Citation
Charlotte sun herald

Material Information

Title:
Charlotte sun herald
Uniform Title:
Charlotte sun herald (Charlotte Harbor, Fla. : 1995)
Running title:
Sun herald
Place of Publication:
Charlotte Harbor, FL
Publisher:
Sun Coast Media Group- Robert E. Lee - Publisher - Jim Gouvellis - Executive Editor
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Charlotte Harbor (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Charlotte County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Charlotte -- Port Charlotte
Coordinates:
26.966141 x -82.068026

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued on microfilm from Crest Technologies.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 103, no. 225 (Aug. 13, 1995)-
General Note:
"An edition of The Sun Herald."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
36852667 ( OCLC )
sn 97027762 ( LCCN )
ocm36852667

Related Items

Related Item:
DeSoto sun herald
Related Item:
Englewood sun herald
Related Item:
North Port sun herald
Preceded by:
Sun herald (Charlotte Harbor, Fla. : Charlotte ed.)

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GRANTS ATHLETICISM PUTS HIM AMONG ELITEThe Charlotte Fightin Tarpons Jayden Grant is a multi-sport athlete, who will be a critical component in his teams success. H e is a dual threat on the football field, a steady presence on the basketball court and an elite weightlifter. See Our Town, page 10 Vol. 126 | Issue No. 231 www.yoursun.com AMERICAS BEST COMMUNITY DAILY $3.00 AN EDITION OF THE SUNSunday, August 19, 2018High 92 Low 76Afternoon thunderstormPulitzer Prize winner2016 CHARLIE SAYSCan we skip fall and go straight to winter already?CALL US ATFIND US ONLINE CHARLOTTE SUN941-206-1000www.yoursun.comTHE SUNCrosswords ........10 Police Beat ..........8 Viewpoint ...........6 Opinion ...............7OUR TOWNObituaries ...........4 Local Sports ......10NEWS WIREComics/Puzzles ....5-7 Nation .................3 State ...................2 Weather ..............2 World ..................8SPORTSLottery ................2 Sports on TV ........2INDEX SUNDAY EDITION $3.00By LIZ HARDAWAYSTAFF WRITERHis pain started in April 2014. Russell Wilcoxs back looked like the Brooklyn Bridge on an X-Ray,Ž he said. An initial series of surgeries didnt correct the 83-year-old Port Charlotte residents issues, which included a degenerative disc disease, and shooting sciatic nerve torture that typically “ res through each side of the lower spine, into the back of the thigh and all the way down to the foot. That kept getting worse. The pain becomes unbearable,Ž said Wilcox, who tried Tylenol, Naproxen and other over-the counter medications he hoped would ease the throbbing, but he couldnt stand it anymore.Ž The retired college professor, who resides in the Heritage Oak Park neighborhood, started taking opiates that May and continued until October. Like many others, he used this prescribed medication to just be able to get through the motions of his daily routine without persistent agony. Today, doctors say Wilcox would not be able to receive this same type of treatment in Florida because of a new law, House Bill 21. The problem,Ž Wilcox said, is HB 21 penalizes innocent people dealing with severe pain, many of whom are severely limited in their mobility and cannot cope with these restrictions.Ž In the wake of a national and statewide crisis thats killing thousands of Floridians, local lawmakers decided to combat the opioid epidemic with HB 21. As of July 1, doctors could only prescribe a three-day supply of schedule II opiate medication to help patients with their acute pain. In some cases, the physician can extend the prescription to seven days if deemed medically necessary. The law affected legitimate ‘We haven’t reached the abyss yet’ Local doctors and law enforcement say its too early to tell what the effects of HB 21 will be WILCOX FLORIDA OPIATE PRESCRIPTIONS PER 1,000 COUNTY RESIDENTS 20122015Year Charlotte Sarasota DeSoto Lee 2012 ......................968 ......................888 ......................646 ..............708 2013 ......................942 ......................861 ......................659 ..............674 2014 ......................999 ......................907 ......................682 ..............716 2015 ...................1,092 ......................965 ......................748 ..............794 Source: Florida Drug-Related Outcomes Surveillance and Tracking System (FROST) THE BOTTOM LINEIn July, the Sun reported on a new law focused on opiate medication that raised a lot of concern among doctors and their patients. Staff writer Liz Hardaway went back to investigate how its going, what has actually happened and whats still ahead. By LAUREN CLASONCQ-ROLL CALLThe number of women giving birth with opioid use disorder quadrupled between 1999 and 2014, a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows. The increase underscores the severity of the countrys opioid epidemic as a legislative package aimed at helping states curb addiction rates idles in the Senate. Newborns exposed to drugs while in the womb can suffer severe complications, including withdrawal, preterm birth and death. The CDC study released this month found significant increasesŽ in the number of women with opioid use disorder at the time of delivery in 28 states with available data. The agency analyzed information from a database of inpatient discharges operated by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, finding that the prevalence of pregnant women addicted to opioids increased from 1.5 per 1,000 deliveries in 1999 to 6.5 in 2014. These findings illustrate the devastating impact of the opioid epidemic on families across the U.S., including on the very youngest,Ž CDC Director Robert Redfield said. Untreated opioid use disorder during pregnancy can lead to heartbreaking results. Each case represents a mother, a child, and a family in need of continued treatment and support.Ž The CDC reported in March that 63,632 Americans died of drug overdoses in 2016, a 22 percent increase over the previous year. Two-thirds of those deaths were linked to opioids. Congress is looking to pass a package of opioid-related bills this year with several measures aimed at improving care for pregnant women and newborns. The House passed its version in June, but the Senate has yet to finalize its own package.Number of pregnant women abusing opioids skyrocketsWELLINGTON, Fla. (AP) „ A high school football stadium was evacuated after gunshots rang out during a practice football game in South Florida on Friday night in what authorities say stemmed from an altercation between students. Palm Beach County Sheriffs of“ cials said two people were injured in the gun“ re during the game at Palm Beach Central High School. The victims were not identi“ ed. Florida Highway Patrol spokesperson Lt. Alvaro A. Feola said in a statement early Saturday that both adult male victims remain hospitalized, and one is critical condition. No information about the condition of the second victim was given. Sheriff spokeswoman Teri Barbera said a group of students got into a “ ght during the game. One of the victims was found on school property and the second victim was taken to the hospital by a friend. Authorities did not release any information about a possible suspect. The Palm Beach Post reports a helicopter landed on the “ eld, and a man was being treated on the track. Lynn Monnette told the newspaper that she was watching her son play when she heard four shots “ red during the fourth quarter. She said the shots were coming from the far end of the bleachers underneath where the band sits. She said chaos broke out and shoes and other personal belongings went ” ying as people ” ed the area. The worried mom said authorities arrived on scene almost immediately. It was not immediately clear whether the shots were “ red in or near the stadium. Authorities said they dont have a motive or suspects but said the violent crimes division would take over the investigation. The game was between Palm Beach Central and William T. Dwyer high schools.2 shot at South Fla. high school football gameBy KAYLA GLEASONSTAFF WRITERLocal students are being met with a new motto that theyve probably heard before, just not in their schools: In God We Trust. The national and state motto, already featured on American currency, the state ” ag and even some Florida license plates, is now required by law to be displayed in all Florida schools. In March, Governor Rick Scott signed a handful of education-related bills into law, including the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Act. He also signed in the changes to state statute 1033.44. According to the law, each district school board shall adopt rules to require, in all of the schools of the district and in each building used by the district school board, the display of the state motto, In God We Trust, Now, schools must trust in GodFla. law makes schools display motto SUN PHOTO BY KAYLA GLEASONStudents, sta and visitors at Peace River Elementary School are greeted by the now-required motto hung in the front o ce. READ THE RULEThe states Patriotic Program law can be found here, including the new requirement to display In God We TrustŽ: https://bit.ly/2BnEilv HB 21 | 4 SCHOOLS | 5

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Page 2 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWSThe SUN (USPS 743170) is published daily at Sun Coast Media Group, Inc., 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980-2100. Periodicals postage paid at Punta Gorda, FL. Postmaster: Please send address changes to the SUN, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, Florida 33980-2100.Publisher ..................................................Glen Nickerson ..............941-205-6400 Executive Editor........................................Jim Gouvellis .................941-206-1134 Circulation Director ..................................Mark Yero ......................941-206-1300 Arcadian Editor.........................................Craig Garrett .................863-494-3925 Charlotte Sun Editor .................................Garry Overbey ...............941-206-1143 North Port Sun General Manager .............Mike Ruiz ......................941-564-3284 North Port Sun Editor ...............................Scott Lawson ................941-429-3002 Englewood Sun Publisher ........................Carol Y. Moore ...............941-681-3031 Englewood Sun Editor ..............................Chris Porter ...................941-681-3022 Editorial Page Editor .................................Steve Baumann .............941-681-3003SUN NEWSPAPERSMember of Alliance for Audited Media For vacation holds, please call Customer Service at 941-206-1300. SUBSCRIPTIONS Home Delivery Rates: Newspaper designated market: City ZoneCarrier home delivered 7 days. Rates as follows plus 7% Florida Sales Tax: Monthly Bank/ Credit Card ......................$40.50 3 Months .......................$121.50 6 Months .......................$243.00 1 Year ...........................$485.99Does not include Waterline and TV Times. Effective May 18, you can add the TV Times or Waterline for an additional monthly charge of $1.00 each. Above rates do not include sales tax.Subscribers residing in outlying areas may incur additional delivery charge. Mail subscription rates: Rates as follows (advance payment required): 7 Days 3 Months 6 Months 1 Year $154.07 $276.35 $492.11 Sunday Only 3 Months 6 Months 1 Year $71.89 $144.61 $243.54Above rates do not include sales tax.Single Copy rates Daily $1.50 Sunday $3.00 Unclaimed account balances under $10, inactive for 15 months, will be used to purchase newspapers for classroom use. Sun Newspapers CUSTOMER SERVICE POLICY Delivery should be expected prior to 6:30 a.m. Monday through Saturday and 7 a.m. Sunday. Redelivery hours: 6:30 a.m. to 9 a.m. Monday through Saturday and 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Customer Service hours: 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday Friday; Saturday 7 a.m. to 9:30 a.m.; and Sunday 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. Call Customer Service for our current specials. To subscribe or to report any problems with your service, please call or visit your local office. Charlotte: 941-206-1300 23170 Harborview Road, Port Charlotte Englewood: 941-681-3000 120 W. Dearborn St., Englewood North Port: 941-429-3000 13487 Tamiami Trail, North Port DeSoto: 863-494-0300 or toll-free at 877-818-6204 108 S. Polk Avenue, Arcadia By ALEXANDRA HERRERA STAFF WRITERSARASOTA „ Following backlash from Sarasota County Schools charter school partners Aug. 7, the School Board will discuss its charter school capital agreement Tuesday. The conversation comes just two weeks after the board decided to not share the capital dollars for the 2018-19 school year. Along with the charter school capital, the board will also discuss the review of the School Avenue community workshops. The closure of School Avenue has been on the forefront of the boards priority for this school year. School Avenue runs through the Sarasota High School campus, and is opened to traf“c after the school is closed for the day. The road has pedestrian access during the day, which according to the district poses a threat to students. The district has been meeting with city of“cials from Sarasota to work on the closure of the street. Its also been meeting with residents who use the road and live near the school to try and get it closed. Also during the morning workshop the board will discuss its 2019 board meeting calendar, and cellphone use among students. The last two items on the agenda is the extended day program access for employee dependents and its legislative platform. Following its morning workshop, the board will meet at 3 p.m. for its regular board meeting. During its regular 3 p.m. board meeting, the board will discuss three items under new business. One of the items on the 3 p.m. agenda is the approval of the 2018-19 “ve year capital improvement plan. The capital plan is used for construction projects, which are funded in year one and only in the planning stages in years two through “ve. This years capital plan had many of the construction projects shifted in order to harden schools and add additional fencing. Another item under new business is the approval to advertise the updated chapter two in the boards policy book. The second chapter deals with rental of district owned spaces, such as “elds, performing arts centers and schools for community use. Following the discussion of the policy, the board will also discuss the rental rates for the district. According to board documents the rental rates cover the use of classrooms, gyms, media centers, as well as the use of performing arts centers. Rates vary by space and are done by the hour, there are different rates for pro“t and non-pro“t groups. The Sarasota County School Board will meet at 8:30 a.m. Tuesday for its monthly workshop, followed by its 3 p.m. meeting in the board chambers, 1980 Landings Blvd., Sarasota. Meetings and workshops are broadcast live on The Education Channel, Comcast channel 20 and Frontier channel 33. Meetings are also streamed live on the districts website www. sarasotacounty schools. net.Email: aherrera@sun-herald.comSarasota County Schools to discuss charter school funds Memorials in the Sun Honor your passed loved ones anytime with a personalized memorial tribute. Call (941) 206-1028 for rates. Golf to help basketball teamThe Pride Parents of North Port High School Bobcats boys basketball team will host a golf tournament fundraiser Saturday, Aug. 25 at Riverwood Golf Club, 4100 Riverwood Drive, Port Charlotte. The entry is $300 per foursome and includes green fees, golf cart, bag handling, two meals and two drink tickets per player, according to Pride Parents. Check-in and breakfast is 7 a.m. and the tourney starts at 8:30 a.m. Entry deadline is noon, Thursday, Aug. 23. Checks can be made payable to Pride Parents, Inc. and sent to Ryan Power, care of North Port High School, 6400 Price Blvd., North Port, 34291. For more information, email prideparentsinc@ gmail.com.Volunteers soughtLiteracy Volunteers of South Sarasota County seeks residents in the area who want to help other adults working to learn English or improve their reading skills. There are more than 60 adults waiting for a tour, according to LVSSC. An orientation session is set from 11 a.m.-noon, Sept. 19 in the Start Now! of“ce at 6919 Outreach Way, Suite B111, North Port. For more information, contact Karen Bridgam at 941861-1320, or email north. port.literacy@gmail.com.Wing FestThe Sons of AMVETS Post 2000 hosts Wing Fest from 2-8 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 25 with 10 ”avors of wings with a choice of “ve for $5.50 or 10 for $9. Fries are available for $2 with carry outs available. Music begins at 7:30 p.m. The post is at 401 Ortiz Blvd., Warm Mineral Springs. For more information, call 941-429-1999. COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS Bank of the Ozarks is nowMember FDICNew name, same commitment to you. A commitment to the great service youve come to expect. And no matter where you go, our digital experiences go with you, making life simpler, safer, and more fun. And if youre new to Bank OZK? Well you can count on all that, too. adno=50538510 KIRKPLANKitchens&Baths*NOT VALID WITH OTHER OFFERS. ANY OF THE 6 OFFERS WITH PURCHASE OF ANY KIRKPLAN KITCHENS REFACING OR CABINET SYSTEM D I R E C T T O Y OU F ROM KI R K P LA N KIT C HE NS & B ATH SEven without this special youd save hundreds, even thousands by ordering from Kirkplan Kitchens & Baths because theres no middlemen to deal with.50 % O FF OUR R EG U LA R L O W PR I C E SKirkplan Kitchens & Baths will build your kitchen, bath or refacing system that precisely “ts your taste, needs or budget at 50% less than our usual low list prices.P L US 6 G R EAT O FFE RS .*And, if you order now, you can take advantage of our free design, delivery and installation oer. Call for FREE Consultation | 1575 Cattlemen Road | Sarasota, FL 34232341-0143 Ext. 100MON.-FRI. 8-5 CGC1524705 5 YEARS IN A ROW! BEST CABINET COMPANYFOR VOTING US You get ALL these 6 Oers! REFACE OR REPLACETan u arasa Enjoy A No Obligation AT-Home Shopping Experience adno=545392480818

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Page 4 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018FROM PAGE ONE users, taking (opiates) as prescribed,Ž said Dr. Dan Smith, an anesthesiologist running Liberate Physician Centers in Port Charlotte. They were looking for functionality.Ž Many doctors were skeptical of the new law, considering it a knee-jerk reaction carried out by nonphysiciansŽ as described by Dr. Joseph Ravid, a primary care physician at Bayfront Port Charlotte and Punta Gorda. Dr. John Mason, a family physician at Sarasota Medical Center called it a form of state-imposed torture.Ž I just dont understand how youre going to be able to remedy something without consulting with the people who are in the trenches,Ž Ravid said. Has it been as bad as anticipated? Some say the real test hasnt come yet: Thats when the population surges with the arrival of winter residents. The biggest challenge that we are facing right now among my other colleagues,Ž Ravid said, is educating the patient. They just dont understand why they have to jump through all these hoops being that theyve been on a medication for years and years and years. Were educating rather than remedying their issues.Ž There also has been some cases where communication between pharmacists and doctors has been unclear. Though a patient is prescribed a three or seven-day supply, there have been instances lately where pharmacies will not fill the legitimate prescription, said Fraser Cobbe, the executive director of the Florida Orthopaedic Society. One patient, Cobbe said, was denied a threeday prescription because it was not labeled for acute pain. However, this labeling is only required for seven-day prescriptions. Patients are denied service of a prescription that leaves them scrambling,Ž Cobbe said. It makes it extremely troublesome and burdensome for the patient.Ž The Florida Orthopaedic Society is working with the state Board of Pharmacy to encourage communication to its members to ensure congruent interpretations of the new law. To address confusion with HB 21, the state Department of Health recently issued an updated Frequently Asked Questions statement that included clarifying that the three-day rule doesnt require an acute painŽ designation but needs to have the words, acute pain exception.Ž The first few weeks were just weeding through all these issues,Ž Cobbe said. However, Cobbe considers the transition to be going relatively smooth, especially with the state-mandated course being administered to clear up any confusion. One of the largest concerns was whether the law would cause patients to ” ood the emergency rooms. Though a handful of pain patients do go to the emergency room before being able to get an appointment with their doctor, it doesnt seem to have affected wait times for patients yet. Since The Florida Senate Controlled Substances House Bill 21 (HB 21) went into effect,Ž Bevin Holzschuh, the system director of marketing and public relations for Bayfront Health, said, neither Bayfront Health Port Charlotte nor Bayfront Health Punta Gorda emergency departments have seen an in” ux of patients seeking pain management for acute pain.Ž As a result, Bayfront emergency rooms still are completing their pledge for a patient to be seen by a medical profession within 30 minutes of arrival, Holzschuh said. Sarasota Memorial Healthcare emergency rooms, located in both North Port and Sarasota, have not seen much a difference either. According to the most recent available data, average wait times had increased by less than two minutes in July compared to Junes numbers. Dr. Eugene Pereira, director of pain management centers in Sarasota Memorial Healthcare Systems, said he hasnt seen much of a change in the way he practices. Though its too premature to really see the effects of the bill, Pereira says patients are more aware that opioids are no longer the good guys in pain management.Ž Pereira even cited a study conducted by the U.S Department of Veteran Affairs that compared opioid and non-opioid therapies for pain. Opioids were not superior to non-opioid approaches in terms of efficiency but were associated with significant side effects,Ž the study said. Pereira said a lot of doctors and patients experienced a lot of anxiety regarding the new law, but people will get used to the new norm.Ž One alternative that patients have explored even before the implementation of HB 21 is medicinal marijuana. Smith, who works Liberate Physician Centers in Port Charlotte, which assists qualifying patients in obtaining medical marijuana, said there has been a steady increase in interest, saying roughly 60 percent of his practice is made up of patients trying to manage their chronic pain. With an average patient age of 59 years old, Smith says medical marijuana has helped patients with their withdrawal symptoms. Though chaos hasnt ensued from the new law, doctors are skeptical how that will change in six months. Were not at the most overly-stressed time of the year,Ž said Rep. Julio Gonzalez (R-Venice), who is also an orthopedic surgeon in Venice. Our doctors arent as busy as they are during season.Ž Gonzalez said so far the transition hasnt been too strenuous, as his practice already gives seven-day prescriptions anyways. We havent reached the abyss yet,Ž Ravid said. We dont have the infrastructure in Charlotte County to deal with this problem right now.Ž Though local law enforcement was optimistic that the bill would totally change up the gameŽ of drug dealing, Ron Beck, a detective for the Charlotte County Sheriffs Of“ ce narcotics unit, said its simply too early to tell. In six months, however, he said they should be able to compare their numbers and see. Im not saying the bill is perfect,Ž said Rep. Michael Grant (R-Port Charlotte), but its a step in the right direction. No ones trying to impose harm on individuals; were trying to begin to fix a societal problem that is draining precious resources.Ž Harm is what concerns Wilcox, the patient with the Brooklyn BridgeŽ back. The former Rhode Island professor had been prescribed Vicodin in May 2014 and had corrective surgery that July, leaving him somewhat disabled afterward with both legs suffering from nerve damage. Wilcox, who worked at Stonehill College in Massachusetts, logged each of his three daily pills as to not overuse during his six-month period. Once the pain started to subside, Wilcox decided to wean himself off of the addictive drug, tapering down to two pills, then one and finally none in a little over a week. Three of those days, Wilcox did say he felt uncomfortable while experiencing withdrawal. I definitely felt I was going through something,Ž Wilcox said. That something just took the form of not being able to sleep.Ž He didnt feel he wanted another pill, and hasnt had the need for one since.HB 21FROM PAGE 1By NASEEM S. MILLERORLANDO SENTINELWhen Dr. Pamela Trout, a pediatrician and a solo practitioner, heard about the states new opioid law, she didnt worry because she rarely prescribes opioids. But then she learned the law, which went into effect on July 1, covers more than just opioids. Almost all medications that are classi“ ed as Schedule II through V drugs, including steroids; anti-seizure medications; stimulants like Adderall, Ritalin and ADHD medications; Ambien and Xanax are included in the law. The Controlled Substances law doesnt put a limit on the prescription of non-opioid drugs. But it adds a new requirement for doctors to check a statewide database when prescribing from a list of more than 100 scheduled drugs before putting pen to the prescription pad. And while many local doctors agree that the law is a step toward reducing the availability of opioids, they also “ nd its mandates onerous and time-consuming. The number of patients that I see that are on ADHD medications that I re“ ll every day is crazy,Ž said Trout. It is more regulation and more consequences for something that we already did pretty smoothly. It just adds to the work for the day, and I dont think its necessary for my patients.Ž Florida is now one of two dozen states to have passed legislation related to prescription of opioids. Its part of a nationwide effort to curb the opioid epidemic thats killing more than 115 people each day. The laws vary from state to state. In Florida, it places a threeand seven-day limit on the prescription of opioids for acute pain. It also requires that health providers check the states prescription drug monitoring program before writing a new prescription for most controlled substances for patients who are 16 years and older. Called E-FORCSE, Floridas prescription drug database was created by the Legislature in 2009 to encourage safer prescribing of controlled substances. The database collects and stores scheduled drug prescriptions, which are mainly dispensed by pharmacists. The database can help providers identify patients who are doctor shopping.Ž Under the new law, providers who fail to check the database can result in penalties, including a disciplinary action against their license. Theres still a lot of misinformation about the law among providers and patients. Local health systems have launched massive education campaigns for their staff and patients about the new law, emphasizing mostly limitations on opioid prescriptions, to prepare the patients for what they should expect when they see their doctors. Earlier this month, the state Department of Health made live Take Control, an educational website to educate the public about the new law. The department is committed to working with patients and the health-care community to clear up any possible confusion about the new law to ensure that patients are able to obtain and “ ll necessary prescriptions for pain medication,Ž said State Surgeon General and Secretary Dr. Celeste Philip. I think it has had a bigger impact than any law that I can remember in recent years,Ž said Dr. Jennifer Keehbauch, chief medical of“ cer of Winter Park Memorial Hospital. It touches you wherever you practice and whatever your specialty is.Ž In addition to the new E-FORCSE requirement, the laws restrictions on opioid prescriptions have also raised concern among some physicians, particularly surgeons. I think the idea was good, but it went too far ƒ for a person who has major surgery, the seven-day limit is totally inadequate,Ž said Dr. Larry Halperin, an orthopedic surgeon. It is yet another addition to our workload forcing us to spend more of our of“ ce time looking down at the computer.Ž Executives at Jewett Orthopaedic, a large Florida practice with more than a dozen of“ ces treating between 700 and 900 patients each day, say that the laws restrictions create an inconvenience for patients after surgery and worry about the impact of patient requests for new prescriptions. If we have to renew prescriptions every three days, or even every seven days, you can imagine the workload,Ž said Jewett CEO Chad Wiggins. More than a month after the law went into effect, Dr. Benjamin Kaplan, an internal medicine doctor, calculated the “ nancial cost of the legislation in his practice. If you include log-in time, and then checking the patients name, it takes about 30 seconds to 1 minute to check the database,Ž said Kaplan. He said he spends between half-an-hour to 45 minutes a day on the E-FORCSE, which adds up to about $750 loss because of the patients he cant see. Then you can extrapolate out the rest of the loss for the year: “ ve days a week; 48 weeks, taking into account vacation, per year,Ž he said. You should be very careful when prescribing opioids. I get it and I know that. But making a blanket statement affecting all physicians in the state of Florida, thats a big deal without really knowing the true validity of that decision.Ž Although studies have shown that opioid prescriptions have dropped in recent years, theres little data to show that laws limiting opioid prescription have made an impact in curbing the current epidemic. The laws do service to reduce opioid prescription, but the ultimate goal is to reduce overdose deaths, and laws like HB 21 are unlikely to do that,Ž said Dr. Joanna Starrels, associate professor of medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. While the prescription opioids are to blame for the onset of the epidemic, the main driver of overdose deaths today is illicit opioids, including heroin, fentanyl and the deadly carfentanyl, researchers say. I struggle to think of anywhere that opioid overdose deaths have been reduced,Ž said Starrels, whose research is focused on opioids and related practices and policies. As we role out well-intentioned initiatives to reduce the risks associated with prescription opioids, we need to keep the big picture in mind. Our ultimate goal needs to be to reduce opioid overdose deaths.ŽNew law: More than just opioids PHOTO PROVIDEDImage of Russell Wilcoxs back, which he described as the Brooklyn Bridge on an X-Ray.Ž DR. JULIO GONZALEZ DR. JOSEPH RAVID DR. EUGENE PEREIRA WHAT THE LAW REQUIRESBefore prescribing Schedule II to V controlled substances to patients 16 years and older, providers have to check the states prescription drug monitoring program. For patients who have acute pain and need an opioid medication, providers are limited to a three-day prescription. If doctors can justify an exemption, they can extend the prescription to seven days. The opioid prescription limit does not apply to the treatment of non-acute (chronic) pain. It also exempts patients who have pain because of cancer, terminal diseases, palliative care or severe traumatic injuries. Health providers, including physicians, dentists, podiatrists, optometrists, advanced registered nurse practitioners and physician assistants who prescribe scheduled drugs are required to take a state-approved two-hour course on prescribing controlled substances by Jan. 31, 2019. Health providers who violate the law will be penalized, the details of which are currently being worked out by the professions state boards.Source: Orlando Sentinel NEW CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES LAWHere are some of the drugs included in the Controlled Substances law. Health providers have to check the state database before writing a prescription for these drugs. Only Schedule II drugs (opioids) are subject to three and seven-day prescription limits. There are also no refills for opioids: Schedule II drugs: hydromorphone (Dilaudid), methadone (Dolophine), meperidine (Demerol), oxycodone (OxyContin, Percocet), and fentanyl (Sublimaze, Duragesic). Other Schedule II narcotics include morphine, opium, codeine, and hydrocodone. Schedule III drugs: buprenorphine (Suboxone), benzphetamine (Didrex), phendimetrazine, ketamine, and anabolic steroids such as Depo-Testosterone. Schedule IV drugs: alprazolam (Xanax), carisoprodol (Soma), clonazepam (Klonopin), clorazepate (Tranxene), diazepam (Valium), lorazepam (Ativan), midazolam (Versed), temazepam (Restoril), and triazolam (Halcion). Schedule V drugs (excluding non-opioid drugs): cough preparations containing not more than 200 milligrams of codeine per 100 milliliters or per 100 grams (Robitussin AC, Phenergan with Codeine), and ezogabine.Source: Orlando Sentinel

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The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 5FROM PAGE ONEdesignated under s. 15.0301, in a conspicuous place.Ž Other than a conspicuous place,Ž the state has not provided any speci“c guidelines or instructions for display. Locally, Charlotte County Public Schools plans to comply with the law by installing six-inch raised black letters that spell out the motto. Every school lobby, as well as the Board Room, will now feature In God We Trust.Ž Mike Riley, CCPS spokesman, reported that the fabrication and installment of all the letters will cost the district $14,000. Some Charlotte schools are already displaying the phrase, like Peace River Elementary School which has had the letters up since this summer, according to Assistant Principal Melissa White. We currently have 11 of our 20 schools in compliance and are working on the others at this time,Ž Riley said. A deadline has also not been set, though many schools, such as those in Sarasota County, hung up temporary signage for the start of the academic year. Signs have been placed in all schools and school district buildings as of the “rst day of school. We had them in all front of“ces on last Monday. We are having permanent signs made now and we will replace the paper copies when they are complete,Ž said Kelsey Whealy, Sarasota County Schools spokesperson. Unlike Charlotte Countys large lettering, Sarasota is meeting the new requirement with a specially designed sign. We drew upon best practices from Duval County and incorporated the motto, SCS logo and seal of the State of Florida,Ž Whealy said. State Sen. Denise Grimsley (R-Lake Placid), whose district covers part of Charlotte County, is running for the of“ce of Florida Commissioner of Agriculture. She said a school is the perfect place to implement the phrase and help teach young minds. We have placed In God We Trust on our money, our public buildings, our state ”ag, and even in the fourth verse of our national anthem. So I cant think of a better place for our motto than Florida classrooms. Students are subject to a lot of in”uences in life, but Ive never seen anyone harmed by the proud display of our motto,Ž she said.ControversyThe introduction of this rule, however, has some concerned over separation of church and state. In 2012, Scott passed another, similarly controversial law. Section 1003.45 made it legal for public schools to allow under two minutes of silent prayer or meditation. While the U.S. Constitution prohibits public schools from encouraging the practice of religion, the Florida law gets around this by not requiring any speci“c prayer. According to Riley, CCPS simply has a moment of silence for all staff and students.Ž To minimize disruptions, students with certain religious requirements can also use time between classes, at lunch, or before and after school to pray. Supporters of the new motto requirement have also stated it is a signi“cant aspect of American history and government. [The motto] has been ruled constitutional [when challenged],Ž said Anthony Verdugo, Executive Director of the Christian Family Coalition of Florida, at a hearing on the bill earlier this year. Its just a reaf“rmation and recognition of what we already know to be true. Our students should not be denied that knowledge of our history and our heritage here in America.Ž Verdugo, who [serves] as a voice for the pro-family citizens of Florida,Ž according to his Twitter bio, has also spoken in favor of bills that would ban transgender Floridians from using the restroom matching their gender identity and fought against rulings that overturned the ban on same-sex marriage. We believe that this is a very simple step in the right direction for Florida,Ž he said of the new motto requirement. Others in favor of the law have also cited the importance of the phrase over the course of U.S. history as the driving motivation. Many of them also have strong ties to Christianity or are members of a Christian denomination. Gov. Scott, who is running for U.S. Senate, helped found Naples Community Church. Rep. Kimberly Daniels, D-Jacksonville, sponsored the bill and is also a pastor and author of numerous faith-based books, including Prayers that Bring Change,Ž The Demon DictionaryŽ and Spiritual Bootcamp.Ž Everyone should have a right to their own faith but were not talking about just our faith, were talking about a symbol that we need to get back to the basics of,Ž she said at the bills hearing. Daniels went on to cite a Psalm that conveys the same In God We TrustŽ message. In fact, the initial institution of the phrase in the U.S. carried a very strong religious connotation. The motto In God We Trust was placed on United States coins largely because of the increased religious sentiment existing during the Civil War. Secretary of the Treasury Salmon P. Chase received many appeals from devout persons throughout the country, urging that the United States recognize the Deity on United States coins,Ž according to the U.S. Department of the Treasury. Even if implementing the phrase was meant in a truly historical context, its hard to mention the Christian God without bringing in or somehow promoting faith. At least some organizations are looking to combat this. A Tampa-based group, Atheists of Florida, is designing special In God We TrustŽ signs to donate to schools with the hope of expanding on the typical, Christian association. One example would feature a variety of different gods and “gures as to not alienate students practicing non-Christian religions or no religion at all. Census data as of 2010 at least shows less than half of Charlotte County residents are religious „ about 40 percent. Other mentions of God or religion in schools allow students to opt out if they or a parent/guardian so chooses. Students, for instance, can get permission to not perform the Pledge of Allegiance or they can not say one nation under God.Ž Even the earlier controversial prayer bill lets students decide how and if they pray. Sarasota County schools also requires teachers get approval from the school board before teaching any course that features an objective study of the Bible or a comparative study of religion. An opt-out of the new signage is not available, and there has not been a specific deadline imposed to implement it, according to Riley. Riley said he was unaware of anyone coming in from the state to check every single campus for signage. He said no of“cial deadline or explicit instructions on erecting the signage were imposed.Email: kgleason@sun-herald.comSCHOOLSFROM PAGE 1 SUN PHOTO BY KAYLA GLEASONTo create and hang the motto in all schools and the School Board meeting room, the district will have to pay $14,000. By LAUREN COFFEY STAFF WRITERNORTH PORT „ After a person dies of suicide, family members and friends are often left with a slew of emotions and questions. Some North Port residents want to offer help for those families, right in the city. The reason why you just try to put (those affected by suicide) together is because of the stigma, the wondering, people are embarrassed,Ž said Amy Vogel, Hollys Hope education coordinator. So its a support place where people have all dealt with the same issue and its a common ground.Ž Hollys Hope, a group formed by Joan and Ed Morgan after their daughter Holly died by suicide in 2017, will host the “rst support group to help with grief from suicide. The closest support group currently for survivors of suicideŽ is at Tidewell Hospice in Sarasota. The survivor of suicide groups are needed and theyre hard, but they do help,Ž Joan Morgan said. A lot of the people around here arent going to go up to Sarasota and unfortunately we have a lot of people who need it.Ž The group is especially needed in the area, Morgan said, as suicides continue to occur in North Port and the county. Theres a lot of people in this area hurting,Ž she said. I cant believe all the stories. It is so prevalent, it is here. Most families and most people I talk with „ oh my gosh theres some story in most families.Ž And for those left behind, they need a different type of grief support group, according to Vogel. You could go to bereavement group where someone died of cancer or even murder; we understand murder more than suicide, unfortunately,Ž she said. (With a suicide support group) those people feel comfortable, they know other people are feeling the same thoughts and questions and its easier to open up knowing they have lost a family by suicide.Ž The group will meet on the fourth Monday of every month at 6 p.m. in the Module Three at New Hope Community Church, 5600 S Biscayne Drive. The “rst meeting will be Aug. 27. For more information on the group, contact Vogel at 317-250-7316 or email at amy.vogel98@ gmail.comEmail: lcoey@sun-herald.comNorth Port support group arrives for families of suicide victims adno=50538515

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Page 6 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018VIEWPOINTPublisher „ Glen Nickerson Executive editor „ Jim Gouvellis Editorial page editor „ Stephen Baumann Commentary Editor „ John Hackworth Email letters to letters@sun-herald.comOUR VIEW LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Trump has done plenty for countryEditor: Its amazing how people keep their head in the sand for over a year and a half and then ask the question on the Sunday Viewpoint what has this president done. Well here are some things for you to go check. How about GDP over 4.1 percent up from 1.9, how about unemployment at a all time low 3.9, how about more blacks unemployment at a all time low. How about more women are working, how about the tax cut that was for every one not just the rich, like you claim, how about the middle class has gotten bigger, how about the average pay has gone up for most people for the “rst time in years. How about the 52 heroes from the Korean War that President Trump got home from the North Koreans, yes a lot more has to come home but this is a start. Can you tell me if any other president even talked to anyone from North Korea. (No.) You pull your head out of the sand like an ostrich after 18 months and make all kinds of stupid statements like you have 4,000 veri“able lies he told since he was elected. You must be thinking about Obama or Hillary. Before you make a bigger fool of yourself do a fact check, or keep your comments to yourself.Allen R. Svihlik ArcadiaPrice should condemn mailerEditor: If you, like me, received a political mailer that attacked Rob Hancik and you were taken aback, then you should be mad as hell, as I surely am. There is not one word of truth to the scandalous print. So, who may bene“t from such a vile political ad? Julie Price, little Miss Innocence? Now, we all see to what she and her supporters will stoop to in an effort to win an election. Prices last mailer depicted three of her supporters: Bill Truex, Bill Prummell and Roger Eaton, each of whom declare that their administration is the most ethical, honest and professional. Well, gentlemen, its time to put up or shut up. Julie Price and her backers should come out immediately and condemn this vicious and dishonest political manure. And if they do fail to do so, then I say that they are all complacent in this Chicago-type corrupt politics. Prove me wrong!Bob Reichert Punta GordaVote for Yates, a district residentEditor: Regarding the letter, on Aug. 13. As a resident of North Port for 18 years, I read with interest the letter to the editor, Candidate must move to district.Ž Fortunately, the voters in District 74 do not need to await legislative changes to consider this issue in this election. Linda Yates, candidate for representative District 74, is running as a 12-year-plus resident of North Port, has served and is now termed out as commissioner, vice mayor and mayor for an aggregate of eight years. During that time, the city of North Port has grown exponentially, and in my view this commission brought the city along as a great place to live. Her knowledge and hard examining ethic should be carried forward to the next level. Vote Yates for state representative, District 74.Clinton K. Shantz North PortSmoking marijuana is a bad choiceEditor: It is bad enough to fool people into believing cannabis is good for many ailments, but to suggest smoking it is absurd. The smoke from marijuana is toxic to the lungs, just as the smoke from any other substance would be. Every physician and most lay people know that inhaling smoke in any form is bad for the alveolae and bronchial tubes of the lungs and causes chronic in”ammation. According to the American Lung Association, regardless of the source of smoke one inhales „ whether it is from burning wood, paper, coal, diesel fuel, tobacco, marijuana, corn silk, etc. „ combustion releases toxins, particulate matter and carcinogens into the air that are damaging to the lungs and are likely to cause chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic bronchitis and hypoxemia (low blood oxygen levels). These chronic changes make one more susceptible to lung infections, i.e. pneumonia and cardiovascular disorders such as heart attack and strokes. When marijuana is heated and burned it changes the chemical structure and acidity of the THC, which in turn negates its debatable therapeutic value. In summary, there is no justi“cation for smoking marijuana for its medicinal purposes and anyone who states otherwise should be held responsible and liable for the consequences of misleading and misinforming the general public. This includes the people behind the ads that bombard us on daily television with marijuana propaganda for their own “nancial gain.Pierre J. Fisher Lake SuzyVery good shopping experienceEditor: I had to get a new washing machine a month ago, and found that the North Port Home Depot was the least expensive. Ordered my wash machine, set a delivery date, was in and out in 15 minutes. That was already awesome. Delivery was another awesome. Then, of all things, I get a personal thank you card from Joe P. from Home Depot thanking me for my purchase. Who does that? Just saying, my dryer is about to die, so I will, for sure, be going to HD again.Jane Spaid North PortRob Hancik is the clear choiceEditor: The Punta Gorda Airport will be undertaking some major growth changes over the next 18-24 months. These changes will not only affect the airport but will have a huge effect on Charlotte County on a whole. This is certainly not the time to consider individuals with no experience in the aviation “eld nor any experience in airport management. Rob Hancik, who is running for re-election, currently is the vice chairman of the Airport Authority. He brings a world of experience in airport management, coupled with overall aviation knowledge that will be paramount in the decision-making process that will be taking place. Its critical for us to place our trust in an individual like Rob Hancik with proven experience to insure a bright future for the Punta Gorda Airport and for the citizens here in Charlotte County. Vic Poitras Punta Gorda OUR POSITION: The time for “nger-pointing is over. Lets commission a comprehensive study of the problems with our water.If we were Gov. Rick Scotts campaign manager, we would urge him to immediately announce a multi-million-dollar study of the states water problems. When we say water problems we mean the algae oozing from Lake Okeechobee and the red tide choking our beaches. The governor could use some of the $700 million he slashed from the states water management districts in his “rst couple of years in of“ce. That was money that would have paid for things like monitoring water quality. The South Florida Water Management District (on the east side of the state) saw its budget go from $1.07 billion in 2011 to $576 million in 2012. Our own Southwest Florida Water Management Districts budget was cut by $124 million in 2012. Scott was proud of the cuts to the state budget, claiming in a radio address in 2011 that he took actionŽ to cut more than $700 millionŽ from the states “ve water management districts. To be transparent, we should add that in the past couple of years he has restored about $300 million of that money. And no one can prove that cutting that money had anything to do with the terrible problems we have right now. It may be just a coincidence. Realistically, though, that increasingly seems unlikely. Funding a major study is, in our book, a necessary “rst step toward trying to avoid another summer like the one beachgoers, business owners and those who just enjoy a nice day on the water are experiencing here in Southwest Florida. Its nasty, its frustrating and its killing Florida tourism. When will we recover? Red tide, which is nothing new to Florida, has killed thousands, probably millions, of “sh and a whole bunch of turtles, dolphins and manatees. It can cause respiratory irritation for humans; for those with severe or chronic respiratory problems, it can result in a serious illness. Scott has declared a state of emergency. He has agreed to fund Visit Florida and Mote Marine with $600,000 or so to pay for monitoring the situation and to begin an advertising campaign to bring visitors back to our beaches „ when they are clean of dead “sh, of course, and when air along the beaches wont make them choke. Theories abound as to why red tide is so pervasive this summer. Some would tie it to the algae-clogged Lake Okeechobee, which has sent horribly polluted runoff down the Caloosahatchee River to our shoreline, the islands and the bays along the Gulf Coast. The belief is that the high concentrations of nutrients from that goop is feeding the red tide algae and keeping it close to the beach. Another theory is that climate change „ a term the governor detests „ is helping red tide survive. We have now experienced three years of record-setting temperatures. The Gulf has become warmer. One weather service said the Gulf reached 90 degrees in May this year „ the earliest in history. A warmer Gulf also means a better environment for hurricanes, should they form there or survive the cooler Atlantic Ocean to reach us. Is the phenomenon of higher Gulf temperatures linked to climate change? A proper study could help us understand, and its a vital step; acknowledging the possibility is the first step, though, and wed like to hear Scott acknowledge that possibility without hesitation. Red tide was not caused by Rick Scott. But the people along the Gulf Coast sure would like to know what did cause this years outbreak to be labeled the worst in memory by residents who have lived here for decades. The only sure way to “gure it all out is with an indepth, comprehensive study that, we hope, could lead to some strategies to “ght back so that well never have to suffer through another miserable summer like this one.Study of water issues is needed HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER TO THE EDITOR Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have some rules. Please keep them to less than 250 words. Letters will be edited to length as well as for grammar and spelling. All letters must be signed with full name „ not initials. An address and telephone number must be in cluded. The phone number and address are not for publication, but must be provided. Due to the number of letters received, we are able to run only one lette r per person per month. The Letters to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community discourse, and the opinions and statements made i n letters are solely those of the individual writers. The newspaper takes no responsibility for the content of these letters. Please send or bring correspondence to the Sun, Letters to the Editor, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980. Readers may email Letters to the Editor at letters@sun-herald.com. Further questio ns or information, call 941-681-3003.

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The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 7VIEWPOINT Eric Sevareid (19121992), the author and broadcaster, said he was a pessimist about tomorrow but an optimist about the day after tomorrow. Regarding Americas economy, prudent people should reverse that. This Wednesday, according to the Financial Times Robin Wigglesworth and Nicole Bullock, the U.S. stock market will of“cially have enjoyed its longestever bull runŽ „ one that rises 20 percent from its low, until it drops 20 percent from its peak. And Sept. 15 will be the 10th anniversary of the collapse of Lehman Bros., the fourth-largest U.S. investment bank. Historys largest bankruptcy “ling presaged the October 2008 evaporation of almost $10 trillion in global market capitalization. The durable market rise that began March 6, 2009, is as intoxicating as the Lehman anniversary should be sobering: Nothing lasts. Those who see no Lehmanlike episode on the horizon did not see the last one. Economists debate, inconclusively, this question: Do economic expansions die of old age (the current one began in June 2009) or are they slain by big events or bad policies? What is known is that all expansions end. God, a wit has warned, is going to come down and pull civilization over for speeding. When He, or something, decides that todays expansion, currently in its 111th month (approaching twice the 58-month average length of post-1945 expansions), has gone on long enough, the contraction probably will begin with the annual budget de“cit exceeding $1 trillion. The presidents Of“ce of Management and Budget „ not that there really is a meaningful budget getting actual management „ projects that the de“cit for “scal 2019, which begins in six weeks, will be $1.085 trillion. This is while the economy is, according to the economic historian in the Oval Of“ce, as good as its ever been, ever.Ž Leavening administration euphoria with facts, Yales Robert Shiller, writing in The New York Times, notes that since quarterly GDP enumeration began in 1947, there have been 101 quarters with growth at least equal to the 4.1 percent of this years second quarter. The fastest „ 13.4 percent „ was 1950s fourth quarter, perhaps produced largely by bad news: The Cold War was on, the Korean War had begun in June, fear of the atomic bomb was rising (New York City installed its “rst air-raid siren in October), as was (consequently) a homebuilding boom outside cities and scare buyingŽ of products that might become scarce during World War III. Today, Shiller says, it seems likely that people in many countries may be accelerating their purchases „ of soybeans, steel and many other commodities „ fearing future government intervention in the form of a trade war.Ž And fearing the probable: higher interest rates. Another hardy perennial among economic debates concerns the point at which the ratio of debt to GDP suppresses growth. The (sort of) good news „ in that it will satisfy intellectual curiosity „ is that we are going to “nd out where that point is: Within a decade the national debt probably will be 100 percent of GDP and rising. As Irwin Stelzer of the Hudson Institute says, If unlimited borrowing, “nanced by printing money, were a path to prosperity, then Venezuela and Zimbabwe would be top of the growth tables.Ž Jay Powell, chairman of the Federal Reserve, says “scal policy is on an unsustainable path,Ž but such warnings are audible wallpaper, there but not noticed. The word unsustainableŽ in “scal rhetoric is akin to unacceptableŽ in diplomatic parlance, where it usually refers to a situation soon to be accepted. A recent IMF analysis noted that among advanced economies only the United States expects an increase in the debt-to-GDP ratio over the next “ve years.Ž Americas complacency caucus will respond: But among those economies, ours is performing especially well. What, however, if this is signi“cantly an effect of exploding debt? Publicly held U.S. government debt has tripled in a decade. Despite todays shrill discord between the parties, the political class is more united by class interest than it is divided by ideology. From left to right, this class has a permanent incentive to run enormous de“cits „ to charge, through taxation, current voters signi“cantly less than the cost of the government goods and services they consume, and saddling future voters with the cost of servicing the resulting debt after the current crop of politicians have left the scene. This crop derives its political philosophy from the musical AnnieŽ: Tomorrow is always a day away. For normal people, however, the day after tomorrow always arrives. George Wills email address is georgewill@ washpost.com.America is overdue for another Lehman-like episode WEEK IN REVIEW George WILLColumnist Is President Trump ful“lling candidate Trumps promises? You can make a case that he is, based on some surprising and widely unexpected economic developments. Vice President Mike Pence, writing in The Des Moines Register, put it succinctly: The evidence is clear: America is back.Ž He adds, Its no accident.Ž Pence and other Trump enthusiasts can point to increasing macroeconomic growth. Growth rose 4.1 percent in the second quarter and is up more than 3 percent for the year. Unemployment was down to 3.9 percent in July. The S&P 500 stock index is up 6 percent since the Trump presidency, while the rest of the worlds stock markets are down 6 percent. These are numbers any recent administration would boast about. More notable are positive trends among subgroups that werent doing so well before Trump took of“ce. Former Obama administration chief economic adviser Jason Furman, writing for Vox, notes that in the past three years recent wage growth ... at the low end of the wage scaleŽ is stronger than growth among the higher-paid. Similarly, Bloomberg columnist and portfolio manager Conor Sen makes the point that job growth has been greatest among goods-producing workers and the least-educated workers.Ž Both Furman and Sen contrast current trends with those in the 1998-2001 period of torrid economic growth, when income gains were concentrated at the top of the economic spectrum and employment gains were concentrated in of“ce jobs and meds and edsŽ „ the government“nanced or heavily regulated health care and education sectors. So maybe growing income inequality isnt inevitable after all. And maybe the economic prospects of groups clustered at the low end of the economic scale are not as dire as has long been assumed. The unemployment rate among young millennials „ those over 25 „ is only 5.1 percent, according to Sen, the lowest since the government began measuring this in 1994. So much for moms basement sofa. Black unemployment was down to 5.9 percent in May, and Hispanic unemployment was down to 4.6 percent in June, both the lowest number since the early 1970s, when government began tracking them. Moreover, the labor force is expanding, with 600,000 entrants in June, notes American University economist Evan Kraft, writing in The Hill. Simultaneously, the disability rolls are decreasing. All of which suggests that incentives to work are returning to Appalachia and other previously forlorn areas where so many idle people have been driven to opioid dependency. Blue-collar employers have been searching hard to “ll job vacancies, ditching educational requirements and following the advice of liberal and conservative politicians to take a chance on former felons who have served their time, as the Manhattan Institutes Aaron Renn reports. Historically, Democratic candidates have promised to create economic opportunities for those starting off with disadvantages, especially racial minorities and those from non-college households. But recent Democratic presidents, like recent Republican presidents, have seen economic growth concentrated among the af”uent, highly educated and well-positioned. Candidate Trumps call to Make America Great Again,Ž however unspeci“c, was taken, and intended to be taken, as a promise to deliver different better results for the downscale. He constantly talked about reopening factories, strengthening manufacturing and encouraging blue-collar job growth. As an electoral strategy, this seemed to ignore courting minorities and rely on an inevitably shrinking segment of the electorate. But the segment hadnt shrunk enough (and its size was consistently underestimated, as The New York Times Nate Cohn demonstrated) to prevent Trump from winning 100 Obama electoral votes in Florida, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Iowa and Maine. Now it looks like Trump is creating the kind of economy he promised, with growth targeted at the downscale (including blacks and Hispanics) rather than the upscale, with lower economic inequality and with growth spreading to regions that have seen little of it for decades. Do you remember any mainstream media or liberal economist who envisioned such results? Of course you can add caveats. You can say these numbers are just statistical noise, not harbingers or long-term trends. You can argue, as Furman does, that some of these trends started in the late Obama years. You can make the broader point that presidents policies have only limited economic effects, and that trends like the apparent revival of manufacturing may owe more to exogenous factors rather than to Trumps policies. So maybe this is not a case of promises kept but just dumb luck. Of course you can say the same thing „ just dumb luck „ about the 100 electoral votes Trump targeted and won. But after a while, you might wonder. Michael Barone is a senior political analyst for the Washington Examiner, resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and longtime co-author of The Almanac of American Politics.Has Trump delivered on his economic promises? Michael BARRONColumnist adno=50540105 LAWN REPLACEMENT CALL MALONEY'S SOD No job too big or too small!www.maloneysod.comServing Charlotte County for 40 years941-637-1333 € Diabetic Care € Foot Pain € Foot Surgery € Heel Pain Same Day Appointments 941-613-1919 3191 Harbor Blvd. Unit D Port Charlotte, FL 33952 adno=50538499 COMPLETE FOOT CARE Dr. Michael Metyk Podiatric Surgery Bethany L. Walden, Au.D.American Board Certi“ ed Doctor of AudiologyCharlotte Hearing Center, Inc. Central Plaza West21216 Olean Blvd., Ste. 4 Port Charlotte, FL 33952 Phone: (941) 766-8886 adno=50538676

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Page 8 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS CHARLOTTE COUNTY „ Beginning Monday, the Charlotte County Sheriffs Of“ce will increase traf“c enforcement at the following locations: Speed enforcement: € School zones Top crash locations: € Veterans Boulevard and Murdock Circle € Tamiami Trail and Cornelius Boulevard € Tamiami Trail and Cochran Boulevard € Tamiami Trail and Conway Boulevard € Veterans Boulevard and Kings Highway € I-75 and Jones Loop Road € I-75 and Duncan Road The Charlotte County Sheriffs Office reported the following arrests: € Nicholas Patrick Barron, 36, 28400 block of Yacht Club Blvd., Punta Gorda. Charge: out of county warrant. Bond: $4,000. € Anthony Battista, 40, 26100 block of Concepcion Dr., Punta Gorda. Charge: battery by intentional touch or strike. Bond: $2,500. € James Anthony Popivich, 30, 2300 block of Pinegrove Cir., Punta Gorda. Charge: discharging a firearm in public, improper exhibition of dangerous weapons or firearms and resisting an officer without violence. Bond: $10,500. € Richard Austin Lynch, 27, 500 block of Berry St., Punta Gorda. Charge: violation of probation or community control. Bond: none. € Alexis Floy Dahl, 25, 23100 block of Glen Ave., Port Charlotte. Charge: two counts violation of probation or community control. Bond: none. € Travis Joel McMinn, 20, of Machesney Park, Ill. Charge: knowingly driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond: $1,000. € Brooke Elaine Edwards, 25, of Arcadia. Charge: out of county warrant, possession of a controlled substance without a prescription, possession of under 20 grams of marijuana and possession or use of drug paraphernalia. Bond: $13,500. € Savannah Lynn Wolfe, 19, 5700 block of Caburn Rd., North Port. Charge: possession or use of drug paraphernalia, possession of cocaine and possession of under 20 grams of marijuana. Bond: $2,500. The Punta Gorda Police Department reported the following arrests: € Pedro Carrilo, 25, of North Fort Myers. Charge: possession of a controlled substance without a prescription and possession or use of drug paraphernalia. Bond: $8,500. € Andres Garcia, 25, of Fort Myers. Charge: possession or use of drug paraphernalia and possession of cocaine. Bond: $7,500. „ Compiled by Kayla GleasonTraffic enforcement locations setThe information for Police Beat is gathered from police, sheriffs office, Florida Highway Patrol, jail and fire records. Not every arrest leads to a conviction and guilt or innocence is determined by the court system. POLICE BEATBy ALEXANDRA HERRERA STAFF WRITERSARASOTA „ Six new board members have been named to the Sarasota County Education Foundation, including a teacher and two students. The board members will serve a three-year term that began on May 2018. The three board members who will serve a three year term are Nancy Harris, Kent A. Hayes and Anne Rollings, according to a release by the Education Foundation. According to the Education Foundation, this is the “rst year that a teacher will serve on the board „ the foundation chose William B.J.Ž Ivey who was the 2017 teacher of the year. Ivey is a coach and teacher at Riverview High School in Sarasota. Along with Ivey, the foundation also named North Port High School senior Stephanie Hawkins to the board along with Michael Feltovic, a senior at Riverview High School. Hawkins, Feltovic and Ivey will serve a one-year term on the board. Harris is a retired arts educator, museum archivist, oral historian and entrepreneur. Harris was named the 2017 adult volunteer of the year at Alta Vista Elementary School. Hayes is the director of client services at Sarasota-based tandem construction, has experience with start-ups and small businesses, and has supported growth strategies for the Education Foundation, according to the foundation. Rollings is the manager of corporate of“ce operations for Geckos Hospitality Group, which is the parent company of locally owned restaurants. The group will serve on the board along with existing board members, and Education Foundation President Jennifer Vigne.Email: aherrera@sun-herald.comNew members named to Sarasota Education Foundation board SUN PHOTO BY SCOTT LAWSONFrom left, Sarasota County Education Foundation Board ocers are Tom Koski, Juan Villaveces, Britt Riner, Linda Jellison and Lisl Liang. By KAYLA GLEASONSTAFF WRITERWhile students were busy getting gold stars their “rst week back, Charlotte County Public Schools pulled in nine Energy Star Awards. The Energy Star Awards are presented by the United States Environmental Protection Agency and recognize applicants who have gone above and beyond energy ef“ciency and conservation. At Tuesdays meeting of the Charlotte County School Board, Charlotte High School, Hope Day Care at Charlotte Technical College, Liberty Elementary School, Meadow Park Elementary School, Neil Armstrong Elementary School, Peace River Elementary School, Port Charlotte High School, Punta Gorda Middle School, and Sallie Jones Elementary School were awarded for demonstrating superior energy performance,Ž according to the board agenda. CCPS has come a long way since we started down the road of energy ef“ciency,Ž said Jerry Olivo, Assistant Superintendent for District Support. Charlotte High was designed as energy ef“cient but has leaped even farther forward by embracing the program.Ž Plaques noting CHSs sustainability efforts even line the halls of the campus, explaining everything from usage of solar panels to energy ef“cient light bulbs to native ”ora planted in the courtyard. Many teachers and students at the awarded schools have introduced and taken part in games and competitions that help reduce energy usage. Light switch competitions were a big hit, according to Olivo, where classes will try to out-save th eir neighbors by remembering to turn lights off in the en-suite restrooms or when the classroom is unoccupied. This achievement, it takes a lot of trying to remember to turn those lights off every time you leave the room, so thank you for that,Ž said board member Wendy Atkinson. Most of the schools are repeat winners of the award. This is Sallie Joness seventh win and Libertys sixth. Both CHS and PCHS have also been recognized for three years now. Meanwhile, Meadow Park received its “rst win this year. This is a great leap into a greener tomorrow... Were creating a culture of environmental sensitivity,Ž Olivo said. The Energy Star program is so important, I just cant thank teachers enough for doing the right thing.ŽEmail: kgleason@sun-herald.comCharlotte schools earn energy stars By KAYLA GLEASONSTAFF WRITERPort Charlotte Middle School rewarded its students and teachers for being an A school with a special pep rally. This year, the school ranked number one in the district, thanks to the hard work and dedication of everyone involved, according to Principal John LeClair. Your teachers did their job but you know who else did their job? Students,Ž he said. Now, we have to show the sixth graders how its done.Ž After the crowd was suf“ciently hyped from chanting and stomping on the wooden bleachers, a few student representatives from each grade were selected to compete in activities like a cup stacking contest. Some lucky students and teachers even got to decorate Assistant Principal Matthew Kunder with colorful hairspray and silly string. Part motivation, part revenge, Kunder then suggested they do something different next year „ shave LeClairs head. I will shave my head next year, this time if you get an A again,Ž LeClair said.Email: kgleason@sun-herald.comPCMS makes the grade SUN PHOTOS BY KAYLA GLEASONPCMS teachers spray Assistant Principal Matthew Kunders hair festive Terrier colors. WEEKLY RECORD WINNERS CIRCLE American Legion Post 110 € Bridge winners Aug. 13: Marty DeWitte, 4130; Niki Stroudt 3880; Judy Tayler, 3660; Pat Schram, 3410. Charlotte County Bridge Club € Winners Aug. 10: Blanche Thum, 5050; Connie Oberlander, 4330; Jay Oberlander, 3480; Jim Ellsworth, 3400. Charlotte Harbor Yacht Club € Ladies Bridge winners Aug. 14: 1-Janie Ressel; 2-Chris Green. € Slam Bridge winners Aug. 15: 1-Emine Sahin; 2-Glen Tschetter; 3-Irene Runkle. Charlotte Square Condominium Complex € Charlotte County Bridge Group winners Aug. 11: Virginia Clayton, 6950; Trudy Riley, 5920; Dee Weisenberg, 3580; Bill Kutschman, 3190. Cultural Center of Charlotte County € Mahjong winners Aug. 9: Table 1: Kathy Cimaglia, Linda Kopp; Table 2: Merry Davine, Doris Marlin. Aug. 14: Table 1: Doris Marlin, Toni Trezise; Table 2: Carole Drake, Cindy Robertson; Table 3: Linda Paholsky; Table 4: Doreen Foster; Table 5: Dorothy Quirk, Marie Devlin; Table 6: Emily Hughes, Judy Sprauge. € Port Charlotte Cribbage Club 147 winners Aug. 15: Sharon Liotta-19; John McPherson-15; Frank White-14. Isles Yacht Club € Scrabble winners Aug. 10: Joanne Collins, 189; Diana Lehr, 343. € Duplicate Bridge winners Aug. 15: 1-Bob and Jackie Whitaker; 1-Jane Seatter, Jan Savino; 2-Arlene and Ray Rothhaar; 3-Debbie and John Greenslade. Kings Gate € Wednesday Night Double Deck Pinochle winners Aug. 15: Bob Garbowicz, 1385; Gary Sblendorio, 1316. € Friday Night Double Deck Pinochle winners Aug. 10: Osborne Davis, 1351; Lynn Davis; 1119; Bob Garbowicz, 1013. € Monday Bridge winners Aug. 13: 1-Anna Saxson, 4030; 2-Jenny Shoemaker, 3870; 3-Bill Kutschman, 3540; 4-David Beard, 3410. Kingsway Country Club € Ladies Bridge winners Aug. 10: 1-Sara Croak; 2-Carol Fisher. Aug 15: 1-Carol Taylor; 2-Marlene Warburton. Moose Lodge 2121 € Contract Bridge winners Aug. 8: Trudy Riley, 6180; Bud Barnhouse, 5440; Ernie Kamaitis, 4510; Jay Oberlander, 4200. € Euchre Card Game winners Aug. 9: Ginger Emerine, 69; Bonnie M. Weithman, 68; Harry Godfrey, 65; Mike Emerine, 64; Jim Knott, 64. Twin Isles Country Club € Duplicate Bridge winners Aug. 15: 1-Terri Leavy, Shirley Carlson; 2-(tie) Nancy Padgett, Susan Baird, Nancy Scheer, Kathy Strayton. Aug 16: 1(tie) Maria Antanelis, Barbara Clay, Joan Shute, Joanne Ryder. Want to add your group? Email sdennis@sun-herald.com for details. Charlotte County marriage licenses € Ronald Eric Tornwall of Punta Gorda, and Camella Ann Myers of Punta Gorda € Brittany Kay Babbs of Punta Gorda, and Jason Ray Wilburn of Punta Gorda € Mark Edward Ugi of Punta Gorda, and Natalie Weinstein of Punta Gorda € Thomas Earl Ringelspaugh of Englewood, and Amanda Marie Callow of Englewood € Gary Lee Hutsenpiller of North Port, and Janine Marie Korpa of North Port € Shane Alun Whittemore of Punta Gorda, and Amber Nichole Nielsen of Punta Gorda € Charles Roland Church of Englewood, and Patricia Lee Hiller of Englewood € Ashley Desiree Cowdery of Port Charlotte, and Zachary Ryan Smith of Port Charlotte € Benjamin Wayne Mercer of Port Charlotte, and Shannon Marie Calleja of Port Charlotte € Alexis Mendez Gonzalez of Punta Gorda, and Omarie Beatriz Martinez of Punta Gorda € Steven Robert Krankoski of Punta Gorda, and Kimberly Sue Hertner of Punta Gorda € Michela Lyn Straub of Punta Gorda, and Alex Angel Cononico of Punta Gorda € Lawrence Eugene Blake of Punta Gorda, and Carol Bort Robison of Punta Gorda € Jeannine Marie Kubiak of Punta Gorda, and Joseph Michael Jelinek of Punta Gorda € Anthony Joseph Crisafi of North Port, and Nicole Lynn Micek of North Port € Sarah Anne Slack of Placida, and Robert James Murphy of Placida € Melissa Mabel Martinez Torres of Punta Gorda, and Clyde Wayne Hancock of Punta Gorda € Elizabeth B onner Melton of Port Charlotte, and John Franklin Tracey of Port Charlotte € Jeffrey David Berry of Lebanon, Ohio, and Elizabeth Ann Maloney of Lebanon, Ohio € Emmanuel Saint Ilus of North Port, and Yvonia Duvras of North Port € Amanda Louise Masters of Port Charlotte, and Robert Joseph Verville of Port Charlotte € Miranda Jayne Wilkie of Port Charlotte, and Robert Daniel Rodriguez of Port Charlotte € Charlotte County divorces € Tamera Lynn Dannewitz v. Stephen Richard Dannewitz € Linda Carol Foster v. David Leon Foster € Kristen Alicia Fristed v. Thomas A. Hudzik € Gary Allan Gray v. Judith Anne Gray € James F. Jones Jr. v. Ann E. Jones € Jason Mazzo v. Vanya Popadiyne € Giuliana Elizabeth Melreit v. Bryan James Melreit € Robert Parise v. Danielle Parise € Bruce Edgar Pearson v. Larissa Anne Pearson € Anthony M. Pribble v. Karyn T. Pribble € Ginger Sue Reiter v. Gregory Schreiber Reiter € Robert A. Riggs v. Michelle R. Riggs € Donna Schiller v. Stephen Schiller € Brandy L. Ventimiglia v. Angelo Ventimiglia adno=50539632

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The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 9LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS Honda Port C harlotte Honda adno=50540459

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Page 10 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWSBy ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICHENGLEWOOD COMMUNITY NEWS EDITORENGLEWOOD „ This political season, Englewood Indivisible members are making recommendations they believe match the groups platform. In addition to holding a meet-and-greet event in North Port to attract new guests from Charlotte and Sarasota counties, to recently rallying in Tampa, local members remain vocal. Englewood Indivisible is a non-partisan group resisting the Trump agenda, respectfully making their voices heard by elected representatives, according to the groups website. Lately, members have been participating in community-wide events to bring attention to the persistent red tide issues. I can hardly breathe in my own yard,Ž said Englewood resident Judith Schumacher during the meet-andgreet in North Port. What is red tide doing to our community? Think of all of the waitresses who are single parents who arent making money. Their bills dont stop coming in. Its really bad here. We need something done about it.Ž Wesley Anne Beggs, candidate for Sarasota County Commission District 4, who is running against Al Maio, spoke to the crowd about the environment. Beggs said county commissioners should restrict the use of pesticides and fertilizers for four additional weeks during the year. Beggs said red tide is a crisis here and the algae bloom is a crisis in Okeechobee. Every time I go out to Venice Beach, every time I go out to Englewood Beach, Im dodging dead “sh,Ž said Beggs, a Tampa native, who owns her own marketing and media company. The group is recommending Beggs, who said she would “ght for smart growth to prevent paving over paradise.Ž Jane Hunter of Englewood Indivisible said 10 members of the group decided on endorsements. They admitted to not interviewing all of the candidates, but based their decisions on those candidates who drove the groups agenda. The group picked Lourdes Ramirez and Alexandra Coe for Sarasota County Commissioner seats. Lourdes talks of limiting development until the necessary infrastructure is in place. In the last election, the Republicans took a picture of her and took it out of context and made contributions in her name to Democrats. Her site is about local issues, while her opponent, incumbent Al Maio, talks vaguely about what hes done on the board,Ž said member Sue Busko. We decided that, given the arrival of vote-by-mail ballots, we would make recommendations to our members, rather than continue with our slow endorsement process,Ž Hunter wrote in an email to members. The group endorses Sarasota School Board candidates Jane Goodwin, Shirley Brown and Nick Guy. They also picked state House District 74 candidate Tony Mowry, and state Senate District 23 candidate Olivia Babis. Babis, was at the meet and greet. She said she is the only candidate with a visible disability. She was born without arms. She uses her legs to drive and her toes to hold a microphone to speak during forums. Mowry said hes disturbed by how the Stand Your Ground Law is protecting people who may be guilty of crimes. I believe the Stand Your Ground Law has been misapplied in several instances,Ž he said during the meet and greet. Mowry said one reason he ran for District 74, is because he met an elderly couple who were nearly homeless after their rent went up and they only had social security and a small pension to pay their bills. They needed a lot more help than to just write a will,Ž Mowry said. He helped the couple get federal housing assistance. They would have been evicted and homeless by the time any social services agency could help them,Ž he said. If I get elected to the state house, I can help all of the Dorothys out there.Ž The group also endorsed Maria Ruhl, for 12th Judicial Circuit Court in Sarasota County. In Charlotte County the group endorsed School Board candidates Cara Reynolds because she is an experienced teacher in Charlotte County and a strong supporter of public schools. Her main opponent, Geri Waksler, is a land-use attorney who represents developers, most recently the Mosaic Company in its (failed) effort to mine potash in DeSoto County,Ž Hunter said. She also founded Charlotte Academy, a charter school. A third candidate “led at the last minute and is viewed by some insiders as intending to force Reynolds and Waksler into a runoff.Ž For Commissioner of Agriculture, R. David Walker was the groups pick. David Walker is by far the most quali“ed and experienced candidate, as he is a marine biologist and has served at the US Geological Institute. Additionally, he was a founder of Indivisible Broward,Ž Hunter said.Email: eallen@sun-herald.comEnglewood Indivisible recommends candidates SUN PHOTO BY ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICHOlivia Babis, right, is running for Florida Senate District 23. She spoke to a crowd at a meet and greet held at St. Nathaniels Episcopal Church in North Port sponsored by the Englewood Indivisible group. By ANNE EASKERSTAFF WRITERSince Chief Pam Davis took over the leadership of the Punta Gorda Police Department in January, shes gotten to know residents and business owners and made some policy changes. People have already made me feel a part of the department,Ž she told the Sun Day one, I didnt feel like an outsider.Ž Davis came from the Baltimore Police Department, where she was the director of the professional development and training academy. Moving to a smaller department was a big change. Chief Davis has accomplished a great deal in her “rst six months and most noteworthy is her ability to move the department forward in training and policies, enhance morale, “ll position vacancies, stabilize department leadership and establish a genuine rapport with all sectors of our community,Ž said City Manager Howard Kunik. She has ingrained herself into Punta Gorda, and the feedback I receive from the business and residential community are overwhelmingly positive and reassuring. We look forward to progressive, community-oriented policing for years to come.Ž Mayor Rachel Keesling said it was clear Davis background in police training and assessments would be a valuable asset to the community, and thats evidenced by her “rst six-month review. She has praise for the department, but yet she is able to outline a speci“c plan to move forward,Ž Keesling said. I personally feel she has added a level of stability we needed.Ž Prior to Davis hire, the department had experienced a dif“cult year and a half. In August 2016, retired citizen Mary Knowlton was fatally shot by former Punta Gorda Police Of“cer Lee Coel during a community demonstration. Both Coel and former police chief Tom Lewis were charged by State Attorney Stephen Russell for crimes related to the incident. While Lewis was acquitted of culpable negligence by a jury trial last summer, he was ultimately “red from the department for a lack of attention to citizen safety in repeated community events. After months with an interim chief and several changes among command staff, Davis entered the department with plans to begin by assessing morale. As a former fellow with the Police Executive Research Forum, she had experience working with struggling agencies throughout the country „ talking to staff, analyzing policies, and making recommendations for improvement. Every single one of them, when we talked to the of“cers, they would tell you the morale is the worst its ever been, this place is terrible, I hate change, I hate what Im doing right now,Ž she said. But here I did not get that at all.Ž At PGPD, she said there was initially some anxiety, as there always is with changes in leadership, but everyone was receptive and excited to move forward. Policy changes were a group effort, with input from everyone affected. The biggest change so far, she said, has been additional safety requirements for training exercises. While the department previously required a safety of“cer for training exercises, the of“cers responsibilities were never spelled out clearly. You cant have a safety of“cer whos also participating in the training or is an instructor,Ž she said. That person has to be there just by themselves watching everything thats going on as well as checking weapons and making sure everybodys been searched.Ž The new policy gives detailed responsibilities for the designated safety of“cer, including participating in a planning meeting, inspecting the training site for any hazards and developing a plan to mitigate those hazards, conducting a safety brie“ng at the start of the training,and maintaining general awareness during the training to address any safety concerns. Both of“cer training and any demonstrations with citizen involvement now require a written safety plan, which must be approved by the employee development coordinator, the operations captain, and Davis herself. Once we all like how its written out and were all happy with the safety measures taking place, then we sign off on it and say OK, you can do the training,Ž she said. In a recent community event with Leadership Charlotte, the department used the agencys use of force simulator, which is like a video game that responds to of“cers actions. By observing the simulation, community members got an idea of the training of“cers do and how of“cers should behave in a certain situation. Even for that simulation, Davis said everyone was searched prior to entering the sectioned off area to make sure no weapons were brought into the area. For community events, Davis said she would avoid using even Simunition weapons, which “re nonlethal rounds used for of“cer training. Even though the Simunition guns are designed that they will not take live rounds, it doesnt matter to me, and it doesnt matter to anyone in this agency,Ž she said. Everyones searched, and you will not bring anything in there.Ž The agency, and agencies across the country, all learned from the tragedy in 2016, Davis said. Last week marked the two-year anniversary of the incident, and Davis said it was probably tough for members of the agency, though they keep moving along. The one thing youve got to remember is they dont forget that that happened,Ž she said. These guys have learned, weve all learned from that. Yeah, it was probably tough, but again theyre very talented, dedicated people here trying to move forward, but they remember it every day.Ž Other policy changes since Davis started include removing the notolerance policy for drugs in Punta Gorda schools, which previously required arrests, rather than civil citations, for all juveniles found with any type of drug. Here in Charlotte County we have a diversion program where if its a “rst-time offense and its a small amount of marijuana, they can be given a civil citation and put into a diversion program,Ž Davis said. So to us, that makes a lot more sense to have these kids educated about the reasons you dont want to use these drugs as opposed to just putting handcuffs on them and now youre done with them.Ž The change brought the department in line with other schools in the county, where Charlotte County Sheriffs Of“ce deputies generally issue citations. The biggest challenges for Davis have been adjusting to a small department, which has limited resources. Coming from a bigger agency, she said shes used to being able to pull “ve of“cers to attend a community event or do foot or bike patrol, but with PGPD, there may only be four of“cers on patrol on any given day. Were doing well, I think, with what we have,Ž she said. Theres just other things I hope Ill be able to do at some point in time.Ž The agency is always looking for innovative ideas, Davis said, and has recently started some new things, including incorporating a K-9 team at Charlotte High School. More kids will want to interact with that school resource officer if they can come up and pet that dog,Ž Davis said. Think about the relationship thats going to build with those kids. Were testing it out and its working great so far.Ž The department is also creating a new volunteer service unit focusing on pedestrian and bicycle safety, which they hope to get up and running this month.Email: aeasker@sun-herald.comNew Punta Gorda police chief gets good early review SUN PHOTO BY ANNE EASKERChief Pam Davis at the Punta Gorda Police Department. To view todays legal notices and more visit, www.oridapublicnotices.com To view todays legal notices and more visit, www.oridapublicnotices.com 3000 NOTICES 3112 FICTITIOUS NAME 08/19/2018 3138 OTHER NOTICES NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE: The Southwest Florida Wate r Management District is propos ing to amend the following rule(s): 40D-3.037, F.A.C. Rules, Pub lications and Agreements Incor porated by Reference The purpose and effect of this amendment is to update the Ap plication for a Water Well Con tractors License to conform to section 373.323(3)(b)(1), F.S., as amended in 2016. The Notice of Proposed Rule ma king appeared in the Florida Administrative Register, Vol. 44, No. 160, on August 16, 2018. A copy of the proposed rule can be viewed on the Districts web site a t https://www.swfwmd.state.fl.us / business/epermitting/rules/pr oposed-rule-amendments. Pursuant to the provisions of the A mericans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special ac commodations to participate in this workshop/meeting is asked to advise the agency at least 5 days before the workshop/meeting by contact ing: SWFWMD Human Re sources Office Chief, (352) 796-7211, ext. 4703; 1-800 423-1476 (FL only), ext. 4703; or to ADACoordinator@Water Matters.org. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please con tact the agency using the Florida Relay Service, 1(800)955-8771 (TDD) or 1(800)955-8770 (Voice). IF REQUESTED WITHIN 21 DAYS OF THE DATE OF THIS NOTICE, A HEARING WILL BE SCHEDULED AND ANNOUNCED IN THE FAR. THE PERSON TO BE CON TACTED REGARDING THE PRO POSED RULES AND TO OBTAIN A COPY IS: James B. Fussell, Jr., Staff Attorney, SWFWMD, 7601 U.S. 301 North, Tampa, F L 33637, (813)985-7481, Ext. 2139 (J2018015-3). Publish: August 19, 2018 395588 3604994 T urnyou r trashinto cash! Advertise youryard sa l e! CLASSIFIED ADSSELL

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LEE HEALTH PLANSLee Health plans to expand its role at Babcock Ranch solar community soon, after opening a Healthy Life Center there earlier this year. See page number 4 PIRATES TREASURE TROTPlenty of Pirates and community members set a course for the Port Charlotte High School track Saturday See page number 7 GRANTS ATHLETICISM PUTS HIM AMONG ELITEIt was while he was attending elementary school in Savannah, Georgia, that the future Fightin Tarpon would get his first exposure to football. See page number 10OUR TOWN: SUNCOAST HOMES Sunday, August 19, 2018 607 Bayshore Rd, Nokomis 4521 Hansard Ave, North Port 6 Fairway Dr, Englewood, FL 34223 County: Sarasota Year Built: 1979 Price: $399,900 LP/SqFt: 188.72 Garage: Yes Beds: 3 Baths: 2/0 SqFt Heated: 2,119 Total Acreage: 1/4 Acre to 21779 Sq. Ft. Pool: Yes Location: Boca Royale Listing Agent/ Brokerage: Jamie Mullis, 941-716-1375, Jamie.mullis@” oridamoves.com, Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate 607 Bayshore Rd, Nokomis,FL 34275 County: Sarasota Year Built: 1990 List Price: $750,000 LP/SqFt: $ 277.88 Garage/Carport: Yes, Attached, 3 Spaces Beds: 4 Baths: 2/1 Sq Ft Heated: 2,699 Total Acreage: 1/4 Acre to 21779 Sq. Ft. Pool : Yes Location: Tierra Sonada Listing Agent/ Brokerage: Clark Bowman, 941-5045488, Clark.bowman@ ” oridamoves.com, Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate 4521 Hansard Ave, North Port, FL 34286 County: Sarasota Year Built: 1998 Price: $248,500 LP/Sqft: 178.91 Garage: Yes, Attached, 2 Spaces Beds: 3 Baths: 2/0 SqFt Heated: 1,389 Total Acreage: 1/4 Acre to 21779 Sq. Ft. Pool: Yes Location: Port Charlotte Listing Agent/ Brokerage: Jim Bartlett, 941-234-7514, jim. bartlett@” oridamoves. com, Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate Question: In your last column, you stated that median sales price of a 3/2/2/pool home (3-bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage, with pool) was $275,000 during the first half of 2018 in Charlotte County. I recently purchased a fixer-upper that meets that same description. Does that mean I should price it to sell for $275,000 since thats the average price 3/2/2/pool homes are selling for? Answer: No. The median sales price reported in the media cannot be used to determine the market value of any specific home. It is a general indicator used to gauge changes in the entire market. The median sales price is simply the price at where half the homes sold for less, and half sold for more. The reason we narrowed the criteria to 3/2/2/pool homes is that this has been the most popular configuration for homes sold over the years. Another reason for using this specific configuration is that we were comparing the median sales price of homes from 2011 to 2018. Limiting our comparison to a fixed configuration of homes produces a more apples-to-apples comparison. For example, what if from 2011 to 2018, the need for affordable housing produced a wave of new homes with a 2-bedroom, 1-bath, 1-car garage, and nopool configuration? Including this wave of smaller, lower-priced homes in our 2011 to 2018 comparison of home prices would have pushed the median price down, erroneously suggesting most home prices went down during these years. Also noteworthy is that you are equating the median sales price with the average sales price. They are not the same. The average price is the total dollar amount that all the homes sold for divided by the number of homes sold. The median is the price at which half the homes sold for more, half for less. Why is the median used instead of the average? Its common for sales prices at the high or low end of the price spectrum to have a much greater deviation from the norm. That can distort the numbers to suggest all home prices are moving up or down more dramatically than they are. That is why the universal standard of practice has been to use the median sales price. Its not perfect, but it is recognized as the best tool we have for generalizing the direction and velocity of home prices over time. Drilling deeper into your question, the median sales price has nothing to do with your home because the only thing we know your home has in common with the other homes used to calculate the median sales price is that they are also 3/2/2/ pool homes. To determine the value of your home, you will need an appraisal or CMA (comparative market analysis). That involves researching homes that are comparable to yours on many levels, including year built, location, upgrades, amenities, cleanliness, move-in-readiness, architectural features, landscaping, and a long list of other attributes. Median sales prices are most commonly used when comparing year-over-year, monthly prices. For example, the next reporting cycle will focus on the change in the median sales price in August 2018 compared to August 2017. I prefer using a three, six, and sometimes 12-month rolling median because the larger sampling eliminates the often-ridiculous gyrations when using single month comparisons. A six-month rolling period would mean, for example, we compare prices for the first six months of 2018 compared to the first six months of 2017. This will create more consistency and less distortion than comparing prices in June 2018 compared to June 2017. Brett Slattery is broker/ owner of Brett Slattery Realty llc in Charlotte County. Brett responds to all questions and column suggestions, including those not printed due to space limitations. Reach him via 941-468-1430, Brett@ BrettSlattery.com, or www.BrettSlattery.com.Is my home worth the median sales price? Brett SLATTERYColumnist 6 Fairway Dr, Englewood

