Charlotte sun herald

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Charlotte sun herald
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Charlotte HSun L
HEANWELY


An Edition of the Sun
VOL. 122 NO. 150


GE refrigerator, $75
In Today's
Classifieds!


SPORTS PAGE 1

SHINSEKI SUPPORT FALTERS TIME TO REFOCUS
Support for the Veterans Affairs secretary is eroding quickly Miami Heat holds a rare practice on the day after a road game
among congressional Democrats facing tough re-election bids. to clear their heads and focus on the keys to finishing Indiana.


AMERICA'S BEST COMMUNITY DAILY


FRIDAY MAY 30, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net $1.00


SIDE DISH


Marcella's


turn now
uring Marcella Caen's first dinner
service at her new restaurant,
husband Roberto came into the
kitchen and said, "Marcella, someone
wants to talk to you."
She flushed. What
could be wrong?
As she rounded the
corner, she ran right
into an ebullient
customer who
waved her arms and
Blurted, "I love your
food! I want to give
you a hug!"
Sue Marcella was so
surprised that she
WADE burst into tears like
COLUMNIST Sally Field accepting
the Best Actress Oscar.
"It felt so good," she breathes. "It made
me feel like what I do is good."
For Roberto and Marcella, the path
to that moment at Piccolo Italian
Restaurant traces back, through 30 years
of hard work, to Argentina- where the
Palermo district of Buenos Aires sprawls
like a cobblestoned corner of Rome.
Leafy parks with mammoth banyans,
brightly painted buildings leaning chum-
mily against one another, streets strewn
with sidewalk caf6s and galleries.
Marcella couldn't help noticing a
serious fellow with black curls and olive
skin who lived across the street from her
there. Before long, she was biking around
the streets of Palermo, wrapped around
him. One thing led to another in the warm
Buenos Aires nights, and they married.
From the start, they've been partners
in everything. Marcella left Palermo
to help Roberto with his ailing dad in
Miami, then with his work, then with
raising their son, Brandon, here in Punta
Gorda.
Roberto's an IT specialist, a left-brained
planner who stays up all night, his mind
gnawing on an idea like a dog with a
bone. He's also a planner for the restau-
rant, so these two make a perfect team.
Outgoing Marcella, with her broad smile
and infectious laugh, says, "I love to cook.
When I saw the for-rent sign here, I said,
'Robert, I want it. I want a restaurant
right now!' And he said OK!"
Roberto adds quietly, "I felt this was
her time to do whatever she wanted.
The whole idea at first was, this is for
Marcella, and I'll just help a little bit."
But achieving the fresh quality that
Marcella envisioned proved too much
for just one person. The partnership
adjusted once more, and Roberto and
his mom, Ramona, who had owned a
Buenos Aires restaurant, pitched in.
After six months, they're still learning
something new every day. As Roberto
points out, smiling, "I'm still learning
how to be a waitress."
In Italian, piccolo means "little." But
what this Piccolo lacks in size it more
than makes up for in warmth. You can't
help but befriend your fellow diners in
its compact dining room that holds only
29 and is always reserved right up to
the walls as Marcella says, "just like
an Italian family; everybody comes for
dinner."
"Once, we were so packed," jokes
Roberto the Planner, "I said, 'OK, you
people, if you want to go to the bathroom
you better do it now!"'
Marcella is always in back cooking
with Ramona, but can hear everybody
laughing. So, her ears tend to perk up
with worry when she hears silence from
the dining room. Once she whispered to
Roberto, "What's going on? I don't hear
anything."
"Everybody's eating," he grinned.
Sue Wade is a local columnist for the
Charlotte Sun. You can recommend
restaurants and/or bars to her by email to
sue.gleasonwade@cengage.com.

IF YOU GO
Where: Piccolo Italian Restaurant, 5354 Duncan
Road (U.S. 17), Punta Gorda
When: 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday to Thursday,
4 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday
More info: 941-621-2200


Woman dies in




bizarre accident


By ADAM KREGER
STAFF WRITER

Lillian Stalnaker never really drove
much anymore.
But the 89-year-old Punta Gorda
woman was only trying to back her car
out of her carport Wednesday when
she inadvertently stepped on the gas
pedal too hard and slammed into a
neighbor's mobile home, according to
the Florida Highway Patrol.
She was rushed to Lee Memorial
Hospital in Fort Myers, where she died


shortly after the 5:15 p.m. crash.
"It's sad," said Joe Mathey, who lives
across from Stalnaker's home on Pine
Needle Drive. "She wasn't even going
anywhere."
Mathey was home when he heard a
crash. Stalnaker had backed her Ford
Fusion into the concrete porch area of
a mobile home on Sugarwood Street
- about 100 feet from her driveway.
Mathey called 911 and tended to
the woman until medical personnel
arrived. Stalnaker told him she was
just moving her car so she could wash


PHOTO PROVED BY JOE MATHEY
Lillian Stalnaker, 89, died Wednesday evening
after accidentally hitting the gas pedal too
hard while backing out of her carport.
the dirt off it.
"It was just a freak thing," Mathey
said. "And she never really drove. She
always had one of her sons drive her."
Mathey said Stalnaker was bleeding

ACCIDENT 111


Hurricane season looms

SBy PAUL FALLON
STAFF WRITER

Although forecasters
predict a below average to
average hurricane season,
experts still advise
residents throughout
Southwest Florida to be
prepared.
"It only takes one hur-
ricane to ruin your day,"
said Dan Noah, a meteo-
rologist with the National
Weather Service's Tampa
~office.
Hurricane season starts
Sunday and lasts until the
end of November.
The National Hurricane
Center is forecasting a
50 percent chance of a
below-normal hurricane
season, a 40 percent
chance of a normal
season and a 10 percent
EMMMMchance of an above-
NATIONAL OCEANIC normal season. The
AND ATMOSPHERIC Climate Prediction Center
ADMINISTRATION IMAGE is forecasting a 70 percent
This NOAA satellite image shows the eye cane somseigh1
of Hurricane Charley just as it reaches named storms, with
the Punta Gorda area on Aug. 13, 2004. winds 39 miles per hour
WEEKEN D WEATHER There's a 70 percent
WE N Wchance that three to six of
4( FORECAST those named storms will

Friday: High 89. Low 69. become hurricanes with
Sixty percent chance of thunderstorms wind speeds of 74 miles
mainly after 2 p.m. per hour or higher, and
Saturday: High 91. Low 72. one to two major hurri-
Fifty percent chance of thunderstorms canes of Category 3, 4 or 5
SUN PHOTO BY PAUL FALLON mainly after 2 p.m. with winds of 111 miles
Wayne Sallade, Charlotte County Emergency Management director, Sunday: High 89. Low 71. per hour or stronger,
holds up a copy of the Disaster Planning Guide he is distributing to Fifty percent chance of thunderstorms according to the National
various organizations throughout the county. Boxes holding the guides mainly after 2 p.m. Weather Service.
can be seen in the car behind Sallade. -Source: National Weather Service HURRICANE 111



District proposes leadership shuffle


By PAUL FALLON
STAFF WRITER

Charlotte County Public Schools
officials will be reviewing a series of
staff moves during their upcoming
meeting in June, superintendent Doug
Whittaker said.
Whittaker will propose moving Port
Charlotte Middle School
principal Demetrius
Revelas to Murdock
Middle School. Murdock
Middle School's principal
Maria Gifford will then
move into the principal's
spot at Port Charlotte
Middle School, Whittaker
REVELAS said.
Both schools in 2013 received a grade
of C, based on FCAT scores, from the
Florida Department of Education.
However, Whittaker is not proposing
the move because of any issues at
either school, he said.


"They're ready for a change of
environment," Whittaker said about
the switch.
Revelas has been principal of Port
Charlotte Middle School for around
12 years and is ready for a change,
Whittaker said. Gifford has been
principal at Murdock Middle School for
around six years.
'And she's up for a change too,"
Whittaker said.
Revelas will be taking one of his
assistant principals, Daniel McIntosh,
to Murdock Middle School along with
him, Whittaker said.
None of the staff members involved
in the proposed move could be reached
for comment.
The proposed moves will leave an
assistant principal spot open at Port
Charlotte Middle, a vacancy Whittaker
plans to fill with former Charlotte High
School principal Richard Shafer.
Whittaker moved Shafer out of
Charlotte High School in September


2013. Shafer was relocated
to the Charlotte Technical
Center to serve as an
assistant director.
An assistant director at
the Charlotte Technical
Center, DeeLynn Bennett,
was tapped as the interim
SHAFER principal at Charlotte
High School. Punta
Gorda Middle School principal Cathy
Corsaletti has since been moved to
Charlotte High School to serve as
principal.
Bennett will be moving back to the
Technical Center as an assistant direc-
tor when Shafer takes over as assistant
principal at Port Charlotte Middle,
Whittaker said.
Whittaker made the decision to move
Shafer out of the principal's position
at CHS because he had issues with his
"leadership" style, he said.

DISTRICT 111


INDEX I THE SUN: Obituaries 51 Police Beat 61Legals61 Crosswords 7 Viewpoint 8 Opinion 9-10 CLASSIFIED: Comics 9-121 Dear Abby 12 TV Listings 13
THE WIRE: Nation 2 World 3,81 State 51 Business 6-71 Weather 8 SPORTS: Lotto 2 A a


Daily Edition $1.00 High L



7 05252 00025 8 Scattered thunderstorms


-- Look inside for valuable coupons
SUN COUPON This year's savings to date
VALUE METER $40,296


CHARLIE SAYS ...
I hope my buddies and I don't
become extinct!


CALL US AT
941-206-1000






Our Town Page 2 C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014


A tale of two seasons


By KENNETH ANDRESEN
SUN CORRESPONDENT

ENGLEWOOD -It
can be the busiest of
times, or the slowest of
times; but, interestingly,
in each case it is the best
of times. Affectionately
referred to as a drinking
town with a fishing
problem, Englewood's
heartbeat quickens
during "season" and
slows considerably in
''non-season."
Englewood has long
been a community
where snowbirds gather
to avoid harsh northern
winters. That has never
been more true than this
past winter when waves
of bitter cold and snow
caused a larger influx
of northerners than is
usually the case.
No one records annual
numbers on winter visi-
tors. But, roughly 17,000
call Englewood their per-
manent home. Season,
generally extending from
Dec. 1 through Easter


weekend, has a dramatic
effect on the community.
Some business owners
have estimated revenues
increased up to three
times this past season
over non-season. Using
those numbers, it can
be argued Englewood
saw its population swell
to between 35,000 and
50,000 people this past
winter even though
that reasoning could be
skewed since snowbirds
tend to spend more per
person than year-round
residents.
Sensing a need for
better data, Ed Hill,
executive director
of Englewood Beach
Chamber of Commerce,
said he intends to incor-
porate questions con-
cerning season's impact
in a business survey.
Meanwhile, those
who rely on jobs in
Englewood for their
livelihood are impacted
by the seasons more than
most.
"Season is crazy,"
said Charli Starks, a


server atVino Loco Wine
and Gourmet on West
Dearborn Street. "I love
living vicariously through
the people I meet."
She works long hours,
six days a week in a cycle
she says is work, sleep,
recover, work, but she
likes it. "It's exciting."
However, it is hard on
her feet. "I have spent a
ton of money trying to
find the right shoes."
During the offseason
Starks plans find to
part-time work, as her
hours are reduced,
including working at her
brother-in-law's kayaking
business and caring for
residences that north-
erners have left behind
for the summer.
Those sentiments are
echoed by Ashley Brown,
a server at Farlow's on
the Water on South
McCall Road who said
she likes the season/
non-season lifestyle.
She works long, hard
hours during season but
loves the free time which
non-season permits.


"Tips have been really
good this year," she said;
"but I love spending
time with family during
off-season."
Peggy Rice at Gulf View
Grill on Manasota Key
has been in the business
for more than 30 years.
She, too, relies heavily
on the tips, but broke an
ankle at the beginning of
February putting her out
of work for five weeks
and highlighting yet
another issue for those
who rely on seasonal
employment: the lack of
medical insurance.
"Everyone faces a
challenge when it comes
to insurance," she said.
Like Starks, Rice said she
has learned to "put back"
some money to help get
by during non-season.
She, too, plans to find
odd jobs this summer.
"I love the energy and
seeing the people; but,
I love off-season, too,"
Rice said. "We get to
enjoy paradise now. It's
when we get our town
back."


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


More ADA
work at parks
Charlotte County
Community Services
announced construction
will start June 9 and go
through Aug. 2 for ADA
accessibility improve-
ments at several county
park locations, including
Ann Dever Memorial
Regional Park, Harold
Avenue Park, the Port
Charlotte Public Library,
G.C. Herring Park and
the Tringali Recreation
Center. These parks and
libraries will remain
open during this period
for improvements; there
will be ongoing construc-
tion activity near conces-
sion stands, walkways,
parking lots and ramps
for accessibility improve-
ments. Activities in these
areas will not be closed,
but will be limited to

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Sun Newspapers
CUSTOMER SERVICE POLICY
Delivery should be expected prior
to 6 a.m. Monday through Saturday
and 6:30 a.m. Sunday. Customer
Service hours: 6 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday- Friday; Saturday and
Sunday 7a.m. to noon. To subscribe
or to report any problems with your
service, please call 941-206-1300 or
toll-free at 877-818-6204. You may
visit our office at: 23170 Harborview
Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980.


alternate routes and
entrances.

Golf tourney
to benefit Octagon
The Punta Gorda
Chamber of Commerce
and St. Andrews South
Golf Club will hold a
Summer Safari Golf
Scramble at 7:30 a.m.
June 14 at the club, 1901
Deborah Drive, Punta
Gorda. Registration and
a continental breakfast
will begin at 7:30 a.m.,
followed by a shotgun
start at 8:30 a.m. Lunch
will begin at 1 p.m.
Prizes will be awarded
at this time for closest
to the pin, the longest
drive, hole-in-one and
other contests. The $75
registration cost includes
the green fees, a cart, the
continental breakfast,
lunch and prizes.
Registration and
payment must be
completed by June 12.
This event is limited
to 100 players, and is
processed on a first-
come, first-served basis.
Proceeds will benefit
the Octagon Wildlife
Sanctuary. For more
information, call Sue at
941-639-5261, ext. 3.

Band to perform
on train dock
Bug Tussle Ramblers
Band will perform a free
concert from 2 p.m. to
4 p.m. June 14 at the
Punta Gorda Historical
Society's historic train
dock, 1009 Taylor Road,
Punta Gorda. Bring a
chair, sit back and enjoy
the music. The Depot
Museum and Mall will


be open. Refreshments
will be available. For
more information, call
941-639-6774.

Antique dealers
at market
The Farmers Market
will play host to various
antique dealers from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. June 8
at the History Park, 501
Shreve St., Punta Gorda.
In addition to the regular
vendors, antique dealers
also will be on-site. For
more information, call
941-380-6814.

Outdoor flea
market set
The Punta Gorda
Historical Society will
hold an Outdoor Flea
Market from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. June 21 at the
Historic Train Depot
Antique & Collectibles
Mall, 1009 Taylor Road,
Punta Gorda. This is a
great opportunity to
reserve a free space
and sell your wares, or
to shop for treasures.
The Museum and
Antique Mall will be
open. Refreshments
will be available. For
more information, call
941-639-6774.

Parkside fest
needs sponsors,
vendors
Team Parkside, a
501(c) (3) nonprofit
dedicated to revi-
talizing the original
neighborhoods of Port
Charlotte, currently is
seeking sponsors and
vendors for its signature
fundraising event, the


Parkside Fall Festival,
to be held from 11 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Nov. 8 in the
common area behind the
Promenades Mall, in the
Parkside area of town.
Now in its third year,
the festival celebrates
community spirit in the
heart of Port Charlotte,
and helps to raise funds
for operating expenses
for Team Parkside for the
upcoming year.
This year's theme is
"A Salute to Veterans."
Veterans will get free
admission with military
ID or the proper designa-
tion on their driver's li-
cense. The Port Charlotte
High School NJROTC
will present the colors,
and other area veterans
organizations also are
encouraged to partici-
pate. Expect a full day of
musical entertainment
provided by local bands,
such as The Crashers and
Banjo Bash.
Team Parkside is
currently seeking
sponsors for the event.
Specific sponsorships are
available as well, such as
the Children's Area and
the Veterans Gate. Vendors
also are needed. For-profit
and nonprofit organiza-
tions and businesses are
welcome. A 10-by-10-foot
space costs $50. Food
vendor spaces will be
allocated on a first-come,
first-served basis for their
specialty. Vendor and
sponsorship applications
are available by email. For
more information about
the festival, sponsorship
and vendor opportuni-
ties, call Pat Garriton at
941-661-7994, or email
teamparksidecc@gmail.
com.


- Notice to Calendar Event Submitters -


The Sun revised the calendar events we publish in
the paper and display online. All events must be entered
by the person submitting them through our website.
It's easy. Go to www.yoursun.com, select an edition and
click on the "Community Calendar"link on the left. Click
"Submit Event"and fill out the appropriate information.
The"Print edition text" area of the form is for
information intended for the print edition of the
paper. Information outside of the "Print edition text"
area will appear online only. Please don't repeat the
"Event Title; as that will be included automatically.
We will print a maximum of four lines per event (the
Event Title plus 120 additional characters, to be included
in the "Print edition text"field, up to three lines deep)
at no cost to the event submitter. Your contact number
must be included in these 120 characters.
You may, however, purchase additional space for $10
per day, per event, per community edition. Simply choose
"Paid Listing"on the Submit Event page. All paid listings
will run in the location designated for the event type.


If you do not have the ability to enter your events via our
website, we can type them in on your behalf at the rate of
$5 per event, per community edition, but this fee does not
guarantee your event will make the printed version. Please
call 941-206-1180 from 9 a.m.-4p.m. weekdays to make a
payment or to have us enter your event.
The Sun reserves the right to exclude any submitted
event that does not meet our specifications or that
requires excessive editing. There is no expressed or
implied guarantee that any free listing will be included
in any event calendar or run in any specific location.
This is on a first-come, first-served basis. Be sure to
review the "Important Tips"on the Submit Event page
to help ensure you get the most information in without
exceeding the line limit.
Remember to save the confirmation email you receive
after submitting each event. If you made an error or
the event gets canceled, simply click on the "Withdraw
submission"noted at the bottom of that email, follow the
provided instruction and then resubmit the event.


PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Featured Event
Incredibly Bad B Movie, Monday, June 2,6 p.m., at the
Mid-County Regional Library, 2050 Forrest Nelson Blvd., PC. Free
screening of the"Brain that Wouldn't Die."Free pizza while supplies last.
For info, call 941-613-3166.


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


GOVERNMENT

0 TODAY
LDR/Unified Land,
Development Code (ULDC) Roundtable
meeting, 2 p.m., 18500 Murdock Circle,
Bldg. B, Room 106-B, PC. 764-4909.

0 EVENTS

0 TODAY

Easy Does It Club, offers AA
and Alanon meetings daily from
7:30 am-9 pm, 23312 Harbor Ave., PC.
Call 941-624-0110.
Deep Creek Elks 2763,
Dinner 5-8 pm, AYCE fried fish, prime
rib and more; music with Heart & Soul
6:30-9:30 pm.
Port Charlotte Elks, Lunch
11 am-2 pm; Dinner 5 to 8 pm, full
menu and specials. AYCE fish fry.
Karaoke 6 to 9 pm with Breeze.
Punta Gorda Elks, Lunch
11 am-2 pm; Dinner 5-8 pm; Music by
Geoff Schmit (TaT 2) 6:30-10:30 pm;
Tiki open 2 pm @ 25538 Shore, PG.
637-2606 members/guests.
Bingo Friday, Friendliest
Bingo game in town. Quarter games
start at 10:15 am, Centennial Hall,
Cultural Center. 625-4175.
Mahjong, Join us for Mahjong
every Friday from 1-5 pm, Music
Room, Cultural Center.
75 cents an hour. 625-4175.
Crosstown Gypsy,
Fishermen's Village, Center Stage, Live
Music, 5-9 pm, 639-8721.
American Legion 103,
AUX Salisbury steak, fish/shrimp
dinner 5:30-7 pm; music TBA, 2101
Taylor Road. 639-6337.
Friday Night Dance,
7 pm, a variety of local entertainers
for your enjoyment. $7. Cultural
Center, 625-4175.

U SATURDAY

Easy Does It Club, offers AA
and Alanon meetings daily from
7:30 am-9 pm, 23312 Harbor Ave., PC.
Call 941-624-0110.
PG Farmers Market,
8 am-noon, Taylor Street and Olympia
Avenue. 391-4856. Fresh veggies,
fish, pasta, cheese, pickles, citrus and
much more.
Acme Bicycle Ride, 8 am@
615 Cross St., PG. Free, adults, helmet
required, three levels. 941-639-2263.
Mental Heath First Aid,
8 am-4 pm, Bayfront Health Punta
Gorda, Medical Plaza, 713 E.
Marion Ave. $25 includes manual.
Registration required. 637-2497.
Deep Creek Elks 2763,
Wings and dogs 12-2 pm; Dinner
5-8 pm, filet, crab cakes and more;
music with One Love from
6:30-9:30 pm.
Punta Gorda Elks, Lunch
11 am-2 pm; Dinner 5-8 pm; Music
by Tim & Roseanne 6:30-10:30 pm;
Queen of Hearts 6 pm; Tiki, 2 pm @
25538 Shore, PG. 637-2606 members/
guests.
Bingo Saturday, Friendliest
Bingo game in town. Quarter games
start at 10:15 am, Cultural Center.
625-4175.
American Legion 103,
noon-3 pm, Veterans Appreciation
Day, 2101 Taylor Road. 639-6337.
Ashtanga Yoga, The
Tristhana Method of Ashtanga Yoga,
A Master Class, 1-3:30 pm, $40,
941-505-9642.


Kids' Karaoke, at Harborwalk
Scoops & Bites, free event for kids of
all ages. 3-5 pm. 505-8880.
Reconnections Band,
Live Music, Fishermen's Village, Center
Stage, 5-9 pm, 639-8721.

* SUNDAY

Cardiac Bicycle Ride, Join
us for a 40-mile no drop 13 to
15 mph ride. Call Bill 941-740-2257
for start location.
Farmers Market, History
Park Farmers Market open 9 am-
I pm, 501 Shreve St., between
Virginia Avenue and Henry Street.
941-380-6814.
Punta Gorda Elks, Bar open
noon; Wings and Rings 2-5 pm; Tiki
bar open I1pm; Music by Island Vibe @
25538 Shore, PG. 637-2606 members/
guests.
Garden Tour, at History
Park, 501 Shreve St., PG, I pm, $5
suggested donation; Q&A. 380-6814.
American Legion 103,
Dart League, Ipm. $3/round. Join us
for a fun afternoon! 2101 Taylor Road,
PG. 639-6337.

* MONDAY

Life Port Free Camp,
now through June 6, 390 Flamingo
Blvd., PC, 7am- 6:30 pm, grades K-6,
941-815-8256. www.tinyurl.com/
LPCamp2014.
Deep Creek Elks 2763,
Lunch with Amy 11 am-2:30 pm.
Punta Gorda Elks, Light
Lunch 11 am-2 pm; Chicken Night
4:30-7:30 pm; Tiki 4 pm; Karaoke
w/Billy G., 6:30-9:30 pm @ 25538
Shore, PG. 637-2606 members/
guests.
Fun With Music, An
afternoon of music, dancing and
fun! 1 pm, Centennial Hall, Cultural
Center. $2. 625-4175.
Yogi Runners, The Yoga
Sanctuary, Mondays through
July 7, 5:45 pm: Run 7pm: Yoga,
$99, 941-505-9642.
Charlotte Democrats,
7 pm, 4300 Kings Hwy., No. 402, PC.
942-258-3542.

U TUESDAY

Charlotte Carvers, wood-
carving and burming, Punta Gorda
Boat Club, W. Retta Boulevard, 8
am-noon. Call Bob 391-5064 or
stop in.
Deep Creek Elks 2763,
Lunch with Diane 11 am-2:30 pm;
Dinner 5-8 pm, AYCE pasta, pizza
and more; Karaoke with Spot Light
6:30-9:30 pm.
Meet the Author, Sally
Simon at the library to sell and sign
copies of her books, 10am-1 pm @
424 W. Henry St. 833-5460.
Bingo Mania, 11 am-
1 pm, 20225 Kenilworth Blvd., PC.
Elks event benefits CC Homeless
Coalition. New prizes and games.
Port Charlotte Elks,
Lunch 11am-2 pm; Dinner 5-7pm,
full menu; Bingo 11 am-1 pm.
Punta Gorda Elks, Lunch
11 am-2 pm (in bar); LBOD Meeting
6 pm; Lodge meeting 7pm @ 25538
Shore, PG. 637-2060 members/
guests.
American Legion 103,
Bar Bingo 6 pm; 100 percent
payout on coverall! Canned goods
get free cards!! Fun times for good
cause! 2101 Taylor Road, PG. Info:


SUN NEWSPAPERS
- Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulation
Chairman...........Derek Dunn-Rankin.......941-206- 1001
Publisher...........David Dunn-Rankin.......941-206-1003
Executive Editor........Chris Porter...........941-206-1134
Advertising Director......Leslee Peth...........941-205-6400
Circulation Director...... MarkYero............941-206-1300
Arcadian Editor........Susan E. Hoffman........863-494-0300
Arcadian Publisher......Joe Gallimore..........863-494-0300
Charlotte Sun Editor......Rusty Pray...........941-206-1168
North Port Sun Publisher .......... Steve Sachkar.........941-429-3001
North Port Sun Editor ................ Lorraine Schneeberger ................ 941-429-3003
Englewood Sun Publisher ......... Carol Y. Moore.........941-681-3031
Englewood Sun Editor ............... Clinton Burton.........941-681-3000
_mtw W rC r tI N EWS It%


CONTACT US WITH YOUR NEWS: Email Charlotte Sun Editor Rusty Pray at rpray@sun-herald.com, or call 941-206-1168, or email Deputy Charlotte Editor Garry Overbey at overbey@sun-herald.com or call 941-206-1143. Fax to
941-629-2085. On Saturdays, contact Assistant Charlotte Editor Marion Putman at mputman@sun-herald.com or 941-206-1183, or the newsroom at 941-206- 1100. On Sundays, contact Garry Overbey or call the newsroom. Circu-
lation director MarkYero, 941-206-1317. Business news email business@sun-herald.com or call 941-206-1121. Consumer advocacy email dmorris@sun-herald.com or call 941-206-1114. Obituaries call 941-206-1028 or email
obituaries@sunletter.com. Religion/church news or events mputman@sun-herald.com. Editorial letters email letters@sun-herald.com or write: Letter to the Editor, c/o Charlotte Sun, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL
33980. Puzzles 941-206-1128. Classified ads 866-463-1638. Subscriptions For missed papers, or to put your paper on hold, call 941-206-1300. Display advertising 941-206-1214

The SUN (USPS743170) is published daily at Sun Coast Media Group, Inc., 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980-2100. Periodicals postage paid at Punta Gorda, FL. Postmaster: Please send address changes to the SUN, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, Florida 33980-2100.


OurTown Page 2 C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014





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The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014


SUMMER CAMPS
2014 Boys & Girls Clubs of
Charlotte County Summer
Programs (space is limited; call now
to register):
S7 a.m. to 6p.m.
Monday-Aug. 13 at the Family
Services Center, 21450 Gibralter
Drive, Port Charlotte. For kindergarten
(completed) through eighth grade.
Cost (nonrefundable): $50 per week
for one child; $40 per week per child,
if enrolling two or more children
(plus a $25 registration fee per child).
941-235-2472 or dpaige@bgcofcc.
org.
.8 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-June
25 at the Murdock Middle School
Teen Center, 17325 Mariner Way. For
rising sixth- through eighth-graders.
Cost (nonrefundable): $50 for the
18-day camp, plus a $25 registration
fee. 201-572-0381 or amcallister@
bgcofcc.org.
.8 a.m.-i p.m. Monday-June 25
at the Port Charlotte High School
Teen Center, 18200 Cochran Blvd.
(credit retrieval provided). Cost
(nonrefundable): $50 for the 18-day
camp, plus a $25 registration fee.
941-258-8149 or jcook@bgcofcc.org.
7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Monday-Aug. 13 at Tiffany Square
Plaza, 2828 S. McCall Road, Engle-
wood. For kindergarten (completed)
through eighth grade. Cost (nonre-
fundable): $50 per week for one child;
$40 per week per child, if enrolling
two or more children (plus a $25
registration fee per child). 941-460-
6589 or cpierce@bgcofcc.org.
.8 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-June 25
at the L.A. Ainger Middle School
Teen Center, 245 Cougar Way,
Rotonda West. For rising sixth-
through eighth-graders. Cost
(nonrefundable): $50 for the 18-day
camp, plus a $25 registration fee.
941-276-1048 or mcarroll@bgcofcc.
org.
All these weekday programs offer
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a technology lab, field trips and much
more. Lunch and a snack are provided
daily. General info: 941-979-8379,
jpralle@bgcofcc.org or www.bgcofcc.
org.

Charlotte County FamilyfYMCA
programs:
Camp Dotzler: 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m.
weekdays, now-Aug. 14 at 22801
Bayshore Road, Charlotte Harbor. For
youth who have completed kinder-
garten through eighth grade. Activi-
ties include swimming, kayaking, field
trips, a climbing tower, and art and
humanities. Lunch and an afternoon
snack are included. Cost: Charlotte
County FamilyYMCA members, $170
per two-week session; nonmembers,
$200 per two-week session. 941-629-
2220.
Kiddie Kollege:
6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. weekdays,
now-Aug. 15 at four locations in
Port Charlotte, Punta Gorda and
North Port. For children who have
completed voluntary prekindergarten
and those entering kindergarten.
Activities include letter recognition,
number recognition, phonological
awareness and basic math skills,
Cost: Charlotte County FamilyYMCA
members, $100 per week; nonmem-
bers, $115 per week. 941-629-2220.
CIT Counselor In Training
programs: 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. week-
days, now-July 3 (Session A) and July
7-Aug. 14 (Session B) in Port Charlotte
and North Port. For youth who have
completed ninth through 10th grades.
CIT is a training program that prepares
youth to take on the role of a future
YMCA camp counselor. The ClTs will
be under the direction of a director,
and will work with different age
groups all summer. Free lunch and an
afternoon snack included. Cost: $175
per session. 941-629-2220.
Camp North Port: 6:30 a.m.-
6 p.m. weekdays, Tuesday-Aug. 15
at 5930 Sam Shapos Way, North
Port. For youth who have completed
kindergarten through eighth grade.
Focus on nature, character develop-
ment, arts and humanities, health,


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wellness and sports; weekly camp
activities will include swimming,
kayaking and field trips to Camp
Dotzler. Cost: Charlotte County
FamilyYMCA members, $85 per
week; nonmembers, $100 per week.
941-429-2269.
Sailing Camp: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
June 6-Aug. 15 at the Bayfront Center
YMCA, 750 W. Retta Esplanade, Punta
Gorda. For youth ages 8 through 16.
Campers will be introduced to water
safety and the rules of navigation,
and will be instructed in a "lifetime"
skill that promotes self-confidence
and responsibility while sailing on
Charlotte Harbor. Cost: Charlotte
County Family YMCA members, $140
per week; nonmembers, $160 per
week. 941-347-8855.
Tennis Camp:
10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. (full day) or
10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. (half-day)
June 9-July 31 at the Punta Gorda
Club YMCA, 2905 Tamiami Trail. For
children/youth ages 5and older.
Tennis Pro Roberto and his two
assistants will teach campers how
to play tennis or improve their skills.
Cost: Charlotte County FamilyYMCA
members, $55 per week (half-day) or
$115 per week (full day); nonmem-
bers, $75 per week (half-day) or $135
per week (full day). 941-505-0999.
Soccer Clinics: 9:30-l0 a.m.
(ages 5-7) or 10:15-11 a.m. (ages
8-10) Tuesdays and Thursdays,
June 10-Aug. 14 at Camp Dotzler,
22801 Bayshore Road, Charlotte
Harbor. For children ages: 5 through
10. Campers will learn the basic
skills of soccer, including dribbling,
ball control, balance and shooting
- NOT for advanced players. Cost:
$20 for four lessons (two weeks).
941-629-9622.
Swim Camp: 1-5 p.m. weekdays
June 16-20, July 14-18, and Aug. 4-8
at the North Port YMCA, 5930 Sam
Shapos Way. Ages: children must
be able to swim the length of the
pool to participate. Swimmers will
spend a week learning swim strokes,
technique and dry-land conditioning,
all while having fun. Cost: Charlotte
County Family YMCA members, $60
per week; nonmembers, $80 per
week. 941-429-2269.
Kayaking Camp: 9 a.m.-noon
June 30-July 3 at the North Port
YMCA, 5930 Sam Shapos Way. For
youth ages 8 through 16. Campers
will learn water safety, open water
kayaking, first aid, observation and
exploration. Cost: Charlotte County
FamilyYMCA members, $5 per
week; nonmembers, $75 per week.
941-629-9622.

Other camps:
Summer Camp at Life Port
Church, 390 Flamingo Blvd., Port
Charlotte: 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Monday-
June 6. For children in kindergarten
through fifth grade. Includes crafts,
games, snacks and drinks and more.
Art lessons and visit from the Creation
Museum in Arcadia are just a few
of the things planned. Parents are
asked to provide students with a
lunch. Free; register, www.tinyurl.
com/LPCamp2014, or at the church.
Info, Cheryl Reber, 941-815-8256 or
941-255-5544, Ext. 251.


Eco-Day Camp: 8 a.m.-noon
Monday-June 6 at the Charlotte
Harbor Environmental Center's
Alligator Creek Preserve office, 10941
Burnt Store Road, Punta Gorda.
Camp involves children in a variety of
outdoor and environmental activities,
including wading, hiking, taking a
boat trip and more, as they learn
about Florida wildlife, habitats and
ecology. Designed for children leaving
second grade to entering eighth
grade. Cost: $60. Children attending
must dress for the outdoors- jeans,
sneakers (no sandals or open-
toed shoes), hat and T-shirt; they
should bring an extra pair of shoes,
sunscreen, bug spray and a bagged
lunch. 941-575-5435.
"Symphony Kids" Summer
Music Camp: 8:30 a.m.-i2:30 p.m.
Monday-June 13 at Liberty Elemen-
tary School, 370 Atwater St., Port
Charlotte. Students entering grades
one through 12 will combine fun and
learning at the Charlotte Symphony
Orchestra's all-new summer camp.
Includes instrument instruction,
ensemble, chorus, rhythm and
movement, music and technology,
and guest performers demonstrating
musical culture from around the
world. Cost: $125; $120 for siblings.
- tuition assistance is available.
T-shirts and healthy snacks are
included. Registration forms, www.
charlottesymphony.com or 941-205-
5996.
Junior Chef Summer Cooking
Camp: 9 a.m.-i p.m. Tuesdays and
Thursdays, Tuesday-June 26 at home
of instructor Alice White, 3597 Froude
St., North Port. For children entering
grades three through eight. Campers
will discover and prepare the foods
of four countries- Mexico, France,
Italy and China. Junior Chefs will
prepare breakfast and lunch recipes
while learning about the country's
culinary history. Cost: $60 per weekly
session; includes all food, materials
and supplies. Weekly classes are
limited to 10 participants. A portion
of the camp's proceeds will benefit
People forTrees Inc., a 501 (c)(3)
nonprofit native tree advocacy group
since 1997. Info/register, 941-426-
9752 or treeladyl12001@yahoo.com.
Carroll Swayze's 16th Annual
Art Adventure Camp: various
sessions, to take place at the Carroll
Swayze Studio, 2373 Donovan Road,
Englewood. Session 1: 9 a.m.-12:30
p.m. Tuesday-June 6; Session 2:
1:30-5 p.m. Tuesday-June 6; Session
3:9 a.m.-i2:30 p.m. June 24-27;
Session 4:1:30-5 p.m. June 24-27.
Mixed ages, 5 through 14 (4-year-
olds OK with an older sibling).
Limited availability- no more than
10-12 students per session. Working
in a real artist's studio, each child
will receive individual instruction
in a wide variety of mediums, from
painting and print-making to sculp-
ture and fine crafts. Each student will
take home beautiful original art every
day. Cost: $100 per child, per session,
plus one package of plain white
T-shirts in your child's size; includes
materials and a snack. Parents who
would like their children to stay for
both the morning and afternoon
sessions are encouraged to send a
lunch. Parents may stay with their
children if they wish. Carroll Swayze,
941-266-6434, SwayzeArt@msn.com
or www.carrollswayze.com.
.2014 Sabal Trace Junior Golf
Camp: 9-11 a.m. various dates at
Sabal Trace Golf& Country Club,
5456 Greenwood Ave., North Port.
Sessions will be with instructor Peggy
Kirsch, and include: Wednesday
- introduction to golf fundamen-
tals, etiquette and rules; June 11
- putting and chipping; June 13
- putting and pitching; June 18-


short irons; June 20- long irons
and hybrids; June 25- drivers and
tee shots; and June 28- course
management and course instruction.
Cost: $15 per student, per session; or
$90 for the whole series. Info/sign up,
941-426-8240.
North Port Parks and
Recreation Division GMAC
Summer Camp: 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
weekdays, June 9-Aug. 15 (except
for July 4) at the George Mullen
Activity Center, 1602 Kramer Way. For
youth entering first through eighth
grades. Includes nature exploration,
hands-on science, sports, crafts,
swimming and team building, plus
a field trip each week. Campers will
be placed in age-appropriate groups,
in accordance with the established
counselor-to-camper ratios. Parents
looking for a longer camp day can
enroll their child in weekly Extended
Care, which provides care as early
as 7 a.m. and as late as 6 p.m., for
an additional fee. Cost: $70 per
week, per child (includes field trip
admission); $15 per week, per child
for Extended Care. Receive a 10
percent discount when you pay in
advance for 10 weeks of camp -
deadline, Sunday. Register/info
www.cityofnorthport.com, click on
"Parks and Recreation/GMAC Summer
Camp"; or at either the Morgan
Family Community Center, 6207 West
Price Blvd., or the Mullen Center. Info,
429-PARK (7275).
Exploring 4-H Day Camp:
9 a.m.-3 p.m. June 9-13 at the UF/
IFAS Charlotte County Extension
Service, 25550 Harborview Road,
Suite 3, Port Charlotte. Charlotte
County 4-H will play host. Campers
will explore 4-H activities in
gardening, wildlife, food preparation,
arts and crafts, animal care, dog
safety and much more. For elemen-
tary school-age youth. Cost for the
week: $25. Parents may stay or drop
children off. 941-764-4345 or pam.
phillippe@charlottefl.com.
Dance Arts Camp:
9 a.m.-4 p.m. June 9-13 at Studio
Seven Center for Creative Studies,
2509 Rio de Janeiro Ave., Deep Creek.
For ages 5and 6, and 7 through 10.
Includes daily classes in tap, jazz,
ballet and tumbling; arts and crafts;
movies; and special guest performers.
Cost: $140 per week. There will be a
$10 registration fee for camp enroll-
ment- good for all four weeks
of camps at Studio Seven (current
students, fee already paid with Spring
2014 enrollment). Camp tuition
must be paid in full by Monday to
reserve a place. No prorated fees, and
no refunds. Children should bring a
lunch. Camp details provided upon
enrollment. 941-764-0680 or info@
studiosevenpg.com.
Kids OnStage Summer Drama
Workshops: weekdays, June 9-21
(contact group for times) at the
Charlotte Performing Arts Center, 701
Carmalita St. (next to Charlotte High
School), Punta Gorda. Students in first
and second grades- Dolly's Kids -
will perform "Over the Meadow"; third
through sixth grades- Stars- will
perform the musical,"On the Radio";
seventh through 12th grades-Thes-
pians will perform the award-win-
ning Broadway musical,"Hairspray,
Jr'Participants will have"hands-on"
experiences in all facets of a theatrical
production: backstage, scenic design,
props, costumes, music, choreography,
sound and lights, as well as performing
onstage. Performances of all three
productions, which are open to the
public, will be at 7 p.m. June 20,
and at 2 p.m. June 21 at CPAC. Cost:
$185 before June 2; afterward, $210
- there is a $25 discount for each
additional child per family. Register/
info, 941-255-1022.
Funtastic Art Camp:
9 a.m.-i p.m. weekdays, June
9-Aug. 8 at the North Port Art Center,
5950 Sam Shapos Way. For youth
ages 6 through 14. Two art classes
daily; lunch provided. Cost: $80 per
week. 941-423-6460.
Active Art Youth Class:
1-3 p.m. June 9-Aug. 8 at the North
Port Art Center, 5950 Sam Shapos
Way. For youth ages 6through 14. Art
activities to build creative minds. Cost:
$35 per week. 941-423-6460.
Dance Technique Camp:
9 a.m.-4 p.m. June 16-20 at Studio
Seven Center for Creative Studies,
2509 Rio de Janeiro Ave., Deep Creek.
For ages 11 through 17. Includes daily
classes in tap, jazz, ballet, modern
and acro; also will include classes in


core strengthening, dance history,
funk, leaps and turns, and more. Cost:
$140 per week. There will be a $10
registration fee for camp enrollment
- good for all four weeks of camps
at Studio Seven (current students,
fee already paid with Spring 2014
enrollment). Camp tuition must be
paid in full by Monday to reserve
a place. No prorated fees, and no
refunds. Children should bring a
lunch. Camp details provided upon
enrollment. 941-764-0680 or info@
studiosevenpg.com.
Punta Gorda Elks Lodge 2606
is accepting Summer Camp Appli-
cations for July 6-July 12. Boys and
girls ages 9 through 13 are eligible
to participate. There is no cost to the
families. Applications are available at
the lodge, 25538 Shore Drive. Partici-
pation is limited to the first 80 camper
applications. Joe Campbell, exalted
ruler, 941-637-2606, Ext. 405.
Stage and Screen Camp:
9 a.m.-4 p.m. July 7-11 at Studio
Seven Center for Creative Studies,
2509 Rio de Janeiro Ave., Deep Creek.
For ages 7 and older. Students will
learn all about life onstage and on
screen, as they will be introduced
to performance terminology and
technique, audition tips and tricks,
musical theatre choreography, vocal
performance and much more. Cost:
$140 per week. There will be a $10
registration fee for camp enrollment
- good for all four weeks of camps
at Studio Seven (current students,
fee already paid with Spring 2014
enrollment). Camp tuition must be
paid in full by Monday to reserve
a place. No prorated fees, and no
refunds. Children should bring a
lunch. Camp details provided upon
enrollment. 941-764-0680 or info@
studiosevenpg.com.
Summer Youth Running
Camp: 7:30-11 a.m. Mondays and
Tuesdays (meet at South County
Regional Park, 670 Cooper St., Punta
Gorda), and 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays
(meet at The Foot Landing, 117
Herald Court, Punta Gorda) July
7-30. Sponsored by New Balance.
For age groups 10-12 and 13-15. All
abilities welcome. Preregistration
required. Cost: early registration, $99;
after June 15, $119. To include The
Foot Landing Pub Run. Info/register,
941-347-7751.
Kids' Summer Spec-
trum: 9 a.m.-i2:30 p.m. and
1:30-5 p.m. weekdays, July14-18 and
July 21-25 at State College of Florida,
Manatee-Sarasota in South Venice,
8000 S. Tamiami Trail. For youth ages
11 through 15. Provided by Corporate
and Community Development. Will
include puppetry, jewelry design,
safari, clay creations, science,
junior journalism, gross chemistry,
cooking and more. Hands-on
science, technology, engineering
and mathematics (STEM) classes-
including clay animation, video game
design, stop-motion animation and
creative robotics also are offered
at the campus. www.scftedu/kids or
941-408-1412.
SoYou Want tobe a Rock
Star Camp: 9 a.m.-4 p.m. July 21-25
at Studio Seven Center for Creative
Studies, 2509 Rio de Janeiro Ave.,
Deep Creek. For ages 7 and older.
Music professionals from around
the country will work with students
on their instrument of choice, their
stage performance, song-writing
techniques and more. The camp
will conclude with a Friday night
performance at the Punta Gorda
Woman's Club. Cost: $175 per week.
There will be a $10 registration fee
for camp enrollment- good for
all four weeks of camps at Studio
Seven (current students, fee already
paid with Spring 2014 enrollment).
Camp tuition must be paid in full
by Monday to reserve a place.
No prorated fees, and no refunds.
Children should bring a lunch. Camp
details provided upon enrollment.
941-764-0680 or info@studiosev-
enpg.com.
Golf & Tennis Junior Camp:
8:30 am.-i p.m. July 22-24 at
Heron Creek Golf& Country Club,
5301 Heron Creek Blvd. (off Sumter
Boulevard), North Port. For boys and
girls ages 8 through 14. Professional
golf and tennis instructors; lunch
provided daily; learn skill techniques,
basic rules and etiquette of golf and
tennis. Cost: $12S for all three days;
register at Heron Creek by July 15.
941 -423-6955.


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The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014


LOCALIREGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page5


I OBITUARIES

CHARLOTTE


Dominick J.
Alfano
Dominick J. Alfano, 70, of
Port Charlotte, Fla., passed
away Tuesday, May 27,
2014. Arrangements are
by Kays-Ponger & Uselton
Funeral Homes and
Cremation Services.

Robert William
Hansen
Robert William Hansen,
90, of Port Charlotte, Fla.,
died Sunday, May 25,
2014. Arrangements are by
Roberson Funeral Home &
Crematory, Port Charlotte
Chapel.

Angela Marie
Luciano
Angela Marie Luciano,
58, died Friday, May 23,
2014, at Tidewell Hospice
in Port Charlotte, Fla.
She was born March 15,
1956, in Washington, D.C.,
the daughter of Rita (nee
Luciano) Bailey, and step-
daughter of Jerry Bailey.
Angela is survived by
three children, Regina
Brown of Germantown,
Md., J. Scott (Megan)
Wigle Jr. of Germantown,
and Rita (David) Guevara
of Brentwood, N.Y; and
three grandchildren.
Services will be held at
4 p.m. Saturday, May 31,
2014, at Pilgrim United
Church in Port Charlotte.
Angela may be remem-
bered at www.icscremation
andfunerals.com.
Arrangements are
by ICS Cremation and
Funerals Inc.

Lester L.
Rainey Sr.
Lester L. Rainey Sr. of
Port Charlotte, Fla., and
formerly of Rock Hill, S.C.,
died Tuesday,
May27,2014.
Mr. Rainey
served in the
U.S. Navy
during the Korean War as
a Radio Man. He worked
for J.P Stevens in Rock Hill
for over 40 years, in the
maintenance department.
Lester was a lifetime
member of the American
Legion andVFW in Rock
Hill. He loved the outdoors,
hunting and fishing.
Lester is survived by his
five children, Shelli Rainey
of Port Charlotte, Deborah
S. Hayes of Fort Lawn, S.C.,
Judy S. Barrett ofVanWyck,
S.C., Lester Rainey Jr. of
Port Charlotte, and Michael
E Sims of Catawba, S.C.;
four grandchildren; and
nine great-grandchildren.
The Funeral and Burial
will be in Rock Hill. You
may share a memory or
express condolences to the
family at www.englewood
fh.com.
Arrangements are by
Englewood Community
Funeral Home and
Cremation Service,
Englewood, Fla.

David Carl Taylor
David Carl Taylor, 65,
of Punta Gorda, Fla., died
Tuesday May 27, 2014.
Arrangements are by
Roberson Funeral Home,
Punta Gorda Chapel.

ENGLEWOOD


Leon Bryant
Abernathy
Leon Bryant Abernathy
60, passed away Tuesday
May 27, 2014, in
Englewood, Fla.
He was born July 13,
1953, in Maryland.
Leon grew up in
NorthernVirginia, and


graduated fromVirginia
Military Institute in 1974
with a degree in civil
engineering. He worked
for a few years inVirginia,
and relocated to Florida
in 1976. He retired from
Pinellas County, Fla., and
moved to Englewood in
2007.
Leon is survived by his
mother, Lillian Abernathy;


Richard Tyler Murray
Richard "Tyler" Murray, 84, of RotondaWest, Fla., died on his 28th wedding
anniversary, Saturday, May 24, 2014.
He was born Feb. 21, 1930, in Butler, Pa., the son of Hazel Shrake Murray and
George W Murray Sr.
Tyler graduated from Butler High School in 1948, and served in the
U.S. Navy from 1948 to 1952. Part of his service was aboard the USS
Wasp CV18. Following the Navy, he was hired into Armco (America
Rolling Mill Company), which later became A-K Steel. He began in
the Strip Shears Department, and retired in 1990 as superintendent of
processing maintenance.
Tyler served as president of the Armco Management Club from
1979 to 1980. A member of the Armco Country Club, he served on the
board, and he was an avid golfer, known for his strict adherence to the
rules. He was remarkable for his sense of fairness and honesty in golf
and in life. Tyler arranged annual golfing trips to Myrtle Beach, S.C., for
20 years, for about 20 fellow golfers.
A history buff who had a special interest in the Civil War, he visited many different
battlefields over the years. To accompany him was to enjoy your own private tour
guide. Tyler knew all of the generals and their strategies from pouring over his many
books and maps.
He enjoyed hiking, and did several weeklong hikes on the Appalachian Trail, as
well as hiking other shorter trails. Tyler loved dancing, and he and his wife Tammee
were members of the Butler Two-Steppers Club for many years. Biking was another
of his favorite activities, and in 2002, at the age of 72, he completed a 150-mile, two-
day bike ride from Butler to Meadville, Pa., then to Erie, Pa., to raise money for MS.
Tyler was a proud member of Argyle Lodge 2540 in Chicora, Pa., and served as
master in 1961. At the time of his death, he was the oldest living past master of his
lodge. In RotondaWest, he drove for the NeighborhoodWatch for several years, and
was a member of American Legion Post 113.
He was a cancer survivor for 32 years, having fought three battles with the disease
in his lifetime. Tyler gifted his body for anatomical scientific study and medical
research and education. He hoped that he might benefit future generations in some
small way Tyler loved poetry, and will be well-remembered by his friends for his
recitations by memory of "The Cremation of Sam McGee" by Robert Service. On his
80th birthday, he delighted party-goers with a full rendition.
He is survived by his loving wife, Tamara Zoe "Tammee" Murray; beloved daugh-
ters, Sherry AnnWorstell of Marysville, Ohio, and Tracy Lynn Hack and Elaine Marie
Foguth of Butler; stepdaughter, Melissa Zoe Barlow of Annville, Pa.; stepson, Brady
Garth Hood of Shrewsbury, Pa.; 14 grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; sister-
in-law, Marian Murray of Butler; three nieces; and a nephew. Tyler was preceded in
death by his brother, George W Murray
I Heartfelt gratitude to Tidewell Hospice and all who helped him to make a
smooth, peaceful passage.I
A quote from one of his favorite poems had personal meaning in his last months:
"Oh Captain, my Captain, our fearful trip is done..."
Farewell to an extraordinary human being, husband, father, grandfather and
friend.

is sister, Diane (Charles)


his sister, Diane (Charles)
Deily; three nephews,
Curtis (Julie), Morgan
(Christine) and Casey
Deily; one great-nephew
(Nicholas); three great-niec-
es, Alyssa, Madyson and
Allyson; as well as his Aunt
Wanda and Uncle Jack;
his Aunt Peggy; many
cousins; and his cousin
he was especially close to,
Mark (Sallie) Abernathy of
El Jobean, Fla., who was
essentially his brother. He
was preceded in death by
all of his grandparents; his
father, Milton Abernathy;
his Uncle Winston and
Aunt Bonnie; his Uncle
Bobby and Aunt Martha;
and his cousins, Larry and
Denise.
A service and cele-
bration of his life will be
held at 2 p.m. Saturday,
May 31, 2014, at Son-Light
Community Church,
4694 Tamiami Trail, Port
Charlotte, FL 33980. In
lieu of flowers, the family
suggests donations to
Bayside Operation, 43550
Riverpoint Drive, Leesburg,
VA 20176- a charityfor
recuperating wounded
veterans and their families,
founded by his cousin,
Neal Zimmerman; or to
Son-Light Community
Church. You may express
your condolences to the
family at www.lemon
bayfh.com.
Arrangements are by
Lemon Bay Funeral Home
and Cremation Services,
Englewood.

Patricia Rae
McCadam Sargent
Patricia Rae McCadam
Sargent, 78, departed
Tuesday, May 20, 2014.
She was born Oct. 1,
1935, in Roxbury, NY.
She was a resident of
Olde Knox Commons
Nursing facility in
Huntersville, N.C. Patricia
was under the care of
Hospice and Palliative
Care of Lake Norman.
Patricia studied and
became a dental hygien-
ist for the NYS school
system. She went on to
work for several private
dental practices, until
her retirement. Patricia
and her husband Robert
Gregory Sargent were
residents of Brier Hill,
N.Y., for many years,
before retiring to Grove
City, Fla., in 1982, where
Robert passed away
Dec. 9, 2005.
Patricia and Robert
have three children,
daughters, Kathleen
Sargent (Theodore)


Elling of Charlotte, N.C.,
and Christine (longtime
boyfriend, John) Sargent
of Charlotte; and son,
Gregory (Carolyn) Sargent
of Dix Hills, N.Y; along with
grandchildren, Benjamin
and Daniel, and Nicole and
Caidin. She also is survived
by a brother, Stanley
(Beverly) McCadam of
Waterloo, Iowa; nephew
and nieces, Scott, Jennifer
and Holly, who are all
married with children; and
three stepsiblings, Jane
McCadam, Mary Martin
and Michael McCadam.
To our loving mother
who will be missed dearly
and forever loved:

0 God, Who has
commanded us to
honour our father
and mother have
compassion in thy
mercy, on the souls of
myfather and mother;
forgive them their sins,
and grant that I may
see them in the joy
of eternal brightness.
Through Christ our
Lord. Amen.


Margaret L.
Bennett
Margaret L. Bennett, 87,
of RotondaWest, Fla., died
Wednesday, May 28, 2014.
Arrangements are by
Englewood Community
Funeral Home Inc.,
with Private Crematory,
Englewood, Fla.

Eugene L. Cass

Eugene L. "Gene"
Cass, 88, of Venice, Fla.,
died Tuesday, May 27,
2014. Arrangements are
by Lemon Bay Funeral
Home & Cremation
Services, Englewood, Fla.

NORTH PORT

There were no deaths
reported in North Port
Thursday.

DESOTO

There were no deaths
reported in DeSoto
Thursday.


PHOTO PROVIDED BY MARTIN MANDEL


A wood carving of a little boy and his dog on Manasota Key is
getting a facelift thanks to local community leaders.


Manasota Key



landmark getting


a makeover


By MARTIN MANDEL
SPECIAL TO THE SUN
On the southeast
corner of the Emil R.
Swepston Bridge on
Beach Road in South
Manasota Key is a wood
carving of a small boy
with his dog. The land-
mark sculpture has seen
better days, but will soon
be getting a much-need-
ed facelift.
Originally the boy was
holding a fishing pole but
vandals kept removing it.
It has since been replaced
by an American flag
which has fared better
than the fishing pole.
This statue also has
no name or plaque on
it and the actual artist is
unknown. But with the
invaluable help of B.J.
Galberaith, a member
of the Charlotte County
Municipal Service Taxing
Unit and past president
of the South Manasota
Key Association, the
origin of this beautiful
cypress wood carving was
discovered.
It was a beautification
project of the South
Manasota Key Association
which was purchased
from John Davis of "Davis
Cypress" in Punta Gorda.
His full-time job was as a
Charlotte County deputy
sheriff. Originally he went
into a side business with
Tom Rhoads making
cypress clocks and tables.
Later he partnered with
Tom Penny of Canada,
who taught him how to
carve wood.
He had been creating
and merchandising
beautiful cypress and
cedar wood carvings
for 16 years prior to the
unveiling of "Little Boy
Fishing."
Davis is a past pres-
ident of the Fraternal
Order of Police. He retired
from the Sheriff's Office


after 37 years on the
job. In 2004, Hurricane
Charley leveled the store
and his shop in Punta
Gorda, which put an end
to this business.
The unveiling of the
"Little Boy Fishing"
on April 5, 2001, at the
Swepston Bridge was an
exciting event. The invit-
ed guests included Adam
Cummings, then-chair-
man of the Charlotte
County Commission,
then-county administra-
tor Jan Winters and many
other dignitaries. A re-
ception was held after the
unveiling which included
a tour of Manasota Key.
At present this beautiful
wood carving needs a
great deal of professional
attention to reinvigorate
and protect its finish.
Joan Dunham-Card,
president of the South
Manasota/Sandpiper Key
Association will monitor
this project under the
purview of the Manasota
Key Streets and Drainage
MSTU and help to bring
it to fruition.
Jacob Rhoads of Rhoads
Produce and Chainsaw
Art has volunteered to
use his skill to restore
this statue at minimal
cost. He is the son of
Tom Rhoads, who was
originally connected with
Davis, from whom the
statue was purchased.
He learned this art from
his father and is today a
skilled woodcarver who
uses mostly chainsaws to
produce bears, pelicans,
eagles, alligators and
myriad birds, fish and
other wild creatures from
cypress and cedar. You
can see his work at the lit-
tle red barn which houses
"Jacob Rhodes Produce
and Chainsaw Art" and
his outdoor workshop at
210 N. Indiana Ave., in
Englewood.


Words of Comfort LYC
Light always
follows darkness.
Anonymous






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William Joseph Kirkley
Retired U.S. Coast Guard Capt. William Joseph
Kirkley, 89, of Land O' Lakes, Fla., passed away
Friday, May 23, 2014.
He was born in Arlington, Va., and
moved to Land 0' Lakes from Punta
Gorda, Fla., in 2013.
He served proudly in the United
States Coast Guard, and retired as a
decorated Captain. In the late 1960s,
William was selected to be the United
Nations United States Coast Guard
liaison in NewYork City, N.Y From
1970 until retirement, he was an acting
JAG. He was presently a member of Our
Lady of the Rosary Catholic Church in
Land 0' Lakes, and previously was a
longtime member of Sacred Heart Catholic Church
in Punta Gorda. William was a member of the MOAA
(Charlotte Harbor Chapter), the Navy League of the
United States, and a board member of Burnt Store
Isles Country Club in Punta Gorda. William enjoyed
entertaining and opening up his home to family and
friends.
He is survived by his daughters, Patricia Ann (Ken
Brown) Kirkley of North Carolina, Susan Kirkley
Maffeo of Land 0' Lakes, and Nancy K. (Jeffrey)
Miller of Sarasota, Fla.; grandchild, Elizabeth (John
Mila) Maffeo; and great-grandchildren, Michael John
and Sophia Lorraine Mila. William was preceded
in death by his loving wife of 67 years, Frances M.
Kirkley; brothers, Richard Kirkley and George Kirkley
Webber Jr.; and sister, Mary Elizabeth Kirkley.
The family will receive friends from 6 p.m. to
8 p.m., with a wake service at 7 p.m., today, Friday,
May 30, 2014, at Loyless Funeral Home in Land 0'
Lakes. A funeral Mass will be celebrated at 11 a.m.
Saturday, May 31, 2014, at Our Lady of the Rosary
Catholic Church. William's final resting place will be
at Arlington National Cemetery. Words of comfort
maybe expressed at www.Loylessfuneralhome.com.
Arrangements are by Loyless Funeral Home, Land
O' Lakes.





OurTown Page 6


C www.sunnewspapers.net


LOCALIREGIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014


* 66ewtoays.egl.otce
an .moe ist,


3100


LEGAU


FICTITIOUS N



5/30/2014
NOTICE OF AC




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
Case No.: 14-1012-CA
Division:
Monica Ann Perreira,
Petitioner
and
Dale Thomas Perreira,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
DISSOLUTION OF MA
TO: Dale Thomas Perre
Last Known Addres
Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED
action for dissolution of
has been filed against
that you are required tc
copy of your written de
any, to it on Monica Ann
whose address is 2210
Rd. Port Charlotte, FL 3
or before 6/10/14, an
original with the clerk
Court at 350 E. Mar
Punta Gorda, FL 3395
service on Petitioner or
ately thereafter. If you f
so, a default may be
against you for th
demanded in the petit
Copies of all cou
ments in this case, i
orders, are available
Clerk of the Circuit
office. You may revie
documents upon requ
You must keep the
the Circuit Court's off
fied of your current
(You may file Notice
rent Address,
Supreme Court A
Family Law Form
Future papers in this
will be mailed to the
on record at the clerk
WARNING: Rule
Florida Family Law I
Procedure, requires
automatic disclosure
ments and informati(
ure to comply can i
sanctions, including d
or striking of pleading
Dated: 5/5/14
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
By: C.L.G.
Deputy Clerk
Publish: 05/0914, 05,
05/23/14, 0
339038 3037493
NOTICE 01

AUCTION


PROMPT WRECKER S
11139 TAMIAMI TI
PUNTA GORDA, FL 3
941-639-4000
AUCTION DATE 6/1
AT 10:00 AM
1987 MALL
VIN# 1U83MON26HC01
Publish: May 30, 2014
103614 3046183
NOTICE OF PUBLIC A
THE FOLLOWING
SHOPS Gives notice of
intent to sell pursuant t
tion 713.858 of the FL
satisfy any liens. Intere
ties may call the numi
below. Be advise that t
and or the Leinholder h
to a hearing prior to the
date of sale by filing
Clerk of Court. Owners/
er may recover vehicle
judicial proceedings by
bond as per FL ST 559.
proceeds will be dispel
the Clerk of Courts.
reserve the right to a
reject any and all bids.
PUBLIC AUCTION TO BE
MPM AUTO, INC. 1182
Trail #H, Port Charl
33953-3841, 941-&
commencing at 8:OOAI
24th day of JUNE 20
AUTO, INC. reserves th
accept or reject any anc
1997 CHEV $2273.4'
1GCHC33FXVFO1 9008
Publish: May 30, 2014
342460 3046171


I FORECLOSE



IN THE CIRCUIT COUR
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL
IN
CHARLOTrE COUNTY,
CASE NO. 100(
BAC HOME LOANS SERY
LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE I
LOANS SERVICING LP,
Plaintiff,
VS.
STEPHEN J. COHEN, El
Defendants
RE-NOTICE 01
FORECLOSURE S
NOTICE IS HEREBY GI
suant to a Final Judgmer
closure dated Decen


NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE


2011, and entered in Case No.
10002318CA, of the Circuit
Court of the Twentieth Judicial Cir-
cuit in and for CHARLOTTE Coun-
ty, Florida. BAC HOME LOANS
SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRY-
WIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING
LP (hereafter "Plaintiff"), is Plain-
tiff and STEPHEN J. COHEN;
MARGARET M. COHEN, are defen-
dants. I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash via the Inter-
net at www.charlotte.realfore-
close.com, at 11:00 a.m., on the
25 day of June, 2014, the follow-
ing described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment, to
wit:
LOT 20, BLOCK 587, OF
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION,
SECTION 41, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF,
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
5, PAGE 51A THRU 51K OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
If you are an individual with a
OF THE disability who needs an
CIRCUIT, accommodation in order to
participate in a court pro-
FLORIDA ceeding or other court ser-
vice, program, or activity, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain
assistance. Requests for
accommodations may be pre-
sented on this form, in anoth-
er written format, or orally.
N FOR Please complete the attached
,RRIAGE form and return it to jem-
ira bury@ca.cjis20.org as far in
ss advance as possible, but
preferably at least seven (7)
that an days before your scheduled
marriage court appearance or other
you and court activity. Upon request
o serve a by a qualified individual with a
fenses, if disability, this document will
i Perreira, be made available in an alter-
Hayworth nate format. If you need assis-
33952 on tance in completing this form
d file the due to your disability, or to
of this request this document in an
ion Ave., alternate format, please con-
50 before tact Jon Embury,
d Admin.Svc.Mgr., phone
fai itoedi-(941)637-2110, e-mail iem-
failtered bury@ca.cmis20.org.
e relief Dated this 27 day of May,
tion. 2014.
rt docu- Barbara Scott
including CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
n dat the BY K. Sandrock
t Court's As Deputy Clerk
ew these Any person claiming an inter-
iest. est in the surplus from the
Clerk of sale, if any, other than the
rice noti- property owner as of the date
address. of the Lis Pendens must file a
of Cur- claim within 60 days after the
Florida sale.
Approved Publish: 5/30/14 and 6/6/14
12.915.) 232598 3046233
lawsuit IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
address TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
Cs office. IN AND FOR
12.285, CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
Rules of CIVIL ACTION
certain CASE NO.: 08-2012-CA-003039
of docu- RESI WHOLE LOAN III LLC,
on. Fail- Plaintiff
result in vs.
dismissal KENNETH T. ANDERSEN, et al.
gs. Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF SALE
COURT Notice is hereby given that, pur-
suant to a Final Judgment dated
March 24, 2014, entered in Civil
/16/14, Case Number 08-2012-CA-
5/30/14 003039, in the Circuit Court for
Charlotte County, Florida, wherein
GREENWICH INVESTORS XLIII
F TRUST 2013-1 is the Plaintiff, and
KENNETH T. ANDERSEN, et al.,
are the Defendants, Charlotte
County Clerk of Court will sell the
property situated in Charlotte
County, Florida, described as:
SERVICE LOTS 35 AND 36, BLOCK 109
RAIL OF HARBOUR HEIGHTS, SEC-
33955 TION 4, PART 2, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS
7/14 RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3,
PAGE 32, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CHARLOTTE
0488 COUNTY, FLORIDA.
at public sale, to the highest bid-
der, for cash, at at www.char-
lotte.realforeclose.com at 11:00
,UCTION: AM, on the 25 day of September,
REPAIR 2014. Any person claiming an
lien and interest in the surplus from the
o subsec- sale, if any, other than the prop-
L. ST., to erty owner as of the date of the
sted par- its pendens must file a claim with-
ber listed in 60 days after the sale.
the owner Dated: Aril 8. 2014
as a right Barbara T. Scott
secluded CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
with the By: J. Miles
/Leinhold- If you are a person with a disabili-
e without ty who needs any accommoda-
posting a tion in order to participate in this
.917. Net proceeding, you are entitled, at
nsed with no cost to you, to the provision of
We also certain assistance. Please con-
accept or tact the Administrative Services
Manager, whose office is located
-HELD AT at 350 E. Marion Avenue, Punta
Tamiami Gorda, Florida 33950, and whose
lofteo, FL telephone number is (941) 637-
22-7204, 2281, within two working days of
Mi on the your receipt of this [describe
14. MPM notice]; if you are hearing or voice
e right to impaired, call 711.
all bids. Si ou se yon moun ki gen yon
6 andikap ki bezwen aranjman nen-
pot nan Iod yo patisipe nan sa a
pwose dapel, ou gen dwa, san sa
pa koute ou, ak founiti asistans a
seten. Tanpri kontakte Adminis-
tratif Sevis Manadje a, ki gen
F biwo sitiye nan 350 Avenue Mani
RE on E., Punta Gorda, Florid 33950,
epi ki gen nimewo telefon se
(941) 637-2281, nan de jou k ap
travay yo resevwa ou nan sa a
T OF THE [avi dekri]; si ou se odyans oswa
LCIRCUIT, vwa ki gen pwoblem, rele 711.
*AND FOR Si vous etes une personne handi-
FLORIDA capee qui a besoin d'une adapta-
02318CA tion pour pouvoir participer a
VICING, cefte instance, vous avez le droit,
HOME sans frais pour vous, pour Ia four-
niture d'une assistance certain.
S'il vous plait contacter le
Directeur des services adminis-


r AL. tratifs, dont le bureau est situe au
350, avenue E. Marion, Punta
IF Gorda, Floride 33950, et dont le
ALE numero de telephone est le (941)
IVE pur- 637-2281, dans les deux jours
nt of Fore- ouvrables suivant la reception de
nber 15, la presente [decrire avis]; si vous
etes audience ou de la voix


A copy of this notice is available
for inspection at the Office of the
City Clerk at the above address.
If an appeal is to be taken from
any decision at this hearing, a ver-
batim record of the proceeding
may be required.
KAREN SMITH, CITY CLERK
CITY OF PUNTA GORDA
Pubish: May 30, 2014
102469 3046206
To view today's legal notices
and more visit,
www.floridapublicnotices.com


Officer cleared in crash


L NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE


alteree, composer le 711.
Si usted es una persona con una
discapacidad que necesita
cualquier acomodacion para
poder participar en este proced-
imiento, usted tiene derecho, sin
costa alguno para usted, para el
suministro de determinada asis-
tencia. Por favor, pongase en
contacto con el Administrador de
Servicios Administrativos, cuya
oficina esta ubicada en 350 E.
Avenida Marion, Punta Gorda,
Florida 33950, y cuyo numero de
telefono es (941) 637-2281, den-
tro de los dos dias habiles sigu-
ientes a la recepcion de esta
[describa aviso]; Si usted. esta
escuchando o la voz alterada,
Ilame al 711.
Publish: 5/30/14 and 6/6/14
276862 3046218


A Bargain
Hunters
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NOTICE OF
I HEARING
~3124

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
CITY OF PUNTA GORDA,
FLORIDA
YOU ARE HEREBY notified that
the Punta Gorda Isles Canal
Advisory Committee will hold
Public Hearings on Monday,
June 16, 2014, at 1:30 p.m.,
or as soon thereafter as may be
heard, to consider the following
requests:
CCSP-04-14 Petition for Spe-
cial Permit under the provisions
of Section 6-6(j) of the Punta
Gorda Code of Ordinances to
install 1, 8-post boat lift with 4 of
the pilings 43 feet waterward
from the seawall per Subsection
6-6(c)4 at Lot 8, Block 145, Sec-
tion 12, a/kva 5039 Key Largo
Drive, Punta Gorda, Florida
33950
Owner/Petitioner:
Paul Baker
CCSP-05-14 Petition for Spe-
cial Permit under the provisions
of Section 6-6(j) of the Punta
Gorda Code of Ordinances to
install 1, 4-post boat lift with 3 pil-
ings outside the 45 degree rule
per Subsection 6-6(c)4 at Lot 11,
Block 103, Section 11, a/k/a
2302 Magdalina Drive, Punta
Gorda, Florida 33950
Owner/Petitioner:
Joe Menchhofer
Said hearings will be held in Coun-
cil Chambers at 326 West Marion
Avenue, Punta Gorda, Florida.
Any person desiring to be heard
on these matters may appear at
the above time and place. In
accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act and Florida
Statute 286.26, special accom-
modations may be made by con-
tacting the Office of the City Clerk
at (941)575-3369.
A copy of this notice is available
for inspection at the Office of the
City Clerk at the above address.
If an appeal is to be taken from
any decision at this hearing, a ver-
batim record of the proceeding
may be required.
KAREN SMITH, CITY CLERK
CITY OF PUNTA GORDA
Publish: May 30, 2014
102469 3046201
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
CITY OF PUNTA GORDA,
FLORIDA
YOU ARE HEREBY notified that
the Punta Gorda Isles Canal
Advisory Committee will hold a
Public Hearing on Monday, June
16, 2014, at 1:30 p.m., or as
soon thereafter as may be heard,
to consider the following request:
CCSP-06-14 --Petition for Spe-
cial Permit under the provisions
of Section 6-6() of the Punta
Gorda Code of Ordinances to
install 2 pilings outside the 45
degree rule per Subsection 6-
6(c)4 at Lot 26, Block 6, Section
4, a/k/a 193 Crescent Drive,
Punta Gorda, Florida 33950
Owners/Petitioners:
Arnold and Doris Bean
Said hearing will be held in Coun-
cil Chambers at 326 West Marion
Avenue, Punta Gorda, Florida.
Any person desiring to be heard
on this master may appear at the
above time and place. In accor-
dance with the Americans with
Disabilities Act and Florida
Statute 286.26, special accom-
modations may be made by con-
tacting the Office of the City Clerk
at (941)575-3369.


I POLICE BEAT
The information for Police Beat is gathered from police, sheriffs office, Florida High way
Patrol, jail and fire records. Not every arrest leads to a conviction and guilt or innocence is
determined by the court system.


PUNTA GORDA- A
police officer will not be
charged or cited after
crashing into the back of
a car that was stopped for
an ambulance.
Just before 12:15 p.m.
Tuesday, Punta Gorda
Police Officer Tiffany
Viola was driving her
police-issued 2014 Dodge
Charger southbound on
U.S. 41 north of Henry
Street when she was
canceled from a call to
service. She was look-
ing down at her in-car
laptop and rear-ended a
Chevrolet Cobalt driven
by Gina Stephenson, 28,
of Port Charlotte, ac-
cording to the Charlotte
County Sheriff's Office
report. Stephenson had
stopped for an ambu-
lance with activated
emergency equipment,
the report shows.
No one was injured.
Both vehicles sustained
only minor damage.
The crash happened
within city limits, but
the CCSO conducted the
investigation because it
involved a Punta Gorda
Police Department
officer.

The Charlotte County Sheriff's
Off ice reported the following
arrests:
Kevin Andre Jordan, 43, an
inmate at Charlotte Correctional
Institution. Charge: lewd or lascivious
exhibition in front of a correctional
facility employee. Bond: $20,000.
Larry Santega Martin, 33, 800
block of Dolphin Ave., Port Charlotte.
Charge: driving with a suspended


license. Bond: $7,500.
Ciara Lynne Matusik, 19, 20300
block of Gentry Ave., Port Charlotte.
Charge: violation of probation
(original charges: grand theft and
providing false information to a
metals recycler). Bond: none.
Dayne Nystrom, 26, 4300 block
of Mundella Circle, Port Charlotte.
Charge: driving with a revoked license.
Bond: $6,000.
Stephanie Leann Stanley, 24,
3300 block of Monday Terrace,
North Port. Charges: possession of
a controlled substance without a
prescription, possession of less than
20 grams of marijuana and possession
of drug paraphernalia. Bond: $10,000.
Kevin Michael Steinmetz, 24,
9000 block of Willmington Blvd.,
Englewood. Charges: petty theft,
resisting a retail merchant and
an out-of-county warrant. Bond:
$10,500.
Jeffrey Wayne Templeton, 43,
5700 block of Swaying Palm Drive,
Punta Gorda. Charge: off-bond status
forfeiture from a previous charge.
Bond: $5,000.
Eric Christopher Varga, 24, of
Pigeon Forge, Tenn. Charge: violation
of probation (original charge: driving
with a suspended license). Bond:
none.
Robert Shawn Vowell, 24,
12600 block of Feldman Ave., Port
Charlotte. Charges: three counts
of violation of probation (original
charges: possession of less than 20
grams of marijuana, possession of
drug paraphernalia and resisting an
officer). Bond: none.
Mark Francis Abaire, 54, homeless
in Punta Gorda. Charge: disorderly


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


'A Tribute
to Barbara' set
The Charlotte County
Republican Party and
clubs will play host to 'A
Tribute to Barbara" hon-
oring Barbara T. Scott, the
long-serving Clerk of the
Circuit Court and County
Comptroller for Charlotte
County -Wednesday at the
Cultural Center of Charlotte
County, 2280 Aaron St., Port
Charlotte. Friends, associ-
ates and fellow Republicans
are invited. The program
will begin with a reception
and a silent auction at
5 p.m., followed by a surf-
and-turf dinner and a mu-
sical tribute by Al Holland.
Individuals are encouraged
to create congratulatory
messages for inclusion
in the tribute's program.
Tickets are $60 per person,
and maybe purchased by
calling 941-258-2080 or
941-257-4826; by email to
president@ccflrc.org; or via
www.ccflrc.org.
Barbara Scott was
elected clerk in 1984, and
currently is serving her
eighth consecutive term.
She has served as president
of the Florida Association
of Court Clerks, and is a
member of WhosWho in
Government Services, a
recipient ofWoman & Boss
of the Year recognition by
the American Business
Women's Association,
and a two-time recipient
of the "Clerk of the Year"
award from the Florida
Association of Court Clerks
& Comptrollers, among
many other recognitions.

'Show your
Charlotte'
The Charlotte Harbor
Visitor & Convention
Bureau invites visitors and
residents to "Show Us Your
Charlotte." The yearlong
program encourages
photographers of every
skill level to submit photos
taken in Charlotte County to
www.ShowUsYourCharlotte.
com. Prizes will be awarded
quarterly by a panel of
judges.
Each quarter, bureau staff
will select four photos as
contest finalists based on
the quality of the photos
and how well they represent
and communicate Charlotte
Counts tourism offerings.
The final decision on first-
and second-place winners
will be made by the Tourist


Development Council at
its next scheduled meeting.
Prizes awarded will include
gift certificates for local
tourism-related businesses
and services. The first-prize
value will be no less than
$200, and second prize will
be no less than $50. Prize
winners will be announced
the day following the
meeting via a press release,
and will be posted on the
bureau's website.
The photos will be used
to invite potential visitors to
experience the area's good
nature, and may be featured
on the Charlotte Harbor
Visitor & Convention
Bureau website (www.
CharlotteHarborTravel.
corn); on one of its social
media channels such
as Facebook, Twitter or
Pinterest; or on a postcard
or in a magazine.

Project Lifesaver
seeks volunteers

The Volunteer Services
Unit of the Charlotte
County Sheriff's Office
seeks caring and compas-
sionate volunteers to assist
with the implementation
of Project Lifesaver. This
program serves Charlotte
County residents by
providing radio-frequency
bracelets to people with
cognitive disorders who are
at risk for the life-threaten-
ing behavior of wandering
away from their caregivers.
This includes those with
Alzheimer's disease, autism
and Down syndrome.
All volunteers will be
trained on how to provide
the bracelets and conduct
monthly home visits for the
purpose of changing the
radio batteries, as well as
on the use of the special-
ized electronic search-and-
rescue equipment that
is linked to the bracelets.
Each volunteer must be a
Charlotte County resident,
have a clean driving record,
and must complete a
background check.
To apply to be a volun-
teer, complete a general
volunteer application
online at www.ccso.
org/ContactUs/PDF/
VolunteerApplication-
saveable.pdf. Once you
have completed the appli-
cation, you will be contact-
ed. For more information,
call 941-639-2101.


Apply for
2015 property
exemptions
The Charlotte County
Property Appraiser now is
accepting 2015 exemption
applications. Homestead
Exemption Applications
may be filed online; visit
www.ccappraiser.com.
In addition, applications
may be filed in person at
one of the following office
locations: 18500 Murdock
Circle, Murdock; South
County Annex, 410 Taylor
St., Punta Gorda; andWest
Charlotte Annex, 6868 San
Casa Drive, Englewood. To
apply by mail, obtain an
instruction sheet and an
application form at www.
ccappraiser.com.
The filing deadline is
5 p.m. March 1, 2015. For
more information, call
941-743-1593.

