Transcripts of Letters to Burton Bellamy

A Guide to the Bellamy Family Papers ( Related URL )
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Material Information

Title:
Transcripts of Letters to Burton Bellamy
Series Title:
Bellamy Family Papers (1825-1901)
Added title page title:
Bellamys of territorial Florida
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Language:
English
Creator:
Mary Walker, March 11, 2010 ( Transcriber )
Creation Date:
1877, 1882, 1883
Physical Location:
Box: Box 1

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Women pioneers -- History -- Correspondence -- Florida -- 19th century   ( lcsh )
Plantation life -- Florida   ( lcsh )
History -- Jefferson County (Fla.) -- 19th century   ( lcsh )
History -- Florida -- 19th century   ( lcsh )
Florida -- 12000   ( ceeus )
Territorial Florida, 1821-1845   ( fhp )
Ante-Bellum Florida, 1845-1861   ( fhp )
Civil War in Florida, 1861-1865   ( fhp )
Economics and Society: Post-Civil War Florida, 1865-1913 -- Reconstruction Era, 1865-1877   ( fhp )
Economics and Society: Post-Civil War Florida, 1865-1913 -- Business, Agriculture, and Tourism, 1878-1897   ( fhp )
Genre:
Transcript

Notes

Summary:
The Bellamy Papers contain correspondence between members of the Bellamy family and their acquaintances, spanning the years 1825-1894. These letters are personal in nature, consisting mostly of family members and friends corresponding with one another over personal matters. The major correspondents are Burton William Bellamy and his mother, Eliza A. Bellamy. Eliza's second husband was William J. Bailey, and the collection contains correspondence relating to the Bailey family, also of Jefferson County.
Summary:
Of particular interest is Burton Bellamy's "Paper on Slavery" (1849). This piece, written from the eyes of a southern man studying at Yale, defends the institution and maintenance of American slavery as the South's unalienable right as derived from the Constitution of the United States. This was the prevailing argument during this time, and thus reflects the greater socio-political climate of the slave-holding section of the nation. In 2008, Mary Walker, a Bellamy descendant, donated additional family letters, which now comprise about half the collection. These letters were written to Burton Bellamy by his mother, his stepfather, his sisters, other relatives and friends. A few of the letters were written to his sisters. Walker's transcriptions of the Bellamy Family Papers are available on CD in the collection.
Content Advice:
Bellamys of Territorial Florida, by Eleanor Hortense Grenelle, 1953; housed in the Department of Special and Area Studies Collections at the University of Florida Libraries; refer to this title for a history of the Bellamy-Bailey family.
Biographical:
Bellamy family of Jefferson County, Florida. The genealogy of this family is as follows: John Bellamy, Civil Engineer, and early Florida pioneer, 1776-1845; Abram Bellamy, his son, plantation owner, 1800-1839; and the children of Abram and Eliza Williams, Sarah, Burton William, Josephine, and Victoria. Eliza's second husband was William J. Bailey of Jefferson County, Florida, with children Burton Bellamy Bailey, William Bailey and Abram Bailey.
Biographical:
Burton William Bellamy, 1830-1891, attended Yale University between 1849 and 1851. He subsequently became a planter on the Aucilla River.
General Note:
Originally derived from archival-level ALEPH record 028037248 ( OCLC: 48838424 )
Funding:
Funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) as part of the Pioneer Days in Florida Project

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History, Special Collections
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
028037248
System ID:
AA00017204:00010


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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) LETTERS TO BURTON Produced by Mary Walker, 2009 2010, Oak Hammock; copy provided to the P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History, March 11, 2010 The letters in this collection were written to Burton Bellamy, a student at Yale before the Civil War. They were written by his mother, his stepfather, his sisters, other relatives and friends. A few of the letters were written to his sisters. They are wonderful sources of information about this family and about life on a southern plantation during this time. Whi Madison were more like the adjoining Georgia counties than they were like the rest of the state. Here, plantations were large and cotton was king. These letters tell about several prominent families who were among the earliest settlers in Jefferson County and about families who arrived in Florida while it was still a British colony. To make the letters easier to understand a brief biography of each of these families f ollows below. The Williams Samuel Williams, a native of North Carolina, remained loyal to King George III during the North Carolina, he fled to the British Colony of East Florida. He continued the fight against the Colonists as a captain in the East Florida Rangers. At the same time his son Henry Williams and several of his other sons also fled from North Carolina. Instead of going to the British Colony of Fl orida, Henry and his family moved to the Ceded Lands of Georgia, the sparsely settled western part of state recently acquired from Indian tribes. Henry continued the fight against the Colonists in all of the important battles in the Southern Campaign of th e Revolutionary War. When the British were defeated, the lives of Loyalist living in the former colonies were endangered, so Henry like most other Loyalists left. He went first to East Florida planning to continue his life there as an Englishman, but the T reaty of Paris returned Florida to Spain. When this happened, many Loyalist families left for England or for other British colonies. Samuel Williams went to England with the former Royal Governor of East Florida, Patrick Toyn. Samuel died shortly after his ship reached Portsmouth. Henry, his sons Samuel, Wilson, and Burton, and his brother William moved to the Bahamas. Henry, Samuel and Burton received grants for land on Watling Island (now San Salvador Island). In addition, Samuel received a small grant on Great Exuma. Henry and Burton never returned to America, but Samuel returned to East Florida. He received a grant from the Spanish government for land on the Halifax River at the present day site of sugar cane. In 1805, Samuel Williams married Ana Maria Hill in St. Augustine. She was the daughter of Theophilus Hill and Theresa Thomas, who were early settlers in East Florida. They were living there as early as 1 784, and unlike many others who came to Florida at this time, they did not

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) leave when the British left. Although they were formerly Protestants, the entire family was baptized in the Catholic Church. Samuel and Ana Maria had three sons, William Henry, Sa muel Hill, and John Theophilus and one daughter, Eliza Ann. Some family tradition tells that Eliza Ann was born in England or in May 21, 1807, and baptized in St. Augustine on June 30, 1807. Her God parents were Jose Samuel Williams died in 1811, and two years later his widow married General Joseph Hernandez. Ana Maria and General Hernandez may have had as many as ten children. One source names the following children: Ana Eduardo Teresa (Anita), Jose Mariano Tomas, Elena Rupina (Ellen), Maria Josepha, Fernando Martine, Martin Eduardo, Lucia Catalina (Louisa), Jose Mariano, John Gaspar, and Dorothea Frederic a Ignacio. The Williams children and the Hernandez children grew up together and remained closely connected to each other all their stepsisters and stepbrothers. A na Maria Hernandez died in St. Augustine in 1849. She was buried in the old City Cemetery on St. George Street. she and her three brothers were sent to Englan d for their education. Supposedly, Eliza Ann went to Lyndhurst, England, and loved it so much that in later years she named her home in Jefferson that they joined hi s father and mother and his brothers and sisters in Jefferson County, Florida. The Bellamys The Bellamy family, early settlers in Jefferson County, Florida, were descendents of John Bellamy [Bellame, Belamee] and his wife, Elizabeth Jordan, who were in t he Colony of South Carolina by 1750. Their sons, John, Jr. and Abraham, were born there John, Jr. in 1750, and Abraham in 1752. Some evidence shows that John and Elizabeth had other children, but none seemed to be documented at this time. [There is also some evidence, but no real documentation, that this John Bellamy was a son of the John Bellamy who left London, and went first to Barbados and from there to Charleston with other English families about 1655.] By the time the 1790 Census was taken John Bell amy, John, Jr., and Abraham were living in St. Georges Parish, Georgetown, South Carolina. John Bellamy, Jr., the oldest son of John and Elizabeth Jordan Bellamy, remained in South Carolina all of his life. He married twice and had at least five children, Abraham, Mary, Susannah, John Dillard, and Marsden. John Dillard Bellamy was a prominent physician, wealthy planter and businessman. Although he was active in politics, he never could be persuaded to run for public office. His brother, Marsden, served as an assistant paymaster on the CSS Richmond and in the 3 rd North Carolina Cavalry. After the Civil War ended, he became a prominent attorney in Wilmington, South Carolina.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) is grandfather, Abraham Jordan. Before 1776, he married Claramond [surname unknown]. He was a soldier in the American Revolution, possibly serving under General Francis Marion. He also served under Andrew Jackson in the Spanish War. According to the Sons o f the American Florida in 1828. He was buried a few miles northeast of the Jefferson County Courthouse. orn about 1776. He and his wife Margaret Bell were the parents of at least six children: Abram, William, Elizabeth Mary, Sarah, Mary [Maria] Theresa, and Bethel. There was possibly a seventh child, Lydia. Their oldest son, Abram, married Eliza Ann Williams ; William married Emmala Simkins; Elizabeth Mary married General William Bailey; Sarah married Colonel Daniel Burch; Mary Theresa married Colonel Sarah and Mary Th eresa died soon after their marriages. Bethel probably died in the Second Seminole War while serving in the militia under his brother in Militia Muster Rolls: Seminole Indian Wars, Florida Department of Military Affairs State Arsenal St. Francis Barracks, St. Augustine, Florida. Muster Roll of Brigadier General Leigh Sept. 1836 at Tallahassee, Fla. by Leigh Read, Brig. Gen'l, 1st Briga de, Fla. Militia from 10th Sept. 1836 to the 16th Nov. 1836. REMARKS: Dead Appointed from the ranks by the By 1823, John Bellamy and his oldest son Abram were in Duval County, Florida. That year John ser ved as the foreman on the first Grand Jury and as the clerk of the court, he signed the first marriage license issued in the county. He purchased land there from a John Brady in January 1823, and in 1824, he was one of the commissioners responsible for lay ing out the town of Jacksonville. That same year Congress appointed him the contractor to build the eastern half of the Federal road that would join St. Augustine and Pensacola. He was to build the part of the e Ochlocknee River in Leon County. For this, he was to be paid $20,000, but instead of receiving cash, he received land. Bellamy Road was completed in 1826. About this time he moved his family to the part of Leon County that would become Jefferson County. Abram Bellamy was educated at the academy of Dr. Waddel in Wilmington, South Carolina. He studied law first under Joseph Alston, a former governor of South Carolina, and then in the law office of Mr. Simmons in Charleston. He was admitted to the Bar in Ch arleston in 1821. The next year, he joined his father in Duval County, Florida. According to the Florida historian and writer, Frederick Davis, he was the first lawyer in Jacksonville. He built a small office on some land owned by his father, and here, he drew up most of the legal papers for the citizens of that area. By 1825, he was practicing law in St. Augustine, and in January 1826, he married Eliza Ann Williams, the daughter of Samuel Williams and Ana Maria Hill. At the time of their marriage, Eliza An About 1827, Eliza Ann and Abram Bellamy joined his family in Jefferson County, Florida. Sometime after their move, they built a large home on their plantation, Nacoosa. Abram and E

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) was three years old. He was followed by Sarah, born in 1828; Burton, born in 1830; Anita, born in 1832; Josephine, born in 1835; and the twins Theodosia and Victoria were born in 1838. and her husband, General William Bailey, had a very close relationship with Abram and his family. They seemed to visit each other often. In the letters written to Burton Bellamy while he was a student at Yale, there are many references to these relatives, and there are letters from Margaret, Emmala and William. Yes, William was a daughter! She was born shortly before her father died, and because they had no sons, they named the new baby girl William. When the Second Seminole war began in 1835, Abraham Bellamy was one of the captains in the militia that was r aised in Jefferson and several other Middle Florida counties to attack the Indians near the Withlacoochee River. He and others were ambushed near the Suwannee River, but his company managed to drive the attackers away without serious losses before marching to relieve the survivors of another company who were trapped in a blockhouse close to the Withlacoochee River. In November 1835, Abram Bellamy fought a duel with Everett White, who was also a citizen of Jefferson County. The real reason for the duel is not clear, but it probably had something to do with their different political beliefs. The duel took place somewhere in a field near the Florida Georgia border. Abram was badly wounded, but he lived; however, Everett was so badly wounded that he died w ithin several days. Because dueling was illegal in Florida at that time, Abram, his brothers, Bethel and William, and others who witnessed the duel were arrested, but the charges against them were dropped. Abram Bellamy was very active in the politics of the Territory of Florida. In 1823, his father was a member of the Territorial Legislative Council, and Abram became a member in 1824. He became the clerk in 1827 and the president in 1831. In 1838, the Territorial Council passed an act calling for the elec tion of delegates to attend a Constitutional Convention in St. Joseph, Florida [a city that no longer exists]. Abram Bellamy was one of the four elected to represent Jefferson County. When the Convention convened in December 1838, he chaired the committee on the preamble and bill of rights. This was the last time Abram Bellamy was involved in politics, because he died in 1839. Later, his son Burton and several of his sons in law followed his example and were very active in politics in Jefferson County. A bram wrote his will in November 1835, probably just before he fought the duel with White. In the will he wrote that he had made arrangements for the sale of Nacoosa and for the division of best education of which they are twins, Victoria and Theodosia, because they had not been born at this time. At a later date, William John Bailey, their step father, had the will broken so that the twins would receive their fair share. The diary of Eliza Ann Bailey, given to her by her second husband, William John Bailey, as a birthday present in 1846, shows that Abram Bellamy died August 15, 1839; but a cl ipping from a

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Tallahassee newspaper tells that when Abram Bellamy died, the members of the Bar of Middle the feelings of the Bar for the loss sustained by the de cease of their late brother, Col. Abram death, Eliza Ann probably moved to Macon, Georgia, so that her children could have the advantages of living in a city. Fami ly tradition tells that she married Colonel William John Bailey in Macon, Georgia, but there is no proof of this. Their marriage license was issued in Jefferson County in 1844. The Baileys The exact year that the Bailey family settled in East Florida is difficult to document, but it is known that John Bailey married Elizabeth [Ysabel] Rain [Rains, Rein] about 1783. She was the daughter of Joseph Rain, a Loyalist, who came to the British Colony of East Florida soon after the end of the American Revolution was probably his second marriage. He was about sixteen years older than she was, and he probably had a son, David, who was about fourteen at the time of their marriage. Some records show that David was his brother, but copies of some original Spanish records of the time show Why John Bailey came to East Florida is not known at this time. Although he settled in an area where other Loyalist lived, there is no documentation sh owing that he was a Loyalist. At a later date, the Spanish East Florida government began urging Americans to move to the area north of time In 1789, the rur al residents of the area in which John Bailey and Joseph Rain lived were ordered to gather at the Bailey home to take part in a census that the Spanish government was ty three years old; his wife was twenty seven. It showed that they had a son [the name was torn, but other records show this was John, Jr.] age 8*; a daughter Mary, age 5. It showed that he was a Protestant, how many slaves and how much livestock he owned. The same census showed that David Bailey was married and living on the Nassau River. He was twenty one, and his wife [Elizabeth Lang] was sixteen. He was a Protestant, owned some livestock, but no slaves. In 1790, John and Elizabeth had another son, Wi lliam. The three children, six* year old Juan Bealy, five year old Maria Bealy and one month old Guillermo Bealy were baptized by Father Thomas Hassett on May 6, 1790. The same year both John and David Bailey took the Oath of Allegiance to the Spanish King Spanish record, but the 1789 census record was a transcription]. in law, Richard Lang, were members of the tw area in 1793. On May 9 th of that same year, Father Thomas Hassett baptized five months old Zachariah Bailey, the fourth child of Elizabeth and John Bailey. Four days later, Father Hassett baptized John and David Bailey, the sons of David and Elizabeth Lang Bailey. Although John

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) and Elizabeth had two more children, Margaret and Winifred, there are no records of their baptisms in the Catholic Church. They were probably born after John Bailey and his family had November 2, 1798, John Bailey became a naturalized citizen of the United States. He signed an Oath of Allegiance in Camden County, stating the he had lived five ye ars in the United States and at least one year in Georgia. He promised to support the Constitution of the United States and renounce all allegiance to any foreign state or sovereignty whatever particularly to the King of Spain. John Bailey, Jr., the olde st son of John and Elizabeth Bailey, married Margaret Mickler in Camden County, and on October 2, 1807, their only child, William John Bailey, was born. He was only three when his father died, and shortly after that his mother married William Seals. Margar et Mickler Seals lived to be eighty years old. She wrote interesting letters to her John Bailey, died in 1821, he named his children William, Zachariah, Mary, Winifr ed and Margaret and his grandson John William Bailey [he later changed his name to William John Bailey] in his will. After this time, nothing more is known about his daughter Mary Bailey. About 1821, William Bailey, his wife Elizabeth Mary Bellamy, Marg aret Bailey and her husband James Scott, Winifred Bailey and her husband William Hollingsworth, Zachariah Bailey and their mother, Elizabeth Bailey, moved from Camden County to Jefferson County, Florida. Although Elizabeth Bailey was over sixty, she was ab le to live on her own farm. Zachariah married Elizabeth Mathers shortly after he arrived in Jefferson County. Later, William John Bailey joined his aunts and uncles there. William Bailey acquired a tremendous amount of land not only in Jefferson County b ut in other areas of Florida as well. At one time he was known as the richest man in Florida because of the fortune he made as a land speculator, a planter and a banker. He owned a gristmill where he ground his own grain and that of others in the area. Aft er his arrival from Camden County, he built his home, the Cedars, about fifteen miles northeast of Monticello. His main crop was cotton, but he also experimented with growing sugar cane. He and Elizabeth Mary had a large family including: John, Margaret, S arah, William, Jr., Theresa, Mary, Martha, Abram Zachariah most of the wealthy planters in the area, sent all of his children away to school. In 1847, he purchased the Union Bank in Tallahassee, and the following year he ran unsuccessfully as the Democratic candidate for governor. Shortly after Elizabeth Mary died in 1849, W illiam married Eliza Branch Read (She was the widow of General Leigh Read, who married first Theresa 1854, she and William had a son whom they named Edward. Eliza d ied when Edward was about three, so he went to live with his stepsister Sarah Bailey and her husband, Thompson B. Lamar. In 1860, William married Grace Ware. When William died in 1867, he was buried in the Bellamy Family cemetery with his first wife Elizab suffered two tragedies in the Civil War first, William, Jr. was wounded and captured at Gettysburg and subsequently died in a Union prison; and second, his son in law Thompson

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) son Abram Zachariah served in the same regiment as his brother William, Jr., but he survived the war. Zachariah and Eliza Mathers Bailey had a plantation southwest of Monticello. They had two daughter, Cornelia and Julia Bailey, and two sons, William Za chariah and John T. Bailey. Zachariah died before 1860, but Eliza kept the farm intact. At the time of the 1880 census, she was seventy seven years old and still living on the farm. Her daughter Cornelia never married and neither did her son William Zachar iah. Julia married W.H. Mathews of Madison County Bailey was about twenty two years old when the Civil War began. He does not appear in Florida at the time of the might have been killed in the Civil War. Margaret Bailey and her husband James Scott had a plantation about two miles northeast of Monticello. In 1837, Indians attacked their pl antation and killed one of their visitors. James Scott practiced law in Monticello until he died in the1850s. After his death, Margaret had her house cousin William B ailey, Jr. were good friends of Burton Bellamy. While the three of them were away at school, the two Williams often wrote very entertaining letters to Burton. After studying law, William Scott returned home to practice with his father. During the Civil War he served in the 5 th Florida Infantry. Many of his friends in the 5 th Florida Infantry, including William Bailey, Jr., were killed. After he resumed his law practice, he married Kate Dilworth Bird, the widow of younger brother Robert, a very successful physician, practiced medicine in Monticello until his death. Winifred Bailey and her husband, William Hollingsworth, were still living in Jefferson County at the time of the 1850 Census, but they do not appear aft er that. They had at least one child, Eliza, who married Reverend Edward A. Willie, a Methodist minister from Georgia. William John Bailey moved to Jefferson County sometime before 20 May 1839. On this day, he mustered as captain of a company of mounted militia to serve four months in the Second Seminole War. His company was to find and fight the Seminoles in Mid and East Florida. He was mustered out on 28 September 1839. Because he only mustered in for a period of three or four months at a time, he was o ut one day and back in the next until what seems to be his final muster out as a colonel commanding the regiment on 17 April 1841. The 1840 Census of Jefferson County shows William J. Bailey living with a large group of young men in what was probably a bar racks. He was described as a fine horseman and a skilled hunter and woodsman. Most of his fellow cavalrymen preferred using a sword in combat, but he discarded his sword ice. Colonel expeditions. William John Bailey married Eliza Ann Bellamy, the widow of Abram Bellamy, on January 23, 1844. Family tradition tells that they lived tempora rily in Greeneville, Florida, until he purchased a large farm northeast of Monticello. By 1847, Colonel Bailey, Eliza Ann, the six Bellamy children and the two Bailey daughters were living in an existing house on this farm that they

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) named Lyndhurst. Their original plan was to remodel this house, but soon they decided to live there while they built a beautiful home large enough for the six Bellamy children, the two Bailey daughters, Virginia Hernandez, and Christine Independence [born on the 4 th of July1846! ], and the two Bailey sons, William John, Jr. [known as Jacky] and Burton Bellamy [named for his stepbrother], who soon followed. Not only was this house large enough for the family [and at times a tutor or governess], but also for the many relatives and f riends who often visited there. Probably there were never ten children actually living at Lyndhurst at the same time, because Burton went to Yale to complete his education, and Sarah and Anita went to Miss Havens, a finishing school for girls in New York. After finishing school Sarah Bellamy married J. Caraway Smith in 1849. The other daughters went away to school; then, they married and moved into their own homes. Anita married James Paul and went to live in New York and London; Josephine married Dr. John W. Eppes; and Theodosia married Thomas Jefferson Eppes. After they married, Sarah, Josephine and Theodosia remained in Florida. Victoria Bellamy did not marry until later, and Burton never married. Virginia Bailey was the first of the Bailey children to ma rry. She was only eighteen when she married Captain James Tucker in November 1864. Life was pleasant for the Baileys and their friends and relatives living in and around Monticello. They visited one another frequently, attended picnics, 4 th of July celebr ations in Monticello and balls in Tallahassee. They traveled often. Groups of friends and family members would travel to escape the many illnesses that arrived in Fl orida at that time of the year. New York City seemed to be the place of choice. fought in some of fiercest battles of the war. Even sixteen year old Jacky enlis ted at Tallahassee Battle of Natural Bridge near St. Marks, Florida. General Bailey is said to have taken part in that battle also. Although this was a small bat tle, it was important to the state, because the Union defeat saved Tallahassee from capture. After the war was over, Jacky was discharged at any unit, but there is a record of his taking the Confederate Amnesty Oath. abundant wealth had vanished, Colonel Bailey managed to send Jacky to Virginia Military Institute and Burton to a school in Baltimore. Letters to Jacky from his parents and sisters are very gloomy. Each letter urges him to study hard. Unfortunately Colonel Bailey was er wrote him that he must leave VMI and return to Lyndhurst to work on the plantation. Colonel Bailey was also taking Burton out of his school for a different reason. Since diseases were rampant in Florida in the summertime, he did not want Jacky to come h ome until fall. The brothers were to travel to Sewanee, Tennessee, and enroll in the University of the South for the summer term. At the end of the term Jacky would return home, but Burton would continue his education there. A family tradition tells that J acky graduated from VMI, and that Robert E. Lee was his math teacher. Neither is true. Sometime after Jacky left VMI, he wrote in a letter that he

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) helped her cross College (later named Washington & Lee) not VMI. Jacky had more on his mind than books while he was in Sewanee that summer. He met Miss Clara Evans, a young girl from Russellv ille, Kentucky, who was there visiting friends. Not long after he returned to Lyndhurst, he wrote to her father, Selby K. Evans, asking his permission to marry his daughter. Mr. Evans agreed, and a year later on November 17, 1870, Clara and Jacky were marr ied in Russellville. Eliza Ann Williams Bailey, the beloved mother of all her Bellamy and Bailey children, died at for home work, while extending to them all the November 7, 1871. Eliza A nn, usually called Anita, was followed over a period of time by her siblings, Selby Evans, Rebecca Evans, and William John. Rebecca and Selby were named for Colonel William John Bailey died at Lyndhurst on December 17, 1872. Officially, he died from pneumonia, but letters written about this time show that he had no will to live after the death of hearted, and generous in disposition, just and upright in all his actions, scorning measu res in any shade, and always bold in defense of virtue. His hearty welcome and genial smile will long be remembered by those who visited his Clara Evans Bailey hat ed living at Lyndhurst. She had grown up in Russellville, Kentucky, a small town with good schools, a college, churches and many other advantages. When Jacky inherited Lyndhurst, she was determined not to live there. Leaving his sister Virginia and her hus band Captain James Tucker in charge of the plantation, Jacky and his family moved to a farm Lyndhurst. Eventually, they compromised by selling Lyndhurst to his other brother in law, John B. Mays, and moving south to Hernando County. During the Seminole War, Colonel Bailey is said to have captured an elderly Indian who was suffering with rheumatism. He told Colonel Bailey about the Springs of the Great Spirit (Espiri tu Santo Springs) where he and his fellow Indians went to be cured of all their aches and pains. After the war was over, Colonel Bailey visited these magic springs and bought the land from the United States Government. When Jacky and his family moved to He rnando County, his sister Virginia Tucker and her family and their younger brother Bellamy moved with them. The Tuckers eventually settled at these springs in what is today called Safety Harbor. Virginia, her husband and her brother Bellamy are buried ther e in the yard of the Episcopal Church. Jacky and his family moved to the town of Brooksville about 1885. He was listed as a farmer and an orange grower in the Brooksville area in 1886. He remained there until sometime after 1891. That year, his oldest da ughter, Anita, married Thomas Theodore Weltch in the Episcopal Church. He probably was still living in Brooksville when the disastrous freeze struck Florida in

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 1894 1895. The first hard freeze arrived late in December of 1894. This was followed by an unusu ally warm January that caused the trees to put out new growth, and in early February, an even worse freeze occurred in Florida destroying all the citrus trees. After this, many growers moved further south. Those who remained worked hard to replant their gr oves only to be struck again in 1899 by another very severe freeze. By 1900, Jacky and his family had moved south to Wauchula in what was then DeSoto County. He, like many other growers, never recovered from the freezes. By 1910, he had stopped planting ci trus and had moved to the east coast. He and Clara settled in Titusville, and Jacky worked as a weatherman and a seafood broker. His two sons lived in Titusville, and his daughters, Anita and Rebecca, lived in Jacksonville. Jacky and Clara loved visiting w ith their grandchildren. 22, 1929, Jacky died in Titusville. He and Clara were buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Jacksonville where three generations of his family are buried. Virginia Bailey Tucker died in 1931, and the last surviving child of Eliza Ann and Colonel William John Bailey, Burton Bellamy Bailey, died in 1935. All of the Bellamy children and the Bailey children who had called Lyndhurst their home were g one. Sumter and Virginia Mays, the two unmarried children of Christine Bailey and John Mays, lived on there until 1964 when they sold it to Dr. and Mrs. Hopefully, it will remain standing another 160 years, and the families who occupy it now and in the future will treat it with as much care and love as the families who occupied it the first 160 years.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Descendants of Henry Samuel WILLIAMS Generation No. 1 1. H ENR Y S AMUEL 3 WILLIAMS (H ENRY 2 S AMUEL 1 ) 1 was born in North Carolina 2 and died March 1811 in St. Augustine, East Florida 3 He married A NA M ARIA HILL 4 12 August 1805 in St. Augustine, East Florida 5 daughter of T HEOPHILUS HILL and T HERESA THOMAS. She was b orn June 1787 in St. Augustine, on The North River Area, East Florida 6 and died 23 June 1849 in St. Augustine, East Florida 7 More About A NA M ARIA HILL: Burial: Old City Cemetery, St. George St., St. Augustine, FL 8 Children of H ENRY WILLIAMS and A NA HI LL are: i. W ILLIAM H ENRY 4 WILLIAMS 9 b. 06 May 1806. 2. ii. E LIZA A NN WILLIAMS b. 21 May 1807, St. Augustine, St. John's County, East Florida; d. 25 March 1871, Lyndhurst Plantation, Jefferson Co., Florida. iii. S AMUEL H ILL WILLIAMS 10 iv. J OHN T HEOPHI LUS WILLIAMS 11 Generation No. 2 2. E LIZA A NN 4 WILLIAMS (H ENRY S AMUEL 3 H ENRY 2 S AMUEL 1 ) 12 was born 21 May 1807 in St. Augustine, St. John's County, East Florida 13 and died 25 March 1871 in Lyndhurst Plantation, Jefferson Co., Florida 14 She married ( 1) A BRAM BELLAMY January 1826 in St. Augustine, Territory of Florida 15 son of J OHN BELLAMY. He was born in South Carolina 16 and died 15 August 1839 in Jefferson County, Territory of Florida 17 She married (2) C OL. W ILLIAM J OHN 3 BAILEY 23 January 1844 1 8 son of J OHN 2 BAILEY and M ARGARET MICKLER. He was born 02 October 1807 in St. Marys, Camden Co., Georgia 19 and died 17 December 1872 in Lyndhurst Plantation, Jefferson Co., Florida 20 More About E LIZA A NN WILLIAMS: Burial: Lyndhurst Plantation, Jeffer son Co., Florida 21 More About C OL. W ILLIAM J OHN BAILEY: Burial: Lyndhurst Plantation, Jefferson Co., Florida 21 Children of E LIZA WILLIAMS and A BRAM BELLAMY are: i. S AMUEL J UNIUS 5 BELLAMY, b. 28 November 1826 22 ; d. 13 September 1829, Jefferson County, T erritory of Florida 23 ii. S ARAH BELLAMY, b. 08 December 1828, Jefferson County, Territory of Florida 24 ; d. 01 June 1896 25 ; m. J OHN C ARAWAY SMITH 26 iii. B URTON W ILLIAMS BELLAMY, b. 26 November 1830, Jefferson County, Territory of Florida 27 ; d. 28 August 1891, Jefferson County, Florida 28 iv. B ELL A NITA BELLAMY, b. 09 January 1832, Jefferson County, Territory of Florida 29 ; m. J AMES PAUL 30 v. J OSEPHINE H ERNANDEZ BELLAMY, b. 13 May 1835, Jefferson County, Territory of Florida 31 ; d. March 1898 32 ; m. J EFF ERSON W ALES EPPES; d. 02 October 1906 33 vi. T HEODOSIA B URR BELLAMY, b. 17 March 1838, Jefferson County, Territory of Florida 34 ; d. 11 August 1872 35 ; m. T HOMAS J EFFERSON EPPES. vii. V ICTORIA BELLAMY, b. 17 March 1838, Jefferson County, Territory of Flori da 36 ; d. 18 April 1891 37 ; m. E DWARD N ICHOLAS PILLOT. Children of E LIZA WILLIAMS and W ILLIAM BAILEY are: viii. V IRGINIA H ERNANDEZ 5 BAILEY, b. 12 October 1844 38 ; d. 1931, Safety Harbor, Florida; m. J AMES F TUCKER, 10 November 1864, Jefferson Co., Florid a; d. 09 July 1913, Safety Harbor, Florida. More About V IRGINIA H ERNANDEZ BAILEY: Burial: Episcopal Church yard, Safety Harbor, Florida

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) More About J AMES F TUCKER: Burial: Episcopal Church yard, Safety Harbor, Florida ix. I NDEPENDENCE C HRISTINE BAILEY, b. 04 July 1846 39 ; d. 1925; m. J OHN B APTIST MAYS. x. W ILLIAM J OHN BAILEY J R. b. 01 November 1849, Lyndhurst Plantation, Jefferson Co., Florida 40 ; d. 22 January 1929, Titusville, Florida 41 ; m. C LARA T HOMAS EVANS 42 17 November 1870, Russellville, Logan Co., Kentucky 43 ; b. 13 January 1851, Scottsville, Allen Co., Kentucky 44 ; d. 02 February 1923, Titusville, Florida 45 More About W ILLIAM J OHN BAILEY, J R. : Burial: Lot 5, Evergreen Cemetery, Jacksonville, Florida More About C LARA T HOMAS EVANS: Burial: Lo t 5, Evergreen Cemetery, Jacksonville, Florida xi. B URTON B ELLAMY BAILEY, b. 03 July 1852 46 ; d. 09 January 1935, Safety Harbor, Florida. More About B URTON B ELLAMY BAILEY: Burial: Episcopal Church yard, Safety Harbor, Florida Endnotes 1. Libro segundo de Matrimonios de Blancos del Ano de 1802 [Marriages 1802 1832, II.] from files of St. Augustine Historical Sociey, FL.This contains the marriage record of Henry Samuel WILLIAMS and Anna Maria HILL in a Catholic Church in St. Augustine, FL. It is signed by the Catholic Priest, Miguel CROSBY. This names his parents as Henry WILLIAMS and Margarita BRUTON [possibly BURTON] 2. Libro segundo de Matrimonios de Blancos del Ano de 1802 [Marriages 1802 1832, II.] from files of St. Augustine Historical Sociey, F L, "...Don Henry Samuel WILLIAMS, bachelor, native of North Carolina, legitimate son of Don Henry and Margareta BRUTON [possibly BURTON] natives of said Carolina, and Dona Anna Maria HILL, spinster, native of this province, legitimate daughter of Don Theo filus and Dona Teresa THOMAS, natives of South Carolina..." [photocopy of original and a translation] 3. Ianthe B. Hebel, '', Abstract of Will of Samuel WILLIAMS, "The Journal of the Halifax Historical Society," Vol. I, No. 1, Daytona Beach, FL, pp. 26 2 7, "Bernardino SANCHEZ asks opening of will of Samuel WILLIAMS, 15 March 1811." 4. Libro segundo de Matrimonios de Blancos del Ano de 1802 [Marriages 1802 1832, II.] from files of St. Augustine Historical Sociey, FL Record # 54, This contains the marri age record of Henry Samuel WILLIAMS and Anna Maria HILL in a Catholic Church in St. Augustine, FL. It is signed by the Catholic Priest, Miguel CROSBY. 5. Libro segundo de Matrimonios de Blancos del Ano de 1802 [Marriages 1802 1832, II.] from files of St Augustine Historical Sociey, FL, WILLIAMS, Henry Samuel, bachelor, native of North Carolina, legitimate son of Henry WILLIAMS and Margarita BRUTON [possibly BURTON], natives of said Carolina, and Ana Maria HILL, spinster, native of this province, l egitimate daughter of Theofilo HILL and Teresa THOMAS, natives of South Carolina..." Fr. Miguel CROSBY, August 12, 1805." 6. Translation and Transcription of Church Archives of Florida; Roman Catholic Records, St. Augustine Parish White Baptisms 1784 179 2, # 7943 State Library Board, Tallahassee, FL, from St. Augustine Historical Society p. 34, 1787, Entry 136, Anna HILL, twin, one month old, Baptized July 8, 1787... 7. Ianthe B. Hebel, Abstract of Will of Ann Maria Hill, 27 28, St. John's County Courtho use, St. Augustine Historical Society Library, Will dated: 14 Jan, 1814; recorded 7 July 1849. "Mrs. HERNANDEZ died in St. Augustine 23 June 1849." 8. John Patrick Mackenzie, "Old Spanish Cemetery," database online, www.rootsweb.com/~flstjohn/resources/in dex.html, "HERNANDEZ, Ann M. Birth Date: 1787, Birth Place: not listed, Death Date: June 23, 1849." 9. Ianthe B. Hebel, Abstract of will of Ann Maria Hill," "The Journal of the Halifax Historical Society" Vol. I, # 1 pp. 2 7 28, "I was married to Mr. S amuel WILLIAMS of St. Augustine. We had four children: William Henry, Eliza Ann, Samuel Hill and John Theophilus." 10. Ianthe B. Hebel, Abstract of Will of Ann Maria Hill," "The Journal of the Halifax Historical Society," Vol. I, # 1, pp 27 28, I wa s married to Mr. Samuel WILLIAMS of St. Augustine. We had four children: William Henry, Eliza Ann, Samuel Hill and John Theophilus. 11. Ianthe B. Hebel, Abstract of Will of Ann Maria Hill," "The Journal of the Halifax Historical Society," Vol. I, # 1, pp.27 28, I was married to Mr. Samuel WILLIAMS of St. Augustine. We had four children: William Henry, Eliza Ann, Samuel Hill and John Theophilus. 12. St. Augustine Parish White Marriages, Vol. II, 1803 1832, from the Files of the St. Augustine Historical Society, 251, 13. "Book III Cathedral Parish Baptismal Records 1800 1815" Translation by Earl Masters, St. Aug. Historical Soc. Library, Record # 467, WILLIAMS, Ana Ysabel, ...Born: May 21, 1807. Baptized: June 30, 1807."

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 14. "The Weekly Floridian," Tue sday, June 6, 1871, Obituary of Mrs. Eliza A. Bailey, "Departed this life at Lyndhurst, Jefferson County, Florida, on the 25th of March, 1871, Mrs. Eliza A. Bailey, consort of Col. W. J. Bailey.... 15. St. Augustine Parish White Marriages, Vol. II, 1803 1 832, from the Files of the St. Augustine Historical Society,, 251, Abram Bellamy and Eliza Ann Williams were married "Dia seiz de Enero de mil ocho veinte y seis" in St. Augustine, East Florida, possibly at the home of her stepfather, Don Joseph Hernandez. This record is in Spanish and is difficult to read. 16. St. Augustine Parish White Marriages, Vol. II, 1803 1832, from the Files of the St. Augustine Historical Society, 251, "Don Abraham Bellamy, national de la Carolina del Sud." 17. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, "Abram Bellamy died 15th August 1839." 18. Florida Marriages, 1822 1850. Ancestry.com database on line. 19. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, William J. Bailey born 2nd October, 1807" His obitua ry in the "Weekly Floridian" Tallahassee Fla., February 4, 1783, told that he was born in St. Mary's, Georgia. 20. "Weekly Floridian" Tallahassee Fla. February 4, 1783, "Died at Lyndhurst, in Jefferson County, Florida, on the 17th of December, 1782, Col. William J. Bailey, in his 66th..." 21. Photograph of the tombstones of Eliza Ann Bailey and Col. William John Bailey, Photograph taken by their great, great granddaughter, Mary Bartlum Walker, at the private cemetery at Lyndhurst Plantation, Jefferson Co unty, Florida, c. 2000. 22. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, "Samuel Junius Bellamy, born 28th November, 1826" 23. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, "Samuel Junius Bellamy died 13th September," Jefferson Count y, Florida. 24. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, "Sarah Bellamy born 8 December 1828" 25. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, "Sarah B. Smith died June 1, 1896." 26. Family Letters Written to Burton W. Bellamy, a student at Yale, 27. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, "Burton Williams Bellamy born 26th November 1830" 28. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, "Burton W. Bellamy died August 28, 1891." 29. A Copy of the Hol y Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, "Bell Anita Bellamy born 9th January 1832" 30. Family Letters Written to Burton W. Bellamy, a student at Yale,. 31. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, "Josephine Hernandez Bellamy born 13 May 18 35" 32. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, Josephine H. Eppes died March 1898. 33. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, "Dr. John W. Eppes died 2nd October 1906. Age 81 years & three months." 34. A Copy of the Hol y Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, "Theodosia Burr Bellamy born 13 May 1838" 35. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, "Theo B. Eppes died August 11, 1872." 36. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, "Victoria Bella my born 17 March 1838" 37. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, Victoria B. Pillot died April 18, 1891." 38. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey,, Virginia Hernandez Bailey born 12th October 1844. 39. A Copy of th e Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey,, "Independence Christine Bailey born 4th July 1846." 40. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey,, "William John Bailey, Jr. born 1st November 1849." 41. Office of Vital Statistics, Florida State Board of Health, Certified Copy Certificate of Death of William J. Bailey, File # 179, Date of Death 1 22 1929, in Titusville, Brevard County, Florida. 42. Will of S. K. EVANS, [connects Gen 4 and 5]. 43. Marriage Bond of WJB and CTE. 44. Certified Cop y of Certificate of Death #1379 for Clara Evans Bailey, Bureau of Vital Statistics, FL State Board of Health, Date of Birth: 13 Jan. 1851; Place of Birth: Scottsville, Kentucky. 45. Eulogy of Mrs. W. J. Bailey, "Star Advocate," Titusville, Florida, "Mrs. Clara Evans Bailey died last Friday evening, February 2." 46.A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey,, "Burton Bellamy Bailey born 3rd July 1852."

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Descendants of Gen. Jose HERNANDEZ Generation No. 1 1. G EN. J OSE 1 HERNANDEZ was born in Cuba, and died 08 June 1857 in Matanza, Cuba. He married (1) D OROTHEA F J 1 He married (2) A NA M ARIA HILL 2 25 February 1814 in St. Augustine, East Florida 3 daughter of T HEOPHILUS HILL and T HERESA T ERESA She was born June 1787 in St. Augustine, or The North River Area, East Florida 4 and died 23 June 1849 in St. Augustine, East Florida 5 More About G EN. J OSE HERNANDEZ: Burial: Junco Family Vault, San Carlos Cemetery, Cuba More About A NA M ARIA HILL: Burial: Old City Cemetery, St. George St., St. Au gustine, FL 6 Children of G EN. HERNANDEZ and A NA HILL are: i. A NA E DUARO T ERESA 2 HERNANDEZ, b. November 1814. ii. J OSE M ARIANO T OMAS HERNANDEZ, b. 1816. iii. E LLEN I R UPINA HERNANDEZ 7 b. 19 July 1817. iv. M ARIA J OSEPH HERNANDEZ 7 b. 03 September 181 9. v. F ERNANDO M ARTINE HERNANDEZ, b. 14 February 1821. vi. M ARTIN E DWARD HERNANDEZ 8 b. 08 June 1822. vii. L UCIA C ATALINA HERNANDEZ, b. 08 June 1823. viii. J OSE M ARIANO HERNANDEZ, b. 1825. ix. J OHN G ASPAR HERNANDEZ 9 b. Bet. 1825 1826. x. D OROTHEA F REDERICA I GNACIO HERNANDEZ 10 b. 22 February 1828. Endnotes 1. 1850 United States Federal Census, St. Augustine, St. Johns County, Florida, Joseph M. Hernandez, planter, born Florida; Dorothea F. J. Hernandez. 2. Libro segundo de Matrimonios de Bla ncos del Ano de 1802 [Marriages 1802 1832, II.] from files of St. Augustine Historical Sociey, FL Record # 54, This contains the marriage record of Henry Samuel WILLIAMS and Anna Maria HILL in a Catholic Church in St. Augustine, FL. It is signed by the Catholic Priest, Miguel CROSBY. 3. Cathedral of St. Augustine White Marriages, St. Augustine, Florida 1786 1923; From Files of the St. Augustine Historical Society. 4. Translation and Transcription of Church Archives of Florida; Roman Catholic Records St. Augustine Parish White Baptisms 1784 1792, # 7943 State Library Board, Tallahassee, FL, from St. Augustine Historical Society p. 34, 1787, Entry 136, Anna HILL, twin, one month old, Baptized July 8, 1787... 5. Ianthe B. Hebel, Abstract of Will of An n Maria Hill, 27 28, St. John's County Courthouse, St. Augustine Historical Society Library, Will dated: 14 Jan, 1814; recorded 7 July 1849. "Mrs. HERNANDEZ died in St. Augustine 23 June 1849." 6. John Patrick Mackenzie, "Old Spanish Cemetery," database o nline, www.rootsweb.com/~flstjohn/resources/index.html, "HERNANDEZ, Ann M. Birth Date: 1785, Birth Place: not listed, Death Date: June 23, 1849." 7. Ianthe B. Hebel, Abstract of Will of Ann Maria Hill," "The Journal of the Halifax Historical Society," Vol. I, # 1, This will lists Ellen I. Rupina as one of her children by her second husband, Joseph Hernandez 8. Ianthe B. Hebel, Abstract of Will of Ann Maria Hill," "The Journal of the Halifax Historical Society," Vol. I, # 1, thi s will lists Martin Edw ard as one of her children by her second husband, Joseph Hernandez 9. Ianthe B. Hebel, Abstract of Will of Ann Maria Hill," "The Journal of the Halifax Historical Society," Vol. I, # 1, Thi s will lists John Gaspar as one of her children by her second hu sband, Joseph Hernandez 10. Ianthe B. Hebel, Abstract of Will of Ann Maria Hill," "The Journal of the Halifax Historical Society," Vol. I, # 1, Th is will lists Martin Edward as one of her children by her second husband, Joseph Hernandez.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Descendants o f Abram BELLAMY Generation No. 1 1. A BRAM 2 BELLAMY (J OHN 1 ) was born in South Carolina 1 and died 15 August 1839 in Jefferson County, Territory of Florida 2 He married E LIZA A NN WILLIAMS 3 January 1826 in St. Augustine, Territory of Florida 4 daughter o f H ENRY WILLIAMS and A NA HILL. She was born 21 May 1807 in St. Augustine, St. John's County, East Florida 5 and died 25 March 1871 in Lyndhurst Plantation, Jefferson Co., Florida 6 More About E LIZA A NN WILLIAMS: Burial: Lyndhurst Plantation, Jefferson Co ., Florida 7 Children of A BRAM BELLAMY and E LIZA WILLIAMS are: i. S AMUEL J UNIUS 3 BELLAMY, b. 28 November 1826; d. 13 September 1829, Jefferson County, Territory of Florida 9 ii. S ARAH BELLAMY, b. 08 December 1828, Jefferson County, Territory of Florida 10 ; d. 01 June 1896 11 ; m. J OHN C ARRAWAY SMITH 12 iii. B URTON W ILLIAMS BELLAMY, b. 26 November 1830, Jefferson County, Territory of Florida 13 ; d. 28 August 1891, Jefferson County, Florida 14 iv. B ELL A NITA BELLAMY, b. 09 January 1832, Jefferson County, Te rritory of Florida 15 ; m. J AMES PAUL 16 v. J OSEPHINE H ERNANDEZ BELLAMY, b. 13 May 1835, Jefferson County, Territory of Florida 17 ; d. March 1898 18 ; m. J EFFERSON W ALES EPPES; d. 02 October 1906 19 vi. T HEODOSIA B URR BELLAMY, b. 17 March 1838, Jefferson Cou nty, Territory of Florida 20 ; d. 11 August 1872 21 ; m. T HOMAS J EFFERSON EPPES. vii. V ICTORIA BELLAMY, b. 17 March 1838, Jefferson County, Territory of Florida 22 ; d. 18 April 1891 23 ; m. E DWARD N ICHOLAS PILLOT. Endnotes 1. St. Augustine Parish White Marri ages, Vol. II, 1803 1832, from the Files of the St. Augustine Historical Society, 251, "Don Abraham Bellamy, national de la Carolina del Sud." 2. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, "Abram Bellamy died 15th August 1839." 3. St. August ine Parish White Marriages, Vol. II, 1803 1832, from the Files of the St. Augustine Historical Society, 251, 4. St. Augustine Parish White Marriages, Vol. II, 1803 1832, from the Files of the St. Augustine Historical Society, 251, Abram Bellamy and Eliza Ann Williams were married "Dia seiz de Enero de mil ocho veinte y seis" in St. Augustine, East Florida, possibly at the home of her stepfather, Don Joseph Hernandez. This record is in Spanish and is difficult to read. 5. "Book III Cathedral Parish Baptism al Records 1800 1815" Translation by Earl Masters, St. Aug. Historical Soc. Library, Record # 467, WILLIAMS, Ana Ysabel, ...Born: May 21, 1807. Baptized: June 30, 1807." 6. "The Weekly Floridian," Tuesday, June 6, 1871, Obituary of Mrs. Eliza A. Bailey, Departed this life at Lyndhurst, Jefferson County, Florida, on the 25th of March, 1871, Mrs. Eliza A. Bailey, consort of Col. W. J. Bailey.... 7. Photograph of the tombstones of Eliza Ann Bailey and Col. William John Bailey, Photograph taken by their gre at, great granddaughter, Mary Bartlum Walker, at the private cemetery at Lyndhurst Plantation, Jefferson County, Florida, c. 2000. 8. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, "Samuel Junius Bellamy, born 28th November, 1826" 9. A Copy of t he Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, "Samuel Junius Bellamy died 13th September," Jefferson County, Florida. 10. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, "Sarah Bellamy born 8 December 1828" 11. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging t o Eliza Ann Bailey, "Sarah B. Smith died June 1, 1896." 12. Family Letters Written to Burton W. Bellamy, a student at Yale, 13. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, "Burton Williams Bellamy born 26th November 1830" 14. A Copy of the H oly Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, "Burton W. Bellamy died August 28, 1891." 15. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, "Bell Anita Bellamy born 9th January 1832" 16. Family Letters Written to Burton W. Bellamy, a student at Yale. 17. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, "Josephine Hernandez Bellamy born 13 May 1835" 18. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, Josephine H. Eppes died March 1898. 19. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza An n Bailey, "Dr. John W. Eppes died 2nd October 1906. Age 81 years & three months." 20. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, "Theodosia Burr Bellamy born 13 May 1838" 21. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, "Theo B. E ppes died August 11, 1872." 22. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, "Victoria Bellamy born 17 March 1838"

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 23. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, Victoria B. Pillot died April 18, 1891."