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Page 2 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 OUR TOWN „ SUNCOAST HOMESBy KIM PARKSBOARD OF REALTORSThe Englewood Area Board of Realtors attended the largest real estate event of the year. The Florida Realtors 102nd Convention and Trade Expo was held in Orlando along with Governance meetings Aug. 8-12. EABOR Board President, Kathi Obendorfer, PresidentElect Mark Spurgeon, Past President Kevin Hyde, and RPAC/Government Affairs and Board Director David Haynes attended, along with Interim CEO, Linda Pizarro. A topic of top priority was Amendment 2 that will be on the November general election ballot. It gives voters the chance to make a 10 percent cap on annual non-homestead property tax increases permanent. This event showcases our awesome workforce, which is made up of 180,000 Realtors in our state and nine thousand in our districtŽ Obendorfer said. Our senators, congress and state representatives listen to us about the issues we support: Obtainable Flood Insurance, Affordable Housing along with Amendment 2 and Clean Water,Ž she said. EABOR received an award from Florida Realtors for the highest participation in all of Florida for Call to Action,Ž Obendorfer said. When there is a Call to Action, EABOR responds. These calls to action are sent to our legislature to prompt immediate action,Ž Obendorfer said. Realtors are local, state and national advocates.Ž The Trade Expo featured more than 200 industry experts and exhibitors showcasing their products including the latest technology. The event featured more than 50 speakers and workshops that covered everything form negotiating techniques, arti“cial intelligence, legal and professional standards, property management to the latest technology trends in real estate. This years theme was Make Magic,Ž and it featured performances by magicians from Americas Got MagicŽ and Penn & Tellers Fool Us.Ž Florida Realtors mission is to support the American dream of home ownership and building strong communities, as well as to advance the states real estate industry by shaping public policy on real property issues. EABOR has been the local voice for real estate since 1962. The mission is to support the success and professionalism of their members while improving our community and protecting private property rights. Learn more about EABOR and their involvement in the community by following them on Twitter and Instagram at @EABORFL or “nd them on Facebook.Realtor board leaders represent Englewood PHOTO PROVIDEDEnglewood Area Board of Realtors memebers attending the Florida Realtors 102nd Convention and Trade Expo in Orlando include, from left, Past President Kevin Hyde, Director David Haynes, President Kathi Obendorfer and President-Elect Mark Spurgeon. By KIM PARKSBOARD OF REALTORSThe Englewood Area Board of Realtors, along with backing from The Florida Realtors, believes communities will thrive under Amendment 2. The initiative will appear on Floridas November general election ballot. Every Floridian will be protected, explained Kathi Obendorfer, president of the EABOR. It gives voters the chance to make a 10 percent cap on annual non-homestead property tax increases permanent. Prior to the 10 percent cap, if the value of a business owners property increased signi“cantly compared to the previous year, they could see their property tax bill skyrocket. Owners of investment homes also faced steep property tax hikes, which could be passed along to tenants in the form of higher rents. Florida TaxWatch released a study recently that projects that property taxes could increase by more than $700 million on non-homestead properties like businesses, apartments and second homes should Florida fail to extend a property tax yearly rate cap. According to TaxWatch, the increase would happen if voters reject a proposed constitutional amendment that theyll consider in November. If Amendment 2 fails, 2.2 million properties will face an immediate tax increase in 2019 of up to $700 million,Ž Obendorfer said. It would have a widespread negative impact on business owners, renters, shoppers, jobs and the Florida economy.Ž The 10 percent cap on non-homestead properties was part of the Save Our Homes portability constitutional amendment voters approved in 2008. The 10 percent cap portion of the amendment sunsets on Jan. 1, 2019. More infoormation can be found online at Everybodyisfor2.com EABOR has been the local voice for real estate since 1962. The mission is to support the success and professionalism of their members while improving our community and protecting private property rights.Amendment 2 failure will trigger tax increase Where Shopping Makes Cents charlottecountychamber.org adno50539946 adno50539944 Conveniently located in North Port Commons on Rt 41 just 1/4 mile north of Sumter Blvd and 800 feet south of Lowes.PAIN-FREE DENTISTRY! EMERGENCIES WELCOME! ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS! Kristin A. Woods, D.D.S. Thomas R. Cherpak, D.D.S. Richard L. Ballentine, D.M.D. adno=720803 Thank You for voting Dr. Ballentine best Dentist and Alison best Dental Hygienist in 2017 adno=50538362 24 HOUR WATER REMOVAL€ Steam Cleaning € Rotary Scrub € Dry Cleaning€ Tile & Grout Cleaning € Carpet Repair & Stretching € Oriental & Wool Rug Cleaning Specialist10% OFFCARPET, UPHOLSTERY & TILE CLEANINGPresent this ad at time of service for discount. *10% Discount does not apply to minimum.Punta Gorda/Port Charlotte 941.766.0115WWW.HAPPYHOMESERVICES.NET Custom Granite CountertopsLARGEST INVENTORY IN OUR AREA!! FREE ESTIMATES 18440 Paulson Dr., Suite B € Port Charlotte 941-624-5958 Mon-Fri 9-5 € Sat 9 Noon € Sun Closed www.acergranite” a.com Licensed & Insured adno=50538360 FOR THE BUSINESS WOMANCelebrate Your Accomplishments onSeptember 22, 2018American Business Womens DayThe Sun is once again publishing its Women in Business page. Each advertisement features a PHOTOGRAPH and BIO (Subject to Editing) of the business woman herself and her achievements. Its a way to showcase YOU and how YOUVE excelled in the world of business. It will publish on American Business Womens Day, September 22nd in the main section of the following editions of the Sun:Charlotte, Englewood & North PortIf you would like to join the celebration of Women in BusinessŽ please “ll out the form below and send it with your photo, payment and bio to the address below. AD SIZES AVAILABLE 3.25Ž X 2.25Ž (Approx. 50 words) $90 3.25Ž X 4.50Ž (Approx. 100 words) $150MAIL TO: Sun Newspapers Attn: Classifieds Department 23170 Harborview Rd. € Port Charlotte, FL 33980 eMail: mbernsen@sunletter.comName:Company Name: Address: City: State: Zip: Phone:Fax:YES! Id like to be a part of your salute to Business Women. I have enclosed my bio & photo I have enclosed my check DEADLINE IS SEPTEMBER 15 AT NOON adno=719290 adno=720855 Political Advertisement paid for and approved by Alexandra Coe, Republican, for Sarasota County Commission, District 2.www.AlexandraCoe.com… Paid Advertisement … Vote ALEXANDRA COEAlexandras Plan for Sarasota€ Protect Communities from Over development € Conservation of our Environment € Transparency in our Government € Build Resilience in our CommunitiesSarasota County Commissioner District 2 @electAlexandraCoe @CoeAlexandra 2 0 1 8 0 8 1 9 o t e n c 1 2 w o p t r e m o v e d p d f 1 1 9 A u g 1 8 0 3 : 5 2 : 0 9

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The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 3 OUR TOWN „ SUNCOAST HOMESBy LIZ WESTONNERDWALLETYour home equity could keep you afloat in retirement or bail you out in an emergency „ but not if you spend it first. U.S. homeowners are sitting on nearly $6 trillion of home value they could tap as of May 2018, according to data provider Black Knight. Lenders are eager to help many do just that through home equity loans, home equity lines of credit and cash-out refinancing. The rates are often lower than other kinds of borrowing, and the interest may still be deductible, despite last years tax reform changes. But you can lose your home to foreclosure if you cant pay back the loan, which is why financial planners generally frown on using equity for luxuries, investing or consolidating credit card debt. Many planners point to the foreclosure crisis that started a decade ago as an example of what can go wrong when people binge on home equity debt. Having equity in your home is a huge financial advantage that can provide for significant flexibility, security and peace of mind,Ž says Howard Pressman, a certified financial planner in in Vienna, Virginia. It is not an ATM that can be used to supplement your lifestyle.ŽYou may need that money laterRetirement experts predict many Americans will need to use home equity to support them when they stop working. They may do that by selling their homes and downsizing or by using a reverse mortgage, which doesnt require payments. Reverse mortgages give people 62 and older access to their equity through lump sums, lines of credit or a series of monthly checks, and the borrowed money doesnt have to be paid back until the owner sells, dies or moves out. Home equity also can be used to supplement emergency funds, planners say. Pressman recommends home equity lines of credit to his clients who dont have debt problems and who are disciplined and wont spend the money frivolously.Put your own limits on borrowingBefore the Great Recession, several lenders allowed people to borrow over 100 percent of their homes value. These days, the maximum is typically 80 percent. (Black Knight used this 80 percent loan-to-value standard to calculate how much tappable equity people have, based on current home values and existing home loans. The answer: $5.8 trillion.) Homeowners would be smart, though, to set their own limits lower to ensure they still have access to equity in an emergency and are able to pay off all of their mortgage debt before retirement.Is the potential benefit worth the risk?Financial planners generally frown on using equity for luxuries such as vacations, high-risk ventures such as investing in the stock market or starting a business, or for debts that should be paid off more quickly. (The typical mortgage lasts 30 years, while home equity loans and lines of credit can stretch for 20 or more years.) If the money is being used to pay down credit cards or buy a car, then think twice about doing it at all,Ž says Monica Dwyer, a certified financial planner in West Chester, Ohio. Those kinds of debts should be paid off in the short term, not with long-term borrowing.Ž Many people use home equity to pay college bills for their kids, but planners urge caution since its easy to overspend on higher education. In general, parents shouldnt borrow more for college than they can pay off before retirement, and the debt shouldnt prevent them from saving enough for that retirement. Federal education loans may be a better option, since they have fixed rates and consumer protections such as forbearance and deferral. Investing in home improvements can be a good use of home equity, financial planners say, as long as the projects add value to the home. (The IRS has said that interest on home equity borrowing may still be deductible if the taxpayer itemizes deductions and the money is used to buy, build or substantially improve the taxpayers home that secures the loan.Ž) Even then, Kristin Sullivan, a certified financial planner in Denver, likes her clients to have a plan to pay off the loan within five years. Thats a reasonable time period to pay off something you dont really need,Ž she says. Liz Weston is a columnist at NerdWallet a certified financial planner and author of Your Credit Score.Ž Email: lweston@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @lizweston.Your house isnt a piggy bank By JACK GUTTENTAGTHE MORTGAGE PROFESSORMost economists are negative or ambivalent about the provision in the U.S. tax code that allows homeowners to deduct mortgage interest from their taxable income. The major concern is that the provision is regressive. Up to some limit, the bene“t increases with wealth. The wealthier the consumer, the more costly the homes they buy, the larger the mortgages they take, the higher the interest charge on the mortgage and the greater the deduction. Some of this ambivalence is re”ected in the recently enacted Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. While it did not generate a lot of attention at the time, that legislation reduced the maximum mortgage amount on which interest is deductible from $1.1 million to $750,000. However, that legislation did not adapt the deduction provision to emerging new social priorities.Change in PrioritiesA new priority is the amelioration of the retirement funds crisis, as net worth at retirement declines and life expectancy rises. Since home equity is a potential buffer against economic hardship after retirement, the focus of tax deductibility should shift from increasing the affordability of home ownership to inducing homeowners to build equity more quickly. One way to do that is to shift the deductibility provision from interest to principal. Such a shift would result in faster equity growth, and could be implemented in such a way that it did not cost the government any more than the current rule. Shifting deductibility from interest to principal would cause a swing away from 30-year mortgages to shorter terms by borrowers who can afford them. This would result from the much larger tax bene“t on the shorter-term mortgage. For example, a $100,000 loan at 4.5 percent for 30 years has a monthly payment of $506, of which only $131 is principal in month one. A loan of $100,000 at 4 percent for 15 years has a payment of $739, of which $406 is principal. The deduction in month one would be $275 larger on the 15-year term, and the difference increases over time. By month 60, the difference has grown from $275 to $331, and by month 120 it is $398. Equally important is the swing in the incentive to make extra payments. The present system discourages prepayments because they reduce future deductions. The proposed system would encourage prepayments because they would generate deductions.Rules of the GameTo keep the costs down and the incentives properly aligned, the principal payments that are deductible must be properly de“ned. They consist of the principal component of the recurring monthly payment, and extra payments that reduce the loan balance by the same amount. They do not include repayments of the loan balance on sale of the house, since there is no reason to reward house sales. The eligible mortgage is one that was used to purchase the house, or one that re“nanced the mortgage that was used to purchase the house. A mortgage placed on a house that does not have a mortgage would not be eligible. This prevents a homeowner from taking out a mortgage in order to pay it off immediately for a large deduction. Shifting the deduction from interest to principal would probably cost the government a little more because principal payments usually exceed interest payments. For example, on a $100,000 mortgage for 30 years at 4.5 percent, principal payments add to $100,000. Interest payments add to $82, 407 if the loan runs to term, $57,437 if it is paid off in 12 years. If necessary, the cost of the new system could be reduced by scaling down the percentage of principal payments that is deductible, from 100 percent to a smaller “gure as needed. Jack Guttentag is professor emeritus of “nance at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Comments and questions can be left at http://www. mtgprofessor.com.Adjusting the home mortgage to meet the retirement funds crisis: the role of deductibility In the CLASSIFIEDS! Find The Perfect Companion F i n d i t F i n d i t Find it i n i n in t h e t h e the C l a s s i f i e d s C l a s s i f i e d s Classifieds W h a t e v e r W h a t e v e r Whatever i t i t it i s . i s . is... DICK & SHEILA WELLS INVITE YOU... Longtime cabinet experts Dick and Shelia Wells invite you to come in and see the new and expanded showroom. KITCHENS € BATHS NEW BUILD € REMODEL 213 Wood St Punta Gorda, FL 33950 941-639-2242 D D&Custom Cabinetsadno=50538278 2.26%APY*15 Month CD Special Great RateDont Wait!Open Online:ozk.com / sw”CDPort Charlotte 1950 Tamiami Trail 24100 Veterans Blvd. Punta Gorda 3855 Tamiami Trail1-844-901-6975 minimum deposit to open and is required to earn stated APY. Penalty for early withdrawal. counties: Charlotte, Desoto and Glades. Fees could reduce earnings. adno=50540162

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William J Hillis William J Hillis, 83, of Placida, Fla., passed away unexpectedly, within days of a diagnosis of an aggressive leukemia, on Saturday, Aug. 4, 2018, in Fort Myers, Fla., with his dear Joanie by his side. Bill was born on March 14, 1935, in his grandmothers home in Sullivan, Ind., to Paul and Eunice (Robinson) Hillis. He spent his childhood and teenage years in Sullivan, Terre Haute, Detroit and Chicago, and much of his adult life in Indianapolis and Carmel, Ind. He will be dearly missed by his devoted wife, Joan; his cherished children, and their families „ daughters Bridget (Jim) Sisson, of Jeffersonville, Indiana, and their children, Zach and Natalie (Dustin) Harryman and great-grandson, Cade; Stephanie Rollings of New Braunfels Texas, and her children, Sean and Meridith (Jerry) Purtle and great-grandson, Hudson; Pamela (Doug) Crowe, of Bloomington, Indiana and their children, Olivia, Luke and Joey; son, Andrew (Melanie),of Sheridan, Indiana, and their children, A.J., Peyton, and Jordan; and stepson, Gregory (Shefali) Martens of Birmingham, Alabama. Friends and family may gather on Friday, Aug. 24 for a Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. at Our Lady of Mount Carmel in Carmel, Ind., with a reception with family one hour prior beginning at 9 a.m. Following lunch at the church, full military honors will be held at 1 p.m. at Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Ind. A memorial will be held in Placida, Fla., at a later time. Full obituary can be found in The Indianapolis STAR in the Sunday, August 19, 2018 publication. The family suggests donations in Bills memory to Progress House at 201 Shelby St. Indianapolis IN 46202 or S.O.A.R. Initiative at 3901 Rookwood Avenue Indianapolis IN 46208. Semper Fi. Go in Peace and Soar with the Eagles.Eugene H. Engebrecht Eugene H. Engebrecht, 92, of Punta Gorda, died on August 10, 2018. Gene was born on July 6, 1926, in Marsh“eld, Wisconsin, the son of Henry and Rose (Winkler) Engebrecht. He joined the US Navy in June 1944 and was stationed on the island of Saipan. Following his discharge, he returned to his hometown where he assisted his parents in their dry-cleaning business. In 1949, he married Marilyn (Polly) Senn, and they would have celebrated their 69th annive rsary this year. Gene and Polly moved to Waukesha, Wisconsin, where he was a founding member of Senn Plywood and Door. In 1954, their daughter, Christine Ann, was born and was the light of his life. He retired in 1977 and was able to pursue his favorite activities: cheering on his beloved Chicago Cubs, “shing, gol“ng, and traveling. He and Polly explored the four corners of the world. Gene and Polly moved to Sarasota, Florida in 1982 and later to Punta Gorda in 2012. Gene was active in the United Church of Christ congregations to which he belonged, most recently in the Congregational United Church of Christ, Punta Gorda. He could be counted on to prep the coffee for fellowship hour. Gene was preceded in death by his parents, his older sister Jean Lish, and his daughter Chris. He is survived by his wife, Polly, son-in-law, the Rev. Bill (Hazel) Klossner, grandchildren, Jacob (Jenna), Michael, and Emily, as well as great-grandchildren, Caden, Kiersten, Dylan, Alaina, and Easton, and his niece, Diane Lish, of Nashville. The Memorial Service celebrating Genes life will be held on Saturday, August 25th at 1:30 pm at the Congr egational United Church of Christ, 1201 Aqui Esta Drive, Punta Gorda, with Pastor Mike Ford of“ciating. Inurnment at Sarasota National Cemetery with military honors will be held at a later date. Memorial contributions may be made in Genes name to the Congregational United Church of Christ or the charity of choice. To express condolences to the family, please visit www.LTaylorfuneral.com and sign the online guest book. Arrangements are by Larry Taylor Funeral and Cremation Services.DESOTO Colonel Douglas J. Mann I Colonel Douglas J. Mann I, 82, of Arcadia, Fla., passed away on Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2018 in Sarasota, Fla. He was born on Nov. 10, 1935, in Urbana, Ill. Col. Mann graduated in 1958 from Florida Southern College and was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant for the Army in May of that year. He served for 37 years as a Ranger and Aviator, was a Vietnam veteran, and retired a full Colonel in 1995 with the following honors: Distinguished Flying Cross, Bronze Star Medal, and Air Medal with Ten Oak Leaf Clusters. Col. Mann was a member of the Arcadia community since 1969. He was of the Baptist faith and loved “shing, hunting, reading, and raising Weimaraners. Col. Mann was especially fond of playing cards with his friends and family. He is survived by his daughter, Catherine CathyŽ Nott (Danny Smith); son, Douglas J. DutchŽ (Roberta) Mann; sister, Marsha Cooper of Algonquin, Ill.; nephews, David, Darren, and Rick Brents; granddaughters, Jennifer (Jeffrey) Scharf, Ashley (Jose) Nieto, and Danielle (Bryan) Backer; and great-grandchildren, Perry, Lily, and Colton Scharf and Holden Backer. Preceding Col. Mann in death are his loving wife of 49 years, Carol A. CayŽ Mann; his parents, Wayne and Dorothy Mann; and his brother-in-law, Alan Cooper. A Celebration of Life and Memories will be held on Saturday, Aug. 25, at the First Presbyterian Church of Arcadia, in Pfrangle Hall from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. In lieu of ”owers, contributions may be made to the DeSoto County Education Foundation Cay Mann Memorial Scholarship 530 LaSolona Ave. Arcadia, FL 34266. Online condolences can be made at www.ponger kaysgrady.com. PongerKays-Grady Funeral Home has been entrusted with the arrangements. Page 4 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018OUR TOWN „ SUNCOAST HOMES I Loving MemoyRobert J. Aruta Jr.February 26, 1964August 19, 2007 Life Life, a God given gift often taken for granted Life, always too short but meaningful in its length Life, not how long it is but how well its lived music, laughter, memories, your gifts to us. Thank you, By: Wendy (ne Aruta) Shaw OBITUARIES By ANDREA PRAEGITZERASSISTANT EDITORLee Health plans to expand its role at Babcock Ranch solar community soon, after opening a Healthy Life Center there earlier this year. Babcock Ranch is located off State Road 31 in Charlotte County, near the border of Lee County. In May, the 26,000-square-foot Healthy Life Center run by Lee Health opened in the Babcock communitys town center. That was after Babcock welcomed its “rst residents in January. The center currently offers a “tness center, services such as yoga, massage therapy and acupuncture, rehabilitation services, along with classes and seminars. Lee Physician Group will be opening a Family Medicine practice beginning the “rst week of December to compliment the Wellness and Rehabilitation services already provided within our Healthy Life Center at Babcock Ranch,Ž said a Lee Health spokesperson, Jonathon Little. Lee Health is the largest not-for-pro“t public health system in Florida that receives no direct tax support, and has more than 1,480 physicians. The system in Lee County includes four acute care hospitals and two specialty hospitals, according to its website. In January, Lee Health and Babcock Ranch struck a deal to give the public hospital system exclusive rightsŽ to perform medical services in the emerging Babcock Ranch community for “ve years, with an option to renew after another “ve. At build out, the community may one day have an estimated 19,500 homes, along with 6 million square feet of commercial space. Other hospital systems in Charlotte County are for-profit, including Bayfront Health Port Charlotte, Bayfront Health Punta Gorda, and Fawcett Memorial Hospital. So far, Lee Healths reach has extended into Charlotte County through its presence at Babcock Ranch, as well as Lee Physician Group of“ces at 22655 Bayshore Rd., in Port Charlotte. We will be happy to provide additional operational details of our newest primary care of“ce soon, as our planning for the clinic is ongoing,Ž said Little about emerging plans at Babcock. Though no additional short-term projects are planned, Little said Lee Health intends to partner with Babcock Ranch to expand services offered as the surrounding community grows.Ž And even more of a Lee Health presence in Charlotte County isnt out of the question. While additional expansion in the county is possible in the future, we have nothing to announce at this time,Ž said Mary Briggs, spokesperson for Lee Health.Email: Apraegitzer@sun-herald.comLee Health plans to expand at Babcock RanchBy BETSY CALVERTSTAFF WRITERMake government better. Make it smaller. Make it obedient. These were among the ideas proposed at one of Charlotte Countys “rst Community Conversations.Ž Thirty men and women of Charlotte County, representing different age groups and ethnicities, gathered at Herald Court Square in Punta Gorda for one of many sessions scheduled by the countys Community Services Division. The moderators said they would forward the ideas to managers in county government. Some anti-government rhetoric heated up, but by the meetings end more than an hour later, everyone seemed on good terms. As they identi“ed more area needs such as transportation, many in the group realized that taxpayers would have to front the money for those services. That led Dave Kesselring to call for less government. Keep government as small as possible,Ž he said. Private charities do a better job with social services, he added. Former County Commissioner Adam Cummings stressed the role that government can play in setting controls on development and taxing developers to help pay for services. Government can also encourage the right kind of businesses to come into the region, he said „ businesses that bring in outside money over retail that circulates the same dollars. Stanley Stewart agreed, saying Money will come from industry and commerce, not development. Eventually, theres not enough people to move here.Ž Kesselring acknowledged the gulf between his view of limited government, and Cummings view of government as a change agent. We have totally opposite beliefs,Ž Kesselring said politely to Cummings. Michael Zarzano wants more direct control over government, the local one in particular. When asked what he wants, he said people with low income need better ways to gain redress against government officials. He also asked for a citizen-controlled cable access channel. As residents mentioned more and more problems in the area, from over-regulation of small business, to low wages for young people, one man decided to point out what is good with the area. Twenty-six years Ive been in the county, and Im proud of it, and I have a fantastic lifestyle,Ž said John Milone. He described how he raised his children here and how his grandchildren are thriving in local schools. Government is a very difficult job to do. We dont like to pay taxes, but something has to pay for services.Ž Statistics show that you sir, are the exception,Ž said Zarzano. Many dont have living wages.Ž Shushila Cherian summarized a wide range of issues and the feelings of the audience saying, I think this is a wonderful community. Ive heard some pie-in-the-sky ideas of bringing in millennials. No millennial is going to come here with entry level jobs. We have to see what can be fixed, not moan about what is wrong.Ž The calm cracked momentarily when Michael Hirsh said he had heard enough from Andrew Sheets, who believes area law enforcement is out of control. Im a little concerned. Im sitting in a meeting with conspiracy theorists,Ž he said. I see a lot of positives in the Punta Gorda community, and the ability of citizens to have an impact.Ž The two moderators, historian Annette Snapp and librarian Leeann Beckwith, kept the peace. After the meeting, Sheets said, I thought that went really well.ŽCharlotte County holds community conversations AUGUST CONVERSATIONS SCHEDULEDUpcoming schedule of Community ConversationsŽ sponsored by the Libraries and History Division of Charlotte County:€ Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2 p.m. St. Vincent de Paul Society, 25200 Airport Rd., Punta Gorda € Wednesday, Aug. 22, 5 p.m. Murdock Baptist Church, 18375 Cochran Blvd, Port Charlottte € Wednesday, Aug. 29, 10 a.m. Punta Gorda Housing Authority, 340 Gulf Breeze Avenue, Punta Gorda € Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2 p.m. Verandas of Punta Gorda, 24500 Airport Road, Punta Gorda SIMPLE CREMATION$69500 YourTraditionsFuneralHome.com941-921-4247AT NEEDPlus Transportation When Applicable.adno=54539238 www.LTaylorFuneral.com € Now Available to you 24 hrs A Day At Your Convenience 2002-2017adno=50539821Ask Larry: Im a veteran, but can we still use a National Cemetery if my wife dies first?Yes, you can, and the cost is still free for the cemetery lot, marker, vault, and opening/ closing. We believe in giving straight answers to your questions. Nobody likes unexpected surprises.Old Fashioned Service at a Price You Can AffordTAYLOR FUNERALand Cremation ServicesL arry(941) 833-06001515 Tamiami Trl, Punta Gorda, FL 33950 of compassion and careCome check out our Specials of the monthPET HAVENCemetery & Cremation Services27200 Jones Loop Rd. Punta Gorda, FL 33982941-637-0332www.royalpalmmemorial.comadno=50540068CELEBRATING 40 YEARS 2017

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The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 5 C7401021 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 3006 CARING WAY #208 $59,900 656 $58,000 8/10/2018 Community 1 1 0 1981 Condominium Conventi onal 91.31 0.97 88.41 A4405796 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 2360 WILEY ST $69,900 880 $60,000 8/11/2018 None 3 1 0 1960 Single Family Residence Cash 79. 43 0.86 A4400628 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33980 22481 WESTCHESTER #A19 $73,800 1,046 $62,000 8/15/2018 Community 2 2 0 1981 Condominium Cash 70 .55 0.84 59.27 C7402738 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 22115 MIDWAY BLVD $90,000 897 $90,000 8/13/2018 None 2 1 1 1961 Single Family Residence Conv entional 100.33 1 65.55 C7401162 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 2200 CONWAY BLVD $99,000 806 $90,000 8/13/2018 None 2 1 0 1962 Single Family Residence FHA 1 22.83 0.91 67.16 C7235323 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33953 14459 RIVER BEACH #110 $100,000 1,150 $85,000 8/09/2018 Community 2 2 0 1986 Condominium Cas h 86.96 0.85 73.91 C7249977 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33983 2140 HERON LAKE #104 $104,900 924 $102,000 8/09/2018 Community 2 2 0 2006 Condominium Conventio nal 113.53 0.97 110.39 C7402805 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33983 2061 WILLOW HAM #304 $112,900 924 $111,500 8/09/2018 Community 2 2 0 2006 Condominium Conventio nal 122.19 0.99 120.67 D6101513 Sold ENGLEWOOD 34223 1504 FAIRLESS RD $118,000 1,038 $118,000 8/15/2018 None 2 2 0 1969 Single Family Residence Cash 1 13.68 1 63.51 C7403209 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 1490 KENSINGTON ST $119,900 1,063 $123,000 8/10/2018 None 2 1 0 1969 Single Family Residence FHA 112.79 1.03 107.61 N6100216 Sold ENGLEWOOD 34223 835 S BROADWAY $124,900 1,008 $121,500 8/10/2018 None 2 1 0 1956 Single Family Residence Conventi onal 123.91 0.97 120.54 C7248712 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33980 161 GUAVA ST $127,000 1,140 $127,000 8/09/2018 None 2 2 0 1960 Single Family Residence FHA 1 11.4 1 98.91 C7403295 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 1294 W CORKTREE CIR $127,900 923 $110,500 8/13/2018 Community 2 2 0 1985 Single Family Resid ence Cash 138.57 0.86 82.1 C7249701 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33983 2120 HERON LAKE #302 $127,900 996 $122,900 8/10/2018 Community 2 2 0 2006 Condominium Conventio nal 128.41 0.96 123.39 C7402809 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 642 HARTFORD DR NW $128,900 968 $127,400 8/10/2018 None 2 2 0 1982 Single Family Residence F HA 133.16 0.99 A4408165 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 22332 NYACK AVE $129,900 1,364 $113,284 8/14/2018 Private 2 2 0 1973 Single Family Residence Cash 95.23 0.87 67.31 C7401788 Sold NORTH PORT 34287 8239 COCO SOLO AVE $129,900 1,104 $129,000 8/10/2018 None 3 1 0 1970 Single Family Residence FHA 117.66 0.99 117.17 C7402637 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 4370 GARDNER DR $138,333 1,148 $137,000 8/10/2018 None 3 2 0 1974 Single Family Residence Co nventional 120.5 0.99 A4215078 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 6309 CUTLER TER $138,900 914 $137,000 8/13/2018 Community 2 2 0 1973 Single Family Residence FHA 151.97 0.99 87.09 C7402046 Sold ENGLEWOOD 34224 10406 DEERWOOD AVE $139,000 1,180 $139,001 8/09/2018 None 2 2 0 1989 Single Family Residence Cash 117.8 1 78.53 C7402701 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 21107 IONIA AVE $139,900 1,456 $136,000 8/14/2018 None 3 2 0 1960 Single Family Residence Co nventional 96.09 0.97 D6101356 Sold NORTH PORT 34287 4234 ABBOTSFORD ST $140,000 1,236 $138,000 8/10/2018 None 3 2 0 1980 Single Family Residence Cas h 113.27 0.99 79.4 C7401401 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33948 18326 SHADOWAY AVE $144,900 1,135 $145,600 8/10/2018 None 2 2 0 1984 Single Family Residence VA 127.67 1 C7249428 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 23044 PEYTON PL $144,900 1,573 $140,000 8/13/2018 None 3 2 0 1973 Single Family Residence FH A 92.12 0.97 78.43 C7402108 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 22524 BOLANOS CT $147,700 1,788 $145,000 8/10/2018 None 3 2 0 1964 Single Family Residence C onventional 82.61 0.98 54.33 C7251512 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 3625 BROOKLYN AVE $149,900 1,329 $139,900 8/10/2018 None 3 2 0 1980 Single Family Residence Cash, Conv FHA 112.79 0.93 80.63 O5566083 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 120 CONCORD DR NE $154,900 1,242 $128,000 8/15/2018 None 2 2 0 1964 Single Family Residence Conventional 124.72 0.83 66.05 C7402320 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 22027 CATHERINE AVE $155,000 1,048 $143,200 8/13/2018 None 2 1 0 1961 Single Family Residenc e Conventional 147.9 0.92 110.49 C7401349 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33982 30097 N ELM RD N $158,000 1,120 $158,000 8/14/2018 None 2 1 1 1982 Single Family Residence USDA 141.07 1 92.94 C7248988 Sold ENGLEWOOD 34224 6280 BROOKRIDGE ST $158,000 1,301 $158,000 8/14/2018 None 2 2 0 1989 Single Family Residence Conv entional 121.45 1 78.57 N5917191 Sold ENGLEWOOD 34224 6699 SAN CASA DR #L4 $159,900 1,028 $157,000 8/10/2018 Community 2 2 0 1982 Condominium Cash 155. 54 0.98 152.72 D6101362 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 5413 COLFAX TER $165,000 1,323 $170,000 8/15/2018 None 3 2 0 2009 Single Family Residence Co nventional 124.72 1.03 A4409283 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33983 2158 AMARILLO LN $169,900 2,188 $176,500 8/14/2018 Private 3 2 0 1987 Single Family Residence C ash 77.65 1.04 C7402149 Sold NORTH PORT 34287 3055 PAN AMERICAN $169,900 1,374 $169,900 8/09/2018 None 3 2 0 1979 Single Family Residence FHA 123.65 1 U8010724 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33950 240 W END DR #621 $174,700 1,586 $163,000 8/15/2018 None 3 2 0 2006 Condominium Cash 110.15 0.9 3 102.77 C7400225 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 3187 FULTON ST $174,900 1,666 $186,000 8/10/2018 None 3 2 0 1974 Single Family Residence FHA 104.98 1.06 85.71 C7402938 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33954 392 WATERSIDE ST $175,000 2,208 $179,550 8/10/2018 Private 3 2 0 1987 Single Family Residenc e Cash 79.26 1.03 C7401931 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33953 7 RAMBLEWOOD ST $175,000 1,213 $175,000 8/14/2018 None 3 2 0 1984 Single Family Residence FH A 144.27 1 89.97 D6100731 Sold ENGLEWOOD 34223 550 DENBURN CT $179,000 1,166 $169,000 8/15/2018 None 2 2 0 1964 Single Family Residence Conventi onal 153.52 0.94 93.06 C7402655 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 22440 LEWISTON AVE $185,000 1,741 $179,000 8/9/2018 None 4 2 0 1976 Single Family Residence Conventional 106.26 0.97 68.95 C7402262 Sold NORTH PORT 34286 3498 BARTIGON AVE $189,500 1,372 $190,000 8/10/2018 None 3 2 0 2004 Single Family Residence FHA 138.12 1 94.06 A4407328 Sold NORTH PORT 34291 5488 SHAFFER AVE $194,900 1,323 $192,500 8/15/2018 None 3 2 0 2018 Single Family Residence Conve ntional 147.32 0.99 103 C7402673 Sold NORTH PORT 34287 5165 BROPHY ST $194,900 1,422 $190,000 8/14/2018 Private 3 2 0 1980 Single Family Residence Conv entional 137.06 0.97 C7402966 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33948 381 CAPATOLA ST $195,500 1,558 $193,000 8/13/2018 Private 3 2 0 1987 Single Family Residence Conventional 125.48 0.99 C7401783 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 157 CARLISLE AVE NW $197,500 1,747 $210,000 8/13/2018 None 2 2 0 1977 Single Family Residenc e VA 113.05 1.06 79.67 C7404143 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33948 980 SIDNEY TER NW $199,900 1,545 $193,000 8/14/2018 Private 3 2 0 1977 Single Family Residen ce Cash 129.39 0.97 C7402681 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 21293 COACHMAN AVE $199,900 1,483 $190,000 8/10/2018 Private 3 2 0 1979 Single Family Reside nce VA 134.79 0.95 85.16 C7401504 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33950 208 LEWIS CIR #4A $199,900 1,180 $182,200 8/09/2018 Community 2 2 0 1985 Condominium Convention al 169.41 0.91 C7401453 Sold NORTH PORT 34286 2770 BADGER LN $199,900 1,762 $200,000 8/10/2018 None 3 2 0 2005 Single Family Residence VA 113. 45 1 C7403140 Sold NORTH PORT 34286 3778 LAMARQUE AVE $205,000 1,826 $205,000 8/09/2018 None 3 2 0 2006 Single Family Residence Conv entional 112.27 1 112.27 N6100888 Sold NORTH PORT 34286 4305 CINDERELLA RD $210,000 2,246 $215,000 8/15/2018 None 3 2 0 2006 Single Family Residence FHA 93.5 1.02 C7402060 Sold NORTH PORT 34288 2556 HOLLAND ST $210,000 2,015 $212,000 8/15/2018 None 3 2 0 2006 Single Family Residence VA 104 .22 1.01 75.42 C7403217 Sold NORTH PORT 34287 4150 FAIRWAY PL $214,900 1,488 $206,000 8/15/2018 Private, Comm 3 2 0 2003 Single Family Residen ce Cash 144.42 0.96 N5915965 Sold ENGLEWOOD 34223 750 W PERRY ST $215,000 2,963 $199,000 8/14/2018 None 4 4 0 1952 Single Family Residence Conventi onal 72.56 0.93 55.68 N6100720 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33982 28137 ARROWHEAD CIR $217,630 1,756 $217,630 8/13/2018 None 3 2 0 2018 Single Family Residence V A 123.94 1 94.83 C7401063 Sold NORTH PORT 34291 5396 PONCE DE LEON $219,900 1,670 $224,900 8/13/2018 None 3 2 0 2018 Single Family Residence FHA 131.68 1.02 98.12 D5923944 Sold ENGLEWOOD 34224 8539 GATEWAY CT $219,900 1,627 $195,000 8/10/2018 Community 2 2 0 2000 Single Family Residence Co nventional 135.16 0.89 93.66 A4211172 Sold NORTH PORT 34286 3588 N SALFORD BLVD $220,000 2,042 $215,000 8/15/2018 None 4 2 0 1997 Single Family Residence FH A 107.74 0.98 79.93 C7249772 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33983 1726 BLUE LAKE CIR $224,900 2,093 $220,000 8/14/2018 None 3 2 0 1987 Single Family Residence Co nventional 107.45 0.98 73.78 C7402253 Sold NORTH PORT 34288 1268 W HILLSBOROUGH $225,000 1,732 $205,000 8/15/2018 Private 3 2 0 2004 Single Family Residence Cash 129.91 0.91 86.53 C7251561 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33982 415 SUNSET BLVD E $225,000 1,297 $218,000 8/14/2018 None 3 2 0 2018 Single Family Residence Con ventional 173.48 0.97 124.43 D6101124 Sold ENGLEWOOD 34223 612 LINDEN DR $229,900 1,381 $220,000 8/13/2018 Community 2 2 0 1985 Condominium Cash 166.47 0.96 104.81 U8008388 Sold NORTH PORT 34288 1424 EXCHANGE AVE $229,900 1,552 $228,000 8/14/2018 None 3 2 0 2018 Single Family Residence Conv entional 148.13 0.99 105.21 C7247749 Sold NORTH PORT 34286 3995 W PRICE BLVD $229,900 1,946 $203,000 8/10/2018 Private 3 2 0 2000 Single Family Residence C ash 118.14 0.88 79.27 D5922260 Sold ENGLEWOOD 34223 1098 IOWA AVE $229,900 1,767 $229,900 8/14/2018 None 3 2 0 1981 Single Family Residence VA 130.11 1 90.62 C7245094 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33950 237 COLDEWAY DR #B6 $229,900 1,111 $220,000 8/9/2018 Community 2 2 0 1985 Condominium Conventio nal 206.93 0.96 198.02 N6100694 Sold ENGLEWOOD 34224 7428 BRANDYWINE DR $231,000 1,652 $212,000 8/15/2018 None 3 2 0 1998 Single Family Residence Conv entional 139.83 0.92 91.62 N6101162 Sold NORTH PORT 34291 8594 OLSTER DR $239,500 1,785 $236,000 8/10/2018 Private 3 2 0 2004 Single Family Residence Cash 134.17 0.99 92.01 C7250792 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33983 27045 ECUADOR DR $239,500 1,704 $239,500 8/13/2018 None 3 2 0 2018 Single Family Residence Conv entional 140.55 1 A4402468 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 6118 GILLOT BLVD $244,000 2,036 $240,000 8/9/2018 Private 3 2 0 1989 Single Family Residence Conventional 119.84 0.98 74.44 O5556020 Sold NORTH PORT 34287 5266 PINEHURST COURT $249,900 2,004 $249,900 8/10/2018 Private 3 2 0 2002 Single Family Residenc e Conventional 124.7 1 92.49 A4404802 Sold NORTH PORT 34286 1804 NORVELL AVE $249,950 1,831 $240,000 8/14/2018 None 3 2 0 2005 Single Family Residence Cash 136.51 0.96 96.85 A4405029 Sold NORTH PORT 34287 7100 ST JAMES CT $259,900 1,740 $259,900 8/10/2018 None 2 2 0 2004 Single Family Residence Conve ntional 149.37 1 103.22 D6100629 Sold ENGLEWOOD 34223 1145 CAPLES ST $259,900 1,421 $259,000 8/10/2018 Private 2 2 0 1980 Single Family Residence Cash 182.9 1 123.57 D6100333 Sold ENGLEWOOD 34224 8491 CREEKVIEW LN $259,900 1,760 $254,000 8/10/2018 Community 3 2 0 1992 Single Family Residence Cash 147.67 0.98 104.79 C7401617 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33954 23510 SHELBY AVE $265,000 2,114 $257,500 8/10/2018 Private 3 2 0 1990 Single Family Residenc e VA 125.35 0.97 89.6 C7400529 Sold NORTH PORT 34286 5993 BRICKELL DR $269,900 1,976 $265,000 8/10/2018 Private 3 2 0 2001 Single Family Residence Co nventional 136.59 0.98 96.54 N5916200 Sold NORTH PORT 34291 5858 GAINSBORO ST $279,500 1,985 $272,500 8/10/2018 Private 3 2 0 2007 Single Family Residence C onventional 140.81 0.97 105.01 D5924111 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33953 3148 SILKWOOD LN $284,900 2,213 $272,000 8/10/2018 Community 2 2 0 1995 Single Family Reside nce Cash 128.74 0.95 88.92 D6100258 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33983 24409 KINGSWAY CIR $295,000 2,048 $285,000 8/13/2018 Private 3 2 0 2009 Single Family Residence FHA 144.04 0.97 105.4 C7400310 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 4357 LISTER ST $299,000 1,873 $295,000 8/10/2018 None 3 2 0 1967 Single Family Residence Con ventional 159.64 0.99 150.97 C7400853 Sold NORTH PORT 34288 3541 ADELAIDE AVE $310,000 1,950 $305,000 8/10/2018 Private 3 3 0 2018 Single Family Residence C onventional 158.97 0.98 107.85 C7246759 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 22265 BLANCHARD AVE $315,900 2,744 $305,000 8/13/2018 Private 4 2 0 2006 Single Family Resid ence Conventional 115.12 0.97 79.82 O5706829 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33980 1633 BRITANNIA BLVD $319,900 2,181 $306,000 8/14/2018 Community 2 2 0 2002 Single Family Res idence Conventional 146.68 0.96 111.43 C7402548 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33955 508 TABEBUIA TREE $324,888 2,257 $315,000 8/10/2018 Private 3 2 0 1994 Single Family Residence Conventional 143.95 0.97 C7248670 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33953 15368 MILLE FIORE $325,000 2,191 $301,500 8/10/2018 Private, Comm 3 2 0 2007 Single Family R esidence VA 148.33 0.93 103.29 C7402076 Sold NORTH PORT 34289 1731 BOTTLEBRUSH $335,000 2,856 $315,000 8/10/2018 Community 4 2 1 2017 Single Family Residence FHA 117.3 0.94 80.83 C7401019 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33954 214 STANHOPE ST $339,000 2,666 $326,000 8/10/2018 Private 3 2 0 2004 Single Family Residence Conventional 127.16 0.96 C7250602 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33954 395 HALLCREST TER $339,000 2,394 $327,500 8/10/2018 Private 3 2 0 2006 Single Family Residen ce Cash 141.6 0.97 102.5 C7401148 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 173 BANGSBERG RD SE $349,900 1,579 $340,150 8/14/2018 Private 2 2 0 1962 Single Family Resid ence Cash 221.6 0.97 D6100486 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 15380 ALSACE CIR $354,900 2,072 $345,000 8/9/2018 Private 3 2 0 1999 Single Family Residence Cash 171.28 0.97 122.12 A4404982 Sold ENGLEWOOD 34223 1751 BEACH RD #206 $359,000 1,070 $359,000 8/15/2018 Community 2 2 0 1982 Condominium Cash, Conve ntional 335.51 1 306.31 C7402782 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33950 1 COLONY POINT DR #8C $369,000 1,564 $370,000 8/15/2018 Community 2 2 0 1972 Condominium Cash 2 35.93 1 C7401966 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33948 3415 KNOX TER $369,900 2,131 $369,900 8/15/2018 Private 3 2 0 1989 Single Family Residence C onventional 173.58 1 120.29 D6100149 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 13029 RIDGELY CIR $374,900 2,178 $370,000 8/10/2018 Private 4 3 1 2018 Single Family Residen ce Cash 172.13 0.99 110.41 C7400996 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33980 5116 MELBOURNE #B306 $375,555 1,831 $342,000 8/10/2018 Community 3 2 1 2006 Condominium Conv entional 205.11 0.91 D5923310 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 15312 LAKELAND CIR $379,900 1,823 $379,900 8/10/2018 Private 3 3 0 2018 Single Family Reside nce VA 208.39 1 138.05 C7243965 Sold PORT CHARLOTTE 33952 105 FREE CT SE $398,000 1,772 $279,900 8/14/2018 None 2 2 0 1969 Single Family Residence Cas h 224.6 0.7 114.34 C7249699 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33950 2200 AQUI ESTA DR $399,000 2,184 $372,000 8/13/2018 Private 3 2 0 1989 Single Family Residence Conventional 182.69 0.93 128.23 C7245989 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33950 1045 VIA FORMIA $419,900 1,968 $403,000 8/10/2018 Private 3 2 0 1977 Single Family Residence Co nventional 213.36 0.96 138.39 C7401321 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33982 5221 BLACKJACK CIR $450,000 2,142 $440,000 8/10/2018 None 3 2 0 2004 Single Family Residence Co nventional 210.08 0.98 93.9 N6101026 Sold ENGLEWOOD 34223 1711 LARSON ST $485,000 2,308 $470,000 8/13/2018 Private 3 2 1 1990 Single Family Residence Cash 210.14 0.97 C7247564 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33982 13250 OAKWOOD CT $485,000 2,582 $450,000 8/10/2018 Private 3 2 0 1989 Single Family Residence C onventional 187.84 0.93 127.99 C7401973 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33950 92 HIBISCUS DR $595,000 2,220 $546,000 8/13/2018 Private 3 2 1 1994 Single Family Residence Con ventional 268.02 0.92 C7247276 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33950 3774 WHIPPOORWILL $615,000 2,095 $580,000 8/10/2018 Private 3 2 0 2011 Single Family Residence Conventional 293.56 0.94 196.54 C7400643 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33950 2807 DEBORAH DR $799,000 2,826 $770,000 8/10/2018 Private 3 2 1 2001 Single Family Residence Ca sh 282.73 0.96 201.1 C7246589 Sold PUNTA GORDA 33950 1478 KITTIWAKE DR $856,700 2,839 $775,000 8/13/2018 Private 4 3 0 1991 Single Family Residence Seller Financing 301.76 0.9 195.21 C7248490 Sold ENGLEWOOD 34224 2100 BAY DR $1,295,000 2,805 $1,140,000 8/10/2018 None 3 3 0 1988 Single Family Residence Convent ional 461.68 0.88 220.59 N6101248 SLD 4 S ESPLANADE ST ENGLEWOOD 34223 ALAMEDA ISLES 960 $90,000 2 2 0 1978 Community Mobile Home Cash 8/7/2018 $101.56 $93.75 0.92 N6100216 SLD 835 S BROADWAY ENGLEWOOD 34223 HORTON ESTATES THE 1,008 $121,500 2 1 0 1956 None Single Family Residence Conventi onal 8/10/2018 $123.91 $120.54 0.97 C7401240 SLD 11 S FLORA VISTA ST ENGLEWOOD 34223 ALAMEDA ISLES 1,280 $128,000 2 2 0 1980 Community Manufactured Home Cash 8/7/ 2018 $105.39 $100 0.95 C7402046 SLD 10406 DEERWOOD AVE ENGLEWOOD 34224 PORT CHARLOTTE SEC 062 1,180 $139,001 2 2 0 1989 None Single Family Residence Cash 8/9/2018 $117.80 $117.80 1 D6100968 SLD 7482 ROSEMONT DR ENGLEWOOD 34224 PORT CHARLOTTE SEC 065 952 $155,000 3 2 0 1984 None Single Family Residence Cash 8/6/2018 $167.96 $162.82 0.97 N5917191 SLD 6699 SAN CASA DR#L4 ENGLEWOOD 34224 WATERS EDGE PH 01 BLDG L 1,028 $157,000 2 2 0 1982 Community Condominium Cash 8/10/2018 $155.54 $152.72 0.98 D6101708 SLD 617 DOGWOOD AVE ENGLEWOOD 34223 FOXWOOD 1,498 $175,000 2 2 0 1987 Community Villa Cash 8/6/2018 $116.82 $116.82 1 D5921639 SLD 252 CADDY RD ROTONDA WEST 33947 ROTONDA W OAKLAND HILLS 1,536 $160,000 3 2 0 1981 Private Single Family Residence Cash 8/7/2018 $116.47 $104.17 0.89 D6100840 SLD 553 BOUNDARY BLVD ROTONDA WEST 33947 ROTONDA W PINEHURST 1,172 $190,250 3 2 0 1997 None Single Family Residence F HA 8/10/2018 $162.33 $162.33 1 N6100464 SLD 286 ANNAPOLIS LN ROTONDA WEST 33947 ROTONDA W OAKLAND HILLS 1,493 $217,000 3 2 0 1974 Private Single Family Resid ence Conventional 8/6/2018 $147.29 $145.34 0.99 D5923944 SLD 8539 GATEWAY CT ENGLEWOOD 34224 OYSTER CREEK PH 02 1,627 $195,000 2 2 0 2000 Community Single Family Residence Co nventional 8/10/2018 $135.16 $119.85 0.89 N5915248 SLD 115 SMALLWOOD RD ROTONDA WEST 33947 ROTONDA LAKES 1,800 $218,000 3 2 0 2008 None Single Family Residence Cash 8/6 /2018 $129.39 $121.11 0.94 A4402468 SLD 6118 GILLOT BLVD PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 PORT CHARLOTTE SEC 052 2,036 $240,000 3 2 0 1989 Private Single Family Resi dence Conventional 8/9/2018 $119.84 $117.88 0.98 D6101079 SLD 3016 MONTGOMERY DR PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 PORT CHARLOTTE SEC 060 1,687 $244,000 3 2 0 1987 Private Single Family Re sidence Conventional 8/6/2018 $147.60 $144.64 0.98 D6101155 SLD 56 BUNKER CT ROTONDA WEST 33947 ROTONDA W PEBBLE BEACH 1,798 $249,900 3 2 1 1990 Private Single Family Residence Conventional 8/6/2018 $138.99 $138.99 1 AREA PROPERTY TRANSFERSML# STATUS ADDRESS ZIP CODE CITY LIST PRICE AREA SOLD PRICE SOLD DATE POOL BE FB HB BUILT PROPERTY STYLE SOLD TERMS LP/ SQFT SP/LP LP/SQFT ML# STATUS ADDRESS CITY ZIP LEGAL SUBDIVISION NAME SQFT PRICE BE FB HB BUILT POOL PROPERTY STYLE SOLD TERMS CLOSE LP/SQFT SP/SQ FT SP/LPCHARLOTTE COUNTY/NORTH PORT COURTESY OF PUNTA GORDA, PORT CHARLOTTE, NORTH PORT ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS ENGLEWOOD COURTESY OF ENGLEWOOD AREA BOARD OF REALTORS OUR TOWN „ SUNCOAST HOMES

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Page 6 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 D6101047 SLD 8407 PLACIDA RD #401 PLACIDA 33946 CAPE HAZE RESIDENCE C 7/9 1,272 $252,500 3 2 0 2007 None Condominium Cash 8/8/ 2018 $200.47 $198.51 0.99 D6100629 SLD 1145 CAPLES ST ENGLEWOOD 34223 BAY VISTA BLVD 1,421 $259,000 2 2 0 1980 Private Single Family Residence Cash 8/10 /2018 $182.90 $182.27 1 D6100333 SLD 8491 CREEKVIEW LN ENGLEWOOD 34224 OYSTER CREEK PH 01 1,760 $254,000 3 2 0 1992 Community Single Family Residence Cash 8/10/2018 $147.67 $144.32 0.98 C7247149 SLD 10 LONG MEADOW LN ROTONDA WEST 33947 ROTONDA W LONG MEADOW 2,030 $272,500 3 2 0 1998 Private Single Family Reside nce Conventional 8/10/2018 $135.47 $134.24 0.99 D6100763 SLD 9446 RUM RUNNER RD PLACIDA 33946 GASPARS HIDEAWAY 1,220 $325,000 2 2 0 1986 None Single Family Residence Cash 8/1 0/2018 $270.49 $266.39 0.98 D5921263 SLD 1920 PENNSYLVANIA AVE ENGLEWOOD 34224 GROVE CITY SHORES 1,220 $335,000 3 2 0 1968 None Single Family Residence Ca sh 8/8/2018 $285.82 $274.59 0.96 D6100486 SLD 15380 ALSACE CIR PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 PORT CHARLOTTE SEC 081 2,072 $345,000 3 2 0 1999 Private Single Family Resi dence Cash 8/9/2018 $171.28 $166.51 0.97 D5922471 SLD 84 MARINER LN ROTONDA WEST 33947 ROTONDA WEST PINEHURST 1,899 $354,900 3 2 0 2018 Private Single Family Residence Conventional 8/7/2018 $187.41 $186.89 1 D6100149 SLD 13029 RIDGELY CIR PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 PORT CHARLOTTE SEC 095 2,178 $370,000 4 3 1 2018 Private Single Family Res idence Cash 8/10/2018 $172.13 $169.88 0.99 D5923310 SLD 15312 LAKELAND CIR PORT CHARLOTTE 33981 PORT CHARLOTTE SEC 082 1,823 $379,900 3 3 0 2018 Private Single Family Re sidence VA 8/10/2018 $208.39 $208.39 1 D6101201 SLD 1315 FORKED CREEK DR ENGLEWOOD 34223 OVERBROOK GARDENS 1,748 $450,000 3 2 0 1977 Private Single Family Residence Conventional 8/8/2018 $263.10 $257.44 0.98 C7248490 SLD 2100 BAY DR ENGLEWOOD 34224 ROLLS COVE 2,805 $1,140,000 3 3 0 1988 None Single Family Residence Conventional 8/10 /2018 $461.68 $406.42 0.88 D5921144 SLD 16010 GULF SHORES DR BOCA GRANDE 33921 GULF SHORES NORTH 04 2,657 $2,200,000 3 3 1 2016 None Single Family Reside nce Cash 8/7/2018 $901.39 $828 0.92ML# STATUS ADDRESS CITY ZIP LEGAL SUBDIVISION NAME SQFT PRICE BE FB HB BUILT POOL PROPERTY STYLE SOLD TERMS CLOSE LP/SQFT SP/SQ FT SP/LP AREA PROPERTY TRANSFERS CONTINUEDN6100461 Sold 519 ALBEE FARM RD #117 2 2 0 1974 Las Palmas Condominium Cash 94.24 0.89 8/10/2018 $85,000 FALSE A4406641 Sold 4956 POMPANO RD 2 1 1 1964 South Venice Single Family Residence Cash 97.3 0.78 8/7/2018 $90,000 FALSE N6100597 Sold 1027 CAPRI ISLES BLVD #21 2 1 0 1982 Greenview Villas Condominium Cash 173.39 1 8/8/2018 $129,000 FALSE N5915662 Sold 647 BIRD BAY CIR #86 2 2 0 1978 Bird Bay Condominium Cash 139.92 0.86 8/7/2018 $136,000 FALSE D6100903 Sold 1211 E VENICE AVE 2 2 0 1964 East Gate Single Family Residence FHA 143.26 1.03 8/10/2018 $154,000 FALSE N6101151 Sold 800 MIRABELLA CIR #101 2 2 0 2005 Mirabella Condominium Conventional 141.7 0.97 8/10/2018 $175,000 FALSE A4404143 Sold 1041 CAPRI ISLES BLVD #132 3 2 0 1997 Golf Green Condominium Cash 134.56 1 8/10/2018 $183,000 FALSE N6101220 Sold 472 MISSOURI RD 2 2 0 1974 South Venice Single Family Residence VA 160.07 1.01 8/10/2018 $186,000 FALSE N6100949 Sold 308 LYNBROOK CIR #103 2 2 0 2003 West Preserve At Waterside Village Condominium Cash 137.7 0.98 8/6/2018 $187,000 FALSE N6101534 Sold 132 PATTERSON AVE 2 2 0 2004 Ogburns T B Add To Town Of Osprey Single Family Residence Conventional 165.95 1 8/10 /2018 $192,000 FALSE N6100042 Sold 742 DEVON RD 2 2 0 1981 South Venice Single Family Residence Conventional 137.19 0.88 8/7/2018 $197,000 TRUE A4208253 Sold 125 SHADY PINE LN 3 2 0 1986 Laurel Pines Single Family Residence Conventional 142.57 0.98 8/6/2018 $215,000 FALS E N6101032 Sold 252 MARLIN RD 3 2 0 1997 South Venice Single Family Residence Cash 150.34 0.97 8/9/2018 $218,000 FALSE N5915489 Sold 106 PORTA VECCHIO BND #101 2 2 0 2017 Toscana Isles Condominium Cash 167.62 0.98 8/6/2018 $235,000 FALSE N5914837 Sold 182 CIPRIANI WAY 2 2 0 2005 Venetian Golf & River Club Single Family Residence Cash 157.58 0.96 8/10/2018 $239,20 0 FALSE N6100726 Sold 124 BRAEMAR AVE 2 2 0 1999 Wexford On The Green Single Family Residence Cash 153.92 0.95 8/6/2018 $247,500 FALSE A4206223 Sold 1303 MANGO AVE 3 2 0 1965 East Gate Single Family Residence Conventional 171.32 0.93 8/8/2018 $270,000 TRUE T3106128 Sold 13831 CAMPOLEONE STREET 3 2 0 2018 Not Applicable Single Family Residence Cash 190.47 0.99 8/11/2018 $272,944 FAL SE N5916446 Sold 980 COOPER ST #401 3 2 0 2006 Island Park Condominium Cash 185.37 0.94 8/9/2018 $282,500 FALSE N6100466 Sold 157 HOURGLASS DR 2 2 0 1985 Hourglass Lakes Single Family Residence Cash 171.95 0.96 8/10/2018 $287,500 TRUE N5915699 Sold 2542 CORTENOVA CT 2 2 0 2011 Grand Palm Single Family Residence Cash 167.43 0.97 8/10/2018 $292,000 FALSE A4405509 Sold 2898 ARROWHEAD RD 3 2 0 2000 South Venice Single Family Residence FHA 154.64 0.98 8/7/2018 $294,900 FALSE E2400165 Sold 2049 MESIC HAMMOCK WAY 4 2 0 2018 Stoneybrook At Venice Single Family Residence Cash 176.02 0.95 8/6/2018 $295,01 0 FALSE A4406189 Sold 937 HARBOR TOWN DR 3 3 0 1989 Patio Homes Of Chestnut Creek Single Family Residence Cash 165.22 0.97 8/8/2018 $30 5,000 TRUE A4215601 Sold 11595 BLACKFIN ST 3 2 0 2016 Venetia Single Family Residence FHA 155.75 0.98 8/10/2018 $309,000 FALSE N6101315 Sold 1128 MISTI CT 3 2 0 1983 Venice Gardens Single Family Residence Seller Financing 149.9 1.05 8/10/2018 $310,000 TR UE A4179880 Sold 201 TURQUOISE LN 2 2 0 2001 Oaks The Single Family Residence Cash 133.51 0.89 8/8/2018 $310,000 TRUE A4209336 Sold 12632 RICHEZZA DR 4 3 0 2016 Gran Paradiso Single Family Residence Cash 155.51 1 8/10/2018 $316,000 FALSE N5916743 Sold 1000 SAN LINO CIR #1011 2 2 0 2008 San Lino Condominium Cash 155.9 0.98 8/9/2018 $324,900 FALSE N6101089 Sold 1507 SAN YSIDRO WAY 3 2 0 2000 Pelican Pointe Golf & Country Club Single Family Residence Conventional 199.06 0.9 7 8/10/2018 $340,000 TRUE N5916741 Sold 100 AURORA ST E 3 2 0 1957 Beach Manor Single Family Residence Cash 250.35 0.89 8/10/2018 $357,000 TRUE N6100543 Sold 302 CIPRIANI WAY 3 2 0 2006 Venetian Golf And River Club Single Family Residence Conventional 176.03 0.97 8/8/201 8 $379,000 TRUE N6101081 Sold 150 FIESOLE ST 3 2 0 1968 Venezia Park Single Family Residence Cash 215.93 0.81 8/8/2018 $385,000 FALSE N6101504 Sold 264 BENEDETTO CT 3 2 1 2018 Nokomis Single Family Residence Conventional 193.38 1.3 8/8/2018 $399,134 TRUE N6101140 Sold 1441 GLENEAGLES DR 3 2 0 1989 Waterford Single Family Residence Cash 164.61 0.96 8/10/2018 $400,000 TRUE A4215336 Sold 808 GOLDEN POND CT 3 2 0 2004 Rivendell The Woodlands Single Family Residence Cash 177.01 0.98 8/8/2018 $425,000 TRUE A4207792 Sold 2022 CORDES ST 3 2 1 2018 Cordes Cove Single Family Residence Cash 192.48 0.98 8/8/2018 $430,000 FALSE A4410448 Sold 13333 CARAVAGGIO CT 4 3 0 2018 Gran Paradiso Single Family Residence Cash 176.33 1 8/6/2018 $450,000 TRUE T3103796 Sold 5612 CANTUCCI ST 3 3 1 2018 Not Applicable Single Family Residence Conventional 215.09 0.91 8/10/2018 $451,695 FA LSE A4205752 Sold 11805 HUNTERS CREEK RD 3 2 0 2018 Grand Palm Single Family Residence Conventional 190.31 0.97 8/7/2018 $452,752 F ALSE N6101505 Sold 12386 SAGEWOOD DR 3 2 1 2012 Grand Palm Single Family Residence Conventional 203.93 1 8/9/2018 $455,365 TRUE A4410205 Sold 13596 TRENTINO ST 3 2 1 2018 Islandwalk At The West Villages Single Family Residence Conventional 177.32 1 8/6/20 18 $459,079 FALSE A4207278 Sold 1180 ORANGE AVE 3 2 0 2017 Hidden Bay Estates Single Family Residence Conventional 234.22 0.98 8/8/2018 $475,000 TRUE N5916070 Sold 19664 COBBLESTONE CIR 4 3 0 2011 Stone Walk Single Family Residence Cash 187.19 0.98 8/6/2018 $489,500 TRUE N6101479 Sold 13287 CALIMENTO STREET 3 3 0 2018 Islandwalk At The West Villages Single Family Residence VA 217.67 1 8/8/2018 $5 41,574 TRUE A4404793 Sold 29 LANDLUBBER LN 3 2 0 1984 Southbay Yacht & Racquet Club Single Family Residence Cash 222.18 0.95 8/10/2018 $545 ,000 TRUE T2832703 Sold 400 BEACH RD 2 2 0 1957 Gulf Point Single Family Residence Cash 301.36 0.9 8/10/2018 $600,000 TRUEML# STATUS ADDRESS BE FB HB YEAR BUILT SW SUBDIV COMMUNITY NAME PROPERTY STYLE SOLD TERMS SP / SQFT SP / LP CLOSE DATE CLOSE PR ICE POOL Y/NSOUTH SARASOTA COUNTY COURTESY OF VENICE AREA BOARD OF REALTORS OUR TOWN „ SUNCOAST HOMESBy BONNIE LEROYLLI BOARD OF DIRECTORSA young friend recently expressed to me that he had been thinking a lot about learning, and he was concerned about his parents disinterest in learning new things as they age. Knowing that I am an active supporter of the Lifelong Learning Institute (LLI) at Florida SouthWestern State College, he as ked me why some people continue to learn but not his parents. It was a great question. Why do some people enjoy learning throughout their lives while others stop and say, Im done with all of that!Ž? LLI provides an opportunity for adult learners to continue pursuing their quest for knowledge, believing that learning enriches lives and contributes to the well-being of our communities. An armyŽ of LLI volunteers devotes many hours and energy to providing learning opportunities and events ful“lling our motto of learning … just for the fun of it!Ž The LLI fall schedule begins Oct. 11 at 11:30 a.m. with a presentation by Lucienne Pears, Charlotte County Economic Director, providing important updates on some of the countys projects, in collaboration with the Punta Gorda Isles Civic Association in their center. It is free and open to the public. LLI will host Coffee and RegistrationŽ at the FSW Charlotte Campus auditorium on Oct. 16, 9-11:30 a.m. Complete schedule and registration infor mation for all fall activities will be available during the event. The public is invited and there is no charge. New Discoveries from the 1559 Colonization Attempt in PensacolaŽ is the first fall class scheduled for Oct. 23 at 10 a.m. Rachael Kangas, with the Southwest Region of the Florida Public Archaeology Network, will tell the story of 11 ships, carrying 1,500 soldiers and settlers who landed in Pensacola Bay in late August and were met with devastation by a severe hurricane that September. Learn about Don Tristan De Lunas fateful journey, why it failed, and how archeology helps us to better understand Floridas early colonization. On Dec. 11, a docent-led tour of St. Armands Circle is scheduled, highlighting the historical significance to this Sarasota area from John Ringling and the Ringling Brothers Circus, followed by a progressive lunch in four different restaurants. Another trip, scheduled for Jan. 30, 2019, requires 30 paid reservations received in the LLI office by Sept. 3. This trip includes lunch at Seasons 52 and a matinee stage performance of The Revolutionists,Ž an explosive comedy that puts a modern twist on a historical French period. More trips will be scheduled in 2019. LLI program schedules and online registration can be found at www. lifelonglearning-charlotte. org, at the LLI office on the FSW Charlotte Campus, Room B-114, or by calling 941-637-3533. Its encouraging to see many Charlotte County residents and LLI participants who are still very eager to continue their learning. Kudos to all of you! Maybe my young friends parents will find their way to us, too. Bonnie Leroy is a member of the LLI Board of Directors.About Learning . .By ANNE EASKERSTAFF WRITERWhen 911 personnel respond to a medical emergency, they need to access a home quickly and get information on medical history, allergies and emergency contacts. Thats why Charlotte County created the Red Dot program more than 10 years ago, which allows “rst responders to easily access participants information. There are currently between 1,500 and 1,800 participants, said E911 Coordinator Laurie Anderson. If theres certain things theyre allergic to that the paramedics would not want to be administered, or something the paramedics need to know right away, they would need to know it when they get on scene,Ž Anderson said. Any emergency contacts, gate codes, key codes to get access into the home during an emergency, emergency contacts „ they “ll all that stuff out.Ž The program is paid for by the four area hospitals and is entirely free to participants. Anyone wishing to participate can pick up a Red Dot packet at all four Charlotte County Sheriffs district of“ces, the Charlotte County Fire & EMS headquarters, the Punta Gorda Police Department, or area hospitals. The packet includes a brochure with directions, a carbon copy form, a Red Dot sticker, a Red Dot magnetic pouch, and a return envelope. The top portion of the form is kept by the patient in the red magnetic holder to be kept on the refrigerator door, while the bottom part of the form is mailed to 911. E911 staff enter the information into the 911 computers, where its stored in the E911 database. In the event of an emergency, 911 dispatchers can provide the information to emergency responders while they are enroute to patients homes. The Red Dot sticker, along with the dispatchers notes, alerts emergency responders that there is a Red Dot Medical Information Form on the patients refrigerator. If this person cant speak or communicate effectively, depending on the situation, they can grab that paper, and it can tell them all the major medical information about this person,Ž Anderson said. If a patient requires hospital care, the Red Dot information is transported to the hospital as well and copies are provided to emergency room staff. Anyone who has additional questions or is unable to travel to a location to pick up the Red Dot packet can contact CCSOs E911 Of“ce at 941-639-2101, or Charlotte County Fire & EMS at 941-833-5600.Email: aeasker@sun-herald.comRed Dot Program lets first responders quickly access patients medical history CONTACT FOR BIRTHDAYS Each week in Sundays Sun we run free birthday announcements, along with a photo. Email your .jpg photo of the birthday boy or girl of any age, along with the persons name, age, and birthday month and date, to Sherri Dennis at sdennis@sun-herald.com. Deadline is noon Wednesday. Note: If you bring or mail in a hard-copy photo (to 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980), we will try to accommodate you, but we CANNOT guarantee the ability to return it to you. For more information, call Sherri at 941-206-1010. Happy 3rd birthday to Drew Pinkman on his special day, Aug. 21. Happy 95th birthday to Anne Dye on her special day, Aug. 17.Bridge Winners for Aug. 6, 2018 North Port Senior Center North/South 1st: Helen Norris and Dave Johnson; 2nd: Leslie Clugston and Robert Heidbrink; 3rd: Sharon Redmond and Ron Baxter. East/West 1st: Marcia Lanphear and John Herrmann; 2nd: Ann Benmayor and Warren Prince; 3rd: Donna and George Przybylek. Bridge Winners for Aug. 13, 2018 North Port Senior Center North/South 1st: Carol Schuldt and Homer Baxter; 2nd: Helen Norris and Dave Johnson; 3rd: Sharon Redmond and Ron Baxter. East/West 1st: Donna and George Przybylek; 2nd: Leslie Clugston and Robert Heindbrink; 3rd: Ann Benmayor and Warren Prince. BIRTHDAYS BRIDGE WINNERS

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The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 7OUR TOWN „ SUNCOAST HOMES By KAYLA GLEASONSTAFF WRITERPlenty of Pirates and community members set a course for the Port Charlotte High School track Saturday during the fourth annual Treasure Trot. The Treasure Trot incorporates both a 5k and a mile Fun RunŽ to help raise gold doubloons „ which is money for the PCHS boys and girls cross country and track and “eld teams. We hope to raise enough money to give us opportunities to travel to bigger, more competitive meets and have new uniforms and warm-ups. That amount varies, but generally falls in the $2,000 to $3,000 range,Ž said PCHS coach and Treasure Trot Director Ray Chumbley. He estimated anywhere between 250 and 300 runners showed up Saturday morning, ranging from under nine to over 65 years old. One runner even pushed a baby stroller with her during the race. Games, food and activities were also set up near the track for those cheering from the sidelines. I have grandchildren in cross country so we came out to support them,Ž said Kim Mault, whose grandsons Chandler and Connor run for PCHS and were busy volunteering in the concession booth. Chumbley says that the students help is imperative in ensuring the event runs smoothly. I was just really impressed with all the kids volunteering. They were really just incredible, so when it came up, I had to come back and do it again,Ž said Brian Ward, last years Treasure Trot winner and a former high school cross country runner. Its just a small, fun race for the community.Ž For many participants, it was clear a love of running starts at a young age. Katrina Machado is only 12 years old and placed within the top “ve female “nishers, even after taking a break from the sport over summer. Kylin Marquez was also eagerly awaiting her turn to race as she cheered on her older brother. I like running. Sometimes I get tired but I never give up,Ž she said, standing on tip-toes to see the track over the chain-link fence. Mom, Marie Thompson added: My older son goes to North Port and does cross country there. She saw him doing it and started running at Imagine through their program.Ž Even if running wasnt normally their cup of tea, community members were still up and ready to support the cause. Philip Cruz just started running two months ago at the Firecracker 5k, since taking a break for the last few years. I play Ultimate Frisbee with the organizer and, when he told me about it, I thought it sounded fun and I wanted to help out,Ž he said. Its been good to get back into it. My time was 24:15 and last time it was 25:30, so little by little Im improving.Ž Now, he plans to run in Remember the Fallen in September, a 5k honoring “rst responders and armed forces members. At the end of the day, winning a shiny trophy wasnt the “rst thing on peoples minds, it was all about coming together to support Charlotte County students and what they love to do.Email: kgleason@sun-herald.comPirates young and old turn out at Treasure Trot SUN PHOTOS BY KAYLA GLEASONThe 5k path covered the track and parts of the PCHS and Charlotte Technical College campuses. Cross country runners John Perez, Kaya Hensler, Chandler Mault and George Mancinn, volunteer at Saturdays event. Kylin Marquez cheers on her brother on Saturday morning. Katrina Machado was one of the “rst girls to “nish the 5k Saturday. Barbie Lisson, Lucie Lisson, Makayla Bueno and Kim Mault pose in a pirate scene painted by cross country runner Kaya Hensler. adno=50539847Affordable Living TrustsNow theres no excuse for you and your family not to bene“ t from the advantages of a Revocable Living Trust -especially if you own a home or condo. 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They are friendly and are always there when I need them. Theres always some type of fun activity or outing going on. I am so grateful for all the friends Ive made at Heritage Oaks!Ž Provided by: Richard C. Current Resident THANK YOU ENGLEWOOD & CHARLOTTE COUNTY FOR YOUR ONGOING SUPPORT. WE CURRENTLY HAVE A LIMITED NUMBER OF LUXURY SUITES AVAILABLECALL OR COME BY TODAY FOR A TOUR OF OUR COMMUNITY adno=54540870 €Affordable Options and Savings€Worldwide Travel Protection €Veterans Bene“ts€Avoid Hidden Society Fees €Complimentary Personal Planning Guide€Customized Packages and Terms CONSIDERING PLANNING AHEAD?CREMATION/FUNERAL SERVICES? CEMETERY OPTIONS? FREE LUNCH & SEMINARJOIN US FOR ACall Today to RSVP: 941Reservation required. Limited seating available. 150 Laishley Court Punta GordaWednesday, August 22nd @ 11:30 am1200 W Retta Esplanade Punta GordaThursday, August 23rd @ 11:30 am adno=54538941 Wednesday, August 22nd @ 11:30 am Thursday, August 23rd @ 11:30 am

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Page 8 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 OUR TOWN „ SUNCOAST HOMESIt was a recent fun family night playing bingo with a twist: ”orescent colors, black lights and music. The Binglo Family Game Night took place recently at the Morgan Family Community Center. A variety of prizes were won, including pints of custard and family fourpacks to other events in the area.North Port families get their glow on Above: North Port Park and Recreation organizers and counselors pose for a photograph during the recent event of Binglo Family Game Night at Morgan Family Community Center in North Port. SUN PHOTOS BY MONICA AMAYAAngela Adams helps her daughter, Rebecca, 6, nd the numbers on the scorecard while they take part in North Ports Binglo recently. Brant Bissainthe and his sons, Nicolas, 9, and Noah, 3, enjoy the family Binglo night held through the city of North Port. Jamie and Erlene Larson, along with their daughter, Hayden, 6, spent a recent night playing Binglo as a family. Dennis DeCame III, 9, came along with his parents to play some Binglo at North Ports Morgan Family Community Center. At left: Savannah Holland, 14, and her mother, Desiree, were winners of the rst Binglo, which included one pint of Custard each month for a year, from Culvers. Other prizes included a family fourpack to VIP skip the line at Trick o Treat at City Hall; family fourpack to IMAG, and a family canoe trip from Canoe Outpost Peace River. 19887 Veterans Blvd Port CharlotteBetween Cochran & Atwater$10 OFF Delivery$$ Get More for Less $$941-623-6192 K ustomized urbing & Discount Rocks NO SUBS HIRE THE PROS! PICK UP & DELIVERY AVAILABLE FREEESTIMATESWe sell & Install: € Curbing € Decorative Stone € Plants € Full Landscaping € Pavers (Bastedo Construction CRC1328854) € Professional Landscape Renovations Exp.9/1/18 (Must Present Coupon)adno=720788 STARTING AT $25,100!! CONSTRUCTION HEATING & SALT SYSTEMS POOL SERVICE & REPAIRS POOL SUPPLY STORE625-50561212 Enterprise Drive Port Charlotte, FL 33953service@casapools.comwww.casapools.com 26Reader's Choice Awards!Lic./Insured Lic.#CPO56749 2017 Complete Pool Package (Charlotte County Only)adno=50538361 Advertisement Advertisement DOES YOUR BUSINESS QUALIFY? CALL 941-205-6406adno=50539473BUSINESS JournalAbsolute Blinds Has A Window Treatment For YouAbsolute Blinds is the BEST place to go for all your window treatments, specializing in hardwood plantation shutters! This three-generation family owned & operated business is managed by Doug and Brett Hamilton. Their family has over 18 years of knowledge & experience in Southwest Florida window treatments. All their shutters are American made, custom fabricated, and manufactured from furniture grade North American hardwoods. Looking for excellent customer service, quality products, and a life time guarantee on work? Call them today. You can enjoy the luxury that plantation shutters bring to your home. Is the existing REAL wood around your home warped? NO, so dont be misled by those who think that REAL wood shutters warp its just not true! The look, the feel, and ambiance of REAL wood shutters are unparalleled. Go see for yourself in their showroom at 2842 Tamiami Trail in Port Charlotte or call 941-627-5444. Find them on the web at www.absoluteblinds.com and please like them on Facebook @Absolute Blinds Etc Inc. Absolute Blinds 2842 Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte call 941-627-5444Count On The Best Service At Dr. Ds Auto RepairCall Dr. Ds Auto Repair for all your auto repairs. Owner, Mike True, and his staff are all ASE certi“ ed and they offer the “ nest full service repair in this area. Dr. Ds repairs all types of vehicles including motor homes and four wheelers. At Dr. Ds you can count on the best service, diagnostics, repairs, replacement parts, etc. Only superior quality replacement parts are used and rates are very reasonable. With the computerized engine analysis, you can be assured that the service required on your vehicle is necessary. True is well known as an excellent auto mechanic and the business enjoys an excellent reputation. Dr. Ds is located at 23415 Janice Avenue in the Whidden Industrial Park in Charlotte Harbor and the phone number is 941-743-3677 For the best service at a reasonable price, call or stop by Dr. Ds Auto Repair. Dr. Ds Auto Repair, 23415 Janice Avenue in the Whidden Industrial Park in Charlotte HarborUltraviolet Light Puri“ es Air Inside Homes and BusinessesUltraviolet (UV) light is widely used in hospitals and laboratories to sanitize instruments and work surfaces and to prevent the spread of potentially lethal airborne infectious diseases. It is also used by the food industry to sterilize food before packaging, and water treatment systems now incorporate UV light as a chemical-free means of puri“ cation. Ocean Air Conditioning of Southwest Florida is making this technology available for area homes and businesses through Fresh-Aire UV, a world leader in whole-house UV light and activated-carbon air puri“ ers. Fresh-Aire UV will cleanse the air throughout your indoor environment, protecting your family or business and also extending the life of your air system and reducing energy and maintenance costs,Ž owner Jack Spielman said. Fresh-Aire UV is one of the top-rated products offered by Ocean Air, established in 1978 and serving Charlotte, Sarasota and Desoto counties. Located at 4145 Whidden Blvd #12, Port Charlotte, their of“ ce is open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. Their phone number, 941-625-8900 has a 24/7, live-person answering service. Their website is www.oceanair” .com DETOX THE AIR With APCO, Ocean Air Conditioning of SWFL, 4145 Whidden Blvd #12, Port CharlotteWestchester GoldLooking for the best place to buy and sell your coins, gold & silver bullion, diamonds, Rolex watches and “ ne jewelry? See Westchester Gold & Diamonds “ rst, you wont be disappointed! Located in Baers Plaza at 4200-F Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte, they carry an eclectic blend of new and old items. Visit their shop to purchase not only unique custom and new pieces, but pre-loved and estate jewelry as well. They specialize in pre-loved Rolex watches, new and estate jewelry pieces, oriental rugs, unusual gifts, paintings, rare collectibles, and more, for over 41 years. Owner, Steve Duke, is on site to assist you with jewelry, diamond or gold & silver bullion purchases and appraisals, or the sale of your gold and other valuables. He offers unsurpassed quality, variety and great pricing when buying or selling. Westchester Gold sells predominantly jewelry but antiques also line the shelves and decorate their corners. You can call for home or bank appointments or just stop by the store. Their phone number is 941-625-0666 or visit www.westchestergold.com to browse items online. Westchester Gold and Diamond is the place for you. Steve Duke Westchester Gold & Diamonds, 4200-F Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte, call 941-625-0666 2 0 1 8 0 8 1 9 o t e n c 1 8 p d f 1 1 8 A u g 1 8 2 3 : 3 6 : 2 4

