Citation
Charlotte sun herald

Material Information

Title:
Charlotte sun herald
Uniform Title:
Charlotte sun herald (Charlotte Harbor, Fla. : 1995)
Running title:
Sun herald
Place of Publication:
Charlotte Harbor, FL
Publisher:
Sun Coast Media Group- Robert E. Lee - Publisher - Jim Gouvellis - Executive Editor
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Charlotte Harbor (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Charlotte County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Charlotte -- Port Charlotte
Coordinates:
26.966141 x -82.068026

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued on microfilm from Crest Technologies.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 103, no. 225 (Aug. 13, 1995)-
General Note:
"An edition of The Sun Herald."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
36852667 ( OCLC )
sn 97027762 ( LCCN )
ocm36852667

Related Items

Related Item:
DeSoto sun herald
Related Item:
Englewood sun herald
Related Item:
North Port sun herald
Preceded by:
Sun herald (Charlotte Harbor, Fla. : Charlotte ed.)

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Digital Newspaper Library

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Full Text

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By JOHN HACKWORTHCOMMENTARY EDITORArmy 1st Lt. Jason S. Hunt surveyed the French skies as he and four fellow pilots accompanied an American observation machine on Aug. 1, 1918. The 24-year-old pilots job was to protect the observer from German planes as it photographed the enemyheld terrain. All went well, until they turned for home, believing their mission complete. Twenty German planes swept out of the skies and opened “re on the “ve American aircraft. No one knows the exact fate of Hunt, but he and three other pilots never returned from that mission. Army records only state he was missing in action, but presumed he died instantly when hit by enemy “re. His family never learned the details of the “re “ght and was never able to pinpoint the place where he perished. The only recognition, until Friday, was the name of 1st Lt. Jason S. Hunt inscribed on a wall of the chapel in the Aisne-Marne American Cemetery and memorial in Belleau, Picardie, France. He never knew he earned a Purple Heart. On Friday, at Pershing Park in Washi ngton, D.C., Hunts nephew, Howard Scott of Englewood, his wife Karin, and two of Hunts great-nieces, received that Purple Heart. It was one of four awarded by the Purple Hearts Reunited nonpro“t in conjunction with the United States World War One Centennial Commission to veterans who never returned from battle. It was an impressive and emotional day for us,Ž Scott said. It was a very moving ceremony.Ž Scott, 79, had reached out to the Purple Heart Reunited organization after reading about families receiving Purple Hearts awarded to deceased veterans. After some research, he was contacted and told he would be among the descendants of Purple Heart veterans to receive the award in Fridays ceremony. It provided some closure for our family,Ž he said. My aunts and uncles had told stories and talked about my uncle for years. This means so much to seventy-some living relatives and all the greatand great-great nieces and nephews who could not come today, many of them because CHARLOTTE SUNVETERANS DAY COVERAGE INSIDE OUR TOWN SECTION€ Veterans Day events happening today ................................... page 3 € Veteran returns to Vietnam 50 years later .............................. page 9 € Why employers like hiring vets .................................................. page 4 € Englewood kids salute veterans ................................................ page 2 € Veterans Park getting more renovations ................................ page 10 FIRES BLAZE ON 2 ENDS OF CALIFORNIA, KILL 11Fatigued firefighters worked to evacuate residents and contain blazes that already have claimed at least 11 lives, and destroye d thousands of homes and other structures. See The News Wire Vol. 126 | Issue No. 315 www.yoursun.com AMERICAS BEST COMMUNITY DAILY $3.00 AN EDITION OF THE SUNSunday, November 11, 2018High 86 Low 70Partly sunnyPulitzer Prize winner2016 CHARLIE SAYSThank you, Veterans!CALL US ATFIND US ONLINE941-206-1000www.yoursun.comTHE SUNViewpoint ...........8 Opinion ...............9 Calendar ............10 Family Album ....10OUR TOWNLocal News .....1-12 Obituaries ...........8 Police Beat ..........7NEWS WIREComics/Puzzles ....5-7 Nation .................3 World ..................2SPORTSLocal Sports ........3 Lottery ................2 Sports on TV ........2 Weather ..............8INDEX SUNDAY EDITION $3.00 705252000753100 years later, family receives Purple Heart AP PHOTO BY KEVIN WOLFHoward Scott, left, a nephew of World War I veteran Jason Scott, is presented a plaque during the medals-return ceremony hosted by Purple Hearts Reunited on Friday, in Washington, D.C. The descendants are joined by sta of Purple Hearts Reunited and the U.S. World War I C entennial Commission, who co-hosted the event. The event was held at Pershing Park, site of the new National World War I Memorial. HEART | 4By ANNE EASKERSTAFF WRITERLast week, a Port Charlotte woman stabbed her boyfriend to death after hed been drinking. In her statement to Charlotte County Sheriffs Of“ce deputies, she said he was often abusive when intoxicated. Detective Bill Prummell said the boyfriend had been arrested, but the cases had never been prosecuted. That case is an example of exactly what the Sheriffs Of“ce hopes to prevent by creating a new Domestic Violence Unit, in which Prummell serves as the detective. With my position, specifically being able to help the state strengthen a case or assist them, or with the assistance of our advocate being able to get involved and offer the family, or this couple, services, that could have been prevented,Ž he said. Ashley Britto, 33, was charged with second-degree murder a week ago for fatally stabbing her boyfriend, Justin Burton, 35, in a home on Lakeview Boulevard in Port Charlotte. The unit is made up of Prummell, along with Intelligence Analyst Brett Armstead, and Domestic Violence Advocate Chelsea P., who works with CCSO through the Center for Abuse and Rape Emergencies (C.A.R.E.). Chelseas last name was not released to the Sun per C.A.R.E. policy. The unit is supervised by Cpl. Dustin Paille. So far, the team has spent one month tracking domestic violence offenders and rendering aid to domestic violence victims throughout the county. In regard to the murder, Prummell said looking back, it seems alcohol was a huge factor in the couples domestic disputes. If theres some type of counseling C.A.R.E. could have offered in regards to alcohol, or if prosecution had gone through (on past cases) and then after the fact, in the court system, there Was couples fatal dispute preventable?New domestic violence unit aims to intervene earlyFATAL | 4By STEVE BOUSQUEST & ELIZABETH KOHTAMPA BAY TIMESFlorida ordered mandatory machine recounts in three statewide elections Saturday for the “rst time in state history. Secretary of State Ken Detzner issued a one-page order directing all 67 counties to conduct a machine recount of more than 8.2 million combined ballots over the next “ve days in the races for governor, U.S. Senator and commissioner of agriculture. The state placed a machine recount indicatedŽ banner in red letters below the “rst unof“cial returns in all three races. Republican Ron DeSantis led Democrat Andrew Gillum in the race for governor by 0.41 percent (33,684 votes). Republican Rick Scott led Democrat Bill Nelson in the Senate race by 0.15 percent (12,562). Democrat Nikki Fried led Republican Matt Caldwell in the agriculture commissioner race by 0.18 percent (5,326 votes). Detzner also ordered machine recounts in razor-close contests for a Tampa state Senate seat and for House seats in Volusia and Palm Beach counties. All machine recounts must be completed by 3 p.m. next Thursday. Detzner will then order manual recounts if two candidates in any race are separated by .25 percent or less, and if the total number of undervotes and overvotes in any race is greater than the separation between the two candidates in a race. Shortly after the recounts were ordered, the political The recount begins State orders machine recounts; Gillum withdraws concession GILLUMDESANTISRECOUNTS | 4Honor brings closure to more than 70 living relatives

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Page 2 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 SUBSCRIPTIONS Home Delivery Rates: Newspaper designated market: City ZoneCarrier home delivered 7 days. Rates as follows plus 7% Florida Sales Tax: Monthly Bank/ Credit Card ......................$40.50 3 Months .......................$121.50 6 Months .......................$243.00 1 Year ...........................$485.99Does not include Waterline and TV Times. Effective May 18, you can add the TV Times or Waterline for an additional monthly charge of $1.00 each. Above rates do not include sales tax.Subscribers residing in outlying areas may incur additional delivery charge. Mail subscription rates: Rates as follows (advance payment required): 7 Days 3 Months 6 Months 1 Year $154.07 $276.35 $492.11 Sunday Only 3 Months 6 Months 1 Year $71.89 $144.61 $243.54Above rates do not include sales tax.Single Copy rates Daily $1.50 Sunday $3.00 Unclaimed account balances under $10, inactive for 15 months, will be used to purchase newspapers for classroom use. Sun Newspapers CUSTOMER SERVICE POLICY Delivery should be expected prior to 6:30 a.m. Monday through Saturday and 7 a.m. Sunday. Redelivery hours: 6:30 a.m. to 9 a.m. Monday through Saturday and 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Customer Service hours: 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday Friday; Saturday 7a.m. to 9:30 a.m.; and Sunday 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. Call Customer Service for our current specials. To subscribe or to report any problems with your service, please call or visit your local office. Charlotte: 941-206-1300 23170 Harborview Road, Port Charlotte Englewood: 941-681-3000 120 W. Dearborn St., Englewood North Port: 941-429-3000 13487 Tamiami Trail, North Port DeSoto: 863-494-0300 or toll-free at 877-818-6204 108 S. Polk Avenue, Arcadia LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWSBy BETSY CALVERTSTAFF WRITERAfter “ve years of decline in Charlotte County, real estate foreclosures are showing an increase. The number of foreclosures for 2018 is already higher than 2017 with two months to go, according to reports from the countys Civil Court Department. The number for the year reached 333 at the end of October. In 2017, the total number was 332. Ive seen an uptick,Ž said real estate agent Cynthia Logan, who specializes in foreclosures in this region. Im getting more bank-owned.Ž She also noticed that nearly all her recent foreclosure cases are from reverse mortgages. These are loans that older citizens who own their homes take out against the value of their homes. Usually, the loan can be repaid after they die or leave their home, by the sale of the home. There are a lot of elderly people who took advantage of those reverse mortgages,Ž she said. Reverse mortgages can go into foreclosure if the value of the home does not reach the loan balance, and if owner fails to keep up with costs such as property taxes, according to the Federal National Mortgage Association, or Fannie Mae. Regional economist Christopher Westley said the numbers of foreclosures are still low compared to the catastrophic numbers during the crash. Historically, its still at a pretty low range,Ž said Westely, director of Florida Gulf Coast Universitys Regional Economic Research Institute. Theres not a lot to read into that ƒ Its lower (foreclosures) than it was at the same point of the previous expansion.Ž Foreclosures reached a high in Charlotte County in 2012 at 2,100 foreclosures. The number ramped up following the 2008 recession. The number has been dropping since 2012 in the county. Logan agreed that the market continues to be good for home sales, despite a slight decline in sale prices for homes in recent months. You cant complain about the market. I feel theres been a little slow down, a pause.Ž Westley also said he does not see any upward trends in reverse mortgage foreclosures. It could just be an outlier,Ž he said, of Logans experience.The years foreclosures already surpass 2017Charlotte County foreclosures often tied to reverse mortgages MEDICARE ADVANTAGE *$0 Rx copay does not apply to all Tiers. **Free gifts without obligation to enroll. One gift card voucher will be provided to each attendee. The voucher provides instructions to redeem a $10 gift card from a selection of merchants online or by phone. Gift card vouchers are available at events through 11/14/18. Gi ft cards must be redeemed by 12/5/18. One Entertainment Saving Spree booklet will be provided free to each attendee. The Entertainment Saving Spree booklet is only available at events through 11/21/18. For accommodation of persons with Receive a $10 gift card and Entertainment coupon booklet for attending a seminar through 11/14/18**Come to a Florida Blue seminar Our licensed agents will walk you through your possibilities BlueMedicareSM Choose a convenient location near you Learn about Call 1-866-216-3615(TTY 1-800-955-8770) Visit us online at FloridaBlueMedicare.com/value Reserve your seat NOW! Get straightforward information about your BlueMedicare options. Sarasota Florida Blue Center 11/14 & 11/15 at 10 AM Sarasota 5999 Cattleridge Blvd 11/13 at 10 AM & 2 PM Sarasota 11/15 at 2 PM Venice 11/20 at 2 PM Venice 11/20 at 10 AM & 2 PM Venice Senior Friendship Centers 2350 Scenic Dr 11/14 at 10 AM & 2 PM Priority Code: B416 indicates a Florida Blue Center Event € € *$10 copay for care doctor visits No referral needed to see a specialist Freedom to see providers both inand out-of-network $0 copay for Tier 1 and Tier 6 prescription drugs at an in-network SilverSneakers Additional hearing and vision coverage BlueMedicare means more valueBlueMedicare means more where you live adno=3612339-1 The SUN (USPS 743170) is published daily at Sun Coast Media Group, Inc., 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980-2100. Periodicals postage paid at Punta Gorda, FL. Postmaster: Please send address changes to the SUN, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, Florida 33980-2100.

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The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 3Hundreds of people showed up Saturday to the Charlotte Sun of“ce and parking lot to see an array of vehicles and tour the newsroom and press.12th annual Collector Car Show & Open House SUN PHOTOS BY LIZ HARDAWAYDave Gehring and his wife had a 1958 Edsel Pacer just like this when he was 19 years old. When an identical car became available “ve years ago, he bought his beloved Taz.Ž The car sports a stued-Tazmanian Devil in the backseat and a license plate asking, Aint I a handsome devil?Ž Its an oddball car,Ž Gehring said. Visitors gathered in the Suns parking lot Saturday morning for the 12th Annual Collector Car Show. One of the two Ferrari vehicles displayed at the 12th annual Collector Car Show Saturday at the Charlotte Sun oce in Charlotte Harbor.The South Gulf Cove Yacht Club held its 17th annual car show Nov. 4. Organizer Ed Kerschke has grown the show over the years. His initial show seven years ago drew 22 cars, and there was no food or drinks. Ed has partnered with Peace River Corvette Club and the Rotonda Cruisers to increase the attendance. This year, the show had a record 76 cars registered, with food, drinks and music with many spectators in attendance.South Gulf Cove Yacht Club brings in the classic cars PHOTOS PROVIDED BY RALPH YOUNG Ed Kerschke, right, has worked over the years to build and improve this show each year. This year he had 20 more cars than in past years. Tom Ireland, right, along with Roger Redman, serve a car show enthusiast, while Dave Zembower looks on. Marla Young likes the color and beautiful interior of the hot rod. Sonny Haack, right, and Jim Keibler discuss several engine additions to this popular hot rod. This eagle soars under the hood of this corvette every day. Dont change your body; just change your bra! If your straps slip, the back rides up, or your bra is just PORT CHARLOTTE TOWN CENTER WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14 10 AM 8 PM BRA FIT EVENT adno=3627856-1 Selected styles. Selection varies by size and store. Call 1-800-345-5273 VETERANS DAY CLEARANCE 40%OFFLADIES SPORTSWEAR NEW REDUCTIONS!40%OFFLADIES DRESSES40%OFFMENS SPORTSWEAR40%OFFLADIES INTIMATE APPAREL & SLEEPWEAR40%OFFFASHION BEDDING40%OFFKIDS SPORTSWEAR30%OFFLADIES HANDBAGS & WALLETS NOW THRU MONDAY, NOVEMBER 12ENTER FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN A $500 LADIES DENIM WARDROBE Try on a pair of ladies jeans and enter for your chance to win. Let our style experts help you select the Code Bleu and others. In store only; see associate for details. Ladies Denim Department. adno=3627857-1LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS

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Page 4 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018FROM PAGE ONEthey are in school.Ž Scott has lived in Englewood about eight years. He grew up in the same Vermont area of his uncle. 1st Lt. Hunt, according to the Army, was a man of unusual character, charm and directness ƒ standing ready always to do not only his part but that part which should exact the greatest sacrifice.Ž Hunt was born Jan. 27, 1894, in Johnson, Vermont, to Bertran A. and Nettie Morse Hunt. In July 1917, he was one of 25 men sent from Plattsburg to Toronto, Canada to take up aviation, according to a press release. From Canada he was sent to Texas to continue his training, where he was officially commissioned 1st Lieutenant in the U.S. Army in February 1918. He was then sent overseas attached to the 27th Squadron, 1st Pursuit Group. I appreciate the efforts of Purple Heart Reunited,Ž Scott said. And I am very pleased that after 100 years (my uncles) contributions have been publicly recognized.ŽHEARTFROM PAGE 1was some type of mandatory counseling, maybe (it could have been prevented),Ž he said. Sheriff Bill Prummell stated in a press release about the new unit the county has had a decrease in many types of crime but assaults and physical violence between subjects who know each other remains consistent. The Domestic Violence Unit will take a more holistic approach to stemming violent crime, and by working with our community partners to provide services to both offenders and victims, we hope to drastically reduce the number of domesticrelated incidents in our community,Ž he said. Grant funding for the unit was provided by the Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence Enhance Law Enforcement Project, which pays for Prummells position, as well as agency-wide training in domestic violence and several certi“cations for American sign language. Prummell said when he heard about the new unit, he was interested in joining in order to take on new role while still working with the same team in the Major Crimes Unit. My main function that Ive been doing thus far is following up on arrests from evening shifts our day prior,Ž he said. The patrolmen essentially make most of these arrests. I work closely with the State Attorneys Of“ce to ensure that they have what they need to go through with prosecution, whether that be monitoring what theyre saying and doing within the jail, or once they get out that theyre abiding by what the judge has put in place like parameters for no contact orders or things like that.Ž His work has led to additional charges for several domestic violence offenders for things like violations of pretrial release. One more intensive investigation led to additional cyberstalking charges for an offender. Armstead has spent his first month on the job reading through a couple thousand reports, in order to establish a base of historical information. He looks out for things like escalating violence, drug and alcohol abuse, and repeat offenders or problem houses. That information is shared with a team so solutions can be identified, such as providing services or making arrests when necessary. Chelsea bridges the gap between CCSO and C.A.R.E., informing victims of services available to them and helping them understand the process. It can be daunting talking to a detective, so Im kind of the mediator in simple terms, if needed,Ž she said. And then just letting the victim know that no matter what happens, no matter what they choose to do, that C.A.R.E. will always be there for them even if its five years down the line or immediate. There are services and theyre not alone in this process, because it can only be horrifying to go through it.Ž Prummell said hes made about a half dozen arrests throughout the month, while Chelsea about 10 victims have engaged with Chelsea for services. A lot of these people in domestic violence situations may not have had someone just reach out to them and say, Hey, listen, were here. Weve got services that we can provide to help you out or to help your situation out,Ž said Lt. Paille. Obviously thats very key in what were doing here.Ž Lt. John Heck said the overall goal of the unit is to reduce the amount of assaults or batteries throughout the county. Having a full time detective and a full time advocate ensures each case gets the full attention it deserves. Obviously the sheriff is big about intervention, to hopefully get to these people and provide the services they need before we get to the point where we need to arrest someone or someone becomes a victim,Ž he said.Email: aeasker@sun-herald.comFATALFROM PAGE 1 SUN PHOTO BY ANNE EASKERAnalyst Brett Armstead, Victim Advocate Chelsea P. and Detective Billy Prummell make up the new Domestic Violence Unit in the Charlotte County Sheris Oce. jockeying began. Scotts campaign spokesman, Chris Hartline, blast emailed a statement that encouraged Nelson to decline a recount. The voters of Florida have spoken and Rick Scott was elected to the United States Senate in a close but decisive victory,Ž Hartline said. The margin of victory is larger than any recount since 2000 has ever closed, with the average recount changing the outcome by just a few hundred votes. Its time for Senator Nelson to accept reality and spare the state of the Florida the time, expense and discord of a recount.Ž That seemed unlikely, considering Nelsons recount attorney tweeted out Detzners order with a hopeful comment that more votes are out there. In a Saturday afternoon press conference, Gillum and his elections lawyer Barry Richard issued yet another call that votes be counted fully after a machine recount was ordered by the Florida Secretary of State. There are still votes that are outstanding,Ž said Gillum, even some uncertainty around the total number of votesŽ left to be accounted for. He called out comments from President Donald Trump, outgoing Gov. Rick Scott and U.S. Sen Marco Rubio, calling for the ending of the counting in this process.Ž In America we count every vote regardless of what the outcome may be,Ž Gillum said. He added some had cited his concession on election night to ending the recount process: I am replacing my words of concession with an uncompromised and unapologetic call that we count every single vote,Ž he said. I say this recognizing my fate in this may or may not change. What I do know is that every single Floridian who took time to go out to cast their vote, to participate in this process deserves the comfort of knowing in a democratic society in this process every vote will be counted.Ž After Gillum left the stage without taking questions, Richard, who represented Bush in the 2000 recount, said the current situation differed substantially from that presidential election, largely because the recount process is now automatic rather than triggered by lawsuit. Asked if Gillum would accept a DeSantis win should the machine recount end with a result outside the quarter of a percentage margin needed for an additional hand count, Richard said the mayor is not waiving any legal right he has to ensure all the votes are counted.Ž He added if there were evidence votes had not been counted they would consider further legal action. He declined repeatedly to comment on the likelihood that the machine recount might yield enough overvotes and undervotes to help trigger an additional manual count in the governors race. DeSantis allies mocked Gillums support for the recount. The Democrat who ran strongest in a statewide campaign, Nikki Fried, declared victory. Her opponent, Republican Matt Caldwell, has sued Broward on allegations that ballots were illegally included after polls closed on Election Day.RECOUNTSFROM PAGE 1 NELSONCALDWELLFRIED SCOTTBy ALEXANDRA HERRERA STAFF WRITERSARASOTA „ Following a rocky start to its meeting, the Sarasota County School Board looked at three items of new business. The board looked at its 2019-20 and 2020-21 calendars for the school year, seeking input. The calendars for the coming year will start earlier, beginning on Aug. 12 in 2019 and Aug. 20 in 2020. Students would end the school year May 29. The district has pushed to have an earlier start date to align better with neighboring Charlotte and Manatee counties. The proposed calendars will have a full week of school off for the Thanksgiving holiday beginning in 2019. Superintendent Todd Bowden commented during the Superintendents Report saying that the Thanksgiving week is when the district sees the highest number of absences for students. Board Member Shirley Brown said she hopes the committee who worked on the calendar made sure that the graduation dates were later than exam dates. She said this past year students were taking exams after graduation dates. The board passed the calendars and the approval to advertise them unanimously. One of the items the board looked at was the approval or denial of the Dreamers Academy Charter School in North Sarasota County. The school planned to target English-as-a-secondlanguage students, and also students who wanted to learn Spanish. Dreamers Academy planned to have a dual-language curriculum to serve ESOL students. The charter school had applied to the district in the spring before pulling its application to “x some of the errors found by the district. The school reapplied in the fall. According to Bowden, the school had no parts on its application that did not meet expectations.Ž Overall, 85 percent of the application met all the criteria needed by the district to open as one of its charter schools, Bowden said. Bowden said the application had also been updated to remove a dual-language lottery system, which the board was worried about because it may be seen as discrimination. Among the speakers for gender identity at the Election Night meeting, there were several speakers who begged the board to approve the charter application. The board discussed the item with board member Eric Robinson, who said he wasnt planning to support the application because of the curriculum. Robinson is concerned students would not be spending enough time reading and it would hurt the students Florida Standard Assessment scores. While Robinson was not a fan of the curriculum, board member Shirley Brown said the district has trouble with closing the achievement gap, especially when it comes to ESOL students. The achievement gap is caused when students are not reading at or above grade level when a student reaches the third grade. Like Brown, Vice Chair Jane Goodwin and board member Caroline Zucker agreed with the school being an opportunity to close the achievement gap for those ESOL students. Chair Bridget Ziegler fully supported the school, saying she had concerns until the school changed its lottery system. Ziegler added she had been worried about the possible discrimination with the two-part lottery system the school was looking to use. The charter school was approved 4 to 1 with Robinson dissenting. The “nal item on the agenda was the progression plan for students. The progression plans deals with different topics such as ESOL education, transferring in and out of Sarasota County Schools, curriculum for all grades, among other topics. The progression plan was on the Oct. 23 agenda but was pulled to clean up some of the language. The progression plan passed unanimously with little comment from the board. The Sarasota County School Board will meet at 8:30 a.m. for its monthly workshop followed by its 3 p.m. regular board meeting on Nov. 20 in the board chambers, 1980 Landings Blvd., Sarasota. Meetings and workshops are broadcast live on The Education Channel, Comcast channel 20 and Frontier channel 33. Meetings and workshops are also streamed live on the districts website www. sarasotacountyschools. net.Email: aherrera@sun-herald.comSarasota County schools to start earlier in 2019 SUN FILE PHOTO BY ALEXANDRA HERRERASarasota County School District reviewed its upcoming school year calendars during a recent meeting.Casino tripKnights of Columbus Council 7997 hosts a bus trip to Immokalee Casino on Monday. It leaves from the North Port Walmart parking lot with buses boarding at 8 a.m. The cost is $25. For more information or to make reservations, call Michael at 941-400-7416.Pinochle gamesGames of pinochle are scheduled from noon to 3:30 p.m. on Fridays at St. Pedro Catholic Church Hall, 14380 Tamiami Trail, North Port. For more information, call Terry at 941-698-4904.Beer and BBQAMVETS Post 2000 hosts a beer and barbecue festival at 5 p.m. Friday. The menu is Texan mesquite smoked brisket, smoked sausage, potato salad, beef and beans, roll and draft beer for $12. Entertainment by Greg Gage. The post is at 401 Ortiz Blvd., Warm Mineral Springs. For more information, call 941-429-1999. COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS

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The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 5 adno=3626523-1

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Page 6 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 7 Learn more facts and about our commitment to clean water at LakeOkeechobeeInfo.org In times of heavy rain, more water cannot go SOUTH Federal protections for the Everglades and urban development exist today (that didnt exist in the natural Everglades system) which Tamiami Trail (US-41) East Coast dike that protects people and property in western Palm Beach, Broward and Miami-Dade Canals that convey water south Everglades National Park Endangered Species Act protects the Cape Sable Seaside Sparrow Lake Okeechobee dike When it rains so much that discharges must be made to protect the Lake Okeechobee dike, rainfall over 2.3 million acres of Everglades also Everglades restoration projects (CERP, CEPP, including the approved EAA Reservoir) are being built to store, treat and send more water Southadno=3625376-1

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Page 8 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018Let gun owners pay for deathsEditor: There has been another mass shooting. Already due to a mass school shooting in Florida our county has increased costs for security. Non-gun owners who are in the majority pick up most of this tab. Yes, gun manufacturers, gun stores and gun owners stiff the majority with the cost. It is time for the gun owners to support better gun safety and the best way to encourage this is to have them pay exclusively for all gun violence. Only when unsafe gun laws cost them in their pocketbook will things change. We have 30,000 gun deaths and many more severe injuries costing around $50 billion annually. There are over 50,000 gun stores (many more than McDonalds). Each store should be surtaxed $1 million to pay for the cost. In Charlotte County this would bring in over $10 million to offset the increased costs gun violence has brought to our county (a recent shooting probably cost millions). Sure, the stores would pass the cost onto gun owners. It would encourage safety since reducing the risk would be the only way for gun stores to reduce the surtax. If hypothetically a lack of safety at McDonalds killed 30,000 per year would you let them off the hook? If you eat at KFC would you pay for poor safety at McDonalds? The Second Amendment does not contain the right to stiff non-gun owners.Douglas Kennedy Punta GordaOn the highway, please move overEditor: I am absolutely fed up with the poor driving habits of many Florida drivers. Particularly, the interstate drivers, but this applies to drivers on any multiple-lane road. Drivers spread themselves across the highway, creating obstacles for drivers driving at different rates of speed. Courtesy is a prominent issue being ignored by these drivers, but also safety. Some people seem to have the attitude that they will drive in any lane they want and drive any speed they want. In bygone years, you would ”ash your brights and a courteous driver would move right to allow you to pass. Today, you are likely to get ”ipped off if you employ this tactic. Florida Statute provides for a “ne and points on your license if you drive in this discourteous manner. Fine: $164 and three points. Obeying this law traf“c will move faster, safer and we will not require so many multiplelane highways. What good does a thee-lane highway do to ef“ciently move traf“c if cars moving at the same speed block all three lanes? You might say that speeding is against the law and you would be correct, but it is not your duty to attempt to enforce that law by blocking the ”ow of traf“c. This only serves to create an even more dangerous situation than the speeding driver. So move over, please.Brian P. Brunderma n Port CharlotteA sad situation with bicyclistsEditor: The articles about the four cyclists who were struck by a motorist in late October is disturbing and frightening. I do not understand why we know all about the cyclists and bicycle safety, but have heard nothing about the person who struck them. Did the person who struck them also get injured? One article states that there is an investigation underway and ongoing. What sort of investigation? It is a very sad situation.Toni Waltz Port Charlotte Kinder discourse can start with cartoonsEditor: I am writing in regard to your Our View editorial. You spoke of a kinder, gentler civil discourse that is needed at this time in politics, etc. I have been reading your newspaper for over 10 years now. I “nd that most or all the political cartoons you allow on the editorial page have been against or negative toward our current president and conservative issues, values etc. Perhaps you could just have more than one-sided political cartoons to balance views that others might want to see. Not all your readers are from NYC, Boston, and other liberal areas of the country. It would be great if I could believe again in non-biased fact-based news once more.Sylvia Dessauer Punta GordaCan we really impact our weather?Editor: When I was young, soda straws were made of paper. Then the environmentalists told us that we ought not manufacture paper straws because they are made from wood pulp and our forests were being depleted, partly because of the demand for paper products. (I suspect the plastic industry had a hand in propagating this idea). So we abandoned many paper products and went to plastic. Now we are told that plastics of all kinds are clogging the oceans and land“lls, which they are, and we ought to go back to biodegradable wood products. Does this mean that our forests have recuperated suf“ciently to sustain an onslaught of wood pulp seekers? The environmental community seems to be rather silent on this issue. In relation to this inept manipulation of the environment, it is most scary that mans ego has enabled him to think that he can tinker with worldwide weather change and bring about a viable solution.Henry August Port CharlotteVIEWPOINTPublisher „ Glen Nickerson Executive editor „ Jim Gouvellis Editorial page editor „ Stephen Baumann Commentary Editor „ John Hackworth Email letters to letters@sun-herald.com OUR VIEW LETTERS TO THE EDITOR OUR POSITION: A century past The War to End All Wars.ŽThe 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month. Chances are very good youve heard that phrase a hundred times. At least we hope so. It was the exact time an armistice ended the con”ict of World War I. It was 100 years ago today. One hundred exactly, if youre reading this at 11 a.m. this morning. As noted in recently published books, and distilled in a Nov. 5 article in The New Yorker magazine by the historian Adam Hochschild, the German government “rst sued for peace “ve weeks before the date of the Armistice. During protracted negotiations, the Allies held out and demanded capitulation. Fighting continued unabated. So it was that by the time the bugle sounded signaling a cease-“re, another half-million people were either killed or wounded. On the “nal day alone, before 11 a.m., 2,738 soldiers on both sides were killed and 8,206 wounded. And then, said a New York Times report: Four years killing and massacre stopped, as if God swept His omnipotent “nger across the scene of the world carnage and cried, Enough!Ž At the end, an estimated 9.7 million military personnel had been killed, and 10 million civilians. An equal number were wounded. As we learned in school „ or at least as we hope we may have learned in school „ World War I was dubbed, The War to End All Wars.Ž Of course, this was not the case. The term is especially ironic, given the broader follow-up that became Roman numeral II, which was a wider and more deadly war. Some historians actually view the period between the end of World War I and the beginning of World War II as a lull in what could be seen as one war with a long break, like the Hundred Years War. Or, in a sense, the Armistice lasted from 11-11-11, 1918, until sometime in the 1930s, generally accepted to be the date of the Nazi invasion of Poland on Sept. 1, 1939. Armistice Day, November 11, became Veterans Day, November 11, in 1954, according to an act of Congress looking to spread the honor to all military veterans. Our involvement in wars throughout the world continues to this day, as does the need for all citizens to honor and thank the men and women who swear an oath to support and defendŽ us and our Constitution with their lives, if necessary. Today, Veterans Day ceremonies will take place at: € The Veterans Memorial and Freedom Pavilion on Harbor Lane in Englewood. 11 a.m. Put on by the Englewood Community Redevelopment Area and the Friends of the Veterans Memorial. € Rotonda West American Legion Post 113, 3436 Indiana Road. 11 a.m. Lunch afterwards. € The D.N. McQueen American Legion Post 103, Taylor Road, Punta Gorda. 11 a.m. A picnic and entertainment follows throughout the afternoon and into the evening. € North Ports Veterans Memorial Park, 3750 Tamiami Trail, with a ceremony led by VFW Post 8302 and other North Port veterans groups. 11 a.m. A luncheon follows at VFW Post 8302. Please, show respect and honor those who have worn the uniform. Our thanks to all.One hundred years past Armistice Day HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER TO THE EDITOR Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have some rules. Please keep them to less than 250 words. Letters will be edited to length as well as for grammar and spelling. All letters must be signed with full name „ not initials. An address and telephone number must be included. The phone number and address are not for publication, but must be provided. Due to the number of letters received, we are able to run only one letter per person per month. The Letters to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community discourse, and the opinions and statements made i n letters are solely those of the individual writers. The newspaper takes no responsibility for the content of these letters. Please send or bring correspondence to the Sun, Letters to the Editor, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980. Readers may email Letters to the Editor a t letters@sun-herald. com. Further questions or information, call 941-681-3003. I am a veteran. I served in the U.S. Army from 1968 to 1971. I served in the military police. I am proud of the service I did for my country and Im especially pleased at the respect veterans are receiving today. Today, as you salute those of us who served, Im asking all of you to re”ect on what this day really means. As I re”ect on this day, I am particularly proud of the fact that I was part of a family tradition of military service. My grandfather served in World War I, my dad and his brother served in World War II. Dad also served in the Korean War. My brothers, cousins and I served during the Vietnam War, and I have a nephew who currently serves in the Marines. What makes this unique is that my family belong to a church that is a strong believer in peace and conscientious objectors, but all of us served nonetheless. We served because we were taught that protecting the country we prospered in was a responsibility, even an obligation. Dad taught us that the principles we have in this country were too important not to defend and our country too important not to serve. One of the unique things about our military is that we take an oath, not to a piece of land, not to a monarch or supreme leader, not especially to any speci“c political ideology, but rather to protect and defend the Constitution of the United States of American.Ž We took an oath to protect and defend the principles outlined that Constitution. The principles of freedom, self-government, justice and equality. The ideologies outlined in this great document are self-government, majority rules, and checks and balance of power. The key elements of a democratic republic is a government by discussion, debate and compromise. None of us who served did so to serve a single ideology, we served so that every ideology and every idea can be heard and discussed. Another election is almost over ... some votes need to be recounted and perhaps recounted again. Thats all right, because that is the democratic process. Its not perfect but still driven by the people. As a veteran and as an American, I ask that we take the time to honor our veterans, not by parades, not by waving ”ags, and not by saluting us, although all of those things are appreciated. But rather reach out and do your part to defend and protect our Constitution. Become more involved and informed in the local, state and federal governments and issues. Put aside your commitment to you singular ideology and reach out preserving the ideology de“ned in our Constitution. We need to be focused on the weŽ part of the people, and not the meŽ part. We are a community of the United States of America, and it is the community that we need to preserve. So, this Veterans Day, honor those who served by committing yourself to the oath we took to preserve and protect the Constitution of the United States of America,Ž and make that your political ideology. Paul W. Platt is a Punta Gorda resident.Honoring veterans, committing to US principles GUEST COLUMNPAUL W. PLATT 2 0 1 8 1 1 1 1 o t e n c 0 8 p d f 1 1 1 N o v 1 8 0 0 : 1 6 : 3 6

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The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 9 THIS WEEK IN REVIEW VIEWPOINTIn the previous 50 years, the state of Mississippi has validated Lord Tennysons belief that men may rise on stepping-stones of their dead selves to higher things.Ž Now the state has asked the U.S. Supreme Court for 20 more days to provide the court with a defense of the proposition that a state court was suf“ciently serious in ruling that Joey Chandler is so depraved that he could never undergo a regeneration comparable to what Mississippi has managed. In 2003, Chandler, then 17 and seeking money to support his pregnant girlfriend, tried selling marijuana. When his supply was stolen from his car, he believed the thief was his cousin Emmitt, 19. Chandler fatally shot Emmitt and ”ed the scene, but later that night he surrendered to authorities. Convicted of murder, Chandler was sentenced to life imprisonment without possibility of parole. Parents who have raised sons understand that civilizations primary task is to civilize adolescent males, a task that is dif“cult for many reasons, some of which neuroscience explains. The part of the brain that stimulates anger and aggression is larger in males than in females (for evolutionary, meaning adaptive, reasons). And the part that restrains anger is smaller in males. The Supreme Court has noted that adolescent brain anatomy can cause transient rashness, proclivity for risk, and inability to assess consequences,Ž thereby diminishing moral culpabilityŽ and, more important, enhancing the prospect that, as the years go by,Ž offenders de“ciencies will be reformed.Ž Hence a lifetime in prison is a disproportionate sentence for all but the rarest of children, those whose crimes re”ect irreparable corruption.Ž Now, there is spirited disagreement among thoughtful people concerning whether such disproportion constitutes a violation of the Constitutions Eighth Amendment proscription of cruel and unusual punishments.Ž There is disagreement concerning whether the Eighth Amendment as originally understood by those who wrote and rati“ed it was intended to forbid only certain methods of punishment, or to assign to courts the task of enunciating standards of proportionality in sentencing. There is disagreement about what the modern court has done in incrementally circumscribing states discretion in punishing juveniles: It has held that the Eighth Amendment forbids capital punishment for children under 18. And that it forbids life imprisonment without parole for juveniles convicted of non-homicide offenses. And that it forbids „ this is the issue in Chandlers case „ mandatory life imprisonment without possibility of parole for juvenile homicide offenders unless they have demonstrated such irretrievable depravity that rehabilitation is impossible.Ž Never mind that it is dif“cult to imagine how a sentencing court could determine that a juvenile has manifested such depravity. Clearly, however, the Mississippi court that heard Chandlers argument for resentencing in light of Supreme Court rulings about sentencing juveniles did not seriously attempt this dif“cult task. While incarcerated, Chandler has not been a discipline problem. He has earned a GED and completed collegelevel coursework in Bible studies. He has earned certi“cates in construction trade skills and made substantial progress toward a certi“cate in automotive repair. Nevertheless, the resentencing courts almost ”ippant reasons for reaf“rming Chandlers sentence to die in prison included the following: Nothing in the recordŽ suggested that Chandler suffered from a lack of maturityŽ when he shot his cousin. (Science demonstrates a physiological basis of varying maturities of male adolescents.) The 17-year-old Chandler was very matureŽ because he planned his crime. (His prompt surrender suggests more bewilderment than planning.) He was mature because he came from a nuclear family. (How does a familys attribute prove the existence of a different attribute in a family member?) He was mature because 17-year-olds are allowed to get drivers and pilots licenses, and abortions, and because he fathered a child, and because in World War II a 17-year-old won a Medal of Honor. Really. And the court simply ignored the evidence of Chandlers efforts at rehabilitation. Fifty years ago, many Americans thought Mississippi itself exempli“ed irretrievable depravity. Today the state has more „ not more relative to population, more „ AfricanAmericans in elective of“ces than any other state. Culturally and economically, Mississippi is a vibrant participant in the American mainstream. The states self-rehabilitation was not impossible. In 2053, the 50th anniversary of Joey Chandlers crime, he will be 67, if he lives that long. Today, the Supreme Court should hear Chandlers case in order to provide standards requiring sentencing courts to be serious when making an extraordinarily serious judgment about someones irretrievable depravity.Ž George Wills email address is georgewill@ washpost.com.In Mississippi, irretrievable depravity vs. rehabilitation George WILLColumnist The fact that a man is a newspaper reporter is evidence of some ”aw in character.Ž „ Lyndon Johnson They are a sort of assassins ...Ž „ John Quincy Adams I look forward to these confrontations with the press to kind of balance up the nice and pleasant things that come to me as president.Ž „ Jimmy Carter The president of the United States will not stand and be questioned like a chicken thief by men whose names he does not even know.Ž „ Herbert Hoover I rarely think them worth reading, and almost never worth notice.Ž „ Thomas Jefferson Those villainous reporters ...Ž „ Abraham Lincoln To hell with them.Ž „ Harry S. Truman Our topic du jour: What Journalists Do. Consider it a public service for the bene“t of Failed President Trump. As he reminded us Wednesday in a characteristically bizarre news conference, he has not a clue. First, CNN reporter Jim Acosta tried „ Trump kept interrupting him „ to ask about the propriety of designating a caravan of refugees an invasion.Ž But the rude president called Acosta rude for the questions he asked. Of course, the questions were tough, but entirely fair. Then PBS reporter Yamiche Alcindor tried „ Trump interrupted her, too „ to ask whether he emboldened white supremacists by declaring himself a nationalist. But the racist president chided her for such a racist question.Ž Her question, too, was fair. The man doesnt seem to know „ more likely, simply doesnt care „ that this is What Journalists Do. They ask questions, questions that are sometimes tough, pointed and skeptical. Thats how truth is learned. Thats how the peoples right to know is served. As the quotes at the top attest, Trump is hardly the “rst chief executive to disdain reporters. But the vast majority of his predecessors nevertheless endured journalistic scrutiny with the understanding, as George W. Bush once put it, that news media are indispensable to democracy.Ž I mean, power can be very addictive and it can be corrosive,Ž Bush said, and its important for the media to call to account people who abuse their power, whether it be here or elsewhere.Ž But Trump is different. And perhaps thats no surprise, given that hes a con artist who has spent decades shucking, jiving, de”ecting and blustering his way past every moment of accountability. The man with no answers naturally fears the man asking questions. Its telling that Sean Hannity of Fox NewsŽ is Trumps idea of a real journalist. Were talking about the Trump sycophant who, with fellow Fox star Jeanine Pirro, actually campaigned with Trump, speaking at a Missouri rally on Monday and shattering journalistic norms like glass. Some will quibble that Hannity considers himself a talk show host and not a journalist „ hes actually called himself both „ but thats no excuse. So long as Fox continues to identify „ or, misidentify „ itself as a news organization, neither its pundits nor its reporters have any business rallying with Trump or any other political “gure. Thats a bright red ethical line, yet Hannity and Pirro stomped across it in muddy boots. Both should be on the unemployment line. Yet these two are what Trump thinks journalists should be: his cheering section. Spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders tweeted after the news conference that Trump believes in a free press.Ž But thats a bodacious lie. Trump hates What Journalists Do. Nor is he alone in that. But you know the only thing worse than a country where journalists ask questions? A country where they dont. Leonard Pitts is a columnist for The Miami Herald. Readers may contact him via email at lpitts@miamiherald.com.Asking hard questions? Its what the press has always done Leonard PITTSColumnist adno=3621937-1MY DENTIST USED A LASER TO TREAT MY GUM DISEASEDR. SUSAN R. BROOKS941-234-3420www.susanrbrooksdds.comGeneral Dentistry Implants € Cosmetic € Nitrous Oxide € Dentures & One Day Repair € Laser Periodontal Therapy3440 Conway Blvd. #2A (Behind Post O ce) € Port Charlotte NEW LOW COST DENTURES New Patients Welcome Bad Breath, Bleeding Gums adno=3625675-1 Bethany L. Walden, Au.D.American Board Certi“ ed Doctor of AudiologyCharlotte Hearing Center, Inc. Central Plaza West21216 Olean Blvd., Ste. 4 Port Charlotte, FL 33952 Phone: (941) 766-8886 adno=3621939-1

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Page 10 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWSCharlotte County marriage licenses€ Luke David Morales of Indianapolis, Ind., and Cali Leigh Walerko of Indianapolis, Ind. € Timothy Hunter Jameson of Reston, Va., and Jana Elisabeth Richards Taylor of Reston, Va. € Brooke Elen Sterbenz of Waconia, Minn., and Brandon Michael Tahedl of Waconia, Minn. € David William Thurner of Cincinnati, Ohio, and Annabelle Manzler of Cincinnati, Ohio € Ryan Eric Oliver of Bridgeport, W.V., and Angela Nichole Alastanos of Bridgeport, W.V. € Lisa Dawn Wehr of Suttons Bay, Mich., and Dawn Gail Benson of Suttons Bay, Mich. € Nicole Claire Swetley of Astoria, N.Y., and Daniel Francis Diette of Astoria, N.Y. € Dontece Courtney Hines of Port Charlotte, and Shakira Denise Wilson of Port Charlotte € Adele Hernandez of Port Charlotte, and Nancy Ellen Galloway of Port Charlotte € Widelande Pierre of Port Charlotte, and Obed Jean of Lehigh Acres € Brianna Meredith Dinapoli of Englewood, and Shawn Robert Lemay of Englewood € Lorine Sandra Edwards of Port Charlotte, and Michael William Bowen of Port Charlotte € Ronald Patrick Golder of Port Charlotte, and Kristen Eileen Ord of Port Charlotte € Walter Andrew Harkins of Punta Gorda, and Taylor Nacole Dennis of Punta Gorda € Edward Michael Cole of Punta Gorda, and Christy Maria Della Camera of Punta Gorda € Kelly Jean Fugitt of St. Petersburg, Fla., and Nina Marie Jones of St. Petersburg, Fla. € Jennifer Nichole Mohr of Punta Gorda, and Nathan Cameron Byrne of Punta Gorda € Caressa Carina Meroni of Punta Gorda, and Tico Andre Williams of Punta Gorda € Kimberlee Ann Sheppard of Punta Gorda, and Tibor Teo“l Odor of Punta Gorda € Jorge Lazaro Quintero of North Port, and Annia Griselia Valladares Menedez of North Port € Ronald Joashwa Cole of Port Charlotte, and Kimberly Christine Ramos of Port Charlotte € Austin Martin Rietveld of Port Charlotte, and Nicole Patricia Huck of Port Charlotte € Samuel Adams Duggan of Port Charlotte, and Angela Wade Stocks of Port Charlotte € Jerey Scott Wilson of Punta Gorda, and Margaret Ann Hadala of Punta Gorda € Sean Patrick Ferriter of Englewood, and Jazmin Faye Smith of Rotonda West € Arnold Steven Ali of Port Charlotte, and Charles W. Harley of Port Charlotte € Renee Marie Baker of Port Charlotte, and Noel James Henry of Port Charlotte € Larry Keith Hendrickson of Punta Gorda, and Patricia Hendry Clark of Punta Gorda € Cole Austin Phillips of Port Charlotte, and Kelsey Evynelle Behler of North Port € Thomas Robert Dubbert of Punta Gorda, and Kendice French Devries of Port Charlotte € Ron Myron Klineschmidt of North Port, and Celina Neraida Rodriguez of Punta Gorda € Stacy Jerome Schmidt of Englewood, and Mary Janet Wainwright of Rotonda West € Theresa Marie Russo of North Port, and Philip Wesley Waller of North Port € Kathryn Lee Altman of Arcadia, and Alberto Muniz of Arcadia € Suzanne Constance Herron of Punta Gorda, and David Scott West of Punta Gorda € Jessika Jean Berkay of Punta Gorda, and Stephen Edward Sanders of Taylors, S.C.Charlotte County divorces€ Marlana Kimberly Armstrong v. Andrew Pearson Armstrong € Michael Benjamin Elliott v. Debra Ann Elliott € Louise Howard v. Ronald Howard € Diane R. Hunt v. Steven J. Hunt € Ashley Lauren Moore-Boreni v. Austin Daniel Moore-Boreni € Toni M. Rosas v. Hugo Rosas Silva € Cory Sayen v. Michael J. SayenAmerican Legion Post 103€ Sunday Darts winners Nov. 4: Game 1: 1-CW Clark, John Branscome; 2-Fran Smith, Donna Branscome; 3-Margaret Baldwin, Marion Goodman. Game 2: 1-Donna Branscome and John Branscome; 2-Pat Seaman and John Seaman; 3-Barb Carroll, George Stearn Jr.American Legion Post 110€ Bridge winners Nov. 5: 1-Judy Tayler, 3810; 2-Bucky Jacques, 3790; 3-Ann Beers, 3460; 4-Mary Ellen Fox, 3160.Charlotte Harbor Yacht Club€ Slam Bridge winners Nov. 7: 1-Irene Runkle; 2-Louise Rea; 3-Glen Tschetter.Charlotte Square Condominium Complex€ Charlotte County Bridge Group winners Nov. 3: Dale Schneiderhan, 6500; Rosemary Schneiderhan, 5510; Trudy Riley, 4010; Jay Oberlandeer, 3850.Cultural Center of Charlotte County€ Port Charlotte Cribbage Club 147 winners Nov. 7: Dennis Larson, 14; Frank Farrish, 13; Donna Last, 13; Don Francis, 13; Bea Cook, 13; Frank White, 12; Al Gaudreau, 12; Martha Bryant, 12.Englewood Elks€ Trivia Game winners Nov. 6: 1-Barbarians, $62; 2-Eight Shades of Grey, $23.Isles Yacht Club€ Scrabble winners Nov. 2: Peggy Carter, 351, 286; Judith Howell, 386, 277.Kings Gate€ Wednesday Night Double Deck Pinochle winners Nov. 7: Karen Eagleston, 1287; Jim Conway, 1273; Lynn Davis, 1182. € Friday Night Double Deck Pinochle winners Nov. 2: Lynn Davis, 1034; Jan Howard, 927; Don Eagleston, 916; John Cahall, 873.Kingsway Country Club€ Ladies Bridge winners Nov. 7: 1-Linda Bellmore; 2-Marlene Warburton. € Partners Bridge winners Nov. 7: 1-Bev Bossert, Linda Bellmore; 2-Marilyn Gilbert, Colette Dowdell.Moose Lodge 2121€ Euchre Card Game winners Nov. 1: Jack Bates, 76; Allan S. Weithman, 73; Jan Howard, 71; Ginger Emerine, 67; Sally Bell Matthias, 67; Mike Emerine, 65; Wanda Clark, 63; John M. Williams, 63. € Contract Bridge winners Nov. 7: Joyce Weibel, 5480; Jini Clayton, 5230; Dale Schneiderhan, 5050; Art Fritz, 4080.PGI€ PGICA Monday Night Duplicate Bridge winners Nov. 5: 1-Debbie Meyer, Penny Stif”er; 2-Jack Bulkley, Lila Jameson; 3-Yvonne Heer, Betty Luckow.Port Charlotte Bridge Club€ Contract Bridge winners Nov. 2: Mike Duck, 4690; Pat Mulligan, 3870; Harry Huddleston, 3240.Riverwood€ Friday Night Riverwood Trivia Game winners Nov. 2: 1-Riverwood Rebels; 2-Sawgrass Sharks.Rolls Landing Condo€ Ladies Bridge winners Nov. 6: 1-Irene Runkle; 2-Phoebe McMillan; 3-Kaye MacDonald.Twin Isles Country Club€ Duplicate Bridge winners Nov. 6: 1-Barbara Clay, Sharon Groff; 2-Susan Baird, Mary Lou Miller. Nov. 7: 1-Nancy Scheer, Shirley Carlson; 2-Kathy Strayton, Marilyn Holder; 3-Susan Baird, Joan Lasley. Nov. 8: 1-(tie) Barbara Clay, Emma May Goddard; Joan Shute, Joanne Ryder; 3-Susan Baird, Lori Howard. Walter R. Robinson and his wife Linda could have never imagined 11 years ago how much their lives were about to change when he crossed paths with this beautiful woman. Walter, aka Reggie writes, I was on a bad path in my life but this woman helped me believe in myself and that I was destined for better things. She “rst insisted that we have mutual respect for each other but also showed me how important it is to have respect for myself.Ž We decided to move from SW Indiana to Port Charlotte, Florida for new and better opportunities. I took a position working for the Charlotte Sun newspaper and Linda works as a leasing agent at a local apartment complex. We had a beautiful beach wedding on Nov. 11, 2011 and I am certain that is the best thing that could ever have happened for me. We have 7 children between the two of us and we strive to live a good life to be good examples for our kids. We want them to know the importance of being a positive member of their community and to respect themselves as well. We have endured our share of troubles and heartaches. Most recently, both of us losing beloved friends and family members to illness and a tragic accident. But my beautiful wife has taught me to “nd comfort through prayer and in each others arms. We love our children and families immensely and I thank God for putting Linda in my life everyday. I want to wish her a very happy anniversary and to let her know how much I appreciate her and everything she does for our family. Robinsons celebrate 11 years FAMILY ALBUM WEEKLY RECORD WINNERS CIRCLE BIRTHDAYS CONTACT FOR BIRTHDAYSEach week in Sundays Sun we run free birthday announcements, along with a photo. Email your .jpg photo of the birthday boy or girl of any age, along with the persons name, age, and birthday month and date, to Sherri Dennis at sdennis@sun-herald.com. Deadline is noon Wednesday. Note: If you bring or mail in a hard-copy photo (to 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980), we will try to accommodate you, but we CANNOT guarantee the ability to return it to you. For more information, call Sherri at 941-206-1010. Happy 2nd birthday to Bobby Mielke on his special day Nov. 13. Happy 95th birthday to Armen Jacobs on his special day Nov. 11. Happy 8th birthday to Aiden Adams on his special day Nov. 12. Happy 30th birthday Jesse Camacho on his special day Nov. 10. Happy belated birthday to Dawn Walker on her special day Oct. 9. Happy belated 15th birthday to Gary Walker on his special day Oct. 22. Happy belated 15th birthday to Hayley Hernandez on her special day Oct. 3. Happy 17th birthday to Alexandria Walker on her special day Nov. 12. COMMUNITY CALENDAR TODAYPunta Gorda Elks, 8 a.m.-12 p.m. Breakfast, 12 p.m. Bar&Tiki open, 2-5 Funday Sunday, Music/Wolfie & Robert@ 25538 ShorePG637-2606, members & guests PC Bandits car wash, Football, cheer teams raising funds for regionals, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Charlotte State Bank & Trust, 3002 Tamiami Trail. 235-4444. Farmers Market, History Park Farmers Market open every Sunday 9 a.m.-1 p.m., 501 Shreve St., between Virginia Ave. & Henry St. 941-639-1887 Christmas Bazaar, Cultural Center 2280 Aaron St. 11 a.m.-2 p.m., free admission, over 80 vendors arts, crafts & more 941-625-4175. Vintage Car Show, Vintage Car Show 11 am-2 pm Fishermens Village Parking Lot. 639-8721 Veterans Day Salute, Renowned Sarasota Concert Band, various all-age favorites, 3 pm, 700 E. Dearborn, 474-5588, $10, www. englewoodumc.net Fellowship Sun Srvs, FC Srvs-8:30&10:30 a.m. @ FC Worship Ctr. 140 Rot.Blvd.W. Come hear Pastor Garry & FC Praise Band in both srvs. 475-7447 Broasted Chicken, Lodge open at noon. Broasted Chicken, potato wedges, coleslaw 2-4 p.m.Enjoy food & football Rotonda Elks, Public Welcome 941-474-7516 Veterans Day Salute, Renowned Sarasota Concert Band, various all-age favorites, 3 pm, 700 E. Dearborn, 474-5588, $10, www. englewoodumc.net Fellow shipChurch YFF, FC YFF/Blast/FUEL is for families w/ kids, to get together for fun & food. Its held at Rot. Park@ 4:30 p.m. 475-7447 AMVETS 2000 Special, Best Breakfast in Town large menu to choose from 8-11 a.m. only $7 incl/bev 401 Ortiz Blvd NP 941-429-1999 AMVETS 312 Breakfast, 8:30-11:00 Large selection incl bev only $7.00 $1.00 Bloody Marys 7050 Chancellor Blvd NP 941-429-5403 North Port Moose, Happy Veterans Day! Kitchen is open from 12-5! Come watch your favorite team! 14156 Tamiami Trl NP North Port VFW, Members & Guests, Veterans Day Svc. at Vets Park at 11, $025 off drafts, dom btls & wells, 4860 Trott Cir, NP 426-6865 SOA Fry & Grill Day, Sons Fry & Grill 1-5 p.m. Relax watch the NFL a new menu added 401 Ortiz Blvd NP 941-429-1999 Republican Mixer, Monday, Nov. 12, 5 p.m., join us at Laishley Crab House for social with appetizers, wine, and beer. Special guests are Supervisor of Elections and County Tax Appraiser. All Republicans are welcome. $8. Info: (941) 258-2080. Featured EventPAID ADVERTISEMENT The Community Calendar items are entered by the event organizers and are run as submitted.Ž To submit an item, go to www.yoursun. com, select an edition and click on the Community CalendarŽ link on the left. Click Submit Event,Ž and fill out the appropriate information. adno=3616367-1 Where Shopping Makes Cents charlottecountychamber.org adno=3611928-1 STARTING AT $25,100!! CONSTRUCTION HEATING & SALT SYSTEMS POOL SERVICE & REPAIRS POOL SUPPLY STORE625-50561212 Enterprise Drive Port Charlotte, FL 33953service@casapools.comwww.casapools.com 28Reader's Choice Awards!Lic./Insured Lic.#CPO56749 2018 Complete Pool Package (Charlotte County Only)adno=3625391-1adno=3621940-1COMPLETE FOOT CARE€ Diabetic Care € Foot Pain € Foot Surgery € Heel PainSame Day Appointments941-613-19193191 Harbor Blvd. Unit D Port Charlotte, FL 33952Dr. Michael MetykPodiatric Surgery

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The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 11 You can choose from...Dont forget Medicare Advantage and Prescription Drug Plan Annual Enrollment Period ends December 7.*According to the July, 2018 CMS Enrollment Report. Humana is a Medicare Advantage HMO, PPO and PFFS organization and a stand-alone prescription drug plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in any Humana plan depends on contract renewal. Contact the plan for more information. Limitations, copayments and restrictions may apply. Bene“ts, premium and member cost share may change on January 1 of each year. You must continue to pay your Medicare Part B premium. Other providers are available in our network. The provider network may change at any time. You will receive notice when necessary. Humana Gold Plus (HMO) H1036-217. It is important that we treat you fairly. Discrimination is against the law. Humana Inc. and its subsidiaries do not discrimina te or exclude people because of their race, color, national origin, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, or religion. Humana complies with all Federal and State Civil Rights laws. Language assistance services, free of charge, are available to you. Call 1-855-898-9119 (TTY: 711). Espaol: Llame al nmero arriba indicado para recibir servicios gratuitos de asistencia lingstica. Kreyl Ayisyen (French Creole): Rele nimewo ki pi wo la a, pou resevwa svis d pou lang ki gratis.Y0040_GHHJY6NTE19_V104_M SWFL 11/18 Call to schedule an appointment with a licensed Humana sales agent in the comfort of your home or reserve your spot in a local neighborhood sales meeting.Call a licensed Humana sales agent 1-855-898-9119 (TTY: 711) 5 a.m. 8 p.m., seven days a week En espaol? Llame gratis al 1-855-898-9121 (TTY: 711) € $0 Monthly plan premium € $0 Primary Care Visit Copay € $15 Specialist Visit Copay € $3400 Maximum out-of-pocket limit to help protect you “nancially € Dental, Hearing and Vision coverageAnd we have the bene“ts you want.www.Humana.com 527,000* OF YOUR NEIGHBORS IN FLORIDA HAVE HUMANA MEDICARE ADVANTAGEYOU MAY BENEFIT FROM A WIDE SELECTION OF IN-NETWORK PRIMARY CARE DOCTORS AND HOSPITALS IN THE GULF COAST. COLLIER Physicians Regional Medical Center Collier Physicians Regional Medical Center Pine Ridge Naples Community Hospital North Collier Hospital LEE Cape Coral Hospital Gulf Coast Hospital HealthPark Medical Center Lee Memorial CHARLOTTE Bayfront Health Port Charlotte Bayfront Health Punta Gorda Fawcett Memorial Hospital CHARLOTTE COUNTY Baron, Jack, M.D. Bek, Esenbike, M.D. Bermudez, Zaida C., M.D. Black, Brent D., M.D. Blain, Timothy, M.D. Burgess, Raymond, D.O. Burt, Melody H., D.O. Calvino, Stephane M., M.D. Casanova, Pedro F., M.D. Chace, Todd, D.O. Christesen, Steven, M.D. Criss, Cathy L., D.O. DeLeon, Ramon, M.D. Fernandez, Luis F., M.D. Hassan, Syed, M.D. Kamal, Asif, M.D. Koppuzha, George C., M.D. Kumar, Sanjay, M.D. Lombardo Paz, Gina D., M.D. Martinez, Manuel, M.D. McAtee, David L., D.O. Murphy, Jean, M.D. Nackley, George E., M.D. Nadler, Jaclyn, M.D. Nord, Janice G., M.D. Perdigon, Rhoniel M.D. Pham, Karen, M.D. Planer, Dana F., D.O. Reiss, Kenneth, D.O. Rivera, Juan I., M.D. Rojas, Ramses, M.D. Ruano, Odel, M.D. Somai, Kevin, M.D. Valente, Malgorzata, M.D. Ventrudo, Steven, M.D. Zutshi, Sanjeev, M.D. COLLIER COUNTY Abarca Selva, Aschanti, M.D. Arocho, Pedro, M.D. Atkins, Robert, M.D. Bickerton, Andrea, M.D. Costello, Nicole, M.D. Dagney, Holly, M.D. Diaz, John, M.D. DuPont, Ruth, M.D. Ferber, Kae, M.D. Galbut, Alan, M.D. Harris, Julia, M.D. Herrera, Angel, M.D. LoMonaco, Mary Ann, M.D. Lucombe, Linda P., M.D. Maciejewski, James, M.D. Nyanudor, Vava Y., M.D. Ruiz-Novero, Rhena M., M.D. Scola, Anthony, M.D. Shaheen, Elias, M.D. Trivedi, Ketan H., M.D. Webb, Gary, M.D. LEE COUNTY Adkins, Hursel L., D.O. Ahsan, Salwa, M.D. Aloise, Joseph, D.O. Alvarez-Krizan, Maria, M.D. Arana, Jeannie M., M.D. Ardesia, John A., D.O. Armas-Kolostroubis, Laura, M.D. Axelrod, Daniel, M.D. Baez, Euclides, M., M.D. Ball, George A., M.D. Barres, Carmen I., M.D. Bowers, Eve, M.D. Bowman, Patrick S., M.D. Breen, James O., M.D. Briseno Jr., Charles, M.D. Brisson, Jonathan M., D.O. Burford II, Frederick J., D.O. Bushan, Lakshmi, M.D. Caceres, Christie, D., M.D. Candelore, Michelle A., D.O. Cavanagh, Christina M., M.D. Chaudhari, Anjana M., M.D. Coghill, Lee, M.D. Collier, Michael, M.D. Concepcion, Alberto, M.D. Constante, Galo F., M.D. Cuna, Guillermo, M.D. Dalrymple, Jennifer, M.D. Daneshmand, Patricia J., M.D. David, Nora, D.O. David, Hilario G., M.D. Del Sol, Manuel M., M.D. Delgado, Delores, M.D. Delgado, Adolfo, M.D. DePree, David, M.D. Draulans, Sebastian, M.D. Durando, Christopher, D.O. Farag, Sherry, M.D. Fernandez, Carmen M., M.D. Garcia, Manuel A., M.D. Gesheva, Irena, M.D. Gitu, Alfred C., M.D. Goforth, Gary A., M.D. Green, John J., D.O. Greer, Shannon S., D.O. Harris, Donald, T., M.D. Hayes, William A., D.O. 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Page 12 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 adno=3625556-1

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STUDENTS SALUTE THOSE WHO SERVEStudents personally introduce their family member who served or is currently serving in the military. € See page 2 MORE RENOVATIONS TO VETERANS PARKA flag blows in the wind in front of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall at Laishley Park. € See page 4 BACK TO VIETNAMBob and Karen Ruybal of North Port took an eight-day trip to Vietnam recently, more than 50 years after serving in the country. € See page 9OUR TOWN: SUNCOAST HOMES Sunday, November 11, 2018 412 Hunter Drive, Venice 1794 Wasilla St, North Port 2855 Mangrove Pl, Englewood 412 Hunter Drive, Venice, FL 34285 County: Sarasota Year Built: 1998 List Price: $4,850,000 LP/SqFt: $1,123 Garage: 3-car Beds: 4 Baths: 4.5 SqFt Heated: 4,354 Total Acreage: 36,149 sq ft lot size Pool: Heated pool w/spa Location: Beach on the Gulf of Mexico, Venice Island Listing Agent/ Brokerage: Gae Stewart, RE/Max Alliance Group, 941-544-3775 1794 Wasilla St, North Port, FL 34291 County: Sarasota Year Built: 2004 Current Price: $259,000 LP/SqFt: 2259 Garage: 2-car Beds: 3 Baths: 2 Sq Ft Heated: 1614 Total Acreage: 0.398 acres / 17,337 sf Pool: Yes, private Location: Corner lot Listing agent/brokerage: Mark Floryjanski, PA, 941468-0830, mark.” oryjanski@ ” oridamoves.com; Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate, 941-493-1000 2855 Mangrove Pl, Englewood, FL 34224 County: Charlotte Year Built: 1989 Current Price: $279,900 LP/SqFt: 2,032 Carport: 2-car Beds: 3 Baths: 2 Sq Ft Heated: 1,758 Pool: No Listing agent/ brokerage: Maurice and Barbara Burton Richardson, 860-2023113 or 941-685-6039, Maurice.richardson@ ” oridamoves.com; Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate, 941-493-1000A few weeks ago, I was sitting at our kitchen peninsula talking to Deb as she did food prep. Barefoot, I noticed something peculiar. The ” oor felt unusually warm. It felt good on the feet. Curious, I checked out the ” ooring a few yards from the hot spot. Those ” oors were cool, like usual. I set a thermostat on the warm patch and it spiked up to 92 degrees. Like most Rotonda West homes, ours is built on a slab. It drove me a bit crazy that I could not even conjure up a wild guess what was causing this. So, I let it go. That night, another strange thing happened. I was in the master bathroom and all was quiet. Except for a high pitch sound „ the one you hear when someone else in the home is running water. Deb and I were home alone. She was sitting at her computer. I knew the dishwasher, washing machine, and sprinklers were all turned off. So, whos using our water? I veri“ ed that all water “ xtures were turned off, that none of toilets were leaking, and that all outdoor spigots were off. I could still hear the high-pitched sound whenever I got near a water pipe or “ xture. I then turned off the main water valve to our home. The sound disappeared. It was clear at that point we had a leaky pipe under our slab or inside the walls. Yikes! We called the plumber and got an appointment for the next day. The prospect of spending the night without running water was very unpleasant. As Deb implored me to “ nd a solution, I remembered that warm spot on our kitchen ” oor. Could it be that there is a warm water pipe underneath that spot, and that is where the leak is? To test this, I cut power to the water heater and closed its on/off valve. Now that the hot water pipes were shut down, we turned the main water valve to the house back on. Voila! We had cold water throughout the home and the high-pitched sound disappeared. Connecting the dots, it became clear that there was a hot-water pipe leaking under the slab below the hot spot on the kitchen ” oor. This was con“ rmed several hours later when the hot spot on the ” oor cooled to normal. I got 2 estimates. Both plumbers advised that a band-aid approach would be too risky. Once 27-year-old copper plumbing begins to leak, you should expect more of the same. It was just a few months prior to this that the copper pipe coming from the hot water heater developed a leak. So this was my second warning. Im sharing this with you because homeowners know that the big-ticket, repair items include a new roof, HVAC, and the water-heater. But in recent years, Ive seen a spike in homes that require re-piping. The biggest take-away from todays column is for homeowners with older homes plumbed with copper piping. If you hear that high-pitched sound that indicates water is running somewhere else in your home, pay attention to it if you have reason to believe that all water-using “ xtures are turned off. If your high-frequency hearing is diminished, turn off everything and check the water meter. If the needle is moving, you have a leak. If youre lucky, its just a slow-leaking toilet. According to my research, the average repair bill for damages caused by a leaky wall pipe is $5,600. That doesnt include the cost to repair or replace the plumbing. So prevention is the goal. Heres a reference point for determining the cost of replumbing your home. Our home plumbing services the kitchen, laundry room, 2 bathrooms, the garage water heater, and 3 exterior spigots. Estimate number 1 was from a large company that wanted about $4,800. They estimated it would take a team of 2 plumbers a total of 24 labor-hours over two days to complete the job. Estimate number 2 was from a smaller company owned by a certi“ ed master plumber. Their estimate also was very close to $4,800. However, they estimated it would take a team of 3 plumbers a total of 54 labor-hours over two days to complete the job. Estimate 2 also included Uponor piping with a 50-year manufacturers warranty. As Realtors, weve seen some unsightly re-plumbing jobs. But we were very pleased with the outcome, as there are no outward indications that our home has been replumbed. I wasnt sure that was possible. Brett Slattery is broker/ owner of Brett Slattery Realty llc in Charlotte County. Reach him via 941-468-1430, Brett@ BrettSlattery.com, or ww.BrettSlattery.com.Use your senses to detect leaky pipes Brett SLATTERYColumnist r

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Page 2 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018OUR TOWN „ SUNCOAST HOMES The students and staff of Englewood Elementary spent Friday morning honoring the Active Duty and Veterans of the United States Military. The special Great AmericansŽ ceremony featured a presentation of the colors, the posting of the service ”ags, special musical performances by the students, and a personal introduction of each and every veteran who is part of the Englewood Elementary family by the students themselves. Venice Middle School Resource Of“cer Deputy Phillip Mockler, of the Sarasota County Sheriffs Of“ce and a Veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps, spent some time with Liz Coles kindergarten class after the ceremony letting them try on his military gear and explaining what it meant to be in the military.Students salute those who served Elijah Bates and Jeremy Bates pose for a picture with their grandfather Laszlo Apathy. SUN PHOTOS BY TIM KERN Left: The Englewood Elementary “fth-grade students sing during the Great AmericansŽ ceremony on Friday. 19887 Veterans Blvd Port CharlotteBetween Cochran & Atwater ustomized urbing & Discount Rocks 3 gal. V.Che” ara $5.99 THEIR Price $10.98 1/2 in Tan River Rock $99.99/yd. THEIR Price $128.00/yd. We Install, We Deliver and Pickup Available Limestone $39.99/yd. THEIR Price $50.00/yd.We sell & Install: € Curbing € Decorative Stone € Plants € Full Landscaping € Pavers (Bastedo Construction CRC1328854) € Professional Landscape Renovations No Subcontractors FREE ESTIMATESVisit our Outdoor Showroom and Nurseryadno=3625277-1941-623-6192 adno=3625379-124 HOUR WATER REMOVAL€ Steam Cleaning € Rotary Scrub € Dry Cleaning€ Tile & Grout Cleaning € Carpet Repair & Stretching € Oriental & Wool Rug Cleaning Specialist10% OFFCARPET, UPHOLSTERY & TILE CLEANINGPresent this ad at time of service for discount. *10% Discount does not apply to minimum.Sarasota & Charlotte Counties 941.766.0115WWW.HAPPYHOMESERVICES.NET READERS CHOICE AWARD2018 adno=3625579-1Affordable Living TrustsNow theres no excuse for you and your family not to bene“ t from the advantages of a Revocable Living Trust -especially if you own a home or condo. Single Person $ 345Married Couple $ 445Plus Additional Incidental CostRobert D. SchwartzAttorney At Law € Certi“ ed Public AccountantToll Free 1-866-34TRUST(348-7878)Paulson Centre 18245 Paulson Dr. Suite 107 Port Charlotte, FL 33954 Premier Executive Center 5237 Summerlin Commons Blvd., Suite 322 Fort Myers, FL 33907Available by appointmentMr. Schwartzs quali“ cations Include: Graduate of Univ. of Florida College of Law w/honors. Graduated Cum Laude from Florida State University. National Speaker on Estate & Tax PlanningThe hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be basedsolely upon advertisement. Before you decide, ask me to send you freewritten information about my quali“ cation and experience.Ž From coast to coast, the United States boasts some of the most incredible scenery in the world. Explore its natural and cultural treasures with specially crafted itineraries that uncover the wonders so close to home. And with the exclusive bene ts and exceptional savings you can nd only through AAA, it promises to be a vacation you wont forget. AAA Travel invites you toDISCOVER THE USA EXPECT SOMETHING MORETMTRAVELBR-0774A Thursday,November15€2:00PM VeniceCommunityCenter 326NokomisAveS Venice,FL34285Pleasejoinusforlightrefreshmentsandmeetourtravel expertfromAAAMemberChoiceVacations!Spaceislimited.PleaseRSVPonlineat AAA.com/localeventsorcall(941)493-2100 adno=3625522-1 adno=3628368-1 Fishermens Village, Punta GordaCall(941) 639-0969 A Punta Gorda Tradition for 30 YearsŽ December 1st thru 31st 2018Trip Length 1 Hour 6:00 p.m. 7:30 p.m. 9:00 p.m.Adults: $20 € Children Under 12: $10 Groups (15+): $18 BOOK ONLINE NOWwww.king“ sher” eet.com NOW BOOKING 1901 S. Tamiami Trl. € Unit D € Venice DiscountMedsOfCanada.comCALL US, RELAX & SAVE!941-488-0638 or 877-488-0638 FREE Price Quotes Call Today!Safe, Reliable & Guaranteed RELAXƒ You dont have to drive to Canada to get cheap medications! of Canada Discount Meds VIAGRA Generic ...100mg ...........48 Pills ....$133.00 CIALIS Generic .........5 mg ...........90 Pills ....$150.00 ADVAIR Generic .....250/50 .....180 Doses ....$161.00 SPIRIVA Generic ...18 mcg ...........90 Pills ....$135.00 COUPON REQUIREDBrand and Genericadno=3628644-1 QUIT YOUR WAY Quitting tobacco isnt easy. Finding help should be. Gulfcoast South Area Health Education Center is Call 941-552-1283 Includes FREE DOUBLES Program covers all forms of tobacco. System„ adno=3628650-1 E v e r y T h u r s d a y o n l y i n