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Descendants of William John BAILEY Generation No. 1 1. C OL. W ILLIAM J OHN 3 BAILEY (J OHN 2 J OHN 1 ) was born 02 October 1807 in St. Marys, Camden Co., Georgia 1 and died 17 December 1872 in Lyndhurst Plantation, Jefferson Co., Florida 2 He married E LIZA A NN WILLIAMS 3 23 January 1844 4 daughter of H ENRY WILLIAMS and A NA HILL. She was born 21 May 1807 in St. Augustine, St. John's County, East Florida 5 and died 25 March 1871 in Lyndhurst Plantation, Jefferson Co., Florida 6 More About C OL. W ILLIAM J OHN BAILEY: Burial: Lyndhurst Plantation, Jefferson Co., Florida 7 More About E LIZA A NN WILLIAMS: Burial: Lyndhurst Plantation, Jefferson Co., Florida 7 Children of W ILLIAM BAILEY and E LIZA WILLIAMS are: i. V IRGINIA H ERNANDEZ 4 BAILEY, b. 12 October 1844 8 ; d. 1931, Safety Harbor, Flor ida; m. J AMES F TUCKER, 10 November 1864, Jefferson Co., Florida; d. 09 July 1913, Safety Harbor, Florida. More About V IRGINIA H ERNANDEZ BAILEY: Burial: Episcopal Church yard, Safety Harbor, Florida More About J AMES F TUCKER: Burial: Episcopal Church y ard, Safety Harbor, Florida ii. I NDEPENDENCE C HRISTINE BAILEY, b. 04 July 1846 9 ; d. 1925; m. J OHN B APTIST MAYS. iii. W ILLIAM J OHN BAILEY J R. b. 01 November 1849, Lyndhurst Plantation, Jefferson Co., Florida 10 ; d. 22 January 1929, Titusville, Florida 11 ; m. C LARA T HOMAS EVANS 12 17 November 1870, Russellville, Logan Co., Kentucky 13 ; b. 13 January 1851, Scottsville, Allen Co., Kentucky 14 ; d. 02 February 1923, Titusville, Florida 15 More About W ILLIAM J OHN BAILEY, J R. : Burial: Lot 5, Evergreen Cemetery, Jacksonville, Florida More About C LARA T HOMAS EVANS: Burial: Lot 5, Evergreen Cemetery, Jacksonville, Florida iv. B URTON B ELLAMY BAILEY, b. 03 July 1852 16 ; d. 09 January 1935, Safety Harbor, Florida. More About B URTON B ELLAMY BAILEY: Burial: Episcopal Church yard, Safety Harbor, Florida Endnotes 1. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, William J. Bailey born 2nd October, 1807" His obituary in the "Weekly Floridian" Tallahassee Fla., February 4, 1783, told that he was born in St. M ary's, Georgia. 2. "Weekly Floridian" Tallahassee Fla. February 4, 1783, "Died at Lyndhurst, in Jefferson County, Florida, on the 17th of December, 1782, Col. William J. Bailey, in his 66th Tear of age ..." 3. St. Augustine Parish White Marriages, Vol. I I, 1803 1832, from the Files of the St. Augustine Historical Society, 251, 4. Florida Marriages, 1822 1850. Ancestry.com database On line. 5. "Book III Cathedral Parish Baptismal Records 1800 1815" Translation by Earl Masters, St. Aug. Historical Soc. Li brary, Record # 467, WILLIAMS, Ana Ysabel, ...Born: May 21, 1807. Baptized: June 30, 1807." 6. "The Weekly Floridian," Tuesday, June 6, 1871, Obituary of Mrs. Eliza A. Bailey, "Departed this life at Lyndhurst, Jeffe rson County, Florida, on the 25th of Ma rch, 1871, Mrs. Eliza A. Bailey, consort of Col. W. J. Bailey.... 7. Photograph of the tombstones of Eliza Ann Bailey and Col. William John Bailey, Photograph taken by their great, great granddaughter, Mary Bartlum Walker, at the private cemetery at Lynd hurst Plantation, Jefferson County, Florida, c. 2000.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 8. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, Virginia Hernandez Bailey born 12th October 1844. 9. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, "Independence Christine Bailey b orn 4th July 1846." 10. A Copy of the Holy Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, "William John Bailey, Jr. born 1st November 1849." 11. Office of Vital Statistics, Florida State Board of Health, Certified Copy Certificate of Death of William J. Bailey, Fi le # 179, Date of Death 1 22 1929, in Titusville, Brevard County, Florida. 12. Will of S. K. EVANS, [connects Gen 4 and 5]. 13. Marriage Bond of WJB and CTE. 14. Certified Copy of Certificate of Death #1379 for Clara Evans Bailey, Bureau of Vital Statis tics, FL State Board of Health, Date of Birth: 13 Jan. 1851; Place of Birth: Scottsville, Kentucky. 15. Eulogy of Mrs. W. J. Bailey, "Star Advocate," Titusville, Florida, "Mrs. Clara Evans Bailey died last Friday evening, February 2." 16. A Copy of the H oly Bible belonging to Eliza Ann Bailey, "Burton Bellamy Bailey born 3rd July 1852."

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) BELLAMY FAMILY CENSUS RECORDS 1790 1920

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) CENSUS RECORDS OF THE BELLAMY FAMILY IN SOUTH CAROLINA 1790 CENSUS Prince Georges Parish, Georget own, South Carolina Note: At his time, this is probably considered John 1 Bellame, and will be used to number the descent of all the Bellamys on these census records. This could change if more documentation is found connecting these Bellamys with the immig rant to Charleston. 1. BELLAME, JOHN 1 2 free white males of 16 years & upwards, including heads of families; 1 free white male under 16; 0 free white females 2. BELLAME, JOHN JR. 2 (John 1 ) 1 free white males of 16 years & upwards, including heads of fami lies; 1 free white male under 16; 2 free white females 3. BELLAME, ABRAHAM 2 (John 1 ) 1 free white males of 16 years & upwards, including heads of families; 2 free white male under 16; 2 free white females 1800 CENSUS Kingston, Georgetown, South Carolin a Note: John 1 ages given are not accurate. 1. JOHN BELLAME, SR. (probably John 2 John 1 ) 1 free white male 10 15; 1 free white male 26 through 44, 1 free white female under 10, 1 free white female 10 15; 1 free white female 26 44 2. ABRAHAM BELLAME (probably Abra ham 2 John 1 ) 1 free white male 16 25; 1 free white male 45 and over; 1 free white female 26 44 3. JOHN BELLAME, JR (probably John 3 Abraham 2 John 1 )

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) possibly 1 free white male under 10; 1 free white male 16 25; 1 free white female 16 25 Note: There is no data on Richard to help identify him. 4. RICHARD BELLAME 4 free white males under 10; 1 free white male 16 25; 1 free white male 26 44; 1 free white female under 10; 1 free white female 26 44 1810 CENSUS Kingston, Georgetown, South Ca rolina JOHN BELLAME, SR (probably John 2 John 1 ) 1 free white male 10 15; 1 free white male 26 44; 1 free white female under 10; 1 free white female 10 15; 1 free white female 26 44 2. ABRAHAM BELLAME (probably Abraham 2 John 1 ) 1 free white male 1 6 25; 1 free white male 45 and over; 1 free white female 26 44 3. JOHN BELLAME, JR. (probably John 3 Abraham 2 John 1 ) possibly 1 free white male under 10; 1 free white male 16 25; 1 free white female 16 25 4. RICHARD BELLAME 4 free white males under 10; 1 free white male 16 25; 1 free white male 26 44 1 free white female under 10; 1 free white female 26 44 1820 CENSUS Horry County, South Carolina Note: Shortly after this census was taken John Bellamy 3 (Abraham 2 John 1 ) probably moved h is family to Duval County, Florida. His father, Abraham, 2 moved to Florida also. He died there in 1828 and wad buried in Jefferson County, Florida. 1. JOHN BELLEMEE SR (difficult to read, but probably John 3 Abraham 2 John 1 ) 1 free white male under 10; 1 free white male 45 and over; 1 free white female under 10; 1 free white female 16 26 2.ABRAHAM BELLEMEE (probably Abraham 3 John 2 John 1 ) 1 free white male 26 45; 1 free white female 10 16; 1 free white female 16 26; 1 free white female 45 an d over 3. RICHARD BELLEMEE, SR. 2 free white males under 10; 2 free white males 16 26; 1 free white males 45 and over; 1 free white female 10 16; 1 free white female 26 45

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 4. RICHARD BELLEMEE, JR possibly 1 free white male 16 18; 1free white mal e 16 26; 1 free white female 16 26 5. WILLIAM BELLEMEE (possibly William 3 Abraham 2 John 1 ) 1 free white male under 10; 1 free white male 10 16; 2 free white males 16 26; 1 free white male 26 45; 3 free white females under 10; 3 free white female s 10 16; 1 free white female 26 45 6. WILLIAM BELLAM Y ( unknown) 1 free white male 26 45; 1 free white female 26 45 1830 CENSUS Horry County, South Carolina Note: John 2 Bellame, Sr. probably died before this census was taken. The others cannot be identified at this time. Information used to identify the Bellamys in the South Carolina Census records. 1.John 1 Bellamy: probably born 1720; died 1792; probably married Elizabeth Jordan] 2. John 2 Bellamy: born about 1750; died about 1826 in Horry Cou nty, SC 3. Family of John 2 Bellamy Married 1 st Sarah Frink; she died about 1814; Children: Abraham 3 Mary 3 Susannah 3 Married 2 nd Elizabeth Vaught Children: John D. (1817 1896), Marsden 4. Abraham 2 Bellamy (John 1 ): born 1752 South Carolina; died 1828 Florida; buried a few miles NE of Monticello Courthouse, Jefferson Co. FL 5. Family of Abraham 2 Bellamy Married Claramond Children: 1. John [Jack 3 born 1776; died Jefferson Co. FL] 2. William 3 [probably] Granville Co. NC, Archives [on line] Transcription of Will of John 2 Bellamy [on line] [On line]

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) CENSUS RECORDS OF THE BELLAMY FAMILY IN FLORIDA 1830 C ENSUS Madison County, Territory of Florida [Madison County was formed from Jefferson in 1827] 1. JOHN BELLAMY ( John 3 Abraham 2 John 1 ) 1 m 15 20; 1 m 20 30; 1 m 50 60; 1 f under 5; 2 f 15 20; 1 f 20 30; 1 f 50 60 Note : John 3 rgaret Bell. Their children were Abram 4 William 4 Elizabeth Mary 4 Sarah 4 Mary Theresa 4 Bethel 4 and Lydia. 4 There is no way to identify all the people shown on the census, but the 20 30 male and female could be Abram 4 Bellamy and his wife, Eliza An n Williams who were married in 1826. Abram was not on the census as Head of Household, but he and Eliza Ann moved from St. Augustine to Jefferson County before 1830. 2. WILLIAM BELLEME 1 m 20 30; 1 f 70 80 Note: This William could be the son of John 3 Bellamy, because his son William was born in 1802. The 70 80 years old female is unknown, but probably an elderly relative

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 1840 CENSUS Jefferson County, Territory of Florida Note: This is John 3 Bellamy (Abraham 2 John 1 ) and his wife, Margaret 1. JOHN BELLAMY 1 m 60 70; 1 f 50 60 Note: Abram 4 Bellamy died in 1839 leaving a widow, Eliza Ann Williams Bellamy, and six children (Their first child, Samuel Junius 5 died as a young child before 1830.) The six children were Sarah Matilda 5 [1828 1896], Burton Williams 5 [1830 1891], Bell Anita 5 [1832 ?], Josephine Hernandez 5 [1835 1898], Theodosia Burr 5 [1838 1872], and Victoria 5 [1838 1891]. The male 20 30 is not known 1m 5 10; 1m 20 30; 3f under 5; 1f 5 10; 1f 10 15; 1f 20 30 Note: This is William 4 Bellamy, his wife, Emmala Simkins, and probably their daughter, Elizabeth 3. WILLIAM BELLAMY 1 m 30 40; 1 male 50 60; 1 f under 5; 1 f 20 30 -----------------------------Note: This could be John Bellamy and his wife Charlotte. He had two sons under 5, Marsden and Thomas. The third could have died before the 1850 census. He had two sons probably 5 10, William and Calvin. It is not known how this family was related to John 1 Bellamy, but possibly he was descended from J ohn 2 who married second, Elizabeth Vaught and had a son named Marsden. 4. JOHN BELLAMY 3 m under 5; 2m 5 10; 1m 30 40; 1f 30 40 Note: Bellamy, he is unknown at this time. 5. JOHN C. BELLAMY 3 m 5 10; 1 m 30 40; 2 f under 5; 1 f 15 20 1850 CENSUS Jefferson County, State of Florida

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note: John 1 Bellamy and hi s wife Margaret were probably dead. They are not on the census records, and their son William had inherited their plantation. DESCENDENTS OF ABRAM BELLAMY Note: Abram 4 1844. She and the Bellamy children (except Sarah, who was now married to J. Caraway Smith) children shown on this census are: Sarah, Burton, Bell Anita, Josephine, and the tw ins, Theodosia and Victoria Jefferson County, Florida No township 1. WILLIAM J. BAILEY 42 year old, farmer, born Georgia Eliza A 43 years old female, born Florida Virginia H., 5, years old female, born Florida Bailey daughter Independent C., 3, years old, born Florida Bailey daughter William J., 7/12 years old male born, Florida Bailey son Burton W. Bellamy 19 years old male, born Florida Bell Anita Bellamy 16 years old female, born Florida Josephine H Bellamy 13 years old female, born Florida Theodosia B. Bellamy 12 years old female, born Florida Victoria Bellamy 12 years old female, born Florida Jefferson County Monticello 2. J. CARAWAY SMIT H 31 years old, an attorney, born South Carolina Sarah, 22 years old, born Florida Abraham Bellamy [Smith] 6/12 years old, born Florida DESCENDENTS OF WILLIAM BELLAMY [William 4 (John 3 Abraham 2 John 1 ] Jefferson C ounty No township Note: William Bellamy died before 1850 leaving his widow, Emmala Simkins and four daughters in Jefferson County. His daughters were: Elizabeth, Margaret, Emmala S., and William. William, who was born a short time before her father died, was named for him. 3. EMMALA BELLAMY 34 years old, born in South Carolina Elizabeth B. 12 years old female. born Florida Margaret B. 9 years old female, born Florida Emmala S. 6 years old female, born Florida William 4 years old female born Florida

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 1850 CENSUS (continued) Note: This could possibly be the same family as # 4 on the 1840 Census. This family was probably related to the family of John 2 Bellamy ( John 1 ) of South Carolina ( 1750 1826) who had daughters Mary and Susannah and a son Abraham by his first wife and by his second wife he had two sons, John Dillard Bellamy and Marsden Bellamy. 4. JOHN BELLAMY 46 years old, farmer, born South Carolina Charlotte 44 years old female, born Georgia Calvin 21 years old male, born Georgia William 17 years old male, born Florida Marsden 14 years old male, born Florida Thomas 13 years old male, born Florida Wesley J. 8 years old, male, born Ge orgia Richard 6 years old male, born Florida Eliza 5 years old female, born Florida Bethel 2 years old male, born Florida

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 1860 CENSUS DESCENDENTS OF ABRAM BELLAMY Madison County, Florida 1.Sarah 5 1. CARAWAY SMITH 40 y ears old planter, born South Carolina Sarah Stockton Jefferson County, Florida Note: Burton 5 Bellamy now lived on his own plantation, and one of his twin sisters, Victoria lived with him. 2 B. W. BELLAMY 28 years old male, planter, born Florida Victoria 21 years old female, born Florida Note: Bell Anita 5 Bellamy married James Paul and probably did not live in Florida. At sometime during her married life she lived in New York and possibly London. Note: Josephine 5 Bellamy married John Wales Eppes of Virginia. They lived in the vicinity of Lyndhurst at the time of this census. 3. JOHN W. EPPES 34 years old p hysician/ farmer, born Virginia Josephine 24 years old female, born Florida Eliza 2 years old female, born Florida Note: Theodosia Burr 5 Bellamy married Thomas Jefferson Eppes. 4. THOMAS J. EPPES 30 years old m ale farmer, born Virginia Theo B. Eppes 20 years old female, born Florida Note: Victoria 5 Bellamy was living at the home of her brother Burton Bellamy [see # 2] DESCENDENTS OF WILLIAM BELLAMY Note: William 4 and his wife Emmala were both dead by t his time. Their daughter Elizabeth 5 (William 4 John 3 Abraham 2 John 1 ) Bellamy married George Washington Parkhill. Their daughter Margaret Bellamy married Richard Turnbull. The younger daughters Emmala S. and er and brother in law Dr. B.W. Taylor in Monticello.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Jefferson County 5. G.W. PARKHILL 35 years old male, physician, born VA. E.B 22 years old female, born Fla. (E.B. is Elizabeth Bellamy) B. ??? 1 year old male, born Fla. 1860 CENSUS (c ontinued) 6. R. TURNBULL 22 years old male, born Fla. Margaret 16 years old female, born Fla. 7. B.W.TAYLOR 45 years old male, M.D., born VA. ____Elizabeth 45 years old female, born S.C. E.S. Bellamy 16 years old female, born F la. (E.S. Bellamy is Emmala S. Bellamy) William Bellamy 14 years old female born Fla.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 1870 CENSUS DESCENDENTS OF ABRAM BELLAMY Madison County, Florida husband, J. Caraway Smith, was dead by the time of th is census. Family letters spoke of his poor health. Although he survived the war, it is not known if that caused his death. He served in a cavalry unit, but probably only fought in Florida. Sarah continued living in Madison County, Florida. She would have been about 42 years old not 46*. 1. SMITH, SARAH B 46* years old female, keeping house, born Fla. Caraway 17 years old male, born Fla. Stockton 15 years old male, born Fla. Burton 15 years old male, born Fla. Archer 11 years old male, born Fla. Bailey 6 years old male, born Fla. Jefferson County, Florida 2. BELLAMY, BURTON W 38 years old male, farmer, born Florida husband, James Paul, was dead by the time of this census, and she and probably a daughter were living with friends. Anita was about two years younger than Burton, so she would have been about 36 not 40*. 3. PAUL, ANNETA 40* years old female, born Fla. Dena 16 years old female, born England Note: Josephine Bellamy Eppes and her husband, John Wales Eppes seem to be missing from the Florida census at the time. Her sister, Victoria Bellamy was living at Lyndhurst Plantation with her mother Eliza Ann Bailey, and stepfather, William John Bailey. Another sister, husband, Thomas Jefferson Eppes, was probably dead by the time of this census. The cause of his deat h is unknown at this time. 4. EPPES, THEODOSIA, 32 years old female, keeping house, born Fla. Jefferson 9 years old male, born Fla. Victoria 8 years old female, born Florida Mary 6 years old female, born Fla. Frank 5 years old male, born Florida Paul 3 years old male, born Fla. Randolph 1 year old male, born Fla.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 1870 CENSUS (continued) DESCENDENTS OF WILLIAM BELLAMY Jefferson County, Flor ida Note: Dr. George Washington Turnbull, husband of Elizabeth Bellamy Parkhill, was killed at Gaines Mill near Richmond, Virginia. She and her children were living with her sister and brother in law, William and Junius Turnbull. 5 TURNBULL, JUNIUS 30 years old male, farmer William 23 years old female Maggie 5 years old female Simkins 3 years old male Parkhill, Elizabeth 32 years old female, lives with family, b orn Fla. Charles B. 9 years old male, born Fla., at school E [illegible] 7 years old female, born Fla., at school 6. TURNBULL, RICHARD 31 years old male, farmer, born Fla. Margaret 29 years old female, keep ing house Waller L. 9 years old male, at school, born Fla. Ida C. 7 years old female, at school, born Fla. William B. 6 years old male, at school, born Fla. Elizabeth B. 3 years old female, born Fla. Emily P. 1 year old female, born Fla. 33 years old male, farmer Emily S 26 years old female, keeps home, born Fla. George W. 5 years old male, born Fla. Johns, Martha A. 6 years old female (lives in family) identification unknown at this time Note : Cudjo, a servant of William and Emmala Bellamy, took the name Bellamy after he was free. Emmala often mentioned him very kindly in her letters to Burton. He was listed on the 1870 Census of Jefferson County BELLAMY, CUDJO 80 years old mulatto male, farmer, born SC Nancy 75 years old black female, keeps house, born SC John 23 years old mulatto male, works on farm, born Fla.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 1880 CENSUS DESCENDENTS OF ABRAM BELLAMY Madison County, Florida 1. SMITH, SARAH 50 years old female She would have been about 54 ac tually. Bellamy 38 years old male Caraway 37 years old male, farmer/lawyer Bailey 19 years old male Jefferson County, Florida Note: was keeping house for him. His nephew Randolph Ep pes, son of Theodosia and Thomas Jefferson Eppes was living with him Both of 2. BELEMY, B.W. 48 years old male, planter* Anita Paul 46 years old female, k eeping house Eppes, Randolph 11 years old male (orphan son of Theodosia Bellamy Eppes) Madison County, Florida Note: Although Josephine and her husband were missing on the 1870 Census; they were listed on the 1880 Census. 3. EPPES, J.W 55 years o ld male, M.D. Mrs. J. H 44 years old female (Josephine Hernandez Bellamy) Mary 15 years old female, at school Frank 10 years old male, at school Note: THEODOSIA BELLAMY EPPES and her husband, Thomas Jefferson Eppes were both Victoria was now married to Edward Nicholas Pillot. Madison County, Florida. 4. PILLOT. E.N. 61 years old male, farmer, born New York Victoria B 31 years old female, keeping house, born Fla. Ma tilda E. 7 years old female, at school, born Fla. Victoria E. 18 years old female, at school, born Fla. (She was actually ten or younger.)

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 1880 CENSUS (continued) DESCENDENTS OF WILLIAM BELLAMY Jefferson County, Florida Note: Elizabeth Bellam y Parkhill was still living with her sister and brother in law, William and Junius Turnbull. She was listed as Lizzie Parkhill on this census. 5. TURNBULL J 40 years old male, farmer William 34 years old female, wife (William Bellamy) Maggie 13 years old female, daughter, at school Simkins 12 years old male, son, at school Lizzie 9 years old female, daughter, at school Junius 4 years old male, son, at school John 1 years old male, son Parkhill, Lizzie 42 years old female, boarder, widow (Elizabeth Bellamy) 42 years old male, farmer M B 38 years old female, wife, keeps house (Margaret Bellamy) Waller T. 19, years old male, son, at school Ida 17 years old female, daughter, at school Eunice 11 years old female, daughter, at school Margaret 9 years old female, daughter, at school Richard, Jr. 6 years old male, son, at school Lamar 4 years old male, son, 7. PARKHILL R C 42 years old male, farmer E.S 36 years old female, wife, keeping house (Emmala Simkins Bellamy) G .W. 15 years old male, son, at school Kate 5 years old female, daughter

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 1900 CENSUS DESCENDENTS OF ABRAM BELLAMY The Bible of Eliza Ann Bailey gives the dates of death for all of her Bellamy children except Anita Bellamy Paul. She is on the 1880 census, but she does not appear on the index of the 1900 Florida Census; therefore she was probably dead by 1900. The Bible shows the following dates of death: Theodosia Bellamy Eppes died in 1872. Burton and Victoria died in 1891. Sarah died in 1896. Josephine died in 1898. Because the 1890 Florida Federal Census Records were completely burned in a 1921 warehouse fire (including the Florida Widows and Veterans Census schedules), there are no census entries for the children of Abram 2 Bellamy af ter 1880. The 1900 census does include some of his 1900 records follow. Sons of Sarah Bellamy and Caraway Smith Dunnellon, Marion County, Florida 1. SMITH, BELLAM Y 49 years old male, single, no occupation given Madison County, Florida 3. SMITH, STOCKTON 45 years old male, single, policeman 4. SMITH, ARCHER 40 years old male, head of family, married 10 years, farmer ----Lucy 32 years old female, wife ----Archer 9 years old male, son ----Caraway 7 years old male, son Husband and Granddaughter of Josephine Bellamy Eppes Jefferson County, Florida 5. EPPES, JHN. W 74 years old male head of family, widower, former M.D. Her nandez, Josie 20 years old granddaughter, single Son of Theodosia Bellamy and Thomas Jefferson Eppes Jefferson County, Florida 6. EPPES, RANDOLPH, 32 years old male, head of family, farmer -----Sadie 28 years old female, wife -----Edith 6 months old female, daughter Eugenie, daughter of Victoria Bellamy and Edward Nicholas Pillot, Quitman, Brooks County, Georgia 7. TILLMAN CHARLES, 28 years old male, head of family, farmer -----Eugenie 24 years old female, wife

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) -----Anita P. 3 years old female, daughter -----Charles E. 1 year old male, son 1900 CENSUS DESCENDENTS OF WILLIAM BELLAMY Note: Eli zabeth Bellamy Parkhill, the oldest daughter of Emmala and William Bellamy, was probably dead by 1900. She was no longer living in the household of her sister and brother in law, William and Junius Turnbull. She had lived with them since the death of her h usband in the Civil War. Jefferson County, Florida 8. Turnbull, Junius 60 years old male, head of family, farmer -----William, 52 years old female, wife -----Junius, Jr. 23 years old male, son -----John T. 21 years old m ale, son -----Willamena 18 years old female, daughter -----Lois P. 10 years old female, daughter Note: Margaret Bellamy Turnbull, the second daughter of Emmala and William Bellamy was dead by the time of this census. Her husband, Rich ard was still living. 9. TURNBULL, RICHARD 61 years old male, head of family, farmer -----Margaret, 28 years old female, daughter, single -----Tiffany ? 18 years old male, son at school 10. PARKHILL R.C 62 years old male, head of family, farmer -----Emila S 56 years old female, wife -----Genevieve 16 years old female, daughter, at school -----Emila 14 years old female, daughter, at school -----Helen 12 years old female, daughter, at scho ol Cocke, Mrs. Kate 73 years old female, sister

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 1910 CENSUS DESCENDENTS OF WILLIAM BELLAMY There were no children of Eliza Ann and Abram Bellamy living at this time. Jefferson County, Florida Note: m Bellamy were living by 1910. 1. PARKHILL RICHARD C 71 years old male, head of family, county clerk -------Emmala B 65 years old female, wife -------Genevieve P 26 years old female, daughter -------Helen 22 years old female, daughter 2. TURNBULL JUNIUS 69 years old male, head of family, own income -------William 62 years old female, wife -------Junius Jr. 33 years old male, son, farmer -------Wilhemina 25 years old female, daughter -------Lois P. 20 y ears old female, daughter -------Elizabeth P 4 months old female, granddaughter -------Mays Finlayson 14 years old male, grandson 1920 CENSUS Jefferson County, Florida Parkhill and William Bellamy Turnbull, died between 1910 and 1920. The two sisters lived their entire lives in County at the time of the 1920 Census. He was eig hty two years old and was living with his daughter and son in law, Emila and Roy Simpson.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) BAILEY FAMILY CENSUS RECORDS 1820 1930

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) CENSUS RECORDS OF THE BAILEY FAMILY 1820 CENSUS Camden County, Georgia 1. JOHN 1 BAILEY the results are completel y illegible 2. JOSEPH 1 RANE (Rein Rain) 1 father in law 3.WILLIAM HOLLINGSWORTH (husband of Winifred 2 Bailey) the results are completely illegible Note: James Scott (husband of Margaret 2 Bailey) a nd his family were not found on this census. 1830 CENSUS Jefferson County, Florid a Note: Nothing is documented about John 1 life until about 1784 when he and his wife, Elizabeth Rains They lived there until 1797 when they moved to Camden County, Georgia. Members of his family began moving from Camden County to Jefferson County in the Territory of Florida sometime before the 1830 Census was taken. Although tradition tells that he died in Jefferson County, there is no documentation for this, and his will was probated October 1821, in Camden County, Georgia. His wife, Elizabeth Rains Bailey, was living in Jefferson County by 1830. The children of John 1 and Elizabeth Rains Bailey were: 1. John 2 Bailey (a.k.a. John, Jr.) John 2 died in Camden County before any members of this family moved to Jefferson County; however, his only child, William John 3 Bailey, moved there before the 1840 Census was taken. 2. Mary 2 Bailey Nothing is documente d about Mary Bailey except that she was born about 1785, possibly in Spanish East Florida. 3.William 2 Bailey (a.k.a. General Bailey) William and his wife, Elizabeth Mary 2 Bellamy, the daughter of John 1 Bellamy, moved to Jefferson County, Florida, prior to the 1830 Census. 4. Zachariah 2 Bailey Zachariah was unmarried when he moved to Jefferson County, but he married Eliza Mathers there in 1827 5. Winifred 2 Bailey Winifred and her husband, William Hollingsworth, moved to Jefferson County before the 18 30 Census.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 6. Margaret 2 Bailey Margaret married James Scott before moving to Jefferson County at the same time that her mother and possibly her father also moved there. 1830 CENSUS (continued) Jefferson County, Territory of Florida 1. ELIZABETH BAILEY (widow of John 1 Bailey) 1 female 60 70 2. WILLIAM BAILEY (married to Elizabeth Mary Bellamy, daughter of John Bellamy) 1 m under 5; 1 m 20 30; 1 m 40 50; 2 f under 5; 1 f 20 30 3. ZACARIAH BAILEY (married to Eliza Mathers) 1 m 20 30; 1 m30 40; 2 f under 5; 1 f 20 30 4. WILLIAM HOLLINGSWORTH (husband of Winifred Bailey) 1 m 5 10; 1 m 30 40; 1 m 50 60; 1 f 5 10; 1 f 20 30 5. JAMES SCOTT (husband of Margaret Bailey) 1 m 30 40; 1 f under 5; 2 f 5 10; 1 f 20 30 1840 CENSUS Jefferson County, Territory of Florida ELIZABETH BAILEY, widow of John 1 Bailey, was no longer living alone. She lived with her daughter, Margaret Bailey Scott, when this census was taken. 1. WILLIAM BAILEY (married to Elizabeth Mary Bellamy daughter of John Bellamy) 2 males under 5; 1 male 10 15; 1 male 40 50; 1 female under 5; 2 females 5 10; 2 females 10 15; 1 female 30 40 2. ZACARIAH BAILEY (married to Eliza Mathers) 2 males under 5; 1 male 40 50; 1 female 5 20; 2 females 1 0 15; 1 female 30 40 3. WILLIAM HOLLINGSWORTH (husband of Winifred Bailey) 1 male 5 10; 1 male 15 20; 1 male 20 30; 1 male 40 50; 1 female under 5; 1 female 15 20; 1 female 40 50 4. JAMES SCOTT (husband of Margaret Bailey) 2 males 5 10; 1 m ale 40 50; 2 females under 5; 1 female 10 15; 1 female 15 20; 1 female 30 40; 1 female 70 80

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note: William John 3 Bailey son of John 2 Bailey of Camden County deceased, had joined his uncles in Jefferson County by the time of this census. He was singl e and probably living in a barracks or boarding house. At some time he was called Colonel Bailey for his service in the Seminole Wars. 5. WILLIAM J. BAILEY (Col.) 5 males 15 20; 33 males 20 30; 19 males 40 40 1850 CENSUS Jefferson County, Florida No te: Elizabeth Mary Bellamy Bailey, wife of William Bailey, died before this census was taken. *Although this census and most records show that he was born in Georgia, William Bailey was born in East Florida. The records of the Catholic Diocese of Saint Aug ustine showed that he was baptized in May 1790 at 1 month old. 1. WILLIAM BAILEY 60 years old male, farmer, born *Georgia John B. 24 years old male born Florida Margaret 23 years old female born Florida Sarah 20 years old female born Flor ida William 18 years old male born Florida Theresa 16 years old female born Florida Mary 14 years old female born Florida Martha 12 years old female born Florida Abram Z 10 years old male born Florida Bethel 8 years old male born 2. ZACHARIAH BAILEY 57 years old male farmer born Florida Eliza M. 47 years old female born Georgia Cornelia E. 20 years old female born Florida Julia A. 15 years old female born Florida William Z. 14 years old male born Florida John T. 12 years old male born Florida Note: By the time Margaret and Winifred Bailey were born, their father John 1 Bailey had moved from East Florida to Camden County, Georgia. 3. WILLIAM HOLLINGSWORTH 60 years old male born Florida Winifred 50 years old female born Georgia ( Winifred 2 Bailey) John Gridley 60 years old male born Maryland 3. JAMES SCOTT 55 years old male, farmer, born Georgia Mary E 44 years old female born Georgia (really named Margaret 2 ) William 20 years old male born Florida Robert 18 years old male born Florida Emily C. 13 years old female born Florida Julia 11 years old female born Georgia

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Sarah 8 years old female born Florida 1850 CENSUS (continued) Note: Colonel William John 3 Bailey (Joh n 2 John 1 ) married Eliza Ann Williams Bellamy, the widow of Abram Bellamy. The three Bailey children and all the Bellamy children except Sarah were living at Lyndhurst Plantation. Sarah Bellamy married J. Caraway Smith in 1849 (See Bellamy Census Records) 5. WILLIAM JOHN BAILEY 42 years old male, farmer, born Georgia Eliza Ann 43 years old female, born Florida Virginia H. 5 years old female born Florida (She was a Bailey) Independence C 3 years old female born Florida (She was a Bailey) William J. Jr. 7 months old male born Florida (He was a Bailey) Burton W. Bellamy 19 years old male born Florida (The rest were Bellamy children) Bell Anita Bellamy 16 years old female born Florida Josephine H. Bellamy 1 4 years old female born Florida Theodosia B. Bellamy 12 years old female born Florida Victoria Bellamy 12 years old female born Florida

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 1860 CENSUS Jefferson County, Florida DESCENDENTS OF GENERAL WILLIAM 2 BAILEY s econd wife, Eliza Branch Reade, had died by the time of this census. She was the mother of his youngest son, Edward. His sons John D. and Bethel Bailey and his daughter Margaret were probably dead by this time also. His son William was married and so were his daughters Sarah and Martha. His other daughters Theresa and Mary were probably married, but their married names are unknown at this time. William 2 Bailey and his two other sons were living with his daughter, Sarah Bailey Lamar. 1. T. B. LAMAR 32 ye Sarah B 30 years old female born Florida (Sarah 3 William 2 Bailey) Sarah B. 8 years old female born Florida William B. 6 years old male born Florida Elizabeth 5 years old fe male born Florida Jefferson M. 3 years old male born Florida William Bailey, Sr 70 years old male, banker, born Georgia Abram Z. Bailey 20 years old male born Florida (Abram Z 3 William 2 Bailey)) Edward Bailey 4 y ears old male born Florida (Edward 3 William 2 Bailey) 2.WILLIAM BAILEY, JR 28 years old male, farmer, born Florida (William 3 ,William2) Maria 24 years old female born Virginia William W. 4 years old male born Florida John B. 2 ye ars old male born Florida M [illegible] 3 months old female born Florida Leon County, Florida 3. ALEXANDER HAWKINS 38 years old male, planter, born North Carolina Martha 22 years old female born Florida (Martha 3 William 2 Bailey) Jefferson County, Florida DESCENDENTS OF ZACHARIAH 2 BAILEY Note: Zachariah 2 Bailey died before this census. His daughter Julia was not listed in the household. She was by this time married to W.H. Mathews and was living in Madison. 4 ELIZA BAILEY 58 years old f Cornelia 28 years old female born Florida William Z. 23 years old male, farming, born Florida John T. 21 years old male born Florida

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 1860 Census (continued) DESCENDENTS OF JAMES SCOTT AND MARGARET 2 BAILEY SCOTT Note: James Scott died before this census was taken. His son Robert was now married. His daughters Julia and Emily are not listed in the household, but they were probably married by this time. 5. MARGARET SCOTT 58 years old female born Georgia (widow of James Scott) William 30 years old male, attorney, born Florida Sarah 19 years old female born Florida 6. ROBERT SCOTT 27 year old male, M.D., born Florida (Robert 3 ,Margaret 2 Bailey) Moley A. 21 years old female born Kentucky M.C. 9 months old female born Florida FAMILY OF WILLIAM JOHN 3 BAILEY Note: William John 3 Bailey and his wife Eliza Ann had a new son, Burton B. (named for his stepbrother Burton W. Bellamy). None of the Bellamy children were living at Lyndh urst at the time of this census. 7. W. J. BAILEY 52 years old male, farmer, born Georgia (William John 3 Bailey) Eliza Ann 52 years old female born Florida Virginia 15 years old female born Florida ______ 14 years old female born Florida (Independence Christine) William J. 10 years old male born Florida Burton B. 8 years old male born Florida

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 1870 CENSUS Note: General William Bailey was dead by the time this census was taken. His son, William Jr., was wounded at Gettysburg and died in a Union prison. His son in law, Thomas B. Lamar, was killed at Petersburg. His youngest son, Edward, was now a cadet at VMI. At fourteen, he was the youngest cadet ever attending VMI. His daughter Sarah moved to Athens Georgia so that her children could attend school there. DESCENDENTS OF WILLIAM 2 BAILEY Athens, Clarke County, Georgia 1. LAMAR, S. B 40 years old female, keeping house, born Florida (Sarah 3 William 2 ) _____, Sarah 18 years old female, at home, born Florida _____, Willi am 17 years old male, at school, born Florida _____, Elizabeth 15 years old female, born Florida _____, Jefferson 13 years old male, born Florida _____, Clyde 7 years old son born Florida Jefferson County Florida Note: William 3 widow Mariah, and her children were living in a boarding house at the time this census was taken. 2. BAILEY, MARIAH 33 years old female, living as a family, born Alabama (see 1850) William W. 16 yeas old male, at school, born Florida John B. 11 years old male, at school, born Florida Mary B. 10 years old female, at school, born Florida Leon County, Florida Note: Martha Bailey Hawkins and her husband have a child from a Bailey family living with them. The parents of this child are not known at th is time. She was born after the 1860 census so it is difficult to find out who her parents were. 3. HAWKINS, ALEX B 42 years old male, planter, born North Carolina Martha L 32 years old female, keeping house, born Florida Bailey, Martha Hawkin s 9 years old female, at school, born Florida 4. ABRAM Z. BAILEY 29 years old male, farming, born Florida (Abram Z .3 William 2 ) Margaret 18 years old female, keeping house, born Florida

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 1870 CENSUS (continued) DESCENDENTS OF ZACHARIAH 2 BAILEY Note: Zachariah and Eliza Bailey had a son John T. (21 years old in 1860). He does not appear on the Census index for this census. He was the right age to have fought in the Civil War. am F. Bailey at the time of this census. 5 WILLIAM Z. BAILEY 30 year old male, farmer, born Georgia* (WilliamF. 3 Zachariah 2 ) Cornelia 35 years old, at home, born Flor ida (Cornelia 3 Zachariah 2 ) Mathews, Julia 32 years old female, lives in family, born Florida (Julia 3 Zachariah 2 ) ____ Zack M 10 years old male, born Florida (Zack 4 Julia 3 Zachariah 2 ) ____ Margaret F. 7 years old fem ale (Margaret 4 Julia 3 Zachariah 2 William Z. was born in Florida and not in Georgia. DESCENDENTS OF JAMES SCOTT AND MARGARET 2 BAILEY SCOTT Jefferson County, Florida son Robert and his family were living with her and her and her daughter. 6. MARGARET SCOTT 66 years old female, at home, born Georgia Robert 35 years old male, physician, born Florida (Robert 3 Margaret 2 ) Sarah R. 27 yea rs old female, at home, born Florida (Sarah 3 Margaret 2 ) Lizzie W. 10 years old female born Florida 4 Robert 3 ) K. Adams 7 years old female Note: William Scott married Kate Dilworth, the widow of his friend, D aniel Bird, who was killed in the Civil War. 7. WILLIAM SCOTT 38 years old, lawyer, born Florida Kate D. 32 years old female, keeps house, born Georgia Bird, Mag L. 13 years

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) ___ *Behethland 10 years old female, at school, born Florida *Behethland was a family name on the Bird and Simkins families. 1870 CENSUS (continued) WILLIAM J. BAILEY AND HIS DES CENDANTS Jefferson County, Florida Note: William J. 3 two daughters, Virginia H. and Christine, were now married and living in their own homes. Victoria Bellamy had moved back to live with her mother and stepfather at Lyndhurst. 8. WILLIAM J. B AILEY 65 years old male, farmer, born Georgia Eliza Ann 65 years old female, keeps house, born Florida Wm. J. Jr. 21 years old male, farmer, born Florida Burton B. 18 years old male, at school, born Florida Bellamy, Victoria 30 years old 9. JAMES F. TUCKER 30 years old male, farmer, born Florida Virginia H 25 years old female, keeping house, born Florida (Virginia H. Bailey) Eliza B. 4 years old female born Florida Wm. P. 3 years old male born Florida Madison County, Florida 10. JOHN B. MAYS 23 years old male, farmer, born Florida C. Bailey 22 years old female, keeps house, born Florida (Christine Bailey)

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 1880 CENSUS DESCENDENTS OF WILLIAM 2 BAILEY Jeffers on County, Florida 1. LAMAR, S.B. 50 years old female, keeping house, born Florida (Sarah Bailey) _____ W.B. 27 years old male, Clerk of Court, born Florida _____ J. B. 23 years old male, merchant born Florida Note: h, had married Dr. B. W. Taylor before this census was taken. They had two young children, and one child of William Bailey. Jr. still lived with them. 2. TAYLOR, B. W. 55 years old male, physician, born Virginia ____ M. B 42 years old female, wif ____ Waller 6 years old male, son, born Florida ____ Elizabeth 5 years old female, daughter, born Florida r) Note: William W. 4 (William 3 William 2 John 1 Bailey) Bailey, the son of William and Mariah time of this census. 3. BAILEY, W.W. 30 years old male farm er, born Florida Baker, B.W. 34 years old, uncle, born Ala. Leon County, Florida Note: Martha Bailey Hawkins and her husband, A. B. Hawkins, had four Bailey nieces and nephews living with them at the time of this census. Abram Z. Bailey and his wif e died before this census was taken, Although the ages do not seem correct, their two children Martha and Mary lived with their aunt and uncle, Martha and AB Hawkins, after their parents died. There does not seem to be any information about Nellie and Wil liam Bailey, although they could also be children of Abram Z. Bailey. 4. HAWKINS, A. B 50 years old male, receiver for a railroad, born North Carolina ____ Martha L 40 years old female, wife, born Florida Bailey, William 12 years old male, nephew born Florida ____ Nellie H. 18 years old female, niece, born Florida ____ Margaret, 17 years old female, niece, born Florida ____ Mary F. 17 years old female, born Florida

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 1880 CENSUS (continued ) DESCENDENTS OF ZACHARIAH 2 BAILEY Jeffer son County, Florida N ote: Eliza Bailey William Z. had moved out leaving only her two daughters and two grandchildren living with her. 5. BAILEY, ELIZA 77 years old female, farmer, bo rn Georgia ____, Cornelia 47 years old female, daughter, at home, born Florida Mathews, Julia, 42 years old female, daughter, widowed, at home, born Florida ____, Bailey 21 years old male, grandson, farmer, born Florida ____, Maggie, 17 years old granddaughter, at home, born Florida 6. BAILEY, W.Z. 45 years old male, single, boarder, sheriff, born Florida (William Zachariah 3 Zachariah 2, John 1 ) DESCENDENTS OF JAMES SCOTT AND MARGARET2 BAILEY SCOTT Note: Margaret Bailey Scott, widow of J ames Scott was dead by the time this census was taken. Both of her sons seemed to have only daughters. 7. SCOTT, WM 49 years old male, lawyer, born Florida (William 3 Margaret 2 ) ____, Kate D. 42 years old female, wife, keeping house, born Georgia ____, Mammie 14 yeas old female, daughter, at school, born Florida Note: Mrs. Rebecca Johnson Simkins. Mollie was the mother of his five daughters, 8. SCOTT, ROBERT 47 years old male, physician, born Florida (Robert 3 Margaret 2 ) ____, Rebecca, 30 years old female, wife, born Florida ____, Netta 18 years old female, born Florida ____, Minnie 13 years old female born Florida ____, Julia 11 years old fe male

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 1880 CENSUS (continued) DESCENDENTS OF WILLIAM JOHN 3 BAILEY Note: By the time this census was taken both William John Bailey and his wife Eliza Ann Bailey were dead. Their daughter Virginia Hernandez 4 Bailey Tucker her husband and ch ildren were still living in Jefferson County, Florida. Her brother, Burton Bellamy Bailey and S. Smith were living with the Tuckers. S. Smith was very probably Stockton Smith Sarah Bellamy usband and their children were living in Madison County, Florida. William John Bailey, Jr., his wife and two children were living in Logan County, Kentucky. Unfortunately, known of the new information on this census was filled in. Jefferson County, Flor ida 9. TUCKER, J. F. 40 years old male farmer, born Indiana (James F. Tucker) ____ V. H. 34 years old female, keeping house, born Florida (Virginia 4 Bailey Tucker) ____ E. A 14 years old female, born Florida (Eliza Ann Tucker) ____ W. P 12 years old male, born Florida (William Pelham Tucker) ____ E. L, 10 years old female born Florida (Eugenia Tucker) ____ V. B. 4 years old female, born Florida (Victoria Bellamy Tucker) Bailey, B.B. 29 years old male, farmer, born Florida (Burton 4 Bellamy Bailey) Smith, S. 25 years old male, farmer, born Florida (probably Stockton 4 Smith, Sarah 3 Bellamy Smith) Madison County, Florida 10. MAYS, JOHN B. 33 year old male, farmer, born Florida ____ Christine B. 33 years old female, wife, keeping house, born Florida (Christine 4 Bailey Tucker) ____Wm. B. 8 years old male, son, born Florida ____Mary C. 6 years old female, daughter, born Florida ____ Dennet H. 4 years old male, son, born Florida (probably misspelled) Log an County, Kentucky

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note: William John 4 Bailey, Jr., his wife Clara, and two children had left Florida at the time this census was taken and moved to Kentucky. They were living near Russellville, the town where Clara was born. 11. BAILEY, WILLIAM J 30 years old male, farmer, born Florida ____Clara E. 29 years old female wife, keeping house, born Kentucky ____Eliza Ann 8 years old female, born Florida ____ Selby E. 6 years old male, born Florida

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 1900 CENSUS Note: The 1890 Flori da Federal Census Records were completely burned in a 1921 warehouse fire (including the Florida Widows and Veterans Census schedules). The gap of twenty years from 1880 until 1900 makes it difficult to follow the generations of Bailey descendents. DESCE NDENTS OF WILLIAM 2 BAILEY Note: Edward 3 Bailey, the youngest son of General William Bailey, seemed to be the only one nor Martha L. Bailey Hawkins was on th daughters, Theresa and Mary, because their married names are not known 1. BAILEY, EDWARD, 45 years old male, farmer, born Florida ____ Caroline D. 39 years old female, wife, born Florida __ _John D. 21 years old male, son, born Florida ____Caroline 17 years old female, daughter, born Florida ____Edwd. Jr. 14 years old male, son, born Florida ____Martha H. 10 years old female, daughter, born Florida ____Sarah L. 7 ye ars old female, daughter, born Florida ____George R. 3 years old male, son, born Florida DESCENDENTS OF ZACHARIAH 2 BAILEY Note: Eliza Bailey, the widow of Zachariah Bailey, did not appear on this census. She had probably died by the time this c ensus was taken, Her daughter Cornelia and her widowed daughter, Julia Mathews, and her children cannot be found in the index. Julia might have remarried. Her son William Zachariah who was the sheriff of Jefferson County cannot be found either; however, he was living at this time because he was listed on the 1910 Census as still living in Jefferson County. DESCENDENTS OF JAMES SCOTT AND MARGARET 2 BAILEY SCOTT son Robert, a physician, was not listed on this census, however his widow, living in Jefferson County. 2. SCOTT, REBECCA 58 years old female, widow, head of family, born Florida 3. SCOTT, WILLIAM 62 years old male, lawyer, born Florida ____ Kate D. 69* years old female, wife, born Georgia