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The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 9 OUR TOWN „ SUNCOAST HOMESBy ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICHSTAFF WRITERENGLEWOOD „ Amid bright lights, and screaming and laughing babies, 16-month-old Olivia Evans slept peacefully in her moms lap on stage. She awoke to a second place win, trophy and carnation. Looking pretty in a frilly pink dress, Olivia was one of about 80 contestants in the Little Miss and Mr. Englewood Pageant Saturday at Lemon Bay High School. The annual pageant is part of the Pioneer Days events celebrating Englewood families leading up to Labor Day. For 2-year-old Wyatt Dion, waiting for the winners names to be called meant trying to escape from his mom while on the stage. Wyatt belly laughed each time his mom grabbed his legs and pulled him back to her. Nearby a handsome Dylan Carter cupped his dad John Cummings hands to stand up on stage. The 5-month-old wore a tie and a smile for his part in the pageant. Older contestants were asked their favorite place to go and most said Disney or LEGOLAND. However, 8-year-old Oceanna Beach didnt say amusement parks were her favorite. Instead, she loves being on the water boating and “shing with her family. She described herself as a caring, funny and adventurous person who loves manatees and mermaids. Vineland Elementary School student Oscar Zapata, 7, said he wasnt scared to go out in front of the crowd. I have to beat two others in my age group to come in “rst place,Ž said Oscar, who considers himself energetic, outgoing and compassionate. I did this last year. Im not nervous.Ž Oscar won in his age group. Someone who was shy was Khloe Hooper, 6, a Glenallen Elementary School student. This is my “rst time, she said. I am nervous.Ž Makenzie Kelley had no problem telling the judges she is going to play volleyball in college. She said she considers herself unique. Ella Howell said she is fearless.Ž Mexi Font, who was in the 10 to 14 age group, didnt mind saying she was a little strangeŽ and smiled as it was announced. We had a really great turn out,Ž said Chris Phelps, who is heading the Pioneer Days committee. We had some sound issues at the theater. We will get them worked out next year. We will be adding a talent portion to the pageant next year. I give a lot of credit to Melissa Whittemore who just had a C-section and did a wonderful job heading the pageant. She also had a great team of judges Diane Charest, Nicole DeSantis and Toy Coxey,Ž Phelps said. It was a great day. The parents were very nice and the children were wonderful.Ž Pioneer Days events continue from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m today with a charity bowling event at Englewood Bowl, 299 South Indiana Ave. Games are $4 with a portion going to an Englewood charity of the teams choice. For more information, call 941-474-5400.Email: eallen@sun-herald.comContestants crowned Little Miss and Mr. Englewood Garlin Boling, 7, and Oscar Zapata, 7, both from Vineland Elementary School came out winners on Saturday. SUN PHOTOS BY ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICHKhloe Hooper, 6, participated in her “rst pageant. Olivia Evans, 16 months, was the second place winner in her division. Makenzie Kelley is comfortable on stage as a contestant in the Little Miss and Mr Englewood Pageant. Left: Oceanna Beach, 8, loves being out on the water. She competed in the pageant and received support from her grandma Lisa Beach. Baby Rex Brown is held by his dad during the pageant. Brinley Dexter, 2, stands with her mom, Heather at the pageant. Cash Marsolek, 9 months, is held by his mom Carina. Cash was among the winners in the Little Miss and Mr. Englewood Pageant Saturday at Lemon Bay High School. To learn more, call 1.877.378.4297, stop by your local FCB banking center or visit FloridaCommunityBank.com.BETTER BANKING WITH BETTER RATES! Promo Rate with minimum $10,000 of new funds1255 Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte, FL 33953 | (941) 624-4225 125 Nesbit St., Punta Gorda, FL 33950 | (941) 637-8909 3100 S. McCall Rd., Englewood, FL 34224 | (941) 474-7734 205 Del Prado Blvd. S., Cape Coral, FL 33990 | (239) 242-2130 12MONTH CD Florida Based. Florida Focused. At Florida Community Bank better banking means great rates, convenient locations and personalized service. With 50 banking centers across the state, FCB is committed to ensuring that exceptional banking is right around the corner „ come experience the way banking should be! 2.37%APY1Offer expires August 31, 2018. Programs, rates, terms and conditions are subject to change without notice and maybe withdrawn a t any time. Deposit must be new funds. Promotional rate applies to new funds only. Existing balances or transfers from existing accounts do not qualify for this promotion. Promotion excludes Public Funds CDs. Annual Percentage Yield (APY) is accurate as of date of publication. Early withdrawal penalty applies; fees may reduce earnings. 1. Minimum opening deposit of $10,000 will earn 2.37% APY. Advertised rate applicable to ini tial 12-month term only. CD will automatically renew to a standard 12-month CD term at the current rate and APY available at that time. BauerFinancial is a registered trademark. 7422 0718 HURRY, OFFER ENDSAugust 31st, 2018!adno=50539594 adno=50538597Bring Sexy Back!Bad Breath may be a sign you have periodontal disease Laser Gum TherapyCall For A Free Consultation! We Accept Most Insurances Joseph H. Farag, D.M.D. 3441 Conway Blvd, Port Charlotte(941) 764-9555www.drfarag.comCharlotte County's Premier LANAP Provider 941-234-3420 www.susanrbrooksdds.com General Dentistry Implants € Cosmetic € Nitrous Oxide € Dentures & One Day Repair € Laser Periodontal Therapy 3440 Conway Blvd. #2A (Behind Post Office) € Port Charlotte DR. SUSAN R. BROOKS Seniors are our Specialty NEW LOW COST DENTURES! HAVING A HARD TIME CHEWING? adno=50538652AGRICULTURE EQUIPMENT OPERATORS NEEDED DESOTO FRUIT AND HARVESTING, INC. 1192 NW LIVINGSTON ST, ARCADIA, FLORIDA, 34266DeSoto Fruit and Harvesting, Inc. is seeking 17 temporary Agriculture Equipment Operators to Operate equipment used to harvest citrus for the contract period of September 1, 2018 to June 1, 2019. Applicants must be able to operate the equipment used to move citrus from the inside of the grove to the trailers and from trailers to the storage facility, operate the equipment used to transport workers to and from worksites and operate equipment used to move supplies and harvesting equipment to and from worksites. The applicant is required to have the correct type of drivers license required by the State and Federal government. All drivers must pass a DOT approved Physical and Drug test. The adverse effect wage rate of $ 11.29 per hour will apply to this job. Employer offers guarantee for the work period for each employee. DeSoto Fruit & Harvesting, Inc. will at no cost, provide tools and equipment necessary to perform the task of the worker. This work will take place in Central and South Florida. Housing will be provided for individual workers outside normal commuting distance. Quali“ ed workers will be provided transportation and subsistence expenses to the workplace. Apply for this job at the nearest of“ ce of the Department of Economic Opt/Foreign Labor Cert-H2A; MSC G-300 Caldwell Building 107 E Madison St., Tallahassee, Florida 32399-4140 Phone 850-9213466. Job Order #10743931 adno=721079

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Page 10 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 LOCAL SPORTS CONTACT USBenjamin Baugh € Editor bbaugh@sun-herald.com or 941-206-1175 Jacob Hoag € Staff writer jhoag@sun-herald.com or 941-206-1122 Email: sports@sun-herald.com Fax: 941-629-2085 HOW TO ƒ€ Submit a story idea: Email sports@sun-herald.com or call 941-206-1175. Must contain name, address and number. € Report a high school result: Call 877-818-6204 or 941-206-1175. € To report an error: Call the sports department at 941-206-1175 or email sports@sun-herald.com. SunCoast Sports NowWhen news breaks, we blog it at www.suncoastsportsnow.com. Like us and share our photos on Facebook: facebook.com/ SunCoastSports Follow us on Twitter for live updates and breaking news: @SunCoastSports OUR TOWN „ SUNCOAST HOMESBy BEN BAUGHSPORTS EDITORAn encouraging word can open a series of opportunities. Sports have played a signi“cant role in Jayden Grants life from a young age. It was while he was attending elementary school in Savannah, Georgia, that the future Fightin Tarpon would get his “rst exposure to football, through a person who could recognize Grants potential based on his physical attributes. My principal was the Rec Coach, and he saw that I had good size, and wanted to see what I would look like on the football “eld,Ž said Grant. However, Grants introduction to football, left him with some uncertainty regarding his future in the sport. When I got out there, I didnt like it at “rst, but as I kept growing, I grew to like it, and now its my favorite sport.Ž A three-sport athlete, Grant has emerged as a formidable force, not only on the gridiron, but on the hard court and as a weightlifter. Its his dedication, adeptness and work ethic that have allowed Grant to evolve into a leader, a paragon of discipline and determination when competing, and someone who exempli“es humility off the “eld. Grants leadership qualities have seen him accept more responsibility, and the senior embodies the spirit of a program whose emphasis is on excellence. Hes a tough kid,Ž said Binky Waldrop, Charlotte Fightin Tarpons head coach. Hes a great athlete, weightlifter and by far the toughest kid on the football “eld. At 7:25 on a Friday night, you know hes ready to go.Ž Its his intense level of concentration, an attribute thats made him a productive performer as an athlete, that has enabled him to evolve both mentally and physically. Its not an easy job, its very hard, you have to stay mentally focused because everything isnt going to go your way all the time,Ž said Grant.Ž Competence and reliability are attributes synonymous with Grants athletic performances, and are an inherent part of his character. You always have to go over your stuff,Ž said Grant, who had 554 all purpose yards in 2017. At home, I think about it at night, what Im going to do on every play, and I watch “lm to be prepared.Ž Fitness has also played a large role in Grants success, allowing him to perform at an optimal level. Jayden seldom comes off the football “eld,Ž said Waldrop. Its not often that you can get a kid who can do that. In the Port Charlotte game, he didnt come off the “eld for one play. And he was on two special teams.Ž A standout on both sides of the ball, Grant rushed for 494 yards and six touchdowns in 2017. He had 108 yard games against Ida Baker and Cape Coral. He was equally impressive on defense, with a 46-yard interception return against Dunbar, a game where he also recovered a fumble. Against Fort Myers, he had nine solo tackles and caused a fumble. As a defensive player, I try to go after the ball, make my reads the right way, make sure everyone is in the right position, keep my defense together, so we all can ”ex the ball,Ž said Grant. The 510Ž, 195 pound senior, also excels on the basketball court, having averaged 9.4 points, 3.1 assists, 3 rebounds and and 3 steals per game during the 2017-18 season. Grant also distinguished himself as a weightlifter, “nishing fourth in the FHSAA State Championship in the Class 2A 199 lbs. division, with a bench press of 310 pounds and a clean and jerk of 300 pounds, totaling out at 610 pounds. Jaydens a very strong young man,Ž said Ray Hixson, Charlotte high school weightlifting coach and assistant foot ball coach. His overall strength makes him a very powerful football player thats tough to bring down when hes carrying the football.ŽGrants athleticism puts him among elite PHOTO BY BEN BAUGH Jayden Grant has enjoyed success as a multi-sport athlete. He is a key member of the Charlotte Fightin Tarpons football, basketball and weightlifting programs. PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER BLAKECharlotte Fighting Tarpons Jayden Grant carries the ball for a substantial gain against the Mariner Tritons on Friday evening.MODEL SAILINGCharlotte Harbor Multihull Association: For multihull owners or those interested in them. No dues. Meets “rst Monday of each month 6 p.m. at Harpoon Harrys. Visit http:// groups.yahoo.com/ group/CHMA/ or call Ron, 941-876-6667. Charlotte Harbor Community Sailing Center: Year-round weekly sailing classes for youth and adults. Monthly Portsmouth racing second Saturday each month. Family membership $140 per year includes use of boats on days open. Discounts available for multiple family members taking a class. Classes open to public and include beginning learn to sail, learn to race, advanced race training, tactical racing, water safety. Contact 941-4568542 or email at thesailingcenter.org@gmail. com or web at www. thesailingcenter.org or Facebook page Charlotte Harbor Community Sailing Center. Club schedules: Sun Coast Club meets Monday, Wednesday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at South County Regional Park in Punta Gorda. Open to the public. 941-628-8802. Dragon boat club: The Charlotte Harbor Dragons Boat Club meets Wednesday and Saturday at 8 a.m., at the Port Charlotte Beach Complex, 4500 Harbor Boulevard, Port Char lotte for practices. This club races Dragon Boats at various venues in Florida year round. Learn more about uu by joining us for practice. Contact Eddie Amara at 941-740-1286 or eamara1@comcast. net.RUNNINGZoomers: The Southwest Florida club emphasizes running events and triathlons. Visit zoomersrun.com for information.SWIMMINGCharlotte County Swimming: Year-Round USA Swimming team provides instruction and competition ages 5 and up. Year-Round Masters Swim program for all abilities, ages 18 and up. Come join us. Visit www.ccswim.org, or call Shelley @ 941-626-1804.SOFTBALLThe 60+ Evening Slow Pitch Softball League is looking for players 60 years and older. Season starts in September. For more information call Vince 941-624-3630. The Charlotte County 55+ Senior Morning Softball League will be holding batting practice and sign ups beginning at 9:30 a.m. on Aug. 27, Aug. 30 and Sept. 6 at the Carmalita Softball Field Complex in Punta Gorda. Players fee is $30. League games will begin on Sept. 10 and run through Dec. 17. Questions, call Tim Seagreaves at 941-276-7048, Tim Casey at 203-996-6632 or Fred Stankovich at 908-415-9379.BASEBALLSenior Men: The South Florida Suns, mens over-50 baseball team, is looking for players. All positions needed. Call 941-456-5229. Little League: Port Charlotte Little League Baseball Fall Ball sign ups. Sign ups are being held at the Harold Ave. Rec Center at 23400 Harold Ave. on Aug. 23 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. and Aug. 25 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Players birth certificate is required. The fee for the fall season is $45 per player and the season starts September 10 and lasts for approximately 10 weeks. Were also looking for coaches. Please call Lou at 941-629-1220 with any additional questions or if youre interested in coaching. TARPONS: Football LOCAL SPORTS CALENDAR Chronic Back & Joint Pain? Arthritis? Trouble Walking? Recent Joint Replacement? Aquatic Therapy Can help you Freedom Rehab Aquatic Therapy 941-400-1505 3545 Massini Ave. € North Port Visit our Facebook page to see the testimonials of people weve helped at: facebook.com/freedomrehabaquatictherapy adno=720795 adno=54537349

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By MARY BERNARDTHE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRERNearly one in “ve U.S. children is obese, according to the most recent estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A new study by Pennsylvania State University that linked overeating to the brains response to food rewards may help to shed light on the national epidemic that can lead to Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and breathing problems. Among the kids in the study, a high responsiveness to food rewards, rather than money, indicated a higher likelihood to overeat and to eat even when they werent hungry. The researchers measured responsiveness using blood-oxygen-level dependent imaging (BOLD) on a functional magnetic resonance imaging scan (fMRI), which indicates the locations in the brain with the most activity. The results remained the same, regardless of the childrens weight and body mass index. (Responsiveness) was happening independently of if the child had obesity, so the parent might not even realize that their child is on a trajectory to overeat,Ž said Shana Adise, coauthor of the study and current post-doctoral fellow at the University of Vermont. Adise worked on the study while completing her Ph.D. at Penn State. Certain food habits as a child, such as an inability to stop eating or a tendency to hide snacks, can indicate an unhealthy relationship with food. Even if the child has a healthy BMI, such habits might precede obesity later in life. Parents should avoid behaviors that put a lot of emphasis on food, such as using food consistently as a reward and, even, restricting kids access to food, said Kathleen Keller, coauthor of the study and an associate professor in the department of nutritional sciences and food science at Penn State. Children are still developing, so this is a really critical period of time,Ž Adise said. Things could become a permanent habit later in life.Ž The 59 children in the study, ages 7 to 11, visited a lab on four occasions. Once, they ate a meal to establish a baseline appetite. That same day, 20 minutes later, they were offered more food to judge their tendency to eat when they arent hungry. Another time, the children were offered a buffet of food to measure their proclivity to overeat. At the “nal session, the fMRI scanned the childrens brains while they played a guessing game and were given either a food, money or neutral reward for a correct answer. The researchers found children whose brains were more excited by food rewards also had a tendency to overeat at the buffet and eat when not hungry. People who are vulnerable to overeating, they are people who value food over other types of rewards,Ž Keller said. Its clearly starting at a time when children are young, before they develop obesity.Ž However, certain eating behaviors might have been exacerbated in the study. By only meeting four times and serving foods that the child may not be exposed to at home, eating habits in the lab may not necessarily mimic normal eating habits perfectly. This is the beginning of the road,Ž Adise said.Study: How kids brains react to food may cause them to overeat PHOTO PROVIDEDResearchers found children whose brains were more excited by a food reward also had a tendency to overeat at the buet and eat when not hungry. Feeling FitPort Charlotte € Punta Gorda € North Port € Englewood € ArcadiaSunday, August 19, 2018www.yoursun.netMy good friend Dr. Johnson stopped by the other day while I was writing the symbols on my chalkboard. Ahha,Ž he exclaimed. Man, woman, birth, death, infinity „ opening line of the old Ben Casey television show.Ž Intoned weekly by actor Sam Jaffe as Dr. Zorba and later by Franchot Tone as Dr. Freeland, the line opened the show with Vince Edwards as an intense but idealistic neurosurgeon serving his residency under chief of neurosurgery Dr. Zorba/Freeland. Ben Casey was my hero,Ž said Dr. Johnson, surly but absolutely PROVIDED BY STATEPOINTNutritious, delicious and low-calorie, vegetables should be the star player of all your meals. But sometimes providing veggies for your family can be time consuming and costly. Luckily, there are a number of simple ways to boost your veggie intake, and it all starts in your grocery stores freezer aisle. € Go frozen: Frozen vegetables are often one of the most affordable options and the quickest to prepare, reducing time spent slicing and dicing on busy weeknights. Whats more, by opting for frozen veggies, your family will likely reduce its food waste. Frozen vegetables are easy to store for long periods of time, and recent studies have found that freezing actually helps lock nutrients in. € Swap it out: Little ones and even some adults can be resistant to certain vegetables at “rst. But there are ways to incorporate them into family meals with no one the wiser. Consider cooking with vegetables that offer the look, feel and taste of traditional starches such as rice, pasta and potatoes. For example, Green Giants frozen Veggie Swap-Ins line, which includes riced veggies, veggie spirals and mashed cauli”ower are easy go-to items in any kitchen for quick family meals. Indeed, 52 percent of American consumers who noted they had purchased Green Giant Swap-Ins products within three months of taking the survey, said they have introduced the product into their kids meals without their kids knowing they werent traditional potatoes, rice and/or pasta, and 49 percent admit to swapping these items for potatoes, rice and pasta one to two times per week. € Be mindful: Dining out can be especially tricky territory for those looking to eat more vegetables. Be mindful of what you order. Read the menu carefully and ask questions. Many restaurants are happy to make substitutions to accommodate your preferences. For example, see if you can replace a side of fries with a garden salad or sauted seasonal vegetables like green beans. € Get creative: Whether youre hosting a barbecue, attending a potluck or simply making your family dinner, consider reducing calories in salads and sides by upping your vegetable intake in these dishes. Make an Italian pasta salad out of zucchini or carrot spirals. Swap out traditional rice with riced cauli”ower to make a simple pilaf. The possibilities are endless.Health & Hope DanMEARNSC TV diagnosis, treatment, healing in an hour PHOTO PROVIDED/Man, woman, birth, death, in“nityEasy ways to boost your familys veggie intake PHOTO PROVIDEDAre you looking to simplify your familys clean-eating routine and increase your vegetable intake? With a few tips and tricks, you can incorporate broccoli, beets, squash and more into your familys diet while saving time and money in the process. DAN | 5 J e nn ifer Gi l pi n ARNPis now accepting e patients in Port Charlotte Call today to schedule an appointment.Same day appoi nt me nt s a l so a v ai l ab l e !941-255-353519531 Cochran Blvd. Port Charlotte, FL 33948 www. MillenniumPhysician .com adno=50538588

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Page 2 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 Feeling FitPresident Michael Beatty Publisher Glen Nickerson Feeling Fit Editor Marie Merchant feelingfit@sun-herald.com 941-206-1135 Medical Advertising Executives Bibi R. Gafoor 941-258-9528 bgafoor@sun-herald.com Jim Commiskey 941-258-9526 jcommiskey@sun-herald.com Elaine Schaefer eschaefer@sun-herald.com 941-205-6409 Deadlines: Support groups and News & Notes are published as space permits. To be included send the information to feelingfit@sun-herald.com. Deadlines for listings are the Monday prior to publication.By PAUL SISSONTHE SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE Though its name sounds like a trendy workout craze, Medicares new step therapyŽ policy has nothing to do with getting people in their 60s to move their feet. Sometimes called fail “rst,Ž step therapy is the term used when a health insurance company forces doctors to prescribe the cheapest medication “rst, providing access to more expensive alternatives only if the “rst option doesnt get results. The U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services recently announced that privately administered Medicare Advantage plans will be allowed to create step therapy policies for drugs delivered in doctors of“ces and other outpatient settings. Such measures are already allowed in Medicare Part DŽ medication plans. Allowing step therapy for doctor-administrated drugs represents a significant change, especially since this class of medication often is used to treat serious illness such as cancer, said Juliette Cubanski, director of the Program on Medicare at the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation. This is de“nitely a fundamental change in terms of giving plans more authority,Ž Cubanski said. I would think that health plans would tread carefully because they dont want to end up driving customers away.Ž Sarah Emond, executive vice president and chief operating of“cer for the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review in Boston, said it will be incumbent on health insurance companies to make sure that theyre not ignoring evidence which shows that one drug can deliver better results than another even though it costs more. You would de“nitely want something like this to be anchored in solid evidence,Ž Emond said. The federal government touted the move as a positive for the millions of Medicare recipients nationwide who feel drug prices are too high, saying in a statement that the move empowers patients with more choicesŽ and that it shows that the Trump administration is taking action to lower drug prices.Ž But many have been quick to say the change could slow down the often-frantic process of “nding the right drug among many options to treat deadly diseases. In its own statement, the American Cancer Society said allowing step therapy for Medicare Part B plans could erect barriers to care for cancer patientsŽ while the American College of Rheumatology called the decision an affront to Americas sickest Medicare patients.Ž Those concerns, though, rub up against public outrage over drug prices. According to Health System Tracker, a service of the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation, Americans continue to pay drastically-higher prices for drugs. For example, the average 2014 price for a 28-day supply of Humira, a drug used to treat rheumatoid arthritis and other conditions, was $2,669 in the United States, a sum that is 96 percent higher than the average paid in the United Kingdom. Some private health plans already employ step therapy for some drugs on their formularies. A 2011 analysis in the Journal of Managed Care and Specialty Pharmacy, which examined the evidence in 14 different step therapy studies, found that forcing patients to take the cheapest drug, with the exception of antipsychotic medications used to treat conditions such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, does save money. However, many have questioned the ethics of fail-“rst policies. Noting that many states have limited step therapy amid doctor and patient stories of long waits for approval after “rst-step drugs fail or side effects appeared, researchers argued in a 2014 paper that step therapy can pose ethical problems when forcing a patient to take a cheaper drug could cause signi“cant harm such as when treating cancer, mental health, or seizure conditions.Ž Medicares step therapy rule does give doctors and patients an out, allowing them to request an exception to a fail-“rst requirement and get a decision within 72 hours. Denied exceptions can be appealed to Medicare. Any Medicare Advantage plan that decides to implement a step therapy program must notify all current policy holders of the change in writing, and Medicare has extended the amount of time that it will allow bene“ciaries to change plans in 2019. But the big picture remains a signi“cant issue. The whole point of step therapy is to reduce drug costs and, while experts agree that the approach could cut costs somewhat, none predicted price shrinkage large enough that the average Medicare bene“ciary would notice a signi“cant difference. A much more fundamental re-think of the way Medicare pays for drugs is necessary to start driving costs down closer to what the citizens of other countries pay, said Kristof Stremikis, director of market analysis and insight at the California Health Care Foundation. Currently, he noted, Medicare uses a drugs average price in the wider market as a baseline for what it will pay. But the reasons why those prices are what they are are often murky. If the government truly wants to make a big dent in drug prices, unpacking those prices and demanding more transparency from drug companies will be necessary. The baseline we have today does not necessarily incorporate an objective assessment of a drugs value, and until that happens, the game isnt fundamentally changed. Thats where significant savings are hiding,Ž Stremikis said. Cubanski, the Kaiser expert, agreed. She noted that the new step-therapy policy does require insurance plans to pass 50 percent of money saved by requiring the use of cheaper drugs onto patients, but, in the aggregate, she said, no one should expect a reversal of ever-increasing drug price trends. Its another opportunity to try and wring some savings out of Medicare, but, just because theyre given this opportunity to use step therapy doesnt mean drug prices are coming down,Ž Cubanski said.Is Medicares latest change a step too far?By MATTHEW PERRONEAP HEALTH WRITERWASHINGTON „ U.S. health of“cials on Thursday approved a new generic version of EpiPen, the emergency allergy medication that triggered a public backlash due to its rising price tag. The new version from Teva Pharmaceuticals is the “rst that will be interchangeable with the original penlike injector sold by Mylan. The Food and Drug Administration announced the approval in a statement. EpiPen injections are stocked by schools and parents nationwide to treat children with severe allergies. They are used in emergencies to stop potentially fatal allergic reactions to insect bites and stings and foods like nuts and eggs. EpiPen maker Mylan has dominated the $1 billion market for the shots for two decades. Several other companies sell competing shots containing the drug epinephrine, but they arent heavily marketed or prescribed by doctors. In 2016, Congress blasted Mylan in letters and hearings for raising EpiPens to $600 for a twopack, a “ve-fold increase over nearly a decade. The company responded by launching its own lower-cost generic version for $300. Mylan continues to sell both versions at those prices, according to data from Elseviers Gold Standard Drug Database. Tevas generic shot will be the “rst version that pharmacists can substitute even when doctors prescribe the original EpiPen. A Teva spokeswoman declined to comment on the drugs price but said it would launch in the coming months.Ž Generic drugs can be priced as much as 80 percent lower than the original product. But those price cuts usually appear after several companies have launched competing versions. Tevas bid to sell a generic EpiPen faced multiple setbacks at the FDA, which rejected the companys initial application in 2016. While epinephrine is a decades-old generic drug, Teva and other would-be competitors struggled to replicate the EpiPens auto-injector device.US approves new generic competitor to EpiPen By KELLY POMERVILLE CHARLOTTE BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CAREEstablished more than 40 years ago in 1976, The Florida Council for Community Mental Health (FCCMH or the Council) is a nonpro“t, 501(c)(3) statewide association of communitybased mental health and substance abuse treatment providers. The number one priority for the FCCMH and its member organizations is to ensure that Floridians have access to a comprehensive and effective system of coordinated mental health and substance abuse treatment services. Charlotte Behavioral Health Care is proud to announce that its CEO, Victoria Scanlon, LMHC, has been appointed as the Councils new Organizational Treasurer. Scanlon has worked as a clinician and administrator in community behavioral health for over 20 years. Her clinical career focus created a passion in treating adults with serious mental illnesses, emphasis on criminal justice diversion, and eliminating suicide. She joined Charlotte Behavioral Health Care in 2006 as Clinical Director, and quickly assumed oversight of Quality Management. She was then promoted to Chief Operating Of“cer in 2007 and remained in that position for nine years, until assuming the role of Chief Executive Of“cer in May, 2016. Scanlon holds a Bachelors Degree in Psychology and an Educational Specialist/Masters in Education with a specialty of Community Counseling/Mental Health Counseling from the University of Florida.Victoria Scanlon appointed Organizational Treasurer of Florida Council for Community Mental Health SCANLON SAVE LIVES. GIVE BLOOD. Alzheimers support groupsThe Alzheimers Association holds monthly caregiver suapport groups for spouses, adult children and family members who want to connect and share insight with others in similar situations. RSVP is not required to attend. For questions on groups and services through the Alzheimers Association, please call 941-235-7470. Port Charlotte area € 3 p.m. third Tuesday at South Port Square (Harbor Terrace), 23033 Westchester Blvd., Port Charlotte. € 3 p.m. third Thursday at Port Charlotte United Methodist Church, 21075 Quesada Ave., Port Charlotte. Punta Gorda area € 3 p.m. third Monday at Life Care center, 450 Shreve St., Punta Gorda. € 3 p.m. second Tuesday at Punta Gorda Civic Association, 2001 Shreve St., Punta Gorda. Englewood area € 10:30 a.m. third Friday, Englewood United Methodist Church, 700 E. Dearborn St., Englewood.Alzheimers Caregiver Support GroupThe Alzheimers Caregiver Support Group meets from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. the second Tuesday every month at The Springs at South Biscayne, 6235 Hoffman St., North Port. Call 941-426-8349 to register. SUPPORT GROUPS Come see why our Residents Call Lexington Manor HomeASSISTED LIVING FOR SENIORS!Our Assisted living community includes upscale restaurant dining, with many choices. You can rest easy knowing the details are taken care of so that you can live a carefree lifestyle.adno=50538682At Lexington Manor you have the freedom to remain independent while relaxing or enjoying our fully scheduled calendar of social and recreational activities. Our many exceptional services and amenities include outings, exercise classes, full-service beauty salon and barber shop, game room, library, transportation, laundry, and housekeeping. CALL US TODAY TO SCHEDULE YOUR OWN PERSONAL TOUR. www.lexingtonmanorportcharlotte.com941-766-7991 20480 Veterans Blvd., Port Charlotte, FL 33954Assisted Living Facility # 10548

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The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 3 Missin Mammaries, a breast cancer dragon boat racing team from Punta Gorda, presented a check of $5,000 to Dollars for Mammograms. For more information, visit www.dollarsformammograms.org.Dollars for Mammograms Sue Smith; Alice Walker; Rita Bertler, Director for Dollars for Mammograms; and Marge Jones Members of Missin Mammaries: Deb Dehmel, Sue Smith, Alice Walker, Marge Jones and Eileen Wein € Englewood Beach: Daily at 8:30 a.m.; and Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. 941-473-0135. € Manasota Beach: Monday-Saturday at 8 a.m. € Venice Beach Pavilion: Monday-Thursday at 7:30 p.m. € North Jetty, Nokomis Beach Yoga: 9 a.m. Monday, Tuesday and Friday € Pop Up Yoga classes at local business led by The Yoga Sanctuary will be held all throughout the summer. You never know where until the week prior to a Pop Up Class. The Yoga Sanctuary is excited to be working with other businesses in town (and sometimes beyond) to provide people with even more opportunities to explore their yoga practice and shop local! These surprise yoga classes will be held all over „ you never know when or where until that week. To “nd out about these special complimentary classes be sure to likeŽ and follow us and other Punta Gorda businesses on Facebook. Thats where well be announcing each class. Other things to know: 1. A limited number of mats will be available for use. But if you have your own, feel free to bring it. 2. There is no cost for these classes. However, there will be some events held at nonpro“t locations and some done to support are nonpro“ts. Consider having some funds to donate or even shop local in some of the shops after class. 3. All classes will be approximately 45 minutes long. 4. Some classes will be held outside. These events will be weather permitting. For more information, Facebook: https:// www.facebook.com/ yogasanctuary. € Yoga Tots „ The Punta Gorda Library, 424 W. Henry St., hosts the free program Yoga Tots Storytime from 10:15 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. on Fridays for children ages 12-36 months. Bring your toddler, towels or yoga mat to stretch your mind and muscles with a story and fun yoga poses. For more information, call 941-833-5460 or email: PuntaGordaLibrary@ charlottecounty”.gov. If you would like your free yoga event added to our events, email feeling “t@sun-herald.com. YOGACancer Support MinistryFirst United Methodist Church offers a scripturally based cancer support ministry to anyone affected by this life altering diagnosis. Whether you are new diagnosis or have been battling for a long time, the cancer ministry provides a place where people who understand the treatment journey are available to help, listen and support patients, as well as survivors, caregivers and family members. The Cancer Support Ministry meets the “rst Wednesday of every month at 6:30 p.m. in room 9 at 507 W. Marion Ave., Punta Gorda. All adult cancer survivors and their caregivers are welcome to attend, regardless of cancer type, church af“liation or faith base. For more information, contact Mitzi Kohrman, kohrman 1562@comcast.net.Food Addicts AnonymousA 12-step program for those who wish to recover from food addiction. Group meets from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Thursdays, at First Alliance Church, 20444 Midway Blvd., Port Charlotte. For more information, call 941-380-6550.Courage Over CancerGulf Cove United Methodist Churchs cancer care program, Courage Over Cancer, offers support and ministry to men, women, and families who are affected by cancer. Church and community members touched by this disease are provided with help and spiritual counsel that are speci“c to their needs as a cancer patient, caregiver, or loved one. This ministry is based on the outreach program Our Journey of Hope which was developed by the Cancer Treatment Centers of America. If you or someone you know could bene“t from a friend to support them through this journey, contact the church at 941-697-1747 or GulfCoveUMC@gmail. com. Gulf Cove UMC is located at 1100 McCall Road, in Port Charlotte. SUPPORT GROUPS Its important to know who to trust with your health because you want the very best. Fawcett Memorial Hospital has been recogni zed as an accredited Comprehensive Center under the Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Improvement Program (MBSAQI P). is accreditation ensures that bariatric surgical patients receive a multidisciplinary program, not just a surgical procedure, which improves patient outcomes and long-term success. For more information on this accreditation, visit us at FawcettWeightLoss.com 21298 Olean Boulevard, Port Charlotte, FL 33952 € 941.624.8281 € FawcettWeightLoss.comadno=50538623

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Page 4 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 BAYFRONT NEWS & NOTESAug. 21, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. Cardiac Diet Nutrition Class. Bayfront Health Wellness & Rehab Center, 733 E. Olympia Ave., Punta Gorda. Learn heart-healthy, low fat and low sodium food options. Free. Call 941-637-2450 to register. Aug. 21, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Massage Therapy. Punta Gorda Isles Civic Association, 2001 Shreve St., Punta Gorda. Massage therapy can improve blood flow and soothe tired and sore muscles, but it also can be an effective form of stress relief. Led by a licensed massage therapist, join us and learn the health benefits, types and various techniques of massage therapy. Free. Lunch provided. RSVP required. Call 941-6371655 to register. Aug. 21, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Breastfeeding Class. Bayfront Health Port Charlotte, Conference Center, 2500 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte. Taught by a Registered Nurse, this class will give expectant mothers important information to prepare for a successful breastfeeding experience. Free. Register at www. BayfrontHealthEvents. com. Aug. 22, 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. What Do You Have To Lose? Bayfront Health Punta Gorda Medical Office Plaza, 3rd Floor, Suite 131, 713 E. Marion Ave., Punta Gorda. If youre considering weight loss surgery, the best place to start is with the right information. Thats why we offer free weight loss seminars as an opportunity to talk with the experts. Seminars are interactive and include members of our weight loss team. You are invited to bring a family member, friend, or other support person with you. Free. Register at www.Bayfront CharlotteWeight Loss. com or call 941-7664564 to schedule a free consultation. Aug. 25, 9 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Childbirth and Newborn 1-Day Course. Bayfront Health Port Charlotte, Conference Center, 2500 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte. In this course, you will leave with a better understanding of labor and delivery, the birthing process, anatomy and physiology, birth basics, comfort techniques, hospital procedures and medical interventions. ($) or ask how you can take this course for Free. Register at www. BayfrontHealthEvents. com. Aug. 25, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. What Do You Have To Lose? Bayfront Health Port Charlotte Bariatric Services Suite, 2500 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte. If youre considering weight loss surgery, the best place to start is with the right information. Thats why we offer free weight loss seminars as an opportunity to talk with the experts. Seminars are interactive and include members of our weight loss team. You are invited to bring a family member, friend, or other support person with you. Free. Register at www.BayfrontCharlotte WeightLoss.com or call 941-766-4564 to schedule a free consultation. Aug. 25, 11 a.m. to noon. Bayfront Baby Place Tours. Bayfront Health Port Charlotte, Lobby, 2500 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte. Expecting? View the birthing suites, meet the staff and get questions answered in preparation for an exceptional experience. Free. Register at www. Bayfront HealthEvents. com. Aug. 27, 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Quit Your Way. Bayfront Health Port Charlotte, Conference Center, 2500 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte. Quitting tobacco isnt easy. Finding help should be. Bayfront Health and Tobacco Free Florida offer free tools and services to help you get started. Free. Call 866534-7909 to register. Aug. 28, 1:15 p.m. to 2:15 p.m. Emotions of the Heart: Stress Management Class. Bayfront Health Wellness & Rehab Center, 733 E. Olympia Ave., Punta Gorda. Everyone experiences stress from time to time; however, excessive stress can take a toll on your health. Learn techniques to recognize, manage, overcome and cope. Free. Call 941-637-2450 to register.By NICOLE VILLALPANDOAUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN (TNS)We have hit the home stretch „ that “nal year of grade school. Senior year. How did this happen? Wasnt it just yesterday that my husband and I dropped 5-year-old Benjamin off at his kindergarten classroom and stood outside the doorway trying to see what was going on while hoping he didnt see us? Weve done it all: parent-teacher conferences, trips to the principals of“ce, “eld trips, clubs, science fairs, impossibly challenging projects that had us cursing teachers names, tests failed, tests aced, school performances that had us beaming with pride. Now, in this senior year, I cant help thinking about all the things we still need to teach him. We thought we had more time. Luckily, this year Benjamin is actually taking a class called How to Be an Adult,Ž because in between physics and calculus, sometimes real life skills take a backseat. So, for Ben, heres my list of things to learn this year: 1. How to drive. Yes, you have a permit, and yes, we practice, but in this world where Uber is at the touch of your “ngertips, youre not really seeing the point. And youre not alone. A lot of your classmates arent licensed drivers either. Dude, its a life skill. Let me help you get it. 2. How to manage money. Debit cards, credit cards, checking accounts, thats all something that happens in theory. This year were moving beyond the savings account to having a checking account with a debit card to practice working within a budget before college next year. 3. How to advocate for your own medical care. Its time to practice how to make a doctors appointment, re“ll medication and use the insurance card. Mom needs to ease out of being the medical manager. 4. How to feed yourself. Yes, youre wiz at making cookies, sandwiches and frozen pizza. Lets try to expand those chef skills. 5. How to clothe yourself. Hooray, you “nally mastered the washer and dryer, but shockingly, we havent really had you go shopping for clothes. Why? Because you hate it. Its time to head to the store, pick out your size and try things on, and then buy them with your debit card. Maybe if you knew how much those jeans cost, they wouldnt be on the ”oor all the time. 6. How to read a map and navigate public transportation. If Mom or Dad has always driven you everywhere, can you “nd your way? Next year at college will you be able to get from your dorm to class, to the grocery store or anywhere else you might want to go? 7. How to have a conversation. In this world of texting, lets make sure you can talk to people, make eye contact and be comfortable talking to a stranger. (Yes, I know we told you never to talk to strangers, but now youre going to have to.) 8. How to advocate for yourself to get something “xed. If you have an issue with a store, a professor, a service provider, your dorm room, will you know how to effectively state your case and ask for what you need? Mom or Dad wont be there to do it for you next year. 9. How to manage your time. That nice alarm that wakes you up every morning with a kiss? That wont be coming to your dorm room. Nor will the reminder service that tells you to get off your phone and do your homework. Youll have to do it yourself. Senior year is a great year to build up these skills. 10. How to access resources. If you had a problem, would you know where to turn? If Mom or Dad are the only ones with the power to Google or ask a school administrator what is available to you, what will happen next year? Will you be able to “nd academic counseling services, tutoring, or even know what the weather is going to be like that day and what clothing is appropriate? Im sure there is more to consider, more to teach and more to learn. This time next year, youll be off on a new adventure. And that will be wonderfully exciting „ and a little bit scary, too. Good luck, sweet Ben.So much still to teach as students start final year of high school TNS PHOTOBenjamin Villalpando is working on learning to drive. He recently started his senior year of high school. Alcoholics AnonymousCall 941-426-7723 for information on meetings in the Arcadia, Venice, Port Charlotte, Punta Gorda, North Port and Englewood areas, including dates times and places.Amputee Support GroupThe Amputee Support Group meets at 3 p.m. on the second Monday of every month at the Life Care Center, Punta Gorda. Contact George Baum at 941-787-4151 for more information.At Ease, VeteransDuring World War II, and the wars in Korea, Vietnam, Afghanistan and Iraq, the percentage of American soldiers who shot their weapons with the intent to kill steadily rose from just 15 percent to almost 100 percent. The Department of Housing & Urban Development estimates that in January 2017, over 40,000 veterans are more likely to be homeless each night. As recently as 2014, an average of 20 veterans died from suicide each day. These brave men and women need a listening ear, and they need to know that Gods grace is still with them. Combat veterans from Gulf Cove United Methodist Church are providing some of the support and discussion that our veterans deserve. On the “rst Tuesday of each month at 6 p.m., they are at the American Legion Post 113, at 3436 Indiana Road in Rotonda West. Veterans are invited and encouraged to join them. Gulf Cove UMC is located at 1100 McCall Road in Port Charlotte, just mile south of the Myakka River on Route 776. The church can be reached at 941697-1747 or GulfCoveUMC@gmail.com and their website is found at http://GulfCoveChurch. com.Breast cancer networkingBreast Cancer Networking in Venice offers support and sharing with other breast cancer survivors. Meetings are on the third Monday of each month from 11 a.m. to noon at the Venice Health Park, Suite 1217 (north side), Jacaranda Blvd., Venice. For more information, call 941-408-9572. Caregivers Support GroupPort Charlotte United Methodist Church, 21075 Quesada Ave., Port Charlotte, hosts a caregiver support group from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. every Wednesday. The cost is free and is open to any caregiver dealing with a care-receiver with any debilitating disease. There are no requirements to join the group. For more information, contact Mike Boc cia at 941-815-6077. SUPPORT GROUPS a d no= 54539135 DIABETIC & WOUND CARE CERTIFIED BOARD Dr. Tom Lane DPM, FAPWCA Guardian Angel Foot Care2400 S. McCall Road, Suite FEnglewood, FL 34224 (941) 473-3338 Fax (941) 474-8597 Pediatric Dermatology | Teen Skin Facial Rejuvenation | Skin Cancer Screening & Treatment Anti-Aging | Ethnic Skin | Mens Therapies Skin Care Products | Mohs SurgeryCome Florida Skintroduce yourself when you visit our newest location at 329 East Olympia Avenue. FloridaSkinCenter.com 239.236.8322 OFFICES: FORT MYERS | CAPE CORAL | LEHIGH ACRES | PUNTA GORDA Hablamos ESPAOL 1 The key to looking and feeling younger is prevention. That begins with minimizing sun exposure and using topical treatments with SPF 35 or higher. As we age, our skin becomes less elastic and prone to discoloration. For timeless, youthful skin, we offer:€ Routine skin checkups € Skin cancer screenings and treatment € Injectable “llers, nonsurgical lifts and rejuvenation treatments € Age spot treatments and hair restoration therapy € Customized skin care and wrinkle reduction regimensAT ANY AGE AT ANY AGE YOU CAN LOOK YOU CAN LOOK adno=50537036

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The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 5 dedicated.Ž Ben CaseyŽ debuted in 1961 at a time TV was nominated by westerns like Wagon TrainŽ and Bonanza.Ž Doctor shows were rarities, with the exceptions of City Hospital,Ž which first aired in 1951 and is considered to be the first televised medical drama, and Medic,Ž which featured Richard Boone, ran from 1954-56 and was the first show to focus on medical procedures. The still ongoing genre of hero doctors began with Ben CaseyŽ and another show that began the same year, Dr. Kildare,Ž based on the successful movie serial and referred to in some quarters as the anti-Ben Casey.Ž Dr. Kildare, as played the handsome Richard Chamberlain, was an intern learning the ropes under the senior Dr. Gillespie (Raymond Massey). Both shows dominated the ratings. Kildare dated his female patients,Ž noted Dr. Johnson. First of all, thats unethical. Secondly, Richard Chamberlain would not have been interested in women.Ž (Chamberlain, an award-winning actor, was outed at the age of 55 by a French magazine in 1989 and confirmed his homosexuality in his 2003 autobiography Shattered Love.Ž) In 1969 came Marcus Welby, M.D.Ž and Medical Center,Ž two popular series that took a different approach to medical cases. The former starred Robert Young as the title character, a kindly family practitioner who made house-calls along with his young partner, Dr. Steve Kiley, played by James Brolin. Medical CenterŽ starred Chad Everett and James Daly as young/old surgeons Joe Gannon and Paul Lochner at a big-time Los Angeles university hospital. Both Medical CenterŽ and Marcus Welby, M.D., went off the air in 1976 tied as the longestrunning medical dramas on American television at the time. Another long-running series, Emergency!,Ž began as a midseason replacement in 1972 and lasted five years, followed by a half-dozen, two-hour television movies. The first medical drama ever to combine both a paramedic program with an emergency room hospital, the show featured Robert Fuller and Julie London as Dr. Kelly Brackett and head nurse Dixie McCall, Emergency Room staff members who saw the patients brought in by the EMTs. Dr. Johnson liked this one. Julie London as Dixie who wore very flattering, skin-tight, silk nurse uniforms,Ž he recalled. Talk about a fantasy for a young, pre-medical Dr. Johnson.Ž Dr. Johnson had some things to say about another cast member, singer-songwriter Bobby Troup, who played neurosurgeon Dr. Joe Early. Bobby wrote the Route 66 song,Ž he informed me. You might also remember him from the MASH movie. He picked up the doctors at the airport in Tokyo and kept saying Gosh darned army over and over.Ž Jack Webb of DragnetŽ fame was the creator and producer of Emergency!Ž Julie the nurse was married to Jack, then divorced him, then married Bobby,Ž said the good doctor. That must have been cozy. Troup also wrote Girl Talk.Ž which was a hit for Julie. Jack always wanted just the facts maam, just the facts. I have a feeling that he was a Wham Bam kind of man. That might have been the problem.Ž Comments and suggestions are always welcome. Call Dan Mearns at 941-893-9692 or email danmearns@gmail.com.DANFROM PAGE 1 By LAURAN NEERGAARDAP MEDICAL WRITERWASHINGTON „ You know your cholesterol, your blood pressure ... your heart gene score? Researchers say a new way of analyzing genetic test data may one day help identify people at high risk of a youthful heart attack in time to help. Today, gene testing mostly focuses on rare mutations in one or a few genes, like those that cause cystic fibrosis or sickle cell disease, or the BRCA gene responsible for a small fraction of breast cancer. It is less useful for some of the most common diseases, such as heart disease or diabetes, because they are influenced by vast numbers of genes-gone-wrong working together in complicated ways. Monday, researchers reported a new way to measure millions of small genetic variations that add up to cause harm, letting them calculate someones inherited risk for the most common form of heart disease and four other serious disorders. The potential cardiac impact: They estimated that up to 25 million Americans may have triple the average persons risk for coronary artery disease even if they havent yet developed warning signs like high cholesterol. What I foresee is in five years, each person will know this risk number, this polygenic risk score, similar to the way each person knows his or her cholesterol,Ž said Dr. Sekar Kathiresan who led the research team from the Broad Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. If the approach pans out and doctors adopt it, a bad score wouldnt mean youd get a disease, just that your genetic makeup increases the chance „ one more piece of information in deciding care. For example, when the researchers tested the system using a DNA database from Britain, less than 1 percent of people with the lowest risk scores were diagnosed with coronary artery disease, compared to 11 percent of people with the highest risk score. There are things you can do to lower the risk,Ž Kathiresan said „ the usual advice about diet, exercise, cholesterol medication and not smoking helps. On the flip side, a low-risk score doesnt give you a free pass,Ž he added. An unhealthy lifestyle could overwhelm the protection of good genes. The scoring system also can predict an increased risk of Type 2 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, breast cancer and an irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation, the team reported in the journal Nature Genetics „ noting that next steps include learning what might likewise lower those risks. It doesnt require the most sophisticated type of genetic testing. Instead, Kathiresan can calculate risk scores for those five diseases „ eventually maybe more „ simply by reanalyzing the kind of raw data people receive after sending a cheek swab to companies like 23andMe. A geneticist who specializes in cardiovascular disease, he hopes to open a website where people can send in such data to learn their heart risk, as part of continuing research. Kathiresan and coauthor Dr. Amit Khera, a Mass General cardiologist, are co-inventors on a patent application for the system. Other scientists and companies have long sought ways to measure risk from multiple, additive gene effects „ the polyŽ in polygenic „ and Myriad Genetics has begun selling a type of polygenic test for breast cancer risk. But specialists in heart disease and genetics who werent involved with the research called the new findings exciting because of their scope. The results should be eye-opening for cardiologists,Ž said Dr. Charles C. Hong, director of cardiovascular research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. The only disappointment is that this score applies only to those with European ancestry, so I wonder if similar scores are in the works for the large majority of the world population that is not white.Ž Hong pointed to a friend who recently died of a massive heart attack despite being a super-fit marathon runner whod never smoked, the kind of puzzling death that doctors have long hoped that a better understanding of genetics could help to prevent. Most of the variation in disease risk comes from an enormous number of very tiny effectsŽ in genes, agreed Stanford University genetics professor Jonathan Pritchard. This is the first time polygenic scores have really been shown to reach the level of precision where they can have an impactŽ on patient health. First, the Bostonbased team combed previous studies that mapped the DNA of large numbers of people, looking for links to the five diseases „ not outright mutations but minor misspellings in the genetic code. Each variation alone would have only a tiny effect on health. They developed a computerized system that analyzed how those effects add up, and tested it using DNA and medical records from 400,000 people stored in Britains UK Biobank. Scores more than three times the average persons risk were deemed high.Multi-gene test may find risk for heart disease and more PROVIDED BY STATEPOINTHuman papillomavirus (HPV) is the most commonly diagnosed sexually transmitted disease in the U.S. and cases of HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer „ a cancer that develops on the back and sides of the throat, tonsils and base of the tongue „ in middle-age men have tripled in the past three decades. But did you know that vaccines can help reverse this trend? August is Immunization Awareness Month and a good opportunity to learn more. Nearly all sexually active men and women get exposed to HPV at some point in their lives,Ž said Dr. Tom Thomas, director, Head and Neck Reconstructive Surgery and Transoral Robotic Surgery at Atlantic Health Systems Morristown Medical Center. Symptoms may develop decades after you become infected, so its often impossible to know who transmitted the virus to you.Ž Youre at higher risk for oral HPV if you: € Havent been vaccinated against HPV € Have had unprotected oral sex € Have many sexual partners € Have a sexual partner who has had many sexual partners € Started having sex when you were 16 or younger The good news is that when caught early, treatment for HPVrelated throat cancer is often successful. Symptoms include a lump on the neck that isnt painful but doesnt go away, a sore throat or difficulty swallowing that doesnt go away after 3-4 weeks, unexplained weight loss and a change in voice. If you have any of these symptoms, see your doctor right away. If you have a history of known HPV infection or other sexually transmitted diseases, see a head and neck expert. Even with no symptoms, you can pass HPV on to others, and you can get HPV from someone who doesnt show any symptoms,Ž said Dr. James Wong, medical director, Leonard B. Kahn Head and Neck Cancer Institute at Morristown Medical Center. As one of the leaders of the new Atlantic HPV Center, the countrys first center dedicated to the diagnosis, treatment, research and survivorship of HPVassociated cancers of the head and neck, Dr. Wong points out that understanding HPV and cancer can mean catching the disease early. Unfortunately, experts say that persisting misconceptions associated with throat cancers caused by HPV create stigmas and fears and prevent many patients from having important conversations with loved ones and doctors. We need to overcome the embarrassment associated with throat cancer caused by HPV,Ž said Dr. Thomas. Anyone whos sexually active is at risk for getting HPV, even if youve had only one sexual partner.Ž There are more than 150 types of HPV, but the HPV vaccine protects against both types 16 and 18, which cause the majority of cases of oropharyngeal cancer. More widespread use of the vaccine could lower the rate of highrisk HPV infection in men and women and consequently lower the rate of HPV-related cancer in both sexes. The Centers for Disease Control recommends getting the HPV vaccine for children at ages 11-12, before they are exposed to HPV, in order to protect them from certain cancers later in life. However, those who have already been infected can still get some protection from the vaccine, which is recommended for females aged 13 through 26 and males aged 13 through 21 who were not adequately immunized previously.HPV and throat cancer in men: How vaccines can help PHOTO PROVIDEDVaccines in childhood can protect against HPV-related throat cancers. STOP Living with Hip or Knee Pain!MAKO Robotic SurgeryCall for a consultation with Dr. Ronald Constine941.629.6262 or 941.639.6699www.AdvancedOrthopedicCenter.comOrthopedic Consultants for the Tampa Bay Rays and Team Physicians for the Charlotte Stone Crabs! Center For JointsHelping our community get back to life since 1980!Ronald M. Constine, M.D.Board Certi“ ed Orthopedic Surgeon 2003-2017 adno=50538695

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Page 6 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018Beating addiction is possibleBeating addiction is possible, and Fellowship Church of Englewood wants to get that message of hope out there to the Greater Englewood Community. Addiction is a huge problem in our culture and is affecting more families than ever before in our nations history. Special guest speaker Joe Hamblen, a former addict himself, will give his personal story of success and how others can make it too. Hamblen now serves as the Director for Loving Hands Ministry which strives to rehabilitate men who have addictive problems. Beating addiction is possible! Find out how on Sunday, Aug. 19, at 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Fellowship Church is located at 140 Rotonda Blvd. W., in Rotonda. Nursery and Kids Programs are available during both services. Complimentary hot coffee, donuts and juice are served at our Fellowship Hospitality Center at 9:30 a.m. For more information, visit www.fcenglewood.com or call 941-475-7447.Neuro Challenge Foundation for Parkinsons€ Special Event, North Port,  Understanding the Medical In“nity Deep Brain Stimulation System and Parkinsons Disease with Chad Davie, Abbott Labs; Neuro Challenge Foundation: North Port, 5600 Peace River Road, North Port, 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Aug. 20. € North Port JFCS Care Partner Connection with Carolyn Stephens, LCSW and Parkinson Power Hour with Carisa Campanella, Open Forum and Sharing; Neuro Challenge Foundation: North Port, 5600 Peace River Road, 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Aug. 22. € North Port JFCS Care Partner Connection with Carolyn Stephens, LCSW and Parkinson Power Hour with Karla Brody, Open Forum and Sharing; Neuro Challenge Foundation: North Port, 5600 Peace River Road, 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Aug. 22. € North Port Voice Aerobics with Mary Spremulli, SLP; An exercise program focusing on breath support, posture, and vocal function exercises for improved vocal performance: Neuro Challenge Foundation: North Port, 5600 Peace River Road, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Aug. 23. € Venice Movers and Shakers PD Discussion Group: Open discussion with Care Partner Relationships with Alex Addona. Facilitated by Dr. John Moore: Jacaranda Public Library, 4143 Woodmere Park Blvd., Venice, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Aug. 23. € Punta Gorda Parkinsons Support Group Care Partners and People with Parkinsons Breakout Groups: Punta Gorda Civic Association, 2001 Shreve St., 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Aug. 24. € Venice Parkinsons Wellness Club: In-Home Assessments for Safety and Better LivingŽ featuring Cindy Anderson, OT; Jacaranda Trace Retirement Community, 2nd Floor Classroom, 3600 William Penn Way, Venice, 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on Sept. 6.Quarters for a CauseJoin The Homeless Coalition for Quarters for a Cause at 6 p.m. on Aug. 21, at the Charlotte Harbor Event and Conference Center located at 75 Taylor St., Punta Gorda. A Quarter Auction is a game where bidders play for prizes valued from $12-$50 and even higher. Bring lots of enthusiasm and $3 for a paddle rental, rolls of quarters for bidding, cash for 50/50 drawing. All proceeds bene“t The Programs and Services at The Homeless Coalition. There will be items for sale from various vendors and a cash bar and food also for purchase. For more information, call Darcy Woods at 941-627-4313, ext.134 or email events@cc homelesscoalition.org.Childbirth Education ProgramsSarasota Memorial Hospital offers comprehensive childbirth education programs at its North Port Health Care Center, 2345 Bobcat Village Center Road, North Port. All sessions are taught by quali“ed instructors, on a rotating monthly schedule. For the educational sessions, youll need to sign-up in advance. We recommend signing up for classes by your second trimester and “nishing them four weeks prior to your due date. Upcoming classes include: € Wednesday, Aug. 22: CPR for Infants 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. € Monday, Sept. 10: Baby Care Basics 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. € Saturday, Sept. 15: Prepared Childbirth Class 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. € Wednesday, Sept. 26: Breastfeeding Basics 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Register online at babies.smh.com.Tibetan Singing Bowl and Yoga ImmersionThe Yoga Sanctuary, 112 Sullivan St., Punta Gorda, will host a Tibetan Singing Bowl and Yoga Immersion from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Aug. 19. The therapeutic sounds of Tibetan Singing Bowls have been used for centuries for healing and meditative purposes. The range of sounds and vibrations that come from the bowls are meant to awaken, refresh, and relax people in sacred spaces. Experience the sounds and vibrations of the bowls as they move throughout your being, bringing balance to the physical, mental, emotional and spiritual bodies. Cost is $25 per person. For more information, visit www. theyogasanctuary.biz or call 941-505-9642.Dart tournamentRoyal Palm and Interim Healthcare present the third Annual Dart Tournament Fundraiser at 5 p.m. on Aug. 23. at the Ice House Pub, 408 Tamiami Trail #111, Punta Gorda. All proceeds to support the Alzheimers Association. For more information, call Tanyah Lockett at 941-627-6762.Community Class, A Benefit for the Peace River Wildlife CenterSeptember is Yoga Month and The Yoga Sanctuary, 112 Sullivan St., Punta Gorda, is celebrating. Join us as we kickoff this special month with Augusts Community Class from 6 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. on Aug. 29, in honor of the Peace River Wildlife Center (PRWC). Class will open with an introduction by PRWCs veterinarian Dr. Robin Jenkins, highlighting PRWCs role in the care, preservation, and protection of our native wildlife. You will then be led through an all levels yoga class. This donation-based class is open to everyone and kicks off The Yoga Sanctuarys Yoga Month Bingo Challenge. All donations collected go directly to PRWC. For more information, visit www.theyogasanctuary. biz or call 941-505-9642.Yoga month bingo challengeSeptember is National Yoga Month. During Yoga Month, designated by the Department of Health & Human Services, festivities occur across the country. Hundreds of studios, teachers, and students join in. Come celebrate with The Yoga Sanctuary and discover the transformational power of a consistent yoga practice. Participate in our monthlong game of Yoga Month Bingo and see the difference yourself! In addition to feeling stronger, more relaxed, and less stressed, you will also be supporting the Peace River Wildlife Center (PRWC). Our Aug. 29 Community Class at PRWC kicks off the Bingo game, which culminates with a celebration for all participants and supporters on Sunday, Sept. 30. Visit www.theyogasanctuary.biz or call 941-5059642 to learn more about this month long event.Fall FestivalA fall festival will be held from noon to 4 p.m. on Sept. 22, at Quality Health Care Center, 6940 Outreach Way, North Port. There will be food, games, face painting, baked goods and more. All proceeds bene“t the Walk to End Alzheimers disease. For more information, call 941-626-8411.Family-to-Family programFamily-to-Family, a free, 12-session educational program for family, partners and friends of adults living with mental illness will be offered by NAMI Sarasota County starting Friday, Sept. 7, through Nov. 30, from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Venice United Church of Christ, 620 Shamrock Blvd., Venice. The course includes information on illnesses such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression and other mental health conditions. Family-to-Family also offers skill-building workshops on problemsolving, communication and empathy. This life-changing program is taught by trained teachers who are also family members and know what it is like to have a loved one living with mental illness. To register contact NAMI at 941-3769361 or email info@ NAMIsarasotacounty. org. Visit the website at namisarasotacounty.org for more information.NAMI Family Support Group TrainingNAMI Sarasota County will offer statewide Family Support Group (FSG) Training on Oct. 6-7 in Sarasota. Prospective facilitators must be family members (parents, siblings, adult children, spouses or partners) of a person with mental illness. If you would like to train as a volunteer facilitator and can commit to co-facilitating a monthly support group, please consider this unique opportunity. Additional FSG facilitators are needed in Sarasota County, particularly for the Venice and North Port areas, and NAMI Sarasota County will cover the cost of training for applicants from Sarasota County. NAMI Family Support Group is a peer-led support group for family members, caregivers and loved ones of individuals living with mental illness. The groups provide an opportunity to gain insight from the challenges and successes of others facing similar circumstances. FSG is con“dential and provided free of cost to participants. For more information or an application contact Colleen Thayer, Executive Director, NAMI Sarasota County, at colleen@ NAMIsarasotacounty.org or call 941-376-9361.Run like a BanditThe Port Charlotte Bandits Youth Football and Cheer Programs will host its inaugural running of Run like a Bandit 5K/10K from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Oct. 14, at Port Charlotte Beach Park, 400 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte. All proceeds from the event bene“t this amazing program for the kids in the area. It is a 5K and a 10K road race on all paved surfaces, with a $200 overall male/female prize for the 10k and $100 overall male/female for the 5K. Overall youth male/female will have prizes as well. There will also be awards for all the masters categories. There will be a custom “nishers medal for every “nisher of both races. Each participant will also receive an of“cial custom race shirt. There will be food and beer at the after party. There will also be in”atables for the kids, cornhole for the adults and music by DJ Justin of Party Pro DJs. Registration is $45 for 10K and $30 for 5K. To register or for more information, visit www.runsignup.com/ Race/FL/PortCharlotte/ RunLikeABandit5k10k.Annual Tour de North PortThe 9th Annual Tour de North Port, Its the Green Pumpkin!,Ž that will take place at 7 a.m. on Oct. 28, at Imagine High School, 2575 Sycamore St., North Port. A fundraiser event sponsored by People for Trees, a nonprofit native tree advocacy group since 1997, the Tour de North Port is not a race but an organized bicycle ride where cyclists follow a 15, 35, or 65-mile route through North Port that highlights the citys parks and natural settings. The ride includes breakfast, lunch, rest stops, and SAG support. Advance registration is $40 (www. peoplefortrees.com) or $45 at door. For more information, contact Alice White at 941-426-9752 or email treelady12001@ yahoo.com. NEWS & NOTES MEDICAL2030 $2000 Sign on BONUS!! SOLARIS HEALTHCARE is now HiringCNAs : Full Time & Weekends NURSES: PRN Apply: solarishealthcare.vikus.net CNAs, HHAs and CaregiversFind New Clients by Advertising Your Services in the Senior Directory Every Wednesday in The Sun Newspapers. This Feature Publishes in Charlotte, Sarasota, and Desoto Counties. Market Yourself Reach 150,000 Readers! 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The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 7North Port Yoga + Wellness Studio hosted a summer open house August 3, including free 45-minute demonstrations with chair yoga, all levels yoga, meditation 101, yoga with Nidra, as well as ongoing massage therapy and energy healing mini-sessions throughout the day. For more information on class scheduling and other events hosted by North Port Yoga + Wellness visit www.northportyoga.org.North Port Yoga + Wellness hosts summer open house FEELING FIT PHOTOS BY TAMI GARCIA Dianne Saywell, yoga instructor, hosted a free, 45-minute chair yoga demonstration. Martha Case, left, receives assistance from Diane Saywell, while stretching during chair yoga at North Port Yogas recently held summer open house. Those who attended the free chair yoga demonstration follow the lead of Dianne Saywell, instructor. Amy Osborne, owner and studio director, stretches her arm above her while participating in a yoga pose. Amy Osborne, right, and her mother Bea participate in several yoga poses during the 45-minute session. Bea Osborne utilizes a Pilates toning ring during the 45-minute chair yoga session. Martha Case uses a toning ring. By MARIE MCCULLOUGHTHE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRERPHILADELPHIA „ Unthinkable until a few years ago, the practice of putting hepatitis C-infected organs into uninfected patients has been embraced by the transplant world as a way to whittle long waiting lists for life-saving kidneys, livers, hearts and lungs. The main reason for this about-face is simple: New, easy-to-tolerate antiviral drugs with better than 95 percent effectiveness have transformed the treatment of hepatitis C, a virus that can slowly destroy the liver. A small but growing body of research by the University of Pennsylvania and other pioneers shows these medications can cure hep C infection in transplant patients who accept infected organs, typically with just four to 12 weeks of therapy. At the same time, the opioid crisis has meant there are more organs available from people with hep C, which can be spread by the use of injection drugs. Now, the question is whether this approach should continue to be studied in clinical trials, or opened right away to the 114,000 Americans awaiting transplants. Patients are told about the potential risks of accepting organs with the virus and do not lose their place on transplant lists if they decline. At least one transplant center, at the University of Washington, is not holding off. It announced in June that all heart transplant patients will be offered suitable hearts from hep C-infected donors. Infected hearts may eventually account for as many as eight of the 48 heart transplants UW performs annually, it said in a press release. Greater donor-organ availability means faster transplants for people on the wait list „ and shorter waits are associated with better patient outcomes,Ž said Shin Lin, a UW cardiologist and heart transplant specialist. Paul E. Sax, an infectious disease specialist at Harvard Medical School, favors such fast adoption. There are advances in medicine that are so dramatic that theyre obvious,Ž he said. This has to move quickly into standard of care.Ž But a committee convened by the American Society of Transplantation urges a go-slower approach. The 15-member panel, including Penn liver transplant specialist David S. Goldberg, last year published a review that concluded more studies are needed to fully understand the long-term risks and bene“ts. I know there are some centers that think its the right thing to doŽ to offer hep C-infected organs, said lead author Josh Levitsky, a Northwestern University liver transplant specialist. I just would encourage that it be done under research protocols so they can report the data.Ž Niraj Desai, director of the kidney transplant program at Johns Hopkins University, echoed that concern. At this point,Ž he emailed, it is still important that patient outcomes are followed and reported so everyone in the “eld of organ transplantation can learn what the outcomes are in larger numbers of patients than what has so far been reported.Ž So far, small studies „ about 100 published cases in total „ have shown success with all major thoracic organ transplants, even lungs. Among the centers researching the approach besides Penn are Hopkins, Vanderbilt University, Brigham and Womens Hospital, and Massachusetts General Hospital. Penn „ the “rst to leap into the uncharted ethical territory starting two years ago „ has eradicated hep C in 20 kidney transplant patients using the drug Zepatier, donated by Merck. Penn has done the same in 10 heart transplant patients, and is about to expand to lung transplants. So far, no transplant patients hep C has been incurable. Normally, hep C-infected organs are offered only to patients who already have the virus „ or else the precious donations are thrown away. Using such organs would put a small but meaningful dent in the national waiting list, enabling a few thousand additional organ transplants each year, experts estimate. However, both the number and quality of hep C infected organs has been dramatically increasing because so many young people are dying of opioid overdoses. Between 2000 and 2016, the number of infected donors more than tripled, from 181 to 661, one study found. In a blog post for the New England Journal of Medicine, Harvards Sax wrote that using infected organs to save people on the waiting list is a tragic silver lining to the horrible opiate epidemic cloud.Ž Still, questions remain to be answered about the best treatment regimen, when therapy should begin, and how long it should last. Long term safety concerns are also unsettled. We dont have the kind of data we need to say whether patients (who receive infected kidneys) have more rejection,Ž said Penn kidney transplant specialist Peter P. Reese. We cant rule it out. Its possible theres more immunological injury with hep C infection.Ž One potential barrier to widespread adoption may be easing. The cost of the mainstay antiviral therapies has been falling because of competition. Merck, for example, recently slashed the list price for a course of Zepatier by 60 percent, to $21,840. That undercuts the $24,600 price of the newest entrant, Abbvies Mavyret. Medicare would cover antiviral treatment for transplant-induced hep C infection, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services said in an email. Private insurers may also be amenable to the approach, which is more cost-effective in the long run than supportive therapies such as kidney dialysis. These are expensive drugs and it is a factor, but the experience of other centers that have gone down this road has been 100 percent of patients getting covered,Ž UW cardiothoracic surgeon Jason Smith said in the press release. We havent heard of a center getting a denial (from an insurer) that has stood.Ž Experts agree that patients „ in or outside of studies „ must be informed of the small risk of transmitting an infection that does not respond to antiviral drug treatment and goes on to cause harmful liver inflammation. But Robert S. Brown Jr., director of the liver transplant center at Weill Cornell Medical College, put that risk in perspective. The failure rate of these drugs is 3 percent,Ž he said in an article on the health website Healio. The risk of dying on the waiting list is greater than that. It is certainly not an ethical issue in terms of risk-benefit.Ž Kiran Shelat, 65, of Yardley, agrees. The infected kidney he received two years ago at Penn freed him from debilitating dialysis and restored his ability to enjoy life „ to exercise, hike, and travel with his wife. Of course, people should make an informed decision,Ž said the recently retired civil engineer. But at the same time, people should not fear it. Thats my message.ŽNew hepatitis C drugs mean diseased organs can be used for transplants 941-624-4500zusmaneyecarecenter.comadno=50538599 Team Eye ConsultantTampa Bay Rays and Charlotte Stone CrabsVOTED BEST OPHTHALMOLOGIST 2011-20152015 Ricardo Gauthier, Au.D Doctor of Audiology 941.505.0400 The Best of Charlotte for the Past 10 Years!We offer a complete range of audiology services for our clients including the following: We participate in most insurance programs adno=50538593100 Madrid Blvd Suite 214 Punta Gorda, FL 33950www.harboraudiology.netRicardo Gauthier, Au.D Doctor of Audiology We participate in most insurance programs

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Page 8 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018By MELISSA HEALYLOS ANGELES TIMESMaybe its the elephants genes that never forget. In addition to having great memories, elephants are known for having a very low incidence of cancer. In what might seem a wild mashup of the SyFi channel and National Geographic, new research has uncovered a surprising factor that protects elephants against the dread disease: a gene that had gone dormant in their mammalian ancestors, but got turned back on as their evolving bodies grew ever bigger. Scientists call it a zombie geneŽ „ cue the chilling music here „ a reanimated pseudogene that kills cells when expressed.Ž The zombie gene is not just a curiosity. Along with elephants, several kinds of whales as well as bats and the naked mole rat share enviably minuscule rates of cancer. Biologists suspect that each of those species has evolved a different strategy to ward off malignancies, and they want to understand them all. In time, they might “nd ways to approximate those strategies in humans and drive down our vulnerability to cancer. Thats not easy,Ž said Vincent J. Lynch, who led the research published this week in the journal Cell Reports. Nor, he added, would it always be safe. After all, mechanisms that thwart fast-growing cells or turbocharge cellular-repair machinery have evolved over countless generations in “ne balance with other checks and balances, Lynch said. Transfer one of these mechanisms willy-nilly to another species, and it would very likely run amok, he said. But if you dont do the research, youll never know,Ž added Lynch, a geneticist and evolutionary biologist at the University of Chicago. So Lynchs team went looking for LIF (short for Leukemia Inhibiting Factor) genes in 53 mammals, including the African elephant, the bowhead and minke whales, bats and naked mole rats. In most species, they found a single active LIF gene. But in the modern African elephant „ as well as in the manatee and the rock hyrax, both distant cousins of the elephant „ they found between seven and 11 additional copies of the LIF gene, called pseudogenes. In every species but the elephant, these LIF genes and their extra duplicates were inactive: That is, they didnt turn on or off to produce proteins. If they had been active in the past, their function had been phased out. In the march of evolution, they had fallen by the wayside and been left for dead, like vast stretches of every species genomes. But in the elephant, Lynch and his colleagues saw that one of the additional copies of the LIF gene was active. When the researchers induced cell stress „ a step that would have led to cancer in most other animals „ a widely recognized tumor-suppressor mechanism turned on. That, in turn, activated the LIF6 pseudogene. Stirred to life, the zombie gene proceeded to carry out its grim program, entering the internal machinery of damaged cells and ordering them to kill themselves. In elephant tissue, the damaged cells turned themselves inside-out, and cancer was thwarted before it could gain any momentum. And when the researchers suppressed the action of the LIF6 zombie gene,Ž they found that stressed cells were more likely to form tumors in elephant tissue. Its a fascinating study,Ž said molecular and cell biologist Vera Gorbunova of the University of Rochester in New York, who has studied the mechanisms by which naked mole rats thwart cancerous cells. The collective research of Lynchs group also raises intriguing questions,Ž said Gorbunova, who was not involved in the new work. The group has offered evidence that in their evolution, all complex creatures have made trade-offs, such as taking on genes (including anti-cancer genes) that increase their life span but reduce their reproductive prowess, or vice versa. The reanimation of the LIF6 gene may be one way in which elephants have countered what would seem to be a growing threat as they evolved to become bigger, said Lynch. How? Biological reasoning would suggest that bigger animals would have a greater propensity than very small ones to develop cancer „ mainly because they are made up of more cells. Theoretically, the more cells there are, the higher the odds that one or more will go rogue and seed a tumor. That is true within species: big dogs (and tall humans) are more likely to develop cancer than smaller members of their species. But strangely, very large species are not, in general, more likely to develop cancer than are small species „ an observation made by epidemiologist Richard Peto that has come to be known as Petos Paradox. In part, elephants and their extinct relatives (proboscideans) may have resolved Petos ParadoxŽ by giving LIF6 new life as a killer of would-be cancer cells, wrote Lynch and his colleagues. Apparently, not all zombies are to be feared.Why is cancer so rare in elephants? They might thank their zombie gene TNS PHOTOElephants are known for having a very low incidence of cancer. New research has uncovered a surprising factor that protects elephants against the dread disease: a gene that had gone dormant in their mammalian ancestors, but got turned back on as their evolving bodies grew ever bigger. By JUDI LIGHT HOPSON, EMMA H. HOPSON and TED HAGENTRIBUNE NEWS SERVICEDo you feel a lot of anger and disappointment? Does your temper get the best of you? Or, do you watch the news, wondering if the world is coming to an end? Most of us can get “red up over a lot of things. However, these extreme emotions can put a lot of strain on our relationships. I was in a bad mood for over a year,Ž says a friend of ours well call Rebecca. I was involved in a lawsuit at my workplace.Ž Rebecca says her bad mood nearly wrecked a couple of friendships. While no one should ignore societys problems or danger in the world, its critical to guard our emotional health. Having a healthy mind and spirit helps us defeat negativity and danger. These tips can help: € Strive to be the adult in the room. If something terrible has happened, you certainly need to acknowledge this. But, watch your words carefully so you help to stabilize the emotions of others. € Realize that self-control helps you feel better. Keep in mind that if you speak with calmness and strive to make good decisions, you wont feel as baf”ed or upset. € Act out of sound logic when things get rough. Even if you feel like screaming at someone, hold your fire. You can always show anger later. Once youve screamed at a friend or relative, this is tough to take back. Ive learned to devise a plan of action for everything,Ž says a teacher well call Mrs. Jackson. She often helps the principal in her school deal with unruly students. When I sit down and come up with a cool-headed plan of action, this helps me talk more calmly with the students.Ž She told us, Kids are often stressed by problems before they get to school. Thats why I tell them we can work these problems out. I try to offer hope and help them maintain a sense of humor, regardless of how bad the issues are.Ž Students, employees and married couples who feel lots of emotions can send out a ripple effect. To be the sane voice in any situation, take control by voicing hope and a clear-headed approach to “xing whats wrong. For example, tell someone: Im sure we can work this out, so lets look at our options here. Were not going to attack a person. Instead, lets go after the problem and “x it.Ž When we get extremely emotional, we are usually trying to go afterŽ a person. But as long as were doing a character assassination on someone, we usually arent making a dent in correcting the problem. I dealt with a student stealing another students money last week,Ž says Mrs. Jackson. When I drilled down into the problem, I found out the student who stole “ve dollars had not eaten in two days. Her parents had left town on a trip and failed to leave her any money.Ž Mrs. Jackson said she had a long talk with the student over stealing. When I demonstrated how she might have come to someone to ask for help, she was shocked. She told me she didnt know how to ask for help from other people. She really didnt know this was a viable option.Ž When you calmly act as the adult in the room, so to speak, you de“ne good choices. This takes practice; but, the more you do it, the more adept youll become at overcoming rocky emotions.Avoid extreme emotions to improve relationships Cancer support groupFawcett Memorial Hospital, an HCA affiliate, now offers a cancer support group for cancer patients, their families and caregivers. The group meets the last Wednesday of each month from noon to 1:30 p.m. with lunch provided. Research shows that social support has benefits for cancer patients, those recovering from treatment and their family and loved ones by reducing anxiety and stress, emotional distress and depression, fatigue and the experience of pain while improving mood, self-image, ability to cope with stress and feelings of control. In addition, having a supportive social network can help with recovery and adjusting to life after treatment. The support group allows those experiencing a cancer diagnosis to cope with the emotional aspects by providing a safe place to share their feelings and challenges while allowing people to learn from others facing similar situations. Cancer patients and their family members are encouraged to attend. Active participation is not required, listeners are welcome. Physicians and other health professionals will periodically speak to the group on cancer related topics. For more information or to RSVP, please call Fawcetts oncology patient navigators at 941-624-8318.Lung cancer support groupThe North Port Lung Cancer Support Group meets from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. the third Wednesday of every month at Sarasota Memorial ER in North Port along Toledo Blade Boulevard. The group is for people with lung cancer along with their caregivers. No RSVP nor charge is required. For more information, call or email Marc Cohen at 941-240-8989 or marcscohen@aol.com.Lung Matters support groupLung Matters support group meets from 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. on the third Tuesday of each month. Call Port Charlotte Rehab Center for locations and more information at 941-235-8011.NAMI Family Support groupsPort Charlotte: The National Alliance on Mental Illness will have a Family Support Group meeting from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 1532 Forrest Nelson Blvd., Port Charlotte. This is for family members and caregivers of individuals with a mental illness. For more information, contact Karen at 941-456-3100. North Port: The family support group meets from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. on the fourth Monday of the month at Anchor House, 3555 Bobcat Village Center Road, North Port. The National Alliance on Mental Illness family support group is a peer-led group for family members and caregivers of adults living with mental illness. All meetings are free and con“dential. For more information, call 941-3769361 or visit the website at namisarasotacounty.org. Venice: The family support group meets from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on the “rst Wednesday of the month at Venice Health Park, 1201 Jacaranda Blvd., room 1283. The National Alliance on Mental Illness family support group is a peer-led group for family members and caregivers of adults living with mental illness. All meetings are free and con“dential. For more information, call 941-3769361 or visit the website at namisarasotacounty.org. Sarasota: The family support group meets at 6:30 p.m. on the third Thursday of the month at the Beneva Christian Church, 4835 S. Beneva Road, Sarasota. For more information, call 941-3769361 or visit the website at namisarasotacounty.org.NAMI Connection Recovery Support GroupThe National Alliance on Mental Illness meets from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.. the “rst and third Tuesday of the month at the Mental Health Community Center (Prospect House), 240 S. Tuttle Ave., Unit B, Sarasota. Connection is a recovery support group program for adults living with mental illness providing a place that offers respect, understanding, encouragement and hope. It offers a casual and relaxed approach to sharing the challenges and successes of coping with mental illness. All meetings are free and con“dential. Call 941-376-9361 or visit the website at namisarasotacounty.org for more information.Neuro Challenge for Parkinsons patients, caregiversSt. Davids, 401 S. Broadway, Englewood, is welcoming Neuro Challenge, a non-pro“t organization dedicated to improving the quality of life of people with Parkinsons and their caregivers. Neuro Challenge provides ongoing monthly support groups, educational programs, and individualized care, advising to help empower people with Parkinsons and their caregivers with A Better Approach to Parkinsons. They will meet in St. Davids Parish Hall every the third Friday of every month at 10 a.m. Neuro Challenge serves Manatee, Sarasota and Charlotte counties … there are an estimated 9,000 people with Parkinsons in the three county service area. For more information, call 941-926-6413, 941-474-3140 or go to www.neurochallenge. org. Neuro Challenge is happy to include people with other neurological illnesses „ ie: MS; ALS; etc. SUPPORT GROUPS Having Problems With Your Dentures?100 Madrid Blvd., Ste. 414 Punta Gorda 941-575-2626www.smilesofpuntagorda.comDifficulty Eating? Sore Gums? Wobbly or Loose? Messy Adhesives? Denture Stabilization Affordable! Complimentary Initial Consultation!Are you concerned about zinc content in your denture adhesives? For more information on zinc and your denture adhesives visit www.ada.org adno=50538605