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The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 3 OUR TOWN „ SUNCOAST HOMESEnglewood ceremonyThe Englewood Community Redevelopment Area and the Friends of Englewood Veterans Memorial and Freedom Pavilion is hosting its third annual Veterans Day Celebration of Honor at 11 a.m. Sunday, at the Englewood Veterans Memorial, 10 Harbor Lane, Englewood (end of West Dearborn Street). The event is free and open to the public. Englewood VFW Post 10178 and Boy Scout Troop 26 will participate. Refreshments will be served. For more information, call the Sarasota County Contact Center at 941-861-5000 or visit www.scgov.net.Post 103 ceremonyD.N. McQueen American Legion Post 103 2101 Taylor Road, Punta Gorda, will host a celebration to honor veterans at 11 a.m. Sunday. A free picnic will follow the ceremony. Entertainment will be Van at noon, followed by Bandana at 3 p.m., and It Takes Two at 6 p.m. Any veterans wishing to join are asked to bring their DD214. For more information, call the Post at 941-639-6337.Laishley Park PavilionsSuncoast One Title will have a celebration and barbecue for veterans from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday at the Laishley Park Pavilions, 150 Laishley Court, Punta Gorda,near the Vietnam Wall of Southwest Florida. The ceremony is free and open to the public. There will also be a barbecue thats $5 per plate; food and drinks are free for veterans. Call 850-428-0699.North Port ceremonyVFW Post 8302 with other North Port veteran groups will lead ceremonies 11 a.m. Sunday at the North Ports Veterans Memorial Park, 3750 Tamiami Trail, North Port. A luncheon is planned at the post after the ceremonies. For more information, call the post at 941-426-6865.Veterans Day concertThe Sarasota Concert Band will perform a Veterans Day concert at 3 p.m. on Sunday, in the Englewood United Methodist Church Sanctuary, 700 E. Dearborn St. Pay tribute to our veterans while enjoying patriotic favorites as well as a diverse repertoire ranging from rousing to sublime, classical through jazz and pops, all masterfully delivered by this high-energy 40-50 piece professional band. The $10 tickets are available at www.englewoodumc.net, in the Church Office during office hours, or at the door. Students and children will be admitted free with a paying adult. For more information, call 941-474-5588.More observances:€ The Alameda Isles Veterans Association will have a flag-folding event at 11 a.m. at the communitys clubhouse, 1 Alameda Grande, Englewood. € The Diocese of Venice will have a special Memorial Mass at 2:45 p.m. Sunday, at Sarasota National Cemetery, 9810 State Road 72 in Sarasota. All are welcome. € Lighthouse Grill at Stump Pass Marina 260 Maryland Ave., will have a flag-raising ceremony at 2 p.m. Sunday. Many local groups will be participating as the establishment raises the flag on its new 80-foot pole and dedicates it to veterans of the area. Veterans get a 10 discount at the restaurant that day. € AMVETS Post 777 3386 N. Access Road, Englewood, invites all veterans to stop by the Post Sunday afternoon, and partake of a complimentary hot dog roast. For football fans, NFL games will be telecast. € Sonrise Baptist Church 11050 Willmington Blvd., Englewood, will have a special Veterans Day service at 10:15 a.m. Sunday. Sharing will be a recipient of two purple hearts, flag folding and other remembrances. The public is invited. € Englewood VFW Post 10178 550 N. McCall Road, Englewood, will serve free dinners to veterans from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Call Post 10178 at 941-474-7516. € Rotonda West American Legion Post 113 3436 Indiana Road, Rotonda West, plans a ceremony with guest speakers at 11 a.m. Sunday. A luncheon will follow the ceremony. Call 941-697-3616. € Port Charlotte VFW Post 5690, 23204 Freedom Ave., Port Charlotte, plans a special luncheon with music from noon to 4 p.m. Sunday. Call 941-629-4200. € Punta Gorda American Legion Post 103 2101 Taylor Road, Punta Gorda, plans a special luncheon with live music. Call 941-639-6337. € Calvary Baptist Church 75 Pine St., Englewood, welcomes all veterans to a special service at 11 a.m. on Sunday. All veterans will be recognized in the service and a special patriotic song will be sung by veterans. Ray Kelley, a marine in the Vietnam War, will be recognized as a recent recipient of the Silver star award. All veterans and their immediate family will be served a free meal after the service. For more information, call 941-475-1555. € Sonrise Baptist Church 11050 Willmington Blvd., Englewood, will have a special Veterans Day service at 10:15 a.m. Sunday. Sharing will be a recipient of two purple hearts and flag folding. The public is invited to attend. € Berean Baptist Church 17377 Godwin Ave., Port Charlotte, will celebrate its annual roundup and homecoming day on Sunday. The services will begin at 9:30 a.m. Following the service will be a barbecue rib dinner with all the fixings. The public is invited to attend. For more information, call 941-421-2217. € Rotonda West Community Church 501 Rotonda Blvd. West, Rotonda, will host a special service, to honor veterans at 10:30 a.m. Sunday. The veterans within the church have been interviewed and their stories compiled into a booklet. There will be displays of memorabilia, an Honor Guard, individual recognition for all veterans, music honoring God and our country and a very special video presentation. For more information, call 941-697-2100. VETERANS DAY EVENTS SUN PHOTOS BY TIM KERNAmelia Smith introduces her father Josh Smith and thanks him for his service to our Country. Harold Feasel of the Rotonda West Honor Guard salutes the ” ag during the National Anthem. adno=3628816-1 adno=3628145-1110 Tamiami Trail, Unit G. Port Charlotte 301-301-8819 Free Dessert Crepe with ANY Purchase Buy any crepe, get a fresh squeezed lemonade for FREE! adno36281451 For Your Service! Thank You 941-575-1446www.cayocostadental” .com0% “ nancing with approved credit. CAYO COSTA DENTALFREDERICK J. FOX III, DMD PA316 W. Helen Ave., Punta Gorda ( 3/10 miles S. of Charlotte Harbor on US 41 Southbound)Mon.-Thurs. 8:00-4:00 € Fri. 9:00-12:00Frederick J. 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Page 4 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 OUR TOWN „ SUNCOAST HOMESBy DANIEL SUTPHINSTAFF WRITERWith Veterans Day today, the Vietnam Memorial Wall of Southwest Florida will serve as a centerpiece and symbol for the holiday as Americans celebrate the men and women who served and sacri“ced their lives in the Vietnam War. Completed in November 2016, the Memorial Wall at Veterans Park in Punta Gorda has become a major attraction for Charlotte County residents and visitors alike. However, there is still more work to be done at the site. With an estimated planning cost of $540,000, the City Council has asked city staff to break down the second-phase of renovations planned for the area, which is at the entrance of Laishley Park. As of this report, city staff has yet to itemize funding for the projects, according to a statement from City Manager Howard Kunik at Wednesdays City Council meeting. Upon doing so, the city will be able to provide a better timeline of work on the projects involved. For the new phase, city staff has worked with community partners to develop a concept plan for the renovations including parking improvements along Nesbit Street, and East Retta Esplanade, streetscaping, an honor walk, a mural wall plaza, a Purple Heart memorial, a donors plaza and the gazebo ceremonial plaza. Council Member Gary Wein said that since the city has agreed to contribute to the renovations, it would be best to take the project on in pieces. I think we are going to have to take it in smaller chunks,Ž Wein said at the Oct. 3 council meeting. Theres the 80/20 rule ... 20 percent of the effort can get 80 percent of the results. I think we need to see how we can get the most bang for our efforts.Ž City staff has already been working on plans for the site with Vietnam Wall of Southwest Florida, a nonpro“t corporation. We are ready to request bids (from contractors) on the rest of the donor plaza,Ž said Dick Carr, president of the nonpro“t, said at a council meeting in October. We are a little held up with getting the parking started but we will soon (get it going).Ž Carr “rst requested funding for the second phase renovations at the Sept. 17 regular council meeting. According to Carr, the nonpro“t corporation plans on being able to fund and “nish the parking and the donor plaza renovations, which leaves the Purple Heart Memorial, the Mural Wall Plaza and the Gazebo Memorial renovations to be determined. Moving forward, council members urged staff, with Carrs assistance, to determine the next best phase to begin after completing the parking and donors plaza renovations. Logically,Ž said Carr, from a construction standpoint, we have to move next to the Purple Heart area, which is a fairly small area. I would like to point out that the “nal area in front of the gazebo is to me as much bene“t to the city as it is to any veterans ceremonies.Ž During its design, Carr said he and the citys Urban Planner Mitchell Austin discussed the importance of the Gazebo Ceremonial Plaza to the park. It is designed as an amphitheater, (such as) for concerts,Ž said Carr. That would be the crown jewel, I think ƒ and logically be the last (for) construction.Ž Austin also noted that the gazebo area has served as a popular location for wedding ceremonies in the past. Its bigger than anything else,Ž said Carr. With the seating hall and the amphitheater and the ribbons of concrete, I would say thats the big (phase) left.Ž The $540,000 estimate was only for the planning cost, which includes site prep, drainage structure, signs and markings, and electrical, among other requirements. An estimated cost of construction was not available at the time of this report. I think this is an incredible asset for the community,Ž said Wein, as well as an appropriate, respectful comment to the people who have served our country. I think we have to go forward with that.Ž Veterans Park and the Vietnam Memorial Wall of Southwest Florida are located at 200 Harbor Walk Drive, in Punta Gorda.Email: dsutphin@sun-herald.comMore renovations to come at Veterans Park SUN PHOTO BY DANIEL SUTPHINA ”ag blows in the wind in front of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall at Laishley Park. VETERANS DAY CELEBRATION AT THE LAISHLEY PARK PAVILLIONSSuncoast One Title will have a celebration for Veterans from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday at the Laishley Park Pavilions, near the Vietnam Wall of Southwest Florida. The ceremony is free and open to the public. adno=3628817-1 Paradise Gardens & Decor LLCFull Service Landscape Companywww.paradisegardensdecor.com(941) 564-9408North Port, Florida 34286 denise@paradisegardensdecor.comThank you for your service adno=3627974-1Toledo BladeBarber ShopA Real Traditional Barber ShopŽ 17218 Toledo Blade Blvd. Port CharlotteSpecializing in Fades and Flat TopsŽ(941) 624-0584God Bless our Veterans! adno=3628711-1 WE WOULD LIKE TO THANK ALL OUR VETERNS FOR THERE SERVICESWere ready…Were willing…Were Abel. We Are A Avalon And Tahoe Pontoon DealerFactory Authorized € Certi“ ed € TrainedSales & Service 2009-20187341 Sawyer Circle, Port Charlotte 941-698-4006 www.AbelsMarine.com Abels Marine Serving the Area Boater since 2003adno=3628655-1 adno=3627956-1 adno=3627970-1 HONOR FREEDOM The nation which forgets its defenders will itself be forgotten…Calvin CoolidgeThat's why at Larry Taylor Funeral and Cremation Services we offer options that allow us to honor those who served in a way that is “ tting.Come see why so many of your friends and neighbors have chosen Larry Taylor Funeral and Cremation Services.Old Fashioned Service at a Price You Can AffordTAYLOR FUNERALand Cremation ServicesLarry1515 Tamiami Trail, Punta Gorda 833-0600 € www.Ltaylorfuneral.com READERS CHOICE AWARD 2002-2018 adno=3628705-1 € printed banners € yard signs € realty signs € vehicles & magneticsTHANK YOU VETERANS! 2018 Pest Control Lawn Spray Termite Control Ask About OurONCE-A-YEARPest Control Service 2010 475-9551 or 629-40151560 S. McCall Road, Englewood a d no= 3628708 1 CELEBRATING OUR VETERANS

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The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 5OUR TOWN „ SUNCOAST HOMESBy ALISON BOWENCHICAGO TRIBUNECHICAGO „ Stefanie Clark knew it was a good roommate match when their “rst breakfast together in late 2017 was full of laughter. It was a new feeling for Clark, who had recently shed the name Stephen and come out as the woman shed felt she was her entire life. In recent months, she found herself confronting a new apartment, navigating a new life and feeling lonely. A year later, Clark and Jane Callahan-Moore “nish each others sentences and interrupt conversations to compliment the other „ shes a wonderful artist, her zest for life is so inspiring „ and enjoy explaining who cooks breakfast and who makes dinner. Loneliness is one reason elderly adults might seek help “nding a roommate. Like Clark and CallahanMoore, many people prefer to “nd each other through groups or websites that connect roommates, versus the more anonymous and sometimes overwhelming listings in places like Craigslist. Websites like Roomster and SpareRoom expand options for people who want to rent a room or “nd a renter. A spokesman at Roomster.com said it has about 27,000 users in Illinois; a SpareRoom spokesman said about 29,000 users in Illinois have visited the site so far this year (SpareRoom tracks users locations when they browse the site, but they could be seeking a room in a different state). Similar to some dating apps, Roommates.com, which has nearly 2,000 users in Illinois, requires users to “ll out questionnaires and connects them to others seeking the same location and cost. Communication can go through the site instead of personal contact information. It gives you a safety net because you can actually talk to these people. You can contact them through the website and “nd out about them,Ž said Vice President of Business Development Mike Peters. The site is free to join; once users receive matches, they can pay $5.99 to connect with those matches for three days. Amazingly, people “nd a match in three days,Ž he said. The site also offers oneand two-month options. Clark and CallahanMoore met through the Homesharing Program at the Center on Halsted, which since 2011 has connected people looking for renters or a room. Britta Larson, senior services director and the programs coordinator, said it made about “ve matches last year. The program launched as a solution for older LGBTQ adults who might appreciate a person comfortable with an LGBTQ roommate. Most of the people offering rooms to rent are 55 and older, Larson said, and the renters vary in age, as young as people in their 20s but tend to be middle-aged, usually in their 40s. The Center of Halsted program was modeled after two other programs in Illinois which no longer exist. As more people “nd roommates online, she said, there are fewer requests for these types of services. Were really one of the last home-sharing programs out there, but were not actively promoting and advertising the program simply because its very labor-intensive,Ž she said. Without funding, she said, its hard to invest the time needed to make successful matches. Beyond taking applications and managing connections, she also coordinates background checks and acts as an intermediary for any concerns. Callahan-Moore noted she didnt even know Clarks full name until they signed the lease, to assure con“dentiality. She put me through my paces,Ž she said. Many older adults, Callahan-Moore added, might be in the same situation she found herself in: dying of loneliness.Ž They have these gorgeous apartments, and theyre terri“ed of letting anyone come in and live, because theyre afraid of getting an ax murderer, or somebodys going to take all of their money,Ž she said. Previously, CallahanMoore was living with her daughter. Not wanting to continue that arrangement, but also not wanting to live alone, she looked up the National Shared Housing Resource Center and eventually found her way to the Center on Halsted, Britta and the Homesharing Program. The new roommates navigated common situations; coordinating times to shower, setting boundaries around sex in the home (speci“cally, that there would be none). Clark, 73, and CallahanMoore, 69, are a success story, Larson said, but not all matches work out. Becoming friends and really hitting it off and having a lovely experience „ the reality is thats not guaranteed in this program, no matter how much screening we do. Things dont work out for a million different reasons,Ž Larson said. Youre at the intersection of peoples “nances and peoples housing, and those are dif“cult waters to navigate.Ž Some renters have extravagant expectations. Larson remembers one person who wanted the worlds most perfect arrangement for $500. I want parking, I want my own bathroom, I want it quiet, I want it clean, I dont want the person to be home that much. The reality is thats like impossible.Ž Sometimes, renters offer to do chores in exchange for reduced rent, but such an arrangement can create tension around how often and how well duties are completed. Your de“nition of clean might be different from my version of clean,Ž Larson said. Clark, who is retired but very busy as an Art Institute of Chicago greeter and speaker on LGBTQ issues, “rst considered a roommate after purchasing her Edgewater condo. But it wasnt a quick decision; she didnt really need the rental income, and it felt important to “nd the right person „ someone comfortable with her and enjoyable to be around but also respectful of time alone. After Clark met two men she did not feel were comfortable with her, Larson introduced her to Callahan-Moore. Following an application process, Callahan-Moore came over to see the apartment, with Larson as intermediary. I was extremely impressed with the space,Ž Callahan-Moore said, noting the expansive windows that show the rippling waves of Lake Michigan. Who wouldnt be?Ž She also immediately connected with Clark. I felt immediately safe, immediately welcome.Ž Since that “rst breakfast, only the seasons have changed „ during the summer, they eat breakfast on the balcony by the lake and dinner on the balcony overlooking miles of trees. When Callahan-Moore was waking up at 4 a.m. to begin long days as a mental health coordinator, Clark made her amazing breakfastsŽ of poached eggs, hollandaise sauce and fresh fruit. They are plotting hosting a salon centered on classical music; Callahan-Moore is helping Clark expand her piano skills. We laugh constantly,Ž Callahan-Moore said. Clark echoed her roommates sentiments: Within one month, she made my house a home.ŽRoommate matching programs make use of extra space adno=3624850-1

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Page 6 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018OUR TOWN „ SUNCOAST HOMESBy ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICHCOMMUNITY NEWS EDITORENGLEWOOD „ Jacque Hopkins teared up as she listened to the band play Saturday. I know if it werent for F.A.M.E., a lot of those kids couldnt be in the band,Ž Hopkins said. Kids have aspirations to be musicians and they wouldnt be able to do it if they couldnt afford an instrument. Instruments are expensive, one tuba can cost $5,000.Ž Hopkins is an original member of F.A.M.E. (Friends for the Advancement of Music Education) and is in charge of the make-shift saloon at the Music City Festival, a two-day event on Dearborn Street We started doing the saloon “ve years ago,Ž she said. I get costumes for all my girls and guys. We dress up to serve beer at the saloon. Even the tips go back to F.A.M.E. to buy instruments for all schools in Englewood and a few in North Port. We give the schools a wish list so they can tell us what instruments they want. We buy as many as we can. We get them at a discounted price.Ž The event was started by Jim Pivovar and Barry Bianche and has grown tremendously over the years. Last year we raised between $40,000 and $42,000 and we hope to surpass that this year,Ž Bianche said. We are in line to break $250,000 for the total weve given since we started 13 years ago.Ž On Saturday, Sarah Creech, 13, Alex Harris, 12, and Matthew Sacco, 12, all LA Ainger Middle School students sold F.A.M.E. T-shirts for $10 and $15. They were hoping to sell them all by sun down. I tested out for the clarinet and Mr. (Tim) Ostrow (music director) said I had a great sound,Ž Matthew said. A Lemon Bay High School student mentor said there arent a lot of tuba players. I thought I would try it. Its heavy and loud. I like it. Im in the intermediate band.Ž When we watched Harry Potter, I could hear the clarinet,Ž said Sarah, who is in the intermediate and advanced band. I could hear the bassoon,Ž chuckled Alex, who is in the jazz and advanced band. For Lauren Elene, selling honey, candles and pot holders at Music City is just one reason she goes to the event. The other is because shes a single mother of “ve whose son Kyan plays the drums. F.A.M.E. helped our family,Ž she said. I wouldnt be able to have him in band if it werent for F.A.M.E. and its supporters. The people in Englewood are so much more generous than the people in the big city where we are from. This is such a great community.Ž The Moose Riders donated $500 to F.A.M.E. Saturday and gave an additional $500 from the Bike Nights (sponsored by the Moose Riders and held in Englewood) to help with a trailer and instruments. All of the bands, American Made, The Echo Band, Matrix Band, McCarthy Band, Smoked Mullet Band, Mystic River Band, Copper Head, Maiden Cain, Kenny Rose, Saxy Blues, L&M Acoustic, Elderly Brothers, Dan Meadows, Johnny Awesome and Twinkle & Rock Soul Radio, all played for free and several have been involved all 13 years.Email: eallen@sun-herald.comHundreds raised for musical instruments Sarah Creech, 13, left, Alex Harris, 12, and Matthew Sacco, 12, all LA Ainger Middle School students, show o shirts on sale at the F.A.M.E. Music City on Saturday. They were asked by the school to volunteer to help F.A.M.E. Raven Cowell, 9, an Englewood Elementary School student, helps his mom make money at the festival. SUN PHOTOS BY ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICHJames Abner, Jacque Hopkins and Jim Marshall volunteer at the saloon that raises money for F.A.M.E. at the Music City fundraiser. KIRKPLANKitchens&Baths*NOT VALID WITH OTHER OFFERS. 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CALL 941-205-6406adno=3628273-1BUSINESS JournalWestchester Gold & Diamonds, Serving Charlotte County Over 37 YearsWestchester Gold and Diamond has served Port Charlotte and the surrounding area for 41 years. Their store in Baers Plaza at 4200 Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte, FL 33952 carries an eclectic blend of new and old. Shop not only unique custom and new pieces, but pre-loved and estate jewelry as well. Special coins, David Yurman pieces, and art deco jewelry are just a few of the items in stock. If you are on the search for timepieces, you can “ nd them there, from vintage wristwatches to Rolexes. They also have the stock and knowledge to service Rolex watches. There are even designer pieces for a low price. Westchester Gold sells predominantly jewelry but antiques also line the shelves and decorate corners. To browse jewelry online, visit Westchester Gold and Diamonds website: http:// westchestergold.com/ Whether youre in the market for a unique adornment or an interesting antique, Westchester Gold and Diamond might be the place for you! Westchester Gold & Diamonds, 4200-F Tamiami Trail, Port CharlotteAbsolute Blinds Has a Window Treatment For YouAbsolute Blinds is the BEST place to go for all your window treatments, specializing in hardwood plantation shutters! This three-generation family owned & operated business is managed by Doug and Brett Hamilton. Their family has over 18 years of knowledge & experience in Southwest Florida window treatments. All their shutters are American made, custom fabricated, and manufactured from furniture grade North American hardwoods. Looking for excellent customer service, quality products, and a life time guarantee on work? Call them today. You can enjoy the luxury that plantation shutters bring to your home. 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With the computerized engine analysis, you can be assured that the service required on your vehicle is necessary. True is well known as an excellent auto mechanic and the business enjoys an excellent reputation. Dr. Ds is located at 23415 Janice Avenue in the Whidden Industrial Park in Charlotte Harbor and the phone number is 941-743-3677 For the best service at a reasonable price, call or stop by Dr. Ds Auto Repair. Dr. Ds Auto Repair, 23415 Janice Avenue in the Whidden Industrial Park in Charlotte Harbor

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By ANNE EASKERSTAFF WRITERSixteen children of“cially became members of 10 families Wednesday during a mass adoption at the Charlotte County Justice Center. The hearing, overseen by Judge Mary C. Evans, was one of three events by the Childrens Network of Southwest Florida to highlight November as National Adoption Awareness Month. Adoptions are very important to us, because it ends in permanency for the children,Ž said CEO Nadereh Salim. We always say theres no unwanted children; theres just un-found families.Ž Florida Rep. Mike Grant was in attendance to observe the event and spoke brie”y, thanking the parents and grandparents for taking on the responsibility of parenting. Im pleased as punch to be here,Ž he said. The emotional bonds you have already formed are now going to be recognized legally, and thats just amazing.Ž Ranging in age from 1 to 13 years old, the children joined families big and small. The new parents mostly fostered to adopt, while some were relatives, and multiple sibling groups were adopted. Felix and Sandra Aviles welcomed 3-year-old Steven to their home, a toddler who has lived with them since he was 7 months old. Steven is just a few months younger than his sister So“a, who is also adopted. Theyre so good,Ž Sandra said. They already have a really close bond since theyre only three and a half months apart.Ž The Aviles also have an adopted son, Edwin, who is 16 years old. Raising toddlers has been a different experience, Sandra said. Edwin already had his own perceptions when they adopted him, but theyve been able to instill good principles and have a good in”uence on him, she said. It was de“nitely a calling in our hearts to adopt and foster,Ž she said. Its something Ive always wanted to do.Ž They credit their interest in adoption to their faith in God. Its something he put in our hearts to do,Ž she said. And you just want whats best for them, to give them hope for a good future.Ž Other children joined less traditional family structures. Robert Green adopted his 13-year-old nephew, Zechariah, who has lived for him for a year and a half, after Zechariah was taken away from his mom, Green said. Ive been around him his whole life, so its not anything new,Ž Green said. Were family, so its the only logical step in my book, versus letting someone else take him.Ž Green was already cracking dad jokes Wednesday, saying hes now Zechariahs duncle,Ž “lling the role of both dad and uncle. Maribel Arroyo adopted siblings Athan, 4, and Rose, 6, after what she said has been a long journey of fostering, with her partner, Ana. The couple, who has been together for 14 years, is also raising Bryson, 4, who was adopted by Ana last year. Theyve had all of the children for several years now. When they came up for adoption, we ran at the chance,Ž Arroyo said. Im very happy, but Ive been mom for so long, its nothing new.Ž Rose has Down Syndrome and several other health problems, and the family traveled to doctors appointments in Miami, Naples, and Fort Lauderdale. She only says a few words, but they love her to pieces.Ž Shes our daughter,Ž Ana said. We never said she was our foster daughter or anything like that. We treat them like theyre ours. Theyre our family.Ž She would encourage anyone to give fostering and adoption a shot if theyre at all interested. There are so many kids out there who need an opportunity to have a better way of life, to have a family,Ž she said. Dont be afraid. Dont be afraid to have your heart broken. That happens in life anyway.ŽEmail: aeasker@sun-herald.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 7OUR TOWN „ SUNCOAST HOMESPort Charlotte resident Michael Shea was killed Friday evening in a hit-and-run. The driver of a 2017 Nissan Sentra who hit Shea has not been identified and the case is still under investigation, the Florida Highway Patrol said Saturday in a press release. Shea, 67, was driving his 2014 Harley motorcycle northbound on U.S. 41, approaching the intersection of Jacaranda Blvd. On a green light, Shea approached the intersection still traveling north, according to FHP. The Nissan entered the intersection on a red light, turning left, and struck the left of Sheas motorcycle. Shea was separated from the vehicleŽ and pronounced deceased on the scene. Shea was wearing a helmet, according to the Florida Highway Patrol. The unidentified driver fled the scene on foot. FHP asks anyone with information regarding the crash or the unidentified driver to c all them at: 239-938-1800. The Charlotte County Sheriffs Office reported the following arrests: € Margarito Pegueros Vazquez, 31, of Southwest Palm Beach, Fla. Charge: operating a motor vehicle without a valid license. Bond: $500. € Twila Michelle Cooper, 52, 200 block of West Pine Valley Lane, Rotonda West. Charge: battery by intentional touch or strike. Bond: none. € Matthew Scott Kula, 31, 2800 block of Dixie Dr., Punta Gorda. Charge: possession or use of drug paraphernalia. Bond: $2,500. € Maurine White Abrams, 52, 22000 block of Bombay Dr., Port Charlotte. Charge: sentenced, serving 28 days concurrent. Bond: none. € Samantha Alyse Meyer, 24, 4000 block of Gardner Dr., Port Charlotte. Charge: battery by intentional touch or strike. Bond: none. € Fernando Romero Esteban, 28, of Gibsonton, Fla. Charge: operating a motor vehicle without a valid license. Bond: $3,000. € Sarah Rose Snellenberger, 34, of Fort Myers. Charge: violation of probation or community control. Bond: none. € Jermaine Wilson, 35, of Fort Myers. Charges: two counts of grand theft property of more than $300 but less than $5,000. Bond: $15,000. € Frederick R. Redwood, 54, of Fort Myers. Charge: violation of probation or community control. Bond: none. € Sandra Milena Orlas, 37, of Fort Myers. Charge: DUI. Bond: $1,500. € Angel Lisa Busch, 21, of Davie, Fla. Charges: three counts of underlying charges and failure to appear. Bond: none. € Won-Yong Cho, 42, of Cape Coral. Charges: knowingly driving while license suspended or revoked, possession or use of drug paraphernalia and possession of a controlled substance without a prescription. Bond: $2,100. € Abel Galarza, 29, of Arcadia. Charge: violation of probation or community control. Bond: none. € Moises Santiago-Perez, 36, of Arcadia. Charge: violation of probation or community control. Bond: $1,200. € Margo Lenice Dunn, 43, 5500 block of Papaya Dr., Punta Gorda. Charge: possession or use of drug paraphernalia. Bond: $2,500. € Kimberly Mia Butler, 48, 3400 block of Gulfbreeze Lane, Punta Gorda. Charges: possession or use of drug paraphernalia, failure to appear and underlying charge. Bond: $1,500. € Nikolay Valadimar Maldzhiev, 41, 3400 block of Croton Ter., Port Charlotte. Charges: battery by intentional touch or strike and resisting an ocer without violence. Bond: $12,500. € David Anthony Flick, 33, 100 block of Earnest St., Port Charlotte. Charges: disorderly intoxication and resisting an ocer without violence. Bond: $1,500. € Scott Jay Fontaine Jr., 37, homeless of Port Charlotte. Charges: failure to appear and three counts of underlying charges. Bond: none. € Kylie Amber Johnston, 22, 2500 block of Wilburn Ter., North Port. Charge: possession or use of drug paraphernalia. Bond: none. € Todd Michael Matsinger, 45, 2000 block of Marylyn Ave., Englewood. Charge: grand theft property of more than $300 but less than $5,000. Bond: $5,000. „ Compiled by Liz HardawayPort Charlotte man dies in hit-and-run The information for Police Beat is gathered from police, sheriffs office, Florida Highway Patrol, jail and fire records. Not every arrest leads to a conviction and guilt or innocence is determined by the court system. POLICE BEAT By ALEXANDRA HERRERA STAFF WRITERWEST VILLAGES „ The State College of Florida in Venice re cently hosted a survival event featuring lessons on how to survive off the land. The presentation featured Steve Claytor, who owns North Florida Survival & Adventure. During the hour-long disc ussion, Claytor talked about how to use natural surroundings to survive in case of an emergency, but also how to take care of yourself should you be in a situation where survival skills are tested. Claytors visit is part of an annual series which is put together by the SCF Green Team club. Language and Literature Prof essor Matthew Masucci said that the college features an annual lecture on things people fear. This year they chose surviving the apocalypse as a topic. He said that the talk was just expressing being prepared especially in Florida. We usually get together and bounce ideas around, we decided to bring in someone who spoke about survival,Ž Masucci said. The talk also featured education on things that can be eaten from SCFs Food Forest club. The forest was started by Jared Kirshner, who brought the idea to SCF Professor Woody McCree. I had suggested planting a forest for education,Ž Kirshner said. The forest started on a 15-by-15 plot of land, which the club is looking to expand. McCree said that is the next step for the club going forward. The plan is to extend the forest along the lake on campus. McCree is the adviser for the club and said the forest is student run and monitored. The plants in the forest are native, but also include edible non-native plants such as bananas and papayas. Some of the plants were featured during the presentation to teach people what they can use or eat while out in the forest. We brought examples and samples,Ž Kirshner said. He said it was showing the function of some plants; not all of them are for just food but some are also used to drink or work as repellents. Masucci said the forest provides students with a lesson growing foods but also just what is available. I hope it gives people a better connection to nature,Ž Kirshner said.Email: aherrera@sun-herald.comSCF hosts presentation on living off the land SUN PHOTO BY ALEXANDRA HERRERAThe SCF food forest will hopefully begin expansion soon. Several of the plants were featured during the Nov. 7 apocalypse presentation at the campus.16 local kids get families in mass adoption SUN PHOTO BY ANNE EASKERThe Arroyo family waits in the courtroom for their turn to ocially add two children to the family. Athan, 4, and Rose, 6, were adopted Wednesday by Isabel Arroyo and her partner, Ana. To view todays legal notices and more visit, www.oridapublicnotices.com To view todays legal notices and more visit, www.oridapublicnotices.com 3000 NOTICES 3112 FICTITIOUS NAME 11/11/ 20 1 8 3130 NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE : STEVE'S TOWING gives Notice of Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on 11/23/2018, 09:00 am at 23423 Janice Ave Lot D Port Charlotte, FL 33980, pursuant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes. STEVE'S TOW ING reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids. 3G5DA03E95S511879 2005 BUICK Publish: 11/11/2018 274754 3628248 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE : On 11/23/2018 at 08:00 AM an auction will take place at 2021 TAMIAMI TRL punta gorda fl. The vehicles which will be auct ioned include: 1FMHK7D93CGA00175 2012 FORD 1G4HP52L8SH534432 1995 BUIC 1HGCP26379A075874 2009 HOND 2CNBE134746904886 2004 CHEV W BANF33546CS36250 2006 BMW W DBTJ65J65F153807 2005 MERZ Publish: 11/11/2018 403890 3628052 Turn Your Trash Into Cash! 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Page 8 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018OUR TOWN „ SUNCOAST HOMESBy STEVE REILLYSTAFF WRITERENGLEWOOD „ The Englewood Water Districts new administrator is preparing for the districts transition into the future. The 20-year effort to install centralized vacuum sewers for most of the district is complete. No more sewer expansions are scheduled for the near future. But that doesnt mean the districts new administrator, Ray Burroughs, isnt looking ahead. I plan to get involved heavily in the Englewood community,Ž the 53-year-old Burroughs said this week in an interview with the Sun He took over the reins of the district from Roger Quick six months ago. People seem to get what we do and appreciate it.Ž The water district is in a state of transition, as many of its senior staff are retiring. The district, Burroughs suggested, is facing new challenges as it moves forward. New developments are springing up, like the Villages of Manasota Beach that intends to build 2,000 new residences in three phases. The development will be located east of State Road 776, off East Manasota Beach Road with a second egress planned on S.R. 776 near the Gulf Pines Memorial Park cemetery. District of“cials expect construction to begin within the next two years. The district board approved a land swap Tuesday that will protect its wells in the V illages of M anasota Beach development. Further into the future, the water district anticipates 10,000 new homes will be constructed in Winchester Ranch,Ž a development planned along South River Road. Then theres the fate of the districts 57-year-old lime softening water treatment plant. It can treat up to 3 million gallons of water daily. The water districts potable water is a blend of freshwater drawn from shallow wells and treated in its lime plant, while brackish water from the deeper levels of the aquifer is treated in its reverse osmosis plant. The water district doesnt know yet whether the Florida Department of Environmental Protection will permit refurbishing and expanding the lime treatment plant. That will come up in our next “ve years,Ž Burroughs said. If that plant is decommissioned, then we will just treat water in the RO plant. We have a building in place for the expansion of the RO system „ just in case.Ž As far as other routine upkeep of its plants and utility lines, Burroughs said the district alternates its focus between water and wastewater projects annually. With West Villages coming this way, we will also have to upgrade the wastewater treatment plant,Ž he said. Unlike Quick and administrator Mike Ray before him, Burroughs did not come up through the district ranks. Burroughs came to the water district from the private sector. He worked as an environmental specialist for the Florida Department of Health in Sarasota County from 2003 until he came to the water district. From 1996 to 2003, he worked as the director of drinking water services for Sanders Laboratories in Nokomis; from 1993 to 1996 as an analytical chemist and microbiologist for Microbac Laboratories in Venice. After serving eight years in the U.S. Air Force from 1984 to 1992, Burroughs worked as an environmental consultant based out St. Louis. Burroughs, who comes from a family of doctors and nurses, “rst served as a medic with the Air Force Flight Surgeons of“ce, but his interests lied elsewhere and he left the service specializing in environmental health. His duties included management of a base hazardous waste and drinking water programs. For more information about the Englewood Water District, visit englewoodwater.com.Email: reilly@sun-herald.comNew administrator for Englewood Water District SUN PHOTO BY STEVE REILLYOnly six months on the job, the Englewood Water Districts new administrator, Ray Burroughs, is ready to lead the utility into its future. By CHRIS KOURAPISSUN CORRESPONDENTIf you love Broadway musicals, Married to Broadway,Ž Englewood Performing Arts Societys “rst show of the season, will thrill you with show-stopping favorites sung by Ron Sharpe and Barbra Russell, on Nov. 13. The couple “rst met when they were playing the young romantic leads as Marius and Cosette in Les MiserablesŽ and after being married on stage hundreds of times, they decided to get married for real. Over the years Ron Sharpe has played both male leads of Marius and Jean Valjean on Broadway. His other Broadway credits include singing in original productions of The Scarlet PimpernelŽ where he portrayed Lord Hal, and in The Civil WarŽ where he performed as Private Conrad B. Russell performed with Sir Tim Rice and Alan Menken in Disneys King DavidŽ and reprised his role as Jean Valjean at the 25th anniversary production of Les MizŽ in 2014. In addition to performing as Cosette Barbra Russell has toured as Luisa in The FantastiksŽ and as Laurie in Oklahoma.Ž She can be heard on many TV and radio commercials and has performed with Tony Bennett at The US Open. Russell also produced and performed the music of Janette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy. Together Barbra and Ron have served as executive producers of the Broadway musical A Tale of Two Cities.Ž Its no surprise to learn that theyre the proud parents of four children, all who love to sing. Its good news that afternoon and evening performance tickets are available for all seven Englewood Performing Arts concerts, and single show tickets will continue to be sold on a space available basis. The EPAS committee will be selling season tickets from now until the date of the “rst performance on Nov. 13, and single tickets for any performance may be purchased at any time during the season,Ž explained publicity chairman, Judy Miller. The most popular season tickets costing $90 o ffer seating in the back and side sections, but for $140 patrons may update to center reserved seating that includes a tax deductible contribution of $50, a signi“cant savings over the per ticket cost of $25 for back and side seating and $30 for center reserved seats. A most versatile Celtic band Highland Way, EPAS second show of the season, is set for Dec. 11, followed by The Kingston Trio on Jan. 8. On Jan. 29 the River City Brass Band returns with their 28 piece British style brass band. Summer BreezinŽ follows on Feb. 19, with soft rock and on March 5 Close To YouŽ recreates the Carpenters experience. On March 26 the Sarasota Orchestra returns for a 37th appearance, always a perfect ending to the EPAS series. Call 941-473-2787 to order season tickets or single tickets for the Englewood Performing Arts Series at Englewood United Methodist Church, 700 E. Dearborn St., Englewood. Afternoon shows begin at 1:30 p.m. and evening concerts at 7:30 p.m. Visa, MasterCard and PayPal are accepted. If tickets are picked up at the door, they must be paid for in cash or by personal check. For more information go to englewoodpas. org or emailepas1@ verizon.net.Englewood Performing Arts Society opens season with Married to Broadway IF YOU GOMarried to Broadway,Ž Englewood Performing Arts Societys first show of the season, will thrill you with show-stopping favorites sung by Ron Sharpe and Barbra Russell, on Nov. 13. Call 941-473-2787 to order season tickets or single tickets for the Englewood Performing Arts Series at Englewood United Methodist Church, 700 E. Dearborn St., Englewood. Afternoon shows begin at 1:30 p.m. and evening concerts at 7:30 p.m. Visa, MasterCard and PayPal are accepted. If tickets are picked up at the door, they must be paid for in cash or by personal check. For more information go to http:// englewoodpas.org or emailepas1@verizon.net. Memorials in the Sun Honor your passed loved ones anytime with a personalized memorial tribute. Call (941) 206-1028 for rates. OBITUARIES CHARLOTTE Lisa M CrytserLisa M Crytser, 56 of Port Charlotte, Fla., died Monday Nov. 5, 2018. Arrangements are by Larry Taylor Funeral and Cremation Services.Richard Fitzgerald Richard Fitzgerald, 90, of Port Charlotte passed away Nov. 5, 2018. He was the son of John and Annette Fitzgerald, born Jan. 16, 1928, in Washington, D.C. He moved to Port Charlotte from New Jersey in 2010. He was employed as Pr esident of Yegen Associates for 20 years. Richard was a member and Vice Commodore of Stony Point Yacht Club and Emerson Country Club. He served in the Navy during World War II. Richard was a longtime parishioner of St. Peter the Apostle parish in River Edge, NJ, where he spearheaded the renovation of the convent for affordable senior housing in 1984. In Punta Gorda, he was a parishioner of the Sacred Heart Catholic Church. He was a member of the planning and zoning board in River Edge, NJ from 1981 to 1984, serving as its chairman from 1985 to 1986. Richard will be greatly missed by his wife Claire of 27 years, daughter Katherine (Peter) Van der Mey, Joanne (Dennis) Mulligan, Susan (Tom) McCarthy, Donna (David) Slaughter, Lisa (Jerry) Riordon; Son James (Stacey) Leonard; sisters Mary Neftel, Dolores Klopher, Sr. Catherine Fitzgerald; 10 Grandchildren and one Great-Grandson. The service will be held at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2018, at Sacred Heart Church. The family requests memorial donations be made to The Boys and Girls Club. To express condolences to the family, please visit www. LTaylorfuneral.com and sign the guest book. Arrangements are by Larry Taylor Funeral and Cremation Services.Lloyd D. Kemp Lloyd D. Kemp, 82, of Port Charlotte, Fla., died Sunday, Nov. 4, 2018, in Port Charlotte. Lloyd was born on March 17, 1936, to Jeralo and Lorretta (Malcolm) Kemp in Jamaica, West Indies. He immigrated to London, England in the late 50s and then to the United States in 1967 to New York working at Con Edison for almost 30 years before moving to Port Charlotte in 1995. Lloyd was a member of Community Life Center in Port Charlotte. He is survived by his loving family, his wife, Olive T. Kemp of Port Charlotte; a son, Junior Kemp of Brooklyn, New York; two daughters, Ann Haxton of Tampa, Florida and Sonia Nelson of Brooklyn, New York; and 13 grandchildren. Funeral services will be held Saturday, Nov. 17 at 11 a.m. at the Community Life Center, 19048 Edgewater Dr., Port Charlotte, Florida 33948. Visitation will be held at the church from 10 a.m. until 11 a.m. prior to the funeral service. Entombment will follow at Restlawn Memorial Gardens, Port Charlotte. Friends may visit online at www.robersonfh. com to extend condolences to the family. Arrangements by Roberson Funeral Home Port Charlotte Chapel.Vera M. LozenVera M. Lozen, 90, of Port Charlotte, Fla., died on Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018. Charlotte Memorial Funeral Home, Cemetery, and Crematory is handling arrangements. To send condolences, please visit www.charlotte memorial.com.Noreen Caie McCarthy Noreen Caie McCarthy, 75, of Burlington and Punta Gorda, Fla., passed away Saturday, Nov. 3, 2018. Born in Highland Park, Ill., daughter of the late John J. and Catherine (Ritchie) McCarthy, she was raised in Suf“eld and Winsted and received an Associates Degree from Bay Path Junior College. She had been employed in professional positions all over the world as her former husband, the late Charles W. Fretz, worked in Saudi Arabia. She had been a television editor and producer in Saudi Arabia and held various administrative and marketing positions with United Technologies. After her move to Florida, she enjoyed a career in real estate. She leaves her daughter, Jennifer L. Wilson and her husband, Kevin of Burlington; a son, Kevin C. Fretz and his wife Priscilla of Wethers“eld; seven grandchildren, Alex, Nicole, and Nicholas Fretz; Joey, Josh, Jenny, and Jeremiah Wilson; three great grandchildren Zach, Ben, and Kinsley; and cousins William and Joanie Ritchie and Richard and Bonnie McCarthy. There are no visiting hours. A private graveside service for family will be held in Riverside Cemetery, Barkhamsted. Contributions may be made to the donors local chapter of the American Cancer Society. The Carmon Funeral Home & Family Center of Avon is caring for the arrangements. For condolences please visit www. carmonfuneralhome.com. adno=3624427-1 Another Reason to Choose Our Crematory... It is unwise to pay too much, but it  s worse to pay too little. When you pay too much, you lose a little money that  s all. When you pay too little, sometimes you lose everything, because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the job it was bought to do. The common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a lot it cant be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well to add something for the risk you run, and, if you do that, you will have enough to pay for something better. Ž John Ruskin Author-Economist941-475-98003070 S. McCall Rd € Englewoodwww.englewoodfh.comSIMPLE CREMATION$69500 YourTraditionsFuneralHome.com941-921-4247AT NEEDPlus Transportation When Applicable.adno=3628152-1adno=3625145-1 www.royalpalmmemorial.comVeterans are Honored Every Day at Royal Palm Memorial Gardens.ROYAL PALM MEMORIAL GARDENS27200 Jones Loop Rd., Punta Gorda, FL 33982 941-639-2381Serving the community Since 1972Ask About Our Free Space Program 2018

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The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 9OUR TOWN „ SUNCOAST HOMES Editors note: Don Moores columns on veterans normally run on Mondays. With Veterans Day today, we are running a story to commemorate those who served in the military.Returning to Vietnam was no sentimental journey for Bob Ruybal after 50 years. Ruybal, 71, of North Port, was a member of the 101st Airborne Division chewed up on Hamburger HillŽ by North Vietnamese Army units in May 1969. I had no desire to go back to Vietnam. When I returned from Vietnam we were spit on and cursed at by our own people,Ž he said. Karen, my wife, was the one who always wanted me to go back. Weve been married 47 years. We became pen-pals during the war. When I returned from war we got married.Ž This year, his wife booked an eight-day package tour of the country that included airfare, “rst-class accommodations, food and in-country transportation for two for a total of $2,145. It was a 17-hour ”ight from Los Angeles to Taiwan,Ž Ruybal said. We had an hour layover and then we ”ew into Ho Ch Minh City (Saigon, South Vietnam).Ž When he stepped out of the plane in Ho Ch Minh City, he expected to smell the gas fumes and napalm like what he smelled when he got off the plane 50 years ago. In those days helicopters were going through the air and jets were ”ying over and the military was everywhere. This time, he was impressed, and wast overwhelmed by the fumes produced by the military; it smelled like Florida. When I left Saigon in 1969 it was a war zone. Bin Ha, where I was stationed with the 101st, was right next to Long Bin Air“eld.Ž Today, Bin Ha is a beautiful resort town with a golf course. Our guide who came with us was from Hanoi,Ž Ruybal said. He explained after the war ended in 1975 and the U.S. pulled out, the country fell to North Vietnam within six months. During the next 10 years South Vietnam became a Communist-run country dependent on Russian foreign aid. Then the Russian aid stopped and things got really tough for the people of South Vietnam. If a family was given 10 chickens to raise and the chickens produced 10 eggs a days the family had to return nine of the eggs to the government. It could only keep one. If the family slaughtered one of their chickens it got to keep the neck, feet and wing tips. The good parts were returned to the government. After 20 tough years, the Vietnamese government was unsustainable as a communist entity. At that point, under a new Communist chairman, the country became a combination communist-capitalistic regime. Then the country was opened to trade from around the world. Lots of big American companies invested in Vietnam. Canon camera from Japan came to Vietnam and so did other “rms from South Korea. Vietnam today is one of the top “ve countries in the world where Americans go to retire in the Central Highlands. Living is so affordable and safe. We had dinner one night at our “ve-star hotel on the roof-top in Ho Ch Minh City. A complete meal with hors doeuvres, main meal, desert, and drinks came to $21 total for both of us. On our tour we spent four days in Ho Ch Minh City. The people were so friendly,Ž Ruybal said. Saigon is a beautiful, cosmopolitan city much like many big cities in the U.S.Ž Then we spent a day on the Mekong Delta in the south of the country. We took a river boat up and down the the channels where our patrol boats went during the war.Ž Our group was offered a tunnel tour when we ”ew to Hanoi. I said, no because I lived through that during the war and I didnt want to do it again.Ž Hanoi was a completely different experience than Saigon. Its an old city in”uenced by the Chinese and less in”uenced by the French like down south. We took a “ve-hour drive to Long Bay, a beautiful resort area on the South Back to VietnamVeteran visits where he fought, recommends others do, too PROVIDED PHOTOBob and Karen Ruybal of North Port took an eight-day trip to Vietnam recently more, than 50 years after serving in the war-torn country with the 101st Airborne Division during the Vietnam War. MORE INFODon Moores stories are submitted to the Library of Congress and are available online through its official website. V isit www.donmoores wartales.com for more than 900 stories of veterans who grew up or moved to Southwest Florida. If you or someone you know is a veteran with a story to share, contact Don Moore at donmoore39@gmail. com or 941-426-2120.DON | 12 Don MOOREWar Stories adno=3628818-1adno=3627972-1 941-475-19594245 S. ACCESS RD. € ENGLEWOOD, FL 34224WE SALUTE THOSE WHO HAVE SERVED SO WE CAN BE FREE! adno=3628030-1 119 Tamiami Trail Unit C Port Charlotte, FL 33953 941-999-0717Fade Blow Out Comb Over Flat Top Straight Razor Mohawk Eyebrow Beard Shape Up Design Hot Towel Classic Cut Kids Cut Sunday and Monday closed Tuesday to Thursday 11am 7pm | Friday Saturday 11am 8pm Green ProductsThank You Veterans THANK YOUadno=3628713-1 2112 S. Tamiami Tr., Venice(2 doors south of AAA Travel) In Honor of Veterans Day, for a limited time only! 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Tamiami Tr., S., Venice, FL 34293 493-0025 HOURS : Mon.-Sat. 9am-5:30pm € Fri. 9am-8pm € Closed Sundays www.cookssportlandinc.com THANK YOU to our Veteransadno=3628812-1 OPENING IN NEW LOCATION EARLY SPRING OF 2019 Fishermens Village1200 W Retta Esplanade € Punta Gorda Fl 33950 Information: 941-575-9002 or WWW.FREEDOMISNTFREE.ORGHonoring All Who Serve The Board of Directors of theMilitary Heritage Museumsalutes and thanks the 53 volunteer Veterans who donate countless hours inspiring visitors to the Museum.THEY MAKE THE STORIES COME ALIVE! adno=3628408-1adno=3628815-1 CELEBRATING OUR VETERANS

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Page 10 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 OUR TOWN „ SUNCOAST HOMESBy LIZ HARDAWAYSTAFF WRITERIn 1990, Lori Howard returned from Cuba. Serving in the intelligence “eld for the U.S. Marines, she was used to discipline, camaraderie and 18-hour shifts. Back in the U.S., Howard kept busy with various jobs as a teacher and she worked for the government. But, since moving to North Port, shes having trouble “nding a job she actually likes. I dont think you ever really get u sed to it,Ž she said, being out of the military for some time now. Since her service, its frustrating to have employers who arent as ethical...I feel it shouldnt be this hard to find job satisfaction.Ž Howard was one of the handful of veterans who attended CareerSource Southwest Floridas Paychecks for PatriotsŽ job fair, where 30 employers, support agencies and 200 open positions were present to connect with those who served the country. A lot of what we do is based on military background,Ž said Jim Mundo, a U.S. Secret Service employee relations director and retired agent. T heyre very dependable...its an easy transition. We hire a lot of vets.Ž Mundo was looking to hire a special agent and uniformed divisions of“cer. A myriad of positions were available, such as a deputy at the Charlotte County Sheriffs Of“ce, a cook at IHOP, a home health aide for Right at Home, a clerk for the U.S. Census Bureau, a paramedic for Charlotte County Fire & EMS or a bank teller for Wells Fargo. CareerSource has helped 70 veterans since Nov. 2017, with their Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) setting veterans up with special services and bene“ts to help them successfully gain and retain employment. Sometimes when they come out (of the service), theyre a little lost,Ž said Hans Dettling, the employment security representative for CareerSource Southwest Florida. We want to make sure their skills and ability match with the position to ensure longevity.Ž Thats where Susan Allen comes in. As a veteran of the Navy herself, Allen talks with veterans and refers them to the proper agencies to get them specialized care and attention. We have to make sure theyre mentally ready (for employment),Ž she said. Veterans can have so many issues and a lot of times they dont want to talk about it. They dont want to ask for help.Ž The Charlotte County Clerk of Courts of“ce currently has four veteran employees. Amanda Rooney, the court services supervisor, served in Afghanistan as a medical support corpsman for the Navy. It was constantly go, go, go,Ž she said, but when returning as a civilian, I felt different, like I had no purpose... it took a few months to get back in the groove of things.Ž Employing a veteran can be very bene“cial: up to $9,600 in tax cuts and an eager learner. It also helps the veteran transition back into civilian life. When youre used to structure and that structures not there anymore, thats scary for a lot of veterans,Ž Allen said. If (a veteran) had a traumatic experience overseas, it gives them a reason to apply purpose,Ž Rooney said, and a reason to be here.Ž Rooneys time in the Navy has also helped her succeed at her job. After dealing with a certain number of emergency situations, I can pretty much handle when things hit the fan. It could always be worse.Ž Luke Graham, who served seven years in the Army and is now the veterans claims examiner for the Florida Department of Veterans Affairs, “nds many positive qualities veterans have as employees. The value of a vet,Ž he said, highlighting their trainability and adaptability. Veterans are results-driven people.Ž But, its becoming more apparent that more transitional assistance is needed,Ž Graham said. Post-traumatic stress is a natural reaction to an unnatural situation,Ž he said. Our standards for ourselves are higher than our standards for others,Ž Howard said. I could not have foreseen the difference the Marine Corps would make in my personality and future,Ž she said. It isnt just something that we join; it is something that we become.Ž CareerSource Florida is a statewide workforce policy and investment board, including partnerships with the Department of Economic Opportunity, 24 local workforce development boards and 100 career centers. CareerSource connects businesses with skilled employees for free, and offers training programs and education opportunities.Email: Lhardaway@sun-herald.comTheyre very dependableEmployers value military experience Veterans are very dependable,Ž said Jim Mundo, the employee relations director for the U.S. Secret Service. SUN PHOTOS BY LIZ HARDAWAYRight at Home representatives Aubrey Chavez (left) and Jamie Landry (right) think veteran Lori Howard (center) would make an excellent home health aide. The most experience we look for is having a heart,Ž Chavez said. DETTLING Port Charlotte resident Robert Schoenle served six years in the Air Force. Knowing Morse code, and past jobs including hotel management and selling insurance, Ive had eight dierent lives,Ž he said. adno=3628818-1 The Englewood Elk Lodge 401 North Indiana Ave. 941-474-1404adno=3628407-1Honors You for Serving Our Country Corey Steinfath, Owner941-697-70714990 Placida Rd., EnglewoodExpert Foreign & Domestic Collision Repairadno=3628710-1 H O O N O R R I N G G T T H O S S E W W H O O S E E R V E D VETERANS DAY Catholic Memorial MassSARASOTA NATIONAL CEMETERY 9810 STATE HWY 72, SARASOTA SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11 AT 2:45 P.M.Diocese of Venice in Florida adno=3629143-1 We honor and pay special tribute to all Veterans. We show appreciation to you & your families. We thank you for your service to our Country.Thanks for Your SERVICE Through the Years adno=3628709-11600 South McCall Rd. Englewood, FL 34224 CELEBRATING OUR VETERANS

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Page 12 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018OUR TOWN „ SUNCOAST HOMES adno=3627502-1NOW OPEN Family owned & operated for over 50 yearsTop Quality Shades2675 Tamiami Trail | Port Charlotte, FL 33952 941-624-2200 | Tuesday Saturday 9:30-5:00pmLargest Collection of Lampshades Available in SWFL Custom Granite CountertopsLARGEST INVENTORY IN OUR AREA!! FREE ESTIMATES 18440 Paulson Dr., Suite B € Port Charlotte 941-624-5958 Mon-Fri 9-5 € Sat 9 Noon € Sun Closed www.acergranite” a.com Licensed & Insured READERS CHOICE AWARD2018 adno=3625578-1China Sea near Hanoi. We spent time driving around there. H Long Bay has these gorgeous mountains coming out of the middle of the bay. Karen and I saw the changing of the guard at Ho Ch Minhs mausoleum in Hanoi,Ž Rubyal said. It is very similar to Arlington. They have a changing of the guard on the hour. Its very respectful and very nicely done. Ho Ch Minh died three years before the end of the Vietnam War. His goal was to be buried in Saigon. When the war ended, after his death, they kept his body in Hanoi and renamed Saigon Ho Ch Minh City, in his honor. Im so thankful we didnt destroy that country. Its recovered and is thriving. The people of Vietnam have no animosity toward the U.S.Ž Looking back on their trip to Vietnam, Ruybal said, Karen knew what effect the war had on me. All these years I said, No, no, no. I didnt want to go back. Im so thankful she convinced me to go. I would highly recommend that anyone who fought there during the war and has bad memories of the place should make the trip. Its worth every second of it.ŽDONFROM PAGE 9 NOT ALL LASERS ARE CREATED EQUAL!Dr. Farag provides the ONLY FDA Approved Laser Gum Therapy for Periodontal Diseases. The 1st Dentist in Charlotte County to Provide Patients with Laser Gum Therapy! Laser Gum TherapyLaser Gum Therapy Less Pain and Discomfort than the Traditional Alternatives. adno=3625577-1 Now Accepting New Patients Joseph H. Farag D.M.D. 3441 Conway Blvd Port Charlotte(941) 764-9555www.drfarag.com Southwest Floridas Premier Celebration of The BlockParty ThankYouToOur PremierSponsors! adno=3628035-1

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Feeling FitPort Charlotte € Punta Gorda € North Port € Englewood € ArcadiaSunday, November 11, 2018www.yoursun.comDespite numerous and ongoing attempts to derail it, the Patient Protection & Affordable Care Act (PPACA), more commonly referred to as the Affordable Care Act, ACA or Obamacare, is still on the books. Considered the most sweeping change to the U.S. healthcare system since Medicare and Medicaid were created in 1965, the 2010 ACA guarantees that most Americans can receive or buy health insurance. The ACAs health insurance exchanges have survived a barrage of federal actions that threatened to topple them. Florida uses the Federal Health Insurance Exchange (also known as the Marketplace), so residents may enroll through HealthCare.gov. The Open Enrollment Period for the federal exchange began on Nov. 1 and runs through Dec. 15 for coverage starting on Jan. 1, 2019. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is taking a strategic and cost-effective approach to inform individuals about open enrollment, deliver a smooth enrollment experience and use consumer feedback to drive ongoing improvements. Consumers can visit HealthCare.gov, or CuidadodeSalud.gov for Spanish speakers, to preview 2019 plans and prices. Florida has the highest exchange enrollment of By MELISSA HEALYLOS ANGELES TIMESAlong with soulful eyes, endearingly long necks and warm fuzzy coats, llamas have a far less appreciated feature: They make an array of immune system antibodies so tiny they can “t into crevices on the surface of an invading virus. That feat could one day protect humans from entire families of ”u viruses that bedevil scientists with their unpredictable and shape-shifting ways. All, potentially, with a once-a-year puff up the nose. In a study in Fridays edition of the journal Science, a team from the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla and their international colleagues have taken a major step toward the long-sought goal of developing a universal vaccine against in”uenza. When they tested their intranasal formulation in mice, it quickly conferred complete protection against a raft of human ”u strains adapted to mice. Those include A viruses, such as the H1N1 swine ”uŽ that touched off a global pandemic in 2009, and B viruses, which occur only in humans. Against H1N1, a dose of the experimental vaccine was shown to protect for at least 35 days „ a span of time equivalent to more than a single ”u season for humans. Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, offered a full-throated appreciation for the new study, which received funding from the National Institutes of Health. From a scienti“c and technical standpoint, this is really a very elegant study „ the highest quality of science,Ž Fauci said. He praised it for demonstrating that in order to protect people from pathogens that can change or emerge unpredictably, scientists must construct vaccines that can knock down an array of viruses, even in people whose immune systems are fragile or compromised. In”uenza is a viral scourge that kills as many as 650,000 people each year, according to the World Health Organization. To “ght it, the research team borrowed new techniques from immunology, microbiology, nanotechnology and genetic Health & Hope DanMEARNSC Scientists may have found the key ingredient for a universal flu vaccine, and it comes from llamasTNS PHOTOScientists think they have developed a universal u vaccine; The key ingredient that can take on the u virus may come from llamas. By BRUCE HOROVITZKAISER HEALTH NEWSI was convinced I would become an adult when I turned 21. But now, Im certain that turning 65 was the watershed moment that “nally grew me up. Im pleased as pomegranate punch to be 65 „ and alive. Not just alive and breathing, but actively engaged in making the right choices about this next chapter. We enter this phase of life without a playbook or anything equivalent to institutions like elementary school and college that prepare youth for adulthood,Ž said James Firman, CEO of the National Council on Aging, who turned 65 two years ago. Theres really nothing to prepare us for the transition to this next phase of life.ŽPreparing for life after 65:Consider enrolling in Medicare Part A, to cover hospitalization expenses. It works for me because my family is still covered under my wifes health care plan. Double up on checkups. My annual visit to my primary care doctor evolved into a biannual visit. Age 65 is a time to proactively visit a geriatric physician instead of just going when youre in trouble,Ž said Dr. Ardeshir Hashmi, director of the Center for Geriatric Medicine at Cleveland Clinic. Dont wait until things get to a point where youre in a cycle of being in and out of the hospital all the time.Ž Starting at age 65, he said, these visits should last longer than the standard 20 minutes „ so older patients have time to discuss whats on their minds. Older patients who do this regularly tend to require minor tweaksŽ instead of major repairs, said Hashmi. Schedule annual visits to the dermatologist, ophthalmologist „ and visits every “ve years to the gastroenterologist. Establishing a coordinated care team becomes more important at 65,Ž said Jean Setzfand, senior vice president of programs at AARP. Take the leap and sign up for longterm health insurance. My wife and I “nally did after putting it off for years. Remember, its a lot easier „ and cheaper „ to get when youre younger than 65. Stick to a vaccine regimen. Vaccines are important again. Ive since received my “rst pneumonia vaccine. My doctor also told me to get the new shingles vaccine, Shingrix, because I developed shingles about “ve years ago. Evaluate your diet. I have mostly stopped eating red meat, except for the very occasional burger. I now opt for meals mostly composed of fruit, veggies and my new diet staple that I used to gag on as a kid: salmon. Bone up on Social Security. I attended a free county-funded seminar at the local library. Then, to discuss my personal needs, I met (for free) with the PHOTOS PROVIDED Bruce Horovitz with his wife, Evelyne, and daughters, Becca (left) and Rachel, at a lakeside campground near Interlaken, Switze rland, where the family travels each summer. Bruce Horovitz plays Wallyball with friends early every Friday morning at a local recreation center in Falls Church, Virginia.Who knew? Life begins (again) at 65Obamacare sign-ups underway DAN | 9 VACCINE | 10 LIFE | 10 Charlotte Heart & Vascular Instituteof North Port Now Accepting New Patients. CALL TODAY to schedule an Appointment 9417645858Michael Malone, D.O.Amit Gupta, M.D.Nicolai Mejevoi, M.D.Melody Strattan, D.O.14575 South Tamiami Trail €North Port, FL 34287 CharlotteHeartandVascular.com Cardiology Peripheral Vascular Disease Venous Disease Electrophysiology

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Page 2 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 Feeling FitPresident Michael Beatty Publisher Glen Nickerson Feeling Fit Editor Marie Merchant feelingfit@sun-herald.com 941-206-1135 Deadlines:Support groups and News & Notes are published as space permits. To be included send the information to feelingfit@sun-herald.com. Deadlines for listings are the Monday prior to publication.Medical Advertising Executives Bibi R. Gafoor 941-258-9528 bgafoor@sun-herald.com Jim Commiskey 941-258-9526 jcommiskey@sun-herald.com Elaine Schaefer eschaefer@sun-herald.com 941-205-6409By LINDSEY TANNERAP MEDICAL WRITERIt was launched decades ago as an anesthetic for animals and people, became a potent battle“eld pain reliever in Vietnam and morphed into the trippy club drug Special K. Now the chameleon drug ketamine is “nding new life as an unapproved treatment for depression and suicidal behavior. Clinics have opened around the United States promising instant relief with their uniqueŽ doses of ketamine in IVs, sprays or pills. And desperate patients are shelling out thousands of dollars for treatment often not covered by health insurance, with scant evidence on long-term bene“ts and risks. Chicago preschool teacher Lauren Pestikas long struggled with depression and anxiety and made several suicide attempts before trying ketamine earlier this year. The price tag so far is about $3,000, but its worth every dime and penny,Ž said the 36-year-old. Pestikas said she feels much better for a few weeks after each treatment, but the effects wear off and she scrambles to “nd a way to pay for another one. For now, ketamine has not received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating depression, though doctors can use it for that purpose. Ketamine has been around since the 1960s and is widely used as an anesthesia drug during surgery because it doesnt suppress breathing. Compared to opioids such as morphine, ketamine isnt as addictive and doesnt cause breathing problems. And some studies have shown that ketamine can ease symptoms within hours for the toughest cases. Its potential effects on depression were discovered in animal experiments in the late 1980s and early 1990s showing that glutamate, a brain chemical messenger, might play a role in depression, and that drugs including ketamine that target the glutamate pathway might work as antidepressants. Conventional antidepressants like Prozac target serotonin, a different chemical messenger, and typically take weeks to months to kick in „ a lag that can cause severely depressed patients to sink deeper into despair. Ketamines potential for almost immediate if temporary relief is what makes it so exciting, said Dr. Jennifer Vande Voort, a Mayo Clinic psychiatrist who has treated patients with depression since February. We dont have a lot of things that provide that kind of effect. What I worry about is that it gets so hyped up,Ž she said. The strongest studies suggest its most useful and generally safe in providing short-term help for patients who have not bene“ted from antidepressants. That amounts to about one-third of the roughly 300 million people with depression worldwide. It truly has revolutionized the “eld,Ž changing scientists views on how depression affects the brain and showing that rapid relief is possible, said Yale University psychiatrist Dr. Gerard Sanacora, who has done research for or consulted with companies seeking to develop ketamine-based drugs. But to become standard depression treatment, he said, much more needs to be known. Last year, Sanacora co-authored an American Psychiatric Association task force review of ketamine treatment for mood disorders that noted the bene“ts but said major gapsŽ remain in knowledge about long-term effectiveness and safety. Most studies have been small, done in research settings and not in the real world. When delivered through an IV, ketamine can cause a rapid increase in heart rate and blood pressure that could be dangerous for some patients. Ketamine also can cause hallucinations that some patients “nd scary. There are some very real concerns,Ž Sanacora said. We do know this drug can be abused, so we have to be very careful about how this is developed.Ž Dr. Rahul Khare, an emergency medicine specialist in Chicago, “rst learned about ketamines other potential bene“ts a decade ago from a depressed and anxious patient he was preparing to sedate to “x a repeat dislocated shoulder. He said, Doc, give me what I got last time. For about three weeks after I got it I felt so much better,Ž Khare recalled. Khare became intrigued and earlier this year began offering ketamine for severe depression at an outpatient clinic he opened a few years ago. He also joined the American Society for Ketamine Physicians, formed a year ago representing about 140 U.S. doctors, nurses, psychologists and others using ketamine for depression or other nonapproved uses. There are about 150 U.S. ketamine clinics, compared with about 20 three years ago, said society co-founder Dr. Megan Oxley. Khare said the burgeoning “eld is like a new frontierŽ where doctors gather at meetings and compare notes. He has treated about 50 patients with depression including Pestikas. Theyre typically desperate for relief after failing to respond to other antidepressants. Some have lost jobs and relationships because of severe depression, and most “nd that ketamine allows them to function, Khare said. Typical treatment at his clinic involves six 45-minute sessions over about two weeks, costing $550 each. Some insurers will pay about half of that, covering Khares of“ce visit cost. Patients can receive boosterŽ treatments. They must sign a fourpage consent form that says bene“ts may not be long-lasting, lists potential side effects, and in bold letters states that the treatment is not government-approved. At a recent session, Pestikass seventh, she leaned back on a reclining white examining-room chair as a nurse hooked her up to a heart and blood pressure monitor. She grimaced as a needle was slipped into the top of her left palm. Khare reached up with a syringe to inject a small dose of ketamine into an IV bag hanging above the chair, then dimmed the lights, pulled the window curtains and asked if she had questions and was feeling OK. No questions, just grateful,Ž Pestikas replied, smiling. Pestikas listened to music on her iPhone and watched psychedelic videos. She said it was like a controlled acid tripŽ with pleasant hallucinations. The trip ends soon after the IV is removed, but Pestikas said she feels calm and relaxed the rest of the day, and that the mood boost can last weeks. Studies suggest that a single IV dose of ketamine far smaller than used for sedation or partying can help many patients gain relief within about four hours and lasting nearly a week or so. Exactly how ketamine works is unclear, but one idea is that by elevating glutamate levels, ketamine helps nerve cells re-establish connections that were disabled by depression, said ketamine expert Dr. Carlos Zarate, chief of experimental therapies at the National Institute of Mental Health. A small Stanford University study published in August suggested that ketamine may help relieve depression by activating the brains opioid receptors. Janssen Pharmaceuticals and Allergan are among drug companies developing ketamine-like drugs for depression. Janssen leads the effort with its nasal spray esketamine. The company “led a new drug application in September. Meanwhile, dozens of studies are underway seeking to answer some of the unknowns about ketamine including whether repeat IV treatments work better for depression and if theres a way to zero in on which patients are most likely to bene“t. Until there are answers, Zarate of the mental health institute said ketamine should be a last-resort treatment for depression after other methods have failed.High hopes and hype for experimental depression drug ketamine AP PHOTOSSince starting treatments with ketamine infusions, Lauren Pestikas says she feels much better for a few weeks after each session. Lauren Pestikas sits as she receives an infusion of the drug ketamine during a 45-minute session at an outpatient clinic in Chicago. Dr. Rahul Khare poses for a portrait at his outpatient Chicago clinic. Khare, an emergency medicine specialist, has treated about 50 patients with ketamine since he began oering it for severe depression earlier this year. Its never too late to get theSMILEyouve always wanted!Call Dr. Pepper for a free Invisalign treatment consult!941-629-2221|Charlotteadvancedortho.com 3100 Port Charlotte Blvd | Port Charlotte, FL 33952Invisalign and the Invisalign logo, among others, are trademarks of Align Technology, Inc., and are registered in the U.S. and other countries. Dr. Christina S. Pepper ABO Board Certi“ ed Orthodontist

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The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 3By NEIL B. ZUSMAN, M.D., FACSZUSMAN EYE CARE CENTERAn estimated 24 million Americans now have diabetes, with the number expected to grow at least 5 percent annually in future years. One serious consequence of the disease can be vision loss or blindness. November is Diabetic Eye Disease Awareness Month, and Zusman Eye Care Center urges anyone who may be at risk for diabetes to see their ophthalmologist and primary care physician. The earlier diabetes is caught and appropriate lifestyle changes and treatment begin, the better the chance of avoiding vision loss and other health consequences. Hispanic-Americans are especially at risk for diabetes and related eye problems, but most are unaware of their heightened susceptibility, several recent studies show. Among HispanicAmericans older than 40, one in “ ve is diabetic, and almost half of this group have diabetic retinopathy, abnormal blood vessel changes in the eyes retina and optic nerve area. Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of vision loss and blindness in this ethnic group. Studies show that many do not receive the screening and treatment they need due to obstacles to care, including lack of health insurance and language barriers. This is a tragedy waiting to happen,Ž said Neil B. Zusman, M.D. Effective treatments, including annual eye exams, can reduce severe vision loss in diabetics by up to 94 percent.Ž In the United States, one-third of those with diabetes are unaware of it. Some “ nd out when their ophthalmologist notices changes in their retina „ the light-sensitive area at the back of the eye „ during a dilated eye exam. Type 2 diabetes is much more common than Type 1; both types can affect eye health. Nearly 5.5 million Americans age 18 and older have diabetic retinopathy. In addition to controlling their blood sugar, people with diabetes should work with their primary care physician to control their blood pressure, since both are important to slowing the development of diabetic retinopathy. Diabetics are also more likely to develop glaucoma, a complex disease that damages the optic nerve, which relays images from the eye to the brain. Zusman Eye Care Center and the American Academy of Ophthalmology recommend that people with Type 2 diabetes see an ophthalmologist (an Eye M.D.) at the time of diagnosis and annually thereafter. Those with Type 1 diabetes should see an ophthalmologist within “ ve years of diagnosis and then yearly. Women who have either diabetes type should see an Eye M.D. before they become pregnant or early in the “ rst trimester. Also, the Academy now recommends that adults with no signs or risk factors for eye disease get a baseline eye disease screening at age 40, when early signs of disease and changes in vision may start to occur. Based on the results of the initial screening, an Eye M.D. will prescribe the necessary intervals for follow-up exams. In the initial stages, people with diabetic retinopathy may not notice their vision changing. Diabetics sometimes experience rapid changes in blood sugar that can temporarily cause blurry vision even when retinopathy is not present. If a person notices a few specks or spots ” oating in his visual “ eld, this may mean he has developed proliferative diabetic retinopathy, the growth of abnormal new blood vessels on the retina and optic nerve. High blood sugar levels have been linked in studies to retinal blood vessel abnormalities. Blurred vision may occur when the macula „ the small area at the center of the retina „ swells as it “ lls with ” uid that has leaked from retinal blood vessels. Because damage to the eye often develops slowly, early detection of diabetes and control of blood sugar through diet and medications can make a crucial difference in saving vision. Effective diabetic retinopathy treatments include laser photocoagulation for early to moderate stages and a microsurgery called vitrectomy for repair of eyes with extensive damage. Injectable and oral medications that act on abnormal blood vessels to control diabetic retinopathy before vision loss occurs are now in development. Early detection would be key to the effectiveness of these treatments, also. Additional information on diabetic retinopathy can be found on www. GetEyeSmart.org. Zusman Eye Care Center is a state of the art facility providing a variety of services ranging from routine eye exams to medical and surgical treatment of eye disease. Dr. Zusman specializes in no stitch, no needle, no patch cataract surgery under topical anesthesia. He also performs laser surgery and eyelid surgery. Additional interests include glaucoma, diabetes, macular degeneration and the diagnosis and treatment of ocular trauma/Injuries. Dr. Zusman is a board-certi“ ed ophthalmologist and a consultant for the Tampa Bay Rays. He was voted Best Ophthalmologist in Charlotte County from 2011-2015, 2018. He has been serving Charlotte County since 1988 Zusman Eye Care Center is located at 3430 Tamiami Trail, Suite A, Port Charlotte. For more information, call 941-624-4500.Diabetes threatens the eyesight of many unsuspecting Americans IMAGE PROVIDEDBy GREGORY WHYTETHE CULTURAL CENTER OF CHARLOTTE COUNTYS FITNESS CENTERIf you are 55 or older, it is quite possible that you already possess one or more diseases or conditions that are likely to decrease your ability to live your life to its fullest. Conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, asthma, arthritis, respiratory disease and high blood pressure that are familiar to many seniors do not have to prevent you from living a healthy and ful“ lling life. A program that has been helping folks improve their “ tness and health for over 30 years is Fusion One. It is a naturalŽ and holistic health program that is safe, simple and effective. Since its creation in the late 70s, the program has addressed the health needs of thousands without deliberately or carelessly harming anyone. This fact is consistent with a guiding principle of the program. This principle simply states that good health can, and should be had without harm or injury to those seeking it.Ž The user friendlinessŽ and effectiveness of Fusion One are re” ected in the vast number of its practitioners who remain with the program for years. In addition, the number of people who are practicing Fusion One is increasing at an enormous rate. The popularity of the program is due to a number of factors. The principal ones are, again, the simplicity and ease of performing its exercises and the tremendous bene“ ts that are quickly had through their practice. In a general way, Fusion One will assist in preventing certain illnesses. Furthermore, its practice will help to slow the aging process, improve the circulation of the blood, tone muscles, relax tensed nerves, strengthen muscles and bones, improve coordination and balance, focus the mind and foster deep relaxation. In more speci“ c ways, Fusion One provides the following bene“ ts: € It helps control daily stress € It is capable of “ rming and ” attening the abdominal region € It improves breathing and combats respiratory problems € It increases ” exibility € It improves balance and helps prevent falling € It strengthens muscles € It eliminates pain and stiffness found at various parts of the body € It encourages participation in “ tness and health promoting activities. We know that the exercises and other activities of Fusion One are performed slowly, require a minimum of time, effort and strength and produce bene“ ts that are many and quickly had. We also know that a portion of the exercises are performed while sitting and that the exercises can be practiced at any time, require little space and make use of no expensive, bulky or complicated equipment. In addition, we know that Fusion One is a relatively inexpensive activity that may be performed by individuals or by groups of people. All of these features help to make it appealing to most people. Furthermore, because of the bene“ ts it offers and its user friendlyŽ nature, people are more likely to participate in its practice. It should also be noted that Fusion One offers a vast number of exercises that are ideal for the workplace. These exercises may be done while sitting at a desks or even in the lunch or break area. Techniques to prevent or combat job-related stress, eye strain, lower back injury, mental fatigue, decreased concentration and ef“ ciency and weight gain due to inactivity are all offered by the Fusion One program. For additional information on Fusion One or its available classes, contact the Cultural Center of Charlotte Countys Fitness Center at 941-6254175, ext. 263.Using Fusion One to improve your health Cancer Support MinistryFirst United Methodist Church offers a scripturally based cancer support ministry to anyone affected by this life altering diagnosis. Whether you are new diagnosis or have been battling for a long time, the cancer ministry provides a place where people who understand the treatment journey are available to help, listen and support patients, as well as survivors, caregivers and family members. The Cancer Support Ministry meets the “ rst Wednesday of every month at 6:30 p.m. in room 9 at 507 W. Marion Ave., Punta Gorda. All adult cancer survivors and their caregivers are welcome to attend, regardless of cancer type, church af“ liation or faith base. For more information, contact Mitzi Kohrman, kohrman1562@ comcast.net.Caregivers Support GroupPort Charlotte United Methodist Church, 21075 Quesada Ave., Port Charlotte, hosts a caregiver support group from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. every Wednesday. The cost is free and is open to any caregiver dealing with a care-receiver with any debilitating disease. There are no requirements to join the group. For more information, contact Mike Boccia at 941-815-6077.Co-Dependents Anonymous (CoDA)Co-Dependents Anonymous (CoDA) is a Twelve Step Fellowship of men and women whose common purpose is recovery from CoDependence and the development and maintenance of healthy relationships. The Coda meetings in the area meet at the Oasis Alana Club at 2936 S. McCall Road, Englewood. Monday Step from 7 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Thursday Open from 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Friday from 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. For more information, contact Barbara at 941-474-4190.Hollys HopeHollys Hope, a group formed by Joan and Ed Morgan after their daughter Holly died by suicide in 2017, will host the “ rst support group in North Port to help with grief from suicide. The group will meet on the fourth Monday of every month at 6 p.m. in Module Three outside New Hope Community Church, 5600 S Biscayne Drive. For more information on the group, contact Vogel at 317250-7316, or email at amy.vogel98@ gmail.com. Support Groups Happiness is..... Finding a furry friend in the Classifieds adno=3621991-1 READERS CHOICE AWARD2018 Robotic Hip and Knee SurgeryMAKO Robotic Arm (RIO) offers ALL of the following:€ Minimal hospitalization € Smaller incision € Less scarring € Reduced blood loss € Also bene“ t from ART’ Accelerated Recovery TechniquesNick Connors, M.D.Board Certi“ ed & Speciality Trained in knee, hip & shoulder replacement 1st in Charlotte County using RIO(As seen on WINK-TV)CALL TODAY!941.629.6262 or 941.639.6699www.AdvancedOrthopedicCenter.com 2003-2018

