Charlotte sun herald

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Charlotte sun herald
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,Charlotte Sun ANDWEEKLY



PUTIN FACES CRITICAL CHOICES TREATMENT FOR GREENING?
President Barack Obama and Western allies opened a pathway for UF researchers say they've found a possible treatment for a disease
Russia to ease tensions in Ukraine. THE WIRE PAGE 4 that's devastating citrus trees around the state.


AMERICA'S BEST COMMUNITY DAILY


FRIDAY JUNE 6, 2014


Keyboard, $8
In Today's
Classified!


www.sunnewspapers.net $1.00


SIDE DISH


Cultural


exchanges

A en you meet Dino Lykopou-
us, co-owner of Greek Grille
Glleryyou might think Zeus
descended from Olympus to hold court in
North Port.
When he laughs,
his grin subdivides his
face, and his salt-and-
Spepper curls shake
with mirth. Ifs but a
small leap to picture
", him as the Greek se-
nior deity- especial-
ly considering that he
once played the part
Sue in aWorcester, Mass.,
Greek festival. "When
WADE ah we sacrificing the
COLUMNIST bulls?" he roared
in Greek-flavored
IF YOU GO Bostonian.
A screenwriter
Where: Greek friend toying with the
Grille& Gallery, 14828 idea of Dino's story
Tamiami Trail (in the said, "It's not the life,
North Port Commons), it's the way you tell the
North Port life, Dino!"
Open: 11 a.m. to Life is what Dino's
2:30 p.m. and 5 p.m. all about. Whether
to 8:30 p.m. Monday in their previous
to Thursday; 11 a.m. to incarnation as travel
2:30 p.m. and 5 p.m. agents or now, as
to 9 p.m. Friday; 5 p.m. Greek restaurateurs,
to 9 p.m. Saturday; the motto following
closed Sunday outspoken Dino
More info: and wife Wendy for
941-423-6400 30 years has been: "Be
honest with yourself
about what you want to do, and do it."
His life journey began five decades ago
in Greece. "My third-grade teacher there
used to say, 'What are we gonna talk about
today? When you get older and people say
you can't talk religion or politics, are you
gonna talk about the weather? Open up!
If you let other people speak for you, you
haven't lived."'
Dino was 10 when his family moved
to Worcester. His father insisted he hang
only with American kids and speak only
English. So he devoured TV English, and
after three months was able to translate the
moon-landing coverage for his delighted
family.
Dino's first English word was "OK," so
he was tickled to discover it might've been
Greek to begin with. You can take the boy
out of Greece, but ... you know the rest.
He explains proudly, "Greek mariners
have plied the seas and major ports for
over 2,500 years. At the ports, captains and
merchantmen were Greek, so the words
used were often Greek. Nineteenth-century
customs officials stamped the cargo 'Ola
Kala (OK) all is good."'
Self-taught in not only etymology but
also history, science, art, music and Greek
culture, Dino once had his own Greek
radio show, teaching Americans about his
birthplace. He's a living cultural exchange,
as Greeks always have been.
Of his family, he exclaims: "We're Greeks.
We live all over the world! My father's in
Tarpon Springs, my mother's in Germany.
I have brothers all over. Anywhere there's
a port, there are Greeks. Just like the old
days, we colonize we interact with locals
and interweave cultures. We bring things
to them from our country and from theirs
back to ours. When we go to Greece, chefs
ask us what's popular here, so we tell them
crab cakes."
The gallery here is another cultural
exchange benefiting both the restaurant
and artists. "If you want to decorate your
business," advises Dino, "bring in local
artists and sell their work. And our Greek
music here isn't just Zorba the Greek, 'Opal'
stuff. Music fusion is fluid, like art. It travels
subliminally among human beings who
are attracted to the same musical tones, the
same colors, similar food presentations.
"Being Greek, I've always appreciated
the arts, but the real blessing of coming to
America is the people here who expanded
my horizons."
Sue Wade is a local columnist for the
Charlotte Sun. You can recommend
restaurants and/or bars to her by email to
sue.gleasonwade@cengage.com.


bu


we fight'


Seabees played key role in D-Day invasion


By AL HEMINGWAY
SUN CORRESPONDENT

On a remote Pacific island
one night during World War
II, a lone Seabee was standing
guard duty when he heard a
noise, according to an article
written by former Seabee
Construction Electrician 1st
Class Robert A. Germinsky. The
sentry challenged the individu-
al to come forward and, as the
story goes, the person turned
out to be a high-ranking officer.
"Do you know who I am?" he
asked the Seabee.
"Nope," the Seabee
answered.
"I am the admiral command-
ing this operation," he said.
The Seabee thought for a
moment and replied, "Well,


INSIDE
For worldwide D-Day
commemorations and original Associated
Press coverage, see The Wire
that's a pretty important job,
Bub. Don't louse it up."
That anecdote certainly
illustrates the rugged individu-
alism and "can-do" attitude of
a Seabee. From their beginning
in March 1942, to present-day
operations in the Middle East,
members of the U.S. Navy's
Construction Battalions, or
CBs, have played an important
role in our nation's conflicts.
And nowhere was their
determination and fighting
spirit more evident than on the

D-DAYI6


SUN PHOTO BY ADAM KREGER
Charlotte County Firefighter/EMT Jeff Rathburn, front, and Firemedic Corey Vern finish a search-
and-rescue training exercise Thursday at an abandoned building at the Mid-County Mini-Transfer
& Recycling Facility in Port Charlotte.


Old buildings offer



unique training


By ADAM KREGER
STAFF WRITER
PORT CHARLOTTE -When Charlotte
County Facilities Construction &
Maintenance Director David Milligan
learned his department would be in
charge of tearing down a couple of
buildings in town, he came up with the
idea to aid another department before
the demolition.
"I thought this might be a chance for
(Charlotte County Fire/EMS) to do some
exercises in the buildings," he said. "It
might be more like what they encounter."


So on Thursday, most of the fire
department took advantage of a training
opportunity that hadn't been afforded to
them in more than three years.
"This is valuable training for us," Fire
Training Capt. Tony Messina said. "It's
rare for us to get real buildings like this to
actually go in and do something."
The two 1,500-square-foot buildings
on the site of the Mid-County Mini-
Transfer & Recycling Facility, offVeterans
Boulevard, served as storage for the
PublicWorks department. They're being
TRAINING 16


70 years


ago


PHOTO PROVIDED BY U.S. NAVY SEABEE MUSEUM,
NAVAL HISTORY AND HERITAGE COMMAND
A pontoon causeway erected by the 111th Naval Construction
Battalion bringing troops ashore on Utah Beach during D-Day
on June 6,1944. Today is the 70th anniversary of that massive
campaign that turned the tide during World War II.


County


to weigh



transit plan

By GARY ROBERTS
STAFF WRITER
MURDOCK Charlotte County
commissioners on Tuesday will
have their first look at a plan to
provide residents
with fixed-route bus
service, costing no
more than what now
is paid for limited
transit options.
The county now
offers only Dial-A-
DEUTSCH Ride and Sunshine
Ride, and remains
the only county in Southwest
Florida without a fixed-route
bus system. However a proposal
endorsed last month
by the Charlotte
County-Punta Gorda
Metropolitan Planning
Organization calls
for three regular bus
routes crisscrossing
the county.
DUFFY The yearlong
transportation study
included a survey of 1,000 county
residents, seeking public input on
what services they would like. The
results found that 97 percent of
respondents wanted improvements
made in public transportation.
The countywide Transportation
Development Plan, branded
Charlotte Rides, is a 10-year plan
that is updated every five years to
assist setting priorities for trans-
portation services. Commission
approval of the TDP is required for
continued federal transportation
funding.
However, at Thursday's pre-
agenda meeting, commissioners
clarified that any vote in favor of
Charlotte Rides would not consti-
tute a commitment to the proposal.
"It's more of a vision based
on the information gathered by
the consultants," Commissioner
Stephen R. Deutsch said.
In the past, Deutsch has been
critical of any transit plan requir-
ing significant public subsidy. In
addition, Commissioner Tricia
Duffy has said the county doesn't
have the population to support a
fixed-route system.
COUNTY16


IN DEX I THE SUN: Obituaries 51iCrosswords 71iPolice Beat 7 i Viewpoint 81Opinion 9-10
THE WIRE: Nation 2 i State 2,81 Business 6-7 i World 8 i Weather 8


Daily Edition $ 1. 00
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SPORTS: Lotto 2


CALL US AT
941-206-1000 j


CHARLIE SAYS ...
"We will accept nothing less
than victory."
Gen. Eisenhower


An Edition o the Sun
VOL. 122 NO. 157












Thunderstorms in weekend forecast


STAFF REPORT

A sea breeze out of the
east should bring thun-
derstorms to Southwest
Florida, some of which
could be severe, through
the weekend, according
to the National Weather
Service.
The isolated thunder-
storms could cause gusty
winds, hail and lightning,
said Jennifer Hubbard,
a meteorologist with
the National Weather
Service's Tampa office.


"People should head
inside if they hear
thunder, because we
could have some severe
lightning," she said.
There is a 30 percent
chance of thunderstorms
today, mostly occurring
after 2 p.m. Areas through-
out Charlotte and southern
Sarasota counties could
see rainfall amounts of less
than 0.10 inch, with higher
amounts during storms.
Today's high temperature
should be around
92 degrees, and it should


be humid, Hubbard said.
The scattered showers
and thunderstorms
should continue tonight,
occurring mainly before
8 p.m. Tonight's low
should be around
71 degrees.
The hot, humid
weather should continue
Saturday with a high
temperature of around
92 degrees. There is a
40 percent chance of
thunderstorms popping
up, mainly after 2 p.m.
Rainfall amounts


should be around
0. 10 inch, with higher
amounts occurring
during thunderstorms.
Scattered thunder-
storms should continue
Saturday night, mainly
occurring before 8 p.m.
The low should be around
73 degrees.
Temperatures should
cool a little on Sunday,
with a daytime high of
around 88 degrees. There
is a 40 percent chance of
thunderstorms popping
up, mainly after 1 p.m.


Sunday night should
be partly cloudy,
and the temperature
should be around
73 degrees. There is a
20 percent chance of
thunderstorms.
Meteorologists with
the National Hurricane
Center also are keeping
an eye on a possible
tropical system forming
in the Bay of Campeche
near the Yucatan
Peninsula in Mexico.
However forecasters do
not believe the area of


low pressure, if it forms
into a storm, will im-
pact Florida, Hubbard
said.
There is a 30 percent
chance the system will
form into a storm in the
next five days, she said.
"It's really close to
land right now, so
we're not expecting it
to affect us," Hubbard
said. "We're going to
have some moisture
next week, but we don't
think it will be from this
system."


Charley



survivors wanted


SUN PHOTO BY CHRISTY FEINBERG


Were you here for Hurricane Charley 10 years ago? If so, the Charlotte Sun would love to see
you on the waterfront side of the Charlotte Harbor Event and Conference Center at 10 a.m.
Monday for a group photo. The photo was originally planned for the Charley statue in Laishley
Park, but due to sea wall work, the location has been moved to this beautiful spot between
the U.S. 41 bridges. We hope to see you there.


Sup(


3 Days Oni


1


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OFF"


Any One Regular Priced
ITEM
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Valid 616114 618114 only.
Must present coupon
to receive discount.
cannot be combined with any other I
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Jo adjustments made on previously I
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Clara Sun Woo, Magdalena, O
discount. Selection may vary by
A clearance

Punta Gorda
Fort Myers (at C
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item is one that has been reduced at least twice.

(in Cross Trail Center) 941-505-2177
college Parkway Center) 239-275-3111
www.anthonysfla.com & www.facebook.com/anthonysfl Ia


I0onay-. riay10-.S atuda 10-. S unday 1


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEF


2014 Redfish
Roundup
Tournament set
Charlotte High School
will hold its 2014 CHS
Redfish Roundup
Tournament at 6 a.m.
June 21 at Laishley
Park, 100 Nesbit St.,
Punta Gorda. Three
anglers per team are
allowed. Boat check-in
will begin at 6 a.m.
June 21, with late
check-in permissible
until 8 a.m. The tour-
nament will begin at
safe light. Weigh-in will
start at 1:30 p.m. at the


Laishley Crab House,
150 Laishley Court,
Punta Gorda. All boats
must be in the weigh-in
line by 3:30 p.m.
Awards will be given
out after the weigh-in
and the anglers' buffet.
First place will receive
$5,000; second place,
$2,000; third place,
$1,000; fourth place,
$600; fifth place,$400;
six through 10th places,
$300.
The entry fee per
team of three anglers
is $300. There is a
$50 late fee if your
team enters after


June 16. All anglers will
receive a tournament
T-shirt, plus three
tickets to the anglers'
barbecue. Make checks
payable to Charlotte
High School, and
mail to Flatsmasters,
150 Laishley Court,
No. 1112, Punta Gorda,
FL 33950.
There will be a man-
datory rules meeting
and anglers' dinner at
6:30 p.m. June 20 at the
Laishley Crab House.
For more informa-
tion, or to find out how
to register, call 941-637-
5953 or 941-380-8099.


I COMMUNITY CALENDAR


GOVERNMENT
0 TODAY

Punta Gorda,
Development Review Committee
meeting, 9 a.m., 326 W. Marion Ave.,
PG. 941-575-3369.
LDR/Unified Land,
Development Code (ULDC) Roundtable
meeting, 2 p.m., 18500 Murdock
Circle, Bldg. B, Room 106-B, PC.
941-764-4909.

0 EVENTS
0 TODAY

Easy Does It Club, Easy
does It Club offers meetings daily from
7:30am to 9:00 p.m. at 23312 Harper


SUBSCRIPTIONS
Home Delivery Rates:
Newspaper designated market:
City Zone- Carrier home
delivered 1 days.

Rates as follows
plus 7% Florida Sales Tax:
Monthly Bank/
Credit Card.......$16.47
3 Months........$66.51
6 Months........$113.05
1 Year ............................... $197.69
Does not include Waterline and TVinmes.
Above rates do not include sales tax.

DESOTO COUNTY RATES
Monthly Bank/
Credit Card........$16.40
3 Months........1....... 74.09
6 Months........$119.54
1 Year ............................. $196.70
Arcadian home delivery
$29.99 per year.

Mail subscription rates: Rates as
follows (advance payment required):
7 Days
3 Months 6 Months IYear
$120.88 $216.81 $386.10
Sunday Only
3 Months 6 Months IYear
$58.81 $110.56 $186.19
Single Copy rates
Daily $1.00 Sunday $2.00
Unclaimed account balances
under $10, inactive for 15
months, will be used to purchase
newspapers for classroom use.

Sun Newspapers
CUSTOMER SERVICE POLICY
Delivery should be expected prior
to 6 a.m. Monday through Saturday
and 6:30 a.m. Sunday. Customer
Service hours: 6 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday- Friday; Saturday and
Sunday 7a.m. to noon. To subscribe
or to report any problems with your
service, please call 941-206-1300 or
toll-free at 877-818-6204. You may
visit our office at: 23170 Harborview
Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980.


Ave. PC Call 941-624-0110
Deep Creek Elks 2763,
Dinner 5-8, AYCE Fried Fish, Prime Rib,
Crab Cakes and more, Music 6:30-9:30
With 3 OfA Kind
Port Charlotte Elks, Lunch
11-2, Dinner 5-7 Full Menu. Karaoke
6 to 9 w/Breeze. AYCE Fish Fry
Punta Gorda Elks, Lunch
11am-2pm; Dinner 5-8:30; Tiki bar
open 3p.m.; Music by Doo Wop Group,
6:30-9:30pm at 25538 Shore PG
941-637-2606 members and guests.
Punta Gorda Elkettes,
Thrift Shop Open to the Public,
11:30am-2:30pm @ 25538 Shore Dr.,
PG 941-637-2606, ext.451
Bingo Friday, Friendliest
Bingo game in town. Quarter games
start at 10:15 A, Centennial Hall
Cultural Center 941-625-4175
Mahjong, Join us for
Mahjong every Friday from 1-5p in
the Music Room. 75 cents an hour.
941-625-4175.
The Beaches, Live Music,
Fishermen's Village, Center Stage,
5-9pm, 941-639-8721
Friday Night Dance,
Friday Night Dance A variety of local
entertainers for your enjoyment. $7
7P The Cultural Center, 941-625-4175

U SATURDAY

FC Men's Breakfast, FC
Pastor Garry holds Communion Srv
@ 6pm @ church-corner of Parade &
Rot. Blvd W.& lasts about 30 mins.
941-475-7447
PG Farmers Market, 8 to
12 Taylor st. & Olympia 941-391-4856
Enjoy, FRESH veggies, fish, pasta,
pickles, cheese, citrus and much more.
music
Acme Bicycle Ride, Acme
Bicycle Ride 8 am @ 615 Cross St PG
Free, Adults, Helmet Required 3 Levels
941-639-2263
FC Men's Breakfast, FC
Men's Prayer Brkfst @ 8:00am @
Church prop. corner of Parade &
Rot. W. Blvd. All men are invited.,
475-7447


SVDP rummage sale,
St. Vincent rummage sale 8-11 a.m.
June 7 25200 Airport Rd. Punta Gorda
941-575-0767.
Closet of Hope, Free
clothing, ID required. 1st & 3rd
Saturdays 9:30a-12p. Gulf Cove UMC,
1100 McCall, PC. 941-697-1747
Deep Creek Elks 2763,
Wings And Dogs 12-2, Dinner 5-8,
Filet, Pork and much more, Music
6;30-9:30 With Escape
Port Charlotte Elks,
Crockpot Lunch with Bartender Ito 4.
Kitchen Closed.
Punta Gorda Elkettes,
Elkettes'"Christmas in June"Sale
11:30am-2:30pm at 25538 Shore
Dr.,PG 941-637-2606 ext 451
Bingo Saturday, Bingo
Saturday Friendliest Bingo game in
town Quarter games start at 10:15
Cultural Center 941-625-4175
Michael Hirst, Live Music,
Fishermen's Village, Center Stage,
5-9pm, 941-639-8721
Young Adults, If U R 18-35,
we meet on an ad-hoc basis. "Gulf
Cove The YARD"on FB, youngadults
GCUMC@gmail.com, or 941-681-0477.

* SUNDAY

Cardiac Bicycle Ride,
Cardiac Bicycle Ride Join us for a 40 mile
- no drop 13 to 15 mph ride. Call Bill
941-740-2257 for start location
Farmers Mkt+Antiques,
History Park Farmers Market &
Antique Show 9am-1pm, 501 Shreve
St., between Virginia Ave. & Henry St.
941-380-6814.
Punta Gorda Elkettes,
Elkettes"Christmas in June"Sale
9am-12pm@25538 Shore Dr.PG
637-2606 Ext 451
Garden Tour, Guided tour
of gardens at History Park, 501
Shreve Street, PG, Ipm, $5 suggested
donation; Q&A. 380-6814.
American Legion 103,
Dart League @1 pm. $3 per rd.Join us
for a fun afternoon! 2101 Taylor Rd PG
639-6337


SUN NEWSPAPERS
- Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulation
Chairman...........Derek Dunn-Rankin.......941-206-1001
Publisher...........David Dunn-Rankin.......941-206-1003
Executive Editor........Chris Porter...........941-206-1134
Advertising Director......Leslee Peth...........941-205-6400
Circulation Director...... MarkYero............941-206-1300
Arcadian Editor........Susan E. Hoffman........863-494-0300
Arcadian Publisher......Joe Gallimore..........863-494-0300
Charlotte Sun Editor......Rusty Pray...........941-206-1168
North Port Sun Publisher .......... Steve Sachkar.........941-429-3001
North Port Sun Editor ................ Lorraine Schneeberger ................ 941-429-3003
Englewood Sun Publisher ......... Carol Y. Moore.........941-681-3031
Englewood Sun Editor ............... Clinton Burton.........941-681-3000


CONTACT US WITH YOUR NEWS: Email Charlotte Sun Editor Rusty Pray at rpray@sun-herald.com, or call
941-206-1168, or email Deputy Charlotte Editor Garry Overbey at overbey@sun-herald.com or call 941-206-
1143. Fax to 941-629-2085. On Saturdays, contact Assistant Charlotte Editor Marion Putman at mputman@
sun-herald.com or 941-206-1183, or the newsroom at 941-206-1100. On Sundays, contact Garry Overbey or call
the newsroom. Circulation director- MarkYero, 941-206-1317. Business news email business@sun-herald.com
or call 941-206-1121. Consumer advocacy email dmorris@sun-herald.com or call 941-206-1114. Obituaries -
call 941-206-1028 or email obituaries@sunletter.com. Religion/church news or events- mputman@sun-herald.
com. Editorial letters email letters@sun-herald.com or write: Letter to the Editor, c/o Charlotte Sun, 23170
Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980. Puzzles 941-206-1128. Classified ads- 866-463-1638. Subscrip-
tions- For missed papers, or to put your paper on hold, call 941-206-1300. Display advertising 941-206-1214


The SUN (USPS743170) is published daily at Sun Coast Media Group, Inc., 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980-2100. Periodicals postage paid at Punta Gorda, FL. Postmaster: Please send address changes to the SUN, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, Florida 33980-2100.


:OurTown Page 2


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The Sun /Friday, June 6, 2014





:The Sun /Friday, June 6, 2014 www.sunnewspapers.net


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Tech Center student wins scholarship


A Charlotte Tech-
nical Center
student will be
attending a program at
the Embry Riddle Aero-
nautical University after
winning a scholarship.
Jeff Booth will be
attending the program
at the Daytona Beach
campus June 22-28
after receiving a Florida
Aerospace Career
Academy Summer Camp
scholarship. Out of the
3,500 Aerospace Career
Academy students in
Florida, only 12 students
have been selected to
receive this scholarship.
Students can explore
fields like space technol-
ogy, flight, safety, mete-
orology and engineering
at the summer camp.
State-of-the-art
simulators are available
for students. The stu-
dents also participate
in field trips during the
summer camp and guest
speakers are also invited
to the program.
Booth will be starting
his third year in the








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Where Shopping Makes Cents
charlottecou ntycham ber.org


~ON

Charlotte Engineering
and Aerospace Institute
program.

Running
club awards
scholarship
A recent Lemon Bay
High School graduate
received a $1,000 schol-
arship from a nonprofit
running club.
James Harrison
received the scholar-
ship from Zoomers:
Southwest Running and
Triathlon Club on May
29 at the organization's
weekly Englewood Beach
run/walk. Harrison is a
former member of the
Lemon Bay track and
cross-country teams.
Harrison volunteers
with many organizations
including the YMCA, the
American Cancer Society
Relay for Life, the Boy
Scouts and Zoomers.
He plans on attending
Tallahassee Community
College before trans-
ferring to Florida State
University.
Zoomers is a running
club whose members
primarily come from
Charlotte and southern
Sarasota counties.
The club holds its


scholarship run and the
Trick or Trot 5K Trail Run
in October.
The organization is
also planning a kids
fun run series starting
June 11 at 7 p.m. at Ann
Dever Park.
For more information
on the scholarship, the
races or the kids series
go to Zoomers' website
at www.zoomersrun.
com.

Port Charlotte
High grad receives
scholarship
A Port Charlotte
High School graduate
recently received a
$2,500 scholarship from
the Southwest Florida
Community Foundation
and the Smith Family
Foundation.
Nicholas Owens, 18,
received the scholarship
after his name was
drawn on May 21. He
became eligible for the
scholarship after filling
out his Free Application
for Federal Student Aid.
The foundations spon-
sored the event in order
to encourage students
to fill out the FAFSA.
Other prizes handed
out during the evening
included iPads.
Owens plans to attend
Edison State College,
where he will study crim-
inal justice for a career in
law enforcement.
Compiled by Paul Fallon


4.. A1/


I
I


/t


PHOTOS PROVIDED
Jeff Booth is one of only 12 students selected statewide to recieve a scholarship to the Embry
Riddle Aeronautical summer camp in June. Booth is a student at Charlotte Technical Center.


Nicholas Owens receives a $2,500 scholarship check from the Smith Family Foundation and the
Southwest Florida Community Foundation. Pictured from left are: Anne Douglas, director of
programs for the Southwest Florida Community Foundation, Owens, Wayne Smith with the Smith
Family Foundation and Ron Jones with Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Sunset Coast.


JOSEPH'S (j4\

YOUR HOMETOWN DELI


Right: Zoomers
president Dug
Stetter, left, and
Ed Gillen, right,
present a $1,000
scholarship to
James Harrison
after the club's
weekly Thursday
night run/walk at
Englewood Beach.


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:Our Town Page 4


C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Friday, June 6, 2014


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS





The Sun /Friday, June 6, 2014


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 5


OBITUARIES
CHARLOTTE


John F. LaPage
Retired U.S. Air Force
Chief Master Sgt. John
E LaPage, 84, of Punta
Gorda, Fla.,
passed away
peacefully
Monday, June 2,
2014, in the
loving, comforting care of
family at his home.
John was born April 17,
1930, in Norwich, Conn.,
to Delia (nee Cote) and
Mathias LaPage.
One of nine children,
John left home and family
and began a career with
the United States Air
Force that spanned nearly
23 years of service, and
the Korean and Vietnam
Wars. He retired as a
Chief Master Sergeant
in September 1970. John
moved from Uncasville,
Conn., to Punta Gorda in
1984, and enjoyed many
activities. He was a skilled
woodcarver and an avid
Golfer who enjoyed giving
his wooden creations to
family and friends and
sharing his knowledge of
Golf with other Golfers to
help improve their games.
John is survived by his
wife of 10 years, Ann M.
Ayers-LaPage; daughters,
Sue (Gary) Bledsoe,
Melinda (Wayland)
Hedding, Cindy (John)
Kuc and Delia LaPage;
stepdaughters, Cathy
(John) Keohane and
Jennifer Ayers; stepsons,
Paul (Beth) Ayers, Peter
(Joan) Ayers, Richard
(Carrie) Ayers and William
(Sarah) Ayers; nine
grandchildren; a number
of great- grandchildren;
sisters, Rosemary
Blackburn and Delia
Podurgiel; brother,
Andre Paul LePage; and
numerous nieces and
nephews. In addition
to his parents, John was
preceded in death by five
brothers, Omer, Albert,
Louis, Mathias and Victor
LaPage; a son, John M.
LaPage; and his first wife
of 50 years, Dorothy E.
LaPage.
A Committal followed
by burial will be held
for John at a later date
at Arlington National
Cemetery. Friends may
visit www.robersonfh.
com to sign the memory
book and extend condo-
lences to the family.
Arrangements are by
Roberson Funeral Homes
& Crematory, Punta
Gorda Chapel.

ENGLEWOOD

There were no deaths
reported in Englewood
Thursday.

NORTH PORT

There were no deaths
reported in North Port
Thursday.

DESOTO

There were no deaths
reported in DeSoto
Thursday.



Obituaries are accepted from
funeral homes only. There's no charge
for publishing an abbreviated death
notice. Full obituaries and repeat
death notices will be subject to an
advertising charge.
Obituaries must be received by
2 p.m. for Tuesday through Saturday
publication. For Sunday publication
deadline is noon on Saturday. For
Monday publication deadline is noon
on Sunday. In Loving Memories must be
received by 2 p.m. for Tuesday through
Friday publication. For Saturday through


Monday publication deadline is noon on
Friday. The American flag accompanying
an obituary indicates a veteran of the
U.S. Armed Forces. Please send emails to
obituaries@sunletter.com.

Words of Comfort
Recall it as often you
wish, a happy memory
never wears out.
-Libbie Fudim


A little songbird grows up


or years, Marcella
Brown has been
called the "little girl
with the big voice."
"You just don't expect
a voice like that from
someone her size," said
the Rev. Jerry Kaywell,
pastor of Sacred Heart
Church.
He recalled first hear-
ing Marcella sing nine
years ago when he was
told by the choir director
there was going to be a
surprise at Mass.
The surprise was
7-year-old Marcella
Brown whose powerful
voice and polished poise
belied her tender years.
The youngster was
such hit that she was
invited to join the senior
choir and serve as cantor.
"She was so small
we had to bring her
grandmother's wooden
stool for her to stand
out," recalled Marcella's
mother, Connie. "But
she stood up there
with the assurance of a
professional."
No wonder. Marcella
has been dazzling audi-
ences since she was 2,
when she stopped people
in their tracks by singing
a little French song.
At 2 1/2, when her
parents took her to
Fishermen's Village to
listen to a duo entertain,
Marcella climbed up
on the stage and played


~Mihalik



the tambourine as if she
were born to be on stage.
Since then, she has
been entertaining
audiences at church
and community events,
sometimes singing for a
thousand people.
When she sang for
"Field of Stars" at the
Charlotte Performing
Arts Center, she brought
the audience to tears
with her pure vocals.
Last year the Punta
Gorda songbird won the
Charlotte County Idol
contest. The teenager
said she was thrilled
when county commis-
sioners proclaimed the
day as Marcella Brown
Day.
For her, life isn't all
about receiving. "I
believe in giving back to
my community. It's my
joy to be an advocate
for charities, especially
veterans groups. I've
learned more about
our country from these
veterans than I have from
history books," she said.
When people hear


her sing, they often tell
her she should be on
"American Idol."
Last year she "came
close" when she went to
New York to audition for
"The Voice."
"We got to the theater
so early we thought we
would be the only ones
there. But there were so
many contestants lined
up for blocks," she said.
When it was finally her
turn to sing for a produc-
er, she sang an Italian
aria, then was one of the
few invited to sing an-
other song. The producer
asked for a third song,
something from the last
seven or eight years. She
did an Adele number,
but it wasn't suited to her
voice.
"The producer was so
encouraging, telling me
I had a lot of potential.
He specifically told me
to come back in six
months," she said.
Was she disappointed?
"I was thrilled with
how far I got," she said.
"Some winners have to
audition several times
before they get a shot at
it. When auditions are
nearby, I'll try again."
Meanwhile, she is
receiving one accolade
after another. Her biggest
thrill to date, she said,
was being invited to sing
at Carnegie Hall with a
magnificent 180-voice


SUN PHOTO BY PATTIE MIHALIK


Marcella Brown,17, entertains at Trattoria Limoncello
in Punta Gorda, where she always attracts a crowd from
throughout the region. The songbird has a full schedule
appearing at community events and concerts as she pursues
her entertainment career.


choir.
Because she has a full
schedule doing concerts,
going on auditions, mak-
ing several movies and
appearing in regional
theater productions, she
is homeschooled so she
can pursue an entertain-
ment career.
Meanwhile, she and
musician Rory Dewey
entertain several times
a month at Trattoria
Limoncello in Punta
Gorda, where they always


bring out a crowd.
"It will happen some-
day," said the classical
singer as she talked
about several exciting
career boosts in the
works.
At 17, the little girl with
the big voice is grown
up, and her talent and
aspirations have grown
with her.
Pattie Mihalik is a
regular columnist for the
Sun. Contact her at news-
girl@comcast. net.


Group supports land buy for watersheds


By DREW WINCHESTER
STAFF WRITER

SARASOTA COUNTY
- The Environmentally
Sensitive Lands Oversight
Committee on Thursday
unanimously approved
writing a letter of recom-
mendation to Sarasota
County commissioners
in support of acquiring
connector lands between
the Myakka and Peace
river watersheds.
The seven pieces of
privately owned land


would bridge the two
watersheds and span the
border of Sarasota and
DeSoto counties, helping
to aid the water flow and
water management of
the two rivers.
According to
Wildlands conservation
director Julie Morris, the
price tag for the land
acquisition wouldn't
be known until the
negotiation phase, when
individual landowners
and county officials
would hash out the final


selling price.
Wildlands is a non-
profit organization that
focuses on conservation
planning and policy,
land management, land
protection, research,
education and outreach
in the Southwest and
South Central portions
of the state.
Morris said landown-
ers often will negotiate
to keep cattle on the
land, or use it for other
agricultural interests,
while the county owns


the portions needed for
the watershed.
Morris said DeSoto
County leaders have
not shown interest in
purchasing the land on
their side of the border,
but doing so would
address a decided lack
of conservation lands in
that county.
Morris thinks "Florida
Forever" funding could
be available to purchase
some of the land. She also
said acquisition of the
lands, and the continued


improvement of the
watershed, also would
be a boon for Charlotte
County residents.
"It's very important to
maintaining the ecologi-
cal integrity of Charlotte
Harbor," she added.
County commission-
ers could see the letter of
support from the ESLOC
as early as their next
meeting Tuesday, but the
timetable for the actual
acquisition of the lands
is unknown.
Email: dwinchester@sun-herald.com


Mote meeting tackles coastal ecosystem, climate change


By IAN ROSS
STAFF WRITER
SARASOTA COUNTY
- Mote Marine
Laboratory played host
to a five-speaker panel
of experts Thursday to
discuss climate-change
issues related to coastal
communities.
Patricia Beneke,
director of the United
Nations Environment
Programme's Regional
Office for North America
(UNEP RONA), presented
the findings of a recently
released UNEP report on
the unique vulnerabilities
Small Island Developing
Nations have to climate
change.
Mote President and
CEO Michael Crosby,
who hosted the event in
Sarasota, said the findings
are important for islands
in developed countries
too.
The report "is pertinent
to us, when you think of
the barrier island we're on
right now," he said.
The forum was held
for World Environment
Day, an annual celebra-
tion of environmental
progress that takes
places in more than
100 countries around the
world. Sarasota County
was selected by UNEP
RONA as the official
North American Host
Community for World
Environment Day.
Beneke, in her pre-
sentation, said the small
island nations studied
would experience a
"disproportionate impact
of climate change due to
their topography," noting
some island nations


SUN PHOTO BY IAN ROSS


Gilly, Mote Marine Laboratory's mascot, and the Baltimore Orioles Bird made an appearance
at the World Environmental Community Forum Thursday. Mote CEO and President Michael
Crosby introduced the mascots before opening the floor to a five-speaker expert panel, who
presented on climate change, in relation to coastal environments.


could be in danger of
submersion over time,
depending on how water
levels rise. Other prob-
lems include flooding,
shoreline erosion, ocean
acidification and rising
water temperatures.
In regard to the island
states' development,
Beneke argued for the
measure of developing
countries' growth, that
takes environmental
capital into account.
"(Gross Domestic
Product) doesn't really
translate" to prosperity,
she said. "Natural re-
sources capital isn't really
taken into account the
way it ought to be."
Barbara Lausche,
director of the Marine
Policy Institute at Mote,
presented sea-level data
and projections, noting
not just an increase in sea
levels over the years, but
also an increase in the
rate of increase.


According to Lausche,
the global average rise in
sea level is 3.2 millimeters
per year, but the annual
increase can be as high
as 12 millimeters per year
in areas like the Tropical
Western Pacific.
After the scientific
data was laid out, the
conversation switched
to Southwest Florida's
response to climate
change.
Sarasota Bay Estuary
Program Community
Outreach Manager Sara
Kane presented data from
the program's economic
valuation of local bay and
Gulf Coast areas.
According to Kane,
the program estimates
the total value of homes
near Sarasota Bay and the
Gulf at $3.6 billion, which
generates $184 million in
tax revenue.
She also noted
disasters provide anec-
dotal evidence of the


environment's economic
importance.
Events like "the (BP)
Deepwater Horizon oil
spill," in which millions
of barrels of oil spilled
into the Gulf of Mexico
following the explosion
and sinking of the oil rig
in 2010, "have heightened
our awareness (that) ...
a healthy environment
equals a healthy econo-
my," she said.
After Kane spoke to the
value of natural resources,
Jennifer Shafer, executive


director for the Science
& Environment Council
of Southwest Florida,
spoke about how best to
capitalize on that value,
espousing government
leadership that nurtures
ecotourism through the
creation of reservation
websites, concessions and
guided tour programs.
For the Southwest
Florida residents, "our
lifestyle is defined by the
natural environment,"
she said.
The last speaker, Tony
Stefan, a member of
the Florida Gulf Coast
Chapter of the U.S. Green
Building Council, ended
the round of presentations
by shifting the focus
forward. Pointing to the
Sarasota County's 2020
and 2050 comprehensive
plans' call for higher-
density development, he
challenged governments
and planners to use
that density to create
more carbon-efficient
transportation systems.
He posed the ques-
tion, "Can we offer an
independent, car-free,
retirement lifestyle in
Sarasota?" which drew
murmurs and chatter
from the audience.
Email: iross@sun-herald.com


JAMES W. MALLONEE, P.A.
LAW OFFICE
JAMES W. MALLONEE
PROBATE WILLS/TRUSTS
GUARDIANSHIPS REAL ESTATE
Office Hours Monday thru Friday, 9:00AM to 5:00PM
946 Tamiami Trail, #206, Port Charlotte, FL 33953
901 Venetia Bay Blvd. #360, Venice, FL 34285
(941) 207-2223
www.j ameswmallonee.com
(941) 206-2223





OurTown Page 6


C www.sunnewspapers.net


FROM PAGE ONE


The Sun /Friday, June 6, 2014


COUNTY
FROM PAGE 1

Gordon Burger,
county budget director,
explained that the con-
sultant makes the case
that the TDP is feasible,
not that it's advisable.
He said future discus-
sions will be needed
before taking any action
on the transportation
plan, a process that
could take up to a year.
The consultant's
report, prepared by
Tindale-Oliver &
Associates, presented
a "cost-efficient plan"
that would not require
any increased funding
beyond what is spent
now for Dial-A-Ride
and Sunshine Ride



TRAINING

FROM PAGE 1
torn down in about a
month so the site can be
used for a vegetation-
recycling program,
Milligan said. Until then,
the fire department has
been granted permission
to train with them.
A high-powered
machine filled one
building with thick smoke
Thursday. A dummy was
placed inside, and crews
had to work together to
find it with virtually no
visibility. Later, personnel
followed a fire hose
through the smog to a
downed firefighter.
"It's dark and smoky
in there, and you can't
see," Messina said. "It's
great. Because when we
do search-and-rescue
trainings, we'll usually just
smoke up one of the bays
at the station."
The dilapidated
buildings contained some
real hazards that were left
in for added effect- like
nails on the ground.
"It's usually difficult to
get something close to
real life like this," Messina
said. "Next week, we'll be
cutting holes in the roof


D-DAY
FROM PAGE 1

beaches of Normandy
during the Allied inva-
sion of Europe better
known as D-Day, during
the Second World War -
70 years ago today.
Their ranks, 10,000
strong, were filled with
carpenters, bulldozer
operators, electricians,
machinists, welders and
even blacksmiths. Their
average age was 37, with
some as old as 60, even
though the cut-off age to
join was 50.
Despite their ad-
vanced years, the
Seabees assigned to the
25th Naval Construction
Regiment were some of
the first troops to wade
ashore with Army com-
bat engineers on June 6,
1944, to help liberate the
European mainland held
under Nazi occupation
since 1940. They were
split up into Combat
Demolition Teams, and
they had the danger-
ous assignment of
destroying the steel and
concrete fortifications
that the Germans had
constructed, known as
the Atlantic Wall. Lining
this impregnable fortress
were miles of pillboxes,
machine gun nests and
gun emplacements
ready to chew to pieces
the invading forces
hitting the beachhead.
As dawn broke, enemy


service. The study stated
regular bus service
would provide improved
transportation opportu-
nities for residents, and
would promote local
businesses by linking
them to shoppers.
The transit plan is
proposing three bus
routes that would run
hourly from 6 a.m. to
8 p.m. Monday through
Saturday. They include
North Port to Punta
Gorda, along U.S. 41
and ending at Bayfront
Health Punta Gorda;
the Englewood Beach
Hopper, along State
Road 776 to Murdock
Circle, and down U.S. 41
to the Promenades Mall;
and Lake Suzy to Punta
Gorda, along Kings
Highway to Midway
Boulevard to Harbor


Boulevard, and south
on U.S. 41 to the Punta
Gorda Airport.
A proposed regional
route with limited stops,
scheduled every two
hours from 6 a.m. to
6 p.m. Monday through
Saturday, would travel
from North Port to Fort
Myers, by way of the
Punta Gorda Airport.
To assist people in
getting to these routes,
the transit plan recom-
mends a flex-route bus
system that requires
same-day notice for
pickups.
The Charlotte County
Commission will meet at
9 a.m. Tuesday in com-
mission chambers at the
County Administration
Center, 18500 Murdock
Circle, Murdock.
Email: groberts@sun-herald.com


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


Cultural Center
to celebrate
Father's Day
The Cultural Center of
Charlotte County, 2280
Aaron St., Port Charlotte,
will hold a Father's Day
luncheon from 11 a.m.
to 2 p.m. June 15 in the
Midtown Caf. The menu
will feature barbecued
chicken, bratwurst, potato
salad, macaroni and cheese,
com on the cob, apple
crisp and ice crean Coffee
and iced tea are included
with the meal, while beer,
wine and soft drinks will be
available for purchase.
The cost is $9.95 for
adults, and $5 for children
10 years old and younger.
Advanced tickets may be
purchased at the Cultural
Center information desk,


the theater box office, by
telephone at 941-625-4175,
or online at www.the
culturalcenter.com.

Culver's to
partner with
Future Farmers
Culver's, 385 Kings
Highway, Port Charlotte,
will donate a portion of its
sales from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Tuesday to raise funds for
Future Farmers of America.
FFA helps to make a
positive difference in the
lives of children by pro-
viding programs that help
develop their potential for
leadership, personal growth
and career success through
agricultural education.
For more information, call
941-627-2600.


Funeral home
to hold artist
reception
Charlotte Memorial
Funeral Home and
Cemetery, 9400 Indian
Springs Cemetery Road,
Punta Gorda, will play host
to a wine and appetizer
reception from 5 p.m. to
7 p.m. June 19 for Henry
August, its award-winning
resident artist. August will
display his large collection
of oil paintings, and will be
on-site to answer questions.
Charlotte Memorial is
proud to participate in
the 'Art in Public Places"
program through the Arts
& Humanities Council
of Charlotte County. The
public is invited. For more
information, visit www.
charlottememorial.com.


Firefighter/EMT David Clyatt and Firemedic Timothy Owen begin their search for a person
trapped inside the smoky building, as part of a drill.


and breaching the exterior
walls."
As many crews that
could make it out got to
run through search-and-
rescue drills throughout
the day Firefighter/EMT
Lt. Louis Adamo who
trained with his Engine 1
crew Thursday- has
been with the department
for 32 years. While it's next
to impossible to replicate
a real fire, the veteran
said training like this -
with limited visibility
- is good to practice


communicating together
with other crews you don't
know as well.
"This allows us to work
together with companies
we don't usually run with,
like you would at a real
fire," he said. "It allows us
to practice communica-
tion with guys we don't
see too often."
Charlotte County Fire/
EMS has hired 20 new
employees in the last 18
months. Although that's
mostly due to the addition
of two ambulances, there


"You have to marvel at these guys.
There is no doubt in my mind that
they were the greatest generation."

Jerry Baumgartner, Vietnam War Seabee,
and nephew of a World War II Seabee


fire raked the landing
beaches, causing numer-
ous casualties. It was a
double-edged sword for
the Seabees not only
did they have to endure
intense shelling, but
some of the explosives
they were carrying to
eliminate the German
defenses prematurely
detonated, killing entire
teams. Disregarding the
danger, they advanced to
plant their charges and
blow huge, gaping holes
in the fortifications so
the infantry could push
forward.
As demolition
teams performed their
hazardous duty, large
ferries known as Rhinos
transported much-need-
ed troops and supplies
to both Omaha and Utah
beaches. Operating on
extremely choppy seas,
the odd-looking barges
had to make their way
to shore under the worst
possible conditions.
According to the
after-action report of the
25th Naval Construction
Regiment, "During
the first two days, the
Rhinos were damaged
by mine explosions,
hit submerged vehicles


and other objects at
high water, and at all
times during the initial
stage were subjected to
enemy fire from shore
installations."
Those Seabees already
ashore immediately
went to work erecting
pontoon causeways, as
the German gunners
kept up their harassing
fire. Also, teams quickly
assembled offshore
docking facilities and
piers from material
provided from dis-
carded cargo vessels
that had crossed the
English Channel prior
to the invasion. The
strange-looking facilities
were dubbed Mulberry A
and Mulberry B.
"Even after the artifi-
cial harbor was partially
destroyed in a severe
storm, the Seabees
landed hundreds of
thousands of tons of
war material daily,"
according to Seabee
Online, the official
online magazine of the
Seabees. "In addition to
these massive amounts
of supplies, by July
4, only 28 days after
D-Day, the Seabees had
helped land more than


still are many new faces
on the firefighting side.
"There's been a lot of
new people within the
last year and a half,"
said Adamo, 54. "This is
another way for them to
see how we do certain
things."
Although the fire
department isn't able to
set the buildings ablaze
due, in part, to U.S.
Environmental Protection
Agency regulations,
Adamo said the exercises
still are beneficial.


SUN PHOTOS BY ADAM KREGER
Charlotte County Firefighter/EMT Nate Boyette, foreground, and
Firemedic Doug Marker suit up for a training scenario.


'A lot of times, these
trainings are harder than a
real fire," he said. "In a real
fire, a lot of things become
routine. When you're told


exactly what you have
to do and how to do it, it
makes you think about it
more."
Email: akreger@sun-heraldxom


PHOTO PROVIDED BY U.S. NAVY SEABEE MUSEUM,
NAVAL HISTORY AND HERITAGE COMMAND
The Rhino ferries braved murderous German fire to transport troops and supplies to both Omaha
and Utah beaches during the D-Day operation 70 years ago today.


a million Allied fighting
men on the shore."
Indeed they had. From
June 6 until Oct. 21, the
Rhinos carried nearly
95,000 vehicles of all
types and more than
8,000 tons of supplies to
the advancing infantry.
Fortunately, Seabee
casualties were low -
21 dead, 61 wounded
and three missing in
action during the D-Day
operation.
Port Charlotte resident
Jerry Baumgartner, a
Seabee who served
in Vietnam, said he
followed in his uncle's


footsteps and became a
Seabee.
"I was 23 years old
and a pipefitter when
I joined, and it was
due, in part, to my
uncle's service with the
Seabees," he said. "My
Uncle George served
three years in the South
Pacific. When he came
to this country from
Germany between the
world wars, he couldn't
speak English. He
learned the language,
became a master chief in
six months, and taught
at Quantico."
Baumgartner said the


Seabees at Normandy
were "pretty impressive."
"You have to marvel
at these guys," he said.
"There is no doubt in my
mind that they were the
greatest generation."
Whether operating
a bulldozer on Saipan,
manhandling a pontoon
causeway on Omaha
Beach, or picking up a
rifle to fight on Okinawa,
the Seabees had an
exemplary record in
World War II, and
certainly lived up to their
motto -"Construimus
Batuimus" -
"We build, we fight."


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The Sun /Friday, June 6, 2014


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 7


Report: Drunken woman



assaults boyfriend, cops


PUNTAGORDA- A
60-year-old woman was
arrested Tuesday evening
after yelling about anal sex
in a public park, throwing
a six-pack of beer bottles
at her older boyfriend, and
trying to kick, bite and spit
on officers, according to a
Punta Gorda Police report.
Police were dispatched
at 6:15 p.m. to Ponce de
Leon Park, where a man
told them his girlfriend had
stolen his car, and he point-
ed her out about 100 yards
away. Officers contacted
Janet Norine Plahutnik, who
they said apparently was
drunk in the passenger seat.
While an officer was
talking with Plahutnik about
getting a ride home, she
suddenly became enraged
and began screaming about
how her boyfriend with
whom she lives- would
make her become homeless
"all because I wouldn't let
him (have sex with) me in
the (rear end)," the report
shows. Police noted that
several families started
leaving the park and took
notice of Plahutnik"due to
her screaming about her
sexual problems and her
drunkenness," the narrative
went on.
Plahutnik then allegedly
began tossing fruit and
vegetables from the car,
and threw a six-pack of
Corona beer bottles at her
boyfriend, who was across
the street. The beer narrowly
missed an officer, the report
shows, and the policeman
took down Plahutnik
While multiple officers
were attempting to load the
suspect into a police car, she
tried to kick one and spit at
and tried to bite another,
authorities said. She also
allegedly cursed at passing
cars, and claimed she need-
ed a lawyer because she was
being arrested for not letting
her boyfriend have anal sex
with her.
Plahutnik, of the 24000
block of Madaca Lane, Port
Charlotte -was charged
with disorderly intoxication,
assault on a person 65 years
old or older, and assault
on a police officer. She was
held at the Charlotte County
Jail on Thursday on $4,500
bond.

Report: Man
stole artist's
$15K painting
PORT CHARLOTTE -A
local man has been accused
of stealing an oil painting


I POLICE BEAT
The information for Police Beat is gathered from police, sheriff's office, Florida High way
Patrol, jail and fire records. Not every arrest leads to a conviction and guilt or innocence is
determined by the court system.


reportedly worth $15,000
from an established artist,
according to a Charlotte
County Sheriff's report.
Richard William Foucher,
36, was arrestedWednesday
afternoon and charged with
one count of grand theft
more than $10,000, after
he allegedly took the work
of art from a local storage
facility early Saturday.
Foucher had been renting
a unit at the facility next to a
unit the painter was renting,
the report shows. The victim
told authorities he keeps
his work in the unit, but
it and his car were full
Friday. So he left some large
oil paintings just outside the
unit, figuring they'd be OK
overnight and he could pick
them up in the moving.
When he returned early
Saturday, he saw the canvas
from one of his paintings
had been cut and taken
from the wood frame. The
44-year-old artist told
detectives the painting
hadn't been appraised, but
he's sold similar paintings
for about $15,000.
When authorities re-
viewed surveillance footage,
they saw Foucher walking
out of the facility around
3 a.m. with the painting, the
report shows. Wednesday,
deputies conducted a traffic
stop on Foucher, found an
oil painting in the vehicle,
and arrested the suspect
after questioning.
Foucher, of the 18900
block of McGrath Circle,
Port Charlotte, was held at
the Charlotte County Jail
Thursday on $5,000 bond.

The Charlotte County Sheriff's
Office reported the following arrests:
Jose Luis Andrade-Leon, 34, 2800
block of N.E. Washington St, Arcadia.
Charge: failure to appear. Bond: none.
Bradley Curtis Blankenship, 30, 22200
block of Belinda Ave., PortCharlotte.
Charge: grand theft. Bond: $7,000.
Alexis Ann Clancey, 21,400 block of
Harvard St., Englewood. Charge: violation
of probation (original charges: possession of
drug paraphernalia and resisting an officer).
Bond: none.
-John Keith Ewing, 50,23100 block
of Seneca Ave., Port Charlotte. Charge:
trespassing. Bond: $2,500.
*Ionya Rochelle Hines, 26,800 block
of Palmetto Circle, Port Charlotte. Charges:
failure to appear and violation of probation
(original charge: driving with a suspended
license). Bond: none.
Rafail Kurbanov, 40, of N. Milwaukee


Ave., North Port. Charge: out-of-county
warrant. Bond: none.
Tera Lee Martin, 34,100 block of
Rodgers Ave., Port Charlotte. Charges:
possession of a controlled substance
without a prescription, possession of
drug paraphernalia and violation of
probation (original charge: driving
without registration). Bond: none.
Derrick Anthony Nealon, 23, 21000
block of Glendale Ave., Port Charlotte.
Charge: out-of-county warrant. Bond:
none.
Tanjeev Rahman Patwary, 23,
of Seffner, Fla. Charge: violation of
probation (original charges: two counts
of aggravated assault with the intent to
commit a felony). Bond: none.
Trevor John Richards, 38, homeless
in Port Charlotte. Charge: petty theft.
Bond: $2,500.
Phillip James Robertson, 35, 5000
block of Placida Road, Englewood.
Charge: loitering or prowling. Bond:
none.
Jennifer Lynn Robinson, 39,1600
block of Cardinal Lane, Englewood.
Charges: two counts of requesting
a refund using a false receipt. Bond:
none.
Ernesto Lopez Salinas Jr., 22,600
block of Sheridan Drive, Venice. Charge:
violation of probation (original charge:
DUI). Bond: none.
Mark Ellsworth Septer, 60, Zenith
St., Port Charlotte. Charge: failure to
appear. Bond: $6,000.
Rodolfo Sanchez, 45, of
Homestead, Fla. Charges: possession
of less than 20 grams of marijuana,
possession of a controlled substance
without a prescription, possession of
drug paraphernalia, tampering with
evidence and violation of probation.
Bond: none.
Filiberto Vizcarra-Lopez, 37, 3300
block of S.W. Live Oak Ave., Arcadia.
Charge: out-of-county warrant. Bond:
none.

The Punta Gorda Police
Department reported the
following arrests:
Jennifer Lynn Camplin, 22, 3300
block of Vasco St., Punta Gorda.
Charges: possession of less than
20 grams of marijuana and possession
of drug paraphernalia. Bond: none.
Taana Lynn Carlson, 30, 25000
block of Airport Road, Punta Gorda.
Charges: possession of less than
20 grams of marijuana and possession
of drug paraphernalia. Bond: $6,000.
-Teresa Curcio, 34, of Rochester, N.Y.
Charges: three counts of petty theft;
and possession of less than 20 grams of
marijuana. Bond: $6,000.
Travis Todd Nottingham, 29,
21100 block of Gephart Ave., Port
Charlotte. Charge: possession of
less than 20 grams of marijuana.
Bond: $2,500.
-Compiled by/Adam Kreger


Teacher charged



with DUI after crash


By ADAM KREGER
STAFF WRITER

MURDOCK A local
teacher who crashed
early Thursday is facing
a charge of
DUI with
property
damage, af-
ter blowing
about three
times the
legal limit,
WAISANEN according to
a Charlotte
County Sheriff's report.
Cory Pearson Waisanen
was arrested around
2 a.m. after allegedly
failing field-sobriety tests
following a crash near El
Jobean Road (State Road
776) and Toledo Blade
Boulevard. He was the
only person in the car,
and he was unsteady on
his feet, the report shows.
The 33-year-old is a
language arts teacher at


Murdock Middle School,
and has been there
for at least four years,
according to Charlotte
County Public Schools
spokesman Mike Riley.
Since school is out and
Waisanen hadn't been
arrested before, Riley
said no immediate action
was taken by the school
district.
"But anytime some-
thing like this happens,
we certainly look into it,"
he said. 'And we'll look at
this case."
Anytime a teacher is
arrested, Riley added, he
is supposed to self-report
to his principal, and then
they will meet with an
assistant superintendent
to discuss the next steps.
Waisanen had been
driving a four-door
Chevrolet westbound on
El Jobean Road when he
jumped the median and
hit a concrete culvert and


a street sign, the report
shows. Waisanen report-
edly told authorities that
something jumped out
at him and he swerved to
miss it, while a witness
claims the driver swerved
to miss her vehicle
coming the other way.
The deputy transport-
ing the suspect to the
Charlotte County Jail not-
ed in his report that "the
entire inside of the patrol
vehicle was filled with
the smell of an alcoholic
beverage, to the point I
had to roll the windows
down. After rolling down
the windows, the smell
could still be smelled."
Waisanen blew a
0.234 and 0.244 at the
jail during a breath test
for alcohol content, the
report shows. Florida's
legal limit is 0.08.
He was held at the jail
Thursday on $2,500 bond.
Email: akreger@sun-heraldcom


-~wsa Cros sod


ACROSS
1 Keyboard
symbol over 6
6 Clash
participants
10 Bad-weather
sound
14 Dwelling
15 Hardware pro
16 Starter for sailing
17 Clunky footwear
18 Give a ticket to
19 Fivers
20 Surpass all
expectations
23 Porridge morsel
24 Action-film
weaponry
25 Makes good
26 Oxford offering
27 Catch on
28 GPS reading
29 Half-square
shape
30 Music
appreciation
31 City newspaper
desk
33 Diamond dusters
34 Patronize a
tanning parlor,
informally
38 Call from the
bridge
40 Not easily
explained
41 Excessively
42 "Could you
repeat that?"
45 Upper limit
46 Took a breather
49 Word following
fine or folk
50 "Am I the
problem?"
52 Turns down
53 Ensnare
54 All-important


56 Navigational
projections
58 "Old" noggin
59 Pianist inspired
by Paganini
60 Ten
Commandments
locale
61 Great relish
62 They're required
by choirs
63 Lunkhead
64 French word
for "sword"
65 Something to
fill in

DOWN
1 Arizona quarter
depiction
2 In flames
3 First-year
4 Periphery


Look forathird

crossword in

I the Sun Classified:

section.


PAIRS SQUARES by S.N.
Edited by Stanley Newman
www.stanxwords.com


5 Beta version
6 And more of
the same
7 Berkshire
Hathaway
company
8 Number on a
pump
9 Israeli coin
10 Possible
controller
designation
11 Gig for Caruso
12 Tour-book
reference
13 Spiritual leaders
21 Precipitancy
22 Frequent YMCA
class
28 Mock "Yikes!"
31 Has the
potential to
32 A person


33 Mandolin kin
34 What
Manchester
United plays
35 Milk-Bone
owner
36 Thorny stem
37 Go to bat for
38 Finished
39 Pal of Hamlet
42 "That guy did it!"
43 Working OK
44 Hoist
46 Brief rest
47 "Search Inside
the Book" offerer
48 "You shouldn't
have"
51 Play with
52 Marching order
55 Spill all
57 Stubbornly
determined


nswer to previous puzzle


6/6/14


Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis


ACROSS
1 Gush forth, as
chimney smoke
6 Coldplay gear
10 Fix, in away
14 Foil
15 Pace
16 Old Milano
moola
17 Shakes, as a tail
18 Capital on
Chesapeake Bay
20 Lost traction
21 Drug initially
studied for use in
treating angina
22 To whom lisa
said "I'll hum it
for you"
23 Shying away
from
25 Natural dye
27 Advise
28 Nest egg item,
for short
31 Spinoff of TV's
"Hercules"
32 Place for a cast
33 Carmelite, e.g.
34 Buckingham
buggy
35 Boat lifters
found in this
puzzle's three
longest
answers
38 Port near the
Red Sea
40 Alumni directory
word
41 Chap
42 Winter coat
43 Nursery supply
44 Reply to "No,
you couldn't
have!"
48 It was founded in
Oxford in 1946
50 From the start
52 One-time
connection
53 White terrier, for
short
56 California's
Mission Santa

57 Aster relative
59 Schubert's "Eine
kleine
Trauermusik,"
e.g.
60 Martial
61 French 101
infinitive


By Frank Virzi 6/6/14


62 Make nasty
comments
63 GPS part: Abbr.
64 Make nasty
comments
65 From Nineveh:
Abbr.

DOWN
1 Fragrant fir
2 Develop
gradually
3 Sore spot
4 Bank offerings
5 Abbr. after
Cleveland or
Brooklyn
6 "Come ?"
7 Journalism
bigwigs
8 Sign of engine
trouble, perhaps
9 One billed
higher than the
rest
10 Traffic warning
11 Pale lagers
12 Author Huffington
13 Polite assent
19 Tuba note
21 Vestal
Roman flame
tenders
24 Executes


Thursday's Puzzle Solved
S cIAIMIA K I INIR A C E R
TCAMB KIN RCERASE
TUBE 0 E
EMUISGNATBORED





P R CACA




A E Al PA De EIR I M e
M DAKEIMADOBEE


(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC


26 Journeys of
discovery
29 Track
30 Dye-making
compound
35 Leftovers
36 Natal opening
37 Word from a crib
38 Seagoing forces
39 Like many
supplements
45 Hall of Fame
pitcher Eckersley


6/6/14


46 Nodding
47 Bed denizen
49 Leave
dumbstruck
51 Dressing
extreme?
54 Monthly pmt.
55 As found, with
"in"
58 Source of addl.
evening light
59 Surveillance
org.


iYour source for fishing, boating and outdoor news
every Thursday only in your Sun newspaper






Our Town Page 8 C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Friday, June 6, 2014


IEWPOINT


Derek Dunn-Rankin Chairman
David Dunn-Rankin Publisher
Chris Porter Executive Editor


Brian Gleason Editorial page editor
Stephen Baumann Editorial writer


Email letters to letters@sun-herald.com


]OUR VIEW


The day that


changed


history
S seventy years ago today,
young Ed Kent of Audu-
bon, N.J., found himself
cruising the English Channel.
His ship a Landing Craft
Tank, or LCT for short was
one of nearly 7,000 vessels that
night in the 100-mile-wide
span between the coasts of
England and France. Another
156,000 men made the
mission, dubbed Operation
Neptune.
"The sea was rough," Kent
told Sun staff writer Don
Moore many years later.
"At 20, I was apprehensive.
But I was also excited and ea-
ger to go. We had been training
for this invasion for two years."
Two years of training for this
one day: D-Day.
Kent, now 90 and living in
Englewood, participated in
the largest seaborne invasion
in human history. D-Day -
June 6, 1944 turned out to
be one of the most significant
days in American and world
history; it changed the course
of western civilization forever.
For the better, as we well know.
We couldn't begin to count
the number of books written
about this day in particular
and the days and months that
followed as the Allies battled
east across Europe for the
next 11 months. The photos
that survived the landing in
Normandy and the films that
depict the events from
"The Longest Day" to "Saving
Private Ryan" are familiar to
most.
Cpl. Kent reached landfall at
6:30 a.m. on Utah Beach, the
westernmost Allied landing
site on the Normandy coast.
Others came ashore at beach
sites called Omaha, Gold,
Juno and Sword. More jumped
from aircraft into the French
countryside. Tens and tens of
thousands in all the first day.
"We drove our M-7 gun off
the landing craft into waist-
deep seas and onto the beach
without any problem," said
Kent, a gunner on an armored
howitzer. "There was lot of
enemy fire on the beach."
Four hours later, the small
tank made it off the beach
and onto a road headed west.
Encountering a German
88 mm gun position, the lead
tank in the unit was hit, then
a second tank. Both burst into
flames and all men aboard
were killed. Kent made it
through and his unit eventual-
ly reached the town of St. Mere
Eglise.
So ended Kent's D-Day. He
survived and fought on for
15 more days before he was
struck by shrapnel on the
outskirts of Cherbourg. Kent
almost lost his right arm, and
spent 10 months recuperating.
He married, had two daughters
and, many years later, retired
to Englewood.
One hundred years from
today, Americans will still
look back upon the Normandy
invasion of June 6, 1944. They
will study with awe the details
of Operation Neptune and
the larger Allied Operation
Overlord. They will read the
extraordinary accounts of
individuals like Kent who
participated and those who
contributed to a most worthy
cause of ridding the world of
this particular dark tyranny.
Best estimates are that
4,413 individuals were killed
on that first day of the Allied
invasion. Overall casualties
run as high as 12,000.
We honor their sacrifice and
thank all the men and women
who served. An estimated
1 million of the 16 million
American veterans of World


War II are with us still today.
The world should not and will
not forget.


LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR

Runs counter
to original story

Editor:
Before the letters start pour-
ing in about President Obama
and the release of prisoner of
war, Bowe Bergdahl, take a
walk down memory lane and
remember what President
Reagan did and said:
"A few months ago I told
the American people I did not
trade arms for hostages. My
heart and my best intentions
still tell me that's true, but
the facts and the evidence
tell me it is not. As the Tower
board reported, what began
as a strategic opening to Iran
deteriorated, in its implemen-
tation, into trading arms for
hostages. This runs counter to
my own beliefs, to administra-
tion policy, and to the original
strategy we had in mind."
Sunny Ingersoll
Port Charlotte


Fr. Tatman was
a good leader

Editor:
As an active member of San
Antonio and mother of four
children, three of whom are in
the faith formation program
(Children's ministry), I would
like to take this opportunity
to thank Fr. Robert Tatman
for a great job at San Antonio.
He not only made the appro-
priate changes to the parish
(which I will fight to keep) but
treated the children (boys and
girls) with love and guidance.


It is truly unfortun
he was treated so po
some of my fellow bi
and sisters. I will col
to go to church and I
these people. They n
listen a little more at
and critique it a little
now our Mass is the
should be and shoul
Li



Community I
doing good v

Editor:
I was lucky enough
weekend to spend ti
fabulous group of vo
and professionals w]
their time to control
humanely for the fer
free roaming cats of
County.
Community Cats


Charlotte is a nonprofit
501 (c) (3), and an absolutely
wonderful group of caring
folks. Since their beginning
late last year, they have
neutered/spayed over 800
feral or free roaming cats.
Community Cats of Charlotte
not only neuters or spays but
gives rabies vaccinations,
cleans ears and treats ferals
with antibiotics if needed.
These are the most dedicat-
ed folks I have ever seen. We
are lucky to have several ani-
mal rescue groups in our area
and all deserve your help and
attention. But Community
Cats of Charlotte is a new one
and one that deserves your
special attention.
They are saving taxpayers'
money. Community Cats is
controlling the cat population
in a humane, educated and
civilized way. Come volunteer,
foster, and please consider
making a donation so they
can continue this wonderful
program. Contact them at
Community Cats of Charlotte,
P.O. Box 380755, Murdock, FL
33948, or at charlottecats@
yahoo.com.
Mary McNeely
Port Charlotte


Milbank's criticism
of Carson offbase

Editor:
It appears that some
African-American people who
run for office are not as good
as other African-Americans.
Barack Obama is a "Good
AA," while Ben Carson is a
"Bad AA." How do we know?
Because Dana Milbank
says so.
He indicts Carson for his


rate that religiosity, his comparisons
orly by of this administration with
rothers Nazi Germany, his feeling that
ntinue opponents are "Un-American
pray for and Dangerous and the
Leed to fallback, Carson is a Fox News
Mass contributor." In other words,
e less, for Carson should not have his
way it First Amendment rights
d stay! and he should edit what he
sa Kaveney says. Dana should only have
Punta Gorda Carson's credibility.
Carson indicts the Obama
administration for spying on
Cats the public, using government
Nork to harass the population
(See: IRS scandal), following
Marx and Alinsky ideals and
[ this methods and for Obama
me with a marginalizing a "God oni-
)lunteers ented" society. Dana wants
ho gave of a conversation with Carson,
I and care not a real conversation, but
ral and one where he gets to dispar-
Charlotte age Carson and then goes
onto another screed. Either
of Dana is afraid that a "smart


black man" is going
Hillary's applecart,
taunting the GOP to
and nominate him.
Hillary will never
Carson unless she i
While Carson does
elected experience,
does and look at his
over 30-plus years.
is smarter than Oba
Hillary, will surround
self with better peo
demand results. Da
be worried about H
her next Benghazi t
Carson gets better a
Hillary not so much
Dana."




Beware c
pesticide poise

Editor:
I would like peop
informed of the po
effects of pesticide
to them and their p
found out the hard
harm these chemic
Vomiting. Coughi
Thirst. Muscle weak
Convulsions. Seizure
Trembling. Fatigue.
nose and throat irri
Difficulty breathing
appetite. No muscle
tion. Pinpoint pupil
These symptoms
within three days of
pesticides being spr
If you or your pet
any of these sympt
please inform your
veterinarian that pe
poisoning could be
possibility.
Re



Had to rele
them to kill
Editor:
The NSA is harvest
numbers of images
cial recognition tect
that are revolutionize
way the U.S. finds ir
targets worldwide. V
U.S. once focused o
and oral communic
the NSA now uses fa
images, fingerprints
scans to compile bi
and biometric infori
to implement preci
targeting. These sys
seem to now be aut
a manner that will a
generation identified
systematically bring
information gained
surveillance platfor
to follow, locate, tai


destroy selected targets.
Once it is understood that
'~the criminal cases of the five
Taliban detainees traded from
the release of Sgt. Bergdahl
were not strong enough
to guarantee conviction in
American civil court or mili-
tary tribunal, it will become
apparent that in light of the
power of our intelligence
gathering systems, combined
with our remote sensing
* capabilities and our advanced
weapons targeting, these five
can neither run nor hide; and,
we can attack them at will.
Try to understand that we
had to release them in order
to execute them.
Jim Orth
Punta Gorda


Railroad engineer
is not to blame
Editor:
In reply to recent items
published in the Sun re-
garding the sounding of
"locomotive whistles," I
suggest those who wrote them
make themselves familiar
with the Federal Railroad
to upset Administration Operating and
or he is Safety Rules set forth, which
o go ahead by the way must be complied
with by the local railroad
debate company, regarding the
s forced to. blowing of locomotive horns
not have at public railroad crossings.
Joe Biden Any engineer found to be in
s record non-compliance with those
Carson rules can be reprimanded,
ama and serve time off or be dis-
ad him- missed. Those rules specify
ple and that; at a specific location,
ma should (distance from the crossing)
tillary and the locomotive horn must
testimony. be sounded in a specific
and better, sequence and duration until
. "Bye the locomotive actually is
on the crossing. As one with
Richard Pitz 52 years railroad service, in
Punta Gorda the following positions: clerk,
agent dispatcher, yardmaster,
asst. trainmaster, trainmaster,
of terminal trainmaster, and
supt. of transportation, while
soning working in positions above
asst. trainmaster, was required
to perform a specified num-
)le to be ber of "operating and safety"
ssible side rules compliance checks on
spraying those employees who operate
)ets.he trains, each month. As I was
way the also a "certified locomotive
als cause. engineer" I also came under
ing. those rules. Do not blame the
kness. "engineer" for doing his job as
res. required.
Eye, skin, Harry Rodman
station.
z. L of Port Charlotte


e coordina-
Is.
will start
f the
rayed.
t have
oms,
r doctor or
esticide
a

enea Revard
Rotonda West

ease
them

sting huge
using fa-
hnologies
zing the
ntelligence
While the
rn written
nations,
'acial
s, and iris
iographic
rmation
vision
stems
tomatic in
allow next
cation to
g to bear
I from all
ms and
*get and


Nothing wrong
with today's kids

Editor:
I respectfully disagree with
the description of today's
children, 'Kids today! And
in 400 BC' published in the
Viewpoint edition May 29.
My opinion is the total
opposite to what he describes.
I am amazed at the level of
intelligence that our young
people of today have, how
they excel in sports, their
energy, and their compassion.
I taught my children by the
example my mother taught
me: Be quick with praise and
slow to judge, treat all with
respect and there is no excuse
for bad manners.
My life would have been
less bright without children
in my life my own and all
the other mothers' children
who found their way to my
doorstep.
If any child makes their
way to your doorstep, bend
down and offer a helping
hand and a kind word of
encouragement.
The children of today are
our leaders of tomorrow, our
dreams, and our future.
Gay E. Shields
Port Charlotte


LETTER SUBMISSION POLICY
Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have some rules. Please keep them to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community discourse, and the opinions
to less than 250 words. Letters will be edited to length as well as for grammar and spelling. All and statements made in letters are solely those of the individual writers. The newspaper takes
letters must be signed with full name- not initials. An address and telephone number must be no responsibility for the content of these letters. Please send or bring correspondence to the Sun,
included. The phone number and address are not for publication, but must be provided. Due to the Letters to the Editor, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980, or fax to 941-629-2085.
number of letters received, we are able to run only one letter per person per month. The Letters Readers with access to the Internet may email Letters to the Editor at letters@sun-herald.com.


OurTown Page 8 C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Friday, June 6, 2014





The Sun /Friday, June 6, 2014


VIEWPOINT


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 9


Expand new needle exchange pilot program


he Miami-Dade
Infectious Dis-
ease Elimination
Act will now become a
reality with the passing
of House Bill 491 and
Senate Bill 408. The bill
requires the Florida
Department of Health
to establish a needle
and syringe exchange
pilot program in Mi-
ami-Dade County. The
pilot program is to offer
free, clean and unused
needles and hypodermic
syringes as a means to
prevent the transmission
of HIV/AIDS and other
blood-borne diseases
among intravenous drug
users and their partners.
The pilot program must
be administered by the
DOH or a designee, who
may operate the pilot
program at a fixed loca-
tion or by using a mobile
health unit. The desig-
nee may be a licensed
hospital, a licensed
health care clinic, a sub-
stance abuse treatment
program, an HIV/AIDS
service organization, or
another nonprofit entity.
The pilot program
must:
Provide maximum
security of the exchange
site and equipment
Account for the
number, disposal and
storage of needles and
syringes


Dr. Mark
7 speria



Adopt any measure
to control the use and
dispersal of sterile
needles and syringes
Strive for a one ster-
ile to one used exchange
ratio
Make available edu-
cational materials, HIV
counseling and testing,
referral services to pro-
vide education regarding
HIV, AIDS and viral
hepatitis transmission,
and drug-use prevention
and treatment
The bill requires the
collection of data for an-
nual and final reporting
purposes, but prohibits
the collection of any
personal identifying in-
formation from a partic-
ipant. The pilot program
expires July 1, 2019, or
five years after the DOH
designates an entity to
operate the program.
Six months prior to
expiration, the Office of
Program Policy Analysis
and Government
Accountability is
required to submit a


report to the to the
Legislature that includes
data on the pilot pro-
gram and a recommen-
dation on whether the
pilot program should
continue.
The bill prohibits the
use of state funds to op-
erate the pilot program
and specifies the use of
grants and donations
from private sources to
fund the program. The
bill grants the DOH the
authority to adopt rules
to implement the pilot
program.
Needle Exchange
Programs provide sterile
needles and syringes
in exchange for used
needles and syringes to
reduce the transmission
of human immunodefi-
ciency virus (HIV) and
other blood-borne infec-
tions associated with the
reuse of contaminated
needles and syringes
by injection-drug users.
According to the FDA,
used needles are dan-
gerous to people and
pets if not disposed of
safely because they can
injure people and spread
infections that cause
serious health condi-
tions. The most common
infections from such
injuries are:
Hepatitis B (HBV)
Hepatitis C (HCV)
Human


immunodeficiency virus
(HIV)
Moreover, injections
of illicit drugs have been
estimated to represent
approximately one-
third of the estimated
2-3 billion injections
occurring outside of
health care settings
in the U.S. each year,
second only to insulin
injections by persons
with diabetes. For these
reasons, communities
are trying to manage
the disposal of unsterile
needles within the illicit
drug population.
According to the
Center for Disease
Control and Prevention,
needle exchange pro-
grams can help prevent
blood-borne pathogen
transmission by increas-
ing access to sterile sy-
ringes among illicit drug
users and enabling safe
disposal of used needles
and syringes. Often,
programs also provide
other public health
services, such as HIV
testing, risk-reduction
education, and referrals
for substance-abuse
treatment.
A 2012 study
compared improper
public syringe disposal
between Miami, a
city without a needle
exchange program, and
San Francisco, a city


with a needle exchange
program. Using visual
inspection walk-
throughs of high drug
use public areas, the
study found that Miami
was eight times more
likely to have syringes
improperly disposed of
in public areas.
An estimated 1 million
people in the U.S. are
living with HIV/AIDS
and it has been esti-
mated that one-third of
those cases are linked
directly or indirectly
to injection drug use,
including the injection
of heroin. Recently the
National Institute on
Drug Abuse reported an
epidemic of heroin use
in South Florida and
particularly in Miami-
Dade County. The num-
ber of heroin-related
deaths in Miami-Dade
County jumped to 33 in
2012 from 15 in 2011,
a 120 percent increase.
Statewide, Florida has
also seen an upswing
in heroin deaths, which
rose to 117 in 2012 from
62 in 2011, an increase
of 89 percent.
The State of Florida
pays for HIV/AIDS treat-
ment through a variety
of programs, including
Medicaid, the AIDS Drug
Assistance Program,
and the AIDS Insurance
Continuation Program.


The lifetime treatment
cost of an HIV infection
is estimated at $379,668
(in 2010 dollars). Miami-
Dade County has 3,274
reported cases of indi-
viduals living with HIV/
AIDS that have an illicit
drug use-associated risk.
If 10 percent of those
individuals with an illicit
drug use-associated risk
had avoided infection,
this would represent
a savings in treatment
costs of approximately
$124 million.
Injection drug use is
now the major mode
of transmission of HCV
through sharing of
contaminated needles
or drug preparation
equipment. HCV is the
most common chronic
blood-borne infection
in the United States.
Charlotte County,
Florida had one of the
highest incidence rates
of chronic HCV in 2012
(117.12 per 100,000
compared to state rate
of 96.59 per 100,000)
and continues to have a
high incidence rate for
2013 (137.00 per 100,000
compared to state rate of
103.27 per 100,000).
Dr Mark Asperilla is
an infectious disease
specialist in Charlotte
County. Readers may
reach him at doctor@
sunline.net.


Opening up a trunk and memories of D-Day


M elissa Craw-
ford's grand-
father kept
World War II in a trunk
in the basement of his
Rhode Island home. All
of Robert M. Walling Jr.'s
memorabilia was there:
the worn yearbook from
his time training at Camp
Rucker in Alabama,
pictures of his fellow sol-
diers, letters to and from
his mother, the miniature
Bible he carried when he
landed in Normandy on
the morning of June 6,
1944 ...
"Pa," as Walling's
grandchildren called
him, kept his memories
as sealed as that foot-
locker. He never talked
about the war. But four
years ago, when Melissa
turned 30, she asked for a
special birthday gift: Tell
me about the trunk, Pa.
Melissa lives in
Arlington, Va., and is a
copyright specialist at
the Library of Congress.
She didn't know much
about World War II, but
every couple of months
for a year she went to


John Kelly
Washington Post



Rhode Island to sit with
her maternal grandfather
as he pulled items from
the trunk. Each piece of
paper and scrap of fabric
was a time machine
transporting him back to
the war.
Friday marks the 70th
anniversary of D-Day,
the Allied invasion of
France. "They knew
some guys in the boat
couldn't swim," Melissa
said of the men in the
87th Chemical Mortar
Battalion, Company D.
"Their major fear wasn't
getting hurt ashore, but
it was actually swimming
out of the boat to get to
the shore."
Nauseated from the
swell and the anticipa-
tion, men were throwing
up everywhere in the
landing craft. "The
stench of the boat stayed
on their clothes, the
reeking smell staying


with them on the shore,"
said Melissa. "He said,
'I never have forgotten
that."'
And then Cpl. Walling
was on the beach.
"He was in the first
wave," Melissa said.
"They were supposed
to land closer to Omaha
Beach, but because of
the currents, they landed
on Utah. He said it prob-
ably saved their lives."
Even so, casualties
mounted. Their leader,
Capt. HenryWilliams,
was killed by a German
bomb.
"He'd trained them all
and was like a father to
them," Melissa said.
Walling and the others
were ordered to leave the
body behind and move
forward. It was a mantra
repeated endlessly over
the coming months: You
can't turn back. You can't
turn back. You have to
keep moving forward.
On D-Day, Walling
focused on a landmark
he'd seen from the land-
ing craft: the red roof of
a house in the village of


Sainte-Marie-du-Mont.
It was a fixed point in
the deadly chaos around
him.
Walling survived
D-Day and the Battle
of the Bulge and was
on leave back in Rhode
Island when he learned
the war in Europe was
over.
"He was in the Irish
American club in
Newport," Melissa said.
"There was cheering
and drinking. He just
got up and walked back
home. He didn't feel like
celebrating."
And he didn't feel
much like talking about
his experiences, some-
thing not uncommon
among members of the
Greatest Generation. "I
think what had hap-
pened with him was he
moved back and just
wanted to move on with
life," Melissa said.
He went to Brown
University on the
GI Bill, got married,
settled down, moved
to Middletown, R.I.,
worked as an engineer,


had kids, retired. Then
his granddaughter asked
him to tell her about the
trunk in the basement.
They decided they would
write a book together
about the 87th Chemical
Mortar Battalion. They
visited a military muse-
um in Massachusetts,
where he showed her
how a mortar worked.
They planned to go
to Normandy together
but never did. Pa had
a stroke and died in
December 2010. He
was 85. The last item
that Melissa pulled from
the trunk was a piece of
green parachute fabric
her grandfather had
picked up in Europe.
"It was really sad," she
said of coming to the end
without her Pa. But how
much sadder it would
have been had they
never talked about the
trunk.
Two years ago, Melissa
went to Normandy,
where the French still
cherish the GIs. She


walked to the beach,
turned away from the
water and saw the house
with the red roof. She
visited the graves of
members of the 87th
who never returned.
Melissa has finished
the book. Today, she'll
go to the National World
War II Memorial in
Washington. She'll re-
member her grandfather
and all the other young
soldiers who waded
ashore in France 70 years
ago.
"I always would say,
'Pa, you were part of
D-Day. That's amazing,'"
Melissa said. "He said the
way he thought about it,
every day in the war is
important, not just the
day when you're landing.
Every day you're lucky to
be alive. Every day you're
one more day closer to
home."
John Kelly is a
Washington Post col-
umnist. Readers can
follow him on Twitter @
johnkelly


Victims of progressivism


olleges and uni-
versities are being
educated by Wash-
ington and are finding the
experience excruciating.
They are learning that
when they say campus
victimizations are ubiqui-
tous ("micro-aggressions,"
often not discernible to
the untutored eye, are
everywhere), and that
when they make victim-
hood a coveted status that
confers privileges, victims
proliferate. And aca-
demia's progressivism has
rendered it intellectually
defenseless now that pro-
gressivism's achievement,
the regulatory state, has
decided it is academia's
turn to be broken to gov-
ernment's saddle.
Consider the supposed
campus epidemic of
rape, aka "sexual assault."
Herewith, a Philadelphia
magazine report about
Swarthmore College,
where in 2013 a student
"was in her room with
a guy with whom she'd
been hooking up for three
months":


"They'd now decided -
mutually, she thought -
just to be friends. When
he ended up falling asleep
on her bed, she changed
into pajamas and climbed
in next to him. Soon,
he was putting his arm
around her and taking off
her clothes. 'I basically
said, "No, I don't want to
have sex with you." And
then he said, "OK, that's
fine" and stopped.... And
then he started again a
few minutes later, taking
off my panties, taking off
his boxers. I just kind of
laid there and didn't do
anything- I had already
said no. I was just tired
and wanted to go to bed. I
let him finish. I pulled my
panties back on and went
to sleep."'
Six weeks later, the
woman reported that she
had been raped. Now the
Obama administration
is riding to the rescue of
"sexual assault" victims. It
vows to excavate equities
from the ambiguities of
the hookup culture, this
cocktail of hormones,


alcohol and the faux
sophistication of today's
prolonged adolescence
of especially privileged
young adults.
WILL 110


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CHARLOTTE COUNTY BOARD
OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATIVE VARIANCE

The zoning official has received a request for an
Administrative Variance and intends to qrant the
variance pursuant to Section 3-9-6.1(g) of the
Charlotte County Zoning Code. Petition number
AVAR-14-011 is being requested by Fireside
Homes of Venice, Inc. (Skip Paschke for Joseph
and Diane Geiss). The request is for an
Administrative Variance of .20' to allow a 14.8'
street side yard setback instead of the required
15', located in the Residential Single Family-3.5
(RSF-3.5) zoning district. The property address is
1111 Salox Street, Port Charlotte, Florida and is
described as Lot 4 and 5, Block 846, Port
Charlotte Subdivision Section 26, located in
Section 09, Township 40 South, Range 22 East. A
complete legal description and additional
information are on file.
This notice is being mailed to the adjoining
property owners as revealed by the current
County Tax Roll. Within fifteen (15) days of the
publication of this notice, but not thereafter, any
interested person may apply in writing stating their
name, the nature of their interest and the nature of
their opposition. Any such written communication
should be addressed to Shaun Cullinan, Zoning
Official, Charlotte County Community
Development Department, Zoning Division, 18400
Murdock Circle, Port Charlotte, Florida 33948-
1095.

