sion these objectives are: 1. Tbe lnqttiring Mind. The educated person has an appetite for learning. 2 Speech. The educated person can the mother tongue clearly. 3. Reading The educated person reads the mother tongue effi ficiently. 4 Writing. The educated person writes the mother tongue effectively T H..E T H INK E R P A G E F 1FT Y N I N E

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5. Number. The educated person solves his problems of counting and calculating. 6. Sight and Hearil1g. The educated person is skilled in listening and observing 7 Health Knowledge. The educated person understands the basic facts concerning health and disease. 8. Health Habits The educated person protects his own health and that of his dependents. 9 Public Health. The educated person works to improve the health of the community. 10. Recreation. The educated person is participant and spectator in many SpOrts and other pastimes 11. Intellectual Interests. The educated person has mental resources for the use of leisure 12. Esthetic Interests. The educated person appreciates beauty. 13. Character. The educated person gives responsible direction to his own life. This statement means that the teacher will have constantly in mind the need for the development of an inquiring mind. He wiil be concerned with the intellectual and esthetic interests which children are developing. He will seek constantly to insure through the organ ization of experiences, the full and complete self-realization of all boys and girls. He will be concerned quite as certainly with their emotional stability as with their intellectual attainments. He will not be satisfied with any result less than an individual who is well ad justed to his contemporaries and who finds satisfaction and pleasure in his life activities. It is not possible here to discuss completely all the objectives of self-realization, but I wish to call attention to eight of these objectives First, Speech. The educated person can speak the mother tongue clearly. The individual who has the ability to express himself orall), in clear and correct language has a decided advantage in his social, occupational, and other contacts. The school still has the tremendous job of teaching English that functions in and out of school. It is also the job of the school to "know what in the speech in our com munities is acceptable and worthy of preservation. For example, in our cosmopolitan Isthmian community, people do not have to speak with the same accents; but people should speak clear grammatical English, and use acceptable pronunciations. Although the curriculum of the school places emphasis on oral English, it has been recognized that this is a bi-lingual country and that at least a working knowledge of the fundamentals of Spanish is necessary for any individual who is to remain on the Isthmus For this utilitarian reason, Spanish is included in the curriculum of the school. Second, Reading. The educated person reads the mother tongue efficiently. In addition to the eager search for knowledge which the educated person always exhibits, he needs to have available every possible means of satisfying his urge to know the truth. One of the PAGE SIXTY THE THINKE R

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important tools in this quest is an ability to read Wlien the school teaches the child to read, it hands him a passport to cross boundaries of time and space, a letter of introduction to the great minds in all pans of the world and in all periods of time. However, in addition to teaching the skills of reading, the school must guide the child in his selection of reading materials. Teachers must never be content to declare their objective gained when a child has merely learned to srumble through words and sen tences. They must, as part of the program in reading, shoy.' the child how to select his reading, to read some things carefully, to skim other books hastily, to reject still others entirely to comprehend what he reads and to apply it in the solution of his problems, to use reading as a means of experience, and to enjoy to the fulleST degree possible the rich domain of his heritage of world li.rerarure Nothing less than this is a justifiable goal in teaching reading. The school should realize that the amount, distribution, and quality of reading done by our community is an excellent index of our culrural develop ment and social competence Third Writing. The educated person writes the mother tongue effectively Every person should be able to write a simple and straight forward statement in concise and legible English. One has only to look through the contributions from members of our group to the several newspapers to realize the urgent necessity of acquiring effec tive expression. The program in writing should include such func tional abilities as letter writing, formulating announcements, report ing an experience, writing directions or explanations, and keeping personal memoranda These activities are basic to the teaching and learning of written c omposition Opporrunity should also be provided for creative expression, the artistic translation of personal experience into words For those per sons whose writing will be directly associated with earnil).g a living, the desirable standards are simplicity, clarity, honesty, legibility, and brevity Fourth, Number. The educated person solves his problems of counting and calculating Some acquaintance with numbers and skill in the fundamental operations of addition substraction, multiplica tion, and division is an educational objective we have come to rake for granted. The selection of the skills to be taught in this field and the types of problems to which these skills are applied should be determined by the kinds of arithmetical calculations which the indi vidual in our community has occasion to make New aspects of applied mathematics are constantly developing and the educational experiences of children and adults need to be extended to include them For example, one has only to pick up the newspaper to note the presentation of numbers in graphic and tab ular form. Children should learn the rudiments of graphic presenta tion, particularly since this form of presenting data is so effective and THE THINKE R PAGE SIXTYONE

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so easy to misinterpret. The child should be trained to understand the language of graphic presentation and what constirutes a reliable and honest use of this device. The ability to deal with number and form, the fundamentals of mathematics, has always been a basic human need. In this modern age of ours the appreciation and use of basic mathematical skills and concepts offer significant assistance for self-realization. Fifth, Sight and Hearing. The educated perSOn is skilled in lis tening and observing. A great deal of our knowledge is acquired by other methods, particularly by speaking, by listening, by observing, ane;! finally, by reflecting on what we have read, written, counted, said and done, heard and seen. With the motion-picrure, radio pro gram, concerts, and plays adding to the enrichment of our lives, the task of the school is to help develop those skills so that its boys and girls will be able to listen, observe, and reflect skillfully. Sixth, Health Knowledge and Health Hab its The educated per son understands the basic facts concerning health and disease. He pro tects his own health and that of his dependents. The modern school places great emphasis on health as an outcome of education : The educated person is inoculated against superstition, obeah, and witchcraft It is the duty of the school to know something of the wasteful habits of members of our communities who invest thousands and thousands of dollars on needless illnesses, on useless and harmful patent medicines, and on questionable superstitious and magical tices. KI)owing what is necessary for maintaining his own health, the educated person is ready to protect the health of other people. He knows that all children should be well born, carefully guarded against avoidable infections, properly nourished in body and mind and given an environment in which they can grow and live long and well. Seventh, Recreation. The educated person is participant and spectator in many SPOrtS and pastimes Under the strain of industrial working conditions, our people stand in urgent need of learning forms of recreation. The school should attempt to include in its recreational activities a variety of games and to emphasize more cooperation and less competition in all its play activities. The games taught should include a variety of those requiring physical as well as mental agility Enjoyment and relaxation are the ultimate aims in all these recreational activities. Competition, as you know, will do more harm than good if it centers on a few persons to the neglect of the majority and if it elevates winning the game above playing the game. For this reason, recreational training should include less com petitive physical activities such as walking, camping, and various forms of manual and creative arts When the school gives adequate attention to the expression of the creative impulse, we shall be amaz ed at the contribution which youth will make to the intangible, spir irual values which constirute the durable satisfactions PAGE SIXTY-TWO THE THINICER

