A Graduate Conducting Recital

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Title:
A Graduate Conducting Recital
Physical Description:
Project in lieu of thesis
Language:
English
Creator:
Eberly, Kimberly Renee
Publisher:
College of Fine Arts; University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla
Publication Date:

Notes

Abstract:
This Master of Music Conducting Recital was performed on December 3, 2012 at 2:45pm in the University Auditorium. The program included works from the standard wind band repertoire. The recital was performed by the University of Florida Wind Symphony, and shared with Sameed S. Afghani. The program alternated between works conducted by Sameed Afghani and myself. The opening work of the recital was Karel Husa’s Smetana Fanfare. Written in 1984, the piece was commissioned by the San Diego State University for the 1984 Festival of Music honoring Bedrich Smetana, a Czech composer. The work uses two excerpts from Smetana’s symphonic poem The Wallenstein’s Camp (1859). The instrumentation of the piece is somewhat unique. It calls for three of most woodwinds, plus a bass saxophone, and four parts for both trumpet and trombone. Smetana Fanfare is a fairly short piece, just over three minutes in length. It features very exposed trumpet parts in the opening which grow into a fanfare, followed shortly by a similar fanfare played by low brass. The next piece I conducted was Martin Ellerby’s Paris Sketches. The work is in four movements, and is a personal tribute to the city of Paris. Each movement pays homage to some part of the city. The first movement, titled “Saint-Germain-des Pres” is reminiscent of the Latin Quarter famous for artistic associations and bohemian lifestyle. The second movement, “Pigalle”, is a fast-paced balletic scherzo, whereas the third movement, “Pere Lachaise” is a hauntingly slow and beautiful homage to the city’s largest cemetery. The end of this movement quotes the Dies Irae. The fourth and final movement, “Les Halles” is a bustling representation of the old market area with the same name. The final work I conducted was Eric Ewazen’s A Hymn for the Lost and the Living. This work was written in memory of the heart-breaking events that happened on September 11, 2001. Through this piece, Ewazen recounted the events he experienced in New York City during the days following this catastrophe. The work begins slowly and quietly, bringing to mind the solemnity of the silent people walking on the streets. Ewazen develops the slow theme, adding to the orchestration little by little, representing the growing memorials of lost citizens, friends, and family that began to line the streets. As the work goes on, the theme is transformed as more and more instruments join the orchestration. Eventually, the work reaches its climax, representing the transformation of individuals to a community of citizens leaning on each other for strength and support. The work quietly slows to an end, similar to how it started. A Hymn for the Lost and the Living is meant to be “a memorial for those lost souls, gone from this life, but who are forever treasured in our memories.”
General Note:
Instrumental Conducting terminal project

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00016994:00001


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1 A GRADUATE CONDUCTING RECITAL By KIMBERLY RENEE EBERLY SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE David Waybright, Chair Leslie Odom, Member A PROJECT IN LIEU OF THESIS PRESENTED TO THE COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF MUSIC UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 2013

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2 Summary of Performance Option in Lieu of Thesis Presented to the C ollege of Fine Arts of the University of Florida in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Music A GRADUATE CONDUCTING RECITAL By Kimberly Renee Eberly May 2013 Chair: Dr. David Waybright Major: Music This Master of Music Conducting Recital was performed on December 3, 2012 at 2:45pm in the University Auditorium. The program included works from the standard wind band repertoire. The recital was performed by the University of Florida Wind Symphony, and s hared with Sameed S. Afghani. The program alternated between works conducted by Sameed Afghani and myself. Smetana Fanfare Written in 1984, the piece was commissioned by the San Diego State University for the 1984 Festival of Music symphonic poem (1859). The instrumentation of the piece is somewhat unique. It calls for three of most woodwinds, pl us a bass saxophone, and four parts for both trumpet and trombone. Smetana Fanfare is a fairly short piece, just over three minutes in length. It features very exposed trumpet parts in the opening which grow into a fanfare, followed shortly by a similar fanfare played by low brass.