Flea market
thrift spot helps
homeless

Jesus Loves You Ministry
Inc., the county's only
mobile outreach program
for the homeless, will
benefit from spaces at the
Sun Flea Market, 18505
Paulson Drive, Murdock,
through June. Stop by the
Charity Thrift Store booths
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Fridays through Sundays.
Proceeds go to help
this nonprofit to provide
services such as in-depth
case management
(which includes helping
individuals file for Social
Security, veterans and
other benefits; facilitating
medical and mental health
appointments; and much
more), along with a mobile
food pantry and lunch
program, and a mobile
clothing and hygiene
pantry. Funds also will
help the ministry purchase
tents, tarps, sleeping bags,
etc., for those it helps.
The organization
always can use donations
(monetary, along with
item donations, such as
furniture, that it can resell)
and volunteers. To make
a financial contribution,
mail a check to Jesus
Loves You Ministry Inc.,
P.O. Box 380275, Murdock,
FL 33938-0275. For more
information, call Leslie at
941-661-8117.


intoxication and battery. Bond: none.
Damian Eugene Bannister, 35,
1500 block of Sheehan Ave., Port
Charlotte. Charge: violation of proba-
tion (original charge: driving with a
suspended license). Bond: $1,100.
Dustin William Bloom, 20, 300
block of Langsner St., Englewood.
Charge: violation of probation. Bond:
$777.
Deberah Ann Elie, 25, of W. Venice
Ave., Venice. Charge: loitering or
prowling. Bond: $1,000.
Lisa Garcia, 42, 6800 block of
Biscayne Blvd., North Port. Charge:
violation of probation. Bond: none.
David Louis Green, 35, homeless
in Port Charlotte. Charge: disorderly
intoxication. Bond: $2,000.
Edward Wayne Kologinski, 34, of
DeFuniak Springs, Fla. Charge: fugitive
from justice. His bond information
was unavailable Thursday.
Aaron Bradley Stein, 28, of North
Fort Myers. Charges: possession of
less than 20 grams of marijuana,
possession of drug paraphernalia and
driving without registration. Bond:
$6,000.

The Punta Gorda Police
Department reported the
following arrests:
Michelle Denise Blount, 46, of
North Fort Myers. Charges: two counts
of possession of a controlled substance
without a prescription, and one count
each of possession of a harmful new
legend drug and possession of drug
paraphernalia. Bond: $13,500.
Craig Scott Simmons, 54, 8300
block of Riverside Drive, Punta Gorda.
Charge: petty theft. Bond: none.
Compiled by Adam Kreger





The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 7


By IAN ROSS
STAFF WRITER

SARASOTA COUNTY-
Taxable property values
in the city of North Port
are estimated to increase
8.65 percent over last
year's the highest
rate in Sarasota County,
according to the Property
Appraiser's Office.
The total estimated
value for North Port was
over $2.6 billion, over
$209 million more than
the city's 2013 taxable
value. Although the num-
ber is just preliminary
and may differ from final
values, city officials were
pleased with the news.
"It's a pretty significant
jump up for us, and we're
the highest in the county,
in terms of a percentage
increase," City Manager
Jonathan Lewis said.
Countywide, taxable
values also have in-
creased, though not quite
as much as North Port.
"If you take the in-
crease that (the property
appraiser) provided today
of 6.34 percent, that
equates approximately
to ... $6.9 million in
additional revenue over
last year assuming the
millage remains flat,"
Sarasota County Chief
Financial Officer Steve
Botelho said.
Should the county's
millage rate remain the
same at 3.3912, the coun-
ty could see a $139 mil-
lion increase in property


tax revenue, Botelho said.
A mill equates to $1 in
taxes for every $1,000 of a
property's taxable value.
According to North
Port CFO Pete Lear, staff
estimated in an assump-
tions meeting with the
City Commission that
property values would
increase about 3 percent.
The unexpected bump is
"definitely good news,"
Lear said.
According to Lear,
property values in North
Port began to increase
only last year, after a
more-than-six-year losing
streak, in which taxable
property values dropped
a devastating 60 percent.
"So we had lost a large
chunk of taxable value
from 2007 to last year,"
he said. Then last year,
property values in the
city increased about
4 percent, Lear said.
This year's "8.65 percent
increase is good news
for (residents), because
it means property values
have gone back up after
years of decline," he said.
"It's another sign that
things are improving."
Now that taxable
values are up, the City
Commission has a
decision to make regard-
ing how to handle the
potential revenue in-
creases in the next fiscal
year's budget. Fiscal year
2015 begins Oct. 1.
"As far as property
tax revenue for the city,
taxable value is half


of the equation," Lear
explained. The other part
of the equation is the
millage rate.
If the commission
keeps the current rate
of 3.4474 mills, the city
could stand to raise
$700,000 more in taxes
than it did with last year's
budget.
Alternatively, the
commission could use
the "rollback rate," which
would reduce the tax rate,
so that the city would
raise the same amount
of revenue as last year,
$8.2 million.
Although the decision
ultimately is up to the
commission, Lear said
extra revenue could help
pad the city's budget
reserve.
City records indicate
spending caused the
reserve to dip below
fund-balance minimums,
ultimately resulting in a
downgrading of the city's
bond rating.
"The general fund
budget last year was
about $29.5 million, and
in order to balance that
budget, we used about
$1.4 million in reserves."
To close the gap, the
city would need to set
aside $1.4 million "either
through increased reve-
nues, decreased expen-
ditures, or a combination
of the two," to arrive at
a structurally balanced
budget, Lear said.

Email: iross@sun-heraldxom


PHOTO PROVIDED
Members work out during a busy morning at the Cultural Center's Fitness Salon.



Exercising friendship



at Fitness Salon


he Cultural Center
is known as the
"Place that Friend-
ship Built."
As true as that may
be, it is also the place
where lasting friendships
are made and built. It's
these relationships that
keep the center growing.
The Cultural Center
receives no funding from
the government toward
operating expenses.
We depend on our
members, volunteers and
the community to sup-
port us. By supporting the
Cultural Center, it enables
us to give the support
back to our members by
keeping our pricing at an
affordable level without
abandoning the quality of
our programs.
One of the attractions
is the Fitness Salon,
where we cater to each
and every member. We
develop a fitness program


ErING RAMPED
Get rid of the clutter, I


CULTURAL
CENTER
TED ROBEDEE

centered on your needs
and goals, and assist and
monitor your progress.
This is a significant
benefit of becoming a
member free personal
training.
Our mission at the
Fitness Salon is to provide
a place that promotes
better physical and
mental health with a
comfortable, friendly
and noncompetitive
atmosphere. To quote a
member, "We have dis-
covered that the Fitness
Salon is more than a gym.
It is a place where people
come together to find
support, make friends
and improve their mental
health as well as their


physical well-being. Many
seniors come here in
order to improve flexibil-
ity, balance and muscle
strength, something that
will help them maintain
their independence. We
enjoy working out here
in a calm, supporting
and non-intimidating
atmosphere."
The only competi-
tion we promote is the
competition with oneself.
Get out of the heat, get
off your couch, grab your
spouse or friend and
begin to live a healthier
and more productive
lifestyle. You won't regret
it. The Cultural Center is
the place where lifetime
friendships are made.
Ted Robedee is the man-
ager of the Fitness Salon
at the Cultural Center of
Charlotte County. He can
be contacted at 941-625-
4175, ext. 263.


-ewdCos


Sarasota County




property values up


ACROSS
1 Traditional
autumn
beverage
6 Fowl-shaped
revolver
10 Difficulty,
informally
14 Dog from Japan
15 Word of consent
16 Legally impose
17 Capital of
Western
Australia
18 Detailed,
with "out"
19 Support in
misdeeds
20 Age-old
upbringing
conflict
23 Really impresses
24 Lodging places
25 Meditative
martial art
29 Indian export
30 Formerly
31 PBS series
since '74
34 Urban pollution
39 Age-old morality
conflict
42 Incorporate, as
new territory
43 Put up with
44 All boys
45 Numerical
ending
47 Subtle aspect
49 Resistant to
change
53 It's right on
the map
55 Age-old power
conflict
61 On the ball
62 Carol trio
63 Missouri river
64 Roller coaster's
360


Lookfora third

crossword in

I the Sun Classified:

section.


AGE-OLD CONFLICTS by Bruce Venzke
Edited by Stanley Newman


65 Utility customer
66 Barber-chair
attachment
67 Storm systems
68 Trim down
69 Tribute with
drinks

DOWN
1 Skipper
2 "Make a house
a home"
sloganeer
3 Cruel gossip
4 Comment of
betrayal
5 Gung-ho
6 Water regulator
7 Gather together
8 Rhinelander's
rejection
9 Get through
10 Founder of an
ancient academy


11 Where oars are
conjunctions
12 Undisguised
13 Data measures
21 Dallas surname
22 Tribute with
digs
25 Garb when
uttering 4 Down
26 Before long,
quaintly
27 Cultural
legend
28 Give over
29 Fail big,
informally
32 Solemn
statement
33 By, as you fly
35 It's south-
southeast of
Scottsdale
36 Cover Girl
competitor


Answer to previous puzzle
ILIOIPIEISEOIPIAILE II M PIS


IFIRIEITMKI I ITIEEHII uNODu
ADIDISMAXIEIS N IE ER
5/30114


Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis


ACROSS
1 Whimpers
6 *See 29-Across
9 Cooperative
group
13 Hindu nectar
15 Suitor
16 Pierce player
17 *See 29-Across
18 Pool equipment
19 *See 29-Across
20 *See 29-Across
21 High-tech card
contents
23 Toned down
24 "Star Wars" saga
nickname
25 Web store icon
26 Quad Cities city
27 French income
29 With 35- and 49-
Across, start of a
refrain whose
ending words
appear in
sequence in the
answers to
starred clues
32 bloom: pond
buildup
33 Additionally
34 San Jose
Earthquakes'
org.
35 See 29-Across
41 Dough extruder?
44 It may follow T.
45 "Washington
Week" moderator
Gwen
49 See 29-Across
54 Actress
Raymonde of
"Lost'
55 Withstood the
ordeal
56 Matterhorn's
range
58 *See 29-Across
59 "Just me,"
formally
60 Immature
62 Article in El
Diario
63 *See 29-Across
64 Decline
65 Sign of fish
67 Youngest Bront6
68 Chimps, e.g.
69 Make a point of
70 Prepare scallops,
in a way
71 *See 29-Across
72 *See 29-Across


By Jeffrey Wechsler 5/30/14


DOWN
1 Cosmetic
product
2 Put on a jury
3 "On ._": Stephen
King memoir
4 Cover
5 Subject of recent
medical research
6 Dread
7 Like many doilies
8 Guffaw
9 Roman slate
10 Upper-class rule
11 Major endocrine
gland
12 Really ticks off
14 Field
15 Stew basis
22 "Rocky I1l" actor
23 Do some yard
work
26 Call from a
Persian
28 Eastern 'Way"
30 LAX listing
31 Mr. Rogers on a
horse
36 Let go
37 Kareem, formerly
38 Let go
39 Gives suddenly,
as bad news
40 Son-gun
connection


Thursday's Puzzle Solved
A ANDP C R A I GBSKI
BRR R U MBA C N N
LE PGEHN I N H 1O I
ES GLAEN N 0 R N
KIeEPYOURFRK

O A R-- IMA PI
N H IE SS FAIvA
REND S
OVRY TWEEN MAP



MRT IORORI I N

I L DDU P TEARY
TS ESTY A EX


(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC


41 Comparable to,
sizewise
42 Like some sporty
shoes
43 Islands: Guam
locale
46 Draft motor:
gas furnace
component
47 Hunting 20-Across
48 "Kicked-up
Sandwiches"
author


5/30/14


50 Bluegrass
guitarist Flatt
51 Him, to Henri
52 Low-lying
locales
53 The whole
shebang
57 Boston
60 Mob boss
61 From the top
64 Female in WWII
66 "No more seats"
sign


www.stanxwords.com
37 Penultimate
element,
alphabetically
38 Of another sort
40 Jumps on ice
41 Something not
as common as
it's called
46 Collaborate
48 Fullest extent
49 Petty
50 Off-limits
51 Rule permissible
52 Microwave
sounds
53 Landscaping tool
54 Rarin' to go
56 Curiosity
launcher
57 In the matter of
58 Croft of video
games
59 Id moderators
60 Quatre + trois


'I
iell It In The Classifieds. Call206-1200


I






Our Town Page 8 C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014


IEWPOINT


Derek Dunn-Rankin Chairman
David Dunn-Rankin Publisher
Chris Porter Executive Editor


Brian Gleason Editorial page editor
Stephen Baumann Editorial writer


Email letters to letters@sun-herald.com


I OUR VIEW

Free-spending

Scott has leg

up on opponent

OUR POSITION: Florida Gov.
Rick Scott's campaign war chest
is a challenge the Democrats will
have a difficult time overcoming.
lorida Gov. Rick Scott,
fresh off one of the best
Legislative sessions since
he was elected governor, is
shaping up as one tough oppo-
nent for whomever Democrats
nominate for the fall election.
Scott, and just about anyone
who pays attention, believes
that opponent will be former
Republican governor, turned
Democrat, Charlie Crist.
While Crist must still win the
Democrats' nomination in
August, against state Sen. Nan
Rich, Scott's camp certainly is
treating him as the person to
beat.
When Crist first announced his
candidacy, he drew on a political
career that gave his name instant
recognition. He used that famil-
iarity with voters to move out to
a 2 percent to 3 percent edge in
most polls over Scott.
The governor, however, has all
but wiped out that lead after the
Legislature completed its 2014
session that saw little, if any,
controversy. And, there were
hundreds of hometown projects
that garnered funding barring
a veto from Scott. Those
projects, referred to as bringing
home the bacon in most circles,
will do nothing to hurt Scott's
image. And, bills such as the
one lowering the cost of vehicle
license plates, are proving
popular with voters.
Scott has stated he wants to
accumulate $100 million to fund
his reelection campaign. That
will far surpass any amount the
Democrats can raise.
Scott has already spent
$10 million in TV ads while Crist
has yet to spend a dime on TV.
As a matter of fact, Crist's entire
campaign fund presently totals
little more than $10 million.
So far Crist has received most
of his backing from the state's
legal community. And, of the
$10 million raised, most of the
donations have come from
the Tampa and Coral Gables
communities, according to a
Bradenton Herald story.
Scott, on the other hand,
has seen a lot of support from
real estate, construction and
health care industries. And, of
that money, a lot of it has been
funneled into the war chest from
Tallahassee, the Herald reported.
None of this is surprising given
the fact Scott is the incumbent
and a former owner of a network
of health care facilities.
The governor also has huge
advantages in full-time staffers,
consultants and offices. While
Crist has relied on name recog-
nition and his charm to march
toward a fall showdown, he
has had to dodge critics of his
idea of visiting Cuba and those
who continually point out his
flip-flopping on policies that he
either supported or criticized as
a Republican governor. Now, as
a Democrat, Crist has not been
shy about saying he has merely
changed his mind.
If the election were today,
Scott would unleash a media
blitz that likely would bury his
opponent. What will happen
between now and November will
be interesting.
All eyes will be on Florida this
fall. If a Democrat can beat an
incumbent Republican whose
financial advantage will be
significant, it could serve as a
barometer for the entire nation.
And, it would be a feather in the
caps of Democrats who would
have a governor serving in a key
swing state, and one of the most
populous states, in the nation.
And that could have ramifica-


tions in 2016 when Republicans
hope to win back the White
House.


LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR

Fishermen's Village
will remain 'Village'

Editor:
"What's in a name? That
which we call a rose by any
other name would smell as
sweet."
A wonderful line penned
by Shakespeare for "Romeo
and Juliet," and, judging by a
number of recent letters to the
editor, perhaps also appro-
priate for Fishermen's Village,
Punta Gorda's waterfront
jewel. It seems that at times
Fishermen's Village is referred
to by the shorter nickname
"Fishville," and some folks
have taken offense at what
they perceive as a slight to
their favorite shopping and
dining destination.
The origins of the
"Fishville" nickname might
be traced back to the early
days of the Internet when
our first website was being
conceived. It was discov-
ered that the domain name
FishermensVillage.com was
already taken, so the shorter
fishville.com was acquired
and has since remained our
Web address for many years.
Rest assured that there is
no move afoot to rename
Fishermen's Village.
The term "Fishville" is not
used in any of our adver-
tising or marketing other
than when listing our Web
address. I suspect that when
the name "Fishville" appears
in this newspaper it's a result
of space constraints, and I
know that when some of our
neighbors use this nickname
in casual conversation that it's
intended as a term of endear-
ment rather than as a snub.
So my dear friends and con-
cerned patrons of Fishermen's
Village, no matter if you
call it Fishermen's Village or
Fishville we just want you to
come, enjoy yourselves and
support the many small busi-
nesses that call Fishermen's
Village home. Closing with yet
another of Shakespeare's great
lines: "This is the short and
long of it."


General Manager a



Citizen rul
poorly desig

Editor:
In this time betwe
presidential election


Patti Allen
nd head Fish
Punta Gorda


es
ned


en
s, a


worthwhile exercise by the
Congress would be to clarify
the definition of "natural born
citizen." At the same time, we
should identify the responsi-
ble parties. Currently, there is
no place where the buck stops
on this issue.
As the country has more
and more candidates with
roots outside our borders, it is
time to put in place the rules
and responsibilities.
No matter where you stand
on Obama, Cruz, Rubio and
others, the fact is, no one has
the authority to challenge the
appropriateness of a candi-
date and there is nowhere that
the rules are defined.
Bill Hamilton
North Port


Corporate culture
beyond rehab

Editor:
This message is directed to
GM dealerships.
If you consider it eco-
nomically feasible, then I


suggest you open d
with other motor-v
manufacturers.
Contrary to the o
media hype, I belie
be a very long time
before GM rehabili
"corporate culture.


administering his duties. His
administration has guided
the county through extremely
tough economic times. For
this, we owe him thanks.
Likewise, the county
attorney is hard-working and
knowledgeable in the law.
She and her staff bring years
of experience in serving the
people of Charlotte County.
No, I do not agree with
everything these folks do
or say, but I know that all of
them have the best interest
of Charlotte County in their
hearts. Sure, mistakes have
been made. We're all human.
But from where I sit, we


are in good hands. C
County is fortunate I
these dedicated pub
servants.
W. Ke



Farmers Mar
art gallery o

Editor:
The "weekly" Farn


discussions Market at the Punta
vehicle Historical Society Hi
is on Sundays all yea
ongoing It is open from 9 a
eve it will to 1 p.m. May throu
e, if ever, September and from
states its to 2 p.m. October thr
"1 April. Local artists ha
Gene Leboy art gallery and gift si
Port Charlotte the Trabue Building,
for five years now, w


Charlotte County
in good hands

Editor:
I have had the pleasure of
living in Charlotte County
for over 40 years. Because of
my profession, I have had
the opportunity to work with
our local government. I have
seen county commissioners,
administrators and county
attorneys come and go. I
have watched county gov-
ernment struggle with the
challenges of the legacy of
General Development Corp.,
Punta Gorda Isles, Cape Cave
Corp. and other large land
developers.
It is from this perspective
that I say we are fortunate
to have our present group
of elected officials. Our
present County Commission
is a diverse group of hard-
working, intelligent people.
They are dedicated to the
future of Charlotte County.
The county administrator is
an honest and knowledgeable
man. He is someone who has
worked his way up through
the ranks. He brings a com-
mon sense perspective when


also generates incon
the Punta Gorda His
Society as they pay r
monthly for use of t]
building in the coun
1886.
Sontemhr thrnii11


Kids used to be
much healthier

Editor:
When I was growing up
we kids were much healthier
than the kids of today. We
weren't stuck in the house a
good part of the day playing
with a computer or anything
else. We were outside playing
no matter the season.
I grew up in New England,
where we had winter cold
and a lot of snow. There
weren't waterproof clothes
then. We went out to play in
the snow in winter and our
ski pants and jackets got wet
through as we slid down hills
and used our sled and skis.
When we got home off
came our clothes and they
were put on the radiator to
dry and we sat and read by
our heaters to get warm. The
medicine we were given to
keep us healthy was a tea-
spoon of cod liver oil every
day, and just before winter
started for about a month we
were given one tablespoon of
sulphur and molasses every
evening upon going to bed.
If we caught a little chest
cold our chests were rubbed
with Vicks VapoRub or some
hot mustard with a cloth
over it at bedtime, or our
foreheads were also rubbed
with Vicks Vapo Rub if we had
a head cold.
We were given salt and
water to gargle if we had a
sore throat and liquid cough
medicine if we coughed.
Adeline Radford
Englewood


Police Department
in great shape now


harlotte Editor:
to have A recent letter submitted
Alic by a former New York City
police officer criticized the
evin Russell structure of the Punta Gorda
Punta Gorda Police Department, suggest-
ing it is top-heavy and does
not need additional officers.
rket, Instead, the writer recom-
mends "getting rid of" eight
)pen of the higher-ranked posi-
tions and supplanting them
with three patrol sergeants
ners and five more officers. He
Gorda proposes that police per-
istory Park sonnel might be directed
ar. to conduct patrols "such
.m. as monitoring the vacant
gh homes of snowbirds."
i 9 a.m. I suspect that many
rough other full-time residents like
ave an myself would regard any at-
hiop in tempt to invoke such tasking
open as an absurd way in which to
hich spend our tax money.
ne for It seems unreasonable to
torical attempt to draw parallels
rent
re oldest between a city the size of

ity, circa New York and relatively little
Punta Gorda in any type
,h M of career discipline. Our


the gallery is open from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday
through Saturday and from
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday; June,
July and August the gallery is
open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Friday and Saturday and from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday.
Louie Desguin started as
volunteer manager of the
History Park in 2011. The
well-maintained grounds
would not exist if not for the
many hours he gives of his
time. Over the last three years
we have planted over 400
new plants and added picnic
tables and benches so the
community can relax and
enjoy the beautiful park.
The grounds at the History
Park can also be rented for
weddings, anniversaries,
private parties, etc. For
further info contact me, the
art gallery director, at 941-
391-4446, or Louie Desguin at
941-380-6814.
Starr Zacaritz


minimal crime rate which
ranks extremely low in rela-
tion to any similar-sized city
in Florida can be firmly
attributed to the PGPD
consistently performing its
job in a sustained, highly
professional and successful
manner. As an example of its
effectiveness, one might take
note of how quickly regis-
tered sex offenders leave
the city due to assiduous
attention being given their
movements here. Numerous
accolades often bestowed
on the department by state
officials also attest to their
crime-fighting competence.
As the saying goes, "If it
ain't broke, don't fix it," and
from my perspective Chief
Arenal and his fine cadre of
PGPD personnel are any-
thing but top-heavy, broken
or any other derogatory
descriptor.
Jim Townsend
Punta Gorda


LETTER SUBMISSION POLICY
Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have some rules. Please keep them to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community discourse, and the opinions
to less than 250 words. Letters will be edited to length as well as for grammar and spelling. All and statements made in letters are solely those of the individual writers. The newspaper takes
letters must be signed with full name- not initials. An address and telephone number must be no responsibility for the content of these letters. Please send or bring correspondence to the Sun,
included. The phone number and address are not for publication, but must be provided. Due to the Letters to the Editor, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980, or fax to 941-629-2085.
number of letters received, we are able to run only one letter per person per month. The Letters Readers with access to the Internet may email Letters to the Editor at letters@sun-herald.com.


OurTown Page 8 C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014






The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014 VIEWPOINT www.sunnewspapers.net C OurTown Page 9


The Kardashian in


he rapper
Kanye West and
reality star Kim
Kardashian didn't get
married over the weekend
in Florence, Italy, so
much as complete a
celebrity merger. As West
reportedly gushed in his
remarks on the blessed
occasion, evidently
overcome with emotion,
"The Kardashians are an
industry!"
It was like he was
marrying General
Electric. He was right, of
course, and one of the
industry's top products
is weddings. There is an
impeccable commercial
logic to the proposition
that it is better to sell two
weddings than to sell
one.
The last time Kim
Kardashian looked
stunning in a wedding
gown (byVeraWang),
passionately kissed her
dapper new hubby (Kris
Humphries, a basketball


player) and cut into
a wedding cake taller
than the average person
(by Hansen Cakes), she
made $15 million.
She released a "wed-
ding fragrance" called,
with scant regard for
truth in advertising, "Kim
Kardashian Love," and
got a two-part special
on E! out of the wedding
planning and ceremony.
Her divorce filing 72 days
later wasn't quite as
marketable, but every
industry has its core
competency, and the
Kardashians still haven't
figured out how to make
as much out of the end of


marriages as out of their
storybook beginnings.
For all that the details
of the latest Kardashian
wedding differ (gown
by Givenchy, Kanye
West as dapper new
hubby, 7-foot-tall cake
by Galateo Ricevimenti),
the bottom line is the
same: Some reports say
they will make more
than $20 million off it.
If Elizabeth Taylor had
had a similar knack for
martial monetization,
she might have died
a billionaire.
The rehearsal dinner
was atVersailles, and
the wedding ceremony
at Forte di Belvedere in
Florence -appropri-
ately enough, since the
Kardashians are part of
a degenerate celebrity
aristocracy that lacks
for nothing except class,
grace and enduring
accomplishment.
BothVersailles, built
into one of the largest


palaces in the world by
Louis XIV, and Forte di
Belvedere, a project of
the Medicis, have seen
their share of gross
excess, needless to say.
But the multimillion-
dollar Kardashian-West
union has to rank among
the most sensationally
vapid events ever to
grace those centuries-old
structures.
For all its flaws, there
was something noble
in the old nobility. It set
standards and main-
tained ideals. Selfishness
and greed were usually
at least filtered through
a commitment to
something higher.
The Kardashians are a
testament only to the
tacky art of money- and
fame-grubbing, without
style, wit or a commit-
ment to the common
good. In TV program
terms, it is the difference
between "Downton
Abbey" and "Kourtney


and Khloe Take Miami."
In his wedding speech,
Kanye West enthused
that the assembled
guests included "the
most remarkable people
of our time," with the
power to "make the
world a better place."
Especially if it involves
Instagramming photos of
themselves.
The celebrity wedding
is nothing new, of course.
Once upon a time, the
famous starlet Marilyn
Monroe married the
famous ballplayer Joe
DiMaggio, and that
didn't last long, either.
But the ill-fated Monroe-
DiMaggio union had an
unmistakable element
of tragedy, whereas the
Kardashian productions
play more like farce.
Kim is the apotheosis
of what Jason Roger
Moore, one of the cre-
ators of the Paris Hilton
phenomenon, calls
Fame 2.0. It is celebrity


with no substance. Kim
isn't an actress, singer or
supermodel. She boot-
strapped the temporary
notoriety of a sex tape
into a reality-show fran-
chise that the family has
managed to keep going
well beyond its 15 min-
utes through shrewdness
and shamelessness.
The magic of Fame
2.0 is that it builds on
itself until it doesn't.
The undoing of the
Kardashian clan prob-
ably won't be public
revulsion, or any strate-
gic misstep on their part,
given their canny. It will
be the onset of public
boredom, with the arti-
fice and manipulation
and the whole cast of
uninteresting characters.
That's how this particular
industry ends.
Rich Lowry is the editor
of the National Review.
Readers may reach him
at comments. lowry@
nationalreview.com.


All the news fit for a president


ormer President
George W Bush
once said, rather
proudly, that he didn't
read newspapers.
President Barack
Obama, a confirmed
newsie, has claimed to
read the major papers,
perhaps to learn what's
going on in his own
administration.
Latest to the list of
presidential discoveries
thanks to the dailies is
the horrific news that the
Department of Veterans
Affairs has kept secret
lists of veterans waiting
for treatment. Some have
died during the wait.
In a world of faux
outrage, finally we have
something about which
to be scandalized. It is
hard to imagine leaving
our veterans to wither
and die after they've
survived enemy fire and
war. As we celebrate
Memorial Day weekend,
it must be particularly
painful for the families of
those who never reached


the top of the list.
The deepest cut is
knowing that the presi-
dent, who as a candidate
promised that veterans'
care would be among his
highest priorities, hasn't
burdened himself with
keeping this promise.
Instead, we learn that
Obama knows more or
less what every newspa-
per-reading American
knows. Does he also
do more or less what
Americans do in re-
sponse? Shake his head,
cluck his tongue and
then turn the page?
The president didn't
know, for instance,
how badly things were
going over at Health


and Human Services
preceding the dramatic
non-rollout of the
Affordable Care Act.
In other breaking news,
Obama was surprised to
learn that the Internal
Revenue Service was
paying special attention
to conservative groups.
And, who, by the way,
knew whatever was going
on in Benghazi that hor-
rific night? Not to pound
the Republican drum,
which too often sounds
like a car alarm, but was
the administration's first
impulse really to call
YouTube?
So says Rep. Darrell
Issa, Republican
chairman of the
House Oversight and
Government Reform
Committee. Issa recently
noted a State Department
email indicating that one
of the White House's first
responses to the attack
on Sept. 11, 2012, was to
contact the video-sharing
website to warn of the
ramifications of posting


the anti-Islam video
initially blamed for the
attack.
Issa has entered into
the Congressional Record
an excerpt from the
email, which was sent at
9:11 p.m. Eastern Time
that very night:
"White House is reach-
ing out to U-Tube [sic] to
advise ramifications of
the posting of the Pastor
Jon video," the email
reads, according to Issa.
No word yet on wheth-
er the president knew
about this at the time,
but his history suggests
that this, too, may have
been news. His com-
munications team has
managed, meanwhile, to
detect a sliver of silver in
the cloud of doubt hover-
ing over Benghazi.
The fact that the White
House was contacting
YouTube as Americans
were being attacked
merely confirms that
the administration
really believed that the
attack erupted during a


video-induced riot.
What difference does
it make at this point, one
might ask? Does it matter
that the president gets
his news from the media
rather than from his staff
and Cabinet? Does it mat-
ter that time after time
- add the NSAs spying
on our allied leaders and
the Justice Department's
tapping into reporters'
communications -the
president doesn't know
what's going on in agen-
cies his Cabinet oversees?
Yes, it all really matters.
It matters because denial
of knowledge tastes like
chicken and smells
like cover-up. At best it
sounds like incompe-
tence. It matters because
this White House has
failed to perform in a
manner that justifies the
public's faith and trust in
its leadership.
Being president is
surely the least envi-
able job imaginable,
second only to being a
woman in most other


places. Staying abreast
of so many complex
issues not to mention
foreign affairs must be
overwhelming at times.
And, to be fair, sometimes
agency leaders don't like
to share bad news with
their commander in
chief.
Finally, the problem
of admitted ignorance
may be less a matter of
negligence than a symp-
tom of an even bigger
problem the programs
themselves. To admit
that our government
bureaucracies and our
hulking programs are too
big to succeed, however,
is to admit to a failure of
ideology. The president
likely knows this in his
heart, which may be
why he prefers being
surprised by news than
collapsing under the
burden of being wrong.
Kathleen Parker is a
columnist for the Orlando
Sentinel. Readers may
reach her at kathleen
parker@washpost.com.


Some like it hot


ome people have
such a radical vital-
ity, such an electric
consciousness, such a
lifelong love affair with the
world that when they stop
breathing, it's like a wind
dying, like the waning and
disappearing of a light.
And the world feels dull-
er and dumber and more
lackluster without them.
Arthur Gelb, The
New York Times editor
known as "The Arthurian
Legend," had that
constant, overflowing,
generous engagement.
The world was always
putting its hooks in him,
and he was always putting
his hooks in the world.
Immersed in an 'All
About Eve" milieu of
theater and criticism ani-
mated by schadenfreude,
Arthur didn't have any.
During my job interview,
he told me that he enjoyed
being an editor because as
a reporter he could think
of 17 stories but work on
only one at a time, while
as an editor he could
assign all 17 at once.
He was 17 stories all by
himself, the most culti-
vated ink-stained wretch
ever.
Arthur was 90 when he
died Tuesday, and he had
written a zesty reminis-
cence, "City Room," about
the raffish "Front Page"
era in journalism. Yet


there was nothing fusty
about him.
Even in the exuberant
age of Abe and Arthur,
the tall, kinetic member
of the team had a Twitter
metabolism and Big Data
appetite.
I always associated
him with "V" words -
Vesuvian, voracious,
voltaic. In his imagination,
almost any random re-
mark you dropped could
be spun into a potential
story, causing his eyes to
flash and arms to flap.
Once when he invited
some reporters to dinner
at Sardi's he spied Helen
Hayes and Lillian Gish at a
nearby table. "Go inter-
view them!" he whispered
to Michi Kakutani, even
though there was no news
peg and it would run only
in the second edition.
While she was gone, he
had her untouched dinner
put in a doggie bag.
The third Eugene
O'Neill biography that
he wrote with his wife,
Barbara, will be published


next year. It focuses on
the three wives who
influenced the playwright
and is titled "ByWomen
Possessed."
That could also work as
the title of an Arthur bio.
"I like women," he would
say with a shrug.
He especially liked tal-
ented, neurotic, operatic
women funny, since his
son Peter grew up to be
the visionary head of the
Met.
Arthur loved getting
to the heart of women's
hearts. Once, dining with
Mia Farrow and Woody
Allen, he asked Farrow
how on earth she could be
attracted to both Woody
and Frank Sinatra.
And there was the time
he sent the Times music
critic Harold Schonberg
over to ask the irascible
Wanda Horowitz what it
was like to have two de-
manding musical geniuses


localoibr
rree:alf[-r rEAJS,


DOWD 110 S wUfN


BUIN

GOD IVR

OPAOND


-CIS


W~sI 61 GoD &Iuosi
40F AMIAM *TAIL OTCA.LTT
(EINDABI QURS)
o 62-066
Monday- Friday 10 a.m.- 6 p.m.; Saturday 10:30 -4 p.m.


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The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014


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VIEWPOINT










Forgetting the Tiananmen Square massacre


he young man
approached with
an air of furtive ur-
gency, covering his mouth
with his hand. "Please can
you tell me," he asked,
"what happened in 1989?"
In China, there is a
single answer to that
question: the Tiananmen
Square massacre, 25 years
ago next week. The
quarter-century mark is
not auspicious in Chinese
culture, but the date
itself has acquired iconic
significance: 6/4 is to
China what 9/11 is to the
United States.
Except that in place of
public commemoration
in China, there is careful
whispering and sly refer-
ences to troops firing on
unarmed pro-democracy
demonstrators.
And, an even more
unsettling exception: As
the young man's question
illustrated, a new gener-
ation remains ignorant,
uninterested or both
about Tiananmen. China
has become, in the title of
a new book by National
Public Radio reporter
Louisa Lim, "The People's
Republic of Amnesia."


Ruth
Marcus



For Americans, the
image of the unknown
young man standing in
front of a menacing tank
is seared into memory
or for the post-
Tiananmen generation
- taught as a central
moment in modern
Chinese history.
Yet for many Chinese,
as became clear on a
trip here sponsored by
the Committee of 100, a
U.S. nonprofit dedicated
to promoting mutual
understanding, the topic
remains best unmen-
tioned, if not unknown.
Only the bravest teachers
broach it, and then most
likely as a cautionary tale
of popular protest that
unfolded too fervently,
too soon.
The horrors of the
Cultural Revolution have


become safe ground
for public discussion.
"Coming Home," a new
film by Zhang Yimou, who
directed the 2008 Olympic
opening and closing
ceremonies, tells the story
of a professor sent away
for "re-education" and a
family destroyed.
The events of 1989, by
contrast, remain distinctly
off-limits. Imagine a
comparable moment of
searing national shame
- Kent State, Watergate,
Abu Ghraib effectively
banished from public
discussion.
It would be most
comfortable, from a
Western perspective, to
understand this phe-
nomenon in China as
a brutal and ultimately
self-defeating reflection
of government censorship
and intimidation.
Certainly, suppression
of free speech plays a
significant role. Five years
ago, as the 20th anniver-
sary neared, dissidents
were detained, foreign
newspapers had pages
excised, television screens
went strategically dark,
and the plug was pulled


on Internet sites.
Today, if anything, the
government is even more
heavy-handed; recent
bombings in the western
province of Xinjiang have
only added to the impera-
tive to stifle dissent.
Still, the "Great
Firewall," China's effort
to censor the Internet, is
rather easily breached, es-
pecially by a techno-savvy
young generation adept
at enlisting virtual private
networks to evade official
blockages. Young people
determined to discover
the events of 6/4 can find
a workaround.
But that assumes a
widespread discontent
with the free-speech
status quo that instead
seems disconcertingly
muted.
Eric Li, a Shanghai-
based 46-year-old venture
capitalist who watched
the protests from afar, as
a Berkeley undergrad-
uate he went on to
work for Ross Perot and
earn a Stanford MBA-
expressed undisguised
relief at the crackdown,
notwithstanding the
"tragic" loss of life. Li


echoes the official view
that letting the protests
continue would have
jeopardized governmental
stability and imperiled an
economic rise that has
lifted hundreds of mil-
lions out of poverty.
"I look at what hap-
pened" in Egypt and
Ukraine "and think,
'Thank heaven it didn't
succeed here,"' Li said in
an interview.
Many younger Chinese
express a similar toler-
ance. Amanda, a graduate
student, described being
"shocked" on seeing a
video of Tiananmen in a
constitutional law class,
her first exposure to the
protests. The professor's
message? "It is difficult
to change the situation
of China." Others ques-
tioned whether photos
had been doctored, or
authorities forced to act
only after negotiations
failed.
This has become a
privileged, me-first gen-
eration of "little emper-
ors" and empresses, only
children coddled by par-
ents and grandparents.
Even with rising tensions


over China's astonishing
income inequality and
anxiety over whether
those less well-connected
will be able to nab their
share, this new cohort
enjoys a standard of
living unimaginable at
the time of Tiananmen.
They are, according
to pollsters, particularly
nationalistic -more
worked up over Japan's
wartime atrocities and
perceived territorial in-
cursions than over issues
of personal freedom, or,
perhaps more threatening
to Chinese leaders, unrest
over rampant corruption
and pollution.
For them, the explo-
sion of wealth often
seems worth the price
of studied ignorance
about Tiananmen. Hence
the chilling question:
If those who cannot
remember the past are
condemned to repeat it,
what becomes of those
who never knew the past
at all?
Ruth Marcus is a colum-
nist for The Washington
Post. Readers may reach
her at marcusr@washpost.
com.


GOP mainstream and tea party come together


or several weeks,
analysts of all
stripes have been
assessing the implications
of Republican primaries in
which, for the most part,
establishment-backed
mainstream candidates
defeated tea party-backed
insurgents.
The GOP establishment
saw these apparent
reversals of the tea
party's 2010 and 2012
successes as significant.
Other Republicans and
many Democrats said the
results reflected better
candidates, more money
and the assumption by
embattled GOP lawmakers
of more conservative tea
party positions.
Two of the most cogent
assessments came from
House Speaker John
Boehner and Matthew
Dowd, a onetime political
strategist for President
George W Bush and now
an ABC analyst.
Boehner, who earlier
complained tea party
activists were "pushing our
members in places where


DOWD
FROM PAGE 9

in her life her father,
Arturo Toscanini, and


they don't want to be," was
asked if he was pleased
with their setbacks.
Avoiding a direct answer,
he said it was difficult
to find a "distinction
between the tea party and
Republicans."
And Dowd said on ABC's
"This Week with George
Stephanopoulos," "There's
not much difference any-
more between tea party
people and the establish-
ment people. They have
almost become one."
Those statements have
a fair amount of truth.
For example, despite
differences about how far
to go in backing Sen. Ted
Cruz's campaign against
Obamacare, Republicans
all advocate repealing

her husband, Vladimir
Horowitz.
"They ruined my life
and they should roast in
hell!" she shrieked.
Arthur never tired of
telling how he discovered


(or replacing) President
Barack Obama's health
care program. Most agree
on the need to pay for
spending increases.
And publicized differ-
ences between individual
Republicans are often
relatively narrow.
According to National
Journal's respected non-
partisan ratings, Senate
Republican leader Mitch
McConnell of Kentucky,
who recently survived a tea
party primary challenge,
had a more conservative
voting score in the past
three years than his col-
league, tea party-backed
Sen. Rand Paul.
Though assistant GOP
leader John Cornyn of
Texas faced his own tea
party challenge this year,
he joined Cruz as two of
the three senators voting
against Secretary of State
John Kerry's confirmation.
Cornyn consistently ranks
among the 15 most con-
servative senators, though
slightly less conservative
than Cruz.
Then, there is North

Barbra Streisand in the
Village and fell in love
with 19-year-old Barbara
Stone the day the comely
redhead started working
with him on the Times
copy desk.
As a young theater
reporter, he was always
getting bewitched by
beautiful actresses.
One morning in 1951,
he went to a small mid-
town hotel to interview


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A


Carolina House Speaker
Thom Tillis, one of
the year's most touted
establishment victors. He
presided over a sharply
conservative legislative
record that sounds like a
tea party agenda: tax cuts
favoring the wealthy, new
abortion restrictions, an
easing of firearms laws, a
restrictive voter identifi-
cation law and measures
curbing pre-election
voting.
To be sure, some
extreme conservatives lost
in this year's primaries,
like those whose nom-
inations probably cost
the GOP the five seats in
the past four years that
would have enabled it to
win Senate control. As a
result, Republican chances
of reaching that goal are
better in 2014.
In Georgia, two
arch-conservative con-
gressmen, Paul Broun
and Phil Gingrey, failed to
make the runoff. Defeated
Republican aspirants in
North Carolina included
some tea party-backed

"a new personality"
handpicked by Colette
to star in "Gigi" on
Broadway.
"She opened the
door and she was in her
bathrobe," he told me,
"and she looked a little
disheveled, and that was
very exciting, and I found
my heart pounding a little
bit because she was so
pretty close up. And she
was so intelligent and she
had humor and a kind of
come-hither way when
she talked to a man."
He peppered her with
so many questions, she
told him they should


Charlote Hearing
Center Inc.


I -
Bethany L. Walden, Au.D.
Board Certified Doctor of Audiology

Hearing
Evaluations &
Hearing Aids
"Since 1984"
21216 Olean Blvd.,
Suite 4
Port Charlotte
Across from AAA Bldg.
766-8886
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hopefuls considered more
conservative than Tillis.
But the primaries are
not over. While Sens.
Lindsey Graham of South
Carolina, Pat Roberts
of Kansas and Lamar
Alexander of Tennessee
are all favored against tea
party rivals, Mississippi
Sen. Thad Cochran faces a
stiff fight Tuesday against
tea party-backed state Sen.
Chris McDaniel.
Fortunately for the GOP,
Mississippi is Republican
enough that McDaniel
would likely hold the
seat, though former
Democratic Rep. Travis
Childers is a potentially
competitive rival.
And in a race that could
shake the House GOP,
House Majority leader Eric
Cantor of Virginia expects
to defeat a tea party
challenger, though he has
resorted to denouncing
immigration reform to
do so. Even if he wins,
Cantor could face trouble
in a House GOP caucus
dominated by tea party
types.

finish up over dinner at
the Plaza.
When he called Barbara
to tell her he had to work
late interviewing Audrey
Hepburn, his irritated
bride replied, "You call
that work?"
My favorite story, which
I made Arthur retell
on a BBC radio show a
couple years ago, was
his "drunken prank" on
Marilyn Monroe.
One night in the early
1950s when he was about
30 and was working on
night rewrite, he and his
fellow rewrite guys took
their 10 o'clock dinner
break at Sardi's. Monroe
came in with a group and
was seated at the next
table.
Her dress had a low-cut
back, and Arthur said he
and his pals were "mes-
merized by her back" and
her "absolutely flawless
skin, very white, very
pure."
"One of us said, 'You
know, wouldn't it be
wonderful to be able to


In Texas, tea party
strength remains evident.
Though Cornyn won, he
got just 59 percent against
a group of little-known
candidates. State Sen.
Dan Patrick's victory in
Tuesday's lieutenant
governor runoff marked
the second time Lt. Gov.
David Dewhurst lost to
a tea party primary rival,
following last year's loss
to Cruz. Another tea party
favorite, state Sen. Ken
Paxton, was nominated for
attorney general.
Nationally, the
Republican establishment
is clearly doing a better
job preventing the kind of
damaging, high-profile tea
party victories Christine
O'Donnell and Sharron
Angle scored in 2010
Senate primaries. But that
doesn't mean its influence
in the GOP is going away
any time soon.
Carl Leubsdorf is
Washington bureau chief
of The Dallas Morning
News. Readers may reach
him at cleubsdorf@
dallasnews.com.

just touch that back?'
And before we knew it,
we were talking about
who would have the guts,
the nerve, the bravery to
touch her. We all put up a
couple of dollars and said
the first person who leans
over and touches her will
collect the money. And I,
with bravado I was
kind of a wise-guy young
man leaned over
quickly and just touched
her with my forefinger.
"I thought I'd touch her
and maybe she wouldn't
even feel the touch. But
she swung around and
said in the loudest voice
imaginable: 'Who did
that?' And we just went
into our clothes to hide.
It was just the most
horrible moment you
could possibly imagine.
And her friends said,
'Come on, Marilyn,' and
they calmed her down
and turned her around.
I collected the 10 bucks
and we got out of there."
Some like it hot. Arthur
liked it crackling.


CHARLOTTE COUNTY BOARD
OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATIVE VARIANCE

The zoning official has received a request for an
Administrative Variance and intends to grant the
variance pursuant to Section 3-9-6.1 (g) of the Charlotte
County Zoning Code. Petition number AVAR-14-010 is
being requested by Richard Sinclair Daniels. The
request is for an Administrative Variance of 1.09' for a
23.91' front yard setback instead of the required 25',
located in the Residential Single Family-3.5 (RSF-3.5)
zoning district. The property address is 26081
Constantine Road, Punta Gorda, Florida and is
described as Lot 6, Block 828, Punta Gorda Isles
Section 23, located in Section 16, Township 40 South,
Range 23 East. A complete legal description and
additional information are on file.
This notice is being mailed to the adjoining property
owners as revealed by the current County Tax Roll.
Within fifteen (15) days of the publication of this notice,
but not thereafter, any interested person may apply in
writing stating their name, the nature of their interest
and the nature of their opposition. Any such written
communication should be addressed to Shaun
Cullinan, Zoning Official, Charlotte County Community
Development Department, Zoning Division, 18400
Murdock Circle, Port Charlotte, Florida 33948-1095.


Shaun Cullinan
Zoning Official P

Publish: May 30, 2014 47062


COMPLETE FOOT CARE
Diabetic Care
Foot Pain
Foot Surgery
Diabetic Shoes
New Patients Welcome
941-613-1919
Dr. Michael Metyk 3191 Harbor Blvd. Unit D
Podiatric Surgery Port Charlotte, FL 33952


Our Town Page 10 C


www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014


VIEWPOINT





The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014


FROM PAGE ONE


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Pagel11


North Porters to decide on districting again


By SAMANTHA GHOLAR
STAFF WRITER

NORTH PORT Local
voters will once again be
asked to decide if they
want city candidates to
live in specific districts
following commissioners
approving 3-2 the second
reading of a proposed
ordinance this week.
North Port City
Attorney Rob Robinson
said the changes would
basically take the lan-
guage back to its original
form.
"This commission ...
has requested to elim-
inate the requirement
to create those districts
for commission residen-
cy. ..."he said Tuesday
night. "This just undoes
and returns it back to the
status quo, to the way the
charter was written prior



HURRICANE

FROM PAGE 1

Although the agency
is predicting few major
storms, Charlotte County
Emergency Management
director Wayne Sallade
reminded everyone that
1992 was also a below-
average hurricane season.
"We had the same type
of forecast in 1992, and
everyone got all excited
about it," Sallade said.
No hurricanes formed
throughout June, July and
the first half of August that
year, he added.
'And then a little
tropical depression
popped up and it was
named Andrew," Sallade
said. 'And 36 hours later it
destroyed 86,000 homes."


DISTRICT
FROM PAGE 1

Whittaker added that
he expects principals at
district schools to "listen
very deeply" and to be
"patient" when dealing
with staff members and
students.
"He had an issue
with getting frustrated,"
Whittaker said. "And that
wasn't OK with me."
However, Whittaker is
confident that the issues
have been resolved and


to the election in 2012."
Citizens voted in
favor of creating five
districts for commission
candidates in November
2012. However, during
a March 24 meeting,
commissioners directed
the city attorney to draft
a charter amendment
ordinance to go back on
the primary ballot that
would remove the district
residency requirement,
saying they believed
residents may have been
confused about what
they voted for.
Mayor Jim Blucher and
Commissioner Linda
Yates cast the dissenting
votes.
"Though I do not
support districting, I
respect the voters," Yates
said. "They passed it, and
I respect that. I am not
for putting this back on

All area residents
should have already
started stocking items
and preparing for a major
storm, Sallade said. He
added that early season
storms can occur and the
National Hurricane Center
is looking at a possible
low-pressure system
forming off the Yucatan
Peninsula in the next
week.
However, the system is
not yet formed and it may
not amount to anything,
Noah said.
Sallade is currently
distributing about 40,000
Disaster Planning Guides
to organizations and
locations throughout
Charlotte County.
The guide, which
outlines what prepara-
tions should be made well
before a hurricane, as well


that Shafer is a good fit
for the school.
Shafer has never been
formally disciplined by
the school district, ac-
cording to his personnel
file. The move from CHS
to the Technical Center
was an informal method
of discipline, Whittaker
said. He added that he
didn't believe Shafer's
issues "rose to the level"
of initiating formal disci-
plinary action.
"This is a second chance
for him (Shafer)," he
added. "And we do second
chances in this district."


the ballot, to ask them
to delete it. I'd entertain
something going on the
ballot to ask voters to
redefine districting, but
the way this is written I
cannot support it."
Blucher agreed.
"I can't support the
motion," he said. "I can't
find anyone who voted
for it, but it was 57 per-
cent of the population
who voted for it.
"I don't think it's prop-
er timing for districting.
... (But) the public has
voted, and I think we
need to respect that. It
doesn't pay to question
the voters like that."
The ordinance's second
reading did leave in the
one-year requirement of
living in the city to run
for office. All candidates
will still be elected in a
citywide election.


as what steps should be
taken if one is predicted
to make landfall, can be
obtained at locations such
as area libraries, churches,
government buildings and
hospitals, he said.
Sallade also encour-
aged everyone to have
preparations made
early, and not wait until
a hurricane forms before


Shafer will give up
his principal's salary
when the move is made,
Whittaker said. Principals
in the Charlotte County
school district make in
the high $90,000 range.
Assistant principals in
the district make around
$80,000. He could not be
reached for comment.
The proposed moves
will likely go before
the School Board at
the June 17 meeting.
Whittaker would like to
see the moves become
effective on July 1.
Email: pfallon@sun-herald.com


SUN PHOTO BY ADAM KREGER
The concrete wall to a porch area that Lillian Stalnaker backed into is only about 100 feet from
her driveway.


ACCIDENT
FROM PAGE 1

but didn't seem to be in
much pain.
"She wasn't moaning
or groaning or anything,"
he said.
Charlotte County Fire/
EMS spokeswoman Dee
Hawkins-Garland said
rescuers found the wom-
an in the back seat of her
car. Mathey said she was
there when he got to her,
too, and no one knows
how she got there. The
investigating FHP trooper


noted in his report that
it was "unknown" if the
woman was wearing a
seat belt.
No one was inside the
home that was hit.
Hawkins-Garland said
Stalnaker was alert after
the accident, but she was
immediately declared a
trauma alert and sent to
Lee Memorial. Since the
weather was bad, she was
taken in an ambulance
rather than helicopter,
Hawkins-Garland added.
Stalnaker had suffered
internal injuries. The FHP
announced Wednesday
night that she had died.


Mathey, 62, said
Stalnaker already lived
in the neighborhood -
located off Jones Loop
Road, east of Interstate 75
- when he moved there
about 10 years ago.
He said Stalnaker was
widowed and retired.
"She was just a nice
lady," he said. 'And she
was feisty and sharp as a
tack. She was funny."
He said Stalnaker had
two local sons named
Bruce and Terry, who
could not be reached for
comment Thursday

Email: akreger@sun-herald.com


Commissioners voting
in favor of the ordinance
Tuesday did not com-
ment on it.
Prior to the vote,
Seat 5 City Commission
candidate Marty Murphy
said during public
comment that all the
backtracking has caused
confusion.
"In November 2012,
this was approved by
citizens to create five
districts for commission-
ers to live in that would
be drawn up by the
2016 elections," he said.
"However on March 24,
2014, it was brought
up that perhaps the
electorate didn't know
what they were voting
on in 2012 ... I as a voter
in 2012, I voted against
this knowing exactly
what this amendment
said, thinking the city is


buying the essentials.
"People can't run to
Home Depot or Walmart
the day before a storm
and buy everything they
need," he said.
"Because guess what?
It's going to be gone," he
said.
Among supplies that
should be accumulated,


still too small to district.
I feel that this is doing
the wrong thing, I didn't
want this to begin with.
And if it goes on the bal-
lot I'm kind of conflicted
on what to vote on."
Resident Pete Peterson
said that the entire
process of the districting
amendment was poorly
handled.
"I came here from
Chicago, where you have
wards," he said. "I don't
think it was explained
too well to the people. It
was a good idea if it was
done right, but not the
way it was done here,
where the whole city
can vote. If you're not
gonna do it right, then
go back to the way it was
in 2012."
Former city commis-
sioner Buddy Hughes
was interested in the

residents should have at
least one gallon of water
per person per day for
seven days on hand, he
said.
"Water is vitally import-
ant to our folks, especially
with the temperature
here," Sallade said.
Southwest Florida is
one of the most difficult
places in the country to
evacuate because of the
advanced age of many of
the residents, Sallade said.
The low elevation and lack
of roadways in the area
also makes it difficult to
evacuate residents, he said.
Hurricane Charley
changed the way some
area residents look at the
storms, and many who
lived in Charlotte County
when the storm lashed


cost of districting,
though she stated she
didn't expect an answer
that evening.
"I voted against this
(then) and I will again,"
she said. "I think it's too
soon. In these economic
times, we can't afford
it. I have not heard how
much it's going to be. I
think if people knew the
costs they would proba-
bly vote against it."
If the primary ballot
requires a second page
as a result of the addi-
tion of the districting
item, the cost would
be about $7,500 to put
it on, according to city
officials however, they
said that most likely
won't be the case.
The primary election
is Aug. 26.

Email: sgholar@sun-herald.com

the area a decade ago take
preparedness much more
seriously, Sallade said.
"People realized that
they could no longer take
for granted that this area
would escape a hurricane
season," he said.
However, much of
the county's population
did not live here when
Hurricane Charley
devastated the region in
August 2004, Sallade said.
Therefore, those residents
need to inform them-
selves about the dangers
of storm surges, high wind
and heavy rain. They also
need to obtain a Disaster
Planning Guide from one
of the many locations at
which they are available,
Sallade said.
Email: pfallon@sun-herald.com


Start your day with the Crossword Puzzle
Mon. Sat. in the Classifieds

STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

NOTICE OF INTENT
The Department of Environmental Protection provides Notice of Intent to Issue a permit for the
City of Punta Gorda, Mr. Tom Jackson, Utility Director, 326 West Marion Avenue, Punta
Gorda, Florida 33950, who applied on December 16, 2013, for a permit to operate a Class V
injection well system. The project is located at 38100 Washington Loop, Punta Gorda, Florida
33982 in the County of Charlotte (File No. 0104020-016-017-UO/5X; WACS No. 87948). The
purpose of the project is for aquifer storage and recovery.
The facility will operate two (2) Class V, Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) injection wells
and five (5) monitor wells two (2) existing storage zone monitoring wells, two (2) inactive
ASR wells, and one (1) existing overlying zone monitor well. The ASR wells (ASR-3 and ASR-
4) shall be operated for the storing and recovering of potable water in the Suwannee Limestone
of the Upper Floridian aquifer system. One storage zone monitor well, SZMW-IR, may be
plugged and abandoned under this permit. The potable water will be produced at the City of
Punta Gorda Shell Creek Water Treatment Plant. The ASR wells are designed to inject an
annual maximum of 200 million gallons.
The Department has permitting jurisdiction under Chapter 403 of the Florida Statutes and the
rules adopted thereunder. The project is not exempt from permitting procedures. The
Department has determined that an operation permit is required for the proposed work.
The Department will issue the permit unless a timely petition or an administrative hearing is
filed under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S. Mediation is not available for this proceeding.
A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department's proposed permitting
decision may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) in accordance with Sections
120.569 and 120.57, F.S. The petition must conform to the requirements specified in the Notice
and be filed (received) within 14 days of publication of the Notice in the Department's Office of
General Counsel, MS 35, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000,
agencyclerkidep.state.fl.us. The failure of any person to file a petition within the appropriate
time period shall constitute a waiver of that person's right to request an administrative
determination (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statutes, or to
intervene in this proceeding and participate as a party to it. Any subsequent intervention (in a
proceeding initiated by another party) will only be at the discretion of the presiding officer upon
the filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.205 of the FloridaAdministrative Code.
The Petition shall contain the following information:
a. The name and address of each agency affected and each agency's file or
identification number, if known,
b. The name, address, any e-mail address, any facsimile number and telephone
number of the petitioner, if the petitioner is not represented by an attorney or a
qualified representative; the name, address and telephone number of the
petitioner's representative, if any, which shall be the address for service
purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the
petitioner's substantial interests will be affected by the agency determination;
c.A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency
decision;
d.A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the
petition must so indicate;
e.A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts
the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the agency's
proposed action;
f. A statement of the specific rules or statutes the petitioner contends require
reversal or modification of the agency's proposed action, including an
explanation of how the alleged facts relate to the specific rules or statutes; and
g.A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely what
action the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the agency's
proposed action.
If a petition is filed, the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate agency action.
Accordingly, the Department's final action may be different from the position taken by it in this
intent. Persons whose substantial interests will be affected by any decision of the Department
with regard to the application have the right to petition to become a party to the proceeding, in
accordance with the requirements set forth above.
The application, draft permit, and fact sheet are available for public inspection during normal
business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except legal holidays, at the
Department of Environmental Protection, South District Office, 2295 Victoria Avenue, Suite
364, Ft. Myers, Florida 33901-3875, and at the Department of Environmental Protection, 2600
Blair Stone Road, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400. Any additional information concerning this
project may be obtained by contacting Neil Campbell, Engineering Specialist, at (850)245-8612.
470629


NECESSITIES:
Store a seven-day supply of a gallon of water per day, per person.
Individuals should have extra batteries for flashlights, radios or
lanterns, as well as a first-aid kit.
A battery-operated radio is another essential item for any household.
Nonperishable food should also be included in any survival kit,
along with a can opener.
A portable kit filled with essentials on hand in case an evacuation
is called.
A nine-day sales tax holiday starts Saturday and runs through
June 8 on selected disaster preparedness supplies. Visit http://
dor.myflorida.com for the complete list of approved items.






Our Town Page 12 C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014


U U


NOTICE OF INTENTION TO

CONSIDER REVISION TO

THE CURRENT

k WATER, SEWER AND REUSE

RATES, FEES AND CHARGES

The Board of County Commissioners of Charlotte County will consider Charlotte County Utilities'
proposal, and the following recommended options, to increase the water, sewer and reuse utility rates:

Option l: Rate increase of 3% for both water and sewer
Option 2: Rate increase ofO.75% for water and 6% for sewer

The proposed rate increase will be scheduled to occur annually on October lst of 2014, 2015 and 2016; and
will affect all customers in Charlotte County Water and Sewer District 1 and District 2, beginning with the
customer bills assessed on or after October 1, 2014 (for services provided during the prior month.)

A public hearing on this resolution amendment will be held at 10AM, or as soon thereafter as it may be
heard, on the 10th day of June, 2014 in Room 119 of the Charlotte County Administration Center, 18500
Murdock Circle, Port Charlotte, Florida.

Interested parties may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed amendment.

PROPOSED RATES EXAMPLES

Below are examples of what a typical household utility bill will reflect should the Board of County
Commissioners adopt the new rates. Customers whose monthly usage differs from these examples may use

the rate schedule to calculate their utility bill, or may call the Charlotte County Utility office for assistance









40M.5 GD 3.50



OPTION 1: 2014 PI O'ED RATEVWITH 3% Q'ER SEWATER AD3% INCFEASEY n


Avr~dy tj 4 DO=,011D v--








OPT ION Z. 2014 _P V WITH ,7% WA rPANO% iN S






URes l C W Jr.j1 e. ,T,.7 [ S
______I_____________It3 4 ssm- S4, ?


OPTION 1: PROPOSED WATER RATE SCHEDULE
October 1, 2014 October 1, 2015 October 1, 2016
CUSTOMER METER EXISTING EXISTING 3% INCREASE 3% INCREASE 3% INCREASE 3% INCREASE 3% INCREASE 3% INCREASE
CLASS SIZE BASE USAGE CHARGE BASE USAGE CHARGE BASE USAGE CHARGE BASE USAGE CHARGE
FACILITY PER 1,000 GALS. FACILITY PER 1,000 GALS. FACILITY PER 1,000 GALS. FACILITY PER 1,000 GALS.
RESIDENTIAL 5/8" x'/4" $18.27 Regular $18.82 Regular $19.38 Regular $19.96 Regular
1" $45.67 0-5,999 4.67 $47.04 0-5,999 4.81 $48.45 0-5,999 4.95 $49.90 0-5,999 5.10
1 "/2' $91.33 6,000-10,999 5.37 $94.07 6,000-10,999 5.53 $96.89 6,000-10,999 5.70 $99.80 6,000-10,999 5.87
2" $146.12 11,000-15,999 6.77 $150.50 11,000-15,999 6.97 $155.02 11,000-15,999 7.18 $159.67 11,000-15,999 7.40
3" $292.25 16,000-25,999 7.70 $301.02 16,000-25,999 7.93 $310.05 16,000-25,999 8.17 $319.35 16,000-25,999 8.41
4" $456.63 26,000 gals. & up 8.87 $470.33 26,000 gals. & up 9.14 $484.44 26,000 gals. & up 9.41 $498.97 26,000 gals. & up 9.69
Emergency Emergency Emergency Emergency
0-5,999 4.67 0-5,999 4.81 0-5,999 4.95 0-5,999 5.10
6,000-10,999 6.44 6,000-10,999 6.63 6,000-10,999 6.83 6,000-10,999 7.04
11,000-15,999 8.80 11,000-15,999 9.06 11,000-15,999 9.34 11,000-15,999 9.62
16,000-25,999 10.78 16,000-25,999 11.10 16,000-25,999 11.44 16,000-25,999 11.78
26,000 gals. & up 13.31 26,000 gals. & up 13.71 26,000 gals. & up 14.12 26,000 gals. & up 14.54
MOBILE 5/8" x 3/4" $14.98 Regular $15.43 Regular $15.89 Regular $16.37 Regular
HOMES 0-5,999 4.67 0-5,999 4.81 0-5,999 4.95 0-5,999 5.10
6,000-10,999 5.37 6,000-10,999 5.53 6,000-10,999 5.70 6,000-10,999 5.87
11,000-15,999 6.77 11,000-15,999 6.97 11,000-15,999 7.18 11,000-15,999 7.40
16,000-25,999 7.70 16,000-25,999 7.93 16,000-25,999 8.17 16,000-25,999 8.41
26,000 gals. & up 8.87 26,000 gals. & up 9.14 26,000 gals. & up 9.41 26,000 gals. & up 9.69
Emergency Emergency Emergency Emergency
0-5,999 4.67 0-5,999 4.81 0-5,999 4.95 0-5,999 5.10
6,000-10,999 6.44 6,000-10,999 6.63 6,000-10,999 6.83 6,000-10,999 7.04
11,000-15,999 8.80 11,000-15,999 9.06 11,000-15,999 9.34 11,000-15,999 9.62
16,000-25,999 10.78 16,000-25,999 11.10 16,000-25,999 11.44 16,000-25,999 11.78
26,000 gals. & up 13.31 26,000 gals. & up 13.71 26,000 gals. & up 14.12 26,000 gals. & up 14.54

OPTION 1: PROPOSED WATER RATE SCHEDULE
October 1, 2014 October 1, 2015 October 1, 2016
CUSTOMER METER EXISTING EXISTING 3% INCREASE 3% INCREASE 3% INCREASE 3% INCREASE 3% INCREASE 3% INCREASE
CLASS SIZE BASE USAGE CHARGE BASE USAGE CHARGE BASE USAGE CHARGE BASE USAGE CHARGE
FACILITY PER 1,000 GALS. FACILITY PER 1,000 GALS. FACILITY PER 1,000 GALS. FACILITY PER 1,000 GALS.
MULTI- ALL $12.78 Regular $13.16 Regular $13.56 Regular $13.97 Regular
FAMILY METER (per unit) 0-3,999 4.67 (per unit) 0-5,999 4.81 (per unit) 0-5,999 4.95 (per unit) 0-5,999 5.10
SIZES 4,000-7,999 5.37 6,000-10,999 5.53 6,000-10,999 5.70 6,000-10,999 5.87
8,000-11,999 6.77 11,000-15,999 6.97 11,000-15,999 7.18 11,000-15,999 7.40
12,000-15,999 7.70 16,000-25,999 7.93 16,000-25,999 8.17 16,000-25,999 8.41
16,000 gals. & up 8.87 26,000 gals. & up 9.14 26,000 gals. & up 9.41 26,000 gals. & up 9.69
Emergency Emergency Emergency Emergency
0-3,999 4.67 0-5,999 4.81 0-5,999 4.95 0-5,999 5.10
4,000-7,999 6.44 6,000-10,999 6.63 6,000-10,999 6.83 6,000-10,999 7.04
8,000-11,999 8.80 11,000-15,999 9.06 11,000-15,999 9.34 11,000-15,999 9.62
12,000-15,999 10.78 16,000-25,999 11.10 16,000-25,999 11.44 16,000-25,999 11.78
16,000 gals. & up 13.31 26,000 gals. & up 13.71 26,000 gals. & up 14.12 26,000 gals. & up 14.54
BULK ALL $8.59 $3.30 $8.85 $3.40 $9.11 $4.10 $9.39 $4.22
SERVICE METER (per unit) (per unit) (per unit) (per unit)
SIZES

GENERAL 5/8" x 3/4" $18.27 $4.67 $18.82 $4.81 $19.38 $4.95 $19.96 $5.10
SERVICE 1" $45.67 $4.67 $47.04 $4.81 $48.45 $4.95 $49.90 $5.10
(Commercial) 1 '/2' $91.33 $4.67 $94.07 $4.81 $96.89 $4.95 $99.80 $5.10
2" $146.12 $4.67 $150.50 $4.81 $155.02 $4.95 $159.67 $5.10
3" $292.25 $4.67 $301.02 $4.81 $310.05 $4.95 $319.35 $5.10
4" $456.63 $4.67 $470.33 $4.81 $484.44 $4.95 $498.97 $5.10
6" $913.26 $4.67 $940.66 $4.81 $968.88 $4.95 $997.94 $5.10
8" $1,461.22 $4.67 $1,505.06 $4.81 $1,550.21 $4.95 $1,596.71 $5.10
IRRIGATION 5/8" x 3/4 > $18.27 Regular $18.82 Regular $19.38 Regular $19.96 Regular
SERVICE 1" $45.67 0-15,999 $6.77 $47.04 0-15,999 $6.97 $48.45 0-15,999 $7.18 $49.90 0-15,999 $7.40
1 '/2' $91.33 16,000 & up $7.70 $94.07 16,000 & up $7.93 $96.89 16,000 & up $8.17 $99.80 16,000 & up $8.41
2" $146.12 $150.50 $155.02 $159.67
3" $292.25 Emergency $301.02 Emergency $310.05 Emergency $319.35 Emergency
4" $456.63 0-15,999 $8.81 $470.33 0-15,999 $9.07 $484.44 0-15,999 $9.35 $498.97 0-15,999 $9.63
6" $913.26 16,000 gal & up$10.77 $940.66 16,000 gal & upS$11.09 $968.88 16,000 gal & up$11.43 $997.94 16,000 gal & upS$11.77
18" $1,461.22 ,$1,505.06 __1 $1,550.21 __1 $1,596.71

OPTION 1: PROPOSED SEWER RATE SCHEDULE
October 1, 2014 October 1, 2015 October 1, 2016
CUSTOMER METER EXISTING EXISTING 3% INCREASE 3% INCREASE 3% INCREASE 3% INCREASE 3% INCREASE 3% INCREASE
CLASS SIZE BASE USAGE CHARGE BASE USAGE CHARGE BASE USAGE CHARGE BASE USAGE CHARGE
FACILITY PER 1,000 GALS. FACILITY PER 1,000 GALS. FACILITY PER 1,000 GALS. FACILITY PER 1,000 GALS.
RESIDENTIAL ALL $27.70 $3.86 $28.53 $3.98 $29.39 $4.10 $30.27 $4.22
METER (10,000 gallon max.) (10,000 gallon max.) (10,000 gallon max.) (10,000 gallon max.)
SIZES

MOBILE ALL $26.86 $3.86 $27.67 $3.98 $28.50 $4.10 $29.35 $4.22
HOMES METER
SIZES

MULTI- ALL $22.16 $3.86 $22.82 $3.98 $23.51 $4.10 $24.21 $4.22
FAMILY METER (per unit) (per unit) (per unit) (per unit)
SIZES

BULK SERVICE ALL $18.43 $3.15 $18.98 $3.24 $19.55 $3.34 $20.14 $3.44
METER
SIZES


RECLAIMED
WATER
(Reuse)
RESIDENTIAL N/A $2.53 $2.53 $2.61 $2.61 $2.68 $2.68 $2.76 $2.76

BULK $0.31 $0.32 $0.33 $0.34


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The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 13


GENERA'
SERVICE
(Com erI


SEWER ONLY
RESIDENTIAL
MONTHLY
FLAT FEE
MULTI FAMILY
MONTHLY
FLAT FEE
BULK
MONTHLY
FLAT FEE

GENERAL
MONTHLY
FLAT FEE

SEWER ONLY
WAT ERSERVED
BY ANOTHER UTILITY
RESIDENTIAL
MONTHLY
FLAT FEE
MULTI FAMILY
MONTHLY
FLAT FEE
BULK
MONTHLY
FLAT FEE

PER CONTRACT
(ConsuptionOnly)

GENERAL
SERVICE
(C- ria)


CLS Z FASE LSAGCPAR GE1AE00SG ECFARIL Y1 E 100GE FCL;Y1PR100GL FC7A E 0 4


$2939
$7 47
$1 4695
$235 12
$470 24
$7347 5
$1,46952
$2,351 21

$7034


$5627


$5297


$7347





$2939


$2351


$1955





$2939
$7347
$146 95
$235 12
$47024
$734 75
$1,46952


1 1 '- I $ 1 ', 1 $ j $1- 6952 j $1,1360 $ 11


OPTION 2: PROPOSED WATER RATE SCHEDULE

October 1, 2014 October 1, 2015 October 1, 2016

CUSTOMER METER EXISTING EXISTING .75% INCREASE .75% INCREASE .75% INCREASE .75% INCREASE .75% INCREASE .75% INCREASE
CLASS SIZE BASE USAGE CHARGE BASE USAGE CHARGE BASE USAGE CHARGE BASE USAGE CHARGE
FACILITY PER 1,000 GALS. FACILITY PER 1,000 GALS. FACILITY PER 1,000 GALS. FACILITY PER 1,000 GALS.
RESIDENTIAL 5/8" x'14" $18.27 Regular $18.41 Regular $18.55 Regular $18.68 Regular
1" $45.67 0-5,999 4.67 $46.01 0-5,999 4.71 $46.36 0-5,999 4.74 $46.71 0-5,999 4.78

1 "/2' $91.33 6,000-10,999 5.37 $92.01 6,000-10,999 5.41 $92.71 6,000-10,999 5.45 $93.40 6,000-10,999 5.49
2" $146.12 11,000-15,999 6.77 $147.22 11,000-15,999 6.82 $148.32 11,000-15,999 6.87 $149.43 11,000-15,999 6.92
3" $292.25 16,000-25,999 7.70 $294.44 16,000-25,999 7.76 $296.65 16,000-25,999 7.82 $298.88 16,000-25,999 7.87
4" $456.63 26,000 gals. & up 8.87 $460.05 26,000 gals. & up 8.94 $463.51 26,000 gals. & up 9.00 $466.98 26,000 gals. & up 9.07
Emergency Emergency Emergency Emergency
0-5,999 4.67 0-5,999 4.71 0-5,999 4.74 0-5,999 4.78
6,000-10,999 6.44 6,000-10,999 6.49 6,000-10,999 6.54 6,000-10,999 6.59
11,000-15,999 8.80 11,000-15,999 8.87 11,000-15,999 8.93 11,000-15,999 9.00
16,000-25,999 10.78 16,000-25,999 10.86 16,000-25,999 10.94 16,000-25,999 11.02
26,000 gals. & up 13.31 26,000 gals. & up 13.41 26,000 gals. & up 13.51 26,000 gals. & up 13.61
MOBILE 5/8" x 3/4" $14.98 Regular $15.09 Regular $15.21 Regular $15.32 Regular
HOMES 0-5,999 4.67 0-5,999 4.71 0-5,999 4.74 0-5,999 4.78
6,000-10,999 5.37 6,000-10,999 5.41 6,000-10,999 5.45 6,000-10,999 5.49
11,000-15,999 6.77 11,000-15,999 6.82 11,000-15,999 6.87 11,000-15,999 6.92
16,000-25,999 7.70 16,000-25,999 7.76 16,000-25,999 7.82 16,000-25,999 7.87
26,000 gals. & up 8.87 26,000 gals. & up 8.94 26,000 gals. & up 9.00 26,000 gals. & up 9.07
Emergency Emergency Emergency Emergency
0-5,999 4.67 0-5,999 4.71 0-5,999 4.74 0-5,999 4.78
6,000-10,999 6.44 6,000-10,999 6.49 6,000-10,999 6.54 6,000-10,999 6.59
11,000-15,999 8.80 11,000-15,999 8.87 11,000-15,999 8.93 11,000-15,999 9.00
16,000-25,999 10.78 16,000-25,999 10.86 16,000-25,999 10.94 16,000-25,999 11.02
1 126,000 gals. & up 13.31 1 126,000 gals. & up 13.41 1 126,000 gals. & up 13.51 26,000 gals. & up 13.61


OPTION 2: PROPOSED WATER RATE SCHEDULE

October 1, 2014 October 1, 2015 October 1, 2016

CUSTOMER METER EXISTING EXISTING .75% INCREASE .75% INCREASE .75% INCREASE .75% INCREASE .75% INCREASE .75% INCREASE
CLASS SIZE BASE USAGE CHARGE BASE USAGE CHARGE BASE USAGE CHARGE BASE USAGE CHARGE
FACILITY PER 1,000 GALS. FACILITY PER 1,000 GALS. FACILITY PER 1,000 GALS. FACILITY PER 1,000 GALS.
MULTI- ALL $12.78 Regular $12.88 Regular $12.97 Regular $13.07 Regular
FAMILY METER (per unit) 0-3,999 4.67 (per unit) 0-5,999 4.71 (per unit) 0-5,999 4.74 (per unit) 0-5,999 4.78
SIZES 4,000-7,999 5.37 6,000-10,999 5.41 6,000-10,999 5.45 6,000-10,999 5.49
8,000-11,999 6.77 11,000-15,999 6.82 11,000-15,999 6.87 11,000-15,999 6.92
12,000-15,999 7.70 16,000-25,999 7.76 16,000-25,999 7.82 16,000-25,999 7.87
16,000 gals. & up 8.87 26,000 gals. & up 8.94 26,000 gals. & up 9.00 26,000 gals. & up 9.07
Emergency Emergency Emergency Emergency
0-3,999 4.67 0-5,999 4.71 0-5,999 4.74 0-5,999 4.78
4,000-7,999 6.44 6,000-10,999 6.49 6,000-10,999 6.54 6,000-10,999 6.59
8,000-11,999 8.80 11,000-15,999 8.87 11,000-15,999 8.93 11,000-15,999 9.00
12,000-15,999 10.78 16,000-25,999 10.86 16,000-25,999 10.94 16,000-25,999 11.02
16,000 gals. & up 13.31 26,000 gals. & up 13.41 26,000 gals. & up 13.51 26,000 gals. & up 13.61
BULK ALL $8.59 $3.30 $8.65 $3.32 $8.72 $4.12 $9.73 $4.15
SERVICE METER (per unit) (per unit) (per unit) (per unit)
SIZES


GENERAL 5/8" x 3/4" $18.27 $4.67 $18.41 $4.71 $18.55 $4.74 $18.68 $4.78
SERVICE 1" $45.67 $4.67 $46.01 $4.71 $46.36 $4.74 $46.71 $4.78
(Commercial) 1 '/2' $91.33 $4.67 $92.01 $4.71 $92.71 $4.74 $93.40 $4.78
2" $146.12 $4.67 $147.22 $4.71 $148.32 $4.74 $149.43 $4.78
3" $292.25 $4.67 $294.44 $4.71 $296.65 $4.74 $298.88 $4.78
4" $456.63 $4.67 $460.05 $4.71 $463.51 $4.74 $466.98 $4.78
6" $913.26 $4.67 $920.11 $4.71 $927.01 $4.74 $933.96 $4.78
8" $1,461.22 $4.67 $1,472.18 $4.71 $1,483.22 $4.74 $1,494.34 $4.78
IRRIGATION 5/8" x 3/4 > $18.27 Regular $18.41 Regular $18.55 Regular $19.10 Regular
SERVICE 1" $45.67 0-15,999 $6.77 $46.01 0-15,999 $6.82 $46.36 0-15,999 $6.87 $47.75 0-15,999 $6.92
1 '/2' $91.33 16,000 & up $7.70 $92.01 16,000 & up $7.76 $92.71 16,000 & up $7.82 $95.49 16,000 & up $7.87
2" $146.12 $147.22 $148.32 $152.77
3" $292.25 Emergency $294.44 Emergency $296.65 Emergency $305.55 Emergency
4" $456.63 0-15,999 $8.81 $460.05 0-15,999 $8.88 $463.51 0-15,999 $8.94 $477.41 0-15,999 $9.01
6" $913.26 16,000 gal & up $10.77 $920.11 16,000 gal & up $10.85 $927.01 16,000 gal & up $10.93 $954.82 16,000 gal & up $11.01
18" $1,461.22 1 _1 $1,472.18 1 1 $1,483.22 $1,527.72__1


OPTION 2: PROPOSED SEWER RATE SCHEDULE

October 1, 2014 October 1, 2015 October 1, 2016

CUSTOMER METER EXISTING EXISTING .75% INCREASE .75% INCREASE .75% INCREASE .75% INCREASE .75% INCREASE .75% INCREASE

CLASS SIZE BASE USAGE CHARGE BASE USAGE CHARGE BASE USAGE CHARGE BASE USAGE CHARGE

FACILITY PER 1,000 GALS. FACILITY PER 1,000 GALS. FACILITY PER 1,000 GALS. FACILITY PER 1,000 GALS.

RESIDENTIAL ALL $27.70 $3.86 $29.36 $4.09 $31.12 $4.34 $32.99 $4.60

METER (10,000 gallon max.) (10,000 gallon max.) (10,000 gallon max.) (10,000 gallon max.)