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Eighth, Cbaracter. The educated person gives responsib1e direc tion to his own life. Since the public school is the one agency which has all the children under its jurisdiction at one time or another, it can and should take a position of leadership in building the character of our future citizens. Through deliberate education our boys and girls can be taught to be generous, courageous, friendly, considerate, to believe in and to have rhe habit of working well, and to be accurate and responsible The school must organize its experiences in such a manner that it will help to develop men and women who, of their own volition, will budget their lives intelligently and effectively among their work family and friends, recreation and rest, civic res ponsibilities, cultural growth, and spiritual life In the development of the first broad purpose-the Objecrives of 'Self-Realization-I have endeavored to give a clear understanding of the principles of education and have tried to sho"l how these principles can be applied by the school in deliberately s olving many of the problems of our communities. In its organization and administration, our school should be pattern of the theory which ir advocates The role of the La Boca Normal School, therefore, is to develop in its students, the future teachers of our schools, fine and ennobling conceptions and ideals of life and education, an understanding of social and insriturional life, a knowledge of child nature and growth, and a working skill in the techniques of aiding learners in carrying forward a continuous pro gram of educative activities. As graduates of the La Boca Normal School, impregnated wirh the ideals of the philosophy previously dis cussed, we hope that when we become teachers, we shall be able t<;l apply this conception of education to our communities. Cerrainly by applying these principles through organized and deliberate education, the school will be making of the young "something which if left to themselves and the culture, they would not become." Deliberate edu cation can and should develop in each individual "the knowledge, in terests, ideals, habits and powers whereby he will find himself and his place and use that place to shape both himself and sociery toward ever nobler ends, l' H E THINXER ERIC GRAHAM, Chairman VERONA BROWN PEARL EASTMOND ALFRED GORDON PAGE SIXTY-THREI;

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.;.;:. GIRLS' ACTIVITIES About eight months after the opening of our Normal Training course, the girls of our class began to amuse themselves with the in discriminate shooting of arrows. They assured themselves that this game was archery. The ancient spOrt of archery offers many appeals to everyone, but I am afraid that our fair lassies did it an injustice. During the first days of practice the entire playing field was converted into a restricted area. The only zone of safety could be found behind these novice archers who really took careful aim at the target but shot elsewhere. The leaders in this Robin Hood spOrt were Margie Trotman and Mary George .. .. After convincing themselves that this archery business was not within their field of competence, our dear classmates decided to try some other game. Their choice was volley-ball. All the girls practiced faithfully and carefully. Soon a feminine community league was inau gurated and our girls' team entered this league. We were surprised however, to note that all th e opposition that the girls' volley-ball team met was easily swept aside. Our girls emerged victorious in the inter community league. The team played like any well oiled machine. Each girl cooperated very nicely in aggressive and defensive action. As a result of their coordinated action and concentrated effort the efficiency of the team was maintained on a one-thousand per cent level. The team was a veritable Rock of Gibraltar to the extent that for the years '42 and '43 they resisted all attacks and were declared, therefore, un disputed champions of girls' volley-ball of the Pacific and Atlantic side colored comrtlUnities. For having triumphed in the volley-ball series in '43, the girls' team received a beautiful silver trophy which, at present, stands proudlyon the top of the library shelves in our classroom. PAGE SIXTY-SIX THE ,HINKER

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BOYs' ACT1VITIES Well, th a t s all from the girls. Let us look at the boys aCtiVities. Let us rum to the aquatic feats. Scene: Hideaway Beach, La Boca: A very large cosmopolitan g athering at the Water Sports Car nivals ... Over ten individuals are poised for the take-off All con testants submerged together in this 50 yard free style event The ruffled. surface reg a ined its calm To our surprise we found that the winner of the race was a calm, unassuming alld dignified fellow srudent. This srudent was our aquatic comet, Alfred Gordon. Fresh from victory and desirous of adding more laurels to his name, Alfred entered the lOa-yard free style race and won the first place position easily. One sunny Friday morning after receiving full instructions from our physical director, the boys occupied their respective positions on the field. The umpire disrurbed the tranquil air with a shrill noise from his whistle, an act which automatically started what rurned out to be a free-for-all. It all started when Riley took the ball in his hands and started off for the goal of the opposing team Then came the fray Each player was forced to protect himself as he found it necessary. All the rules of the game were disregarded in about five minutes of play. Even teeth and claws were employed in the melee at times were broken The umpire blew his whistle, loud and long, but it was useless. The players were too absorbed in their rough sruff. The game continued in this way until nearly all the gladiators were falling from exhaustion. The game ended and the players were in no condition to play another game From this encounter the boys amused themselves with the thought of developing an invincible soc-cer team The boys' softball team proved to be a chronic headache to its opponents. This team, under the managership and captaincy of Hall and Smith respectively, blasted many hopes and aspirations of various teams in the Metropolitan League. Owing to the umpire-in chief's questionable decisions at crucial moments, the team lost the first game of a round of seven games. These decisions were S0 erratic that the sympathetic narure of the boys prompted them to suggest to the umpire that he pay a visit to Scadron's Outstanding in defensive play in the various positions were Skeete and Br athwaite in left field ; Headley in short center; David son, handling all chances at short Stop without a miscue ; Smith at second base; Graham in center field ; Dowlin in right field ; and Hall in the pitcher's box. Before we close we must make special mention of Lady Luck s Harrison. All members of opposing teams knew that he was a dead right field hitter. Yet, to their chagrin whenever he went to b at, he invariably placed the ball in right field for a hit. His unequalled feat was that of having connected six hits in as many trips to the plate