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 1900 CENSUS (continued) DESCENDENTS OF WILLIA M JOHN 3 BAILEY Note: The four descendents of William John and Eliza Ann Bailey were still living at the time of the 1900 Census. All of them lived in Florida again. Bellamy Bailey was living with his sister Virginia Bailey Tucker Hernando County, Florida 4. TUCKER, JAMES F. 55 years old male, head of house, born Indiana ____ Virginia H. 49 years old female, wife, born Florida (daughter of William J. Bailey) ____ WM. P. 30 years old male, son, born Florida ____ Eugenia 22 years old female, daughter, born Florida ____ Virginia H. 19 years old female, daughter, born Florida ____ Rose, 17 years old female, daughter, born Florida ____ Susie, 16 years old female, daughter, born Florida BAILEY, BURTON B 41 yea rs old male, boarder, born Florida (son of William John Bailey) Jefferson County, Florida Note: This page of the census is almost completely illegible. 5. MAYS, JOHN B. head ____ Christine wife (daughter of William J. Bailey) ____ William Son The names of others cannot be read. Desoto County, Florida (Wauchula) [Wauchula is now in Hardee County] Note: William J. 4 time of this census. Eliza Ann 5 was married to Thoma s Theodore Weltch. They lived in Jacksonville, Florida. Her sister Rebbeca 5 was living with them. 6. BAILEY, WILLIAM J. 50 years old male, farmer, born Florida ____ Clara, 49 years old female wife, born Kentucky ____ William J. Jr. 12 years old male, son, at school, born Florida ____ Selby E. 26 years old male, son, express messenger, born Florida ____ Nona E. 24 years old female, daughter in law, born Alabama ____ William S. I years old male, grandson, born Florida

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 1910 CE NSUS DESCENDENTS OF WILLIAM 2 BAILEY Jefferson County, Florida 1. BAILEY, EDWARD B. 55 years old male, head, born Florida ____ Carrie D. 49 years old female, wife, born Florida ____ Edward B., Jr. 24 years old male, son, born Florida ____ Martha H. 20 years old female, daughter, born Florida ____ Sarah L. 18 years old female, daughter, born Florida ____ Teresa R. 17 years old female, daughter, born Florida ____ George R. 13 years old male, son, born Florida ____ William, 8 years old male, son, born Florida Clarke, S. Dilworth 29 years old male, son in law, born Florida ____ Carrie B. 27 years old female, daughter, born Florida DESCENDENTS OF ZACHARIAH 2 BAILEY Jefferson County, Florida (Drifton) 2. BAILEY, WILLIAM Z. 72 years ol d male, head, born Florida DESCENDENTS OF JAMES AND MARGARET 2 BAILEY SCOTT Note: William Scott, a lawyer in Jefferson County, was the last living child of Margaret Bailey Scott and her husband James Scott. Neither William nor his wife Kate was listed on the 1910 Census. Rebecca Scott, the second wife of Dr. Robert Scott, was still living in Jefferson County at the time of this census. She was not the mother of his children DESCENDENTS OF WILLIAM JOHN 3 BAILEY Note: The four children of William John and Eliza Ann Bailey were still living in Florida at the time this 1910 Census was taken Hernando County. Florida 3. TUCKER, JAS. F. 69 year old male, head, born Indiana ____ Virginia H. 63 years old female, wife, born Florida ____ W. P. 40 years old male, son, born Florida ____ Eugenia L. 37 years old female, daughter, born Florida ____ Virginia B. 32 years old female, daughter, born Florida ____ Rosalie 26 years old female, daughter, born Florida ____ Susie H. 24 years old, fema le, daughter, born Florida

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 4. BAILEY, BURTON B. Pinellas County, Florida son) 1910 CENSUS (continued) Jefferson County, Florida (Ashville) Note: The John Mays family still lived at Lyndhurst at the time of this census 5. MAYS, JOHN B. 61 years old male, head, born Florida ____ Christine B 61 years old female, wife, born Florida ____ Virginia 26 years old female, daughter, born Florida ____ Sumpter 24 years old male, son, born Florida ____ Christine 20 years old female, daughter, born Florida ____ Liza 18 years old female, daughter, born Florida Brevard County, Florida (Titusville) 6. BAILEY, WM. J. 61 years old male, head, born Florida ____ Clara E. 59 years old female, wife, born Kentucky

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 1920 CENSUS DESCENDENTS OF WILLIAM 2 BAILEY Jefferson County, Florida 1. BAILEY, EDWARD B. 65 years old male, head, born Florida ____ Carrie D. 59 years old female, wife, born Florida ____ John W. 8 years o ld male, grandson, born Florida DESCENDENTS OF ZACHARIAH 2 BAILEY Jefferson County, Florida 2. BAILEY, W.Z. 82 years old male, head, single, born Florida DESCENDENTS OF WILLIAM JOHN 3 BAILEY Pinellas County, Florida Note: James Tucker was dead the tim e of this census, but his wife, Virginia H. was still living as the head of her family 3. TUCKER, VIRGINIA H. 70 years old female, head, widow, born Florida ____ Susan 29 years old female, daughter, single, born Florida Goodrich, Eugenia L. 40 years old female, daughter, widow, born Florida Sinclair, William E. 45 years old male, son in law, married, born England ____ Rosalie 35 years old female, daughter, married, born Florida Holmes, Mary 5 years old female, boarder, born Missouri BAILEY, BURTON B. 65 years old male, brother, born Florida Hernando County, Florida Note: 4. TUCKER, WILLIAM P. 52 years old male, head, single, born Florida ____ Virginia 40 years old female, sist er, single, born Florida Jefferson County, Florida Note: John Mays was dead at the time of this census, but his wife Christine Bailey Mays still lived at Lyndhurst with her son Sumter and daughter Virginia. Neither Sumter nor Virginia ever married. 5. MAYS, THOMAS S. ____ Christine B. 72 years old female, mother, born Florida

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) ____ Virginia 39 years old female, sister, born Florida 1920 CENSUS (continued) Brevard County, Flo rida (Titusville) 6. BAILEY, WILLIAM J 70 years old male, head, born Florida ____Clara E. 69 years old female, wife, born Florida 1930 CENSUS Edward Bailey, probably the last living child of General William Bailey, died in 1923. His widow Carrie D. Ba iley was still living in 1930. William Zachariah Bailey, the last living child of Zachariah and Eliza Bailey, was probably dead by the time the 1830 census was taken. He was eighty two in 1820 and living in Monticello. He was not listed in Monticello in 19 30. Christine Bailey Mays died at Lyndhurst Plantation in 1925 and her brother, William John Bailey, Jr. died in Titusville in 1929. Virginia H. Bailey Tucker, the oldest of the four children of William John and Eliza Ann Bailey, was listed on the 1930 ce nsus as an eighty five year old widow living in Safety Harbor, Pinellas County, Florida. She died in 1931. Burton Bellamy Bailey, the youngest of the four children of William John and Eliza Ann Bailey, was listed on the 1930 Census as a seventy eight year old single male. He was living with his sister Virginia in Safety Harbor. He died there in 1935. His death meant that all of the Bellamy and Bailey children who grew up at Lyndhurst and loved the house and the land were gone.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 1825

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note: A. Bellamy (Abram Bellamy) wrote this letter to Miss E. A. Williams (Eliza Ann Williams) 16 October 1825. They were married on January 2, 1826, in St. Augustine. I call no Goddess to inspire my strains A fabled Muse may suit hard the feigns; Girl of my life; my ardent Spirit burns, And all the tribute of my heart returns. Thy gift received, goodness ever new, The Purse still dearer, as the giver you. Thou Orb of day; thou other paler light; And all ye many sparkling Stars of night; If aught tha t giver, from my mind efface Then roll to me along your wandering spheres Thy present this morning (as a memento of my birthday), My Dearest Eliza, has awakened reflections which most probably would have remained Page 2 dormant_ It has caused me to look back on the tide of the time, and scan the apparent rapidity of my past life with wonder and astonishment. The periods of childhood though seldom or never marked with any st riking incidents or peculiarities is always dwelt upon with rapture and delight But a few years ago and seemingly the other day my heart felt not the throbs of contending passions; my soul was confined within the limits of its own narrow call, and sufficie nt for the day were the pleasures thereof. But how changed is the scene, the blandishment of youthful sports have passed away, new objects and new pursuits are presented, and the part which will fall my lot to play on the stage of action time alone can det ermine. While I linger on days that are passed and gone, let me not forget the present and (I hope auspicious) period of my life. Happy at least in anticipating bliss happy \ \ \ \ \ \ [crossed out words] Page 3 in finding a heart so much in union with my own, one which I know will in every situation of life fondly cling to me, one which when pain and anguish wring the [torn out] will prove the ministering Angel. What can equal such anticipation, but the full fruition of the reality. This day has found me f easting on the one, may the next annual return cause me to reflect on myself [torn out] making the comparison Yr. True A. Bellamy Miss E. A. Williams

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 10 October _1825 1826

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note: The following copy is so poor that it is impossible to transcribe accurately, but it is a marriage bond for the wedding of Abraham Bellamy and Eliza Ann Williams. Know all men by those present that Mes. Abraham Bellamy and Samuel Z. Gary Are held and firmly bound_______________ ____________________________________ sum of two hundred dollars to the ____paym ent of which we bind ourselves____________________ ____by those present Sealed ________________ and dated this 2 nd day of January 1826 When a marriage is suddenly intended to be had and solemnized between the above bound Abraham Bellamy of lawful age and Miss Eliza A Williams ___if there be no lawful cause to obstruct the said marriage ___ this obligation ____________________ in full _____________ A. Bellamy Witness Sam Z Gary James Tingle

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC)

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 1835

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note: The following is a letter from Abram Bellamy to Samuel H. Duval, Esq. Monticello 15 August 1835 Saml. H. Duval Esq Sir_ I had hoped the pleasure of seein g you a few days since, when in your County_ I desired to give you, in person, an invitation to attend a meeting of the Citizens of the County at Hollowors store to take place on the last Saturday of the month_ My object in desiring you to be present on th at occasion is this: I have been informed that you said when lately in this County that you would give when called upon, perhaps had already given to Mr. Hollowor, that you had the people of wished you to ___ me take this statement of yours, provided your friend would let me have it so long in my possession, and in presence of the Crowd Page 2 assembled on that occasion, endorse a certain significant and somewhat unequivocal word of ___ syllable upon the face of it, subscribe my name to the endorsement & return it to the individual, for whom it was manufactured, in the kindest, most disinteres ted and patriotic motives on your part, no doubt_ I should have believed it impossible for [ink blot] Mr. Duval to have given such a certificate, notwithstanding the respectability of the source where the information has been received; if I had not been i nformed that Mr. Duval did on a former occasion take with the greatest public spirit, doubtless a very laudable interest in my affairs_ An Individual of this County placed in my hands a cheque on a Bank in Tallahassee, drawn by a person residing in that ci ty that I took the money thus___ contrary to express instructions and appropriated it to the payment of debts against the said individual placed in my Page 3 hand for collection & ___ I have heard ___, that you are one of a pack of ___ of Tallahasee, wh o are most actively engaged in the circulation of this story_ Some I understand went so far as to say, that they would in consequence of my conduct in this regard never recognize me again! I am fallen indeed if a refusal of the recognition of such could ef fect me_ Of you Sir, I had expected better things, but however that may be, if you had inquired into the facts, of either of the above [ink blot] Cates, I am of the opinion I should have been spared the mortification of addressing a communication like this to one, who if I am correctly informed, has disgraced the name of Duval With all due respect A. Bellamy

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Nacoosa 28 August 1835 Col Augt. Alston Sir_ I have never uttered to any man the threat which you say in your note to me of Indeed I do not know, for I have never inquired of D r. Mc L [?] or anybody else what you or the individual who signed with you or any other person, told Dr. McL, or any other concerning myself in Tallahassee or elsewhere_ This must be satisfactory to you ; As to the Individual who signed with you I am quite indifferent with regard to him however I have a passing remark for you__ Shortly after my return from St. Augustine Page 2 I understood that Mr. DuV. had volunteered to give a certificate to an individual of this County, that I had before the last C ongressional Election said in conversation in Tallahassee with perhaps Col. Parish of your vicinity that the people of Jefferson County belonged to me & I would be damned if they should go for Wyatt. This story I have pronounced false repeatedly and when after an unsuccessful effort to see Mr. Duval in his own County on this subject, I wrote him some two weeks ago since by a safe private conveyance at the Mineral Springs where he then was that I would be on the 29 previous appointment that I would take his certificate and in the presence of the crowd assembled on that occasion give it the character it merited, by Page 3 the face of it, subscribing my name_ and returning it to the individua l for whom it was manufactured_ That letter contained a notice of another rumor with which the name of Mr. DuV. was connected it need not be noticed now nor perhaps at any other time, as I presume_ it had no relevancy to the matter in question. Mr DuV. must have rec. that letter_ it having been committed at the Springs to the hands of Col. Reid, who was returning home; but I will have admitted my great surprise if you, Sis, have seen that communication_ Should I however be mistaken upon that point, I hav e to say in conclusion, that if you have identified yourself, with the Individual who has signed with you the extraordinary Page 4 note to which a sense of Justice to my own character has promised this reply, I have not the least objectio n Your conven ience will be my pleasure; I must be permitted to add however_ that I have now a right to expect that this matter will be conducted in accordance with the rules recognized among Gentlemen Very Respectfully A. Bellamy N.B. I address the vo ters at Hollomans Store tomorrow according to the appointment above referred to I can be seen at home at any time afterwards A.B. Col. Augustus Alston Note: b

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) after the duel. Abram Bellamy also killed a man in 1835 in a duel over politics. In the Abram Bellamy Everett White duel, both were seriously injured; however, White died and Bellamy recovered and lived until 1839. 1839

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note: L. A. Thompson, Chairman of the Bar of Middle Florida, wrote this letter to John Bellamy and sent him a copy of the resolution passed by members of the Bar expressing their sympathy upon the death of his son, Abram Bellamy. Tallahassee July 22 nd 1839 John Bellamy Esq. Dearest Sir I transmit you annexed a Copy of the resolution of the Bar of this County at a meeting held this date expressive of their feelings upon the occasion of the lamented decease of their brother, your son the Hon. Abram Bellamy. Permit me to add my condolence for you the unhappy bereavement, which you and the County at large has sustained and believe me My dear Sir Yours very truly Sincerely L A Thompson

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 1847

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Lyndhurst March 18 th 1 847 My dear brother Uncle Bailey handed me your letter to day, and I can assure you it was very interesting indeed. Cousin Margaret spent the day with us to day. Mrs. Anderson and her granddaughter Miss Shaw have been spending some few days with Mamma. I must tell you what we had for dinner, Turkey, elegantly dished up and dressed with oisters [sic], ham, kid, chicken, rice, potatoes, cabbage, etc. I must bid you good night Bon Soir. I have risen quite early this morning for the purpose of finishi ng my letter. I have so many things to tell you that I do not know what to say first, but I will [omitted word] the first about your pigeons. They are now increasing very rapidly. I am now hearing them. Mamma had 40 geese eggs. They are now laying, and she gets 50 or 60 hen eggs every day. The woods look beautifully, the trees being covered with leaves. I suppose you have heard about its snowing. I never was so surprised in my life. We kept some in a pail for three days and had eggnog and made Ice cream. I do not Page 2 think it as cold when it snows as when it does not. Mr. Taylor has been here from New York. Father has been very sick but is now recovering very fast. When do you expect to enter Yale? I do not like our teacher much. Mr. Skannel is going to m ove to Louisiana in six weeks and Mr. Finlayson is going to live in his place. I am now gazing at the beautiful field before me covered with grain. I told Steven what you said and he told me when I wrote to you to give his love to you. I was very much plea sed with the piece you sent me It reminded me of my visit somewhat. Mamma intends letting Anita come home next year and //////// [scratched out words] Theresa and I return with her in the winter. I am trying hard to make this letter worth its postage but I do not know. It is raining very hard. Chip and Tory come on very well with their studies. I am glad Sister has written to you. I owe her a letter. I should like to know who the Valentine was from, you received. I do not know whether Cousin received any or not. As Mamma wishes to fill this letter up I thought I would stop as you would no doubt like to hear from her. All join with me in kind love to you and accept the same from your affectionate Sister Josephine H B March 31 st I have been very anxious my beloved son to write you a long letter but have been prevented by the illness of William who has been confined to his bed for three weeks from Bilious Nosmonia Page 3 or rather since cold settled on his lu ngs_ he left his room to day and walked about the yard_ tomorrow he and I with Nanny leave for Cedar Keys there to remain for two weeks_ Doctor Hines recommend his doing so and I hope it will prove beneficial to him, at one time I was truly alarmed about h is recovery, I am now cheered and hope by going to the Keys 100 miles south of us, where he will inhale such pure air and enjoy the luxury of fine fish and Oysters he may return home much improved_ I should have written you before but I was so wearied and unwell that I could not bring myself even to the pleasure of writing to you as one of my happiest moments that I enjoy_ To days mail brought us all your valued letter and on my return home I will answer it. I cannot tell you how much it elates me to hear from you_ I will tell Phine to write you during my absence_ We have had some company lately_ Mr. Taylor from N.Y._ I was much pleased him_ Gov. Call, Mrs. Anderson and her interesting grand daughter Edwarda Shaw, who is

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) engaged to Doctor Cary Gamble of Ta llahassee, and on Thursday your Aunt Emmala Doctor and Mrs. Taylor Dan and Sally Bird and Lieut Mosely dined with me Page 4 also your Cousins Emmala looks pretty well she speaks of going North this summer and traveling with you_ But I expect it is all talk, as she has to take expenses so much into consideration Williams illness prevents his going to Tampa now, but he intends going on his return home. Wm. Bailey is here again he says he will write you he looks better than I ever saw him Your Un cles family are pretty well John appears some better, he killed a fine deer this week. The children are all in fine health_ I have much to say but must defer to another time as I must write a few lines to Sarah and ought to Anita also but I fear I shall not_ Take good care of yourself my dear Burton, appreciate your golden moments, and you will reap a rich harvest_ All send love to you Good night my dearest son may every blessing crown you and ensure you happiness here and hereafter and believe me with the tenderness of a Devoted Mother Yours ever Eliza A Bailey Note: ildren, John and William. She also wrote about her sister in law, Emmala [sometimes called Aunt Emily]. Mary Bellamy, was the wife of General Bailey. In some places s he is called Mary Elizabeth. Josephine wrote about Steven, a house servant, who was loved by all the Bellamy children. He is mentioned in many of their letters to Burton. She also wrote about her four sisters, Sarah, Anita, icknames for the twin, Theodosia and Victoria.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Oxford Georgia July 7 th 1847 Dear Major Your affectionate favor writt en from Charleston came to hand some week since but I have been so busily engaged writing the above speech that I have not had an opportunity before this besides I thought I would wait and send you a copy as you requested I have had it corrected by Judge L ongstreet. His corrections were very few_ he only scratched out a few words and substituted others All I have to do now is to deliver it on the 21 st or 22 nd of this month. I wish you were all here not that I expect to do well, but that you might hear som e fine speeches from some of the great men from this state & Alabama also you might see some rare fun_ Dr. Means will preach the commencement sermon_ George Pierce will deliver an address before the Education Society_ Hon. H.W. Hilliard of Ala will deliver an address before the Litterary Socertas [sic]_ besides several other Page 2 addresses to be delivered by gentlemen from a distance & gentlemen of distinction_ There will be in addition to these 26 Senior and Junior Speeches and an address from Judge Long street to our class_ We will have a big time here this year_ I wish you were all here_ I admit my Dear Major I treated you rather bad in not writing you at Macon but this speech bothered me so much that I did not think of the promise I made in my last l etter while you were at home I know it is bad to be disappointed by a friend but under the circumstances I think you ought to forgive me_ I wish it could have been in my power to have went [sic] on to New York with you_ but as I could not I must be conten t with spending the Summer in old Georgia another time_ I wanted to go so that I might return with the two Sarahs_ It was all that could have carried get either o f them to write Page 3 nor Anita with them_ It seems that no inducement can be offered Cousin Sarah & Anita to write last & now I think I have done all I ought t o do_ But will take great pleasure in writing either of them if they will write_ I have always felt it my duty to write you and give you all the advice in my power being the oldest & I am happy to say that you have listened to my admonitions & have been very punctual in answering my letters_ Any advice you may need write me just as you would a brother ( for you are as near to me as a brother) & if I can render you any assistance I will heartily do so_ if I live I will try to see you next year_ I will then have time to spend as long a time North as I wish_ I hope you may all continue well & that you may enjoy yourselves & learn fast_ Remember that now is the harvest season reap and garner well You are now at that age when you ought to be in college & unl ess you study hard it will be a year or two before you can enter yet_ Give my love to all our relatives & friends & accept the same for yourself I remain in Sincerity your affectionate Cousin John Bellamy Bailey Note: John Bellamy Bailey, the oldest son of General William Bailey, wrote this letter to his cousin, Burton Bellamy. John was graduating from a school in Oxford, Georgia. The original campus of Emory University was in Oxford [1836 1915].

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note: The first p age of the speech seems to be missing. expressive language of Burns_ Assiduous wait upon her: Not for to hide it in a hedge, Nor for a train attendant But for the glorious privilege As an element of government, wealth is indispensable_ as a source of individual happiness it is highly requisite, but by the abuse of it the pilla rs of the republic may be undermined and a government more hideous than the ghost of Bangor may be reared in its stead. Our principle objection to making wealth the standard of promotion, apart from other considerations is the moral influence which it exer ts_ Let wealth be the standard of power and there will be no check to the immorality of the wicked; they might commit every species of villainy with perfect impunity to say nothing of the corrupting influence their conduct would have upon others. Having shown the importance which we attach to wealth_ the servility with which we hail its possessions as our superiors & the consequences of an over estimate of it we shall next attempt to Page 2 prove that morality and intelligence are the only things which s hould raise one man above another. Endowed with knowledge and enlightened by morality, man is divested of the evil propensities of his nature, and clothed anew in heavens choisest [sic] blessings The base promptings of passion are spurned, and he seeks n ot by stratagem what should be gained by honor But if moral restraint be wanting if man be left to the guidance of his nature, talent is but a fit instrument in his hands for the accomplishments of his base designs. Hence we see intelligence unaccompanie d by morality may if perverted be injurious in its effects. It should not therefore of its self be the criterion of distinction But let morality and intelligence be inseparable, and they will be proof against all the assaults of the base passions_ If now o ur premises be correct, that the nearer we approach to equality the happier will be the condition of mankind_ and if by taking some of the power we accord to wealth and adding it to true merit, will tend to make us more equal, our duty is plainly marked ou t, & he who follows it not must account to his maker & to his country for his conduct. Let us then as citizens, as republicans, endeavor not to look at man through golden medium nor be dazzled by brilliant talent when united with base Note: This end of th e speech was written on the top of the first page of his letter. principles. Let us lend a helping hand to meritorious poverty, and then may we expect to develope [sic] talent_ give virtue its proper reward and increase the happiness of mankind._ Jno. B. Bailey Florida

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Est A Bellamy To Taylor & Ritch To Cash paid Burton W. Bellamy Jun 29 to cash paid him 50.00 50.00 50.00 50.00 Sep 13 100.00 100.00 85 50 100 $685.00 New York 9 Dec 1847 Mr Burton W Bellamy New Haven, Dear Sir: Your favour [sic] of 5 th Inst at hand & its content, noticed We did not get you r letter until last evening & could not of course send the money by Tuesdays mail as you requested_ We now enter herewith a Certificate of Deposit in Tradesmens Bank for one hundred Dollars, payable to your order, which you will have no difficulty in getti ng the money for from any of the Banks in New Haven_ We thought this the safest manner of remitting you the money & hope it will answer your purpose_ We also send you statement of the amount of money our bank paid you_ we have had but one letter from Wm J Bailey since he left here & that was dated at St. Marys on his way home__ Yours ___ Taylor & Ritch Note: This statement t is from the firm of Taylor and Ritch who managed the account for Burton. His stepfather, William J. Bailey, depo sited money to this account, but the money came from the estate of his father, Abram Bellamy

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Mr. Burton W. Bellamy New York Dec 20, 1847 New Haven Dear Sir. Your favour of the 18 th Inst ___ hand, Enclosed you have a certificate of Deposit in Trading Bank for Two hundred Dollars payable to your order & we hope you will have no difficulty in negotiating it through some of the New Haven Banks. The Apples we will send by the first favourable opportunity [blotted out] have almost daily intelli gence from your section of Country & and they are well. We have received 54 Bales cotton & have sold 6 & received 72 Bales W. B. yet on hand also 78 Ba [blotted out] J.B. 78 Bal [blotted out] J B.78 Bales & B B 84 Bales both sold at 63 p hundred. Price very low & we do not look for much improvement soon Yours truly Taylor & Ritch Note: Burton had Taylor & Rich order some apples to be sent to his family at Lyndhurst. This firm managed his finances and attended to many of his personal purchases.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) LYNDHURST 1848

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Oucilla Feb 3 1848 My dear brother Your kind and affectionate letter was received about a week ago. I was very glad to see it. I have been indolent in answering it I am getting along with my studdies [sic] very well an d hope you are doing the same. I am now studied Geography, Grammar, History, spelling, French and a few others. I am now reading the History of England by Mrs. Markham, it is very interesting. Miss Williams makes me write compositions now. I write them eve ry Wednesday, my last subject was on this Self praise goes but little ways. Sister has been to Tallahassee for the last month she said she enjoyed herself very much. Miss Williams went also she only staid ten days she likes Tallahassee very much while she was gone we went up to the new place. I cooked dinner but we had to walk back we rode up there in the wagon. I expect we will move up there next week. Ma longs to get up there. I have just come out of school to finish my letter. It has been raining now for two days and is still doing so now. Cousin John has just come to see us about a half an hour ago he and ma and sister are in the room talking. Christmas was very dull here nothing to do but to drink egg nog [sic]. Victoria is sitting by me writing to Anit a. She intends adding a few Page 2 lines to this letter. Miss Hoag is going back to new York the middle of the month with Mr. Denham. She thinks that this climate does not agree with her. I am very sorry for I like her very much. The children are very much pleased with the books that you sent them. Victoria has read hers through and commenced to read Virginias. Thedosia [sic] is now reading hers. Mary is now standing by me she begs to be remembered to Master Burton. I think she will make a smart house maid[ sic] for me. Page is out in the yard at play he says he wants to see Master Burton. Your Ruster [sic] was nearly dead but Ma has made Steven attend to him He has fought so much that he is nearly blind. He is quite recovered now. Your pigeons are coming on very well. There are eight young ones. They are laying. Virginia often speaks of you she is standing by me she sometimes gives me a shake and I give her a word or two. She said she will write to you I must close my dear brother by telling you that all the family write in kind love to you. May God bless you as long as you live that is my sincere wish I remain your affectionate sister Josephine H Bellamy Il sera bientt nuit Bon Soir Note: In her letter Josephine writes about moving to the new place. This is a house already standing on the land where they will build their new home, Lyndhurst.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) My Dear Burton I fear you have some suspicion of my sincerity in promising to write to you or perhaps you have thoughts that I repente d having made such a promise. I acknowledge that I have been very dilatory in performing it, but I hope you will excuse me when I assure you that I have not delayed writing for the want of inclination to do so, but solely because I have long been in arrear s with nearly all of my correspondents who are, as perhaps you may remember, somewhat numerous. In fact, I am not yet out of debt but have resolved to postpone writing to you no longer, well knowing how acceptable a letter from home always is, even if it is dull and uninteresting, and it is not probable that I shall be able to tell you any thing [sic] new, as without a Page 2 doubt your mother and Sarah keep you well informed of the few events that transpire in this out of of the s illness has been the chief and almost the only point of interest for more than a week past and has excited the utmost alarm and anxiety among us all. Mrs. Bailey and Sarah will, if they have not already done so, give you more particulars in regard to it than I am able to do, as I have seen him but once and have been away two or three days since he was confined to his room. It could scarcely have occurred more unfortunately as to time it being just in the middle of moving and everything coming together in this way has worn upon your mother. Now, however as her anxiety is allayed and she is able to take more rest at night, I hope she will soon regain her strength and good looks. During last month I paid a visit to Page 3 my relations in Tallahassee and spe nt a week there very agreeably. I saw some of your old friends, who all said many kind things of you and expressed much interest in your health and improvement. It is scarcely necessary to tell you that you have been very much missed from home since our re turn. The whist table has been quite deserted all winter and eggnog has gone out of fashion. You remember perhaps that I have a tender feeling for both these good things and you will readily believe that I have not been forgetful of you when musing upon th e enjoyments of the past winter. I do not yet feel at home up here and fear I shall not very soon. I miss the pleasant walks about the old place, for I have not yet found any to compare with them. Time, however, the friend of the afflicted, may Page 4 pe rhaps console me in his passage, and reconcile me to the change. And, speaking of time, how near at hand is the time for going North! When I go, I shall be certain to think of you. I do not yet know who will take your place as beau. I fancy it does not lo ok much like Spring [sic] with you yet, but here the weather is almost like paradise. We are having great quantities of flowers and the birds are singing as they only sing in Spring. I have written in great haste and have had Theo at my side coursing a les son aloud, which is to say the least not much an assistance. I shall expect a reply by return mail, and hope that you will not disappoint me, indeed, I believe you have too much gallantry for that.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Believe me very truly Your friend Lyndhurst Feb. 23/48 Anna Williams Note: Anna Williams was the tutor for the children living at Lyndhurst. Theo [Theodosia] and win sisters. Dear Burton, I told you in my last letter that I could not write you again for some time. It was quite impossible for me to collect my thoughts sufficiently to write you during my stay in Tallahassee. Although you were absent, you were ofte n the theme of the conversation. You have indeed won golden opinions with all that know you. many kind inquiries concerning your improvements and your health. I received your letter about a month [sic] and am under many obligations to you for it. I am glad to hear that your health is improving. I hope you have had a sleigh ride I am sure you will enjoy it. During my stay in Tallahassee we spent some three or four days at Gov. vated and they are adding to their house. We spent an evening at Dr. Hunters also at Dr. Bradford. They inquired after you and your pigeons. I think Sarah is quite pretty, there is not enough character attached to her features it is true her features are r egular. I am no advisor of beauty of expressions more than beauty of features. Miss Branch is very affable in her manners. Mr. Hopkins is very attentive we all prophesy that it will be a match. They all send their love to you. Among the gentlemen you know was Mr. Garret, Miss Branch & Mr. Southall. Mr. James Branch Page 2 Mr. Southall I consulted about the two colleges knowing that he was acquainted with both he advises you by all means to graduate at Yale he thinks it is far preferable. All the gentlemen wish to be remembered to you. We attended many parties during our visit to the metropolis and had a picnic to Waculla [sic] Springs. We enjoyed it very much. It is indeed a curiosity. Dr McIntyre went with Cousin Margaret James Branch with Sarah and Mr. So uthall and myself. Miss Lang went with Cousin John, Mr. Garret with Miss Anderson and ___ with Miss Whitfield We had quite a dance Dr. McI [sic] played on the violin. We expect Miss Lang, Miss Douglass, Mr. Papy, Mr. Southall the last of next week. Mama is very much engaged in making preparations to move. They have just carried off the large orange tree which stood near the kitchen. Mrs. Williams house has been removed. It is a beautiful place and only wants a fine house to show to advantage. I hope it wil l not be long before we have it. Mama, Father and the children have received your letters. Josephine has answered it. We think often of you and Anita and wish you were here to enjoy to some of the real pleasures of home. Cousin John is much improved by his visit he came over on yesterday and remained until Page 3 today. I told him you thought very unkindly of his conduct toward you He always says he will write you very soon William is going to school in Monticello he likes his teachers very much. He comes home once in two weeks. Mr. Allen teaches in Tallahassee, Mr. ___is somewhere in Leon. we shall soon have this part of Jefferson to ourselves so many have emigrated to another negros [sic] to

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Dre and Amos. Uncle B. is immensely wealthy he has been buying a great many negros. I should rather have property in money than slaves. Mr. Rowel l was over here the other day he makes 160 bales it is discouraging taking so much pains with our cotton to receive so little compensation. I heard from Anita not very long ago she enjoys herself very much at school. Anita is not very fond of writing we h ear from her very seldom. They are making grand preparations for moving Mama has 60 turkeys we shall finish on Thursday. Uncle Bailey was over on yesterday he looks very well and sends his love to you. Have you had a sleigh ride yet Anita writes me that th ey have had a great deal of snow in New York. We have had and continue to have some very cold weather here. I hope your health is good. Do study hard we all feel Page 4 interested in your improvement and shall expect great things from you How is Mr. ___ d o you see him often. my love to Carey Conley how does she like her school. I did not see your friend ___during my visit to Tallahassee Miss Chaires told me that she wanted him to make his debut about the time that we did but he would not. Tit and myself a re going this afternoon to visit Aunt Bailey and remain for a few days during the moving. I do wish you were here I am sure you would enjoy it We killed hogs about a month ago& have had bad luck with it The children are all well they send many kisses to yo u. Write us often your letters are very acceptable presents we delight to hear from those we love You have not been to NY since we parted I wish we could [sic] there next summer but I shall have to practice economy and go to St. Augustine We spend a great to be remembered to Maj. Burton Adieu my dearest Burton may God preserve, guide and direct you is the heart felt wish from dear sister Sarah Feb. 26. 1848 Note: Sarah Bellamy was the oldest of the Bellamy children. Her writing is very difficult to read, and she uses very little punctuation. Margaret and William, his children were John, Sarah, Martha, Lydia, Abraham Zachariah, Mary, the uncle of the There were six living Bellamy children: Sarah, Burton, Anita, Josephine and the twins, Victoria an d Theodosia. After their mother, Eliza Ann Williams Bellamy, married Col. William John speaking of her sisters, Josephine, Victoria and Theodosia Bellamy and her two s tepsisters, slaves. The slaves often asked about Burton and sent him messages. The family rarely used the

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC)

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Home March 16 1848 My Dear Burton It is more pleasure for me to receive letters than to write them, but I though [sic] that when I got yours about two weeks ago that I would answer it amediately [sic] but little Sis was taken very ill the next day and I thought she would die, but the good providence relieved her, she is up but is not well threatened with chills and fever and is taking quinine and iron. I am not well suf fering with asthma and have been for a week, the other children are pretty well. Daught is going to school in Monticello your mother and Aunt I suppose have a plenty without her, Sis is reading very well and I am teaching her, she is very fond of her book. of the Aucilla as I very seldom see any one or hear from there and have not been there since November. Man. stayed here Sunday night a week ago and went to s chool with Daught Monday morning he sayed [sic] the girls would be here the last of the week but they did not come. I heard Mr. Southall and Mr. J. B. had come up which is I suppose was the cause. Mr. S. I hear visits Col eeks. I do not know whether Miss Margaret has any perticular [sic] admirer, but hear that Mr. Dilworth makes pretty frequent visits there. The Gen. has bought all the Roberts Negroes and a Page 2 good [sic] others, I never hear how Rowell and Baugh get o n, or what kind of crop Mr. B. has made all I know about him is the Negroes say he has moved in Mahs house and his wife has well, I always read your letters to him and he is delighted to hear from you tears fall from his eyes he says poor fellow I shall not live to see him a man, he sends his love to you he truly is a good and faithful creature. In all my troubles he tries to console me and I have many I believe I wrote you about Moses having his hand ruined in the sugar mill it is nearly well, but think he will never be able to do much, and just getting through the trouble, when Pete got f through the hand and nearly ruined it tore it a great deal onjointed [sic] thumb and fore finger. The Dr. was here and done [sic] it up and it is doing as well as could be expected. Many are my troubles but I hope the good Lord will deliver me out of the m all. I am glad to see that you are diligently pursuing your studies. Dan is still studying law, Sallie is at College her Father left this week to bring her home, as she has been sick nearly ever since she went up and is not able to pursue her studies, I will deliver your message when I see her, Oh Bub I wish you could see my dear little sweet blue eyed William is the smartest in the world beginning to talk any thing, my de__ The rest of this letter is missing. Note: Emmala [sometimes called Aunt Emily] was the widow of William Bellamy, Abram youngest daughter, born a short time before her father died, was named William! Daniel and She wrote about some of her slaves. Cudjo was a particular favorite. She also named two of the overseers, Rowell and Baugh. Baugh was at the plantation owned by her father in law, John Bellamy. His estate was still not settled.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Lyndhurst March 18 th 1848 My dear Burton I was highly gratified tod ay at the receipt of your long epistle Cousin John had the kindness to bring us the mail Mr Papy and Mr Branch were here today Mr. B poor fellow is dreadfully smitten, but I fear that his love or rather affection is not reciprocated judging from Sarahs con duct one might say she encouraged him How wrong I am sure that if I knew that a gentleman liked me, and I did not care for him, while is [sic] devotion was not so intense I would express to him my feelings Mama received a letter from Anita today she is qui te a lady I am glad to hear that she keeps up her regular correspondence with you It gives us a great deal of pleasure to hear from Anita and yourself and more pleased to know that you are making good progress in your studies Anita expects to leave schoo l at semester I do not know what she will [sic]. Page 2 I wanted to write you last week my dearest B but something always prevented me from following my inclinations Mr Lang and Mr Southall were down last week Nothing has occurred of much consequence latel y it is indeed rather difficult to find material to form a letter when nothing happens Col Butler died on the 17 th he has been ill for some time but at least he was prepared to go to that place prepared by our blessed Lord He has left many children some in very poor circumstances Mr. Garret I believe you met in N York sent me several pieces of music he was down last week I like him much Poor Mr Joseph Branch he has been suffering from a sore foot all the winter He is continually sending me some messages. M rs. Lang & Mrs. Douglass spent some time with us I believe they enjoyed themselves very much Mrs. L has such a sweet little boy his name is Richard after his grand father [sic] the general Cousin John is becoming very domesticated. Page 3 he has been trans acting some business for his father in Madison I think it is time for him to amend his physical image I believe he has buried his mental capacity in a napkin Reading which is one of the most delightful amusements we have, instructing as well as making the time pass rest of my time reading. Miss Williams and myself have been reading together all winter We have been reading the Queens of England by Mr ___ We hav e not completed it as yet We are now reading Mary the daughter of Henry 8 th and Katherine of Aragon. Do you study English history I think it would be an excellent plan to read it during your vacation it is very interesting Anita will be delighted to see yo u In the latter part of your letter what did you allude to you spoke of hard feelings in our settlement explain yourself the next time you write. Our Page 4 county has commenced to look beautifully The dogwood jasmine violets & red bud now decorate our sou thern land. The atmosphere is highly perfumed. The orange tree is indeed a feast for the eyes The trees are perfectly enveloped in buds. The farmers are very busy planting. I have not seen or heard from Mr. Rowell recently. Father has quite recovered and i s going to Monticello to attend court he will be gone some time as he is one of the jurors. Stephan is still very faithful he begs me to make many kind remembrances to you. [blurred] has been suffering much from ear ache[sic] which is very painful, but I a m happy to says she is much better this morning. Christine

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) is one of the sweetest children I ever saw she is very interesting making great effort efforts to use loquacious ___. She succeeds very well in ___ but not in sound The other children are well not making much improvement in [The transcription of the writing across the side of the page 4 begins here.] their studies. We all spent a day with Aunt Bailey last week they made many inquiries after you eir very long promised letters until they arrive_ Anita mentions Mr. Washington and Cousin calling to see her. Aunt Louisa is still in St. Augustine There is not much affection in her I intend writing her very soon. The hawk killed your pigeons the other d me. My love to Cary Conley and respects to Mr. ___ I never have had great opinion of his capacity, therefore do not feel disappointed in what you say concerning him Ere this I suppose Mr. C lay has visit the Elm city I hope he was without any trouble received by the people. Many kisses from the children accompanied by much love from Father and Mother with some dearest Burton [missing words] Sister Sarah Note: Bailey. half sister of Eliza Ann Bailey. Eliza Ann was the daughter of Ana Maria Hill Williams and Samuel Williams. After Samuel Williams died, Ana Maria married General Joseph Hernandez, and Louisa was one of their children.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) My dear brother Your kind letter was received about a week ago and I now take my pen in hand to answer it with a great deal of pleasure I can assure you. You do not know how much pleasure it gives me to receive a letter from you who I love so dearly. I hope you will continue to make grea t progress in your studies. I am still taking music lessons. I can hardly realize that so long a time intervened since our separation my dear brother. Mr. Southall gave sister a beautiful little lap dog its name is Perrito. He speaks very often of you and thinks that you Page 2 will make a smart man. He tells us that we ought to be glad to have such a kind brother. Mamma showed him one of your letters he thought that you wrote a beautiful hand. Aunt Baileys children like Miss Huntington very well they get a long well. It was the white ruster [sic] he is dead I am sorry to say the Red one can out fight all the other rusters in the yard. We are up to the new place after a long time. I like it much better than the old place. Uncle Morris went out to kill a squi rrel to make some soup and killed a deer. Aunt Stavia has a very sick baby and Mamma thinks it will die. Miss Williams likes Tallahassee very much. Chip was very glad when she went. Victoria commenced Grammer [sic] last Monday she has got to the third less think she will Page 3 like it in a week or so. When you write to Anita again give my love to her and tell her she must answer my letter. I must draw my [sic] to a close my dear brother I must not forget to say that I am very [sic] to hear of the death of Mr. John Adams. Mamma sister [sic] send their love to you. Sister says that she spends her time profitable [sic] in sewing reading and practicing. All send their love to you. In haste Your affectionate sister Josephi ne H Bellamy Note: Uncle Morris and Aunt Stavia were probably servants. Miss Huntington was a tutor and

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Lyndhurst April 1 st 1848 My dearest Burton Away from home letters are very acceptable presents, this I know from experience, scarcely two weeks have elapsed since I last wrote to you, but f eeling in a grand notion to send my ideas, notions, etc. abroad, I follow my inclination and write you. I hope you are enjoying excellent health and when I see you again may you be a New Englander in rosy cheeks as well as habits. Miss Williams received yo ur highly gratifying epistle last week and will respond to it very soon. Are you aware that ladies are creatures of impulse when they do not feel inclined they can never accomplish what they wish Page 2 that is the reason they are so tardy in answering let ters. Anita favored us last week with her thoughts and imaginations which was [sic] very entertaining. She had just been to ___ her reconnaissance with Mr. Clay she was much pleased with her visit and described him in a very pompous style so caracteristic [sic] of Anita She raised my curiosity much by saying that she had a great secret that you had told her but she did not feel inclined to commit it to black and white Mama has in reserve for you the Floridian which contains the doings at Madison. Mr. Pappy Hawkins dined with us on Sunday Mr Southall also made us a visit on his return Furman Chaires was down here some two weeks ago he is as lean as ever and as susceptible [sic] as ever Aunt Bailey and family were Page 3 here on Friday also Mrs. Mays also Cou sin Danitte he is indeed a spring flower quite agreeable not loquacious enough to be irksome he says he is coming again to ride horseback with me but gentlemen are not to be trusted I shall not look for him until I see him Yesterday we spent at Mrs. Finlay ___ Wallace and little Stephen are gratifying their roaming propensities now for abo ut five her infant last Friday it had been sick for some time William Bailey spent to day [sic] with us he nticello Mr Haynes is dead, died last Saturday Page 4 night Poor fellow he looked miserably During our stay in Tallahassee he gave us a party his liver was affected. Cousin John spent last Sunday with us he is very much confined at home as they have no ov erseer Mr. Jones has been quite ill and has gone to the Keys to recruit [sic] I have not heard from the plantation for some time The weather is delightful now the smiling spring is in its zenith and truly imparts its balmy influence to the human heart work ing continually to admire and enjoy its beauty. We rise quite early. This morning was beautiful as we awakened man to labor it was truly a spring morning with that soft hazy mellowness which melts into beauty Stephen is pretty well his garden looks finely. We had green peas, Irish potatoes, etc. The flowers are in bloom the atmosphere is highly perfumed [The next part is written from the bottom to the top of the page over the other writing on page 4. It is difficult to read.]