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Page 4 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 NEWS & NOTESNeuro Challenge Foundation for Parkinsons€ Port Charlotte Parkinsons Support Group with Carisa Campanella, NCF Program Manager and Courtnie Giddens, NCF Care Advisor; Murdock Baptist Church, 18375 Cochran Blvd., Port Charlotte from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Nov. 13. € North Port Wellness Club: Improving Outcomes with Vision in People with ParkinsonsŽ with Anne Marie Oliveto, OT; Sarasota Memorial Health Care System, SMH North Port Medical Plaza, (2nd Floor Conference Room), 2345 Bobcat Village Center Road, North Port, from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Nov. 14. € Englewood Parkinsons Support Group: Ask the Elder Care AttorneyŽ with Attorney Kevin Staas, Staas Law Group; St. Davids Episcopal Church, 401 S. Broadway, Englewood, from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on Nov. 16. € North Port JFCS Care Partner Connection with Carolyn Stephens, LCSW (Open Forum and Sharing) and Parkinsons Power Hour with Karla Brody and Courtnie Giddens; Neuro Challenge Foundation: North Port, 5600 Peace River Road, North Port, from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Nov. 21. € North Port JFCS Care Partner Connection with Carolyn Stephens, LCSW (Open Forum and Sharing) and Parkinsons Power Hour with Carissa Campanella and Courtnie Giddens; Neuro Challenge Foundation: North Port, 5600 Peace River Road, North Port, from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Nov. 28. € North Port Voice Aerobics with Mary Spremulli, SLP: An exercise program focusing on breath support, posture, and vocal function exercises for improved vocal performance; Neuro Challenge Foundation: North Port, 5600 Peace River Road, North Port, from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Nov. 29. € Venice Movers and Shakers PD Discussion Group: Lessons Learned from CopingŽ with Edie Anderson, Ambassador, Davis Phinney Foundation; (A Learning and Support Discussion Group focusing on the Cognitive and Behavioral Aspects of PD), Jacaranda Public Library, 4143 Woodmere Park Blvd., Venice, from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Nov. 29. € Punta Gorda Parkinsons Support Group: Care Partners and PwP Breakout Groups with Carisa Campanella and Courtnie Giddens; Punta Gorda Civic Association, 2001 Shreve St., Punta Gorda, from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on Nov. 30. € Neuro Challenge Foundation Crafters Guild Holiday Craft Fair, (all proceeds from the Craft Fair are utilized to fund Neuro Challenge Foundation Programs and Services): Sarasota Memorial Health Care Center at Clark Road, 5880 Rand Blvd., Classroom A Sarasota, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Nov. 30.Twins Tot Walk & 5KThe Punta Gorda/Port Charlotte Bridge Twins Tot Walk will be held today, at Laishley Park, 120 Laishley Park, Punta Gorda. Registration begins at 4 p.m. with a 5 p.m. vigil and walk immediately following. Strollers welcome on the Walk. Teams are encouraged but not necessary. For more information, visit runsignup.com/Race/Events/FL/ PuntaGorda/TwinsWalk5K.Englewood CRA to host Veterans Day celebrationThe Englewood Community Redevelopment Area and the Friends of Englewood Veterans Memorial and Freedom Pavilion is hosting its third annual Veterans Day Celebration of Honor at 11 a.m. today, at the Englewood Veterans Memorial, 10 Harbor Lane, Englewood. The event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served. For more information, call the Sarasota County Contact Center at 941-861-5000 or visit www.scgov.net.More Than Weight LossJoin Chrisanna Harrington, dietitian and counselor for a discussion on more than weight loss.Ž Understand how the food we eat can impact our health and cognition. She explains why people crave sweets, have dif“culty losing weight and start to have brain fogŽ in their 40s and 50s. Anyone who is thinking about dieting, weight loss surgery or has been advised by their doctor to lose weight should hear this lecture to understand just how nutrition impacts disease. The discussion will be held from 11:30 a.m to 12:30 p.m. Nov. 14, at 252 W. Marion Ave. Punta Gorda. For more information or to reserve a seat, call 941-787-3525.Trivia night Chelsea Place Adult Day Care, 3626 Tamiami trail, Port Charlotte will host Trivia Night from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Nov. 15. Pizza, beer, wings and wine. All proceeds to bene“t the Homeless Coalition. Cost is $10. Donation includes food and drink. RSVP to Amie at 941-787-0687.Charlotte Prostate Support Group meetingThe Charlotte Prostate Support Group will meet from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Nov. 16, at the Fawcett Hospital H2U facility located 3280 Tamiami Trail, Suite #493, Port Charlotte. The speaker will be Dr. Marc Melser, M.D., a longtime Urologist in Port Charlotte. Dr. Melser will be speaking on imaging in prostate cancer care. A cancer diagnosis is not required for attendance, many of our members have other prostate issues. We try to present an open, casual, environment to discuss any prostate concern. Women are cordially invited to attend and participate. Refreshments and room provided by Fawcett Memorial Hospital. There will be no meeting in December and our speaker Jan. 18 will be Dr. Ivor Percent, M.D., Oncologist from Florida Cancer Specialists.Englewood Lions Club to host flea marketEnglewood Lions Club on 4611 Placida Road, Englewood, will be hosting its Flea Market starting the second Sunday of every month from November through March from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Inside tables are available for $20 each. Vendor spots outside are available for $15 each. For more information, call Diane at 941-681-2161.Ride for Tiny TownRide for Tiny Town, a celebration ride for the Arcadia community of 2019 will be held at 8 a.m. on Feb. 9. The start and “nish line is at the Mosaic Arena in Arcadia. Bicyclists from around Florida are invited to participate with 15, 30, and 60 mile routes. The ride is fully supported with periodic rest stops and sag vehicles. Ride pre-registration is only $40, ride day registration $50. Participants can preregister online at ridefortinytown.com or by sending name, address, phone, email, and $40 to Ride for Tiny Town, 1144 NW Peace Point Drive, Arcadia, Florida 34266.Bucs on the Run 5K Run/WalkThe annual Bucs on the Run 5K run and fun walk will be held on Feb. 23. Proceeds bene“t the student activities account. Register early for a discounted rate and try to be one of the “rst 200 to register to receive an of“cial run day long-sleeve dry-“t shirt. Registration by Feb. 28 is $25 for adults, $25 youth (under 18). Day of race is $30 adults/$25 youth. Registration is from 7 a.m. to 7:45 a.m. Race start at 8 a.m. Register at www.runsignup.com. or more information, contact Coach Winkler at gwinkler@fsw.edu.American Cancer Society seeks participation in Relay For Life of Charlotte CountyAmerican Cancer Society is calling on all community members to participate in the annual Relay For Life of Charlotte County on April 6, at Laishley Park. Be part of the “ght, and together we can beat our biggest rival. American Cancer Society is seeking volunteers to form teams and stand shoulder to shoulder with us and cancer patients and those supporting them. Founded by Dr. Gordy Klatt in Washington in 1985, the Relay For Life movement unites communities across the globe to celebrate people who have been touched by cancer, remember loved ones lost, and take action for lifesaving change. Symbolizing the battle waged around the clock by those facing cancer, the event can last up to 24 hours and empowers communities to take a stand against cancer. This year, an estimated 1.3 million people in the U.S. will participate in more than 2,000 events to help the American Cancer Society attack cancer in dozens of ways, each of them critical to achieving a world without cancer „ from developing breakthrough therapies to building supportive communities, from providing empowering resources to deploying activists to raise awareness. Funds raised support the American Cancer Society 24/7 cancer help line and free rides to chemo. By joining the Relay For Life event, you can help attack cancer from every angle. To learn more about Relay For Life, and register a team, visit RelayForLife.org/ charlottecounty”.Hope PACE seeking volunteersDo you have a caring heart and time to share? Hope PACE, a Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly that helps aging adults live independently in our community, is seeking volunteers for its Port Charlotte Care Center. Volunteers may be asked to talk and socialize with individuals in Hopes care, organize fun games and activities, assist with crafts or special projects, help with meals and snacks, or offer administrative support to onsite staff. Before helping at the Hope PACE Care Center, volunteers will receive an in-depth orientation session. Volunteers must be at least 14 years or older. Call 239-415-7217 or visit www.HopeHCS.org/ volunteer for more information about volunteer opportunities. To learn more about Hope Healthcare programs, including Hope Kids Care, Hope PACE, Hope Palliative Care and the Hope Parkinson Program, call 239482-4673 or visit www. HopeHCS.org.LOUD Crowd classesThe LOUD Crowd classes meet every Thursday from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Universal Fitness, 1544 Rio De Janeiro Ave, Punta Gorda. No fee. New member are requested to contact 941-204-1515 prior to attending for the “rst time. The LOUD Crowd is a weekly speech class for individuals with Parkinsons disease who have previously undergone speech therapy. For more information contact Mary Spremulli at 941-204-1515 or email info@voiceaerobicsdvd.com. PHOTO PROVIDEDEvelyn Lauer, celebrates her 102nd birthday with her son and daughter-in-law, Bill Lauer and Marjorie Kamp, at River Commons. By NICOLLE CAUFFMANRIVER COMMONSLongtime resident of River Commons, Evelyn Lauer, turned 102 on Thursday. She has been a resident since 2011. Shes been an amazing addition to the community and a perfect example of what living independently is all about. Shes can always be found with a smile on her face and singing a tune when she is out and about. Happy Birthday to this wonderful woman. River Commons is located at 2305 Aaron St, Port Charlotte. For more information, call 941-629-0043 or visit https://www.myrivercommonshome.com.River Commons resident turns 102 MEDICAL2030 $2000 Sign on BONUS!! SOLARIS HEALTHCARE is now HiringCNAs: Full Time and PRN Apply: solarishealthcare.vikus.net CNAs, HHAs and CaregiversFind New Clients by Advertising Your Services in the Senior Directory Every Wednesday in The Sun Newspapers. This Feature Publishes in Charlotte, Sarasota, and Desoto Counties. Market Yourself Reach 150,000 Readers! Call 941-429-3110 for more information Caring for HeroesDouglas T. Jacobson State Veterans Home MDS Coordinator Full Time Sr. RN Super Full or Part Time CDM/Cook Full Time CNAs 3-11 or 11-7Excellent Benefits Job security, Tuition paid, Generous time off/paid leave.941-613-0919Online: www.peoplefirst.myflorida.com FRONT DESK f or M e di ca l Of fice. Must have computer knowledge & good communication skills. Call 941-764-8550 IMMEDIATE O PENIN GS Receptionist/Med Assistant Open Interviews 8:30-2PM Wed 11/7 & Thurs 11/8. BRING RESUME! Apply Within: 2866-A Tamiami Trail Port Charlotte, FL 33952 www.HorizonTechInstitute.ComADVANCE YOUR CAREERŽ Licensed & Accredited School Murdock Town Center on 411032 Tamiami Tr Unit 3YOUcan become a LPN within 11 months. Enrollment ongoing.Start Working In 2-5 wks! Classes Start Each Month Call For Class Dates Nursing Assistant (120hrs) Home Health Aide (75hrs) Phlebotomy Tech (165hrs) EKG Tech (165hrs) Patient Care Tech (600hrs) Job Assist. & Pymt. Plans Call Now to Register! 941-889-7506 PHLEBOTOMY,EKG, Classes Start 11/12LPNwkds 11/12 CNA11/12 Med. Asst. 11/12 ADULTCARE5050 ALL IN CLEANING AND HOME SERVICES Residential & commercial, Seasonal, Full time and 1 time cleanings, Call 941-586-5239 MEDICAL6095 GO-GO ELITE SCOOTER 3 wheel, good cond. $500/obo 216-952-5800 LIFT C HAIR RE C LINER f ull size, used very little like new Asking $250 941-421-2217 OXYGEN CONCENTRATOR Portable, Philips SimplyGo Mini, $1,500 obo 941-473-4652 WALKER N ew w i t h b ra k es an d seat $120. 941-204-9729 MEDICAL6095 PORTABLE OXYGEN CONCENTRATORRuns on 12 Volts, 110 Volts or Battery. In cludes. 2 Rechargeable Batter ies. $1,500. 330-343-1866 (P.G.) W HEEL C HAIR Excellent condition. $75 941-697-8273 T urnyou r trashinto cash! Advertise youryard sa l e! PUT CLASSIFIEDS TOWORK FORYOU!FINDAJOB! BUYAHOME! BUYACAR! 2 0 1 8 1 1 1 1 o t c s 2 8 p d f 1 0 9 N o v 1 8 2 1 : 4 0 : 5 9

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The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 5 Nov. 13, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Lung Cancer Support Group. Bayfront Health Punta Gorda Medical Of“ ce Plaza, 4th Floor Conf. Room, 713 E. Marion Ave., Punta Gorda. Find out what support and assistance is available to you and your family and how others are coping. No registration required. For details, call 941-637-9575. Nov. 13, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Hands-Only CPR and Early Heart Attack Care (EHAC). Villa San Carlos I, 2550 Easy St., Port Charlotte. Hands-only CPR is a method of CPR that has been recommended by the American Heart Association (AHA) since 2010 and is 10 times more likely to save someone in cardiac arrest then not doing anything. Help given immediately in an emergency can often make the difference between life and death. Free. Register at www. BayfrontHealthEvents. com. Nov. 13, 15-minute Time Slots Available 4 p.m to 5:30 p.m. „ Personalized Balance Assessment. Bayfront Health Port Charlotte, Center for Balance Disorders, 2500 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte. Anyone can lose the ability to balance. Receive an individualized assessment and learn ways to improve balance. Free. Limited time slots available. Call 941-766-4903 to register. Nov. 14, noon to 1 p.m. Hip and Knee Pain? Ask Dr. Davis. Speaker: Mark Davis, M.D., Orthopedic Surgeon. Bayfront Health Punta Gorda Medical Of“ ce Plaza, 4th Floor Conf. Room, 713 E. Marion Ave., Punta Gorda. Have your questions answered one-on-one for all your hip and knee ailments. Free. Lunch provided. Register at www. BayfrontHealthEvents. com. Nov. 14, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Bayfront Baby Place Tours. Bayfront Health Port Charlotte, Lobby, 2500 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte. Expecting? View the birthing suites, meet the staff and get questions answered in preparation for an exceptional experience. Free. Register at www. BayfrontHealthEvents. com. Nov. 15, 11 a.m. to noon. Lunch and Learn: Recognizing the Signs of Caregiver Burnout. Sandhill Gardens Retirement Center, 24949 Sandhill Blvd., Punta Gorda. Are you battling feelings of hopelessness? Are you suffering from appetite changes and sleep disturbances? If you are caring for a loved one, than you may be suffering from caregiver burnout. Many caregivers do not take time to care for themselves. Your emotional and psychological health can affect your physical health. Join us and learn the signs of burnout, how to better manage daily stress, and when to seek help. Free. Boxed lunches provided. Registration is required. To register, call 941-764-6577. Nov. 15, 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Be Free from Knee Pain. Speaker: Ronald Constine, M.D., Orthopedic Surgeon. Bayfront Health Punta Gorda Medical Of“ ce Plaza, 4th Floor Conf. Room, 713 E. Marion Ave., Punta Gorda. If you suffer from knee pain, you know how it can limit your daily activities. Learn more about treatment options are available. Free. Register at www. BayfrontHealthEvents. com. Nov. 15, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Infant CPR Class. Bayfront Health Port Charlotte, Conference Center, 2500 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte. Caregivers learn how to respond during the “ rst critical minutes of an emergency until a professional arrives. CPR techniques, safety, and accident prevention tips are covered. Parents, grandparents and caregivers are encouraged to attend. Free. Register at www. BayfrontHealthEvents. com. Nov. 17, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Childbirth and Newborn 1-Day Course. Bayfront Health Port Charlotte, Conference Center, 2500 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte. In this course, you will leave with a better understanding of labor and delivery, the birthing process, anatomy and physiology, birth basics, comfort techniques, hospital procedures and medical interventions. ($) or ask how you can take this course for free. Register at www. BayfrontHealthEvents. com. Nov. 17, 11 a.m. to noon. Bayfront Baby Place Tours. Bayfront Health Port Charlotte, Lobby, 2500 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte. Expecting? View the birthing suites, meet the staff and get questions answered in preparation for an exceptional experience. Free. Register at www. BayfrontHealthEvents. com. Nov. 20, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Allergies: The Scoop vs. The Rumors. Speaker: Maria Compton, D.O., Otolaryngologist. Punta Gorda Isles Civic Association, 2001 Shreve St., Punta Gorda. Allergies or not? Learn the difference between symptoms that may be disguising themselves. Free. Lunch provided. RSVP is required. Call 941-637-1655 to register. € Englewood Beach: Daily at 8:30 a.m.; and Wednesday at 5 p.m. 941-473-0135. € Manasota Beach, 8570 Manasota Key Road: Monday-Friday at 8 a.m. and 9 a.m.; Saturday 9 a.m. € Venice Beach Yoga, Daily 8 a.m. and 9 a.m.; Monday-Thursday at 5 p.m. € North Jetty, Nokomis Beach Yoga, 1000 S Casey Key Road: 9 a.m. MondayFriday. All ages and abilities bring a towel or blanket and join. Free will donation. € Pop Up Yoga classes at local business led by The Yoga Sanctuary will be held all throughout the summer. You never know where until the week prior to a Pop Up Class. The Yoga Sanctuary is excited to be working with other businesses in town (and sometimes beyond) to provide people with even more opportunities to explore their yoga practice and shop local! These surprise yoga classes will be held all over „ you never know when or where until that week. To “ nd out about these special complimentary classes be sure to likeŽ and follow us and other Punta Gorda businesses on Facebook. Thats where well be announcing each class. Other things to know: 1. A limited number of mats will be available for use. But if you have your own, feel free to bring it. 2. There is no cost for these classes. However, there will be some events held at nonpro“ t locations and some done to support are nonpro“ ts. Consider having some funds to donate or even shop local in some of the shops after class. 3. All classes will be approximately 45 minutes long. 4. Some classes will be held outside. These events will be weather permitting. For more information, Facebook: https:// www.facebook.com/ yogasanctuary. € Yoga Tots „ The Punta Gorda Library, 424 W. Henry St., hosts the free program Yoga Tots Storytime from 10:15 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. on Fridays for children ages 12-36 months. Bring your toddler, towels or yoga mat to stretch your mind and muscles with a story and fun yoga poses. For more information, call 941-833-5460 or email: PuntaGordaLibrary@ charlottecounty” .gov. If you would like your free yoga event added to our events, email feeling“ t@sun-herald.com. Yoga BAYFRONT NEWS & NOTESLung Cancer Support Group of Punta GordaLung Cancer Support Group of Punta Gorda meets the second Tuesday of each month at 2 p.m. on the 4th ” oor of the medical of“ ce building at Bayfront Health hospital campus on E. Marion Ave., Punta Gorda. Speakers: Nov. 13: Rachel Jaycox, Clinical Nutrition Manager BFH Dec. 11: Pamela Fadness, M.D. Psychiatrist BFH Jan. 8: The Yoga Sanctuary of Punta Gorda Feb. 12: Dr. Dakouny, M.D. March 12: Dr. Bobe, Pulmonologist April 9: Dr. Glick, Oncologist Florida Cancer Specialists May 14: Thomas Cappello, speaking on estate planning For more information, call 941-637-9575 or email icgarg@embarqmail.com.Charlotte Prostate Support Group meetingThe Charlotte Prostate Support Group will meet from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Nov. 16, at the Fawcett Hospital H2U facility located 3280 Tamiami Trail, Suite #493, Port Charlotte. The speaker will be Dr. Marc Melser, M.D., a long time Urologist in Port Charlotte. A cancer diagnosis is not required for attendance, many of our members have other prostate issues. We try to present an open, casual, environment to discuss any prostate concern. Women are cordially invited to attend and participate. Refreshments and room provided by Fawcett Memorial Hospital. There will be no meeting in December and our speaker Jan. 18 will be Dr. Ivor Percent, M.D., Oncologist from Florida Cancer Specialists. Support Groups Less waiting where it matters most … our emergency room.*Medical professionals may include physicians, physician assistants and nurse practitioners.In a medical emergency, every minute matters. So, at Bayfront Health Port Charlotte and Punta Gorda, youll “nd faster care in the emergency room. We work diligently to have you initially seen by a medical professional* in 30 minutes … or less. And, with a team of dedicated medical specialists, we can provide a lot more care, if you need it. The 30-Minutes-Or-Less E.R. Service Pledge … only at Bayfront Health Port Charlotte and Bayfront Health Punta Gorda.2500 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte, FL 809 E. Marion Ave., Punta Gorda, FLBayfrontCharlotte.com adno=3625576-1

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Page 6 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 NAMI Family Support groupsPort Charlotte: The National Alliance on Mental Illness will have a Family Support Group meeting from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 1532 Forrest Nelson Blvd., Port Charlotte. This is for family members and caregivers of individuals with a mental illness. For more information, contact Ken and Ginger at 701-306-0023. North Port: The family support group meets from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. on the fourth Monday of the month at Anchor House, 3555 Bobcat Village Center Road, North Port. The National Alliance on Mental Illness family support group is a peer-led group for family members and caregivers of adults living with mental illness. All meetings are free and con“ dential. For more information, call 941376-9361 or visit the website at namisarasotacounty.org. Venice: The family support group meets from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on the “ rst Wednesday of the month at Venice Health Park, 1201 Jacaranda Blvd., room 1283. The National Alliance on Mental Illness family support group is a peer-led group for family members and caregivers of adults living with mental illness. All meetings are free and con“ dential. For more information, call 941-376-9361 or visit the website at namisarasotacounty.org. Sarasota: The family support group meets at 6:30 p.m. on the third Thursday of the month at the Beneva Christian Church, 4835 S. Beneva Road, Sarasota. For more information, call 941-376-9361 or visit the website at namisarasotacounty.org.NAMI Connection Recovery Support GroupThe National Alliance on Mental Illness meets from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.. the “ rst and third Tuesday of the month at the Mental Health Community Center (Prospect House), 240 S. Tuttle Ave., Unit B, Sarasota. Connection is a recovery support group program for adults living with mental illness providing a place that offers respect, understanding, encouragement and hope. It offers a casual and relaxed approach to sharing the challenges and successes of coping with mental illness. All meetings are free and con“ dential. Call 941-376-9361 or visit the website at namisarasotacounty.org for more information.Neuro Challenge for Parkinsons patients and caregiversSt. Davids, 401 S. Broadway, Englewood, is welcoming Neuro Challenge, a non-pro“ t organization dedicated to improving the quality of life of people with Parkinsons and their caregivers. Neuro Challenge provides ongoing monthly support groups, educational programs, and individualized care, advising to help empower people with Parkinsons and their caregivers with A Better Approach to Parkinsons. They will meet in St. Davids Parish Hall every the third Friday of every month at 10 a.m. Neuro Challenge serves Manatee, Sarasota and Charlotte counties … there are an estimated 9,000 people with Parkinsons in the three county service area. For more information, call 941-926-6413, 941474-3140 or go to www. neurochallenge.org. Ostomy support meetingsThe Charlotte County Ostomy Support Group meets at 2 p.m. on the second Tuesday of the month in Port Charlotte. For more information and assistance, contact Jerry Downs at 941-6297568 or Gloria Patmore at 941-627-9077.Overeaters anonymousOvereating a problem? Overeaters Anonymous offers free meetings at 10 a.m. Thursdays at Pilgrim United Church of Christ, 24515 Rampart Blvd., Port Charlotte. Call 941-626-8969 for more information.Port Charlotte Pulmonary Hypertension & Pulmonary Fibrosis Support GroupThe group meets from noon to 2 p.m. on the second Thursday of every month at 2370 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte. RSVP at 941-255-5043.Sex Addicts AnonymousSex Addicts Anonymous is a 12-step support group for those who are struggling with sexual compulsion and/ or emotional dependency. No dues or fees. The meetings are held at 7:30 p.m. Mondays in Englewood and 7 p.m. in Port Charlotte. For more information, call 941-222-0539 or email saaenglewood@gmail. com.Stroke support groupA stroke support group will be held at 1 p.m. on the last Friday of each month at Fawcett Memorial Hospital, Executive Dining Room, 21298 Olean Blvd., Port Charlotte.By LAURAN NEERGAARDAP MEDICAL WRITERAnatomy at birth may prompt a check in the maleŽ or femaleŽ box on the birth certi“ cate „ but to doctors and scientists, sex and gender arent always the same thing. The Trump administration purportedly is considering de“ ning gender as determined by sex organs at birth, which if adopted could deny certain civil rights protections to an estimated 1.4 million transgender Americans. But variation in gender identity is a normal part of human diversity, the American Academy of Pediatrics, or AAP, stresses in a new policy that outlines how to provide supportive medical care for transgender youth. Here are some questions and answers about what can be sometimes blurry lines. Q: Arent sex and gender interchangeable terms? A: Sex typically refers to anatomy while gender goes beyond biology,Ž says Dr. Jason Rafferty, a pediatrician and child psychiatrist at Hasbro Childrens Hospital in Rhode Island, and lead author of the AAPs transgender policy. Gender identity is more an inner sense of being male, female or somewhere in between „ regardless of physical anatomy, he explained. It may be in” uenced by genetics and other factors, but its more about the brain than the sex organs. And transgender is a term accepted across science and medical groups to mean people whose gender identity doesnt match what Rafferty calls their sex assigned at birth.Ž Q: How early can people tell if theyre transgender? A: Its normal for children to explore in ways that ignore stereotypes of masculinity and femininity. Rafferty says its whether those feelings and actions remain consistent over time that tells. Sometimes that happens at a young age, while for others it may be adolescence or beyond. Regardless, the pediatricians policy calls for gender-af“ rmativeŽ care so that children have a safe, nonjudgmental and supportive avenue to explore their gender questions. Q: What kind of care might they need? A: Transgender people of all ages are more likely to be bullied and stigmatized, which can spur anxiety and depression and put them at increased risk for suicide attempts. For children, medicine to suppress puberty may be considered, to buy time as the youth grapples with questions of gender identity. Q: Cant a genetic test settle if someones male or female? A: Its not like were going to “ nd a magic transgender gene,Ž Rafferty says, noting that a mix of genes, chemicals and other factors contribute but is not well understood. Generally, people are born with two sex chromosomes that determine anatomical sex „ XY for males and XX for females. But even here there are exceptions that would confound any either-or political de“ nition. People who are intersexŽ are born with a mix of female and male anatomy, internally and externally. Sometimes they have an unusual chromosome combination, such as men who harbor an extra X or women who physically appear female but carry a Y chromosome. This is different than being transgender.Science says: Sex and gender arent the sameAmid political uproar, doctors say birth certificates cant tell the whole story: Gender and sex arent always the same thing By LAURAN NEERGAARD and SETH BORENSTEINASSOCIATED PRESSTwo U.S. government agencies are giving con” icting interpretations of a safety study on cellphone radiation: One says it causes cancer in rats. The other says theres no reason for people to worry. No new research was issued. Instead, the National Toxicology Program dialed up its concerns about a link to heart and brain cancer from a study of male rats that was made public last winter. The Food and Drug Administration, which oversees cellphone safety, disagreed with the upgraded warning. And these “ ndings should not be applied to human cellphone usage,Ž said Dr. Jeffrey Shuren, FDAs chief of radiological health. Whats most important is what happens in humans, not rats, said Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical of“ cer of the American Cancer Society. The incidence of brain tumors in human beings has been ” at for the last 40 years,Ž Brawley said. That is the absolute most important scienti“ c fact.ŽTHE ORIGINAL STUDYIn a $30 million study, scientists put rats and mice into special chambers and bombarded them with radiofrequency waves, like those emitted by older 2G and 3G phones, for nine hours a day for up to two years, most of their natural lives. The levels the rodents experienced were far higher than people are typically exposed to.THE FINDINGSLast February, the National Toxicology Program said there was a small increase in an unusual type of heart tumor in male rats, but not in mice or female rats. The agency concluded there was some evidenceŽ of a link. Also, the February report cited equivocal evidenceŽ of brain tumors in the male rats. Thursday, the agency upgraded its description of those “ ndings. The heart tumor increase marked clear evidenceŽ of cancer in male rats, it announced. There is some evidenceŽ of brain cancer. The change came after the agency asked outside experts to analyze the “ ndings. We believe that the link between radiofrequency radiation and tumors in male rats is real, and the external experts agreed,Ž said John Bucher, the toxicology agencys senior scientist. While his agency said the risks to rats dont directly apply to people, the study raises safety questions.THE DISAGREEMENTThe FDA immediately disagreed, “ ring off a press release assuring Americans that decades of research and hundreds of studiesŽ has made the health agency con“ dent that the current safety limits for cellphone radiation protect the public health. Plus, FDA pointed out confusing “ ndings from the rodent study „ such as that the radiated rats lived longer than comparison rats that werent exposed to the rays. The toxicology agency said it appeared that the radiofrequency energy helped older rats kidneys. Theres a reason two different government agencies are clashing „ theyre asking different questions, said George Washington University public health professor George Gray. A former science chief for the Environmental Protection Agency, Gray said the toxicology program examined how cellphone radiation affected animals. By looking at what it means for humans, the FDA brings in more sources of information and data than just these recent tests in rats and mice,Ž he said in an email.ARE CELLPHONES SAFE?Im calling you from my cellphone,Ž noted the cancer societys Brawley. He pointed out one well-known risk from cellphones: Car crashes when drivers are distracted by them. As for cancer, if people are concerned, they could use earphones or speakers, he said. Those who study risk arent hanging up. My family and I wont change our mobile phone habits based on this news,Ž said George Washingtons Gray, co-author of the book Risk: A Practical Guide for Deciding Whats Really Safe and Whats Really Dangerous in the World Around You.ŽFederal agencies clash on cellphone cancer riskTwo U.S. government agencies give conflicting interpretations of a safety study on radiation PHOTO PROVIDEDTwo U.S. government agencies are giving con icting interpretations of a safety study on cellphone radiation. One says it causes cancer in rats. The other says theres no reason for people to worry. Support Groups 941-624-4500zusmaneyecarecenter.comadno=3629219-1 Team Eye ConsultantTampa Bay Rays and Charlotte Stone CrabsVOTED BEST OPHTHALMOLOGIST 2009-2015, 20182018 Ricardo Gauthier, Au.D Doctor of Audiology 941.505.0400 The Best of Charlotte for the Past 10 Years!We offer a complete range of audiology services for our clients including the following: We participate in most insurance programs adno=3625309-1100 Madrid Blvd Suite 214 Punta Gorda, FL 33950www.harboraudiology.netRicardo Gauthier, Au.D Doctor of Audiology We participate in most insurance programs Having Problems With Your Dentures?100 Madrid Blvd., Ste. 414 Punta Gorda 941-575-2626www.smilesofpuntagorda.comDifficulty Eating? Sore Gums? Wobbly or Loose? Messy Adhesives? Denture Stabilization Affordable! Complimentary Initial Consultation!Are you concerned about zinc content in your denture adhesives? For more information on zinc and your denture adhesives visit www.ada.org adno=3625308-

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The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 7 By BARBARA ANDERSONTHE FRESNO BEEIdentical twins BaoNhia and BaoKou Yang were inseparable growing up in Fresno, and on Sunday night when each sister gave birth to a daughter, it seemed more like destiny than chance. We share a lot. And everywhere we go, we go together,Ž BaoKou says. But the sisters, 23, didnt plan on having simultaneous pregnancies and same-night births. It just happened. Maybe its like a miracle,Ž BaoNhia said. It was amazing. I didnt know I was pregnant until I took the pregnancy test after she did, and I found out I was pregnant, too.Ž The sisters due dates were two days apart. BaoKou was due Nov. 11 and BaoNhia on Nov. 13. BaoKou went into labor “ rst on Sunday, Nov. 4 at Community Regional Medical Center. But she had an idea that her sister might soon follow. BaoNhia told her: Im having a pain here and there, too. So I might be in labor with you.Ž BaoKou gave birth to Nadalie Xiong at 6:59 p.m. and BaoNhia gave birth to Candra Thao at 8:48 p.m. The newborns were almost the same weight: Nadalie weighed 7 pounds, 3 ounces; Candra weighed exactly 7 pounds. BaoKou and BaoNhia are from a family of 14 children. Theyre the second to the youngest. On Monday, sister Mao Yang said the siblings made a bet on which twin would go into labor “ rst. She won, when BaoKou entered the hospital. But we didnt think its going to be on the same day,Ž she said of the double delivery. We just bet who is going to go “ rst.Ž When the twins were babies, they cried if they were apart. As children, if one was ill, so was the other. They had special words they shared. They had the same friends. Even their mother would get the two confused. During these pregnancies, they had the same food cravings. Like sour stuff,Ž BaoKou said. It was the same „ sour, spicy,Ž BaoNhia agreed. And yes,Ž they said in unison on Monday, they wanted to share a room together when Community Regional offered one on Sunday night. Sitting side by side on a bed, BaoNhia swaddled Candra and BaoKou snuggled Nadalie. The sisters each had a miscarriage during a “ rst pregnancy, and BaoKou said she leaned on her twin during this one. Nadalie is her “ rst child. BaoNhia has two older daughters. I had been trying for a while (to have a baby),Ž BaoKou said. And then I “ nally have a baby of my own.Ž BaoNhia lives in Clovis and BaoKou in Fresno, but they are seldom apart, often cooking meals together. BaoNhia already has given BaoKou pointers on motherhood: Youll be busy.Ž And theyll be busy together. Their babies dont look alike, but theyll grow up side-by-side, BaoKou said. Theyre going to be playing around together, seeing each other.ŽTwin sisters give birth just hours apart PHOTO PROVIDEDTwin sisters Bao Nhia Julia Yang and Bao Kou Julie Yang with their daughters.Courage Over CancerGulf Cove United Methodist Churchs cancer care program, Courage Over Cancer, offers support and ministry to men, women, and families who are affected by cancer. Church and community members touched by this disease are provided with help and spiritual counsel that are speci“ c to their needs as a cancer patient, caregiver, or loved one. This ministry is based on the outreach program Our Journey of Hope which was developed by the Cancer Treatment Centers of America. If you or someone you know could bene“ t from a friend to support them through this journey, contact the church at 941-697-1747 or GulfCoveUMC@gmail. com. Gulf Cove UMC is located at 1100 McCall Road in Port Charlotte.Food Addicts AnonymousA 12-step program for those who wish to recover from food addiction. Group meets from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Thursdays, at First Alliance Church, 20444 Midway Blvd., Port Charlotte. For more information, call 941-380-6550.Lung Matters support groupLung Matters support group meets from 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. on the third Tuesday of each month. Call Port Charlotte Rehab Center for locations and more information at 941-235-8011.Lung cancer support groupThe North Port Lung Cancer Support Group meets from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. the third Wednesday of every month at Sarasota Memorial ER in North Port along Toledo Blade Boulevard. The group is for people with lung cancer along with their caregivers. No RSVP nor charge is required. For more information, call or email Marc Cohen at 941240-8989 or marcscohen@aol.com. Support Groups Its important to know who to trust with your health because you want the very best. Fawcett Memorial Hospital has been recogni zed as an accredited Comprehensive Center under the Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Improvement Program (MBSAQI P). is accreditation ensures that bariatric surgical patients receive a multidisciplinary program, not just a surgical procedure, which improves patient outcomes and long-term success. For more information on this accreditation, visit us at FawcettWeightLoss.com 21298 Olean Boulevard, Port Charlotte, FL 33952 € 941.624.8281 € FawcettWeightLoss.comadno=3625310-1

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Page 8 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 PROVIDED BY MCCAt some point in a son or daughters life, the role of caregiver may shift. Where parents once took care of their children, aging parents very frequently rely on their children to care for them. Adult caregivers typically want to do right by their aging loved ones but sometimes “ nd that the demands of medical and emotional support can dominate their lives „ so much so that their own children and other household responsibilities are neglected. The Mayo Clinic says it is natural to feel sad, alone, frustrated, and even angry when serving as a caregiver to an elderly parent. However, its also important to recognize the signs that the burden has become too much and to look for ways to lighten the workload. Anyone can get caregiver stress, but the National Alliance for Caregiving says women are more susceptible than men. Those who are responsible for helping someone with Alzheimers disease, dementia or a debilitating illness are also at a high risk of developing their own medical issues. These responsibilities can affect the quality of caregivers sleep and impede their ability to relax and unwind. Finding relief from caregiver stress can involve a few different strategies. € Ask for more help Dont hesitate to ask for help. If other family members or siblings are unable to pitch in, look into the possibility of hired aides. These professionals can be excellent and trained sources of support who assist with activities of daily living, remind patients to take their medications and assist in coordinating medical checkups. € Consider watchdog technology. Smart homes have enabled remote control of many household systems, making it possible to monitor thermostat temperature, water leaks or ” oods, appliance and light usage, and much more. Video and sound surveillance can offer peace of mind to those who cannot be with their loved ones constantly. Another option is a product called Care Coach. This is a digital tool that provides medicine reminders, health coaching, automated alerts, and an interactive avatar that can offer psychological and comforting support. € Explore respite care. Many rehabilitation and nursing facilities offer short-term respite care for loved ones so that caregivers can take the time to go on vacation or enjoy a day or two without having to check in on an elderly parent. Facilities generally have 24-hour staff to monitor residents, provide meals and provide entertainment. The change of pace can also be stimulating to the senior, and respite care can be a gradual introduction to long-term care. € Embrace community resources. Seniors may be eligible for lowor no-cost services like visiting nurses, meal delivery and adult day programs. This network of support can further alleviate caregiver stress. € Talk it out. Work with a licensed therapist to find other coping strategies for dealing with the mounting pressure of being a caregiver. Talk therapy and relaxat ion techniques can help curb stress. Being a caregiver is a rewarding but demanding responsibility. Utilizing all possible resources can make the job easier.Finding relief from caregiver stress can involve a few di erent strategies PHOTO PROVIDEDWork with a licensed therapist to nd other coping strategies for dealing with the mounting pressure of being a caregiver. Talk therapy and relaxation techniques can help curb stress.BY MAYO CLINIC NEWS NETWORKWhat once seemed like a scene from a 22nd century sci-“ movie is reality today. High speed, big data-processing computers combine arti“ cial intelligence with human know-how to crack complex health care conditions. This deep computer analysis may unveil new patterns that could bolster your providers ability to prescribe precise therapies, make a diagnosis, recommend a clinical trial or even predict your risk of disease. Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine (CIM) is collaborating with the Coordinated Science Laboratory (CSL) at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign (UIUC) to unleash the potential of arti“ cial intelligence in patient care. Funded by a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant, the Mayo UIUC Alliance and corporate partners are conducting research into the big data challenge: how to develop computer systems that, combined with human intelligence, unlock new analysis of health and disease. Research within CIM is probing whether arti“ cial intelligence can reduce or eliminate the trial and error of prescribing antidepression medication. In a clinical study with Mayos department of psychiatry, researchers have combined machine learning, a type of arti“ cial intelligence, with genomics, metabolomics and other clinical variables. This machine learning approach helps providers to choose a therapy most likely to work on the “ rst try. We combined expertise from clinicians, engineers and biologists to create an algorithm that uncovered patterns of antidepressant response that each of these specialists alone might not be able to recognize,Ž said Arjun Athreya, a Mayo-UIUC Alliance predoctoral research fellow. Using this data with deep machine learning, we were able to predict with 75-85 percent accuracy whether a common antidepressant drug would work for each individual patient in the study. That compares to 58 percent accuracy when predictions are based only on clinical, demographic and social factors. In addition, we found that women and men respond differently to this antidepressant therapy.ŽWill a machine pick your next medication?BY AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION NEWSWhile preeclampsia puts women at greater risk for stroke and high blood pressure following childbirth, a new study found that the pregnancy-related condition may not predispose them to signi“ cant cognitive impairment later in life. Instead, other physical and social risk factors related to the condition may be contributing to those subtle cognitive changes, according to the Canadian study published Wednesday in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension. Preeclampsia, a pregnancy complication most commonly characterized by high blood pressure and protein in the urine, usually resolves after delivery. But women who had the condition are twice as likely to have a stroke or prematurely develop heart disease within 10 to 15 years after giving birth than women who did not have preeclampsia. This could be because of post-pregnancy development of high blood pressure, also known as hypertension, and damage to the vascular system, both of which can affect blood supply to the brain, said Dr. Natalie Dayan, the studys lead author. We wondered whether preeclampsia predisposes women to early-onset cognitive impairment due to this type of damage to blood vessels in the brain,Ž said Dayan, director of the McGill University Health Centres obstetrical medicine program in Montreal. Using a database that followed a group of healthy young U.S. adults for 25 years, researchers looked at 568 women who had given birth at least once. About a third of the women reported having preeclampsia while the rest reported pregnancies without blood pressure problems. Both groups were given three sets of cognitive tests 18 years after their “ rst childbirth. The average age of the women taking the tests was 49. The cognitive assessments measured executive function, learning and memory, and attention and processing speed. Women who had preeclampsia scored lower on two of the tests than the women who didnt have the condition. However, the differences in scores diminished after researchers accounted for age, high blood pressure, depression, body mass index and education level. This means that although women who reported preeclampsia appear to have lower scores on these neurocognitive tests than women who did not report this condition, it may not be the preeclampsia itself, but rather these other factors that are also common in women with preeclampsia that led to worse cognitive scores,Ž Dayan said. But because the study did not use MRI or another type of scan to compare the brains between the two groups, a link between cognitive impairment and preeclampsia could not be entirely ruled out, said Dr. Sudha Seshadri, director of the Glenn Biggs Institute for Alzheimers and Neurodegenerative Diseases in San Antonio. Childbirth is generally believed to reset a body affected by preeclampsia, but the high blood pressure associated with the condition may have permanently harmed the liver, kidneys and other organs „ including the brain „ during the pregnancy, she said. When your blood pressure goes up very high, you can have changes in the brain. In the absence of any direct visualization of the brain, I dont want to say we know that there wasnt a direct effectŽ on cognition, said Seshadri, who was not connected to the study. Preeclampsia, despite having been around forever, is still quite poorly understood. So it probably makes sense for physicians to monitor these women a little more carefully, with attention given to things like blood pressure.Ž Seshadri, a senior investigator for the Framingham Heart Study, also suggests the women take a simple cognitive test, at least for a few years,Ž to help detect possible changes. Dayan agreed that the study stresses the need for doctors to closely monitor blood pressure and other heart disease risk factors in women whose pregnancies were complicated by preeclampsia. Physicians should keep an open mind about the possible blood vessel changes after preeclampsia that may occur in the heart and in other organ systems in the body,Ž she said.No direct link between preeclampsia and cognitive impairment, study says PHOTO PROVIDEDA new study nds that the pregnancy-related condition may not predispose them to signi cant cognitive impairment later in life. Substance abuse support groupThe Substance Abuse support group meets at 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays at the Lifeworks Substance Abuse Services, 4678 Tamiami Trail, Suite 105, Port Charlotte. Contact George at 941-979-5023 for more information.TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly)The Punta Gorda Chapter meets at 9 a.m. on Wednesday mornings at the South Punta Gorda Heights Civic Association, 11200 1st Ave., Punta Gorda. For more information, call 941-575-1161 or visit topschapter0828. wordpress.com or on Facebook: Tops Chapter 0828.Womens cancer support groupCelebrate Life womens cancer support group meets at 10 a.m. on the first Wednesday of each month at the Punta Gorda Isles Civic Association, 2001 Shreve St., Punta Gorda. There typically is a speaker. Lunch at a Punta Gorda restaurant follows the meeting. Contact either Diane Mabye at 941-575-7746 or Sara Benson at 941575-6765 to learn a little more about Celebrate Life. To submit information about your support group, email the details to FeelingFit@sun-herald.com. Support Groups DIABETIC & WOUND CARE CERTIFIED BOARD Dr. Tom Lane DPM, FAPWCA Guardian Angel Foot Care2400 S. McCall Road, Suite FEnglewood, FL 34224 (941) 473-3338 Fax (941) 474-8597adno=3624423-1

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The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 9 any state in the country. More than 1.7 million Floridians enrolled in plans during the open enrollment period for 2018 coverage. This was lower than the states 2017 enrollment, but still by far the highest in the country, representing 14.6 percent of all U.S. enrollments. The number of consumers who signed up for 2018 coverage in area counties included: Charlotte County 9,945 DeSoto County 1,514 Sarasota County 28,911 Collier County 30,445 Sarasota County 28,911 Lee County 55,750 Thats the good news. The bad news is that premium will continue to rise in 2019. Analysts blame the kind of general increases expected from in”ation and rising medical costs and the repeal of the individual mandate penalty in the Republican tax law, and the Trump administrations expansion of non-Obamacare plans. The Florida Of“ce of Insurance Regulation (FLOIR) published a list of the insur ers that had “led to participate in 2019, noting that the average proposed rate increase for 2019 was 8.8 percent. But after the rate approval process was completed, FLOIR announced that the “nal average rate increase would be just 5.2 percent. Those insurers are: Blue Cross Blue Shield of Florida (Florida Blue): 2.4 percent increase (the proposed average rate increase was 10.5 percent); Florida Blue HMO (Health Options): 7.2 percent increase (the proposed average rate increase was 9.5 percent); Florida Health Care Plan Inc. (a subsidiary of Florida Blue): 5.6 percent increase (approved as proposed); Ambetter (Celtic): 5.9 percent increase (slightly higher than the proposed 5.8 percent increase); Molina: 1.5 percent decrease (Molina had proposed a 9.5-percent average increase); Health First Health Plans: 9.8 percent increase (approved as proposed); Oscar Health: New for 2019. All of those are offering plans on the federal exchange. Two other companies “led with the state to offer ACAcompliant plans: Avmed Inc. and Cigna Health and Life Insurance. Florida premiums are lower than other states with a large percentage of ACA users. HealthSherpa.com, a California-based technology company partnering with HealthCare.gov in connecting individuals with health coverage, reported on the early results of the 2019 enrollment, in which Texas surpassed Florida in early enrollments. Net median premiums for the top “ve states in enrollments so far: 1. Texas $53.35 2. Florida $29.28 3. North Carolina $26.63 4. Wisconsin $85.64 5. Georgia $41.91 HealthSherpa also noted that women are once again more likely to “le as head-of-household, this year by a margin of 15 percent (57 percent of women “ling as headof-household. compared to 43 percent of men). In addition, most enrollees are once again in the 50-64 age range. So, what do you do? Since Florida elected not to create a state-based exchange, residents and employers are pretty much forced to participate through the federally facilitated Marketplace. The Marketplace can be accessed at www.healthcare.gov or by calling 800-318-2596 or 855889-4325 for those using telecommunications devices for the deaf. You can view available health plans without identifying yourself, but you will need to create an account in order to purchase coverage. Comments and suggestions are always welcome. Call Dan Mearns at 941-893-9692 or email danmearns@gmail.com.DANFROM PAGE 1 By TOM AVRILTHE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRERAt “rst, it seemed like just a bad cold, with a fever that came and went. Then one day, when Scarlett Camburn woke from her nap, the Havertown, Pa., toddler was unable to move her right arm. Panicked, parents Andrea and Chris Camburn rushed the little girl to an urgent care center in King of Prussia operated by Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia, and from there to the hospitals emergency room in West Philadelphia. X-rays showed that Scarlett, a few days shy of her second birthday in August 2016, had no broken bones. But an MRI on a future visit revealed an alarming sign: damage to her spinal cord. The Camburns would soon learn that Scarlett was among dozens of children around the country that year whose arms or legs suddenly went limp „ evoking memories of polio, a scourge eliminated in the United States decades ago. One of those children was Chase Kulakowski, of Dyer, Ind., age 15 months. Same pattern: had a cold, woke up from a nap, couldnt use his right arm. His arm was totally limp,Ž said his mother, Jessica. The in”ammation in Scarletts spinal cord eventually was attributed to a virus, called enterovirus D68, that had infected many of the other children. But for some patients, including Chase, no virus „ or other cause „ was found. This fall, its happening again. Last week, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it had con“rmed 72 cases of sudden muscle weakness or paralysis so far in 2018, including six in Pennsylvania and three in New Jersey. The disease is often referred to as mysterious, given that some victims are found to be infected with D68 while others are not, and of“cially, the CDC says the cause for most cases remains unknown. But a core group of academic researchers tracking the disease is fairly certain that the virus, which can be hard to detect, is the primary culprit. Theyre just not sure what to do about it. And they are worried it could get worse. The “rst warning signs came in 2012, when the California Department of Public Health learned that a handful of children in the state were suffering from sudden, unexplained weakness in the arms or legs. The agency launched a statewide surveillance program, and by years end found that among 10 patients, two had been infected with enterovirus D68. First identi“ed in 1962, D68 was known only to cause respiratory symptoms. But the two cases of muscle weakness were cause for concern. Those symptoms were similar to what happens with polio, which also is caused by an enterovirus. Was D68 able to cause similar harm? Two years later, things went national. By the end of 2014, 120 people in 34 states were con“rmed to have the condition, called acute ”accid myelitis. Again, almost all were children. Again, some were found to be infected with D68. Many were not, yet by the end of the year, an informal working group of prominent physicians was con“dent the virus played a key role. Symptoms ranged from moderate weakness to complete paralysis of the affected limbs, more often in the arms than legs. In Dallas, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center had recently been awarded a federal grant to study a broader category of pediatric paralysis, so they were up and runningŽ to track the unusual new cases, neurologist Benjamin M. Greenberg said. Among the questions: How much did children recover the use of their limbs? Which treatments seemed most effective? What type of spinal-cord damage was seen on their MRI scans? The condition remained rare, but the words polio-likeŽ in media headlines stoked public fears, bringing to mind a dreaded disease that was far worse in scope. Polio, eliminated in the United States through widespread vaccination, paralyzed thousands of people each year in the early 1950s. Keen to make sure polio had not returned, the CDC began testing patients fecal samples for the virus that causes the real thing. After all, polio still emerges periodically in a handful of other countries, said Sarah Hopkins, a neurologist at Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia. With some people opting not to vaccinate their children and international travel, there always is that worry,Ž Hopkins said. Its important for us to rule it out.Ž None of the new cases tested positive for polio. But while some patients were found to be infected with D68, some of the children did not test positive for anything. What was causing their paralysis? Two years later, in 2016, the number of patients with muscle weakness spiked again. Physicians tracking the illnesses suspected that the enterovirus was to blame even in patients where it was not found. Thats because the genetic information in an enterovirus is stored as RNA, not DNA, which makes it harder to isolate from a patient. And by the time muscle symptoms appear, the patients body may have cleared itself of the virus. The fact that kids are testing negative on a regular basis should not surprise anybody,Ž said Greenberg, of UT Southwesterns ODonnell Brain Institute. So CHOP and some other hospitals set up protocols to obtain and test nasal swabs as soon as possible in patients with sudden muscle weakness or paralysis „ maximizing their chances of “nding the virus if it was there. Sure enough, most patients at CHOP that year had D68 in their respiratory secretions, Hopkins said. And the virus popped up repeatedly elsewhere in the country, though in a handful of cases, patients were found to be infected with a different enterovirus, dubbed A71. At the end of 2016, the CDC had con“rmed 149 cases of patients with sudden muscle weakness or paralysis in 38 states and Washington, D.C. By de“nition, those included in the total had experienced a sudden onset of symptoms and had suffered damage to the internal gray matter of the spinal cord „ interrupting the nerve signals needed to activate an arm or leg. The cases tended to emerge in geographic clusters, supporting the theory that the symptoms were caused by an infectious agent „ a virus. And, like illnesses caused by some other viruses, the cases of muscle weakness spiked in the fall „ consistent with an infectious agent that thrives in cooler temperatures. Even the two-year pattern made sense. It is common for viruses to ebb and ”ow on a multi-year cycle as they travel through a population. Yet another layer of evidence for a viral cause came from the University of Colorado, where researchers injected mice with strains of D68. Just as in human patients, the animals limbs became paralyzed. To Greenberg, that represented a convincing, three-pronged case that the enterovirus was to blame for the biennial spikes in acute ”accid myelitis. We know the virus can do itŽ in mice, he said. We know its present in humans. And we know the epidemiological pattern “ts that of an infection.Ž But two mysteries remained. When Chase Kulakowski got his cold in October 2016, his stepsister had the same symptoms: a runny nose and a cough. By all appearances, they were infected with the same virus. Yet her arms and legs were “ne, whereas Chase could not move his right shoulder and arm. What makes him different?Ž his mom asked. Likewise at Scarlett Camburns preschool, there were the usual runny noses, but nobody else had her muscle symptoms. Why? Those are good questions, scientists say. At the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, researchers are exploring whether some genetic quirk might make certain infected people more likely to develop acute ”accid myelitis. The team has gathered DNA samples from more than 60 willing families „ including patients, siblings, and parents, said Priya Duggal, director of the schools genetic epidemiology program. Any two non-identical siblings share 50 percent of their DNA, on average, so one child might inherit some mutation that raises the risk of virally induced paralysis while a sibling does not, she said. Or such a mutation could have occurred in a child sporadically „ popping up for the “rst time in that generation. To date, Duggal said, there have been no reports of two children in the same household developing acute ”accid myelitis. It cant just be the virus,Ž Duggal said. Otherwise, wed have schools “lled with children that were all paralyzed.Ž If the virus is causing the paralysis, it makes sense that the symptoms would occur primarily in children, physicians say. Most people become infected with a variety of enteroviruses during childhood without symptoms and are therefore immune to them as adults. A similar lack of symptoms was seen in most people infected with polio. One in four people infected with polio experienced ”u-like symptoms that went away on their own, and fewer than 1 percent of infections led to irreversible paralysis. But when they did, the consequences could be deadly, as the disease can affect muscles involved in breathing. Then theres the mystery of the virus itself. In addition to injecting mice with D68 strains that were isolated from the 2014 outbreak, the Colorado researchers injected animals with strains of the virus that had infected humans in 1962. Just like the humans infected in 1962, mice in the latter group did not become paralyzed. The strains of virus from the two eras, “ve decades apart, look very similar but apparently evolved in some consequential way, acquiring the ability to harm the spinal cord, Greenberg said. And as with any virus, it will evolve again. Something changed,Ž he said. This is a very rare event, and I acknowledge its a rare event, but I am also asking the scienti“c and public-health community to recognize that doesnt mean its going to be a rare event forever.Ž As the detective work continues, physicians have developed effective treatments for patients. At CHOP, Scarlett was given intravenous immunoglobulin „ a substance that can help reduce swelling in the spinal cord. Elsewhere, physicians have opted to administer steroids, though there is disagreement as to when that is appropriate. After months of therapy, Scarlett also underwent surgery at CHOP called a nerve transfer. Chase did the same at Shriners Hospital for Children in Philadelphia, traveling there from Indiana. The procedure allows physicians to reactivate a paralyzed limb by connecting it to healthy nerves that have been rerouted from elsewhere in the body, said Dan Zlotolow, who performs the surgeries at Shriners. Patients must then adapt to the rewiring „ learning how nerve signals that once controlled, say, a rib muscle will now operate the elbow. Early on, a patient may “nd that during a sneeze or a deep breath, the elbow will bend, the surgeon said. Over time, your brain will “gure out that is not what should happen,Ž Zlotolow said. Now 4 years old, Scarlett has regained the use of her right arm but still has trouble making a “st, as her hand muscles deteriorated during the months of receiving no nerve signals. Next year, she will have another operation, in which surgeons will transfer a tendon to her hand from elsewhere in the body. Her family has nicknamed her right arm LuckyŽ „ in the Disney movie Finding Nemo,Ž the title characters lucky right “n is small and weak. Scarletts parents both got matching tattoos of the orange “sh on their right arms. They seek solace from an active support group on Facebook, which includes parents of many of the nearly 400 children recovering from acute ”accid myelitis. We felt so isolated, and now to realize theres a whole community of us,Ž Andrea Camburn said. She, Jessica Kulakowski and other parents in the support group worry that the federal government is not doing enough to address the disease. Greenberg, the UT Southwestern neurologist, describes the experience for families as a horri“c nightmare,Ž and agrees that the medical community should do more. Better tests for diagnosis are needed, he said. More should be invested in researching the best treatments, especially if the virus becomes more widespread. I get asked the question all the time: Should parents be worried?Ž he said. In 2018, no, your kids are going to get a cold, and theyre going to be “neŽ in the overwhelming majority of cases. As a society, we should ask, Should we be worried about 2028 or 2038?Ž Duggal, the Johns Hopkins epidemiologist, agrees. Given that enterovirus D68 is the likely culprit, she said society should consider investing in the same weapon that stopped polio: a vaccine. Weve been here for four years looking at these patients, watching the devastation,Ž Duggal said. This is the third round of it. We dont want to be looking at it in 2020, saying, Theres a mystery illness. We want to be looking at it in 2020 saying, Were making headway.ŽA poliolike illness is on the rise again. But why? TNS PHOTOScarlett Camburn, center, 4, smiles for a photo with her parents, Andrea and Chris, at their home in Havertown, Pa. on Thursday, October 25, 2018. Three days before her second birthday, Havertown toddler Scarlett Camburn woke up from a nap and suddenly was unable to raise her right arm. More than four years into a mysterious rise in illnesses with polio-like symptoms, public health ocials remain mystied as to its cause.

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Page 10 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 engineering labs around the world. First, they vaccinated llamas against a number of A and B strains of in”uenza. Then they took blood samples to collect the antibodies the llamas produced in response. Among them were four uniquely small antibodies that showed an ability to destroy many different strains of in”uenza. In a nod to their size and function, they called their creations nanobodies.Ž From those multitasking little powerhouses, the researchers engineered a single protein capable of squeezing into spaces on a virus surface that are too small for most proteins. The resulting multidomain antibody MD3606,Ž with its impressive breadth and potency,Ž could confer protection against pretty much any strain of ”u that nature could throw in humankinds way, the study authors said. If the dominant strain in a given season were to suddenly change, these antibodies would be ready for the unwelcome guest. If a ”u strain came out of nowhere and threatened a population with no immunity to it „ the nightmare scenario of pandemic ”u „ this supercharged defender would recognize that ”u and counter it. If health of“cials guessed wrong about what ”u strain was coming and ordered up a vaccine that would be largely ineffective „ a scenario that played out last ”u season „ this package of antibodies could save the day. But the researchers still faced a key hurdle: getting the human immune system to make such a super-protein even when its weighed down by age, stress and disease. Their solution: Dont even try. Instead, they devised a way to work around humans unreliable response to vaccines, building a gene that encoded the production plans for their powerhouse protein. To ferry that gene into a host organism, they enlisted a harmless virus used by labs working on gene therapy. By splicing their designer gene into this viral delivery device, the scientists not only found a way to get their antibody package into a host, they were delivering the manufacturing machinery to produce it. This passive transferŽ of antibodies gives this vaccine candidate the potential to be equally effective in everyone, Fauci said. The next step is to conduct further tests in animals and clinical trials in humans, and that will take years,Ž he said. But if fully successful „ a majestic leap right now „ it could essentially eliminate the need from season to seasonŽ to divine which of countless possible ”u viruses will rear up, and to then build a yearly ”u vaccine that neatly “ts the bill. Scripps immunologist Ian Wilson, the studys senior author, said that as the cells infectedŽ by the delivery virus turn over, repeated doses might be needed to sustain the production of antibodies. We dont really know how long this treatment would survive in humans yet,Ž he said. But even less-than-permanent immunity against a broad range of ”u threats would help buffer people from the emergence of unexpected ”u strains, Wilson said. And the rapid response of mice to the vaccine suggests it could be used to inoculate a population after a new viral threat has emerged, he added. That the experimental vaccine might need to be administered each year makes it an interesting hybrid, said Ted M. Ross, who directs the University of Georgias Center for Vaccines and Immunology. This approach is similar to antivenom,Ž said Ross. The therapeutic is an antibody that was made in another species to neutralize the toxin. Its short-term, but it gets you through the period of time where bad things could happen.Ž Over time, patients who got the same antibodies repeatedly might start to build resistance to them, he said. Vaccine makers could counter that by “nding and including new antibodies in their formulation every few years, he suggested. Ross and other scientists also cautioned that the human immune system might see the llama-derived proteins as foreign and attack them. This is not the only universal ”u vaccine under development. In May, Faucis NIAID launched the “rst clinical trial to test the safety of a universal ”u vaccine in 120 healthy humans. The candidate vaccine, called M-001, targets portions of the ”u virus that tend not to change even as other proteins do. This should prime the human immune system to recognize and “ght many different strains of in”uenza viruses. Janssen Vaccines and Prevention, a Dutch company that employs some of the study authors, has applied for a patent that would cover some of the molecules described in the new report.VACCINEFROM PAGE 1 same volunteer who led the seminar. Challenge your “nancial plan. I changed “nancial advisers „ based on recommendations from trusted friends „ because my portfolio really matters now. Serve your community. I bumped-up my volunteer schedule to once a week instead of once a month at a local food pantry. I also volunteer every other week at a local homeless shelter on the 5 p.m.to-midnight shift. Ive most recently started to volunteer at an equestrian therapy center for kids with mental or physical handicaps. Each of my volunteer gigs re”ect my personal interests. Stay active. I extended my daily exercise routine from “ve days to seven. I now swim at least “ve days a week; take our dog, Shadow, for 45-minute walks twice daily; and hit the weight room at least twice weekly. I also play Wallyball (a fast-moving form of indoor volleyball where the walls are considered inbounds) every week with friends who are equally motivated to stay in shape. Stay ”exible. I learned to stretch my back muscles an extra long time before beginning any strenuous exercise. When I forget, I inevitably pay for it. Look to the future. I initiated adult,Ž end-of-life conversations with my kids that I wish my parents had had with me. Get your paperwork in order. I not only updated my will but I “lled out a Five WishesŽ end-of-life pamphlet created by the Aging With Dignity nonpro“t group; and I got very speci“c, in writing, about where I want my ashes to be scattered. Stay connected „ and not solely to devices. I stopped taking my friends for granted, banished past grudges and re-established contact with a best buddy from college w hose friendship Id foolishly let slip away. Age 65 is when many of us realize that were mortal. This is when we start thinking about our next 20 to 30 years,Ž said Hashmi. Its when we ask: How can I be smart about investing my remaining decades wisely?Ž Eric Tyson, author of Personal Finance After 50 for Dummies,Ž theorizes that one of the most powerful undercurrents of turning 65 is how it affects the working lives of so many Americans. Its when the majority go from working full time to working less „ or not working at all, he said. The best scenario is when this change can unfold over many years instead of all at once.Ž It has for me. Things started changing at age 62, when I took a buyout from USA TODAY, where Id worked for 20-plus years as a marketing reporter. Im now a freelance writer and media training consultant. So, at 65, the one thing Ive opted to put off for at least a few years is retiring. While 65 still remains the most common retirement age, more and more folks are breaking that tradition, said AARPs Setzfand. Call it living with purpose. Turning 65 is not just an extension of middle age. Its a new life chapter thats waiting to be written. Its a new stage of life that reminds us we dont have forever,Ž said Firman. About a decade ago, at age 56, Firman had a quintuple bypass operation. His father, grandfather and uncle all died of heart disease in their 40s and 50s. Firman isnt distraught over the family genes he inherited. Instead, hes celebrating his survival. When he turned 65 two years ago, he said, he had a realization that the real purpose of aging is to make the world a better place. Life is a gift,Ž he said. Success in old age starts with an attitude of gratitude.Ž It seems Firman and I share one common trait: We both grew up at 65.LIFEFROM PAGE 1By MARIE MCCULLOUGHTHE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRERA dozen years after the debut of the HPV vaccine, its track record of warding off infections that cause cervical cancer and other malignancies keeps getting better. Thats why the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in October expanded the age range for Mercks Gardasil. Previously approved for adolescents and those up to age 26, the shots can now be given to men and women up to age 45, bringing the United States in line with markets including Europe and Canada. But, ironically, this powerful cancer-prevention tool also faces growing fear and rejection, stoked by anti-vaccine activism. So-called vaccine hesitancy „ concerns and doubts about vaccines in general „ has become a global public health problem. Even in that context, the HPV vaccine stands out. In Japan, Denmark, Ireland and some other countries, bogus claims of HPV vaccine harms have derailed immunization campaigns that were initially highly successful. There has been a uniquely hostile reaction to the HPV vaccine,Ž said Patti Gravitt, an HPV researcher at George Washington Universitys Milken Institute School of Public Health. A Merck scientist disagreed. I dont think its more hated or less hated,Ž said Alain Luxembourg, the companys director of clinical research. Its a recent vaccine, an innovation, a medical advance. It attracts attention.Ž Genital strains of HPV, the human papillomavirus, are so ubiquitous that almost all sexually active people „ not just promiscuous ones „ will be infected at some point. While most HPV infections are wiped out by the immune system, high-risk strains can persist and initiate cancer of the cervix, vagina, anus, vulva, penis, mouth and throat. Worldwide, that translates to more than 600,000 cancers a year „ nearly 5 percent of all cancers. The original version of Gardasil, approved in 2006, protected against two high-risk HPV types, plus two types that cause genital warts. The current version, Gardasil 9, approved in 2014, protects against seven high-risk types that cause 90 percent of cervical cancers, as well as the two wart types. (Revaccination with the newer product is not recommended.) Giving the vaccine to boys and girls at age 11 or 12 is recommended. At that point, their immune response is optimal, and they likely havent been exposed to the virus through sexual activity. People who miss out can still get catch-upŽ shots up to age 26. After 10 years of use and over 270 million doses administered globally, HPV vaccines have proved safe and effective,Ž the World Health Organization declared last year. Transmission of the most common and dangerous HPV types is declining in countries with high coverage rates.Ž Although it will take more time to see the impact on cancer rates, many studies show vaccination has reduced genital warts, precancerous lesions that can progress to cancer and oral infections „ the kind that have fueled an explosion in head and neck cancers in recent decades, particularly in men. Nonetheless, parents and doctors have been cool to Gardasil, put off by its novelty, the link to sex, the need for two or three shots, and misperceptions. Just under half of adolescents ages 13 to 17 were immunized last year, far fewer than for other childhood vaccines. Patients are always asking me, Do you really think this is important for my daughter?Ž said Mark S. Shahin, chief of gynecologic oncology at Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center of Thomas Jefferson University. They arent even thinking of boys, which is crazy. To have the maximum bene“t, you have to vaccinate both males and females.Ž Vaccination rates could be boosted by requiring the shots for school, or by giving them to infants, said Judith Wolf, an infectious-disease specialist at Drexel University College of Medicine. Neither scenario is likely. Hypothetically, infants would respond to the vaccine, but wed have to prove that in clinical trials,Ž she said. Im unaware that anyone is interested is doing that.Ž Given lagging uptake among the targeted tweenŽ age group, why expand to middle age? Because, even if adults have been exposed to a few HPV types, they can still be protected from other types. The odds that any individual will have been exposed to all nine vaccine types are vanishingly rare,Ž Wolf said. Mercks latest data, from an international study of 3,200 women ages 27 to 45 who got the vaccine or a placebo, show the value. Over an average of 3 1/2 years, the vaccine was 88 percent effective in preventing persistent HPV infection, genital warts, and precancerous genital lesions. The FDA said the effectiveness in men is extrapolated from those results, and from a small study that found the vaccine stimulated immunity in males ages 27 to 45. But heres the caveat: Even among women who got the placebo, harmful infections were uncommon; only about 1 percent developed warts or precancerous cervical lesions. Gravitt, at George Washington University, said, There is data for ef“cacy, but the expanded population is at low risk. We need to focus on (adolescent) uptake and not be distracted by people who arent likely to bene“t.Ž While FDA approval frees Merck to market to the older group, the federal panel that decides vaccine policy is not expected to weigh in until next year. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) could recommend Gardasil use up to age 45 „ which would encourage insurance coverage „ or leave the choice to doctors and patients. Scienti“c groups and global health authorities „ including the European Medicines Agency and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention „ keep monitoring the safety of the vaccine. They have concluded that it does not cause chronic pain, heart arrhythmias, autoimmune diseases, life-threatening allergic reactions, stroke, neurological disorders or premature ovarian failure. But parents, anti-vaccine groups, even academics can still claim it does. (A New York University law school faculty member co-authored the just-published book, The HPV Vaccine on Trial: Seeking Justice for a Generation Betrayed.Ž) And the media can still sensationalize the unsubstantiated claims, fueling a panic. Japan is the most extreme illustration. Vaccination rates among adolescent girls plunged from more than 70 percent in 2013 to less than 1 percent today. The collapse began when Japanese media carried unveri“ed reports of vaccine harms, even showing parents videos of girls in wheelchairs or having apparent seizures. Then the Japanese government suspended the recommendation for HPV vaccination, even though its own health ministry found no evidence to support the allegations. The suspension remains in effect. The World Health Organizations advisory committee on vaccine safety lamented, Despite the extensive safety data available for this vaccine, attention has continued to focus on spurious case reports and unsubstantiated allegations.Ž In Denmark and Ireland, government and private health authorities responded to plunging vaccination rates with strong campaigns that have been rebuilding public con“dence in the vaccine. Its interesting that one of the poorest countries on Earth „ where cervical cancer is a major killer because of the lack of screening programs „ now boasts 93 percent vaccine coverage of sixth-grade girls. Rwandas program, launched in 2011, received free and then discounted vaccine from Merck. But the government also invested in a nationwide community-education campaign that reached religious, educational, political, and tribal leaders. It was important “rst to explain the link with cancer,Ž Agnes Binagwaho, a Rwandan pediatrician who served as health minister during the campaign, wrote in the Conversation.The cancer-preventing HPV vaccine a dozen years on: Progress, fear and loathing TNS PHOTOAt Medford Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine in Medford, New Jersey, the HPV vaccine to combat cervical cancer is displayed in a 2006 le image.

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The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 11 By RUSTY PRAYFEELING FIT CORRESPONDENTIts all about the whats and the huhs. If youre not sure you need a hearing aid, give it the what, huh test. If your response to someone speaking to you is what or huh, you probably need to get your hearing checked. Thats the formula recommended by Grant Stevens and Stefan Butz, owners of Delta Hearing, a pop-and-pop hearing center in Port Charlotte. When you start missing out on a lot of everyday stuff,Ž Stevens said of the time to start checking. I liken it to needing glasses,Ž Butz said. Thats kind of common as you get older. Most of the time, people dont notice so much themselves because hearing loss happens so slowly over time. It usually takes somebody else. Usually, its the whats and huhs or the spouse who becomes tired of, Hey, honey can you pass the dish? And he says, Pack the “sh?Ž Stevens and Betz opened the Port Charlotte of“ce in January. Stevens is the inside guy; Betz travels to clients who cant make it into the of“ce such as residents of assisted living and nursing homes. They have another of“ce in Sarasota, which they founded about two years ago. They both worked in the corporate hearing-aid world before branching out on their own. Were a good team,Ž Stevens said. What separates Delta from its competitors, say Stevens and Butz, is the nature of its ownership. It is not corporate. It is not a franchise. They own it with a “nancial investor, Denny DeMaria, who does the marketing. He and Stevens are veterans. We are one little of“ce,Ž Butz said. We are the mom-and-pop operation.Ž We keep our prices down because we dont have the overhead of a large corporate group,Ž Stevens said. Somebody might not need new hearing aids, so the second-opinion factor is really good. Because were familiar with all the brands, you can bring your existing hearing aid in to us. A lot of times it just needs cleaning and reprogramming.Ž They make house calls, do their own testing and repair assessments, and they just signed up for a pick-up transportation service that will bring clients to the of“ce. They are accessible, affordable and affable. They are a small, local business. They are your neighbors. Delta Hearing is located at 866 Tamiami Trail, Suite D, in Port Charlotte. For more information, call 941-249-9142.Delta Hearing wants you to lend an ear FEELING FIT PHOTO BY RUSTY PRAY Grant Steven, left, and Stefan Butz own Delta Hearing in Port Charlotte.Ž We keep our prices down because we dont have the overhead of a large corporate group,Ž Stevens said of their business. Millennium Health Care held its Aaron Street Fall Health FestŽ at the Millennium Physician Group Of“ce, located on Aaron Street, in Port Charlotte. The Health Fest, which was open to the public, featured a grilled food buffet and handouts with information on services provided by Millennium. Free Flu shots were available, while staff provided short tours of Millenniums Aaron Street Facility. The Aaron Street location is currently accepting new patients For more information, call 941-629-2900.Aaron Street Fall Health Fest FEELING FIT PHOTOS BY JERRY BEARD Millennium Physician Group sta was on hand at the fair. Pictured: Front Desk Clerk Angelina Eldridge (from right), North Region Coordinator Manager Alison Green, Aaron Street Practice Manager Kathy Carlton and LPN Suzanne Cliord. LPN Suzanne Cliord gives front desk clerk Angelina Eldridge her u shot. Dan Elias stacks grilled cheeseburgers onto the buet, at the Millennium Physican Groups Aaron Street Fall Health Fest.Ž By DANIELLE CINONENEW YORK DAILY NEWSThey both helped carry their baby „ and made medical history in the process. Ashleigh Coulter, 28, and her wife Bliss Coulter, 36, of Texas, took turns carrying their baby boy, thanks to the help of two fertility specialists. They are believed to be the “rst same-sex couple to take turns physically carrying their babys embryo. While Bliss wanted a child that was biologically hers, Ashleigh wanted to carry the baby. Ive always wanted my own child but I didnt want to give birth to my own child. I didnt know anything like this existed,Ž Bliss Coulter told the Daily News in a phone interview recently. Determined to make the couples wishes come true, Dr. Kathy Doody and her husband Kevin „ fertility specialists at CARE Fertility Clinic in Bedford, Texas „ decided to try Effortless Reciprocal In Vitro Fertilization (IVF). In the procedure, the eggs and sperm are introduced in an INVOcell device, which is inserted into the vagina during an incubation period. The INVOcell device „ a small plastic capsule „ was put into Bliss, allowing the egg to be fertilized with donor sperm. Its held in place with a small diaphragm and has holes in it to allow secretions to come out. We harvest the egg, put it with the sperm for “ve minutes and then place it directly into the vagina with the INVOcell device,Ž Dr. Doody told The News. The vagina works as a very good incubator.Ž After “ve days, the embryo was removed from Bliss and frozen. Prior to the embryo being inserted into Ashleigh, her body had to be prepped with hormones „ estrogen by mouth and progesterone injections „ which took about three weeks. They placed the embryo in my body and they did a blood test 10 days later „ and we got pregnant on the “rst try,Ž recalled Ashleigh, who carried the baby for nine months. Stetson Coulter was born in June 2018 weighing 8 pounds, 4 ounces. Hes healthy, happy, and we had no complications,Ž Ashleigh said. The women, who married in 2015, have faced many questions about the risks of the unique process, but the dangers are no different than traditional IVF. In fact, its more natural because everything is happening inside the body rather than inside a lab,Ž Ashleigh Coulter said. The Coulters hope to inspire other same-sex couples to go through Effortless IVF „ which is about half the cost of traditional IVF. In Texas, traditional IVF costs could reach as high as $20,000, which is signi“cantly higher than effortless IVF, which could cost up to $6,500. In the LGBT community, it seems like theres always one person in a couple that more so wants to carry the child ƒ with this procedure it will open up a huge window for those that are like me,Ž Bliss said.Same-sex couple makes medical history by physically carrying the same embryo PHOTO PROVIDEDAshleigh Coulter, 28, and her wife Bliss Coutler, 36, made medical history after they took turns carrying their baby boy „ thanks to the help of two fertility specialists. CONCERT!SP119414The Real Local NewspaperLet'sGo! Let'sGo! Let'sGo!TO A Check Our Local Listings Only in the... Let The DONT BE LEFT IN THE DARK! Light Your Way! Your source for local, national & world news. adno=3627504-1 €Affordable Options and Savings€Worldwide Travel Protection €Veterans Bene“ts€Avoid Hidden Society Fees €Complimentary Personal Planning Guide€Customized Packages and Terms CONSIDERING PLANNING AHEAD?CREMATION/FUNERAL SERVICES? CEMETERY OPTIONS? FREE LUNCH & SEMINARJOIN US FOR ACall Today to RSVP: 941Reservation required. Limited seating available. 150LaishleyCourt PuntaGorda,FL33950 Tuesday,November13th@11:30am 1200WRettaEsplanade PuntaGorda,FL33950 Thursday,November15th@11:30am 150 Laishley Court Punta GordaTuesday, November 13th @ 11:30 amThursday, November 15th @ 11:30 am1200 W Retta Esplanade Punta Gorda

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Page 12 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018Laurentz Cascante of North Port hosted Pink Hallow: Give Cancer the Boot at Tringali Recreation Center in Englewood. The program was held as a combination of cancer awareness, Zumba and Halloween fun, in honor of breast cancer survivors Keith Casper and Faith Kar. Live musical entertainment was provided by Port Charlotte resident Jeff Hughes of Short 1-Man Band, as well as door prizes and raf” e drawings held throughout the day.Giving cancer the boot FEELING FIT PHOTOS BY TAMI GARCIA Tracie LaTourette has a great time dancing during Zumba. Dancing in Western attire was Connie Castillo. Maureen Treece uses pom-poms during one of many Zumba songs. Laurentz Cascante, Zumba instructor, hosted the 2-hour program. Guest of honor Faith Kar, a breast cancer survivor for more than 20 years, danced a traditional Persian belly-dancing routine during the program. Other guest of honor, Keith Casper, has been a breast cancer survivor for 16 years. Ladies join in a line to kick up their heels during Give Cancer the Boot.Alzheimers support groupsThe Alzheimers Association holds monthly caregiver suapport groups for spouses, adult children and family members who want to connect and share insight with others in similar situations. RSVP is not required to attend. For questions on groups and services through the Alzheimers Association, please call 941-235-7470. Port Charlotte area € 3 p.m. third Tuesday at South Port Square (Harbor Terrace), 23033 Westchester Blvd., Port Charlotte. € 3 p.m. third Thursday at Port Charlotte United Methodist Church, 21075 Quesada Ave., Port Charlotte. Punta Gorda area € 3 p.m. third Monday at Life Care center, 450 Shreve St., Punta Gorda. € 3 p.m. second Tuesday at Punta Gorda Civic Association, 2001 Shreve St., Punta Gorda. Englewood area € 10:30 a.m. third Friday, Englewood United Methodist Church, 700 E. Dearborn St., Englewood.Alzheimers Caregiver Support GroupThe Alzheimers Caregiver Support Group meets from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. the second Tuesday every month at The Springs at South Biscayne, 6235 Hoffman St., North Port. Call 941426-8349 to register.Alcoholics AnonymousCall 941-426-7723 for information on meetings in the Arcadia, Venice, Port Charlotte, Punta Gorda, North Port and Englewood areas, including dates times and places.Amputee Support GroupThe Amputee Support Group meets at 3 p.m. on the second Monday of every month at the Life Care Center, Punta Gorda. Contact George Baum at 941-787-4151 for more information.At Ease, VeteransDuring World War II, and the wars in Korea, Vietnam, Afghanistan and Iraq, the percentage of American soldiers who shot their weapons with the intent to kill steadily rose from just 15 percent to almost 100 percent. The Department of Housing & Urban Development estimates that in January 2017, over 40,000 veterans are more likely to be homeless each night. As recently as 2014, an average of 20 veterans died from suicide each day. These brave men and women need a listening ear, and they need to know that Gods grace is still with them. Combat veterans from Gulf Cove United Methodist Church are providing some of the support and discussion that our veterans deserve. On the “ rst Tuesday of each month at 6 p.m., they are at the American Legion Post 113, at 3436 Indiana Road in Rotonda West. Veterans are invited and encouraged to join them. Gulf Cove UMC is located at 1100 McCall Road in Port Charlotte, just mile south of the Myakka River on Route 776. The church can be reached at 9416971747 or GulfCoveUMC@ gmail.com and their website is found at http:// GulfCoveChurch.com.Breast cancer networkingBreast Cancer Networking in Venice offers support and sharing with other breast cancer survivors. Meetings are on the third Monday of each month from 11 a.m. to noon at the Venice Health Park, Suite 1217 (north side), Jacaranda Blvd., Venice. For more information, call 941-408-9572.Breastfeeding support groupThe Florida Department of Health, local partners and organizations, such as the American Academy of Pediatrics, strongly recommend babies exclusively breastfeed for the “ rst six months of life and continue to breastfeed for one to two years. There are a variety of programs and resources to empower breastfeeding moms. Health professionals and peer counselors provide a range of services from right after birth at the hospital to breastfeeding support groups in the community as noted below: € Tuesdays, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., WIC in partnership with Lactation Love Breastfeeding Support Group, Jacaranda Library, 4143 Woodmere Park Blvd., Venice. Contact: Arielle Ball, DOH-Sarasota, WIC and Nutrition Services, Arielle. Ball@FLHealth.gov or 941-685-3324. € Second Wednesday each month, 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., North Port Library conference room, 13800 Tamiami Trail, North Port. Contact: Jamee Thumm, Healthy Start Coalition of Sarasota County, jamee.thumm@ gmail.com or 941-3737070, ext. 307.Cancer support groupFawcett Memorial Hospital, an HCA af“ liate, now offers a cancer support group for cancer patients, their families and caregivers. The group meets the last Wednesday of each month from noon to 1:30 p.m. with lunch provided. Research shows that social support has bene“ ts for cancer patients, those recovering from treatment and their family and loved ones by reducing anxiety and stress, emotional distress and depression, fatigue and the experience of pain while improving mood, self-image, ability to cope with stress and feelings of control. In addition, having a supportive social network can help with recovery and adjusting to life after treatment. The support group allows those experiencing a cancer diagnosis to cope with the emotional aspects by providing a safe place to share their feelings and challenges while allowing people to learn from others facing similar situations. Cancer patients and their family members are encouraged to attend. Active participation is not required, listeners are welcome. Physicians and other health professionals will periodically speak to the group on cancer related topics. For more information or to RSVP, please call Fawcetts oncology patient navigators at 941-624-8318. Support Groups $150HOLIDAY INTRODUCTORY OFFER(Expires 12/3/18)adno=3625575-1 SWFLs LEADING MEDICAL MARIJUANA CLINIC Visit us online!www.ICCPortCharlotte.comBOOK AN APPOINTMENT TODAY:941-375-67753524 Tamiami Trail Ste. 105G Port Charlotte, FL. 33952 info@ICCPortCharlotte.comDr. Tucker Greene Dr. Gregory R. Sonn What are the steps?1. Make an appointment. 2. Get certi“ ed that day. 3. Start buying your THC products in 10-30 days from your initial appointment date. 4. Return for your follow-up 7 months later.Caring. Compassionate. Con“ dential.