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BOUQUETS FOR NORMAL (Extracts from letters to Miss Jump ) Fr o m Ben M Williams, S u perintendent of C a nal Zone S c hools : I was pleased to receive a copy of the October number of "The Torch" published by the La Boca Normal School, and I wish to compliment you and the students of the Normal School who took part in the preparation of this booklet It is evidence of the fine cooperative spirit in carrying on a very worthwhile enterprise The material included in this number, as well as that of the preceding numbers, is an indication of the ability of the students. Their appel!l for recognition can rest on the worth of the material in "The Torch. In fact this i s the only basis on which any pubh cation can have continued success It is requested that you send a copy of each issue to the Balboa High School library a nd to the Cristobal High School library, and also to each of the colored junior high schools From Joseph R Koch, Department Chaplain o f the Panama Canal : "On behalf of the Brotherhood Council for the observance of Brotherhood Week we take this means to express our deep ap preciation to you and the young ladies and young men of the Boca Normal School Ensemble for their generous participation in the Brotherhood Week Program held at the Tivoli U. S O. last week. Miss Helen Currier Baker deserves the highest commendation for her most able and efficient directorship of this ensemble as well as Miss Emily Butcher for her excellent performance as accompanist The renditions of the Ensemble were beautifully and efficiently done and enthusiastically received both by the seen and un seen audience Kindly extend our heartfelt thanks to Mrs Baker, Miss Butcher and the members of the Ensemble not only for their splendid performance but also for their edifying spirit of coopera tion It was a real privilege to have them with us and we sincerely hope we shall have the opportunity of hearing them again PAGE SIXTY-EIGHT THE THINKER,

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THE THINKER PA.GE SIXTY-NINE

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SWEET MUSIC Sweet music b a lm to the soul is, Smooth galleon floating to eternal bliss The rapture of music-loving souls expressed, By brass, strings, and voices with emotion expressed. When burdened wi,h never-ending woes, When harried by relentless foes Sweet music, soft and low, shall be The finest friend that one can see. The peer, the proletari at, and all the world, Are transp.orted to the heavens where a re unfurled All the tenderness, the good, and the beauty there is, All the haFlpiness the love, contentment, a nd bliss -HarmOlzd Cock bum MUSIC THAT LIVES Jiear the music of the day, Jiear it, feel the throb it gives, Played a while and cast away, .. Only for a while it lives. Hear the music of this age, Played for many and many a day Yet its fate the gods presage, That it live and pass away. Hear the music of all time, Played a day a month, a year, Music that is more than rhyme, More than rhythm, lives fore er Lives as long a s men will live, Lives forever, live it can, Happiness and joy to give Succor to the ills of man .... -Eric Gr abam ,HE THINK;ER PAGE SEVENTY

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NOSTALGIA In Normal three years have I spent With many of my dearest friends, And as the time goes swiftly by I think of parting with a sigh; Bur, oh, it is so sweet to know That soon I'll be returning home. The first few weeks were all so new, And h,omesickness would have its due But one glance at my neighbor's face, And I knew that I'd love this place; Whenever I was feeling blue I'd only look, and hum a tune Those afternoons so gladly spent In singing songs we loved so well As Je a nnie with the Light Brown Hair" And melodies like "Massa Dear Will bring to us where e'er we dwell Thou g hts of the school we love so well. Can we forget the moon and stars And planets Jupiter and Mars Which brought forth such a learned talk From Smith, who loves to hem and haw; Or times spent like bright happy larks Discussing Darwin and Lamarck Or Lil'belle with the childish smile, Or W atkis with all seeing eyes, Or Inez with her stately height Or Dottie with enchanting wiles? Oh, no, we could bur ne 'er f orge t The antics of our classroom pets. I could go on and on and on And tell you all I'm thinking of; Of M ary's song, of Aida's poise, Of Riley's irritating voice, Of trying to absorb McKee When others thought 'twas time to sleep Of singing classes never missed Of ciph'ring Bond's arithmetic, Of Cessie and her feline sneeze, Of Skeete and his' annoying tease, Bur all good things must h ave an end, And I must soon lay down my pen. And so the end draws very near, And brings along nostalgic tc ars, Tho well we know how hard twill be To part with friends so dear as these; But yet, it still is sweet to know That SOOn I'll be returning home -Sylvia McDonaia

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I'AGE A FAREWELL TO NORMAL Normal, a name I love so well, On whom my thoughts shall ever dwell, Like a lighthouse to me shall alw ays be ; Farewell dear Normal, farewell to thee. Books of methods and books of facts You gave to me in numerous stacks ; Some I liked especially McKee Farewell, dear Normal, farewell to thee. Three years and a half with thee I've You sh a ped me each day that carne and went I'm launching our now as the boat to the sea, Farewell, dear Normal, farewell to thee. Can I recall one moment of wrath Against thee and thy torch that lighted my path? No! mem ries of joy alone remain with me. Farewell, dear Normal, f a rewell to thee. Thy grandeur and power both abstract and rare, A challenge will be for many who ll dare, Victory and success surely theirs can be, Farewell, dear Normal farewell to thee. Into the future scurrying I must go Looking bac k now and then but nOt with woe; For did you not lift me and make me free? Farewell, dear Normal, farewell to thee. The time of our parting now is at hand, Oh, that fore er side by side we could stand, The waves of the ocean repeat sadly with me : Farewell, dear Normal, farewell to thee -Ruth Buckley LABOR L -is for leisure, a period of rest. After h a rd work this is best \ -is for apprentice who is legally bound To work for another, more renowned B -is for barbering; a skilled art indeed Requiring precision elegance, and speed. o -stands for obelisk, a pointed-crest pillar Carved by Egyptians to honor their ruler. R is for respite when work is suspended It s glorious to know that a work-day is ended ... -Eduardo Dogue SEVENTYTWO THE THINKER

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THE TO MOTHER Oh humble queen, oh noble soul, Good shepherd of the human fold, A rosy crown adorns your head, The path is sacred where you tread. In gloomiest day, in darkest night, When sorrow enters joys take flight, Our weary heart abounds with love And pleads with angels from above. When danger lurks beyond the wall, When evil softly makes its call, Your virtuous arm0r and seasoned sword PrOtect us, weaklings from the hated horde When youthful hearts so sullen grow And helpless feet drift from the shore, Your sacred lips they part in prayer Imploring His aid to draw us nearer Oh humble queen, oh noble soul, Whose glorious history remains untold, We offer our prayers, Out hopes, our tears For you today .......... On MOther's Day ........ .. .. -Sydney Smith ON MOTHER'S DAY Dearest mOther sits in yon old rocking chair, A feeling of gladness prevails in the air, From oldest to youngest her children are gay, For this Sunday morn is the second in May The day set apart to honor the mOther Who bore you nd loves you as never another, The one to whose sure arms you flee when depressed, To bury your weary-worn head on her breast Today, think of many a bold sacrifice! COUnt yourself product of good sound advice! If only dear mothers with us could but stay, And not like a frail, wilting flower, fade away. Don't wait for this one day to show her you care, But lavish attentions on her while she is here. A word of affection, a loving embrace Will cheer her and brighten her kind, thoughtful face We offer for mothers a prayer sincere, We ask to be worthy of these creatures dear God gave us our mOthers to cherish and love For they are His most precious gifts from above. Aida Mack THINKER P AGE S EVENTYTHREE