SIZES


MOBILE ALL $26.86 $3.86 $28.47 $4.09 $30.18 $4.34 $31.99 $4.60

HOMES METER

SIZES


MULTI- ALL $22.16 $3.86 $23.49 $4.09 $24.90 $4.34 $26.39 $4.60

FAMILY METER (per unit) (per unit) (per unit) (per unit)

SIZES



BULK SERVICE ALL $18.43 $3.15 $19.54 $3.34 $20.71 $3.54 $21.95 $3.75

METER

SIZES




RECLAIMED

WATER

(Reuse)

RESIDENTIAL N/A $2.53 $2.53 $2.68 $2.68 $2.84 $2.84 $3.01 $3.01


BULK $0.31 $0.33 $0.35 $0.37



Should any agency or person decide to appeal any decision made by the Board with respect to any matter considered at such meeting, he will need a record of the proceeding,

and for such purpose, he may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to

be based.



BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA

Charlotte County Board of County Commissioners does not discriminate on the basis of disability This nondiscrimination policy involves every aspect of the County's
functions, including access to and participation in meetings, programs and activities. FM Sound Enhancement Units for the Hearing Impaired are available at the Front

Security Desk, Building A of the Murdock Administration Complex. Anyone needing other reasonable accommodation or auxiliary aids and services please contact our" office

at 941 764 4191, TDD/TrY 941 743 1234, or by email to Walt.Black@charlottefl. com.




Reference No.: 061014-A


Published: May 30, 2014


OPTION 1


-SCHEDULE
October 1, 2015 1 October 1, 2016
INCREASED 3% INCREASE 3% INCREASE 3% INCREASE
BASE USAGE CHARGE1 BASE USAGE CHARGE


CLASS


mml


SIZE BASE USAGE CHARGE
FACILITY PER 1 000 ^ALS


3%INCRE SE 3%INCREASE 3
BASE USAGECHARGE
FACI LITY PER 1 000 GALS


I FACILITY


I


I PER 1 000 GALS I


FACILITY


$3027
$7567
$1 51335
$2 217
$1435
$75679
$1,513 60

$2,421 75
$7673


$61 3

$5778


$7567





$3027


$2421


$2014





$3027
$7567
$151 35
$24217
$ 8435
$756 7'
$1,513 60


OPTION 2: PROPOSED SEWER RATE SCHEDULE
October 1, 2014 October 1, 2015 October 1, 2016
CUSTOMER METER EXISTING EXISTING .75% INCREASE .75%INCREASE .75% INCREASE .75% INCREASE .75% INCREASE .75% INCREASE
CLASS SIZE BASE USAGE CHARGE BASE USAGE CHARGE BASE USAGE CHARGE BASE USAGE CHARGE
FACILITY PER 1,000GALS FACILITY PER 1,000 GALS FACILITY PER 1,000 GALS FACILITY PER 1,000GALS
GENERAL 5/8" x 3/4" $2770 $386 $2936 $409 $3112 $434 $3299 $540
SERVCE 1" $6925 $386 $7341 $409 $7781 $434 $8248 $540
(Co eril) 1 '2" $13851 $386 $14682 $409 $15563 $434 $16497 $540
2" $221 62 $386 $23492 $409 $24901 $434 $26395 $540
3' $44325 $386 $46985 $409 $49804 $434 $52792 $540
4" $69257 $38 $734 12 $409 $77817 $434 $82486 $540
6' $1,385 16 $386 $1,46827 $409 $1,55637 $43 $1,64975 $540
8' $2,2162 $2,34921 $2,49017 $2,63958
EWER ONLY
RESIDENTIAL N/A $6630 $7028 $7449 $8133
MONTHLY
FLAT FEE
MULTI FAMILY N/A $5304 $5622 $5960 $6507
MONTHLY
FLAT FEE
BULK N/A $4993 $5293 $56 10 $61 25
MONTHLY
FLAT FEE

GENERAL N/A $6925 $7341 $7781 $8248
MONTHLY
FLAT FEE $386 $409 $434 $460

EWER ONLY
WATER SERVED
BY ANOTHER UTILITY
RESIDENTIAL N/A $2770 $386 $2936 $409 $31 12 $434 $3299 $460
MONTHLY
FLAT FEE
MULTI FAMILY N/A $2216 $386 $2349 $409 $2490 $434 $2639 $460
MONTHLY
FLAT FEE
BULK N/A $1843 $315 $1954 $334 $2071 $354 $2195 $375
MONTHLY
FLAT FEE

PER CONTRACT $315 $334 $354 $375
(Conupio Ony)

GENERAL 5/8" x 3/4" $2770 $38 $2936 $409 $3112 $434 $3299 $460
ERVCE 1" $6925 $386 $341 $409 $7781 $434 $8248 $460
(Co eril) 1 '2" $13851 $386 $14682 $409 $15563 $434 $16497 $460
2" $221 62 $386 $23492 $409 $24901 $434 $26395 $460
3' $44325 $386 $46985 $409 $49804 $434 $5292 $460
4" $69257 $386 $73412 $409 $77817 $434 $82486 $460
$1385 16 $386 $1,46827 $409 $1,55637 $434 $1,69 75 $460
8' $2,216124 $386 $2,34921 $409 $2,490 17 $434 $2,63958 $460





:OurTown Page14 C


www.sunnewspapers.net


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014


D&D Garage Doors, a member of the Charlotte DeSoto Builders Industry
Association, a professional organization of building industry leaders and
supporters, held a CDBIA member mixer Tuesday at its location on Market
Circle in Port Charlotte. Nancy Hyndman of Aluminum, Vinyl Building Products
enjoys watching a game of cornhole being played by CDBIA president Bob
Miller and his opponent, Donna Knatz Barrett.


Patrick Lewis and Jamie Rawlinson of Sharp Hosting the event, D&D Garage Doors employees Cindy
Development of SWFL at the CDBIA mixer Braga-Armstrong, Sue Layland, manager, Josh Gull, Joe Ernst
Tuesday evening, and Uwe Christ.


Kale Dailey, Paul Wojtowicz and Charlotte County Commissioner Bill Truex, all with Truex
Preferred Construction, talk anything but shop.


Enjoying good conversation and good food are Donna Smith of Friendly Floors, Rise Wells of
Michael Saunders Realty, Wendy Atkinson of Atlas Insurance and Jacqueline Benjamin of Char-
lotte State Bank & Trust.


rw p -,"-,0
Terry and Marjorie Benson of Friendly Floors enjoy themselves
at the CDBIA member and associate mixer on Tuesday evening.


Kevin Koch of AA Disaster 24/7, wearing the hat he won and
holding a $25 gift certificate along with a new travel cup,
courtesy of the business card raffle.


Paul Camposeo and Robert Pra of Security Alarm Corp. enjoy
watching those playing cornhole inside the D&D Garage Door
showroom.


Left: Mona Miller, chef for the evening, her granddaughter Cassidy Miller, and Susan Moeller of
LiftMaster at the dessert table.


Above: Carlene Zeches of Z's Interiors and Megan Guynn of Pipedream Plumbing
try their hand at the cornhole game.


Below: Thumb licking was a good thing for Dave Appelo of Apex Roofmasters
and Don Guynn of Pipedream Plumbing as they consumed their share of the
chocolate desserts.


John Rullman and Chuck Mash of Kimal Lumber Co. and Nancy Hyndman of Aluminum, Vinyl Building Products
wait patiently for the next business card to be drawn for the night's prizes.







INSIDE


Obama: Sports
concussions need
more attention


President Barack Obama called
Thursday for more and better
research into the effects and
treatment of concussions in
youth athletes.
Page 2 -


Tyson enters meat
brawl with Hillshire bid


Tyson Foods, the largest U.S.
meat processor, on Thursday
made a $6.2 billion offer for the
maker of Jimmy Dean sausages
and Ball Park hot dogs.

Page 4 -

10 things to know


1. Shinseki losing
support
Support for embattled Veterans
Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki eroded
quickly Thursday, especially among
congressional Democrats facing tough
re-election campaigns. Seepage 1.

2. Ukraine's armed
forces dealt fresh blow
At least 12 soldiers were killed when
rebels down a helicopter. The deaths
underscore the challenge the military
faces in fighting a guerrilla-style
insurgency. See page 3.

3. Insurers accused of
discrimination
Two health organizations filed a
complaint with federal health officials
Thursday alleging some Florida insur-
ance companies are structuring their
insurance plans in a way that discourage
consumers with HIV and AIDS from
choosing those plans. Seepage 1.

4. White House touts
energy policies
The Obama administration is making a
concerted effort to cast its energy policy
as an economic success that is creating
jobs, securing the nation against inter-
national upheavals and shifting energy
use to cleaner sources. Seepage 4.

5. EI-Sissi wins
convincingly
Former military chief Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi
was elected president bya landslide of
92 percent of the vote. Seepage8.

6. Officials: Measles
tally doubled in past
month
Measles cases are accelerating, and
in the last five months have caused
more U.S. illnesses than in any entire
year since 1996. See page 2.

1. Study: Species
disappearing faster
A study concludes that species are
becoming extinct at least 1,000 times
faster than they did before humans spread
themselves across the plant. Seepage 1.

8. Brad Pitt accosted
on Hollywood red carpet
It's the latest such stunt by Vatalii
Sediuk, who has lost his job with
the Ukrainian TV station that gave
him a platform to cross the line with
celebrities. See page 2.

9. Secret proceeding
in Fla. redistricting trial
Circuit Judge Terry Lewis removed
members of the public and the media
from the courtroom during the eighth
day of the ongoing trial. Seepage 5.

10. What's next in the
search for MH310
Officials are seeking out a new
vessel that can go deeper than the
unmanned sub that was being used to
search the ocea n floor. See page 8.


he' w ire ww unesaerCe

FRIDAY MAY 30, 2014




Economy set for rebound



Signs point to comeback after first decline since 2011


By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP ECONOMICS WRITER

WASHINGTON -The U.S.
economy took a beating from
an especially harsh winter
during the January-March
quarter, skidding into reverse
for the first time in three
years. But spring has arrived
and along with it, signs that
the chill was just a temporary


setback in the long road to
recovery.
Gross domestic product
contracted at an annual
rate of 1 percent in the first
quarter, the Commerce
Department said Thursday.
That was worse than the
government's initial estimate
that GDP grew by a slight
0.1 percent. The economy last
posted a decline in the first


three months of 2011 when it
dropped 1.3 percent.
Since then, the labor market
has continued to improve,
consumer spending is solid
and manufacturers are
benefiting from increased
spending. Economists expect
a robust GDP rebound in the
April-June quarter as a result.
"We knew that weather
dramatically impacted growth


in the first quarter, and we
fully expect a bounce back in
the second quarter," said Dan
Greenhaus, chief strategist at
BTIG, in a note to clients.
The government released a
separate report Thursday re-
flecting progress. Applications
for unemployment benefits, a
proxy for layoffs, fell by 27,000

ECONOMY14


Study: Species disappearing faster


By SETH BORENSTEIN
AP SCIENCE WRITER

WASHINGTON -Species
of plants and animals are
becoming extinct at least
1,000 times faster than they
did before humans arrived
on the scene, and the world
is on the brink of a sixth great
extinction, a new study says.
The study looks at past and
present rates of extinction and
finds a lower rate in the past
than scientists had thought.
Species are now disappearing
from Earth about 10 times
faster than biologists had be-
lieved, said study lead author
noted biologist Stuart Pimm
of Duke University.
"We are on the verge of
the sixth extinction," Pimm
said from research at the Dry
Tortugas. "Whether we avoid
it or not will depend on our
actions."
The work, published
Thursday by the journal
Science, was hailed as a
landmark study by outside
experts.
Pimm's study focused on
the rate, not the number, of
species disappearing from
Earth. It calculated a "death
rate" of how many species
become extinct each year out
of 1 million species.
In 1995, Pimm found that
the pre-human rate of ex-
tinctions on Earth was about
1. But taking into account
new research, Pimm and his
colleagues refined that back-
ground rate to about 0.1.
SPECIESI4


AP PHOTOS


Above: This handout photo, taken in
December 2012, in Brazil, provided
by Stuart Pimm, Duke University,
shows a baby golden lion tamarin.
Once thought to be extinct, this
tamarin is a success story because
biologists have helped set aside
land for them.


Left: This undated handout photo,
taken in 2010, provided by Terry
Goss Photography USA/Marine
Photobank, shows an Oceanic
whitetip shark.


Support falters as Shinseki fights for his job


By MATTHEW DALY
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
WASHINGTON -Support
for embattled Veterans Affairs
Secretary Eric Shinseki
eroded quickly Thursday,
especially among congressio-
nal Democrats facing tough
re-election campaigns, even
as Shinseki continued to fight
for his job amid allegations
of delayed medical care and
misconduct at VA facilities
nationwide.
Shinseki spoke privately
with lawmakers and met with
nearly two dozen veterans
groups, assuring them that
he takes the reports seriously
and is moving swiftly to fix
problems. On Friday, he is to
address the National Coalition
on Homeless Veterans, outlin-
ing his plans for corrections.


A federal investigation of
operations in the troubled
Phoenix VA Health Care
System found that about
1,700 veterans in need of care
were "at risk of being lost or
forgotten" after being kept
off an official waiting list.
While initially focused on
Phoenix, the investigation
described Wednesday by the
VA Department's inspector
general found broad and
deep-seated problems in the
sprawling health care system,
which provides medical care
to about 6.5 million veterans
annually.
The interim report con-
firmed earlier allegations
of excessive waiting times
for care in Phoenix, with an
average 115-day wait for a first
FALTERSI4


AP FILE PHOTO
This May 15 photo shows Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki testifying
on Capitol Hill in Washington.


Complaint accuses 4 insurers of discrimination


By KELLI KENNEDY
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER

FORT LAUDERDALE -Two
health organizations filed a
complaint with federal health
officials Thursday alleging
some Florida insurance
companies are violating
the Affordable Care Act by
structuring their insurance


plans in a way that discourage
consumers with HIV and AIDS
from choosing those plans.
The National Health Law
Program and The AIDS
Institute said four insurance
companies offering plans in
Florida through the federal
online exchange required
HIV and AIDS patients to pay
a percentage of their often


expensive drugs instead of a
flat co-pay.
Instead of paying a flat $10
co-pay at the pharmacy, the
plans require patients to pay
40 to 50 percent of the cost of
their drug, which could run
into the thousands of dollars,
according to the complaint
which health experts say could
have national implications.


The groups also alleged
that the plans charged high
up-front costs and require
unwieldy prior authorizations.
The complaint, filed with
the Office for Civil Rights at
the Department of Health
and Human Services, asks
the agency to investigate the

INSURERS14





Page 2 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


NATIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014


Obama says sports concussions



need more attention


WASHINGTON (AP)
- Saying he wants
kids to play sports but
play safely, President
Barack Obama called
Thursday for more and
better research into the
effects and treatment
of concussions in youth
athletes. The issue is
one of growing concern
for parents who spend
weekends driving their
kids from one game to
another.
But without direct
authority over youth
sports leagues, Obama's
ability to address the
issue meaningfully is
limited to calling for
research and trying to
jumpstart a national
conversation to teach
parents, coaches and
young athletes about
concussions the goal
of a summit he hosted at
the White House.
He also said a new
attitude is needed where
players who have been
hit don't feel wimpy for
sitting out a game or two.
"We have to change
a culture that says you
suck it up," Obama said,
adding that he probably
suffered mild concus-
sions as a young football
player. He noted that


President Barack Obama applauds Victoria Bellucci,
graduate of Huntingtown High School in Huntingto
who suffered five concussions playing soccer, Thursi
the East Room of the White House in Washington, d
White House Healthy Kids and Safe Sports Concussi


concussions are also an
issue in soccer, hockey,
lacrosse and other
contact sports.
The event brought
together representatives
of professional and
college sports associa-
tions, coaches, parents,
young athletes, doctors
and others. The presi-
dent was introduced by
Victoria Bellucci, a high
school graduate from
Huntingtown, Md., who
suffered five concussions
during her high school
and club soccer career.
Victoria said her


injuries made it
to focus on her
ments. She even
turned down a f
scholarship to p
cer at Towson U
in Maryland an(
instead attend F
College in Floric
fall, the White H
said.
"Concussions
drastically alter(
life," she said.
Obama, an av
fan whose two d
are active in spo
highlighted mill
dollars in pledg(


the NFL, the National
Institutes of Health
and others to conduct
research that could begin
to provide answers and
improve safety.
"We want our kids
participating in sports,"
he said. "As parents,
though, we want to keep
them safe."
Nearly 250,000 kids
and young adults
visit hospital emergency
AP PHOTO rooms each year with
brain injuries caused by
a 2014 sports or other recre-
own, Md., ational activity, Obama
day, in said. He noted that the
during the figure excludes those
on Summit. who see a family doctor
or seek no treatment.
t hard Obama previously had
assign- waded into the debate
ntually over concussions,
full saying last year that he'd
)lay soc- have to think "long and
niversity hard" about allowing
d will a son to play football
Flagler because of the risk of
da in the head injury.
louse Among the financial
pledges Obama high-
have lighted is a $30 million
ed my joint research effort by
the NCAA and Defense
Ad sports Department and an
daughters NFL commitment of
)rts, also $25 million over the next
lions of three years to promote
es from youth sports safety.


Officials: Measles tally



doubled in the past month


NEWYORK (AP)-
Measles cases are accel-
erating, and in the last
five months have caused
more U.S. illnesses than
in any entire year since
1996.
Health officials say 307
cases have been reported
since New Year's Day.
About half have been in
the past month most
from a huge outbreak
in unvaccinated Amish
communities in Ohio.
That's a blistering start,
even before the custom-
ary spurt of cases seen
in the late spring and
summer, health officials
noted.
"Measles has reached
a 20-year high. This is
not the kind of record
we want to break," said
Dr. Anne Schuchat of
the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention.
The CDC released
the latest numbers
Thursday during a news
conference.
Nearly all the cases
have been linked to
travelers who caught the


In this Nov. 26, 2013, photo, Red Cross and UNICEF medics
administer polio and measles vaccinations to children at an
evacuation center for typhoon survivors more than two weeks
after Typhoon Haiyan ravaged the city of Tacloban, Leyte
province in central Philippines.


virus abroad and spread
it in the United States
among unvaccinated
people. Many of the
travelers had been to
the Philippines, where a
recent measles epidemic
has caused more than
30,000 illnesses.
Most of the unvacci-
nated skipped shots for


personal or philosoph-
ical reasons, Schuchat
said.
About half of those
who got sick have been
adults 20 or older. At
least 43 people were hos-
pitalized with measles
complications -mainly
pneumonia. There have
been no deaths.


No measles deaths
have been reported in
the U.S. since 2003.
The measles virus
is highly contagious,
spreading easily through
the air and in closed
rooms. Infected droplets
can linger for up to
two hours after the sick
person leaves.
It causes a fever, runny
nose, cough and a rash
all over the body. In rare
cases, measles can be
deadly, and is particular-
ly dangerous for chil-
AP PHOTO dren. Infection can also
rnil o nrofnant nrtmnn


to have a miscarriage or


premature birth.
According to CDC
records, the last time the
nation saw this many
cases in an entire year
was 1996, when 508 were
reported.
The last time this
many cases was reported
this early in the year was
1994, when 764 cases
occurred in the first five
months. The end-of-
year tally turned out to
be 963.


Google steps up efforts for more diversity


SAN JOSE, Calif.
(AP) Google has had
more trouble diversifying
its workforce than its
computer scientists have
had writing programs
that respond to search
requests in the blink of
an eye or designing cars
that can navigate traffic
without a human behind
the wheel.
That seemed to be the
conclusion when the
Silicon Valley giant this
week issued a gender and
ethnic breakdown of its
workforce that showed
that of its 26,600 U.S.
employees, 61 percent
are white, 30 percent
Asian, 3 percent Hispanic
and 2 percent black.
Thirty percent of its
employees are women.
Intel, Hewlett-Packard,
Cisco and Advanced
Micro Devices have
published similar
breakdowns.
"Google is miles from
where we want to be,"
said Laszlo Bock, head of
personnel at Google.


Why is one of the most
innovative, dynamic sec-
tors of the U.S. economy
looking like the corporate
world of the past, at least
when it comes to blacks,
Hispanics and women?
The biggest factor is a
shortage of such students
majoring in computer
science or other technical
fields in college, according
to Bock.
"There is an absolute
pipeline problem," he
said in an interview
Wednesday with "PBS
Newshour."
One year, Google says,
there were just two black
people in the U.S. with
newly minted doctorates
in computer science on
the job market. The com-
pany hired one of them,
and Microsoft hired the
other, according to Bock.
But the educational
choices of some minori-
ties don't entirely account
for the lack of diversity at
technology companies.
For instance, Google sells
$50 billion in advertising


annually, a task that re-
quired more than 2,900
salespeople in the U.S. as
of last August. Just 79 of
them, or 3 percent, were
black A total of 127, or
4 percent, were Hispanic.
More than 2,000, or about
70 percent, were white.
Google attributes this
phenomenon to "uncon-
scious biases" that have
historically favored white
people. "We like people
who are like us, who watch
the same shows, who like
the same food, who have
the same backgrounds,"
Bock told PBS.
To address this issue,
Google has put more than
20,000 employees through
90-minute training
sessions during the past
year to help them become
more aware of their
biases.
Google is also trying
to do more recruiting at
colleges with large minori-
ty enrollments. During
the past year, Google has
dispatched a specialist
to work with historically


black Howard University
to draw up a curriculum
that will give its gradu-
ates a better chance of
competing for technology
jobs against the likes of
MIT. The program will
be extended to five other
colleges this fall.
Google is just one of
many high-tech compa-
nies that are pledging to
diversify their workforces
this spring under pres-
sure from the Rev. Jesse
Jackson. But the same
promises were made in
the SiliconValley 15 years
ago, again under pressure
from the civil rights
leader. That effort includ-
ed a conference, a new
website, commitments
from top firms, and a call
to educate and employ
200,000 young people.
"I'm disappointed.
For the most part they
have not improved," said
Jackson on Thursday
"Look at their board
of directors and their
c-suites. There's a culture
of exclusion."


I NATIONAL NEWS BRIEFS


Guard in hot cell
death has record
of leaving post
NEWYORK (AP)- A
Rikers Island jail guard
who investigators say
left her post without
permission as a mentally
ill inmate lay dying in
his 101-degree cell in
February had been
disciplined four years
earlier for a similar
infraction, according to
documents obtained by
The Associated Press.
Carol Lackner was
accused in 2010 of leaving
her post and leaving Rikers
Island entirely without
permission while working
in a women's section of the
jail, according to the docu-
ments obtained through a
public records request.
That administrative
charge was settled, her at-
torney says, when Lackner
agreed to give up five
vacation days. He said she
was on a break when she
left, which is nevertheless
a policy violation.
More recently, Lackner
was suspended for 30 days
following the Feb. 15
death of 56-year-old
Jerome Murdough. A city
corrections investigation
found she abandoned
her post in a mental
health observation unit
20 minutes before the
homeless ex-Marine was
discovered unresponsive
in his overheated cell.

Proposed rocket
launch site in
Texas clears hurdle
McALLEN, Texas (AP)
- Building and operating
a private rocket launch
site along the coast in the
southernmost tip of Texas
is unlikely to jeopardize
the existence of protected
animal species and create
few unavoidable impacts,
according to a final federal
environmental review.
The Federal Aviation
Administration released
the environmental impact
statement for California-
based SpaceX on Thursday
It does not guarantee
that the FAA would issue
launch licenses there, but
it is an essential step in
that direction.
SpaceX has proposed
launching 12 rockets per
year from the site east of
Brownsville and 3 miles
north of the U.S.-Mexico
border called Boca Chica
Beach, but did not make
any promises Thursday.
If built, it would be the
first commercial orbital
launch site.

Harvard graduates
wear red tape in
sexual assault
policy protest
BOSTON (Bloomberg)
- Dozens of Harvard
University seniors marked
their graduation caps
with red tape in support
of victims of sexual
assault and to protest
the school's response to
campus attacks.
Students put a stripe of
crimson tape on the edge
of their mortarboards at
the school's 363rd com-
mencement Thursday in
Cambridge, Mass.
Harvard, the oldest and
richest U.S. college, has
come under increasing
criticism from students
saying that programs to
prevent sexual assault
are inadequate and not
enough is being done so
that victims can continue
their studies.

GOP bristles over
Obama pressure
on immigration
WASHINGTON (AP)-
President Barack Obama's


latest attempt to pressure
House Republicans to act
on immigration legislation
will backfire and make
action harder, a House
chairman said Thursday
Judiciary Committee
Chairman Bob Goodlatte,


R-Va., criticized Obama's
move this week to delay
the results of a review of
the nation's deportations
policy until late summer.
White House officials
said they wanted to allow
House Republicans the
opportunity to act before
Congress' August recess
and November midterm
elections.
If they don't, Obama is
expected to take steps on
his own to curb deporta-
tions, which have reached
record highs on his watch.
"When the president
says he's going to set a time
limit and then consider
taking actions himself...
that makes doing immi-
gration reform harder not
easier," Goodlatte said
during an oversight hearing
with Homeland Security
Secretary Jeh Johnson.

Man who rushed
Pitt had pulled
Grammy prank
LOS ANGELES (AP) -
A man who was arrested
after police said he
rushed and touched Brad
Pitt at the premiere of
the Angelina Jolie movie
"Maleficent" is a former
Ukrainian journalist with
a history of getting too
close to celebrities.
Vitalii Sediuk was jailed
Wednesday on suspicion
of misdemeanor battery
at the El Capitan Theatre
in Hollywood and was
held in lieu of $20,000
bail, police said.
Sediuk has previously
crossed the line with
celebrities, most recently
rushing America Ferrara
on a red carpet at the
Cannes Film Festival and
crawling under her dress.
He crashed the 2013
Grammy Awards and was
arrested after he went
onstage and grabbed a
microphone before Adele
accepted an award. He
pleaded no contest to
trespassing and remains
on probation.

Elder Bush, Queen
of Soul honored
at Harvard
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP)
- A former president and
the Queen of Soul have
received honorary degrees
from Harvard University.
George H.W Bush,
Aretha Franklin and
six others were hon-
ored at Thursday's
commencement.
Harvard President Drew
Faust poked fun at the
89-year-old Bush's Yale
University credentials,
saying his "cap was blue,
his house was white and
now his robe is crimson,"
but added that Bush
"piloted our nation though
changeful skies."
Bush smiled and
gestured to the crowd as
he received the doctor of
laws degree, but he did not
stand.
The 72-year-old Franklin
accompanied herself
on piano to perform the
national anthem. She
later received an honorary
doctor of arts degree.
Former New York City
Mayor Michael Bloomberg
also received an honorary
degree.

Oil back above
$103 ahead on
supply drop
(AP) --The price of oil
rose above $103 barrel
Thursday on a drop in
supplies at the main
U.S. oil trading hub and
signs of growing gasoline
demand in the U.S.
Benchmark crude for
July delivery rose 86 cents
to close at $103.58 a
barrel in New York. On


Wednesday, the Nymex
contract dropped $1.39 to
close at $102.72.
Brent crude, a bench-
mark for international oil
used by many U.S. refiner-
ies, rose 16 cents to close at
$109.97 a barrel in London.





The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014


WORLD NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


WIRE Page 3


I WORLD NEWS BRIEFS


CIA winds down
drone strike
program in Pakistan
WASHINGTON (AP)-
The CI's targeted killing
program in Pakistan, once
the mainstay of President
Barack Obama's counter-
terrorism effort, is winding
down.
Because of stricter rules,
diplomatic sensitivities
and the changing nature of
the al-Qaida threat, there
hasn't been a U.S. drone
strike in Pakistan's tribal
areas since Christmas.
And American officials say
opportunities for drone at-
tacks will dwindle further
as the CIA and the military
draw down in neighboring
Afghanistan, reducing
their intelligence-gather-
ing footprint.
"The program (in
Pakistan) appears to have
ended," said Peter Bergen,
who has closely studied
drone strikes for the New
America Foundation, a
Washington think tank.
U.S. officials won't
go that far, but Obama
announced this week
a plan to pull nearly all
American troops out of
Afghanistan by the end of
2016. The targeted killing
program in Pakistan relies
on drones flown from, and
intelligence gathered in,
U.S. bases in Afghanistan
that would then be closed.


Putin forms
ex-Soviet trade bloc
to challenge EU, US
ASTANA, Kazakhstan
(Bloomberg) -Russian
President Vladimir Putin
Thursday signed a treaty
with his counterparts from
Kazakhstan and Belarus
creating a trading bloc of
more than 170 million peo-
ple to challenge the United
States and European
Union.
The formal creation of
the Eurasian Economic
Union in the Kazakh
capital of Astana marks the
culmination of two decades
of talks between former
Soviet republics. Kyrgyzstan
and Armenia are seeking to
join the union by the end
of the year, the countries'
leaders said at the signing
ceremony today.
Putin, facing sanctions
from the U.S. and EU
for his annexation of
Crimea from Ukraine,
said the three countries
will "gradually align" their
currency and monetary
policies to facilitate trade
and minimize risks. The
Russian leader has pushed
for Ukrainian membership
in the union and, before
relations soured with the
EU, urged the creation
of a free-trade zone from
Lisbon to Vladivostok on
the Pacific Ocean.


Thailand's junta
Village protests bans all anti-coup
rape, killings of protests
Indian s is ters


LUCKNOW, India (AP) -
Two teenage sisters in rural
India were raped and killed
by attackers who hung their
bodies from a mango tree,
which became the scene of
a silent protest by villagers
angry about alleged police
inaction in the case. Two of
the four men arrested so far
are police officers.
Villagers found the girls'
bodies hanging from the
tree earlyWednesday, hours
after they disappeared
from fields near their
home in Katra village in
Uttar Pradesh state, police
Superintendent Atul Saxena
said. The girls, who were 14
and 15, had gone into the
fields because there was no
toilet in their home.
Hundreds of angry
villagers stayed next to the
tree throughout Wednesday,
silently protesting the police
response. Indian TV footage
showed the villagers sitting
under the girls' bodies as
they swung in the wind,
and preventing authorities
from taking them down
until the suspects were
arrested.
Police arrested two police
officers and two men from
the village later Wednesday
and were searching for
three more suspects.

Japan's Abe
says North Korea
agrees to probe
abductions
TOKYO (dpa) -
Japanese Prime Minister
Shinzo Abe said Thursday
that North Korea had
agreed to reinvestigate
its past abductions of
Japanese nationals.
The announcement
came after diplomatic talks
this week in Stockholm
between Japan and North
Korea.
Tokyo said it would lift
some sanctions on North
Korea once Pyongyang
launches its reinvestigation
and that it would supply
humanitarian assistance.
Abe's government is
eager to make progress
on the issue of Japanese
nationals abducted by
North Korean agents in the
1970s and '80s.
Japan lists 17 nationals
kidnapped by North Korea.
Five were returned alive in
2002.
Pyongyang has con-
tended that eight have
died and four others never
entered the country, and it
previously said repeatedly
that it considers the issue
resolved.


BANGKOK (AP) -
More than 1,000 Thai
troops and police sealed
off one of Bangkok's
busiest intersections
Thursday to prevent a
planned protest, as au-
thorities said they would
no longer allow any
demonstrations against
last week's military coup.
Truckloads of soldiers
blocked all incoming
roads to the capital's
Victory Monument in a
massive show of force
at the height of evening
rush hour in an area that
serves as one of the city's
commuter bus hubs.
More than a dozen po-
lice prisoner trucks were
parked along the emptied
roundabout, but there
was little sign of protest-
ers, who have come out
almost daily to defy a ban
on political gatherings.
A Belgian man was
detained for displaying
a T-shirt saying "PEACE
PLEASE," and two Thai
women were taken away
in a police truck after
they showed signs with
anti-coup messages.

China's advance
spurs Indonesian
military shift
JAKARTA, Indonesia
(Bloomberg) -China's
intensifying move to as-
sert claims over the South
China Sea has given fresh
impetus to a military
buildup in Indonesia that
will see its forces de-
ployed with greater focus
on external risks.
After years of con-
centrating on separatist
threats across an archipel-
ago long enough to stretch
from New York to Alaska,
Indonesia plans to deploy
attack helicopters to its
islands at the southern
end of the South China
Sea and expand its naval
power. The front-runner
for July's presidential elec-
tion, Joko Widodo, aims to
boost defense spending
to 1.5 percent as a share
of the economy, which is
Southeast Asia's largest.
The strategy shift
comes as China esca-
lates disputes with the
Philippines and Vietnam,
fellow members of the
Association of Southeast
Asean Nations. China's
standoff with Vietnam
over an oil rig this month
followed its 2012 success
in taking control of the
Scarborough Shoal from
the Philippines.


SLOVYANSK, Ukraine
(AP) In another devas-
tating blow to Ukraine's
armed forces, rebels shot
down a troop helicopter
Thursday, killing at least
12 soldiers, including a
general who had served
in the Soviet army and
was in charge of combat
training.
The loss underscored
the challenge Ukrainian
forces face in fighting a
guerrilla-style insurgency
that has proven to be an
agile foe.
Ukraine, mean-
while, announced that
President-elect Petro
Poroshenko will be
sworn in June 7, less
than two weeks after his
overwhelming victory
in special balloting
that was hoped would
ease tensions in the
deeply divided country.
Poroshenko has prom-
ised to negotiate with
representatives in rebel-
lious eastern Ukraine but
also has vowed to uproot
the pro-Moscow rebels
who want the region to
join Russia.
The Mi-8 helicopter
was downed on the
outskirts of Slovyansk by
rebels using a portable
air defense missile,
according to Oleksandr
Turchynov, Ukraine's
acting president, in


remarks to parliament
in Kiev. Slovyansk, a city
of 120,000 people, has
become a focal point for
the insurgency and has
for weeks been encircled
by Ukrainian troops.
Turchynov said the
helicopter was rotating
troops into a checkpoint
when it came under rebel
fire. Among the dead was
Gen. Serhiy Kulchytskiy,
who the Interfax news
agency said had once
served in the Soviet
army and was in charge
of training Ukraine's
National Guard.
White House spokes-
man Jay Carney said the
U.S. hasn't verified what
happened in the inci-
dent, but he added that
Washington is concerned
because it indicates the
separatists still have ac-
cess to advanced weap-
ons and are getting help
from outside Ukraine,
alluding to Russia.
While Ukrainian forces
may be better equipped
that their opponents,
fears the fighting could
degenerate into brutal
urban warfare have so
far held authorities back
from ordering an all-out
assault.
"It is extremely difficult
to fight against guerrillas.
You just cannot destroy
them. They are not


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Black smoke rises from a shot down Ukrainian Army helicopter
outside Slovyansk, Ukraine, Thursday.


regular troops," said Igor
Sutyagin, a research fel-
low at the London-based
Royal United Services
Institute. "It's the classic
problem which Russia
had in Chechnya and
the United States had in
Vietnam."
The Ukrainian govern-
ment has been waging a
military campaign in the
Donetsk and Luhansk re-
gions to try to put down
the uprising by gunmen
who have taken over
public buildings and set
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city of Donetsk, the
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In recent days,
Ukrainian troops have
been using mortars to
try to retake Slovyansk,
causing civilian casual-
ties and prompting some
residents to flee. The
tactic has produced few
immediate results other
than deepening distrust
toward the government
in the city and instilling
general fear.
Russia's Foreign
Ministry denounced the
use of aircraft and artil-
lery against the rebels
and demanded that Kiev
end a "fratricidal war and
launch a real political
dialogue with all political
forces and representa-
tives of the regions."


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Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014 FROM PAGE ONE


Tyson enters meat brawl with Hillshire bid


NEWYORK (AP)-
Hillshire Brands is at
the center of a barnyard
brawl.
Tyson Foods, the
largest U.S. meat
processor, on Thursday
made a $6.2 billion offer
for the maker of Jimmy
Dean sausages and Ball
Park hot dogs, topping
a bid made two days
earlier by rival poultry
producer Pilgrim's Pride.
Based in Greeley, Colo.,
Pilgrim's Pride is owned
by Brazilian meat giant
JBS.
The takeover bids
for Hillshire by the two
major meat processors
are being driven by the


desirability of brand-
name processed prod-
ucts like Jimmy Dean
breakfast sandwiches.
The convenience foods
are more profitable
than fresh meat, such as
chicken breasts, where
there isn't as much wig-
gle room to pad prices.
Selling more types of
products also would give
the companies a buffer
from volatile price swings
of fresh meat. When beef
prices rise and shoppers
turn to other meats, the
companies can sell more
chicken or bacon, for
example.
While both Tyson
and Pilgrim's sell some


prepared products like
frozen fried chicken piec-
es, their main business
has been as suppliers
of fresh meat for super-
markets and restaurant
chains.
Both offers are
contingent on Hillshire
abandoning its plan to
acquire Pinnacle Foods,
which makes Birds
Eye frozen vegetables
and Wish-Bone salad
dressings. Hillshire had
been trying to diversify
its own portfolio by
moving into other areas
of the supermarket
with the $4.23 billion
acquisition.
But some investors


questioned whether
combining with Pinnacle
made sense, given the
sharp differences in
product categories and
the outdated image of
some Pinnacle brands,
such as Hungry Man
frozen dinners.
Hillshire said earlier
it strongly believes in
its deal with Pinnacle
Foods but would review
Pilgrim's offer. In its latest
statement on Thursday,
the Chicago-based com-
pany said it would review
Tyson's offer as well and
made no mention of its
Pinnacle deal.
Pilgrim's Pride said it
is considering its options


and will "update the
markets in due course,"
making no mention of
whether it planned to
raise its offer. Pinnacle
didn't respond to request
for comment.
Earlier this week, J.P.
Morgan analyst Ken
Goldman had noted
other potential suitors
for Hillshire could
emerge, including Tyson
and Cargill. Goldman
suspended his ratings for
Hillshire and Tyson on
Thursday because of J.P.
Morgan's role in the deal
on behalf of Tyson.
A representative
for Cargill declined to
comment.


White House touts energy policies as rules loom


WASHINGTON (AP)
- Setting the stage for
upcoming restrictions
on coal-fired power
plants, the Obama ad-
ministration is making a
concerted effort to cast
its energy policy as an
economic success that
is creating jobs, secur-
ing the nation against
international upheavals
and shifting energy use
to cleaner sources.
In a 42-page report
released Thursday, the
White House argues that
significant increases in
the domestic production



ECONOMY

FROM PAGE 1

last week to 300,000.
The result is nearly a
seven-year low.
Ian Shepherdson, chief
economist at Pantheon
Macroeconomics, said
that the big drop in
unemployment benefit
applications was more
significant than the latest
GDP figure because
"it strongly supports



SPECIES
FROM PAGE 1

Now, that death rate is
about 100 to 1,000, Pimm
said.
Numerous factors
are combining to make
species disappear much
faster than before, said
Pimm and co-author
Clinton Jenkins of the
Institute of Ecological
Research in Brazil. But
the No. 1 issue is habitat
loss. Species are finding
fewer places to live as



FALTERS
FROM PAGE 1

appointment for those
on the waiting list -
nearly five times as long
as the 24-day average the
hospital had reported.
House Speaker John
Boehner and House
Minority Leader Nancy
Pelosi said they were
reserving judgment
about Shinseki. But with
the situation threatening
to affect congressional
elections in November,



INSURERS
FROM PAGE 1

Florida plans offered
by CoventryOne, Cigna,
Humana and Preferred
Medical and require the
insurance companies to
take corrective actions if
necessary.
Federal health officials
said they are reviewing
the complaint.
The report alleges
that CoventryOne
requires consumers to
pay 40 percent co-in-
surance for the cost of


of natural gas and
reductions in oil con-
sumption have better
positioned the United
States to advance its
economic and environ-
mental goals.
Few of the report's
conclusions are new, but
it includes a detailed
analysis of how past
reliance on petroleum
imports made the U.S.
economy especially
susceptible to oil price
shocks, a vulnerabil-
ity that White House
economists say has been
diminished by a reduced


the idea that the labor
market conditions are
improving markedly,
despite the weak head-
line growth during the
winter."
Other analysts noted
that consumer spending,
which accounts for
70 percent of economic
activity, was very strong in
the first quarter, growing
at an upwardly revised
3.1 percent annual rate.
A report earlier this week
showed that consumer
confidence is climbing,

more places are built up
and altered by humans.
Add to that invasive
species crowding out
native species, climate
change affecting where
species can survive, and
overfishing, Pimm said.
The buffy-tufted-ear
marmoset is a good
example, Jenkins said.
Its habitat has shrunk
because of development
in Brazil, and a compet-
ing marmoset has taken
over where it lives. Now,
it's on the international
vulnerable list.
The oceanic white-tip

the chorus of lawmakers
calling for his departure
grew by the hour.
Democratic Sens. Mark
Warner and Tim Kaine of
Virginia, Mary Landrieu
of Louisiana, Jeff Merkley
of Oregon and New
Mexico's Tom Udall
and Martin Heinrich all
urged Shinseki to step
aside. Eleven Senate
Democrats have called
for Shinseki's resignation
since Wednesday, when
the VA inspector general
report came out. All
but Heinrich are on the
ballot this fall.


all HIV drugs, including
generics, after a $1,000
deductible. "That would
be about $1,000 per
month per drug in most
instances. what patient
could afford that?" said
Carl Schmid, deputy
executive director of The
AIDS Institute.
Health advocates warn
high costs cause patients
to skip doses or go off
their medications alto-
gether, causing serious
health complications.
Cigna, Humana and
Coventry said in separate
statements that their
plans follow the latest


U.S. demand for foreign
oil.
The report, obtained
in advance by The
Associated Press, is
designed to inoculate
the administration
against criticism that
new Environmental
Protection Agency
regulations on coal-fired
power plants, expected
to be unveiled Monday,
will increase electricity
costs, cost jobs and be
a drag on economic
growth. Conservatives
and business groups
such as the U.S.


with nearly one-fifth of
Americans expecting their
incomes to grow over the
next six months.
And earlier this month,
the Institute for Supply
Management said that
manufacturing grew fast-
er in April than March as
exports picked up and
factories accelerated
their hiring.
The release Thursday
was the government's
second look at first quar-
ter GDP, the country's
total output of goods

shark used to be one
of the most abundant
predators on Earth, but
they have been hunted so
much they are now rarely
seen, said Dalhousie
University marine biol-
ogist Boris Worm, who
wasn't part of the study
but praised it. "If we don't
do anything, this will go
the way of the dinosaurs."
Five times, a vast major-
ity of the world's life has
been snuffed out in what
have been called mass ex-
tinctions, often associated
with giant meteor strikes.
About 66 million years

White House press
secretary Jay Carney
declined to say whether
President Barack Obama
still has full confidence
in Shinseki, who has led
the VA since the start of
the Obama administra-
tion. The president is
waiting for a full investi-
gation into the VA before
deciding who should be
held accountable, Carney
said.
Rep. Steve Israel, the
New York Democrat
who chairs the party's
campaign committee in
the House, called for a


HHS guidelines, cover all
medically necessary HIV
drugs and offer a variety
of options so consumers
can pick a plan that best
meets their health needs.
Preferred Medical did not
immediately return a call
seeking comment.
South Florida attorney
Vicki Tucci said she's
trying to help more than
30 clients with HIV and
AIDS to get off Humana,
Coventry and other plans
and switch to other plans
with better coverage for
those conditions.
"They go to the phar-
macy and find their drug


Chamber of Commerce
have argued that the
reductions in emissions
will be too small and
the consequences to the
economy too large to
justify new restrictions.
While the White
House economic report
does not address those
criticisms directly, it
says greater domestic
energy production, the
use of wind and solar
power and the reduction
in oil consumption
"have had substantial
economic and energy
security benefits, and


and services.
The data primarily re-
flected a sharp slowdown
in businesses stockpiling,
which subtracted 1.6 per-
centage points from
growth, a full percentage
point more than the
initial estimate. Analysts
noted that the weaker
inventory figure would
likely translate into more
restocking and stronger
growth in the second
quarter.
The trade deficit was
slightly larger than

ago, one such extinction
killed off the dinosaurs
and three out of four
species on Earth. Around
252 million years ago, the
Great Dying snuffed out
about 90 percent of the
world's species.
Pimm and Jenkins said
there is hope. Both said
the use of smartphones
and applications such as
iNaturalist will help ordi-
nary people and biologists
find species in trouble,
they said. Once biologists
know where endangered
species are they can try
to save habitats and use

criminal investigation of
the department by the
Justice Department and
said of Shinseki, "If his
resignation is what it takes
to fix the problem, then
yes, he should resign."
And Dick Durbin
of Illinois, the No. 2
Democrat in the Senate,
said that he respects
Shinseki, a former four-
star Army general who
served in Vietnam but
that the IG's report "does
really move us closer
to that point where we
have to question his
leadership." He said, "If


is not covered and they
can't afford them. There's
no way," said Tucci.
Tucci is working with
advocacy groups that
would pay the cost of
medication while those
with HIV and AIDS are
without insurance until
the next open enrollment
period later this year.
Even before the
Affordable Care Act
took effect, insurers had
increasingly begun re-
quiring patients to pay a
percentage of their drug
costs instead of a flat co-
pay, but experts say pa-
tients often spend more


they are helping to re-
duce carbon emissions
in the energy sector and
thereby tackle the chal-
lenge posed by climate
change."
A quarter of the report
is devoted to analyzing
the economic impact of
the United States' shift
from importing more
energy than it produces
to producing more than
it imports. The White
House makes the case
that the U.S. economy
is better protected from
high oil prices now than
before.


previously thought.
Business investment
in structures fell at an
annual rate of 7.5 percent
in the first quarter, also
worse than the initial
estimate.
The 1 percent decline
in the first quarter was
only the second negative
quarterly GDP reading
since the current recov-
ery began in June 2009.
In the fourth quarter,
the overall economy
grew at an annual rate of
2.6 percent.

captive breeding and
other techniques to save
the species, they said.
One success story is
the golden lion tamarin.
Decades ago the tiny
primates were thought
to be extinct because
of habitat loss, but they
were then found in
remote parts of Brazil,
bred in captivity and bi-
ologists helped set aside
new forests for them to
live in, Jenkins said.
"Now there are more
tamarins than there are
places to put them," he
said.

this is what I think it is, it
could mean we need new
leadership."
The American
Legion and dozens of
Republicans have called
for Shinseki to resign,
including Jeff Miller of
Florida, chairman of the
House Veterans Affairs
Committee, and Richard
Burr of North Carolina,
senior Republican on the
Senate veterans panel.
Arizona's two Republican
senators, John McCain
and Jeff Flake, also have
called for Shinseki to step
down.


for their prescriptions in
plans offered under the
health law because of the
co-insurance.
The organizations said
they didn't know how
many HIV and AIDS
patients had purchased
health plans from com-
panies being targeted
in the complaint. But a
study from the non-
partisan Kaiser Family
Foundation estimates
about 23,000 uninsured
people in the U.S. being
treated for HIV and AIDS
would be eligible for
coverage through the
online exchange.


ALMANAC

Today is Friday, May 30, the
150th day of 2014. There are
215 days left in the year.
Today in history
On May 30,1814, the first
Treaty of Paris was signed,
ending war between France
and the Sixth Coalition (the
United Kingdom, Russia, Austria,
Sweden, Portugal and Prussia),
with France retaining its bound-
aries of 1792.
On this date
In 1431, Joan of Arc,
condemned as a heretic, was
burned at the stake in Rouen,
France.
In 1883,12 people were
trampled to death in a stampede
sparked by a rumor that the
recently opened Brooklyn Bridge
was in danger of collapsing.
In 1911, the first Indy 500 took
place at the Indianapolis Motor
Speedway; the winner was Ray
Harroun, who drove a Marmon
Wasp for more than 612 hours at
an average speed of 74.6 mph and
collected a prize of $10,000.
In 1922, the Lincoln Memorial
in Washington, D.C., was dedi-
cated in a ceremony attended
by President Warren G. Harding,
Chief Justice William Howard Taft
and RobertTodd Lincoln.
In 1937, 10 people were
killed when police fired on
steelworkers demonstrating near
the Republic Steel plant in South
Chicago.
In 1943, during World War II,
American troops secured the
Aleutian island of Attu from
Japanese forces.
In 1958, unidentified Amer-
ican service members killed in
World War l1 and the Korean War
were interred in the Tomb of the
Unknowns at Arlington National
Cemetery.
In 1962, Benjamin Britten's
War Requiem had its world
premiere at the new Coventry
Cathedral in England.
In 1989, student protesters
in Beijing erected a"Goddess of
Democracy" statue in Tiananmen
Square (the statue was destroyed
in the Chinese government's
crackdown).

Today's birthdays
Actor Clint Walker is 87.
Actor Keir Dullea is 78. Actress
Ruta Lee is 78. Actor Michael
J. Pollard is 75. Pro and College
Football Hall of Famer Gale
Sayers is 71. Rock musician
Lenny Davidson (The Dave
Clark Five) is 70. Actor Stephen
Tobolowsky is 63. Actor Colim
Meaney is 61. Actor Ted
McGinley is 56. Actor Ralph
Carter is 53. Actress Tonya
Pinkins is 52. Rock musician
Tom Morello (Audioslave; Rage
Against The Machine) is 50.
Movie director Antoine Fuqua
is 49. Rock musician Patrick
Dahlheimer (Live) is 43. Actress
Idina Menzel (Film: "Frozen")
is 43. Actor Trey Parker is 42.
Rapper Cee Lo Green is 39.
Actor Blake Bashoff is 33. Actor
Jake Short is 17. Actor Jared
Gilmore is 14.



Deer leaps from
Illinois overpass
onto minivan
WEST DUNDEE, Ill.
(AP) --A suburban
Chicago woman is
grateful her family is safe
after a 200-pound deer
leapt from an overpass,
landing on their minivan
as it traveled along an
Illinois interstate.
Heidi Conner tells The
(Arlington Heights) Daily
Herald the doe came to
rest in the middle of the
West Dundee family's
Chevy on Sunday. She
and her four children
were traveling about
70 mph on the Jane
Addams Tollway.
She says the accident
was bizarre, adding
"nobody can believe this
deer fell from the sky."
Illinois State Police


say witnesses reported
seeing the deer jump
from an overpass.
Conner says the crash
totaled the van and
caused minor injuries,
but says the way the
deer landed on the
vehicle was "a miracle in
itself."
Police say the animal
died.


Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014


FROM PAGE ONE





The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014


STATE NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


WIRE Page 5


Secret proceeding held


in Fla. redistricting trial


TALLAHASSEE (AP)
-A landmark trial over
whether Florida legisla-
tors broke the law and
used a "shadow" process
when drawing up new po-
litical maps for Congress
is now being held behind
closed doors.
Circuit Judge Terry
Lewis removed members
of the public and the me-
dia from the courtroom
during the eighth day of
the ongoing trial.
Lewis had said before
the trial that he did not
want to close the court-
room during the legal
challenge to Florida's
congressional districts be-
ing brought by a coalition
of groups including the
League of Women Voters,
Common Cause and a
group of voters.
But he was forced to
do so after the Florida
Supreme Court ruled this
week that up to 538 pages
of evidence -which
includes emails and maps
- must not be disclosed
in open court.
The Supreme Court
took that step after an ap-
peals court had previously
blocked the use of the


evidence entirely.
Lawyers represent-
ing Data Targeting, a
Gainesville-based political
consulting firm, and its
employees contend that
revealing the documents
violates their First
Amendment rights and
also includes trade secrets.
Several news orga-
nizations, including
The Associated Press,
publicly objected to the
closing which occurred
during the questioning
of Republican consul-
tant Rich Heffley. The
courtroom also remained
closed when Pat Bainter,
a top employee at Data
Targeting, took the stand.
The documents are
considered key evidence
of whether legislators vi-
olated the "Fair Districts"
amendments which
said districts cannot be
drawn in a way to favor
incumbents or members
of a political party. The
current legal challenge
marks the first time those
new standards adopted
by voters in 2010 are
being used to challenge
the Legislature.
While legislators,


legislative staff and
political consultants have
denied any wrongdoing,
attorneys for the groups
have argued that legis-
lators used a "shadow"
process that relied on
consultants in an effort to
bypass the constitutional
amendment. Attorneys
for some of those suing
are being paid by the
National Democratic
Redistricting Trust.
Evidence so far has
shown that one GOP
consultant received maps
before they were made
public. A Republican
Party official testified
Friday that congressio-
nal maps he drew and
turned over to a GOP
consultant were identical
to those submitted to the
Legislature back in 2012
by Alex Posada.
But in a new twist
on Thursday, attorneys
revealed that Posada,
a former Florida State
University student and
member of that school's
College Republicans,
had denied in a new
deposition that he ever
submitted a map to the
Legislature.


ST. PETERSBURG
(AP) -We see them on
TV, braving tornadoes and
hurricanes and flooding.
Delivering the weather
has put a whole new group
of celebrities on the nation-
al radar: meteorologists.
But what path did they
take to become so well-
known? For some, it was a
childhood obsession with
storms; for others, it was a
fortuitous but unpredict-
able turn of events
With the Atlantic
hurricane season opening
Sunday, here are a couple
of the nation's most well-
known meteorologists
and how they reached the
top of their field:

Jim Cantore
A self-described
"Vermont boy," Cantore
grew up shoveling snow.
Today he's just as likely
to be covering a major
blizzard as a hurricane
or tornado, one of the
undisputed stars of The
Weather Channel.
When Cantore was a
senior in high school, his
father told him to "study
the weather" because the
teen would linger in the
barn, fascinated as he
watched the snow falling.
"When you wake up in
the morning, you'd better
love what you do," his
father advised him.
Cantore, who is now 50,
attended Lyndon State


College, a small school
in Vermont's Northeast
Kingdom, studying in its
well-known meteorology
program.
After graduation, he
went home to White River
Junction to paint houses
for the summer and send
out demo tapes of his
college weather forecasts.
He expected to land a job
at a TV station and never
dreamed he would one
day be deemed a "hurri-
cane hunk" by fans on the
Internet.
"I knew about snow, I
knew about coastal lows.
I didn't know anything
about tropical meteorolo-
gy," Cantore said.
One day that summer
his brother walked up
to him. "Hey Jim, the
Weather Channel called,"
his brother said. They liked
his tape and hired him.
At that time 1986
-The Weather Channel
was 4 years old. It was in
22 million homes then,
and according to Cantore,
in about 101 million
homes now.
Cantore's first hurricane
was Andrew, in 1992.
He reported live from
Louisiana.

Bryan Norcross
Norcross took a less
traditional path into
meteorology, but he also
made it to The Weather
Channel.


He began his career
as a radio DJ, then was
a TV news director and
producer. He was running
a news department for a
TV station in Louisville,
Kentucky, when he
decided he wanted to "try
and do the weather."
It intrigued him so
much that he ended up
going back to school.
He earned his master's
degree from Florida State
University in meteorol-
ogy, then took a job as a
forecaster in Tallahassee.
From there, he was CNN's
first weekend weather
forecaster and took a job
in Miami atWPLG in 1983.
Norcross became in-
terested in South Florida
history and its previous
storms. He wondered
what would happen if a
big storm hit the area. In
1990, Norcross went to
WTVJ and he suggested
that the station raise the
profile of the weather
during the newscasts,
and suggested calling it
"The Storm Center." He
broadcast specials about
past storms.
Then Andrew hit in
1992. The Category 5 storm
devastated Homestead,
a town south of Miami.
"That really was a conflu-
ence of a set of circum-
stances that happened
to come together that
allowed us to be prepared
like no TV station had ever
been," he recalls.


Don't forget to take us with you!
Read the SUN-online for only a1 341_ EWSAP E S
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I STATE NEWS BRIEFS


Bond reduced for
woman who drove
kids into ocean
DAYTONA BEACH
(AP) -A mother charged
with trying to kill her
three children by driving
them into the Atlantic
Ocean in a minivan with
the windows rolled up is
no longer hearing voices
or having hallucinations,
a psychiatrist testified
Thursday before a Florida
judge reduced the wom-
an's bond.
EbonyWilkerson, 32, has
been back in a Daytona
Beach jail for a week since
giving birth to her fourth
child, a boy, on May 19.
Before Circuit Judge
Leah Case made the
bond decision, she heard
from psychiatrist Jeffrey
Danzinger, who said he
believed Wilkerson was
not a danger to herself or
the community. Danzinger
testified that after exam-
iningWilkerson three
times since the birth that
"she presents now with a
normal mental status."

Deputies: Teen
used grandma in
counterfeit scheme
GAINESVILLE (AP)
- Authorities say a
Gainesville teenager
used her 74-year-old
grandmother who suffers
from memory loss to cash
counterfeit checks.
Alachua County Sheriff's
officials say 19-year-old
Jennifer Sparacino took
her grandmother to
a Gainesville Bank of
America twice in early
May to cash three checks
totaling more than $5,400.
Deputies say bank
managers told them
Sparacino tried earlier to
deposit the fraudulent
checks using her grand-
mother's identification.
When she wasn't allowed
to make the deposit, she
left and returned with her
grandmother.
The Gainesville Sun
reports the grandmother
told deputies she doesn't
recall going to the bank.
Bank managers told
investigators Sparacino's
account was closed in
March for an allegation of
fraud involving $4,518.
Sparacino is jailed on
charges of grand theft,
fraud and exploitation of
an elderly person.


Ocala teen wins
new Honda for
perfect attendance
OCALA (AP) -An Ocala
teen was having a bad day
as he stood in the audience
at a Honda dealership,
hoping to win a new car
for having perfect atten-
dance during his senior
year in high school.
Marion Technical
Institute senior Ira Gilmore
had just dropped his iPhone
and cracked the screen
Wednesday evening when
he heard his name called
as the winner of a $22,616
2014 Honda Civic LX.
The Ocala Star-Banner
reports that as the seconds
passed, the audience
screamed in disbelief,
thinking Gilmore had
missed his opportunity
since you had to be
present for the drawing to
win. But the 18-year-old
appeared from the back of
the crowd, smiling.
Officials say 104 teens
were eligible for Honda
of Ocala's "Perfect Car for
Perfect Attendance" event.

Police in Fla.
probe middle
school plot
CLERMONT (AP)-
Deputies in central Florida
are investigating a possible
plot by a middle school
student to harm some of
his teachers.
Officials said Thursday
that the student at East
Ridge Middle School in
the Orlando suburb of
Clermont is undergoing a
mental health evaluation.
No charges have been filed.
Deputies say the student
brought a knife to school
last week and had a black
book detailing a plot to kill
some of his teachers and
then himself.
Deputies searched the
student's home but found
no other weapons.
Officials say the student
had recently been sus-
pended from school for
10 days and the school was
looking for an alternative
placement for him.

2 men struck
by lightning in
Pompano Beach
POMPANO BEACH
(AP) Officials say
lightning struck two men
who were working on
the roof of a Pompano


Beach car dealership.
The lightning strike hap-
pened Thursday morning.
Pompano Beach
spokeswoman Sandra
King says one man was
taken to the hospital in
critical condition. The
other was also taken to
the hospital. Officials say
he was conscious.

Interstate
construction in
Tampa snarls traffic
TAMPA (AP) The
southbound Interstate 275
exit ramp to Dale Mabry
Highway is closed for four
months and is confusing
the first wave of down-
town commuters.
The ramp closed early
Wednesday on the inter-
state that runs through
the city's downtown. Dale
Mabry Highway is one of
the city's main arteries,
and the location of both
Raymond James Stadium
and MacDill Air Force Base.
A new ramp is
under construction
and drivers are being
detoured. But that
didn't stop Wednesday's
commutes from being
bumper-to-bumper.
The roadwork on 1-275
began in 2012.
When 1-275 work is
done in 2016, there will
be four lanes in each
direction, a flatter road
to improve sight distance
and decrease the chance
of crashes, improved
interchanges and a wide
median to allow for future
improvements.

Panama City airport
flood damage tops
$2 million
WEST BAY (AP) -
Officials are trying to figure
out who will pay for $2 mil-
lion in flood damage to the
Northwest Florida Beaches
International Airport.
Some 16 inches of rain
fell on the airport near
Panama City Beach in late
April. During a meeting
on Wednesday, the airport
board agreed to spend
$137,500 for emergency
repairs. They're still wait-
ing on an emergency dec-
laration form the Federal
Emergency Management
Agency, which would
free up federal funds for
damage repairs.


Hurricane forecasters:


Unpredictable paths to fame


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Page 6 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


BUSINESS NEWS/STOCKS


The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014


Deal news, jobless claims


push stocks higher


NEWYORK (AP) -
Another quiet day, another
quiet record.
Stocks rose modestly
Thursday, sending the
Standard & Poor's 500 index
to another record high.
Investors rallied behind
a bidding war in the food
industry as well as a some-
what positive report on the
U.S. labor market.
The S&P 500 rose
10.25 points, or 0.5 percent,
to 1,920.03, closing above
Tuesday's record of 1,911.11.
The Dow Jones industrial
average rose 65.56 points,
or 0.4 percent, to 16,698.74
and the Nasdaq composite


rose 22.87 points, or 0.5 per-
cent, to 4,247.95.
Among the biggest
gainers was deli meat and
hotdog maker Hillshire
Brands, which jumped
$7.95, or 18 percent, to
$52.76. Only two days
after Pilgrim's Pride made
a $5.56 billion offer to buy
the company, chicken com-
pany Tyson Foods stepped
in to offer $6.2 billion.
Investors expect that
Tyson's offer will start a
bidding war. Hillshire's
closing price of $52.76
was already above Tyson's
offer of $50 per share. The
stock is up 43 percent this


week alone.
Tyson also rose on the
news. The stock gained
$2.50, or 6 percent, to
$43.25, making the compa-
ny the biggest gainer in the
S&P 500.
The overall stock market
has moved little this year,
but one theme that contin-
ues to play out is the large
amount of corporate deals
being announced. Just
during this holiday-short-
ened week, Apple said
late Wednesday it would
buy Beats Electronics for
$3 billion, and now there's
the battle over Hillshire
Brands.


I BUSINESS NEWS BRIEFS
Consumer comfort Jobless claims Ford recalls
falls to lowest level fall 27,000 last 1.1M vehicles for
since November week to 300,000 steering problems


WASHINGTON
(Bloomberg) -Consumer
confidence declined
last week to the lowest
level since November as
Americans' views of their
finances and the buying
climate weakened.
The Bloomberg
Consumer Comfort Index
fell to 33.3 in the period
ended May 25 from 34.1
the prior week. A measure
of personal finances
retreated for the third
time in four weeks, and a
gauge of whether this is
a good time to buy goods
and services dropped to
the lowest point since
mid-February.
Sentiment among
full-time workers and
those employed part time
slipped to six-month lows,
underscoring the need for
more employment oppor-
tunities and faster income
growth. Rising expenses
for food and gasoline
are leaving households
with less money for
nonessential purchases.


WASHINGTON
(Bloomberg) -Fewer
Americans than forecast
filed applications for unem-
ployment benefits last week,
a sign the labor market
continues to strengthen.
Jobless claims fell by
27,000 to 300,000 in the
week ended May 24, a
Labor Department report
showed Thursday in
Washington. The median
forecast of 50 economists
surveyed by Bloomberg
called for 318,000. The
four-week average de-
clined to the lowest level
since August 2007, before
the last recession began.
Fewer dismissals may
be a sign that companies,
already lean from reces-
sion-era job cutting, are
gearing up for improving
demand as the economy
shows signs of rebounding
from a first-quarter slump.
Gains in the labor market
are needed to underpin
consumer spending, which
accounts for 70 percent of
the economy


(AP) Ford is recalling
1.1 million SUVs to fix
problems that could
result in the loss of power
steering while driving.
The company issued
two recalls, one affecting
915,000 Ford Escape and
Mercury Mariner small
SUVs and one affecting
196,000 Ford Explorer
SUVs. The problems are
slightly different, but
both could result in a
loss of electric power
steering while driving,
increasing the risk of a
crash.
The Escape and
Mariner recall involves
a torque sensor within
the steering column.
Ford recommends one of
three fixes: replacing the
sensor, updating software
or replacing the steering
column. The recall affects
model year 2008 through
2011 vehicles built be-
tween Aug. 18, 2006, and
Sept. 11, 2010, in Kansas
City.


Summer programs offered


at Boys & Girls Club


T


he Boys & Girls
Clubs of Saraso-
ta County offer


academic support,
healthy lifestyles and
leadership develop-
ment, all rolled into
fun and impactful
programs offered year-
round, according to
information provided
by the organization.
Enrollment for summer
programs at the Gene
Matthews Boys & Girls
Club, 6851 S. Biscayne
Drive, North Port, now
is open. Summer pro-
grams include a liter-
acy program focusing
on reading, writing,
field trips and com-
puter-based activities;
culinary, highlighting
a Foodies Club and et-
iquette; sports, includ-
ing a wacky Olympics;
fine and digital arts;
prevention programs;
and more. For more in-
formation or to sign up,
call 941-423-4405.

Owner Dan Shockroo
of Treasure Chest
Collectibles, 14375
Tamiami Trail, Unit B,
North Port, is celebrat-
ing the business' first
year. Treasure Chest is
your local eBay store
and collectibles shop,
where you can buy, sell
or trade comics, Hot
Wheels, sports mem-
orabilia, NASCAR and
NHRA diecast cars, and
much more. Treasure
Chest is a top-rated
seller for eBay, and can
get your items sold
faster, Dan says. Bring
in what you want to get
rid of; staff handles it
all from start to finish
- photos, shipping,
etc. Treasure Chest
Collectibles is located


on U.S. 41, between
Olde World Restaurant
and ACE Hardware.
To celebrate the first
year of business, it is
having a 25 percent
to 50 percent off sale
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Saturday. For
more information, call
941-888-2948, or
email treasurechest
collectibles@aol.com.

Heron Creek Golf
& Country Club will
play host to a Golf &
Tennis Junior Camp
from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
July 22-24 at 5301
Heron Creek Blvd. (off
Sumter Boulevard),
North Port. The cost is
$125 for all three days.
There will be profes-
sional golf and tennis
instructors, and lunch
will be provided daily.
Have fun while learning
skill techniques, basic
rules, and golf and
tennis etiquette. Boys
and girls ages 8 through
14 can register at Heron
Creek by July 15. For
more information, call
941-423-6955.

Rod and Carla
Pawich, owners of the
North Port Medicine
Shoppe for the past 15
years, have changed the
name of the pharmacy.
The ownership remains
the same, as does their
caring and courteous


staff. Only the name
has changed. And,
because Rod, Carla and
all of the staff are your
neighbors, residing in
North Port, Rod said it
was only fitting to re-
name the pharmacy the
North Port Pharmacy
(Your Good Neighbor
Pharmacy). So stop by
and meet your neigh-
bors if you haven't
already. And watch for
the grand opening,
coming soon. The
pharmacy is located at
14255 S. Tamiami Trail.
Call 941-426-2800 for
more info.

Olde World
Restaurant, 14415 S.
Tamiami Trail, is offer-
ing a N.Y. strip steak, a
seafood trio with pasta,
or chicken Marsala for
Father's Day specials
on June 15. At 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday, a quarter
auction will be held
to help raise money
for local charities. At
6:30 p.m. June 6, The
Goldtones will present
"Lost in the '50s." From
6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
June 21, the Gotta Luv
It Band will perform
rock 'n' roll, Motown
and oldies. From 7 p.m.
to 10 p.m. June 28, the
restaurant will see the
return of the popular
Bandana classic rock
band. Olde World
also offers karaoke
from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Fridays (except June 6).
For more information,
call 941-426-1155.
Steve Sachkar is
publisher of the North
Port Sun. You can e-mail
him at ssachkar@
sun-herald.com, or fax
business information to
941-429-3007.