Shaun Cullinan
Zoning Official
Published: June 6, 2014


F


I


IWEMPT R ed! 114-
MAMMA ry h .,.d.y only in the SUNAL





OurTown Page10 C


www.sunnewspapers.net


VIEWPOINT


The Sun /Friday, June 6, 2014


Don't harsh our mellow, dude


he caramel-choco-
late flavored candy
bar looked so in-
nocent, like the Sky Bars
I used to love as a child.
Sitting in my hotel
room in Denver, I
nibbled off the end and
then, when nothing
happened, nibbled
some more. I figured if
I was reporting on the
social revolution rocking
Colorado in January, the
giddy culmination of pot
Prohibition, I should try
a taste of legal, edible pot
from a local shop.
What could go wrong
with a bite or two?
Everything, as it turned
out.
Not at first. For an
hour, I felt nothing. I
figured I'd order dinner
from room service and
return to my more
mundane drugs of
choice, chardonnay and
mediocre-movies-on-
demand.
But then I felt a scary
shudder go through my
body and brain. I barely
made it from the desk
to the bed, where I lay
curled up in a halluci-
natory state for the next
eight hours. I was thirsty
but couldn't move to get
water. Or even turn off


~Maureen
Dowd



the lights. I was panting
and paranoid, sure that
when the room-service
waiter knocked and I
didn't answer, he'd call
the police and have me
arrested for being unable
to handle my candy.
I strained to remember
where I was or even what
I was wearing, touching
my green corduroy
jeans and staring at the
exposed-brick wall. As
my paranoia deepened, I
became convinced that I
had died and no one was
telling me.
It took all night
before it began to
wear off, distressingly
slowly. The next day, a
medical consultant at
an edibles plant where
I was conducting an
interview mentioned that
candy bars like that are
supposed to be cut into
16 pieces for novices; but
that recommendation


hadn't been on the label.
I reckoned that the fact
that I was not a regular
marijuana smoker made
me more vulnerable, and
that I should have known
better. But it turns out,
five months in, that some
kinks need to be ironed
out with the intoxicating
open bar at the Mile
High Club.
Colorado raked in
about $12.6 million
the first three months
after pot was legalized
for adults 21 and older.
Pot party planners are
dreaming up classy
events: The Colorado
Symphony just had
its first "Classically
Cannabis" fundraiser
with joints and Debussy.
But the state is also
coming to grips with the
darker side of unleash-
ing a drug as potent as
marijuana on a horde of
tourists of all ages and
tolerance levels seeking a
mellow buzz.
In March, a 19-year-
old Wyoming college
student jumped off a
Denver hotel balcony
after eating a pot cookie
with 65 milligrams of
THC. In April, a Denver
man ate pot-infused
Karma Kandy and began


talking like it was the end
of the world, scaring his
wife and three kids. Then
he retrieved a handgun
from a safe and killed his
wife while she was on the
phone with an emergen-
cy dispatcher.
As Jack Healy reported
in The Times on Sunday,
Colorado hospital
officials "are treating
growing numbers of chil-
dren and adults sickened
by potent doses of edible
marijuana," and neigh-
boring states are seeing
more stoned drivers.
"We realized there was
a problem because we're
watching everything
with the urgency of the
first people to regulate in
this area," said Andrew
Freedman, the state's
director of marijuana
coordination. "There are
way too many stories of
people not understand-
ing how much they're
eating. With liquor,
people understand
what they're getting
themselves into. But that
doesn't exist right now
for edibles for new users
in the market. It would
behoove the industry to
create a more pleasant
experience for people.
"The whole industry


was set up for people
who smoked frequently.
It needs to learn how
to educate new users
in the market. We have
to create a culture of
responsibility around
edibles, so people know
what to expect to feel."
Gov. John
Hickenlooper and the
Legislature recently
created a task force to
come up with packaging
that clearly differentiates
pot cookies and candy
and gummy bears from
normal sweets with
an eye toward protecting
children and directed
the Department of
Revenue to restrict the
amount of edibles that
can be sold at one time
to one person. The
governor also signed
legislation mandating
that there be a stamp on
edibles, possibly a mar-
ijuana leaf. (Or maybe a
stoned skull and bones?)
The state plans to start
testing to make sure the
weed is spread evenly
throughout the product.
The task force is discuss-
ing having budtenders
give better warnings to
customers and moving
toward demarcating a
single-serving size of


10 milligrams. (Industry
representatives object-
ed to the expense of
wrapping bites of candy
individually.)
"My kids put rocks
and batteries in their
mouths," said Bob
Eschino, the owner of
Incredibles, which makes
candy and serves up
chocolate and strawberry
fountains. "If I put a
marijuana leaf on a piece
of chocolate, they'll still
put it in their mouths."
He argues that, since
pot goodies leave the
dispensary in child-
proof packages, it is the
parents' responsibility
to make sure their kids
don't get hold of it.
"Somebody suggested
we just make every-
thing look like a gray
square so it doesn't
look appealing," he
said. "Why should the
whole industry suffer
just because less than
5 percent of people are
having problems with
the correct dosing?"
Does he sound a little
paranoid?
Maureen Dowd is a
New York Times colum-
nist. Readers may reach
her via www.newyork
times. com.


VA scandal further discredits Obama's policies


resident Obama
evidently was
caught by surprise
by the scandal at the
Department of Veterans
Affairs.
So, apparently, was VA
Secretary Eric Shinseki,
who evidently took at
face value the corrupt
VA statistics and who,
after a distinguished
military career, resigned
last week.
One who was probably
not taken by surprise
is longtime Yale Law
Professor Peter Schuck,
who identified the prob-
lems at the VA before
the scandal broke in his
recently published book,
"Why Government Fails
So Often and How It Can
Do Better."
Schuck is no liber-
tarian who wants to do
away with government
altogether. He says he
has voted for every
Democratic presidential
candidate but one since
1964.
The federal govern-
ment, he notes, does
more things than ever
and gets less respect
than ever from the


people it purports
to serve. There is, he
argues, a connection
between these two
trends.
The Department of
Veterans Affairs is a
case in point. Writing
well before the current
scandal, Schuck notes
that the VA's budget
has more than doubled
in real terms over a
dozen years, from
$45 billion in 2000 to
$154 billion in 2012, and
that it hired many more
claims processors.
"Yet as Congress keeps
authorizing new benefits
and makes eligibility
easier, the backlog (now
900,000 claims) grows
steadily worse due to the
agency's continued reli-
ance on paper records,
its perversely designed


production quotas that
encourage employees to
reach for the thin folders
first, the numerous
refilled and appealed
claims after denials,
and its lax definition
of disability to include
common age-related
conditions."
Reaching for the thin
folders first, it turns
out, was not the worst
of it. The waiting list
scandal uncovered at the
Phoenix VA hospital was
not just the product of a
few miscreants.
As the VA inspector
general's report makes
clear, there was a
widespread conspiracy
to keep veterans off the
official waiting lists.
Dozens if not hundreds
of VA employees must
have cooperated and
colluded.
Each of them knew
what was going on. Each
knew that they were
cheating and violating
the rules. And many
understood that bonuses
and promotions hinged
on the success of their
conspiracy.
So the PhoenixVA


hospital reported that
the average waiting
time for medical ap-
pointments was 24 days
- short of the Obama
administration's 2011
goal of 14 days but
within ballpark range.
But the actual waiting
time, according to the
inspector general's re-
port, was 115 days. That
is orders of magnitude
greater than the 14-day
goal.
When Obamacare was
under consideration in
Congress, liberal blog-
gers like Ezra Klein, then
at the Washington Post,
called the VA health
system "one of the most
remarkable success sto-
ries in American public
policy." It was an exam-
ple of "when socialism
works in America."
True, in some respects
the VA system performs
admirably. Its work on
prosthetics has helped
many severely wounded
veterans live productive
and satisfying lives.
And it's also true that
some VA units perform
better than others.
Death rates and IV-line


bloodstream infections
are far better at the
top-rated Boston VA
than in Phoenix, for
example.
But, as the Ethics and
Public Policy Center's
Yuval Levin points out,
"centrally run, highly
bureaucratic public
health care systems that
do not permit meaning-
ful pricing and do not
allow for competition
among providers of care
can really only respond
to supply and demand
pressures through wait-
ing lines." Long queues
are the price of free care.
It's easy to call for
eliminating waste, fraud
and abuse, and some-
times an administrative
change can improve
performance. Levin, who
worked in the George
W Bush administration,
credits the Clinton
administration for some
"very well executed"
modernization efforts at
the VA.
But policy failure
and mismanagement,
Schuck argues, are
the result of "the deep
structures of our policy


system perverse in-
centives, collective
irrationality, lack of
credibility with neces-
sary stakeholders, the
superior speed, flexibili-
ty and incentives of pri-
vate markets, obstacles
to implementation, the
inherent limits of law as
a policy instrument and
a mediocre and degrad-
ed bureaucracy."
It doesn't help when
you have a president
uninterested in the
actual operations of
government and a VA
secretary unduly trust-
ing of subordinates.
Barack Obama came
to office determined to
expand government and
confident that Americans
would like it. Instead,
Obamacare, the sluggish
economy and now the VA
scandal have tended to
discredit big government
more than any abstract
argument could.
Michael Barone is a
senior political analyst
for The Washington
Examiner Readers can
reach him via www.
washingtonexaminer
com.


WILL
FROM PAGE 9

The administration's
crucial and contradictory
statistics are validated the
usual way, by official repe-
tition; Joe Biden has been
heard from. The statistics
are: One in five women
is sexually assaulted

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Center, Inc.


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while in college, and only
12 percent of assaults
are reported. Simple
arithmetic demonstrates
that if the 12 percent
reporting rate is correct,
the 20 percent assault
rate is preposterous. Mark
Perry of the American
Enterprise Institute notes,
for example, that in the
four years 2009-12 there
were 98 reported sexual
assaults at Ohio State.
That would be 12 percent
of 817 total out of a fe-
male student population
of approximately 28,000,
for a sexual assault rate of


approximately 2.9 percent
- too high but nowhere
near 20 percent.
Department of
Education lawyers disre-
gard pesky arithmetic and
elementary due process.
Threatening to withdraw
federal funding, DOE
mandates adoption of a
minimal "preponderance
of the evidence" standard
when adjudicating sexual
assault charges between
males and the female
"survivors" note the
language of prejudgment.
Combine this with
capacious definitions of


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sexual assault that can
include not only forcible
sexual penetration but
also nonconsensual
touching. Then add the
doctrine that the consent
of a female who has
been drinking might not
protect a male from being
found guilty of rape. Then
comes costly litigation
against institutions that
have denied due process
to males they accuse of
what society considers
serious felonies.
Now academia is
unhappy about DOE's
plan for government to
rate every institution's
educational product.
But the professors need
not worry A DOE official
says this assessment will
be easy: "It's like rating
a blender." Education,


Neil B. Zusman,
M.D., EA.C.S.


gadgets what's the
difference?
Meanwhile, the newest
campus idea for prevent-
ing victimizations an
idea certain to multiply
claims of them is
"trigger warnings." They
would be placed on
assigned readings or an-
nounced before lectures.
Otherwise, traumas could
be triggered in students
whose tender sensibilities
would be lacerated by
unexpected encounters
with racism, sexism, vio-
lence (dammit, Hamlet,
put down that sword!)
or any other facet of
reality that might violate
a student's entitlement to
serenity. This entitlement
has already bred campus
speech codes that punish
unpopular speech. Now


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the codes are begetting
the soft censorship of
trigger warnings to swad-
dle students in a "safe,"
"supportive," "unthreat-
ening" environment, in-
tellectual comfort for the
intellectually dormant.
It is salutary that
academia, with its
adversarial stance toward
limited government
and cultural common
sense, is making itself
ludicrous. Academia is
learning that its attempts
to create victim-free
campuses by making
everyone hypersensitive,
even delusional, about
victimizations -brings
increasing supervision by
the regulatory state that
progressivism celebrates.
What government is
inflicting on colleges
and universities, and
what they are inflicting
on themselves, dimin-
ishes their autonomy,
resources, prestige and
comity. Which serves
them right. They have
asked for this by asking
for progressivism.
George Will is a colum-
nist for The Washington
Post. Readers may reach
him at georgewill@
washpost. com.


I ~ ZUSMAN EYE CARE CENTER1
L I







The Sun /Friday, June 6,2014 www.sunnewspapers.net C Our Town Page 11


NOTICE OF ACTION NOTICE OF
L31161 FORECLOSURE


3100








LEGALS



FICTITIOUS NAME




6/6/2014

NOTICE OF ACTION




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 13-2986-CA
Division:
Stephanie Arture,
Petitioner
and
Brian Arture,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
Permant Change of Parental
Rights
TO: Brian Arture
Last Known Address
335 San Carlos Dr,
Punta Gorda, FL 33950
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for parental rights has
been filed against you and that
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any, to
it on Stephanie Arture, whose
address is 335 San Carlos Dr.,
Punta Gorda, FL 33950 on or
before 07/07/2014, and file the
original with the clerk of this
Court at 350 E. Marion Ave.,
Punta Gorda, FL 33950 before
service on Petitioner or immedi-
ately thereafter. If you fail to do
so, a default may be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the petition.
Copies of all court docu-
ments in this case, including
orders, are available at the
Clerk of the Circuit Court's
office. You may review these
documents upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of
the Circuit Court's office noti-
fied of your current address.
(You may file Notice of Cur-
rent Address, Florida
Supreme Court Approved
Family Law Form 12.915.)
Future papers in this lawsuit
will be mailed to the address
on record at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285,
Florida Family Law Rules of
Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of docu-
ments and information. Fail-
ure to comply can result in
sanctions, including dismissal
or striking of pleadings.
Dated: 06/02/2014
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: J. Kern
Deputy Clerk
Publish: 06/06/14, 06/13/14
06/20/14, 06/27/14
339038 3049108
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO: 14001058CA
JEFFREY H. WHEELER
2011 REVOCABLE TRUST
Plaintiff,
Vs.
TAMMY BLUMENSTINE LANG-
MAN, DAVID JON BLUMENSTINE,
MARC LEE BLUMENSTINE, and
ALDA M. BLUMENSTINE
CHARLOTTE COUNTY
CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARD
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: TAMMY BLUMENSTINE LANG-
MAN, DAVID JON BLUMENSTINE,
MARC LEE BLUMENSTINE, and
ALDA M. BLUMENSTINE, if alive,
or if dead, their unknown spous-
es, widows, widowers, heirs,
devisees, creditors, grantees,
and all parties having or claiming
by, through, under, or against
them, and any and all persons
claiming any right, title, interest,
claim, lien, estate or demand
against the Defendants in regards
to the following-described proper-
ty in Charlotte County, Florida:
Parcel #1:Lot 32, Block 3120,
Port Charlotte Subdivision, Sec-
tion 50, a Subdivision according
to the Plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book 5. Pages 64A
through 64F, of the Public
Records of Charlotte County,
Florida. Parcel I.D. No.
402202451002.
Parcel #2:Lot 29, Block 3120,
Port Charlotte Subdivision, Sec-
tion 50 according to the Pat
thereof recorded in Plat Book
5, Pages 64A thru 64F of the
Public Records of Charlotte
County Florida. Parcel I.D. No.
402202451005.
Notice is hereby given to each of
you that an action to quiet title to
the above-described property has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve your written
defenses on Plaintiff's attorney,
Sandra A. Sutliff, 3440 Conway
Blvd., Suite 1-C, Port Charlotte,


FL 33952, and file the original
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Charlotte County, P. 0. Box 1687,
Punta Gorda, FL 33950, on or
before Jly 7, 2014, or otherwise
a default judgment will be entered
against you for the relief sought in
the Complaint.
THIS NOTICE will be published
once each week for four consec-
utive weeks in a newspaper of
general circulation published in
Charlotte County, Florida.


DATED this 3rd day of June,
2014.
SANDRA A. SUTLIFF. ESQ.
3440 Conway Blvd., Suite 1-C
Port Charlotte, FL 33952
(941)743-0046
FL Bar # 0857203
Publish: 06/06/14, 06/13/14
06/20/14, 06/27/14
129606 3048974

I NOTICE OF
AUCTION



PROMPT WRECKER SERVICE
11139 TAMIAMI TRAIL
PUNTA GORDA, FL 33955
941-6394000
AUCTION DATE 6/20/14
AT 10:00 AM
1994 DODGE
VIN# 1B4GH54R3RX222756
Publish: June 6, 2014
103614 3049070

NOTICE TO


12~

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RAYMOND H. WENTLAND
Deceased.
File No. 14-818-CP
Division PROBATE
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate
of RAYMOND H. WENTLAND,
deceased, whose date of death
was April 2, 2014, is pending in
the Circuit Court for CHARLOTTE
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is P.O. Box
511687, Punta Gorda, FL 33951.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attor-
ney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN
THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECE-
DENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this notice is June 5, 2014.
Attorney for
Personal Representative:
FRANK S. LEONTITSIS
Attorney
Florida Bar Number: 47072
Lucas Law Firm P.A.
17833 Murdock Circle Suite B
Port Charlotte, FL 33948
Telephone: (941) 206-2120
Fax: (941) 206-2122
E-Mail:
fleontitsis@lucaslawfirm.org
Secondary E-Mail:
yghilardi@lucaslawfirm.org
Personal Representative:
RODGER R. WENTLAND
21031 W. Confier Dr.
Plainfield, Florida 60544
Publish: June 5 and 12, 2014
239255 3048298

NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE I



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 10002318CA
BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,
LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME
LOANS SERVICING LP,
Plaintiff,
vs.
STEPHEN J. COHEN, ET AL.
Defendants
RE-NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Fore-
closure dated December 15,
2011, and entered in Case No.
10002318CA, of the Circuit
Court of the Twentieth Judicial Cir-
cuit in and for CHARLOTTE Coun-
ty, Florida. BAC HOME LOANS
SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRY-
WIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING
LP (hereafter "Plaintiff"), is Plain-
tiff and STEPHEN J. COHEN;
MARGARET M. COHEN, are defen-
dants. I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash via the Inter-
net at www.charlotte.realfore-
closecomn, at 11:00 a.m., on the
25 day of June, 2014, the follow-
ing described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment, to
wit:
LOT 20, BLOCK 587, OF
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION,
SECTION 41, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF,
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
5, PAGE 51A THRU 51K OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF


CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
If you are an individual with a
disability who needs an
accommodation in order to
participate in a court pro-
ceeding or other court ser-
vice, program, or activity, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,


to the provision of certain
assistance. Requests for
accommodations may be pre-
sented on this form, in anoth-
er written format, or orally.
Please complete the attached
form and return it to jem-
bury@ca.cjis20.org as far in
advance as possible, but
preferably at least seven (7)
days before your scheduled
court appearance or other
court activity. Upon request
by a qualified individual with a
disability, this document will
be made available in an alter-
nate format. If you need assis-
tance in completing this form
due to your disability, or to
request this document in an
alternate format, please con-
tact Jon Embury,
Admin.Svc.Mgr., phone
(941)637-2110, e-mail iem-
bury@ca.ciis20.org.
Dated this 27 day of May,
2014.
Barbara Scott
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY K. Sandrock
As Deputy Clerk
Any person claiming an inter-
est in the surplus from the
sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date
of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the
sale.
Publish: 5/30/14 and 6/6/14
232598 3046233

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 08-2012-CA-003039
RESI WHOLE LOAN III LLC,
Plaintiff
vs.
KENNETH T. ANDERSEN, et al.
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pur-
suant to a Final Judgment dated
March 24, 2014, entered in Civil
Case Number 08-2012-CA-
003039, in the Circuit Court for
Charlotte County, Florida, wherein
GREENWICH INVESTORS XLIII
TRUST 2013-1 is the Plaintiff, and
KENNETH T. ANDERSEN, et al.,
are the Defendants, Charlotte
County Clerk of Court will sell the
property situated in Charlotte
County, Florida, described as:
LOTS 35 AND 36, BLOCK 109
OF HARBOUR HEIGHTS, SEC-
TION 4, PART 2, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3,
PAGE 32, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
at public sale, to the highest bid-
der, for cash, at at www.char-
lotte.realforeclose.com at 11:00
AM, on the 25 day of September,
2014. Any person claiming an
interest in the surplus from the
sale, if any, other than the prop-
erty owner as of the date of the
its pendens must file a claim with-
in 60 days after the sale.
Dated: April 8, 2014
Barbara T. Scott
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: J. Miles
If you are a person with a disabili-
ty who needs any accommoda-
tion in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please con-
tact the Administrative Services
Manager, whose office is located
at 350 E. Marion Avenue, Punta
Gorda, Florida 33950, and whose
telephone number is (941) 637-
2281, within two working days of
your receipt of this [describe
notice]; if you are hearing or voice
impaired, call 711.
Si ou se yon moun ki gen yon
andikap ki bezwen aranjman nen-
pot nan lod yo patisipe nan sa a
pwose dapel, ou gen dwa, san sa
pa koute ou, ak founiti asistans a
seten. Tanpri kontakte Adminis-
tratif Sevis Manadje a, ki gen
biwo sitiye nan 350 Avenue Mari-
on E., Punta Gorda, Florid 33950,
epi ki gen nimewo telefon se
(941) 637-2281, nan de jou k ap
travay yo resevwa ou nan sa a
[avi dekri]; si ou se odyans oswa
vwa ki gen pwoblem, rele 711.
Si vous etes une personne handi-
capee qui a besoin d'une adapta-
tion pour pouvoir participer a
cette instance, vous avez le droit,
sans frais pour vous, pour la four-
niture d'une assistance certain.
S'il vous plait contacter le
Directeur des services adminis-
tratifs, dont le bureau est situe au
350, avenue E. Marion, Punta
Gorda, Floride 33950, et dont le
numero de telephone est le (941)
637-2281, dans les deux jours
ouvrables suivant Ia reception de
Ia presente [decrire avis]; si vous
etes audience ou de Ia voix
alteree, composer le 711.
Si usted es una persona con una
discapacidad que necesita
cualquier acomodacion para
poder participar en este proced-
imiento, usted tiene derecho, sin
costa alguno para usted, para el
suministro de determinada asis-
tencia. Por favor, pongase en
contacto con el Administrador de
Servicios Administrativos, cuya
oficina esta ubicada en 350 E.
Avenida Marion, Punta Gorda,
Florida 33950, y cuyo numero de
telefono es (941) 637-2281, den-
tro de los dos dias habiles sigu-
ientes a Ia recepcion de esta
[describa aviso]; Si usted. esta
escuchando o Ia voz alterada,
Ilame al 711.
Publish: 5/30/14 and 6/6/14
276862 3046218
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR


CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 13001766CA

To view today's legal notices
and more visit,
www.floridapublicnotices.com


L NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE



CINCO FUND-I, LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
FREDERICK JOSEPH JORDAN, IV,
an individual, UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF FREDERICK JOSEPH
JORDAN, IV, IF ANY, and
UNKNOWN TENANTS IN
POSSESSION, IF ANY,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE
PURSUANT TO 45.031
FLA. STAT.
TO ALL DEFENDANTS
AND ALL OTHERS WHOM
IT MAY CONCERN:
Notice is hereby given that pur-
suant to the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure entered on May 6,
2014, in Case No.:
130011766CA, of the Circuit
Court of the Twentieth Judicial Cir-
cuit in and for Charlotte County,
Florida, in which CINCO FUND-I,
LLC, is the Plaintiff, and FREDER-
ICK JOSEPH JORDAN, IV,
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF FREDER-
ICK JOSEPH JORDAN, IV, IF ANY,
and UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POS-
SESSION, IF ANY are the Defen-
dants, I, Barbara T. Scott, the
Charlotte County Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court, will sell at public sale
the following described property
as set forth in said Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure, to wit:
The SW 1/4 of NE 1/4 of
SE 1/4 of Section 1,
Township 41 South, Range
23 East. Consisting of two
and one-half acres (2 1/2)
more or less. Tract #475
and Tract #476, Charlotte
County, Florida.
The sale will be held on Il9,
2014, or soon thereafter, to the
highest and best bidder for cash
at https://www.charlotte. realfore-
close.com/, beginning at 11:00
a.m., on the prescribed date, in
accordance with 45.031 Fla.
Stat.
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis
Pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 29 day of May,
2014.
Clerk of Court
By: K. Sandrock
Deputy Clerk
Publish: June 6 and 13, 2014
322311 3048328

NOTICE OF
I HEARING

L~m3124

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
YOU ARE HEREBY notified that
the Punta Gorda City Council will
hold Public Hearings on Wednes-
day, June 18, 2014, at 9:00
a.m. or as soon thereafter as may
be heard to consider the following
requests:
GA-04-14 An Ordinance of
the City of Punta Gorda, Flori-
da, Amending Chapter 23,
"Traffic", Article II, "Parking
Areas", Section 23-13, "Park-
ing in Laishley Park and Ponce
de Leon Park", Subsection
(b), Punta Gorda Code, to
allow for temporary parking
by marina customers; provid-
ing for conflict and severabili-
ty and providing an effective
date.
GA-07-14 An Ordinance of
the City of Punta Gorda, Flori-
da, Amending Chapter 12,
"Business Tax Act", Section
12-17, 'Vending and Amuse-
ment Machines", Punta Gorda
Code, to clarify the local busi-
ness tax rate for vending and
amusement machines and to
reduce the rate levied per
machine; providing for conflict
and severability and providing
an effective date.
GA-08-14 An Ordinance of
the City of Punta Gorda, Flori-
da, Amending Chapter 23,
"Traffic", Article II, "Parking
Areas", Section 23-17(e),
Punta Gorda Code, limiting on-
street parking on Olympia
Avenue between Cross Street
(U.S. 41) and Sullivan Street;
providing for conflicts and
severability; and providing an
effective date.
Said hearings will be held in Coun-
cil Chambers at 326 West Marion
Avenue, Punta Gorda. Any per-


NOTICE OF NOTICE OF
HEARING MEETING
~3124 LW43126


son desiring to be heard on these
matters may appear at the above
time and place. In accordance
with the Americans with Disabili-
ties Act and Florida Statute
286.26, special accommoda-
tions may be made by contacting
the Office of the City Clerk at
(941)575-3369.
A copy of this notice is available
for inspection at the Office of the
City Clerk at the above address.
If an appeal is to be taken from
any decision at this hearing, a ver-
batim record of the proceeding
may be required.
KAREN SMITH, CITY CLERK
CITY OF PUNTA GORDA
Publish: June 6, 2014
102469 3049054

CHECK THE
CLASSIFIED!
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
YOU ARE HEREBY notified that
the Punta Gorda Planning Com-
mission will hold Public Hearings
on Monday, June 23, 2014, at
2:00 p.m., and City Council will
hold Public Hearings on Wednes-
day, July 9, 2014, at 9:00 a.m.
or as soon thereafter as may be
heard to consider the following
requests:
SE-01-14 A Special Excep-
tion request by Jake Williams,
Agent for the Isles Yacht Club,
Inc., pursuant to Chapter 26,
Section 26-16.8, Punta Gorda
Code, to allow the expansion
of the Yacht Club use on to
Lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 & 6, Block
1, Punta Gorda Isles Section
1, in a General Multi-family-15
units per acre (GM-15) zoning
district as required by Chapter
26, Section 26-3.5(f)(1),
Punta Gorda Code.
Property Address:
1780 and 1800 West Marion
Avenue, Punta Gorda, Florida.
ZA-02-14 An Ordinance of
the City of Punta Gorda, Flori-
da, Amending Chapter 26,
Punta Gorda Code, known as
the Land Development Regu-
lations, to correct scrivener's
errors; amending Article 3,
"Regulating Districts", Section
26-3.13, "SRO, Special Resi-
dential Overlay District", Sub-
section (n), "Garbage Contain-
ers/Clothes Drying", and
amending Article 8, "Stan-
dards of General Applicabili-
ty", Section 26-8.14, "Struc-
tures and Uses Limited in
Yards", Subsection (i), provid-
ing for a maximum permitted
width for garbage can or
equipment hide pads; provid-
ing for conflict and severabili-
ty; and providing an effective
date.
ZA-05-14 An Ordinance of
the City of Punta Gorda, Flori-
da, Amending Chapter 9,
"Public Nuisances", Section 9-
12, "Appearance and Mainte-
nance Standards", Subsection
(i), "Vacant Lots", Punta Gorda
Code, to provide require-
ments regarding dead trees
and dead vegetation; amend-
ing Chapter 26, "Land Devel-
opment Regulations", Article
8, "Standards of General
Applicability", Section 26-
8.11, "Property Mainte-
nance", Subsection (e), Punta
Gorda Code, providing for the
removal of dead trees and
dead vegetation; providing for
conflict and severability; and
providing an effective date.
Said hearings will be held in
Council Chambers at 326 West
Marion Avenue, Punta Gorda. Any
person desiring to be heard on
these matters may appear at the
above time and place. In accor-
dance with the Americans with
Disabilities Act and Florida
Statute 286.26, special accom-
modations may be made by con-
tacting the Office of the City Clerk
at (941)575-3369.
A copy of this notice is available
for inspection at the Office of the
City Clerk at the above address.
If an appeal is to be taken from
any decision at this hearing, a ver-
batim record of the proceeding
may be required.
KAREN SMITH, CITY CLERK
CITY OF PUNTA GORDA
Publish: June 6, 2014
102469 3049057


NOTICE OF AUDITOR
SELECTION COMMITTEE
MEETING
The Englewood Water District has
scheduled an Auditor Selection
Committee Meeting on Wednes-
day, June 11, 2014 commencing
at 10:00 a.m.; or as soon there-
after as practical, for the purpose
of developing a Request for Pro-
posal for Auditing Services. The
meeting will be held in the EWD
Board Room at 201 Selma
Avenue, Englewood. The public is
invited to attend.
Steven Samuels, Chairman
Board of Supervisors
Englewood Water District
Publish: June 6, 2014
251809 3049043
CHARLO'TE COUNTY
HEALTHY START COALITION
GENERAL MEMBERSHIP
MEETING
Charlotte County Healthy Start
Coalition, Inc., General Mem-
berhsip Meeting will be held at the
HOMELESS Coalition Office,
1476 Kenesaw Street, Port Char-
lotte 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday,
June 11, 2014. The meeting is
open to the public. Phone 764-
9700 for more information.
Publish: June 6, 2014
128405 3049127

/ NOTICE OF SALE




NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
Big Jim Self Storage intends to
sell the personal property
described below to enforce a lien
imposed on said property under
the Florida Self Storage Facility
Act statutes (section 83.801-
83.809). The owner will sell at
Public Sale on or after 6-27-14 at
10:30 AM at Big Jim Self Stor-
age, 1001 Executive Ave. North
Port, Florida 34289....
RYAN CLAPHAM
A-125
MELISSA DALY
A-126
REANYA C MAGDA
C-113
JAKE GLASSMOYER
E-115
Publish: June 6 and 13, 2014
309823 3049080

Looking for
Adventure?
Find it
in the
Classifieds

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE:
ABLE WRECKER & ROAD SER-
VICE LLC gives Notice of Foreclo-
sure of Lien and intent to sell
these vehicles on JUNE 27,
2014, 08:00 am at 5135 NE
CUBITIS AVENUE ARCADIA, FL
34266, pursuant to subsection
713.78 of the Florida Statutes.
ABLE WRECKER & ROAD SER-
VICE LLC reserves the right to
accept or reject any and/or all
bids.
1G2HZ541314181716
2001 PONTIAC
Publish: June 6, 2014
108133 3049083
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE:
Value Self Storage located at
23227 Freedom Ave, Port Char-
lotte, FL 33980, hereby gives
notice of a public sale to the high-
est bidder for cash only on or
thereafter June 27, 2014, at
11:30am, in accordance with the
Florida Self Storage Facility Act
Statutes (Section 83.801-83-
809). Seller reserves the right to
withdraw property from sale at
any time. This property is being
sold to satisfy a landlord lien.
Property includes the contents of
the spaces of the following ten-
ants: Unit 317, Harry Beatty,
lawn equipment, tools, small
engines; Unit 321, Harry Beatty,
riding lawn mowers, generator,
tools, boxes; Unit DD22, Judith
Reding, furniture; Unit D29L,
Mitchell L. Geras, Boxes, fan,
cooler, misc; 2D02, Michelle Lynn
Tolbert, furniture, boxes, tubs.
Publish: June 6 and 13, 2014
127294 3049107


7Vf ind




Bo















Read About It


Every Sunday In




FEELING


FIT SUN
THE SNHERALD


The Sun /Friday, June 6, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net C OurTown Page I11






:OurTownPagel2 C www.sunnewspapers.net LOCALIREGIONAL NEWS The Sun /Friday, June 6,2014


A


worthy 'Tribute9


Charlotte County Sheriff's Maj. Earl Goodwyne and his wife
Laurie, who also works at the CCSO, enjoy the evening before
the start of the program.


Bob Reichart, a member of the Charlotte County Curmudgeon
Club, peruses the prizes offered for the raffle.


Marie Hicks checks out the raffle prizes at the event.


Longtime Clerk of the Circuit Court for Charlotte County Barbara T. Scott was recognized for her
numerous awards and achievements in "A Tribute to Barbara"Wednesday at the Cultural Center
of Charlotte County in Port Charlotte. Nearly 200 state and local dignitaries attended the event.
Here, Hardee County Clerk of Courts Victoria Rogers; Scott; Punta Gorda City Councilwoman Nancy
Prafke; and Patti Allen, general manager of Fishermen's Village, gather for a photo during the
event.


Mike Riley, the master of ceremonies for the evening; former State Rep. Mike Grant; and
Charlotte County Republican Party Chairman Bill Folchi take the opportunity to chat before the
program begins.


Janet Carter poses for a photo with Dick and Deborah Miller.


Bill and Cathi Dryburgh, Linda Schortz and Mike Riley attended the tribute to honor Barbara T.
Scott.


Larry and Marian Taylor, and Katrin and Justin Gerow attend the "Tribute to BarbaraT"


:OurTown Page 12 C


www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Friday, June 6, 2014


Theresa Murtha, Dave Ivankovic and Dr. Richard Pitz share a laugh at the event.


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS







INSIDE


Stocks head higher


New steps from the European
Central Bank to revive the
region's flagging economy gave
markets a lift Thursday, pushing
the Standard & Poor's 500 index
to another record high.

Page 6-


Immigrant tuition,
abortion, pot bills
sent to Scott


Governor Rick Scott has 15 days to
sign, veto or let each bill become
law without his signature.
Page 8 -

10 things to know


1. Vets, visitors
flock to Hormandy to
remember f-Day
Ceremonies to commemorate the
70th anniversary of D-Day are drawing
thousands of visitors to the cemeteries,
beaches and stone-walled villages of
Normandy this week. Seepage 1.

2. Senators reach
deal on VA health care
Senior senators reached agreement
Thursday on the framework for a
bipartisan bill expanding veterans'
ability to get health care outside
the government's Veterans Affairs
hospitals and clinics. Seepage2.

3. How GM is dealing
with recall scandal
The company says it has fired 15
employees and will compensate
victims of crashes linked to at least 13
deaths. Seepage 1.

4. White House: Worry
over Bergdahl's safety
drove swap
The administration says it didn't
notify Congress about the pending
prisoner exchange because of
intelligence the Taliban might kill him
if the deal leaked. See page2.

5. Obama, allies give
Putin a choice
The Western leaders say Russia can
avoid more sanctions by following
several steps aimed at easing tensions
in Ukraine. Seepage4.

6.4 shot, one fatally,
at Seattle school
The gunfire at a private Christian
university follows a spate of recent
shootings on or near college campuses
in the U.S. Seepage4.

1. Obama nominee
confirmed to run
health department
Sylvia Mathews Burwell nowturns her
attention to trying to make sure"Oba macare"
works as it should.Seepage2.

8. Islamic extremists
mount fresh slaughter
Disguised as Nigerian soldiers, Boko
Haram militants kill hundreds of
villagers in a new attack. Seepage 8.

9. UF team finds
possible greening
treatment
Researchers said Wednesday that
they've found a possible treatment
for a disease that's devastating citrus
trees around the state. Seepage 1.

10. Women's final set
at French Open
Maria Sharapova will be favored to win
a second championship at Roland Garros
when she faces the relatively little-known
Simona Halep. See Sports page 6.


h e 1Fj irwww.sunnewspapers.net
FRIDAY JUNE 6, 2014





GM ousts 15 employees



CEO: 'Incompetence' to blame for recall delay


By TOM KRISHER
and DEE-ANN DURBIN
AP AuTo WRITERS

WARREN, Mich. General
Motors said Thursday that it
has forced out 15 employees
for their role in the deadly
ignition-switch scandal and
will set up a compensation
fund for crash victims, as an
internal investigation blamed


the debacle on engineering
ignorance and bureaucratic
dithering, not a deliberate
cover-up.
GM took more than a
decade to recall 2.6 million
cars with bad switches that
are now linked to at least 13
deaths by the automaker's
count.
"Group after group and
committee after committee


within GM that reviewed the
issue failed to take action
or acted too slowly," Anton
Valukas, the former federal
prosecutor hired by the
automaker to investigate the
reason for the delay, said in
a 315-page report. 'Although
everyone had responsibility to
fix the problem, nobody took
responsibility."
GM CEO Mary Barra said


more than half the 15 employ-
ees forced out were senior
legal and engineering exec-
utives who failed to disclose
the defect and were part of a
"pattern of incompetence."
Five other employees have
been disciplined, she said,
without identifying any of
them.

DELAY14


Remembering D-Day


Above: Britain's Queen Elizabeth is accompanied by France's President
Francois Hollande as she attends a wreath-laying ceremony at the Arc de
Triomphe in Paris, France, Thursday.
Right: 93-year-old U.SWW II veteran Jim Martin of the 101st Airborne, left,
completes a tandem parachute jump onto Utah Beach, western France,
Thursday, as part of the commemoration of the 70th anniversary of the D-Day.

AP WAS THERE
See The Associated Press'coverage of D-Day, released 70 years after its
original publication.


Vets, visitors flock to Normandy for ceremonies


By GREG KELLER
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER

COLLEVILLE-SUR-MER,
France Ceremonies to
commemorate the 70th anni-
versary of D-Day are drawing
thousands of visitors to the
cemeteries, beaches and stone-
walled villages of Normandy
this week, including some of


the few remaining survivors of
the largest seaborne invasion
ever mounted.
World leaders and digni-
taries including President
Barack Obama and Queen
Elizabeth II will gather to
honor the more than 150,000
American, British, Canadian
and other Allied D-Day veter-
ans who risked and gave their


lives to defeat Adolf Hitler's
Third Reich.
For many visitors, the
Normandy American
Cemetery and Memorial,
with its 9,387 white marble
tombstones on a bluff over-
looking the site of the battle's
bloodiest fighting at Omaha
Beach, is the emotional
centerpiece of pilgrimages to


UF team finds possible



treatment for greening

By TAMARA LUSH
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER

ST. PETERSBURG-
University of Florida
researchers said Wednesday
that they've found a possi-
ble treatment for a disease
that's devastating citrus
trees around the state, but
caution that it could be
years before the cure could
become commercially
available to growers.
The team from UF's
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences said
that it has discovered a AP PHOTO

GREENING 14 Oranges ripen in a grove Dec. 11, 2013, in Plant City.


honor the tens of thousands of
men killed on D-Day and the
months of fighting afterward.
D-Day veteran Clair Martin,
93, said he's come back to
Omaha Beach three times in
the last 70 years "four if
you count the time they were
shooting at me."

NORMANDYI4


Board: Oil


drilling risks


remain from


device woes
By SETH BORENSTEIN
AP SCIENCE WRITER
WASHINGTON The key
last-ditch safety device that failed
to prevent the 2010 BP oil spill
remains a potentially catastrophic
problem today for some offshore
drilling, according to a federal
safety board investigation.
The report issued Thursday by
the U.S. Chemical Safety Board
details the multiple failures and
improper testing of the blow-
out preventer and blames bad

WOES14





-Page 2 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


NATIONAL/STATE NEWS


The Sun /Friday, June 6, 2014


I NATIONAL BRIEFS


Senators reach deal
on VA health care
WASHINGTON (AP) -
Senior senators reached
agreement Thursday
on the framework for a
bipartisan bill expanding
veterans' ability to get
health care outside the
government's scan-
dal-beset Veterans Affairs
hospitals and clinics.
The bill would allow
veterans who experience
waits of 30 days or more
for VA appointments or
who live at least 40 miles
from a VA hospital or
clinic to use private
doctors enrolled as
providers for Medicare,
military TRICARE or other
government health care
programs.
It also would let the VA
immediately fire as many
as 450 senior regional
executives and hospital
administrators for poor
performance. The bill re-
sembles a measure passed
last month by the House,
but includes a 28-day
appeal process omitted by
the House legislation.
The Senate deal came
as acting VA Secretary
Sloan Gibson announced
that 18 veterans who were
kept off official VA waiting
lists in the Phoenix area
have died. Gibson said he
does not know whether
the deaths were related to
long waiting times to see
aVA doctor.

Senate confirms
Obama pick to
head HHS
WASHINGTON
(Tribune Washington
Bureau)- Sylvia Mathews
Burwell sailed to con-
firmation Thursday as
President Barack Obama's
next secretary of health
and human services,
picking up bipartisan
support in the Senate
despite Republicans'
ongoing opposition to the
Affordable Care Act.
Twenty-four
Republicans joined 52
Democrats and two
Independents in backing
Burwell, who last year won
unanimous Senate confir-
mation to head the White
House budget office.
"Sylvia is a proven
manager who knows
how to deliver results,
and over her career she
has built deep relation-
ships with Democrats
and Republicans alike,"
Obama said in a state-
ment after the vote.

VA health care
nominee withdraws
WASHINGTON (AP)
- President Barack
Obama's choice to be
the top health official
at the Veterans Affairs
Department withdrew
his nomination Thursday,
saying he feared his con-
firmation could spark a
prolonged political battle.


Jeffrey Murawsky,
health care chief for
the VAs Chicago-based
regional office, was
nominated last month to
be the department's new
undersecretary for health
care, replacing Robert
Petzel, who resigned
under pressure. Petzel
had been scheduled to
retire later this year but
was asked to leave early
amid a firestorm over
delays in patient care and
preventable deaths at
veterans hospitals.

Delaware inspecting
all major bridges
DOVER, Del. (AP)-
Delaware's transportation
secretary ordered imme-
diate inspections of major
bridges in the state on
Thursday to see if they
might have any problems
similar to an interstate
bypass that had to close
in Wilmington.
Delaware Department
of Transportation
Secretary Shailen Bhatt
also told The Associated
Press that his agency
was checking under the
bridges to make sure
the state's property is
properly marked.
The action comes after
the Interstate 495 bridge
was closed because of
tilting support columns.
The bridge, a bypass that
helps alleviate congestion
on 1-95 and normally car-
ries about 90,000 vehicles
daily, has been closed
since Monday, snarling
traffic on the crucial
north-south artery. It will
be at least several weeks
before it is reopened.

Navy considers
banning tobacco
sales on bases
NORTH KINGSTOWN,
R.I. (AP) -Tobacco
sales on Navy ships and
in stores on Navy and
Marine Corps bases
would be a thing of the
past under a plan being
considered by Navy
Secretary Ray Mabus, but
some congressional mem-
bers are pushing back.
The Navy Department,
which includes the Marine
Corps, would be the first
military department to
prohibit tobacco sales.
"We know tobacco
hurts you. We know to-
bacco kills you. We know
it makes you less fit, and
one of our big initiatives
is to have sailors that are
fit and resilient," Mabus
said in an interview
during a visit to Rhode
Island this week. "And so
the whole idea is that we
want to encourage sailors
who smoke to quit."
Congress is considering
a measure that would pre-
vent Mabus from institut-
ing a sales ban, with the
prohibition's opponents
arguing it overreaches on
a habit that is unhealthy
but still legal.


Gulf Power sued over


pollutant leaks into river


MIAMI (AP) Gulf
Power Company is
allowing pollutants from
aging coal ash pits to leak
into the Apalachicola
River, according to a
lawsuit filed by three
environmental groups.
The nonprofit law
firm Earthjustice filed
a lawsuit Wednesday in
Tallahassee federal court
on behalf of the Southern
Alliance for Clean Energy,
Waterkeeper Alliance and
Apalachicola Riverkeeper.
They say Gulf Power
is illegally discharging
arsenic, lead and other
pollutants from its coal-
fired plant near Sneads
into the river.
The Jackson County
plant, which opened in
1953, is scheduled to
close next year. It's al-
ways been in compliance
since Gulf Power began
groundwater monitoring
in the mid- 1980s, said
utility spokeswoman
Natalie Smith.
Gulf Power and the
state Department
of Environmental
Protection conducted
follow-up inspections
and testing after the
groups announced their
intent to sue, and an


additional study compar-
ing ecosystems upstream
from the plant with
downstream ecosystems
found no differences,
Smith said.
'All test results were
determined to be within
compliance and did not
support the allegations
made," she said.
Gulf Power has a
federal Clean Water
Act permit that allows
it to discharge treated
coal ash water and
chlorinated condensing
water directly into the
river through an outfall,
but the Pensacola-based
company is violating that
permit because pollut-
ants are leaking from
other points without
being treated, according
to the lawsuit.
Nearly 40 acres of
coal ash pits atop a
bluff along the river lack
linings to keep pollutants
from leaking into the
water, and Gulf Power
knows about the prob-
lem but has not worked
to fix it, the groups said.
Citing a 2010
Environmental Protection
Agency draft report on
wastes produced by coal-
fired electricity plants


nationwide, the lawsuit
said the toxic metals leak-
ing from the Panhandle
plant include arsenic,
barium, cadmium, lead
and selenium.
The pits have been
inspected by EPA con-
tractors but those reports
and "hazard potential"
ratings have not been
made public because
Gulf Power has said such
information contains
"confidential business
information," the lawsuit
said.
'All groundwater
and surface testing as
required by our permits
is submitted to regulato-
ry agencies on a regular,
ongoing basis and we
are in full compliance,"
Smith said.
Apalachicola
Riverkeeper Dan
Tonsmeire said the
river system supports
a multi-billion dollar
seafood industry in the
Gulf of Mexico and an
important oyster fishery
in Apalachicola Bay.
"The Apalachicola is
not just a local asset, it's
a national treasure that
needs to be protected,"
Tonsmeire said in a
statement Thursday.


Threat to Bergdahl led to


US action, officials say


WASHINGTON (AP)
- The Obama admin-
istration told senators
it didn't notify Congress
about the pending swap
of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl
for five Taliban officials
because of intelligence
the Taliban might kill
him if the deal was
made public.
That fear not just
the stated concerns
that Bergdahl's health
might be failing drove
the administration to
quickly make the deal to
rescue him, bypassing
the law that lawmak-
ers be notified when
detainees are released
from the U.S. prison
at Guantanamo Bay,
Cuba, congressional and
administration officials
said Thursday.
They spoke only on
condition of anonymity
because they were not
authorized to comment
publicly.
Since Bergdahl's
release on Saturday,
administration officials


including President
Barack Obama, Defense
Secretary Chuck Hagel
and National Security
Adviser Susan Rice have
said publicly that the
key reason for the secret
prisoner swap was
evidence that Bergdahl's
physical health was
deteriorating after five
years in captivity. But
on Wednesday night,
administration officials
told senators in a closed
session that the primary
concern was the death
risk if the deal collapsed.
At a news confer-
ence in Brussels on
Thursday, Obama said
he makes no apologies
for recovering Bergdahl,
and he said the furor
in Washington over the
exchange has made
the matter a "political
football." He appeared
to be referring to
potential danger to
Bergdahl's life when he
said that "because of the
nature of the folks that
we were dealing with


and the fragile nature of
these negotiations, we
felt it was important to
go ahead and do what
we did."
There was no overt
threat by the Taliban but
rather an assessment
based on intelligence re-
ports that Bergdahl's life
would be in jeopardy if
news of the talks got out
and the deal failed, said
two senior U.S. officials
familiar with the efforts
to free the soldier.
In public comments,
State Department
spokesman Marie
Harf told reporters
Thursday, "There were
real concerns that if this
were made public first,
his physical security
could be in danger." The
risks, she said, included
"someone guarding him
that possibly wouldn't
agree and could take
harmful action against
him. So as we needed
to move quickly, all of
these factors played into
that."


SAN DIEGO (AP)
- Military crews on
Thursday mopped up
the debris of an exploded
fighter jet that struck
a Southern California
neighborhood, as
authorities launched an
investigation into the
latest crash of the Cold
War aircraft with a history
of problems.
The Harrier AV-8B had
taken off from the Marine
Corps Air Station in Yuma
and was almost at its
destination at Naval Air
Facility El Centro when
it went down Wednesday
afternoon, going up in
flames and destroying
two homes and badly


damaging a third. The
pilot who was ejected
landed in a nearby field
and suffered only scrapes
and bruises.
There were no injuries
in the neighborhood,
which is near a county
airport and the El Centro
training facility.
"We have air traffic
every day from big
military helicopters to
Osprey to Blue Angels
flying over us," said resi-
dent Leonardo Olmeda,
25, who was racing
remote-controlled cars
in a street where children
were playing when they
saw the pilot eject and
the jet ignite. "Everybody
seems relieved and
thankful that the outcome
of this was not worse."
Two of the displaced
families in the newer
neighborhood of
Imperial- a small desert
city of about 15,000
people about 90 miles
east of San Diego went
to stay with friends or
relatives, while the Red
Cross put up one couple
in a hotelWednesday


night. Officials were
assessing whether any of
the families would need
longer term help, such as
rental assistance or other
items, said Red Cross
spokeswoman Courtney
Pendleton.
Marine Capt. Anton
Semelroth said the
military was investigating
to determine whether
human error, a mechan-
ical failure or some other
reason caused the jet to
crash. The probe could
take months to complete.
It was the second crash
in a month of a Harrier
jet from the Yuma air
base. On May 9, a pilot
was able to eject safely
before his jet crashed
in a remote desert area
near the Gila River Indian
Community, south of
Phoenix. No one was
injured.
In July 2012, another
AV-8B Harrier crashed
in an unpopulated area
15 miles from the air
base, which is among the
busiest training aviation
centers in the world for
the Marine Corps.


HOW THEY

VOTED


U.S. SENATE


SEN. BILL SEN. MARCO
NELSON, RUBIO,
D-FLORIDA R-FLORIDA

0 VOTES

0 June 4
On the Nomination PN1219:
Mark G. Mastroianni, of
Massachusetts, to be United
States District Judge for the
District of Massachusetts
Nomination Confirmed 92/2
Sen. Nelson [D-FL]:Yea
Sen. Rubio [R-FL]: Yea

On the Nomination PN1197:
Bruce Howe Hendricks, of
South Carolina, to be United
States District Judge for the
District of South Carolina
Nomination Confirmed 95/0
Sen. Nelson [D-FL]:Yea
Sen. Rubio [R-FL]: Yea

On the Nomination PN1227:
Tanya S. Chutkan, of the
District of Columbia, to be
United States District Judge
for the District of Columbia
Nomination Confirmed 95/0
Sen. Nelson [D-FL]:Yea
Sen. Rubio [R-FL]: Yea

On the Cloture Motion
PN 1612: Sylvia Mathews
Burwell, of West Virginia, to
be Secretary of Health and
Human Services
Cloture Motion Agreed to 67/28
Sen. Nelson [D-FL]:Yea
Sen. Rubio [R-FL]: Nay

STATE BRIEFS

Former judge
disbarred for
handling of case
TALLAHASSEE (AP)
- The Florida Supreme
Court is disbarring a
former judge who got
involved in a relationship
with a prosecutor.
The court on Thursday
took away the law license
of former Broward
County Circuit Judge Ana
Gardiner. The high court
said the severe sanction
was appropriate because
Gardiner's actions
resulted in a new trial in a
murder case.
During the 2007
trial, prosecutor Howard
Scheinberg and Gardiner
began a secret personal
relationship and ex-
changed repeated phone
calls and texts. Gardiner
was presiding over the
trial.
Omar Loureiro was
convicted of first-degree
murder, and Gardiner
sentenced him to
death. The conviction
was thrown out after
her relationship with
Scheinberg was dis-
closed. Loureiro was
convicted after a second
trial and sentenced to
life in prison.

Orlando state's
4th largest city,
passing St. Pete
ORLANDO (AP)
- Orlando now has
more people than
St. Petersburg, making
it Florida's fourth largest
city.
The Census Bureau
says Orlando now has
more than 255,000
residents, compared to
St. Petersburg's 249,000.
Orlando has a high-
er birthrate than St.
Petersburg and has more
room for expansion be-
cause it is not surrounded
by water. St. Petersburg's
residents are also older
on average, meaning the
city has a higher death
rate.
Jacksonville is the
state's most populous city,
followed by Miami and
Tampa.


Residents relieved no one


injured by military jet


A SPECIAL
ADVERTISING FEATURE

Wednesday,

June 25th






SUN.

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The Sun /Friday, June 6, 2014 www.sunnewspapers.net


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Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Friday, June 6,2014 FROM PAGE ONE


Obama and allies: Putin faces critical choices


PARIS (AP) Laying
out clear conditions,
President Barack Obama
and Western allies
opened a pathway for
Russia to ease tensions
in Ukraine on Thursday
but pointedly warned
Moscow it could face
new sanctions within
weeks if Vladimir Putin
fails to go along.
The leaders, who were
gathered in Brussels
for a wealthy-nations
summit, said the Russian
president could avoid
tougher penalties in
part by recognizing the


legitimacy of the new
Ukrainian government
and ending support for
an insurgency in eastern
cities that is widely
believed to be backed by
the Kremlin. There was
no mention of rolling
back Russia's annexation
of the Ukrainian region
of Crimea, which precipi-
tated the European crisis.
"We are at a point
where Mr. Putin has the
chance to get back into
a lane of international
law," Obama said during
a news conference with
British Prime Minister


David Cameron. But
Obama also said the
West "can't simply allow
drift" in Ukraine, where
insurgents continue to
clash with government
forces in eastern cities.
From Brussels, Obama
and other leaders jetted
to France ahead of events
marking Friday's 70th
anniversary of the D-Day
Normandy invasion that
paved the way for the
Allied victory in World
War II.
This time Putin was on
the scene. And Cameron,
French President


Francois Hollande and
German Chancellor
Angela Merkel each were
using the commemora-
tions as a backdrop for
separate meetings with
the Russian president,
who arrived in Paris.
Hollande in particular
appeared to be em-
bracing the diplomatic
mantle, hosting Putin at
Elysee Palace Thursday
night just after finishing
dinner with Obama at a
Paris restaurant.
The willingness of
Western leaders to meet
face-to-face with Putin


for the first time since
he annexed the Crimean
Peninsula from Ukraine
marked a noticeable
shift in tactics. While
leaders have spoken
with Putin by phone
during the crisis, they
had avoided meeting
him in person and
boycotted the summit he
was to host in Russia this
week, choosing instead
to meet without him in
Brussels.
It was the group's first
similar summit in two
decades without the
participation of Russia.


Police: University student disarmed gunman; 4 shot


SEATTLE (Seattle
Times) -A gunman
killed one student and at
least three others were
wounded inside a hall at
Seattle Pacific University
Thursday afternoon,
unleashing a wave of
terror as the school went
into lockdown.
One of the victims who
was taken to Harborview
Medical Center, a young
man, has died, according
to the hospital. Another,


DELAY
FROM PAGE 1

The automaker said it
will establish a compen-
sation program covering
those killed or seriously
injured in the more than
50 accidents blamed
on the switches. GM
did not say how much
money will be involved,
but a Wall Street analyst


NORMANDY
FROM PAGE 1

The San Diego, Calif.
resident landed on
D-Day with the 29th
Infantry Division and
said he kept fighting until
he reached the Elbe River
in Germany the following
April. "I praise God I
made it and that we've
never had another World
War," he said.
Ceremonies large and
small are taking place
across Normandy, ahead
of an international
summit on Friday in
Ouistreham, a small port
that was the site of a
strategic battle on D-Day.
Fireworks lit up the sky
Thursday night to mark
the anniversary.
French President
Francois Hollande's


GREENING
FROM PAGE 1

chemical that kills the
citrus greening bacteria.
The chemical benz-
bromarone has been
used to treat gout in
humans but has never
been approved for use in
the United States because
of concerns over reports
of acute liver injury.
Researchers sprayed
greenhouse tree shoots
infected with greening
with three different



WOES
FROM PAGE 1

management and opera-
tions for the breakdown.
They found faulty wiring,
a dead battery and a bent
pipe in the hulking device.
"The problems with
this blowout preventer
were worse than we
understood," safety
board managing director
Daniel Horowitz said in
an interview. "And there
are still hazards out there
that need to be improved
if we are to prevent this


a 20-year-old woman,
was in critical condition
and in surgery. Two
others, men ages 22
and 24, are in satisfac-
tory condition; one had
gunshot wounds; one
was not shot, but the
nature of his injuries was
unclear.
Two other people were
reported to be hurt,
although the nature of
their injuries was not
known, and they were


estimated the payouts
will total $1.5 billion.
Barra called the report
"brutally tough and
deeply troubling."
The report lays bare a
company that operated
in "silos," with employ-
ees who didn't share
information and didn't
take responsibility for
problems or treat them
with any urgency.
Valukas also portrayed
a corporate culture in

decision to invite Russian
President Vladimir Putin
to participate in the
official ceremony despite
his exclusion from the
G-7 summit in Brussels
is being seen by some as
justified recognition of
the Soviet Union's great
sacrifice in defeating
Hitler, but by others
as a distraction given
the West's dispute with
Russia over Ukraine.
Russian paratroopers
joined the commemo-
rations late Thursday,
jumping down onto the
town of Arromanches
waving a Russian flag, in
a reminder of their role
fighting the Nazis on the
eastern front in World
War II and the millions
of lives the Soviet Union
lost. The Russians' par-
ticipation comes despite
tensions between the U.S.
and Russia over Ukraine.

chemicals, and the benz-
bromarone halted the
bacteria in 80 percent of
the infected trees' shoots.
The researchers pub-
lished their findings in the
journal PLOS Pathogens.
But researchers
caution that this good
news is the first step in a
years-long process.
"We are getting closer
and closer," said Claudio
Gonzalez, an associate
professor at UF who is
part of the three-person
team in the microbiology
and cell science
department.

from happening again."
The safety board,
like the National
Transportation Safety
Board, can investigate
but has no regulatory
power. It recommended
new safety standards and
regulations in its report.
If the offshore oil
drilling industry doesn't
adopt them and reg-
ulators don't tighten
up oversight of these
devices, it "opens the
possibility of another
catastrophic accident,"
lead investigator Cheryl
MacKenzie said at a news
conference Thursday.


not taken to Harborview.
Seattle police arrested
the gunman, who was said
to be armed with a shot-
gun and handgun. Police
said a gunman walked
into the foyer of Otto
Miller Hall at 3:30 p.m.
and shot three people.
Police said a student,
a building monitor,
subdued the gunman
as he stopped to reload.
Then other students
helped hold him down


which there was heavy
pressure to keep costs
down, a reluctance to
report problems up the
chain of command,
a skittishness about
putting safety concerns
on paper, and general
bureaucratic resistance
to change.
He described what
was known as the "GM
nod," in which "everyone
nods in agreement to a
proposed plan of action

With many D-Day
veterans now in their 90s,
this year's anniversary
has the added poignancy
of being the last time
that many of those who
took part in the battle
will be able to make the
long journey back to
Normandy and tell their
stories.
"Three minutes after
landing a mortar blew up
next to me and I lost my
K-rations," said Curtis
Outen, 92, of Pageland,
S.C. Outen, making his
first return to Normandy
since the war, related the
loss of his military-issued
meal packet as though
it happened yesterday.
"Then I cut my arm in
the barbed wire entan-
glements. After that I was
all right."
By midmorning
hundreds of visitors
walked among the

The chemical appears
to break down the bac-
teria's cellular structure
- it doesn't allow the
bacteria to survive in the
vascular system of the
tree, the research found.
They've only tested
the chemical in the lab.
Researchers now must
test the chemical in the
real world mature
trees planted in a grove
- and if that goes well,
will eventually seek
federal approval to use
the chemical commer-
cially. One of the key
things to determine, said

But investigators also
noted that the industry is
working on new designs
that could fix many of
the problems the safety
board outlined. And the
American Petroleum
Institute issued a state-
ment saying the report
"ignores the tremendous
strides made to enhance
the safety of offshore
operations."
The nation's worst off-
shore oil spill followed an
explosion that killed 11
workers at the Deepwater
Horizon drilling rig, about
50 miles off the Louisiana
coast. The blowout


until police arrived. At
some point, police said,
someone pepper-sprayed
the gunman.
A search for a possible
second suspect kept
medics from getting
to injured people in-
side, said Seattle Fire
Department spokesman
Kyle Moore.
But police later said
there was only one suspect.
SPU student Gloris
Jones, 20, was walking


but then leaves the room
and does nothing."
Valukas exonerated
Barra and two other top
executives, Mark Reuss,
chief of global product
development, and
general counsel Michael
Millikin, saying there is
no evidence they knew
about the problems
any earlier than last
December.
Since February, GM
has recalled 2.6 million


from Otto Miller Hall
with her mother, Mary
Jones, who is visiting
from Michigan.
Jones received a text
message from a friend
who said he had been
shot. She sent back five or
six messages to the SPU
senior, but he didn't reply.
"I don't even know
where he is," Gloris Jones
said as she hugged her
mother. 'And you want to
make sure he's OK."


older-model Chevrolet
Cobalts, Saturn Ions and
other small cars because
their ignitions can slip
out of the "run" position
and shut off the engine.
That disables the power-
assisted steering and
brakes, making it
difficult to control the
car, and deactivates the
air bags.
Trial lawyers suing the
company put the death
toll at more than 60.


Al-' IMUPHO
A C130 plane flies above Picauville, during a ceremony in homage
to the English and American airborne and pilots, at the Memorial
of airborne and U.S. Air Force, in Picauville, France, as part of the
commemoration of the 70th D-Day anniversary, Thursday.


cemetery's long rows of
white crosses and stars
of David. Schoolchildren
and retirees, soldiers in
uniform and veterans
in wheelchairs quietly

Gonzalez, is whether the
chemical affects the taste
of the citrus fruit.
The researchers will
begin field experiments
this year.
Ken Keck, the pres-
ident of the California
Citrus Research Board in
Visalia, said that he's read
about the UF research
and is measured with his
optimism.
"Our industry growers
are a sober bunch," he
said. "In that they realize
that panaceas, magic
bullets, when it comes to
this challenging disease,

preventer anchored to
the top of the underwater
well should have stopped
the leak.
In such emergencies,
the device uses multiple
mechanisms -including
clamps and quick-re-
lease blades to try to
choke off the oil flowing
up from a pipe and
disconnect the rig from
the well. It can operate
automatically when
pressure or electricity is
cut off or manually.
The one that failed
was 9 years old, nearly
57 feet tall and weighed
about 400 tons. After it


move from grave to
grave, pausing to read
the brief inscriptions
that can only give hints
of the lives laid to rest
there.

they've been once bitten
twice shy."
Keck points out that if
the chemical were to be
effective on greening, it
would still need USDA
approval and approval
from different states'
regulatory agencies.
Greening affects
Florida's $9 billion citrus
industry. Florida growers
are seeing the bacteria's
effects this season. This
year's orange crop is
approaching the fruit's
lowest harvest in de-
cades, and experts say
greening is to blame.

broke down, an estimated
172 million gallons of oil
spewed into the Gulf for
87 days.
Robert Bea, a professor
of engineering and expert
in oil pipelines at the
University of California
Berkeley, praised the
report and said blowout
preventers are like cruise
ship lifeboats, used only
in last resort but crucial.
In this case, and poten-
tially in some others
still out there, a blowout
preventer may be "deeply
flawed" or full of holes,
said Bea, who was not
involved in the new study.


ALMANAC

Today is Friday, June 6, the
157th day of 2014. There are
208 days left in the year.
Today in history
On June 6,1944, Allied
forces stormed the beaches of
Normandy, France, on "D-Day"
beginning the liberation of
German-occupied western
Europe during World War II.
On this date
In 1799, American politician
and orator Patrick Henry died at
Red Hill Plantation in Virginia.
In 1844, theYoung Men's
Christian Association was
founded in London.
In 1912, the greatest volcanic
eruption of the 20th century took
place as Novarupta in Alaska
began a series of explosive
episodes over a 60-hour period.
In 1925, Walter Percy Chrysler
founded the Chrysler Corp.
In 1934, the Securities and
Exchange Commission was
established.
In 1939, the first Little League
game was played as Lundy Lumber
defeated Lycoming Dairy 23-8 in
Williamsport, Pennsylvania.
In 1955, the U.S. Post Office
introduced regular certified mail
service.
In 1966, black activist James
Meredith was shot and wounded
as he walked along a Mississippi
highway to encourage black
voter registration.
In 1968, Sen. Robert F
Kennedy died at Good Samaritan
Hospital in Los Angeles, a day
after he was shot by Sirhan
Bishara Sirhan.
In 1978, California voters
overwhelmingly approved
Proposition 13, a primary ballot
initiative calling for major cuts in
property taxes.
In 1984, government forces in
India stormed the Golden Temple
in Amritsar in an effort to crush
Sikh extremists; at least 1,000
Sikhs and 200 soldiers were killed.
In 1994, President Bill Clinton
joined leaders from America's
World War II allies to mark the
50th anniversary of the D-Day
invasion of Normandy.

Today's birthdays
Actress Billie Whitelaw
is 82. Civil rights activist Roy
Innis is 80. Singer-songwriter
Gary"U.S" Bonds is 75.
Country singer Joe Stampley
is 71. Actor Robert Englund
is 67. Folk singer Holly Near is
65. Singer Dwight Twilley is
63. Playwright-actor Harvey
Fierstein is 62. International
Tennis Hall of Famer Bjorn Borg
is 58. Actress Amanda Pays is
55. Comedian Colin Quinn is 55.
Record producer Jimmy Jam is
55. Rock musician Steve Vai is
54. Rock singer-musician Tom
Araya (Slayer) is 53. Actor Jason
Isaacs is 51. Rock musician Sean
Yseult (White Zombie) is 48.
Actor Max Casella is 47. Actor
Paul Giamatti is 47. Rhythm-
and-blues singer Damion Hall
(Guy) is 46. Rock musician Bardi
Martin is 45. Rock musician
James"Munky" Shaffer (Korn)
is 44. Actress Sonya Walger is
40. Actress Staci Keanan is 39.
Actress Amber Borycki is 31.


Puppy drives car
into Mass. pond
CANTON, Mass.
(AP) -After going
for a walk, a German
shepherd puppy owned
by a Massachusetts
man decided to go for
a drive straight into
a pond.
John Costello tells
WFXT-TV that his
12-week-old puppy,
Rosie, was so excited
Sunday after going for
a walk at Bolivar Pond
in Canton that she
jumped in his running
car, hit the gear stick
and shifted into drive,
before falling onto the
gas pedal and sending
the car careening into
the water.
A couple of passers-by
saw the commotion and
helped Costello rescue
Rosie. Nobody was
injured, but Costello
says the Dodge Neon is
a total loss.
The 911 call surprised
even police. Officer
Robert Quirk says he
has never heard of a
dog driving into a pond.


Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Friday, June 6, 2014


FROM PAGE ONE










AP WAS THERE, 1944: Allies win footholds in France


D-DAY 70TH ANNIVERSARY


WIRE Page 5


EDITOR'S NOTE:
The newsflash came on
a slip of paper in a red-
and-white striped courier
pouch: "EISENHOWERS
HEADQUARTERS
ANNOUNCES ALLIES
LAND IN FRANCE."
The Associated Press
had some two dozen
writers and photogra-
phers among the Allied
forces as they landed on
Normandy's coast on
June 6, 1944. From Gen.
Dwight D. Eisenhower's
London headquarters,
Wes Gallagher who
later went on to become
AP's general manager
- wrote up the first
Allied official dispatches
announcing D-Day and
sent them in the sealed
pouch to APs London
office by military courier
after the military censor
authorized their release.
They arrived at
9:32 a.m. and were sent
to the rest of the world by
teletype one minute later
In France, the AP team
included Don Whitehead,
who was making his
fifth landing with Allied
troops, and Bede Irvin, a
photographer who would
soon be killed by friendly
fire while covering the
American forces.
Months of planning
went into that flash and
subsequent dispatches,
from securing a dedicated
phone line and berths
on planes and ships, to
reconfiguring the office
furniture in London
to ensureAP would be
fastest at getting out word
of the expected invasion
of France. At the end, an
editor ran down the hall
to intercept the courier
and bolted back into the
newsroom. Subsequent
detail on the invasion
made its way back to
England in a variety
of ways including
radio transmission,
messages tied to the legs
of carrier pigeons, and
hand-carried dispatches
from Henry jameson, who
returned to England with
the wounded after an
exploding shell dislocated
his shoulder
Seventy years after its
original publication, the
AP is making Gallagher's
original report available.
000
The Associated Press
SUPREME
HEADQUARTERS
ALLIED EXPEDITIONARY
FORCE (AP) -Allied
troops landed on the
Normandy coast of
France in tremendous
strength by cloudy day-
light today and stormed
several miles inland with
tanks and infantry in the
grand assault which Gen.
Dwight D. Eisenhower
called a crusade in which
"we will accept nothing
less than full victory."
German broadcasts
said the Allies penetrat-
ed several kilometers
between Caen and Isigny,
which are 35 miles apart
and respectively nine and
two miles from the sea.
Prime Minister
Churchill told the House
of Commons part of
the record-shattering
number of parachute
and glider troops were
fighting in Caen, and
had seized a number of
important bridges in the
invasion area.
German opposition
apparently was less
effective than expect-
ed, although fierce in
many respects, and the
Germans said they were
bringing reinforcements
continuously up to the
coast, where "a battle
for life or death is in
progress."~
The seaborne troops,
led by Gen. Sir Bernard


L. Montgomery, surged
across the channel from
England by 4,000 regular
ships and additional
thousands of smaller craft.
They were preceded
by massed flights of


parachute and glider
forces who landed inland
during the dark. Eleven
thousand planes sup-
ported the attack.
The German radio
said the landings were
made from Cherbourg
to Le Havre a strip of
coast roughly 100 miles
long and later said
additional landings, were
being made "west of
Cherbourg," indicating the
Allies intended to seize the
Normandy peninsula with
its ports and airdromes as
the first base.

Germans Expect
More Invasions
Hourly
The initial landings
were made from 6 to
8:25 a.m. British time.
The Germans said sub-
sequent landings were
made on the English
channel isles of Jersey
and Guernsey and that
invasion at new points
on the continent was
expected hourly.
Aside from confirming
that Normandy was
the general area of
the assault, Supreme
Headquarters of the
Allied Expeditionary
Force was silent concern-
ing the location.
From Moscow came
word that the Russian
army was massing in
preparation for another
great attack from the east
as its part in defeating
Germany.
All reports from the
beachhead, meager
though they were in
specific detail, agreed
that the Allies had made
good the great gamble
of amphibious landing
against possibly the
strongest fortified section
of coast in the world.
Reconnaissance pilots
said the Allied troops
had secured the beaches
and were slashing inland,
some of them actually
running in a swift
advance. The unofficial
word at headquarters
confirmed this, while the
Vichy radio admitted the
Allied drive inland was
going right ahead.

Naval Guns Shell
Fortifications
More than 640 naval
guns, ranging from 4 to
16-inch, hurled many
tons of shells accurately
into the coastal fortifica-
tions which the Germans
had spent four years
preparing against this day.
Prime Minister
Churchill was able to tell
parliament the shore bat-
teries had been "largely
quelled," the underwater
obstructions had proven
less dangerous than
feared and the whole
operation was "proceed-
ing according to plan."
Allied planes preceded
the landings with a
steady 96-hour bom-
bardment which reached
its pinnacle in the hour
before the troops hit the
beaches.
The absence of
German aerial opposi-
tion was remarked by
nearly all returning fliers
and correspondents.
The Germans are known
to have about 1,750
fighters and 500 bombers
available for the western
front, but it was sup-
posed they had chosen
not to risk them in an
all-out first-day battle.
German naval oppo-
sition was confined to
destroyers and motor
torpedo boats which
headquarters said were
being "dealt with."
The Germans, as
expected, blared on their
radios all sorts of claims


of vast destruction done
to Allied fleets and
forces, but with no con-
firmation. In one defiant
gesture, some of the
German cross-channel
guns opened a sporadic


fire on Dover during the
afternoon.
Supreme headquarters
kept silent on the loca-
tions, to exploit, to the
fullest whatever element
of tactical surprise the
Allies may have gained.
A superior officer at
supreme headquarters
said frankly he did not
know yet what amount
of surprise there was,
but Allied air forces were
in control of the skies
over the channel and the
coast despite unfavor-
able flying weather.

May Head Up
Seine River To
Paris
If the Germans were
correct about the
locations, the Allied plan
apparently was to seize
the Cherbourg peninsula
and make Normandy the
initial beachhead for a
drive up the Seine valley
to Paris.
The German radio
began broadcasting
a constant stream of
invasion flashes almost
as soon as the first troops
landed, and continued
with extensive reports of
the gigantic naval and air
bombardments that cov-
ered the assault. Allied
headquarters, however,
kept silent until 9:32 a.m.
British time when the
following communique
was issued:
"Under the command
of Gen. Dwight D.
Eisenhower, Allied naval
forces supported by
strong air forces began
landing Allied armies this
morning on the northern
coast of France."
A high officer explained
that Gen. Eisenhower
had kept resolutely silent
until he was absolutely
certain the landings had
"taken hold."
Gen. Eisenhower
broadcast during the
morning an announce-
ment to the peoples of
western Europe, telling
them of the landings and
declaring, "all patriots,
young and old, will have
a part to play in the
liberation."

Urges Patriots
Just To Be Patient
He urged against
premature uprisings,
however, saying, "be pa-
tient. Prepare. Wait until I
give you the signal."
The Allied commander
also issued an order of
the day to his forces,
telling them:
"You are about to
embark on a great
crusade. The eyes of the
world are upon you and
the hopes and prayers of
all liberty-loving peoples
go with you ... Your task
will not be an easy one.
Your enemy is well-
trained, well-equipped
and battle-hardened. He
will fight savagely. I have
full confidence in your
courage, devotion to duty
and skill in battle. We will
accept nothing less than
full victory.''
It was disclosed that a
number of unannounced
teints had taken place in
the pre-invasion period,
so that the Germans
would not know when the
real blow was coming.
A senior officer at
supreme headquarters
said rough water caused
"awful anxiety" for the
sea-borne troops but that
the landings were made
successfully, although
some soldiers were
undoubtedly seasick.

Sun Breaks
Through Heavy
Clouds


The sun broke through
heavy clouds periodically
this morning after a
daybreak shower. The
wind had blown fairly
hard during the night but
moderated somewhat


AP FILE PHOTO
In this June 6,1944, photo, Allied troops crouch behind the bulwarks of a landing craft as it nears
Omaha Beach during a landing in Normandy, France.


with the dawn. The
weather outlook remained
somewhat unsettled.
Aside from Gen.
Montgomery, no other
Allied commanders were
announced for the thou-
sands of battle-trained
Allied troops, although
Gen. Omar Bradley has
been in command of
American ground forces
in England for several
months. Gen. Bradley
participated in the
Tunisian victory.
The Allied forces had
been ready for days,
but were awaiting the
best moment from the
weather standpoint.
"We have been months
and years waiting for
this," said a senior
officer giving corre-
spondents the story at
headquarters.
"Geography made it
evident to the Germans
as well as us that the
shortest way to Europe
was across channel."
First reports from
across the channel, how-
ever, indicated that the
Allies controlled the air
over the scene of opera-
tions. The Allied officer
commented that landing
against fixed defense of
western Europe was a
task quite different from
that in the Mediterranean
and sketched briefly the
German defensive plan of
underwater barriers and
shore guns.

Nazis Report
Dunkerque
Attacked
He said the German
had possibly 1,750 fighter
planes and bombers to
oppose the Allies.
For three hours
previous to the Allied
announcement, the
German radio had been
pouring forth a series
of flashes reporting that
the Allies were landing
between Le Havre and
Cherbourg along the
south side of the Bay of
the Seine and along the
north coast of Normandy.
Thousands of
battle-trained American,
British and Canadian
troops hurled them-
selves at Hitler's western
defenses after months of
preparation. Huge troop-
ship armadas slipped
out of English ports in
the darkness and sped
toward Europe where
four years ago almost to
the day Britain brought
back the last battle-worn
defenders of Dunkerque.
The German radio gave
the reports of the invasion
while correspondents
were hurriedly summoned
from bed to supreme press
headquarters and locked
in a press conference
room until the communi-
que was released several
hours after the landings
were made.
It was made known
that the supreme com-
mand felt it necessary
to yield the initiative in
the war of words to the


Germans in order to re-
tain the initiative on land
and keep the German
high command in the
dark as long as possible.
The great Allied arma-
das dwarfed anything yet
seen on the sea. Huge
transport planes filled
with paratroopers and
pulling airborne troops
in gliders roared over the
German West all to drop
their cargos in the rear.
All night long London
and England resounded
to the roar of thousands
of airplanes, some
carrying bombs, some
carrying men. Returning
R.A.E bombers met big
fleets of Flying Fortresses
on their way out.
The forces thrown
into operation were by
far the greatest ever
used in an amphibious
operation. They had to
be. An estimated million
German troops waited in
their fortifications for the
great onslaught under
crack Nazi field marshals,
Runstedt and Rommel.
It was reported earlier
this week that Adolf
Hitler himself had a
special train ready to
rush him to France to
take over personal com-
mand as he did on the
east front. Despite these
reports, Allied military
men expected Rommel
to be the main tactician
on German defense.
Although amphibious
attacks are the most
difficult in war, a quiet
feeling of confidence
characterized the Allied
generals.

No Chance To
Hide Great Allied
Convoys
The fleet included
several battleships which
the Germans said set the
whole Seine bay area
ablaze with their fire.
The Germans an-
nounced also that
American reinforcements
began landing at dawn,
aided by artificial fog,
and that in some places
dummy parachutists
were dropped to confuse
the defense.
French patriots
previously had been
warned by Allied radio
broadcasts to get out of
areas within 35 kilome-
ters (22 miles) of the
coast to escape the shock
of battle and the gigantic
aerial bombardment.
An Associated Press
correspondent flying
over the French coast in a
B-26 Maurauder reported
seeing the fields inland
strewn with hundreds of
parachutes and dotted
with gliders, while great
naval forces fired into the
coast fortifications.
The western front
opening climaxed years
of patient preparation by
the top military minds of
America and Britain, and
hard work in factories
and munitions plants by
millions of Americans
and Britons.


The plan of attack was
the same which Gen.
Eisenhower had when
he came to England in
June 1942, but which
was shelved during the
improvised North African
operation.

Sweat And Toil Of
Factory Worker
Pay Off
This morning the
sweat and toil of the fac-
tory worker of America
and Britain, and the cool
planning of the military
men of both countries
bore fruit. Every weapon
that has proved its worth
since Pearl Harbor was in
the hands of the fight-
ing men of the United
Nations.
What success they
would meet no one
could say with certainty.
No such attempt has
been made in warfare
before on such a huge
scale to storm a
continent from the sea
against fixed defenses.
Gen. Eisenhower and the
supreme Allied staff had
left as little as possible
to chance. Several weeks
ago all the air forces in
the United Kingdom
were placed under the
strategic command of
supreme headquarters
to pave the way for the
landings.
The strategic air forces
under Lt. Gen. Carl A.
Spaatz were assigned
the task of smashing the
German aerial reserves
by bombing aircraft fac-
tories deep in Germany.
Theirs was the job of
making the Nazi air
force's once mighty fleet
incapable of sustained
effort against our ground
forces. The Fortresses
and Liberators also were
given the task of breaking
up the rail system of
western France. The
R.A.E under air chief
Marshal Sir Arthur T.
Harris was given a simi-
lar order, only its primary
targets were railroads.
The Ninth air force
under Lt. Gen, Lewis
Brereton, along with the
Second R.A.E tactical
air force, was assigned
selected targets along the
West Wall itself.
The Allies did not hope
to knock out everything
from the air, but to crip-
ple and hamper German
troop movements.
This morning a
shattering barrage such
as reduced the defenders
of the Mediterranean
island of Pantelleria last
summer was laid down
by the combined air
forces.
In the landing craft
were men who knew the
beaches on which they
were to land like the backs
of their hands. For months
in English camps they
had drilled down to the
finest detail for their task
They had been formed
into combat teams, some
of a dozen men, some of
several thousand.


The Sun /Friday, June 6, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net





Page 6 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


BUSINESS NEWS/STOCKS


The Sun /Friday, June 6, 2014


Stocks head higher after


ECB takes new steps


NEWYORK (AP) New
steps from the European
Central Bank to revive
the region's flagging
economy gave markets
a lift Thursday, pushing
the Standard & Poor's 500
index to another record
high.
In the U.S. market, the
gains were broad but
modest. All 10 industries
in the S&P 500 crept
higher, led by industrial
companies and banks.
The ECB cut two key
interest rates, pushing
one of them below
zero. The unusual move
means that the ECB will
charge banks to hold


their money, instead of
paying them interest.
The goal is to arm-twist
banks into lending
money rather than
stockpiling it.
Mario Draghi, the
ECB's president, said the
bank was willing to take
more steps to support
the region's economy if
needed, including buying
bonds.
"It's a big step by
Draghi," said Jason Pride,
director of investment
strategy at Glenmede
Trust. "I would say it's a
big thing even though
the markets may have
expected it."


The Standard &
Poor's 500 index rose
12.58 points, or 0.7 per-
cent, to close at 1,940.46.
The Dow Jones in-
dustrial average rose
98.58 points, or 0.6 per-
cent, to 16,836.11. The
Nasdaq composite gained
44.59 points, or 1.1 per-
cent, to 4,296.23. Both
the S&P 500 and the Dow
average are at record-high
levels.
Germany's main stock
index, the DAX, touched a
record high before pulling
back and ending the day
with a gain of 0.2 percent.
France's CAC 40 surged
1.1 percent.


I BUSINESS NEWS BRIEFS

Household worth Consumer comfort World food
rises by $1.49T in improves for first prices decline for
first quarter time in five weeks 2nd month


WASHINGTON
(Bloomberg) -
Household wealth
climbed in the first
quarter, helped by labor
market improvement and
gains in the stock and
residential real estate
markets that are giving
balance sheets a lift.
Net worth for house-
holds and non-profit
groups increased by
$1.49 trillion from
January through March,
or 1.9 percent from the
previous three months, to
$81.8 trillion, the Federal
Reserve said Thursday
from Washington in its
flow of funds report.
Rising stock prices
and home values helped
Americans feel wealth-
ier at the start of the
year, even as unusually
harsh weather battered
consumer and business
spending.


WASHINGTON
(Bloomberg) -Consumer
sentiment rose for the
first time in five weeks as
Americans, particularly
women, grew more upbeat
about the economy, financ-
es and the buying climate.
The Bloomberg
Consumer Comfort Index
rose to 35.1 from 33.3 a
week earlier. The gauge of
whether it's a good time
to spend advanced by the
most in more than a year,
while views on the economy
were the best in five weeks.
Steady improvement in
the job market, higher stock
prices and rising property
values have helped sustain
consumer sentiment this
year. Limited wage growth
remains a risk to confi-
dence and spending at the
same time Americans pay
higher prices at the gas
pump and grocery-store
checkout lines.


PARIS (Bloomberg) -
World food prices fell for a
second month in May as
the cost of dairy, grains and
vegetable oils declined, the
UN's Food & Agriculture
Organization said.
An index of 55 food
items dropped 1.2 per-
cent to 207.8 points from
a restated 210.3 points
in April, the Rome-based
United Nations agency
wrote in an online report
Thursday. World food
prices are down 3.2 per-
cent from a year earlier.
Dairy prices are con-
tinuing their slide from
a February record amid
rising production in New
Zealand, where milk
output suffered from
drought last year, as well
as the European Union
and the U.S.
An index of dairy
costs slid 5 percent to
238.9 points in May.