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Feeling FitPort Charlotte € Punta Gorda € North Port € Englewood € ArcadiaSunday, November 11, 2018www.yoursun.comDespite numerous and ongoing attempts to derail it, the Patient Protection & Affordable Care Act (PPACA), more commonly referred to as the Affordable Care Act, ACA or Obamacare, is still on the books. Considered the most sweeping change to the U.S. healthcare system since Medicare and Medicaid were created in 1965, the 2010 ACA guarantees that most Americans can receive or buy health insurance. The ACAs health insurance exchanges have survived a barrage of federal actions that threatened to topple them. Florida uses the Federal Health Insurance Exchange (also known as the Marketplace), so residents may enroll through HealthCare.gov. The Open Enrollment Period for the federal exchange began on Nov. 1 and runs through Dec. 15 for coverage starting on Jan. 1, 2019. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is taking a strategic and cost-effective approach to inform individuals about open enrollment, deliver a smooth enrollment experience and use consumer feedback to drive ongoing improvements. Consumers can visit HealthCare.gov, or CuidadodeSalud.gov for Spanish speakers, to preview 2019 plans and prices. Florida has the highest exchange enrollment of By MELISSA HEALYLOS ANGELES TIMESAlong with soulful eyes, endearingly long necks and warm fuzzy coats, llamas have a far less appreciated feature: They make an array of immune system antibodies so tiny they can “t into crevices on the surface of an invading virus. That feat could one day protect humans from entire families of ”u viruses that bedevil scientists with their unpredictable and shape-shifting ways. All, potentially, with a once-a-year puff up the nose. In a study in Fridays edition of the journal Science, a team from the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla and their international colleagues have taken a major step toward the long-sought goal of developing a universal vaccine against in”uenza. When they tested their intranasal formulation in mice, it quickly conferred complete protection against a raft of human ”u strains adapted to mice. Those include A viruses, such as the H1N1 swine ”uŽ that touched off a global pandemic in 2009, and B viruses, which occur only in humans. Against H1N1, a dose of the experimental vaccine was shown to protect for at least 35 days „ a span of time equivalent to more than a single ”u season for humans. Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, offered a full-throated appreciation for the new study, which received funding from the National Institutes of Health. From a scienti“c and technical standpoint, this is really a very elegant study „ the highest quality of science,Ž Fauci said. He praised it for demonstrating that in order to protect people from pathogens that can change or emerge unpredictably, scientists must construct vaccines that can knock down an array of viruses, even in people whose immune systems are fragile or compromised. In”uenza is a viral scourge that kills as many as 650,000 people each year, according to the World Health Organization. To “ght it, the research team borrowed new techniques from immunology, microbiology, nanotechnology and genetic Health & Hope DanMEARNSC Scientists may have found the key ingredient for a universal flu vaccine, and it comes from llamasTNS PHOTOScientists think they have developed a universal ”u vaccine; The key ingredient that can take on the ”u virus may come from llamas. By BRUCE HOROVITZKAISER HEALTH NEWSI was convinced I would become an adult when I turned 21. But now, Im certain that turning 65 was the watershed moment that “nally grew me up. Im pleased as pomegranate punch to be 65 „ and alive. Not just alive and breathing, but actively engaged in making the right choices about this next chapter. We enter this phase of life without a playbook or anything equivalent to institutions like elementary school and college that prepare youth for adulthood,Ž said James Firman, CEO of the National Council on Aging, who turned 65 two years ago. Theres really nothing to prepare us for the transition to this next phase of life.ŽPreparing for life after 65:Consider enrolling in Medicare Part A, to cover hospitalization expenses. It works for me because my family is still covered under my wifes health care plan. Double up on checkups. My annual visit to my primary care doctor evolved into a biannual visit. Age 65 is a time to proactively visit a geriatric physician instead of just going when youre in trouble,Ž said Dr. Ardeshir Hashmi, director of the Center for Geriatric Medicine at Cleveland Clinic. Dont wait until things get to a point where youre in a cycle of being in and out of the hospital all the time.Ž Starting at age 65, he said, these visits should last longer than the standard 20 minutes „ so older patients have time to discuss whats on their minds. Older patients who do this regularly tend to require minor tweaksŽ instead of major repairs, said Hashmi. Schedule annual visits to the dermatologist, ophthalmologist „ and visits every “ve years to the gastroenterologist. Establishing a coordinated care team becomes more important at 65,Ž said Jean Setzfand, senior vice president of programs at AARP. Take the leap and sign up for longterm health insurance. My wife and I “nally did after putting it off for years. Remember, its a lot easier „ and cheaper „ to get when youre younger than 65. Stick to a vaccine regimen. Vaccines are important again. Ive since received my “rst pneumonia vaccine. My doctor also told me to get the new shingles vaccine, Shingrix, because I developed shingles about “ve years ago. Evaluate your diet. I have mostly stopped eating red meat, except for the very occasional burger. I now opt for meals mostly composed of fruit, veggies and my new diet staple that I used to gag on as a kid: salmon. Bone up on Social Security. I attended a free county-funded seminar at the local library. Then, to discuss my personal needs, I met (for free) with the PHOTOS PROVIDED Bruce Horovitz with his wife, Evelyne, and daughters, Becca (left) and Rachel, at a lakeside campground near Interlaken, Switze rland, where the family travels each summer. Bruce Horovitz plays Wallyball with friends early every Friday morning at a local recreation center in Falls Church, Virginia.Who knew? Life begins (again) at 65Obamacare sign-ups underway DAN | 9 VACCINE | 10 LIFE | 10 Charlotte Heart & Vascular Instituteof North Port Now Accepting New Patients. CALL TODAY to schedule an Appointment 9417645858Michael Malone, D.O.Amit Gupta, M.D.Nicolai Mejevoi, M.D.Melody Strattan, D.O.14575 South Tamiami Trail €North Port, FL 34287 CharlotteHeartandVascular.com Cardiology Peripheral Vascular Disease Venous Disease Electrophysiology

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Page 2 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 Feeling FitPresident Michael Beatty Publisher Glen Nickerson Feeling Fit Editor Marie Merchant feelingfit@sun-herald.com 941-206-1135 Deadlines:Support groups and News & Notes are published as space permits. To be included send the information to feelingfit@sun-herald.com. Deadlines for listings are the Monday prior to publication.Medical Advertising Executives Bibi R. Gafoor 941-258-9528 bgafoor@sun-herald.com Jim Commiskey 941-258-9526 jcommiskey@sun-herald.com Elaine Schaefer eschaefer@sun-herald.com 941-205-6409By LINDSEY TANNERAP MEDICAL WRITERIt was launched decades ago as an anesthetic for animals and people, became a potent battle“eld pain reliever in Vietnam and morphed into the trippy club drug Special K. Now the chameleon drug ketamine is “nding new life as an unapproved treatment for depression and suicidal behavior. Clinics have opened around the United States promising instant relief with their uniqueŽ doses of ketamine in IVs, sprays or pills. And desperate patients are shelling out thousands of dollars for treatment often not covered by health insurance, with scant evidence on long-term bene“ts and risks. Chicago preschool teacher Lauren Pestikas long struggled with depression and anxiety and made several suicide attempts before trying ketamine earlier this year. The price tag so far is about $3,000, but its worth every dime and penny,Ž said the 36-year-old. Pestikas said she feels much better for a few weeks after each treatment, but the effects wear off and she scrambles to “nd a way to pay for another one. For now, ketamine has not received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating depression, though doctors can use it for that purpose. Ketamine has been around since the 1960s and is widely used as an anesthesia drug during surgery because it doesnt suppress breathing. Compared to opioids such as morphine, ketamine isnt as addictive and doesnt cause breathing problems. And some studies have shown that ketamine can ease symptoms within hours for the toughest cases. Its potential effects on depression were discovered in animal experiments in the late 1980s and early 1990s showing that glutamate, a brain chemical messenger, might play a role in depression, and that drugs including ketamine that target the glutamate pathway might work as antidepressants. Conventional antidepressants like Prozac target serotonin, a different chemical messenger, and typically take weeks to months to kick in „ a lag that can cause severely depressed patients to sink deeper into despair. Ketamines potential for almost immediate if temporary relief is what makes it so exciting, said Dr. Jennifer Vande Voort, a Mayo Clinic psychiatrist who has treated patients with depression since February. We dont have a lot of things that provide that kind of effect. What I worry about is that it gets so hyped up,Ž she said. The strongest studies suggest its most useful and generally safe in providing short-term help for patients who have not bene“ted from antidepressants. That amounts to about one-third of the roughly 300 million people with depression worldwide. It truly has revolutionized the “eld,Ž changing scientists views on how depression affects the brain and showing that rapid relief is possible, said Yale University psychiatrist Dr. Gerard Sanacora, who has done research for or consulted with companies seeking to develop ketamine-based drugs. But to become standard depression treatment, he said, much more needs to be known. Last year, Sanacora co-authored an American Psychiatric Association task force review of ketamine treatment for mood disorders that noted the bene“ts but said major gapsŽ remain in knowledge about long-term effectiveness and safety. Most studies have been small, done in research settings and not in the real world. When delivered through an IV, ketamine can cause a rapid increase in heart rate and blood pressure that could be dangerous for some patients. Ketamine also can cause hallucinations that some patients “nd scary. There are some very real concerns,Ž Sanacora said. We do know this drug can be abused, so we have to be very careful about how this is developed.Ž Dr. Rahul Khare, an emergency medicine specialist in Chicago, “rst learned about ketamines other potential bene“ts a decade ago from a depressed and anxious patient he was preparing to sedate to “x a repeat dislocated shoulder. He said, Doc, give me what I got last time. For about three weeks after I got it I felt so much better,Ž Khare recalled. Khare became intrigued and earlier this year began offering ketamine for severe depression at an outpatient clinic he opened a few years ago. He also joined the American Society for Ketamine Physicians, formed a year ago representing about 140 U.S. doctors, nurses, psychologists and others using ketamine for depression or other nonapproved uses. There are about 150 U.S. ketamine clinics, compared with about 20 three years ago, said society co-founder Dr. Megan Oxley. Khare said the burgeoning “eld is like a new frontierŽ where doctors gather at meetings and compare notes. He has treated about 50 patients with depression including Pestikas. Theyre typically desperate for relief after failing to respond to other antidepressants. Some have lost jobs and relationships because of severe depression, and most “nd that ketamine allows them to function, Khare said. Typical treatment at his clinic involves six 45-minute sessions over about two weeks, costing $550 each. Some insurers will pay about half of that, covering Khares of“ce visit cost. Patients can receive boosterŽ treatments. They must sign a fourpage consent form that says bene“ts may not be long-lasting, lists potential side effects, and in bold letters states that the treatment is not government-approved. At a recent session, Pestikass seventh, she leaned back on a reclining white examining-room chair as a nurse hooked her up to a heart and blood pressure monitor. She grimaced as a needle was slipped into the top of her left palm. Khare reached up with a syringe to inject a small dose of ketamine into an IV bag hanging above the chair, then dimmed the lights, pulled the window curtains and asked if she had questions and was feeling OK. No questions, just grateful,Ž Pestikas replied, smiling. Pestikas listened to music on her iPhone and watched psychedelic videos. She said it was like a controlled acid tripŽ with pleasant hallucinations. The trip ends soon after the IV is removed, but Pestikas said she feels calm and relaxed the rest of the day, and that the mood boost can last weeks. Studies suggest that a single IV dose of ketamine far smaller than used for sedation or partying can help many patients gain relief within about four hours and lasting nearly a week or so. Exactly how ketamine works is unclear, but one idea is that by elevating glutamate levels, ketamine helps nerve cells re-establish connections that were disabled by depression, said ketamine expert Dr. Carlos Zarate, chief of experimental therapies at the National Institute of Mental Health. A small Stanford University study published in August suggested that ketamine may help relieve depression by activating the brains opioid receptors. Janssen Pharmaceuticals and Allergan are among drug companies developing ketamine-like drugs for depression. Janssen leads the effort with its nasal spray esketamine. The company “led a new drug application in September. Meanwhile, dozens of studies are underway seeking to answer some of the unknowns about ketamine including whether repeat IV treatments work better for depression and if theres a way to zero in on which patients are most likely to bene“t. Until there are answers, Zarate of the mental health institute said ketamine should be a last-resort treatment for depression after other methods have failed.High hopes and hype for experimental depression drug ketamine AP PHOTOSSince starting treatments with ketamine infusions, Lauren Pestikas says she feels much better for a few weeks after each session. Lauren Pestikas sits as she receives an infusion of the drug ketamine during a 45-minute session at an outpatient clinic in Chicago. Dr. Rahul Khare poses for a portrait at his outpatient Chicago clinic. Khare, an emergency medicine specialist, has treated about 50 patients with ketamine since he began oering it for severe depression earlier this year. Its never too late to get theSMILEyouve always wanted!Call Dr. Pepper for a free Invisalign treatment consult!941-629-2221|Charlotteadvancedortho.com 3100 Port Charlotte Blvd | Port Charlotte, FL 33952Invisalign and the Invisalign logo, among others, are trademarks of Align Technology, Inc., and are registered in the U.S. and other countries. Dr. Christina S. Pepper ABO Board Certi“ ed Orthodontist

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The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 3By NEIL B. ZUSMAN, M.D., FACSZUSMAN EYE CARE CENTERAn estimated 24 million Americans now have diabetes, with the number expected to grow at least 5 percent annually in future years. One serious consequence of the disease can be vision loss or blindness. November is Diabetic Eye Disease Awareness Month, and Zusman Eye Care Center urges anyone who may be at risk for diabetes to see their ophthalmologist and primary care physician. The earlier diabetes is caught and appropriate lifestyle changes and treatment begin, the better the chance of avoiding vision loss and other health consequences. Hispanic-Americans are especially at risk for diabetes and related eye problems, but most are unaware of their heightened susceptibility, several recent studies show. Among HispanicAmericans older than 40, one in “ ve is diabetic, and almost half of this group have diabetic retinopathy, abnormal blood vessel changes in the eyes retina and optic nerve area. Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of vision loss and blindness in this ethnic group. Studies show that many do not receive the screening and treatment they need due to obstacles to care, including lack of health insurance and language barriers. This is a tragedy waiting to happen,Ž said Neil B. Zusman, M.D. Effective treatments, including annual eye exams, can reduce severe vision loss in diabetics by up to 94 percent.Ž In the United States, one-third of those with diabetes are unaware of it. Some “ nd out when their ophthalmologist notices changes in their retina „ the light-sensitive area at the back of the eye „ during a dilated eye exam. Type 2 diabetes is much more common than Type 1; both types can affect eye health. Nearly 5.5 million Americans age 18 and older have diabetic retinopathy. In addition to controlling their blood sugar, people with diabetes should work with their primary care physician to control their blood pressure, since both are important to slowing the development of diabetic retinopathy. Diabetics are also more likely to develop glaucoma, a complex disease that damages the optic nerve, which relays images from the eye to the brain. Zusman Eye Care Center and the American Academy of Ophthalmology recommend that people with Type 2 diabetes see an ophthalmologist (an Eye M.D.) at the time of diagnosis and annually thereafter. Those with Type 1 diabetes should see an ophthalmologist within “ ve years of diagnosis and then yearly. Women who have either diabetes type should see an Eye M.D. before they become pregnant or early in the “ rst trimester. Also, the Academy now recommends that adults with no signs or risk factors for eye disease get a baseline eye disease screening at age 40, when early signs of disease and changes in vision may start to occur. Based on the results of the initial screening, an Eye M.D. will prescribe the necessary intervals for follow-up exams. In the initial stages, people with diabetic retinopathy may not notice their vision changing. Diabetics sometimes experience rapid changes in blood sugar that can temporarily cause blurry vision even when retinopathy is not present. If a person notices a few specks or spots ” oating in his visual “ eld, this may mean he has developed proliferative diabetic retinopathy, the growth of abnormal new blood vessels on the retina and optic nerve. High blood sugar levels have been linked in studies to retinal blood vessel abnormalities. Blurred vision may occur when the macula „ the small area at the center of the retina „ swells as it “ lls with ” uid that has leaked from retinal blood vessels. Because damage to the eye often develops slowly, early detection of diabetes and control of blood sugar through diet and medications can make a crucial difference in saving vision. Effective diabetic retinopathy treatments include laser photocoagulation for early to moderate stages and a microsurgery called vitrectomy for repair of eyes with extensive damage. Injectable and oral medications that act on abnormal blood vessels to control diabetic retinopathy before vision loss occurs are now in development. Early detection would be key to the effectiveness of these treatments, also. Additional information on diabetic retinopathy can be found on www. GetEyeSmart.org. Zusman Eye Care Center is a state of the art facility providing a variety of services ranging from routine eye exams to medical and surgical treatment of eye disease. Dr. Zusman specializes in no stitch, no needle, no patch cataract surgery under topical anesthesia. He also performs laser surgery and eyelid surgery. Additional interests include glaucoma, diabetes, macular degeneration and the diagnosis and treatment of ocular trauma/Injuries. Dr. Zusman is a board-certi“ ed ophthalmologist and a consultant for the Tampa Bay Rays. He was voted Best Ophthalmologist in Charlotte County from 2011-2015, 2018. He has been serving Charlotte County since 1988 Zusman Eye Care Center is located at 3430 Tamiami Trail, Suite A, Port Charlotte. For more information, call 941-624-4500.Diabetes threatens the eyesight of many unsuspecting Americans IMAGE PROVIDEDBy GREGORY WHYTETHE CULTURAL CENTER OF CHARLOTTE COUNTYS FITNESS CENTERIf you are 55 or older, it is quite possible that you already possess one or more diseases or conditions that are likely to decrease your ability to live your life to its fullest. Conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, asthma, arthritis, respiratory disease and high blood pressure that are familiar to many seniors do not have to prevent you from living a healthy and ful“ lling life. A program that has been helping folks improve their “ tness and health for over 30 years is Fusion One. It is a naturalŽ and holistic health program that is safe, simple and effective. Since its creation in the late 70s, the program has addressed the health needs of thousands without deliberately or carelessly harming anyone. This fact is consistent with a guiding principle of the program. This principle simply states that good health can, and should be had without harm or injury to those seeking it.Ž The user friendlinessŽ and effectiveness of Fusion One are re” ected in the vast number of its practitioners who remain with the program for years. In addition, the number of people who are practicing Fusion One is increasing at an enormous rate. The popularity of the program is due to a number of factors. The principal ones are, again, the simplicity and ease of performing its exercises and the tremendous bene“ ts that are quickly had through their practice. In a general way, Fusion One will assist in preventing certain illnesses. Furthermore, its practice will help to slow the aging process, improve the circulation of the blood, tone muscles, relax tensed nerves, strengthen muscles and bones, improve coordination and balance, focus the mind and foster deep relaxation. In more speci“ c ways, Fusion One provides the following bene“ ts: € It helps control daily stress € It is capable of “ rming and ” attening the abdominal region € It improves breathing and combats respiratory problems € It increases ” exibility € It improves balance and helps prevent falling € It strengthens muscles € It eliminates pain and stiffness found at various parts of the body € It encourages participation in “ tness and health promoting activities. We know that the exercises and other activities of Fusion One are performed slowly, require a minimum of time, effort and strength and produce bene“ ts that are many and quickly had. We also know that a portion of the exercises are performed while sitting and that the exercises can be practiced at any time, require little space and make use of no expensive, bulky or complicated equipment. In addition, we know that Fusion One is a relatively inexpensive activity that may be performed by individuals or by groups of people. All of these features help to make it appealing to most people. Furthermore, because of the bene“ ts it offers and its user friendlyŽ nature, people are more likely to participate in its practice. It should also be noted that Fusion One offers a vast number of exercises that are ideal for the workplace. These exercises may be done while sitting at a desks or even in the lunch or break area. Techniques to prevent or combat job-related stress, eye strain, lower back injury, mental fatigue, decreased concentration and ef“ ciency and weight gain due to inactivity are all offered by the Fusion One program. For additional information on Fusion One or its available classes, contact the Cultural Center of Charlotte Countys Fitness Center at 941-6254175, ext. 263.Using Fusion One to improve your health Cancer Support MinistryFirst United Methodist Church offers a scripturally based cancer support ministry to anyone affected by this life altering diagnosis. Whether you are new diagnosis or have been battling for a long time, the cancer ministry provides a place where people who understand the treatment journey are available to help, listen and support patients, as well as survivors, caregivers and family members. The Cancer Support Ministry meets the “ rst Wednesday of every month at 6:30 p.m. in room 9 at 507 W. Marion Ave., Punta Gorda. All adult cancer survivors and their caregivers are welcome to attend, regardless of cancer type, church af“ liation or faith base. For more information, contact Mitzi Kohrman, kohrman1562@ comcast.net.Caregivers Support GroupPort Charlotte United Methodist Church, 21075 Quesada Ave., Port Charlotte, hosts a caregiver support group from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. every Wednesday. The cost is free and is open to any caregiver dealing with a care-receiver with any debilitating disease. There are no requirements to join the group. For more information, contact Mike Boccia at 941-815-6077.Co-Dependents Anonymous (CoDA)Co-Dependents Anonymous (CoDA) is a Twelve Step Fellowship of men and women whose common purpose is recovery from CoDependence and the development and maintenance of healthy relationships. The Coda meetings in the area meet at the Oasis Alana Club at 2936 S. McCall Road, Englewood. Monday Step from 7 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Thursday Open from 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Friday from 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. For more information, contact Barbara at 941-474-4190.Hollys HopeHollys Hope, a group formed by Joan and Ed Morgan after their daughter Holly died by suicide in 2017, will host the “ rst support group in North Port to help with grief from suicide. The group will meet on the fourth Monday of every month at 6 p.m. in Module Three outside New Hope Community Church, 5600 S Biscayne Drive. For more information on the group, contact Vogel at 317250-7316, or email at amy.vogel98@ gmail.com. Support Groups Happiness is..... Finding a furry friend in the Classifieds adno=3621991-1 READERS CHOICE AWARD2018 Robotic Hip and Knee SurgeryMAKO Robotic Arm (RIO) offers ALL of the following:€ Minimal hospitalization € Smaller incision € Less scarring € Reduced blood loss € Also bene“ t from ART’ Accelerated Recovery TechniquesNick Connors, M.D.Board Certi“ ed & Speciality Trained in knee, hip & shoulder replacement 1st in Charlotte County using RIO(As seen on WINK-TV)CALL TODAY!941.629.6262 or 941.639.6699www.AdvancedOrthopedicCenter.com 2003-2018

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Page 4 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 NEWS & NOTESNeuro Challenge Foundation for Parkinsons€ Port Charlotte Parkinsons Support Group with Carisa Campanella, NCF Program Manager and Courtnie Giddens, NCF Care Advisor; Murdock Baptist Church, 18375 Cochran Blvd., Port Charlotte from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Nov. 13. € North Port Wellness Club: Improving Outcomes with Vision in People with ParkinsonsŽ with Anne Marie Oliveto, OT; Sarasota Memorial Health Care System, SMH North Port Medical Plaza, (2nd Floor Conference Room), 2345 Bobcat Village Center Road, North Port, from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Nov. 14. € Englewood Parkinsons Support Group: Ask the Elder Care AttorneyŽ with Attorney Kevin Staas, Staas Law Group; St. Davids Episcopal Church, 401 S. Broadway, Englewood, from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on Nov. 16. € North Port JFCS Care Partner Connection with Carolyn Stephens, LCSW (Open Forum and Sharing) and Parkinsons Power Hour with Karla Brody and Courtnie Giddens; Neuro Challenge Foundation: North Port, 5600 Peace River Road, North Port, from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Nov. 21. € North Port JFCS Care Partner Connection with Carolyn Stephens, LCSW (Open Forum and Sharing) and Parkinsons Power Hour with Carissa Campanella and Courtnie Giddens; Neuro Challenge Foundation: North Port, 5600 Peace River Road, North Port, from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Nov. 28. € North Port Voice Aerobics with Mary Spremulli, SLP: An exercise program focusing on breath support, posture, and vocal function exercises for improved vocal performance; Neuro Challenge Foundation: North Port, 5600 Peace River Road, North Port, from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Nov. 29. € Venice Movers and Shakers PD Discussion Group: Lessons Learned from CopingŽ with Edie Anderson, Ambassador, Davis Phinney Foundation; (A Learning and Support Discussion Group focusing on the Cognitive and Behavioral Aspects of PD), Jacaranda Public Library, 4143 Woodmere Park Blvd., Venice, from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Nov. 29. € Punta Gorda Parkinsons Support Group: Care Partners and PwP Breakout Groups with Carisa Campanella and Courtnie Giddens; Punta Gorda Civic Association, 2001 Shreve St., Punta Gorda, from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on Nov. 30. € Neuro Challenge Foundation Crafters Guild Holiday Craft Fair, (all proceeds from the Craft Fair are utilized to fund Neuro Challenge Foundation Programs and Services): Sarasota Memorial Health Care Center at Clark Road, 5880 Rand Blvd., Classroom A Sarasota, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Nov. 30.Twins Tot Walk & 5KThe Punta Gorda/Port Charlotte Bridge Twins Tot Walk will be held today, at Laishley Park, 120 Laishley Park, Punta Gorda. Registration begins at 4 p.m. with a 5 p.m. vigil and walk immediately following. Strollers welcome on the Walk. Teams are encouraged but not necessary. For more information, visit runsignup.com/Race/Events/FL/ PuntaGorda/TwinsWalk5K.Englewood CRA to host Veterans Day celebrationThe Englewood Community Redevelopment Area and the Friends of Englewood Veterans Memorial and Freedom Pavilion is hosting its third annual Veterans Day Celebration of Honor at 11 a.m. today, at the Englewood Veterans Memorial, 10 Harbor Lane, Englewood. The event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served. For more information, call the Sarasota County Contact Center at 941-861-5000 or visit www.scgov.net.More Than Weight LossJoin Chrisanna Harrington, dietitian and counselor for a discussion on more than weight loss.Ž Understand how the food we eat can impact our health and cognition. She explains why people crave sweets, have dif“culty losing weight and start to have brain fogŽ in their 40s and 50s. Anyone who is thinking about dieting, weight loss surgery or has been advised by their doctor to lose weight should hear this lecture to understand just how nutrition impacts disease. The discussion will be held from 11:30 a.m to 12:30 p.m. Nov. 14, at 252 W. Marion Ave. Punta Gorda. For more information or to reserve a seat, call 941-787-3525.Trivia night Chelsea Place Adult Day Care, 3626 Tamiami trail, Port Charlotte will host Trivia Night from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Nov. 15. Pizza, beer, wings and wine. All proceeds to bene“t the Homeless Coalition. Cost is $10. Donation includes food and drink. RSVP to Amie at 941-787-0687.Charlotte Prostate Support Group meetingThe Charlotte Prostate Support Group will meet from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Nov. 16, at the Fawcett Hospital H2U facility located 3280 Tamiami Trail, Suite #493, Port Charlotte. The speaker will be Dr. Marc Melser, M.D., a longtime Urologist in Port Charlotte. Dr. Melser will be speaking on imaging in prostate cancer care. A cancer diagnosis is not required for attendance, many of our members have other prostate issues. We try to present an open, casual, environment to discuss any prostate concern. Women are cordially invited to attend and participate. Refreshments and room provided by Fawcett Memorial Hospital. There will be no meeting in December and our speaker Jan. 18 will be Dr. Ivor Percent, M.D., Oncologist from Florida Cancer Specialists.Englewood Lions Club to host flea marketEnglewood Lions Club on 4611 Placida Road, Englewood, will be hosting its Flea Market starting the second Sunday of every month from November through March from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Inside tables are available for $20 each. Vendor spots outside are available for $15 each. For more information, call Diane at 941-681-2161.Ride for Tiny TownRide for Tiny Town, a celebration ride for the Arcadia community of 2019 will be held at 8 a.m. on Feb. 9. The start and “nish line is at the Mosaic Arena in Arcadia. Bicyclists from around Florida are invited to participate with 15, 30, and 60 mile routes. The ride is fully supported with periodic rest stops and sag vehicles. Ride pre-registration is only $40, ride day registration $50. Participants can preregister online at ridefortinytown.com or by sending name, address, phone, email, and $40 to Ride for Tiny Town, 1144 NW Peace Point Drive, Arcadia, Florida 34266.Bucs on the Run 5K Run/WalkThe annual Bucs on the Run 5K run and fun walk will be held on Feb. 23. Proceeds bene“t the student activities account. Register early for a discounted rate and try to be one of the “rst 200 to register to receive an of“cial run day long-sleeve dry-“t shirt. Registration by Feb. 28 is $25 for adults, $25 youth (under 18). Day of race is $30 adults/$25 youth. Registration is from 7 a.m. to 7:45 a.m. Race start at 8 a.m. Register at www.runsignup.com. or more information, contact Coach Winkler at gwinkler@fsw.edu.American Cancer Society seeks participation in Relay For Life of Charlotte CountyAmerican Cancer Society is calling on all community members to participate in the annual Relay For Life of Charlotte County on April 6, at Laishley Park. Be part of the “ght, and together we can beat our biggest rival. American Cancer Society is seeking volunteers to form teams and stand shoulder to shoulder with us and cancer patients and those supporting them. Founded by Dr. Gordy Klatt in Washington in 1985, the Relay For Life movement unites communities across the globe to celebrate people who have been touched by cancer, remember loved ones lost, and take action for lifesaving change. Symbolizing the battle waged around the clock by those facing cancer, the event can last up to 24 hours and empowers communities to take a stand against cancer. This year, an estimated 1.3 million people in the U.S. will participate in more than 2,000 events to help the American Cancer Society attack cancer in dozens of ways, each of them critical to achieving a world without cancer „ from developing breakthrough therapies to building supportive communities, from providing empowering resources to deploying activists to raise awareness. Funds raised support the American Cancer Society 24/7 cancer help line and free rides to chemo. By joining the Relay For Life event, you can help attack cancer from every angle. To learn more about Relay For Life, and register a team, visit RelayForLife.org/ charlottecounty”.Hope PACE seeking volunteersDo you have a caring heart and time to share? Hope PACE, a Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly that helps aging adults live independently in our community, is seeking volunteers for its Port Charlotte Care Center. Volunteers may be asked to talk and socialize with individuals in Hopes care, organize fun games and activities, assist with crafts or special projects, help with meals and snacks, or offer administrative support to onsite staff. Before helping at the Hope PACE Care Center, volunteers will receive an in-depth orientation session. Volunteers must be at least 14 years or older. Call 239-415-7217 or visit www.HopeHCS.org/ volunteer for more information about volunteer opportunities. To learn more about Hope Healthcare programs, including Hope Kids Care, Hope PACE, Hope Palliative Care and the Hope Parkinson Program, call 239482-4673 or visit www. HopeHCS.org.LOUD Crowd classesThe LOUD Crowd classes meet every Thursday from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Universal Fitness, 1544 Rio De Janeiro Ave, Punta Gorda. No fee. New member are requested to contact 941-204-1515 prior to attending for the “rst time. The LOUD Crowd is a weekly speech class for individuals with Parkinsons disease who have previously undergone speech therapy. For more information contact Mary Spremulli at 941-204-1515 or email info@voiceaerobicsdvd.com. PHOTO PROVIDEDEvelyn Lauer, celebrates her 102nd birthday with her son and daughter-in-law, Bill Lauer and Marjorie Kamp, at River Commons. By NICOLLE CAUFFMANRIVER COMMONSLongtime resident of River Commons, Evelyn Lauer, turned 102 on Thursday. She has been a resident since 2011. Shes been an amazing addition to the community and a perfect example of what living independently is all about. Shes can always be found with a smile on her face and singing a tune when she is out and about. Happy Birthday to this wonderful woman. River Commons is located at 2305 Aaron St, Port Charlotte. For more information, call 941-629-0043 or visit https://www.myrivercommonshome.com.River Commons resident turns 102 MEDICAL2030 $2000 Sign on BONUS!! SOLARIS HEALTHCARE is now HiringCNAs: Full Time and PRN Apply: solarishealthcare.vikus.net CNAs, HHAs and CaregiversFind New Clients by Advertising Your Services in the Senior Directory Every Wednesday in The Sun Newspapers. This Feature Publishes in Charlotte, Sarasota, and Desoto Counties. Market Yourself Reach 150,000 Readers! Call 941-429-3110 for more information Caring for HeroesDouglas T. Jacobson State Veterans Home MDS Coordinator Full Time Sr. RN Super Full or Part Time CDM/Cook Full Time CNAs 3-11 or 11-7Excellent Benefits Job security, Tuition paid, Generous time off/paid leave.941-613-0919Online: www.peoplefirst.myflorida.com FRONT DESK f or M e di ca l Of fice. Must have computer knowledge & good communication skills. Call 941-764-8550 IMMEDIATE O PENIN GS Receptionist/Med Assistant Open Interviews 8:30-2PM Wed 11/7 & Thurs 11/8. BRING RESUME! Apply Within: 2866-A Tamiami Trail Port Charlotte, FL 33952 www.HorizonTechInstitute.ComADVANCE YOUR CAREERŽ Licensed & Accredited School Murdock Town Center on 411032 Tamiami Tr Unit 3YOUcan become a LPN within 11 months. Enrollment ongoing.Start Working In 2-5 wks! Classes Start Each Month Call For Class Dates Nursing Assistant (120hrs) Home Health Aide (75hrs) Phlebotomy Tech (165hrs) EKG Tech (165hrs) Patient Care Tech (600hrs) Job Assist. & Pymt. Plans Call Now to Register! 941-889-7506 PHLEBOTOMY,EKG, Classes Start 11/12LPNwkds 11/12 CNA11/12 Med. 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The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 5 Nov. 13, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Lung Cancer Support Group. Bayfront Health Punta Gorda Medical Of“ ce Plaza, 4th Floor Conf. Room, 713 E. Marion Ave., Punta Gorda. Find out what support and assistance is available to you and your family and how others are coping. No registration required. For details, call 941-637-9575. Nov. 13, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Hands-Only CPR and Early Heart Attack Care (EHAC). Villa San Carlos I, 2550 Easy St., Port Charlotte. Hands-only CPR is a method of CPR that has been recommended by the American Heart Association (AHA) since 2010 and is 10 times more likely to save someone in cardiac arrest then not doing anything. Help given immediately in an emergency can often make the difference between life and death. Free. Register at www. BayfrontHealthEvents. com. Nov. 13, 15-minute Time Slots Available 4 p.m to 5:30 p.m. „ Personalized Balance Assessment. Bayfront Health Port Charlotte, Center for Balance Disorders, 2500 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte. Anyone can lose the ability to balance. Receive an individualized assessment and learn ways to improve balance. Free. Limited time slots available. Call 941-766-4903 to register. Nov. 14, noon to 1 p.m. Hip and Knee Pain? Ask Dr. Davis. Speaker: Mark Davis, M.D., Orthopedic Surgeon. Bayfront Health Punta Gorda Medical Of“ ce Plaza, 4th Floor Conf. Room, 713 E. Marion Ave., Punta Gorda. Have your questions answered one-on-one for all your hip and knee ailments. Free. Lunch provided. Register at www. BayfrontHealthEvents. com. Nov. 14, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Bayfront Baby Place Tours. Bayfront Health Port Charlotte, Lobby, 2500 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte. Expecting? View the birthing suites, meet the staff and get questions answered in preparation for an exceptional experience. Free. Register at www. BayfrontHealthEvents. com. Nov. 15, 11 a.m. to noon. Lunch and Learn: Recognizing the Signs of Caregiver Burnout. Sandhill Gardens Retirement Center, 24949 Sandhill Blvd., Punta Gorda. Are you battling feelings of hopelessness? Are you suffering from appetite changes and sleep disturbances? If you are caring for a loved one, than you may be suffering from caregiver burnout. Many caregivers do not take time to care for themselves. Your emotional and psychological health can affect your physical health. Join us and learn the signs of burnout, how to better manage daily stress, and when to seek help. Free. Boxed lunches provided. Registration is required. To register, call 941-764-6577. Nov. 15, 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Be Free from Knee Pain. Speaker: Ronald Constine, M.D., Orthopedic Surgeon. Bayfront Health Punta Gorda Medical Of“ ce Plaza, 4th Floor Conf. Room, 713 E. Marion Ave., Punta Gorda. If you suffer from knee pain, you know how it can limit your daily activities. Learn more about treatment options are available. Free. Register at www. BayfrontHealthEvents. com. Nov. 15, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Infant CPR Class. Bayfront Health Port Charlotte, Conference Center, 2500 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte. Caregivers learn how to respond during the “ rst critical minutes of an emergency until a professional arrives. CPR techniques, safety, and accident prevention tips are covered. Parents, grandparents and caregivers are encouraged to attend. Free. Register at www. BayfrontHealthEvents. com. Nov. 17, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Childbirth and Newborn 1-Day Course. Bayfront Health Port Charlotte, Conference Center, 2500 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte. In this course, you will leave with a better understanding of labor and delivery, the birthing process, anatomy and physiology, birth basics, comfort techniques, hospital procedures and medical interventions. ($) or ask how you can take this course for free. Register at www. BayfrontHealthEvents. com. Nov. 17, 11 a.m. to noon. Bayfront Baby Place Tours. Bayfront Health Port Charlotte, Lobby, 2500 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte. Expecting? View the birthing suites, meet the staff and get questions answered in preparation for an exceptional experience. Free. Register at www. BayfrontHealthEvents. com. Nov. 20, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Allergies: The Scoop vs. The Rumors. Speaker: Maria Compton, D.O., Otolaryngologist. Punta Gorda Isles Civic Association, 2001 Shreve St., Punta Gorda. Allergies or not? Learn the difference between symptoms that may be disguising themselves. Free. Lunch provided. RSVP is required. Call 941-637-1655 to register. € Englewood Beach: Daily at 8:30 a.m.; and Wednesday at 5 p.m. 941-473-0135. € Manasota Beach, 8570 Manasota Key Road: Monday-Friday at 8 a.m. and 9 a.m.; Saturday 9 a.m. € Venice Beach Yoga, Daily 8 a.m. and 9 a.m.; Monday-Thursday at 5 p.m. € North Jetty, Nokomis Beach Yoga, 1000 S Casey Key Road: 9 a.m. MondayFriday. All ages and abilities bring a towel or blanket and join. Free will donation. € Pop Up Yoga classes at local business led by The Yoga Sanctuary will be held all throughout the summer. You never know where until the week prior to a Pop Up Class. The Yoga Sanctuary is excited to be working with other businesses in town (and sometimes beyond) to provide people with even more opportunities to explore their yoga practice and shop local! These surprise yoga classes will be held all over „ you never know when or where until that week. To “ nd out about these special complimentary classes be sure to likeŽ and follow us and other Punta Gorda businesses on Facebook. Thats where well be announcing each class. Other things to know: 1. A limited number of mats will be available for use. But if you have your own, feel free to bring it. 2. There is no cost for these classes. However, there will be some events held at nonpro“ t locations and some done to support are nonpro“ ts. Consider having some funds to donate or even shop local in some of the shops after class. 3. All classes will be approximately 45 minutes long. 4. Some classes will be held outside. These events will be weather permitting. For more information, Facebook: https:// www.facebook.com/ yogasanctuary. € Yoga Tots „ The Punta Gorda Library, 424 W. Henry St., hosts the free program Yoga Tots Storytime from 10:15 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. on Fridays for children ages 12-36 months. Bring your toddler, towels or yoga mat to stretch your mind and muscles with a story and fun yoga poses. For more information, call 941-833-5460 or email: PuntaGordaLibrary@ charlottecounty” .gov. If you would like your free yoga event added to our events, email feeling“ t@sun-herald.com. Yoga BAYFRONT NEWS & NOTESLung Cancer Support Group of Punta GordaLung Cancer Support Group of Punta Gorda meets the second Tuesday of each month at 2 p.m. on the 4th ” oor of the medical of“ ce building at Bayfront Health hospital campus on E. Marion Ave., Punta Gorda. Speakers: Nov. 13: Rachel Jaycox, Clinical Nutrition Manager BFH Dec. 11: Pamela Fadness, M.D. Psychiatrist BFH Jan. 8: The Yoga Sanctuary of Punta Gorda Feb. 12: Dr. Dakouny, M.D. March 12: Dr. Bobe, Pulmonologist April 9: Dr. Glick, Oncologist Florida Cancer Specialists May 14: Thomas Cappello, speaking on estate planning For more information, call 941-637-9575 or email icgarg@embarqmail.com.Charlotte Prostate Support Group meetingThe Charlotte Prostate Support Group will meet from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Nov. 16, at the Fawcett Hospital H2U facility located 3280 Tamiami Trail, Suite #493, Port Charlotte. The speaker will be Dr. Marc Melser, M.D., a long time Urologist in Port Charlotte. A cancer diagnosis is not required for attendance, many of our members have other prostate issues. We try to present an open, casual, environment to discuss any prostate concern. Women are cordially invited to attend and participate. Refreshments and room provided by Fawcett Memorial Hospital. There will be no meeting in December and our speaker Jan. 18 will be Dr. Ivor Percent, M.D., Oncologist from Florida Cancer Specialists. Support Groups Less waiting where it matters most … our emergency room.*Medical professionals may include physicians, physician assistants and nurse practitioners.In a medical emergency, every minute matters. So, at Bayfront Health Port Charlotte and Punta Gorda, youll “nd faster care in the emergency room. We work diligently to have you initially seen by a medical professional* in 30 minutes … or less. And, with a team of dedicated medical specialists, we can provide a lot more care, if you need it. The 30-Minutes-Or-Less E.R. Service Pledge … only at Bayfront Health Port Charlotte and Bayfront Health Punta Gorda.2500 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte, FL 809 E. Marion Ave., Punta Gorda, FLBayfrontCharlotte.com adno=3625576-1

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Page 6 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 NAMI Family Support groupsPort Charlotte: The National Alliance on Mental Illness will have a Family Support Group meeting from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 1532 Forrest Nelson Blvd., Port Charlotte. This is for family members and caregivers of individuals with a mental illness. For more information, contact Ken and Ginger at 701-306-0023. North Port: The family support group meets from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. on the fourth Monday of the month at Anchor House, 3555 Bobcat Village Center Road, North Port. The National Alliance on Mental Illness family support group is a peer-led group for family members and caregivers of adults living with mental illness. All meetings are free and con“ dential. For more information, call 941376-9361 or visit the website at namisarasotacounty.org. Venice: The family support group meets from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on the “ rst Wednesday of the month at Venice Health Park, 1201 Jacaranda Blvd., room 1283. The National Alliance on Mental Illness family support group is a peer-led group for family members and caregivers of adults living with mental illness. All meetings are free and con“ dential. For more information, call 941-376-9361 or visit the website at namisarasotacounty.org. Sarasota: The family support group meets at 6:30 p.m. on the third Thursday of the month at the Beneva Christian Church, 4835 S. Beneva Road, Sarasota. For more information, call 941-376-9361 or visit the website at namisarasotacounty.org.NAMI Connection Recovery Support GroupThe National Alliance on Mental Illness meets from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.. the “ rst and third Tuesday of the month at the Mental Health Community Center (Prospect House), 240 S. Tuttle Ave., Unit B, Sarasota. Connection is a recovery support group program for adults living with mental illness providing a place that offers respect, understanding, encouragement and hope. It offers a casual and relaxed approach to sharing the challenges and successes of coping with mental illness. All meetings are free and con“ dential. Call 941-376-9361 or visit the website at namisarasotacounty.org for more information.Neuro Challenge for Parkinsons patients and caregiversSt. Davids, 401 S. Broadway, Englewood, is welcoming Neuro Challenge, a non-pro“ t organization dedicated to improving the quality of life of people with Parkinsons and their caregivers. Neuro Challenge provides ongoing monthly support groups, educational programs, and individualized care, advising to help empower people with Parkinsons and their caregivers with A Better Approach to Parkinsons. They will meet in St. Davids Parish Hall every the third Friday of every month at 10 a.m. Neuro Challenge serves Manatee, Sarasota and Charlotte counties … there are an estimated 9,000 people with Parkinsons in the three county service area. For more information, call 941-926-6413, 941474-3140 or go to www. neurochallenge.org. Ostomy support meetingsThe Charlotte County Ostomy Support Group meets at 2 p.m. on the second Tuesday of the month in Port Charlotte. For more information and assistance, contact Jerry Downs at 941-6297568 or Gloria Patmore at 941-627-9077.Overeaters anonymousOvereating a problem? Overeaters Anonymous offers free meetings at 10 a.m. Thursdays at Pilgrim United Church of Christ, 24515 Rampart Blvd., Port Charlotte. Call 941-626-8969 for more information.Port Charlotte Pulmonary Hypertension & Pulmonary Fibrosis Support GroupThe group meets from noon to 2 p.m. on the second Thursday of every month at 2370 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte. RSVP at 941-255-5043.Sex Addicts AnonymousSex Addicts Anonymous is a 12-step support group for those who are struggling with sexual compulsion and/ or emotional dependency. No dues or fees. The meetings are held at 7:30 p.m. Mondays in Englewood and 7 p.m. in Port Charlotte. For more information, call 941-222-0539 or email saaenglewood@gmail. com.Stroke support groupA stroke support group will be held at 1 p.m. on the last Friday of each month at Fawcett Memorial Hospital, Executive Dining Room, 21298 Olean Blvd., Port Charlotte.By LAURAN NEERGAARDAP MEDICAL WRITERAnatomy at birth may prompt a check in the maleŽ or femaleŽ box on the birth certi“ cate „ but to doctors and scientists, sex and gender arent always the same thing. The Trump administration purportedly is considering de“ ning gender as determined by sex organs at birth, which if adopted could deny certain civil rights protections to an estimated 1.4 million transgender Americans. But variation in gender identity is a normal part of human diversity, the American Academy of Pediatrics, or AAP, stresses in a new policy that outlines how to provide supportive medical care for transgender youth. Here are some questions and answers about what can be sometimes blurry lines. Q: Arent sex and gender interchangeable terms? A: Sex typically refers to anatomy while gender goes beyond biology,Ž says Dr. Jason Rafferty, a pediatrician and child psychiatrist at Hasbro Childrens Hospital in Rhode Island, and lead author of the AAPs transgender policy. Gender identity is more an inner sense of being male, female or somewhere in between „ regardless of physical anatomy, he explained. It may be in” uenced by genetics and other factors, but its more about the brain than the sex organs. And transgender is a term accepted across science and medical groups to mean people whose gender identity doesnt match what Rafferty calls their sex assigned at birth.Ž Q: How early can people tell if theyre transgender? A: Its normal for children to explore in ways that ignore stereotypes of masculinity and femininity. Rafferty says its whether those feelings and actions remain consistent over time that tells. Sometimes that happens at a young age, while for others it may be adolescence or beyond. Regardless, the pediatricians policy calls for gender-af“ rmativeŽ care so that children have a safe, nonjudgmental and supportive avenue to explore their gender questions. Q: What kind of care might they need? A: Transgender people of all ages are more likely to be bullied and stigmatized, which can spur anxiety and depression and put them at increased risk for suicide attempts. For children, medicine to suppress puberty may be considered, to buy time as the youth grapples with questions of gender identity. Q: Cant a genetic test settle if someones male or female? A: Its not like were going to “ nd a magic transgender gene,Ž Rafferty says, noting that a mix of genes, chemicals and other factors contribute but is not well understood. Generally, people are born with two sex chromosomes that determine anatomical sex „ XY for males and XX for females. But even here there are exceptions that would confound any either-or political de“ nition. People who are intersexŽ are born with a mix of female and male anatomy, internally and externally. Sometimes they have an unusual chromosome combination, such as men who harbor an extra X or women who physically appear female but carry a Y chromosome. This is different than being transgender.Science says: Sex and gender arent the sameAmid political uproar, doctors say birth certificates cant tell the whole story: Gender and sex arent always the same thing By LAURAN NEERGAARD and SETH BORENSTEINASSOCIATED PRESSTwo U.S. government agencies are giving con” icting interpretations of a safety study on cellphone radiation: One says it causes cancer in rats. The other says theres no reason for people to worry. No new research was issued. Instead, the National Toxicology Program dialed up its concerns about a link to heart and brain cancer from a study of male rats that was made public last winter. The Food and Drug Administration, which oversees cellphone safety, disagreed with the upgraded warning. And these “ ndings should not be applied to human cellphone usage,Ž said Dr. Jeffrey Shuren, FDAs chief of radiological health. Whats most important is what happens in humans, not rats, said Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical of“ cer of the American Cancer Society. The incidence of brain tumors in human beings has been ” at for the last 40 years,Ž Brawley said. That is the absolute most important scienti“ c fact.ŽTHE ORIGINAL STUDYIn a $30 million study, scientists put rats and mice into special chambers and bombarded them with radiofrequency waves, like those emitted by older 2G and 3G phones, for nine hours a day for up to two years, most of their natural lives. The levels the rodents experienced were far higher than people are typically exposed to.THE FINDINGSLast February, the National Toxicology Program said there was a small increase in an unusual type of heart tumor in male rats, but not in mice or female rats. The agency concluded there was some evidenceŽ of a link. Also, the February report cited equivocal evidenceŽ of brain tumors in the male rats. Thursday, the agency upgraded its description of those “ ndings. The heart tumor increase marked clear evidenceŽ of cancer in male rats, it announced. There is some evidenceŽ of brain cancer. The change came after the agency asked outside experts to analyze the “ ndings. We believe that the link between radiofrequency radiation and tumors in male rats is real, and the external experts agreed,Ž said John Bucher, the toxicology agencys senior scientist. While his agency said the risks to rats dont directly apply to people, the study raises safety questions.THE DISAGREEMENTThe FDA immediately disagreed, “ ring off a press release assuring Americans that decades of research and hundreds of studiesŽ has made the health agency con“ dent that the current safety limits for cellphone radiation protect the public health. Plus, FDA pointed out confusing “ ndings from the rodent study „ such as that the radiated rats lived longer than comparison rats that werent exposed to the rays. The toxicology agency said it appeared that the radiofrequency energy helped older rats kidneys. Theres a reason two different government agencies are clashing „ theyre asking different questions, said George Washington University public health professor George Gray. A former science chief for the Environmental Protection Agency, Gray said the toxicology program examined how cellphone radiation affected animals. By looking at what it means for humans, the FDA brings in more sources of information and data than just these recent tests in rats and mice,Ž he said in an email.ARE CELLPHONES SAFE?Im calling you from my cellphone,Ž noted the cancer societys Brawley. He pointed out one well-known risk from cellphones: Car crashes when drivers are distracted by them. As for cancer, if people are concerned, they could use earphones or speakers, he said. Those who study risk arent hanging up. My family and I wont change our mobile phone habits based on this news,Ž said George Washingtons Gray, co-author of the book Risk: A Practical Guide for Deciding Whats Really Safe and Whats Really Dangerous in the World Around You.ŽFederal agencies clash on cellphone cancer riskTwo U.S. government agencies give conflicting interpretations of a safety study on radiation PHOTO PROVIDEDTwo U.S. government agencies are giving con icting interpretations of a safety study on cellphone radiation. One says it causes cancer in rats. The other says theres no reason for people to worry. Support Groups 941-624-4500zusmaneyecarecenter.comadno=3629219-1 Team Eye ConsultantTampa Bay Rays and Charlotte Stone CrabsVOTED BEST OPHTHALMOLOGIST 2009-2015, 20182018 Ricardo Gauthier, Au.D Doctor of Audiology 941.505.0400 The Best of Charlotte for the Past 10 Years!We offer a complete range of audiology services for our clients including the following: We participate in most insurance programs adno=3625309-1100 Madrid Blvd Suite 214 Punta Gorda, FL 33950www.harboraudiology.netRicardo Gauthier, Au.D Doctor of Audiology We participate in most insurance programs Having Problems With Your Dentures?100 Madrid Blvd., Ste. 414 Punta Gorda 941-575-2626www.smilesofpuntagorda.comDifficulty Eating? Sore Gums? Wobbly or Loose? Messy Adhesives? Denture Stabilization Affordable! Complimentary Initial Consultation!Are you concerned about zinc content in your denture adhesives? For more information on zinc and your denture adhesives visit www.ada.org adno=3625308-

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The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 7 By BARBARA ANDERSONTHE FRESNO BEEIdentical twins BaoNhia and BaoKou Yang were inseparable growing up in Fresno, and on Sunday night when each sister gave birth to a daughter, it seemed more like destiny than chance. We share a lot. And everywhere we go, we go together,Ž BaoKou says. But the sisters, 23, didnt plan on having simultaneous pregnancies and same-night births. It just happened. Maybe its like a miracle,Ž BaoNhia said. It was amazing. I didnt know I was pregnant until I took the pregnancy test after she did, and I found out I was pregnant, too.Ž The sisters due dates were two days apart. BaoKou was due Nov. 11 and BaoNhia on Nov. 13. BaoKou went into labor “ rst on Sunday, Nov. 4 at Community Regional Medical Center. But she had an idea that her sister might soon follow. BaoNhia told her: Im having a pain here and there, too. So I might be in labor with you.Ž BaoKou gave birth to Nadalie Xiong at 6:59 p.m. and BaoNhia gave birth to Candra Thao at 8:48 p.m. The newborns were almost the same weight: Nadalie weighed 7 pounds, 3 ounces; Candra weighed exactly 7 pounds. BaoKou and BaoNhia are from a family of 14 children. Theyre the second to the youngest. On Monday, sister Mao Yang said the siblings made a bet on which twin would go into labor “ rst. She won, when BaoKou entered the hospital. But we didnt think its going to be on the same day,Ž she said of the double delivery. We just bet who is going to go “ rst.Ž When the twins were babies, they cried if they were apart. As children, if one was ill, so was the other. They had special words they shared. They had the same friends. Even their mother would get the two confused. During these pregnancies, they had the same food cravings. Like sour stuff,Ž BaoKou said. It was the same „ sour, spicy,Ž BaoNhia agreed. And yes,Ž they said in unison on Monday, they wanted to share a room together when Community Regional offered one on Sunday night. Sitting side by side on a bed, BaoNhia swaddled Candra and BaoKou snuggled Nadalie. The sisters each had a miscarriage during a “ rst pregnancy, and BaoKou said she leaned on her twin during this one. Nadalie is her “ rst child. BaoNhia has two older daughters. I had been trying for a while (to have a baby),Ž BaoKou said. And then I “ nally have a baby of my own.Ž BaoNhia lives in Clovis and BaoKou in Fresno, but they are seldom apart, often cooking meals together. BaoNhia already has given BaoKou pointers on motherhood: Youll be busy.Ž And theyll be busy together. Their babies dont look alike, but theyll grow up side-by-side, BaoKou said. Theyre going to be playing around together, seeing each other.ŽTwin sisters give birth just hours apart PHOTO PROVIDEDTwin sisters Bao Nhia Julia Yang and Bao Kou Julie Yang with their daughters.Courage Over CancerGulf Cove United Methodist Churchs cancer care program, Courage Over Cancer, offers support and ministry to men, women, and families who are affected by cancer. Church and community members touched by this disease are provided with help and spiritual counsel that are speci“ c to their needs as a cancer patient, caregiver, or loved one. This ministry is based on the outreach program Our Journey of Hope which was developed by the Cancer Treatment Centers of America. If you or someone you know could bene“ t from a friend to support them through this journey, contact the church at 941-697-1747 or GulfCoveUMC@gmail. com. Gulf Cove UMC is located at 1100 McCall Road in Port Charlotte.Food Addicts AnonymousA 12-step program for those who wish to recover from food addiction. Group meets from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Thursdays, at First Alliance Church, 20444 Midway Blvd., Port Charlotte. For more information, call 941-380-6550.Lung Matters support groupLung Matters support group meets from 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. on the third Tuesday of each month. Call Port Charlotte Rehab Center for locations and more information at 941-235-8011.Lung cancer support groupThe North Port Lung Cancer Support Group meets from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. the third Wednesday of every month at Sarasota Memorial ER in North Port along Toledo Blade Boulevard. The group is for people with lung cancer along with their caregivers. No RSVP nor charge is required. For more information, call or email Marc Cohen at 941240-8989 or marcscohen@aol.com. Support Groups Its important to know who to trust with your health because you want the very best. Fawcett Memorial Hospital has been recogni zed as an accredited Comprehensive Center under the Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Improvement Program (MBSAQI P). is accreditation ensures that bariatric surgical patients receive a multidisciplinary program, not just a surgical procedure, which improves patient outcomes and long-term success. For more information on this accreditation, visit us at FawcettWeightLoss.com 21298 Olean Boulevard, Port Charlotte, FL 33952 € 941.624.8281 € FawcettWeightLoss.comadno=3625310-1

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Page 8 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 PROVIDED BY MCCAt some point in a son or daughters life, the role of caregiver may shift. Where parents once took care of their children, aging parents very frequently rely on their children to care for them. Adult caregivers typically want to do right by their aging loved ones but sometimes “ nd that the demands of medical and emotional support can dominate their lives „ so much so that their own children and other household responsibilities are neglected. The Mayo Clinic says it is natural to feel sad, alone, frustrated, and even angry when serving as a caregiver to an elderly parent. However, its also important to recognize the signs that the burden has become too much and to look for ways to lighten the workload. Anyone can get caregiver stress, but the National Alliance for Caregiving says women are more susceptible than men. Those who are responsible for helping someone with Alzheimers disease, dementia or a debilitating illness are also at a high risk of developing their own medical issues. These responsibilities can affect the quality of caregivers sleep and impede their ability to relax and unwind. Finding relief from caregiver stress can involve a few different strategies. € Ask for more help Dont hesitate to ask for help. If other family members or siblings are unable to pitch in, look into the possibility of hired aides. These professionals can be excellent and trained sources of support who assist with activities of daily living, remind patients to take their medications and assist in coordinating medical checkups. € Consider watchdog technology. Smart homes have enabled remote control of many household systems, making it possible to monitor thermostat temperature, water leaks or ” oods, appliance and light usage, and much more. Video and sound surveillance can offer peace of mind to those who cannot be with their loved ones constantly. Another option is a product called Care Coach. This is a digital tool that provides medicine reminders, health coaching, automated alerts, and an interactive avatar that can offer psychological and comforting support. € Explore respite care. Many rehabilitation and nursing facilities offer short-term respite care for loved ones so that caregivers can take the time to go on vacation or enjoy a day or two without having to check in on an elderly parent. Facilities generally have 24-hour staff to monitor residents, provide meals and provide entertainment. The change of pace can also be stimulating to the senior, and respite care can be a gradual introduction to long-term care. € Embrace community resources. Seniors may be eligible for lowor no-cost services like visiting nurses, meal delivery and adult day programs. This network of support can further alleviate caregiver stress. € Talk it out. Work with a licensed therapist to find other coping strategies for dealing with the mounting pressure of being a caregiver. Talk therapy and relaxat ion techniques can help curb stress. Being a caregiver is a rewarding but demanding responsibility. Utilizing all possible resources can make the job easier.Finding relief from caregiver stress can involve a few di erent strategies PHOTO PROVIDEDWork with a licensed therapist to nd other coping strategies for dealing with the mounting pressure of being a caregiver. Talk therapy and relaxation techniques can help curb stress.BY MAYO CLINIC NEWS NETWORKWhat once seemed like a scene from a 22nd century sci-“ movie is reality today. High speed, big data-processing computers combine arti“ cial intelligence with human know-how to crack complex health care conditions. This deep computer analysis may unveil new patterns that could bolster your providers ability to prescribe precise therapies, make a diagnosis, recommend a clinical trial or even predict your risk of disease. Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine (CIM) is collaborating with the Coordinated Science Laboratory (CSL) at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign (UIUC) to unleash the potential of arti“ cial intelligence in patient care. Funded by a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant, the Mayo UIUC Alliance and corporate partners are conducting research into the big data challenge: how to develop computer systems that, combined with human intelligence, unlock new analysis of health and disease. Research within CIM is probing whether arti“ cial intelligence can reduce or eliminate the trial and error of prescribing antidepression medication. In a clinical study with Mayos department of psychiatry, researchers have combined machine learning, a type of arti“ cial intelligence, with genomics, metabolomics and other clinical variables. This machine learning approach helps providers to choose a therapy most likely to work on the “ rst try. We combined expertise from clinicians, engineers and biologists to create an algorithm that uncovered patterns of antidepressant response that each of these specialists alone might not be able to recognize,Ž said Arjun Athreya, a Mayo-UIUC Alliance predoctoral research fellow. Using this data with deep machine learning, we were able to predict with 75-85 percent accuracy whether a common antidepressant drug would work for each individual patient in the study. That compares to 58 percent accuracy when predictions are based only on clinical, demographic and social factors. In addition, we found that women and men respond differently to this antidepressant therapy.ŽWill a machine pick your next medication?BY AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION NEWSWhile preeclampsia puts women at greater risk for stroke and high blood pressure following childbirth, a new study found that the pregnancy-related condition may not predispose them to signi“ cant cognitive impairment later in life. Instead, other physical and social risk factors related to the condition may be contributing to those subtle cognitive changes, according to the Canadian study published Wednesday in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension. Preeclampsia, a pregnancy complication most commonly characterized by high blood pressure and protein in the urine, usually resolves after delivery. But women who had the condition are twice as likely to have a stroke or prematurely develop heart disease within 10 to 15 years after giving birth than women who did not have preeclampsia. This could be because of post-pregnancy development of high blood pressure, also known as hypertension, and damage to the vascular system, both of which can affect blood supply to the brain, said Dr. Natalie Dayan, the studys lead author. We wondered whether preeclampsia predisposes women to early-onset cognitive impairment due to this type of damage to blood vessels in the brain,Ž said Dayan, director of the McGill University Health Centres obstetrical medicine program in Montreal. Using a database that followed a group of healthy young U.S. adults for 25 years, researchers looked at 568 women who had given birth at least once. About a third of the women reported having preeclampsia while the rest reported pregnancies without blood pressure problems. Both groups were given three sets of cognitive tests 18 years after their “ rst childbirth. The average age of the women taking the tests was 49. The cognitive assessments measured executive function, learning and memory, and attention and processing speed. Women who had preeclampsia scored lower on two of the tests than the women who didnt have the condition. However, the differences in scores diminished after researchers accounted for age, high blood pressure, depression, body mass index and education level. This means that although women who reported preeclampsia appear to have lower scores on these neurocognitive tests than women who did not report this condition, it may not be the preeclampsia itself, but rather these other factors that are also common in women with preeclampsia that led to worse cognitive scores,Ž Dayan said. But because the study did not use MRI or another type of scan to compare the brains between the two groups, a link between cognitive impairment and preeclampsia could not be entirely ruled out, said Dr. Sudha Seshadri, director of the Glenn Biggs Institute for Alzheimers and Neurodegenerative Diseases in San Antonio. Childbirth is generally believed to reset a body affected by preeclampsia, but the high blood pressure associated with the condition may have permanently harmed the liver, kidneys and other organs „ including the brain „ during the pregnancy, she said. When your blood pressure goes up very high, you can have changes in the brain. In the absence of any direct visualization of the brain, I dont want to say we know that there wasnt a direct effectŽ on cognition, said Seshadri, who was not connected to the study. Preeclampsia, despite having been around forever, is still quite poorly understood. So it probably makes sense for physicians to monitor these women a little more carefully, with attention given to things like blood pressure.Ž Seshadri, a senior investigator for the Framingham Heart Study, also suggests the women take a simple cognitive test, at least for a few years,Ž to help detect possible changes. Dayan agreed that the study stresses the need for doctors to closely monitor blood pressure and other heart disease risk factors in women whose pregnancies were complicated by preeclampsia. Physicians should keep an open mind about the possible blood vessel changes after preeclampsia that may occur in the heart and in other organ systems in the body,Ž she said.No direct link between preeclampsia and cognitive impairment, study says PHOTO PROVIDEDA new study nds that the pregnancy-related condition may not predispose them to signi cant cognitive impairment later in life. Substance abuse support groupThe Substance Abuse support group meets at 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays at the Lifeworks Substance Abuse Services, 4678 Tamiami Trail, Suite 105, Port Charlotte. Contact George at 941-979-5023 for more information.TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly)The Punta Gorda Chapter meets at 9 a.m. on Wednesday mornings at the South Punta Gorda Heights Civic Association, 11200 1st Ave., Punta Gorda. For more information, call 941-575-1161 or visit topschapter0828. wordpress.com or on Facebook: Tops Chapter 0828.Womens cancer support groupCelebrate Life womens cancer support group meets at 10 a.m. on the first Wednesday of each month at the Punta Gorda Isles Civic Association, 2001 Shreve St., Punta Gorda. There typically is a speaker. Lunch at a Punta Gorda restaurant follows the meeting. Contact either Diane Mabye at 941-575-7746 or Sara Benson at 941575-6765 to learn a little more about Celebrate Life. To submit information about your support group, email the details to FeelingFit@sun-herald.com. Support Groups DIABETIC & WOUND CARE CERTIFIED BOARD Dr. Tom Lane DPM, FAPWCA Guardian Angel Foot Care2400 S. McCall Road, Suite FEnglewood, FL 34224 (941) 473-3338 Fax (941) 474-8597adno=3624423-1

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The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 9 any state in the country. More than 1.7 million Floridians enrolled in plans during the open enrollment period for 2018 coverage. This was lower than the states 2017 enrollment, but still by far the highest in the country, representing 14.6 percent of all U.S. enrollments. The number of consumers who signed up for 2018 coverage in area counties included: Charlotte County 9,945 DeSoto County 1,514 Sarasota County 28,911 Collier County 30,445 Sarasota County 28,911 Lee County 55,750 Thats the good news. The bad news is that premium will continue to rise in 2019. Analysts blame the kind of general increases expected from in”ation and rising medical costs and the repeal of the individual mandate penalty in the Republican tax law, and the Trump administrations expansion of non-Obamacare plans. The Florida Of“ce of Insurance Regulation (FLOIR) published a list of the insur ers that had “led to participate in 2019, noting that the average proposed rate increase for 2019 was 8.8 percent. But after the rate approval process was completed, FLOIR announced that the “nal average rate increase would be just 5.2 percent. Those insurers are: Blue Cross Blue Shield of Florida (Florida Blue): 2.4 percent increase (the proposed average rate increase was 10.5 percent); Florida Blue HMO (Health Options): 7.2 percent increase (the proposed average rate increase was 9.5 percent); Florida Health Care Plan Inc. (a subsidiary of Florida Blue): 5.6 percent increase (approved as proposed); Ambetter (Celtic): 5.9 percent increase (slightly higher than the proposed 5.8 percent increase); Molina: 1.5 percent decrease (Molina had proposed a 9.5-percent average increase); Health First Health Plans: 9.8 percent increase (approved as proposed); Oscar Health: New for 2019. All of those are offering plans on the federal exchange. Two other companies “led with the state to offer ACAcompliant plans: Avmed Inc. and Cigna Health and Life Insurance. Florida premiums are lower than other states with a large percentage of ACA users. HealthSherpa.com, a California-based technology company partnering with HealthCare.gov in connecting individuals with health coverage, reported on the early results of the 2019 enrollment, in which Texas surpassed Florida in early enrollments. Net median premiums for the top “ve states in enrollments so far: 1. Texas $53.35 2. Florida $29.28 3. North Carolina $26.63 4. Wisconsin $85.64 5. Georgia $41.91 HealthSherpa also noted that women are once again more likely to “le as head-of-household, this year by a margin of 15 percent (57 percent of women “ling as headof-household. compared to 43 percent of men). In addition, most enrollees are once again in the 50-64 age range. So, what do you do? Since Florida elected not to create a state-based exchange, residents and employers are pretty much forced to participate through the federally facilitated Marketplace. The Marketplace can be accessed at www.healthcare.gov or by calling 800-318-2596 or 855889-4325 for those using telecommunications devices for the deaf. You can view available health plans without identifying yourself, but you will need to create an account in order to purchase coverage. Comments and suggestions are always welcome. Call Dan Mearns at 941-893-9692 or email danmearns@gmail.com.DANFROM PAGE 1 By TOM AVRILTHE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRERAt “rst, it seemed like just a bad cold, with a fever that came and went. Then one day, when Scarlett Camburn woke from her nap, the Havertown, Pa., toddler was unable to move her right arm. Panicked, parents Andrea and Chris Camburn rushed the little girl to an urgent care center in King of Prussia operated by Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia, and from there to the hospitals emergency room in West Philadelphia. X-rays showed that Scarlett, a few days shy of her second birthday in August 2016, had no broken bones. But an MRI on a future visit revealed an alarming sign: damage to her spinal cord. The Camburns would soon learn that Scarlett was among dozens of children around the country that year whose arms or legs suddenly went limp „ evoking memories of polio, a scourge eliminated in the United States decades ago. One of those children was Chase Kulakowski, of Dyer, Ind., age 15 months. Same pattern: had a cold, woke up from a nap, couldnt use his right arm. His arm was totally limp,Ž said his mother, Jessica. The in”ammation in Scarletts spinal cord eventually was attributed to a virus, called enterovirus D68, that had infected many of the other children. But for some patients, including Chase, no virus „ or other cause „ was found. This fall, its happening again. Last week, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it had con“rmed 72 cases of sudden muscle weakness or paralysis so far in 2018, including six in Pennsylvania and three in New Jersey. The disease is often referred to as mysterious, given that some victims are found to be infected with D68 while others are not, and of“cially, the CDC says the cause for most cases remains unknown. But a core group of academic researchers tracking the disease is fairly certain that the virus, which can be hard to detect, is the primary culprit. Theyre just not sure what to do about it. And they are worried it could get worse. The “rst warning signs came in 2012, when the California Department of Public Health learned that a handful of children in the state were suffering from sudden, unexplained weakness in the arms or legs. The agency launched a statewide surveillance program, and by years end found that among 10 patients, two had been infected with enterovirus D68. First identi“ed in 1962, D68 was known only to cause respiratory symptoms. But the two cases of muscle weakness were cause for concern. Those symptoms were similar to what happens with polio, which also is caused by an enterovirus. Was D68 able to cause similar harm? Two years later, things went national. By the end of 2014, 120 people in 34 states were con“rmed to have the condition, called acute ”accid myelitis. Again, almost all were children. Again, some were found to be infected with D68. Many were not, yet by the end of the year, an informal working group of prominent physicians was con“dent the virus played a key role. Symptoms ranged from moderate weakness to complete paralysis of the affected limbs, more often in the arms than legs. In Dallas, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center had recently been awarded a federal grant to study a broader category of pediatric paralysis, so they were up and runningŽ to track the unusual new cases, neurologist Benjamin M. Greenberg said. Among the questions: How much did children recover the use of their limbs? Which treatments seemed most effective? What type of spinal-cord damage was seen on their MRI scans? The condition remained rare, but the words polio-likeŽ in media headlines stoked public fears, bringing to mind a dreaded disease that was far worse in scope. Polio, eliminated in the United States through widespread vaccination, paralyzed thousands of people each year in the early 1950s. Keen to make sure polio had not returned, the CDC began testing patients fecal samples for the virus that causes the real thing. After all, polio still emerges periodically in a handful of other countries, said Sarah Hopkins, a neurologist at Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia. With some people opting not to vaccinate their children and international travel, there always is that worry,Ž Hopkins said. Its important for us to rule it out.Ž None of the new cases tested positive for polio. But while some patients were found to be infected with D68, some of the children did not test positive for anything. What was causing their paralysis? Two years later, in 2016, the number of patients with muscle weakness spiked again. Physicians tracking the illnesses suspected that the enterovirus was to blame even in patients where it was not found. Thats because the genetic information in an enterovirus is stored as RNA, not DNA, which makes it harder to isolate from a patient. And by the time muscle symptoms appear, the patients body may have cleared itself of the virus. The fact that kids are testing negative on a regular basis should not surprise anybody,Ž said Greenberg, of UT Southwesterns ODonnell Brain Institute. So CHOP and some other hospitals set up protocols to obtain and test nasal swabs as soon as possible in patients with sudden muscle weakness or paralysis „ maximizing their chances of “nding the virus if it was there. Sure enough, most patients at CHOP that year had D68 in their respiratory secretions, Hopkins said. And the virus popped up repeatedly elsewhere in the country, though in a handful of cases, patients were found to be infected with a different enterovirus, dubbed A71. At the end of 2016, the CDC had con“rmed 149 cases of patients with sudden muscle weakness or paralysis in 38 states and Washington, D.C. By de“nition, those included in the total had experienced a sudden onset of symptoms and had suffered damage to the internal gray matter of the spinal cord „ interrupting the nerve signals needed to activate an arm or leg. The cases tended to emerge in geographic clusters, supporting the theory that the symptoms were caused by an infectious agent „ a virus. And, like illnesses caused by some other viruses, the cases of muscle weakness spiked in the fall „ consistent with an infectious agent that thrives in cooler temperatures. Even the two-year pattern made sense. It is common for viruses to ebb and ”ow on a multi-year cycle as they travel through a population. Yet another layer of evidence for a viral cause came from the University of Colorado, where researchers injected mice with strains of D68. Just as in human patients, the animals limbs became paralyzed. To Greenberg, that represented a convincing, three-pronged case that the enterovirus was to blame for the biennial spikes in acute ”accid myelitis. We know the virus can do itŽ in mice, he said. We know its present in humans. And we know the epidemiological pattern “ts that of an infection.Ž But two mysteries remained. When Chase Kulakowski got his cold in October 2016, his stepsister had the same symptoms: a runny nose and a cough. By all appearances, they were infected with the same virus. Yet her arms and legs were “ne, whereas Chase could not move his right shoulder and arm. What makes him different?Ž his mom asked. Likewise at Scarlett Camburns preschool, there were the usual runny noses, but nobody else had her muscle symptoms. Why? Those are good questions, scientists say. At the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, researchers are exploring whether some genetic quirk might make certain infected people more likely to develop acute ”accid myelitis. The team has gathered DNA samples from more than 60 willing families „ including patients, siblings, and parents, said Priya Duggal, director of the schools genetic epidemiology program. Any two non-identical siblings share 50 percent of their DNA, on average, so one child might inherit some mutation that raises the risk of virally induced paralysis while a sibling does not, she said. Or such a mutation could have occurred in a child sporadically „ popping up for the “rst time in that generation. To date, Duggal said, there have been no reports of two children in the same household developing acute ”accid myelitis. It cant just be the virus,Ž Duggal said. Otherwise, wed have schools “lled with children that were all paralyzed.Ž If the virus is causing the paralysis, it makes sense that the symptoms would occur primarily in children, physicians say. Most people become infected with a variety of enteroviruses during childhood without symptoms and are therefore immune to them as adults. A similar lack of symptoms was seen in most people infected with polio. One in four people infected with polio experienced ”u-like symptoms that went away on their own, and fewer than 1 percent of infections led to irreversible paralysis. But when they did, the consequences could be deadly, as the disease can affect muscles involved in breathing. Then theres the mystery of the virus itself. In addition to injecting mice with D68 strains that were isolated from the 2014 outbreak, the Colorado researchers injected animals with strains of the virus that had infected humans in 1962. Just like the humans infected in 1962, mice in the latter group did not become paralyzed. The strains of virus from the two eras, “ve decades apart, look very similar but apparently evolved in some consequential way, acquiring the ability to harm the spinal cord, Greenberg said. And as with any virus, it will evolve again. Something changed,Ž he said. This is a very rare event, and I acknowledge its a rare event, but I am also asking the scienti“c and public-health community to recognize that doesnt mean its going to be a rare event forever.Ž As the detective work continues, physicians have developed effective treatments for patients. At CHOP, Scarlett was given intravenous immunoglobulin „ a substance that can help reduce swelling in the spinal cord. Elsewhere, physicians have opted to administer steroids, though there is disagreement as to when that is appropriate. After months of therapy, Scarlett also underwent surgery at CHOP called a nerve transfer. Chase did the same at Shriners Hospital for Children in Philadelphia, traveling there from Indiana. The procedure allows physicians to reactivate a paralyzed limb by connecting it to healthy nerves that have been rerouted from elsewhere in the body, said Dan Zlotolow, who performs the surgeries at Shriners. Patients must then adapt to the rewiring „ learning how nerve signals that once controlled, say, a rib muscle will now operate the elbow. Early on, a patient may “nd that during a sneeze or a deep breath, the elbow will bend, the surgeon said. Over time, your brain will “gure out that is not what should happen,Ž Zlotolow said. Now 4 years old, Scarlett has regained the use of her right arm but still has trouble making a “st, as her hand muscles deteriorated during the months of receiving no nerve signals. Next year, she will have another operation, in which surgeons will transfer a tendon to her hand from elsewhere in the body. Her family has nicknamed her right arm LuckyŽ „ in the Disney movie Finding Nemo,Ž the title characters lucky right “n is small and weak. Scarletts parents both got matching tattoos of the orange “sh on their right arms. They seek solace from an active support group on Facebook, which includes parents of many of the nearly 400 children recovering from acute ”accid myelitis. We felt so isolated, and now to realize theres a whole community of us,Ž Andrea Camburn said. She, Jessica Kulakowski and other parents in the support group worry that the federal government is not doing enough to address the disease. Greenberg, the UT Southwestern neurologist, describes the experience for families as a horri“c nightmare,Ž and agrees that the medical community should do more. Better tests for diagnosis are needed, he said. More should be invested in researching the best treatments, especially if the virus becomes more widespread. I get asked the question all the time: Should parents be worried?Ž he said. In 2018, no, your kids are going to get a cold, and theyre going to be “neŽ in the overwhelming majority of cases. As a society, we should ask, Should we be worried about 2028 or 2038?Ž Duggal, the Johns Hopkins epidemiologist, agrees. Given that enterovirus D68 is the likely culprit, she said society should consider investing in the same weapon that stopped polio: a vaccine. Weve been here for four years looking at these patients, watching the devastation,Ž Duggal said. This is the third round of it. We dont want to be looking at it in 2020, saying, Theres a mystery illness. We want to be looking at it in 2020 saying, Were making headway.ŽA poliolike illness is on the rise again. But why? TNS PHOTOScarlett Camburn, center, 4, smiles for a photo with her parents, Andrea and Chris, at their home in Havertown, Pa. on Thursday, October 25, 2018. Three days before her second birthday, Havertown toddler Scarlett Camburn woke up from a nap and suddenly was unable to raise her right arm. More than four years into a mysterious rise in illnesses with polio-like symptoms, public health ocials remain mysti“ed as to its cause.