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SYLVIA I dream o f Sylvia with her large black DOW And of A lfred pulling the thing to and fro, Sometimes I wondered why she'd wear That gloomy, depressing bow in her hair. Mani: are the wild jeers her bow would invite As it danced in the wind-a disturbing sight. At times it sighed and her neck it caressed; At times it acted l ike a demon possessed I long for Sylvia when the quizzes come But sometimes I consider her Quite dumb. For when, after hearing her expound A well-merited zero on my quiz sheet is found I sigh for Sylvia and her weeping violin, With it she never fails to create a din. She'd torture, murder and cruelly torment The soul of the dying, old instrument I wonder if it is Sylvia and her bow exotic Who have changed the professor into that neurotic Who quizzes on topics he forgot to teach And then, on our lack of intelligence would preach. I think of Sylvia, of castor oil and spinach; In answering a question she fills it with verbiage. If fortunately this lassie you chance not to know, T h en, avoid anybody with a black bow Aida Mack TO A GIRL (With Apologies to Joyce Kilmer) I think that I shall never see A girl that means as much to me As you, w hose dusky head is pressed Against my warm and happy breast; A girl whose smile is like the ray Of sunlight on an endless day, A girl who may in summer wear A bunch of roses in her hair A girl whose twinkling eyes so true Reflect it shade of every hue, Poems are made by fools like me But only God makes girls like thee Roy Watkis PAGE SEVENTY-FOUR THE THINKER

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NORMAL'S FAMOUS WRECK There was joy in the car as it furrowed the road, With Normalites bound for their pe a ceful abode. The lads in the back were happy and free, Their laughter was heard in most every key. Bd1ind the wheel sat the proud little driver, At his side was a damsel his lovely admirer. Th(y were talking of the past day's affairs, Without a thought of danger or care How pleasing," said the lads, "to be home for our rest, After p a ssing a day of quizzes and tests. And sewing said the damsels, "and c o oking t oo, To home we shall go with nothing to do." A screech, a bang, and then a loud smash An uproar of voices arose from the clash Twa s really and truly a pitiful sight For Hilda and Linda went out like a light B{cause of his lack of carefulness Our cute little chauffeur gOt into a mess, Now he rides in the back like a bee in its hive And is never again permitted to drive ....... Mercella Scott REMEMBER Remember the skies looked down on us And whispered soft and low, And how we thought-at least this must Be love that starts to grow. Remember those very skies so fair That nutsed our dreams of love? That silvery moon (it seemed so ne ar) Shone softly from above. Remember its glow began to wane; How suddenly my heart grew ill ; How Cupid promised to call again? Tho' now he never will. Love died arid left us h a rdly friends; But, remember the spark a nd ember It left to return to burn again, I do.... ......... but do you remember? Roy Watkis THE THINKER PAGE SEVENTY FIVE

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['j ttl .... .... FR. E SHMEN

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THE FRESHMAN CLASS On July 8, 1943 a freshman class of 30 students was admitted to the La Boca Normal Training School. This is the third class to be admittfd to the L a Boca Normal School and is compo sed of students from the following communities: La Boca, 11; Mir a flores 1; Red Tank, 3; Obi s po, 1; Gamboa, 5; Gatun, 3; Panama City, 1 ; Fort Randolph, 1; Silver City, 2; Colon, 2. Twenty-f our of this group were graduated from the ninth grade of the Canal Zone colored schools either in 1941 or 1942 Four had b ee n graduated from grade eight and had been attending Spanish sch c ols before entering the Norm a l S c hool. Twenty five gave up full time jobs to come to school. Ther e are 19 girls an' d 11 boys in the class. The average age of the group is 17 years and 2 months the lowest age being 15 years and 10 months and the highest, 19 years. Most of the students are now living in La B oca Twelve of them commute daily from Gamboa, Red Tank, or Panama We wish the members of the Class of '47 much success in their scho lastic career. Bowen, Olga Lee, Thelma Burrows, Gilbert Moise, Inez Caner, Pearline Moore Elleanora Cockburn, Halden Morris on, Wilmoth Daley, Norm a Newell Matthias Dowlin, Ivan SCott, Conzinetta Eastmond, Leon Simon, Pearl Ellis, Lodiana Smythe Icllyn Gordon, Agnes Stone, D aisy Gordon, Gladstone Thompson, Pearl Hawkins Priscilla Thompson Ruby Jardine Pablo Watkis Daphne Jordon Ruby Wadey, Clara Leach, Celene Webster Andley Webster, James 'THE 'THINKER PAGE S EVEN'TYSEVEN

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Artiuitit5 anb 1/fift THE THINKER PAGE SEVENTYNINE

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..... ..... La Boca Normal School Class, Studying Methods of Teaching

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\ La Bom Normal School Freshmen, Faculty anq Junior Classes, 1943

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NOTES ON THE ALUMNI It might be of interest to know what the alumni are doing Of t he thirty-seven graduates, seventeen have positions in the colored fch cols. Two who are married, have regular work at the La Boca School. Twelve of the thirty-seven graduates worked for a short time in the schools, and then resi g ned their positions for more attractive jobs w ith the Contractors, the Army and Navy Four migrated to the United States to pursue advanced studies in colleges and universities. Of this r.umber one h a s returned to work in the diocese of the Panama Canal Z o ne after completing successfully a theologic a l course at an Episcopa lian seminaty. It is also important to note that a former student who left after his sophomore year, is successfully pursuing a theological course at a Roman Catholic seminary in the United States Following is a list of the alumni in their respective fields labor : 1. Aubrey Blair Clerk Naval Supply Depot, Balbo a 2. Preston Blake Teacher, Gatun Junior High School 3. Adelle Sealey Bolt Combines a career with marriage Teacher, La Boca School 4. Andre Buller Teacher, La Boca Junior High School 5. Carmen Buller Tea c her, Gatun Jlinior High S choo l 6. Jo sep h Burnham Office helper, Fort Kobbe 7 Ellsworth Caesar Storekeeper heIper Fort Davis 8. Wilfred Clement Graduate of a School in Tec hnology, Detrait, Michigan; R C. A F. in Canada 9. Leafy De Sousa Teacher, Silver City School 10. Cleveland Ennis Clerk La Boca Restaurant 11. Lurlene Fergus Teacher, Silver City School 12_ Edward Gaskin Teacher, La Boca Junior High School THINKER PAGE EIGHTY-NINE