Black Knight Firearms



to hold grand opening


oin Black Knight
Firearms Training &
Sales and Parabel-
lum Firearms, 4994 Trott
Circle, Unit 28, North
Port, for their grand
opening on Saturday.
There will be free hot
dogs and hamburg-
ers available at noon.
Black Knight Firearms is
committed to providing
the best training on safe
handling of all firearms
and tactics. All trainers
are NRA-certified. Black
Knight offers the NRA ba-
sic pistol shooting course
(one day, eight hours),
learning pistol knowledge
and safe gun handling,
and the NRA First Steps
pistol orientation course
(four hours). For more in-
formation, call 941-268-
7223 or visit bkfts.com.
000
Welcome to North
Port Headquarters
Unisex Barber Shop,
13644 Tamiami Trail in
Biscayne Plaza. Owner
Rich Frederique offers
haircuts starting at $10,
and a senior special on
Wednesdays of $10. They
offer all types of fade styles,
as well as a father-and-son
buy one, get one half off
special (regular priced
haircut, see store for
details). For more infor-
mation or to schedule an
appointment call 941-799-
2663 or visit hqunisex
barber@gmail.com.
000
Steve Matthews of
Matthews Insurance
Services announces they
have moved the busi-
ness to 14818 Tamiami
Trail, in the North Port
Commons, across from
Lowe's. He invites you to
stop by the new office for
a free insurance quote


to find out how Allstate
can help protect you. For
more information, call
941-426-9571 or email
smatthews@allstate.com.

Olde World Restaurant
& Lounge, 14415 S.
Tamiami Trail, North Port,
is offering a New York
strip steak, seafood trio
with pasta, or chicken
marsala as Father's Day
specials on June 15.
Today at 6:30 p.m., The
Goldtones will present
"Lost in the '50s." On
June 21, the Gotta Luv It
Band will perform rock
'n roll, Motown and
oldies from 6:30-9:30 p.m.
June 28 will see the return
of the Bandana rock band
from 7-10 p.m. The Olde
World also offers karaoke
on Friday nights (except
tonight) from 7-10 p.m.
For more information,
call 941-426-1155.

The North Port Yoga
Center, 1001 Corporate
Ave., off Toledo Blade
Boulevard, is gearing up
for a new teacher training
and personal develop-
ment program beginning
July 13 under the direction
of VirginiaWilliamson
and Natalie DiMauro.
Recent tai chi was such
a success that the Yoga
Center is now offering it
on an ongoing basis from
11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m.


Mondays beginning
June 16. Drop-in fee of
$12 applies. This class
will be experiential rather
than instructional. If
you ever wondered what
this ancient Chinese
practice is all about, this
is the class for you. It will
feature meditation (wujji),
centering (zhang zhaung),
stretch and balance (dao
yin yang sheng gong), and
a new taiji or qigong form
each week.
For more information,
call Natalie at 941-423-5409.
000
The North Port
Young Professionals
Development Series
presents "Get More
Done with Less Effort
Using Free Online
Project Management
Tools," set for 11:30 a.m.-
1 p.m. Monday at USF
Sarasota-Manatee's
North Port campus at
5920 Pan American Blvd.
Cost is $10 (lunch from
Subway included) and is
free for NPYP members
ages 21-40.
Wendy Namack
of Namack Portfolio
Investment Professionals
LLC will introduce you
to Asana, free online,
cloud-based project
management software.
Learn how you can
organize your team and
your personal tasks in
ways that improve work
flow and communication.
Bring your laptop, tablet
or smartphone; space is
limited. To register, go to
northportyoung
professionals.com/lunch.
Steve Sachkar is
publisher of the North
Port Sun. Email him at
ssachkar@sun-herald.
com or fax business infor-
mation to 941-429-3007.


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Leisure d 129.96 +.46 +21.4
Materials d 87.12 +.55 +18.7
MedDeliv d 74.98 +.26 +21.8
MedEqSys d 36.40 +.20 +18.4
NatGas d 44.04 +.21 +10.0
NatRes d 40.95 +.23 +11.9
Pharm d 20.19 +.06 +24.5
Wireless d 9.53 +.05 +14.2
Fidelity Spartan
500cdAdvtg 69.05 +.45 +18.0
500lcxnstl 69.05 +.45 NA
500lcxnv 69.04 +.45 +18.0
ExtMktldAg d 54.33 +.68 +20.6
IntlldxAdg d 42.23 +.25 +11.6
TotMktldAg d 56.89 +.44 +18.5
Fidelity-/E
SenesGrowthCoF 10.97+.09 NA
First Eagle
GIbA m 56.11 +.31 +13.0
OverseasA m 24.45 +.12 +11.7
First Investors
GlobalA m 8.75 +.06 +12.3
TotalRetA m 19.70 +.07 +13.1
Firsthand
e-Comm 8.14 +.08 +17.9
FrankTemp-Frank
FedTFA m 12.30 +6.1
FrankTemp-Franklin
CATFA m 7.35 +6.9
EqnA m 23.69 +.15 +16.6
FLTFA m 11.24 +4.9
GrOppA m 29.69 +.25 +17.6
GrowthA m 69.42 +.52 +17.3
IncomeC m 2.57 +.01 +13.9
IncomeA m 2.54 +.01 +14.5
IncomeAdv 2.53 +.01 +14.7
RisDvA m 50.27 +.39 +16.8
TotalRetA m 10.12 +.01 +7.2
FrankTemp-Mutual
DiscovZ 35.62 +.15 +12.9
DiscovA m 35.06 +.14 +12.6
SharesZ 30.26 +.14 +15.8
SharesA m 29.99 +.14 +15.4
FrankTemp-Templeton
GIBondC m 13.37 +.03 +7.6
GIBondA m 13.34 +.03 +8.0
GIBondAdv 13.30 +.03 +8.3
GrowthA m 26.41 +.20 +15.7
WoddA m 20.30 +.14 +15.2
GMO
EmgMktsVI d 11.10 +.08 +7.6
IntltVlIV 27.60 +.30 +11.6
QuIll 26.33 +.14 +15.7
USCorEqVI 18.06 +.12 +16.7
Gabelli
AssetAAA m 67.98 +.53 +18.7
EqlncomeAAA m 29.54+.17 +17.1
Value m 19.97 +.15 +20.3
Glenmede
SmCapEqAd 26.45 +.48 +21.0
Goldman Sachs
MidCpVals 47.68 +.29 +19.6
ShDuGovA m 10.18 ... +1.2
Harbor
Bond 12.25 +.02 +6.1
CapAplnst 57.75 +.54 +17.2
Intllnstl 74.63 +.66 +13.1
Intllnv b 73.80 +.66 +12.7
Hartford
CapAprA m 48.38 +.26 +15.0
CpApHLSIA 62.10 +.32 +16.6
SmallCoB m 19.59 +.34 +17.7
Heartland
ValuePlus m 36.47 +.74 +17.0
Hennessy
ComerGrlnv 17.73 +.24 +16.3
Hodges
Hodges m 39.04 +.44 +20.8


INVESCO
ComstockA m 24.92 +.14 +19.0
Divlnclnv b 20.34 +.13 +14.5
EnergyA m 50.81 +.18 +10.4
Energylnv b 50.63 +.18 +10.4
EqlncomeA m 11.12 +.06 +14.3
EuroGrA m 41.16 +.21 +15.5
GIbGrB m 29.25 +.16 +13.4
GrvAhAllA m 14.24 +.07 +12.9
PacGrowB m 22.65 +.06 +7.1
SmCapEqA m 16.70 +.28 +17.0
Techlnv b 39.32 +.23 +16.6
USMortA m 12.49 +.01 +4.3
IVA
Woddwidel d 18.71 +.04 +11.6
Ivy
AssetSTrB m 30.43 +.09 +10.0
AssetStrA m 31.53 +.09 +10.8
AssetStrC m 30.58 +.09 +10.0
AsstStrgl 31.82 +.10 +11.1
JPMorgan
CoreBdUlt 11.70 +.01 +5.7
CoreBondA m 11.70 +.02 +5.3
CoreBondSelect 11.69 +.01 +5.5
HighYldSel 8.15 +.01 +12.7
LgCapGrSelect 32.26 +.16 +18.8
MidCpVall 37.37 +.16 +21.2
ShDurBndSel 10.92 ... +2.0
USLCpCrPS 29.31 +.18 +18.0
Janus
BalC m 30.97 +.10 NA
ContrT 22.88 +.05 +15.9
EntrprsT 84.40 +.56 +19.0
FlexBdS b 10.61 +.01 NA
GIbVaIT 14.97 +.07 +14.1
HiYdT 9.39 ... +12.6
OverseasT 38.82 +.26 +4.9
PerkinsMCVL 24.82 +.16 +14.2
PerkinsMCVT 24.57 +.17 +14.0
PerkinsSCVL 26.89 +.40 +15.1
RsrchT 45.89 +.28 +18.5
ShTmBdT 3.08 ... +3.1
T 42.52 +.31 +15.1
USCrT 21.08 +.11 +18.9
VentureT 64.45 +.88 +21.6
John Hancock
LifBal b 15.86 +.08 +12.7
LifGrl b 16.69 +.11 +14.0
Lazard
EmgMkEqlnst d 19.93 +.16 +10.8
Legg Mason
WAManagedMuniA m 16.66... +.6
Litman Gregory
Maslntllntl 18.80 +.12 +11.6
Longleaf Partners
LongPart 35.78 +.20 +18.2
Loomis Sayles
Bdlnstl 15.70 +.04 +12.6
BdR b 15.63 +.04 +12.3
Lord Abbett
AffiliatA m 16.35 +.12 +15.0
ShDurlncA m 4.56 +5.5
ShDurlncC m 4.59 +4.7
ShDurlncF b 4.56 +.01 +5.6
MFS
IntlValA m 35.45 +.10 +14.7
lslntlEq 23.22 +.13 +13.7
MAInvB m 27.92 +.19 +15.6
ValueA m 34.34 +.18 +16.2
Valuel 34.52 +.18 +16.5
MainStay
HiIdorA m 6.13 +.01 +11.7
Mlleld 17.74 +.09 +11.5
Mairs & Power
Grthlnv 114.50 +.84 +19.0
Manning & Napier
PBConTrmS 14.26 +.04 +8.3
PBMaxTrmS 21.18 +.14 +14.7
WridOppA 9.41 +.04 +10.7
Marsico
21stCent b 20.29 +.09 +15.5
FlexCap b 18.12 +.07 +22.9


Meridian
MendnGr d 36.83 +.51 +17.6
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdl 10.80 +.01 +9.3
TotRtBd b 10.81 +.01 +9.0
Midas Funds
Magic m 24.36 +.20 +18.6
Midas m 1.45 +.02 -12.9
Muhlenkamp
Muhlenkmp 70.22 +.55 +13.1
Natixis
LSInvBdY 12.33 +.03 +10.2
LSStratlncA m 17.03 +.05 +13.5
LSStratlncC m 17.14 +.05 +12.6
Needham
Growth m 45.10 +.62 +17.6
Neuberger Berman
SmCpGrlnv 26.75 +.47 +16.3
Northeast Investors
Growth 16.89 +.16 +11.8
Northern
HYFixInc d 7.67 +.01 +12.0
Stkldx 24.10 +.16 +17.9
Nuveen
NYMuniBdl 10.97 -.01 +6.0
Oak Associates
BlkOakEmr 4.01 +.05 +15.0
HlthSinces 20.68 +.02 +21.3
PinOakEq 48.41 +.47 +20.1
RedOakTec 15.66 +.10 +21.6
Oakmark
EqIncI 34.09 +.14 +12.2
Globall 31.74 +.25 +16.3
Intll 27.19 +.17 +17.0
Oakmarkl1 67.31 +.33 +20.8
Select I 43.91 +.38 +22.3
Old Westbury
GlIbOppo 8.20 +.03 +10.4
GIbSmMdCp 17.64 +.13 +15.0
LgCpStr 12.95 +.05 +11.3
Oppenheimer
DevMktA m 39.27 +.26 +12.5
DevMktY 38.85 +.26 +12.8
GlobA m 81.72 +.60 +15.5
IntlGrY 39.41 +.23 +15.6
IntlGrowA m 39.56 +.23 +15.2
MainStrA m 50.66 +.22 +16.5
SrFItRatA m 8.41 +10.3
StrlncA m 4.20 +9.7
Oppenheimer Rocheste
FdMuniA m 15.35 -.01 +8.2
Osterweis
OsterStrlnc d 12.08 +.01 +9.1
PIMCO
AllAssetl 12.70 +.04 +10.3
AIIAuthIn 10.36 +.03 +8.2
ComRIRStI 5.95 +.01 +58
EMktCurl 10.29 +4.2
EmgLclBdl 9.58 +7.3
HiIdls 9.76 +.01 +13.0
IncomeD b 12.67 +.01 +14.7
Incomelnl 12.67 +.01 +15.0
LgTmCrdln 12.58 ... +14.0
LowDrls 10.39 +.01 +4.3
RealRet 11.47 +.03 +6.7
ShtTermls 9.90 ... +2.2
TotRetA m 10.92 +.02 +6.2
TotRetAdm b 10.92 +.02 +6.4
TotRetC m 10.92 +.02 +5.4
TotRetls 10.92 +.02 +6.6
TotRetmD b 10.92 +.02 +6.3
TotlRetnP 10.92 +.02 +6.5
UnconstrBdlns 11.30 +.02 +4.5
PRIMECAP Odyssey
AggGr 31.01 +.36 +25.7
Growth 24.66 +.21 +19.0
Parnassus
CoreEqlnv 39.20 +.23 +17.9
Pax World
Bal b 25.47 +.12 +10.9


Permanent
Portfolio 44.34 +.26 +8.0
Principal
LCGrllnst 12.92 +.10 +19.2
SAMConGrA m 18.57 +.12 +14.2
Prudential Investmen
BlendA m 22.70 +.19 +15.4
IntlEqtyC m 7.44 +.04 +10.3
Putnam
GlbUtilB m 12.87 +.11 +7.6
GrowlncA m 21.15 +.14 +17.7
IntlNewB m 18.57 +.18 +11.9
SmCpValA m 15.62 +.27 +19.3
Reynolds
BlueChip b 74.82 +.52 +16.5
Royce
ValueSvc m 13.62 +.12 +14.2
Rydex
Electrlnv 70.98 +.35 +12.8
HlthCrAdv b 26.00 +.12 +19.6
NsdqlOOlv 22.47 +.20 +20.2
Schwab
10001nv d 51.43 +.34 +18.0
S&PE0OSel d 30.54 +.20 +18.0
Scout
Intemtl 38.03 +.19 +11.6
Sentinel
CmnStkA m 44.37 +.24 +16.3
Sequoia
Sequoia 226.92 +.97 +19.1
State Farm
Growth 72.76 +.54 +13.9
Stratton
SmCapVal d 77.51 +1.16 +19.9
T Rowe Price
Balanced 24.14 +.12 +13.5
BlChpGr 65.99 +.45 +19.4
CapApprec 27.27 +.11 +15.5
Corplnc 9.84 +.01 +9.3
EmMkStk d 33.90 +.21 +8.1
Eqlndex d 52.48 +.35 +17.8
Eqtylnc 34.18 +.23 +17.3
FinSer 20.74 +.19 +15.5
GlbTech 14.02 +.20 +23.4
GrowStk 53.30 +.40 +18.8
HealthSci 62.50 +.17 +28.5
HiYield d 7.31 +.01 +13.4
InsLgCpGr 27.85 +.21 +19.9
IntlEqldk d 14.14 +.10 +11.3
lntlGrlnc d 16.49 +.13 +12.5
lntlStk d 17.17 +.08 +12.4
MediaTele 70.04 +.64 +24.4
MidCapVa 32.45 +.25 +18.9
MidCpGr 75.80 +.61 +20.0
NJTaxFBd 11.94 ... +5.6
NewAmGro 44.56 +.41 +17.4
NewAsia d 16.99 +.08 +11.8
NewHonz 45.39 +.57 +24.6
Newlncome 9.54 +.01 +5.7
OrseaStk d 10.54 +.06 +12.7
R2015 14.98 +.08 +12.9
R2025 16.12 +.10 +14.8
R2035 17.07 +.11 +16.0
Rtmt202O 21.35 +.11 +13.9
Rtmt203O 23.70 +.15 +15.5
Rtmt204O 24.56 +.17 +16.2
SciTech 40.19 +.57 +17.8
ShTmBond 4.80 ... +2.6
SmCpStk 44.82 +80 +21.6
SmCpVal d 50.46 +.96 +18.2
SpecGrow 25.11 +.18 +17.0
Speclnc 13.13 +.03 +8.7
SumMulnc 11.72 ... +6.6
TaxEfMult d 20.53 +.13 +17.9
TaxFShlnt 5.67 ... +28
Value 36.52 +.26 +19.9
TCW
TotRetBdl 10.24 +.01 +8.9
TIAA-CREF
Eqlx 14.88 +.11 +18.4
Target
SmCapVal 27.53 +.39 +18.4


Templeton
lnFEqSeS 23.78 +.18 +11.2
Third Avenue
Value d 60.00 +.37 +11.0
Thompson
Bond 12.00 +.01 +7.5
LargeCap 50.09 +.44 +17.0
Thornburg
lncBdC m 21.86 +.12 +13.2
IntlVall 31.11 +.09 +8.9
Thrivent
IncomeA m 9.30 +.01 +9.4
MidCapGrA m 19.85 +.17 +15.9
Tocqueville
Gold m 38.16 +.72 -0.8
Turner
SmCapGr 36.58 +.52 +17.1
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 27.97 +.08 +15.0
U.S. Global Investor
Gld&Prec m 6.40 +.12 -9.4
GlobRes m 9.84 +.06 +8.9
USAA
CorstnMod 15.53 +.07 +12.1
GNMA 9.99 +.01 +3.5
Growlnc 22.78 +.12 +17.0
HYOpp d 8.97 +.02 +15.0
PrcMtlMin 14.27 +.22 -8.0
SciTech 20.60 +.17 +20.9
TaxELgTm 13.65 ... +7.1
TgtRt204O 13.51 +.10 +13.6
TgtRt205O 13.37 +.11 +13.7
WoddGro 28.23 +.16 +17.0
Unified
Winlnv m 18.73 +.06 +14.2
Value Line
PremGro b 35.26 +.27 +18.4
Vanguard
50OAdml 179.61 +1.18 +18.1
5001nv 179.57 +1.18 +17.9
50OSgnl 148.36 +.97 +18.0
BalldxAdm 28.65 +.14 +13.3
Balldxlns 28.66 +.15 +13.3
BdMklnstPIs 10.80 +.02 NA
CAITAdml 11.67 ... +5.6
CapOp 49.66 +.29 +18.7
CapOpAdml 114.69 +.66 +18.7
Convr 14.37 +.08 +13.7
DevMkldxAdm 13.79 +.09 +11.5
DevMkldxlnstl 13.81 +.09 +11.6
DivGr 22.26 +.11 +16.6
EmMklAdm 35.61 +.27 +7.8
EnergyAdm 139.09 +.97 +10.9
Eqlnc 31.39 +.19 +19.2
EqlncAdml 65.80 +.40 +19.3
ExplAdml 95.57 +1.29 +20.2
ExtdldAdm 64.83 +381 +20.5
Extdldlst 64.83 +381 +20.5
ExtdMkldxlP 159.99 +1.99 NA
FAWeUSIns 103.23 +.67 +10.6
FAWeUSInv 20.66 +.13 +10.4
GNMA 10.69 +.01 +4.4
GNMAAdml 10.69 +.01 +4.5
GlbEq 24.79 +.16 +15.8
Grolnc 41.88 +.25 +17.9
GrthldAdm 50.35 +35 +18.8
Grhlstld 50.34 +34 +18.8
HYCorAdml 6.15 ... +11.9
HItCrAdml 84.32 +.05 +21.6
HlthCare 199.88 +.13 +21.6
ITBondAdm 11.42 +.01 +7.2
ITGradeAd 9.91 +.01 +8.5
InfPrtAdm 26.59 +.05 +5.5
InfPrI 10.83 +.02 +5.5
InflaPro 13.54 +.02 +5.4
Instldxl 178.44 +1.17 +18.1
InstPlus 178.45 +1.17 +18.1
InstTStPI 44.44 +34 +18.6
IntlGr 23.81 +.18 +12.9
lntlGrAdm 75.74 +.57 +13.1
IntlStkldxAdm 29.17 +.19 NA
IntlStkldxl 116.64 +.75 NA


IntlStkldxlPls 116.66 +.74 NA
IntlStkldxlSgn 34.99 +.23 NA
IntlVal 38.85 +.19 +11.1
LTGradeAd 10.33 +.01 +11.4
LgCpldxlnv 36.08 +.23 +18.0
LifeCon 18.72 +.07 +9.5
LifeGro 28.97 +.17 +14.1
LifeMod 24.16 +.11 +11.9
MdGrlxlnv 37.21 +.27 +19.7
MidCapldxlP 157.70 +1.11 NA
MidCpAdml 144.74 +1.02 +20.8
MidCplst 31.97 +.22 +20.9
MidCpSgl 45.67 +.32 +20.8
MorgAdml 81.80 +.52 +17.6
MuHYAdmI 11.08 +7.0
MulntAdml 14.13 -.01 +5.0
MuLTAdmI 11.56 +6.0
MuLtdAdml 11.07 +2.5
MuShtAdml 15.87 +1.3
Prmcp 99.77 +.55 +18.8
PrmcpAdml 103.49 +.57 +18.9
PrmcpCorl 21.15 +.12 +18.7
REITIdxAd 108.27 +1.94 +22.2
STBondAdm 10.53 +2.7
STBondSgl 10.53 +2.7
STCor 10.77 +4.2
STGradeAd 10.77 +4.3
STIGradel 10.77 +4.4
STsryAdml 10.71 +1.6
SelValu 29.79 +.24 +20.9
SmCaplcklP 157.21 +2.22 NA
SmCpldAdm 54.46 +.77 +20.7
SmCpldlst 54.46 +.77 +20.7
SmCplncdSgnl 49.06 +.69 +20.7
SmVIIdlst 24.76 +.34 +20.4
Star 25.03 +.11 +13.1
StratgcEq 32.26 +.27 +22.2
TgtRe20lO 26.60 +.09 +10.3
TgtRe20l5 15.41 +.07 +11.5
TgtRe202O 28.35 +.14 +12.5
TgtRe203O 28.98 +.17 +14.1
TgtRe2035 17.83 +.12 +14.8
TgtRe204O 29.75 +.19 +15.1
TgtRe2045 18.66 +.12 +15.1
TgtRe205O 29.62 +.20 +15.1
TgtRetlnc 12.90 +.03 +8.5
Tgtet2025 16.49 +.08 +13.3
TllntlBdldxlnst 30.58 +.04 NA
TllntlBdldxlnv 10.19 +.01 NA
TotBdAdml 10.80 +.02 +5.0
TotBdlnst 10.80 +.02 +5.1
TotBdMklnv 10.80 +.02 +4.9
TotBdMkSig 10.80 +.02 +5.0
Totlntl 17.44 +.11 +10.5
TotStlAdm 49.01 +.37 +18.5
TotStllns 49.02 +.38 +18.6
TotStlSig 47.30 +.36 +18.6
TotStldx 48.99 +.38 +18.4
TxMCapAdm 99.30 +.66 +18.4
ValldxAdm 31.44 +.19 +17.6
Valldxlns 31.44 +.19 +17.6
Wellsl 25.86 +.07 +12.0
WellslAdm 62.65 +.17 +12.1
Welltn 39.75 +.16 +13.7
WelltnAdm 68.65 +.26 +13.8
WndsllAdm 69.60 +.41 +17.9
Wndsr 21.82 +.10 +19.0
WndsrAdml 73.64 +.36 +19.1
Wndsrll 39.21 +.23 +17.8
Victory
SpecValA m 21.81 +.12 +14.1
Virtus
EmgMktsls 10.17 +.04 +13.0
Wasatch
LgCpVal d 12.87 +.06 +12.9
Wells Fargo
Discovlnv 31.86 +.39 +21.1
Growlnv 49.26 +.47 +21.1
Outk2O1OAdm 13.58 +.04 +6.7


Stocks of Local Interest


52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN PIE DIV
AV Homes Inc AVHI 12.86 --*- 20.82 17.79 +.92 +5.5 A A V -2.1 +24.2 dd
Arkansas Bst ARCB 17.68 0 44.63 44.05+1.46 +3.4 A A A +30.8 +128.6 45 0.12
Bank of America BAC 12.13 18.03 15.43 +.22 +1.4 A A V -0.9 +14.1 20 0.04
CarnivalICorp CCL 31.44 41.89 40.19 +.10 +0.2 A A A +27.0 31 1.00
Chicos FAS CHS 14.90 19.84 15.35 +.04 +0.3 A V V -185 -13.8 20 0.30
Cracker Barrel CBRL 89.46 118.63 101.85+1.62 +1.6 A A A -7.5 +7.6 19 4.00f
Disney DIS 60.41 84.42 84.78 +.54 +0.6 A A A +11.0 +32.2 22 0.86f
Eaton Corp plc ETN 61.23 78.19 73.56 +.18 +0.2 V A V -3.4 +14.7 18 1.96
Fortune Brds Hm&Sec FBHS 35.80 47.92 39.94 +.27 +0.7 V A V -12.6 -0.6 27 0.48
Frontline Ltd FRO 1.77 ---- 5.18 2.44 +.06 +2.5 A V V -34.8 +22.7 dd
HarrisCorp HRS 47.69 79.32 76.49 +.76 +1.0 V A A +9.6 +54.6 18 1.68
iShs U.S. Pfd PFF 36.63 40.31 39.30 +.07 +0.2 V V A +6.7 +5.1 q 2.55e
KCSouthern KSU 88.56 125.96 106.41 +1.89 +1.8 V A A -14.1 -2.9 34 1.12
Lennar Corp A LEN 30.90 44.40 40.99 +.43 +1.1 A A A +3.6 +7.0 18 0.16
McClatchy Co MNI 2.15 7.39 5.56 +.25 +4.7 A A V +63.5 +123.1 31
NextEra Energy NEE 74.78 101.50 97.77 +.45 +0.5 A V A +14.2 +30.9 21 2.90
Office Depot ODP 3.77 5.85 5.18 +.02 +0.4 A A A -2.1 +18.9 dd
PGT Inc PGTI 7.85 ---- 12.61 8.35 +.11 +1.3 V V V -17.5 -1.3 17
Panera Bread Co PNRA 149.60 ---- 194.65 155.69+1.23 +0.8 A V V -11.9 -19.0 23
Pembina Pipeline PBA 28.76 42.76 40.54 -.47 -1.1 A A A +15.1 +34.1 33 1.74f


52-WK RANGE *CLOSE


YTD 1YR


NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
Pepco Holdings Inc POM 18.04 -- 27.90 27.86 +.11 +0.4 A A A +45.6 +39.0 24 1.08
Phoenix Cos PNX 35.25 61.54 47.41 +1.05 +2.3 V A V -22.8 +9.9
Raymond James Fncl RJF 40.01 56.32 49.51 +.34 +0.7 A A V -5.1 +17.1 17 0.64
Reliance Steel Alu RS 61.93 76.78 72.49 +.71 +1.0 A A A -4.4 +11.9 17 1.40
Ryder R 55.17 87.23 86.51 +.69 +0.8 V A A +17.3 +41.2 18 1.36
St Joe Co JOE 16.82 24.76 24.99 +.44 +1.8 A A A +30.2 +23.1 6
Sally Beauty Hid SBH 24.38 ---- 31.86 25.14 +.12 +0.5 V V -16.8 -17.0 17
Simon Property Gp SPG 142.47 177.31 169.84 +3.07 +1.8 A A A +18.7 +10.2 38 5.20f
Stein Mart SMRT 11.53 16.17 13.81 +.57 +4.3 A A V +2.7 +2.1 25 0.30f
Suntrust Bks STI 30.17 41.26 39.20 +.37 +1.0 A A V +6.5 +22.8 14 0.80f
Superior Uniform SGC 10.08 16.97 15.40 -.13 -0.8 V V A -0.5 +39.7 17 0.54
TECO Energy TE 16.12 18.45 17.41 +.19 +1.1 A V A +1.0 +4.0 18 0.88
Tech Data TECD 46.04 65.98 60.49 +.04 +0.1 A V V +17.2 +21.8 12
Wendys Co WEN 5.57 10.27 8.37 +.09 +1.1 A A V -4.0 +45.5 38 0.20
World Fuel Svcs INT 34.57 46.86 47.07 +.48 +1.0 A A A +9.1 +15.5 16 0.15






The Sun /Friday, June 6, 2014


STOCKS


www.sunnewspapers.net


WIRE Page 7


STOCKS LISTING CHANGE REQU ESTS WELCOME! our readers don't want. If you do not see your stock in the paper, please let us
know and we will put it in the listings. Email the name of the company and the
The Sun Newspaper is tweaking the way stocks are listed in the daily paper. symbol to nlane@sun-herald.com, or call 941-206-1138. You can leave the stock
We will continue to run a wide range of stocks, but we're trying to eliminate stocks name and symbol on voice mail.



S&P 500 +12.58 NASDAQ +44.59 DOW +98.58 6-MO T-BILLS 30-YR T-BONDS CRUDE OIL 16 EURO +0058 GOLD +9.00
1,940.46 4,296.23 16,836.11W 05% .344% I $10248 $13658411,253.00 4



Money Markets


CombinedStocks
From the New York Stock Exchange
and the Nasdaq.


YTD Name Last Chg
A-B-C
-1.6 AES Corp 14.28 +.31
-7.3 AFLAC 61.95 +.02
+13.9 AGL Res 53.79 +.91
-22.6 AK Steel 6.35 +.09
+29.4 ASM Intl 42.70 +.50
-.2 AT&Tlnc 35.10 +.05
+4.7 AbbottLab 40.15 +.40
+4.7 AbbVie 55.30 +.72
+19.4 AberFitc 39.30 +.47
+60.4 Abraxas 5.23 +.58
+1.7 Accenture 83.58 +.13
-1.5 Accuray 8.57 +.21
+23.8 Actavis 208.00 -3.00
+16.2 ActvsBliz 20.71 -.02
+9.3 AdobeSy 65.47 +1.30
-16.1 AdvEnld 19.18 +.54
+5.4 AMD 4.08 +.04
-19.6 AdvisoryBd 51.17 +.46
+10.4 AecomTch 32.50 +.34
-60.9 Aeropostl 3.55 +.11
+13.9 AeroViron 33.19 +.93
+15.4 Aetna 79.12 -.27
+2.5 Agilent 58.60 +1.15
-11.0 Aircasde 17.06 +.35
-3.1 Airgas 108.43 +1.01
-18.9 AlaskCom 1.72 +.03
-9.5 AlcatelLuc 3.98 +.14
+31.7 Alcoa 14.00 +.18
+27.6 Alexion 169.50 -.09
+13.9 AllegTch 40.59 +.49
+49.4 Allergan 165.90 +.30
-.2 Allete 49.77 +.88
+14.7 AIlnceRes 88.30 -.42
+4.2 AlliBInco 7.43 +.04
+20.1 AlliBern 25.64 +.39
+13.8 AlliantEgy 58.70 +.51
-22.3 AlIdNevG 2.76 +.09
+10.1 AllisonTrn 30.41
+8.4 Allstate 59.11 +.49
-2.0 AllyFin n 23.51
-52.9 AlphaNRs 3.36 +.15
+6.0 AIpToDv rs 8.88 +.03
+3.5 AIpAerMLP 18.41 +.03
+4.2 AlteraCpIf 33.88 +.36
+7.6 Alria 41.29 +.06
-18.9 Amazon 323.57+16.79
-4.4 Ambev n 7.03 +.01
+9.5 Ameren 39.61 +.43
-14.4 AMviL 20.01 +.57
+68.0 AmAirln 42.41 -.41
-50.3 AmApparel .61 -.03
+22.5 ACapAgy 23.63 +.27
-4.9 AmCapLtd 14.88 +.19
+16.9 ACapMtg 20.41 +.27
-26.2 AEagleOut 10.63 -.14
+15.9 AEP 54.17 +.18
+2.3 AmExp 92.80 +.99
+7.6 AmlniGrp 54.95 +.08
+4.1 ARCapH n 10.98 +.10
-3.2 ARItCapPr 12.44 -.03
+7.0 AmStWtr s 30.75 +.95
+13.9 AmWtrWks 48.12 +.18
+7.4 Amerigas 47.87
+.6 Ameriprise 115.79 +.68
+3.5 AmeriBrgn 72.79 -.87
+1.1 Ametek 53.27 +.42
+3.2 Amgen 117.74 -1.41
+80.1 AmkorTch 11.04 +.23
+8.6 Amphenol 96.87 +.77
+28.9 Anadarko 102.21 +.17
+3.7 ABInBev 110.41 +.26
+16.0 Annaly 11.57 +.07
-33.8 Annies 28.50 -1.57
+26.4 Anworth 5.32 +.06
+8.4 Apache 93.17 +.67
-1.9 Apollolnv 8.31 +.03
+15.4 AppleInc 647.35 +2.53
+23.2 ApdMatl 21.78 +.22
+6.6 AquaAms 25.14 +.20
+30.8 ArkBest 44.05 +1.46
-14.7 ArcelorMit 15.21 +.20
-23.4 ArchCoal 3.41 +.11
+3.6 ArchDan 44.97 +.66
+5.1 ArenaPhm 6.15 +.10
-3.4 AresCap 17.17 +.05
-1.9 AriadP 6.69 +.14
+9.7 ArmourRsd 4.40 +.04
-14.6 ArrayBio 4.28 +.03
+8.6 ArrowEl 58.90 +.22
+29.6 ArrowRsh 14.06 +1.26
-.8 ArubaNet 17.76 +.53
+8.8 Ashland 105.60 +.59
+21.7 AsfraZen 72.24 -.41
-5.6 AtlasPpln 33.07 +.57
+9.1 Atmel 8.54 +.10
+13.4 ATMOS 51.50 +.16
-2.6 AutoData 78.70 -.13
+35.9 AvagoTch 71.87 +.26
+55.7 AvanirPhm 5.23 +.16
-1.1 AveryD 49.62 +.12
+45.2 AvisBudg 58.71 +.91
+12.8 Avista 31.80 +.54
-16.4 Avon 14.40 +.21
+13.9 B2gold g 2.30 -.02
+2.8 BB&T Cp 38.38 +.23
+7.2 BCE g 46.42 -.18
+18.0 BGC Ptrs 7.14 +.08
+1.5 BHPBiIpIc 63.06 +.24
+3.8 BP PLC 50.44 +.37
+18.7 BP Pru 94.52 +1.07
-5.2 BabckWil 32.41 +.51
-6.4 Baidu 166.42 +3.04
+28.3 BakrHu 70.90 +.62
+18.1 BallCorp 61.02 +.50
+143.6 BallardPw 3.69 +.05
+6.3 BcBilVArg 13.17 +.38
+9.3 BcoBradpf 13.69 +.08
+15.0 BcoSantSA 10.43 +.27
+26.7 BcoSBrasil 6.84 +.16
-11.8 BankMutl 6.18 +.31
-.9 BkofAm 15.43 +.22
+5.4 BkMont g 70.27 -.08
BkNYMeI 34.95 +.33
+2.7 BkNova g 64.21 -.19
-10.7 Barclay 16.19 -.04
-24.9 B iPVix rs 31.95 -1.20
+9.8 Bard 147.08 -.30
+30.9 BarnesNob 19.57 +.67
-8.7 BarrickG 16.09 +.17
+65.2 BasicEnSv 26.07 -.22
+6.3 Baxter 73.91 +.91
-23.0 BeazerHm 18.81 -.06
-23.6 BedBath 61.33 +.22
+.4 Bemis 41.12 +.44
+8.1 BerkH B 128.20 +.97
-28.1 BestBuy 28.67 +.12
+35.8 BigLots 43.86 -.03
+40.1 Biocryst 10.65 +.52
+14.5 Biogenldc 320.13 +.95


+22.9 BioMedR 22.27 +.23
+3.4 BlackBerry 7.69 +.04
+5.0 BIkHIthSci 37.23 -.01
+3.8 Blackstone 32.71 +.74
+9.3 BlksThMtg 29.66 -.11
-6.8 BobEvans 47.16 +.74
+.2 Boeing 136.82 +1.49
+16.5 BorgWrn s 65.15 +.76
-11.8 BostBeer 213.34 +.91
+9.7 BostonSci 13.18 +.13
-1.9 BoydGm 11.05 +.08
-6.4 BrigStat 20.37 +.07
+11.2 Brinker 51.52 +.31
-11.2 BrMySq 47.21 -.31
+10.9 BritATob 119.08 -.61
+26.9 Broadcom 37.61 +.54
+3.1 BrcdeCm 9.14 -.01
+6.0 Brkflnfra 41.59 +.72
+10.2 Buckeye 78.28 +.11
-9.3 Buenavent 10.18 -.09
+2.3 BuffaloWW150.65 -.11
-14.4 CA Inc 28.81 +.49
+16.8 CBRE Grp 30.72 +.14
-5.1 CBS B 60.48 +.64
+3.6 CH Robins 60.44 +1.06
+12.5 CMS Eng 30.12 +.34
-4.0 CNH Indl 10.90 +.19
+3.5 CSX 29.79 +.67
+19.6 CVR Rfng 27.06 +.17
+9.9 CVS Care 78.62 +.46
+22.7 CYS Invest 9.09 +.04
-6.5 CabotOG s 36.25 +.26
+18.2 Cadence 16.57 +.07
+20.4 Cal-Maine 72.52 +.55
+12.3 Ca1aCvHi 14.52 +.26
+9.8 Calgon 22.58 +.76
-.7 CalifWtr 22.92 +.90
+24.1 Calpine 24.21 +.48
+21.3 CalumetSp 31.55 +.21
+26.7 CamdenPT 72.08 +1.13
-9.6 Cameco g 18.78 -.84
+7.1 CampSp 46.37 +.65
+6.6 CdnNR gs 60.77 +.28
+22.8 CdnNRs gs 41.57 -.04
-21.3 CdnSolar 23.46 -.13
+4.2 CapOne 79.82 +.64
CapSenL 23.99 +.47
+9.4 CapsteadM 13.21 +.06
+17.8 CpsmnTurb 1.52 -.02
+5.9 CardnlHIth 70.72 -.33
+9.8 CareFusion 43.72 +.05
+28.1 Carmike 35.65 +1.00
Carnival 40.19 +.10
-.1 CarpTech 62.11 +.16
+37.7 Carrizo 61.67 +.08
+17.8 Caterpillar 106.96 +2.65
+11.2 CedarE 55.11 +.42
-4.3 Celgene 161.72 +2.90
-37.4 CeIldexTh 15.15 +1.70
+13.1 Cemex 12.87 +.04
+21.2 Cemigpfs 7.22 +.10
+3.5 CenovusE 29.65 -.10
+4.0 CenterPnt 24.10 +.16
+16.7 CntryLink 37.18 -.31
-7.6 Cenveo 3.18 +.14
-14.5 Checkpnt 13.49 +.51
-7.5 ChemFinl 29.31 +.93
+54.0 CheniereEn 66.40 -.24
+10.1 ChesEng 29.87 +.58
-1.1 Chevron 123.52 +1.17
-1.2 ChicB&l 82.16 +1.41
-18.5 Chicos 15.35 +.04
+6.5 Chimera 3.30 +.14
+4.9 ChurchDwt 69.53 +.26
-6.1 CienaCorp 22.48 +3.49
+3.2 Cigna 90.29 -.12
+9.0 CinciBell 3.88 +.05
-6.2 CinnFin 49.12 +.28
+14.7 Cirrus 23.43 +.17
+11.0 Cisco 24.70 +.20
-6.7 Citigroup 48.63 +.75
-3.2 CitrixSys 61.20 +.65
-16.2 CleanEngy 10.79 +.50
-43.5 CliffsNRs 14.80 +.20
-3.6 Clorox 89.43 +.46
-32.4 ClovisOnc 40.77 +2.37
-29.5 Coach 39.58 +.59
+11.4 CobaltlEn 18.33 -.19
-1.0 CocaCola 40.89 +.10
+2.2 CocaCE 45.10 -.85
-3.0 CognizTc s 49.00 +.47
+20.5 CohStQIR 11.42 +.15
+3.3 CohStSelPf 25.51 +.06
+4.2 CogPalm 67.96 +.25
-11.7 ColonialFS 11.75
+1.4 Comcast 52.71 +.42
+4.7 Comc spcl 52.21 +.21
+2.4 Comerica 48.70 +.17
+12.9 CmtyHlt 44.32 +2.19
-20.7 CmpTask 14.94 +.22
-13.2 Compuwre 9.73 -.02
+4.7 Comtech 32.99 +1.55
-3.6 ConAgra 32.48 +.11
-8.5 ConnWtrSv 32.48 +1.03
+13.3 ConocoPhil 80.05 +.25
+24.6 ConsolEngy 47.41 +1.65
+4.2 ConsolCom 20.46 +.50
+.8 ConEd 55.73 +.51
+27.4 ContlRes 143.32 +.45
+18.7 CooperTire 28.54 +.15
-26.6 CorOnDem 39.12 +1.09
+21.1 Corning 21.58 +.22
+19.3 CorpOffP 28.27 +.53
-1.1 Costco 117.75 +1.44
+10.8 Cotyn 16.89 -.03
-68.6 CSVInvNG 2.78 -.07
+18.7 CSVeIIVST 40.82 +1.40
-49.5 CSVxSht rs 3.79 -.26
+4.0 CrestwdEq 14.39 +.30
-5.6 Crocs 15.03 +.08
+3.2 CrwnCstle 75.76 +.29
+11.0 CrownHold 49.47 +.62
+10.8 Cummins 156.25 +2.47
+23.3 CybrOpt 7.88 -.06
+.7 CypSemi 10.57 +.14
-31.1 CVtRx 4.32 -.01
D-E-F
+13.6 DCT IndI 8.10 +.23
+15.8 DDR Corp 17.80 +.33
+8.0 DNPSelct 10.17 +.06
+7.5 DR Horton 24.00 +.31
-38.5 DSWInc s 26.28 +.42
+15.3 DTE 76.54 +.32
+6.5 DTE En 61 25.75 +.17
+3.0 Danaher 79.50 +1.07
-6.7 Darden 50.71 +.62
+20.1 DeVryEd 42.65 +.76
.9 Deandsrs 17.35 +.48
..Deere 91.30 +.46
+51.1 DeltaAir 41.50 -.67


1,960 ................................. S& P 500
Close: 1,940.46
Change: 12.58 (0.7%)
1,880". 10DAYS .........


4,320 ............................."Nasdaq composite

4,220 .. Close: 4,296.23
Change: 44.59 (1.0%)
4,120 10 DAYS .........


1 ,9 5 0 ............. ............ ............ ............ .............................. 4 ,4 0 0 ............. ............ ............ ............. ............. ................

1,950........ .................. 4,20............ ........... ........... ...........








1,70 ...,........... :-....... ........ .. ... .... ........... 3...
D J 3,900 .......... F M........... A.... M...... .. DJoFooA.


StocksRecap

NYSE NASD
Vol. (in mil.) 3,016 1,882
Pvs. Volume 2,724 1,581
Advanced 2441 2085
Declined 687 568
New Highs 308 122
New Lows 20 43


+3.7 DenburyR 17.04 +.24
-18.2 DeutschBk 39.44 -1.09
-3.1 Diageo 128.31 +.05
-16.4 DiaOffs 47.58 -.15
-21.7 DicksSptg 45.49 +.98
+12.4 Diebold 37.11 +.02
-23.8 Digilnfi 9.23 +.42
+20.7 DigitalRIt 59.30 +.92
+18.3 Dillards 114.96 -.58
+20.1 DirecTV 82.95 +.40
+8.5 DxGIdBII rs 29.73 +1.43
-15.4 DrxFnBear 18.18 -.53
-8.0 DrxSCBear 15.61 -1.02
+8.6 DrxFnBull 98.08 +2.61
-5.2 DrxSCBuII 73.44 +4.30
+7.2 Discover 59.99 +.18
-11.2 DiscComA 80.27 +1.64
+.9 DishNetw h 58.45 -.50
+11.0 Disney 84.78 +.54
-4.4 DollarGen 57.69 +1.07
-3.1 DollarTree 54.66 +.34
+8.6 DomRescs 70.23 +.18
+5.3 Dominos 73.31 +.08
-21.3 DonlleyRR 15.97 +.15
+18.5 DowChm 52.62 +.14
+9.1 DryStrt 8.29 +.02
-31.9 DryShips 3.20 +.10
+6.7 DuPont 69.34 +.02
+4.9 DufPUC 10.52 +.01
+3.9 DukeEngy 71.73 +.72
+20.4 DukeRlty 18.11 +.36
-41.5 E-House 8.82 -.01
+1.2 E-Trade 19.87 +.17
-7.8 eBay 50.58 +.13
+5.4 EMCCp 26.51 +.18
+28.6 EOG Res s107.90 +1.53
-3.4 Eaton 73.56 +.18
+4.2 EV EEq2 13.54 +.06
+4.5 EVTxMGIo 10.45 +.06
+5.3 Ecolab 109.80 -.18
+22.3 EdwLfSci 80.42 -.06
+2.8 EldorGId g 5.85 +.09
+51.6 ElectArts 34.78 -.17
+48.8 Emeritus 32.19 +.43
-4.0 EmersonEl 67.39 +.65
+6.3 EmpDist 24.11 +.41
+6.7 EnbrdgEPt 31.86 +.24
+8.1 Enbridge 47.21 -.12
+29.9 EnCana g 23.44 -.08
+7.5 Energizer 116.36 +.28
-1.3 EngyTsfr 56.53 -.12
-20.3 EngyXXl 21.56 +.67
+13.9 EnLkLLCn 41.69 +.81
-13.1 EnnisInc 15.22 +.43
-9.4 ENSCO 51.80 -1.26
+24.2 Entergy 78.61 +2.00
-14.7 EnteroMed 1.74 -.11
+13.8 EntPrPt 75.42 -.04
+.9 Ericsson 12.35 -.04
-3.6 ExcoRes 5.12 +.06
-46.5 Exelixis 3.28 +.04
+36.8 Exelon 37.46 +.19
+6.2 Expedia 74.00 +.73
-25.7 Express 13.87 +.37
+1.3 ExpScripts 71.12 +.63
-41.7 ExfrmNet 4.07 +.09
-.6 ExxonMbl 100.55 +.51
+12.8 FMCTech 58.91 -.10
-.3 FNBCpPA 12.58 +.26
+3.8 FS Invest n 10.64 +.08
+15.6 Facebook 63.19 -.15
-7.5 FamilyDIr 60.11 +.10
+4.5 Fastenal 49.65 +.25
-.8 FedExCp 142.65 -.35
+52.3 FedNatHId 22.34 +.94
+14.6 Ferrellgs 26.29 -.51
+4.5 FidNFin 33.92 +.52
+.9 FifthStFin 9.33 +.09
+.8 FifthThird 21.19 +.10
+3.9 Finisar 24.85 +2.20
-25.1 FireEye n 32.68 +2.22
-17.3 FstNiagara 8.78 +.10
+17.2 FstSolar 64.02 -1.37
+4.8 FirstEngy 34.56 +.26
-12.5 FstMerit 19.46 +.40
-18.9 FiveBelow 35.04 -1.49
+39.4 Flexfrn 10.83 +.13
-3.8 FlowrsFd s 20.65 +.07
-3.8 Fluor 77.26 +2.22
+8.1 FordM 16.68 -.11
+56.4 ForestLab 93.86 -.91
-33.8 ForestOil 2.39 +.07
-12.6 FBHmSec 39.94 +.27
-7.8 FMCG 34.77 +.26
+46.2 Freescale 23.47 +.48
+23.0 FrontierCm 5.72 -.07
-34.8 Frontline 2.44 +.06
+62.4 FuelCellE 2.29 +.10
-8.2 Fusion-io 8.18 +.26
G-H-I
+86.7 GTAdvTc 16.27 +.13
+2.2 GabDvlnc 22.66 -.12
-15.1 GabMultT 10.54 -.18
+12.8 GabUtil 7.21 +.01
-51.6 GalenaBio 2.40 +.15
-11.8 Gam&Lsrn 33.90 +.05
+5.4 Gap 41.19 +.04
+27.5 Garmin 58.87 +.56
-24.7 Geeknet 13.62 -.03
+2.7 GAInv 36.16 +.31
+26.5 GenDynam120.89 +2.53
-4.5 GenElec 26.77 +.22
+21.1 GenGrPrp 24.30 +.42
+10.9 GenMills 55.34 -.22
-11.3 GenMotors 36.27 -.25


HIGH LOW CLOSE CHG. %CHG. WK MO QTR YTD


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


+8.6 GenesisEn 57.08 -.22
-10.7 Gentex 29.33 +.30
+13.3 Genworth 17.60 +.02
-23.7 Gerdau 5.98 -.02
+10.3 GileadSci 82.80 -.22
-.2 GlaxoSKn 53.30 +.21
+20.9 GlimchRt 11.32 +.22
+116.0 Globalstar 3.78 +.17
-26.9 Gogon 18.15 -.15
+7.4 Goldcrp g 23.28 +.30
+65.4 GoodrPet 28.15 -.24
+12.5 Goodyear 26.82 +.47
+.7 GoogleA 564.93+11.17
-.8 Google C n553.90 +9.24
-7.4 vjGrace 91.60 -.19
+7.8 GramrcyP 6.20 +.09
+18.9 GraphPkg 11.41 +.17
-72.6 GNIron 18.64 +.13
+5.9 GtPlainEn 25.66 +.17
+3.5 Greif A 54.21 -.29
-18.2 Griffin h 27.29 -.01
-50.5 Groupon 5.82 +.09
-19.4 GuangRy 18.63 +.02
+17.9 HCAHIdg 56.26 +1.49
+17.4 HCPInc 42.64 +.81
-5.2 HSBC 52.28 +.07
+2.6 HainCel 93.15 +1.17
+64.2 HalconRes 6.34 +.29
+29.8 Hallibrtn 65.89 +.50
-39.6 Halozyme 9.05 +.97
+20.6 Hanesbrds 84.73 -.37
+3.9 Hanoverlns 62.06 +.69
+2.6 HarleyD 71.06 -.27
-2.9 Harsco 27.21 +.53
-.9 HartfdFn 35.90 +.21
+23.7 HafterasF 20.22 +.09
-5.8 HawaiiEl 24.56 +.70
+20.9 HItCrREIT 64.74 +1.23
+5.8 HlthCSvc 30.01 +.22
-6.8 HeclaM 2.87 +.09
-31.3 HercOffsh 4.48 +.03
+16.5 Hersha 6.49 +.14
-.2 Hershey 97.06 -.42
+6.5 Hertz 30.49 +.25
+21.1 HewlettP 33.87 +.11
+75.4 Hillshire 58.67 -.57
-10.9 HilltopH 20.61 +.60
-55.9 HimaxTch 6.48 +.22
-2.4 HomeDp 80.38 -.16
-24.6 HomeAway 30.84 +.77
-15.3 Honda 35.03 +.13
+3.9 Honwlllndi 94.95 +1.10
+9.5 Hormel 49.45 -.13
+10.1 HospPT 29.76 +.38
+16.9 HostHotls 22.72 +.53
-32.8 HovnanE 4.45 -.03
+19.4 Huanwr 43.29 +1.22
+9.1 HubbelB 118.83 +.89
+5.4 HudsCity 9.94 +.10
-1.3 HuntBncsh 9.52 +.10
+13.1 Huntgtnlng 101.81 +.68
+7.2 IAMGIdg 3.57 +.11
+37.3 ICICI Bk 51.02 +.32
-15.2 iGateCorp 34.05 +.60
+4.1 ING 14.58 +.37
+8.6 iSAstla 26.46 +.21
+3.6 iShBrazil 46.27 +.36
+5.9 iShEMU 43.84 +.65
+1.5 iShGerm 32.25 +.29
+15.9 iShltaly 18.07 +.41
-2.7 iShJapan 11.81 +.03
-1.3 iShMe~dco 67.15 +.69
+5.9 iSTaiwn 15.27 +.12
-2.4 iShSilver 18.26 +.20
+6.3 iShSelDiv 75.88 +.61
-2.4 iShChinaLC 37.44 +.30
+5.4 iSCorSP500195.63 +1.29
+3.2 iShEMkts 43.13 +.45
+9.6 iSh20yrT 111.59 +.05
+4.1 iS Eafe 69.84 +.48
+1.8 iShiBxHYB 94.56 +.23
+.1 iSh1-3CrBd15.53 +.07
-.5 iShR2K 114.78 +2.36
+5.9 iShHiDiv 74.39 +.30
+6.7 iShUSFfd 39.30 +.07
+15.6 iShREst 72.90 +1.12
-2.4 iShHmCnst 24.22 +.26
+6.9 Idacorp 55.40 +1.20
-33.7 IderaPhm 3.07 +.35
+4.3 ITW 87.67 +.55
+48.4 Illumina 164.09 +3.16
+9.7 IndBkMI 13.16 +.26
-5.9 Infinera 9.20 +.59
-62.3 Infoblox 12.44 +.27
-1.3 IngerRd 60.80 +.62
+12.8 Ingredion 77.25 +1.03
+2.6 InlandRE 10.79 +.19
-20.3 InovioPhm 2.31 +.03
+31.5 IntgDv 13.39 +.07
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P-Q-R
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-0.83%


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S-T-U
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V-W-X-Y-Z
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-33.0 VaVis A 4.68 +.06
+18.4 VangREIT 76.41 +1.38
+3.6 VangDivAp 77.93 +.51
+4.3 VangEmg 42.90 +.48
+4.2 VangEur 61.26 +.56
-2.9 Vantiv 31.67 +.61
+13.5 Vectren 40.30 +.42
+14.6 Ventas 65.67 +1.58
-63.9 VentrusBio 1.38 +.20
+17.1 VeoliaEnv 19.15
-.6 VBradley 23.89 -1.36
+26.1 VeriFone 33.82 -.03
+19.1 VerintSys 51.16 +4.57
-15.2 Verisign 50.68 +.56
+.3 VerizonCm 49.28 +.13
-15.3 ViadCorp 23.54 +1.14
-32.0 VimpelCm 8.80 +.14
-4.7 Visa 212.22 +.79
+15.2 Vishaylnt 15.28 +.05
+7.8 VMware 96.70 +.32
-14.0 Vodafone 34.41 +.19
+2.7 VoyaFincl 36.10 -.69
+5.7 VulcanM 62.80 +1.52
-.2 WD40 74.20 +2.38
+5.9 WPCarey 64.98 +1.00
+6.1 WPXEngy 21.63 +.48
-1.7 WalMart 77.32 +.19
+31.6 Wagrn 75.60 +1.04
-72.8 WalterEn 4.52 +.19
-4.9 WashPrm n 19.07 -.02
+14.8 WREIT 26.82 +.76
-1.6 WsteMInc 44.13 -.07
+4.6 Waters 104.57 +2.00
+41.6 Weathflntl 21.94 -.07
-1.0 WebsterFn 30.87 +.65
-34.9 WtWatch 21.45 +.38
+18.5 WeinRlt 32.48 +.52
+16.1 WellPoint 107.26 -1.37
+13.7 WellsFargo 51.63 +.59
-4.0 WendysCo 8.37 +.09
+12.7 WestarEn 36.24 +.37
+9.0 WAstEMkt 12.91 -.02
+5.4 WAstlnfSc 12.04 +.07
+9.6 WDigital 91.95 +2.80
-5.8 WstnUnion 16.25 -.01
+10.2 Westpac s 32.02 +.21
-.9 Weyerhsr 31.29 +.31
-8.7 Whrlpl 143.20 +1.61
-30.7 WholeFood 40.08 +1.70
+22.8 WmsCos 47.38 +.48
+21.1 Windstrm 9.66 +.04
+11.0 WiscEngy 45.87 +.36
-32.8 WisdomTr 11.90 +.44
-3.9 WTJpHedg 48.87 -.06
+31.1 WT India 22.87 +.59
+9.6 Woodwrd 49.98 +5.31
-3.8 Workday 80.01 +3.21
-32.6 WIdW Ent 11.18 +.06
+6.0 Wynn 205.85 -4.36
+10.9 XcelEngy 30.99 +.25
+2.0 Xerox 12.41 -.09
-.2 Xilinx 45.81 -.13
+29.8 YRCWwde 22.55 +.74
-13.6 Yahoo 34.94 +.21
-14.0 Yamanag 7.41 +.06
-23.2 Yandex 33.15 +.17
-5.7 Yelp 65.00 +.42
-43.6 YingliGrn 2.85 +.02
+10.3 Yongye n 7.06
-1.5 YorkWater 20.61 +.48
-37.1 YoukuTud 19.05 -.37
+4.6 YumBrnds 79.11 +.41
+8.0 Zagg 4.70 +.11
+14.8 Zimmer 106.98 +.13
-3.3 Zoetis 31.61 +.24
-47.7 Zogenix 1.80 -.02
+3.6 ZweigFd 15.39 +.02
-21.8 Zynga 2.97 -.30


Stock Footnotes: Stock Footnotes: cd Issue has been called for
redemption by company. d New 52-week low. ec- Company for-
merly listed on the American Exchange's Emerging Company Mar-
ketplace. g Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h Does
not meet continued-listing standards. If Late filing with SEC. n -
Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low fig-
ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf Preferred stock
issue. pr Preferences. pp Holder owes installments of purchase
price. rt- Right to buy security at a specified price. rs Stock has
undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50% within the past year.
s Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi -
Trades will be settled when the stock is issued. wd When distrib-
uted. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u New 52-week
high. un Unit,, including more than one security. vj Company in
bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankrupt-
cy law. Appears in front of the name. Stocks in bold are worth at
least $5 and changed 5 percent or more in price. Underlining for 50
most actively traded stocks of the day. Dividend Footnotes: a -
Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b Annual rate plus
stock. c Liquidating dividend. e Amount declared or paid in last 12
months. f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent
dividend announcement. i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no
regular rate. j Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend
was omitted or deferred. k<- Declared or paid this year, a cumulative
issue with dividends in arrears. m Current annual rate, which was
decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p Initial divi-
dend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r Declared or paid in
preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t Paid in stock, approxi-
mate cash value on ex-distnbution date. PE Footnotes: q Stock is
a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown. cc P/E exceeds 99. dd -
Loss in last 12 months. Mutual Fund Footnotes: b Fee covering
market costs is paid from fund assets. d Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. f- front load (sales charges). m Multiple fees are
charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption
fee. NA not available. p previous day's net asset value. s fund
split shares during the week. x fund paid a distribution during the
week. Source: Morningstar and the Associated Press.


Interestrates

S WVA





The yield on the
1 0-year Trea-
sury fell to 2.59
percent Thurs-
day. Yields af-
fect rates on
mortgages and
other consumer
loans.


PRIME FED
RATE FUNDS
YEST 3.25 .13
6MOAGO 3.25 .13
1 YR AGO 3.25 .13


NET 1YR
TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .03 0.03 ... .04
6-month T-bill .05 0.05 ... .07
52-wk T-bill .09 0.09 ... .12
2-year T-note .38 0.40 -0.02 .29
5-year T-note 1.63 1.64 -0.01 1.02
1 0-year T-note 2.59 2.60 -0.01 2.09
30-year T-bond 3.44 3.44 ... 3.25


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.24 3.25 -0.01 2.98
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.55 4.54 +0.01 4.31
Barclays USAggregate 2.28 2.28 ... 2.11
Barclays US High Yield 5.02 5.02 ... 5.91
Moodys AAA Corp Idx 4.28 4.28 ... 4.10
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.87 1.88 -0.01 1.28
Barclays US Corp 2.97 2.97 ... 2.94


Foreign
Exchange
The dollar
weakened
against the
euro, British
pound and
Japanese yen.
The ICE U.S.
Dollar Index,
which compares
the dollar
against a basket
of major
currencies, also
declined.


MAJORS CLOSE
USD per British Pound 1.6813
Canadian Dollar 1.0926
USD per Euro 1.3658
Japanese Yen 102.45
Mexican Peso 12.8786
EUROPEIAFRICAIMIDDLE EA.
Israeli Shekel 3.4671
Norwegian Krone 5.9916
South African Rand 10.6901
Swedish Krona 6.6671
Swiss Franc .8916


ASIAPACIFIC
Australian Dollar
Chinese Yuan
Hong Kong Dollar
Indian Rupee
Singapore Dollar
South Korean Won
Taiwan Dollar


1.0710
6.2550
7.7527
59.105
1.2526
1020.25
30.03


1 YR.


1YR.
CHG %CHG AGO
+.0069 +.41% 1.5404
-.0012 -.11% 1.0347
+.0058 +.42% 1.3088
-.26 -.25% 99.19
-.0660 -.51% 12.8439
ST
+.0011 +.38% 3.6668
+.0003 +.18% 5.8136
+.0006 +.64% 10.0092
-.0003 -.20% 6.5957
+.0068 +.61% .9417


-.0069 -.64% 1.0494
+.0051 +.08% 6.1325
-.0003 -.00% 7.7614
-.170 -.29% 56.856
-.0050 -.40% 1.2492
-5.15 -.50% 1118.40
-.05 -.17% 29.85


Commodities
An improved
outlook for the
weather and
growing condi-
tion for U.S.
crops has
caused corn
prices to fall this
week. In metals:
gold, silver and
platinum all rose
Thursday.


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 102.48
Ethanol (gal) 2.03
Heating Oil (gal) 2.88
Natural Gas (mm btu) 4.70
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.96

METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1253.00
Silver (oz) 19.06
Platinum (oz) 1445.10
Copper (Ib) 3.09
Palladium (oz) 838.85

AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.40
Coffee (Ib) 1.69
Corn (bu) 4.49
Cotton (Ib) 0.86
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 306.30
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.64
Soybeans (bu) 14.61
Wheat (bu) 6.06


PVS.
102.64
2.19
2.85
4.64
2.94


%CHG
-0.16
+0.23
+1.11
+1.31
+0.72


PVS. %CHG
1244.00 +0.72
18.77 +1.54
1433.90 +0.78
3.09 -0.08
836.65 +0.26


% YTD
+4.1
+6.2
-6.4
+11.1
+6.1

% YTD
+4.3
-1.5
+5.4
-10.2
+16.9

% YTD
+3.7
+52.8
+6.4
+1.0
-14.9
+20.2
+11.3
+0.1


PVS.
1.38
1.70
4.56
0.86
307.80
1.64
14.83
6.15


%CHG
+1.09
-0.62
-1.59
-0.67
-0.49
+0.21
-1.48
-1.42






-Page 8 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


WEATHER/STATE/WORLD NEWS


The Sun /Friday, June 6, 2014


TODAY




Partly cloudy, iso. p.m.
rain

910/720
40% chance of rain


CONDITIONS TODAY
UV Index and RealFeel Temperature Today


83 97 107 106 96 92
8 a.m. 10a.m. Noon 2p.m. 4 p.m. 6 p.m.
The hiier the AccuWeather.com UV Index" number,
the greater the need for eye and skin protection. 0-2 Low;
3-5 Moderate; 6-7 Hih; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme.
RealFeel Temperature is the exclusive
AccuWeather.com composite of effective temperature
based on eight weather factors.

AIR QUALITY INDEX
Air Quality Index readings as of Thursday
34
I'I I .
0 50 100150 200 300 500
0-50 Good; 51-100 Moderate; 101-150 Unhealthy
for sensitive groups; 151-200 Unhealty; 201-300
Very Unhealthy; 301-500 Hazardous
Main pollutant: ozone
Source: scgov.net

POLLEN INDEX
Pollen Index readings as of Thursday
Trees 0
Grass
Weeds o
Moldsoog
absent low moderate hit veryhigi
Source: National Allergy Bureau

ALMANAC
Punta Gorda through 5 p.m. Thursday
Temperatures
High/Low 900/710
Normal High/Low 920/710
Record High 970 (1985)
Record Low 640 (1984)
Precipitation (in inches)
24 hours through 5p.m.,Thursday 0.00"
Month to date 0.12"
Normal month to date 0.92"
Year to date 15.81"
Normal year to date 12.96"
Record 1,90" (1999)

MONTHLY RAINFALL
Month 2014 2013 Avg. Record/Year
Jan. 3.67 0.43 1.80 7.07/1979
Feb. 1.24 2.12 2.52 11.05/1983
Mar. 5.10 1.98 3.28 9.26/1970
Apr. 2.00 3.06 2.03 5.80/1994
May 3.68 2.76 2.50 9.45/1991
Jun. 0.12 10.50 8.92 23.99/1974
Jul. 7.38 8.22 14.22/1995
Aug. 9.29 8.01 15.60/1995
Sep. 11.12 6.84 14.03/1979
Oct. 3.48 2.93 10.88/1995
Nov. 0.01 1.91 5.53/2002
Dec. 0.97 1.78 6.83/2002
Year 15.81 53.10 50.74 (since 1931)
Totals are from a 24-hour period ending at 5 p.m.


SATURDAY



A M P.M.
Partly cloudy, scatt.
p.m. storms

910/ 730
50% chance of rain


AIRPORT
Possible weather-related delays today. Check
with your airline for the most updated schedules.
Hi/Lo Outlook Delays
Ft. Myers 92/73 part cldy afternoon
Punta Gorda 94/72 part cldy afternoon
Sarasota 89/72 part cldy afternoon

SUN AND MOON


The Sun
Today
Saturday
The Moon
Today
Saturday


Rise
6:34 a.m.
6:34 a.m.
Rise
2:11 p.m.
3:04 p.m.


Set
8:20 p.m.
8:21 p.m.
Set
1:49 a.m.
2:24 a.m.


Full Last New First


I.E
Jun 12 Jun 19 Jun 27 Jul 5


SOLUNAR TABLE
Minor Major Minor
Today 12:50a 7:01a 1:12p
Sat. 1:31a 7:43a 1:54p
Sun. 2:12a 8:24a 2:36p


Major
7:23p
8:05p
8:48p


The solunar period schedule allows planning days
so you will be fishing in good territory or hunting in
good cover during those times. Major periods begin
at the times shown and last for 1.5 to 2 hours.The
minor periods are shorter.

TIDES
High Low High Low
Punta Gorda
Today 10:48a 4:19a 10:33p 5:30p
Sat. 11:23a 5:04a --- 6:39p
Englewood
Today 9:25a 2:35a 9:10p 3:46p
Sat. 10:OOa 3:20a 10:44p 4:55p
Boca Grande
Today 8:30a 12:56a 8:15p 2:07p
Sat. 9:05a 1:41a 9:49p 3:16p
ElJobean
Today 11:20a 4:48a 11:05p 5:59p
Sat. 11:55a 5:33a --- 7:08p
Venice
Today 7:40a 1:14a 7:25p 2:25p
Sat. 8:15a 1:59a 8:59p 3:34p

FLORIDA CITIES


city
Apalachicola
Bradenton
Clearwater
Coral Springs
Daytona Beach
Fort Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Fort Pierce
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key Largo


Today
Hi Lo W
88 72 t
89 73 pc
90 73 pc
90 73 pc
91 71 pc
89 76 pc
92 73 pc
88 71 pc
92 68 t
92 71 t
86 78 pc


Sat.
i Lo W
9 73 c
8 74 pc
0 73 pc
0 73 pc
0 72 pc
9 76 pc
1 73 pc
9 71 pc
1 69 t
1 70 t
7 77 pc


SUNDAY




Partly cloudy, scatt,
p.m. storms

90o/ 730
60% chance of rain


MONDAY



AM. P.M.
Partly cloudy, scatt.
p.m. storms

890 / 730
60% chance of rain


Clearwaterl
90/73


-" Tampa Bmandon
1, f 91/74 95/72



St. Petersburg
90/73 Apollo Beach
91/73





Bradenton
89/73
Longboat Key q Myakka
89/74 1a3/


Osprey
89/73


Temperatures are today's
highs and tonight's lows.


Gulf Water
Temperature

830


Forecasts and graphics, except for the
WINK-T 5-day forecast, provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. 92014

Publication date: 6/6/14

MARINE
Wind Speed Seas Bay Inland
direction in knots in feet chop
Cape Sable to Tarpon Springs
SSE 4-8 0-2 Smooth
Tarpon Springs to Apalachicola
WNW 4-8 0-2 Smooth


city
Key West
Kissimmee
Lakeland
Melbourne
Miami
Naples
Ocala
Okeechobee
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola


Today Sat.


Hi Lo W
88 78 pc
91 74t
91 73 t
89 73 pc
90 76 pc
89 73 pc
91 68 t
89 70 t
92 72 t
85 73 pc
89 75 pc


Hi Lo W
87 79 pc
93 74 pc
92 73 pc
88 72 pc
89 76 pc
90 74 pc
92 68 pc
89 70 pc
92 72 pc
86 73 t
88 74 t


TUESDAY THE NATION
I -10* Is *Os O s I s20s 130S 140s 150S 1G6S I70s I80s 90s l0kO 1S
; Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation.Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Mostly cloudy, scatt. 76WOtw M "onu eel
storms Billingsd

880 / 720Minnpolis 77M W
70% chance of rain Chicg e

603 vvrWashIngton

Winter Haen Los Ang e. 82MB
92/72 At l ant
~. r8a(70


Ba9o


Ft Meade


Fronts Precipitation

Cold Warm Stationary Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice
U.S. Extremes (For the 48 contiguous states yesterday)


High ..........1080 at PecosTX


j Arcadia
92/73

Port JHull
94/72

Port Charlotte
91/72


Punta Gorda
94/72


Fort Myers
92/73

Cape Coral
92/73


Lehigh Acres
93/72


city
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
Fairbanks
Fargo
Hartford


Today
Hi Lo W
95 62 s
65 50 s
88 70 t
80 58 s
63 44 t
87 70 t
83 52 pc
73 61 pc
73 51 s
73 54 pc
80 52 pc
87 65 pc
80 58 s
80 56 pc
73 51 s
90 70 t
78 56 pc
75 50 pc
94 75 pc
80 52 t
82 66 pc
77 55 s
76 48 pc
69 45 c
66 48 t
77 54 pc


Helena 69 42
Sanibel Honolulu 87 75
89/77 Houston 92 75
Bonita Springs Indianapolis 80 58
93/73 -':
93/73 WORLD CITIES

AccuWeather.com Toda
t i.fI i 1.


City H
Pompano Beach 88
St. Augustine 90
St. Petersburg 90
Sanford 92
Sarasota 89
Tallahassee 94
Tampa 9
Titusville 88
Vero Beach 89
West Palm Beach 89
Winter Haven 92


Today Sat.
i Lo W Hi Lo W
8 75 pc 88 75 pc
0 72 pc 89 72 pc
0 73 pc 91 73 pc
2 73 pc 93 73 t
9 72 pc 88 73 pc
4 70 t 93 71 t
1 74 pc 91 73 pc
8 71 pc 88 72 pc
9 72 pc 89 72 pc
9 74 pc 90 74 pc
2 72 pc 92 72 t


city
Amsterdam
Baghdad
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calgary
Cancun
Dublin
Edmonton
Halifax
Kiev
London
Madrid


2t
pc

pc


ly
. W


Hli LU W
72 57 s
106 77 sV
83 64 t
76 56 s
59 49 s
87 67 s
61 41 pc
84 79 t
62 54 sh
59 36 c
60 49 sh
87 61 pc
73 62 pc
84 59 pc


Sat.
i Lo W
2 63 s
4 52 sh
7 70 t
462 s
7 48 pc
9 71 t
355 s
463 s
8 57 s
153 s
5 60 pc
5 65 pc
2 61 t
4 62 pc
758 s
8 67 t
361 s
5 50 s
4 76 pc
5 50 t
9 56 t
058 s
3 40 r
5 51 s
4 42 r
655s
3 46 pc
7 76 pc
374 s
2 62 pc


Sat.
i Lo W
0 64 c
4 81 s
9 62 s
461 s
8 41 pc
8 69 s
1 43 t
8 78 t
451 r
5 35 s
5 47 sh
5 63 pc
754r
2 56 s


Low .............. 260 at Sunset Crater, AZ
Today Sat.


city
Jackson, MS
Kansas City
Knoxville
Las Vegas
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Montgomery
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk, VA
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Salt Lake City
St. Louis
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Washington, DC



City
Mexico City
Montreal
Ottawa
Paris
Regina
Rio de Janeiro
Rome
St. John's
San Juan
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Vancouver
Winnipeg


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.


Immigrant tuition, abortion,




pot bills sent to Scott


TALLAHASSEE (News
Service of Florida) After
drawing heavy debate
during the spring legisla-
tive session, a measure is
now on Gov. Rick Scott's
desk that would allow
undocumented-
immigrant students to
pay in-state tuition rates
at Florida colleges and
universities.
The proposal (HB 851),
which Scott has promised
to sign, is one of 105 bills
forwarded to the gov-
ernor Thursday by the
Legislature.
Among the other
measures is a bill (HB 1047)
that would add further


restrictions to Florida's
abortion laws, preventing
most abortions after fetuses
reach "viability." Also, Scott
received two bills (HB 989
and HB 7141) aimed at
curbing human-trafficking
in the state.
Another bill (SB 1030)
now before Scott would
legalize a form of medical
marijuana that purport-
edly does not get users
high but which alleviates
life-threatening seizures.
That measure, which
Scott has said he will sign,
was pushed by parents
who say the substance
can help their children
who suffer from a severe


type of epilepsy.
Also among the for-
warded legislation is a
bill (HB 629) intended to
crackdown on charities
that may be misusing
contributions, a prior-
ity issue of Agriculture
Commissioner Adam
Putnam. In addition, Scott
will consider a bill (HB 9)
that would move up the
starting date of the 2016
legislative session from
March to January. Sessions
typically last from early
March to early May, except
in redistricting years.
And Scott will now decide
on a bill (SB 224) that would
ban the sales of electronic


I STATE NEWS BRIEFS

Florida files suit Sarasota Ballet St. Pete nursing
against VA for dancer killed while home fined $16,000
hnqnital4 r-r-- rirlinn hil


ST. PETERSBURG (AP) -
The state Agency for Health
Care Administration has
filed suit in federal court
in an attempt to inspect
federal Veterans Affairs
hospitals in Florida.
This comes after the
state agency made several
unannounced visits to
inspect Florida's six VA
hospitals and other VA-
operated facilities. Each
time they were blocked,
and the VA responded
with three letters one
to Gov. Rick Scott and
two to AHCA Secretary
Elizabeth Dudek- stating
that federal facilities aren't
subject to state laws.
The lawsuit says the VA
has repeatedly failed to
comply with minimum
standards of patient safe-
ty in VA hospitals within
the State of Florida.


SARASOTA (AP)- A
dancer from Brazil with the
Sarasota Ballet was killed
when he was hit by a truck
while riding his bicycle.
Sarasota police say
20-year-old Pedro Pupa
died Wednesday.
Pupa had recently con-
cluded his second season
with the company, which he
joined after training at the
Miami City Ballet School.
He had danced featured
roles in several ballets.
Authorities say Pupa
was hit by a large delivery
truck after leaving the
company's studios. The
truck, driven by 58-year-
old Willie G. Burns of
Tampa, was making a
right turn into a service
entrance leading to the
museum and pulled in
front of Pupa as he was
approaching the road.


ST. PETERSBURG (AP)
- A St. Petersburg nursing
home has been fined by
state regulators after work-
ers there performed CPR
and used a defibrillator
on a 75-year-old man who
had a "do not resuscitate"
order on file.
The Tampa Bay Times
reported Wednesday that
Jacaranda Manor was
fined $16,000.
Under state law, nursing
homes must honor resi-
dents' end-of-life directives.
The incident happened
in February after the man
stopped breathing in the
dining hall and was revived.
A licensed practical nurse
who helped perform CPR
on him told her supervisor
she discovered the 2010
order, which was signed by
a legal guardian and physi-
cian, after paramedics took
the man to the hospital.


cigarettes to minors, similar
to bans on sales of ciga-
rettes and other tobacco
products. Electronic
cigarettes have become
increasingly popular as
they allow users to inhale
vaporized nicotine without
all the health risks of smok-
ing regular cigarettes. While
supporters point to those
health benefits, critics of
"e-cigarettes" warn that the
devices can hook people
on nicotine, which could
lead to use of other tobacco
products.
Scott has 15 days to
sign, veto or let each bill
become law without his
signature.




Woman gets
probation for
burning ancient tree

SANFORD (AP)- A
central Florida woman
accused of setting a fire
that burned down what
was thought to be one of
the world's oldest cypress
trees has been sentenced
to five years of probation.
The Orlando Sentinel
reports that 26-year-old
Sara Barnes entered a no
contest plea Wednesday in
Seminole County Court.
A judge adjudicated her
guilty of unlawful burning
of lands, possession
of methamphetamine
and possession of drug
paraphernalia.
The tree, dubbed "The
Senator," burned down in
Big Tree Park in January
2012. It was estimated to be
3,500 years old.
Two witnesses identified
Barnes as the person who
started the fire.


I WORLD NEWS BRIEFS


Wearing disguise,
Boko Haram
slaughters hundreds

MAIDUGURI, Nigeria
(AP) -When men wear-
ing military fatigues and
carrying weapons showed
up in pickup trucks,
villagers thought Nigerian
soldiers had finally come
to protect them from
Boko Haram.
But it was a disguise.
The gunmen rounded up
everyone in the village
center and then started
shooting.
Altogether, Boko Haram
militants slaughtered
hundreds of people
in three villages in the
far northeast corner of
Nigeria, witnesses said
Thursday, describing
the latest attack by the
Islamic extremist group
that drew international
attention for the kidnap-
ping of more than 300
schoolgirls.
A community leader
who witnessed the
killings on Monday said
residents had pleaded
for the military to send
soldiers to protect the
area after they heard that
militants were about to
attack.


Israel approves
new settlement
construction

JERUSALEM (AP)-
Israel gave the final go-
ahead Thursday to build
nearly 1,500 homes in
Jewish settlements, saying
the construction was a
response to the formation
of the Palestinian unity
government backed by
the Islamic militant group
Hamas.
The move triggered in-
ternational criticism and
deepened a rift between
Israel and its Western al-
lies. With Israel outraged


at the world's embrace
of the unity government,
Israel's housing minister
said the new construction
was "just the beginning."
Israel has been spar-
ring with its allies in
Washington and Europe
since Western-backed
Palestinian President
Mahmoud Abbas swore
in the unity government
Monday.
Israel has asked the
world to shun the new
government because it is
backed by Hamas, which
has killed hundreds of
Israelis in suicide bomb-
ings and other attacks in
the past two decades.


Hunt on for
Canadian suspect
in police killings

MONCTON, New
Brunswick (AP) Royal
Canadian Mounted Police
combed the streets and
woods of a normally
tranquil city Thursday
in search of a man who
killed three officers in the
deadliest attack on their
ranks in nearly a decade.
The suspect, armed
with high-powered long
firearms, was spotted
three times while eluding
the massive manhunt
that emptied roads and
kept families hunkered in
their homes in Moncton,
an east coast city where
gun violence is very rare.
A large number of police
officers could be seen in a
part of the search perim-
eter with their weapons
drawn, some peeking
around buildings. Others
were patrolling streets
within the cordoned off
area. Armored security
trucks were also visible.
Justin Bourque, 24, was
seen in three different
places around the search
area Thursday morning,
said RCMP Commander
Marlene Snowman.


Englewood. I
90/72 ;.


Placida4
91/72.
Boca Grande*
89/76


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465 s
5 77 s
158 s
0 55 s
8 54 pc
459 s
6 61 pc
154 s
0 70 t
5 75 pc
4 64 pc
0 55 pc
4 54 pc
5 65 s


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2 55t
161 s
155 s
4 62 pc
642 s
7 76 pc


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SPORTS


Friday, June 6, 2014


YourSun.com Facebook.com/SunCoastSports @SunCoastSports SunCoastSportsBIog.com


Sports Editor: Mark Lawrence


0 MLB: Miami 11, Tampa Bay6


AP PHOTO
Tampa Bay Rays third baseman Evan Longoria reacts after grounding out against the Miami Marlins during the eighth inning of
an interleague game Thursday in St. Petersburg. The Rays lost 11-6 for their 10th consecutive loss.





WORST OF DAYS

Marlins sweep Rays, whose losing streak reaches 10


By MARC TOPKIN
TAMPA BAY TIMES
ST. PETERSBURG- The Rays'
misery has reached a perfect 10.
Tampa Bay's losing streak reached
10 games Thursday with an 11-6 loss
to the Marlins.
The loss dropped the Rays to 23-38,
the worst record in the majors. The
10-game streak matches their fourth
longest in franchise history.
Before the game, the Rays held a
moment to silence to honor Don
Zimmer, their senior adviser who died
Wednesday at age 83. A ceremony
to celebrate his life is planned for


Saturday afternoon.
The Rays took and lost an early 1-0
lead, then came back to tie 3-3 in the
fifth but faltered from there and could
not catch up.
Jake Odorizzi got off to a strong
start, striking out seven of the first
12 Marlins, but with two outs in the
fourth allowed five consecutive hits
- mostly softies that led to three
Miami runs. He worked one batter
into the sixth, and then manager Joe
Maddon went with an unusual bull-
pen deployment, using Jake McGee in

RAYS I 3


MARINERS AT RAYS
WHO: Seattle (31-28)
at Tampa Bay (23-38)
WHEN: Today, 7:10 p.m.
WHERE: Tropicana Field,
St. Petersburg
PITCHERS: Chris Young (5-2,
3.27) vs. Erik Bedard (2-4, 4.08)
TV: Sun Sports
RADIO: 620 AM, 1220 AM, 1480
AM, 1530 AM, 1580 AM
PROMOTION: Tampa Bay Times
Ticket Tandem


By MATT BAKER
TAMPA BAY TIMES
ST. PETERSBURG Casey
Gillaspie watched his brother star
in college, then become the No.
37 pick in the draft and hit better
than .330 in the majors.
Gillaspie finally scored a
big point in his sibling rivalry
Thursday night in the first round
of the amateur draft.
The Rays chose the Wichita
State first baseman with the No.
20 overall pick- 17 spots better
than his brother, Conor, went
in 2008 before reaching the big
leagues.
"It was cool when it happened,
but now I'm ready and focused


THE GILLASPIE FILE
NAME: Casey Gillaspie
AGE: 21
BATS/THROWS: Switch/Left
HEIGHT/WEIGHT: 6'4", 238 pounds
HOMETOWN: Omaha, Neb.
HIGH SCHOOL: Millard North
COLLEGE: Wichita State
DRAFTED: 20th overall by Tampa Bay
INSIDE: Astros, Marlins draft pitchers with
Nos. 1, 2 picks, PAGE 3

on making that next impact,"
Gillaspie said.
The Rays hope that next impact
comes soon. Recently regarded
among the best in baseball, the
Rays are ranked around 20th,


depending on the publication.
Only five picks from the Rays'
last eight drafts have reached the
majors.
And the 21-year-old Gillaspie
has the potential to move quickly
through the organization as just
the third college hitter the Rays
have ever chosen with their first
pick.
"He's certainly advanced, so
that plays into our evaluation,"
executive vice president Andrew
Friedman said.
Gillaspie led the Cape Cod
League with eight home runs last
summer, so he's shown power
with wooden bats. He followed
DRAFT I 3


0 COLLEGE TRACK & FIELD: Ryan Schnulle



Schnulle eyes


national meet


UF standout
is graduate of
Charlotte High

By ROB SHORE
SPORTS WRrrER
Ryan Schnulle is
looking forward to seeing
Eugene, Ore., especially
if everything he's heard
about it is true.
"(I've heard) nothing
specific," said Schnulle,
now a sophomore at
Florida. "Just that the
atmosphere is unbeliev-
able and the
surrounding
area is
beautiful."
Schnulle's
itinerary for
his Eugene
visit features
SCHNULLE about 800
meters of
that area specifically,
two laps around the track
at Hayward Field for the


NCAA Outdoor Track and
Field Championships.
The former Charlotte
High standout qualified
for the national meet
with his 13th place
finish in the 800 at the
East Preliminary meet,
running the event in 1
minute, 48.69 seconds.
Specifically, Schnulle
qualified for nationals by
finishing second in his
quarterfinal heat at the
East Preliminaries.
It wasn't his fastest time
- more than 1.5 seconds
off of his personal record
in the trials of the SEC
championships. But he's
OK with that.
"In college, you're more
focused on how you fin-
ish place-wise," he said. "I
would take a slower time
for a place any day."
That seems to have
worked out for Schnulle,
who will try to bring a
national championship
back to Gainesville. The
SCHNULLE I 2


* HORSE RACING: Belmont Stakes


Triple Crown's


elusiveness:


Myriad factors


By BETH HARRIS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK -Three
races in a five-week span
at varying distances on
different tracks. It's so
tough only 11 horses have
won the Triple Crown,
and none in 36 years.
It's the longest span
without a winner. Now it's
California Chrome's turn
to try on Saturday at the
Belmont Stakes.
The striking chestnut
colt with a blaze and
four white feet appears
to have rebounded well
after two hard races in
the Kentucky Derby and
Preakness, with the most
exhausting still to come.
He'll run 112 miles around
Belmont's sweeping oval
with 10 rivals gunning
to keep history from
happening.
Before Affirmed swept
the 1978 Kentucky Derby,
Preakness and Belmont,
25 years had passed
between Citation in 1948
and Secretariat in 1973.
Few can agree on what


BELMONT STAKES
WHAT: 146th running of the
final leg in thoroughbred
racing's Triple Crown
WHEN: Saturday, 6:52 p.m.
post time
WHERE: Belmont Park,
Elmont, N.Y.
TRACK: 112 miles dirt
PURSE: $1.5 million
TV: NBC, 4:30 p.m.