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Page 10 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 engineering labs around the world. First, they vaccinated llamas against a number of A and B strains of in”uenza. Then they took blood samples to collect the antibodies the llamas produced in response. Among them were four uniquely small antibodies that showed an ability to destroy many different strains of in”uenza. In a nod to their size and function, they called their creations nanobodies.Ž From those multitasking little powerhouses, the researchers engineered a single protein capable of squeezing into spaces on a virus surface that are too small for most proteins. The resulting multidomain antibody MD3606,Ž with its impressive breadth and potency,Ž could confer protection against pretty much any strain of ”u that nature could throw in humankinds way, the study authors said. If the dominant strain in a given season were to suddenly change, these antibodies would be ready for the unwelcome guest. If a ”u strain came out of nowhere and threatened a population with no immunity to it „ the nightmare scenario of pandemic ”u „ this supercharged defender would recognize that ”u and counter it. If health of“cials guessed wrong about what ”u strain was coming and ordered up a vaccine that would be largely ineffective „ a scenario that played out last ”u season „ this package of antibodies could save the day. But the researchers still faced a key hurdle: getting the human immune system to make such a super-protein even when its weighed down by age, stress and disease. Their solution: Dont even try. Instead, they devised a way to work around humans unreliable response to vaccines, building a gene that encoded the production plans for their powerhouse protein. To ferry that gene into a host organism, they enlisted a harmless virus used by labs working on gene therapy. By splicing their designer gene into this viral delivery device, the scientists not only found a way to get their antibody package into a host, they were delivering the manufacturing machinery to produce it. This passive transferŽ of antibodies gives this vaccine candidate the potential to be equally effective in everyone, Fauci said. The next step is to conduct further tests in animals and clinical trials in humans, and that will take years,Ž he said. But if fully successful „ a majestic leap right now „ it could essentially eliminate the need from season to seasonŽ to divine which of countless possible ”u viruses will rear up, and to then build a yearly ”u vaccine that neatly “ts the bill. Scripps immunologist Ian Wilson, the studys senior author, said that as the cells infectedŽ by the delivery virus turn over, repeated doses might be needed to sustain the production of antibodies. We dont really know how long this treatment would survive in humans yet,Ž he said. But even less-than-permanent immunity against a broad range of ”u threats would help buffer people from the emergence of unexpected ”u strains, Wilson said. And the rapid response of mice to the vaccine suggests it could be used to inoculate a population after a new viral threat has emerged, he added. That the experimental vaccine might need to be administered each year makes it an interesting hybrid, said Ted M. Ross, who directs the University of Georgias Center for Vaccines and Immunology. This approach is similar to antivenom,Ž said Ross. The therapeutic is an antibody that was made in another species to neutralize the toxin. Its short-term, but it gets you through the period of time where bad things could happen.Ž Over time, patients who got the same antibodies repeatedly might start to build resistance to them, he said. Vaccine makers could counter that by “nding and including new antibodies in their formulation every few years, he suggested. Ross and other scientists also cautioned that the human immune system might see the llama-derived proteins as foreign and attack them. This is not the only universal ”u vaccine under development. In May, Faucis NIAID launched the “rst clinical trial to test the safety of a universal ”u vaccine in 120 healthy humans. The candidate vaccine, called M-001, targets portions of the ”u virus that tend not to change even as other proteins do. This should prime the human immune system to recognize and “ght many different strains of in”uenza viruses. Janssen Vaccines and Prevention, a Dutch company that employs some of the study authors, has applied for a patent that would cover some of the molecules described in the new report.VACCINEFROM PAGE 1 same volunteer who led the seminar. Challenge your “nancial plan. I changed “nancial advisers „ based on recommendations from trusted friends „ because my portfolio really matters now. Serve your community. I bumped-up my volunteer schedule to once a week instead of once a month at a local food pantry. I also volunteer every other week at a local homeless shelter on the 5 p.m.to-midnight shift. Ive most recently started to volunteer at an equestrian therapy center for kids with mental or physical handicaps. Each of my volunteer gigs re”ect my personal interests. Stay active. I extended my daily exercise routine from “ve days to seven. I now swim at least “ve days a week; take our dog, Shadow, for 45-minute walks twice daily; and hit the weight room at least twice weekly. I also play Wallyball (a fast-moving form of indoor volleyball where the walls are considered inbounds) every week with friends who are equally motivated to stay in shape. Stay ”exible. I learned to stretch my back muscles an extra long time before beginning any strenuous exercise. When I forget, I inevitably pay for it. Look to the future. I initiated adult,Ž end-of-life conversations with my kids that I wish my parents had had with me. Get your paperwork in order. I not only updated my will but I “lled out a Five WishesŽ end-of-life pamphlet created by the Aging With Dignity nonpro“t group; and I got very speci“c, in writing, about where I want my ashes to be scattered. Stay connected „ and not solely to devices. I stopped taking my friends for granted, banished past grudges and re-established contact with a best buddy from college w hose friendship Id foolishly let slip away. Age 65 is when many of us realize that were mortal. This is when we start thinking about our next 20 to 30 years,Ž said Hashmi. Its when we ask: How can I be smart about investing my remaining decades wisely?Ž Eric Tyson, author of Personal Finance After 50 for Dummies,Ž theorizes that one of the most powerful undercurrents of turning 65 is how it affects the working lives of so many Americans. Its when the majority go from working full time to working less „ or not working at all, he said. The best scenario is when this change can unfold over many years instead of all at once.Ž It has for me. Things started changing at age 62, when I took a buyout from USA TODAY, where Id worked for 20-plus years as a marketing reporter. Im now a freelance writer and media training consultant. So, at 65, the one thing Ive opted to put off for at least a few years is retiring. While 65 still remains the most common retirement age, more and more folks are breaking that tradition, said AARPs Setzfand. Call it living with purpose. Turning 65 is not just an extension of middle age. Its a new life chapter thats waiting to be written. Its a new stage of life that reminds us we dont have forever,Ž said Firman. About a decade ago, at age 56, Firman had a quintuple bypass operation. His father, grandfather and uncle all died of heart disease in their 40s and 50s. Firman isnt distraught over the family genes he inherited. Instead, hes celebrating his survival. When he turned 65 two years ago, he said, he had a realization that the real purpose of aging is to make the world a better place. Life is a gift,Ž he said. Success in old age starts with an attitude of gratitude.Ž It seems Firman and I share one common trait: We both grew up at 65.LIFEFROM PAGE 1By MARIE MCCULLOUGHTHE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRERA dozen years after the debut of the HPV vaccine, its track record of warding off infections that cause cervical cancer and other malignancies keeps getting better. Thats why the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in October expanded the age range for Mercks Gardasil. Previously approved for adolescents and those up to age 26, the shots can now be given to men and women up to age 45, bringing the United States in line with markets including Europe and Canada. But, ironically, this powerful cancer-prevention tool also faces growing fear and rejection, stoked by anti-vaccine activism. So-called vaccine hesitancy „ concerns and doubts about vaccines in general „ has become a global public health problem. Even in that context, the HPV vaccine stands out. In Japan, Denmark, Ireland and some other countries, bogus claims of HPV vaccine harms have derailed immunization campaigns that were initially highly successful. There has been a uniquely hostile reaction to the HPV vaccine,Ž said Patti Gravitt, an HPV researcher at George Washington Universitys Milken Institute School of Public Health. A Merck scientist disagreed. I dont think its more hated or less hated,Ž said Alain Luxembourg, the companys director of clinical research. Its a recent vaccine, an innovation, a medical advance. It attracts attention.Ž Genital strains of HPV, the human papillomavirus, are so ubiquitous that almost all sexually active people „ not just promiscuous ones „ will be infected at some point. While most HPV infections are wiped out by the immune system, high-risk strains can persist and initiate cancer of the cervix, vagina, anus, vulva, penis, mouth and throat. Worldwide, that translates to more than 600,000 cancers a year „ nearly 5 percent of all cancers. The original version of Gardasil, approved in 2006, protected against two high-risk HPV types, plus two types that cause genital warts. The current version, Gardasil 9, approved in 2014, protects against seven high-risk types that cause 90 percent of cervical cancers, as well as the two wart types. (Revaccination with the newer product is not recommended.) Giving the vaccine to boys and girls at age 11 or 12 is recommended. At that point, their immune response is optimal, and they likely havent been exposed to the virus through sexual activity. People who miss out can still get catch-upŽ shots up to age 26. After 10 years of use and over 270 million doses administered globally, HPV vaccines have proved safe and effective,Ž the World Health Organization declared last year. Transmission of the most common and dangerous HPV types is declining in countries with high coverage rates.Ž Although it will take more time to see the impact on cancer rates, many studies show vaccination has reduced genital warts, precancerous lesions that can progress to cancer and oral infections „ the kind that have fueled an explosion in head and neck cancers in recent decades, particularly in men. Nonetheless, parents and doctors have been cool to Gardasil, put off by its novelty, the link to sex, the need for two or three shots, and misperceptions. Just under half of adolescents ages 13 to 17 were immunized last year, far fewer than for other childhood vaccines. Patients are always asking me, Do you really think this is important for my daughter?Ž said Mark S. Shahin, chief of gynecologic oncology at Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center of Thomas Jefferson University. They arent even thinking of boys, which is crazy. To have the maximum bene“t, you have to vaccinate both males and females.Ž Vaccination rates could be boosted by requiring the shots for school, or by giving them to infants, said Judith Wolf, an infectious-disease specialist at Drexel University College of Medicine. Neither scenario is likely. Hypothetically, infants would respond to the vaccine, but wed have to prove that in clinical trials,Ž she said. Im unaware that anyone is interested is doing that.Ž Given lagging uptake among the targeted tweenŽ age group, why expand to middle age? Because, even if adults have been exposed to a few HPV types, they can still be protected from other types. The odds that any individual will have been exposed to all nine vaccine types are vanishingly rare,Ž Wolf said. Mercks latest data, from an international study of 3,200 women ages 27 to 45 who got the vaccine or a placebo, show the value. Over an average of 3 1/2 years, the vaccine was 88 percent effective in preventing persistent HPV infection, genital warts, and precancerous genital lesions. The FDA said the effectiveness in men is extrapolated from those results, and from a small study that found the vaccine stimulated immunity in males ages 27 to 45. But heres the caveat: Even among women who got the placebo, harmful infections were uncommon; only about 1 percent developed warts or precancerous cervical lesions. Gravitt, at George Washington University, said, There is data for ef“cacy, but the expanded population is at low risk. We need to focus on (adolescent) uptake and not be distracted by people who arent likely to bene“t.Ž While FDA approval frees Merck to market to the older group, the federal panel that decides vaccine policy is not expected to weigh in until next year. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) could recommend Gardasil use up to age 45 „ which would encourage insurance coverage „ or leave the choice to doctors and patients. Scienti“c groups and global health authorities „ including the European Medicines Agency and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention „ keep monitoring the safety of the vaccine. They have concluded that it does not cause chronic pain, heart arrhythmias, autoimmune diseases, life-threatening allergic reactions, stroke, neurological disorders or premature ovarian failure. But parents, anti-vaccine groups, even academics can still claim it does. (A New York University law school faculty member co-authored the just-published book, The HPV Vaccine on Trial: Seeking Justice for a Generation Betrayed.Ž) And the media can still sensationalize the unsubstantiated claims, fueling a panic. Japan is the most extreme illustration. Vaccination rates among adolescent girls plunged from more than 70 percent in 2013 to less than 1 percent today. The collapse began when Japanese media carried unveri“ed reports of vaccine harms, even showing parents videos of girls in wheelchairs or having apparent seizures. Then the Japanese government suspended the recommendation for HPV vaccination, even though its own health ministry found no evidence to support the allegations. The suspension remains in effect. The World Health Organizations advisory committee on vaccine safety lamented, Despite the extensive safety data available for this vaccine, attention has continued to focus on spurious case reports and unsubstantiated allegations.Ž In Denmark and Ireland, government and private health authorities responded to plunging vaccination rates with strong campaigns that have been rebuilding public con“dence in the vaccine. Its interesting that one of the poorest countries on Earth „ where cervical cancer is a major killer because of the lack of screening programs „ now boasts 93 percent vaccine coverage of sixth-grade girls. Rwandas program, launched in 2011, received free and then discounted vaccine from Merck. But the government also invested in a nationwide community-education campaign that reached religious, educational, political, and tribal leaders. It was important “rst to explain the link with cancer,Ž Agnes Binagwaho, a Rwandan pediatrician who served as health minister during the campaign, wrote in the Conversation.The cancer-preventing HPV vaccine a dozen years on: Progress, fear and loathing TNS PHOTOAt Medford Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine in Medford, New Jersey, the HPV vaccine to combat cervical cancer is displayed in a 2006 “le image.

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The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 11 By RUSTY PRAYFEELING FIT CORRESPONDENTIts all about the whats and the huhs. If youre not sure you need a hearing aid, give it the what, huh test. If your response to someone speaking to you is what or huh, you probably need to get your hearing checked. Thats the formula recommended by Grant Stevens and Stefan Butz, owners of Delta Hearing, a pop-and-pop hearing center in Port Charlotte. When you start missing out on a lot of everyday stuff,Ž Stevens said of the time to start checking. I liken it to needing glasses,Ž Butz said. Thats kind of common as you get older. Most of the time, people dont notice so much themselves because hearing loss happens so slowly over time. It usually takes somebody else. Usually, its the whats and huhs or the spouse who becomes tired of, Hey, honey can you pass the dish? And he says, Pack the “sh?Ž Stevens and Betz opened the Port Charlotte of“ce in January. Stevens is the inside guy; Betz travels to clients who cant make it into the of“ce such as residents of assisted living and nursing homes. They have another of“ce in Sarasota, which they founded about two years ago. They both worked in the corporate hearing-aid world before branching out on their own. Were a good team,Ž Stevens said. What separates Delta from its competitors, say Stevens and Butz, is the nature of its ownership. It is not corporate. It is not a franchise. They own it with a “nancial investor, Denny DeMaria, who does the marketing. He and Stevens are veterans. We are one little of“ce,Ž Butz said. We are the mom-and-pop operation.Ž We keep our prices down because we dont have the overhead of a large corporate group,Ž Stevens said. Somebody might not need new hearing aids, so the second-opinion factor is really good. Because were familiar with all the brands, you can bring your existing hearing aid in to us. A lot of times it just needs cleaning and reprogramming.Ž They make house calls, do their own testing and repair assessments, and they just signed up for a pick-up transportation service that will bring clients to the of“ce. They are accessible, affordable and affable. They are a small, local business. They are your neighbors. Delta Hearing is located at 866 Tamiami Trail, Suite D, in Port Charlotte. For more information, call 941-249-9142.Delta Hearing wants you to lend an ear FEELING FIT PHOTO BY RUSTY PRAY Grant Steven, left, and Stefan Butz own Delta Hearing in Port Charlotte.Ž We keep our prices down because we dont have the overhead of a large corporate group,Ž Stevens said of their business. Millennium Health Care held its Aaron Street Fall Health FestŽ at the Millennium Physician Group Of“ce, located on Aaron Street, in Port Charlotte. The Health Fest, which was open to the public, featured a grilled food buffet and handouts with information on services provided by Millennium. Free Flu shots were available, while staff provided short tours of Millenniums Aaron Street Facility. The Aaron Street location is currently accepting new patients For more information, call 941-629-2900.Aaron Street Fall Health Fest FEELING FIT PHOTOS BY JERRY BEARD Millennium Physician Group sta was on hand at the fair. Pictured: Front Desk Clerk Angelina Eldridge (from right), North Region Coordinator Manager Alison Green, Aaron Street Practice Manager Kathy Carlton and LPN Suzanne Cliord. LPN Suzanne Cliord gives front desk clerk Angelina Eldridge her u shot. Dan Elias stacks grilled cheeseburgers onto the buet, at the Millennium Physican Groups Aaron Street Fall Health Fest.Ž By DANIELLE CINONENEW YORK DAILY NEWSThey both helped carry their baby „ and made medical history in the process. Ashleigh Coulter, 28, and her wife Bliss Coulter, 36, of Texas, took turns carrying their baby boy, thanks to the help of two fertility specialists. They are believed to be the “rst same-sex couple to take turns physically carrying their babys embryo. While Bliss wanted a child that was biologically hers, Ashleigh wanted to carry the baby. Ive always wanted my own child but I didnt want to give birth to my own child. I didnt know anything like this existed,Ž Bliss Coulter told the Daily News in a phone interview recently. Determined to make the couples wishes come true, Dr. Kathy Doody and her husband Kevin „ fertility specialists at CARE Fertility Clinic in Bedford, Texas „ decided to try Effortless Reciprocal In Vitro Fertilization (IVF). In the procedure, the eggs and sperm are introduced in an INVOcell device, which is inserted into the vagina during an incubation period. The INVOcell device „ a small plastic capsule „ was put into Bliss, allowing the egg to be fertilized with donor sperm. Its held in place with a small diaphragm and has holes in it to allow secretions to come out. We harvest the egg, put it with the sperm for “ve minutes and then place it directly into the vagina with the INVOcell device,Ž Dr. Doody told The News. The vagina works as a very good incubator.Ž After “ve days, the embryo was removed from Bliss and frozen. Prior to the embryo being inserted into Ashleigh, her body had to be prepped with hormones „ estrogen by mouth and progesterone injections „ which took about three weeks. They placed the embryo in my body and they did a blood test 10 days later „ and we got pregnant on the “rst try,Ž recalled Ashleigh, who carried the baby for nine months. Stetson Coulter was born in June 2018 weighing 8 pounds, 4 ounces. Hes healthy, happy, and we had no complications,Ž Ashleigh said. The women, who married in 2015, have faced many questions about the risks of the unique process, but the dangers are no different than traditional IVF. In fact, its more natural because everything is happening inside the body rather than inside a lab,Ž Ashleigh Coulter said. The Coulters hope to inspire other same-sex couples to go through Effortless IVF „ which is about half the cost of traditional IVF. In Texas, traditional IVF costs could reach as high as $20,000, which is signi“cantly higher than effortless IVF, which could cost up to $6,500. In the LGBT community, it seems like theres always one person in a couple that more so wants to carry the child ƒ with this procedure it will open up a huge window for those that are like me,Ž Bliss said.Same-sex couple makes medical history by physically carrying the same embryo PHOTO PROVIDEDAshleigh Coulter, 28, and her wife Bliss Coutler, 36, made medical history after they took turns carrying their baby boy „ thanks to the help of two fertility specialists. CONCERT!SP119414The Real Local NewspaperLet'sGo! Let'sGo! Let'sGo!TO A Check Our Local Listings Only in the... Let The DONT BE LEFT IN THE DARK! Light Your Way! Your source for local, national & world news. adno=3627504-1 €Affordable Options and Savings€Worldwide Travel Protection €Veterans Bene“ts€Avoid Hidden Society Fees €Complimentary Personal Planning Guide€Customized Packages and Terms CONSIDERING PLANNING AHEAD?CREMATION/FUNERAL SERVICES? CEMETERY OPTIONS? FREE LUNCH & SEMINARJOIN US FOR ACall Today to RSVP: 941Reservation required. Limited seating available. 150LaishleyCourt PuntaGorda,FL33950 Tuesday,November13th@11:30am 1200WRettaEsplanade PuntaGorda,FL33950 Thursday,November15th@11:30am 150 Laishley Court Punta GordaTuesday, November 13th @ 11:30 amThursday, November 15th @ 11:30 am1200 W Retta Esplanade Punta Gorda

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Page 12 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018Laurentz Cascante of North Port hosted Pink Hallow: Give Cancer the Boot at Tringali Recreation Center in Englewood. The program was held as a combination of cancer awareness, Zumba and Halloween fun, in honor of breast cancer survivors Keith Casper and Faith Kar. Live musical entertainment was provided by Port Charlotte resident Jeff Hughes of Short 1-Man Band, as well as door prizes and raf” e drawings held throughout the day.Giving cancer the boot FEELING FIT PHOTOS BY TAMI GARCIA Tracie LaTourette has a great time dancing during Zumba. Dancing in Western attire was Connie Castillo. Maureen Treece uses pom-poms during one of many Zumba songs. Laurentz Cascante, Zumba instructor, hosted the 2-hour program. Guest of honor Faith Kar, a breast cancer survivor for more than 20 years, danced a traditional Persian belly-dancing routine during the program. Other guest of honor, Keith Casper, has been a breast cancer survivor for 16 years. Ladies join in a line to kick up their heels during Give Cancer the Boot.Alzheimers support groupsThe Alzheimers Association holds monthly caregiver suapport groups for spouses, adult children and family members who want to connect and share insight with others in similar situations. RSVP is not required to attend. For questions on groups and services through the Alzheimers Association, please call 941-235-7470. Port Charlotte area € 3 p.m. third Tuesday at South Port Square (Harbor Terrace), 23033 Westchester Blvd., Port Charlotte. € 3 p.m. third Thursday at Port Charlotte United Methodist Church, 21075 Quesada Ave., Port Charlotte. Punta Gorda area € 3 p.m. third Monday at Life Care center, 450 Shreve St., Punta Gorda. € 3 p.m. second Tuesday at Punta Gorda Civic Association, 2001 Shreve St., Punta Gorda. Englewood area € 10:30 a.m. third Friday, Englewood United Methodist Church, 700 E. Dearborn St., Englewood.Alzheimers Caregiver Support GroupThe Alzheimers Caregiver Support Group meets from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. the second Tuesday every month at The Springs at South Biscayne, 6235 Hoffman St., North Port. Call 941426-8349 to register.Alcoholics AnonymousCall 941-426-7723 for information on meetings in the Arcadia, Venice, Port Charlotte, Punta Gorda, North Port and Englewood areas, including dates times and places.Amputee Support GroupThe Amputee Support Group meets at 3 p.m. on the second Monday of every month at the Life Care Center, Punta Gorda. Contact George Baum at 941-787-4151 for more information.At Ease, VeteransDuring World War II, and the wars in Korea, Vietnam, Afghanistan and Iraq, the percentage of American soldiers who shot their weapons with the intent to kill steadily rose from just 15 percent to almost 100 percent. The Department of Housing & Urban Development estimates that in January 2017, over 40,000 veterans are more likely to be homeless each night. As recently as 2014, an average of 20 veterans died from suicide each day. These brave men and women need a listening ear, and they need to know that Gods grace is still with them. Combat veterans from Gulf Cove United Methodist Church are providing some of the support and discussion that our veterans deserve. On the “ rst Tuesday of each month at 6 p.m., they are at the American Legion Post 113, at 3436 Indiana Road in Rotonda West. Veterans are invited and encouraged to join them. Gulf Cove UMC is located at 1100 McCall Road in Port Charlotte, just mile south of the Myakka River on Route 776. The church can be reached at 9416971747 or GulfCoveUMC@ gmail.com and their website is found at http:// GulfCoveChurch.com.Breast cancer networkingBreast Cancer Networking in Venice offers support and sharing with other breast cancer survivors. Meetings are on the third Monday of each month from 11 a.m. to noon at the Venice Health Park, Suite 1217 (north side), Jacaranda Blvd., Venice. For more information, call 941-408-9572.Breastfeeding support groupThe Florida Department of Health, local partners and organizations, such as the American Academy of Pediatrics, strongly recommend babies exclusively breastfeed for the “ rst six months of life and continue to breastfeed for one to two years. There are a variety of programs and resources to empower breastfeeding moms. Health professionals and peer counselors provide a range of services from right after birth at the hospital to breastfeeding support groups in the community as noted below: € Tuesdays, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., WIC in partnership with Lactation Love Breastfeeding Support Group, Jacaranda Library, 4143 Woodmere Park Blvd., Venice. Contact: Arielle Ball, DOH-Sarasota, WIC and Nutrition Services, Arielle. Ball@FLHealth.gov or 941-685-3324. € Second Wednesday each month, 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., North Port Library conference room, 13800 Tamiami Trail, North Port. Contact: Jamee Thumm, Healthy Start Coalition of Sarasota County, jamee.thumm@ gmail.com or 941-3737070, ext. 307.Cancer support groupFawcett Memorial Hospital, an HCA af“ liate, now offers a cancer support group for cancer patients, their families and caregivers. The group meets the last Wednesday of each month from noon to 1:30 p.m. with lunch provided. Research shows that social support has bene“ ts for cancer patients, those recovering from treatment and their family and loved ones by reducing anxiety and stress, emotional distress and depression, fatigue and the experience of pain while improving mood, self-image, ability to cope with stress and feelings of control. In addition, having a supportive social network can help with recovery and adjusting to life after treatment. The support group allows those experiencing a cancer diagnosis to cope with the emotional aspects by providing a safe place to share their feelings and challenges while allowing people to learn from others facing similar situations. Cancer patients and their family members are encouraged to attend. Active participation is not required, listeners are welcome. Physicians and other health professionals will periodically speak to the group on cancer related topics. For more information or to RSVP, please call Fawcetts oncology patient navigators at 941-624-8318. Support Groups $150HOLIDAY INTRODUCTORY OFFER(Expires 12/3/18)adno=3625575-1 SWFLs LEADING MEDICAL MARIJUANA CLINIC Visit us online!www.ICCPortCharlotte.comBOOK AN APPOINTMENT TODAY:941-375-67753524 Tamiami Trail Ste. 105G Port Charlotte, FL. 33952 info@ICCPortCharlotte.comDr. Tucker Greene Dr. Gregory R. Sonn What are the steps?1. Make an appointment. 2. Get certi“ ed that day. 3. Start buying your THC products in 10-30 days from your initial appointment date. 4. Return for your follow-up 7 months later.Caring. Compassionate. Con“ dential.

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The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 1 METRO CREATIVEChange plays a big role as people ring in a new year. At the dawn of a new year, some people resolve to live healthier in the months ahead while others might make financial resolutions in an attempt to improve their bottom lines. The decision to change jobs is another popular resolution at the dawn of a new year. Professionals change jobs for various reasons. But regardless of whats behind a career change, many people can benefit by looking for things in a new job that can make them happy both professionally and personally. € Salary: Of course everyone would love to earn more money when changing jobs, but there is more to changing jobs than just improving your bottom line. As you begin your job search, consider how much you currently earn and if that allows you to live a life you love. If so, dont overemphasize finding a new job that pays considerably more than your currently earn. On the flip side, young professionals who want to start a family in the years ahead should consider the costs associated with such a decision and how the salaries they earn at their next jobs may affect what they want down the road. € Work/life balance: Before beginning your search for a new job, think about why you want to switch careers or companies. Long hours often leads to burnout. If youre looking for a new job because youre burned out, try to find a job that affords you a better work/life balance. A study from the Happiness Research Institute in Copenhagen found that, with the curious exception of people who work more than 55 hours per week, stress rises accordingly with the numbers of hours worked each week. Keep that in mind if your goal is to find a job that affords you a better work/life balance. € Satisfaction: When attempting to achieve a better work/life balance, it can be easy to overlook satisfaction at work in exchange for more time at home. But studies have shown that feeling satisfied by what you do can have a profound impact on your overall happiness. Its possible to find an engaging career that still affords you time away from work, and such a career can ultimately pave the way toward a happier life. € Commute: Bending over backwards simply to get to work and then get home from work can have an incredibly negative impact on your life. A study from the Office of National Statistics in the United Kingdom found that commuters, especially those who spend between 60 and 90 minutes commuting to work, have lower life satisfaction and lower levels of happiness compared to people who dont commute. Before accepting a job offer, estimate your commute time to and from the new office and try to determine the impact of that commute on your quality of life. Many people aspire to find a new job at the dawn of a new year. Job seekers should consider a host of factors before switching jobs to make sure they make the best decisions.Things to look for in a new job adno=3629170-1 Mission Driven... Results Oriented 180 Bed Rehab Facility Solaris HealthCare Charlotte Harbor is a trusted, compassionate provider of rehabilitation and extended care. We have maintained a consistent history of high performance standards. Our expert staff, state of the art facilities and upscale environment makes Solaris HealthCare Charlotte Harbor the premier choice for rehab in Southwest Florida. Apply online @ solarishealthcare.vikus.net NEW!! Sign-On Bonus of $2000CNA RN/LPN PRN Floor Nurse Positions Available adno=3629163-1

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Page 2 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 VISIT US ONLINE: DESOTOAUTOMALL.COMHighway 70 ArcadiaAll stores available at one convenient location1-800-880-3099Hours:Thurs-Friday 8am-7pm Saturday 8am-5pm Sunday ClosedVisit us 24/7 on the web atwww.DesotoAutomall.com* Prices include all factory rebates. Cheaper In The Country Cheaper In The Country NEW 2018 FORD TAURUS $ 20,988 SALE PRICESTOCK#18F374 NEW 2018 RAM 1500 CREW CAB $ 28,888 SALE PRICESTOCK#18DT122 NEW 2019 JEEP CHEROKEE $ 23,988 SALE PRICESTOCK#19JT017 NEW 2018 FORD EDGE $ 24,988 SALE PRICESTOCK#18T161 NEW 2018 FORD ESCAPE $ 19,988 SALE PRICESTOCK#18T242 NEW 2018 FORD F150 CREW CAB $ 29,988 SALE PRICESTOCK#18T407 NEW 2018 FORD FIESTA $ 12,888 SALE PRICESTOCK#18F229 NEW 2018 FORD EXPLORER $ 28,988 SALE PRICESTOCK#18T464 NEW 2018 FORD FOCUS $ 14,988 SALE PRICESTOCK#18F216 NEW 2018 JEEP COMPASS $ 21,888 SALE PRICESTOCK#18JT208 NEW 2018 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE $ 29,888 SALE PRICESTOCK#18JT484 NEW 2018 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN $ 21,888 SALE PRICESTOCK#18DT135 NEW 2018 JEEP RENEGADE $ 18,988 SALE PRICESTOCK#18JT186 NEW 2018 JEEP WRANGLER JL $ 30,888 SALE PRICESTOCK#18JT508 NEW 2018 FORD ECOSPORT $ 18,988 SALE PRICESTOCK#18T500 LARGE SELECTION WITH THE BEST DEALS OF THE YEARadno=3628361-1

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The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 3 C7406307 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 3381 CROTON TER $55,000 776 $55,000 11/5/2018 None 1 1 0 1958 Single Family Residence Cash 7 0.88 1 C7250509 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 4158 TAMIAMI TRL #M4 $75,000 957 $70,000 11/5/2018 Community 2 2 0 1970 Condominium Cash 78. 37 0.93 73.15 C7406235 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 340 PALMETTO DR NE $100,000 828 $95,000 11/2/2018 None 2 1 0 1957 Single Family Residence FH A 120.77 0.95 92.41 A4413619 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 21365 MIDWAY BLVD $109,900 812 $103,000 11/2/2018 None 2 1 0 1961 Single Family Residence Ca sh 135.34 0.94 D6102828 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 346 LASAYETTE DR NE $109,911 1,176 $109,000 11/1/2018 None 3 2 0 1977 Single Family Residenc e Cash 93.46 0.99 66.79 D5919892 Sold ENGLEWOOD 34224 6796 GASPARILLA #14 $114,900 932 $114,900 11/5/2018 Community 2 2 0 1980 Condominium Cash 123.28 1 106.98 A4412272 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33948 19505 QUESADA #U104 $119,900 838 $107,000 11/7/2018 Community 2 2 0 1985 Condominium Convent ional 143.08 0.89 127.68 C7251454 Sold ENGLEWOOD 34224 6796 GASPARILLA PINES #75 $123,000 1,036 $118,500 11/5/2018 Community 2 2 0 1987 Condominium Cash 118.73 0.96 114.38 C7406988 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 3376 EASY ST $124,900 1,551 $119,000 11/2/2018 None 3 2 0 1959 Single Family Residence Cash 80.53 0.95 C7404633 Sold NORTH PORT 34287 5945 HOBHILL AVE $139,900 900 $139,900 11/5/2018 None 2 1 0 1983 Single Family Residence Convent ional 155.44 1 C7406158 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33948 1173 HURTIG AVE $141,901 1,036 $138,000 11/2/2018 None 2 2 0 1980 Single Family Residence Co nventional 136.97 0.97 U7838334 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 11683 WILLMINGTON BLVD $144,000 1,283 $144,000 11/1/2018 None 3 2 0 2005 Single Family Residence VA 112.24 1 73.36 C7405752 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 22011 CATHERINE AVE $149,900 1,075 $154,000 11/6/2018 None 3 2 0 1961 Single Family Residenc e FHA 139.44 1.03 75.53 N5916335 Sold ENGLEWOOD 34224 1188 MARTIN DR $149,900 1,770 $140,000 11/2/2018 None 2 2 0 1960 Single Family Residence FHA 84.6 9 0.93 76 C7404634 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 525 READING ST NW $150,000 1,167 $117,600 11/2/2018 Private 3 2 0 1971 Single Family Residen ce Cash 128.53 0.78 C7403601 Sold ENGLEWOOD 34223 126 PINE HOLLOW #126 $150,000 1,112 $144,000 11/7/2018 Community 2 2 0 1990 Condominium Conventi onal 134.89 0.96 C7404245 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 473 SKYLARK LN NW $159,900 1,563 $159,900 11/2/2018 Private 2 2 0 1969 Single Family Residen ce Conventional 102.3 1 C7404469 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 354 ORANGE DR NW $169,900 1,149 $173,000 11/1/2018 Private 3 2 0 1970 Single Family Residenc e VA 147.87 1.02 98.13 C7402837 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33955 2090 MATECUMBE KEY #1508 $169,900 890 $163,000 11/6/2018 Private, Comm 2 2 0 1998 Condominium Cash 190.9 0.96 167.01 C7402407 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33954 151 JACOBSON WAY $173,000 1,486 $164,000 11/1/2018 None 3 3 0 1980 Single Family Residence C onventional 116.42 0.95 87.14 N6100805 Sold NORTH PORT 34288 2629 LACROIX AVE $175,000 1,712 $165,000 11/6/2018 None 3 2 0 2006 Single Family Residence Cash 102.22 0.94 67.46 C7403509 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33982 422 BOLENDER ST $179,900 1,358 $169,000 11/1/2018 None 2 2 0 1979 Single Family Residence Conve ntional 132.47 0.94 90.33 D5924020 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 14143 BETHESDA LN $189,900 1,633 $175,000 11/6/2018 None 3 2 0 1980 Single Family Residence Cash 116.29 0.92 76.12 C7236971 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33980 24144 BUCKINGHAM WAY $194,900 1,382 $178,500 11/7/2018 Community 2 2 0 2001 Single Family Re sidence Cash 141.03 0.92 89.03 C7404678 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33948 1027 TROPICAL AVE NW $199,000 1,616 $192,000 11/2/2018 None 3 2 0 1988 Single Family Residen ce FHA 123.14 0.96 76.86 N6100049 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 450 GARFIELD AVE NW $209,000 1,596 $205,000 11/1/2018 Private 3 2 0 1979 Single Family Resid ence Conventional 130.95 0.98 96.79 D6101740 Sold ENGLEWOOD 34224 6983 BEARDSLEY ST $209,900 1,220 $200,000 11/1/2018 Private 2 2 0 1986 Single Family Residence Ca sh 172.05 0.95 108.4 C7403049 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33983 27323 MADISON ST $219,900 1,634 $220,000 11/1/2018 None 3 2 0 1995 Single Family Residence Conv entional 134.58 1 105.01 C7402134 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 1360 INVERNESS ST $229,000 2,340 $229,900 11/5/2018 Private 3 2 0 1989 Single Family Residen ce Conventional 97.86 1 86.2 A4411830 Sold NORTH PORT 34286 3661 GARLENDA AVE $230,000 1,258 $225,000 11/2/2018 Private 3 2 0 1999 Single Family Residence C onventional 182.83 0.98 116.7 N6101697 Sold NORTH PORT 34286 2866 WOODWARD AVE $235,000 1,771 $230,000 11/1/2018 None 3 2 0 2007 Single Family Residence Conv entional 132.69 0.98 96.68 C7405775 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33950 10110 CYPRESS BRANCH $238,900 2,246 $239,900 11/6/2018 None 4 2 1 2016 Single Family Residence FHA 106.37 1 C7405403 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33983 26537 BARRANQUILLA $238,900 1,901 $232,900 11/1/2018 Private 3 2 0 1988 Single Family Residence Conventional 125.67 0.97 C7405094 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 144 DOWLING AVE NE $239,000 1,578 $227,000 11/2/2018 Private 3 2 0 1960 Single Family Reside nce Cash 151.46 0.95 84.42 C7248673 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 2056 DELTA ST $239,900 2,720 $220,000 11/2/2018 Private 3 3 1 1978 Single Family Residence C ash 88.2 0.92 49.11 D6101985 Sold ENGLEWOOD 34223 740 SESAME ST $244,900 1,502 $230,000 11/1/2018 Private 4 3 0 1981 Single Family Residence Cash 1 63.05 0.94 D6102139 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 6118 GILLOT BLVD $249,000 2,036 $249,000 11/2/2018 Private 3 2 0 1989 Single Family Residenc e Private 122.3 1 77.23 C7401976 Sold NORTH PORT 34291 2801 ADELE ST $249,900 1,521 $234,000 11/1/2018 Private 3 2 0 2007 Single Family Residence Conve ntional 164.3 0.94 D6103305 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 15149 TAURUS CIR $251,500 1,723 $266,500 11/6/2018 Private 3 2 0 2018 Single Family Residenc e Cash 145.97 1.06 111.13 C7406092 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33983 313 MARACA ST $253,650 2,557 $253,650 11/3/2018 None 4 2 0 2018 Single Family Residence Convent ional 99.2 1 D6100920 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 10054 ANCONA ST $254,900 1,704 $264,312 11/1/2018 None 3 2 0 2018 Single Family Residence FH A 149.59 1.04 105.05 C7407722 Sold NORTH PORT 34286 3622 PETUNIA TER $255,530 1,436 $255,530 11/5/2018 Private 3 2 0 2018 Single Family Residence Co nventional 177.95 1 C7405932 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33954 181 ALBERT LN $285,000 1,628 $265,000 11/1/2018 Private 3 2 0 1980 Single Family Residence C ash 175.06 0.93 113.34 D6100050 Sold ENGLEWOOD 34224 9104 EVELYN RD $285,000 1,986 $290,000 11/1/2018 Private 3 2 1 2003 Single Family Residence Conve ntional 143.5 1.02 103.79 C7406232 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 1057 ALTON RD $289,000 1,907 $285,000 11/5/2018 Private 3 2 0 2007 Single Family Residence C onventional 151.55 0.99 105.83 C7246508 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33955 3255 SUGARLOAF KEY #32A $289,000 1,516 $275,000 11/2/2018 Community 2 2 0 1984 Condominium Cash 190.63 0.95 181.4C7404129 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33948 17124 CANARY LN $294,900 1,504 $294,000 11/5/2018 Private 3 2 0 1984 Single Family Residence Conventional 196.08 1 136.62 N6101500 Sold NORTH PORT 34289 2459 ARUGULA DR $299,000 2,006 $290,000 11/2/2018 Community 3 3 0 2013 Single Family Residence C onventional 149.05 0.97 110.52 D6101787 Sold ENGLEWOOD 34224 7256 HOLSUM ST $299,000 1,787 $282,500 11/5/2018 None 3 2 0 2007 Single Family Residence Cash 167 .32 0.94 116.45 A4412440 Sold NORTH PORT 34288 1646 CAMPBELL ST $299,900 2,196 $292,000 11/5/2018 Private 4 2 0 2006 Single Family Residence FH A 136.57 0.97 97.99 D6101442 Sold ENGLEWOOD 34224 9057 EVELYN RD $299,900 2,076 $305,900 11/2/2018 Private 3 2 0 1991 Single Family Residence Cash 144.46 1.02 100.16 C7402307 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33955 3321 SUNSET KEY #102 $299,900 1,669 $285,000 11/6/2018 Community 3 2 0 2004 Condominium Cash 17 9.69 0.95 155.82 D5921010 Sold ENGLEWOOD 34224 7403 SNOW DR $299,900 1,729 $329,000 11/2/2018 Private 3 2 0 2018 Single Family Residence Cash 17 3.45 1.1 131.6 D5921931 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 15326 ANCEL CIR $319,900 1,616 $320,000 11/2/2018 None 3 2 0 2018 Single Family Residence Co nventional 197.96 1 142.22 C7401167 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33955 24189 SAVORY LN $329,900 2,184 $310,000 11/5/2018 None 3 2 0 1997 Single Family Residence Conve ntional 151.05 0.94 103.02 C7403407 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33950 3959 SAN ROCCO DR #122 $334,800 2,383 $308,000 11/2/2018 None 3 2 0 2006 Condominium Convention al 140.5 0.92 C7404672 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33982 6056 SWEDEN BLVD $334,900 2,000 $323,000 11/2/2018 Private 3 2 1 1999 Single Family Residence C onventional 167.45 0.96 113.65 C7402811 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33983 27242 SAN MARCO DR $345,000 1,718 $345,000 11/2/2018 Private 3 2 0 1996 Single Family Residence VA 200.81 1 135.35 C7406139 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33950 920 DON JUAN CT $355,000 1,580 $350,000 11/5/2018 Private 3 2 0 1972 Single Family Residence Co nventional 224.68 0.99 137.74 D6103217 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 9267 PANAMA CIR $363,730 2,098 $382,730 11/1/2018 Private 3 2 0 2018 Single Family Residence Cash 173.37 1.05 N6101652 Sold NORTH PORT 34286 2815 WESTBERRY TER $369,900 1,784 $359,900 11/1/2018 Private 3 2 0 2001 Single Family Residence Conventional 207.34 0.97 D6102752 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 8122 SANTA CRUZ DR $374,400 2,018 $374,400 11/6/2018 Private 3 2 0 2018 Single Family Reside nce Other 185.53 1 122.67 C7401479 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33950 810 W OLYMPIA AVE $375,000 1,929 $347,500 11/2/2018 None 3 2 0 1999 Single Family Residence Cas h 194.4 0.93 131.03 C7251216 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33955 17707 COURTSIDE LAND CIR $379,000 1,820 $355,000 11/1/2018 Private 2 2 0 1999 Single Family Residence Conventional 208.24 0.94 98.12 C7404653 Sold NORTH PORT 34287 5288 WHITE IBIS DR $379,900 2,765 $379,900 11/5/2018 Private 3 3 1 2001 Single Family Residence Conventional 137.4 1 137.4 D5923462 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 9522 GAZANIA DR $389,900 2,010 $375,000 11/2/2018 Private 3 2 0 2015 Single Family Residence Conventional 193.98 0.96 135.87 D6102318 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 15448 ALDAMA CIR $399,900 2,147 $391,000 11/2/2018 Private 4 3 0 2006 Single Family Residenc e Conventional 186.26 0.98 130.9 D6102208 Sold ENGLEWOOD 34223 306 LAKE TAHOE CT $410,000 2,443 $402,500 11/1/2018 Private 3 2 0 2003 Single Family Residence Co nventional 167.83 0.98 119.65 C7406074 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33950 200 HARBOR WALK #252 $447,000 2,018 $444,900 11/1/2018 Community 3 2 0 2000 Condominium Cash 22 1.51 1 220.47 D5923142 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 15530 STAUNTON CIR $449,900 2,114 $462,700 11/1/2018 Private 3 2 0 2018 Single Family Reside nce Conventional 212.82 1.03 D6103267 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33953 13921 LONG LAKE LN $470,000 2,612 $470,000 11/5/2018 Private, Comm 4 3 0 1996 Single Family Residence Conventional 179.94 1 138.97 D6101718 Sold ENGLEWOOD 34223 568 S MCCALL RD $549,900 1,696 $493,650 11/6/2018 None 3 2 0 1986 Single Family Residence Cash 32 4.23 0.9 185.3 D5916439 Sold ENGLEWOOD 34223 7795 MANASOTA KEY RD $1,489,000 3,244 $1,370,500 11/1/2018 Private 4 4 0 1999 Single Family Resid ence Cash 459 0.92 200.72 AREA PROPERTY TRANSFERSML# STATUS CITY ZIP CODE ADDRESS LIST PRICE AREA SOLD PRICE SOLD DATE POOL BE FB HB BUILT PROPERTY STYLE SOLD TERMS LP/ SQFT SP/LP LP/SQFTCHARLOTTE COUNTY/NORTH PORT COURTESY OF PUNTA GORDA, PORT CHARLOTTE, NORTH PORT ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS By MARIE G. MCINTYRETRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Q After four months in my new job, I am extremely frustrated. I was hired to help manage projects and provide administrative support, but now I seem to have become my bosss personal assistant. While I dont mind doing general administrative tasks, I dont think I should have to run her errands and make personal calls. Although I was clearly told that project management would be a large part of the job, I have yet to be given a task which requires those skills. When I asked my manager for more complex assignments, she seemed to understand. However, her idea of a project seems more like random busy work. Because this experience has been so disappointing, I recently began investigating other jobs. It now appears that I may get an offer for a more suitable and rewarding position. However, I feel guilty about quitting so quickly. If I do get an offer, should I accept?A Even the most diligent and experienced applicants may encounter unpleasant surprises once they start work. Because it is virtually impossible to determine the actual requirements of a job from outside, new hires frequently suffer from unmet expectations. Unfortunately, such misunderstandings can easily occur during the hiring process. In an effort to attract desirable employees, interviewers naturally tend to emphasize the positive aspects of the job. Since eager applicants tend to be willing believers, they often neglect to ask probing questions. During the interview process, you were apparently told that your position would include both project management and administrative support. But since the reality appears to be personal errands and busy work, I doubt you will ever be happy there. So if a more suitable offer should happen to come along, dont feel guilty about accepting. Just be sure to examine the job carefully before committing, since you dont want another shortterm stay on your resume.Q My coworkers constantly ask me to help them solve simple problems. Whenever they encounter an obstacle, they automatically come to me for assistance. Because I have more than enough to do in my own job, this has become very frustrating. After I discussed the problem with my manager, he initially told everyone to handle these issues on their own. But when they replied that coming to me was faster, he backtracked and said we should work this out among ourselves. How can I stop these annoying interruptions?A Since your boss seems to have abdicated his management responsibilities, you must develop your own strategy, and then tell him what you plan to do. For example: Im always glad to help my coworkers solve difficult problems, but they keep asking me to do very simple things. While this may be faster for them, these requests are interfering with my own work. I plan to show them exactly how to resolve these issues so they can do so independently in the future. I would appreciate your support on this.Ž Tell your needy colleagues about the revised expectations, teach them what they need to know, and provide written instructions where possible. After that, you must resist any temptation to continue helping. Otherwise, they will never learn to fly solo.Your Office Coach: Disappointed new hire should take better job offer PROPERTY TRANSFERS

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Page 4 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 AREA PROPERTY TRANSFERSA4416228 Sold 126 SANDHURST DR 2 1 1 1961 Venice East Single Family Residence Cash 132.16 0.95 10/31/2018 $143,000 FALSE N6100943 Sold 309 BRIARWOOD RD 2 2 0 1973 Venice Gardens Single Family Residence Cash 81.01 0.88 10/29/2018 $148,000 FALSE N5915671 Sold 3730 CADBURY CIR #701 2 2 0 2000 Woodmere At Jacaranda Condominium Cash 112.81 0.92 10/31/2018 $155,000 FALSE A4413382 Sold 671 CYPRESS RD 2 2 0 1982 Not Applicable Single Family Residence Conventional 113.86 1.02 10/31/2018 $158,500 FAL SE A4412577 Sold 568 CIRCLEWOOD DR #Q-7 3 2 0 1980 Circlewoods Of Venice Single Family Residence Cash 151.65 0.94 10/31/2018 $170, 000 FALSE N6101892 Sold 544 CENTER RD 2 2 0 1973 Venice Gardens Single Family Residence FHA 186.15 0.98 10/29/2018 $172,000 FALSE N6101704 Sold 424 DORCHESTER DR 2 2 0 1978 Venice East Single Family Residence Conventional 191.3 1.02 10/30/2018 $189,000 FALS E N6102125 Sold 391 BARD RD 2 2 0 1987 South Venice Single Family Residence FHA 174.15 0.95 11/2/2018 $190,000 FALSE N6101854 Sold 605 MARCUS ST #25 2 2 0 1998 Leslie Park Condominium Cash 163.36 0.99 11/2/2018 $197,500 FALSE N6102002 Sold 840 LEEWARD RD 2 2 0 1989 South Venice Single Family Residence Other 182.98 1 10/30/2018 $200,000 FALSE N6102227 Sold 320 CLEARBROOK CIR #204 2 2 0 2003 East Preserve At Waterside Village Condominium Conventional 150.96 0.98 11/1/2 018 $205,000 FALSE N6101894 Sold 903 ADDINGTON CT #103 2 2 0 2001 W Lke Gards Of St. And Prk At The Plnt Condominium Conventional 160.16 0.98 10/3 0/2018 $205,000 FALSE A4409650 Sold 1019 WEXFORD BLVD #1019 3 2 0 1990 Tenth Fairway Condominium Cash 154.89 0.98 10/29/2018 $206,000 FALSE A4408044 Sold 1507 GONDOLA PARK DR #1507 3 2 0 2003 Gondola Park Condominium Conventional 152.43 0.96 10/29/2018 $207,000 FALSE N6102000 Sold 1905 TRADEWINDS CIR 2 2 0 1990 Cove Pointe Single Family Residence Cash 118.98 1 10/31/2018 $215,000 FALSE A4215021 Sold 5287 CITADEL RD 3 2 0 2002 South Venice Single Family Residence FHA 174.19 0.98 11/1/2018 $216,000 FALSE O5733678 Sold 5816 TAYLOR RD 2 2 0 1995 Gulf View Estates Single Family Residence Conventional 138.24 0.97 10/31/2018 $219,250 FALSE N6102332 Sold 1010 MALIBU CT 2 2 0 1980 Venice Gardens Single Family Residence Cash 125.64 0.96 10/31/2018 $220,000 TRUE N6101578 Sold 422 SUNSET LAKE BLVD #101 2 2 0 2004 Waterside Village Condominium Cash 137.61 0.98 11/1/2018 $225,000 FALSE A4410392 Sold 12645 SAGEWOOD DR 2 2 0 2016 Grand Palm Single Family Residence Cash 182.72 0.96 10/30/2018 $229,500 FALSE N6101949 Sold 5372 PRATT RD 3 2 0 1994 South Venice Single Family Residence FHA 167.39 0.99 10/29/2018 $231,840 TRUE N6101776 Sold 1280 INDUS RD 2 2 0 1974 South Venice Single Family Residence Conventional 161.16 0.96 10/31/2018 $236,900 FALSE N6101281 Sold 1606 RAVINIA CIR #1606 3 2 0 2004 Ravinia Condominium Cash 165.39 0.95 10/31/2018 $238,000 FALSE N6102006 Sold 4545 RAINBOW RD 3 2 0 1996 South Venice Single Family Residence Conventional 195.44 0.93 11/1/2018 $240,000 FALSE A4412916 Sold 400 GLEN OAK RD 3 2 0 1963 Venice Gardens Single Family Residence Conventional 164.54 0.95 11/2/2018 $245,000 TRU E A4400851 Sold 404 RUBENS DR 3 2 0 1986 Sorrento East Single Family Residence Cash 128.35 0.99 10/30/2018 $247,975 FALSE N6100972 Sold 20150 RAGAZZA CIR #201 3 2 0 2016 Gran Paradiso Condominium Conventional 125.74 0.99 10/30/2018 $275,000 FALSE A4411786 Sold 1683 ALBINO ST 3 2 0 1985 Mission Valley Estates Single Family Residence Cash 139.11 0.99 10/29/2018 $278,500 FAL SE A4417946 Sold 479 CASALINO DR 3 2 0 2017 Not Applicable Single Family Residence Other 185.67 1.07 10/3/2018 $280,181 FALSE N6100200 Sold 19210 SEA TROUT CT 2 2 0 2018 Caribbean Village Single Family Residence Conventional 156.39 0.94 10/31/2018 $284, 000 FALSE N6102623 Sold 20685 SWALLOWTAIL CT 3 2 0 2018 Not Applicable Single Family Residence Cash 174.54 1 10/30/2018 $286,420 FALSE N6101970 Sold 1604 VIKKI CT 3 2 0 1975 Jacaranda West Country Club Single Family Residence Cash 155.84 1 10/31/2018 $288,000 TR UE A4411709 Sold 444 BAY VISTA AVE 3 2 0 2000 Not Applicable Single Family Residence Cash 160.92 0.82 10/30/2018 $294,000 TRUE N6102042 Sold 1220 YAWL WAY 3 2 0 1980 Pinebrook South Single Family Residence Conventional 197.37 1 11/1/2018 $300,000 TRUE N6102679 Sold 9824 WINGOOD DR 4 3 0 2018 Not Applicable Single Family Residence Cash 148.72 0.99 10/31/2018 $302,198 FALSE A4415085 Sold 784 BRIDLE OAKS DR 3 2 0 1994 Bridle Oaks Single Family Residence Cash 130.31 0.95 10/30/2018 $310,000 FALSE T3113235 Sold 10542 MEDJOOL DR 3 3 0 2018 Sarasota National Single Family Residence Cash 167.66 0.94 10/31/2018 $310,000 FALSE N6102392 Sold 10080 COZY GROVE DR 2 2 0 2018 Sarasota National Single Family Residence Cash 163.16 1 11/1/2018 $310,495 FALSE N6101718 Sold 403 GIOVANNI DR 3 2 0 1981 Sorrento East Single Family Residence Cash 169.59 0.94 11/1/2018 $319,000 FALSE A4411669 Sold 732 SERATA ST 2 1 1 1954 Venezia Park Single Family Residence Seller Financing 300.38 0.98 11/1/2018 $319,900 TRU E N6101875 Sold 5286 LAYTON DR 3 2 0 2006 Ventura Village Single Family Residence Cash 160.1 0.96 10/30/2018 $322,450 FALSE N6101225 Sold 1353 NEW FOREST LN 2 2 0 2003 Rivendell The Woodlands Single Family Residence Cash 162.83 0.93 10/30/2018 $325,00 0 FALSE N6100359 Sold 601 MOSSY CREEK DR 3 2 0 1999 Sawgrass Single Family Residence Conventional 162.48 0.97 10/31/2018 $330,000 FALSE N6102686 Sold 12481 CINQUETERRA DR 4 3 0 2018 Gran Paradiso Single Family Residence Cash 163.78 1 10/30/2018 $332,796 FALSE N6101674 Sold 11626 PARROTFISH ST 3 2 0 2018 Caribbean Village Single Family Residence Cash 172.32 0.92 10/29/2018 $341,715 FAL SE N6101702 Sold 605 MISTY PINE DR 3 2 0 2002 Sawgrass Single Family Residence Cash 185.68 0.95 11/2/2018 $350,000 FALSE N6102669 Sold 10466 MEDJOOL DR 3 3 0 2018 Sarasota National Single Family Residence Conventional 191.07 1 11/1/2018 $353,296 FA LSE N6101763 Sold 20574 PEZZANA DR 2 2 1 2006 Venetian Falls Single Family Residence Cash 171.55 0.97 10/30/2018 $357,000 FALSE N6102581 Sold 1634 LISCOURT DR 3 2 0 1992 Waterford Single Family Residence Conventional 161.2 0.97 10/28/2018 $364,000 TRUE A4409323 Sold 346 S SHORE DR 3 2 0 1963 Sorrento Shores Single Family Residence Cash 183.72 0.88 10/29/2018 $368,550 TRUE N6102608 Sold 13602 YELMA STREET 2 2 0 2018 Islandwalk At The West Villages Single Family Residence Cash 226.23 1 10/31/2018 $3 78,034 FALSE N6102670 Sold 10454 MEDJOOL DR 3 3 0 2018 Sarasota National Single Family Residence Conventional 173.6 1 10/31/2018 $382,094 FA LSE A4412538 Sold 526 PINE RANCH EAST RD 4 3 0 1997 Bay Oaks Estates Single Family Residence Conventional 169.13 0.97 10/31/2018 $3 89,000 TRUE T3118408 Sold 13471 ESPOSITO STREET 3 2 0 2018 Not Applicable Single Family Residence Conventional 203.23 1 10/31/2018 $407,874 FALSE A4410229 Sold 2191 CALUSA LAKES BLVD 3 2 0 1997 Calusa Lakes Single Family Residence Cash 168.72 0.96 10/31/2018 $424,000 TRUE A4408303 Sold 755 FORDINGBRIDGE WAY 3 2 0 2002 Rivendell The Woodlands Single Family Residence Conventional 190.93 0.97 11/1/20 18 $425,000 TRUE N6100911 Sold 20735 GRANLAGO DR 4 2 0 2015 Gran Paradiso Single Family Residence Conventional 196.17 0.99 11/2/2018 $440,000 TR UE D6100773 Sold 500 PARK BLVD S #57 2 2 0 1970 Aldea Mar Condominium Conventional 455.58 0.95 10/31/2018 $441,000 FALSE N6101456 Sold 368 CEDARBROOK CT 3 3 0 1998 Venice Golf & Country Club Single Family Residence Conventional 173.99 0.97 11/1/201 8 $447,500 TRUE N6100501 Sold 461 SHERBROOKE CT 3 3 0 2000 The Reserve Single Family Residence Cash 173.69 0.96 10/29/2018 $470,000 TRUE N6102687 Sold 278 MARTELLAGO DR 3 3 1 2013 Venetian Golf And River Club Single Family Residence Conventional 181.42 1 11/1/2018 $498,000 FALSE N5916607 Sold 5046 BELLA TERRA DR 3 3 1 2001 Venetia Single Family Residence Conventional 178.34 0.94 10/31/2018 $540,000 TRUE A4169779 Sold 3621 N POINT RD #602 3 3 0 2006 The Oaks Condominium Cash 212.18 0.94 10/31/2018 $540,000 FALSE N6100940 Sold 112 PARK BLVD S 4 5 0 1950 Venice Gulf View Single Family Residence Cash 295.13 0.92 11/1/2018 $600,000 FALSE N5917020 Sold 830 THE ESPLANADE N. #205 2 2 0 2016 Not Applicable Condominium Cash 400.82 0.99 10/30/2018 $685,000 FALSE N5915935 Sold 830 THE ESPLANADE N. #202 2 2 0 2016 Not Applicable Condominium Cash 424.13 1 10/29/2018 $710,000 FALSE N5915934 Sold 830 THE ESPLANADE N. #305 2 2 0 2018 Gulf View Section Of Venice Condominium Cash 415.45 1 11/2/2018 $710,000 FAL SE N5915900 Sold 830 THE ESPLANADE N. #302 2 2 0 2018 Gulf View Section Of Venice Condominium Cash 439.07 1 10/29/2018 $735,000 FA LSE A4213856 Sold 367 SUGAR MILL DR 3 4 0 1991 Oaks Single Family Residence Cash 177.24 0.95 10/30/2018 $760,000 TRUEML# STATUS ADDRESS BE FB HB YEAR BUILT SW SUBDIV COMMUNITY NAME PROPERTY STYLE SOLD TERMS SP / SQFT SP / LP CLOSE DATE CLOSE PR ICE POOL Y/NSOUTH SARASOTA COUNTY COURTESY OF VENICE AREA BOARD OF REALTORS D5920670 SLD 6796 GASP PINES BLVD ENGLEWOOD 34224 VILL AT WILDFLOWER CC PH 02 932 $100,000 2 2 0 1981 Community Condominium Conventional 10/30/2018 $123.28 $107.30 0.87 D6102678 SLD 1685 MEADOWLARK LN ENGLEWOOD 34224 BREEZEWOOD MANOR 864 $120,000 2 2 0 1962 None Single Family Residence Cash 10 /30/2018 $138.89 $138.89 1 D6101459 SLD 3321 GOLDFINCH TER ENGLEWOOD 34224 SANDALHAVEN ESTATES 1,696 $118,000 2 2 0 1986 None Manufactured Home Cash 11/ 1/2018 $76.59 $69.58 0.91 N6100908 SLD 39 N FLORA VISTA ST ENGLEWOOD 34223 ALAMEDA ISLES 1,296 $137,000 2 2 0 1980 Community Manufactured Home Cash 10 /29/2018 $110.26 $105.71 0.96 U7838334 SLD 11683 WILLMINGTON BLVD PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 PORT CHARLOTTE SEC 072 1,283 $144,000 3 2 0 2005 None Single Family R esidence VA 11/1/2018 $112.24 $112.24 1 N5916335 SLD 1188 MARTIN DR ENGLEWOOD 34224 HARRIS 1,770 $140,000 2 2 0 1960 None Single Family Residence FHA 11/2/2018 $84.6 9 $79.10 0.93 D6102204 SLD 15 QUAILS RUN BLVD Unit#2 ENGLEWOOD 34223 QUAILS RUN I 1,013 $148,000 2 2 0 1980 Community Condominium Cash 10/2 9/2018 $153.01 $146.10 0.95 C7405062 SLD 6356 COLISEUM BLVD PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 PORT CHARLOTTE SEC 066 1,096 $159,900 2 2 0 1978 Community Single Family Residence FHA 10/31/2018 $145.89 $145.89 1 D6101652 SLD 231 ROTONDA BLVD W ROTONDA WEST 33947 EL SOMBRERO VILLAGE 1,107 $159,900 2 2 0 2004 Community Condominium Other 10/29/2018 $144.44 $144.44 1 D6102785 SLD 4706 GILLOT BLVD PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 PORT CHARLOTTE SEC 056 1,283 $167,900 3 2 0 2004 None Single Family Residen ce Cash 10/31/2018 $132.42 $130.87 0.99 N6101737 SLD 9051 APPLE VALLEY AVE ENGLEWOOD 34224 PORT CHARLOTTE SEC 074 1,350 $170,000 2 2 0 1987 None Single Family Reside nce Cash 10/29/2018 $129.56 $125.93 0.97 D6102261 SLD 11152 CARNEGIE AVE ENGLEWOOD 34224 PORT CHARLOTTE SEC 065 1,704 $171,000 3 2 0 1994 None Single Family Residence Conventional 10/29/2018 $102.82 $100.35 0.98 C7401728 SLD 6 OAKLAND HILLS RD ROTONDA WEST 33947 ROTONDA W OAKLAND HILLS 1,192 $172,500 2 2 0 1986 None Single Family Reside nce Cash 10/31/2018 $148.91 $144.71 0.97 T3127014 SLD 21 BUNKER TER ROTONDA WEST 33947 ROTONDA WEST PEBBLE BEACH 1,440 $181,000 2 2 0 1987 Private Single Family Reside nce Cash 10/30/2018 $125.00 $125.69 1.01 A4414618 SLD 9390 FRUITLAND AVE ENGLEWOOD 34224 PORT CHARLOTTE SEC 074 1,495 $205,000 3 2 0 2009 None Single Family Residence FHA 10/31/2018 $133.71 $137.12 1.03 A4411060 SLD 11104 CORRIGAN AVE ENGLEWOOD 34224 PORT CHARLOTTE SEC 065 1,612 $204,000 3 2 0 2018 None Single Family Residence Cash 10/29/2018 $127.11 $126.55 1 A4208239 SLD 12371 APPLEBERG CIR PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 PORT CHARLOTTE SEC 095 1,612 $204,900 3 2 0 2018 None Single Family Resi dence Conventional 10/29/2018 $127.11 $127.11 1 D6101740 SLD 6983 BEARDSLEY ST ENGLEWOOD 34224 PORT CHARLOTTE SEC 064 1,220 $200,000 2 2 0 1986 Private Single Family Residen ce Cash 11/1/2018 $172.05 $163.93 0.95 D6102304 SLD 59 MARINER LN ROTONDA WEST 33947 ROTONDA WEST PINEHURST 1,534 $215,000 2 2 0 1990 Private Single Family Residence Conventional 10/30/2018 $140.16 $140.16 1 D6101146 SLD 181 CADDY RD ROTONDA WEST 33947 ROTONDA W OAKLAND HILLS 1,578 $221,000 3 2 0 1977 None Single Family Residence VA 10/31/2018 $141.00 $140.05 0.99 D6101366 SLD 809 E 7TH ST ENGLEWOOD 34223 ROCK CREEK PARK 1,114 $232,000 2 2 0 1970 None Single Family Residence Conventional 10/30/2018 $214.54 $208.26 0.97 D6101985 SLD 740 SESAME ST ENGLEWOOD 34223 SESAME STREET 1,502 $230,000 4 3 0 1981 Private Single Family Residence Cash 11/1/ 2018 $163.05 $153.13 0.94 D6102139 SLD 6118 GILLOT BLVD PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 PORT CHARLOTTE SEC 052 2,036 $249,000 3 2 0 1989 Private Single Family Resi dence Private 11/2/2018 $122.30 $122.30 1 D6100920 SLD 10054 ANCONA ST PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 PORT CHARLOTTE SEC 87 1,704 $264,312 3 2 0 2018 None Single Family Residence FHA 11/1/2018 $149.59 $155.11 1.04 D6101331 SLD 112 MARINER LN ROTONDA WEST 33947 ROTONDA WEST PINEHURST 2,096 $260,000 3 2 0 1991 None Single Family Residence C onventional 11/1/2018 $124.00 $124.05 1 A4411092 SLD 48 BUNKER LN ROTONDA WEST 33947 ROTONDA WEST PEBBLE BEACH 2,138 $264,900 3 2 0 1992 Private Single Family Residen ce Conventional 10/31/2018 $123.90 $123.90 1 D6100724 SLD 21 PINE VALLEY PL ROTONDA WEST 33947 ROTONDA WEST PINE VALLEY 1,634 $250,000 3 2 0 2004 Private Single Family Res idence Conventional 11/2/2018 $162.12 $153 0.94 W7804471 SLD 95 SPORTSMAN RD ROTONDA WEST 33947 ROTONDA WEST BROADMOOR 1,679 $262,000 3 2 0 1991 Private Single Family Residen ce Conventional 10/29/2018 $157.83 $156.05 0.99 D5924010 SLD 4185 CAPE HAZE DR PLACIDA 33946 CAPE HAZE WINDWARD 2,113 $263,500 3 2 0 1991 None Single Family Residence Cash 1 1/2/2018 $130.15 $124.70 0.96 N6100045 SLD 29 CHARLESTON CIR ENGLEWOOD 34223 PINE LAKE DEV 1,809 $270,000 3 2 0 1993 Private Single Family Residence Conven tional 10/29/2018 $154.73 $149.25 0.96 D6100050 SLD 9104 EVELYN RD ENGLEWOOD 34224 SHAMROCK SHORES 1,986 $290,000 3 2 1 2003 Private Single Family Residence Convent ional 11/1/2018 $143.50 $146.02 1.02 D6102464 SLD 6247 CATALAN ST ENGLEWOOD 34224 PORT CHARLOTTE SEC 063 1,453 $275,000 3 2 0 1993 Private Single Family Residence Cash 10/31/2018 $198.90 $189.26 0.95 C7400916 SLD 10449 REDONDO ST PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 PORT CHARLOTTE SEC 085 2,265 $289,750 4 3 0 2018 None Single Family Residen ce FHA 10/30/2018 $127.92 $127.92 1 D6102221 SLD 26 WHITE MARSH LN ROTONDA WEST 33947 ROTONDA WEST WHITE MARSH 1,823 $289,900 3 2 0 2004 Private Single Family Res idence Conventional 11/1/2018 $159.02 $159.02 1 D6102117 SLD 1451 BEACH RD Unit#302 ENGLEWOOD 34223 SANDPIPER KEY BLDG 02 1,242 $280,000 2 2 0 1982 Community Condominium Cas h 10/31/2018 $237.52 $225.44 0.95 C7403769 SLD 10301 CORAL LANDINGS LN PLACIDA 33946 LANDINGS/CORAL CRK UN 5 2,355 $259,875 3 3 0 2007 Community Townhouse Conv entional 11/1/2018 $125.27 $110.35 0.88 N6102180 SLD 5 STONE MOUNTAIN BLVD ENGLEWOOD 34223 ENGLEWOOD ISLES SUB 1,700 $299,900 3 2 0 1975 Private Single Family Reside nce FHA 10/31/2018 $176.41 $176.41 1 D6101442 SLD 9057 EVELYN RD ENGLEWOOD 34224 SHAMROCK SHORES 2,076 $305,900 3 2 0 1991 Private Single Family Residence Cash 11 /2/2018 $144.46 $147.35 1.02 D5921010 SLD 7403 SNOW DR ENGLEWOOD 34224 PORT CHARLOTTE SEC 064 1,729 $329,000 3 2 0 2018 Private Single Family Residence Ca sh 11/2/2018 $173.45 $190.28 1.1 D5921931 SLD 15326 ANCEL CIR PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 PORT CHARLOTTE SEC 081 1,616 $320,000 3 2 0 2018 None Single Family Residenc e Conventional 11/2/2018 $197.96 $198.02 1 C7249232 SLD 14211 FRUITPORT CIR PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 PORT CHARLOTTE SEC 87 2,265 $325,000 4 3 0 2018 None Single Family Resid ence Conventional 10/30/2018 $145.06 $143.49 0.99 N6102102 SLD 637 BOUNDARY BLVD ROTONDA WEST 33947 ROTONDA WEST BROADMOOR 2,138 $315,000 3 2 1 2004 Private Single Family Resid ence Cash 10/30/2018 $153.88 $147.33 0.96 D6100632 SLD 561 BOUNDARY BLVD ROTONDA WEST 33947 BROADMOOR ROTONDA WEST 2,129 $335,000 3 2 0 2003 Private Single Family Resid ence Conventional 11/1/2018 $164.35 $157.35 0.96 D6100829 SLD 421 ROTONDA CIR ROTONDA WEST 33947 ROTONDA WEST PINEHURST 1,899 $357,000 3 2 0 2018 Private Single Family Residen ce Conventional 11/1/2018 $188.47 $187.99 1 D6100640 SLD 6230 COLLIER ST ENGLEWOOD 34224 PORT CHARLOTTE SEC 069 2,840 $348,000 4 3 0 1984 Private Single Family Residence VA 10/31/2018 $126.41 $122.54 0.97 D6103217 SLD 9267 PANAMA CIR PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 PORT CHARLOTTE SEC 071 2,098 $382,730 3 2 0 2018 Private Single Family Resid ence Cash 11/1/2018 $173.37 $182.43 1.05 D5923462 SLD 9522 GAZANIA DR PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 PORT CHARLOTTE SEC 078 2,010 $375,000 3 2 0 2015 Private Single Family Resid ence Conventional 11/2/2018 $193.98 $186.57 0.96 D6102318 SLD 15448 ALDAMA CIR PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 PORT CHARLOTTE SEC 082 2,147 $391,000 4 3 0 2006 Private Single Family Resi dence Conventional 11/2/2018 $186.26 $182.11 0.98 D6102208 SLD 306 LAKE TAHOE CT ENGLEWOOD 34223 STILLWATER 2,443 $402,500 3 2 0 2003 Private Single Family Residence Conventio nal 11/1/2018 $167.83 $164.76 0.98 D6103207 SLD 1359 KEYWAY RD ENGLEWOOD 34223 OVERBROOK GARDENS 1,972 $410,528 3 2 0 2018 Private Single Family Residence Conve ntional 10/31/2018 $208.18 $208.18 1R4707468 SLD 737 CRESTWOOD RD ENGLEWOOD 34223 WELLINGTON ACRES 2,365 $410,000 4 3 0 1974 None Single Family Residence Convent ional 10/31/2018 $175.48 $173.36 0.99 D5920899 SLD 226 ROTONDA BLVD E ROTONDA WEST 33947 ROTONDA WEST WHITE MARSH 2,278 $405,000 3 2 0 2014 Private Single Family Re sidence Conventional 10/30/2018 $186.13 $177.79 0.96 D5923142 SLD 15530 STAUNTON CIR PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 PORT CHARLOTTE SEC 082 2,114 $462,700 3 2 0 2018 Private Single Family Re sidence Conventional 11/1/2018 $212.82 $218.87 1.03 D6100227 SLD 9298 LITTLE GASPARILLA IS PLACIDA 33946 GASPARILLA COVE 1,870 $535,000 3 2 0 2007 None Single Family Residence C ash 10/29/2018 $293.58 $286.10 0.97 D5916439 SLD 7795 MANASOTA KEY RD ENGLEWOOD 34223 MANASOTA KEY 3,244 $1,370,500 4 4 0 1999 Private Single Family Residence Ca sh 11/1/2018 $459.00 $422.47 0.92 D6103201 SLD 380 GULF BLVD Unit#3 BOCA GRANDE 33921 SEAGRAPE COLONY 1,484 $1,725,000 3 3 0 1978 Community Townhouse Cash 10/30 /2018 $1,162.40 $1,162.40 1 D6101558 SLD 267 PALM AVE BOCA GRANDE 33921 BOCA GRANDE 2,067 $2,295,000 3 2 0 2002 None Single Family Residence Cash 10/31/20 18 $1,110.30 $1,110.30 1 ML# STATUS ADDRESS CITY ZIP LEGAL SUBDIVISION NAME SQFT PRICE BE FB HB BUILT POOL PROPERTY STYLE SOLD TERMS CLOSE LP/SQFT SP/SQ FT SP/LPENGLEWOOD COURTESY OF ENGLEWOOD AREA BOARD OF REALTORSPROPERTY TRANSFERS