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) with the odor of the dogwood and honey suckle Mama has just been to set some turkeys she has not been very well Father and herself send much love to you The farm is improving every day The children are well with the exception of Christina who has the chills and fever every now and the n I have a beautiful little dog he is perfectly white I suppose Josephine wrote you who was the donor he is a great pet with the children We are going to build very soon This is a beautiful place and only wants cultivation Every one [sic] says it is decid edly the handsomest place in Jefferson Write soon I will try to write in one or in two weeks Many kisses from the children and remembrances from the domestics Adieu Your affectionate Sister Sarah Bellamy Note: The following is an explanation of the name Anthony, Wallace and Little Stephen were slaves who had run away. Satira was another slave. Cousin John and William Bailey were sons of General Bailey. Aunt Emily was the name the Bellamy children sometimes cal

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note: Lyndhurst 16 th April 1848 Your valued letters my beloved and cherished Burton are always exciting to read and tho no pleasure on Earth is so true a gratification to me as to write you nevertheless I find myself truly deficient in its performance_ Your a ffectionate and valued letters make me sigh from your absence_ You are never absent from my mind and my heart throbs with the deepest and most anxious desires for your improvement and health_ Your health my dear Burton must be improved as you are able to p ursue your studies without interruptions_ You have improved much in your writing_ but you still are careless in your spelling except for accept and you drop many of your final letters_ These omissions I think you will soon overcome it requires only a littl e attention on your part_ Your letters are truly precious to me You write to pleasantly express your thoughts and feelings un Page 2 reservedly which begets confidence_ When I write you I do the same thing and as you say secrets are safe with you_ I shal l make my letters up of many items not worth repeating_ We are all at present pretty well_ William is perfectly restored to health he says he intends writing you soon but procrastination is the thief of time_ I try and make him do so_ I am better pleased e ach day with our removal here_ I hope it may prove healthy as the location is very desirable_ The little that has been done has much improved the appearance of the place and William has got into the spirit of improving and adding to our comfort_ The spot where the house is put is the most eligible therefore by advice we have decided on adding an addition to the North side of the house_ The house will then front North and I am well pleased with the arrangement and think it quite as desirable as to build a n ew house_ we expect the brick layer this week to commence making bricks_ Mr. Stephens Page 3 patch_ Corn is planted in the fields opposite the house it look s very free of insects, we have a favorable season only rather cold_ Mr. Rowell has a very promising crop, he made 163 bales of cotton last years_ Mr. Baugh comes on pretty well_ Your Aunt B has taken Mary and all her children home and Caroline, Your Uncle B now owns all the Roberts negroes he has taken Pete in place of Doc_ She wanted Ellen to stay with her but Ellen would not_ Your Aunt B thinks no one has as good a claim on your moneys* as herself and acts accordingly_ I spent a few days with Emmala_ I t hink she is in better spirits than I have seen her for some time she was here to dinner today on her way to the Keys (17 th ) I understand that your Aunt B and John have gone also_ John is in very bad health_ The family are very anxious about him_ Sarah Bail ey came over to day Page 4 to practice and paint with your sister The two Sarahs make quite a commotion_ Jim Branch is all devotion to S Bailey and I am of the opinion she will marry him_ Reports say she has refused Furman Chaires and Irvine Denham_ Mr. D ilworth has addressed Margaret but with no success_ Mr. D. Papy is at present her devotee_ Your sister is much admired and has many beaus, but between us Mr. S is the favored one_ I cannot express my feelings to you when I first knew it but I now feel reco nciled and hope she may ever be happy_ Nothing is yet determined on_ She shall not be in a hurry and know my beloved son you shall know every thing [sic] that passes here_

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Mr. Southall is a member to the Baltimore convention and intends visiting N.H. so yo u will see him_ John Denham was married last week to Miss Marvin_ Sally Bird has come from college she was too sick to be at school_ Big Tony had been very sick with rheumatism he is now up here under my care_ Satira lost her infant the 31 st of March_ Se lvy had a [Page 5 is written from the bottom to the top of the page over the writing on page 1. It is difficult to read.] boy on Thursday last_ Wallace and Little Stephen have been run away for six weeks_ Mr. Cole was killed last week by his Negroes_ The goats were brought up here on Saturday_ Noah has made a pigeon house with 28 nests_ I shall attempt to remove them next week_ Rosanna is yet at the old place taking [care] of them and other things_ I have eight turkeys nesting_ I have 10 young ones_ We ha ve lived well this spring on poultry_ William bought forty turkeys from Mr. Shehee and we have feasted on them_ Stephen is well and often speaks of you_ Tit has not forgotten you she often inquires when you are coming home_ The twins and Phine are well_ P their studies_ [The next words are cut off in the margin. They concern Miss Williams, who was hired to teach the younger children] [Page 6 is written from the bottom to the top of the page over the other writing on page 2. It is difficult to read.] she will not give the twins music lessons_ She is well paid and ought to be more attentive_ She has not done as well this year as she did last_ If any time is l ost she does not make it up nor does she teach on Saturday_ William says he will not pay so much money away when your sisters receive so little benefit from it_ Therefore Miss Williams will not return to us_ I regret it much as I am attached to her see w hat you can do in the way of getting one for me_ Sarah is writing to you_ I send you a Floridan_ Love from all and every body and kisses from the children_ Good night my dearest Burton_ May every blessing Mind you and honor and virtue adore you this life is the fervent prayer of Your devoted Mother Eliza Ann Bailey Note: letter: Mr. Stephens was the brick mason not the servant. He was to make the brick to enl arge the existing house on the Lyndhurst property. William John Bailey bought the property from Mr. Many of those mentioned in this letter were sl newspaper.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) *This is probably some name that Burton called his grandfather John Bellamy or his grandmother Margaret B ellamy, because his mother seemed to be talking about their plantation. Lyndhurst April 17, 1848 My Dearest Burton best way to treat such remarks is not to think they were intended for you I always make it a point to write nothing but what I know would interest you as for writing upon every little thing that occurs is indeed requiring too much from me whose imagination is not altogether under her control Excu se me for detaining you so long with this unnecessary preface Many thanks to you my dearest Brother for your kind letter which reached its place of destination on Friday last I am pleased to learn about your visit [sic] N York in May Anita will be Page 2 delighted to see you Mama and myself received letters from her last week she is contented and happy Miss Havens wrote me about a month ago and I am now looking for an answer to my last it is indeed a great pleasure to hear from her she writes so beautifull y. Last week I spent with Aunt Emily I wrote Anita all the particulars ask her to let you see the letter. Aunt E, Mrs. Taylor and Sally Bird dined with us to day [sic] on their way to Cedar Keys Aunt E [sic] health is not very good she desires much love t o you Miss S. is just sick enough to look interesting and excite sympathy Aunt Bailey Dubbing and Cousin John have accompanied them the later [sic] is in miserable health he looks terribly I do wish you were at home and I would enjoy myself more if you Pa ge 3 was [sic] home The children have all taken a great notion to write you and I believe have delved deeply into details. I saw Mr. Rowel at church he does not visit us. Fathers [sic]corn looks beautifully. The weather is quite cool This is one of the fin est situations in Jefferson and when we have cultivated it it will be the most desirable in Florida. Father has engaged Mr. Stephens to build our new house. We are going to Tallahassee on Thursday week to attend the May party something on a grand scale Thi s morning it was delightful I took a long walk with Father and Mother they are very much interested in everything The fields look beautifully especially the corn. Father has taken several hunts without success Sarah Bailey has come over to spend the week we have recommenced [sic] our painting You mentioned in your letter to Mother that you had written to Aunt E. she will not get it for some time as she will be at the Keys. Sylvia had a son last Page 4 week Wallace and Little Stephen have not come in as ye t they have been in the woods two months. I received a letter from Madison Kolicky and Miss Phillips. Do write me during your stay in New York. Since writing the above several days have elapsed Mr. Denham, Mr. Bird, Col ___ have been here Sarah Bailey and imagine how pleasantly we spend our time I would give anything if you and Anita were home

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) with us. Tomorrow we expect the Tallahassians. They have invited us to Monticello to see the odd fellows they are going to have a gay time I imagine. They have the May party on Tuesday and after spending the first there we shall then go to Tallahassee I hope you will enjoy your visit to NY. Write soon and believe me dearest Burton to be your affectionate sister Sarah Bellamy Note: property. In this letter Sarah wrote that they had now decided to build a new house.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Lyndhurst, April 28 th 1848 As you so anxiously desire a response to your epistle I must comply with your wish I thought I would defer answering it until I returned from Tallahassee, but knowing from experience the pleasure it affords when we are absence from home to receive letters from dear friends I have concluded to perform a duty as well as a pleasure_ And have you been to N. York Wh at is going on there People are as busy as ever I guess_ making improvements in everything I do really wish that Southerners could be inspired with an interesting spirit like the Yankey. [sic] Our country looks beautifully at present I only wish you and An ita were here to enjoy it. Do not for one moment cherish the idea that Page 2 we do not think of you In all our pleasures you are a participant in imagination. How does Anita look. Is she contented. She regrets much that Aunt Louisa has concluded to live in St. Augustine I have not heard from Grand Mama [sic] since her return. Mama has been urging me to write for sometime, but I have procrastinated for so long a time that I almost feel ashamed. I sent a long letter to Anita last week and four pages this w eek. Do I not deserve credit Mr. Southall came down last Saturday he desires his respect to you Mr. Joseph Branch & Col Dilworth on Wednesday Mr Lang & Mr Papy on yesterday Mr. B. made many inquiries after you and desired to be remembered to you The Tallah assee ladies have not been down to see us since Page 3 Christmas Miss Susan Branch will remain here until July then she goes North we have not decided what we shall do, but it is more than probable we shall remain here. N Haven must be a delightful place i n Summer I am so happy that you will enjoy good health Cousin Margaret was over here on Wednesday. They have their new carriage I have not seen it as yet Uncle Bailey looks well They all send much love to you I hope Cousin Johns trip to Cedar Keys will be beneficial. The have not returned as yet. I send you two papers. Father is quite well he has been intending to write to you for some time Mama was used as a substitute I write you and Anita for him Stephen is well. Your pigeons have not been removed to the ir stately mansion as yet several of them are setting Burton Mr. Ellenwood is over here making brick he has made this week ten thousand he is a very agreeable man decidedly musical Page 4 Aaron was here some time ago, he brought some very fine fish from M r.Rowell he said all the Negroes were well. Mr. Smith, the preacher, has lost his wife she died last week leaving behind an infant one month old he is indeed very unfortunate, the third wife. Mama is very much interested in her poultry she has some fifty t urkeys and an innumerable quantity of chicks. Fathers crop looks finely. I saw old Crockett the other day I never should have known him he is so much changed I hope after your vacation you will return to your books with renewed energy. Lay now the foundati on for future use, cultivate your affections, learn to feel the way of ___, this you can do, be not calus [sic] to those in affliction Your little sisters send many kisses to their dear brother Write us frequently and rest assured you shall not be neglecte d. May every blessing in life attend you is the sincere wish of a sister who is interested in your welfare [The letter ends here without a signature.] Note: father, Samuel Williams, Ana Maria married as her second husband General Joseph Hernandez.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) as not Ellen Rufina, John Gaspar, Martin Edward, and Dorothea Frederica. There were other children who were not mentioned. Anita Bellamy was names for Anita Hern andez. at the end. Lyndhurst on May 3, 1848 My Dear Burton You must pardon me for my long silence as your mother and sisters were writing alm ost every week and as a matter of course gave you all the news with us & I thought consequently, it was unnecessary for me to add expense for nought [sic]. I have now seated myself to write you a few lines and hardly know what to say we are all tolerably w ell but our dear little Christina who has had the chills and fever for the last few days but seems better today. Your Aunt Emmala & children, Aunt Bailey & Master & Dubbing Mrs. Doctor Tayler [sic] and Miss Sally Bird & Cousin John have all been to the Ke ys for their health John looks very badly seems to be on adiction [sic] they returned a few days ago all much improved Aunt Bailey says she has found (at last) the fountain of youth in Cedar Keys they went to Columbus on Suwannee & down the river in steamb oat the first steamboat that Aunt Bailey had ever seen & of course all things went well with her. Our crops here are tolerable likely tho we are now in want of rain Wallis & little Stephen are run away they have been in the woods for about ten weeks not fo r their work but for their night walking my overseer Mr Darracott was about to flog Wallis for going off the plantation without leave & he left & took little Stephen with him Buck Tony has been down with the rheumatism for the last month Bill and Dority ar e lying up with their eyes, it seems like they each will look one eye Page 2 them on readiness for you when you come home provided however that you make a Smart Fellow Sarah Bellamy & Sarah & Margaret Bailey & Josephine are now at Tallahassee I hope enjoying themselves there has been quite a commotion among us since the girls were at Tallahassee in the winter the like of Bucks you cannot imagine & and as to name them all it would be impossible I have engaged Stephens to build us a house & to make me 100,000 bricks which they are now at. The kiln is about mile from our house we ha ve made some improvements here but the crop is now on hand & cannot spare hands out of it particularly when we have so many sick & run away I lost a very fine large bay mare yesterday with staggers I remain my dear Burton As ever affectionately William J Bailey P.S. Your mother says she will fill up & tell you no doubt all about her chickens & the hogs she has had killed on account of their ___ W.J.B. 6 th May 1848

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) My dear Burton I am all alone this evening_ William went yesterday to see John who had the and Phine are in Tallahassee_ Miss W. went over to Gen Baileys this morning Page 3 and the four youngest I have sent with Stephen to the old place to get some plums_ John Bailey is so much better that he accompanied William to the Aucilla_ Your Aunts children still have chills and fevers_ I do not see them often_ John looks wretchedly and if he does not go somewhere this summer he will not live to see another_ Christina is again improving she is much more cheerful than Virginia Your Daguerreotype made her cry and say I want to see Bubba and often she asks me when are you coming home_ The Twins are well_ I can hardly say whether they are improving or not_ Tory is quite smart and Theo I hope will be some of these days_ William leaves Monday morning for Tallahassee and your sister s will return with him_ Mr. Southall met your cousins and sisters in Monticello and accompanied them to Tallahassee_ Mr. S was here some short time since and was rather unwell Your sister [Sarah] is engaged to him but when the knot will be tied I cannot say_ My heart my dear Son feels many anxious cares and solitude about you all as you advance to years of discretion, and have to hope and pray that my blessings may follow you all and that our gratitude to the Being that bestows all good things may guide you to every virtuous and honorable relation connected with this life_ I like Mr S very well and everyone speaks in his favor But I desire to see him Page 4 great ly improved_ I like our location here very much_ I have 50 young turkeys but they die so fast I am doubtful if I raise many It is very dry and we are suffering for want of rain The corn looks finely but some of the cotton is not yet up Big Jinny at the pla ntation had her infant very badly burnt a few days ago_ The country is pretty healthy_ Mrs. Peyton Smith is dead, she left a Branch has been all devotion and Tom D enham the same, she prefers Tom to Jim, but it does wall aro night he inserted an eye tooth for me_ He made many inquiries after you and requested to be remembered to you_ Joe Branch while here beged [sic] me to present his regard s to you_ When my dear Burton am I to have the happiness of seeing you again, it will soon be a year since you left home and it appears to me much longer_ I fear to urge a visit from you as it would encroach on you college [The next part is written from t he bottom to the top of the page over the other writing on this page.] course and put you back in your class_ William urges my going North next summer_ Should I like I shall then hope to see you_ William has entirely recovered and looks well Your letters my dear Burton are truly ever dear and most acceptable therefore write home often_ Sarah writes you frequently therefore it is an excuse for my being remiss Sarah failed to send the Floridian I now do so_ Rumors say your Uncle B will run well The Whi gs are opposing him on the grounds of his being a Regulator Old Sneed is dead and has left Anderson 2 negroes His reputed son ___was 68_ Mr. Skannal goes to Louisiana this coming winter Finlayson has carried some of his hands to the Wacacassa Your p ig and pigeons are yet at the old place I will

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) try and remove the pigeons next week_ My garden is pretty good but needs rain_ The negroes are all well and send many remembrances to you Cudge speaks very affectionately of you and who does not my dearest B urton_ I hope your visit to New York is pleasant and that you [the rest of the page is missing.] [The next part is written from the bottom to the top of page 1 over the other writing on page 1.] P.S. Your sow is still very fat and has 7 jugs nearly a week old so Stephen tells me Saw your Aunt Bailey at church today, she has received your letter of the 7 th E.A.B. Note: General William Bailey, a Democrat, was a candidate for governor of the state.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) May 3, 1848 My dear Burton, We have just returned from a very pleasant trip to Cedar Key on Sunday last. Where we spent a week most delightfully, plenty of fish, oisters [sic] and turtle, and the pure sea breeze, and pleasant sails on the water, and visiting the islands or keys around. The people are very kind. Our party was Mrs. Bailey, John & Dub, Mrs. Taylor, Sallie Bird, myself and children, Dan accompanied us as far as Columbi a and returned with the carriages We took the steamboat which took a day and a half and night to go down. It could go in a shorter time if the river was up, but it is very low. It is about two hundred miles we were gone two weeks. John and myself were quit e feble [sic] and J. looked very badly and thought a trip would improve us and did, we were quite well while there, but as soon as we got home are both sick. I have suffered with asthma the two past days dreadfully, and J. has taken the fever. He came over to Monticello with the girls to see the odd fellows and hear one of them speak Mr. Kevins, and went to a party that evening given by them. From there the Miss Baileys, Miss Bellamys and Phine went on to Tallahassee, and John, Theresa & Mary and Daught ret urned. J had quite a high fever on yesterday, he returned home this morning, poor fellow I Page 2 feel sorry for him he is low spirited, and says he is afraid he will die like his dear uncle. O he is so much like him. I told him about writing to you he sa yed [sic] he was ashamed but poor fellow he looks as if he was not able or had not energy enough to do anything, though he improved very much while at the key, and it would have been the very making of us both to have remained there. We have some idea of g oing there to spend the summer but have not fully made up our minds, I would if any one would go with me, though we would not have all the comforts there no milk and no physician which is a great objection with your Aunt Bailey, but the people tell her she Mr. Finlayson plantation is about twenty miles from the key, he has a neighbor whose family resides at the key, they are a wealthy family from Lou. or Mis. and seem to be clever people. I never hea rd of the difficulty between Mr. F. and Col. B. until J.B. told me which I believe was about working the road Mr. F. had his part to do and did it and Col. thought he did not do it as it ought to be and cursed him, and refused to speak to him afterwards, w hich I think is bad for neighbors. Mr. F. is to take his family down to the key to spend the summer. Since our return I have heard of the death of my dear old grandfather. Mother intended to visit him this summer, but do not know Page 3 whether she will no w or not. Mr. P. P. Smith has lost his wife, poor fellow he has been truly unfortunate. She was the third and has left three little children the youngest only five weeks old. You spoke of g.g. & ___ the wealth, true it is pleasant to have a competency but what good will it do us when we are gone and it cannot make us happy hear [sic] nor hearafter [sic] therefore let us endeavour [sic] to be content. I am glad you are progressing in your studies. Daught I am sorry to say is at home or not going to school, a s they have changed the teacher in Monticello again. I am very desireous [sic] to get a governess if I can get one, as you hear of any good ones, but I am almost afraid of the Yankeys [sic]. ___ ___ I like very well and it is thought to be an [sic] good in strument, Daught has commenced music and liked it very well, I did not pay Miss Hs passage but one way, do to Mans improving in his studies I do not, but he is growing very fast he is quite a large boy. The two Sarahs have become quite northerners [sic] in principle turned Whigs, I told your Sister she had forgotten her Fathers principles and I knew you would

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) not, but she thought you would, but I have confidence in you, more like the true and dear one. I do not know whether Gen Bailey will go to Tallahassee if elected, but expect they will. Gen T Brown is his opponent. As to Pahs estate being divided I do not know, but heard Gen. B. say he wont like it this winter, Your Aunt B. has taken [ink faded] Page 4 and all her family, Pete and Caroline, home and I h ear she says she is going to carry Ellen to Tallahassee when she moves, the cattle are still on the place. I dislike to trouble your mind, but O Burton, how I wish you were of age, we are all imposed upon, but keep it all to yourself. The children are tole rable well and join me with Cudjo and all the servants in much love to you and Anita and say to her when you write her, to write to me as I would be glad to hear from her, I did not receive yours until my return which was the first instant, write soon as t he children and as well as myself are all ways [sic] glad to hear from you excuse my scribbling for I fear it is almost unintelligible. Adieu my dear Burton, Emmala Bellamy Note: There is no information to i dentify Masters, Dub or Man.. in

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) My dear brother Burton I received your very kind letter two weeks ago and would have answered it with great pleasure if I had not have gone to Tallahassee with sister. I spent a very pleasant time indeed with Mrs. Long. I went to the May party and enjoyed m and danced with a little Mr. Haywood. I did not dance at the May party because I did not feel like it and___ to dance before so many persons there. To change the subject I will tell you about home affairs. Y our red ruster [sic] can whip every one in the yard and your pigeons come on finely and as for your pig she has grown out of all shape. Mamma had 100 turkeys and all of them are dead except 20 or 25 they came on finely at first. I am ashamed of this page a lready but as I have three more letters to write I hope you will excuse all mistakes and bad writing. Over Page 2 I am going to tell you some news that Chip thinks is joyful news_ Miss Williams is going to Tenessee [sic] in 8 or ten days she is not coming back next year her brother wrote for her to be that I am glad she is going away for I like her better this year. I must not forget to tell you about Perrit o sister little pet dog. He is a playful as ever I think he is the prettyest [sic] little dog I ever saw. I never think of composing my letter first I write them just as the words enter my mind. Virginia wants me to write you a letter for her and she says I must send her love to Bubba. I think I must do it for her. Christina is very playful and she is a lovliliest [sic] child I ever saw without the least exaggeration. I have nearly come to the place where I will have to stop, but I hate to do it. I must clo se my letter with the expectation of hearing from you soon. Mamma, Father and all the children send their love to you and accept the same from your affectionate sister Josephine Virginia Bailey, his half sister]. My dear Bubba I get Phine to write you a letter for me and send my love to you. Numna sends her love to you I ate some nice lunch today I remain your dear little sister Tit I wrote those words just as she spok e them only I connected the ___.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC)

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Notwithstanding Dearest Burton the distance is great which separates us yet the knowledge I have in knowing your sympathizing heart permits me to say much. We all have our days of sunshine; they last but for a season then comes the raging storm, we scarcely can bear them but the trust I have in Divine Providence who promises that all shall work together for good to them that love him, supports me under the present affliction. Mr. Southall as you well know has been very attentive to me because I was prepossessed in his favor, it has caused him much trouble, as there are many persons in Tallahassee (among them young men) who are malicious enough to calumniate him, Mr S I know from experience, having associated with him da y after day, is a perfect gentleman in every respect. You well know that he has not had of late any employment which was offered as objectionable, he immediately purchased Page 2 a farm and has been very busy in tending it for some months past. He met us at Monticello and accompanied us to Tallahassee. Mr S as you well know is very popular especially among the ladies We had been there about five days when Mr & Mrs Lang would not permit us to visit his sister and thought it improper to call his name in Soci ety. Of course we were surprised and wanted to know the reason. Mr. Lang who was here recommending him to Mama and myself told us that he had been beastly drunk in the street and cutting about the street on his horse and many other things which if they wer e true would stigmatize him for us Mr S. before reaching Tallahassee told me that he had been on a spree I laughed and told him I thought him excusable on the grounds that it was not an habitual practice. I saw him on Saturday night at his sisters and he t hen told me that he was on his way to see me when Page 3 [sic] heard the reports which I mentioned He went down town and inquired into it Every man provoked and stabbed Chisby editor of the Sentinel. The wound was not dangerous. Mr. C was about the next day. But there was a warrant for him. Poor fellow I did not see him again during my stay in Tallahassee he spent his days in the country and his nights at his sis ters. Father came down for us. Mr. Lang immediately prejudiced Father against him, and poor me Burton have not the least hope of seeing him again. How I have wished for you, your generous soul never would have permitted your fellow man to suffer the tortur es of hell undeservedly. I never have believed it and Mrs. Triplett was here on yesterday just from Tallahassee she says no one believes and all say if Mr. S will return they will be his friend, Oh inconsistent man. When he needed Page 4 friends no one sto od near him. This affair has reminded much of Napoleons fate that heated spirit confined in a dungeon. It has been the greatest trial I ever had to endure and I still hope that he proves himself worthy of me. So unexpected my dear brother It is the subject of my thoughts Stephen feels it he saw how Mr S was imposed upon. The children all feel attached to him and inquire when he is coming again. Those that were h is friends but yesterday extolling him, today are his enemies and doing all they can to harm him. I shall have something from Tallahassee next week and I will write you for I feel confident that you are interested. I have taken up four pages in writing my troubles, they are the first thing that present themselves to my mind. Oh how I wish you were here, you would be a cordial to my desponding soul my dearest brother Page 5 r Finlayson, Mr Skannal and our own formed the party. We had a few Monticellians Mrs. Triplett

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) and Dora, the latter made the time pass off very agreeably Cousin John was over polite I guess he thought Mr S cake was all done Oh! Oh! Oh! policy We had quite a pleasant morning but after dinner it rained quite hard. The children got quite wet but I believe this added much to their enjoyment. That place is a beautiful place. Father killed 1 dozen alligators. Mama enjoyed it very much she wrote to you last mail, but Father did not put it in the post office. Mr. Ellenwood is here making brick for the new house he has made 45,000 Mama and Father have gone on a horseback ride to the old place. Father left Mr. Rowell this morning he says he has the finest crop he has ever seen. Providence will favor us at any rate Mr. R Page 6 was at the fishing party he looks very well. We attended the May party in Monticello which I enjoyed exceedingly and went up on Tuesday to the party that night. I enjoyed myself very much the fi rst few days We were courted as much as ever which was not at all desirable Every evening entertaining those young gentlemen ___ ridding [sic] all afternoon in buggies. I am so in I assure you. The Branches are going away nearly everyone is going North Mr. Garrett, Mr. James Branch the young gentlemen who pride themselves upon their strict morality intend remaining in Florida. He undoubtedly meets with encouragement or else he wo will be down here soon He is another snake in the grass, deceitful how many soft speeches has he said to me since Mr. Southall has been obliged to stay away Page 7 I shall treat him with the utmost contempt however I shall (if possible)___with my likes and dislikes. The country looks beautifully at present I have not seen Aunt Emily and family for some time. I received your letter last week for which I owe many thanks. Letters are always a great source of enjoyment to me as they assure me that friends have not forgotten them. Miss Williams leaves us in about ten days for Knoxville, Ten.[sic] I shall then take the children under my supervision for the ensuing year. What kind of instructor do you think I will make. I am going to be very strict. I shall teach them music and French besides English. I have been so busy in telling you of this land of promise that I have almost forgotten to question you upon matters and things in general And how have you been, has the north ern wind brought the rose to you cheeks & has it elongated your understanding and enlarged your mental capacity We hope Page 8 for all this, it looks out of place in a small sense to have too much sense. I hope you enjoyed visit in N York I am sure Anita fared well indulged occasionally in the delicacies of the salon I am glad to hear that Mr. ___ is so very attentive I could afford to say bother ___ I suppose all the girls are agreed to feel that their ___ is so near at hand. It is indeed the happiest tim e of ones life retrospect will show it. I shall hope to visit you next summer if I am alive I hope you have returned to your studies with renewed energies Knowledge is indeed a great source of enjoyment but like everything sweet in life it has some bitter. I could not help from contrasting myself the other day with a poor little girl she was ignorant of her misfortunes Every day teaches her the same lesson. I find that every day adds an item to my vocabulary. Page is about he is growing [The next part is written from the bottom to the top of the page over the writing on page 8.] very fast Mama is unfortunate with her turkeys She had one hundred hatched now she has eight and one of them is in the ___ Do write me soon I assure you what blessings your lett ers afford me I received a letter from Charlotte ___this Monday she said that Mary Bissell spoke frequently of you How do you like George, he is a young man of considerable talent. I believe you have

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) vacation in August What do you intend doing Last mail brought a letter from Anita I must answer it I have been thinking for some days whether I should write you all that I have but when I reflect that you are my only brother I cant refrain from sending you the promptings of my lacerated heart Breathe not a word to anyone Have a deaf ear to all that written but what comes from your affectionate Sister Sarah [The next part is written from the bottom to the top of the page over the writing on page 5.] P.S. Mama Father and all the children send their love to you May 1848

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Oxford May 11 th 1848 Dear Burt I received your letter last week and I should have answered it before now but I have been putting it off from day to day until I have come to this conclusion that if I did not write at once I never would do so. I have little or nothing to write and hence my letter will be short. Dr. Turnbull from Florida has just returned here last Monday to see the place and to improve his health, he intended staying a week or two but he has begun to feel so well that he determined to return home. I now have a vacation which commenced last Friday and will continue until next Monday. It has not been a usual thing to have vacation in this month but the students presented a petition to the faculty requesting the Fac ulty to give them a vacation which after a little hesitation was granted. We will have one other vacation of three weeks in about 7 weeks. I am becoming better pleased with Oxford every day I stay here. Page 2 and I expect that after I stay here two years I will not wish to leave. When are you going home on a visit? I think it is rather doubtful about my going home in the winter. I can return if I wish but I expect I will be completely over my homesickness by that time and I desire to see a little more of Georgia. Bill Hill has just left my room he has been here consulting about taking some of the ladies out to walk but it is rather too cool. He told me to give his respects to you and tell you that you must accomplish yourself. You said in some of your lett ers that there was a great difference in the mode of instruction at the North and South. I wish you would explain the difference. I am anxious to hear. I received a letter from Brother Robert yesterday all the family were well. I wrote to Gen Bailey the da y before yesterday I intend visiting Cousin William before very long. I have nothing more to say at present. You must write soon. Please excuse all mistakes and the very bad manner in which this is written for I am a very poor Scribe. I remain Your Affect. Friend William Scott Note: co usins. After he finished college, he returned to Monticello to practice law with his father.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) June 7 th 1848 I left home last Sat urday dearest Burton accompanied by Josephine and Theodosia to spend the week with Aunt Emily and as I did not write you last week at home I cannot permit another week to pass without sending you a few lines As I sit here alone my thoughts to remit to you therefore with such material as I have I follow my inclinations and hope you will excuse accordingly Aunts family has been very ill and little William is still very sick had a very hot fever today she is undetermined as yet where to pass the summer I left improving daily Miss Williams left us last Monday and I have taken the entire charge of the children They are very ambitious and undoubtedly will succeed Miss Huntington will not return she behaved very rudely on her departure and left saying that she was half paid which is altogether false 40 dollars a month is a great deal for a teacher who enjoys as much as they did Miss W neglected our children very much I only account for her in this way that her conscious was ha rdened. She has undoubtedly reached Knoxville before this. Cousin John came over on Sunday afternoon and is still here he spent yesterday in Monticello saw William who was well Since I last wrote you Mr. Mays and Major Parsons have been to see us Mama read your letter to them which they were very much pleased with and Page 2 said very complimentary things in your behalf. Dear Burton we all wish you were at home Aunt Emily was continually speaking of you she expects you to do much for her when you are a man. would transact her business. We all depend upon you therefore make great progress in every thing[sic] be a smart and intelligent man More than probable I sh all have someone to take care of me before you return for good, but there are your younger sisters who will indeed appreciate you. I saw Sallie Byrd this Thursday she is going up to Louisville to a wedding Mr. Furman Chaires is going to marry Miss Jones He was down to see us about two months ago & then asked Sarah Bailey if there was any hope for him she told him no. he told his bride (intended) bride that he divi ded he was in love with Sarah all the time_ I can scarcely believe it. This is a strange world of ours Jimmy was here some two weeks ago I think it is uncertain about his success not withstanding Sarahs long encouragement she is indeed very fickle. Mr P apy was down last week to see Miss Margaret she is so very non committal [sic] that no one finds out her secrets. I spent last Saturday with them. Aunt Bailey had much to say about Page 3 every one [sic] as usual Dr. Mitchell visited us last week he is in deed a fine man a noble soul big heart and wise head. Our friend Mr. Southall is staying with him He had much to say about Mr. S and talks to Father because he knew that he was prejudiced by that Mr. Lang who was but yesterday Mr S friend Oh what sincerity no one thinks the less of Mr. S for taking that spree everyone is convinced that the reports were utterly false Every young man likes his frolick [sic] but because Mr S did and paying attention to me he is disgraced I only wish you were at home to see t hrough Aunt Baileys policy. It is indeed very perceptible she talks much about Mr S and has long since he commenced to pay me attention Everyone knows he was [blotted out] still out with Mr S. I hope these persons will be more charitable toward his faults than he has been toward Mr S. Makes no excuses but condemns I have never met a more perfect gentleman in all my life than Mr Southall so refined so intelligent and a perfect gentleman & if he occasionally indulges what harm is there other young men do and I have heard him say that if he had land and a home of his own he would not feel any inclination that way Hope is my only solace Father

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) the least changed Page 4 [Note: This page is written on four sides and folded to make the small envelope addressed to Burton at Yale.] She always liked him and will Oh Aunt Bailey I never can think much of her and if I should indeed be so fortunate as to marry Mr S the opinion s he has expressed to me ___toward him would be the end of a friendship between us This is indeed a sad experience for me I think of it much and only wish you were here I am sure you could convince Father of the error of his way He doubtedly is [sic] acted a s he thinks for the best Burton he listened to Mr S enemies why not listen to his friends and be confused Dr Mitchell will be to see us in about a month I have nearly finished my letter Do write soon Aunt Emily [The letter is continued on page. The writi ng is from the bottom to the top of the page.] and all the children desire to be remembered to you. Mama will be over on Thursday with the other children All here write in dearest love to you and believe me to be ever your dear Sister Sarah [An other part is added to page 4.] All I have said is between us Stephen is well he always makes many inquiries after you I have made Page pantaloons and jacket to wait on us and be footman Adieu until I again hear from you

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note: so difficult to read. My dear Burton Tis the Sabbath and I know you will think immediately Sister Sarah is practicing what she has preached agains t to me so often. I have devoted this morning to the instruction of my little sisters & in entering my room after dinner you are the object of my thoughts I must indeed follow my inclination and connect awhile in a silent way to one I so dearly love notwi thstanding scarcely two weeks have elapsed since I last wrote Anita and yourself & have received no answer but knowing from experience what cordial letters are to the absent and in caring send again my thoughts hoping they may interest you. Home affairs u ndoubtedly interest you most. Nothing of importance has transpired lately to break in upon our quiet life Last week Page 2 [very difficult to read] Aunt Emily accompanied by her brother and his wife Dr Simpkins from Louisiana, Mrs. Taylor visited us and w e were all invited to Mrs. Finlayson where we passed the day very pleasantly Cousin John visits us presently and hunts with Father They saw nothing to hunt except in killing squirrels We have had so much rain until the grass is caking up every things All the farmers are complaining Mr Rowell has decidedly the best cotton about here but how poorly we are recompensed for so much trouble only six cents per pound is indeed discouraging I can now preach scanning to you as I practice so great an extent as I do here We have had a good many peaches but they are very indifferent Mama has been for several days baking puddings I have not as yet taken any part in the domestic line owing to the many disadvantages we labor under having no pantry and other convenie nces which are essential requisites to Page 3 [very difficult] house wife [sic] Oh I shall have time enough you may well imagine that I have no ambitions in this aspect I feel so confident that my name will never be known to fame through this Margaret made this Sarah [Bailey] did that is Aunt Baileys continual cry. she can blow their trumpet There is a secret satisfaction that persons are never disappointed in you when they have not heard so much puffing They find out my ___ ___ ability Do you not agr ee with me We have very fine watermelons and often wish you had some of them. Figs too are in abundance. Oh what a curiosity Bill has just come in & brought a rattle snake[sic] sixteen years old it is indeed as wide as my hand. I never saw such a sight Th ey obtained a pint of oil from its body. Mama received a letter from Miss Williams last mail she is much better pleased with her new home than anticipated. Oh how hypocritically those two governesses have acted Last mail brought me a piece of music from Ge n ___ Page 4 what do you think of him? Did you spend your time pleasantly in New York on the fourth. We thought of you frequently. We enjoyed our independence in a very quiet way I believe there was several orations delivered about here but who would ride five miles to hear what they have known for years Mr. Johnston dined with us today he quite an amusing country gentleman I have heard nothing new recently Father has the greatest quantity of dogs so many fleas my gracious me I am nearly ___The negros [sic ] are well & often inquire after you. Stephen the faithful is

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) still with us & does all he can to promote our happiness. Uncle Bailey will undoubtedly be governor. What a dash our kin folks [sic] will cut. I would give anything to have Anita and yourself ed ucated at home I hope you will excuse so___ interesting letter but like the will for the dead if I had the material I could make myself as agreeable as any one. I detest a letter that is filled with ___ high figments of imagination & all those things. They ___ [The next part is written from the bottom to the top of the page over the writing on page 1] Page 5 in place in letters My idea of letter writing is to commute as if the individual was really present I have just finished ( last week) one of Scotts novels called W__ & commenced another, they are highly interesting What a treat you have in anticipation. What did you see during your visit to New York I shall now close for the present hoping tomorrow may bring with it ___ Monday has arrived & I again r esume my pen. Father and Mr Darascot have just returned and brought a fine deer. I would have given you any thing to have been here last evening Mr Ellenwood and myself beat Father and Mother at whist. When Cousin John visits us we invariably beat. Today w e have had rain more grass than any thing else. Tuesday morning Now I am surrounded by the children who are [The next part is written from the bottom to the top of the page over the writing on page 2. This is the page that did not copy well and is very difficult to read.] Page 6 ready to say their lessons They are well and improving in many subjects They send much love to you Note: The remainder of this page cannot be read. The last page of the letter is written from the bottom to the top of the page over the writing on page 3 Page 7 is becoming quite loquacious Mama has ___her. Adieu Brother Think of me often & believe me to be Ever your devoted Sister Sarah Lyndhurst July 7 8 1848

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Knoxville July 9 /48 My dear Burton What do you think, what can you think of such a negligent correspondent as I have proved myself? I am afraid you have erased my name from your list and resolved to have no more to say to me. I deserve it I frankly confess, but I really hope you will not proceed to extremities against me for past misconduct. I am ready to promise never to do so ithout fulfillment of my promise; yet I felt guilty and ashamed all the time. I could write a long string of apologizes such as the excessive heat of the weather, not very good health, indolence, change of residence, etc. etc. but they are worthless and I should be ashamed to offer them, for I know and so would you that they are not, any one of them or all put together, a sufficient excuse for not devoting an hour to an absent friend. The only reason that I did not long ago reply to your most acceptable let ter is found Page2 in the word procrastination, which you have undoubtedly realized is the thief of time. You have probably heard long ago of my removal from the pine woods to the land of the mountains and the streams. I made my journey and quite an advent urous one it was from Macon alone or rather under the protection of strangers, and I assure you ___ beau of last summer would have been a most welcome traveling companion. I got along safely, however, and that was a great mercy, for we were in imminent dan ger of breaking our necks many times while traveling in a stage a distance of more than thirty miles. I am very pleasantly situated here and like Knoxville and the people so far very much. I teach [blurred] in the Seminary and have about as much as I wish to do, but I get a good salary and have no expenses except for my wardrobe, so that I am [blurred] to do as much as I can. I would send you a catalogue of the institution, but the truth is they have puffed me up so egregiously that I am [blurred] of it. We have some beautiful girls here and I only wish you could see them but perhaps that might be too dangerous for such a very susceptible young bachelor as yourself Page 3 I calculated fully upon seeing you at the North this summer and I cannot tell you how m uch disappointed I am at being obliged to remain at a distance from nearly all my friends another wait any longer as he had no good teachers in my department, an d now that I am here, I do not care to go on and then hurry back as I should be obliged to do, as our vacation is only seven weeks long. Now, Burton, you see how egotistical I have been and I wish would follow my example, tell how you do and what you are d oing, where you go and who and what you see. Everything from the North interests me, your own experience will assure you of that. But in one respect I do not wish you to follow my example for I hope to hear from you very soon, and by writing promptly you w ill give me pleasure to [sic] Your sincere friend Anna Williams

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note: Anna Williams, the former tutor at Lyndhurst, wrote this letter to Burton. iley, added a note at the end. Aucilla July 30 th 1848 My dear Cousin, As this is our Saturday for writing compositions and I am left to choose my own subject I could not employ my time better than by writing to you. I was over to your Mother s a few days ago all were well, I spent a week with Josephine we enjoyed ourselves very much indeed. We have been going to school to Sister Sarah since Miss Huntington went away and Cousin Sarah is also teaching your little sisters. Miss Williams and Miss Huntington left us the first of June we are much pleased with our present teachers. I learnt seven or eight tunes before Miss H. left us and has learnt [sic] three since she left, and Theresa the same. How do you like the North I hope you will not forget y our own home. We all think of you very often and speak about you very often as a brother. Master send his love to you, he is studying spelling, Reading, Arithmetic, and writing he hopes he will soon be able to write you a letter, he wants to see you very m uch. William is now in Monticello at school he comes home twice a month. When he was home last he said he was seriously waiting for an answer to his last letter. This is my second composition my dear Cousin I hope you will answer it and excuse th writing. Papa and Mama and all the family write in love with me to you Believe me as ever your affectionate Cousin Mary B. Bailey Note: ter follows: I can scarcely believe my dear cousin, that I have permitted so many months to pass without writing to you_ I recollect distinctly the many promises that were exchanged previous to our parting and is it possible that a year has past? and I ha ve treated you with so much neglect Pardon me and I shall promise to do better in the future_ I have thought frequently about writing you but something has always interfered to prevent the completion of my good intentions, however as I have made so many ap ologies I am in hopes you will regard them as sufficient proofs that I am sorry that I have done so. I spent yesterday at your mothers they were all quite well, but your mother has been quite sick. I have frequently heard of you from your sisters The messa ges that you send regarding my getting married were duly deliberated and I think if you will return home this coming fall year that you may have the pleasure of witnessing several more_ I understand that you have become a fine beau_ Page2 Often does fond m emory revert to the many pleasant hours that we have spent together & no period so indelibly impressed as our visit to Tallahassee_ Have you forgot Miss Sally? She was looking as sweetly as usual when I saw her last_ The young Ladies frequently inquire aft er you_ Aunt Emmala is at Tampa Bay we have heard of her safe arrival_ Her children were very unhealthy before she left home but were somewhat improved. We have enjoyed very good health

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) this summer and we have not has any sickness until today several of th e children were taken with fever_ Sarah sends her kind love to you and will answer your letter soon as possible_ You must excuse my indifferent writing for we have had company and I have had very little time to devote to it since Mary asked me to fill up t he sheet for her_ All unite in kindest love to you & believe me ever your affectionate cousin_ Margaret

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Lyndhurst, 6 August 6, 1848 Several months my beloved son has [sic] passed away since I have written to you and many valued and dear letters have been received from you and all remain so long unanswered but Sarah writes often which is the reason I am not more punctual_ I am truly pleased that your health is so good_ it enables you my dearest Burton to apply yourself closely to your studies, an d I fervently hope that the attention you now give may in after years reap a hundred fold_ your laudable observations delight me, and I live in hopes of seeing my son one of the most distinguished men of this State equally noted for his virtue as his tale nts_ You have greatly improved in your letter writing, but still there is room for improvement_ you are careless about correctly, but in haste you did not observe it_ A good scholar makes no errors so try and be more careful_ I received a letter from Mamma yesterday She sends her best love to you and requests you will write her she says her grandchildren do not love her, do write her_ Page 2 Your Uncle Samuel is in Ne w Orleans doing or going into business with Mr Walker_ Martin Hernandez is married to his cousin in Cuba_ Dora is still in New Orleans_ Col Hunt in Washington City_ I heard the other day that Mr Walker had broke Col Hunt_ John Hernandez has charge of the Generals Plantation is getting along very well_ John Williams is quite sober now_ Louisa and Mr. Washington are living with Mamma_ She expects an addition to her family shortly_ August 13_ No letter from you [cut off in margin] weeks has made us all fear you are sick_ I pray it may not be so_ All of us my dearest Burton are in fine health, no fever has been on this hill yet, and what a blessing if we can continue so until frost_ Your Uncle Bs family have fever_ Master is badly salivated John and four s isters have gone to spend 10 or 12 days at the Keys_ Your sister gets a long very well with the children I am anxious to procure another teacher but she insists she can teach them, that she does not mind the confinement_ You ask when Phine goes North? I i ntend for Anita to come home next fall and remain a year at home, and then on return to N.Y. for Phine to accompany her_ She will then be in her 16 th year_ Sarah still thinks very highly of Mr. S. William was in Tallahassee at the time of the excitement ag ainst him and became prejudiced against him, and Page 3 had request he would not visit us_ so we see nothing of him now, but I understand it has been a severe but good lesson to him_ We always thought very highly of him_ Miss Williams [missing] of condu ct was strange_ You know she consented to return for $400 and we have nothing to do with her expenses_ She said she presented the account against Phine because she did not do as much as she expected_ She acted very differently this year to what she did he r first_ She had not been with us more than a week before William observed she does not return to us again_ She did not do justice to your sisters_ She never gave the twins one music lesson the whole time and Phine not more than half and was so crabbed t o them that I felt much for them and the example has had a bad tendency to sour their dispositions_ She was also ungrateful to be talking home affairs to Mrs. Huntington who never failed to communicate them to General Baileys family_ She has written me bu t her letter lies neglected_ I think it is a mistaken idea that teachers are to get their whole salary when they only remain 6 months_ She went to Tallahassee and was gone 10 days which she never made up, we sent her as far as Tallahassee which she did n ot ever thank Stephen for his help_ No one liked her, She wrote me that her Page 4

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) friends had provided her a husband before she got there_ so I hope she may be soon be hired if she gets a good salary_ She has to earn it_ She teaches music and French_ Sh e pays her board and washing and to help on her expenses has a young lady to share her rooms_ I wish if you see an elderly lady you think would suit me to make some inquiries about her_ Things are not progressing smoothly on the plantation_ Mr. Rowell is m aintaining too much sway_ Seven negro fellows came here to William with complaints striking them with awful weapons and correcting them to satisfy his spleen They say it is all occasioned by Clara_ Lucy and some other of his favorites he denies it, and th e poor negroes are in fault Your Uncle Bailey and William went by there a few days ago to adjust things, but anarchy still reigns as Lise and Rachael are now here wailing for William to take them home_ He has taken Rachael in among his favorites hugging an d kissing one moment and then lashing for disclosures_ Mr Rowells crop is very fine his cotton is superior_ Judge Shehee is dead_ I would send you the Floridian but there is no er to let you see the democratic feelings in this state, and I expect the governors in expectancy will receive [The next part is written from the bottom to the top of the page over the writing on page 1.] Page 5 their merits and demerits_ It is thought y our Uncle Bailey will be elected_ He starts on Tuesday to the East on an electioneering tour_ Stephen keeps pretty well he often speaks of you and day_ None of her pigs has short legs like herself_ They still are at the old place_ Christina begins to talk very plain, she looks at your daguerreotype and says it is Bubba_ Virginia is well and has forgot neither you or Anita_ We all write in tenderest love to you and with daily prayers for your health and happiness and success in this life and a crown of glory in the next believe me my beloved Son Your ever devoted Mother Eliza A. Bailey [The next part is written from the bottom to the top of the pag e over the writing on page 4.] Page 6 P.S. Do not say one word my dear Burton to Anita about my letting her come home next year_ William went with the runaways to the Plantation he had Clara Lucy Beck and Rachel corrected Mr. Rowell commences picking cott on on Monday_ Cornelius Seals, Mr. Burwell and Capt. Behn are all here Adieu my dear son I want to see you much Be careful not to expose yourself too much to the cold this fall_ I am anxious and uneasy about you Dearest love from all Yours most sin cerely E.A.B. Note: ms. She married General Joseph Hernandez John Theophilus Williams.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) The children of Ana Maria and her second husband, General Joseph Hernandez, were Eliza children: Eliza Ann, William Henry, Samuel Hill, and John Theophilus. It also na mes six of the Hernandez children: Anita, Maria Josepha, Ellen Rufina, Martin Edward, John Gaspar, and Dorothea Frederica Ignacia (Dora) Hernandez. Louisa was probably born after the will was written. oung when he died. He and his wife, Seals. Cornelius Seals is probably the stepbrother of William John Bailey.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Lyndhurst Sep br 23 rd 1848 Florida My beloved Burton No pleasure is so great to me as to receive intelligence from you and to know you are well_ Your winter doubtless has commenced and I hope you have been prudent in prepar ing for it by putting on your flannel_ Your constitution I hope is much improved by your being at the North_ Do you ever feel any of those feeble symptoms that you did whilst at home? We have been much blessed thus far as none of us have any fever, but all look and feel well, and can do justice to our meals_ General Baileys family are more or less sick all the time. William came from Monticello last week sick from fever John and Margaret were both down at the same time_ we spent yesterday with them, they al l look badly_ Sarah Bailey has had the fever again She looks however as if her health is improved_ Your Uncle Bailey has returned from a trip East_ He feels sanguine in that quarter and thinks his election is sure_ The family are pleased with the idea of l iving in Tallahassee_ They have endea Page 2 vored [sic] to injure him on the regulation business and I expect it has had some influence with the people_ I send you 2 newspapers and some pieces cut out_ it will show you the disposition of the Mullerites next Monday is election day when the tug of war will be decided_ I am always pleased to read your political views as I read but little on that subject and improve from yours_ and it assures me that you read_ I hope my dear son is receiving all the advantag es that he now enjoys and is laying a foundation in after years that will ever be replete with successfulness and knowledge_ Mr. Rowell I believe is coming on well he has 50 bales packed_ William went there and put all things right He had Clara, Lucy a nd Rachael well punished and I understand they behave better Asa has parted from his wife and has taken Rachael_ Jenny has a very fine child, she repents her conduct and is very anxious to return to the house_ Sophy and Wallace it is said will make a mat ch_ Your pigeons do not do so well, something has destroyed the last young ones_ William says he will fix the house so the cats cannot climb up, as he thinks it is them that has caught them. The lumber for our house is sawed and Page 3 waiting for us to s end for it Noah was putting a scaffold to the Gin house when one of the overseers family has been quite sick_ Mr. Darracot is a good overseer, but too cross_ After m y boasted number of young turkeys I have only raised five_ The negroes make constant inquiries after you and send many remembrances to you Christina knows Bubba by your daguerreotype Virginia often inquires when you are coming home I would advise you m y dear son to answer are missing.] you to correspond with her [missing] your epistolary style as you write takes pains to have your letters nicely written, spelling correct, and diction elegant_ I believe I have told you all things_ Sarah has severed her engagement with Mr. S_ I heard the painful intelligence that your cousin Anita Williams is dead_ have not learnt the particulars but intend writing to poor a fflicted Fanny_ Our united love to you from us all_ and with every wish and prayer from for you my beloved Burton believe me Your devoted Mother Eliza A. Bailey Page 4 P.S. William has received the papers you sent to him_ he wrote you a short time since

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) To make corn muffins _Stir one spoonful of butter in a pint of homony [sic], beat three eggs separately 1 pint of milk 1 pint of corn meal Stir all well and bake in rings Have you commenced school again? Note: ote about some of the slaves on the plantation. She wrote Tallahassee. Mr. Darracot was the overseer at Lyndhurst, and Mr. Rowell was the overseer at some other p lantation owned by the family, but not identified. probably the Fanny about whom Eliza Ann wrote. Anita Williams was probably their daughter.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Lyndhurst October 1 st 1848 My dear Burton Scarcely two weeks have elapsed since I last wrote you, and knowing what heart felt pleasure is derived from the receipt of letters from home, I write sans ceremonies not waiting for a response from mine. How have you been deares t B. is the first and most important of all questions. You have indeed been the subject of our conversation & theme of our meditation. You brightened by a norther n clime. Anita I suppose is busily engaged at school. How delighted she will be when she knows of her return home next fall. What an advantage it will be to her after spending one year not here, she will appreciate more highly her advantages. I would have given anything if they had first pursued the same course with me. The change dear Burton is indeed great. Having enjoyed so many delightful privileges in N. York & now deprived of these wholly. Uncle Bailey returned home last week from the East and he has now gone to the West. The election is on Monday. Every one thinks Uncle B. will be elected, his accounts of the East are very flattering. I shall be delighted on many accounts to have him governor. Mr. Cabel is not here electioneering; he has not been to Jefferson. Uncle Bailey brought us the sad intelligence Page 2 of the death of Anita Williams. It is indeed an irreparable loss to Aunt Fanny for she superintended all the domestic duties. We have indeed been quite alone since last I wrote you. Mr Barnes of Tallahassee & Mr Putnam of Madison have been our only visitors. Sarah Bailey has been spending some days with us. We have accomplished much in our painting. We arose oming quite an equestrian. Cousin and the younger members of the family spent yesterday with us. Cousin M is as pneumonious as ever. Cousin John has not been over lately his business confines him at home He has no political turn whatever. I do like politic ians and hope one of these days my brother an active one. Father received your letter today. We were much amused at you when you asked to make provisions in his mansion for yourself and anticipated family. Mama was delighted to hear from you all your lette rs give her pleasure. Anita has treated us rather shabbily three weeks have elapsed and not a line from N. York. William Bailey has vacation now he spent a day and night visit with us. Aunt B thinks he is going to be something extra because he is inclined to be rather studious. I am very anxious to go to New Orleans & think it more than probable I shall go during the winter. I am tired of Tallahassee. The people there are too calumniating, raucous, contentious all of the time & then it is mixed with such ar rogant egotism that I have become quite disgusted. Oh happy school days Page 3 you know not how to appreciate them until they are gone. Several days have elapsed since I wrote the above. On Sunday Mr. Smith and Cousin John came over the former remained al l night. Have you ever seen Mr. S. he is highly intelligent, very handsome, & mentally very whether I will go as it depends upon my cousins. It is indeed a very dis agreeable thing to rely upon them. I am truly unfortunate in this respect, no brother to accompany me about. It will be court in Madison & we shall have many of our best speakers as Mr. Ward, Mr Papy, & Smith will address the club. They promise us much ple asure if we go. Yesterday was election day. Uncle Bailey had the majority in Jefferson & Cabel the Whigs representative in Congress whose opponent is Governor Duval. I sadly fear he will be beaten. We have no other news about it yet I will write you immedi ately who is to be governor when I know. Cousin John spent last night