ODDS
I. Medal Count 20-1
2. California Chrome 3-5
3. Matterhorn 30-1
4. Commanding Curve 15-1
5. Ride On Curlin 12-1
6. Matuszak 30-1
7. Samraat 20-1
8. Commissioner 20-1
9. Wicked Strong 6-1
10. General a Rod 20-1
11. Tonalist 8-1

makes winning the Triple
Crown so tough. Often it's
a combination of factors
that help or hurt a horse,
including racing luck and
jockey error.
FACTORS I 6


AP PHOTO
Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes winner California
Chrome, with exercise rider Willie Delgado in the saddle, gallops
in the rain Thursday at Belmont Park in Elmont, NY.


INDEX I Lottery 2 1 NBA 2 1 Community Calendar 2 1 NHL 2 1 Pro baseball 3-4 1 Scoreboard 5 1 NFL 5 1Quick Hits 5 1 Tennis 6 1 Golf 6 1 Soccer 6


0 MLB DRAFT: Tampa Bay


Rays draft Wichita St. first baseman






Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Friday, June 6,2014


Florida Lottery
www.flalottery.com

* CASH 3
June N ................................ 9-0-6
June 5D................................ 4-3-7
June 4N ................................ 5-6-6
June 4D................................ 6-1-3
June3N ................................ 6-9-3
June3D ................................ 17-7-8
D-Day, N-Night

0 PLAY4
June N............................3-3-3-2
June 5D............................ 8-2-4-7
June 4N ............................ 3-0-8-1
June 4D............................ 6-5-3-8
June3N ............................7-2-2-7
June3D ............................ 0-6-9-7
D-Day, N-Night

0 FANTASY 5
June 5 ..................9-10-18-20-26
June 4 ..................5-22-28-29-36
June 3 ....................4-5-11-20-29
PAYOFF FOR JUNE 4
5 5-digit winners ............ $47,260.74
300 4-digit winners..............$127
9,863 3-digit winners ............ $10.50

0 MEGA MONEY
June 3 .......................9-26-33-44
MegaBall ................................... 18

May 30................ 8-16-27-39
MegaBall .................................... 3
PAYOFF FOR JUNE 3
0 4-of-4 MB .............................. $1.4M
4 4-of-4...........$1,688.50
43 3-of-4 MB .............................. $344
722 3-of-4 .................................... $61

0 LOTTO
June 4 .............6-13-22-39-40-48
May 31 ............2-11-31-38-49-52
May 28 ................. 13-14-18-26-37-45
PAYOFF FOR JUNE 4
0 6-digit winners................$5M
20 5-digit winners ............. $6,026.50
1,185 4-digit winners ............. $73.50
22,922 3-digit winners.............$5
0 POWERBALL
June 4 ....................11-7-10-22-49
Powerball ................................. 24

May 31............. 15-27-31-34-48
Powerball ......................................... I
PAYOFF FOR JUNE 4
0 5of5+ PB ........................... $192M
0 5of5 ............................. $1,000,000
3 4of5+PB........$10,000
114 4of5...........$....... 100
ESTIMATED JACKPOT
$221 million
* MEGA MILLIONS
June 3 .................19-28-62-66-74
MegaBall .................................... 6

May 30.............. 10-13-42-43-62
MegaBall .................................... 2
PAYOFF FOR JUNE 3
0 5of5+ MB ............................ $34M
0 5of5 ............................. $1,000,000
1 4of5 + MB ........................... $5,000
10 4of 5............$....... 500


Corrections
Ride on Curlin was shown during
a morning workout on Wednesday at
Belmont Park in a photo on Page5
of Thursday's sports section. Ride on
Curlin was misidentified in the cutline
that accompanied the photo.


How to...

Submit a story idea: Email or call
Mark Lawrence 941-206-1175. Include
name, address and phone number.
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to golfscores@sun-herald.com. Scores
appear in the weekly Herald sections.
Report a high school result: Call
877-818-6204 or 941-206- 1126 by
10:30 p.m. the day the event is held.

SunCoast Sports Now

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www.suncoastsportsblog.com


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v


Contact us
Mark Lawrence- Sports Editor
mlawrence@sun-herald.com
Mike Bambach Deputy SE
mbambach@sun-herald.com
Matt Stevens Assistant SE
mstevens@sun-herald.com
Rob Shore. Staff writer
shore@sun-herald.com
Zach Miller. Staff writer
zmiller@sun-herald.com
Josh Vitale Staff writer
jvitale@sun-herald.com
EMAIL: sports@sun-herald.com
FAX: 941-629-2085


1 NBA::


AP PHOTO
San Antonio Spurs forward Tim Duncan shoots as Miami Heat center Chris Bosh defends during the
first half of Game 1 of the NBA Finals on Thursday in San Antonio. The Spurs won 110-95.




Spurs handle Heat


San Antonio wins as air conditioning fails


By BRIAN MAHONEY
ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN ANTONIO Tim
Duncan had 21 points
and 10 rebounds, and the
San Antonio Spurs beat
the Miami Heat 110-95 on
Thursday night in Game 1
of the NBA Finals inside a
sweltering AT&T Center.
With an air conditioning
failure making it feel like
basketball in a sauna and
causing LeBron James
to battle cramps that
knocked him out of the
game's decisive stretch,
the Spurs pulled away to
win the opener of the first
finals rematch since 1998.
Manu Ginobili had 16
points and 11 assists, and
Tony Parker added 19
points and eight assists
for the Spurs, who shot
59 percent and improved
to 6 for 6 in NBA Finals
Game Is.
James finished with 25
points but played only 33
minutes, and Miami was
outscored 36-17 in the
fourth quarter.
With temperatures
measured in the mid-80s
inside the arena, it was a
sweltering struggle.
Players tried to cool
by placing icebags on
their necks while rest-
ing on the bench, and
just about everyone in
the sellout crowd was


HEAT AT SPURS
WHO: Miami at San Antonio
WHAT: NBA Finals, Game 2,
Spurs lead series 1-0
WHEN: Sunday, 8 p.m.
WHERE: AT&T Center,
San Antonio
TV: ABC
RADIO: 99.3 FM

NBA FINALS
(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
Thursday: San Antonio 110,
Miami 95
Sunday: Miami at San Antonio,
8p.m.
Tuesday: San Antonio at Miami,
9p.m.
June 12: San Antonio at Miami,
9p.m.
x-June 15: Miami at San
Antonio, 8 p.m.
x-June 17: San Antonio at
Miami, 9 p.m.
x-June 20: Miami at San
Antonio, 9 p.m.

using something to fan
themselves.
"It's just a bad situa-
tion," Spurs coach Gregg
Popovich told ABC's Doris
Burke during an interview
before the fourth quarter.
Moments earlier, Burke
reported that a hand-held
thermometer placed near
the playing surface mea-
sured the air temperature


at 88 degrees.
It's not the first time
electricity has had a
significant impact on a
championship event in
recent years. The Super
Bowl in 2013 between
Baltimore and San
Francisco was marred
by a power outage at
the Superdome in New
Orleans, interrupting play
for 34 minutes.
Power was the culprit
in Game 1 of the finals as
well, arena officials said.
'An electrical failure for
the power that runs the AC
system in the AT&T Center
has occurred," Spurs
Sports and Entertainment
said in a statement
distributed in the second
half. "We are continuing
to work on resolving the
problem. We apologize for
any inconvenience."
Many fans removed the
giveaway black T-shirts
handed out before the
game, obviously wanting
to wear as few layers inside
the steamy building as
possible. James was clearly
laboring in the second half.
"They're trying to
smoke us out of here," he
told teammates during
one stoppage in play.
Neither team was
scheduled to practice
at the arena today or
Saturday.


0 NHL:.


Kings wow Rangers in opener


By GREG BEACHAM
ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA MONICA,
Calif. Alain Vigneault
reviewed only portions of
the video from the New
York Rangers' Stanley Cup
finals opener before he
sat down at their oceans-
ide hotel to explain how it
got away.
The coach had already
formed a few impres-
sions, and they made him
even more wary of the
Los Angeles Kings.
"They're one of the
best teams I've seen in
a long time," Vigneault
said Thursday. "Areas to
exploit, they don't jump
out at you. We're going to
have to be better than we
were."
The Rangers realize
they missed a golden
chance to grab an early
game from the weary
Kings, who were 72 hours
removed from a grueling,
seven- game Western
Conference finals victory
over defending champion
Chicago.
NewYork jumped to a
2-0 lead in the first period
at Staples Center, but was
soon overwhelmed. The
Kings tied it in the sec-
ond, utterly dominated
the third and won early
in overtime on Justin
Williams' latest clutch


STANLEY CUP
Best-of-7; *-if necessary
Wednesday
Los Angeles 3, N.Y. Rangers 2, OT
Saturday
N.Y. Rangers at Los Angeles, 7 p.m.
Monday
Los Angeles at N.Y. Rangers, 8 p.m.
Wednesday
Los Angeles at N.Y. Rangers, 8 p.m.
June 13*
N.Y. Rangers at Los Angeles, 8 p.m.
June 16*
Los Angeles at N.Y. Rangers, 8 p.m.
June 18*
N.Y. Rangers at Los Angeles, 8 p.m.

goal.
The comeback was
classic Kings and now
the Rangers realize exact-
ly what they're facing.
"We're a team that's just
never going to go away,"
Kings forward Jeff Carter
said. "We're going to play
hard no matter what the
score is."
Game 2 is Saturday.
The Kings enjoyed a rare
day off at home, while
the Rangers tried to
relax near the beach on a
splendid sunny day.
Despite Vigneault's lofty
praise, the Rangers don't
seem intimidated by the
2012 Stanley Cup cham-
pions. Although New York
was outshot 20-3 in the
third period, Carl Hagelin


was denied by Jonathan
Quick on a breakaway in
the last minute of regu-
lation, barely missing a
chance to steal it.
"To be honest, I don't
think they had that many
grade-A scoring chances
in the third," Hagelin
said. "They had a lot of
puck-possession time.
They had some shots.
It wasn't really a lot of
good chances. I mean, we
can't look too much into
shots."
The Kings realize
they've also got work
to do after stumbling
early in their first series
opener at home in the
entire postseason. New
York's speed on the wings
surprised the Kings,
leading to numerous
prime scoring chances for
the Rangers.
But Los Angeles' ability
to adjust during a game
has been a strength
throughout its remarkable
playoff run. The Kings
also have proven to be
an incredible comeback
team after rallying from
four multigoal deficits to
win: They've rallied from
at least two goals down
in three of their last four
games, winning twice.
"Well, you can't chase
leads all the time," Kings
coach Darryl Sutter said.


I COMMUNITY CALENDAR


BASEBALL
Stone Crabs youth camp:
July 16-19,9 a.m. tolI p.m.; open to
boys and girls ages 6-14; Cost: $125/
camper. Includes instruction by Stone
Crabs players and coaches, daily lunch
and autograph sessions, two tickets to
July 18 Stone Crabs game. Registration
deadline: July 11lth. To register, contact
Mary, 941-206-3510 or mhegley@
stonecrabsbaseball.com or visit
stonecrabsbaseball.com.

Game Day Heat: 12U travel
team looking for players. Practices
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 6 p.m. at
North Charlotte Regional Park. Call
Scott, 941-421-8378.

Hit Factory: Venice team seeks
experienced managers, coaches for
travel teams ages 9-12. Teams will train
at the Hit Factory, including a strength
and agility program designed for their
age group. Call Dave, 941-716-4451.

Iron Pigs travel team
tryouts: July12-13,10 a.m.-noon
for ages 12 and younger and 1-3 p.m.
for ages 13 and older, North Charlotte
Regional Park, 1185 O'Donnell Blvd.,
Port Charlotte. Call or email coach
Wayne, 941-626-1274 or waynel har-
rell@yahoo.com

BADMINTON
Play dates: Tuesdays and
Thursdays, 9:30 a.m.-noon, year-
round; Englewood Sports Complex,
all levels of play. Cost: $2/session.
Rackets and shuttles provided. Call
Terry 941-740-0364.

BASKETBALL
Port Charlotte High
School camp: Monday-Thursday
for boys and girls in grades 1-9 and
June 16-19 for boys in grades 5-9. Cost:
$50. Each camper receives a T-shirt.
Daily prizes will be awarded. Call Bill,
941-255-7485, ext. 3515.

Charlotte High School
girls camp: Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.
to noon; girls entering grades 4-9; Cost:
$50. Each camper receives a T-shirt. Call
Mike, 941- 661-9636.

Charlotte High School
boys camp: Three sessions:
June 11 -13, $45; June16-19, $60;
June 23-26, $60. The camp is held at
Charlotte's Wally Keller Gymnasium
and is for players ages 8-15. Call Tom,
941-815-6099.

Joe Dooley Individual
Basketball Camp: June 30-July
2; 9 a.m.-noon; at Alico Arena, FGCU
campus; open to boys in grades 3-12;
cost: $150. Call 859-229-8809 or email:
mfly@fgcu.edu.

BOXING
Youth and adult classes:
Male and female. Mondays-Fridays,
6-8 p.m. at 24710 Sandhill Blvd., Deep
Creek. Training and/or competition.
Member of USA Boxing. Call 239-292-
9230 or visit CharlotteHarborBoxing.
com, www.facebook.com/
CharlotteHarborBoxingGymnasium.

FISHING
CHS Redfish Roundup:
June 21, Laishley Crab House, Punta
Gorda. Cost: $300 for teams of three;
$50 late fee after June 16. First
place: $5,000. Call 941-637-5953 or
941-380-8099.

FOOTBALL
Port Charlotte Bandits:


SCHNULLE

FROM PAGE 1
Florida men's squad is
ranked as the No. 1 team
in the country according
to the USTFCCA national
computer rankings.
Whatever he can do to
make that happen is all
that matters now.
"I think the team goal is
the first thing," Schnulle
said. "But it's always hand
in hand with individual
results. The better you do
as an individual, the more
points you get for the
team.''
Schnulle already


has some experience
with that. He nabbed a
fifth-place finish in the
800 at the NCAA Indoor
Championships in March,
helping the Gators earn
a third-place team finish.
But his best 800 came two
months later at the SEC


Unlimited Weight Midget team for ages
11-4 in Charlotte/Sarasota counties.
Headed by former NFL player Anthony
Hargrove. Contact Shea, 941-661-9368.

Charlotte Warriors regis-
tration: For football and cheer, ages
5-15. June 19 6-8 p.m.; June21 10
a.m.- I p.m. at the Carmalita Athletic
Park, 2610 Carmalita St., Punta Gorda.
Cost: $200 per player. Call Janelle,
540-220-2379.

GOLF
Tarpon 2-Man tourna-
ment: The Charlotte High School
football team is hosting its annual
2-man golf scramble on Saturday at
Port Charlotte Golf Club. The cost is $70
per person.You must have a minimum
15 handicap on your team. There will
be a skins game, long drive contest and
closest to the pin on all par 3s. Start
time is 8:30 a.m. To register, call Scott,
941-204-5691.

KICKBALL
CC Adult Sports: Games
on Thursdays at 7p.m. and 8:15 p.m.
at Englewood Sports Complex adult
softball fields. Call 941-209-5924.

PRESCHOOLERS
Franz Ross Park YMCA:
All Sport, Soccer and T-ball. Register in
person, online at CharlotteCountyYMCA.
com or call 941-629-9622.

PROSPORTS
ACADEMY
Youth sport specific
personal training and
group sessions: Football,
baseball, basketball, track & field,
volleyball and soccer. Strength and
conditioning, speed, agility, stretching,
mobility and weight management.
Call Elgin, 941-268-1891 or email
makeitcountsports@gmail.com.

ROWING
National Learn to Row
Day: Saturday, 8 a.m. toII a.m. at
Indian Mound Park in Englewood.
Learn the basics: how to work out on an
erg and row in a 60-foot rowing shell.
Come ready to row, wear water shoes,
close fitting clothing and sunscreen.
Visit Lemonbaycrewclub@gmail.com or
call Lynn, 941-830-8802.

RUNNING
Team V Fitness: 5K and
10K programs starting in mid-June.
Strength and conditioning also offered.
Contact Scott or Krissy, 941-889-9914.

SAILING
Englewood Sailing
Association youth camps:
June9- 13,July 7-11,and July 28-Aug
1; 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily; at Indian
Mound Park, Englewood. Cost: $125/
camp ($10 discount for YMCA or ESA
members). To register, call Englewood
YMCA, 941-475-1234. Call Hugh
Moore, 941-257-8192 or visit www.
englewoodsailing.org.

Charlotte Harbor
Community Sailing Center
camps: Weeklong youth sail camps;
Monday, June 23, July11 and 25; at
Port Charlotte Beach Park. Cost: $175/
week (maximum). Details and applica-
tion forms online at www.thesailing-
center.org or call 941-773-6326.


meet.
'Any time you PR, I feel
like it's a sign you're going
in the right direction,"
he said. "It's especially
nice when you can PR
again --there's always
the possibility you might
get hurt and not PR (ever)
again. Its really special."
It's this sort of perfor-
mance that takes him
to Eugene on Sunday
for the NCAA Outdoor
Championships starting
June 11. The place they
call "Track Town" is some-
thing of a special place to
any runner.
Making the finals in the
800 next week would also


be special, but Schnulle
was wary of the competi-
tion he'll see.
"There's a lot of good
guys," Schnulle said.
"So we'll just see what
happens."
Contaa Rob Shore at 941-206-1174 or
shore@sun-herald.Com


Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Friday, June 6, 2014






The Sun /Friday, June 6,2014 www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3


0 FSL:


U BASEBALL:,


STONE CRABS
AT YANKEES
WHO: Charlotte (29-29) at
Tampa (29-30)
WHEN: Today, 7 p.m.
WHERE: Steinbrenner Field,
Tampa
PITCHERS: Austin Pruitt (3-1,
4.56) vs. Rafael De Paula (1-3,
4.18)
RADIO: 91.7 FM or
stonecrabsbaseball.com



Charlotte


blanks


Yankees
STAFF REPORT
TAMPA Blake Snell
pitched six scoreless
innings, Patrick Leonard
homered and had two
RBIs, and the Charlotte
Stone Crabs beat the
Tampa Yankees 5-0 on
Thursday at Steinbrenner
Field.
Snell (1-1) allowed four
hits while striking out
three and walking one,
earning his first Florida
State League win. He
started the season with
Bowling Green in the
Midwest League.
Despite going 0 for 14
with runners in scoring
position, the Stone
Crabs took advantage of
extra-base hits. Marty
Gantt had two triples and
Justin O'Conner hit a pair
of doubles. Leonard went
3 for 5 including his ninth
home run of the season.
With one out in the
sixth, Kes Carter singled
and scored on a Gantt
triple to center to put the
Crabs on the board.
Charlotte added
insurance runs in the
eighth and ninth innings.
A missed throw to second
as Thomas Coyle was at-
tempting to steal allowed
Julian Ridings to score in
the eighth, and O'Conner
doubled and scored on a
Gantt groundout in the
ninth.
Luis Cabrera picked up
his first save of the season
by pitching three score-
less innings of relief.
STONE CRABS 5, YANKEES 0
Charlotte AB R H RBI BB SO AVG
Coyle2B 5 0 0 0 0 3 .243
ReginattoSS 4 1 2 0 1 0 .320
Leonardi1B 5 1 3 2 0 1 .286
O'ConnerC 5 1 2 0 0 0 .246
Goeddel3B 4 0 0 0 0 1 .250
KesCarterCF 4 1 2 0 1 2 .235
GanttRF 5 0 2 1 0 2 .270
RidingsLF 5 1 1 0 0 1 .300
DePewDFH 2 0 0 0 2 2 .222
Totals 39 5 12 3 412 .257
Tampa AB R H RBI BB SO AVG
Cave CF 4 0 1 0 0 2 .305
CervelliC 3 0 0 0 0 0 .000
GarrisonC 1 0 0 0 0 0 .184
Bird 1B 4 0 0 0 0 2 .248
BichetteJr.3B 4 0 2 0 0 0 .281
Wilson RF 4 0 2 0 0 0 .304
CulverSS 4 0 1 0 0 1 .238
SnyderDH 3 0 0 0 1 1 .200
Toussen2B 2 0 0 0 0 0 .253
GriceLF 3 0 2 0 0 0 .156
Totals 32 0 8 0 1 6 .251
Charlotte0OOOOO1211- 5121
Tampa 000000000- 0 8 2
E: O'Conner (9, catcher interference).
Toussen 2 (8, missed catch, throw). LOB:
Charlotte 12.Tampa 7. 2B:O'Conner2 (18).
Culver (12). 3B: Gantt 2(2). HR: Leonard (9).
RBI: Gantt (14), Leonard 2 (30). SB: Ridings
(1), Coyle (11). RISP: Charlotte 0 for 14.
Tampa 0 for 4. GIDP: Cervelli, Culver. DP: 2
(Coyle-Leonard 2).
Charlotte IP H R ER BB 50 HR ERA
SnellW,1 l1 6 40 0 1 3 01.80
CabreraS, 1 3 40 0 0 3 00.00
Tampa IP H R ER BB SO HR ERA
Sulbaran 5 60 0 1 8 04.28
GerritseL,2-3 1 2 1 1 1 2 04.53
Smith 1 22 2 1 1 1180
Haynes 2 22 1 1 1 02.96
HBP: Goeddel (by Haynes). Umpires: HP:
Ryan Benson. 1 B: David Arrieta. T: 3:04. At:
1,028.


FLORIDA STATE LEAGUE
North Division


W L
Dunedin (Blue Jays) 41 18
Lakeland (Tigers) 38 22
Brevard County (Brewers)31 28
Tampa (Yankees) 29 31
Daytona (Cubs) 24 34
Clearwater (Phillies) 12 47
South Division
W L
Fort Myers (Twins) 35 24
St. Lucie (Mets) 34 26
Bradenton (Pirates) 30 30
Charlotte (Rays) 29 29
Palm Beach (Cardinals) 29 31
Jupiter (Marlins) 24 36


Pct. GB
.695 -
.633 312
.525 10
.483 1212
.414 1612
.203 29
Pct. GB
.593 -
.567 112
.500 51/2
.500 51/2
.483 61/2
.400 1112


Thursday's results
Dunedin 7, St. Lucie 4
Palm Beach 9, Clearwater 2
Brevard County 10, Bradenton 7
Charlotte 5Tampa 0
Daytona 5,Jupiter 4
Fort Myers 4, Lakeland 3
Today's games
St. Lucie at Dunedin, 6:30 p.m.
Bradenton at Brevard County, 6:35 p.m.
Clearwater at Palm Beach, 6:35 p.m.
Charlotte at Tampa, 7p.m.
Jupiter at Daytona, 7:05 p.m.
Lakeland at Fort Myers, 7:05 p.m.


Commissioner Bud Selig, left, poses with shortstop Nick Gordon fro
Windemere at the MLB draft Thursday in Secaucus, N.J. Gordon wa
Twins with the fifth selection.




Astros draft

Marlins make history by also t

By DENNIS WASZAK Jr.
ASSOCIATED PRESS Complete first-round selections,
SCOREBOARD, PAGE 5
SECAUCUS, N.J. -The
Houston Astros had the
Houst As hagannd ths Carlos Correa in 2012 and
~No. 1 pick again, and this rih-adrMkApe
time, they took a pitcher
last year.
polished beyond his years. lIst y ea
Caliorni hig schol I'm just ready to move
California high school forward and see what the
left-hander Brady Aiken Astros have in store for me
was the first selection in in the future," Aiken said
the Major League Baseball in an interview on MLB
draft Thursday night. Network. "I'm just really
The 17-year-old from
San Diego's Cathedral exid.
Aiken is also the first
Catholic High School is high school lefty to be
just the third prep pitcher drafted in the first five
to be selected first overall, picks since Adam Loewen
joining fellow lefties Brien went fourth overall to
Taylor (1991, Yankees) Baltimore in 2002. The
and David Clyde (1973, UCLA recruit has terrific
Rangers). control of a fastball
The Miami Marlins that hits 96-97 mph, a
made it the first time high knee-buckling curve and
school pitchers were the a tough changeup that sits
top two picks in the draft in the low- to mid-80s. His
when they selected Tyler draft stock rose late last
Kolek, a hard-throwing year when he struck out
right-hander Shepherd 10 in a gold medal-win-
High School in Texas. ning performance against
Aiken is "the most Japan in the 18-and-under
advanced high school World Cup.
pitcher I've ever seen in The 6-foot-5, 230-pound
my entire career," Astros Kolek has a fastball that
general manager Jeff sits in the high-90s and
Luhnow said. "He has touched 100-102 mph
command like I've never several times, causing
seen before of his stuff." many to compare him to
The Astros are the first some fellow Texas flame-
team to select first in throwers such as Nolan
three consecutive drafts, Ryan, KerryWood and
having picked shortstop Josh Beckett.

0 BASEBALL:o



Zimmer was on

By JOHN ROMANO It could be argued
TAMPA BAY TIMES that Zimmer's life in
e was nearly a star baseball is without
once. Long ago, compare. Not for what
Sand barely remem- he accomplished, but for
bered. A power-hitting what he represented. He
shortstop who was tearing was a participant and a
up Triple A and was ex- witness, a scene-stealer
pected soon in Brooklyn and a bystander to more
where he was supposed to of the game's history than
nudge Pee Wee Reese over perhaps any man who
to third base. ever wore a uniform.
Then came the curve- Zimmer, who passed
ball that struck him in the awayWednesday at 83,
temple and kept him in a was baseball's everyman.
hospital room for so long He was every dream
that he was 120 pounds and every possibility
by the time they let him wrapped tightly in a short,
back out. Undaunted, round and fierce-looking
he made it to the majors package.
the following summer ays, Clemente,
bland was still working as Koufax. They were other-
Reese's heir apparent two worldly. Zimmer was one
years later when a fastball of us. An unremarkable
shattered his cheekbone kid from middle America
Back to the hospital and who loved the game for all
more sleepless nights. He the right reasons.
would eventually become He played rough and
a useful player for a hand- talked tough but had a
ful of teams over a dozen soft spot a mile wide. He
seasons but never again called bull when he saw
was considered a star. it and apologized if his
And, as it turns out, mistakes called for it.
that was fine. Baseball Baseball might occa-
is always going to have sionally disappoint you
plenty of stars. There will but, if you treat it right, it
be more than enough will never abandon you.
athletes with numbers, And so it was that Zimmer
achievements and awards. says he never had to ask
Fur this ballplayer, his- fur a jub. Nut when he
tory had something else in was released, not when he
mind. Don Zimmer would was fired, not when he got
become an institution, angry and walked away.