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The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 9By BRADLEY J. FIKESTHE SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNESAN DIEGO „ Women whose mothers lived to 90 years have a 25 percent greater chance to also live that long, compared with those whose mothers didnt, according to a new study led by University of California, San Diego researchers. Moreover, the women achieved this extreme longevity while staying healthy. They had no major chronic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, hip fracture or physical limitations. When both parents survived to 90 years, the advantage jumped to 38 percent, said the study, published Wednesday in the journal Age and Ageing. If only the father lived to be 90, there was no increase in healthy longevity for the daughter. These results are probably a combination of genetics, environment and behavior, said UCSDs Aladdin Shadyab, who led the study. It examined the health records of a racially and ethnically diverse population of more than 20,000 women. The study used information from the Womens Health Initiative, a large, long-term study on major risk factors for chronic diseases. It enrolled more than 160,000 post-menopausal American women when it was launched in 1993. Since only women are tracked in the initiative, the study did not examine men or parental life span effects on sons. The initiative has yielded a wealth of information about womens health, including the effects of hormone therapy, diet and supplementation with calcium and vitamin D. Previous research jibes with the studys “ndings, including health in the greatly long-lived, the study said. In the New England Centenarian Study, offspring of centenarians had 78 percent, 83 percent and 86 percent lower risk of developing myocardial infarction, stroke and diabetes, respectively, than a similarly aged referent cohort,Ž the study said. A lot of factors go into total life expectancy. This effect of long-lived parents adds an additional calculation. For a baseline comparison, 34 percent of all American women 65 years old will live to 90, according to the Social Security Administration. The increase in life expectancy is calculated compared to this base. Just 22 percent of men of that age will reach 90. In addition, total life expectancy has grown over the decades. In 1965, just 25 percent of 65-year-old American women lived to 90, and only 10 percent of the men. In addition to outside factors such as exercise and diet, researchers in recent years have found some genetic traits that appear more commonly in those who achieve very long lifespans. There are speci“c genes that predict your ability to live longer, which these women likely inherited from their parents,Ž Shadyab said. Researchers dont know, however, why the mothers longevity seems to play a more important role in a daughters lifespan than the fathers. Further, the women whose parents lived longer had higher socioeconomic status, meaning that they were more educated with higher income,Ž he said. And growing up in a high socioeconomic environment predicts your chances of living longer and aging well.Ž Those in high-income households tend to have access to better health care and education on healthy habits and presumably those in”uences play a role. Its possible that the parents who lived to 90 also practiced good health habits that they passed along to their daughters. More studies are needed to determine how genetic factors interact with behavioral factors like physical activity and socioeconomic status to in”uence our future aging outcomes,Ž Shadyab said. Other studies have looked at health in aging. In San Diego, the ongoing WellderlyŽ study tracks men and women who have reached their 80s and beyond, to look for genetic and lifestyle factors that may in”uence their longevity. If women want to know how the results apply to them, their present age makes a difference. Older people have a better chance of great longevity than younger people. Thats because some younger people will die prematurely, whether by illness or injury, and never reach old age. By de“nition, the elderly have already survived these dangers. For young women, this means that environmental and behavioral patterns are much more important to attaining extreme longevity than for those who are already older.Why your mothers age could be the key to longevity TNS PHOTOAccording to a new study, women whose mothers lived to 90 years have a 25 percent greater chance to also live that long, compared with those whose mothers didnt. By KADIA GOBANEWSDAY (TNS)A recent summer day found Nicole Oliva sitting at the edge of her swimming pool in Holbrook, not dangling her feet over the waters edge but wriggling, twisting and willing her legs „ slathered in hair conditioner „ into a 30-pound silicone mermaid tail. Step 1: Oliva spreads the tail out on a mat in front of her, positioning it so that she can “nesse her way into it. Step 2: She applies the conditioner to both legs, from her feet to her thighs. Step 3: Oliva sits poolside and puts one leg at a time into the tail, pushing her feet into the mono“n at the end that resembles a ”ipper. Step 4: With her pelvis raised off the ground and her elbows planted on the mat, she pulls the mermaid tail up from her knees toward her waist. Step 5: The shimmying begins, as Oliva adjusts the tail to her contours and pulls at the silicone until it is wrinkle-free. Oliva said she knows when shes done based on how the tail feels against her skin. What used to require a half hour now takes Oliva a little less than 10 minutes. For some, the magical world of mermaids means more than an animated Disney character. Its a lifestyle that encourages camaraderie and a sense of belonging. That was so much the case for Oliva that in 2016 she started a Facebook page and created a pod „ a group of men and women who perform or practice as mermaids and mermen „ that has grown from seven people to about 30 active members on Long Island. As a kid, Ive always been a pretty good swimmer,Ž said Oliva, 28. When I was younger, I would tie those detachable Velcro skirts that come with bathing suits around my legs and practice swimming like a mermaid.Ž Six years ago, while designing a costume, Oliva set out to create her own mermaids tail. Her research and Google searches revealed an entire community of mermaids, in pods from North Carolina to Singapore and at mermaid festivals that have sprung up in Michigan, Georgia and North Carolina and include the annual and long-running Mermaid Parade on Coney Island. Olivas pod meets every other month for group swims at aquatic facilities, public pools or members homes. They practice technical swimming and theatrical performance stunts, such as front and back ”ips, barrel rolls and ”uke stands „ which involve them standing on the tip of their mermaid tail. They also work on making underwater bubble rings, bubble hearts and bubble kisses that are part of their shows at the Long Island Aquarium in Riverhead. On Mermaid Mondays,Ž from July to Labor Day, visitors can pay $39.95 to swim with the mermaids in one of four daily sessions or interact with them on dry land during meet-and-greets. In the real-life mermaid world, pod members have alternate identities and speak in mermaid jargon. Oliva goes by the name Mermaid Aria, and others are known as Mermaid Marina, Mermaid Caylis and Mermaid Rose. Helpers or assistants are known as mer-tenders, boyfriends are merwranglers, and if you are a member of the mermaid collective, you are merfolk. Kai Wagner, 27, who identi“es as a transgender man, joined the Long Island pod three years ago but has been interested in the mermaid lifestyle for “ve years. The Lindenhurst resident has gender-speci“c mermaid personas. As a woman, she is Mermaid Pearl, as a man he is Merman Atlas. I love the aesthetics of both lady mermaids and male mermaids,Ž said Wagner, who owns and operates Spoonful of Sugar Entertainment, a staf“ng agency that provides mermaid and princess personas for private events, birthday parties and the Long Island Aquarium. His company employs four mermaids, plus Wagner, at the aquarium in Riverhead, all of whom belong to a micro-pod within the larger Long Island pod. Mermaid Mondays began in 2016 and attract visitors from as far away as New Jersey, said Darlene Puntillo, the aquariums spokeswoman. Weve also introduced a dry meetand-greet, which has been very popular among young girls,Ž Puntillo said. The aquarium mermaids said their relationships extend beyond just being co-workers. It brings everyone together,Ž said Daniella Tiranno, 26, of Bayport, who recalled having to lie face down as her co-worker wrestled with the zipper on the back of her mermaid tail. The “rst time Tiranno, aka Mermaid Marina, tried on her tail, she said it didnt register that she wouldnt be able to walk, and she quickly fell to the mercy of her mertenders. It feels good to swim with people you know and trust,Ž she said. Though Olivas pod is relatively new to Long Island, the world is well-familiar with mermaids. Half-man, half-“sh legends date to Greek mythology, with characters such as Triton, the “sh-tailed sea god. Jules Vernes 1870s novel, Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,Ž also featured underwater creatures that resemble men. Modern-day mermaid enthusiasts also take inspiration from the 1950s, when Disneyland employed eight mermaids to launch the new Submarine Voyage attraction in California, and more recently from Hannah Mermaid and Mermaid Kariel, who have been featured in a national advertising campaign for Atlantis Paradise Island, a resort in the Bahamas. Long Islands pod of mermaids gets together once a month to craft headdresses and shell bikini tops or teach each other tricks. Their second skinŽ usually consists of neoprene, silicone and spandex. Tails can weigh up to 60 pounds and range from $100 to $4,000. Some mermaids use monofins, a “nlike rubber or plastic accessory that “ts inside the “n portion of the mermaids tail and helps them swim underwater. Many of the mermaids purchase their tails but create their own shell bikini tops for a more hands-on approach. Crafting is a big part of the mermaid lifestyle and allows merfolk bonding time with one another. The process of making a top begins by applying a thick acrylic paint to the lions-paw shells. Next, iridescent faux gemstones are af“xed with an adhesive. In the “nal stages, a waterproof sealant is applied and then a decorative strap using “shnets, imitation pearls or ”owers to keep the top in place. Sinead Atkinson, 26, of Hauppauge, is a substitute teacher and a member of the Long Island pod. Her elaborate, 26-pound tail is a silicone and neoprene hybrid with iridescent, multicolored resin scales that she bought used for $950 (it would have cost $1,500 if purchased new). Like many of her fellow mermaids, Atkinson „ she was a student at SUNY New Paltz when she discovered a video of someone making a mermaid tail out of spandex „ has a background in theater and costume design. Ive always had a childhood connection with mermaids and water,Ž said Atkinson, whose alter ego is Mermaid Mist and whose younger sister, Mairead (aka Mermaid Caylis), 23, is also a member of the pod. This is my way of reconnecting with that.Ž For Hannah Palmer, 31, who last year moved from Aurora, Colorado, to Hicksville, with a stop in Florida, camaraderie and her new pod family are everything. She said she applied dozens of times to be a princess at Disney World in Orlando, Florida, before she “nned-upŽ last year for her “rst mermaid swim at a birthday party for a 1-year-old. I got in the water and was like, Oh, this is where I have always been meant to be,Ž said Palmer, who is known as Mermaid Meara. Members of the pod said relatives, friends and co-workers have been supportive of their mermaid personas. Ive always been a creative person, being into theater and costuming and mermaid lore as a kid, so when I took that “rst leap, people were very happy for me,Ž Atkinson said. There is still an element of surprise when I tell people what I do. The reaction is usually somewhere along the lines of, You do what, and get paid for it? But a lot of people think its cool.Ž Wagner said those he knows have taken it in stride. Its more or less I have always been the black sheep (in my family). So something that is odd or strange coming from me isnt new,Ž Wagner said. Sometimes they ask me for pictures, because its an interesting subject to bring up to people ƒ Something like Look at what my child, niece/nephew, grandchild does. It is somehow simultaneously bragging about me while also making a spectacle of me.ŽSignature dolphin kickMermaids need to look good underwater, but they also need to be strong swimmers. A strong core is an important part of performing the signature dolphin kick, the only viable swim movement for mermaids, whose tails impede the movement of their legs. The whipping motion propels them forward while their legs are bound by fabric. All the mermaids in the Long Island pod said its important to stretch for three to “ve minutes before entering the water. Breathing techniques are just as important as the athleticism, and the ability to hold your breath is key as a performer. Wagner said he can hold his breath for 90 seconds, enough time for him to swim a lap in an Olympic-size pool or 50 meters. Aside from the rigors of performance, being a mermaid has helped some in the Long Island pod to overcome life challenges. Mary Grecco, 26, said she turned to swimming and video games as early as elementary school to cope with being bullied. The combination, along with her childhood fascination with the movies SplashŽ and The Little Mermaid,Ž pulled her into a life a mermaiding, she said. My demons tried to drown me, but they did not know I could breathe underwater,Ž said Grecco, who lives in Centereach and credits the mermaid community for helping her feel better about herself. She goes by the name Mermaid Rose and works with children with disabilities. They call me Miss Mermaid,Ž Grecco said. To them, its not a hobby. To them, Im a mermaid and I leave the water and take care of them every day.Ž The mermaids in Long Islands pod all agree that children are their biggest advocates and fans. You believe you are a mermaid, but they convince you,Ž Wagner said. And for those who remain unconvinced? I just give them a little splash with my tail,Ž he said.Dive in to the fascinating lifestyles of Long Islands mermaids TNS PHOTOLong Island Mermaid Pod member Nicole Oliva, aka Mermaid Aria, helps Merman Andrew Weinstein put his tail on as they prepare to swim in Nicoles backyard pool on the morning of July 26. MERMAID-SPEAKClamtini: bikini Fintastic: fantastic Merfolk: mermaid people (men and women) Mermazing: amazing Mersona: persona Mervelous: marvelous Mersaurus: thesaurus Mertender: assistant or helper Merwrangler: boyfriend Sand dollars: currency Shelfie: selfie Shellabrate: celebrate Shellphone: cellphone „Source: Long Island mermaid pod

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Page 10 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018PROVIDED BY MCCAn alternative to eyeglasses, contact lenses are widely used across the globe. Contact lenses provide the inconspicuous clarity many people desire, and the wide array of materials used to make lenses coupled with the assortment of styles of contact lenses have helped to make them more comfortable than ever before. It may seem like contact lenses are a relatively recent invention, but theyve actually been around far longer than one would think. As far back as 1508, Leonardo da Vinci illustrated the concept of contact lenses. Three hundred years later a British astronomer named Sir John Herschel conceptualized the practical lens design. First designs of contact lenses covered the entire eye and were made from glass. By 1948, plastic contact lenses came on the scene and were designed to cover only the eyes cornea. Through the 20th century, contacts continued to evolve. It is believed that now more than 30 million people in the United States alone wear contact lenses. Twothirds of those wearers are female, says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Because contact lenses come in direct contact with the eye, maintenance is especially important. Medical professionals say that teenagers as young as 13 may be able to wear contacts. Its never too early to share the proper care procedures. The following are contact lens care guidelines, courtesy of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. € Wash hands with soap and water and dry with a lint-free towel before handling contact lenses. € Never store lenses in water (tap or ster ile). Contact lenses must be stored in special disinfecting lens solution. € Saliva is not a sterile solution and should not be used to moisten dry contacts. € Minimize lenses contact with water. Remove them before swimming. € Always follow the recommended lens cleaning and storage guidelines from an eye care professional and the contact solution manufacturer. € Many professionals advise you to rub and rinse contact lenses even if the solution used is a no-rubŽ variety. € Leave empty contact cases open to air dry. € Replace storage cases and contact lenses as advised by the manufacturer or your eye care professional. Cases can be a source of contamination if they are cracked, dirty or damaged. € Do not allow the tip of the solution bottle to come in contact with any surface, and keep the bottle tightly closed when not in use. Following these recommendations and adhering to proper hygiene can prevent eye infections and injury.Maintenance a must when wearing contact lenses PHOTO PROVIDEDBy GREGORY WHYTETHE CULTURAL CENTER OF CHARLOTTE COUNTYS FITNESS CENTERAccording to the World Health Organization more than 1.9 billion adults (18 years and older) were overweight in 2016. Of these, over 650 million were obese. Information acquired from other sources also showed that between 2015 and 2016, almost 40 percent of adults in the United States were obese. Being overweight can be dangerous and should be taken seriously. According to WHO, most of the worlds population live in countries where overweight and obesity kill more people than underweight. It should also be kept in mind that ones risk for osteoarthritis, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancers such as liver, colon, kidney, breast, etc., increases with increased body weight. Each year, Americans spend over 60 billion dollars to lose weight. This price tag includes such things as gym membership, personal training services, the services of weight reduction specialists and programs and even the foods used in the weight reduction process. The sad new is, according to the CDC, we are losing the war w ith overweight and obesity. For over 25 years, the weight and pot belly reduction component of the Fusion One holistic health system has been providing services, the quality of which could be considered exceptional. The effectiveness of the program is due, primarily, to the following: € It is comprehensive enough to address the many causative factors of the overweight condition. € It makes use of weight reduction principles and practices that are backed by science and those that have passed the test of time. € Drugs and surgical operations are not a part of the program. Furthermore, the food and other items that the program advocates are natural and friendly to those using them. € The use of pre-determined timeframes (Lose 10 pounds in two weeks, etc.) are not used by the program. € The functional elements of the program are quite expansive and include: knowledge of weight reduction, exercise, nutrition and proper eating, behavior modi“cation and social support. To impart its principles and practices, the Fusion One weight reduction program uses lectures, workshops, classes, personal and special training. Many of these are offered through the Cultural Centers Learning Place and its Fitness Center. Members of the general public are encouraged to visit the Fitness Center to discuss (free of cost) their weight reduction concerns. For more information, visit the Cultural Center at 2280 Aaron St., Port Charlotte or call 941625-4175, ext. 263.Losing weight with Fusion OneContact lense awareness week August 20-24 adno=50538685

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By MARY BERNARDTHE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRERNearly one in “ve U.S. children is obese, according to the most recent estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A new study by Pennsylvania State University that linked overeating to the brains response to food rewards may help to shed light on the national epidemic that can lead to Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and breathing problems. Among the kids in the study, a high responsiveness to food rewards, rather than money, indicated a higher likelihood to overeat and to eat even when they werent hungry. The researchers measured responsiveness using blood-oxygen-level dependent imaging (BOLD) on a functional magnetic resonance imaging scan (fMRI), which indicates the locations in the brain with the most activity. The results remained the same, regardless of the childrens weight and body mass index. (Responsiveness) was happening independently of if the child had obesity, so the parent might not even realize that their child is on a trajectory to overeat,Ž said Shana Adise, coauthor of the study and current post-doctoral fellow at the University of Vermont. Adise worked on the study while completing her Ph.D. at Penn State. Certain food habits as a child, such as an inability to stop eating or a tendency to hide snacks, can indicate an unhealthy relationship with food. Even if the child has a healthy BMI, such habits might precede obesity later in life. Parents should avoid behaviors that put a lot of emphasis on food, such as using food consistently as a reward and, even, restricting kids access to food, said Kathleen Keller, coauthor of the study and an associate professor in the department of nutritional sciences and food science at Penn State. Children are still developing, so this is a really critical period of time,Ž Adise said. Things could become a permanent habit later in life.Ž The 59 children in the study, ages 7 to 11, visited a lab on four occasions. Once, they ate a meal to establish a baseline appetite. That same day, 20 minutes later, they were offered more food to judge their tendency to eat when they arent hungry. Another time, the children were offered a buffet of food to measure their proclivity to overeat. At the “nal session, the fMRI scanned the childrens brains while they played a guessing game and were given either a food, money or neutral reward for a correct answer. The researchers found children whose brains were more excited by food rewards also had a tendency to overeat at the buffet and eat when not hungry. People who are vulnerable to overeating, they are people who value food over other types of rewards,Ž Keller said. Its clearly starting at a time when children are young, before they develop obesity.Ž However, certain eating behaviors might have been exacerbated in the study. By only meeting four times and serving foods that the child may not be exposed to at home, eating habits in the lab may not necessarily mimic normal eating habits perfectly. This is the beginning of the road,Ž Adise said.Study: How kids brains react to food may cause them to overeat PHOTO PROVIDEDResearchers found children whose brains were more excited by a food reward also had a tendency to overeat at the buet and eat when not hungry. Feeling FitPort Charlotte € Punta Gorda € North Port € Englewood € ArcadiaSunday, August 19, 2018www.yoursun.netMy good friend Dr. Johnson stopped by the other day while I was writing the symbols on my chalkboard. Ahha,Ž he exclaimed. Man, woman, birth, death, infinity „ opening line of the old Ben Casey television show.Ž Intoned weekly by actor Sam Jaffe as Dr. Zorba and later by Franchot Tone as Dr. Freeland, the line opened the show with Vince Edwards as an intense but idealistic neurosurgeon serving his residency under chief of neurosurgery Dr. Zorba/Freeland. Ben Casey was my hero,Ž said Dr. Johnson, surly but absolutely PROVIDED BY STATEPOINTNutritious, delicious and low-calorie, vegetables should be the star player of all your meals. But sometimes providing veggies for your family can be time consuming and costly. Luckily, there are a number of simple ways to boost your veggie intake, and it all starts in your grocery stores freezer aisle. € Go frozen: Frozen vegetables are often one of the most affordable options and the quickest to prepare, reducing time spent slicing and dicing on busy weeknights. Whats more, by opting for frozen veggies, your family will likely reduce its food waste. Frozen vegetables are easy to store for long periods of time, and recent studies have found that freezing actually helps lock nutrients in. € Swap it out: Little ones and even some adults can be resistant to certain vegetables at “rst. But there are ways to incorporate them into family meals with no one the wiser. Consider cooking with vegetables that offer the look, feel and taste of traditional starches such as rice, pasta and potatoes. For example, Green Giants frozen Veggie Swap-Ins line, which includes riced veggies, veggie spirals and mashed cauli”ower are easy go-to items in any kitchen for quick family meals. Indeed, 52 percent of American consumers who noted they had purchased Green Giant Swap-Ins products within three months of taking the survey, said they have introduced the product into their kids meals without their kids knowing they werent traditional potatoes, rice and/or pasta, and 49 percent admit to swapping these items for potatoes, rice and pasta one to two times per week. € Be mindful: Dining out can be especially tricky territory for those looking to eat more vegetables. Be mindful of what you order. Read the menu carefully and ask questions. Many restaurants are happy to make substitutions to accommodate your preferences. For example, see if you can replace a side of fries with a garden salad or sauted seasonal vegetables like green beans. € Get creative: Whether youre hosting a barbecue, attending a potluck or simply making your family dinner, consider reducing calories in salads and sides by upping your vegetable intake in these dishes. Make an Italian pasta salad out of zucchini or carrot spirals. Swap out traditional rice with riced cauli”ower to make a simple pilaf. The possibilities are endless.Health & Hope DanMEARNSC TV diagnosis, treatment, healing in an hour PHOTO PROVIDED/Man, woman, birth, death, in“nityEasy ways to boost your familys veggie intake PHOTO PROVIDEDAre you looking to simplify your familys clean-eating routine and increase your vegetable intake? With a few tips and tricks, you can incorporate broccoli, beets, squash and more into your familys diet while saving time and money in the process. DAN | 5 J e nn ifer Gi l pi n ARNPis now accepting e patients in Port Charlotte Call today to schedule an appointment.Same day appoi nt me nt s a l so a v ai l ab l e !941-255-353519531 Cochran Blvd. Port Charlotte, FL 33948 www. MillenniumPhysician .com adno=50538588 2 0 1 8 0 8 1 9 o t e n c 2 1 p d f 1 1 7 A u g 1 8 2 1 : 0 8 : 5 0

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Page 2 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 Feeling FitPresident Michael Beatty Publisher Glen Nickerson Feeling Fit Editor Marie Merchant feelingfit@sun-herald.com 941-206-1135 Medical Advertising Executives Bibi R. Gafoor 941-258-9528 bgafoor@sun-herald.com Jim Commiskey 941-258-9526 jcommiskey@sun-herald.com Elaine Schaefer eschaefer@sun-herald.com 941-205-6409 Deadlines: Support groups and News & Notes are published as space permits. To be included send the information to feelingfit@sun-herald.com. Deadlines for listings are the Monday prior to publication.By PAUL SISSONTHE SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE Though its name sounds like a trendy workout craze, Medicares new step therapyŽ policy has nothing to do with getting people in their 60s to move their feet. Sometimes called fail “rst,Ž step therapy is the term used when a health insurance company forces doctors to prescribe the cheapest medication “rst, providing access to more expensive alternatives only if the “rst option doesnt get results. The U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services recently announced that privately administered Medicare Advantage plans will be allowed to create step therapy policies for drugs delivered in doctors of“ces and other outpatient settings. Such measures are already allowed in Medicare Part DŽ medication plans. Allowing step therapy for doctor-administrated drugs represents a significant change, especially since this class of medication often is used to treat serious illness such as cancer, said Juliette Cubanski, director of the Program on Medicare at the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation. This is de“nitely a fundamental change in terms of giving plans more authority,Ž Cubanski said. I would think that health plans would tread carefully because they dont want to end up driving customers away.Ž Sarah Emond, executive vice president and chief operating of“cer for the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review in Boston, said it will be incumbent on health insurance companies to make sure that theyre not ignoring evidence which shows that one drug can deliver better results than another even though it costs more. You would de“nitely want something like this to be anchored in solid evidence,Ž Emond said. The federal government touted the move as a positive for the millions of Medicare recipients nationwide who feel drug prices are too high, saying in a statement that the move empowers patients with more choicesŽ and that it shows that the Trump administration is taking action to lower drug prices.Ž But many have been quick to say the change could slow down the often-frantic process of “nding the right drug among many options to treat deadly diseases. In its own statement, the American Cancer Society said allowing step therapy for Medicare Part B plans could erect barriers to care for cancer patientsŽ while the American College of Rheumatology called the decision an affront to Americas sickest Medicare patients.Ž Those concerns, though, rub up against public outrage over drug prices. According to Health System Tracker, a service of the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation, Americans continue to pay drastically-higher prices for drugs. For example, the average 2014 price for a 28-day supply of Humira, a drug used to treat rheumatoid arthritis and other conditions, was $2,669 in the United States, a sum that is 96 percent higher than the average paid in the United Kingdom. Some private health plans already employ step therapy for some drugs on their formularies. A 2011 analysis in the Journal of Managed Care and Specialty Pharmacy, which examined the evidence in 14 different step therapy studies, found that forcing patients to take the cheapest drug, with the exception of antipsychotic medications used to treat conditions such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, does save money. However, many have questioned the ethics of fail-“rst policies. Noting that many states have limited step therapy amid doctor and patient stories of long waits for approval after “rst-step drugs fail or side effects appeared, researchers argued in a 2014 paper that step therapy can pose ethical problems when forcing a patient to take a cheaper drug could cause signi“cant harm such as when treating cancer, mental health, or seizure conditions.Ž Medicares step therapy rule does give doctors and patients an out, allowing them to request an exception to a fail-“rst requirement and get a decision within 72 hours. Denied exceptions can be appealed to Medicare. Any Medicare Advantage plan that decides to implement a step therapy program must notify all current policy holders of the change in writing, and Medicare has extended the amount of time that it will allow bene“ciaries to change plans in 2019. But the big picture remains a signi“cant issue. The whole point of step therapy is to reduce drug costs and, while experts agree that the approach could cut costs somewhat, none predicted price shrinkage large enough that the average Medicare bene“ciary would notice a signi“cant difference. A much more fundamental re-think of the way Medicare pays for drugs is necessary to start driving costs down closer to what the citizens of other countries pay, said Kristof Stremikis, director of market analysis and insight at the California Health Care Foundation. Currently, he noted, Medicare uses a drugs average price in the wider market as a baseline for what it will pay. But the reasons why those prices are what they are are often murky. If the government truly wants to make a big dent in drug prices, unpacking those prices and demanding more transparency from drug companies will be necessary. The baseline we have today does not necessarily incorporate an objective assessment of a drugs value, and until that happens, the game isnt fundamentally changed. Thats where significant savings are hiding,Ž Stremikis said. Cubanski, the Kaiser expert, agreed. She noted that the new step-therapy policy does require insurance plans to pass 50 percent of money saved by requiring the use of cheaper drugs onto patients, but, in the aggregate, she said, no one should expect a reversal of ever-increasing drug price trends. Its another opportunity to try and wring some savings out of Medicare, but, just because theyre given this opportunity to use step therapy doesnt mean drug prices are coming down,Ž Cubanski said.Is Medicares latest change a step too far?By MATTHEW PERRONEAP HEALTH WRITERWASHINGTON „ U.S. health of“cials on Thursday approved a new generic version of EpiPen, the emergency allergy medication that triggered a public backlash due to its rising price tag. The new version from Teva Pharmaceuticals is the “rst that will be interchangeable with the original penlike injector sold by Mylan. The Food and Drug Administration announced the approval in a statement. EpiPen injections are stocked by schools and parents nationwide to treat children with severe allergies. They are used in emergencies to stop potentially fatal allergic reactions to insect bites and stings and foods like nuts and eggs. EpiPen maker Mylan has dominated the $1 billion market for the shots for two decades. Several other companies sell competing shots containing the drug epinephrine, but they arent heavily marketed or prescribed by doctors. In 2016, Congress blasted Mylan in letters and hearings for raising EpiPens to $600 for a twopack, a “ve-fold increase over nearly a decade. The company responded by launching its own lower-cost generic version for $300. Mylan continues to sell both versions at those prices, according to data from Elseviers Gold Standard Drug Database. Tevas generic shot will be the “rst version that pharmacists can substitute even when doctors prescribe the original EpiPen. A Teva spokeswoman declined to comment on the drugs price but said it would launch in the coming months.Ž Generic drugs can be priced as much as 80 percent lower than the original product. But those price cuts usually appear after several companies have launched competing versions. Tevas bid to sell a generic EpiPen faced multiple setbacks at the FDA, which rejected the companys initial application in 2016. While epinephrine is a decades-old generic drug, Teva and other would-be competitors struggled to replicate the EpiPens auto-injector device.US approves new generic competitor to EpiPen By KELLY POMERVILLE CHARLOTTE BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CAREEstablished more than 40 years ago in 1976, The Florida Council for Community Mental Health (FCCMH or the Council) is a nonpro“t, 501(c)(3) statewide association of communitybased mental health and substance abuse treatment providers. The number one priority for the FCCMH and its member organizations is to ensure that Floridians have access to a comprehensive and effective system of coordinated mental health and substance abuse treatment services. Charlotte Behavioral Health Care is proud to announce that its CEO, Victoria Scanlon, LMHC, has been appointed as the Councils new Organizational Treasurer. Scanlon has worked as a clinician and administrator in community behavioral health for over 20 years. Her clinical career focus created a passion in treating adults with serious mental illnesses, emphasis on criminal justice diversion, and eliminating suicide. She joined Charlotte Behavioral Health Care in 2006 as Clinical Director, and quickly assumed oversight of Quality Management. She was then promoted to Chief Operating Of“cer in 2007 and remained in that position for nine years, until assuming the role of Chief Executive Of“cer in May, 2016. Scanlon holds a Bachelors Degree in Psychology and an Educational Specialist/Masters in Education with a specialty of Community Counseling/Mental Health Counseling from the University of Florida.Victoria Scanlon appointed Organizational Treasurer of Florida Council for Community Mental Health SCANLON SAVE LIVES. GIVE BLOOD. Alzheimers support groupsThe Alzheimers Association holds monthly caregiver suapport groups for spouses, adult children and family members who want to connect and share insight with others in similar situations. RSVP is not required to attend. For questions on groups and services through the Alzheimers Association, please call 941-235-7470. Port Charlotte area € 3 p.m. third Tuesday at South Port Square (Harbor Terrace), 23033 Westchester Blvd., Port Charlotte. € 3 p.m. third Thursday at Port Charlotte United Methodist Church, 21075 Quesada Ave., Port Charlotte. Punta Gorda area € 3 p.m. third Monday at Life Care center, 450 Shreve St., Punta Gorda. € 3 p.m. second Tuesday at Punta Gorda Civic Association, 2001 Shreve St., Punta Gorda. Englewood area € 10:30 a.m. third Friday, Englewood United Methodist Church, 700 E. Dearborn St., Englewood.Alzheimers Caregiver Support GroupThe Alzheimers Caregiver Support Group meets from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. the second Tuesday every month at The Springs at South Biscayne, 6235 Hoffman St., North Port. Call 941-426-8349 to register. SUPPORT GROUPS Come see why our Residents Call Lexington Manor HomeASSISTED LIVING FOR SENIORS!Our Assisted living community includes upscale restaurant dining, with many choices. You can rest easy knowing the details are taken care of so that you can live a carefree lifestyle.adno=50538682At Lexington Manor you have the freedom to remain independent while relaxing or enjoying our fully scheduled calendar of social and recreational activities. Our many exceptional services and amenities include outings, exercise classes, full-service beauty salon and barber shop, game room, library, transportation, laundry, and housekeeping. CALL US TODAY TO SCHEDULE YOUR OWN PERSONAL TOUR. www.lexingtonmanorportcharlotte.com941-766-7991 20480 Veterans Blvd., Port Charlotte, FL 33954Assisted Living Facility # 10548

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The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 3 Missin Mammaries, a breast cancer dragon boat racing team from Punta Gorda, presented a check of $5,000 to Dollars for Mammograms. For more information, visit www.dollarsformammograms.org.Dollars for Mammograms Sue Smith; Alice Walker; Rita Bertler, Director for Dollars for Mammograms; and Marge Jones Members of Missin Mammaries: Deb Dehmel, Sue Smith, Alice Walker, Marge Jones and Eileen Wein € Englewood Beach: Daily at 8:30 a.m.; and Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. 941-473-0135. € Manasota Beach: Monday-Saturday at 8 a.m. € Venice Beach Pavilion: Monday-Thursday at 7:30 p.m. € North Jetty, Nokomis Beach Yoga: 9 a.m. Monday, Tuesday and Friday € Pop Up Yoga classes at local business led by The Yoga Sanctuary will be held all throughout the summer. You never know where until the week prior to a Pop Up Class. The Yoga Sanctuary is excited to be working with other businesses in town (and sometimes beyond) to provide people with even more opportunities to explore their yoga practice and shop local! These surprise yoga classes will be held all over „ you never know when or where until that week. To “nd out about these special complimentary classes be sure to likeŽ and follow us and other Punta Gorda businesses on Facebook. Thats where well be announcing each class. Other things to know: 1. A limited number of mats will be available for use. But if you have your own, feel free to bring it. 2. There is no cost for these classes. However, there will be some events held at nonpro“t locations and some done to support are nonpro“ts. Consider having some funds to donate or even shop local in some of the shops after class. 3. All classes will be approximately 45 minutes long. 4. Some classes will be held outside. These events will be weather permitting. For more information, Facebook: https:// www.facebook.com/ yogasanctuary. € Yoga Tots „ The Punta Gorda Library, 424 W. Henry St., hosts the free program Yoga Tots Storytime from 10:15 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. on Fridays for children ages 12-36 months. Bring your toddler, towels or yoga mat to stretch your mind and muscles with a story and fun yoga poses. For more information, call 941-833-5460 or email: PuntaGordaLibrary@ charlottecounty”.gov. If you would like your free yoga event added to our events, email feeling “t@sun-herald.com. YOGACancer Support MinistryFirst United Methodist Church offers a scripturally based cancer support ministry to anyone affected by this life altering diagnosis. Whether you are new diagnosis or have been battling for a long time, the cancer ministry provides a place where people who understand the treatment journey are available to help, listen and support patients, as well as survivors, caregivers and family members. The Cancer Support Ministry meets the “rst Wednesday of every month at 6:30 p.m. in room 9 at 507 W. Marion Ave., Punta Gorda. All adult cancer survivors and their caregivers are welcome to attend, regardless of cancer type, church af“liation or faith base. For more information, contact Mitzi Kohrman, kohrman 1562@comcast.net.Food Addicts AnonymousA 12-step program for those who wish to recover from food addiction. Group meets from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Thursdays, at First Alliance Church, 20444 Midway Blvd., Port Charlotte. For more information, call 941-380-6550.Courage Over CancerGulf Cove United Methodist Churchs cancer care program, Courage Over Cancer, offers support and ministry to men, women, and families who are affected by cancer. Church and community members touched by this disease are provided with help and spiritual counsel that are speci“c to their needs as a cancer patient, caregiver, or loved one. This ministry is based on the outreach program Our Journey of Hope which was developed by the Cancer Treatment Centers of America. If you or someone you know could bene“t from a friend to support them through this journey, contact the church at 941-697-1747 or GulfCoveUMC@gmail. com. Gulf Cove UMC is located at 1100 McCall Road, in Port Charlotte. SUPPORT GROUPS Its important to know who to trust with your health because you want the very best. Fawcett Memorial Hospital has been recogni zed as an accredited Comprehensive Center under the Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Improvement Program (MBSAQI P). is accreditation ensures that bariatric surgical patients receive a multidisciplinary program, not just a surgical procedure, which improves patient outcomes and long-term success. For more information on this accreditation, visit us at FawcettWeightLoss.com 21298 Olean Boulevard, Port Charlotte, FL 33952 € 941.624.8281 € FawcettWeightLoss.comadno=50538623

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Page 4 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 BAYFRONT NEWS & NOTESAug. 21, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. Cardiac Diet Nutrition Class. Bayfront Health Wellness & Rehab Center, 733 E. Olympia Ave., Punta Gorda. Learn heart-healthy, low fat and low sodium food options. Free. Call 941-637-2450 to register. Aug. 21, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Massage Therapy. Punta Gorda Isles Civic Association, 2001 Shreve St., Punta Gorda. Massage therapy can improve blood flow and soothe tired and sore muscles, but it also can be an effective form of stress relief. Led by a licensed massage therapist, join us and learn the health benefits, types and various techniques of massage therapy. Free. Lunch provided. RSVP required. Call 941-6371655 to register. Aug. 21, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Breastfeeding Class. Bayfront Health Port Charlotte, Conference Center, 2500 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte. Taught by a Registered Nurse, this class will give expectant mothers important information to prepare for a successful breastfeeding experience. Free. Register at www. BayfrontHealthEvents. com. Aug. 22, 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. What Do You Have To Lose? Bayfront Health Punta Gorda Medical Office Plaza, 3rd Floor, Suite 131, 713 E. Marion Ave., Punta Gorda. If youre considering weight loss surgery, the best place to start is with the right information. Thats why we offer free weight loss seminars as an opportunity to talk with the experts. Seminars are interactive and include members of our weight loss team. You are invited to bring a family member, friend, or other support person with you. Free. Register at www.Bayfront CharlotteWeight Loss. com or call 941-7664564 to schedule a free consultation. Aug. 25, 9 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Childbirth and Newborn 1-Day Course. Bayfront Health Port Charlotte, Conference Center, 2500 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte. In this course, you will leave with a better understanding of labor and delivery, the birthing process, anatomy and physiology, birth basics, comfort techniques, hospital procedures and medical interventions. ($) or ask how you can take this course for Free. Register at www. BayfrontHealthEvents. com. Aug. 25, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. What Do You Have To Lose? Bayfront Health Port Charlotte Bariatric Services Suite, 2500 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte. If youre considering weight loss surgery, the best place to start is with the right information. Thats why we offer free weight loss seminars as an opportunity to talk with the experts. Seminars are interactive and include members of our weight loss team. You are invited to bring a family member, friend, or other support person with you. Free. Register at www.BayfrontCharlotte WeightLoss.com or call 941-766-4564 to schedule a free consultation. Aug. 25, 11 a.m. to noon. Bayfront Baby Place Tours. Bayfront Health Port Charlotte, Lobby, 2500 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte. Expecting? View the birthing suites, meet the staff and get questions answered in preparation for an exceptional experience. Free. Register at www. Bayfront HealthEvents. com. Aug. 27, 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Quit Your Way. Bayfront Health Port Charlotte, Conference Center, 2500 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte. Quitting tobacco isnt easy. Finding help should be. Bayfront Health and Tobacco Free Florida offer free tools and services to help you get started. Free. Call 866534-7909 to register. Aug. 28, 1:15 p.m. to 2:15 p.m. Emotions of the Heart: Stress Management Class. Bayfront Health Wellness & Rehab Center, 733 E. Olympia Ave., Punta Gorda. Everyone experiences stress from time to time; however, excessive stress can take a toll on your health. Learn techniques to recognize, manage, overcome and cope. Free. Call 941-637-2450 to register.By NICOLE VILLALPANDOAUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN (TNS)We have hit the home stretch „ that “nal year of grade school. Senior year. How did this happen? Wasnt it just yesterday that my husband and I dropped 5-year-old Benjamin off at his kindergarten classroom and stood outside the doorway trying to see what was going on while hoping he didnt see us? Weve done it all: parent-teacher conferences, trips to the principals of“ce, “eld trips, clubs, science fairs, impossibly challenging projects that had us cursing teachers names, tests failed, tests aced, school performances that had us beaming with pride. Now, in this senior year, I cant help thinking about all the things we still need to teach him. We thought we had more time. Luckily, this year Benjamin is actually taking a class called How to Be an Adult,Ž because in between physics and calculus, sometimes real life skills take a backseat. So, for Ben, heres my list of things to learn this year: 1. How to drive. Yes, you have a permit, and yes, we practice, but in this world where Uber is at the touch of your “ngertips, youre not really seeing the point. And youre not alone. A lot of your classmates arent licensed drivers either. Dude, its a life skill. Let me help you get it. 2. How to manage money. Debit cards, credit cards, checking accounts, thats all something that happens in theory. This year were moving beyond the savings account to having a checking account with a debit card to practice working within a budget before college next year. 3. How to advocate for your own medical care. Its time to practice how to make a doctors appointment, re“ll medication and use the insurance card. Mom needs to ease out of being the medical manager. 4. How to feed yourself. Yes, youre wiz at making cookies, sandwiches and frozen pizza. Lets try to expand those chef skills. 5. How to clothe yourself. Hooray, you “nally mastered the washer and dryer, but shockingly, we havent really had you go shopping for clothes. Why? Because you hate it. Its time to head to the store, pick out your size and try things on, and then buy them with your debit card. Maybe if you knew how much those jeans cost, they wouldnt be on the ”oor all the time. 6. How to read a map and navigate public transportation. If Mom or Dad has always driven you everywhere, can you “nd your way? Next year at college will you be able to get from your dorm to class, to the grocery store or anywhere else you might want to go? 7. How to have a conversation. In this world of texting, lets make sure you can talk to people, make eye contact and be comfortable talking to a stranger. (Yes, I know we told you never to talk to strangers, but now youre going to have to.) 8. How to advocate for yourself to get something “xed. If you have an issue with a store, a professor, a service provider, your dorm room, will you know how to effectively state your case and ask for what you need? Mom or Dad wont be there to do it for you next year. 9. How to manage your time. That nice alarm that wakes you up every morning with a kiss? That wont be coming to your dorm room. Nor will the reminder service that tells you to get off your phone and do your homework. Youll have to do it yourself. Senior year is a great year to build up these skills. 10. How to access resources. If you had a problem, would you know where to turn? If Mom or Dad are the only ones with the power to Google or ask a school administrator what is available to you, what will happen next year? Will you be able to “nd academic counseling services, tutoring, or even know what the weather is going to be like that day and what clothing is appropriate? Im sure there is more to consider, more to teach and more to learn. This time next year, youll be off on a new adventure. And that will be wonderfully exciting „ and a little bit scary, too. Good luck, sweet Ben.So much still to teach as students start final year of high school TNS PHOTOBenjamin Villalpando is working on learning to drive. He recently started his senior year of high school. Alcoholics AnonymousCall 941-426-7723 for information on meetings in the Arcadia, Venice, Port Charlotte, Punta Gorda, North Port and Englewood areas, including dates times and places.Amputee Support GroupThe Amputee Support Group meets at 3 p.m. on the second Monday of every month at the Life Care Center, Punta Gorda. Contact George Baum at 941-787-4151 for more information.At Ease, VeteransDuring World War II, and the wars in Korea, Vietnam, Afghanistan and Iraq, the percentage of American soldiers who shot their weapons with the intent to kill steadily rose from just 15 percent to almost 100 percent. The Department of Housing & Urban Development estimates that in January 2017, over 40,000 veterans are more likely to be homeless each night. As recently as 2014, an average of 20 veterans died from suicide each day. These brave men and women need a listening ear, and they need to know that Gods grace is still with them. Combat veterans from Gulf Cove United Methodist Church are providing some of the support and discussion that our veterans deserve. On the “rst Tuesday of each month at 6 p.m., they are at the American Legion Post 113, at 3436 Indiana Road in Rotonda West. Veterans are invited and encouraged to join them. Gulf Cove UMC is located at 1100 McCall Road in Port Charlotte, just mile south of the Myakka River on Route 776. The church can be reached at 941697-1747 or GulfCoveUMC@gmail.com and their website is found at http://GulfCoveChurch. com.Breast cancer networkingBreast Cancer Networking in Venice offers support and sharing with other breast cancer survivors. Meetings are on the third Monday of each month from 11 a.m. to noon at the Venice Health Park, Suite 1217 (north side), Jacaranda Blvd., Venice. For more information, call 941-408-9572. Caregivers Support GroupPort Charlotte United Methodist Church, 21075 Quesada Ave., Port Charlotte, hosts a caregiver support group from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. every Wednesday. The cost is free and is open to any caregiver dealing with a care-receiver with any debilitating disease. There are no requirements to join the group. For more information, contact Mike Boc cia at 941-815-6077. SUPPORT GROUPS a d no= 54539135 DIABETIC & WOUND CARE CERTIFIED BOARD Dr. Tom Lane DPM, FAPWCA Guardian Angel Foot Care2400 S. McCall Road, Suite FEnglewood, FL 34224 (941) 473-3338 Fax (941) 474-8597 Pediatric Dermatology | Teen Skin Facial Rejuvenation | Skin Cancer Screening & Treatment Anti-Aging | Ethnic Skin | Mens Therapies Skin Care Products | Mohs SurgeryCome Florida Skintroduce yourself when you visit our newest location at 329 East Olympia Avenue. FloridaSkinCenter.com 239.236.8322 OFFICES: FORT MYERS | CAPE CORAL | LEHIGH ACRES | PUNTA GORDA Hablamos ESPAOL 1 The key to looking and feeling younger is prevention. That begins with minimizing sun exposure and using topical treatments with SPF 35 or higher. As we age, our skin becomes less elastic and prone to discoloration. For timeless, youthful skin, we offer:€ Routine skin checkups € Skin cancer screenings and treatment € Injectable “llers, nonsurgical lifts and rejuvenation treatments € Age spot treatments and hair restoration therapy € Customized skin care and wrinkle reduction regimensAT ANY AGE AT ANY AGE YOU CAN LOOK YOU CAN LOOK adno=50537036

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The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 5 dedicated.Ž Ben CaseyŽ debuted in 1961 at a time TV was nominated by westerns like Wagon TrainŽ and Bonanza.Ž Doctor shows were rarities, with the exceptions of City Hospital,Ž which first aired in 1951 and is considered to be the first televised medical drama, and Medic,Ž which featured Richard Boone, ran from 1954-56 and was the first show to focus on medical procedures. The still ongoing genre of hero doctors began with Ben CaseyŽ and another show that began the same year, Dr. Kildare,Ž based on the successful movie serial and referred to in some quarters as the anti-Ben Casey.Ž Dr. Kildare, as played the handsome Richard Chamberlain, was an intern learning the ropes under the senior Dr. Gillespie (Raymond Massey). Both shows dominated the ratings. Kildare dated his female patients,Ž noted Dr. Johnson. First of all, thats unethical. Secondly, Richard Chamberlain would not have been interested in women.Ž (Chamberlain, an award-winning actor, was outed at the age of 55 by a French magazine in 1989 and confirmed his homosexuality in his 2003 autobiography Shattered Love.Ž) In 1969 came Marcus Welby, M.D.Ž and Medical Center,Ž two popular series that took a different approach to medical cases. The former starred Robert Young as the title character, a kindly family practitioner who made house-calls along with his young partner, Dr. Steve Kiley, played by James Brolin. Medical CenterŽ starred Chad Everett and James Daly as young/old surgeons Joe Gannon and Paul Lochner at a big-time Los Angeles university hospital. Both Medical CenterŽ and Marcus Welby, M.D., went off the air in 1976 tied as the longestrunning medical dramas on American television at the time. Another long-running series, Emergency!,Ž began as a midseason replacement in 1972 and lasted five years, followed by a half-dozen, two-hour television movies. The first medical drama ever to combine both a paramedic program with an emergency room hospital, the show featured Robert Fuller and Julie London as Dr. Kelly Brackett and head nurse Dixie McCall, Emergency Room staff members who saw the patients brought in by the EMTs. Dr. Johnson liked this one. Julie London as Dixie who wore very flattering, skin-tight, silk nurse uniforms,Ž he recalled. Talk about a fantasy for a young, pre-medical Dr. Johnson.Ž Dr. Johnson had some things to say about another cast member, singer-songwriter Bobby Troup, who played neurosurgeon Dr. Joe Early. Bobby wrote the Route 66 song,Ž he informed me. You might also remember him from the MASH movie. He picked up the doctors at the airport in Tokyo and kept saying Gosh darned army over and over.Ž Jack Webb of DragnetŽ fame was the creator and producer of Emergency!Ž Julie the nurse was married to Jack, then divorced him, then married Bobby,Ž said the good doctor. That must have been cozy. Troup also wrote Girl Talk.Ž which was a hit for Julie. Jack always wanted just the facts maam, just the facts. I have a feeling that he was a Wham Bam kind of man. That might have been the problem.Ž Comments and suggestions are always welcome. Call Dan Mearns at 941-893-9692 or email danmearns@gmail.com.DANFROM PAGE 1 By LAURAN NEERGAARDAP MEDICAL WRITERWASHINGTON „ You know your cholesterol, your blood pressure ... your heart gene score? Researchers say a new way of analyzing genetic test data may one day help identify people at high risk of a youthful heart attack in time to help. Today, gene testing mostly focuses on rare mutations in one or a few genes, like those that cause cystic fibrosis or sickle cell disease, or the BRCA gene responsible for a small fraction of breast cancer. It is less useful for some of the most common diseases, such as heart disease or diabetes, because they are influenced by vast numbers of genes-gone-wrong working together in complicated ways. Monday, researchers reported a new way to measure millions of small genetic variations that add up to cause harm, letting them calculate someones inherited risk for the most common form of heart disease and four other serious disorders. The potential cardiac impact: They estimated that up to 25 million Americans may have triple the average persons risk for coronary artery disease even if they havent yet developed warning signs like high cholesterol. What I foresee is in five years, each person will know this risk number, this polygenic risk score, similar to the way each person knows his or her cholesterol,Ž said Dr. Sekar Kathiresan who led the research team from the Broad Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. If the approach pans out and doctors adopt it, a bad score wouldnt mean youd get a disease, just that your genetic makeup increases the chance „ one more piece of information in deciding care. For example, when the researchers tested the system using a DNA database from Britain, less than 1 percent of people with the lowest risk scores were diagnosed with coronary artery disease, compared to 11 percent of people with the highest risk score. There are things you can do to lower the risk,Ž Kathiresan said „ the usual advice about diet, exercise, cholesterol medication and not smoking helps. On the flip side, a low-risk score doesnt give you a free pass,Ž he added. An unhealthy lifestyle could overwhelm the protection of good genes. The scoring system also can predict an increased risk of Type 2 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, breast cancer and an irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation, the team reported in the journal Nature Genetics „ noting that next steps include learning what might likewise lower those risks. It doesnt require the most sophisticated type of genetic testing. Instead, Kathiresan can calculate risk scores for those five diseases „ eventually maybe more „ simply by reanalyzing the kind of raw data people receive after sending a cheek swab to companies like 23andMe. A geneticist who specializes in cardiovascular disease, he hopes to open a website where people can send in such data to learn their heart risk, as part of continuing research. Kathiresan and coauthor Dr. Amit Khera, a Mass General cardiologist, are co-inventors on a patent application for the system. Other scientists and companies have long sought ways to measure risk from multiple, additive gene effects „ the polyŽ in polygenic „ and Myriad Genetics has begun selling a type of polygenic test for breast cancer risk. But specialists in heart disease and genetics who werent involved with the research called the new findings exciting because of their scope. The results should be eye-opening for cardiologists,Ž said Dr. Charles C. Hong, director of cardiovascular research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. The only disappointment is that this score applies only to those with European ancestry, so I wonder if similar scores are in the works for the large majority of the world population that is not white.Ž Hong pointed to a friend who recently died of a massive heart attack despite being a super-fit marathon runner whod never smoked, the kind of puzzling death that doctors have long hoped that a better understanding of genetics could help to prevent. Most of the variation in disease risk comes from an enormous number of very tiny effectsŽ in genes, agreed Stanford University genetics professor Jonathan Pritchard. This is the first time polygenic scores have really been shown to reach the level of precision where they can have an impactŽ on patient health. First, the Bostonbased team combed previous studies that mapped the DNA of large numbers of people, looking for links to the five diseases „ not outright mutations but minor misspellings in the genetic code. Each variation alone would have only a tiny effect on health. They developed a computerized system that analyzed how those effects add up, and tested it using DNA and medical records from 400,000 people stored in Britains UK Biobank. Scores more than three times the average persons risk were deemed high.Multi-gene test may find risk for heart disease and more PROVIDED BY STATEPOINTHuman papillomavirus (HPV) is the most commonly diagnosed sexually transmitted disease in the U.S. and cases of HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer „ a cancer that develops on the back and sides of the throat, tonsils and base of the tongue „ in middle-age men have tripled in the past three decades. But did you know that vaccines can help reverse this trend? August is Immunization Awareness Month and a good opportunity to learn more. Nearly all sexually active men and women get exposed to HPV at some point in their lives,Ž said Dr. Tom Thomas, director, Head and Neck Reconstructive Surgery and Transoral Robotic Surgery at Atlantic Health Systems Morristown Medical Center. Symptoms may develop decades after you become infected, so its often impossible to know who transmitted the virus to you.Ž Youre at higher risk for oral HPV if you: € Havent been vaccinated against HPV € Have had unprotected oral sex € Have many sexual partners € Have a sexual partner who has had many sexual partners € Started having sex when you were 16 or younger The good news is that when caught early, treatment for HPVrelated throat cancer is often successful. Symptoms include a lump on the neck that isnt painful but doesnt go away, a sore throat or difficulty swallowing that doesnt go away after 3-4 weeks, unexplained weight loss and a change in voice. If you have any of these symptoms, see your doctor right away. If you have a history of known HPV infection or other sexually transmitted diseases, see a head and neck expert. Even with no symptoms, you can pass HPV on to others, and you can get HPV from someone who doesnt show any symptoms,Ž said Dr. James Wong, medical director, Leonard B. Kahn Head and Neck Cancer Institute at Morristown Medical Center. As one of the leaders of the new Atlantic HPV Center, the countrys first center dedicated to the diagnosis, treatment, research and survivorship of HPVassociated cancers of the head and neck, Dr. Wong points out that understanding HPV and cancer can mean catching the disease early. Unfortunately, experts say that persisting misconceptions associated with throat cancers caused by HPV create stigmas and fears and prevent many patients from having important conversations with loved ones and doctors. We need to overcome the embarrassment associated with throat cancer caused by HPV,Ž said Dr. Thomas. Anyone whos sexually active is at risk for getting HPV, even if youve had only one sexual partner.Ž There are more than 150 types of HPV, but the HPV vaccine protects against both types 16 and 18, which cause the majority of cases of oropharyngeal cancer. More widespread use of the vaccine could lower the rate of highrisk HPV infection in men and women and consequently lower the rate of HPV-related cancer in both sexes. The Centers for Disease Control recommends getting the HPV vaccine for children at ages 11-12, before they are exposed to HPV, in order to protect them from certain cancers later in life. However, those who have already been infected can still get some protection from the vaccine, which is recommended for females aged 13 through 26 and males aged 13 through 21 who were not adequately immunized previously.HPV and throat cancer in men: How vaccines can help PHOTO PROVIDEDVaccines in childhood can protect against HPV-related throat cancers. STOP Living with Hip or Knee Pain!MAKO Robotic SurgeryCall for a consultation with Dr. Ronald Constine941.629.6262 or 941.639.6699www.AdvancedOrthopedicCenter.comOrthopedic Consultants for the Tampa Bay Rays and Team Physicians for the Charlotte Stone Crabs! Center For JointsHelping our community get back to life since 1980!Ronald M. Constine, M.D.Board Certi“ ed Orthopedic Surgeon 2003-2017 adno=50538695

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Page 6 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018Beating addiction is possibleBeating addiction is possible, and Fellowship Church of Englewood wants to get that message of hope out there to the Greater Englewood Community. Addiction is a huge problem in our culture and is affecting more families than ever before in our nations history. Special guest speaker Joe Hamblen, a former addict himself, will give his personal story of success and how others can make it too. Hamblen now serves as the Director for Loving Hands Ministry which strives to rehabilitate men who have addictive problems. Beating addiction is possible! Find out how on Sunday, Aug. 19, at 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Fellowship Church is located at 140 Rotonda Blvd. W., in Rotonda. Nursery and Kids Programs are available during both services. Complimentary hot coffee, donuts and juice are served at our Fellowship Hospitality Center at 9:30 a.m. For more information, visit www.fcenglewood.com or call 941-475-7447.Neuro Challenge Foundation for Parkinsons€ Special Event, North Port,  Understanding the Medical In“nity Deep Brain Stimulation System and Parkinsons Disease with Chad Davie, Abbott Labs; Neuro Challenge Foundation: North Port, 5600 Peace River Road, North Port, 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Aug. 20. € North Port JFCS Care Partner Connection with Carolyn Stephens, LCSW and Parkinson Power Hour with Carisa Campanella, Open Forum and Sharing; Neuro Challenge Foundation: North Port, 5600 Peace River Road, 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Aug. 22. € North Port JFCS Care Partner Connection with Carolyn Stephens, LCSW and Parkinson Power Hour with Karla Brody, Open Forum and Sharing; Neuro Challenge Foundation: North Port, 5600 Peace River Road, 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Aug. 22. € North Port Voice Aerobics with Mary Spremulli, SLP; An exercise program focusing on breath support, posture, and vocal function exercises for improved vocal performance: Neuro Challenge Foundation: North Port, 5600 Peace River Road, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Aug. 23. € Venice Movers and Shakers PD Discussion Group: Open discussion with Care Partner Relationships with Alex Addona. Facilitated by Dr. John Moore: Jacaranda Public Library, 4143 Woodmere Park Blvd., Venice, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Aug. 23. € Punta Gorda Parkinsons Support Group Care Partners and People with Parkinsons Breakout Groups: Punta Gorda Civic Association, 2001 Shreve St., 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Aug. 24. € Venice Parkinsons Wellness Club: In-Home Assessments for Safety and Better LivingŽ featuring Cindy Anderson, OT; Jacaranda Trace Retirement Community, 2nd Floor Classroom, 3600 William Penn Way, Venice, 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on Sept. 6.Quarters for a CauseJoin The Homeless Coalition for Quarters for a Cause at 6 p.m. on Aug. 21, at the Charlotte Harbor Event and Conference Center located at 75 Taylor St., Punta Gorda. A Quarter Auction is a game where bidders play for prizes valued from $12-$50 and even higher. Bring lots of enthusiasm and $3 for a paddle rental, rolls of quarters for bidding, cash for 50/50 drawing. All proceeds bene“t The Programs and Services at The Homeless Coalition. There will be items for sale from various vendors and a cash bar and food also for purchase. For more information, call Darcy Woods at 941-627-4313, ext.134 or email events@cc homelesscoalition.org.Childbirth Education ProgramsSarasota Memorial Hospital offers comprehensive childbirth education programs at its North Port Health Care Center, 2345 Bobcat Village Center Road, North Port. All sessions are taught by quali“ed instructors, on a rotating monthly schedule. For the educational sessions, youll need to sign-up in advance. We recommend signing up for classes by your second trimester and “nishing them four weeks prior to your due date. Upcoming classes include: € Wednesday, Aug. 22: CPR for Infants 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. € Monday, Sept. 10: Baby Care Basics 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. € Saturday, Sept. 15: Prepared Childbirth Class 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. € Wednesday, Sept. 26: Breastfeeding Basics 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Register online at babies.smh.com.Tibetan Singing Bowl and Yoga ImmersionThe Yoga Sanctuary, 112 Sullivan St., Punta Gorda, will host a Tibetan Singing Bowl and Yoga Immersion from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Aug. 19. The therapeutic sounds of Tibetan Singing Bowls have been used for centuries for healing and meditative purposes. The range of sounds and vibrations that come from the bowls are meant to awaken, refresh, and relax people in sacred spaces. Experience the sounds and vibrations of the bowls as they move throughout your being, bringing balance to the physical, mental, emotional and spiritual bodies. Cost is $25 per person. For more information, visit www. theyogasanctuary.biz or call 941-505-9642.Dart tournamentRoyal Palm and Interim Healthcare present the third Annual Dart Tournament Fundraiser at 5 p.m. on Aug. 23. at the Ice House Pub, 408 Tamiami Trail #111, Punta Gorda. All proceeds to support the Alzheimers Association. For more information, call Tanyah Lockett at 941-627-6762.Community Class, A Benefit for the Peace River Wildlife CenterSeptember is Yoga Month and The Yoga Sanctuary, 112 Sullivan St., Punta Gorda, is celebrating. Join us as we kickoff this special month with Augusts Community Class from 6 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. on Aug. 29, in honor of the Peace River Wildlife Center (PRWC). Class will open with an introduction by PRWCs veterinarian Dr. Robin Jenkins, highlighting PRWCs role in the care, preservation, and protection of our native wildlife. You will then be led through an all levels yoga class. This donation-based class is open to everyone and kicks off The Yoga Sanctuarys Yoga Month Bingo Challenge. All donations collected go directly to PRWC. For more information, visit www.theyogasanctuary. biz or call 941-505-9642.Yoga month bingo challengeSeptember is National Yoga Month. During Yoga Month, designated by the Department of Health & Human Services, festivities occur across the country. Hundreds of studios, teachers, and students join in. Come celebrate with The Yoga Sanctuary and discover the transformational power of a consistent yoga practice. Participate in our monthlong game of Yoga Month Bingo and see the difference yourself! In addition to feeling stronger, more relaxed, and less stressed, you will also be supporting the Peace River Wildlife Center (PRWC). Our Aug. 29 Community Class at PRWC kicks off the Bingo game, which culminates with a celebration for all participants and supporters on Sunday, Sept. 30. Visit www.theyogasanctuary.biz or call 941-5059642 to learn more about this month long event.Fall FestivalA fall festival will be held from noon to 4 p.m. on Sept. 22, at Quality Health Care Center, 6940 Outreach Way, North Port. There will be food, games, face painting, baked goods and more. All proceeds bene“t the Walk to End Alzheimers disease. For more information, call 941-626-8411.Family-to-Family programFamily-to-Family, a free, 12-session educational program for family, partners and friends of adults living with mental illness will be offered by NAMI Sarasota County starting Friday, Sept. 7, through Nov. 30, from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Venice United Church of Christ, 620 Shamrock Blvd., Venice. The course includes information on illnesses such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression and other mental health conditions. Family-to-Family also offers skill-building workshops on problemsolving, communication and empathy. This life-changing program is taught by trained teachers who are also family members and know what it is like to have a loved one living with mental illness. To register contact NAMI at 941-3769361 or email info@ NAMIsarasotacounty. org. Visit the website at namisarasotacounty.org for more information.NAMI Family Support Group TrainingNAMI Sarasota County will offer statewide Family Support Group (FSG) Training on Oct. 6-7 in Sarasota. Prospective facilitators must be family members (parents, siblings, adult children, spouses or partners) of a person with mental illness. If you would like to train as a volunteer facilitator and can commit to co-facilitating a monthly support group, please consider this unique opportunity. Additional FSG facilitators are needed in Sarasota County, particularly for the Venice and North Port areas, and NAMI Sarasota County will cover the cost of training for applicants from Sarasota County. NAMI Family Support Group is a peer-led support group for family members, caregivers and loved ones of individuals living with mental illness. The groups provide an opportunity to gain insight from the challenges and successes of others facing similar circumstances. FSG is con“dential and provided free of cost to participants. For more information or an application contact Colleen Thayer, Executive Director, NAMI Sarasota County, at colleen@ NAMIsarasotacounty.org or call 941-376-9361.Run like a BanditThe Port Charlotte Bandits Youth Football and Cheer Programs will host its inaugural running of Run like a Bandit 5K/10K from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Oct. 14, at Port Charlotte Beach Park, 400 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte. All proceeds from the event bene“t this amazing program for the kids in the area. It is a 5K and a 10K road race on all paved surfaces, with a $200 overall male/female prize for the 10k and $100 overall male/female for the 5K. Overall youth male/female will have prizes as well. There will also be awards for all the masters categories. There will be a custom “nishers medal for every “nisher of both races. Each participant will also receive an of“cial custom race shirt. There will be food and beer at the after party. There will also be in”atables for the kids, cornhole for the adults and music by DJ Justin of Party Pro DJs. Registration is $45 for 10K and $30 for 5K. To register or for more information, visit www.runsignup.com/ Race/FL/PortCharlotte/ RunLikeABandit5k10k.Annual Tour de North PortThe 9th Annual Tour de North Port, Its the Green Pumpkin!,Ž that will take place at 7 a.m. on Oct. 28, at Imagine High School, 2575 Sycamore St., North Port. A fundraiser event sponsored by People for Trees, a nonprofit native tree advocacy group since 1997, the Tour de North Port is not a race but an organized bicycle ride where cyclists follow a 15, 35, or 65-mile route through North Port that highlights the citys parks and natural settings. The ride includes breakfast, lunch, rest stops, and SAG support. Advance registration is $40 (www. peoplefortrees.com) or $45 at door. For more information, contact Alice White at 941-426-9752 or email treelady12001@ yahoo.com. NEWS & NOTES MEDICAL2030 $2000 Sign on BONUS!! SOLARIS HEALTHCARE is now HiringCNAs : Full Time & Weekends NURSES: PRN Apply: solarishealthcare.vikus.net CNAs, HHAs and CaregiversFind New Clients by Advertising Your Services in the Senior Directory Every Wednesday in The Sun Newspapers. This Feature Publishes in Charlotte, Sarasota, and Desoto Counties. Market Yourself Reach 150,000 Readers! 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The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 7North Port Yoga + Wellness Studio hosted a summer open house August 3, including free 45-minute demonstrations with chair yoga, all levels yoga, meditation 101, yoga with Nidra, as well as ongoing massage therapy and energy healing mini-sessions throughout the day. For more information on class scheduling and other events hosted by North Port Yoga + Wellness visit www.northportyoga.org.North Port Yoga + Wellness hosts summer open house FEELING FIT PHOTOS BY TAMI GARCIA Dianne Saywell, yoga instructor, hosted a free, 45-minute chair yoga demonstration. Martha Case, left, receives assistance from Diane Saywell, while stretching during chair yoga at North Port Yogas recently held summer open house. Those who attended the free chair yoga demonstration follow the lead of Dianne Saywell, instructor. Amy Osborne, owner and studio director, stretches her arm above her while participating in a yoga pose. Amy Osborne, right, and her mother Bea participate in several yoga poses during the 45-minute session. Bea Osborne utilizes a Pilates toning ring during the 45-minute chair yoga session. Martha Case uses a toning ring. By MARIE MCCULLOUGHTHE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRERPHILADELPHIA „ Unthinkable until a few years ago, the practice of putting hepatitis C-infected organs into uninfected patients has been embraced by the transplant world as a way to whittle long waiting lists for life-saving kidneys, livers, hearts and lungs. The main reason for this about-face is simple: New, easy-to-tolerate antiviral drugs with better than 95 percent effectiveness have transformed the treatment of hepatitis C, a virus that can slowly destroy the liver. A small but growing body of research by the University of Pennsylvania and other pioneers shows these medications can cure hep C infection in transplant patients who accept infected organs, typically with just four to 12 weeks of therapy. At the same time, the opioid crisis has meant there are more organs available from people with hep C, which can be spread by the use of injection drugs. Now, the question is whether this approach should continue to be studied in clinical trials, or opened right away to the 114,000 Americans awaiting transplants. Patients are told about the potential risks of accepting organs with the virus and do not lose their place on transplant lists if they decline. At least one transplant center, at the University of Washington, is not holding off. It announced in June that all heart transplant patients will be offered suitable hearts from hep C-infected donors. Infected hearts may eventually account for as many as eight of the 48 heart transplants UW performs annually, it said in a press release. Greater donor-organ availability means faster transplants for people on the wait list „ and shorter waits are associated with better patient outcomes,Ž said Shin Lin, a UW cardiologist and heart transplant specialist. Paul E. Sax, an infectious disease specialist at Harvard Medical School, favors such fast adoption. There are advances in medicine that are so dramatic that theyre obvious,Ž he said. This has to move quickly into standard of care.Ž But a committee convened by the American Society of Transplantation urges a go-slower approach. The 15-member panel, including Penn liver transplant specialist David S. Goldberg, last year published a review that concluded more studies are needed to fully understand the long-term risks and bene“ts. I know there are some centers that think its the right thing to doŽ to offer hep C-infected organs, said lead author Josh Levitsky, a Northwestern University liver transplant specialist. I just would encourage that it be done under research protocols so they can report the data.Ž Niraj Desai, director of the kidney transplant program at Johns Hopkins University, echoed that concern. At this point,Ž he emailed, it is still important that patient outcomes are followed and reported so everyone in the “eld of organ transplantation can learn what the outcomes are in larger numbers of patients than what has so far been reported.Ž So far, small studies „ about 100 published cases in total „ have shown success with all major thoracic organ transplants, even lungs. Among the centers researching the approach besides Penn are Hopkins, Vanderbilt University, Brigham and Womens Hospital, and Massachusetts General Hospital. Penn „ the “rst to leap into the uncharted ethical territory starting two years ago „ has eradicated hep C in 20 kidney transplant patients using the drug Zepatier, donated by Merck. Penn has done the same in 10 heart transplant patients, and is about to expand to lung transplants. So far, no transplant patients hep C has been incurable. Normally, hep C-infected organs are offered only to patients who already have the virus „ or else the precious donations are thrown away. Using such organs would put a small but meaningful dent in the national waiting list, enabling a few thousand additional organ transplants each year, experts estimate. However, both the number and quality of hep C infected organs has been dramatically increasing because so many young people are dying of opioid overdoses. Between 2000 and 2016, the number of infected donors more than tripled, from 181 to 661, one study found. In a blog post for the New England Journal of Medicine, Harvards Sax wrote that using infected organs to save people on the waiting list is a tragic silver lining to the horrible opiate epidemic cloud.Ž Still, questions remain to be answered about the best treatment regimen, when therapy should begin, and how long it should last. Long term safety concerns are also unsettled. We dont have the kind of data we need to say whether patients (who receive infected kidneys) have more rejection,Ž said Penn kidney transplant specialist Peter P. Reese. We cant rule it out. Its possible theres more immunological injury with hep C infection.Ž One potential barrier to widespread adoption may be easing. The cost of the mainstay antiviral therapies has been falling because of competition. Merck, for example, recently slashed the list price for a course of Zepatier by 60 percent, to $21,840. That undercuts the $24,600 price of the newest entrant, Abbvies Mavyret. Medicare would cover antiviral treatment for transplant-induced hep C infection, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services said in an email. Private insurers may also be amenable to the approach, which is more cost-effective in the long run than supportive therapies such as kidney dialysis. These are expensive drugs and it is a factor, but the experience of other centers that have gone down this road has been 100 percent of patients getting covered,Ž UW cardiothoracic surgeon Jason Smith said in the press release. We havent heard of a center getting a denial (from an insurer) that has stood.Ž Experts agree that patients „ in or outside of studies „ must be informed of the small risk of transmitting an infection that does not respond to antiviral drug treatment and goes on to cause harmful liver inflammation. But Robert S. Brown Jr., director of the liver transplant center at Weill Cornell Medical College, put that risk in perspective. The failure rate of these drugs is 3 percent,Ž he said in an article on the health website Healio. The risk of dying on the waiting list is greater than that. It is certainly not an ethical issue in terms of risk-benefit.Ž Kiran Shelat, 65, of Yardley, agrees. The infected kidney he received two years ago at Penn freed him from debilitating dialysis and restored his ability to enjoy life „ to exercise, hike, and travel with his wife. Of course, people should make an informed decision,Ž said the recently retired civil engineer. But at the same time, people should not fear it. Thats my message.ŽNew hepatitis C drugs mean diseased organs can be used for transplants

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Page 8 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018By MELISSA HEALYLOS ANGELES TIMESMaybe its the elephants genes that never forget. In addition to having great memories, elephants are known for having a very low incidence of cancer. In what might seem a wild mashup of the SyFi channel and National Geographic, new research has uncovered a surprising factor that protects elephants against the dread disease: a gene that had gone dormant in their mammalian ancestors, but got turned back on as their evolving bodies grew ever bigger. Scientists call it a zombie geneŽ „ cue the chilling music here „ a reanimated pseudogene that kills cells when expressed.Ž The zombie gene is not just a curiosity. Along with elephants, several kinds of whales as well as bats and the naked mole rat share enviably minuscule rates of cancer. Biologists suspect that each of those species has evolved a different strategy to ward off malignancies, and they want to understand them all. In time, they might “nd ways to approximate those strategies in humans and drive down our vulnerability to cancer. Thats not easy,Ž said Vincent J. Lynch, who led the research published this week in the journal Cell Reports. Nor, he added, would it always be safe. After all, mechanisms that thwart fast-growing cells or turbocharge cellular-repair machinery have evolved over countless generations in “ne balance with other checks and balances, Lynch said. Transfer one of these mechanisms willy-nilly to another species, and it would very likely run amok, he said. But if you dont do the research, youll never know,Ž added Lynch, a geneticist and evolutionary biologist at the University of Chicago. So Lynchs team went looking for LIF (short for Leukemia Inhibiting Factor) genes in 53 mammals, including the African elephant, the bowhead and minke whales, bats and naked mole rats. In most species, they found a single active LIF gene. But in the modern African elephant „ as well as in the manatee and the rock hyrax, both distant cousins of the elephant „ they found between seven and 11 additional copies of the LIF gene, called pseudogenes. In every species but the elephant, these LIF genes and their extra duplicates were inactive: That is, they didnt turn on or off to produce proteins. If they had been active in the past, their function had been phased out. In the march of evolution, they had fallen by the wayside and been left for dead, like vast stretches of every species genomes. But in the elephant, Lynch and his colleagues saw that one of the additional copies of the LIF gene was active. When the researchers induced cell stress „ a step that would have led to cancer in most other animals „ a widely recognized tumor-suppressor mechanism turned on. That, in turn, activated the LIF6 pseudogene. Stirred to life, the zombie gene proceeded to carry out its grim program, entering the internal machinery of damaged cells and ordering them to kill themselves. In elephant tissue, the damaged cells turned themselves inside-out, and cancer was thwarted before it could gain any momentum. And when the researchers suppressed the action of the LIF6 zombie gene,Ž they found that stressed cells were more likely to form tumors in elephant tissue. Its a fascinating study,Ž said molecular and cell biologist Vera Gorbunova of the University of Rochester in New York, who has studied the mechanisms by which naked mole rats thwart cancerous cells. The collective research of Lynchs group also raises intriguing questions,Ž said Gorbunova, who was not involved in the new work. The group has offered evidence that in their evolution, all complex creatures have made trade-offs, such as taking on genes (including anti-cancer genes) that increase their life span but reduce their reproductive prowess, or vice versa. The reanimation of the LIF6 gene may be one way in which elephants have countered what would seem to be a growing threat as they evolved to become bigger, said Lynch. How? Biological reasoning would suggest that bigger animals would have a greater propensity than very small ones to develop cancer „ mainly because they are made up of more cells. Theoretically, the more cells there are, the higher the odds that one or more will go rogue and seed a tumor. That is true within species: big dogs (and tall humans) are more likely to develop cancer than smaller members of their species. But strangely, very large species are not, in general, more likely to develop cancer than are small species „ an observation made by epidemiologist Richard Peto that has come to be known as Petos Paradox. In part, elephants and their extinct relatives (proboscideans) may have resolved Petos ParadoxŽ by giving LIF6 new life as a killer of would-be cancer cells, wrote Lynch and his colleagues. Apparently, not all zombies are to be feared.Why is cancer so rare in elephants? They might thank their zombie gene TNS PHOTOElephants are known for having a very low incidence of cancer. New research has uncovered a surprising factor that protects elephants against the dread disease: a gene that had gone dormant in their mammalian ancestors, but got turned back on as their evolving bodies grew ever bigger. By JUDI LIGHT HOPSON, EMMA H. HOPSON and TED HAGENTRIBUNE NEWS SERVICEDo you feel a lot of anger and disappointment? Does your temper get the best of you? Or, do you watch the news, wondering if the world is coming to an end? Most of us can get “red up over a lot of things. However, these extreme emotions can put a lot of strain on our relationships. I was in a bad mood for over a year,Ž says a friend of ours well call Rebecca. I was involved in a lawsuit at my workplace.Ž Rebecca says her bad mood nearly wrecked a couple of friendships. While no one should ignore societys problems or danger in the world, its critical to guard our emotional health. Having a healthy mind and spirit helps us defeat negativity and danger. These tips can help: € Strive to be the adult in the room. If something terrible has happened, you certainly need to acknowledge this. But, watch your words carefully so you help to stabilize the emotions of others. € Realize that self-control helps you feel better. Keep in mind that if you speak with calmness and strive to make good decisions, you wont feel as baf”ed or upset. € Act out of sound logic when things get rough. Even if you feel like screaming at someone, hold your fire. You can always show anger later. Once youve screamed at a friend or relative, this is tough to take back. Ive learned to devise a plan of action for everything,Ž says a teacher well call Mrs. Jackson. She often helps the principal in her school deal with unruly students. When I sit down and come up with a cool-headed plan of action, this helps me talk more calmly with the students.Ž She told us, Kids are often stressed by problems before they get to school. Thats why I tell them we can work these problems out. I try to offer hope and help them maintain a sense of humor, regardless of how bad the issues are.Ž Students, employees and married couples who feel lots of emotions can send out a ripple effect. To be the sane voice in any situation, take control by voicing hope and a clear-headed approach to “xing whats wrong. For example, tell someone: Im sure we can work this out, so lets look at our options here. Were not going to attack a person. Instead, lets go after the problem and “x it.Ž When we get extremely emotional, we are usually trying to go afterŽ a person. But as long as were doing a character assassination on someone, we usually arent making a dent in correcting the problem. I dealt with a student stealing another students money last week,Ž says Mrs. Jackson. When I drilled down into the problem, I found out the student who stole “ve dollars had not eaten in two days. Her parents had left town on a trip and failed to leave her any money.Ž Mrs. Jackson said she had a long talk with the student over stealing. When I demonstrated how she might have come to someone to ask for help, she was shocked. She told me she didnt know how to ask for help from other people. She really didnt know this was a viable option.Ž When you calmly act as the adult in the room, so to speak, you de“ne good choices. This takes practice; but, the more you do it, the more adept youll become at overcoming rocky emotions.Avoid extreme emotions to improve relationships Cancer support groupFawcett Memorial Hospital, an HCA affiliate, now offers a cancer support group for cancer patients, their families and caregivers. The group meets the last Wednesday of each month from noon to 1:30 p.m. with lunch provided. Research shows that social support has benefits for cancer patients, those recovering from treatment and their family and loved ones by reducing anxiety and stress, emotional distress and depression, fatigue and the experience of pain while improving mood, self-image, ability to cope with stress and feelings of control. In addition, having a supportive social network can help with recovery and adjusting to life after treatment. The support group allows those experiencing a cancer diagnosis to cope with the emotional aspects by providing a safe place to share their feelings and challenges while allowing people to learn from others facing similar situations. Cancer patients and their family members are encouraged to attend. Active participation is not required, listeners are welcome. Physicians and other health professionals will periodically speak to the group on cancer related topics. For more information or to RSVP, please call Fawcetts oncology patient navigators at 941-624-8318.Lung cancer support groupThe North Port Lung Cancer Support Group meets from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. the third Wednesday of every month at Sarasota Memorial ER in North Port along Toledo Blade Boulevard. The group is for people with lung cancer along with their caregivers. No RSVP nor charge is required. For more information, call or email Marc Cohen at 941-240-8989 or marcscohen@aol.com.Lung Matters support groupLung Matters support group meets from 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. on the third Tuesday of each month. Call Port Charlotte Rehab Center for locations and more information at 941-235-8011.NAMI Family Support groupsPort Charlotte: The National Alliance on Mental Illness will have a Family Support Group meeting from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 1532 Forrest Nelson Blvd., Port Charlotte. This is for family members and caregivers of individuals with a mental illness. For more information, contact Karen at 941-456-3100. North Port: The family support group meets from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. on the fourth Monday of the month at Anchor House, 3555 Bobcat Village Center Road, North Port. The National Alliance on Mental Illness family support group is a peer-led group for family members and caregivers of adults living with mental illness. All meetings are free and con“dential. For more information, call 941-3769361 or visit the website at namisarasotacounty.org. Venice: The family support group meets from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on the “rst Wednesday of the month at Venice Health Park, 1201 Jacaranda Blvd., room 1283. The National Alliance on Mental Illness family support group is a peer-led group for family members and caregivers of adults living with mental illness. All meetings are free and con“dential. For more information, call 941-3769361 or visit the website at namisarasotacounty.org. Sarasota: The family support group meets at 6:30 p.m. on the third Thursday of the month at the Beneva Christian Church, 4835 S. Beneva Road, Sarasota. For more information, call 941-3769361 or visit the website at namisarasotacounty.org.NAMI Connection Recovery Support GroupThe National Alliance on Mental Illness meets from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.. the “rst and third Tuesday of the month at the Mental Health Community Center (Prospect House), 240 S. Tuttle Ave., Unit B, Sarasota. Connection is a recovery support group program for adults living with mental illness providing a place that offers respect, understanding, encouragement and hope. It offers a casual and relaxed approach to sharing the challenges and successes of coping with mental illness. All meetings are free and con“dential. Call 941-376-9361 or visit the website at namisarasotacounty.org for more information.Neuro Challenge for Parkinsons patients, caregiversSt. Davids, 401 S. Broadway, Englewood, is welcoming Neuro Challenge, a non-pro“t organization dedicated to improving the quality of life of people with Parkinsons and their caregivers. Neuro Challenge provides ongoing monthly support groups, educational programs, and individualized care, advising to help empower people with Parkinsons and their caregivers with A Better Approach to Parkinsons. They will meet in St. Davids Parish Hall every the third Friday of every month at 10 a.m. Neuro Challenge serves Manatee, Sarasota and Charlotte counties … there are an estimated 9,000 people with Parkinsons in the three county service area. For more information, call 941-926-6413, 941-474-3140 or go to www.neurochallenge. org. Neuro Challenge is happy to include people with other neurological illnesses „ ie: MS; ALS; etc. SUPPORT GROUPS Having Problems With Your Dentures?100 Madrid Blvd., Ste. 414 Punta Gorda 941-575-2626www.smilesofpuntagorda.comDifficulty Eating? Sore Gums? Wobbly or Loose? Messy Adhesives? Denture Stabilization Affordable! Complimentary Initial Consultation!Are you concerned about zinc content in your denture adhesives? For more information on zinc and your denture adhesives visit www.ada.org adno=50538605