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The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 5CLASSIFIEDS 2000EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT 2005Services 2010Professional 2015Banking 2020Clerical 2025Computer 2030Medical 2035Musical 2040 Restaurant/Hotel2050SkilledTrades 2060Management 2070Sales 2090Child/Adult Care Needed 2100General 2110Part-time/ Temp 2115Home Based Business 2120Seeking Employment 2005 SERVICES PROFESSIONAL RESUMES SARASOTA/CHARLCO. CALLFORDETAILS 941-214-5257 2010 PROFESSIONAL THE CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING DEPT. WILL BE CLOSED THANKSGIVING DAY, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22ND. *We Will Re-Open at 8:00am, Friday, November 23rd*DEADLINES FOR CLASSIFIED LINE ADS ARE AS FOLLOWS : Monday November 19th at 11:30pm for Wednesday November 22nd Tuesday November 20th at 12:00pm for Thursday, November 22nd and 2:30pm for Friday, November 23rd. Wednesday November 21st at 2:30pm for Saturday, November 24th & Sunday, November 25th We Wish Everyone a Happy Thanksgiving! 2020 CLERICAL/OFFICE BOOKKEEPING CLERK P/T 20-25 hrs, for residential complex on beach. Salary depending on experience. Email Resume to sunclassifieds1@gmail.com PC OFFICE: Customer service, phones, Quickbooks, Excel. Email resume or letter of interest to: kpaine@sunletter.com 2030 MEDICAL $2000 Sign on BONUS!! SOLARIS HEALTHCARE is now HiringCNAs: Full Time and PRN Apply: solarishealthcare.vikus.net CNAs, HHAs and CaregiversFind New Clients by Advertising Your Services in the Senior Directory Every Wednesday in The Sun Newspapers. This Feature Publishes in Charlotte, Sarasota, and Desoto Counties. Market Yourself Reach 150,000 Readers! Call 941-429-3110 for more information FRONT DESK f or M e di ca l Of fice. Must have computer knowledge & good communication skills. Call 941-764-8550 IMMEDIATE OPENINGS Receptionist/Med Assistant Open Interviews 8:30-2PM Wed 11/7 & Thurs 11/8. BRING RESUME! Apply Within: 2866-A Tamiami Trail Port Charlotte, FL 33952 2030 MEDICAL Caring for HeroesDouglas T. Jacobson State Veterans Home MDS Coordinator Full Time Sr. RN Super Full or Part Time CDM/Cook Full Time CNAs 3-11 or 11-7Excellent Benefits Job security, Tuition paid, Generous time off/paid leave.941-613-0919Online: www.peoplefirst.myflorida.com www.HorizonTechInstitute.ComADVANCE YOUR CAREERŽ Licensed & Accredited School Murdock Town Center on 411032 Tamiami Tr Unit 3YOUcan become a LPN within 11 months. Enrollment ongoing.Start Working In 2-5 wks! Classes Start Each Month Call For Class Dates Nursing Assistant (120hrs) Home Health Aide (75hrs) Phlebotomy Tech (165hrs) EKG Tech (165hrs) Patient Care Tech (600hrs) Job Assist. & Pymt. Plans Call Now to Register! 941-889-7506 PHLEBOTOMY,EKG, Classes Start 11/12LPNwkds 11/12 CNA11/12 Med. Asst. 11/12 2035 MUSICAL MINISTER OF MUSIC Worship Music Planner Choir Director & Organist Congregational UCC Punta Gorda Send resume, cover letter to office@puntagorda-ucc.com 2040 RESTAURANT/ HOTEL F/T COOK for Veterans Org. Experience required. Call 941-429-5403 for Appt. Monday-Friday 10-3PM 2050 SKILLED TRADES CONCRETE FINISHERSneeded ASAP. Pay rate based on Skills. Work is in Charlotte County area. 941-628-8498 and ask for Tim. INSTALLER/HELPER NEEDEDfor INSTALLATION/ MANUFACTURING of Hurricane Shutters. FL Drivers lic. required. Exp. helpful but will train the right person. (941)-485-5878 Venice MAINTENANCE TECH Handyman & plumbing skills required. 40 Hours a week. Background check & drivers license required. 941-628-5268. PAINTER E ng l ewoo d A rea, Experienced, Valid Drivers License & Reliable Trans. 941-697-3894 Leave Msg. TOW TRUCKDRIVER Clean Drivers Record, CDL Prefd. Immediate Opening!941-232-8455 941-639-5705 2100 GENERAL BU S DRIVER NEEDED Englewood Boys & Girls Club. 3 hours per day must be available Monday thru Friday. CDL Class B Air brakes & passenger endorse ment. Call Jessica Anderson: 941-268-7861 The Venice Gondolier Sun is now taking applications for carriers in Venice and surrounding areas. Must have dependable vehicle, a valid Florida Drivers License and proof of insurance. Apply in person: 200 E. Venice Ave. Venice, FL 34285 No Phone Calls Please. CARRIERS NEEDED CLEANING PERSON NEEDED, for Condos in Englewood P/T, 20 Hrs Wk. Thur.Mon. $11. Per Hr. Send Resume sunclassifieds1@gmail.com EXPD SCREENER NEEDED, Pay by Square Foot. Must have Transportation. 941-883-1381 2100 GENERAL IMMEDIATE OPENINGS! We Have Several Open Positions for Sales Representatives to Promote the Sun Newspapers at Various Locations, Grocery Stores, and Events Throughout the Area. This is an Enjoyable Year-Round Position with the Potential to Earn $100$300+ Per Day on a Part Time Basis! Perfect for College Students, Retirees, and as Supplemental Income. This is an Opportunity to Work in a Positive, Profess ional Work Environment with Flexible Hours. If You Are: 18 or Older, Outgoing, Dependable, and Professional and have Reliable Transportation and a Cell Phone, We Want to Talk to You! Background Checks are Performed. We Offer: Complete and Thorough Training Flexible Work Schedules Weekly Bonuses Unlimited Earning Potential Opportunity for Advancement Into Management! To Make an Appointment for an Interview, Please Call Andy at 941-268-5731 POOL SERVICE TECH Full Time Position Available Experience Preferred But Not Required. Nice Work Environment. 401K, Paid Vacation. Must have 5 year Driving Record, 3 years Clean. Call 941-637-6083 SISTERS FOR SENIORS i s growing! We are hiring part-time Homemakers and Companions to work with seniors in Venice and surrounding areas. Apply at www.SistersforSeniors.com TRUCK DRIVER F/T & TRUCK HELPERF/Tfor the Salvation Army Family Store.Apply at: salvationarmysouth.org, go to careers to apply now, scroll to truck driver or truck driver helper-Thrift Store Dept #402 2110 PART TIME/ TEMPORARY "AMBASSADORS" NEEDEDTOSOLICITSUBSCRIPTIONS FORTHEAWARDWINNING LOCALNEWSPAPERS, THESUN, ATSTOREFRONTSINTHEVENICE, NORTHPORTANDENGLEWOODAREAS. CONTACTJIMDEFALLEAT941-786-7676FORMOREINFORMATION. 2120 SEEKING EMPLOYMENT PROFESSIONAL NANNY (Baby Whisperer) exc references, Babies and Young Children pre ferred. 941-276-8572 or email oliviadonovan252@icloud.com Findthe perfect companion inthe Classifieds! 1000REAL ESTATEWe Are Pledged To The Letter And Spirit of U.S. Policy For The Achievement Of Equal Housing Opportunity Throughout The Nation. We Encourage And Support An Affirmative Advertising And Marketing Program In Which there Are No Barriers To Obtaining Housing Because of Race, Color, Religion, Sec, Handicap, Familial Status Or National Origin.Ž REAL EST A TE 1010 16501010Open House 1015 Real Estate Auctions 1020Homes/General For Sale 1030Waterfront Homes For Sale 1031 Foreclosures For Sale 1035 Golf Course Community For Sale 1040Condos/Villas For Sal e 1060Townhouses For Sale 1070Duplexes For Sale 1075Tri-Plex For Sale 1080Apartments For Sale 1090Mobile Homes For Sal e 1100Interval Ownership 1100 Out of Area Homes For Sale 1115Trade/Exchange 1120Wanted To Buy RENT 1205 Lease Option 1210 Homes 1240Condos/Villas 1280 Townhouses 1300Duplexes 1320Apartments 1330Hotel/Motel 1340Mobile Homes 1345Misc. Rentals 1350Efficiencies 1360Room ToRent 1370Rentals To Share 1390Vacation/Seasonal 1420Wanted To Rent LOTS 1500Lots & Acreage 1515Waterfront 1520Out Of Area Lots 1530Commercial Lots 1540Trade/Exchange BUSINESS 1600Business For Sale 1610Business Rentals 1615Income Property 1620 Commercial/ Industrial Prop. 1640Warehouse & Storage 1650Farm/Ranches Y Y ouSa ouSa ve ve BigBuc BigBuc ks ks Shopping Shopping Classifieds! Classifieds! 1010 OPEN HOUSE 11/11/18 26336 NADIR RD UNIT 3 DEEP CREEK 33983 OPEN SUN NOON 3PMGORGEOUSTURNKEY DECORATORFURNISHEDGOLF CONDOWITHBREATHTAKING VIEWSGREENSIDEOFTHE10THHOLEOFTHEDEEPCREEKGOLFCOURSE. THIS2 BED2 BATHISINMINT CONDITIONANDMOVEIN READY. ENDUNITWITHSOAR-INGCEILINGANDCLERESTORY WINDOWSBATHESTHISUNITIN SUNLIGHT. NEWOWNERNEED NOTHINGBUTATOOTHBRUSH, $137,500.00 FLA GOLF PROPERTIES INC 941-698-4653 ENGLEWOOD OPEN HOUSE SAT. & SUN. 12-4PM 2684 Titania Rd. 2/2/2 Gulf Access/Pool, Updated, Boat Dock/Lift, Fenced Yard. (Dir: 776 to San Casa to Titania) $365,000 941-214-0766 FIVE STAR REALTY OPEN HOUSEStop by Five Star Realty to pick up a home tour flyer with directions.ŽSUNDAY 11/11/2018 2811 Ryan Boulevard, Punta Gorda, FL 33950, 12:00PM-3:00PM 719 W Henry Street, Punta Gorda, FL 33950, 1:00PM-3:00PM 23388 Bretton Avenue, Port Charlotte, FL 33980, 1:00PM-3:00PMF OR MORE INFORMATION AND PHOTOS VISIT : WWW FIVESTARREALTY COM / BLOG / 1010 OPEN HOUSE NORTH PORT SUN. 11-3 15349 Mille Fiore Blvd. SPECTACULAR CUSTOM 1-OWNER Mediterranean design 2200 SF Light, Bright, Open Great Room Concept with Formal Dining Room, 3-Bedrooms + DEN/OFFICE. $325,000 Patty Gillespie, REMAX ANCHOR 941-875-2755 OPEN Nov. 18th 1-4PM 700 Gardens Edge Dr. Unit # 732, Venice 34285 ELEVATOR building, a 1488 sq ft, 2/2 condo with Den and garage, absolutely STUNNING, with Cathedral ceilings & a lovely Lanai looking over the Pond. FURNITURE INCLUDED. Debra Villari 609-458-4627 Berkshire Hathaway T urnyou r trashinto cash! Advertise youryard sa l e! OPEN SAT. & SUN. 1pm-4pm 208 CARRAIGE HOUSE LANE. NOKOMIS THE INLETS PRIZEFORREMODELING. $68,000. WORTHOFITIN1 1/2 YEARS. COMESEETHERESULTS. 2001 SF, 3/2/2 HOMEHASBEENMADEFORENTERTAININGORENJOYINGYOURSELF. $335,000. CALLFORPERSONALSHOWING. 941-412-3356 OPEN SUN 1PM-3PM ALMOST NEW! 23388 Bretton Ave, PC 3 BR + den, 2015 built w/impact doors & windows, gorgeous upgrades everywhere! Oversized 3-car, huge lanai, double lot $340k. ROBYN SIGURDSON 941-662-9636 FIVE STAR REALTY OPEN SUN. 12-3PM DEEP CREEK 103 MOCHA CT 2017 CUSTOMHOME. METICULOUSLYMAINTAINED3/2/2, 1,886 SQ. FT. GRANITECOUNTERTOPS. MANYUPGRADES, NEUTRALCOLORS. OVERSIZEDGARAGE& LANAI. GREATVIEWS! $258,500. FSBO 941-391-5217 PORT CHARLOTTE OPEN SAT. & SUN. 11AM-2PM, 5494 RILEYLANE, 33981 3/2/2, 2040 SF + GARAGE. 0.27 AC. FENCED, CORNERLOT, PRIVACY, CLEAN. $194,000. 941-276-0500 PUNTA GORDA OPEN SUN. 12-3 26336 NADIR RD #5 2br/2ba Golf Course Condo. Claudia DeBruyn Sandbill Realty Group 781-799-7570 THE AWARD WINNING PALM 2 by Cantin Homes. Starting at $271,000.Model Open HouseEvery SAT. & SUN. 11-4 9756 Singer Cir., S. Gulf Cove, PC. 1015 R.E.AUCTION REAL ESTATE SATURDAY NOV. 17 11AM 22329 Yonkers AvePort Charlotte, Fl 339522 BEDROOMS, 2 BATHS, 2 CARGARAGE, LANAI______________________ DIRECTIONS: HWY41 N, R ONCONWAY, R ONELMIRA, R ONMIDDLE-TOWN, R ONYONKERS.)____________________ TERMS: 10% DAYOFAUCTIONWITH BALANCEATCLOSINGDECEMBER17, 2018. _________________AUCTION HELD ON SITE_________________ OPEN1 HOURBEFOREAUCTION_________________AUCTIONEER: PHILLIPF. WILSONWILSONREALTY4485 TAMIAMITRLPORTCHARLOTTE, FL 33980PHONE: 941-629-6624phillipwilsonauctioner.comPHILLIPWILSON@CCIMPHIL.COM AUCTION AUCTION Findthe newYou intheClassifieds! 1020 HOUSES FOR SALE SELLING YOUR HOME, CONDO, OR LOT? WE CAN HELP YOU. Advertise your home, condo, or lot with us and reach over 150,000 readers in Charlotte, Sarasota, & DeSoto Counties and online everyday. Ask about our 90 day special. Call one of our classified experts for all the details at 866-463-1638 Realtors Welcome! CHOOSE VENICE REALTY TO HELP YOU FIND YOUR NEW CONSTRUCTION HOME WITH A 1% REBATE Visit VeniceRealty.com Megan Hess Diane Shiell Venice Realty, Inc. Serving SW Florida

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Page 6 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018CLASSIFIEDS 1020 HOUSES FOR SALE DEEP CREEK 26084 CONCEPCIONDRIVEDEEPCREEK33983. GORGEOUSNEWCONSTRUCTION! JUSTCOMPLETED! 3/2/2, 1875 SQ. FT. OPENFLOORPLAN. LOADEDWITHUPGRADES! WOODPLANKTILETHROUGH-OUT, GRANITECOUNTERS, ALLWOODCABINETS, LARGECOVEREDLANAIW/ SPACEFOR APOOL! STONECOLUMNSGIVESHOMEGREATCURBAPPEAL! $284,900. 239-826-5440 HARBOUR HEIGHTS 2/2, 1,406 SF, city water & sewer, incl adjoining lot, upgrades, newer roof & electric, shed, complete hurricane shutters, NOT in flood zone. $150,000. Steve Vieira 941-258-2891Coldwell Banker Residential RE NORTH PORT 1710 New Street HERE'S THE KEY ... TO YOUR HAPPINESS! Beautiful, move-inready, totally renovated 1600 SF, 2001 built 3/2/2 on the sought-after Lagoon Waterway, CITY WATER! Plenty of room for a pool! No carpet (tile throughout, with bamboo flooring in Master Bedroom)! Seethrough hurricane shutters! ENJOY DAYBREAK, SUNSET AND ALL THE HOURS IN BETWEEN. $210,000 Patty Gillespie Remax Anchor 941-87 5-2755 NORTH PORT 5156 Sago Palm, Rd., MAKE MY DAY! Call now to see this custom 2400 SF 4-bedroom, 3-bath, 3-car garage with formal living-dining area + separate family room with 11x14' screened/tiled lanai + 12x14' open patio on lushly landscaped oversized corner lot. 10x12 utility shed. NO DEED RESTRICTIONS! NOT IN FLOOD ZONE! Nothing comparable at this price! Move right in! $260,000 Patty Gillespie, Remax A nchor 941-875-2755 REDUCED ABargainHunters Delight Checkthe ClassifiedsFirst! AWhole Marketplaceof Shoppingisrightat your Fingertips! NORTH PORT 5574 Gagnon Terrace. SOLAR POWERED HOME!! Immaculate, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, Pool home, 1987sq ft, built in 2004. Fenced yard, private setting. RV parking. Beautiful! Don't miss this energy efficient home. Perfect! $295,000 Pat Walker 941-276-4674 REMAX Anchor Realty PORT CHARLOTTE 2/1 Large Fenced Yard, Totally Renovated inside & out. All New A/C Unit, Appliances & Remote Control Fans! Nice, Quiet Area! $125,000. 941-626-4117 Owner PORT CHARLOTTE 2683 SUNCOAST LAKES BLVD Four bdrm, lake front, pool home, 1874 sq ft!! What more could you want! Beautifully maintained! Tile floors in all main areas, granite counters and stainless appliances, hurricane shutters. Gated community! This total package is waiting for you! Call today! $279,500 Pat Walker 941-276-4674 REMAX Anchor Realty PENDING PORT CHARLOTTE 3/2.5/2 SPACIOUS HOME with NEW ROOF, CARPET and MANY MORE EXTRAS! CALL BARBARA $265,000 941-626-9718 1020 HOUSES FOR SALE PT. CHARL/PUNTA GORDA 3 BR 2BA 3CG Build a new Greenblock Home! Custom Built Pool Home w/ Hurr Windows, Quartz, SS, Tile thru out, & Paver driveway/Pool Deck!Save $$$$299,000. Dave Irwin 239-405-2537 MVP REALTY PUNTA GORDA3/2/3/Pool Brand New Custom Built Home Located In Popular Burnt Store Meadows. Great Floorplan W/Top of The Line Features. Must See To Appreciate!-$349,000 BARBMCHENRY941-833-1667 COLDWELLBANKERSUNSTARREALTY REDUCED 1030 WATERFRONT HOMES 10578 RIVERSIDE RD PORT CHARLOTTE, FL 33981 OPEN BY APTUNIQUE ONE OF A KIND SAILING COMPOUND A SAILORS DREAM GORGEOUS3 BEDROOM2.5 BATH4 CARGARAGEHOME WITHHEATEDPOOL& SPAND OVER2,550 SFUNDERAC OF LIVINGSPACE(3284SFTOTAL) A 160 CONCRETESEAWALL, 145 OFDOCKINCLUDING2 BOATLIFTS. IFSAILINGAND LIVINGONTHEWATERISYOUR DREAM, THISISYOURDESTINATION.FLA GOLF PROPERTIES INC 941-698-4653 LAKE SUZY/PORT CHARLOTTE Architecturally Pleasing Open Floor Plan Home Offers a Stunning Kitchen, Magnificent Master Suite, Solar-Heated Pool, and a Private, Backyard Lake View. Oversized Garage (26 ft long). Relax Pool Side and Enjoy the Tranquility of Nature From Your Own Home Enjoying the Sunset Hues Over the Lake. LOTS of NEW in this Kings Gate/Lake Suzy Home. A Bird-watchers Paradise! $279,900 Sharon Kerr 941-286-7315 Coldwell Banker Sunstar Realty NORTH PORT 5402 MacCaughey Dr., RELAX ƒ ENJOY! EVERYTHING IS PERFECT Gorgeous light, bright, airy 1600 SF 3/2/2 heated pool home with extended drive-way for your RV or boat, and your own private fishing pier overlooking the MacCaughey Waterway, in quiet residential neighborhood only 5 minutes to US41 restaurants, shops, amenities! CITY WATER! NO DEED RESTRICTIONS! $259,000 Patty Gillespie Remax Anchor 941-875-2755 PORT CHARLOTTE 4/4/2 BOATERS DREAM! Well-maintained waterfront pool home. Handicapped friendly. $475,000 Jackie Thornberry Harbor Coast Realty 941-740-4580 PUNTA GORDAISLES! Best Buy in PGI! 3/2/2 Pool Home! 2000SF, 60 Waterfront. Light, Bright & Airy! ONLY $315,000. You have to love it! Priced low to Sell! 941-380-7954 PUNTA GORDA-SAYWOWTOTHIS2 STORY4/5.5/2 ESTATEON30 ACRESINCLUDESFREESTANDING2 STORYGARAGE WITH2 IN-LAWAPTS. & DETACHED1 STORYHOME. PRIVATEBOATRAMP, NATURALSPRING, SECURITYCAMERAS, GATED, GRANITE, 10-20 CEILINGS, TRAVERTINE, MARBLE, ONYX, & SO MUCH MORE!! COMEANDSEETHEPINNACLE OFLUXURYINPARADISE! $3,900,000. STEFANIEPISH, 941-7161334 COLDWELLBANKERSUNSTAR 1035 GOLF COURSE COMMUNITY PLACIDA CAPEHAZEWINDWARDHEATEDPOOLHOME! 3/2.5/2, FAMILYROOMW/ GOLF/LAKEVIEWSONCORNERLOT. 2215SF, BUILT2004. TO-TALLYRENOVATED! $425,000. BROKERSWELCOME. 941-6973982 1040 CONDOS/VILLAS FOR SALE COASTAL CAPE HAZE LUXURY CONDO STUNNING2B/2BA W/PRIVATEGARAGE. TOTALLY REFURBISHED! NEWAPPLIANCES,ALLNEWTROPICAL FURNITURE& ACCESSORIES. TURN-KEYREADY. PRISTINE GATEDRESORT, POOL, SPA,CLUBHOUSE& LOTSMORE. MINUTESTOBEACH& BAY, $174,900. 941-769-0200 ENGLEWOOD-2/2/2 VILLA INGATEDBOCAROYALEONCORNERLOT. LOTSOFUPGRADES! BUILTIN2016. GOLF, POOL, CLUBHOUSE, TENNIS, PICKLEBALL, BEAUTIFUL, PEACEFULWALKWAYS& MORE! $296,500. NOREALTORS. 678-438-5576 To Advertise in The Showcase of Homes Please Call 866-463-1638 or Email; special@sunnewspapers.net ADVERTISE In TheClassifieds! VENICE 3/2/2 20200 Ragazza Cir 102. Ground floor, water view in maint-free resort community. OPEN HOUSE Sundays 1-4p. West Villages Realty. $274,900 941-539-5771 1090 MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE ENGLEWOOD 2BR/1BA 14x52 55+ Park, No Dogs Allowed. $13,500. 941-474-1353 PORT CHARLOTTE 1/1 24325 Harborview Rd Unit 10C Open House 11-2 Sat 10th & Sun 11th$19,999 941-875-3978 PUNTA GORDA1/1 w/ Large Lanai in Punta Gorda RV Resort. Community Pool, Hot Tub, Clubhouse, Coin Washer & Dryer. $12,500. 18 or Over Community. Pets OK. $25.00 Background & Credit Check Required. 941-666-1757 VENICE RANCH MOBILE HOME ESTATES BEAUTIFUL LOT RENTAL & 55 + COMMUNITY. NEW & PRE-OWNED HOMES NO DOGS. CATS OK Call 941-488-5672 www.VeniceRanch.com 1095 MANUFACTURED HOMES FOR SALE 2692 NE HIGHWAY 70 ARCADIA 55+ Active Community Affordable Manufactured Homes!!! 1 Year FREEGolf Membership With Any Home Purchase! Call to Schedule An Appointment For a Tour! Ted 800-538-2590 www.arcadiavillage.com 1095 MANUFACTURED HOMES FOR SALE NEW 3/2 DblWide Delivered & Set-Up on Your Lot w/ Skirting, Steps & Air! Only $58,795. + Tax. Financing For ALL Credit Scores Avail! Prestige Homes, Punta Gorda 941-637-1122 1210 HOMES FOR RENT 2/1 Tile & Carpet, Window A/C, Meehan Ave., P.C. $725/Mo 2/1 Terrazzo Floors, Lanai, Catherine Ave., P.C. $800/Mo 3/1 Tile Floors, Lanai, Waltham St., P.C. $850/Mo 2/2/1 Tile Floors, Newer Home, Bersell Ave., P.C. $950/Mo 3/2/1 Tile Floors, Lanai, Shenandoah Ave., N.P. $950/Mo2/2/2 Spacious, Carpet & Tile, Lanai, Deep Creek, Padre Ln., P.G. $1200/Mo *We Welcome NEW Listings* AWARD WINNINGSUNBELT MGT. SERVICES RENTALS COMPLETE LISTINGS (941) 764-7777 sunbeltmgtservices.com G R O VE C ITY C lean Home 1/1 Unfurn-Lawn&Trash Service Stove, Fridge, Air, w&d hook-up. $650/mo+util, 517-529-4533 NEED A RENTAL Paradise Properties & Rentals, Inc 941-625-RENT 1240 CONDOS/VILLAS FOR RENT VENICE Near Beach, 2/2 Corner unit, 2nd floor, $1200/mo 941-492-5050 INVESTMENT REALTY OF W.Fl. 1320 APARTMENTS FOR RENT HARBOR HEIGHTS 2/2, Granite Countertops, Laundry Room, Updated! $1025/Mo. + 1st, Last & Sec. 941-276-5719 PORT CHARLOTTE 1/1 U nfurn. Near Cultural Center. No Smoke or Pets.$850. Mo. Move in for $1,700. 941-629-6663 VENICE ISLAND EFFICIENCY1 & 2 br, Call for Details. No Pets, 1 Year Lease 941-416-5757or 323-6466 1350 EFFICIENCIES FOR RENT HARB O UR HEI G HT S close to river, newly renovated efficiencies w cable & internet, Sunny brookMotel 941-625-6400 NOKOMIS includes utilities cable, wifi, private entrance, 1st & Last Req. Avail Dec. 1st $725 941-456-9402 No pets! NORTH PORT 1 person f urn. eff. private entrance & bath. All utilities included. 1st months rent and sec. deposit. $750/per mo. Call 848-448-0797 PC HARBOR Blvd & Murdock, F URNISHED EFF.SRMNICEFOR1 PER-SONNOPETS, NS/NODRUGS. CLOSE TOBEACH& HARBOR941-883-8083 1360 ROOMS FOR RENT PORT CHARLOTTE Single, Person, $130/wk. Incl Sat. & Internet. No Pets. 941-276-4909 1390 VACATION/ SEASONAL RENTALS ENGLEWOOD, N. PORT, ROTONDA AND PC GREAT SELECTION OF SEASONAL RENTALS!WEST COAST/ PROPERTY Mgmt 941-473-0718www.rentalsflorida.net 1390 VACATION/ SEASONAL RENTALS WOW ROTONDA 3/2 Condo, Beautifully Appointed & Cozy, Heated Pool, Avail. Jan. & Feb. waterside2207@gmail.com PORT CHARLOTTE 2 Room TROPICAL GET-A-WAYS Waterfront, Wifi, Daily, Wkly Extend a Stay $320. wk + Up Non smoker 941-661-4262. S. VENICE 2BR/1BA, Turn-key, Non smoker Walk/Bike to Manasota Beach. Avail NOW. Call 941-493-0849 VENICE BIRD BAY 2br/2ba first floor, $2800/mo 3 month Min. 941-492-5050 INVESTMENT REALTY OF W.Fl. C a s h i n w i t h C l a s s VENICE PELICAN POINTE 3/2/2 with pool 6 mths $2300/mo no tax; 4 mth $4000+tax; 3 mths $4500 + tax 941-492-5050 INVESTMENT REALTY OF W.Fl. 1500 LOTS & ACREAGE SELLING YOUR HOME, CONDO, or LOT?We Can help you.Advertise your home, condo, or lot with us and reach over 175,000 readers in Charlotte, Sarasota, & DeSoto Counties and online everyday. Ask about our 90 day special.Call one of our classified experts for all the details at 866-463-1638 Realtors Welcome! THE LAST BEST LOT AT MERCHANT'S CROSSING ALMOSTANACREAT1599 PLACIDARD. (RT775) ENGLEWOOD ACROSSFROMPUBLIXANDBEALLS.WATER, SEWER ANDTURNINGLANEIN PLACE. IDEALFORMULTI-UNITBUILDING(S), OFFICE,ORCONDOS. NEIGHBORING LOTSPRICEDAT$1.8 AND$1.9 MILLIONDOLLARS!!! OURGIVE-AWAY PRICEŽ ONLY$329,000W/ SHORTTERMFINANCING POSSIBLE. 941-769-0200 1515 WATERFRONT LOTS DIRECT GULF ACCESS LOWEST PRICED LEMON BAY LOTDEEPSAILBOATWATER, 1/4 ACRE, BAYVIEWS, NEWSEA-WALL, 2 MINSTOICW, 6 MINS TOGULFONLY$239,900 941-769-0200 MANASOTA KEYLOT 1/2 acre, Wooded & Private! 4 Public Beaches within 5 mins, No HOA! Close to Everything! 1 Lot off Water. Build your Dream Beach Retreat! $189,000 941-475-1379 1515 WATERFRONT LOTS ROTONDA SHORES3415 ETHLYNLANEBACKSUPTOA200+ ACRE WILDLIFEPRESERVE. NICE,QUIET, CLEANNEIGHBORHOOD. ONLY$19,900 AND NOHOA FEES.941-769-0200 1620 COMMERCIAL/ INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY THE LAST BEST LOT AT MERCHANT'S CROSSING ALMOSTANACREAT1599 PLACIDARD. (RT775) ENGLEWOODACROSSFROMPUBLIXANDBEALLS.WATER,SEWERANDTURNINGLANEIN PLACE. IDEALFORMULTI-UNIT BUILDING(S), OFFICE, OR CONDOS. NEIGHBORINGLOTS PRICEDAT$1.8 AND$1.9MILLIONDOLLARS!!! OURGIVE-AWAY PRICEŽONLY$329,000 WITHSHORT TERMFINANCINGPOSSIBLE. 941-769-0200 3000 NOTICES 3010 ANNOUNCEMENTS CLOSING ANNOUNCEMENT Dr. William Letson, Jr. is closing his urology practice located at 1505 Tamiami Trail South, Ste. 405, Venice, FL 34285 effective October 31, 2108. 21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, will assist patients with medical records requests and will furnish a list of Urologists that can provide continued care. Please contact them at 239-936-8930 for information. To my patients: My wish is that you stay in the best of health. It has been a privilege serving you. Dr. William Letson, Jr. FREE MERCHANDISE ADS!! WELCOME TO OUR WEBSITE! To Place a FREE Merchandise Ad Go to: sun-classifieds.com Click on Place Ad. If You`ve Advertised Online with Us Before or Not Just Click Register and Follow the Prompts. FREE Ads are for Merchandise UNDER $500. and the Ad Must be Placed Online by You. One Item Per Ad, the Ad Must be 3 Lines or Less, Price Must Appear in the Ad. Your Ad Will Appear Online for 7 Days and in Print Wednesday ThroughSunday. Some Restrictions Do Apply. LIMIT 5 FREE ADS PER WEEK Need To Place a Classified Ad? Enter Your Classified Ad and Pay With Your Credit Card 24 Hours a Day, 7 Daysa Week. CLASSIFIED ADSSELL 3020 PERSONALS THE G IRL NEXT D OO R941-483-0701 Port Charlotte 3065 BIBLE STUDY & CHURCHES BIBLE STUDY BEGINNING SUNDAY, OCT. 14TH FEB. 10TH @5PM. The Book of Isaiah Ž New Hope Baptist Church Fellowship hall. 2100 Englewood Rd. Eng. FL 34223 Public is invited and encouraged to attend. work book donation www.NewHopeBC4U.org To register or for more information, call the church office at 941-474-7647 or e-mail kay@newhopebc4u.org. C AL VAR Y BIBLE C HUR C H 1936 E. Venice Ave. Venice Friday at 9am. Study features video teachings of noted Bible Scholars on various subjects. For more info. Call Rev. Jones at: 941-485-7070 or visit www.CBCVenice.com

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The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 7CLASSIFIEDS 3065 BIBLE STUDY & CHURCHES CERTIFIED CHRISTIAN COUNSELING 941-876-4416Liberty Community Church North Port Charlotte Charlotte County House of Prayer Night Watch Fridays 7pm-9pm Worship-Word-Prayer One River-One Stream 992 Tamiami Trail Unit I Port Charlotte 941 249-8946 cchop.org COMMUNITY CENTER 4PM 7PM each Wednesday. Christ the King Lutheran Church, 23456 Olean Blvd. PC, Open to All Ages. For more info 941-766-9357 FAITH BUILDERS A Basic Study to Build your Christian Faith. Call Pastor Gumm at Christ the King Lutheran Church for times. 941-766-9357 Port Charlotte FOR THOSE WHOSE GRIEF OF HAVING LOST A FRIEND OR LOVED ONE TO DEATH, The Congregational Church in Nokomis is starting another 13 week GriefShare course. YOU are invited. GriefShare, a national program in over 12,000+ churches worldwide, is equipped to offer meaningful grief support in your time of loss. This nondenominational program features Biblical concepts for healing in grief. The group will meet every Mon day at The Congregational Church at 730 East Laurel Rd. in Nokomis each Monday, starting September 10th from 6:00-8:00pm. TO REGISTER PLEASE CALL Denise at 941-809-9238 or email to: CCGriefShare@yhaoo.com There is a nominal fee for workbooks GATEWAY WORSHIP PRAYER & HEALING ROOMS If you need healing, we want to pray with you! Our prayer teams are available to minister to you every Thursday 7:30 pm-8:30 pm. For information call 863-832-4418 5377 Dunkin Rd., Punta Gorda 33982 Jesus Still Heals Today! Lutheran Church of the Cross 2300 Luther Rd., Deep Creek Bible Study Thursdays 10-11:30 and Sundays @ 9 AM Questions and/or Info (941) 627-6060 NEW SEASON FULLGOSPEL MINISTRIES Meets Every Wednesday at 3320 Loveland Blvd Port Charlotte, Fl (Held at Board of Realtors Building Near Visani's Restaurant) Food at 6:30PM and Fellowship Starts at 7:00PM Everyone Welcome!! Pamela Sams 941-268-3589 UNI Q UE & INF O RMATIVE DVD Every Sunday @ 6pm. Disussion After at El Jobean Baptist 941-769-6291 3070 BURIAL LOTS/CRYPTS VENICE MEMORIAL GDNS 2 s/s Burial plots, incl opening/closing & vaults. 1 lot $2800 or Both for $4950. 941-627-6260 3090 LOST & FOUND FOUND: WALLET on sidewalk near the corner of Aaron & Olean Blvd. Will hold for 10 days. Must Identify wallet and contents. Arrange to meet at Sheriffs office. 941-286-3952 3091 ARTS CLASSES Beginning watercolor classes with award winning artist Robert Broyles at North Port Hobby Lobby. Private lessons also avail Call 941-875-8163 3095 EXERCISE CLASSES GULF COAST ACUPUNCTURE 151 Center Rd. Wednesdays 5:30pm Thursdays 9:00 am Saturdays 8:30am YOGAFOR BEGINNERS Proceeds to Venice Wildlife Center Call Rick or Mary 941-488-1769 To Announce Your Class Information Call 866-463-1638 or Email; special@sunnewspapers.net 3096 RELIGION CLASSES BEGIN YOUR DAY IN BIBLE STUDY Christ the King Lutheran Church, 23456 Olean Blvd. Tuesdays 10AM-11AM. For more info 941-766-9357 Port Charlotte 3096 RELIGION CLASSES F AITH LUTHERAN CHURCH 4005 Palm Drive, Punta GordaVarious Days & Times CONFIRMATION/BIBLE STUD Y Adult Infomational Class 941-639-6309 START YOUR DAY RIGHT Bible Study Thursdays 10:00-11:30 LUTHERAN CHURCH OF THE CROSS 2300 Luther Rd., Deep Creek and Sundays at 9:00 a.m. Questions and/or Info (941) 627-6060 5000 BUSINESS SERVICES AN OCCUPATIONAL LIC may be required by the Cit y and/or County. Please call th e appropriate occupational licensing bureau to verify. 5005 ALTERATIONS SEWING/ALTERATIONS Over 50 Years Experience. Terri 941-255-3831. 5006 ALUMINUM ALL AMERICAN RENOVATIONS Lic & Insured Family owned & operated Specializing in rescreening, building and repairing. Screw changeouts, pressure washing & painting pool cages, lanais, front entry ways etc... 941-915-3381 Serving Sarasota County Free Estimates GULF COAST RESCREEN LIC& INSUREDFAMILYOWNED& OPERATEDPAINTING & RESCREENING POOLCAGES IS OUR SPECIALITY! 941-536-7529 SERVINGSARASOTACOUNTYFREEESTIMATES SURFSIDE HOME IMPROVEMENTSLanais, Bathrooms, Kitchens, Windows, Storm Shutters, Screen Rooms and more! 30 Years Local Family Owned & Operated. 941-766-0331Lic#CBC1261010 5007 ANIMAL REMOVAL GOT RATS? OR OTHER CRITTERS? Call 941-777-3247 www.venicecritters.com 5020 APPLIANCE SERVICE/REPAIR GARY DRAKE DRYER VENT CLEANING & INSPECTION. 30 yrs. Exp. (941)-889-7596 THE VENT DOCTOR You Won't Drink Dirty Water, Why Breathe Dirty Air? Schedule Your Air Duct Cleaning Now and SAVE 10% Off with this Ad! We also offer Dryer Vent Cleaning 941-268-9525 Competent, Thorough & Reliable. Lic. Fla. Home Inspector. 5050 ADULT CARE ALL IN CLEANING AND HOME SERVICES Residential & commercial, Seasonal, Full time and 1 time cleanings, Call 941-586-5239 5051 CHILD CARE ALL CHILDCARE FACILITIES MUST INCLUDE, WITH ADVERTISEMENT, STATE OR LOCAL AGENCY LICENSE NUMBER. FL O RIDA S TATE LAW requires all child care centers and day care businesses to register with the State of Florida. The Sun Newspapers will not knowingly accept advertising which is in violation of the law 5054 CONTRACTORS BLUE PARROT CONSTRUCTION Custom Homes Commercial & Residential Renovations 941-662-0366 Cell: 941-662-0266BlueParrotConstruction@aol.com www.BlueParrotConstruction.comCBC1258748/Fully Insured EDWARD ROSS CONSTRUCTION Services, Inc. 941-408-8500 pool cages, Scr. lanais, etc... TEDDY`S HANDYMAN & REMODELING, INC. No Job Too Big or Too Small! (941)-629-4966 Lic./Ins. Serving NP, Charlotte & PG CRC 1327653 5057 CONCRETE FLORIDA CONCRETE DRIVEWAYSSIDEWALKSADDITIONSRESIDENTIAL& COMMERICALNEWCONSTRUCTION941-628-5965 INS/LICCG034909 PRO PATH CONCRETE Driveways Patios Sidewalks Pads Free Estimates 941-286-6415 Lic #AAA-11-00081 RICH LANDERS STUCCO, INC. Honest, Reliable work! LIC/INS New Const & Remodels. Rusted bands & wire lathe repair. spraycrete & more (941)-497-4553 POOL DECKS, Driveway Designs Garage Floors Patios and more. QUALITY Lic 941-375-1103 Insu THE CONCRETE GUY 941-716-0872Driveways, Walkways, Patio All flat work Demo & Removal & permiting. Ch Lic AAA14-100088 LEE 14-02339 SRQ SWC 44 Walls by WalzWhen your options are limited turn your property into a staycation! Rockwalls, Waterfalls, Sea Walls, Ponds, Hardscape, grading, clearing & simple drainage solutions. license & insured Charlotte County Free estimates 305-731-3827 5060 CLEANING SERVICES MRS CLEANING UP! 1st Class Cleaning Service! Specials Now! Now offering Home Watch Services! 941-204-8057 www.mrscleaningup.com Lic & Insured A&R PRO WINDOW CLEANERS In/Out, Tracks & Screens, Mirror Walls, Ceiling Fans, Also Vinyls, Clean & Polish, H/W Team. Lic#25014 & Ins. 941-441-8658 ANNIE`S CLEANING SERVICE Home Office Weekly Bi-Weekly Reliable Service Reasonable Rates 941-391-6850 H.D Nandas Housecleaning Service Special Offers, Weekly Bi-Weekly Move ins & Move Outs Vacations, Office, New Construction. FREE Estimates. Lic/Insured 941-315-0291 5065 DRYWALL CHARLOTTE COUNTY DRYWALL INC. SPECIALIZINGINHOMEREPAIRS. NOJOBTOOSMALL! 941-763-0606 LIC./INS. COMPLETE DRYWALL Hang,Finish, Patchwork, All Textures, Popcorn Removal, and Paint. Matt Potter 941-232-8667Lic.& Ins CRC1328482 DEPENDABLE DRYWALL & REMODELING PATCHREPAIRSNEWHOMES941-639-4440 LIC.#SCC131150207INSUREd 5070 ELECTRICAL DRM ELECTRICAL SERVICE, Plug Into Personalized ServiceŽElectrical Maintenance Repairs Troubleshooting 941-480-0761 941-366-3646 LUMINOUS ELECTRIC NO JOB TOO SMALL! LIC# EC13007383941-777-4320 5083 FLOORING Bill Noland Ceramic Tile, IncRepairs & All Phases of FlooringWe Bring Samples To You! Mobile Showcase Tile, Laminates, Carpet & Baseboards. Porcelain Tile Wood look Planks $1.89/Sqft, Waterproof Vinyl Planks $3.29/Sq FtCall 941-276-0814Licensed & Insured PGI 9906758 North Port 11546 Charlotte AAA007730 5089 HANDYMAN / GENERAL REPAIR A C ARPENTER AR O UND THE HOUSE for all your car pentry needs! James M. Okell 941-270-1693 DAVID J SHEPARD, JR., OVER20 YEARS INCHARLOTTECOUNTY, HANDYMANSVCS, WOODROT, WINDOWS& DOORS, DRYWALL& STUCCOREPAIR, PAINTING, ETC. 941-627-6954 OR941456-6953 LIC# RR282811062 5090 HEATING & AIR HIGHLAND H eat i ng an d Air Conditioning Sales & ServiceCall Tom 941-236-6359 FL#CAC1814414 KMF AIR CONDITIONING INC.Sales, Service and Installation FREEservice call with repairs Lic & insured CAC057537 Kevin M Ferero941-875-1956 S.O.S. A/C & Heat 941-468-4956AIRCONDITIONINGSYSTEMSCOOLINGMADEAFFORDABLE! INSTALLED10 YRWARRANTY ST. LIC#CAC1816023SOSAIRFL.COM 5100 HOME & COMMERCIAL IMPROVEMENT If it creaks, leaks, squeaks or the thingamajiggy falls of the whojamathing and whatchamacallit wont fit itƒ WE CAN!D. Ricke & Son 941-587-3044INSTALLƒFlooring Kitchen & Bath Windows/Doors Remodel/Repair Licensed & Insured Lic. #9900/0075051REPAIRƒOdd Jobs Plumbing Fixtures Electrical Fixtures Painting/Staining Pressure Wash Cabinet Resurfacing Mobile Home Repair $75.00 PER PANEL SLIDING GLASS DOOR REPAIRS Wheels Tracks & LocksLicensed & Insured, Free Est. since 1981 Call Bob 941-706-6445 www.SlidingDoorsandmore.com Low overhead = Low prices! A & R Quality Homes Inc.Customer Satisfaction is our goal. Kitchen/bath remodels Pressure cleaning, Interior & exterior painting Concrete/driveways/ walkways/slabs Stucco/repairs/fascia/ soffit Pool deck resurfacing Doors/WindowsFully licensed and insured941-429-1285 941-626-0315 License # CRC1329404 ALUMASERV BEST PRICES IN TOWN GUARANTEED!!Screen Rooms, Carports, Sheds, Entryways, Pan Roofs, Complete Roofs, Vinyl Windows, Storm Panels, Awnings, Rescreens Repair & Service.941-627-9244Visit: alumaserv.net #SC131149736 ALUMASERV BEST PRICES IN TOWN GUARANTEED!!Screen Rooms, Carports, Sheds, Entryways, Pan Roofs, Complete Roofs, Vinyl Windows, Storm Panels, Awnings, Rescreens Repair & Service.941-627-9244Visit: alumaserv.net #SC131149736 GUTTERS 6Ž S eam l ess. Ken Violette, Inc. (941) 240-6699Lic.CGC#060662/Ins. 5100 HOME & COMMERCIAL IMPROVEMENT Clean Your Dryer before it Catches on Fire! Special Rates for multiple clientsAffordable, Lic & Insured. Roger P Frechette Sr. 941-661-2020 COMPLETE CLEAN PRESSURE WASHING Excellent Rates20+ YEARS EXPERIENCE941-460-4936Lic/ins www.completecleanpw.com DO YOU HAVE LOOSE, HOLLOW OR BUCKLING TILES?Inject-A-Floor-System can help. Grout Cleaning/Staining, Marble Cleaning, Tile Repair. 941-893-8475 FIR S T C H O I C E C ABINET S Custom Cabinets LLC Kitchens, Baths, Custom Cabinets, Countertops, Hardwood, Laminate, Solid Surface. Commercial, Residental. 941-505-5570 GARAGE FLOORS DONE RIGHT! Epoxy Flakes, Quartz, Silica. In Charlotte County over 30 yrs! 941-628-0251 HAMMER FIREPROOFING & INSULATION, Inc. for all your insulation needs. 941-268-5615 or Office 941-423-7478 HANDYMANHome repairs. 30+ yrs Exp. Call 941539-1694 J&JHANDYMANPainting, Pressure Washing & Much More!Over 40Years Experience & Satisified Customers Service with YOU in Mind. Reasonable, Reliable & Honest.Serving Englewood, Venice & Sarasota AreasLARGERORSMALLERPROJECTS, COMMERCIAL& RESIDENTIALLICENSED& FULLYINSUREDCALLJOECHIMINIELLO(941) 525-7967 Johns Rescreening & Handyman Service Pressure Washing: Pool Decks, Driveways! No Job To Small, Free EstimatesLic9341./Ins.941-883-1381 K&J PLASTERING & STUCCO, INCWe do NEW Construction & Remodeling. Call Kevin 941-286-9547 or Jalisa 239-826-0514 Lic & Ins. OCEAN AIR CONDITIONING of SWFL Inc. Proudly in business since 1978 Prompt & Courteous service on all brands! We offer LENNOX, BOSCH and others! Call Today for your FREEquote! 941-625-8900 ROOF CLEANING LOW PRESSURE LOW CHEMICAL 941-468-2744WWW.COMPLETECLEANPW.COMALLWORKPERFORMEDBYSTATECERT. ROOFINGCONTRACTOR StormTwisters Hurricane ShuttersShuttersUp.Today Roll Down Shutters Accordian Shutters Clear Hurricane Panels Hurricane Screens Bahama Shutters941-626-8200*A DIVISIONOFBAYBRIDGEHOMESLic#CBC1254261 CARPENTER, INC. Handyman Rotten wood, doors, soffit, facia, etc. Phil 941-626-9021lic. & ins. WHOLE HOUSE REMODELING Additions, Cabinetry, Kitchens, Baths, Painting, Tile, Laminate Floors. 941-706-6525 LIC CGC1518335 5108 JUNK REMOVAL MOVE IT JUNK REMOVAL Got Junk? We like to Move It, Move It! 941-803-4959 YOUR ARMY LOGISTICS JUNKREMOVAL MOVINGSERVICE FORECLOSURECLEANUPCLEANING HAULING RENTALDUMPSTER941-456-2120 5110 LAWN/GARDEN & TREE AN OCCUPATIONAL LICENSE may be required by the Cit y and/or County. Please call th e appropriate occupational licens ing bureau to verify AFFORDABLE LAWN CARE Flat Rates from Bradenton to Punta Gorda. FREE Estimates. 941-706-5569 Lic. & Ins. 5110 LAWN/GARDEN & TREE A JAMISON TREE SERVICE Complete & Professional 15% Sr Discount! FREEEST. LIC. & INSUREDVENICE941-496-8782 ENGL941-475-6611 N. PORT941-423-0020 PT. CHARLOTTE941-828-0065 SERVINGCHARLOTTEANDSARASOTAFOROVER20 YEARS.JAMISON-TREESERVICEINC.COM ALTMANTREESERVICE Tree Trimming, Removal, Stump Grinding. Lic & Ins. Call Mike Altman 941-268-7582 AMERICAN IRRIGATIONCall 941-587-2027 FREE ESTIMATES!!! Licensed & Insured Charlotte Co. lic#AAA-1100010. Serving Charlotte and Sarasota Counties DP`s ABILITY TREE SERVICE Removals, Stump Grinding, Palm Trimming, Shaping, Oaks Thinned & Raised Up. 19 Yrs. Exp. Free Estimates! 941-889-8147 Lic#00000192 & Insured. FLORIDA TREE INC .Tree Trimming & Removal Stump Grinding Lawn Service Bucket Service 941-613-3613 pcftree.comLic./Ins. GENERAL LAWN & Landscape services. (941)-426-7844 Wright & Son Landscaping Inc N O W A C C E P T I N G N E W L A W N A C C O U N T S 9 4 1 4 6 8 4 3 7 2 ISA Certified Arborist John Cannon FL-6444A South Sarasota & Charlotte Co. PREMIER STUMP GRINDING,LLC Let me Help you have your stump removed today. No stump too small or big! Licensed & insured (941)-662-9779 RAINSCAPE INC,Irrigation, Maintenance, Repair, Installation. Monthly Maintenance starts at $40. FREE ESTIMATES 941-888-2988 SANDEFURS HOME &TREE Maintenance Tree trimming, removal. We do it all!License/Insured941-484-6042 SPM TREE TRIMMIMG & LANDSCAPING Specializing inTREE REMOVAL. Call Today for your FREE Estimate. ****************** QUICK RESPONSE! ****************** *(941)-412-5273 Lic/Insured STEVES TREE & HAULING Tree Removal & Trimming 30 Years Exp. Lic/Insd Free Estimates 941-866-6979 Treemendous Tree, Inc. Certified Arborist Tree Removal Stump Grinding Lic./Insured Shrub & Tree Nursey CALL TODAY! 941-426-8983 www.northporttree.com FL-6444 A Treemendous Tree, Inc. NURSERY PINEAPPLE PLANTS fruiting $30/ea SNOW QUEEN HIBISCUS 7 gal $20.00 NICE MANY OTHER SHRUBS AVAILABLESTOP IN TO SEE US MONDAY SATURDAY 9AM-3PM 6068 RUFF ST. NORTH PORT OR CALL 941-426-8983 FL-6444 A WENDELL ALBRITTON TREE SERVICE VERY AFFORDABLE Will Work with you!! 941-763-5042 Lic & Insured! 5115 LEGAL SERVICES BANKRUPTCY $995.00 Includes Cost & Fees Atty. Stephen Rei 800-273-3731 FREE CONSULTATION Fee Payment Plans www.attysteverei.com 5121 MARINE REPAIR CAPTAIN RONS MARINE CONSTRUCTION Seawalls, Docks, Pilings, Boat Lifts. 941-637-1128 Lic# CRC1328423 & Insured. 5130 MOVING/HAULING ALL TYPE S O F C LEAN-UP S Same Day Service! 24 Hrs. a Day! 941-764-0982 or 941-883-1231 ODYSSEY MOVERS Your Journey Begins With Us! Licensed & Insured.941-803-4959Lic. # 2539

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Page 8 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018CLASSIFIEDS 5130 MOVING/HAULING ROBS ON THEMOVE i nc. Moving and Delivery Honest, Reliable, Courteous! Great Rates! 941-237-1823 5140 PAINTING/ WALLPAPERING STEVENS CUSTOM PAINTINGRes/Comm. Int/Ext FREE EST. Lic. & Ins. 941-255-3834 BEST PRICINGCALLNOWTOLOCKINANAMAZINGBANGFORYOURBUCKFROMASEASONEDPAINTER941-468-2660AAA0010126630 YEARSEXP. LIC/INSURED FORMERFIREFIGHTER LARRY ESPOSITO PAINTING INC Its Not What We Do, Its How We Do It!ŽFree Estimates, 941-764-1171 Lic & Insured AAA007825 Nathan Dewey Painting CoCommercial & Residental Interior & Exterior Pressure washing Handyman Services Free Estimates ~ Prompt Service941-484-4576 nathandeweypainting.com Lookingfor Adventure? Findit inthe Classifieds PAINTING UNLIMITED Where Quality & Value Meet! Family Owned and Operated. Call Now for aFREEEstimate 941-979-7947 Lic. & Ins. AAA-12-00015 SUPERIOR PAINTING, INC. Full Spray Shop 941-474-9091Lic # AAA009837 SWEENEY`S PAINTING INC.Pressure Cleaning MildewTreatment Painting Interior & Exterior Free Estimates Sr. Discounts 941-916-1024 Lic# AAA0010702 We Do It A Shade Better! LARRY BATES PAINTING Free Estimates Locally Owned & Operated Nominated Best Painter Of The Year in 2016! 941-625-1226Lic/Ins #RRR0002261 5160 PLUMBING LARRY`S PLUMBING R e Pipes (Most in 1 Day) Beat An y Estimate Complete Servic e 941-484-5796 Lic.#CFC1425943 5180 PRESSURE CLEANING BAILEYS PRESSURE CLEANING Complete Exterior House Painting! Call 941-497-1736 5184 SCREENING A TIP TOP RESCREEN LLCA quality rescreen at a fast and affordable price. Call us today for your free estimate at 239-440-6857 licensed and insured ALL ABOUT ALUMINUM & SCREEN: Rescreen & new. 941-876-4779 wescreenflorida.comLic# SA37, AL0511993X BREEZE THRU RESCREEN LLC. Full Rescreen Panel Repair. Power Washing Pool Cage Painting We have you covered! Call Today for your FREEEstimate. 941-661-7897 Lic./Ins.Visa/MC/Discover/Amex Apple/Android Pay FREE POWER WASH WITH FULL RESCREEN RESCREENING by NORTHSTAR Free Estimates. 941-725-7599 Lic# CC20597 & Insured SELLS ALUMINUM CONSTRUCTION LLCRESCREENS POOLCAGES 6Ž SEAMLESSGUTTERS LICENSED& INSURED 40 YEARSEXPERIENCECALLGREG941-234-8056OR941497-4450 SERVINGSARASOTACOUNTYLIC#CBC035139 Southwest RescreenComplete Rescreening: $1,395. (up to 1,500 SF)941-465-2318Free Estimates! We Accept All Major Credit CardsLic./Ins. 5185 ROOFING COMPLETE ROOFING SOLUTIONS OF FLORIDA Reroofing and Repairs Commercial and Residential Flat and Metal Roof Restoration Free Estimates All Work Guaranteed George M. Schwartz Jr. Owner 941-961-8263 Lic # CCC1325750 EXPERT ROOF REPAIRS at Prices you can AFFORD!! 2 YEARS UNLIMITED Guarantee on leaks. Call Roger 941-661-2020 Licensed and Insured LEONARDSROOFING&INSULATIONINC.FAMILYOWNED&OPERATED SINCE1969Shingle, Tile, Built-Up, SinglePly, Metal, Full Carpentry, Service AvailableSARASOTA COUNTY ONLY!Reagan Leonard 941-488-7478LIC# RC0066574 ROOF LEAK PATROL, INC. RESIDENTIAL/COMMERCIAL Repairs, Reroof, Carpentry, etc... 35 yrs exp. Lic/insured#RCA065387941-474-ROOF (7663) www.RoofLeakPatrol.com S t o r m s a r e h e r e C a l l u s T o d a y T O M J O Y C E R O O F I N G f o r p r o m p t r o o f r e p l a c e m e n t a n d r e p a i r s 4 5 Y e a r s o f Q u a l i t y W o r k a n d E x p e r i e n c e 9 4 1 4 8 4 9 8 0 4 9 4 1 4 2 9 1 8 0 0 lic#1325725 941-483-4630ShinglesSlats MetalTileRepairs Old Roof Removal OurSpecialty Full CarpentryFree EstimatesLic.# CCC068184 Fully Insured 5191 SOD LAWN REPLACEMENTMaloneys SODCharlotte 941-637-1333Sarasota 941-955-8327No Job Too Big or Too SmallŽ www.maloneysod.com 5195 TILE/GROUT TILES BY FRANK, INC Backsplashes, Tub & Shower walls, shower floors, Floors & Repairs. "IT'S NOT A JOB WHEN YOU DO SOMETHING YOU LOVE". (941)-307-9507 ABargainHunters Delight Checkthe ClassifiedsFirst! AWhole Marketplaceof Shoppingisrightat your Fingertips! 5225 WINDOW CLEANING Window Cleaning,RESIDENTIALWINDOW CLEANINGPRESSUREWASHINGP : 9 4 1 9 7 9 1 6 5 4 LIC/INSURED 6000 MERCHANDISE GARAGE SALES 6001Arcadia 6002Lake Suzy 6003Deep Creek 6004Port Charlotte 6005Punta Gorda 6006North Port 6007Englewood 6008Rotonda 6009Gulf Cove 6010S. Gulf Cove 6011S. Venice 6012 Venice 6013 Nokomis/Osprey 6014 Garage Sales 6015Flea Market 6020Auctions MERCHANDISE 6013 Moving Sales 6025Arts & Crafts 6027Dolls 6030Household Goods6035 Furniture 6038 Electronics 6040TV/Stereo/Radio6060Computer Equip6065Clothing/Jewelry/ Accessories6070Antiques & Collectibles 6075Fruits/Veges 6090Musical 6095Medical 6100Health/Beauty 6110 Trees & Plants 6120Baby Items6125Golf Accessories6128Exercise/Fitness6130Sporting Goods 6131 Firearms6132 Firearm Access. 613 5Bikes/Trikes 6138Toys 6140Photography/Video 6145Pool/ Spa & Supplies6160Lawn & Garden6161 Outdoor Living 6165Storage Sheds/ Buildings6170Building Supplies6180Heavy Constr. Equipment 6190Tools/Machinery6220Office/Business Equip & Supplies6225Restaurant Supplies 6250Appliances 6260Misc. Merchandise 6270Wanted to Buy/T rade 6001 ARCADIA AREA GARAGE SALES INCREDIBLE 3 DAY ESTATE SALE IN ARCADIANOVEMBER16/17/18 THOUSANDS+ THOUSANDS OFITEMS. 3 GENERATIONSOFAWESOMENAUTICAL ANTIQUES, DECOR, FURNITUREANDSO MUCHMORE. ADDRESSWILLBE RELEASEDNEXTWEEK.DONTMISSTHIS ESTATESALE!WWW.AETHER.ESTATE(239) 451-3137 6004 PORT CHARLOTTE GARAGE SALES FRI.S UN. 8 AM3 PM 3150 Brooklyn Ave. HUGE 3 FAMILY SALE!! Everything Goes! SAT. & SUN. 9AM-6PM 24645 Nova Ln. MOVING!Many, Many hundreds of Tools, Trailers: Open & Enclosed; Stainless Steel Shelving; Fridge: Side by Side; Restaurant Equipment, New & Used. Everything MUST GO! NO Reasonable Offers Turned Down! SAT .SUN 7 : 30 3PM 1158 Market Cir. Furniture, Household, Holiday, & MUCH MORE!! Come Check Us Out! S AT.S UN. 8 -4PM 1 86 55 Mac Gill Ave. ESTATE SALE!! Furniture, Household Items, Tools, Clothing.... ETC!! S AT.S UN. 8 AM2 PM 4117 Sumac St. Clothes, Boat Parts, Tools, Fishing, Pressure Washer, Plants, Household, & MUCH MORE!! THE GREAT GARAGE SALE! Sat Dec 1 8am-1pm Charlotte Sports Park Only $10 per 10x40 space. Registration deadline for sellers is Nov 21 by calling 941-235-5010 or emailAmanda.Long@ CharlotteCountyFL.gov 6005 PUNTA GORDA AREA GARAGE SALES FRI SAT& SUN 9-3 27590 DISSTON AVE. 33982 PUNTA GORDA MOOSE LODGE Community Wide Yard Sale ... Everything for the hunter, builder, Collector, etc... We accept Visa & MC 6005 PUNTA GORDA AREA GARAGE SALES FRI. 11/16 8-12PM & SAT. 11/17 8-10AM 1780 Deborah Dr #25. ESTATE SALE Assisted by the Isles Girls & Guys. (Dir: South on Hwy 41; West on Aqui Esta; Left on Bal Harbor; Right on Deborah Dr.) Twin Beds; Night Table; Dresser & Chest; Leather Sectional Sofa; Side Tables; Glass-Top Cocktail Table; Curio Cabinet; Rattan Side Chair; Rugs; Lamps; Wall Decor; Dining Table, 6 Chairs & Buffet; 3 Piece Entertainment Center ; Samsung TV & Electronics; Computer Desk & Chair; Queen Headboard, Night Stand & Dresser w/Mirror; Rattan Bar w/4 Stools; Mini Refrigerator; Tower Fan; Lanai Table w/6chairs; Rattan Queen Sleeper Sofa; Drop Leaf Table w/2 Chairs; Recumbent Bike; Treadmill; Tool Bench; Table Saw; 10 HP Generator; Miscellenous Kitchen & Garage items. Please check out our website www.islesgirlsandguys.com 6006 NORTH PORT AREA GARAGE SALES FRI SAT 8 2 1028 COMFORT LANE MOVING SALE FURNITURE,MISC 6012 VENICE GARAGE SALES BAY INDIES FALL CRAFT SALE SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17TH 9AM TO 2PM INDIES HOUSE OVER50 VENDORS! HANDMADEITEMS, GIFTS, JEWELRY, CHRISTMASDECORANDMORE! REFRESHMENTSAVAILABLE FORPURCHASE! 950 RIDGEWOOD AVE VENICE, FL941-484-1122FORMOREINFORMATION! 6020 AUCTIONS 32ND ANNUAL FALL CITY OF NORTH PORT GOVERNMENT ASSETS AUCTION! SAT. NOV. 17TH, 20189AM FORT MYERS, FLCars, Trucks, Tractor Trailers, Commercial Vehicles, Kitchen & Construction & Farm Equipment, Golf Carts, Motorcycles, Boats, Buses & Much MORE!ROYAL AUCTION GROUP6927 ALICO RDFORT MYERS FL 33912WWW.ROYALAUCTIONGROUP.COM 6025 ARTS AND CRAFTS PET PORTRAITS i n C o l ore d Pencils 8Ž x 10Ž Beautiful Memories $140 607-215-1426 6026 SEWING EMBROIDERY HOOP H usqvarna Viking 360x150. Brand new $35, OBO 941-286-6376 6027 DOLLS 1 8 D O LL REFEREN C E & Price books by Jan Foulke & Pat Smith $30 941-828-1411 18Ž SCARLETT F ran kli n Mi nt DOLL original mint condition $90, OBO 941-828-1411 COC A CO LA 1 99 7 Fashion Classic BARBIE MIB with accessories $45 941-828-1411 DOLL FROM 1950 s era C r i es, open & closes eyes, beautiful $20, OBO 941-356-0129 MARIE OS M O ND D O LL Beautiful blond, clean great gift for Christmas $20 941-627-6542 6030 HOUSEHOLD GOODS 5X 8 AREA RU G Used. Beige and Pink $60 941-505-9460 BREADMAKER A utomat i c CUISINART, 2Lb. Capa Stainless steel, GC $25 941-697-0794 C HINA HARM O N Y HouseŽgolden wheatŽ serves 10 $45 941-676-0289 CHINA SET NORITAKE 50 PCS $150; 941-204-9729 C HINA S ET Noritake Buckingham 91-pc 13 place settings $325, OBO 214-906-1585 COMPUTER CHAIR b rown m icrofiber w/arm rests, hi back $40 941-676-0289 C URTAIN S 4 beige panels 36x84,rod 12 w/shell covers at supports $50 941-979-5134 DEEP FRYER S un b eam F ry Right 6 cup capacity, like new $20 941-624-3091 END TABLE, VI C T O RIAN ANTIQUE $150; 941-2049729 EXPANDABLE LUGGAGE p l us matching tote Unused JM New Y ork $45 941-306-7882 6030 HOUSEHOLD GOODS HANDLED/ CO VERED BU C KETS Hold 35 lbs New Pr/ $5 941-787-3208 LAMPS 2 w hi te ceram i c w / embossed flowers 40Ž tall $40 941-676-0289 LI G HT H O U S E S C ollection o f 5, 6Ž tall $10 941-356-0129 MIRROR Vi ntage D ar k wood frame 27.5 x 17.5Ž $15 941-356-0129 FREE MERCHANDISE ADS!! WELCOME TO OUR WEBSITE! To Place a FREE Merchandise Ad Go to: sun-classifieds.com Click on Place Ad. If You`ve Advertised Online with Us Before or Not Just Click Register and Follow the Prompts. FREE Ads are for Merchandise UNDER $500. and the Ad Must be Placed Online by You. One Item Per Ad, the Ad Must be 3 Lines or Less, Price Must Appear in the Ad. Your Ad Will Appear Online for 7 Days and in Print Wednesday ThroughSunday. Some Restrictions Do Apply. LIMIT 5 FREE ADS PER WEEK Need To Place a Classified Ad? Enter Your Classified Ad and Pay With Your Credit Card 24 Hours a Day, 7 Daysa Week. PICTURE PALM TREE 27x30, white frame, ex. cond $25 941-235-2203 PRO FORM XP Th rea d m ill in excellent condition $150 941-505-9460 PULLIN G C ART Wood & S teel. Play cart on 4 wheels w/handle GC $19, OBO 941-697-0794 RACHEL RAY A cac i a W oo d Utensils tortoise glass pitcher NEW 5pc $29 941-306-7882 S HADEIN S ULATED 68 -1/ 2 W x 78H Very Good Condition. $40, OBO 941-505-6290 TABLE LAMP vintage Bradley Hubbard beautiful leaded glass shade $500 214-906-1585 V A C UUM C LEANER Electrolux with attachment $60 941-743-0582 V A C UUM C LEANER Tristar. 5 tools. Orig 1200 $50 941275-5457 W HITE WI C KER D/DR N S 6 DR HI/BY Mir Lamp Toy Ches More $445, OBO 941-408-7535 WHITE WICKER TWIN HB/FRM MT/BS EX/CON $245, OBO 941-408-7535 W INE B O TTLE S 60 bottles, mixed colors in boxes $60 941-235-2203 6031 HOLIDAYITEMS 9 FT C HRI S TMA S TREE plus lights and lots of decorations $100 941-505-9460 DEPT. 5 6 C all f or description. Many items! $5 and up. $5, OBO 941-889-9187 OUTDOOR POWER STAKE 3 outlets with cover and 25ft cord $8 941-451-3958 SO LAR PATHWAY lights 3 Acorn lights $5 941-451-3958 6035 FURNITURE BAKERS RACK L t,so lid woo d w/scrolls. NICE! $95, OBO 941-889-9187 BAR S T OO L S (2) 30 Ž rattan. Seat height; Tommy Bahama style $99 941-356-0129 BED MATTRESS & BOX $100 941-629-5550 BED FRAME Ki ng s i ze. Metal with middle support $20 941-460-9540 BEDR OO M S ET Whitewashed oak. 6 pieces. Solid oak. Nice $495 941-474-3101 B OO K S HELF 44X44 light solid oak $150; 941-2049729 CHAIR RATTAN P apasan Ch a i r, Brown w/ cushion, Good Condi tion $50 941-268-7068 C HAIR S Him/Hers, Wicker, white $250. 941204-9729 CHEST KNOTTY p i ne w / embossed carvings, 52Žx52Ž $100 941-676-0289 CO FFEE & END TABLE Wicker w/ glass top. exc.cond $300 941-979-5134 COFFEE & END TABLE Wicker w/glass top exc. cond $300 941-979-5134 CO FFEE TABLE Natural Rattan 4x19.5Ž Glass top/lower shelf exc cond $40 941-306-7882 COFFEE & 2 en d ta bl es Off wht w/glass, excellent cond. $195, OBO 941-889-9187 CO U C H C U S T O M tan cocoa peach $300, OBO 330-509-1111 DE S K 7 0  S beauty, wood 8 drawer 1 keyed w/chair & phone $175 941-474-7866 DESK B ur l woo d f rom Baers like new $350, OBO 941-889-9187 DE S K S E C RETARY rattan like new 33x41 $150 941-740-3286 DINING HUTCH LIGHTED BLACK W/WALNUT TRIM-BUN FEET $185 941-505-6965 6035 FURNITURE DINETTE S ET, w/ Marble Like Top, 1 Year Old, Bronze Like Metal Chairs w/ Tan Cushions. $275. Paid $600. New. 941 484-7008 Venice Island DINING SET OVAL WALNUT TOP METAL BASE W/METAL CHAIRS $150 941-505-6965 DINING SET A mer i can D rew, 6 chairs Tropical look man size seats $499 941-627-6542 DRAWER S TAND 3 baskets drawers color espresso 18x30 fr Pier One. $40 941-740-3286 END TABLE Rattan. Vg condition, glass top $30 942-356-0129 END TABLES Gl ass. 4 p i eces. Green metal legs. $250, OBO 941-474-3101 ENTERTAINMENT CTR Lg wall unit, storage, sturd y $300, OBO 941-889-9187 I BUY FURNITURE Or anything of value! 941-485-4964 LOVESEAT Wi c k er, pa l e ye ll ow, cushion with flowers, 52Ž $65 315-521-6250 MATTRESS & BOX QUEEN $175 ALSO HAVE KING 941-629-5550 SLEIGH BED Q ueen s i ze d ; 64Ž Wide x 45Ž Tall on head board $65 941-460-9540 SOAP STONE BASE 24Ž Tall by 9.5Ž Wide good con dition $50 941-460-9540 SO FA & RE C LINER Lazybo y from non-smoking, pet free home. $200 941-255-1025 SOFA 90 black leather sofa like new $350, OBO 941-876-4814 SOFA BED QUEEN W/AIR MAT TRESS SOLID COLOR VER Y NICE $150 941-423-5701 SOFA BERKLINE rec li ner so f a excellent condition $200 989-875-2265 SO FA S ET Nice set, matches anything, GREAT BUY! $125 540-602-9267 SO FA S LEEPER Beige, sleeper sofa with mold resistant mate rial. Like new, very clean. $110 815-549-0343 SWIVEL CHAIRS (2) RATTAN COUNTER HEIGHT, BAREL Y USED $150 941-412-5781 TABLE R oun d R atten 48Ž w hi te wash, glass top. $40. or bes t offer941-497-2692 TV S TAND wood & glass 2 4H 55W 20D $100 941-876-3878 6038 ELECTRONICS DELL PR O JE C T O R Dell 1 20 1 Projector, all parts & bag $45 941-284-7391 NEST THERMOSTAT NEST LEARNING THERMOST A $50 941-787-7041 PALM PDA T ungsten E2 C om plete. $25 941-639-4108 6040 TV/STEREO/RADIO IN S I G NIA 26 Ž W/DVD PLAYER WORKS GREAT GOOD PICTURE $35 941-423-5701 RE C EIVER S S ony. S urround choose from 3 you pick 340 500 watts $30 954-642-6599 SPEAKERS (2) v i ntage I n fi n i t y Qa. Excellent sound & cond. 2 ft. tall $75 954-642-6599 TV CONSOLE f or up to 48Ž tv, dk. wood, glass doors $75 941-235-2203 6060 COMPUTER EQUIPMENT 1 TB H ar d D r i ve 3 5Ž f or D es ktop Computer. $35 941-764 8804 17Ž L C D C omputer Monitors 2 available $20 941-764-8804 2 TB Hard Drive 3 .5Ž f or Desk top Computer. $50 941-764 8804 CABLE MODEM ARRIS COMCAST SURFBOARD SB6141 $25 941-787-7041 IPAD PR O WiFi/ C ellular 9 .7Ž 128GB like new with box $360, OBO 941-426-0090 ROUTER LINKSYS WRT1900 $40 941-787-7041 W EB C AM L OG ITE C H 2=MP, C600, new $15, OBO 941-505-6290 6065 CLOTHING/JEWELRY ACCESSORIES DE S I G NER W O MAN S C L O THE S Size Sm Med. Some New all Excellent 941-330-6546 SNEAKERS AVIA w hi te, womens, sz 7, New $40, OBO 941-505-6290 6070 ANTIQUES COLLECTIBLES 1977 SEABURG JUKEBO X Plays 60 Records + Over 1000 45`s. $3,500 941-429-8523 $2 00 BILLS $6 00/ ea. 941204-9729 A .L.B O MBER S 1 96 4 Baseball card Mantle Maris Kaline Cash. $58, OBO 810-210-9553 ALWAYS BUYING ANTIQUES, ART, SILVER NEW ENGLAND ANTIQUES (941) 639-9338 ANTIQUE MILLER f a ll s mo hawk vintage egg beater drill nice cond $20 941-426-4151