DRAFT being drafted by the
Giants in 2008. Now with
the White Sox, the third
FROM PAGE 1 baseman is hitting .336
that up this spring for with 18 RBIs and dis-
the Shockers, blasting pensed plenty of advice
15 home runs tied for to his younger brother in
15 hme rns -tiedfor the antsy weeks leading
fifth in the country and the e a din
walking an NCAA-best 58 up to the draft.
walkng a NCA-bes 58 "He's kind of guided me
times. Baseball America's
top first baseman in the through this whole draft
draft also ranked second process," Gillaspie said
in a conference call with
nationally with a .520 on- reporters. "He told me
base percentage and was rpres H odm
to enjoy it. I'm thankful
fifth in slugging (.682). to have him. He's been
Scouting director R.J.
Harrison said before the through it all."
drHaftihow fewuaid f t e Gillaspie is hopeful that
~~~~~~~draft how few quality h a xeinesm
he can experience some
amateur hitters there of the same things his
were, but he felt the Rays brother has. He's spent
snagged one of the top time watching Conor play
ones Thursday in the for Chicago and expressed
6-foot-4 switch hitter tremendous respect for
from Omaha, Neb. the work it took him to get
"He's big," Harrison to a big-league clubhouse.
said. "He's strong.... He's "I'm going to try to work
AP PHOTO made the way you want a my way up there," Gillaspie
om Olympia high school in big leaguer to be made." said. "Whatever I need to
drafted by the Minnesota His baseball pedigree do, I'm going to do."
doesn't hurt, either. The Rays also had the
He's the third college No. 60 and No. 72 picks
le t y All-America player in his Thursday but had not

* family. made them at press time.
Gillaspie's dad, Mark, The slotted bonus for the
starred at Mississippi Rays' top three picks are
State and averaged 17 $2,035,500, $943,200 and
home runs over his eight $784,000, and the team has
taking pitcher seasons in pro baseball. a bonus pool of $5,848,400
He never reached the big allotted for its first 10
"How do you pass leagues but ranked among selections. Teams have until
up a guy throwing the minors' leaders with July 18 to sign draft picks.
100?" Marlins manager 122 RBIs in 1983. The draft continues
Mike Redmond said Conor starred at today with rounds 3-10
after Miami's 11-6 win Wichita State before and ends Saturday.
at Tampa Bay. "So, I'm
happy with the pick. It's
a big, old country strong
right-hander."
The Chicago White Sox
selected North Carolina
State left-hander Carlos
Rodon with the third
overall pick. The 6-3,
235-pound junior was
widely regarded as the top
college pitcher available in
the draft and had been in
the mix to go No. 1 overall.
He followed a dominant 4
sophomore year with a...
solid but not spectacular AP PHOTO
junior season: 6-7, 2.01,
117 Ks, 31 BBs in 98 2-3 Miami starter Jacob Turner delivers to Tampa Bay during an
innings. Rodon has a interleague game Thursday in St. Petersburg.
fastball that sits in the
mid- to low-90s, but gets MARLINS 11, RAYS 6
Miami AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
up to 96-97 mph, and a Yelichlf 5 0 0 0 0 3 .242
devastating slider that sits Solano2b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .227
in the mid-80s. FROM PAGE 1 Stantonrf 5 1 2 2 0 1 .314
McGehee3b 5 4 4 0 0 0 .298
Indiana left-handed Gioneslb 5 2 3 0 0 1 .272
slugging catcher Kyle the sixth, Brad Boxberger Ozuna cf 5 3 3 4 0 2 .274
and Joel Peralta in the Bourdh 5 0 2 1 0 2 .400
Schwarber went No. 4
seventh and Grant Realmutoc 4 0 2 3 0 0 500
overall to the Chicago Mathisc 1 0 0 0 0 0 .255
Cubsas the fi i o MBalfour in the eighth. Hechavarria ss 4 0 0 1 0 1 .264
ae st t McGee, who had retired Totals 4411 1711 011
player selected. The 21 consecutive batters Tampa Bay AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Hoosiers star is a finalist DeJesusdh 5 1 2 0 0 0 .264
and hadntallowed arun Zobrist 2b 4 11 1 1 2 .251
for the Johnny Bench Zbit2 5
Awrd the best ccher since April (with 15 ap- Longoria3b 5 1 2 0 0 1 .268
Award as the best catcher Loney lb 4 0 0 1 0 0 .282
in Division I, although he pearances since), allowed DeJenningscf 5 1 2 1 0 0 .236
singles to three of the first JoyceIf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .279
four he faced, then an RBI -S.Rodriguezph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .225
ol et theot ie d bs fuihnacd thenanos. Y.Escobar ss 5 0 0 0 0 0 .251
or the outfield in the pros groundout, ending both Kiermaierrf 3 1 3 1 10 .379
.of his streaks, and putting Solisc 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000
a-Sandsph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .167
the Rays behind 6-3. J.Molinac 1 0 0 0 0 1 .140
They closed the gap Totals 39 613 6 3 7
to 6-5 on a single by Miami 000303 302-11170
Tampa Bay 100022 100- 6130
le oDesmond Jennings, a a-singled for Solis in the 6th. b-walked for
i S triple by Matt Joyce and Joyce in the 9th. LOB-Miami 6,Tampa Bay
10.2B-McGehee (14), Longoria (8), Deien-
one-out RBI pinch hit nings(13), Kiermaier (2).3B-Joyce (1).HR-
At some point each single by Jerry Sands, Stanton (17), off Boxberger; Ozuna (11), off
winter the phone would snapping their team Lueke; Kiermaier (3), offJa.Turner; Zobrist (5),
off Ja.Turner RBIs-Stanton 2 (53), Ozuna
ring in Treasure Island, 0-for-34 hitless streak 4 (39), Bour (1), Realmuto 3 (3), Hechavarria
and someone would ask with runners in scoring (13), Zobrist (13), Loney (29), DeJennings
(15),Joyce (23), Kiermaier (4), Sands (1). SB-
Zim if he was ready for an- position. Their last hit Kiermaier (1). SF-Loney. Runners left in
other season. Sometimes with a runner in scoring scoring position-Miami 2 (Hechavarria 2);
it meant going to Japan, or position had come Friday Tampa Bay4 (Solis, Zobrist, YEscobar, Longo-
ria). RISP-Miami 8 for 14,Tampa Bay 2 for
taking a step back to the in Boston, when David 12.Runnersmoved up-Loney.
minors, and sometimes it DeJesus singled in the Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Ja.TurnerW,4 51E 8 5 5 1 3 845.93
meant they wanted him at fifth. DaJennings 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 1.26
Fenway or maybe in pin- But Boxberger, who was Hatcher H,2 1 3 1 1 0 1 184.50
stripes. That's pretty close working on astreak of nine A.RamosH,9 1 2 0 0 0 3 28281
MDunn 1 00 0 1 0 25380
to how it worked for most straight scoreless appear- Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
of the past six decades. ances, gave up a leadoff Odorizzi L, 2-6 5 7 4 4 0 8 945.31
McGee 1 32 2 0 022169
He once told a story of single to Donovan Solano Boxberger 0 3 3 3 0 0 13 2.70
playing for Cincinnati's and a homer to Giancarlo Jo.Peralta 1 2 0 0 0 2 22 4.50
American Legion team in Stanton. Peralta followed Lueke~fu 1222 0 1255.64'9
high school and taking a and gave up another run, Odorii pitched tol batterinthe6th.Boxberg-
trip toCalifornia for the making it 9-5. er pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. DaJennings
to pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inherited run-
national championship. On the plus side, the ners-scored-DaJennings 1-0, Hatcher 2-1,
Zim's team won and he six runs were the most A.Ramos 1-0, McGee 1-1,JoPeralta 1-1.wP-
was ame thetouna- the aysscoed i a ameBoxberger. Umpires--Home, Chris Conroy
was ame thetouna- the aysscoed i a ame First, Bill Miller Second, Vic Carapa~za; Third,
ment's most valuable since May 27 in Toronto. Adam Hamari.T-345.A-10,442 (31,042).


player.
At the ceremony
afterward, Zimmer got
to meet Babe Ruth, who
autographed a baseball
the starstruck teenager.
Can you imagine, Zin
would say, how much
the ball would be worth
today? So, someone ask
where is the ball now?
Took it home and use
it for sandlot games unt
the cover came off, Zim
said. Then taped the cov
back on and used it son
more.
That's what a ballplay
does.
That was Don Zimme


f
for

TI


4
S,

ed
til

ver


yer

er.


HERONGCREEK


YOUTH
PLAY
FREE


with eac paidrad ltlroat


"e after12:30pm $125
before 12 30pm
Residoty-ot Required CALL FOR TWILIGHT RATES
EXP,.6/30/14 Not valid with other offers, 7-Day Advance Tee Times (941) 423-6955)


I


The Sun /Friday, June 6, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3






Page 4 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Friday, June 6, 2014


I STANDINGS


Toronto
Baltimore
NewYork
Boston
RAYS


Detroit
Chicago
Cleveland
Minnesota
Kansas City


Oakland
Los Angeles
Seattle
Texas
Houston



Atlanta
MARLINS
Washington
NewYork
Philadelphia


Milwaukee
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Chicago


San Francisco
Los Angeles
Colorado
San Diego
Arizona


AMERICAN
East Divi
Pt GB WC(
.607 -
517 512
.508 6
.458 9
.377 14
Central D
Pt GB WC(
554 -
508 212
500 3
.491 312
.483 4
West Div
Pt GB WC(
.617 -
525 512
525 512
.500 7
.426 1112
NATIONAL
East Divi
Pt GB WC(
534 -
.533 -
.517 1
.467 4
.414 7
Central D
Pt GB WC(
583 -
.508 412
.475 612
.466 7
.404 1012
West Div
Pt GB WC(
.650 -
508 812
.483 10
.450 12
.410 1412


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Wednesday's results
Seattle 2, Atlanta 0
Cleveland 7, Boston 4,12 innings
Oakland 7, N.Y Yankees 4
Toronto 8, Detroit 2
MARLINS 5, RAYS 4
Baltimore 6,Texas 5
L.A. Angels 4, Houston0
Minnesota 6, Milwaukee 4
St. Louis 5, Kansas City2,11 innings
Chicago White Sox 2, L.A. Dodgers 1
Thursday's results
N.Y. Yankees 2, Oakland 1
Toronto 7, Detroit 3
MARLINS 11, RAYS 6
Houston 8, LA. Angels 5
Texas 8, Baltimore 6
Kansas City 3, St. Louis 2
Milwaukee at Minnesota, late
Today's games
Oakland (Milone 3-3) at Baltimore (W.Chen
6-2),7:05 p.m.
St. Louis (Lynn 6-3) at Toronto (Stroman
2-0),7:07 p.m.
Boston (R.De La Rosa 1-0) at Detroit (Smyly
2-4),7:08 p.m.
Seattle (C.Young 5-2) at RAYS (Bedard
2-4), 7:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Bauer 1-2)(at Texas (Darvish 5-2),
8:05 p.m.
Houston (Keuchel 6-3) at Minnesota
(PHughes6-1 ),8:10pm
N.Y. Yankees (Whitley 00) at Kansas City
(Guthrie 2-5),8:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Rienzo 4-2) at LA. An-
gels (Weaver 6-4), 10:05 p.m.
Saturday's games
St. Louis atToronto, 1:07 p.m.
Houston at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m.
Cleveland atTexas,4:05 p.m.
Seattle at RAYS, 4:10 p.m.
Boston at Detroit, 7:15 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Kansas City, 7:15 p.m.
Oakland at Baltimore, 7:15 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at LA. Angels, 10:05
p.m.
Sunday's games
St. Louis atToronto, 1:07 p.m.
Oakland at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m.
Seattle at RAYS, 1:40 p.m.
Houston at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m.
Cleveland at Texas,3:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at LA. Angels, 3:35 p.m.
Boston at Detroit, 8:05 p.m.



* BASEBALL NOTEBOOK




France




develop


Cubs cut

long-time

ties with

WGN Radio

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LAUSANNE,
Switzerland -Baseball
and softball are hoping
a little French flavor will
boost their international
appeal and chances for a
return to the Olympics.
The Francophone
Association of Baseball
Softball has been
launched in Paris to
promote the sports
in French-speaking
countries.
The association was
formed by national
federations in 14 coun-
tries in Europe and
Africa, including Belgium,
Burkina Faso, Cameroon,
Ivory Coast, France,
Switzerland and Tunisia.
The World Baseball
Softball Confederation
says the new body will
work to develop the
sports across 77 French-
speaking countries and
provinces, especially in
Africa. It will be led by
Didier Seminet, head of
the French federation.
WBSC president
Riccardo Fraccari says the
new body should help the
global campaign to bring
baseball and softball back


BASEBALL SCOREBOARD


LEAGUE NATIONALS 4, PHILLIES 2
vision Philadelphia AB R H BIBBSO Avg. For Wednesda
CGB L10 Str Home Away Reverecf 4 1 1 0 0 1 282 see Scoreboar
- 8-2 W-5 18-13 19-11 Rollinsss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .248
12 5-5 L-1 11-12 19-16 Utley2b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .311
1 4-6 W1 13-16 17-13 Howardlb 4 0 0 0 0 2 .227
4 7-3 L-3 15-17 12-15 Mayberryrf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .255 YANKEES:
9 0-10 L-10 12-16 11-22 DBrownIf 3 0 0 0 0 0 206 Oakland A
visionn Nievesc 3 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Crispc'
CGB L10 Str Home Away Brignac3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .242 Jasoc
- 3-7 L-5 14-14 17-11 K.Kendrickp 2 0 0 0 0 1 .083 Donaldson3b
1 6-4 W-2 17-14 14-16 a-GwynnJr.ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .165 Mosslf
112 6-4 W-6 21-11 9-19 DeFratusp 0 0 0 0 0 0 --- Cespedesdh
2 5-5 W-2 14-14 14-15 Diekmanp 0 0 0 0 0 0 --- Lowess
212 5-5 W-1 14-15 15-16 Totals 30 2 4 2 0 9 Vogtrf
vision Washington AB R H BIBBSO Avg. 2-Gentrypr
CGB L10 Str Home Away Spancf 4 1 1 0 0 1 283
- 7-3 L-i 17-12 20-11 Rendon2b 3 1 1 0 0 0 .271
- 3-7 L-1 15-13 16-15 Werthrf 3 1 1 1 1 0 285 Sogard2b
- 7-3 W-5 14-15 17-13 LaRoche1b 3 1 1 2 1 0 .315 a-D.Norrisph
112 5-5 W-1 14-15 16-15 Zimmermanlf 3 0 1 1 1 1 364 Totals
6 7-3 W-1 14-18 12-17 McLouthlf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .180 NewYork A
LEAGUE Frandsen3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 234 GardnerIf
vision Espinosa ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 218 Jeterss
CGB L10 Str Home Away Lobatonc 3 0 1 0 1 1 .232 Ellsburycf
- 4-6 L-2 18-14 13-13 Fisterp 1 0 0 0 0 0 .100 Teixeira1b
- 6-4 W-4 22-11 10-17 Clippard p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --- Beltrandh
- 6-4 W-3 19-15 11-13 b-Dobbsph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Solarte3b
3 6-4 L-3 13-17 15-15 c-Hairstonph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .409 McCannc
6 2-8 L-6 12-19 12-15 R.Sorianop 0 0 0 0 0 0 --- A.Sorianorf
visionn Totals 28 4 8 4 5 3 1-I.Suzuki pr-rf
CGB L10 Str Home Away Philadelphia 100000100- 2 40 BRoberts2b
- 6-4 L-2 19-13 16-12 Washington 10003000x- 4 80 Totals
12 3-7 L-1 16-14 15-16 a-grounded out for K.Kendrick in the 8th. Oakland
212 6-4 Li1 16-13 12- b-was announced for Clippard in the 8th. NewYork
3 5-5 L-2 13-14 14-17 c-popped out for Dobbs in the 8th. LOB- a-struckoutforSo
612 5-5 W3 1313 10-21
61/i2n 55 1-3 02 Philadelphia 3, Washington 8.2B-Revere A.Soriano in the
vision ASraoi h
:GB 110 Str Home Away (2), Rollins (8), Span (16). HR-Mayberry 9th. E-Moss (3)
- 7-3 W-2 In-g 20-12 (4), off Fister; LaRoche (8), off K.Kendrick. York 5.2B-EllsL
12 7-3I-2 19-9 -12 RBIs-Utley (28), Mayberry (12), Werth HR-Jaso (6), ofi
62 L-2 13-19 18-11 (25), LaRoche 2 (30), Zimmerman (8). S- Pomeranz RBIs-
2 2-8 L6- 16-9 12-21 Rollins, Fister 2. Runners left in scoring ASoriano (20) 51
4 5-5 Wi1 1517 1216P .oin(2)SB
612 5-5 W-2 9-22 16-14 position-Philadelphia 1 (Utley);Washing- (18) Runners le
ton5 (Frandsen 2, Span 2, Hairston). RISP- O
Philadelphia 1 for 2; Washington 2 for 10.
NATIONAL LEAGUE Runners moved up-Rendon, Werth. ris);NewYork5 (E
Wednesday's results GIDP-Frandsen, Lobaton. DP-Phila- ra).RISP-Oaklar
Seattle2,Atlanta 0 delphia 2 (Utley, Rollins, Howard), (Rollins, Runners moved
San Diego 3, Pittsburgh 2 Utley, Howard). Roberts. DP-Oa
Washington 8, Philadelphia 4 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Callaspo).
MARLINS5, RAYS4 :K.KendrickL, 7 6 4 4 5 2103 4.30 Oakland II
San Francisco 3, Cincinnati 2 De Fratus 2 2 0 0 0 1 93.00 PomeranzL,5-3
Chicago Cubs5, N.Y.Mets 4 Diekman 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 4.97 JiiJohnson
Minnesota 6, Milwaukee4 :Washington IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA NewYork II
St. Louis5, Kansas City2,11 innings FisterW,4-1 7 4 2 2 0 5 93 3.19 TanakaW,9 -1
Arizona 16,Colorado8 Clippard H, 12 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 1.37 BetancesH,7
ChicagoWhiteSox2, LA. Dodgers RSorianoS 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 0.78 WarrenH,10
Thursday's results HBP-by K.Kendrick (Rendon), by Fister Dav.Robertson S
San Francisco 6, Cincinnati 1 (Utley).T-2:38. A-33,016 (41,408). WP-Warren. Ur
Washington 4, Philadelphia 2 lion; First, Sean Ba
MARLINS 11, RAYS 6 CUBS 7, METS 4 one;Third, Paul N
Chicago Cubs 7,N.Y.Mets 4 NewYork AB R H BIBBSO Avg. (49,642).
KansasCity3,St. Louis2 C.Youngcf 3 0 1 1 2 0 .197
Milwaukee at Minnesota, late Granderson rf 4 0 1 0 1 0 .217 BLUEJI
Arizona at Colorado, late D.Wright3b 5 0 0 0 0 0 285 Toronto A
Today's games Mejia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Reyesss
MARLINS (Eovaldi 4-2) at Chicago Cubs Campbell1lb-3b 4 1 1 0 1 3 .289 Me.Cabrera f
(Hammel 6-3), 4:05 p.m. A.BrownIf 3 2 1 2 1 0 .200 PillarIf
Milwaukee (Lohse 7-1) at Pittsburgh Flores2b 5 1 2 0 0 0 254 Piarf
(Cumpton 0-2), 7:05 p.m. Tejadass 3 0 1 1 1 1 230 B s
St. Louis (Lynn 6-3) at Toronto (Stroman d'Arnaudc 3 0 0 0 0 0 .184 Lindb
20),707pm c-BAbreu ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .283 J.Francisco3b
Reckerc 0 0 0 0 0 0 200 StTolleson2b
Philadelphia (Hamels 1-3) at Cincinnati dLawrie2b-3b
(Cueto 5-4), 7:10 p.m.:derom p 2 0 1 0 0 0 556
LA. Dodgers (Ryu 6-2) at Colorado (EButler a-Dan.Murphyph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .297 DNavarrodh
0-0),8:40p.m. Blackp 0 0 0 0 0 0 ___ Kratzc
Atlan(T ) at Arizona (McCarthy Edginp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Gosecf
Atlanta (Teheran 5-3) d-Duda ph-lb 1 0 0 0 0 0 243 Totals
1-7),9:40p.m. Totals 35 4 8 4 6 5 Detroit A
Washington (Roark 3-4) at San Diego Chkago AB R H BIBBSO Avg. Kinsler2b
(T.Ross 6-4),p10:10P.m. Lakelf 5 0 1 2 0 0 .241 Tor.Hunterrf
N.Y Mets (Niese 3-3) at San Francisco (M. N.Ramirez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --- Mi.Cabrera lb
Cain 1-3)1015 pm RuggianocfIf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .231 V.Martinezdh
Saturday'sgames Rizzo lb 4 1 2 1 0 1 274 J MartinezIf
StLouisatToronto, O:07pim.: S.Castross 3 0 0 0 1 1 272 AJacksoncf
MARLINSatChicagoCubs,4:05p.m. Valbuena3b 4 1 2 0 0 1 270 Avilac
MilwaukeeatPittsburgh,4:pm. Schierholtzrf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .215 Castellanos3b
LA DodgersatColorado,4:10pm Barney2b 4 3 2 0 0 0 .188 An.Rominess
PhiladelphiaatCincinnati,4:10p.m. Whitesidec 3 0 0 1 0 1 .000 Totals
N.YMetsatSanFrancisco,05pm. TWoodp 2 1 1 3 0 0 .273 Toronto
Atlanta atArizona,10:10p.m. Schlitterp 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000 Detroit
Washington at San Diego, 10:10p.m. b-Coghlanph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .171
Sunday's games Grimm p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ___ E-Tor.Hunter (2)
St. LouisatToronto, :07p.m. Strop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ___ 5. 2B-Castellan
Philadelphia at Cincinnati, 1:10p.m e-Bonifacioph-cf 0 1 0 0 1 0 .269 HR-J.Francisco
MilwaukeeatPittsburgh, 1:35p.m. Totals 31 7 8 7 5 8 rie (10), off Verlar
MARLINS at Chicago Cubs, 2:20p.m. NewYork 000002200- 4 80 Coke. RBIs-Me.i
N.Y Mets at San Francisco,4:05 p.m. Chicago 030100 12x- 7 82 (26), Lawrie (35),lD
Atlanta atArizona,4:10p.m. a-struck out for deGrom in the 6th. Kinsler 2 (26), Toi
LA. DodgersatColorado,4:10p.m. b-walked for Schlitter in the 6th. c-fouled ta (2). CS-J.Mar
Washington at San Diego,4:10p.m. out for dArnaud in the 8th. d-flied out Runners left in
for Edgin in the 8th. e-was intentionally ronto 3 (J.Francisc
walked for Strop in the 8th. E-Valbuena Hunter, An.Romi
(4), Rizzo (4). LOB-New York 11, Chicago Toronto 3 for 8;
6. 2B-Flores (2), deGrom (1), Valbuena moved up-Kins
(13), Barney 2 (3). 3B-Lake (2). HR-A. Kratz2,GoseTor.
Brown (2), off Grimm; TWood (2), off de- mine. DP-Toror
Grom; Rizzo (11), off Black. RBIs-CYoung Lind), (Reyes, Law
(15), A.Brown 2 (7),Tejada (15), Lake 2 (21), Lind); Detroit 3
a i m t o Rizzo (2),Whiteside (1),T.Wood 3 (8). SF- Cabrera), (An.Roni
Whiteside. Runners left in scoring posi- An.Romine, Mi.Ca
1 tion-New York 8 (Tejada, Granderson 2, Toronto II
d'Arnaud2,Campbell2,D.Wright);Chicago HappW,5-2 6t
1 (Schierholtz). RISP-New York 2 for 13; Jenkins H, 1 2!
Chicago 2 for 8. Runners moved up-D. Janssen S, 10
Wright,d'Arnaud, Whiteside. GIDP-Flores. Detroit II
DP-Chicago 1 (TWood, S.Castro, Rizzo). Verlander L, 65
into the Olympics. The NewYork IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA EReed
IOC has said it willcon- deGrom 55o4 4 3 3 31 ke
BlackL, 1-1 12 1 1 1 1 3 33 1.17
sider adding the sports to Edgin % 0 0 0 0 1 7 2.70 Inherited runne
the program of the 2020 Mejia 1 2 2 2 1 1 204.35 Janssen 2-0.Umr
Chicago IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA ley; First, Brian G
Tokyo Games. TWood 5 4 2 2 5 3 925.04 dazzo;Third, Jim
SchlitterH,8 1 1 0 0 0 1 162.03 (41,681).
Cubs moveto CBS GrimmW,2-2 1 22 2 0 0 183.29
StropH,5 1 1 0 0 1 0 204.02 GIAN
Radio: The Chicago Cubs N.Ramirez S, 1-1 1 0 0 0 0 1 170.68 San Francisco A
announced a new broadcast rights TWood pitched to 3 batters in the 6th. Pagan cf
Inherited runners-scored-Schlitter Pence rf
deal with a CBS-owned station, 2-1. IBB-off Mejia (Bonifacio). HBP-by Poseyc
ending the team's partnership : TWood (A.Brown). T-3:16. A-28,833 Sandoval 3b
with WGN Radio, which was one of :(41,072). Mrse lb
the longest such relationships in : ROYALS 3, CARDINALS 2 Colvin If
broadcast history. :St. Louis AB R H BI BBSO Avg. B.Crawford ss
M.Carpenter3b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .306 B.Hicks2b
The new deal will begin with the :Wong 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .258 Bumgarner p
2015 season. Under the multi-year Descalso2b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .161 Kontosp
AMwilbracat Hollidaydh 3 0 1 0 1 0 .267 Totals
deal, WBBM-A wilbraat Craig lb 4 0 1 0 0 0 .246 Cincinnati A
regular-season and postseason games YMolina c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .299 B Hamilton c
in addition to some spring training :Taverasrf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .227 Frazier3b
-Grichukpr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .147
games. Jh.Peralta ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .224 Phillips 2b
Mesoraco c
Jay lf 4 2 2 0 0 1 .295 Brcf
Bourjoscf 3 0 1 1 1 1 211 Brcr
Latos hits obstacle in Totals 34 2 8 2 2 5 Heiseylf
rehab quest: Starter Mat Latos KansasCity AB R H BIBBSO Avg. BPenailb
Aokirf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .259 Cozartss
could make one more start in the Dysoncf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .275 Leakep
minors before the Reds will consider Infante 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .241 a-R.Santiago ph
aciaighim and bringing their :Hosmerib 4 1 1 1 0 0 264 S.Marshallp
aciaigB.Butlerdh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .251 Hooverp
rotation back to full strength. A.GordonlIf 2 0 1 0 1 0 284 b-Ludwickph
Latos hadto0leave aminor league :S.Perezc 3 0 1 1 0 1 .260 A.Chapmanp
reabstrtftr nl 6 ptceson LCaincf-rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .319 Totals
rehbstrtaternly7piche~n Moustakas3b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .148 San Francisco
Wednesday night atiriple-A Louisville A.Escobarss 2 1 1 0 0 0 276 Cincinnati
beauehedveoeda rmpi a :Totals 28 3 7 3 2 1 a-struck out for LE
beaue e evlpe acrmpina St. Louis 010100 000- 2 80 for Hoover in the
calf. The Reds were planning to have KansasCity 000003 OOx- 3 70 8, Cincinnati 2. H
him throw approximately 100 pitches LOB-St. Louis 7, Kansas City 4. 2B-Hol- B.Crawford (7). o


.,... _. .I. .. .. ,. ,, 1
and then activate him if there was no liday (14), Aoki (9), BButler (10), A.Escobar Bumgarner. RBIs-
Prtm ieewsno : (16). 3B-Bourjos (3). RBIs-M.Carpenter B.Crawford 3 (29)
problem. Manager Bryan Price said no (21), Bourjos (9), Aoki (13), Hosmer (25), left in scoring p
decision had been made on whether S.Perez (16). S-A.Escobar. Runners left in (Pence 2, Colvin).
scoring position-St. Louis 5 (Y.Molina 2, 7, Cincinnati 0 fc
M.Carpenter, Wong, Bourjos); Kansas City Cincinnati 1 (Leak
3 (Moustakas 2, LCain). RISP-St. Louis 1
for 8; Kansas City 3 for 9. Runners moved San Francisco II
Encarnacion scratched up-Craig, Infante, S.Perez. DP-St Louis 2 BumgarnerW
from game: Toronto slugger (Craig), (Taveras, Jh.Peralta). Kontos
Edwin Encarnacion sat out of the St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cincinnati II
WachaL,4-4 6 7 3 3 1 1 95 2.61 LeakeL,35
Blue Jays's game at Detroit with what C.Martinez 2 00 0 1 0 194.41 S.Marshall 1t
the team describes as a minor back KansasCity IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA Hoover 1
VenturaW,3-5 6 7 2 2 2 1 91 3.41 A.Chapman
problem. BuenoH,2 1 0 0 0 0 1 124.50 Inherited runner
Manager John Gibbons said he W.DavisH,9 1 00 0 0 0 91.32 Umpires-Home
wanted to let Encarnacion rest, buthe G.Holland S, 17-1811 0 0 0 3 181.52 Larry Vanover;Se
WP-G.Holland. T-2:26. A-24,438 Third, Adrian Joh
hopes to have him back today. (37,903). (42,319).


ay's late linescores,
d, Page 5


S 2, ATHLETICS 1
AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
3 0 1 0 1 0 258
4 1 2 1 0 0 .293
4 0 0 0 0 2 .280
4 0 2 0 0 1 .284
4 0 1 0 0 1 .250
4 0 0 0 0 2 .245
4 0 2 0 0 1 .333
0 0 0 0 0 0 .252
4 0 0 0 0 0 .235
3 0 0 0 0 1 .195
1 0 0 0 0 1 .286
35 1 8 1 1 9
AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
4 1 1 1 0 1 279
4 0 1 0 0 0 .259
3 0 2 0 1 0 .286
4 0 0 0 0 2 .241
3 0 0 0 0 2 .229
3 0 0 0 0 1 .293
3 1 1 0 0 1 .230
3 0 2 1 0 0 .233
0 0 0 0 0 0 .309
3 0 0 0 0 0 .234
30 2 7 2 1 7
100000000- 1 81
01100000x- 2 70
ogard in the 9th. 1-ran for
7th. 2-ran for Vogt in the
). LOB-Oakland 8, New
bury (14), A.Soriano (14).
f Tanaka; Gardner (4), off
-Jaso (15), Gardner (23),
B-Gentry (10), Ellsbury 2
eft in scoring position-
e,Jaso, Cespedes 2, D.Nor-
eltran 3, B.Roberts, Teixei-
nd Ofor 7;NewYork 1 for6.
up-Callaspo. GIDP-B
akland 1 (Sogard, Lowrie,

P H RER BBSONPERA
7 62 1 1 7101 2.20
1 10 0 0 0166.26
PH RERBBSONPERA
6 5 1 1 1 4104 2.02
1 00 0 0 1 151.54
1 2 0 0 0 2 23 2.45
1 1 0 0 0 2 15 4.05
rnpires-Home, Tom Hal-
arber; Second, Chris Gucci-
auert.T-2:57.A-44,346


AYS 7, TIGERS 3
AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
5 0 1 0 0 1 247
5 1 1 1 0 0 307
0 0 0 0 0 0 250
5 1 2 0 0 1 320
3 2 1 0 1 0 .349
4 1 1 2 0 0 .268
0 0 0 0 0 0 .288
3 2 1 1 1 1 .240
2 0 1 1 2 1 .271
3 0 1 2 1 0 .231
4 0 0 0 0 2 .237
34 7 9 7 56
AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
4 1 2 2 0 0 .301
3 0 0 1 0 0 .260
4 0 0 0 0 0 .313
3 0 1 0 1 1 .332
4 0 0 0 0 1 .242
3 0 2 0 1 0 .240
3 1 1 0 1 1 .215
4 1 3 0 0 0 .249
3 0 0 0 0 0 .202
31 3 9 3 3 3
000303001- 7 90
002010000- 3 91
. LOB-Toronto 5, Detroit
os (9). 3B-Kinsler (1).
(10), off Verlander; Law-
nder; Me.Cabrera (10), off
Cabrera (33), J.Francisco 2
D.Navarro (23), Kratz 2 (9),
rHunter (30). SB-Bautis-
tinez (2). SF-Tor.Hunter.
i scoring position-To-
co 2, Gose); Detroit 3 (Tor.
ne, Castellanos). RISP-
Detroit 1 for 7. Runners
sler, An.Romine 2. GIDP-
Hunter, J.Martinez, An.Ro-
nto 3 (J.Francisco, Lawrie,
wrie, Lind), (Jenkins, Reyes,
(An.Romine, Kinsler, Mi.
"nine, Mi.Cabrera), (Kinsler,
brera).
P H R ER BBSO NP ERA
473 3 2 2106 4.12
2 0 0 1 1 27 4.26
4 0 0 0 0 10.00
P H R ER BBSO NP ERA
7 86 5 4 4107 4.19
1 00 0 1 1 134.50
1 1 1 1 0 1 12 6.41
ers-scored-Jenkins 1-0,
pires-Home, David Rack-
orman; Second, Tony Ran-
Wolf T-2:52. A-39,440


TS 6, REDS 1
AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
3 1 2 0 2 0 321
5 0 1 0 0 2 .290
5 0 1 1 0 2 .262
5 2 3 0 0 0 .251
0 0 0 0 0 0 .169
5 1 1 2 0 2 286
4 1 1 0 0 2 .259
3 1 1 3 1 1 .236
3 0 1 0 1 2 .182
4 0 0 0 0 3 .207
00 0 000 --
37 6 11 6 414
AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
4 0 0 0 0 1 261
4 1 2 1 0 1 275
4 0 1 0 0 0 .270
3 0 0 0 0 1 .324
3 0 0 0 0 1 .203
3 0 0 0 0 0 .230
3 0 0 0 0 0 .269
3 0 0 0 0 1 .212
1 0 0 0 0 0 .120
1 0 0 0 0 1 19g4
00 0 000 --
00 0 000 --
1 0 0 0 0 0 .247
00 0 000 --
30 1 3 1 056
020300 100- 6110
100000000- 1 30
eake in the 5th. b-flied out
8th. LOB-San Francisco
R-Morse (13), off Leake
)ff Leake Frazier (12), off
--Posey (27), Morse 2 (41),
g), Frazier (31). Runners
osition-San Francisco 3
RISP-San Francisco 2 for
r 0. GIDP-Morse. DP-
PH RERBBSONPERA
83 1 1 0 51062.68


1 00 0 0 1 120.90
PH RERBBSONPERA
5 85 5 1 6 79 3.29
2 1 1 2 3 33 9.00
4 1 0 0 1 3 294.78
1 00 0 0 2 131.64
ers-scored-Hoover 2-0.
e, Gabe Morales; First,
second, Angel Hernandez;
nson. T-2:49. A-25,532


ASTROS 8, ANGELS 5
LosAngeles AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
Calhoun rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 221
a-Cronph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .301
Cowgillrf 1 0 0 1 0 0 .287
Troutdh 5 1 2 1 0 2 .295
Pujols1b 4 0 0 1 0 0 .249
J.Hamiltoncf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .342
H.Kendrick2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .283
Freese3b 3 1 2 0 1 1 .230
Ibanezlf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .143
lannettac 4 1 3 0 0 1 .263
Aybarss 3 1 1 2 1 0 .277
Totals 36 5 9 5 2 6
Houston AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Fowler cf 3 2 2 1 2 0 .268
Altuve2b 5 1 2 2 0 1 .317
Springer rf 4 0 1 3 0 2 .250
M.Dominguez3b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .245
Singletonlb 4 1 1 0 0 1 .182
Carterdh 0 0 0 0 4 0 .198
1-Villarpr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .193
Grossmanlf 2 2 2 1 1 0 .190
Corporanc 3 2 1 1 1 0 .190
Ma.Gonzalezss 4 0 1 0 0 2 .286
Totals 30 8 10 8 8 7
LosAngeles 100020002- 5 90
Houston 100300 04x- 8101
a-grounded out for Calhoun in the 7th.
1-ran for Carter in the 8th. E-Singleton
(3). LOB-Los Angeles 7, Houston 8.2B--
Trout (12), lannetta (8), Altuve (18). 3B-
Trout (5). RBIs-Cowgill (14), Trout (39),
Pujols (34), Aybar 2 (34), Fowler (17), Altuve
2 (19), Springer 3 (32), Grossman (11), Cor-
poran (10). SB-Altuve (21), Singleton (1).
CS-Carter (1), Villar (3). S-Grossman.
SF-Pujols, Springer. Runners left in
scoring position-Los Angeles 4 (Aybar,
J.Hamilton, Pujols 2); Houston 5 (Singleton,
Ma.Gonzalez, Altuve 3). RISP-Los Angeles
3 for 9; Houston 6 for 15. Runners moved
up-Calhoun, Pujols.
LosAngeles IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
Skaggs L, 4-4 5 74 4 3 4 94 4.34
Morin 1 1 0 0 1 2 20 1.13
Jepsen 1 00 0 0 1 15 3.72
Bedrosian 2 03 3 4 0 31


16.20
Salas
Houston
Peacock W, 2-
Fields H, 2


1,21 1 0 0 93.47
IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
4 5 6 3 3 1 1 814.82
1% 1 0 0 0 2 216.46


D.DownsH,2 % 00 0 0 0 71.69
FarnsworthH,4 00 0 0 1 52.84
ClemensH,1 1 22 1 1 1 27 3.92
Qualls S, 6-7 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.29
Clemens pitched to 4 batters in the 9th.
Skaggs pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. In-
herited runners-scored-Morin 1-0, Salas
3-3, Quails 3-1 .WP-Skaggs 2. Umpires-
Home, Angel Campos; First, Jerry Meals;
Second, Paul Emmel; Third, Jordan Baker.
T-3:33. A-24,672 (42,060).


Baltimo
Markaki
Machad

N.Cruzd
A Jones
C.Davis
Hardy ss
Schoop
LoughlIf
CJosep
a-Pearce
Totals
Texas
ChooIf
Andrus
Morelan
A.Beltre
Rios dh
Gimene.
LMartin
Choiceir
1 -D.Rob
Odor 2b
Totals
Baltimo
Texas


RANGERS 8, ORIOLES 6
ore AB R H BIBBSO
s rf 5 1 1 2 0 0
do3b 3 1 1 0 1 1
dh 400003
scf 422300
lb 402 1 00
301 010
)2b 4 0 0 0 0 1
f 411001
hc 2 1 0 0 1 0
eph 1 0 0 0 0 1
34 6 8 6 3 7
AB R H BIBBSO
310021
ss 512100
ndlb 4 1 1 2 1 0
3b 4 1 2 0 0 0
402 1 02
ezc 402 1 01
ncf 4 1 1 0 0 0
rf 412200
ertsonpr-rf0 0 0 0 0 0
221020
34813 7 54


ore


002030010- 6 83
230000 30x- 8130


a-struck out for CJoseph in the 9th. 1-ran
for Choice in the 8th. E-Hardy 3 (4).
LOB-Baltimore 4, Texas 7. 2B-A.Jones
(12), Hardy (13), Lough (3), Andrus (15),
Choice (4). HR-Markakis (5), off Lewis;
AJones (8), off Scheppers; Choice (4), off
Tillman. RBIs-Markakis 2 (23), AJones 3
(36), C.Davis (27), Andrus (15), Moreland 2
(23), Rios (30), Gimenez (6), Choice 2 (21).
SB-Machado (2), Rios (12), L.Martin (12).
CS-L.Martin (5). Runners left in scoring
position-Baltimore 1 (Schoop); Texas 6
(Gimenez, A.Beltre, Choice, LMartin, More-
land 2). RISP-Baltimore 3 for 6;Texas 4 for
16. Runners moved up-CJoseph, Choo
2. GIDP-Schoop, ABeltre 2, Gimenez,
Odor. DP-Baltimore 4 (Hardy, Schoop, C.
Davis), (Machado, Schoop, C.Davis), (Hardy,
C.Davis), (Schoop, Hardy, C.Davis); Texas 1
(A.Beltre, Odor, Moreland).
Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Tillman 1 6 5 5 3 1 51 5.20
Brach 3 1 0 0 1 2 523.86
RWebb 12A1 0 0 0 1 15 2.77
MatuszL,2-2 1 2 0 0 0 11 3.32
Guilmet 3 1 1 0 0 85.79
McFarland 1 1 0 0 1 0 16 4.61
Texas IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
Lewis 5 75 5 2 4 98 5.77
RossJr.W,2-4 2 00 0 0 2 22 4.68
ScheppersH,1 1 1 1 1 1 0 15 9.78
SoriaS, 12-13 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.14
Tillman pitched to 5 batters in the 2nd.
Inherited runners-scored-Brach 2-0,
R.Webb 1-0, Guilmet 1-1. Umpires-
Home, Lance Barrett; First, Fieldin Culbreth;
Second, Manny Gonzalez; Third, Jim Reyn-
olds.T-3:l 1.iA-34,254 (48,114).


Leaders
BI AMERICAN LEAGUE
SBATTING-VMartinez, Detroit, .332; Cano,
Seattle, .330; Rios, Texas, .322; Bautista,
Toronto, .320; ARamirez, Chicago, .319;
Altuve, Houston, .317; MiCabrera, Detroit,
.313; NCruz, Baltimore, .313.
RBI-NCruz, Baltimore, 55; MiCabrera,
Detroit, 50; Encarnacion, Toronto, 50; Don-
aldson, Oakland, 49; Moss, Oakland, 49;
JAbreu, Chicago, 47; Bautista,Toronto, 43.
HOME RUNS-NCruz, Baltimore, 21; En-
carnacion, Toronto, 19;JAbreu, Chicago, 17;
Donaldson, Oakland, 16; Moss, Oakland,
15; Bautista, Toronto, 14; Pujols, Los Ange-
les, 14.
PITCHING-Buehrle, Toronto, 10-1; Tana-
ka, New York, 9-1; FHernandez, Seattle, 8-1;
Porcello, Detroit, 8-3;14 tied at 6.
ERA-Tanaka, New York, 2.02; Darvish, Tex-
as, 2.08; Buehrle,Toronto, 2.10; Kazmir, Oak-
land, 2.40;Gray, Oakland, 2.45;,FHernandez,
Seattle, 2.57; Keuchel, Houston, 2.70.
SAVES-Holland, Kansas City, 17; Perkins,
Minnesota, 16; Rodney, Seattle, 16.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-Tulowitzki, Colorado, .354;
Puig, Los Angeles, .340; MaAdams, St. Louis,
325; Lucroy, Milwaukee, .324; Pagan, San
Francisco, .321; Pollock, Arizona, 316; Stan-
ton, Miami, .314.
RBI-Stanton, Miami, 53; Goldschmidt,
Arizona, 42; Morse, San Francisco, 41; How-
ard, Philadelphia, 40; Puig, Los Angeles, 40;
Tulowitzki, Colorado, 40; Ozuna, Miami, 39.
HOME RUNS-Stanton, Miami, 17; Tulow-
itzki, Colorado, 15; Morse, San Francisco, 13;
Reynolds, Milwaukee, 13; JUpton, Atlanta,
13; Frazier, Cincinnati, 12;Gattis, Atlanta, 12;
AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 12.
PITCHING-Greinke, Los Angeles, 8-2;
Wainwright, St. Louis, 8-3; Bumgarner, San
Francisco, 8-3; Lohse, Milwaukee, 7-1; Si-
mon, Cincinnati, 7-3;9 tied at 6.
ERA-Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.68; Hudson, San
Francisco, 1.75;Teheran,Atlanta, 1.83;Wain-
wright, St. Louis, 2.31; Greinke, Los Angeles,
2.50; Samardzija, Chicago, 2.54; Beckett, Los
Angeles, 2.57.
SAVES-Romo, San Francisco, 18; Street,
San Diego, 18.


* MLB ROUNDUP




Tanaka




picks




up win




No. 9


By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEWYORK -Masahiro
Tanaka tamed the
highest-scoring team in
the majors and the New
YorkYankees stopped a
four-game skid, beating
Oakland 2-1 Thursday
and ending the Athletics'
five-game winning streak.
Facing the As for the
first time, Tanaka (9-1)
got an early jolt when
John Jaso homered as
the second batter in the
game. But that was the
only run Tanaka allowed
in six innings, and he left
with an AL-leading 2.02
ERA.
David Robertson
worked the ninth for his
13th save in 15 chances,
helped by a lucky bounce.
Stephen Vogt sin-
gled with one out and
pinch-runner Craig
Gentry stole second.
Alberto Callaspo followed
with a hard grounder that
deflected off Robertson's
leg, and first baseman
Mark Teixeira corralled
the carom and flipped to
the pitcher covering the
bag for an out. Pinch-
hitter Derek Norris looked
at strike three for the final
out.
Shortly after he was
inserted for speed and
defense, Yankees right
fielder Ichiro Suzuki
blunted Oakland's bid to
tie it in the eighth with a
sliding catch on Brandon
Moss' liner into the gap
with runners on first and
second. After a wild pitch,
Adam Warren struck out
Yoenis Cespedes to end
the inning.
Brett Gardner hit a
leadoff homer in the third
against Drew Pomeranz
(5-3) for a 2-1 lead. Jacoby
Ellsbury also hit a homer
for the Yankees.


Blue Jays 7, Tigers 3:
In Detroit, Juan Francisco and Brett
Lawrie hit consecutive home runs in
the sixth inning off Justin Verlander,
and Toronto completed a three-game
sweep of Detroit.
The AL East-leading Blue Jays
have won 19 of 23, including sweeps
of defending champion Boston, AL
West-leading Oakland and AL Central-
leading Detroit.


Giants 6, Reds 1: Left-
hander Madison Bumgarner got his
career-high sixth straight win, and
San Francisco beat the Reds, winning
a series in Cincinnati for the first time
in five years.
San Francisco moved a season-high
18 games over .500 with its 11th win
in 14 games.

Nationals 4, Phillies 2: In
*Washington, Doug Fister kept himself
and his club on a roll, allowing two
*runs and four hits in seven innings of
*work as Washington capped a sweep
of Philadelphia.


* Cubs 7, Mets 4: In Chicago,
*Anthony Rizzo hit a tiebreaking
*homer, Travis Wood went deep and
*drove in three runs, and Chicago beat
*New York to complete the three-game
*sweep.


* Astros 8, Angels 5: In
*Houston, Jose Altuve and George
*Springer drove in two runs each
*during Houston's four-run eighth
*inning as the Astros pulled away.


* Royals 3, Cardinals 2:
In Kansas City, Mo., Yordano Ventura
threw six innings in his return from a


sore elbow, and Kansas City rallied to
beat St. Louis and end a string of eight
straight home losses to its in-state
rival.


Rangers 8, Orioles 6:
In Arlington, Texas, Rougned Odor
had a leadoff single in the seventh
and scored the tiebreaking run with
the help of two errors by Baltimore
shortstop J.J. Hardy as Texas avoided a
three-game sweep.






The Sun /Friday, June 6, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 5


* NFL NOTEBOOK




Irsay's license suspended for refusing test


Bills owner

had Monet

paintings

worth millions

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NOBLESVILLE, Ind.
-A court suspended
Indianapolis Colts owner
Jim Irsay's driver's license
for one year following his
arrest for driving while
intoxicated.
The Indianapolis Star
reports recently released
documents in Hamilton
County confirm the
license suspension
effective starting May 27.
Police and prosecutors
have declined to discuss


I SCOREBOARD


Sports on TV
AUTO RACING
Noon
FS1 NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for Po-
cono 400, at Long Pond, Pa.
2p.m.
NBCSN Formula One, practice for Cana-
dian Grand Prix, at Montreal
4:30p.m.
FS1 NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole qualifying
for Pocono 400, at Long Pond, Pa.
6:30p.m.
NBCSN IndyCar, qualifying for Firestone
600, at Forth Worth,Texas (same-day tape)
9p.m.
FS1 -NASCAR,Truck Series,WinStarWorld
Casino & Resort 400, at Fort Worth,Texas
BOXING
10 p.m.
SHO Junior middleweights, Eddie Go-
mez (16-0-0)(vs. Francisco Santana (19-3-1);
middleweights, Hugo Centeno Jr. (20-0-0)
vs. Gerardo lbarra (14-0-0), at Indio, Calif.
10:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Junior middleweights, Yudel
Jhonson (15-1-0) vs. Norberto Gonzalez
(20-3-0), at Verona, N.Y
COLLEGE BASEBALL
1 p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA, Division I playoffs, super
regionals, Stanford at Vanderbilt
ESPNU NCAA, Division I playoffs, super
regionals, College of Charleston at Texas
Tech
4p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA, Division I playoffs, super
regionals, Houston atTexas
ESPNU NCAA, Division I playoffs, super
regionals, Pepperdine atTCU
7p.m.
ESPNU NCAA, Division I playoffs, super
regionals, Kennesaw State at Louisville
10 p.m.
ESPNU NCAA, Division I playoffs, super
regionals, UC Irvine at Oklahoma State
EXTREME SPORTS
8p.m.
ESPN X Games, at Austin, Texas
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Lyoness Open,
second round, part II, at Atzenbrugg,
Austria
10:30 a.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Legends of Golf,
first round, at Ridgedale, Mo.
12:30p.m.
TGC LPGA, Manulife Financial Classic,
second round, at Waterloo, Ontario
3p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, St. Jude Classic, second
round, at Memphis,Tenn.
6:30p.m.
TGC Web.com Tour, Cleveland Open,
second round, at Westlake, Ohio (same-day
tape)
12 Mid.
TGC USGA, Curtis Cup,first round match-
es, at St. Louis (same-day tape)
HORSE RACING
5p.m.
NBCSN Thoroughbreds, True North
Handicap and Belmont Gold Cup, at El-
mont, N.Y.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
4p.m.
FSFL Miami at Chicago Cubs
7p.m.
SUN Seattle at Tampa Bay
MLB Regional coverage, Boston at De-
troit or Oakland at Baltimore
SOCCER
8:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Men's national teams, exhibition,
Mexico vs. Portugal, at Foxborough, Mass.
TENNIS
11 a.m.
NBC French Open, men's semifinals, at
Paris


Glantz-Culver Line
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
National League
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
atChicago -115 Miami +105
atPittsburgh -110 Milwaukee +100
atCincinnati -160 Philadelphia +150
Los Angeles -135 at Colorado +125
Atlanta -110 at Arizona +100
atSanDiego -125 Washington +115
at San Francisco-145 NewYork +135
American League
at Baltimore -105 Oakland -105
at Detroit -150 Boston +140
atTampa Bay -140 Seattle +130
atTexas -190 Cleveland +180
at Kansas City -115 NewYork +105
atMinnesota -120 Houston +110
atLosAngeles -200 Chicago +185
Interleague
atToronto -130 St. Louis +120
NBA PLAYOFFS
Sunday
FAVORITE LINE O/U UNDERDOG
at San Antonio 41/2 (199) Miami
NHL PLAYOFFS
Tomorrow
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
at Los Angeles -155 N.Y. Rangers +135


Pro baseball
WEDNESDAY'S LATE LINESCORES
INDIANS 7, RED SOX 4, 12 INNINGS
Boston 000002 200 000 -4 70
Cleveland 100003 000 003 -7110
(12 innings)
Workman, Capuano (6), Badenhop (6),
Breslow (7), Tazawa (9), Uehara (10), Mujica
(12) and Pierzynski, D.Ross; Kluber, Atchison
(7), Hagadone (8), Axford (8), Outman (9),
Shaw (10), Carrasco (11) and YGomes. W-
Carrasco 1-3. L--Mujica 2-2. HRs--Boston,
D.Ortiz (13). ClevelandA.Cabrera (5).


Colts owner Jim Irsay, right,
leaves the Hamilton County
Jail in Indianapolis with his
attorney after he was arrested
in March. His license was
suspended for the incident.

the case.
Irsay refused a blood
test after his March 16
arrest in Carmel, a suburb


of Indianapolis. Indiana
law requires a one-year
license suspension for re-
fusing such a test. Police
later obtained a warrant
ordering Irsay to submit
to a blood draw.
Irsay faces a June 19
initial hearing on two
misdemeanor counts of
impaired driving. A prob-
able cause affidavit said
Irsay was driving under
the influence of powerful
painkillers.
A message seeking
comment was left with a
spokeswoman for Irsay.


back. It wasn't a problem for him as
the Patriots conducted their organized
team activities on a soggy day.
Ridley lost fumbles in three
consecutive games last season. After
the third, in the first quarter against
Denver on Nov. 24, he was benched
for the rest of New England's 34-31
overtime comeback win. He lost a
total of four fumbles last season
leading to three touchdowns and a
field goal.
Ridley said he needs to focus more
consistently and carry the ball more
tightly. And he said he can learn from
his mistakes.

Wilson's estate sale
includes valuable art: Claude


Ridley works on fumble Monetcertainly made an impression
problems: Fumbles have plagued on late Buffalo Bills owner Ralph
Stevan Ridley even when the ball was Wilson. Two Monet paintings, each
dry. Steady rain presents another chal- valued at more than $10 million, will
lenge for the New England running be among four pieces that Wilson's


ORIOLES 6, RANGERS AT NASHVILLE, TENN. Sunday'sgames
Baltimore 103 011 000 -6131 Today: Stanford (34-24) at Vanderbilt (44- Houston at Sky Blue FC, 6 p.m.
Texas 200 030000-5112 18),p.m.
BNorris, McFarland (6), O'Day (7), Z.Brit- Saturday: Stanford vs.Vanderbilt,3 p.m.
ton (9) and CJoseph; N.Martinez, Poreda x-Sunday:Stanfordvs.Vanderbilt,3 p.m. Pro football
(6), Sh.Tolleson (6), Cotts (7), Frasor (9) and AT STILLWATER, OKLA.
Chirinos. W-B.Norris 45. L-N.Martinez Today: UC Irvine (38-23) at Oklahoma State AFL
1-2. Sv-Z.Britton (5). HRs-Baltimore, (48-16),9:30 p.m. NATIONAL CONFERENCE
Markakis(4),C.Davis (8).Texas, A.Beltre2 (8). Saturday: UC Irvine vs. Oklahoma State, West Division
2 p.m. W L T Pt
x-Sunday: UC Irvine vs. Oklahoma State, y-Arizona 11 0 0 1.000 7
CARDINALS 5, ROYALS2 2p.m. LosAngeles 2 8 0 .200 1
St.Louis 010000100 03-5120 ATAUSTINTEXAS SanAntonio 1 10 0 .091 4
Kansas City 000000002 00-2 50 Today: Houston (48-16) at Texas (41-19), PacificDivision
(11 innings) 4p.m. W L T PtI
Wainwright, Rosenthal (9), S.Freeman (10), Saturday: Houstonvs.Texas,2 p.m. San Jose 7 4 0 .636
Neshek (11) and Y.Molina; Vargas, Mariot x-Sunday:Houstonvs.Texas2 p.m. Spokane 6 5 0 .545 5
(9), G.Holland (10), K.Herrera (11),Ti.Collins ATCHARLOTTESVILLE, VA. Portland 3 8 0 .273 4
(11) and S.Perez, Hayes.W-S.Freeman 1-0. Saturday: Maryland (39-21) at Virginia AMERICAN CONFERENCE
L-K.Herrera 1-2. Sv-Neshek (1). (47-13), Noon South Division
Sunday: Maryland vs.Virginia, Noon W L T Pct
WHITE SOX 2, DODGERS 1 x-Monday: Maryland vs.Virginia,4p.m. Orlando 6 5 0 .545
Chicago 001 100 000-2 91 AT LAFAYETTE, LA. Tampa Bay 5 6 0 .455 5
LosAngeles 000 000010-1 21 Saturday: Mississippi (44-18) at Louisi- Jacksonville 3 7 0 300 5
Joh.Danks, Putnam (8), S.Downs (8), Belis- ana-Lafayette (57-8),8p.m. NewOrleans 2 8 0 .200 4
ario (9) and Flowers; Beckett, League (7), Sunday: Mississippi vs.Louisiana-Lafayette,
BWilson (8), JWright (9) and Butera. W- 9p.m. East Division
JohDanks 45. L-Beckett 3-3. Sv-Belisa- x-Monday: Mississippi vs. Louisiana-Lafay- CW T Pdt 0
rio (5). HRs-Chicago, Le.Garcia (1), A.Dunn ette, 7 p.m.
(9). ATFORTWORTHTEXAS Pittsburgh 8 3 0 .727
Saturday:PepperdineatTCU,4p.m. Philadelphia 6 5 0 545
NATIONALS 8, PHILLIES 4 Sunday:Pepperdinevs.TCU,6 p.m. Iowa 6 5 0 .545 5
Philadelphia 000 020 200- 490 x-Monday: Pepperdine vs.TCU, 7 p.m. y-clinched division
Washington 000 413 00x-8112 ATLUBBOCK,TEXAS
A.Burnett, De Fratus (7), Bastardo (8) and Saturday: College of Charleston (44-17) at Today's game
Ruiz; Strasburg, Barrett (8), Blevins (9) and TexasTech (43-19), 1 p.m. Arizona at Portland, 10 p.m.
W.Ramos. W-Strasburg 5-4. L-A.Bur- Sunday: College of Charleston vs. Texas Saturday's games
nett 3-5. HRs-Philadelphia, Mayberry (3). Tech,3 p.m. Spokane at Jacksonville,3 p.m.
Washington, Rendon (8). x-Monday: College of Charleston vs.Texas Philadelphia atTampa Bay,5 p.m.
Tech, 1 p.m. New Orleans at Pittsburgh, 5 p.m.
k CUBS 5, METS 4 Orlando at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
NewYork 300 100 000 -4 70
Chicago 200 03000x-5 81 Pro basketball LowaatCleveland,8pm .
Matsuzaka, Eveland (5), Familia (5), Carlyle Los Angeles at San Jose, 1030pm
(6), Rice (7), C.Torres (7) and Recker, d'Ar- NBAPLAYOFFS
naud; EJackson, Villanueva (6), W.Wright (Best-of-7;x-if necessary) Transactions
(6), Russell (7), Grimm (7), Strop (8), H.Ron- NBA FINALS


don (9) and Jo.BakerW-EJackson 45. L-
Eveland 0-1. Sv-H.Rondon (7). HRs-New
York,Tejada (2).

DIAMONDBACKS 16, ROCKIES 8
Arizona 301000165 -16211
Colorado 000040 400 8131
Collmenter, Delgado (6), Thatcher (7),
Ziegler (7), .Perez (8), Cahill (9) and
M.Montero; Lyles, Morales (5), Logan (7), Ot-
tavino (7), Brothers (8), Masset (8), Belisle (9)
and Rosario. W-Ziegler 2-1. L-Brothers
2-4. HRs-Arizona, Gregorius (1), M.Mon-
tero (6).


Miamivs. San Antonio
Thursday: Miami at San Antonio, late
Sunday: Miami at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
Tuesday: San Antonio at Miami, 9 p.m.
June 12: San Antonio at Miami,9 p.m.
x-June 15: Miami at San Antonio,8 p.m.
x-June 17: San Antonio at Miami, 9 p.m.
x-June 20: Miami at San Antonio, 9 p.m.

WNBA
Wednesday's results
No games scheduled
Thursday's results
Washington 74, Connecticut 66
San Antonio 87, NewYork 75


2014 Baseball Draft Selections Today'sgames
Thursday Indiana atWashington, 7 p.m.
FIRST ROUND Phoenix atTulsa, 8 p.m.
1. Houston, Brady Aiken, Ihp, Cathedral LosAngelesatChicago,8:30p.m.
Catholic HS, San Diego. Minnesota at Seattle, 10 p.m.
2. Miami,Tyler Kolek, rhp, Shepherd (Texas) Saturday's games
HS. Chicago at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
3. Chicago White Sox, Carlos Rodon, Ihp, Indiana at Connecticut,7 p.m.
N.C. State. Phoenix at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
4. Chicago Cubs, Kyle Schwarber, c, Indiana.
5. Minnesota, Nick Gordon, ss, Olympia HS,IPro
Orlando, Fla. ro hockey
6. Seattle, Alex Jackson, of, Rancho Bernar-
do HS, San Diego. NHL PLAYOFFS
7. Philadelphia, Aaron Nola, rhp, LSU. (Best-of-7;x-if necessary)
8. Colorado, Kyle Freeland, Ihp, Evansville. STANLEY CUP FINALS
9.Toronto, Jeff Hoffman, rhp, East Carolina. Los Angeles 1, Y Rangers 0
10. N.Y. Mets, Michael Conforto, of, Oregon Wednesday: LA 3, NY Rangers 2,OT
State Saturday: NY Rangers at Los Angeles, 7 p.m.
11.Toronto (Phillip Bickford-unsigned), Max Monday: Los Angeles at NY Rangers,8 p.m.
Pentecost, c, Kennesaw State. Wednesday: Los Angelesat NYRangers,8 p.m.
12.Milwaukee, KodiMedeiros, lhp, Waiakea x-June 13: NY Rangers at Los Angeles,8 p.m.
HS, Hilo, Hawaii. x-June 16: LosAngelesat NY Rangers,8 p.m.
13.SanDiegoTreaTurner, ss, N.CState. x-June 18: NYRangers at LosAngeles,8 p.m.
14. San Francisco, Tyler Beede, rhp,
Vanderbilt. ECHL PLAYOFFS
15. L.A. Angels, Sean Newcomb, Ihp, (Best-of-7;x-if necessary)
Hartford. KELLY CUP FINALS
16. Arizona, Touki Toussaint, rhp, Coral Alaska 2, Cincinnati 1
Springs (Fla.) Christian Academy. May 30: Alaska 5, Cincinnati 3
17. Kansas City, Brandon Finnegan, Ihp, May31:Cincinnati2,Alaska1
TCU. Monday: Alaska 2, Cincinnati 0
18.Washington, Erick Fedde, rhp, UNLV Today: Alaska at Cincinnati, 7:35 p.m.
19. Cincinnati, Nick Howard, rhp,Virginia. Saturday: Alaska at Cincinnati, 7:35 p.m.
20. Tampa Bay, Casey Gillaspie, 1lb, Wichita x-Monday: Alaska at Cincinnati, 7:35 p.m.
State. x-Wednesday: Cincinnati at Alaska,
21. Cleveland, Bradley Zimmer, of, San 11:15p.m.
Francisco.
22. L.A. Dodgers, Grant Holmes, rhp, Con- AHL PLAYOFFS
way (S.C.) HS. (Best-of-7;x-if necessary)
23. Detroit, Derek Hill, of, Elk Grove (Calif.) CALDER CUP FINALS
HS. Texas vs. St. John's
24. Pittsburgh, Cole Tucker, ss, Mountain Sunday: St.John's atTexas,9:30p.m.
Pointe HS, Phoenix. Monday: St. John's atTexas, 8:30 p.m.
25. Oakland, Matt Chapman, 3b, Cal Wednesday: Texasat St.John's,6p.m.
State-Fullerton. June16:Texas atSt. John's, 6 p.m.


26 Boston, Michael Chavis, ss, Sprayberry x-June 17:Texas at St. John's,6 p.m.
HS, Marietta, Ga. x-June 19: St. John's atTexas, 8:30 p.m.
27. St. Louis, LukeWeaver, rhp, Florida St. x-June 23: St. John's atTexas, 8:30 p.m.
28. Kansas City (Santana-Atlanta), Foster
Griffin, lhpThe First Academy, Orlando, Fla.
29. Cincinnati (Choo-Texas), Alex Blandino, Soccer
ss, Stanford.
30. Texas (Cruz-Baltimore), Luis Ortiz, rhp, Wednesday's results
Sanger (Calif.) HS.
Coubs1, Real Salt Lake 1, tie
31. Cleveland (Jimenez-Baltimore),Justus Colo o 0, Ciag 0, tie
Sheffield, lhpTullahoma (Tenn.) HS. Colorado 0, Chicago 0, tie
32. Atlanta (McCann-NY Yankees), Braxton Today's game
Davidson, of, T.C. Roberson HS, Asheville, Sporting KansasCityat Houston,830 p
N.C Saturday's games
33. Boston (Ellsbury-NY Yankees), Michael San Jose atToronto FC,4 pm
:Columbus at D.C. United, 6:30 p.m.
Kopech, rhp, Mount Pleasant (Texas) HS. coub atC nide ,7pm
34 Vancouver at Philadelphia, 7 pm.
34. St. Louis (Beltran-NY Yankees), Jack e h
Flaherty, rhp, Harvard-Westlake HS, Studio SeattleFCatChicago,8:30 p.m.
City, Calif. Colorado at FC Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Portland at Real Salt Lake, 10 p.m.


Sunday's games
College baseball NewYorkat New England,5 p m
Chivas USA at Los Angeles, 8 p.m.
NCAA DIVISION I SUPER REGIONALS
(Best-of-3;x-if necessary) NWSL
AT LOUISVILLE, KY. Wednesday's results
Today: Kennesaw State (40-22) at Louisville Washington 1, Chicago 0
(48-15), 6:30 p.m. FC Kansas City 1,Western New York0
Saturday: Kennesaw State vs. Louisville, Saturday's games
7 p.m. Boston at FC Kansas City, 8 p.m.
x-Sunday: Kennesaw State vs. Louisville, ChicagoatSeattleFC,l0pm
6 p.m. Western New York at Portland, 10 p.m.


PF PA
714 519
336 495
487 642

PF PA
608 456
585 528
455 568


PF PA
628 646
566 603
525 531
451 576

PF PA
497 422
601 488
646 600
535 560


BASEBALL
American League
NEW YORK YANKEES Reinstated OF
Carlos Beltran from the 15-day DL Desig-
nated INF Scott Sizemore for assignment.
TEXAS RANGERS Activated RHP
Tanner Scheppers from the 15-day DL Op-
tioned LHP Aaron Poreda to Round Rock
(PCL).Transferred OF Jim Adduci from Fris-
co (TL) to Round Rock (PCL).
National League
COLORADO ROCKIES Placed RHP
Jordan Lyles on the 15-day DL Recalled
RHP Chris Martin from Colorado Springs
(PCL).
NEW YORK METS Recalled OF An-
drew Brown from LasVegas (PCL).
American Association
AMARILLO SOX Signed INF Omar
Luna.
Frontier League
TRAVERSE CITY BEACH BUMS -
Signed LHP Alex Phillips.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
ARIZONA CARDINALS Signed S De-
one Bucannon.
CHICAGO BEARS Signed QB Jimmy
Clausen to a one-year contract. Waived LB
Lawrence Wilson.
CINCINNATI BENGALS Claimed WR
Jasper Collins offwaivers from Pittsburgh.
CLEVELAND BROWNS -Agreed to
termswith LB Chris Kirksey.
DETROIT LIONS Signed LB Kyle Van
Noy to a four-year contract.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS Claimed
WR Kevin Smith off waivers from Arizona.
Waived LSTrevor Gillette.
OAKLAND RAIDERS Signed G Gabe
Jackson, WR David Gilreath, K/P Michael
Palardyand WR Rahsaan Vaughn.
PITTSBURGH STEELERS- Signed Ryan
Shazier to a four-year contract.
Canadian Football League
EDMONTON ESKIMOS Released WR
Joe Adams.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
MINNESOTAWILD Signed F Michael
Keranen to a one-year contract.
NEW YORK ISLANDERS Acquired D
Dan Boyle from San Jose for a conditional
2015fifth-round draft pick.
Southern Professional Hockey League
PEORIA RIVERMEN Traded F Kyle
Watson to Huntsville for C Josh Harris.
Signed D Jeff Burke has been signed to a
tryout.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
MLS Fined Kansas City D Igor Juliao
an undisclosed amount for striking D.C.
United's Davy Arnaud in the head or face in
a May31 game. Fined Montreal D Hassoun
Camara and Vancouver MF Sebastian Fer-
nandez undisclosed amounts for attempt-
ing to draw fouls.
COLLEGE
ARIZONA STATE Named David Co-
hen senior associate athletics director.
AUBURN Named Chad Prewett spe-
cial assistant to the men's basketball coach
and Jordan VerHulst video coordinator for
men's basketball.
CHARLESTON SOUTHERN Named
Mark Kost women's assistant basketball
coach.
CHATTANOOGA Signed women's
basketball coach Jim Foster to a one-year
contract extension through the 2018-19
season.
RICHARD STOCKTON Announced
the retirements of baseball coach Marty
Kavanagh and women's tennis coach Phil
Birnbaum, effectiveJune 30.
UAB Named Erica Sisson assistant
softball coach.


estate is putting on the block at
Sotheby's semi-annual Impressionist
and Modern Art sale in London on
June 23.
Wilson's collection will lead the
auction, and highlighted by Monet's
"[a Seine a Argenteuil"which
Sotheby's values at $12 million to $17
million. Wilson purchased the painting
from the San Francisco Museum of
Modern Art in 1997.

Elway's son pleads not
guilty to assault charges:
Jack Elway, the son of Denver Broncos
general manager John Elway, pleaded
not guilty to charges that he assaulted
his girlfriend and pulled her from a car
by her hair.
Court records show 24-year-old
entered the plea on Wednesday.
He was charged with assault and
disturbing the peace after the
Saturday incident near a college


campus in downtown Denver.
Police reports show Elway's
girlfriend told officers he shoved her
to the ground when she tried to get
back into the car, causing scrapes.
Police said Elway then fled the scene.
He is free after posting $550 bond.

Around the league: The
Oakland Raiders have their entire draft
class under contract after signing a
deal with third-round pick guard Gabe
Jackson. Jackson became the eighth
draftee to sign when he finalized
his deal. ... The Chiefs signed wide
receiver Deon Anthony and cornerback
Justin Rogers while waiving defensive
lineman Risean Broussard ... The
Chicago Bears agreed to a one-year
contract with former Notre Dame and
Carolina Panthers quarterback Jimmy
Clausen. ... The Arizona Cardinals
signed first-round pick Deone
Bucannon to a four-year deal.


I QUICK HITS


Flip Saunders, who used to coach the Minnesota Timberwolves,
is introduced as the team's new president for basketball opera-
tions. He will return to his old post next season.


SAUNDERS SET TO

RETURN TO'WOLVES

SIDELINE

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) -
Two people with knowl-
edge of the decision told
The Associated Press that
Flip Saunders is moving
out of the front office
to coach the Minnesota
Timberwolves.
Saunders was hired
last season as president
of basketball operations.
After the team's search to
replace the retired Rick
Adelman was snagged by
Kevin Love's uncertain
future in Minnesota, it
was determined that
Saunders should step in
to coach the team. The
people requested ano-
nymity Thursday because
the team has not officially
announced the move.
Saunders coached
the team from 1995-
2005. He has taken the
Timberwolves to the only
eight playoff appearances
in franchise history,
including the Western
Conference finals in 2004.
Saunders will continue
to work with GM Milt
Newton in the front office
while handling coaching
duties....
Thunder general manager Sam
Presti said he's pleased with the
direction the franchise is heading in
despite the loss to San Antonio in the
Western Conference finals, and that
he feels the Thunder are positioned
to succeed. Kevin Durant, the league
MVP, is signed through 2015-16 and
three-time All-Star Russell Westbrook
and defensive ace Serge Ibaka are
signed through 2016-17.
Presti also spoke highly of coach
Scott Brooks, who has come under
some scrutiny locally for not getting
back to the NBA Finals, and for
his offense, which critics say gives
Westbrook too much freedom. ....
The mayors of Miami-Dade
County, Carlos A. Gimenez, and San
Antonio, Julian Castro, have made a
friendly wager on the outcome of the
upcoming rematch of the NBA finals.
Mayor Castro promised to send
out to South Florida some of San
Antonio's finest food from Chef
Johnny Hernandez if the reigning
champion Heat win another title. If
they lose, Gimenez will have to pay up
with some of Miami Beach's famous
restaurant Joe's Stone Crab.


SOCCER

Mayor of Brazilian city
reminisces on World Cup
errors: Rio de Janeiro Mayor
Eduardo Paes said it was a bad idea


for Brazil to spread the World Cup over
12 cities. The World Cup starts in a
week, but several of the 12 stadiums
are still being finished, and work
outside many continues with roads
and sidewalks being put down, and
sponsor and media areas still under
construction.
Brazil is spending about $11.5
billion on the World Cup with about
$4 billion going to build or renovate
12 stadiums....
FIFA said it's "not afraid"things will
go wrong at the start of the World Cup
despite preparation problems in Brazil
The sport's governing body said it's "in
control"of what needs to be done to
get the tournament off to a good start
in a week....
Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain is set
to go with England to the World
Cup even if he doesn't recover from
a knee injury in time for the group
stage, coach Roy Hodgson said.
The midfielder sustained ligament
damage in his right knee in England's
warmup against Ecuador on
Wednesday....


COLLEGE SPORTS

Kentucky rewards
Calipari with extension:
Kentucky has given coach John
Calipari a seven-year, $52.5 million
contract extension that will pay a base
package of $6.5 million next season
and $8 million over each of the final
three seasons. Already one of college
basketball's highest-paid coaches,
Calipari led the Wildcats to the 2012
NCAA championship and is coming
off his third Final Four appearance, a
60-54 title-game loss to Connecticut
in April. He has often been rumored
as a potential coaching candidate for
NBA coaching openings, most recently
this spring with the Los Angeles
Lakers. ...
Oregon State teammates Michael
Conforto and Ben Wetzler are among
five finalists for the Dick Howser
Trophy, given to college baseball's
top player. Other finalists are pitcher
Aaron Nola of LSU, catcher Max
Pentecost of Kennesaw State and
pitcher-first baseman A.J. Reed of
Kentucky. The award is presented
by Easton Foundations and the
National Collegiate Baseball Writers
Association.


TRACK & FIELD

Gatlin wins another
100-meter title: In Rome, Justin
Gatlin won the 100 meters at the
Golden Gala for a second straight year,
while Mutaz Essa Barshim of Qatar set
a meet record in topping a high-class
high jump.
Gatlin, who set a year-leading time
of 9.87 seconds last month, was in
front from the start and finished in
9.91, 0.11 ahead of Jamaica's Nesta
Carter. It was a repeat of last year's
success for Gatlin, who edged Usain
Bolt on the line.


p.m.






Page 6 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Friday, June 6,2014


* SOCCER:


Guzan used to


backup role


Goalkeeper

still waiting

for his chance

to start
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

JACKSONVILLE -Brad
Guzan has been in this
position a few times.
Sitting behind U.S.
goalkeeper Tim Howard
and waiting patiently
for a chance to play is
nothing new for the
29-year-old Illinois native.
But that doesn't mean
Guzan is content with his
second-string spot on the
U.S. national team.
"It's not ideal, ob-
viously, when you're
not playing," Guzan
said Thursday as the
Americans continued
preparations for their
World Cup send-off series
finale against Nigeria.
"Everyone wants to play.
It's probably a little bit
more of a difficult situa-
tion for a goalkeeper just
because we know only
one of us can play.
Guzan has spent more
than his fair share in
someone's shadow.
He was a backup for
most of four seasons
(2008-12) for Aston Villa
in the English Premier
League, a sometimes
frustrating experience
that often tested his per-
severance. Still, he stayed
positive while learning
behind fellow American
Brad Friedel.
He made one appear-
ance in his first three
years with Villa. He ex-
perienced some success
by leading Villa to the
League Cup final against
Manchester United in
2010 only to be replaced


BELMONT
FROM PAGE 1
In 2002, War Emblem
nearly fell to his knees
when the starting gate
sprang open, and jockey
Victor Espinoza knew right
then the colt was doomed.
He straggled home in
eighth place, beaten 19 1-2
lengths by a 70-1 shot.
Espinoza gets another
shot on Saturday aboard
California Chrome, who,
if he wins, will have faced
down the largest field of
any Triple Crown winner.
"It doesn't matter if
there are 14 or six horses.
He needs to break clean,"
said Bob Baffert, the only
trainer to lose the Belmont
three times with horses
that won the first two legs,
includingWar Emblem.
California Chrome
had been slow out of the
starting gate in some of
earlier his races because
of his habit of shifting
from one foot to the
other. Espinoza will try
to keep his head pointed
straight and get him to
show some early speed
leaving the gate.
"With a clean break,
he's way better than all
the other horses," said
Baffert, who will be


by Friedel in the final.
Guzan was loaned to
Hull City the following
year and played in the
second-tier League
Championship for three
months before returning
to Hull's bench for the
final month of the season.
When Friedel left for
Tottenham after the 2011
season, Guzan figured he
would get a promotion.
It didn't happen. Villa
signed veteran keeper
Shay Given.
Guzan remained a
backup. He filled in
capably when Given
was sidelined a month
by an injury, but once
Given was healthy,
Guzan returned to the
bench. Frustrated, Guzan
considered leaving Villa.
He ultimately decided to
stay, re-signing with the
club and finally got the
starting job.
It may have the best
decision of his career.
Guzan has since blos-
somed into one of the
best netminders in the
Premier League, starting
nearly every game the last
two seasons.
And he probably could
start for a number of
other World Cup teams.
But for the Americans,
who consistently produce
some of world's top keep-
ers, he's behind Howard
again.
"It goes both ways,"
Guzan said. "He makes
me a better goalkeeper
and I like to think I make
him better as well. Our
training environment, the
atmosphere we've created
among our goalkeeping
group, it's been really
good. We're very compet-
itive. We all want to play.
At the end of the day, we
all support each other."

watching from Southern
California on Saturday.
Luck good or bad
- plays a big part in
winning the triple Crown.
Bad luck could befall
California Chrome in the
form of stumbling out of
the gate, getting squeezed
or bumped by his rivals
or being ganged up on by
other horses.
Sometimes jockey error
proves costly, too. Riders
aren't used to 112-mile
races in the U.S., where
the focus is on sprinting.
Some have mistakenly
moved too soon and
burned out their horses
before the 1,097-yard
stretch run. Others have
moved too late and let the
leaders get away.
"Some horses abso-
lutely do not want to go a
mile and a half and some
horses thrive on it," said
Billy Gowan, who will
saddle 12-1 shot Ride On
Curlin, who was second
in the Preakness.
California Chrome
figures to control the
race when he moves
his rivals will follow and
when he hangs back, so
will the rest of the field.
"A little bit of luck, a
good trip and a fast horse
is what it's going to take
to beat him," Gowan said.


we
FOOTBALL AND CHEER
SPEED CAMP JUNE 14 JULY 16
Non Contact Drills, Conditioningll
Registration: 8:00AM 'ff.' ,hin.ayrSadd
For Further information contact
President Shea Davis: 941-661-9368
NEW Website: portcharlottebandits.com
POP WARNER UNLIMITED WEIGHT DIVISION:
Ages 12.14
Franz Ross Park "Bandit Field"
FALL REGISTRATION: JUNE 14 10-2


* TENNIS:,



Sharapova one win from title


By HOWARD FENDRICH
ASSOCIATED PRESS
PARIS Maria
Sharapova offered a tidy
aphorism to sum up the
formula that's carried her
to a third consecutive
French Open final.
"It's not how you finish
a first set," Sharapova
said, "it's how you finish
the last set."
Right now, no one is
a better closer than she
is on clay. Nearing a
second championship
at Roland Garros, and
fifth Grand Slam trophy
overall, Sharapova gritted
her way to yet another
comeback victory, beating
18th-seeded Eugenie
Bouchard of Canada 4-6,
7-5, 6-2 in the semifinals
Thursday.
"If some things are
not working out, I don't
just want to quit in the
middle. Because when
you lose the first set or a
few games or you're down
a break, that's not the end
of the match," Sharapova
said. "That's the type of
philosophy that I play
with."
She famously described
herself years ago as
feeling like a "cow on ice"
on clay, but Sharapova
now has won her past
19 matches that went to
three sets on the de-
manding surface.
In Saturday's final, the
No. 7-seeded Sharapova
will face No. 4 Simona
Halep, a 22-year-old
Romanian who never


AP PHOTO


Russia's Maria Sharapova returns the ball to Canada's Eugenie
Bouchard in her semifinal victory on Thursday. She will face
Simona Halep in the finals on Saturday.


before had been past the
quarterfinals at a major.
Halep turned in a much
more straightforward
victory than Sharapova,
eliminating No. 28 Andrea
Petkovic of Germany 6-2,
7-6 (4).
"I have a lot of confi-
dence in myself now,"
said Halep, who a year
ago was ranked only
57th and lost in the first
round in Paris for the
third time since 2010. "I
played really well here;
a few good matches. But
next round will be very
tough. I know Maria. She's
a great champion."
She is 0-3 against
Sharapova. But Halep has
claimed seven titles since
the start of last season -
"Impressive 12 months,"
she called it and used
her smooth movement
and smart angles to win
all 12 sets she's played
these two weeks.


AT A GLANCE
WHAT: Year's second Grand Slam
WHERE: Roland Garros, Paris
WHEN: Continues today at 7
a.m.
TODAY'S MATCHUPS: No.
2 Novak Djokovic vs. No. 10
Ernests Gulbis, No. 1 Rafael
Nadal vs. No. 7 Andy Murray.
TV: Tennis Channel (7 a.m.), NBC
(11 a.m.)
FORECAST: Sunny. High of 81
degrees.
QUOTE OF THE DAY: "1 played
a super-stupid forehand slice.
I should have just killed it."-
Petkovic, about a point she lost
in the second set.
STAT OF THE DAY: 19-
Consecutive third sets won by
Maria Sharapova on clay.
ONLINE: www.rolandgarros.
com

Sharapova took a more
difficult route to her ninth
Grand Slam final.
In the fourth round


against 2011 U.S. Open
champion Samantha
Stosur, Sharapova trailed
6-3, 4-3, then won the last
nine games.
In the quarterfinals
against 20-year-old
Garbine Muguruza, the
woman who stunned
SerenaWilliams last week,
Sharapova trailed 6-1, 5-4,
then won nine of the last
10 games.
That pattern continued
against another 20-year-
old, Bouchard. After
dropping the first set,
then standing two games
from defeat at 5-all in the
second, Sharapova won
eight of the last 10 games.
She did it by playing ag-
gressively in crunch time,
risking more but also
coming through more.
After Bouchard's ability to
take the ball early helped
her build a 13-8 edge in
winners in the first set,
Sharapova had a 25-16
edge in that category over
the last two, celebrating
most by shaking her left
fist and crying, "Come
on!"
"She kind of elevated
her game a little bit,"
said Bouchard, who had
been 9-0 in Grand Slam
matches when winning
the opening set.
This was only
Bouchard's fifth major
tournament, her second
in a row reaching the
semifinals.
Less than two years
ago, Bouchard was at the
junior level, winning the
Wimbledon girls' title.


E GOLF ROUNDUP


Mickelson opens St. Jude with 67


Michelle Wie
tied with

defending

champ
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MEMPHIS, Tenn. -
Phil Mickelson talked
about finishing off
rounds coming into the
St. Jude Classic, and he
did just that Thursday
with a 3-under 67 at TPC
Southwind.
Mickelson birdied
three of his final four
holes for his first round
in the 60s since the third
round at the Wells Fargo
Championship. He hadn't
shot below 70 since then,
missing the cut at The
Players Championship
and tying for 49th at
Memorial last week
following a visit from
FBI agents and lingering
questions about an insid-
er-trading investigation.


Phil Mickelson tees off at the St. Jude Classic in Memphis, Tenn.,
where he shot a 3-under 67 in the opening round Thursday.


He hasn't won in 19
events dating to the
British Open and is
among the players in
Tennessee tuning up for
the U.S. Open next week
at Pinehurst.
"I did exactly what I
need to do and some
momentum that I need
heading into the U.S.
Open," Mickelson said.


"Tomorrow's round,
the same thing. Finish
strong and play a good
round."
Ben Crane was the
clubhouse leader after
shooting a 7-under 63,
taking advantage of the
3 1/2-hour delay that left
nearly perfect scoring
conditions with no wind
and rain-softened greens.


Wie and Park tied for
LPGA lead: In Waterloo, Ontario,
Michelle Wie and defending champion
Hee Young Park shared the first-round
lead at 6-under 65 in the Manulife
Financial Classic at windswept Grey
Silo.
Wie, the winner in Hawaii in April,
birdied three of the last four holes
in her morning round. She's seeking
her second victory in Canada after
winning the 2010 Canadian Women's
Open in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Park had
a bogey-free round in the afternoon.
Last year, the South Korean player
beat Angela Stanford on the third
playoff hole after they finished at
26-under 258 to match the tour record
for lowest total score.

Jimenez overcomes
the elements at Lyoness
Open: In Atzenbrugg, Austria,
Miguel Angel Jimenez overcame three
bogeys on the first eight holes to card
a 2-under 70 and sit one stroke off the
clubhouse lead on a windy and cloudy
opening day of the Lyoness Open.
The 50-year-old Spaniard is
seeking his third win of the season.
He bogeyed three times early on, but
recovered with four birdies.


I GOLF SCOREBOARD


PGA Tour
ST. JUDE CLASSIC
At TPC Southwind
Memphis, Tenn.
Purse: $5.Billion
Yardage: 7,239; Par: 70(35-35)
(a-amateur)
Partial First Round
60 players did not finish the round due
toweather.
Ben Crane 30-33-63
Peter Malnati 33-32-65
Retief Goosen 35-31 -66
Joe Durant 31-35-66
Freddie Jacobson 32-35-67
Phil Mickelson 32-35-67
Brooks Koepka 34-33-67
Troy Merritt 33-34-67
Hudson Swafford 34-33-67
Gonzalo Fdez-Castano 33-34-67
Luke Guthrie 33-34-67
Padraig Harrington 32-36-68
David Hearn 33-35-68
Scott Stallings 34-34-68
Dustin Johnson 33-35-68
Woody Austin 35-33-68
Ted Potter, Jr. 33 -35 -68
CamiloVillegas 33 -35 -68
Miguel Angel Carballo 35-33-68
Andres Romero 34-34-68
Ricky Barnes 34-34-68
CharlieWi 34-34-68
Steve Marino 32-37-69
Heath Slocum 32-37-69
Brian Harman 34-35-69
James Hahn 36-33-69
TommyGainey 35-34-69
Sean O'Hair 32-37-69
Andrew Svoboda 36-33-69
Joe Ogilvie 33-36-69
Shawn Stefani 37-33-70
Paul Casey 33-37-70
Ben Curtis 36-34-70


Stewart Cink
MichaelThompson
Rickie Fowler
Martin Laird
Lee Westwood
Geoff Ogilvy
Greg Owen
John Rollins
Robert Streb
Tag Ridings
Michael Putnam
Charles Howell III
Kevin Stadler
Webb Simpson
David Toms
NicholasThompson
Jim Herman
Jerry Kelly
Stephen Ames
Chad Collins
Troy Matteson
Morgan Hoffmann
Kevin Streelman
Patrick Reed
Harrison Frazar
Jonathan Byrd
Brian Gay
Robert Allenby
Matt Bettencourt
Josh Teater
Alex Prugh
Tyrone Van Aswegen
Brad Fritsch
Danny Lee
Scott Langley
John Daly
Russell Knox


LPGA Tour
MANULIFE FINANCIAL CLASSIC
At Grey Silo Golf Course
Waterloo, Ontario
Purse: $1.5 million


Yardage: 6,330; Par: 71 (36-35)
(a-amateur)
First Round
HeeYoung Park 32-33-
MichelleWie 34-31-
Shanshan Feng 33-33-
Cristie Kerr 34-33-
Xi Yu Lin 34-33-
Paz Echeverria 36-32-
Belen Mozo 35-33-
Sarah Kemp 36-32-
Na Yeon Choi 34-34-
Haru Nomura 34-34-
Moira Dunn 34-34-
JeeYoung Lee 34-34-
Kristy McPherson 35-33-
So Yeon Ryu 34-34-
Marina Alex 35-33-
Alejandra Llaneza 32-36-
Jacqui Concolino 32-36-
Ayako Uehara 35-34-
I.K. Kim 36-33-
I lhee Lee 36-33-
Mirim Lee 35-34-
LineVedel 37-32-
Stacy Lewis 35-34-
Austin Ernst 35-34-
Vicky Hurst 36-33-
KrisTamulis 36-33-
Jennifer Rosales 37-32-
European Tour
LYONESS OPEN
At Diamond CountryClub
Atzenbrugg, Austria
Purse: $1.36 million
Yardage: 7,433; Par: 72
First Round
Adam Gee, England 33-34-
Mikael Lundberg, Sweden 34-33-
Rhys Davies, Wales 33-35-
Richard Finch, England 33-35-
Matthew Baldwin, England 34-34-
Berry Henson, United States 33-35-


Scott Henry, Scotland 35-34-
Fabrizio Zanotti, Paraguay 32-37-
Victor Riu, France 35-34-
-65 Richard Bland, England 35-34-
-65 Ross McGowan, England 34-35-
-66 Thomas Levet, France 34-35-
-67 Phillip Archer, England 34-35-
-67 Tjaart Van derWalt, South Africa35-35-
-68 Miguel AngelIJimenez, Spain 33-37-
-68 Florian Praegant, Austria 33-37-
-68 Daniel Im, United States 34-36-
-68 Simon Wakefield, England 36-34-
-68 Sihwan Kim, South Korea 33-37-
68 Matthew Nixon, England 34-36-
-68 Robert Dinwiddie, England 33-37-
-68 Gaganjeet Bhullar, India 35-35-
-68 Lee Slattery, England 36-34-
68 AnthonyWall, England 35-35-
68 Stephen Dodd,Wales 35-35-
-69
-69
-69 Web.com Tour
-69
-69 CLEVELAND OPEN
-69 At Lakewood Country Club
-69 Westlake, Ohio
-69 Purse: $600,000
-69 Yardage: 7,104; Par 71 (36-35)
-69 First Round
Max Homa 32-32-
Si Woo Kim 33-33-
Jeff Curl 34-32-
Franklin Corpening 32-35-
Tom Gillis 36-31-
Colt Knost 35-33-
Whee Kim 36-32-
Sung Kang 35-33-
-67 Vaughn Taylor 33-35-
-67 Ryan Sullivan 37-31-
-68 Andy Pope 33-35-
-68 Henrik Norlander 33-35-
-68 Shaun Micheel 36-32-
-68 Colin Biles 36-32-


Page 6 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Friday, June 6, 2014








PORT CHARLOT E


Friday, June 6,2014 A weekly section of the Sun


Nicole Noles
EDITOR'S CORNER
nnoles@sun-herald.com





Generous community

funds scholarships
appy Friday! This week in the
Port Charlotte Herald, we
have a feature story about the
American Association of University
Women. Our local chapter recently
gave scholarships to three returning
students. They are always looking for
new members, too, so check out the
story and photos on page 8 today.
Also on our calendar page, we have
a photo of Port Charlotte High School
graduates who were awarded scholar-
ships from the Kiwanis. We are blessed
to have so many organizations in town
that care about giving a helping hand
to students of all ages.
These awards can make the
difference between a student staying
in school and having to drop out for
financial reasons. Many thanks go to
all our generous clubs in the area.
If your organization helped with
scholarships this year, please email me
at nnoles88@gmail.com and tell me all
about it. See guidelines are page 6.


Slimed at Neil Armstrong


Annual Book Bash rewards students with messy fun


HERALD PHOTO BY STEVE KNAPP


These are some of the top readers from kindergarten through second grade at Neil Armstrong
Elementary School in Port Charlotte. Students and staff recently celebrated their annual Book
Bash with plenty of slime and pies in the face on May 22. See more pictures, page 11.


BUSINESS NEWS


Sun signs: Your dermatology horoscope need not be gloomy


By CRAIG GARRETT
HERALD CORRESPONDENT

You need not be into astrology
to heed a newspaper horoscope.
In part, the daily message about
summer sun warned, "Pick a
nice spot, lay a blanket down,
and become engrossed in a good
mystery but don't ignore the
sun or you could get burned. Be
careful of missing the signs of
potential trouble this week, and
all will be well."
Laura DeStefano could
not have given better advice,
especially in Florida, where the
sun's rays are strong. DeStefano
is a doctor with Water's Edge
Dermatology, one of the nation's
larger skin-care practices with
21 offices and 28 providers in


Florida. There are Water's Edge
offices in Port Charlotte, Arcadia
and Sebring.
While it may warm our
spirits, the sun can be a serious
adversary, DeStefano said. Skin
disease and related illnesses
are mostly sun-related, which
can be easily checked with
proper clothing, a penetrating
sunscreen, and regular check-
ups with your doctor. Most of
us fail to heed the warnings,
however. According to the web-
site www.cancer.org, 9,700 or so
Americans with advanced skin
disease will not last the year.
Others of us will notice blemish-
ing and other cosmetic changes
on our legs, arms and faces,

SUN SIGNS 14


From left, Dr. Laura DeStefano, Priscilla Arellano, Amy
Lasanska and Marissa Mills from Water's Edge Dermatology.
There are Water's Edge offices in 21 locations around Florida,
including Port Charlotte.


By STEVE KNAPP
HERALD CORRESPONDENT

In what was advertised as
"The Greatest School On Earth,"
Neil Armstrong Elementary School
celebrated their annual Book Bash on
May 22. In attendance was the Stron-
gest Man on Earth, the Tall Lady and
Lion Tamer (of beanie baby lions),
clowns, live music and popcorn along
with slime and plenty of it.
The Book Bash encourages kids to
read more books with a higher skill
level to increase their ability to read.
The person with the most points in
each class gets to pull the rope that
spills out a mixture of slime on the
head of Principal Angie Taillon.
These buckets of slime contain a mix-
ture of many things. Each class mixed
up a concoction that included spaghetti,
oatmeal, corn, peas, food coloring and
just about any other thing a student's
imagination could come up with. The
Kindergarten class made up a bucket of
confetti which Taillon declared, "That
was the best bucket I've ever had!"
She wasn't so lucky with the other
grades.



Robert Nelson
BIZ BITS
pcbizbits@yahoo.com





ReJuvination Day

Spa expanding
R ejuvination Mind Body & Spirit
Day Spa has expanded at their
current location. Owner Julie
Antochi is now offering a number of
new classes called the Wellness Series.
Want to learn to improve your memo-
ry, journaling, meditation or the law of
attraction? These are just a few of the
classes being offered at ReJuvination
Mind Body and Spirit Day Spa, 3036
Tamiami Trail Suite C, Port Charlotte.

BIZ BITS 14


RESTAURANT
Good Friends, Good Food, Good Times
Reservations recommended.




Hors 'd oeres
Live Music ."-
by
Tim Goodman &
Roseanne Linders
1975 Tamiami Trail, Punta Gorda _s-7-'
941-575-7575
www.phils4l.comI
Mon-Thurs & Sun 11-9 Fri & Sat 11-1(





Herald Page 2


WHAR S

INSIDE


MAY CROWNI N6


ST. CHARLES,


SEE PAGE 12


FOR LOVE OF KIDS


ANNUAL PICNIC,

SEE PAGE 9


VOLLEYBALL


TOURNEY AT PCHS,

SEE PAGE 15


Golfers needed for Octagon golf scramble
A Summer Safari Golf Scramble in Leslee Peth
benefit of the Octagon Wildlife
anctuary is taking place at St.
Andrews South Golf Club, 1901 Deborah
Drive, Punta Gorda. Registration and a
continental breakfast start at 7:30 a.m., LesleePeth is the publisher ofthe
with a shotgun start scheduled for Punta Gorda Herald. Contact her at
8:30 a.m. on Saturday, June 14.IP un Herald. c.
The $75 registration cost includes the
green fees, a cart, breakfast, lunch and
prizes for closest to the pin, the longest
drive, hole-in-one and other contests.
All proceeds will benefit Octagon, a
facility in southern Punta Gorda that
seeks to care for and give a lifelong PHOTOS PROVIDED
home to abandoned, abused or neglect-
ed wild and exotic animals. The refuge This lion named Zulu seems content now, but
is located at 41660 Horseshoe Road in the marks on his face were formed because a
Punta Gorda. previous owner kept him in a small dog crate
Call Sue Garand at 941-639-5261, hoping it would keep him from growing. He is
ext. 3, to sign up for the golf event or to Rainbow and Harley say hello to visitors at one of a dozen big cats that are now wards of
receive more information. Octagon Wildlife Sanctuary. Octagon Wildlife Sanctuary.


I COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Email your calendar items to
nnoles88@gmail.com. Please follow the
format you see in the listings: Event,
time, place, address, description, cost
and contact information.

0 JUNE EVENTS
Mark Preuss will exhibit his artwork
at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship,
1532 Forrest Nelson, Port Charlotte,
through June 15. Preuss, born in
Germany, studied architectural design
and worked for many years creating
art for videos, films, and off-Broadway
theater in New York City. In the 1990s,
Preuss began showing his paintings of
abstract nudes, winning awards in New
York, Germany and Southwest Florida.
He currently has a studio at the Punta
Gorda Artisans Atelier on W. Olympia
Avenue where his large, brushy, colorful
work is created and displayed. For more
information, call 941-627-4303.

0 FRIDAY, JUNE 6
Bingo, 11:45 a.m. to 3 p.m.,
Centennial Hall, Cultural Center of
Charlotte County, 2280 Aaron St., Port
Charlotte.

0 SATURDAY, JUNE 7
Bingo, 11:45 a.m. to 3 p.m.,
Centennial Hall, Cultural Center of
Charlotte County, 2280 Aaron St., Port
Charlotte.
Pinochle, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Cultural
Center of Charlotte County, 2280 Aaron
St., Port Charlotte.

0 MONDAY, JUNE 9
Organ and piano group, 9 a.m. to
11 a.m., Cultural Center of Charlotte
County, 2280 Aaron St., Port Charlotte.
Fun with music, I p.m. to 3 p.m.,
Cultural Center of Charlotte County,
2280 Aaron St., Port Charlotte.
Pinochle, 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.,
Cultural Center of Charlotte County,
2280 Aaron St., Port Charlotte.

0 TUESDAY,JUNE 10
Free Braille class, 11:30 a.m. to I p.m.,
Visually Impaired Persons of Charlotte
County, 3459 Depew Avenue, Port
Charlotte. Course instructor Wendy
Sue Olson, a Certified Orientation and