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The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 9By BRADLEY J. FIKESTHE SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNESAN DIEGO „ Women whose mothers lived to 90 years have a 25 percent greater chance to also live that long, compared with those whose mothers didnt, according to a new study led by University of California, San Diego researchers. Moreover, the women achieved this extreme longevity while staying healthy. They had no major chronic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, hip fracture or physical limitations. When both parents survived to 90 years, the advantage jumped to 38 percent, said the study, published Wednesday in the journal Age and Ageing. If only the father lived to be 90, there was no increase in healthy longevity for the daughter. These results are probably a combination of genetics, environment and behavior, said UCSDs Aladdin Shadyab, who led the study. It examined the health records of a racially and ethnically diverse population of more than 20,000 women. The study used information from the Womens Health Initiative, a large, long-term study on major risk factors for chronic diseases. It enrolled more than 160,000 post-menopausal American women when it was launched in 1993. Since only women are tracked in the initiative, the study did not examine men or parental life span effects on sons. The initiative has yielded a wealth of information about womens health, including the effects of hormone therapy, diet and supplementation with calcium and vitamin D. Previous research jibes with the studys “ndings, including health in the greatly long-lived, the study said. In the New England Centenarian Study, offspring of centenarians had 78 percent, 83 percent and 86 percent lower risk of developing myocardial infarction, stroke and diabetes, respectively, than a similarly aged referent cohort,Ž the study said. A lot of factors go into total life expectancy. This effect of long-lived parents adds an additional calculation. For a baseline comparison, 34 percent of all American women 65 years old will live to 90, according to the Social Security Administration. The increase in life expectancy is calculated compared to this base. Just 22 percent of men of that age will reach 90. In addition, total life expectancy has grown over the decades. In 1965, just 25 percent of 65-year-old American women lived to 90, and only 10 percent of the men. In addition to outside factors such as exercise and diet, researchers in recent years have found some genetic traits that appear more commonly in those who achieve very long lifespans. There are speci“c genes that predict your ability to live longer, which these women likely inherited from their parents,Ž Shadyab said. Researchers dont know, however, why the mothers longevity seems to play a more important role in a daughters lifespan than the fathers. Further, the women whose parents lived longer had higher socioeconomic status, meaning that they were more educated with higher income,Ž he said. And growing up in a high socioeconomic environment predicts your chances of living longer and aging well.Ž Those in high-income households tend to have access to better health care and education on healthy habits and presumably those in”uences play a role. Its possible that the parents who lived to 90 also practiced good health habits that they passed along to their daughters. More studies are needed to determine how genetic factors interact with behavioral factors like physical activity and socioeconomic status to in”uence our future aging outcomes,Ž Shadyab said. Other studies have looked at health in aging. In San Diego, the ongoing WellderlyŽ study tracks men and women who have reached their 80s and beyond, to look for genetic and lifestyle factors that may in”uence their longevity. If women want to know how the results apply to them, their present age makes a difference. Older people have a better chance of great longevity than younger people. Thats because some younger people will die prematurely, whether by illness or injury, and never reach old age. By de“nition, the elderly have already survived these dangers. For young women, this means that environmental and behavioral patterns are much more important to attaining extreme longevity than for those who are already older.Why your mothers age could be the key to longevity TNS PHOTOAccording to a new study, women whose mothers lived to 90 years have a 25 percent greater chance to also live that long, compared with those whose mothers didnt. By KADIA GOBANEWSDAY (TNS)A recent summer day found Nicole Oliva sitting at the edge of her swimming pool in Holbrook, not dangling her feet over the waters edge but wriggling, twisting and willing her legs „ slathered in hair conditioner „ into a 30-pound silicone mermaid tail. Step 1: Oliva spreads the tail out on a mat in front of her, positioning it so that she can “nesse her way into it. Step 2: She applies the conditioner to both legs, from her feet to her thighs. Step 3: Oliva sits poolside and puts one leg at a time into the tail, pushing her feet into the mono“n at the end that resembles a ”ipper. Step 4: With her pelvis raised off the ground and her elbows planted on the mat, she pulls the mermaid tail up from her knees toward her waist. Step 5: The shimmying begins, as Oliva adjusts the tail to her contours and pulls at the silicone until it is wrinkle-free. Oliva said she knows when shes done based on how the tail feels against her skin. What used to require a half hour now takes Oliva a little less than 10 minutes. For some, the magical world of mermaids means more than an animated Disney character. Its a lifestyle that encourages camaraderie and a sense of belonging. That was so much the case for Oliva that in 2016 she started a Facebook page and created a pod „ a group of men and women who perform or practice as mermaids and mermen „ that has grown from seven people to about 30 active members on Long Island. As a kid, Ive always been a pretty good swimmer,Ž said Oliva, 28. When I was younger, I would tie those detachable Velcro skirts that come with bathing suits around my legs and practice swimming like a mermaid.Ž Six years ago, while designing a costume, Oliva set out to create her own mermaids tail. Her research and Google searches revealed an entire community of mermaids, in pods from North Carolina to Singapore and at mermaid festivals that have sprung up in Michigan, Georgia and North Carolina and include the annual and long-running Mermaid Parade on Coney Island. Olivas pod meets every other month for group swims at aquatic facilities, public pools or members homes. They practice technical swimming and theatrical performance stunts, such as front and back ”ips, barrel rolls and ”uke stands „ which involve them standing on the tip of their mermaid tail. They also work on making underwater bubble rings, bubble hearts and bubble kisses that are part of their shows at the Long Island Aquarium in Riverhead. On Mermaid Mondays,Ž from July to Labor Day, visitors can pay $39.95 to swim with the mermaids in one of four daily sessions or interact with them on dry land during meet-and-greets. In the real-life mermaid world, pod members have alternate identities and speak in mermaid jargon. Oliva goes by the name Mermaid Aria, and others are known as Mermaid Marina, Mermaid Caylis and Mermaid Rose. Helpers or assistants are known as mer-tenders, boyfriends are merwranglers, and if you are a member of the mermaid collective, you are merfolk. Kai Wagner, 27, who identi“es as a transgender man, joined the Long Island pod three years ago but has been interested in the mermaid lifestyle for “ve years. The Lindenhurst resident has gender-speci“c mermaid personas. As a woman, she is Mermaid Pearl, as a man he is Merman Atlas. I love the aesthetics of both lady mermaids and male mermaids,Ž said Wagner, who owns and operates Spoonful of Sugar Entertainment, a staf“ng agency that provides mermaid and princess personas for private events, birthday parties and the Long Island Aquarium. His company employs four mermaids, plus Wagner, at the aquarium in Riverhead, all of whom belong to a micro-pod within the larger Long Island pod. Mermaid Mondays began in 2016 and attract visitors from as far away as New Jersey, said Darlene Puntillo, the aquariums spokeswoman. Weve also introduced a dry meetand-greet, which has been very popular among young girls,Ž Puntillo said. The aquarium mermaids said their relationships extend beyond just being co-workers. It brings everyone together,Ž said Daniella Tiranno, 26, of Bayport, who recalled having to lie face down as her co-worker wrestled with the zipper on the back of her mermaid tail. The “rst time Tiranno, aka Mermaid Marina, tried on her tail, she said it didnt register that she wouldnt be able to walk, and she quickly fell to the mercy of her mertenders. It feels good to swim with people you know and trust,Ž she said. Though Olivas pod is relatively new to Long Island, the world is well-familiar with mermaids. Half-man, half-“sh legends date to Greek mythology, with characters such as Triton, the “sh-tailed sea god. Jules Vernes 1870s novel, Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,Ž also featured underwater creatures that resemble men. Modern-day mermaid enthusiasts also take inspiration from the 1950s, when Disneyland employed eight mermaids to launch the new Submarine Voyage attraction in California, and more recently from Hannah Mermaid and Mermaid Kariel, who have been featured in a national advertising campaign for Atlantis Paradise Island, a resort in the Bahamas. Long Islands pod of mermaids gets together once a month to craft headdresses and shell bikini tops or teach each other tricks. Their second skinŽ usually consists of neoprene, silicone and spandex. Tails can weigh up to 60 pounds and range from $100 to $4,000. Some mermaids use monofins, a “nlike rubber or plastic accessory that “ts inside the “n portion of the mermaids tail and helps them swim underwater. Many of the mermaids purchase their tails but create their own shell bikini tops for a more hands-on approach. Crafting is a big part of the mermaid lifestyle and allows merfolk bonding time with one another. The process of making a top begins by applying a thick acrylic paint to the lions-paw shells. Next, iridescent faux gemstones are af“xed with an adhesive. In the “nal stages, a waterproof sealant is applied and then a decorative strap using “shnets, imitation pearls or ”owers to keep the top in place. Sinead Atkinson, 26, of Hauppauge, is a substitute teacher and a member of the Long Island pod. Her elaborate, 26-pound tail is a silicone and neoprene hybrid with iridescent, multicolored resin scales that she bought used for $950 (it would have cost $1,500 if purchased new). Like many of her fellow mermaids, Atkinson „ she was a student at SUNY New Paltz when she discovered a video of someone making a mermaid tail out of spandex „ has a background in theater and costume design. Ive always had a childhood connection with mermaids and water,Ž said Atkinson, whose alter ego is Mermaid Mist and whose younger sister, Mairead (aka Mermaid Caylis), 23, is also a member of the pod. This is my way of reconnecting with that.Ž For Hannah Palmer, 31, who last year moved from Aurora, Colorado, to Hicksville, with a stop in Florida, camaraderie and her new pod family are everything. She said she applied dozens of times to be a princess at Disney World in Orlando, Florida, before she “nned-upŽ last year for her “rst mermaid swim at a birthday party for a 1-year-old. I got in the water and was like, Oh, this is where I have always been meant to be,Ž said Palmer, who is known as Mermaid Meara. Members of the pod said relatives, friends and co-workers have been supportive of their mermaid personas. Ive always been a creative person, being into theater and costuming and mermaid lore as a kid, so when I took that “rst leap, people were very happy for me,Ž Atkinson said. There is still an element of surprise when I tell people what I do. The reaction is usually somewhere along the lines of, You do what, and get paid for it? But a lot of people think its cool.Ž Wagner said those he knows have taken it in stride. Its more or less I have always been the black sheep (in my family). So something that is odd or strange coming from me isnt new,Ž Wagner said. Sometimes they ask me for pictures, because its an interesting subject to bring up to people ƒ Something like Look at what my child, niece/nephew, grandchild does. It is somehow simultaneously bragging about me while also making a spectacle of me.ŽSignature dolphin kickMermaids need to look good underwater, but they also need to be strong swimmers. A strong core is an important part of performing the signature dolphin kick, the only viable swim movement for mermaids, whose tails impede the movement of their legs. The whipping motion propels them forward while their legs are bound by fabric. All the mermaids in the Long Island pod said its important to stretch for three to “ve minutes before entering the water. Breathing techniques are just as important as the athleticism, and the ability to hold your breath is key as a performer. Wagner said he can hold his breath for 90 seconds, enough time for him to swim a lap in an Olympic-size pool or 50 meters. Aside from the rigors of performance, being a mermaid has helped some in the Long Island pod to overcome life challenges. Mary Grecco, 26, said she turned to swimming and video games as early as elementary school to cope with being bullied. The combination, along with her childhood fascination with the movies SplashŽ and The Little Mermaid,Ž pulled her into a life a mermaiding, she said. My demons tried to drown me, but they did not know I could breathe underwater,Ž said Grecco, who lives in Centereach and credits the mermaid community for helping her feel better about herself. She goes by the name Mermaid Rose and works with children with disabilities. They call me Miss Mermaid,Ž Grecco said. To them, its not a hobby. To them, Im a mermaid and I leave the water and take care of them every day.Ž The mermaids in Long Islands pod all agree that children are their biggest advocates and fans. You believe you are a mermaid, but they convince you,Ž Wagner said. And for those who remain unconvinced? I just give them a little splash with my tail,Ž he said.Dive in to the fascinating lifestyles of Long Islands mermaids TNS PHOTOLong Island Mermaid Pod member Nicole Oliva, aka Mermaid Aria, helps Merman Andrew Weinstein put his tail on as they prepare to swim in Nicoles backyard pool on the morning of July 26. MERMAID-SPEAKClamtini: bikini Fintastic: fantastic Merfolk: mermaid people (men and women) Mermazing: amazing Mersona: persona Mervelous: marvelous Mersaurus: thesaurus Mertender: assistant or helper Merwrangler: boyfriend Sand dollars: currency Shelfie: selfie Shellabrate: celebrate Shellphone: cellphone „Source: Long Island mermaid pod

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Page 10 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018PROVIDED BY MCCAn alternative to eyeglasses, contact lenses are widely used across the globe. Contact lenses provide the inconspicuous clarity many people desire, and the wide array of materials used to make lenses coupled with the assortment of styles of contact lenses have helped to make them more comfortable than ever before. It may seem like contact lenses are a relatively recent invention, but theyve actually been around far longer than one would think. As far back as 1508, Leonardo da Vinci illustrated the concept of contact lenses. Three hundred years later a British astronomer named Sir John Herschel conceptualized the practical lens design. First designs of contact lenses covered the entire eye and were made from glass. By 1948, plastic contact lenses came on the scene and were designed to cover only the eyes cornea. Through the 20th century, contacts continued to evolve. It is believed that now more than 30 million people in the United States alone wear contact lenses. Twothirds of those wearers are female, says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Because contact lenses come in direct contact with the eye, maintenance is especially important. Medical professionals say that teenagers as young as 13 may be able to wear contacts. Its never too early to share the proper care procedures. The following are contact lens care guidelines, courtesy of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. € Wash hands with soap and water and dry with a lint-free towel before handling contact lenses. € Never store lenses in water (tap or ster ile). Contact lenses must be stored in special disinfecting lens solution. € Saliva is not a sterile solution and should not be used to moisten dry contacts. € Minimize lenses contact with water. Remove them before swimming. € Always follow the recommended lens cleaning and storage guidelines from an eye care professional and the contact solution manufacturer. € Many professionals advise you to rub and rinse contact lenses even if the solution used is a no-rubŽ variety. € Leave empty contact cases open to air dry. € Replace storage cases and contact lenses as advised by the manufacturer or your eye care professional. Cases can be a source of contamination if they are cracked, dirty or damaged. € Do not allow the tip of the solution bottle to come in contact with any surface, and keep the bottle tightly closed when not in use. Following these recommendations and adhering to proper hygiene can prevent eye infections and injury.Maintenance a must when wearing contact lenses PHOTO PROVIDEDBy GREGORY WHYTETHE CULTURAL CENTER OF CHARLOTTE COUNTYS FITNESS CENTERAccording to the World Health Organization more than 1.9 billion adults (18 years and older) were overweight in 2016. Of these, over 650 million were obese. Information acquired from other sources also showed that between 2015 and 2016, almost 40 percent of adults in the United States were obese. Being overweight can be dangerous and should be taken seriously. According to WHO, most of the worlds population live in countries where overweight and obesity kill more people than underweight. It should also be kept in mind that ones risk for osteoarthritis, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancers such as liver, colon, kidney, breast, etc., increases with increased body weight. Each year, Americans spend over 60 billion dollars to lose weight. This price tag includes such things as gym membership, personal training services, the services of weight reduction specialists and programs and even the foods used in the weight reduction process. The sad new is, according to the CDC, we are losing the war w ith overweight and obesity. For over 25 years, the weight and pot belly reduction component of the Fusion One holistic health system has been providing services, the quality of which could be considered exceptional. The effectiveness of the program is due, primarily, to the following: € It is comprehensive enough to address the many causative factors of the overweight condition. € It makes use of weight reduction principles and practices that are backed by science and those that have passed the test of time. € Drugs and surgical operations are not a part of the program. Furthermore, the food and other items that the program advocates are natural and friendly to those using them. € The use of pre-determined timeframes (Lose 10 pounds in two weeks, etc.) are not used by the program. € The functional elements of the program are quite expansive and include: knowledge of weight reduction, exercise, nutrition and proper eating, behavior modi“cation and social support. To impart its principles and practices, the Fusion One weight reduction program uses lectures, workshops, classes, personal and special training. Many of these are offered through the Cultural Centers Learning Place and its Fitness Center. Members of the general public are encouraged to visit the Fitness Center to discuss (free of cost) their weight reduction concerns. For more information, visit the Cultural Center at 2280 Aaron St., Port Charlotte or call 941625-4175, ext. 263.Losing weight with Fusion OneContact lense awareness week August 20-24 adno=50538685

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By JOYCE M. ROSENBERGAP BUSINESS WRITERNEW YORK „ A tight labor market and a shrinking pool of talented workers make Im quittingŽ some of the most dreaded words a small business owner can hear. Staff turnover is a fact of life, but its particularly painful at small companies competing with larger businesses for workers. Owners learn they must make staff retention efforts a priority „ including mentoring or changing workplace policies „ and do some soul-searching if turnover increases. When “ve out of 22 staffers left Dash Design last year, owner David Ashen understood that some naturally wanted to move on to new challenges. But he also discovered after talking to employees that they felt the culture in his New York-based interior design company had changed since he brought in a new business partner. Ashen realized he needed to help employees feel more connected to the business, and focused on mentoring younger staffers. We ask them, where do you want to be in six months or three years, and create a path to do that. When we failed to do that, people were less satis“ed in their work,Ž he says. Ashen has also started letting workers have ”exible schedules and bring their dogs to the of“ce. Many companies “nd that a staff can be stable for some time, and then several employees leave at once. And with fewer employees, small businesses arent as able as big corporations to shuf”e assignments when people leave. At The SEO Works, a digital marketing company in Shef“eld, Britain, “ve staffers out of 30 left in a short period last year for a mix of professional and personal reasons, managing director Ben Foster says. When staffers who are on teams leave, co-workers can pitch in while a replacement is hired, Foster says. But when employees who work by themselves quit, the managing director just had to step up and take on two roles,Ž he says. The company has been changing its policies to try to improve retention, and recently also introduced ”ex time. Owners “nd that one big thing they can do is be clear with younger workers who want to know theres a chance for them to grow and develop new skills. Jeff Rizzo and business partner Matt Ross aim for each of their 10 staffers at product review website RIZKNOWS to understand what they need to do to win a promotion or a raise. If employees do not see a clear career path or opportunity for advancement, chances are theyll look elsewhere after a year or two,Ž Rizzo says. Many of the employees at the Reno, Nevadabased company have been hired straight out of college. Rizzo is philosophical about young people wanting to try something new eventually „ but, he says, were going to “ght like heck to keep them.Ž Companies that want to reduce turnover need to let employees know theyre valued and that what they do matters, says Leigh Branham, owner of Keeping the People, a human resources consultancy. People want to feel their job is meaningful,Ž Branham says. He suggests telling staffers, I want you to know why you do what you do „ and why its important to this company.Ž Staffers also need regular feedback, and not have to wait for an anxiety-provoking annual review, says Nina Velasquez, a senior vice president at North 6th Agency, a public relations “rm based in New York and with of“ces in Toronto and Boulder, Colorado. North 6th Agency gives its nearly 60 employees monthly feedback that is intended to be part of their training and development. The company also has a rewards system allowing staffers to accumulate points in return for good performance. The points can be redeemed for perks including cash, commuting passes, groceries and time off. Small businesses that hire freelancers, particularly those that dont offer steady work, also struggle with turnover. Turnover: Preventing it and dealing with the aftermath AP PHOTOIn this photo, Dash Designs founder David Ashen poses for a picture in his oce in New York. When “ve out of 22 staers left D ash Design last year, owner Ashen understood that some naturally wanted to move on to a new challenge. But he also discovered after talking to employees that they felt the culture in his New York-based interior design company had changed since he brought in a new business partner. Ashen sought help from a team-building expert to help employees feel more connected to the business, and he focused on mentoring younger staers.TURNOVER | 2 Mission Driven... Results Oriented 180 Bed Rehab Facility Solaris HealthCare Charlotte Harbor is a trusted, compassionate provider of rehabilitation and extended care. We have maintained a consistent history of high performance standards. Our expert staff, state of the art facilities and upscale environment makes Solaris HealthCare Charlotte Harbor the premier choice for rehab in Southwest Florida. Apply online @ solarishealthcare.vikus.net NEW!! Sign-On Bonus of $2000 CNAs: Full Time & Weekends Nurses: PRN adno=50540465 adno=50540464

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Page 2 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 TrivWorks, which runs trivia contests for corporate entertainment and team-building exercises, uses freelancers to emcee and produce between 50 and 100 events a year. The events require skills like running something akin to a game show, and the people who have them are hard to “nd, owner David Jacobson says. His approach is to treat these workers as if they were employees. I pay excellent wages, work to advance their career goals/development, and will basically bend over backward to keep them happy,Ž says Jacobson, who is based in Los Angeles and also has events in New York. When staffers say theyre leaving, some owners will try to persuade them to stay, offering money or bene“ts like ”extime and working remotely. Sometimes it works, but Casey Hill, who uses freelance artists, graphic designers and videographers for his board game manufacturer, Hill Gaming Co., “nds the opposite is true. By the time staffers inform you they are leaving, 95 percent of the time it is too late,Ž says Hill, whose company is based in Camarillo, California. His suggestion: Always know what your next step is when a worker leaves. Hill has a team of three or four backups, and he also hires people who have multiple skill sets. We need to have cross-pollination of skills so we dont have substantial downtime on products,Ž he says.TURNOVERFROM PAGE 1 By WINA STURGEONADVENTURE SPORTS WEEKLYIts a common story for folks who have spent most of their adult life working in lowerpaying jobs and are now middle age or seniors; people who dont have a pension and didnt established a consistent savings program for retirement. When they age to the point where Social Security becomes available, they leave their job in order to live on their SS Bene“ts. Thats when they learn that their Social Security doesnt offer the income they were expecting. They need more money. Some of these people try to get back into the workforce but “nd it dif“cult to obtain employment. Age discrimination may be against the law, but that doesnt stop it. Just ask any 55-plus job applicant who is vying with folks in their 20s for the same opening. This is despite the fact that older employees are well known for their honesty, loyalty and work ethic. Most have spent a lifetime training to possess those qualities. An older hire is also a lot less likely to jump from job to job. At the same time, those who spent many years on the job at a small business “nd that they are actually not marketable as an employee because their skills have not been updated in a decade or more. They are behind in knowledge about electronics and computer operations. Where can they go to get the necessary training? Though it doesnt get much publicity, there has developed a wide community speci“cally for the older worker. This is where the nonpro“ts come in. One of the best known is Easter Seals. This well-known nonpro“t offers job coaching and training for those who want to get back into the workforce, and also has a strong program of job placement How to find a job at any age By DANIEL BORTZMONSTER CONTRIBUTORThese buzzwords and phrases are music to any hiring managers ears. Prepare what you want to say in your job interview. Sweaty palms. Nervous laughter. Fidgeting. Welcome to the job interview! Unless youre made of titanium, the question-and-answer process is likely to rattle your nerves no matter how many years youve been working a job. Thing is, the key to acing your next job interview is pretty simple: Say the things that hiring managers want to hear. Thats not meant to be a joke! there are a few standard phrases that will go over well no matter what industry youre in or what job youre interviewing for. These phrases and buzzwords will delight every hiring manager. I was so excited when I learned this position was open.Ž To persuade an employer that youre the best person for the job, you have to show enthusiasm, says Vicki Salemi, career expert at Monster. That means expressing upfront that youre stoked about the position and the company. Kelly Marinelli, president and principal consultant at Solve HR, Inc., recommends coupling this statement with something speci“c about the position: I love creating content for clients in this space, and Id love to do it here with this team.Ž Theres no shame in being blunt. This job aligns well with my experience and quali“cations, and heres why.Ž A job interview is an extension of your cover letter,Ž says Salemi. It gives you the opportunity to explain, in detail, why someone should hire you.Ž Hence, its important to have anecdotes prepared that demonstrate your expertise. Choose stories that highlight your best strengths and core skills. By telling such stories, youll be helping to explain what contributions you can make to the company and how you produce measurable results. Let me tell you about a time that I solved a problem like that.Ž According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers Job Outlook 2018 survey, problem solving is one of the soft skills new college graduates lack the most. But theres a big difference between saying Im a problem solverŽ and actually showing how youre one. Your best approach, says Marinelli, is to “nd out what challenges the company is facing, and explain how youve solved similar problems in the past. I read about that project on your website.Ž Any time you can demonstrate youve done your homework is a way you set yourself apart,Ž says Marinelli. So, do a little detective work before you interview by reading not only the companys website but also its social media, business reports, and press releases„and look at recent news stories about the company for timely insight into the companys agenda.Keywords from the job descriptionJob postings dont just outline what the requirements are for a position„they provide you with buzzwords that you can use during a job interview to make you a more appealing candidate. You have to speak the companys language,Ž says Salemi. For instance, I know that data analysis is one of the crucial skills for this position. Let me give you a few examples of how Ive applied this skill in my career thus far.ŽCan you clarify?ŽAsking simple followup questions during an interview shows youre fully engaged in the conversation, says Lynda Zugec, managing director at HR consulting “rm The Workforce Consultants. For instance, asking for clari“cation demonstrates that you care about really understanding what the other person is saying. You let them know theyre not wasting their time with you.The interviewers nameOne way to forge a connection with a hiring manager is to casually use the persons name two or three times during the interview. Job interviews are very much about intuition and chemistry,Ž says Lynda Spiegel, resume writer and job search coach at Rising Star Resumes. Saying the interviewers name can help you cement a relationship.ŽGive smart answersYou always want to choose your words carefully during a job interview because its your prime opportunity to make a great impression on hiring managers. Want some help crafting compelling answers to their questions? Join Monster today. As a member, youll get interview insights, career advice, and job search tips sent directly to your inbox to help you become a topshelf candidate. Its not recommended to go in blind on questions like, Can you tell us about yourself?Ž or, Why do you want to leave your current job?Ž But with Monsters expert help, youll know just what to say.The best things you can say in a job interview SHUTTERSTOCK PHOTOAGE | 9JOBS adno=50540466

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The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 3 JOBS adno=50540467 Apply in Person (Preferred) or send Resume: 4290 JAMES ST., UNIT 8PORT CHARLOTTE, FL 33980or call 941-743-4466 Southwest Restoration is a Full-Service Restoration and Remodeling Contractor. Family Owned and Operated by Todd and Ryan Provencal. We have been serving homeowners, businesses & Property Managers across Charlotte, Lee & Sarasota Counties since 1988. We offer a multitude of services relating to restoration and renovation including: Water Damage Restoration, Mold Remediation, Kitchen Remodeling, Bathroom Remodeling, Countertops, Flooring & Cabinets. EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY! NOW HIRING! Experienced Carpenter/Tiler (Not a Supervisor Position) with Knowledge in All Other Aspects of Residential Construction (Painting, Drywall, Texture, Wood Floor & Trim Carpentry ETC) Valid FL Drivers License Required.adno=50540469 Quality Healthcare is an Equal Opportunity Employer Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, protects applicants and employees from discrimination in hiring, promoti on, discharge, pay, fringe bene“ts, job training, classi“cation, referral, and other aspects of employment, on the basis of race, c olor, religion, sex (including pregnancy), or national origin. Religious discrimination includes failing to reasonably accommodate an employees religious practices where the accommodation does not impose undue hardship. For more information please visit http://www.eeoc.gov/Career OpportunitiesFull Time with Great Bene“ts€ Cook Full time. The quali“ed candidate must have at least 2 years Long Term Care experience as a cook. Preferred candidate will have Serve Safe Certi“cation a requirement for this individual is to be knowledgable as to AHCA, Federal/ State regulations for the Dietary Dept. and Food Sanitations standards. Previous experience as a supervisor is required. € Floor Tech PRN € CNAs 1st & 2nd Shifts, sign on bonusApply In PersonQuality Health Care 6940 Outreach Way € North Port (941) 426-8411 Fax Resume 941-423-1572 E-mail Resumeqhccnp5@verizon.net EOE / DFWPMore Infoqualityhealthcarecenter.net/contact-us/careers adno=50540470 CNAFull-time DISHWASHERS SERVERSAll Shi sHOUSEKEEPING SECURITY Welcome to the home of award-winning senior living in Venice, Florida. Aston Gardens At Pelican Pointe is in the heart of Venice just minutes from the best shopping, entertainment and medical facilities. Rich in local culture and appreciated for its world-class amenities, Venice is an amazing city to enjoy in your retirement years. Offering Independent Living, Assisted Living and Memory Care, our secured dementia and Alzheimers community, Aston Gardens At Pelican Pointe offers the best value in affordable, carefree, senior living. Everything we do is focused on providing you the very best in senior living. Its all right here! By Discovery Senior LivingAt Pelican Pointe Equal Opportunity Employer, including disabled and veterans.For Job Details:CURRENT OPENINGS at our Venice Location 1000 Aston Gardens Drive Venice, FL 34292 941-2401010 Assisted Living Facility License AL#10612APPLY IN PERSONwww.astongardens.com/senior-living/ /venice/aston-gardens-at-pelican-pointe/career-center adno=50540393 To sell media and digital products to Local Professionals throughout Charlotte and Lee Counties. Minimum of 2 years quanti“able outside sales experience with digital and media experience preferred. Salary plus commission. €Health insurance €Paid time off €401(k) €Training €Stable and secure company with advancement opportunities adno=50540392

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Page 4 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018CLASSIFIEDS 2000EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT 2005Services 2010Professional 2015Banking 2020Clerical 2025Computer 2030Medical 2035Musical 2040 Restaurant/Hotel2050SkilledTrades 2060Management 2070Sales 2090Child/Adult Care Needed 2100General 2110Part-time/ Temp 2115Home Based Business 2120Seeking Employment 2005 SERVICES PROFESSIONAL RESUMES SARASOTA/CHARLCO. CALLFORDETAILS 941-214-5257 2010 PROFESSIONAL MOBILE HOME OWNERS ASSOCIATION, comprising 992 homes, and annual revenues of $2 million annually, is requesting proposals from CPA firms, with at least three years auditing experience with Community Associations, and providing Consolidated Financial Statements, and an Audit Report, to their Board of Directors. Our year end is December 31, 2018. Our company has two entities, a non-profit co-op and a for prof it Real Estate Brokerage Firm. BE SURE TO TELL US WHY WE SHOULD ENGAGE YOU! Proposals must be received below by September 15, 2018 Park Manager Venice Isle Home Owners Inc. 603 Roma Rd Venice, Fl 34285 The engagement must be completed and delivered by 11:00AM March 15, 2019. RECEPTIONIST F u ll Ti me needed for busy Real Estate Attorney Real Estate exp helpful but will train. Send resume to cbruce@sarasotaclosings.com 2020 CLERICAL/OFFICE TICKET CLERK NEEDED f or Shell Mine. Must Have Good People Skills, Experience w/ Microsoft Word & Excel and be A ble to Work in a High Paced Env ironment. 941-391-3200. 2030 MEDICAL $2000 Sign on BONUS!! SOLARIS HEALTHCARE is now HiringCNAs : Full Time & Weekends NURSES: PRN Apply: solarishealthcare.vikus.net CNAs, HHAs and CaregiversFind New Clients by Advertising Your Services in the Senior Directory Every Wednesday in The Sun Newspapers. This Feature Publishes in Charlotte, Sarasota, and Desoto Counties. Market Yourself Reach 150,000 Readers! Call 941-429-3110 for more information www.HorizonTechInstitute.ComADVANCE YOUR CAREERŽ Licensed & Accredited School Murdock Town Center on 411032 Tamiami Tr Unit 3YOUcan become a LPN within 11 months. Enrollment ongoing.Start Working In 2-5 wks! Classes Start Each Month Call For Class Dates Nursing Assistant (120hrs) Home Health Aide (75hrs) Phlebotomy Tech (165hrs) EKG Tech (165hrs) Patient Care Tech (600hrs) Job Assist. & Pymt. Plans Call Now to Register! 941-889-7506 PHLEBOTOMY,EKG, Classes Start 08/20LPNwkds 08/20 CNA08/20 Med. Asst. 08/20 2030 MEDICAL COOK FULL TIME THEQUALIFIEDCANDIDATEMUST HAVEATLEAST2 YEARSLONGTERMCAREEXPERIENCEASA COOK. PREFERREDCANDIDATEWILL HAVESERVESAFECERTIFICATION AREQUIREMENTFORTHISINDIVID-UALISTOBEKNOWLEDGABLEAS TOAHCA, FEDERAL/STATEREGU-LATIONSFORTHEDIETARYDEPT.ANDFOODSANITATIONSSTAN-DARDS. PREVIOUSEXPERIENCEAS ASUPERVISORISREQUIRED. FLOOR TECH PRNCNAS1ST& 2NDSHIFTSSIGNONBONUSApply in Person: QUALITY HEALTH CARE 6940 Outreach Way North Port, FL (941)426-8411 FAX RESUMES TO: (941)-423-1572EMAIL RESUMES TO: qhccnp5@verizon.netEOE DFWPqualityhealthcarecenter.net/ contact-us/careers 2050 SKILLED TRADES CARPENTERS f or F ram i ng, Siding & Decks for Englewood & Boca Grande Area. Tolls Paid. Must Have Tools & Transportation. Call: 941-475-5095 Leave Msg EXPERIENCEDCARPENTER/TILER(NOTASUPERVISORPOSITION) W/KNOWLEDGEINALLOTHERASPECTSOFRESIDENTIALCONSTRUCTION(PAINTING, DRYWALL, TEXTURE, WOODFLOOR& TRIMCARPENTRYETC) VALIDFL DL REQUIRED. APPLYINPERSON PREFERRED: SOUTHWESTRESTORATION4290 JAMESST. #8 PT. CHARLOTTE33980941-743-4466 TIRE CHANGER $500-$800 PER WEEK w/DL. Call 941-639-5681 2050 SKILLED TRADES INSTALLER/HELPER NEEDEDfor INSTALLATION/ MANUFACTURING of Hurricane Shutters. FL Drivers lic. required. Exp. helpful but will train the right person. (941)-485-5878 Venice LOCAL ESTABLISHED DUMP TRUCK COMPANYISSEEKINGTOFILL2 POSITIONS. MUSTHAVEVALIDANDCLEARCDL; 2 YEARSDUMPTRUCK EXPERIENCEREQUIRED. CALL941-628-5227 TOAPPLY. MANAGER TRAINEEwith Tire Store Experience. $600 $900 Per week. Call 941-639-5681 2070 SALES CHARLOTTE SUN NOW HIRINGOUTSIDE SALES REPRESENTATIVETo Sell Media and Digital products to Real Estate & Automotive Professionals throughout Charlotte & Lee Counties. Salary plus commission. We OFFER: Health Insurance Paid Time Off 401K Training Stable and secure company with advancement opportunies. We are a Drug FREE Workplace. Pre-employment Drug testing required. EMAIL RESUME TO: jharrington@sun-herald. com 2100 GENERAL CLEANING PERSON in private home on Pine Island. P/T, Seniors Welcome. 239-283-8920 GARBAGE TRUCK TRASH SLINGER 3 days/wk. Mon., Wed., Thurs., 7am-3pm. Must Have Own Transp. Starting $11/hr after 30 days $12/hr. Call 941-815-6208 or 941-2769578 para-espanol 2100 GENERAL ASTON GARDENSISINNEEDOFTHEFOLLOWING: CNA FT DISHWASHERS SERVERS ALL SHIFTS HOUSEKEEPING SECURITYAPPLY IN PERSON AT:1000 ASTONGARDENSDRIVEVENICE, FL 34292 941-240-1010 The Venice Gondolier Sun is now taking applications for carriers in Venice and surrounding areas. Must have dependable vehicle, a valid Florida Drivers License and proof of insurance. Apply in person: 200 E. Venice Ave. Venice, FL 34285 No Phone Calls Please. CARRIERS NEEDED A-Z LAWNCARE/ LANDSCAPING SEEKINGLAWNCARE TECHS FT, YEARROUND,ANDPT. TOP PAY$12.00 $18/PER HOURBASEDON EXPERIENCE. ENGLEWOOD AREA, LV. MSG. (941)-270-0508 OR(941)-474-2554 PER SO N to work in 6 acre Grove on Pine Island. Private home, P/T, Seniors Welcome. 239-283-8920 TRUCKDRIVER HEAVY EQUIP. OP MIn. 2 yrs exp. Call for directions 863-494-4147 2100 GENERAL IMMEDIATE OPENINGS! We Have Several Open Positions for Sales Representatives to Promote the Sun Newspapers at Various Locations, Grocery Stores, and Events Throughout the Area. This is an Enjoyable Year-Round Position with the Potential to Earn $100$300+ Per Day on a Part Time Basis! Perfect for College Students, Retirees, and as Supplemental Income. This is an Opportunity to Work in a Positive, Profess ional Work Environment with Flexible Hours. If You Are: 18 or Older, Outgoing, Dependable, and Professional and have Reliable Transportation and a Cell Phone, We Want to Talk to You! Background Checks are Preformed. We Offer: Complete and Thorough Training Flexible Work Schedules Weekly Bonuses Unlimited Earning Potential Opportunity for Advancement Into Management! To Make an Appointment for an Interview, Please Call Andy at 941-268-5731 2110 PART TIME/ TEMPORARY "AMBASSADORS" NEEDEDTOSOLICITSUBSCRIPTIONS FORTHEAWARDWINNING LOCALNEWSPAPERS, THESUN, ATSTOREFRONTSINTHEVENICE, NORTHPORTANDENGLEWOODAREAS. CONTACTJIMDEFALLEAT941-786-7676FORMOREINFORMATION. HELPWITH Small Jobs Around the House Needed in Venice. Great for Student. Please Write P.O. Box 444 Venice Fla. 34284

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The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 5CLASSIFIEDS 1000REAL ESTATEWe Are Pledged To The Letter And Spirit of U.S. Policy For The Achievement Of Equal Housing Opportunity Throughout The Nation. We Encourage And Support An Affirmative Advertising And Marketing Program In Which there Are No Barriers To Obtaining Housing Because of Race, Color, Religion, Sec, Handicap, Familial Status Or National Origin.Ž REAL EST A TE 1010 16501010Open House 1015 Real Estate Auctions 1020Homes/General For Sale 1030Waterfront Homes For Sale 1031 Foreclosures For Sale 1035 Golf Course Community For Sale 1040Condos/Villas For Sal e 1060Townhouses For Sale 1070Duplexes For Sale 1075Tri-Plex For Sale 1080Apartments For Sale 1090Mobile Homes For Sal e 1100Interval Ownership 1100 Out of Area Homes For Sale 1115Trade/Exchange 1120Wanted To Buy RENT 1205 Lease Option 1210 Homes 1240Condos/Villas 1280 Townhouses 1300Duplexes 1320Apartments 1330Hotel/Motel 1340Mobile Homes 1345Misc. Rentals 1350Efficiencies 1360Room ToRent 1370Rentals To Share 1390Vacation/Seasonal 1420Wanted To Rent LOTS 1500Lots & Acreage 1515Waterfront 1520Out Of Area Lots 1530Commercial Lots 1540Trade/Exchange BUSINESS 1600Business For Sale 1610Business Rentals 1615Income Property 1620 Commercial/ Industrial Prop. 1640Warehouse & Storage 1650Farm/Ranches 1010 OPEN HOUSE 08/19/18 10578 RIVERSIDE RD PORT CHARLOTTE, FL 33981 OPEN BY APPT.UNIQUE ONE OF A KIND SAILING COMPOUND A SAILORS DREAM GORGEOUS3 BEDROOM2.5 BATH4 CARGARAGEHOME WITHHEATEDPOOL& SPAND OVER2,550 SFUNDERAC OF LIVINGSPACE(3284SFTOTAL) A 160 CONCRETESEAWALL, 145 OFDOCKINCLUDING2 BOATLIFTS. IFSAILINGAND LIVINGONTHEWATERISYOUR DREAM, THISISYOURDESTINATION.FLA GOLF PROPERTIES INC 941-698-4653 Classified=Sales 3 PEBBLE BEACH RD. ROTONDA WEST 33947 SHOWN BY APPT.1986 BUILTROTONDAPOOL HOMEONQUIETCUL-DESAC STREET. HOMEHASGREAT"BONES" INNEEDOFJUSTA WEEBITOFTLC. OFFERED@ $179,900 FLA GOLF PROPERTIES INC 941-698-4653 ADVANTAGE REALTY INC.OPEN HOUSE TODAY12PM 3PM6511 Americana, N.P. $393,333 Beautiful 3/2.5/2 home w/pool sitting on over 3/4 acre. (RT 41 to Sumter, L onto Price Blvd, R onto S. Biscayne, R Ponce De Leon, R onto Americana.)941-255-5300 800-940-5033www.eraportcharlotte.com 1010 OPEN HOUSE DEEP CREEKOPEN HOUSE SAT. & SUN. 1-4PM 1493 Navigator Road Beautiful NEW Construction Home on Deep Creek golf course. 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 3 car garage, 2,000 sq.ft. All Custom Upgrades. $299,900 941-626-7682 FIVE STAR REALTY OPEN HOUSEStop by Five Star Realty to pick up a home tour flyer with directions.ŽSUNDAY 8/19/2018: 2506 Broadpoint Drive, Punta Gorda, FL 33983, 1:00PM-3:00PMF OR MORE INFORMATION AND PHOTOS VISIT : WWW FIVESTARREALTY COM / BLOG / Open House 1-4PM 2643 Suncoast Lakes Blvd MLS C7403233 $240,000 4 bdrm 2 bath with lake view. Gated community, built in 2009 See this one today! Call Pat Walker 941-276-4674 REMAX Anchor Realty OPEN SAT.-SUN. 12PM-4PM 342 MONACODR. P.G.I. 3/2.5/2, 3,300 SFWATERFRONTHOME. CUSTOMINFINITYPOOLW/ WATERFALL& CUSTOMINFINITYSTONESPA. LP GASTHROUGHOUT. $725,000. (518)-810-5070OR(863)-529-3736 OPEN SUN 12-3PM 2251 Cannolot Boulevard, Port Charlotte Come see all the EXCITING UPGRADES to this STUNNING WATERFRONT HOME with great Charlotte Harbor access. 2007 built 3/2/2 block home w/tiled floors, 8' glass sliders opening the view to the water, split floor plan living room w/ vaulted ceilings, formal dining and gourmet kitchen/dinette with granite. Custom wood cabinets and SS appliances. Master suit e with dual closets, dual vanities, Roman shower, and private lanai access. 2 car garage, indoor laundry, seller says room for a pool! Come see it today! Great Price! $264,900 Your Host: Paul Hicks Blue Mind Group Nix & Associates Real Estate 941-916-8289 Open Sunday 11am-2pm 5021 Seagrass Dr, Venice 3/2/2 Villa w/ PRIVATE newly resurfaced pool and a beautiful pond view. NEW A/C! Just add a little TLC to make it shine again. Maintenance Free Community! Low HOA's! Listed at: $265,000 For More Info Call: RE/MAX Palm The McGuire Group Brady McGuire 941-204-5840 OUTSTANDING OPPORTUNITYLocation, location, location with the best corner in Rotonda West the premiere subdivision of Charlotte County. Land, plans, blueprints, engineering and a Real Estate brokerage. $250,000.00 Principals Only! FLA GOLF PROPERTIES INC 941-698-4653 1020 HOUSES FOR SALE 20145 CRISTOFORO, 3/2.5/3 Venice +den, water view, & custom pool-maintfree community. West Villages Realty $459,900 941-539-5771 1020 HOUSES FOR SALE SELLING YOUR HOME, CONDO, OR LOT? WE CAN HELP YOU. Advertise your home, condo, or lot with us and reach over 150,000 readers in Charlotte, Sarasota, & DeSoto Counties and online everyday. Ask about our 90 day special. Call one of our classified experts for all the details at 866-463-1638 Realtors Welcome! 5156 Sago Palm, Rd., North Port RARELY AVAILABLE 3 CAR GARAGE! Gorgeous, move-in-ready 2400 SF 4bedroom, 3-bath, with 11x14' screened/tiled lanai + 12x14' open patio and 10x12' utility shed on lushly landscaped oversized corner lot for just $275K! Gleaming tile & laminate throughout (no carpet)! NO DEED RESTRICTIONS! NOT IN FLOOD ZONE! Available immediately! Patty Gillespie, Remax Anchor 941-875-2755 DEEP CREEKGorgeousWELLMAINTAINEDCUSTOMHOMEW/ JACUUZI, SUMMERKITCHEN, HUGE LANAI, LAKEVIEW, ALLON2 LOTS. 4BR/3BA/4CG 3076SF/ AC, 4772SFTOTAL. $369,900. By Owner 941-456-6500 NEW CUSTOM HOME 1493 Navigator Road Beautiful NEW Construction 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 3 car garage, Home on Deep Creek Golf Course. 2,000 sq.ft. All Custom Upgrades. $299,900 941-626-7682 NORTH PORT 2434 Bartek Place FINANCING FELL THROUGH! PRICED FOR IMMEDIATE (RE) SALE! LOVE AT FIRST SIGHT! YOU'D EXPECT TO SEE THIS GORGEOUS 3/2/2 1900 SF IN HOUSE BEAUTIFUL MAGAZINE! In the quiet, serene, beautiful Woodlands community with quick access to I-75! NOT in flood zone! ONCE YOU SEE IT, YOU WILL NEVER LET ANYONE ELSE BUY IT! $236K Patty Gillespie, Remax Anchor 941-875-2755 So-o-o MUCH for so little! PORT CHARLOTTE 15349 Mille Fiore Blvd., UNRIVALED OPPORTUNITY! WATER-FRONT with ULTIMATE PRIVACY in NW Port Charlotte's expanding GATED COMMUNITY of Villa Milano, Spectacular custom 1-owner Mediterranean design 2200 SF LIGHT, BRIGHT, open great room comcept with formal dining room, 3-Bedrooms + Den/Office. Low HOA ($98/MO) $325,000 Patty Gillespie Remax Anchor 941-875-2755 PUNTA GORDA3/2/3/Pool Brand New Custom Built Home Located In Popular Burnt Store Meadows. Great Floorplan W/Top of The Line Features. Must See To Appreciate!-$375,000 BARBMCHENRY941-833-1667 COLDWELLBANKERSUNSTARREALTY 1020 HOUSES FOR SALE PORT CHARLOTTE 2683 SUNCOAST LAKES BLVD Four bdrm, lake front, pool home, 1874 sq ft!! What more could you want! Beautifully maintained! Tile floors in all main areas, granite counters and stainless appliances, hurricane shutters. Gated community! This total package is waiting for you! Call today! $279,500 Pat Walker 941-276-4674 REMAX Anchor Realty PORT CHARLOTTE WHYBUILD? THIS2295 SQ.FT. 3/2/2 W/ OFFICE, GOURMETKITCHEN& HEATEDPOOLISUPDATEDANDREADY FORANEWFAMILY. WATER, SEWER, SPLITPLAN, TILE, FENCEDBACKYARD. NO FLOODZONE! $349,900. MLS#C7402794 DEBRASAUNDERS, ALLISONJAMESREALESTATE941-380-1961 SELLINGYour Home? 941-800-1680-Our Trademark --To Sell Fast at Best Price!Allan & Nicuta NielsenCertified Luxury Agent by Josh Flag fromMILLION DOLLAR LISTING on BRAVO TVwww.HomeMaxi.com 1030 WATERFRONT HOMES LAKE SUZY Magnificent 3/2/2 Pond/Lake Location Home! BRAND NEW A/C SYSTEM Dining Room, Newly Installed Granite Counter Kitchen, Sizable Dinette, Area Opens to That Spacious Covered Lanai and POOL Area! Master Bedroom w/ Sitting Area and Bath. Oversized Garage w/ Workbench. Solar Heater Pool Features NEW Heater, Pump & Motor. All Appliances and 1 Year Warranty! Enjoy Golfing? Check Out Kingsway Golf & Country Club in the Neighborhood! $289,000. Sharon Kerr 941-286-7315 Coldwell Banker Sunstar Realty Y Y ouSa ouSa ve ve BigBuc BigBuc k s k s Shopping Shopping Cla ss ified s Cla ss ified s PORT CHARLOTTE 3/2/2 SAILBOATWATERFRONTPOOLHOME! ONLYMINUTESTOCHARLOTTEHARBOR, FANTASTICWATERVIEWOFLAKE, WELLMAINTAINED! $379,000 BARBMCHENRY941-833-1667COLDWELLBANKERSUNSTARREALTY PORT CHARLOTTE 4/4/2 BOATERS DREAM! Well-maintained waterfront pool home. Handicapped friendly. $488,500 Jackie Thornberry Harbor Coast Realty 941-740-4580 1030 WATERFRONT HOMES PORT CHARLOTTE 41 Robina Street Stunning 4/3/2 Waterfront SALTWATER POOL & SPA Home w/ Great Room, Split Bedroom Floor Plan, Gourmet Kitchen w/ Aquarium Window Breakfast Nook. Fabulous Master Bedroom w/ Separate Shower, Dual Sinks and Garden Tub! Upgrades Galore! Situated on a Dead End Street, this Location Offers a Peaceful, Natural Setting w/ Wildlife, Birds & Tranquility of Living on the Water. 1 Year Home Wa rranty at Closing! $348,900 Sharon Kerr 941-286-7315 Coldwell Banker Sunstar Realty PUNTA GORDA-SAYWOWTOTHIS2 STORY4/5.5/2 ESTATEON30 ACRESINCLUDESFREESTANDING2 STORYGARAGE WITH2 IN-LAWAPTS. & DETACHED1 STORYHOME. PRIVATEBOATRAMP, NATURALSPRING, SECURITYCAMERAS, GATED, GRANITE, 10-20 CEILINGS, TRAVERTINE, MARBLE, ONYX, & SO MUCH MORE!! COMEANDSEETHEPINNACLE OFLUXURYINPARADISE! $4,500,000. STEFANIEPISH, 941-7161334 COLDWELLBANKERSUNSTAR 1040 CONDOS/VILLAS FOR SALE COASTAL CAPE HAZE LUXURY CONDO STUNNING2B/2BA W/PRIVATEGARAGE. TOTALLY REFURBISHED! NEWAPPLIANCES,ALLNEWTROPICAL FURNITURE& ACCESSORIES. TURN-KEYREADY. PRISTINE GATEDRESORT, POOL, SPA,CLUBHOUSE& LOTSMORE. MINUTESTOBEACH& BAY, $174,900. 941-769-0200 To Advertise in The Showcase of Homes Please Call 866-463-1638 or Email; special@sunnewspapers.net 1090 MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE PUNTA GORDA1/1 w/ Large Lanai in Punta Gorda RV Resort. Community Pool, Hot Tub, Clubhouse, Coin Washer & Dryer. $13,300. obo. Pets OK. $25.00 Background & Credit Check Req. 941-666-1757 GreatDealsin theClassifieds! VENICE RANCH MOBILE HOME ESTATESWALKING DISTANCE TO PUBLIX & CVS No Dogs, Cats ok! Call 941-488-5672 www.VeniceRanch.com Needs TLC 12x50, 1/1 Florida Room Asking 8,500 Needs Work 24x48, 2/2 Semi-Furnished Screen & Florida Rm Asking 18,000 1095 MANUFACTURED HOMES FOR SALE NEW 3/2 DblWide Delivered & Set-Up on Your Lot w/ Skirting, Steps & Air! Only $56,795. + Tax. Financing For ALL Credit Scores Avail! Prestige Homes, Punta Gorda 941-637-1122 1095 MANUFACTURED HOMES FOR SALE PORT CHARLOTTE 743 Nipigon Trail, Resident owned, Gated, Golfing Community, 4 pools, 2016 manufactured home, 1674 sq ft overall, Open Plan 2BR+ DEN/OFFICE Vaulted Ceilings, Wood/plank Ceramic Floors, Spacious Granite Kitchen. $177,400 Barb Collins 941-268-0505 Allison JamesHomes SAVE 25% UP TO $25,000 OFF THE PURCHASE OF YOUR NEW HOME! 55+ COMMUNITYW/ AMENITIES! 701 AQUIESTADRPUNTAGORDA, 33950 BUTTONWOODVILLAGE.COM941-212-1516 1110 OUT OF AREA HOMES DON'T MISS THIS ONE! Only $182,900. New cabin in western NC mtns w/views, fpl, vault ceilings. 2 bed/2 bath on 1.57 pvt acres. 828-286-2981 T urnyou r trashinto cash! Advertise youryard sa l e! 1210 HOMES FOR RENT 1/1 Tile Floors, Storage Shed, Window A/C, Mallory Ave, P.C$700/MO3/1 Tile & Carpet, Window A/C, Meehan Ave., P.C. $775/Mo 2/1/1 Florida Room, Window A/C, Melbourne St., P.C. $850/Mo2/2 Condo, Lanai,Comm. Pool, Rampart Blvd., P.C. $950/Mo *We Welcome NEW Listings* AWARD WINNINGSUNBELT MGT. SERVICES RENTALS COMPLETE LISTINGS (941) 764-7777 sunbeltmgtservices.com ENGLEWOOD Brand Ne w Home! 3/2/2, Granite, Stain less, 1612sf., Annual. $1600. mo. 1st, Last, Sec. 12330 Gulfstream. 941-214-0766 NEED A RENTAL Paradise Properties & Rentals, Inc 941-625-RENT F i n d i t i n t h e C l a s s i f i e d s 1240 CONDOS/VILLAS FOR RENT PORT CHARLOTTE/LAKE SUZY 13370 SW Pembroke Cir N, Fully Furn/or Not 3/2/2. Gorgeous with Granite, SS, Tile, Crown, Fla. Shutters. Employment, Credit. No Animals or Smoking. Annual. $1,400. 508-974-5084

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Page 6 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018CLASSIFIEDS 1240 CONDOS/VILLAS FOR RENT PUNTA GORDAs Newest Design for Villas has Arrived in the Downtown Area. Featuring 3br/2.5ba/1 car detached garage. Upgraded amenities that include porcelain plank tile, granite counter tops, SS appliances, Center island with open kitchen great room, Master baths have walk in showers with Dbl sink vanities. Large bedrooms with a nice size walk in closet in the master. Near community pool & club house At th e Oaks on Henry. Outdoor activities such as shopping, restaurants, fishing pier, marina and so much more. Contact Barbara Lisby @ Barnes & Phillips Real Estate 941-743-4200 or 941-628-5599 1320 APARTMENTS FOR RENT PUNTA GORDA Cl ean & C ozy one Bedroom, partially fur nished, tile, ceiling fans, court yard, N/S. Utilities incld except cable/internet. 941-575-7006 PUNTA GORDA Downtown, Up stairs, 1 Bdrm Apt, Unfurn. No Pets, All Utilities Included $1,000/mo. (941) 391-4856 F i n d y o u r B e s t F r i e n d i n t h e C l a s s i f i e d s VENICE ISLAND EFFICIENCY1 & 2 br, Call for Details. No Pets, 1 Year Lease 941-416-5757or 323-6466 1350 EFFICIENCIES FOR RENT HARBOUR HEIGHTS c l ose to river, newly renovated efficiencies w cable & internet, Sunny brookMotel 941-625-6400 1360 ROOMS FOR RENT P O RT C HARL O TTE hospital area, use of house, pool, on water, laundry, all wifi-phone, full cable and internet. $630/mo plus $600 dep. 941-623-3775 1390 VACATION/ SEASONAL RENTALS RENT THE BEST LIKENEWŽ LARGE2 BED/2 BATH W/PRIVATEGARAGE, BEAUTIFULLY APPOINTED, HEATEDPOOL. COASTALCAPEHAZEAREA. SO CLOSETOMANYBEACHES& BAY. LARGEDECKW/LAKEVIEW. 941-769-0200 ROTONDA 3/2/2 Den, Htd. Pool, Pool Serv, Granite, & SS Appliances.......$2,350/mo 3/2/2 Screen Lanai on Canal, New Tile, Carpet & Paint.................$1,500./mo 2/2 Condo, All Utilities Incl.....................$1,350/moWEST COAST/ PROPERTY Mgmt 941-473-0718www.rentalsflorida.net 1500 LOTS & ACREAGE SELLING YOUR HOME, CONDO, or LOT?We Can help you.Advertise your home, condo, or lot with us and reach over 175,000 readers in Charlotte, Sarasota, & DeSoto Counties and online everyday. Ask about our 90 day special.Call one of our classified experts for all the details at 866-463-1638 Realtors Welcome! PUNTA GORDA Double Lot in Pine Acres Mobile Home Park. Complete with electrical service, water, septic tank & Drive Entrance. No Motor Homes, No HOA fees. $27,500 Call 941-281-0234 419-784-6638 1600 BUSINESS FOR SALE PORT CHARLOTTE Restaurant/Pizzeria. Turn-Key!! Seats 50 People, Has Beer & Wine Lic. $80K. 941-286-0069 1620 COMMERCIAL/ INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY PORT CHARLOTTEApprox. 4000+sf Warehouse/Building with Yard. Great Location! $1600/mo 941-628-2883 3000 NOTICES 3010 ANNOUNCEMENTS FREE MERCHANDISE ADS!! WELCOME TO OUR WEBSITE! To Place a FREE Merchandise Ad Go to: sun-classifieds.com Click on Place Ad. If You`ve Advertised Online with Us Before or Not Just Click Register and Follow the Prompts. FREE Ads are for Merchandise UNDER $500. and the Ad Must be Placed Online by You. One Item Per Ad, the Ad Must be 3 Lines or Less, Price Must Appear in the Ad. Your Ad Will Appear Online for 7 Days and in Print Wednesday ThroughSunday. Some Restrictions Do Apply. LIMIT 5 FREE ADS PER WEEK Need To Place a Classified Ad? Enter Your Classified Ad and Pay With Your Credit Card 24 Hours a Day, 7 Daysa Week. 3065 BIBLE STUDY & CHURCHES BIBLE STUDY BEGINNING SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 2ND-SEPTEMBER 30TH @5PM. The End of MeŽ (No Meeting on September 16th) New Hope Baptist Church Fellowship hall. 2100 Englewood Rd. Eng. FL 34223 Public is invited and encouraged to attend. $10/ Workbook fee. www.NewHopeBC4U.org To register or for more information, call the church office at 941-474-7647 or e-mail kay@newhopebc4u.org. C AL VAR Y BIBLE C HUR C H 1936 E. Venice Ave. Venice Friday at 9am. Study features video teachings of noted Bible Scholars on various subjects. For more info. Call Rev. Jones at: 941-485-7070 or visit www.CBCVenice.com CERTIFIED CHRISTIAN COUNSELING 941-876-4416Liberty Community Church North Port Charlotte Charlotte County House of Prayer Night Watch Fridays 7pm-9pm Worship-Word-Prayer One River-One Stream 992 Tamiami Trail Unit I Port Charlotte 941 249-8946 cchop.org CO MMUNITY C ENTER 4PM 7PM each Wednesday. Christ the King Lutheran Church, 23456 Olean Blvd. PC, Open to All Ages. For more info 941-766-9357 FAITH BUILDERS A Basic Study to Build your Christian Faith. Call Pastor Gumm at Christ the King Lutheran Church for times. 941-766-9357 Port Charlotte GATEWAY WORSHIP PRAYER & HEALING ROOMS If you need healing, we want to pray with you! Our prayer teams are available to minister to you every Thursday 7:30 pm-8:30 pm. For information call 863-832-4418 5377 Dunkin Rd., Punta Gorda 33982 Jesus Still Heals Today! 3065 BIBLE STUDY & CHURCHES Lutheran Church of the Cross 2300 Luther Rd., Deep Creek Bible Study Thursdays 10-11:30 and Sundays @ 9 AM Questions and/or Info (941) 627-6060 NEW SEASON FULLGOSPEL MINISTRIES Meets Every Wednesday at 3320 Loveland Blvd Port Charlotte, Fl (Held at Board of Realtors Building Near Visani's Restaurant) Food at 6:30PM and Fellowship Starts at 7:00PM Everyone Welcome!! Pamela Sams 941-268-3589 THE SO UND O F SO UL Saturday, August 25, 11:00 a.m.-12:00 noon, Mid-County Regional Library, Room B, Forrest Nelson Blvd., Port Charlotte. Sing HU, an ancient name for God, and learn how to connect to the Holy Spirit. Experience inner peace and calm, divine love, expanded awareness, spiritual self-discovery and growth, and healing of the heart. Then participate in Spiritual Conversation. Fellowship, Ligh t refreshments, and Free CD. Presented by Eckankar in Port Charlotte for people of all faiths. 941-766-0637. www.TheSoundofSoul.or g UNI Q UE & INF O RMATIVE DVD Every Sunday @ 6pm. Disussion After at El Jobean Baptist 941-769-6291 3070 BURIAL LOTS/CRYPTS F O RE S T LAWN MEM O RIAL GDNS 2 spaces, Eternal love, $4350. 214-794-6326 3090 LOST & FOUND HELP ME TO GET HOME! I am a Female Black Teacup Chihuahua. I Got Lost at Placida Ave. & Florida Ave. in Grove City on 8/12 My Name is Nikki. Please Call 941-268-1337 FINDYOUR BESTFRIEND INTHE CLASSIFIEDS! 3091 ARTS CLASSES Beginning watercolor classes with award winning artist Robert Broyles at North Port Hobby Lobby. Private lessons also avail Call 941-875-8163 3095 EXERCISE CLASSES GULF COAST ACUPUNCTURE 151 Center Rd. Wednesdays 5:30pm Thursdays 9:00 am Saturdays 8:30am YOGA FOR BEGINNERS Proceeds to Venice Wildlife Center Call Rick or Mary 941-488-1769 To Announce Your Class Information Call 866-463-1638 or Email; special@sunnewspapers.net 3096 RELIGION CLASSES BEGIN YOUR DAY IN BIBLE STUDY Christ the King Lutheran Church, 23456 Olean Blvd. Tuesdays 10AM-11AM. For more info 941-766-9357 Port Charlotte F AITH LUTHERAN CHURCH 4005 Palm Drive, Punta GordaVarious Days & Times CONFIRMATION/BIBLE STUD Y Adult Infomational Class 941-639-6309 START YOUR DAY RIGHT Bible Study Thursdays 10:00-11:30 LUTHERAN CHURCH OF THE CROSS 2300 Luther Rd., Deep Creek and Sundays at 9:00 a.m. Questions and/or Info (941) 627-6060 4000 FINANCIAL 4080 LOANS / MORTGAGES LOANS$500-$3,000 (941)-423-0142 5000 BUSINESS SERVICES A N OCC UPATI O NAL LI C may be required by the Cit y and/or County. Please call th e appropriate occupational licensing bureau to verify. 5000 BUSINESS SERVICES 5006 ALUMINUM ALL AMERICAN RENOVATIONS LIC& INSUREDFAMILYOWNED& OPERATEDSPECIALIZINGINRESCREENING,BUILDINGANDREPAIRING. SCREWCHANGEOUTS PRESSUREWASHING& PAINT-INGPOOLCAGES, LANAIS,FRONTENTRYWAYSETC... 941-915-3381 SERVINGSARASOTACOUNTYFREEESTIMATES SURFSIDE HOME IMPROVEMENTSLanais, Bathrooms, Kitchens, Windows, Storm Shutters, Screen Rooms and more! 30 Years Local Family Owned & Operated. 941-766-0331Lic#CBC1261010 5007 ANIMAL REMOVAL GOT RATS? OR OTHER CRITTERS? Call 941-777-3247 www.venicecritters.com 5020 APPLIANCE SERVICE/REPAIR GARY DRAKE DRYER VENT CLEANING & INSPECTION. 30 yrs. Exp. (941)-889-7596 THE VENT DOCTOR You Won't Drink Dirty Water, Why Breathe Dirty Air? Schedule Your Air Duct Cleaning Now and SAVE 10% Off with this Ad! We also offer Dryer Vent Cleaning 941-268-9525 Competent, Thorough & Reliable. Lic. Fla. Home Inspector. 5050 ADULT CARE HONEST, CARING PERSONALASSISTANT AVAIL. TOCAREFORYOUR LOVEDONE! I WILLCAREFOR YOURSASI DOMYOWN! DR. APTS, LITECLEANINGAND MEALPREP, ERRANDS& MUCH MORE. (941)-979-2887 INDEPENDENT CARE GIVER10 years experience For elders who need assistance with showering, light food prep, light exercise and around the house care. Please Call Donett Marie 813-858-2697 5051 CHILD CARE ALL CHILDCARE FACILITIES MUST INCLUDE, WITH ADVERTISEMENT, STATE OR LOCAL AGENCY LICENSE NUMBER. FLORIDA STATE LAW requ i res all child care centers and day care businesses to register with the State of Florida. The Sun Newspapers will not knowingly accept advertising which is in violation of the law 5054 CONTRACTORS BLUE PARROT CONSTRUCTION Custom Homes Commercial & Residential Renovations 941-662-0366 Cell: 941-662-0266BlueParrotConstruction@aol.com www.BlueParrotConstruction.comCBC1258748/Fully Insured EDWARD ROSS CONSTRUCTION Services, Inc. 941-408-8500 pool cages, Scr. lanais, etc... ERYK`S REMODELING INC. Specializing in Home Remodeling & Repairs. 35 Years Experience. Lic# RR282811696/INS. (239)-682-2758 JLS ENTERPRISES INCQuality & Dependability Remodeling Painting Additions Drywall Carpentry Repairs Odd Jobs & more. STATE CERTIFIED LIC #CRC033392941-468-9701 TEDDY`S HANDYMAN & REMODELING, INC. No Job Too Big or Too Small! (941)-629-4966 Lic./Ins. Serving NP, Charlotte & PG CRC 1327653 5057 CONCRETE FL O RIDA CO N C RETEDRIVEWAYSSIDEWALKSADDITIONSRESIDENTIAL& COMMERICALNEWCONSTRUCTION941-628-5965 INS/LICCG034909 5057 CONCRETE PRO PATH CONCRETE Driveways Patios Sidewalks Pads Free Estimates 941-286-6415 Lic #AAA-11-00081 RICH LANDERS STUCCO, INC. Honest, Reliable work! LIC/INS New Const & Remodels. Rusted bands & wire lathe repair. spraycrete & more (941)-497-4553 POOL DECKS, Driveway Designs Garage Floors Patios and more. QUALITY Lic 941-375-1103 Insu 5060 CLEANING SERVICES MRS CLEANING UP! 1st Class Cleaning Service! Specials Now! Now offering Home Watch Services! 941-204-8057 www.mrscleaningup.com Lic & Insured A&R PRO WINDOW CLEANERS In/Out, Tracks & Screens, Mirror Walls, Ceiling Fans, Also Vinyls, Clean & Polish, H/W Team. Lic#25014 & Ins. 941-441-8658 H.D Nandas Housecleaning ServiceSpecial Offers, Weekly Bi-Weekly Move ins & Move Outs Vacations, Office, New Construction. FREE Estimates. Lic/Insured 941-769-4455 HOUSE CLEANING Licensed, Insured & 20 yr exp Punctual & Trustworthy! References available 941-548-8804 RABYS CLEANING SERVICE ResidentialServing Punta Gorda to Venice 941-504-7370 SO FRESH AND SO CLEANBUSINESS& RESIDENTIAL BASICCLEANDEEPCLEAN MOVEIN`S& MOVEOUT`S NEWCONSTRUCTIONREMODELCLEAN-UP INDOOR& OUTDOOR WINDOWWASHINGKAYLAHILLIS(941)-786-2275 5065 DRYWALL CHARLOTTE COUNTY DRYWALL INC. SPECIALIZINGINHOMEREPAIRS. NOJOBTOOSMALL! 941-763-0606 LIC./INS. COMPLETE DRYWALL Hang,Finish, Patchwork, All Textures, Popcorn Removal, and Paint. Matt Potter 941-232-8667Lic.& Ins CRC1328482 DEPENDABLE DRYWALL & REMODELING PATCHREPAIRSNEWHOMES941-639-4440 LIC.#SCC131150207INSUREd 5070 ELECTRICAL DRM ELECTRICAL SERVICE, Plug Into Personalized ServiceŽElectrical Maintenance Repairs Troubleshooting 941-480-0761 941-366-3646 LUMINOUS ELECTRIC NO JOB TOO SMALL! LIC# EC13007383941-777-4320 5080 EXCAVATING/ BUSH HOG BRYAN LAND SERVICES LLCLand Clearing Excavating Grading Underdrain Free Estimates (863)-263-8250 Lic./Ins. 5083 FLOORING Bill Noland Ceramic Tile, IncRepairs & All Phases of FlooringWe Bring Samples To You! Mobile Showcase Tile, Laminates, Carpet & Baseboards. Porcelain Tile Wood look Planks $1.89/Sqft, Waterproof Vinyl Planks $3.29/Sq Ft941-423-4054 Cell 941-276-0814Licensed & Insured PGI 9906758 North Port 11546 Charlotte AAA007730 5089 HANDYMAN / GENERAL REPAIR A C ARPENTER AR O UND THE HOUSE for all your car pentry needs! James M. Okell 941-270-1693 BOBCATProfessional HOME Services *Roof Cleaning/Repair, *Power Washing, *Seal Coating, *Landscaping, *Tree Removal. Serving Port Charlotte, Punta Gorda, Venice, Englewood, & North Port. 941-979-0315 5089 HANDYMAN / GENERAL REPAIR DAVID J SHEPARD, JR., OVER20 YEARS INCHARLOTTECOUNTY, HANDYMANSVCS, WOODROT, WINDOWS& DOORS, DRYWALL& STUCCOREPAIR, PAINTING, ETC. 941-627-6954 OR941456-6953 LIC# RR282811062 PREFERRED HANDYMAN Over 30 Years Experience! For All Your Small Home Repairs Including Pressure Washing! NO JOB TOO SMALL! Call Steve 760-403-3709 5090 HEATING & AIR HI G HLAND Heating and Air Conditioning Sales & ServiceCall Tom 941-236-6359 FL#CAC1814414 KMF AIR CONDITIONING INC.Sales, Service and Installation FREEservice call with repairs Lic & insured CAC057537 Kevin M Ferero941-875-1956 S.O.S. A/C & Heat 941-468-4956AIRCONDITIONINGSYSTEMSCOOLINGMADEAFFORDABLE! INSTALLED10 YRWARRANTY ST. LIC#CAC1816023SOSAIRFL.COM 5100 HOME & COMMERCIAL IMPROVEMENT $75.00 PER PANEL SLIDING GLASS DOOR REPAIRS Wheels Tracks & LocksLicensed & Insured, Free Est. since 1981 Call Bob 941-706-6445 www.SlidingDoorsandmore.com Low overhead = Low prices! Seizethesales withClassified! A & R Quality Homes Inc.Customer Satisfaction is our goal. Kitchen/bath remodels Pressure cleaning, Interior & exterior painting Concrete/driveways/ walkways/slabs Stucco/repairs/fascia/ soffit Pool deck resurfacing Doors/WindowsFully licensed and insured941-429-1285 941-626-0315 License # CRC1329404 ALUMASERV BEST PRICES IN TOWN GUARANTEED!!Screen Rooms, Carports, Sheds, Entryways, Pan Roofs, Complete Roofs, Vinyl Windows, Storm Panels, Awnings, Rescreens Repair & Service.941-627-9244Visit: alumaserv.net #SC131149736 COMPLETE CLEAN PRESSURE WASHING Excellent Rates20+ YEARS EXPERIENCE941-460-4936Lic/ins www.completecleanpw.com DO YOU HAVE LOOSE, HOLLOW OR BUCKLING TILES?Inject-A-Floor-System can help. Grout Cleaning/Staining, Marble Cleaning, Tile Repair. 941-893-8475

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The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 7CLASSIFIEDS 5100 HOME & COMMERCIAL IMPROVEMENT FIR S T C H O I C E C ABINET S Custom Cabinets LLC Kitchens, Baths, Custom Cabinets, Countertops, Hardwood, Laminate, Solid Surface. Commercial, Residental. 941-505-5570 GARAGE FLOORS DONE RIGHT! Epoxy Flakes, Quartz, Silica. In Charlotte County over 30 yrs! 941-628-0251 GUTTERS 6Ž S eam l ess. Ken Violette, Inc. (941) 240-6699Lic.CGC#060662/Ins. H.D. MAINTENANCE/ HANDYMAN 24 Hr Home Repair Pressure Cleaning, Painting, Light Fixtures, Drywall & Much More! FREE ESTIMATES Ed 941-726-7776 Lic. & Ins. HANDYMANHome repairs. 30+ yrs Exp. Call 941539-1694 J&JHANDYMANPainting, Pressure Washing & Much More!Over 40Years Experience & Satisified Customers Service with YOU in Mind. Reasonable, Reliable & Honest.Serving Englewood, Venice & Sarasota AreasLARGERORSMALLERPROJECTS, COMMERCIAL& RESIDENTIALLICENSED& FULLYINSUREDCALLJOECHIMINIELLO(941) 525-7967 Johns Rescreening & Handyman Service Pressure Washing: Pool Decks, Driveways! No Job To Small, Free EstimatesLic9341./Ins.941-883-1381 MOTTERNIZED LLC Home Services Specialist *All Home Repairs *Custom Built Cabinets, Bookcases & Closet Systems. ALL WORK GUARANTEED Please Call or Text Steve 941-661-8318 FREE Estimates Lic & Ins ROOF CLEANING LOW PRESSURE LOW CHEMICAL 941-468-2744WWW.COMPLETECLEANPW.COMALLWORKPERFORMEDBYSTATECERT. ROOFINGCONTRACTOR StormTwisters Hurricane ShuttersShuttersUp.Today Roll Down Shutters Accordian Shutters Clear Hurricane Panels Hurricane Screens Bahama Shutters 941-626-8200 *A DIVISIONOFBAYBRIDGEHOMESLic#CBC1254261 5108 JUNK REMOVAL MOVE IT JUNK REMOVAL Got Junk? We like to Move It, Move It! 941-803-4959 5110 LAWN/GARDEN & TREE AN OCCUPATIONAL LICENSE may be required by the Cit y and/or County. Please call th e appropriate occupational licens ing bureau to verify A JAMISON TREE SERVICE Complete & Professional 15% Sr Discount! FREEEST. LIC. & INSUREDENGL941-475-6611ORN. PORT941-423-0020 SERVINGCHARLOTTEANDSARASOTAFOROVER20 YEARS.JAMISON-TREESERVICEINC.COM A PLUS LAWN CARE LLC Commercial & Residental Landscaping & Maintenance 941-769-7261 Lic & Insured AFFORDABLE LAWN CARE Flat Rates from Bradenton to Punta Gorda. FREE Estimates. 941-706-5569 Lic. & Ins. ALTMANTREESERVICE Tree Trimming, Removal, Stump Grinding. Lic & Ins. Call Mike Altman 941-268-7582 AMERICAN IRRIGATIONCall 941-587-2027 FREE ESTIMATES!!! Licensed & Insured Charlotte Co. lic#AAA-1100010. Serving Charlotte and Sarasota Counties CHRIS RABYS LANDSCAPE Hedges Trimmed (Up to 8) Small Trees Trimmed & Shaped Shrubs Trimmed Mulch Laid Serving Port Charlotte & North Port 941-623-3601 DP`s ABILITY TREE SERVICE Removals, Stump Grinding, Palm Trimming, Shaping, Oaks Thinned & Raised Up. 19 Yrs. Exp. Free Estimates! 941-889-8147 Lic#00000192 & Insured. GENERAL LAWN & Landscape services. (941)-426-7844 Wright & Son Landscaping Inc 5110 LAWN/GARDEN & TREE FLORIDA TREE INC .Tree Trimming & Removal Stump Grinding Lawn Service Bucket Service 941-613-3613 pcftree.comLic./Ins. J RIZ TREESERVICESComplete Tree & Palm Service. HURRICANE SEASON IS HERE! BE PREPARED!SPECIALIZING IN DANGEROUS TREE REMOVAL.Servicing all Charlotte & Sarasota Counties FREE ESTIMATES 941-306-7532 Lic & Ins MATHEWS TREE SERVICE Specializes in Dangerous Limb & Tree Removals941-303-3252Full Service Tree Care Quality Lawn Care Storm Damage Clean -Up Tree & Limb Removal N O W A C C E P T I N G N E W L A W N A C C O U N T S 9 4 1 4 6 8 4 3 7 2 ISA Certified Arborist John Cannon FL-6444A South Sarasota & Charlotte Co. PREMIER STUMP GRINDING,LLC Let me Help you have your stump removed today. No stump too small or big! Licensed & insured (941)-662-9779 RAINSCAPE INC,Irrigation, Maintenance, Repair, Installation. Monthly Maintenance starts at $40. FREE ESTIMATES 941-888-2988 SANDEFURS HOME &TREE Maintenance Tree trimming, removal. We do it all!License/Insured941-484-6042 TERRY SOWERS WINDOW CLEANING Lawn Mowing, Trimming, Landscaping. Servicing All Areas. Per Cut or Contract. Call (941)-628-0751 Treemendous Tree, Inc. Certified Arborist Tree Removal Stump Grinding Lic./Insured Shrub & Tree Nursey CALL TODAY! 941-426-8983 www.northporttree.com FL-6444 A Treemendous Tree, Inc. NURSERY PINEAPPLE PLANTS fruiting $30/ea SNOW QUEEN HIBISCUS 7 gal $20.00 NICE MANY OTHER SHRUBS AVAILABLESTOP IN TO SEE US MONDAY SATURDAY 9AM-3PM 6068 RUFF ST. NORTH PORT OR CALL 941-426-8983 FL-6444 A WENDELL ALBRITTON TREE SERVICE VERY AFFORDABLE Will Work with you!! 941-763-5042 Lic & Insured! 5121 MARINE REPAIR C APTAIN R O N S MARINE CONSTRUCTION Seawalls, Docks, Pilings, Boat Lifts. 941-637-1128 Lic# CRC1328423 & Insured. 5130 MOVING/HAULING ALL TYPE S O F C LEAN-UP S Same Day Service! 24 Hrs. a Day! 941-764-0982 or 941-883-1231 ODYSSEY MOVERS Your Journey Begins With Us! Licensed & Insured.941-803-4959Lic. # 2539 R O B S O N THEM O VE, inc. Moving and Delivery Honest, Reliable, Courteous! Great Rates! 941-237-1823 5140 PAINTING/ WALLPAPERING Best Prices -Quality Job Best Coast Painting and Pressure Washing Residential/Commercial 10% Off With Ad! 941-815-8184 AAA00101254 STEVENS CUSTOM PAINTINGRes/Comm. Int/Ext FREE EST. Lic. & Ins. 941-255-3834 SUPERIOR PAINTING, INC. Full Spray Shop 941-474-9091Lic # AAA009837 5140 PAINTING/ WALLPAPERING BEST PRICINGCALLNOWTOLOCKINANAMAZINGBANGFORYOURBUCKFROMASEASONEDPAINTER941-468-2660AAA0010126630 YEARSEXP. LIC/INSURED FORMERFIREFIGHTER LARRY ESPOSITO PAINTING INC Its Not What We Do, Its How We Do It!ŽFree Estimates, 941-764-1171 Lic & Insured AAA007825 Nathan Dewey Painting CoCommercial & Residental Interior & Exterior Pressure washing Handyman Services Free Estimates ~ Prompt Service941-484-4576 nathandeweypainting.com SWEENEY`S PAINTING INC.Pressure Cleaning MildewTreatment Painting Interior & Exterior Free Estimates Sr. Discounts 941-916-1024 Lic# AAA0010702 We Do It A Shade Better! LARRY BATES PAINTING Free Estimates Locally Owned & Operated Nominated Best Painter Of The Year in 2016! 941-625-1226Lic/Ins #RRR0002261 5155 PET CARE Use DD-33 to control Fleas & Ticks on Dogs and Cats topically. AT TRACTOR SUPPLY (www.kennelvax.com) 5160 PLUMBING LARRY` S PLUMBIN G Re Pipes (Most in 1 Day) Beat An y Estimate Complete Servic e 941-484-5796 Lic.#CFC1425943 MASTER PLUMBER SEMI-RETIRED, REASONABLERATES. LICENSEDANDINSURED. 941-830-0106 CFC1429017 5180 PRESSURE CLEANING BAILEYS PRESSURE CLEANING Complete Exterior House Painting! Call 941-497-1736 FULL HOUSE PRESSURE WASHINGRates Starting At: Tile Roofs $150 Houses $65 Pool Cage/Decks $65 Driveways Exterior Painting, Pool Deck Coatings AND MORE!! 941-451-7550 Lic./Ins MR. PRESSURE CLEANINGSAFE, NO PRESSUREROOF CLEANING941-257-8624Mr.Pressurecleaning.com Fully Lic & Insured 5184 SCREENING ALL ABOUT ALUMINUM & SCREEN: Rescreen & new. 941-876-4779 wescreenflorida.comLic# SA37, AL0511993X BREEZE THRU RESCREEN LLC. Full Rescreen/Panel Repair. Power Washing Pool Cage Painting We have you covered! Call Today for your FREEEstimate. 941-661-7897 Lic./Ins. RESCREENING by NORTHSTAR Free Estimates. 941-725-7599 Lic# CC20597 & Insured Southwest RescreenComplete Rescreening: $1,395. (up to 1,500 SF)941-465-2318Free Estimates! We Accept All Major Credit CardsLic./Ins. 5185 ROOFING COMPLETE ROOFING SOLUTIONS OF FLORIDA Reroofing and Repairs Commercial and Residential Flat and Metal Roof Restoration Free Estimates All Work Guaranteed George M. Schwartz Jr. Owner 941-961-8263 Lic # CCC1325750 EXPERT ROOF REPAIRS at Prices you can AFFORD!! 2 YEARS UNLIMITED Guarantee on leaks. Call Roger 941-661-2020 Licensed and Insured LEONARDSROOFING&INSULATIONINC.FAMILYOWNED&OPERATED SINCE1969Shingle, Tile, Built-Up, SinglePly, Metal, Full Carpentry, Service AvailableSARASOTA COUNTY ONLY!Reagan Leonard 941-488-7478LIC# RC0066574 5185 ROOFING PAUL DEAO ROOFING PROTECTINGYOURBIGGESTINVESTMENT. 22 YRSEXP. 941-441-8943 LIC#1329187 ROOF LEAK PATROL, INC. RESIDENTIAL/COMMERCIAL Repairs, Reroof, Carpentry, etc... 35 yrs exp. Lic/insured#RCA065387941-474-ROOF (7663) www.RoofLeakPatrol.com T O M J O Y C E R O O F I N G H U G E * S P E C I A L S * 4 5 Y e a r s o f Q u a l i t y W o r k a n d E x p e r i e n c e 9 4 1 4 8 4 9 8 0 4 9 4 1 4 2 9 1 8 0 0 lic#1325725 941-483-4630ShinglesSlats MetalTileRepairs Old Roof Removal OurSpecialty Full CarpentryFree EstimatesLic.# CCC068184 Fully Insured 5195 TILE/GROUT TILES BY FRANK, INC Backsplashes, Tub & Shower walls, shower floors, Floors & Repairs. "IT'S NOT A JOB WHEN YOU DO SOMETHING YOU LOVE". (941)-307-9507 5225 WINDOW CLEANING Window Cleaning,RESIDENTIAL& COMMERCIAL WINDOWCLEANINGPRESSUREWASHING1 0 % O F F P : 9 4 1 9 7 9 1 6 5 4 LIC/INSURED 6000 MERCHANDISE GARAGE SALES 6001Arcadia 6002Lake Suzy 6003Deep Creek 6004Port Charlotte 6005Punta Gorda 6006North Port 6007Englewood 6008Rotonda 6009Gulf Cove 6010S. Gulf Cove 6011S. Venice 6012 Venice 6013 Nokomis/Osprey 6014 Garage Sales 6015Flea Market 6020Auctions MERCHANDISE 6013 Moving Sales 6025Arts & Crafts 6027Dolls 6030Household Goods6035 Furniture 6038 Electronics 6040TV/Stereo/Radio6060Computer Equip6065Clothing/Jewelry/ Accessories6070Antiques & Collectibles 6075Fruits/Veges 6090Musical 6095Medical 6100Health/Beauty 6110 Trees & Plants 6120Baby Items6125Golf Accessories6128Exercise/Fitness6130Sporting Goods 6131 Firearms6132 Firearm Access. 613 5Bikes/Trikes 6138Toys 6140Photography/Video 6145Pool/ Spa & Supplies6160Lawn & Garden6161 Outdoor Living 6165Storage Sheds/ Buildings6170Building Supplies6180Heavy Constr. Equipment 6190Tools/Machinery6220Office/Business Equip & Supplies6225Restaurant Supplies 6250Appliances 6260Misc. Merchandise 6270Wanted to Buy/T rade 6005 PUNTA GORDA AREA GARAGE SALES JIMS ESTATE SALE FRI & SAT 9-3 SUN 10-2 2701 BAY CT. PGI CONTENTSOFHOME! 6005 PUNTA GORDA AREA GARAGE SALES S AT. 8 : 30 AM2 : 30 PM & SUN. 8:30AM-1:00PM 1100 Muscovie Ct. P.G.I. (off Rio Villa) HUGE ESTATE SALE! Furniture, Refrigerator, Household, Clothing & MUCH MORE!! S AT.S UN. 8 AM2 PM 2800 Palm Dr. (Charlotte Park) MOVING SALE!! Furniture, Tools, Household & MUCH MORE! Great Prices!! SAT .SUN 8AM NOON 1701 Boca Raton Ct. P.G.I. MOVING SALE! Large Solid Wood Dining Room Table, Tons of Glassware & MUCH MORE!! 6006 NORTH PORT AREA GARAGE SALES NORTH PORT ESTATE SALE Fri-Sun ~ 10am-6pm 4793 GLORDANO Ave. ALL MUST GO! Cash Only ~ Come Own! b-keen.com/SALES 6020 AUCTIONS DRYER, G as. reduced. In excellent condition. $125, OBO 941-416-0575 6026 SEWING S ER G ER BABY L OC K serger Model BLE1AT Works $100 941-627-6815 SEWING MACHINE Si nger Model 5932T, doesnt work $40, OBO 941-697-4713 6030 HOUSEHOLD GOODS BACKREST gray f a b r i c use on bed or floor barely used $8 941-787-3208 BATH ACCESSORIES 7 pc re d tropical litter/tissue/lotion/soap plant/etc. $50 941-697-0501 BRITA PITCHER 10 C up White, 6 new (boxed) filters All/ $28 941-787-0328 CARGO CARRIER Th u l e cargo carrier -never used. Comes with bag. $75 412-956-0128 CHINA 83PC serves 12 11 serving pieces, white, platinum edge, LN $120 941-830-0524 C HINA C ABINET Beauti f ul China Cabinet, moving must sell $200, OBO 941-855-0656 CO MF O RTER S twin 14pc T Hil figer dk grn palms 82Wx75H tab curt LN $80 941-697-0501 CRYSTAL 40PC 12 water 12 champagne 8 wine 8 cordial silver rim LN $60 941-830-0524 C UTLERY IN BL OC K 9 PIE C E CHICAGO GOOD CONDITION $20 941-473-4168 DRYER LG re d e l ec, w / black base $325, OBO 941-661-1261 EXPANDABLE LUGGAGE 3 sizes-in-1, plus matching tote JM New York $45 941-276-1881 FLATWARE 88 P C serves 1 6 Silkema German stainless 8 serve pcs $100 941-830-0524 FLATWARE 88PC serves 16 Silkema German stainless 8 serve pcs $120 941-830-0524 F O LDIN G C ARD TABLE/4 CHAIRS $20 941-473-4168 FOLDING SCREEN DOOR 36Ž folds inward complete $50 941-587-9466 FRAMED PAINTIN G Beauti f ul 42ŽX54Ž must see reduced art bargain! $160 941-639-1517 HUT C HE S 2 Farm Fresh Wood great for dishes, pantry, collectables $125 407-484-1529 MI C R O WAVE Whirlpool White Counter top 1.1 cu ft w/turntable $25 941-697-1557 MIRR O R 41x 26 beveled glass, new in pkg. $25 941-235-2203 MR COFFEE 12 cup program mable black & stainless exc cond $20 941-276-1881 FREE MERCHANDISE ADS!! WELCOME TO OUR WEBSITE! To Place a FREE Merchandise Ad Go to: sun-classifieds.com Click on Place Ad. If You`ve Advertised Online with Us Before or Not Just Click Register and Follow the Prompts. FREE Ads are for Merchandise UNDER $500. and the Ad Must be Placed Online by You. One Item Per Ad, the Ad Must be 3 Lines or Less, Price Must Appear in the Ad. Your Ad Will Appear Online for 7 Days and in Print Wednesday ThroughSunday. Some Restrictions Do Apply. LIMIT 5 FREE ADS PER WEEK Need To Place a Classified Ad? Enter Your Classified Ad and Pay With Your Credit Card 24 Hours a Day, 7 Daysa Week. PI C TURE palm tree, 27x30, white frame, ex.c. $25 941-235-2203 P O RTABLE A C unit w/ heater, 12000BTU, Soleus, $149 910-200-1298 PR O JE C TI O N S Y S TEM Hi-de f Projector, spkrs, 6 screen, in boxes $350 obo 941-661-1261 RUGS 3 pc 54Ž x 79Ž 2 x 34Ž 2x76Ž brn/gold/rust patchwork pics avail $99 941-697-0501 6030 HOUSEHOLD GOODS STORAGE CUBE Bl ac k Cl ot h nice storage, side pocket $10, OBO 941-697-4713 TRAY Vi ntage C romwe ll h am mered alum 12x21 handles vil lage scene $15 941-830-0524 6035 FURNITURE BA SS ETT SO FA modern f loral beige/green/mauve, full uphol, xlnt $200, OBO 941-740-0357 BED MATTRESS & BOX $100 941-629-5550 BED, CRAFTSMATIC Twin w / Removable Handrails. Used Once! $2,000. 262-331-0916 BEDROOM SET 5 pc. Q ueen sleigh bed /mattress brown wood $300 407-484-1529 BEDR OO M S ET, 4pc C olonial, Solid Maple with Craftmatic Bed. $250 941-306-8583 CHAIR M e d green accent w/antique white cane $25, OBO 941-249-5077 COCKTAIL TABLE R oun d Medium Brown Color, All Wood $35 941-257-5500 COFFEE TABLE + 2 t i ere d en d tables, solid wood, leather tops, $280, OBO 941-740-0357 CO FFEE/ S IDE TABLE S (9) var ious sizes and shapes starting at $10, OBO 941-307-9211 CO FFEE/ SO FA TABLE S wrought iron thick beveled glass t ops $100 941-275-5837 CO U C HE S 3 RE G ULAR & one sleeper delivery available start ing at $100 941-307-9211 DESK 52Ž so lid oa k 2 fil e drawers glass top ex. cond. $150 941-492-5050 DINETTE SET TALL wroug ht iron 30Ž table frame+2 like ne w chairs $100 941-307-9211 DININ G R OO MHUT C H solid wood Drexel $200 414-899-0006 DINING ROOM SET table & chairs Drexel $400 414-899-0006 DINING ROOM TABLE GLASS TOP 60ŽLX42ŽW EX. COND. $250 941-539-5566 DINING SET 54Ž g l ass top on column+4 fabric upholstered chairs $150 941-307-9211 DINING SET ova l Gl ass ta bl e top70x39 4 lite uphol. chairs $100, OBO 941-743-6688 DRESSER 32Ž 3 drawers solid oak ex.cond $75 941-492-5050 DRE SS ER high boy 40Ž solid oak ex.cond $100 941-492-5050 DRE SS ER W OO D brown 7 drawers+mirror 70Ž X 18Ž X 30Ž $100 941-275-5837 END TABLE Wicker glass Coffee tables gret $45 941-580-4460 ENTERTAINMENT CENTER All glass & mirrors 3pcs 106wide. $150 941-743-6688 FOOT STOOL Q u il te d P atc hwork 30s Feedsack Replica Fabric $60 407-484-1529 FUT O N W OO D natural color f ull size 85Ž X 35Ž X 31Ž pressure washed $50 941-275-5837 I BUY FURNITURE Or anything of value! 941-485-4964 LADDER W oo d b ac k c h a i r blue cotton weave seat $35 407-484-1529 L O UN G E C HAIR S 1 electric li f t, 1 European Leather. $100 each OBO $100 941-661-3930 L O UN G E C HAIR S 1 Electric, 1 European Leather, $100 each or OBO $100 941-661-3930 MA SS A G E C HAIR S harper Image, low hours, 6 years stor age $490, OBO 941-661-1261 MATTRE SS & B O X Q UEEN $175 ALSO HAVE KING 941-629-5550 MATTRE SS KIN G 1 3 Ž memory foam+wood slats & steel foun dation $450 941-307-9211 MATTRE SS E S TWIN S IZE boxspring+frame+headboard+n ightstand $75 941-275-5837 O FFI C E C HAIR Black Vinyl, large $20, OBO 941-697-4713 PATI O S ET with table 4 chairs ornate chairs cushions. Exc. Cond. asking $90/obo 941 380-7224 PEDE S TAL TABLE 36 Ž High Top White w/ 4 High Top Chairs $150, OBO 941-697-1557 RATTAN C ART 30 Wx1 8 Dx 29 H med brn 2 doors casters $199 at Leaders $75 941-697-0501 RE C LINER R OC KER, swivel chair maroon leather ex.cond. $150 941-492-5050 ROCKER RECLINER L azy b oy also have a recliner, nice. each $185 941-580-4460 SOFA BEAUTIFUL T rop i ca l Colors. Like New. PGI area. $95 305-395-3333 SOFA CHAIR N ew N ever U se d Lays Flat. $150 941-625-0384 SWIVEL ROCKER + F ootstoo l pink upholstery, A+, 2 avail, ea $150, OBO 941-740-0357 TABLE R oun d W oo d 25ŽH 20Ždia. custom glass top Free aqua tblcth $12 941-787-3208 WINDSOR ROCKER Nichols & Stone, solid maple, ex. cond $85 941-235-2203