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3 Paris Sketches The work is in four movements, and is a personal tribute to the city of Paris. Each movement pays homage to some part of the city. The first movement, titled aint Germain des Pr Quarter famous for artistic associations and bohemian lifestyle. The second movement, hauntingly slow and beau quotes the Dies Irae of the old market area with the same name. A Hymn for the Lost and the Living This work was written in memory of the heart breaking events that happened on September 11, 2001. Through this piece, Ewazen recounted the events he experienced in New York City during the days following this catastrophe The work begins slowly and quietly, bringing to mind the solemnity of the silent people walking on the streets. Ewazen develops the slow theme, adding to the orchestration little by little, representing the growing memorials of lost citizens, friends, and family that began to line the streets. As the work goes on, the theme is transformed as more and more instruments join the orchestration. Eventually, the work reaches its climax, representing the transformation of individuals to a community of citize ns leaning on each other for strength and support. The work quietly slows to an end, similar to how it started. A Hymn for the Lost and the Living but who are forever treasured in our

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4 A Graduate Conducting Recital Kimberly Renee Eberly, Conductor Sameed S. Afghani, Conductor Program *Smetana Fanfare Karel Husa (b. 1921) Trauersinfonie Richard Wagner (1813 1883) Rev. Erik Leidzen *Pa ris Sketches Martin Ellerby (b. 1957) I. Saint Germain de Pr s II. Pigalle III. P re Lachaise IV. Les Halles Spiel Ernst Toch (1887 1964) I. Ouverture II. Idyll III. Buffo *A Hymn for the Lost and the Living Eric Ewazen (b.1954) Ill yrian Dances Guy Woolfenden (b. 1937) I. Rondeau II. Aubade III. Gigue Denotes piece conducted by Kimberly Renee Eberly

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5 Smetana Fanfare Born August 7, 1921 in Prague, Karel Husa is an American composer and conductor of Czech birth. His early musical training consisted of lessons on piano and violin, after which he studied composition and conducting at the Prague Conservatory from 1941 1945. His composition teacher was Jaroslav Vclav Talich. In 1943, while still a student at the conservatory, Husa composed his first published piece, a sonatina for piano. After completing studies in Prague, Husa attended the cole Normale de Musique in Paris (1946 1951), where he continued to study both composition, with Honegger, and conducting, with Fournet. Upon completing schooling here, he then continued his studies in conducting at the Paris Conservatoire with Eugne Bigot. He also took private lessons with Boulanger and Cluytens. In 1954, five years prior to becoming an American citizen, Husa was appointed as Kappa Alpha Professor of Music at Cornell University, teaching composition, conducting, and orchestration until his retirement in 1992. Throughout his lifetime, Husa has been awarded two Guggenheim Fellowships (1964, 1965), the Pulitzer Prize (1969), the Friedheim Award of the Kennedy Center (1983) and the Grawemeyer Award (1993). al, with characteristic driving rhythms and dramaticism. He explored serial techniques in pieces such as The Pome (1959) and Mosaques (1961), and extended instrumental sonorities in Concerto for Alto Saxophone and Concert Band (1967), String Quartet No. 3 (1968), and Violin Sonata (1973). However, Husa is well known for his pow erful compositions that combine invention and emotional depth to reflect his own views of political, ethical, and humanitarian issues. Included in this category are his main work s for band, Music for Prague (1968) and Apotheosis of this Earth (1971), as well as his ballet The Trojan Women (1981).