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GNMA 11.55 -.03 +4.6
GrowCo 123.03 +.81 +20.8
Growlnc 28.78 +.15 +18.3
GrthCmpK 122.92 +.82 +21.0
Hilnc d 9.49 +.01 +13.1
Indepndnc 38.88 +.27 +19.9
IntRelEst d 10.79 +.04 +13.0
IntlDisc d 40.50 +.07 +11.6
InvGrdBd 7.92 -.01 +6.8
JapanSmCo d 12.81 +.03 +13.7
LatinAm d 32.29 +.06 +3.2
LevCoSt d 45.16 +.21 +21.2
LowPrStkK d 50.45 +.17 +19.6
LowPnStk d 50.47 +.16 +19.4
Magellan 90.14 +.48 +14.7
MeCpSto 16.08 +.09 +19.2
MidCap d 40.99 +.14 +21.1
Munilnc d 13.34 +.01 +6.0
NYMulnc d 13.41 +.01 +5.2
NewMille 40.65 +.15 +20.3
OTC 79.48 +.65 +21.1
Overseas d 41.55 +.12 +11.2
Puntan 22.02 +.09 +14.2
PuntanK 22.01 +.09 +14.3
SASEqF 14.43 +.08 NA
SlnvGrBdF 11.45 -.01 NA
STMIdxF d 56.24 +.30 NA
SesAl-SctrEqt 14.43 +.08 +18.0
SeslnmGrdBd 11.45 -.01 +6.1
ShTmBond 8.62 ... +2.8
SmCapDisc d 31.31 +.03 +24.1
Stratlnc 11.22 +.01 +9.4
TaxFrB d 11.54 +.01 +6.0
TotalBd 10.76 ... +7.2
USBdldx 11.68 -.02 NA
USBdldxlnv 11.68 -.02 +4.7
Value 109.31 +.50 +21.1
ValueDis 23.15 +.09 +18.5
Fidelity Advisor
EqGrowB m 76.98 +.28 +18.3
IntlCapAB m 13.39 +.03 +13.1
LmtdTermBondA m 11.56... +5.7
LmtdTermBondB m 11.55... +5.0
LrgCapA m 27.77 +.17 +20.8
LrgCapB m 25.91 +.15 +19.9
NewlnsA m 27.09 +.15 +17.2
Newlnsl 27.57 +.15 +17.5


Fidelity Select
Biotech d 187.69 +1.38 +28.9
Electron d 72.95 +.25 +20.4
Energy d 58.55 +44 +13.0
Gold d 19.71 +.11 -10.7
HealtCar d 197.18 +1.58 +27.0
Leisure d 127.87 +.27 +21.5
Materials d 86.18 +.78 +18.8
MedDeliv d 74.08 +.77 +21.6
MedEqSys d 36.04 +.18 +18.3
NatGas d 43.47 +.37 +10.0
NatRes d 40.57 +.36 +11.5
Pharm d 20.11 +.14 +24.3
Wireless d 9.57 +.02 +14.5
Fidelity Spartan
500cdAdvtg 68.30 +.38 +18.3
500lcxnstl 68.30 +.37 NA
500lcxnv 68.29 +.38 +18.3
ExtMktldAg d 53.59 +.25 +21.1
IntlldxAdg d 41.95 +.17 +11.4
TotMktldAg d 56.24 +.30 +18.8
Fidelity-i/E
SenesGrowthCoF 10.91 +.07 NA
First Eagle
GIbA m 55.67 +.12 +12.9
OverseasA m 24.26 +.02 +11.6
First Investors
GlobalA m 8.64 +.05 +12.3
TotalRetA m 19.63 +.06 +13.3
Firsthand
e-Comm 8.17 +.09 +19.1
FrankTemp-Frank
FedTFA m 12.38 +.01 +6.1
FrankTemp-Franklin
CATFA m 7.40 +.01 +6.9
EqInA m 23.46 +.11 +16.7
FLTFA m 11.25 ... +48
GrOppA m 29.45 +.19 +18.1
GrowthA m 68.55 +40 +17.9
Income C m 2.56 ... +14.2
IncomeA m 2.54 +.01 +14.7
IncomeAdv 2.52 +.01 +14.9
RisDvA m 49.68 +.26 +17.3
StrlncA m 10.70 +.01 +9.1
TotalRetA m 10.17 ... +7.2
FrankTemp-Mutual
DiscovZ 35.47 +.15 +13.0
DiscovA m 34.92 +.15 +12.7
SharesZ 30.01 +.17 +16.0
SharesA m 29.74 +.17 +15.6
FrankTemp-Templeton
GIBondC m 13.37 +.03 +7.7
GIBondA m 13.34 +.03 +8.1
GIBondAdv 13.29 +.02 +8.4
GrowthA m 26.19 +.08 +15.8
WoddA m 20.14 +.06 +15.2
GMO
EmgMktsVl d 11.08 +.06 +78
IntltVlIV 27.38 +.12 +11.3
QuIll 26.15 +.14 +16.1
USCorEqVI 17.93 +.09 +17.1
Gabelli
AssetAAA m 67.14 +.30 +19.1
EqlncomeAAA m 29.21+.13 +17.3
Value m 19.71 +.06 +20.4
Glenmede
SmCapEqAd 25.97 +.11 +21.8
Goldman Sachs
MidCpVals 46.97 +.20 +20.0
ShDuGovA m 10.18 ... +1.0
Harbor
Bond 12.29 -.01 +5.9
CapAplnst 57.34 +45 +17.6
Intllnstl 73.94 +.31 +12.9
Intllnv b 73.12 +.31 +12.5
Hartford
CapAprA m 47.89 +.22 +15.1
CpApHLSIA 61.56 +.35 +16.9
SmallCoB m 19.20 +.08 +18.2
Heartland
ValuePlus m 36.16 +.10 +17.7


Hennessy
ComerGrlnv 17.24 +.09 +16.7
Hodges
Hodges m 38.80 +.24 +21.4
INVESCO
ComstockA m 24.61 +.11 +19.0
Divlnclnv b 20.12 +.08 +14.5
EnergyA m 50.43 +.53 +10.3
Energylnv b 50.24 +.52 +10.3
EqlncomeA m 11.03 +.03 +14.3
EuroGrA m 41.02 +.13 +15.3
GIbGrB m 29.16 +.09 +13.6
GrvAhAllA m 14.21 +.04 +13.2
PacGrowB m 22.48 +.08 +6.9
SmCapEqA m 16.45 +.04 +17.8
Techlnv b 39.46 +44 +17.5
USMortAm 12.54 -.02 +4.1
IVA
Woddwidel d 18.62 +.04 +11.5
Ivy
AssetSTrB m 30.29 ... +10.0
AssetStrA m 31.38 -.01 +10.9
AssetStrC m 30.44 ... +10.1
AsstStrgl 31.66 -.01 +11.2
JPMorgan
CoreBdUlt 11.79 +5.5
CoreBondA m 11.78 +5.2
CoreBondSelect 11.77-.01 +5.3
HighYldSel 8.17 +.01 +13.1
LgCapGrSelect 32.12 +.17 +19.3
MidCpVall 36.91 +.14 +21.6
ShDurBndSel 10.93 ... +1.9
USLCpCrPS 28.94 +.16 +18.3
Janus
BaIC m 30.85 +.08 NA
ContrT 22.53 -.02 +16.1
EntrprsT 83.35 +.20 +19.3
FlexBdS b 10.65 NA
GlbVaIT 14.89 +.04+14.0
HiYdT 9.39 ... +13.0
OverseasT 38.24 -.07 +5.0
PerkinsMCVL 24.46 +.09 +14.4
PerkinsMCVT 24.20 +.08 +14.2
PerkinsSCVL 26.41 +.05 +15.5
RsrchT 45.37 +.22 +18.7
ShTmBdT 3.08 ... +3.0
T 42.03 +.24 +15.1
USCrT 20.84 +.12 +19.2
VentureT 63.59 +.18 +22.2
John Hancock
LifBal b 15.79 +.05 +12.9
LifGrl b 16.57 +.07 +14.3
Lazard
EmgMkEqlnst d 19.93 +.10 +11.0
Legg Mason
WAManagedMuniA m 16.71+.01 +.6
Litman Gregory
Maslntllntl 18.65 +.10 +11.4
Longleaf Partners
LongPart 35.38 +.12 +18.3
Loomis Sayles
Bdlnstl 15.71 +.03 +12.8
BdR b 15.64 +.03 +12.5
Lord Abbett
AffiliatA m 16.16 +.08 +15.2
ShDurlncA m 4.56 +5.4
ShDurlncC m 4.59 +4.6
ShDurlncF b 4.56 +5.5
MFS
IntlValA m 35.23 +.08 +14.4
lslntlEq 23.08 +.04 +13.5
MAInvB m 27.83 +.14 +15.8
ValueA m 33.92 +.15 +16.2
Valuel 34.10 +.16 +16.5
MainStay
HiIdorA m 6.15 ... +12.1
Mkleld 17.69 +.02 +11.8
Mairs & Power
Grthlnv 113.20 +44 +19.4
Manning & Napier
PBConTrmS 14.23 +.02 +8.2
PBMaxTrmS 21.10 +.11 +15.1


WrddOppA 9.45 +.03 +10.9
Marsico
21stCent b 20.18 +.09 +15.6
FlexCap b 18.03 +.09 +23.5
Meridian
MendnGr d 36.13 +.06 +18.0
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdl 10.85 -.01 +9.2
TotRtBd b 10.85 -.01 +8.9
Midas Funds
Magic m 24.21 +.05 +18.4
Midas m 1.44 +.01 -13.6
Muhlenkamp
Muhlenkmp 69.38 +.48 +13.7
Natixis
LSInvBdY 12.40 +.01 +10.1
LSStratlncA m 17.02 +.04 +13.7
LSStratlncC m 17.13 +.05 +12.8
Needham
Growth m 44.55 +.14 +18.1
Neuberger Berman
Genesislnstl 59.77 +.13 +17.9
SmCpGrlnv 26.38 +.10 +17.2
Northeast Investors
Growth 16.70 +.10 +12.2
Northern
HYFixInc d 7.66 ... +12.3
Stkldx 23.84 +.13 +18.2
Nuveen
NYMuniBdl 11.01 +.01 +6.0
Oak Associates
BlkOakEmr 3.99 +.03 +16.0
HlthSinces 20.46 +.14 +21.3
PinOakEq 47.85 +.24 +20.4
RedOakTec 15.55 +.07 +22.0
Oakmark
EqIncI 33.76 +.11 +12.1
Globall 31.34 +.16 +16.3
Intll 27.09 +.09 +17.1
Oakmark I 66.53 +.31 +21.2
Select I 43.31 +.21 +22.4
Old Westbury
GIbOppo 8.16 +.02 +10.5
GIbSmMdCp 17.46 +.03 +15.2
LgCpStr 12.85 +.07 +11.0
Oppenheimer
DevMktA m 39.28 +.11 +13.1
DevMktY 38.85 +.11 +13.5
GlobA m 81.19 +.36 +15.6
IntlGrY 39.15 +.19 +15.5
IntlGrowA m 39.31 +.20 +15.0
SrFItRatA m 8.40 +10.7
StrlncA m 4.21 +9.7
Osterweis
OsterStrlnc d 12.06 +9.2
PIMCO
AllAssetl 12.68 +.02 +10.2
AIIAuthIn 10.37 +.01 +8.1
ComRIRStI 6.03 ... +6.2
EMktCurl 10.37 +.03 +4.4
EmgLclBdl 9.68 +.05 +7.6
HiIdls 9.75 ... +13.4
IncomeD b 12.68 +.02 +14.6
Incomnelnl 12.68 +.02 +14.9
LgTmCrdln 12.75 -.02 +14.4
LowDrls 10.39 -.01 +4.2
RealRet 11.61 +.01 +6.6
ShtTermls 9.89 +2.2
TotRetA m 10.97 +6.1
TotRetAdm b 10.97 +6.2
TotRetC m 10.97 +5.3
TotRetls 10.97 +6.5
TotRetmD b 10.97 +6.2
TotlRetnP 10.97 +6.4
UnconstrBdlns 11.30 +4.4
PRIMECAP Odyssey
AggGr 30.64 +.10 +26.3
Growth 24.33 +.13 +19.4
Parnassus
CoreEqlnv 38.71 +.08 +18.2


Pax World
Bal b 25.30 +.08 +11.0
Permanent
Portfolio 44.30 +.05 +8.0
Principal
LCGrllnst 12.81 +.09 +19.5
SAMConGrA m 18.38 +.06 +14.5
Prudential Investmen
BlendA m 22.39 +.09 +15.7
IntlEqtyC m 7.39 +.03 +10.1
Putnam
GlbUtilB m 12.71 +.06 +7.2
GrowlncA m 20.75 ... +18.0
IntlNewB m 18.32 +.09 +11.5
SmCpVaIA m 15.41 +.05 +20.2
Reynolds
BlueChip b 74.00 +.40 +17.0
Royce
ValueSvc m 13.43 +.06 +14.5
Rydex
Electrlnv 69.98 +.51 +12.5
HlthCrAdv b 25.69 +.17 +19.3
NsdqlOOlv 22.22 +.14 +20.9
Schwab
10001nv d 50.86 +.28 +18.3
S&P50OSel d 30.21 +.16 +18.3
Scout
Intemtl 37.83 +.14 +11.5
Sentinel
CmnStkA m 43.97 +.21 +16.5
Sequoia
Sequoia 224.92 +1.32 +19.3
State Farm
Growth 72.15 +31 +14.3
Stratton
SmCapVal d 76.48 +.22 +20.2
T Rowe Price
Balanced 24.00 +.08 +13.6
BlChpGr 65.44 +.49 +19.8
CapApprec 27.06 +.08 +15.7
Corplnc 9.91 -.01 +9.4
EmMkStk d 33.92 -.01 +8.7
Eqlndex d 51.91 +.29 +18.0
Eqtylnc 33.84 +.12 +17.5
FinSer 20.44 +.04 +15.6
GlbTech 14.06 +.10 +24.3
GrowStk 52.90 +.37 +19.2
HealthSci 61.89 +.48 +28.6
HiYield d 7.30 +.01 +13.9
InsLgCpGr 27.69 +.24 +20.3
IntlEqlcd d 14.02 +.04 +11.1
lntlGrlnc d 16.34 +.06 +12.4
lntlStk d 17.09 +.06 +12.5
MediaTele 70.13 +.33 +24.7
MidCapVa 31.90 +.12 +19.1
MidCpGr 74.77 +.32 +20.4
NJTaxFBd 11.99 +.01 +5.6
NewAmGro 44.28 +.32 +17.9
NewAsia d 16.90 -.07 +12.6
NewHonz 45.06 +.20 +25.5
Newlncome 9.58 -.01 +5.6
OrseaStk d 10.47 +.04 +12.7
R2015 14.91 +.05 +13.1
R2025 16.00 +.05 +15.1
R2035 16.93 +.07 +16.3
Rtmt202O 21.23 +.07 +14.2
Rtmt203O 23.52 +.09 +15.8
Rtmt204O 24.34 +.11 +16.5
SciTech 39.89 +.31 +18.2
ShTmBond 4.80 ... +2.5
SmCpStk 44.17 +.11 +22.3
SmCpVal d 49.82 +.08 +19.0
SpecGrow 24.88 +.12 +17.3
Speclnc 13.15 +.01 +88
SumMulnc 11.77 +.01 +6.6
TaxE1ult d 20.35 +.13 +18.3
TaxFShlnt 5.67 ... +28
Value 35.92 +.20 +20.0
TCW
TotRetBdl 10.28 -.01 +88
TIAA-CREF
Eqlx 14.72 +.08 +18.7


Target
SmCapVal 27.08 +.09 +19.1
Templeton
lnFEqSeS 23.61 +.05 +11.3
Third Avenue
Value d 59.53 +.14 +11.0
Thompson
Bond 12.01 ... +7.8
LargeCap 49.34 +.22 +17.2
Thornburg
lncBdC m 21.79 +.08 +13.4
IntlVall 30.89 +.01 +8.9
Thrivent
IncomeA m 9.36 +9.5
MidCapGrA m 19.60 +.10 +16.3
Tocqueville
Gold m 37.27 +.21 -2.2
Turner
SmCapGr 36.27 +.09 +17.9
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 27.96 +.07 +15.3
U.S. Global Investor
Gld&Prec m 6.32 +.05 -10.5
GlobRes m 9.80 +.07 +8.9
USAA
CorstnMod 15.47 +.04 +12.5
GNMA 10.02 -.01 +3.4
Growlnc 22.53 +.12 +17.2
HYOpp d 8.95 ... +15.4
PrcMtlMin 14.07 +.10 -9.4
SciTech 20.43 +.10 +21.3
TaxELgTm 13.70 +7.0
TtRt2040 13.41 +.04 +13.7
TtRt2050 13.26 +.05 +13.9
WoddGro 27.97 +.12 +17.1
Unified
Winlnv m 18.68 +.04 +14.5
Value Line
PremGro b 34.81 +.15 +18.8
Vanguard
50OAdml 177.65 +.97 +18.3
5001nv 177.61 +.97 +18.2
50OSgnl 146.74 +80 +18.3
BalldxAdm 28.51 +.08 +13.4
Balldxlns 28.51 +.08 +13.4
BdMklnstPIs 10.85 -.01 NA
CAITAdml 11.72 +.01 +5.6
CapOp 49.04 +.27 +19.0
CapOpAdml 113.27 +.64 +19.0
Convrt 14.30 +.04 +14.0
DevMkldxAdm 13.69 +.07 +11.3
DevMkldxlnstl 13.71 +.07 +11.3
DivGr 22.01 +.15 +16.8
EmMktlAdm 35.55 +.07 +8.0
EnergyAdm 138.13 +1.10 +10.8
Eqlnc 31.09 +.14 +19.2
EqlncAdml 65.17 +30 +19.3
ExplAdml 94.50 +.48 +20.9
ExtdldAdm 63.94 +.29 +21.1
Extdldlst 63.94 +.29 +21.2
ExtdMktldxlP 157.80 +.71 NA
FAWeUSIns 102.62 +.45 +10.5
FAWeUSInv 20.54 +.09 +10.3
GNMA 10.72 -.02 +4.2
GNMAAdml 10.72 -.02 +4.4
GlbEq 24.58 +.11 +15.8
Grolnc 41.42 +.22 +18.1
GrthldAdm 49.83 +33 +19.3
Grthlstld 49.83 +33 +19.3
HYCorAdml 6.14 ... +12.2
HItCrAdml 83.77 +.64 +21.2
HlthCare 198.57 +1.51 +21.1
ITBondAdm 11.51 -.01 +7.0
ITGradeAd 9.97 +8.4
InfPrtAdm 26.92 +5.5
InfPrtl 10.96 -.01 +5.6
InflaPro 13.71 +5.4
Instldxl 176.49 +.97 +18.3
InstPlus 176.50 +.96 +18.4
InstTStPI 43.93 +.23 +19.0
IntlGr 23.65 +.07 +12.9
lntlGrAdm 75.23 +.21 +13.0


Stocks of Local Interest


52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AV Homes Inc AVHI 12.72 0 20.82 16.62 -.08 -0.5 V v -8.5 +26.9 dd
Arkansas Bst ARCB 17.68 43.74 43.78 +.29 +0.7 A A A +30.0 +132.2 45 0.1
Bank of America BAC 12.13 18.03 15.15 +.01 +0.1 A A v -2.7 +13.7 20 0.04
CarnivalCorp CCL 31.44 0 41.89 39.74 +.22 +0.6 V A A -1.1 +22.8 30 1.00
ChicosFAS CHS 15.12 *- 19.84 15.24 +.10 +0.7 V V v -19.1 -20.4 20 0.30
Cracker Barrel CBRL 86.79 --o- 118.63 99.25 -1.89 -1.9 A A -9.8 +17.8 19 4.00f
Disney DIS 60.41 0 83.98 84.03 +.43 +0.5 A A A +10.0 +26.6 22 0.86f
Eaton Corp plc ETN 61.23 -0- 78.19 74.03 +.05 +0.1 A A v -2.7 +10.4 18 1.96
Fortune Brds Hm&Sec FBHS 35.80 0 47.92 40.11 +.20 +0.5 V A V -12.2 -6.5 27 0.48
Frontline Ltd FRO 1.77 --- 5.18 2.42 +.10 +4.3 v V V -35.3 +4.5 dd
HarrisCorp HRS 47.69 -- 79.32 77.00 +.04 +0.1 A A A +10.3 +54.2 18 1.68
iShs U.S. Pfd PFF 36.63 0 41.03 39.85 +.10 +0.3 A A A +8.2 +38 qR 2.53e
KCSouthern KSU 88.56 125.96 107.36 -.41 -0.4 V A A -13.3 -45 35 112
Lennar CorpA LEN 30.90 44.40 40.87 +.50 +1.2 A A A +3.3 -4.0 18 0.16
McClatchy Co MNI 2.15 0 7.39 5.03 +.12 +2.4 V V V +47.9 +86.0 28
NextEra Energy NEE 74.78 101.50 96.55 -.08 -0.1 A V A +12.8 +29.9 21 2.90
Office Depot ODP 3.77 0 5.85 5.13 -.02 -0.4 A A A -3.0 +17.0 dd
PGTInc PGTI 7.85 -0--- 12.61 8.72 +.11 +1.3 A V V -13.8 53 17
Panera Bread Co PNRA 149.60 0- 194.77 152.32 -2.46 -1.6 V V V -13.8 -19.9 23
Pembina Pipeline PBA 28.76 42.76 40.44 -.04 -0.1 V A A +14.8 +25.9 33 1.74f


52-WK RANGE *CLOSE


YTD 1YR


NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO OTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
Pepco HoldingsInc POM 18.04 27.90 27.66 -.03 -0.1 V A A +44.6 +35.2 23 1.08
Phoenix Cos PHX 35.25 61.54 48.60 +.19 +0.4 A A V -20.8 +12.3
Raymond James Fncl RJF 40.01 56.32 48.25 -.34 -0.7 V V v -7.5 +12.9 16 0.64
Reliance Steel Alu RS 61.93 76.78 73.04 +.70 +1.0 A A A -3.7 +9.7 17 1.40
Ryder R 55.17 86.20 86.97+1.47 +1.7 A A A +17.9 +36.7 19 1.36
St Joe Co JOE 16.82 23.95 23.18 -.11 -0.5 A A A +20.8 +12.2 5
Sally Beauty Hid SBH 24.38 ---- 31.86 25.55 +.41 +1.6 A A V -15.5 -19.3 17
Simon Property Gp SPG 133.94 167.09 165.29 -.11 -0.1 A A A +15.6 +3.1 37 5.20f
Stein Mart SMRT 11.53 --- 16.17 13.36 +.03 +0.2 V A v -0.7 +9.4 24 0.30f
Suntrust Bks STI 30.17 -0- 41.26 38.16 -.09 -0.2 A A V +3.7 +20.1 13 0.80f
Superior Uniform SGC 10.08 16.97 15.50 -.27 -1.7 V V A +0.1 +40.2 17 0.54
TECO Energy TE 16.12 18.45 17.27 +.06 +0.3 A V A +0.2 +1.9 18 0.88
Tech Data TECD 46.04 65.98 60.26 -2.68 -4.3 V V v +16.8 +27.0 13
Wendys Co WEN 5.57 10.27 8.23 ... V v -5.6 +38.6 37 0.20
World FuelISvcs INT 34.57 46.75 46.13 +.38 +0.8 A A A +6.9 +11.9 16 0.15


+.12 NA
+.49 NA
+.49 NA
+.15 NA
+.23 +10.9
-.04 +11.5
+.20 +18.3
+.03 +9.6
+.12 +14.2
+.07 +12.0
+.19 +19.9
+.78 NA
+.72 +21.1
+.16 +21.2
+.22 +21.1
+.44 +18.1
+.01 +7.0
+.01 +5.0
+.01 +6.0
+.01 +2.5
+1.3
+.64 +19.2
+.67 +19.3
+.11 +19.0
+.24 +22.6
+2.6
+2.6
-01 +4.1
-.01 +4.2
-.01 +4.3
-.01 +1.4
+.09 +20.8
+.23 +21.5
+.23 +21.5
+.20 +21.5
+.09 +21.1
+.06 +13.2
+.14 +22.7
+.04 +10.4
+.03 +11.6
+.08 +12.6
+.10 +14.3
+.07 +15.0
+.13 +15.3
+.08 +15.3
+.13 +15.3
+.U1 +85
+.05 +13.4
-.01 NA
NA
-.01 +4.9
-.01 +4.9
-.01 +4.7
-.01 +4.9
+.08 +10.4
+.26 +18.9
+.26 +18.9
+.25 +18.9
+.26 +18.8
+.52 +18.7
+.14 +17.8
+.14 +17.8
+.02 +12.0
+.05 +12.1
+.12 +13.7
+.20 +13.8
+.38 +18.1
+.12 +19.0
+.41 +19.1
+.21 +18.0
+.09 +14.4


IntlStkldxAdm 28.98
IntlStkldxl 115.90
IntlStkldxlPls 115.92
IntlStkldxlSgn 34.77
IntlVal 38.57
LTGradeAd 10.50
LgCpldxlnv 35.69
LifeCon 18.68
LifeGro 28.77
LifeMod 24.06
MdGrlxlnv 36.63
MidCapldxlP 155.35
MidCpAdml 142.58
MidCplst 31.50
MidCpSgl 44.99
MorgAdml 81.07
MuHYAdmI 11.12
MulntAdml 14.19
MuLTAdmI 11.61
MuLtdAdml 11.09
MuShtAdml 15.87
Prmcp 98.99
PrmcpAdml 102.68
PrmcpCorl 20.89
REITIdxAd 105.35
STBondAdm 10.55
STBondSgl 10.55
STCor 10.78
STGradeAd 10.78
STIGradel 10.78
STsryAdml 10.71
SelValu 29.27
SmCpldAdm 53.63
SmCpldlst 53.63
SmCplncdSgnl 48.31
SmVIIdlst 24.31
Star 24.93
StratgcEq 31.75
TgtRe20lO 26.55
TgtRe20l5 15.35
TgtRe202O 28.22
TgtRe203O 28.78
TgtRe2035 17.69
TgtRe204O 29.50
TgtRe2045 18.50
TgtRe205O 29.37
TgtRetlnc 12.89
Tgtet2025 16.40
TllntlBdldxlnst 30.67
TllntlBdldxlnv 10.22
TotBdAdml 10.85
TotBdlnst 10.85
TotBdMklnv 10.85
TotBdMkSig 10.85
Totlntl 17.33
TotStlAdm 48.45
TotStllns 48.46
TotStlSig 46.76
TotStldx 48.43
TxMCapAdm 98.16
ValldxAdm 31.08
Valldxlns 31.08
Wellsl 25.87
WellslAdm 62.67
Welltn 39.52
WelltnAdm 68.26
WndsllAdm 68.75
Wndsr 21.50
WndsrAdml 72.56
Wndsrll 38.73
Victory
SpecValA m 21.53
Virtus
EmgMktsls 10.20
Wasatch
LgCpVal d 12.71
Wells Fargo
Discovlnv 31.69
Growlnv 48.82
Outk2O1OAdm 13.60







The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014 STOCKS www.sunnewspapers.net WIRE Page 7



STOCKS LISTING CHANGE REQU ESTS WELCOME! our readers don't want. If you do not see your stock in the paper, please let us
know and we will put it in the listings. Email the name of the company and the
The Sun Newspaper is tweaking the way stocks are listed in the daily paper. symbol to nlane@sun-herald.com, or call 941-206-1138. You can leave the stock
We will continue to run a wide range of stocks, but we're trying to eliminate stocks name and symbol on voice mail.



S&P 500 & +10.25 NASDAQ & +22.87 DOW & +6556 6-MO T-BILLS & 1 30-YR T-BONDS & +.03 CRUDE OIL & +.86 EURO +0010 GOLD -3.00
1,920.03 4,247.95 16,698.74 .05% 3.33% $103.58 $1.3603 4 + 1 25630 '


Money Markets


CombinedStocks
From the New York Stock Exchange


and the Nasdaq.

YTD Name Last Chg
A-B-C
-3.8 AES Corp 13.96 +.09
-8.0 AFLAC 61.44 +.49
+11.9 AGLRes 52.85 -.24
-23.5 AK Steel 6.27 +.10
+26.1 ASM Intl 41.60 +.74
+.7 AT&T Inc 35.39 +.05
+3.3 AbbottLab 39.60 -.07
+2.3 AbbVie 54.03 -.04
+12.9 AberFitc 37.14 +2.02
+1.6 Accuray 8.84 +.21
+27.1 Actavis 213.45 +3.12
+16.4 AcvsBliz 20.75 +.42
+9.3 AdobeSy 65.45 +.61
-13.8 AdvEnld 19.71 +.06
+4.1 AMD 4.03 +.03
-23.0 AdvisoryBd 49.04 -.11
+9.1 AecomTch 32.11 -.13
-56.3 Aeropostl 3.97 -.01
+10.1 AeroViron 32.09 -.35
+12.5 Aetna 77.19 +.49
-.4 Agilent 56.96 -.15
+12.8 Agnico g 29.75 +.09
-12.7 Aircase 16.72 -.07
-4.7 Airgas 106.63 +1.52
+16.1 AkamaiT 54.77 +.42
-13.7 AlaskOom 1.83 +.04
-8.9 AlcatelLuc 4.01 +.02
+27.8 Alcoa 13.58 +.21
+26.1 Alexion 167.52 -.13
+16.0 AllegTch 41.34 +.44
+42.7 Allergen 158.50 +2.38
-.7 Allete 49.51 -.32
+17.8 AInceRes 90.67 +.57
+4.8 AlliBInco 7.47
+11.3 AlliBern 23.75 +.12
+11.9 AlliantEgy 57.75 -.19
+6.9 Allstate 58.30 +.12
-50.1 AlphaNRs 3.56 -.02
+4.2 AIpToDv rs 8.73 +.04
+2.0 AIpAerMLP 18.15 -.01
+2.3 AlteraCp If 33.25
+7.6 Altria 41.31 +.54
-21.3 Amazon 313.78 +3.62
-2.0 Ambev n 7.20 +.03
+7.6 Ameren 38.91 -.27
-15.1 AMovilL 19.84 -.08
+57.7 AmAirln 39.82 +.02
+22.1 ACapAgy 23.56 -.09
-5.1 AmCapLtd 14.85 +.31
+16.6 ACapMtg 20.36 -.03
-24.7 AEagleOut 10.85 +.04
+12.9 AEP 52.79 -.15
+.6 AmExp 91.28 +.22
+6.1 AmlnIGrp 54.18 +.70
-4.0 ARItCapPr 12.34 -.07
+3.8 AmStWtrs 29.83 -.14
+12.7 AmWtrWks 47.64 +.04
+5.3 Amerigas 46.95 -.01
-1.9 Ameriprise 112.82 +1.64
+4.2 AmeriBrgn 73.28 +.60
+.7 Ametek 53.06 +.22
+1.7 Amgen 116.00 +.33
+3.4 AmicusTh 2.43 +.22
+7.6 Amphenol 95.92 +.61
+30.2 Anadarko 103.31 +1.31
+33.1 AnglogldA 15.60 +.14
+3.4 ABInBev 110.03 +.10
+2.2 AnnInc 37.35 -.85
+17.4 Annaly 11.70 -.05
+26.4 Anworth 5.32 -.02
+8.3 Apache 93.06 +1.30
-1.4 Apollolnv 8.36 +.01
+13.3 AppleInc 635.38+11.37
+14.7 ApdMatl 20.28 -.26
+5.8 AquaAm s 24.96 -.08
-1.5 Aramark n 25.83 -1.00
+30.0 ArkBest 43.78 +.29
-13.2 ArcelorMit 15.48 +.09
-18.9 ArchCoal 3.61 +.02
+7.0 ArenaPhm 6.26
-3.5 AresCap 17.15 +.01
-6.5 AriadP 6.38 +.01
+7.7 ArmourRsd 4.32
-15.8 ArrayBio 4.22 -.03
+35.5 Arris 32.98 +.39
+6.8 ArrowEl 57.95 +.02
+5.6 ArubaNet 18.91 +.29
+6.9 Ashland 103.72 +.96
+4.5 AssuredG 24.66 -.08
+20.1 AsraZen 71.29 +.13
+11.7 Asrotch h 3.16 +.92
-7.6 AtlasPpln 32.39 -.16
+6.6 Atmel 8.35 +.16
+9.6 ATMOS 49.76 -.36
+4.7 Autodesk 52.69 +.97
-1.5 AutoData 79.56 +.69
+33.9 AvagoTch 70.79 +.69
+60.4 AvanirPhm 5.39 +.21
-2.0 AveryD 49.21 +.39
+41.0 AvisBudg 56.99 +.03
+14.0 Avista 32.15 -.09
-16.4 Avon 14.40 +.30
+1.5 BB&TCp 37.89 -.24
+5.4 BCE g 45.62 -.13
+8.6 B/EAero 94.51 +.14
+15.5 BGC Ptrs 6.99 -.14
+4.4 BHPBiIlplc 64.85 +.87
+4.2 BP PLC 50.65 -.02
+15.4 BP Pru 91.88+ .19
-5.8 Baidu 167.50 +1.33
+27.9 BakrHu 70.68 +.69
+16.7 BallCorp 60.28 +.31
+144.2 BallardPw 3.70 -.18
+15.2 BcoBradpf 14.43 -.16
+11.7 BcoSantSA 10.13 -.08
+24.6 BcoSBrasil 6.73 -.10
-14.4 BankMutl 6.00 -.03
-2.7 BkofAm 15.15 +.01
+5.6 BkMont g 70.39 -.03
-1.0 BkNYMeI 34.58 +.21
+2.0 BkNova g 63.83 +.56
-20.9 B iPVix rs 33.64 -.14
+10.4 Bard 147.89 +.88
+21.7 BarnesNob 18.20 -.03
-10.6 BarrickG 15.77 +.08
+71.2 BasicEnSv 27.02 +1.05
-18.9 BeazerHm 19.81 +.13
-24.0 BedBath 60.99 +.48
+.6 Bemis 41.20 +.20
+8.1 BerkH B 128.11 +.65
-31.1 BestBuy 27.47 +.53
+16.2 BigLots 37.51 +.46
+34.5 Biocryst 10.22 +.15
+14.4 Biogenldc 319.85+11.04
+4.0 BlackBerry 7.74 +.45
+4.0 BlkHlthSci 36.84 -.50
-.8 Blackstone 31.25 +.29
-13.8 BloominBr 20.70 -.31
-10.7 BobEvans 45.20 -1.21


Interestrates







The yield on the
1 0-year Trea-
sury rose to 2.47
percent Thurs-
day. Yields af-
fect rates on
mortgages and
other consumer
loans.


PRIME FED
RATE FUNDS
YEST 3.25 .13
6MOAGO 3.25 .13
1 YR AGO 3.25 .13


-1.0 Boeing 135.14 +.81
+15.5 BoozAIInH 22.12 -1.51
+12.4 BorgWrn s 62.84 +.21
-9.4 BostBeer 218.95 +.05
+8.1 BostonSci 12.99 -.16
-2.1 BoydGm 11.02 +.10
+8.8 Brandyw 15.17 +.04
-3.5 BrigSrat 20.99 -.02
+6.8 Brinker 49.49 -.14
-6.8 BrMySq 49.52 +.89
+12.2 BritATob 120.50 +2.34
+6.8 Broadcom 31.67 +.27
+1.5 BrcdeCm 9.00 +.05
+22.3 Brookdale 33.25 -.30
+2.6 Brkflnfra 40.23 -.73
+9.9 Buckeye 78.07 +.52
-1.5 BuffaloWW144.92 -.73
-14.0 CA Inc 28.95 +.05
+4.6 CBLAsc 18.78 -.04
-5.6 CBSB 60.15 -.33
+10.0 CMS Eng 29.46 -.07
-3.6 CNH Indl 10.94 +.08
+2.6 CSX 29.52 -.07
+17.9 CVR Rfng 26.68 +.10
+8.5 CVS Care 77.66 +.41
+23.2 CYSInvest 9.13 -.05
-2.6 CblvsnNY 17.47 +.03
-5.7 CabotOG s 36.54 +.58
+19.8 Cadence 16.80 -.07
+13.6 Cal-Maine 68.41 +.52
+12.2 CalaCvHi 14.51 +.11
+5.3 Calgon 21.65 -.02
-6.1 CalifWtr 21.67 -.09
+16.8 Calpine 22.78 -.04
+21.9 CalumetSp 31.72 +.48
+22.9 CamdenPT 69.90 +.12
-3.4 Cameco g 20.06 +.45
+4.3 CampSp 45.14 +.53
+6.0 CdnNR gs 60.44 +.35
+20.7 CdnNRs gs 40.85 +.45
-8.5 CdnSolar 27.30 +1.25
+2.8 CapOne 78.72 +.17
-1.0 CapSenL 23.75 -.20
+8.0 CapsteadM 13.05 -.06
+19.4 CpsnTurb 1.54 +.05
+6.4 CardnlHIth 71.11 +1.66
+7.7 CareFusion 42.90 +.40
+21.6 Carmike 33.84 +.40
-1.1 Carnival 39.74 +.22
+.9 CarpTech 62.75 -.20
+30.9 Carrizo 58.59 +.71
+14.1 Caterpillar 103.60 +.69
+4.9 CedarF 51.99 +.03
-9.3 Celgene 153.26 -1.04
+14.5 Cemex 13.02 +.03
+21.6 Cemigpfs 7.24 -.03
+2.1 CenovusE 29.26 +.18
+3.8 CenterPnt 24.06 +.05
+18.3 CntryLink 37.68 -.12
-9.9 Cenveo 3.10
+4.1 ChambStPr 7.96 +.09
-18.1 Checkpnt 12.92 -.04
+48.1 ChelseaTh 6.57 -.03
-8.8 ChemFinl 28.89 -.05
+45.0 CheniereEn62.52 +4.19
+6.4 ChesEng 28.89 +.48
-2.1 Chevron 122.32 -.20
-1.2 ChicB&l 82.18 +1.08
-19.1 Chicos 15.24 +.10
+.3 Chimera 3.11
+35.9 ChiMYWnd 3.33 +.17
+3.9 ChurchDwt 68.89 +.71
-16.8 CienaCorp 19.92 -.24
+3.0 Cigna 90.10 +.63
+9.3 CinciBell 3.89 +.07
-6.7 CinnFin 48.85 +.16
+9.1 Cirrus 22.29 +.01
+10.9 Cisco 24.68 -.14
-9.3 Citigroup 47.28 -.04
-2.5 CitrixSys 61.66 +.80
-13.2 CleanEngy 11.18 +.91
-36.7 CliffsNRs 16.60 +.54
-3.5 Clorox 89.48 +1.01
-27.7 Coach 40.61 -.20
+11.7 CobaltlEn 18.37 +.28
-1.6 CocaCola 40.66 +.08
+4.2 CocaCE 45.97 +.12
-3.0 CognizTc s 48.96 +.06
+18.5 CohStQIR 11.23 +.03
+4.5 CohStSelPf 25.79 +.11
+2.6 ColgPalm 66.92 +.80
-12.8 ColonialFS 11.60 +.23
+.2 Comcast 52.07 +.22
-1.0 Comerica 47.07 +.22
+50.0 CmtyHIt rt .08 +.00
-16.9 CmpTask 15.65 +.02
-12.1 Compuwre 9.85 -.18
+52.9 ComstkRs 27.96 +1.55
+4.9 Comtech 33.04 +.19
-4.5 ConAgra 32.17 +.59
-9.5 ConnWtrSv 32.12 -.08
+12.6 ConocoPhil 79.55 -.02
+17.5 ConsolEngy 44.69 -.58
+3.7 ConsolCom 20.35 +.07
-1.1 ConEd 54.65 +.13
+25.9 ContlRes 141.64 +2.62
+15.6 CooperTire 27.80 -.19
-21.3 CorOnDem 41.94 +.25
+20.1 Corning 21.40 +.14
+15.9 CorpOffP 27.46 +.08
-4.1 Costco 114.14 -.10
+8.3 Cotyn 16.51 -.03
+6.6 Covidien 72.62 -.13
-66.3 CSVInvNG 2.98 +.05
+13.1 CSVeIIVST 38.88 +.14
-44.0 CSVxSht rs 4.20 -.07
-.5 CrestwdEq 13.76 -.16
-5.6 Crocs 15.03 +.06
+9.6 CrownHold 48.85 +.35
+8.2 Cummins 152.52 +.29
+24.3 CybrOpt 7.94 -.23
-1.8 CypSemi 10.31 +.07
-37.6 CvtRx 3.91 -.22
D-E-F
-40.7 DaraBio rs 1.60 -.58
+10.2 DCT IndI 7.86 +.03
+11.8 DDRCorp 17.18 +.04
+8.8 DNPSelct 10.25 -.03
+7.0 DR Horton 23.88 +.55
-42.1 DSWlncs 24.73 +1.11
+13.5 DTE 75.37 +.01
+7.9 DTE En 61 26.08 +.11
+1.7 Danaher 78.55 -.13
-8.3 Darden 49.88 -.30
+18.2 DeVryEd 41.96 +.11
+1.2 DeanFdsrs 17.40 +.29
-.3 Deere 91.10 +.19
-16.8 dELIAs h .73 +.00
+46.1 DeltaAir 40.14 -.13
-18.9 DemndMda 4.68 +.11


1,960 ................................. S& P 500
... Close: 1,920.03
Change: 10.25 (0.5%)
1,840 .........10 DAYS .........


1 ,9 5 0 ............... .......................... ............. ............. ............ 4 ,4 0 0 ............... ............. ........... ............. ..........................
1,9 0 0 .... . . ..............................I. .. 4 30............ ....... . ...........................
1,950 ... ... ................4400o


8 5 0 ............. ....... ........ ...........

,8 0 ..... .......... ........... .. ............ 4 10 ......... .... 0 0...... .


1 7 5 0 / . . . . . . .. . . . .. 0 0 0 N . . ... . . .. . . . .


I'" D


StocksRecap

NYSE NASD
Vol. (in mil.) 2,653 1,652
Pvs. Volume 2,861 1,715
Advanced 2082 1522
Declined 1024 1061
New Highs 185 80
New Lows 17 26


+3.2 DenburyR 16.96
+19.4 DevonE 73.89
-3.5 Diageo 127.77
-9.8 DiaOffs 51.33
+14.9 Diebold 37.92
-27.1 Digilnl 8.83
+16.9 DigitalRIt 57.40
+15.8 Dillards 112.58
+19.0 DirecTV 82.16
+2.4 DxGIdBII rs 28.07
-10.7 DrxFnBear 19.19
-4.3 DrxSCBear 16.24
-7.6 DirGMnBull 14.41
-33.2 DirDGdBr s 29.44
-8.5 DrxSCBull 70.87
+10.0 Disney 84.03
-11.3 DollarGen 53.50
-5.6 DollarTree 53.26
+5.9 DomRescs 68.52
+4.0 Dominos 72.47
-20.9 DonlleyRR 16.05
+18.2 DowChm 52.47
+10.5 DryStrt 8.40
-34.5 DryShips 3.08
+6.2 DuPont 68.97
+6.2 DufPUC 10.65
+2.8 DukeEngy 70.93
+17.4 DukeRlty 17.65
+8.7 E-CDang 10.38
-34.4 E-House 9.89
+4.0 E-Trade 20.42
-8.6 eBay 50.14
+6.4 EMC Cp 26.77
+27.1 EOG Res s106.67
-2.7 Eaton 74.03
+3.6 EV EEq2 13.46
+3.5 EVTxMGIo 10.35
+4.2 Ecolab 108.68
+22.5 EdwLfSci 80.54
+.5 EldorGId g 5.72
+51.5 ElectArts 34.76
+44.5 Emeritus 31.26
+5.3 EmpDist 23.90
+3.8 EnbrdgEPt 31.00
+8.2 Enbridge 47.25
+29.0 EnCana g 23.28
+5.8 Endo Intl 71.40
+6.6 Energizer 115.38
-1.8 EngyTsfr 56.21
+12.0 EnLkLLC n 40.99
-13.2 EnnisInc 15.20
-8.2 ENSCO 52.47
+19.4 Entergy 75.53
-1.0 EnteroMed 2.02
+11.4 EntPrPt 73.88
+1.6 EsteeLdr 76.51
+2.4 ExcoRes 5.44
+31.7 Exelon 36.06
+5.6 Expedia 73.57
-27.0 Express 13.63
+1.2 ExpScripts 71.06
-42.8 ExrmNet 3.99
+.1 ExxonMbl 101.27
+10.9 FMCTech 57.90
-2.5 FNBCp PA 12.30
+1.8 FS Invest n 10.43
-9.4 Fabrinet 18.63
+16.8 Facebook 63.83
-10.3 FamilyDIr 58.26
+2.8 Fastenal 48.85
+.5 FedExCp 144.53
+62.4 FedNatHId 23.82
+20.7 Ferrellgs 27.71
+2.7 FidlNFin 33.33
+.8 FifthStFin 9.32
-2.3 FifthThird 20.55
-20.5 FireEye n 34.65
FstAFin n 28.21
-1.5 FstHorizon 11.48
+16.1 FstSolar 63.41
+1.5 FirstEngy 33.48
-15.7 FstMerit 18.74
+31.1 Flexrn 10.19
-1.1 FlowrsFd s 21.23
-5.8 Fluor 75.61
+7.2 FordM 16.54
-34.3 ForestOil 2.37
+18.5 Fornet 22.67
-12.2 FBHmSec 40.11
-9.1 FMCG 34.27
+40.2 Freescale 22.51
+24.9 FrontierCm 5.81
-35.3 Frontline 2.42
+68.8 FuelCellE 2.38
-6.3 Fusion-io 8.35
G-H-I
+97.6 GTAdvTc 17.22
+2.3 GabDvlnc 22.67
-14.3 GabMultT 10.63
+12.4 GabUtil 7.18
-22.5 GameStop 38.17
-12.0 Gam&Lsr n 33.84
+4.6 Gap 40.86
+27.4 Garmin 58.84
-22.4 Geeknet 14.03
-14.9 Generac 48.20
+1.2 GAInv 35.61
+23.5 GenDynaml17.97
-4.6 GenElec 26.74
+17.8 GenGrPrp 23.65
+9.6 GenMills 54.70
-15.7 GenMotors 34.45
+5.4 GenesisEn 55.39
-10.8 Gentex 29.28
+10.6 Genworth 17.18


NET 1YR
TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .03 0.03 ... .04
6-month T-bill .05 0.04 +0.01 .07
52-wk T-bill .09 0.09 ... .13
2-year T-note .38 0.37 +0.01 .30
5-year T-note 1.53 1.48 +0.05 .99
1 0-year T-note 2.47 2.44 +0.03 2.12
30-year T-bond 3.33 3.30 +0.03 3.05


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.10 3.09 +0.01 2.98
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.48 4.49 -0.01 4.21
Barclays USAggregate 2.15 2.21 -0.06 2.05
Barclays US High Yield 5.03 5.03 ... 5.42
Moodys AAA Corp Idx 4.13 4.21 -0.08 4.06
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.73 1.72 +0.01 1.26
Barclays US Corp 2.84 2.89 -0.05 2.86


J F M A M ... D


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


-21.4 Gerdau 6.16 -.04
+9.3 GileadSci 82.08 +.22
+1.9 GlaxoSKn 54.38 +.60
+16.5 GlimchRt 10.90
+90.3 Globalstar 3.33 +.09
-24.8 Gogo n 18.67 +.99
+38.7 GolUnhas 6.34 +.01
+9.7 GoldFLtd 3.51 -.02
+6.6 Goldcrpg 23.11 -.03
+69.8 GoodrPet 28.90 +1.10
+9.0 Goodyear 26.00 -.16
+1.7 GoogleA 570.56 +.11
+.3 Google C n560.08 -1.60
-5.7 viGrace 93.22 +1.64
+1.4 GramrcyP 5.83 -.01
+13.5 GraphPkg 10.90 +.12
-74.4 GNIron 17.43
+4.3 GtPlainEn 25.29 +.04
+3.5 Greif A 54.26 +.70
-16.4 Griffin h 27.90 -.23
-49.1 Groupon 5.99 -.10
+13.5 GpTelevisa 34.34 +.52
-18.9 GuangRy 18.73 -.03
+14.6 HCP Inc 41.61 +.16
-4.8 HSBC 52.51 -.11
+1.0 HainCel 91.68 +.88
+64.8 HalconRes 6.36 +.32
+26.1 Hallibrtn 64.00 +.56
+19.4 Hanesbrds 83.90 +.12
+1.7 Hanoverlns 60.71 +.14
+2.9 HarleyD 71.23 +.08
+3.6 HarmonyG 2.62 +.01
-4.0 Harsco 26.91 -.06
-3.9 HartfdFn 34.81 +.34
+24.1 HatterasF 20.28 -.04
-7.6 HawaiiEl 24.07 -.11
+17.0 HItCrREIT 62.67 +.32
+5.7 HlthCSvc 29.98 -.06
-10.1 HeclaM 2.77 +.02
-30.2 HercOffsh 4.55 +.10
-.3 Hershey 96.93 +.18
+2.2 Hertz 29.24 +.07
+9.1 Hess 90.59 +.62
+20.2 HewlettP 33.64 +.29
+57.8 Hillshire 52.76 +7.95
-10.5 HilltopH 20.70 -.10
-52.8 HimaxTch 6.95 +.04
+8.5 Hologic 24.25 +.28
-3.0 HomeDp 79.90 +.22
-23.7 HomeAway 31.19 -.01
-15.7 Honda 34.87 +.27
+1.6 Honwlllnt 92.83 +.32
+90.8 HorizPhm 14.54 -.21
+7.8 Hormel 48.71 +1.00
+7.3 HospPT 29.00 +.19
+12.1 HostHotls 21.80 +.12
+16.4 HuanPwr 42.18 +.60
+7.4 HubbelB 116.98 +.97
+3.7 HudsCity 9.78 -.07
-4.2 HuntBncsh 9.25 +.04
+10.4 Huntgtnlng 99.38 -.56
-7.5 IAMGId g 3.08 +.04
-10.3 iGateCorp 36.04 -.03
-.3 ING 13.97 +.11
+4.2 iShGold 12.17 -.02
+6.3 iShBrazil 47.50 -.15
+4.7 iShEMU 43.32 .15
-4.8 iShJapan 11.56 +.13
+5.6 iSTaiwn 15.23 +.01
-2.2 iShSilver 18.30 +.02
+3.7 iShS&P100 85.43 +.48
+5.1 iShSelDiv 74.99 +.27
-4.5 iShChinaLC 36.66 +.07
+4.2 iSCorSP500193.53 +.97
+3.2 iShEMkts 43.14 +.12
+6.8 iShEMBd 115.53 +.49
+12.1 iSh20yrT 114.15 -.61
+3.4 iS Eafe 69.40 +.42
+2.2 iShiBxHYB 94.95 +.09
-1.7 iShR2K 113.37 +.38
+5.2 iShHiDiv 73.87 +.31
+8.2 iShUSPfd 39.85 +.10
+13.1 iShREst 71.32 +.09
-2.6 iShHmCnst 24.17 +.14
+5.8 Idacorp 54.85 -.18
-33.0 IderaPhm 3.10 +.16
+3.2 ITW 86.75 +.23
+8.2 IndBkMI 12.98 +.13
-10.3 Infosys 50.75 -.41
-3.0 IngerRd 59.78 -.06
+11.3 Ingredion 76.23 +.68
+.9 InlandRE 10.61 +.03
-22.1 lnovioPhm 2.26 +.14
+32.9 IntgDv 13.53 +.38
+5.4 IntegrysE 57.34 +.11
+3.9 Intel 26.96 +.08
-67.4 IntrCloud n 5.99 +1.05
+256.0 InterceptP 243.06 +9.03
-5.2 InterNAP 7.13 -.01
-2.0 IBM 183.76 +.68
-30.7 IntlGame 12.58 -.02
-4.4 IntPap 46.85 +.09
+8.0 Interpublic 19.11 +.18
-45.2 Intersecths 4.27 +.04
-2.4 IntSurg 374.85+10.17
-6.2 InvenSense 19.49 +.25
+.6 Invesco 36.63 +.69
+6.8 InvBncps s 10.71 .10
+30.1 IridiumCm 8.13 +.23
-24.1 Isis 30.25 -.54
+18.3 ItauUnibH 16.04 -.20
J-K-L
+15.3 JASolar 10.57 +70
+21.5 JD.comn 25.40 +.62
-13.7 JDSUniph 11.21 +.05


Foreign
Exchange
The dollar
weakened
versus the euro,
but weakened
against the
Japanese yen.
The ICE U.S.
Dollar Index,
which compares
the dollar
against a basket
of major
currencies, also
declined.

6; Orn i


HIGH
16698.74
8110.46
541.19
10752.16
4247.95
1920.03
1380.82
20333.04
1141.35


4,280 ................................ Nasdaq composite
4,140 ... Close: 4,247.95
Change: 22.87 (0.5%)
4,000 .........10 DAYS .........


J F M A M


LOW
16620.43
8065.79
537.78
10699.49
4228.96
1909.82
1372.86
20228.68
1134.78


-4.1 JPMorgCh 55.72 +.27
-13.1 JacobsEng 54.75 +.13
+26.6 JkksPac 8.51 -.05
+11.8 JetBlue 9.55 +.10
-.3 JinkoSolar 29.21 +3.00
+10.0 JohnJn 100.76 +.46
-5.6 JohnsnCtl 48.42 -.14
+12.8 JnprNtwk 25.45 +.22
-9.1 KB Home 16.62 -.01
-6.4 KKR 22.78 -.13
+5.6 KKR Fn 41 28.31 +.29
-13.3 KC Southn 107.36 -.41
+12.5 Kellogg 68.73 +1.17
+1.6 KeryxBio 13.16 +.02
+48.9 KeurigGM 112.48 -1.88
+1.6 Keycorp 13.63 +.07
+6.5 KimbCIk 111.26 +.72
-5.9 KindME 75.88 -.22
-6.7 KindMorg 33.60 +.01
-14.8 Kinross g 3.73
+13.7 KodiakO g 12.75 +.28
+9.5 KraftFGp 59.03 +.70
+9.5 KratosDef 8.41 -.30
-1.6 KrispKrm 18.99 -.10
+18.1 Kroger 46.70 +.01
+6.6 Kulicke 14.18 -.01
-8.1 L Brands 56.83 +.47
+12.7 L-3Com 120.41 +1.44
+11.4 LTC Prp 39.44 -.14
+14.1 Landstar 65.56 +.43
-2.4 LVSands 77.01 +1.04
+6.7 LaSalleH 32.94 +.15
+9.1 LeggPlat 33.77 +.01
+3.3 LennarA 40.87 +.50
+30.8 Level3 43.40 -.56
+10.9 LexRItyTr 11.32 -.05
-1.3 LbtyASE 5.89 +.02
-.3 UbGIobA s 45.30 -.14
+2.1 UbGIobC s 43.03 -.23
-.8 LbtylntA 29.12 +.10
+14.0 UbtProp 38.61 -.02
-17.0 Ufevantge 1.37 -.02
+16.6 UllyEli 59.47 -.23
-6.9 UncNat 48.04 +.16
-24.5 Lnkedln 163.69 +3.25
-6.3 LnnEngy 28.84 +.32
-10.0 UnnCo 27.74 +.13
-6.7 UonsGtg 29.53 +.75
+247.4 UveDeal s 4.61 -.46
-2.1 LloydBkg 5.21 -.08
+9.7 LockIhdM 163.15 +2.38
+18.9 Lorillard 60.24 +1.39
-21.0 LaPac 14.62 +.03
-5.1 Lowes 47.01 +.30
+4.9 Luxottica 56.57 +.22
+25.0 LyonBasA 100.35 +1.36
M-N-O
+3.6 M&T Bk 120.64 -.77
-.5 MBIA 11.88 -.01
-22.7 MCG Cap 3.40 +.02
-10.1 MDC 28.98 +.10
+9.8 MDU Res 33.55 -.44
+1.2 MGICInv 8.54 -.02
+10.5 MGM Rsts 26.00 +.29
-25.5 MacroGn n 20.44 +1.00
+10.8 Macys 59.16 +.56
+225.0 MagneGas 1.43 -.24
+7.0 MagHRes 7.82 -.05
+18.2 Manitowoc 27.57 +.18
+64.4 MannKd 8.55 +.38
-6.7 Manulife g 18.40 +.02
+3.9 MarathnO 36.66 +.11
-2.1 MarathPet 89.81 +2.44
+7.6 MVJrGId rs 33.40 +.30
+5.3 MktVGold 22.24 +.20
-11.4 MktVRus 25.58 +.24
+.5 MVPreRMu 24.61 -.04
-6.3 MarkWest 61.95 -.25
+23.0 MarlntA 60.68 +1.24
+3.5 MarshM 50.03 +.13
-5.9 MartinMid 40.29 +.33
+9.5 MarvellT 15.74 +.02
-6.5 Masco 21.30 +.03
+45.0 MastThera .67 +.01
-8.1 MasterCds 76.79 -.14
-19.7 McDrmlnt 7.36 +.24
+4.4 McDnlds 101.34 +.85
+9.9 MeadWvco 40.58 +.44
+23.7 Medgenics 7.41 +.16
+10.1 MedProp 13.45 +.02
+5.6 Medtrnic 60.62 +.46
-10.8 MelcoCrwn 34.97 -.33
-18.7 MercadoL 87.61 +5.51
+15.3 Merck 57.70 +1.30
-4.6 MercGn 47.41 -.16
-13.2 Meredith 44.98 +.02
+33.2 Mentor 13.89 +.03
-5.7 MetLife 50.82 -.19
+13.7 MKors 92.28 -4.73
+5.7 Microchp 47.31 +.05
+31.4 MicronT 28.58 -.03
+7.8 Microsoft 40.34 +.33
+50.0 Microvisn 1.98 +.03
-.5 Middleby 238.51 +2.48
-1.5 MdsxWatr 20.63 -.01
-13.2 MobileTele 18.77 +.30
+16.4 MolsCoorB 65.34 +1.04
-48.9 Molycorp 2.87 -.04
+6.2 Mondelez 37.48 +.08
+6.3 MoogA 72.23 +.18
-.7 MorgStan 31.13 +.20
-.9 MotrlaSolu 66.91 -.02
+14.6 Mylan 49.73 +.86
-4.3 NCR Corp 32.61 -.19
-79.9 NIl Hldg .55 -.02


MAJORS


CLOSE
16698.74
8110.35
540.84
10752.11
4247.95
1920.03
1380.53
20332.99
1140.07


CHG.
+65.56
+34.47
+0.42
+49.38
+22.87
+10.25
+5.97
+103.08
+3.39


%CHG.
+0.39%
+0.43%
+0.08%
+0.46%
+0.54%
+0.54%
+0.43%
+0.51%
+0.30%


-9.6 NPS Phm 27.45 +.04
-53.8 NQ Mobile 6.79 -.56
+23.8 NRG Egy 35.55 +.39
+1.0 NTT DOCO 16.68 +.03
+35.1 NXP Semi 62.03 +.22
+54.0 Nabors 26.17 +.05
-38.0 NBGrce rs 3.47 +.03
+4.7 NatFuGas 74.79 -.28
+13.7 NatGrid 74.30 -.14
+11.2 NtHIthlnv 62.36 +.48
+3.2 NOilVarco 82.08 +.21
-7.7 Navient n 15.68
+6.2 NektarTh 12.05 +.33
-17.6 Neogens 37.67 -.07
-9.9 NetApp 37.05 +.21
+12.8 Netflix 415.20+13.96
+17.6 NJ Rscs 54.38 -.71
+33.0 NwMedia n 13.97
-17.7 NewOriEd 25.92 +.37
-5.4 NewResid 6.32 +.03
-9.1 NY CmtyB 15.31 -.01
+13.3 NYMtgTr 7.92 +.01
Newcastle 4.83 +.02
-99.8 NewLead rs 1.67 -.75
-1.2 NewmtM 22.76 +.28
-5.0 NewsCpAn 17.12 +.01
+12.8 NextEraEn 96.55 -.08
+13.0 NiSource 37.15 -.09
-2.9 NikeB 76.38 +.35
+9.5 NipponTT 29.60 +.18
-16.4 NobleCorp 31.34 +.85
-2.3 NokaCp 7.92 +.07
-13.3 NordicAm 8.41 -.01
+8.8 NorfikSo 101.04 +.90
-53.9 NA Pall g .30 +.03
+19.1 NAtlDrlln 10.17 +.62
+6.2 NoestUt 45.03 -.10
+13.5 NthnTEn 27.91 +.60
+4.9 NorhropG 120.20 +.63
+21.8 NStarRlt 16.38 +.05
-9.2 NwstBcsh 13.42 +.09
+5.4 NwstNG 45.13 +.05
+18.9 NovaGld g 3.02 +.07
+12.2 Novartis 90.16 +.27
-4.1 Novavax 4.91 -.01
+14.8 NovoNord s 42.42 +.06
+7.6 NuanceCm 16.36 +.17
-3.1 Nucor 51.70 +.43
+12.6 NuvDivA 14.18 +.01
+4.5 NuvEqtP 13.11 +.03
+7.9 NuvMuOpp 14.26 +.03
+11.0 NvlQI 15.02 +.03
+12.1 NvMAd 13.63
+7.6 Nv AMT-Fr 16.35 -.04
+8.9 NvNYP 14.49 -.03
+9.8 NuvPP 14.85 -.04
+8.3 NvPfdlnco 9.61 +.02
+11.5 NvPMI 13.79 +.02
+11.2 NuvPl 13.71 -.03
+11.6 NuvPI2 14.00 +.06
+6.6 NuvPI4 12.93 -.04
+13.8 NuvQnc 13.94 -.05
+18.3 Nvidia 18.95 -.03
+36.8 NxStageMd 13.68 +.09
+7.9OGE Egy s 36.57 +.01
+5.0OcciPet 99.83 +.78
-3.3OceanFst 16.56 -.07
-3.0OfficeDpt 5.13 -.02
-45.70Ci SA .86 -.02
-11.6OIdNBcp 13.58 -.06
-.7CldRepub 17.15 -.08
-6.3 Olin 27.04 +.17
+23.3OmegaHlt 36.73 -.06
+16.60megaP 14.33 +.08
-4.5Omnicom 71.06 +.41
+5.6OnSmcnd 8.70 +.01
-53.2OncoGenex 3.90 -.22
+4.1OneokPtrs 54.82 -.74
+4.7OpkoHlth 8.84 -.05
-9.6OplinkC 16.82 -.01
+10.3 Oracle 42.20 +.63
+15.2Orbotch 15.58 -.12
+14.0OreJgen 6.42 +.16
-35.4Organovo 7.15 +.18
+38.7Orthofix 31.65 -.34
+9.3OshkoshCp 55.09 +.19
-2.9OtterTail 28.43 +.11
P-Q-R
+13.4 PG&E Cp 45.68 +.38
+9.3 PNC 84.76 +.24
+17.0 PNM Res 28.21 +.08
-7.3 POSCO 72.27 -.65
+6.0 PPG 201.00 +.75
+15.6 PPL Corp 34.78 +.14
+7.2 Paccar 63.42 -.44
+27.3 PaloAltNet 73.17 +3.66
-4.4 Pandora 25.42 +.13
-13.8 PaneraBrd 152.32 -2.46
-20.7 ParkDrl 6.45 +.12
-3.1 ParkerHan 124.67 +.28
+30.1 PattUTI 32.95 -.01
-14.5 PeabdyE 16.69 -.07
+14.8 Pembina g 40.44 -.04
+2.4 Pengrth g 6.35 -.03
-20.1 PnnNGm 11.45 -.04
+74.8 PennVa 16.48 +.12
+10.8 PennWstg 9.26 +.10
-4.7 PennantPk 11.06 +.02
-1.3 Penney 9.03 +.25
-1.4 Penske 46.50 +.12
-4.2 Pentair 74.40 -.21
-4.9 PeopUtdF 14.38 -.06
-15.6 PepBoy 10.25 -.07
+44.6 PepcoHold 27.66 -.03
+5.8 PepsiCo 87.73 +.66


1YR.
CLOSE CHG %CHG AGO


USD per British Pound 1.6719 +.0
Canadian Dollar 1.0841 -.C
USD per Euro 1.3603 +.0
Japanese Yen 101.72
Mexican Peso 12.8392 -.C
EUROPEIAFRICAIMIDDLE EAST


Israeli Shekel
Norwegian Krone
South African Rand
Swedish Krona
Swiss Franc

ASIAPACIFIC
Australian Dollar
Chinese Yuan
Hong Kong Dollar
Indian Rupee
Singapore Dollar
South Korean Won
Taiwan Dollar


3.4727
5.9661
10.4156
6.6473
.8976


1.0761
6.2387
7.7529
58.915
1.2548
1019.82
29.97


+.0008
+.0002
+.0005
-.0001
+.0009


-.0077
+.0047
-.0005
-.015
-.0009
-2.45
-.17


+.06% 1.5124
-.36% 1.0357
+.07% 1.2934
-.16% 101.15
-.27% 12.6842


+.28% 3.6946
+.12% 5.8967
+.52% 9.8479
-.07% 6.6553
+.08% .9631


-.72% 1.0379
+.08% 6.1312
-.01% 7.7642
-.03% 56.285
-.07% 1.2661
-.24% 1132.32
-.57% 30.01


MO QTR
A A
A A
v A
A A
A v
A A
A A
A A
A v


YTD
+0.74%
+9.59%
+10.25%
+3.38%
+1.71%
+3.88%
+2.83%
+3.18%
-2.03%


+38.1 PeregrinP 1.92 +.06
-9.6 Perrigo 138.80 +2.08
-22.3 PetSmart 56.50 +.93
+6.3 PetrbrsA 15.61 -.21
+5.8 Petrobras 14.58 -.20
-3.4 Pfizer 29.60 -.01
-18.8 Pharmacyc 85.85 -2.55
+1.4 PhilipMor 88.37 +1.02
-13.9 PhilipsNV 31.84 +.34
+9.3 Phillips66 84.32 +1.33
-20.8 PhoenxCos 48.60 +.19
+7.5 PiedNG 35.64 -.12
+10.4 PimlncStr2 10.98 -.02
+15.4 PinnaclFds 31.68 +.31
+3.7 PinWst 54.86 -.20
+14.2 PioNtrl 210.15 +7.19
+8.4 PlainsAAP 56.10 -.04
+181.3PugPowrh 4.36
-2.9 PlumCrk 45.14 +.06
-10.1 Polaris 130.93 +.52
+10.4 Potash 36.40 +.21
-.4 PS SrLoan 24.78 -.03
+3.8 PwShs QQQ91.30 +.58
-71.5 PranaBio 2.00 -.10
+1.9 Praxair 132.50 +2.33
-6.1 PrecCastpt 252.90 +1.90
+11.1 Priceline 1291.73+21.71
-5.4 PrinFncl 46.63
-6.5 ProAssur 45.35 +.55
+11.9 ProLogis 41.34 +.30
+8.2 ProUtSP 111.01 +1.16
-44.0 PUVixST rs 37.57 -.23
-1.2 ProctGam 80.40 +.30
-7.7 ProgsvCp 25.17 -.09
-10.2 ProUShSP 26.62 -.28
-11.2 PUShQQQ rs53.23 -.69
-23.4 ProUShL20 60.64 +.62
-17.4 PShtQQQ rs47.42 -.90
-15.5 PUShSPX rs50.95 -.84
-10.9 ProspctCap 10.00 +.03
-10.9 Prudentl 82.13 +.29
+20.2 PSEG 38.50 +.31
+12.9 PubStrg 169.99 -.45
-3.1 PulteGrp 19.74 -.02
+8.6 PMMI 7.21
+4.1 QEP Res 31.92 +.42
+16.6 Qihoo360 95.66 +.52
+8.0 Qualcom 80.19 -.03
+11.3 QstDiag 59.60 +1.53
+4.2 Questar 23.96 +.04
-17.9 QksilvRes 2.52 +.02
-29.9 Quiksilvr 6.15 -.15
+83.1 RFMicD 9.45 -.26
-7.3 Rackspace 36.27 +.80
+2.6 RadianGrp 14.49 +.19
-44.2 RadioShk 1.45 +.13
-13.3 RLauren 153.06 +.46
-23.7 Ravenlnds 31.38 -.18
+11.7 Rayonier 47.04 +.13
+6.9 Raytheon 96.97 +.36
-24.4 Realogy 37.41 -.32
+16.2 Rltylnco 43.36 +.38
+.2 RedwdTr 19.41 +.08
+5.1 RegncyEn 27.59 -.17
+2.1 RegionsFn 10.10
-3.7 RelStlAI 73.04 +.70
-20.3 ReneSola 2.75 +.05
-12.7 RenewEn 10.01 -.93
+35.4 Rentech 2.37 +.01
+42.0 Replgn 19.37 +.86
-2.9 ResrceCap 5.76 +.04
+6.7 RetailOpp 15.71 +.14
+83.5 RexahnPh .94 -.00
-6.0 Rexnord 25.40 -.78
+19.2 ReynAmer 59.61 +1.21
+65.6 RiteAid 8.38 +.07
+1.9 RockwlAut 120.37 -.77
+6.4 RockColl 78.67 +1.06
+1.0 Rogers 62.12 -.41
+1.9 Roper 141.31 +.23
-9.6 RossStrs 67.76 +.28
-12.5 Rowan 30.94 +.37
+2.6 RoyalBk g 69.00 -.09
+15.5 RyCarb 54.75 +.52
+9.4 RoyDShlIB 82.16 +.44
+10.6 RoyDShlIA 78.81 +.66
-12.3 Ryland 38.06 +.55
S-T-U
-5.2 S&T Bcp 24.00 -.04
+9.8 SCANA 51.52 -.07
-8.7 SLM Cp 8.57 -.17
-7.3 SM Energy 77.01 +.35
+.8 SpdrDJIA 166.78 +.69
+4.2 SpdrGold 120.94 -.26
+3.0 SP Mid 251.53 +1.42
+4.2 S&P500ETF192.37 +.99
-5.0 SpdrHome 31.63 +.01
-5.7 SpdrS&P RB38.31 -.02
+13.6 SpdrOGEx 77.83 +1.39
+11.7 SabnR 56.47 +.85
+41.0 Sa Inc s 45.20 +.74
+20.8 StJoe 23.18 -.11
-1.4 Salesforce 54.40 +1.06
+28.5 SaJixPhm 115.60 -.36
-15.5 SallyBty 25.55 +.41
+12.8 SJuanB 18.88 +.08
+43.0 SanchezEn 35.05 +1.14
+37.0 SanDisk 96.61 +.58
+11.0 SandRdge 6.74 +.14
-.7 Sanofi 53.28 +.29
-21.6 SantCUSA n19.76 -.96
+15.3 Schlmbrg 103.86 +1.99
-1.7 Schwab 25.55 +.26
-6.6 SeadrillLtd 38.38 +.84
+3.6 SearsHIdgs41.15 +2.91


Commodities
Gold and silver
prices ended
slightly lower
Thursday, ex-
tending their
losing streak to
four days. The
price of crude oil
rose above
$103 a barrel.
Crop prices
were mixed.


+11.5 SempraEn 100.05 +.34
+7.4 SenHous 23.88 +.20
+10.8 Sherwin 203.37 +1.66
+11.5 ShipFin 18.26 -.23
-35.5 SiderurNac 4.00
+37.7 SignetJwlrslO8.37 +3.70
+1.3 SilvWhtng 20.45 +.24
+15.6 SimonProp 165.29 -.11
-44.6 Sina 46.64 +1.57
-4.9 SiriusXM 3.32 +.03
+5.4 Skullcandy 7.60 +.12
+50.2 SkywksSol 42.91 +.67
-45.3 SmithMicr .81 -.01
-.6 Smucker 103.00 +2.38
+6.8 SnapOn 117.00 +.25
-24.8 SodaStrm 37.35 +.14
-6.6 SolarCap 21.07
-3.1 SolarCity 55.07 +3.09
-4.1 Solazyme 10.44 +.70
+1.1 SonocoP 42.16 +.28
+19.4 Sonus 3.76 +.03
-6.2 SonyOp 16.21 -.12
-21.7 SouFun s 12.91 -.45
+1.8 SourcC 68.34 +.35
+2.1 SoJerlnd 57.15 +.08
+5.9 SouthnCo 43.54 +.09
+40.3 SwstAirl 26.44 +.01
+16.3 SwsmnEngy 45.76 +.47
+17.6 SovranSS 76.63 -.28
+38.7 Spansion 19.26 +.41
+14.3 SpecfraEn 40.72 -.08
-12.6 Specfranet 21.84 -.55
-74.3 Spherix 2.07 -1.39
-3.8 SpiritAero 32.80 +.48
+15.0 SpiritROn 11.30 -.08
-27.1 Splunk 50.04 +1.16
-12.2 Sprintn 9.44 +.24
+6.2 SP Matls 49.09 +.49
+7.6 SP HIthC 59.63 +.47
+4.0 SP CnSt 44.69 +.35
-1.8 SP Consum 65.62 +.27
+7.8 SP Engy 95.38 +.81
+1.7 SPDR Fncl 22.24 +.05
+3.5 SP Inds 54.09 +.22
+5.7 SPTech 37.78 +.22
+11.8 SPI 42.46 +.12
+8.0 StanBIkDk 87.18 -.22
-28.4 Staples 11.37 +.03
+20.0 StarGas 6.30 +.01
-6.7 Starbucks 73.11 -.16
-.2 StarwdHt1 79.33 +.37
-11.4 StateStr 65.01 +.18
-10.2 SDynam 17.55 +.08
+14.5 SfratHotels 10.82 +.17
+11.6 Styker 83.89 +1.25
-1.7 SubPpne 46.10 +.09
+9.5 SuffolkBcp 22.78 +.16
-8.6 SunHydrl 37.32 -.38
+9.7 Suncor gs 38.45 -.03
+57.1 SunEdison 20.50 +1.03
+14.0 SunPower 33.99 +.86
+8.7 SunstnHtl 14.56 +.03
+3.7 SunTrst 38.16 -.09
+2.9 Supvalu 7.50 +.05
+12.5 SwiftTrans 24.99 +.66
-6.0 Symantec 22.17 +.11
-8.5 Synovus rs 23.05 +.19
+3.0 Sysco 37.17 +.50
+3.6 T-MobileUS 34.86 +.46
+7.7 TCPpLn 52.14 -.27
-1.1 TDAmeritr 30.29 +.41
+.2 TECO 17.27 +.06
-14.6 TJX 54.45 +.15
+18.7 TaiwSemi 20.70 -.16
-11.7 TalismE g 10.29 +.05
-11.7 Target 55.88 +.54
+22.3 TataMotors 37.67 -1.05
+16.5 Taubmn 74.46 -.13
+13.9 Tenneco 64.44 +.53
-7.3 Teradata 42.19 +.59
-1.3 TerraNifro 139.24 -1.11
+39.8 TeslaMot 210.24
+26.4 TevaPhrm 50.66 -.26
+6.3 Texlnst 46.66 +.20
-8.6 TexRdhse 25.41 -.04
-3.7 Textainer 38.72 -.06
+6.8 Texron 39.27 +.18
-44.7 3DSys 51.37 +.93
+1.5 3M Co 142.39 +.96
-3.6 TibcoSft 21.68 +.47
-7.0 THorton g 54.28 +.01
+3.1 Time wi 21.50
+.8 TimeWarn 70.31 -.36
+16.8 Timken 64.32 +.31
-1.6 TollBros 36.40 +.02
TorchEngy .45
+3.5 Torchmark 80.85 -.04
+5.9 TorDBk gs 49.48 -.04
+13.9 TotalISA 69.78 +.13
-35.2 TowerGplf 2.19 +.02
-8.6 Toyota 111.49 +1.58
-14.3 Transocn 42.37 +.35
+3.9 Travelers 94.10 +.64
+3.7 TriContl 20.71 +.04
+7.7 TriCntl pf 47.93 +.80
+4.9 TrinaSolar 14.34 +1.10
+31.3 TriNetn 25.07 +.32
+60.5 Trinity 87.48 +1.46
+87.3 TriQuint 15.62 -.45
+6.5 TrueBlue 27.45 +.03
-10.3 TrstNY 6.44 -.06
-10.9 Tuppwre 84.25 +.24
+10.0 TurqHillRs 3.63 -.10
+1.0 21stCFoxA 35.51 +.35
-.3 21stCFoxB 34.50 +.34
-46.6 Twitter n 34.00 +.23
+11.6 TwoHrblnv 10.36 -.08


+6.5 Tycolntl 43.70 -.02
+29.3 Tyson 43.25 +2.50
+17.8 UDR 27.51 +.04
+16.8 UGI Corp 48.42 +.07
-4.5 UIL Hold 36.99 +.23
+1.3 UNS Engy 60.61 -.01
-14.4 UltraClean 8.59 -.12
+25.7 UltraPt g 27.22 +.01
+16.4 UndArmrs 50.79 +.64
-7.0 UniFirst 99.53 +.14
+8.0 UnilevNV 43.46 +.51
+17.7 UnionPac 197.80 +1.43
+22.9 Unit 63.44 -.33
+17.9 UtdContl 44.60 -.29
-1.0 UPSB 104.06 +.65
+30.2 UtdRentals 101.51 +.58
+4.0 US Bancrp 42.03
+22.3 US NGas 25.30 -.17
-18.1 USSteel 24.15 +.48
+2.2 UtdTech 116.35 +.40
+5.4 UtdhlthGp 79.37 +.79
-2.3 UnvslCp 53.35 +1.04
-3.7 UnumGrp 33.77 +.14
-10.1 Ur-Energy 1.24 +.12
-10.0 UraniumEn 1.80 -.11
-10.3 UrbanOut 33.27 +.22
V-W-X-Y-Z
+8.1 VCA Ant 33.89 +1.06
+.5 VF Corp s 62.68
-13.8 ValeSA 13.14 +.08
-14.2 ValeSApf 12.02 +.11
+10.1 ValeantPh 129.22 +2.27
+12.4 ValeroE 56.64 +.95
-4.3 VlyNBcp 9.68 +.03
-35.6 VaJVis A 4.50 +.02
+15.2 VangREIT 74.35 +.15
+2.3 VangDivAp 76.98 +.41
+3.9 VangEmg 42.76 +.05
+3.6 VangEur 60.94 +.28
+2.4 VangFTSE 42.66 +.28
-4.0 Vantiv 31.30 +.24
+11.4 Vectren 39.53 -.06
-31.3 VeevaSys n 22.04 +.15
+16.0 Ventas 66.44 +.21
-66.8 VentrusBio 1.27 +.24
+16.5 VeoliaEnv 19.06 +.17
-15.8 Verisign 50.34 +.33
+1.2 VerizonCm 49.72 -.02
-16.8 ViadCorp 23.12 -.31
-3.6 Visa 214.67 +.87
+12.2 Vishaylnt 14.88 +.10
-43.6 Vivus 5.12 +.17
+10.0 VMware 98.64 +2.61
-12.4 Vodafone 35.04 +.08
+13.2 Vringo 3.35 +.07
+2.5 VulcanM 60.93 -.48
-3.4 WD40 71.82 -.79
+3.2 WP Carey 63.33 +.24
+4.6 WPXEngy 21.32 -.10
-3.4 WaJMart 75.98 +.45
+23.8 Walgrn 71.11 +1.30
-69.4 WalterEn 5.09 +.06
+2.7 WashPrm n 20.60 -.43
+9.7 WREIT 25.62 -.05
-1.1 WsteMInc 44.36 +.11
+.5 Waters 100.46 +.31
+37.2 Weathflntl 21.26 +.28
-3.4 Webstern 30.13 -.01
-5.4 Weibon 19.15 +.78
-36.3 WtWatch 20.96 -.10
+15.1 WeinRlt 31.55 +.09
+17.5 WellPoint 108.55 +.67
+10.7 WellsFargo 50.27 -.17
-5.6 WendysCo 8.23
+11.3 WestarEn 35.80 -.03
+10.1 WAstEMkt 13.03 +.04
+6.7 WAstlnfSc 12.19 +.03
-7.1 WstnUnion 16.03 +.16
+10.6 Westpacs s 32.13 +.29
-68.4 WetSeal .86 -.02
-1.0 Weyerhsr 31.27 +.16
-8.7 Whrlpl 143.22 -.04
+39.3 WhiteWave 31.96 +.95
-34.1 WholeFd s 38.10 +.25
+21.3 WmsCos 46.78 +.07
+20.7 Windstrm 9.63 -.06
+9.1 WiscEngy 45.10 -.22
-41.8 WisdomTr 10.31 -.08
-6.0 WTJpHedg 47.80 +.48
+24.9 WT India 21.79 -.17
-.6 Woodward 45.35 -.40
-2.6 Workday 80.96 -3.08
-32.0 WIdW Ent 11.27 -.04
+13.3 Wynn 219.99 +1.99
+32.9 xG Tech n 2.10 +.40
+9.4 XcelEngy 30.57 +.07
+1.1 Xerox 12.30 +.10
+6.2 Xylem 36.75 -1.41
+26.9 YRCWwde 22.04 +.16
+29.6 YYInc 65.15 +1.46
-13.7 Yahoo 34.90 +.12
-17.3 Yamanag 7.13 +.01
-26.0 Yandex 31.91 +.01
-.6 Yelp 68.56 +5.14
-30.5 YingliGrn 3.51 +.10
-2.7 YorkWater 20.37 +.12
-33.9 YoukuTud 20.03 +.04
+1.5 YumBrnds 76.72 -.22
+6.4 Zagg 4.63 +.11
+33.3 ZaleCp 21.02 -.14
+1.8 Zalicus rs 1.13 +.15
+11.4 Zimmer 103.86 +.95
-6.0 Zoetis 30.72 +.24
+3.6 ZweigFd 15.39 +.07
-10.3 Zynga 3.41 -.03


Stock Footnotes: Stock Footnotes: cd Issue has been called for
redemption by company. d New 52-week low. ec- Company for-
merly listed on the American Exchange's Emerging Company Mar-
ketplace. g Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h Does
not meet continued-listing standards. If Late filing with SEC. n -
Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low fig-
ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf Preferred stock
issue. pr Preferences. pp Holder owes installments of purchase
price. rt- Right to buy security at a specified price. rs Stock has
undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50% within the past year.
s Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi -
Trades will be settled when the stock is issued. wd When distrib-
uted. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u New 52-week
high. un Unit,, including more than one security. vj Company in
bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankrupt-
cy law. Appears in front of the name. Stocks in bold are worh at
least $5 and changed 5 percent or more in price. Unerl n no for 50
most actively traded stocks of the day. Dividend Footnotes: a -
Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b Annual rate plus
stock. c Liquidating dividend. e Amount declared or paid in last 12
months. If- Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent
dividend announcement. i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no
regular rate. j Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend
was omitted or deferred. k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative
issue with dividends in arrears. m Current annual rate, which was
decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p Initial divi-
dend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r Declared or paid in
preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t Paid in stock, approxi-
mate cash value on ex-distnbution date. PE Footnotes: q Stock is
a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown. cc P/E exceeds 99. dd -
Loss in last 12 months. Mutual Fund Footnotes: b Fee covering
market costs is paid from fund assets. d Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. If- front load (sales charges). m Multiple fees are
charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption
fee. NA not available. p previous day's net asset value. s fund
split shares during the week. x fund paid a distribution during the
week. Source: Morningstar and the Associated Press.


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 103.58
Ethanol (gal) 2.38
Heating Oil (gal) 2.92
Natural Gas (mm btu) 4.56
Unleaded Gas (gal) 3.01

METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1256.30
Silver (oz) 19.00
Platinum (oz) 1460.10
Copper (Ib) 3.15
Palladium (oz) 833.80

AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.38
Coffee (Ib) 1.82
Corn (bu) 4.70
Cotton (lb) 0.86
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 312.10
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.56
Soybeans (bu) 14.99
Wheat (bu) 6.33


PVS.
102.72
2.35
2.93
4.62
3.01


%CHG
+0.84
-0.21
-0.40
-1.21
+0.26


PVS. %CHG
1259.30 -0.24
19.04 +0.06
1462.70 -0.18
3.19 -0.88
839.75 -0.72


PVS.
1.36
1.76
4.72
0.85
312.00
1.58
14.98
6.39


%CHG
+1.37
+3.29
-0.63
+1.51
+0.03
-1.14
+0.08
-0.98


% YTD
+5.2
+24.5
-5.1
+7.8
+8.2

% YTD
+4.5
-1.8
+6.5
-8.4
+16.2

% YTD
+2.6
+64.4
+11.3
+1.8
-13.3
+14.4
+14.2
+4.5






-Page 8 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


WEATHER/WORLD NEWS


The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014


TODAY


Scattered
thunderstorms

880/690
50% chance of rain


CONDITIONS TODAY
UV Index and RealFeel Temperature Today






78 89 100 99 91 83
8 a.m. 10a.m. Noon 2p.m. 4 p.m. 6 p.m.
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Indexw number,
the greater the need for eye and skin protection. 0-2 Low;
3-5 Moderate; 6-7 Hig; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme.
RealFeel Temperature is the exclusve
AccuWeather.com composite of effective temperature
based on eight weather factors.
Ain. ||ll |Al I ||U.ik inr


SATURDAY




Scattered p.m.
thunderstorms

89'/70-
50% chance of rain


AIRPORT
Possible weather-related delays today. Check
with your airline for the most updated schedules.
HVLo Outlook Delays
Ft. Myers 89/72 storms afternoon
Punta Gorda 88/69 storms afternoon
Sarasota 86/71 storms afternoon

SUN AND MOON


The Sun
Today
Saturday
The Moon
Today
Saturday


AIR UUALII T INUt First
Air Quality Index readings as of Thursday


0 50 100150200 300 500 Jun 5
0-50 Good; 51-100 Moderate; 101-150 Unhealthy
for sensitive groups; 151-200 Unhealthy;201-300 SOLU
Very Unhealthy; 301-500 Hazardous
Main pollutant: ozone Today
Source: scgovnet Sat.

POLLEN INDEX Sun.
The soluna
Pollen Index readings as of Thursday so you will
T #good cover
Thres [ /0 at the time
oas minor per
Weeds o
Molds o { co l TIDES
absent low moderate hit veryhi
Source: National Allergy Bureau Punta Go
Today
ALMANAC Sat.
Punta Gorda through 5 p.m. Thursday Engewo,
Temperatures Today
High/Low 910/690 Sat.
Normal High/Low 910/690 Boca Gr
Record High 970 (2011) Today
Record Low 620 (1980) Sat.
Precipitation (in inches) El Jobea
24 hoursthrough 5p.m.Thursday 0.14" Today
Month to date 3.18" Sat.
Normal month to date 2.25"
Year to date 1519" Venic
Normal yearto date 1179" Today
Record 1.03" (1970) Sat.


MONTHLY RAINFALL
Month 2014 2013 Avg. Record/Year
Jan. 3.67 0.43 1.80 7.07/1979
Feb. 1.24 2.12 2.52 11.05/1983
Mar. 5.10 1.98 3.28 9.26/1970
Apr. 2.00 3.06 2.03 5.80/1994
May 3.18 2.76 2.50 9.45/1991
Jun. 10.50 8.92 23.99/1974
Jul. 7.38 8.22 14.22/1995
Aug. 9.29 8.01 15.60/1995
Sep. 11.12 6.84 14.03/1979
Oct. 3.48 2.93 10.88/1995
Nov. 0.01 1.91 5.53/2002
Dec. 0.97 1.78 6.83/2002
Year 15.19 53.10 50.74 (since 1931)
Totals are from a 24-hour period ending at 5 p.m.


Rise Set
6:35 a.m. 8:17 p.m.
6:35 a.m. 8:18 p.m.
Rise Set
8:13 a.m. 9:59 p.m.
9:04 a.m. 10:44 p.m.
Full Last New


l ,
Jun 12 Jun 19 Jun 27


INAR TABLE
Minor Major Minor
7:32a 1:19a 7:56p
8:25a 2:13a 8:49p
9:18a 3:06a 9:41p


Major
1:44p
2:37p
3:29p


r period schedule allows planning days
be fishing in good territory or hunting in
r during those times. Major periods begin
es shown and last for 1.5 to 2 hours.The


iods are sh
S

High
orda
6:15a
6:52a
od
4:52a
5:29a
rande
3:57a
4:34a
n
6:47a
7:24a

3:07a
3:44a


FLORIDA (

City
Apalachicola
Bradenton
Clearwater
Coral Springs
Daytona Beach
Fort Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Fort Pierce
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key Largo


shorter.


Low High Low

9:47a 3:52p ---
12:09a 4:28p 10:24a

8:03a 2:29p 10:25p
8:40a 3:05p 11:03p

6:24a 1:34p 8:46p
7:01a 2:10p 9:24p

12:02a 4:24p 10:16a
12:38a 5:00p 10:53a

6:42a 12:44p 9:04p
7:19a 1:20p 9:42p

CITIES
Today Sat.
Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
86 68 t 87 71 t
87 72 t 87 74t
88 73 t 89 75 t
87 73 pc 87 74 pc
87 71 pc 86 72 pc
86 76 pc 88 77 pc
89 72 t 90 72 t
86 71 pc 85 71 pc
87 67 t 89 68t
89 68 t 87 70 pc
85 78 sh 85 76 pc


SUNDAY


Scattered p.m.
thunderstorms

920/690
40% chance of rain


Clea~aterl
88/73


;Tampa
87/71




St. Petersbqrg
88/72 Ap
87/





Bradenton
87/72
Longboat Key q
86/74
Sarasota ,
86/71

Osprey
86/70


Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights lows.


Gulf Water
Temperature

840


MONDAY


Scattered p.m.
thunderstorms

91'/70O
30% chance of rain


%Bra ndon
89/70


40


8


Barto
88/7


Ft.