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) with us his health is improving he sends many loves to you. I read the pamphlet you sent Father & found it exceedingly interesting. I agree with ___ patrias in every respect. I have not heard from the plantation in sometime poor Negroes I feel very much for them they have no master or mistress to look up to. Tomorrow I go to Monticello & as the hour is rather late I hope you will excuse all the imperfections of this apology of a letter Fa ther received your letter He with Mama desire many loves to you. The children are all well [The ending of the letter is on the envelope.] and desire much love to you Write soon & believe me ___ as your affectionate Sister S.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) letter at the end. Lyndhurst, Oct. 22nd 1848 Dear Burton Your esteemed favor has been received and we are most happy to hear that you are in the enjoyment of good health and t hat you are progressing rapidly in your studies and that we may expect in a few years at farthest for you to return to your own cherished home a thorough scholar & a polished Gentleman. My dear Burton, you know that there will be in the course of a few yea rs a very great responsibility fall upon your shoulders & I wish you to be fully prepared & qualified for the task. You have many sisters and you the only son. I may live to see them all grown, but life is uncertain. I had like to have gone last spring but through the blessing of God have been restored comparatively to good health how long to last I know not. We are all enjoying good health now and have done so all this summer. I hope we have (now) a healthy residence. Rowell is making a good crop also Baug h. Uncle Bailey does not make a huge crop this year. My own crop is tolerably good. I have housed about 6000 bushels of corn & I think I shall make 150 or upwards bales of cotton, have easily (I think) a plenty of hogs for our own meat. I hunt a little I killed two deer last week there is a good many about also lots of turkey which I'll commence on soon. Page 2 Uncle Bailey has been beaten by Gen'l Brown the Whig candidate for Governor I have not yet had the full return from the election but it is supposed that Gen'l Brown has beat him by about 500 votes. Cabel has beat Duval for Congress about 600 votes. Our legislature is Whig throughout so we will see what our Whig Governor & Legislature will do to benefit us as they have it all in their own hands now. Tho, last but not least, I now inform you that your sister Sarah is to be married on the 7th of December next to a Gentleman by the name of Caraway Smith, a resident at this time at Apalachicola, he has lived in Tallahassee he is brother to Mrs. Doctor Pop e of Madison County in this state so you see how things go in this county while you are absent I do hope she may, in doing so, do well. I remain my Dear Burton as ever Yours Devotedly William J Bailey P.S. Your Mother will add a P.S. hoping soon to hear from you I stop W. J. B. I was weighed in Monticello a short time ago in my summer clothes weight 196 lbs. The negroes send many howdys to you. Note: I have intended to write to you the last two weeks and to send the papers to you, but their irregularity has caused my delay, however, I hope you have received some from Mr. Dilworth who promised me that as soon as he got the full return of the elections he would send them to you_ We are all my dear Burton very much c hagrined at your Uncle Bailey's defeat and attribute it more to the Presidential election than anything else as Taylor is all the go!!! William thinks

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) this state will cast her vote for him_ His victories in Mexico are still harped upon as laurels to crown him and on that ground the People are disposed to sacrifice their principles for the Man!!! "God save the state and the Union" says W.J. B. Doubtless the intelligence of Sarah's intended marriage has startled you_ As for myself, I cannot reconcile it to m y mind_ I think she is hasty, one year more and she could have done more justice to herself, and I would have been more willing to give her up_ but she thinks she is old enough and persuasions to the contrary is unavailing_ Only two months ago, Mr. Smit h became acquainted with her and now they are shortly to be united_ He is a man of fine person, cultivated Page 2 mind and easy address_ He is District Attorney for West Florida, but may calculate to lose his office this winter as he is a politician of th e Democratic school_ He lives in Apalachicola_ He is considered smart & a very pretty speaker_ I do not believe he is worth any property_ Sarah will be married privately as our domicile will not allow much company_ She will leave the next morning for he r new home, and leave behind those whose hearts will throb with intense emotions until time reconciles us to the loss in our family circle_ May she ever be blessed and happy_ but in that uncertain task (wedlock) she must not always expect sunshine and fai r weather_ May God almighty guide and protect her is my fervent prayer_ You are most affectionately remembered by the two little ones_ Virginia asked William if God could see Bubba_ W. answered yes, she then said she loved God and Bubba too_ She often t akes your likeness and tells me that she misses Bubba_ My health is improved W_ says I am fattening_ Your dear sisters are well_ all unite in tenderest love to you_ Adieu, my beloved son and believe most sincerely Your devoted mother Eliza A. Bailey The negroes send many howdys to you

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note: entirely. Knowing how interested my dear Burton is in the Florida elections I hasten to tell him all I know. The democra ts are in the backgrounds. The whigs have been the favored ones Poor Uncle Bailey is beaten The only thing to be regretted is that he allowed such a man as Brown to run against him I am no longer a whig but cling to the side where justice & principle emana te These whigs here are all a lot of bankers & after bringing Uncle B out how have they supported him The leading members casting in their votes & doing all they can do against him. Since writing you the above dearest Burton I have heard nothing but the [b adly blurred] of the democrats They feel it very sensibly. I assure you Gov Duval has gone to court I feel very sorry for him. I spent one day in Monticello. I dined at Mrs. Budds. Sally Byrd is in Tallahassee she leaves for S Carolina in about three weeks She is not very much admired How have you been dearest Burton I am anxiously awaiting Saturdays mail in order to hear from you. Anita favored Mama and myself Page 2 last mail. She has resumed her studies with serious energy. I hope she accomplishes much. When do you intend visiting N York. Are you acquainted with ___ Taylor [sic] a nephew of Dr Taylor of Monticello He desired to be remembered to you. I am at a loss what to say in order to interest you the excitement of the election for governor is over. Ge n Taylor will undoubtedly have the majority in Florida. I suppose you remember Miss Magill she died last week ___ an of rare occurrence. Miss Jane McIntyre was married last week to a Mr Van his household is already complete having six children she took us all by surprise as we thought she was confirmed in blessed singleness. We spent a day at Mrs. Scotts & there we saw Mrs. Shehee she says Tom was a strong democrat. I hope the next question will he sees the error of the present. The crops I believe are qui te good Mr Rowell has sent 48 bales to N Port I never hear from the plantation none of the negros have been here lately. You admire Fathers style of writing so much that I have endeavored to imitate it in order to make my letter more acceptable. Mrs. Smith May & Pope spent yesterday & last night We enjoyed the three very much as Page 3 they are all witty The weather has been very disagreeable for several days just raining continually It has a peculiar effect [sic] on me. After a weeks interruption my dear Burton I resume my pen hoping that the foregoing pages will not prove ___ than acceptable. Father wrote you last week and communicated that I am to be married on the 7 of December. Mama thinks I am hasty__ [ Note: Most of the remainder of page 3 is illegib le whether the copy is light or dark.] Page 4 Yesterdays mail brought us letters from Anita she is very much engaged in her books she anticipates much pleasure in seeing you at Christmas. Miss Haven also wrote me her number of boarder are very small only two. Stephen has not been well he often inquires after you and sends remembrances. Poor Crocket is dead he died last week he was thrown to the buzzards how little the requests of the dead are regarded Nancy always said she wanted him buried. This is ind eed a scarce place for news and I feel almost ashamed to send you so dull ___ letter but I promise you something better in my next. Mama and Father are well They desire their love to you. [The next

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) two lines are illegible] We have not had church for two mo nths You do not know how to appreciate sufficiently those blessings until deprived from them. what church do you attend I hope Episcopal for I want all our family to be raised up in that faith. I expect to go to Monticello next week & spend some time with Amy Budd. Mama and myself spent last Thursday very pleasantly with Mrs. Mays she is a lovely lady. Write soon and make many allowances for all ___& believe me ever sincerely My dearest Burton to be your ___ Sarah Bellamy

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Lyndhurst 15 th Nov 48 Mr. Southall is here my dear Burton and affords me the opportunity of writing you a few lines to send by mail. I have daily intended writing you since my last but the distance of the mail has caused me to procrastinate_ I am anxious to convey my many c ontending feelings to you on your sisters intended union with John Caraway Smith He is a man I do not admire, he has courted Sarah by traducing Mr Southall who is his superior in every respect and broke the engagement by circulating that Mr Southall was d runk at New Port which is a base falsehood_ His family Page 2 is not of the first class His father is a perfect sot about Tallahassee and his two youngest brothers were the ones who started the reports about Mr. Southall_ He has been in too big a hurry about the matter to meet my approbations_ The 7 th of December was the appointed day and he is writing to Sarah to have it on the 30 th Instant_ He has written to Sarah the course she ought to pursue towards Mr Southall_ I am surprised that she submits to i arrogance, and brass and I am determined to do my best to give him his walking ticket_ I am so agitated that I can Page 3 scarcely write but perhaps you can read it_ Sarah has been spending the week in Monticello Tomorrow I send the old carriage to Emilys for her_ The horses ran away with the new carriage last Friday in Monticello and injured it very much_ I left it to be mended_ Emily looks m uch better_ Write me as soon as you get this as I desire your views_ I am in a hurry love from all and believe me my dearest Burton Your devoted Mother Eliza A Bailey

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note : The margin was cut off in copying this letter, and parts of words are missing November 23, 1848 My last letter my beloved Son was so incoherent that I expect you feel uneasy, as for myself my own heart has not had its natural pulsations for some weeks I am truly unhappy_ Your ever affectionate and kind letter of the 4 th Insta nt tended to modify my drooping spirits and prove a balm to my sorrowing heart_ Would you were grown and were here to assist me in making of most momentous results to us all_ I wrote you my opinion of Caraway Smith, it is the same_ he is not worthy of my t enderly loved Sarah and I never shall consent to their union_ This fifth visit he asked William and myself for Sarah and I was astounded and assented very equivocally telling him he was a stranger to us and I did not know any thing of him, when I left the room your sister went in and after some consultation the 7 of December was the appointed day on condition we receive our winter stores from the North_ He was not absent more than a week when he wrote Sarah urging her to beg me to set the 30 th Instant_ I f elt incensed then, but when I perused accidentally the balance of the letters where he advised her course toward Mr. Southall I felt indignant and shall remain so at his audacity Page 2 he any thing [sic] to do with any gentleman but himself_ that he should take upon himself to instruct her how to behave certain gentleman must be returned and if you can find no opportunity, make one language do you not think to write my child while under my supervision_ Sarah my dear Sarah is blinded in her estimat ion of the man and I am sorry to tell you that I entertain so mean an opinion of him that he will persuade her to violate her Christian principles and her moral obligations_ My ___ and sentiments she heeds not_ I visited Emmala last Saturday week when I na med it to her she was shocked and begged me not to let it be_ She told me his father was a drunkard about the streets of Tallahassee and that his family was not received in the first circle of society in Tallahassee_ His father was a tavern keeper in tha t city some years ago_ Mr Southall I wrote had visited us_ He did so, by invitation from me, I did so to show Mr Smith that the veto power Page 3 was not yet in his grasp_ Mr Southall says he is a regenerated man he never will again take ardent spirits_ His attachment to your sister is intense and sincere, he was engaged to her until John Carraway Smith told to your cousin Margaret that Mr Southall was drunk at New Port_ Smith drinks whiskey as well as the next one_ The ceremony of the 7 th of December is postponed_ I cannot tell you until when but I fervently pray forever_ I have just written to Gen Call respecting this Smith_ His answer will greatly govern my opinions_ Mr Rowell is grinding_ We have had very little cold weather as yet_ William says he ho pes to begin tomorrow_ He has the course you are pursuing my beloved Son may prove a beneficial one for you_ Time wears away, and I may live to see you return to m y home again_ Virginia speaks of you frequently also Anita_ Miss Havens writes affectionately and advised to your sister and says she fears she is hasty and after so long a separation from me, how can I give her up Alas! My entreaties were

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) voiced The Dem on had effected his ends_ We are all well_ Your Uncles family are still sick_ Your Cousins here but seldom_ Man is from school_ Mr Ewell is to be the Episcopal minister in Monticello_ [The next few lines are written on the flap of the envelope.] All sen d many loves to you and from me my dear Burton every anxious and tender thought for your welfare and happiness and believe me Your devoted Mother Eliza A. Bailey

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note: Eliza Ann Bailey wrote General Richard Kei th Call to inquire about Caraway Smith. This very difficult to read. Tallahassee 29 No 1848 My Dear Friend Absence from town has prevented me from sooner receiving and answering your note of the 23 rd Ins t. I can never be indifferent to any thing [sic] which may affect your happiness or that of any member of your family. I cannot therefore hesitate to answer any question you may ask me on a subject so interesting as the one you have mentioned. My secluded life for the past five or six years has prevented me from observing much of the character of those who have figured here in society during that time. With Mr. Smith I have had only a passing acquaintance. So far as I am informed from personal observation o r ___ he has always supported the character of an honorable gentleman and I have never observed any thing injurious to his reputation. I have only little personal acquaintance with the ladies of his family, I understand they are highly intelligent and resp ectable. His father was an old man of very moderate circumstances against whom I remember to have heard nothing more unfavorable than intemperance to which I now understand he was habituated until a year or two past when his wife Page 2 on her death bed extracted a promise from him which he has kept inviolate, and to his credit it is said he has been temperate ever since. One of his sisters was married a few weeks since to a respectable merchant tailor of this place and I think the connections of the fam ily are generally respectable. should be studious and attentive to business (without which the best talents are of little use to any one [sic]) he may I think make a v ery respectable figure in his profession. I have yet my dear friend, to answer the most difficult and embarrassing question you and deserving of (your) beloved S Mr. Smith, but yet I do not think him in every respect, such a person as Sarah has a right to expect, as a companion for life. I regard your dear Sarah, her youth, her beauty, her accomplishments, her disposition and her talents, as presenting one of the most interesting figures in society. She is worthy and deserving of the highest and best positions in any society of our country, and if she could have Page 3 a little patience, she would most cert ainly attain it. She cannot fail to attract the attention and admiration of every one [sic] wherever she goes and she may make any choice she may please. I am rejoiced to learn that she has escaped from a farmer, and I think a very great danger.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) I feel my dear friend that I am performing a sacred duty which I owe to the living and the dead, in addressing you thus, on the subject of your lovely Sarah. I know she is, as she ought to be, the pride of your heart, and I sympathize with you most sincerely in all the care and practical concern you feel for her present and future happiness. I have told you in the sincerity of my friendship, all I know and believe about Mr. Smith, sensibility, is too much engaged to break her engagement to Mr. Smith which appears to be generally known and spoken of here. Of this, you and the Colonel are the best judges, and I know none can act more correctly than both of you. I am very anxious to pay you a visit and will do so sometime this winter. Ellen joins me in the kindest regards for yourself, the young ladies and Col. Bailey Page 4 to whom you will present me most respectfully, and accept the ___ of the sincere and regard of R K Call Mrs. Eliza A. Bailey

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note: At the top of this page is the end of a letter from Eliza Ann Bailey to Burton [the first part is missing]. It is followed by a letter from William John Bailey. my mind_ Gay times in Tallahassee, I am desirous of going there myself_ We all enjoy fine health_ I believe I am getting fat_ You are often the theme of conversation_ Tit and Christina speak of Bubba_ I close with every wish for your happiness and am my beloved son Your devoted Mother Eliza A. Bailey My dear Burto n far had nothing to say for or against & I believe your mother a nd sister both think I ought to take a part one for and the other against Mr. Smith but I hold off on taking sides with either. I took a decided stand against Southall owing to his dissipation and your sister and mother thought I was too harsh in my cours e toward him I can only say to you Burton that Mr. Smith has his friends & also his enemies some laud him to the skies while others do not think worthy of your sister. Your mother, I have no doubt, gave you more information than I could possibly do if I we re to try. I opinion from to suit your own notion of right and wrong_ I now weigh I suppose about 200 pounds but it is not from high living but pure laziness Yo ur mother received from Mr Rowells poultry one large turkey, 2 geese, and four fine ducks and Cousin John killed a deer here Saturday last so you see we have plenty of wild game I can kill a turkey any time I wish to there is plenty of deer about here but Page 2 this year. I am now hauling the lumber to build and I shall most undoubtedly make arrangements for yourself, wife and numerous progeny Our election for the Legislature is just over and will take place again in 2 years, Our Govern ors are elected every 4 years The Legislature is doing nothing in the world as I am informed but meet every morning at 10 AM & adjourn immediately without doing any business They are all the while electioneering for the loaves & fishes. Ward, Morten, Finla y, Burrett & Call are all anxious to be elected to the Senate of the U.S. I do hope Ward will not get it. He has made himself so conspicuous in the past caucus There is quite a difference of opinion among the Whigs in their caucuses They can not settle on one as each has his friends to stand by him & if they continue to run more than one candidate the Democrats will all center on Call and with his Whig friends elect him as he is the least objectionable to the Democratic party. The legislators from Jefferson are to be House of Rep Blackburn, W. R. gratified my dear Burton to hear that you are getting along finely with your studies and as for going to Princeton I would no t think of it as I think you will get along better where you are. You have become acquainted with the manner of their management. I saw Will Cole today he says you are due him a letter. I have got through making sugar have made some very pretty sugar for t his country have dug my potatoes that is as many as I calculate to dig having several acres undug for the hogs I have about one hundred and twenty head of meat hogs up fattening. Tit & Numna are as fat as they can be. I remain Dear Burton as ever Yours De votedly

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) William J. Bailey Rowell has made 40 bbls syrup but could make no sugar.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note: There are so many spelling and grammatical errors in this letter that it is difficult to mark all of them. Compound words are often written as two words. My dear Bur ton Having a little more leasure [sic] than I have had for some time I will now embrace it to write you a line. But rest assured you are not forgotten by us though I may neglect to write for a time. I would like to have done so before but ever since my return from Tampa have had so much to attend to. I have been from home very little, and the first visit we have made over the Aucilla was in the Christmast [sic] holydays [sic]. Found all pretty well except your Uncles family They was [sic] complaining y our Aunt quite sick with cold also Margaret. We are all pretty well except little Em which had quite a fever yesterday from cold but is better today. She has had continual relapses since last August year, and had missed them for five or six weeks, but hope they may not return again. You have ear [sic] this heard of the course of your Sister which is a trouble to us all, and your poor mother how you would pity her. She talks of little else. Poor Sarah I also pity her, but hope she may never regret it. She h eard I suppose that I had said some thing [sic] of Smith. that he was not her equal or good enough for her which wiffed her. She passed from home to Monticello two or three times and never put a foot a near me. I felt a little hurt at first, but do not car e now as I feel [blurred] Page 2 [blurred] surely from good fealing [sic] and well wishes for her lblurred] feel interested for you all and hope all may do well. Oh My dear Burton see how ___ a dear Father and Brother was and is needed and to know my dear little ones have neither. How it grieves me, but it is the hand of Providence that has taken them and feel you are the only one to come next them [sic]. Your Mother says if your Father was living Sarah would not have acted as she has. My dear little Willia m is a sweet blue eyed child Many think her like Sarah and calls herself Miss Sarah Bellamy. but alas she has changed her maner [sic] for a much uglyer [sic]one but that is but little importance if she had gained one worthy of her. Mrs. Leobs Daughter ra n away on last Monday night with Charley Taylor and were [sic] married at George Taylors How wrong for people to act in such a manner. You asked if Mr. Baugh and Rowell would remain on the plantations. The latter will and I expect the former will. Both mad e very good crops I understand. We have a Mr. Barrington from Carolina, a Cousin of the others we did not make as good a crop as was expected. The winter has been very warm so far, we have no wether [sic] to save meat, as yet, but it rained yesterday and t urned cold and we have killed 20 hogs to day. a great many persons have lost a good deal of meat. I am in hopes we shall have more favorable weather the balance of the winter. Poor little Sis has another chill. Page 3 I could not get a governess this seas on which I regret much. Daught is going to school in Monticello again to a Mrs. Ferguson from Quincy. I intend to get one next fall if I can. I must close this uninteresting letter. The Children say they want to see you very much and you must make haste an d come home. All desire with me there [sic] kindest love to you. Your sincearly [sic] attached aunt, Emmala Bellamy Dec. 30 1848

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC)

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) LYNDHURST 1849

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note: In this letter Sarah wrote about Governor Branch. He was the last territorial governor of Florida. He served from August 11, 1844, until June 12, 1845, when William Moseley became the first governor of the new state. I am grieved dear Burton when I think how long a time has passed since I last wrote you and although my silence has not proce eded from forgetfulness yet the thought of commuting any thing to black and white which might hereafter reproach me is my only excuse I have thought of you much and yes have with affection several times have I made the effort and not frequently without bei ng successful & have __before a letter which I finished a month ago _but for the has taken from us the last women of one family Aunt Bailey died on the 12 th of December her suffering was great and the loss to her family is irreparable Mr. Smith and myself visited home last week and & we have all made friends I cannot but think that Providence uses means in order to Page 2 to [sic] accomplish certain ends That t he death of Aunt B that caused a reconciliation Mr. Smiths home is in the West & Mama is so anxious to have me near her that he is willing to give up his interest there & reside in Monticello I am delighted at the idea I long to introduce you to my husband he is all that a man can be & I am confident that you & he will be great friends. I arrived home last Tuesday and am quite tired from ___ but Mr. S business detains us Our home this year will be in Marianna where you must direct your letters Oh Burton for give me for my past neglect it has caused me many bitter moments. You are my only brother & one whom I place implicit strongly knit together to loose the tie whic h exists between us I was out at Gov Branches the other day they made many inquiries after you and desire their love Uncle Bailey left us this morning he is very much depressed he told me that they were all well at home All Tallahassee have [sic] been to s ee me Page 3 How are you progressing dear Burton in your studies You well know that I am interested in your improvement and want you to emulate the example of your dear Father whose memory is cherished by all Every body[sic] speaks of him although many ye ars have passed away since his death I am indebted to you for several kind and welcoming letters & although I never have answered them yet I have sincerely thanked you in my heart Mama enjoys excellent health I am very much in hopes she will visit you this summer it will be the means of reestablishing her health entirely I have promised to take possession of the household until her return How is your health dear Burton I hope you are well Have you visited New York recently It has been so long since I have heard from you that I know nothing of your arrangements. Writing has indeed become irksome to me but I hope my natural fondness will be ___ before very long When I hear from [very blurred] Page 4 Note: The first two lines on page are almost illegible. They concern daguerreotypes. Mr. Hoskins must be the person making them. This entire page is difficult to read. not at all good Burton do send me yours Mr. Budd wi ll be in New York and can you not send it

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) to me by him Nothing has occurred of interest lately Tallahassee has been very gay but I of course have not been a participant. How are you ___in your classical studies are you still exercising your musical talents Anita will be an ___ in that accomplishment What delightful times we shall have here when you both return home. Burton do write to Mr Smith I know you will love him like a brother when you know him He is interested in you all for my sake The children at h ome are delighted with him ___ says ___ Burton write soon and direct your letters to Marianna My love to Anita when you write. Mr Smith joins me in dearest love to you my own dear brother believe me to be ever your devoted sister Sarah Bellamy Smith

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note: The margins were missing on some pages of the copy of the original letter. Let Anita see this letter when convenient E.A.B. Lyndhurst 21 st Jan_1849 My beloved Burton Five weeks have elapsed since I have written to you_ an interim of time that has awakened me to the most painful feelings that the human heart is heir to_ My letters must be to you only the tidings of sorrows and afflictions and when you receive them you look upon them as the harbinge rs of woe_ Too true Alas! When I communicate the painful and melancholy bereavement that has again ___ with tears our family circle and called the last of her generation She departed this life on the 12 th Ins t She died of inflammation of the lungs from a cold she took some 4 weeks previous, we thought at one time she was recovering, and never thought her dangerous, until the day before she died_ a week before she died she relapsed from which she never recovered_ On the 11 th she fell into a deep sleep from which nothing could rouse her and th On the 14 th she was entered in the family burying ground_ The funeral was very large [500] and Peyt on Smith performed the service_ Never in all my life my dear son Page 2 have I witnessed so agonizing and melting a sight as nine children and a devoted husband awaiting natures stern decree, and watching with tears, groans lamentations, then buoyed by hop e, then ___by despairs, and at last obliged to resign the sweet spirit of her, who was their dearest and best friend_ They all took it much to heart_ Poor John I thought his heart would break and ___ his feelings were so acute that he could not give vent to them_ Margaret by dear bubba is the most exemplary girl I know of, her attention, devotion and obedience to that mother that now is no more must crown her with blessings, she is a bright example for this world to follows, she is capable of the most ard uous duties that have involved her_ Sarah [Bailey] is also an excellent girl, but in her own way_ It is impossible to describe the afflictions of the family_ John in the fullness of heart poured forth his deep distress in prayer and was comforted_ Your Un cle looks are the ___ to his lacerated bosom Time alone is the balm for their wounds_ and may our blessed Redeemer look upon them in Mercy_ On the Ins t Sarah (Bailey) wrote to Smith to visit them_ Stephen went for her, she came without Mr Smith_ I was there, John brought her to me, she extended her hand, offered to kiss an offended parent with the simple Page 3 eeling a child that has so

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) me was more than I could bear_ It was four weeks since her marriage, she had not written to me only the note I sent you, and treate d us all with perfect sangfroid_ I repulsed her and told her I never intended receiving her as my child and other things I cannot commit to paper_ We both staid at your uncles that night, she made no effort to see me, and the next morning Mrs. Mays interc eded with me to allow Sarah an interview, which I refused as being too painful however Mrs. Mays endeavored to convince her she was wrong and she came into the room where I was, and expressed her penitence_ I told her I was willing to speak to her but to r eceive her as the child I once blindly loved and cherished as the comfort of my declining years, was never more to be We parted_ I returned to my own home to make preparations for the funeral the next day and she remained with her cousins_ William staid all night to sit up with the corpse and followed it next morning to Emmalas, she wrote me a note by him begging my forgiveness and appealing to the solemnity of the scene, as a source to subdue my feelings toward her_ I hesitated some time but Page 4 wh his erring child and I received her_ she returned home with her cousins I remained at Emmalas spent the next day with me_ She is no more Sarah Bellamy That sweet ___ that existed between us is gone She does not appear to or feel that she has acted wrong, but thinks that scoundrel is something superior_ Her family, her friends are all disappoin ted in her and surprised at her marrying Smith_ The ___is her own and it is not in our power to secure any of it to her_ Smith has purchased a pair of fine horse ($300) and a barouche_ He has so charmed your unfortunate sister that she does not think any o f us worthy of her notice_ is the reason she does not write to you and Anita_ This morning I received a verbal message from her through Clement that if I would let Jinny go with her to Marianna she would come and stay a day or two with me_ had she written to me I would heed her request, but to treated in so servile a manner by one who knows better is deeply mortifying_ She is now staying in Madison with his sister_ but I understand they start for Marianna W Fl next week where they will board_ Smith told Sar ah that he is to be the next representative to Congress from Florida_ Today is Sunday_ Peyton Smith preached_ ___staid with us last night, he desires to be remembered to you. Uncles family are well, Man. dined with us_ He goes shortly to Fletcher Institut e in Thomasville_ Your kind and bountiful present of apples we received today_ They were much rotten I shall overlook them tomorrow and shall not fail to remember to send your Aunt Emmala and Uncles family a good share_ I have a teacher for the children, a plain unassuming female who I doubt not will advance them well in the English branches of their education_ [The following was added on the top of the first page] We all unite in tender love to you_ I received your valued letter yesterday which was tru ly comforting to your ever devoted Mother Eliza A. Bailey

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Lyndhurst Jan 30 1849 Your ever welcomed letter dated Jan 13 th my dear brother was received by yesterdays mail, and I must return my thanks to you. I have had so many things t o think of lately that I had no time to write you. But rest assured that I will always answer your letter in due season now. I suppose that you have heard of the death of our dear Aunt Bailey by this time. She departed this life on the 13 th of Jan 1849. H ow little did you think that the day you wrote to me that there was such news as this at home. Is it not melancholy to think that the last of this generation is no more? But Ah! Let us return to news that is more grateful our dear sister has been at home b oth she and Mr. Smith. I shall leave it to Mamma to tell you the particulars. They went on to Marianna last evening. I expect they will live in Monticello or at least I hope so. Sister is coming down to see us in a few months. She says she is going to writ e you. Mamma has let her have Jinny. We are going to school to Miss Croosland [sic]. I like her very well. Chip and Did come along very well with their studies. You asked me about Miss Williams she wrote to us once, but we would not answer it because she a cted so hypercritically. Mamma never received an answer to Mrs. Reids letter. I intend to go on North when Anita comes home next summer and return Page 2 in the winter. Aunt Emily has been very sick indeed and the Doctor gave her out and she signed her wil l. She gave Makin to you and if he was not willing to stay with you, you should have his worth in money. But she is better now and we all hope she will entirely recover. The apples have arrived, but they were very much spoiled and we did not get more than 1 barrel of good ones, but we are feasting on them. Your pigeons are coming along very well. They have not begun the new house yet. They are hauling the lumber, father sends his cotton to Madison and brings back a load of lumber each time. One of Aunt Emil Mamma expects to go to Monticello and I am writing this letter to send by her. When you write Anita tell her she owes me a letter. I received a letter from Helen Phelps and Tate Havens not long ago and I have them to answer. You must excuse this last page my dear brother as I am tired writing. Virginia knows all her letters and can spell in two letters. I asked her w hat I must tell Bubba and she said tell him I lob him till I ded I believe I have told you all the news and Mamma wants to add a few lines so I close with the hope of hearing from you soon. Mamma and all the children send their love to you and accept the same from your beloved sister With much affection I am your own sister Josephine Note: 30,1849 Sunday Night

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Before I retire to bed I must devote a few moments to my dearest Burton_ I wrote you last week in the middle of tears happiness feelings have animated us all, and tended to convince us we must li ve for the living and not death_ Kind Providence orders all things, and we must admit for the best_ Circumstances have brought Sarah and Mr. Smith to my house together, and they have bers of our families_ My heart my dear son feels lighter, but Sarah has acted unkindly towards me but a mothers affection to her children is great, and no matter what the offense ever ready to receive them_ I hope they may do well Mr. S will make over may locate in Monticello_ Your Aunt Emily has been dangerously ill from Congestion of the lungs_ I hope she is on the mend_ I sent both families plenty of apples as coming from you_ You must write your Uncle Baile y a feeling letter on the death of your aunt, also Margaret_ They all love you dearly. Man. goes next week to Thomasville_ John says he will soon write you_ Procrastination is the cause of his silence_ I hope your sisters are doing well with Miss Page 2 Cr ossland_ Sarah received her wedding things on the 21 st Instant_ Mr. Rowell I believe will make 200 bales of cotton_ I got a letter from Mama yesterday. The General has been quite sick with whooping cough_ They made a poor crop again last year_ Col. Hunt & Maria are still in W. City so you can see them when you visit that monumental place_ John Williams has gone to Dora has returned to New Orleans_ I understand that one of General Clinches son is much taken with her_ Mamma with Louisa are all living in the country_ I received a letter a few days ago from Fanny_ She writes very despondently_ St. Augustine is a poor place. I wish to go to St. Augustine, but know not how to leave home as I cannot take all the children and am unwilling to leave them_ I send you 1 newspaper The piece by Punch is truly amusing_ Hope soon to hear from you_ Goodnight William is in bed he says he will soon write you Stephen is well he often speaks of you_ This morning Phine told Virginia Mr. Smith was her brother, She said No, her brother was in New Haven_ she ever speaks of you much lovingly_ We send love to you_ My pen provokes me Adieu_ hope soon to hear from you_ May success attend you and reward and follow you to do well_ Let the goodness of God ever animate your ___ as your unfailing guide through life Your devoted Mother E.A.B. Note: mother was Ana Maria Hill Williams, but she became Ana Maria Hernandez when she married General Joseph Hernandez as her second husband. Their daughter Maria was probably the Maria mentioned in this letter. John Williams and Samuel [Williams] were Eliza An Fannie Munroe of Nassau. This was probably the Fanny about whom Eliza Ann wrote.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Oxford, Ga. Febry 12 th 1849 My Dearest Friend My co nscience tells me that I should write you, though the state of my feelings would decide one in the negative, I will not blame you as I have intended for neglecting me so long but will only say that I did expect from you of all others, but I am glad to find that I was mistaken in the cause to which I ascribed your neglect. I am in hopes that neither of us will have cause for complaint in the future. You shall not dear Burt in my case at least. Many circumstances have transpired since my last communication to you, but very [sic] of which, however, have I either the space or inclination to relate, or as I suppose, you the inclination or patience to listen to. Your very kind letter was received this evening and with it a paper which I have for the last two hours been most attentatively [sic] and interestingly perusing, most piec e of composition it has ever been my lot to fall in with. I can not [sic] with sufficient force at present express my contempt of the author of it. I will not therefore attempt it Oh Burt, how I wish you and I could only be together one hour were it only to abade [sic] these hellish abolitionists, these personifications of all that is mean and destructive of the interests of our beloved Country. My opinion is, and one generally promoted at the South, that the spirit manifested by [blurred words] will in th e end subvert the relations existing between the Page 2 North and the South. God grant that it may not prove true. But if it is to do so, the blame must rest and that entirely on the Northern States who have not made any attempt whatever to restrain the fa natical spirit but rather by their laws have tended to increase this spirit in their citizens. Although I desire to express my feelings more explicitly upon this point yet I must restrain myself as perhaps I have something to say which will interest you mo re, not that I promise however anything very interesting. You have propounded a number of questions to which I may and expect will find it rather difficult to answer. I will do the best I can however and you will excuse if I come short. In reference to yo ur questions about home. the answer which I make and which would be most satisfactory to myself under similar circumstances is that I found everything just as we left. Changes I found none or at least none worthy of mention. As refers particularly to your own Family and the several members about whom you are more particularly interested, I have a few remarks to make which may interest you. Your Mother is just the same as far as I could see. She was enjoying very good health. She does not look one bit older than when I saw her last. Your Sisters, I mean the three youngest, have grown surprisingly, and especially Josephine. The twins have also done their part, thought [sic] not so well as their Sister, and as they increase in size, they grow in beauty and if they go one as they have begun they will be the Belle s of Jefferson in a few years. Cousin William is as fat as any man you ever saw perhaps. When over to see him I had some difficulty in reference to the road and looking about for someone to set me right I saw someone riding Page 3 Cousin John. He is not in very good health. Co a multiplicity of beaus so far as I could judge. Man looks as usual, Uncle intends sending him to Mr. Hunt at Thomasville where there is a good school a sort of a college. I do not know where he

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) intends sen ding him to College. Byron Scott is in College here, as great an oddity as ever. I have answered all your inquiries except those in reference to Caraway Smith which with extreme reluctance however I will ___ to the extent of my knowledge to answer tomorrow so good night as it is passed my Bed time Tuesday night I resume my pen to fulfill my promise. I have little to say however, nor will say that little ___ My first remark is that you will in a few weeks and perhaps a few months, be induced to drop any di slike which his elopement with your Sister may have engendered in your mind. In the first place he is a gentleman in every sense of the word. So far as I can judge and I believe all who are acquainted with him have the same opinion. This is the opinion I h ave formed of him upon a very slight acquaintance. He is a very handsome man with graceful and easy carriage of a very good size being about six feet in height and weighing about 150 lbs. The remainder of what I shall say will be upon the authority of othe rs as I can say nothing Page 4 upon my own. Pa was very much pleased with him before his marriage with your sister. His opinion is that he is very talented, and I believe this is the general opinion, but those who are best acquainted with him say he lacks application. Some say that he has a very prodigal spirit while on the other hand others say that he is just the reverse. I am inclined to believe that he is not of a very saving disposition, but that he is fond of parade and show, more so I think than was fitting for a man in rather straitened circumstances. I am inclined to this opinion from his driving two instead of one horse in his Buggy; and more particularly from the fact that being near thirty, he has saved nothing from his profession. Tom Heir, his intimate and particular friend, sayd [sic] that he is inclined to be penurious rather than otherwise. He has been occluded by being rather fond of his cups. It has been proven that he has been twice drunk, but what of this? There are few who have not done the same. I have heard him commended for his conduct to his former wife to whom they say he was most devotedly attached. It is said that her death came near killing him so deeply was he affected by his loss. I have said enough, and will with sincere hope t hat he may turn out all that we could desire. I will close. Give my love to your Family when you write them; and my respects to Anita, Your Family, Hill, Scott, Brantley all send their respect and their assurancy [sic] that you are still remembered. Scott & Brantley frequently speak of you. Please excuse haste as I am in no condition to write I remain dear Burt your affectionate Cousin William Scott The following was written down the side off this last page. This is very blurr ed. I will leave to you the part of finding mistakes which I have no doubt there are a goodly number. Farewell. Write soon a long letter Note: William Scott was a nephew of General Bailey and a cousin of William John Bailey. His mother was Margaret Bai

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Lyndhurst Feb 12 th 1849 My dear Burton I have seated myself to write you a few lines & I really do not know what to write, but I know duty and affection binds me to do so, if it is only to tell you a little of the nonsense We are all well at this time tho our family circle has met with a great loss in the death of our Aunt Bailey the particulars of wh ich your mother wrote you some time since, Your Aunt Emmala has been seriously ill but is now on the mend it was seriously expected that she would not be able to survive as the attack was so severe, it was congestion of the lungs so the Drs. say. Her children are all well at this time as far as I know, Uncle Bailey has been quite unwell for some time past days & months but he is now better and has gone to Tallahassee. John and the rest of the children are well that is to say tolerably well there is fir st one and then another always complaining, Man. has gone to Thomasville to school He is a very studious youth to tell you that during his stay at home t hat he killed a deer with his little gun. John has killed several. Uncle Bailey now owns all the Roberts negroes and he also owns the Purifoy negroes. Mr. Skannal is going to Louisiana. He has sold out his land to Mr. Finlayson. Uncle Bailey has also sold the land that lay between myself and Mr. F. to Page 2 him, it was the tract that Uncle B bought of Elias Edward so you see that Mr. F. owns land all the way from Mr. Rogers to my land he has become a close neighbor so far as land is concerned_ Mr. Rowell made 198 bales cotton this last year and a fine crop of corn & potatoes and about 40 bbls. Syrup, I have made about 150 bales of cotton not yet all packed out Uncle Bailey has made about 400 bales, Baugh made 202 Bales. I saw George Hitz the other day and he still has Genl. have it I should have done so before now but calculated that you had no use for it. You wrote me some time ago about slavery and disunion or ra event the South would be the loser by it for at least fifty years. My dear boy you are entirely out of the secret the boot is on the other leg, we the South can live without the North but the North cannot exist without the South. We are an agricultural people and they a manufacturing Consequently they are compelled to have our raw material we have a good many factories in the South now and would soon have many more. I have just finished getting about fifty thous and cypress shingles for the contemplated house have about 35 ___ feet of lumber hauled from the mill. I calculate to make the first story of brick. Your mother has become reconciled to Sarah and Mr. Smith so far as to invite them to our house. They stayed two or three days during their stay Mr. Smith killed an old buck. they are now gone to Marianna where they calculate to live. Ann Scott is married to Wm. Page 3 Marvin. William Scott has been home during Christmas but has returned to Oxford to school. he perhaps he has written you about them as he corresponds with you William is a very studious young man and is making every effort to become a ___ man. I hope my dear B. will not let any of the young men go ahead of him. I should be very much pleased to hear from your teacher if he would condescend to do so I expect to go to Tampa Bay about the middle of March The young ones at our house are all well Miss Indepe ndent came in to where I was writing just now & asked She is independently mature as well as ___. Virginia is a very modest child she often speaks of

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Bubba. You r mother and all the children unite with me in kindly love to you I remain my dear Burton As ever Yours devotedly William J. Bailey Note: Miss Independent is Christina Independence Bailey. Dearest Burton_ Today (Saturday) our mail day brought me another dear letter from you_ death_ Affliction throws a gloom over our inclina tions as well as mind and heart and so ___ and contending have been the occurrences of one short month that a ready pens man would have much to say_ Your sentiments my dear son about the feelings Page 4 of cousins with regard to your sister conduct is wron g_ They have sympathized sincerely with me, and your poor Aunt Bailey said it had helped to make her sick and begged on Sunday previous to her death to forgive Sarah and said could we only see Sarah she knew it would make her well_ Their silence to you pro ceeds from want of energy_ They have so little to do that less satisfies them and procrastination claims them for his own_ They all love you dearly and think none are like you_ Therefore in their deep affliction write to them and comfort them by your kind feelings_ I wrote you in my last that Sarah and Mr Smith had been received and I gave Jinny up to Sarah_ She has left us two weeks and has not written a single line_ I cannot tell you how I feel I am become almost reconciled to any thing since my own child can treat me in so neglected a manner_ She has no shame_ She thinks there is nothing reproachable in the steps she has taken and her love for Smith is a sufficient excuse for her_ The Honey Moon[sic] will not last forever and cares and troubles are the co mpanions of life and she will be truly blessed if she never meets with them_ How happy it would make me dear Bubba to see you_ But how can I leave any of the children and we are too many to go_ I still intend for Anita to come home, She will send you the Floridian with y our aunts obituary May every blessing attend you_ Look for happiness above and expect it not in this vale of tears_ Your mother E.A.B. [The following is written across the writing on page 4.] I have received a kind letter form Miss H e will soon answer it_ Your Grandma censors Miss H very much.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Oxford, Ga. March 12 th 1849 Dear Burt, I have just eaten supper and taken too much. You may therefore expect a letter badly writt en and what is worse than all badly composed. I must beg you to excuse all imperfections and forgive haste. Your most acceptable and well written letter was duly received this morning. You can not accuse me therefore of being backward in informing you of i ts arrival. I am truly sorry to hear that have [sic] been sick, but exceeding much gratitude to hear of your recovery. I am glad you were pleased at the account I gave you of Mr. Smith, and I sincerely hope all our hopes may be consummated in regard to hi m, and they will be if I am not mistaken. c] not, touch not, and handle not, the unclean thing. The die is cast and I am safe. You may perhaps think that I was addicted to the practice and wished to escape from it by joining the Sons, but if you think that you are mistake, but I desired to put mys which numbered among its victims men of the highest rank and most towering intellect, men of every age and of every clim [sic]. With the order I am very much please d, more so now than I expected. Suppose you join. Burt, I am sure you would be Page 2 well pleased. You tried to accuse me of some sure faults one was the being in love and intending to run away with the Bright eyed Sally, but my Dear Fellow let me ___you for once in your life, you are mistaken. It is true I am in love and have been for sometime but not with Miss Sally, but ewell to my boyish love!!! alas!! alas!! That I must ever be compeled [sic] to say so, but so I am afraid it must be, to Miss Sallie I expect soon to hear of her marriage to Bill Moseley. Joy attend her!! The other charge you porfered [sic] against me was that I had quickly taken a thrashing from a blustering Georgia Cracker, but no such thing, Sir, as I will show you. This Fellow cursed me and when got [sic] an opportunity I returned his complement, and we locked horns, he being almost 20 lbs. the heavier. I obtained the decided advantage in the first fight, but in the second he took the advantage of me and knocked my head once with a cudgel as I fell, I happened to fall near his legs and caught hold and threw him, and was in the act of crawling upon him wh en we were parted. I have had an aching desire to shoot the villain, but he was sort of a sport twice after the affair and my anger cooled. We came very near having a fight among the students a few days ago. The whole College nearly were armed from head to foot, but it has all blown over and all is peace and quietness again. The excitement was from an election which took place in the two Societies, and from some expressions let fall Page 3 by the defeated party in the hour of defeat. You mentioned that you had a great many correspondents. How do you find time to keep this up? I had 7 or 8 last year but found that I could get along better without them, and since discontinued two or three. I now have four or five, and [sic] takes all the time I can spare from my other duties to keep up. I have considerable writing to do between letters and other compositions. I have a composition to read before College in about two weeks and two speeches to write and speak about the same time and all this in two weeks or a lit

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) either, I must begin them soon, tonight, so I must bid you adieu. I wish to write more but this is as much as I have time to write, and I guess, as much as you will have patience to read. I remain most affectionately Burton Bellamy Your Friend New Haven Connicticut [sic] William Scott Vaucluse March 23, 1849 My dear Burton, It is with much pleasure that I r eceive all your letters & was very sorry that I was not able to answer your last letter until a short time since. I have suffered a great deal this winter and still am far away from being well and thought I never should recover but the good Lord has raise d me again for some good purpose I hope. I took severe cold at the time of the death of your dear Aunt. Truly we are an afflicted family, but it is the way of Providence I suppose you have heard the pertucklars [sic] ere this. Col Bailey has been very sick I have not seen any of them except your Uncle who spent a night with us this week from Court. For several weeks he says John was very unwell poor fellow he looked very badly when I saw him. He comes very seldom. I have been trying to persuade him to go w ith North and see you. Mrs. Anderson is going on this summer and some of my friends have been trying to get me to consent to go with her but it is such an undertaking for me and the children are small unless I could take a servant, and John would go. But I have thought that if I got there you would travel with me the month you had vacation. I must go some where [sic] on account of my own and Sises [sic] health she is quite feeble. The other children are well Daught is still going to school and is geting [si c.] on prety [sic] Page 2 well I hope. I feel very anxious about her and would prefer to have her at home with a good governess. Do you know of any? I prefer a Southerner if I can get one. Farmers are busy planting we shall commence planting cotton next week. Cuggo [sic] is as busy as any one he always wishes to be kindly remembered to you and wants to know how long before you come home. I wish all were as good as he, we have been unfortunate in losing three Negroes an infant an old man at Graves place an d Little Flora, she left a babe six weeks old. Mary Simpkins has another daughter that is three Children they have. Daniel Bird is attending to his Fathers business. Sally is at home receiving beaus I fear she will not wait for you. She is anxious if I go North to accompany me. Old Mrs. Anderson has been on a visit to us with her grand Daughter [sic] Miss Shaw, She is a pleasant young lady. The grave yard [sic] is finished being walled in with brick. It needs an Iron gate which I suppose your Uncle will get I must now close with much love from the Children with me to you and Anita when you write her, Your sincear [sic] attached Aunt Emmala A Bellamy