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6 Smetana Fanfare (1984) was commissioned by San Diego State University for the 1984 Festival of Music honoring Bed ich Smetana (1824 1884 ) Czech composer most well known for his opera, The Bartered Bride Smetana Fanfare was premiered at the festival on April 3, 1984 death. The work uses two exact Camp (1859), shown below. ( Fig 1. Beginning of Smetana Fanfare quotation of )

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7 ( Fig 2. M. 58 60 of Smetana Fanfare quotation from ) The instrumentation of the piece is somewhat unique. It calls for three of most woodwinds, plus a bass saxophone, and four parts for both trumpet and trombone. Smetana Fanfare is a fairly short piece, just over three minutes in length, however i t fea ture s a great deal of exposed brass sections which make it incredibly difficult. As shown in Figure 1 above, the opening consists of individual trumpet notes which grow into a driving, triplet based fanfare, s. This fanfare eventually gives way to a similar excerpt played by the low brass and horns. Woodwinds act primarily as a driving force throughout the piece with repeated triplet rhythmic patterns. This piece was chosen for performance because of its dy namic and energetic nature as well as its difficulty level. The fanfare challenged not only brass players to play with accuracy and blend, but also woodwind players to play precise rhythms without pushing the time. Paris Sketches Martin Ellerby was born in 1957 in Worksop, England a Nottinghamshire township. At a young age, Ellerby became interested in music through listening to various recordings of Mozart, Bach, Handel, and Brahms. He also noted Benjamin Britten, English composer, as an early influenc e in his affinity for music. Ellerby began composing short piano pieces at the age of sixteen, culminating in fifty some short works. However, in order to qualify for music school, Ellerby was required to show proficiency on piano and another primary inst rument. He began

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8 studying trumpet and eventually joined a local brass band for pleasure. Shortly after, in 1976, Ellerby began studies at the London College of Music. Unlike many of his classmates, Ellerby had ambitions of becoming a composer, rather tha n a music educator. As a result, he took private lessons in music theory to broaden his musical understanding. Upon graduating from the London College, Ellerby sought out Joseph Horovitz to teach him composition. This required him to do one year of stud y at the Royal College of Music, where he focused on composition and electronic music. During this year, Ellerby received the Allcard Award, which allowed him funds to study privately with Wilf red Josephs. He eventually moved back to London, where he was appointed adjunct professor at the London College of Music, teaching keyboard harmony, counterpoint, orchestration, and a few private composition lessons; he was later appointed as Head of Comp osition and Contemporary Music. Ellerby now works as Artistic Director of Studio Music (based in London) out of his home in Manchester, England. Paris Sketches (1994, rev. 2004) was commissioned under the backings of the BASBWE Consortium Commissioning S cheme with funds provided by: BASBWE, Bell Baxter High School, Bodmin Community College, Cleveland Youth Wind Orchestra, Hemel Hempstead High School, Northern Arts, Richmond School, Scottish Arts, South West Arts, Springwood High School, and Yorkshire & Hu mberside Arts. It was premiered on July 26, 1994 by the Cleveland Youth Wind Orchestra under the direction of John MacKenzie at the Ripon Cathedral. The four movements of the work derive their names from four distinct districts found in Paris, France. E llerby makes the following notes in the score: This is my personal tribute to a city I love, and each movement pays homage to some part of the French capital and to other composers who lived, worked or passed through rather as did Ravel in his own tribute to an earlier master in Le Tombeau de Coupein Running like a unifying thread through the whole piece is the idea of bells a prominent feature of Paris life.