TUESDAY THE NATION
*l-1s I*Os Os l1s I20s 130S 140s I50s IG6s I70s I80sO lO s j
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation.Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Scattered p.m. Mnra
thunderstorms

890/710 I TkroNtwoYlk2
% chance of rain / ""k i

%Wesingtoh
Kaerl k
winter H ,en
9/72 7-9/62*

'44
72 k kHousto0 4ouUto
*Chlhuahua k81 k,0 k


Meade Mkntwn,
8/71 Fronts Precipitation

Cold Warm Stationary Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice
U.S. Extremes (For the 48 contiguous states yesterday)


Arcadia
87/72

#Hull
88/70


Port Charlotte
E --- .88/69
Englewood, 88

87/70Punta Gorda
riat.u 88/69


88/69.
Boca Grande*
87/74


Forecasts and graphics, except for the
WINK-TV/5-day forecast, provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. c2014

Publication date: 5/30/14

MARINE
Wind Speed Seas Bay Inland
direction in knots in feet chop
Cape Sable to Tarpon Springs
SE 6-12 1-2 Light
Tarpon Springs to Apalachicola
SSE 3-6 1-2 Light


city
Key West
Kissimmee
Lakeland
Melbourne
Miami
Naples
Ocala
Okeechobee
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola


Today
Hi Lo W
87 80 sh
89 72 t
88 72 t
87 72 sh
87 75 pc
87 72 t
89 68 t
86 71 t
90 70 t
84 68 t
84 71 t


Sat.
Hi Lo W
87 78 t
87 70 t
88 70 t
86 73 pc
87 76 pc
89 72 t
89 70 t
83 71 t
89 71 t
85 70 pc
88 72 pc


Fort Myers
89/72

Cape Coral
89/71


Lehigh Acres
89/71


High ........1040 at Needles, CA


city
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
Fairbanks
Fargo
Hartford


Today
Hi Lo W
86 66 t
57 46 sh
88 69 t
73 56 pc
77 54 c
87 67 t
79 58 pc
68 52 pc
74 51 s
70 48 t
82 57 pc
83 65 t
78 54 s
82 59 s
73 53 s
89 69 t
80 57 s
72 48 t
84 71 t
79 55 t
82 66 t
79 56 s
77 55 pc
77 51 c
86 65 t
73 52 t


Helena 79 48
Sanibel Honolulu 88 75
88/75 Houston 86 70
Bonita Springs Indianapolis 82 60
88/72 i WORLD CITIES


AeeiuWahnw cm ...Toda


City H
Pompano Beach 86
St. Augustine 85
St. Petersburg 88
Sanford 90
Sarasota 86
Tallahassee 89
Tampa 87
Titusville 86
Vero Beach 86
West Palm Beach 86
Winter Haven 89


IVII nnCity
Amsterdam
Baghdad
Today Sat. Beijing
Lo W Hi Lo W Berlin
6 74 pc 87 76 pc Buenos Aires
5 71 pc 84 73 sh Cairo
2 72 t 88 74t Calgary
0 72 t 89 72 t Cancun
6 71 t 87 72 t Dublin
9 68 t 92 69 t Edmonton
7 71 t 87 72 t Halifax
6 70 pc 85 70 pc Kiev
6 71 pc 85 72 pc London
6 73 pc 86 74 pc Madrid
0 72 t 88 72 t Weather (W): s-s


pc

0t
Os


ly
. W t":


Hi Lo W fli
65 48 pc 66
108 80 pc110
96 66 s 97
66 48 pc 71
61 52 r 64
106 75 pc 93
68 42 pc 67
86 77 t 87
61 44 pc 66
67 41 s 74
57 44 c 56
74 59 sh 71
68 48 pc 71
73 54 pc 75


Sat.
i Lo W
9 67 s
4 42 sh
5 69 t
854 s
754 t
1 69 t
4 52 pc
2 49 pc
552 s
0 48 pc
456 s
0 64 c
1 60 s
460 s
553 s
2 66 t
2 59 s
6 41 c
472 t
556 t
3 68 t
0 55 s
557 t
4 43 sh
863 r
9 46 c
6 48 t
875 s
471 t
361 s


Sat.
Lo W
47 s
84 s
75 pc
48 s
45 sh
67 s
42 t
78 sh
53 pc
41 s
43 pc
56 sh
53 pc
52 pc


Low ..........210 at Stanley, ID
Today Sat.


city
Jackson, MS
Kansas City
Knoxville
Las Vegas
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Montgomery
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk, VA
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Salt Lake City
St. Louis
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Washington, DC



City
Mexico City
Montreal
Ottawa
Paris
Regina
Rio de Janeiro
Rome
St. John's
San Juan
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Vancouver
Winnipeg


Today
i Lo W
1 55 t
9 51 t
3 51 pc
6 51 sh
4 47 pc
5 66 s


sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, rain, sfTsnow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.


Egypt: El-Sissi wins election by landslide


CAIRO (AP) Nearly
a year after he ousted
Egypt's first freely elected
president, former mili-
tary chief Abdel-Fattah
el-Sissi was elected
president by a landslide
of 92 percent of the vote,
according to unofficial
results released by his
campaign Thursday.
But questions over the
authorities' drive to
boost turnout threatened
to stain his victory.
New details emerged
of a frantic government
effort to get officials,
town mayors and promi-
nent families in southern
provinces where voting
was low to push up turn-
out during the three-day
election amid a boycott
by el-Sissi's Islamist foes.
After a weak first day
of polling on Monday,
the prime minister held
a video conference with


governors and senior se-
curity and military chiefs
in several of Egypt's
provinces, telling them to
get out voters, according
to three officials with
knowledge of the call.
Tuesday saw a flurry
of free buses to polling
stations in those areas.
"People must get out.
This will not do," Prime
Minister Ibrahim Mahlab
said in the call, according
to one of the officials, who
participated in the confer-
ence. The three spoke to
The Associated Press on
condition of anonymity to
discuss the incident.
E1-Sissi's victory was
never in doubt, but the
career infantry officer
had pushed for a massive
turnout as well to bestow
legitimacy on his ouster
last July of Islamist
President Mohammed
Morsi and the ensuing


A supporter of presidential hopefi
former military chief, holds his po
a celebration at Tahrir Square in C

crackdown on his
Muslim Brotherhood and
other supporters.
To ensure that
happened, authorities
declared the second day
of voting a public holiday
to free people to vote and


country to allow voters
to cast ballots in home
districts.
A member of el-Sissi's
campaign told the AP
that the threat of fines of
$70, a hefty sum to most
Egyptians, was particu-
larly effective, causing a
spike in voting Tuesday
evening.
But he said the third
day of voting was thin
and adding an extra
day a decision the
campaign itself publicly
AP PHOTO objected to- did little

ul Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, Egypt's to help. He spoke on
ster and a national flag during condition of anonymity
'airo, Egypt, Thursday. to discuss the campaign's
internal research.
threatened to enforce Interim President Adly
fines on those who did Mansour, installed by
not cast ballots. Then el-Sissi last July, said
they took the extraor- Thursday that turnout
dinary step of adding a was 46 percent, pro-
third day to the election claiming it showed "a
and gave free train and broad consensus."
bus rides across the But the victor's sole


rival in the race, left-wing
politician Hamdeen
Sabahi, said the figure
was not credible and
amounted to an "insult
to the intelligence of
Egyptians."
That figure was lower
than the 52 percent turn-
out in the 2012 presiden-
tial election that vaulted
Morsi to power. It also
was lower than the bar
el-Sissi himself set in his
last campaign interview,
when he said he wanted
three-quarters of the
country's 54 million
registered voters to cast
ballots so he could "show
the world" his support.
Still, el-Sissi can
genuinely claim he
comes into office with
an impressive tally of
23.38 million votes -
significantly more than
the 13 million won by
Morsi two years ago.


What's next in the stalled hunt for Flight 370?


SYDNEY (AP) -
Thursday marked a bleak
moment for Malaysia
Airlines Flight 370. For
the first time since it dis-
appeared March 8 with
239 people on board, no
one is looking for it.
An unmanned sub that
spent weeks scouring
the area of the Indian
Ocean where searchers
had detected acoustic
signals they hoped were
from the aircraft finished
its workWednesday,
after finding nothing.
Australian officials
leading the search
acknowledged that the
area can be ruled out as
the aircraft's final resting
place.


A civilian expert with
the U.S. Navy told CNN
that the "pings," detected
about a month after
Flight 370 disappeared,
probably were not
from the jet. A Navy
spokesman later said
the comments were
premature, but now that
850 square kilometers
(330 square miles) of
ocean floor have been
thoroughly searched, the
point may be moot.
Australian and
Malaysian authorities
still believe the plane is
somewhere in a broader
expanse of ocean close
to where they had been
searching. They released
details this week of


satellite contact with the
jet that led them to that
conclusion.
Answers to the tragic
mystery appear to be
months away at best.
Here are details about
where the search stands:
Q: If the pings were
not from the plane,
how does that affect the
search?
A: Given that the head
of the search operation,
Angus Houston, once
dubbed the pings the
"most promising lead" in
the hunt for Flight 370, a
determination that they
were unrelated would be
a huge disappointment.
But it wouldn't change
the direction of the


search. Officials have
already been planning
to move beyond the
search area centered on
the pings to a far larger
search zone, which was
calculated based on an
analysis of satellite data.
That plan remains in
place.
Q: Why is no one
searching for the plane
now, and when will the
search resume?
A: The Bluefin 21, the
unmanned sub that
scoured the ocean floor
for several weeks, finished
its search on Wednesday.
Officials now must find
a vessel that can go even
deeper than the Bluefin
to survey the expanded


search zone, parts of
which have never been
mapped and where the
maximum depth remains
a mystery. Officials must
organize contracts for
the new equipment
with a private compa-
ny The Joint Agency
Coordination Center,
which is heading up the
search effort, said the new
search involving powerful
towed side-scan commer-
cial sonar equipment will
begin in August.
Q: How big is the
search area now, and
how long will it take for
the new equipment to
cover it?
A: The search area is
56,000 square kilometers


(21,600 square miles).
Officials say it will take
up to a year for the new
equipment to thoroughly
search the area.
Q: How much is the
search expected to cost,
and who is paying?
A: Australia has
budgeted 90 million
Australian dollars
($84 million) for the
search through June
next year. Until now,
each country involved
in the search has been
bearing its own costs.
But Australian Prime
Minister Tony Abbott
said he will now seek
contributions from other
countries to help pay for
the new equipment.


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SPORTS


Friday, May 30, 2014


YourSun.com Facebook.com/SunCoastSports @SunCoastSports SunCoastSportsBIog.com


Sports Editor: Mark Lawrence


0 BASEBALL: Draft


Rays try


to fill a


talent gap


in system

By JOSH VITALE
SPORTS WRITER
PORT CHARLOTTE -
Being better on the field
means picking lower in
the draft. It's a trade-off
Tampa Bay gladly will
continue to make, but it
does pose challenges in
the MLB First-Year Player
Draft.
The chances of finding
franchise cornerstones
such as David Price and
Evan Longoria some-
thing the
Rays did with RAYS'
top-three
picks in 2006 PICKS
and 2007 Tampa Bay
are slimmer, has four of
After picking the top 100
in the picks this
top-eight year's draft
every year (June 5-7):
from 1999- 20th 60th
2008, the
2008,the 72nd 96th
Rays have A72nd
made their And 22nd
first pick in rounds
outside of 4-40
the top- 15 in
each of the last six years.
The Rays' first pick this
year is 20th, although
they will have four of
the top-100 selections in
the three-day draft that
begins on Thursday.
The effects of the lower
draft slot have been
noticeable, too.
"I definitely think we
have a void of obvious,
kind of star-caliber
players coming up,"
executive vice president
of baseball operations
Andrew Friedman said
on a conference call
Thursday. "We have a lot
of depth in our system,
and there are pleasant
surprises that come from
that. We have a number
of guys that are really
performing here today.
But it's not nearly as good
as we all want it to be."
The organization's
"talent gap" as some
observers have described
it is most notable
among the system's
position player prospects.
DRAFT14


0 FLORIDA STATE LEAGUE: Dunedin 7, Charlotte 0


Blake Snell, making his debut with Charlotte after being promoted from Bowling Green, delivers a pitch against Dunedin on


Blake Snell, making his debut with Charlotte after being promoted from Bowling Green, delivers a pitch against Dunedin on
Thursday at Charlotte Sportts Park. Snell cruised through four innings but took the loss.






Rude welcome


BLUEJAYSAT
STONE CRABS
WHO: Dunedin (38-15)
at Charlotte (25-27)
WHEN: Today, 6:30
p.m.
WHERE: Charlotte
Sports Park, Port
Charlotte
PROBABLE PITCHERS:
Ben White (2-2, 3.73)
vs. Austin Pruitt (3-1,
5.13)
RADIO: 91.7 FM, Stone-
CrabsBaseball.com
TICKETS: At stadium
ticket office (opens 9
a.m.)
PROMOTION: Public
Safety Night, Friday
Happy Hour


Dunedin gets to Snell in fifth
inning, rolls to the shutout


By JOSH VITALE
SPORTS WRITER
PORT CHARLOTTE
- Blake Snell's High-A
debut was going well.
The Charlotte left-
hander who was called
up from Bowling Green
on Thursday- cruised
through his first four
innings against Dunedin,
giving up an unearned
run on four hits and
striking out three.
The start unraveled in
the fifth.
Blue Jays' leadoff man
Christian Lopes reached
on an error, and Snell
gave up a run on two


singles and a bases-load-
ed walk before exiting
the game. Reliever Jose
Alberto Molina allowed
all three of the inherited
runners to score and then
some as Dunedin hung
six on Charlotte in the
inning.
"They just got a couple
hits to fall that usually
wouldn't fall," Snell said
after the Stone Crabs'
7-0 loss to the Blue Jays.
"There's nothing you can
do. You just tip your cap
to them and get them
again."
He departed his first

CRABS I 3


''I


KATHERINE GODINA


Charlotte's Tommy Coyle throws
to first after fielding a grounder
in Thursday's game against
Dunedin in Port Charlotte.


* PREP FOOTBALL:


0 PREP FOOTBALL:
DeSoto County


Bulldogs


hope for


spring


gains

By ROB SHORE
SPORTS WRITER
ARCADIA Matt
Egloff was watching his
DeSoto County High
School football squad on
Tuesday when a minute
detail of a particular drill
caught his eye.
One of the offensive
linemen fell during a rep,
quickly got back to his
feet and went looking
for another defender
to block. For a DeSoto
County team that needs
all it can get from its
limited spring roster, that
was a pretty good sign to
the Bulldogs' coach.
There was a lot of that
going around in the
DeSoto County practices
this spring.
"We've had a great
spring teamwise," rising
senior Tajahs Jackson
said. "We came together
as a team, did the fun-
damentals. We stopped
talking about the little
stuff and it came natural
to us."
But tonight's spring
game at Boca Ciega in
Gulfport still will be
BULLDOGS I 6


DESOTO COUNTY
AT BOCA CIEGA
WHERE: Charles Beauchamp
Memorial Stadium, Gulfport
WHEN: 7p.m.
PLAYER TO WATCH: Tajahs
Jackson will be given more
carries with the graduation of
Terrell Gordon, but the Bulldogs
running game should look
different. Gordon was a bruising
power runner, while Jackson is
more of a speed merchant.
IF YOU GO: Take 1-295 to Exit
18 (26th Avenue South). Turn
left onto 26th Ave South, take
first right (34th Street South)
and then take a left onto 22nd
Avenue South). Proceed until
intersection with 58th Street
South. Turn right onto 58th
Street South and the high school
will be on the right


0 COLLEGE BASKETBALL: Southeastern Conference


Coaches plot an


image overhaul


Scheduling
changes, TV will
play a role
By MARK LONG
ASSOCIATED PRESS
DESTIN -New
Auburn coach Bruce Pearl
has some ideas about
improving the profile of
men's basketball in the
Southeastern Conference.
Most of them involve
the SEC Network. One of
them would be must-see
TV.
"Bring the SEC Network
to my home, let them see
a barbecue and let them
see what a barbecue looks
like," Pearl said. "Let them
see me cooking."
The suggestion drew
laughs since the former
Tennessee coach was fired


after he invited recruit
Aaron Craft to his home
for a barbecue in 2010 and
later lied about it to NCAA
investigators. Pearl ended
up with a three-year,
show-cause penalty.
"Got to make sure the
guest list is what it needs
to be, right?" Pearl said,
taking a playful shot at
himself. "But don't you
think the fans want to see
that? So much of what
we do is beyond just the
basketball."
Pearl and his fellow SEC
coaches are counting on
the SEC Network's nation-
al exposure and better
non-conference schedules
to bolster a league that
has been criticized in
recent years for a lack of
depth.
The football
SEC 16


0 NBA: Miami


Miami tries to


regain its focus

Heat hold rare PACERS AT HEAT


AP PHOTO
Miami forward Chris Andersen shoots during practice
Thursday in Miami. The Heat lead Indiana 3-2 in the Eastern
Conference finals. Game 6 is today in Miami.


workout after
road game
By TIM REYNOLDS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
MIAMI By now,
Lance Stephenson's list
of egregious acts from
Game 5 of the Eastern
Conference finals are
well-known: He blew air
into LeBron James' ear,
interrupted a Miami Heat
huddle and was caught
flopping for the second
time.
And on Thursday, the
Heat tried to get their
focus back on themselves.
Heat coach Erik
Spoelstra almost never
holds a practice the
day after a road game,
especially when the team
plane lands around 3:30


WHO: Indiana at Miami, Eastern
Conference finals, Game 6
(Miami leads series 3-2)
WHEN: Today, 8:30 p.m.
WHERE: AmericanAirlines
Arena, Miami
TV: ESPN
RADIO: 99.3 FM

a.m. as was the case in the
wee hours of Thursday.
But Spoelstra deviated
from the norm on the day
before Game 6 of this East
title series, not for any one
on-court issue but rather
so the two-time defending
NBA champions could
relieve some frustration.
"Clear heads ... and to
connect," Spoelstra said.
"We didn't want to leave
HEAT I 6


INDEX I Lottery 2 1 Golf 2 1 Community calendar 2 1 Local sports 2 1 Tennis 3 1 Pro football 3 1 Pro baseball 3-4 1 Scoreboard 5 1 Quick hits 5 1 NHL 5 1 NBA 6






Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014


Florida Lottery
www.flalottery.com
* CASH 3
May29N ..............................8-4-3
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May271D............................. 9-5-0
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May29N ...........................7-0-8-4
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May27N ...........................8-5-9-8
May271D..........................6-3-4-4
D-Day, N-Night

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May 29 .................3-13-32-34-36
May 28 ..............14-17-26-29-33
May27..................4-9-16-18-33
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5 5-digit winners ............ $45,278.53
314 4-digit winners.............$116
9,141 3-digit winners............$11

0 MEGA MONEY
May27.......................1-26-38-44
MegaBall .................................. .. 2

May 23................. 1-3-10-25
MegaBall .................................. .. 8
PAYOFF FOR MAY 27
0 4-of-4 MB ......................... $700,000
5 4-of-4 .............................. $1,145.50
39 3-of-4 MB ......................... $321.50
1,074 3-of-4..........$34.50

0 LOTTO
May 28 ................. 13-14-18-26-37-45
May 24 ..............3-6-17-19-45-48
May 21 ...........10-12-23-34-38-53
PAYOFF FOR MAY 28
0 6-digit winners............... $3M
19 5-digit winners ............. $5,866.50
994 4-digit winners............. $82
21,620 3-digit winners.............$5

0 POWERBALL
May 28 .................2-24-28-32-59
Powerball ................................. 25

May 24.............. 15-16-28-49-55
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PAYOFF FOR MAY 24
0 5of5+ PB ........................... $152M
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1 4of5+ PB .......................... $10,000
65 4of 5................... $100
ESTIMATED JACKPOT
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* MEGA MILLIONS
May27...................1-6-10-46-58
MegaBall .................................. 13

May 23............. 12-14-21-38-70
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PAYOFF FOR MAY 27
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17 4of5 .................................... $500


Corrections
It is the Sun's policy to correct all
errors of fact. To report an error, call
or email the sports department at
sports@sun-herald.com.


How to...

Submit a story idea: Email or call
Mark Lawrence 941-206-1175. Must
contain name, address and phone
number.
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scores to golfscores@sun-herald.com.
Scores appear in the weekly Herald
sections.
Report a high school result: Call
877-818-6204 or 941-206-1126 by
10:30 p.m. the day the event is held.


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Contact us

Mark Lawrence- Sports Editor
mlawrence@sun-herald.com
Mike Bambach Deputy SE
mbambach@sun-herald.com
Matt Stevens Assistant SE
mstevens@sun-herald.com
Rob Shore. Staff writer
shore@sun-herald.com
Zach Miller. Staff writer
zmiller@sun-herald.com
Josh Vitale Staff writer
jvitale@sun-herald.com
EMAIL: sports@sun-herald.com
FAX: 941-629-2085


0 RECREATIONAL SPORTS



Charlotte Premier hopes to help Cheal


ByZACH MILLER
SPORTS WRITER
PUNTA GORDA The
Charlotte Premier youth soccer
club is giving back to former
player and current assistant
coach Dexter Cheal.
The club will hold a car wash
from noon to 5 p.m. Saturday at
Calusa Bank at the corner of US-
41 and Aqui Esta Drive in order
to raise money for Cheal, 17,
to attend a "college showcase"
tournament in Decatur, Ala.
Cheal, whose father coaches
the U- 14 soccer team, spent his
youth soccer days playing for
the club and now serves as an
assistant coach while playing for
the Cape Coral Cyclones club
and Mariner High School. Cheal
and his Cyclones teammates


will compete at the tournament
from June 10 to 14 in front of
recruiters from more than 20
college soccer programs, with
the hopes of obtaining scholar-
ship offers.
"All the parents got together
because we knew Dexter was
gonna go to this tournament,
and these tournaments are
expensive, so we thought we'd
get together and raise some cash
for him," said Robert Rexroad,
whose son Connor plays for
Charlotte Premier. "It was a
very easy buy in from the kids'
standpoint, I asked them if they
wanted to try it and they said,
'yeah, let's do it."'
The club doesn't have a goal
amount to raise on Saturday,
but is hoping for a minimum of
$5 donation from every person


who stops by. Cheal will be ap-
preciative of any donation since
he wasn't expecting anyone to
start a fundraising effort in the
first place.
"I was really shocked," Cheal
said. "I didn't ask for it or
anything, they came forward
and suggested it themselves and
I was really, really surprised.
That doesn't happen often, a
whole soccer team supporting
one person. It's crazy, really. I'm
grateful."
Rexroad and others involved
with the club see it as a way to
help out Cheal, since he has
helped them so much. Several
players on the club have seen
Cheal's work ethic and follow his
lead by running on the field to
build stamina during off-days.
"The kids like Dexter a lot,


he plays soccer with them,"
Rexroad said. "He's a little older
than the rest of the team and
we've been trying to use him as
a kind of role model because
he's a really good soccer player
and he's now going on to this
next step and the kids really
look up to him. He's very good
and they see that if you work
hard and practice, you can go a
lot further in soccer."
This is the first car wash
Charlotte Premier has done to
raise funds, but this will prob-
ably not be the last. Rexroad
said they hope to hold more car
washes in the future to start a
scholarship fund for potential
players in need of financial as-
sistance in order to participate.
Contact lah Miller at 941-206-1140 orzmiller@
sun-herald.om.


* STATE COLLEGE ROUNDUP


Murray, aNoll earn


All-American honors


STAFF REPORTS
TUCSON, Ariz.-
Florida Gulf Coast
University standouts Mike
Murray and Jake Noll
were named to Louisville
Slugger All-American
teams announced by
Collegiate Baseball on
Thursday. They joined
former Eagles standout
Chris Sale as the lone
All-American selections
in the program's history.
Murray notched a
program-record 13 wins
and an Atlantic Sun-best
1.85 ERA to go with 79
strikeouts which also led
the league.
Noll, a redshirt fresh-
man from Charlotte
High School, collected a
program record 101 hits
this season which ranks
second in the nation be-
hind the A-Sun Player of
the Year, Max Pentecost.
Noll built a team-best
.367 batting average to go
with 56 runs, 18 doubles
and 29 RBI all while
being the only Eagle to
appear in all 61 games
this season, which is also
a single-season program
record.
Miami junior lefthander
Chris Diaz hauled in his
career-first All-America
honors Thursday after-
noon, earning a spot on
the Louisville Slugger
First Team as announced
by Collegiate Baseball
Newspaper.
Diaz finished the spring
with a flawless 9-0 record
and a 2.31 ERA. The
Hurricanes won every
2014 regular-season


game started by Diaz,
who became Miami's first
first-team selection since
Yasmani Grandal in 2010.
Florida State was
recognized as DJ Stewart
and Luke Weaver were
honored as second and
third-team All-Americans.
Stewart heads into the
NCAA tournament ranked
in the top 10 in the ACC
in nine offensive cate-
gories while leading the
league in average (.348),
on-base percentage (.469)
and slugging percentage
(.561).
Weaver leads the team
in wins (8), innings
pitched (101.1) and
strikeouts (81). In 15
starts, Weaver has posted
a record of 8-3 with an
ERA of 2.66. Opponents
are hitting just .224
against Weaver this year.

COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
USF women releases
conference schedule: The
first domino in a series of scheduling
announcements fell for the University
of South Florida women's basketball
team, as the American Athletic
Conference announced its 2014-15
home and away pairings.
In an 11-team conference that gains
Tulsa, Tulane and East Carolina this
season, the Bulls will play eight teams
a two-game, home-and-home series,
while seeing two teams (Houston
and Tulsa) just once to complete the
18-game conference schedule.
USF will return to Houston during
the 2014-15 season, but will not
make a trip to Tulsa, as the Bulls host
the Golden Hurricane in the teams'
first-ever meeting.


I COMMUNITY CALENDAR


BASKETBALL
Charlotte High School
girls camp: June 9-13,9 a.m. to
noon; girls entering grades 4-9; Cost:
$50. Each camper receives a T-shirt.
Call Mike Robishaw, 661-9636.

Charlotte High School
boys camp: Three sessions
running through late June
(Wednesday-Friday, $45; June
16-19, $60; June 23-26, $60). The
camp is held at Charlotte's Wally
Keller Gymnasium and is for players
ages 8-15. Call Tom Massolio at
941-815-6099.

FISHING
Lemon Bay Touchdown
Club tournament: June 14, out
of Gasparilla Marina. Cost before June
2: $300 per 4-person team ($50 every
additional angler); after June 2 ($350
per 4-person team). Deadline: June 2.
Contact John Redman, 941-456-1186,
Eric Fogo, 941-468-9888, or Dan
Reigle, 941-716-2795.

FOOTBALL
Port Charlotte Bandits:
Unlimited Weight Midget team for
ages 11-14 in Charlotte/Sarasota
counties. Headed by former NFL player
Anthony Hargrove. Contact Shea,
941-661-9368.


North Port Mustangs
registration: Football and
cheerleading, Saturday, 9 a.m. to
1 p.m., at concession stand behind
the George Mullen Activity Center,
off Sumter Boulevard. Boys and girls
ages 5-15. Cost: $195/football, $215/
cheerleading. Visit northportmustangs.
org, call Catrina Willis, 941-815-0804,
or email ryan-trina@comcast.net.

GOLF
Tarpon 2-Man tourna-
ment: The Charlotte High School
football team is hosting its annual
2-man golf scramble on June 7 at Port
Charlotte Golf Club. The cost is $70 per
person. You must have a minimum 15
handicap on your team. There will be
a skins game, long drive contest and
closest to the pin on all par 3s. Start
time is 8:30 a.m. To register, call Scott
Harvey at 941-204-5691.

SAILING
Punta Gorda Sailing
Club: Racing and cruising programs
for all ages. Call Bill, 781-910-3217 or
visit pgscweb.com.

The Community Calendarappears daily
as space permits. To have youractivity
published, fax (941-629-2085) or e-mail
(sports@sun-herald.com) event details to
the Sports Department at least one weekin
advance. Phone calls will not be accepted.
Submissions suitable for publkation will be
edited forlength and clarity.


Rory cards

two eagles on

way to 63 for

three-shot lead
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DUBLIN, Ohio-
Whether it's his health
or his personal life, Rory
Mcllroy is not easily
distracted when he's on
top of his game.
Mcllroy made two ea-
gles and three birdies on
the back nine at Muirfield
Village along with a
double bogey- on his
way to a 9-under 63 and a
three-shot lead Thursday
after the opening round of
the Memorial.
A week ago, Mcllroy
began his week at
Wentworth by announc-
ing he and tennis star
Caroline Wozniacki had
broken off their engage-
ment. Then, he went
out and won the BMW
Championship for his
strongest win in more
than two years.


At the Memorial,
Mcllroy caught his spikes
in the turf on his second
shot at the seventh hole
and felt pain the rest of
the round, especially
when he had to put a little
extra pop into tee shots
or long irons. He was
limping when he walked
off the stage after talking
about how he made five
birdies and two eagles
after hurting his knee.
It was the lowest
opening round in 39 years
at the Memorial.
Masters champion
BubbaWatson, Chris Kirk
and Paul Casey each had a
66 while playing in calmer
and slightly softer morn-
ing conditions. Keegan
Bradley was at 67, notable
not because it was his best
score at MuirfieldVillage
but because it was his first
time in his four years on
the PGA Tour that he did
not use a belly putter.
Adam Scott, who won
at Colonial last week in
his debut at No. 1 in the
world, lost momentum
with a shot into the water
for double bogey on No.


9, and he missed some
birdie and eagle chances
on the back nine that
would have allowed him
to stay close with Mcllroy.
He settled for a 69.
Phil Mickelson also
looked sharp at least
for 15 holes. He was at 5
under after a birdie on the
15th hole at the time,
just one shot out of the
lead. But he hit into the
water on the par-3 16th
and did well to escape
with bogey. He came up
short on the 17th and
muffed two flops shots on
his way to double bogey.
And he finished with
another double bogey by
three-putting the 18th.
That gave him a 72.

Dantorp, Pepperell
share lead at Nordea
Masters: In Malmo, Sweden,
Sweden's Jens Dantorp and Eddie
Pepperell of England both opened
with a 6-under-par 66s to share the
lead after the first day of the Nordea
Masters.
Boosted by the support of family,
friends and other fans in Malmo, the
25-year-old Dantorp hit six birdies and
no bogies on his home course.


I GOLF SCOREBOARD


PGA Tour
MEMORIAL SCORES
Thursday
At Muirfeld Village Golf Clubcourse
Dublin, Ohio
Purse: $6.2 million
Yardage: 7,392; Par: 72 (36-36)
First Round
RoryMcllroy 32-31 63
PaulCasey 32-34 6
Chris Kirk 32-34 6
BubbaWatson 32-34 6
Keegan Bradley 34-33 -67
MichaelThompson 32-35 67
J.B. Holmes 35-32 67
HunterMahan 34-34- 68
Ryan Moore 31-37- 6
Justin Leonard 33-35- 68
Ben Curtis 34-35- 6
MarkWilson 36-33- 6
Martin Flores 35-34- 6
Kevin Kisner 33-36- 6
Aaron Baddeley 29-40- 6
Jordan Spieth 35-34- 6
AdamScott 34-35- 6
Charles Howelllll1 35-34- 6
NickWatney 34-35- 6
CharleyHoffman 36-33- 6


Hideki Matsuyama
Ernie Els
Hyung-Sung Kim
Thomas Aiken
Nicholas Thompson
Scott Brown
Lucas Glover
David Hearn
Pat Perez
Marc Leishman
Josh Teater
Billy Horschel
Luke Donald
Jason Dufner
Steve Stricker
Russell Henley
Freddie Jacobson
Michael Putnam


European Tour
NORDEA MASTERS
Thursday
At PGA Sweden National, Lakes Course
Malmo, Sweden
Purse: $2.05 million
Yardage: 7,390; Par: 72 (36-36)
First Round, Leading Scores
JensDantorp 34-32 66


Eddie Pepperell
Gareth Maybin
Rikard Karlberg
Daan Huizing
Stephen Gallacher
Sebastain Soderberg
Adam Gee
Paul Waring
Rafael Cabrera-Bello
Johan Carlsson
Craig Lee
Jorge Campillo
Bradley Dredge
WadeOrmsby
Victor Dubuisson
Peter Hanson
Michael Hoey
Thongchai Jaidee
Ricardo Gonzalez
Stuart Manley
Johan Edfors
Roope Kakko
Kim Sihwan
Oliver Fisher
Henrik Stenson
Miguel Angel Jimenez
Simon Dyson
Scott Jamieson
Mikael Lundberg


0 GOLF ROUNDUP


AP PHOTO
Rory Mcllroy hits from a bunker on the 14th hole during the first round of the Memorial on
Thursday in Dublin, Ohio.




Mcllroy keeps on




rolling at Memorial


Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014






The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014 www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3


TENNIS
SCOREBOARD

French Open
At Stade Roland Garros, Paris
Purse: $34.12 million (Grand Slam)
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
Singles
Men
Second Round
David Ferrer (5), Spain, def. Simone Bolel-
Ii, Italy, 6-2,6-3,6-2.
Donald Young, United States, def. Felicia-
no Lopez (26), Spain, 6-3, 7-6 (1), 6-3.
Kevin Anderson (19), South Africa, def.
Axel Michon, France, 6-2,6-3,6-2.
Ivo Karlovic, Croatia, def. Andreas Haid-
er-Maurer, Austria, 7-5,6-3,6-4.
Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, def. Dominic
Thiem, Austria, 6-2,6-2,6-3.
Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain, def. Adri-
an Mannarino, France, 6-4,6-3,4-6,6-0.
Dusan Lajovic, Serbia, def. Jurgen Zopp,
Estonia, 6-2,6A, 6-4.
Leonardo Mayer, Argentina, def. Teymu-
raz Gabashvili, Russia, 6-2,4-6,6-4, 6-4.
Andreas Seppi (32), Italy, def. Juan Mona-
co, Argentina, 6-2,64,6-4.
Philipp Kohlschreiber (28), Germany, def.
Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, 6-3,7-6 (5), 6-2.
Andy Murray (7), Britain,def. Marinko Ma-
tosevic, Australia, 6-3,6-1,6-3.
Richard Gasquet (12), France, def. Carlos
Berlocq, Argentina, 7-6 (5), 64,64.
Jack Sock, United States, def. SteveJohn-
son, United States, 7-5, 6-4,6-2.
Fabio Fognini (14), Italy, def. Thomaz Bel-
lucci, Brazil, 6-3,6-4, 7-6 (2).
Gael Monfils (23), France, def. Jan-Len-
nard Struff, Germany, 7-6 (4), 6-4,6-1.
FernandoVerdasco (24), Spain, def. Pablo
Cuevas, Uruguay, 4-6,6-7 (6), 7-5,64,6-3.
Women
Second Round
Jelena Jankovic (6), Serbia, def. Kurumi
Nara, Japan, 7-5,6-0.
Sloane Stephens (15), United States, def.
Polona Hercog, Slovenia, 6-1,6-3.
Svetlana Kuznetsova (27), Russia, def.
Camila Giorgi, Italy, 7-6 (5),6-3.
Kiki Bertens, Netherlands, def. Anastasia
Pavlyuchenkova (24), Russia, 5-7, 6-4, 3-0,
retired.
Julia Glushko, Israel, def. Kirsten Flipkens
(21), Belgium, 6-4,3-6,6-4.
Silvia Soler-Espinosa, Spain, def. Yanina
Wickmayer, Belgium, 6-2,64.
Maria-Teresa Torro-Flor, Spain, def. Mag-
dalena Rybarikova, Slovakia, 6-2,2-6,6-2.
Paula Ormaechea, Argentina, def. Moni-
ca Niculescu, Romania,2-6, 7-5,6-2.
Lucie Safarova (23), Czech Republic, def.
Casey Dellacqua, Australia, 6-1,5-7,6-3.
Pauline Parmentier, France, def. Yaroslava
Shvedova, Kazakhstan, 1-6,6-3,6-3.
Ekaterina Makarova (22), Russia, def.
CoCoVandeweghe, United States,64,6-3.
Kristina Mladenovic, France, def. Alison
Riske, United States, 7-6 (5), 3-6,6-3.
Andrea Petkovic (28), Germany, def. Ste-
fanieVoegele, Switzerland, 6-2,4-6,6-2.
Sara Errani (10), Italy, def. Dinah Pfizen-
maier, Germany, 6-2,6-4.
Sorana Cirstea (26), Romania, def.Teliana
Pereira, Brazil, 6-2, 7-5.
Petra Kvitova (5), Czech Republic, def.
Marina Erakovic, New Zealand, 6-4,64.
Simona Halep (4), Romania, def. Heather
Watson, Britain, 6-2,64.
Ana Ivanovic (11), Serbia, def. Elina Svito-
lina, Ukraine, 7-5,6-2.

AT A GLANCE
WHAT: Year's second Grand Slam
WHERE: Roland Garros, Paris
WHEN: Continues today at 5 a.m.
TODAY: No. 2 Novak Djokovic
vs. No. 25 Main Cilic, No. 4
Roger Federer vs. No. 31 Dmitry
Tursunov, No. 6 Tomas Berdych
vs. No. 27 Roberto Bautista Agut,
No. 10 John Isner vs. No. 17
Tommy Robredo; No. 3 Agnieszka
Radwanska vs. Ajla Tomljanovic,
No. 7 Maria Sharapova vs. Paula
Ormaechea, No. 8 Angelique
Kerber vs. No. 31 Daniela
Hantuchova, No. 9 Dominika
Cibulkova vs. No. 19 Samantha
Stosur.
FORECAST: Chance of rain. High
of 68 degrees (20 Celsius).
STAT OF THE DAY: 10 Number
of games Nadal has dropped in
the first two rounds this year.
ONLINE: http://www.roland-
garros.com/index.html


U TENNIS:


AP' -HO
Spain's Rafael Nadal returns a shot during the second-round match of the French Open against
Austria's Dominic Thiem at Roland Garros, in Paris, France, Thursday.



Nadal considers




tennis' future


He thinks his

second-round
foe has right
star quality

By CHRIS LEHOURITES
ASSOCIATED PRESS
PARIS Shortly after
winning for the 61st time
in his 62nd match on
the red clay at Roland
Garros, Rafael Nadal took
a moment to look at the
future of tennis.
And the top-seeded
Spaniard doesn't see
himself in the picture. Or
Roger Federer. Or Novak
Djokovic. Or Andy Murray.
True, Nadal advanced
to the third round of the
French Open on Thursday,
beating a 20-year-old
Austrian in straight sets.
But it's that 20-year-old
Austrian, Dominic Thiem,
who is one of the men
who could start winning
the major titles that have
been so elusive to almost
everyone outside that
famous quartet.
Together, they have won
34 of the last 36 Grand
Slam titles.
But, to drive home his
point, Nadal notes he's
almost 28 while Djokovic
and Murray are 27 and
Federer is "I don't know,
32."
"(We're) not going to be
here for 10 more years,"
he said.
The eight-time French
Open champion followed
that last statement with a
chuckle, probably because
he quickly realized how


American Sloane Stephens
hits a shot during her 6-1, 6-3,
second-round victory against
Slovenia's Polona Hercog at
the French Open on Thursday.

ridiculous that kind of
prognostication sounds
after his 6-2, 6-2, 6-3
victory against Thiem.
It was, however, quite a
contest on Court Philippe
Chatrier, the main
stadium at Roland Garros
and Nadal's favorite place
to play.
Thiem broke Nadal's
serve twice, once in the
first set and once in the
third. The first time, Nadal
was serving for the set at
5-1 and leading 40-30, but
Thiem hit three straight
thundering shots into the
same corner, the first a
backhand and the next
two forehands, to make
it 5-2.
"He has very powerful
shots," said Nadal, who
can become the first man
in history to win five
consecutive French Open
titles with another victory
this year. "Very powerful


forehand and good
backhand, too."
Good, for sure, but not
yet good enough to take
down Nadal.
"It's really important to
play against these guys a
lot, against these top guys
because it's more import-
ant than every practice,"
said Thiem, playing in
only his second Grand
Slam tournament. "I hope
I can take a lot with me
from this match."
The three other
old-timers also reached
the third round, with
Murray beating Marinko
Matosevic 6-3, 6-1, 6-3.
Despite the lopsided
score, Murray still had
to work to keep himself
sharp, at times chastising
himself out loud for all to
hear.
"From a player's per-
spective ... the beginning
of sets are very important
to try and get ahead
whilst the opponent's
head is down a little bit,"
Murray said. "I was just
trying to make sure that
my intensity was there
every moment, especially
at the beginning of the
sets. I managed to get
ahead early in all of them,
and that helped."
Murray has never won
the French Open, nor
has anyone else in the
men's draw besides Nadal
and Federer. But the
Wimbledon champion
reached the semifinals
at Roland Garros in 2011
and the quarterfinals in
2012. He missed last year's
tournament because of a
back injury.


* NFL NOTEBOOK


Jacksonville assistant has cancer


Yarno plans to keep

working; Manning

practices with Giants
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JACKSONVILLE -Veteran
Jacksonville line coach George
Yarno has been diagnosed with
cancer.
Jaguars coach Gus Bradley did
not disclose the type of cancer
Yarno has, but he said Yarno does
not plan to take a leave of absence.
He did say Yarno would miss some
practice time with the team due to
his treatment schedule.
Yarno was at the Jaguars OTA
practice on Thursday, but spent
most of his time on the sidelines.
Assistant line coach Luke Butkus
handled most of the drills.
"He has our full support in this
fight that he's about to undertake,"
Bradley said. 'After being informed
of the news yesterday, he did
receive some really positive news.
He's received positive news on his
treatment options and how we're
going to go about attacking this.
"He's confident in the treatment
plan and felt really good after the
initial part of it with the plan that
the doctors have, and he's actually
excited about getting after this


NFL CALENDAR
Through June 19: Team practices, OTAs and
minicamps
June 22-28: Rookie symposium, Aurora,
Ohio
Aug. 3: Hall of Fame game, Canton, Ohio
Sept. 4: Regular season begins, Green Bay
at Seattle


battle that he's got."
Yarno has coached for 23 years
including six years in the NFL. He
joined the Jaguars coaching staff as
offensive line coach in January of
2013.
The 55-year-old Yarno also
coached in Tampa Bay and Detroit.
Bills enjoy ticket sales jump:
Renovations to Ralph Wilson Stadium are helping
spark a jump in season-ticket sales for Buffalo. Vice
president of marketing Marc Honan said the team
has passed the 44,000 mark, which already tops
the total in each of the past four seasons. Honan
provided the update during a media tour of the $130
million in renovations taking place at the stadium.
The upgrades include new fan-friendly amenities,
such as larger concessions stands, a sports bar, easier
access into the stadium and wider concourses.
The Bills sold 42,450 season tickets last year, and
had topped 44,000 just 13 times in their 54 seasons.
Manning takes field for Giants: Eli
Manning participated with the first-team offense
at the NewYork Giants'organized team activity,


showing no signs of the ankle surgery he underwent
in early April....
NewYork Jets offensive coordinator Marty
Mornhinweg said the quarterback competition
between Geno Smith and Michael Vick isn't quite
"50 *0"During a conference call with season ticket
holders, Mornhinweg insisted that the quarterbacks
will compete for the job. Vick has said that it's "not an
open competition"and Smith is the starter.
Bears claim former Dolphin: Chicago
claimed offensive lineman Michael Ola off waivers
after he was released by the Miami. The Bears also
terminated the contract of cornerback Derrick Martin
and waived offensive lineman Rogers Gaines....
Buffalo signed offensive tackle Cyrus Kouandjio.
The second-round pick from Alabama was the last of
the Bills seven-player draft class to sign....
Carolina announced its signed second round draft
pick Kony Ealy, a defensive end from Missouri. Terms
of the deal were not released Thursday.
Around the league: Cleveland
announced the hire of Morocco Brown to serve as
vice president of player personnel. Brown spent
the past six seasons as director of pro personnel for
Washington....
NFL teams and the league's foundation will fund
trainers in underserved high schools nationwide
in a $1 million program. An announcement was
made as part of a White House summit on youth
sports safety. The program, a collaboration with the
National Athletic Trainers'Association (NATA) and
the Professional Football Athletic Trainers Society
(PFATS), is part of $25 million committed by the NFL
Foundation over the next three years toward health
and safety projects.


CRABS

FROM PAGE 1
outing with the Stone
Crabs after giving up five
runs (two earned) on six
hits, but Sandberg said
Snell "definitely" pitched
better than his line.
"Two strikes was where
he struggled a little bit,
trying to put hitters away.
But that's a good offensive
Dunedin team right there.
They're experienced;
they're playing well,"
Sandberg said. "He'll defi-
nitely be able to build off
this one, which is good. It
was definitely a positive
outing."
Snell had plenty of pos-
itive outings with the Hot
Rods: He went 3-2 with
a 1.79 ERA in eight starts
this season. Stone Crabs
manager Jared Sandberg
managed the Tampa Bay
Rays' No. 14 prospect
in Bowling Green last
season, and said the
left-hander has developed
a curveball this season to
go along with his mid-90s
fastball, slider and "plus-
plus" changeup.
Dunedin right-hander
Taylor Cole struck out
nine and scattered
three singles over seven
scoreless innings. Center
fielder Kes Carter was
the only Stone Crab to
advance past first, but he
was thrown out on the
same play trying to reach
third.
Through the first three


games of the four-game
set, the Stone Crabs have
three runs on 16 hits
against Blue Jays pitching.
Dunedin, meanwhile, has
19 runs on 33 hits.
"You got to give credit
to Dunedin and their
pitching staff," Sandberg
said. "Tonight, one big
inning does us in. You
look at the way that Taylor
Cole pitched; he's had a
great season. That's three
starters of theirs, back
to back to back, putting
together three good
seasons."
Despite the loss, Snell
was happy to be in Port
Charlotte playing along-
side the teammates he
spent all of last season
with in Bowling Green.
"I just had a good time.
It felt normal," Snell
said. "Same game, same
everything."
Noteworthy: Third baseman
Tyler Goeddel left Thursday's game
after getting hit with a pitch on his
left wrist in the seventh inning. He
went to the hospital to undergo
precautionary X-rays. Sandberg didn't
have an update after the game....
Center fielder Andrew Toles was away
from the team on Thursday to take
care of a personal matter. Sandberg
said it had nothing to do with his
removal from Sunday's game and
subsequent days out of the lineup.
... Hitting coach Joe Szekely was not
with the Stone Crabs on Thursday,
and pitching coach Steve "Doc"
Watson will not be with the team
tonight: They are attending their
respective daughters'graduations.
Contaa Josh Vitale at 941-206-1122
orjvitale@sun-herald.om.


Charlotte's Maxx Tissenbaum takes a swing during Thursday's
game against the Dunedin. Tissenbaum went 0 for 3.


STONE CRABS GAME REPORT


BLUE JAYS 7, STONE CRABS 0

HITTERS OF THE GAME
Marcus Knecht and Nick
Baligod, Blue Jays: Hard to pick
between the two when they both
finished with the exact same line at
the plate. The designated hitter and
right fielder each went 2 for 4 with a
walk, two RBIs and a run scored.
PITCHER OF THE GAME
Taylor Cole, Blue Jays. The
right-hander was nearly unhittable
Thursday night, scattering just three
base hits over seven scoreless innings.
He struck out nine batters in the
game, and he lowered his season ERA
to 2.31

BLUE JAYS 7, STONE CRABS 0
Dunedin AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
SmithJr.LF 5 2 2 0 0 1 .296
PompeyCF 4 1 1 0 1 2 .328
KnechtDH 4 1 2 2 1 1 .271
Hobson1B 5 1 1 2 0 0 .212
ChungC 5 0 2 0 0 0 .331
GuerreroSS 5 0 0 0 0 1 .242
BaligodRF 4 1 2 2 1 0 .239
Pierre3B 3 0 0 0 1 1 .217
Lopes2B 3 1 0 0 1 0 .239
Totals 38 710 6 5 6 .260
Charlotte AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Coyle2B 4 0 1 0 0 1 .242
ReginattoSS 4 0 1 0 0 0 .339
TissenbaumC 3 0 0 0 0 1 .270
Goeddel3B 2 0 0 0 0 1 .262
a-Leonard1B 0 0 0 0 0 0 .282
SaleLF 3 0 0 0 0 1 .227
GuevaraDH 3 0 0 0 0 2 .207
Carter CF 3 0 1 0 0 1 .229
GanttRF 3 0 0 0 0 2 .250
QuinonezlB-3B 3 0 0 0 0 2 .212
Totals 28 0 3 0 011 .258
Dunedin 001 060 000- 710 0
Charlotte 000 000 000- 0 3 2
a-entered for Goeddel in the eighth. E:
Goeddel (9), Reginatto (12). LOB: Duned-
in 9, Charlotte 2.2B: Knecht (10), Hobson,
K (9). RBI: Knecht 2 (22), Hobson, K 2 (42),
Baligod 2 (6). SB: Knecht (5). RISP: Dunedin
4 for 15; Charlotte 0 for 0. GIDP: Guerrero,
Sale. DP: Dunedin 1 (Guerrero,-Lopes, Hob-
son). Charlotte 1 (Quinonez-Coyle-Leon-
ard).
Dunedin IP H R ER BBSO HR ERA
ColeW,4-2 7 3 0 0 0 9 02.31
Girodo 2 00 0 0 2 01.78
Charlotte IP H R ER BB SO HR ERA
Snell(L,0-1) 465 2 1 3 04.50
Molina 3 3 2 1 4 2 02.93
Brandt 2 1 0 0 0 1 00.50
Snell pitched to 4 batters in the 5th.
Inherited runners-scored: Molina, Jose A
3-3. WP: Snell, Molina 4. HBP: Goeddel (by
Cole). PB:Tissenbaum (4). Umpires: Home:
Nate Tomlinson. First: Charlie Ramos. T:
2:42. A: 1,259.


INNING OF THE GAME
Fifth. The Stone Crabs trailed by
just one entering the frame, but four
hits, two walks, an error and three
wild pitches allowed the Blue Jays to
put another six runs on the board.

QUOTE OF THE GAME
"Every day just get better. Just
focus on the controllables of what I
can do. Each day just get better, and
focus on what I can do to get better
every day. Nothing is really going to
change for me."
-Blake Snell, on how he
can build on his Stone Crabs debut

Josh Vitale

FLORIDA STATE LEAGUE
North Division
W L Pt. GB
Dunedin (BlueJays) 38 15 .717 -
Lakeland (Tigers) 33 20 .623 5
Brevard Co. (Brewers) 27 25 .519 1012
Tampa (Yankees) 26 27 .491 12
Daytona (Cubs) 20 31 .392 17
Clearwater (Phillies) 11 41 .212 2612
South Division
W L Pt. GB
St. Lucie (Mets) 31 22 .585 -
Fort Myers (Twins) 30 22 .577 12
Bradenton (Pirates) 27 26 .509 4
Charlotte (Rays) 25 27 .481 512
Palm Beach (Cards) 25 28 .472 6
Jupiter (Marlins) 22 31 .415 9
Thursday's results
Lakeland 3,Jupiter 1
Dunedin 7, Charlotte 0
Bradenton 4,Tampa 0
Brevard County 9, St. Lucie1
Fort Myers 3, Clearwater 0
Palm Beach 8, Daytona 1
Today's games
Fort Myers at Clearwater, 6:30 p.m.
Dunedin at Charlotte, 6:30 p.m.
Tampa at Bradenton, 6:30 p.m.
Brevard County at St. Lucie, 6:30 p.m.
Lakeland at Jupiter, 6:35 p.m.
Palm Beach at Daytona, 7:05 p.m.
Saturday's games
Brevard County at Charlotte, 6 p.m.
Palm Beach at Lakeland, 6 p.m.
Tampa at Fort Myers, 6:05 p.m.
Bradenton at Clearwater, 6:30 p.m.
Daytona at St. Lucie, 6:30 p.m.
Dunedin at Jupiter, 6:35 p.m.
Sunday's games
Palm Beach at Lakeland, 1 p.m.
Bradenton at Clearwater, 1 p.m.
Daytona at St. Lucie, 1 p.m.
Dunedin at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m.
Tampa at Fort Myers, 4:05 p.m.
Brevard County at Charlotte, 5 p.m.


The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3







Page 4 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014


I STANDINGS


Toronto
NewYork
Baltimore
Boston
RAYS


Detroit
Chicago
Kansas City
Minnesota
Cleveland


Oakland
Los Angeles
Texas
Seattle
Houston


W L Pt
Atlanta 28 25 528
MARLINS 28 25 .528
Washington 25 27 .481
New York 25 28 .472
Philadelphia 23 28 .451

W L Pt
Milwaukee 32 22 593
St. Louis 29 24 .547
Cincinnati 23 28 .451
Pittsburgh 23 29 .442
Chicago i1 32 .373

W L Pt
San Francisco 34 19 .642
Los Angeles 29 25 .537
Colorado 28 25 .528
San Diego 24 30 .444
Arizona 22 33 .400

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Wednesday's results
Houston 9, Kansas City 3
Toronto 3, RAYS 2
Boston 4, Atlanta 0
Milwaukee 8, Baltimore 3
Chicago White Sox 3, Cleveland 2
Texas 1, Minnesota 0
N.Y Yankees 7, St. Louis 4
Oakland 3, Detroit 1
Seattle 3, L.A. Angels 1
Thursday's results
Texas 5, Minnesota 4
Detroit 5, Oakland 4
Kansas City8,Toronto 6, 10 inning
Boston 4, Atlanta 3
Houston 3, Baltimore 1
L.A. Angels at Seattle, late
Today's games
Colorado (Nicasio 5-2) at Clevelan
5-3),7:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Nolasco 2-5) at N.Y.
(Nuno 1-1), 7:05 p.m.
Texas (Lewis 4-3) at Washington)(S
3-4), 7:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Vargas 4-2) at Toron
4-1 ),7:07 p.m.
RAYS (Price 4-4) at Boston (W
0-0), 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore (Mi.Gonzalez 3-3) at
(Oberholtzer 1-6), 8:10 p.m.
San Diego (Kennedy 3-6) at Chica
Sox (Joh.Danks 3-4),8:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Richards 4-1) at
(Pomeranz 4-2), 10:05 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 5-4) at Seattle (
3-1), 10:10 p.m.




* MLB ROUNDUP




Cabre




edge


Sacrifice f

boosts Detr

to series sp

with Oakla

By THE ASSOCIATED P

OAKLAND, Calif.
Miguel Cabrera hi
a go-ahead sacrifice
fly in the fifth to bact
Rick Porcello's eighth
victory, and the Detr
Tigers beat the Oakla
Athletics 5-4 on Thui
for a split of the four
game series between
division leaders.
Porcello (8-2) over
came a career-high s
walks, three shy of hi
season total coming
Thursday's start. Joe
Nathan earned his 13
save after allowing Jo
Donaldson's leadoff d
ble, an RBI infield sin
byYoenis Cespedes a
Josh Reddick's run-si
ing double.
It was Nathan's firs
outing since he sur-
rendered Donaldson!
game-ending three-ri
homer in Wednesday
loss for his fourth bb
save opportunity.
Victor Martinez do
bled home two runs
the seventh and Cab
also had an RBI grou
out for the Tigers, wi
head to Seattle for th
weekend before retu
home.
Nick Punto hit a
two-run homer in thi
fourth for Oakland,
which wasted chanc
all game to lose for c
the seventh time in;2
games. Jesse Chavez
lost consecutive star
the first time this sea
following a two-gain
winning streak.


I SCOREBOARD

AMERICAN LEAGUE RED SOX 4, BRAVES 3
East Division Atlanta AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
t GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away Heyward rf 5 1 2 1 0 1 243
2 9-1 L-1 16-12 16-11 B.Uptonc 4 1 1 0 0 0 208
3 212 55 W-1 11-11 17-13 FFreemanib 3 1 1 1 1 0 305
412 2 4-6 L-3 11-12 15-14 J.Uptonlf 4 0 1 0 0 0 308
3 7 412 4-6 W4 12-17 12-12 Gattisc 40 1 1 0 0 .248
81/2 6 4-6 L-3 12-14 11-17 CJohnson3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 258
CentralDivision Doumitdh 4 0 1 0 0 2 217
t GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away 2-J.Schaferpr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .103
3-7 W-1 14-11 16-9 LaStella2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 286
41/2 11/2 7-3 W-3 16-12 12-15 Simmonsss 4 0 2 0 0 0 271
2 61/2 31/2 3-7 W-1 13-14 12-14 Totals 35 3 9 3 1 5
61/2 31/2 3-7 L-2 13-14 11-13 Boston AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
4 8 5 5-5 L4 15-11 9-19 Holt3b 4 1 3 1 1 1 315
West Division Bogaerts ss 5 1 3 1 0 0 296
t GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away Pedroia 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 275
3 4-6 L-1 14-12 18-10 Pierzynskidh 4 0 2 0 0 0 279
3 2 6-4 L-1 15-13 14-10 J.GomesIf 4 0 1 0 0 1 248
4 1 7-3 W-2 13-13 15-13 G.Sizemorerf 4 0 1 0 0 1 231
5 2 6-4 W-1 12-13 14-13 Lavarnway1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
3 912 612 6-4 W-6 11-15 12-17 a-Navaph-ib 2 0 0 0 0 1 .130
b-D.Ortizph 0 0 0 0 1 0 270
NATIONAL LEAGUE 1-Carppr-lb 0 0 0 0 0 0 231
East Division D.Rossc 4 1 1 0 0 1 .177
GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away BradleyJr.cf 3 1 0 0 1 0 205
2 4-6 L4 18-12 10-13 Totals 35 412 2 3 5
1/2 6-4 W-2 20-8 8-17 Atlanta 001100010- 3 93
21/2 3 3-7 L-2 14-14 11-13 Boston 000010021- 4120
3 312 55 W-3 13-17 12-11 No outs when winning run scored, a-struck
4 412 4-6 L-1 11-16 12-12 out for Lavarnway in the 5th. b-was inten-
Central Division tionallywalked for Nava in the 8th. 1 -ran for
GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away D.Ortiz in the 8th.2-ran for Doumit in the
3 -- 5-5 W-2 16-11 16-11 9th. E-B.Upton (3), J.Upton (5), CJohnson
212 6-4 L-1 15-9 14-15 (4). LOB-Atlanta 7, Boston 10.2B-F.Free-
712 412 4-6 W-1 12-12 11-16 man (15), Holt (5), Bogaerts (13), D.Ross (3).
8 5 6-4 L-2 16-13 7-16 HR-Heyward (5), off Peavy. RBIs-Hey-
S1112 812 55 L-2 10-13 9-19 ward (13), FFreeman (29), Gattis (22), Holt
West Division (7), Bogaerts (12). SB-Simmons (1). S-La
GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away Stella. Runners left in scoring position-
7-2 W-2 19-9 15-10 Atlanta 4 (Doumit, FFreeman, CJohnson,
512 6-4 L-1 11-14 18-11 Heyward); Boston 4 (J.Gomes, Bogaerts,
6 12 45 L-1 16-7 12-18 D.Ross 2). RISP-Atlanta 2 for 11; Boston
1012 5 3-7 L-1 14-15 10-15 5 for 12. Runners moved up-J.Upton,
13 712 5-5 W-1 8-19 14-14 BradleyJr.. GIDP-G.Sizemore. DP-Atlan-
ta 1 (F.Freeman, Simmons, F.Freeman).
NATIONAL LEAGUE Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Wednesday'sresults Minor 7 7 1 1 0 3113 3.41
N.YMets5, Pittsburgh0 CarpentrBS,2-4% 42 2 0 1 173.18
San Francisco5, Chicago Cubs 0 Avilan % 0 0 0 1 1 9 4.76
Philadelphia 6, Colorado 3 Kimbrel L, 0-1 % 1 1 0 2 0 16 1.93
MARLINS 8,Washington5,10 innings Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Boston4,Atlanta0 Peavy 8 8 3 3 1 4111 4.50
Milwaukee8, Baltimore3 UeharaW, 1-1 1 1 0 0 0 1 90.83
N.YYankees 7, St.Louis 4 Kimbrel pitched to 3 batters in the 9th.
Arizona 12, San Diego 6 Inherited runners-scored-Avilan 2-0,
Cincinnati 3,L.A.Dodgers2 Kimbrel 3-0. IBB-off Avilan (D.Ortiz).
Thursday's results Balk-Peary. Umpires-Home, Bill Welke;
N.Y Mets 4, Philadelphia 1 First, John Tumpane; Second, Bob David-
Boston 4, Atlanta 3 son;Third, James Hoye. T-3:00. A-36,292
s San Francisco at St. Louis, late (37,499).
Cincinnati at Arizona, late
Pittsburgh at L.A. Dodgers, late METS 4, PHILLIES 1
Today'sgames NewYork AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Colorado (Nicasio5-2) at Cleveland (Kluber Lagares cf 5 0 2 0 0 0 295
d (Kluber 5-3),7:05p.m. Dan.Murphy2b 4 0 0 0 1 0 .307
N.Y Mets (R.Montero 0-2) at Philadelphia D.Wright 3b 5 0 1 0 0 0 .302
Yankees (A.Burnett 3-4), 7:05 p.m. Granderson rf 2 1 0 1 2 1 .202
Texas (Lewis4-3) atWashington (Strasburg Duda lb 3 1 1 0 1 1 .238
Strasburg 3-4),7:05p.m. C.Younglf 4 1 2 2 0 0 .205
Atlanta (Teheran 4-3) at MARLINS (Koe- Flores ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 233
to (Happ hler4-4),7:10p.m. d'Arnaudc 4 0 0 0 0 1 .189
Chicago Cubs (TWood 5-4) at Milwaukee Z.Wheeler p 3 1 1 0 0 1 .059
orkman (Estrada4-2),8:10p.m. Ricep 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
San Diego (Kennedy 3-6) at Chicago White Black p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Houston Sox(Joh.Danks3-4),8:10p.m. b-BAbreuph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .286
San Francisco (Bumgarner6-3) at St. Louis Mejia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
goWhite (Wainwright8-2),8:15p.m. Totals 35 4 8 3 4 5
Cincinnati (Leake 2-4) at Arizona (Arroyo Philadelphia AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Oakland 4-3),9:40 p.m. Reverecf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .291
Pittsburgh (Liriano 0-5) at L.A. Dodgers Rollinsss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .251
Iwakuma (Beckett 3-1),10:10 p.m. Utley2b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .328
Howardlb 4 0 0 0 0 4 .235
Byrd rf 3 1 1 1 0 1 .284
D.Brownlf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .200
Ruizc 3 0 1 0 0 1 .262
C.Hernandez3b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .146
Buchanan p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000
Hollandsp 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
a-GwynnJr.ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .181
De Fratus p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
SBastardop 00 0 0 00
'i~i C T igers Totals 31 1 4 1 015
NewYork 010210000-4 80
Philadelphia 000000100- 1 41
a-struck out for Hollands in the 8th.
b-grounded out for Black in the 9th. E-C.
Hernandez (2). LOB-New York 8, Philadel-
phia 3. 2B-Lagares (11), Ruiz (11). HR-C.
Young (4), off Buchanan; Byrd (7), off Z.
-lT Royals 8, Blue Jays 6, 10 Wheeler. RBIs-Granderson (23), C.Young
l.y nnings: In Toronto, mar Infante 2 (13), Byrd (31). SB-Revere (14). Runners
left in scoring position-New York 5 (Z.
:oit hit a two-run single in the 10th inning WheelerC.Young2,Granderson,D.Wright);
and the Royals overcame two home Philadelphia 2 (Howard, Buchanan). RISP-
a yt New York 1 for 11; Philadelphia 1 for 4.
) runs by Edwin Encarnacion to beat the Runners moved up-D.Wright. GIDP-D.
d Blue Jays, snapping Toronto's winning Wright, dArnaud. DP-Philadelphia 2 (Roll-
ins, Utley, Howard), (Utley, Rollins, Howard).
streak at nine games. NewYork IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
PRESS Facing Todd Redmond(0-4), ZWheelerW,2-56 4 1 1 0 91084.31
:RiceH,6 %00 0 0 0 15.40
Alcides Escobar singled to begin the BlackH, 1 1 00 0 0 3 130.00
10th. Pedro Ciriaco was hit on the Mejia S,5-5 1 0 0 0 0 3 153.97
Philadelphia IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
it front of the helmetwhile squaring BuchananL, 1-1647 4 3 2 2 96 3.86
to bunt and Nori Aoki advanced the Hollands 1 0 0 0 1 3 253.50
De Fratus 1 0 0 0 0 54.91
k runners with a sacrifice before Infante Bastardo 2A 0 0 0 1 0 10 3.80
h lined a single just over the reach of Inherited runners-scored-Hollands
oit leaping third baseman Brett Lawrie. 1-0, Bastardo 1-0. Umpires-Home, Doug
Eddings; First, Cory Blaser; Second, Mar-
and vin Hudson; Third, Brian O'Nora. T-2:55.
rsday Rangers 5, Twins 4: In A-26,668 (43,651).
F- Minneapolis, Leonys Martin doubled TIGERS 5, ATHLETICS 4
twice and scored three times, Detroit AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Kinsler2b 5 2 2 1 0 0 318
including the go-ahead run in the D.Kellyrf 4 1 2 0 1 1 .254
eighth inning, and Texas won its Mi.Cabrera lb 3 1 1 2 1 0 323
V.Martinezdh 4 0 2 2 0 0 .344
six second straight four-game series on J.MartinezIf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .263
is the road. AJackson cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .250
ino Sina rn Avilac 4 0 0 0 0 2 .217
it ShnSoo Choo hitathree-u Castellanos3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .236
double in the second for the Rangers, An.Romine ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 .202
3th but the Twins tooka4-31lead in the Totals 36 511 5 2 5
)5h fith n oshfist Oakland AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
oh ithinning oJshWillingham's irt Crispcf 4 0 2 0 1 1 .246
dou- home run of the season, a no-doubt Jaso c 3 0 2 0 0 0 .297
a-D.Norrisph-c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .301
ngle drive to the second deck above Donaldson 3b 4 1 1 0 1 2 .276
and left-center field. Moss lf 3 0 0 0 2 0 .273
zor- Cespedesdh 5 1 1 1 0 1 242
Callaspoib 4 1 1 0 11 242
Red Sox 4, Bravesg3:lIn Reddickrf 4 0 1 1 1 1 215
4 alr o Puntoss 2 1 1 2 3 0 239
st Boston, Tommy [a Stella's falr o Sogard 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .188
catch a force attempt at second base b-Lowrie ph 100 0 00 .241
allowed Jackie Bradley Jr. to score Detroit 001 020 200- 5110
from second with none out in the Oakland 000200002-4 90
y's 3-1 ninth inning, giving the Red Sox their a-fouled out foriJaso in the 6th. b-grounded
own out for Sogard in the 9th. LOB-Detroit 7,
fourth straight win after a 10-game Oakland 14. 2B-Kinsler 2 (19),V.Martinez
skid. (13), Donaldson (12), Reddick (3). HR-
in Te Re So too advntae oftwo Punto (1), off Porcello. RBls-Kinsler (23),
The ed ox ookadvatag oftwo Mi.Cabrera 2 (46), V.Martinez 2 (31), Ces-
)rera more Atlanta errors to score twice in pedes (32), Reddick (22), Punto 2 (8). SF-
[ild th totieit al an se up Mi.Cabrera. Runners left in scoring pos-
ro teeighth totei -l n e p tion-Detroit 4 (J.Martinez 2, An.Romine,
ho closer Koji Uehara (1-1) for the win. AiJackson, Oakland 8 (Cespedes 2, Crisp 2,
D.Norris 2, Reddick, Lowrie). RlSP-Detroit
he 3 for 9, Oakland 2 for 14. Runners moved
]rning Mets 4, Phillies 1: In up-DKelly, Mi.Cabrera, Moss. GIDP-J.
Philadelphia, Chris Young hit a Martinez, Sogard. DP-Detroit 1 (Porcello,
Avila, Mi.Cabrera), Oakland 1 (Punto, Sog-
two-run homer and Zack Wheeler ard, Callaspo).


i struck out nine in 61/3 innings to lead Detroit IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
PorcelloW,8-2 51 5 2 2 6 4105 3.82
the New York Mets over Philadelphia Krol H,9 0 0 0 0 0 42.45
es in the opener of a rare five-game AlburqrqueH,8 1 0 0 0 2 1 23 3.22
ChamberlnH, 111 1 0 0 0 2 20 2.2
inly series. Nathan S, 13-17 1 32 2 1 1 265.23
20 Oakland IP H RER BBSO NP ERA
J.Chav-Baltimore J L43 6 8 3 3 2 3107 2.78
(4-3) Houston 3, BJiohnson 1 3 2 2 0 0 14 6.55
ts for 1: In Houston, George Springer Abad 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 2.08
Fe.Rodriguez 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 1.29
ason hit a tiebreaking two-run homer in Inherited runners-scored-Krol 3-0.
e the seventh inning, and Houston HBP-by Porcello (Sogard). Umpires-
Home, Paul Emmel; First, Jordan Baker;
extended their winning streak to six Second, Angel Campos; Third, Jerry Meals.
games with a victory over Baltimore. T-3:28.A-21,860 (35,067).


For Wednesday's late linescores,
see Scoreboard, Page 5


RANGERS 5, TWINS 4
Texas AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Choodh 4 0 2 3 0 0 .297
Sardinasss 5 0 1 0 0 1 .267
Morelandlb 5 0 1 0 0 3 .270
A.Beltre3b 5 0 2 0 0 0 .290
Riosrf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .325
Choicelf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .210
D.RobertsonIf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .150
L.Martincf 3 3 2 0 1 0 .283
Chirinosc 3 0 1 1 0 0 .225
Odor2b 3 0 0 1 0 1 .275
Totals 37 512 5 1 6
Minnesota AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Dozier2b 4 0 0 0 1 1 .243
Mauer1b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .275
Plouffe3b 5 1 2 1 0 1 .247
Arciarf 5 0 3 0 0 0 .257
1-A.Hickspr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .195
Willingham dh 3 1 2 3 2 1 .276
Kubellf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .238
Pintoc 4 0 0 0 0 1 .233
E.Escobarss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .324
D.Santanac' 4 1 3 0 0 1 .368
Totals 37 411 4 4 7
Texas 030001 010- 5120
Minnesota 002020000- 4110
1-ran for Arcia in the 9th. LOB-Texas 9,
Minnesota 10. 2B-Choo (9), LMartin 2 (4),
Plouffe (19), Arcia (3). HR-Willingham (1),
off N.Martinez. RBIs-Choo 3 (18), Chirinos
(10), Odor(9g), Plouffe (31),Willingham 3 (4).
SB-D.Santana (1). S-Chirinos. SF-Odor.
Runners left in scoring position-Texas
3 (Sardinas 2, LMartin); Minnesota 4 (E.Es-
cobar, Kubel, Mauer, Pinto). RISP-Texas 2
for 8; Minnesota 3 for 11. Runners moved
up-Odor, Arcia. DP-Texas 1 (Moreland,
Sardinas).
Texas IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
N.Martinez 549 4 4 2 2108 2.75
OgandoW,2-21 1 0 0 2 2 355.84
FrasorH, 8 1 00 0 0 2 142.00
CottsH,7 1i 00 0 0 0 43.63
SoriaS, 10-11 241 0 0 0 1 72.37
Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Deduno 51i 9 4 4 1 2101 3.86
Duensing 1 00 0 0 1 17 1.33
Swarzak 34 1 0 0 0 1 104.81
FienL,3-2 1 1 1 1 0 0 192.05
Guerrier 1 1 0 0 0 2 11 3.24
Inherited runners-scored-Ogando 1-0,
Duensing 1-0. HBP-by Duensing (Choo).
WP-N.Martinez. Umpires-Home, Jerry
Layne; First, Mike DiMuro; Second, Mike
Estabrook; Third, Pat Hoberg. T-3:34.
A-28,170 (39,021).

ROYALS 8, BLUE JAYS 6, 10 INNINGS,
KansasCity AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Aokirf 3 1 1 0 1 1 265
Infante2b 6 0 2 3 0 0 .265
Hosmer1b 6 1 1 0 0 2 .276
B.Butlerdh 6 0 2 1 0 2 .238
A.Gordonlf 5 0 2 1 0 0 .279
1 -Dysonpr-lf 0 1 0 0 0 0 .276
S.Perezc 4 1 1 1 0 1 .259
L.Cainc' 4 0 1 0 1 2 .325
A.Escobarss 5 2 3 0 0 2 .271
Ciriaco3b 4 2 1 1 0 1 .222
Totals 43 814 7 211
Toronto AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Reyesss 5 0 0 0 0 2 252
Me.Cabreralf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .317
Pillar If 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333
Bautistarf 4 1 1 2 0 0 .299
Lind dh 4 2 2 0 0 0 .341
Encarnacion lb 4 2 2 4 0 1 .268
J.Francisco3b 3 0 0 0 0 3 .260
StTolleson2b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .298
Lawrie2b-3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .231
Thole c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .340
a-D.Navarroph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .268
Gosecf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .310
Totals 37 6 9 6 010
KansasCity 010130001 2- 8140
Toronto 200202000 0- 6 91
a-struck out for Thole in the 10th. 1-ran for
A.Gordon in the 9th. E-Reyes (5). LOB-
Kansas City 11, Toronto 1. 2B-Hosmer
(19), A.Gordon (14), LCain (6), Ciriaco (2).
HR-S.Perez (5), off Dickey; Bautista (13),
off Shields; Encarnacion 2 (18), off Shields
2. RBIs-lnfante 3 (23), B.Butler (21), A.Gor-
don (27), S.Perez (13), Ciriaco (2), Bautista 2
(38), Encarnacion 4 (48). SB-Dyson (10),
A.Escobar (15). S-Aoki. Runners left in
scoring position-Kansas City 6 (B.But-
ler, LCain, S.Perez, Infante, A.Escobar 2).
RISP-Kansas City 6for 18;Toronto0 for0.
Runners moved up-nfante, A.Gordon.
DP-Toronto 1 (Reyes, Lawrie).
Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Shields 7 8 6 6 0 6108 3.36
W.DavisW,4-1 2 00 0 0 2 21 1.48
G.HollandS, 15-1611 0 0 0 2 171.74
Toronto IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
Dickey 510 5 5 1 7108 4.30
Delabar 1 00 0 0 1 124.09
Rasmussen H,2 34 1 0 0 1 1 250.00
LoupH,10 1 00 0 0 1 92.70
JanssenBS,1-9 1 11 0 0 1 180.00
Redmond L, 0-4 1 22 2 0 0 17381
Dickey pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. In-
herited runners-scored-Delabar 2-0,
Loup 3-0. HBP-by Delabar (Aoki), by
Redmond (Ciriaco), by Rasmussen (S.Pe-
rez). WP-Rasmussen. Umpires-Home,
Angel Hernandez; First, Adrian Johnson;
Second, Gabe Morales;Third, LarryVanover.
T-3:26. A-17,978 (49,282).


ASTROS 3, ORIOLES 1


Baltimore AB
Markakis rf 4
Pearce If 4
AJones cf 4
C.Davis1 b 4
N.Cruz dh 4
Hardyss 4
Machado 3b 4
Flaherty 2b 3
Hundleyc 3
Totals 34
Houston AD
Altuve2b 4
Springer rf 4
Fowler cf 3
J.Ca stro c 3
M.Dominguez 3b 4
Carter lb 3
Guzmanlb 0
PresleyIf 2
Grossman dh 4
Villar ss 4
Totals 31
Baltimore
Houston


3 R H BI BBSO Avg.
1 0 1 0 0 0 .300
1 1 1 0 0 0 324
1 0 1 0 0 1 .289
1 0 0 0 0 3 .237
1 0 2 1 0 0 .310
1 0 0 0 0 3 .296
1 0 0 0 0 2 .216
3 0 1 0 0 1 .206
3 0 1 0 0 2 .214
4 1 7 1 012
3 R H BI BBSO Avg.
1 1 3 0 0 0 325
1 1 1 2 0 2 .268
3 0 0 0 0 1 .259
3 1 0 0 1 0 .231
1 0 1 0 0 2 .246
3 0 0 0 0 2 .196
) 0 0 0 1 0 .206
2 0 0 0 2 0 .244
1 0 0 0 0 0 .141
1 0 0 0 0 2 .196
35249
000100000- 1 72
010000 20x- 3 50


E-C.Davis (1), Machado (6). LOB-Bal-
timore 6, Houston 9. 2B-Pearce (5),
Altuve (17). HR-Springer (10), off Guil-
met. RBIs-N.Cruz (49), Springer 2 (29).
SB-Altuve 2 (19). Runners left in scoring
position-Baltimore 1 (Hardy); Houston 8
(Villar 4, J.Castro, M.Dominguez 3). RISP-
Baltimore 1 for 4; Houston 1 for 15. Run-
ners moved up-Fowler, J.Castro, Presley,


Grossman.
Baltimore
UJimenez
Guilmet L, 0-1
R.Webb
Houston
Peacock
Fields W, /
Quails S,4-5


IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
6 3 1 1 3 8112 4.65
1 22 2 0 1 22 2.57
1 00 0 1 0 14 3.13
IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
6 6 1 1 0 8 93 4.76
2 1 0 0 0 3 217.20
1 00 0 0 1 82.76


HBP-by UJimenez (Fowler). WP-U.
Jimenez, Guilmet. Umpires-Home, Mike
Muchlinski; First, Mark Wegner; Second,
Andy Fletcher; Third, Chris Segal. T-2:56.
A-22,884 (42,060).


* MLB:




Rodriguez rides




power surprise


Reserve leads RAYS AT RED SOX

team in HRs WHO: Tampa Bay (23-31) at

through first Boston (23-29)
WHEN: Today, 7:10 p.m.
two months WHERE: Fenway Park, Boston

By JOE SMITH PITCHERS: David Price (4-2, 4.42)
TAMPA BAY TIMES vs. Brandon Workman (0-0, 3.18)

Raise your hand if you TV: Sun Sports
predicted Sean Rodriguez RADIO: 620 AM, 1220 AM, 1480
would be leading Tampa AM, 1530 AM, 1580 AM
Bay in home runs through
the first two months of the
season. box, that's half the battle.
Didn't think so. I think he's feeling it
Neither did manager Joe right now, and when he's
Maddon. getting the opportunity
"Of course, I'd be and getting the pitch, he's
surprised," he said. doing some damage."
But here is Rodriguez Rodriguez deflected
entering tonight's game most of the credit to
against Boston topping Nelson and hitting coach
Tampa Bay with six Derek Shelton, who have
homers in 78 at-bats consistently worked with
surpassing his total from him the past two years on
last year (five). Starting both the mechanical and
primarily against left- mental side. Before, if he
handers, Rodriguez is the went through a slump,
only player in baseball he'd search for ways to tin-
to lead his team in home ker. Now, he's sticking with
runs with fewer than 100 his same approach, and
at-bats; by comparison, "trusting the preparation,"
Evan Longoria has five and not over-thinking at
in 212 at-bats. Two of the plate.
Rodriguez's homers were 'A thinking mind is a
pinch-hit, three-run heavy bat," Nelson said.
blasts, giving him 20 RBI, Just as important,
with 13 of his 18 hits going Rodriguez has grown
for extra bases. more comfortable in his
"He's been outstand- role, which has evolved
ing," Maddon said. "He's since he was the player to
growing up as a major be named later in the 2009
league baseball player. Scott Kazmir trade to the
He's hitting the ball hard, Angels.
you can put him defen- "I was the throw-in guy,"
sively anywhere and he Rodriguez said, smiling.
plays great defense. He's The Rays threw him
always involved, always everywhere in his first
engaged. I'm really happy two seasons, starting at
for him." seven spots in 2010 and
Valued for his defensive all four infield positions in
versatility and can- 2011. Rodriguez was the
do-anything attitude opening day shortstop in
Rodriguez has worked 2012 but hit just .213, so
hard to fine-tune his more utility role.
ability at the plate. But Rodriguez still believes
Maddon said Rodriguez, that, given the chance,
batting .244, is a more he could succeed as an
mature hitter. everyday player, "I abso-
"He believes in himself lutely have no doubt."
right now," coach Jamie But he's not worrying
Nelson said. "He's going about that now, his main
through a period where focus doing anything
he's very confident. He to help the team win,
knows that he's going whether that's a bunt,
to hit the ball hard each steal, or a pinch-hit, three
time when he gets to the run homer.