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Oxford Ga. Apr. 4 th 1849 Dear Burt After a long time of waiting and expectation I this m orning received a letter from you. I will return you my thanks but can not [sic] commend your promptness, as the want of this however is very often to be seen in myself. I will forbear complaints. It is now bed time but as I feel very little like going I h ave concluded to write a portion of this epistle to night although I never felt less like I could write anything which could by any means interest you, and particularly when I reflect I have nothing to write about. You began your letter by telling me you w ere an infidel! If I had any cause to suspect you I would conclude you were trying how far you could stretch my credulity, but as the case stands I am compeled [sic] to take you at your word, although I could most willingly suspect you of joking upon a sub ject which is too grave and important to joke about. I am sorry to say it but I can not say with truth that I am a Christian, but I do most earnestly hope I have not, now or ever will, fall into the dreadful pit of Infidelity. I have long since concluded t hat there never was an Infidel who became such by yielding obedience to the dictates of conscience and reason, and believe then [sic] was never a man out of the Church who would not have been in it if he had yielded the voice of conscience his obedience an d had not not stifled the dictates of Page 2 [blurred] upon the Ocean of life. Man needs a guide [blurred] his bark and keep from the rocks and quick sand which lie in his way. For this then there is no surer guide than Religion. Directed by this his words the Gulf of intemperance and the alluring prospect of Pleasure. But enough of this. You have made an unjustifiash [sic] attack upon the Order of the Sons of Temperance. In your next epistle I desire you to prove it a humbug. There has a considerable degree of excitement existed in Oxford several days past, or rather during the latter part of last week arising from some of the Boys having been expelled [sic] and others prosecuted for some wanton attacks made by some of them upon the property of some o f the Citizenry. This morning after it was done, John Brantly heard some one of his friends say whether in earnest or not, he did not know that he himself was engaged in the frolic and when they were presented to the G. I. John was called on as a witness but instead of giving them the desired information he kept the proceedings of the Court delayed a whole day and would not give in his evidence until he discovered it would not when known, recriminate his friend and that by delaying one minute longer he wou ld subject himself to fine and imprisonment. The affair, so far as the prosecuted were concerned, was satisfactorily settled. I received a letter from my Mother a few days since containing the unwelcomed intelligence that Cousin Wm. Bailey had been sick a nd was not when heard from last Page 3 considered out of danger. There is a report in Town today that the small pox[sic] is in Atlanta only 25 miles from this place and also at Union Point, so that it appears we are completely surrounded by it. It being bo th up and down the Rail Road, leaving us no means of escape by that way. I think of being vaccinated tomorrow. I hear that the cholera is raging with great violence in New Orleans, and that it is in Memphis, Tenn. If any of these maladies take a notion to make a call in Oxford, I will not stay to receive a visit, but will try the Mountains for a season There is no two diseases I would dread more than these two. The first is certain death I suppose and the other if it does not inflict death it leaves its tra ce behind more horrible to me than death itself. Just suppose that now that I should have the small pox! All my brightest hopes would be blighted

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) and I would be compeled[sic] if I lived at all to drag out a miserable existence in single cursed only for wha t Lady worth having would view me with a favorable eye when my visage had been head to the soles of his feet. I suspect the old man of having had that disease. You frequently mention that you wish me to come on to Yale. Burt! I tell you that I would not go to a Northern College to get my education if I never got one. I may tell you my reasons at some future time when I have more leisure than at present. You asked my opinion concerning the address Page 4 newspapers other than big speaches [sic] or something of the kind, and do not suppose Gen Taylor has been guilty o f speaking such as our ___The truth of my suspisions [sic] has at least acknowledging that he is an Abolitionist. The old scoundrel! I must now conclude. Give my lov e to your Family when next you write them, and my very best respects to Mrs. Smith and Anita. Does Anita intend returning home next winter? And if so do you expect to return with her? If you do, just come by land and call at Oxford and get me ___! Your A ff e Friend William Scott P.S. You must excuse haste and all mistakes and bad writing. William Scott

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Aucilla April 14 th 1849 My dear Burton, Your kind and affectionate letter of the 25 th of February last was received with the kindest affection and with sincere satisfaction. I would have written before this time but my health has not been good and I have so many cares on my mind, so much business to attend to that my mind is always on a strain and do assure you that it is not for a want of feeling on my part to write you often for I am aware of your affection to me an d to your dear departed Aunt who doted on you and never spoke of you but with the most loving kindness. You have lost a devoted friend and one who loved you much and well may we all mourn her loss her irreparable loss. Nothing can erase it from our memory time may diffuse but can never do it away We are all in reasonable health at this time except your Cousin Margaret who has a cold and which has length of time and I trust it will continue to improve. Your Father has had another severe time of neumonia [sic] he was confined some four or five weeks to his bed & room, but left some ten days ago for the Cedar Key at the mouth of the Suwannee River Your Mama wen t with him, I got a letter a day or two since from her and she mentioned that he was improving They will return in the course of ten or twelve days and I hope he will quite recovered_ The health of your Ma and the children has been very good ever Page 2 si nce they returned to the place he got of Judge Shehee_ Dear Burton I sent William to Thomasville the first of February and think of continuing him there at least one year. I should like for him to be with you but cannot send him on to be gone so long f rom home, will probably send him on so as to be with you the last year of your stay at college. Man. is doing I think considerably well at this time, he is very studious and is under the care of a most excellent man and I think a very competent teacher he has not been at home since he left We have had a fine spring and the crops look well and it bids fair for a fine season and other day and never saw a better prosp ect_ Mr. Skannal left with his family the last week for Louisiana We have lost a most excellent citizen from this part of the country and one of the best planters_ Dear Burton the children all unite with me in their kindest love and affection to you and wi sh you good health and great success in your studies and believe me ever your affectionate Uncle Wm Bailey Note: stepfather, William John Bailey. He was married to Elizabeth Mary Bellamy, the sister of Abram Bellamy. He was the stepfather,

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Thomasville, Ga. May 8, 1849 My dear Cousin Your kind letter was received a little more than a week ago and would have answered it a week ago, but I put it off until Saturday and when that came something else prev ented and so I have put it off but it shall not be so again. I was sorry to hear of the injury done to you by the fire, and the sickness you got from getting up that night. You asked me for some of my love letters, I would send you a copy of one if I had a ny, but as I have none you may not expect any. I do not know any girls that I love so hard that I would correspond with. There is not more than one or two pretty girls in school. I would like to see some of the letters you get from the Yankee [sic] gals, w hom you love so dear. I guess I may not be much surprised if you bring home one of them. The reason that I wrote you about those newspapers was to show you that you were wrong and that you may have to suffer something by it where you did not know that it w as wrong. I have been thrown back by sickness and the loss of time that I am now far behind I am now reading in mythological notices (greek) [sic] and the 5 th Aenied I average about fifty lines a day not having gone over it before and there is no one in my class but myself (in latin and greek). I have only read the latin [sic] reader, Caesar, and part of Virgil. I have never scaned [sic] any yet but will try and commence it soon. You asked which I liked the best greek or latin I think that I prefer the lat ter, but I have not read far enough in greek to see the prettiest part I guess. Tom (Bebe) is studying latin he is read Page 2 ing in his first book of Caesar [the rest of the line is too dark to read] is not studying the languages.. You asked where he li ved when he is at home he lives on the Chattahoochee river he says that is the greatest place for game that he ever saw, you can go in the pine woods and see them like flocks of sheep and the turkeys are innumerable. That will be the place for us to go whe n we get through school. There we can have as much fun as we please in hunting the times here are very dull on Saturday as we have nothing much to do, for my part I have been loafing about, but I do not intend to do so again, if I have any letters to write I will do it then and if not I will spend my time in reading or in something that is beneficial. You said that Cousin William Scott told you that the boy [sic] had kicked up a row in school, what kind of one was it, did they do any serious injury. I do no t think that I ever will go there for it and Athens are two of the last places in the world, I have not given up the idea of coming north, I am stronger in favor of it than ever, If Papa lets me have my way I will never stop in Georgia, for taking it in ge neral it is the poorest state in the Union. I have not gotten a letter from home since I went down there are so many there that I think that I should get a letter every mail, but I miss it by a long shot. I believe that I have answered all your questions a nd I have no news to tell you of any consequence except that I will go to a wedding this evening (May 1 st ) about 7 miles from town she is the wealthiest girl in the county. I must ask many apologies for this badly written scrawl as I have no time to do it better. P.S. I do no [sic] recollect I remain your ever affectionate Cousin the sum that I gave William Bailey you exactly

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) I will send it in my next, in haste Note: The second page was missing from the original letter written by Sarah Bailey to her cousin Burton. May 14 th 1849 I have been dilatory my beloved Cousin in not writing ere this, believe me I have often thought of you in the most affectionate manner and remember well the dear interest my dear departed Mother felt in you, yes she has gone I trust to those bright mansions above not made with hands eternal in the Heavens in the presence of her savior she is free from all sorrow and pain and with the innumerable throng of angels that surround the throne of the Almighty she wil l sing praises forever. This is a deep affliction a great trial, my dear Cousin. The Lord loveth whom he ___ He has promised that he will not tempt us above what we are able to bear. Jesus knows Page 3 them quite often we hope to see them the first of ne xt month. They think of residing in Monticello it will certainly be more pleasant for Cousin Sarah and for us all. We all missed her much, I was with her much last summer, I have a pleasant recollection of our horse back rides before breakfast. Sister has been suffering for many weeks with a cold it is the same one that Father spoke of in Mrs. Long has spent several weeks with us this Spring [sic]. She has a v ery interesting little boy named after her Father Richard Call Long. Miss Havens writes me that Mr. Henry has really left for California, he will certainly have to be more expert in digging gold than he was in studying law if he expects to make a fortune do you not think so? Papa and all the children unite with me in kindest love to you. Adieu, my dear Cousin may God ever smile upon you & bless you with His Love_ Ever your affectionate Cousin, Sarah Note: This last sentence was written across the margin on page 1.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Lyndhurst on May 27, 1849 My dear brother, Your letter though lo ng delayed was not the less cordially welcomed by me, the sight of your well known hand brought very forcibly to me the many many happy hours we have spent together, for I find it impossible to eradicate from memory the sweet remembrances of those delight ful moments. I had better not deal in such thoughts as these for fear of your calling me sentimental so I will change the subject. We have had three weeks vacation, but it nearly ended. Daughter is spending some time with us. Aunt Emily is going on to the North this summer and anticipates much pleasure in seeing you and Anita. She expects to start the middle of June and return in October. Anita is going to return with her. I wish the time was at hand. When do you expect to finish? It seems to me almost a c entury since we parted. They have begun the new house and have got considerable done to it. It begins to look very stilish [sic]. This place is Page 2 health has been very bad some weeks, she has been suffering with a cold. Cousin Sarah has had the fever. They all look very badly indeed. Mamma is going to spend the day with her tomorrow. They are going to spend the summer in Macon. We will feel very lonely when they go away. We expect Sist er next week to remain some months with us. I received a letter from her the other day. I suppose you knew she carried Jinny with her. They expect to live in Monticello. How did you enjoy your visit in New York. I expect Anita was very glad to see you. I wish this was October for two reasons. Anita will be home, And Miss Crossland will be done like her she does not teach French or music. Theresa and Mary I expect are ahead of me in French. I received a letter from Emma Skannal, they like their place very much indeed. She wrote very affectionately indeed. Mr. Johnson took breakfast with us today. He keeps me a laughing all the time. I believe I have told you all the news. All join in kind love to you and accept the same from your affectiona te sister Josephine H. Bellamy P.S. The 13 th of this month was my birthday. I was 14 years old.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note: em in other letters.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Thomasville June 2 nd 1849 My dear Cousin Your kind letter was received last Sunday and I take this first opportunity of answering it. I assure you it was heartily received for I thought that you had neglected me as I had you & I ask many apologies for treating you as I did. I could not write sooner as this was composition week and it took nearly all my time to attend to my lessons and composition, but you must not think that by this I will neglect you hereafter, but will make the best of my time and always promptly answer your letters. Remember me kindly to Anita and say to her that if she returns home this winter I will be sure to see her. I have not heard Father speak of sending Theresa on to New York, but I think she will g o before very long. I should like to go on when she goes and Oh what fine times would we have together. Dear Cousin I feel so bad now that I can hardly write, but as it is to you I will try to say a few things, hoping that you may be able to read such writ ing and will excuse all mistakes above again it is no pleasure to write today for it is Sunday as the letter will have to go this evening or not until Friday. I am afraid I have I have [sic.] delayed writing too long, but rest assured you shall not be put off so when I can do better. I wish I was with you now, I know that I could enjoy myself as well as I could anywhere. I will insist upon Papa sending me there before you leave, and if he will not send me to Yale I will try to go to Columbia, S. C. or to Pr inceton, N. J. Page 2 I was sorry to hear of the riot in New York it must have cost a great many lives, I did not read all about it before the little children got hold of the paper and ruined it. I would like to go to some of the theaters if I were with yo u. I know I could not enjoy it better with any one else, and I think if we ever meet in New York I will have the pleasure to go with you to some of them. I am better than you in one respect (that is) I do not think the nightly visitors could induce me so a s to give them five dollars for a little greens I think I would keep away from them just as far as I possibly could, there are two or three hookers [or as you call them nightly visitors] here, I have not been to see them and the best of it is I shall neve r, for I know I can do without them as I have for the last five months and hope to do without them until I can get 21, and one of the fair daughters of Adam. Dear Burt I have written this ___and am almost ashamed to send it but I can do no better as it is my only chance to send it now, and I hope you will excuse this, and next time I will write a long letter and take some pains with it. Papa was up here last week, he had a case in court and had to come up and attend to it. He said Sister and Master have bee n sick but were nearly well, Cousin William has recovered from his sickness and is going to Tampa the place where Kar Bailey was praising up so much. Aunt Emela [sic] was there last summer. She never was put out with a place so much before then, there was two or three storms there while she was down there. Her health has not been very well this The rest of the letter is missing John Bailey.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note: Sarah Bellamy Smith and her husband, Caraway Smith, have returned to Lyndhurst for several months. Lyndhurst June 17 th 1849 I made a resolution last night dear Burton that I would not permit another twenty four hours to pass aw ay leaving me still indebted to you though I have taken advantage of this lovely morn at an early hour to devote it entirely to my absent brother. Your letter reached me in Marianna and I would have answered it then, but expecting to leave daily for home, I deferred it until now feeling confident I could find something to write which would interest you. My trip to the West was truly a delightful one. I passed three weeks in Apalachicola very pleasantly and I realized for the first time since I left the Nort h that I was transported into a city. The weather has been excessively hot but today was much pleasanter owing to the refreshing showers of yesterday. I arrived home about two weeks ago and during that time I have heard from you through others quite freque ntly. I was indeed very sorry to hear Page 2 of your indisposition in New York. I really had the heart ache [sic] when I heard Miss Haven York could not detai n me. They are progressing rapidly with the new house and I am delighted this health is very delicate & I thought her situation some weeks ago truly precarious but she is rapidly convalescing. Cousin John has joined Mr. Smith and Father i n their hunts frequently his health is delicate. The family leaves in July for Georgia. I think & I sincerely hope they will all be benefited by their trip. Mama and myself made Aunt Emily a visit last week. She has appointed several days for starting but changes her mind every time. She anticipates visiting New York & other cities, with inexperienced ___ Daniel Bird. Burton that Bird family is the meanest set that was ever created, Aunt Emily not excepted, just think she Page 3 objects to giving us that p lantation on the Aucilla saying it was not just for us to have ten thousand dollars more than her children. No wonder Uncle Bailey is so ___. Providence must smile on so good and just man. He has been trying to persuade Aunt Emily but she is very obstinate and those Birds confusing her in all her penurious ways as regards us but are more than willing to be benefited themselves. Dan goes on she pays all his expenses. If they do go treat that fellow with contempt he is not worthy of your notice. If Aunt E sti ll persists in her present has been suffering very much from face ache, but I am happy to say that she is somewhat relieved this morning although her face is ve ry much swollen. Mr. __left us last week he received your letter. The children are well. Jenny is a very interesting child, she is very mischievous. Mama has not heard from Anita very recently. I wrote her during my stay in Marianna. Mr Smith also, but she has slighted us both so devoted to her accomplishments I suppose. I sadly fear she will be more ornamental than useful. We have delightful weather now. The crops are looking finely. Father & Mr. Smith visited the plantation last week. Mr. Rowell as usual has the finest crops in the county. I saw many of the negroes on last Sabbath I believe they

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) are very healthy, several births on the place & more are expecting. Have you seen Mr & Mrs Brooks from Page 4 Apalachicola. Do pay them some attention for they wer e exceedingly kind to me during my stay in that place. They have a daughter at school in New Haven. You knew Mr Clark You will have the pleasure of seeing him in August. He married a sister of Mr. Smith. Josephine has grown so much you would not know her. I do sincerely wish we knew some good schools South where we might send our children to be educated. I am so much of a Democrat that I am no longer in favor of northern education. I hardly know what Anita will do this vacation that is if Aunt Emily does no could go for her. Anita will enjoy herself here very much she will have so fine an opportunity for improving herself. She will meet with no interruption. Burton do daguerreotypes by the first good opportunity. I shall prize it very highly. Burton I sincerely hope you are prepared to enter college. How are your eyes. Stephen sends a great deal of love and says his prayers ___ on your be half hoping that you may be a smart man. All of us are well. I wish you had been here to enjoy these hunts which occupy so much of the time of these gentlemen. Mr Smith is very ___. We are all well and desire much love to you, do write soon and believe me always to be sincerely your truly affectionate sister S

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Vaucluse, June 18, 1849 My dear Burton, You I expect think that I have forgotten to write you, but I have been so busy getting ready to visit the North, and hoped soon to see you. Bu t we are to meet with disappointment in this life and those are best off who mind them the least, and perhaps its all for the best. I was ready to be off when I heard of Cholera. It is truly distressing to read the accounts of it in different places. I tru st its ravages will soon seace [sic] and you and Anita may escape it. I remember you in my feble [sic] petitions. I have not determined whither [sic] I shall leave home or not. Your Mother and Sarah were to see me last week, your Mother looks very well, bu t S. not so well. Poor Cousin Margaret and John look very badly, there[sic] health is bad. They have not left for Georgia yet, the rest are pretty well. Daught has a very bad cold, she was very much disappointed in the abandonment of our contemplated visit I have nothing of interest to write, I stay pretty close at home and never see Mr. Rowell or Baugh these days, and do not know how they get along, though John told me they had good crops. Ours is pretty good. We had a little Negro to break his thigh abou t 2 weeks ago. John Barrinton a Cousin of the other Barrington is our Overseer, he married a Sister of Charles Dewetts. She is a clever woman. Cug is getting on very well, and always desireous [sic] to be remembered to you. Page 2 Poor fellow I feel sorry for him sometimes he feels his dependence, in not having a mail [sic] one of the family to look up to, he says I am all of his dependents and I will protect him while I live and he believes and I think he will. If you both live until you come home he will be better satisfied for he goes in for the name. The children are not going to school. Daught stopped to travail [sic], and there will be a vacation August and September. Oh that I could procure a good teacher for several years. Daught is very anxious to see you, and says she is afraid you will get the Cholera. I try to make them say their lessons but it is a hard matter. They all join me in much love to you. Yours as ever Emmala A. Bellamy

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Thomasville 24 th June 1849 My dear Cousin As I h ave a little spare time today and being the only chance of writing in some length of time I will endeavor to write to you few lines to let you know that I think as much of you as ever. I am sorry that I neglected writing you sooner (but the reason was that I kept waiting for an answer to my last and did not get it, and I put it off from time to time and in that way I have neglected you. I hope you will take it into consideration and pardon for so neglecting you. I have not heard from home in better than a w eek ago, then they were all well except Sister, she had a very bad cold, but hope that by this time she has entirely recovered. Cousin William had returned from Cedar Keys, his health was much benefited by the trip he has now gone to Tampa. Mr. Caraway Smi th will accompany him I guess. He is going to settle in Monticello, and when you return home you will have a Brother to visit. I think he is a very fine fellow. I wish you were at home to get some of the fine vegetables that grow in our garden such as bean s, peas, potatoes, roasting ears and many others that I cannot enumerate. I know you have many things there that we cannot have here. The crops this year is generally good although the most of them were cut down Page 2 by the cold last spring, I think on y our place this cold did not effect much, I guess it was because the Aucilla drew all the vapor into itself, and in that way the crops were saved. We have now a tolerable good school, about 50 in each department. I am getting along with my studies very wel l at present. I am reviewing the Aeneid now at the great readers yet but expect to commence Xenophen [sic] in about a week I wish I were with you so that you could assist me some in my greek [sic], I find it very difficult, but when it is learned we find a great many little lessons in it that we never thought of before. Mr. Hume is a very good teacher, I am pleased with him more every day, I think he is full competent to be at that station. I would not quit him to go to any teacher I ever went to Causey exc epted I do not think you or I can ever forget him do you remember how he used to give us bringens every day. He is now living in Leon County, Florida. Dear Burt I have nothing more to write you at present for there is no news stirring in Thomasville tha t would interest you I am going home in about a week from now and then I will write you a long letter and tell you all the news about home, my only wish is that I would like to have you with me next week as I expect to have lots of fun Page 3 in hunting an d every other way that I can but I know that I could have double the fun if I had you along with me, when we got tired of hunting, B, we could go off and see the girls There is one in the parlor now and I must go down and talk with her as I expect she will not remain very long. hoping you will excuse me for so doing, but rest assured that next time I will try to write you a longer letter. I remain your ever sincere Cousin William Bailey P.S. Please excuse these few disconnected remarks as I hav e not time to do better in haste Yours W.B.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Lyndhurst 1 st July 1849 My beloved Burton I have made several efforts to write you but something has prevented the completion of my intentions_ Nothing in the world gives me more he artfelt satisfaction than to receive a letter from you, and yours of the 9 th Ultimate was truly a cordial as it apprised me of your improved health. I was really uneasy when I knew you had had the measles, but now my view of the matter is more consoling_ I hope it has produced a change in your constitution which may be beneficial_ I hope your close application to your studies will not impair your health tho your success will be gratifying to me_ and oh! my dear Burton may kind heaven protect you from the ma ny fatal diseases that affect the human family, and roll that joyous moment around that will release you from college and restore you to your home and family once more. The time you have been way appears to me to be an age, and when I know that only two ye ars have passed away, and two more to detain you, I pause and pray for divine protection. Page 2 The cholera as you have anticipated has made Emmala give up the idea of leaving home at all this summer_ Her decision was very suddenly made up_ Sarah and I w ent on Monday to bid her good bye expecting her to leave on Wednesday and left her packing up, and we were surprised to hear that she had given it up_ Dan Bird was to be her escort as she would not give Dr. Taylor the amount he desired_ poor ___! She is to be pitied her noble feelings are so small_ She was to bear land to you children_ she says your Grandpa never intended it, but I think there is proof sufficient to testify the fact, and I hope there is just to keep her out of so much more_ Her granddaughter_ sister to Charles DeWitt ___ such a kind hearted generous disposi tion as Mrs. Bennet, she has been very kind hearted to Emmala in her sickness, and yet Emmala does not appear to thank her, and the other day she abused Mr B very much_ Mr. B I think is a fine man, gentlemanly in his manners and Page 3 one who has made it his study to please_ He is about to quit them_ She has put an addition to her house_ Your sister and Mr. Smith has [sic] been with us for a month he speaks of settling in Monticello, which I suppose they will sometime this winter My home will be theirs unt il they do_ Tho Mr. Smith will board in Monticello so as to establish himself in the law business_ We are head and eyes in work, so perfectly engrossed with the new house_ The first story of brick is nearly completed it will be one of the best houses in th e state, and I can look forward to many happy hours of true domestic happiness with my children_ We have had much company today your Uncle Bailey and Mar., Mr Baugh and Mr Rowell, Mr Smith and your sister, Miss Crossland and the balance of our numerous fa mily_ We had peach tarts for dinner, sweet affection ___ Bubba cherished name_ We have a good garden_ plenty of ___, corn, melons [sic], mush melons, and soon figs and peaches and delightful beer every day_ My servants are rather sickly. Beck has been of n o service for 6 months and Nancy is daily expecting an heir fathered by Morris wonders never cease_ Leah at the plantation has a son. The crop there is

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Page 4 fine indeed and the Negroes quite healthy only Lilly Bob who has been extremely ill but is now improving fast. John Bailey looks very badly_ They are to leave next week_ Margaret I do not think is improving in her health as she ought to do_ Your Grandma sends many loves to you she own overseer_ I am truly sorry for him_ Fortune appears to frown on him_ They are now living at the plantation_ I wrote Anita last week informing her of Emmalas change of mind and telling her I expected her to return home ear ly in the fall under the care of Mr Wm. Budd. I came very near forgetting to tell you the arrangement for the 4 th_ Dan Bird is to read the Declaration and Lieut. Mosely [sic] delivers the address and a Ball at night. Sarah and the children will attend so you may properly learn the particulars. William desires with his kindest love to say he will soon write you_ He has fine sport hunting deer and bear. The latter are numerous destroying his hogs. All unite in kind and affectionate love to you and join me i n the earnest desire and best wishes for you happiness and life and believe me in haste Your devoted Mother, Eliza A. Bailey Note: The general mentioned on this last page was her second husband, General Joseph Hernandez. Her first husband was Samuel Williams.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note: Because the writing is very difficult to read and the margin has been cut off in copying the Lyn dhurst July 12 th 1849 My dearest Burton You are the last person I would stand on ceremony with and although you are indebted to yesterdays mail brought us no letter from you but I am living in anticipation and & awaiting patiently the returning Saturday. Mama wrote you last week if she had not, I should have done so for I have had many leisure ___ but the truth is Burton you are the only one I care to write. A nita has treated me so shabbily that I hardly know how to review her ___ ___. We are all enjoying excellent health, Mama has been complaining is the only exception. Where did you spend the 4 th I can form some idea of the height of your enjoyment as there a re so many amusements to entertain us and where we have each enjoyed those things on so extensive a scale as they have there in northern cities. Barbeques served by Mrs West sinks in insignificance. The day was very propitious and I assure you it was only on that account that I consented to go to Monticello for I assure you I had anticipated Page 2 no pleasure in listening to Dan Bird reading the Declaration or Lieutenant Mosely delivering an oration. Neither of them will ever be distinguished as declaimer s. The children enjoyed it very much but I must say it was rather ___ to me. We returned home the next day. It was indeed a relief. Mr. Smith is passionately fond of hunting and he has a fine opportunity of indulging here I frequently tell him I consider i t my only rival. He has been very successful. Mr. Kar Baillie has been spending some weeks with Father. I think he is as indefatigable as my husband in that aspect. Yesterday he went down to Mr Rowells and there met Mr Baugh. I believe they destroyed almos t fifty alligators. William Bailey spent today with us, he returns tomorrow to Thomasville. He has been spending a week at home. He had a great deal of application & if he does not succeed in his literary presents it will be the fault of the head. The girl s are not very sociable and it is no ___ of ___ as Cousin Margaret is as fast at ___. They leave tomorrow week for Georgia. Mama received a letter from Anita yesterday. Burton I am truly ___that such a thing has happened. I regret it exceedingly and if I had the control of Anita she should not stay another day in New York. She is now adding her ___ to Miss Havens and all ___ Mr Havens not to return home. It will interfere so much with her finished education. Anita is so easily flattered that it is no wonde r why she has had such an Page 3 unpleasant time of it. It is better to learn things by ___ than be taught by bitter experiences. I think it ___ decidedly be of an advantage to her as she will be so much more able to appreciate her advantages. I know from experience how Mrs. Havens influenced me & notwithstanding my intense anxiety to return home, it was altogether owing to her entreaties that I consented to remain. Florida is no place for a finished education although it is a heartfelt satisfaction to me y et there is none to appreciate us. We are so low in the scale of civilization that there is nothing to excite ones ambition or ___ his energies. On the whole within the last week I am opposed to Northern instruction. This misfortune of Anita if I may speak shows me ___ mostly of girls being under ___ their mothers watchful eye. Those of us who enjoy domestic ___ can form no idea of the ___ & work of those who inhabit cities. Dear Burton in writing to Anita do not

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) encourage her wishes with regards to ___ an other year. It is so useless & the expense so much. I have not written to Anita in some time. She treated Mr. Smith and myself so unbecomingly that I hardly knew how to recommence our intercourse I feel so confident my dearest Burton would not have acted t hus. Anita I love dearly she has many noble qualities but her ___ ___ and equally ___. Do you remember us to her when you write. The crops are looking finely. Fathers corn has been Page 4 very much demolished by a bear. Last Sunday evening Morris killed it just as he was making preparations for his feast. They are indeed a curiosity. The ___ ___ Father insisted on having some for his dinner. Mr. Smith and himself were the only partakers. I think they eat of it through policy as they had been recommending i t all day. It is nearly our fruit season. The peaches are ripening rapidly. Watermelon is in abundance & very fine. I do not fail to think of the absent while luxuriating upon the delicacies of our southern dinner. Aunt Emily spent several days at Uncle Ba ileys but did not trouble us with her company. Sometime I wish we lived faraway from our relations. There is always such malicious things as you well know always existed among us. I sometimes wonder Burton if it will be this case among us. Cousin John spen t a few days with us this week. His health is very delicate. The children are all well and send love and kisses to our dear brother. Ginny is a very interesting child she entertains us all with her precious chit chat. I had almost forgotten to tell you tha t our dear Grand Mamma is dead. The tidings were indeed unexpected as the mail before the last brought Mamma a letter from her. Her illness was short but severe. Aunt Louisa wrote that she had an attack of palsy. I deeply sympathize with her family and I know of no one whose death among friends will be more ___ felt than hers. She was so very charitable. How uncertain is life sometimes___ [Note: The following was written over the writing on page 4.] I am afraid to indulge the hopes of us all meeting her e again. God grant it may be so. Stephen is well. He is as faithful in his inquiries concerning you as ever. I suppose New Haven is in the zenith of its beauty. I often in imagination accompany you through those ___ and streets. Father is well and desires his love & now my dearest brother do not fail to write to us_ your letters breathe so much love and kindly affection that I delight in perusing them. Mr. Smith unites with us in many warm wishes as regards your studies accompanied by many remembrances and now I must bid you adieu hoping soon to hear from you I must say adieu Your affectionate sister Sarah Note: June 1849.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Thomasville July 17 th 1849 My dear Cou sin I received your kind epistle by last mail, with which I was very gratified as it was a token of your remembrance of which I thought was almost gone, but as you were sick, I could not have expected a letter from you when you were so unwell. It is a g reat task to write when you are sick, I must beg to be excused. In the beginning, as my head is all stired [sic] up about something that I cannot write today, and if I put off now I cannot write until next Saturday, for I am so hard pushed about my lessons during the next week that I have not time a line, therefore you must take this miserable scrawl as it is, I was at home last week, they were all very well except Budy B[sic]. Sister, Papa and the children except myself are going to travel about in the upp er part of Georgia this summer. I would like very much to go, but I have to stick down to my books as I am so very far behind. I now ought to be nearly as far advanced as you are, but sickness, bad teachers and the loosing [sic] of so much time has thrown me very far in the rear. I did not see much fun when I was home, but I know if you had been there we could have enjoyed ourselves most glorious [sic] Page 2 in eating, riding about, hunting and various other ways. I think Cousin William has eight or nine h ounds and Budy has three or four. We have had very fine water and muskmelons at home, which I guess you have not so abundant at New Haven, but you have a great many little nice fixens there. When at home I rode over some of the crops, they were generally g ood. Mr. Rowell has the cleanest and as good crops as ever was on the place considering how dry the weather has been. Finlayson has the most grassy crops I ever saw, he overcroped [sic] himself so much that he was not able to tend two thirds of it. I was a t Monticello on the 4 th July, in the morning the horse company paraded, then we went to the church and heard a very fine oration from Lieutenant Mosely, Dan Bird read the Declaration of Independence, we then marched to the dinner table and eat sheepmeat [s ic] about half cooked, it was not a very good dinner or I would have plunged into it and made some of it fly, but I could not stand the sheep, after dinner the table was cleared off and then we had some toasts danked [sic] and speeches given from some of t he gentlemen, and one or two fights that evening. That night there was a large party given, I did not attend it as none of the family attended it. Do you attend the parties now or do they never have one, I would like to see you flying around the yankee [si c] gals. Page 3 I hope you will not bring one back with you, but I expect there are some very fine girls there. There is one in Florida from Newport, I was deeply smitten by her in the way of love last summer and have not entirely recovered from it yet there is an old saying that absence conquers love but it is not always the case, Tom Shehee (i.e. Babe) was at Madison last week he says there are more pretty girls there than any where else, I guess you had better wait until you come home before you begin to look about for a wife. And then get her at home, I do not fancy the Georgia girls as much as I do the Florida. I guess you think that I am dreadfully in love, but it is a mistake, it only takes me seldomly by fits and starts and this is one of the time s. Dear Burt, I must close as I wish to write Cousin W. Scott this evening I hope this letter will be both readable and excusable by you. I remain your sincere Cousin William Bailey P.S. I forgot in the beginning to tell you that Budy [sic] had the horse (Gen Tayler) that you owned before you went to New York

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note:

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note: Beca use the margin has been cut off in copying the original, many words are left out of this transcription. Thomasville July21 st Dearest Cousin Your affectionate letter of the 2 nd of this month was received by me last mail with the s incere affection which I always feel at the arrival of your letters. As you said in your letter that and sending them so far away to the one that we love so dearly. I guess you and everyone know that if everything was to be given up in the way of study that we that we would first take reading and then writing, the reason we would take reading first because we could not write without reading, You said that I a m so ___ that I would not be able to pop the question to one of the Thomasville girls. I acknowledge that I am so ___ that I will not pop the question, there is a good reason for it is because I would not. There are some very good looking young ladies, but the girls are ugly as [he drew a blank line here]___ but I intend to fly around some of [sic] next Thursday night at the wedding. I guess it will be the largest wedding that ever was given in Thomasville, the ones to be married is a Mr. Bran__ from Tennes see to Miss Magnolia Bryan, daughter of Hardy Bryan. I got a ticket last Wednesday. I have heard that there has been about 400 tickets to___ out. The house is not very large and I guess all such fel Page 2 lows as myself will be cut out of the chance of be ing with the girls. I guess you think I am the very [he drew a blank line here] after the girls but it is very seldom that I am in company with them. I agree somewhat with the advice you offered me in your last letter, but I think a fellow should associate with them a little, say once a month, so as to keep him in practice, for if he does not go in their company when a boy, and learn something about their ways, when he gets so be a man he will be called a fool because he cannot keep the company of ladies, t herefore I think it advisable to associate with them in some degree, but as you said it is not good to be too thick with them as it will take your mind from the studies at school. I am not experienced in love therefore I cannot say much about it. I have co mmenced Xenophen it is very hard in some places, but in others I can get along very easy. I have also commenced geometry. I find it tolerable hard, I still keep up all my former studies. You said you were afraid that the teachers make us read about half of every latin or greek [sic] book, it is exactly so, I have not read but half of the Aenied [sic] and as soon as I review them and read the ___ and Bucolics I shall have to go into ___. I would prevail on Papa to let me come there but I know he will not do it, as my constitution will not bear it. I have always have been very weakly and sickly and if I should go there I know I would die with the consumption or Page 3 some disease of the lungs that would keep me lingering a long time and finally carry me to the grave much sooner than I would wish now to go, from my past life I do not expect to live to be what is called an old man, if I live to see 30 years it will be more than I expect to do. Papa and family left me yesterday morning for upper Georgia, they a re all going to spend their summer up there. I will have to stay in this vale of darkness and stick close to my books for I am so far behind that I am almost ashamed to mention what I am studying, but I assure you it has not been because I was not willing to study but it has been on account of sickness and bad teachers. I heard from Mr Allan on yesterday [torn out] the man that taught school near us two years ago as I have sliped [sic] off it I will now tell you something about the trip Papa is going to tak e they

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) intend to go to Macon and they will probably send the carriages back and take the cars and go up in DeKalb County and in the adjoining counties. Papa will return in about three weeks but the health is very bad ever since Budy returned home from Oxford his health has been very bad, Sister was taken last April with a violent cold and has not recovered from it yet the rest are very well, Duff is as fat as a little pig the reason of their stop Page 4 in Thomasville is that Sister was very sick the night they got here and was not able to travel until yesterday morning. I hope she was will be able to travel until they get up among the mountains and I am confident she will be restored. Dear Burt, I have written more than I expected to have written and there are many mistakes in it that I do not know that I ought to send it, but knowing that it is to you and you will look over those mistakes, I will venture to send it hoping that it may be readable a nd excusable by you. They all send their kindest love to you I am very tired and besides I have to write two other letters today. I remain your ever sincere Cousin, William Bailey P.S. I send a sum that Tom Shehee and myself picked out of Emers ons Arithmeticks [sic]. I would like for you to work it and send it in your next letter. I am very much obliged to you for your kindness for offering to read my greek but I do not know the hard places until I come to them and then it is too late. Yours truly WB

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Lyndhurst August 3 rd 1849 My Dear Burton I have once more seated myself to write you a few lines, it is not for the want of a will I assure you that I do not write oftener it is that you mother and sister write and keep you advised of all the little circumstances that transpire in this neighborhood. We are all well at this time except your mother who is complaining almost all the time tho nothing serious is the matter with her. We have had Mr. Smith and Sarah with us fo r the last two months until last week when they went to Madison and carried Josephine with them we have been looking for their return now for several days. I do not know what keeps them I rather fear that some of them are sick they were to have returned on last Monday or Tuesday. Mr. Smith is going to settle in Monticello. Dilworth & himself have entered into a partnership in the law business. I do hope my dear Burton you will be very particular as regards to your health and that you are particularly attent ive to you studies that our most sanguine expectations may be realized if you do not come home a finished scholar you will have no one to blame but yourself_. Uncle Bailey has gone to the upper part of Georgia Page 2 with all his children but William who is in Thomasville at school. They have gone for their health and will not return until October. Uncle Bailey will return very soon just as soon as he can see then properly provided for at some healthy place. John looked very badly when he went off but I do hope they will all return in fine health this fall. Your Aunt Emmala came over to see them before they left but she did not see proper to come over to us. I suppose her conscience pricked her so deeply about the divisioning [sic] that she could not come o ver or she wishes to make a breach purposely in order as the old saying is, that she may go the whole hog in the matter against you children so far as I am concerned she is perfectly welcome to stay away. I understand that she has the children so hostile t hat Betty met your sister in Monticello & would not speak to her for what I know not but of this fact I am sure that your sister shall not visit them again without she makes some amends for her conduct. This county at this time is very healthy and crops ar you come home than stay and take it as a great deal depends on you if I should die. Morris killed a huge bear a few days ago it came into my field and ate corn. I have [now] a fine pack of hounds all unite with me in kind love to you and believe me my dear Burton as ever Your affectionate, William J. Bailey Page 3 P.S. I had forgot to tell you that there is some sickness on the plantation of a character particularly adapted to this section of the country. Mr. Asa who was one of the wagoners on the way to New Port last month had to seek out some of those women of loose habits and he got most decidedly inoculated with the French pox he came home and gave it to his wife [ Rache l] They are now in the charge of Dr. Hines also it has been conveyed from them to a small child of The long spoken of house is now on the way and I hope we will have it ___ and___ whe n you quit school. W. J. B.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) My beloved Son, I should have answered your dear letter long ere this, but I have been too unwell and dull in spirits to write even you_ Your kind com munication regarding Anita pains me pray her love of family and virtue may be redeeming qualities in her character_ her love and admiration amounts to a fault a nd I hope the lesson experience has taught her may correct so weak a point in her character_ She positively returns home this fall_ Miss Havens has Page 4 persuaded her that she will not receive a finished education if she comes home and return to school a gain_ But in this case I shall maintain my own opinion. Instead I want her to come out with Mr. Wm Budd. Write to Anita my dear Burton and tell her the reason I have not written to her_ I have not heard from either of you in several mails and I feel uneasy We have the greatest quantity of fine peaches and are fattening on peaches and milk. Would you were here to enjoy them with us!! No one else has peaches but ourselves_ I hope soon to feel like writing you a long letter. Nancy had a daughter on the 26 th J herself are both doing well_ No sickness at all among the Negroes_ The ravages of cholera draws my utmost thoughts to you and Anita, may kind heaven protect you both and keep you from illness_ Dearest l ove to you both and believe me your devoted Mother_ Eliza A. Bailey Note: Eliza Ann complains of feeling unwell, because she is expecting another baby in November. She is forty two years old and has already had nine children [Her first, Samuel Bel lamy, died when he was three years old]. This new one will be named William John Bailey, Jr. She will have one more after this!!

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Thomasville on August 18, 1849 My dear Cousin I rec eived your kind epistle from Monday last, and I assure you it was a source of gratification to me to hear from one who I so dearly love, I thought at one time that you had almost forgotten me, but after thinking of it rightly, I knew that you were very bus y in preparing for College, and then I knew what was the matter, it is the same way with myself I have but very little time for letter writing, then I have to write in such hurry that I never have time to write a decent letter and besides the weather is so warm that it keeps me dull stupid You said that you expected to stand and [sic] examination soon, I hope you will not be disappointed in entering college soon, I would like very much to attend the commencement so that I might see some of the smart men tha t Yale produces, I would like very much to go to that college but as Papa says that that climate will not suit me, I must give up and go by what he says. He thinks now of sending me to Columbia, S.C. I do not think that it depends entirely upon the college but the man himself And another reason for me not wanting to stay at the North is that I would be afraid of the cholera and many of the diseases that the people are subject to_ the papers give an account of several thousand falling by the cholera in the n orthen [sic] weather Page 2 and some of the southern states, you said that it had not visited you, I guess you are very glad of it, if it had visited New Haven the school would have been almost deserted during the summer there was I guess hundreds that fel l by it in New York, Do you ever hear from Anita, is she much afraid of it. We have not had it near us I do not know how soon it will, but I think that when the country becomes more settled it will get a stronger hold and will come sweeping over this cou ntry and carry off a great many whites and the negroes for they are so head strong that they will eat every kind of fruit and vegetables that they can get. We have had some symptoms of the cholera here the diarrhea I think must be a symptom of the cholera it has been prevalent along this region of the country. We have had a great many water and musk melons, not many peaches and apples they were almost all killed by the cold last spring. I do wish you had some of the peaches and watermelons that I saw two we eks ago, they were very delicious I think that if the Yankees do not hold their tongues about our slaves that there will be a war before many years They have no right to abuse us because we hold slaves and they cannot produce argument enough to show that it is wrong, the only thing that they can say is how it is a sin, and they have never proven that they say that we do not treat them like human beings I guess you see how the majority of the poor whites and negroes are treated at the north from all Page 3 that I have heard it seems to me that they are worse than brutes. The Yankee land cannot beat the southern with pretty girls, I never saw but one girl that came from there that I liked very well she has gone back again I will be very much surprised if y ou bring home one the Yankee girls when you return home it almost makes me mad when I think of some of the northerners, especially (Miss Huntington) the way she did when she left Florida, she came nearer cursing Sister when she left the house than any lady ( as she called herself) as I have ever heard of. You must not mention this, I have just told you to show the character that some of them have and again they seem to be the proudest race of people that I have ever seen, the most of them are trying to impo se on the south, but the south will not be run down by the north. I have not read the whole before now that the Indians have broken out in Florida again several persons have been murdered by them lately, when I heard it I wanted to go down there very much just to get one or two shots

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) at them, to revenge the one that had at me. I have no doubt you would like to go down there and take a few cracks at them. I received a letter from Josephine they were all enjoying good health Cousin William is putting up a ring for horses, Budy and Sister have gone to the upper part of Georgia to spend the summer as it so sickly at home that if they were to stay there all the summer they most Page 4 would [sic] surely die. Papa has returned home I am afraid that if he stays there all summer he will be sick. You asked if Budy ever spoke of you while I were [sic] at home he has not forgotten you, the reason he does not write is that he is always so unwell that he cannot get his mind settled enough to write a letter at once & if he writes a short piece at on time he will never feel like taking it up again to finish, He just bought the horse that you once owned from the same man y ou sold him to I think his name is Herts, Budy paid about $130 for him, and he says $150 could not get him, the horse rides better now than when you owned him, and works very well in the sulky, Budy rode him up the country and before he got back home Pap a worked him in the sulky we still drive Polk and Dallas in the carriage, Polk has gone blind in both eyes, but Dallas there never was a better horse (except Old Tom), the fault with Dallas is that he will sometimes bawk [sic] I did not hunt much when at h ome as I had only a week to stay, the Aucilla River was very dry, a day or so before I left Mr. Rowell and Mr. C. Smith went alligator hunting and caught 44, Dear Burt I must close as I felt very unwell today and I have two or three letters more to write and go to church too, there has been a great revival in Thomasville, many joined and a great many more went up to be prayed for I was in that crowd, I felt that I was so very wicked and had got to cursing so I thought that I needed some assistance so I we nt up, please excuse this badly written letter for I am in such haste that I cannot do better, I ought not to be in such haste but it cannot be helped, I remain your sincere cousin William Bailey Note: The fragment and the signature above are on the top of page1. Both lines show on the original letter, but only the signature shows on the copy.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Aucilla Fla August 26 th 1849 Dear Burton This is the second time I have wrote to you since I got a letter from you I have got one paper which was kindly received I wrote to you some time the first of the summer I have looked for an answer until I am tired. I now write this to know the causes of your long silence If you will be so kind as to tell me If I wrote any thing [sic] in my last to offend the it was not intended as such The health of the country is very good for this season of the year Cotton crops are not so as that of last year they was very pr omising the first of the summer we have a weeks rain the make as much by fifty or sixty bails as I did last year_ My corn crop is very good I lost a par t of my fodder that wet week The peas is not good_ Potatoes are pretty good Kain [sic] not so good there has been but very little fever on the place as yet_ Col Bailey & family are all well Page 2 Gen Bailey has taken his family up in Georgia he has got bad when he left Baugh & family are well he has a pretty good crop_ Stephan Palmer is dead, Mr. C. Smith is goin [sic] to board in Monticello the balance of this year at old Mrs. Palmers My Dear Burt I am in hopes you will accept of these few lines and believe me to be Yours Truly Thomas Rowell fifty dollars would get him from John Note: Some information shows that Mr. Rowell and Mr. Baugh were probably overseers on two included in the division of his estate.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Oxford Ga. Aug 29 1849 My Dear Friend Some time has elapsed since the receipt of your kind favor and I confess myself rather slow in answering it. It is true I could offer apologies sufficient to exc use in part at least my tardiness but I expect you are not sorry that my answer takes some time to reach you as it will afford you an opportunity acting in your usual way replying to my letter namely taking your own time. Although I have taken my pen to w rite you dear Burt I am for once at a loss what to write about as I do not know what be [sic] interesting to you. I wish you would let me know what subjects are most interesting to you but as I can not [sic] hear before this has been answered I must try a nd think up some thing [sic] to make it worth an answer. Shall I write about the Ladies? Well I will tell you some thing about them if I can think of anything to say. Alas! What shall I say? shall I say that I love the dear critters? This I am quite sure w ould be totally unnecessary as I suppose you know that already. I think I have enjoyed myself Page 2 more within the last month than I ever did before in my life. In the first place during commencement time Oxford was crowed [sic] with young ladies and so me of the prettiest too I ever saw. Ah Burt you ought to have been here. I know you are a man of taste and admire the fair sex, and if such is the case you would have been perfectly delighted with some who were here. You may reply that you have seen some a t New Haven, but man I tell you your northern girls can [sic] compare with those of whom I speak I spent a week among them in Oxford and then cut out for Athens ___ I passed another week of the most consummate bliss, then I went up the road to Marietta whe n I found our Cousins and enjoyed myself finely for nearly three weeks. marry in six months. She is very rich indeed perfectly beautiful very smart with an exce llent education and a very good disposition. I came very near courting her any how [sic] notwithstanding all the impediments in the way. I left Cousin John & Sisters in M___ Page 3 but expect them in Oxford in a few days perhaps tomorrow. Cousin John was taken sick about a week after he reached Marietta and as near dieing as possible without actually being so silly as to do the thing itself. I watched by two nights and slept on the floor two nights near his bedside. He is very imprudent indeed and when he takes a notion to do anything nothing can restrain him from it not even the advice of his Phisician [sic] if he does not carry this imprudence to to great an extent and bring on a relapse I think he will well [sic] or nearly so before he returns home in O Georgia. If I was [sic] in her place I would think of returning to Florida for a year yet. Cousin Sarah looks very well much prettier than when she arrived at home from N York the children are not in very good health but are improving very fast, This mountain air and excellent water agreed with them all. I must now conclude dear Burt as I have a hard and long chemistry lesson to get. My love to all your Family Yours Truly Wm. Scott