Mobility Specialist and teacher of the
blind and visually impaired. Olson holds
a Masters Degree in Special Education
with emphasis on rehabilitation teaching
for the blind and visually impaired. Free.
RSVP by calling 941-625-8501, or visit the


Eleven seniors from Port Charlotte High School show off the plaques they were awarded
during the Kiwanis Foundation 31st annual scholarship night May 5 at Congregational
United Church in Punta Gorda. They later signed the paperwork to get the checks, which
ranged up to more than $2,000. The foundation, made up of the Port Charlotte, Port Char-
lotte Sunrise and Punta Gorda clubs, has given out $700,000 to 600 graduating seniors over
the years.


PORTCHARLOTTE HERALD EMBER ofthe Audit Bureau ofCirculation. USPS 743170The Sun is published daily by Sun Coast Media Group,Inc., 23170
Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980-2198.
Derek Dunn-Rankin CEO & Chairman ........... 941-206-1001 ADVERTISING
David Dunn-Rankin President/Sun Publisher.941-206-1003 Leslee Peth, Advertising Director, PCH Publisher...................941-205-6400
Chris Porter Executive Editor ............ 941-206-1134 Bob White, Retail Advertising Manager....................... 941-258-9521
NE1W SPAPERS Rusty Pray Charlotte Editor ............ 941-206-1168 Patricia Compton, Advertising Account Executive........941-258-9524
Charlotte DeSoto Englewood North Port Venice Nicole Noles PCH Editor, Designer ........ 941-258-9529 Tanyah Lockett, Advertising Account Executive.........941-258-9526
Email: nnoles88@gmail.com Darcy Woods, Advertising Account Executive..................... 941-258-9525
23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980. 206-1000 MarkYero, Circulation Director.............................. 941-206-1317





FridyY June 62014


Shirley Bluttaumeuller


spies on the private


lives of sandhill cranes


hirley Bluttaumeuller has been
snooping on a local family, but
don't worry, it's not you.
More than 20 years ago, she and her
husband, Bob, moved to Southwest
Florida from southern Ohio. They were
instantly taken with the abundance of
wildlife. Shirley was drawn to a pair
of sandhill cranes that believed they
owned the greenspace in front of the
Bluttaumeullers' condo. She and several
friends soon named the duo Red and
Scarlet. Over the years, Shirley watched
as injury, death, love, and childbirth
cast alternating shades of dark and light
on the family.
I recently published her book,
"Private Lives: A Sandhill Crane
Family." I'm an editor and publisher
who helps authors bring their books to
life. Sometimes I coach writers as they
find ways to communicate their ideals.
Other times my job entails taking their
material and packaging it. Sometimes it
encompasses all those tasks and more.
I've published more than 300 books
since starting my business 10 years
ago. The profundity of subjects speaks
well for the varied interests of our
community.

The editing process
Shirley knew what she wanted -
at least she thought she did. Although
she had her story firmly fixed, I
suggested some ways to improve
the presentation. For example, her
beautiful photographs would have
been poorly presented in a 6-by-9
inch book (that's the average size).
I suggested a larger format, so that
the glory of her winged friends would
be on display. I made a few other
suggestions that gave her story the
framing it deserved.
Another joy of working with Shirley
was that she was receptive to editing.
As a former journalist, I not only am
used to being edited, I also under-
stand that editors' jobs were to make
my work better. But many fledgling
authors assume that to be edited
means that their work is inferior or
that the gist of their story will be lost
or rewritten. One's story is as private
and delicate as one's feelings, and
it's hard to put one's emotions out
there for public consideration and
criticism. But believe me, rewriting
and editing are not synonymous, and
an editor with a gentle touch is worth
his weight in paper.
That said, probably the hardest



Spring Fling
begins NOW!


i-ri. I-OHM
I t~Sat.10AM-4PM
Business Casual Church Clothing
All Regular Clothing 81/pc
Tops Bottoms Dresses *-Jeans Sets
Church Hats Pocketbooks Shoes
Boutique Clothing 85

GOD'S PRECIOUS GIFTS, Inc.
Thrifty Treasures
418 E. Virginia Ave., Punta Gordafn
iamgpgi@live.com


James Abraham



James Abraham owns Book-broker
Publishers of Florida, based in
Port Charlotte. Email him at
book-broker@hotmail.com.


PHOTO PROVIDED


Shirley Bluttaumeuller recently released her
book,"Private Lives: A Sandhill Crane Family;'
about a pair of sandhill cranes that believed
they owned the greenspace in front of the
Bluttaumeullers' condo. Over the years, Shirley
watched as injury, death, love and childbirth
cast alternating shades of dark and light on
the family.
part of working with Shirley was that
she kept making changes. That's part
of what I encounter; a passionate
author sees only his or her book and
doesn't consider what their obses-
sion may mean to others. However,
the end result makes the process
worthwhile.
As I continue this column, I'll be
writing about books, the process
of making them, and local events
that celebrate the written word. My
emphasis will be on self-published
books. I view the advances in text
manipulation that make self-pub-
lishing possible to be liberating and
uplifting.
I'll write about both the books I
produce and those created by others.
Feel free to email me with questions,
comments, or to suggest a good book
to review in this column.


Experience Better
Healthcare
HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE
HIGH CHOLESTEROL
PROSTATE HEALTH
I CARDIAC DISEASE
U OSTEOPOROSIS
MEMORY LOSS
ARTHRITIS
DIABETES


Providing Primary
& Hospital Care
For Patients Ages 16 yrs. & .up

MARo E. CABONELL, MD
BOARD CERTIFIED IN INTERNAL MEDICINE
FELLOWSHIP IN GERIATRIC MEDICINE
New Patients Welcome
941-766-1001
17912 Toledo Blade Blvd.
Port Charlotte, FL


The minimally invasive surgery techniques performed at
Bayfront Health Port Charlotte and Punta Gorda give you
advantages not found anywhere else in Charlotte County.
Using robotic-assisted surgery, surgeons can perform what
was once considered a complex operation, with complete
precision. Smaller incisions, less pain and a quicker recovery,
now that's a beautiful thing.


Learn more at BayfrontHealthRobotics.com,
or for a free referral, call 941-637-2497.


Charlene Okomski, D.O.
OBGYN


N


How is robotic-assisted gynecological surgery
different than conventional surgery? Learn the
pros and cons, then sit at the helm of the robot
and take it for a test drive. Free.
Thursday, June 19 16 7:00 p.m.
Bayfront Health Punta Gorda
809 E. Morion Ave, Punta Gorda
To register for this free seminar and event,
call 941-637-2497.


Bayfront Health
Robotics


Bayfront Health Robotics.com
Port Charlotte: 941-766-4122 Punta Gorda: 941-639-3131


Herald Pdge 3


I





Friday, June 6, 014


SUN SIGNS: Get checked


FROM PAGE 1


each relating to the sun's
searching rays.
"The old saying about an
ounce of prevention being
worth a pound of cure is
absolutely the way to go,"
said DeStefano, who is
Board Certified in skin and
internal medicine.
Water's Edge
Dermatology specializes
in treating and surgically
repairing a kaleidoscope
of skin ailments, from
acne, rashes and warts,
to far more serious issues
like carcinoma/cancers,
infections, vessel damage,
sexually transmitted
diseases and skin fungus.
The centers also welcome
patients seeking laser reju-
venations, laser treatments
and hair removal, peels
and Botox. Water's Edge is
a one-stop adult and child
center to treat, restore
and rehabilitate our body
armor, the largest organ of
the body.
So why is skin cancer still
so prevalent? A couple of
reasons, DeStefano said.
One is the surge in tanning
salons. A tan, whether
on the beach, in a salon,
or through incidental
exposure, is bad news. Skin
coloration is caused by the
sun's ultraviolet radiation
(UV). In theory, the sun
in moderation is good,
recharging the body's vita-
min D. Some studies even
suggest an under-exposure


to the sun is damaging to
health. Either theory is an
extreme.
The average person of
any color, culture or gender
absorbs too much sun,
which over time is mathe-
matically proven to cause
problems. You're just asking
for trouble with unchecked
time in the sun. One in five
of us, in fact, can expect
to acquire some form of
skin disease, according to
the American Academy of
Dermatology.
The solutions are fairly
simple, DeStefano said.
Stay out of the sun. But
other than living in a cave,
our best defense is an
awareness of the threat:
wear clothing with special
UV fibers (dark over light),
steer clear of tanning beds
and the afternoon beach
visit; wear a sunscreen of
at least 30 SPF with a broad
spectrum additive and
re-lather every few hours;
lather children with a UPF
sunscreen; use a sun-guard
additive in the laundry; and
most importantly, schedule
an annual health screening.
"In Florida," DeStefano
said, "we go house to car,
car to buildings. And it still
adds up. We really have
to be careful to protect
ourselves."
Water's Edge Dermatology
is located at 2484 Caring
Way, Suite C, Port Charlotte.
For more information, visit
www.wederm.com or call
941-235-2111.


HERALD PHOTO BY
ROBERT NELSON
LEFT: Julie Antochi owner of
ReJuvination Mind Body & Spirit
Day Spa and Lotus Wellness
Center has expanded. The 900
square feet of additional space
is used for holding classes and
it is also available for 1/2 day
and full day rentals for busi-
ness meetings, seminars and
workshops. Rental also allows
for kitchen amenities. Contact
ReJuvination for upcoming
classes and or rental of the
classroom at 941-235-4466.

BIZ BITS: Learn to relax at ReJuvination Day Spa


FROM PAGE 1


Tired of forgetting names,
lists and dates that you know
you should remember? Sign up
for the class on how to improve
your memory.
Learning to relax and release
your daily troubles is hard work.
Meditation can help you release
and relax after a long day.
Rejuvination Mind Body & Spirit
Day Spa can help you reach that
goal of inner peace.
Did you know colors can affect
your life and moods? They also
offer color analysis classes.
For more information on these
and the other services they offer,
visit www.relax2health.com or
call 941-235-4466.


Summer time
means dive time


Depthfinders Dive Center is a
full-service dive center. For $300,
you can get your basic open water
diver certification and then move
on to one of the other 26 specialty


certifications that owner Terry
Myers has to offer. The dive shop
is more than a little shop; it is also
a small museum, with dive gear
dating back to the mid 1950's.
Depthfinders also offers dive
trips at different times through-
out the year. The next dive trip
is June 27-29 in the upper Keys.
The price of the trip is $250 and
includes four boat dives and
accommodations. You have
to get yourself there as well as
bring your gear.
Depthfinders is open from
9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday,
Tuesday and Friday, 11 a.m. to
7 p.m. Wednesday and 8 a.m. to
3 p.m. Saturday at 1225 Tamiami
Trail, Unit A-5, Port Charlotte.
For more information, go online
to www.depthfinders.com or call
941-776-7565.

Cats n Dogs to host
non-anesthesia dental
day June 19
Cats n Dogs Pet Supplies will
be holding a non-anesthesia


dental care day for your cats
and dogs starting at noon on
June 19. Owner Nancy Okun has
partnered up with holistic veter-
inarian Dr. Kristen Swanson of
Natural Veterinary Services Inc.
to perform dental cleanings at
the store using no anesthesia or
drugs. Prior to the dental work,
your pet will get a veterinary
physical exam.
Some pets with health issues
that cannot normally be put un-
der anesthesia can benefit from
this event. Dr. Swanson has also
created a holistic anti-infective
solution that can be purchased
at the event.
Pet dental cleanings at some
veterinary clinics can range from
$300 to $1,000. At this event, the
cost will range from $165 to $195
per pet. A $20 non-refundable
deposit is required in order to
secure your appointment. For
more information, call Cats n
Dogs Pet Supplies at 941-627-
4093. Cats n Dogs is located
at 2826 Tamiami Trail, Port
Charlotte.


IN CHARLOTTE COUNTY


Little Elites I .naks
Dance Camp! Pvdd


A FUN DANCE INTENSIVE FOR 4-6 YEAR OLDS!


When: Monday, July 7- Friday, July 11
Noon 3:00PM
For More Information Call 941.235.1441


The Greatest Summer Camp on Earth!
At Elite Fine Arts Academy!


Come learn to fly! Trapeze, Slackline, Lira, Spanish Web, Fabric,
Musical Theater, Acrobatics, Act Building, Fun, Fun and More Fun!
Field trip to Ringling! (ticket extra)


When: July 7-25 9AM-3:30PM
8:30AM DROPOFF!
Where: 17960 Toledo Blade Blvd.,
Port Charlotte, FL 33948
941.235.1441
Who: boys and girls ages 6-15
Price: $380 for 3 weeks. $275 for 2 weeks
$175 for 1 week*-Sibling Discount Available


OVER
IN THE
MEADOW
R JACK Kby
EZRA JACK KEATS


oTHE --

%LADIO


h irsl r gg,


A L


SHerald Page 4





:Friday June 6,2014HeadPg5


THEME CROSSWORD


NO EXCUSES


By James Barrick

ACROSS
1 .- signum
5. Programs,
for short
9. Reference
volume
14. Blubber
17. Water bird
18. "The World
According to
19. Elk
20. Marsh bird
21 .Start of a quip by
Jimmy Kimmel:
3 wds.


23. Green gem
24. Subdued
25. Special -
26.Tap
27. Soften
29. Illusory thing
30. Kind of error
32. Sludge
33. Computer type
34. Part 2 of quip:
5 wds.
40.Woodwinds
41. Smart
42. Grasslands
43. Bound


44.With breath
46. Seafood item
48. Part of PBA
or NBA
52. Slippery -
53.Ordered
amounts
54. Carpus
55. Hold accountable
56. Serigraph
58.Curb
59. Unseen particle
60. Part 3 of quip:
6 wds.
65. Events in poker


66. Russian range
67. Cousin of Emmy
and Obie
68. Deduce
69. Desolate
70. 111 will
72. Say further
75. Simon -
76. Parts of shoes
77. Worries
78. Old covered walk
79. Dried out
80. Big cheeses
81. Area of expertise


82. Part 4 of quip:
5 wds.
90. Kind of tweed
91. Gaelic
92.Juvenile heroine
93. Korean airline
94. Arum plants
96.- Wednesday
97. U.N.'s -
Hammarskjold
100. Packs
101. Honker
102. End of the quip:
3 wds.
105. Broker's advice


106. Game bird
107. Genus of olives
108. Celebes ox
109. Dutch commune
110. Dwindled
111. Car cover
112. Region


DOWN
1. Repeat
2. Farm structure
3. Intimidates
4. Lat. abbr.
5. Related
paternally
6. E-commerce
giant
7.-tem
8. Goad
9. Increase
10. Bullfighter
11. Temporary
wheels
12. Helper: Abbr.


13. Look- -
14. Horn of Africa
denizen
15. Crater Lake's
state
16. Disreputable
fellow: 2 wds.
20.- Lawrence
College
22. Bedouins
24. Salon treatments
28. Correct
29. Of indigenous
Americans
30. Lucy's landlord
31. Caffe -


34. Princely Italian
family
35. Ski area
36. Represent
37. Parts of pumps
38. "Seward's Folly"
39. Eft
44. Nest-egg
holdings
45. About: 2 wds.
46. Troubles
(with "on")
47. Full-bodied
48. Word of welcome
49. Sodden
50. Urban problem


51. Hawaiian goose
53. Eatery
54. Large snail
55. Pair
57. "Days of Wine
and-"
58. Blackens
59. Gadflies
60. Murdoch the
writer
61. Zola title
62. A spice
63. Entangle
64.- dire
69. Wraparound
garment


70. Clan
71.Ali -
73. Toy box item
74. Miami- county
76. Vice -
77. Subjected to
punishment
78. Viewpoint
79. Pelts
80. Traveled to
81. Microfilm, for
short
82. Step in ballet
83. Deltas anagram
84. Songbird
85. Go slowly


86. Diamorphine
87. Performing group
88. Beetle
89. Accident
94. Girl in Savannah
95. Lampblack
97. Performed
98. Some missing
GIs
99. Midge
101. Compass pt.
103. A state: Abbr.
104. Divider


Answers on page 13.


2014 United Feature Syndicate, Dist. by Universal Uclick


Charlotte HarborYacht Club
to host open house, cookout
Charlotte Harbor Yacht Club will host an open house and
cookout for prospective new members from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on
Sunday, June 22. They will be serving burgers and hot dogs to
prospective members who stop by. On hand will be numerous
members of the club, who will provide information on activities
available to all members who join the club.
This will be a special opportunity to join under a discounted
membership entrance fee program; boat ownership is not
required. For more information or reservations, call Joy at 941-
629-5131. Charlotte Harbor Yacht Club is located at 4400 Lister St.
in Port Charlotte, right off Edgewater Drive, on the north shore of
the Peace River.

Team Parkside farmers
market taking summer vacation
Team Parkside's Business Alliance, in partnership with the
Cultural Center of Charlotte County, hosts a farmer's market in
the main entrance on Fridays, but will be taking a summer hiatus
until further notice. The next farmer's market is scheduled for
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Friday, July 11, in conjunction with the
Cultural Center's Christmas in July event at 2280 Aaron St., Port
Charlotte. For more information about the farmers market, or to
join as a vendor, email parksidebaCIgmail.com.

Team Parkside seeks festival sponsors,
vendors for "A Salute to Veterans" on Nov. 8
Team Parkside, a 501 (c) (3) nonprofit dedicated to revitalizing
the original neighborhoods of Port Charlotte, is currently seek-
ing sponsors and vendors for its signature fundraising event,
the Parkside Fall Festival, to be held from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on
Saturday, Nov. 8 in the common area behind the Promenades
Mall in the Parkside District. Vendor and sponsorship applications
are available by email. For more information, call Pat Garriton at
941-661-7994 or email teamparksidecc@gmail.com.


Hedd Pdge;





Herald Page 6


Do you remember wi


The following are excerpts from
the Daily Herald News, dated from
June 1, 1974, through June 7, 1974:

Springs site OK'd for grant
Continued underwater explora-
tion of the Warm Mineral Springs
archaeological site near North Port
seems assured now.
The announcement came that a
grant of $100,000 was recently ap-
proved by the state legislature. The
funds will be administered by the
Division of Archives and History.
The grant will be used for equip-
ment and to bring scientific spe-
cialists to examine the prehistoric
Indian burial site. History may well
be rewritten after the experiment.
The 3-acre pond at the springs
made national news in February
1973. It was discovered then that
a well-preserved human skull was
brought up from a shelf in the
220-foot sinkhole in the pond.
Radio carbon examination of the
skull and bones indicated the re-
mains to be 10,200 years old. These
are the oldest documented remains
in the western world.
Col. William Royal, a well-known
diver, made the first significant
discovery at Warm Mineral Springs
15 years ago.

Charlotte Tarpons
to graduate tonight
Ceremonies will be held tonight
for the 370 Charlotte High School
graduating seniors in the Charlotte
Memorial Auditorium, Punta Gorda.
High School Principal Earl Nall is
going to be the guest speaker. The
school band and the senior girls'
choir will perform.
Three graduating seniors are
the Class of 1974 valedictorians.
Each has maintained a perfect
14-point academic standing for the
past three years, along with other
achievements. They are:
Cathie Cheves was senior class
president and school newspaper
editor.
Leslie Horton was a National
Honor Society Scholarship finalist
and president of Interact.


Janine Smith



Janine Smith writes about Charlotte
County's historic past. Contact her
atjaninehs l@comcast.net.


9 Randy Cummins was president of
the Charlotte County Chapter of the
National Honor Society.

State funding to
increase for schools
Thanks is owed to Superintendent
Thomas E. Benner Jr. and School Board
Chairman C. Dana Burke. They put in
long hours at Tallahassee with their
effective persuasion, which gained state
dollars for our schools.
The accomplishment is considerable.
The amount of money is going from
$354,000 to $1.4 million this year in
state funding.
Many thanks from Charlotte County.

Cultural Center breaks
ground on expansion
Saturday signaled the start of the
Cultural Center of Charlotte County's
$600,000 five-year expansion program.
Ground was broken for the first two of
five planned structures, costing nearly
$200,000 to build and equip.
The golden shovels were handled by
Marion Reager; County Commissioner
Myrtle Burnett; Warren G. Payne,
director of volunteers for the center and
board chair; and Dr. Esmat Maayergy,
president of Growth International, the
contractor.


Cable TV franchise granted

The Charlotte County Commissioners
unanimously granted cable franchise to
G.A. Mobile Homes for operation of a
cable business. The location is a mobile
home and motel in the area of Englewood.
The commission's decision came despite
protests from competing firm, Storer Cable
Vision. Vice President James Hall stated
there is an unwritten law that "you don't
go where the other guy is."
After a long discussion, it was agreed
upon that the G.A. Franchise is to run
for five years, with no guarantee of
renewal after that.

City approves plans
for Solana area condos
The Punta Gorda City Council
approved plans for a 459-unit condo-
minium complex near Solana.
City Attorney Leo Wotitzky told the
council of plans that would call for
the annexation of land into the city of
Punta Gorda. Over a five-year span, a
17-building condo could be constructed
adjacent to the Peace River.
The City Council also OK'd a city
workers' credit union proposal during
this regular Tuesday meeting.


In the service


Pvt. Michael Haymans has been
selected as the Outstanding Trainee of
Company C, 13th Battalion, 4th Training
Brigade at U.S. Army Armor Center in
Fort Knox. Haymans is the son of Mr.
and Mrs. Ken Haymans of Burnt Store
Road, Punta Gorda, and is a Charlotte
High School graduate.
Pfc. Thomas P. Whisenant left the
Marine Corp Base at Camp Lejeune,


.Port Charlotte I


Wrestlers bound
for British Isles


Al Lloyd is a wrestling standout
at Charlotte High School. He will be
joined by Jim Bostwick and Mark
Spurgeon in the British Isles this sum-
mer, thanks to community support.
Kiwanis President Eli D. Richard and
Capt. Steve Archer were instrumental
in spearheading the six-week drive.


DONATIONS NEEDED!


Please Donate Clean, Usable Items.


Call To Schedule A Pickup For
Large Furniture & Appliances
Now accepting pick up in Arcadia. All money received from donations
in Arcadia will be utilized to assist DeSoto County residents in need.
Charlotte County to assist people in need in Charlotte County.



SALVATION ARMY
THRIFT STORES
1048 Tamiami Trail, Punta Gorda
Open: Mon.- Sat. 9am 5pm


Adults Children
$39.50 14 & under

18 holes %088.00
18 holes


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627-5393
4949 Tamiami Trail (U.S. 41).- Port Charlotte
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Friday, June 6,2014






ien?


North Carolina, to participate in
amphibious training exercises in the
Caribbean. He serves with the 3 Marine
Regiment. Whisenant is the son of
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P Whisenant Sr.
of West Grace Street, Punta Gorda.

Charlie Sez
Life's little pleasures an ice-cold
watermelon on a day like yesterday.

Today in history June 5
9 In 1876: Visitors to the U.S.
Centennial Exposition at Philadelphia
got their first taste of bananas. Before,
bananas were rare in the United States.

Driggers-Blondell
engagement announced
Mr. and Mrs. William E. Driggers
of Punta Gorda announced the en-
gagement of their daughter, Claudia
Elizabeth, to Eugene M. Blondell.
Blondell is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Val Blondell of Arcadia.
He is employed by Harbor Plumbing,
Port Charlotte, and is a 1970 graduate of
DeSoto County High School.The bride
elect is a 1974 graduate of Charlotte
High School. She is employed by the
State Department of Transportation
in the Punta Gorda office.

Venn-Esparza plan
summer wedding
The engagement and forthcom-
ing marriage of Tara Dee Venn to
Francisco A. Esparza was announced
by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Donald
L. Venn of Southeast Eagle Road,
Charlotte Harbor. The groom is the
son of Mr. and Mrs. Francisco S.
Esparza of Star Route A, Punta Gorda.


Send in your photos! The Port Charlotte Herald accepts photos from
the community for publication in our weekly paper Please email the
original lPEG photo file as an attachment to nnoles88@gmail.com and
include in the body of the email a description of WHO, WHAT, WHEN,
WHERE and WHY the photo was taken, and include the first and
last names of everyone in the photo from left to right.
Do not resize the photo; please make sure your email program does
not downsize files automatically.
Do not send photos from photo sharing sites or from Facebook.
Photos will run as space allows.


I




:Friddy June 6,2014Head Pg1


4 .


MORE REASONS
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:Friday, June 6,2014Head Pg9


For the Love of Kids celebrates with annual picnic


Spencer Eggers, 8, a second-grader at Liberty N1
Elementary, was among those students chosen
from each of the local school and invited along HERALD PHOTOS BY BETSY WILLIAMS
with their families to the annual For the Love
of Kids picnic that celebrates CCPS Outstanding Public school students were invited to the
Students each year. Each student received a annual For the Love of Kids picnic held at the
Certificate of Excellence and a goody bag. Port Charlotte Beach Complex on May 10.


Fifth-grader at Peace River Elementary Justin lannotti and his mother, Melissa, were among the first in
line for lunch served by volunteers of the For the Love of Kids that sponsors the picnic each year.


RIGHT: Ciara
Lewis, 9, and
her sisters
Ariana, 10,
and Ellora, 5,
all students
at Deep Creek
Elementary,
sit inside an
ambulance.
Kyle Vulgamore
explained
about all the
equipment .
used by the C
firemedics.


Lt. Craig Soosh and a few of his crew from Station I in Port Charlotte volunteered for the picnic
sponsored by For the Love of Kids, demonstrating equipment from both a fire truck and an ambu-
lance that the kids and their families could tour.


Punta Gorda

(941)766-0115
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(941) 429-5902

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Friday, June 6, 014


Are dead tre
Are dead tree snags hazardous
to a neighborhood? The pre-
serve area bordering my yard
has mostly low vegetation with one
very tall and dying pine tree. The
tree is 25feetfrom my house and
woodpeckers have been spotted in its
trunk. How safe is it to leave a tree
snag like this?
-Barry Rotunda
Dead tree and palms attract
many species of birds and
other wildlife. Tree snags left
behind after a tree dies becomes an
excellent feeding and breeding loca-
tion for many types of birds. Small
songbirds roost on its branches.
Nuthatches, Carolina and house
wrens will occupy almost any tree
cavity. Screech owls use holes left
behind by woodpeckers. Downy
woodpeckers and flickers use holes
in trees surrounded by an open and
unmowed field.
Branches left on a dead tree can
become a wind hazard. However,
damage would be unexpected unless
your lanai or pool screen sit directly
under the tree canopy. Tall snags are
more a concern then shorter ones.
Shorter ones are usually more stable.
Shrubs and vines surrounding a snag
help to keep it in place longer.
Nesting boxes and feeders are an
alternative. Any dead tree snag or
other fire-prone scrubby vegetation
should remain 30 feet or more from
your house. This is considered a safe
distance in case of a forest fire. Also,
I recall several years ago in Cape
Coral, a tall, dead pine tree left on
a neighborhood lot exploded after
a lightning strike, doing damage to
both homes and parked cars.


e snags hazardous to a neighborhood?

rn Becker


PHOTOS PROVIDED
Screech owls will locate their nests in the cavity
of mature trees, including this dead cabbage
palm snag. Multiple cavities in the same tree
trunk are not unusual.
Q I'm a new resident to Port Char-
lotte. My neighbors and I have
bahiagrass lawns. Some mow
weekly, keeping their mowers low and
leaving two to three inches of grass. I
want to keep my lawn low maintenance
and as natural as possible. Can I mow
less frequently and let it grow taller?
Arman, Port Charlotte


A bahiagrass covered drainage swale along the Parks that Teach linear path in Punta Gorda.


Home lawns in Florida are
mowed regularly to keep attrac-
tive and healthy. A bahiagrass
(Paspalum notatum) lawn without
regular fertilizer and irrigation treat-
ment qualifies as low maintenance and
environmentally friendly. Learn more
at sarasota.ifas.ufl.edu/fyn/Pubs/FYN-
CommunityGuidelines-Broc.pdf.
However, regular and proper mow-
ing is critical to keeping it that way.
Bahiagrass produces grass blades,
roots and a tough seed stem during the
spring, summer and fall months. These
stems need mowed with a sharpened
blade to keep from becoming too tall.
How often depends on many factors,
including the overall health of the turf,
time of year and environmental condi-
tions like drought, shade or excessive
rainfall.
The usual number of days between
each mowing typically falls weekly (ev-
ery seven days) or may extend longer


(14 or more days). Mowing height
recommended is three and a half to
four inches. Less frequent mowing is
recommended only during periods of
drought or excessive shade. Another
rule of thumb is never removing more
than one-third the length of the grass
blade at any one mowing. Leave the
lawn clippings on the ground after
mowing. They are readily degraded by
microorganisms and provide a source
of nutrients to the lawn grasses. Learn
more about bahiagrass lawns for
Florida at edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/LH/
LH00600.pdf.
In Charlotte County, a home lawn on
a developed lot has excessive growth
when it is left unmowed and is 12
inches or higher, or has underbrush
present containing noxious vegetation
like weeds, vines and palmetto scrub.
Also, to be excessive growth, 50 percent
of the total mowable area on the lot
would have to be 12 inches or greater.


Boat ramp packed in El Jobean


he El Jobean Community League
is on break until October, but the
town is by no means asleep. The
snowbirds have flown, but life goes on.
The boat ramp is constantly packed
and the area around the bridge is
usually full of fishing boats. This is the
season of the locals.
There is a container for aluminum
cans in the parking lot of the Community
Hall at 14344 Jamison Way. The profit
from these cans helps the Boy Scout
Troop. Please make an effort to fill it up.
We all know what a great organization
the Scouts are, and all the good they do
for boys.
The Dumpster near the Tarpon Bay
Condos is for paper, card board, phone
books and junk mail. The profit from
this helps the El Jobean Community
League and its projects in town. Please
help fill this to capacity.
Support your local businesses. Stop


PAT SPENCE
I'XJEN F flT T RFrl


in and say "hi" to Holly at Bean Barber
and Beauty; check out the pawn shop,
bait shop, seafood store, auto repair, car
sales, marina and Chevron. Even stop
in and thank the Fire EMS people. For
information, talk to Mary in the water
office, and like any small town, we have
a couple of bars. Hopefully, the restau-
rant will open soon. Hooray for
El Jobean.
Thanks for helping us pay our
respects to those who fought for our
freedom and anyone who has passed
on. Our Memorial Day ceremony was
May 24 at the Randy Spence Park,
right off of S.R. 776 across from the
boat ramp.
Smile at every one, you will feel
better.


"Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap,
but by the seeds that you plant."
Robert Louis Stevenson, www.brainyquote.com


Children exposed to secondhand smoke have higher rates of asthma and
respiratory infections, and are more likely to become smokers themselves.
Help them be safe...please don't smoke around kids.
For more information, contact the Department of Health in Charlotte
County, 941-624-7279 or visit tobaccofreeflorida.com


Wed.,JMe 1" JMe 2P
enjoy live music performed
by Rory Dewey, musical
director at Sacred Heart
Church, and young
vocalist Marcella Brown,
\^whilp-,ri dinp-


HEALTH


5.UU U0FF
qqI Nn fMnnl


SHerald Page 10


TobaccooFloridn)
ge-
chw"cou""





:Friddy June 6,2 0 1 4e rd Pge1


Principal gets slimed at Neil Armstrong


The Ringmaster, second-grade teacher Melissa White, and the World's Strongest Man, fifth-grade
teacher Phil Noel, tell the students how reading can make them strong during the annual Book
Bash at Neil Armstrong Elementary School on May 22.


Principal Angie Taillon gets covered with the
second-grade class' bucket of slime.


Kara Sofilka turns the tables on the students as
she puts the pie in fourth-grader Parker Sifrit's
face. Sifrit's mother, Sonja, is a third-grade
teacher at Neil Armstrong Elementary.


Coplt Cardiovasc.ularCar

in heHear of enic


Fourth grader Jaiden Rheinschmidt prepares to cover teacher Wileidy Carrion with a whipped-
cream pie.


The third- to fifth-graders with the most points in each of the classes received gift cards along
with their certificates.


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Herdld Pdge 11


KAEi





Friday, June 6, 014


May Crowning at St. Charles Borromeo


'Ii


" :; lili ... w


HERALD PHOTOS BY BETSY WILLIAMS


The second-grade class of Keelin Stauffer at St. Charles Borromeo Catholic School led the traditional May Crowning on May 2, starting with the
Children's Mass, then proceding to the courtyard for the actual crowning.


Each carrying a flower to be placed at the
foot of the statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary,
Abigail Robinson and Alejandro Cristobal Jr.
enter the courtyard.


Abigail Robinson, Keeley Abel, Leah Massey and Sheila Williamson sing during the ceremony.


Children proceed through the courtyard to the statue
of the Blessed Virgin for the crowning. Jasmine
Yamashita, walking next to Jake Smarsh, carries the
small pillow where the crown of flowers lay for the
statue at St. Charles Borromeo.


Gina Deluca with her daughter, Isabella
Castro, at the breakfast hosted by the
first-grade class.



in A


Abigail Robinson, Keeley Abel, Leah Massey and Sheila Williamson were the
last to leave the courtyard before heading into the cafeteria for a breakfast
honoring second-graders who recently received their First Holy Communion.


Edward Nolan, Jack Helgemo,
Kevin Delgado, Alejandro Cristobal
Jr., Kevin Johns, Oliver Hegarty,
Kisai Tordecillas and Jake Smarsh
were the second-grade boys who
participated in the May Crowning
ceremony.

LEFT: Angelique Adcock
waits her turn as Edward
Nolan and Kevin Johns step
up to the podium for their
prayer turn in the ceremony.


41


Second-grader Christina Kelly and first-grader Benjamin
Lozada at the breakfast, hosted by the first grade students,
held after the annual May Crowning.


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:Friday June 6,2014


Hurricane Charley GOLF SCORES
survivors wanted All golf scores must be
d emiled to golfscores@
sun-herald.com.


HERALD PHOTO BY CHRISTY FEINBERG
Were you here for Hurricane Charley 10 years
ago? If so, the Charlotte Sun would love to see
you at 10 a.m. Monday on the waterfront side
of the Charlotte Harbor Event and Conference
Center, 75 Taylor St., Punta Gorda, for a group
photo. The photo was originally planned for
the Charley statue in Laishley Park. Due to sea
wall work, the location has been moved to this
beautiful spot between the U.S. 41 bridges. We
hope to see you there.
*2C CF A PPS ATLAS SOIB
COO 0T G3A RP MOO1SIE SORJA
* 0OWCANYO0U PRAISE TA ME D
OPS RAP RELENIT MIRAGE
FA TL MRE ANALOG

LM 0lS ER WPI TB A ME
I NT C HECKP ROTOAWN
ILONDON THE YHAV EAH UGIEI
RISES JRAL S 0OS CAR
INFER RSTARK SPIT E AD
AyV A MIPS FEAIRST
E R E V IS FIELD
GLQ0KR I G HT I NH EM I DEL
HARRIS NERSE ALICE
ASlAAA RC0 DSA S H A
sTOS NOU T OF TH ETOW
FOTAND TRP B EL T


0 DEEP CREEK
GOLF CLUB
- Hole-in-One
May 20
Thomas Burkhart aced
Hole No.I11 from 115
yards using a SW golf
club. It was witnessed by
Mike Burrich, Bob Howell
and Diane Mclvor.

0 KINGS GATE
GOLF CLUB
- Hole-in-Ones
May 21: Art Vespi aced
Hole No. 3 from 105
yards using a 7-iron. It
was witnessed by Clare
Vespi.
May 27: Karen Combs
aced Hole No. 2 from 93
yards using a 5-hybrid. It
was witnessed by Ingrid
Luecht, Marty DeWitt
and Elaine Cronin.
May 27: Alvin Messer
aced Hole No. 12 from
118 yards using a No.
7 metal wood. It was
witnessed by Mike
Orobello, Bill Ryan and
John Nunes.

0 KINGSWAY
COUNTRY CLUB
- Sunday Couples, 1 Best
Ball odd/2 Best Balls
even holes
May 18
1.) Dave and Carolyn
Stewart; PJ & Carol
Fisher, 87.


- Ladies' Day, 2 Best Balls
front 9/1 Best Ball back 9
May 22
1.) Mary Albers, Carolyn
Stewart, Carol Fisher, 89.

0 RIVERWOOD
GOLF CLUB
- Hole-in-One
May 23: Warren Fowler
aced Hole No. 16
from 156 yards using
a 5-hybrid. It was
witnessed by Tony
Grcevic and Dennis Siok.

0 ROTONDA GOLF
& COUNTRY CLUB
- Scramble
May 26
1.) Charles Elliot, William
Tait, Carl Kaltreider,
Ed Johnson, 35.
2.) Jim Jones, Jim
Knowlton, Dave Wein-
berger, John German, 37.
CLOSEST TO THE
PIN: Hole No. 3: Jim
Knowlton; Hole No. 8:
William Tait.

0 ST. ANDREWS
SOUTH GOLF CLUB
- LGA, 9-Hole, 1 Low
Net of 3
May 22
1.) Norma Brownlow,
Lucy Mills, Helen
Anderson, 29.
- LGA, 18-Hole, 1 Low
Net of 3
May 22
1.) Trudy Cheatham,
Dianne Lupp, 54.
- 2014 Memorial Day
Scramble
May 26
FLIGHT A:


1.) Ed and Joyce Dye;
Jack and Laura Ferrell,
54.9.
2.) Rich Kaplan and
Denise Horne-Kaplan;
Kevin and Sally Drehmer,
55.5.
3.) Jim and Emma
Becker; Mark and Robin
Katz, 56.1.
FLIGHT B:
1.) Rex and Helen
Anderson; Lou and
Sue Dieke, 57.6.
2.) Harvey and Marianne
Goldberg; Randy Jess
and Meride Dooriss,
57.9.
3.) Paul and Donna
Flagg; Rudy and Dianne
Lupp, 58.1.
CLOSEST TO THE PIN:
Hole No. 7: Mark Katz;
Hole No. 16: Carol
Wetherald.

0 TWIN ISLES
COUNTRY CLUB
- Ladies'9-Hole, Low Net
May 21
FLIGHT A:
1.) Gunny Haefner, 37.
2.) Mary Collins, 38.
3.) Cecelia Eames, 37.
FLIGHT B:
1.) Laura Felmore, 33.
2.) Ann Ashworth, 35.
3.) Mary Ellen Hanley,
37.
FLIGHT C:
1.) 37 Kate Curley, 37.
T-2.) Joanne McGraw,
Ann Fitzsimmons, 41.
- Ladies'18-Hole,
Stableford Points
May 21
FLIGHT A:
1.) Linda Seber, 38.
2.) Eileen Roehrig, 33.


FLIGHT B:
1.) Debbie Snedeker, 35.
2.) Sue Galvin, 32.
FLIGHT C:
1.) Sandy Lorden, 43.
2.) Lorrie Ross, 34.
FLIGHT D:
1.) Anita Campion, 43.
2.) Joan Montovano, 35.

0 BURNT
STORE GOLF &
ACTIVITY CLUB
- Hole-in-Ones
May 10: Phyllis Love.
May 13: William Story.
- Cross Country Scramble
May 17
FLIGHT A:
1.) Fred Hart, Vic Martel,
Bill Story, Jack Orr.
2.) Bill Brandt,
Elba Brandt,
Morton Fleishman,
Rhea Fleishman.
3.) Phyllis Love,
Raymond Love, Lee
Plank, Barbara Mueller.
FLIGHT B:
1.) Millie Hierro,
Tom Laredo, Phil
Leonard, Robert Paul.
2.) Jim Merz,
Larry Marks, Debra
Lehmann, Jerry Tollini.
3.) Paula AlIton,
Jim Pursley, Judy Coyne.
FLIGHT C:
1.) Ron Marker, Sheryl
Marker, Carole McLean,
Andrew Wilhite.
2.) Don Clements,
Margaret Hiestand,
Donald Barratt,
Marilyn Whitley.
3.) Windy Synenberg,
Rick Kellner, Linda
Wright, Babe Ahrens.


- 9-Hole Scramble
May 20
1.) Bill Story, Vic Martel,
Joyce Punt.
- Ladies'League
May 21
FLIGHT A:
1.) Paula AlIton.
2.) Linda Wright.
3.) Missy Coykendall.
FLIGHT B:
1.) Brenda Holmes.
2.) Sue Leffingwell.
3.) Diane Mitchell.
- Men's League
May 21
FLIGHT A:
1.) Don Clements.
2.) Dick Bagwell.
FLIGHT B:
1.) Larry Marks.
2.) Stan Hochstadt.
3.) Tommy Shannon.
4.) Bob San Juan,
Larry Marks.
- Scramble
May 24
1.) Lee Plank, Mary
Welch, Janet Wood.
CLOSEST TO THE PIN:
Jerry Hunter, Reggie
Conrad, Bob Wood,
Wendy Synenberg.
- Hole-in-One
May 26: Lee Plank.
- Red, White& Blue
Scramble
May 26
FLIGHT A:
1.) Todd Mattas,
James Powers,
Gary Tenharmsel,
George Folio.
2.) Maryanne Sanjuan,
Diane Mitchell, Gary
Mitchell, Bob Sanjuan.
3.) Tommy Shannon,
Daniel Pontius, Robert
Nuckols, Tom Schmit.


Herald Page 13


FLIGHT B:
1.) Ray Love, Lee Plank,
Barbara Mueller,
Phyllis Love.
2.) Jim Pursley, Joel
Spector, Marianne
Gasner, Paula AlIton.
3.) Jerry Hunter, Bob
Wood, Janet Wood,
Lynn Hunter.
FLIGHT C:
1.) Ed Hutcheson, Bobby
Vail, Lynda McDermott,
Larry Marks.
2.) Linda Wright,
Babe Ahrens, Joan
Cullen, Ed Kosiewicz.
3.) Jerry Tollini,
Jim Merz, Debra
Lehmann, Jim Willhoite.
FLIGHT D:
1.) Jack Orr, Paul Nicholls,
Deborah Nicholls,
Pat Folio.
2.) Wendy Synenberg,
Gene Wilson, Darlene
Wilson, Rick Kellner.
3.) Betty Hallowell,
Marlowe Clark, Walter
Clark, Rich Hallowell.
- Ladies' League
May 28
FLIGHT A:
1.) Mary Ann SanJuan.
2.) Babe Ahrens.
3.) Jeanne Brown.
FLIGHT B:
1.) Pat Lawlor.
2.) Rhea Fleishman.
3.) Marianne Gassner.
- Men's League
May 28
FLIGHT A:
1.) Don Clements.
2.) Gary Mitchell.
FLIGHT B:
1.) Stan Hochstadt.
2.) Bill Brandt, Tommy
Shannon.


. F


cll*-SSl--l-r
CFM





Herald Page 14




Girls on the Run hosts 5K


Neck and neck, Jim Bartek, 51, and John Libonati, 40, both cross the
finish line at 22:10, each winning first place in their age division.


Sophia Cherniak, 9, placed first in her age divi-
sion for Female 9 and 10 with a time of 24:52.


Still smiling, 10-year-old Haley Gulsby crosses
the finish line with a time of 31:36.


Gloria Williams and her son Andre, 41, with the St. Charles
Borromeo team, have their own last-minute race for the finish
line. They tied with a time of 52:18.


NEWS RELEASE

U.S Coast Guard Auxiliary, Flotilla 9-2, North Port

Looking to "Welcome Aboard" New Volunteers
SWe Do: On Water Safety And Training Patrols Search And Rescue
Missions Teach Safe Boating Classes Vessel Safety Inspection
Attend Displays At Various Events And Much Much More!
We are a uniformed support organization to the Coast Guard and operate under the direction of the Coast Guard and the Department of Homeland Security


YOU OW *BEA*ISTUTO *A


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OF PPRTNI IEYuDCE
Contact
ALYENO:
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:Friddy June 6,2014 Hrl ae1


Port Charlotte High hosts volleyball tourney


-... Haley Dionisio, a player for the Port
Port Charlotte Primetime's Tawnie Simpson spikes the ball through the hands Charlotte Primetime team, sets up the
of the Venice Jellys during the tournament, ball during the tournament.


RIGHT: Emily Treasure, a
player on the Port Charlotte
Primetime 17U team, hits
the ball over the net during
the tournament.


Brooklin Sharpe, a Port Charlotte Primetime player, hits the ball during the tournament held at
Port Charlotte High School.



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Friday, June 6, 014


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PUNTA GORDA
HERALD ON


Friday, June 6,2014. Since 1893


RESTAURANT
Good Friends, Good Food, Good Times
Reservations recommended.


Free -
Hors 'd oedvres
ZLive Music."-
by
Tim Goodman &
Roseanne Linders
1975 Tamiami Trail, Punta Gorda oii'tT ,
941-575-7575
www.phils4l .com
Mon-Thurs & Sun 11-9 Fri & Sat 11-1(1


INSIDE



Wine


meets art





MEMORIAL DAY


A TRADITION

By GORDON BOWER, PGH Correspondent

he Downtown Merchants
Association's Third Thursday
Gallery Walk is still going
strong after 11 and a half
years. Started in January 2003, it was
designed to get people downtown
to frequent shops and restaurants
struggling to survive in the absence
of any foot traffic.
Newcomers may be unaware
that downtown at the turn of the
21 st century was a hollow shell
compared to its earlier days, when it
was the center of politics, commerce,
entertainment and social life.

GALLERY I P 8


LIVES


ON


MARK YOUR CALENDAR
Gallery Walk is always from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. on the third
Thursday of the month in downtown Punta Gorda. Here are the
rest of the dates for 2014: June 19, July 17, Aug.21, Sept. 18,
Oct. 16, Nov. 20 and Dec. 18.


Honoring

those who

sacrificed all





Fifth-graders

celebrate

promotion QM


Serving Puntd Gordd dnd Burnt Store. A section of the SON. 16 pdges





Friday, June 6, 204


Fun, food and frolic at Gallery Walk


PUNTA GORDA


VS.


A


TABLE OF CONTENTS


GalleryW alk ......................... 1, 8-9
Editor's Insights............. 2
Happenings on the Harbor ... 2
Business news.............. 3-7
Golf scores................. 7
Community beat............ 8-13
40 Years ............................. 14
School Buzz .......................... 15-16


or one Thursday a month, the
streets of downtown Punta Gorda
are packed with pedestrians,
each taking a leisurely stroll from one
building to the next to explore local
shops, jam out to the music played by
local bands and taste the treats served
at local establishments. The event I'm
describing is none other than the Third
Thursday of the Month GalleryWalk.
Although the weekends and late-night
escapades in the city tend to gravitate
toward the bar and restaurant scene,
most of the activity related to Gallery
Walk is centered around showcasing
our local mom-and-pop businesses.
Be they pet stores, realtors, interior
designers, boutiques, galleries or salons,
downtown merchants elect to keep
their doors open after hours, welcoming
visitors into their place of business from
5 p.m. to 8 p.m. on the third Thursday
of the month.


a


Pamela Staik




Pamela Staik is the editor of the
Punta Gorda Herald. Contact her at
pgherald@sun-herald.com.


Of course, the party doesn't just stick
to the 3-hour time slot. In fact, some
businesses in the area get into the swing
of things earlier and keep the party roll-
ing hours later. And, boy, do the Gallery
Walkers come out in full force.
During season, we at the Purple
House, one of the business sites for the
Charlotte Sun, see folks scavenging for
parking and good band-watching seats
as early as 4 p.m. The crowd may start
to thin out by 8 o'clock, but there is still
plenty of people cruising the streets in
search of entertainment, food and fun.


Although we don't participate in
GalleryWalk during the summer
months, the Purple House does stay
open late during season. We put out
snack plates of cheese, fruits and
vegetables, and we have been known
to bake brownies and cookies for our
guests around the holidays. We also put
out several bottles of wine and stock
a cooler full of beer and water for our
thirsty travelers.
And that's just our little spot in down-
town Punta Gorda. The rest of the area
is just as hopping with activities. Even
in the hot, stormy months of summer,
there is plenty of fun, nibbles, drinks, art,
music and deals to enjoy around town.
Read the cover story in this week's
Punta Gorda Herald, which continues
to pages 8 and 9, for more information
on the monthly Gallery Walk. The next
event is June 19, so mark your calen-
dars. You won't be disappointed.


Hurricane Charley


HERALD PHOTO BY CHRISTY FEINBERG
Were you here for Hurricane Charley 10 years ago? If so, the Charlotte Sun
would love to see you at 10 a.m. June 9 on the waterfront side of the Charlotte
Harbor Event and Conference Center, 75 Taylor St., Punta Gorda, for a group
photo. The photo originally was planned for the Charley statue in Laishley
Park. Due to sea wall work, the location has been moved to this beautiful spot
between the U.S. 41 bridges. We hope to see you there.


ON THE HARBOR


Submit information about public
events to Punta Gorda Herald Editor
Pamela Staik via email at pstaik@
sun-herald or by calling 941-206-1125.


A Florida Antique Tackle Collectors
Show is taking place June 6-7 at the
Punta Gorda Waterfront Hotel & Suites,
300 W. Retta Esplanade. Event hours are
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 6 and from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 7. Admission is $3
for adults, with kids under 16 admitted
for free. Bring old tackle to the event
for free appraisals. Call Dick Braun at
941-639-8330 or visit www.fatc.net for
details.


The grand opening of the community
garden behind the Public Safety Building,
located at 1410 Tamiami Trail, Punta
Gorda, is scheduled for 8 a.m. The garden


consists of 25 beds, as well as an ADA
plot, all of which are available on a first-
come, first-serve basis. For more informa-
tion, call Pat Prusha at 941-575-5535.


The Downtown Farmers Market on
Taylor Street, betweenWest Olympia
Avenue and Herald Court, runs from 8 a.m.
to I p.m. Call 941-391-4856 or visit www.
pgdowntownmerchants.com for details.
Opening-day games for the 2014
Jammers Youth Basketball League
will begin at 9 a.m. at South County
Regional Park, 670 Cooper St., Punta
Gorda. The league is run by the Punta
Gorda Police Department. For details,
visit http://www.ci.punta-gorda.fl.us/
depts/police/jammers.html or call
941-639-4111.
Tory's Trio Band will perform a free
concert from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. on the
dock at the Punta Gorda Historic Train
Depot, located at 1009 Taylor Road.
Refreshments will be available, and it is
advised to bring a chair. Call 941-639-
6774 for more information.
The Firefighter MDA Ball begins at
6 p.m. at the Charlotte Harbor Event


330 NORTH BREVARD
(NEXT TO FARM CREDIT)
ARCADIA
863-993-2020


and Conference Center, 75 Taylor St.,
Punta Gorda. The formal event is a
fundraiser for local families affected by
any of the 43 neuromuscular diseases
that are encompassed by the Muscular
Dystrophy Association. Tickets are $85,
which includes a cocktail hour, dinner,
dancing, formal photos and a silent
auction. Visit www.ccfemsda/2014ball
to purchase tickets. Call Mike Brucci at
941-276-8734 or Jamie Caro at 941-276-
9108 for more information.


The Punta Gorda Historical Society's
Farmers Market at History Park, 501
Shreve St., runs from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Antique dealers will also be on display.
Call 941-380-6814 for details.
A Yappy Hour in benefit of the
AnimalWelfare League of Charlotte
County is taking place outside Four
Points by Sheraton Punta Gorda
Harborside, 33 Tamiami Trail, Punta
Gorda, from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. An agility
course, pet photographer, music and a
"Fashion Paw-ty" with various prizes
will highlight the event's activities. Entry
is $20 per person, and party-goers can
knock $2 off the price of admission for


a)


FREE


EYE EXAM

FOR NEW PATIENTS


donating an item from the AWL Wish
List. Visit www.awlshelter.com or call
941-625-6720 for more information. A
rain date of June 17 has been set.


Registration for The Foot Landing's
free, weekly Pub Run begins at 6 p.m. at
the store, 117 Herald Court, Suite 1112,
Punta Gorda. This week's event will end
at the Celtic Ray. All levels of runners
and walkers are welcome. Call 941-347-
7751 for details.


A free design seminar, called "Bring
High Point Home," will be presented
by Interiors by SandStar at 5 p.m. at the
Punta Gorda Isles Civic Association,
2001 Shreve St. During the event,
designer Olena Turkalo will share
ideas and products she learned about
during a recent trade show in High
Point, North Carolina. Reserve a spot by
calling 941-205-2993.
The Gilchrist ParkWaterfront Music
Jam Session, known as Guitar Army, will
take place from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. at the
park, 400W Retta Esplanade, Punta Gorda.


complete medical exam with one
of our board certified eye doctors
includes prescription for
eyeglasses, and tests for cataracts,
glaucoma and other eye diseases.
Offer applies to new patients
59 years and older.
Offer Does Not A apply To Freedom And
Optimum HealthiPIan Participants.
Coupon Expires 7/16/2014


PUNTA GORDA HERALD3MEMBERof theAudit Bureau of Circulation. USPS 743170 The Sun is published daily by Sun Coast Media Group, Inc.,
23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980-2198.
Derek Dunn-Rankin CEO, Chairman.......206-1001 ADVERTISING
David Dunn-Rankin President, SunPublisher ...... 206-1003 Leslee Peth, Sun Advertising Director/P Publisher ................... 205-6400
Chris Porter Exec. Editor.........206-1134 Mike Ruiz, Retail Advertising Manager.......................... 205-6402
NEW SPAPERS Rusty Pray Charlotte Editor......206-1168 Colleen Daymude, Advertising Account Executive.........205-6403
Pamela Stalk Punta Gorda Herald Editor ... 206-1125 Lori White, Advertising Account Executive..............205-6404
Charlotte DeSoto Englewood North Port Venice Email: pgherald@sun-herald.com CIRCULATION
23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980. 206-1000 Michele Bellue Designer...........206-1000 Mark Yero, Circulation Director...................206-1317


2529 TAMIAMI TRAIL
PUNTA GORDA

941-639-2020


SHerald Page 2


I I I





Friday, June 62014


PHOTO PROVIDED
The Punta Gorda Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon-cutting ceremony on May 29 at Studio
Seven Center for Creative Studies, 2509 Rio De Janeiro Ave., Deep Creek.


Events heat up calendar


here is a lot going on in Punta
Gorda and the surrounding area
this weekend and beyond. Here
is a sample of upcoming events in the
region:

Cleanup efforts announced
for Peace River
The 20th annual Peace River Cleanup,
sponsored by the Nav-A-Gator Grill at
DeSoto Marina and Womack Sanitation,
will take place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
June 7-8 at the Nav-A-Gator, 9700
SW Riverview Circle, Lake Suzy. The
Charlotte Harbor Parrot Head Club and
The Navigator Boat Club will organize
the cleanup efforts, and all boat, canoe
and kayak clubs, nature lovers, environ-
mentalists and individuals are invited to
take part in the weekend cleanup.
A prize will be awarded for the
most unique or unusual item found.
Sponsorships and donations are being
accepted. For information on how to
help, call 941-627-3474.
The Nav-A-Gator will provide live
music from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m., and a cover
charge of canned goods or non-perish-
able food items will be accepted.

Breakfast networking
event announced
Members of the Punta Gorda Chamber
of Commerce will meet for the monthly
Business Over Breakfast meeting at 7:15
a.m. on June 11 at Edison State College,
Charlotte Campus, 26300 Airport Road,
Punta Gorda. The event will be led by Pat
Land, campus president. Guest speaker
Keith Callaghan of the Lee Memorial
Health Foundation will update the group
on the progress of the Golisano Children's
Hospital project in Southwest Florida.
Having the event at Edison will
be a timely program, as the college
will be changing its name to Florida
SouthWestern State College on July 1.
To reserve a spot at this event, call the
chamber office at 941-639-3720 before
noon on June 10 for catering purposes.
There is no cost and this is also a great
way to get to know the chamber and its
members.

Chamber helps plan
fall events


John R. Wright



John R. Wright is president of
the Punta Gorda Chamber of
Commerce. Contact him atjrwright@
puntagorda-chamber.com.


PUNTA GORDA



CONTACT THE CHAMBER
For more information about events listed in
this column, contact the Punta Gorda Chamber
of Commerce at 941-639-3720 or visit its website
at www.puntagordachamber.com. While on the
chamber's website, don't forget to sign up for the
"Friday Facts" newsletter.

planning some large events for the fall
that are open to the public.
In September, the chamber will offer
an "It's a Knockout" competition. The
bragging rights for Sandra's restaurant
will expire at that time as a new cham-
pion is crowned, unless the current title
holder wins again.
Teams of six people, with a minimum
of two females per team, can register
now for the event. Each team costs
$50 to enter, and fun, team-building
activities are guaranteed.
The date has been set for this year's
Downtown Merchants Association's
annual Oktoberfest, which will follow
the winning format of past years on
Taylor Street, right in front of the
historic courthouse. The event will take
place Oct. 4.
The DMA is looking for event spon-
sors, so, if you see this as a fit for you,


The Punta Gorda Chamber isWWRIGHT 17


Blue Facial included with all grooming procedures
*not to be combined with any other offers.


The minimally invasive surgery techniques performed at
Bayfront Health Port Charlotte and Punta Gorda give you
advantages not found anywhere else in Charlotte County.
Using robotic-assisted surgery, surgeons can perform what
was once considered a complex operation, with complete
precision. Smaller incisions, less pain and a quicker recovery,
now that's a beautiful thing.


Learn more at BayfrontHealthRobotics.com,
or for a free referral, call 941-637-2497.


Charlene Okomski, D.O.
OBGYN


N


How is robotic-assisted gynecological surgery
different than conventional surgery? Learn the
pros and cons, then sit at the helm of the robot
and take it for a test drive. Free.
Thursday, June 19 16 7:00 p.m.
Boyfront Heolth Punto Gordo
809 E. Morion Ave, Punto Gordo
To register for this free seminar and event,
call 941-637-2497.


Bayfront Health
Robotics


Bayfront Health Robotics.com
Port Charlotte: 941-766-4122 Punta Gorda: 941-639-3131


Herdld Pdge 3





Friday, June 6, 014


Art meets wine at Chamber event


he Punta Gorda Chamber of
Commerce offers a Corks 'n'
Canvas program, which enables
people to try their hand at painting a
masterpiece with the help of a local
artist, a few glasses of wine and cama-
raderie.
Offered four times a year, the pro-
gram is ideal for anyone who has ever
dreamed of becoming an artist or just
wants to give it a try. For the $35 cover
price, the evening includes all the art
supplies needed to take home a one-
of-a-kind piece of art work, as well as
the opportunity to enjoy wine, nibbles
and a night on the town with friends,
co-workers and neighbors.
John Wright, president of the Punta
Gorda Chamber of Commerce, said the
events always sell out. And the evening
of May 22 was no exception.
Thirty-six men and women gathered
at 6 p.m. at the Charlotte Community
Foundation, located at 227 Sullivan St.
Each received their own canvas, acrylic
paints and brushes, and instruction
was offered by local artist Ashley


Marilyn Thorndycraft




Marilyn Thomdycraft writes about
the local art scene. Contact her at
tcraftl@embarqmail.com.


Leonard, the owner of Brushstrokes by
Ashley Studio on Zemel Road. She was
assisted by Vito ViChiaro, who helped
distribute paint and supplies.
Whatever nervousness participants
felt going into the event was washed
aside byWright, who helped serve wine
and hors d'oeuvres, both of which were
provided by OPUS.
Pat Oliva, who helped clean the paint
brushes, wash glasses and kept the
wine flowing, said the Corks 'n' Canvas
events are always popular.
"These classes have become tre-
mendously popular and are always
sold out well in advance of the event,"
she said. "We even have many repeat
customers."


HERALD PHOTOS BY
MARILYN THORNDYCRAFT


Offering instruction for the Corks'n' Canvas
event on May 22 is local artist Ashley Leonard.
Here, she demonstrates to the group how to
make a tropical fish pop out of the canvas.
Beginning in the fall, the events
will alternate between the Charlotte


Barbara Carr and Sheila Degnan enjoy the mix
of wine and art during the May 22 Corks'n'
Canvas event.
Community Foundation and the Visual
Arts Center, 210 Maud St., Punta Gorda.
The next Corks 'n' Canvas event is set
for 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on July 24 at the
Charlotte Community Foundation. Call
the chamber at 941-639-3720 to reserve
a spot. Visit www.puntagordachamber.
com for details.


LEFT: During the
Corks'n' Canvas event
May 22, local artist
Ashley Leonard makes
her way around the room
to offer assistance to
participants.


RIGHT: Keith and
Christa Callaghan joined
Terri Williams in the
art-making fun associ-
ated with the Corks'n'
Canvas event on May 22.


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% Bayfront Health
JO Port Charlotte a Punta Gorda


. F


AmerNic' EIMSPAPiyAS
Amer caBEST Commum Daily


Local artist Ashley Leonard was
in charge of leading the group
through the May 22 Corks'n' Canvas
event.


,AS ifji-uI

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:Herld Pdge 4


cll*-SSl--l-r
CFM






:Friday June 6,2014


Herald Page 5


Michael Saunders & Company


CHISI' I& Ll aLEDNRELETE


18U S Gult blvd 40I Sunset Uir 1 131 acida Point -t
$735,000 MLS D5785472 $710,000 MLS N5784630 $649,000 MLS D5798054
Kevin Mackin 941 769-0198 941-473 7750 Maryanne Kurtz 941-441 6624 941-485 5421 Sue &Jim Reske 941 276-4219 9419644


420 Alligator Dr 320 Wild Pine Way 604 Narvaezi St
$575,000 MLS D5798166 $550,000 MLS N5784607 $495,000 MLS N5784726
Bob Lorence 239-6822106 941-473 7750 Susan Brooker 941 223-6055 941-493 2500 Helen Moore 941 724 2030 941-48


308 Useppa Is
$1,295,000 MLS C7044007
Brian & Mary McColgan 239-410 7 941 964


318 Uulmer Ur 10U Meredith Ur IUU1 Hel-lew t
$439,900 MLS N5783479 $399,000 MLS D5798234 $379,000 MLS D579816
Martha Pike 941-716-4392 941-485-5421 Kevin Hyde 941 628-4730 941 964 2000 Elizabeth Burr 941 855-1142 941-47


7295 Manasota Key Rd
$1,274,900 MLS D5796067
Ellen Baker & M44ichael Hollenbeck941-268 4999 941-47


503 PennyroyalPI 3313 Sunset Key Cir # 207 733 Carnoustie Ter# 17
$339,000 MLS N5784720 $329,900 MLS C7055498 $329,900 MLS N5784688
Robert Goldman & BeverlyWeltzien 941 4002756 941 4855421 Ken Parr 941 916-1252 941 505-5555 Cindy Dillander 941 716-3203 941-49


7I Kotonlda ir I 77 6 ourtside Landings ir 3296 Village Ln
$269,000 MLS D5798056 $259,000 MLS C7052398 $249,900 MLS C7055941
Joanne Pattona 941-626-0880 941 473-7750 Jennifer Calenda '41-916-0/98)41 5555 Diana Deyampert 843-22
MUDAY, MCNEM
4PE44HCU4ES41D D


849 941


ENGLEWOOD
ENGLEWOOD. 2321 Manasota Beach Rd.
$795,000. Reatha Valera, 941 875 4770.
#D5797266
ENGLEWOOD. 1375 Beach Rd # 308.
$499,000. Maryann Casey, 941 468 3741.
#D5798161
MARINA ISLES. 150 Englewood Isles Pkwy
# 306. $195,000. Dianne Corcoran, 941 266
1426. #N5784366
NOKOMIS/NORTH VENICE
ENCHANTED ISLES. 406 Sunrise Dr.
$959,000. Janet Oberholtzer, 941 451 6722.
#N5783868
INLETS. 79 Inlets Blvd # 79. $249,900.
Marilyn Tibball, 941 350 1832. #N5782733
VENETIAN. 462 Montelluna Dr $200,000.
Martha Pike, 941 716 4392. #N5783805
OSPREY
RIVENDELL. 811 Golden Pond Ct.
$439,900. Marybeth Tvaroch, 941 815 4202.
#D5798035
PUNTA GORDA
PRAIRIE CREEK PARK. 17901 Wood Path
Ct. $673,800. Debra Gurin, 941 875 3242.
#C7052040
BURNT STORE LAKES. 23967 Cedar
Rapids Rd. $359,000. Jeff Ray, 765 977 4045.
#C7055040
ROTONDA WEST
ROTONDA WEST. 162 Mark Twain Ln.
$279,000. Maryann Casey, 941 468 3741.
#D5797112
ROTONDA WEST. 311 Antis Drive.
$274,617. Elizabeth Burr, 941 855 1142.
#D5796972
VENICE
VENEZIA PARK. 708 Nokomis S Ave.
$269,900. Martha Pike, 941 716 4392.
#N5784102

ENGLEWOOD PUNTAGORDA VENICE
9414737750 9416390000 9414855421
BOCA GRANDE BURNT STORE PLANTATION


572 Toledo Rd 19127 Navarro St
$245,000 MLS M545137 $239,900 MLS N5783404
Janet Fleming 941 524-8240 941 74 6300 Scott Johnston 941 232545


2996 Phoenix Palm Ter 1205 Laurel Pines Dr
$226,000 MLS D5798144 $224,999 MLS N578351
James Callahan 941 676-0901 941-473 7750 Derryle Berger 941-223


6821 Pindo Blvd
$849,000 MLS N5784310
Edie Lomason 941 320-6298 941-485 542


941-485 542


327 Falling Waters Ln # 180 2411 Sunninglow St
$199,900 MLS D5798211 $156,000 MLS C70548


II Bunker Rd 2561 Whispering Pine Ln
$224,000 MLS D5798158 $219,000 MLS N5784698
Randall McLendon/JoniMcLendon 941-504-5675 941-473-7750 Katie Malloy 941-468-2483 941-48


53 W Bay Heights Rd # 307 Englewood 329 Glen Oak Rd
$1,500/month annual rental MLS D5797906 $2,300 MLS N5784390
]can Rebeck941 204 3155 941-473 7750 Robin Sullivan 941552 42


Venice


RETA S IPOPRY AAGMNTIMOTAG ITEI OMECAL m chesa n er*o





Friday, June 6, 014


Leslee Peth




LesleePeth is the publisher of the
Punta Gorda Herald. Contact her at
lpeth@sun-herald.com.



Golfers



needed for



Octagon



golf scramble


A Summer Safari Golf Scramble in
benefit of the Octagon Wildlife
anctuary is taking place June 14
at St. Andrews South Golf Club, 1901
Deborah Drive, Punta Gorda. Regis-
tration and a continental breakfast
start at 7:30 a.m., with a shotgun start
scheduled for 8:30 a.m.
The $75 registration cost includes
the green fees, a cart, breakfast, lunch
and prizes for closest to the pin, the
longest drive, hole-in-one and other
contests.
All proceeds will benefit Octagon, a
facility in southern Punta Gorda that
seeks to care for and give a lifelong
home to abandoned, abused or
neglected wild and exotic animals. The
refuge is located at 41660 Horseshoe
Road in Punta Gorda.
Call Sue Garand at 941-639-5261,
ext. 3, to sign up for the golf event or to
receive more information.


PHOTO
PROVIDED
This lion, named
Zulu, seems
content now,
but the marks
on his face were
formed because
a previous owner
kept him in a
small dog crate
hoping it would
keep him from
growing. He is
one of a dozen
big cats that are
now wards of
Octagon Wildlife
Sanctuary.


F-77U


P4-
4


'F 4


'2


LLZ


FILE PHOTOS


ie Locals!

atilffordab le Prices


FEW


AVINGS MENU

IONDAY, June 2nd

Atree and get the second

r lesser value 1/2 price
6:30PM Not valid with any other offer


$24.95


Have the
OPUS
Experience
Today!


d to make reservations visit us at
.com or call 941-575-2352
#116 (corner of Marion Ave & Sullivan)
3 17, go West, toward PUNTA GORDA


ABOVE, LEFT: Lilly, a black leopard, has been a resident at Octagon Wildlife Sanctuary for about
12 years. RIGHT: Rainbow and Harley say hello to visitors at Octagon Wildlife Sanctuary.


HERALD PHOTO BY DONNELL BATES
LEFT: Dr. David Klein poses for a photo
with honoree Kathy Hollinger-Strayton
during a tribute on June 1 at the
Cultural Center of Charlotte County. She
has been an important fixture in this
community for several decades, and
she worked with the Charlotte Sun in
many different capacities for 19 years.
Be sure to congratulate her if you see
her out and about.


DONATIONS NEEDED!

"Your donate Clan,-Usabigle dIemse"
Please Donate Clean, Usable Items.


Call To Schedule A Pickup For
Large Furniture & Appliances
Now accepting pick up in Arcadia. All money received from donations
in Arcadia will be utilized to assist DeSoto County residents in need.
Charlotte County to assist people in need in Charlotte County.



SALVATION ARMY
THRIFT STORES
1048 Tamiami Trail, Punta Gorda
Open: Mon.- Sat. 9am 5pm


:erdld


Page 6





:Friday June 6,2014Hrad Pg1


I GOLF SCORES
All golf scores must be emailed to
golfscores@sun-herald.com.

0 BURNT STORE GOLF
& ACTIVITY CLUB
Holes-in-one
May 10: Phyllis Love.
May 13: William Story.
Cross Country Scramble
May 17
FLIGHT A:
1.) Fred Hart, Vic Martel, Bill
Story, Jack Orr.
2.) Bill Brandt, Elba Brandt,
Morton Fleishman, Rhea Fleishman.
3.) Phyllis Love, Raymond Love,
Lee Plank, Barbara Mueller.
FLIGHT B:
1.) Millie Hierro, Tom Laredo, Phil
Leonard, Robert Paul.
2.) Jim Merz, Larry Marks, Debra
Lehmann, Jerry Tollini.
3.) Paula Allton, Jim Pursley, Judy
Coyne.
FLIGHT C:
1.) Ron Marker, Sheryl Marker,
Carole McLean, Andrew Wilhite.
2.) Don Clements, Margaret
Hiestand, Donald Barratt, Marilyn
Whitley.
3.) Windy Synenberg, Rick Kellner,
Linda Wright, Babe Ahrens.
9-Hole Scramble
May 20
1.) Bill Story, Vic Martel, Joyce
Punt.
Ladies' League
May 21
FLIGHT A:
1.) Paula Allton.
2.) Linda Wright.
3.) Missy Coykendall.
FLIGHT B:
1.) Brenda Holmes.
2.) Sue Leffingwell.
3.) Diane Mitchell.
Men's League
May 21
FLIGHT A:
1.) Don Clements.
2.) Dick Bagwell.
FLIGHT B:
1.) Larry Marks.
2.) Stan Hochstadt.
3.) Tommy Shannon.
4.) Bob San Juan, Larry Marks.
Scramble
May 24
1.) Lee Plank, Mary Welch, Janet
Wood.
CLOSEST TO THE PIN: Jerry Hunter,
Reggie Conrad, Bob Wood, Wendy
Synenberg.
Hole-in-one
May 26: Lee Plank.
Red, White & Blue Scramble
May 26
FLIGHT A:
1.) Todd Mattas, James Powers,
Gary Tenharmsel, George Folio.
2.) Maryanne Sanjuan, Diane
Mitchell, Gary Mitchell, Bob Sanjuan.
3.) Tommy Shannon, Daniel
Pontius, Robert Nuckols, Tom Schmit.
FLIGHT B:
1.) Ray Love, Lee Plank, Barbara
Mueller, Phyllis Love.
2.) Jim Pursley, Joel Spector,
Marianne Gasner, Paula Allton.


3.) Jerry Hunter, Bob Wood, Janet
Wood, Lynn Hunter.
FLIGHT C:
1.) Ed Hutcheson, Bobby Vail,
Lynda McDermott, Larry Marks.
2.) Linda Wright, Babe Ahrens,
Joan Cullen, Ed Kosiewicz.
3.) Jerry Tollini, Jim Merz, Debra
Lehmann, Jim Willhoite.
FLIGHT D:
1.) Jack Orr, Paul Nicholls,
Deborah Nicholls, Pat Folio.
2.) Wendy Synenberg, Gene
Wilson, Darlene Wilson, Rick Kellner.
3.) Betty Hallowell, Marlowe
Clark, Walter Clark, Rich Hallowell.
Ladies' League
May 28
FLIGHT A:
1.) Mary Ann SanJuan.
2.) Babe Ahrens.
3.) Jeanne Brown.
FLIGHT B:
1.) Pat Lawlor.
2.) Rhea Fleishman.
3.) Marianne Gassner.
Men's League
May 28
FLIGHT A:
1.) Don Clements.
2.) Gary Mitchell.
FLIGHT B:
1.) Stan Hochstadt.
2.) Bill Brandt, Tommy Shannon.

0 DEEP CREEK
GOLF CLUB
Hole-in-one
May 20
Thomas Burkhart aced Hole No.I11
from 115 yards using a SW golf club.
It was witnessed by Mike Burrich,
Bob Howell and Diane Mclvor.

0 KINGS GATE
GOLF CLUB
Holes-in-one
May 21: Art Vespi aced Hole No. 3
from 105 yards using a 7-iron. It was
witnessed by Clare Vespi.
May 27: Karen Combs aced Hole
No. 2 from 93 yards using a 5-hybrid.
It was witnessed by Ingrid Luecht,
Marty DeWitt and Elaine Cronin.
May 27: Alvin Messer aced Hole
No. 12 from 118 yards using a No.
7 metal wood. It was witnessed by
Mike Orobello, Bill Ryan and John
Nunes.

0 KINGSWAY
COUNTRY CLUB
Sunday Couples, 1 Best Ball
odd/2 Best Balls even holes
May 18
1.) Dave and Carolyn Stewart; PJ &
Carol Fisher, 87.
Ladies' Day, 2 Best Balls
front 9/1 Best Ball back 9
May 22
1.) Mary Albers, Carolyn Stewart,
Carol Fisher, 89.

0 RIVERWOOD GOLF
CLUB
Hole-in-one
May 23: Warren Fowler aced
Hole No. 16 from 156 yards using a


5-hybrid. It was witnessed by Tony
Grcevic and Dennis Siok.

0 ROTONDA GOLF &
COUNTRY CLUB
Scramble
May 26
1.) Charles Elliot, William Tait, Carl
Kaltreider, Ed Johnson, 35.
2.) Jim Jones, Jim Knowlton, Dave
Weinberger, John German, 37.
CLOSEST TO THE PIN: Hole No. 3:
Jim Knowlton; Hole No. 8: William
Tait.

0 ST. ANDREWS SOUTH
GOLF CLUB
LGA, 9-Hole, 1 Low Net of 3
May 22
1.) Norma Brownlow, Lucy Mills,
Helen Anderson, 29.
LGA, 18-Hole, 1 Low Net of 3
May 22
1.) Trudy Cheatham, Dianne Lupp,
54.
2014 Memorial Day Scramble

May 26
FLIGHT A:
1.) Ed and Joyce Dye; Jack and
Laura Ferrell, 54.9.
2.) Rich Kaplan and Denise
Horne-Kaplan; Kevin and Sally
Drehmer, 55.5.
3.) Jim and Emma Becker; Mark
and Robin Katz, 56.1.
FLIGHT B:
1.) Rex and Helen Anderson; Lou
and Sue Dieke, 57.6.
2.) Harvey and Marianne
Goldberg; Randy Jess and Meride
Dooriss, 57.9.
3.) Paul and Donna Flagg; Rudy
and Dianne Lupp, 58.1.
CLOSEST TO THE PIN: Hole No.
7: Mark Katz; Hole No. 16: Carol
Wetherald.

0 TWIN ISLES
COUNTRY CLUB
Ladies'9-Hole, Low Net
May 21
FLIGHT A:
1.) Gunny Haefner, 37.
2.) Mary Collins, 38.
3.) Cecelia Eames, 37.
FLIGHT B:
1.) Laura Felmore, 33.
2.) Ann Ashworth, 35.
3.) Mary Ellen Hanley, 37.
FLIGHT C:
1.) 37 Kate Curley, 37.
T-2.) Joanne McGraw, Ann
Fitzsimmons, 41.
Ladies' 18-Hole, Stableford
Points
May 21
FLIGHT A:
1.) Linda Seber, 38.
2.) Eileen Roehrig, 33.
FLIGHT B:
1.) Debbie Snedeker, 35.
2.) Sue Galvin, 32.
FLIGHT C:
1.) Sandy Lorden, 43.
2.) Lorrie Ross, 34.
FLIGHT D:
1.) Anita Campion, 43.
2.) Joan Montovano, 35.


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WRIGHT

FROM PAGE 3

give the chamber a call to discuss it in
more detail.
On Oct. 11, the Punta Gorda
Chamber will be managing the out-
door pops concert, which will be held
at Edison, or as it will be known in
September, Florida SouthWestern State
College. This is always a fun event.
The chamber is currently finalizing
the talent for this year, and event spon-
sors are needed. For sponsorship level
details, call the chamber office today.
As always, a percentage of the
proceeds will go to the Edison College
Foundation to support the education
of local students.
On Oct. 25, in conjunction with Twin
Isles Country Club, the chamber is
bringing back an old tradition with a
fun-filled Halloween Golf Scramble,
which will start at noon and be
followed by a poolside costume party.
While full details are still being
finalized, now is the time to purchase
sponsorships and register foursomes.
Call the chamber to sign up.

Wine & Jazz tickets
available
Just in case you missed the


chamber's recent announcement, there
are only a fewVIP tickets remaining
for next year's 10th annual Wine & Jazz
Festival. The lineup is Dave Koz, Nick
Colionne and Mindi Abair.
Tickets are on sale for all categories,
and many of the VIP tickets have
already been snapped up. Don't delay.
Either visit the Punta Gorda Chamber
of Commerce website, www.punta
gordachamber.com, or call the office
to purchase tickets. Full details of
what is included in each ticket price
can also be found on the website.
The only disclaimers are, sadly, no
pets and definitely no coolers. It is
with great pride that the chamber
brings such a talented lineup to the
city.
This coming week, the Punta Gorda
Chamber will be honored by the Arts
& Humanities Council of Charlotte
County for putting together this
festival. We are truly honored to receive
this accolade in recognition of the
chamber's significant contribution to
the promotion of performing arts in
our area. We'll treasure this award for
years to come.
The event begins at 5:30 p.m. on June
12 at the Charlotte Harbor Yacht Club,
4400 Lister St., Port Charlotte. Tickets
are $40 and include hors d'oeuvres
and a cash bar. For those interested in
attending this special event, call 941-
764-8100 to purchase tickets.


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Herald Pdge





HFriday June 6 2014H


GALLERY
FROM PAGE 1

Decay started to set in during the
1960s. The two famous hotels -
Charlotte Harbor and the Princess -
burned down, and longtime businesses
closed as shoppers headed to shopping
malls or other cities to buy what they
used to get in downtown stores.
Downtown didn't go down without
a fight. Some businesses hung on,
and the Punta Gorda Mall, fortified by
anchors Publix and Eckerds, still drew
people downtown.
The city also celebrated its 100th
birthday and first downtown Block
Party in 1987 as part of a revitalization
drive that at least stemmed the decline
and gave a long-needed sprucing up to
downtown streets and buildings.
Nevertheless, something was missing
- people.

Getting people downtown
The dearth of foot traffic did not go
unnoticed, and a group of citizen vol-
unteers formed the Downtown Focus
Group to figure out a way to get more
people to shop and eat downtown.
Their solution was the Third
Thursday Gallery Walk, a night each
month when merchants would stay
open and offer wine, music, art, food
samples, free trolley rides, games with
prizes and funky themes that had peo-
ple showing up in silly-looking outfits.
That first Gallery Walk was a reve-
lation. Thousands showed up dressed
appropriately for the night's theme
- the Roaring '20s over the course
of the 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. event, as people,


Marty Wisher models one of designer Helen
Gerro's creations during the March Gallery
Walk.


Gordon Bower




Gordon Bower is a freelance writer
and photographer. Contact him at
glbower@comcast.net.


ON THE COVER:
FILE PHOTOS
MAIN: Checking out a display of Brighton
jewelry at Tiki's Boutique on Marion Avenue
during the August 2013 Gallery Walk is
Ashley Shaffer.
INSET: Toasting to the holiday season
at Jack's on Marion during the December
2013 Gallery Walk are Pat Lewis and Jane
Rawlinson.

mostly from Punta Gorda but also from
neighboring cities, strolled the streets,
checked out the shops and galleries,
sampled free wine and nibbles and
listened to live music.
Adding to the crowd and also creat-
ing a buzz that night was the opening
of River City Grill by Doug Amaral and
his partners, who expected 250 diners
and had 540.
Amaral always tips his hat to the
Celtic Ray and Dean's South of the
Border, but a strong argument can be
made that GalleryWalk and the open-
ing of the trendy eatery are what first
put downtown on the eating, drinking
and entertainment map.
From then on, Gallery Walk was the
place to be every third Thursday.

Gallery Walk today
Coordinated by Downtown Focus
member Marilyn Thorndycraft, the
Downtown Merchants Association took
over Gallery Walk shortly after the kick-
off event, and much has changed over
the years. While the music, art, food
and wine are still featured, the trolley
no longer runs, themes are only used
occasionally and games each month
are left up to individual merchants.
Nevertheless, it still draws big
crowds, especially in season.
Jerry Presseller, president of the
DMA and proprietor with wife Patti of
two downtown businesses, has been
involved in organizing the walk since
the beginning, and he believes the
numbers still look good, especially
during season.
He said of attendance, "We're
definitely in the thousands 1,500
to 2,000, probably more like 1,500.
It's hard to tell. We're so spread out,
it's hard to judge. Those are sheer
guesstimates."
Even if imprecise, those numbers
also mean GalleryWalk is still a hit
with downtown businesses. Amaral is a
true believer; he sees proof in his cash
register receipts and the attitude of his
customers every third Thursday.
"From a financial and economic


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FILE PHOTOS


Candy Hays, Sam Sanders and 4-year-old Khyrie Sofge check out the vintage and antique cars on
display during the June 2013 Gallery Walk.


Posing for a picture at Sea Grape Gallery during the July 2013 Gallery Walk are Thelma Daida,
Susan Kapuchinski and Don Krasny.


GALLERY

FROM PAGE 8

She said, "We wanted it to continue.
Some people don't come every month
but do come out once in a while. We
don't want people to forget about it. It's
well ingrained in their minds that the
third Thursday is always Gallery Walk,
whether they come down or not. We've
been doing it for 11 years, and I don't
want to change. It doesn't make sense."
As of now, merchants will continue
to entice Gallery Walkers during the
summer by offering weather-resistant
regulars entertainment and lower prices.
Specials like two-for-one drinks and buy-
one, get-one meals will be available. At
the June 19 event, merchants will have a
sidewalk sale with merchandise on tables
at special prices.
Consideration is also being given to
restart the games, in which people visit
businesses and get a card stamped to win
prizes up to $100.
Presseller said, "We're thinking about
bringing the games back, probably in July
if we can get them started by then. We
have to have somebody make the game


up, and nobody wants to take the bull by
the horns."
Benande is supportive of the change
and said, "We haven't quite decided yet;
there are logistical problems. Even if we
just dress up, that would be good. We
probably won't implement it until fall and
then do occasional games year around.
My main thing is let's not do away with
GalleryWalk in the summer."

Surviving the summer
Making it through the summer dol-
drums is always difficult, especially for
downtown businesses. A core of loyalists
helps, but they don't spend money like
seasonal residents, who, Presseller said,
tend to eat more, have drinks with their
lunches and shop more. What is needed
are more and hardier shop-local resi-
dents, and he urges those who come out
only in cool weather to give the hot third
Thursdays a try.
"Rain or shine, we're open," he said.
"If it rains, just duck into a restaurant for
a glass of wine. When it stops, go back
out. I don't think anybody here, including
myself, will melt. It would be a fantastic
idea to come on down and enjoy down-
town. We're here year around just for you,
so please give us your support."


Local artist Becky VanPelt displays one of her paintings at Sunart Gallery & Frames during Gallery
Walk in October 2013.


LEFT: Dogs are
always welcome
at Gallery Walk.
Posing with
their Pomera-
nians during the
October 2013
Gallery Walk are
Jim Parker with
Maya and Liz
Ameruso with
Dexter.


Young musicians from Good Shepherd Day Musician Les DeCosta and his traveling band
School performed during the November 2013 rode through downtown Punta Gorda while
Gallery Walk. Here, Sreejita Roy concentrates playing music in honor of Mardi Gras for the
hard on her violin piece while entertaining the hundreds of people out and about for Gallery
audience. Walk in February.



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Herald Page 10


Honoring those who gave all


here have been 1.8 million men
and women who have given their
lives while in the United States
military since 1775.
That figure is extremely important
and should always be remembered.
That's why so many people gathered
May 26 at the Kiwanis Veterans Garden
in Laishley Park for the Charlotte
CountyVeterans Council's Memorial
Day ceremony to honor those 1.8
million who fell while defending the
nation.
Members from many veterans' orga-
nizations Charlotte County Marine
Corps League Detachment 756, Delta
Company of the Vietnam Brotherhood,
Vietnam Veterans of America Gulf
Coast Chapter 1037, American Legion
Post 110 Riders and the Patriot Riders
of America assembled to pay tribute.
"We assemble here as survivors of
war and peace and remember those
we lost," said Bill "Buff" Martin,
commanding officer of Delta Company
of the Vietnam Brotherhood and vice
president of the Veterans Council.
Veterans Council President Dave
Donohew read the poem "Freedom
isn't Free" to remind everyone of the
sacrifices veterans and their families
make for this country.
"I thought of all the children, of the
mothers and the wives, of fathers,
sons and husbands with interrupted
lives," Donohew read, "I thought about
a graveyard at the bottom of the sea,
of unmarked graves in Arlington. No,
freedom isn't free."
Retired U.S. Marine Corps Maj.
Laurence M. Altenburg, current com-
mander of the CCMCL Detachment
756, was the keynote speaker. He


Al Hemingay




Al Hemingway is a freelance writer.
Contact him at alhemingway3@
gmail.com.


reminded the crowd that no one prays
for peace more than a veteran who has
served in war.
"We take our freedoms for granted,"
Altenburg said. "We forget what the
price of liberty cost. The men we honor
today paid that price with their lives."
Altenburg told the audience that we
have a "tenuous peace" today that was
bought and paid for with the blood of
those who died for it and those who are
still serving around the globe. As each
grave is decorated with an American
flag, it will symbolize the fighting spirit
of those that were lost.
"That spirit is so unbreakable,"
he said. "The men I served with in
Vietnam had it, as well as those in
uniform today. They are prepared to
defend and die for their country."
That indomitable American spirit
was embodied in the individuals who
served in all the nation's conflicts and
inspired Francis Scott Key to write
the National Anthem, according to
Altenburg.
"We can take hope and comfort
from his words, 'Land of the free and
the home of the brave,"' he said. "How
many times have we heard and sang
those words?"
Altenburg said that he does not want
the country's young men and women


We Install


turn to the experts 6nd Service
-l .. e j _


World War II and Vietnam veteran Lee Chalifour, a member of the Military Order of the Purple
Heart, stops to chat with members of the Patriot Riders of America Color Guard.
to have to march off to war to learn to duty, honor, patriotism, and, most of
love and respect the flag. They should all, the American spirit.
be taught that it is not an abstract idea "It is important to mourn their
but learn about the "power and beauty deaths," he said. "We must never
of our flag" and what it stands for forget."


Members of American Legion Post 110 Honor Guard salute as the National Anthem was sung by
Celine Galvan.


r( a- i i i e-- -0




:Friddy June 6,2014 Hrl ae1


4 .


MORE REASONS
I ii kfl i~i~ i 1 Vimui 131~ ~


'Irria


III


Herdld Pdge 11





Herald Page 12


Key Lime Festival delights at Fishermen's Village