TALENT Taylor Guerrieri,
outfielder Mike Mahtook
and shortstop Jake Hager
FROM PAGE 1 have found success in

Fifteen of Baseball the minors. Guerrieri is
America's top 30 Rays recovering Tommy John
prospects entering the surgery, but he pitched
well before the injury.
season were position
players, but less than Mahtook is batting .331
playrs, ut ess han in Durham, and Hager
half of those are playing inDam n d Hager
above Double-A in the is batting .286 with
Double-A Montgomery.
As for the rest of the
Four have spent time 2011 class, the jury is
with Triple-A Durham out. Third baseman Tyler
this season, but only Goeddel, outfielder Kes
one outfielder Kevin Carter and pitchers Jeff
Kiermaier, a 31st-round Ames and Blake Snell
pick in 2010 --seems --are playing for the
poised to make a notice- Charlotte Stone Crabs.
able impact with the Shortstop Brandon
major-league club this Martin and outfielder
season. In fact, the Rays James Harris are with
called him up for the Low-A Bowling Green.
third time this season on Left-hander Grayson
Wednesday. Garvin pitched with
"Because of our finan- Montgomery last season,
cial limitations relative but, like Guerrieri, he's
to our competitors, also recovering from
our mentality and our Tommy John surgery.
thought process has been "There's some guys
more to go big and shoot doing some really good
for upside," Friedman things from that draft,
said. 'And, obviously, there's some guys who
when you do that, there's have flatlined and there's
a lot of downside that some guys who are hurt,''
comes with it. It's a scouting director R.J.
high-risk, high-reward Harrison said. "There are
strategy." some bright spots, and
The Rays are hoping there are some not-so-


to reap some reward for bright spots."
that strategy from the "We have expectations
2011 draft. Tampa Bay to do far better than what
had three true first-round we've done. It drives us
picks and another seven every day to continue to
supplemental picks that get better on this front,"
fell in the top-60, giving Friedman said. "It's
the Rays 10 chances tough, but, that being
(and 12 in the top 100) said, it's everything for
to vastly improve their us. So we have to be
system. better than we've been."
The three true-first contaa Josh Vitale at 941-206-1122
rounders right-hander orjvitale@sun-herald.om


Page 4 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014






The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 5


* NHL:




Lundqvist sends Rangers to finals


Moore's lone

goal in second

holds up for

NewYork

By IRA PODELL
ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEWYORK -Dominic
Moore scored in the
second period, Henrik
Lundqvist bounced
r back from his worst
performance in the
playoffs and the New
York Rangers beat the
Montreal Canadiens 1-0

AP PHOTO on Thursday night to
advance to the Stanley
The New York Rangers celebrate after a second period goal by Cup finals.
center Dominic Moore against the Montreal Canadiens in Game 6 The Rangers are in the
of the Eastern Conference finals on Thursday. championship round


I SCOREBOARD


Sports on TV
AUTO RACING
12:30p.m.
FS1 NASCAR, Truck Series, final practice
for Lucas Oil 200, at Dover, Del.
2p.m.
FS1 NASCAR, Nationwide Series, final
practice for May Dover Race, at Dover, Del.
3:30p.m.
FS1 NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole qualifying
for FedEx 400, at Dover, Del.
5:30p.m.
FS1 NASCAR,Truck Series, Lucas Oil 200,
at Dover, Del.
COLLEGE BASEBALL
1 p.m.
ESPNU NCAA, Division I playoffs, region-
als, Nebraska vs. Cal St.-Fullerton at Stillwa-
ter, Okla.
4p.m.
ESPNU NCAA, Division I playoffs, region-
als,Texasvs.Texas A&M at Houston
7p.m.
ESPNU NCAA, Division I playoffs, region-
als, Arkansas vs. Liberty at Charlottesville,
Va.
11 p.m.
ESPNU NCAA, Division I playoffs, region-
als, N. Dakota St. at Oregon St.
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
7p.m.
ESPN2 -World Series, game, Florida vs.
Oregon, at Oklahoma City
9:30p.m.
ESPN2 World Series, game 6, La.-Lafay-
ette-Kentucky winner vs. Oklahoma-Ala-
bama winner, at Oklahoma City
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Nordea Mas-
ters, second round, part II, at Malmo, Swe-
den
Noon
TGC LPGA, ShopRite Classic, first round,
at Galloway, N.J.
2:30p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, The Memorial Tourna-
ment, second round, at Dublin, Ohio
7p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Principal Charity
Classic, first round, at Des Moines, Iowa
(same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7p.m.
SUN -Tampa Bay at Boston
FSFL Atlanta at Miami
8p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Baltimore at
Houston or San Francisco at St. Louis
WGN Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee
NBA BASKETBALL
8:30 p.m.
ESPN Playoffs, conference finals, game 6,
Indiana at Miami
NHL HOCKEY
8p.m.
NBCSN Playoffs, conference finals, game
6, Chicago at Los Angeles


Glantz-Culver Line
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
National League
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
at Philadelphia-140 NewYork +130
Atlanta -120 atMiami +110
at Milwaukee -160 Chicago +150
at St. Louis -150 San Francisco +140
at Arizona -120 Cincinnati +110
at LosAngeles -140 Pittsburgh +130
American League
at NewYork -160 Minnesota +150
atToronto -140 Kansas City +130
TampaBay -125 atBoston +115
Baltimore -115 at Houston +105
at Oakland -130 Los Angeles +120
Detroit -115 at Seattle +105
Interleague
atWashington -170 Texas +160
at Cleveland -150 Colorado +140
San Diego -115 at Chicago (AL) +105

NBA PLAYOFFS
FAVORITE LINE O/U UNDERDOG
at Miami 7 (183) Indiana

NHL PLAYOFFS
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
atLosAngeles -130 Chicago +110


Baseball
WEDNESDAY'S LATE MLB LINESCORES
ATHLETICS 3, TIGERS 1
Detroit 000 100000-1 60
Oakland 000 000 003 -3 50
A.Sanchez, Nathan (9) and Avila; Kazmir
and D.Norris. W-Kazmir 6-2. L-Nathan
2-1. HRs-Detroit, Tor.Hunter (8). Oakland,
Donaldson (13).

MARINERS 3, ANGELS 1
LosAngeles 000 000001 -1 40
Seattle 020 000 01x-3 50
C.Wilson, Jepsen (8) and Conger; F.Hernan-
dez, Rodney (9) and Zunino. W-FHernan-
dez 7-1. L-C.Wilson 6-4. Sv-Rodney (13).
HRs-Seattle,Zunino (7).

BREWERS 8, ORIOLES 3
Baltimore 010 001100 -3 90
Milwaukee 121 00004x-8101
BNorris, Brach (7), Matusz (8) and Hundley;
Gallardo, Kintzler (7), W.Smith (7), Duke (9)
and Lucroy. W-Gallardo 3-3. L-B.Norris
3-5. HRs-Baltimore, N.Cruz 2 (19). Milwau-
kee, K.Davis (9).

YANKEES 7, CARDINALS 4
NewYork 004 300 000 -7121
St. Louis 000 111 010-4131
Kuroda, Thornton (6), Betances (6), War-
ren (7), Day.Robertson (8) and J.Murphy
S.Miller, S.Freeman (6), Maness (7), Choate
(8), Motte (9) and Y.Molina.W--Kuroda 4-3.
L-S.Miller6 -4.


DIAMONDBACKS 12, PADRES 6
San Diego 000130020 6111
Arizona 82000020x -12172
Stauffer, Roach (1), A.Torres (5), Patton (7)
and Grandal; C.Anderson, Delgado (6),
Thatcher (8), Cahill (9) and M.Montero.
W-C.Anderson3-0. L-Stauffer2-1 HRs-
San Diego, Medica (3). Arizona, Prado (2),
Goldschmidt (10).

REDS 3, DODGERS 2
Cincinnati 200 001 000 -3 80
LosAngeles 000 011000-2 50
Bailey, M.Parra (8), Broxton (8), A.Chapman
(9) and Mesoraco; Kershaw, League (8),
Howell (8), BWilson (9)and Butera.W-Bai-
ley 5-3. L-Kershaw 3-2. Sv-A.Chapman
(5). HRs-Cincinnati, Phillips (4). Los Ange-
les, Puig (11).


I College baseball
NCAA DIV. I REGIONALS
Double Elimination;
* x-if necessary
At Davenport Field, Charlottesville, Va.
Today's games
Game 1 -Virginia (44-13)vs. Bucknell (30-
19-1),2 p.m.
Game 2 -Liberty (41-16)vs. Arkansas (38-
23),7 p.m.
Saturday's games
Game 3 Game 1 loser vs. Game 2 loser,
2 p.m.
Game4 -Game 1 winner vs.Game 2 win-
ner, 8 p.m.
At Carolina Stadium, Columbia, S.C.
Today's games
Game 1 Old Dominion (36-24) vs. Mary-
land (36-21),] p.m.
Game2 -South Carolina (42-16)vs. Camp-
bell (40-19),7 p.m.
Saturday's games
Game 3 Game 1 loser vs. Game 2 loser,
1 p.m.
Game4 -Game 1 winner vs.Game 2 win-
ner, 7 p.m.
At Alfred A. McKethan Stadium,
Gainesville
Today's games
Game 1 North Carolina (34-25) vs. Long
Beach State (32-24), 1 p.m.
Game 2 Florida (40-21) vs. College of
Charleston (41-17),7 p.m.
Saturday's games
Game 3 Game 1 loser vs. Game 2 loser,
1 p.m.
Game4 -Game 1 winner vs.Game 2 win-
ner, 7 p.m.
At A-Rod Parkat Mark Light Field,
Coral Gables
Today's games
Game 1 Columbia (29-18)vs.Texas Tech
(40-18),2 p.m.
Game 2 Miami (41-17) vs.
Bethune-Cookman (26-31),7 p.m.
Saturday's games
Game 3- Game 1 loser vs. Game 2 loser,
2 p.m.
Game4 -Game 1 winner vs.Game 2 win-
ner, 7 p.m.
At Dick Howser Stadium, Tallahassee
Today's games
Game 1 -Kennesaw State (37-21) vs. Ala-
bama (34-22), Noon
Game 2 Florida State (43-15) vs. Geor-
gia Southern (39-21),6 p.m.
Saturday's games
Game 3 Game 1 loser vs. Game 2 loser,
1 p.m.
Game4 -Game 1 winner vs.Game 2 win-
ner, 5 p.m.
At Jim Patterson Stadium, Louisville, Ky.
Today's games
Game 1 -Kansas (34-24)vs. Kentucky (35-
23),2 p.m.
Game 2 Louisville (45-15) vs. Kent State
(36-21),6 p.m.
Saturday's games
Game 3 Game 1 loser vs. Game 2 loser,
1 p.m.
Game4 -Game 1 winner vs.Game 2 win-
ner, 5 p.m.
At Bart Kaufman Field,
Bloomington, Ind.
Today's games
Game 1 Stanford (30-23) vs. Indiana
State (35-16),2 p.m.
Game 2 Indiana (42-13) vs. Youngstown
State (16-36),7 p.m.
Saturday's games
Game 3 Game 1 loser vs. Game 2 loser,
2 p.m.
Game4 -Game 1 winner vs.Game 2 win-
ner, 6 p.m.
At Hawkins Field, Nashville, Tenn.
Today's games
Game 1 Clemson (36-23)vs. Oregon (42-
18),1 p.m.
Game 2 -Vanderbilt (41-18)vs. Xavier (29-
27),8 p.m.
Saturday's games
Game 3 Game 1 loser vs. Game 2 loser,
2 p.m.
Game4 -Game 1 winner vs.Game 2 win-
ner, 8 p.m.
At Swayze Field, Oxford, Miss.
Today's games
Game 1 Georgia Tech (36-25) vs. Wash-
ington (39-15-1),4 p.m.
Game 2 Mississippi (41-18) vs. Jackson-
ville State (36-25),8 p.m.
Saturday's games
Game 3 Game 1 loser vs. Game 2 loser,
2 p.m.
Game4 Game 1 winner vs.Game 2 win-
ner, 6 p.m.
At Alex Box Stadium, Baton Rouge, La.
Today's games
Game 1 LSU (44-14-1) vs. Southeastern
Louisiana (37-23),3 p.m.
Game 2 Bryant (42-14) vs. Houston (44-
15),8 p.m.
Saturday's games
Game 3 Game 1 loser vs. Game 2 loser,
3 p.m.
Game4 -Game 1 winner vs.Game 2 win-
ner, 8 pm.
At M.L. Moore Field, Lafayette, La.


for the first time since
winning it all in 1994.
Lundqvist and the
Rangers shook off a
7-4 road loss Tuesday
night and took out the
Canadiens on home ice.
Lundqvist needed to
make only 18 saves in his
team-record tying ninth
postseason shutout. He
was pulled after allowing
four goals in less than two
periods Tuesday.
Lundqvist had been 0-5
since 2009 in non-Game
7 clinching games. He
leaped several times in
his crease with his hands
raised as streamers were
fired off from the rafters.
Montreal's Dustin
Tokarski, who replaced
injured No. 1 goalie Carey
Price after Game 1, was


Today's games FOOTBALL
Game 1 -San Diego State (42-19) vs. Mis- National Football League
sissippi State (37-22),2p.m. BUFFALO BILLS Signed OL Cyrus

Game 2 Louisiana-Lafayette (53-7) vs. Kouandjio.Released OL RandyColling.
Jackson State (31-23),7 p.m. CAROLINA PANTHERS Signed DE
Saturday's games Kony Ealy.
Game 3 Game 1 loser vs. Game 2 loser, CHICAGO BEARS Claimed OL Mi-
2 p.m. chael Ola off waivers from Miami. Termi-
Game4 -Game 1 winner vs.Game2win- nated the contract of CB Derrick Martin.
ner, 7 p.m. Waived OL Rogers Gaines.
At Allie R Reynolds Stadium, CLEVELAND BROWNS Agreed to
Stillwater, Okla. termswith DB Pierre Desir. Named Morocco
Today's games Brown vice president of player personnel.
Game 1 -Cal State Fullerton (32-22) vs. DETROIT LIONS Promoted Rob
Nebraska (40-19), 1p.m. Lohman to assistant director of pro person-
Game2 -Oklahoma State (45-16)vs.Bing- nel. Named Darren Anderson midwest re-
hamton (25-25), 7p.m gion scouting supervisor and Joe Kelleher
Saturday's games midwest to the plains-central region scout.
Game 3 Game 1 loser vs. Game 2 loser, Named Patrick Mularkey pro personnel co-
1 p.m. ordinator.
Game4 -Game 1 winnervs.Game2win- PITTSBURGH STEELERS Signed OL
ner, 7 p.m. Emmanuel McCray and CB Shaquille Rich-
At Charlie and Marie Lupton Stadium, ardson. Claimed CB Deion Belue offwaivers
FortWorth, Texas from Miami. Released OLs Nik Embernate
Today'sgames and Kaycee Ike.
Game 1 Sam Houston State (41-17) vs. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS Agreed to
Dallas Baptist (40-19),3:30 p.m. terms with WR Doug Baldwina on a con-
Game 2 TCU (42-15) vs. Siena (26-31), 8 tract extension through the 2016 season.
p.m. WASHINGTON REDSKINS- Signed T
Saturday's games Morgan Moses.
Game 3 Game 1 loser vs. Game 2 loser, Canadian Football League
3:30 p.m. WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS Named
Game 4- Game 1 winner vs.Game 2 win- Jason Smith general manager for the 2015
ner, 8 p.m. Grey Cup Festival, as well as vice president
At Reckling Park, Houston ofentertainment and events.
Today's games HOCKEY
Game 1 -Texas A&M (33-24) vs. Texas (38- National Hockey League
18),4 pm.BUFFALO SABRES Signed D Brady
Game 2 Rice (41-18) vs. George Mason Austin to a three-year contract.
(34-20),8 p.m. DALLAS STARS Signed F Jason Dick-
Saturday's games inson to a three-year contract.
Game 3 Game 1 loser vs. Game 2 loser, FLORIDA PANTHERS Agreed to
4 p.m. termswith D MacKenzie Weegar.
Game4 -Game 1 winnervs.Game 2 win- LOS ANGELES KINGS Signed F Val-
entin Zykovand D Nick Ebert to three-year
ner, 8 p.m.
At Goss Stadium at Coleman Field, contracts
Corvallis, Ore. SOCCER
Major League Soccer
Game U Iv e(3 s UMLS -Issued official warnings to Van-
23),am Ucouver and Seattle for violating the league
Game,2 OenStmass confrontation policy in their game
Game 2 Oregon State (42-12) vs. North InMy2.FndVnovrM er
Dakta tat (2 24, 1 p on May 24. Fined Vancouver MF Pedro
Morales and Seattle F Chad Barrett undis-
Saturday's games
Gm3 am r s game 2 closed amounts for contact to the head of
Game 3 Game 1 loser vs. Game 2 loser, :nopnn:n saltn h niet
an opponent and escalating the incident.
5pm Fined Toronto FC coach Ryan Nelsen an un-
Game 4- Game 1 winner vs.Game 2 win- disclosed amount for public criticism after
ner pm. their May23 game.
At Baggett Stadium, COLLEGE
San Luis Obispo, Calif. I AUSTIN PEAY Named Brandon Jor
SToday's games dan defensive line coach and Leron Eaddy
Game 1 Pepperdine (39-16) vs. Arizona defensive backcoach
State (33-22),4 pm. CALIFORNIA-Named Nicodemus
Game 2 Cal Poly (45-10) vs. Sacramento Christopher men's basketball strength and
State (39-22),9 p.m. conditioning coach.
G e Saturday's games NEW MEXICO HIGHLANDS Named
Game 3 Game 1 loser vs. Game 2 loser, Chase Holbrook offensive coordinator and
Gae4 G quarterbacks coach.
Game 4-Game1winner vs. Game 2win- WILMINGTON, DELAWARE Named
ner,9 pm Dan Burke men's basketball coach.


College softball Pro basketball
NCAA DIV. I WORLD SERIES NBAPLAYOFFS
At ASA Hall of Fame Stadium, CONFERENCE FINALS
Oklahoma City (Best-of-7;x-if necessary)
Double Elimination; x-if necessary EASTERN CONFERENCE
Thursday's results Miami 3, Indiana 2
Game 1 -Florida 11, Baylor 0,5 innings Mayl8:Indiana 107,Miami96
Game 2 Oregon 3, Florida State 0 May 20: Miami 87, Indiana 83
Game 3 -Kentucky 4, Louisiana-Lafayette :May24: Miami 99,Indiana 87

Game 4 Oklahoma (50-11) vs. Alabama Monday: Miami 102, Indiana 90
(50-11), late Wednesday: Miami 93, Indiana 90
Today's games Today: Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m.
Game 5 Florida (51-12) vs. Oregon (55 x-Saturday: Miami at Indiana, 830pm
7),7 pm WESTERN CONFERENCE
Game 6 Kentucky (49-14) vs. Game 4 San Antonio 2, Oklahoma City 1
wi m May 19: San Antonio 122, Okla. City 105
Saturday's games May 21: San Antonio 112, Okla. City 77
Game 7 Baylor (47-15) vs. Florida State Sunday: Okla. City 106, San Antonio 97
(55-8), Noon Tuesday: Okla. City105, San Antonio 92
Game 8 Louisiana-Lafayette (49-9) vs. Thursday: Okla.Cityat San Antonio, late
Game 4 loser,2:30p.m. Saturday: San Antonio at Okla. City,
Game 9- Game 5 loser vs. Game 7 winner, 8:30 p.m.
7 p.m. x-June 2: Okla. City at San Antonio, 9 p.m.
Game 10 Game 6 loser vs. Game 8 win-
ner, 9:30 p.m. WNBA
Sunday's games Wednesday's result
(Game 11 Game 5 winner vs. Game 9 Tulsa 82, San Antonio 79
winner, 1 p.m. Thursday's result
Game 12 Game 6 winner vs. Game 10 Indiana 79,Connecticut 65
winner, 3:30 p.m. Today'sgames
NOTE: If only one game is necessary, it will New York at Washington, 7 p.m.
be played at 7 p.m. Seattle at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
San Antonio at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Transactions Connecticut at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
T Tulsa at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
BASEBALL
American League Pro
KANSAS CITY ROYALS Reassigned
Dale Sveum as hitting coach, Pedro Grifol NHL PLAYOFFS
as catching instructor and Mike Jirschele as
CONFERENCE FINALS
third base coach.
TEXAS RANGERS Acquired INF Jason (Best-of-7;x-if necessary)
Donald from Kansas City Royals for cash EASTERN CONFERENCE
considerations. N.Y. Rangers 4, Montreal 2
National League May 17: N.Y. Rangers 7, Montreal 2
NEW YORK METS Named Wes En- May19: NY Rangers 3, Montreal 1
gram vice president, corporate partner- May22:Montreal 3,NYRangers 2,OT
ships sales and service. Sunday: NY Rangers 3, Montreal 2, OT
Frontier League Tuesday: Montreal 7, NY Rangers 4
LAKE ERIE CRUSHERS Released INF Thursday: N.Y. Rangers 1, Montreal 0
Kevin Berard. WESTERN CONFERENCE
ROCKFORD AVIATORS Sold the Los Angeles 3, Chicago 2
contract of RHP Josh Slaats to the Arizona
Diamond backs. May18: Chicago 3, Los Angeles1
BASKETBALL May 21: Los Angeles 6, Chicago 2
National Basketball Association May 24: Los Angeles 4, Chicago 3
NBA- Fined Indiana players, G Lance Monday:LosAngeles5,Chicago2
Stephenson $10,000 for his second viola- Wednesday:Chicago5,LosAngeles4,20T
tion and C Roy Hibbert $5,000 for violating Today: Chicago at Los Angeles, 9 p.m.
the league's anti-flopping rules during last x-June1: Los Angeles at Chicago,8 pm.
night's game.


PLAYOFF GLANCE

Thursday's result
N.Y. Rangers 1, Montreal 0

Today's game
Chicago at Los Angeles


solid in making 31 saves.
The Stanley Cup finals
will begin Wednesday
at either Chicago or Los
Angeles, which leads the
Western finals 3-2.
Montreal made one
final push after Tokarski
was pulled for an extra
skater with 1:53 left.
Lundqvist held off the
Canadiens as fans chant-
ed "Hen-rik! Hen-rik"
The Rangers broke
the deadlock late in the
second period after some


QUICK HITS


FLORIDA ROMPS

OVER BAYLOR IN

SOFTBALL TOURNEY

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP)
- Florida senior Hannah
Rogers is a seasoned vet
at the Women's College
World Series and pitched
like one Thursday.
Rogers, appearing
in her third WCWS,
threw a three-hitter and
fifth-seeded Florida rolled
to an 11-0, five-inning
victory over No. 13 seed
Baylor on Thursday in the
NCAA softball cham-
pionship tournament's
opening round.
Rogers (27-8) threw
her fourth shutout of the
postseason for the Gators,
who have won six of their
seven NCAA tournament
games this season by
shutout. The run-rule win
over Baylor (47-15) was
the fifth of the tourna-
ment for Florida (51-12).
Florida advanced to
play today against the
top-ranked Oregon, a 3-0
winner over Florida State.
Baylor will face Florida
State in an elimination
game Saturday.
Two errors and a passed
ball led to three unearned
runs for Florida in the
first off Whitney Canion
(31-11), who pitched the
Bears into the national
semifinals in 2011. Bailey
Castro had the big hit for
the Gators, a double that
scored Lauren Haeger
and Briana Little.
"For our team to come
out and get as many runs
as we were able to get
there early off of Whitney
Canyon, I thought that
was pretty much the goal,
to get out there and score
as many runs as we can,
because we know what
their offense can do and
has done," Florida coach
Tim Walton said.
Kirsti Merritt lined a
shot over the center field
wall to lead off the third
inning, putting Florida
up 4-0. Aubree Munro's
double to center with one
out in the fourth chased
Canyon, and Munro
later scored on a single by
Kelsey Stewart ....
Sophomore left-hander Cheridan
Hawkins threw a one-hitter and
top-seeded Oregon beat Florida
State 3-0 in the opening round of the
Women's College World Series. Alexa
Peterson had a pair of hits, including a
run-scoring double for Oregon (55-7-
1), which set a single-season program
record for wins. The Ducks advanced
to play Florida today...
Kelsey Nunley threw a one-hitter,
Lauren Cumbess homered and had an
RBI double and Kentucky won the first
Women's College World Series game in
program history, beating Louisiana-
Lafayette 4-1.


COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Big 12 commish
suggests recruiting
changes: In Irving, Texas, Big
12 Commissioner Bob Bowlsby


believes now is a good time to look
at modernizing parts of the college
recruiting model.
"We haven't looked at the
recruiting model in its entirety for


good grinding work in
the left corner by rugged
forward Derek Dorsett.
The puck came free
to defenseman Ryan
McDonagh, who sent it
behind the net to Brian
Boyle in the right corner.
Boyle spotted Moore
alone in the crease and
fed a crisp pass for a hard
shot that got through
Tokarski with 1:53 left.
Moore punctuated his
third goal of the playoffs
with an emphatic fist
pump and yell.
The Canadiens failed
on their two power plays
and finished 2 for 23 in
the series.
Tokarski kept his club
in it early in the third
when the Rangers pushed
for an insurance goal.


a very long time;"Bowlsby said at
the conference's spring meetings.
"We haven't really looked at how
we recruit (with) the changes in
technology."
The commissioner suggested
possibly using Skype or FaceTime for
initial recruiting interviews.


HORSE RACING

California Chrome visits
paddock at Belmont Park:
In NewYork, California Chrome has
visited the Belmont Park paddock
and galloped his usual two miles in
preparation for his bid to win horse
racing's first Triple Crown in 36 years.
The chestnut colt walked around
the paddock Thursday before standing
in a stall for five minutes so he can
become familiar with the spot where
he will be saddled for the Belmont
Stakes on June 7.
The Kentucky Derby and Preakness
winner is to visit the starting gate
today and complete his only timed
workout before the Belmont next
Saturday.


WOMEN'S

BASKETBALL

Fever use strong
second half to beat Sun: In
Indianapolis, Briann January scored 20
points and led a strong second half by
the Indiana Fever in a 79-65 victory
over the Connecticut Sun.
Erlana Larkins, the WNBA's leading
rebounder, added 14 points and 10
rebounds for Indiana.
The Fever (2-3) overcame slow
starts in both the first and second
quarters and rode January's intensity
on both ends of the floor in the
second half.


CYCLING

Arredondo wins 18th
Giro stage; Quintana in
lead: In Rifugio Panarotta, Italy,
Julian Arredondo claimed the biggest
win of his career with a solo victory
on the 18th stage of the Giro d'ltalia,
while Nairo Quintana retained the
overall leader's pink jersey as the race
returned to the mountains.
The 25-year-old Arredondo
had been part of a breakaway and
made his move with just under four
kilometers (2.5 miles) remaining to
ride alone up the summit finish to
Rifugio Panarotta.
The Colombian had time to raise
one arm into the air as he crossed the
finish line, 17 seconds ahead of Fabio
Duarte.


SOCCER

3 stadiums worry FIFA
after final inspections:
FIFA Secretary General Jerome Valcke
expressed his concern about three
of the 12 World Cup stadiums as he
ended his final inspection of host
cities on Thursday.
After a two-week trip across Brazil
for a last check on preparations, Valcke
sent warnings to organizers in Natal,
Porto Alegre and Sao Paulo, which will
host the World Cup's opening match in
two weeks. ....
U.S. captain Clint Dempsey's sore
left groin has improved and coach
Jurgen Klinsmann plans to start him
in the Americans'second World Cup
warmup match this weekend against
Turkey....
Ireland coach Martin O'Neill said
his assistant Roy Keane has held
talks with Celtic over the Scottish
champion's managerial vacancy. The
42-year-old Keane briefly played for
the Glasgow club at the end of his
career, which the midfielder mostly
spent at Manchester United.






~Page6 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014


* NBA NOTEBOOK



Sterlings



agree to sell



for $2 billion


By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES -
Shelly Sterling reached
an agreement Thursday
night to sell the Los
Angeles Clippers to for-
mer Microsoft CEO Steve
Ballmer for $2 billion in
what would be a record
deal if approved by the
NBA, according to an in-
dividual with knowledge
of the negotiations.
The individual, who
wasn't authorized to
speak publicly, told The
Associated Press that
Ballmer and the Sterling
Family Trust now have a
binding agreement. The
deal must be presented
to the NBA.
Shelly Sterling ne-
gotiated the sale after
her husband, Donald
Sterling, made racist
remarks that were made
public. The remarks
included Sterling telling
girlfriend V. Stiviano
not to bring blacks to
Clippers games, spe-
cifically mentioning
Hall of Famer Magic
Johnson. Donald Sterling
must also approve the
final agreement as a 50
percent owner.
Ballmer beat out bids
by Guggenheim Partners
and a group including
former NBA All-Star
Grant Hill after present-
ing an "all-around superi-
or bid," the individual
said. Ballmer made
more than an hour-long
personal visit to Shelly
Sterling's Malibu home
Sunday and laid out his
plan.

NBA expands games to
Mexico, London: The NBA
will play regular-season games in
Mexico City and London as part of its
extended global schedule for next
season. Houston and Minnesota will
play at the Mexico City Arena on Nov.
12. Milwaukee will face the NewYork
Knicks atThe 02 on Jan. 15.


PLAYOFF GLANCE
Thursday's result
Okla. City at San Antonio, late
Today's game
Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m.
Saturday's game
San Antonio at Oklahoma City,
8:30 p.m.
For series glance, see
Scoreboard, Page 5

76ers plan a New
Jersey practice space:
The Philadelphia Inquirer, citing a
government source, reported that the
Philadelphia 76ers are close to a deal
to build a new practice facility and
executive offices on the waterfront
of struggling Camden, New Jersey.
The official spoke on the condition of
anonymity because the negotiations
are ongoing. The team now rents
practice space in Philadelphia.
Warriors star speaks of
coaching change: Golden
State Warriors point guard Stephen
Curry received the NBA's community
assist award, spoke passionately about
his charitable works, then dished out
another assist to his former coach.
In his first public comments since
Mark Jackson was fired, Curry said
he disagreed with the decision. Curry
said the "semi-quick hire"of Steve Kerr
was "kind of a shock"to most players,
calling it"a weird, expedited situation
that we didn't see coming"
Around the league:
Cleveland interviewed Los Angeles
Clippers assistant Tyronn Lue on
Thursday and is scheduled to inter-
view Clippers assistant Alvin Gentry
today for their coaching job. Lue spent
the past four seasons working under
Doc Rivers in Boston and Los Angeles.
He played 11 seasons for seven teams,
including Orlando....
Indiana's Lance Stephenson and
Roy Hibbert were fined for flopping
in Game 5 of the Eastern Conference
finals. Stephenson was fined $10,000
for his second violation. Hibbert was
fined $5,000....
Minnesota GM Milt Newton said
the team does not feel rushed to
replace retired coach Rick Adelman,
and trade talks haven't heated up
regarding star forward Kevin Love.


FREE PUNT, PASS, & KICK CAMP MAY 31
10:00 2:00PM Registration: 8:O0AM
REGISTRATION FOR FALL FOOTBALL: MAY 31 AND JUNE 16
SPEED CAMP JUNE 14-JULY 16
Cheer And Non Contact Drills
And Conditioning
Registration: 8:00AM The New Standard
CAMP HOURS: 10-12PM DAILY -'1 ilayerSafety
For Further information contact President Shea Davis: 941-661-9368
%E* Website: portcharlottebandits.com
UNLIMITED WEIGHT POP WARNER PC BANDIT TEAM: Ages 12-14
HEAD COACH: ANTHONY HARGROVE
F Franz Ross Park "Bandit Field"


AP PHOTC
Indiana guard Lance Stephenson joins a huddle as Miami coach
Erik Spoelstra talks to Mario Chalmers, left and Norris Cole (30)
during the second half of Game 5 Wednesday in Indianapolis.


HEAT
FROM PAGE 1
it all to tomorrow. There
were some things we
wanted to go over, and
for time's sake, splitting
it up was a little bit more
efficient."
The Heat still lead the
series 3-2, and get the
chance to close the Pacers
out for the third consec-
utive year tonight. The
game is in Miami, where
the Heat have won their AP PHOTC
last 10 playoff contests.
Predictably, the talk Miami coach Erik Spoelstra
on the off day wasn't so said there was enough for
much about Paul George the team to work on to merit
scoring 39 points to lead practicing Thursday and today
his team to a season-sav- ahead of Game 6.
ing win, or even how about the excitable Pacer
James was held to seven
Jame washeldto sven guard's attempts to throw
points on a night that he guar' attets totho
was rendered silent for Miami offaits game
long stretches because of "Very bizarre game,"
foul trouble. Heat guard Dwyane Wade
said. "Weird game. But it's
Instead, the buzz was
almost entirely about over.
Stephenson, who has Indiana coach Frank
simultaneously become Vogel didn't seem to mind
Heat frustration and the huddle move, though
aIHatrstrationansuggested the ear-blowing
Internet sensation. dcso a i uh
Images of his already-in- decision was a bit much.
famous ear-blowing stunt "People are in my
were widely distributed huddle all the time. Every
on social media moments player in the NBA does
after it occurred in Game that. That's nothing,"
5, and he didn't back Vogel said. "Blowing in his
down Thursday when face probably crosses the
asked about his desire to line. That's not really who
pester the Heat. we are. We want to be a
"Just playing ball, man, competitive team, but we
having fun and enjoying don't want to cross the
the moment," Stephenson line."
said. Almost everything went
Spoelstra didn't react wrong for Miami, and the
when Stephenson who Heat nearly won.
said James was showing James shot just 2 for
signs of "weakness" earli- 10in 24 minutes, and
er in the series crashed got his fifth foul with 81/2
the Heat huddle. Much minutes left in the third
like his players, Spoelstra quarter, with the Heat
didn't bite when asked leading by eight. Miami


went scoreless on nine
of its first 12 possessions
after James checked out
and the Pacers used that
stretch to build a five-
point lead, the margin
eventually reaching seven
when George connected
on a 3-pointer at the
third-quarter buzzer.
Down by as many as 11
in the fourth, Miami had a
chance to take the lead in
the final seconds.


SEC
FROM PAGE 1
powerhouse has been
far from a hardwood
heavyweight even with
Kentucky and Florida ad-
vancing to this year's Final
Four. The league ranked
seventh in conference
RPI last season, received
three berths in the NCAA
tournament and had two
coaches at high-profile
places leave.
Missouri's Frank Haith
bolted for Tulsa, and
Tennessee's Cuonzo
Martin jumped to Cal.
Those moves did little
to change the SEC's
reputation as a mostly
football-first conference.
Coaches and admin-
istrators are looking for
solutions that would
ultimately land teams in
the NCAA tournament.
"This is as focused as
I've seen this league and
these coaches and the
programs and the ADs in
how do we move this ball
forward," Kentucky coach
John Calipari said. "We
had three teams in the
Elite Eight, two teams in
the Final Four, a team in
the national champion-
ship game and still ... Our
goal is let's get half of our
teams in within the next
three years and two of
us playing for a national
championship."
That's fairly ambitious
for a league that has
gotten five teams in the
NCAA tournament just
once in the last five years.
Better nonconference
schedules could help. The
league hired former NCAA
tournament guru Greg
Shaheen as a scheduling



BULLDOGS

FROM PAGE 1
revealing.
"It's a great unknown,"
Egloff said. "I think the
kids have done a nice job.
We've got low numbers,
but I think the kids have
done a nice job of prac-
ticing against each other.
But you just don't know
what you're going against
and how good they are."
Numbers have been a
legitimate concern to the
Bulldogs, who sometimes
had 20 players in pads for
spring practices not
enough for full 11-on-IlI
drills.
But Egloff was philo-
sophical about that.
"It is (a concern)," he
admitted. "I try to get
kids out here, but, if they
don't want to, they don't
want to. It's not playing
golf or playing tennis.
No offense to those
sports, but you can feel
pretty awful after a game,
getting hit around a little
bit."
Numbers weren't the
only issue for DeSoto
County, which is coming
off a 2-8 season. The


consultant last year.
Shaheen made his
second consecutive trip to
the annual SEC meetings
this week, giving detailed
presentations to coaches
and athletic directors. It's
essentially scheduling
analytics, which show
coaches that who they
play in November and
December affects every-
one they play- fellow
SEC teams in January
and February.
The SEC also started
approving non-confer-
ence schedules.
But the league is
going a step further this
year, mandating three
permanent, home-
and-home opponents
on everyone's 18-game
conference schedule.
And Commissioner Mike
Slive plans on pitting
the best against the best,
essentially strengthening
schedules across the
board for the top half of
the league while weaken-
ing the others.
"If every program just
took the bottom-feeder
off its schedule -just
one then we go from
seventh in RPI to second,"
Pearl said. "What's best
for the league is what's
best for the upper half of
the league. Let's look at
the best playing against
the best because that's
what fans want, that's
what television wants and
that ultimately going to
get us more teams in the
tournament."
The SEC Network,
which is scheduled to
launch in August, could
create more basketball
awareness of the league
in a football-dominated
region as well as other
parts of the nation.


Bulldogs are attempting
to replace skill players
such as quarterback Kari
Williams and running
back Terrell Gordon.
Luckily, Egloff feels
pretty good about Tony
Lee and Tajahs Jackson at
quarterback and running
back, respectively. So
far, Lee has looked the
part at quarterback- he
spent most of his time
on offense last year at
receiver.
"He's got a knack of
the reads," Egloff said of
Lee. "Sometimes, that's
hard to teach there is
a lot of things that make
it hard. And he just has
a natural ability to see it.
But it will be a lot faster
on Friday."
Egloff's hopes for
tonight are simple: Just
do enough good things to
show the spring has been
productive and leave
Boca Ciega with no major
injuries.
Jackson can't wait.
"I'm just looking for my
team to come hout and
show what we learned
and put it on the field,"
he said.
Contort Rob Shore at 941-206-1174
or shore@sun-heraldxom


Shop Chadotte

Where Shopping Makes Cents
charlottecou ntycham ber.org


-Page 6 SP


www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Friday, May 30, 2014


u.








:PORT CHARLOT-E


Friday, May 30, 2014 A weekly section of the Sun


Nicole Noles
EDITOR'S CORNER
nnoles@sun-herald.com





Port Charlotte

shows its spirit with

Memorial Day events
Sunday was a busy day all
around town, and it wasn't just
about picnics. Several organiza-
tions held ceremonies honoring soldiers
who gave their lives to protect us.
In this week's Port Charlotte Herald,
you can read about Port Charlotte
High School's Junior Navy ROTC
cadets who volunteered to prepare
the grounds of Restlawn Memorial
Gardens for its Monday ceremony. You
can also see pictures from the Douglas
T. Jacobson State Veterans Home event
on page 6 and the American Legion's
event on page 8. Additionally, Tidewell
partnered with Royal Palm Retirement
Center to honor living veterans with a
pinning ceremony earlier this month.
You can see those pictures on page 8.
These pages are a small represen-
tation of the honor our local veterans
deserve. Thank you for protecting us.


Remembering the fallen


Pirate ROTC cadets prepare Restlawn


PHOTO PROVIDED


Cadet Mabry honors one of her dear friends from the Douglas T. Jacobson Veterans Nursing
Home who is buried at Restlawn Memorial Gardens on Forrest Nelson Boulevard. Port Charlotte
High School Junior Navy ROTC cadets spent the Friday before Memorial Day preparing the
grounds for Monday's ceremony.


COMMUNITY NEWS


Local League of Women Voters

recognized for membership growth


PHOTO PROVIDED
From left, 2011-2013 local president Ingrid Jiminez sits with Jean
Finks, current president of the League of Women Voters of Charlotte
County. The local branch increased their membership by more than
21 percent this year. For more information, visit Iwvccfl.org.


PROVIDED BY THE
LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS
OF CHARLOTTE COUNTY

The Charlotte County chap-
ter of the League of Women
Voters was recently recognized
by the League of Women
Voters of the United States
(LWVUS) for significant growth
in membership and continued
commitment to their com-
munity and the mission of the
League of Women Voters.
"We are very proud to have
our efforts acknowledged,"
said new local league presi-
dent Jean M. Finks. "Our mem-
bers are committed to making
our community stronger and


more vibrant. Quite simply, we
want Charlotte County to be
the best it can be."
The League of Women
Voters, a nonpartisan political
organization, encourages the
informed and active participa-
tion of citizens in government,
works to increase understand-
ing of major public policy
issues, and influences public
policy through education
and advocacy. Membership is
open to men and women of
all ages. With more than 94
years experience and almost
800 state and local affiliates,
the League is typically regard-
ed as one of America's most
LEAGUE17


Memorial Gardens

By SAMANTHA MABRY and TYLER MOORE
ROTC MEDIA LIAISONS

Last Friday, the Port Charlotte High
School's Navy Junior ROTC arrived at
the Restlawn Memorial Gardens to show
their appreciation for the veterans who
served our country. For Memorial Day,
being only a couple of days away, cadets
decided to give a helping hand to the
cemetery by planting American flags
in front of the soldier's graves. As they
planted the flag, cadets thanked the
veterans for their service, knelt down
to place the flag neatly, and stood up
straight and tall, just like the soldiers
once did.
The event was held at 1400 and ended
at 1545. Florida's blazing sun beat down
on the dedicated Pirates out in the heat,
but they kept going in order to show
their respect toward every fallen hero.
The Executive Officer, Lukas Philips,
watched vigorously to ensure that none
of the American flags came close to
touching the ground. The VFW Post 5690
rewarded the Pirates with chilly bottles
of water and smiling faces. Some Cadets
shared stories about their past family
REMEMBERING 17



Robert Nelson
BIZ BITS
pcbizbits@yahoo.com





Annual Peace River

Clean up June 7-8

at Nav-A-Gator Grill
id you know National Marina
Day is June 14? Nav-A-Gator
Grill & Marina will be cele-
brating National Marina Day for a full
week starting on June 7. It starts at
their annual Peace River Clean-Up on
June 7 and 8. Clubs, organizations and
individuals are welcome to help clean,
which starts at 9 a.m. on both days.
There will also be live music on both
BIZ BITS 16


Acreitd ace Poga-( o C )Crtfid6.neSugey yJontCo ms sion
Accredilt ebld PriySoke Centr bylJintl Commiso eslopiaJy lrdaWel
*ol I -: I id.rltI 6 5c' I 5[] i 5o* 6,eii
-. .6t :* "." :" : .",-


IARF Acre I SF tt [un )e ,HoptI 5l BstERby 6ChrltteSu I


RESTAURANT
Good Fri en ds, Good Food, Good Times
Reservations recommended.




Hors 'd oe res
Live Music ,-
hy
Tim Goodman &
Roseanne Linders
1975 Tamiami Trail, Punta Gorda __._
941-575-7575 9
www.phils4l.cor 1
Mon-Thurs & Sun 11-9 Fri & Sat 11u


Ll


E


Fi





Friday May 30,2014


Leadership Charlotte graduation nears


WH A'S

INSIDE


SUNRISE KIWANIS


READ AT NEIL,

SEE PACE 4


MEMORIAL DAY


AMERICAN LEGION,

SEE PACE 9

PIRATE MEMORIES


PROM,

SEE PACE 10


It's hard to believe that the Leader-
ship Charlotte Class of 2014's gradu-
ation is less than a month away.
What a terrific year we have had, and
we have learned so much. Most import-
ant to me has been the new friendships
formed and the camaraderie amongs
us.
Well, it's almost over, and we graduate
on June 20. For those interested in
more information on the program, visit
http://charlottecountychamber.org.
Applications for the next class are now
available.

'Big' golf event unites
mentors with kids
A meet-and-greet golf outing for Big
Brothers Big Sisters of the Sun Coast
will take place May 31 at the Blue Heron
Pines Golf Course Community, 29200
Jones Loop Road, Punta Gorda. The
event, called "Golf Buddy Fore a Day," is
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., and it will provide
adults with the opportunity to be paired
with a child for a day of fun.
The event is free, and participants will

I COMMUNITY CALENDAR

Email your calendar items to
nnoles88@gmail.com. Please follow the
format you see in the listings: Event,
time, place, address, description, cost
and contact information.

* MAY EVENTS
Mark Preuss will exhibit his artwork
at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship,
1532 Forrest Nelson, Port Charlotte
through June 15. Preuss, born in
Germany, studied architectural design
and worked for many years creating
art for videos, films, and off-Broadway
theater in New York City. In the 1990s,
Preuss began showing his paintings of
abstract nudes, winning awards in New
York, Germany and Southwest Florida.
He currently has a studio at the Punta
Gorda Artisans Atelier on W Olympia
Avenue where his large, brushy, colorful
work is created and displayed. For more
information, call 941-627-4303.

* FRIDAY, MAY 30
Bingo, 11:45 a.m., Cultural Center of
Charlotte County, 2280 Aaron St., Port
Charlotte.
Stroke Support Group, I p.m. to 2 p.m.,
Executive Dining Room, Fawcett
Memorial Hospital, 21298 Olean Blvd.
Mahjong, 1 p.m., Cultural Center of
Charlotte County, 2280 Aaron St., Port
Charlotte.
Chess, 5 p.m., Cultural Center of
Charlotte County, 2280 Aaron St., Port
Charlotte.
Euchre and bridge, 6 p.m., Cultural
Center of Charlotte County, 2280 Aaron
St., Port Charlotte.
Friday Night dance, 7 p.m., Cultural
Center of Charlotte County, 2280 Aaron
St., Port Charlotte.

* SATURDAY, MAY 31
Help the Stone Crabs Strike Out
Lung Cancer, game at 6 p.m., fireworks
at 10 p.m., Charlotte Sports Park, 2300
El Jobean Road, Port Charlotte. Portion
of the ticket sales will be donated to
the Lung Cancer Research Council, the
local Florida organization that raises
funds to increase public awareness and
understanding about lung cancer and
supports programs for early detection
and screening.


Leslee Peth

@MMI &m~ ~~


Leslee Peth is the publisher of the
Port Charlotte Herald. Contact her
at lpeth@sun-herald.com.
not be obligated to become a mentor in
the program.
For more details, call Melissa Nelson
at 941-764-5812.

Honoring a longtime
community member
A tribute in honor of Kathy Hollinger-
Strayton is set to take place at 5 p.m.
on June 1 at the Cultural Center of
Charlotte County, 2280 Aaron St., Port
Charlotte. Hollinger-Strayton has been
an important fixture in this community
for several decades, and she worked
with the Charlotte Sun in many differ-
ent capacities for 19 years.
Hollinger-Strayton has continued to
serve the community with countless


* TUESDAY, JUNE 3
Master Gardener Clinic, 11 a.m., first
Tuesday of the month, Port Charlotte
Library, 2280 Aaron St., Port Charlotte.
Located between the library and the
used book store.
Free Braille class, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.,
Visually Impaired Persons of Charlotte
County, 3459 Depew Avenue, Port
Charlotte. Course instructor Wendy
Sue Olson, a Certified Orientation and
Mobility Specialist and teacher for blind
and visually impaired. Olson holds a
Master's Degree in Special Education
with emphasis on rehabilitation teach-
ing for the blind and visually impaired.
Free. RSVP by calling 941-625-8501, or
visit the website at vipofcc.com.


hours of her time and generosity.
If you can help pay tribute, that
would be terrific. If not, be sure to
congratulate her if you see her out and
about.
Visit www.theculturalcenter.com or
call 941-625-4175, ext. 240, for tickets
and more information.

Corks 'n' Canvas
events draw crowds
The Corks 'n' Canvas events booked
by the Punta Gorda Chamber of
Commerce have been very popular
this year. On May 22, participants
gathered at the Charlotte Community
Foundation's new home, located at 227
Sullivan St., Punta Gorda, where we all
painted beautiful tropical fish acrylics
on canvas.
If you have ever wanted to try your
hand at painting or just want to have
an enjoyable evening out this is a
terrific event to attend.
The next event is slated for July 24.
Call the Punta Gorda Chamber of
Commerce at 941-639-3720 for details.


* WEDNESDAY, JUNE 4
Free Blood Pressure Clinic, 9 a.m.
to 11 a.m., music room of the Charlotte
County Cultural Center, 2280 Aaron St.,
Port Charlotte. Dr. Don Delahaye and
registered nurses provide care. Sponsored
by the Port Charlotte Kiwanis Club.
"A Tribute to Barbara;' honoring
BarbaraT. Scott, Cultural Center's
Conference Center, 2280 Aaron St., Port
Charlotte. Reception and silent auction
at 5 p.m., dinner at 6 p.m. Surf-and-turf
dinner, cash bar, auction and music by
Al Holland. Event honors her many years
of leadership and service. Tickets are
$60; call 941-258-2080, 941-257-4826,
email president(Occrcfl.org or visit www.
ccflrc.org.


PORT CHARLOTTE HERALD fMEMBER of the Audit Bureau of Circulation. USPS 74317O The Sun is published daily by Sun Coast Media Group,lInc., 23170
Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980-2198.
Derek Dunn-Rankin CEO & Chairman ........... 941-206-1001 ADVERTISING
David Dunn-Rankin President/Sun Publisher.941-206-1003 Leslee Peth, Advertising Director, PCH Publisher...................941-205-6400
Chris Porter Executive Editor ............ 941-206-1134 Bob White, Retail Advertising Manager....................... 941-258-9521
NEW SPAPERS Rusty Pray Charlotte Editor ............ 941-206-1168 Patricia Compton, Advertising Account Executive........941-258-9524
Charlotte DeSoto Englewood North Port Venice Nicole Noles PCH Editor, Designer ........ 941-258-9529 Tanyah Lockett, Advertising Account Executive.........941-258-9526
Email: nnoles88@gmail.com Darcy Woods, Advertising Account Executive..................... 941-258-9525
23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980. 206-1000 MarkYero, Circulation Director.............................. 941-206-1317


AWL PETS OF THE WEEK


PHOTO PROVIDED


Tommy and Charlie are 9-year-old, front declawed brothers that came to the shelter
together after their owner passed away unexpectedly. They would like to find a forever
home together. All animals are spayed or neutered and are current with their shots prior to
adoption, except for rabies. The Animal Welfare league is open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven
days a week. To view adoptable pets, visit www.awlshelter.org.


SHerdld Page 2




:Friday May 30, 2014 Herald PdgeS






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Friday, May30, 2014


K0et
iwanis read to students at Neill Armstrong


HERALD PHOTOS BY
NICOLE NOLES


RIGHT: Connie Thrasher
and Rae Hockenberry
from the Sunrise
Kiwanis hand out
free copies of"Kung
Pow Chicken: Let's
Get Cracking" in Jill
Mitchell's second-grade
class at Neil Armstrong
Elementary School on
April 29. The Kiwanis
read to the class each
month and gave each
student a new book
to keep. To donate to
the reading program,
call Connie Thrasher at
941-625-1858.


0


Students from Jill Mitchell's second-grade class read copies of thier book"Kung Pow Chicken;'
which were purchased and donated by the Sunrise Kiwanis of Port Charlotte.


From left, Aiden Hanlan-Cook, Taylor Temple, Kendra Tournear, Michale Desrosier and Dameyon
Bloomfield look at their copies of"Kung Pow Chicken: Let's Get Cracking" in Jill Mitchell's second-
grade class at Neil Armstrong Elementary School on April 29.


Connie Thrasher reads while Kelli Geddeis
(left) waits her turn to read and second-grade
teacher Jill Mitchell (right), listens.


Kelli Geddeis takes her turn reading while
Connie Thrasher and Rae Hockenberry listen.


ULY16-18 9AM-1PM 4


.3 days of instrucion and interaction
with Stone Crabs players and coaches
* FREE lunch each day
.2 FREE tickets to a Stone Crabsgame on
Friday, July 18th


IN CHARLOTTE COUNTY


Swim & Sports
Alpine Climbing Tower
Kayaking & Archery
Team Building
Arts & Crafts
Marine Life classes with Mote Marine


* Pre-game parade to honorall campers
Player autograph session after each camp
ssion
* On-field group photo plus individual
camper photo


IN THE
MEADOW
EZRA JACK KEATS
a -


FtA HE
vlAI0


The Greatest Summer Camp on Earth!
At Elite Fine Arts Academy!
Come learn to fly! Trapeze, Slackline, Lira, Spanish Web, Fabric,
Musical Theater, Acrobatics, Act Building, Fun, Fun and More Fun!
.. ...-... Field trip to Ringling! (ticket extra)


When: July 7-25 9AM-3:3UPM
8:30AM DROPOFF!
Where: 17960 Toledo Blade Blvd.,
Port Charlotte, FL 33948
941.235.1441
Who: boys and girls ages 6-15
Price: $380 for 3 weeks. $275 for 2 weeks


IF 61t I I I Ikw wo


Gr' e


hirs r


SI


SHerald Page 4





Friday Maym3 Ba20ePg


THEME CROSSWORD


SENSATIONAL!


By James Barrick


ACROSS
1 .Old measures of
length
5. Los -
10. Beat it!
15. Creme caramel
19.Seem imminent
20.A Founding
Father
21. Excuse
22. Corporate device
23. Like the
Fantastic Four
25. Runway VIP
27. City in Australia


28. "We're off -
the wizard..."
30. Texas city
31.Neap -
32. Covered with
frost
33. Inexperienced
35. Leases anagram
38. Windsock shape
39. Hat
43. Aspersions
44. Oversight
48. Cable network
49. Inside info
50. Falsehoods in
print


51 .Quechuan
52. Inbox junk
53. Arden or Queler
54. Bundled
55. Gannet
56. War action
57. Increased a bet,
again
59. Racer
60. Made imperfect
61. Part of CPI
62. Earn
63. Inventor of
dynamite
64. Cater (with "to")


66. Flaxen fabric
67. Woo with song
70. Fretted
instruments
71. Frog
72. flare
73. Playing marble
74. A son of Zeus
75. Liguria's capital
76. To any extent:
2 wds.
77. Charter
78. Bronze
79. Beyond the
moon


81. Pack rat
82. Senior citizen
84. Droops
85. Tatters
86. Mystical card
88. Earnhardt or
Carnegie
89. Check
90. Bone collagen
93. Enlighten
95. Make plain:
2 wds.
99. Like some
aircraft
101. Bet at the track


103. Seed cover
104. Notched, as a
leaf
105. Pointless
106. Twinkler
107. Soaks, as flax
108. Northerners
109.- voce
110. Area of London
or New York


DOWN
1. Disney's
Snow Queen
2. Gaudy
3.Run
4. Industrial plants
5. Insects
6.Summa cum -
7. Duration
8. Out limb
9. Lookout man
10. Brash
11. Murder-mystery
game
12. Mellow
13. Honest-


14. Vegetable pear
15. Corollet
16. Ore deposit
17. Like some beef
18.- contendere
24. Tracks
26. Expert
29. Old Hebrew
measure
32. Lassoed
34. Chinese, e.g.
35. Lab compound
36.- and kicking
37. Oversee
38. Cut into pieces
40. Extremely good


41. Kind of orange
42. Specified
44. Coffeemaker
name
45. Kit
46. Puget Sound,
e.g.
47. Disfigure
50. Light-show
device
52. Enchantress
54. Waits for
55. Fathered
56. Cossack's
weapon
58. Mint candy brand


59. Underling
60. Upright
62. Secondary field
of study
63. Nice- -
64. Pupil of Socrates
65. Pertaining to
hearing
66. Seaway
67. Goes aloft
68. Was adequately
bold
69. Pitchers
71. Duplicate, for
short
72. Station


75. Breed of cattle
76. Dissection
77. Like a placebo
79. Step
80. Serv. branch
81. Mantelpiece
83. Hardens
85. Start for phonic
87. Part for a mortise
88. Chops
89. Exhausted
90. Eskers
91. Confident
92. Rod for roasting
94. Platter
95. Petty quarrel


96. Number prefix
97. The Beehive
State
98. Cocoyam
100. pro nobis
102. Numero -


Answers on page 15.


2014 United Feature Syndicate, Dist. by Universal Uclick


Charlotte Players offering summer drama
Charlotte Players are offering three two-week summer drama
workshops beginning June 9. They will be held at the Charlotte
Performing Art Center (CPAC) in Punta Gorda Monday through
Friday from June 9 through June 21.
Students in first and second grades (Dolly's Kids) will be
performing "Over the Meadow." Children in grades third through
sixth (Stars) will be performing the musical, "On the Radio." Older
students in grades seventh through 12th (Thespians) will be
performing the award-winning Broadway musical, "Hairspray, Jr."
Participants will have hands-on experience in all facets of a
theatrical production. Performances of all three productions will be
in the Charlotte Performing Arts Center on Friday, June 20 at 7 p.m.
and Saturday, June 21 at 2 p.m. Performances are open to the
public. Students may register by calling the Charlotte Players office
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday at 941-255-1022.
Workshop fees are $185 before June 2. After June 2, registration
will be $210. There is a $25 discount for each additional child per
family. For more information, call 941-255-1022.

YMCA Summer Camp registration open
The Charlotte County Family YMCA is taking registrations for
all of the YMCA's 2014 Summer Camp Programs. The summer
camp programs being offered in 2014 are:
Camp Dotzler, formally Character Camp by the Bay, located
at 22801 Bayshore Drive, Port Charlotte with parent drop off
locations in Port Charlotte and Punta Gorda. Camp is for chil-
dren who have completed grades K through 10th. Swimming,
kayaking and alpine tower climbing available. Lunch and snack
provided. Call 941-627-2220.
Kiddie Kollege for children who completed VPK and are
entering kindergarten. Camp will help your child be ready
for kindergarten with letter recognition, number recognition,
phonological awareness and basic math skills while having fun
swimming and going on field trips. Locations: Edgewater CDC,
Glass Lane, Port Charlotte (941-629-2220) and Franz Ross Park
YMCA, Quesada Avenue, Port Charlotte, (941-629-9622).


Herdld Pdge 5





Herald Page 6


Fallen warriors honored on Memorial Day


HERALD PHOTOS BY NICOLE NOLES


From left, Joseph Plas shakes hands with Gary Martinez from
the Patriot Riders of America Monday before the Memorial Day
ceremony at the Douglas T. Jacobson State Veterans Home in
Port Charlotte. "Every weekend we come here to play bingo"
Martinez said. "They bless us more than we bless them:'


Lt. Col. Henry Gillespie, U.S. Army ret., who is the Executive
Director at Consulate Health Care, was the keynote speaker
for Monday's Memorial Day ceremony.


Gregory Bevins, vice president of the Douglas
T. Jacobson Residents Fund, plays taps to close
the Memorial Day ceremony Monday.


From left, Gary Martinez, Phil Pauley and Connie Huffman from the Patriot Riders
of America preprare to present colors Monday before the Memorial Day ceremony at
the Douglas T. Jacobson State Veterans Home in Port Charlotte.


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BIZ BITS: Nav-A-Gator to celebrate National Marina Day
FROM PAGE 1 May 9, 1989, and were located in the the next generation of golfers.
Sunny Dell Plaza. After having a few The PGA sports academy was started
days at the Child Hut from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. different locations in different parts of in 2012 and has over 100 sites across
During the week, Nav-A-Gator will have town, Jeff's Auto Sales has been at its the country. They will be adding 25
daily drink and food specials, half-price current location of 540 Tamiami Trail, clubs in 2014 and hope to expand to
boat rides as well as canoe and kayak rental Port Charlotte, since 2007. For more 150 Boys & Girls clubs within the next
specials. Nav-A-Gators is located at information, visit their website at www. three years. For more information, visit
9700 SW Riverview Circle, Arcadia. jeffsautosales.net or call 941-629-1888. www.bgcofcc.org or call 941-979-5463.
Nav-A-Gators Grill & Marina will
close out the week-long event on June Boys and Girls Club Golf Friendly Floors wins three
14, National Marina Day, with live to start youth golf program awards from Angie's List
music by Kid Conch. For more infor-
mation on the different events that will The PGA of America and the United Local flooring specialist Friendly
be going on all week, call 941-627-3474 States Golf Association will be launch- Floors has won three super-service
or visit nav-a-gator.com. ing their golf program for youth at the awards from Angie's List recently.
Boys & Girls clubs of Charlotte County You can find Friendly Floors at
Jeff's Auto Sales celebrates soon. The first session will start on 3785 Tamiami Trail in Port Charlotte.
25th anniversary June 9 and run until June 23. The sec- They are open from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
ond session will run from July 7 until Monday through Friday and from
This year marks Jeff's Auto Sales July 21. The program helps youth with 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturdays. For more
25th year in business. Jeff and Fay the promotion of character and healthy information, call 941-624-0077 or visit
Roughton started the business on lifestyles while helping them become www.friendlyfloors.com.


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Friday May3 0,2014Hrad Pg1


PHOTOS PROVIDED
Pirate Navy Junior ROTC cadets helped prepare the grounds of Restlawn Memorial Gardens for
Monday's Memorial Day Ceremony held by VFW Post 5690.


REMEMBERING: Cadets honor the fallen


FROM PAGE 1
members who served this country.
As the Commanding Officer, Brianna
Spieldenner, and the Executive Officer,
Lukas Phillips, walked around the
cemetery, checking on cadets and their
progress, they noticed the cadets were
walking around the graves respectfully,
and really taking honor in what they


were doing for these noble men and
women.
The Port Charlotte High School Navy
Junior ROTC outdid themselves again,
with the work of their outstanding
cadets.
It is a great pleasure to see the youth
of today honoring those who made it
possible for them to do such an event
today. Ooorahhh, Pirates!


Cadet Clemente holds a flag, while Cadet Perry digs a hole and Cadet Mabry holds the rest of
the flags while tending to grave markers at Restlawn Memorial Gardens last Friday. Pirate Navy
Junior ROTC cadets helped prepare the grounds for Monday's Memorial Day ceremony.


LEAGUE: Local chapter thriving


FROM PAGE 1

trusted organizations.
In the past year, the League's mem-
bership has grown by more than 21 per-
cent. Interest in the League has grown
because of recent efforts, including
talks at many locations to educate on
the contents of the Affordable Care Act,
and in support of a Florida land and
water preservation amendment, as well
as a Law Day event with local judge
George C. Richards, who spoke on the
Americans with Disabilities Act and its
effect on his own life.
"We are thrilled to see that League
of Women Voters of Charlotte County
is thriving and committed to serving
the Southwest Florida community,"
said national president Elisabeth


MacNamara. "The League is a true
grassroots organization. Without strong
and devoted Leagues like the Charlotte
County chapter helping to make democ-
racy work in communities across the
country, we would not have been able
to accomplish all that we have over the
last 94 years, nor would we be able to
continue our mission for years to come."
"While we appreciate the recognition,
the greatest reward that we could get is
seeing more members of our commu-
nity active and involved in the issues
that are critical to all of us. The more
individuals who join the League and
are part of that, the better it is for all
of us," said 2011-2013 local president
Ingrid Jiminez. "We welcome everyone
to visit our website, lwvccfl.org, to learn
more."


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Friddv, Mdy 3 0,2014HeldPg9


American Legion holds Memorial Day ceremony


HERALD PHOTOS BY BETSY WILLIAMS Saluting or hands over heart for the
Brenda Dorsett sang the national anthem for the Memorial Day service at the American Legion Pledge of Allegiance, the packed
Post 110, where veterans were honoring veterans. Post Commander Mike Raymond and Post American Legion Post 110 ballroom
Chaplain Tim Coady oversaw the ceremony that was open to both members and the community, was filled to capacity for the Memo-
with a luncheon following in the ballroom. rial Day service Monday afternoon.


Legion Riders like Marianne and Steve Goldman as well as
anyone in the community were invited to the service held
Monday afternoon.


Soon to turn 98, Peter Athanasas, who served
with the U.S. Coast Guard during WWII, stood
with the help of his daughter Janelle Athens for
the presentation of colors by the American Legion
Post 110 Color Guard.


Twelve-year-old Port Charlotte Middle School student Clayton Wyant attended
the Memorial Day service with his grandmother, Linda Franco. Part of the service
honored those members of the Post who passed away this year- close to 40.
Members of the Port Charlotte Unit 110 Auxiliary brought up a poppy for each of
their lost members.


lw WWI



e

1111I


Outside the American Legion ballroom, the Post 110 Honor Guard fired their rifles
three times for the traditional rifle salute followed by taps being played by Pat
MacDonald.


Playing "Amazing Grace;' bagpiper Tom Larkin ended the
Memorial Day ceremony at the Port Charlotte American
Legion Post 110.


Ken Donihue, U.S. Army veteran who served in
Vietnam, stood at full attention saluting through
the Rifle Salute and until after taps was played.


RIGHT: "God Bless Americawas the
message 8-year-old Crystal Walker
wanted to share to make sure
everyone know how she felt. She was
attending the American Legion Memo-
rial Day ceremony with her grand-
mother at Post 110 in Port Charlotte.


Herdld Pdge 9





Herald Page 10


PCHS students dance the night away


HERALD PHOTOS BY BETSY WILLIAMS
Brandon Jean, Kayla Fletcher, Alyssa Karr, and Janai Dones pose for pre-prom photos at Gilchrist Park.


Junior court for Port Charlotte High School's Prom included Jacob Smarjesse, Haley Dionisio,
Matias Robles, Blayne Selley, Suhail Tabri and Chloe Pappas.


Gathering for pre-prom photos at Gilchrist Park has become a tradition for students and families.


Innocence is precious. Unfortunately, ignorance can destroy it in a heartbeat.
The secondhand smoke from your cigarettes or cigars can cause asthma,
respiratory infections or worse. To save your children and yourself from
the dangers of tobacco, contact Tobacco Free Florida for free counseling,
information and more today.

For more information, contact the Department of Health in Charlotte
County, 941-624-7279 or visit tobaccofreeflorida.com


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Friday Mdy 3 0,2014 Hrl ae1


'Fly Away With Books' at library


Port Charlotte Library held a special event for families on April 26, "Fly Away With Books;'
highlighted by a butterfly release into the new garden just outside the library's front entrance.
The free event offered crafts, games, free books and lunch for all. Here, 9-month-old Susanna
Azzarelli sits in the new butterfly garden outside the front of the library.


Juggles the Clown entertains 2-year-old Parker
Cummo and his father, Billy, with a game of toss.


A'Lanya Schenk, 3, was amazed as she opened
her blue envelope that contained a sleeping
butterfly that was released into the new
butterfly garden.


After creating a tie-dye craft, Jermainne Nikki Moll, 7, chose an Ironman book as her
Bessette, 9, sits for an arm painting by complimentary gift from the Friends of the
Stephanie Whitehead. Library, represented by Bill Cataldo.


*, Fo


Teen library volunteers Victoria Hippolyte, 16, her sister Lovelyne, 18, and Mikaila Roe, 13, spent
the morning setting up and decorating for the event.


U


. giallaill


Herdld Pdge 11





Herald Page 12


Do you remember wi


The following are excerpts from
the Daily Herald-News from May 25,
1974, through May 31, 1974:

Growth relates
to air service
Future socio-economic con-
ditions in Charlotte County will
determine the amount of benefit
the county can expect from a prob-
able Department of Transportation
revamping.
Researcher Tom Burnard asked
members of the Regional Planning
Committee, Charlotte Chamber
of Commerce and Development
Authority about the current condi-
tion of county transportation and
growth.
"Construction and tourism are
the backbone of Charlotte's econo-
my," was the general opinion.

Bicentennial event to be
held in Charlotte County
Members of the Veterans' group
Barrracks 714 and the Ladies'
Auxiliary are to be congratulated
for all the work that has gone into
gaining a bicentennial kickoff in
Charlotte County Jan. 3-5.
Working with Charlotte Chairman
Harry Nohr, these people have
planned a program including meet-
ings at the Memorial Auditorium,
a banquet, patriotic displays by
businesses, displays advertising
the event, a listing of restaurants
along U.S. 41 as well as numerous
tours for visitors who will attend the
kickoff.
It will be the first time such a
large conference will be held this far
down the west coast, and the first
time it has not been held in one of
Florida's larger cities.
Cliff Blackburn, who has been
named general chairman, states
that he and his committee are
looking to show off the real charm
and beauty of Charlotte County.

New chairman of
commission announced
Charlotte County Commission
Chairman B.C. Nuzum took over
the reins of the commission from
Chairman Ray Griffith, who stepped
down this week.
The commissioners take turns
in the chairman's chair every six
months.


Janine Smith

m-EM


Janine Smith writes about Charlotte
County's historic past. Contact her
atjaninehs 1@comcast.net.

Ground broken
on hospital wing
Sister Mary Augustine, the admin-
istrator at St. Joseph Hospital, and the
Rev. Charles B. McLaughlin, bishop of
St. Petersburg, turned dirt for a new
pediatric unit for the hospital. The wing,
when completed, will have 24 beds.

Farr elected chairman
Earl D. Farr, a resident of Punta Gorda
for 50 years, has been elected chairman
of the board of directors of First Federal
Savings and Loans Association.
Farr is a senior partner of the law
firm Farr, Farr, Haymans, Mosely and
Odom. He first joined First Federal as its
attorney in 1940.

In the service
Cadet Christopher Lance Maixner has
graduated from the Citadel, the Military
College of South Carolina, recently.
Maixner received a bachelor of science
degree in business administration
and will be commissioned as a second
lieutenant in the U.S. Army in the fall.
His parents are Col. and Mrs. H.V.
Maixner of Bayshore Court, Punta Gorda.

County library news
Of interest to patrons of all three
libraries are contributions of books
on sailing and navigation. This was
arranged by the United States Coast
Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 98.
Upon receipt in each library, Punta
Gorda, Port Charlotte and Englewood,


the books will be displayed as a special
collection.
Jean Obermayer is the librarian in
Punta Gorda, A. Lynette Parsons is
the librarian for Port Charlotte and
Elizabeth Childs is the librarian for
Englewood. They should be contacted
by those interested in this collection.

Professional women's
group install officers
The Punta Gorda Business and
Professional Women's Club conducted
installation ceremonies during its
annual dinner meeting, held recently at
the First Federal Building.
Installed were Lois Peeples, president;
May Frisch, first vice president; Figra
Strickland, second vice president;
Mima McCandless, recording secretary;
Hildreth Warnock, corresponding secre-
tary; and Jean Johnstone, treasurer.

Young pilot gets wings
Douglas Bell, 17, of Norma Court,
Punta Gorda, worked as a busboy in
Punta Gorda Isles Yacht Club to make
enough money for flying lessons. The
Charlotte High School junior's ambition
"finally" became reality.
It happened when Punta Gorda
Aviation owner-instructor Bob Gade
presented Bell with his private pilot's
license. Seventeen is the youngest a
person can be to get a pilot's license.

Good scout and carrier
Thirteen-year-old John Walsh finds
time between school and delivering the
Daily Herald-News to keep up with his
Boy Scout work. Walsh recently received
skill awards in first aid, swimming
and cooking from Troop 21 in Port
Charlotte.
Bill Faulk, circulation manager for
the Daily Herald-News, said he is an
excellent newsboy with a near perfect
record of delivery and collection.


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Send in your photos! The Port Charlotte Herald accepts photos from
the community for publication in our weekly paper Please email the
original lPEG photo file as an attachment to nnoles88@gmail.com and
include in the body of the email a description of WHO, WHAT, WHEN,
WHERE and WHY the photo was taken, and include the first and
last names of everyone in the photo from left to right.
Do not resize the photo; please make sure your email program does
not downsize files automatically.
Do not send photos from photo sharing sites or from Facebook.
Photos will run as space allows.





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ien?


He is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Robert Walsh of Edgehill Terrace,
Port Charlotte.

Letter to the Editor
Re: Mall needed
To the Editor:
In my opinion, Port Charlotte
needs a good-sized shopping mall.
When you need clothing or any odds
and ends, you usually end up going
to Fort Myers. A large shopping mall
would go over with the size of Port
Charlotte. With more stores, the
prices would be lower, too.
Nobody seems to do anything
about it. What do you think about
this subject? Thank you.
Gene Lombard
Port Charlotte

Powell-Hendrickson
engagement announced
Mr. and Mrs. J.D. Powell of
Duncan Road, Punta Gorda,
announce the engagement and
forthcoming marriage of their
daughter, Karen Jaye, to Richard A.
Hendrickson. Hendrickson is the son
of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hendrickson
of Vasco Street, Punta Gorda.
He graduated from Charlotte High
School in 1972 and is employed
by James Coleman Plumbing
Contractor. The bride-elect is a 1974
Charlotte High School graduate
and works as a dental assistant in
the office of Dr. JohnWatters, Port
Charlotte.
The couple will be married July 27
in the First United Presbyterian
Church of Punta Gorda.

Girls basketball season
brought to a close
Much of the local attention has
been focused on the Boys' Little
League. The Charlotte YMCAs Girls'
Softball League, with "Coach Mac,"
wrapped up its season Saturday.
Winners were the Ospreys, who
topped the Eagles 18-14 to win the
title. The teams are sponsored by the
Charlotte Junior Woman's Club.
Members of the winning team
are Shaun Lu Ann Tennant, Shellee
Hall, Kellyanne Mercadante, Patty
Wimpey, Debbie Page, Heidi Murray,
Tammy Leaf, Janice Daniele, Kim
Gorgis, MaryVetters, Lorie O'Brien,
Michele Brandel, Dory Tocco, Kelly
Cunningham and Kristin Yankowski.


s38. .0


I


q t





Friday May3 0,2014 Hrl ae1


Error leads to Pirate loss in JV softball


By STEVE KNAPP
HERALD SPORTS WRITER

The Port Charlotte Pirates JV softball
team had a 2-1 lead at DeSoto County
on April 4, but an error helped the
Bulldogs to score three unearned runs
in their four run fourth inning for a 5-2
Bulldog win.
The Pirates scored once in the
second inning to tie the game and
went ahead in the third with another
run. Both runs were scored without the
benefit of a hit.
Samantha Hagerty and Andrianna
Suarez both walked and Hagerty scored
on a sacrifice by Danielle Ferrentino for
the first Pirate run. Monica Albertini
drew a two-out base on balls in the
third and was moved around the bases
on two more free passes to Cheyenne
Rylott and Hagerty. Albertini scored on
a wild pitch, but the inning ended on a
called strike three.
The Pirates threatened to add to
their lead in the top of the fourth
when Suarez was safe on an error and
Breanna Salter drew a walk. Taylor
Snooks collected the only hit of the
game for the Pirates as she singled
sharply to right. Saurez was cut down
at the plate to end the inning.
The Pirates kept their 2-1 lead until
the bottom of the fourth. With one out
and a runner on third, a throw from
third baseman Suarez sailed off the tip
of the glove of Albertini at first. That
scored the tying run.
After two walks loaded the Bulldog
bases, a pop up that should have ended
the inning was caught. A hit batter,
another walk and a single added three
runs to the Bulldog side of the score-
board which was the difference in the
5-2 DeSoto County win.
Pirate Coach Frank Mastrella was
pleased with his team's performance.
"That was a very good game you played
against a good team. It was close all
of the way, I've got nothing bad to say
about that game."
They did play well against the 10-4
DeSoto County team. They collected six
walks along with the one hit and played
well on defense despite the error that
allowed the three unearned runs to
score. They played smart on defense


-w -~\


HERALD PHOTOS BY STEVE KNAPP


The Port Charlotte Pirates JV softball team show some attitude after the loss at DeSoto County April 4.


and showed improvement since the
beginning of the season. The only
downside to the game was "excessive
window shopping" as the five strike-
outs were all on a called strike three.
Brooke Pulliam and Breanna Salter
were teammates for the Pirate soccer
team this past winter. "She (Salter) won
the award for most improved in soccer
and should win it for softball too. She's
really gotten better this season as well
as a couple of the other girls," said
Pulliam.
"Help me come up with some big
words; I want to sound smart," joked
Salter to Pulliam after she was asked
her first question.
"I think our hitting has gotten
better this year and when we play our
best we are a pretty good team," said
Salter.


Samantha Hagerty scores the tying run for the Pirates in the second inning. Hagerty led off the
inning with a walk in the 5-2 loss at DeSoto County.


I SPORTS & RECREATION BRIEFS


Park to undergo
construction
Charlotte County Community
Services announces that construction
will start on May 27 at El Jobean Randy
Spence Park for ADA accessibility
improvements. The park will remain
open during the improvements of ADA
parking and a sidewalk. There will
be ongoing construction activity for
approximately two weeks. Activities
in these areas are not closed but will
be limited. For more information, call
941-743-1392.

Port Charlotte Little
League Allstars tryouts
Tryout dates for Port Charlotte Little
League Allstars is as follows:
9 10- and 11-year-old tryouts are at
6 p.m., Monday
9 9- and 10-year-old tryouts are from


6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Tuesday
9 Junior tryouts are at 7 p.m., Thursday.
All tryouts are at the Harold Avenue
Park, 23400 Harold Ave., Port Charlotte.
Like them on Facebook at Port
Charlotte Little League Baseball. For
more information, visit their website at
www.portcharlottelittleleague.com.

Midway Park
improvements have begun
Charlotte County Community
Serviced announces construction start-
ed Tuesday at Midway Park for ADA
accessibility improvements. The park
will be open during the improvements
of ADA parking and a sidewalk; there
will be ongoing construction activity
for approximately two weeks. Activities
in these areas are not closed, but will
be limited. Midway Park currently has
open fields and tennis courts at 23023
Midway Boulevard, Port Charlotte.


County conducts
park-needs survey
Charlotte County Community
Services is conducting a survey of park
needs. The survey is another opportu-
nity for citizens to provide much-need-
ed input into the development of the
Countywide Parks and Recreation
Master Plan. The last long-term plan
was completed in 1997, and the new


plan will be included in the county's
comprehensive plan. This short survey
covers your views of current services,
as well as future needs, and will be
available through Saturday.
To complete the survey, visit www.
CharlotteCountyFL.gov, and click
the survey banner, or follow this link:
https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/
communityservicesparksneedsassess
mentsurvey.