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note: transcribe than most of hers. Many words have been left blank. Monticello Sept 12 th 1849 I had about despair ed of ever receiving a letter from you when on Monday last the post brought a good tiding of you. I should not have permitted so long a time to elapse without writing, had I had the necessary implements, but in leaving Aucilla for my new home I left behind many things but find it pleasant. Monticello is the same old place, but if you can imagine it in a more dilapidated state you can form some idea of what improvem ents are going on. The inhabitants are too much for self to take any interest in public property. I visited home about a week ago. They are pretty well. Virginia and Christine were suffering from cold. Mama was very much depressed in spirit. Your letter ha d the contrary affect to what it usually has. She despairs of ever seeing you and after congratulating herself that she would see you in two years you now inform her it is four. Burton how or why is it you are a Freshman. You have been telling us for the p ast year that you are preparing for Junior& we would not be so disappointed if you had not in making the attempt to enter second highest only succeeded in entering. We know not what to make of Page 2 [missing words] have talent & we were all impressed with the idea that your proposed application in an eminent degree & resting assured that whatever end you intend accomplishing if it lay in human power, you would obtain it. Burton I think you were wrong in having a private tutor. The mind must have something to stimulate it and what better exercise can it have than by competition. If I was in your place I would leave Yale and go to the South Carolina College. It has produced as many great men & I am sure you can enter the Junior class and another advantage is you can visit home three months in the year and have your younger sisters within two miles of you. I am heartily disgusted with northern institutions and if I can exert any influence over Mama Anita shall never return. I cannot see the use of spending so m uch money unnecessarily. I see now the folly of it at this late date & want the rest of you to profit by my experience. Your rewards are not very abundant & and when you are about to settle down in these wild woods you will feel the want of it. So finished an education as we shall expect from you after two years of preparation for College will not be a good substitute I fear if you enter the freshmen class you will never graduate so soon as you become a man you will have.I do not believe is necessary for Pa ge 3 [Part is missing] and to spend so long a time in procuring an education to live in Florida. Do write us all about yourself for you will know my dearest brother we all feel interested in whatever concerns you. It has often been a theme of inexpressibl e delight to me to know that you will be the protector of my younger sisters and I have often congratulated them on having you so soon to fulfill that important duty. Autumn has at last come & commenced to deck us ___ with her yellow habiliments. We are an xiously expecting our equinoctial storm. The past week gave strong ___ of its approach, but I am happy to see the weather tempered by pleasant & balmy breezes. The county generally is healthy. Some few deaths have occurred among your acquaintances. Stephen Pal___ died some months ago. His death was much regretted being a good citizen ____________& most important (some say) because he was a good Democrat. What of course interests you most (that is if you intend remaining four years in college) is our

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) crops T hey are poor by themselves, but when compared with Leon it is discouraging. I am under the impression that it is mismanagement for with the same fuss they make ___ the quantity of cotton. Mr. Croom of Tallahassee will make 1500 bales Uncle Bailey with the same number of hands will Page 4 exceed four hundred. I received a letter from Sarah Bailey a week ago. They were all improving in health. We expect them home in about three weeks. Monticello has been gay they say several ___. The inhabitants often leading such a normal life very little excitement is magnified into wonders ___ are called parties. Miss Bird is still___ ___ ___ belle. Mr. Dilworth is awaiting her arrival. Mr. Budd left us some two weeks ago and intends being absent a month or five weeks. So we shall have the pleasure of welcoming our dear sister to her own native land in a very short time. Burton I fear you are not as attentive to your studies as y ou ought to be. Your last letter to Mama was the poorest piece of composition I ever saw from your pen and believe ___ is examined thoroughly and to my utter astonishment found 35 mistakes in spelling. Now you know it is considered a great fault & when we are aware of what advantages you have had & still do enjoy it grieves us much. Remember you are the only son who has this name so do credit to it as your Father has done. I think it a very inexcusable thing. It is but little trouble to look into a dictiona ry when we are uncertain about the ___ of a word. I give you permission [missing] Page 5 [written across page 4 from bottom to top] letters is very particular and will thank you for ___ any defect and now my dear Burton perhaps you will think I have said too much_ pardon and consider my motive _____________ and if I do not hear from you shortly I shall assign it to hurt feelings. The Negroes are all well. Old Buck died last week _______ in the plantation. The children speak often of you. They are not makin g as great progress in their studies as we should wish Miss ___ is wholly unfit for her station No refinement whatever and as you know children learn more ___ example than precept Num and Tit are very interesting children. Virginia is really an extraordi nary child & if proper pain was taken she would be a little prodigy. I suppose New Haven is losing fast its beauty all those northern villages do as winter approaches. Mama heard from Dora last mail. She is in St. Augustine. Edna Shaw is to be married next month to Dr. Gamble of Tallahassee. Her family will all reside in_____________________ Write soon and accept for yourself the warmest wishes for your health & [badly blurred] Mr.Smith joins me in love to you Sarah

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note: Caraway Smith, Sarah Be Monticello 15 th My dear Burton Sarah has just written you a long letter and read me the part relati ve to your college course in which she strongly urges upon you the propriety of leaving Yale and entering the So Carolina college at Columbia _Being a South Carolinian myself (and quite clannish in that) I need not say that I entirely coincide with her in opinion, Nor will I apologize, my dear Burton, for taking the liberty I now take in obtruding my advice unasked, upon you for being the brother & only brother too of my wife you must know that I feel no little interest in your future welfare and therefore you cannot ever construe my motive _I will not then offer an apology but proceed to state my reasons as briefly as possible. In the first place then you will never graduate at Yale. You are now 19 and in 4 years will be 23 2 years over your majority. No w, Burton, life is short and liberty is sweet _so take my word for it_ as soon as you are able to vote and to take part in the great political drama of life you will not feel disposed any longer to brook control but will experience an anxiety amounting alm ost to torture and which you will find in this ___ irresistible to take upon yourself the cares that too, with or without a diploma_ In the second place, f rom the signs Page 2 of the times, I am afraid that before 4 years have elapsed the state of feeling between the North and the South will have become so embittered that as a true a Southerner like yourself would not be willing to receive even an education at the hands of the North and besides are you not in some degree virtually giving aid & comfort to the enemy by spending at the North those means & resources which should be distributed at home and go into Southern pockets, In the third place I think your mother is getting pretty well tired of Northern institutions for the education of her daughters; and if you were to enter the So. Carolina college your sisters could be educated at Barhamvilla within two miles of Columbia, an institution, by the way, infe rior to none in the U States for the education of young ladies and again as the vacation lasts from July to October, you could pay us a visit every summer and keep up those relations with Florida which would be if incalculable benefit to you if you shoul d enter upon political life and which on the other hand you would in a great measure lose if you were to remain away for 4 consecutive years. Again if you were to enter the Columbia college you would feel more at home you would be in a southern city e ducated with Southern gentlemen_ patronizing Southern institutions and exhibiting with your every breath Southern feelings & Southern principles_ and lastly I do not think the South Carolina College with such a man as William C Preston at its head, inferio that is if we Page 3 his acts for being educated at Yale himself, yet having the control of McDuff in education he sent him to Columbia but enough Mark my word you will not stay at Yale or for that matter at any other institution till you are 23 yrs of age and even if you could, we could not allow you_ for indeed, my dear Burton, I am most anxious to see you myself and confidently expect before yo u are 23 yrs of age to have you for my partner in the practice of law [ Note: There is a large hole in campaign_ In conclusion I hope you will take this letter in the spirit in which it is meant_ I shall

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) be glad to hear from you in reply and at all other times whenever your leisure will permit Very sincerely Yours Smith P.S. I had broken open this letter for the purpose of rewriting it in as much as I ha d not presented my views as clearly or as forcibly as I wished but I find that I will not have time before the mail closes and it must go as it was first written_ But, indeed, my dear Burton, I feel such a strong desire that you should graduate at a Southe rn Page 4 Institution that I will add a word or two more_ I lay it down as a maxim then that it makes no difference at what college a man graduates and for the simple reason that the collegiate course is only intended for the exercise of the mind and to giving to its system before entering in the duties of life In other words you do not acquire knowledge at college that is not is not the object of a collegiate course but you prepare the mind for acquiring by giving to it system, industry & a healthy actio n after you graduate there then you begin to acquire _If then a man have not talent or [ Note: This is on the back of the hole mentioned above] ___ industry & perseverance all the colleges in the world cannot give him success on the other hand give him t he prerequisites to success and if he only has a good foundation I mean a good academical education _he will succeed you cannot keep him down so that in short, Burton, graduating at Yale of itself will not make a man of you but you must be true to y ourself or you will pass and that it matters not whether he graduates at Yale or Columbia or e ven does not graduate at all But I am getting tedious _adieu C. Smith

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Hardtimes Sept 22 nd 1849 My dear Cousin I received your kind letter this day week ago, and this is the first opportunity that has presented i tself to respond to your kind letter. But at the beginning I must ask many excuses as I am very tired, having worked several difficult problems in algebra, and this evening writing a composition for next Friday, and also a letter to Josephine, from whom I received a letter some time since; she said that Anita was coming home in a short time. I was very glad as I wanted to [word omited] her, I wish you were coming home with her and then we would enjoy ourselves once more together. I long to see that day come when our education will be finished and each of us to settle in our log cabins, keeping bachelor hall, and having ours [sic] spent in fishing and hunting. They will be almost as amusing as rolling ten pins of which I am not allowed the privilege of doing now as these Methodist preachers (the trustees of the institution) are so strict that they will not let the students go near there, if we do the Teacher says that he will inform our Fathers of it. I do not know whether Papa would like for me to keep away f rom there or not. As my chest is very weak and by the advice of a Doctor, I intend to roll when it suits my convenience, without Papa saying that it must be stopped. I am now reviewing Page 2 for the examinations, which comes off the last Monday in Novemb er. I am reviewing between recitations and also a part of Saturdays, I employ in working over what I have reviewed, so that I may keep it fresh in my memory (Sept. 23 rd ) I wrote the above on yesterday evening and would have finished it had it not been for getting with Tom Shehee, and could not get away. He says that he does not know what to write you and he cannot or will not find time, I think it is the latter. H e is the greatest gallant you ever saw when he takes the notion, he wishes me to go out into the country this afternoon to see some of the ladies. I received a letter from sister Theresa last evening they were all very well and had enjoyed themselves finel y since they had been there. They are at Oxford at present. Papa says that intends starting after them in a few days I wish you were coming coming [sic] home this winter and then we would all be at home except one my dear Mother. You cannot tell how I do m iss her every time I look over my cloths [sic] and see that something is missing I cannot think but if she was living that I would not want anything long before I would have it. There is news of interest stirring here, this is the poorest place that you ev er saw Pickens Bird is boarding here, you would laugh to [word omitted] Page 3 him curse the chackens as he calls them, he says that he will not not board in town next year He has just returned from the country, Miss Sally is up here. I have not been out t o see her, I would like it very much but have not found a suitable opportunity. I must close as there is no news worth relating. Pickens sends his best respect to you. I remain your ever affectionate Cousin. William Bailey

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note: William J. Bailey wrote this letter telling about the birth of his first son, William John Bailey, Jr. Lyndhurst Nov. 13 th 1849 My Dear Burton I onc e more seat myself to write you a few lines informing you that we are all well at this time, Your mother has a fine large boy, he was born the first day of this month and is now 13 days old we are at a loss to know what name to give him, I have had 2 names in view but your mother seems not disposed to give these & requests that you now to suggest a name, so you see the names I proposed until we hear from you. Yo ur mother has looked for your letter in which we thought you mentioned about Junior Class but has not yet found it, it may be that we were mistaken, but we were all of that belief but however let it all drop. I wish you my dear Burton to be very studious a nd remain at the same school as I wrote you long since you have formed acquaintances & it will certainly be much more pleasant for you. Mr. Smith & Sarah have been ought bond? Was the faculty satisfied with it? I do hope you are progressing well and will be a polished to have you away from us for so another man in his Page 2 place, I have employed Norton to oversee for me the ensuing year. Rowell says he will make 175 bales cot 200 bales_ Your grandfathers estate will be divided this January that is the Negroes and money. Num has just come around me and says tell her Bubba howdy for her & says she wa nts to see him, You will be uncle some of these days toward the first of January next. I suppose you will hear all about it as soon as it takes place we are progressing very slowly with the house & God knows when it will be finished. Hoping you are in good health I close Your mother and the girls all unite in kindly love to you Yours truly & devotedly William J. Bailey

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note: The two lines below are the end of a letter letter. Most of her letter is missing. William wrote to you not long ago. We are anxiously awaiting the name you may select for the little Benjamin. He desires kindest love to you_ E.A.B. Dec 10, 1849 My dear brother, I suppose you think that I have entirely forgotten you but it is quite the contrary. I have thought several times of writing you but every time I commenced some thing [sic] has prevented my doing so, but I am not going to let a ny interruption prevent my doing so now. I suppose you are quite busy now as you have just entered college. William Scott has arrived home. He has been to see us. He looks improved both in looks and in manners He is going to return to Oxford in two months and is then coming home and is going to New Haven to study medicine. Mr. Conner has at last arrived. He and Cousin John are in the passage talking of you. He speaks very highly of you and thinks you perfection Mamma wishes you to see if there are any go od female schools in New Haven as she intends sending me there instead of New York as Anita is not going to remain but a short time. Please let us know in your next letter. Mary and Theresa Bailey are going to school in Culloden, Georgia. Jim Hawfield has been staying some time with us. He has gone home with William Scott. He says he is not going to be married. William Bailey has vacation. Page 2 Anita is going to a large Ball to be given the 12 th of December in Tallahassee with Mr. Smith. She received your letter on yesterday. She intends to answer after she comes from the ball. We are all much obliged to you for the books which you sent us. Floride Palmer has been spending some time with me. She went home yesterday. William is dreadfully in love with Anita and has given her his Badge which is a token of love. You must write to him and ask him how he likes her, but do not in any way hint at it fo r he would not like to let any one know that he gave it to her This is a secret you must not tell any one I will tell you another. Cousin Sarah [Bailey] is engaged to be married to Mr. Lamar her if you wish but you need not let her know that you know it. My pen is very bad so I hope you will excuse all the mistakes and bad writing. Mr. Conner desires to be remembered to you. Our house is nearly finished. We took a very delightful [sic] last evening with Mr. Conner. Mr. Smith is a great hunter and kills a deer very often. I believe Jim is going to practi ce medicine in the county. There is a very sick little Negro on the Plantation. Our little brother is quite well and has taken his first walk today. Mamma says you must write her and send her a name for him. The weather is so pleasant that I can scarcely r ealize it is December. It is as warm as summer. We have not killed any hogs as yet. I hardly know what to write as Mr. Conner, Anita and Miss Crossland are talking Page 3 at such a rate. I am trying to make this letter worth its postage, but I am afraid it will not. Miss Croosland [sic], our governess, has but one more week to teach then we will have a vacation until January. Father has just finished grinding cane. I expect to spend Christmas in Monticello. Anita starts to Tallahassee on Tuesday and comes h ome the next Tuesday. Father is going to write you soon. My dear Brother I have tried to make this letter interesting and to tell you the

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) news that Jefferson County affords so I hope you will excuse all mistakes All unite in kindest love to and accept a l arge share from you affectionate sister. Josephine Hernandez Bellamy N B Note: o f the first page. Parts of this are missing and much of it is illegible. The part below is probably her second page. they [Mr. Smith and Anita] are about to take their departure for Tallahassee. Sarah is now staying with us to remain sometime in my ___ I will be in ___ she is in tolerable health ___ nameless baby boy is one of the best ___ Virginia kisses him and says it is for you he is fair complexion and ligh theaded Mr. Connnor has been with us I regret much not seeing him, but Note : The rest of this page is torn off.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Lyndhurst 17 th December 1849 I received by Saturdays mail my beloved Burton your kin d and welcome letter and have determined to write you a long letter once again_ it is not disposition on my part that I write so seldom but so many things crowd on my mind to see to, that leisure and quietness seldom are enjoyed by me_ In the first place t he new house employs all hands_ the workmen [some] are fed by us and they increase our family care_ A Mr Thomas Bailey and his companion, a Mr Drew are the painters, Mr. Caerot and Ellenwood are the masons_ They come on Sunday evening and return to Montic ello on Saturday 23 rd_ I again my beloved son resume my pen with hopes of no interruptions as all are gone to bed_ I will again mention the new house Mr. Shearous the carpenting [sic] says he will complete his work in February, the masons say four m onths and the painters about the same time so I do not calculate to move into it before summer_ Its location is most desirable and I flatter myself that but few in Florida have a more healthy residence that we, and at the same time more beautiful location_ The house is large Page 2 and during our warm summer months it will be really a satisfaction to enjoy such pleasant chambers_ This week is Xmas_ a time of festival among the negroes_ Today is the first time I have been in the carriage since last June, I went with William and Sarah to the negro quarters, sugar house, etc Our overseer left yesterday and we are daily looking for Mr. Norton who is to oversee for us the coming year_ We have made 15 barrels of sugar_ The negroes made many inquiries after you Haga from the plantation paid me a visit today, she says all are well_ Mr Madry will take Mr Rowells place_ Jenny has a fine mulatto daughter_ She denied anything being the matter with her and I allowed her to go to the plantation to see her mother [who is expecting an increase shortly] and to remain some days_ The very day she got there that night her disgraceful conduct was brought to light_ and I hear from her frequently that she is doing she has been dead two months she died in childbed her infant was taken from her by Doctor Pettis_ Miss Crossland has left, and Anita will take charge of her sisters. Phine and the [missing]. Page 3 are in Monticello spending some days with Floride Palmer who has been here on a visit to Phine. Anita appears to be quite happy and enjoys some retirement very much_ She has visited Tallahassee with Mr Smith was enraptured with her visit she will write you an account of her visit_ She has her eccentricities a is still delicate_ John much improved Sarah [Bailey] I understand is to be married in April to Mr Lamar a son of the lady who John boarded with when at Oxford_ perhaps you may know something of him by profession he is a doctor I understand he will not be seen here until he comes as a groom_ her acquaintance with him is short [some weeks] and marries him from her brothers approbation_ Sarah is a sweet girl and I hope she may do well_ Your sister Sarah has been with us some weeks and will remain with me until she is over her impending difficulty when Mr Smith thinks of going to housekeeping in Monticello On Saturday the division of your grandfathers Negroes take place_ The commissioners are Mr Finlayso n selected by your Uncle Bailey Mr Thomas Johnson by your Aunt Emily and Mr John Johnson by your Father_ Your Aunt Emily objected to Mr Rowell and Baugh therefore the judge [sic] Page 4 the heirs to select his own commissioners. She wants to make hersel f of great importance_ but that narrow soul of hers will make her enemies_ Business compels William to be in Madison the

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) day of division therefore I shall attend and write you the affairs of the day_ Margaret wants Ellen and ___Caroline_ My little son is a fine fellow and grows fast_ he is very good, not being disturbed at all at night by him_ he only more forcibly recalls my cherished and absent son to his mothers heart_ he has no name yet_ I think he resembles Virginia_ V and C are constantly speaking of you_ They are sweet children but Christina has more animation than V and her sparkling black eyes speak volumes at times_ Sarah speaks of writing you soon_ Your college paper offered ___ us amusement_ I would write more but must close now expressing ever y tender and ___ wish for your success in your studies and good health, and that a few years will return you to your home welcomed by your relatives and more particularly by her who claims more from you than any other being on earth_ James Hawfield has go ne to Georgia, but will return to Florida, locate at New Port as a physician_ All join me in dearest love to you good night my dear Burton and wishing you the compliments of the season I am your devoted Mother E.A.B.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) B. W. B. Composition Sl avery There is perhaps no question open to discussion between those differing in certain conscientious views and there is none more rancorously abused than the one I have taken as a subject. It is one, which appeals directly to the most firmly rooted preju dices, the most sacred strongholds of opinions in our nature, and it is one where the inate [sic] sense of justice, the great principles of expediency, and the precepts of divine truth, are continually brought into review, only to be willfully misconstru ed or relently [sic] suppressed. The arguments which have been used from time immemorial and in vain to crush the System of Slavery are few and simple, and although they present to the careless listener a show of solidarity and plausibility, it is only i n appearance, taken under different circumstances, they might be good and sufficient. Under no circumstances at all they would, under the present circumstances, and in our country, such position as are held are utterly false and hopelessly inefficient. Lea ving out of view, the questions of natural justice, which have been sufficiently argued, and while in any case needs not to be argued here, become to this fact, that by the constitution of our country, Slavery is firmly established in the southern portion of our country in the first place by their own legislature and then by sanctum and approval of the general government Page 2 the southern States have a perfect right to establish any system, which they may see fit, within the bounds allowed by federal cons titution, and moreover have a claim to the protection and assistance of the Government in sustaining and defending that system It is strictly and solely their own business, their own risk and their own responsibility. Any interference with its operation is not only officious and insulting, but unconstitutional and illegal. What has been the case among us, the South has only availed herself of her federal rights, and in doing so has not attacked nor injured any other portion of the country. The Ins titution is her own, necessary to her nature, congenial and endeared by old and sacred associations, held still more sacred to her by the feelings of insulted and outrage independence. It is her own and it concerns her honor to defend it to the death, and how is she treated, how are her rights respected, the very honorable northern States do not take them from her, because they cannot. They do not openly and honestly attack them, because a penalty might shame their attempt and wrench their pockets, or perh aps, because their value takes to itself its better half, discretion the only resource left to their rampant indignation and the only weapon they have strength or spirit to use in treachery. All the means of ___ attack, from political intrigue, to sneakin g theft has been used to the utmost extent. The law, where it could not be ___ with infamy, has been eluded by rascality. The press has been made a means of instigating revolt Page 3 and bloodshed. The clergymans holy office has been made the cloak for th ieves and kidnappers. Societies and associations have been formed for the purpose of demolishing slavery. The Ladies have been taught to give their winning graces to the art, and to use their gentle speach [sic] to comfort the hall of Legislation and the s acred desk. The strangers hospitality has been profaned by the polluting touch of the insinuating serpent. Hypocrisy and treachery have been the attack, robbing and theft the conquest, the undermined railroad the ___mark of Abolitionism B, W, B

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Aucilla on December 18, 1849 My dear Cousin It has been three weeks since I came home from Thomasville. And I feel bad about letting so long a time ela pse and not having written to you before now but the truth of it is I have been in the bush ever since I have been home. We have been out hunting nearly every day. Cousin William, Budy [sic] and myself went out today. I killed a fine buck. I wish you were here to enjoy some of the sport in shooting deer, squirrel etc.. Master and I went out and killed 5 or 6 squirrels this evening. It seems that Budy will never get tired deer hunting, he goes every day that he can get any one to go with him. You need not ex pect to get a letter from him as long as he can hunt. Kar Bayley is living at the Skannals place, very few geese and duck in there this fall. The crops throug h the county are very much better than we expected for they were killed late last spring but the late fall has made up for it. Cotton has taken a considerable rise from the sale Page 2 of last years crop, I am in hopes that it will keep up high, and then i t will be pay for the trouble we take in preparing it for market, There is some talk of putting up a cotton factories through middle Florida. I would like to see that, so that it will deprive some of those Yankees of getting it for little or nothing. Papa speaks of dividing his hands next year and sending one part on the Aucilla about 20 miles south of this, and putting Budy to superintend them. I would like to be through school and settle off so, but as I have 5 years to spend at school I will take it cool and easy, be patient and persevere. Papa told me on Sunday last that I may come to old Yale if I wish. I have been thinking upon it, and if I can stand the winter I would like it very much. I guess if I come on there it will be next summer. I would not be prepared to enter the freshman class, for from the catalogue it seems that I have not been pursuing all the studies required to enter that class. My studies this last term were the Aenied [sic] two books in the Anabases [sic], all of algebra and a little in geometry. When you write again give a correct list of all the studies you pursued for entering so that I can study them before I go on there. Page 3 If I do not go to Yale, I shall go to Columbia, S.C. Cousin Wm Scott wishes me to go Oxford the last pla ce this side of the jumping off place it is the poorest apology for a college I ever heard of. Mr. Conner from New York was here a few days ago, he is as lively as a cricket. Dear Burt I have a great many things to tell you which is too laborious to put on paper. I hope we will meet soon and then we can [sic] over the past. It is now bed time [sic] and I am very tired after my days hunt. Please excuse this badly written piece for I have but little time to write. It seems the more time I have the less use I put it to and my hand feels numb and clumsy as if I had not taken hold of a pen in a year. goodnight Yours truly until death Mr Burton W. Bellamy William Bailey New Haven Con P.S. Jim Harfield left us this morning for Macon, he has been looki ng for a location to practice medicine.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) LYNDHURST 1850

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC)

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Fla. Jan. 18 th 1850 My dear Brother I received your kind and affectionate letter a few days ago and hasten to reply to it. I am glad to hear that you are so well. I suppose you had a dull Christmas. I did not spend mine at home. I staid a week at Monticello, while I was there, I attended two parties and enjoyed myself very much. I staid with Floride Palmer. I suppose that you have by this time heard of our little nephew. He i s a beautiful child. He was born on the 6 of January. His name is A. Bellamy Smith. Sister is as proud of him as she can be and I think she ought to be so for she has something to be proud of. Our little brother is quite well and is improving very rapidly. His name is William. A very bad accident happened to Miss Sally Bird not long ago. She was sitting down by the fire and fell asleep and her clothes caught a fire and she is very badly burnt. Some think she will recover and others Page 2 do not. I feel ver y sorry for her mother. I was sorry to hear of the condition in which the schools of New Haven are kept as I would like so much to have gone there. I believe mother thinks the same as you do about sending me there. In your next letter tell me if you know o f any good schools any where [sic]. I would not like to go to Mrs. Havens. The Gentleman to which Cousin Sarah is to be married is named Tompson [sic] Lamar. He is a Physician. His father was crazy and killed himself with a gun. The wedding is to take plac e in May. He is only 22 years old. Do Saturday. Aunt Emily is still unwilling for us to have the land. Some think she was influenced by her family. I saw Daug hter in Monticello Christmas week at the circus. She spoke to us very kindly. ___ through our county quite often. Cousin Margaret and Sarah and William Scott spent the day with us Wednesday. Cousin John is improving in health. He has no occupation at all e xcept hunting and he does that very seldom. We killed hogs this week but the weather has become so warm that I am afraid it will spoil. It looks like rain today. I wish it would rain and turn Page 3 warm. William Scott returns to Oxford tomorrow. He says t hat he is really going to New Haven to study Law not Medicine. We have egg nog quite often and I always think of you. Father is quite well and thinks hard of your not writing. Mr. Norton is overseeing for Father. Mr. Rowell has left the Ocilla and Mr. Madr y occupies his place. Father made some pretty sugar last year. Miss Crosland our governess has left us now. I believe that Anita is going to teach us. Cousin Sarah and William Bailey are going to Tallahassee next week. Cousin Margaret is not a going as the Doctor does not think it prudent. I believe William is going to Tomasville [sic] the first of February. Steven is quite well and inquires after you quite often. I believe Mrs. William Denham is going on to New York next month. It appears like a century s ince we parted. Anita is going on with Mrs. William Budd next Sept. I wish you would write mother and persuade her to send me to some southern institution. I do not mean such as the Georgia College. Mother says if she goes traveling this summer she will se nd us to Monticello and we will stay with Sister. Mrs. Ferguson has quite a large school and it is said she is a most excellent teacher Page 4 Note: Much of this page is badly faded and impossible to read. Mr. Smith and Father go hunting quite often and generally meet with success. Jinny has got

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) another child its name Henrietta. Steven named it. You know he is a great one to name. Virginia can spell very well and will soon read. Numny is as wild as a deer. Tory and ___ are well and desire to be remembered to you The weather is so warm that it looks like summer. We have just heard from Cousin Margaret they are quite well. We also heard from Sally Bird. Her Physicians do not think she will ever recover. Anita is to be one of Cousin Sarahs brides maids [sic] and Mr. Lamars sister the other. Anita is to stand with a gentleman from Georgia. Mother intended going to Mrs. Finlaysons today, but the weather was so impossible she declined going. One of negros is quite sick it is Mersia. We had to call the Doctor for her. I believe my dear brother that I have told you all the news that Jefferson County [the rest of this line is illegible.] ___ desires to be remembered to you. I close with the hope of hearing from you soon. I remain your affectionate and sincere Sist er Josephine

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note: Because the margin was cut off in copying the original, many words are left out of this transcription. Oxford Ga. Jany 29 th 1850 Dear Burt. It was with mingled feelings of surprise and gratification that upon my return to this del ightful little Hilltop I found among the letters for me in the Post Office one from a correspondent whom I prize most highly but whom I had long given up as lost? That correspondent was yourself. Accustomed myself to scrupulous promptness in replying to al l letters received from my friend I thought myself entitled to equal courtesy and consequently have my feelings considerably ruffled when I am neglected especially when that neglect is from and old and much valued friend. But enough of finding fault! And to heal the wound which this may have caused I will say that I consider your excuse for such a long silence altogether valid and has been willingly received. I returned to Oxford last Thursday night after a most tedious passage of 5 days having left home last Sunday week 19 th January 1850. I will not boor you with a long and as I am sure ___ circumstances it would ___ uninteresting bundle of news news which Page 2 although in the hearing I recd. great pleasure would be dry and unpleasant for you to read. If I may judge of your feelings by what I know would be mine if placed in your situation, I would come to the conclusion that the subject that would interest you most is the Home of your Youth and those dear ones then residing I have within the last thr ee weeks seen that Home and enjoyed the Society of those you love or who at all events love you and that too most devotedly. It is a difficult although a delightful task which I have imposed upon myself to attempt to describe things as they are. I left Ox ford on Tuesday 19 th of November and after stopping a few days in Quincy I ___ Tallahassee on Saturday night. On Sunday I went to Church and on Sunday night I called on Misses ___whom I found most astonishly homely but delightfully interesting. On Monday I arrived at home that little oasis in this world and plain that fountain of all fun, unadulterated happiness to poor pilgrims of earth. I found my relatives in fine health and exuberant spirit! Ah Burt men may talk of honor, wealth and every other source o f happiness to poor fallen degraded man, but happiness is more enrapturing Page 3 than that of meeting after some time of separation with those we love of mingling once more in the Social Circle. Ah! Think on few such hours in store for me as I spent on t he night of my arrival home and for days and weeks after. In a week or so after my arrival Home I saw your Sisters, two of them in Monticello and a few days after that I went over the river first to Uncle f time finger a but barely perceptible upon old, but tis seen in unmistakable signs upon old familiar faces, those who but a few years since were babes in their m children have burst into all the beauties of that delightful era, those who were school boys have approached the dignity of manhood, (Cousin John) It is truly astonishing what changes a f ew years can affect! Take Miss Anita and Miss Sallie Bird as examples, instead of the little romping hopscotch girls I used to know, I am struck dumb with the sight of two full grown ladies and instead of running giving hardy shake of the hand and stealing a kiss I am under the necessity__ of making myself a fool in order not to seem one

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Page 4 Continuation from page 3 rd I was speaking of some of the changes precipitated in our relatives over in the bend. Josephine is as tall or nearly so as Anita. S he is as large now as your mother and grows prettier everyday. She will be the Bell of the County when she returns from the North. She was in Monticello a few weeks ago and the boys and some of them pretty old nearly went crazy about her. Now for the twins they both have child I ever knew or ever expect to know. I could receive much more pleasure from her conversation than that of one half the grown girls I saw at home (in Fla.). The two little Bailey calls him is a very fine child as is also your little nephew who was brought out for my inspection. From the appearance o f his features and head I would say that he bids fair to be as handsome and talented as his father, who is a man of a fair face and form and possessed of elegant manners. Your sister is still the same in many respects only possessed of Page 5 of a much mo re matronly look than she did the time I saw her something more than a year ago. Your mother was not in very good health the first time I saw her and I thought she was considerably broken, but she was much improved the last time I saw her which was last We supper. 10 miles in two hours. As to our Big Cousin I can only say of him that he is fat and sassy as ever and looking younger and handsomer than I ever saw ( l b) for the last 5 or 6 years and that is saying a good deal for the old Feller. I intend writing him in a few days as I gave him a promise to that effect. His Cousin Sall ie is to be married to as handsome __ and talented a young man as Georgia suppose. She was possibly burned from her dress having taken fire. She was not expec ted to live when I left. Poor Sallie! I spent many happy hours of my vacation with her. My limited space bids me conclude so farewell. I am your sincere friend William Scott

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note: Because the margin has been cut off in copying the original, many w ords are left out of this transcription Lyndhurst 24 th Feb ry 1850 My beloved Son Your letter of the 3 rd Instant is before me. I seat myself with the intention of answering mind as free from perplexities as you I would not be so remiss_ Cares and turmoil belong to me therefore that sweet equanimity of mind which denotes happiness is only a transient visitor to me, and produces a burden of thought that letter writing is avers e to_ but to write you the pleasure is great, and I may be for awhile beguile the loneliness I feel_ I find you are still imprudent about your dress, has experience not yet taught you a lesson? Flannel cannot be thrown off at pleasure_ Therefore be guarded I hope my dear Burton you will not be wasteful of your golden moments_ Now is the time for you to study and what you consider to be your advantage gather, so that you may reap well Let not a trifle discourage you but bear in mind what Patience and Pers everance does_ I only add may every blessing attend you and virtue guide your footsteps_ It is true you go to church against your will, but let not that turn your mind from religious feelings and Page 2 principles, as religion is the guide of youth and giv es in advance life that stamina of character that makes the correct man, and gives him under all circumstances an approving conscience months_ what vacation? And wha t month will it be? I have not yet got Williams consent therefore cannot at present say anything about it_ He left for Tampa on the 18 th Instant with is Mother and Mr Kerr Bailie he expects to be gone 4 or 5 weeks_ His mother has gone on a visit to Cornel ius Seals Mr and Mrs Richards have visited us, but have returned home, they all inquired kindly after you and desired to be remembered to you, Mr Norton desires to be remembered to you he often speaks of you, he is the same warm hearted friend as ever_ Mr Smith told me he sent you a list of the divided negroes_ It was done by each one selecting those who had families on their plantations_ The lot selected for the Estate by William is considered the best_ I visited the plantation yesterday and divided out among the Negroes calico, checks, ovens and pots. Mr. Madry I found quite civil and obliging to me_ he has made Ceasar Driver as he thinks Harry is not trusty_ Hostor Nancy attends to the children_ Mr M says he will try to Page 3 make 300 bales of cotton this year_ The division of the land by the commissioners Mr Smith your Uncle Bailey claims Your Aunt Emily retains Gideon without any resistance and your Uncle [missing] to your Aunt Bailey to take her_ I believe you children received $2000 in good notes William grows worse in silence as he tells me, but few things_ Your Aunt Emily drew Caroline and Sarah, Your Uncle B Ellen and her 3 children. Mr Smith has taken your sisters part of her but I am happy to say she has nearly recovered her good looks and has a fine son_ Mr Smith speaks of returning shortly to Monticello to board_ I must now talk some of my own little son, he is my dear Bubba an exception to children, he is very good, never cries only when hungry or sleepy and never frets through the n ight, he is good looking and has a beautiful complexion and

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) friend li ving_ I shall send Phine to Mrs. Darby this fall. Miss Havens is too expensive_ Anita is anxious to return for one year to New York Page 4 I ask your advice how I am to act_ she does not wish to return to Miss H as a boarder, but desires to go and board with Mrs. Hull_ and be a day scholar to Miss H_ She wants society to give polish and at Miss H she says she is kept too close I know nothing of Mrs. Hull only w hat you think and how I ought to act_ The twins are going to school to Anita_ they are doing quite well_ Virginia & Christine are in fine health and look rosy_ The latter is all life. The new house will soon be finished that is completed by May or June so we can go into it_ 2nd March I now add a few lines to say my dear Bubba I send you two Florida papers, you will soon discover 60 persons are to be invited_ You r cousins talked to Anita about it, but to me or William they have never mentioned it_ Our winter has been very mild, only one cold spell that killed the tomatoes etc. My garden does not look well Charlotte [Tar Bucket] is now married to Sep and Lil to Mr Smiths driver Cuffy_ Sophy is married to Wallace, she is now in the field_ Kitsy expects an increase daily_ Did you hear of the death of Hetty? Clara has Henry [Billy Fosters son] for a husband_ Mr Rowell I understand is engaged in Negro trading_ I believe I have given you all the news_ Love from all_ Goodnight my dear son may every blessing attend you is the daily prayer of your devoted mother Eliza A. Bailey Note: The following is an explanation of the names of some of people mentioned in his mo letter: husband, John Bailey, died very young. William John Bailey was the only child of her first marriage, but she had several children by her second mar riage. Cornelius Seals was one of these children. Eliza Ann Bailey wrote Burton about slave families at the Plantation and about those that were Mr. Madry was the ne w overseer at the Plantation replacing Mr. Rowell. Mr. Norton was the new overseer at Lyndhurst.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Lyndhurst March 29, 1850 My dear brother Although I wrote you a long letter some time ago I thought I would write you a few lines if it was only to tell you that I and the rest of the family are well and hope you are the same. Father and Grandma are well and have just returned from a long visit to Tampa Bay. Father feels quite hurt at your not writing him Just as soon as you receive this write to him if you have not done it before. Victoria received your letter last Saturday and answered it the same week to which I added one of my scribbles. I have not long finished a letter to William Bailey. He intends coming a and Mary Ann Lamar are the bridesmaids and Cousin shamefully about the matter. They never told any of us except Anita. Mother intended giving them a dinner but t hey treat her so indifferently about the matter that I do not think she ought to. Page 2 A very bad accident happened the other day as Abby Budd and Victoria and myself were going h the front wheels. Abby and Victoria fell out in a mud puddle and were bruised a little. I was more injured than flag was delivered to the sons of Temperance by Miss Floride Palmer. She did not speak loud enough which you know is the failing of all the Palmers. Have you heard from Mr Conner recently. Anita did not treat him as she ought. I am afraid she is going to be a sad flirt But do not say anything to her a bout it. I suppose you know of my going to Culloden Do you ever write intend having a May party in Monticello this May. Do you not think the people of Florida are co ming out. Our new house is to be finished the last of this month. I mean the woodwork. I think that we have improved this place very much indeed. Steven is still the same good old Steven. I think we all ought to be very good to Steven for he has been so ki nd to us all We have the mail at old Mrs Rogers Some one of us children always ride there on Saturday with George for the mail. Sally Bird is recovering very slowly indeed. I feel very Page 3 sorry for her parents. I am going to school to Anita. William Scott has returned to Oxford. p oor fellow cast off Anita had no business to give any encouragement if she never intended to reciprocate his affections. I must leave this nonsense as I am afraid I will tire you my dearest brother. Sister is going to Monticello on Saturday, she intends taking Chip with her. Mr. Rowel has returned with a good many Negroes and sells them at a high price. He offered Ma a negro woman and three children for 2000 dollars. Do you not think that is high but he says she is a very good cook. Cousin Sarah went to Tallahassee in January and took William with her and he danced while they were there. If you were to see him you would not know him he has improved so much. Do write soon. Mother received your letter to day. I hope you will answer this letter soon and excuse all the mistakes and miserable [word omitted] all send love to you Your affectionate sister Josephine Hernandez Bellamy

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Monticello 8 th April 1850 My dear Burton I received your kind and confiding letter in due course of mail; but have so carefully concealed it that for the life of me I cannot now lay my hands on it I must therefore answer from memory and wait for time, the great discloser of all things, to betray this also with to [sic] thousand other secrets In the meantime I must give you my kind acknowledgment for the speeches of Mr Calhoun & Webster the two great master speakers of the day_ A few days ago an event I cannot tell you how much I regret it_ Indeed I have always looked up to Jno C. Calhoun as my model_ and if there be any truth private characters of Webster, Clay and all those who were worthy to mate with him intellectually have been sta ined with the fashionable vices of the day_ the private character of John C. Calhoun has ever been without reproach Let that be his Epitaph_ Page 2 not entirely to my satisfaction He says indeed that Mr. John Bellamy never at any time owned lands on the Suwannee but they always belonged to him, Genl Bailey_ It may be so and in the absence of proof to the contrary I am bound to believe that his statement is correct but one thing I do know, there is not a man in the community who did not believe that those lands belonged to your grandfather until within the last few months so that if there was error as to the ownership, it was an error very generally indulged in But to explain why I cannot proceed in the matter at present, I would have to discuss certain principles of law which none but a lawyer could understand and therefore I will dismiss the sub ject until we meet, when we will have a full, force & confidential conversation on this as well as other subjects of vital importance to the interests of yourself & sisters_ I will repeat again that I hope you Page 3 will come out as soon as you can as the re are business matters about which I wish to converse with you, but which also private in nature that I dislike committing them to paper But enough of this disagreeable subject __Your Father has gone to East Florida I believe to enter lands so at l east I am informed, for he never talks to me about business matters. Your Mother and Sisters except for Anita and Phine have been spending several days with us at Mrs. Palmers_ They are all well and appear to enjoy themselves very much Anita and Phine in the meantime stayed with Miss Sarah Bailey preparing I presume for the wedding which event is to come off the 25 th I precarious the Doctor pronounces her case on e of confirmed consumption and my own for whom I have the highest regard) is looking remarkably well and wants to see you as much as I do_ and now if there i s anything which I have neglected to answer, you will Page 4 please bear in mind that I have mislaid your letter One thing, however, I do recollect you promised to send me a copy of a speech which you were on the eve of delivering and this I shall no t forget_

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) I am writing at the office and therefore from Sarah does not know or she would freight my letter to which desire I would cordially conform_ Let me hear from you as often as possible and always believe that you are writing to a friend who takes no little interest in your welfare Very truly yours Smith

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Thomasville April 17, 1850. My dear Cousin I received your kind epistle not long since I can apprise you it afforded me the greatest pleasure to hear from a brotherly companion who I have not seen in so long a time. It seems that years have passed away since I saw you last, but I never could forget you, you have always seemed more like a brother than a cousin. I confess I have rather n eglected you in writing, but it has been so with all my correspondents. I have written very few letters this year, because I have had to study very hard as I wish to enter college by the last of this year. I am now reading the anabasis [sic], salluot [?] a nd geometry & algebra, etc. I would have written sooner but I had concluded to wait until after the wedding, then I could give you a full account of it and probably write something interesting, but knowing that you would like to hear from me, I could not p ut it off any longer, and besides I would rather write you than eat or write my sweetheart. You asked who I was smitten with at Tallahassee, this is rather a delicate point, but to tell the truth I actually was taken with Miss Mary Call, the daughter of Ge n Call, she is intelligent and pretty. I am afraid that you will get through college before I do, and be so taken with her that you will be after her with a sharp stick. The girls of this place are to have a May party, I have received an invitation, and in tend to lay aside my bashfulness, and flourish among the ga [sic] halls that night. Miss Sally Bird has not entirely recovered yet, but is gradually mending Page 2 I have not heard from home in a long time, news is very dull in those parts, the only news i s that Sarah will be married this day week if nothing prevents, to Mr. T B Lamar of Georgia. I guess you have heard of him, he is said to be very talented, He has nothing to begin the world with but his talents, and if he will improve these to a double fol d I think they will live very comfortably together I saw our old friend Mr. Rowel not long after he has quit overseeing and turned to speculating on Negroes, he left for Virginia about a month ago with the intention of bringing out a drove of darkies. We w ould all be very happy to see you come to the south again even if it is to stay but a short time, You will not spend more than two or three months at home before you will return, We must let ourselves out for southern rights and see if we cannot do somethi ng for it in years to come. I am afraid that we shall have a split of the union, and then war. The people of the south will not allow themselves or their rights to be trampled on by the yankeys [sic]. We have lost our main prop, our sole dependence, John C Calhoun, never was there a more noble, high minded & honorable man than him, naught can be brought against him. O! that I had words to express my feeling for such an one. I suppose the people of Boston have hung Prof. Webster before now, I never would g ive my consent to hanging man on circumstantial evidence, for there has been so many persons hanged on such evidence and afterwards proved innocent that it would be impossible for a man knowing such cases conscientiously to give in his verdict as guilty. I would cite you some, but time is too pressing. Page 3 Sunday evening April 21 st I wrote the above some days since and would have hasten [sic] to send it, but I thought of writing you a longer letter. I doubt that it will be interesting to you, for I feel so lazy this evening that I cannot write scarcely. I went to church today and heard a sermon delivered by our old friend P. P. Smith. He is married again, this the fourth time. There were a few pretty girls there. I almost fell in love with one. The girls of this place are going to have a May party, then I will make sure of their hearts ache. We have two debating societies here at which we meet every Friday night and discuss some subject. We had a little difficulty with one

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) of the boys of the other. He said that he intended to whip me, and came forward to do it, but when I drew my knife (for he was much larger than myself) and told him that a Floridian never backed out, then he was willing to stop. I received a letter from Theresa not long since, she was wel l and was pleased with her school, Phine spoke of going there next summer. Dear Burt the news here are so uninteresting that I hate to trouble you with reading. The homefolks [sic] write Write soon. Excuse all mistakes for this is full. I remain your ever affectionate and devoted Cousin, William Bailey Major Burton W. Bellamy New Haven Conn. Note: by that title. There is nothing written to explain this

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Monticello Fla. May 18 th 1850 My Dear Friend Your very acceptable letter came to hand last evening, and since it gives me much ple asure to hear from my friends once within the space of six months, I have concluded after mature reflection upon the subject to write you at once in order that I may have the pleasure of another communication from you by Christmas next as a Christmas treat which I shall most assuredly expect. Do not therefore I beg of you disappoint me_______________ You observe that I am once more at Home away down here in the land of Flowers, Alligators, frogs and mosquitos [sic] I reached here yesterday a week ago havin g graduated two weeks previous. We had a tolerable strict examination and it was with much joy and exciting gladness that I heard I was permitted to graduate with honor of a speakers place which however I hardly think I will make use of as it is extremely doubtful about my returning to commencement the distance being so great and the weather so warm. There is nothing new of any importance here that I am conscious that anything you Page 2 could hear from this part of the world would be devoured with avidity. Still I feel some hesitancy in beginning to give you what to me seems much to akin to trifle. I will attempt however to interest you as far as I may be able, tho I basicly [sic] know where to begin I will assure you however that time in his burial march h as wrought but few changes in our nation state and among our friends and relatives. It is true that Monticello begins to look a little more like the residence of a Christian and Civilized people. The buildings look finer than those which once disgraced it, the number of inhabitants are increasing rapidly so far as I can judge, but I am sorry to say are becoming no more moral but in that respect are rather becoming worse than they were formally were. Yesterday there was a quantity of ice received from new po rt [sic] and as a consequence of such Buggys and horses were very much in demand in the afternoon. Among the young men who wished to ride a little after their grog [ie] those were sensible enough as not to get so tight as not to be able to ride, the remain der found their beds if they were able to reach them or the hard floor if they could find no better accommodations very pleasant to their aching heads and sickened stomachs. I am glad to say I was not in the crowd, still holding on to my Temperance pledge. Your Sister Sarah is still boarding in Mo Page 3 with Mrs. Palmer. She went over the river on Sunday morning last, but returned I understand a few days since. I have not had the pleasure of seeing her yet. I saw Mr. Smith yesterday he seems to be in fine health and spirit. Josephine is going to school to Mrs. Ferguson in Monticello. She in very good health [sic] and has grown astonishingly. She is nearly as large as her mother. I understand she will go up to Culloden in August where there is an excellent s chool, as good I expect as there is at the South. The wedding party passed through Monticello on Tuesday last on their way to Tallahassee whence Mr. Mrs. & Miss Lamar will or rather intended taking the stage to Macon. Cousin John and Margaret were in comp any with them. They intend returning in a few days and will stop with us a day or so and I will accompany them over the River. I understand Cousin William has gone to Camden to take his Mother home who has been spending sometime with him. He is expected ba improved by marrying. I think they will do well, and pass a happy life, both I think are deeply i n love, and, Cousin Sarah is such a sweet little creature there is no doubt but that if she has the