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13, Lilian Rowe Gibson 14. Egla Gooden 15. Alfonso Greaves 16. Kenneth Griffith 17. Hanrow Hartley 18. Hamilton L-avalas 19. Janice Ledgister 20. "Carlos Lewis 2l. Edmund Lynch 22. Audley Mamby 23. Emanuel Nolan 24. Beryl Ogle 25. Reynell Parkins 26. Joseph Seales 27. Rev. Mr. 1. Shirley 28. "Gladstone Stone 29. Sylvia Hassan Stout 30 Drusilla Villiers 3l. Henry Watkis 32. Alvin Williams 33. Eustace Williams 34. Louis Williams "Former Studenr P AGE NINETY Combines teaching with homemaking. Teacher, La Boca School Teacher, Red Tank School; graduate of the University of Panama, March, 1944 Teacher, Silver City Junior High School Teacher, Silver City Junior High School Office helper, Cristobal Silver commissary Teacher, Red Tank School Teacher, Gamboa School Studenr at a Catholic Seminary Employee, Frederick Snare Corporation Medical studenr at the University of Mi chigan Office helper, Municipal Division, Pedro Miguel Employee, Panama Canal Press Studenr at the University of Oregon; later Pvt. in the United States Army Clerk, R. F. A., Cristobal, Canal Zone Priest, St Christopher's Church, Rio Abajo Leaderman, Nava l Supply Depot Former teacher at Silver City School; now a happy housewife. Teacher, Silver City School Storekeeper, Fort Kobbe Stockman, Naval Supply Depot Stockman, Naval Supply Depot Empioyee, Wunderlick Okes Companr : l

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THE THINKER' PAGE NINETY-ONE

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ACKNOWLEDGM ENT The Staff of The Thinker sincerely thanks the patrons, and all others who so generously aided in the publication of this Yearbook. PAGE NINETY-TWO THE THINKER

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Qtomplimtltts nub .ALL WA5HW, up! THE' THINKE'!t

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FOTOGRAFIA WALLACE BROS. Vacation is coming! Before you leave, there will he various social obligations which you can best discharge with an autogra, phed photograph of yourself. It is the you, of today, that your friends will want to remember and a visit to our studio now will avoid much last minute hurry. H. P. WALLACE, MASTER PHOTOGRAPHER GRADUATE, MODERN SCHOOL OF PHOTIOGRAPHY, NEW YORK, N. Y. MEMBER OF PHOTOGRAPmC SOCIETY OF AMERICA DAY & NIGHT SERVICE No. 33 Mariano Arosemena (Behind Encanto Theater) Panama City Tel. 1691-J

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Heartiest Congt;atulations on your success. Put God first, your fellow man next and yourself last, and you will make the greatest contribution possible to life. T. Stanley Cannon Compliments of. The Rev. Mrs. D. A. Osborne Pueblo Nuevo Heights, R. P Best Wishes to The Class of '44 The Rev. L. B. Shirley Panama, R. P. Compliments of. The Girls Friendly Society ST. PAUL'S CHURCH Panama, R P Compliments of. The Rev. Mrs. I. O. Veitch Silver City, C. Z. Best Wishes to The Class of '44 The Rev. Mrs.' S. N. Brown La Boca, C Z. Best Wishes to The Class of '44 The Rev. Mrs. J. T. Mulcare La Boca, C. Z. Compliments of ST. VINCENT'S CHOIR st. Vincent's Church Silver City, C. Z.

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BEST WISHES -to the CLASS OF 1944 Adjutant & Mrs. Neil" C. Fisher -and -The Staff of the Salvation Army GATUN, c. Z. Compliments of A Student of The Class of 1938 Gamboa School Best Wishes to The Class of '44 Spanish Club Gamboa School Gamboa, C. Z Compliments of The Class of 1944 Gamboa School Gamboa, C. Z Compliments of Mr. & Mrs. Phillip A. Grant Gamboa, C. z. Best Wishes to The Class of '44 The Carver's Science Club Gamboa, C. Z Compliments of The Charlotte Hawkins Brown Culture Club Gamboa, C Z. Compliments of CLUB TROPICAL COLON R. P

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Compliments of -Dr. Fred Sterling Colon, R. P. Best Wishes to The Class of '44 Mr. & Mrs C. B. Prescott Silver City, C Z. Compliments of Beresford L. Stone (Physiotherapist) 7022-8th. Street Colon, R. P. Compliments of PANAMA RADIO CORPORATION Avenida Central No. 29 Panama, R. P Compliments of LEWIS SERVICE INC. 124 Central Ave. & 18 J st Books Magazines, Office -and-School Supplies Compliments of Dr Hubert C. Edwards 1002 -11th Street Colon, R. P Best Wishes to The Class of '401 Mr. & l"-rS E. A. Robertson La Boca, C Z Compliments of. Mi'. George Westerman La Boca, C. Z

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JUST "NUTS" AND "NUTTING" ELSE All about School IXar Miss Jump: I can' t come to school today because I have a pain in my neck, so please give the tesr today. I can't take the test because of this pain in my neck. I can't twist my neck so I can't take the test. I would gladly take the test if I could twist my neck-to see my neighbor's paper As I won t be there, please don't forget to give the test today thus sparing me a zero. Thanking you in advance MARY GEORGE ---000---The teacher had juSt got through expounding on Italian arc, lit erature and music Tea c her: Now L i lybell, tell us what is the !DOSt important contribution of the Italians to civilization. Lilybelt : Er-ah spaghetti, Sir ---000---Teacher : According to science what happens when we wet bread? :Eddie: Don't you know it gets soaked? ---000---Miu Jllmp: When and where was the Declaration of Independence signed, John? John : In 1776 and at the bottOm, ma'am. ---000---!>mitty: (reading from blank paper): The ear is a er--ah--bony set of (jones er--ah--a nervy set of bones er--ah--a bony set of is, I mean ............... Mr. S. P. (interrupting) : Say, Smith, will you throw that sheet of paper through the window and hang on to it? PAGE NINETY-EIGHT THE THINKER

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Compliments of DR. REGI NALDO FORDE COLON, R. P Best Wishes to The Class of 44 Mr. Andrew Sainten Gamboa, c Z Compliments of Mr. R. R. Livingston Rio Abajo, R. P Best Wishes to The Class of '14 Mr. Mrs. H. L. Rose La Boca, c z. Best Wishes to The Class of '14 Dr. A. D. Mastellari Panama. R. P Compliments of Mr. Felipe Butcher Gamboa, C Z. Best Wishes to The Class of 44 Mr. P. P. Daniels La Boca, c. z 1-05261.