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The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 9CLASSIFIEDS 6070 ANTIQUES COLLECTIBLES A NTI Q UE MILLER f alls shoulder drill Mohawk Shelburne nice cond $35 941-426-4151 A NTI Q UE WALL phone oak 1900s western elec nice cond $295 941-426-4151 BABE RUTH 1 96 1 Baseball card call mornings $19$29, OBO 810-210-9553 BEL G IUM S N O W WHITE & 7 dwarfs Biscuit tin 1939-great lithograph $90 941-828-1411 BETTY BOOP LIGHT Large light. Excellent condition $50 941-391-6090 BUYING OLD MONEY SILVERCOINS & PAPER MONEY. 941-626-7785 CO LLE C TIBLE S Elvis, Reagan, Bush, 33s, tapes, mags, coins, lots $500 941-474-7866 DEREK JERTER TOPPS ROOKIE Baseball card Mint call mornings. $19 810-210-9553 EMMETT KELLY co k e fi gur i ne lim ed like new 1996 $45 941-426-4151 FLINCH CARD CARD GAME CARD OUR 100YR OR BX $30, OBO 941-200-5718 LENSATIC COMPASS WORLD WAR 11 GOOD COND $50, OBO 941-200-5718 MICKEY MANTLE 1961 62 Baseball cards $15$26 810-210-9553 MONOLUX SUMMIT OLD SPY GLASS WITH CASE $30, OBO 941-200-5718 OLD TRANSISTOR RADIOS Very collectible. $75 941-391-6090 PLAYB O Y C LUB DRINK GLASSES 12 in EXCELLENT CONDITION $25 941-391-6090 PRE S IDENTIAL CO IN S 1st 1 2 issues P+D & Sacagawea Rolls $35, OBO 941-408-7535 S ERVI C E MANUAL 1 9 7 9 Evinrude 2HP model 2902 like new $15 941-214-8188 S N O W WHITE 2 antique tin lunch boxes, 1 thermos $55 941-828-1411 TRAIN S /BUILDIN GS /TRA C K OLD COLLECTIBLE. GREAT DEAL $200 941-391-6090 V INTA G E HUMMEL C ollection 50+ vintage Hummels $10, OBO 941-426-0090 V INTA G E MEN S WAT C H Re f urbished universal Geneva. Gold filled $425 941-391-6090 WO RLD CO LLE C T MEX painting BALI masks etc africa $100, OBO 941-200-5718 6090 MUSICAL G UITAR TAKAMINE Acoustic $350 941-284-7391 INSTRUMENTS GUITARS Mandolins, Violins, cases prices vary $300 941-408-7535 6095 MEDICAL 3 WHEEL WALKER w /BASKET & BRAKES NO SEAT NICE $45 941-268-8951 4 WHEEL WALKER w/Basket Brakes and Seat, NICE $60 941-268-8951 BED S IDE CO MM O DE O R SHOWER CHAIR LIKE NEW Each $25 941-268-8951 BED S IDE CO MM O DE S turdy & Adjustable. $20 941-275-5457 GO-GO ELITE SCOOTER 3 wheel, good cond. $500/obo 216-952-5800 JA C UZZI WALK IN TUB bisque color works great no longer need $425 941-740-0276 LIFT C HAIR by PRIDE Fabric, Like NEW $275 941-268-8951 LIFT C HAIR RE C LINER f ull size, used very little like new Asking $250 941-421-2217 MASSAGE TABLE professional portable massage table and chair Excellent condition $250 941-697-3126 6095 MEDICAL O XY G EN CO N C ENTRAT O R Portable, Philips SimplyGo Mini, $1,500 obo 941-473-4652 PORTABLE OXYGEN CONCENTRATORRuns on 12 Volts, 110 Volts or Battery. Includes. 2 Rechargeable Batter ies. $1,500. 330-343-1866 (P.G.) SCOOTER 3WHL 2017 Golden, bal. of warranty, North Port $500 716-536-5440 TRAN S P O RT WHEEL C HAIR Like NEW $60 941-268-8951 WALKER Ch rome, a dj ust bl e, folds, pads, no wheels $25 941-474-7866 WALKER N ew w i t h b ra k es an d seat $120. 941-204-9729 WHEEL CHAIR E xce ll ent condition. $75 941-697-8273 6100 HEALTH/BEAUTY BATHROOM SCALE Taylor brand, white, up to 300 pds. $25 941-235-2203 MA G NIFYIN G LAMP plus Woods Lamp. used 5 times $75 941-505-9460 PORTABLE MASSAGE T a bl e with carrying case. used only twice $250 941-505-9460 6110 TREES & PLANTS COCONUT PALM TREE In 7 gallon containers $25 843-735-8912 Treemendous Tree, Inc. NURSERYHUGE PINEAPPLE PLANTSw/ lots of fruit 2 for $50/ea MANY OTHERS AVAILABLE!STOP IN TO SEE US MONDAY SATURDAY 9AM-3PM 6068 RUFF ST. NORTH PORT OR CALL 941-426-8983 FL-6444 A 6125 GOLF ACCESSORIES CALLAWAY STEELHEAD X16 irons 4-PW CW85 firm flex shafts $80 214-906-1585 CLEVELAND LAUNCHER 400 8 driver, fairway 13, graphite shafts stiff $45 214-906-1585 COBRA FLY Z 3 WD REG GRAPHITE LIKE NEW $50 941 423-5701 COBRA FLY Z 3 w d G rap hi te Like New $50, OBO 941-4235701 COBRA MAX DRIVER 10 5* REG GRAPHITE LIKE NEW $65 941-423-5701 GO LF BA G New Titleist C art Bag $150 941-284-7391 PR G PIN G knocko ff irons 5S W, firm graphite shafts, nice clubs ex. cond. $40 214-906-1585 ABargainHunters Delight Checkthe ClassifiedsFirst! AWhole Marketplaceof Shoppingisrightat your Fingertips! YELLOW JACKET 4G BATTERY CABLES Corrosion Resistant Best Golf Cart Cables $129.95/SET. VISIT DarsGolfCarts.com 941-769-1431 NO TEXT PLEASE 6126 GOLF CARTS 06 EZ-GO FREEDOM EDITION High speed, Polar white, Factory lighting package, W/S, Battery monitor, Horn, Mirrors, Newer Trojan batteries. One owner, Garage kept, N. Port A MUST SEE! $2300 508-888-2852 Can Deliver 2015 CLUB CAR Precedent "SNOW WHITE" $3985 8Volt BATTERIES-L7 New Yellow Jacket Cables, Sunbrella Rain Enclosure, Club Cover, New Head and Tail Lights, Fold down Windshield, Cooler and Sand Bucket. Factory Upholstery, Chrome SS Wheel Caps, Great Tires, Brakes, Mirror 48 Volt ERIC Charger. $3985 941-769-1431 FREE DELIVERY (25 MILES) VISIT DARSGOLFCARTS.COM NO TEXT PLEASE 6126 GOLF CARTS 2015 Club Car Precedent $3995 BOB-CAT Green BRAND NEW BATTERIES Yellow Jacket Cables Monsoon Roof Matching Club Cover 48 volt ERIC Charger Factory Upholstery Folding Windshield Factory spoke Hubcaps Cooler, Sandbucket Excellent DOT Tires Wide Angle Mirror STK# 1824 941-769-1431 Visit DarsGolfCarts.com WE DELIVER FREE (25 MI.) Club Car DS 4 PASS $2850 Reconditioned 4 PASSENGERŽ Brand New Batteries NEW Flip Down rear seat NEW $Yellow Jacket Cables$ NEW Head & Taillights NEW Flip Down Windshield Aluminum Frame Chrome SS wheel caps Great Tires, Brakes, Mirror 36 Volt Charger Runs as it should! STK#D974 $2850 941-769-1431 Free Delivery (25 miles) Visit … Darsgolfcarts.com NO TEXT PLEASE Club Car Precedent $3595 RECONDITIONED 4 Passenger Golf Cart Tan w/Tan Top Flip Down Rear Seat BRAND NEW BATTERIES $New Yellow Jacket Cables$ Battery Meter Factory Upholstery Head & Taillights Flip Down Windshield Chrome SS wheel caps All New Bushings Fresh Tires, Brakes, Mirror 48 Volt Charger, STK#R8 Call: 941-769-1431 Free Delivery (25 miles) Visit … Darsgolfcarts.com NO TEXT PLEASE PASSION PINK Custom Build 2014 Club Car Precedent BRAND NEW BATTERIES Custom Pearl Pink Paint Tuck & Roll Upholstery NEW Yellow Jacket Cables NEW New Bushings NEW Folding Windshield NEW Head and Taillights NEW SS Wheel Covers New Rear Seat AVAIL. New Tires, Mirror Top and Charger STK#1823 $4995 941-769-1431 Delivery Inc. 25 MI. Visit DarsGolfCarts.com NO TEXT PLEASE NEEDCASH? HaveAGarage Sale! 6130 SPORTING GOODS 2 GUYS GUN SHOWS NOV 17TH & 18TH Charlotte County Fairgrounds 2333 El Jobean Rd (776) Port Charlotte, FL Buy-Sell-Trade New-Used FREEParking CWP Classes Avail. Sat 9-5 and Sun 9-4 727-776-3442 www.nextgunshow.com B OCC I BALL S Wooden Bocci Balls $100 845-323-6550 FIREWOOD $100.00 PER PICK UP LOAD NOCAMPINGTRIPIS COMPLETEWITHOUTIT! PINE, OAK, ORCITRUSSPLIT, BUN-DLED, ANDREADYFORTHE FIREPIT! 941-468-4372 SC UBA G EAR S ea Q uest sz. M weight holster and rolling dive bag. $100 503-312-4024 TENNIS BALL HOPPER b as k et holds & picks up w/ balls $25, OBO 941-426-4151 6131FIREARMS FORT MYERS ANTIQUE GUN CIVIL WAR & MILITARY COLLECTORS SHOW Sat., Nov. 17, 9am-5pm Sun., Nov. 18, 9am-2pm Araba Shrine Temple 2010 Hanson St. Ft. Myers 33901 @ Rt. 41 WEBSITE:fmaac.tripod.com EMAIL:infofmac@yahoo.com Call 847-863-3929 N O TI C E: S eller Acknowledges Compliance With All Exisiting Federal, State and Local Firearms Regulations and Laws in Regards to Sale and Transfer of Advertised Firearms. 6135 BICYCLES/ TRICYCLES 3 WHEEL ADULT TRIKE B ran d new, Easy To Ride, Big Seat, In Box! $275 941-500-4798 A DULT TRI C Y C LE 3 wheel bike, brand new, still in box! $275 941-500-4798 BICYCLE 26Ž $25 941-202-8658 BICYCLE PET B as k et H o ld s up to 20 lbs. $45 941-284-7391 BIKE RACK f or 4 bik e fi ts 1Ž or 2Ž hitch $75 941-743-0582 CANNONDALE re d u l tegra, 50cm, 16 speed, high end $349 941-235-2203 ELECTRIC BICYCLE Pink, TREK,500W Motor w/Battery & charger. $1,200 941-639-4438 ELE C TRI C TRI C Y C LE motor for Adult Tricycle, Brand New! $500 941-500-4798 FOLDING BIKES 2 D a h on Bikes. Exc.cond. Buy both for $375 941-416-5165 6140 PHOTOGRAPHY/ VIDEO S PE C TRA C AMERA 2 Brand new camera and film $40, OBO 941-286-6376 6145 POOL/SPA/ & SUPPLIES **SPAS & MORE** Family owned and operated for 20 years! www.spasandmoreflorida.com Over 40 Spas to choose from. We take trades! We Move Spas & We Buy Used! 941-625-6600 6160 LAWN & GARDEN C u ddl e up b y t h e fi re Firewood Split, Bundled and ready for the firepit! Pine, Oak, or Citrus, 941-468-4372 FERTILIZER 5 0 LB bag, for Trees or Grass $30 941-257-5500 G A S C AN 5 G al. old good one $10 941-743-0582 GAS HEDGE TRIMMER Ryobi Model HT26 E/C $100 941-662-7644 JOHN DEERE 42Ž T w i n B agger For 100 series tractors E/C $175 941-662-7644 KOBALT 40V max cor dl ess chainsaw New in box rechar gable $100 941-421-9984 LAWN M O WER Husky Hi Wheel, 6.5HP Briggs & Stratton, $75. 941-743-8243 LAWN M O WER John Deere, 6.5HP Briggs & Stratton, 3 Speed. $110. 941-743-8243 MOWER MURRAY RIDER 11HP, 30Ž CUTNEWBATTERY$425 (941)763-4818 THUNDERBAY 8  E art h A uger 43cc New in box power combo kit $125 941-421-9984 WEED EATEREXPAND IT Ryobi Like New Hardly used $80 941-662-7644 W EED TRIMMER Troybuilt 4 cy. New w/aero flex line attachment $100 941-421-9984 W EED WA C KER, 2 C ycle Craftsman, $25. 941-743-8243 6161OUTDOOR LIVING BEA C H S UN Tent C over Automatic 10 x 10 nice $35 540-602-9267 PATIO SET Gl ass. 45Ž round+Chairs with Cushions GC $69, OBO 941-697-0794 Treemendous Tree, Inc. NURSERYPROFESSIONAL LANDSCAPE DESIGN SERVICES AVAILABLE!STOP IN TO SEE US MONDAY SATURDAY 9AM-3PM 6068 RUFF ST. NORTH PORTOR CALL 941-426-8983 FL-6444 A 6170 BUILDING SUPPLIES DRAIN R OC K 3 /4 approx 1/ 8 yd (2 commercial wheelbarrows worth) $8 941-306-7882 EXTERIOR HOUSELITES 4 DECORATIVE 24Žx12Ž $30 941-889-7229 6190 TOOLS/ MACHINERY 32 FT ALUM ladder heavy duty $150 941-743-0582 6 FT a l um l a dd er $25 941 7430582 6190 TOOLS/ MACHINERY AUTOMOTIVE TOOLS H an d Tools $50, OBO 941-451-3958 COMPRESSOR E mg l o 1 5 HP Cast iron cylinder. Excellent condition $150 941-460-9540 DRILL PRE SS Rockwell 32 drill press with stand $50 941-249-4117 ELE C TRI C IAN S T OO L pouch Klein #5166 leather, good condition $30 843-735-8912 FLARIN G T OO L set 6 pcs Craftsman $20 941-451-3958 HITCH WITH 2 i nc h b a ll N ew, never used, for your towing needs $20 941-780-3977 MAGNUM LTS 15 true a i r l ess paint sprayer new in box $100 941-421-9984 MUFFLER C UT O FF Tool C ra f tsman 13/8 to 21/2 inches $10 941-451-3958 T OO L B O X New Kobalt loaded w/tools blue $100 941-421-9984 6220 OFFICE/BUSINESS EQUIP./SUPPLIES O FFI C E C HAIR Black Vinyl on wheels. $20 941-257-5500 6232 CATS NOTICE : S tatute 585 195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots, and be free of intestinal and external parasites. 6233 DOGS NOTICE : S tatute 585 195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots, and be free of intestinal and external parasites. BEA G LE FEMALE 8 mths, spayed & all shots. $700. (941)-828-3609 CAVALIER KING CHARLES PUPS Great companions! Home Raised, Shots/Health Cert. $1875. Also2 Adults @ $2300 each. 772-985-2186 Visa/Mc website: furmysunshine.com HELP ME TO GET HOME! I am a Female Black Teacup Chihuahua. I Got Lost at Placida Ave. & Florida Ave. in Grove City on 8/12 My Name is Nikki. REWARD $200 FOR SAFE RETURN. Please Call 941-875-1519 LAB PUPPIES AKC Ready Dec. 2nd, Come pick out your fur baby for Christmas. (941)-661-3810 SAVE THE LIVES OF HOMELESS ANIMALS.ŽDONATE YOUR USED CAR, TRUCK OR BOAT TO SUNCOAST HUMANE SOCIETY. CALL (941) 474-7884 EXT 402. 6250 APPLIANCES AC WIND O W UNIT INCLUDES HEAT$125. (941)763-4818 COFFEE POT 5 cup Rival. Works great. $5 941-275-5457 DRYER S UPER LAR G E S IX CYCLE HEAVY DUTY $175, OBO 941-587-0882 FREEZER Ni ce, Whi te, $100 (941)763-4818 delivery avail. FRIDGE SIDE b y Sid e, W ater i n Door, Perfect Condition. $200 941-268-2799 I C EMAKER MA G I C C he f $ 75 941-460-9484 MICROWAVE 1 2CF K enmore WT 1100 Watts LIKE NEW $65 941-408-7535 MI C R O WAVE CO UNTERT O P 1250 WATT $65, OBO 941-587-0882 RANGE/MICROWAVE DW WHIRLPOOL,white xcond $200 941-916-9544 REFRI G ERAT O R G Eside by side 33wx70h bone exc cond $150 941-445-0950 WASHER & DRYER Ni ce, White, $325. (941)763-4818 deliver y avail. W A S HER & DRYER top loader ,super capacity, white $199 941-240-8925 WINE COOLER exce ll ent $60 OBO 330-509-1111 6260 MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE 25 NORMAN R oc k we ll pr i nts at $3.00 each U pick $3 941-496-9252 5 00 O LDIE S 45 RPMs at $1.00 each U pick. $1 941-496-9252 BEA C H C HAIR S VINYL Strap Lounge chair $10, OBO 941-505-6290 C ARRY O N BA G 2 1Ž Lt. weight/exp. Never used $20 941-505-6290 TABLE 5 ROUND f o ldi ng l egs Max Chief $75 941-496-9252 6260 MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE $75.00 per panel SLIDING GLASS DOOR REPAIRS Wheels Tracks & LocksLicensed & Insured, Free Est. since 1981 visit us at www. SlidingDoorsandmore.com Call Bob 941-706-6445 Owned and operated by Local Fire fighter. L o w o v e r h e a d = L o w p r i c e s CONFEDERATE FLAG new never flown-3x5 great shape $15 941-445-5619 CREMATION URN N ew, G o ld with Mother of Pearl, Cost 400 $180 941-268-7068 ELASTOMERIC UNIFLEX Premium Roof Tan Paint 5 gal. $50 941-496-9252 FIREWOOD Split, Bundled, and ready for the firepit! Perfect for these cooler nights! Pine, Oak, Citrus 941-468-4372 FLIGHT BAGS many, new nylon, Totes, etc $60 941-474-7866 G ARMENT S TEAMER 900W by mangano retractable cord exc. $15, OBO 941-204-3274 HAND T OO L S TABLE FULL TOOLS ASSORTED,good shape must see $50 941-200-5718 LUGGAGE AMTURE? 5 pc nesting, leather, whls, straps. Aqua $60 941-474-7866 T urnyou r trashinto cash! Advertise youryard sa l e! PAPER S HREDDER 6 S HEET Strip-Cut with Basket. Good con dition $16 941-697-0794 RE CO RD CO LLE C TI ON includes album covers 5 0 cents each. Entire collection. 941-496-9252 SLOT MACHINE B u lld og f u ll size good cond. Heavy to lif t $200 941-423-2585 TRIPLE BEAM S cale new cond. up to 5+ pound capacity (2610 Grams) $40 954-642-6599 WIND CHIMES new in boxes nice selection $5 941-426-4151 CLASSIFIED WORKS! 6270 WANTED TO BUY/TRADE BUYIN G S ILVER CO IN S DIMES Thru SILVER DOLLARS. 941-626-7785 HOYER LIFT WANTED USED POOL HOYER LIFT 941-235 8976 WANTED TRAIN MAN lanterns, Railroad signal lights, locks, keys, 519-301-3387 Rotonda or email: stratforddave@yahoo.ca

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Page 10 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018CLASSIFIEDS 7000TRANSPORTATION 7005 AUTOMOTIVE SAVE THE LIVES OF HOMELESS ANIMALS.ŽDONATE YOUR USED CAR, TRUCK OR BOAT TO SUNCOAST HUMANE SOCIETY. CALL (941) 474-7884 EXT 402. 7020 BUICK 2013 BUICK LACROSSE $15,990. BRONZE, 13K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 7040 CHEVROLET 2014 CHEVY CORVETTE $47,990. RED, NAV, CONV, 16K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 20 17 C HEVY CO RVETTE. $67,990. WHITE, GR. SPORT 3,578 MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 2004CHEVY TRAIL BLAZER MATTAS MOTORS 941-916-9222 DLR 7060 DODGE 2007 DODGE CHARGER R/T $5,000obo. 5.7 Hemi. 100K Miles. 941-623-8719 7070 FORD 2016 FORD EDGE SEL $24,000.Ruby Red, Extremely Low Mileage, Like New Condition! Call Barry 239-246-7786 FREE MERCHANDISE ADS!! WELCOME TO OUR WEBSITE! To Place a FREE Merchandise Ad Go to: sun-classifieds.com Click on Place Ad. If You`ve Advertised Online with Us Before or Not Just Click Register and Follow the Prompts. FREE Ads are for Merchandise UNDER $500. and the Ad Must be Placed Online by You. One Item Per Ad, the Ad Must be 3 Lines or Less, Price Must Appear in the Ad. Your Ad Will Appear Online for 7 Days and in Print Wednesday ThroughSunday. Some Restrictions Do Apply. LIMIT 5 FREE ADS PER WEEK Need To Place a Classified Ad? Enter Your Classified Ad and Pay With Your Credit Card 24 Hours a Day, 7 Daysa Week. 2018 FORD MUSTANG CONVERTIBLE, leather, Navigation, Lane Dep, R pk aid, Back-up Cam, Full Fact Warr, 5 available; Factory Off Lease-Venice, Fin Low % $2,500 dn. Low bal. $24,000 CALL JUSTIN 941 350-7544 7075 GMC 2017 GMC SIERRA 1500 $36,911. WHITE, SLT, 11K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 7080 JEEP 2009 JEEP PATRI O T 4 wheel drive 68k mi, like new great tow vehicle Mattas Motors 941-916-9222 7090 LINCOLN 2009 LINCOLN TOWN-CAR $5,900 OBO, new tires & brakes, $1500 spent on upgrades. 941-276-3574 2007 LINCOLN MKX $7,100 obo. 100K Miles, Runs Great! 816-589-3956 (Englewood) 2013 LINCOLN MKX $16,911. WHITE, NAV, 57K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 7090 LINCOLN 2008 LIN CO LN T O WN C AR SIGNATURE SERIES 68K MI, GOTTA SEE THIS ONE MATTAS MOTORS 941-916-9222 DLR 2008 LIN CO LN MKZ 7 2 K MILES, LEATHER CLEAN CLEAN CAR! MATTAS MOTORS 941-916-9222 DLR 7100 MERCURY 2006 MER C URY G RAND MARQUIS LEATHER. SUPER CLEAN MATTAS MOTORS 941-916-9222 DLR 7135 SATURN USED SATURN CARS & SUVs Starting at $1,200 & Up. Saturn Parts Available. Pro Power Auto Sales941-627-8822www.propowerauto.com 7147 AUDI 2014 AUDI A6 $28,990 GRAY, NAV, 31K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 7148 BMW 2005 BMW Z4 $7,200 2.5l, Convertible, 5 spd, sport package, Call 508-380-0666 2012 BMW 128ICV $13,911. WHITE, CONV., 71K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 20 11 BMW 328 I C V $13,911. BLACK, 59K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 20 1 2 BMW 5 28 I $17,990. GRAY, NAV, 48K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 2014 BMW 428I $26,990. WHITE, NAV, 32K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 2007 BMW 335i 2dr, 6sp manual, 64k mi, Nav/sport & premium pkg. $10,495 941-268-0078 1998 BMW Z3 $7,000/OBO 1.9, 95k miles, 1 owner, 5spd manual, Excellent Cond. 941-460-9484 7160 HONDA 20 1 2 JEEP G RC HER O KEE $17,990. BEIGE, LTD, NAV 78K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 20 1 6 H O NDA C RV $24,990. BROWN, EX-L, 22K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 2007 HONDA ACCORD EX-LLoaded, Exc Condition, low mile, $7995 OBO 941-626-7682 7177 KIA 20 1 2 KIA O PTIMA EX 4CYL. LEATHER, EXTRA SHARP MATTAS MOTORS 941-916-9222 DLR 20 11 KIA SO UL PLU S 4 CYL. AUTO, EXTRA CLEAN. MATTAS MOTORS 941-916-9222 DLR 2005 KIA SEDONA LX MINI VAN, EXTRA CLEEN, MATTAS MOTORS941-916-9222 DLR 7178 LEXUS 2010 LEXUS IS 250C $17,990. GRAY, NAV, 69K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 20 14 LEXU S RX3 5 0 $19,990. WHITE, NAV, 80K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 2016 LEXUS CT 200H $21,911. WHITE, CERT, 27K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 20 1 3 LEXU S RX3 5 0 $24,990. RED, CERT, NAV, 53K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 2012 LEXUS GX 460 $24,990. GOLD, NAV, 106K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 20 15 LEXU S E S 300 H $25,911. BLACK, CERT, NAV, 37K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 2013 LEXUS GS 350 $25,990. SILVER, CERT, LUX 25K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 20 1 3 LEXU S L S -4 60 $39,990. SILVER, CERT, NAV, 22K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 20 1 8 LEXU S L S -5 00 $79,990. BLACK, F-SPT, NAV 5,234 MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 7190 MERCEDES 2016 MERCEDES CLA-250 $22,900 15k miles, Black, Perfect cond. 941-575-3756 7200 NISSAN 20 1 0 NI SS AN MURAN O $11,990. SILVER, LE, AWD, 79K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 2017 NISSAN ALTIMA $17,990. WHITE, SR, 25K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 7207 SUBARU 20 17 S UBARU WRX $29,911. BLUE, STI, 28K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 7210 TOYOTA 2001 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER $7,990. BLUE, LTD, 77K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 2016 TOYOTA RAV4 $16,911. GRAY, 44K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 2012 TOYOTA 4RUNNER $21,990 White, Nav, SR5, 116K miles 855-280-4707 20 1 6 T O Y O TA RAV4 $26,990. GRAY, NAV, AWD 12K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 2017 TOYOTA TUNDRA $35,990. RED, NAV, SR5 26K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 2010 TOYOTA COROLLA 4CYL. AUTOMATIC, EXTRA NICE MATTAS MOTORS 941-916-9222 DLR 7250 ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES MERCEDES 1929 REPLICA, 4 cyl Chevy engine, Excellent cond, 6k miles, Lots of extras, Runs great, $7000/OBO Text to 941-626-9598 CLASSIC 1989 CADILLAC ALLANTE Conv., Both Tops, Very good Condition, Pearl White ext. Burgandy int. NO Rust or Damage, 115K miles, $3900 OBO 941-626-0552 1984 CHEVY CAMARO Z28 T-Tops, Cold A/C, Full Power, Stock, $6,800 941-220-9394 7260 AUTOS WANTED I BUY SC RAP CARS & TRUCKS Ed 941-456-1342 WE BUY & PICK UP JUNK CARS 941-661-1928 BEST $$ FOR JUNKERS 7 Days, FAST PICKUP941-286-3122, 623-5550 CASHFOR ALL TRUCKS & CARS ANY COND RUNNING OR NOT. (352)-342-7037 W E BUY CARS & PICKUPS RUNNING OR NOT! $400 CASH + UP Frank 941-763-3552 7270 AUTO PARTS/ ACCESSORIES 5 LU G C HEVY Truck Rims $ 1 0 EACH $10 863-558-2836 14Ž 6 LU G white spoke rims (2) $30 863-558-2836 HU S KY ANTI S W WEI G HT BAR 1yr. $150 863-287-6876 TRAILER HITCH D raw Ti te brand for Toyota Camry 92-96 $65 941-676-2019 TIRES 4 l ess t h an 5000 m il es on 15Ž Dakota rims with center caps $200 941-875-0929 SNAP ON MT 2590 E ng i ne analyzer with accessories. $220 941-460-9540 HITCH WITH 2 i nc h b a ll N ew, never used, for your towing needs $20 941-780-3977 FAL CO N 2 Tow Bar 6000 lb. capacity; excellent cond; used twice $325 941-429-1543 C HEVY REDU C TI O N G ear Starter NEVER USED (Original $145) $100 863-558-2836 BRAKE BUDDY Auxiliary Brak ing System Excellent condition $400 941-429-1543 3 SPEED CHEVY S tan d ar d Transmission For 60s and 70s $100 863-558-2836 14Ž CHROME REVERSE Chevy Rims (2) 4 3/4Ž $40 863-558-2836 7290 VANS 2015 DODGE G ran d C aravan W HEELCHAIR Van, 10Ž lowered floor & ram p 941-870-4325 7290 VANS 2009 FORD E-350 $6,500 14-passenger van, excellent condition. $11K warranty parts/labor comes with it 260K miles 941-451-1202 2008 C HRY S LER T O WN & COUNTRY LIMITED MATTAS MOTORS 941-916-9222 DLR 7300 TRUCKS/ PICK-UPS 20 1 3 C HEVY S ILVERAD O 1500 $16,990. WHITE, 4X4, 116K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 2016 FORD F 150 $42,990. WHITE, KG. RANCH 39K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 2018 CHEVY TAHOE $44,990. BLACK, LT, 19K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 2018 FORD F-150 XLT CREW CAB 3.5 V6 Auto, Back-up Camera, Fog Lamps, Navigation, Running Boards, 14k mi, $28,500, 5 availableFinance low int FACTORY OFF LEASE Venice Justin 941 350-7544 20 1 0 D O D G E RAM 15 00 QUAD CAB, 4X4, BIG HORN PACKAGE,IMMACULATE! MATTAS MOTORS 941-916-9222 DLR AREYOUONLINE? INCREASEYOUR EXPOSURE! Addyourinternetaddress toyouradforalittleextra! 2004 FORD F 150 SUPERCAB AUTO, 6CYL., EXCEPTIONALLY CLEAN! MATTAS MOTORS 941-916-9222 DLR 7305 SPORT UTILITY/ VEHICLES 2017 GMC TERRAIN SLE 1 Back-up Cam, Nav, 2.4 30 mpg-Reg fuel 4 Cyl-Auto, Bluetooth, Full Fact Warr, $3,000 dn, cash or trade, LOW BAL $17,500 LOW PAYT, $270MO 5 AVAILABLE FACTORY OFF LEASE, JUSTIN 941 350-7544 7330 BOATS-POWERED 22 C-DORY 2008 CRUISER, $39,900 Punta Gorda Fl. Info and pics at C-Brat site. Please text owner at 268-1161. 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The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 11 JOBSMETRO CREATIVEThe days of spending an entire career with one company are a thing of the past. According to data published in The Balance: Careers, the average professional switches jobs 10 to 15 times in his or her lifetime, while the Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates that the average employee tenure in 2016 was 4.2 years. Understanding which fields have a high rate of growth can ensure men and women make smart choices when switching jobs. The following are the top-rated careers, based on data from the BLS, U.S. News & World Report and Glassdoor. € Mathematician: Mathematicians earn an average salary of $106,000 per year. Mathematicians use statistical theories to help companies in various industries make informed decisions. € Marketing manager: Marketing managers guide how a particular company or industry presents itself. They also analyze how campaigns and efforts have succeeded or failed to improve market share. A marketing manager earns an average of $85,000. € Actuary: These individuals employ mathematics and economics to help corporations predict and manage risk in their organizations. The field is expected to increase by 22.5 percent by 2026. Actuaries earn a median salary of $101,000. € DevOps Engineer: Thanks to the ubiquity of digital technology, professionals who can work with software developers and system operators to oversee code and IT infrastructure are in high demand. These workers command, on average, $105,000, and as computer-based industries only continue to expand, so do the career opportunities. € Optometrists: Seeing clearly and maintaining proper visual health is important. Optometrists can earn $106,000 a year. € Nurse anesthetist: Several different careers in the medical field are booming, and nurse anesthetist is one of them. These medical professionals administer anesthesia to patients undergoing surgery and monitor vital signs to maintain patient safety. An average salary of $160,000 can entice registered nurses to go through the extra schooling to become anesthetists. € UX designer: A UX designer is a graphic designer, interior designer or architect who helps improve the usability, accessibility and enjoyability of tangible and digital products based on user experiences. Salaries vary depending upon the specific niche, but can average $90,000 annually. € Physical therapist: These health care workers earn an average of $85,000 and help people decrease physical pain and improve mobility through rehabilitative exercises. When considering changing careers, people may want to consider various professions that are currently booming.Explore these in-demand professions Need a Friend? Look in the Classifieds adno=3629172-1 adno=3625869-1

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Page 12 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 JOBS Port Charlotte Honda Hondaadno=3629171-1

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THE NEWS WIRESTATE € NATIONAL € WORLD € BUSINESS Unsung heroes, Animals played vital and varied roles in WWISee page 4 Sunday, November 11, 2018 By JONATHAN J. COOPER and ANDREW DALTONASSOCIATED PRESSMALIBU, Calif. „ Two people were found dead and scores of houses from ranch homes to celebrities mansions burned in a pair of wild“ res that stretched across more than 100 square miles of Southern California, authorities said Saturday. The two bodies were found in Malibu, but Los Angeles County sheriffs Chief John Benedict offered no further details. They were discovered in the area of a winding stretch of Mulholland Highway with steep panoramic views, where on Saturday the roadway was littered with rocks, a few large boulders and fallen power lines, some of them still on “ re. Most of the surrounding structures were leveled. The deaths brings to 11 the number of people killed in the states wild“ res in the past few days, with nine found dead in a Northern California wild“ re. Fire“ ghters have saved thousands of homes despite working in extreme, tough “ re conditions that they said they have never seen in their life,Ž Los Angeles County Fire Chief Daryl Osby said. Those vicious conditions on Friday night gave way to calm Saturday, with winds reduced to breezes.S. Calif. fire doubles in size, deaths rise to 11 COURTESY OF BEN WATKINS VIA APLos Angeles County “ re Chief Daryl Osby said Saturday that “ re “ ghters told him they were working in the toughest, most extre me conditions they had seen in their lives on Friday night. By SKYLER SWISHER, LARRY BARSZEWSKI, LINDA TRISCHITTA and RAFAEL OLMEDASUN SENTINELFORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. „ Fraud claims, angry protests and courtroom skirmishes spread Friday as vote counting dragged on in Broward and Palm Beach counties, drawing the nations ridicule back to Florida with shades of the infamous 2000 presidential recount. Fueled by tweets from President Donald Trump, dozens of protesters stormed Broward Countys elections of“ ce, directing a chant of lock her upŽ at Brenda Snipes, the countys supervisor of elections. Demonstrators in Palm Beach County demanded that every vote be counted. Facing a deadline of noon Saturday to submit the “ rst unof“ cial results, canvassing board members continued to scrutinize provisional ballots well into the evening. As of Friday night, an undetermined number of ballots remained to be counted in Palm Beach and Broward counties. Palm Beach County elections chief Susan Bucher previously said her countys canvassing board could have the “ rst unof“ cial votes in late Friday night, slightly ahead of the deadline. The stakes are high with three statewide races already headed for recounts. In the closely watched race for U.S. Senate, Scott led Democratic incumbent Bill Nelson by 14,855 votes as of Friday night, a margin close enough to trigger a hand recount. The governors contest is close enough to warrant a machine recount with Republican Ron DeSantis holding a 36,002-vote lead over Democratic nominee Andrew Gillum. In the race for agriculture commissioner, Democrat Nikki Fried led Republican Matt Caldwell by 3,120 votes. Machine recounts must be “ nished by Thursday. The deadline to complete a hand recount is Nov. 18, according to the Florida Division of Elections. Three days after Election Day, the Senate candidates continued to clash in the bitter partisan “ ght. Scott delivered a speech Thursday night at the governors mansion, calling for state police to investigate potential rampant fraudŽ with the counting of ballots in the Democratic strongholds of Palm Beach and Broward counties. He accused unethical liberalsŽ of trying to steal the election. Despite that speech, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement hasnt received reports of voter fraud from the Secretary of States Of“ ce, and the agency has not received a written request from Scott to investigate, said Jessica Cary, an FDLE spokeswoman. In his “ rst public remarks since the election, Nelson accused Scott of trying to stop a complete and accurate counting of all the votes.Ž I wont stand for anyone using his position to undermine our democratic process, and neither should the people of Florida,Ž he said. Its wrong and it goes against every value that we have in our country.Ž Scotts claims struck a nerve with protesters. About 75 Republican supporters chanted lock her up,Ž bye, bye BrendaŽ and stop the steal.Ž Theyre putting ballots in and signing ballots that dont exist,Ž said Jodi Sandak of Boynton Beach, a member of Americans for Trump Broward Chapter, who held a sign with a picture of Snipes under the heading Supervisor of Corruption. At the canvassing boards, party observers watched as provisional ballots were scrutinized. With every vote being crucial, observers from the Nelson and Gillum campaigns objected whenever the Palm Beach canvassing board rejected a ballot that was cast by a voter in the wrong precinct. Bucher, Palm Beach Countys elections head, “ red back against claims of fraud. Its unfortunate that some of the highest elected of“ cials are trying to disrupt our democracy because they dont like the demographics of our voters,Ž she said. Both sides are digging in for a protracted legal battle. A judge sided Friday with Scott in a lawsuit against Broward Countys elections supervisor. Broward Circuit Judge Carol-Lisa Phillips had given Snipes until 7 p.m. Friday to turn over public records of voting activity sought by Scotts Senate campaign.Nation watches as Florida vote counting drags on By RAF CASERT and ANGELA CHARLTONASSOCIATED PRESSPARIS „ Traveling from across the world to monuments honoring soldiers who fell 100 years ago, victors and vanquished alike marked those sacri“ ces Saturday ahead of Armistice Day and assessed alliances that have been redrawn dramatically since the dark days of World War I. The leaders of former enemies France and Germany, in an intimate gesture that underscored their countries current roles as guarantors of peace in Europe, held their heads together at the site north of Paris where the defeated Germans and the Allies signed the agreement that ended the 1914-18 war. After Chancellor Angela Merkel brie” y snuggled her head into the neck of French President Emmanuel Macron, the two went inside a replica of the train car where the armistice was reached and put their names in a guestbook. Macron then took Merkels hand in his, again highlighting the changes on the continent where two world wars were fought in the 20th century. Our Europe has been at peace for 73 years. There Leaders laud fallen soldiers on eve of armistice centennial AP PHOTOA soldiers grave is pictured after a ceremony at the Aisne Marne American Cemetery near the Belleau Wood battleground, in Belleau, France, Saturday. Belleau Wood, 55 miles northeast of the capital, Iis the place where U.S. troops had their breakthrough battle by stopping a German push for Paris shortly after entering the war in 1917.FALLEN | 4 FIRE | 8By DON THOMPSONASSOCIATED PRESSCHICO, Calif. „ Teachers, aides and bus drivers in Northern California loaded more than 100 school students into cars and school buses as a fast-moving wild“ re approached, driving hours through smoke and ” ames to safely reunite the children with their families, according to one of the teachers who helped get people to safety. Marc Kessler, a science teacher at a Paradise Uni“ ed School District middle school, said he arrived at work early Thursday and saw smoke plumes that soon grew uncomfortably near. He and others quickly realized they would have to leave as the sound of propane tanks exploding in the heat got closer. A sheriffs deputy arrived and told them to get to Chico, a TEACHER: BUS DRIVERS EVACUATED STUDENTS AMID FIREEVACUATED | 8 COUNTING | 4 adno=3621992-1 Suffer from Back or Knee pain? Medicare Will Pay for Your Brace!Get pain relief without medication.All Powered Mobility2765 Tamiami Trail, Unit B1 Port Charlotte, FL 33952 Tel. 941-625-0103 … www.AllPoweredMobility.com n Do Businesswit LOCALCOMPANY

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Page 2 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018WORLD NEWSANKARA, Turkey (AP) „ Of“cials from Saudi Arabia, the United States, Germany, France and Britain have listened to audio recordings related to the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul, Turkeys president said Saturday, in the “rst public acknowledgement of the existence of tapes of the slaying. President Recep Tayyip Erdogan also told reporters that Saudi Arabia had to act fairlyŽ and disclose those responsible for the Oct. 2 killing of The Washington Post journalist to rid itself of suspicion.Ž We gave them the tapes. We gave them to Saudi Arabia, to America, to the Germans, the French, to the British, to all of them,Ž Erdogan said before departing for Paris to attend ceremonies marking the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I. They (Saudi of“cials) also listened to the conversations and they know. There is no need to distort this. They know for certain who among the 15 is the killer or are the killers,Ž he said. He was referring to an alleged 15-member assassination squad that Turkey believes was sent to kill Khashoggi at the consulate where he had arrived to obtain papers to marry his Turkish “ancee. CIA Director Gina Haspel, who visited Turkey last month for information on the investigation, is reported to have heard the audio recordings of the killing. The existence of the recordings was leaked to the media but never openly con“rmed until now. Turkey says Khashoggi, who was critical of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, was strangled and dismembered at the consulate as part of a premeditated killing. Media reports have suggested that his body could have been chemically dissolved. Turkey is seeking the extradition of 18 suspects who have been detained in Saudi Arabia, so they can be put on trial in Turkey. They include the 15 members of the alleged assassination squad. Saudi Arabia had insisted for weeks after Khashoggi disappeared that he had walked out of the consulate, before changing its account to say he died in a brawl. Last month, Saudi Arabia acknowledged that Turkish evidence indicates that Khashoggis killing was premeditated, shifting its explanation in an apparent effort to ease international outrage over the death. Saudi of“cials characterize the killing as a rogue operation carried out by Saudi agents who exceeded their authority. Yet some of those implicated in the killing are close to the crown prince, including a member of the princes entourage on foreign trips who was seen at the consulate before Khashoggis slaying. Erdogan accused Saudi Arabias chief prosecutor, who was sent to Istanbul last month as part of a joint probe, of employing delaying tactics.Ž Saudi Arabia needs to accept that (the killer) is among the 18 and needs to get rid of the suspicion by responding to Turkeys good will and acting fairly,Ž Erdogan said.Erdogan: Saudi officials, others heard tapes of writers death AP POOL PHOTOTurkeys President Recep Tayyip Erdogan talks to members of the media at the airport in Ankara, Turkey before departing to France, Saturday. Erdogan said at the news conference that ocials from Saudi Arabia, the United States, Germany, France and Britain have listened to audio recordings related to the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul. Erdogans comments were the “rst public con“rmation of the existence of recordings of the Oct. 2 killing of The Washington Post columnist at the consulate. By LAURE VAN RUYMBEKEASSOCIATED PRESSPETRA, Jordan „ The death toll from ”ash ”oods in Jordan rose to 12 on Saturday and the kingdoms main tourist attraction, the ancient city of Petra, was closed for cleanup after what local of“cials said was the biggest deluge in the area in decades. Fridays ”oods struck several areas of Jordan. Rescuers continued the search for missing people around the Wala reservoir in central Jordan on Saturday. In the southern town of Maan, authorities opened a shelter for dozens of people whose homes were surrounded by water. In all, 12 people were killed, including two children and a diver who had been involved in rescue efforts, according to state media and Jordanian government spokeswoman Jumana Ghuneimat. Two of the bodies were found Saturday. Separately, Israels public radio said contact has been restored with six Israeli tourists who could not immediately be accounted for after the ”ooding. The Arabiclanguage Makan Radio said some of the tourists had been touring the Wadi Rum area, another major tourist attraction. The torrents came two weeks after 21 people, most of them children, were killed in ”ash ”oods near the Dead Sea. The tourism and education ministers resigned over the Dead Sea ”ooding. In Petra, the ancient trade hub carved into rose-hued rocks, heavy rains began at around 1 p.m. Friday and last for about 40 minutes, said Rafael Dorado, 41, a tourist from Spain. At about 3 p.m., a torrent of water came gushing through the sites steep and narrow access canyon, flooding the area within minutes, he said. Delgado said he was observing from a hilltop temple in the area, but saw other visitors scrambling to higher ground. He said some visitors were later evacuated by trucks and others made their way out on foot. Suleiman Farajat, the chief administrator in Petra, said the site would remain closed Saturday, but would likely reopen Sunday. He said hes never seen flood ing of such intensity in the area. Its really, I wouldnt say scary, but surprising how huge the ”ood was,Ž he said.Jordan opens shelter as flash flood death toll climbs to 12 AP PHOTOSJordanian rescue teams search Saturday for missing people in the Madaba area, south of the capital of Amman, after ”ash ”oods unleashed by heavy rain a day earlier killed several people. Jordanian rescue teams search Saturday for missing people in the Madaba area, south of the capital of Amman, after ”ash ”oods unleashed by heavy rain a day earlier killed at least 12 people. Jordanian rescue teams search Saturday for missing people in the Madaba area, south of the capital of Amman. NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) „ Somali hospital and police sources say the death toll from Fridays bombings outside a hotel in Mogadishu has risen to 53 with over 100 injured. Capt. Mohamed Hussein, a senior Somali police of“cer, said many of the injured suffered horri“c wounds, raising fears that death toll could rise further. The “gure given by Hussein is consistent with submissions from hospitals. Ahmed Yusuf, a nurse at Madina hospital, said that Mogadishus hospitals are coping to treat the in”ux of wounded victims who continued to come in Saturday. Four car bombs by Islamic extremists exploded outside a hotel in the capital, Mogadishu, Friday afternoon. After the three explosions in front of the hotel, a fourth blast hit as medics attempted to rescue the injured. Somalias Islamic extremist rebels, al-Shabab, claimed responsibility for the bombs.Toll rises to 53 dead from bomb blasts in Somalias capitalRIO DE JANEIRO (AP) „ Ten people were killed and 11 injured in a mudslide near Rio de Janeiro on Saturday, Brazilian authorities said. Roberto Robadey, Rios civil defense department head, told the Globo TV network that the mudslide in the city of Niteroi was caused by heavy downpours. He said people were killed and injured when a large boulder rolled on top of six houses in the Boa Esperanca neighborhood. It rained a lot over the past two days and a state of alert was declared for Niteroi,Ž he said. People were advised of the situation and were recommended to move to safer locations.Ž But Claudio dos Santos, president of the Boa Esperanca Residents Association, told Globo TV that several families refused to leave.Ž Rescue workers were searching for victims and survivors trapped under the debris and mud. The Rio “re department said the dead included a 3-year-old boy, two elderly women and a middle-aged man. It did not give any more information about the victims. Rosemary Caetano da Silva, a resident of Boa Esperanca, told Globo TV that her 8-year-old granddaughter was buried underneath the rubble. She also said she managed to rescue her grandson who was taken to a hospital.Mudslide near Rio de Janeiro kills 10, injures 11SAQQARA, Egypt (AP) „ A top Egyptian antiquities of“cial says local archaeologists have discovered seven Pharaonic Age tombs near the capital Cairo containing dozens of cat mummies along with wooden statues depicting other animals and birds. Mostafa Waziri told reporters Saturday that the discovery at Saqqara also includes mummies of scarabs, the “rst ever to be found in the area. Of the statues found, those depicting cats were the majority, re”ecting the reverence ancient Egyptians showed the felines, whose God Bastet was worshipped. Other statues depicted a lion, a cow and a falcon. Egypt has been whipping up publicity for its new historical discoveries in the hopes of reviving a devastated tourism sector still recovering from the turmoil following a 2011 uprising that toppled longtime autocrat Hosni Mubarak.Egypts newly discovered tombs hold mummies, animal statues AP PHOTOArchaeologists work on statues and artifacts inside a tomb, at an ancient necropolis near Egypts famed pyramids in Saqqara, Giza, Egypt, Saturday. A top Egyptian antiquities ocial says local archaeologists have discovered seven Pharaonic Age tombs near the capital Cairo containing dozens of cat mummies along with wooden statues depicting other animals. WORLD BRIEFS

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The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 3 ANSWER TO CROSSWORD BOBSFORAPPLESMIDRIFF AREWEDONEHEREOCEANIA WIRERECORDERSTOETAGS LORENKISSOSMONDSET SNAPBONEBRIARSHEAD POUTBEFOGSFANTA DESCENTLEARNSDORSEY INTOTOHALVESPORTERS TRAPSBOWTIEMEME KATIEHOLMESPARASAIL OPENMINDEDBARMITZVAH TDGARDENMASKINGTAPE TEEMCORSETRENTS RICHARDSORBETGECKOS AMOURSFOULEDGOESAPE DIRTYALFREDBRAN INNSPRETTYMOOTSCAB OLESENATEVATSCLOSE COLGATEASBIGASAHOUSE AVIATESCAYENNEPEPPER REAPERSONEWAYSTREETSDear Mr. Berko: My husband and I are in our 30s and make about $87,000 a year. We have a 10-yearold son, and we want him to go to college and become a doctor and make a good living. Were told a bachelors degree will cost at least $125,000 in 2027. Thats terrible. What can we do? Our son isnt brilliant. He works hard but gets Bs and Cs. „ HO, Spring“eld, Ill. Dear HO: Kids who get Bs and Cs in Americas schools arent college material. Even my dog, who doesnt bark English well, could get Bs. All reports are in. College costs could grow by 50 percent in the next 10 years. Life is of“cially declared unfair. Calm down; take three deep breaths and hold it for 20 minutes. Theres no way, short of enormous luck, you guys could accumulate $125,000 by 2027 for his bachelors degree. And med school would cost $200,000. Forget about sending your kid to college. Repaying a $125,000 loan for tuition and books over 20 years at 7 percent would cost you about $1,000 a month. In 20 years, that would be $240,000, or $115,000 more than you borrowed. Dont listen to those advertisements claiming that Jack, who graduated from college, earns more than Jim, who didnt get any education past high school. If you subtract Jacks tuition costs plus the four years of income Jim earned while Jack was in college, its probably even-steven. For many of Americas children, college is a waste of money and time. Too many classes are taught by academics with little private work experience and zero teaching skills. Many academics cant make it in the real world, so they teach. And if they cant teach, they become department heads. Frankly, much of what is called education today is really an expensive isolation from reality. Its said that the r eal reason colleges exist is to seed the NFL and NBA with football and basketball players and provide coaches for professional teams. Education is a secondary goal. Nobody thinks of Ole Miss, the Sooners and the Crimson Tide as academic institutions. Todays colleges are enormous bureaucracies that are living, breathing organisms with a survival instinct stronger than the sum of their parts. As enrollments increase, colleges demand more money to grow their bureaucracies. In this process, they become bigger and stronger, but certainly not better. If your son wasnt born into money or pr ivilege, if he lacks a skill set placing him at a competitive advantage to his contemporaries and if his IQ isnt markedly above average, then your high achievement dreams for him must end. Get realistic. Your son is an average lad, so all he probably will earn are average rewards. And thats “ne! Technology is now at a boiling point, and many good folks in our society are politically, socially and economically unprepared to cope. And as we embark on the Fourth Industrial Revolution, economists Carl Benedikt Frey and Michael Osborne, both Ph.D.s at Oxford University, tell us that 40 percent of todays jobs will be lost to automation. Many colleges (high schools, too) teach mostly Whac-A-Mole-like skills and have failed to help students become productive and competitive in this economy. Only a blithering idiot would spend $125,000 (plus $115,000 in principal) for a bachelors degree. And be mindful that $125,000 compounded at 7 percent annually would grow to $3.7 million by the time your son is 60. If you want your son to be wealthy, advise him to get elected to political of“ce. Even though most folks today would rather have dinner with a pedophile than a member of Congress, he could make millions as a federal politician. But if your kid is unelectable because of a cr iminal background, then advise him to become a lobbyist or a union of“cial. If he lacks the brawn and rage to be a union of“cial or the forked tongue to be a lobbyist, then tell him to join the French Foreign Legion. Hed return to you as a real man. Please address your “nancial questions to Malcolm Berko, P.O. Box 8303, Largo, FL 33775, or email him at mjberko@ yahoo.com. To “nd out more about Malcolm Berko and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com.College education not worth it MalcolmBERKOC By GREG BLUESTEINTHE ATLANTA JOURNALCONSTITUTION (TNS)ATLANTA „ The clash over the unsettled race for Georgia governor heightened Saturday as Republican Brian Kemp said the trickle of provisional ballots counted this weekend made it impossible for him to lose the race, while Democrat Stacey Abrams said theres a larger number of unreported votes. The dynamics of the race have remained the same for days, with Kemp maintaining a roughly 63,000-vote lead over Abrams after nearly all ballots have been counted. The more important margin, however, is 26,000: Thats roughly the vote the Democrat needs to net to force the contest into a Dec. 4 runoff. The focus is on the remaining provisional ballots and other votes still yet to be counted. The secretary of states of“ce „ recently vacated by Kemp „ reported 21,190 provisional ballots, many of them yet uncounted. There is also a maximum of 3,291 remaining military absentee ballots. The Abrams campaign asserts that the total number of uncounted votes is actually about 10,000 votes higher, including roughly 4,000 early votes and voteby-mail ballots it has identi“ed. And it provided the Atlanta Journal Constitution with a county-by-county tally it conducted with local elections of“ces that showed nearly 27,000 provisional votes. The biggest gap between state “gures and the Abrams tally is in Gwinnett County, where the Democrats campaign says a scan of county data showed 3,500 more provisional ballots. A spokeswoman for the secretary of states of“ce said its account of the provisional ballot numbers were provided by the counties and are accurate. If theres a window for Abrams, its narrowing. At least 89 counties have certi“ed their votes, and 118 counties have reported some results from provisional ballots. Roughly half the provisional ballots were rejected, and those that have reported have provided Abrams a net boost of about 100 votes. About 40 counties had yet to report their “nal provisional ballots by Saturday afternoon, including many larger left-leaning counties where Abrams stands to gain votes. The Kemp campaign declared anew that the race is overŽ and Kemp is the governor-elect. It is mathematically impossible for Stacey Abrams to win, force a runoff or trigger a recount,Ž Kemp spokesman Ryan Mahoney said. Georgia voters have spoken. Its time for Abrams to listen and concede immediately.Ž That line was echoed by a range of Georgia Republican leaders and conservative “gures, and ampli“ed by President Donald Trump, who demanded on Twitter that Abrams concede. Thats not likely to happen anytime soon. Abrams has repeatedly said she will continue her campaign until all ballots are counted, and announced a legal team thats already “led a successful lawsuit requiring Dougherty County to accept a few dozen late-arriving absentee ballots.Dispute grows over uncounted Georgia ballotsNEW YORK (AP) „ The Rockefeller Center Christmas tree is in place and will soon be strung with 50,000 LED lights as one of New York Citys star holiday attractions „ the gift of a same-sex married couple. The 72-foot-tall, 12-ton Norway spruce arrived on a ”atbed trailer Saturday morning and was hoisted by a crane into a spot overlooking the Rockefeller skating rink. Crowds will gather Nov. 28 for a televised ceremony to see the tree burst alive with 5 miles of multicolored lights and a 900-pound Swarovski crystal star. The 75-year-old spruce comes from Wallkill, 60 miles north of New York. It was donated by Lissette Gutierrez and her wife, Shirley Figueroa, from their home property. They nicknamed it Shelby.Ž Millions of people are expected to visit the tree that will stay up till Jan. 7. Now its not my tree, its the worlds treeƒŽ Figueroa said.Rockefeller Center Christmas tree goes up PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) „ Three men authorities say set up a booby trap on a walking and bike path in Portland, Oregon, that injured a female cyclist have been taken into custody. KOIN-TV reports that 23-year-old Justin J. Jones, 27-year-old Antonio R. TolmanDuran and 21-year-old Dakota E. Murphy were arrested Friday and face charges of assault and reckless endangering. Portland police say a woman cyclist at about 11 p.m. ran into material strung across the path. A responding police of“cer spotted woven string across the path and other of“cers found three men suspected of putting the material on the path and arrested them. Its not clear if the three men have attorneys.3 men arrested after cyclist injured by booby trap on path(TNS) „ Voters in Alabama and West Virginia Tuesday approved triggerŽ measures that could lead to state abortion bans if the U.S. Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade „ a possibility raised by the appointment of Justice Brett Kavanaugh to the court. Even while Roes constitutional right to abortion remains in place, abortion has become so hard to get in many parts of the country that an online service called Aid Access launched in the summer to provide prescription abortion pills by mail to women in the U.S. Founder Rebecca Gomperts, a Dutch physician and activist, has for years run Women on Web, which ships abortion pills to women in countries where abortion is illegal. Meanwhile, the Self Induced Abortion (SIA) Legal Team last month announced a help line and website to provide information and attorney referrals for women who have ended their pregnancies and fear they will be arrested or prosecuted. We know of at least 21 people who have been arrested, and some prosecuted, either for ending their own pregnancy or helping othersŽ since 1973, said Jill E. Adams, a Berkeley, Calif., lawyer who founded the SIA team. Now that we have the help line, we expect well learn about more.Ž Tuesdays elections illustrated the everdeepening divide over abortion. Oregonians overwhelmingly voted to preserve public funding for abortion, while Alabama passed a state constitutional amendment that recognizes the sanctity of unborn life and the rights of unborn children.Ž West Virginia amended its constitution to declare no right to abortion. If Roes legal framework is abolished, 20 other states already have laws that could be used to further restrict or ban abortion, according to the Guttmacher Institute, a research center that supports abortion rights.Online abortion pills come to the US NATIONAL NEWSTHOUSAND OAKS, Calif. (AP) „ Authorities trying to make sense of why a gunman killed 12 people at a Southern California bar are not publicly discussing what theyve learned, but at least one Instagram post he made after beginning the massacre has emerged as an early focus. Social media platforms have scrubbed that and any other posts following Wednesday nights massacre. But one law enforcement of“cial said Ian David Long, a 28-year-old former Marine, posted about his mental state and whether people would believe he was sane. Authorities also were investigating whether he believed his former girlfriend would be at the Borderline Bar and Grill, said the of“cial, who was briefed on the investigation but not authorized to discuss it publicly and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity. A second law enforcement of“cial, Ventura County Sheriffs Capt. Garo Kuredjian, said that „ based on time stamps „ the gunman apparently stopped shooting inside the bar and posted to Instagram. Kuredjian said he didnt know the content of any posts. Instagram and Facebook typically refuse to discuss individual accounts and did not respond to a request for comment. Authorities described an attack of military ef“ciency. None of those injured was hurt by gun“re. When the gunman shot his .45-caliber pistol, he killed. As scores of police of“cers closed in, Long apparently shot and killed himself. Several people who knew Long in the suburb of Thousand Oaks where the gunman went to high school and eventually moved back in with his mother described him in disturbing terms. Long made others feel uncomfortable going back to his teens. Dominique Colell, who coached girls track and “eld at the high school where Long was a sprinter, remembers an angry young man who could be verbally and physically combative. In one instance, Colell said Long used his “ngers to mimic shooting her in the back of the head as she talked to another athlete. In another, he grabbed her rear and midsection after she refused to return a cellphone he said was his. I literally feared for myself around him,Ž Colell said in an interview Friday. He was the only athlete that I was scared of.Ž Colell said she wanted to kick Long off the team, but the boys coach urged her to reconsider because that could compromise his goal of joining the Marines. She relented when, at the next track meet, Long apologized in front of several coaches and administrators. Attempts to get comment by phone and in person from of“cials at Newbury Park High School and its school district were unsuccessful. Both were closed because of a destructive wild“re in the area. As investigators worked to “gure out what set him off, President Donald Trump blamed mental illness, describing the gunman as a very sick puppyŽ who had a lot of problems.Ž At the White House on Friday, Trump touted his efforts to fund work on post-traumatic stress disorder among veterans and ignored questions about stricter gun control laws. Investigators have not commented on whether mental illness played a role in the rampage. But a mental health specialist who assessed Long after sheriffs deputies responded to a call about his agitated behavior last spring worried he might be suffering from PTSD. The incident happened in April, when yelling and loud banging noises coming from the home Long shared with his mother prompted a next-door neighbor to call authorities. The mental health specialist concluded there were no grounds to have him involuntarily committed. Among the dead in the shooting rampage were a sheriffs sergeant gunned down as he entered the bar and a U.S. Navy veteran who survived last years massacre in which a gunman in a high-rise Las Vegas hotel killed 58 people at an outdoor country music festival.Official: Gunman apparently stopped shooting to post online NATION BRIEFS

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Page 4 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018ALMANACToday is Sunday, Nov. 11, the 315th day of 2018. There are 50 days left in the year.Today in historyOn Nov. 11, 1921, the remains of an unidentified American service member were interred in a Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery in a ceremony presided over by President Warren G. Harding.On this dateIn 1620 41 Pilgrims aboard the Mayflower, anchored off Massachusetts, signed a compact calling for a body politick.Ž In 1831 former slave Nat Turner, whod led a violent insurrection, was executed in Jerusalem, Virginia. In 1909 President William Howard Taft accepted the recommendation of a joint Army-Navy board that Pearl Harbor in the Hawaiian Islands be made the principal U.S. naval station in the Pacific. In 1918 fighting in World War I ended as the Allies and Germany signed an armistice in the Forest of Compiegne. In 1942 during World War II, Germany completed its occupation of France. In 1960 South Vietnamese President Ngo Dinh Diem survived a coup attempt by army rebels. (However, he was overthrown and killed in 1963.) In 1966 Gemini 12 blasted off on a four-day mission with astronauts James A. Lovell and Edwin BuzzŽ Aldrin Jr. aboard; it was the tenth and final flight of NASAs Gemini program. In 1972 the U.S. Army turned over its base at Long Binh to the South Vietnamese, symbolizing the end of direct U.S. military involvement in the Vietnam War. In 1987 following the failure of two Supreme Court nominations, President Ronald Reagan announced his choice of Judge Anthony M. Kennedy, who went on to win confirmation. In 1992 the Church of England voted to ordain women as priests. In 1998 President Clinton ordered warships, planes and troops to the Persian Gulf as he laid out his case for a possible attack on Iraq. Iraq, meanwhile, showed no sign of backing down from its refusal to deal with U.N. weapons inspectors. Ten years ago: President George W. Bush marked his last Veterans Day as president at a New York pier, speaking to a crowd of thousands gathered for the rededication of the USS Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum. San Franciscos Tim Lincecum won the National League Cy Young Award.Todays birthdays Actress June Whitfield (TV and film: Absolutely FabulousŽ) is 93. Actress Bibi Andersson is 83. Country singer Narvel Felts is 80. Former Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., is 78. Americana roots singer/songwriter Chris Smither is 74. Rock singer-musician Vince Martell (Vanilla Fudge) is 73. The president of Nicaragua, Daniel Ortega, is 73. Rock singer Jim Peterik (Ides of March, Survivor) is 68. Golfer Fuzzy Zoeller is 67. Pop singer-musician Paul Cowsill (The Cowsills) is 67. Rock singer-musician Andy Partridge (XTC) is 65. Singer Marshall Crenshaw is 65. Rock singer Dave Alvin is 63. Rock musician Ian Craig Marsh (Human League; Heaven 17) is 62. Actor Stanley Tucci is 58. Actress Demi Moore is 56. Actress Calista Flockhart is 54. Actor Philip McKeon is 54. Rock musician Scott Mercado is 54. Actor Frank John Hughes is 51. TV personality Carson Kressley is 49. Actor David DeLuise is 47. Actor Adam Beach is 46. Actor Tyler Christopher is 46. Actor Leonardo DiCaprio is 44. Actor Scoot McNairy is 41. Rock musician Jonathan Pretus (Cowboy Mouth) is 37. Actress Frankie Shaw is 37. NFL quarterback Mark Sanchez is 32. Actress Christa B. Allen is 27. Actor Tye Sheridan is 22. Actor Ian Patrick is 16.Bible verseAnd Jesus looking upon them saith, With men it is impossible, but not with God: for with God all things are possible.Ž „ Mark 10:27. Does your situation look impossible? God specializes in that category. Nothing is impossible with God. is no precedent for it, and it is at peace because we willed it and “rst and foremost, because Germany and France wanted it,Ž he said. Merkel was equally convinced of the power their friendship exudes. The will is there, and I say this for Germany with full conviction, to do everything to achieve a more peaceful order in the world even though we know we have very, very much work still ahead of us,Ž she said. The open show of affection was a welcome antidote for Macron. Earlier Saturday, the French leader had a somewhat awkward meeting with U.S. President Donald Trump. As Air Force One landed in Paris on Friday night, Trump wrote on Twitter he had been veryŽ insulted by comments Macron made in the days before that he considered anti-American. A century ago, the entry of U.S. troops into World War I tipped the momentum toward its allies, including France and Britain. Even as he embarked on two days of observances for the Nov. 11, 1918 armistice, Trump said the United States now bears far too much of the burden to defend the West. A ”urry of Armisticerelated diplomacy once again turned Paris, the jewel that Germany sought to take in 1914 but which the Allies successfully fought to defend, into the center of global attention Saturday as dozens of world leaders arrived in the French capital on the eve of the solemn centennial commemorations. Merkels appearance in Compiegne marked how her nations bloodstained history with France has become a close alliance that is now the driving force behind the European Union. In the four years of “ghting, remembered for brutal trench warfare and the “rst use of gas, France, the British empire, Russia and the United States had the main armies opposing a German-led coalition that also included the Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman empires. Almost 10 million soldiers died. France lost 1.4 million and Germany 2 million. Yet, despite a war that was supposed to end all wars, World War II pitted both sides against each other once again in 1940. Across the line that once marked the Western Front, leaders lauded the courage of soldiers who were killed during the unprecedented slaughter, before converging on Paris for a dinner. At the dinner, Macron warned world leaders against taking peace for granted, saying we will talk about this peace that our predecessors tried to construct 100 years ago but failed to preserve, because 20 years later a new war broke out.Ž The armistice entered into force on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, and on Sunday 69 world leaders will commemorate the centennial of the event at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, underneath the Arc de Triomphe in central Paris. At dawn Saturday, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau went to Vimy Ridge, the battle“eld in northern France where Canada found its sense of self when it defeated German opposition against the odds. Standing amid the white headstones against an ashen sky, Trudeau addressed the fallen, saying what Canada has achieved in the past century has been a history built on your sacri“ce. You stand for the values on which Canada was built.Ž In southern Belgiums Mons, Canadians were also lauding George Price, the last Commonwealth soldier to die in the war when he was shot by a German sniper two minutes before the armistice took effect. Trump was looking beyond the tragedy of death and destruction, asking in a tweet: Is there anything better to celebrate than the end of a war, in particular that one, which was one of the bloodiest and worst of all time?Ž After his meeting with Macron, Trump had been scheduled to head to the battle“eld of Belleau Wood, 55 miles northeast of the capital, where U.S. troops had their breakthrough battle by stopping a German push for Paris shortly after entering the war in 1917. The battle of Belleau Wood proved Americas mettle to allies and foes alike, and by the time the war ended U.S. forces were at least an equal to any of the other major armies, which were exhausted and depleted. However, Trump canceled his visit because of bad weather and immediately came in for criticism. Its incredible that a president would travel to France for this signi“cant anniversary „ and then remain in his hotel room watching TV rather than pay in person his respects to the Americans who gave their lives in France for the victory gained 100 years ago tomorrow,Ž David Frum, a speechwriter for former President George W. Bush, tweeted, The White House sent a delegation that included chief of staff John Kelly in Trumps place. Ben Rhodes, who served as deputy national security adviser in the Obama administration, said the White House should have had a fallback plan for the president. There is always a rain option. Always,Ž Rhodes said. Trump is scheduled to visit a different U.S. cemetery close to Paris on Sunday.FALLENFROM PAGE 1 AP PHOTOPresident Donald Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron gesture during their meeting inside the Elysee Palace in Paris Saturday. Trump is joining other world leaders at centennial commemorations in Paris this weekend to mark the end of World War I. Snipes also must share documents that show the number of ballots cast, the number of ballots counted and how many are still to be counted, all requests made in Scotts complaint. This court “nds once again Broward County is under the microscope and being viewed by the entire nation,Ž Phillips said. Hearing argument, this court “nds that there has been a violation of the Florida Constitution, the Florida statute public records act and pursuant to the applicable case law.Ž In Palm Beach County, Scotts campaign alleged Bucher did not allow outside witnesses to watch elections staff duplicate ballots that couldnt be fed through machines because they had been damaged or not “lled out properly. Palm Beach County Circuit Judge Krista Marx ordered on Friday that any disquali“ed ballots will need to be reviewed by the countys canvassing board. The judge also ordered the release of the names of voters who cast provisional ballots. Nelsons campaign is suing Secretary of State Ken Detzner, accusing election of“cials of disenfranchising voters by discarding absentee and provisional ballots where the signatures dont appear to match. Marc Elias, lead recount attorney for Nelson, said election of“cials are using their untrained opinionsŽ on handwriting to discard votes. He said Scotts calls for the Florida Department of Law Enforcement to investigate elections of“cials in Broward and Palm Beach counties crossed a line. Elias said he thinks that Nelson will be ahead when the recount is completed and that Scotts comments re”ect a candidate who is fearful. This is not a Third World dictatorship,Ž he said. We dont let people seize ballots when they think theyre losing.Ž Scott is touting his own legal “repower. He tweeted Friday morning that the National Republican Senatorial Committee has retained the law “rm Gibson Dunn „ veterans of the Bush v. Gore case that decided the 2000 presidential contest in favor of George W. Bush.COUNTINGFROM PAGE 1 By ELAINE GANLEYASSOCIATED PRESSPARIS „ They were messengers, spies and sentinels. They led cavalry charges, carried supplies to the front, comforted wounded soldiers and died by the millions during World War I. Horses, mules, dogs, pigeons and even a baboon all were a vital „ and for decades overlooked „ part of the Allied war machine. Researchers have been hardpressed to “nd of“cial accounts of the services rendered by animals during the Great War. But if their labors once were taken for granted, four-legged and winged warriors have been acknowledged more recently as unsung heroes. France recently decided to recognize their wartime role. And in 2004, Britain installed a huge memorial on the edge of Londons Hyde Park to all the animals that served, suffered and died alongside the British, Commonwealth and Allied forces in the wars and con”icts of the 20th century.Ž Heres a look at how they contributed.WHAT THEY DIDAn estimated 10 million horses and mules, 100,000 dogs and 200,000 pigeons were enrolled in the war effort, according to Eric Baratay, a French historian specializing in the response of animals to the chaos, fear and smells of death in the mission that man thrust upon them. World War I marked the start of industrial warfare, with tanks, trucks, aircraft and machine guns in action. But the growing sophistication of the instruments of death couldnt match the dog tasked with “nding the wounded, the horses and mules hauling munitions and food or the pigeons serving as telecommunications operators or even eyes, carrying pigeongramsŽ or tiny cameras to record German positions. Indeed, gas masks were “tted to the muzzles of four-legged warriors braving noxious battle“eld fumes.FEATHERED HEROESCher Ami, or Dear Friend, the carrier pigeon who wouldnt quit, lived up to her name, saving the lives of 194 American troops of the Lost BattalionŽ of the 77th Infantry Division, isolated behind enemy lines during the 1918 Meuse-Argonne offensive in eastern France. About 550 men had held their ground against a far larger German force for days before coming under “re from American troops unaware the trapped soldiers werent the enemy. On Oct. 4, Maj. Charles Whittlesey sent Cher Ami into the skies with a “nal message giving the U.S. battalions location, followed by a plea: For heavens sake stop it.Ž Cher Ami lost an eye and a leg from German gun“re, but kept ”ying, around 25 miles in about a half-hour, according to the United States World War One Centennial Commission. Survivors of the Lost BattalionŽ returned to American lines four days later. Another carrier pigeon named Vaillant, assigned to the French military, also performed extraordinary feats during the war. On June 4, 1916, he was released into the sky with the desperate message, Hes my last pigeon.Ž French Commander Sylvain Eugene Raynal, encircled by Germans at the Fort de Vaux near Verdun, was counting on Vaillant to save his men. The feisty bird ”ew through toxic gas and smoke, reaching the Verdun pigeon loft choked by fumes. With no help arriving despite Vaillants courageous effort, Raynal and his men surrendered three days later.ROUND EM UPHorses are ancient warriors, but most of those conscripted during World War I werent war-ready. They died by the millions, from disease, exhaustion and enemy “re, forcing the French and British armies to turn to America to renew their supply. A veritable industry developed with more than half a million horses and mules shipped by boat to Europe by fall 1917, according to the American Battle Monuments Commission. So important was the commerce that the Santa Fe Railroad named a station Drage, after British Lt. Col. F.B. Drage, the commander of the British Remount Commission in Lathrop, Missouri, a major stockyard for the future beasts of war.SERVICE BY EXOTICSAmong the more exotic animals called into service was a baboon named Jackie, who served with the 1st South African Infantry Brigade in then British-occupied Egypt and later in the trenches in France and Belgium. His acute hearing and keen eyesight helped warn soldiers of enemy movement or possible attacks when he would screech and tug on their clothing. Jackie was wounded in Flanders Fields when the South African brigade came under heavy shelling in April 1918 and his leg had to be amputated.DOGS OF WARMans best friend helped soldiers survive. Dogs served, “rstly, as spotters of the wounded, learning to identify ally from enemy. They also served as sentinels, messengers, transporters and chasers of rats „ the bane of the trenches along with lice and ”eas. The French military created a service devoted to dogs of war in December 1915. Less of“cial, but crucial to soldiers morale, was the role of dogs and other creatures in the trenches, and as mascots. Stray dogs running from “ghting were adopted as companions along with other animals, including a Royal Air Force fox mascot adopted by British pilots. These dogs and other mascots helped soldiers think of life ... and the life they hoped to “nd again,Ž said Baratay, the French historian, in a speech last month in Paris.Unsung heroes: Animals played vital and varied roles in WWI AP FILE PHOTOIn this undated WWI “le photo, soldiers move toward the front with their machine guns and ammunition pulled by dogs in Belgium. FROM PAGE ONE

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The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 5 Name That CompanyI trace my roots back to 1930, when the Oak Ridge Telephone Company was bought for $500. Over the years, I bought other telecom companies (such as Qwest, Savvis and Level 3 Communications) and some security businesses, too. I was added to the S&P 500 in 1999. In the early 2000s, I operated in 22 states and was focused on rural markets. Today, headquartered in Monroe, Louisiana, and with a market value recently near $23 billion, Im the second largest U.S. communications provider to global enterprise customers, serving customers in more than 60 countries. Who am I?Think you know the answer? Well announce it in next weeks edition. IRA contribution is $5,500 (plus $1,000 if youre 50 or older), and its $18,500 (plus $6,000) for 401(k)s. The earlier in the year you do so, the longer your contributions will have to grow. (Learn more about these plans at fool.com/retirement .) € Plan to grab any available tax credits. If your income is low enough and youre contributing to retirement plans, you may be eligible for the Savers Credit, worth up to $1,000 for a single person and $2,000 for couples. If you pay someone to care for your child under age 13 so that you can work, you might be eligible for the Child and Dependent Care Credit. The Child Tax Credit offers $2,000 per qualifying child under the age of 17. The American Opportunity Tax Credit offers savings of up to $2,500 per eligible student for qualified tuition and fees paid by or for the student, while the Lifetime Learning Credit offers up to $2,000. If youve recently adopted a child, you may be able to enjoy a credit of up to $13,840. There are many other credits to explore. For more information, visit irs.gov and usa.gov/taxes .The Motley Fool TakeA Biotech Bargain?Biotech stocks are rarely value stocks, but Celgene (Nasdaq: CELG) is an exception, with a forwardlooking price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio recently below 8. Why havent investors been snapping up shares? Well, many worry about Celgenes overreliance on multiple myeloma drug Revlimid, and about the drug losing its patent protection. Revlimid makes up more than 60 percent of Celgenes total sales and is expected to generate nearly $10 billion in sales in 2018. But Celgene has protected its key product through settlements and agreements. A December 2015 agreement with a handful of generic producers will keep a flood of generics off pharmacy shelves until the end of January 2026. That leaves several years in which Celgene can profit handsomely from one of the best-selling drugs in the world. Theres also been backlash over Celgenes flubbing of its new drug application for the multiple sclerosis drug ozanimod, which was being counted on to help diversify the companys sales away from Revlimid. But even with the delay, ozanimod could still be a multi-billiondollar drug when it does come to market. Meanwhile, the companys other key cancer and inflammation medicines look to be on track to grow organically on the bases of volume, price and label-expansion, and its pipeline sports more potential blockbusters. There seems to be little for investors to worry about. (The Motley Fool owns shares of and has recommended Celgene.) Ask the Fool My Dumbest InvestmentRenewable PlasticIm an environmentalist and, as such, I hate plastic bags and all things plastic. Some years ago I ran across a small company that was a leading manufacturer of proprietary biobased, sustainable bioplastics,Ž focused on renewable plastics, and winning various awards in Europe. So I plunked down a huge sum (for me) for some shares. Meanwhile, my job was getting highly pressured, my mother was dying, and I stopped watching my portfolio. I lost everything but $1.13. Big lesson: I watch my stocks all the time now. And I read and evaluate companies as well as I can, using spreadsheets and everything „ with better results. „ M.K., online The Fool Responds: Like many investors, especially beginners, you got overly excited by a stocks story and potential and didnt spend enough time assessing its financials. Ideally, a company you invest in should be profitable, with little debt and increasing revenue and earnings. Many young and small companies arent at that level yet, so they can be extra risky. You need to keep an eye on your stock holdings, too. This one offered a few red flags over the years, such as two reverse stock splits „ and hefty ones, at that. Shares split 1-for-40 in 2010, leaving anyone with 2,000 shares suddenly with only 50 shares. A 1-for-50 split in 2014 would have turned those 50 shares into just one. The company filed for bankruptcy protection in 2014, too. Beef Up Your InsuranceQWhats umbrella insurance? „ F.W., Mansfield, OhioAIt exists to keep you from getting soaked financially. It offers coverage exceeding the limits of the policies covering your house or apartment, car and more. Umbrella policies can pay for any property damage and personal injury youre found responsible for causing. Policies also cover losses not typically paid for by standard insurance, such as coverage for rental units, or coverage if youre sued for slandering or libeling someone. Imagine a scenario in which youre sued and end up ordered to pay $1 million. Your regular insurance policy wont offer anything close to that, but an umbrella policy can. Umbrella insurance wont cost you a lot, either: A $1 million umbrella insurance policy often costs around $100 to $350 annually. ***QIm thinking of selling two stocks I own. One doesnt pay a dividend, and the other hasnt grown much in the past few years. Should I just move that money into CDs? „ G.V., onlineAIf you no longer have faith in the long-term growth potential of either stock, do sell. But dont sell any holding just because it pays little or no dividend. There are two main ways to make money in stocks: dividends and stock-price appreciation. A company may pay no dividend (perhaps because its still trying to grow rapidly and is investing any available cash back into the business), but if its executing its strategies successfully, its stock price might increase substantially over time, rewarding shareholders. Some of the best stocks will offer both growing dividends and stockprice growth. Certificates of deposit are fine for short-term savings, but with interest rates so low these days, they arent that great as long-term investments.Want more information about stocks? Send us an email to foolnews@fool.com.Fools SchoolSmart Year-End Tax MovesAs the end of the year approaches, look into what smart tax moves you can make. For example, donate cash, stocks or other assets to charities, especially if you plan to itemize your deductions. Also: € Review your investment portfolios winners and losers. If youve sold some holdings and have substantial capital gains on which youll be taxed, you might want to sell some underwater stocks for a loss to offset some or all of those gains. (Dont buy that stock back until after 30 days pass, though, for the loss to count.) € Spend any funds in a Flexible Spending Account (FSA) on qualifying expenses, as thats use-it-or-loseit money. Some employers may give you an extra 2 1/2 months to spend it, and some may let you roll over up to $500 to the following year. € Contribute to an IRA (and/or your employer-sponsored retirement plan such as a 401(k)) if you havent done so yet. The maximum 2018 2018 THE MOTLEY FOOL/DIST. BY ANDREWS MCMEEL SYNDICATION 11/8 LAST WEEKS TRIVIA ANSWERI trace my roots way back to the 1812 founding of the City Bank of New York, which later grew into the National City Bank of New York. I had a network of ATMs in the late 1970s. I became a major credit card issuer after buying Carte Blanche in 1978 and am now the top issuer globally. Im an international banking giant, with more than 200,000 employees, more than 100 million customers and a market value recently near $165 billion. I rake in more than $70 billion annually. Im the result of a 1998 merger with Travelers Group. Who am I? (Answer: Citigroup) Want to Invest? Email us at foolnews@fool.com, and well send you some tips to start investing. Sorry, we cant provide individual financial advice. UNTHEMEDBY PATRICK BERRY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS1 Goes to grab a bite, say14 What a crop top exposes21 Anything else, or can I go?Ž22 1984Ž superstate that includes America23 Early reel-to-reel devices24 Expired IDs?25 Marriage Italian-StyleŽ star26 Give mouth-to-mouth to?27 Donny who won Dancing With the StarsŽ29 Construction on Broadway30 Speak sharply31 Stockpot addition32 Stickers forming a patch33 Keep it under your hat!34 Petulant expression35 Leaves mystified36 Soda brand with more than 90 flavors37 Ancestry41 Picks up42 Tommy or Jimmy of jazz43 As a whole44 Two for one?45 Case workers?46 Golfing hazards47 ____ pasta (farfalle)48 2018s debate over Yanny or Laurel,Ž e.g.49 Joey Potters portrayer on Dawsons CreekŽ51 Travel on-line?55 Receptive to new ideas56 Party of 13?58 Home arena of the Bruins and Celtics59 Painters roll60 Overflow61 Trunk fastener?62 Lets out63 Ringo Starrs real first name67 Palate cleanser in a multicourse meal68 Reptiles that can walk on ceilings69 Casanovas intrigues70 Ran into in court?71 Wigs out72 On the take73 ____ the Great (ninthcentury English king)74 Cereal ingredient75 Places to crash on road trips76 Very77 Purely academic78 Strikers replacement82 Copa Amrica cheer83 Century in American politics84 Brewery sights85 In the ballpark86 Old It cleans your breath while it cleans your teethŽ sloganeer88 Awfully large91 Takes to the sky92 Paprika lookalike93 Forerunners of combines94 You cant go back on them DOWN1 Cries loudly2 Greek hero killed by a giant scorpion3 Who once said, You wouldnt have won if wed beaten youŽ4 Win every prize in5 Green housewarming gift6 Wordsworth wrote one on immortality7 Crank up the amp to 11 and go wild8 Name, as a successor9 Essentially10 Many faculty members, in brief11 Stan who co-created Spider-Man12 Presented perfectly13 Courtroom periods14 Travels by car15 Touchscreen array16 Document kept in a safe17 Untrustworthy sort18 Sort of19 Shiny beetle disliked by fruit growers20 You should avoid feeding on them28 Food & Wine and Field & Stream31 Rock musician with a knighthood32 Deadbeat student at TVs Highland High33 The Lady Is a TrampŽ lyricist34 Stephen King novel with a misspelling in the title35 Like some tires36 Shade in the woods37 Steve who co-created Spider-Man38 Absorbed39 Express40 Muddling through41 Wearers of white hats42 Sphere44 Game featured in 2006s Casino RoyaleŽ45 Department of Buildings issuance47 Became inseparable48 Selling point?50 Companies that need help51 Didnt bid52 Ancient Mexicas, e.g.53 Sister of Tiffany54 It may be open for business56 Unkind, as criticism57 German-Swiss author who won the 1946 Nobel in Literature59 Safer of 60 MinutesŽ61 Satines profession in Moulin Rouge!Ž63 Copper wheels?64 Torch carriers announcement65 Julius Caesars first wife66 Calls from quarterbacks67 Its shell doesnt crack68 U.S. Naval Academy mascot70 Small jumper71 Shows earnings73 James of TVs How the West Was WonŽ74 Field with lots of growth?76 Pan resistant to aging77 Ars ____ (anagram of anagrams,Ž aptly)78 Slaloming spot79 Ford Mustang, for one80 Valuable possession81 Round units?83 Stuff84 What an essay presents85 Her 2018 album Dancing QueenŽ consists entirely of Abba covers87 Break89 Word spoken while waving90 Well chosen 1234567891011121314151617181920 21 22 23 24 2526272829 30313233 343536 373839404142 434445 464748 495051525354 55 5657 5859 606162 636465666768 697071 727374 75767778798081 82838485 8687888990 9192 9394Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). NEW YORK TIMES SUNDAY CROSSWORDFOR ANSWERS TURN TO PAGE 3No. 1104