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Page 4 the proper kind of a husband she will be happy herself and make him equally so. Of Lamar I have a very high opinion both as a man of honor and integ rity and as a man of talent. He is not a wealthy man, but he has the energy which will soon make him one. I think he understands his profession very well for a young man. He will enter into partnership with his Uncle Dr. Henry Lamar of Macon, who has a fin e practice and is old and infirm and will soon retire from practice Margaret looks badly. Some think she has the consumption, but I am still inclined to doubt it. I spirits and if I had looked at her plan [sic] face I might have thought her as well as ever was. Page 5 The weather has been remarkably pleasant for several d ays past, but just at this moment it is extremely warm and as I have just eaten a very hearty diner, I think you will excuse me and thank me for asking you So farewell I remain Your Sincere Friend P.S. I shall expect a William Scott L etter very soon Excuse haste &c &c &c. Wm I remain your sincere Fr. Note: He wrote that Cousin William was going to Camden to take his mother home. William John Margaret Seals, lived in Camden County, Georgia. Bailey was the sister of Margaret Bailey Scott and General Bailey. She was, also, the aunt of William Scott and Wi lliam John Bailey.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Thomasville June 2 nd 1850 My dear Cousin This being the third time that I have commenced a letter to you since I received yours, I feel almost ashamed to write. Every time that I commenced something would preve nt, sometimes I would write about a page when I would have to stop on account of being sick or some friend would call to see me then after leaving it off for some time I would not send it because I had not written enough. I have had a tough time of it for this past week or two, having fever, headaches etc. I guess you have no such complaints there. I have not heard from home except for Cousin W. Scott. He graduated about a month ago and is now at home, he did not tell me in his letter what standing he took in college. I guess it was not the highest honor or he would have stayed to make a speech at the close of the term (in July) He requested me that I should mention to you that if you did not answer the long letter he wrote you before leaving Oxford, that he does not care to hear from you again. Page 2 Dr. Lamar and Lady (i.e. Sister Sarah) is [sic] now living in Oxford. I have not heard from them since they left home. They look as much alike as any couple I ever saw. I think they were made purposely for eac h other When I was at home it looked as ever except still there seems to be one missing, that dear Mothers home looks lost without her. I do not think that I could miss any person than her and Pa. Oh! Burt you will lose a dear one when you lose your Mama n o one she cannot survive many years if she remains there. Sometimes I think that I will never reach the age of thirty, before I will be carried off by consu mption or some other infernal disease. I am inclined to believe that some part of our family is consumptive. The crops in Florida are generally very good this season, if they turn out well and cotton still holds its price, all will be able to splurge a w hile. Last week being court week there was great excitement especially among the boys as we were presented to the grandjury [sic] for raffling they did nothing with us One of the citizens of this county died about three Page 3 months ago. He was sup posed to have died with a fit of apoplexy but on account of some cause of it was supposed that he was poisoned. It is supposed that it was done by a young school teacher who it is thought seduced this lady and made an agreement that if the former was dead that she would marry him, about three months after he was dead, the latter suggested it to her upon her refusing he threatened killing her, but provided saving her at the same time, she put out to town and repented, the sheriff immediately took him he is now in gaol. I am sorry for the poor fellow it looks like a pity that such talents as his should be lost. I read an address delivered by him to the masons [sic] last January I wish I had been with you on your travels. Nothing would give me greater happi ness now than to travel over the union with you. If heaven spares me in two summers I will come on there. If I never can get any farther than Washington I intend to go there. You gave me such a glowing description of it that I am in a perfect rage to get t here. I guess your hopes are fastened before this time upon some Yankee damsel, it would not do for you to bring some one of them to Florida. I have almost sworn Page 4 off from visiting the Ladies, the more I visit them, the more I neglect my studying an d

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) besides I have never found that one woman yet that I would marry. You know the only use that I would put them to. Dear Major, write soon and do forget my negligence, the spirit was willing but the body weak, make allowances for bad writing and all the mi stakes, for I never had the patience to write with any care. This is sunday [sic] morning and I have half dozen letters to write today, good bye. I remain ever your attached Cousin & friend William Bailey

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) 1 st Lyndhurst June 6 th 1850 Dear Bu rton I once more have seated myself to write you a few lines, in the first place we are all very well except your sister Victoria who has the toothache and your mother has occasional shortness of breath that follows her and & has done so for t hope there is nothing serious, she is very thin and perhaps more so than you ever saw her when are [sic] tolerable J ohn and Margaret start in a short time for the north. John says he will see you, best for her to do. Your sister Sarah is very well also little B. he is a f ine fellow but one of the [cut off] children you ever saw. I have never seen him [cut off] more than two or three times yet he looks as serious as a Judge. Mr Smith is now off on a camp hunt on the Finholloway with about a dozen others. Next Sunday he hold s forth in Monticello as you have been advised previously and in about 4 weeks they all go to the Lighthouse Phine with them and perhaps your mother & if she goes you know all the balance of us will have to follow as you know she is as The old bell cow 2 nd suffering now very much for rain our oldest corn now is in full silk & tassel at my home place I have the best stan d of cotton that I ever have had, have not replanted the first [cut off] this year and very little at the sinking place but Madry at the Estate plantation has had a dreadful time replanting he has replanted some of the fields four times & now has not a goo d stand in some of much in his work by having so much replanting to do if we do not have rain soon our crops will be cut quite short, if we can have a good season soon the corn crop will be heavy I calculate in the last weeks to make 10,000 bushels of corn. Our new house is finished all but the painting all of which I suppo se you have been advised. We shall be truly happy my dear Burton to see you improve from what it is now I shall insist on her going north with you and spending the summer with you which would be very pleasant for you both provided it does or will not interfere too much with your 3 studies I do hope you are making rapid progress. I was under the impression that the parents, guardians, etc. were always advised of the s tanding in school, habits, etc of students by the particular to require Bond, etc. Do you draw the money off Taylor & Ritch & pay up to the institution & take a receipt for the same? Anita sometimes speaks of going north & some times of going to New Orleans provided her Aunt Maria (who she has written to) invites her to spend the next winter with [sic]. We sometimes hunt, we were out a few days ago & the dogs st alked two deer & brought them by your Cousin John & he killed one with each barrel of his gun. It made him quite happy. William is now at school in Thomasville I think he will be smart, but you must not let anyone be smarter than yourself, you do not know the anxiety that is manifested by all for your welfare more especially from your devoted mother You are uppermost on her mind all the time day or night & often speaks of you as an example for the other young men, I have

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) been to that most beautiful of all other places [old Tampa] this spring, it certainly the most lovely spot I ever saw Opossum Branch was pointed out to me by P. K. Baillie I am gratified to hear that you were so well pleased with your visit to Washington 4 th You must excuse this miserable scrawl blotting etc. as the yellow flies were awful. All unite with me in kindest love to you and believe me to be Yours truly William J. Bailey Note:

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Lyndhurst 30 th June 1850 Yest erday brought me my Beloved Son your valued letter of the 16 th Instant, there is no pleasure so fine and no joy more elating than a letter from you, it seems to banish care, and affords the mind a congenial retrospect of past, present and future_ The prese nt and past are types of the future and give to their reflective mind some idea of what the future maybe_ These allusions are in connection with your own dear self and in taking a bright view of your short course through life, may it forebode that manhood is to blossom with smiles, and the instructions of your mother with that purity of intentions, nobleness of purpose, conscious attitude in everything, and a sti ll more ennobling quality even in view ___ the fear of God! let that ever dwell on your mind and activate every motive of your life, then my dear Burton I may look up to your approach to silent prayers for your welfare have Page 2 been heard and you classed among honorable men. Let not the name alone satisfy you_ But let your own approving conscience tell you, you merit the same_ Lifes vanities and temptations no doubt assail you! Now is the time whilst your character is forming to take into resolves that will govern your future course through life, and if from principles, checked in its early stages, in more mature years you will find the effort more easy of control and the endearing adm onitions of your mother and best friend may then be acknowledged as a guide to your steps_ O! how happy would I be to know that I have trained my precious children in the fear and nurture of the Lord and in coming years they may speak of me as their Bless ed Mother_ 2 nd July I resume my pen, my train of thoughts are changed but never the less your happiness my dear Burton is a serious affliction that engages my mind. Mr Smiths eulogy on Calhoun I believe was well received_ He dwelt very forcibly on the inte grity and sincere purity of his character and considered them as the commanding and shows a taste for literature_ Sarah was with me about ten days ago she has impr oved in her health and has a fine son named Abram Bellamy Page 3 Lighthouse and they have taken Phine with them expect to be absent about four weeks_ Your Cousins John and Margaret left last Thursday for their summer tour. I hope it may prove beneficial to both_ They say they will visit New Haven if possible for to see you they must_ Your kind invitation to Anita to travel with her this summer came too late for her to ac company her Cousins_ The letter to Mrs ___ is not yet answered_ I am very desirous for her to be with Maria as she would enjoy herself and be in such society that I think she would like_ We are truly very lovely here_ The twins are in fine health, I shall send them to Monticello to school until you come home_ You can assist me to arrange for them, and perhaps with some of your Carolina acquaintances make inquiries that may lead to their advancement. I go nowhere and tied down with young children_ Home is t he only orbit in which I am destined to move_ Phine I intend to send to Mr Darby_ her health requires a more rigid clime than ours and therefore she can do as well near home for two years than to send her north where it consumes so large an amount annually to defray expenses_ When we meet in sweet converse can we say and suggest many ideas and matters, that we Page 4

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) cannot easily commit to paper_ Tomorrow William goes to Monticello to meet Judge Baltzall who will decide the partitions of your grandfathers land and hear evidence in you childrens favor_ Mr Dutton dined with us today_ He and Mr Norton are going as witnesses in your favor_ Emmala has been very ill but I believe is some better_ Sally Bird is dead, they say she suffered beyond description_ D r West is also dead_ he died from consumption, A rumor is that Mr Brotherborough is dead has also reached us_ I am rejoiced to think you can visit home in January_ how delighted we shall all be to see you, even Virginia and Christina are talking about y ou, Virginia says she loves you the best of all_ You did not say anything to me about your introduction to Mr ___ did he mention your father? Or say anything about him _William is perfectly willing for you to get another watch_ Heights paid $112 for your horse etc. which amount is subject to you order whenever you desire it and can draw on Taylor & Ritch for $125 (Williams) request_ Your horse has been dead for some tim e_ he proved very serviceable_ The crops have suffered __ for the want of rain but within the last few weeks we have had delightful rains_ My health and spirits are better and I hope to be quite fat when you visit us_ All unite in love to you and with fe rvent prayers for your welfare believe me my beloved son Your devoted Mother Eliza A. Bailey

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Note: Victoria made many mistakes in this letter. She used very few periods. My dear brother It has be en so long since I have written to you that I am ashamed to write but it gives me the greatest pleasure to hear from you. Chip and myself are she died very happy ( she would often cry out Mother dear Mother I am not afraid to die Jesus is my friend Glory to God.) There has been a great revival in Monticello all of the girls and boys have joined. Daughter has joined. Phine has been going to school in Monticello but s he is now at Tallahassee. Man is here. Ma is well and sends her love to you she has written to you. Uncle Steven is well also and says he wants to see you very much We have a great many watermelons I wish you were here The new house is nearly finished They have nearly painted it The Country affords no news of importance Father and Mr. Norton are gone a Hunting [sic] Have you been to New York Page 2 lately dinner is nearly ready so I will have to stop for a while. Did you hear of Dr. Werts death he suffered a great deal his back bone [sic] came through before his dissolution. Daniel Bird and William Mosely are gone to South Carolina. I hope to see you soon all the plantation negros are well I hope you are well. Sister Anita teaches us she says she will write [sic] intend to travel this summer but in winter she is going with sister to Appalachicola [sic] Mr Norton is well and sends his love to you Mr Karr Bailey is gone to Tamper [sic] Bay We have had green corn for along time. I can pl ay a little on the piano but I hope that when you come that I can play well. We are all well at present you must write me soon My dear brother for I love to receive notes from a brother whom I love so well. ___ is going to school in Monticello. little bubb a [sic] is as good as ever he loves me better than all his sisters and as he is the first baby that has ever liked me I think I ought to love him. father has killed a great many deer. all the wild fruit are getting ripe Peaches will soon be ripe and how I wish you were here to help us eat them We have just received a letter from Phine she is well she said she attended a wedding and two partys [sic] she enjoyed herself very much are you not tired of staying in New Haven Man is going in Page 3 December to S outh Carolina to school and you will not see him unless you go by that way. Cousin Sarah is now in Macon she is going to live in some little place in Macon. I do not reccolect [sic] the name. Cousin Margaret and Cousin John are traveling for their health. Chip intends writing you next week I intend finishing this piece of paper if I can tell you anything more without repetition sister Anita says she is heartily tired of staying in this dull beautiful place for there is no a musement [sic] of any kind whatev er she wishes to go on in August and remain there until you return home but it is very uncertain you must write dear brother and tell her what to do. I will change the subject by asking you if you learn [sic] the flute did you visit Miss Sophe Hull when yo u were in New York Sister Anita received a letter from her Sister Anita sends her love to you Tit and mummny [sic] are very smart with their book Miss Sophia Hull sent Sister Anita an invitation to come and stay with her this summer. Sister and brother are going to Tallahassee today I do not know what to write I will draw to a close my dear brother I remain your affectionate sister Victoria Bellamy

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Monticello Fla July 2 nd 50 My Dear Friend Your favor came to hand a few days since and was read with much pleasure which was heightened by the reflection that it was from the hand of an old and valued friend, and bore testimony that time had not conquered the frie ndship which was formed in childhoods happy season_____ I am exceedingly gratified to hear that we shall in a few months have the privilege if Providence permits and the pleasure of once more welcoming you back to our own native land, and you may rest assu red that nothing that I can [sic] shall remain undone to render your visit agreeable to yourself as it will most assuredly be to us. I must warn you however not to put too much reliance in myself as I am but a poor gallant and you seek mostly the company o f the fair sex. You must also remember that our little state can not offer you such advantage in the way of formal Society as the part of the world in which you now are. My days of gallantry are over and have been since I landed in the land of flowers. I h ave been in the company of but one grown up young lady since my return. Page 2 During last winter vacation and likewise during my last term at Oxford, no place suited me so well or in other words was more agreeable to my feelings than when I could gaze int rudely, for you might put a wrong construction on upon it. I am very much opposed to writing a letter entire [sic] upon this subject without giv ing some of the news, and must therefore stop short off, I have some melancholy news to write (ie) the death of three of our acquaintances and friends. Miss Bird, Dr. Wirt and Mr. Brockenbrough and all of them in rapid succession. Miss Bird breathed her l ast calmly, resignedly this night (Tuesday night) two weeks ago, Yes! Poor Sallie! Young, beautiful and talented and beloved by all who knew her has become a victim of the dread monster and now lies in her narrow home the food for worms! the subject is t o sad to dwell upon! Dr. Wirt died on the Wednesday following and Mr. B on the Friday after. There is nothing else of any importance to relate. Cousin M. Bailey and John were to have left for the North last Wk. Your Aunt Emily was too unwell to accompany Page 3 them as she had previously intended. Dan Bird and Bill Moseley leave also for the North tomorrow morning Poor Bill they say is much afflicted by the death of his affianced bride I understand that he has several times visited her grave to weep over h er remains____ I have not seen any of your relatives lately except Mrs. Smith who was at Church on Sunday morning. I was at your Mothers a few weeks since. Your Sister Anita was not at home but the rest of the family were in fine health except your Mother who looks quite feeble. I think the best thing she can do is to spend a few months in a more northern latitude the traveling too would be of incalculable benefit to her, but she and the Drs. no [sic] best. Josephine has gone down to Tallahassee where she will remain for several weeks. She is in fine health and growing quite fast. Well my news bag is emptied and as my eyes are very much opposed to being skinned beyond 11 oclock especially by candle light I think it advisable to whipe [sic] my quill and re tire for the night. If I can spare time to morrow from watermelons___ I may say a few words Page 4 Upon the state of the Union and become ___ in favor of military expeditions to Cuba &c &c. In the mean time I will subscribe myself as Your most loving

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Friend and To write any more Wm. Scott Jones Hotel Philadelphia July 10 th 1850 My dear Major You will doubtless be surprised at hearing from me so nearly related to you by the ties of consanguinity this far from home & in a band of strangers & Quakers. Yet it is I, even I, a native of Florida, a land for ___welfare we both feel a corresponding feeling interest. Yes, my dear Major tho I have long neglected to write you, I have always cherished that affection & nurtured that love which our near connection & intimate early association would inspire. You have perhaps been apprised by your Mother or some one from home of the object of my visit North this season. It is to bring your Cousin Margaret whose health has been quite delicate for more than a year and as this is the fountain head of Medical Science we have located here for the purpose of seeing whether she can receive any benefit from medical aid. I called on Professor Mitchel of the Jefferson Medical College today and got him to call & see Sister but he made Page 2 how long I shall be kept here, but before I return home I must have the pleasure of seeing you. I want to try & go to New York in the course of a week. If you will write me what time your commencement comes on I will certainly attend it if nothing prevents. Should Sister be able and the doctor thinks it advisable I will bring her along with me. In case she cannot leave her you must come & see her. When you write state how long your vacation will be & how & where you intend spending it. When I left home I left all our family well with the exception of Aunt Emmala who was quite unwell. She wanted to co me on with me but her health was too feeble. She said if she felt better and Mr. Simpkins would come on with her that she would come on with him that she would yet come & see if the doctors could do her any good. But I am afraid my dear fellow that her pro blem on this earth is of short duration_ And here let me drop a word of council, Aunt E. thinks hard of your conduct toward her & so do I. Because my dear fellow you ought to recollect that Uncle Billy once acted the part of a Father & now that Page 3 he now Grandpa property is divided that there will be no further difficulties about property I was sorry to see that such a scene could cut asunder all the tie s of intimate connections. Your mother has one of the finest boys perhaps you ever saw, his name is Jacky. Cousin S has a fine fellow All the children were in fine health & growing very fast. Phine is almost grow n. She is going to school with Thersa & Mary at Cullodon Georgia when they return in October. I will give you a full account of home when I see you. There is too much confusion & being unaccustomed to it I am almost unable to commit my thoughts to paper, I must apologize for the bad style in which it is done when I see you. Write me immediately at Jones Hotel Phil. Ever yours Sincerely Jno Bellamy Bailey

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Monticello 25 July 1850 My dear Burton At the request of you mother I send you a copy of the division of the negroes in your only of the grown Negroes named by Genl. Bailey and for the estate of Wm. Bellamy being put Your Mother received your last letter in due course which we were glad to hear that you propose coming home in the course of the next 12 or 18 months ___for it is Burton I wish you would come home as soon as possible and not be dissuaded from do not by anyone. Your interest and those of your sisters require looking after. To speak more plainly I do not think Genl Bail ey is acting fairly by your Grandfathers Estate. In other words I have been informed by gentlemen who ought to know that Mr John Bellamy owned a large body of land in the Suwannee river and valued at perhaps $40000_ this land it appears Page 2 now belongs to Genl Bailey. Now Burton to be very candid I do not believe from the lights before me that Genl Bailey ever paid for that land but on the contrary that he bid it off at a land sale several years ago in the presence of & for your Grandfather and with hi s money those lands impressions now_ I may be mistaken but I think not. The first difficulty under which I labor over consist in the fact that your father having unlimited c onfidence in Genl Bailey and looking upon him as a Father would never suspect Genl Bailey of anything wrong and could never be induced to take a step against him. So that I have to act by myself and with great caution whenever the time comes for action yo u may rely upon it I shall act with resolution_ In the meantime this letter is strictly confidential say nothing about it to anyone and do not write even a hint of it home_ but come home as soon as you can. I have much to say to you_ Burton the truth is but let that pass they shall not be so again if I can prevent it. On a moment refection I think after Page 3 reading, you had better burn this letter up. It might possibly fall into other han ds and on your suspicions are true, then I shall have nothing to concea l but then I shall be as open as the midday sun_ All are well and would send much love if they onl y knew that I was writing, but they are on the Ocila [sic] and I in Monticello. Sarah has recovered her ___ health but not her color _and your family Very Truly yours in haste Caraway Smith Note: Bellamy.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Aucilla, Fla July 31 st 1850 Mr. Burton W. Bella my Dear Sir: You must excuse me for addressing you again but knowing you must be anxious to hear how matters and things are progressing in this far distant quarter where the rest of mankind dwells. I thought you would know much better from one who is o ne of them than from those political pedlars ___ newspapers whose wares in general are unsound and despoiled of their ___ and tinsel would serve a better purpose in making childrens kites than filling the brains of ambitious demagogues with matter and nons ense sufficient to turn all the world of Yankeedom crazy indeed from what I can see all the Cabbage heads of Kinderhook by the influence of the magic wand of the mighty magician and an Albany editor have resolved to put we poor devils, the rest of mankind under proscription of a ___until we hide our dishonored heads and cry out for the rocks and mountains to fall upon us and hide us from the face of him whom we assisted in sending back among the long Colwart of Kinderhook alas my country the banner state o f Whiggery in /48 is now in /50 veering like a weathercock with every breeze of wind first from Washington then from Nashville We have our Convention and Non convention advocates Our compromise and non Compromise friends indeed upon this latter question th ere seems to be a desire to test the merits of our Candidates for Page 2 not only the Legislature but also Congress Major Pearsh [?] is mainly supported by the democrats also by some of the other party who advocate the Address of the Nashville Convention i n opposition to the Compromise of Mr. Clay there are many who will not recognize or agree to any Compromise they say and truly too that the Constitution is in and of itself amply sufficient to protect the rights of all and if the Northern States are not sa tisfied with it let them secede let them form a Northern Confederacy and by the experiment but let us go under the guarantee bequeathed to us by those who are now and no more If a compromise be necessary there must be a violation of the Constitution then which of the two parties, the North or the South have been guilty of the act of violation certainly not the South for in that bond or Federal Compact every right for which the South is contending is fully and plainly expressed but those for which the North insists are mainly supported by ___and advocated by politicians of mushroom growth whose very existence depends upon agitating such questions as the present from such sources alone can they derive nutriment stop those sources and like a sheriffs writ non est investus For my own part I say the Constitution and no Compromise Missouri or any other but as the Missouri has been once acceded to let it be take out from among us those Northern editors who are no doubt biased in favor of their native land or a ma jority of them let the South speak out her wrongs in her native tongue and you would see an uncertainty of purpose as was never before witnessed The Northern people may have been ___ the idea that we are weak in resources, indeed Page 3 [Note: many words are cut off in the margins on this page and page 4]. from the tone of many of their editors we are little better than half civilized and that our very existence is entirely owing to their magnanimity and forbearance how kind how ___generous

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) those same mus t be do you never thank some of those same inhabitants of all the world for such generosity There is a point at which forbearance is no longer a virtue ___ this point the present controversy seems fast ___should it arrives at it then the scales will fall from the eyes of ___ and they will behold a country more fertile in resources more independent than any other on the face of the globe dissolve the union as many of those fanatics insist upon and think you it would dim the luster of the South far from it. Her Seaports would be crowded with the vessels of all Nation instead of her rich productions having to pass through the hands of Northern Agents they would be shipped directly from her own ports and how millions which are annually paid to the Northern mer chants from their agency would pass into the coffers of the Southern Merchant heretofore the word enterprise has been a dead letter in the Southern vocabulary it is now becoming used not only in theory but also in practice. Madison County has started on a system of manufacturing Tomorrow a large meeting is to be held there to welcome the delegates to the Nashville Convention on their return and to approve their proceedings whilst in that Convention no doubt there will be much speaking Yet I hope that better counsels will ultimately prevail and that the North will retract from her ___ position would it not be a crying shame a disgrace not Page 4 only for all time but also I might say for eternity to think that such objects of scorn and contempt as Gar rison & Co. had the power to control the destiny of one of the mightiest nations on the face of the globe we would become a byword in the mouth of the civilized world and the ___ ___ of liberty would be held up in derision by the menace of Europe. Fanati cism has ever proved a curse ___allowed to be the order of the day and when ___ by mad ambition in its act what can stay the whirlwind of its wrath But the position of the South is taken in my opinion Never will she concede the point that Might makes right Justice strict ___ to the letter of the compact is all that she asks or ever will require. All are well at home this portion of the county are very healthy. Corn crops, not good in general, cotton so far thrives we ll and opening Mr.& Mrs. Smith at St. Marks lighthouse enjoying the cool seabreeze [sic] Your Mother I do not think is enjoying as good health as I have seen her but this to yourself however she is much elated in anticipation of your intended visit and I a m fully of opinion that the pleasure of enjoying the society of her children together will in a great measure tend to benefit her health Your cousin Wm Bailey has joined the church or so I understand also many of the students in the Fletcher Institute I ho pe you are progressing rapidly in your studies and that you will return to the South fully qualified to meet the expectations Page 5 of your friends I a know that I am not qualified to play the part of a mentor but I would say I would like to see you exce l Never be weary of well doing. Youth is the season for improvement for how many do we see after they arrive at the age of manhood ashamed to be the scholars and bitterly lament the time misspent I can look around and see many on whom thousands have been s pent to qualify them to fill the highest stations in life yet have proved total failures merely from and many very many will expect the son worthy to wear that Father thus let nothing impede your progress but perchance I am saying so much, or as the saying is meddling with none of my business yet I hope I do not offend in expressing oft repeated opinions and expectations so far as you are conc erned Would you feel satisfied with mediocrity I think not I have ever thought the word when applied to a young man where first entering upon the stage of action to imply a ___to the word reproach in many respects or that is so far as education is

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) concerne d I am an admirer of Burr. I am truly pleased to see your judgment of things in general remaining purely Southern I remain PS Overlook errors Truly yours In an old man Peter K. Baillie Page 6 P.S. Since writing the foregoing I missed the opp ortunity of sending it to the office but am in hopes to be more fortunate this time. I see demonstrations are making by the people in many of our counties in favor of 36 30 and nothing less and every day seems to add friends to the Constitutional Compact a nd no Compromise this is in my opinion the only safe and true position for the South to maintain and if she but proves true to her self she will maintain it and the North will concede the various interests of the North will and must compel her to concessio n the demonstration of her politician to the contrary will not be sustained by the masses, fear not for the South your own South she is fully capable of meeting any emergency Do you plan to obtain a copy of Judge Tuckers speech in the Nashville convention. I read it yesterday it is not only strong but severe language and I must say though it may not strengthen the bond of Amity the Castigation was but just it truly portrays the positions of both parties Thomas Heir Esq. and Mr. Dilworth are considering for the Legislature who the others in our county I do not yet know Col Blackburn may be also in opposition to Heir I do not like Blackburn as a legislator he deals to [sic] much in the Bombasto Furioso for me and all must bow obsequious [sic] to his will on th e part of the Whigs Col. Rob.Gamble will be a candidate he is undoubtedly strong and self worth powerful effect on the democrat phalanx last election he has Blackburn very close I think Page 7 8 or 10 votes, close race in a County where the Demo Majority is over 100 at least. Note:

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Lyndhurst September 21, 1850 My dear Burton neglect is not caused from indisposition. We are all looking forward to the time of your arrival with great anxiety I hope to see you much improved in health and education, we are all tolerably well at this time your mother and the girls are all busy fixin g and arranging for Josephine to go to Culloden with her cousins Theresa and Mary Bailey to go to school. Chip and Did are going to school in Monticello this winter to board at Mrs. Palmers with your sister Sarah and Mr Smith. Anita thinks of going to Mont icello to practice on the harp. Mr Anderson E. Rogers is engaged to teach in the Monticello Academy. Josephine starts next week & the others very soon thereafter. Your mother and myself will be almost lost after having so much company. Your sister Sarah ha s been quite unwell lately but is on the mend now. Our house is now completed except painting which will soon be done say in two weeks. The cotton crop has been cut very short lately from the drought the fields look like fire had passed through them in so many places, Uncle Bailey who planted 5 or 6 bales says he will not now make 300 bales, if he does that Madray will not make over 200 bales & I thought he would be certain to make 350 bales one month ago. Corn crops are also very short Yours devotedly William J. Bailey Note: Chip and Did are nicknames for the twins, Theodosia and Victoria Bellamy. 22 nd Your letter to Anita my dear Burton was joyfully received by yesterdays mail and we were all entertained by its content. The pleasure of hearing from you was increased by knowing you were in good health which I hope may be the case with you until you journey south Oh! exhilarating thought!! How shall our hearts render thanks to our merciful and kind God when he permits us to enjoy so great an earthly blessing!! May it to you my dear awaken the mind to that great and changes has that length of time effected? If improved in mind and person has the heart had its share? Sept 27 th I was interrupted on Sunday Evening by violent rain & wind, the first rain we have had in several weeks_ The crops are very short, our potatoes and cane are very indifferent_ Cotton may bring a hig her price and make some compensation to the farmers_ Corn is going to be very scarce and very dear_ Yesterday we had much company_ Sarah and Mr Smith came down to spend a few days with us_ Sarah has been quite sick from a rising breast but is now recoverin g quite fast_ Little B is a fine fellow. My little boy grows fast he runs all around and like my beloved and cherished Burton, evinces his devotion Page 2 to his mother_ May blessings crown you both here, and hereafter_ I spent Monday at the plantation w ith William, the whooping cough has been raging there_ One infant has died from it_ I cut out flannel shirts for the sick children_ None of the grownups were sick only Big Prince_ and I did not think anything very serious, but he conceived that turpenti ne in oil had given him a violent cold. Felicia has nearly lost her right hand from having it mashed in running

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) gears, but I am in hopes it will not be as bad as we feared it would be_ I am rejoiced to tell you that my health and spirits are both improved We all enjoy fine health_ Josephine leaves us tomorrow for Culloden_ It is painful to part with her but it is a sacrifice we must make_ Next week the twins are going to Monticello_ I shall feel deserted I think the change will be serviceable for them_ Wi lliam Scott and Doctor Darby spent the night here and leave in a short time for Monticello, so I have to make my letter short_ The idea of Anita going to be married is truly amusing to __ When she came home last fall she brought none of the articles of dre ss a young lady requires and her memorandum doubtless is rather Page 3 large, but thinking she might visit N.O. this winter I consented to her sending for some extras Her pearls I limited to $30 but Miss H. with her usual liberality has far exceeded that sum_ and William blames me for allowing Anita to do so_ Dan Bird has got back_ He says you are a fine looking boy_ Mr. Norton desires to be remembered to you_ William has gone to the Simpkins place_ We all unite in tenderest love to you hope tomorrow m ay bring me a letter from you Adieu my beloved Burton I am ever ___ devoted Mother Eliza A. Bailey

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Culloden October 12 1850 My dear Brother I contrary. You will see that I have at last arrived at the place of my destination. I suppose that the first thing that you would like to hear about is the School. I li ke the school very much indeed with the exception of the Music department and the exception is that there are too many schollars [sic] and only one teacher. So you see at once she cannot do justice to them although she is capable to do it. I suppose you wi ll come home in January and you look forward to the approaching event Page 2 with pleasure I should like very much to be at home. I intend going to New York next summer to school to Miss Havens. I received a letter from home on Tuesday One from sister a nd brother and Anita It made me quite homesick. I did not indulge long in sick feelings because I knew that it was useless. Mr. Darby gives lectures every other day and we note down the most important parts, and the experiments that he makes are very wonde rful and interesting. I like to study chemistry on that account. We had quite a pleasant time coming up. While in Macon we staid at the Lanier house. I saw Mrs. Logan while there I think she is quite a fine looking lady. You will find my letter very uninte resting as I have heard nothing new since my arrival. Will you come through here on your way home. If you will we will be most happy to see you but you will find nothing more than small very small houses Theresa and Mary are well Page 3 and desire to be re membered to you. Uncle Bailey brought Martha with them. I did not see Dan Bird before I left home, but from various things I heard he made himself appear very ridiculous while North. I believe they tease him very much. Did you see Tom Denham while North. H e is to be married soon to Miss Jennie Brown. Before I left home I went to Tallahassee with brother and sister and had quite a time of it. We spent a week at New port and enjoyed ourselves very much. I must go and practice so I must bid you Adieu. Accept t his hurried scrawl from you devoted sister Josephine Note: Josephine and her cousins, Mary, Theresa and Martha Bailey, are in boarding school in Culloden, Georgia. Today, Culloden is part of metropolitan Macon.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Thomasville Oct 2 3 rd 1850 My dear Cousin You know it is against my inclination to write on the Sabbath, but I cannot pass this opportunity. I hope you have not forgotten to write me, I have been waiting to receive a letter from you before I wrote, but I see that you h ave been as negligent in writing as I have. The cause of my not having written is that I have been traveling about for the last two weeks on account of ill health. I went down to Tallahassee it is a delightful place, the people sociable & the ladies pretty & sweet. There is a girl there the very pink of perfection. You & I must go down there next winter I assure you we can have a pleasant time I have given out the idea of going to Columbia this winter for two or three reasons first because I would not be pr epared before the middle of winter & then by going a few degrees of latitude north of this I might die with a cold as I am very subject to it & secondly I wish to remain another year with Mr. Hunt & besides I would like exceedingly much to spend a few week s with you this winter I imagine you & I in the forest now with horn, gun, hounds ready for the chase or in the parlor by some fair one. Page 2 I look with great anxiety for January to come, the time that you propose to visit the sunny south. Brother & Sis ter pass [sic] through here a few days since on their way home, They told me that they had see [sic] you & how pleasantly they passed the time Dr. Lamar has moved to Fla with the intention of locating there We have had great excitement in Fla this fall the two parties (democrat & whig) have kept the state in an uproar all this year. Old democracy is once more gaining its ground, we are apt to have a democratic legislature this winter, if we do have there will be a fair chance of Mr Yulee being reelected. I am afraid that Mr Cable will be reelected to the House. I will try to find out soon & write you who will be elected. Do excuse all mistakes as I have but a short time to write in, I will patiently [sic] for a letter from you & I will expect them frequently until you get home. I hope you will not expect many from me this fall, for fear of disappointing your expectations, I will commence review tomorrow, then I will not have time even to look at the girls, not even write long letters, however I will try to an swer all that you write. Excuse all mistakes & bad writing Believe me to be ever your affectionate Cousin William Bailey

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Lyndhurst November 4 th 1850 My Dear Burton I herewith enclose a paper for your signature will you therefore please sign and return it to me by mail as early as possible as Uncle Bailey is wishing to settle up the administration of your Grandfathers Estate and it is necessary to turn your signature in order to do so he has made one attempt but failed inconsequence of no t having you all notified, I have this day sent one to Josephine at Colloden [sic] & your mother has also sent her your chicks who have whooping cough I wrote y ou not long ago giving you the particulars & to which I have rec. no answer as yet but hope to get one soon. I kill a deer now and then also a turkey_ Your Mother unites with me in kindest love to you and believe me to be as ever Yours Affectionat ely William J Bailey We are looking anxiously for January to roll along as we may be able to see your face. signature knowing that you have not been used to these things. WWB Note: [General Bailey].

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) LYNDHURST 1851

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Josephine Bellamy wrote this pitiful letter to her mother. Culloden Jan 25. 1851 My Dear Mother, I have looked and looked for a letter from home for so long that I have almost despaired of ever hearing again, but I thought I would write you as you might think something was the matter. This is the fifth letter that I have written home and no answer to any of them. I know you are excusable my dear mother as you have so much to occupy your mind but I think Anita might write, as she has nothing much to do, she has not written me but once since I have been here but I will overlook the past and hope you all will do better in the future. About a week ago we attended a circus after much persuasion Page 2 from Mrs. Darby. I thought of dear Tit when I saw Miss Henrietta riding. I suppose Burton has become settled at home. Does it seem right to have him at home, will he come here on his return. Today is mail day, and I am anxiously waiting to see if I will get a letter. Does Cousin Christina stand the wh ooping cough? and dear little Bubba and B. Did you have their portraits taken. Did Sister have hers taken. I am afraid my letter will be filled up with questions but I have no news to tell. Tell Burton to remember his promise to write me. Do you ever see a ny of the plantation Negroes? and is Mr Madry as cross as ever? What has become of Kar Bailey? is he still an inhabitant of Jefferson County? I am trying to make this letter worth its postage, but I cannot. How often do you see Chip and Did? I suppose Tor y is the same good Tory? Do they improve in their studies? We have at last received the mail and no letter Page 3 for me. Mary received a letter from Cousin Sarah, she said Aunt Dora was with you, give my best love to her. She also said that Anita and Burt on attended a fancy ball. Did they go in costume. I suppose Aunt Dora did not go. How did Anita enjoy herself. My curiosity excites me to ask you how she was dressed. Have you received my reports? Are they good. I wish you send them to me my dearest Mother Did sister attend the ball. I hope you will answer this as soon as you receive this and answer all my questions. Where is Aunt Louisa at present. Do you ever hear from Grand Papa? Where is he at present? How long does Dora intend remaining with you Tomor row is Sunday and we are obliged to go to church. Who did Adam Shehee marry? Did any and Mary and Martha unite in kind love to you all and accept the best love of your affectionate Daughter Josephine P.S. I almost forgot to tell you my hair came out so that I had to cut some of it off. I wear it like Mary used to wear hers. In Haste J.H.B. Note: General Hernandez.

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Culloden March 22 nd 1851 My Dear Brother, I received your very interesting letter to day [sic], and I feel homesick. I thought that I could find no better employment than writing you. To day is Tuesday, and I think the time passes off very slowly. I was rejoiced to hear that you intended to return home next winter, as I think it would be decidedly the best plan that you could adopt, and then dear mother would not feel so lonely, she lives so secluded, and sees so little of the world. I would feel very much delighted if she visits north next summer. So that I think it would improve her so much as her health is not very good. Did she look to you, as she formally did? I think that we ought to thank God, that Page 2 he has blessed us with such a kind and affectionate mother, but this subject only increases my sadness and therefore I change it. I received a long letter from Mother last mail, she said that, she intended meeting me in Savannah, an d then she would start for New York. Has your winter disappeared the trees are just beginning to put out here. Mother said in her letter, that the orange trees were in full bloom. How did you enjoy your visit to Tallahassee? Did you make any acquaintances while there. The girls have to play every other Friday night. I have played twice. Mr. Darby finishes his course of chemistry lectures in about a week, and I am very sorry as they are very interesting, but he will begin then to lecture to us on Natural Phy losophy [sic]. I have taken up two more studies this term, Geometry and Botany. Several days have elapsed since I added a line to my letter, and I am sory [sic] that I have chosen such a late hour as I am afraid that I will not write a long letter as I wis hed to have done. Theresa received a letter from William to day he said that he was preparing to enter the sophomore class of Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Did you see much of him while Page 3 at home. Mary also received a letter from Virginia Johnson date d Dec. 22. Virginia and Caroline have gone to a convent to remain two years. I do pity them. You asked me how old Sophia Hull was. She is a year older than me, and I will be sixteen in May. Do you not think that I am advancing. Did you see William Scott wh ile at home. You spoke of Miss Havens as being extravagant, I think she is. I would not like to board with Miss Havens, but I would like to go to school to her. Where is Mr. Wescott. If you return home next winter, what month will you go. You said that you you kindly. Did sister look to you as she always used to look. Did you hear Tory and Chip play on the piano. Sister told me in her letter that they played so well, I am afraid they will make me blush when I see them I am trying to make this letter worth its postage. Culloden is very dull, therefore no news of importance, but that it is very sickly. Write soon to your affectionate sister Josephine

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Monticello March 29 th 51 You r very interesting letter my dear Burton which I received on yesterday merits a response immediately and I am determined that tomorrows mail shall not leave without my letter I meet with so many interruptions that frequently my letters are not sent for a w eek after they are commenced but I was truly delighted to hear from you & rejoiced to hear that your health was so good It is indeed a great blessing. It enables us to enjoy the luxuries of life & we know not how to appreciate it until deprived of it. Well well Burton you are again at old Yale I hope you are improving these golden moments. They are indeed precious Perhaps you may not think so now, but retrospect will teach you. Nothing has transpired since you left Page 2 I have been home only twice. Mama f elt your absence very much. Father got mad some time ago & sent Henry to the plantation & hired Deborah to Mrs. Rogers for 48 dollars a month I have heard nothing of the crops only through Stephen who says there is a fine foundation for an excellent crop i f the season is only favorable. The negros are healthy The weather has been exceedingly warm & disagreeable but today the temperature has been refreshed by continual showers And so you are pleased with Jacksonville The situation is truly a delightful one commanding a view from a beautiful sheet of water Had we only of known of your destination before hand [sic] I might have given you letters of introduction to some of my acquaintances and you could have spent your time so much pleasanter I should think t he land route would be much more desirable than by sea There is now ___ of scenery Your letter was indeed a treat as it carried me back to my school days The home of Sophia Hull has a thousand pleasant memories connected with it & so you like Sophia_ I am truly delighted to hear it She used to be a great favorite of mine. I suppose you will of course see her when you visit New York, do give her Page 3 Mother and self many warm remembrances for me We hear quite frequently from Anita she is enjoying hers elf very much We expect her home next month. She is going North with Father and Mama in July. I received a letter from Anita last mail & answered it immediately I think she had been gone from home two months before a line was sent to us & Mama in the meant ime received five letters She did not according to promise write to me I was anxiously awaiting her letter from mail to mail & finally it came filled with admiration for Jenny Lind. I suppose we shall have no ___ when Anita returns. The same routine of mon otony exists in Monticello. The children still go to school & are very studious. They speak often of their dear brother & I think they have written to Josephine we hear from her quite often I am now writing her a letter. She is anxious to go North I am in hopes Mama will not have Josephine with Miss Havens Expense is the only objection I have with Miss H_ her mode of instruction and her regulation could not be otherwise than admired. I have weaned little B without any great deal of trouble It was much more of a trial to me than to B & I feel it more because he scarcely notices me. He is perfectly devoted to his father wants to go wherever he goes. If you had only Page 4 been here I am sure his affection would have been divided. He is becoming more and more i nteresting daily Mr. Stephens has not left our place but will do so next week. There is a great deal to be done in the way of repairing which will take some two months & as it will be rather late before Father leaves we shall be under the necessity of send ing to Taylor & Rich & if you are in the city when they receive our communication do go around with them & select neat & pretty furniture but not expensive. I intend leaving my silver for Father to purchase. Miss McGehee and Miss ___ visited Mama last week they spent some days in Monticello. I was very

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) much pleased with them. Uncle Bailey has been extremely ill but I believe is recovering Cousin Margaret is as usual. The last time I was at home Cousin John came over and spent several days Father and himself hunted but without success_ None of them even killed a deer but Mr. Smith. Mama has been complaining that her larder is quite deficient owing to Mr. Smith not hunting We have heard nothing of Mr. ___ & now Burton I am at the end of my page do write to me and rest assured that I shall keep up this situation to answer your letters immediately. I forgot to say I am glad to hear that you are having your portrait taken but I sadly fear the artist is imposing on you as regards the price as it is a very imperfect likeness of B. If he succeeds when it comes home I will get Mr. Freeland to paint one for myself Mr. Smith desires his warmest remembrances to you Write soon a kiss from B with much love from your affectionate Sister Sarah

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Not e: This letter was in very bad condition and difficult to read. th April 1851 My beloved Son, I received by last mail your kind letter and feel that I have been truly very remiss in not having written you ere this, but your own reason is the true one, nevertheless you will say no news is good news_ when I impart the painful and melancholy event that has brought me to this most triumphant victory over death_ She died of an attack of pneumonia_ She desired to see me_ company of Cousin Clarasy the satisfaction of attending the last kind act that affection and friendship could prompt_ She gave herself exclusively up to her God the last [cut off] hours of her life_ She made her will I do not know the contents only she has bequeathed to you $500_ Her earnest desire was to see you and told John to t ell her dear Bubba Goodbye and to try and meet her in Heaven_ such an appeal I pray Page 2 will not pass unheeded by you_ Youth is the time to learn to serve the Lord and could you have witnessed her resignation and piety you would cultivate that talent t hat insures the greatest reward offered to man the attainment of heaven_ She shouted and praised God with her last breath praying all she knew to meet her in heaven_ Mrs. Taylor is to take her two oldest girls and her Mother the two youngest_ Mr. Simpki ns I expect will take charge of the plantation_ She took leave of her children several times_ it was her greatest struggle to give these up_ She is to be buried tomorrow_ Sarah and the twins have also been here_ She died in friendship to everybody_ The ch ildren are not satisfied to go to their relatives but want Cousin Burton to take care of them_ Will you be surprised to hear that your Uncle Bailey is to be married sometime next month to Mrs. Eliza Reid!!! He has been quite sick again, and so unwell as no t to have been able to visit Emily during her illness_ Your cousins do not like it but are becoming more reconciled She is an excellent lady in my estimation Page 3 I received long letters from Phine last week she is well and I hope doing well_ Anita i s so lost in pleasure that I have not received a line from her in a month_ George has proved himself a himself with ammunition for his own sport_ many other acts s how his dishonesty_ William intends selling him_ So you see I am without a house servant which is a trial to me_ We have a very flourishing garden and seasons are prosperous to farmers_ You must [torn off] William and he will give plantation [torn] I have received an affectionate letter from your Grandpa H_ He desires his kind [torn] to you_ I suppose Sarah has written you and given you the Monticello news, weaning be his being sick etc I have never felt so lonely in my life as I have since you left me_ A las! poor me_ Nancy has a girl born 6 th training of your mother and renew the daily practice of prayer as the first step to pre ferment and honor Your mother my pen and ink are both wretched Eliza A. B Note: The following was written on the outside of the envelope:

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Dear Burton, I wrote you the two last mails and again address you But may not be the harbinger of bad news as I make no doubt you were this advised from some other Correspondent of the termination of your Aunt Emily destiny in this world. Burton I may never myself live to see you but you know what I requested of you to do as a B rothers part by the children of your Uncle William this I know you will ever do. You did not ask my reason for my making the request Let this suffice I once asked the father of those children a favor he granted it and evinced to me the part of a sincere friend. Can I forget it, never, but I saw a coolness an estrangement take place among those who should be united by the closest ties not only of consanguinity but of love and I was truly sorry Yet I hope the grave will obliterate every feeling of enmity an d the Orphans will forever find a friend in those who remain. attended her most assiduously during her last moments has been quite sick But I hope he will soon recover we re but the physical powers of that young man competent to keep pace with his mental abilities Yea very few in Florida could compete with him in these qualities which constitute the true gentlemen I cannot say to know him is to love him but I can say that h e is one of those whose esteem we covet and whose friendship is a boon worth the acquisition cost what it may. I saw him on Page 2 Monday last he was reading a letter from your Sister Miss Josephine in which she said she was well. I was favored with the pe rusal of your last letter to your Mother the intimacies you therein expressed are but in accordance with those which pervade the breast of every true Southern and if the Halls of Newhaven [sic] College are to become Abolition lecture rooms the sooner you bid them adieu the better. I am sure to be lectured to by the dupes of foreign emissaries and wily demagogues must be disagreeable but such men are worthy of our pity and contempt than any y that they are entirely ___ of and I make no doubt that many are much better judges of the quantity and quality of palm oil necessary to grease the wheels of an abolition free soil agitated ___those whose cause they advocate Note: This page is too difficu lt to finish because the language pertains to the times plus parts of words are missing in the left hand margin. It is about the evils of the abolitionists at Yale and continues to urge Burton to leave such a place. It also tells of the religion of the Blo ody Hand Page 3 Note: The first part of page three seems to defend slavery, but has a large tear in it. The bottom of this page tells and the weather in the area, and about a slave named George, who has stolen also writes about a very bad servant named George. They are possibly the same one. Page four has a large hol e in it and is difficult to read. Note: P. K. Baillie was possibly the Kar Baillie who wrote an earlier letter to Burton. The letter

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A University of Florida Project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Barhamville March 18, 185 4 My dear Sister I had no idea that so long a time would have elapsed after the reception of your kind and interesting epistle before I would have found a leisure moment to respond. Sister and myself were sixteen last night. We were vaccinated about two weeks ago Sisters took but mine did not so I was vaccinated again today, but I do not think it will take. I have heard nothing of the smallpox lately but when Father was in here to see us he told us we ought to be vaccinated and as the Dr was doing so to m Page 2 in our room the other night which caused quite a sensation. Sister got on the bed and began to told her that Sister was only singing she said she did not call that singing. Sister then told her it was operatic and at that she went back to her room. She is very kind to us indeed. I received a letter from Mrs. ___ she asked me to send her my daguerreotype small enough for a breastpin. Ask Brother Burton if I cannot have it taken in one and send it to her she took so much interest in me when I went to school to her that I want to send her a present. We are invited to go to one of the girls homes and as it o n Friday Mrs. Marks wishes us to go very much. We are going I expect. Ask mother if we must get our summer dresses here. You must be sure to write Page 3 soon and let us know. It is getting very warm and most of our dresses we got in New York are so small Monticello but I do not know who sent it I cannot recognize the hand writing. Tell Sister Anita she has keped [sic] her promise very well. Every morning after school we go out and walk with the teachers and gather all kind of flowers but not such a variety as my dear sweet Florida affords. Do you think we will go home in the summer? I am so anxious to see you all. There are in Columbia some beautiful silks only 75 cts a yd they are indeed very cheap as they are very thick. Miss Gordon is so kind and good to us she thinks the world of you, she always inquires after you and sent her love. Does Sister come to see you all often? Tell her she owes me a letter. I must Page 4 clos e my dearest sister as I am getting so sleepy that I am afraid you will not be able to read this if I continue. Give my love to my dearest mother, Father, brother and sisters and kiss all the children for me Cousin and Sister join with me in love to all of you. Do write me soon for it is one of my greatest pleasures. I remain Your affectionate Sister Victoria Bellamy Note: Victoria Bellamy wrote this letter to one of her sisters, probably Josephine. She and her twin sister Theodosia are stu dents at Barhamville Female Institute near Columbia, South Carolina. Today, Barhamville is part of Columbia.