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"Th6 emancipalion 01 sh(l wor j'rI musS btl accomblilhtd bJ I htl wOf"king..m,,, Ihem s elves. ... ................................ ........ K A RL MAR K "Eternal lIigi}anc, ;s th, pr j 01 /iberly ............... WOODROW WJ LSON "Thtl strength 01 she pack ; s fhe wo l l. and fhtl s t retlglh 0 1 the woll ;s thtl pack RUD Y ARD K]PLING. These quota ti ons, if clea rly u ndersto od and appl ied i nd ivid u a ll y can e xeC[ a t rem en d ous in flu ence in we ldi ng our group togt'the r for our prOteCtion an d a d v a n ceme nt. They have so served those w h o hold membe r s h ip i n the P.C.W.I.E. A ., a n d can equa ll y serve outSideors elig i b l e f or mem b ership. W e hea rt ily recommend t he f o r egoing fo r serious consideratio n Panama C anal West Indian Employees' Association Compliments of Mr. & Mrs. L. M. Babb Camp Bierd, C Z Bes t Wishes to The Class of '44 Mr. G. A. Campbell La Boca, C Z. Compliments of THE QUINTET GIRLS J. Dogue, C. Meade, H. Gordon, A. Marti n C Eveary Compliments of Mr. Maurice H. Young C o lon, R. P Best .wishes to The Class of '44 Miss Merlyn O. Gordon Ft. Randolph, C Z. Compliments of Mr. and Mrs. George Bryan Silver City, C Z. Compliments of WILFRED C. MC BARNETTE REAL ESTATE AGENT Satisfactory Service HOUSE 846 RIO ABAJO PHONE Z077-A

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Compliments of DROOUERIA DEL PACIFICO NO. 2 M Street Panama, R P. Compliments of THE LA BOCA ATHENAEUM La Boca, C. Z. Compliments of The Gregg Twilight Closs -and-The Gregg Twilight Alumni Club Box 1200, Balboa, C. Z. SHORTHAND TYPEWRITING Instructors "DON' T LET GO" Vernon L. Donalds George A. Simpson Sidney C ,Lindo Fred A. Howell

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Best Wishes to Best Wishes to The Class of '44 The Class of. '44 Mr. &: Mrs. A. B. Gordon Mr. &: Mrs H. A. Davidson R e d Tank, C Z R e d T ank, C. Z. Compliments of Compliments of Mr. &: Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. M. A. McDonald T. E. Mcintosh Silver C i t y, C Z L a Boca, C Z Best Wishes to Best Wishes to The Class of '44 The Clas s of. '44 Mrs. Anna Williams Mr. &: Mrs. B. Forde Family. Gamboa, C Z La Boca, C Z Compliments of. Compliments of Mr. &: Mrs. C. E. Lewis Miss Hannah Webster G atun, c Z : Red Tank, C Z. Best Wishes to Best Wishes to The Class of The Class of. '44 Mr. &: Mrs. G. Rance Miss Ina Stevens L a Boca, C Z. Red T ank, C. Z Compliments of Compliments of Mr. E A. Gaskin Srta. Lilia Sosa La Boca, c. z. Panama, R. P

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SLUMBER The teacher's t a lk was long and involved, And sometimes the stand which she pounded re lOlved. The girl in the second seat emitted a snore Unaware that this was affecting her score The te a cher made an erudite statement, And the same girl nodded as if in agreement. The teacher scolded the other scholars For not being able to be good followers. This girl, Crima who appeared rather smart, Suddenly fell from her seat and awoke with a start. After being so badly disgraced, Crima took her seat with hands on her face. The tea cher continued to do the impossible And called on Aida, the unforgivable, Who, deep in her slumber, unthinkingly bellows "Hiya, toots; what's buzzing cous?" And due to loud laughter the lassie awakes. -Three cheers to the Student Council her life was at stake Mr. S. P : Now, class, as we are all in a pleasant frame of minc, I'm going to relate an incident which happened when I was a small boy. Once .............. .. Mazie : Gee!!! Ancient History!!! Miu Jump: Oh, why did my poor violets They were blooming so well the other day Hild a : (taking a small cactus plant in her hands) Ohhhhh the poor African violets! Babb: (reading his treasurer s report) : Cash on hand-$55.62 ........ WatkiJ: (interrupting): What abour cash in pocket? --000---Teacher's definition of a pupil: A wild, noisy mammal found in all grades. It is subject to violent outbursts, often c a using temporary insanity to its victim. It can be subjugated by frequent applications of quizzes. THE THINKE R PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND THREE

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Compliments and Best Wishes of THE DRUG STORE loth. & Ave J. D Arosemena (Colon Theatre Bldg. ) NORMAN C. BROWN (Pharmacist) Best Wishes to The Class of '44 De Luxe Girls La Boca, C Z Compliments of Dr. C. Fairweather Panama, R. P. Best Wishes to The of '44 Mr. S. Callendar La Boca, C Z Compliments of Miss Ivy E. Babb Gamboa, C. Z. Best Wishes to The Class of '44 Miss Rosaline Hassell Red Tank, C Z Compliments of Mr. Mrs. C. E. Lewis Gamboa, C. Z. For the years past achievements in moulding the youths of the Canal Zone, WE CONGRATULATE YOU. For future years successes, WE EXTEND BEST WISHES. NOVEDADES McALMON No.7, M. street (Branch) 18 West 26th street Panama City

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Compliments of LOS BANQUEROS R. GEORGE, Manager J REINA, Secy-Treas. J BELL R. LUCAS C. La Boca, C. Z. Courtesy of THE CARLTON DRUG STORE (Mc Allister Bros.) lO()2 Ave Federico Boyd Colon R P Use Linda Grow Hair Pomade to promote the growth and enhance the beauty of your hair. Compliments of Miss Enez Diffenthaler (MAMITA) Panama, R P.