Donnell Bates




Donnell Bates is a freelance
photographer. Contact her at
donnellbates@hotmail.com.


n May 17, Fishermen's Village
went green with lime soaps,
scrubs, pies and drinks as guests
enjoyed the Key Lime Festival.


Nine-year-old Maegan Downey hopes to win
this candy jar full of lime taffy by guessing how
many are in it.


HERALD PHOTOS BY DONNELL BATES
Cody Richards had the honor of being the Donald and Ginger Peters stroll through Fish-
official lime greeter at the Key Lime Festival on ermen's Village during the Key Lime Festival on
May 17. May 17.


Cool lime yogurt from Island Yogurt hit the spot for guests Tabby Supples and Sarah Tribelhorn.


Rosemary Webster and Natalia Pitman, both 6, make a wish as they throw their pennies into the
fountain.


Children exposed to secondhand smoke have higher rates of asthma and
respiratory infections, and are more likely to become smokers themselves.
Help them be safe...please don't smoke around kids.
For more information, contact the Department of Health in Charlotte
County, 941-624-7279 or visit tobaccofreeflorida.com


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Friday June 6,2014 Herald Page 13




Hibiscus pageant takes stage at festival

T he 10th annual Hibiscus P agean tD onnell Bates

was held during the Hibiscus
Festival on May 17, with girls
between the ages of 4 and 10 competing
for the crown. Also, new to the pageant
this year were boys between the ages
ot 5and6 wo al wet hme iththeDonneliRates is a freelance
of 5 and 6, who all went home with the photographer Contact her at
title of "Master." donnellbates@hotmail.com.

Competing in

the Junior Miss
category for
girls between
the ages of
6 and 7 are
Gabriell Schiano, x*
Caimbry Gallant,J11,

Campanella,
Grace Miller, In the 8 to 10 age group, Bianca Colaluca won
Christina the title of Miss Hibiscus.
Garcia, Theo
HERALD PHOTOS BY DONNELL BATES
Kruger, Isabella4W
Lachman and In the 6-to-7 age group, Christina Garcia won
Angelina Barish. the title of Junior Miss Hibiscus.

LEFT: In the Masters *I
division are Izaiah
Lachman, Ace Barish,
Bryson Kartz and Camp -
Goulding.




RIGHT: Contestants in
the Miss Hibiscus cate-
gory for girls between
the ages of 8 and 10
are Mackenzie Hepp, ,;
Daniell Schiano, Bianca o
Colaluca and Jaeleigh
Carson. In the 4 to 5 age group, Zamiyah Pascal won





Herald Page 14


FROM OUR ARCHIVES



Do you remember wi


The following are excerpts from
the Daily Herald News, dated from
June 1, 1974, through June 7, 1974:

Springs site OK'd
for grant
Continued underwater exploration
of the Warm Mineral Springs archae-
ological site near North Port seems
assured now.
The announcement came that
a grant of $100,000 was recently
approved by the state legislature. The
funds will be administered by the
Division of Archives and History.
The grant will be used for equip-
ment and to bring scientific specialists
to examine the prehistoric Indian
burial site. History may well be re-
written after the experiment.
The 3-acre pond at the springs
made national news in February 1973.
It was discovered then that a well-
preserved human skull was brought
up from a shelf in the 220-foot sink
hole in the pond. Radio carbon
examination of the skull and bones in-
dicated the remains to be 10,200 years
old. These are the oldest documented
remains in the western world.
Col. William Royal, a well-known
diver, made the first significant
discovery at Warm Mineral Springs
15 years ago.

Charlotte Tarpons
to graduate tonight
Ceremonies will be held tonight for
the 370 Charlotte High School graduat-
ing seniors in the Charlotte Memorial
Auditorium, Punta Gorda. High School
Principal Earl Nall is going to be the
guest speaker. The school band and
the senior girls' choir will perform.
Three graduating seniors are the
Class of 1974 valedictorians. Each
has maintained a perfect 14-point
academic standing for the past three
years, along with other achievements.
They are:
Cathie Cheves was senior class
president and school newspaper
editor.
Leslie Horton was a National
Honor Society Scholarship finalist and
president of Interact.
Randy Cummins was president of
the Charlotte County Chapter of the
National Honor Society.

State funding to increase
for schools
Thanks is owed to Superintendent


Janine Smith




Janine Smith writes about Punta
Gorda's historic past. Contact her at
janinehsl@ comcast.net.
Thomas E. Benner Jr. and School Board
Chairman C. Dana Burke. They put in
long hours at Tallahassee with their
effective persuasion, which gained state
dollars for our schools.
The accomplishment is considerable.
The amount of money is going from
$354,000 to $1.4 million this year in state
funding.
Many thanks from Charlotte County.

Cultural Center breaks
ground on expansion
Saturday signaled the start of the
Cultural Center of Charlotte County's
$600,000 five-year expansion program.
Ground was broken for the first two of
five planned structures, costing nearly
$200,000 to build and equip.
The golden shovels were handled by
Marion Reager; County Commissioner
Myrtle Burnett; Warren G. Payne,
director of volunteers for the center and
board chair; and Dr. Esmat Maayergy,
president of Growth International, the
contractor.

Cable TV franchise granted
The Charlotte County Commissioners
unanimously granted cable franchise
to G.A. Mobile Homes for operation
of a cable business. The location is a
mobile home and motel in the area of
Englewood.
The commission's decision came
despite protests from competing firm,
Storer Cable Vision. Vice President James
Hall stated there is an unwritten law that
"you don't go where the other guy is."


After a long discussion, it was agreed
upon that the G.A. Franchise is to run for
five years, with no guarantee of renewal
after that.

Immunizations important
for children
The younger generation of Charlotte
County and elsewhere has grown tall,
strong and healthier than the last. But there
are still those who are walking with leg
braces or not walking at all because of polio.
The whooping cough has not totally
disappeared. The choking that accompa-
nies diphtheria is not unknown.
Salk vaccine, when properly used, has
beaten polio. A basic series of shots, plus a
booster, assure children that they need not
suffer numerous other diseases.
Children have the right to health, and it is
advisable for parents to have their children
properly immunized.

City approves plans
for Solana area condos
The Punta Gorda City Council
approved plans for a 459-unit condo-
minium complex near Solana.
City Attorney Leo Wotitzky told the
council of plans that would call for
the annexation of land into the city of
Punta Gorda. Over a five-year span, a
17-building condo could be constructed
adjacent to the Peace River.
The City Council also OK'd a city
workers' credit union proposal during
this regular Tuesday meeting.


In the service


Pvt. Michael Haymans has been
selected as the Outstanding Trainee of
Company C, 13th Battalion, 4th Training
Brigade at U.S. Army Armor Center in
Fort Knox. Haymans is the son of Mr.
and Mrs. Ken Haymans of Burnt Store
Road, Punta Gorda, and is a Charlotte
High School graduate.
Pfc. Thomas P. Whisenant left the


I Amber Insurance Center, Inc.


SUN -EXP. 627/14

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Port Charlotte
(next to Bacon's Furniture)
(941) 743-5300
(866) 743-5300
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Friday June 6,2014








ien?


Marine Corp Base at Camp Lejeune,
North Carolina, to participate in
amphibious training exercises in
the Caribbean. He serves with the
3 Marine Regiment. Whisenant is
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P.
Whisenant Sr. of West Grace Street,
Punta Gorda.

Charlie Sez
Life's little pleasures: an ice cold
watermelon on a day like yesterday.

Today in history June 5
9 In 1876: Visitors to the
U.S. Centennial Exposition at
Philadelphia got their first taste of
bananas. Before, bananas rarely had
been seen in the United States.

Driggers-Blondell
engagement announced
Mr. and Mrs. William E. Driggers
of Punta Gorda announced the en-
gagement of their daughter, Claudia
Elizabeth, to Eugene M. Blondell.
Blondell is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Val
Blondell of Arcadia.
He is employed by Harbor Plumbing,
Port Charlotte, and is a 1970 graduate of
DeSoto County High School. The bride
elect is a 1974 graduate of Charlotte
High School. She is employed by the
State Department of Transportation in
the Punta Gorda office.
A summer wedding is being planned.

Venn-Esparza plan
summer wedding
The engagement and forthcom-
ing marriage of Tara Dee Venn to
Francisco A. Esparza was announced
by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Donald
L. Venn of Southeast Eagle Road,
Charlotte Harbor. The groom is the
son of Mr. and Mrs. Francisco S.
Esparza of Star Route A, Punta Gorda.

Wrestlers bound
for British Isles
Al Lloyd is a wrestling standout at
Charlotte High School. He will be joined
by Jim Bostwick and Mark Spurgeon in
the British Isles this summer, thanks to
community support.
Lloyd received a $100 check, which
capped an $1,800 fundraising drive to
send these wrestlers abroad. Kiwanis
President Eli D. Richard and Capt. Steve
Archer were instrumental in spearhead-
ing the six-week drive.





:Friday June 6,2014 Hrl ae1


Sallie Jones says goodbye to fifth-graders


S allie Jones Elementary School's
fifth-grade promotion ceremony
took place May 23 at the Charlotte
Performing Arts Center.


PUNTA GORDA


HERALD PHOTOS BY DONNELL BATES
Leah McIntosh's fifth-grade homeroom poses for a group photo after receiving their certificates.


Allee Stover receives the Student of the Year
Award from Cmdr. Bruce Buzzell of the Amer-
ican Legion Post 103.


Cmdr. Bruce Buzzell of the American Legion
Post 103 presents student Rachel Dunleavy
with a certificate recognizing her as a fifth-
grade leader.


John Probst's fifth-grade homeroom proudly display their certificates.


Logan Rogers receives a certificate from Cmdr.
Bruce Buzzell of the American Legion Post 103
for being a fifth-grade leader.


Receiving a medal and cash for designing the
best Florida license plate are students Jenna
Baldwin and Dylan Anthony.


ABOVE: Rick Sheets' fifth-grade class is all
smiles during the ceremony on May 23.


Posing with their certificates after graduating from the fifth grade are the Donna Yannia's homeroom class pose for a photo with their
students from Jessica Steyskal's homeroom. certificates.


Spring Fling 9

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Friday, June 6,2014


Luncheon treats fifth-graders to graduation celebration


ast Elementary School held
a luncheon for the entire
fifth-grade class on May 22.
The cafeteria was decorated like
a restaurant, and gold and black
balloons with the name of each
of the 110 fifth-grade students
surrounded the room.


Sue Paquin

gg g *


Sue Paquin is a freelance
photographer. Contact her at
sjpaquinphoto@gmail.com.


Camryn Weinberg and Ashley Hayes are looking forward to being promoted into the sixth-
grade.


'),P


HERALD PHOTOS BY SUE PAQUIN
Angela Benevides, one of the parents volunteering to help at the luncheon, pours a cup of lemonade for
Molly Swiontek, who said one of the best parts of the fifth-grade luncheon is being served.
LEFT: Rose Thibo-
LII deau and Jennifer
Tompas help carry
the serving trays
t k back to the kitchen.


BELOW: Chase
Slicker, Zachariha
DiBiase, Austin
Cook and Jonathon
Perdomo have a lot
of fun at the school
luncheon.


Taylor Johnson, William Lawyer, Cory Lomski, Cody Rice and Devin Spivey goof around for
the camera during the luncheon.


Cane Crafts, Wyatt Smith, Katelyn Vick and Stephanie Ellis get ready to dig into their
lunch.


RIGHT: Casey
Dinh, Carlee
Sheppard, Holli
Cissne (wearing
her tiara) and
Rayelle Rabitti
are excited
about becoming
sixth-graders.


FF


Most Advanced Technique
in Cataract Surgery
\Ewcre No Needles No Stitch No Patch
Quick Recovery
Over 5,000 ctaract and laser surgeries performed
Punta Gorda Christopher Stelly, MD 575-9300
3665 Tamiami Trail, Suite #101 Board Certified Eye Physician & Surgeon Accepting Medicare Assignment


LEFT: Kylie McQueen is
looking forward to the
first taste of her ice cream
sundae, complete with
M&M's Minis and sprin-
kles.



RIGHT: Amber Simpson is
all smiles as she decides
what toppings she wants
on her ice cream.


Wed., June ItI& June 25
enjoy live music performed
by Rory Dewey, musical
director at Sacred Heart
Church, and young
vocalist Marcella Brown,
\^AhiIp ii 'n "


$5.00 iF
qqIq n flnopl


Jerry O'Halloran is registered with, supervised by, and offers securities through Kovack Securities, Inc.
Member FINRA/SIPC 782-4771 6451 N. Federal Hwy., Ste. 1201, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33308


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ARCADIA VILLAGE #771
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BURNT STORE ISLES
OPEN SUN 6/8, 12-3
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3/3 WATERFRONT, POOL
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THE ANDREAE GROUP
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REALTY 941-833-4217





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ALLISON JAMES Estates
& Homes 941-456-8304
www.PuntaGorda
Propertiesforsale.com




SalePnig 7
5.22 ACRE PRAIRIE
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home. County water possible
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941-488-2418 or 496-9252


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JUDY K PETKEWICZ GRI CRS
ALUSON JAMES ESTATES & HOMES
941-456-8304


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River. Perfect For Retiring
Baby Boomers. $130,000
231-499-9574

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3/2/3 Model POOL Home!
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Elaine Martin, Fisherman's Vil-
lage Realty. 941-661-4800


HOMES FOR SALE


uttL ,,,ixn- i I o lKicrolL
Well Maintained 3/2/2 POOL
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Spacious Rooms &
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-$749. $169,900.
VERY MOTIVATED SELLER'
Sue Ellen Fumich,
941-276-2894
Coldwell Banker Morris Realty, Inc






ENGLEWOOD Waterfront
with 2.62 Acres 4 bed,
3 bath & 2 car garage.
$349k
Terry Long / Keller
Williams 941-830-2347





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Friday, June 6, 2014







Friday, June 6, 2014 ads .you rsun net F/N/C The Sun Classified Page 3


HOMES FOR SALE


:Z2


II I K, l[Lh VALUh r rvn
AN INCREDIBLE HOME!
$339,900 3/2.5/3
2,900 Sq. Ft. Living Space
On A Double Lot Located On
442 Donora St. in P.C.
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941-441-8952



EXIT REALTY WELCOME HOME


NORTH PORT 1 acre of
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4556 Addley Ave. 1878 SF
home, 3/2/2 Beautiful,
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Pool. Helene Panaretos
Sellstate Priority 239-691-5355

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Listing Price $334,900 Sold


HOMES FOR SALE



102


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crackerandassoc.com
pV


North Port, 1840 Silver Palm
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Remax Anchor 941-875-2755
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941-716-0040


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PORT CHARLOTTE
2/2/CP on Freshwater Canal!
Large Living Areas and Lots
of Storage Space! Plenty of
Potential! $79,900.
Deb Sestilio 941-391-1873
Fisherman's Village Realty

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HOMES FOR SALE


PORT CHARLOTTE
23294 Kim Ave. 3/2/2
Split Plan in Desireable Area!
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ets, Roman Tub, Dbl. Sinks &
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$199,900. Sue Ellen Fumich
941-276-2894
Coldwell Banker Morris Realty, Inc

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HOMES FOR SALE


PORT CHARLOTTE
3/2/2 NEW KITCHEN &
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SUNCOAST ISLES REAL ESTATE
941-268-6820

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Friday, June 6, 2014


ads~yoursun~net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 3






The Sun Classified Page 4 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Friday, June 6, 2014


HOMES FOR SALE


Pool Home With Bonus Room,
Eat In Kitchen w/Granite
Counters, Glass Backsplash &
Split Floor Plan. $178,000
Bill Jones 941-743-4200
Barnes & Phillips Real Estate




K A I 1, 1
P F A(~ R I VF R PA\RRT FI P%


rUN11A uruA
38492 WASHINGTON LOOP
Stunning Creek Front View! 10
Acres Along Myrtle Creek
4/3.5/2 With Pool, Rooftop
Deck & Additional Detached
Garage. $450,000
Another 12 Contiguous Acres
Available For $96,000
The McPhee Team
Vicky McPhee 941-815-8064
www.PortCharlotteHomes.net

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TO WORK
FOR YOU!

FIND A JOB!
BUY A HOME!
BUY A CAR!


HOMES FOR SALE HOMES FOR SALE


rU I .1'h ,,/' -5 /..J/,.
Pool Home w/ Gated Entry.
Gourmet Kitchen, Butler's
Pantry Room, Office/Den &
MORE! Private Boat Ramp.
Picturesque Setting on
4+ Acres! All the Bells &
Whistles! $650,000.
Sharon Kerr 941-286-7315
Coldwell Banker
Sunstar Realty


Cheery 3/2/ upen Foor
Plan on Fresh Water Canal!
Large Yard in Quiet Area!
$274,900. Timothy Mapp,
941-379-2448 Adrienn Czako
310-500-8857 Mapp Realty
Employ Classified!


NORTH PORT SALT WATER
POOL HOME. 3/2/2 + DEN,
BUILT 2005 2433 TOTAL SF,
UPGRADES THROUGHOUT, DESIRED
AREA, GREAT CURB APPEAL. THIS
IS A MUST SEE! $199,900
FOR SALE BY OWNER
941-423-7168


PORT CHARLOTTE
BY OWNER 1145 Inverness
Over 1400 SF, 3/2/2.
Needs TLC. $68,900.
More Info at: KL30.com
Call Keith
941-677-8550
VENICE ISLAND, Renovated
4/3/2, designer kitchen
w/granite/ss apple skylight,
office, den, close to beaches,
trails & more! $399,000
AmeriWorld Realty
Anne Fillion 941.421.8345

WATERFRONT
HOMES 1030


Water Front 2012 Burnt
Store Isles 2408 SF
Custom Canal Home!
Seawall Dock & BoatLift
Nice locationPrivacy
Viewing Nature Preserve.
New Listing! Was $499 -
Now $479,000
CALL JUDY PETKEWICZ
ALLISON JAMES
ESTATES & HOMES
941-456-8304

Classified = Sales


WAERONT
L HOMES 1030


2br/2ba home Gulf
Access, No bridges, Boat
dock & lift in Windmill
Village 55 and older,
Very active community.
64 Windmill Blvd. P.G.
$152,750.
Call 810-252-3225 or
810-240-2224


310 Spring Lake Blvd.
Furnished 3/2/2 Lakefront
Pool Home W/Great Views,
Boat Dock & Lift. Remodeled
Kitchen & Pool. $299,900
Wayne Rose 941-268-6349
Barnes & Phillips Real Estate

Turn your

trash into

cash!

Advertise

your yard

sale!


7~Y~RONT


WATERFRONT


N I -. I


PUI ICARLUI I Sailors
Delight! 142' of seawall on
a deep, no bridges to Gulf
waterway. 3/2/2 Pool!
Possible Seller Financing.
$259,900 JEFF RICHARDS,
KELLER WILLM941-875-3366


3/2/2 Home w/Many Extras.
112 FT. Seawall, 15K Lift, Lg.
Spa, Beautiful Landscaping.
See forsalebyowner.com
ID#23979228 For Details.
$539,900 913-660-8887


Windmill Village
w/Private Marina
A Waterfront Community of
454 Homes & Building Sites
55+ Resident Owned
Sailboat Access-Gated
Large New Clubhouse
w/Lots of Social Activities
215 Rio Villa Drive
Punta Gorda
windmillvillage.org
Advertise Today!


IFCODOSILLAS7
FOR SALE
1040


ONLY 749
MISSTACS As OF 05/28/14)
HOUSES, VILLAS, CONDOS
ARE AVAILABLE
AS OF TODAY
IN BEATIUL
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ORTO LIST
We do all of Venice d- Area
941-485-4804 Sales
941-484-6777 Rentals
1-800-464-8497





! PENDING! -


PUINTA GORDA ISLES
Prime Waterfront Location
Harbor Point Turnkey
2/2 With Dock & Lift
By Owner $169,000!!
Email darby408@aol.com
For Pics 330-715-8000

A Bargain Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds First!
A Whole
Marketplace of
Shopping is right at
your
Fingertips!






Friday, June 6, 2014


ads.yoursun net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 5


FOR SALE









Gated Comm. of Roll's
Landing. Beautiful Grounds!!
Many Amentities! $4.4O
$94,500. Stacy Scarrow
941-916-0000
I o Avertise in
The Showcase
A of Homes
Please Call
866-463-1638
or Email;

special@sunnewspapers.net





WATERFRONT CONDO
3/2 W/BOATLIFT, DIRECT
ACCESS TO HARBOR NEXT TO
FISHERMEN'S VILLAGE.
LINDA MCCRANEY GULF
REALTY 941-468-2076
$349,900




FOR SALE


ULU- LPNGLEWUUU
Both units 1/1 on 2.5 lots,
completely renovated in/out,
tile throughout. Minutes to
beaches & walking distance
to historic Dearborn.
$119,000 941-268-9995

MOILEiHOMES
FOR SALE



NEW PALM HARBOR
VELOCITY MODELS!
3/2 starting in the 50's,
4/2 starting in the 60's!
Limited time offer!!
800-622-2832
*Se habla espanol


PUNIA GORDA, Adorable 1
Bedroom w/ 1 Bath. Great
Handcrafted TV Room w/
Murphy Bed & Add'l Bath
Combined w/ Laundry Room.
Furnished Nicely! Updated
Kitchen & Bath w/ Exception-
al Storm Windows. Lovely,
Friendly 55+ Neighbors.
Dock & Davit for Small Boat.
$72,000. 941-286-1246
VENICE RANCH M.H.E.
Community is being Renovat-
ed! Lot rental community
12x46 2BR/1BA, furnished,
asking $3,500
24x32 2BR/1 BA, unfurnished,
new appliances,
asking $5,300.
Others to choose from.
WALKING DISTANCE TO
PUBLIX & CVS
55+ comm. No pets
Call Jane
941-488-5672
www.VeniceRanch.com






VENICE, 2BR/2BA
MOBILE HOME, FULLY FURN,
CLOSE TO POOL. OWNER
FINANCING $35,000
516-728-2991


L MANUFACTURED
I HOMES FOR SALE I


2/2 Double Carport
All Newer & Updated
Peaceful Private Lot & View
Amenities Galore!
55+ Community
Call Mike 941-356-5308
ARCADIA VILLAGE #58. 2BR
2BA, all appliances, 2 lanai's,
carport, partially furnished.
$34,900. Call 708-638-1087


NEW 3/2 Delivered & Set-
Up on Your Lot w/ Skirting,
Steps & Air! Only $49,995.
+ Tax. Financing For ALL
Credit Scores Available!
Prestige Homes, Punta Gorda
941-637-1122



= 40MEDEOr
,Visit.~IG

PUNTA GORDA
2014 CHAMPION MODELS
End of Season Blow
Out Special!
Make Reasonable Offer!
Call Greg 941-626-7829


PUNTA GORDA
Beautiful New Homes
Available from $64,500
2/2, Carport, Shed &
Screened Room Monthly
Fees $405.00


2DK/2DA/2CG, SCR. LANAI,
FURNISHED 2006 PALM HAR-
BOR. EXTREMELY CLEAN.
MOVE IN READY $49,999
517-392-6379 OR
941-486-8735
WANTED TO BUY



VENICE & ENGLEWOOD
Area house to buy. Possible
foreclosures. 774-573-7415

Need a

new Job?

Look in the

Classifieds!


HOMES FOR RENT








LAKE SUZY
3/2/2 INCL. LAW CARE ......... $1250
NORTH PORT
3/3/2 POOL HOME.........$1500
PORT CHARLOTTE
2/2 2ND FL OAKS IV .............. $675
3/2/1 AFFORDABLE 3 BDRM ...... $825
PUNTA GORDA
3/3/2 HERITAGE LAKES ........... $140C
WE NEED RENTAL LISTINGS
FULL PROPERTY LIST ONLINE
www.almar-rentals.com
941-627-1465
800-964-3095
LET US MANAGE YOUR PROPERTY
ANNUAL & SEASONAL
RENTALS
Call The Pineapple Girls
941-473-U333
Pineapple Gulf Prop. Mgmt. Inc.
www.PentEnglewood.com

ANNUAL
RENTALS
0 3/2/2 LANAI, DOCK,
CANAL, CARPET, TILE $1300
0 2/2/cp DOWNTOWN
DUPLEX TILE, CARPET $750
0 1/1/cP WATER SEWER,
LAWN INCL. N. ENG. $550
West Coast Property
Mgmt 941-473-0718
www. rentaisflorida. net

BAY INDIES RESORT
COMMUNITY


COME SEE
WHAT OUR
LIFESTYLE
HAS TO OFFER!


$1550..3/2/2 Pool Home ........... DC
$1300..3/2/2 1667 SqFt ...... PC
$1150..3/2/2 Lawn Srv incl..NP
$850...2/2/1 All Tile ............. PC
$750.2/1/1 996 Sq Ft ......... PC
LET US RENT YOUR HOME
Agent Available On Weekends
We Forgive Foreclosures For Renters
0 NEED A RENTAL*
Paradise Properties &
Rentals, Inc 941-625-RENT
PORT CHARLOTTE 2/2/1
Available NOW! Tile floors, w/d
hookup. $725/mo Water incl.
609-709-8538



I Management I
Iwww.floriaarpm.coml
(94129112


CONDOS/VILLAS
I/FOR RENT /
~124~





ANNUAL &
SEASONAL RENTALS
IN BIRD BAY VILLAGE
Venice, FL
BIRD BAY REALTY, INC.
941-484-6777 or
800-464-8497

DEEP CREEK AREA
2BR/2BA, newly remodeled.
1300 SF condo, High Ceilings
Golf course & Lake view,
Amenities. $875 mo. inclds
water NO PETS OR SMOKERS.
941-257-8178 Avail 7/1


ENGLEWOOD TROPICAL
upscale 2/2 furn grnd fir
Condo Every Amenity Avail
thru 12/31/14. 2 mth min.
$900mo+ utils 941474-7400


FOR RENT


DEEP CREEK 2 bed/2 bath,
all tile, fairly new, $800 per
month. Call 941-629-3326 or
941-416-5966
PORT CHARLOTTE 55+
2 ROOM & BATH, 1/2DUPLEX
COMPLETELY FURNISHED.
2 BLOCKS FROM HARBOR &
FISHING PIER. $850 MO
INCLUDES ELEC & WATER.
941-629-5486 or
317-919-1566
PORT CHARLOTTE
Close to Hosp. 2/1, tiled,
Clean, $575/mo 1st, last +
sec. $575 941-916-1535


FOR RENT


CHARLOTTE HARBOR
1/1 apt. $650, updated, incl.
water pool screened lanai, no
pets. Call 941-628-3759.
ENGLEWOOD: MANASO-
TA KEY 1Bd/1Ba Util. &
cable incl., pet ok,
$275/wk 941-716-3660




NOW ACCEPTING
WAITING LIST
APPLICATIONS 941-473-0450



PORT CHARLOTTE
VILLA SAN CARLOS II
AFFORDABLE
Income Based Apartments
for 62 or Older
Income Limits Apply
Call 941-624-4404
TTY-1-800-955-8771
Venice Studio & I
Bedroom Accepting
Section 8 Vouchers ,0I
941-488-7766 o.,,
VILLA SAN CARLOS 2550;
Easy Street Income based
62+ or needing features
of accessible unit. Restric-
tions Apply. 941-624-2266
TY-1-800-955-8771



WILLOW CREEK
Affordable 55+ community
tucked away in North Port.
Pool, Activity Room, Fitness
Center, Restricted Access
Entries. Great Specials on 1BR
& 2BR Apartments. Small Pet
Friendly. Call us Today for a
Tour of our Community.
6 941-429-2402 a


ROOMS FOR RENT



PORT CHARLOTTE Centrally
Located. $400. Month. Call
for Interview. 941-764-3977
PORT CHARLOTTE Room in
lovely home. Private bath, All
Kit. Priv. Resp Female, N/S &
or Pets. $1 10/wk 941-421-6408
PORT CHARLOTTE/Engl/NP
Priv. Entr. Drug Free. $485.
mo. 941-628-2292 Text/Call
VENICE Mother-in-law apt.
w/shared kitchen, dining. Incl.
power, cable, W/D. $550/mo.
No pets. 941-806-8187
RENTALS TO SHAREI


PORT CHARLOTTE 3/2/2
Male/Female To Share Big
Beautiful Pool Home. No
Drugs, Drunks Or Pets. Quiet
Area $450/mo. +Sec Dep.
781-572-8215
VENICE Mature person or
couple to share 2br/2ba
condo in exchange for limit-
ed care for quadraplegic. No
smoking, references rqd.
941-486-5154

VACATION/
SEASONAL RENTALS
~139

ENGLEWOOD EAST Spa-
cious 2/2/1 quiet neighbor-
hood, incl. everything. 6/15 -
9/15 $1100/mo 774-526-7538
LOTS & ACREAGE


SELLING YOUR
HOME, CONDO,
OR LOT?
We can help you.
Advertise your home,
condo or lot with us
and reach over
175,000 readers in
Charlotte Sarasota, &
DeSoto Counties and
online everyday.
Ask about our 90
day special.
Call one of our
classified experts for
all the details at
866-463-1638
Realtors Welcome!


PORT CHARLOTTE
4 adjoining lots,
Water/sewer, Location,
Location, Omi. Multiple
use, Incl. 3 family per
lot. Will hold 1st note.
$45K ea 941-624-5597


rI'M IA 1 KU acries iose
to downtown. Well & Septic in
place. Stalls/Corral, 30'X30'
garage with a/c office & bath.
Rima Riggs Remax Anchor
$124,700 941-626-2040


Well Priced 5 Acre! Plenty to
Offer! Space w/out Restric-
tions. Enjoy Florida Living- In
the Country! $44,900
Deb Sestilio 941-391-1873
Fisherman's Village Realty


BUSINESS
FOR SALE


SUCCESSFUL WATERFRONT
RESTAURANT, ARCADIA
90 SEATS INSID[/100 OUTSIDE
I 7 COP LICENSEINCLUDES
40 SLIPS MARINA. OPTION-
AL: HOME AND 3 COTTAGES
OWNER FINANCING. OVER
10% CAPRATE. SIMPLY
MARINAS: 305-439-9581

BUSINESS RENTALS




PORT CHARLOTTE
Exceptional 8,000 sq. ft.
building available in
Murdock area.
18215 Paulson Dr.
Originally built to house
a phone company. Large
open office area, confer-
ence rooms, server room
and warehouse. To
schedule a visit contact
Glenn Nickerson at
(941) 258-9520.
TURN KEY Restaurant space.
10K SF in great location w/heavy
traffic. Inc. all equip. Motivated.
941-763-5251 317-496-1380
IINCOME PROPERTY


VISANI COMEDY
DINNER THEATER
# 1 RATED ON TRIP ADVISOR!
OWNER WANTS To RETIRE.
POSSIBLE OWNER FINANCING.
INTEGRITY R.E. OF FLA
941-627-8948

COMMERCIAL/
INDUSTRIAL PROP
1162~


ARAUIA b.2 ac By Uwner!
House & Shop, 800 ft. Hwy
17 Frontage, Zoned Comm.
Info. 863-494-5540 or
863-244-3585



FREE Month RentI
INO Sec. Deposits
941-629-1121


AAA LOCATION!!
PORT CHARLOTTE
4,000 sf. Warehouse w/
Office/Apartment on
Peachland Blvd. & Veterans.
Albert 941-628-2883
NEED C ASH?


950 RIDGEWOOD
AVENUE VENICE, FL
34285 941-485-5444
Aged Qualified



BURNT STORE VILL 3/2/2
Kitch w/ wood cab/island
Built 2005, 1909sqft, Tiled
living areas. lanai, Pet OK
KW Peace River Mgmt Svcs
Call Today for Appt. $1300 (941) 888-0142
239-995-3337




OALE ENDING Eii
BFor a Complete List Go To
VENICE BAY INDIES eraportcharlotte.com


LOTS & ACREAGE
1
Z500






The Sun Classified Page 6 E/N/C


ads.yoursunnet


Friday, June 6, 2014


2000 /MED/A /MEIAL
~203 203


EMPLOYMENT



loeal ne flu


theREI kd


news ~


Thediff '




PROFESSIONAL



BARBER, Older, Expr. wanted.
P/- F/- with following. 75%
daily pay. 941-661-0191 Allen
CAM For Multiple Properties.I
Experience Preferred. I
E-mail Resume To
CAMCOMPANY555@GMAIL.COM
INSURANCE CSR, Busy
Englewood insurance office
seeks licensed csr f/t w/ben-
efits. Pay based on experi-
ence. Applied computer sys-
tem. Servicing all aspects of
personal lines in a team envi-
ronment. Send resume to
enginsjob@gmail.com
NEED CASH
Have A Garage
Sale!

FINANCIAL




Citrus Supervisor
Southwest FL:
Seeking an experienced indi-
vidual for caretaking, person-
nel and project management.
Bachelor's degree or sub-
stantial grove experience.
Salary commensurate with
training and experience. Full
benefits package with med-
ical/life insurance. EOE
DFWP E-mail Resume to
hralertsswf@gmail.com

FINANCIAL CONSULTANT III
Charlotte County, Florida.
Salary: $51,168 +
Benefits. Grant Experience
Preferred. Please View
Complete Job Details At:
www.charlottecountyfl.com
Charlotte County Is An
Equal Opportunity Employer.
Minorities & Women Are
Strongly Encouraged To
Apply. Charlotte County Is
A Drug-Free Work Place.

CLERICAL/OFFICE



ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
Requirements Include:
Computer & Social Media
Proficiency, Personality plus;
Excellent People Skills, High
Level Confidentiality, Full Time
in a Christain Environment.
Email Your Resume to:
resume8855@gmail.com


NO
Miliel



SCHEDULER For client
based business. Englewood
area. Great phone voice.
Full time w/benefits &
401K CALL 941-626-6373


Lifie__
caTe
Cae
Center
WWW.LCCA.COM
We're Life Care Centers of
America, the nation's largest
privately-owned skilled care
provider. If you share our
heartfelt approach to caring
for the elderly, consider
oining our family at Life Care
Center of Punta Gorda. We
offer competitive pay and
benefits in a mission-driven
environment.

LPN's FULL TIME
PART TIME/PRN

CNA's ALL SHIFTS FULL
TIME, PART TIME/PRN

COOKS
EXPERIENCE PREFERRED

Come visit with us at 450
Shreve St. Punta Gorda EOE
LPN PT, Family Office. Email
pcdr33952@gmail.com or
Fax 941-743-3313 Prey. Exp.
LPN/MA Fun Peds Office
Seeking FT LPN/MA.
Multitask, Team Player.
Peds Experience Preferred.
Familiar with EMR a Plus!
Email Resume to:
pckidsdoctor@hotmail.com
IM.A/LPNFT, for peds off.
IMultitask, Ped VS, EMR&I
BILLING Exp nec. 625-4919
MILLENNIUM PHYSICIAN
GROUP IS GROWING
AGAIN!!!!

CMA'S
CMA's for Englewood,
Port Charlotte, Punta Gorda
locations. Visit us at
www.millenniumphysician.com
click on "employment" and
"open jobs" to apply for
open positions. Come work
for the best! DFWF/EOE

PROVIDING SERVICE
WITH OUR
,9.4.A4, and ,d ,:.qgxs





ENGLEWOOD
HEALTHCARE AND
REHAB CENTER IS
HIRING RN'S, CNA'S
AND LPN'S...
FULL TIME & PART TIME
ALL THREE SHIFTS
LONG TERM CARE
EXPERIENCE REQUIRED

WE ARE LOOKING FOR
RN's,CNAs AND LPN's
WHO ARE PASSIONATE
ABOUT PATIENT CARE AND
ARE COMMITTED TO PRO-
VIDING A SUPERIOR EXPE-
RIENCE FOR RESIDENTS &
FAMILIES.

TO APPLY, PLEASE EMAIL
PAYROLL@
E NGLEWOODH EALTHCARE.COM
1111 Drury Lane
Englewood Fl 34224
Ph. 941-474-9371
Fax. 941-475-6593

()NsUIAT H IFi
Jtt tftbf ~vf C ,' ';I',v

ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!


RN
WEEKEND
SUPERVISOR
6:45A-7:15P

MUST HAVE LONG TERM
CARE AND SUPERVISORY
EXPERIENCE.

PLEASE APPLY
QUALITY HEALTH CARE
6940 Outreach Way
North Port
(941)426-8411 or
FAX Resume to
941-423-1572
EOE DRUG FREE
WORK PLACE







RNS / LPNS / CNAS

FULL TIME,
PART TIME, PRN


HARBORCHASE OFFERS
COMPETITIVE WAGES AND AN
EXCELLENT BENEFITS PACK-
AGE SUCH AS MEDICAL,
DENTAL, VISION & 401K

PART-TIME TEAM MEMBERS
RECEIVE BENEFITS
AT 20+ HOURS.

FOR CONSIDERATION PLEASE
APPLY IN PERSON TO:

HARBORCHASE
OF VENICE
ASSISTED LIVING AND
SKILLED NURSING
950 PINEBROOK ROAD
VENICE, FL 34285
(941) 484-8801 PH
(941) 484-3450 FAX
EOE M/F/D/V

HORIZON
HEALTHCARE
,rINSTITUTE
www.HorizonTechlnstitute.Com
"ADVANCE YOUR CAREER"
Licensed & Accredited School
Murdock Town Center on 41
1032 Tamiami Tr Unit 3
YOU can become a LPN within
11 months. Enrollment ongoing.
PHLEBOTOMY, EKG, CNA,
Classes Start June 30 '14
LPN-Nights, next class
starts July 28 '14
Start Working In 2-5 wks!
Classes Start Each Month
Call For Class Dates
" Nursing Assistant (120hrs)
" Home Health Aide (75hrs)
" Phlebotomy Tech (165hrs)
" EKG Tech (165hrs)
" Patient Care Tech (600hrs)
" Job Assist. & Pymt. Plans
Call Now to Register!
941-889-7506

RESTAURANT
HOTEL
~2O4UT


SERVERS & LINE COOK
Must be Experienced. Apply in
Person: 3883 Tamiami Trail,
Port Charlotte. No Phone Calls!


SKILLED TRADES



AC SERVICE ITECH &
LEAD INSTALLER,
$500 sign on bonus! Email
Resume: jobskhc@gmail.com
Or Fax: 941-629-8666
CARPENTERS
BOCA GRANDE ENGLEWOOD
AREA. TOOLS & TRANS A MUST.
CALL MIKE 941-468-1715


PA lLUlVERS
F/T W/FULL BENEFITS
UP TO $25 PER HOUR
CALL TODAY
941-629-2500
JEXP. BLOCK MASON 8
LABORS- Must Have Own
ransportation 941-763-2715I
EXPERIENCED PLUMBER
Res. New Construction
40+ hours. Immediate
Opening 941-613-6785
FINISH GRADER & DOZER
OPERATOR, Experienced, For
EEO Company. Fax Resume to
941-766-7191

FULL TIME
EXPERIENCED
HEAVY DUTY
DIESEL MECHANIC
NEEDED

SUNLAND PAVING:
4211 EAST HENRY ST.
PUNTA GORDA, FLA.
941-625-5888
FOR MORE INFO.
I IMMEDIATE OPENING I
I*BACKHOE OPERATOR
1 exp. in lake excavation,
1 experienced in undergroundI
utilities, storm water & sewer'
installation
*FINISH DOZER OPER.
,Experienced in finish slope
*work on the dirt crew.
1* CONCRETE FINISHERS
iExperienced in flat work,I
Icurbs and gutters. Able tol
Finish behind the curbI
'machine. Well-establishedl
construction company pro-'
viding excellent pay and ben-'
efits. Please apply in person'
*at 3801 North Orange Ave., I
*Sarasota, FL 34234.
Or send resume to:
1 JobsAtDerr@gmail.com
I EOE/DFWP

L-------------------
SUN COAST
PRESS

A rapidly growing daily &
commercial print shop, has
the following opportunity at
both their Port Charlotte and
Venice Plants.
FT Press Operators

Experience as Press Opera-
tor. Willingness to work
day/night shift, weekends &
holidays, as needed.

Proficient with back to back
color registration, folder &
1/4 folder operations. Knowl-
edge of pasters and stack-
ers a plus. Candidates must
be reliable and have the abili-
ty to work at a fast pace
while maintaining good quali-
ty and meeting deadlines.

We offer health insurance,
paid holidays, PTO, 401K,
AFLAC. We are a drug & nico-
tine free workplace.

Pre-employment
testing required

Please email resume to
Sue Chisesi
schisesi@suncoastpress.com
or
Amy Honoosic
ahonoosic@suncoastpress.com


SKILLED TRADES/



ISLAND HANDYMAN, Skills
needed: Boat driver, General
repairs. Organized, Customer
Service focused. Pay based
on experience. 941-697-9797
JANITORIAL/MAINTENANCE
SEEKING HIGHLY MOTIVATED
PART TIME JANITORIAL/MAINTE-
NANCE PERSON BURNT STORE
AREA, GOOD WAGES, 16 HOURS
PER WEEK MANDATORY SATUR-
DAY + SUNDAY PAINTING, PRES-
SURE WASHING, ABILITY TO USE
GAS POWERED EQUIPMENT NON
SMOKING ENVIRONMENT MUST
HAVE EXCELLENT REFERENCES
AND PASS BACKGROUND CHECK
SEND RESUME TO
JSISSUM@ASSOCIAGULFCOAST.COM
FAX 239-936-8310
TOW TRUCK DRIVER
Must Have Clean Drivers
Record, CDL Preferred.
941-232-8455
941-639-5705
Seize the sales
with Classified!
WAREHOUSE/
MAINTENANCE P/T
20-25hrs Englewood
KOBIE COMPLETE
941-474-3691


MANAGEMENT
S2060


SALES MANAGEMENT
Opportunity With Innovative
Independent Real Estate
Company. Salary Plus Benefits
Licensed With 5+ Yrs. Exp.
Resumes@bosshardtrealty.com

SAES~





ACCOUNT
[X[CUIVE

SUN NEWSPAPERS IS LOOKING
FOR MOTIVATED SALES PROFES-
SIONALS WITH A COMMUNITY
SPIRIT WHO ARE READY TO
COMMIT TO A LONG-TERM
CAREER WITH AN ESTABLISHED
SUCCESSFUL MEDIA COMPANY.

DOES THIS DESCRIBE
YOU?
AGGRESSIVE
COLD CALLING PRO
DEAL CLOSER
STRONG WORK ETHICS
MONEY MOTIVATED
EXCELLENT COMMUNICATION
SKILLS
PEOPLE PERSON
COMPUTER LITERATE
*EXCEPTIONAL CUSTOMER
SERVICE SKILLS
*MARKETING FLARE
*ABILITY TO WORK
INDEPENDENTLY

WE OFFER:
*COMPETITIVE SALARY PLUS
COMMISSIONS
*VACATION
*HEALTH INSURANCE
*SICK AND SHORT TERM
DISABILITY
*401(K)
*TRAINING
*ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNI
TIES

WE ARE AN EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER & A
DRUG AND NICOTINE FREE
DIVERSIFIED WORKPLACE.
PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG AND
NICOTINE TESTING REQUIRED.

IF WE DESCRIBED YOU, SEND
OR EMAIL YOUR RESUME TO:
ENGLEWOOD SUN
ATTENTION: CAROL MOORE
120 W DEARBORN
ENGLEWOOD, FLORIDA
34223
FAX: 941-681-3008
EMAIL:
CYMOORE@SUN-HERALD.COM


SALES




Advertising Sales
Executive

The Charlotte Sun is
looking for "Winners" to
join our team of
professional Advertising
Sales Executives.
If you are never satisfied
with average successes,
are self-motivated, goal
oriented, confident,
enthusiastic and believe
that the customer is all
important, we would like
to talk to you.
The successful
candidates must possess
good oral and written
communication skills, be
organized and a team
player. Sales experience
a plus but we will train
the right persons.

We offer:
" Competitive salary plus
commission
" Vacation
* Health insurance
" Sick and short term
disability
" Training
* Stable company that is
very Community minded
and involved.
Please send resume to:

Advertising Director,
Leslee Peth
Charlotte Sun
23170 Harborview Road
Charlotte Harbor, FL
33980
Email:
Lpeth@sun-herald.com
We are an Equal
Opportunity Employer &
a Drugand nicotine Free
Diversified Workplace.

v''s,,/'

IN THE
CLASSIFIED
YOU CAN.....

./Find a Pet
./Find a Car
VFind a Job
/Find Garage Sales
/Find A New Employee
VSell Your Home
./Sell Your Unwanted
Merchandise
/Advertise Your
Business or Service

Classified -
it's the reliable
source for the
right results



A Bargain

Hunters

Delight

Check the

Classifieds

first!

A Whole

Marketplace

of shopping

is right at
your
fingertips!






Friday, June 6, 2014


ads.yoursun net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 7


SALES



BODYSHOP MANAGER
FOR NEW AUTOMOTIVE
DEALERSHIP
Great oppurtunity for the
right person. Benefits
include: 401k, profit sharing,
bonus, medical, dental &
vision insurance
Send resume to:
jobsa@sun-herald.com


FURNITURE SALESPEOPLE
& EXPERIENCED DESIGNER
Join Baer's Furniture, The
Leading Premier Furniture
Retail Store In Florida! Sales
Exp., Nights & Weekends
Required; Furniture Sales A
Plus! Experienced Designer
Also Needed. We Offer
Competitive Compensation,
Generous Benefits & A Great
Place To Work!
APPLY IN PERSON:
4200 Tamiami Trail, Port
Charlotte, FL 33952,
Or E-MAIL:
Ihickey@baers.com
EOE/DFWP

LICENSED REAL ESTATE AGENT
For Small, Non Franchised,
Well Established Real Estate
Office To Round Out Team.
Full Time/Part Time.
Hans Kirsten 941-350-0441
Bird Bay Realty

MONTGOMERY'S CARPETS
PLUS COLORTILE SEEKING
EXPERIENCED RETAIL FLOORING
SALES CONSULTANT. SAT 9-2 &
MON-FRI. 8-5. FOR INTERVIEW,
PLEASE CALL 941-893-5910

FIND YOUR
BEST FRIEND
IN THE
CLASSIFIEDS!
SALES & MARKETING
ASSISTANT
Entry Level Marketing/
Entry Level Advertising
We are America's Best
Community Daily newspaper,
with the largest classified
section in Florida. We are
located in North Port Florida.
Duties Include, but are
not limited to:
Executing sales and
marketing functions to
company standards
* Assists customers with any
questions they may have in
regards to our products
Gains knowledge on
all new clients the
company acquires
Ensure highest level of
customer service resulting in
increased productivity and
achieving sales goals
Knowledge of our
systems follow through of
advertising copy
Growth opportunities may be
available for those who
qualify.This position is entry
level, previous experience in
sales and marketing helpful.
We look for candidates with
the following:
Some college or
degree preferred
Outstanding
interpersonal skills
Student Mentality
Leadership Experience
0 Experience in retail, sales,
advertising & marketing
Ability to work in a high
energy environment
Please email resume to:
Jobs@sunletter.com
Sun Classifieds attention:
Geri Kotz EOE, DFWP
Pre-employment drug &
nicotine testing required.


SALES
Come work with the
Sun Newspapers
Telephone Sales,
New Business
Development team
located in North Port Fl.

We are looking for a highly
motivated, Full-Time person,=
with computer skills and
with a positive, energetic,
can-do approach to join our
telephone sales, new
business development team.,

!We offer:

0 Training =
0 Stable company that
is very Community
minded and involved.
0 Opportunity to expand
your business skills.

Please Email your
Resume to:
Jobs@sunletter.com I
Equal Opportunity
Employer/Drug & Nicotine
Free Diversified Workplace.
Pre-Employment Drug &
Nicotine Testing Required.

L CHILD/ADULT
I CRENEEDED I



MALE QUADRIPLEGIC Needs
Personal Care, PT, AM/PM,
Exp. Pref. P.C. 941-629-0157
G ENERAL /




APPRENTICE, to Pressure
Clean, P/T, Send info to Occu-
pant PO BOX 771 Engl 34295
CHARLOTTE SUN
Part Time Position
Typesetter/Designer

Person to design and make
corrections to ads. Knowl-
edge of Photoshop, Indesign
and or Quark. Day and late
after Noon hours. Must be
willing to learn new skills. If
you are looking for a career
in a positive environment with
growth potential and have a
real desire to succeed. Now
accepting resumes:

stoner@suncoastpress.com

We are a drug and nicotine
free workplace
Pre employment drug
and nicotine testing
Required

MAILROOM

THE VENICE GONDOLIER

NOW HIRING

Part-time, must be produc-
tion oriented, able to lift at
least 20 lbs. and willing to
work flexible hours.

To fill out an Application
Apply in person
Mon.-Fri. 9-4
Venice Gondolier
200 E Venice Ave.
Venice, FL

Please, no phone calls

We are a drug and
nicotine free workplace
Pre-employment drug
and nicotine testing
required

Find your Best

Friend In -the
lassfleds!


DRIVER NEEDED
for Taxi Service
941-625-8947
LAWN & LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE PERSON
Full Time. Min. 2 Years Exp.
Must Have A Valid FL Drivers
License. Drug Free Work
Place. Hi-Lingual A PLUS!
Call Eric 941-468-2493
OPERATIONS SET-UP
CREW LEADER, FT Position
w/Benefits. Var. Hours Inc.
Nights & Weekends. Apply In
Person @: 75 Taylor St. P.G.
Or Email: Sharon.markham@
CharlotteCountyFL.gov
P/T NURSERY Shoveling & Fill
pots w/soil, & pulling weeds.
Must be FAST. 941-268-2799 PC
TECHNICIAN, Swimming
Pool. If you are an
upstanding person with
excellent work ethics
applications accepted
between 9 12noon.
$12.00/HR TO START.
Must have Florida drivers
license. MUST HAVE 5 ys
of driving with absolutely
clean driving record.
Howard's Pool World,
12419 Kings Hwy.
Lake Suzy.
NO PHONE CALLS
TREE CLIMBERS &
GROUNDMEN
OWN TRANSPORTATION
AND VALID DRIVERS LICS.
START TODAY!
941-475-6611

TV & Radio Diary
Processing
Positions
Available



INTERESTED IN
WORKING 6 WEEKS
FOUR TIMES A YEAR
OR 48 WEEKS A YEAR
UP TO 30 HOURS
A WEEK?

Nielsen (the TV & Radio
tatingo company) io look-
ing for quality focused indi-
viduals to interpert and
input TV & Radio Diaries
up to four sweeps per year.
Basic to proficient
computer skills required.
No selling or
telephoning involved.
Day Shift
7:45AM 4:00PM
9:00 AM -3:00PM
Night Shift Hours
4:30PM-12:45 AM
6:00pr 12:00AM

Positions starting at
$8.50 to $10. per hr

Apply on line at:
Nielsen.com
Click on "Careers"
Click on "Search All
Careers"
Search Job numbers:
Day shift 1403435
Night Shift 1403433
Paid Training begins
June 9th, 30th and
July 7th, 2014

AzSavings Plan
Retirement Plan
The office where employ-
ees ARE appreciated!

nielsen

1080 Knights Trail
Nokomis, FL 34275
941-488-9658
EOE 0 AA/M/F/D/V


SALES GENERAL


GENERAL ]


SURVEY RODMAN, Rodman
needed for local survey com-
pany. Will Train. 941-423-8875

PART TIME/
TEMPORARY
110


CAREGIVER
PART TIME Small ALF,
VENICE,
941-468-4678 or 488-6565

CHARLOTTE SUN
Part Time Position
Typesetter/Designer

Person to design and make
corrections to ads. Knowl-
edge of Photoshop, Indesign
and or Quark. Day and late
after Noon hours. Must be
willing to learn new skills. If
you are looking for a career
in a positive environment with
growth potential and have a
real desire to succeed. Now
accepting resumes:
stoner@suncoastpress.com

We are a drug and nicotine
free workplace
Pre employment drug
and nicotine testing
Required

SEEKING
EMPLOYMENT


CAREGIVER & COMPANION
NURTURING. Available 24/7
Refer. avail. 941-204-1304
CNA/HHA, 15 Years Exp.,
Reliable. Will Care For Sick Or
Elderly. Light Housekeeping.
941-764-8526/941-421-4833
IN-HOME CARE TAKING
NEW CLIENTS!
941-702-1450
3000










NOTICES

ANNOUNCEMENTS
3010






FREE MERCHANDISE ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
SUN-CLASSIFIEDS.COM
and place your ad.
"CLICK ON CLICK HERE
TO PLACE YOUR AD NOW"
and follow the prompts.
FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 5 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**Everyone Needs to
Register on Our
New Site**

SUNU




Employ Classified!


ANNOUNCEMENTS



THE MEDICAL OFFICE of
Robert Watine, MD LLC Will be
Closed Effectively May 26th
2014. The Office of Dr. Has-
san & Dr. Kamal Will be Taking
Over Care of the Patients.
They are Located at 3005 Car-
ing Way, Unit 2, Port Charlotte
33952. Phone: 941-249-8493
Medical Records Custodian
Will be Debbie Hooper and/or
Dr. Hassan & Dr. Kamal

PPYADS






Place your Happy
Ad for only
$14.75
3 lines 7 day.

Add a photo for
only $13.00!

Please call

(866)-463-1638



PERSONALS
W 3020



MASSAGE AND
RELAXATION
941-626-2641 Lic. MA59041


RELAXATION STATION
1225 US 41 UNIT B3.
CHARLOTTE TRADE CENTER
N OF 776 941-625-0141
Now HIRING
RELAXATION
Call for info 941-726-7617
Pt. Charlotte
RELAXATION
Located in Englewood
Call Stormy 941-549-5520

Need a new

Home?

Look in the

Classifieds!

SINGLE ATHLETIC MALE, 62
Seeking Christian Female, 40-
55 for Friendship & Possible
Relationship. NS/ND. (720)-
746-8585 (Rotonda Area)

I SCHOOLS
I & INSTRUCTION
L4306~



CNA Training, HHA, MED
ASST, CPR. Onsite testing
941-429-3320 IMAGINE
CPR CLASSES
June 6, 11, 13 & 14
BLS for healthcare providers
Heartsaver First Aid AED CPR
www.cprclassfl.com
863-303-1150






ED KLOPFER SCHOOLS OF
CNA TRAINING 1 wk class $250.
Locations: Sarasota, Port Char-
lotte, Ft. Myers. 1-800-370-1570
TRADITIONAL SHAOLIN
KUNG FU CLASSES for
Adults & children. FREE
classes available. All areas.
Call for more info.
941-204-2826


L SCHOOLS
INSTRUCTION


UNEMPLOYED? Earn Your
Commercial Driver's License
(CDL) in Just 3 Wks. & Join
the Ranks of Employed Truck
Drivers Nationwide. Located
Punta Gorda FL. SunCoast
Trucking Academy. 941-855-
0193 or 941-347-7445

BIBLE STUDY
I & CHURCHES


CALVARY BIBLE CHURCH
1936 E. Venice Ave. Venice
Friday at 9am.
Study features video teachings
of noted Bible Scholars on
various subjects.
For more info. Call Rev. Jones
at: 941-485-7070 or visit
www.CBCVenice.com
COMMUNITY CENTER
4PM 7PM each Wednesday.
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
PC, Open to All Ages.
For more info 941-766-9357
EDGAR CAYCE A.R.E.
Search for God Study Group
6 PM 7 PM each Tuesday at
Venice Public Library
More Info call 941-966-1964.
FAITH BUILDERS
A Basic Study to Build your
Christian Faith. Call Pastor
Parsons at Christ the King
Lutheran Church for times.
941-766-9357 Port Charlotte
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
278 S. Mango St. Englewood
Mondays & Thursdays
at 9am. Offering chair exer-
cise classes For more info.
Call 941-474-2473
GULF CUA51
HEALING ROOMS
If you need healing, we want
to pray with you!
Our prayer teams are
available to minister to
you by appointment.
Thursdays 10 am-12:30 pm
For apt. call p.863.558.7455
1538 Rio de Janeiro Blvd.
Punta Gorda, FI 33983
Jesus Still Heals Today!
BURIAL LOTS/

CRYPTS


MAUSOLEUM SPACE In
Beautiful Restlawn Memorial
Gardens. Tandum(Room for 2!)
Space #2208, Unit 22-W,
Level D. $7,500
954-895-1895 or
brianfarley@comcast.net

LOST & FOUND /



LOST CAT IN CARRIER.
Female, Maine Coon. Fell off
moving truck between Big
Lots & Gulf Stream in Engle-
wood 6/4. Please call
941-214-8414!!
LOST CAT, Orange and White
Male, in Gulf Cove Area,
Feldman and Spire Ave.
Call 941-270-2684
LOST DOG: Tan & White
Male, on Washington Loop Rd.
Punta Gorda 941-916-5413
LOST GERMAN SHEPHERD,
Black & tan, male. Lost in
Venice, near Frank's Movie
Theater on June 2. Very friend-
ly, answers to "Bane". Please
call 814-558-0671

EDUCATION



MEDICAL OFFICE
TRAINEES NEEDED!
Train to become a Medical
Office Assistant! NO EXPERI-
ENCE NEEDED. Online training
at SC gets you job ready. HS
Diploma/GED & PC/Internet
needed. (888)528-5547.






The Sun Classified Page 8 E/N/C


ads.yoursunnet


Friday, June 6, 2014


SEXERCISECLASSES



GULF COAST ACUPUNCTURE
151 Center Rd.
Wednesdays 5:30pm
Thursdays 9:00 am
Saturdays 8:30am
YOGA FOR BEGINNERS
Proceeds to
Venice Wildlife Center
Call Rick or Mary
941-488-1769
RELIGION CLASSES




BEGIN YOUR DAY IN
BIBLE STUDY
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
Wednesdays lOAM-11AM.
For more info 941-766-9357
Port Charlotte
FAITH LUTHERAN CHURCH
4005 Palm Drive, Punta Gorda
Various Days & Times
CONFIRMATION/BIBLE STUDY
Adult Infomational Class
941-639-6309
NEW LIFE FAMILY WORSHIP
has "Discipleship Develpo-
ment" Class, "Building a Solid
Foundation" 7PM Every 2nd
Friday of the Month. (941)-
639-1700.

OTHER CLASSES



CONCENTRATIVE MEDITA-
TION with Linda Weser, 4 p.m.
every Monday at Unity Church
of Peace, 1250 Rutledge
Street, off Veterans Boulevard
between Orlando Boulevard
and Torrington Street, Port
Charlotte/North Port line.
Free; open to the public.
941-276-0124

4000


ALUMINUM



THE HEIGHTS ALUMINUM,
INC. Screen Rooms.*
Lanais Pool Cages.*
Rescreens Seamless
Gutters Soffit Fascia .
Pavers Concrete.
941-613-1414 OR
941-492-6064
Lic./Ins. AAA0010565 &
R6ALCL-5AC-33

AIRPORT SHUTTLE



FLORIDA AIRPORT
SHUTTLE TRANSPORT
$25 ONE-WAY!
Pickup/Drop-off Locations:
NORTH PORT BUDGET INN
14000 TAMIAMI TR.
PORT CHARLOTTE- DAYS INN
1941 TAMIAMI TR.
PUNTA GORDA- PG WATERFRONT
HOTEL 300 RETTA ESPLANADE
FLAirShuttle.com
941-451-1202

ADVERTISE

In

The Classifieds!


L APPLIANCE
SERVICE/REPAIR


DRYER VENT CLEANING &
INSPECTION. $49
30 yrs. exp. (941)-889-7596
DRYER VENT CLEANING -
THE VENT DOCTOR Book
Your Dryer Vent Cleaning and
Save! 10% Off With This Ad!
941-268-9525 Competent,
Thorough & Reliable.
Lic. Fla. Home Inspector.
Classified = aes
DRYER VENT CLEANING
ONLY $25!!!
FOR LIMITED TIME ONLY:
$20 for NEW Customer
Referrals!
941-249-1161

ADULT CARE


CHILD CARE



ALL CHILDCARE
FACILITIES MUST INCLUDE,
WITH ADVERTISEMENT,
STATE OR LOCAL AGENCY
LICENSE NUMBER.
FLORIDA STATE LAW
requires all child care centers
and day care businesses to
register with the State of Flori-
da. The Sun Newspapers will
not knowingly accept advertis-
ing which is in
violation of the law
TODDLER TEACHER NEEDED
Tiny Hands Preschool
Please Call 941-766-8469

USE CLASIID
[COMPUTERSERVICE


A LENDING HAND, INC. COMPUTER TUTOR
Caregivers/Companions, (Your home or mine)
Hourly or 24/7 Care ONLY $25.00 an hour!
Please call Steve at:
941-809-3725 941-445-4285
SENIORS HELPING SENIORS 1A+ COMPUTER REPAIR,
Light Housekeeping, Meals, TUTOR IN YOUR HOME
Errands and Companionship Reasonable & Prompt! Sr.
Licensed & Bonded Disc. Ask for Stacy
941-257-8483 941-451-3186


COMPUTER SERVICEI


ANTHONY'S COMPUTER
SERVICE & REPAIR.
ALL COMPUTER NEEDS.
SENIOR DISCOUNT*
941-769-1415

EXPRESS COMPUTER
REPAIR
Low Flat Rate. 7 Days!
Tech 10 Yrs. Exp!
(941)-830-3656 Lic./Ins.
JDS2 COMPUTERS
Affordable Repair!
FREE Computer Check!
MENTION THIS AD $50.00
CLEAN & TUNE!
Exp. 9/1/14
941-764-3400
Advertise Today!

[ CONTRACTORS




Insert
Photo
Here
Edward Ross Construction
Services, Inc. 941-408-8500
pool cages, Scr. lanais, etc...


CONTRACTORS/



TEDDY'S HANDYMAN &
REMODELING, INC.
No Job Too Big or Too Small!
(941)-629-4966 Lic./Ins.
Serving NP, Charlotte & PG
CRC 1327653





AIRPORT SHUTTLE SERVICE
ALWAYS RELIABLE
TRANSPORTATION
PROVIDING SAFE, RELIABLE,
COURTEOUS & AFFORDABLE
TRANSPORTATION TO AND FROM
ALL AIRPORTS!
941-626-5226
RSW-$55 SRQ-$60
TPA-$125 MIA-$225
*ALL RATES ARE FROM PC SEE
WEBSITE FOR ADDITIONAL RATES
WW.ALWAYSRELIABLETRANSPORTATION.COM

Need a
new Ride?
Find it
in the
Classifieds!


FINANCIAL


JANITORIAL BUSINESS
FOR SALE, $19,500.
Grossing $60K/Year, Some
Financing Available, Discount
for a Veteran, Supplies &
Equipment Inc. 239-826-2779

SOWNA UPS STORE
Locations Available In
Your Neighborhood. Call
877-623-7253 Or Visit
theupsstorefranchise.com

5000







BUSINESS SERVICES
AN OCCUPATIONAL LIC.
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational
licensing bureau to verify.

ALTERATIONS



ALTERATIONS ON CALL
Certified Master Tailor
40 Yrs. Exp. Busy Schedule?
All Fittings Done In Your
Home Or Office By Appt.
Men's & Women's Alterations
Annette- 941-375-8153







Friday, June 6, 2014 ads .you rsun net F/N/C The Sun Classified Page 9


CONCRETE



PRO PATH CONCRETE
0 Driveways Patios
0 Sidewalks* Pads
Resurfacing Options Available
Free Estimates
941-286-6415
Lic #AAA-11-00081
RICH LANDERS
STUCCO, INC.
Honest, Reliable work!
LIC/INS New Const &
Remodels. Rusted bands
& wire lathe repair.
spraycrete & dry-wall
repair (941)-497-4553

CLEANING
SERVICES


A&R PRO WINDOW
CLEANERS
In/Out, Tracks & Screens,
Also Vinyls, Clean & Polish,
H/W Team. Lic#25014 & Ins.
941-441-8658
ANNIES CLEANING
SERVICE
HomeOffice .
*Weekly Bi-Weekly.
Reliable Service *
Reasonable Rates .
941-249-9978
MAJESTIC CLEANING
PROFESSIONAL CLEANING AT
AFFORDABLE RATES! HAPPY TO
ACCOMODATE YOUR NEEDS!
941-268-3075 LIC/INS
MRS. CLEANING UP!
1st class cleaning Service!
Specials Now!
$10 off Window Cleaning
941-204-8057
www.mrscleaningup.com
Lic & Insured
RELIABLE CLEANING
Service, Husband/Wife team.
Homes, Condos, Mobiles,
941-286-5920 941-276-4935
Lic./Ins.
iLECICAL7



DRM ELECTRICAL
SERVICE,
"Plug Into Personalized Service"
Electrical Maintenance *
* Repairs Troubleshooting *
941-480-0761 941-366-3646
.............................
LUMINOUS ELECTRIC
NO JOB TOO SMALL!
LIC# ES12000942
941-623-9140

ERRAND/SHOPPING




onestoredoesitall.com
1 STOP SHOPPING!!!!
Product of the Month:
Amazon Fire TV
"The Future is Here Today!"
941-391-1910
Email:
japruneski@gmail.com

EXCAVATING/
BUSH HOG



BUSH BUSTERS INC.
Brush Mowing.*
Bush Hogging.*
*ALL Mulching.*
Selective Clearing.
*Tree & Stump Removal.
"We Can Do Anything!"
941-456-6332 or
941-204-1665

FENCES




Fast HonstPerfection!
AlmChain Link, Vinyl/Wood
9C


HEATING & AIR/


AC/DC AIR CONDITIONING.
Free Service Call with repair.
$39 Maintenance Special for
new Customers Only.. 941-
716-1476 Lic#CAC1814367
HONEST AIR CONDITION-
ING & HEATING. Comm. &
Res. Serving Sarasota & Char-
lotte County. 941-423-1746
Lic. CA C056738


MAHLE COOL AIR & HEAT-
ING- Rent to Own Your
Home's A/C. No Credit..
No Problem. Easy Payments
Free Est. 941-584-6300
Lic#CAC058018

S.O.S.
A/C &Heat
941-468-4956
16 SEER
AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS
LOW AS $2995 INSTALLED
INSTALLED 10 YR WARRANTY
0% APR UP TO 5 YRS TO PAY'
ST. LIC #CAC1816023

U.S. AIR
Heating & Air Conditioning
Services LLC
New Air Conditioning Installs
Starting at $2500!
941-697-8697
813-493-2655
CAC1815695


L HOME / COMM.
1 5100 N I



ALUMASERV INC Guaranteed!
Best prices in town
941-627-9244
BOB'S CABINET SOLU-
TIONS 35 yrs exp. All your
cabinet/counter top needs.
(941)-276-0599 Lic22535
COMPLETE DRYWALL
Hang, Finish, Patchwork, All
Textures, Paint. Matt Potter
941-232-8667Lic.& Ins CRC1328482
COMPLETE DRYWALL
Hang, Finish, Patchwork, All
Textures, Paint. Matt Potter
941-232-8667Lic.& Ins CRC1328482
CONCRETE
Walkways, patios, driveways,
lanai, pool decks, etc.
Veteran & Senior Discounts
941-716-0872
DAVE'S HANDYMAN
Honest, Knowledgeable & Reli-
able. Call for all your needs,
Sm/Lg 941-628-8326 Lic/Ins
DISCOUNT FLOORING
Carpet & All Other Types.
Prof. Sales & Installation.
Free Estimates. 941-451-4867
FLORIDASHOPATHOMEFLOORING.COM



SLIDING GLASS
DOOR
And Window Repair
Lowest Prices
GUARANTEED!!!
941-628-8579
Lic#CRC1130733
GUTTERS, 6" Seamless.
Ken Violette, Inc. (941)-
240-6699 Lic.CGC#060662/Ins.
GUTTERTOWN
Specializing in
5" & 6" gutters, Fascias,
Sofits, Seamless runs.
Call for FREE estimates!
Serving Sarasota County
941-525-3227
HANDYMAN
Home repairs. 30+ yrs Exp.
Call 941- 539-1694
J. BONANNO COMPLETED
HANDYMAN SERVICES
Pressure Washing, Gutter
Cleaning, Mowing, Yard Work
& More 35 years exp.
Call John 941-286-5940


I IMPROVEMENT I

Z510

JJ's RESCREENING &
Handyman Services.
941-875-8296
Lic and Insured.
John's Rescreening &
Handyman Service. No Job
To Small, Free Estimates
Lic9341./Ins. 941-883-1381
RAINSCAPE INC A Full
Service Irrigation Company
Monthly Maintenance starts at
$40. 941-888-2988
REDFLAG MAILBOXES
& MORE
Standard & Custom Mailbox-
es, House Numbers, etc.
Starting at $100 including
installation!
www.RedFlagMailboxes.com
941-270-2829
SELL'S ALUMINUM &
CONSTRUCTION L.L.C.
6" Seamless Gutters.
Rescreens*Front Entries* 37
Yrs. Exp! Greg 941-234-8056
or 941-497-4450
Lic#CBC035139


SLIDING
GLASS DOOR
Wheel repairs.
Free Estimates Lic/Ins.
Bob @ 941-706-644

CARPENTER, INC. Handyman
Rotten wood, doors, soffit, facia,
etc. Phil 941-626-9021 lic. & ins.

US ASSIFIED!
.The Stucco Guy"
Drywall, Window Sill & WireI
Lathe Repair, Rusted Bands,
Decorative Bands,
Match Any Texture,
Senior & Veterans Discount
941-716-0872
TILE (Ceramic), Wood Floor-
ing, Installation. Robert Jones
Ceramic Tile (941)-204-2444
Lic. #AA006338/Ins.
TILE remodel, baths, floors.
your tile or mine. (941)-625-
5186,628-0442Lic.#AAA006387
WE SELL & INSTALL Pavers,
Curbing,Concrete,Rock, Mulch,
DISCOUNT ROCKS
941-623-6192 Lic. 1100002010
WESTSHORE BUILDERS
* Remodeling Additions *
Home Repairs*
Free Estimates
Lic. Residential Contractor
941-204-8237
westshore-builders.com
#CRC1330882
WILLY D'S HOME Improve-
ments, Inc. for all your Building
needs. (941)-716-3351

LAWN/GARDEN
& TREE
~5110

A JAMISON TREE SERVICE
Complete & Professional
15% Sr Discount!
FREE EST. LIC. & INSURED
ENGL 941-475-6611
OR N. PORT 941-423-0020
SERONG CHARLOTTE AND
SARASOTA FOR OVER 20 YEARS.
JAM ISON-TREESERVICEINC.COM
AMERICAN IRRIGiATION
Call 941-587-2027
FREE ESTIMATES!!!
Licensed & Insured
Charlotte Co. lic#AAA-11-
00010. Serving Charlotte
and Sarasota Counties
BASIC LANDSCAPING, INC
*Dependability *Accessability
*Customer Satification
STARTING AT $80/per mo
Lic/Ins 941-504-3307


CHRIS RABY'S LAWNS
* Hedges Trimmed (up to lOft)
Small Trees Trimmed & Shaped
. Shrubs Trimmed. eStumps
Removed .Rock or Mulch Laid
* Port Charlotte & Punta Gorda
Areas. 941-623-3601


& TREE
LLAWN/GARDEN1
~5110

AN OCCUPATIONAL LICENSE
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational licens-
ing bureau to verify
DP's ABILITY
TREE SERVICE
Trimming, Mulching, Planting,
Remove. 15 yrs Exp.
941-889-8147
Lic#00000192 & Insured.
FAMILY TREE SERVICE Tree
Trimming, Free Estimates. Call
Today 941-237-8122. Lic/Ins.
FLORIDA TREE INC.
Tree Trimming & Removal.
*Stump Grinding e
Lawn Service e
*Bucket Service e
941-613-3613
pcftree.com Lic./Ins.
FRESH CUT LAWN N MORE
FRESH CUT LAWNS
STARTING AT $25!
941-661-1850
Free Estimates Call Frank
GENERAL LAWN, landscape
services. (941)-426-7844
Wright & Son Landscaping Inc
ISLAND BREEZE
LAWN SERVICE
Residential & Commercial
14 years experience
Owner operated. Lic&
Ins.Venice & surrounding
areas. For free estimate
call Keith 941-445-2982
J RIZ TREE SERVICES
Complete Tree Services
Servicing Charlotte & Sarasota
FREE ESTIMATES
941-306-7532 Lic & Ins
KEN's PROFESSIONAL
TREE SERVICE
Owner Operator, Stump
Grinding, Palm Trimming,
Removals, & Hedge Trimming.
FREE Estimates!
941-624-4204
Lic #001053





LAKE & POND SERVICES
*r INCREASE PROPERTY VALUES
CREATE AN AESTHETICALLY
PLEASING AMENITY
*, SERVICES TO FiT YOUR
SPECIFIC LAKE & POND NEEDS
-N FREE QUOTE
Call To Schedule An
Appointment With One Of
Our Licensed & Insured
Technicians.
941-378-2700
WWW.APOPFL.COM

[AWn [OI LOOLIG SO
Grf [?Aemtion is efY to
]wen & heallby llawns!
Lwn comtion starting cift $85
Fr lawn & t evolution L
Cert. Ar ist while on premises!
941-4)6-8983
ISA Certified Arborist
John Cannon FL-6444A
South Sarasota & Charlotte Co.
LAWN REPLACEMENT
No Job Too BIG or Too small
Maloney's Sod
941-637-1333
LB'S TOTAL LAWN &
LANDSCAPING SVCS
Lawn Care Mulching
Pruning Hedges & Trees
Pressure Washing & More!
Call TODAY for a
free estimates!
Serving Nokomis, Osprey,
Venice & Englewood
941-302-2244 Lic/Ins
ROMANS LAWN PRO
RESIDENTIAL & COMM.
LICENSED & INSURED
941-380-LAWN
SANDEFURS-HOME & TREE
Maintenance Tree trimming,
removal. We do it all!
License/Insured941-484-6042
STEVE'S TREE & HAULING
Tree Removal & Trimming
29 Years Exp. Lic/Insd
Free Estimates 941-866-6979


LAWN/GARDEN

~5110


THE YARD GUY Lawns
starting at $25.00 Serving
Charlotte county since
1975. ASK ABOUT OUR
SNOWBIRD SPECIAL!
941-276-9693
TJ MILAZZO SR. 941-475-
0058 LAWN CUTTING
MOST LAWNS. $25-$30.
EXPERTLY DONE IN ENGLEWOOD
ROTONDA & CAPE HAZE
MILAZZO'S LANDSCAPING
941-830-1005
ALL PHASES OF RESIDENTIAL
LANDSCAPING, INSTALLATIONS,
PLANTING, PEPPER BERRY CON-
TROL & CONCRETE CURBING.
Tommy's Tree & Property
Service *Trim & remove
*Complete lawn care.
Lic/ins. (941)-809-9035
VETERANS AFFORDABLE
LAWN & LANDSCAPING
Commercial & Residential.
Mobile home parks.
Pressure washing, handyman,
home watch, odd jobs, etc
941-447-2428

L LEGAL SERVICES



NON-LAWYER SERVICES
Wills, Divorces, Taxes, Living
Trusts. Call 941-629-0770





AST MASONRY, 941-525-2435
Over 20 yrs exp. in pavers,
brickwork, concrete, stucco, stone
& decorative concrete.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!
LICENSED, INSURED & BONDED
MOVING/HAULING
5130


ALL TYPES OF CLEAN-UPS!
Same Day Service!
24 Hrs. a Day!
941-764-0982 or
941-883-1231
MOVING HELP
$$$ Save $$$
Packing Loading Driving
30 yrs exp. 941-223-6870
SKIP'S MOVING
Local & Long Distance.
1 Item or Whole House!
941-766-1740
Reg.# IM1142 Lic/Ins


TWO MEN
AND A
TRUCK.
"Movers Who Care."
us DIT no. 1915800
941-359-1904


PAINTING/
WALLPAPERING
~5140

LOKi

BEST PRICES -- QUALITY JOB
Best Coast Painting
Residential/Commercial
Handyman services also!
10/oOff With Ad!
941-815-8184
AAA00101254
L------------------------
STIEVEN'S CUSTOM PAINTING
Res/Comm.Int/Ext
FREE EST.
Lic. & Ins. 941-255-3834


50% OFF
Call Now to Lock in an
Amazing Bang For Your Buck
From a Seasoned Painter
941-468-2660
AAAOO 101266
FORMER FIREFIGHTER
Employ Classified!


IWALLPAPERINGI


Colin's Painting
3rd Generation Painter.
Interior & Exterior Painting,
Carpentry & Pressure Washing.
Free Estimates. Ask About
Senior Discounts.
Serving Sarasota & Charlotte
Counties. (941) 468-7082
SERVING ENGLEWOOD, NORTH
PORT, PORT CHARLOTTE, VENICE
DANNY MILLER PAINTING, LLC
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING
941-830-0360
FREE ESTIMATES
danspaintng4602@comcast.net
LICENSED & INSURED AAO09886
LALOR PAINTING, Residental
& Commercial. References.
Lic. AAA010068 & Ins.
FREE Estimates 941-270-1338
lalorpainting@gmail.com
LARRY ESPOSITO PAINTING
INC "It's Not What We Do, It's
How We Do It!"Free Estimates,
10% off Senior & Veterans
941-764-1171 lic & insured
AAA007825
MIKE DYMOND
Quality Painting
941-544-0764

Nathan Dewey Painting Co
Commercial & Residental
Interior & Exterior
Pressure washing
Handyman Services
Free Estimates Prompt Service
941-484-4576

PAINTING UNLIMITED
Where Quality & Value Meet!
Family Owned and Operated.
Call Now for a FREE Estimate
1941-979-7947
Lic. & Ins. AAA-12-O0015
PIATT'S PAINTING INC.
"Where Appearance
is Everything."
Sarasota County.
FREE detailed estimates
941-549-0586 Lic/ins
SUPERIOR PAINTING, INC.
941-474-9091
Full Spray Shop Lic # AAA009837
We Do It A Shade Better!
LARRY BATES PAINTING
Free Estimates
Locally Owned & Operated
941-625-1226
Lic/Ins #RRRO002261

L PET CARE /



DOG CARE- by day/week,
exercise, fenced, loving home
environment. 941-625-0853

PLUMBING /



DO ALL PLUMBING LLC
A Full Service Company for
ALL Your Plumbing Needs.
Call for Our Monthly Specials.
941-626-9353 Lic#CFC1428884
LARRY'S PLUMBING, Re-
Pipes (Most in 1 Day) Beat Any
Estimate Complete Service
941-484-5796 Lic.#CFC1425943
REPIPES, SLAB LEAKS
FULL SERVICE PLUMBING
PRECISION PLUMBING
941423-3058
#CFC1427378

THINK PLUMBERS
are too high? Give me a try!
Retired Master Plumber.
Ross (941) 204-4286
Lic. RF11067393





ALL'S PARADISE
POOL SERVICE
Repairs & Service
FREE WATER TESTING
941-426-6500


Friday, June 6, 2014


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E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 9






The Sun Classified Page 10 E/N/C


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Friday, June 6, 2014


POOL SERVICES



GLENS POOL SERVICE
*Repairs* Chlorine Generators
*Pumps & Motors e Heat Pumps.e
*Weekly Maintenance e
941-809-5121 CPC1458222/Ins.
Strong Pool Services
REPAIRS & SERVICE
motors, filters, leaks, tile,
decks, heat pump
Insured & Licensed
Res. & Comm. 941-697-8580
RP0067268


CLEANING


AA-1
Power & Pressure Cleaning
Don't Live With Mold.
4000 PSI W/Heat.
Driveway Specialists
Call Sonny 941-698-2418
BAILEY'S PRESSURE
CLEANING Tile roof Clean-
ings starting at @$150.
Call 941-497-1736
BENSON'S QUALITY
CLEANING
Pool Cages, Lanais,
Driveways, ETC!
941-697-1749
or 941-587-5007
www. BensonsQualityCleaning.com
PRESSURE WASHING
SERVICE
941-766-0902
PRESENTTHIS AD
WORTH $20 OFFWHOLE HOUSE
FREE ESTIMATES
Pest Eliminators Inc.
LICENSE STATE OF FL #JF138591
LOCAL BUSINESS TAX LICENSE
CHARLOTTE CO. #4998
FL TAX CERTIFICATE #18-8015280394-1

SCREENING



ALL ABOUT ALUMINUM &
SCREEN: Rescreen & new.
941-876-4779
wescreenflorida.com -
Lic# SA37, AL0511993X
Classified = aes
GULF COAST RESCREEN
Lic & INSURED
FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED
SPECIALIZING IN RESCREENING,
BUILDING AND REPAIRING.
SCREW CHANGEOUTS
PRESSURE WASHING & PAINT-
ING POOL CAGES, LANAIS,
FRONT ENTRY WAYS ETC...
941-536-7529
FREE ESTIMATES
RESCREENING by NORTH-
STAR Free Estimates. 941-
460-8500 or 863-221-9037
Lic# CC20597
RESCREENING Special
$55 Tops, $30 Sides.
Complete $1295 (to 1500SF)
941-879-3136 Lic.
22454/Ins.
ROOFING







Repairs, Roofing Replacement
30Years Experience
Discounts to Seniors &Veterans
FREE Inspections & Estimates
Call Hugh 941-662-0555
RM COATS CONSTRUCTION, INC.
LICENSE C C C #1325731 & INSURED

LEONARD'S ROOFING &
INSULATION INC.
FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED
SINCE 1969
Shingle, Tile, Built-Up, Single-
Ply, Metal, Full Carpentry,
Service Available
Reagan Leonard
941-488-7478
LIC # RC 0066574


L ROOFING
444 518'5


JAMES WEAVER ROOFING
FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED
SINCE 1984. FREE ESTIMATE
941-426-8946
uIc#1325995

PAUL DEAO ROOFING
PROTECTING YOUR BIGGEST
INVESTMENT. 22 YRS EXP. -
941-441-8943 Lc#1329187
R.L. TEEL ROOFING
Reroofs & Repairs
Insurance Inspections
Veterns Discounts
941-473-7781
RC29027453 Lic/ns
Advertise Today!
STEVE'S ROOFING &
REPAIRS
Call Steve & See What
He Can Do For You!
Voted Best of the Best
2011, 2012 & 2013!
Free Est. 941-625-1894
Lic. CCC1326838

WAT Rjco.
941-483-4630
Shingles, Slats, Metal, Tile, Repairs
SOld Roof Removal Our Specialty
SFull Carpentry
Free Estimates
LIC #CCC 068184
FULLY INSURED



LREALTOR
5188


KELLI KONRAD
RE/Max Anchor
Accepting NEW Listings!
I will work hard for YOU!
906-250-5483 cell or
941-697-5606 office.
WINDOW CLEANING

z5225


CLEAN WINDOWS
Over 30 Years doing
Windows, Pressure Washing
& Painting. Also available
Wallpaper Removal
941-493-6426 or
941-321-4845
Serving Sarasota County
WE DO WINDOWS &
PRESSURE WASHING.
e New Customers .
*Specials Package Deals*
Residential & Commercial
Free Estimates. Lic,/ns.
(941)-661-5281

WINDOW REPAIR



L5226DE



SLIDING GLASS
DOOR
And Window Repair
Lowest Prices
GUARANTEED!!!
941-628-8579
Lic#CRC1130733


I SLIDING GLASS I
I DOOR REPAIRS I
I Wheels Tracks. Locks I
IFree Estimates Lic/Ins. I
Bob @ 941-706-6445
LSLIDINGDOORSANDMORE.COM

MISCELLANEOUS



OPENING!! 3109 Tamiami
I Tr. P.C. Mon.-Sat. 10-61
IWide Selection & Bargain
I ries. 94-23515OO


MISCELLANEOUS


South Florida Backwaters
Redfish, Tarpon,
Speckled Sea Trout,
Snook & More.
Sight Fishing, Tours & More.
john@snowbirdcharters.com
lori@snowbirdcharters.com
855-567-SNOW (7669)

6000
qv 1D


MERCHANDISE


recreant anr olvs,




SUN"40'


ARTS AND CRAFTS




CERAMIC DISNEY pcs set
$60. Other $8 941-697-7364
SEWING MACHINE, Pfaff
Creative 1472 X cond $300
941-624-3974

CHECK THE
CLASSIFIEDS!
DOLLS




DOLL 19" porcelain,
ex. cond., frkln, mint $55
941-426-4151


DOLLS ]



BRIDE DOLL 3 ft. needs
work. $45 941-235-2203
DOLL FRKLN MINT 19"
porcelain ex. cond. $55 941-
426-4151
DOLL HOUSE Two story
Victorian Doll House. $25
941-625-8192
HOUSEHOLD GOODS
6030


ARMOIR creme 2 drawers
& shelves 52x48x23 $50
941-286-1170
BED MATTRESS & BOX.
New -Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
BED DOUBLE complete $130
941-623-0195
BEDSPREAD TWIN blue
flower $10 941-249-4601
BEDSPREAD, HAND CRO-
CHET fits queen or king $150
941-227-0676
BLINDS 10' 8" W x 82"L
w/valance, white $30
203-927-6976
CARPET & PADDING
11'X19' BERBER, TAN $120
718-986-3608
CHARGERS-SILVER PLUS
8 Salt/Peppers-New $12
941-661-0990
CHINA NORITAKE "Diana"
Srvc 10 + serving pcs $225
941-704-0322
CHINA- Noritake White w/
Black & Silver Trim, 80 Pcs +
12 Wine Glasses $250 941-
474-1872
COMFORTER, King Beige
10 piece&rods $30
901-219-7775
CORELLE IMPRESSIONS
Pink Trio Service for 12 $75
941-575-2675
DYSON VACUUM excellent
condition. $50 941-235-1303
FANS, 2, 1 white & 1 brown
$20/each 941-227-0676
FOLDING CHAIRS, Kansas, 1
Large & 1 Standard w/ Carry
Cases $15 941-276-1881
GLASS LAMPS New Shades -
$15.00 Each 941-488-0417
HAVILAND CHINA 12PI Plus
Elegant $499 941-347-8825
HAVILAND CHINA 12PI
Plus Elegant HAV $499
941-347-8825
JEWELRY BOX, cherry wood
with mirror doors $40 941-
227-0676
KING COMFORTER Beige
set including rods $30
901-219-7775



FREE MERCHANDISE ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
SUN-CLASSIFIEDS.COM
and place your ad.
"CLICK ON CLICK HERE
TO PLACE YOUR AD NOW"
and follow the prompts.
FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 5 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**Everyone Needs to
Register on Our
New Site**

IMN
\ SI F' R


HOUSEHOLD GOODS



HURRICANE PANEL new for
man door $55 941-918-1239
KING COMFORTER Black 10
piece set $30 901-219-7775
MATTRESS PROTECTORS
2 new, XL twins, cost $119
ea. $35 each 941-493-7930
MATTRESS, QUEEN & BOX.
Brand New Will Sell $175.
Also Have KING.
941-629-5550
SHEETS, PURPLE, King
flannel $10 941-249-4601
SILK DAISIES, Bushy & Real-
istic, Deco Pot, Pretty. New w/
Tag. $7. 941-276-1881
SNAKE PLANT, 4' High w/
Pot & Liner., Green & Healthy
$30. 941-276-1881
THROW Soft Fleece, Great
For Travel, Burgandy. "As
New." $5. 941-276-1881
TOASTER OVEN BLACK &
DECKER-9X13 PANS $15
941-743-2424
VACUUM, NEW Kirby Sentra,
All attachments Pd. 2150,
$499 828-777-5610 (cell)
['YARD SALE items, Whole loti
or sale 603-209-0669




2 FULL/QUEEN BED RAILS
$10 ea. 1 full size headboard
$20. 2 twin size headboards
$10 ea. Call 941-743-4293.
ARMOIRE SANTIAGO
computer desk $475
941-629-8138
ARMOIRE+FREE TV Solid
wood 36w72h Adj shelvs
$175 941-704-0322
ARMOIRE, TV 3PCS 104"
Lighted Thomasville $450
941-626-1365
BAKERS RACK Wrought Iron
folding, 5 shelf $50 941-505-
6290
BAR STOOLS (2) Blond wood
with cane seats $50
714-904-9517
BED MATTRESS & BOX.
New-Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
BED, Trundle/Day, White Rod
Iron. $250 734-730-9800
BEDRM FURN bali hai drs,
chst, mir, hdbd no bed $250
941-474-3194
BEDROOM SET Dresser/mir-
ror, chest+more $400 941-
564-6810
BEDROOM SET, full size.
dresser-mirror, mattress+
$325 941-564-6810
BENCH METAL base, gd
cond. $90 941-894-4115
CHAIR AND OTTOMAN $65
810-423-5087
CHAIR for living room $45
810-423-5087
CHAIR LIVING ROOM Faux-
leather, ivory $125 941-894-
4115
CHAIR SOFT ivory fabric.
Swivels. DC $75
443-618-8161
CHAIR, Overstuffed Leopard
Super Comfortable! $250
941-575-9800
CHAIRS (2) and Sofa good for
rental $25 937-831-0146
CHAIRS (2) kitchen like new
on casters. $50/ea; Table
lamp $35 obo 941-429-9122
CHAIRS LIVING RM. 2 High
Quality ea. swivel $200 941-
894-4 115
CHAIRS-SWIVEL VERY com-
fortable,3 each $60 941-564-
6810
CHASE CHAIR green clean
smoke pet free home $25
401-639-9687
CHEST MAPLE, 48H X
17W, GREAT COND. $125
863-990-1730


FURNITURE



CHEST OF Drawers 24 x 42
Wht 8 drawers $15
941-380-7090
COUCH ALL LEATHER
tan sectional like new $850
941-697-5917
COUCH AND Loveseat
Leather med brown $350
941-456-5546
COUCH Denim Ex Cond $400
941-786-8367
COUCH FLORAL seats
three/great condition $225
941-882-3139
COUCH, LOVESEAT, COFFEE
TABLE EXE COND $175
941-268-9029
DAYBED, TV Stand & Mirror.
All White Wicker. Like New!
$350. 941-505-7780
DESK, ROLL TOP, Oak, Com-
puter Compatible $300 941-
391-7148
DINETTE SET 4 swivel chairs
$200 941-979-6468
DINETTE SET wood with
2 chairs. New $300
941-828-1771
DINING RM SET, Dark Early
Amer. 15 pc including acces-
sories. $495 941-629-2699
DINING ROOM SET,
5 Piece 42" round wood
$175 941-626-5468
DINING SET 48X30 table/6
chairs $300 941-882-3139
DINING SET Brass/GIs 48"
opens to 106"; 4 uphlstrd
chairs $350 941-662-0020
DINING SET Oak, Round
table/leaf 4 chairs $250 941-
743-0005
DINING SET, 2 leafs, 8
Chairs. Walnut wood. Ex Cond
Dining Set, 2 leafs, 8 chairs.
Walnut wood. Ex cond. 250.00
$250 941-623-3872
DRESSER 70W31H,BRN
wd/rattan tr 6drws, 1dr VGC
$150 941-474-3194
DRESSER THOMASVILLE up
dated, paitned It grey Artisan
finish, waxed, showroom quali-
ty! $250 914-850-9841
DRESSER WICKER
six drawers/honey finish $225
941-882-3139
END TABLE dkwd 28w octa-
gon open shlf/stor EXC $75
941-474-3194
END TABLES, Antique
Italian Florentine Great! $100
941-575-9800
ENTERTAINMENT BAMBOO
3pc nice set $200 941-249-
4601
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
wood/whitewash $225
941-882-3139
ADVERTISED!

EXECUTIVE DESK Chair
Dark Bin Leather Hi Back $35
941-380-7090
FOLDING TABLES 2 32x72
2" thick,T frame. $100
941-629-4884
FOYER TABLE & mirror black
metal wood top $100
941-249-4601
FURNITURE, FLORIDA STYLE
2 Sofas w/pillows, 2 oak
tables, 2 glass top tables, 3
lamps $300. 941-629-2699
GLASS, 55 x 26 x 1/4 for
desk Perfect condition $25
207-653-6254
HEADBOARD OAK Towers
King w lighted/mirror bridge.
6'HxlO'W $400 941-624-5468
HOME SPEAKER System
Bose, Cinematic, cost 599.99,
sell for $299 941-493-7930
HUTCH WOOD/METAL
Combo w/drawers $350
941-743-0005
I BUY FURNITURE
Or anything of value!
941-485-4964
LANAI FURN.-WHITE WICK-
ER 4 pieces $195 941-580-
4460






Friday, June 6, 2014


ads.yoursun net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 11


Challenger
DIRECTIONS:
Fill each square with a number, one through nine.
I Horizontal squares should add to totals on right. 6-6
Vertical squares should add to totals on bottom.
Diagonal squares through center should add to
total in upper and lower right. 17 1


THERE MAY BE MORE
THAN ONE SOLUTION.
Today's Challenge
Time 9 Minutes
10OSeconds
Your Working
Time Minutes
Seconds


71 24

8 32
9 27
6 231


1281271281231 211


92014 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.
Yesterday's KIa

Challenger IZ 1L7I5
Answers 1 41216


Cryptoquip 0211 by King Features Syndicate


EDVNZSS EZY


CS P N L G V WY J


I BEETLE BAILEY By Mort Walker


K B C B K V G G I HAGAR THE HORRIBLE By Chris Browne


ASW WS


EYZVPVWY ISLP DVBP BAWS


GVIYPE: AS NSPY WBYPE.
Yesterday's Cryptoquip: THIS WEEK-OLD
BREAD HAS GOTTEN SO HARD IT MIGHT BREAK
SOMEONE'S TEETH. LET THE BITER BEWARE!
Today's Cryptoquip Clue: S equals 0


MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM By Mike Peters


"Yes, I saw the camera, but the light was
still yellow."


WORD MEXICAN
SLEUTH CUISINE
WK H T D A X U Q N K H E B Y

V S P 0MG J H E E B Y VT Q

O L I S GO Z D E L B YW T R

PMK(TORT I LLA)I FDB

YWU A S T Q I R C OMO S M

K I F D AT I D ROG J A A D

B SN A E B Z RC R H X I TW

U S E C QONA F N U C L R L

J H I P F D T C A E YB I O F

WR V S ON E L L E R T H T S

Q PN L K S I H F E C B C Z Y
Thursday's unlisted clue: RIPKEN
Find the listed words in the diagram. They run in all directions -
forward, backward, up, down and diagonally.
Friday's unlisted clue hint: PEPPERS
Beans Frijole Rice Tortas
Burrito Gordita Sopes Tortilla
Chorizo Refritos Taco Tostada
Corn Rellenos Tamale
2014 King Features, Inc. 61


I -.. vp- .... U.- ..


I







TheASun.Classified.Page.12.E..IC Mads i your.un.. Fida Jue6.21


DEAR DR. ROACH:
I am a 64-year-old male
in good health. I had an
outbreak of blisterlike
sores on my upper torso,
in my mouth and near my
eyes. I had an almost-in-
capacitating feeling and
was able to consume
only liquids and shakes
because of the mouth
blisters. The blisters took
their course in seven
to 10 days and scabbed
over. These episodes
reoccurred three separate
times, returning two to
three weeks apart.
Just prior to the
outbreaks, I started
taking Aleve because of
sore knees while I was
walking. On the third
outbreak, I consulted
my dermatologist, and
he observed a reddened
throat without any
noticeable soreness on
my part, so he swabbed
the throat, and it showed
strep throat. The sore
throat was treated, and I
believe I was also given
steroids.
The physician's di-
agnosis was erythema
multiforme. The doctor
thought the EM was
related to the strep throat,
and he wasn't sure if
the Aleve played a role.
I am interested in your
thoughts on the possible
causes of the EM and the
chances of it returning.
I have been blister-free
for a year now, but fear
that the EM will return
or that there is some
underlying autoimmune
issue. -T.C.
ANSWER: Erythema
multiforme is a skin rash
with a characteristic
target appearance. They
tend to appear on the
backs of hands to the
elbows, or on the legs
from the top of the feet
to the knees, and then
appear closer toward the
body. They stay for a few
days and then leave after
two weeks or so.
EM has been associ-
ated with many medical
conditions, including
autoimmune diseases;
however, 90 percent of
EM is related to infection.
The most common in-
fection is herpes simplex
(the cause of cold sores
as well as genital herpes).
Strep throat is not a
common cause of EM.
However, the naproxen
(Aleve) is a well-known
cause.
I would advise against
using Aleve or related
medications, and reassure
you that the likelihood
of a hidden autoimmune
disease is low.
DEAR DR. ROACH: I


Dr. Roach


am an older male, with
irregular heartbeat. I am
on medication for it. Will
having sex put too much
strain on the heart or
cause further problems?
- Anon.
ANSWER: This is a
common concern, and
fear of heart attack or
other problems often
keeps couples from sexu-
al intercourse when one
or both have heart issues.
In most cases, the risk
is low. I can't tell you in
your particular situation,
but your cardiologist or
regular doctor can answer
your question.
People at moderate
risk include those with
a recent heart attack,
with stable angina or
with multiple cardiac
risk factors. Those at
high risk include people
with unstable, recurrent
angina, uncontrolled high
blood pressure, severe
heart failure and high-risk
irregular heart rhythms,
such as ventricular
tachycardia.
Regular exercise reduc-
es heart risk from activity,
including sexual activity.
DEAR DR. ROACH: I
am in my early 80s and
have some chronic kidney
disease. I usually have
one or two beers a day
and one or two glasses
of wine every two weeks
or so. Is this safe with my
kidney disease? K.D.
ANSWER: I would
recommend one rather
than two beers on a daily
basis, and again no more
than one glass of wine.
Moderation is the key. Too
much alcohol can raise
your blood pressure, may
interfere with medication
and, in excess doses,
damage your kidneys.
TO READERS: The
booklet on colon cancer
provides useful informa-
tion on the causes and
cures of this common
malady. Readers can
obtain a copy by writing:
Dr. Roach- No. 505, P.O.
Box 536475, Orlando, FL
32853-6475. Enclose a
check or money order (no
cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6
Can. with the recipient's
printed name and
address. Please allow four
weeks for delivery.


I HEY, LWOKIN' GOOD! lrtL
Of AN AWESOME PARING!


Beatty
B YOU 0 YOURBEST
AND EVERYTHING WILL
- BE INE, SAPAH!


THE KIDS FROM TE BUS
WILL BE WERE IN A
SECOND... JUST HAVE FUN!


ZITS By Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman


el TIFI FNANA
TURNPORAGE,
T1 PO.IN I.K
PUFPLE, ANP
V h FE'1KLL Is


ILIX- &\ / II
GARFIELD By Jim Davis
(ALL WE HAVE IS NOOPLE, I 1
50 WE'RE HAVING NOOPLE
TONIGHT, GARFIELP )


1Mg- FORAAORE
c UNSCRFaN,MKSTER!


THE FORKS ARE PIRT,
BUT WE CAN LE THESE
PENCILS LIKE CHOPSTICKS,


ANP THE NAPKINS ARE
STILL IN THE LAUNPRY. SO...
WILL Y~OU3
PLEASE GET
MARRJEPI


L:


FRESHLY SQUEEZED By Ed Stein
I TOPAY'S THE LAST PAY I-THE KIPS ARG
OF SCHOOL. NATG, LeT' I EPGWFOlNMINd,
NOT 13E LATG FOR THG FIRST.
?VW&WAA. J


MARY WORTH By Karen Moy and Joe Giella


SWHENMAR"T
NEW LITTLE
FRIEN SAYS
SHE DOESN'T
SWIM...


m 11


AFTER1 WHICH THE
MOTNEVS WILL PE
SACRIFICE TO THE
GUMMER VAATION.


NEWJ 'ORK CAN 1E BRIAN TOLP ME YOL'R&-
-HECTIC.\WE JUST EMERGENCY ROOM
WANT TO ROAX!_ poTOR LKE HIM! THIS 2
WIlLL BE A NICE liME
,'qAAW 'FROM -THE SIR ESS


Sa


HOW
LONG WILL
) IT TAKE
YOU TO FIX
EVERY-
THING?


Skin rash associated

with many conditions


THEN TH4 TEAHGVS
WILL. cSE SHOWEIEP
WITH TTANKVS ANP
drIFTS.


The Sun Classified Page 12 E/N/C


ads~yoursun,nef


Friday, June 6, 2014


/A


4


W 'o. _1
510111,MPOILItl AN EC-10 V VIE CAM E
4E. AN HERE FOR A)
SHOW IfOU OTO(45R PEACEFUL
'ESrINZ, CHANGE
TO kz),
,j \,-rHlt4GS HERE! OF
FACE.





Friday, June 6, 2014


ads.yoursun net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 13


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


I O nSliIDLU Vu KLM BORN LOSER By Art and Chip Sansom
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek rO- "q_ OF C.OUREJ NOT- VFUNNY! NOW, W.r
N'U kIE.N4F'T ORPCOflEON VENT1 r U~~'!NOWE5
WPA(T TAW5. IT ATOt#L ,k MC" 5?,DRAkAY PR&SCENT?
i$ s, RNVFi&'o-yoT.tm



ww,! think
rhatwas it wilibe -Lt
ouah to tlet
mke'afoever JhMra



BLONDIE By Dean Young and John Marshall


E X T Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer
here: I IJIJI I
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: VENUE RELIC FOLLOW UTOPIA
Answer: Leaving his electric car plugged in all night
made it- "POWER-FULL"

Fun with folders!


Dear Heloise: Could you
please reprint your hint on
how to create new folders
on your computer for those
of us who need a little extra
help? -A Reader in Illinois
Happy to reprint it for
you! Organizing things into
different folders can make
them much simpler to find
later. Here is how to do it:
Click on the "Start"
button and then click on
"Computer."
Choose one of your
libraries (documents,
pictures, etc.) and
double-click on it.
At the top of the screen
there will be an option for
"New Folder." Click on
it, and a new folder will
appear, which you can tide
whatever you want.
Then just click and drag
or cut and paste files into
your new folder. Heloise

Travel hint
Dear Heloise: My family
laughs at me, but when we
stay at a hotel, I take a pic-
ture of the hotel and our
room number. This way,
I can decide if I want to
stay there again or would
rather have a different
room because of noise,
etc. A Happy Traveler
from New Hampshire

Lip-balm mishap
Dear Heloise: I always
carry a tube of lip balm in
my pocket. I usually am
pretty good about check-
ing clothing before putting
it in the laundry, but I
missed a tube, and it went


Hints from Heloise

through the wash. I now
have clothes with dark
grease spots on them. Is