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Page 8 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018CLASSIFIEDS 6038 ELECTRONICS A T & T IPH O NE 8 plus rose gold with case 64 gigabyte $500 941-380-2429 TRANSPORT WHEEL CHAIR HAND BRAKES GOOD COND. $40 941-473-4168 6040 TV/STEREO/RADIO COLOR TV El ement 19Ž wor k s fine $40, OBO 941-697-4713 ROKU S tream i ng S t i c k se ld om used, good condition, remote $25 941-637-9979 TV CO N SO LE dark wood, glass doors, 48Žl, new. $75 941-235-2203 TV JVC 61Ž pro j ect i on w i t h ta bl e stand. Used little. $200, OBO 315-380-7296 6060 COMPUTER EQUIPMENT COMPUTER ACCESSORIES floppy discs-printers-ink-speakers-cables $10 941-445-5619 6065 CLOTHING/JEWELRY ACCESSORIES BLUE JEANS 15 o ld j eans L ev i redtag 32Ž-33ŽW & 30Ž-34ŽL old but good $2 941-445-5619 LEATHER JA C KET one med one lg $75ea 941-661-7158 TOPS JACKETS PANTS more Mens/Ladies mint $1 to $4 941-639-1517 6070 ANTIQUES COLLECTIBLES 1 90 7 R O LL S S ilver G host 1: 2 4 model with display case COA mint $75, OBO 941-697-0501 ALWAYS BUYING ANTIQUES, ART, SILVER NEW ENGLAND ANTIQUES (941) 639-9338 A UDREY HEPBURN C ANVA S Pop Art Breakfast at Tiffanys 22x18 $45 941-493-3851 BUYING OLD MONEY SILVERCOINS & PAPER MONEY. 941-626-7785 COPPER/BRASS VASE U n i te d A rab Republic Emerits-unique antique $25 941-639-1517 DIE C A S T C AR S $ 1 0 941-661-7158 PLATE S S pode 200 Anniversary Reticulated Cabinet floral print (2) ea $10 941-830-0524 W W 2 REMEMBERED 2 books & uncancelled stamps $20 ea or both $35 941-639-1517 6090 MUSICAL CLARINET AND case p l aya bl e condition, complete. $85 941-575-7793 CLARINET RAMPONI ma d e i n Italy, case, pads corks good. $75 941-575-7793 C LARINET RAMP O NI, made in Italy,case, pads corks good. $60 941-575-7793 CLARINET WITH CASE good playable condition, complete. $90 941-575-7793 6095 MEDICAL 4 WHEEL WALKER w /B as k et Brakes and Seat, NICE $75 941-268-8951 BED S IDE P O TTY Like newvery solid-2 to choose from $10 941-445-5619 BED S IDE CO MM O DE O R SHOWER CHAIR w Arms LIKE NEW Each $25 941-268-8951 POWER CHAIR JET 3 JAZZY NEW BATTERIES, CAN DELIVER $325 941-473-4168 P O WER LIFT C HAIR, 2 to choose from. $100 & $150. 941-625-0384 RAMP MOBILITY FOLDING 5 foot Aluminum $90 941-268-8951 S WIN G LIFT F O R POWER CHAIR FITS VAN $500 941-473-4168 WALKER 4 WHEEL Like new. Orig over $200. $85 941-580-4460 W ALKER brakes, storage, lightweight, 3 wheels. Plush. $65 941-580-4460 6100 HEALTH/BEAUTY 4 WHEEL WALKER Ad u l t w / brakes, padded seat and pouch NICE $79 941-493-3851 6110 TREES & PLANTS ALOE AGAVE b egon i a d ev il s backbone fern paddle plant purple queen $5 941-202-3696 A V OC AD O ( FL & HA SS) C ITRUS (1-3) Aechmea Primera Bromeliads $10 941-202-3696 BROMELIADS VARIOUS ki n d s shapes colors and sizes in pots starting at $5 941-202-3696 6110 TREES & PLANTS FRANGIPANI JATROPHA oyster pineapple pothos snake spider lily $5 941-202-3696 NURSERY LIQUIDATIONPlants, Trees, Shrubs, etc EVERYTHING MUST GO! 5659 SW Owens School St DEE OAKS NURSERY 863-494-3444 PONYTAIL PALM PAIR (5 ta ll) Madjool Palm Pair others each pair $100 941-202-3696 Treemendous Tree, Inc. NURSERYHUGE PINEAPPLE PLANTSw/ lots of fruit 2 for $50/ea MANY OTHERS AVAILABLE!STOP IN TO SEE US MONDAY SATURDAY 9AM-3PM 6068 RUFF ST. NORTH PORT OR CALL 941-426-8983 FL-6444 A 6125 GOLF ACCESSORIES GOLF BAG B ran d N ew w / tag, Naples Bay, tan/navy, tons of storage $150 941-740-0357 YELLOW JACKET 4G BATTERY CABLES Corrosion Resistant Best Golf Cart Cables $129.95/SET. VISIT DarsGolfCarts.com 941-769-1431 NO TEXT PLEASE 6126 GOLF CARTS 2015 Club Car Precedent $3995 BOB-CAT Green BRAND NEW BATTERIES Yellow Jacket Cables Monsoon Roof Matching Club Cover 48 volt ERIC Charger Factory Upholstery Folding Windshield Factory spoke Hubcaps Cooler, Sandbucket Excellent DOT Tires Wide Angle Mirror STK# 1824 941-769-1431 Visit DarsGolfCarts.com WE DELIVER FREE (25 MI.) Club Car DS 4 PASS $2850 Reconditioned 4 PASSENGERŽ Brand New Batteries NEW Flip Down rear seat NEW $Yellow Jacket Cables$ NEW Head & Taillights NEW Flip Down Windshield Aluminum Frame Chrome SS wheel caps Great Tires, Brakes, Mirror 36 Volt Charger Runs as it should! STK#D974 $2850 941-769-1431 Free Delivery (25 miles) Visit … Darsgolfcarts.com NO TEXT PLEASE CLUB CAR PRECEDENT $2995 RECONDITIONED 4 PASSENGER GOLF CART White w/Tan Top Flip Down Rear Seat CROWN BATTERIES $New Yellow Jacket Cables$ Battery Meter Factory Upholstery Head & Taillights Flip Down Windshield Chrome SS wheel caps All New Bushings Fresh Tires, Brakes, Mirror 48 Volt Charger, STK#R7 CALL: 941-769-1431 Free Delivery (25 miles) Visit … Darsgolfcarts.com NO TEXT PLEASE NEEDAJOB? CHECKTHE CLASSIFIEDS! Club Car Precedent $3595 RECONDITIONED 4 Passenger Golf Cart Tan w/Tan Top Flip Down Rear Seat BRAND NEW BATTERIES $New Yellow Jacket Cables$ Battery Meter Factory Upholstery Head & Taillights Flip Down Windshield Chrome SS wheel caps All New Bushings Fresh Tires, Brakes, Mirror 48 Volt Charger, STK#R8 Call: 941-769-1431 Free Delivery (25 miles) Visit … Darsgolfcarts.com NO TEXT PLEASE 6126 GOLF CARTS PASSION PINK Custom Build 2014 Club Car Precedent BRAND NEW BATTERIES Custom Pearl Pink Paint Tuck & Roll Upholstery NEW Yellow Jacket Cables NEW New Bushings NEW Folding Windshield NEW Head and Taillights NEW SS Wheel Covers New Rear Seat AVAIL. New Tires, Mirror Top and Charger STK#1823 $4995 941-769-1431 Delivery Inc. 25 MI. Visit DarsGolfCarts.com NO TEXT PLEASE 6128 EXERCISE / FITNESS EXER C I S E BIKE Pro f orm, NEW! Orig $200 Asking $150 OBO. TREADMILL, Proform Crosswalk, NEW! Orig $430 Asking $350, OBO 941-979-8162 EXER C I S E BIKE UPRIGHT w/Electronics $50 941-268-8951 GYM BAG B rown L eat h er, Like New! $20 941-257-5500 6130 SPORTING GOODS BATTIN G HELMET S O riole & KC size adjustable w tee shirts (L). $5 941-445-5619 FIREWOOD $100.00 PER PICK UP LOAD NOCAMPINGTRIPIS COMPLETEWITHOUTIT! PINE, OAK, ORCITRUSSPLIT, BUN-DLED, ANDREADYFORTHE FIREPIT! 941-468-4372 KNEE BOARD HO Ed ge Pro w/carry case Very Nice! $125 941-493-3851 RED LASER U n i versa l C r i mson Trace Red Laser Sight $75, OBO 941-661-7284 6131FIREARMS N O TI C E: S eller Acknowledges Compliance With All Exisiting Federal, State and Local Firearms Regulations and Laws in Regards to Sale and Transfer of Advertised Firearms. 6133 HUNTING & FISHING SUPPLIES CO RNER G UN C ABINET Lots of storage, holds 6 guns, locks. $350 941-457-3010 6135 BICYCLES/ TRICYCLES 70S SCHWINN VARSITY Good tires seat All clean & original Red $30 941-544-0042 ADULT TRICYCLE T ra il mate New tires tubes Mags Lg Seat & Basket $180 941-544-0042 BIKE HELMETS (3) Ultra Light, S-M, $10 each 941-257-5500 BIKE RACK 2 Bikes trunk mount or suv $15 941-268-8951 CANNONDALE MENS ULTE GRA, 54CM,red, ex. cond. $450 941-979-0712 FUJI R O AD RA C ER ELI OS C R O MOLY 24 SPEED COMP 54cm CLEAN $85 941-544-0042 R O AD BIKE M O T O BE C ANE Ridden 1 month. 21 Spd. 26Ž wheels, 22Ž frame. Like new $325 941-875-9030 TRIKE 3 Wheel Adult Brand new, Easy To Ride, Big Seat, In Box! $275 941-524-1025 U S A ADULT TRIKE DE SO T O Good 24 tires lg Seat & Basket $150 941-544-0042 6138 TOYS/GAMES G IANT JUMBLIN G tower 51 wood pieces. 3-4ft tall. New in box $50 941-330-6546 KIDS MEAL TOYS var i ety 90 s. 245 toys unopened. $175, OBO 315-380-7296 PLAYSTATION 2 w i t h games and memory card 2 controllers $75, OBO 941-661-7158 6145 POOL/SPA/ & SUPPLIES **SPAS & MORE** Family owned and operated for 20 years! www.spasandmoreflorida.com Over 40 Spas to choose from. We take trades! We Move Spas & We Buy Used! 941-625-6600 P OO L C LEANER W/H OS E Hayward Navigator Pro $35 910-578-5273 POOL COVER REEL ADJUSTABLE WIDTH $50, OBO 910-578-5273 6160 LAWN & GARDEN BI C Y C LE S 2 adult Boy & G irl matching coaster brake bikes $50, OBO 941-697-0155 CHAINSAW P ou li n e l ec 14i n, 12 amp, decent cond. $15 941-445-9069 HEDGE TRIMMER G as. Ryobi 26cc 22Ž HT NIB $145 941-485-0681 6160 LAWN & GARDEN C u ddl e up b y t h e fi re Firewood Split, Bundled and ready for the firepit! Pine, Oak, or Citrus, 941-468-4372 LAWNM O WER S napper Self-propelled 21Ž $75, OBO 941-485-0681 MCCLANE EDGER 4 wheel best edger made $75, OBO 941-697-0155 MOWER MURRAY RIDER 11HP, 30Ž CUTNEWBATTERY$425 (941)763-4818 POWERWASHER H us k y electric 1800psi works well manual $35 941-697-2163 PRE SS URE WA S HER Excell Honda 2700 psi $200, OBO 941-485-0681 PUSH LAWNMOWER Lawnboy 20Ž high wheel $65, OBO 941-485-0681 RIDING LAWN MOWER SNAP PER 30Ž12.5 HP. Good cond. dependable. Built for service to last. $450 941-875-9030 RIDING MOWER M urray, 30Ž cut, 11HP, runs good, cuts good, no reverse gear. $200 941-966-1820 SCO TT S S PEEEDY G REEN 3000 Broadcast spreader $15 716-969-6060 SUPER RECYCLER T oro Self-Propelled/21Žcut $60 716-969-6060 T O R O RIDIN G Mower Runs, needs tune up $250 941-626-8448 TRA C T O R C ub C adet, Auto, Hydrostic, 42Ž Cut. Horizontal Engine. $450. 941-743-8243 WATER SOFTENER M o d e l 2510 Econominder $150, OBO 941-485-0681 W EED EATER RY O BI E S30 GAS STRAIGHT SHAFT $15 716-969-6060 F i n d y o u r B e s t F r i e n d i n t h e C l a s s i f i e d s 6161OUTDOOR LIVING G IANT JUMBLIN G tower 51 wood pieces. 3-4ft tall. New in box $50 941-330-6546 Treemendous Tree, Inc. NURSERYPROFESSIONAL LANDSCAPE DESIGN SERVICES AVAILABLE!STOP IN TO SEE US MONDAY SATURDAY 9AM-3PM 6068 RUFF ST. NORTH PORTOR CALL 941-426-8983 FL-6444 A 6190 TOOLS/ MACHINERY EN G INE H O I S T Heavy duty (cherry picker) $150 863-491-0366 MOTOR STAND Like new, heavy duty $100 863-491-0366 60 G AL. AIR CO MPRE SSO R 5 H.P. / 220 V. New pump, newer motor $250863-491-0366 A C ETYLENE T O R C H Welding tips, cart, tanks w/gas $300 863-491-0366 CHAINSAW ELECTRIC 14in. 9am like new! $38 941-474-4254 G RINDER Rockwell Pedestal (2) 6Ž whls 1/2 HP,floor std 46ŽH. ex cond $350 941-496-4727 POLE TREE TRIMMER fi s k ers 14ft 1.125in.cut like new! $38 941-474-4254 POWER SANDER B&D 1.6 amp 1/4 in sand paper $12 941-474-4254 P O WERWA S HER Husky elec tric 1800psi works well manual $35 941-697-2163 R O LLIN G T OO L C HE S T & tools Craftsman tools and automotive testing equip. $300, OBO 817-680-9519 TABLE S AW, 4Ž, DREMEL MODEL 580-2 other tools for less $100 941-275-5837 VINTAGE PULLEY 12Ž metal large nice cond $60 941-426-4151 6232 CATS NOTICE : S tatute 585 195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots, and be free of intestinal and external parasites. EYE CANDYŽ EASY ON THE EYESŽ RESCUE CATS Drop dead gorgeous Siamese male, white female, Tabby Manx (no tail) and steal your heart away kittens. Experience Awesome everyday: get a cat! Cats come with happiness guarantee!! 941-270-2430. 6233 DOGS NOTICE : S tatute 585 195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots, and be free of intestinal and external parasites. 6236 PET SUPPLIES & SERVICES AQ UARIUM BULB New reptiglo 36Ž30w 5.0 $5 941-423-2585 CANNISTER AQUARIUM power filter new Sun-Sun HW305 $35 941-423-2585 LEE SINK to aquar i um 25 ft water transfer system $10 941-423-2585 6250 APPLIANCES AC WINDOW UNIT INCLUDES HEAT$125. (941)763-4818 COFFEE MAKER K eur i g deluxe. Orig. $359. p60 Like new gift $125 941-580-4460 DEEP FRYER El ectron i c W o lf gang Puck, 4.0 liter stainless steel $25 941-235-3193 DRYER L G red, elec, w/ black base $300, OBO 941-661-1261 ELE C T/ CO NV RAN G E GE Glass top7 element new in 2016, perfect condition $400, OBO 770-312-4060 ELE C TRI C RAN G E Kenmore. SS front. Smooth top. Excellent condition. $250 252-241-6895 FOOD PROCESSOR Ki tc h en Aid, 13 cup w/acc. Used once $75, OBO 941-235-3193 FREEZER Ni ce, Whi te, $100 (941)763-4818 delivery avail. FRID G E S AM S UN G SD/SD SS 25CF EC $250, OBO 941-473-4194 FRIDGE STAINLESS S amsung side by side and micro cln pair $300 941-544-0042 FRIG ABSOCOLD MINI DORM SIZE FRIDGE $15 716-969-6060 KEURIG d e l uxe co ff ee ma k er orig 359. latte cappicino expresso $85 941-580-4460 REFRIDGERATOR GE w hi te, Top Freezer $250 (941)7634818 WASHER & DRYER Ni ce, White, $325. (941)763-4818 deliver y avail. 6260 MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE $75.00 per panel SLIDING GLASS DOOR REPAIRS Wheels Tracks & LocksLicensed & Insured, Free Est. since 1981 visit us at www. SlidingDoorsandmore.com Call Bob 941-706-6445 Owned and operated by Local Fire fighter. L o w o v e r h e a d = L o w p r i c e s C ARDB O ARD MAILIN G TUBE S 100 sturdy tubes 17Žl w/end caps $40 941-493-3851 CONFEDERATE FLAG new-never flown-3x5 great shape $15 941-445-5619 COO KB OO K C ollection Mint. All kinds; great variety; great cond $5-50 941-639-1517 FIREWOOD Split, Bundled, and ready for the firepit! Perfect for these cooler nights! Pine, Oak, Citrus 941-468-4372 FRID G E S AM S UN G S/S EC SS 25CF $250, OBO 941-473-4194 G ENERAT O R S portsman 2000 watt new in box with cover $200 941-423-2585 GIANT JUMBLING tower 51 wood pieces. 3-4ft tall. New in box $50 941-330-6546 PLU S H TEDDY BEAR 20 Ž U S F Comes w/new party cups and napkins $20 941-493-3851 POWERWASHER H us k y e l ectric 1800psi works well manual $35 941-697-2163 6260 MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE RECORD COLLECTION includes album covers 5 0 cents each. Entire collection. 941-496-9252 VINTAGE PULLEY 12Ž metal large nice cond $60 941-426-4151 6270 WANTED TO BUY/TRADE BUYING SILVER COINS DIMES Thru SILVER DOLLARS. 941-626-7785 6998 BARGAIN BUYS PARA C HUTE lg surplus appro x 100X60 military $185, OBO 941-661-1261 7000TRANSPORTATION 7020 BUICK 20 1 2 BUI C K LA C R OSS E $12,990. GOLD, 71K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 7030 CADILLAC 2009 CADILLAC CTS $7,000 Good condition. 49k miles Call 941-225-5716 20 1 3 C ADILLA C S RX $16,990 BLACK, 71K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 20 1 2 C ADILLA C C T S $16,990 RED, 32K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 7040 CHEVROLET 2012 CHEVY EQUINOX $8,950. SILVER ICE, LT 92KMI 855-481-2060 DLR 20 17 C HEVR O LET MALIBU $17,990. WHITE, 22K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 2016 CHEVY IMPALA LTZLTD Many Extras! Nice Driver! $13,795. 941-426-3494 2011 CHEVY TRAVERSE 71K MILES, LOCAL TRADE MATTAS MOTORS 941-916-9222 DLR 2004CHEVY TRAIL BLAZER MATTAS MOTORS 941-916-9222 DLR 1976 CHEVY CORVETTE $7,500/OBOSTINGRAY Black 350, T-top, 4 speed, 141,200 mi., (31k on rebuilt engine.) Call 941-258-5090 7050 CHRYSLER 20 1 3 C HRY S LER 300 M $15,990. SILVER, 49K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 2009 C HRY S LER PT CRUISER 4 CYL. AUTO, 59K MILESMATTAS MOTORS 941-916-9222 DLR 7070 FORD 2013 FORD FOCUS $8,990. BLACK, 32K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 20 1 3 F O RD ED G E LTD $16,987. WHITE TRI-COAT, 63KMI 855-481-2060 DLR FREE MERCHANDISE ADS!! WELCOME TO OUR WEBSITE! To Place a FREE Merchandise Ad Go to: sun-classifieds.com Click on Place Ad. If You`ve Advertised Online with Us Before or Not Just Click Register and Follow the Prompts. FREE Ads are for Merchandise UNDER $500. and the Ad Must be Placed Online by You. One Item Per Ad, the Ad Must be 3 Lines or Less, Price Must Appear in the Ad. Your Ad Will Appear Online for 7 Days and in Print Wednesday ThroughSunday. Some Restrictions Do Apply. LIMIT 5 FREE ADS PER WEEK Need To Place a Classified Ad? Enter Your Classified Ad and Pay With Your Credit Card 24 Hours a Day, 7 Daysa Week. 2009 FORD TAURUS LIMITED 88K MI., NICELY EQUIPPED MATTAS MOTORS 941-916-9222 DLR

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The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 9 7075 GMC 2017 GMC SIERRA 1500 $39,500. SLT, 6.2L, 4WD, Dbl. Cab. Like New! Loaded! 7,800 Miles. 716-474-1764 REDUCED! 7080 JEEP 2016 JEEP CHEROKEE $18,689 Latitude-Trim, FWD, 2.4L-I4, Cmfrt/Conv. Pkgs + More! Color: Red/Black; 19K Mi Original Owner. 703-801-1051 2017 JEEP CHEROKEE LIMITED $19,800 XX CLEAN 16,500 MI. WHITE-TANLEATHER, FACT. WARR. VENICEJUSTIN 941-350-7544 20 15 JEEP G RC HER O KEE $19,990. WHITE, 56K MI 855-280-4707 DLR 20 1 2 JEEP WRAN G LER CHERRY RED CRYSTAL PEARL 58KMI 855-481-2060 DLR 2006 JEEP LIBERTY 4X4, 80K MILES MATTAS MOTORS 941-916-9222 DLR 7090 LINCOLN 2006 LINCOLN LS $3,850 105k mi, Very well maintained. Cold ac, new tires. 239-872-7474 2007 LINCOLN TOWN-CAR $4,300 Original Owner. Exc. Condition! 941-639-7985 20 1 3 LIN CO LN MKZ $19,877. WHITE TRI-COAT, 25KMI 855-481-2060 DLR 7135 SATURN USED SATURN CARS & SUVs Starting at $1,200 & Up. Saturn Parts Available. Pro Power Auto Sales941-627-8822www.propowerauto.com 7145 ACURA 2010 ACURA MDX $14,987. GRIGIO METALLIC 112KMI 855-481-2060 DLR 7147 AUDI 2013 AUDI A420QT $15,990 WHITE, 77K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 7148 BMW 2014 BMW X1 S DRIVE28I$18,80027,500 MI, 1 OWNER, LOADED, LEATHER, NAV, BKUPCAMERACALLJUSTIN941 350-7544 7160 HONDA 2008 HONDA CIVIC $6,500 Silver, 4 Door, 120K Mi. New Tires & Brakes 941-769-5003 2009 H O NDA FIT $7,490. BLUE, 100K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 20 11 H O NDA IN S I G HT $7,987. CLEAR SKY BLUE, LX 79KMI 855-481-2060 DLR 20 1 2 H O NDA C IVI C $10,987. TAFFETA WHITE, LX 110KMI 855-481-2060 DLR 20 1 2 H O NDA C IVI C $10,987. BLACK PEARL, LX 76KMI 855-481-2060 DLR 20 1 2 H O NDA IN S I G HT $10,990. GRAY, HYBRID, 42K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 20 1 2 H O NDA C IVI C $11,677. CRIMSON PEARL, LX 38KMI 855-481-2060 DLR 20 11 H O NDA C R-V $14,877 GLACIER BLUE, SE, 38K MI 855-481-2060 DLR 20 1 3 H O NDA A CCO RD $14,950. WHITE PEARL, EX-L 72K MI 855-481-2060 DLR 20 14 H O NDA A CCO RD $15,911. GRAY, 22K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 20 1 3 H O NDA C R-V $15,987. DIAMOND PEARL, EX-L 98KMI 855-481-2060 DLR 7163 HYUNDAI 2012 HYUNDAI VELOSTER $9,877. SILVER W/ BLACK INT 81KMI 855-481-2060 DLR 7163 HYUNDAI 2012 HYUNDAI SONATA $12,677. SILVER BLUE PEARL 33K MI 855-481-2060 DLR 7165 INFINITI 20 1 0 INFINITI G3 7 $12,987. GRAPHITE SHADOW 66KMI 855-481-2060 DLR 7177 KIA 2012 KIA FORTE $2,500 Great Car. Very Clean, 215K Miles. Ice Cold Air. Very Well Kept. 941-268-9627 20 17 KIA SO RENT O $18,911 GRAY, 16K MI 855-280-4707 DLR 20 1 2 KIA O PTIMA 4DR. SEDAN 4 CYL. EXTRA SHARP! MATTAS MOTORS 941-916-9222 DLR 20 11 KIA SO UL PLU S 4 CYL. AUTO, EXTRA CLEAN. MATTAS MOTORS 941-916-9222 DLR 7178 LEXUS 200 4 LEXU S L S -4 30 $13,900. WHITE, 59K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 20 1 0 LEXU S RX3 5 0 $14,987. TUNGSTEN PEARL, 102KMI 855-481-2060 DLR 200 7 LEXU S G X-47 0 $15,900. SILVER, 112K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 20 1 2 LEXU S E S 3 5 0 $18,900. SATIN, CERT, 50K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 20 1 0 LEXU S RX3 5 0 $19,990. TRUFFLE, 58K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 2015 LEXUS ES 350 $22,911. A SILVER, CERT, 40K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 2012 LEXUS IS 350 $23,900. BLACK, NAV, CONV 66K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 20 15 LEXU S C T200 H $25,990. WHITE, CERT, NAV 19K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 20 14 LEXU S E S 3 5 0 $26,900. BLACK, CERT, 8,172 MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 2015 LEXUS RX 350 SUV $28,500 SILVER, 29KMI., NAV. BK-UP, BLINDSPOTFACT. WARR. VENICEJUSTIN 941-350-7544 20 15 LEXU S RX3 5 0 $29,911. BLACK, CERT, 34K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 20 17 LEXU S NX200 T $33,900. A SILVER, CERT, 21K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 20 17 LEXU S GS 3 5 0 $48,990. BLACK, 7,236 MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 7180 MAZDA 2006 MAZDA MIATA-MX-5 $9,990 Touring, 36K Mi., 6 Spd. Exc. Cond! 570-575-3413 20 1 2 MAZDA 3 $11,987. RED MICA, S, 62KMI 855-481-2060 DLR 7190 MERCEDES 2012 MERCEDES C CLASS $15,987. PEARL BEIGE,SPORT 44K MI 855-481-2060 DLR 2007 MERCEDES SLK350 $16,990. RED, 51K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 7195 MITSUBISHI 2012 MITSUBISHI LANCER $6,977. WHITE METALLIC, ES, 85KMI 855-481-2060 DLR 7200 NISSAN 1 998 NI SS AN ALTIM A $1,500 everything works, 5 speed 941-493-0849 20 11 NI SS AN C UBE $8,977. WHITE PEARL, 1.8 S 61KMI 855-481-2060 DLR 7210 TOYOTA 2005 TOYOTA CAMRYSOLARA $2,750Convert. Red w/ black roof V6, 1 owner, 176k miles, new tires 11/2017 941-979-2707 20 11 T O Y O TA RAV-4 $9,877. CLASSIC SILVER, 152KMI 855-481-2060 DLR 20 11 T O Y O TA C AMRY $9,977. BLUE RIBBON, SE, 107KMI 855-481-2060 DLR 2008 T O Y O TA AVAL O N $9,990. BLUE, NAV, 113K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 200 7 T O Y O TA AVAL O N $9,990. SILVER, XLE, 101K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 20 1 2 T O Y O TA AVAL O N $12,950. CLASSIC SILVER, 50K MI 855-481-2060 DLR 2015 TOYOTA COROLLA $13,990. SILVER, LE, 34K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 7210 TOYOTA 2012 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER $15,950. GRAY METALLIC, LTD, 108K MI 855-481-2060 DLR 20 1 2 T O Y O TA HI G HLANDER $18,877. CLASSIC SILVER, SE, 51K MI 855-481-2060 DLR 20 15 T O Y O TA RAV4 $19,911. GRAY, LTD, AWD, 30K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 2015 TOYOTA CAMRY $19,990. BEIGE, NAV, 35K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 20 14 T O Y O TA VENZA $21,990. GRAY, XLE, 38K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 7230 VOLVO 2000 VOLVO S80 T-6 $1,850 4dr Sedan, 116K Sr. Owned Well Maintained. Dealer Serv iced. Exc. Cond. 732-887-4818 7250 ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES 1984 MERCEDES 380SL $9,900. Silver-Blue, 2 Tops. Excellent Body & Running Condition! Garaged. 941-637-7498 1983 CADILLAC SEDAN DEVILLE 50K ORIGINAL MILES! A MUST SEE! MATTAS MOTORS 941-916-9222 DLR 7260 AUTOS WANTED W E BUY CARS & PICKUPS RUNNING OR NOT! $400 CASH + UP Frank 941-276-0204 BEST $$ FOR JUNKERS 7 Days, FAST PICKUP941-286-3122, 623-5550 Needanew Home? LookintheClassifieds! WE BUY & PICK UP JUNK CARS 941-661-1928 7270 AUTO PARTS/ ACCESSORIES B O LTO N TR. HIT C H 2016 Nissan Sentra $25 941-787-3518 BOLT ON TR HITCH 2012 ford fiesta. $25 941-787-3518 S ELLIN G TIRE S 3 used tires size 205/65/15 $25 941-4567547 SEDAN COVER N ew C overMaster locking Sun/H2o proof $125, OBO 941-496-7983 LEER TOPPER F u ll s i ze t k b e d White w/clamps $499 941-276-8265 LEBRA New f its Buick Lucerne protect your investment $70, OBO 941-496-7983 7290 VANS 200 4 KIA S ED O NA $2 800 new tires, new battery, good shape. 941-493-0849 2013 CHRYSLER TOWN-&COUNTRY $16,000/OBO Like New! Only 45K miles! Must SEE! 941-505-8889 2008 C HRY S LER T O WN & COUNTRY LIMITED MATTAS MOTORS 941-916-9222 DLR 7300 TRUCKS/ PICK-UPS 2006 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 $6,200 Tool box, AC, Towing pkg, V8, 941-915-2435 20 11 F O RD F-15 0 $15,987. GOLDEN BRONZE, 111KMI 855-481-2060 DLR 2014 FORD F 150 $21,990. GRAY, 34K MI. 855-280-4707 DLR 7305 SPORT UTILITY/ VEHICLES 2005 JEEP GRAND-CHEROKEE LIMITED $4,000 119k mi., 716-969-2166 2010 GMC TERRAIN SLT $11,800 SILVER V-6, 71KMI. LTH. NAV. TOWPKG. 1 OWNER, EXTENDEDWARRANTYVENICEJUSTIN 941-350-7544 2017 JEEP PATRIOT LATITUDE $15,900 4x4, Sunroof, Upgraded Stereo, Dark Red, V ery Low Miles! MINT Condition! 941-451-9729 7330 BOATS-POWERED 20 GRADY WHITE 1993 Adventurer. Walk around cabin, re-powered with 2011 Yamaha 150. Less than 300 hours and recently serviced. $13,400 407-359-9649 18.5 2001 BASS TRACKER PRO90HP MERCURYW/ 37 HRS! MINN-KOTAWHITEWATERTROLLINGMOTORW/ REMOTE. GALV. TRAILERW/ NEWTIRES. MANYEXTRAS! $6000. 305-987-1634 7338 MARINE SUPPLY & EQUIP. MER C URY PR O PELLER SS RakerŽ 14 1/2 x 24. Like new! $215, OBO 941-258-2702 C a s h i n w i t h C l a s s FOLDING ANCHOR 5 lb with chain ad 50of roe $35, OBO 941-575-0690 DANF O RTH AN C H O R 20 H Like New Hold 2500, boat up to 50 feet $125 941-626-2768 7341 TRAILER & ACCESSORIES 5X 8 UTILITY TRAILER BUY NOW $900.00 Ready for immediate delivery MATTAS MOTORS 941-916-9222 DLR NEW SHIPMENT!ENCLOSEDTRAILERSBYLARK ANDOPENTRAILERSBYTRIPLE CROWNINSTOCKALSO NEW CARGOCRAFTENCLOSEDTRAILERSMATTAS MOTORS 941-916-9222 DLR 120Ž TRAILERS CARGO ENCLOSED DUMP UTILITY EQUIPMENT SKIDSTEER. PARTS-SERVICETRADESWELCOME. FINANCINGAVAILABLE. 941-575-2214WEBUYTRAILERS, CARS& TRUCKS.ROYS TRAILER COUNTRY 4760 TAYLOR RD., P.G. 7360 CYCLES/MOPEDS/ SCOOTERS HARLEY DAVIDSON 2002 Dana 1450 Model, extras. Excellent condition. 19K miles. BEST OFFER or Trade in on Cadillac XLR model, any year or condition. 941-625-0384 HARBOR SCOOTERS for all your scooter needs... 3315 Tamiami Trl. PG We Repair Scooters too! 941-347-8705 SALES SERVICE PARTS HarborScooters.net CARGO CRAFT HAULERS IN STOCK @ MATTAS MOTORS 941-916-9222 DLR BLACK HONDA HELIX MOTOR SCOOTER 250 CC Lowest price & lowest mileage 4,800 on the market $1600 863-444-2998 1996-2012 HONDA GOLDW ING trike 13k orig mi, $13k Runs Perfect! New tires. 941624-3399 or 661-3399 7370 CAMPERS/ TRAVEL TRAILERS CLASS BSLARGEST DEALER IN USAFamily owned/operated GERZENYS R.V. WORLD2110 US 41, Nokomis I-75 Exit 195 941-260-0476 7380 MOTOR HOMES / RVs WANTED All M otor Homes, TTs, 5th wheels,& Diesel trucks. CASH paidon the spot for quick sale. Any Condition! Low or High Value. 954-789-7530 WANT T O BUY Motor Home, Travel Trailer or 5th Wheel. Any condition. Will Pay Cash. Call Andy 352-999-2055 TURN YOUR RV INTO CASH!Sell it! Consign it! Trade it!NOW SERVING NOKOMIS*FORTMYERSBRADENTON* LAKELANDFAMILYOWNED& OPERATEDGERZENYS R.V. WORLD 2110 US 41, NOKOMISI-75 EXIT195 941-260-0476 WWW.RVWORLDINC.COM RV HOTLINE 1-833-287-5265 SAVE $$$HUGE CLOSE-OUT SALE RVS & PARTSSKIP EPPERS RVsPunta Gorda Closed Sun. & Mon. 941-639-6969 I BUY TRAVEL TRAILERS 5th Wheels Motor Homes & Trucks I Come to You! Call Dave Anytime. 813-713-3217 Blue-Ox Tow Hitches Sold & Installed. PRO-POWER AUTO SALES 4140 Whidden Blvd PC 33980 (941) 627-8822 T urnyou r trashinto cash! Advertise youryard sa l e! 1 989 FLEETW OO D RV FREE. Doesnt run but can. Have title. If you can move it you can have it. 941-585-7165 PUT CLASSIFIEDS TOWORK FORYOU!FINDAJOB! BUYAHOME! BUYACAR! CLASSIFIEDS/JOBSon its Senior Community Service Employment Program. On its website, Easter Seals notes, Since getting its “rst grant in 2003, Easter Seals has provided training in Chicago and at af“liates nationwide, for about 38,000 participants. Their educational levels varied widely: Some lacked high school diplomas, others had doctoral degrees.Ž The site adds that since the 2003 inception of the program, Easter Seals has served nearly 40,000 older job seekers, with over 4,500 people transitioning out to employment.Ž Check out their site at, http:// www.easterseals. com/our-programs/ employment-training/ senior-communityservice-employmentprogram-scsep.html Another national nonpro“t also offers training and career support to bring the participants skills up to par, as well as job placement. This is the National Able Network, with of“ces throughout the country. Their site can be viewed at, www. nationalable.org/ jobseekers/ National Able Network says it serves 76,000 job seekers annually, and many clients obtained a job with a 19 percent increase over the wages they had once been getting. New career training and assistance is free at both agencies. Even the Federal Government has developed programs that exist to help older workers “nd new employment. Whether an older worker is doing it for the money or just to make new friends and have a more active social life, America is becoming a lot more friendly to older workers.AGEFROM PAGE 2 Make Your House a HOME! Adopt an animal from your local animal shelter. Call 941-625-6720 WANTED: A HAPPY HOME

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Page 10 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 VISIT US ONLINE: DESOTOAUTOMALL.COMHighway 70 ArcadiaAll stores available at one convenient location1-800-880-3099Hours:Thurs-Friday 8am-7pm Saturday 8am-5pm Sunday ClosedVisit us 24/7 on the web atwww.DesotoAutomall.com* Prices include all factory rebates. Cheaper In The Country Cheaper In The Country PRE-OWNED 2017 LINCOLN MKC $ 27,888 *STOCK#P7335 2017 LINCOLN CONTINENTAL RESERVE $ 48,888 *STOCK#P7166 2017 RAM PROMASTER CARGO VAN $ 22,888 *STOCK#P7264 2017 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA $ 13,988 *STOCK#P7221A 2017 FIAT SPIDER $ 21,988 *STOCK#P7164 2017 DODGE CARAVAN $ 20,988 *STOCK#P7392 2017 FORD ESCAPE $ 16,988 *STOCK#P7320 2016 RAM 1500 REGULAR CAB $ 19,888 *STOCK#P7385 2017 FORD FLEX LIMITED $ 27,888 *STOCK#P7146 2017 JEEP WRANGLER LIFTED $ 36,888 *STOCK#18DT419A 2017 FORD FOCUS $ 13,888 *STOCK#P7272 2015 MINI COOPER $ 14,988 *STOCK#P6959 2017 FORD MUSTANG $ 21,888 *STOCK#P7388 2016 FORD FUSION $ 16,888 *STOCK#17T385A SAVE THOUSANDS INVENTORY CLEARANCE LARGEST USED CAR & TRUCK DEALER IN SW FLORIDAadno=50540447

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THE NEWS WIRESTATE € NATIONAL € WORLD € BUSINESS € WEATHERHundreds of neo-Nazis march in Berlin, protected by policeSee page 8. Sunday, August 19, 2018 By JOHN HEILPRIN and FRANCIS KOKUTSEASSOCIATED PRESSGENEVA „ Ko“ Annan, one of the worlds most celebrated diplomats and a charismatic symbol of the United Nations who rose through its ranks to become the “ rst black African secretary-general, has died. He was 80. His foundation announced his death in Switzerlands capital, Bern, on Saturday in a tweet, saying he died after a short unspeci“ ed illness. It did not give details and remembered the Nobel Peace Prize winner as radiating genuine kindness, warmth and brilliance in all he did.Ž The president of Ghana, where Annan was born, said in a tweet that I am ... comforted by the information, after speaking to (Annans wife) Nane Maria, that he died peacefully in his sleep.Ž Annan spent virtually his entire career as an administrator in the United Nations. His aristocratic style, cool-tempered elegance and political savvy helped guide his ascent to become its seventh secretary-general, and the “ rst hired from within. He served two terms from Jan. 1, 1997, to Dec. 31, 2006, capped nearly mid-way when he and the U.N. were jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2001. During his tenure, Annan presided over some of the worst failures and scandals at the world body, one of its most turbulent periods since its founding in 1945. Challenges from the outset forced him to spend much of his time struggling to restore its tarnished reputation. His enduring moral prestige remained largely undented, however, both through charisma and by virtue of having negotiated with most of the powers in the world. When he departed from the United Nations, he left behind a global organization far more aggressively engaged in peacekeeping and “ ghting poverty, setting the framework for the U.N.s 21st-century response to mass atrocities and its emphasis on human rights and development. Ko“ Annan was a guiding force for good,Ž current U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said. It is with profound sadness that I learned of his passing. In many ways, Ko“ Annan was the United Nations. He rose through the ranks to lead the organization into the new millennium with matchless dignity and determination.Ž Even out of of“ ce, Annan never completely left the U.N. orbit. He returned in special roles, including as the U.N.-Arab Leagues special envoy to Former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan dies at age 80 AP FILE PHOTOSIn this Tuesday, Sept. 21, 2004 “ le photo United Nations Secretary-General Ko“ Anna, right, greets United States President George Bush, at the United Nations, in New York. In this “ le photo dated Sunday, Aug 10, 1997, Swedish Prime Minister Goran Persson, right, and UN General Secretary Ko“ Annan sit in a rowboat on a lake near the Swedish premieres summer residence in Harpsund, Sweden. It is a tradition many decades old for the Swedish Prime Minister to row at Harpsund with foreign visitors. Annan, one of the worlds most celebrated diplomats an d a charismatic symbol of the United Nations who rose through its ranks to become the “ rst black African secretary-general, has died at age 80, according to an announcement by his foundation Saturday. In this April 13, 2005 “ le photo former President Bill Clinton, the United Nations special envoy for tsunami recovery, meets U.N. Secretary-General Ko“ Annan, at U.N. headquarters. In this Sunday, July 22, 2007 “ le photo Nelson Mandela and former United Nations Secretary-General Ko“ Annan arrive together at the 5th Nelson Mandela Annual Lecture, held at the Linder Auditorium in Johannesburg, South Africa. A guiding force for good By MICHAEL RILEYBLOOMBERG NEWS (TNS)WASHINGTON …… President Donald Trump lashed out at John Brennan Saturday in the latest effort to counter criticism of his decision to revoke the former CIA directors security clearance. Trump said in a Twitter post Saturday that Brennan will go down as easily the WORSTŽ CIA director in history and called him a loudmouth, partisan, political hack who cannot be trusted with the secrets to our country!Ž The president also suggested that unspeci“ ed mistakesŽ Brennan made while serving as CIA director should be looked at.Ž Trumps comments came after days of criticism from former U.S. national security of“ cials and military leaders who cast Trumps cancellation of Brennans clearance …… apparent retaliation for his criticism of the president …… as a dangerous precedent. A joint letter from more than a dozen former senior intelligence of“ cials who served Republican and Democratic administrations said Trumps decision has nothing to do with who should and should not hold security clearances …… and everything to do with an attempt to sti” e free speech.Ž That letter followed an op-ed article published in The Washington Post from the retired admiral who oversaw the capture of Osama bin Laden. The retired special operations commander, William H. McRaven, called Brennan one of the “ nest public servants I have ever knownŽ and challenged Trump to revoke his security clearance too. Before being appointed CIA director by President Barack Obama, Brennan, 62, spent 25 years at the agency, including a stint as the station chief in Saudi Arabia. He was also director of the National Counterterrorism Center. Brennan said on MSNBC Friday that Trumps is drunk with power,Ž and criticized Republicans in Congress for turning a blind eye to the presidents actions. Are the Republicans on the Hill who have given him a pass going to wait for a disaster to happen before they actually “ nd their backbones?Ž Brennan said.Trump, former CIA director swap insults over security clearance revocationBy DAVID S. CLOUD and NOAH BIERMANLOS ANGELES TIMES (TNS)WASHINGTON „ When President Donald Trump spoke to Marines at the Miramar Air Station in San Diego March 13, he threw out an idea that he suggested had just come to him. You know, I was saying it the other day, because were doing a tremendous amount of work in space „ I said maybe we need a new force. Well call it the space force,Ž he said. And I was not really serious. And then I said what a great idea „ maybe well have to do that.Ž The origin of the space force wasnt that simple. The concept had been pushed unsuccessfully since 2016 by a small group of current and former government of“ cials …… some with deep “ nancial ties to the aerospace industry …… who see creation of the sixth military service as a sure“ re way to increase Pentagon spending on satellite and other space systems. The idea of a space force is not a new thing,Ž said Stuart O. Witt, an aerospace executive and a member of White Houses National Space Council Users Advisory Group. The president just acted upon it.Ž But Rep. Jim Cooper, (D-Tenn., one of the early supporters of a separate service, complained that Trumps impromptu endorsement had hijackedŽ the issue and could vastly in” ate the budget process. There are many vendors of all types who are excited at the prospect of an explosion of new spending, which was not our goal,Ž he said. Still, when Trump embraced the idea at Miramar „ and began promoting it at other By MIMI WHITEFIELDMIAMI HERALD (TNS)MIAMI „ Since the United States withdrew all but a bare-bones staff from its embassy in Havana last September after mysterious incidents that affected the health of American diplomats, no Cubans have been admitted to the United States as refugees and the U.S. will likely fall far short of its annual commitment to admit Cuban immigrants. As a result of the staff reduction, its also been dif“ cult for diplomats to cover signi“ cant economic and political developments in Cuba,Ž reach out to human rights activists and members of Cuban civil society and to monitor how the Cuban government is treating returned migrants, according to a memorandum released this week by the Congressional Research Service. The memorandum was prepared at the request of New York Democratic Rep. Eliot L. Engel, the ranking member on the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, who wanted information on the impact of the staff reduction. At the time the delegation visited, the embassy had a staf“ ng level of 14 and several positions were being “ lled by foreign service of“ cers on temporary duty or retired diplomats called back on an intermittent basis under a special program. Before the ordered Effects of stripped-down US Embassy in Havana after health incidentsSPACE | 4 EMBASSY | 4 ANNAN | 4 Trump backed space force after months of lobbying by officials with ties to aerospace industryPHOTO PROVIDEDLogos that are up for consideration for the new military branch.

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Page 2 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 TODAY / TONIGHTAn afternoon thunderstorm Partly cloudy and humidHIGH 92 LOW 7650% chance of rain 20% chance of rainPartly sunny, a t-storm in spots; humid92 / 7640% chance of rain MONDAY GULF WATER TEMPERATUREMostly sunny and humid; a p.m. t-storm91 / 7650% chance of rain TUESDAYClouds and sun with a thunderstorm; humid91 / 7555% chance of rain WEDNESDAYChance for an afternoon thunderstorm92 / 7530% chance of rain FRIDAYPartly sunny and humid with a thunderstorm90 / 7550% chance of rain THURSDAY 2 4 10 10 2 0 Trees Grass Weeds Moldsabsentlowmoderatehighvery highabsent 050100150200300500 330-50 Good; 51-100 Moderate; 101-150 Unhealthy for sensitive groups; 151-200 Unhealthy; 201-300 Very Unhealthy; 301-500 HazardousSource : scgov.net 8 a.m. 10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. 6 p.m.The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index’ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. 0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme.RealFeel Temperature is the exclusive AccuWeather. com composite of effective temperature based on eight weather factors.UV Index and RealFeel Temperature TodayPrecipitation (in inches)Precipitation (in inches)Precipitation (in inches)Temperatures Temperatures TemperaturesSource : National Allergy Bureau CONDITIONS TODAY AIR QUALITY INDEX POLLEN INDEX WEATHER HISTORY WEATHER TRIVIA’ PORT CHARLOTTE SEBRING VENICE89951021049894Air Quality Index readings as of SaturdayMain pollutant: OzonePunta Gorda through 2 p.m. Saturday Sebring through 2 p.m. Saturday Venice through 2 p.m. Saturday24 hours through 2 p.m. Sat. 0.04Ž Month to date 6.25Ž Normal month to date 4.54Ž Year to date 42.58Ž Normal year to date 33.72Ž Record 1.31Ž (1999) 24 hours through 2 p.m. Sat. 0.00Ž 24 hours through 2 p.m. Sat. Trace Month to date 2.66Ž Normal month to date 4.43Ž Year to date 26.75Ž Normal year to date 32.49Ž Record 1.31Ž (2013) High/Low 93/77 Normal High/Low 92/74 Record High 96 (1998) Record Low 70 (1972) High/Low 92/74 High/Low 91/77 Normal High/Low 91/75 Record High 97 (2001) Record Low 65 (1975)Pollen Index readings as of Saturday MONTHLY RAINFALLMonth 2018 2017 Avg. Record/Year J an. 1.98 0.88 1.80 9.93/2016 Feb. 0.66 0.94 2.52 11.05/1983 Mar. 0.53 0.80 3.28 9.26/1970 Apr. 1.15 1.59 2.03 5.80/1994 May 15.98 2.74 2.50 15.98/2018 J un. 6.23 14.79 8.92 23.99/1974 J ul. 9.80 9.02 8.22 14.22/1995 Aug. 6.25 13.12 8.01 15.60/1995 Sep. 12.46 6.84 14.03/1979 Oct. 2.54 2.93 10.88/1995 Nov. 0.44 1.91 5.53/2002 Dec. 1.04 1.78 6.83/2002 Y ear 42.58 60.36 50.74 (since 1931) T otals are from a 24-hour period ending at 5 p.m. City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W FLORIDA CITIES Today Mon.Apalachicola 88 77 pc 89 77 pc Bradenton 91 78 pc 91 77 pc Clearwater 91 78 pc 91 78 pc Coral Springs 91 79 pc 91 79 sh Daytona Beach 92 75 t 90 75 pc Fort Lauderdale 89 82 pc 90 81 sh Fort Myers 90 75 t 91 75 pc Gainesville 93 74 pc 92 75 c Jacksonville 93 74 pc 93 73 pc Key Largo 88 81 pc 89 80 pc Key West 91 83 sh 91 82 pc Lakeland 92 75 t 92 74 pc Melbourne 92 75 t 92 74 s Miami 90 80 pc 90 80 sh Naples 89 75 t 90 75 c Ocala 93 73 t 92 74 c Okeechobee 90 74 t 90 72 pc Orlando 93 76 t 92 75 pc Panama City 85 74 pc 88 75 pc Pensacola 86 76 pc 89 76 t Pompano Beach 90 82 pc 91 82 sh St. Augustine 89 73 t 89 74 pc St. Petersburg 92 75 pc 91 75 pc Sarasota 91 75 pc 91 74 pc Tallahassee 87 73 pc 90 75 pc Tampa 92 76 pc 91 76 pc Vero Beach 90 73 t 91 72 sh West Palm Beach 89 80 t 90 80 sh Punta Gorda Englewood Boca Grande El Jobean Venice High Low High Low Cape Sable to Tarpon Springs Tarpon Springs to Apalachicola Wind Speed Seas Bay/Inland direction in knots in feet chop TIDES MARINEPossible weather-related delays today. Check with your airline for the most updated schedules. Hi/Lo Outlook Delays AIRPORTToday 9:39a 3:26a --6:09p Mon. 1:13a 4:23a 10:43a 7:16p Today 8:16a 1:42a 11:50p 4:25p Mon. 9:20a 2:39a --5:32p Today 7:41a 3:26p ----Mon. 8:40a 4:26p ----Today 10:11a 3:55a --6:38p Mon. 1:45a 4:52a 11:15a 7:45p Today 6:31a 12:21a 10:05p 3:04p Mon. 7:35a 1:18a 11:19p 4:11p SSE 6-12 0-1 Light SSE 3-6 0-1 LightFt. Myers 90/75 storms afternoon Punta Gorda 92/76 storms afternoon Sarasota 91/75 part cldy afternoon The Sun Rise Set The Moon Rise Set Minor Major Minor MajorThe solunar period schedule allows planning days so you will be fishing in good territory or hunting in good cover during those times. Major periods begin at the times shown and last for 1.5 to 2 hours. The minor periods are shorter. SUN AND MOON SOLUNAR TABLEFull Aug 26 Last Sep 2 New Sep 9 First Sep 16 Today 3:06 p.m. 1:24 a.m. Monday 3:58 p.m. 2:07 a.m. Today 7:02 a.m. 8:02 p.m. Monday 7:02 a.m. 8:01 p.m. Today 1:02a 7:14a 1:26p 7:38p Mon. 1:47a 7:59a 2:11p 8:23p Tue. 2:30a 8:42a 2:54p 9:07p Monterrey 101/72 Chihuahua 89/66 Los Angeles 86/68 Washington 84/71 New York 76/66 Miami 90/80 Atlanta 86/73 Detroit 83/66 Houston 95/80 Kansas City 82/65 Chicago 85/68 Minneapolis 87/69 El Paso 102/73 Denver 71/51 Billings 77/56 San Francisco 72/55 Seattle 83/60 Toronto 80/62 Montreal 80/60 Winnipeg 73/46 Ottawa 80/55 WORLD CITIESCity Hi Lo W Hi Lo WCity Hi Lo W Hi Lo W City Hi Lo W Hi Lo WCity Hi Lo W Hi Lo WWeather (W): s -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice. THE NATION Cold Warm Stationary Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow IceShown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Fronts Precipitation -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110sU.S. ExtremesPublication date: 08/19/18 Today Mon. Today Mon. Today Mon. Today Mon.Albuquerque 91 65 s 88 69 s Anchorage 60 55 r 60 55 r Atlanta 86 73 t 85 73 t Baltimore 82 67 t 82 68 pc Billings 77 56 pc 72 51 c Birmingham 86 74 t 86 73 t Boise 96 64 s 91 61 s Boston 72 65 c 73 64 pc Buffalo 80 63 s 83 69 pc Burlington, VT 82 62 pc 83 64 pc Charleston, WV 82 64 pc 86 70 c Charlotte 88 71 t 86 72 t Chicago 85 68 s 81 67 t Cincinnati 84 67 pc 85 70 t Cleveland 82 65 s 86 72 pc Columbia, SC 89 74 t 90 75 t Columbus, OH 83 65 s 86 72 c Concord, NH 77 57 pc 78 53 c Dallas 96 76 pc 94 72 pc Denver 71 51 pc 78 55 pc Des Moines 86 66 pc 75 62 r Detroit 83 66 pc 83 72 pc Duluth 82 60 pc 68 53 sh Fairbanks 69 50 c 70 55 c Fargo 71 52 r 75 48 pc Hartford 76 58 c 79 57 pc Helena 84 53 t 67 47 sh Honolulu 91 79 pc 91 77 pc Houston 95 80 pc 95 79 t Indianapolis 84 67 pc 83 70 t Jackson, MS 89 72 t 88 72 t Kansas City 82 65 t 77 60 t Knoxville 83 69 t 83 72 t Las Vegas 109 87 s 107 85 s Los Angeles 86 68 s 86 68 s Louisville 88 72 pc 86 74 t Memphis 89 74 t 88 72 t Milwaukee 80 70 s 79 68 r Minneapolis 87 69 pc 76 62 sh Montgomery 87 73 pc 89 73 t Nashville 89 73 t 87 73 t New Orleans 88 76 pc 88 77 t New York City 76 66 c 76 67 pc Norfolk, VA 87 75 t 85 75 t Oklahoma City 85 66 t 83 62 s Omaha 81 64 t 73 59 sh Philadelphia 76 66 sh 81 66 pc Phoenix 108 87 c 109 87 s Pittsburgh 80 63 pc 80 66 pc Portland, ME 75 58 pc 75 57 pc Portland, OR 87 60 pc 93 67 pc Providence 74 63 c 77 61 pc Raleigh 87 71 t 86 72 t Salt Lake City 89 65 s 93 68 pc St. Louis 88 73 pc 84 70 t San Antonio 99 78 s 96 77 pc San Diego 81 72 pc 82 71 pc San Francisco 72 55 pc 68 57 pc Seattle 83 60 pc 88 63 pc Washington, DC 84 71 t 84 72 pc Amsterdam 74 62 pc 73 60 c Baghdad 109 80 s 110 83 s Beijing 79 73 sh 87 73 t Berlin 85 62 pc 81 58 pc Buenos Aires 53 37 pc 51 36 pc Cairo 95 78 s 97 79 s Calgary 67 45 pc 68 47 pc Cancun 89 77 pc 89 77 pc Dublin 71 61 c 70 58 c Edmonton 69 41 s 71 39 s Halifax 75 60 pc 72 58 c Kiev 80 61 t 82 62 t London 76 61 c 79 61 c Madrid 91 65 s 92 65 s Mexico City 75 55 t 74 56 t Montreal 80 60 c 82 65 pc Ottawa 80 55 pc 82 60 c Paris 84 63 s 79 61 pc Regina 74 44 s 73 43 c Rio de Janeiro 77 64 s 80 64 s Rome 87 68 s 88 69 s St. Johns 63 51 r 66 50 c San Juan 88 76 pc 87 78 sh Sydney 61 47 s 62 46 s Tokyo 85 71 pc 84 75 t Toronto 80 62 s 81 70 pc Vancouver 78 57 s 80 61 pc Winnipeg 73 46 c 73 47 sHigh ................... 106 at Needles, CALow ....................... 37 at Truckee, CA(For the 48 contiguous states yesterday)86After dumping 2.6 inches of rain on Cape Hatteras, N.C., the day before, Hurricane Bob moved into Maine on Aug. 19, 1991. Q: What location in the U.S. has the highest annual average temperature?A: Key West, Florida; 77 degrees Fahrenheit. Port Charlotte Tampa Bradenton Englewood Fort Myers Myakka City Punta Gorda Lehigh Acres Hull Arcadia Bartow Winter Haven Plant City Brandon St. Petersburg Wauchula Sebring Lake Wales Frostproof La Belle Felda Lake Placid Brighton Venus Longboat Key Placida Osprey Limestone Apollo Beach Venice Ft. Meade Sarasota Clearwater Boca Grande Cape Coral Sanibel Bonita Springs Shown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows. North Port 92/76 91/74 90/74 90/74 93/75 92/74 91/73 91/73 90/74 92/76 91/78 89/78 90/78 90/75 92/76 92/76 90/74 91/76 92/75 92/75 93/76 92/75 93/75 92/75 92/75 90/80 90/78 91/77 92/75 92/77 91/78 92/74 91/75 91/78 89/79 90/75 90/75 92/77Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 2018 By RAFAEL OLMEDASOUTH FLORIDA SUN SENTINELFORT LAUDERDALE „ Before she found herself presiding over one of the highest-pro“le cases in the country, Broward Circuit Judge Elizabeth Scherer did little to draw attention. Her rulings tended to be non-controversial. Appellate judges found fault with only two of her decisions „ an impressively low number for someone who has been on the bench for six years. But Scherer, 42, couldnt avoid the spotlight once she was randomly assigned the murder case of Nikolas Cruz, the Parkland teenager who admitted killing 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Feb. 14 and wounding 17 more. She ignited a “restorm on social media in August when she ripped into the South Florida Sun Sentinel, two of its reporters and its attorney for publishing sensitive information about the shooter that the Broward School Board had released unintentionally. Worse, she vowed to restrain what the media reports in the future, a practice found repeatedly to be unconstitutional. Lawyers in Broward were reluctant to discuss Scherers professional reputation because they have cases pending in front of her. But her outburst did not surprise some of them. Some called her temperamental and they said she is known to start her docket an hour or more after hearings are scheduled. But another defense lawyer said she is consistently courteous, prepared and polite „ and she rules against me every time.Ž Scherer is still considering whether to hold the Sun Sentinel and two of its reporters in contempt for publishing the information after agreeing that the school board was authorized to withhold it from public release. Her of“ce declined an interview request Friday morning. Before she became a judge at the end of 2012, Scherer was a prosecutor in the Broward State Attorneys Of“ces career criminal unit. Her only direct brush with media attention was decidedly negative „ in 2009 her husband of seven years was arrested and charged with dealing cocaine and marijuana. She “led for divorce the next day, though her husband told police they had separated three months before that. Scherer is the daughter of one of the most politically connected Republican fundraisers in South Florida. William Scherer, co-founder of the prestigious Conrad & Scherer law “rm, was one of the attorneys working for George W. Bush on the presidential election recount of 2000. He was a longtime member of the countys Judicial Nominating Commission and an adviser to Gov. Rick Scott. William Scherer declined to be interviewed at length, saying only that he was proud of his daughter and that he resigned from the commission in 2011 when it became clear that she would be seeking an appointment to the bench. That appointment came a year later. She was elected without opposition in 2014 and faces her next election campaign in 2020. Scherer is now married to a Hollywood police detective, which became an issue in 2016 when she declined to remove herself from an attempted murder case investigated by her husbands department. The Fourth District Court of Appeal stepped in and removed her from the case. Scherer now does not accept cases or sign warrants emanating from Hollywood, according to the Broward chief administrative judges of“ce. Judge Scherer is a dedicated, hard-working judge who has served the 17th Circuit with distinction since her appointment to the bench,Ž said Chief Administratve Judge Jack Tuter. With the Parkland case, Scherer found it necessary to exert her authority after lawyers went to another judge for an emergency hearing when she was not available. She issued an order in March, two weeks after the shooting, making it clear that she was in charge of the case. She tries to do the right thing, and her hearts in the right place,Ž said Bill Gelin, whose JAABlogŽ website doesnt shy from criticizing judges. But she has a tendency to micromanage. She needs to get out of the way and let lawyers litigate their cases.Ž In August, she berated the Sun Sentinels lawyer, Dana McElroy, for defending the newspapers right to publish information on the Stoneman Douglas shooter that had not been properly redacted by the Broward School Board. She threatened to personally use a magic marker to indicate what the paper could and could not publish about the case in the future. From now on if I have to speci“cally write word for word exactly what you are and are not permitted to print „ and I have to take the papers myself and redact them with a Sharpie „ then Ill do that,Ž she said. Her outburst drew criticism from free press advocates. The notion that a court can presume to dictate to a newspaper what it can and cannot print is offensive to the very core of the First Amendment and antithetical to constitutional jurisprudence over the last 100 years,Ž said Jeffrey Robbins, a Massachusetts attorney who has represented the Boston Herald and the New York Post on First Amendment issues. National security would have to be at stake for government to prohibit the media from reporting factual information, he said, using troop movement plans as an example of coverage that could be restricted. Nova Southeastern University law professor Bob Jarvis said that while the Sun Sentinel is on solid legal ground, its attorney may have been better served if the paper disclosed its possession of the con“dential information and advised the judge prior to publishing.Judges biggest case: The Parkland school shooting Sheriff: Body found in vehicle fire near Walt Disney WorldORLANDO (AP) „ Authorities say a body has been found in the wreckage of a vehicle “re near Walt Disney World in Florida. The Orange County Sheriffs Of“ce said in a news release that the “re was reported shortly after 4 a.m. Saturday. The Reedy Creek Fire Department found a victim inside after putting out the “re. Authorities say the vehicle “re happened on a road near Disneys Epcot attraction outside Orlando. The victim was not immediately identi“ed. Of“cials say an investigation is continuing.Man faces life in prison for killing infantFORT MYERS (AP) „ A 29-yearold Florida man faces life in prison after jurors found him guilty of abusing and killing an 8-monthold child he was babysitting. The state attorneys of“ce in southwest Florida said in a news release that jurors deliberated for under two hours following a four-day trial. Prosecutors say Rafael Antonio Carrion Jr. had been babysitting the baby and two other children in November 2016. On Thanksgiving Day, he called 911 because the baby was unresponsive. The child was taken to a hospital where he later died of blunt force trauma to the skull. He also had signi“cant bruising and had cocaine in his system. Of“cials say Carrion gave con”icting accounts of how the child was injured, but didnt admit to harming him. Sentencing is scheduled for Oct. 1.Baby dies after being left in hot car in drivewaySPRING HILL (AP) „ Authorities say a baby has died after being left in a hot car in Florida. Hernando County Sheriffs of“cials say Eric OCallaghan found his son, 9-month-old Keyton, in the car in the driveway Friday morning. The father performed CPR on his son until rescuers arrived. The boy was pronounced dead at the hospital. Authorities say the baby had been in the care of his mother Cami Lee Moyer since Thursday night. Investigators are still interviewing her. Its unclear how long Keyton had been in the car.Work begins on $50M project to clean Keys canals post IrmaMARATHON (AP) „ A $50 million clean-up project to remove debris from Hurricane Irma has begun in the Florida Keys where a crew lifted a sunken motorhome from a canal. The project started Friday and will target 103 of the most impacted canals in the Keys. It will include a crew of 60 people, 15 barges and “ve sonar boats. The project is slated to take several months. Keys of“cials say they struggled to get funding from the federal government for the clean-up efforts and eventually obtained alternative funding from the Emergency Watershed Protection Program. FEMA does not have a reimbursement policy for removing hurricane debris from canals. Local of“cials called the funding a miracle and said they did not want to pass along the cleanup costs to residents who had already been through so much since Hurricane Irma slammed through the state last fall.School board sued over teacher abuse allegationFORT LAUDERDALE (AP) „ A lawsuit has been “led against a Florida school board for allegedly allowing an elementary school substitute teacher “red for fondling a child to be hired by another school. Attorney Jeff Herman says his client was 8-years-old when teacher Christopher Falzone began sexually abusing her in 2012. The lawsuit “led Friday alleges he touched and sexually harassed the victim and other female students, sometimes right in front of the principal. Falzone was “red in 2013 and was hired by a charter school. The lawsuit says he was also hired by a nearby summer camp where he was recently arrested on charges that he sexually molested a girl there. HEADLINES AROUND THE STATE STATE NEWS/WEATHER

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The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 3 ANSWER TO CROSSWORD STARTJEMIMADUSTAHS INFERULTRASJPMORGAN BUTTERRIVALSALITALIA STERNLYEARNITTIKI REDSWORKINGTHESOUL AMWAYSIDELAODOE LOADONEALPHENOMS CURSESFOULEDAGAINLIE ORDCHASMGOBUSTBILE ANSARIPALESTBOOKS JUNGLEALLTHEWAY CODASLAYUPSHYDRAS UNIXTERESADEFOEOLE RUMHUNDREDDOLLARBULL EPILOGSSEZMEANIL NONHASMEOWHIDES TRUCKQUESTIONSPATH RITAABASERBARSOAP AGITATEDPASSWORDHUNT LOVEDARTUTOPIACOSTS AREORSOPEDANTSPEEDBy CHAD DAYASSOCIATED PRESSWASHINGTON „ A former Trump campaign adviser should spend at least some time in prison for lying to the FBI during the Russia probe, prosecutors working for special counsel Robert Mueller said in a court “ling Friday that also revealed several new details about the early days of the investigation. The prosecutors disclosed that George Papadopoulos, who served as a foreign policy adviser to President Donald Trumps campaign during the 2016 presidential race, caused irreparable damage to the investigation because he lied repeatedly during a January 2017 interview. Those lies, they said, resulted in the FBI missing an opportunity to properly question a professor Papadopoulos was in contact with during the campaign who told him that the Russians possessed dirtŽ on Hillary Clinton in the form of emails. The “ling by the special counsels of“ce strongly suggests the FBI had contact with Professor Joseph Mifsud while he was in the U.S. during the early part of the investigation into Russian election interference and possible coordination with Trump associates. According to prosecutors, the FBI locatedŽ the professor in Washington about two weeks after Papadopoulos interview and Papadopoulos lies substantially hindered investigators ability to effectively questionŽ him. But it doesnt speci“cally relate any details of an interview with the professor as it recounts what prosecutors say was a missed opportunity caused by Papadopoulos. The defendants lies undermined investigators ability to challenge the Professor or potentially detain or arrest him while he was still in the United States,Ž Muellers team wrote, noting that the professor left the U.S. in February 2017 and has not returned since. Prosecutors note that investigators also missed an opportunity to interview others about the professors comments or anyone else at that time who might have known about Russian efforts to obtain derogatory information on Clinton during the campaign. Had the defendant told the FBI the truth when he was interviewed in January 2017, the FBI could have quickly taken numerous investigative steps to help determine, for example, how and where the Professor obtained the information, why the Professor provided the information to the defendant, and what the defendant did with the information after receiving it,Ž according to the court “ling. Prosecutors also detail a series of dif“cult interviews with Papadopoulos after he was arrested in July 2017, saying he didnt provide substantial assistanceŽ to the investigation. Papadopoulos later pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI as part of a plea deal. The “ling recommends that Papadopoulos spend at least some time incarcerated and pay a nearly $10,000 “ne. His recommended sentence under federal guidelines is zero to six months, but prosecutors note another defendant in the case spent 30 days in jail for lying to the FBI. Papadopoulos has played a central role in the Russia investigation since its beginning as an FBI counterintelligence probe in July 2016. In fact, information the U.S. government received about Papadopoulos was what triggered the counterintelligence investigation in the “rst place. That probe was later take over by Mueller. Papadopoulos was also the “rst Trump campaign adviser to plead guilty in Muellers investigation. Since then, Mueller has returned two sweeping indictments that detail a multi-faceted Russian campaign to undermine the U.S. presidential election in an attempt to hurt Clintons candidacy and help Trump. Thirteen Russian nationals and three companies are charged with participating in a conspiracy to sow discord in the U.S. political system primarily by manipulating social media platforms. In addition, Mueller brought an indictment last month against 12 Russian intelligence operatives, accusing them of hacking into the computer systems of Clintons presidential campaign and the Democratic Party and then releasing tens of thousands of private emails through WikiLeaks. According to that indictment, by April 2016, the Russian intelligence operatives had already stolen emails from several Democratic groups including the Clinton campaign and were beginning to plan how they were going to release the documents. That same month, according to court papers, Mifsud told Papadopoulos that he had met with senior Russian government of“cials in Moscow and had learned that they had dirtŽ on Clinton in the form of thousands of emails.Ž Read the sentencing memo: http://apne.ws/ tNIPFAC.Short sentence recommended for former Trump campaign adviserLOS ANGELES (AP) „ A California woman has said she had to drive herself to the hospital and give birth without her husband after he was detained by immigration agents. Maria del Carmen Venegas said she and her husband, Joel Arrona Lara, were driving to the hospital Wednesday when they stopped for gas in San Bernardino, just east of Los Angeles. Surveillance footage obtained by several media outlets shows two vehicles immediately ”ank the couples van after they pulled into the gas station. Agents with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement questioned the couple and asked for identi“cation, Venegas told KMEX-TV on Thursday. She said she was able to provide hers but that Arrona had left his at home in their rush to the hospital. The surveillance footage shows the agents handcuf“ng Arrona and taking him away, leaving a sobbing Venegas alone at the gas station. Venegas said she drove herself to the hospital for a scheduled cesarean section for the birth of her “fth child. Arrona, who is from Mexico, has lived in the U.S. for 12 years without legal authorization, Venegas said, but added that hes a hard worker, the sole provider of the family and has never been in trouble with the police. ICE con“rmed in a statement Saturday that agents detained Arrona on Wednesday and said he remained in custody pending removal proceedings. The agency said it will no longer exempt classes or categories of removable aliens from potential enforcement.Ž All of those in violation of the immigration laws may be subject to immigration arrest, detention and, if found removable by “nal order, removal from the United States,Ž the statement said. Venegas said she has not been able to contact her husband to tell him their new son was born and doing well. The last thing he knew was that I was here in the hospital,Ž she said. Im sure hes worried.Ž She said she is seeking an attorney in hopes of getting Arrona released.Migrant spouse of pregnant woman detained on way to hospital George Washington letter to be read at oldest US synagogue NEWPORT, R.I. (AP) „ A letter from George Washington will be read at the nations oldest synagogue to celebrate freedom of religion. The annual reading is scheduled for 1 p.m. Sunday at the 255-year-old Touro Synagogue in Newport, Rhode Island. Touro Synagogue holds an important place in the history of the nations commitment to religious liberty. In 1790, Washington visited Touro, then sent its congregants a letter saying the government of the United States gives to bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance.Ž The synagogue, dedicated in 1763, is a national historic site that draws tens of thousands of visitors annually.Health officials confirm fifth case of rat lungworm diseaseHONOLULU (AP) „ Hawaii has con“rmed that a Big Island toddler is the “fth victim this year of rat lungworm, a disease that is expected to continue to spread due to climate change. Its the third con“rmed case of rat lungworm disease on the Big Island. The state Department of Health says the toddler started showing symptoms in late July and was taken to an emergency room last week. The child was discharged after several days in the hospital. The state department health suspects the child may have contracted the disease by accidentally ingesting a slug or snail carrying a roundworm parasite, which can cause signi“cant damage to the nerves, brain and spinal cord. HEADLINES AROUND THE NATIONHONOLULU (AP) „ Slowing activity at Hawaiis Kilauea volcano has prompted scientists on Friday to downgrade their alert level for the mountain. The U.S. Geological Survey issued a watchŽ for Kilaueas ground hazards, down from a warning.Ž But scientists say this doesnt mean the eruption, which has destroyed more than 700 homes since May, is over. Kilauea has paused for days, weeks and even months during previous eruptions. Lava mostly stopped ”owing on Aug. 6. Theres a crusted-over lava pond inside a “ssure cone and just a few spots where lava is entering the ocean. The volcanos summit hasnt collapsed since Aug. 2. Sulfur dioxide emissions are the lowest theyve been since 2007. The agency has maintained a warningŽ alert for Kilauea since May 3, when cracks began shooting lava out of the ground in the Big Islands Leilani Estates neighborhood. Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, meanwhile, said it was taking advantage of the lull to assess damage to the park. The damage assessment produced by specialized team will provide the foundation of the parks recovery plan, the National Park Service said. Cindy Orlando, the park superintendent, said the agency is exploring short-term repairs to safely reopen at least part of the park. Two million people visit the Big Island park each year, making it the states biggest tourist attraction. The park has been closed since May because of the dangers posed by the eruption. Downgraded alert level for Hawaii volcano This photo provided by the National Park Service shows a large sinkhole at an intersection inside Hawaii Volcanoes National Park on Friday. Dear Mr. Berko: Whats the difference between exchange-traded funds and mutual funds? I just read your column on convertible bonds and noticed that you only recommended ETFs and didnt write about mutual funds. I bought $10,000 worth of Franklin Convertible Securities Fund in 2007, and its worth about $17,000 today. Id appreciate it if you could recommend several other convertible bond mutual funds like that one. „ VF, Kankakee, Ill. Dear VF: There are some important differences between an exchange-traded fund and a mutual fund that are worth a tinkers dam, and they are: 1) ETFs are bought and sold just like common stock, through a broker employed by a brokerage house. ETFs trade just like common stocks, such as Verizon, PepsiCo and Microsoft. As with common stocks, ETF prices can change from second to second. With MFs, though a purchase can be made whenever the stock market is open, the actual purchase/pricing is not concluded until after the market closes. 2) ETFs tend to focus their portfolios on specific market indexes, such as utilities, banks, arti“cial intelligence, biologics, home construction, gold, real estate, telecommunications, the S&P 500, the Russell 2000, the Dow Jones industrial average, etc. Most ETFs invest passively and tend to do little trading in securities. MFs, however, are actively traded and may rotate their portfolios by 25 to 90 percent during the year. 3) When you purchase an ETF, you pay a commission, just as you do when purchasing a common stock. A 1,000-share purchase of an ETF at J.P. Morgan might cost $300, whereas that same purchase at a discount brokerage, such as Charles Schwab, would cost you $4.95. ETFs usually end up costing you much less than MFs because theres never a load with an ETF as there are with MFs. With MFs, entrance and exit fees are sometimes exorbitant. And because of low portfolio turnover and the manner in which they are structured, ETF investment gains are taxed more favorably than gains on MFs. 4) Most importantly, the annual management fees for MFs are often three to four times those of ETFs. As youll see later, that makes a signi“cant difference. There are other differences, but in my opinion, theyre insigni“cant. Meanwhile, I like your Franklin Convertible Securities Fund (FISCX-$21.50), which has enjoyed three-, “veand 10-year average annual total returns of 10.7 percent, 10.6 percent and 8.9 percent, respectively. But it has a 5.75 percent sales commission plus a 0.8 percent expense ratio. Check out the Calamos Convertible Fund (CCVIX-$18.80), which has a $600 million portfolio that includes Tesla, Wells Fargo, NextEra Energy and Workday. It has a Morningstar rating of three stars, a price-earnings ratio of 12.5-to-1, a price-to-book ratio of 3.5-to-1 and a price-sales ratio of 0.49to-1. The three-, “veand 10-year average annual total returns are 6.3 percent, 7.3 percent and 6.2 percent, respectively. CCVIX has a 1.2 percent expense ratio every year. Look at the Putnam Convertible Securities Fund (PRCCX-$26.18), which has a $731 million portfolio and owns issues such as Micron Technology, ON Semiconductor, Jazz Pharmaceuticals and Crown Castle. This fund has three-, “veand 10year AATRs of 5.2 percent, 7.1 percent and 6.2 percent. It is rated three stars by Morningstar, has a P/E of 20.1-to-1, has a P/B of 2.1-to-1 and has a P/S of 2.3-to-1. Its annual expense ratio is 1.95 percent every year. The MainStay MacKay Convertible Fund (MCCVX-$17.81) owns a $1.2 billion portfolio that includes Anthem, Danaher, Air Lease and Microchip Technology. MCCVXs AATRs for three, “ve and 10 years are 6.3 percent, 8.4 percent and 6.6 percent. It has a P/E of 17.1, a P/B of 2.4 and a P/S of 1.4. Its expense ratio is 1.89 percent this year. It seems that almost all mutual funds specializing in convertible securities have lower returns than the S&P 500, which enjoys a 10-year AATR of 9.5 percent. However, the average ETF that owns a passive portfolio of convertibles has a low expense ratio of less than 0.5 percent and a 10-year AATR of 8.8 percent. And in 10 years, a low expense ratio can make a huge difference to your ETF or MF. Please address your “nancial questions to Malcolm Berko, P.O. Box 8303, Largo, FL 33775, or email him at mjberko@ yahoo.com. To “nd out more about Malcolm Berko and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com.ETFs and Mutual Funds Explained MalcolmBERKOC NATIONAL NEWS