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Congratulations and Best Wishes to The Clnss of '44 DR. MARTIN H. RODNEY PANAMA, R. P. Compliments of Mr. & Mrs. Clifford Bolt Panama, R. P. Best Wishes to The Class of 44 Mr. Carlos Grant Panama, R. P Compliments of Mr. Mrs. A. M. Parchment La Boca, C Z Compliments of Mrs. E. Butcher La Boca, C Z Best Wishes to The Class of '44 GATUN GLEE GALAXY Gatun, C z Compliments of Mr. Mrs. C. C. Carter La Boca, C. Z Compliments of THE PANAMA TRIBUNE PANAMA, R. P.

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Compliments of. Compliments of Anesta's Beauty Parlor Bartley's Barber Shop 6060 -Central Ave La Boca C Z Colon, R. P Best Wishes to Best Wishes to The Class of '44 The Class of '44 Mr. & Mrs. C. Jones Mr. Daniel T. Poster & Pamily La Boca, C Z Silver City, C Z Compliments of. Compliments of Mr. & Mrs. W. H. Inniss Miss Flora E. Sutherland Chilibre, R P P anama, R. P Best Wishes to Bes t Wishes to The Class of 44 The Class of '44 Mr. Lloyd Gaul & Pamily Mr. George Miller Panama, R P Panama, R. P. Compliments of Compliments af. Miss L. Fuller Mr. J. Campbell Panama, R. P Panama, R. P Best Wishes to Best Wishes to The Class of '44 The Class of '44 Mr. Stafford Cole Mr. & Mrs. W. A. Pond Panama, R. P. Panama, R. P

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PRAYER OF A NEW TEACHER Give me a class of twenty-eight, Of children never absent nor late ; A group of children that are smart, Each with a hundred per-cent marks. I want children that will understand And heed at once to my command. Children who will do their assignments, Forgetting completely all other engagements; While I am teaching a unit on Russia, Children who will not suffer from amnesia; Nor while I am standing before the class, Children staring at me with eyes of glass. Oh, create for me children like these, So my teaching career may be one of ease -Lilybell McIntosh --000-Babb (to employer): I would like to get a raise, sir. Employer : Well-tomorrow you will start work i ng on the second floor. --
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Compliments of. Mr. Mrs. H. C. Williams La Boca, C Z. Best Wi shes to The Class of '44 Mr. William Jump La Boca, C Z Compliments of. Compliments of Mr. N. E. L. Smith Silver City, C Z Best Wishes to The Class of '44 Mr. Bertram Gordon Ft. R andolph, C Z Success to The Class of '44 Mr. Mrs. J. E. Waller Mr. Pedro N. Fontenelle Cristobal, C. Z La Boca, C. Z. Congratulations and Best Wishes to The Class of '44 -from-The Alumni of the La Boca Normal Training School

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Compliments of Compliments of Mr. &. Mrs. E. C. Le!;lie Mr. James Holder La Boca, C Z Gamboa, C. Z. Best Wishes to Best Wishes to The Class of '44 The Class of '44 Mr. &. Mrs. R. George Mr. &. Mrs. J. N. Buckley La Boca, C Z. La Boca, C. Z. Compliments Compliments of Mr. & MrS. Mr. &. Mrs. E. Tait, Sr. F. O. Eastmond La Boca, C. Z. La Boca, C Z BEST WISHES TO Best Wishes to The Class of '44 The Class of '44 Mr. &. Mrs. Mr. &. Mrs. T H. 'Riley C. H. Harrison La Boca, C Z Silver City, C. Z. Compliments of Compliments Mr. &. Mrs. L. M. Dogue Mr. &. Mrs. W. A. Howell Silver City, C Z. La Boca, C. Z. Best Wishes to Best Wishes to The Class of '44 The Class of '44 Mr. &. Mrs. C. A. Skeete Mr. &. Mrs. G. Scott Silver City, C Z Gamboa, C Z

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Best Wishe s to The Class of '44 -from -The Faculty -of the -SILVER CITY SCHOOL Wis hes to The Class of '44 -from -The Faculty and Pupils -of the -RED TANK SCHOOL

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Compliments and Best Wishes to The Class of '44 -from -The Faculty -of the -CATUN SCHOOL Compliments and Best Wishes to The Class ,of '44 TROPICAL BOYS S. P,uesey G. Grant B. Phillips G. Beckles K Maloney E Collins C. Bovell J Foril La Boca, C. Z Compliments of. THE BALALAIKA Social & Sporting Club P anama, R. P

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FAMOUS SAYINGS "Praise the Lord and extend the vacation."-John Riley "The clock needs a second gear (0 help it on its upward motion ."Roy Skeete. "Food is the life of any party."-Lorenzo Harrison. Just before a test-"White loudly."-Cecil Carter. -000--Teacher : How many angles has a rectangle? Ruth: Two right ones and two left ones. -000--Mr. S. P.: Why do we teach multiplication facts and their reverses? Crima: To show their relationship Mr. S. P (emphatically): NO! Pearl: To make learning easier. Mr. S. P. (more emphatically): NO! I am ashamed of yOli. pupils. The answer is (0 reduce the teaching load Scene: The music room during a solfeo lesson. Inez: The next two notes are re--di. Mavif (absendy j": Ready for what? Ana: Let's go (0 Coney Island (0 dance, dine, and have a wonderful time. Dade:; : I have the time. Do you have the money? Gladftone: Say, dad, why is English called the mother (Ongue? Mr, Grant: Observe, son, who uses it most around here; then you'll know. THE THINKER PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTEEN

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Compliments of The Staff of the Gamboa School GAMBOA, C Z. Compliments of Mr V Kipping Colon, R. P Best Wishes to The Class of '44 Miss R. McAlmon Panama, R. P CompUments of. Mr. Mrs. S. Williams Panama, R. P Compliments of Miss Ena P. Morgan (Phannacist) (Dro&,ueria del Pacifico) Panama, R. P. Best Wishes to The Class of '44 Miss F. Josephs Silver City, C Z Compliments of. Mr. Cyril S. Colon. R P Compliments of Springfield Social 6-Athletic Club LA BOCA C Z.