there anything I can do to
remove the spots? L.S.
in San Antonio
I think I can help! You
will need to treat each piece
individually. Find the spots
and rub each with a liquid
dishwashing soap that has
degreasing agents in it.
Once you have pretreated
all the spots, wash the
garments on the hottest
water setting that's safe
for the fabric. Let air-dry,
and see if the stains have
been removed. You may
need to re-treat. Laundry
stains are a part of life, but
they can be such a hassle.
Want to know all my stain
secrets? Order my pamphlet
Heloise's Handy Stain Guide
for Clothing. To receive one,
send $5 and a long, self-ad-
dressed, stamped (70 cents)
envelope to: Heloise/Stain
Guide, PO. Box 795001, San
Antonio, TX 78279-5001.
Another hint recommended
by a reader is to treat die
greasy stains with shampoo
to remove them. Put on the
spots and rub the fabric
together. Wash and let air-
dry. -Heloise


BABY BLUES By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott
I Urse rr .o o MW -- --_c- C T AM ;oW
NOWT BKING LLJITEQ, ~m6A4~MMBER
H ,-'--


FOR BETTER OR FOR

CMI A.1R1ND
LZT_.5 R"-







The Sun Classified Page 14 EINIC ads .yoursun net Friday, June 6, 2014


Sister's erratic behavior can't

be blamed on deceased dad


DEAR ABBY: I'm the
middle child. Our father
died in the Gulf War. None
of us really knew him, but
my younger sister, "Delia,"
has no memory of him
at all.
She has been acting
out for years now, and
has broken our mother's
heart more times than I
can count. Whenever she
messes up, she blames it
on not knowing our father
and the life she "could"
have led.
It has been 20 years,
Abby! The past is the past.
Delia continues to ruin
her future and blame
our mom. It has Mom
wondering why she was
able to survive this crisis
20 years ago but can't
manage to deal with my
sister.
I think Delia may have
a chemical imbalance, or
just never dealt with our
father's death. How do
you convince someone
to get help? How do you
make her see that Dad
died so she could enjoy
the many freedoms of
America? DRAINED IN
DELAWARE
DEAR DRAINED: I'm
sorry for your family's loss,
but we are all responsible
for our own behavior
and our own emotions.
You can't force "help" on
your dysfunctional sister.
Before she'll be willing to
accept that she needs it,
she will have to accept
that she has been respon-
sible for her own mistakes
and behavior. If your
father had lived, her life
might not have been any
different than it is.
The person who could
use some professional
help might be your
mother. Counseling might
help her to quit trying to
rescue her adult daugh-
ter, or blaming herself
for the problems Delia
has created for herself.
I'm not saying it will be
easy letting go rarely is.
But it might improve her
emotional and physical
health.
DEAR ABBY: I am an
attractive, physically fit,
well-educated, 41-year-
old divorced woman


Dear Abby


with two young children.
Recently a co-worker I
have known for several
months asked me to
accompany him on a
weekend hiking trip. (He's
23.) After a few conversa-
tions, he confessed that
he was "deeply in love"
with me and hoped we
could begin a "serious
relationship."
Abby, he's mature,
good-looking, financially
independent and has a
great sense of humor. I'm
attracted to him. Should
I pursue this relationship,
or wait until I'm attracted
to someone closer to my
own age? Help! -A.S. IN
SAN DIEGO
DEAR A.S.: Whoa!
Slow down. Regardless
of the age difference, an
overnight first date (with
a co-worker, yet) seems
like an awfully speedy
beginning to me. If you're
smart, start with a coffee
date, graduate to a dinner
date, and pursue the
relationship from there.
Only time will tell if this is
the real thing.
Dear Abby is written
by Abigail Van Buren,
also known as Jeanne
Phillips, and was founded
by her mother Pauline
Phillips. Contact Dear
Abby at www.DearAbby.
corn or PO. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.
Abby shares more than
100 of her favorite recipes
in two booklets: 'Abby's
Favorite Recipes" and
"More Favorite Recipes
by Dear Abby." Send your
name and mailing ad-
dress, plus check or money
order for $14 (U.S. funds)
to: Dear Abby, Cookbooklet
Set, PO. Box 447, Mount
Morris, IL 61054-044 7.
(Shipping and handling
are included in the price.)


"For innumerable evils have compassed me about:
mine iniquities have taken hold upon me, so that lam
not able to look up; they are more than the hairs of mine
head: therefore my heart faileth me." -Psalm 40:12.
Do you feel the same way? The Lord can lift the bur-
dens of your heart. "Though your sins be as scarlet,
they shall be as white as snow."


[_ H O RO SC O PE I the perfect time to pick the issue looming largest in
HOROSCOPE your mind and work on it.
ARIES (March 21-April 19). The environment isn't CANCER (June 22July 22). If you can do a little, do
what you said you wanted, but there's a hidden it. It will turn out to be not only better than nothing,
greatness in it. Ifyou can find things to appreciate in but also what inspires and motivates others. You'll
this, you will come out of this a winner.
be surprised at who is paying attention.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Lately, you wonder
whether you really are on the best eating program LEO (July23-Aug. 22). Nobody is chasing you, so
for you. Some adjustments could be made to why are you running? Stop. There was a reason you
improve your health, but which way would be best? split, but that reason no longer applies. Re-evaluate.
Start the experimental process. There's something you'd rather be doing.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). You're emotionally VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). It's better to be social and
ambitious and filled with courage, which makes this open-minded than to quard your ideas too closely.


i U 6.i




iq* yKo ~ltS mfV


PEANUTS By Charles Schulz


~ir ~
4~~* 1JUN~ b, ~qq-~q- '~T'Q ~EA~M8E~" ~ ~ ~ ~


CRANKSHAFT By Tom Batiuk & Chuck Ayers


JIM SF~j0Us...


SHOE By Gary Brookins & Susie
F MRE lFADING OUT WILL YOU "Sm
ON OUR CAMPING TRIP, ABE TO RIVE IN
ROZ. SEE YOU MONDAY. 4E WILm 555'?


OIr-rI6 WT RnS 1. OGE


EAIF-FqDAY.


Venice Gondolier readers: Look for the puzzle solution in the Our Town section


So throw your ideas out there. You won't be sure of with intelligence. Is there a smarter way? And here's cumbersome. Your heart will be lightest when you
how big or small they are until you share. an even better question: Is there a wiser way? honestly can say that there is no one you blame or
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Each story you hear will CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Small interactions despise.
have a bit of learning inside for you, and the same will pay off in ways you might not have considered, TODAY'S BIRTHDAY (June 6).You give your time
goes for the stories you tell. This is one of your favor- and more significant or formal exchanges will have constantly. Downtime alone is a positive thing,
ite ways to absorb the beautiful world you live in. an even more profound impact. and you'll use it well. Delve into your own unique
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Paying homage to AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). Coming and going are psyche. You're fascinating, and the more you know
other worlds is both respectful and enjoyable. the same. It's as important to finish strong as it is and love yourself the more you have to offer the
Sure, you don't belong there permanently. But you to start strong.There may be some nervous energy world. July features a big purchase.The family
applaud and honor another person's world. throughout the day. dynamic changes for the better in September. Aries
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21).The project you PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). Grudges are and Libra people adore you. Your lucky numbers are:
used to approach with sheer will you now approach heavy. Holding on to them makes your way 4,19,32,16 and 20.


JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process elimination to solve the puzzle. The difficulty
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).

3 1 4 Rating: SILVER

7 1 2 Solution to 6/5/14

1647189325
-- -- ~, 218735946


5 4 2 7 539246871
7 3 2 9825 13467
-~ 364872519

8 2 6 175694283
7 9 872 95 13
_U 7993_4893461752

3 8 5 M 4 5132T 698



6/6/14


The Sun Classified Page 14 E/N/C


ads~yoursun,nef


Friday, June 6, 2014






Friday, June 6, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 15


Friday Television


VEN-VENICE E-N-ENGLEWOOD SAR-SARASOTA PC-PORT CHARLOTTE ARC-ARCADIA SPG-SOUTH PUNTA GORDA


JUN.6 PRIME TIME
ABC7 News WorlddNews To Be a To Be a Shark Tank Kids and teens What Would You Do? (N) 20/20 (N) (HD) ABC7 News (35) Jimmy
ABC 40 7 7 7 10 7 7 @6pm (N) Diane Sawyer Millionaire? Millionaire? offer their ideas. (R) (HD) (HD) @11pm(N) KimmelLive
(N) (R) (R)(R
ABC7News World News The 7 O'Clock Entertainment Shark Tank Kids and teens What Would You Do? (N) 20/20 (N) (HD) ABC7 News (35) Jimmy
ABC@2 7 11 7 @6:00pm (N) Diane Sawyer News (N) (HD)) Tonight (N) (HD offer their ideas. (R) (H)) (HD) @11:00pm Kimmel Live
(N) (N)(R
WINK News CBS Evening WINK News Inside Undercover Boss: Buffets, Hawaii Five-a: Hana Blue Bloods: Drawing Dead WINK Newsal Late Show
CBS 1213213 5 5 5 at6pm(N)(H) News(N)(H)) at7pm(N)(H)) Edition (N) (HD Inc Learning to grill steak. (l Lokomaika'i Chin Officer accused of excessive 11pm(N)(HD) SarahHyland.
(HD) questioned. (R) (H)) force. (R) (N)
10 News, CBS Evening Wheel of Jeopardy! (N) Undercover Boss: Buffets, Hawaii Five-a: Hana Blue Bloods: Drawing Dead 10 News, Late Show
CBS Miio 101 16pm (N) News (N)(H)) Fortune (N)( HD) Inc Learning to grill steak. (1 Lokomaika'i Chin Officer accused of excessive 11pm (N) Sarah Hyland.
(HD) (HD) questioned. (R) (HD) force. (R) (N)
NBC2 News NBC Nightly Wheel of Jeopardy! (N) Bian Williams Reporling: Dateline NBC (N) (H)) Crssbones: The Covenant NBC2 News Tonight Show
NBC 2 2 2 2 @6pm(N)(HDi News(N)(H)) Fortune(N) (H)) JoureytoNomiandyD-Day Pirate questions Blackbeard's @11pm(N) JimmyFallon
(411(HD veterans. (N) plan. (N) (H)) (N)
NewsChannel NBC Nightly NewsChannel Entertainment Bian Williams Reporting: Dateline NBC (N) (HD) Crssbones: The Covenant NewsChannel Tonight Show
NBC M 8 8 8 8 8 8at6:O0(N) News(N)(HD)) 8at7:O0(N) Tonightt(N)(H)JoureytoNorrnandyD-Day Pirate questions Blackeard's 8at11:O0(N) JimmyFallon
veterans. (N) plan. (N) (N)
FOX 4 News at Six Judge Judy The Simpson MasteiChef.Top22 Compete 24: Live Another Day Day 9: FOX 4 News at Ten Local FOX4 News The Arsenio
FOX I6 4 4 4 Community news; weather; (R) (HD) Wackyfamily. Top 22 take mystery bx 4:09PM-5:09OPM Finding news report and weather at Eleven (N) Hall Show (R)
traffic; more. (N) challenge. (R) Margot. (R) update. (N) (HD)
FOX 13 6:00 News News TMZ (N) TheInsider MasteiChef. Top 22 Compete 24: Live Another Day Day 9: FOX 1310:00 News The FOX 13 News Access
FOXIN13 13313 13 13 events of the day are reported. Jane Fonda. (N(Top 22 take mystery box 4:00PM-5:00 PMFinding top news stories are Edge(N)(HD) Hollywood(N)
I(N) (HD) challenge. (R) Margot. (R) updated. (N) (HD) (HD)
BBCWoild Nightly The PBS NewsHour (N)(HD) Washington Chalie Rose: Suze Onnan's Financial Solutions For You Suze Orman My Music: 50's & 60's
PBS 3 3 3 News Business Week(N) (H)) The Week(N) offers advice on how to achieve financial independence. (R) Party Songs Dance music. (R)
America Report(N) (H)) (H))
BBCWoidd Nightly The PBS NewsHour (N)(HD) Washington Florida This Happy (11) Anne Bechsgaard. Individuals' The Australian Pink Floyd Show:
WEDJE 3 3 3 3 News Business Week(N) (HD) Week (N) lives and research are examined to find the Eclipsed By the Moon Tribute concert to
America Report(N) keys to happiness. Pink Floyd. (R) (H))
Big Bang WINKNews Big Bang 21/2 Men Whose Line? Whose Line? Hart of Dixie: Friends in Low WINK News @1Opm (N) (H)) 21/2 Men How Met
CW 6 21 6 Penny's at 6:30pm (N) Theory Former Evelyn's Candice Kyle Rchards. Places Crashed the dinner. (R) Lyndsey moves Mother.
package. __ bully. vengeance. Acola. (R) (H)) in. Hooked (H))
King of King of 2 1/2 Men 21/2 Men Whose Line? Whose Line? Hart of Dixie: Friends in Low Engagement Engagement The Arsenio Hall Show
CW M) 9 9 9 4 Queens Bin Queens Life Lyndsey moves Evelyn's Candie Kyle Richards. Places Crashed the dinner. (R) Audrey'sraise. Bayshower. Betty White. (R) ([I4))
Bingowin. insurance, in. vengeance. Acola. (R) (HD)
Loves Seinfeld Family Feud Family Feud Monk Mr. Monkand the Monk: Mr. Monk Takes a Cops Cops Seinfeld Jerry Community
MYN111 11 11 11 14 Raymond Ne" Mission (V/PG) (R) (IVPG) (R) Marathon Man Woman Vacation Disbelieved Reloaded (HD Reloaded (HD) dates gymnast. Dean's games.
girffriend. aborted. murdered. (HD) witness. (HD)
Access Cleveland Family Guy Family Guy Monk Mr. Monk and the Monk: Mr. Monk Takes a Law & Order. Special Victims Seinfeld Seinfeld Jerry
MYN [E 8 9 8 Hollywood (N) Show Rap Brian's son. Guysjoin tib. Marathon Man Woman Vacation Disbelieved Unit: Wrong Is Right Fatal Mission dates gymnast.
()HD) batie. murdered. (HD) witness. (HD) burning seen. aborted.
Modem Modem Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order. Special Victirm Law & Order Special Victim The Office: The Office Family Guy Family Guy
IND M121212 38 12 Family Family Christmas in a Penny's Theory Former Unit Wrong Is Right Fatal Unit: Obscene TV star attacked. Sabre New Vacation Brian's son. Guys join tile.
I IRV. (HD) day. package. bully. burning seen. (HD) policies, picture. I
Ghost Whisperer: Pieces of Cold Case: It's Raining Men Cold Case: Red Glare Lily Cold Case: Mind Hunter Cold Case: Disretions Cold Case: Blank Generation
ION 2 2 2 132618 17 You Missing girl. (H)) Stangulation death of ankAIDS investgatesMcCarthyera Woman's remains linked to Defendant's conviction Cult member suicide. (I))
activist murder. (4D) seal kller. (4D) questioned. (4D)
A&E 262626263950 181 Criminal (V14) (4D) Criminal (1V14) (4D) Criminal (V14) (D) Criminal Minds: In Heat Criminal: The Crossing Criminal Killer in coma.
Ghostbusters 11('89) The Ghostbusters reunite to tangle The Dark Knight ('08) A new district attorney joins Batman in the fight against crime, but the Hat Catch
AMC5323with the spirit of a 16th-century tyrant. grandiose attacks of a giggling psychopath plunge Gotham City back into fear. Fire: VO
APL 444444443668130 freehouse (R) (I) Treehouse (R) (I)) No Limits INo Limits Treehouse (N) (I) Treehouse (N) (I) Treehouse (R) (I))
BBCAM1 14114114114 l1489Trek: Next Trek Next Trek: Next: Nth Degree Hannibal ('01, Thriller) **1/2 Serial killer returns to America. (R) IHannibal
BET 353535354022 270106 & Park (N) (lID) Message (R) Ray ('04, Drama) *** Ray Charles rises from humble beginnings to become a music industry icon.
BRAVO 6868686825451 185 (5:50) Bee Movie ('07) ** 2 Outside the hive. (PG) (:52) Bee Movie ('07) **1/ Outside the hive. (PG) (52) Daddy Day Camp ('07) Military dad. (PG)
COM 666666661527 190 South Park Tosh.0 (R) Colbert IDaily (R) Futurama (27) Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby ('06) **12 Dave Chappelle
DISC 404040402543 120 Deadliest Distress call. Catch Fishing stops. (R) Deadliest: Lost at Sea Siberian (N) Chrome (N) (4D) Siberian (R)
El 464646462726 196 Kardashian (1 (D) E! News (N) (lID) E! News (R) (4D) Fashion Katie Cassidy. Fashion Katie Cassidy. _C. Lately INews (R)
FAM 555555551046 199 Middle Middle The Breakfast Club ('85)-***1 2 Teens in detention. Pretty in PinkB('86, Comedy) Teen loves rich boy. The 700 Club (VG)
FOOD 37373737-76 164 Diners (R) Diners (R) Diners (R) Diners (R) Diners (R) Diners (R) Diners ( Diners (R) Diners (N) Diners ( Diners (R) Diners (R)
How I Met Hw I Met How I Met How I Met Kung Fu Panda ('08, Comedy) Jack Black. A panda trains with famous (33) Kung Fu Panda ('08) ** Panda is
FX 51 51 51 51 584953 (V14) (1V14) (V14) (V14) martial artists to protect his village using kung fu. chosen as a legendary warrior.
GSN 17917917917934 179184 Fain Feud Fam. Feud Fam. Feud Fam. Feud 1 vs. 100 (VG) Newlywed INewlywed It Takes a Church (R) Fam. Feud Fam. Feud
HALL 5 5 5 17 73 240 Waltons Dew Drop Inn. Waltons: The Tailspin Waltons Nearlyweds Priest incorrectly files paperwork. Golden Golden
HGTV 414141415342 165 Hunt (R) Hunt ( Love It (R) [Hunters Love It (R) (4D) Love It (R) (lID) Hunters lHunters Hunters Hunters
HIST 81 81 81 81 3365 128 American: Cheap Pick American (R) (4D) American (R) (4D) D-Day in HD: Part 1 Survivor accounts. (N) (4D) (:02) American (R) (lID)
LIFE 363636365241 140 Wife Swap (4D) Wife Swap (4D) Wife Swap (4D) Wife Swap (4D) Little (R) (lID) FLittle Dance class. (R)
NICK 252525252444 252Webheads Sam&Cat Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius ('01) ** Sponge Full Hse [Full Hse Full Hse [Full Hse Friends IFriends
OWN 5858585847103161 NY ER NY ER NY ER INY ER Oprah (R) (I)) Oprah (R) (I)) Oprah Ralph Macchio. Oprah (R) (I))
QYC f4 1414 9 1413 150Steel by Design tarte beauty Clarks Footwear Classics: All Jewelry Friday Night Beauty Hair & makeup tips.
SPIKE 575757572963 54 Cops (R) Cops ( Cops (R) Cops (R) Cops (1 Cops (R) Bellator MMA: Summer Series (N) (lID) Cops (R) Cops (R)
SYFY 6767676725364 l8OThe Bourne Ultimatum ('07) Amnesiac assassin. WWE SmackDown (lID) Continuum (N) Wheaton Continuum
TBS 595959593262 52 Seinfeld ISeinfeld Seinfeld ISeinfeld Valentine's Day (10) Love is determined, sought and ignored. lt's Complicated ('09) A secret affair.
The Long, Long Trailer ('54, Comedy) Lucille Ball, Desi The Sea Hawk ('24) ***Ayoung British noble exiled (15) The Black Swan ('42) A former pirate takes to the high
TCM 65 65 65 65 169230Arnaz. A couple has comic misadventures to sea becomes a notorious pirate captain. seas to rescue a damsel in distress.
TLC 454545455772139 Atlanta (R) Atlanta (R) Atlanta (R) Atlanta (R( Atlanta (R Atlanta (R) Atlanta (N) Atlanta (N) Gown (N) Gown (N) Atlanta ( Atlanta (R)
Castle: Punked Time-traveling Castle: Anatomy of Murder Kiss the Girls ('97, Thriller) **1/2 Morgan Freeman. A serial killer's Runaway Jury ('03, Drama) ***
TNT55 51 murderer. (D) Hospital world. (4D) escaped victim aids the police in their search for him. (R) Ambitious lawsuit against gun company.
TOON 80801241244620 257TitansGo! Gumball Adventure Regular King Hill King Hill Cleveland Cleveland Dad (4D) Dad (4D) FamilyGuy FamilyGuy
TRAY 6969696926066 170 Bizarre: Baja Mexico v Food (R) v Food (R) Bizarre: Twin Cities ( Mysteries Baseball bat. Mysteries (R) Mysteries (R)
TRUTV 636363635030 183 Top 20 Gun safety. (R) Pawn (R) Pawn (R) Pawn ( Pawn (R) Pawn (R) Pawn (R) Pawn (R) Pawn (R) Pawn (R) Pawn (R)
TVL 626262623154 244 Walker Gilligan's Gilligan's Gilligan's Gilligan's (48) Who's Boss Who's Boss Queens Queens Queens Queens
USA 1343434342252 50 LittleFockers (10, Comedy) Impressing in-laws. Modern Modern Modern Modem Modern Modern Modem Playing
WE 117117117117 17149 Marriage (N) Mystery (R) Marriage Checking in. Marriage: Ring of Fire Millionaire Landscaper. Marriage: Ring of Fire
WGN f6 1616194111 9 Home Videos (1VP3) Home Videos (1VP3) HowI Met HowI Met How I Met HowI Met HowI Met How I Met Parks Parks
CNBC 39393939 37 102 Mad Money (N) Money IMillions Super Rich Homes 2 Super Rich Super Rich Super Rich Super Rich Super Rich Super Rich
CNN 323232321838 1ooSituation Room (N) Ein Burnett (N) Cooper 3600 (N)(H)) Sixties (R) CNN Spot Unguarded Anthony (R)
CSPAN 181818183712 109 Politics & Public Policy Today Political events. Politics& Public Policy Today Political events. Politics & Public Policy Today Political events.
FNC 646464644871 118Special Report (N) (1I4) Onthe Record (N) (I) The O'Reilly Factor (N) The Kelly File (N) Hannity (N) (1I4) heO'Reilly Factor (R)
MSNBC 8383838318540 103 PoliticsNation (N) (I) lHardball with Chris (N) All in with Chris Hayes Rachel Maddow (N) Lockup Inmates speak. Lockup ( (I))
SNN 1616 6 11 11 News m News m Suncoast IPaid News INews Paid INews Lt LEdition dto LtEditionZILtEdition
ESPN 292929291258 70 SportsCenter. from Bristol, Conn. (I)) X Games Austin 2014 (l)( (I)) SportsCenter (I))
ESPN2 3030300 6 Baseball (We) (lID) fHorn (lID) Interruptn Sports l International Soccer: Portugal at Mexico ([We) I* Friday Night Fights (Live) (1D)
FS1 484848484269 83 Pregame (4D) 1100,000 Race Hub (lID) NN TS Camping World Truck: WinStar World Casino & Resort 400 IFOX Sports
FSN 2727272 156 77 l2I MLB Baseball (We) IMarlins Marlins Golden Boy Live (Taped) (1I)) ICourtside Icons (I)) The Finsiders (lID)
GOLF 494949495560304 Golf Cntrl PGA Web.com Tour: Cleveland Open: Second Round (lID) PGA TOUR Golf. FedEx St. Jude Classic: Second Round (Relay) (lID)
NBCSN 71 7171 71 5461 90 Belmont ,Y IndyCar Qualifying: Firestone 600 ICaliforia IKentucky Derby (4D) 139th Preakness Belmont Stakes Access
SUN 13838401401455776 Florida (1 Rays LIVE! MLB Baseball: Seattle Mariners at Tampa Bay Rays (Live) (1D) RaysLIVE! Inside Inside FOXSports
Austin&Aly Austin&Aly Austin&Aily JessieActof Up('09, Comedy) Ed Asner. An elderly Austin &Ally Good Luck AN.T. Famn Dog with Blog Jessie Teen
DISN 1361361361369945 250 D.C. museum. Jealous of Kira. Pseudonym. (R) kindness. (R) widower flies his house to South America to Tnsh acts odd. College Cameron's film.Stan the fashion show.
R(41HD) fulfill a lifelong dream. (R) application. (R) masot. (
(:20) The Cave ('05, Drama) *1/2 Cole Hauser, Morris The Pacifier ('05, Comedy) ** A tough (:40) Dude, Where's My Car?. ('00) (:05) Little Man ('06, Comedy)
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encounter bloodthirsty creatures. children from a gang of killers. lost car. (P3-13) plays a baby.
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Band of Brothers: Why We (:55) Band of Brothers: Points Big Love: The Ceremony Barb Disconnect (13, Drama) *** Jason Bateman, Hope Prometheus (12) ***
HB03 304304304 304304 404 Fight German soil breached Easy Company invades Hiter's admits to following polygamy. Davis. Individuals come to realize the destructive potential Eqxedition to learn humanity's
fortress. (D) of the internet. (R) (4D) origins. (R) (lID)
(10) Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters (13, Adventure) Ender's Game (13, Science Fiction) **12 Asa Identity Thief (13, Comedy) Jason Bateman, Melissa
MAX 320320320320320320420 *** The son of Poseidon embarks on ajourney to find the Butterfield, Hailee Steinfeld. A gifted child is sent to space McCarthy. After learning that someone has stolen his
mythical Golden Fleece. (PG) where he prepares for an invasion. (P3-13) identity, a man searches for the con.
Closed Circuit(:45) Enemy of the State('98) An innocent lawyer is framed forapolitically The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (12, Fantasy) ***1/2 Martin Mama (13)
MAX2 321 321321321321,321422 Case of motivated murder, which sends him on a race to expose the truth before Freeman, Ian McKellen. Bilbo Baggins joins a quest to reclaim a dwarf fone in tie
intigue. getting caught by national security, kingdom from a powerful dragon. (P-13) (I) forest.
Barbershop 2: Back in Business ('04, Comedy) ** Ice 12 O'Clock Boys: The Director's Cut Calif. Hashtag ShoBox: The New Generation
SHO 3434343 344o363403 Cube. Calvin'sshop is putin dangeragain when a Unfiltered look at dirt bike pack. (N) (1D) Blackfight. (R)
People Like (:25) A Walk on the Moon ('99, Drama) ** Diane Lane. (:25) A Perfect Man (13, Drama) Twist of fate The Canyons (13, Thriller) *1/2 Movie Take This
TC 350350350350350385 Us Siblings Restless woman plans a trip to Woodstock and encounters has cheating husband falling back in love with producer unravels after he discovers his Waltz (12) An
_meet. her rebellious daughter. (R) (lID) his wife. (N girlfriend is having an affair. (R) affair.
aIV 63 -I,- i I 70- a 8 a83 aPm0, a r a I.9-10 I1 a0IV 1 11 -:30


Today's Live Sports

9 a.m. GOLF European Tour
Golf Lyoness Open: Second
Round. (L)
10:30 a.m. GOLF PGA Champi-
ons Tour Golf Big Cedar Lodge
Legends of Golf: First Round. (L)
11 a.m. NBC 2014 French
Open Men's Semifinal 2. (L)
12:30 p.m. GOLF LPGA Tour
Golf Manulife Financial LPGA
Classic: Second Round. (L)
1 p.m. ESPN2 2014 NCAA
Baseball Championship Su-
per Regionals: Nashville, Game
1 Stanford vs Vanderbilt. (L)
3 p.m. GOLF PGA TOUR Golf
FedEx St. Jude Classic: Second
Round. (L)
4 p.m. ESPN2 2014 NCAA
Baseball Championship
Super Regionals: Austin, Game
1 Houston vs Texas. (L)
FSN MLB Baseball Miami Mar-
lins at Chicago Cubs. (L)
4:30 p.m. FS1 NASCAR Sprint
Cup Qualifying Pocono 400. (L)
7 p.m. SUN MLB Baseball
Seattle Mariners at Tampa Bay
Rays from Tropicana Field. (L)
8 p.m. ESPN X Games Austin
2014 Men's Moto X Best Whip
Final, Moto X Step-Up Final,
Skateboard Big Air Final. (L)
8:30 p.m. ESPN2 International
Soccer Portugal at Mexico. (L)
9 p.m. FS1 NASCAR Camping
World Truck Series WinStar
World Casino & Resort 400. (L)
10:30 p.m. ESPN2 Friday Night
Fights Yudel Jhonson vs. Nor-
berto Gonzalez. (L)

Today's Talk Shows

7:00 a.m. ABC Good Morning
America Demi Lovato; Maria
Menounos. (N)
7:00 a.m. NBC Today A look at
D-Day on the 70th anniversary;
Taye Diggs from "Murder in the
First." (N)
9:00 a.m. CBS LIVE! with Kelly
and Michael Actor Ice Cube;
Rapper Nicki Minaj; Television
personality Guy Fieri. (N)
9:00 a.m. MYN The 700 Club A
man talks about losing his mar-
riage and reputation from white-
collar crime. (N)
10:00 a.m. CBS Rachael Ray Katie
Holmes helps prepare Primavera
Mac and Cheese; kitchen gadgets
tested.
11:00 a.m. ABC The View Star
Jones; Miranda Lambert; Maria
Menounos; Jesse Williamson. (N)
11:00 a.m. CW The Queen Latifah
Show Actress Emmy Rossum
discusses her role in the show
"Shameless."
12:00 p.m. CW Dr. Phil A couple
say that their daughter has be-
come a heroin addict.
1:00 p.m. ABC The Chew Curtis
Stone and Carla Hall create Ricotta
Fritters with Strawberry Rhubarb
Jam. (N)
1:00 p.m. CW The Bill Cunning-
ham Show Audience members
share their thoughts before results
come in.
2:00 p.m. CBS The Talk "Million
Dollar Baby Shower!"; actress
Alyssa Milano from "Mistresses."
(N)
3:00 p.m. CW Steve Harvey Lisa
Nichols discusses her success; a
female basketball player goes to
prom. (N)
11:35 p.m. CBS Late Show with
David Letterman Actor Neil Pat-
rick Harris; actress Sarah Hyland;
musician Ray LaMontagne. (N)
11:35 p.m. NBC The Tonight
Show Starring Jimmy Fallon
Actor Channing Tatum from "22
Jump Street"; journalist Joshua
Topolsky. (N)

Convenient Complete Satellite
ONLINE TV Listings
www.sun-herald.com/tv







The Sun Classified Page 16 EINIC ads.yoursun.net Friday, June 6, 2014


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TABLE WOOD DRUM Brown
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TABLES 1-38" 2-25"
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TELL CITY Chairs Vintage M
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GOREN BRIDGE

WITH BOB JONES
2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

COMMON SENSE


Both vulnerable. North deals.


WEST
410
VKQ1O
0AQ
4AJ85


NORTH
*AQ85
(A
0 j762
4 KQ102
EAST
*962
754 2J932
0K943
443
SOUTH
AKJ743
86
01085
4976


The bidding:
NORTH EAST
10 Pass
46 Pass


SOUTH
1
Pass


WEST
Dbl
Pass


Opening lead: King of %

South's decision to respond on his
meager values would not meet with
universal approval, but many good
players today will respond to a one-
club opening with any good excuse.
King-jack fifth of a major is a good
excuse!
South won the opening heart lead
in dummy, cashed the ace of spades
and then led a spade to his king
before leading a low club. West


ducked his ace, allowing dummy's
king to win. South next led a spade to
his jack, drawing the last trump, and
led another club. West rose with his
ace and led the queen of hearts,
forcing dummy to ruff with its last
trump.
South had no choice but to lead a
diamond from the dummy, giving the
defense a chance to score three tricks
in that suit. West won the diamond
queen and cashed the ace before
playing another heart. South ruffed
this in hand and led his last club
toward the dummy. The moment of
truth had arrived.
Declarer knew that West had
started with only one trump, and he
surely would have cashed another
diamond if he could. That meant he
started with only two diamonds.
South reasoned that West would
likely have bid on to five hearts with
a seven-card heart suit, so that left
him with six hearts and four clubs.
"Ten of clubs, please," said South,
and scored up his ambitious contract.
Well done!

(Bob Jones welcomes readers'
responses sent in care of this
newspaper or to Tribune Content
Agency, LLC., 16650 Westgrove
Dr., Suite 175, Addison, TX 75001.
E-mail responses may be sent to
tcaeditors @ tribune.com.)


D7 Little Words

Find the 7 words to match the 7 clues. The numbers in parentheses
represent the number of letters in each solution. Each letter -
combination can be used only once, but all letter combinations
will be necessary to complete the puzzle.
M
CLUES SOLUTIONS >1

1 person in education (11)o

2 opposition votes (4) -J

3 handling clumsily (6)

4 go-to pitches, often (9) __

5 toot the horn (4) 0

6 chefs' domains (8)_ _a

7 right (11)_ _m


YS


ENT


TBA


DEM


Thursday's Answers: 1. WOOSTER 2. CAPON 3. COPYRIGHTS
4. SCOPE 5. SHAZAM 6. ONIONS 7. REGISTERED


ACA


NA


KIT


FAS


HO


CHE


ENT


LEM


IC


NK


PAW


NS


ING


IT


IAN


LLS


ACROSS
1 Iron fishhook
5 Romans, to
Gauls
9 Change decor
13 Kind of tradition
14 Silly trick
16 Tabloid tidbit
17 Arizona"monster"
18 Small crown
19 Iditarod finish
20 Sentry's bark
21 Army off.
22 Filet-
24 Burrito morsel
26 Part of N.B.
27 Inventor's quest
30 Routine trips
(2 wds.)
34 "The Cloister
and the Hearth"
author
35 Lorre's detective
36 Getz or Mikita
37 Is, to Fritz
38 Bolt for an
I-beam
39 NW state
40 Prod
42 Assayers'
samples
43 Bell-shaped
flower
45 Runner
47 Bets
48 Favoritism
49 Colorado ski
town


Burrowing
animal
Caught on
Map detail
Translucent gem
Monroe and
Campbell
Flair
Wrinkle
San Chargers
Warbled
Alfalfa or oats
"Saving
Private
Skiers' aid
(hyph.)
DOWN
Vincent van -
Diva's melody
Tumble
Type of truck
Rich dude
(2 wds.)
Edible bulb
Footnote abbr.
(2 wds.)
Knight's address
Doubles
Collar or jacket
Floor model
Portent
King Arthur's
domain
Squid's weapon
Hydrocarbon
suffix
Takes the bait


PREVIOUS PUZZLE SOLVED
RHUMIA ....... ROK
C O LE E E ROAT H

PRAI E CH GC NON

VACA E W ERS
I T L L E 1CGLE E


ASISE S SF ETIS

R EG IMEN F BULA S
E DI E I N AH U
E GGS M N D U S S R
F E TAl D6- SH OE
6-6-14 @ 2014 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


27 Killjoys
28 Early moralist
29 Golden Horde
member
30 Man with a van
31 Handy
32 Lowest ebb
33 Ginger cookies
35 Bogs down
38 Took turns
41 Planted bulbs
43 Ice skater
Babilonia
44 Most threatening,
as weather


46 Ms. Peeples
of TV
47 Holmes' sidekick
49 River in Russia
50 Dog ancestor
51 Mayberry kid
52 Palomino
feature
53 Cloudy, in
London
55 Marble block
56 Superboy's
girlfriend
57 RR employee
60 Ventilate


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com

Venice Gondolier readers: Look for the puzzle solution in the Our Town section


TODAY'S

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


The Sun Classified Page 16 E/N/C


ads~yoursun~net


Friday, June 6, 2014






Friday, June 6, 2014


ads.yoursun net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 17


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PICTURE: THUNDERBIRDS
AIRPLANE 16X20 $25
941-423-2585
POTTERY DISHES 70's.
juarez mx. exc cond. $75
941-235-2203
ROGERS SILVERPLATE 7
pcs $50 941-266-6718
SEWING DESK 1950's, good
condition $70 941-266-6718
SEWING MACHINE White
Rotary Electric Ser $100
941-350-8159
THE SHOE BOOK BILL SHOE-
MAKER'S SIGN B $20 941-
391-6377
TINS ASSORTMENT of 89
tins. $60 941-266-6718
VHS TAPES 39 ORIG.
Star Trek Mostly sealed $50
941-423-2585
WALNUT DRESSER 5 draw-
ers, marble, exc cond. $375
941-235-2203
WWll U.S. FLAG, 49 Stars,
5' x 10'. $45. (941)-474-1872
ZENITH TRANSOCEANIC
radio Lights up no sound $50
941-423-2585


MUSICAL



FLASHDRIVE MUSIC
collections Christmas! $80
941-662-0865
GUITAR ALVAREZ ACOUSTIC-
ELECTRIC 2014 w/hard case
$399 843-735-8912
GUITAR FENDER Squier
Acoustic, nice, w/bag $50
401-639-9687
ORGAN LOWREY-
CONDUCTOR SE/5
$2,500 OBO 941-743-0005
PIANO WURLITZER upright
& bench $325 941-769-0163
SCHECTER BASS Stiletto
Studio 2013 Excellent. $499
843-735-8912
VIOLIN 3/4 szmd USAEx
built/sound $130
941-473-1690
VIOLIN SUZUKI LtdNew prt-
sEx sound/built $140
941-473-1690

MEDICAL









BATHTUB & SHOWER
GRAB BARS INSTALLED
Don't Wait to Fall to Call!
Free In-Home Evaluation
22 Years Experience
CALL JIM'S
BATHROOM GRAB BARS, LLC
941-626-4296
BED New Serta Twin
Adjustable Never used
$1,050. 941-473-4250
ELECTRIC SCOOTER
with charger. Exec. $399
941-916-8896
KNEE WALKER "Drive" 4whls,
brks, easy turn. $105 941-
624-2105



MOBILITY SCOOTER
and Lift New Batts $500
941-743-7655
NIGHT SPLINT -ADJ. NEW
Adult $17 941-613-1442
NIGHT SPLINT -ADJ. NEW
Adult $17 941-613-1442
RECLINNER ELECTRIC
liftchair orig 1,100. $395
941-580-4460
SCOOTER BY Moxie needs
batt & seat adj $50
941-474-7387
SCOOTER JAZZY mini,
excellent cond, leather $480
718-986-3608
WALKER DELUXE
seat basket breaks $65
941-580-4460
WALKERS 2, 3 and 4 wheels
with access. all $115
941-474-7387
WHEEL CHAIR carrier off 1-
1/4" rear hitch $65
941-474-7387
WHEELCHAIR ELECTRIC
Shoprider Jimmie $499
941-882-3139
HEALH /BEAUTY




BAUSCH&LOMB SOFLENS
2 Boxes +3.00 $30
941-575-6332
YVES SAINT LAURENT
OPIUM Gift Set Brand new!
$50 941-575-9800
TREES & PLANTS




AZALEAS White-Red-Violet $5
941-204-9100
CONTORTED FILBERT Hazel-
nut Tree Harry Lauder $75
941-204-9100


TREES & PLANTS



DESERT ROSE,15Gal Pot
Grown From Seeds! Will deliver
locally. $250 941-204-9100
DESERT ROSE,15Gal Pot
Grown From Seeds! Will deliver
locally. $250 941-204-9100
DOUBLE HIBISCUS,
Peach Big Flowers 2 Gal
$10 941-204-9100
FRANGIPANI PASTEL color 4
ft tall $8 941-258-2016
HELICHRYSUM, BELL or
BANANA PEPPER PLANTS $1
941-258-2016
ORCHIDS LARGE 3' tall
Plants Purple Flowers $35
941-698-9798


VIBURNUM GREAT FOR
PRIVACY HEDGE 15GAL,
ALMOST 5' TALL $45/EA
AND LOTS MORE.
**GREAT PRICES***
su,,s NusuRY 941-488-7291
[Advertise Today!
POINCIANA DWF yel or CAS-
SIA 3 ft 3 gal pot $6 941-258-
2016
/ BABY ITEMS /




BABY STROLLER Jeep
baby stroller for sale $15
941-240-5783

GOLFACCESSORIES


2002 CLUB CAR DS
Hunter Green- 4 Seat
With 2012 Trojan Batteries
New Rear Flip Seat,
Windshield and Lights
Good Tires, Brakes, Top
and Charger.
$2775 941-716-6792
Local Delivery Included
Please no text
-|


4 -assenger
New Trojan Batteries 48 Volt
(5-24-14), 6" Lift, 12" Alu-
minum Rims & 22" Tires
"Black" Body, Lights and
Rear Folding Seat.
New M-Cor 4, 19/20 mpr
Factory Reconditioned
-$ 5275-
Local Delivery Included
941-830-5312
CLUBS HOGAN APEX Plus
irons 3-PW stiff graphite $160
214-906-1585
FACTORY RECONDITIONED
2011 CLUB CAR DS
4 Passenger
New "Red" Body,
Head & Tail Lights,
Rear Seat and Windshield,
6-8 Volt Batteris 48 Volt
As New Conditioned
Local Delivery Included
$3775 941-830-5312
No Text Please
FOR DAD Golf Lamp Unique
base, umbrella online $30
941-704-0322
G15 Driver Sr. Flex W/Head-
cover $85 941-549-1232
GOLF BAG Callaway new
women's silver/blk $60
941-743-2656
GOLF CLUBS with nice bag
$45 941-235-2613
PUTTER, Ping Scottsdale
Putter W/Headcover $75
941-549-1232
STAND BAG New Callaway
HL3.0, Royal/Black $75
941-475-6865


GOLF ACCESSORIES



GOLF CLUBS with nice bag
$45 941-235-2613


1 FITNESS 1
waM128

AB-LOUNGER like new with
manual $45 941-549-1232
BOW FLEX PR1000 Home
Gym. Like new $200
941-627-9498
BOW FLEX ultimate home
gym excellent condition $175
941-661-6487
CARDIOFIT, Total Body
Motion Cost $295 EC $75
207-653-6254
EXERCISE BIKE Good Condi-
tion $15 941-894-4115
EXERCISE BIKE Nordictrack,
GX2.0 up right cycle. Digital
$90 941-505-2819
EXERCISE STEP STOOL
NEW, 9"H X 31 X 15 $12
941-627-6780
PRO-FORM SR30 cycle
Digital display with ow $75
941-549-1232
SKI & ROWING machine good
condition $25 941-629-5746
TANNING BED Sun Quest
Pro, 24RSF, Wolf system w.
face tanner, 20 minute timer,
wrap around body. Paid
$3,500, will take $1,500!
941-876-4674
TREADMILL DP PULSES-
TRIDER 2600 19w46Lwk/rn
sp VGC $125 941-474-3194
TREADMILL IMAGE 10.0
with Incline Treadmill $150
941-626-2276
TREADMILL WESCO Al $95
941-456-2462
SPORTING GOODS



16 SPINNING REELS LRG &
SMALL. ALL FOR $35 714-
599-2137
2 GUYS GUN
SHOW
JUN 14TH & 15TH
Port Charlotte
Charlotte County
Fairgrounds
2333 El Jobean Rd

Buy-Sell-Trade
New-Used
FREE Parking
CWP Classes Avail.
Sat 9-5 and Sun 9-4
727-776-3442
www.nextgunshow.com
BAIT BUCKET 12 VT PUMP
10 GAL $25 941-628-3613
COMPOUND BOW w case
lots of accessories. $140
941-876-4716
FIREWOOD No camping
trip is complete without it!
Pine, Oak, or Citrus
Split, Bundled, and ready for
the firepit!
941-468-4372
FISHING GEAR 7 rods, 11
reels, 3 shirts, 1 net $250
941-575-2675
FISHING REEL, Penn Brand
new. Unopened. $40
941-929-5432
OKUMA 9 B/B HEAVY
SPINNING REEL & 7' $80
714-599-2137
OLD JON down riggers (2)
$100 941-204-2332
PING/PONG TABLE blue and
portable $75 941-350-8159
REELS, 2 Down Riggers Penn
Fathom Master 620 $225
941-661-3298
SLOLAM WATERSKIS HO
Sports, fiberglass gc $110
941-460-8743
TENT 6 person 10x12
w/fly elec. Ik new $60
941-255-7842


SUN




CLASSIFIED


To Place, Correct, or Cancel Ad









1348 T IA' IR








Check Out More SUN Classified Ads Online
oo sunnewspapers.net
UPDATED DAILY!!!






The Sun Classified Page 18 E/N/C


ads.yoursun net


Friday, June 6, 2014


SPORTING GOODS



WETSUIT MEN'S XL
Step in Shorty never worn
$35 941-875-5512
FIREARMS




AK74, same as new, scope,
case and 1700 rounds.
$1,600 941-979-2940

DERRINGERS Dbl Barrel .32
ca., .22 mag $240 choice;
.25 semi auto conceal $210
w/bx papers; AMT .380 Back
Up SS 3 mags holster $440;
9mm Glock; Win. 101. others
(sell/trade) 941-235-2500


L FIREARMS /






GUN & KNIFE SHOW
German American Club
2101 SW Pine Island Rd,
Cape Coral, FL.
Sat 6/7 9-5pm and
Sun 6/8 9-4pm.
Admission $5.00 under
12 FREE & FREE PARKING
CWP Classes $49.95
11am & lpm daily.
Lee County Gun
Collectors LLC.
(239)-223-3370
BUY-SELL-TRADE
www.capecoralgunshow.com

NEED CASH?


BICYCLES
I BICYCLES
Wal6135

BICYCLE 26" Roadmaster 15
spd Rd bike gd cond $45
941-493-0674
BICYCLE RECUMBENT e z 1
super cruzer like new $300
941-743-0582

Get the
Word out -
Advertise
in the
Classified!
BICYCLE, BIRIA $425
941-763-9730
BIKE, Ladies 5 Speed Huffy.
Excellent Condition!! $35.
(941)-474-1872


BICYCLES
I TRICYCLES I
~6135

GIRLS SCHWINN collegiant
just tuned new tires $35
401-639-9687
HUFFY SUPERIA 15 sp Cln
w Ig seat & tires $30
941-544-0042
KNEE WALKER Brand new,
Roscoe brand. $200
941-629-4884
LADIES 26" 1 speed Ross
Europa, great cond. $65 941-
391-6163
TREK 370 Sport Hybrid
Touring Road Bike $75
941-544-0042
TREK 7000 USA aluminum
MT Touring new tires $125
941-544-0042


BICYCLES
L BICYCLES


BIKE RACK Auto bike rack for
2 bikes. $40 941-240-5783
TREK CALYPSO Cruiser Mens
7 sp w basket $75
941-544-0042
VINTAGE SCHWINN 5 sp
Lgts Speedo & new tires $45
941-544-0042
L TOYS/GAMES



2 JAPANESE Slot Machines
Two full size Japanese slot
machines with tokens. $250
Ea. or $450 for the pair.
941-629-2734


TOYS/GAMES



PLAYHOUSE- WOOD with
puppet theater & ball hoop
$80 941-276-6225
SOCCER TABLE GAME Exc.
Condition $40 941-613-1442

Seize the sales
with Classified!
SOCCER TABLE GAME Exc.
Condition $40 941-613-1442
PHOTOGRAPHY/
VIDEO
LZ 6140

BACK PAK "Lowepro", for
SLR & Lenses. Never $50
941-624-2105


6000


MERCHANDISE
IARCADIA AREA
GARAGESALES
6001



IESTAT-FE
SALE
TO DAYJ

FRIDAY & SAT 8-2
139 S. HERNANDO AV
HUGE ESTATE SALE
ENTIRE CONTENTS OF FULLY
FURNISHED HOME INCLUDING
ANTIQUES, COLLECTABLES,
ART, JEWLERY AND LOTS OF
MIS. ITEMS. DON'T MISS!




ENLWOOD7
GARAGESALES


-Fri-Sat 8-4 750 Michigan
Ave. MOVING--EVERY-
THING MUST GO! Furniture,
appl., clothes & much more!


L ENGLEWOOD
I GAAGESALES I



[- FRI.-SAT. 8-2
490 Viridian St.
Lots MORE Added To The
Best Yard Sale Ever!!
mFRI.-SAT. 8-4 120 East
LJHorton Ave. Household
Clearance! Furn., tools, paint,
gardening, fishing, heaters etc
[mSAT ONLY 6/7 8AM-2PM.
5206 Hopkins Ave in Gulf
Cove. Furniture & Household
items.


GARAGESALES
~600~

[ FRI & SAT 8AM-1PM
3408 N. Salford Blvd.
Ellipitical Machine, VCR tapes,
Hess Trucks, Books, Red neck
beer glasses, much more!
m FRI.-SAT. 8-1 2420 S Sal-
ford. Printer, Patio Lamps
& large towel rack, New tum-
blers, Corning & Tupperware.

CHECK THE
CLASSIFIEDS!
[m FRI.-SAT. 8AM-2PM
4319 BULLARD ST.
HUGE SALE, TOOLS, LINEN,
JEWELRY, HOUSEHOLD, ETC.
[ SAT 8-12 1609 Lansdale
Ave. Golf Clubs & bag, 2 5'
Tables & 1 8' Table. House
items, Wall Art, Clothes, Books
Kitchenware & much more.


NORTH PORT
E EARAtESALES







Ide: &e
SAT & SUNDAY 7-4PM
3146 Emporia Terr
North Port 34286
This is the sale you have
been waiting for! Over
30 years of household
items. Living room set,
bedroom set, dining set,
kitchen table & chairs,
BBQ Grill, Yamaha Piano,
glass ware, assorted nic-
nacs, dish set, garden
items/tools, Christmas
items, Washer, dryer,
refrigerator and much
much more. Too much to
list. Sale By:
PIECES OF 0DE
m-ISAT. 8-2 1222 South San
LjMateo Dr. (Off Price).
Appliances, Furniture, Country,
Dept. 56, Household & MORE!!
PT. CHARLOTTE/DEEP
CREEK GARAGE SALES





FRI-SAT 9AM-2PM.
20016 Goldcup Court. Sale in
back of house on lanai.
Lots of bargains!


PT CHARLOTTE/DEEP
CREEK GARAGESALES


[-Fri8-2/Sat8-12 Estate-
Sale 1308 Birchcrest
Blvd. Complete houseful. 3
sofas, Dining room set
w/hutch, freezer, washer,
dryer, 2 bedroom sets & more
[- FRIDAY-SATURDAY 8-2
NEIGHBOORHOOD SALE!!
Lasayette & Oldenburgh Ct.
(off 41 & Harbor) Lots of Bed-
ding, Window Treatments, Col-
lectibles & MUCH..MUCH MORE!!
I Employ Classified!
MOVING SALE. RAIN OR
SHINE. THURS-SUN. 8a-??
270 MENTEL TERR. COLLECTIBLES,
HOUSEHOLD, FURNIJRE & ETC.
m SAT 8-2 18542 Briggs
LJCircle. Household mer-
chandise, tools and fishing
equipment.
m-ISAT ONLY 7-4 22302
IAugusta Ave, My dad was
a 100 and this is his stuff.
Kitchen stuff & cust iron and
tools, trailer wheels & hub
caps, antique price books &
well pump, furn 30's to 50's,
old fans, fishing stuff, signs,
kayak and airplane propellor,
brass king bed, Esso Can &
lots more.
[-] SAT-SUN 8-2
17374UMetcalf Ave
Lots of great items at great
prices.
m THU-SAT 8-4 20009
Behan Ct. MOVING SALE!
Bedrooms, recliners, tables,
chairs, misc. 941-764-7826


IPT CHARLOTTE/DEEP
CREEKGARAGE SALES



[mTHUR.-SAT. 9AM-3PM
2321 Easy St. HUGE SALE!
Mostly Indoors. Furn, appl, Tv,
kitchenware, books and more.


L PUNTA GORDA
Z60071
I GAAGESALES I



EIIFRI. & SAT. June 6 &
7th. 7am to 12. 300
Klispie Dr.. Everything must
go. Tag Sale in Air Condition-
ing. Furniture, Antiques,
Household Goods.
m-]FRI. 7AM-12PM 7265 N.
LJBlue Sage. Many Great
Household items. No Clothes,
and No kids stuff.





FRI. 9A- 1P & SAT. 9A- 11A
16357 Larocha Dr.
Burnt Store Village
Lamps, Household, Tools,
_adder, Small Appl. & MOREP
[-iFRIDAY 8:30-12. 1454
Kiwi Ct. POOL PUMP,
Glass Tables, Home Decor,
Prints, Antiques, MUCH MORE
[mSAT-SUN 9-4. 1305 Pine
Siskin Dr. MOVING. Dolls,
dishes, platters, oil paintings,
ceramics etc. No Early Birds.


L PUNTA GORDA
I GAAGESALESI



[ SAT. 8-3 11027 Pine
Trail Rd. & US41.
Misc. household, some furn.
macaw cage, some antiques
NEED CASH?
Have A Garage
Sale!

[ SVINCENT
F] RUMMAGE SALE
25200 Airport Rd. and Taylor
Rd. Sat. June 7th 8-11am.
Rain Date Sat. June 14th
8-11am. Household items,
furn. clothing, jewelry, shoes,
purses, books & linens.


GARAGE SALES
~600~

--FRI 8am-2pm 157 Long
LJMeadow Ln. Furniture,
tools, Harley stuff, books,
music, dishes, artwork & etc.
-FRI.-SAT. 9-2 77 Oakland
LHills Ct. INSIDE MOVING
SALE!! Furniture, Dryer,
Lamps, Household & MORE!!
IVENICE AREA
GARAGESALES
~6011


m SAT. 9-2, 1013 Tam
0'Shanter Ct, MOVING
SALE! Furniture, household,
mirrors & lots more!!


GtqRtqGE li Yf;milD StqLES







Friday. June 6, 2014 ads.yoursun net E/ N/C The Sun Classified Page 19


I VIDEO /
~614~

NIKON DIOO digital camera
18.50mm lens, Nikon speed-
light flash $150obo 875-1838


I & SUPPLIES I
6145.u

HOT TUB NEVER USED
SEATS 5 WITH LOUNGER,
LIGHT, MAINT. FREE CABI-
NET. CAN DELIVER $1895.
L941421!0395





**SPAS & MORE**
&IJAYS OVER
U IN STOCK

www.spasandmoreflorida.corn
941-625-6600
CLEANER HEAD, hose
quality,8 rollers $35
786-306-6335
POOL VACUUM,
Shark w/extra hose. $125
941-240-5783
ILAWN &GADE




A FRAME Ladder w/spreader
Call after 2pm. $65 941-235-
1303
ALUMINUM RAMPS, 11 feet
folding, first $60. Call 941-
624-0515.
CRAFTSMAN 22" mulch hi
wheel push B&S 6.0 hp $75
941-474-7387
Cuddle up by the fire!
Firewood Split, Bundled and
ready for the firepit!
Pine, Oak, or Citrus,
941-468-4372
HEDGE TRIMMER B. & D 22"
corded $15 941-629-9149
HEDGE TRIMMER,
Craftsman Gas Bushwacker
$90 941-661-3298
HOMELITE MIGHTY lite 26vt
WEEDWACKER NEW $35
714-599-2137
JOE MADDON garden nome
new in the box $50 941-228-
1745
LAWN MOWER 21" recycler
bag rear drive $85
941-661-2452
LAWN MOWER Craftsman
21" 6.75 hp B&S $100 941-
485-0681
LAWN MOWER Toro 22" self
propelled 6.75hp $200 941-
485-0681
LAWN MOWER Troy-Bilt, 21",
grass catch. $75 412-418-
5784
LAWN TRACTOR 42" Troy
Bilt Lawn Tractor (2011) Very
good cond. $450 734-771-
2246 Punta Gorda
LAWN-BOY SELF-PROP
mower. fully serviced. $135
941475-6865
MOWER, TORO 22", 1 yr
old, koeler Eng $225
305-432-7001
MTD PRO Self-prop mower
w/ Honda 6.25hp $165
941475-6865
POLE SAW adjust, elect. Rem-
ington gc $85 941460-8743
POWER WASHER 1800 PSI
Husky Electric $40 941-875-
3306
PUSH MOWER MTD 6.75hp.
21" $75 941485-0681
RAIN BARRELS Two rain bar-
rels for $75. 941-240-5783
ITORO GM 325 Mower,
PRS., 25HP Diesel, Hydroj
Ilrans, 72"deck, Ex. cond,I
Extra parts avail. 22K New!


LAWN & GARDEN


TOP SOIL For Sale! Please STEP LADDER8' Warner fiber
call: 941-468-4372 G/alum $50 941-474-7387


TORO LAWN MOWER
OLD BUT RUNS $30
941-628-3613
TROY PRESSURE Washer
6.75hp 2550psi $220 941-
485-0681
STORAGE SHEDS/
I BUILDINGS
~6165


Llrl Ill3I f rIu n tlVflrL.
BUILDINGS Purchase or
Rent To Own! Free Delivery &
Set Up. Ask Your Dealer,
Mattas Motors About Options
941-916-9222
BUILDING
SUPPLIES
~6170~

BUILDING PERMIT Box Used
Once Like New $20 941-456-
2462
CONDUIT 1/2" bender alu-
minum foot $20 941-204-
2332
HARDWOOD FLOORING
145+sq ft $125
810-423-5087
HEAT PUMP, 3.5 ton Trane
Condensor, R-22 Freon. $425
941-350-4481
PLUMBING FITTINGS ALL
FOR $20 714-599-2137
ROOFING NAILS AND MORE-
ALL FOR $45 714-599-2137
WAGNER PAINT CREW,
2800 psi, used only once,
$75 obo. Call 941-8751838.
[TOOLS/ MACHINERYI




18" CHAIN SAW call after
5:30pm $60 941-6264274
6" SEAMLESS GUTTER
Machine on trailer. $5,000
941-628-8388
BENCH CAN saw sharpener
call after 530pm $20
941-626-4274
CHOP SAW, SKIL (for parts)
ex motor $40 941-629-5746
CORDLESS NAIL GUN MANY
EXTRAS $395 941-628-3613
GENERATOR, Coleman
Honda engine 6875 wt $300
941-624-3974

LADDER SYSTEM Little
Giant, ext. 13'23" $275 941-
629-9149
LADDER SYSTEM Little
Giant, versatile, $175
941-875-5512
LADDER, 20' Extention. $50.
(941474-1872
MILLER WELDER Thunder-
bolt 225 arc, gd cond $250
941-493-0674
MITER SAW, DELTA 10"
Compound New blade $65
941-266-4731
PALM SANDER Loop-hook,.
8amp, 12kRPM-new $8
443-618-8161
PORTER CABLE plate joiner
with extra biscuits, $89.99.
Call 941-629-6165.
J Employ Classified!
POWER WASHER 5HP Honda
w/Cat pump $225 941-266-
4731
SCREW GUN B&D NEW IN
BOX $75 941-628-3613
SHALLOW WELL Jet Pump
Rebuilt 1/2hp $120 941485-
0681
SMELTER JETS 850 watt
for gold & silver $300
941-661-3298


TABLE SAW 9in $50
941-473-2424
TOOL CHEST, Craftmans
60x40 Rolls/locks/key $350
941-624-3974
TOOLS SNAP ON 12DRAWER
TOOLBOX+TOOL $450
941-474-5124
VACUUM PUMP, Robinair
High Vacuum 15101-B $110
941-661-3298

EQUIPSULIES
6220~u

PAPER SHREDDER, Fellows,
large, exc cond $25 Firm
941-493-7930
OFFICE OUTFITTERS
Re-owned & new office fumiture.
VENICE 941-485-7015


I SUPPLIES


BANQUET TABLECLOTHS
14 grey 90x156 floor Igth
$275 941-457-4720





NOTICE: Statute 585.195
states that all dogs and cats
sold in Florida must be at least
eight weeks old, have an offi-
cial health certificate and prop-
er shots, and be free of intesti-
nal and external parasites.
MOMMY & 6 BABIES
Looking For Special Homes.
Would Like To Adopt In Pairs.
Call Barbara 941-497-6755
MUST HAVE
CATS/KITTENS!!
Calico, adult, Orange Maine
Coon, Barn Cats, Calico's,
Bobtails. Call 941-270-2430.





NOTICE: Statute 585.195
states that all dogs and cats
sold in Florida must be at least
eight weeks old, have an offi-
cial health certificate and prop-
er shots, and be free of intesti-
nal and external parasites.
SHIHPOO PUP Beautiful
Small, hm raised, $700 & up
Vet Ck'd Shots, 239-839-3003
LIVESTOCKK



HORSE BOARD North Port.
Nice Place. Great Care. $250
941-426-8361 or 467-0725

PET SUPPLIES
& SERVICES
~6236

AQUARIUM 30 GAL WITH
WOOD STAND $60
941-268-9029
DOGGER PET Stroller Brand
new $175 941-456-5070
PET CARRIER cage,
large metal, quality $60
786-306-6335

7Xi~LiNCT7
L ._AP A NE6250



DISHWASHER (SEARS) SS
$165 941-2862119
DISHWASHER, GE
PROFILE TRITON OFF WHITE
$85 941-286-2119
FRIDGE, KENMORE Side by
side, Ice maker/water. 25 CF.
Good Cond. $400
941-625-1911


TOOLS/ MACHINERY
ZE


APPLIANCES



FOOD PROCESSOR- 7 cup
Cuisinart, never used $50
941-276-6225
RANGE GE Elect. glass top
w/self cln oven $150 941-
505-6290
RANGE GE Electric glass top
$85.00 941-626-8475
RANGE, GE 30" electric
range bisque $85
941-626-8475
REFRIGFREEZER
WHIRLPOOL 1 yr old,
10 cu ft $175 941-391-6163
REFRIGERATOR GE
18CF New, wht, $350
941-204-9415
REFRIGERATOR, Side/Side
Beige H20/Ice works Good
$450 941-623-3955
STOVE WHITE, elec, coil top
$50 941-204-9415
UPRIGHT FREEZER 16cu.ft.
$150 941-627-0690
WHIRLPOOL SIDE/SIDE
ref/freezer. Exc cond. $95
941-493-2481
MISCELLANEOUS



2-CLOWNS material 2'tall
$50 941-496-9252
AFFORDABLE SMOKES
$1.30/PACK $13./CARTON
ROLL YOUR OWN AT HOME!
Top BRAND ToBAccos, TUBES,
CASES, RYO MACHINES & PARTS
VAPOR E-CIGS
E-LIQUID MADE IN USA
LOW PRICES!
ROLL A PACK TOBACCO
2739 Taylor Rd. P.G.
941-505-2233
BASEBALL BOOK OUT TO
THE BALLPARK $30 941-627-
6780
BEAR RUG cinnomon phase
black bear with head open
mouth 810-766-32-66 $350
BEVELED MIRRORS 6" x 50"
ea. ex. cond $8 941-629-5746
BOAT ANCHOR Ig. good con-
dition $30 941-629-5746
BULL HORN Maritec, used
once $100 941-575-0970
COMPUTER MOUSE golf
club it looks like a driver $5
941-228-1745
DEHUMIDIFIER STAINLESS
Steel, AarowDryers $200
941-475-6865
DOG SNARE 5 ft.snarem dog
snare gc $35 941-460-8743
DUAL SHIATSU MASSAGE
CUSHION W/HEAT $35
941-697-6553
DUFFLE BAG/BACKPACK
folds, w/wheels, new $25
941-505-6290
FIREWOOD SEASONED split
oak 1/2 facecord FREE DELY
$120 941-526-7589
FIREWOOD Split, Bundled,
and ready for the firepit
Perfect for these cooler nights!
Pine, Oak, Citrus
941-468-4372
FLAG SET 40 flags + 8, in
case $120 941-575-0970
GAS CANS
2.5 gal.
$5 941-743-0582
GMC VAN rear passenger
seats like new $125
941-743-2223
JEWELRY CASE 10 drawers,
1 door 17'x15" $35
941-575-0970
MOWER SCOTT-S/P needs
tuneup 22" $30 941-496-9252
PICTURE: ORANGE COUN-
TY choppers in color $20
941-423-2585
POOL TABLE, Small,
Good Balls, Cue, Strong
$100 786-3066335
PORTABLE AC, 14,000 BTU
Used 1 Season $300
941-623-5724


TRANSPORTATION





2005 BUICK LUCERNE
72,128 mi, $12,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2007 BUICK LUCERNE CXL
Ltd. 47K, Alloys, luxury, mint
JeffsAutoSales.net 941-629-1888

CADILLAC I



1997 CADILLAC SEVILLE
SLS 32V Northstar, leather
interior, Mint car by owner. @
SouthPort Square. $3500.
115k miles, 941-766-0801
2006 CADILLAC DTS, Alloys,
Navi, Luxury, Crimson Pearl
Jeff'sAutoSales.net941-629-1888
2007 CADILLAC CTS, Alloys,
45K miles, luxury, Black Raven
Jeff'sAutoSales.net941-629-1888
2008 CADILLAC DTS, 50k
Act. Mi., Pristine, Diamond
White Pearl, Pearl White Lthr
Int. Loaded, Chrome Wheels,
Console Etc. Always Garaged
& Serv'd, Sen. Owned. Carfax.
$17,995 828-777-5610 Cell
2011 CADILLAC ESCALADE
NAVI 42K $41,990
855-280-4707 DLR
2011 CADILLAC SRX
33K $27,990
855-280-4707 DLR


MISCELLANEOUS/



RAMP FIBERGLASS lite-
strong 59"x30" $45
941-496-9252
RANGE EXHAUST hood
white excellent cond. $10
941-228-1745
RUNNING SHOES SZ. 10
MEN'S ROCKER BO $15 941-
627-6780
SEWING MACHINE whit
sewing $25 941-473-2424
SHUTTERS & Tracks Alum,
40"x81" & 84"x117" $275
941-575-9047
SPORTS CARDS 3000+,
Basketball, Football, Baseball
$300 for all 941-473-4250
STORAGE RACKS on
wheels, great for garage $50
401-639-9687
TIKI BAR, Bamboo, 2 stools,
$350 941-743-2223


TIRES 265/70RiS with rims
$450 860-710-7167
TOY CHEST 1950'S CEDAR
15 X 30 X 13 $100
941-627-3636
TRAILER 4'X7' VG COND.
NEW SPARE $475
941-628-3613
UPRIGHT BISSELL
QUICK STEAMER. $30
941-697-6553
US FLAG embossed aluminum
12x18" $29.95 941-496-9252
VACUUM KENMORE
Progressive Upright $35
941-426-0760
VESSEL SINK BATHROOM
NEW $420 941-681-2433
WALL LIGHT 3 Candle
Octegon Brass Wall $100
941-347-8825
WALL LIGHT 3 Candle
Octegon Brass Wall L
$100 941-347-8825
WINDOW SHELTER Panels
70" x 15" Aluminum $60
941-380-7090

7000


2010 CHEVY IMPALA LT,
Lthr., Sunroof, All Pwr Bose.
34K Mi $13,W. 941-69-1585
2013 CHEVY CAMARO
RS 9K $25,911
855-280-4707 DLR

I CHRYSLER I



2004 CHRYSLER CON-
CORDE LX Gold, 4dr, 88k
miles, Drives & Looks like new
$3975 941-214-0889
2004 CHRYSLER SEBRING
70,188 mi, $5,987
855481-2060 DIr
2006 CHRYSLER 300M
53,758 mi, $13,950
855481-2060 DIr


uonv, naratop,,79r miles, exc.
cond. $10,500 941-276-1372
2008 CHRYSLER SEBRING
cony, luxury, loaded, silver steel
JeffsAutoSales.net 941-629-1888
2011 CHRYSLER 200 CON-
VERTABLE TOURING MODEL RED
W/ TAN TOP 22K MILES,
$16,900 941-639-9683





2003 DODGE DURANGO SLT
3rd Row Seat $6495
941-916-9222 Dr.
2004 DODGE DURANGO ST
$7995 941-916-9222 DIr.
Mattas Motors
2005 DODGE CARAVAN
94,342 mi, $7,458
855-481-2060 DIr
2005 DODGE NEON
Black, "491 $5995
941-916-9222 DIr.
2007 DODGE 024
47,479 mi, $12,454
855-481-2060 DIr
2007 GRAND CARAVAN
Stow N Go, Leather
VERY NICE! $9495 I
941-916-9222 Dr
2009 DODGE JOURNEY
35,653 mi, $14,987
855-481-2060 Dlr
IL FOR




1997 FORD EXPEDITION
150,874 mi, $4,875
855-481-2060 DIr


Friday, June 6, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 19


[ CHEVY /



1986 CAMARO IROC Z28
59,073 mi, 383 stroker
motor, $6,500 973-7134012
1986 CHEVY CAVALIER
74K Mi! Auto, New Tires/Batt.
VGC $1,750. 941-716-2602
2001 CHEVY CORVETTE
CONVT. 27K $23,990
855-280,4707 DLR
2002 CHEVY BLAZER LS
4X4, 1 owner. Extra Clean
$4,900 Call Bob 941-624-2394
2002 CHEVY SILVERADO
114,486 mi, $7,985
855-481-2060 DIr
2004 GEO TRACKER ZR2
Auto, $7695
941-916-9222 DIr.
2007 CHEVY CORVETTE
Coupe, LT3 with navigation,
Velocity Yellow, 23K miles.
$32,500 941-575-7646
2010 CHEVROLET equinox
75,848 mi, $15,987
855-481-2060 DIr






The Sun Classified Page 20 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Friday, June 6, 2014


FORD



2003 FORD EXPLORER
67K $8,990
855-280-4707 DLR
2004 FORD MUSTANG
57,852 mi, $8,975
855-481-2060 DIr
2005 FORD MUSTANG 4.0
V6, auto, premium package,
121,600 miles, very nice car,
$8,000 941-706-6445
2006 FORD FOCUS ZX4
$6995 Mattas Motors
941-916-9222 DIr.
2006 FORD FREESTYLE
75,015 mi, $9,874
855-481-2060 DIr
2008 FORD F-150
110,250 mi, $12,584
855-481-2060 DIr
2008 FORD FUSION 48k mi,
power sunroof, V6, loaded
JeffsAutoSales.net 941-629-1888
2010 FORD MILAN
75,168 mi, $14,587
855-481-2060 DIr
2010 FORD TAURUS
39,488 mi, $17,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2010 FORD TAURUS
SHO NAVI 33K $22,911
855-280-4707 DLR
2011 FORD ESCAPE
85 mi, $18,957
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 FORD FUSION
30,146 mi, $13,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 FORD FUSION
30,771 mi, $13,960
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 FORD RANGER
24,949 mi, $15,684
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 FORD MUSTANG
46,322 mi, $20,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2013 FORD TAURUS
33,328 mi, $16,950
855-481-2060 DIr




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2011 JEEP GRANDCHERO-
KEE 23,150 mi, $26,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 JEEP LIBERTY
40,995 mi, $16,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 JEEP PATRIOT
33,882 mi, $14,950
855-481-2060 DIr

ICassified Sales I
2012 JEEP PATRIOT
37,856 mi, $15,745
855-481-2060 DIr


JEEP



2014 JEEP GR.CHEROKEE
NAVI 11K $35,911
855-280-4707 DLR

7 LINCOLN



2003 LINCOLN TOWN CAR
$8495 941-916-9222
Mattas Motors
CHECK THE
~CLASS!IFIEDS!
2011 LINCOLN MKZ
31K $19,990
855-280-4707 DLR





LOOK
2011 LINCOLN MKZ 45K
Mi! Exc. Cond! New Tires. War-
ranty. $16,200 740-584-7857


Lwm 7100


2000 GRAND MARQUIS
1 Owner, 71k, $5495
941-916-9222 DIr.
2008 MERCURY MARINER
Premier, 106k mi., $11,499
$10,695 941-916-9222 DIr.
2008 MERCURY MARQUIS
37,334 mi, $11,875
855-481-2060 DIr


1998 OLDSMOBILE Royale
66,059 mi, $3,987
855-481-2060 DIr

PONTIAC



2009 PONTIAC G6
CONVT. 50K $15,911
855-280-4707 DLR
/ SATUP.N /




2005 SATURN ION
116,763 mi, $5,845
855-481-2060 DIr
2008 SATURN AURA
4 Cyl., Auto, Extra Clean!
$8295 941-916-9222 DIr.
2008 SATURN VUE
109,108 mi, $7,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2008 SATURN VUE Limited,
AWD, luxury, loaded, Tech gray
Jeff'sAutoSales. net941-629-1888

PRO POWER AUTO SALES
4140 Whidden Blvd
Port Charlotte, 33980


98 SW2 Wagon
98 SW2 Wagon
00 SL2 Sedan
03 Vue 4cyl
04 Vue 4cyl
06 Vue 4 cyl
06 Vue 4cyl
06 Vue 4 cyl
08 Vue 4 cyl
09 Vue XR leather


$1,550
$2,500
$3,899
4,200
54,799
$5,899
$6,899
$7,800
$10:800


Used Saturn Parts & Service
941-627-8822

USED CAR DEALERS

Z 7137



MATTAS MOTORS
941-916-9222
"SAVING YOU MONEY MATTERS
AMATTAS MOTORS"

Mattas Motors
941-916-9222
Buy Here Pay Here


USED CAR DEALERS




-WE FINANCE
I EVERYONE I
MUST HAVE INCOME
& DOWN PAYMENT
941-473-2277 I
I www.pctcars2.com





2010 acura 3.2TL
54,843 mi, $21,784
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 ACURA TL Loaded,
Alloys, Fact. Warr, WhDiamond
JeffsAutoSales.net941-629-1888

AUDI



2011 AUDI S4 QUATTRO
NAVI 30K $36,990
855-280-4707 DLR
B MW /




2011 BMW 3281
NAVI 31K $23,911
855-280-4707 DLR
2011 BMW 3281S
66,410 mi, $20,574
855-481-2060 DIr
I I


2006 HONDA CIVIC
69,621 mi, $10,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2006 HONDA CR-V
80,166 mi, $13,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2006 HONDA FIT
50,511 mi, $11,844
855-481-2060 DIr

Have A Garage
Sale!
2007 HONDA ACCORD
97,453 mi, $10,445
855-481-2060 DIr
2007 HONDA CIVIC
88,532 mi, $11,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2007 HONDA ELEMENT
82,465 mi, $14,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2008 HONDA ACCORD
20,998 mi, $17,845
855-481-2060 DIr
2008 HONDA ACCORD
49,685 mi, $17,452
855-481-2060 DIr
2008 HONDA ACCORD, 41K,
Gas Saver, Mint, Loaded, Silver
JeffsAutoSales.net941-629-1888
2009 HONDA ACCORD
30,527 mi, 17,858
855-481-2060 DIr
2009 HONDA pilot
120,663 mi, $17,846
855-481-2060 DIr
2010 HONDA ACCORD
44K $16,990
855-280-4707 DLR
2010 HONDA ACCORD
55,536 mi, $16,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2010 HONDA CIVIC
28,535 mi, $16,454
855-481-2060 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V
65,151 mi, $15,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2010 HONDA INSIGHT
hatchback, 20K, 1 owner, Red
Tango JeffsAutoSales.net941-
629-1888
2011 HONDA ACCORD
15,453 mi, $18,754
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
21,529 mi, $16,547
855-481-2060 DIr


HONDA



2011 HONDA ACCORD
30,602 mi, $16,985
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
33,745 mi, $15,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
34,318 mi, $16,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
34,712 mi, $15,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
35,144 mi, $16,758
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
39,456 mi, $19,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
39,686 mi, $17,985
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
40,619 mi, $15,874
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
40,701 mi, $15,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
41,859 mi, 17,854
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
42,932 mi, $15,784
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
47,366 mi, $14,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
CERT,. 17,368 mi, $20,457
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
CERT,. 19,641 mi, $19,854
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
CERT,. 25,401 mi, $20,457
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
CERT,. 29,146 mi, $18,975
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
CERT,. 29,146 mi, $19,485
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
35,632 mi, $23,987
855-481-2060 DIr


2011 HONDA CR-V
35,632 mi, $23,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
61,742 mi, $18,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA FIT
43,514 mi, $14,587
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ODYSSEY
EXL, NAVI 40K $25,990
855-280-4707 DLR
2012 HONDA ACCORD

18,142 mi, $18,975
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
23,037 mi, $17,544
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
25,225 mi, $17,895
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
26,448 mi, $17,854
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
26,676 mi, $23,764
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
33,704 mi, $21,885
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
34,097 mi, $19,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
34,238 mi, $81,874
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
35,848 mi, $18,857
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
38,655 mi, $17,987
855-481-2060 DIr


HONDA



2012 HONDA ACCORD
CERT. 21,801 mi, $24,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
CERT. 24,156 mi, $21,897
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
CERT,. 24,221 mi, $17,895
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
CERT,. 25,661 mi, $18,745
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
CERT,. 27,768 mi, $17,985
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
CERT,. 29,531 mi, $19,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
CERT. 8,143 mi, $21,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
24,687 mi, $16,455
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
28,463 mi, $18,754
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
32,889 mi, $15,684
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
CERT.12,584 mi, $15,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA CR-V
31,220 mi, $23,458
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA CR-V
32,034 mi, $25,687
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA CRV
AWD 14K $22,990
855-280-4707 DLR
2012 HONDA FIT
13,277 mi, $13,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
20,201 mi, $21,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
44,382 mi, $22,457
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
76,162 mi, $15,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA PILOT
28,075 mi, $26,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA PILOT
38,265 mi, $33,954
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA RIDGELINE
23,816 mi, $29,874
855-481-2060 DIr
2013 HONDA ACCORD
CERT. 12,736 mi, $25,841
855-481-2060 DIr
2013 HONDA CIVIC
14,704 mi, $18,754
855-481-2060 DIr
2013 HONDA CR-V
10,420 mi, $22,857
855-481-2060 DIr
2013 HONDA CR-V
CERT. 15,094 mi, $25,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2013 HONDA FIT
CERT. 1,616 mi, $16,455
855-481-2060 DIr
2013 HONDA PILOT
CERT .10,330 mi, $28,759
855-481-2060 DIr
2013 HONDA PILOT
CERT. 6,620 mi, $36,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2013 HONDA PILOT
CERT.25,975 mi, $35,876
855-481-2060 DIr
2014 HONDA ACCORD
CERT. 6,850 mi, $19,950
855-481-2060 DIr
Advertise Toay.
2014 HONDA CR-V
9,258 mi, $23,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2014 HONDA CR-V
CERT. 4,823 mi, $27,844
855-481-2060 DIr
2014 HONDA CR-V
CERT.4,635 mi, $23,451
855-481-2060 DIr


7~AI
7HYUNDAI


2006 HYUNDAI SANTAFE
52,800mi, excl. cond. $8,900
Priv. sale, sr. owned 941-625-9641
2009 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
33K $16,988
855-280-4707 DLR
2010 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
25K $11,990
855-280-4707 DLR
2011 HYUNDAI SANTFE
57,348 mi, $16,888
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HYUNDAI SONATA
Limited, 44,700 mi, Very
Good Condition. Save 2-4 thou-
sand from dealer prices.,
$16,595 757-651-0963
2012 HYUNDAI SONATA
LIMITED 31K $20,990
855-280-4707 DLR




7INFIITI
7165T


2008 INTINITI EX35
77,766 mi, $17,846
855-481-2060 DIr
2009 INFINITI G37
CONVT., 47K $26,990
855-280-4707 DLR


L 04 7175


1997 XK8 JAGUAR Cony.
65K mi, Clean and well main-
tained. Serv. Records Eye
Catcher $7,000 **SOLD!!**
2013 JAGUAR XF
6,309 MILES $43,990
855-280-4707 DLR


Ljs 7177


2006 KIA SPECTRA EX,
mint, 41K, 1 owner, Bronze
JeffsAutoSales.net941-629-1888
2010 KIA OPTIMA LX, Gas
Saver, Like New, Metal Bronze
JeffsAutoSales.net941-629-1888
I 2010 KIA RIO I
4Dr Sedan, White, $9995
941-916-9222 DIr.
2011 KIA SPORTAGE
39,015 mi, $17,895
855-481-2060 DIr
/ LEXUS /




1999 LEXUS ES300
132,271 mi, $4,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2001 LEXUS RX300
130,508 mi, $7,895
855-481-2060 DIr
2004 LEXUS IS300
76,710 mi, $13,744
855-481-2060 DIr
2005 LEXUS 330 Ltd, Mint,
Low mi, Luxury, Bamboo Pearl
JeffsAutoSales.net941-629-1888
/ MAZDA /

7180


2010 MAZDA 3, Sporty,
Hatchback, Velocity Red,
JeffsAutoSales.net941-629-1888
2011 MAZDA MAZDA3
66,871 mi, $14,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 MAZDA MAZDA6
44,406 mi, $15,474
855-481-2060 DIr

MERCEDES
L 7190

2011 MERCEDES R350
NAVI 39K $33,990
855-280-4707 DLR


OLDSMOBILE 76 J
~7110 Lw






Friday, June 6, 2014


ads.yoursun net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 21


MINI COOPER
mI 7192


2011 MINI COOPER
19K $17,990
855-280-4707 DLR

NISSAN



2002 NISSAN ALTIMA
75,364 mi, $8,745
855-481-2060 DIr





2002 NISSAN SENTRA GXI,
Gas Saver, Low mi, Iced Cappuccino
JeffsAutoSales.net 941-629-1888
2007 NISSAN ALTIMA
87,045 mi, $10,874
855-481-2060 DIr
2009 NISSAN ALTIMA S, 2.5
mint, low mi, loaded, Gas saver
JeffsAutoSales.net 941-629-1888
2011 NISSAN ALTIMA, 50K
Miles! 2.5 Special Edition!
$12,988. 941-639-1601, DIr
2011 NISSAN MAXIMA
42,101 mi, $19,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 NISSAN ROGUE
44K $18,990
855-280-4707 DLR
2011 NISSAN ROGUE
49,,432 mi, $17,985
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 NISSAN SENTRA
26,689 mi, $14,897
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 NISSAN ALTIMA
29,702 mi, $16,754
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 NISSAN JUKE
NAVI 21K $19,990
855-280-4707 DLR

7SUBARU



2002 SUBARU FORESTER
1 owner, 140K mi, good con-
dition. $3,500 941-536-7080
TOYOTA




2004 TOYOTA COROLLA
68,297 mi, $8,754
855-481-2060 DIr
2005 TOYOTA AVALON
XLS, NAVI, 93K $13,990
855-280-4707 DLR
2006 TOYOTA SOLARA Conv.
SLE, luxury, loaded, 37K mi,
JeffsAutoSales.net941-629-1888
2007 TOYOTA COROLLA
72,301 mi, $10,874
855-481-2060 DIr
2008 TOYOTA PRIUS,
5 Door Sedan! Loaded!
$10,988. 941-639-1601, DIr
2008 TOYOTA SCION
TC 46K $11,990
855-280-4707 DLR
2009 TOYOTA CAMRY
69K $12,990
855-280-4707 DLR
2009 TOYOTA PRIUS
35,797 mi, $15,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2010 TOYOTA 4RUNNER
64,284 mi, $26,986
855-481-2060 DIr
2010 TOYOTA COROLLA
41,102 mi, $13,874
855-481-2060 DIr
2010 TOYOTA PRIUS
NAVI 36K $17,990
855-280-4707 DLR
2010 TOYOTA VAN
65,034 mi, $20,475
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 TOYOTA AVALON
35K $24,990
855-280-4707 DLR
2011 TOYOTA CAMRY
28,119 mi, $13,950
855-481-2060 DIr


TOYOTA



2011 TOYOTA CAMRY
53,206 mi, $16,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 TOYOTA RAV4
48,444 mi, $20,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 TOYOTA TACOMA
26,480 mi, $23,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 TOYOTA VENZA
16K $23,990
855-280-4707 DLR
2013 TOYOTA AVALON
LTMD NAVI 8K $33,990
855-280-4707 DLR
2013 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER
NAVI 12K $35,990
855-280-4707 DLR

L VOLKSWAGEN/



2007 VOLKSWAGEN GTI
61K mi, Alloys, 4cyl, Turbo
JeffsAutoSales.net941-629-1888
2009 VOLKSWAGEN EOS
CONVT., 49K $18,990
855-280-4707 DLR
2011 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA
2.5 SEL, NAVI, 28K $15,911
855-280-4707 DLR
2013 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA
TDI 19K 422,988
855-280-4707 DLR


C ANTIQUES/
7250ETILE


350 Chevy Engine.
All Steel Body! Great
Condition! Great Looking!
$19,900. All Reasonable
Offers Considered!
941-833-9181
1975 CORVETTE 61K orig.
miles. '69 AMC/AMX 390/4sp
Call for details 941-764-6802.

L BUDGETBUYS/







1997 PONTIAC BONNEVILLE
90K Mi! Moonroof, Loaded!
$3,988. 941-639-1601, DIr
1999 CHEVY CAVALIER,
Z24 2.4 4Cyl Auto PW PD Runs
Good, $1,300 941-626-3265
I NEED CASH? I

2000 VW JETTA,
120K Mi, Black w/ Rims!
$1,588 941-639-1601, DIr
2003 TOYOTA CAMRY,
1 Owner, MINT! Gas Saver!
$2,988. 941-639-1601, DIr


AUTOS WANTED



WE BUY CARS
$400 CASH + UP
Frank 941-276-0204
WE BUY CARS
I Top Dollar for your car
or truck Call us today
941-473-2277
I www.pctcars2.com I
[ .. .... I


L;, -UK FI JUI'IIIF-II
Available 24/7
941-623-5550, 286-3122







I ACCESSORIES


327 V8 block only $399
786-306-6335
700R TRANSM. GOOD
$490 786-306-6335
CURT TRAILER hitch $100
941-661-6487
RIMS & TIRES 20" off 2010
Chevy. P275-55-R20's Nice
$600. 941-716-0007
SPARE TIRE, 1 Full Sz $20
941-704-0322
TIRES, 4, for Heavy Duty
truck. LT295/70 R18. Mitto
Terra Grappler. Brand new.
$600Cash Only!941-979-0932
TIRES- New take offs starting
@ $39.95 Installed & Balanced
Call for Inventory 941-639-5681
TRUCK CAP $200
401-639-9687
VANS




2008 CHRYSLER T&C
stow n go, 62K, Inferno Red
JeffsAutoSales.net 941-629-1888
2010 DODGE Grand Caravan
WHEELCHAIR van, 10" lowered
floor & ramp. 941-870-4325
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
50,678 mi, $27,845
855-481-2060 DIr
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
69,418 mi, $23,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ODYSSEY
37,963 mi, $30,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ODYSSEY
44,992 mi, $30,874
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
37,688 mi, $29,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
38,710 mi, $28,956
855-481-2060 DIr

TRUCKS/PICK-UPS


Eye Sore Removal
We Buy Junk Cars
Running Or Not, No Title,
No Problem. I Buy Them
All! 941-586-8214 Chris
2006 FORD F-250,95k, mi,
A7UTOSWANTED7 UTILITY TRUCK., Custom Pipe
A W Rack $12,500 941-740-7313
7260




2008 FORD F-250 Super
I see Duty Ext. Cab, White, 8' Bed,
71K Miles. Excellent Condition!
$12,999. 941-625-3086


TRUCKS/PICK-UPS




AL3L"3O"3LmW

DON'T WAIT. DRIVE TODAY
GUARANTEED CREDIT
APPROVAL
941-473-2277
www.pctcars2.com
VE HICLES
SPORT UTILITY/
VEHICLES


2007 FORD EXPEDITION
Eddie Bauer, 3rd Row, Luxury
JeffsAutoSales.net 941-629-1888
2009 NISSAN MURANO SL,
Ither, dual roofs, backup camera
JeffsAutoSales.net 941-629-1888
2011 PORSCHE CAYENNE
GTS 42K $73,988
855-280-4707 DLR

l-ar



2012 FORD ESCAPE LTD 1
Owner Garaged! Only 10K
Miles! 17,100 941-350-8159





10' -30' USED BOATS
BUY-SELL-TRADE-CONSIGN
50 BOATS IN OUR SHOWROOM
BOATS ON LIFTS, TOO!
REPAIRS/SERVICE & FIBERGLASS
UPHOLSTERY, & CANVAS, TOO!
CHARLOTTE RV & MARINE
4628 TAMIAMI TRAIL, PC
CHARLOTTE MARINE.COM
941-244-5288

ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!


.I.U 11IrLAIMtL LDIr Ar I
includes trailer & 6HP John-
son. Everything excl. All
access.. PRICED TO SELL
$1500 585-354-7733


Evinrude trim & tilt. 24 volt
MINN KOTA AUTO PILOT
bow mounted -Just aim it &
go! Trailer w/EL Winch,
Canopy. Ready to go fishing.
$2,900 941-485-4641


1 989 70PEvinru de w/'207
Trailer $4,800. 941-488-7283


ZU' Ir'/'l l5 -ILH'lH, .L9b
w/ trailer. Ctr console, Yama-
ha 130 2 stroke w/SS prop,
EC $6,900 941-626-4571 or
941-627-5777


CRUISER Merc 7.4L, w/Bravo
3. A/C Cockpit & Cabin, GPS.
New Isinglass, flat screen TV.
$19,900 obo (941) 276-6552


BOATS-POWERED



19'1" ACTION CRAFT
Coastal Ray, Tournament Edt.
Yamaha 150 4 Stroke. Trailer
incl. $25,500 941-916-5160
20' 2011 Bentley Pontoon
50 HP, 4 stroke Merc.
$17,900 941-916-9222 DIr.


S TRAILER
I ACCESSORIES I


LARK V-NOSE Enclosed
7'X14" Special $3,395
941-916-9222 DIr.


1994 12" draft, 200HP John-
son. Great family & party Boat!
Large enclosed porta potty
cabin. $5,990 941-639-8649


Center Console, Twin Yam
150's Two Strokes, Both With
New Power Heads In Last Yr.
Fully Equipped, Ready To Fish,
Many Extras, On lift in PG
$22,500. 941-661-5560


IPLER NITUW RA I
5 x 10 $1095!
941-916-9222
WANT TO TRADE: 24-26'
Boat Trailer For 14' Trailer.
Please Call 941-626-1389


I SCOOTERS I


2000 HARLEY DAVIDSON
ElectroGlide, black. Many
extras! $8000 734-740-7828
2003 HONDA 1300VTX Like
new! W/shield, new tires, 11k
miles. $4200 270-579-1699


2002 Twin10 Radar, GPS,
AC, Loaded. $41,000
508-942-4600


2007 KAWASAKI VULCAN
1500 18,558mi well maint gar
stored $4000. 941-916-2601


36'- 1998 CARVER
Mariner 350, Twin Merc
Cruisers, All electronics,
Shows like new.
$69,900 941-255-5311

MISC.BOATS



8FT INFLATABLE 4 Man
Dingy 5HP rating, Nice shape
$275 941-661-9784


& EQUIP.


BIRD REPELLERS 5
USED/2NEW. EFFECTIVE $30
941-575-8881
BOAT MOTOR 5 HP Outboard
w/gas tank good condition
$275 941-661-9784
BOAT MOTOR Mariner 2 HP
Gas Engine Great for inflatable
$250 941-661-9784
TRANSDUCER, RAY MARINE
Airmar p58 Triducer $45 941-
223-8735

I TRAILER
I ACCESSORIES I


2012 BIG TEX 16' Hauler with
ramps and sides $3,500
941-525-7287
BOAT TRAILER Axle alsocall
to see $499 941-623-3955
ADVERTISE!


2014 6X10, Tandem Ale
$2195 Many Other Options
Avail. 941-916-9222 DIr



'470 Tylo RdP.G


2008 HARLEY DAVIDSON
FXDC Dyna Super Glide Cus-
tom. $8,600 941-276-9581
HARBOR
SCOOTERS
FOR ALL YOUR
SCOOTER
NEEDS...



3315 Tamiami TH. PG
We Repair Scooters too!
941-347-8705
VANCE & HINES Pro Pipe for
Harley Softtail Pro Pipe $450
941-626-2276

CAMPERS/
I TRAVEL TRAILERS








1997 LANCE LEGEND-500
Truck Slide In Camper w/ Ext.
Cabover. Excellent Condition!
$4,999. 941-625-3086

MOTOR HOMES/
/I R V s/



RV SERVICE SPECIALS
Factory Warranty
All models
RV Wash
Wash & Hand Wax
Brake Flush
New Tires & Balance
Roof Reseal
RV Propane & Bottles
Water Leak Test
Lg. Parts Showroom
Dog Port-a-potties

RV WORLD INC. of Nokomis
FAMILY ONNED/OPERATED FOR 36YRs
2110 US 41 Nokomis,
941-966-2182






The Sun Classified Page 22 EINIC ads.yoursun.net Friday, June 6, 2014


Borrow ithCONFIDENCE!


Better Solution, [nc,
a non-medical solution for your everyday needs!
Our caregivers are experienced, screened,
bonded, and insured employees. We offer
temporary or Long-Term services in
your home or in a facility.


William "Bill" Mercer
Specialist with
12 years experience
NMLS #439847


V Purchase your Dream Home with 50% Down*
V No Monthly Mortgage Payments
V Keep 100% Ownership

&/ Government Insured and Tax Free
V Create Another "Pension-Like" Income
V Member-National Reserve
Mortgage Lenders Association



Call our local office at...

941-575-1020
Clock Tower Plaza
265 E. Marion Avenue, Suite 116


Household Organization
S WardrobeAssistanoce
" Alzheimers & Facilit Care
" Coordinating Services With
Other Facilities
& Agencies
Enjoy a beautiful day\ or
evening while knowing your
loved one is being ca redfor
Free Assessments!
Call Today!


" Homemaking
" Housekeeping
" Companionship
" Surgery Recovery
" Transportation
" Laundry & Linens
" Meal Planning/
Preparation
* Hourly Rates
" 24/7 Available


ERSE MORTGAGE
ASSOCIATES LLc
A FLORIDA COMPANY
= NMI 393872


T serious Bamroom Fall.
Let Us Install A
Safety Shower & Bathtub
GRAB BAR
i i ) Recommended by Doctors


2 Post Stair Railings


& Hallway Banisters Available
Jim's Bathroom Grab I
941-626-4296
Jim bathrnnm orhbbars(don


First surgeon in
Southwest Florida offering
Bladeless Laser Cataract Surgery
FRANTZ
Cataract Center

109 Taylor Street Punta Gorda
(941) 505-2020


Punta Gorda, FL 33950
bmercer@FLreverse.com
*must pay property taxes and insurance
**call for details


and


Physical Therapists
various Lengths 18" thru 36"
Over 20 years Experience
Don't Wait To Fall to Call!
Bars, LLC
Grleatwoo
*f rfhe "141


F.,


112t
11=N


Gulfvinds
Where Compassion & Care is Always There.
Rates as low as $1,500/Month
We provide the following
Assisted Living in a homey atmosphere
Assistance with all activities of daily living
Medications Bathing Dressing
Ambulating Showering
Three daily nutritional meals and snacks
Laundry and linen services
Entertainment and activities
Cleaning rooms Fully sprinklered building
GulFwiNds AssisTEd LiviNq FAciliTy
www.gulfwindsalf.com
2745 E. Venice Ave., Venice, FL 34292
Tel: 941-488-5970


Please call Mark


To place your ad


A Welcome Home
Englewood, LLC
Shelley Belcher, RN
Administrator
2015 E Dolphin Dr.
Englewood, FL 34223
#AL 12221
(941) 375-1044 (941) 475-9626
belcher94174@msn.com
Assisted Living


There's a RIGHT WAY and there's a WRONG WAY!
Contact your Sun Newspaper Advertising Account Executive Today.
Their job is... making sure your advertising stays on the right track. L

Sun Newspapers Advertising Department 206-1253 S UNEWSPAPERS


24- HOURCARE
MEAL PREPARATI(
AND MORE...


HABLAMOS ESPANOL.


The Sun Classified Page 22 E/N/C


ads~yoursun~nef


Friday, June 6, 2014


,* 04 40 0


Var


in






Friday, June 6, 2014 ads .yoursun net EINIC The Sun Classified Page 23


MOTOR HOMES/
/RVsI


2015 WINNEBAGOS
2014 Model CLEARANCE!
NO.1 SELLING RV
RVWorld Inc.of Nokomis
FAMILY ONED/OPERATED FOR 36YRs
2110 US 41, Nokomis
1-75 Exit 195
1-800-262-2182
www.rvworldinc.com

ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!


I MOTOR HOMES/
/ RVs I


- -- -- -- -J I


2015 HOLIDAY RAM-
BLER A MUST SEE MOTOR
HOME MANY MODELS
RVWORLD INC OF NOKOMIS
FAMILY ONNEDIOPERATED FOR 36YRs
2110 US 41 NOKOMIS
941-966-2182

Find the
perfect
companion
in the
Classifieds!


MOTOR HOMES/1
/I R VsI


LUXURY MOTOP HOMES
2015 MODELS UP TO 45'
2014 MODEL CLEAPAICE!
RVWORLD INC OF NOKOMIS
FAMILY ONNEDIOPERATED FOR 36 YRS
2110 US 41 NOKOMIS
941-966-2182
www. rvworld inc.com
FIND YOUR
BEST FRIEND
IN THE
CLASSIFIEDS!


R M TRH S /
/RVsI



I BUY TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS MOTOR HOMES &
TRUCKS I COME TO YOU! CALL
DAVE ANY TIME. (813)-713-3217
RV Collision Repairs
Customer and Insurance
Modern shop, quality work!
FREE ESTIMATES.
RV WORLD Inc. of Nokomis
FAMILY OWNED/OPERATED FOR 36YRs
2110 US 41- Nokomis
941-966-2182

Seize the sales
with Classified!


L MOTOR HOMES/
/I RVs I


RVs WANTED
CASH/CONSIGN/TRADE
CALL: MARK
RVWORLD INC OF NOKOMIS
FAMILY ONNEDIOPERATED FOR 36YRs
2110 US 41 NOKOMIS
941-966-2182
SATURN TOW-CARS
Starting at $2,500. Blue-Ox
Tow hitches sold & installed.
THE SATURN GUYS
PRO-POWER AUTO SALES
4140 Whidden Blvd PC 33980
(941) 627-8822.

r GET RESULTS


I MOTOR HOMES/
/RVsI


WANTED All Motor
Homes, TT's, 5th whls, Pop-
Ups, Vans conversion & pas-
senger, cars & trucks. CASH
paid on the spot for quick
sale. 941-347-7171
/RV/CAMPERPARTS


TOW BAR Roadmaster Stow-
master $179 941-276-3820

FInd youw Best
Friend In the
Classifleds!


IT


At our premier retirement residences we know that you will feel right at home. Our
residences have been designed for the discriminating senior who has planned for their
retirement years to enjoy life to its fullest.
Our premier retirement residences prestigious locations alone are enough for you to
have found the dream of your life. Nestled among beautiful landscaped gardens near the
entrances, each resident will relish the lush tropical atmospheres.
Uncompromising excellence, affordable resort-style retirement living, delicious country
club style dining and spacious accommodations are just a few of the hallmarks that make
our residences the premier retirement
communities for which we are known..C A L

forF ff


A PLACL


CALL DoUlle

At the area's only gated retirement residences, you will enjoy:
Spacious garden apartments & studios. Large walk-in closets
Walk-in showers with safety bars. Furnishings and appliances
Three delicious meals daily plus snacks. Daily housekeeping services
Personal laundry service with linens provided
Transportation to physician's offices, banks, and shopping
Emergency call system Security and safety systems. Recreational activities
Qualified nursing staff 24 hours a day. Much, much more


9
Gardens
of Venice
2901 Jacaranca blvd.
Venice, FL 5+Z95

9+1-+97-o650


76 cqatins
of foth Thrt
RE t aNEX RESDENCE


4-900 5.Sumter Dlvd.
North Port, FL 5237
A55i5ted Living Facilit) Lic #108+.
9-1-+1-O 658


north loort vines
Retirement Residence

4950 Pocatella Ave.
North Port, FL 45+237
A55i5ted Living acilit9 Lic #7860
9A-1 -A-Z -9175


5anfhi[[


24-949 Sancthill blvd.
Deep Cree FL F 98
A55i5tec Living Facilit) Lic #9905
9+- 7+-7577


n i o r Friendly Helper's
Senior Friendly Helper is a premier Companion Service.
Caring, Compassionate, Companion Services.
V' Services are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week or as needed
Shopping Medication Reminders Laundry
Light Housekeeping, Etc.
Please call us today and schedule a FREE no-obligation consultation
941-497-1117 d _


JAMES W. MALLONEE, V.A.
LAW OFFICE
JAMES W. MALLONEE
PROBATE WILLS/TRUSTS
GUARDIANSHIPS REAL ESTATE
Office Hours Monday thru Friday, 9:00AM to 5:00PM
901 Venetia Bay Blvd. #360, Venice, FL 34285
946 Tamiami Trail, #206, Port Charlotte, FL 33953
(941) 207-2223
www.j ameswmallonee.com


I I II I1 I LIJ I I
If You Would Like More Information
You Are Invited To Attend A
FREE NO OBLIGATION Lunch Seminar
CallToday
Rachelle Pastorfield
Q412 I -A794


Port Charlotte
Villa San Carlos II--

AFFORDABLE

Income Based Apartments
For 62 or Older
Income Limits Apply
Call 941-624-4404 TTY-1-800-955-8771


" Family Owned I
" Competitive Rates
" Reliable Service
" Free Estimates]
Insured & Bonded


j I I I


I I


i


Friday, June 6, 2014


ads~yoursun~net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 23


000@0


T icense #? 30908





The Sun Classified Page 24 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Friday, June 6, 2014


I'


TATDI


StK IZ53UA
$6922


S, 4D, Sport Utility, Gray, Stk#11935B
$12,698


'02 T


TUNDRA


Limited, 4D, Ext. Cab, Black, Stk#43456A
$7,922

10 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS


4D, Sedan, White, Stk#43015A
$13,338


FOCUS


S, 4D, Sedan, Red, Stk#43
$7986


SE, 4D, Sedan, Silver, Stk#5744H
$13,923


'05 FORD F-150


1B 4D, EXT. Cab, White, Stk#12037DD
$10,924


'07 VW EOS


2.OT, 2D, Conv., Black, Stk#5692HA
$109996


Stk#5699H LT, 4D, Sport UtiltyStk#12487C
$13v969 $13C973
'13 CHRYSLER 200 '02 LEXUS SC 430


Mans, 4D, HatchbackOrangeStk#12450A
$11,v472

10VW ROUTAN


4D, Passenger, White, Stk#43521A
$14,394


Stk#12443A LE, 4D, Sedan, S verT573
1 4696 14743
'12 HONDA INSIGHT 10 HONDA ODYSSEY


2, 4D, Sedan, Silver, Stk#5735H Sport, 4D, Wagon, White, Stk#433
$17.986 $18.694


$14,896 $14,969


Sport, 4D, SportUttyWhe k 574
$16,499


EX-L, 4D, Sedan, Gray, Stk#43442A
$16,980


2D, Convertible, Black, Stk#43503A
$14,994


S 4D Sport Utility" "jytk#5739H
$1 7,293


a a a a


SXT 4D SportU itySlve Sk#5
$18722


ll N MI SONATA


Limited, 4D, Sedan, White, tk 12482A
$189865


Stk#5708H
$19.469


GLS, 4D, Sedan, Gray, Stk#5741H
$15,590


RS, 4D, Hat h a' Stk#5644HA
$17,695


13 VW BEETLE


2,2D, Conv., White, Stk#43486A
$ 21999


PORTCHARLOTTE 1252 Tamiami Trail 1 =87
Honda US 41, Just North of Town Center Port Charlotte, FL 33953
SSales Mon-Sat 8:30am to 8:00 pm Sales open every Sunday 11:00 am to 5:00 pm

i iSERVICE: Mon thru Fri 7:00 am to 6:00 pm Sat 7:00 am to 4:30 pm Service Closed on Sunda

SHOP PORTCHARLOTTEHONDA.COM


ays


IKA


F7-217-0544




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