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Page 4 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018ALMANACToday is Sunday, Aug. 19, the 231st day of 2018. There are 134 days left in the year.Today in historyOn August 19, 2004, Google began trading on the Nasdaq Stock Market, ending the day up $15.34 at $100.34.On this dateIn A.D. 14 Caesar Augustus, Romes first emperor, died at age 76 after a reign lasting four decades; he was succeeded by his stepson Tiberius. In 1814 during the War of 1812, British forces landed at Benedict, Maryland, with the objective of capturing Washington D.C. In 1934 a plebiscite in Germany approved the vesting of sole executive power in Adolf Hitler. In 1936 the first of a series of show trials orchestrated by Soviet leader Josef Stalin began in Moscow as 16 defendants faced charges of conspiring against the government (all were convicted and executed). In 1942 during World War II, about 6,000 Canadian and British soldiers launched a disastrous raid against the Germans at Dieppe, France, suffering more than 50-percent casualties. In 2003 a suicide truck bomb struck U.N. headquarters in Baghdad, killing 22, including the top U.N. envoy, Sergio Vieira de Mello. A suicide bombing of a bus in Jerusalem killed 22 people. Ten years ago: Tropical Storm Fay rolled ashore in Florida short of hurricane strength but mysteriously gained speed as it headed over land. Todays birthdays Actor L.Q. Jones is 91. Actress Debra Paget is 85. Former MLB All-Star Bobby Richardson is 83. Actress Diana Muldaur is 80. Singer Johnny Nash is 78. Actress Jill St. John is 78. Singer Billy J. Kramer is 75 Former President Bill Clinton is 72. Actor Gerald McRaney is 71. Tipper Gore wife of former Vice President Al Gore, is 70. Actor Jim Carter is 70. Rock musician John Deacon (Queen) is 67. Actor-director Jonathan Frakes is 66. Actor Peter Gallagher is 63. Actor Martin Donovan is 61. Rhythm-and-blues singer Ivan Neville is 59. Actor Eric Lutes is 56. Actor John Stamos is 55. Actress Kyra Sedgwick is 53. Country singer Lee Ann Womack is 52. Actor Matthew Perry is 49. Rapper Fat Joe is 48. Olympic gold medal tennis player Mary Joe Fernandez is 47. Actor Callum Blue is 41. Actor Peter Mooney is 35. Olympic silver medal snowboarder Lindsey Jacobellis is 33. Rapper Romeo is 29.Bible verseFaithful is he that calleth you, who also will do it.Ž „ I Thessalonians 5:24. Stay open to Gods call and when you hear it say yes. Thats what God wants to hear. Then he has something to work with. Excitement and fulfillment will follow in his time. God bless, and I know he will. ODD NEWSBERLIN (AP) „ The German government says it has made no preparations for the possibility that aliens might land in the European country. In a response to questions from opposition Green Party lawmaker Dieter Janecek, the government said there are no protocols or plans for a possible “rst contact with alien life.Ž Justifying that stance, the government added it believes a “rst contact on German territory is extremely unlikely, based on todays scienti“c knowledge.Ž Janecek linked the governments responses to a media article Saturday. Separately, German news agency dpa reported Saturday the classic childrens book The Little PrinceŽ has been translated into Klingon „ the “ctitious language of the eponymous space race in the science “ction franchise Star Trek.Ž Dpa quoted translator Lieven L. Litaer as saying the book, titled  tapuq mach ,Ž will be published in October. Germany: No preparations made in case of aliensrallies „ a moribund notion opposed by much of the Pentagon hierarchy and senior members of the Senate became a real possibility. A few days after the San Diego speech, Trump took a phone call at his Mara-Lago resort in Florida from Rep. Mike D. Rogers, R-Ala., who is chairman of the House Armed Services subcommittee on strategic forces. He had been promoting the space force to Trump and his advisers for months. This is something we have to do,Ž Rogers said he told Trump. Its a national security imperative.Ž Im all in,Ž Trump replied, Rogers said. We are going to have a space force.Ž The story of how that happened is a window into the chaotic way Trump sometimes makes decisions, often by bypassing traditional bureaucracy to tout ideas that work well as applause lines but arent fully thought out. Only Congress can create a new military service, and the administration still has not said what the space force would do, what it would look like or what it would cost. The existing services „ the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard „ not only deploy forces. They also run war colleges, recruiting stations, security and vast contracting operations, with costs in the billions of dollars. Vice President Mike Pence said this month that the administration would send a legislative proposal to Capitol Hill next year and aims to establish a space force by 2020. Congress has shown little appetite for a costly new expansion of government, especially one that would cut the Air Force budget, a service with powerful backing on Capitol Hill. Those political headwinds could reduce the space force to a presidential rallying cry, like his unful“lled vow to build a big, beautiful wallŽ on the border with Mexico. But Trumps enthusiasm has clearly provided momentum, exciting proponents who see a rare opportunity to win more attention and resources for space defense. They agreed on the threat. China and Russia were building weapons and cyber capabilities aimed at knocking out satellites that the Pentagon relies on for communication, precise targeting of bombs and missile defense, according to U.S. intelligence. Last summer, Rogers and Cooper inserted an amendment in the annual defense policy bill to create a separate service they called the space corps. It would be part of the Air Force, just as the Marine Corps is technically part of the Navy. But Rogers worried that putting it in the Air Force might not ”y. The Air Force is dominated by ”yers more interested in warplanes than in outer space, he noted in a speech last year, explaining Air Force opposition to a separate service. I mean, this is about money,Ž Rogers said. As long as space is in the (Air Force) portfolio, they can move money from space to support “ghter jets, bombers or whatever. The Air Force is run by “ghter pilots. Space will always lose.Ž Moreover, defense contractors involved in space were complaining to us about how impossible it was to deal with the Air Force,Ž Rogers said. They kept describing this bureaucratic morass in Air Force procurement, where nobody had decision-making authority.Ž Rogers, who was “rst elected to Congress by a narrow thin margin in 2002, has solidi“ed control of his rural district, with a campaign fund that has received considerable contributions from the aerospace industry. Defense industry companies have contributed $395,000 to his campaign committee and leadership PAC since 2017, becoming by far his largest industry donor, according to Open Secrets, a campaign spending database. Also pushing for the space corps was Douglas L. Loverro, a retired Air Force of“cer and the former executive director of its Space and Missile Systems Center in El Segundo, Calif. Loverro said in an interview that a dedicated corps of space experts would be necessary to ensure that a space force could ful“ll its mission. The Air Force focus on conventional air combat prevents it from building the best space war “ghters „ the ones who can conceive of, imagine, prepare for, and think doctrinally, operationally and technically about space,Ž Loverro said at an industry conference in April. But those are precisely the people we need today.Ž The space corps never got off the ground. The Air Force lobbied to kill it. Defense Secretary James Mattis took the unusual step of sending a letter to Congress voicing his objections. At a time when we are trying to integrate the Departments joint war“ghting functions, I do not wish to add a separate service that would likely present a narrower and even parochial approach to space operations,Ž Mattis wrote. Even the Trump White House called the idea premature at this timeŽ in a July 2017 statement. That was enough to kill the plan in the Senate, though Rogers got other lawmakers to agree to order the Pentagon to study the idea and report on its “ndings. He also began trying to enlist Trump. Last December, Rogers said, he arranged for an intermediary to give Trump information his subcommittee had collected about Russian and Chinese development of anti-satellite weapons, and about the Air Force effort to kill a separate military service. He declined to identify the intermediary. With the Air Force having poisoned the well, I knew I needed to get some energy back in it,Ž he said. Once elected, Trump revived the space council, an advisory panel led by Pence that had been dormant since the early 2000s. The vice president had attended three space shuttle launches while serving in Congress, and was deeply interested in space. When Pence gave an update during a Cabinet meeting in March, Trump marveled at model rocket ships displayed on the table in front of him. He touted the private space launch companies owned by billionaire businessmen, including Amazons Jeff Bezos, Teslas Elon Musk and Microsoft founder Paul Allen. Were letting them use the Kennedy Space Center for a fee,Ž Trump said. And you know, rich guys, they love rocket ships, and thats good. Thats better than us paying for it.Ž But Trump showed no interest publicly in a space force until his speech in San Diego in March, indicating that it was his idea. By then, the Pentagons attitude was beginning to shift. A Trump appointee, Deputy Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan, had begun preparing the report ordered by Congress on whether to create an independent space force. A former senior Boeing executive, Shanahan was familiar with the cumbersome Air Force procurement system. He became the administrations space force point person, consulting with Pence, Rogers, the Air Force and other Pentagon players, and the space council. I can hear my dad kind of whispering in my ear, Dont screw anything up,Ž Shanahan said Aug. 9. There are extensive military operations going on throughout the world right now and theyre heavily reliant on space.Ž Trump began talking up a space force privately, telling Pence to take on the project, according to an administration of“cial who con“rmed reporting “rst published in Axios. The aerospace industry, which was initially cool to the plan, began to come around, seeing a space force as a lucrative avenue not just for expensive new space systems, but also for uniforms, construction projects, support services and other needs of a new military service.SPACEFROM PAGE 1departure last September, embassy staff numbered more than 50. The sharp staff reduction has meant the suspension of all but emergency visa-issuing operations in Havana. Most Cubans seeking non-immigrant visas now must travel and apply for a visa at a U.S. embassy or consulate in another country. The result, the memo said, is that its more dif“cult for Cubans to visit family members in the United States, some Cuban cultural groups have been forced to cancel their U.S. tours, and its become more complicated for private Cuban entrepreneurs to travel to the United States to bring back the inputs they need for their businesses. Interviews and the processing of immigrant visas have been transferred to the U.S. Embassy in Georgetown, Guyana. In a 1994 migration accord between the United States and Cuba, the United States agreed to issue 20,000 travel documents for immigrants from Cuba. However, during the “rst nine months of “scal 2018, fewer than 4,000 immigrant visas were granted to Cubans, according to the memo. The staff reduction also led to closing down the refugee section at the embassy. Embassy of“cials estimate that it would take 2 to 3 years to restart operations in Havana,Ž the memorandum said. As a result, no Cubans have been admitted to the United States as refugees since September 2017.Ž In “scal 2017, at least 177 Cubans were admitted to the United States as refugees. Staf“ng was reduced by two-thirds after some diplomats began reporting medical systems ranging from hearing loss, dizziness, headaches, and cognitive issues to fatigue and insomnia „ sometimes accompanied by a high-pitched sound and a pressure-like sensation and sometimes not. Not all suffered the same symptoms, but some combination of them. Two University of Pennsylvania researchers who examined the diplomatic personnel con“rmed they had suffered brain injuries or concussion-like symptoms but said they werent accompanied by head trauma as would have been expected. Their research is ongoing. The State Department has referred to the incidents as health attacks but has stopped short of accusing the Cuban government of being behind them. The Cuban government, which is conducting its own investigation into the incidents, denies it had anything to do with causing them.EMBASSYFROM PAGE 1Syria in 2012. He remained a powerful advocate for global causes through his eponymous foundation. Annan took on the top U.N. post six years after the collapse of the Soviet Union and presided during a decade when the world united against terrorism after the Sept. 11 attacks „ then divided deeply over the U.S.led war against Iraq. The U.S. relationship tested him as a world diplomatic leader. I think that my darkest moment was the Iraq war, and the fact that we could not stop it,Ž Annan said in a February 2013 interview with TIME magazine to mark the publication of his memoir, Interventions: A Life in War and Peace.Ž Despite his well-honed diplomatic skills, Annan was never afraid to speak candidly. That didnt always win him fans, particularly in the case of Bushs administration, with whom Annans camp spent much time bickering. Much of his second term was spent at odds with the United States, the U.N.s biggest contributor, as he tried to lean on the nation to pay almost $2 billion in arrears. Ko“ Atta Annan was born April 8, 1938, into an elite family in Kumasi, Ghana, the son of a provincial governor and grandson of two tribal chiefs. He shared his middle name Atta „ twinŽ in Ghanas Akan language „ with a twin sister, Efua. He became ”uent in English, French and several African languages, attending an elite boarding school and the University of Science and Technology in Kumasi. He “nished his undergraduate work in economics at Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota, in 1961. From there he went to Geneva, where he began his graduate studies in international affairs and launched his U.N. career. Annan married Titi Alakija, a Nigerian woman, in 1965, and they had a daughter, Ama, and a son, Kojo. He returned to the U.S. in 1971 and earned a masters degree. The couple separated during the 1970s and, while working in Geneva, Annan met his second wife, Swedish lawyer Nane Lagergren. They married in 1984. Annan worked for the U.N. Economic Commission for Africa in Ethiopia, its Emergency Force in Egypt, and the of“ce of the High Commissioner for Refugees in Geneva, before taking a series of senior posts at U.N. headquarters in New York dealing with human resources, budget, “nance, and staff security. He also had special assignments. After Iraq invaded Kuwait in 1990, he facilitated the repatriation from Iraq of more than 900 international staff and other non-Iraqi nationals, and the release of western hostages in Iraq. He led the initial negotiations with Iraq for the sale of oil in exchange for humanitarian relief. Just before becoming secretary-general, Annan served as U.N. peacekeeping chief and as special envoy to the former Yugoslavia, where he oversaw a transition in Bosnia from U.N. protective forces to NATO-led troops. The U.N. peacekeeping operation faced two of its greatest failures during his tenure: the Rwanda genocide in 1994, and the massacre in the Bosnian town of Srebrenica in July 1995. In both cases, the U.N. had deployed troops under Annans command, but they failed to save the lives of the civilians they were mandated to protect. Annan offered apologies, but ignored calls to resign by U.S. Republican lawmakers. After became secretary-general, he called for U.N. reports on those two debacles „ and they were highly critical of his management. As secretary-general, Annan forged his experiences into a doctrine called the Responsibility to Protect,Ž that countries accepted „ at least in principle „ to head off genocide, crimes against humanity, ethnic cleansing and war crimes. Annan sought to strengthen the U.N.s management, coherence and accountability, efforts that required huge investments in training and technology, a new whistleblower policy and “nancial disclosure requirements. Annans uncontested election to a second term was unprecedented, re”ecting the overwhelming support he enjoyed from both rich and poor countries. Timothy Wirth, president of the United Nations Foundation, which disburses Ted Turners $1 billion pledge to U.N. causes, hailed a saint-like sense about him.Ž In 2005, Annan succeeded in establishing the Peacebuilding Commission and the Human Rights Council. But that year, the U.N. was facing almost daily attacks over allegations about corruption in the U.N. oil-forfood program in Iraq, bribery by U.N. purchasing of“cials and widespread sex abuse by U.N. peacekeepers. Before leaving of“ce, Annan helped secure a truce between Israel and Hezbollah in 2006, and mediated a settlement of a dispute between Cameroon and Nigeria over the Bakassi peninsula. At a farewell news conference, Annan listed as top achievements the promotion of human rights, the “ghting to close the gap between extreme poverty and immense wealth, and the U.N. campaign to “ght infectious diseases like AIDS. Former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Richard Holbrooke called Annan an international rock star of diplomacy.Ž After leaving his high-pro“le U.N. perch, Annan didnt let up. In 2007, his Geneva-based foundation was created. That year he helped broker peace in Kenya, where election violence had killed over 1,000 people. Annan continued to crisscross the globe. In 2017, his foundations biggest projects included promotion of fair, peaceful elections; work with Myanmars government to improve life in troubled Rakhine state; and battling violent extremism by enlisting young people to help. He also remained a vocal commentator on troubles like the refugee crisis; promoted good governance, anti-corruption measures and sustainable agriculture in Africa; and pushed efforts in the “ght against illegal drug traf“cking. His homeland of Ghana was shaken by his death. One of our greatest compatriots,Ž President Nana Akufo-Addo said, calling for a week with ”ags at half-mast. Rest in perfect peace, Ko“. You have earned it.ŽANNANFROM PAGE 1 FROM PAGE ONE

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The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 5IF I WERE YOU...BY ROSS TRUDEAU / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS1 Begin6 Commercial aunt since 188912 Prep to find fingerprints16 Checkup sounds19 Deduce20 Rabid supporters21 Steel head?23 Land OLakes and Breakstones?25 Part of the SkyTeam Alliance26 With severity27 The only way to get respect, so they say29 Kind of torch30 Commies31 Ministering?35 Giant in direct sales37 Pro or con38 Vientiane native39 Stags mate40 Laundry unit41 Inside the N.B.A.Ž analyst beginning in 201143 Wunderkinds, say47 Damn, I cant seem to get a ball into fair territory!Ž?53 Fabrication54 Chicago airport code55 Wide divide56 Lose an all-in hand, say57 Vitriol58 Aziz of Master of NoneŽ60 Most susceptible to sunburn61 Biblioklepts targets62 Like a trip overland from Venezuela to Bolivia?67 Musical closings70 Easy buckets71 Tiny, multitentacled creatures75 Operating system since the early 70s76 Mother ____77 Robinson CrusoeŽ author80 Ftbol stadium cry81 Ingredient in a Cuba libre82 Expensive line of nonsense someone throws you?85 Novel endings, maybe87 Informal assertion of authority88 Indigo source89 Part of NGO90 Orders93 Feed me!,Ž maybe94 Tannery stock95 What are you hauling in there?Ž and How many axles you running?Ž100 Course101 Actress Moreno102 One putting others down103 Ivory, e.g.106 In a state108 Entering your middle name, then date of birth, then adding a 1,Ž etc.?112 Missile in a mating ritual113 Best of all possible worlds114 Amounts to115 Amount to116 ƒ ishŽ117 Nitpicky know-it-all118 Scoring factor at a crossword tournament DOWN1 Bros, e.g.2 Letter-shaped fastener3 Subsequently4 Sadly unoriginal works5 In vogue6 Box of 12?7 Manning with two Super Bowl M.V.P. awards8 I want my ____Ž (1980s slogan)9 Suggestion from a financial adviser, for short10 Rami ____ of Mr. RobotŽ11 Attack vigorously12 Title role for Jamie Foxx13 Like the Statue of Liberty at night14 Most common U.S. surname15 Wee one16 Trattoria option that means garlic and oilŽ17 Poem name whose singular and plural forms are the same18 Slowness embodied22 Betrays, in a way24 Treasure IslandŽ monogram28 Genetic messenger31 Excessive lovers of the grape32 Classical theater33 Concrete34 Temptation location35 Big name in soda cans and foil36 Show grief37 Guest bed, in a pinch42 Extended writers blocks?43 Scrapbooking need44 Big success45 Good source of calcium46 Grasps48 Hosiery shades49 This Hebrew letter: 50 American Girl products51 Keep watch for, maybe52 Overdo it on the praise57 The Lord of the RingsŽ actor Billy59 He fought alongside Achilles60 Remote button61 Aspirin maker63 Narrow valleys64 Oreo ingredient until the mid-90s65 One ogling66 You just blew my mind!Ž67 Medical breakthrough68 Movin ____Ž69 Tiny72 Wide-swinging blow73 CBSs Kate & ____Ž74 Peddles76 Harbor sight77 Box of 12, say78 TicklishŽ toys79 Raced82 [The light turned green! Go!]83 Free trial version84 Where you might open a whole can of worms?86 Track down90 Move in the direction of91 Jerk92 Rise to the occasion94 Comedic duo?95 Skipping syllables96 Difficulty97 2022 World Cup host98 Alternatives to cabs99 About to blow ones top100 3, 4 or 5, usually103 What a 76-Down pulls104 Certain buy-in105 Vets malady, for short107 Kerfuffle109 Turf110 Luxury-hotel amenity111 Get gold from ones lead? 123456789101112131415161718 19202122 232425 26272829 3031323334 3536373839 40414243444546 47484950515253 54555657 58596061 6263646566 6768697071727374 757677787980 81828384 85868788 899091929394 9596979899100 101102103104105 106107108109110111 112113114 115116117118Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). NEW YORK TIMES SUNDAY CROSSWORDFOR ANSWERS TURN TO PAGE 3No. 0812 Name That CompanyI trace my roots back to 1936 and a guy selling peanuts out of his car in Los Angeles. Over the years, Ive been involved in businesses as diverse as publishing and child care, but today, based in Philadelphia and with a market value recently topping $9 billion, Im a major food service company. I employ 270,000 people worldwide and regularly serve more than 5,400 dining locations, 2,000 health care facilities, 1,500 colleges and schools and 100 million sports fans at various venues. Ive served at many Olympics, Super Bowls, FIFA World Cups and more. Who am I?Think you know the answer? Well announce it in next weeks edition. what price its a good buy. Pricerelated measures help you determine whether a stock is overpriced, underpriced or priced just right. They address a companys valuation or stock price and include its market capitalization, enterprise value, price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio and price-to-sales ratio. Its easy to think that as long as the company is wonderful, the stock price doesnt matter much. You might assume that if an overvalued company keeps growing, itll eventually grow into and surpass its current price. That could take a long time, though, and instead, the stock might fall closer to its fair value. Even if the stock grows, it might not do so briskly, if its already overvalued. To reduce your risk and have a better chance of realizing solid gains, aim to buy into stock only at attractive prices. Thats what value investors do, and they call it seeking a margin of safety. When you evaluate possible investments, focus on quality and price. These two factors can also help you determine when to sell. Learn more about successful investing at fool.com/how-to-invest .The Motley Fool TakeA Mouse for Your HouseMany investors have been steering clear of Walt Disney (NYSE: DIS), fearing the effect of gobs of consumers cutting their cable cords on its ESPN and ABC TV businesses. But thats short-sighted. Disneys theme parks attract more than 150 million visitors annually, the Disney cruise line is adding three more ships between 2021 and 2023, and the company is breaking away from its Netflix partnership to nurture its own digital video efforts. Disney is already a movie powerhouse. It owns much of the Marvel universe through its acquisition of Marvel Entertainment. And having also bought Pixar and Lucasfilm, it has the Toy Story and Star Wars franchises, too. Some analysts have estimated that Disney earned 61 percent of the movie industrys total profits in 2016. With Disney acquiring TwentyFirst Century Fox for $71 billion (the purchase was approved by shareholders last month), it will get a rich content library featuring properties from AvatarŽ to The Simpsons.Ž Disneys ability to turn intellectual property into cold, hard cash will serve it well as it builds its own video streaming service. Walt Disneys future looks as strong as ever, and its stock seems undervalued today, trading with a recent price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio in the mid-teens and a 1.5 percent dividend yield. (The Motley Fool owns shares of and has recommended Disney.) Ask the Fool My Dumbest InvestmentReverse SplitsI should have known better, but I took investment advice from a rag that repeatedly failed me. More than half the companies I invested in had reverse splits of 1-to-10 or 1-to-20. After those splits, most of them went down the drain completely. „ J.H., online The Fool Responds: Ouch. Too many investors dont sufficiently understand what stock splits and reverse splits are and mean. With a regular stock split, such as a 2-for-1 split, if you have 100 shares of a stock priced at $50 per share (total value: $5,000), post-split youll have 200 shares priced around $25 apiece (total value: $5,000). Splits lower share prices, but investors stakes remain the same. Theres little reason to rejoice or lament a regular stock split, but a reverse split is usually a red flag, signaling a company in trouble. With a 1-for-10 split, 100 shares valued at $5 per share would become 10 shares valued at $50. Reverse splits can be used to inflate a stocks price so that it looks less worrisome. Be careful with any investing newsletter „ make sure that its record is available and impressive. (You can access some rankings of newsletters at hulbertratings.com .) Ideally, make your investment decisions based on your own research, perhaps with the help of a good newsletter „ or just stick with low-fee, broad-market index funds. They instantly and easily set you up to earn the stock markets approximate return. Market ExpectationsQI began investing a few years ago, and my first investments gains have averaged around 30 percent. I suspect this wont last. What average annual returns I can expect over a 10-year period „ maybe 15 percent? „ T.B., Baton Rouge, LouisianaATheres no way to know exactly how any stock or the overall market will do in any time period. Over decades, though, the stock market has averaged close to 8 or 10 percent annually „ more than that with dividends reinvested. Over your particular investing years, you might average 6 percent, or 12 percent, or something else.A market-topping average is hard to achieve over the long run. Yes, Apple stock has averaged annual gains of about 30 percent over the past 20 years, but IBM has averaged 5.7 percent and Johnson & Johnson has averaged 9 percent. Since trying to beat the market is so difficult, superinvestor Warren Buffett has recommended low-cost broad-market index funds for most people. They offer an easy way to roughly match the markets return.***QWhere can I study and compare mutual funds? „ P.L., Grand Rapids, MichiganAThe internet is great for that. Morningstar.com is a major mutual fund resource, offering details about thousands of funds performance, fees, taxes, holdings and much more. The folks at the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA), meanwhile, offer useful comparisons and data via their Fund Analyzer tool at finra.org/fundanalyzer There you can enter fund names or ticker symbols and compare fees and performances of various funds „ as well as assessing their performances after fees have been subtracted. That can be a great way to see how often inexpensive index funds outperform managed funds, even if the managed funds sport higher pre-fee returns.Want more information about stocks? Send us an email to foolnews@fool.com.Fools SchoolValue and QualitySuccessful investing boils down to being able to answer two key questions whenever considering a stock for your portfolio: 1) Is this a healthy, high-quality company? 2) Is the companys stock priced attractively right now? If you focus on only one, you might end up buying overvalued shares of a terrific company, or seemingly bargain-priced shares of a troubled or doomed business. Investors have lost a lot of money doing either or both of those things. Many good companies are rather apparent, but a close examination is wise. You can discern quality by assessing a companys profitability, growth and health via measures such as sales and earnings growth rates, profit margins, return on equity (ROE), return on assets (ROA), inventory turnover and market share, among other things. Management quality and candor is also important. Once you find a great prospect, it can be tricky to figure out at 2018 THE MOTLEY FOOL/DIST. BY ANDREWS MCMEEL SYNDICATION 8/16 LAST WEEKS TRIVIA ANSWERI trace my roots all the way back to a paint ingredient company in 1866. In 1873, I introduced my first paint, raw umber, in oil, and in 1877, my founder patented a re-sealable tin paint can. By the 1880s I was selling ready-mixed paint. I introduced a water-based paint in 1941 and a latex paint in 1950. Over the years I also made items such as insecticide, synthetic resins, automobile lacquer and linseed oil. Today, based in Cleveland and with 4,200-plus stores, Im Americas largest specialty paint retailer. My brands include Krylon, Valspar and Pratt & Lambert. Who am I? (Answer: Sherwin-Williams)Want to Invest? Email us at foolnews@fool.com, and well send you some tips to start investing. Sorry, we cant provide individual financial advice.

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Page 6 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 CRYPTOGRAMS FISHERMANS FOLLY by Myles Mellor 1. PDOOA XZVDWESQ YGEOCEYT JZQA ZSTA YK FZECG PETG ST YGZA GSJZ YGZEQ KFO TVSWZT. XZQPZVY! 2. IYWOW QSP S MSPIZ RCLYI SI IYW PWSRTTN OWPISBOSMI. IYOWW RCPY LTI ESIIWOWN. MTQ IYWZOW TM S EBM! 3. ZYFVT VYH OHTV PMTDB ECS FW FWAKHS? VYHSHT WC RCMOV F EKQ EDTYHSPFW FKZFQT WHHRT TCPHVYDWA BFVBYQ! 4. EYF SIA ZAURR Y BIN JPRBR JYQITPNU LARPEYK PFRNTALUFN? IXQPIARKS Y XYRR ZAPNYT! 1. Funny peculiar thingits very easy to weigh fish as they have their own scales. Perfect! 2. There was a nasty fight at the seafood restaurant. Three fish got battered. Now theyre on a bun! 3. Whats the best music for an angler? Theres no doubt a fly fisherman always needs something catchy! 4. Can you guess a hot fishs favorite musical instrument? Obviously a bass guitar! CROSSWORD PUZZLE GOREN BRIDGECRYPTOGRAMS HOLIDAY MATHIS HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21-April 19). People will nd out who you are through your actions, your stories or because you share your preferences. So you really dont have to worry about telling them who you are. Youre already showing them. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Youre gutsy. You forget that sometimes. Or rather, you take it for granted, believing that everyone else is gutsy, too. Not true! Youre lucky when you recognize the quality and make it count today. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Before a mutually satisfying deal can be struck, the others will want to understand your story. So let them know where you were, what happened, and why they need to know. That should do it. CANCER (June 22-July 22). Self-suciency is among your many attractive qualities. You wont ask your friends to help you unless you truly cant do on your own. In that case, a Taurus is your ideal support. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Like the cat your sign is named for, you are choosy about who you like, and then obsessively loyal to your chosen ones. Also like a cat, curled up and cozy will be your default mode today. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). People have their own agendas, but they might adopt yours if it is appealing enough. People are usually willing to forgo their plan when theres something more interesting, attainable, lucrative, fun, urgent or important to do. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). If you stop saying yes so often, people will take notice. They will value your time and services a little more, seeing them as limited commodities that others also want. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). You love to know whats really going on in peoples lives, but mostly they show you what their lives look like instead of what they feel like. Good thing you never go strictly by appearances. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). Your compassion is an enormous strength. You will ideally use it to be helpful, to teach others and/or be the catalyst for their growth. What you dont want is to enable others or xŽ them, which never works. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Aim for the middle of the road. Youll hit the perfect note: surprising, but not obvious; spontaneous, but not impulsive; romantic, but nobodys fool. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). If playŽ is an art form, youre a ne artist indeed today. Youll be so involved in your process of curious enjoyment that you wont even think to stop and commemorate it. This is living. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). In friendship, youll deal with the other persons aws or be kind enough to look the other way. But youre stricter when your hearts on the line. There are standards that must be met before you give your trust. TODAYS BIRTHDAY (Aug. 19). We are all lions,Ž said the poet Rumi, but lions on a banner: because of the wind they are rushing onward from moment to moment.Ž This solar return, youll seize your moment, marching forward for your cause, a purpose that brings out your most regal characteristics. Windfall months: September and June. Cancer and Capricorn adore you. Your lucky numbers are: 5, 30, 2, 21 and 16.PUZZLE ANSWERSPuzzles on previous pages)

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The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018 www.yoursun.com E/N/C Page 7 CROSSWORD PUZZLE DEAR ABBY HELOISE JUMBLE DEAR ABBY: I am in my late 20s and dating a man in his mid-30s whom I am crazy about. We have been dating for a year and are starting to discuss marriage and children. Hes kind, hard-working, gives back to the community, and does everything he can to make me happy. My problem is his family. His mother curses and yells at him every few months, usually around the holidays when he tells her hes splitting his time between his family and mine. She breaks him down any way she can, such as nding fault with me or bringing up mistakes he made 10 or 15 years ago. His sister tells him often that she doesnt like me because of things she claims I said or did. She has also attacked me on social media. The rest of the family gets involved in the drama and even blackmailed him (insinuating they would get him red) when he tried to ignore them. A week or so after these outbursts occur, his family pretends nothing happened. He admits his family has issues,Ž but he still wants a relationship with them. I try to limit my time with them, but Im worried about our future. He would make an amazing husband, but I am unsure how „ or if „ I can get past his toxic family. Any words of wisdom would be appreciated. „ HAPPILY EVER AFTER? DEAR HAPPILY: I can see why you would question a future with a man from a family that guilts, manipulates and lies to the degree that his does. Whether you can overcome the baggage he will carry after you leave the altar is debatable. It might help if the two of you discuss this not only with each other, but also with a clergyperson who can give you unbiased premarital counseling. If you do get married, consider moving farther away from his family to secure your independence. He may also have to nd another job if hes under their thumb nancially. DEAR ABBY: My teenage son came to us because he feels lonely and like no one cares. He says he knows his family is there for him and loves him, but hes looking for that special girl. I talked to him and tried to let him know that right now he needs to focus on himself and where he wants to go with his life, and eventually he will meet someone. He has now told me that he has had thoughts of hurting himself and wants to talk with a counselor. We have made an appointment for him. My question is, is it a good sign that he is seeking help now before he has done anything? He hasnt harmed himself in any way, doesnt use drugs, doesnt drink or engage in risky behavior. I want to believe that since he is asking early, all will be OK. „ VERY CONCERNED MOM IN ARIZONA DEAR MOM: Its appropriate to believe that. Kudos to your son. The people you have to worry about are the ones who hide their sadness and pretend everything is OK when it really isnt. I assume that you made an appointment for your son with a licensed mental health professional. When your son goes, encourage him to be as open with his therapist about his feelings as he can, so he can get the help he is asking for. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Abby shares more than 100 of her favorite recipes in two booklets: Abbys Favorite RecipesŽ and More Favorite Recipes by Dear Abby.Ž Send your name and mailing address, plus check or money order for $14 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby, Cookbooklet Set, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Shipping and handling are included in the price.)Dear Readers: Trying to get everybody ready for school in the morning can be frenetic and stressful. Use these hints to make mornings calmer and more orderly. „ Ask your children to collect their school materials and place them in their backpacks the night before, so there will not be a dramatic search for their stu in the morning. „ Make certain your older children decide what they are going to wear the next day. For younger kids, you can select their outts and lay them out at night. „ Set the breakfast table before you go to bed. Put dishes, silverware and a box of dry cereal on the table. „ Heloise Dear Heloise: I bought a pair of shoes on sale, and they are too tight. Is there any way I can stretch them? „ Emily from Kansas Dear Emily: Yes, you can! Use a shoe stretcher along with a shoe-stretcher spray. Buy these at a shoe-repair shop. First, spritz the spray inside the shoes and then add the stretcher. If this does not work, get the shoes to a shoe-repair shop, which has a stretching machine, which might or might not work. You can prevent this problem by not being tempted to buy shoes just because theyre on sale and are a great bargain, especially ones that are bit too small. They may not ever t right. „ Heloise Dear Readers: Does your family love to eat bacon? And do you hate to cook it because it splatters grease everywhere? Well, today it does splatter more because commercially sold bacon is cured in liquid brine. In the past, it was cured with dry salt. Heres how to stop that icky grease from ying out of the frying pan and onto the stove and elsewhere. 1. Dunk the bacon into our. 2. Start frying the bacon in a cold skillet. 3. Maintain the heat on medium. 4. Get rid of the fat as the bacon cooks.„ Heloise Dear Heloise: We have several wonderful pieces of wood furniture that have been in our family for years. I have noticed scratches and small cracks on them. Is there any way I can correct the aws? „ Steve from Connecticut Dear Steve: Yes, wood furniture needs a good polish from time to time so it doesnt dry out and develop these problems. Age and use contribute to cracks and scratches. If you have big problems, get the pieces to a furniture professional. For smaller issues, heres how to cover or contain them: Purchase wax sticks at big box or hardware stores. You can match the wax stick color to your wood nish. These sticks will cover cracks or deep scratches in the wood. Rub the stick into the crack until it is even with the surface. Take a putty knife and heat it in hot water. Use the at side of the knife to run across the area lled with the wax to be sure theres a smooth and even surface. „ Heloise Dear Readers: When you pull o duct tape, it can leave a sticky residue thats hard to remove. Heres how to get it o: Pour a bit of baby oil or vegetable oil on the sticky areas, rub it in with your ngers and leave it on for 30 minutes. Pat cornmeal in the oil and use a plastic scrubber to rub in circles until the residue balls up and you can remove it. „ HeloiseToxic family members cast doubt on couples future marriage plansDear Abby Hints from Heloise

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Page 8 E/N/C www.yoursun.com The Sun | Sunday, August 19, 2018By AIJAZ RAHIASSOCIATED PRESSTRIVANDRUM, India „ Thousands of stranded people were waiting to be rescued Saturday and of“cials pleaded for more help as relentless monsoon ”oods battered the southern Indian state of Kerala, where more than 190 have died in a little over a week and much of the state is partially submerged. Heavy rains hit parts of the state again Saturday morning, slowing attempts to deploy rescuers and get relief supplies to isolated areas. Many have seen no help for days and can only be reached by boat or helicopter. More than 300,000 people have taken shelter in over 1,500 state-run relief camps, of“cials said. But authorities said they were being inundated with calls for assistance, local media reported. We are receiving multiple repetitive rescue requests,Ž the of“ce of the states top of“cial, Pinarayi Vijayan, said Friday in a tweet, asking those in need to provide their exact location and nearby landmarks so rescuers can “nd them. Of“cials have called it the worst ”ooding in Kerala in a century, with rainfall in some areas well over double that of a typical monsoon season. The downpours that started Aug. 8 have triggered ”oods and landslides and caused homes and bridges to collapse across Kerala, a picturesque state known for its quiet tropical backwaters and beautiful beaches. Of“cials estimate more than 6,200 miles of roads have been damaged. One of the states major airports, in the city of Kochi, has been closed. Meteorologists expect the rains to ease up over the next few days. Prime Minister Narendra Modi met Saturday with the states top of“cials, promising more than $70 million in aid. While the central government has dispatched multiple military units to Kerala, state of“cials are pleading for additional help. Please ask Modi to give us helicopters, give us helicopters. ... Please, please!Ž state legislator Saji Cherian said on a Kerala-based TV news channel, the Indian Express newspaper reported. Modi said 38 helicopters had been deployed for search and rescue operations in the state, which has a population of more than 33 million. We all pray for the safety and well-being of the people of Kerala,Ž he said in a tweet. Initial storm damage estimates were nearly $2.8 billion, Vijayan said. Indias navy said it airlifted a pregnant woman from the ”oods on Thursday in Kerala and she gave birth to a boy shortly after the rescue. A doctor was lowered to assess the woman before she was lifted into a helicopter, the navy said. At least 194 people have died in the ”ooding and 36 more are missing, according to Keralas disaster management of“ce. More than 1,000 people have died in seven Indian states since the start of this years monsoon season, including more than 300 in Kerala.Thousands await rescue amid deadly south Indian floods AP PHOTOAn Indian woman and a child wade past ”oodwaters after heavy rainfall in Ahmadabad, India, Friday. India receives its annual rainfall from June-October. BERLIN (AP) „ Hundreds of neo-Nazis waving ”ags with the colors of the German Reich are marching through central Berlin, protected from counter-protesters by police in riot gear. Berlin police spokesman Thilo Cablitz said of“cers had to physically remove some left-wing demonstrators who had staged sit-down protests along the route of Saturdays march. He added that stones and bottles were thrown at some of the far-right protesters, but couldnt immediately say how many people were injured. The far-right protesters wore white shirts to commemorate the 31st anniversary of the death of high-ranking Nazi of“cial Rudolf Hess and carried banners with slogans such as I regret nothing.Ž Hess, who received a life sentence at the Nuremberg trials for his role in planning World War II, died on Aug. 17, 1987.Hundreds of neo-Nazis march in Berlin, protected by police AP PHOTOPeople carry a banner reading I dont regret anything during a demonstration commemorating the 31st death anniversary Hitlers deputy Rudolf Hess in Berlin Saturday. Hess died 1987 in a prison in Berlin. LONDON (AP) „ In Britain, there is a growing sense of Brexit deja vu. Two years after the country voted to leave the European Union, emotional arguments about membership in the bloc are raging as “ercely as they did during the 2016 referendum. With seven months until Britain of“cially leaves the bloc, negotiations faltering, chances are rising of an acrimonious divorce „ and the one thing that proand anti-EU forces have in common is that they are both unhappy. Former U.K. Independence Party leader Nigel Farage announced Saturday that he was returning to political campaigning in a bid to derail British Prime Minister Theresa Mays plan for future ties with the EU. Farage, the right-winger who helped lead the successful leaveŽ campaign in 2016, wrote in the Daily Telegraph that he would join a cross-country bus tour by the group Leave Means Leave to oppose Mays cowardly sell-out.Ž Referring to U.K. politicians and civil servants, he said unless challenged, these anti-democrats will succeed in frustrating the resultŽ of the referendum. Negotiations on future relations between the U.K. and the bloc have faltered, largely due to divisions within Mays Conservative government over how close an economic relationship to seek with EU. Last month the government “nally produced a plan, proposing to stick close to EU regulations in return for free trade in goods. That infuriated Brexit-backers such as Farage and former Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, who say it would leave the U.K. tethered to the bloc and unable to strike new trade deals around the world. Opponents of Brexit say that, even if the EU accepts Mays plan „ which appears unlikely „ it would still erect barriers between Britain and the EU, its biggest trading partner.UKs Farage vows to end Brexit sell-out WORLD NEWSadno=3599886 AUTOMATIC, NON-SMOKER, AIR, LOW MILES, UNIQUE QUALITY2015 KIA SOUL $11,818 27,000 MILES, PREFERRED EQUIPMENT PACKAGE, CREW CAB2016 RAM 1500 $25,818 TOURING-L MODEL, LEATHER SEATS, 20,100 MILES, NAVIGATION2017 CHRYSLER PACIFICA $24,518 SE MODEL, AUTOMATIC, ONE OWNER, 37,000 MILES, SMOOTH2014 HYUNDAI ELANTRA $11,518 SV MODEL, ONE OWNER, 34,900 MILES, PEARL WHITE, NICE2015 NISSAN ROGUE $16,818 REGULAR SHORT BED, AUTOMATIC, FULL POWER, LOW MILES2013 FORD F-150 $13,818 LIMITED, LEATHER, SUNROOF, NAVIGATION, 22,000 MILES2015 JEEP GR CHEROKEE $26,818 4 DOOR SR5, 4.0L V-6, AUTOMATIC, FINAL PRICE REDUCTION2008 TOYOTA PRERUNNER $16,818 SL MODEL, ONE OWNER, LEATHER, 43,700 MILES, LOCAL2013 NISSAN ALTIMA $13,518 ONE OWNER SPORT, CANYON COPPER, SE WITH UPGRADES2016 HYUNDAI SANTA FE $17,818 ONE OWNER, LT MODEL, 19,000 MILES, LANE CHANGE SYSTEM2016 CHEVROLET EQUINOX $20,518 1.8T SE MODEL, ONE OWNER, LEATHER, NAVIGATION2015 VW PASSAT $13,818 Send Them Back to School in A Safe & Dependable Ride! 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Sunday, August 19, 2018 SPORTS www.yoursun.com www.Facebook.com/SuncoastSports € @SunCoastSportsINDEX | Lottery 2 | NFL 2 | Golf 2 | Pro Baseball 4 | Scoreboard 5 | Auto Racing 6 | Colleges 6 adno=50539778 1700 Tamiami Trail Port Charlotte, FL 33948 941-626-0434 TODAY ONLY Sunday 8/19/18 Port Charlotte Store OnlyH DS DN H D!!!Gloves3/$18.00Grip Special.99 centsNewCallaway Iron Sets$349.99 Precept Power Drive 15 Ball Pack$11.99 eaLimit 32 Year Waterproof Spikeless Footjoy Shoes $44.99$24.99Hot Z Cart Bags $49.99 $49.99Hot Z Stand BagsHaggar Shorts$10.00 pairLadies Apparel$15.00 ea2/$25USEDGolf Equip50% O 3 Wheel Carts $69.99PUT DOWN THE BACON PUT ON YOUR PANTS THESE DEALS ARE GONE WHEN GONECLEARANCEShoesincludes grip and installationBy DAVE CAMPBELLAssociated PressMINNEAPOLIS „ Minnesota and Jacksonville had the top two defenses in the NFL last season, a major reason why the Vikings and Jaguars reached their respective conference championship games. Two joint practices and one exhibition game produced yet more evidence of the exceptional skill and sound scheme each team has on that side of the ball. Yannick Ngakoue had an 11-yard sack that helped Jacksonville hold Kirk Cousins and Minnesotas starting offense to three completions and three points, before the Jaguars reserves rallied for a 14-10 victory over the Vikings on Saturday. The defense got after them pretty good, and their defense got after us pretty good,Ž Vikings coach Mike Zimmer said. Thats kind of how it looked all week.Ž Cousins was crisp in his only series last week but the Vikings went three-and-out on two of their four possessions with their new quarterback. Latavius Murrays second fumble, stripped by Malik Jackson and recovered by Calais Campbell, stopped another drive. Cousins finished just 3 for 8 for 12 yards. Frankly, I think thats what we need and maybe want at this time of year,Ž Cousins said. Nobody feeling comfortable.Ž About all the everdemanding Zimmer was pleased with was that the Vikings didnt actually win. It kind of looked like we didnt practice this week, to be honest with you,Ž he said. Minnesotas defense was closer to midseason form, with an interception by Harrison Smith of Blake Bortles and another sure pick by Mackensie Alexander that was bobbled and dropped. Bortles played the entire first half and went 12 for 20 for 159 yards, producing a touchdown run by NFLJaguars defeat Vikings 14-10AP PHOTO/BRUCE KLUCKHOHNJacksonville Jaguars wide receiver Marqise Lee is tackled by Minnesota Vikings defensive back Xavier Rhodes, right, during the first half of an NFL preseason football game, Saturday, Aug. 18, 2018, in Minneapolis. Associated PressCLEVELAND „ Buffalo quarterback AJ McCarron sustained a potentially serious shoulder injury, throwing the Bills quarterback situation into total disarray, during a 19-17 win over the Cleveland Browns on Friday night. McCarron, who signed with Buffalo as a free agent for a chance to start after four years as a backup in Cincinnati, completed just 3 of 6 for 12 yards during four series. The 27-year-old didnt show any obvious signs of being hurt „ he was hit hard from behind by Myles Garrett and sacked by Larry Ogunjobi „ and the Bills didnt disclose his injury until the fourth quarter. McCarron is competing with Nathan Peterman and rookie Josh Allen for Buffalos starting job. Allen, the No. 7 overall pick, out-performed McCarron and Peterman rallied the Bills (2-0) with a late touchdown pass to tight end Nick OLeary. Rookie Nick Chubb and Carlos Hyde had touchdown runs for the Browns (1-1).NFL: PRESEASON ROUNDUPMcCarron hurt in Bills win over BrownsBy JOEDY McCREARYAssociated PressGREENSBORO, N.C. (AP) „ Brandt Snedeker held a three-stroke lead Saturday in the Wyndham Championship when the third round was suspended because of severe weather. Snedeker was 16 under for the tournament with 11 holes left in the round at the final event of the PGA Tours regular season. Brian Gay was 13 under through 12 holes, and Trey Mullinax, Keith Mitchell, C.T. Pan and D.A. Points were another stroke back at varying stages of their rounds. Thirty players were still on the course when play was halted during the mid-afternoon with thunder booming and a threat of lightning. After a 3-hour, 23-minute delay, organizers chose to hold things up overnight and resume the round at 8 a.m. Sunday. When things resume, Snedeker „ who opened with a 59 to become the first tour player this year and just the 10th ever to break 60 „ will look to keep himself in position GOLFSnedeker leads Wyndham with play held up due to weather By JENNA FRYERAssociated PressBRISTOL, Tenn. „ Kurt Busch stole the spotlight from his younger brother Saturday night at Bristol Motor Speedway to grab an overdue short-track victory. Busch won for the first time this season but sixth on the 0.533mile bullring he once dominated. But that was before younger brother Kyle Busch learned his way around the place, and Kyle Busch has been the master of the Tennessee track. Kyle Busch, winner of seven career Cup races at Bristol, chose the song All I Do Is WinŽ by D.J. Khaled to play as he was introduced before the race. The crowd responded with a thunderous boo, and Kyle Buschs eventful evening was off to a roaring start. Kyle Busch triggered a 15-car accident just two laps into the race. He fell two laps off the pace, came back to race Martin Truex Jr. for second, and moved Truex out the way late in the race. A frustrated Truex kicked his car in anger. As Kyle Busch was AUTO RACINGKurt Busch steals spotlight from younger brother at BristolBy KEN POWTAKAssociated PressBOSTON „ David Price pitched seven solid innings, J.D. Martinez hit his major league-leading 38th homer after Boston jumped to a quick lead and the Red Sox beat the Tampa Bay Rays 5-2 on Saturday night for their 17th victory in 20 games. Mitch Moreland added an RBI double during Bostons four-run first inning. The Red Sox, who own the majors best record, improved to a season-high 52 games over .500 and maintained their 10 -game lead over the second-place New York Yankees in the AL East. C.J. Cron hit a tworun homer for the Rays. Tampa Bay fell to 4-11 against Boston this season. Price (13-6) gave up BASEBALLPrice goes 7, Martinez hits 38th HR; Red Sox beat RaysAP PHOTO/MICHAEL DWYERTampa Bay Rays Tyler Glasnow pitches during the first inning of a baseball game against the Boston Red Sox in Boston, Saturday, Aug. 18, 2018. SEE VIKINGS, A3 SEE RAYS, A3 SEE NASCAR, A3 SEE NFL, A3 SEE GOLF, A3BIG LEAGUE DREAMSA number of Major League Baseball Players have taken part in the Little League World Series. Page 2

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BASEBALL 9 a.m. ESPN „ Little League World Series, doubleelimination game, Seoul (South Korea) vs. Matamoros (Mexico), at Williamsport, Pa. 11 a.m. ESPN „ Little League World Series, doubleelimination game, Staten Island (N.Y.) vs. Houston, at Williamsport, Pa. Noon ESPN2 „ Junior League World Series, championship game, Taoyuan (Taiwan)Reynosa (Mexico) winner vs. Lufkin (Texas)-Manhattan Beach (Calif.) winner, at Taylor, Mich. 1 p.m. ESPN „ Little League World Series, doubleelimination game, Arraijan (Panama) vs. Kawaguchi (Japan), at Williamsport, Pa. ESPNU „ American Legion World Series, Massachusetts vs. Delaware, at Shelby, N.C. 2 p.m. ABC „ Little League World Series, doubleelimination game, Grosse Pointe Woods (Mich.) vs. Honolulu, at Williamsport, Pa. 4 p.m. ESPNU „ American Legion World Series, Michigan vs. Idaho, at Shelby, N.C. 7:30 p.m. ESPNU „ American Legion World Series, Nevada vs. North Carolina, at Shelby, N.C. BEACH VOLLEYBALL 4:30 p.m. NBC „ AVP Pro Tour, Manhattan Beach Open, semi“ nals & “ nals, at Manhattan Beach, Calif. DRAG RACING Noon FS1 „ NHRA, Lucas Oil Nationals, qualifying, at Brainerd, Minn. (taped) 2 p.m. FS1 „ NHRA, Lucas Oil Nationals, “ nals, at Brainerd, Minn. GOLF 7 a.m. GOLF „ European PGA Tour, Nordea Masters, “ nal round, at Gothenburg, Sweden 1 p.m. GOLF „ PGA Tour, Wyndham Championship, “ nal round, at Greensboro, N.C. 3 p.m. CBS „ PGA Tour, Wyndham Championship, “ nal round, at Greensboro, N.C. GOLF „ Champions Tour, Dicks Sporting Goods Open, “ nal round, at Endicott, N.Y. 4:30 p.m. FS1 „ USGA, U.S. Amateur Championship, championship match, at Pebble Beach, Calif. 5 p.m. GOLF „ LPGA Tour, Indy Women in Tech Championship, “ nal round, at Indianapolis 7 p.m. GOLF „ Web.com Tour, WinCo Foods Portland Open, “ nal round, at North Plains, Ore. GYMNASTICS 8 p.m. NBC „ U.S. Championships, womens competition, at Boston HORSE RACING 4 p.m. FS2 „ Saratoga Live, Summer Colony Stakes, at Saratoga Springs, N.Y. MLB BASEBALL 1 p.m. TBS „ Toronto at N.Y. Yankees 7 p.m. ESPN „ N.Y. Mets vs. Philadelphia, at Williamsport, Pa. SOCCER 8:30 a.m. NBCSN „ Premier League, Manchester City vs. Hudders“ eld Town 11 a.m. NBCSN „ Premier League, Brighton & Hove Albion vs. Manchester United 11:55 a.m. ESPNEWS „ Serie A, Torino vs. AS Roma 7:30 p.m. FS1 „ MLS, New England at D.C. United SURFING 3 p.m. FOX „ Red Bull Signature Series, Volcom Pipe Tour, at Oahu. Hawaii (taped) TENNIS 2 p.m. ESPN2 „ WTA World Tour & U.S. Open Series, Western & Southern Open, womens “ nal, at Cincinnati 4 p.m. ESPN2 „ ATP World Tour & U.S. Open Series, Western & Southern Open, mens “ nal, at Cincinnati WNBA BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 „ Washington at MinnesotaSPORTS ON TV By MICHAEL MAROTAssociated PressINDIANAPOLIS „ Lizette Salas waited patiently for Sung Hyun Park to make a rare mistake Saturday. When the South Korean mishit her approach shot into the water on the par-4 16th, Salas capitalized quickly. She rolled in her birdie putt then watched Park make double bogey „ a three-shot swing that gave Salas the lead and the momentum heading into the final round of the Indy Women in Tech Championship. Salas closed out her 8-under 64 with a birdie on No. 18 to reach 21 under „ two shots ahead of Park and Amy Yang. I have been strikin g the ball really well, and I just had to stay patient,Ž Salas said. And yeah, putts dropped for sure. I just really felt comfortable.Ž If she keeps it up one more day, Salas could be celebrating her first tour win since the 2014 Kingsmill Championship and her second overall. With five of the next six players on the leader board ranked in the worlds top 30, Salas knows it wont be easy. The changing weather conditions weather may not help, either. If the forecast for mostly sunny conditions Sunday holds, the soft greens that have kept scores at near record-lows through the first three rounds could suddenly become quicker and less for g ivin g But the 29-year-old Californian seems to have the perfect touch for this course, which weaves around and inside the historic Indianapolis Motor Speedway. She shot three sub-par rounds and finished tied for fifth last year here. This year, she has three more sub-par rounds including a course record-tying 62 on Thursday and has been atop the leader board each of the first three days. I have been so confident the whole year,Ž Salas said. I have a different mentality, Im a different player. So Im just going to go out and play as if Im behind.Ž Salas toughest challenge still could from Park, who s p ent most of Saturday flirting with a 54-hole scoring record. She birdied the last four holes on the front side and made back-toback birdies on Nos. 13 and 14 to reach 21 under with a chance to become the sixth LPGA player to ever finish three rounds at 23 under. The miscue at No. 16 changed everything. She never really recovered after dropping two shots, settling for par on the final two holes for a 66 after shooting 68 and 63 the first two days. Yang finished with a 65 after going 68 and 64. I was a little weary with right-to-left wind,Ž Park said. I think a little bit of weariness got to me, but overall, its OK.ŽGOLFSalas takes advantage of Parks mistake to grab LPGA leadAP PHOTO/DARRON CUMMINGSLizette Salas reacts after making a putt on the sixth green during the third round of the Indy Women in Tech Championship golf tournament, Saturday, Aug. 18, 2018, Indianapolis. Staff reportsA big first inning for Charlotte helped establish an early cushion, but Palm Beach was resolute and kept battling back Saturday evening at the Charlotte Sports Park. The Stone Crabs won a hard fought contest 8-7 in 10 innings. The game was delayed by rain, but it didnt deter the Stone Crabs from playing heads up baseball. Rene Pinto got the Stone Crabs on the board, with a sacrifice fly to center field, plating Vidal Brujan. Cardinal pitching would once again have problems with their control, allowing the Stone Crabs to take advantage of the opportunities, with Miles Mastrobuoni scoring on a wild pitch. Tristan Gray would walk, one of three bases on balls he would draw in the game, on a wild pitch, this time allowing Jake Fraley to score. Jermaine Palacios would add to the scoring, delivering an RBI single, plating Gray. The Stone Crabs would come back with a 3-run 4th inning, with Brujan doubling to center, driving in Palacios. Rene Pinto would reach on a throwing error, allowing Eleardo Cabrera to score. Fraleys sacrifice fly to right field would cap the innings scoring. However, a 7-4 lead was hardly secure, and the Cardinals began chipping away, tying the game in the 9th inning. Charlotte would have to go an extra frame to earn the win, with Cabreras infield single plating Gray with the winning run. Brujan and Palacios had two hits each for the Stone Crabs, who also stole three bases Saturday night, with Brujan, Mastrobuoni and Fraley successfully adding to their theft totals. Former USF Bull Brandon Lawson started for the Stone Crabs, in a game that saw Charlotte use five relievers, with fireman Trevor Charpie pitching a scoreless 10th inning to earn the win, raising his record to 3-1.BASEBALLStone Crabs defeat Cardinals in 10By SCHUYLER DIXONAP Pro Football WriterARLINGTON, Texas „ Dak Prescott and the Dallas Cowboys had another efficient preseason showing. Andy Dalton bogged down a bit with his Cincinnati Bengals. Prescott led a pair of scoring drives in three possessions, capped with a scrambling 6-yard scoring pass to Terrance Williams before the Bengals rallied after halftime for a 21-13 exhibition victory Saturday night. The Bengals had just one first down in four Dalton-led possessions a week after he threw for two touchdowns with an offense that was revamped after finishing last in the NFL. The lone first down was on Daltons 13-yard scramble after the Bengals (2-0) started with a pair of three-and-outs. A week after throwing a 30-yard touchdown to rookie Michael Gallup on his only drive of the preseason opener in San Francisco, Prescott was 10 of 15 for 86 yards. The TD drive for a 10-0 lead was kept alive by an 8-yard slant to Gallup, who reached out for a nice catch inside the Cincinnati 10. The concern for the Cowboys (0-2) was the status of four-time Pro Bowl guard Zack Martin, who left early on what would have been his last drive with a knee injury. There was no immediate update on the severity of the injury, which happened when Martin bent down to block cornerback Dre Kirkpatrick in the open field on a run by Rod Smith. Daltons final possession ended when Dallas defensive end Taco Charlton forced a fumble on a short completion to Tyler Boyd, with cornerback Byron Jones getting the recovery. Dalton was 5 of 7 for 41 yards. The Cowboys forced two turnovers after getting three against the 49ers. The highlight was Chidobe Awuzies leaping interception which he tipped to himself along the sideline late in the first half. Cincinnatis first points came on backup kicker Jonathan Browns 55-yard field goal in the third quarter.FOOTBALL: COWBOYS 21, BENGALS 13Bengals top Cowboys behind Prescot t AP PHOTO/MICHAEL AINSWORTHDallas Cowboys quarterback Dak Prescott (4) and wide receiver Terrance Williams (83) celebrate after they connected on a pass for a touchdown against the Cincinnati Bengals. By TOMMY BUTLERAssociated PressSOUTH WILLIAMSPORT, Pa. „ Some talented, young baseball players have competed at the Little League World Series over the last 71 years. Fifty-four have gone on to realize another dream „ making the majors. Three of those Little League veterans will be on hand when the Mets play the Phillies in Williamsport on Sunday night: Scott Kingery, Todd Frazier and Michael Conforto. To mark whats being called the MLB Little League Classic, here are some of the notable players who have made the jump from the LLWS to the majors. KINGERY: Twelve years ago, Kingery played for the Ahwatukee AllStars from Phoenix. Now the rookie Philadelphia shortstop is the most recent LLWS player to get to the majors. Its going to be cool to go back there and bring back some memories,Ž he said. Its going to be a good chance to talk to the kids there now, because I know what theyre going through, and I know what they feel like. Theyre probably a little nervous and excited, too, so itll be good to go watch a game, hang out with some Little Leaguers and play a big game.Ž What was it like for him in South Williamsport? The (memory) that sticks out is the first time we got off the bus and I stood on top of the hill and saw the fields we were going to be playing on,Ž Kingery said. When I get there, its probably going to hit me that that was me in 2006. Its pretty crazy.Ž FRAZIER: The Mets third baseman has drawn a lot of attention for his Little League connection. In the 1998 Little League World Series, Frazier led Toms River, New Jersey, with his bat and his arm „ he was a pitcher then „ and his team beat Japan for the championship. In the big leagues, Frazier helped bring the New York Yankees to the ALCS in 2017. CONFORTO: The young outfielder played for the Redmond, Washington, team in 2004. His team did not make it out of pool play. Still, Conforto is one of only three players to participate in the Little League World Series, College World Series (with Oregon State) and MLB World Series. Making the majors in 2015 with the Mets, the year they lost to the Kansas City Royals in the World Series, Conforto was named an All-Star in 2017. BOOG POWELL: The longtime Orioles star appeared in the 1954 Little League World Series, playing for the Orange Little League team out of Lakeland, Florida. His club lost to eventual champions New York 16-0 in their first game. Powell spent 16 years in the majors, winning two World Series titles with Baltimore. He was named an All-Star four times and won the 1970 AL MVP. BASEBALLBig leap up: from Williamsport to majors

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The Sun / Sunday, August 19, 2018 www.yoursun.com SP Page 3AP PHOTO/WADE PAYN E Kevin Harvick (4) and Kyle Larson (42) lead the field on a restart during a NASCAR Cup Series auto race, Saturday, Aug. 18, 201 8, in Bristol, Tenn. two runs on five hits, striking out eight, walking two and hitting a batter. He is 3-0 with a 1.35 ERA in his five starts since the All-Star break. Tyler Glasnow (0-1), making his fourth start since being acquired from Pittsburgh at the non-wavier trading deadline, gave up five runs, four earned, and three hits. He walked three and struck out four in 6 ‡ innings. Craig Kimbrel got the final three outs for his 37th save. The Red Sox took advantage of Glasnows wildness to jump ahead 4-0 in the first. Morelands RBI double made it 1-0 before Martinez and Xander Bogaerts walked to load the bases. The righty then walked Ian Kinsler, forcing in a run. First baseman Jake Bauers then fired Brock Holts grounder into left field attempting a force at second and two runs scored, making it 4-0. In the third, Martinez homered into Bostons bullpen. Crons homer cleared the Green Monster and left Fenway Park completely in the sixth.HEADS UPTampa Bays Carlos Gomez advanced to third when it was left uncovered on a popup that was caught between first and the plate in the first inning.NOT HEADS UPWith Kinsler on second and Holt on first in the first, Kinsler got caught trying to steal third too quickly when Glasnow stepped off and got him in a rundown. Holt was unsure where to go, standing between first and second before he was tagged out in a rundown for an inning-ending double play. Three innings later, Tampa Bays Tommy Pham was doubled off second on a fly ball to the left-field warning track.FRIENDLY FENWAYThe Red Sox improved their home record to a majors best 44-15.TRAINERS ROOMRays: C Jesus Sucre missed his fourth straight game with a sore right wrist. Red Sox: Ace lefty Chris Sale was placed on the 10-day disabled list for the second time in nearly three weeks with mild inflammation in his left shoulder. Its definitely less than it was last time,Ž Sale said. LHP Eduardo Rodriguez (DL since July 15, sprained right ankle) is scheduled to make a rehab start on Monday.RAYSFrom Page 1Leonard Fournette on one of his seven series, the last of three possessions the Vikings starters were still in the game. The Vikings, who led the league with the fewest yards and points allowed in 2017 while the Jaguars finished second, gave Bortles trouble during drills in practices on Wednesday and Thursday at Minnesotas suburban facility. Weve still got some things to fix,Ž Bortles said. The Vikings had six sacks two by Ifeadi Odenigbo. Mike Boone, in a stiff competition for the No. 3 running back spot, had 13 carries for 91 yards and a score T.J. Yeldon helped his cause to be Fournettes backup with five catches for 73 yards and 10 carries for 39 yards. With a 57-yard punt return by Rashad Greene to set up the touchdown just after the two-minute warning, Jacksonville took a late lead on a short run by Brandon Wilds. FLAGS FLYThe Jaguars were called for 13 penalties for a whopping 140 yards, including 10 infractions in the first half. Ngakoue celebrated his sack with an incendiary hip-thrusting dance, taking one of the 15-yarders. Penalties cost you games,Ž Ngakoue said. We still were lucky enough to win today, but weve got to clean it up.Ž Cornerback A.J. Bouye was singled out for the NFLs new targeting rule, for lowering his helmet on a tackle attempt. Both of our heads were lowered,Ž Bouye said. I think they should offset, but Ive just got to learn from it.Ž Vikings linebacker Antwione Williams was also flagged for unnecessary roughness, negating a sack of Cody Kessler for driving him into the turf, another point of emphasis this year for officials on the field. Zimmer initially argued, but said afterward he thought the call was correct.ON THE LINELeft tackle Riley Reiff was the only starter from last year suited up on Minnesotas offensive line, with guards Nick Easton (neck) and Joe Berger (retirement) gone. The new right side, Mike Remmers and Rashod Hill, was held out with ankle injuries. Center Pat Elflein is still recovering from offseason shoulder and ankle surgeries. The Vikings failed to move the chains on all 12 of their third-down attempts.SPARANO TRIBUTEThe wife (Jeanette), daughter (Ryan) and son (Tony Jr.) of former Vikings offensive line coach Tony Sparano, who died suddenly last month of heart disease, were honored before the game. The entire Vikings offensive line joined the family at midfield for the coin flip. Tony Sparano Jr. is the assistant offensive line coach for the Jaguars Sparanos other son, Andy, was unable to attend. Berger blew the ceremonial Gjallarhorn kickoff.NATIONAL ANTHEMLast week four Jaguars players remained in the locker room during The Star-Spangled Banner,Ž cornerback Jalen Ramsey, linebacker Telvin Smith and running backs Leonard Fournette and T.J. Yeldon. Ramsey was not at this game, left at home like Dante Fowler for disciplinary reasons related to the fight at practice last week between Fowler and Ngakoue Fournette and Yeldon were spotted on the sideline during the anthem, though Smith was not.INJURY REPORTJaguars: Left guard Andrew Norwell, the teams premier free agent addition, was held out for the second straight game because of a calf injury, as was rookie defensive end Taven Bryan (abdomen). Center Brandon Linder (knee), strong safety Don Carey (hamstring) and left guard Chris Reed (knee) were injured during the game. Reed started for Norwell. Vikings: Alexander, whos competing with rookie Mike Hughes to play the slot position in the nickel package, hurt his ankle on his dropped interception. VIKINGSFrom Page 1PANTHERS 27, DOLPHINS 20CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) „ Christian McCaffrey had 120 yards from scrimmage in the first half, including a 71-yard touchdown run and Carolina defeated Miami. McCaffrey had 92 yards rushing on five carries and caught four passes for 28 yards for Carolina (2-0). Cam Newton overcame an early interception and two sacks by Robert Quinn to finish 9 of 12 for 89 yards, including a 27-yard touchdown pass to speedy rookie tight end Ian Thomas to give Carolina a 13-9 lead before exiting near the end of the first half. Ryan Tannehill was an effective 14 of 17 for 100 yards despite playing without wide receivers DeVante Parker and Kenny Stills, but Miami (0-2) struggled to finish drives and settled for three field goals in the first half. Kenyan Drake had 54 yards rushing on eight carries.CHIEFS 28, FALCONS 14ATLANTA (AP) „ After a dismal showing in the first preseason game, Matt Ryan and Atlanta found their offensive rhythm. R y an g uided the Falcons right down the field for a touchdown on their first possession, hooking up with Austin Hooper on a 4-yard scoring pass and led another impressive drive before calling it a night in a loss to the Kansas City Chiefs. Ryan finished 5 of 7 for 90 yards, looking very much like the quarterback who won the MVP during the 2016 season even though two of his top weapons, receiver Julio Jones and running back Devonta Freeman, were held out for the second week in a row. It was certainly an encouraging contrast to the preseason opener, when the Falcons (0-2) were blanked 17-0 by the New York Jets and Ryan played only one brief series. Kansas Citys new starting quarterback, Patrick Mahomes, had an up-and-down game. The second-year player was intercepted on a deep throw by Falcons safety Damontae Kazee, who drifted over from the middle of the field to pick a ball intended for Sammy Watkins. Mahomes caught a break when another illadvised throw into the end zone was dropped by Falcons cornerback Blidi Wren-Wilson, allowing the Chiefs to salvage a field goal. But, with just 17 seconds left in the first half, Mahomes made the most of his final p ass. Three Atlanta defensive backs inexplicably allowed Tyreek Hill to get behind them, and Mahomes delivered the pass in stride for a 69-yard touchdown. Mahomes was 8 of 12 for 138 yards.GIANTS 30, LIONS 17 DETROIT (AP) „ Davis Webb took advantage of his opportunity to play for Eli Manning, throwing a go-ahead touchdown in the second quarter to help New York beat Detroit. Webb was 14 of 20 for 140 yards with an 8-yard TD pass to Wayne Gallman Jr., who scored for a second time later in the game. Webb showed poise in the pocket and touch down the field, connecting on a perfectly lofted 40-yard pass to Russell Shepard to set up Aldrick Rosas 55-yard field goal in the second quarter. Webb, a 2017 thirdround pick, bounced back from a poor performance last week. He was 9 of 22 for 70 yards, sailing passes over open receivers in the preseason opener against Cleveland to raise some concerns about whether hes ready to be the teams No. 2 quarterback. The Lions started Matthew Stafford after sitting him in last weeks game at Oakland and he had a shaky game behind a p orous offensive line. Stafford was 2 of 5 for 51 yards and was sacked twice and hit once as he threw. Jake Rudock replaced Stafford in the second quarter and finished 23 of 30 for 171 yards with a TD. Rudock came back in the fourth, reliving veteran Matt Cassel, who threw an interception.CARDINALS 20, SAINTS 15NEW ORLEANS (AP) „ Free-agent acquisition Sam Bradford and 10th overall draft choice Josh Rosen combined to provide a promising outlook for Arizonas quarterback situation. After Bradford completed all six of his passes for 61 yards, Rosen went 10 of 16 for 107 yards, including a 13-yard touchdown to rookie Christian Kirk in a preseason victory over New Orleans. David Johnson bowled his way into the end zone for a 9-yard touchdown to give the Cardinals the games opening score, capping a six-play, 61-yard drive led by Bradford. Kirk finished with four receptions for 49 yards, and Chad Williams caught three passes for 44 yards for Arizona. Saints quarterback Drew Brees sat out the entire game, as he also did when the Saints won their preseason opener in Jacksonville last week. NFLFrom Page 1 tending to his wounded race car, older brother Kurt battled StewartHaas Racing teammate Clint Bowyer for the lead. Kurt Busch was relentless on the restart and got his Ford to the front, then Kyle Busch spun to bring out a ninth caution. Kurt Busch had a good restart but Kyle Larson, on fresher tires, was desperately trying to catch him for the win. Kurt Busch held him off and Larson, winner of the Xfinity Series race on Friday night, finished second in his bid for the Bristol sweep. Kyle Busch wound up 20th. UP NEXT: The Cup Series is off next weekend and races again Sept. 2 in the Southern 500 at Darlington Raceway in South Carolina. Denny Hamlin won last years race. NASCARFrom Page 1position to contend for his ninth victory on tour and his first since the 2016 Farmers Insurance Open. The 2012 FedEx Cup champion won the tournament in 2007, the year before it moved across town to par-70 Sedgefield Country Club. Snedekers final 11 holes of the round could wind up being telling: In seven of the 10 previous years since the tournaments move to this course, the third-round leader or co-leader has gone on to win. And every leader who finished the third round here at 16 under or better has wound up winning, including Henrik Stenson (16 under) last year and Si Woo Kim (18 under) in 2016. Snedeker started the day off strong, rolling in a 60-foot chip for birdie on the par-4 second hole, then pushed his lead to three strokes with a birdie on No. 5 that moved him to 16 under. But after he sank a short par putt on the seventh, thunder boomed and the horn sounded to stop play. Gay was 12 holes into a second consecutive strong round when the delay struck. After shooting a 63 in the second round, he had four birdies and an eagle on the par-5 fifth hole. He placed his 200-yard second shot 10 feet from the flagstick and sank the putt.GOLFFrom Page 1 AP PHOTO/CHUCK BURTONBrandt Snedeker watches his tee shot on the second hole during the third round of the Wyndham Championship golf tournament at Sedgefield Country Club in Greensboro, N.C., Saturday, Aug. 18, 2018.