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Compliments of THE KOOLSPOT REST AU RANT PANAMA, R P. Compliments and Best Wishes to The Class of '44 -From The -Isthmian Negro Youth Congress "Progress Through Education" Compliments of GARAGE DE STERLING COLON, R P.

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Compliments of, Mr. S. S. Josephs Silver 'City, C Z Best Wishes to The Class of '44 Miss E. MitcheIl Silver City, C Z Compliments of. Mr. Mrs. S. SmaIl Family Gamboa, C z Best Wishes to ,The Class of '44 Mr. Mrs. P. Butcher Gatun, C z Compliments of Mr. George Hunter La Boca, C. Z Best Wishes to The Class of 44 Mr. 'D Gayle Gamboa, C z Compliments of, Mr. A. Butcher G amboa, C z Best Wishes to The Class of '44 Mr. Mrs. P. Williams Gamboa, C. z. Compliments of Mr. George Nedrick La Boca, C. Z Best Wishes to The Class of 'M Miss Urlga Hardy Brookly n New York U.s.A. 'Compliments of. Mr. Felix McKay P anama, R. P Best Wishes to The Class of '44 Mr. Donald Hinds Panama, R. P

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Compliments of FOTO Avon Wason-Prescott-Cadet INDIVIDUALIZED PORTRAITS Portraits in which you live Our Customers Mus t b e Satisfied Red Tank Clubhouse Compliments of CLUB CHEVALIER K. EVANS C. MORRIS D. TUDOR M FAWCETT G ,BRATHWAITE I. DOWLIN C. ;McSWEEN La Boca, C Z. Compliments of THE TROPICAL BOYS, JR. Social and Sporting Club Alfonso Sampson I(ennc: h Collins Cecil Ford Reginald Lawrence Cleveland Smith Reginald Matthews La Boca, C Z Best Wishes to Thc Class of '44 CLUB MAZDA Red Tank, C Z. Compliments of. THE RED CAMERA CLUB R e d Tank, C Z. Best Wishes to The Class of '44 Mr. S. J. Simpson Panama, R. P

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THE THREE ZEROS Have you ever heard of the Zero Family? Why, everybody in Normal is well a cquainted with them We meet very often in exami nations, tests, and quizzes This family of zeros consist of the Black Zero, the Red Zero, and the Certificated Zero. Whenever the Black Zero (which is the least dangerous of them all) appears on your record after an exam, test, or quiz it indicates an excused absence--this may mean either that you were out substi tuting, that you were too ill to attend, or that you were unavoidably occupied with some serious domestic trouble At any rate, this zero may be obliterated, only by taking a make-up test (which may result in your getting an ugly two or three-figure score, or a bea-u-ti-ful, charm ing Red Zero). Of the three zeros, the Red is the moot genuine. It is unlike the other two in that it is seldom ever subjected to falsehoods, and for this reason is written with a firm hand, in a bright, bold color As the object of testing is to show just what was gained from a lesson, this zero may be said to be the most helpful, for it frankly and earnestly tells one that he has not learned. However, it is like the other mem bers of the family in that it does not lift your grade any, but helps to mar your record the more, and arrests attention with its conspicuous color instead At this climax, I introduce our dread arch-enemy-the Certificated Zero According to the requirements for receiving this super-imposing cipher, you are commanded to postpone any unforeseen ailment that may conflict with the date announced for an examination. To go against the requirements is such unpardonable sin, that should you fail to comply, your record is most gracefully adorned with an incom parably pulChritudinous zero In addition to this generous offer, you must present on your return an authentic certificate of health signed by a duly authorized physician Once this certificate is in the hands of the authorities you need not worry about make-up tests or grades; you may relax patting yourself On the shoulder as the proud recipient of a Certificated Zero. Eduardo Dogue --
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Best Wishes to Best Wishes to 'The Class of '44 The Class of '44 Miss I. Baker Mr. k Mrs. E. rait, Jr. La Boca, C Z. Panama, R P Compliments of Compliments of Mr. George Kirton Mr. Warren Sealey Gatun, C. Z L a Boca. C. Z Best Wishes Best Wishes to The Class of '44 'l'he Class of '44 Mr. & Mrs. E. C. Graham Mr. and Mrs. & Family R. C. Edwards Red Tank. C. Z Panama, R P Compliments of Compliments of Mr. Selvin Clement Mr. S. Grannum Red Tank. C Z. La Boca. C Z Best Wishes to Best Wishes to The Class of '44 The Class of '44 Mr. Lorenzo J. Forde Mr. & Mrs. J. James Panama, R. P La Boca, C Z. Compliments of Compliments of Mr. & Mrs. Mr. E. M. Morris .I. A. Carrasco Rio Abajo. R. P Chiva Chiva, C. Z.

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Compliments of St. Peter's Girls Friendly Society La Boca, C Z. Best Wishes to The Class of '44 Miss Sylvia Dedier Panama, R. P Compliments of Mr. & Mrs. S. E. McIntosh Rio Abajo, R. P. Best Wishes to The Class of '44 Mr. Mrs. George Lewis Silver City, C. Z Compliments of Mr. Mrs. Gordon Smith La Boca, C. Z Best Wishes to The Class of 44 Mrs. Herbert A. Soley Panama, R. P Compliments of Mr. Mrs. R. T Brownie Pueblo Nuevo, R. P Bes t Wishes to The Class of '44 Mr. }( Mrs. J. O. Laurie G atun, C z Compliments of Mr. E. Butcher Gamboa, C Z. Best Wishes to The Class of '44 Mr. Mrs.E. Kelley Red Tank, C Z. Compliments of Mr. Mrs. V. Hunter Gatun, C. z Best Wishes to The Class of '44 Mr. H. Spencer Gamboa, C Z. -

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Dogue and ''Chokee'' were sitting on the rail of the ferry landing. "Choket" toppled over and fell inca the water. Dogue, an adept swim mer, without hesitation, plunged inco the water after "Chokee The crowd gathered around in suspense as Dogue bobbed and weav
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It is th, e sincere hope of, the Meadowbrook Litepary Soeiety each member of the La Boca Normal Training School, Class of will meet with unqualIfied succe, ss in whatever vocation he may choose. We wish you the very 'best of luck. MEADOWBROOK 'lITERARY SOCI'ETY SI'LVER CrTY CAN AL ZONE

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