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9 Saint Germain de Pr s the Latin Quarter famous for artistic associations and Bohemian lifestyle. This is a dawn tableau haunted by the shade of Rave: the city awakens with the ever present sound of morning bells. Pigalle The Soho of Paris. This is a burlesque with scenes cast in the mould of a balletic scherzo meet s figuration of the opening. The bells here are car horns and police sirens! P re Lachaise This Gymnopedies themselves a t r ibute to a still more distant past is affectionately evoked before the movement concludes with a quo tation of the Dies Irae softness and delicacy, which I have attempted to match with more transparent orchestration. The bells are gentle, nostalgic, wistful. Les Halles A bustling finale; the bel ls triumphant and celebratory. Les Halles is (?are) in the old market area, a Parisian Covent Garden and, like Pigalle this is a series of related but contrasted episodes. The climax Te Deum which was first performed in 1855 at th e church of St. Eustache actually in the district of Les Halles. A gradual crescendo initiated by the percussion prefaces the material proper, and the work ends with a backward glance at the first movement before closing with the final bars of the Berlioz Te Deum The first movement of Paris Sketches Germain des Pr which the theme is almost always present. It begins in the horns in the first three measures, then moves to the trumpets in measures six and seven, where the theme is already varied by diminution. Beginning in measure fourteen, the theme is successively presented in a canon by the horns, trombones, trumpets, and upper woodwinds. This theme is ever present throughout the entire movement, constantly being va ried and passed through the ensemble. in the B section. The A section be gins at measure twenty three, after a lengthy introduction alluding to the themes. The first theme is presented in the upper woodwinds and trumpets. Each

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10 instrument plays a segment of the theme for one measure before passing it on. Figure 3 shows the th eme in full. ( Figure 3. Theme 1, measures 25 32, Movement 2, Paris Sketches) They can be seen in measures fifty four and fifty seven of this movement, played by th e brass and a few woodwinds. The most important aspects of this movement are the imitative passing of the theme and the startling car horn motives. Paris Sketches is the slow movement of the work, representing the c the theme throughout several solo instruments. Beginning with the alto saxophone, the theme then moves to the oboe, flute, and a return to both alto saxophone and oboe. Measure eig hty two soldiers buried at the cemetery. This is followed immediately by tubular bells and glockenspiel playing the Dies Irae motive, somewhat masked by t he texture. The movement comes to a close with two more statements of the theme by the tenor saxophone and alto saxophone. market district of Paris. The form is similar to sonata form however rather than a recapitulation,

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11 Te Deum before the coda bringing the movement to an exciting end. The movement begins with a fanfare presented by the horns, then trumpets, followed finally by trombones. The f anfare continues until measure sixteen brings a change in mood. Here, there is almost a Rossini like influence featuring light woodwinds and a duet between Clarinet 1 and 2. Te Deum at measure ninety five after a dramatic rallent ando into a tempo change. Berlioz is quoted not only because of his significance in Paris, but also because Te Deum was premiered in the Les Halles district of Paris at the church of St. Eustache. The main fanfare theme returns at measure 121, after a pe rcussion soli. This leads to the coda which brings the piece to a bustling and energetic end. Paris Sketches was chosen for performance due to its difficulty level, diverse moods evoked, and historical significance. Rehearsing the piece taught the ensemble about these four major areas of Paris and their musical significance. Paris Sketches was difficult for performers and conductor alike, and took much rehearsal and individual practice to successfully perform. A Hymn for the Lost and th e Living American composer, Eric Ewazen was born on March 1, 1954 in Cleveland, Ohio. He attended school at both the Eastman School of Music and The Juilliard School, where he earned h some of the most well known composers of his time including Samuel Adler, Milton Babbitt, Warren Benson, and Joseph Schwantner In addition, he spent some time at Tanglewood, where he studied with Gunther Schuller. Beginning in 1980, Ewazen was appointed faculty at The Juilliard School, where he continues to teach today. His music has become well known among brass players, and it has been performed a number of times by the brass sections of large orchestras including the