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Page 4 SP www.yoursun.com Sunday, August 19, 2018 / The SunAMERICANLEAGUENATIONALLEAGUEEASTDIVISION TEAMWLPCT.GBWCGBL10STRHOME AWAY Boston8836.710„„8-2W-244-1544-21 NewYork7746.62610„6-4W-244-2033-26 TampaBay6261.50425125-5L-234-2428-37 Toronto5568.44732194-6L-329-3226-36 Baltimore3786.30150373-7W-121-4016-46 CENTRALDIVISION TEAMWLPCTGBWCGBL10STRHOME AWAY Cleveland7052.574„„8-2L-138-2432-28 Minnesota5863.47911156-4W-437-2421-39 Detroit5073.40720243-7L-432-3018-43 Chicago4577.36925284-6L-123-3922-38 KansasCity3885.30932364-6W-118-4420-41 WESTDIVISION TEAMWLPCTGBWCGBL10STRHOME AWAY Houston7449.602„„3-7L-233-2941-20 Oakland7449.602„„7-3W-237-2437-25 Seattle7053.569445-5L-136-2534-28 LosAngeles6262.50012126-4L-233-3029-32 Texas5569.44419196-4W-228-3727-32 EASTDIVISION TEAMWLPCT.GBWCGBL10STRHOME AWAY Atlanta6853.562„„6-4L-234-2634-27 Philadelphia6855.5531„4-6L-141-2127-34 Washington6261.504754-6W-231-2831-33 NewYork5369.43415146-4W-124-3729-32 Miami4876.38721201-9L-628-3520-41 CENTRALDIVISION TEAMWLPCT.GBWCGBL10STRHOME AWAY Chicago7151.582„„6-4L-138-2333-28 St.Louis6856.5484„9-1W-234-2734-29 Milwaukee6857.54443-7L-336-2432-33 Pittsburgh6262.5001064-6W-134-3128-31 Cincinnati5469.43917135-5W-230-3524-34 WESTDIVISION TEAMWLPCT.GBWCGBL10STRHOME AWAY Arizona6855.553„„6-4W-332-2936-26 Colorado6656.541116-4W-231-2735-29 LosAngeles6657.537214-6W-232-3034-27 SanFrancisco6163.492774-6L-334-2627-37 SanDiego4877.38421203-7L-522-4226-35 MAJORLEAGUEBASEBALL A THLETICS7,ASTROS1HOUSTONABRHBIBBSOAVG. S pringercf300000.248 a-Tuckerph100000.154 Bregman3b300012.277 Correass300001.253 Gonzalez2b300001.239 Gurriel1b301001.281 Gattisdh300002.236 Reddickrf300002.245 S tassic300000.237 Kemplf311100.280 T OTALS2812119 OAKLANDABRHBIBBSOAVG. S emienss511003.262 Chapman3b400001.276 Lowrie2b411000.272 Davisdh412201.254 Olson1b422100.242 Piscottyrf412100.253 Pinderlf210020.246 Laureanocf401002.250 Phegleyc402300.233 T OTALS35711727 HOUSTON000000001 „120 OAKLAND20000302X„7110 a-poppedoutforSpringerinthe9th. LOB„Houston1,Oakland6.2B„Davis2 (24),Olson2(26),Piscotty2(33),Phegley 2(6).HR„Kemp(5),offPetit.RBIs„Kemp (25),Davis2(95),Olson(58),Piscotty(53), Phegley3(13).SB„Gurriel(5). Runnersleftinscoringposition„Houston 1(Reddick)Oakland4(Semien2,Piscotty, Phegley).RISP„Houston0for1Oakland5 f or15. Runnersmovedup„Pinder,Piscotty. GIDP„Correa. DP„Houston1(Gonzalez,Correa,Gurriel) Oakland1(Semien,Olson). HOUSTONIPHRERBBSONPERA Kchel,L,9-105.29 551485 3.59 Harris1.10 000114 4.34 Peacock12 221225 3.23 OAKLANDIPHRERBBSONPERA Cahill,W,5-271 0017100 3.12 Familia10 000214 2.96 Petit11 110019 3.46 Inheritedrunners-scored„Harris1-0.WP„ Harris,Peacock. Umpires„Home,JimWolfFirst,D.J. ReyburnSecond,SamHolbrookThird, A lfonsoMarquez. T „2:33.A„32,204(46,765).ORIOLES4,INDIANS2BALTIMOREABRHBIBBSOAVG. Mullinscf422100.357 V illar2b311312.263 Mancinilf400001.235 Rickardlf000000.221 T rumbodh400001.260 C.Davis1b400001.162 Nunez3b402001.254 2-Petersonpr-3b000000.199 Beckhamss400002.223 Gentryrf300001.238 W ynnsc210010.286 T OTALS3245429 CLEVELANDABRHBIBBSOAVG. Lindorss402101.292 Brantleylf300100.299 Ramirez3b300010.301 Diazdh300001.444 A lonso1b301000.248 1-R.Davispr-cf000000.246 Cabrerarf300001.254 Gonzalez1b000000.296 Kipnis2b300000.222 Gomesc311000.247 A llencf-rf311000.243 T OTALS2825213 BALTIMORE003000010 „450 CLEVELAND000002000 „250 1-ranforAlonsointhe7th.2-ranforNunez inthe9th. LOB„Baltimore3,Cleveland1.2B„Nunez (10).HR„Villar(9),offPlutkoMullins(1), offRamirez.RBIs„Mullins(3),Villar3(31), Lindor(76),Brantley(64).SB„Villar(16). CS„Lindor(8).SF„Brantley. Runnersleftinscoringposition„Baltimore2 (Mancini,Beckham).RISP„Baltimore1for3 Cleveland1for2. GIDP„Ramirez,Cabrera. DP„Baltimore2(C.Davis,Beckham),(Villar, Beckham,C.Davis). BALTIMOREIPHRERBBSONPERA Cobb,W,4-1595 2213100 5.09 CLEVELANDIPHRERBBSONPERA Plutko,L,4-373 331697 4.62 Ramirez11 111227 4.55 Otero11 000112 5.44 Umpires„Home,NicLentzFirst,Jordan BakerSecond,JerryLayneThird,Greg Gibson. T „2:17.A„35,007(35,225). Y ANKEES11,BLUEJAYS6 T ORONTOABRHBIBBSOAVG. McKinneylf402212.375 T ravis2b510000.242 Grandersondh212010.241 a-Moralesph-dh201000.245 S moak1b512103.257 Pillarcf501101.253 Hernandezrf411013.242 J ansenc412101.429 Diaz3b401002.256 Urenass311011.250 T OTALS386135413 NEWYORKABRHBIBBSOAVG. Gardnerlf420011.243 S tantondh422101.285 Hickscf310121.251 Gregoriusss411301.268 A ndujar3b523300.300 T orres2b412001.262 Bird1b411201.210 W alkerrf301012.220 1-Robinsonpr-rf010000.129 Rominec100101.260 Higashiokac201000.182 T OTALS3411111149 T ORONTO000005001„6132 NEWYORK21311003X„11112 a-groundedoutforGrandersoninthe7th. 1-ranforWalkerinthe8th. E„Travis(7),Jansen(1),Gardner(2), W alker(3).LOB„Toronto9,NewYork6. 2B„Granderson(20),Pillar(31),Jansen (1),Andujar(36).HR„Gregorius(22),off Reid-FoleyStanton(32),offReid-Foley Andujar(20),offReid-FoleyBird(10),off S antos.RBIs„McKinney2(2),Smoak(60), Pillar(48),Jansen(3),Stanton(79),Hicks (58),Gregorius3(73),Andujar3(63),Bird 2(31),Romine(36).SB„Gardner(11).SF„ Gregorius,Romine. Runnersleftinscoringposition„Toronto 4(Travis,Hernandez2,Diaz)NewYork3 (Andujar,Walker2).RISP„Toronto4for10 NewYork2for10. Runnersmovedup„Bird2. T ORONTOIPHRERBBSONPERA R-Foley,L,0-24.17 863696 8.68 Petricka1.20 000219 4.64 Garcia.21000010 5.96 S antos.23 330123 7.20 T epera.20 001013 3.93 NEWYORKIPHRERBBSONPERA S everino,W,16-656 2228100 3.28 Kahnle.22 321130 6.94 Holder.11 00004 3.28 Britton H 411000013 4.32 Betances,H,1910 001217 2.28 Cole13 110218 5.66 Severinopitchedto2battersinthe6th. Inheritedrunners-scored„Petricka1-0, Santos1-0,Tepera3-2,Kahnle1-1,Holder 3-3.HBP„Santos(Stanton).WP„Reid-Foley 2,Petricka. Umpires„Home,DaveRackleyFirst,Hunter WendelstedtSecond,JansenViscontiThird, LarryVanover. T„3:29.A„44,778(47,309).METS3,PHILLIES1NEWYORKABRHBIBBSOAVG. Rosarioss411000.242 McNeil2b412100.278 Flores1b401100.272 Confortolf400002.238 Frazier3b302000.233 Jacksoncf400004.287 Bautistarf400002.200 Mesoracoc411101.219 deGromp400003.115 TOTALS35373012 PHILADELPHIAABRHBIBBSOAVG Hernandez2b401001.260 Hoskinslf402002.257 Santana1b401001.217 W.Ramosc400001.304 Williamsrf411001.265 Franco3b302000.282 Herreracf300000.268 Kingeryss200001.225 b-Cabreraph-ss100000.269 Arrietap100000.135 a-Quinnph100001.275 Garciap000000--E.Ramosp000000--c-Bourph100001.227 Nerisp000000.000 TOTALS3217009 NEWYORK000100200„371 PHILADELPHIA000000100 „172 a-struckoutforArrietainthe6th.b-”ied outforKingeryinthe8th.c-struckoutfor E.Ramosinthe8th. E„deGrom(1),Santana(9),Arrieta(4). LOB„NewYork6,Philadelphia4.2B„ Frazier(12),Hoskins(29),Franco(16).3B„ McNeil(1).HR„Mesoraco(10),offGarcia. RBIs„McNeil(6),Flores(46),Mesoraco (29).SB„McNeil(1),Hoskins(5). Runnersleftinscoringposition„NewYork 5(Flores,Jackson,Bautista3)Philadelphia 3(Santana,Williams,Herrera).RISP„New York1for7Philadelphia0for4. GIDP„W.Ramos. DP„NewYork2(Flores,Rosario,McNeil), (Rosario,McNeil,Flores). NEWYORKIPHRERBBSONPERA deGrom,W,8-797 1009108 1.71 PHILADELPHIAIPHRERBBSONPERA Arrieta,L,9-864 110696 3.25 Garcia13220223 3.97 E.Ramos10 000216 1.85 Neris10 000216 6.34 HBP„Arrieta(Frazier).PB„W.Ramos(7). Umpires„Home,GerryDavisFirst,Chris GuccioneSecond,MartyFosterThird, JeremieRehak. T„2:31.A„35,158(43,647).REDSOX5,RAYS2TAMPABAYABRHBIBBSOAVG. Gomezrf300001.215 Duffy3b401001.294 Bauers1b310011.216 Phamlf300013.244 Crondh412200.250 Wendle2b400000.292 Adamesss400002.240 Kiermaiercf401000.179 Perezc301002.292 TOTALS32252210 BOSTONABRHBIBBSOAVG. Bettsrf400001.346 Benintendilf412000.299 Moreland1b411101.257 Martinezdh221110.333 Bogaertsss210010.278 Kinsler2b200110.241 Holt3b300100.265 Leonc300002.209 BradleyJr.cf300001.220 TOTALS2754435 TAMPABAY000002000„251 BOSTON40100000X „541 E„Bauers(4),Bogaerts(8).LOB„Tampa Bay6,Boston1.2B„Kiermaier(7), Benintendi(33),Moreland(20).HR„Cron (23),offPriceMartinez(38),offGlasnow. RBIs„Cron2(58),Moreland(63),Martinez (106),Kinsler(35),Holt(32).SB„Moreland (2),Martinez(5).CS„Kinsler(5). Runnersleftinscoringposition„TampaBay 3(Duffy2,Cron).RISP„TampaBay0for8 Boston1for2. Runnersmovedup„Bauers.FIDP„Wendle. DP„Boston1(Benintendi,Kinsler). TAMPABAYIPHRERBBSONPERA Glasnow,L,.16.23 543494 4.10 Kolarek1.11 000116 5.19 BOSTONIPHRERBBSONPERA Price,W,13-675 2228103 3.69 Brasier,H,510 00019 1.00 Kimbrel,S,37-4110 000111 2.47 HBP„Price(Gomez). Umpires„Home,MarkWegnerFirst,John TumpaneSecond,JimReynoldsThird,Chad Whitson. T„2:28.A„36,654(37,731).PIRATES3,CUBS1CHICAGOABRHBIBBSOAVG. Zobristrf-2b412100.309 Heywardcf-rf401000.280 Bote3b400001.303 Rizzo1b400001.264 Baez2b-ss400002.287 Schwarberlf401003.244 Contrerasc401001.272 Chatwoodp100000.160 Rosariop0000001.000 a-LaStellaph101000.280 Chavezp000000.000 b-Happph-cf100000.242 Russellss300002.257 Kintzlerp000000--DeLaRosap000000.000 TOTALS34161010 PITTSBURGHABRHBIBBSOAVG. Dickersonlf303010.307 Martecf400001.276 Polancorf400001.238 Bell1b311011.265 Cervellic211020.256 Frazier2b412102.281 Vazquezp000000.000 Moran3b400101.267 Hechavarriass200100.264 Musgrovep201000.238 c-Luplowph100000.178 Crickp000000--Harrison2b000000.258 TOTALS2938346 CHICAGO001000000 „160 PITTSBURGH03000000X „382 a-singledforRosariointhe5th.b-reached onerrorforChavezinthe7th.c-grounded outforMusgroveinthe 7th. E„Frazier(6),Musg rove (1).LOB„Chicago 6,Pittsburgh7.2B„Dickerson(26),Frazier (13).HR„Zobrist(9),offMusg rove. RBIs„Zobrist(47),Frazier(17),Moran(45), Hechavarria(28).SF„Hechavarria. Runnersleftinscoringposition„Chicago3 (Zobrist,Rizzo,Baez)Pittsburgh3(Marte, Polanco,Moran).RISP„Chicago0for5 Pittsburgh1for6. Runnersmovedup„Bote2,Moran.GIDP„ Baez,Marte2. DP„Chicago2(Russell,Baez,Rizzo), (Russell,Baez,Rizzo)Pittsburgh1 (Hechavarria,Frazier,Bell). CHICAGOIPHRERBBSONPERA Chatwood,L,4-622 333037 5.22 Rosario21 000121 2.83 Chavez23000335 3.05 Kintzler11 000117 3.56 DeLaRosa11001118 4.28 PITTSBURGHIPHRERBBSONPERA Musgrove,W,5-775 110787 3.31 Crick,H,1211 000111 2.27 Vazquez,S,27-3110 000212 2.82 Chatwoodpitchedto1batterinthe3rd. Inheritedrunners-scored„Rosario1-0. Umpires„Home,PaulNauertFirst,Chad FairchildSecond,ScottBarryThird,Carlos Torres. T„2:40.A„35,100(38,362).REDS7,GIANTS1SANFRANCISCOABRHBIBBSOAVG. McCutchenrf411000.257 Panik2b402000.245 Poseyc201020.288 Blachp000000.036 Belt1b300002.275 c-Slaterph-1b100001.269 Longoria3b401100.246 Crawfordss400001.269 Hansonlf402001.283 Duggarcf200001.257 a-Hernandezph-cf200000.251 Bumgarnerp200001.107 b-Penceph100000.223 Stricklandp000000--Hundleyc100000.253 TOTALS3417127 CINCINNATIABRHBIBBSOAVG. Hamiltoncf400000.233 Perazass422100.289 Gennett2b433000.313 Suarez3b301112.296 Ervinrf-lf301100.288 Barnhartc411002.247 Herreralf211111.188 Williamsrf101000.279 Dixon1b401201.178 Harveyp300000.073 Reedp000000.000 Lorenzenp100000.250 TOTALS33711626 SANFRANCISCO000000010 „171 CINCINNATI00032110X„7111 a-”iedoutforDuggarinthe7th.b-grounded outforBumgarnerinthe7th.c-struckout forBeltinthe8th. E„Duggar(2),Suarez(15).LOB„San Francisco8,Cincinnati5.2B„Peraza(26), Gennett(26),Barnhart(19),Dixon(3). HR„Peraza(7),offBumgarnerHerrera(3), offBumgarner.RBIs„Longoria(40),Peraza (40),Suarez(89),Ervin(18),Herrera(6), Dixon2(6).SB„Ervin(3).SF„Ervin. Runnersleftinscoringposition„San Francisco5(Belt,Longoria2,Crawford, Pence)Cincinnati4(Barnhart,Herrera, Harvey2).RISP„SanFrancisco0for8 Cincinnati3for7. Runnersmovedup„Hernandez.GIDP„ Hundley,Lorenzen. DP„SanFrancisco1(Crawford,Panik, Slater)Cincinnati1(Peraza,Gennett, Dixon). SANFRANCISCOIPHRERBBSONPERA Bmgrner,L,4-568 6526100 3.05 Strickland12 110014 3.03 Blach11 000084.34 CINCINNATIIPHRERBBSONPERA Harvey,W,6-76.14 001598 4.91 Reed.22111014 5.23 Lorenzen21000225 2.86 Reedpitchedto3battersinthe8th. Inheritedrunners-scored„Reed2-0, Lorenzen3-1. Umpires„Home,DanBellinoFirst,PhilCuzzi Second,TomHallionThird,RyanBlakney. T„2:35.A„23,878(42,319).CARDINALS7,BREWERS2MILWAUKEEABRHBIBBSOAVG. Yelichlf411101.309 Caincf301000.302 Moustakas3b400001.255 Aguilar1b401002.280 Shaw2b411101.246 Broxtonrf200000.186 a-Thamesph-rf200002.227 Kratzc400001.242 Arciass301002.207 Mileyp201000.267 Knebelp000000--c-Schoopph100001.234 Jenningsp000000.667 Burnesp000000--TOTALS33262011 ST.LOUISABRHBIBBSOAVG. Carpenter1b410000.269 Molinac410003.278 ONeillrf411101.306 Ozunalf221121.271 DeJongss412300.242 Gyorko3b310011.252 Badercf401202.285 Wong2b101000.240 Garcia2b200001.224 Mikolasp200001.133 b-Martinezph100000.308 Mayersp000000.000 Shrevep000000.000 d-Wisdomph100000.375 Poncedeleonp000000.000 TOTALS32767310 MILWAUKEE010000010 „261 ST.LOUIS01300201X „761 a-struckoutforBroxtoninthe6th.b-”ied outforMikolasinthe6th.c-struckoutfor Knebelinthe7th.d-groundedoutforShreve inthe8th. E„Arcia(10),ONeill(2).LOB„Milwaukee 5,St.Louis5.2B„Cain(20),Arcia(8), DeJong(17).3B„Bader(2).HR„Shaw(24), offMikolasYelich(19),offShreveOzuna (15),offMiley.RBIs„Yelich(61),Shaw(69), ONeill(10),Ozuna(67),DeJong3(40), Bader2(25).SB„DeJong(1). Runnersleftinscoringposition„Milwaukee 3(Miley,Thames2)St.Louis3(Gyorko, Martinez,Wisdom).RISP„Milwaukee1for 5St.Louis3for9. Runnersmovedup„Gyorko. MILWAUKEEIPHRERBBSONPERA Miley,L,2-254 411791 2.18 Knebel11 211130 4.89 Jennings10 000115 3.10 Burnes11 111123 4.41 ST.LOUISIPHRERBBSONPERA Mikolas,W,13-365 110791 2.80 Mayers10000216 3.83 Shreve11110118 4.06 Poncedeleon10 000114 2.04 HBP„Mikolas(Cain),Burnes(Garcia). PB„Kratz(3). Umpires„Home,CoryBlaserFirst,Ramon DeJesusSecond,StuScheurwaterThird, GaryCederstrom. T„2:54.A„46,040(45,538).STATISTICAL LEADERSAMERICANLEAGUE BATTING: Betts,Boston, .346;Martinez,Boston, .333;Altuve,Houston,.329; Machado,LosAngeles,.315; Segura,Seattle,.314;Trout, LosAngeles,.309;Merri“eld,KansasCity,.303; Smith,TampaBay,.301; Ramirez,Cleveland,.301; Simmons,LosAngeles,.301. RUNS: Lindor,Cleveland, 102;Betts,Boston,100; Martinez,Boston,92;Benintendi,Boston,87;Ramirez, Cleveland,85;Trout,Los Angeles,82;Stanton,New York,81;Bregman,Houston,78;Segura,Seattle,78; Rosario,Minnesota,77. RBI: Martinez,Boston, 106;Davis,Oakland,95; Ramirez,Cleveland,91; Encarnacion,Cleveland, 81;Stanton,NewYork,79; Haniger,Seattle,78;Cruz, Seattle,77;Abreu,Chicago, 76;Lindor,Cleveland,76; Lowrie,Oakland,76. HITS: Martinez,Boston,149; Segura,Seattle,148;Lindor, Cleveland,145;Rosario, Minnesota,142;Betts, Boston,141;Merri“eld, KansasCity,140;Castellanos,Detroit,138;Stanton, NewYork,136;Altuve, Houston,134;Benintendi, Boston,134. HOMERUNS: Martinez, Boston,38;Ramirez,Cleveland,37;Davis,Oakland,34; Gallo,Texas,32;Stanton, NewYork,32;Cruz,Seattle, 30;Trout,LosAngeles,30; Lindor,Cleveland,29;Betts, Boston,27;2tiedat26. PITCHING: Severino,New York,16-6;Carrasco, Cleveland,15-6;Kluber, Cleveland,15-6;Porcello, Boston,15-5;Snell,Tampa Bay,14-5;Happ,NewYork, 13-6;Price,Boston,13-6;4 tiedat12. ERA: Sale,Boston,1.97; Snell,TampaBay,2.10; Bauer,Cleveland,2.22; Verlander,Houston,2.52; Kluber,Cleveland,2.68; Cole,Houston,2.71;Morton, Houston,2.85;Severino, NewYork,3.28;Carrasco, Cleveland,3.33;Clevinger, Cleveland,3.38. STRIKEOUTS: Cole,Houston,219;Sale,Boston, 219;Verlander,Houston, 217;Bauer,Cleveland, 214;Severino,NewYork, 181;Paxton,Seattle,176; Morton,Houston,175; Carrasco,Cleveland,161; Kluber,Cleveland,160;Berrios,Minnesota,157. NATIONALLEAGUE BATTING: Freeman,Atlanta, .320;Markakis,Atlanta, .319;Gennett,Cincinnati, .313;Yelich,Milwaukee, .310;Martinez,St.Louis, .308;Arenado,Colorado, .308;Dickerson,Pittsburgh, .307;Cain,Milwaukee, .302;Peralta,Arizona,.300; Rendon,Washington,.298. RUNS: Blackmon,Colorado,89;Albies,Atlanta, 84;Yelich,Milwaukee,83; Carpenter,St.Louis,82; Arenado,Colorado,80; Goldschmidt,Arizona,78; Harper,Washington,78; Hernandez,Philadelphia, 77;Freeman,Atlanta,76;2 tiedat74. RBI: Aguilar,Milwaukee, 89;Baez,Chicago,89; Suarez,Cincinnati,89; Arenado,Colorado,84; Story,Colorado,83;Harper, Washington,79;Markakis, Atlanta,78;Rizzo,Chicago, 78;Hoskins,Philadelphia, 77;Freeman,Atlanta,76. HITS: Markakis,Atlanta, 151;Freeman,Atlanta, 150;Gennett,Cincinnati, 141;Peraza,Cincinnati, 139;Albies,Atlanta,138; Story,Colorado,135; Arenado,Colorado,134; Castro,Miami,133;Turner, Washington,133;Yelich, Milwaukee,133. HOMERUNS: Carpenter,St.Louis,33; Arenado,Colorado,30; Harper,Washington,30; Aguilar,Milwaukee,29; Goldschmidt,Arizona,28; Muncy,LosAngeles,27; Suarez,Cincinnati,26;Baez, Chicago,25;Hoskins,Philadelphia,25;Story,Colorado, 25. PITCHING: Scherzer, Washington,16-5;Nola, Philadelphia,14-3;Godley, Arizona,13-6;Lester, Chicago,13-5;Chacin, Milwaukee,12-4;Greinke, Arizona,12-8;Mikolas,St. Louis,12-3;Freeland,Colorado,11-7;6tiedat10. ERA: deGrom,NewYork, 1.71;Scherzer,Washington, 2.11;Nola,Philadelphia, 2.24;Mikolas,St.Louis, 2.86;Foltynewicz,Atlanta, 2.86;Freeland,Colorado, 2.96;Greinke,Arizona, 3.00;Corbin,Arizona,3.18; Arrieta,Philadelphia,3.25; Wood,LosAngeles,3.51. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer, Washington,234;deGrom, NewYork,204;Corbin, Arizona,190;Nola,Philadelphia,160;Greinke,Arizona, 158;Gray,Colorado,157; Pivetta,Philadelphia,153; Foltynewicz,Atlanta,152; Marquez,Colorado,146; Godley,Arizona,143.BOXSCORES ROUNDUP/MATCHUPSAthletics7,Astros1: TrevorCahill pitchedone-hitballforsevenshutoutinningsandtheAthleticstied HoustonfortheALWestlead. Mets3,Phillies1: JacobdeGrom pitchedhis“rstcompletegameof theseasonandloweredhismajor league-leadingERAto1.71. Yankees11,BlueJays6: Giancarlo StantonhitoneofNewYorksfour homers,LuisSeverinostruckout eightwhilepitchingintothesixth inningandtheYankeesbeatToronto. Orioles4,Indians2: AlexCobb pitcheda“ve-hitterforhis“rst completegamein“veyears,andthe BaltimoreOriolessnappedClevelandssix-gamewinstreak. RedSox5,Rays2: DavidPrice pitchedsevensolidinnings,J.D. Martinezhithismajorleague-leading 38thhomerafterBostonjumpedto aquickleadandtheRedSoxbeat theTampaBayRaysfortheir17th victoryin20games. Reds7,Giants1: MattHarveytook ano-hittryintothesixthinning, andJosePerazaandDilsonHerrera backedhimwithhomeruns. Pirates3,Cubs1: JoeMusgrove cruisedthroughseveninnings,and thePittsburghPiratessnappeda “ve-gamelosingstreak. Cardinals7,Brewers2: Marcell OzunahomeredandMilesMikolas tossedsixeffectiveinningstolead St.Louis. LATE MiamiatWashington ColoradoatAtlanta DetroitatMinnesota KansasCityatChicagoWhiteSox L.A.AngelsatTexas ArizonaatSanDiego L.A.DodgersatSeattleTODAYSPITCHINGCOMPARISONNATIONALLEAGUE2018TEAMLASTTHREESTARTS TEAMSPITCHERSTIMEW-LERARECW-LIPERA SanFranciscoSuarez(L)4-84.409-120-216.06.19 CincinnatiCastillo(R)1:10p6-105.0412-121-218.03.50 ChicagoQuintana(L)10-94.4614-91-217.15.71 PittsburghTaillon(R)1:35p9-93.6613-112-121.23.32 ColoradoMarquez(R)10-94.5113-111-120.02.70 AtlantaSanchez(R)1:35p6-33.0710-61-013.03.46 MiamiUrena(R)3-124.746-180-210.18.71 WashingtonGonzalez(L)1:35p7-94.1210-141-214.26.75 MilwaukeeChacin(R)12-43.7218-82-117.15.71 St.LouisGant(R)2:15p5-43.744-72-015.14.70 ArizonaGreinke(R)12-83.0014-110-319.13.26 SanDiegoKennedy(R)4:10p0-211.000-20-29.011.00 NewYorkVargas(L)2-88.102-110-211.17.15 PhiladelphiaPivetta(R)7:10p7-94.3713-111-018.01.50AMERICANLEAGUE2018TEAMLASTTHREESTARTS TEAMSPITCHERSTIMEW-LERARECW-LIPERA TorontoBorucki(L)2-23.295-42-017.04.24 NewYorkHapp(L)1:05p13-63.8615-83-019.01.89 BaltimoreRamirez(R)1-45.403-50-111.210.03 ClevelandClevinger(R)1:10p8-73.3810-141-018.03.00 DetroitTBD0-00.000-00-00.00.00 MinnesotaOdorizzi(R)2:10p5-74.4411-141-013.23.29 KansasCityFillmyer(R)1-13.611-51-015.04.20 ChicagoLopez(R)2:10p4-94.407-170-019.03.32 LosAngelesBarria(R)8-73.509-92-015.22.30 TexasColon(R)3:05p7-105.1910-122-117.06.35 HoustonVerlander(R)11-82.5214-121-215.25.17 OaklandManaea(L)4:05p11-83.4415-102-116.13.31INTERLEAGUE2018TEAMLASTTHREESTARTS TEAMSPITCHERSTIMEW-LERARECW-LIPERA L.Angeles(NL)Ke rshaw(L)5-52.478-101-020.02.25 SeattleElias(L)4:10p2-02.880-10-03.24.91 KEY: TEAMREC-TeamsRecordingamesstartedbytodayspitcher. THISDATEINBASEBALLAug.19 1909: ThePhiladelphiaPhillieswererainedoutforthe 10thconsecutiveday,amajorleaguerecord. 1913: TheChicagoCubstaggedGroverAlexanderfor ninestraighthitsandsixrunsfora10-4triumphover thePhiladelphiaPhillies. 1921: DetroitsTyCobbgothis3,000thcareerhitatage 34,theyoungestplayertoreachthatplateau.ThemilestonehitwasasingleoffElmerMyersoftheBoston RedSox. 1930: GooseGoslinofSt.Louishitthreehomersand drovein“verunstoleadtheBrownstoa7-0winover thePhiladelphiaAthletics. 1934: MooseSoltersoftheBostonRedSoxhitforthe cycleinan8-6losstotheDetroitTigersatFenway Park. 1945: Inthesecondgameofadoubleheader,37-yearoldsluggerJimmieFoxxmadehis“rstmajorleague start,pitchingthe“rstseveninningsforthePhiladelphiaPhillies.Heleftthegamewitha4-1leadover theCincinnatiReds,andAndyKarlsavedFoxxsonly decision,a6-2win. 1951: EddieGaedel,a65-poundmidgetwhowas 3-foot-7,madehis“rstandonlyplateappearanceasa pinch-hitterforFrankSaucieroftheSt.LouisBrowns. GaedelwearingNo.1/8waswalkedonfourpitchesby DetroitTigerspitcherBobCainandthenwastakenout forpinch-runnerJimDelsing.ThegimmickbyBrowns ownerBillVeeckwaslateroutlawed.FRIDAYSGAMES AmericanLeague N.Y.Yankees7,Toronto5,7innings Cleveland2,Baltimore1 Boston7,TampaBay3 Texas6,L.A.Angels4 ChicagoWhiteSox9,KansasCity3 Minnesota5,Detroit4 Oakland4,Houston3,10innings NationalLeague Philadelphia4,N.Y.Mets2 ChicagoCubs1,Pittsburgh0 Washington8,Miami2 Cincinnati2,SanFrancisco1,11 innings Colorado11,Atlanta5 St.Louis5,Milwaukee2 Arizona9,SanDiego4 Interleague L.A.Dodgers11,Seattle1 MONDAYSGAMES AmericanLeague BaltimoreatToronto,7:07p.m. ChicagoWhiteSoxatMinnesota, 7:10p.m. ClevelandatBoston,7:10p.m. KansasCityatTampaBay,7:10p.m. TexasatOakland,10:05p.m. HoustonatSeattle,10:10p.m. NationalLeague AtlantaatPittsburgh,7:05p.m. SanFranciscoatN.Y.Mets,7:10p.m. CincinnatiatMilwaukee,8:10p.m. St.LouisatL.A.Dodgers,10:10p.m.

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The Sun / Sunday, August 19, 2018 www.yoursun.com SP Page 5 SCOREBOARD PRO BASEBALLAMERICAN LEAGUEAll times EasternEAST DIVISION W L PCT. GB Boston 88 36 .710 „ New York 77 46 .626 10 Tampa Bay 62 61 .504 25 Toronto 55 68 .447 32 Baltimore 37 86 .301 50 CENTRAL DIVISION W L PCT. GB Cleveland 70 52 .574 „ Minnesota 58 63 .479 11 Detroit 50 73 .407 20 Chicago 45 77 .369 25 Kansas City 38 85 .309 32 WEST DIVISION W L PCT. GB Houston 74 49 .602 „ Oakland 74 49 .602 „ Seattle 70 53 .569 4 Los Angeles 62 62 .500 12 Texas 55 69 .444 19Fridays GamesCleveland 2, Baltimore 1 Boston 7, Tampa Bay 3 Texas 6, L.A. Angels 4 Chicago White Sox 9, Kansas City 3 N.Y. Yankees 7, Toronto 5, 7 innings Minnesota 5, Detroit 4 Oakland 4, Houston 3, 10 innings L.A. Dodgers 11, Seattle 1Saturdays GamesN.Y. Yankees 11, Toronto 6 Baltimore 4, Cleveland 2 Oakland 7, Houston 1 Boston 5, Tampa Bay 2 Kansas City 3, Chicago White Sox 1 Detroit at Minnesota, late L.A. Angels at Texas, late L.A. Dodgers at Seattle, lateTodays GamesTampa Bay (TBD) at Boston (Sale 12-4), 1:05 p.m. Toronto (Borucki 2-2) at N.Y. Yankees (Happ 13-6), 1:05 p.m. Baltimore (Cashner 4-10) at Cleveland (Clevinger 8-7), 1:10 p.m. Detroit (TBD) at Minnesota (Odorizzi 5-7), 2:10 p.m. Kansas City (Fillmyer 1-1) at Chicago White Sox (Lopez 4-9), 2:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (Barria 8-7) at Texas (Colon 7-10), 3:05 p.m. Houston (Verlander 11-8) at Oakland (Manaea 11-8), 4:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 5-5) at Seattle (Elias 2-0), 4:10 p.m.Mondays GamesBaltimore at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Minnesota, 7:10 p.m. Cleveland at Boston, 7:10 p.m. Kansas City at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. Texas at Oakland, 10:05 p.m. Houston at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.NATIONAL LEAGUEAll times Eastern EAST DIVISION W L PCT. GB Atlanta 68 53 .562 „ Philadelphia 68 55 .553 1 Washington 62 61 .504 7 New York 53 69 .434 15 Miami 48 76 .387 21 CENTRAL DIVISION W L PCT. GB Chicago 71 51 .582 „ St. Louis 68 56 .548 4 Milwaukee 68 57 .544 4 Pittsburgh 62 62 .500 10 Cincinnati 54 69 .439 17 WEST DIVISION W L PCT. GB Arizona 68 55 .553 „ Colorado 66 56 .541 1 Los Angeles 66 57 .537 2 San Francisco 61 63 .492 7 San Diego 48 77 .384 21Fridays GamesPhiladelphia 4, N.Y. Mets 2 Washington 8, Miami 2 Cincinnati 2, San Francisco 1, 11 innings Colorado 11, Atlanta 5 Chicago Cubs 1, Pittsburgh 0 St. Louis 5, Milwaukee 2 Arizona 9, San Diego 4 L.A. Dodgers 11, Seattle 1Saturdays GamesN.Y. Mets 3, Philadelphia 1 Pittsburgh 3, Chicago Cubs 1 Cincinnati 7, San Francisco 1 St. Louis 7, Milwaukee 2 Miami at Washington, late Colorado at Atlanta, late Arizona at San Diego, late L.A. Dodgers at Seattle, lateTodays GamesSan Francisco (Suarez 4-8) at Cincinnati (Castillo 6-10), 1:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Quintana 10-9) at Pittsburgh (Taillon 9-9), 1:35 p.m. Colorado (Marquez 10-9) at Atlanta (Sanchez 6-3), 1:35 p.m. Miami (Lopez 2-3) at Washington (Gonzalez 7-9), 1:35 p.m. Milwaukee (Chacin 12-4) at St. Louis (Gant 5-4), 2:15 p.m. Arizona (Greinke 12-8) at San Diego (Kennedy 0-2), 4:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 5-5) at Seattle (Elias 2-0), 4:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Vargas 2-8) vs. Philadelphia (Pivetta 7-9) at Williamsport, Pa., 7:10 p.m.Mondays GamesAtlanta at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. San Francisco at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. Cincinnati at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.PRO FOOTBALLNFL PRESEASONAll times EasternAMERICAN CONFERENCEEAST W L T PCT. PF PA New England 2 0 0 1.000 63 37 Buffalo 1 1 0 .500 42 45 N.Y. Jets 1 1 0 .500 30 15 Miami 0 2 0 .000 44 53 SOUTH W L T PCT. PF PA Houston 1 0 0 1.000 17 10 Indianapolis 1 0 0 1.000 19 17 Jacksonville 1 1 0 .500 34 34 Tennessee 0 1 0 .000 17 31 NORTH W L T PCT. PF PA Baltimore 2 0 0 1.000 50 23 Cincinnati 2 0 0 1.000 51 40 Cleveland 1 1 0 .500 37 29 Pittsburgh 1 1 0 .500 65 65 WEST W L T PCT. PF PA Kansas City 1 1 0 .500 38 31 Oakland 1 1 0 .500 31 29 L.A. Chargers 0 1 0 .000 17 24 Denver 0 1 0 .000 28 42 NATIONAL CONFERENCE EAST W L T PCT. PF PA N.Y. Giants 1 1 0 .500 40 37 Washington 1 1 0 .500 32 39 Dallas 0 2 0 .000 34 45 Philadelphia 0 2 0 .000 34 68 SOUTH W L T PCT. PF PA Carolina 2 0 0 1.000 55 43 Tampa Bay 1 0 0 1.000 26 24 New Orleans 1 1 0 .500 39 40 Atlanta 0 2 0 .000 14 45 NORTH W L T PCT. PF PA Green Bay 2 0 0 1.000 82 51 Minnesota 1 1 0 .500 52 42 Detroit 0 2 0 .000 27 46 Chicago 0 2 0 .000 43 47 WEST W L T PCT. PF PA Arizona 2 0 0 1.000 44 32 San Francisco 1 0 0 1.000 24 21 L.A. Rams 1 1 0 .500 26 48 Seattle 0 1 0 .000 17 19WEEK 2 Thursdays GamesNew England 37, Philadelphia 20 Washington 15, N.Y. Jets 13 Green Bay 51, Pittsburgh 34Fridays GamesN.Y. Giants 30, Detroit 17 Kansas City 28, Atlanta 14 Buffalo 19, Cleveland 17 Carolina 27, Miami 20 Arizona 20, New Orleans 15Saturdays GamesJacksonville 14, Minnesota 10 L.A. Rams 19, Oakland 15 Cincinnati 21, Dallas 13 Tampa Bay at Tennessee, late San Francisco at Houston, late Chicago at Denver, late Seattle at L.A. Chargers, lateMondays GameBaltimore at Indianapolis, 8 p.m.WEEK 3 Thursday, Aug. 23Philadelphia at Cleveland, 8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 24New England at Carolina, 7:30 p.m. N.Y. Giants at N.Y. Jets, 7:30 p.m. Denver at Washington, 7:30 p.m. Seattle at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Detroit at Tampa Bay, 8 p.m. Green Bay at Oakland, 10:30 p.m.Saturday, Aug. 25Kansas City at Chicago, 1 p.m. Houston at L.A. Rams, 4 p.m. Tennessee at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. San Francisco at Indianapolis, 4:30 p.m. Atlanta at Jacksonville, 7 p.m. Baltimore at Miami, 7 p.m. New Orleans at L.A. Chargers, 8 p.m.Sunday, Aug. 26Cincinnati at Buffalo, 4 p.m. Arizona at Dallas, 8 p.m.COLLEGE FOOTBALLAMWAY PRESEASON COACHES TOP 25 POLLThe preseason Amway Top 25 football poll, with “ rst-place votes in parentheses, 2017 “ nal records, total points based on 25 points for “ rst place through one point for 25th, and last years “ nal ranking (LYR): REC. PTS. LYR 1. Alabama (61) 13-1 1621 1 2. Clemson (3) 12-2 1547 4 3. Ohio State (1) 12-2 1458 5 4. Georgia 13-2 1452 2 5. Oklahoma 12-2 1288 3 6. Washington 10-3 1245 15 7. Wisconsin 13-1 1243 6 8. Miami (Fla.) 10-3 1091 13 9. Penn State 11-2 1050 8 10. Auburn 10-4 1004 12 11. Notre Dame 10-3 892 11 12. Michigan State 10-3 870 16 13. Stanford 9-5 768 19 14. Michigan 8-5 752 „ 15. Southern California 11-3 691 10 16. Texas Christian 11-3 530 9 17. Virginia Tech 9-4 524 25 18. Mississippi State 9-4 407 20 19. Florida State 7-6 328 „ 20. West Virginia 7-6 310 „ 21. Texas 7-6 265 „ 22. Boise State 11-3 261 22 23. Central Florida 13-0 259 7 24. Louisiana State 9-4 254 18 25. Oklahoma State 10-3 168 14 Others receiving votes: South Carolina 138; Florida 135; Oregon 105; Utah 81; Northwestern 67; Texas A&M 67; Kansas State 35; Florida Atlantic 27; Boston College 23; Memphis 23; North Carolina State 22; Arkansas State 19; Troy 19; Appalachian State 16; San Diego State 15; Iowa 8; Iowa State 8; Kentucky 8; Washington State 7; South Florida 6; Duke 5; Fresno State 4; Louisville 3; Arizona 2; Houston 2; Army 1; Northern Illinois 1.ODDSPREGAME.COM LINEMAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Today National LeagueFAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE at Cincinnati -105 San Francisco -105 at Pittsburgh -117 Chicago +107 at Washington -220 Miami +200 at Atlanta -125 Colorado +115 at St. Louis -116 Milwaukee +106 Arizona -185 at San Diego +170 at Philadelphia -180 New York +165American Leagueat Boston Off Tampa Bay Off at New York -230 Toronto +210 at Cleveland -270 Baltimore +240 at Minnesota Off Detroit Off at Chicago -141 Kansas City +131 at Texas Off Los Angeles Off Houston -145 at Oakland +135Interleagueat Seattle Off LA Dodgers OffNFL PRESEASON MondayFAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG at Indianapolis Pk Pk 43 BaltimoreUpdated odds available at Pregame.comTRANSACTIONSBASEBALLAmerican LeagueBOSTON RED SOX „ Placed LHP Chris Sale on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Wednesday, Aug. 15. Recalled RHP Brandon Workman from Pawtucket (IL).National LeagueCOLORADO ROCKIES „ Reinstated RHP Antonio Senzatela from the 10-day DL. Optioned INF Pat Valaika to Albuquerque (PCL). SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS „ Activated RHP Hunter Strickland from the 60-day DL. Transferred INF Pablo Sandoval to the 60-day DL.American AssociationCLEBURNE RAILROADERS „ Released OF Matt Helms. ST. PAUL SAINTS „ Released C Connor Olson. TEXAS AIRHOGS „ Acquired OF Javion Randle from San Rafael (Paci“ c Association).FOOTBALLNational Football LeagueCLEVELAND BROWNS „ Placed WR Josh Gordon on the active/non-football injured list. Signed TE Stephen Baggett. Waived-injured TE Julian Allen. Waived DB Micah Hannemann. GREEN BAY PACKERS „ Signed RB LeShun Daniels. Placed RB Akeem Judd on the reserve/ retired list. WASHINGTON REDSKINS „ Signed OT Kendall Calhoun, DB Darius Hillary and WR Allenzae Staggers. Waived-injured RB Martez Carter. Waived LB Jeff Knox and DE Jalen Wilkerson.COLLEGESFREDONIA STATE „ Named Angela Pucciarelli assistant director of athletics/senior woman administrator; Matt Johnson womens tennis coach; Jay Martinez and Tory Trzyna assistant athletic trainers; Derek Fie sports information assistant; Ben Chatley and Taylor Chwalinski assistant swimming coaches; Reid Lesswing mens assistant hockey coach; Ryan Ross mens assistant soccer coach; Madison Szpaicher womens assistant volleyball coach and Meghann Kilgallon assistant diving coach. LSU „ Suspended junior WR Drake Davis inde“ nitely following his arrest for allegedly hitting and threatening a woman he was dating.GOLFPGA TOURWYNDHAM CHAMPIONSHIPSaturdays leaders at Sedgw“ eld Country Club, Greensboro, N.C. Purse: $6 million. Yardage: 7,127; Par: 70 (35-35) PARTIAL THIRD ROUND Michael Thompson 66-70-63„199 Jamie Lovemark 66-70-64„200 Rory Sabbatini 69-67-64„200 Martin Laird 69-66-65„200 Sangmoon Bae 67-67-66„200 Webb Simpson 66-68-66„200 Hideki Matsuyama 69-68-64„201 Kevin Tway 67-69-65„201 Tom Hoge 69-66-66„201 Matthew Fitzpatrick 70-67-65„202 Rafa Cabrera Bello 68-69-65„202 Shawn Stefani 68-68-66„202 Patrick Rodgers 68-67-67„202 Chris Kirk 69-65-68„202 Hudson Swafford 67-70-66„203 Joaquin Niemann 68-69-66„203 Scott Piercy 70-67-66„203 Sam Saunders 66-70-67„203 Johnson Wagner 70-66-67„203 Mackenzie Hughes 68-68-67„203 William McGirt 69-68-67„204 Danny Lee 68-69-67„204 Roberto Diaz 68-69-67„204 Jonas Blixt 69-68-67„204 Dylan Meyer 67-68-69„204 Harold Varner III 66-69-69„204 Lanto Grif“ n 69-68-68„205 Billy Hurley III 68-69-68„205 Bill Haas 69-68-68„205 Sam Ryder 72-64-69„205 Chesson Hadley 68-68-69„205 Martin Flores 64-73-69„206 Blayne Barber 68-69-69„206 Ricky Barnes 66-70-70„206 Stephan Jaeger 67-68-71„206 Graeme McDowell 70-67-70„207 Ollie Schniederjans 64-73-70„207 Xinjun Zhang 68-67-72„207 Julian Suri 71-66-71„208 Jason Kokrak 69-68-71„208 Richy Werenski 68-69-72„209 Conrad Shindler 69-68-73„210 LEADERBOARD NAME PAR THRU 1. Brandt Snedeker -16 7 2. Brian Gay -13 12 3. Trey Mullinax -12 12 3. Keith Mitchell -12 8 3. C.T. Pan -12 7 3. D.A. Points -12 6 7. Michael Thompson -11 F 7. Ryan Armour -11 15 7. Ryan Moore -11 13 7. Sergio Garcia -11 9 11. Jamie Lovemark -10 F 11. Rory Sabbatini -10 F 11. Martin Laird -10 F 11. Sangmoon Bae -10 F 11. Webb Simpson -10 F 11. Denny McCarthy -10 16 11. Jim Furyk -10 13 11. Nick Taylor -10 11 11. Brett Stegmaier -10 10 11. Harris English -10 9 11. David Hearn -10 7LPGA TOURINDY WOMEN IN TECHSaturdays leaders at Brickyard Crossing Golf Club, Indianapolis; Purse: $2 million. Yardage: 6,456; Par: 72 (36-36) (a-denotes amateur) THIRD ROUND Lizette Salas 62-69-64„195 Amy Yang 68-64-65„197 Sung Hyun Park 68-63-66„197 Lexi Thompson 68-68-64„200 Mina Harigae 69-67-65„201 Nasa Hataoka 64-69-68„201 Jin Young Ko 65-66-70„201 Angel Yin 64-69-69„202 Brianna Do 66-70-67„203 Danielle Kang 65-68-70„203 Marina Alex 68-70-66„204 Hannah Green 69-67-68„204 Ariya Jutanugarn 70-65-69„204 Jennifer Song 68-67-69„204 Mi Hyang Lee 66-69-69„204 Thidapa Suwannapura 67-67-70„204 Bronte Law 69-69-67„205 Chella Choi 68-70-67„205 Lydia Ko 66-71-68„205 Cristie Kerr 69-67-69„205 Eun-Hee Ji 71-69-66„206 So Yeon Ryu 68-71-67„206 Wichanee Meechai 70-68-68„206 Wei-Ling Hsu 67-71-68„206 Emma Talley 70-67-69„206 Madeleine Sheils 67-70-69„206 Caroline Hedwall 65-68-73„206 Jenny Shin 72-68-67„207 Brittany Lang 69-71-67„207 Brooke M. Henderson 70-69-68„207 Jeong Eun Lee 70-69-68„207 Caroline Inglis 69-70-68„207 Shanshan Feng 69-70-68„207 Angela Stanford 68-71-68„207 Jane Park 65-74-68„207 Jessica Korda 71-67-69„207 Sandra Gal 70-68-69„207 Haeji Kang 71-66-70„207 Cindy LaCrosse 70-67-70„207 Paula Reto 69-68-70„207 Jackie Stoelting 70-66-71„207 Beatriz Recari 69-70-69„208 Anne-Catherine Tanguay 68-70-70„208 Alena Sharp 67-71-70„208 Austin Ernst 68-68-72„208 Pernilla Lindberg 67-69-72„208 Ashleigh Buhai 66-70-72„208 Moriya Jutanugarn 68-72-69„209 Katherine Kirk 71-68-70„209 Morgan Pressel 70-69-70„209 Caroline Masson 69-70-70„209 Jaye Marie Green 70-68-71„209 Candie Kung 70-68-71„209 Yu Liu 69-69-71„209 Sophia Popov 70-67-72„209 Maria Torres 68-69-72„209 Katelyn Dambaugh 69-67-73„209 Lindy Duncan 70-70-70„210 Jacqui Concolino 70-69-71„210 Jodi Ewart Shadoff 70-69-71„210 Mariah Stackhouse 66-72-72„210 Kris Tamulis 69-68-73„210 Carlota Ciganda 66-70-74„210 Julieta Granada 68-71-72„211 Brittany Altomare 70-69-73„212 Nicole Broch Larsen 67-73-73„213 Azahara Munoz 70-69-74„213 a-Erica Shepherd 71-67-75„213 Camilla Lennarth 70-68-75„213 Dori Carter 72-68-74„214 Annie Park 70-70-74„214 Peiyun Chien 72-68-75„215 Maude-Aimee Leblanc 70-70-77„217PGA CHAMPIONS TOURDICKS SPORTING GOODS OPENSaturdays leaders at En-Joie Golf Club, Endicott, N.Y. Purse: $2.05 million; Yardage: 6,994; Par: 72 (35-37) SECOND ROUND Michael Bradley 65-68„133 Bart Bryant 68-67„135 Marco Dawson 65-70„135 Wes Short, Jr. 71-65„136 Clark Dennis 66-70„136 Tom Gillis 67-69„136 Jerry Haas 69-68„137 Scott Parel 69-68„137 Mark Calcavecchia 68-69„137 Kenny Perry 68-69„137 Woody Austin 66-71„137 Doug Garwood 64-73„137 Ken Tanigawa 71-67„138 Gene Sauers 70-68„138 Bob Estes 67-71„138 Fran Quinn 68-70„138 Willie Wood 71-68„139 Bernhard Langer 70-69„139 Lee Janzen 70-69„139 Rod Spittle 70-69„139 Paul Goydos 69-70„139 Glen Day 69-70„139 Jeff Sluman 69-70„139 Paul Broadhurst 68-71„139 Jay Haas 68-71„139 Steve Flesch 71-69„140 Joe Durant 70-70„140 Kent Jones 69-71„140 Billy Andrade 68-72„140 Stephen Ames 71-70„141 Tom Byrum 71-70„141 Larry Mize 69-72„141 Duffy Waldorf 73-69„142 Tommy Tolles 74-68„142 Olin Browne 73-69„142 Loren Roberts 72-70„142 David Frost 71-71„142 Tommy Armour III 71-71„142 Jeff Maggert 70-72„142 Carlos Franco 70-72„142 Skip Kendall 68-74„142 Gibby Gilbert III 74-69„143 Jerry Smith 73-70„143 Dan Forsman 73-70„143 Kevin Sutherland 72-71„143 Scott McCarron 72-71„143 Neal Lancaster 71-72„143 Spike McRoy 74-70„144 Blaine McCallister 73-71„144 Joey Sindelar 71-73„144 Robert Gamez 70-74„144 Dudley Hart 75-70„145 Scott Dunlap 73-72„145 Todd Hamilton 73-72„145 Mark Walker 73-72„145 John Huston 69-76„145 Colin Montgomerie 75-71„146 Steve Pate 73-73„146 Mike Goodes 72-74„146 Miguel Angel Jimenez 70-76„146 Jay Don Blake 73-74„147 David McKenzie 72-75„147 Billy Mayfair 72-75„147 Scott Hoch 74-74„148 Gary Hallberg 75-73„148 Steve Jones 68-80„148 Esteban Toledo 75-74„149 David Eger 77-73„150 Mark Brooks 74-76„150 John Daly 73-77„150 Brad Bryant 73-77„150 Jesper Parnevik 72-78„150 R.W. Eaks 77-74„151 Tom Kite 82-74„156 Ken Green 81-78„159 Gibby Gilbert 78-82„160EUROPEAN TOURNORDEA MASTERSSaturdays leaders at Hills GC, Gothenburg, Sweden; Purse: $1.7 million. Yardage: 7,169; Par: 71 THIRD ROUND Paul Waring, England 66-63-69„198 Thomas Aiken, South Africa 66-65-67„198 Thorbjorn Oleson, Denmark 68-66-67„201 Marc Warren, Scotland 70-65-66„201 Maximilian Kiefer, Germany 68-68-66„202 Lee Slattery, England 64-69-70„203 Adam Bland, Australia 67-67-69„203 Lucas Herbert, Australia 66-68-69„203 Sebastien Gros, France 71-64-69„204 Scott Jamison, Scotland 64-65-75„204 Nino Bertasio, Italy 70-68-66„204 Robert Rock, England 70-69-65„204 Matthew Southgate, England 67-73-65„205 Clement Sordet, France 62-72-71„205 Nacho Elvira, Spain 70-67-69„206 Thomas Detry, Belgium 66-72-68„206 Andrew Johnston, England 70-68-68„206 Robert Karlsson, Sweden 67-71-68„206 Johan Carlsson, Sweden 70-68-68„206 Haydn Porteous, South Africa 72-67-67„206 ALSO Hunter Stewart, United States 65-68-74„207 Martin Kaymer, Germany 67-67-75„209 Paul Peterson, United States 69-71-71„211WEB.COM TOURPORTLAND OPENSaturdays results were not available at press timeUNITED STATS GOLF ASSOCIATIONU.S. AMATEURSaturday at Pebble Beach Golf Links, Pebble Beach, Calif. Yardage: 7,075; Par: 71 (35-36) SEMIFINALS Devon Bling, Ridgecrest, Calif. def. Isaiah Salinda, South San Francisco, 1 up. Viktor Hovland, Norway, def. Cole Hammer, Houston, 3 & 2. SUNDAYS CHAMPIONSHIP TEE TIMES (EDT) 10:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. Devon Bling, Ridgecrest, Calif. vs. Viktor Hovland, Norway.AUTO RACINGNASCAR MONSTER ENERGY CUPBASS PRO SHOPS NRA NIGHT RACEFridays qualifying for Saturdays race at Bristol Motor Speedway, Bristol, Tenn. Saturdays race results were not in at press time Lap length: 0.526 miles(Car number in parentheses)1. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 127.792 mph. 2. (9) Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, 127.665. 3. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 127.639. 4. (21) Paul Menard, Ford, 127.605. 5. (24) William Byron, Chevrolet, 127.554. 6. (4) Kevin Harvick, Ford, 127.039. 7. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 126.896. 8. (10) Aric Almirola, Ford, 126.880. 9. (41) Kurt Busch, Ford, 126.863. 10. (12) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 126.762. 11. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 126.253. 12. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 125.988. 13. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 125.922. 14. (20) Erik Jones, Toyota, 125.856. 15. (38) David Ragan, Ford, 125.691. 16. (14) Clint Bowyer, Ford, 125.675. 17. (78) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 125.650. 18. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 125.592. 19. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 125.461. 20. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 125.404. 21. (19) Daniel Suarez, Toyota, 125.363. 22. (88) Alex Bowman, Chevrolet, 125.117. 23. (6) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 125.068. 24. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 124.347. 25. (47) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 124.897. 26. (95) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 124.387. 27. (43) Bubba Wallace, Chevrolet, 124.315. 28. (37) Chris Buescher, Chevrolet, 124.210. 29. (32) Matt DiBenedetto, Ford, 124.066. 30. (72) Corey LaJoie, Chevrolet, 123.937. 31. (34) Michael McDowell, Ford, 123.682. 32. (13) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 123.261. 33. (96) Jesse Little, Toyota, 122.310. 34. (7) JJ Yeley, Chevrolet, 121.798. 35. (15) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, 121.767. 36. (51) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 121.274. 37. (66) Timmy Hill, Toyota, 120.816. 38. (99) Gray Gaulding, Chevrolet, 120.687. 39. (00) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 120.407. 40. (23) Blake Jones, Toyota, 119.173.INDYCARABC SUPPLY 500Lineup after Saturday qualifying for todays race at Pocono Raceway, Long Pond, Pa. Lap length: 2.500 miles(Car number in parentheses)1. (12) Will Power, Dallara-Chevrolet, 219.511 mph. 2. (1) Josef Newgarden, Dallara-Chevrolet, 218.802. 3. (27) Alexander Rossi, Dallara-Honda, 218.758. 4. (28) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Dallara-Honda, 217.806. 5. (22) Simon Pagenaud, Dallara-Chevrolet, 217.769. 6. (6) Robert Wickens, Dallara-Honda, 217.612. 7. (26) Zach Veach, Dallara-Honda, 217.587. 8. (18) Sebastien Bourdais, Dallara-Honda, 217.296. 9. (5) James Hinchcliffe, Dallara-Honda, 217.009. 10. (30) Takuma Sato, Dallara-Honda, 216.863. 11. (98) Marco Andretti, Dallara-Honda, 216.658. 12. (10) Ed Jones, Dallara-Honda, 216.547. 13. (9) Scott Dixon, Dallara-Honda, 216.410. 14. (14) Tony Kanaan, Dallara-Chevrolet, 216.328. 15. (20) Ed Carpenter, Dallara-Chevrolet, 216.025. 16. (21) Spencer Pigot, Dallara-Chevrolet, 215.177. 17. (19) Pietro Fittipaldi, Dallara-Honda, 214.336. 18. (15) Graham Rahal, Dallara-Honda, 214.225. 19. (23) Charlie Kimball, Dallara-Chevrolet, 211.919. 20. (4) Matheus Leist, Dallara-Chevrolet, 211.696. 21. (59) Max Chilton, Dallara-Chevrolet, 209.599. 22. (88) Conor Daly, Dallara-Chevrolet, 208.951.NHRA MELLO YELLO DRAG RACINGLUCAS OIL NATIONALSSaturday at Brainerd International Raceway, Brainerd, Minn. (Pairings based on results in qualifying, which ended Saturday. DNQs listed below pairings.)Top Fuel1. Billy Torrence, 3.784 seconds, 326.48 mph vs. 16. Terry Totten, 12.286, 72.31; 2. Steve Torrence, 3.786, 328.14 vs. 15. Bill Litton, 7.177, 78.39; 3. Antron Brown, 3.789, 325.45 vs. 14. Luigi Novelli, 4.646, 167.95; 4. Clay Millican, 3.790, 323.04 vs. 13. Chris Karamesines, 4.003, 305.01; 5. Mike Salinas, 3.797, 322.19 vs. 12. Doug Kalitta, 3.947, 257.43; 6. Brittany Force, 3.803, 325.53 vs. 11. Richie Crampton, 3.878, 310.55; 7. Tony Schumacher, 3.818, 326.87 vs. 10. Terry McMillen, 3.846, 319.60; 8. Leah Pritchett, 3.818, 324.83 vs. 9. Scott Palmer, 3.834, 323.04.Funny Car1. Robert Hight, Chevy Camaro, 3.959, 326.95 vs. 16. Cruz Pedregon, Toyota Camry, 4.081, 305.84; 2. Ron Capps, Dodge Charger, 3.969, 319.67 vs. 15. Jonnie Lindberg, Ford Mustang, 4.081, 314.53; 3. Matt Hagan, Charger, 3.990, 324.51 vs. 14. Jack Beckman, Charger, 4.029, 317.05; 4. Tim Wilkerson, Mustang, 3.991, 318.32 vs. 13. John Force, Camaro, 4.029, 322.04; 5. Tommy Johnson Jr., Charger, 4.003, 317.42 vs. 12. Del Worsham, Camry, 4.028, 321.04; 6. Shawn Langdon, Camry, 4.013, 321.04 vs. 11. Bob Tasca III, Mustang, 4.026, 318.09; 7. Jim Campbell, Charger, 4.014, 313.15 vs. 10. Courtney Force, Camaro, 4.025, 318.02; 8. J.R. Todd, Camry, 4.018, 318.17 vs. 9. Bob Bode, Charger, 4.018, 316.01.Did Not Qualify17. Gary Densham, 4.107, 315.64; 18. Dale Creasy Jr., 4.141, 267.59.Pro Stock1. Erica Enders, Chevy Camaro, 6.609, 207.72 vs. 16. Dave River, Chevy Cobalt, 7.002, 197.33; 2. Chris McGaha, Camaro, 6.613, 208.36 vs. 15. Mark Hogan, Pontiac GXP, 6.854, 200.59; 3. Alex Laughlin, Dodge Dart, 6.613, 207.59 vs. 14. Alan Prusiensky, Dart, 6.737, 204.45; 4. Bo Butner, Camaro, 6.614, 208.78 vs. 13. Fernando Cuadra, Camaro, 6.677, 207.08; 5. Tanner Gray, Camaro, 6.615, 208.71 vs. 12. Dave Connolly, Camaro, 6.659, 207.53; 6. Deric Kramer, Camaro, 6.615, 208.10 vs. 11. Vincent Nobile, Camaro, 6.642, 207.72; 7. Jason Line, Camaro, 6.622, 207.91 vs. 10. Drew Skillman, Camaro, 6.640, 208.04; 8. Jeg Coughlin, Camaro, 6.623, 208.23 vs. 9. Greg Anderson, Camaro, 6.626, 208.52.Pro Stock Motorcycle1. Matt Smith, Victory, 6.852, 198.47 vs. 16. Jim Underdahl, Suzuki, 6.997, 191.21; 2. Hector Arana Jr, Buell, 6.877, 197.22 vs. 15. Scotty Pollacheck, Suzuki, 6.985, 192.06; 3. Eddie Krawiec, Harley-Davidson, 6.886, 195.45 vs. 14. Ryan Oehler, Buell, 6.983, 192.49; 4. Andrew Hines, Harley-Davidson, 6.899, 195.76 vs. 13. Karen Stoffer, Suzuki, 6.979, 191.00; 5. Jerry Savoie, Suzuki, 6.909, 193.07 vs. 12. Steve Johnson, Suzuki, 6.972, 192.03; 6. Mark Paquette, Buell, 6.917, 193.32 vs. 11. Hector Arana, Buell, 6.965, 193.90; 7. Joey Gladstone, Suzuki, 6.924, 193.27 vs. 10. Angelle Sampey, Buell, 6.960, 192.80; 8. Angie Smith, Buell, 6.924, 192.82 vs. 9. LE Tonglet, Suzuki, 6.946, 193.74.Did Not Qualify17. Cory Reed, 7.040, 191.35; 18. Kelly Clontz, 7.072, 190.35. SOCCERMAJOR LEAGUE SOCCERAll times Eastern EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T PTS GF GA New York 15 6 3 48 47 25 Atlanta United FC 14 4 6 48 50 28 New York City FC 14 6 5 47 48 33 Columbus 11 7 6 39 31 29 Philadelphia 10 11 3 33 34 39 Montreal 10 13 3 33 33 42 New England 7 8 8 29 38 38 D.C. United 6 9 6 24 37 39 Orlando City 7 15 2 23 37 57 Toronto FC 6 12 5 23 39 44 Chicago 6 15 5 23 36 51 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T PTS GF GA FC Dallas 12 5 6 42 37 30 Sporting Kansas City 11 6 6 39 42 30 Los Angeles FC 11 7 6 39 47 39 Portland 10 5 7 37 35 31 LA Galaxy 10 9 7 37 48 47 Seattle 10 9 5 35 31 26 Real Salt Lake 10 10 5 35 34 43 Vancouver 9 9 7 34 40 49 Minnesota United 9 13 2 29 38 48 Houston 7 10 6 27 39 34 Colorado 6 12 6 24 31 40 San Jose 3 13 7 16 33 43 3 points for victory, 1 point for tieAug. 14Colorado 2, LA Galaxy 2, tieWednesdays GamesD.C. United 4, Portland 1 Los Angeles FC 2, Real Salt Lake 0Saturdays GamesSeattle 5, Los Angeles Galaxy 0 New York 2, Vancouver 2, tie Philadelphia 2, New York City FC 0 Montreal 2, Chicago 1 Minnesota United at FC Dallas, late Portland at Sporting Kansas City, late Real Salt Lake at Houston, late Toronto FC at San Jose, lateTodays GamesColumbus at Atlanta United FC, 4 p.m. New England at D.C. United, 7:30 p.m. Colorado at Los Angeles FC, 10 p.m. U.S. OPEN CUPAll times Eastern CHAMPIONSHIP Wednesday, Sept. 26Philadelphia Union (MLS) at Houston Dynamo (MLS), 7 p.m.NATIONAL WOMENS SOCCER LEAGUEAll times Eastern W L T PTS GF GA North Carolina 15 1 5 50 44 16 Seattle 10 4 7 37 23 15 Portland 9 6 5 32 32 24 Orlando 8 7 6 30 29 30 Chicago 7 4 9 30 27 23 Houston 8 8 5 29 29 31 Utah 7 7 8 29 19 22 Washington 2 15 4 10 11 32 Sky Blue FC 0 14 5 5 17 38 3 points for victory, 1 point for tie.Wednesdays GameChicago 0, Seattle 0, tieFridays GameHouston 4, Washington 0Saturdays GamesUtah 2, Sky Blue FC 2, tie Orlando at North Carolina, lateChicago at Portland, lateTuesdays GameHouston at Seattle, 10:30 p.m. PRO BASKETBALLWNBAAll times EasternEASTERN CONFERENCE W L PCT. GB x-Atlanta 22 11 .667 „ x-Washington 22 11 .667 „ x-Connecticut 20 13 .606 2 Chicago 13 20 .394 9 New York 7 26 .212 15 Indiana 5 28 .152 17WESTERN CONFERENCE W L PCT. GB x-Seattle 25 8 .758 „ x-Los Angeles 19 14 .576 6 x-Phoenix 19 14 .576 6 x-Minnesota 17 16 .515 8 Dallas 15 18 .455 10 Las Vegas 14 19 .424 11 x-clinched playoff spotFridays GamesWashington 69, Los Angeles 67 Connecticut 96, Minnesota 79 Dallas 107, Las Vegas 102 Seattle 85, New York 77 Phoenix 104, Atlanta 95Saturdays GameChicago 115, Indiana 106, 2OTTodays GamesLos Angeles at Connecticut, 3 p.m. Atlanta at Las Vegas, 6 p.m. New York at Phoenix, 6 p.m. Indiana at Chicago, 6 p.m. Dallas at Seattle, 7 p.m. Washington at Minnesota, 7 p.m.Mondays GamesNo games scheduledTENNISATP WORLD TOUR/WTA TOURWESTERN & SOUTHERN OPENA U.S. Open Series event Saturday at The Lindner Family Tennis Center, Mason, Ohio; Purse: Men, $5.67 million (Masters 1000); Women, $2.87 million (Premier). Surface: Hard-OutdoorMens Singles Semi“ nalsNovak Djokovic (10), Serbia, def. Marin Cilic (7), Croatia, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3. Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def. David Gof“ n (11), Belgium, 7-6 (3), 1-1, retired.Womens Singles Semi“ nalsKiki Bertens, Netherlands, def. Petra Kvitova (8), Czech Republic, 3-6, 4-6, 6-2. Simona Halep (1), Romania, def. Aryna Sabalenka, Belarus, 6-3, 6-4.Mens Doubles Quarter“ nalsJamie Murray, Britain, and Bruno Soares (4), Brazil, def. Lukasz Kubot, Poland, and Mercelo Melo (5), Brazil, 7-5, 6-7 (6), 10-6. Philipp Kohlschreiber, Germany, and Fernando Verdasco, Spain, def. Henri Kontinen, Finland, and John Peers (3), Australia, 2-6, 7-6 (2), 10-7. Jean-Julien Rojer, Netherlands, and Horia Tecau (6), Hungary, def. Feliciano and Marc Lopez, Spain, 6-3, 7-5. Juan Sebastian Cabal and Robert Farah (7), Colombia, def. Nikola Mektic, Croatia, and Alexander Peya, Austria, wal kover.Semi“ nalsJamie Murray, Britain, and Bruno Soares (4), Brazil vs. Jean-Julien Rojer, Netherlands, and Horia Tecau (6), Hungary, 6-7 (7), 6-2, 10-6. Juan Sebastian Cabal and Robert Farah (7), Colombia def. Philipp Kohlschreiber, Germany, and Fernando Verdasco, Spain, 7-6 (5), 6-4.Womens Doubles Semi“ nalsAnastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Russia, and Anastasija Sevastova, Latvia, def. Lucie Hradecka, Czech Republic, and Ekaterina Makarova (7), Russia, 6-3, 6-3. Elise Mertens, Belgium, and Demi Schuurs (6), Netherlands, def. Kaitlyn Christian and Sabrina Santamaria, United States, 6-1, 6-4.FRIDAYS RESULTS Mens Singles Third RoundJuan Martin del Potro (4), Argentina, def. Nick Kyrgios (15), Australia, 7-6 (4), 6-7 (6), 6-2. David Gof“ n (11), Belgium, def. Kevin Anderson (6), South Africa, 6-2, 6-4. Novak Djokovic (10), Serbia, def. Grigor Dimitrov (5), Bulgaria, 2-6, 6-3, 6-4. Marin Cilic (7), Croatia, def. Karen Khachanov, Russia, 7-6 (5), 3-6, 6-4. Stan Wawrinka, Switzerland, def. Marton Fucsovics, Hungary, 6-4, 6-3. Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def. Leonardo Mayer, Argentina, 6-1, 7-6 (6).Quarter“ nalsMarin Cilic (7), Croatia, def. Pablo Carreno Busta (13), Spain, 7-6 (7), 6-4. Novak Djokovic (10), Serbia, def. Milos Raonic, Canada, 7-5, 4-6, 6-3. David Gof“ n (11), Belgium, def. Juan Martin del Potro (4), Ar g entina, 7-6 (5), 7-6 (4). Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def. Stan Wawrinka, Switzerland, 6-7 (2), 7-6 (6), 6-2.Womens Singles Third RoundLesia Tsurenko, Ukraine, def. Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, 7-6 (5), 6-2. Madison Keys (13), United States, def. Angelique Kerber (4), Germany, 2-6, 7-6 (3), 6-4. Simona Halep (1), Romania, def. Ashleigh Barty (16), Australia, 7-5, 6-4. Elina Svitolina (5), Ukraine, def. Amanda Anisimova, United States, 6-4, 6-4. Kiki Bertens, Netherlands, def. Anett Kontaveit, Estonia, 6-3, 2-6, 6-3.Quarter“ nalsPetra Kvitova (8), Czech Republic, def. Elise Mertens (15), Belgium, 7-5, 5-7, 6-3. Kiki Bertens, Netherlands, def. Elina Svitolina (5), Ukraine, 6-4, 6-3. Simona Halep (1), Romania, def. Lesia Tsurenko, Ukraine, 6-4, 6-1. Aryna Sabalenka, Belarus, def. Madison Keys (13), United States, 6-3, 6-4.Mens Doubles Second RoundJean-Julien Rojer, Netherlands, and Horia Tecau (6), Hungary, def. Sam Querrey and Rajeev Ram, United States, 6-3, 6-3. Henri Kontinen, Finland, and John Peers (3), Australia, def. Ivan Dodig, Croatia, and Robin Haase, Netherlands, 4-6, 7-6 (7), 12-10. Nikola Mektic, Croatia, and Alexander Peya, Austria, def. Oliver Marach, Austria, and Mate Pavic (1), Croatia, 7-6 (3), 6-2.Womens Doubles Second RoundLucie Hradecka, Czech Republic, and Ekaterin a Makarova (7), Russia, def. Johanna Konta, Britain, and Jelena Ostapenko, Latvia, 1-6, 7-6 (4), 10-5. Timea Babos, Hungary, and Kristina Mladenovic (2), France, def. Shuko Aoyama, Japan, and Lidziya Marozava, Belarus, 7-5, 7-6 (2).Quarter“ nalsKaitlyn Christian and Sabrina Santamaria, United States, def. Andreja Klepac, Slovenia, and Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez (4), Spain, 7-6 (2), 6-2. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Russia, and Anastasija Sevastova, Latvia, def. Andrea Sestini Hlavackova and Barbora Strycova (3), Czech Republic, 7-6 (1), 6-4. Elise Mertens, Belgium, and Demi Schuurs (6), Netherlands, def. Barbora Krejcikova, Russia, and Katerina Siniakova (1), Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-1. Lucie Hradecka, Czech Republic, and Ekaterin a Makarova (7), Russia, def. Timea Babos, Hungary, and Kristina Mladenovic (2), France, 1-6, 7-6 (4), 10-5.LITTLE LEAGUEWORLD SERIESAll times EasternAt South Williamsport, Pa. UNITED STATESNEW ENGLAND, Coventry (R.I.); MIDATLANTIC, Staten Island (N.Y.); SOUTHEAST, Peachtree City, Ga.; GREAT LAKES, Grosse Pointe Woods (Mich.); MIDWEST, Des Moines (Iowa); SOUTHWEST, Houston; NORTHWEST, Coeur dAlene (Idaho); WEST, HonoluluINTERNATIONALASIA/PACIFIC, Seoul (South Korea); AUSTRALIA, Gold Coast; CANADA, Surrey (British Columbia); CARIBBEAN, Guayama (Puerto Rico); EUROPE/AFRICA, Barcelona (Spain); JAPAN, Kawaguchi; LATIN AMERICA, Arraijan (Panama); MEXICO, Matamoros(Double Elimination) Thursdays GamesGame 1: Seoul (South Korea) 4, Guayama (Puerto Rico) 2, 9 innings Game 2: Staten Island (N.Y.) 5, Des Moines (Iowa) 2 Game 3: Matamoros (Mexico) 3, Gold Coast (Australia) 2 Game 4: Houston 3, Coventry (R.I.) 1Fridays GamesGame 5: Kawaguchi (Japan) 11, Barcelona (Spain) 1, 5 innings Game 6: Grosse Pointe Woods (Mich.) 5, Coeur dAlene (Idaho) 4 Game 7: Arraijan (Panama) 8, Surrey (British Columbia) 3 Game 8: Honolulu 2, Peachtree City (Ga.) 0, 11 inningsSaturdays GamesGame 9: Guayama (Puerto Rico) 6, Gold Coast (Australia) 0 Game 10: Des Moines (Iowa) 9, Coventry (R.I.) 5 Game 11: Surrey (British Columbia) 2, Barcelona (Spain) 1, 10 inningsGame 12: Peachtree City (Ga.) 3, Coeur dAlene (Idaho) 0Todays GamesGame 13: Seoul (South Korea) vs. Matamoros (Mexico), 9 a.m. Game 14: Staten Island (N.Y.) vs. Houston, 11 a.m. Game 15: Kawaguchi (Japan) vs. Arraijan (Panama), 1 p.m. Game 16: Grosse Pointe Woods (Mich.) vs. Honolulu, 2 p.m.Mondays GamesGame A: Gold Coast (Australia) vs. Coventry (R.I.), 11 a.m. Game 17: Game 15 loser vs. Guayama (Puerto Rico), 1 p.m. Game 18: Game 16 loser vs. Des Moines (Iowa), 3 p.m. Game 19: Game 13 loser vs. Surrey (British Columbia), 6 p.m. Game 20: Game 14 loser vs. Peachtree City (Ga.), 8 p.m.Tuesday, Aug. 21Game B: Barcelona (Spain) vs. Coeur dAlene (Idaho), 11 a.m. Game 21: Game 17 winner vs. Game 19 winner, 3 p.m. Game 22: Game 18 winner vs. Game 20 winner, 7:30 p.m.Wednesday, Aug. 22Game 23: Game 13 winner vs. Game 15 winner, 3 p.m. Game 24: Game 14 winner vs. Game 16 winner, 7:30 p.m.Thursday, Aug. 23Game 25: Game 21 winner vs. Game 23 loser, 3 p.m. Game 26: Game 22 winner vs. Game 24 loser, 7 p.m.Saturday, Aug. 24 International ChampionshipGame 27: Game 23 winner vs. Game 25 winner, 12:30 p.m.United States ChampionshipGame 28: Game 24 winner vs. Game 26 winner, 3:30 p.m.Sunday, Aug. 25 At Lamade Stadium Third PlaceGame 29: Loser Game 27 vs. Loser Game 28, 10 a.m.World ChampionshipGame 30: Winner Game 27 vs. Winner Game 28: 3 p.m.CFLCANADIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUEAll times Eastern EAST DIVISION W L T PTS. PF PA Ottawa 6 3 0 12 244 206 Hamilton 3 5 0 6 204 176 Toronto 3 5 0 6 161 243 Montreal 1 7 0 2 120 266 WEST DIVISION W L T PTS. PF PA Calgary 7 0 0 14 206 87 Edmonton 5 3 0 10 221 198 Winnipeg 5 4 0 10 289 214 Saskatchewan 3 4 0 6 151 175 B.C. 3 5 0 6 180 212Fridays GameOttawa 44, Winnipeg 21Saturdays GamesToronto 24, B.C. 23 Montreal at Edmonton, lateTodays GameCalgary at Saskatchewan, 7 p.m.BOXINGSCHEDULEAug. 19At Moscow, Arnold Khegai vs. Remmy Igga, 10, junior featherweights.Aug. 24At The Armory, Minneapolis (FS1), Jamal James vs. Mahonry Montes, 10, welterweights; Willie Monroe Jr. vs. Immanuwel Aleem, 10, middleweights; Jamonty Clark vs. Jeison Rosario, 10, junior middleweights.

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Page 6 SP www.yoursun.com Sunday, August 19, 2018 / The Sun Say Goodbye to Erectile DysfunctionPaid Advertisement The #1 cause of Erectile Dysfunction is poor blood ow due to blocked or hardened blood vessels. Unlike pills, needles and c reams that DO NOT treat ED, only the symptoms, Acoustic Wave Therapy is a treatmentŽ that will OPEN existing blood vessels and STIMULATE the growth of new blood vessels, making it possible to achieve a full and rigid erection. At Southwest Florida Medical Group, we treat the root cause of Erectile Dysfunction with our proprietary FDA cleared Acoustic Wave Therapy. This type of treatment may provide long-term results and allow men to stop injecting or orally consuming chemicals to receive an erection. The Therapeutic Advances in Urology Journal concluded that Acoustic Wave Therapy aimed outside the body is a revolutionary treatment of ED.Ž The physicians and professional medical sta at Southwest Florida Medical Group will assist and manage your treatment protocol. As men age, the blood vessels that supply blood to the penis begin to breakdown or collapse. Natural or drug induced blood ow cannot enter into the penis,thus creating ED.Acoustic Wave Therapy opens exisiting blood vessels and stimulates growth of new blood vessels. As a result, our patients experience much stronger, rmer and more sustainable erections. NO SURGERY(239) 887-3602Southwest Florida Medical Group www.SWFLMedicalGroup.comIndividual results may vary. All rights reserved.adno=50539596By JOHN RABYAssociated PressThe shock of Chase Littons departure for the NFL draft has transferred into uncertainty at quarterback for Marshall entering the 2018 season. The position appears to be the one of the few question marks on a team that has nine starters back on each side of the ball as Marshall goes after its first Conference USA championship since 2014. Litton, a three-year starter, threw for a careerhigh 3,115 yards and 25 touchdowns last season, then surprisingly opted to skip his senior season and went undrafted. The attention at quarterback has turned to Alex Thomson, a graduate transfer from Wagner of the Championship Subdivision. The 6-foot-5 Thomson missed most of last season with a shoulder injury and Marshall coach Doc Holliday has limited his work in preseason practice. Thomson threw for 2,436 yards and 16 touchdowns with five interceptions in 2016. Marshall also entered fall camp with junior Garet Morrell and sophomore Isaiah Green. Morrell is the only one among the pair with playing experience. He threw for four touchdowns and three interceptions in five games during the 2016 season. Marshall also has a new offensive coordinator. Tim Cramsey arrived from Sam Houston State, which led the Championship Subdivision in scoring and total offense and passing yards. Cramsey replaced Bill Legg, who resigned last December and was hired at an offensive consultant at Mississippi State. Marshall is looking to improve on an 8-5 record from last season, which included a win over Colorado State in the New Mexico Bowl. Holliday, who enters his ninth season, is looking for a few more players to add depth at wide receiver and cornerback. Were the deepest weve ever been since Ive been here,Ž Holliday said. Other things to know about the Thundering Herd, who open the season Sept. 1 at Miami (Ohio):OFFENSIVE STARSWhile it will take time for the new starting quarterback to get acclimated, look for Marshall to rely heavily on running backs Tyler King and Keion Davis. Each surpassed 800 rushing yards a year ago, and Davis returned a pair of kickoffs for touchdowns against Miami last season. Top receiver Tyre Brady also returns. He had 62 catches for 942 yards and eight scores last season and was a Conference USA first team selection.DEFENSIVE PROMISEMarshalls defense is anchored by last years top two tacklers, senior linebacker Chase Hancock and junior safety Malik Gant. The Thundering Herd allowed just 19.9 points per game last season, the 17th best in the Bowl Subdivision. Defensive coordinator Chuck Heater left for Maryland in January and Adam Fuller was promoted from linebackers coach.KICKERS NEEDEDKaare Vedvik, who handled punting, placekicking and kickoffs last season, is gone. Junior college transfer Justin Rohrwasser is likely to take over on field goals and extra points with sophomore Robert Lefevre and walk-on Shane McDonough battling it out for punting and kickoff duties.SOLID O-LINEMarshalls offensive line returns all five starters. Greg Adkins joins Marshall as offensive line coach this season. He held the same job at Oklahoma State in 2015 and 2016. Adkins also was an assistant at Marshall from 1991 to 1995.SCHEDULEMarshalls tough nonconference schedule includes a Sept. 15 trip to South Carolina and a Sept. 22 home game against North Carolina State. After that, the Thundering Herd could make a run at a league title but has tough tests at home Oct. 5 against Middle Tennessee and Oct. 20 against defending champion Florida Atlantic.COLLEGE FOOTBALL: MarshallMarshall returns most starters but must replace LittonLORI WOLFE /THE HERALD-DISPATCH VIA AP, FILEFILE In this Aug. 7, 2018 file photo, Marshall coach Doc Holliday oversees a drill during the NCAA college football teams practice in Huntington, W.Va. By DAVID BRANDTAssociated PressHATTIESBURG, Miss. „ Southern Mississippi faces the daunting task of replacing its star running back, top two receivers and multiple talented defensive players. Probably the quarterback, too. From an outside perspective, it looks like the Golden Eagles might be in for a rebuilding year. Third-year coach Jay Hopson isnt buying that argument. Theres always a few spots where we need to stay healthy, but Im pleased. This team has a lot of talent,Ž Hopson said. We just need to keep pressing and get better.Ž Sophomore Jack Abraham is the Golden Eagles likely starting quarterback after senior Kwadra Griggs was suspended indefinitely earlier this month pending resolution of a student conduct matter.Ž Hopson has not elaborated on Griggs suspension or if he expects him to be eligible at any point during the season. Griggs threw for 1,879 yards last season and was the only quarterback on the roster with FBS experience. Abraham threw for nearly 3,000 yards last year at Northwest Mississippi Community College before transferring to Southern Miss. Im just going out there and showing I can do the right thing every day,Ž Abraham said. Putting the ball in the right spots.Ž Southern Miss hopes that seniors Tez Parks and George Payne can help fill the void at running back after Ito Smith left for the NFL. The defense will lean on an experienced group of linebackers, including Racheem Boothe, Jeremy Sangster and Paxton Schrimsher. Weve got guys in certain spots where its their time to learn it and learn it quick,Ž Hopson said. Thats always a battle in coaching. Sometimes you have everybody back, sometimes youve got to replace a few guys.Ž Some other things to know about the Golden Eagles in 2018:REPLACING ITOThe Golden Eagles must replace several good players from last years team, but the toughest to do without might be running back Ito Smith. The 5-foot-9, 195-pounder was taken in the fourth round of the NFL Draft by the Atlanta Falcons after a stellar college career that included 4,538 yards rushing, 1,446 yards receiving and 49 total touchdowns.ANOTHER CHANCE VS THE SECSouthern Miss is just two years removed from its last win against Southeastern Conference competition when it beat Kentucky 44-35 to open the 2016 season. The Golden Eagles get another chance for an SEC win when they travel to face Auburn on Sept. 29BACK ON TRACKSouthern Miss is going for its fourth straight winning season „ a minor miracle considering how badly the program cratered earlier in the decade. The Golden Eagles went 0-12 in 2012 under coach Ellis Johnson before slowly rebuilding the program under Todd Monken, who went 1-11 in 2013, 3-9 in 2014 and then 9-5 in 2015. Hopsons been able to sustain that success through his first two seasons.WELCOME BACK PICASSOThe Golden Eagles should get a boost in the secondary thanks to the return of senior Picasso Nelson. The 5-foot-10, 195-pounder missed all of last season because of an injury, but made more than 130 tackles over three seasons from 2014-16.SCOUTING THE SCHEDULESouthern Miss opens with Jackson State on Sept. 1 and has some difficult road games in the seasons first half against Appalachian State, Auburn and North Texas. The Golden Eagles have a crucial threegame stretch in November against Marshall, UAB and Louisiana Tech. All three of those programs are expected to be C-USA title contenders.COLLEGE FOOTBALL: Southern MississippiNew faces, same expectations for Southern MississippiBy DAN GELSTONAssociated PressLONG POND, Pa. „ Will Power flirted with the idea of hurling a baseball much like a cricket bowler would throw the ball toward a batsman. Power, an Australian former rugby and cricket player, had second thoughts as he took the mound to throw the first pitch before a recent Philadelphia Phillies game. Id probably get booed,Ž he said, laughing. Even Aussies know what triggers the official sound of contempt in Philly. Power might have heard worse had fans tagged him as bad luck when he left in the fifth inning of Philadelphias 24-4 loss to the New York Mets. I felt bad. I was like, whew, this is a tough gig,Ž Power said. Power finds himself behind on the scoreboard as well, when IndyCar returns from a two-week hiatus for Sundays race at Pocono Raceway. The Indianapolis 500 champion is fourth in the standings, 87 points behind leader Scott Dixon. With four races left this season, Alexander Rossi is second in the points race and defending series champion Josef Newgarden is third. Its quite a points deficit to come back from,Ž Power said. But its not impossible.Ž Powers run toward a second IndyCar championship „ to pair with his 2014 title „ shifts into another gear at Pocono, where hes won the last two races and has an average finish of fourth in the five races since the series returned to the mountains in 2013. He got a nice boost Saturday when he won the pole to match A.J. Foyt for second on the career list with 53. Power was forced to pit early in last seasons race to repair a broken wing and rallied from a lap down to win. He held Mikhail Aleshin at bay after a final restart to win at the track in 2016. Hes had a few missteps in the No. 12 Chevrolet for Team Penske this season that left him looking up at Dixon in the title picture. Powers wins at Indy and Iowa have been offset in the standings a bit by crashes that prevented him from finishing four races. Dixon, who just signed a contract extension with Chip Ganassi Racing, has been about flawless this season. At 38, hes leading the series in pursuit of his fifth IndyCar title. Dixon has three wins this season and leads Rossi by 46 points in the standings.AUTO RACINGPower goes for 3rd straight win at Pocono to aid title shot adno=50539770Will Power looks out from his pit box before a practice session for Sundays IndyCar series auto race, Saturday, Aug. 18, 2018, in Long Pond, Pa. [AP PHOTO/MATT SLOCUM]

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