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Herdld Pdge 13





Page 14


Pirates improve, still lose season series

By STEVE KNAPP
HERALD SPORTS WRITER IMRI


The Port Charlotte Pirates hosted
Lemon Bay on April 2, just a couple of
weeks after getting blown out 16-1 in
Englewood. The Pirates still came out
on the short end of the 9-3 score but
played a much better game the second
time around. Every aspect of the game
showed improvement from the first
match up.
Just like the earlier game, one bad
inning put the Pirates in a hole and
they weren't able to dig themselves out.
After scoring a run in the first and two
in the second, the Mantas tallied five
runs in the third to take an 8-0 lead.
The Pirates weren't able to overcome
the 8-run deficit, but rallied for three
runs and lost 9-3.
Danielle (Squirrel) Ferrentino took
the circle in relief of starter Monica
Albertini with two outs in the third.
Ferrentino allowed three hits and
walked a pair, but only allowed one
run over the final two innings. She
also struck out three batters, all caught
looking at strike three.
Sophomore catcher Sam Hagerty
led the six-hit attack with a single and
triple. Hagerty was involved in all three
Pirate runs as she knocked in two and
her pinch runner scored the final Pirate
run in the fifth.
The Pirates had trouble stringing hits
together to mount a comeback. Taylor
Snooks led off the game reaching first
on an error. She was bunted to second,
but the next two batters got out. In the
second inning after two outs, a double
by Ferrentino was wasted as the next
batter grounded out.
After Hagerty's single scored Brook
Pulliam in the third, the Pirates left two
runners stranded on base as a pop up
ended the inning. In the fourth inning,
there was another two-out single by
Lakyn Walzer, but she was stranded at
first as the next batter struck out.
The fifth inning rally also started
after two outs and nobody on as first
baseman Cheyenne Rylott kept the
game alive with a single. She rode
home on Hagerty's triple and a pinch
runner for Hagerty scored to bring the
final score to 9-3.
"When I hit it (triple) I felt the ball hit
the sweet spot and it just took off," said
Hagerty.
Hagerty has a special bond with her
pitcher Ferrentino.
"Pitchers and catchers become close
because they work together a lot. We've


The Pirates' Paige Pulliam tags out the Lemon Bay runner who tried to steal second base. The Mantas went on to win 9-3.


been friends since sixth grade. When
she is smiling she has better control.
When she is mad, then her control is
gone and she just tries to throw the
ball as hard as she can. I try to keep her
happy. She is so funny that she keeps
everybody up," said Hagerty.
Not only was this game a battle
between schools, it was a first-time
meeting between the head coaches.
Lemon Bay's Frank Mars and the
Pirates' Frank Mastrella both are in
their first seasons as head coaches after
being around the game as assistant
coaches for many years.
In this first "Battle of the Franks," it
would be true to say that both teams
are well coached with an emphasis on
the team.
You won't find any "hot dogs" on
either team. Their pitchers have live
arms and put a lot of "mustard" on the
ball. Two runners got into a "pickle" in
the game and after Lemon Bay got the
big lead, the Pirates couldn't "ketchup."
I wouldn't "relish" playing against either
of these teams when they are both
playing their best.


RIGHT: Port
Charlotte
third
baseman
Andrianna
Suarez puts
the tag on
the Mantas'
Allyson
Gilbert in
the third
inning.


.. .Danielle (Squirrel) Ferrentino shut down the Manta Rays as she pitched the final two innings and
struck out three and allowed a run.



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Friday May 3 02014



GOLF SCORES
All golf scores must be
emailed to golfscores@
sun-herald.com.

KINGS GATE
GOLF CLUB
Hole-in-One
May 2
Rich Blakley aced Hole
No. 8 from 93 yards
using a 9-iron. It was
witnessed by Chuck
Dillin.
Hole-in-One
May 13
Wayne Smith aced
Hole No. 8 from 93
yards using a 9-iron. It
was witnessed by Jack
Tretton, Andy Daignault
and Rich Machado.

KINGSWAY
COUNTRY CLUB
Hole-in-One
May 9
Dave Martin aced Hole
No. 3 from 134 yards
using a 6-iron. It was
witnessed by Don LaCrox
and Roger Hamilton.
Hole-in-One
May 11
Jane Threlkeld aced
Hole No. 16 from 94
yards using a pitching
wedge. It was witnessed
by Dave Threlkeld,


Answers
to
this
week's
puzzle
from
page 5.


Herald Page 15


Joe Rezek and Ann Rezek.

* ROTONDA GOLF
& COUNTRY CLUB
- Scramble
May 12
1.) Bob Scheeler, Robert
Bowen, Larry Luccio,
Charles Elliot, 31.
2.) Brad Gordon, Jim
Knowlton, Ed Johnson,
Bob Zimmerman, 35.
3.) William Tait, Frank
Maren, Jim Shaw, Neil
Greiser, Dave Metcalf, 36.
CLOSEST TO THE PIN:
Hole No. 5: Bill Webber;
Hole No. 8: Bob Scheeler.
*MGA,345
May 15
1.) James Hastings, Dave
Weinberger, Ray Kotzian,
Carl Kaltreider, -32.
2.) Bob Scheeler, Pat
Gabriele, William
Fleming, Jon VanZut-
phen, -29.
3.) Ron Guiliano, Roger
Demeritt, Jerry Aaron,
Chas Eliott, -28.
CLOSEST TO THE PIN:
Hole No. 3: James Hast-
ings; Hole No. 8: James
Hastings; Hole No. 13:
James Hastings; Hole No.
16: Robert Bowen.
- Scramble
May 19
1.) John German,
Richard Barry, Robert


Bowen, Larry Luccio, 34.
2.) Charles Elliot, Ray
Kotzian, John Vanzut-
phen, Ed Johnson, 35.
CLOSEST TO THE PIN:
Hole No. 9: Bill Webber;
Hole No. 7: Robert
Bowen.

* ST. ANDREWS
SOUTH GOLF CLUB
- MGA, 9-Hole,
Individual Low Format
May 14
1.) Clem Eller, 28.
2.) Bob Anderson, 33.
- LGA, 9-Hole, Individual
Low Net + Putts
May 15
1.) Helen Anderson, 47.
2.) Shelia Cunningham,
56.
- LGA, 18-Hole,
Individual Low Net & Putts
May 15
1.) Sue Blaisdell, 99.
2.) Trudy Cheatham, 101.
- 2014 Gran Fiesta on
the Green
1.) Dawn Marx,
Dave Aquila, Rob Carvill,
Pete Orr, 49.
2.) Brian Cruddas,
Brad Lain, Jason Miller,
Alex Radomski, 52.
3.) Steve Nelson, Chuck
Hopper, Kurt Mullick,
Gary Merrett, 52.4.
CLOSEST TO THE PIN:
Men: Kevin Faber;


Ladies: Sharon Prihala.

* BURNT
STORE GOLF &
ACTIVITY CLUB
- Scramble
May 10
1.) Phyllis Love, Bob
Wood, Paula AlIton,
Carsten Kuhr.
2.) Robert Paul,
Lee Plank, Barbara
Mueller, Ken Murray.
- 9-Hole Scramble
May 13
1.) Phil Loenard, Rick
Kellner, Wendy Synen-
berg.
2.) Bill Story, Millie
Hierro, John Magnotta,
Madeline Magnotta.
- Ladies' League
May 14
FLIGHT A:
1.) Margaret Heistand.
2.) Rhea Fleishman.
3.) Mary Welsh.
FLIGHT B:
1.) Kathy Glowicki.
2.) Brenda Holmes.
3.) Carol Smith.
- Men's League
May 14
FLIGHT A:
1.) Gary Mitchell.
2.) Gordon Fogg.
FLIGHT B:
1.) Tommy Shannon.
2.) Bob San Juan,
Larry Marks.


EL LS ALTOS SCRAM FLAN
LOO 0M PAIN E AIL IB I LOGO
SUPERHUMN SUIPERMODE
ADE LA ID CTOSIESE LAREO
TI RIMY NAIVE

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ind and bodel


Learn heart-healthy, low-fat and low sodium food
options and how to read and understand food
labels. Free. Call 941-637-2497 to register.
Tuesday, June 3 I 9:00 11:00 a.m.
The Wellness Center ot Boyfront Heolth Punto Gordo
733 E Olympio Avenue, Punto Gordo
Tuesday, June 17 I 9:00 11:00 a.m.
The Wellness Center ot Boyfront Heolth Punto Gordo
733 E Olympio Avenue, Punto Gordo


Heart-healthy nutrition tips for those with pulmonary
issues. Free. Call 941-637-2497 to register.
Tuesday, June 10 I 9:00 11:00 a.m.
Boyfront Heolth Punto Gordo Medicol Office Plozo
773 Eost Morion Avenue, Punto Gordo

Youth Mental Health Training Course

Just as CPR helps you assist an individual having a
heart attack-even if you have no clinical training-
Youth Mental Health First Aid helps you learn how
to help young people experiencing mental health
challenges or crises. $25 for 8-hour course and
manual. Call 941-637-2497 to register.
Saturday, June 14 I 8:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m.
Boyfront Heolth Punto Gordo Medicol Office Plozo
773 Eost Morion Avenue, Punto Gordo


In honor of Migraine Awareness Month, learn
more about other common neurological disorders.
What they are, symptoms, causes, risks and treatment
options. Free. Call 941-637-2497 to register.
Tuesday, June 17 I 11:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m.
Punto Gordo Isles Civic Associotion
2001 Shreve Street, Punto Gordo


Regain your life with a treatment option that is
less invasive than a total knee replacement and is
available at only one hospital in Charlotte County.
Free. Call 941-637-2497 to register.
Tuesday, June 17 I 5:30 6:30 p.m.
Boyfront Heolth Port Chorlotte
2500 Horbor Blvd, Port Chorlotte

Benefits of Robotic-Assisted Surgery fo

How is robotic-assisted gynecological surgery
different than conventional surgery? Learn the pros
and cons, then sit at the helm of the robot and take it
for a test drive. Free. Call 941-637-2497 to register.
Thursday, June 19 I 6:00 7:00 p.m.
Boyfront Heolth Punto Gordo Cofeterio
809 E. Morion Ave, Punto Gordo


Ramon Gil, M.D.,
Neurologist


Nicholas Connors, M.D.,
Orthopedic Surgeon


Charlene Okomski M.D.,
OBGYN


The adult Mental Health First Aid course is appropriate
for anyone 16 years and older who wants to learn how
to help a person who may be experiencing a mental
health related crisis or problem. $25 for 8-hour course
and manual. Call 941-637-2497 to register.
Saturday, June 28 I 8:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m.
Boyfront Heolth Punto Gordo Medicol Office Plozo
773 Eost Morion Avenue, Punto Gordo


~ Bayfront Health
Port Charlotte e Punta Gorda
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DONATIONS NEEDED!
"Your-ontin a e i ifrne

Please Donate Clean, Usable Items.













Call To Schedule A Pickup For
Large Furniture & Appliances
Now accepting pick up in Arcadia. All money received from donations
in Arcadia will be utilized to assist DeSoto County residents in need.
Charlotte County to assist people in need in Charlotte County.



SALVATION ARMY
THRIFT STORES

1048 Tamiami Trail, Punta Gorda
Open: Mon.- Sat. 9am 5pm


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Friday May 30 2014


hA~it) UI
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Join your hosts Josh Olive
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going on out on the water.
They and their guests will
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PUN'


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Friday, May 30, 2014. Since 1893


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RUNNERS BAND T06ETHER
IN PUNTA 6ORDA

BY GORDON BOWER, PGH CORRESPONDENT [
unning looks like a solitary
and not-much-fun sport.
Most people take it up only
reluctantly to control weight or
improve fitness, not as an av-
ocation. They put on a pair of
rubber-soled tennies and grudg-
ingly head out to do their duty.
RUNNERS I P 8 L..


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Mon-Thurs & Sun 11-9 Fri & Sat 11-1b


I





Friday, May 30,2014


EDITOR'S INS16HTS


PUNTA GORDA


0N0000



TABLE OF CONTENTS

Runners ................................ 1, 8-9
Editor's insights.............. 2
Happenings on the Harbor 2
Business news............... 4-6
Sports ................................... 7-11
40 Years Ago................. 12
Golf scores.................. 12
School Buzz .......................... 14-16













ON THE HARBOR


Submit information about public
events to Punta Gorda Herald Editor
Pamela Staik via email at pstaik@
sun-herald or by calling 941-206-1125.


ONGOING EVENTS
The Foot Landing and The Yoga
Sanctuary are offering a 6-week,
speed-focused series designed specifi-
cally for runners from June 2 to July 7.
The series is called, "Yogi Runners:
Level 2 (Speed Focus)." For details,
visit www.theyogasanctuary.biz or call
941-347-7751.

SATURDAY, MAY 31
9 The Downtown Farmers Market on
Taylor Street, between West Olympia
Avenue and Herald Court, runs from
8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Call 941-391-4856 or
visit www.pgdowntownmerchants.com


WHAT'S


hile studying journalism at the
University of Florida, it was a
fairly common occurrence for
lecture hall classes to be replaced with
panelists representing the print media field.
While these discussions were always enter-
taining and filled with valuable advice for
budding journalists, there was one nugget
of J-school knowledge I picked up and ad-
opted as my life's mantra: get a hobby, and
make it a healthy one.
At the time, I remember thinking,
"Done."
Not only was I a full-time student, but I
freelanced for several magazines and ran
a dance company at the university What
little free time I had was spent in the yoga
studio or running with my dog at the local
pet-friendly park
Fitness was my balance, and naive little
me thought keeping it up would be super



for details.
A Sand Bagging Arthritis Cornhole
Tournament is set to take place at
Gatorz Bar and Grill, located at 502 King
St., Punta Gorda. The cost is $40 per
team of two people. Practice throws are
set to begin at 10 a.m., with the tourna-
ment kicking off at 10:45 a.m. Proceeds
will benefit the United Rheumor
Arthritis Society, Inc. For more informa-
tion, contact Mika Shearer at 941-564-
9443 or mika.shearer@urasociety.org.
The Friends of the Punta Gorda
Library invites the public to the
Charlotte County Summer Reading
Kick-Off Carnival at the Mid-County
Library, located at 2050 Forrest Nelson
Blvd., Port Charlotte. The event is from
11 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information,
call 941-613-3170.
TT's Tiki Bar at Four Points by
Sheraton Punta Gorda Harborside
is throwing a Kick Off to Summer
Party, which is set to begin at noon.
Throughout the event, participants can
enjoy drink specials, souvenirs, promo-
tional giveaways and a lawn cookout,
which will feature barbecue chicken,
burgers and hot dogs. Pitbull Toddler
will be performing live at 8 p.m. For
more information, call 941-637-6770.

SUNDAY, JUNE 1
The Punta Gorda Historical Society's
Farmers Market at History Park, 501
Shreve St., runs from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Call 941-380-6814 for details.

MONDAY, JUNE 2
The Comedy for a Cause Kickoff
Party is set for 5:30 p.m. at the Charlotte
Community Foundation, located at
227 Sullivan St., Punta Gorda. During
the reception, the Charlotte Players will
announce this year's performers. For
more information, call 941-255-1022.


Pamela Staik




Pamela Staik is the editor of the
Punta Gorda Herald. Contact her at
pgherald@sun-herald.com.

easy when I transitioned into the life of a
full-time journalist.
Oh, boy, was I wrong.
The constant on-the-go reporting job
kept me bouncing from assignment to as-
signment, something that was paired with
the emotional distress of writing heavier
news stories, like those involving death or
crimes against children. Then there was
the constant stress of making sure to turn


1 0 Years Later
Hurricane
Charley


FILE PHOTO


TUESDAY, JUNE 3
9 Drug Free Charlotte County is hav-
ing its first meeting for a second teen
substance abuse prevention coalition
in Charlotte County. This group will
be specifically based in Punta Gorda.
The meeting begins at 11:30 a.m. at
the Charlotte Community Foundation,
located at 227 Sullivan St. Reserve a spot
at this event by calling Chrissie Salazar
at 941-979-7471 or emailing her at
chrissie.salazar@yourcharlotteschools.
net.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 4
9 Registration for The Foot Landing's
free, weekly Pub Run begins at 6 p.m. at


Were you here for Hurricane
Charley 10 years ago? If so, the
Charlotte Sun would love to see
you at the Hurricane Charley
statue in Laishley Park for a big
group photo of survivors. The
photo will be taken at 10 a.m.
June 9 at the memorial. We
hope to see you there.


the store, 117 Herald Court,
Suite 1112, Punta Gorda.
This week's event will end at
the Ice House Pub. All levels
of runners and walkers are
welcome. Call 941-347-7751
for details.


THURSDAY, JUNE 5
The monthly Muttini Mingle, also
known as the Pawtastic Yappy Hour, is
set to last from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. in
Center Court at Fishermen's Village, lo-
cated at 1200 W Retta Esplanade, Punta
Gorda. The event is sponsored by Salty
Paws, and it will include live entertain-
ment and treats for both dogs and their
humans. The monthly mingle takes
place on the first Thursday of every
month. For details, call 941-575-7599.
The Gilchrist ParkWaterfront Music
Jam Session, known as Guitar Army,
will take place from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. at
the park, 400 W Retta Esplanade, Punta
Gorda.


2529 TAMIAMI TRAIL
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ARCADE
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Couvon Exvires 6/18/2014


PUNTA GORDA HERALDe MEMBER of the Audit Bureau of Circulation. USPS 743170 The Sun is published daily by Sun Coast Media Group, Inc., 23170
Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980-2198.
Derek Dunn-Rankin CEO,Chairman.......206-1001 ADVERTISING
David Dunn-Rankin President, SunPublisher ........ 206-1003 Leslee Peth, Sun Advertising Director/PGH Publisher.......205-6400
Chris Porter Exec. Editor..........206-1134 Mike Ruiz, Retail Advertising Manager.......................... 205-6402
NEW SPAPERS Rusty Pray Charlotte Editor......206-1168 Colleen Daymude, Advertising Account Executive.........205-6403
Pamela Staik Punta Gorda Herald Editor, 206-1125 Lori White, Advertising Account Executive..............205-6404
Charlotte DeSoto Englewood North Port Venice Email: pgherald@sun-herald.com CIRCULATION
23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980 .206-1000 Michele Bellue Designer..........206-1000 Mark Yero, Circulation Director...................206-1317


Running frame of mind


SHerdld Pdge 2


in all my stories and photos before the
daily deadline bell would chime. Late shifts
and weekend work kept me from teaching
dance, and the gym was almost never open
by the time I would get home from work
I felt out of sorts. I felt incomplete. And I
was in a terrible funk
That's when I turned to the well-lit path-
ways around my house for late-night runs.
Running, while previously an occasional
enjoyment, became my body and mind's
saving grace, offering the chance to clear
my head and bum some calories. All these
years later, I have no idea where I would
be without my runs, nor, for that matter, a
running community as supportive as the
one we have here in Punta Gorda.
Read all about it in this weeks Punta
Gorda Herald, and consider lacing up your
shoes for a light jog. It could be the healthy
hobby you have been looking for.




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Friday, May 30,2014


BUSINTA GNE
PUNTA GORDA


A good time



to reconnect
A frequently asked question of all
chambers is why should I be a
member? What is in it for me?
The truth is there are so many obvi-
ous perks to joining a chamber like the
one we have here in Punta Gorda.
Can you imagine having an organization
that promotes your name 24/7 in all man-
ner of mediums online, on air and in
print for an entire year, and it costs less
than a single ad in most local publications?
The incredible benefit your business
gets from attending even just a few of the
Punta Gorda Chamber of Commerce's
many and varied networking events,
which we host every month, is invaluable.
There is also a certain cache of being
part of a chamber because it adds validity
and credibility to your company name.
Most importantly, you are kept aware
of all aspects of local, statewide and
sometimes federal issues that affect the
running of your own operations, and we
have committees designed to address
these issues, offering a unified business
voice before final decisions are taken.
Clearly, the more you can attend
and involve yourself, the more you
will extract from your attendance at
chamber events. You will get endless
opportunities to shout-out your com-
pany name and reinforce what service


John R. Wright

~bN affi~


John R. Wright is president of
the Punta Gorda Chamber of
Commerce. Contact him atjrwright@
puntagorda-chamber.com.

you provide to the community.
Our board of directors is incredibly
engaged, and the board members respond
and react to all issues that confront busi-
ness owners in today's most competitive
environment.
June maybe one of the slower months
for visitors to Punta Gorda, but it does
allow you that little extra time to reconnect
with fellow business owners and to realize
that you are not alone in the sometimes
scary world of entrepreneurship. To
discuss how you can maximize your
options and be a part of a very welcoming
chamber of commerce, simply call the
Punta Gorda Chamber at 941-639-3720.
We will advise you of all the options
open to you. Even though the member-
ship fee is relatively inexpensive for what
you get back, there are additional options
to ease the initial financial burden on
you, with payment plans and credit card


A ribbon-cutting ceremony took place at Green Coast Homes at the LEED-certified home on
Marion Avenue in Punta Gorda.


opportunities available. So don't miss out
on all the great ways we create to help you.
Make June the month you join and
make our business community even
stronger.

Candidates sought
for PG Chamber's board
In the past few days, the search for new
members for the chamber's board has
been initiated.
If you want to be considered for the
board, all you need to be is a member
in good standing and have your name
submitted to me via email at jrwright@
puntagorda-chamber.com before 4 p.m.
on June 6.
As soon as all nominations are re-
ceived, a committee will meet to discuss
all candidates and to recommend a slate
of possible candidates to the current
board of directors for review at their June
meeting. All successful candidates will
then be notified and their service to the
chamber board would commence Sept. 1,
which is the start of our new fiscal year.
There is no more exciting time to "get
on board" as the Punta Gorda Chamber
enters its 10th anniversary year, with our
official birthday Nov. 19. Lots of things are
being planned to celebrate our service to
the community.

Chamber happenings
At 5:30 p.m. on June 4, the chamber
membership and the general public are
invited to welcome a new business to
Punta Gorda Fresh Interiors, a brand
new home decor and design store, lo-
cated at 322 Sullivan St. If you can make
it to welcome them to town, reserve a
spot by calling the chamber office so we
can give a count for catering purposes.
Be sure to listen in to the Charlie Shoe
Show on Seaview 104.9 FM June 4-5
to listen to the Punta Gorda Chamber
program, including interviews with
some of our great members. The show


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PHOTOS PROVIDED
In celebration of its 15th year
in business, Bisous Salon,
located at 110 Herald Court,
Punta Gorda, held a big
party. Members of the Punta
Gorda Chamber of Commerce
were on hand to perform a
ribbon-cutting celebration as
well.


CONTACT THE
CHAMBER
For more information about
events listed in this column,
contact the Punta Gorda
Chamber of Commerce at
941-639-3720 or visit its
website at www.puntagorda
chamber.com. While on the
chamber's website, don't forget
to sign up for the "Friday Facts"
newsletter.


airs from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Sadly, I personally will miss this event,
but I hope you will all join the Charlotte
Players for the Comedy for a Cause Kickoff
Party on June 2, when they will introduce
eight amazing business leaders who will
perform improv at the benefit show in
November. The event will take place at
the Charlotte Community Foundation,
227 Sullivan St., Punta Gorda. The party is
from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., and food and
beverages will be provided.
Last year's performers are expected to
make an appearance, but Connie Kantor
and myself will be enjoying a little rest and
relaxation in a land far, far away and will
miss all the fun.
For information, contact Marie LaBrosse
at 941-815-6230 or Deb McMullen at 941-
661-8662. They are the event's co-chairs.

Wine & Jazz tickets available
just in case you missed the chamber's
recent announcement, there are only a
few VIP tickets remaining for next year's
10th annual Wine and Jazz Festival. The
lineup is Dave Koz, Nick Colionne and
Mindi Abair.
Tickets are on sale for all categories,
and many of the VIP tickets have
already been snapped up. Don't delay.
Either visit the Punta Gorda Chamber of
Commerce website, www.punta
gordachamber.com, or call the office to
purchase tickets. Full details of what is
included in each ticket price can also be
found on the website.
The only disclaimers are, sadly, no
pets and definitely no coolers. It is with
great pride that the chamber brings
such a talented lineup to the city.
Very shortly, the Punta Gorda
Chamber will be honored by the Arts
& Humanities Council of Charlotte
County for putting together this festival.
We are truly honored to receive this ac-
colade in recognition of the chamber's
significant contribution to the promo-
tion of performing arts in our area. We'll
treasure this award for years to come.




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Friday May3 0,2014Held Pg5


Leadership Charlotte graduation nears


t's hard to believe that the Leader-
ship Charlotte Class of 2014's gradu-
ation is less than a month away.
What a terrific year we have had, and
we have learned so much. Most import-
ant to me has been the new friendships
formed and the camaraderie amongst us.
Well, it's almost over, and we graduate
on June 20. For those interested in
more information on the program, visit
http://charlottecountychamber.org.
Applications for the next class are now
available.

'Big' golf event unites
mentors with kids
A meet-and-greet golf outing for Big
Brothers Big Sisters of the Sun Coast
will take place May 31 at the Blue Heron
Pines Golf Course Community, 29200
Jones Loop Road, Punta Gorda. The
event, called "Golf Buddy Fore a Day," is
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., and it will provide
adults with the opportunity to be paired
with a child for a day of fun.
The event is free, and participants will
not be obligated to become a mentor in
the program.
For more details, call Melissa Nelson
at 941-764-5812.


Leslee Peth




Leslee Peth is the publisher of the
Punta Gorda Herald. Contact her at
Ipeth@sun-herald.com.


Honoring a longtime
community member
A tribute in honor of Kathy Hollinger-
Strayton is set to take place at 5 p.m. on
June 1 at the Cultural Center of Charlotte
County, 2280 Aaron St., Port Charlotte.
Hollinger-Strayton has been an im-
portant fixture in this community for
several decades, and she worked with the
Charlotte Sun in many different capaci-
ties for 19 years.
Hollinger-Strayton has continued to
serve the community with countless
hours of her time and generosity.
If you can help pay tribute, that would
be terrific. If not, be sure to congratulate
her if you see her out and about.
Visit www.theculturalcenter.com or
call 941-625-4175, ext. 240, for tickets and
more information.


FILE PHOTO
The Leadership Charlotte Class of 2014 is set to graduate on June 20. Applications for the 2015
class are now available through the Charlotte County Chamber of Commerce.


Corks 'n' Canvas events
offer great fun
The Corks 'n' Canvas events spon-
sored by the Punta Gorda Chamber of
Commerce have been very popular this
year.
On May 22, participants gathered at
the Charlotte Community Foundation's


new home, located at 227 Sullivan St.,
Punta Gorda, where we all painted
beautiful tropical fish acrylics on canvas.
If you have ever wanted to try your
hand at painting- or just want to have
an enjoyable evening out this is a
terrific event to attend.
The next event is slated for July 24. Call
the Punta Gorda Chamber of Commerce
at 941-639-3720 for details.


Gallery Walk heats up Punta Gorda .T


Donnell Bates




Donnell Bates is a freelance
photographer. Contact her at
donnellbates@hotmail.com.


t was a warm and beautiful evening for May's Gallery Walk. Visitors are still
here taking advantage of our weather and many sights to see in Punta Gorda.
See the rest of the PGH photos online at www.facebook.com/pgherald.


HERALD PHOTOS BY DONNELL BATES
Local author Michael Dennis Hamilton signs his books, "Deep Truth" and "Black Tide:'Marjorie
Benson and Ed Wotitzky visit with him during Gallery Walk.









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\Keith Callaghan, senior
director of development
at Lee Memorial Health
Systems, promotes the new
Golisano Children's Hospital
of Southwest Florida, which
will open in 2017 in Fort
Myers.


Innocence is precious. Unfortunately, ignorance can destroy it in a heartbeat.
The secondhand smoke from your cigarettes or cigars can cause asthma,
respiratory infections or worse. To save your children and yourself from
the dangers of tobacco, contact Tobacco Free Florida for free counseling,
information and more today.
For more information, contact the Department of Health in Charlotte
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At Preseller's
Restau-
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Greathouse
entertains his
audience with
his handmade
guitar.


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Herdld Pdge 5





Herald Page 6


ueaqun OPUS eats and Fat Point brews join forces

Oan May 18, OPUS restaurant and Fat Point Brewing combined their efforts to host a dinner and beer tasting. Executive
Sue Paquin isa freelance chef Jason Van Marter served up a unique four-course dinner, which Bill Frazer, Fat Point's brewmaster and owner,
sjpaquinphoto@gmail.comnc a paired with four different craft brews for more than 75 guests.


HERALD PHOTOS BY SUE PAQUIN -
John Wright, president of the Punta Gorda Chamber of Commerce, chats Glenn and Kim Blondun thought it would be fun to attend
with Matt Dodge, who works at OPUS, before the dinner, the food and beer pairing.


It was a perfect night for friends to get together. Here,
Kerri Scarry, Edith Ferdschneider, Jess Foraker and Kyle
McWhorter sample one of the Fat Point Brewing beers
before the start of the dinner.


Brian Hayman and Rob Kuehn look forward to trying the different foods and
accompanying beers at the event.


Julie and Doug Dawson relax between courses.


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Jason Nickle and Crystal Voris taste a beer
during the event.


Jason Van Marter, the executive chef at OPUS, explains the
dish and beer pairing to the guests. Looking on is Bill Frazer,
the brewmaster and owner of Fat Point.

Left: Bill Frazer, Fat Point's brewmaster and owner, hands a
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Volleyball tourney shows area talent


Youth volleyball teams from across the state converged on Port Charlotte
High School in April for a daylong tournament. The event featured competi-
tion in multiple age groups.


Charlotte Flying Fish's Peyton Raulerson returns the serve during the tournament.
Right: Port Charlotte Primetime's Christina Collins serves the ball
during the volleyball tournament.


IM IV w IIIIIIII-~ ---
HERALD PHOTOS BY JENNIFER BRUNO
Lauren Taylor, a player for the Charlotte Flying
Fish, hits the ball to her teammate during the
volleyball tournament.


Emilly Vincent and Emily Taylor, who play for
the Port Charlotte 13U Primetime team, both
reach to save the ball before it goes out of
bounds.


Blayklee Peterson hits the ball over the net
during the volleyball tournament at Port
Charlotte High School.


Below: Megan McGill returns the serve during
the tournament.


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Friday, May 30, 2014F M


RUNNERS
FROM PAGE 1
FILE PHOTO
Right: New Balance tech rep Kristen Tenaglia
shows a video on running form to runners
before heading outside for a live demonstra-
tion during a workshop at The Foot Landing.
HERALD PHOTO BY GORDON BOWER
Far right: Charlotte High School senior
Caren Crane is a member of Team Foot
Landing and works in the store.


Gordon Bower




Gordon Bower is a freelance writer
and photographer. Contact him at
g1lbower@comcast.net.

Take a look at the sweaty faces of
the solitary joggers heading over the
bridge, a popular spot because of the
breeze and the view. Most don't look
like they are having much fun, despite
the beauty of the venue.
But it doesn't have to be that way.
Ralph and Sherri Lennon, who
opened The Foot Landing specialty
store for runners and walkers in
December 2012, are going all out to
prove that running can be fun rather
than drudgery.
They are, in essence, building a
community of runners, as opposed to
occasional joggers, who love the sport,
enjoy it and make many friends while
indulging in it. Their store is to running
what boat clubs are to boating, bait
shops to anglers and clubhouses to
golfers.
If you are interested in getting in
shape and making new friends, the
best way to learn how is to drop by
their store, located at 117 Herald Court,
and poke around. No high-pressure
sales people will force you into buying
something you don't need. Instead,
chat with the staff or the steady stream
of fit-looking runners who come in just
to hang out and enthuse about their
sport.

Get properly shod
The first thing you are going to hear
from store staff and other runners
is that you can't just lace on any old
pair of rubber-soled shoes and take
off. Getting the proper fit is critical to
prevent injuries and promote efficiency
to the point that running is actually
fun instead of torture. Wear the wrong
or bad-fitting shoes, and you will soon
have aches and pains or even an injury.
In simple terms, you are going to be a
part-time jogger until you have a prop-
er pair of running shoes, and The Foot
Landing has a five-step customized,
computerized process that will put you
on the road to becoming a real runner.
The process takes into account
running habits and foot measurements
and then uses a specialized insole and
computer software to size up pressure


FILE PHOTO


Friendships are established and running partners found during the post-run session at the Celtic
Ray.


The Yoga Sanctuary's Jennifer French demonstrates the reclined leg stretch, a technique she will
use in the yoga part of the Yogi Runners class.


ON THE COVER:
FILE PHOTO
Approximately 300 runners and walkers
took part in the Memorial Day 5K and 10K
run from Fishermen's Village on May 26.

HERALD PHOTO BY GORDON BOWER
Team Foot Landing member Debi
Swinford, left, and member and store
employee Sherry LaBree are dedicated
and fit runners who love the sport.

points on heels and arches. Shoes are
chosen and matched with the proper
orthotics before being checked for
comfort, followed by taking treadmill
video for gait analysis.

Reaching out to the
community
In addition to expert shoe fitting,
The Foot Landing is using innovative
ways to encourage the growth of a local
running community. One of the most
visible is Team Foot Landing, a group
of dedicated runners of all abilities
who serve as store ambassadors and
perform other good works to promote
running.
Store employee Sherry LaBree said,
"There are 25 members of all abilities.
It's a nice, diverse team of people who
can relate to the whole ... commu-
nity of runners without intimidating
anyone. We want to promote health
and wellness and encourage people out
there to run. We're not just targeting
elite runners."
You can see members at any event
associated with running around here,
many sponsored by The Foot Landing.
LaBree said, "We hit the local races
hard; you won't find many without
Team Food Landing there. They are also
at all our fun runs, like our Wednesday
Pub Runs and charity events. They are
a dedicated bunch."

Fun runs and education
At the fun runs, designed to


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accommodate all ages and all ability
levels, Team Foot Landing members
encourage and help other runners
learn the ropes and feel at home.
The most popular fun run is the free,
no-pressure Wednesday Night Pub
Run, which begins at 6:15 p.m. at the
store and follows a 2.5 mile route that
changes from week to week.
It started with 25 or 30 walkers and
runners. It now averages more than
100, and the events have drawn more
than 200.
Many would-be joggers have become
enthusiastic runners by starting with
this run, which convenes at places
like the Celtic Ray, Dean's South of
the Border or the Ice House Pub after
the sweaty part is over. It's a great way
to meet other runners in a convivial
atmosphere.
Runner and Team Foot Landing
member Debi Swinford said, "The pub
run got me integrated into the local
community. This place (the store)
is really a catalyst in making a real
community of runners."
Two more formal initiatives featuring
Team Foot Landing members are The
Academy, a term used to encompass
educational workshops and classes,
and the 123 Runners foundation, which
raises money for good causes.
In the education arena, The Foot
Landing holds classes aimed at increas-
ing runners' knowledge base. These
include workshops put on by running
shoe manufacturers, like New Balance.
A rep from the company typically
shows up and gives a presentation on
shoe selection and fit or proper run-
ning form.
One popular class is Yogi Runners,
a combination yoga and running
class held in concert with The Yoga
Sanctuary, 112 Sullivan St. It's taught by
Jennifer French, an experienced yoga
instructor and a self-described "hobby
runner." A new class begins June 2
and lasts for six weeks. It starts with a
run from the Charlotte Harbor Event
and Conference Center and concludes
at The Yoga Sanctuary. Although no
yoga experience is required, minimal
running expertise is needed.
French said, "What I did was design a
6-week program that is runner specific
and addresses things that are really
tight or really weak. Flexibility can be
limited, making runners more prone to
injury. My focus is on increasing stride
and reducing injury and recovery time."


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During the class, French emphasizes
the hamstrings, quads and hips -
areas of the body that typically get
tight while leading the class through
postures to promote flexibility. A
handout is provided at each class for
participants to take home.
"The yoga is to add balance to what
you're doing," she said. "We're trying
to make people into healthy, strong
runners."

Camp for kids
Under The Academy umbrella,
Team Foot Landing is also starting an
ambitious new educational program
designed to attract youngsters into the
sport.
It's called the Foot Landing Summer
Youth Running Camp and is coached
by Jonathan Nusbaum, a Team member
and former Charlotte High School
and Warner University track and cross
country athlete. He was the university's
athlete of the year and a top-10 fin-
isher in the 800 meters at the National
Association of Intercollegiate Athletics
track championships. He will be
assisted by other team members and
guest speakers.
He said, "The goal of the camp is to
give middle school kids (age groups
10-12 and 13-15) an appreciation of
running and build a foundation for
them to go into the high school level.
We're trying to get them to reach their
full potential by building a strong
foundation."

Supporting the community
As the more savvy merchants in town
know, building ties to the community
is a necessary part of business around
here. That's why The Foot Landing
has organized a number of charity
runs in support of Girls on the Run,
Backpack Kidz, the Sgt. Wilson Fund
and scholarships.
Sherry Lennon believes in a strong
running community that supports the
community at large, and 123 Runners is
a foundation designed to institutional-
ize that support.
She said, "When we opened the
store, we saw right away a need in the
community starting with children and
the schools. Then we realized it was a
community need. We had numerous
charities come to us and ask us to raise


RUNNERSIP
M-4 -


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s38.00


One of the advantages of running you always have cool shoes to wear.


RUNNERS
FROM PAGE 8

money. Instead or raising money for
each cause, we've created 123 Runners
as an umbrella. We pull money out of
the foundation for those community
causes."

Meet the runners
If you visit The Foot Landing, you are
likely to meet local runners, some of
them team members, others in to buy
shoes, shoot the breeze and show off
their new physiques. If you bump into
the fit Debi Swinford, you'll know right
away she's a runner. She's been doing
it for 40 years, and it shows. She also
is a yoga enthusiast, bikes 50 miles a
week and swims 3 or 4 miles.
She's an enthusiastic team member
and frequent presence at fun runs
and races, and she will teach yoga at
the summer kids camp.
Jennifer Seegers will be at the
camp, too. Like Swinford, she's a team
member and has turned her former
unathletic self into a lean, mean
triathlete who's getting into long
distance running.
Caren Crane is a CHS track athlete,
an accomplished equestrian and part-
time store employee. She's also the
second youngest team member.
She didn't go out for the track team
her junior year to concentrate on her
riding in the hunter-jumper class,
but she remains an enthusiastic,


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knowledgeable runner who plans on
resuming competitive running.
She said, "I hope to run as a senior
in the 400 meters, and I'm hoping to
run in the Sarasota half-marathon."
The youngest team member is Tyler
Briggs, a sixth-grader who's 11 years
old. She started running, and running
very well, about a year ago, but tired
of the sport until she figured out it
could be fun by running with friends
and family.
Mother Lisa Briggs said, "We always
run together. The first race we just
walked. We've been doing it together
ever since. We're enjoying it now with
friends and family. That's why we love
it so much, the social aspect."
Now, you can find the whole family
at the Wednesday Pub Run and at a
local race at least once a month.
Barrie and Jeannie Sutton are living
proof of the physical and emotional
benefits of running. Both couch
potatoes and weighing in at 240 and
220 pounds respectively, Barrie is now
a svelte 195 and Jeannie has dropped
to 144 pounds and is determined to
go lower. They started running last
September and quickly joined the
pub run. Now, they do 5Ks and put in
about 20 miles a week together.
Jeannie said, "I was 24 and super
out of shape. All I did was sit on the
couch, and I didn't feel good. I woke
up and decided to run."
Barrie succinctly summarized the
results they and other runners experi-
ence after taking up the sport, saying,
"It's changed our lives totally."


As you can tell from their T-shirts, runners Sherry LaBree, kids camp coach Jonathan Nusbaum
and Jennifer Seegers have a lot to choose from in terms of local races.










Left: John, Lisa
and daughter
Tyler Briggs
make running
r a family affair,
participating
-~ in fun runs
and races
together all
,i 'over the area.


-- - -
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18 holes includes cart
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Herald Pdge 9


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Herald Page 10


Tarpons celebrate spring athletes

rian Nolan, the athletic director at Charlotte High School, welcomed guests to the school during the spring sports
Awards ceremony on May 7.
Nolan told the crowd that the emphasis of the student part of the "student-athlete" designation is strong at
Charlotte High. He said the overall grade point average for all of the athletes in the 21 sports at Charlotte is 3.2.
The three sports that held their ceremony that evening boosted the average. The softball and baseball teams had a com-
bined 3.4 GPA, and the tennis team stood at 3.95.


Junior varsity baseball players show the award they earned during a
highly successful season. Shown here are Clayton Baird, who took home
the award for most outstanding player, Anthony Alexandrou, who won
the coach's award, and Nick Coppola, who took home a scholastic award.


The junior varsity softball team members show their awards. The team
went undefeated during the regular season.

Right: Charlotte High School seniors Matthew Greenberg and Samuel
Heitman show their collage of photos during their careers on the
Tarpon tennis teams.


The award winners for the junior varsity team were Mary Boyd, most valu-
able player; Kristin Knowlton, most improved player; Cheyenne Gaudemer,
who won the award for defense; Amanda Fabian, who won the award for
offense; and Jenna VanHatten, who won the scholastic award.



TRANE SPRING

_into ACTION


Showing off their awards from the varsity softball team are Courtney Sunnarborg, most valu-
able pitcher; Jessie Valerius, most valuable player; Kaylie Chavarria, sportsmanship; Samantha
Burnett, most improved player; Julie Dedrick, scholastic award winner; Kendall Chavarria, award
for defense; and Tiffany Dodson, most valuable hitter.





Friday May3 0,2014Hrad Pg


70-year-old softball players



make local history


an events

ind and body.


nother step in the Charlotte County
softball history records came at
5:52 p.m. on May 6 when 86-year-
old Bob Jones threw the first pitch of the
newly formed 70-plus softball league.
The league, started by 75-year-old
Vince Santello, is part of the growth of
softball in Charlotte County. Santello was
involved with the first 40-and-over team,
which came to the area in 1985. Through
the years, expansion has occurred as the
population grew.
The original league expanded to
six teams. Once they added a 50-and-over
league, five more teams were added. The
55-and-over team added five more teams,
with six additional teams playing in the
morning.
A 60-plus age group was formed, pro-
ducing six more teams, and now the two-
team, 70-plus league has been formed.
All of the teams started from that one
softball team nearly 30 years ago.
On this evening, the Red and Blue
teams played at Carmalita Athletic Park,
6905 Florida St., Punta Gorda. The result
of that first pitch thrown out by Jones:
Tim Seagreaves got a base hit, ending up
on third base after the ball was thrown
around a bit.
The teams had an exciting first game as
the Blue Team scored five times with two
outs in the top of the seventh inning to
tie the game at 20. The Red Team scored
a two-out run to win in the bottom of the
seventh inning, 21-20.
"It would be nice to get two more teams
in the league, so we'd play somebody
different every game," Santello said. "But
the important thing is to just get out here
and have a little fun."
Judging from the reaction of the players


Steve Knapp




Steve Knapp is a sports writer
and photographer. Contact him at
SbigdaddyKnapp@aol.com.


HERALD PHOTOS BY STEVE KNAPP
Jay Fox hits this pitch in the gap for a double
in the first-ever softball league game for men
older than 70.

ON THE COVER:
HERALD PHOTO BY STEVE KNAPP
Pete Riley, 74, drills this pitch for the Blue
Team.
after the game, that mission had been
accomplished.
The teams play at 6 p.m. on Tuesdays
and Thursdays in Punta Gorda. Stop
on by for more information or to cheer
them on.


The Blue Team from the 70-and-older softball league battled hard to tie the game in the last
inning, but the team lost in the bottom of the seventh, 21-20.


These players represent the Red Team, which won the first game ever played in the 70-plus
league. They won with a run in the bottom of the seventh inning, making the score 21-20.


Learn heart-healthy, low-fat and low sodium food
options and how to read and understand food
labels. Free. Call 941-637-2497 to register.
Tuesday, June 3 I 9:00 11:00 a.m.
The Wellness Center ot Boyfront Heolth Punto Gordo
733 E. Olympio Avenue, Punto Gordo
Tuesday, June 17 I 9:00 11:00 a.m.
The Wellness Center ot Boyfront Heolth Punto Gordo
733 E. Olympio Avenue, Punto Gordo


Heart-healthy nutrition tips for those with pulmonary
issues. Free. Call 941-637-2497 to register.
Tuesday, June 10 I 9:00 11:00 a.m.
Boyfront Heolth Punto Gordo Medicol Office Plozo
713 Eost Morion Avenue, Punto Gordo

Youth Mental Health Training Course

Just as CPR helps you assist an individual having a
heart attack-even if you have no clinical training-
Youth Mental Health First Aid helps you learn how
to help young people experiencing mental health
challenges or crises. $25 for 8-hour course and
manual. Call 941-637-2497 to register.
Saturday, June 14 I 8:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m.
Boyfront Heolth Punto Gordo Medicol Office Plozo
713 Eost Morion Avenue, Punto Gordo


In honor of Migraine Awareness Month, learn
more about other common neurological disorders.
What they are, symptoms, causes, risks and treatment
options. Free. Call 941-637-2497 to register.
Tuesday, June 17 I 11:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m.
Punto Gordo Isles Civic Associotion
2001 Shreve Street, Punto Gordo


Regain your life with a treatment option that is
less invasive than a total knee replacement and is
available at only one hospital in Charlotte County.
Free. Call 941-637-2497 to register.
Tuesday, June 17 I 5:30 6:30 p.m.
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2500 Horbor Blvd, Port Chorlotte

Benefits of Robotic-Assisted Surgery fo

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Boyfront Heolth Punto Gordo Cofeterio
809 E. Morion Ave, Punto Gordo


Ramon Gil, M.D.,
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Nicholas Connors, M.D.,
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Charlene Okomski, M.D.,
OB/GYN


The adult Mental Health First Aid course is appropriate
for anyone 16 years and older who wants to learn how
to help a person who may be experiencing a mental
health related crisis or problem. $25 for 8-hour course W U
and manual. Call 941-637-2497 to register.
Saturday, June 28 I 8:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m.
Boyfront Heolth Punto Gordo Medicol Office Plozo
713 Eost Morion Avenue, Punto Gordo


~Bayfront Health
Port Charlotte e Punta Gorda
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P t t l y y r bot beeits dskf s r proerr tr
Uiderstzdi g:e ss d ,beneitsofe echftrehtent c elpyo# e ke bestdeasrf ryouridw d, Isittion
Members Mddepedet ebeftheMed, tof Byf HedPoC lotte d t Gfrd


Herdld Pdge 11


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Herald Page 12


FROM OUR ARCHIVES




Do you remember whe


The following are excerpts from
the Daily Herald-News from May 25,
1974, through May 31,.1974:

Growth relates
to air service
Future socio-economic con-
ditions in Charlotte County will
determine the amount of benefit
the county can expect from a prob-
able Department of Transportation
revamping.
Researcher Tom Burnard asked
members of the Regional Planning
Committee, Charlotte Chamber
of Commerce and Development
Authority about the current condi-
tion of county transportation and
growth.
"Construction and tourism are
the backbone of Charlotte's econo-
my," was the general opinion.

Bicentennial event to be
held in Charlotte County
Members of the Veterans' Group
Barrracks 714 and the Ladies'
Auxiliary are to be congratulated
for all the work that has gone into
gaining a bicentennial kickoff in
Charlotte County Jan. 3-5.
Working with Harry Nohr,
chairman in Charlotte, these
people have planned a program
including meetings at the Memorial
Auditorium, a banquet, patriotic
displays by businesses, displays
advertising the event, a listing of
restaurants along Highway 41 as
well as numerous tours for visitors
who will attend the event.
It will be the first time such a
large conference will be held this
far down the west coast, and the
first time it has not been held in
one of Florida's larger cities.
Cliff Blackburn, who has been
named general chairman, states
that he and his committee are
looking to show off the real charm
and beauty of Charlotte County.


I GOLF SCORES

All golf scores must be emailed to
golfscores@sun-herald.com.

BURNT STORE GOLF & ACTIVITY CLUB
Scramble
May 10
1.) Phyllis Love, Bob Wood, Paula AlIton,
Carsten Kuhr.
2.) Robert Paul, Lee Plank, Barbara Mueller,
Ken Murray.
9-Hole Scramble
May 13
1.) Phil Loenard, Rick Kellner, Wendy
Synenberg.
2.) Bill Story, Millie Hierro, John Magnotta,
Madeline Magnotta.
Ladies' League
May 14
FLIGHT A:
1.) Margaret Heistand.


Janine Smith




Janine Smith writes about Punta
Gorda's historic past. Contact her at
janinehsl@ comcast.net.


New chairman of
commission announced
Charlotte County Commission
Chairman B.C. Nuzum took over the
reins of the commission from Ray
Griffith, who stepped down as chair this
week. The commissioners take turns in
the chairman's chair every six months.

Ground broken
on hospital wing
Sister Mary Augustine, the admin-
istrator at St. Joseph Hospital, and the
Rev. Charles B. McLaughlin, bishop of
St. Petersburg, turned dirt for a new
pediatric unit for the hospital. The wing,
when completed will have 24 beds.

Farr elected chairman
Earl D. Farr, a resident of Punta Gorda
for 50 years, has been elected chairman
of the board of directors of First Federal
Savings and Loans Association.
Farr is a senior partner of the law
firm Farr, Farr, Haymans, Mosely and
Odom. He first joined First Federal as its
attorney in 1940.


2.) Rhea Fleishman.
3.) Mary Welsh.
FLIGHT B:
1.) Kathy Glowicki.
2.) Brenda Holmes.
3.) Carol Smith.
Men's League
May 14
FLIGHT A:
1.) Gary Mitchell.
2.) Gordon Fogg.
FLIGHT B:
1.) Tommy Shannon.
2.) Bob San Juan, Larry Marks.

KINGS GATE GOLF CLUB
Hole-in-One
May 2
Rich Blakley aced Hole No. 8 from 93 yards
using a 9-iron. It was witnessed by Chuck
Dillin.
Hole-in-One
May 13
Wayne Smith aced Hole No. 8 from 93 yards


Jean Joh


JUI Ua You
m 40 years ago Dougl

0* Punta Gi
in Punta
to make
lessons.
junior's
reality.
Community news since 1893 It hap
Aviation
present(
license.
In the service person c
Cadet Christopher Lance Maixner has Goo
graduated from the Citadel, the Military
College of South Carolina, recently. Thirte
Maixner received a bachelor of science finds tin
degree in business administration and deliveril
will be commissioned as a second lieu- to keep
tenant in the U.S. Army in the fall. Walsh re
His parents are Col. and Mrs. H.V.
Maixner of Bayshore Court, Punta Gorda.ifrst a


County library news
Of interest to patrons of all three libraries
are contributions of books on sailing and
navigation. This was arranged by the United
States Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 98.
Upon receipt in each library, Punta
Gorda, Port Charlotte and Englewood,
the books will be displayed as a special
collection.
Jean Obermayer is the librarian in Punta
Gorda, A. Lynette Parsons in Port Charlotte
and Elizabeth Childs in Englewood. They
should be contacted by those interested in
this collection.

Professional women's group
installs officers
The Punta Gorda Business and
Professional Women's Club conducted
installation ceremonies during its annual
dinner meeting, held recently at the First
Federal Building.
Installed were Lois Peeples, president;
May Frisch, first vice president; Figra
Strickland, second vice president; Mima
McCandless, recording secretary; Hildreth
Warnock, corresponding secretary; and


using a 9-iron. It was witnessed by Jack
Tretton, Andy Daignault and Rich Machado.

KINGSWAY COUNTRY CLUB
Hole-in-One
May 9
Dave Martin aced Hole No. 3 from 134 yards
using a 6-iron. It was witnessed by Don LaCrox
and Roger Hamilton.
Hole-in-One
May 11
Jane Threlkeld aced Hole No. 16 from
94 yards using a pitching wedge. It was
witnessed by Dave Threlkeld, Joe Rezek and
Ann Rezek.

ROTONDA GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB
Scramble
May 12
1.) Bob Scheeler, Robert Bowen, Larry
Luccio, Charles Elliot, 31.
2.) Brad Gordon, Jim Knowlton, Ed Johnson,
Bob Zimmerman, 35.
3.) William Tait, Frank Maren, Jim Shaw,


tlllll I1U
Bill Fa
for the D
he is an
near per
collection
He is t
RobertIA
Charlott


Re: Ma
To the
In my
needs a
When yo
and end
to Fort N
A large
over wit
With l
be lower
Nobody
about it.
this subj
Thank
Gene
Port C


Neil Greiser, Dave Metcalf, 36.
CLOSESTTO THE PIN: Hole No. 5: Bill
Webber; Hole No. 8: Bob Scheeler.
MGA, 3 4 5
May 15
1.) James Hastings, Dave Weinberger, Ray
Kotzian, Carl Kaltreider,-32.
2.) Bob Scheeler, Pat Gabriele, William
Fleming, Jon VanZutphen, -29.
3.) Ron Guiliano, Roger Demeritt, Jerry
Aaron, Chas Eliott,-28.
CLOSESTTO THE PIN: Hole No. 3: James
Hastings; Hole No. 8: James Hastings; Hole
No. 13: James Hastings; Hole No. 16: Robert
Bowen.
Scramble
May 19
1.) John German, Richard Barry, Robert
Bowen, Larry Luccio, 34.
2.) Charles Elliot, Ray Kotzian, John
Vanzutphen, Ed Johnson, 35.
CLOSESTTO THE PIN: Hole No. 9: Bill
Webber; Hole No. 7: Robert Bowen.


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Friday May 30,2014











stone, treasurer.

ng pilot gets wings
las Bell, 17, of Norma Court,
orda, worked as a busboy
a Gorda's Isles Yacht Club
enough money for flying
The Charlotte High School
ambition "finally" became

pened when Punta Gorda
owner-instructor Bob Gade
ed Bell with his private pilot's
Seventeen is the youngest a
can be to get a pilot's license.

)d scout and carrier
en-year-old John Walsh
ne between school and
ng the Daily Herald-News
up with his Boy Scout work.
recently received skill awards
tid, swimming and cooking
bop 21 in Port Charlotte.
ulk, circulation manager
Daily Herald-News, said
excellent newsboy with a
rfect record of delivery and
Dn.
the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Walsh of Edgehill, Port
te.

better to the Editor
all needed
Editor:
opinion, Port Charlotte
good-sized shopping mall.
ou need clothing or any odds
Is, you usually end up going
Myers.
e shopping mall would go
1h the size of Port Charlotte.
more stores, the prices would
r, too.
dy seems to do anything
What do you think about
ject?
k you.
Lombard,
harlotte.


ST. ANDREWS SOUTH GOLF CLUB
MGA, 9-Hole, Individual Low Format
May 14
1.) Clem Eller, 28.
2.) Bob Anderson, 33.
LGA, 9-Hole, Individual Low Net +
Putts
May 15
1.) Helen Anderson, 47.
2.) Shelia Cunningham, 56.
LGA, 18-Hole, Individual Low Net +
Putts
May 15
1.) Sue Blaisdell, 99.
2.) Trudy Cheatham, 101.
2014 Gran Fiesta on the Green
1.) Dawn Marx, Dave Aquila, Rob Carvill,
Pete Orr, 49.
2.) Brian Cruddas, Brad Lain, Jason Miller,
Alex Radomski, 52.
3.) Steve Nelson, Chuck Hopper, Kurt
Mullick, Gary Merrett, 52.4.
CLOSEST TO THE PIN: Men: Kevin Faber;
Ladies: Sharon Prihala.


Le




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Herald Page 14


Scout benches 'made in the shade'
hen Charlotte High School History Park to begin constructing the
ninth-grader Kyle Finch would wooden benches. The all-day project
W jog by the Punta Gorda Histo- included cutting the wood, assembling
ry Park with the cross country team, he all the sections and sanding the bench-
had an idea that would enable him to es to eliminate any sharp edges.
= complete his Eagle Scout project and, at Ed Ayres, who has been Troop 351
the same time, assist the park in acquir- AlHemingwayis a freelance writer, scoutmaster for the past 9 years, said
SC O L BUZ ing additional seating. Contact him at alhemingway3@ that the kids used all the tools, with the
Finch, 15, a member of Boy Scout gmail.com. exception of the saw, to complete the
Troop 351, approached Louie Desguin, work.
the park's manager, to ask if he could "I needed additional seating," "It's a learning process," he said. "We
0 0 0 0 0 0 build wooden benches that would en- Desguin said. "The area where the go slowly so no mistakes are made and
compass two of the trees located there. hon hos are .crincr trotsthe most chade. the tinderstand eh ten"


HERALD PHOTOS BY AL HEMINGWAY


Scoutmaster Ed Ayres watches as Kyle Finch measures one of the wooden benches that were built
for the Punta Gorda History Park.


Scoutmaster Ed Ayres holds a piece of freshly-cut lumber as Jordan Warner prepares to drill.


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Large Furniture & Appliances
Now accepting pick up in Arcadia. All money received from donations
in Arcadia will be utilized to assist DeSoto County residents in need.
Charlotte County to assist people in need in Charlotte County.



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Open: Mon.- Sat. 9am 5pm


One of the finished benches circling the newly-planted jacaranda tree in the park.


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Friday May 30,o2014


Students honored for artistic talents at the VAC


he Visual Arts Center was a hub
of activity on the evening of
May 8, when parents, teachers
and Charlotte County students huddled
into the Punta Gorda art center for the
annual Secondary School Art Show
reception. During the event, awards
and scholarships were presented to area
middle and high school students, many
from Punta Gorda.
Speaking to the crowd during the
event was Charles Kovacs from the


MarilyntThorndcraft




Marilyn Thomdycraft writes about
the local art scene. Contact her at
tcrat t @embarqmail.com.

Ringling College of Art & Design.
"The total economic output for arts


education in 2011, the most recent
year for which data are available, was
$104 billion," he said, adding that the
industry employed 17,900 workers in
the past year whose salaries and wages
totaled $5.9 billion.
The conclusion, in a report based on
face-to-face interviews with more than
1,500 CEOs worldwide, was that creativ-
ity trumps other leadership characteris-
tics in an era of complexity and change.
Kovacs' words resonated with the
young artists in the room, which was
filled with considerable talent from the
public school system.
Illustrating this point was Judy
Malbuisson, the executive director
of the Arts & Humanities Council of
Charlotte County, who announced
first-, second- and third-place winners
in 10 categories of art. Various awards
and scholarships were presented


during the evening, too, with monetary
amounts ranging from $250 to $1,500
for the students.
Mary Ann Tipton, the executive
director for the VAC, said, "Our commu-
nity recognizes the importance of art
and has donated generously to provide
scholarships to our future artists. The
overflow crowd at this event shows
the immense interest in art here, and
the quality of the art is so outstanding
that accolades must be given to all the
teachers of these remarkable students."
The secondary students' art work
was on prominent display at the VAC
May 3-8. A similar event for elementary
school children took place April 26
following its April 21-28 show.
For more information, stop by the
VAC, located at 210 Maud St., call 941-
639-8810 or visit www.visualartcenter.
org.


HERALD PHOTOS BY MARILYN THORNDYCRAFT
Lois Porter, a fine arts weaver from Sea Grape Gallery, speaks with Charles Kovacs, the keynote
speaker, during the awards reception. Kovacs works at the Ringling College of Art & Design.


Morgan Hartman's self portrait won a first-place award in the category for black-and-white
drawings.


FILE PHOTO
Kaila Sukennikoff, 11, a fifth-grader at Deep Creek Elementary School, points to her art.

FILE PHOTO
Three-year-old
Zachary Pontius X.
looks up at his
sister, Ava, 7,
a first-grader
at Sallie Jones
Elementary, as
she stands next
to her drawing.


FILE PHOTO
Right: East
Elementary
School art teacher
Tamalin Beau-
champ stands
proudly with
her art student,
fourth-grader
Amy McGuire, 11,
and Amy's sister,
Cheyenna, 7.


Left: Mary Ann
Tipton, the executive
director of the Visual
Arts Center, presents
a $500 Visual Arts
Center scholarship to
Charlotte High School
senior John Dillard.


Welcomes




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David Michael's


Call Today
to Schedule an
Appointment
with Jen!
941-204-0073
Accepting
New Clients!
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Herdld Pdge 15





Friday, May 30,2014


Essay winners roll away on bikes


E very year, fourth- and fifth-grade
students at Sallie Jones Elementary
School enter an essay contest ex-
plaining why they deserve a new bike.
For Tiffany Broom, 10, the answer was
very simple: her father's bicycle had been
stolen and she wanted a replacement
so her family could continue their rides
together. Because the family was on a tight
budget, it was difficult to raise enough
money to purchase a new one.
Although she missed the family bike
outings, Tiffany still thought of others.
"I hope someone nice and generous wins
this special bike if I don't," she wrote in her
essay.
On May 20, someone "nice and gener-
ous" did win the bike Tiffany as well as
three other girls, Victoria Evans, 10, Chloe
McFadzen, 10, and Kaysha Mitchell, 10.
They are all fourth-graders at the school.
Guidance counselor Dale Dandy said
first-grade teacher Gretchen Schnulle and


her husband sponsored the event, refur-
bishing one of the bikes and donating it to
the cause.
Two of the other bicycles were pre-
sented to the school by the Horace Mann
Insurance Agency. A third was given by an
anonymous donor.
"The contest is open to all fourth- and
fifth-graders," Dandy said. "They have to
write an essay justifying why they need the
bike. It was difficult. We had many great
essays. We couldn't decide between these
four, so they were all winners."
When the four girls were escorted to the
lobby, they had no idea that all four of them
were winners. When they saw their parents
waiting for them, they were bewildered.
"We have four bikes here," Dandy said. "I
guess all of you are winners."
Kaysha, who had her essay turned in
before the school day was completed, wrote
that her bike was missing a pedal and that
made it difficult for her to ride it.


"People laugh at me because of my bike,"
she wrote.
Chloe wanted to share her bicycle with
her mother, who has difficulty walking
her to school because of a painful hip.
Like Tiffany, Chloe understood if another
student received the bike.
"If someone has a better essay and has a
better reason, I will understand," she wrote.
An "enormous rip" in the seat, a severe
rusting problem, an annoying squeaking
noise and the fact she had outgrown her
old bike were the reasons Victoria desired
a new one. She enjoyed the long rides she
and her family took around the city to see
the sights while exercising as well.
"We would also go to trails on sunny
days to find animal footprints, birds
eating their lunch and sometimes even
see alligators," she wrote.
Jennie Hoke, principal at Sallie Jones
Elementary, said she is thrilled to see
the community support to help the kids


Al Hemingway




Al Hemingway is a freelance writer
Contact him at alhemingway3@
gmail.com.


at the school.
"Our goal is to build stronger relation-
ships with the community as well as the
parents," she said.
Kim Seward and Mike Chikosky from
Horace Mann Insurance said their com-
pany insures educators and they wanted
to show their appreciation.
"We provide them lunches during
teacher appreciation week," Chikosky
said. "We like to do a lot for the teachers
and students."
Seward added, "They asked and we
delivered."
Vice Principal Lauren Elek said it was
an extremely hard task to select a winner.
"Each essay touched us on a different
level," she said.


HERALD PHOTOS
BY AL HEMINGWAY
Left: Sitting on
their new bikes are
Kaysha Mitchell,
Trinity Broom,
Victoria Evans and
Chloe McFadzen.

Right: First-grade
teacher Gretchen
Schnulle, Guidance
Counselor Dale
Dandy, and SRO Joe
Angelini pose with
the essay winners
Kaysha Mitchell,
Chloe McFadzen,
Trinity Broom and
Victoria Evans -
who each took
home a new bicycle.


SX'.ArJ iitJa

A A 0
fij:Ij-a NJ


Fj/JjjA


IJj -


Bayfront Health
Port Charlotte a Punta Gorda


*. I


S U N,4NiE' W"BEST Comunty Dily
Amerm' BEST Connum Dady


Al I.fl a ll ALIV


010e


SHerdld Pdge 16


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CFM
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,,. JJ '.


FORT My-1
Al IVE


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OPEN HOUSE



05/30/14
ARCADIA VILLAGE #771 Sat
& Sun. 12-3 2br/2ba/CP All
appliances, lanai, part. fur-
nished. 863-494-0023
BAY INDIES RESORT
COMMUNITY


COME SEE
WHAT OUR
LIFESTYLE
HAS TO OFFER!

950 RIDGEWOOD
AVENUE VENICE, FL
34285 941-485-5444
Aged Qualified
OPEN SAT 12-3
3928 Champagne Ave.
North Port Off Salford, Updted
3/2/2 1500sf,
Nikkie Sherwood
Anytime Realty 941-628-3396
C GET RESULTS)
USE CLASSIFIED!

QUICK CASH!! ANY PRICE OR|
CONDITION! HOUSE OR
MOBILE. 941-356-5308


HOMES FOR SALE

1020


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HOMES FOR SALE
10201


2 A IREo, venice 3 l)/Ib1
home. County water possible
owner financing or best offer.
Cash Offers Pay Less!
941 -488-2418 or 496-9252

A Bargain
Hunters
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HOMES FOR SALE
1020


5-30 ACRES Starting @9
$39,900
Punta Gordas's
BEST KEPT SECRET!
Minutes to town, beaches,
harbor! Deed restricted
Horses welcomeblack
top roads. "A Very Special
Ranch Community'!
JUDY K PETKEWICZ
GRI CRS
ALLISON JAMES Estates
& Homes 941-456-8304
www.PuntaGorda
Propertiesforsale.com

Find the
perfect
companion
in the
Classifieds!


Listing Price $143,900 Sold


HOMES FOR SALE
1020


Sale Pending
5.22 ACRE PRAIRIE
CREEK WEST ESTATE
HOME! MARVELOUS
SCREENED POOL &
LANAI 2300 SQ FT
ATTACHED GARAGE, HORSE
BARN, CROSS FENCED
HORSE PASTURES,
DETACHED GARAGE &
SCENIC GROUNDS &
POND. OFFERS MANY
FEATURES NEW KITCHEN &
BATH ,TILE FLRS $420,000
JUDY K PETKEWICZ GRI CRS
ALLISON JAMES ESTATES &
HOMES 941-456-8304

Find the

new You

in the

Classifieds!


1744 Ripley Streel
North Port, fl
3428(

Single family hom

3 bedrooms, 2 bath,

for $137,750


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Friday, May 30, 2014


ads~yoursun~net


E/N/c The Sun Classified Page 1


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The Sun Classified Page 2 EINIC ads .yoursun net Friday, May 30, 2014


IT


At our premier retirement residences we know that you will feel right at home. Our
residences have been designed for the discriminating senior who has planned for their
retirement years to enjoy life to its fullest.
Our premier retirement residences prestigious locations alone are enough for you to
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A PLACL


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At the area's only gated retirement residences, you will enjoy:
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Qualified nursing staff 24 hours a day. Much, much more


9
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2901 Jacaranda blvd.
Venice, FL )4-Z9
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4-900 S. Sumter 5lvc.
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4-950 Pocatella Ave.
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2+9+9 Sandhill blvd.
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A55i5tec Living Facilitqi Lic #9905
9+1- -76+-577


en io r F i Friendly Helper s
Senior Friendly Helper is a premier Companion Service.
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Services are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week or as needed
Shopping Medication Reminders Laundry
Light Housekeeping, Etc.
Please call us today and schedule a FREE no-obligation consultation
90 9414 l-Q 1 117


JAMES W. MALLONEE, P.A.
LAW OFFICE
JAMES W. MALLONEE
PROBATE WILLS/TRUSTS
GUARDIANSHIPS REAL ESTATE
Office Hours Monday thru Friday, 9:00AM to 5:00PM
901 Venetia Bay Blvd. #360, Venice, FL 34285
946 Tamiami Trail, #206, Port Charlotte, FL 33953
(941) 207-2223
www.j ameswmallonee.com
o(941) 206-2223


1112 -


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If You Would Like More Intormation
You Are Invited To Attend A
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941 -2 6-4784


Port Charlotte
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Call 941-624-4404 TTY-1-800-955-8771


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The Sun Classified Page 2 E/N/C


ads~yoursun,nef


Friday, May 30, 2014






Friday, May 30, 2014 ads .you rsun net F/N/C The Sun Classified Page 3


ii 4 0WW04
a tj 1


Borrow


Better Solution, Ic,
a non-medical solution for your everyday needs!
Our caregivers are experienced, screened,
bonded, and insured employees. We offer
temporary or Long-Term services in
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withCONFIDENCE!


William "Bill" Mercer
Specialist with
12 years experience
NMLS #439847


REVERSE MORTGAGE
ASSOCIATES LLC@
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Call our local office at...

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Clock Tower Plaza
265 E. Marion Avenue, Suite 116
Punta Gorda, FL 33950


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*must nav nnrtt,~v aes ndIins.urnce


N #8**call for details

F NMLS #393872n. ar'nr


5400 S. Biscayne Dr.
- North Port, FL 34287

941-423-0800
- -- www.miracleworld.us


rz4,


Household Organization
Wardrobe Assistance
" Alzheimers & Facility Care
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& Agencies
Enjoy a beautiful day o r
evening while knowing your
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Free Assessments!
Call Todap)!


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" 24/7 Available


I-I


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24- HOURCARE
MEAL PREPARATION
AND MORE...


Call us today

Miracle World

Senior Medical Social Center, Spa Salon, and International Cuisine

in one convenient location


Special Lunch
$10


PREVENT Serious Bathroom Falls
Let Us Install A
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GRAB BAR
Recommended by Doctors and
... Physical Therapists
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2 Post Stair Railings Over 20 years Experience
& Hallway Banisters Available Don't Wait To Fall to Call!
Jim's Bathroom Grab Bars, LLC
941-626-4296 -eafgif
fim -.h th room fwrqhh.4 r-.na ma ai- theOlt


First surgeon in
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109 Taylor Street Punta Gorda
(941) 505-2020
BetterVision.net


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Gulfwinds
Where Compassion & Care is Always There.
Rates as low as $1,500/Month
We provide the following
Assisted Living in a homey atmosphere
Assistance with all activities of daily living
Medications Bathing Dressing
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Three daily nutritional meals and snacks
Laundry and linen services
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Cleaning rooms Fully sprinklered building
GUlfwiNds AssiSTEd LiviNq FAciliTy
www.gulfwindsalf.com
2745 E. Venice Ave., Venice, FL 34292
Tel: 941-488-5970


A Welcome Home in
Englewood, LLC
Shelley Belcher, RN
Administrator
2015 E Dolphin Dr.
Englewood, FL 34223
#AL 12221
(941) 375-1044 (941) 475-9626
belcher94174@msn.com
Assisted Living


Please call Mark


To place your ad


HABLAMOS ES;P AOL


Friday, May 30, 2014


ads~yoursun~net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 3


D


q ,yl O E


4 1 p q 40 40 1






The Sun Classified Page 4 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Friday, May 30, 2014


HOMES FOR SALE


5.68 ACRES IN BEAUTIFUL
PRAIRIE CREEK WEST
PRIVATE SETTING, 3 BDRMS
2 BATH ,FAMILY RM, STONE
FIREPLACE, SPACIOUS
SCREENED LANAIFORMAL
DINING AREA, ATT GARAGE +
DETACHED WORK SHOP
BLACK ToP ROADS & DRIVE
MINUTES TO PUNTA GORDA, &
Hwy 75.6- 0
NOW $248,500.
JUDY K PETKEWICZ GRI CRS
ALUSON JAMES ESTATES & HOMES
S941-456-8304


3/2.5/2 Cute Home
Includes Fenced Lot, For
Your Furry Friends. Nice
Quiet Golfing Community
w/Walking, Biking Or Golf
Cart Ride To Beautiful Peace
River. Perfect For Retiring
Baby Boomers. $130,000
231-499-9574

Need a

new Job?

Look in the

Classifieds!


3/2/3 Model POOL Home!
Very GREEN Home with
Energy Efficiencies! This is a
MUST SEE Home! $349,900.
Elaine Martin, Fisherman's Vil-
lage Realty. 941-661-4800

EDCED


Well iVainainea 5/2/2 IUUL
Home on Quiet Cul-De-Sac!
Spacious Rooms &
Special Features!
$199,99. $174,900.
VERY MOTIVATED SELLER!
Sue Ellen Fumich,
941-276-2894
Coldwell Banker Morris Realy, Inc




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S U N NN SP PER
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HOMES FOR SALE


rIlNJLEVVUUU VVL IFeI
with 2.62 Acres 4 bed,
3 bath & 2 car garage.
$349k
Terry Long / Keller
Williams 941-830-2347


HOMES FOR SALE


PORT CHARLOTTE 3/2/2
Open Floor Plan, White Stone
Fireplace, Skylights, Cathedral
Ceilings, Ceiling Fans, Solar
Htd. Pool w/Child Barrier, Spa
& Utility Shed. BY OWNER
$171,000 941-661-7434


NORTH PORT 1 acre of Pr H .-m L..I It o/
Land, Motivated Seller. Pool Home With Bonus Room,
4556 Addley Ave. 1878 SF Eat In Kitchen w/Granite
home, 3/2/2 Beautiful, Counters, Glass Backsplash &
Immaculate, move-in ready, Split Floor Plan. $178,000
Pool. Helene Panaretos Bill Jones 941-743-4200
Sellstate Priority 239-691-5355 Barnes & Phillips Real Estate


North Port, 1840 Silver Palm
Gorgeous 3-bed, 2-bath
Waterfront Pool Home in
Prestigious Gated Golf
Community On Oversized Lot
With THREE-CAR GARAGE!
Move-in Ready! Unbeatable
Value at Just $299,000!
MAKE OFFER. Patty Gillespie
Remax Anchor 941-875-2755

SOPE-'V



OPEN HOUSE 5/30-6/1 10-
4 Punta Gorda in 55+ Shell
Creek Park. MH28 Rose St.
35711 Washington Loop Rd.
X-Large Dble Wide, New Roof
& Plumbing. 330-296-6076






Owner Financing
North Port 3/2/2
on oversized lots
Updated, Turnkey,
Like new $979/mo
$155k 941-716-0040






PORT CHARLOTTE
2/2/CP on Freshwater Canal!
Large Living Areas and Lots
of Storage Space! Plenty of
Potential! $79,900.
Deb Sestilio 941-391-1873
Fisherman's Village Realty
I r n, 1


PURI CHALUII
23294 Kim Ave. 3/2/2
Split Plan in Desireable Area!
Gourmet Kitchen, Formal
Dinin, Master Bath w/
Roman ub, w/Walk-In Clos-
ets, Roman Tub, Dbl. Sinks &
MORE! $2!9,99.
$199,900. Sue Ellen Fumich
941-276-2894
Coldwell Banker Morris Realty, Inc





PORT CHARLOTTE
3/2/2 NEW UPDATED
KITCHEN /BATHS, COMPLETELY
RENOVATED, NICE LOCATION.
OWNER/AGENT $109,900.
SUNCOAST ISLES REAL ESTATE
941-268-6820


PUi I ALUI IE,
Spacious Custom 3/2/2,
Htd. Pool & Spa! Beautiful
Kitchen, Top of the Line
Appliances Corner Lot!
$199,999. $195,000.
Doris Walters, Bud Trayn-
er Realty. 941-661-4019
ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!




PFA, K: R II iR T\FR-


38492 WASHINGTON LOOP
Stunning Creek Front View! 10
Acres Along Myrtle Creek
4/3.5/2 With Pool, Rooftop
Deck & Additional Detached
Garage. $450,000
Another 12 Contiguous Acres
Available For $96,000
The McPhee Team
Vicky McPhee 941-815-8064
www.PortCharlotteHomes.net


PUNTA GORDA- 3/4.5/3
Pool Home w/ Gated Entry.
Gourmet Kitchen, Butler's
Pantry Room, Office/Den &
MORE! Private Boat Ramp.
Picturesque Setting on
4+ Acres! All the Bells &
Whistles! $650,000.
Sharon Kerr 941-286-7315
Coldwell Banker
Sunstar Realty


KUI'I AI bJI vvr' I- D dULIIUI
Cheery 3/2/2 Open Floor
Plan on Fresh Water Canal!
Large Yard in Quiet Area!
$274,900. Timothy Mapp,
941-379-2448 Adrienn Czako
310-500-8857 Mapp Realty


POOL HOME. 3/2/2 + DEN,
BUILT 2005 2433 TOTAL SF,
UPGRADES THROUGHOUT, DESIRED
AREA, GREAT CURB APPEAL. THIS
IS A MUST SEE! $199,900
FOR SALE BY OWNER
941-423-7168


HOMES FOR SALE







SALE "EDN
PORT CHARLOTTE
BY OWNER 1145 Inverness
Over 1400 SF, 3/2/2.
Needs TLC. $68,900.
More Info at: KL30.com
Call Keith
941-677-8550






VENICE 3/2/1 Sandalwood
Park (55+). 405 Longwood
Dr. Beautiful 1700 SF home.
Lots of Amenities, communi-
ty pool, Open concept plan.
Close to shopping, Like New
$179,900 941-412-5715
WATERFRONT

IlllHOMES 1030


Water Front 2012 Burnt
Store Isles 2408 SF
Custom Canal Home!
Seawall Dock & BoatLift
Nice locationPrivacy
Viewing Nature Preserve.
New Listing! Was $499-4
Now $479,000
CALL JUDY PETKEWICZ
ALLISON JAMES
ESTATES & HOMES
941-456-8304






NEWLY REMODELED
2br/2ba home Gulf
Access, No bridges, Boat
dock &, lift in Windmill
Village 55 and older,
Very active communi
64 Windmill Blvd. P.G.
$152,750.
Call 810-252-3225 or
810-240-2224






Owner Financing
North Port 3/2/2
Pool home. Gulf
access. $25k Down;
5.7% interest $1590/mo
$298k 941-716-0040


310 Spring Lake Blvd.
Furnished 3/2/2 Lakefront
Pool Home W/Great Views,
Boat Dock & Lift. Remodeled
Kitchen & Pool. $299,900
Wayne Rose 941-268-6349
Barnes & Phillips Real Estate
[Z ._ -_-


PUI LHARLUI I Sailors
Delight! 142' of seawall on
a deep, no bridges to Gulf
waterway. 3/2/2 Pool!
Possible Seller Financing.
$259,900 JEFF RICHARDS,
KELLER WILLIAMS941-875-3366

FIND YOUR
BEST FRIEND
IN THE
CLASSIFIEDS!


:7WTERRONT
HOMES 1030


rulI,4 iA tl L~uA IZO.LZO
3/2/2 Home w/Many Extras.
112 FT. Seawall, 15K Lift, Lg.
Spa, Beautiful Landscaping.
See forsalebyowner.com
ID#23979228 For Details.
$539,900 913-660-8887


Windmill Village
w/Private Marina
A Waterfront Community of
454 Homes & Building Sites
55+ Resident Owned
Sailboat Access-Gated
Large New Clubhouse
w/Lots of Social Activities
215 Rio Villa Drive
Punta Gorda
windmillvillage.org

A Bargain Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds First!
A Whole
Marketplace of
Shopping is right at
your
Fingertips!