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12 Berlin Philharmonic Cleveland Orche stra, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, New York Philharmonic Orchestra and the Philadelphia Orchestra A Hymn for the Lost and the Living wing program notes which describe his inspiration for the work: On September 11, 2001, I was teaching my music theory class at The Juilliard School, when we were notified of the catastrophe that was occurring several miles south of us in Manhattan. Gather heard the events unfold in shock and disbelief. Afterwards, walking up Broadway on the sun filled day, the street was full of silent people, all quickly heading to their homes. During the next several days, our great city became a landscape of empty streets and impromptu, heartbreaking memorials mourning our lost citizens, friends, and family. But then on Friday, a few days later, the city seemed to have been transformed. On this evening, walking up Broadwa y, I saw multitudes of people holding candles, singing songs, and gathering in front of those memorials, paying tribute to the lost, becoming a community of citizens of this city, of this country and of this world, leaning on each other for strength and su pport. A Hymn for the Lost and the Living portrays those painful days following September 11 th days of supreme sadness. It is intended to be a memorial for those lost souls, gone from this life, but who are forever treasured in our memories. The work w as commissioned by, and is dedicated to, the United States Air Force Heritage of America Band at the Langley Air Force Base in Virginia, under direction of Major Larry H. Lang. It begins with a solemn trumpet solo, reminiscent of a bugle call, then hands the melodic line to the clarinets with bassoon accompaniment. The transparency of this opening theme likely is meant to represent the feelings of isolation and disbelief that filled the souls of the citizens on September 11. Ewazen makes good use of sile nce to build tension and emotion. As the piece progresses, tension builds not only through silence but also with the use of dynamic shading and thickening of the orchestration. Upon reaching measure seventy three after a dramatic crescendo, there is a ch implying for the notes to be connected. At this point, the conductor may choose to slightly

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13 increase the tempo to build more tension and emotion. This climax eventually dies away and leads in to s omewhat of a recapitulation. Measure 121 brings a return of solemn trumpet calls, this time muted and somewhat distant. The addition of chimes at this point in the piece could be representative of church bells honoring the fallen. A Hymn for the Lost and the Living was chosen for performance because of its use of emotion and historical significant. The piece is meant to be a memorial to the fallen on September 11, 2001, and in order to convey the mournful nature of the piece, the conductor and musicians are required to perform with emotion and thought. Though not technically difficult, the A Hymn for the Lost and the Living presents challenges of musicality.

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14 REFERENCES Adams, Byron. Oxford Music Online Oxford University Press, accessed April 7, 2013, http://www.oxfordmusiconline.com Mathews, Jeffrey C. (2006). Martin Ellerby: A Biographical Sketch of the Composer and Descriptive Analysis of Paris Sketches and Symphony for Winds (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from ProQuest Dissertations and Theses. (UMI No. 3225226). Ladd, Jason S. (2009). An Annotated Bibliography of Contemporary Works Programmable by Wind Band and Orchestra (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from ProQuest Dissertations and Theses. (UMI No. 3385327).

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15 A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH Kimberly Eberly is finishing her second year of study for the Instrumental Conducting at the University of Florida. She is a native of Michigan, receiving her Bachelor of Music Education from Grand Valley State Unive rsity (2011) and graduating with Magna Cum Laude honors. An established trumpet player, Mrs. Eberly has performed numerous times at the National Trumpet Competition, including a 2010 third place finish in the trumpet ensemble division. She is an active fre elancer i n Gainesville and Jacksonville and has performed with the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra, as well as numerous chamber groups in the area. Making her professional conducting debut, Eberly conducted the Jacksonville Symphony brass section at a nat ionally has also conducted programs for the Jenison Public Schools (Jenison, MI) and the University of Florida Symphonic Band. In addition to conducting, Mrs. Eberly has also worked as a staf f member for the University of Florida Gator Marching Band and the marching bands of Grosse Ile High School, Allegan High School, Jenison High School, and Wayland High School. As a graduate assistant at the University of Florida, Mrs. Eberly was head libra rian for the bands, director for the volleyball pep band, conducting mentor for undergraduates, and a member of the University of Florida Wind Symphony and Symphonic Brass affiliations include the Florida Bandmasters Association Florida Music Educators Association, National Association for Music Education, and the International Trumpet Guild. In March 2013, Mrs. Eberly was awarded as the University of Florida School of Outstanding Graduate Student, an honor bestowed to only one graduate student each year. In addition, she has been invited to audition as a finalist for conductor of both the United States