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Page 6 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 CRYPTOGRAMS HISTORICAL HOWLERS by Myles Mellor 1. YI FIP QCTBBF ZCCY JI XCJ TZ TQD? A JNAZD A ZITN XPF! QCTBBF! 2. MJY OLO VMU PDWIVC YUNNLKXVJK OURPDLEU VMU KWRVC XUKUDWN KWBJNUJK WIVUD MU YWR OUIUWVUO WV VMU EWVVNU JI YWVUDNJJ? ENJYKWBWDV! 3. TVDS VD MWX MJQOO, YWADA BNGDR VNA YWJSNSM LWOODD EBILG EQX VWT RNR VD YIGD NX? VDEJDT-DR NX! 4. XJ YRU RZ XVGR PH CBXEEXRZKG JP QRMG R BPTZV JRCEG HPB JWG ABGRJ MXZA RBJWTB. YWP QRVG XJ? UXB KTQHGBGZKG! 1. Do you really need to get an ark? I think I Noah guy! Really! 2. How did the crafty Wellington describe the nasty general Napoleon after he was defeated at the battle of Waterloo? Blownapart! 3. When he got gruff, Moses liked his morning coffee black but how did he make it? Hebrew-ed it! 4. It was an idea of brilliance to make a round table for the great King Arthur. Who made it? Sir Cumference! CROSSWORD PUZZLE GOREN BRIDGECRYPTOGRAMS HOLIDAY MATHIS HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21-April 19). Understand more, fear less. Its not really a goal; its just the natural result when you lead with your curious mind and follow up with your courteous ways. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). The good thing about envy is that it gives people a window into their potential that they may not have seen before. We tend to be envious of the things that we have in us to accomplish. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Youll run into another one of loves paradoxes: You want someone to put your happiness rst, but this can happen only when you put anothers rst. It works out best when two people can be made happy by the same sorts of things. CANCER (June 22-July 22). Sometimes it feels like you against the world when its really only you against a few things that didnt go immediately right. After you take a breath and adjust your attitude, try again; the world will get on your side. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Your style isnt just how you dress or what you own; its much deeper than that. Its a mood, a tone, a way of moving about the world. Your outside is changing to reect the new style emerging in you. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Beauty exists in the mind. Its only an idea, but its a contagious one. Youll see beauty and enhance it with the quality of your attention. Then others who didnt see it before will see it, too. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Its once again time to get rid of some superuous things. This is becoming easier for you because the benets are so rewarding. Eliminate what you dont need so that what you do need will become clear. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Do research before you take out your wallet. You will either save a bundle or wind up spending about the same but feeling much better about it because you investigated other options. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). Sorrow is impermanent, and faith is essential. Think back to the younger you. Wouldnt you rush back and share the message if you could? Your eorts are not in vain, and neither are your dreams. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Its one thing to get attention and another thing to hold it. The same goes for power, love, money and any number of possessions. Attaining tends to be easier than maintaining. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You assume responsibility for the fulllment of your loved ones needs. Whether this should be the case is another discussion, though unquestionably, youre made stronger by your caring eorts. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). When does self-care become self-indulgence? The dierence between what feels good and what is good for you is known by your higher mind. Hint: Self-care counts toward health; self-indulgence subtracts from it. TODAYS BIRTHDAY (Nov. 11). The rsts in life are always the most memorable „ for instance, the rst kiss or the rst time you drive alone. Youll be surprised and delighted by what sort of rsts come up this year. Other highlights include an award given by your peers, a meaningful dance or artful expression, and a far-ung gathering. Leo and Pisces adore you. Your lucky numbers are: 17, 9, 22, 29 and 15.PUZZLE ANSWERSPuzzles on previous pages)

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The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 7 CROSSWORD PUZZLE DEAR ABBY HELOISE JUMBLE DEAR ABBY: My girlfriend and I love each other very much and have been living together with our children for ve years. We intend to get married soon. Here is the rub: Shes old school.Ž She believes she should receive a diamond ring as part of the marriage proposal. I would marry her tomorrow, but I dont believe in spending thousands of dollars on a piece of carbon. I understand that somehow she equates her value/social status with the size of her wedding ring (I deserve a nice ringŽ), but I dont agree. She has oered to chip in and even buy one from a used wedding site, but Id rather spend that money on something we could both enjoy or at least on something more practical that she can enjoy. I can nd the money to buy the ring, but in my heart, I dont see the value or buy into the fantasy the diamond industry has put into some womens heads. What do I do? Cave in and give her what she wants because I love her? Or push for a compromise, which will denitely be an uphill battle and potentially spoil what is supposed to be a special thing in our lives? „ HUNG UP ON THE RING IN RENO DEAR HUNG UP: Give her the ring. It will be cheaper in the long run. Trust me on that. And in the future, when she asks what you would like for a gift, tell her YOUR fantasy is that shell make a comparable down payment on your next car. That way, she can make your dream come true. DEAR ABBY: My father and his wife are retired and live across the country from us. Dad is hard of hearing and doesnt like to use the phone, even with hearing aids. He also wont text, so we mostly communicate by email. The challenge is that he and his wife share an email account. She reads every message I send to Dad and often replies without telling him, so Im never sure if he receives them or not. Also, if were discussing something sensitive „ like nances or issues with my siblings „ shell weigh in when its not really her business. In one case, she posted parts of our discussion on her social media! I have talked to Dad about this. He says married couples dont have secrets. I suspect he may not want his wife to be able to communicate privately with other people (shes much younger than he is) and prefers the shared email for this reason. Is it unreasonable for me to want a direct line of communication with my father, or must I save up private conversations for the one time a year we are able to visit in person? „ DISTRESSED DAUGHTER IN IDAHO DEAR DAUGHTER: Im sorry I cant wave a magic wand and change your father. Whats going on should not be blamed on his wife. Because he has made plain to you that he sees no reason for privacy and wants her to be privy to your conversations, saving up those private chats until they are in personŽ is exactly what you are going to have to do. DEAR VETERANS: I salute your service to our country. My thanks to each of you, as well as to the brave men and women still on active duty, some of whom are in harms way. You personify patriotism and self-sacrice with your dedication. I also would like to acknowledge your families for the sacrices they, too, have made and continue to make every day. „ LOVE, ABBYDear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. For everything you need to know about wedding planning, order How to Have a Lovely Wedding.Ž Send your name and mailing address, plus check or money order for $7 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby, Wedding Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Shipping and handling are included in the price.)Dear Readers: Want to give your family a dierent avored holiday turkey? Try this easy one „ the mayonnaise method. This will keep the whole turkey moist and also create a golden skin color. Heres how: 1.Rub the turkey all over with REAL mayonnaise before putting it into the oven. 2.Place an aluminum foil tent over it and bake at 350 degrees F for the appropriate time for the size of the turkey. 3.Remove the tent during the last 20 to 30 minutes so the skin will roast to a golden brown. You also can sprinkle a bit of paprika over the turkey. „ Heloise Dear Heloise: I am hosting my rst family Thanksgiving. I am worried about how I will know if the turkey is done, which is important. Can you help me? „ Colette from Florida Dear Colette: Yes, I can! If the turkey you have purchased does not have a pop-up temperature button, heres how to determine if it is cooked properly: 1.Get a knife and stick it pretty far into the turkey thigh. 2.If the juice comes out completely clear, the turkey is indeed done. 3.However, you should also use a thermometer to be sure it reads 180 degrees F. The turkey should be done then. Allow it to rest for 20 minutes or so before you carve it because that will seal in the juices. „ Heloise Dear Readers: Hiking is so popular during fall and winter, and those boots can get wet, muddy and dirty. If the boots are just dusty, use a shoe brush to get o as much as you can and nish by wiping o any remaining debris with a paper towel. If the boots are muddy and wet, take these steps to clean them: „First, allow the boots to dry completely before you start to clean them. „Use a soft-bristled brush to remove the dried mud from the entire boot. Be sure to also scrub the seams and hidden spots. Then wipe o with water. „Air out the inside of the boots and put several used fabric softener sheets inside to deodorize them. If the outside of the boot is leather, apply a leather conditioner.„ Heloise Dear Heloise: When cleaning recently, I found a huge box of old family photos, and I dont have room on the surfaces in my home to display them. Do you have any ideas for me to show them and share with my family? „ Diane from Kansas Dear Diane: I sure do. Create a family history by rst sorting and organizing the photos. You could hang them on a long, empty wall either chronologically or in dierent groupings. Lay the framed photos on the oor to get an idea of how they will look grouped together. You also could secure a long curtain rod to the wall and hang the framed pictures, attaching ribbons from the curtain rod to the top corners of each photo. „ Heloise Dear Readers: When you volunteer to bring food to a gathering, it can be a real hassle to get the dish back afterward. Heres what I do: During the year, I buy pretty dishes and platters at garage sales. Then I leave the dish as a hostess gift. „ HeloiseA diamond ring comes between couple planning their marriageDear Abby Hints from Heloise

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SPORTSSunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com | www.facebook.com/SunPreps | @Sun_Preps Cape Coral-native a fit with RaysThere are a number of reasons why Mike Zunino is a logical addition for the Rays. On a team of mostly young players, with veteran leaders Carlos Gomez and Sergio Romo not being brought back, Zunino will be a good guy to have around. See more on page 4INDEX | Lottery 2 | NBA 2 | NHL 2 | Local Sports 3 | MLB 4 | Scoreboard 5 | Colleges 6 | NFL 7 | Golf 8 | Auto Racing 8 | Weather 8 By RICK STROUDTAMPA BAY TIMESTAMPA „ The Bucs may have the worst defense in the NFL, allowing 34.4 points per game, and thats a pity. If Tampa Bay was known for anything, its defense. All three Bucs players in the Pro Football Hall of Fame „ Lee Roy Selmon, Warren Sapp and Derrick Brooks „ played on that side of the ball. So how did the Bucs get this bad on defense? Three times they have allowed 30 or more points in the “rst half this season. Three other times, they yielded 24 points or more before halftime. Partly, believe it or not, its by design. The Bucs didnt intend to be this bad, of course, but they did choose to get on the wave of offense that has taken over the league. Fact is, theres a lot of teams with bad defenses this season. The Los Angeles Rams were the only NFLs only undefeated at 8-0 last Sunday when they traveled to New Orleans last Sunday. A defense that included Aaron Donald, Ndamukong Suh, Dante Fowler and Marcus Peters (Aqib Talib is on injured reserve) went out and gave up 45 points to the Saints in the Mercedes-Benz Dome. And nobody noticed. Why? Because offense is king in the NFL. Defense used to win championships, but its hard to make that argument anymore. Not with rules changes that prevent players from hitting defenseless receivers and have shortened the strike zone on quarterbacks to a shoe box. You have to keep up on the scoreboard with Tom Brady, Drew Brees, Ben Roethlisberger, Aaron Rodgers and Patrick By MARK LONGAP SPORTS WRITERGAINESVILLE, Fla. „ Feleipe Franks placed his index finger across his lips after both touchdown runs, sending a message to a home crowd that booed him earlier. After the second one, there was nothing Franks could have done to silence the Florida faithful. Franks accounted for three touchdowns, including the go-ahead score with a little more than four minutes remaining, and the 19th-ranked Gators rallied to beat South Carolina 35-31 Saturday and end a two-game losing streak. Im a super emotional player,Ž Franks said. That what makes it a two-way street. Lots of people are going to like me and lots of people arent going to like me. Maybe thats something I shouldnt have did. But at the same time, Im an emotional player. I want to win as much as anybody in the world. Im an emotional guy. Thats the way I play my game. I do apologize for that.Ž Franks dived across the goal line on fourth down from inside the 1-yard line to put the Gators (7-3, 5-3 Southeastern Conference, No. 15 CFP) ahead for the first time all day and for good. Coach Dan Mullen said he didnt hesitate to go for it even though a short field goal would have tied the game. The Gators overcame a 17-point deficit in the second half to prevent former Florida coach and current South Carolina coach Will Muschamp from getting a win in his second trip back to Gainesville. C.J. Henderson sealed the victory when he intercepted Jake Bentleys third-down pass on the ensuing drive. Muschamp has dropped eighth of his last 10 games in the Swamp. Its a hard, tough loss,Ž said Muschamp, who is 0-2 against his former team in Gainesville. We had our opportunities. Give By VINNIE PORTELLSPORTS EDITORImmediately upon walking into the gym at St. Thomas Aquinas, the Venice High girls volleyball team was met with a stark reminder as to who it was facing in the 8A semi“nals. With dozens upon dozens of state championship banners crammed into the gym and a packed and rowdy student section, the Indians were immediately pitted in one of their most dif“cult environments of the year. Though the Indians advanced past the Raiders to win a state title in 2017, Venice wouldnt have such luck on Saturday afternoon, falling in four sets (17-25, 21-25, 25-21, 21-25) in Fort Lauderdale. It was a tough environment and you have to give credit to Aquinas because I thought they played really great,Ž Venice coach Brian Wheatley said. We had a lot of tape on them and I thought that was one of the best matches theyve played. We knew it was gonna be a battle coming over here. Its a tough place to play.Ž Playing in front of a jampacked gym and a raucous Aquinas student section, the Lady Raiders were “red up at their chance for revenge of last years state semi“nals. With 10 seniors on the roster who experienced the loss to Venice last season, getting a chance to play the Indians again in the playoffs was more than enough motivation for St. Thomas Aquinas. It feels pretty good, Im not gonna lie,Ž St. Thomas Aquinas assistant coach Heather Trebbien said on avenging last seasons loss to Venice. I can say one of the things we had going for us is that we have 10 seniors and they were all here last year and they know what it felt like. They didnt want that to happen again.Ž What might have served as even more motivation for the Lady Raiders was the absence of head coach Lisa Zielinski. Following news of her son having a heart attack yesterday, Zielinski traveled up to Gainesville to be with him for his heart surgery today. Though she couldnt be there, Zielinski watched the match on FaceTime and was in her girls minds. Initially they were obviously a little upset about it, but I feel like By FRED GOODALLAP SPORTS WRITERORLANDO, Fla. „ No. 11 UCF is becoming predictable as the Knights pursue another undefeated season. The defending American Athletic Conference champions keep on winning while insisting they arent listening to chatter about whether they will be deserving of a berth in the College Football Playoff if they remain unbeaten when the four-team “eld is picked in December. Now, coach Josh Heupel and his players say theyre turning their focus to No. 25 Cincinnati, which comes to Florida next week for a crucial AAC test. A victory over the Bearcats will clinch a NFL: Tampa Bay Buccaneers COLLEGE FOOTBALL: No. 15 Florida 35, South Carolina 31 PREP VOLLEYBALL: St. Thomas Aquinas 3, Venice 1 COLLEGE FOOTBALL: No. 11 UCF 35, Navy 24Franks quiets crowd, Florida beats South Carolina AP PHOTOFeleipe Franks celebrates after his “rst rushing touchdown of the day. After his score, he made a shushing motion to the crowd, who had booed him earlier.FLORIDA | 6Milton accounts for 3 TDs, UCF beats Navy 35-24 AP PHOTOCentral Florida wide receiver Dredrick Snelso celebrates in the end zone after scoring a 34-yard receiving touchdown during the “rst half of Saturdays game.UCF | 6Why is the Bucs defense so bad? Its complicatedBUCS | 6Indians rally too little, too late in SemisINDIANS | 3 2100 Kings Highway € Port Charlotte, Floridawww.mapleleafgcc.net Tee Times: 941-629-1666 MAPLE LEAF GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB READERS CHOICE AWARD2018 Memberships Availableadno=3625574-1 TEE TIMES: 941-629-1666 COME PLAY!1.4 MILLION DOLLAR RENOVATED GOLF COURSEBrand new Greens, Fairways, Tees & Bunkers

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Page 2 SP www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 CONTACT USBenjamin Baugh € Editor bbaugh@sun-herald.com or 941-206-1175 Jacob Hoag € Staff writer jhoag@sun-herald.com or 941-206-1122 Email: sports@sun-herald.com Fax: 941-629-2085 HOW TO ƒ€ Submit a story idea: Email sports@sun-herald.com or call 941-206-1175. Must contain name, address and number. € Report a high school result: Call 877-818-6204 or 941-206-1175. € To report an error: Call the sports department at 941-206-1175 or email sports@sun-herald.com. SunCoast Sports NowWhen news breaks, you can find it at www.yoursun.com. Like us and share our photos on Facebook: facebook.com/ SunPreps Follow us on Twitter for live updates and breaking news: @Sun_Preps SPORTS ON TV Florida Lotterywww.flalottery.com PICK 2Nov. 10N ......................................1-2 Nov. 10D.......................................3-4 Nov. 9N ........................................2-1 Nov. 9D.........................................1-2 Nov. 8N ........................................6-5 Nov. 8D.........................................3-6 D-Day, N-Night PICK 3Nov. 10N ...................................5-4-0 Nov. 10D....................................6-1-6 Nov. 9N .....................................6-7-9 Nov. 9D......................................1-7-5 Nov. 8N .....................................4-1-8 Nov. 8D......................................6-5-8 D-Day, N-Night PICK 4Nov. 10N ...............................6-2-8-4 Nov. 10D................................3-5-7-5 Nov. 9N .................................5-1-0-6 Nov. 9D..................................7-4-3-7 Nov. 8N .................................2-2-6-9 Nov. 8D..................................0-4-8-1 D-Day, N-Night PICK 5Nov. 10N ............................9-2-0-8-8 Nov. 10D.............................9-7-4-9-6 Nov. 9N ..............................4-9-8-3-5 Nov. 9D...............................0-3-3-1-3 Nov. 8N ..............................4-5-7-8-5 Nov. 8D...............................6-6-0-2-2 D-Day, N-Night FANTASY 5Nov. 10 ........................................Late Nov. 9 .........................7-17-18-22-26 Nov. 8 .......................13-21-25-34-35PAYOFF FOR NOV. 94 5-digit winner ..............$53,364.40 326 4-digit winners .............$105.50 10,290 3-digit winners ..................$9 CASH FOR LIFENov. 8 .......................31-35-42-44-52 Cash Ball ..........................................4 € € € Nov. 5 .......................19-39-40-47-60 Cash Ball ..........................................4PAYOFF FOR NOV. 80 5-5 CB .........................$1,000/Day 0 5-5 ............................$1,000/Week 2 4-5 CB .................................$2,500 3 4-5 .........................................$500 LUCKY MONEYNov. 9 .............................12-24-31-35 Lucky Ball ........................................17 € € € Nov. 6 .................................1-9-16-37 Lucky Ball ..........................................5PAYOFF FOR NOV. 90 4-of-4 LB .........................$500,000 3 4-of-4 .............................$1,537.50 28 3-of-4 LB .........................$361.00 489 3-of-4 ..............................$60.50 LOTTONov. 10 ........................................Late Nov. 7 ....................2-12-23-27-44-48 Nov. 3 ....................3-10-18-27-41-43PAYOFF FOR NOV. 70 6-digit winners ..............$8 million 24 5-digit winners ............$3,606.50 954 4-digit winners ...............$64.50ESTIMATED JACKPOT $9 million POWERBALLNov. 3 ..........................................Late Powerball ....................................Late € € € Nov. 7 .......................26-28-34-42-50 Powerball .......................................25PAYOFF FOR NOV. 70 5-5 + PB ......................$71 million 0 5-5 .................................$1 million 0 4-5 + PB ............................$50,000 20 4-5 .......................................$100ESTIMATED JACKPOT $92 Million MEGA MILLIONSNov. 9 .........................8-14-27-57-67 Mega Ball .........................................5 € € € Nov. 6 .......................28-34-37-56-69 Mega Ball .......................................12 PAYOFF FOR NOV. 90 5 of 5 + MB ...................$90 mllion 0 5 of 5 ..............................$1 million 1 4 of 5 + MB .......................$10,000 20 4 of 5 ....................................$500ESTIMATED JACKPOT $106 million AUTO RACING12:05 p.m. ESPN2 „ Formula One, Heineken Brazilian Grand Prix, at Sao Paolo 2:30 p.m. NBC „ NASCAR, Monster Energy Cup Series, Can-Am 500, at Avondale, Ariz.CFL FOOTBALL1 p.m. ESPNEWS „ Playos, East Division, semi“nal, teams TBA 4:30 p.m. ESPN2 „ Playos, West Division, semi“nal, teams TBACOLLEGE BASKETBALL1 p.m. ESPN „ Army at Duke 1:30 p.m. FS1 „ ETSU at Creighton 4 p.m. BTN „ Fort Wayne at Ohio St. ESPNU „ SE Louisiana at Nebraska 5 p.m. SEC „ Hartford at Mississippi St. 6 p.m. BTN „ Florida Gulf Coast at Michigan St. 7 p.m. SEC „ Appalachian St. at AlabamaCOLLEGE SOCCER2 p.m. FS2 „ Men, Big East Championship, teams TBA, at higher seedDRAG RACING11:30 a.m. FS1 „ NHRA, Auto Club Finals, qualifying rounds, at Pomona, Calif. (taped) 4 p.m. FS1 „ NHRA, Auto Club Finals, championship rounds, at Pomona, Calif.FIGURE SKATINGNoon NBC „ ISU Grand Prix, NHK Trophy, at Hiroshima, Japan (taped) GOLF 1 p.m. GOLF „ PGA Tour, Mayakoba Golf Classic, “nal round, at Playa del Carmen, Mexico 4 p.m. GOLF „ Champions Tour, Charles Schwab Cup Championship, “nal round, at PhoenixNFL FOOTBALL1 p.m. CBS „ Regional coverage, Arizona at Kansas City, New England at Tennessee, Bualo at N.Y. Jets OR Jacksonville at Indianapolis FOX „ Regional coverage, New Orleans at Cincinnati, Atlanta at Cleveland, Detroit at Chicago OR Washington at Tampa Bay 4 p.m. FOX „ Regional coverage, L.A. Chargers at Oakland 4:25 p.m. CBS „ Regional coverage, Seattle at L.A. Rams OR Miami at Green Bay 8:20 p.m. NBC „ Dallas at PhiladelphiaMLB BASEBALL5 a.m. MLB „ Japan All-Star Series, Game 3, MLB All-Stars vs. Japan, at TokyoSOCCER6:25 a.m. ESPN2 „ Serie A, Internazionale vs. Atalanta 7 a.m. NBCSN „ Premier League, Liverpool vs. Fulham 9:30 a.m. FS2 „ Bundesliga, Leipzig vs. Bayer Leverkusen 11:30 a.m. NBCSN „ Premier League, Manchester City vs. Manchester United 11:50 a.m. FS2 „ Bundesliga, Eintracht Frankfurt vs. Schalke Times TBA ESPN or FS1 „ MLS playos, Eastern Conference semi“nals, Leg 2, team TBA at Atlanta ESPN or FS1 „ MLS playos, Eastern Conference semi“nals, Leg 2, team TBA at N.Y. Red Bulls ESPN or FS1 „ MLS playos, Western Conference semi“nals, Leg 2, team TBA at Sporting Kansas CityWOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL2 p.m. BTN „ Duke at Northwestern 7:30 p.m. ESPN2 „ Baylor at Arizona St.By MARK DIDTLERASSOCIATED PRESSTAMPA, Fla. „ Rookie Brady Tkachuk had a goal and an assist, and Ryan Dzingel scored a tiebreaking goal during Ottawas four-goal third period as the Senators rallied to beat the Tampa Bay Lightning 6-4 on Saturday night. Matt Duchene, Bobby Ryan, Colin White and Mark Stone also scored for the Senators. Craig Anderson stopped 24 shots. Mathieu Joseph had two goals and an assist for the Lightning, and Victor Hedman scored in his return from an injury. Braydon Coburn also scored and Andrei Vasilevskiy made 28 saves. Tkachuk, the No. 4 overall pick in the 2018 draft, was credited with his fourth goal of the season when Lightning defenseman Dan Girardis clearing attempt near the goal line wound up in the net early in the third. The 19-year-old Tkachuk assisted on Whites tying power-play goal at 8:41. Dzingel made it 5-4 from the low left circle with 9:30 left, and Stone added a power-play goal during the “nal minute. Joseph put the Lightning up 4-2 from the right circle at 14:32 of the second. The rookie forward also scored his “rst career goal against Ottawa on Nov. 4. Hedman, who missed seven games with a shoulder injury, tied it at 2 by splitting a pair of defenders skating in from the right wing boards and scoring a power-play goal from the slot just 39 seconds into the second. Tampa Bay went up 3-2 when Coburns soft, knuckling shot from the blue line eluded Anderson with 10:45 left in the second. The Senators needed just three shots to take a 2-0 lead 7:21 into the game. Duchene had a wraparound goal at 4:58 before Ryan made it 2-0 on a rebound 2:23 later. Joseph had his shot at 8:49 of the “rst go off Ottawa defenseman Thomas Chabot and in. NOTES: Lightning D Anton Stralman and LW Adam Erne were scratched with upper-body injuries. ... Tampa Bay C Brayden Point, struck in the face by a puck Thursday, played. ... The Senators played their 1,000th road game. UP NEXTSenators: Play at Florida on Sunday. Lightning: Start a fourgame trip Tuesday night at Buffalo.4-goal 3rd period lifts Senators AP PHOTOOttawa Senators left wing Ryan Dzingel scores past Tampa Bay Lightning goaltender Andrei Vasilevskiy during the third period of Saturdays game. By DIANA NEARHOSTAMPA BAY TIMESTAMPA … Patience is a dying virtue, and its as true in hockey as anywhere else. The Lightnings Jon Cooper is now the longest-tenured coach in the NHL at “ve-plus years. He was granted that status when the Blackhawks “red Joel Quenneville on Tuesday after 10-plus years at the helm. It wasnt long ago that 10year tenures were common and “ve didnt seem that long, but its all a cycle. Its kind of going back to the days when the NHL stood for Not Here Long,  NBC analyst Pierre McGuire said. Coaches were “red and hired really quickly back in those days. You can look back to the 80s.Ž The Blackhawks werent even the “rst team to “re a coach this season. The Kings beat them by two days, “ring John Stevens on Sunday. Cooper, who declined to be interviewed for this story, would say only generally that becoming the longest-tenured coach isnt a good thing when it comes at the expense of someone else in the coaching fraternity. No coaches were “red during the last regular season, but thats uncommon. All that indicates is teams waited until the offseason to make a move. Six teams hired coaches in the offseason; thats 20 percent of the league. Add the two coaches hired this week and one-quarter of the league has a different coach than it ended last season with. Barry Trotz, who was in town this week with the Islanders, is one of those newly hired coaches. He went to New York after leaving the Capitals following their Stanley Cup win when he and management couldnt agree on a new contract. NBC Sports reported that Trotz had been looking for a “ve-year deal and the team didnt want to grant that given coaches short shelf life. As for why teams are quick to “re coaches, Trotz cited parity in the league and impatience. With pressure to win coming from fans, management, ownership and even players, it can be harder to wait it out for long-term gain. A lot of times, a little bit of inexperience gives you less patience and you react differently than someone who has maybe been around a long time and seen the ebbs and ”ows of a season,Ž he said. All those things are combining to make a lot of changes.Ž A lot of things can go wrong with a team, so why is it usually the coach who pays “rst? A lot of times, not always, internally (general) managers overrate their team to their ownership,Ž said McGuire, who in 1994 was “red as the Hartford Whalers coach after six months. They have a vested interest in having a higher-rated roster. Then the owner asks, If our team is so good, why arent we winning? The manager says, My coach isnt getting things done. The coach doesnt have the direct line to the owner.Ž But if you have high-end assets and arent winning, there arent many other places to look than the coach. McGuires example was the Penguins, with the combination of Evgeni Malkin and Sidney Crosby being about as high end as it gets. The Penguins were struggling when they “red Mike Johnston in December 2015 and hired Mike Sullivan. They went on to win the Cup in back-to-back seasons, 2016 and 2017. Thats one of two recent examples of quick turnarounds after a coach was “red that can read like a shortcut for teams looking for one. After the Kings “red Terry Murray while out of a playoff spot in December 2011, they hired Darryl Sutter. The Kings made the playoffs as the eighth seed in the Western Conference and won the Cup. They won again with Sutter two years later. By the Penguins and Kings standards, the Predators almost look like a long-term project. They dumped Trotz, the franchises “rst coach, in April 2014 after failing to make the playoffs for two years and hired Peter Laviolette. They made the playoffs the next year and made it to the Stanley Cup “nal in Laviolettes third year, losing to the Penguins. Looking closer to home, the Lightning had missed the playoffs four out of “ve seasons when it hired Cooper in March 2013 after “ring Guy Boucher (now coach of the Senators, the Lightnings opponent tonight at Amalie Arena). It has made the Eastern Conference “nal three times during Coopers tenure and the Cup “nal once. The Lightning is the only team to advance to a conference “nal three times in the past “ve years in either conference (the Penguins did it three times from 2013-17, though). Does that success come from coaching stability? Some, but thats oversimplifying matters. Success and stability are factors of a well-run organization. Jeffrey Vinik is one of the best owners in professional sports, maybe the best,Ž McGuire said. He provides the assets for his organization to survive. He doesnt meddle.  Additionally, McGuire said, the Lightning has a great scouting staff that has brought in players such as Ryan McDonagh and Andrei Vasilevskiy, even when the transactions seemed surprising. If youre looking for how coaches last longer, the owner usually doesnt meddle, and owners usually are told the right answer about the roster,Ž McGuire said. Thats been working for the Lightning. NHL: Ottawa 6, Tampa Bay 4How Jon Cooper and the Lightning are bucking the NHL trend NHL: Tampa Bay Lightning TAMPA BAY TIMESTampa Bay Lightning head coach Jon Cooper supervises a team practice at the Ice Sports Forum in Brandon during the teams 2018-2019 season training camp.

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it gave them something else to “ght for and they pushed through because of it,Ž Trebbien said of Zielinskis absence. They knew she was behind them. They no that no matter where she is, shes pulling for them.Ž When the match of“cially began, Venice was met with a powerful offensive attack from Aquinas. The Raiders and Indians battled back-and-forth for much of the set, but the Raiders powerful shots and blocking at the net was too much for Venice to overcome early on. Once Aquinas opened the second set with a quick 9-3 lead, the pressure began to set in for Venice. But Venice seniors Paradise Gibson (15 kills) and Aja Jones (11 kills) rallied the Indians and cut the de“cit to 22-21. However, a couple of costly errors at the net by Venice would give Aquinas the set and an imposing 2-0 lead. I thought we evened things out in that second game,Ž Wheatley said. There was a pivotal point in that game, I think 22-21 and we made two or three errors in a row. So after game two, it was just a matter of trying to get back on the horse and riding it.Ž Wheatley took his team out of the gym in the break between the second and third sets, looking to do whatever he could to refocus his senior-laden group. Down to possibly the “nal set of the season, Wheatley was looking for any answer he could “nd. The break did the trick for Venice, as it came out rejuvenated, and responded by opening a 17-10 lead at one point in the set. Though the Lady Raiders would make a late charge, Venice held on for the win and kept hope alive. Again in the fourth set, Venice had its chances to win and force a “nal set, but couldnt capitalize late. Trailing 22-21 in the fourth set, a couple of mistakes and an overturned out of bounds call was all the Raiders needed to seal the match and advance to the state championship. I just told my 10 seniors that I love them and they brought our program to new levels and new expectations,Ž Wheatley said. Sometimes in life, to succeed you have to fail. So, it hurts them today, but I think theyre gonna look back on the process over the years of them playing Venice volleyball and I know theyll smile back on their career. Im real proud of my team. I think they played excellent all year, but unfortunately someone had to go home today, and it was us.Ž The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com SP Page 3By STEVE KNAPPSUN CORRESPONDENTThe Jesuit Tigers showed why they are one of the powerhouse teams in 5A Friday night as they scored quickly and often in their 44-0 win over the DeSoto Bulldogs. The Tigers “eld is in the shadows of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers stadium, and have a state championship under their belt along with several “nal four appearances. The Bulldogs were making their “rst appearance in post season play since 2014 when they won their district. With three straight seasons with less than four wins each, they got their feet wet in the post season playoffs. DeSoto County has used the slogan The beginning of the returnŽ all season as they try to restore the greatness of their football program and community involvement. The community has bought in to the return of the Friday Night Lights experience as the team has turned itself around with a whole new coaching staff this season. The Tigers took just 5 plays and just over 2 minutes to go 67 yards in their “rst possession to take a 7-0 lead. The Bulldogs moved the ball in their “rst possession as freshman Jakeemis Pelham picked up 12 yards for a first down after quarterback Tony Blandings 8-yard pickup to start the game. After a penalty, the Bulldogs lost the ball on a fumble on their own 37 yard line. Two plays later and a 20 yard touchdown run added a second score for Jesuit. DeSoto didnt quit as they recovered an onside kick and Blanding rumbled for 10 yards on the first play. Another penalty and two running plays for losses forced a punt. A good punt gave the Tigers the ball on their own 13-yard line. They needed just 6 plays to travel 87 yards to reach paydirt and a 21-0 lead with 7 seconds left in the first quarter. Jesuit scored twice in the second quarter. First, on a 4 play drive for 39 yards and then another touchdown in just 29 seconds from 42 yards out, highlighted by a 33-yard run to initiate the running clock for the second half. The second half looked much like the first as Jesuit took just 3 plays to score highlighted by a 74-yard touchdown run to increase the score to 41-0 after the missed extra point. Leading 41-0 with a running clock, the Tigers kicked a 41-yard field goal with 7:42 left in the game. Still not satisfied with the score, Jesuit recovered an onside kick after the field goal. They were unable to score and had their second punt of the game, one in each half. The Bulldogs ran their only three plays in the fourth quarter as the game ended to put an end to a good comeback season for DeSoto County who had a 7-3 record through the regular season. Bulldog coach Bumper Hay said, For you seniors we thank you for your contributions and all that you have done to turn this program around. Youve gone through 3 years of just 3 or 4 wins a season and you have been a big part of what we accomplished this season. We have a lot of talented underclassmen, and next year we will win the district and advance further in the playoffs. You know what it feels like to win, and now you know the feeling of losing in the playoffs. This is just the beginning of the return.Ž Photo 15 DeSoto Countys Trayvis Smith, one of 13 seniors on the 30 player roster, leads the Bulldogs onto the field in the Bulldogs 44-0 loss at Jesuit. Photo 43 The Bulldogs sophomore quarterback Tony Blanding picks up 10 yards for a first down in the first round playoff loss to Jesuit. By CHUCK BALLAROSUN CORRESPONDENTNORTH PORT … New North Port High School girls soccer coach Hans Duque isnt going to need much time getting acquainted with his team. As head junior varsity coach the past two seasons, which included an undefeated campaign, he knows his players well, which should help the Bobcats remain competitive following a 7-8-2 season under Lee Thomas. Augusta Pervis, the star of last years team, has gone to play collegiately at North Carolina. Alexi DeFeo and Joey Phillips are also gone from last years team. Augustas sister Aleena Purvis remains, as well as a core of solid players in Abey Nottingham, Janna Barboe, Seraiah Bailey, Jenna Chimelis and Adrianna Troche, which should give Duque some scoring punch on a team that “nished strong last season. The question is if the team has enough con“dence to shoot, which can be a problem with some teams, and if a core of mostly younger players can step up and “ll the void. Duque has been impressed with the teams progress. The question is con“dence. We have enough players from last year and those on JV were developing. They grew physically and mentally. The talent is there, they have footwork and strength, so that shouldnt be a problem,Ž Duque said. They just need to believe.Ž Defensively, Duque is still trying to “nd a goalkeeper, though Jordan Wyatt is expected to have the inside track. Duque said beside that, the defense is expected to be strong, with Bailey Manoran, Isabel Harvey and Raquel Terio helping out. Duque said he will attack on offense, and it will be up to a pair of sophomores, Purvis and Emily Idoyaga, to lead the team, especially if they want to beat Venice, which is expected to be the team to beat in their district. We need to practice hard. I really want to beat Venice and theyll be the one we have to beat to win the district,Ž Purvis said. Idoyaga said there are a lot of freshmen and sophomores coming up to varsity that will become more acquainted with the veterans and contribute. Were going to try our best and wont let anyone down. Were going to try to live up to our expectations and stay physical,Ž Idoyaga said. We have to work the ball to the forwards and “nish and help each other out and compensate for where were weak.ŽBy CHUCK BALLAROSUN CORRESPONDENTNew Port Charlotte High School girls soccer coach Bob Theriault made it clear what he wants to see from his team this season following a recent practice. Anywhere within 25 yards is a prime opportunity to score. I want you to cock that leg and shoot,Ž Theriault said. It will be a departure from the last few seasons, when Port Charlotte won with airtight defense and a counterpunching offense. Unfortunately, Grace Stec, perhaps the best goalkeeper the team ever had, and Doren Staley, her protector, are gone to graduation, meaning Theriault, who was Port Charlottes JV coach for six years, will have to “nd a new way to win, especially after a 7-8-5 season where Stec missed most of the season with a knee injury. He thinks he may have found one, by attacking the opponent and taking shots wherever and whenever possible. We have a young, talented team at a level close to where Doren left us, so I am not looking to skip a beat,Ž Theriault said. We have depth at every position and its great because Ive worked with them for three or four years.Ž The fact Theriault has coached these girls previously at the JV and competitive levels, gives him the knowledge of how to put them in positions where they can succeed. Theriault said Stecs replacements show promise, with Alyssa Toth and junior Kendall Cryer sharing the duties. Defensively, sophomore Skylar Daniels will step into Staleys shoes, along with Hannah Ruth, Izzy Reyes and maybe Toth when she isnt at goal. The 3-5-2 formation will be very offensive minded, with four or “ve players in the mix to score. Emily Lowe and Emily Porto will come from the outside, with Ruth and Reyes in the middle, giving them the opportunity to score. Were a young team, and we have the talent to be where we need to be at, and I think we can go far,Ž Toth said. Were much more offensive minded than in previous years. Well have three defenders instead of four.Ž Me and Megan Porto were the offense of the team, but now we have wingers who can get us more goals,Ž said Tori Thompson, who will play forward this season. We all have the distance shots where we can score from behind the box.Ž If the offense comes together, there wont be very many clean sheets at Pirates games this season. MONDAY Boys SoccerNorth Port at Port Charlotte, 7 p.m. Girls BasketballGirls basketball preseason tournament at Charlotte 7:30 p.m. SOFTBALLDr. Paul M. Popper 12 Dr. Luis F. Fernandez 11 Reuter Accounting 13 DR. Ivette M. Fernandez DMD 8 Dr. Luis F. Fernandez 12 Reuter Accounting 7 Luigis Pizza 10 Ivette M. Fernandez DMD 2RUNNINGThe 20th Annual Turkey Trot, Charlotte Countys oldest and largest annual 5K run and fun walk event, will be held Nov. 22 at Florida Southwestern State College at 26300 Airport Road, Punta Gorda. The proceeds bene“t Charlotte County Habitat for Humanity. Preregistration through Nov. 19 is $40; youth ages 4-14 is $25. Race day registration is $45; from 6 a.m. to 7 :15 a.m. The race begins at 7:30 a.m. There will be an awards ceremony following the race. Runners and walkers will receive a commemorative bib. Bibs can be picked up Nov. 21 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Habitat Of“ce, 1750 Manzana Ave, Punta Gorda, or on race day. There will be t-shirts available for purchase for $15. For race information call 941-639-3162 or you can access the county website at charlottecountyhfh.org for race details. PREP FOOTBALL: Jesuit 44, DeSoto 0 PREP SOCCER: North Port PREP SOCCER: Port CharlotteINDIANSFROM PAGE 1 SUN FILE PHOTOSenior middle hitter Aja Jones gave St. Thomas Aquinas trouble all afternoon, registering 11 kills in the 8A semi“nals. By BEN BAUGHSPORTS EDITORCharlotte County runners performed admirably Saturday at the Florida CrossCountry State Finals at Apalachee Regional Park in Tallahassee. Lady Pirate Isabella Coogan, a two-time winner of the Charlotte Sun Athlete of the Week, placed 13th, “nishing with a time of 18:56.68. The senior has been a model of consistency this fall. Bella went out aggressively, like she had planned,Žsaid Stefany Sanchez, Port Charlotte girls cross-country coach. She ran hard and maintained good position throughout the race. She looked strong through the “rst two miles and fought till the end. She ran her season best, and had a great season.Ž The Pirates John Perez, also a Charlotte Sun athlete of the week winner, placed 21st in the boys division. Perez turned in a tremendous effort covering the terrain on the 5K run in 16:32.88. The Lady Tarpons placed 11th in the 24 team “eld, “nishing only 1:50 behind sixth place “nisher Niceville. I thought collectively it was a good raceŽsaid Chris Robishaw, Charlotte girls cross-country coach. I dont think it was our best race as a team. I thought we did a very good job at the most important meet of the year. Our goal obviously was top 10, weve been ranked eighth for most of the season. We were one point out of 10th, “ve points out of eighth and 11 points out of 6th.Ž Mackenzie Flowers had the Lady Tarpons top time, 20:37.69; Victoria Simeone nearly dead-heated with her teammate, posting a time of 20:37.71; Aleecia Collins was next with a time of 20:42.17, Alexa Roughton was fourth among the Charlotte runners, 20:52.59 and Faith Winkler was “fth, 20:53.42, becoming the sixth Lady Tarpon to eclipse the 21-minute mark in 2018. Aleecia led most of the way, and Victoria and Mackenzie were not far behind, pretty much the whole race,Ž said Robishaw. We had little gaps to Faith who was in fourth for a lot of the race and than Alexa who was in “fth.Ž Tigers quick scores end Bulldog seasonYouth a factor for Bobcats Pirates offer excitement Coogan, Perez and Lady Tarpons turn in strong efforts at state championships SPORT BRIEFS PREP CALENDAR PREP CROSSCOUNTRY: State finals recap

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Page 4 SP www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 NBABy MARC TOPKINTAMPA BAY TIMESST. PETERSBURG „ There are a number of statistical reasons why Mike Zunino is a logical addition for the Rays. His 34.6 caught stealing rate ranked among the AL leaders, as did his .998 “elding percentage. He was tied for “rst with 12 defensive runs saved, a factor in winning the Wilson award as the top defensive catcher. His 3.86 catcher ERA was “fth in the AL. He grades out above average in pitch-framing metrics, and even better in blocking. Plus, he was one of only three AL catchers to hit 20 homers, helping to a team that ranked 14th in the AL with 150. Zuninos 5.1 WAR over 2017-18 is among the best for backstops. But there are other reasons the Rays liked him. Zunino is a solid player, but an even better person. And on a team of mostly young players, with veteran leaders Carlos Gomez and Sergio Romo not being brought back, Zunino will be a good guy to have around. In detailing Zuninos defensive prowess and preparation, Rays GM Erik Neander noted how he navigates a staff, how he manages people, what kind of teammate he is, the care factor, the con“dence that he is putting down the right “ngers. About as much as you could hope for in a younger catcher to provide in all those respects, Neander said. Hes somebody that we see that could take a leadership role with our group. Seattle Times beat writer Ryan Divish noted that Zunino was always accountable and universally respected in the Mariners clubhouse even at a young age because of his freakish strength, his good nature, his willingness to work and always put the pitchers and their needs ahead of his own. Mariners radio broadcaster Aaron Goldsmith tweeted that Zunino was a total proŽ and theres no player I took more joy in watching succeed than Z.Metrics prove Zunino fits like a glove behind the plate MLB:Tampa Bay Rays HOCKEYButler could create new powerhouse after trade to 76ers STEVE YEATER/APJimmy Butler was unhappy in Minnesota but instantly makes Philadelphia a heavyweight contender in the Eastern Conference after being traded there Saturday. By DAN GELSTONAP SPORTS WRITERJimmy Butler has his wish: Hes out of Minnesota. And just like that, Philadelphia has a new Big Three „ one that could make serious noise in the Eastern Conference. A person with knowledge of the situation said Saturday that Butler is being traded to the 76ers in a package that will send Dario Saric and Robert Covington to the Timberwolves. The person spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the trade had not yet been announced by either team and was still pending NBA approval, which is not expected until Monday. Justin Patton will also be sent to Philadelphia, and Jerryd Bayless and a 2022 second-round pick are also going to Minnesota, the person said. The Athletic first reported the agreement. Because the trade was not official, Sixers coach Brett Brown had little comment. I cant speak much about it. Im sorry,Ž he said before the Sixers played Memphis. Philadelphias ProcessŽ led it to the second round of the playoffs last season behind two of the games youngest, brightest stars in big man Joel Embiid and point guard Ben Simmons. Butler, an elite wing and outstanding defender, will join them in a quest to rule the Eastern Conference. The first order of business will be making the trade official, something that could come in time to get Butler in uniform for a game at Miami on Monday. The next step for Philadelphia will be coming to an agreement on an extension for Butler, a pending free agent who made clear to Minnesota that he would not be re-signing there in 2019. There has been Butler drama every step of the way this season. ESPN reported that at his first practice with Minnesota this fall, Butler verbally challenged players, coaches and general manager Scott Layden while dominating in scrimmages, even when going up against stars like Karl-Anthony Towns and Andrew Wiggins. All my emotion came out at one time,Ž Butler told ESPN later that day. Was it the right way to do it? No. But I cant control that when Im out there competing. Thats my love of the game. Thats raw me. Me at my finest, me at my purest. Thats what youre going to get inside the lines.Ž Butler continued to be miserable in Minnesota, and the Timberwolves have gotten off to a lousy start waiting for this inevitable move. Minnesota finished a 0-5 road trip with a loss in Sacramento on Friday night and is 4-9 overall. Butler, who turned 29 on Sept. 14, has been an All-Star in each of the last four seasons. There are also concerns, though they clearly didnt put off Philadelphia. Butler has missed at least 15 games in four of the last five seasons, including a career-high 23 games last year while dealing with a knee injury. Hes on pace this season to average at least 20 points for the fifth consecutive year. SASKATOON, Saskatchewan (AP) „ Two-time Olympic medalist Shannon Szabados is used to facing shots in mens leagues this time of year. Now, the veteran goaltender is perfectly happy competing in the Four Nations Cup and for Buffalo in the womens pro league. I loved my time playing mens hockey,Ž Szabados said. I dont know at 32 that a 65game schedule is what my body needs.Ž Szabados has been the go-to goaltender for the Canadian womens team in many world and Olympic “nals since 2010. Now, shes part of Canadas team for the Four Nations Cup tournament, an annual event that includes the United States, Sweden and Finland. Canada will face the U.S. on Saturday night in the “nal. Its a rematch of the Olympic “nal that the Americans won in South Korea. Szabados has spent the majority of her hockey career in mens leagues, starting with exhibition games for WHLs Tri-City Americans at age 16 to full seasons in the Alberta Junior Hockey League, Alberta Colleges Athletic Conference and the Southern Professional Hockey League. Any sustained time in the womens game came in the winters she spent with the Canadian team in Calgary preparing for Olympic Games. Her physical, personal and geographic needs factored into the Edmonton native signing with the Buffalo Beauts of the “veteam National Womens Hockey League. Lorain, just west of Cleveland, Ohio, is the hometown of her partner Carl Nielsen. Its where Szabados wanted to move after the Olympics in February. First and foremost, the decision was based on him having a good job there,Ž she said. Theyve had a jewelry store in their family for almost 400 years, so it was important for him to be there.Ž Now, shes become familiar with Interstate 90, and the 435-mile (700-kilometer) round trip from Lorain to Buffalo, New York, that she makes twice a week to play and practice with the Beauts. Exit 27, thats my go-to. On the way to Buffalo, theres a Shell and a Tim Hortons,Ž she said Thursday at the Four Nations Cup tournament. Kim and Terry Pegula, owners of the NHLs Buffalo Sabres, purchased the Beauts in 2017. Its kind of a huge step for womens hockey,Ž Szabados said. A lot of our staff overlap. Our media staff, one guy puts on his Sabres jacket and then he puts on his Beauts jacket. We get “rst-class treatment all around as far as facilities and how were treated.Ž Szabados injured ligaments in her left knee toward the end of her second season with the Columbus Cottonmouths of the Southern Professional Hockey League in 2016. Injuries also limited her to a handful of games with the Canadian women during their 2017-18 preparation for Pyeongchang. But Szabados stopped 40 of 42 shots, including nine in overtime, in the Olympic “nal. The U.S. prevailed in a six-round shootout to claim gold. Szabados became tearful after the game while talking about injuries that sidelined her for much of the season. A healthy body that can extend her career is a priority for her now. I knew if I wanted to continue ... I didnt have the healthiest of years last year, so it was important for me to be somewhere where I could be back to being 100 per cent,Ž Szabados said. Being on the ice seven days a week for hours upon hours and getting running over by 200-pound men was probably not the ideal situation for me health-wise. I miss it, but I enjoy where Im at.Ž In 64 games for Canada, Szabados ranks second all-time in wins (47) and shutouts (17), behind Kim St. Pierre, who has 64 wins and 29 shutouts. Szabados made 27 and 28 saves in the 2014 and 2010 Olympic womens “nals, respectively, on the way to the gold medal. She is the “rst player from Canadas national team to play in the NWHL. Szabados is 1-2 for the Beauts this season with a goals-against average of 1.67 and a save percentage of .938. U.S. womens team forward Dani Cameranesi and defender Emily Pfalzer are her Beauts teammates. She echoes players in both the NWHL and Canadian Womens Hockey League in wishing for a merger of the two leagues. I think womens hockey is kind of at an exciting point right now,Ž Szabados said. I would regret it if I didnt stick around to see where it goes.ŽAfter a career of facing the boys, Szabados shifts to NWHL AP PHOTOCanada goalie Shannon Szabados looks back as a U.S. shot goes o the post during the “rst period of a Four Nations Cup game in Saskatchewan, Nov. 7. Szabados spent the majority of her career in mens leagues but is now in the NWHL. TAMPA BAY TIMESCatcher Mike Zuninos work behind the play and power hitting were key reasons why Tampa Bay traded for him. But theres much more to the former Florida Gators standout.

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Page 6 SP www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 Florida credit. They made plays they had to at the end. ... When you go on the road in our league and have the opportunities in front of us, to lose the game, its gut-wrenching.Ž Franks completed 15 of 21 passes for 161 yards and a touchdown. He also ran for 36 yards and two scores a week after getting benched for the third time in two seasons. Mullen opened up the quarterback competition during the week, but backup Kyle Trask broke a foot in practice Wednesday and is out for the remainder of the regular season. That left Franks as Mullens only viable option against the Gamecocks (5-4, 4-4). Still, the home crowd turned on Franks quickly Saturday by booing him after consecutive plays on the first series in which he fumbled and badly overthrew a receiver. Franks responded after his first TD run. Hes an emotional kid,Ž Mullen said. I told him hes going to get booed. ... I also told him dont worry about anything thats not going to help us win the football game. Score a touchdown and get off the sidelines so we can coach you.Ž South Carolina (5-4, 4-4) scored touchdowns on its first two possessions and looked like it would roll on the road „ much like Missouri did last week. Jake Bentley had TD passes to end both drives, but did little down the stretch. But Franks and the Gators responded. The Gators ended up with 367 yards rushing. Jordan Scarlett had 159 yards on the ground. Lamical Perine added 107 yards and two scores. Dynamic receiver Kadarius Toney chipped in 51 yards on four carries.THE TAKEAWAYSouth Carolina: After being up 17 points late in the third quarter, the Gamecocks found themselves in another nail-biter late. It was the teams fifth consecutive game decided by four points or less. They are 3-2 in those. Florida: The Gators still have hopes of making a big-time bowl game and reaching 10 wins for just the second time in the last six seasons.MUSCHAMP CONNECTIONAlthough Muschamp will forever be tied to Florida, he wont have many connections to his former school after this game. The Gators have six fifth-year seniors who signed with Florida before Muschamps final season in 2014. Florida also has one more payment to Muschamp to fulfill his severance, a $787,500 deposit later this month. That will complete his $6.3 million buyout.MISSING MENFlorida was without three key players: guard Brett Heggie, safety Brad Stewart and receiver Freddie Swain. Heggie and Swain were injured last week against Missouri. Stewart has missed two of the last three games.UP NEXTSouth Carolina hosts Chattanooga of the FCS, a welcome break after eight consecutive conference games. Florida concludes a three-game homestand against Idaho, also an FCS team. Its the Gators home finale and senior day.FLORIDAFROM PAGE 1 spot in the conference championship game. At the end of the day, if youre doing it right inside of your program, each game becomes bigger,Ž Heupel said Saturday after McKenzie Milton threw for two touchdowns and ran for a third to key a 35-24 victory over Navy that extended the nations longest winning streak to 22 games. Thats what we want. Thats the type of program were trying to build,Ž Heupel added. I have great respect for Cincinnati. Were going to enjoy this one today and move on to Cincinnati tomorrow.Ž UCF (9-0, 6-0) “nished as the only unbeaten team in the Football Bowl Subdivision a year ago, but was not included in the CFP. The Knights currently are one of four FBS teams that remain undefeated, along with the top three teams in the latest CFP rankings „ Alabama, Clemson and Notre Dame. Although Heupel reiterated the Knights are only concerned with trying to go 1-0 every week,Ž the “rst-year coach said hes growing tired of playoff talk. No, we want to be in that conversation. We want to be in it every single year,Ž Heupel said. Were building this program to have sustained success.Ž Milton completed 17 of 21 passes for 200 yards without an interception for the Knights, whove scored at least 30 points in every game throughout its long winning streak. Dredrick Snelson scored on receptions of 34 and 12 yards, Greg McCrae ran for 101 yards and one TD, and the Knights “nished with 297 yards rushing to stay atop the AAC East Division standings The Knights are 12th in the latest CFP rankings. Beating Navy (2-8, 1-5), which has lost seven straight games, wont exactly silence critics who feel the defending AAC champions are undeserving of a higher ranking because of the strength of their schedule. Obviously, its (disappointing) to lose again,Ž Navy coach Ken Niumatalolo said. Thats a really good team, though. They have won a ton of games. ... Theres no consolation prizes for coming close, but I was proud of the way our guys fought.ŽTHE TAKEAWAYNavy: The Midshipmen “nished a three-week stretch in which they lost to Notre Dame, Cincinnati and UCF, who were a combined 25-1 entering Saturday. Their chances of slowing UCFs potent offense hinged on getting its own running game going and dominating time of possession to keep Milton off the field. UCF: Milton was sharp in his second game since sitting out a road win over East Carolina with an undisclosed injury. The junior from Kapolei, Hawaii, hit 10 of his first 11 passes for 106 yards, completing throws to seven different receivers. He has at least one TD pass in 22 consecutive games.POLL IMPLICATIONSThe Knights dropped two spots in the Top 25 after yielding 670 yards and 40 points in a 12-point home victory over heavy underdog Temple. They dont figure to earn any style points this week, either, after allowing the Midshipmen to hang around until the fourth quarter.UP NEXT:UCF: Hosts No. 25 Cincinnati in key AAC matchup, Saturday.UCFFROM PAGE 1Mahomes if you want to go to the Super Bowl. Need proof? The top “ve defenses in the NFL belong to the Ravens (4-5), Jaguars (3-5), Bills (2-7), Cowboys (3-5) and Bears (5-3). Only one of those teams have a winning record. The top “ve offenses belong to the Rams (8-1), Bucs (35), Chiefs (8-1), Steelers (6-2-1) and Falcons (4-4). Only one of those teams „ the Bucs „ have a losing record. The No. 7 Saints (7-1) and No. 8 Chargers (6-2) would make the playoffs if the season ended today. This does not excuse a Bucs defense that is on pace to give up 550 points this season, the most in league history. But some of this is the result of the Bucs decision to draft quarterback Jameis Winston with the No. 1 overall pick in 2015. When it comes to draft picks and salary cap spending, its an allocation league. Any team that believes they have a potential franchise quarterback that may one day take them to a Super Bowl is going to build around that player “rst. Thats was the plan when the Bucs selected Winston. His draft class included left tackle Donovan Smith and guard Ali Marpet. In his “rst four seasons, general manager Jason Licht drafted two defensive lineman with the Bucs: Noah Spence in the second-round in 2016 and defensive tackle Steve Tuakolovatu in the seventh round in 2017. And speaking of points, the emphasis led to the Bucs gambling away several draft picks to move up in the second-round in 2016 and select kicker Roberto Aguayo. Somehow, the Bucs believed this was working when they went 9-7 in 2016. It included a “ve-game win streak that was built on turnovers and the No. 1 third-down defense in the league. That led to the Bucs making defensive coordinator Mike Smith one of the highest-paid assistants in the NFL and locking him up for at least three more seasons. Smith was “red following the Bucs Week 4 loss at Atlanta and replaced by linebackers coach Mark Duffner. The Bucs spent a lot of resources on rebuilding the defensive line. They signed Eagles defensive linemen Beau Allen and Vinny Curry. They signed Bears defensive tackle Mitch Unrein, who has been on IR since -the second week of training camp with a concussion. They traded for Giants defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul. They used a “rst-round pick on Washington defensive tackle Vita Vea, who missed seven weeks when he suffered a calf injury the “rst day in pads. They claimed defensive end Carl Nassib off waivers from Cleveland. The Bucs offense also has been complicit in putting their defense in bad situations with turnovers, like the interception that set up the Panthers “rst TD Sunday. To complicate matters, the Bucs lost two experienced players in their secondary when Vernon Hargreaves, a “rst-round pick from Florida and Wharton High School, was lost for the season after the “rst game with a shoulder injury, and Chris Conte went on injured reserve with a knee injury. Second-year safety Justin Evans had an interception in Week 3 versus the Steelers but has not played as well as he did as a rookie. Cornerback Brent Grimes didnt look interested in tackling earlier in the year. Three rookies are playing too significant roles in the secondary. The only hope, it seems, is for the Bucs offense to lead the way as they did in the 48-40 win over the Saints. They also have to hope their defense can get better. Its a fact it cant get any worse. But this is the path the Bucs chose, its just not working out.BUCSFROM PAGE 1 By DAVE HYDESUN SENTINEL (TNS)This is the story of a golden opportunity that would solve the Miami Dolphins franchise. But theres no need for suspense. It wont end well. The coach in question, Nick Saban, will ”y to California in this story, watch a quarterback work out for 40 minutes and sound publicly impressed after 92 throws. To throw that many balls in a row and only have one hit that ground, thats pretty impressive,Ž Saban said afterward. But Saban will pass on the quarterback, Aaron Rodgers, by the end of this story. Rodgers will still line up against the Dolphins on Sunday in Lambeau Field. Hell remain the reason why the entire Green Bay franchise matters even with a 3-4-1 record this season. Thirteen years after that workout, New England coach Bill Belichick found defensive coordinator Brian Flores last Sunday night after beating Green Bay and said, in clipped Belichick-ian speech, Great job. Holding them to 17. Hard.Ž Holding him, really. Rodgers, more than any great quarterback of this era, is the one-man band who keeps his franchise in contention, year after year, diluted supporting cast after diluted supporting cast. And for several days in the spring of 2005, he was on the Dolphins radar. Yeah, he was in the discussion,Ž said one former Dolphins staffer who doesnt want to be named in this chapter, even after all these years. It went around meetings. What do you think? Who does he look like? Ultimately, it was (Sabans) decision. He wasnt really letting on his thoughts, as far as I know.Ž By now, Dolphins fans suffer from wrong-way fatigue in quarterback decisions. Dave Wannstedt chose wrong in drafting cornerback Jamar Fletcher over quarterback Drew Brees in 2001. Saban passed on free-agent Brees for Daunte Culpepper in 2006. Bill Parcells passed on quarterback Matt Ryan for tackle Jake Long in 2008. Rodgers is the forgotten whiff in all this. It wasnt just us,Ž the former staffer said. A lot of teams passed on him.Ž Twenty-one teams, to be exact. San Francisco took quarterback Alex Smith with the top pick and Rodgers waited under the glare of ESPN cameras for four hours and 18 minutes before Green Bay drafted him at No. 24. The Dallas Cowboys and Minnesota Vikings skipped him twice. Terrible,Ž he called it afterward. Its worse for those who passed. Jon Gruden, who had Tampa Bays “fth pick, once called passing on Rodgers, the biggest regret of my career.Ž New Orleans (Aaron Brooks), Houston (David Carr) and Kansas City (35-year-old Trent Green) needed a quarterback. And passed. The Dolphins passed “rst on Rodgers, though. They had the second pick. Saban had just taken over the Dolphins, needed a quarterback and watched Smith work out on his pro draft day in Utah, followed the next day by Rodgers workout out in California. Both guys are really impressive people,Ž he told reporters after Rodgers 40-minute session. Both have the right stuff, it seems to me.Ž In private, the Dolphins staffer said it was clear Saban joined much of the NFL in ranking Smith “rst and Rodgers second. Rodgers held the ball strangely, NFL types said. Whats more, his University of California coach, Jeff Tedford, had a list of good college quarterbacks who became NFL suspects: Trent Dilfer, Akili Smith, David Carr, Joey Harrington and Kyle Boller. Was Rodgers next? Sabans plan seemed to be to trade down and possibly take Rodgers lower in the draft. Thats what it seemed to me, in retrospect, what was in play,Ž the staffer said. The problem was the draft had no sure things in the top-5 picks for teams to demand. Washington and Minnesota discussed a pre-draft trade with the Dolphins, the staffer said. Neither wanted to move up that badly. While on the draft clock, Saban called Cleveland, which held the third pick, to ask if it wanted to move up, the staffer remembered. No dice. So that was that,Ž he said. So Saban chose running back Ronnie Brown. He was a “ne pick. He played six Dolphins seasons (and 10 years overall). Made the Pro Bowl in 2008, the year he directed The WildcatŽ offense. Hes just not the story of that draft like Rodgers became. The Dolphins lucked out in 1983 when Dan Marino plummeted to No. 27. They became one of those teams in 2005 with Rodgers. All these years later, a glimpse of the Dolphins never-ending nightmare came at mid“eld in Foxborough. Youre the best,Ž Rodgers told Belichick after their game in an exchange caught by NFL Films. No, youre the best,Ž Belichick said. Let the Dolphins be the judge after Sunday.The Dolphins, the draft, Aaron Rodgers, and another one that got away NFL: Miami Dolphins AP FILE PHOTOGreen Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers during an NFL football game against the New England Patriots.

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The Sun | Sunday, November 11, 2018 www.yoursun.com SP Page 7 NORMAN, Okla. (AP) „ Kyler Murray passed for 349 yards and ran for 66 and No. 6 Oklahoma survived a late two-point conversion attempt to beat Oklahoma State 48-47 on Saturday. Taylor Cornelius connected with Tylan Wallace on a 24-yard TD pass to cut Oklahomas lead to one with 1:03 to play. Oklahoma State went for two, but Cornelius threw short and into coverage, and the pass fell incomplete. Oklahoma (9-1, 6-1 Big 12, No. 6 CFP) recovered the onside kick and ran out the clock. Kennedy Brooks ran for 165 yards and three touchdowns, Trey Sermon ran for 120 yards and two scores and Marquise Brown caught eight passes for 142 yards and a score for the Sooners. Cornelius passed for a career-high 501 yards and three touchdowns for the Cowboys (5-5, 2-5). Wallace caught 10 passes for 220 yards and two scores. Chuba Hubbard ran for 104 yards and three scores, but he lost a critical fumble in the fourth quarter. Brooks had a 5-yard touchdown on the last play of the third quarter to give Oklahoma a 41-35 lead. Hubbard scored with 12:20 to play, but Matt Ammendola missed the extra point, leaving it tied at 41. With Oklahoma State driving for the lead, Hubbard fumbled, and Oklahomas Kenneth Murray recovered with 6:09 to play. Oklahoma took advantage when Trey Sermon powered in from the 1 with 3:29 left.NO. 1 ALABAMA 24, NO. 18 MISSISSIPPI STATE 0TUSCALOOSA, Ala. (AP) „ Josh Jacobs ran for a touchdown and caught a scoring pass and Alabama had its second straight shutout. With quarterback Tua Tagovailoa still battling a gimpy right knee, the Crimson Tide (10-0, 7-0 Southeastern Conference, No. 1 CFP) turned to defense for another vintage performance. The offense raced to a fast start but mostly stalled from there against the Bulldogs (6-4, 2-4) and the nations No. 2 scoring defense. Tagovailoa started the fourth quarter on a stationary bike after getting his right knee checked out in the medical tent following a hard hit. He didnt return and wasnt needed. Fresh from a 29-0 victory over No. 9 LSU, the Tide defense hasnt allowed a point in nineplus quarters. Alabama had “ve sacks and Mississippi State had four in a rough day for both quarterbacks. Tagovailoa was 14 of 21 for 164 yards with a touchdown and an interception. He also lost a fumble on a botched exchange with Damien Harris. Backup Jalen Hurts missed his second straight game with an ankle injury. Jacobs ran for 97 yards on 20 carries as Alabama. He scored on a 1-yard run and a 14-yard catch.NO. 4 MICHIGAN 42, RUTGERS 7PISCATAWAY, N.J. (AP) „ Shea Patterson threw for 260 yards and three touchdowns, Karan Higdon had two 1-yard scoriung runs and Michigan kept its national championship hopes intact. The Wolverines (9-1, 7-0 Big Ten, No. 4 CFP) have won nine straight and remain in “rst place in the conferences East Division. They have a “nal tuneup against Indiana next week at the Big House before closing the regular season at No. 8 Ohio State. Rutgers (1-9, 0-7) didnt have a yard passing until the third quarter.NO. 5 GEORGIA 27, AUBURN 10ATHENS, Ga. (AP) „ Georgia struck for a pair of touchdowns late in the “rst half to take control and DAndre Swift “nished off Auburn with a 77-yard scoring run early in the fourth quarter. Swift rushed for 186 yards to power another big game by Georgias running attack, which “nished with 303 yards. Having already locked up a spot in the Southeastern Conference championship game, the Bulldogs (9-1, 7-1, No. 5 CFP) couldnt afford to slip up against the Tigers. The Bulldogs trailed 10-6 with the “rst half winding down. But, facing third-and-4 from the Auburn 14 and the prospect of bringing on kicker Rodrigo Blankenship for the third time, Jake Fromm connected on a TD pass to Tyler Simmons that pushed the home team ahead with 2:47 remaining. Auburn (6-4, 3-4, No. 24 CFP) went three-and-out, taking only 47 seconds off the clock, and Georgia got a chance to add to its lead. Swift broke off a 24-yard run before two short completions left the Bulldogs facing fourthand-3 at the Tigers 38. Coach Kirby Smart let the clock run down before calling timeout with 29 seconds remaining. He passed on a long “eld goal attempt, and any thoughts that Georgia might be trying to lure Auburn offsides with a no-back alignment were dashed when Fromm took the snap and found Terry Godwin breaking free over the middle to make it 20-10.NO. 7 WEST VIRGINIA 47, TCU 10MORGANTOWN, W.Va. (AP) „ Will Grier threw three touchdown passes for West Virginia. Chasing a berth in the Big 12 championship game, West Virginia (8-1, 6-1, No. 9 CFP) had no trouble against the injury-riddled Horned Frogs (4-6, 2-5). Grier was 25 of 39 for 343 yards. TCU was held to a season-low 222 yards of offense, the third time in four games it has had fewer than 300.NO. 8 OHIO STATE 26, NO. 24 MICHIGAN STATE 6EAST LANSING, Mich. (AP) „ Drue Chrisman kept Michigan State pinned back with a sensational second half of punting, and Ohio State eventually pulled away. The Buckeyes (9-1, 6-1 Big Ten, No. 10 CFP) enjoyed a huge advantage in “eld position during the second half. Chrismans punts forced Michigan State (6-4, 4-3, No. 18) to start its “rst “ve drives after halftime from its own 5, 6, 3, 1 and 2-yard line. On the fourth of those possessions, the Spartans had to punt from their own end zone. They took a safety that appeared intentional, giving Ohio State a 9-6 lead. The ensuing free kick went out of bounds, giving the Buckeyes the ball at the 50, and then Chrisman pinned Michigan State back again. Ohio State capitalized on that punt when a shotgun snap by Michigan State hit the man in motion. DreMont Jones recovered the fumble in the end zone, giving Ohio State a 16-6 advantage.NO. 10 WASHINGTON STATE 31, COLORADO 7BOULDER, Colo. (AP) „ Gardner Minshew II overcame a slow start and three fourth-down failures to lead Washington State past nose-diving Colorado. The Cougars (9-1, 6-1 Pac-12, No. 8 CFP) won their sixth straight, but it wasnt as easy as expected against the Buffaloes (5-5, 2-5), who lost their “fth straight despite the return of star receiver Laviska Shenault Jr. Minshew was 35 of 58 for 335 yards and two TDs. He had a 10-yard scoring run in the fourth quarter. Shenault was rusty in his return from a right turf toe injury. He caught 10 passes for 102 yards but cost his team dearly with back-to-back drops and a lost fumble in the second half.TENNESSEE 24, NO. 12 KENTUCKY 7KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) „ Jarrett Guarantano threw a 39-yard touchdown pass to Marquez Callaway on the “nal play of the “rst half and Darrell Taylor had four sacks for Tennessee. Taylor also forced and recovered a fumble to help Tennessee (5-5, 2-4 Southeastern Conference) beat Kentucky (7-3, 5-3, No. 11 CFP) at Neyland Stadium for a 17th straight time. Guarantano was 12 of 20 for 197 yards, including a 2-yard touchdown pass to Dominick WoodAnderson that extended Tennessees advantage to 24-0 in the third quarter.NO. 14 UTAH STATE 62, SAN JOSE STATE 24LOGAN, Utah (AP) „ Jordan Love threw for a career-high 491 yards and “ve touchdowns on 32-of-42 passing in just three quarters, and Utah State totaled 804 yards in offense. Loves 491 passing yards were the third-highest single game total for a Utah State quarterback. Darwin Thompson had 140 yards and a touchdown on 15 carries along with 115 yards and a pair of scores on four receptions for the Aggies (9-1, 6-0 Mountain West). They became the 17th team in NCAA history to gain at least 800 total yards in a game. The 804 yards and 33 “rst downs were both school records. Josh Love threw for 210 yards and a touchdown for Jose State (1-9, 1-5). Tre Walker added a career-high 209 yards and two touchdowns on seven catches.NO. 21 PENN STATE 21, WISCONSIN 10STATE COLLEGE, Pa. (AP) „ Trace McSorley tied the Penn State record for victories by a quarterback with 29, leading the Nittany Lions past Wisconsin. Miles Sanders ran for 159 yards and a touchdown on 23 carries, and McSorley completed 19 of 25 passes for 160 yards and a TD while matching Todd Blackledges victory total from 1980-82. DeAndre Thompkins caught a touchdown pass for Penn State (7-3, 4-3 Big Ten, No. 20 CFP). The Nittany Lions held the Badgers (6-4, 4-3) to 125 yards in the second half and sacked backup quarterback Jack Coan “ve times. Jonathan Taylor ran 20 times for 185 yards and a touchdown for Wisconsin.NO. 23 IOWA STATE 28, BAYLOR 14AMES, Iowa (AP) „ Brock Purdy threw for a touchdown and ran for another score, and Iowa State topped Baylor after a skirmish in the third quarter. Purdy threw for 230 yards as Iowa State (6-3, 5-2, No. 22 CFP) won a “fth straight Big 12 game in the same season for the “rst time. Deshaunte Jones caught a TD pass and threw for a 2-point conversion. Iowa State star David Montgomery and Baylor linebacker Greg Roberts were ejected after throwing punches at each other early in the third quarter. The Cyclones and Bears (5-5, 3-4) nearly came to blows when a previous play ended up spilling over onto Iowa States bench. The bad blood hung around, and the teams nearly staged a full-on brawl that saw Roberts slap Montgomery on the helmet, prompting Montgomery to swing back.NO. 25 CINCINNATI 35, SOUTH FLORIDA 23CINCINNATI (AP) „ Michael Warren II ran for three touchdowns and caught a pass for another score Saturday night, keeping Cincinnati in the chase for the American Athletic title. The Bearcats (9-1, 5-1) remain a game behind unbeaten UCF for the AAC East lead. No. 11 UCF beat Navy 35-24 and hosts Cincinnati next Saturday. Warren had a 13-yard touchdown catch in the “rst half. He ran for three touchdowns in the third quarter, including a 57-yarder, and set a school record with his 18th TD of the season. Warren has scored in all but one game this season. South Florida (7-4, 3-3) has lost three straight conference games for the “rst time since 2013.College football: Oklahoma beats Oklahoma State 48-47 AP PHOTOOklahoma running back Trey Sermon runs ahead of Oklahoma State linebacker Calvin Bundage in the “rst quarter ofSaturdays game. MIAMI (AP) „ John Wall scored 28 points, Jeff Green had 19 and 10 rebounds, and Washington ran away in the fourth quarter to beat Miami 116-110. Bradley Beal and Austin Rivers each scored 18 points for the Wizards, who won for only the third time in 12 games to start the season. Rivers and Wall had 10 points apiece in the final quarter. Washington opened the fourth on a 31-12 run, before the Heat trimmed what was as much as a 17-point deficit down considerably in the final minutes but never seriously threatened again. Dwight Howard finished with 11 points and 16 rebounds for the Wizards. Josh Richardson scored 24 points and Rodney McGruder had a career-high 22 for the Heat. The Heat were again without Dwyane Wade, who sat a third consecutive game after the birth of his daughter.CLIPPERS 128, BUCKS 126, OTLOS ANGELES (AP) „ Lou Williams hit a jumper with .3 seconds remaining in overtime, lifting the Clippers to the victory. Boban Marjanovic intercepted Giannis Antetokounmpos inbounds pass as time expired, sending the Bucks to just their third loss in 12 games. Montrezl Harrell led the Clippers with 26 points off the bench. Patrick Beverley added 21 points and Tobias Harris had 20 points and 11 rebounds. Harrell led Los Angeles with 26 points off the bench. Patrick Beverley added 21 points and Tobias Harris had 20 points and 11 rebounds. Antetokounmpo had 27 points and 18 rebounds for Milwaukee. Former Clipper Eric Bledsoes 3-pointer tied it at 119 with six seconds remaining. Danilo Gallinaris 3-point try for Los Angeles bounced off the rim at the buzzer, sending both teams to their first overtime of the season.RAPTORS 128, KNICKS 112TORONTO (AP) „ Pascal Siakam scored a career-high 23 points, Jonas Valanciunas had 19 points and 10 rebounds and the Toronto Raptors beat the New York Knicks 128-112 on Saturday, improving their NBA-leading record to 12-1. OG Anunoby scored 16 points and Kawhi Leonard, Serge Ibaka and Delon Wright each had 12 as the Raptors won their sixth straight home meeting with the Knicks and improved to 7-0 at home this season. Toronto has won six straight overall. Torontos Nick Nurse became the first coach to win 12 of his first 13 games since Lawrence Frank started 13-0 with the New Jersey Nets in 2004. Tim Hardaway Jr. scored 27 points and Enes Kanter had 15 points and 15 rebounds for the Knicks, who have lost 16 of their past 19 against the Raptors.BULLS 99, CAVALIERS 98CHICAGO (AP) „ Zach LaVine scored 24 points, rookie Ryan Arcidiacono added 15 and Chicago rebounded to beat Cleveland after blowing an early 16-point lead. Wendell Carter Jr. also had 15 points for Chicago, Tristan Thompson had 22 points and 12 rebounds for the leagueworst Cavs.PELICANS 119, SUNS 99NEW ORLEANS (AP) „ Anthony Davis had 26 points and 12 rebounds to help New Orleans beat Phoenix. Julius Randle added 22 points and 16 rebounds, and New Orleans never trailed in winning its second straight game after a six-game losing streak. T.J. Warren led the Suns with 25 points.John Wall scores 28 as Wizards beat Heat 116-110

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