CONDOSILAS
FOR SALE
~104~


ONLY 772
(MLS SrA-lCS AS OF 05/15/14)
HOUSES, VIAS, CONDOS
ARE AVAILABLE
AS OF TODAY
IN BEAUTIFUL
VENICE, FLORIDA
CALL US FOR SHOWINGS
ORTO LIST
We do aft of Venice &Area
941-485-4804 Sales
941-484-6777 Rentals
1-800-464-8497


PUI I- GIRUA ISLES
Prime Waterfront Location
Harbor Point Turnkey
2/2 With Dock & Lift
By Owner $169,000!!
Email darby408@aol.com
For Pics 330-715-8000




Aztec & Associate
PUNTA GORDA- Ground
Floor 2/2/CP in Secured
Gated Comm. of Roll's
Landing. Beautiful Grounds!!
Many Amentities $ 7-,9.
$94,500. Stacy Scarrow
941-916-0000


VENICE CONDO/APT.
2/2 Ground Floor, Furnished,
1200 Sq. Ft. $134,900
BIRD BAY REALTY, INC.
941-484-6777 or
800-464-8497


FI NOILLAS7
FOR SALE
1040


To Advertise in
The Showcase
of Homes
Please Call
866-463-1638
or Email;
special@sunnewspapers.net



I~c

WATERFRONT CONDO
3/2 W/BOATLIFT, DIRECT
ACCESS TO HARBOR NEXT TO
FISHERMEN'S VILLAGE.
LINDA MCCRANEY GULF
REALTY 941-468-2076
$349,900

DUPLEXES
FOR SALE
1070


ULU EENLWLOUUU
Both units 1/1 on 2.5 lots,
completely renovated in/out,
tile throughout. Minutes to
beaches & walking distance
to historic Dearborn.
$119,000 941-268-9995


FOR SALE


PUNITA LiU A, Adorable 1
Bedroom w/ 1 Bath. Great
Handcrafted TV Room w/
Murphy Bed & Add'l Bath
Combined w/ Laundry Room.
Furnished Nicely! Updated
Kitchen & Bath w/ Exception-
al Storm Windows. Lovely,
Friendly 55+ Neighbors.
Dock & Davit for Small Boat.
$72,000. 941-286-1246
VENICE RANCH M.H.E.
Community is being Renovat-
ed! Lot rental community
12x46 2BR/1BA, furnished,
asking $3,500
24x32 2BR/1BA, unfurnished,
new appliances,
asking $5,300.
Others to choose from.
WALKING DISTANCE TO
PUBLIX & CVS
55+ comm. No pets
Call Jane
941-488-5672
www.VeniceRanch.com






VENICE, 2BR/2BA
MOBILE HOME, FULLY FURN,
CLOSE TO POOL. OWNER
FINANCING $35,000
516-728-2991
MANACTURED]
HOMES FOR SALE
1095


I .j,O;J I
2/2 Double Carport
All Newer & Updated
Peaceful Private Lot & View
Amenities Galore!
55+ Community
Call Mike 941-356-5308

CHECK THE
CLASSIFIEDS!






Friday, May 30, 2014


ads.yoursun net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 5


F ANCTURED]
HOMES FOR SALE
~10

ARCADIA VILLAGE #58. 2BR
2BA, all appliances, 2 lanai's,
carport, partially furnished.
$34,900. Call 708-638-1087


PUNTA GORDA
Beautiful New Homes
Available from $64,500
2/2, Carport, Shed &
Screened Room Monthly
Fees $405.00


i =


Call Today for Appt.I
239-995-3337


2BR/2BA/2cG, SCR. LANAI,
FURNISHED 2006 PALM HAR-
BOR. EXTREMELY CLEAN.
MOVE IN READY $49,999
517-392-6379 OR
941-486-8735

HOMES FOR RENT








PORT CHARLOTTE
2/2 2ND FL OAKS IV .............. $675
3/2/1 AFFORDABLE 3 BDRM ...... $825
3/2/2 LARGE DECK ................ $1075
PUNTA GORDA
3/3/2 HERITAGE LAKES ........... $1400
LAKE SUZY
3/2/2 INCL. LAWN CARE ......... $1250
WE NEED RENTAL LISTINGS
FULL PROPERTY LIST ONLINE
www.almar-rentals.com
941-627-1465
800-964-3095
LET US MANAGE YOUR PROPERTY
ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!


HOMES FOR RENT HOMES FOR RENT


ANNUAL & SEASONAL
RENTALS
Call The Pineapple Girls
941-473-'333
Pineapple Gulf Prop. Mgmt. Inc.
www.PentEnglewood.com

ANNUAL RENTALS

0 3/2/2 LANAI DOCK ON
CALAL SGC $1300
0 3/2/2 ROTONDA, LANAI,
GRANITE, TILE SS APPLI-
ANCES $1100
0 2/2/cPDUPLEX CLOSE TO
DOWNTOWN. $775
West Coast Property
Mgmt 941-473-0718
www.rentalsflorida.net

AWARD WINNING
SUNBELT MGT.
SERVICES
RENTALS
2/2/1 Tile Floors,
Corvette Ln., N.P.
$750/mo
3/2/1 Waterfront,
Ayshire Cir. P.C.
$900/mo.

*we welcome new listings*
COMPLETE LISTINGS
(941) 764-7777
sunbeltmgtservices.com

BAY INDIES RESORT
COMMUNITY


-l




COME SEE
WHAT OUR
LIFESTYLE
HAS TO OFFER!

950 RIDGEWOOD
AVENUE VENICE, FL
34285 941-485-5444
Aged Qualified

CALUSA SPRINGS
NORTH PORT
4BR/2BA/2CAR GARAGE
SINGLE FAMILY HOMES
Starting at $1050/mo
Bring your pets!
Now Open Mon Fri 8-4
Evenings and Saturdays
By appt. only (941) 613-1469
SECHON 8 WELCOME
NEED CASH
Have A Garage
Sale!





1E It AI
A1E A L ESTATE
For a Complete List Go To
eraportcharlotte.com
$1550..3/2/2 Pool Home ........... DC
$1300..3/2/2 1667 SqFt ...... PC
$1150..3/2/2 Lawn Srv incl..NP
$850...2/2/1 All Tile ............. PC
$750..2/1/1 996 Sq Ft ......... PC
LET US RENT YOUR HOME
Agent Available On Weekends
We Forgive Foreclosures For Renters
941-255-0760

0 NEED A RENTAL*
Paradise Properties &
Rentals, Inc 941-625-RENT
PORT CHARLOTTE 2/2/1
Available NOW! Tile floors, w/d
hookup. $725/mo Water incl.
609-709-8538
PORT CHARLOTTE 3/1/1
21318 Stillwater Ave. Tile floors,
near cultural center $650 +sec.
Pets $25/mo 941-627-6448


APARTMENTS
FOR RENT


PUNTA GORDA 3/2 on Shell Venice Studio & 1
Creek $750 (inc discount) Bedroom Accepting
Realty Mgt 941-625-3131 Section 8 Vouchers ,0I
flarentals.net 941-488-7766

A ROOMS FOR RENT
Rentls &Proprty1360
Management :
Iwww.floridarpm.coml
PORT CHARLOTTE, Clean,
Quiet, $125wk!$450mo, incl
CONDOS/VILLAS Util, Furnished, References.

FOR RENT 941-743-3070/941-740-2565
1240 PORT CHARLOTTE, full house
priv.. Male only. $425/M S10


ANNUAL &
SEASONAL RENTALS
IN BIRD BAY VILLAGE
Venice, FL
BIRD BAY REALTY, INC.
941-484-6777 or
800-464-8497

ENGLEWOOD TROPICAL
upscale 2/2 furn grnd fir
Condo Every Amenity Avail
thru 12/31/14. 2 mth min.
$900mo+ utils 941474-7400
PUNTA GORDA 3/2 Down-
town area. Gorgeous view.
2000 sq ft at Prestigious Har-
borwalk $1550 Realty Mgt
941-625-3131 flarentals.net


PORT CHARLOTTE 55+
2 ROOM & BATH, 1/2DUPLEX
COMPLETELY FURNISHED.
2 BLOCKS FROM HARBOR &
FISHING PIER. $850 MO
INLCUDES ELEC & WATER.
941-629-5486 or
317-919-1566
PORT CHARLOTTE 2/2
plus den, 2110 Redmond St.
city water, $750/mo
813-240-8386
PORT CHARLOTTE
Close to Hosp. 2/1, tiled,
Clean, $575/mo 1st, last +
sec. $575 941-916-1535


FOR RENT









PORT CHARLOTTE Studio
Apt, on nice FW canal, totally
renovated, no pets, non smok-
er. 1/L/S $650 941-626-4368
Employ Classified!
10

PORT CHARLOTTE
VILLA SAN CARLOS II
AFFORDABLE
Income Based Apartments
for 62 or Older
Income Limits Apply
Call 941-624-4404
TTY-1-800-955-8771
VILLA SAN CARLOS 255
Easy Street Income based
6+ or needing features
of accessible unit. Restric-
tions Apply. 941-624-2266
-i-iY-1-800-955-8771



WILLOW CREEK
Affordable 55+ community
tucked away in North Port.
Pool, Activity Room, Fitness
Center, Restricted Access
Entries. Great Specials on 1BR
& 2BR Apart-ments. Small Pet
Friendly. Call us Today for a
Tour of our Community!


per wk Rdy 6/6 941-204-9515
PORT CHARLOTTE, Lovely
Room For Rent, TV, Linens,
Private Entrance. $98/wk.
941-828-0248
PUNTA GORDA Queen
Room Specials $85 & $65 per
week. Two WIFI TV's, country
setting. 941-763-9171
RNTALS TO SHARE




MURDOCK Beaches, YMCA.
Share w/lperson. Everything
incl. $500/mo 740-490-8828
MURDOCK Tropical, Close to
YMCA, no s/d, everything incl.
$500/mo 740-490-8828


PORT CHARLOTTE 3/2/2
Male/Female To Share Big
Beautiful Pool Home. No
Drugs, Drunks Or Pets. Quiet
Area $450/mo. +Sec Dep.
781-572-8215
Advertise Today!

VACATION/
~ ESONAL RENTALS
~1390~

ENGLEWOOD EAST Spa-
cious 2/2/1 quiet neighbor-
hood, incl. everything. 6/15 -
9/15 $1100/mo 774-526-7538

LOTS & ACREAGE










SELLING YOUR
HOME, CONDO,
OR LOT?
We can help you.
Advertise your home,
condo or lot with us
and reach over
175,000 readers in
Charlotte Sarasota, &
DeSoto Counties and
online everyday.

Ask about our 90
day special.
Call one of our
classified experts for
all the details at
866-463-1638
Realtors Welcome!


PORT CHARLOTTE
4 adjoining lots,
Water/sewer, location,
Location, Omi. Multiple
use, Incl. 3 family per
lot. Will hold 1st note.
$45K ea 941-624-5597


LOTS & ACREAGE


PUN I/O RDAUI' 5 b acres close
to downtown. Well & Septic in
place. Stalls/Corral, 30'X30'
garage with a/c office & bath.
Rima Riggs Remax Anchor
$124,700 941-626-2040


P"UI IA L OUA
Well Priced 5 Acre! Plenty to
Offer! Space w/out Restric-
tions. Enjoy Florida Living- In
the Country! $44,900
Deb Sestilio 941-391-1873
Fisherman's Village Realty

FIND YOUR
BEST FRIEND
IN THE
CLASSIFIEDS!
BUSINESS RENTALS
1610



PORT CHARLOTTE
Exceptional 8,000 sq. ft.
building available in
Murdock area.
18215 Paulson Dr.
Originally built to house
a phone company. Large
open office area, confer-
ence rooms, server room
and warehouse. To
schedule a visit contact
Glenn Nickerson at
(941) 258-9520.
TURN KEY Restaurant space.
10K SF in great location w/heavy
traffic. Incl. all equip. Motivated.
941-763-5251 317-496-1380

INCOME PROPERTY


VISANI COMEDY
DINNER THEATER
# 1 RATED ON TRIP ADVISOR!
OWNER WANTS To RETIRE.
POSSIBLE OWNER FINANCING.
INTEGRITY R.E. OF FLA
941-627-8948

COMMERCIAL/
INDUSTRIAL PROP


ARCADIA 5.26 ac By Owner!
House & Shop, 800 ft. Hwy
17 Frontage, Zoned Comm.
Info. 863-494-5540 or
863-244-3585


Murdock Prof. Plaza
US 41 Frontage
I Approx. 984 sq ft. I
I Call For Details I
94-29-111J

I & STORAGE I


AAA LOCATION!
PORT CHARLOTTE
4,000 sf. Warehouse w/
Office/Apartment on
Peachland Blvd. & Veterans.
Albert 941-628-2883


2000


EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT
2005 Services
2010 Professional
2015 Banking
2020 Clerical
2025 Computer
2030 Medical
2035 Musical
2040 Restaurant/Hotel
2050 SkilledTrades
2060 Management
2070 Sales
2090 Child/Adult
Care Needed
2100 General
2110 Part-time/ Temp
2115 Home Based
Business
2120 Seeking Employment

PROFESSIONAL/



1BOOKKEEPING CLERK
For Very Busy Office.
E-mail Resume To
CAMCOMPANY555@GMAIL.COM

PUT CLASSFIEDS
TO WORK
FOR YOU!

FIND A JOB!
BUY A HOME!
BUY A CAR!
CA or Multple Properties.
Experience Preferred.
E-mail Resume To
CAMCOMPANY555@GMAIL.COM

REAL ESTATE
SALES
MANAGER
POSITION
Looking for Talented,
Respected, Experienced
Realtor for
Sales Management
Position for an
Established and
Growing Company.
Candidate Must Have
Leadership Experience
with Strong Work Ethics,
People and Technical
Skills and Aspires to
Grow in a Company with
Nearly $2 Billion Dollars
in Closed Sales Volume.
Must be Energetic with
Long Term Goals.
Real Estate Management
Experience Preferred.
Please Email Your
Resume to:
hrinfo7206@gmail.com

CLERICAL/OFFICE/




BOOKKEEPER!
ACCOUNTING
CLERK
Financially Sound,
Expanding Company is
Seeking a Full-Time
Bookkeeper/Accounting
Clerk. Fast Paced
Environment Needs
Someone With Ability to
Multi Task and Switch
Tasks on a Regular Basis.
Applicant Mut be
Extremely Flexible as
Position is Constantly
Changing. This Job is
a Combination of
Accounting/Bookkeeping
and Some Administrative
Work. Experience in
Real Estate is Preferred.
Please Email Your
Resume to:
hrinfo7206@gmail.com






The Sun Classified Page 6 E/N/C


ads.yoursunnet


Friday, May 30, 2014


COMPUTER





ADVERTISING
PRODUCTION
GRAPHIC DESIGNER

The Englewood Sun is
looking for an
experienced
production/graphic
designer for 28 hours a
week with creative ability
to join our team of
professional Advertising
Sales Executives.
Experience with
Photoshop, Illustrator,
Quark, and
Indesign required.
Please send resume to
Englewood Sun
Attention Carol Moore
120 W. Dearborn St.
Englewood Fl, 34223
Fax: 941-681-3008
cymoore@sun-herald.com
We are an Equal
Opportunity Employer
& a Drug and
Nicotine Free Diversified
Workplace.
Pre-employment drug
and nicotine
testing required.
MEDICAL







Life _


Center
WWW.LCCA.COM
We're Life Care Centers of
America, the nation's largest
privately-owned skilled care
provider. If you share our
heartfelt approach to caring
for the elderly, consider
oining our family at Life Care
Center of Punta Gorda. We
offer competitive pay and
benefits in a mission-driven
environment.

LPN's FULL TIME
PART TIME/PRN

CNA's ALL SHIFTS FULL
TIME, PART TiME/PRN

COOKS
EXPERIENCE PREFERRED

Come visit with us at 450
Shreve St. Punta Gorda EOE


A Bargain Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds First!
A Whole
Marketplace of
Shopping is right at
your
Fingertips!

COOK NEEDED
for Prestigious ALF. 3 Years
+ Experience in Hospitality/
Hospital Environment.
Fax Resume to:
(941)-423-2663
MILLENNIUM PHYSICIAN
GROUP IS GROWING
AGAIN!!!!

CMA'S
CMA's for Englewood,
Port Charlotte, Punta Gorda
locations. Visit us at
www.millen niu mphysician.com
click on "employment" and
"open jobs" to apply for
open positions. Come work
for the best! DFWF/EOE


L MEDICAL



CNA/HHA TRAINING Day and
Evening classes CPR & 1st aide
classes Call 941-255-0675
www.bestchancecpr.com







RNS / LPNS / CNAS

FULL TIME,
PART TIME, PRN


HARBORCHASE OFFERS
COMPETITIVE WAGES AND AN
EXCELLENT BENEFITS PACK-
AGE SUCH AS MEDICAL,
DENTAL, VISION & 401K

PART-TIME TEAM MEMBERS
RECEIVE BENEFITS
AT 20+ HOURS.

FOR CONSIDERATION PLEASE
APPLY IN PERSON TO:

HARBORCHASE
OF VENICE
ASSISTED LIVING AND
SKILLED NURSING
950 PINEBROOK ROAD
VENICE, FL 34285
(941) 484-8801 PH
(941) 484-3450 FAX
EOE M/F/D/V
SCHEDULING/FRONT DESK
PT-20 hrs/wk. Surgery Center,
Med. office & insurance exp.
FAX 941-764-7542.
HORIZON
HEALTHCARE
-INSTITUTE
www.HorizonTechlnstitute .Com
"ADVANCE YOUR CAREER"
Licensed & Accredited School
Murdock Town Center on 41
1032 Tamiami Tr Unit 3
YOU can become a LPN within
11 months. Enrollment ongoing.
PHLEBOTOMY, EKG, CNA,
Classes Start June 2 '14
LPN-Nights, next class
starts July 28 '14
Start Working In 2-5 wks!
Classes Start Each Month
Call For Class Dates
Nursing Assistant (120hrs)
Home Health Aide (75hrs)
Phlebotomy Tech (165hrs)
EKG Tech (165hrs)
Patient Care Tech (600hrs)
Job Assist. & Pymt. Plans
Call Now to Register!
941-889-7506
RESTAURANT

HOTEL


SKILLED TRADES




ASPHALT LABORER
Looking For FT Asphalt
Laborer. Will Train If
Necessary. Applications
Can Be Picked Up At:
SUNLAND PAVING
4211 E. Henry St.
Punta Gorda, FL
941-625-5888


SKILLED TRADES/

AC SERVICE TECH &
LEAD INSTALLER,
$500 sign on bonus! Email
Resume: jobskhc@gmail.com
Or Fax: 941-629-8666

AUTO BODY SHOP
NEEDS PAINTER.
EXPERIENCE A MUST.
APPLY @
23309 HARBORVIEW RD
CHARLOTTE HARBOR.
EXP'D SKID STEER OPERTA-
TOR, Great Pay! Benefits! Vaca-
tion, 401K, Call 941-628-9433
EXPERIENCED PLUMBER
Res. New Construction
40+ hours. Immediate
Opening 941-613-6785
Find yolir Best

Ifrimd In the
lassleds

EXPERIENCED TIRE
TECH. 941-639-5681


FULL TIME
EXPERIENCED
HEAVY DUTY
DIESEL MECHANIC
NEEDED

SUNLAND PAVING:
4211 EAST HENRY ST.
PUNTA GORDA, FLA.
941-625-5888
FOR MORE INFO.
HVAC INSTALLER
Must Have Min. 3 Yrs. Exp.
& Valid FL DL. EOE/DFWP.
TOP WAGES & BENEFITS.
Apply In Person Only 2460
Highlands Rd., Punta Gorda
IMMEDIATE OPENING
I*BACKHOE OPERATOR I
Experienced in lake excavation I
*FINISH DOZER OPER. I
Experienced in finish slopeI
work on the dirt crew.
1*LABORER I
1 For concrete crew. I
1* CONCRETE FINISHERS I
IExperienced in flat work, I
Icurbs and gutters. Able to l
Finish behind the curbl
Machine. Well-established I
I construction company pro-I
viding excellent pay and ben-1
efits. Please apply in person
at 3801 North Orange Ave.,
Sarasota, FL 34234
Or send resume to
JobsAtDerr@gmail.com
EOE/DFWP


SUN COAST
PRESS

A rapidly growing daily &
commercial print shop, has
the following opportunity at
both their Port Charlotte and
Venice Plants.
FT Press Operators

Experience as Press Opera-
tor. Willingness to work
day/night shift, weekends &
holidays, as needed.

Proficient with back to back
color registration, folder &
1/4 folder operations. Knowl-
edge of pasters and stack-
ers a plus. Candidates must
be reliable and have the abili-
ty to work at a fast pace
while maintaining good quali-
ty and meeting deadlines.

We offer health insurance,
paid holidays, PTO, 401K,
AFLAC. We are a drug & nico-
tine free workplace.

Pre-employment
testing required

Please email resume to
Sue Chisesi
schisesi@suncoastpress.com
or
Amy Honoosic
ahonoosic@suncoastpress.com


SKILLED TRADES



EXP'D ROOFER Wanted
Drug Free Workplace, Must
Have Driver's License.
At Least 1 Year Exp & Own
Transportation. Most Work
Done In South Sarasota
County.
Call Mark Kauffman
Roofing
941-473-3605
TOW TRUCK DRIVER
Must Have Clean Drivers
Record, CDL Preferred.
941-232-8455
941-639-5705
- ----


I NI

FULL TIME
I WAREHOUSE EXPERIENCE
ORGANIZATION SKILLS
HVAC EXPERIENCE A+

10 TOP PAY
I* HEALTH INSURANCE
1 VACATION
0 RETIREMENT PLAN
MUST BE ABLE TO
PASS DRUG &
BACKGROUND CHECK

BOYD BROTHERS
SERVICE INC.
Apply In Person
2460 Highlands Rd., P.G
SALES






ACCOUI.J
[X[CLIIV[

SUN NEWSPAPERS IS LOOKING
FOR MOTIVATED SALES PROFES-
SIONALS WITH A COMMUNITY
SPIRIT WHO ARE READY TO
COMMIT TO A LONG-TERM
CAREER WITH AN ESTABLISHED
SUCCESSFUL MEDIA COMPANY.

DOES THIS DESCRIBE
YOU?
AGGRESSIVE
COLD CALLING PRO
DEAL CLOSER
STRONG WORK ETHICS
MONEY MOTIVATED
EXCELLENT COMMUNICATION
SKILLS
PEOPLE PERSON
COMPUTER LITERATE
*EXCEPTIONAL CUSTOMER
SERVICE SKILLS
*MARKETING FLARE
*ABILITY TO WORK
INDEPENDENTLY

WE OFFER:
*COMPETITIVE SALARY PLUS
COMMISSIONS
*VACATION
*HEALTH INSURANCE
*SICK AND SHORT TERM
DISABILITY
*401(K)
*TRAINING
*ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNI
TIES

WE ARE AN EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER & A
DRUG AND NICOTINE FREE
DIVERSIFIED WORKPLACE.
PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG AND
NICOTINE TESTING REQUIRED.

IF WE DESCRIBED YOU, SEND
OR EMAIL YOUR RESUME TO:
ENGLEWOOD SUN
ATTENTION: CAROL MOORE
120 W DEARBORN
ENGLEWOOD, FLORIDA
34223
FAX: 941-681-3008
EMAIL:
CYMOORE@SUN-HERALD.COM


SALES




Advertising Sales
Executive

The Charlotte Sun is
looking for "Winners" to
join our team of
professional Advertising
Sales Executives.
If you are never satisfied
with average successes,
are self-motivated, goal
oriented, confident,
enthusiastic and believe
that the customer is all
important, we would like
to talk to you.
The successful
candidates must possess
good oral and written
communication skills, be
organized and a team
player. Sales experience
a plus but we will train
the right persons.

We offer:
Competitive salary plus
commission
Vacation
Health insurance
Sick and short term
disability
Training
Stable company that is
very Community minded
and involved.
Please send resume to:

Advertising Director,
Leslee Peth
Charlotte Sun
23170 Harborview Road
Charlotte Harbor, FL
33980
Email:
Lpeth@sun-herald.com
We are an Equal
Opportunity Employer &
a Drugand nicotine Free
Diversified Workplace.


READY TO MAKE
MORE MONEY?

SALES/NEW BUSINESS
* DEVELOPER

Come work with the Sun
newspapers Telephone
Sales, New Business
Developer team
: located in
: North Port Florida.

We are America's Best
:Community Daily newspaper,:
with the largest classified
section in Florida. This is an
outstanding opportunity to
join a company where you
make the difference. We are
looking for a full-time
person, with computer skills:
and with a positive,
energetic, can-do approach
to join our telephone sales,
new business developer
team. We are looking for a
highly motivated individual
who thrives on challenges,
:loves learning new skills and
enjoys working in a positive
team environment.

. :e offer:
.e Training
:0 Stable company that
is very Community
minded and involved.
i Opportunity to expand .
your business skills


Please email your resume
: to:
Jobs@sunletter.com


* Equal Opportunity
: Employer/Drug & Nicotine :
: Free Diversified Workplace. :
Pre-Employment Drug &
!Nicotine Testing gRequired._

IFEE CSH7


SALES







S ality MFur r & Int Design
FURNITURE SALESPEOPLE
& EXPERIENCED DESIGNER
Join Baer's Furniture, The
Leading Premier Furniture
Retail Store In Florida! Sales
Exp., Nights & Weekends
Required; Furniture Sales A
Plus! Experienced Designer
Also Needed. We Offer
Competitive Compensation,
Generous Benefits & A Great
Place To Work!
APPLY IN PERSON:
4200 Tamiami Trail, Port
Charlotte, FL 33952,
Or E-MAIL:
Ihickey@baers.com
EOE/DFWP

LICENSED REAL ESTATE AGENT
For Small, Non Franchised,
Well Established Real Estate
Office To Round Out Team.
Full Time/Part Time.
Hans Kirsten 941-350-0441
Bird Bay Realty

Need a
new Ride?

Find it
in the
Classifieds!
SALES & MARKETING
ASSISTANT
Entry Level Marketing/
Entry Level Advertising
We are America's Best
Community Daily newspaper,
with the largest classified
section in Florida. We are
located in North Port Florida.
Duties Include, but are
not limited to:
Executing sales and
marketing functions to
company standards
Assists customers with any
questions they may have in
regards to our products
Gains knowledge on
all new clients the
company acquires
Ensure highest level of
customer service resulting in
increased productivity and
achieving sales goals
Knowledge of our
systems follow through of
advertising copy
Growth opportunities may be
available for those who
qualify.This position is entry
level, previous experience in
sales and marketing helpful.
We look for candidates with
the following:
Some college or
degree preferred
Outstanding
interpersonal skills
Student Mentality
Leadership Experience
Experience in retail, sales,
advertising & marketing
Ability to work in a high
energy environment
Please email resume to:
Jobs@sunletter.com
Sun Classifieds attention:
Geri Kotz EOE, DFWP
Pre-employment drug &
nicotine testing required.

SALES **
** CASH PAID DAILY**
Excellent Workplace! Great
Hours & Benefits. Base vs.
Generous Commission Aver-
age $15+/hr. Port Charlotte
941-625-8800




DRY CLEANER, Bag, Inspect,
Delivery, Responsible, Depend-
able M-F Call 941-743-3535






Friday, May 30, 2014


ads.yoursun net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 7


L GENERAL



GOLF COURSE
MAINTENANCE,
Local Golf Course Looking
for Responsible Full Time
Employees to
Work on Course.
Training is Available
for the Right Persons.
Landscaping Background
Helpful but not Required.
CALL 941-697-2505 TO
FIND OUT DETAILS AND APPLY.

CASHIERS
DUNKIN DONUT SERVERS
DELI PERSON NEEDED
Exp'd for C-stores in Pt. Char-
lotte. Call 941-882-4015
LANDSCAPE INSTALLER
NOT LAWN MAINTENANCE!
941-662-8733

MAILROOM

THE VENICE GONDOLIER

NOW HIRING

Part-time, must be produc-
tion oriented, able to lift at
least 20 lbs. and willing to
work flexible hours.
To fill out an Application
Apply in person
Mon.-Fri. 9-4
Venice Gondolier
200 E Venice Ave.
Venice, FL

Please, no phone calls

We are a drug and
nicotine free workplace
Pre-employment drug
and nicotine testing
required
MOVER, exp. needed, Curry
Moving & Storage, 23152 Har-
borview Rd. 941-456-5563.
PAINTERS NEEDED, Valid
Drivers Lic. & Transportation
Needed. 155 S. McCall Rd.
Englewood 941-474-9091
PART TIME
OFFICE HELP
Answer Phones, Process
Paperwork. Computer
Skills Required.
Apply in person.
Raymond Building Supply
2233 Murphy Court,
North Port
EOE, DFWP
SWIMMING POOL REPAIR. If
you have exp. in skimmer
change-outs I'll talk to you. Call
Sherlock Leak 941-764-8181.
TECHNICIAN, Swimming
Pool. If you are an
upstanding person with
excellent work ethics
applications accepted
between 9 12noon.
$12.00/HR TO START.
Must have Florida drivers
license. MUST HAVE 5 ys
of driving with absolutely
clean driving record.
Howard's Pool World,
12419 Kings Hwy.
Lake Suzy.
NO PHONE CALLS

PART TIME/
TEMPORARY


CAREGIVER
PART TIME Small ALF,
VENICE,
941-468-4678 or 488-6565


EMPLOYMENT



HOUSE SIT Excellent
References 941-255-0524

SCassified = Sales


3000








NOTICES

ANNOUNCEMENTS

3010


lEVER DREAM OF GOING|
TO AFRICA? Now Is Your
Chance To Go On A Photo
Safari In Sept. 2014. Call
Susan at 941-979-7322
FOR MORE DETAILS ON THIS
AMAZING ADVENTURE!!




FREE MERCHANDISE ADS!.
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
SUN-CLASSIFIEDS.COM
and place your ad.
"CLICK ON CLICK HERE
TO PLACE YOUR AD NOW"
and follow the prompts.
FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 5 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**Everyone Needs to
Register on Our
New Site**


SUN US




THE MEDICAL OFFICE of
Robert Watine, MD LLC Will be
Closed Effectively May 26th
2014. The Office of Dr. Has-
san & Dr. Kamal Will be Taking
Over Care of the Patients.
They are Located at 3005 Car-
ing Way, Unit 2, Port Charlotte
33952. Phone: 941-249-8493
Medical Records Custodian
Will be Debbie Hooper and/or
Dr. Hassan & Dr. Kamal
V V ADOPTION: V V V
A Creative Financially
Secure Family, Beach
House, Music, LOVE,
Laughter awaits 1st Baby.
Expenses Paid. Trish
V 1-800-552-0045 V
V V FLBar42311VVV

HAPPYADS
3015





Place your Happy
Ad for only
$14.75
3 lines 7 day.

Add a photo for
only $13.00!

Please call

(866)-463-1638


ADVERTISE

In

The Classifieds!


PERSONALS





BDWORKS
ISKILLED IN RELAXATIN

ORIENTAL MASSAGE in
Venice. 617 US 41 Business.
10% off w/ad. 941-786-3803

RELAXATION STATION
1225 US 41 UNIT B3.
CHARIOTrE T ADE CENTER
N OF 776 941-625-0141
Now HIING
RELAXATION
Call for info 941-726-7617
Pt. Charlotte
RELAXATION
Located in Englewood
Call Stormy 941-549-5520
SSINGLE MAN looking for sin-
gle woman. 941-284-7939
WM, 60, NS, drug free, look-
ing for female companion, 30-
68, likes dining, beach,
movies. Call 941-999-7297.

A Bargain
Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds
first!
A Whole
Marketplace
of shopping
is right at
your
fingertips!

SCHOOLS
& INSTRUCTION
L 306~



CNA Training, HHA, MED
ASST, CPR. Onsite testing
941-429-3320 IMAGINE
ED KLOPFER SCHOOLS OF
CNA TRAINING 1 wk class $250.
Locations: Sarasota, Port Char-
lotte, Ft. Myers. 1-800-370-1570
TRADITIONAL SHAOLIN
KUNG FU CLASSES for
Adults & children. FREE
classes available. All areas.
Call for more info.
941-204-2826
UNEMPLOYED? Earn Your
Commercial Driver's License
(CDL) in Just 3 Wks. & Join
the Ranks of Employed Truck
Drivers Nationwide. Located
Punta Gorda FL. SunCoast
Trucking Academy. 941-855-
0193 or 941-347-7445

BIBLE STUDY
& CHURCHES
Lrw!306~

CALVARY BIBLE CHURCH
1936 E. Venice Ave. Venice
Friday at 9am.
Study features video teachings
of noted Bible Scholars on
various subjects.
For more info. Call Rev. Jones
at: 941-485-7070 or visit
www.CBCVenice.com

COMMUNITY CENTER
4PM 7PM each Wednesday.
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
PC, Open to All Ages.
For more info 941-766-9357
EDGAR CAYCE A.R.E.
Search for God Study Group
6 PM 7 PM each Tuesday at
Venice Public Library
More Info call 941-966-1964.


FAITH BUILDERS
A Basic Study to Build your
Christian Faith. Call Pastor
Parsons at Christ the King
Lutheran Church for times.
941-766-9357 Port Charlotte
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
278 S. Mango St Englewood
Mondays & Thursdays
at 9am. Offering chair exer-
cise classes For more info.
Call 941-474-2473
GULF COAST
HEALING ROOMS
If you need healing, we want
to pray with you!
Our prayer teams are
available to minister to
you by appointment.
Thursdays 10 am-12:30 pm
For apt. call p.863.558.7455
1538 Rio de Janeiro Blvd.
Punta Gorda, Fl 33983
Jesus Still Heals Today!

BURIAL LOTS/7 1
ICRYPTSI


1 BURIAL CRYPT in PG,
$4000. 1 VAULT in Englewood
$6000. Call 941-766-9242.

US ASSIFIED!

MAUSOLEUM SPACE In
Beautiful Restlawn Memorial
Gardens. Tandum(Room for 2!)
Space #2208, Unit 22-W,
Level D. $7,500
954-895-1895 or
brianfarley@comcast.net
ROYAL PALM Gardens. 1 plot
Garden Peace, worth $1,395.
Sell $1,050. 941-764-9196.
TANDEM CRYPT For Sale
Restlawn Memorial Gardens
$5500.00 Call 941-769-4013
LLOST &FOUND]



2 LOST DOGS, Beagle Mixes
One Male & One Female. Near
Midway & Broadranch.
330-760-0682


GREY MALE, neutered,
approx 181bs, lost near
Griggs Rd. Placid Rd and
Archie St. area. Please call
941-681-1525
LOST DOG: Tan & White
Male, on Washington Loop Rd.
Punta Gorda 941-916-5413
LOST LOVE BIRD: YEL-
LOW last seen in Deep
Creek area. Owner is heart-
broken, Mr. Toddy Please
call your mother. Please
941-286-9031

S EDUCATION



MEDICAL OFFICE
TRAINEES NEEDED!
Train to become a Medical
Office Assistant! NO EXPERI-
ENCE NEEDED. Online training
at SC gets you job ready. HS
Diploma/GED & PC/Internet
needed. (888)528-5547.

EXERCISE CLASSES]


GULF COAST ACUPUNCTURE
151 Center Rd.
Wednesdays 5:30pm
Thursdays 9:00 am
Saturdays 8:30am
YOGA FOR BEGINNERS
Proceeds to
Venice Wildlife Center
Call Rick or Mary
941-488-1769


I RELIGION CLASSES



BEGIN YOUR DAY IN
BIBLE STUDY
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
Wednesdays lOAM-11AM.
For more info 941-766-9357
Port Charlotte
FAITH LUTHERAN CHURCH
4005 Palm Drive, Punta Gorda
Various Days & Times
CONFIRMATION/BIBLE STUDY
Adult Infomational Class
941-639-6309
NEW LIFE FAMILY WORSHIP
has "Discipleship Develpo-
ment" Class, "Building a Solid
Foundation" 7PM Every 2nd
Friday of the Month. (941)-
639-1700.
OTHERCLASSES



CONCENTRATIVE MEDITA-
TION with Linda Weser, 4 p.m.
every Monday at Unity Church
of Peace, 1250 Rutledge
Street, off Veterans Boulevard
between Orlando Boulevard
and Torrington Street, Port
Charlotte/North Port line.
Free; open to the public.
941-276-0124

4000


FINANCIAL

L BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
4010

JANITORIAL BUSINESS
FOR SALE, $19,500.
Grossing $60K/Year, Some
Financing Available, Discount
for a Veteran, Supplies &
Equipment Inc. 239-826-2779
SOWN A UPS STORE

Locations Available In
Your Neighborhood. Call
877-623-7253 Or Visit
theupsstorefranchisecom
5000








BUSINESS SERVICES
AN OCCUPATIONAL LIC.
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational
licensing bureau to verify.

ALTERATIONS



ALTERATIONS ON CALL
Certified Master Tailor
40 Yrs. Exp. Busy Schedule?
All Fittings Done In Your
Home Or Office By Appt.
Men's & Women's Alterations
Annette- 941-_375-8153

ALUMINUM
LOM 5006U


THE HEIGHTS ALUMINUM,
INC. Screen Rooms.*
Lanais* Pool Cages.
Rescreens* Seamless
Gutters* Soffit* Fascia.
Pavers* Concrete.
941-613-1414 OR
941-492-6064
Lic./Ins. AAAO010565 &
R6ALCL-5AC-33


AIRPORT SHUTTLE



FLORIDA AIRPORT
SHUTTLE TRANSPORT
$25 ONE-WAY!
Pickup/Drop-off Locations:
NORTH PORT- BUDGET INN
14000 TAMIAMI TR.
PORT CHARLOTTE- DAYS INN
1941 TAMIAMI TR.
PUNTA GORDA- PG WATERFRONT
HOTEL 300 RETTA ESPLANADE
FLAirShuttle.com
941-451-1202

APPLIANCE
SERVICE/REPAIR


DRYER VENT CLEANING &
INSPECTION. $49
30 yrs. exp. (941)-889-7596
DRYER VENT CLEANING -
Clean your dryer before it
catches on fire. Call Roger
941-321-7571
Lic 990010103532/Ins

ASK US

HOW
you can place a
PICTURE
of your item
for sale
in your
classified ad!
DRYER VENT CLEANING
ONLY $25!!!
FOR LIMITED TIME ONLY:
$20 for NEW Customer
Referrals!
941-249-1161
DRYER VENT CLEANING-
THE VENT DOCTOR Book
Your Dryer Vent Cleaning and
Save! 10% Off With This Ad!
941-268-9525 Competent,
Thorough & Reliable.
Lic. Fla. Home Inspector.
/ADULT CARE /




A LENDING HAND, INC.
Caregivers/Companions,
Hourly or 24/7 Care
941-809-3725
CAREGIVER avail 10+ yrs. of
exp. Compassionate, certified.
Let me help keep your loved
one at home. 941-204-8653.
LIVE-IN CAREGIVING w/
Love & Professionalism. Your
Loved One Will be in Good
Hands!! 12 Years Experience
w/Elderly. 941-735-7761
SENIORS HELPING SENIORS
Light Housekeeping, Meals,
Errands and Companionship
Licensed & Bonded
941-257-8483

CHILD CARE



ALL CHILDCARE
FACILITIES MUST INCLUDE,
WITH ADVERTISEMENT,
STATE OR LOCAL AGENCY
LICENSE NUMBER.
FLORIDA STATE LAW
requires all child care centers
and day care businesses to
register with the State of Flori-
da. The Sun Newspapers will
not knowingly accept advertis-
ing which is in
violation of the law
TODDLER TEACHER NEEDED
Tiny Hands Preschool
20150 Midway Port Charlotte
Employ Classified!
COMPUTER SERVICEI



COMPUTER TUTOR
(Your .home or mine)
ONLY $25.00 an hour!
Please call Steve at:
941-445-4285






The Sun Classified Page 8 E/N/C


ads.yoursunnet


Friday, May 30, 2014


COMPUTER SERVICE



ANTHONY'S COMPUTER
SERVICE & REPAIR.
ALL COMPUTER NEEDS.
SENIOR DISCOUNT*
941-769-1415

EXPRESS COMPUTER
REPAIR
Low Flat Rate. 7 Days!
Tech 10 Yrs. Exp!
(941)-830-3656 Lic./Ins.
JDS2 COMPUTERS
Affordable Repair!
FREE Computer Check!
MENTION THIS AD $50.00
CLEAN & TUNE!
Exp. 9/1/14
941-764-3400
[CONTRACTORS


Insel
Ph


rt
loto
Here


Edward Ross Construction
Services, Inc. 941-408-8500
pool cages, Scr. lanais. etc...
TEDDY'S HANDYMAN &
REMODELING, INC.
No Job Too Big or Too Small!
(941)-629-4966 Lic./Ins.
Serving NP, Charlotte & PG
CRC 1327653
LCOURIER/TAXI




AIRPORT SHUTTLE SERVICE
ALWAYS RELIABLE
TRANSPORTATION
PROVIDING SAFE, RELIABLE,
COURTEOUS & AFFORDABLE
TRANSPORTATION TO AND FROM
ALL AIRPORTS!
941-626-5226
RSW-$55 SRQ-$60
TPA-$125 MIA-$225
*ALL RATES ARE FROM PC SEE
WEBSITE FOR ADDITIONAL RATES
WWW.ALWAYSRELIABLETRANSPORTATION .COM

CHECK THE
CLASSIFIEDS!

CONCRETE



PRO PATH CONCRETE
0 Driveways Patios
0 Sidewalks Pads
Resurfacing Options Available
Free Estimates
941-286-6415
Lic #AAA-11-00081
RICH LANDERS
STUCCO, INC.
Honest, Reliable work!
LIC/INS New Const &
Remodels. Rusted bands
& wire lathe repair.
spraycrete & dry-wall
repair (941)-497-4553

CLEANING
SERVICES


A&R PRO WINDOW
CLEANERS
In/Out, Tracks & Screens,
Also Vinyls, Clean & Polish,
H/W Team. Lic#25014 & Ins.
941-441-8658
ANNIES CLEANING
SERVICE
*Home Office .
*Weekly Bi-Weekly.
ReliableService .
Reasonable Rates .
941-249-9978


GIGI & CHRIS RABY'S
CLEANING SERVICE
Residential.*
Serving Punta Gorda &
Port Charlotte
941-623-3601


7 CLEANING
1W SERVICES


MAJESTIC CLEANING
PROFESSIONAL CLEANING AT
AFFORDABLE RATES! HAPPY TO
ACCOMODATE YOUR NEEDS!
941-268-3075 LIC/INS
MRS. CLEANING UP!
1st class cleaning Service!
Specials Now!
$10 off Window Cleaning
941-204-8057
www.mrscleaningup.com
Lic & Insured
RELIABLE CLEANING
Service, Husband/Wife team.
Homes, Condos, Mobiles,
941-286-5920 941-276-4935
Lic./Ins.





DRM ELECTRICAL
SERVICE,
"Plug Into Personalized Service"
Electrical Maintenance *
Repairs Troubleshooting *
941-480-0761 941-366-3646
LUMINOUS ELECTRIC
NO JOB TOO SMALL!
* LIC# ES12000942
941-623-9140

[ERRND/SHOPPING



onestoredoesitall.com
1 STOP SHOPPING!!!!
Product of the Month:
Amazon Fire TV
"The Future is Here Today!"
941-391-1910
Email:
japruneski@gmail.com
Advertise Today!


BUSH HOG



BUSH BUSTERS INC.
Brush Mowing.*
: Bush Hogging.*
eALL Mulching.*
Selective Clearing.
*Tree & Stump Removal.
"We Can Do Anything!"
941-456-6332 or
941-204-1665

FENCES
5085


I SALATA FENCING I
Fast, Honest, Perfection!
Alum., Chain Link, Vinyl/Wood
941-769-1788 Lic & Ins.


GENERAL REPAIR



"HONEY DO" Handyman
& Odd Jobs
Kitchen & Bath Tune Ups
Faucets, counters,
windows, doors and more!
941-275-0712

HEATING & AIR
5090



AC/DC AIR CONDITIONING.
Free Service Call with repair.
$39 Maintenance Special for
new Customers Only.. 941-
716-1476 Lic#CAC1814367





MAHLE COOL AIR & HEAT-
ING- Rent to Own Your
Home's A!C. No Credit.
No Problem. Easy Payments
Free Est. 941-584-6300
Li c4CAC0580 18


AIR
HEATING &AIR/


HONEST AIR CONDITION-
ING & HEATING. Comm. &
Res. Serving Sarasota & Char-
lotte County. 941-423-1746
Lic. CA C056738


A/C & Heat
941-468-4956
16 SEER
AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS
LOW AS $2995 INSTALLED
INSTALLED 10 YR WARRANTY
0% APR UP TO 5 YRS TO PAY!
ST. LIC #CAC1816023

U.S. AIR
Heating & Air Conditioning
Services LLC
New Air Conditioning Installs
Starting at $2500!
941-697-8697
813-493-2655
CAC1815695

L HOME / COMM.
I I~'IROWMENT I
10~

ALUMASERV INC Guaranteed!
Best prices in town
941-627-9244
BOB'S CABINET SOLU-
TIONS 35 yrs exp. All your
cabinet/counter top needs.
(941)-276-0599 Lic22535
COMPLETE DRYWALL
Hang, Finish, Patchwork, All
Textures, Paint. Matt Potter
941-232-8667Lic.& Ins CRC1328482

CONCRETE
Walkways, patios, driveways,
lanai, pool decks, etc.
Veteran & Senior Discounts
941-716-0872
DAVE'S HANDYMAN
Honest, Knowledgeable & Reli-
able. Call for all your needs,
Sm/Lg 941-628-8326 Lic/Ins



SLIDING GLASS
DOOR
And Window Repair
Lowest Prices
GUARANTEED!!!
941-628-8579
Lic#CRC1130733
GUTTERS, 6" Seamless.
Ken Violette, Inc. (941)-
240-6699 Lic.CGC#060662/Ins.
GUTTERTOWN
Specializing in
5" & 6" gutters, Fascias,
Sofits, Seamless runs.
Call for FREE estimates!
Serving Sarasota County
941-525-3227

J & J HANDYMAN
941-525-7967, 941-493-6736
Painting, Pressure Washing &
Much More!
Over 30 Years Experience &
Satisified Customers
Serving Venice & Sarasota Areas
NO JOB TOO SMALL OR ODD
CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATE
LICENSED & FULLY INSURED
J. BONANNO COMPLETE
HANDYMAN SERVICES
Pressure Washing, Gutter
Cleaning, Mowing, Yard Work
& More 35 years exp.
Call John 941-286-5940
JJ's RESCREENING &
Handyman Services.
941-875-8296
Lic and Insured.
John's Rescreening &
Handyman Service. No Job
To Small, Free Estimates
Lic9341./Ins. 941-883-1381


SLIDING
GASDOOR
I Wheel repairs.
IFree Estimates Lic/Ins.


L HOME / COMM.
I IMPROVEMENT I



HANDYMAN
Home repairs. 30+ yrs Exp.
Call 941- 539-1694
RAINSCAPE INC A Full
Service Irrigation Company
Monthly Maintenance starts at
$40. 941-888-2988
CARPENTER, INC. Handyman
Rotten wood, doors, soffit, facia,
etc. Phil 941-626-9021 lic. & ins.
S "The Stucco Guy" I
Drywall, Window Sill & Wire
Lathe Repair, Rusted Bands,
Decorative Bands, I
Match Any Texture,
Senior & Veterans Discount
941-716-0872
TILE (Ceramic), Wood Floor-
ing, Installation. Robert Jones
Ceramic Tile (941)-204-2444
Lic. #AAA006338/ins.
TILE remodel, baths, floors.
your tile or mine. (941)-625-
5186,628-0442Lic.#AAA006387
WE SELL & INSTALL Pavers,
Curbing,Concrete,Rock, Mulch,
DISCOUNT ROCKS
941-623-6192 Lic. 11-00002010
WESTSHORE BUILDERS
Remodeling Additions *
Home Repairs*
Free Estimates
Lic. Residential Contractor
941-204-8237
westshore-builders.com
#CRC1330882
WILLY D'S HOME Improve-
ments, Inc. for all your Building
needs. (941)-716-3351
LAWN/GADEN
& TREE
: 5110

AN OCCUPATIONAL LICENSE
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational licens-
ing bureau to verify
A JAMISON TREE SERVICE
Complete & Professional
15% Sr Discount!
FREE EST. LIC. & INSURED
ENGL 941-475-6611
OR N. PORT 941-423-0020
SERWNG CHARLOrrE AND
SARASOTA FOR OVER 20 YEARS.
JAMISON-TREESERVICEINC.COM
AMERICAN IRRIGATION
Call 941-587-2027
FREE ESTIMATES!!!
Licensed & Insured
Charlotte Co. lic#AAA-11-
00010. Serving Charlotte
and Sarasota Counties

BASIC LANDSCAPING, INC
Dependability *Accessability
*Customer Satification
STARTING AT $80/per mo
Lic/Ins 941-504-3307
C&D TRACTOR & TREE Services
One call for all your tree &
home services!
All your lawn & lanscaping
needs including pressure
washing, tree removal,
mulching, more! 15 yrs exp.
941-276-6979


CHRIS RABY'S LAWNS
. Hedges Trimmed (up to lOft)
eSmall Trees Trimmed & Shaped
*Shrubs Trimmed. *Stumps
Removed *Rock or Mulch Laid
* Port Charlotte & Punta Gorda
Areas. 941-623-3601
DP's ABILITY
TREE SERVICE
Trimming, Mulching, Planting,
Remove. 15 yrs Exp.
941-889-8147
Lic#00000192 & Insured.
EXPERIENCED LANDSCAPER
Pruning & transplanting
plants, Pressure Washing &
WINDOW WASHING
941-876-3097
FLORIDA TREE INC.
Tree Trimming & Removal.
e Stump Grinding
Lawn Service .
Bucket Service .
941-613-3613
pcftree.com Lic./Ins.


LAWN/GARDEN
~5110

FAMILY TREE SERVICE Tree
Trimming, Free Estimates. Call
Today 941-237-8122. Lic/Ins.
FRESH CUT LAWN N MORE
FRESH CUT LAWNS
STARTING AT $25!
941-661-1850
Free Estimates Call Frank
GENERAL LAWN, landscape
services. (941)-426-7844
Wright & Son Landscaping Inc
ISLAND BREEZE
LAWN SERVICE
Residential & Commercial
14 years experience
Owner operated. Lic&
Ins.Venice & surrounding
areas. For free estimate
call Keith 941-445-2982
J RIZ TREE SERVICES
Complete Tree Services
Servicing Charlotte & Sarasota
FREE ESTIMATES
941-306-7532 Lic & Ins
KEN's PROFESSIONAL
TREE SERVICE
Owner Operator, Stump
Grinding, Palm Trimming,
Removals, & Hedge Trimming.
FREE Estimates!
941-624-4204
Lic #001053


qutic


LAKE & POND SERVICES
INCREASE PROPERTY VALUES
CREATE AN AESTHETICALLY
PLEASING AMENITY
SERVICES To FIT YOUR
SPECIFIC LAKE & POND NEEDS
FREE QUOTE
Call To Schedule An
Appointment With One Of
Our Licensed & Insured
Technicians.
941-378-2700
WWW.APOPFL.COM

IAWI O LOOLIG SO
GIf[ ??Aemtion is l feY to
],en & telfyawI, !
lawn ,mtion strain cift $5
free lawn& twe evluaton [q
Cert. ArLost wlile on F1Imises!
941-4)6-89S3
ISA Certfied Arborist
John Cannon FL-6444A
South Sarasota & Charlotte Co.

Classified = aes
LAWN REPLACEMENT
No Job Too BIG or Too small
Maloney's Sod
941-637-1333
LB'S TOTAL LAWN &
LANDSCAPING SVCS
Lawn Care Mulching
Pruning Hedges & Trees
Pressure Washing & More!
Call TODAY for a
free estimates!
Serving Osprey, Venice &
Englewood
941-302-2244 Lic/Ins
ROMAN'S LAWN PRO
RESIDENTIAL & COMM.
LICENSED & INSURED
941-380-LAWN
SANDEFURS-HOME & TREE
Maintenance Tree trimming,
removal. We do it all!
License/Insured941-484-6042
SOD WORK REMOVE &
REPLACE SMALL JOBS OK, ALL
TYPES OF SOD941-716-9912
STEVE'S TREE & HAULING
Tree Removal & Trimming
29 Years Exp. Lic/Insd
Free Estimates 941-866-6979
THE YARD GUY Lawns
starting at $25.00 Serving
Charlotte county since
1975. ASK ABOUT OUR
SNOWBIRD SPECIAL!
941-276-9693
MILAZZO'S LANDSCAPING
941-830-1005
ALL PHASES OF RESIDENTIAL
LANDSCAPING, INSTALLATIONS,
PLANTING, PEPPER BERRY CON-
TROL & CONCRETE CURBING.


LAWN/GARDEN
TREE


TJ MILAZZO SR. 941-475-
0058 LAWN CUTTING
MOST LAWNS. $25-$30.
EXPERTLY DONE IN ENGLEWOOD
ROTONDA & CAPE HAZE
Tommy's Tree & Property
Service *Trim & remove
*Complete lawn care.
Lic/ins. (941)-809-9035
VETERANS AFFORDABLE
LAWN & LANDSCAPING
Commercial & Residential.
Mobile home parks.
Pressure washing, handyman,
home watch, odd jobs, etc
941-447-2428

LEGAL SERVICES



NON-LAWYER SERVICES
Wills, Divorces, Taxes, Living
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Friday, May 30, 2014


ads yoursunnet


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 9


Challenger


DIRECTIONS:
Fill each square with a number, one through nine.
" Horizontal squares should add to totals on right.
" Vertical squares should add to totals on bottom.
" Diagonal squares through center should add to
total in upner and lower right.


THERE MAY BE MORE
THAN ONE SOLUTION.
Today's Challenge
Time 5 Minutes
31 Seconds
Your Working
Time Minutes
Seconds


5-30


7 32
8 32

8 32

2 20

29 2 2929 33


)2014 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.


Yesterday's q J jj-3
Challenger 2.9 1 21
Answers 11027614


C ryptoquip 2011 by King Features Syndicate


5-30


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OUZIIH IYGUL


GYELR KN EXBR


RVUFYNYF


PZR FOHYED


"ZIQKELR NKO BSU VKKO!"
Yesterday's Cryptoquip: WHEN WE COLOR
THESE SOFT GOOSE FEATHERS WITH A CRIMSON
PIGMENT, WE'LL PAINT THE DOWN RED.
Today's Cryptoquip Clue: K equals 0


RMADUKE By Brad Anderson


IDNTKNOW
WHAT SHE WANTS
FRMME.


BEETLE BAILEY By Mort Walker


MOTIIER GOOSE AND GRIMM R Mike IDPter


OH AR,
AJHATS CAOSIN0


PROLFS,'*


"So far, we've made two dollars renting
Marmaduke as a petting zoo!"


WORD
SLEUTH

J O L I F C Z W

Z W U R P M J O


xUS Q

E C Z X

L J H E


ATLANTIC 2014
HURRICANE
NAMES
F Q N K I F C


H E R C Z


LN L L AN AN U

VAT R U I M S H


Z C B A


J G

P N


H Y A T DW


VT RN PN L OE P K I R I G

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E DB AYKY LEO I


S U S MG O


I 0GY L


X W U T S Q P 0 D J A R U A L

ANN A H T R E B N L K C F Y
Thursday's unlisted clue: PRINCE
Find the listed words in the diagram. They run in all directions -
forward, backward, up, down and diagonally.
Friday's unlisted clue hint: PARTON


Arthur
Bertha
Cristobal
Edouard


Fay
Gonzalo
Hanna
Isaias


Josephine
Kyle
Laura
Marco


Nana
Omar
Paulette


SNOV) 'MH E ANI 1-F
KEEBLER ELVES


PICKLES By Brian Crane


B.C. By Mastroianni & Hart


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D X H P S K HAGAR THE HORRIBLE By Chris Browne
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The Sun Classified Page 10 E/N/C


ads.yoursunnet


Friday, May 30, 2014


pu rchaae~d


DEAR DR. ROACH:
I have some questions
about GERD. I was
diagnosed 16 years ago
and was put on many
medications, but I either
got side effects or they
didn't work. I made up
my mind to watch my
diet carefully. That has
worked well most of the
time. About six weeks
ago, I started experienc-
ing burning and pain
again. I tried eliminating
different foods in my diet,
but it wasn't working. I
visited my primary care
doctor and he prescribed
sucralfate, four times
a day, along with ome-
prazole twice a day. I've
been on this treatment
a short time, and see a
hint of improvement. I
don't understand why
I went all these years
with little pain and all of
a sudden I feel like I'm
back to square one. The
nurse practitioner in the
same office said they are
thinking GERD is season-
al, just like allergies, and
that it should go away.
I am very frustrated. I
really don't want to have
surgery. -A.
ANSWER: I can't tell
you why, but I do see peo-
ple getting exacerbations
that last for a few days
or weeks, and then they
go back to being fine.
The nurse practitioner
knew something I didn't,
because I found evidence
that GERD symptoms are
statistically worse from
October to December.
Maybe it has to do with
the foods eaten more
commonly at that time of
the year.
That being said, look
at any new medications
(many can worsen GERD);
consider weight loss if
yours has gone up; and
make sure you are eating
a good three hours before
bed. Alcohol and tobacco
are bad for many things,
including GERD. Finally,
sometimes serious condi-
tions can look like GERD.
If symptoms persist, your
primary care doctor may
send you to a gastroenter-
ologist for an endoscopy.
The booklet on heart-
burn explains GERD.
Readers can obtain a copy
by writing: Dr. Roach
- No. 501, Box 536475,
Orlando, FL 32853-6475.
Enclose a check or money
order (no cash) for $4.75
U.S./$6 Can. with the
recipient's printed name
and address. Please allow
four weeks for delivery.
DEAR DR. ROACH:
I am 70 years old, and
three and a half months
ago, my ENT found a


Dr. Roach

malignant sarcoma at
the base of my tongue on
the right side. They also
found a hint of cancer in
the lymph node near the
tumor. On Friday I finish
up an eight-week treat-
ment of radiation and
chemotherapy.
Besides this tumor, the
only other cancer in our
family of five children was
my older sister, 30 years
ago, with cancer of the
thyroid. It was removed
with no chemo or ra-
diation. My question is
what my risk might be for
developing other cancers
in the future, assuming
that this tumor has been
eradicated? -J.K.
ANSWER:
Congratulations to you
and your doctor for his
diligence, and I hope your
recovery goes well.
In general, cancers
are more common in
people who have had
cancer before. The rate
of developing second
cancers depends on the
specific type. There's not a
lot written about second
cancer after head and
neck sarcoma, but what
I found suggests that the
risk is not terribly high. In
general, the younger you
are when you develop the
first cancer, the higher
the risk of a second.
DR. ROACH WRITES:
Several people asked
about vitamin K for
osteoporosis. One person
asked if it is safe, since it
is used to reverse warfarin
(Coumadin). Yes, vitamin
K is very safe unless you
are taking warfarin, in
which case it negates
the effect. Another
asked about vitamin K-2
supplements. Vitamin
K-2 is synthesized by the
bacteria normally present
in our intestines. As I
noted, vitamin K trials in
the U.S. and U.K. have
shown no benefit in frac-
tures or in bone density.
I don't recommend K- I
or K-2 supplements for
bone health, but continue
to recommend plenty of
leafy green vegetables.
People on Coumadin
should not take vitamin
K or change their dietary
intake without discussing
it with their doctor.


REX MORGAN By
YOU COULD BEGIN
YOUR BOOK WITH A
PAIN1iNG OF KIDS
COMING& To THEj
MUSEUM IN S
T 4AT Bu/S!


Wilson and


Beatty


"WATS VERY COOD, SO AM I, SARAH! WEP OE8 R
KELLY.. I C LAP GET TO WORK NOW!
YOUYE MY ASSISTANT!





L


FIINGI
PIING!
FLING


15 THERE
RANGER?


44?


FRESHLY SQUEEZED By Ed Stein
I KNOW IGHOULP 2[ WHAT YOU HAVE
HAVE STUPiEp, 1UT IS CdALLEP GPrINC,
1 COULPN'T MJCG FEVER.
MYS2S FPO IT.;
I SHOULD TAJCE
A SICK PAY.


DILBERT By Scott Adams

I FOUND A QUICK
WAY TO MAKE YOU
MORE MOTIVATED
AND COMPETITIVE.


WHAT IF TNG OTHGR
KIPS CATCH IT?


MY ,*,*6
aG.


r-0-- -


I KNOJ IT'S SAFE
BECAUSE IT'S ALL
NATURAL.


THE ONLY KNOWN
SIDE EFFECTS ARE
PSYCHOPATHY AND AN
IMPROVED DATING
LIFE.


I


GERD relapses

may be seasonal


GARFIELP, WHAT ARE YOU
TRYING TO TELL ME?


: I I I





Friday, May 30, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 11


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME BORN LOSER By Art and
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek rsu- vtcRTONT7 NO


- Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

A:WIII

(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: LUNCH HILLY FIBULA PUNDIT
Answer: After their air conditioner broke down again, she
wished her husband could take a CHILL PILL

Packing pointers


Dear Readers:
Whether you travel for
pleasure or business,
trying to pack often
can be stressful. Here
are some of my favorite
travel hints for packing a
suitcase:
To save space, pack
only trial- or travel-size
items in your luggage.
Save the toothbrushes
and small toothpaste you
get at the dentist's office
for when you travel.
When packing, place
heavy items at the bot-
tom of your luggage, so
they don't squish lighter
items, such as clothing.
To prevent clothes
from wrinkling, roll
them. This also helps
with space. When you
reach your destination,
immediately take out
clothes that are prone to
wrinkling and hang them
up.
Do not pack shoes
with the soles on your
clothes. Pack them facing
out, or better yet, place
each in a newspaper
bag to protect clothing.
Another space-saving
hint is to place small
items, like underwear
and socks, into shoes
before packing.
9 Leave expensive
jewelry or valuable items
at home.
Happy traveling, fellow
road warriors! Heloise

Password perfect
Dear Heloise: I have
a hint for trying to see
aWi-Fi password on a


Hints from Heloise

label on the bottom of a
router. It can be annoying
to try to maneuver so
that one can see the
long string of digits and
letters, as well as enter
them into your device. So
I just took a photo of it
with my phone. I always
have it with me, and no
more struggling with the
router! Kathryn H.,
Fairfax, Va.

Simple addition
Dear Heloise: I had
the misfortune to have
fallen on ice. As a result,
I broke my femur and
had to have extensive
physical therapy. Using a
walker has been a chal-
lenge, to say the least.
My son thought about
attaching a bicycle bas-
ket and cup holder on
the front of my walker.
This addition allows me
to easily make my own
meals, empty the dish-
washer and put dishes,
pans and silverware
away. This also allows
me to carry my clothes
from the bedroom to
the bathroom. Pat Z.,
Warren, Ohio


FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE By Lynn Johnston

FIFE $A r Ffl-7 LOOK AlfAIS L mUrNRV
MWhS ?IN4SWOULDYOU'.~~t~w~
IT SliOUL.D ME!





The Sun Classified Page 12 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Friday, May 30, 2014


Family wishes woman would MALLARD FILLMORE By Bruce Tinsley

give tanning beds a rest ,"IC


DEAR ABBY: I love my
daughter-in-law and I
am afraid she is harming
herself because of her
addiction to tanning. Her
boys are in high school
and cannot remember
their mother without
a really dark tan. One
son told his classmates
in grade school that his
mother was African-
American when they were
doing African-American
studies. (She's Caucasian.)
My son says he cannot
convince her to "lighten
up" a bit. I don't know
what to do. I am ... SO
CONCERNED FOR HER
IN ILLINOIS
DEAR SO
CONCERNED: You are
right to be concerned for
your daughter-in-law.
For years, dermatologists
have cautioned the public
about the dangers of
exposure to the sun. With
the invention of tanning
beds, the rates of melano-
ma among young people
have soared. For anyone
who isn't aware, melano-
ma is an aggressive type
of skin cancer that can be
fatal.
Tanning can be addic-
tive, and you should urge
your daughter-in-law to
discuss this with a derma-
tologist. Because tanning
also causes premature
aging of the skin, she
should explore "sunless
tanning," which is much
safer.
DEAR ABBY: I'm 18. My
boyfriend, "Matt," and I
have been together for a
year and a half, and I'm
leaving for college this
fall. Matt will be attend-
ing community college
nearby.
I have been told that
the next four years are
the best years of life, and
I want to live them to
the fullest. In order to do
that, I want to be single
so I can have a good time
and be a little reckless
without worrying about
him.
I love Matt and would
one day like to marry
him, but since he's only
my third boyfriend, I
want to find out what
other fish are in the sea
before I settle down. What
should I do? -WANTS


Dear Abby


THE BEST OF BOTH
WORLDS
DEAR WANTS THE
BEST: The kindest thing
to do would be to tell
Matt that while you care
deeply for him, because
you are going to be sep-
arated for the next four
years, you feel both of
you should be free to date
others. That's a lot more
tactful than saying you'll
still be there if there aren't
any bigger fish in the sea,
and I'm sure it will get the
idea across.
Whether or not the
next four years will be
the best years of your
life one would hope
you have more than
four they will be an
important growth period
for both you and Matt,
and each of you should
explore them to the
fullest without being
encumbered.
DEAR ABBY: We play
softball at school a lot,
and I can't play well. I
don't know what to do,
and the others laugh at
me. What should I do? -
ANXIOUS FOR ADVICE
DEAR ANXIOUS: I
know of no athlete, ama-
teur or professional, who
can become proficient
at a sport without lots
of practice. Talk to your
coach about what you
need to do to improve,
and see if another adult
would be willing to play
catch and pitch to you. If
you keep trying, you will
improve. If not, there may
be another sport you will
like better.
Dear Abby is written
by Abigail Van Buren,
also known as Jeanne
Phillips, and was founded
by her mother Pauline
Phillips. Contact Dear
Abby at www.DearAbby.
corn or PO. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


"What therefore God hath joined together, let not
man put asunder"- Mark 10:9.
We need a return to old-fashioned Bible believing
and obeying concerning marriage. The future of our
civilization rests on our obedience to the Word of God.


I HOROSCOPE
ARIES (March 21-April 19). Most of those you'll
be interacting with will have an attention span of
about seven minutes, give or take a few. Your effort
to keep it brief but vivid will be appreciated.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20).You may find that you
are hyper-aware of a certain someone and tuned in
to this person's every move.This level of attention
could come off as flattering or scary.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). The opportunities that
arise may not seem so different from one another,
but one thinq that is noticeably different is the level


PEANUTS By Charles Schulz
i'NT FOLLm," EVEWBIX TNS I'M =,Z',, ON'T FOLLOW ME, r SAIN NAA
ME .I ESECIALLq jW A i7ER T4R0064 T FINI5E!
NOT 50iPow EDTO
PAT DBRP9ON1Hw






CRANKSHAFT By Tom Batiuk & Chuck Ayers
A-:- !


5-SD


Venice Gondolier readers: Look for the puzzle solution in the Our Town section


of excitement you feel for each of them. Act on with other species, in the elements, feeling the more than you realize. It's more than you can finish hard to feel that optimistic about.That's why you
these feelings, and they'll guide you well. weather, looking up at the sky instead ofthe ceiling. in a day. Make a plan to get it done. should focus on one thing you can fix at a time; it'
CANCER (June 22-July 22). You are skilled in the art LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).The day has an episodic CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Even though you are strategy that will have miraculous results.
of making the right people look good. For instance, feel, and you will go from scene to scene, chasing very professional in your dealings, you also give the TODAY'S BIRTHDAY (May 30).This year will grab
when the boss looks good, it's a plus for the entire after something. Honoryour need to process what human touch. Each person has unique needs. You your attention with a fantastic start, and you'll
team.Think and plan to this end. you are learning, can't address them all. know an adventure is underway. Your friends will
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22).You'll bounce between being SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21).Just as moments of AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). Knowing that the bring color and excitement to your world in June.
the creative mind on a project and the technical sunlight makeyou feel bright and alive but hours of person you're spending time with might remember There will be a carrot dangling beforeyou in July.
expert. You'll be both the social strategist and the sunlight deplete you, everything powerful needs to your interaction for decades to come, how do you Get down to business and make deals- do not IE
research team. be taken in moderation today. want to design it? things stay in an undefined arrangement. Leo and
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Nature is an integral and SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). An environment PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). Every problem is a Libra people adore you. Your lucky numbers are: 33
necessary part of feeling whole. The time you spend that is less than pleasing is dragging you down growth opportunity, though some problems are 9,13,20 and 18.


'sa







et

3,


SHOE By Gary Brookins & Susie


JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process elimination to solve the puzzle. The difficulty
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).

3 4 8 Rating: SILVER

8 9 3 Solution to 5/29/14
1 9 0l1784653186749


6 9 5 4 259467138
7 81 994 3 6 7


4 1 2 5 762145893

9 8 661

4 1 5 32 89 51



5/30/14


I I






Friday, May 30, 2014


ads.yoursun net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 13


Friday Television


VEN-VENICE E-N-ENGLEWOOD SAR-SARASOTA PC-PORT CHARLOTTE ARC-ARCADIA SPG-SOUTH PUNTA GORDA


MAY30f PRIME TIME
ABC7News WorlddNews To Be a To Be a Shark Tank Digital privacy; What Would You Do? (N) 20/20 (N) (HD) ABC7 News (35) Jimmy
ABC M 7 7 7 10 7 7 @ 6pm (N) Diane Sawyer Millionaire? Millionaire? fitness for kids. (R) (HD) (HD) @ p11am (N) Kimmel Live
(N) The future. (R)(1
ABC7 News World News The 7 O'Clock Entertainment Shark Tank Digital privacy; What Would You Do? (N) 20/20 (N) (HD) ABC7 News (35) Jimmy
ABC20] 7 11 7 @ 6:00pm (N) Diane Sawyer News (N) (HD) Tonight (N) (HD fitness for kids. (R) (HD) (HD) @11:00pm Kimmel Live
(N) (N)(R
WINK News a CBS Evening WINK Newsa Inside Undercover Boss: Donatos Hawaii Five-O:0 Kela Me Keia Blue Blods: Growing Boys WINK NewsalLate Show
CBS (111213213 5 5 5 6pm(N)(H)) News(N)(H)) 7pm(N)(H)) Edition (N)((H) Improving hiring practices. (R)ManawaDisappearance. (R) Jamiequestonedondead llpm (N)(H)) Shailene
I 1(1)(H) (H)) gang member. Woodley.
10 News, CBS Evening Wheel of Jeopardy! (N) Undercover Boss: Donatos Hawaii Five-O: 0 Kela Me Keia Blue Bloods: Growing Boys 10 News, Late Show
CBS101 0110 106pm (N) News (N)(H)) Fortune (N) (H()) Improving hiring practices. (R)Manawa Disappearance. (R) Jamie questoned on dead 11pm (N) Shailene
()(HD) (HD) (HD) gang member. Woodley.
NBC2 News NBC Nightly Wheel of Jeopardy! (N) Dateline NBC: The Secrets of Cottonwood Creek A Crossbones: The Devil's NBC2 News Tonight Show
NBC 2 2 2 2 @6pm(N)(H) News(N)(H)) Fortune(N) (H()) weekend away at a Colorado cabin ends with a tragic Dominion Legendary pirate @11pm(N) JimmyFallon
(HD) drowning. (N)((HD) plunders a ship. (HD)(1
NewsChannel NBC Nightly NewsChannel Entertainment Dateline NBC: The Secrets of Cottonwood Creek A Crossbones: The Devil's NewsChannel Tonight Show
NBC i8i 8 8 8 8 8 8at6:O0(N) News(N)(H)) 8at7:O0(N) Tonight(N)(HDweekend awayataColoradocabin endswithatragic Dominion Legendary pirate 8at11:O0(N) JimmyFallon
drowning. (N)((HD) plunders a ship.(1
FOX 4 News at Six Judge Judy The SimpsonsMasteitheft.Top 30Compete I Wanna Many "Hany": Royal FOX 4 News at Ten Local FOX4 News The Arsenio
FOX IN 4 4 4 Community news; weather; Dg attack.l(R) Wackyfamily. Thirty cooks presentsignature Masquerade Begins news report and weather at Eleven (N) HallShow (R)
traffic; more. (N) (H)) dishes. Masquerade ball. update. (N) (H))
FOX 13 6:00 News News TMZ (N) The Insider Masteitheft. Top 30 Compete IWanna Many "Harry": Royal FOX 13 10:00 News The FOX 13 News Access
FOX IN 131313 13 13 events of the day are reported. Summer Thirty cooks present signature Masquerade Begins top news stories are Edge (N)(HD) Hollywood (N)
(N) (HD movies. dishes. Masquerade ball. updated. (N) (HD) (HD)
BBCWord Nightly The PBS NewsHour (N) (HD) Washington Charlie Rose: Pledge Programming Acclaimed programming highlights Pledge Programming
PBS W 3 3 3 News Business Week(N) (H)) The Week(N) a membership drive encouraging viewer support. Highlights encourage viewer
America Report(N) support.
BBC World Nightly The PBS NewsHour (N) (H)) Washington Florida This 30 Days to a Younger Heart Host discusses three Suze Onnan's Financial
WEtJ] 3 3 3 3 News Business Week(N) (H)) Week (N) lifestyle changes he believes can improve one's heart. (R) Solutions ForYou Financial
America Report(N)(1c (HDi dsions. (R)
Big Bang TV WINK News a Big Bang 21/2 Men Whose Line? Whose Line? Hart of Dixie: Who Says You WINK News @1Opm (N) (H)) 21/2 Men HowlMet
CW 11 6 21 6 show canceled. 6:30pm (N) Theory Secret Improvsklls. (R) mprovgames. Can't Go Home?Zoe's wild Manand Jake Quitfing
Motherly love. relationship. hunt. (R) (H)) ond. smokng.
Queens King of 2 1/2 Men 21/2 Men Whose Line? Whose Line? Hart of Dixie: Who Says You Rules Timmy's Engagement The Arsenio Hall Show Bill
CW I 9 9 9 4 Dream Queens:No lan and Jake Secret Improvsklls. (R)lmprovgames. Can'tGoHome?Zoe'swild acappella.(HD) DirtyTalk(HD) Cosby; JerrikaHinton.l(R)(H))
gynecologist. Retreat bnd. relationship. hunt. (R) (HD)
Loves Seinfeld Family Feud Family Feud Monk Mr. Monk and the Monk Mr. Monk and the Other Cops Cops Seinfeld Community
MYNI113 114 Raymond Muffin tops (VPG) (R) (IVP) (R) Billionaire Mugger Software Woman A murdered lawyer. Reloaded (HD Reloaded (HD 4Kramer the Baby shower.
Home office. sold. kng shot. (HD) (HD) alibi. (HD)
Access Cleveland Family Guy Family Guy Monk Mr. Monk and the Monk Mr. Monk and the Other Law & Order. Special Victims Seinfeld Seinfeld
MYN[8 8 9 8 Hollywood (N) Show Peter the Billionaire Mugger Software Woman A murdered lawyer. Unit: Screwed Issues to resolve. Muffin tops Kramer the
()HD) Matchmaker. barter. king shot. (HD) (HD) (HD) sold. alibi.
Modem Modem Big Bang TV Big Bang Law& OrderSpecial VictirmLaw& Order.SpeciaiVictims The Office The Office Family Guy Family Guy
IND 32 12 1212 38 12 Family House FamilyIrritated show canceled. Theory UnitScrewedIssues to resolve Unit:Grief Dad seton revenge. Awkward Office shuts Peter the
flip. (H)) family. Motherly love. (H)) (H)) evening. down. barter.
Ghst Whisperer. Horror Show Cold Case: Dead Heat Team Cold Case: Read Between the Cold Case: Chinatown Cold Case: Forensics Team Cold Case: Iced Hockey
ION 166192 9212 918 1 College student haunted after investigates jockey's murder. Unes Case of murdered rapper. Chinese-American man investigates debater's death. player found murdered. (HD)
movie. (HD) (HD) murdered. (HD) (HD)
A&E 262626263950 181 Criminal Hate crimes. Criminal: Distress (HD) Criminal Minds: Jones Criminal Arson victims. Criminal Killer in diner. (:02) Criminal (JV14)
(3:00) The Green Mile ('99) A The Matrix ('99, Science Fiction) **** Keanu Reeves. A hacker joins a shadowy (0) The Matrix Reloaded ('03, Science Ficton) *** Neo
AMC 565656563053231 special convict collective's struggle to free humankind from slavery. (R) (HD) speaks with the Oracle about Zion. (R)
APt 444444443668 130 Treehouse (R) ([41)) Treehouse (R) (HD) INo Limits INo Limits Treehouse (N) (HD) Treehouse (N) (HD( Treehouse (R) (HD)
BET 353535354022 270106 & Park (N) ([1)) What's Love Got to Do with It? Legendary singer in an abusive marriage. ComicView ComicView Game (R) Game (
BRAVO 6868686825451 185 (3:36) Titanic ('97) Love and disaster. (:47) Pearl Harbor ('01) Ben Affleck, Josh Hartnett. WWII pilots fight for a woman's love. (:52) Pearl Harbor ('01)
COM 666666661527 190 South Park Tosh.O (R) Colbert Daily (R) Futurama Futurama Key; Peele I Key, Peele Key; Peele Tosh.0 (1 American Pie 2 ('01) *
DISC 404040402543 120Vegas Rat 1928 Buick. Fast Loud (R)((HD) Fast Loud (R)((HD) Fast Loud (R)(HD( Chrome: Road Rage Fast Loud (1 (HD)
E! 464646462726 196Sex&City Sex&City fE! News (N)(HD) E! News (R)(HD) Fashion Police Pia Mia. Fashion Police PiaMia. C. Lately News (R)
FAM 555555551046 199The Last Song ('1O) Teenage girl bonds with estranged dad. The Prince & Me ('04) **A student falls in love with a prince. The 700 Club (IV G)
FOOD 37373737-76 164 Diners (R) Diners (R) Diners (R) Diners (R) Diners (R) Diners (R) Diners (R IDiners (R) IDiners (N) IDiners (R Diners, Drive-Ins (R)
How I Met Hw I Met How I Met How I Met Star Trek ('09, Science Fiction) ***1/2 A team of Starfleet Academy cadets attempts to stop a (33) Star Trek
FX 51 51 51 51 5849 53 (V14) (1V14) (V14) (V14) mysterious menace who is bent on the complete destruction of the Federation. ('09)
GSN 17917917917934 179184 Fain Feud Fam. Feud Fam. Feud Fain. Feud 1 vs. 100 (V G) Minute to Win It (R) Minute to Win It( Fam. Feud Fam. Feud
HALL 5 5 5 17 73240 Waltons Waltons: The Calling Waltons Cheaper by the Dozen ('03) Careers and 12 kids. Golden Golden
HGTV 41 41 41 41 5342 165 1st Place 1st Place Love It (R) (H()) Love It Cramped home. Love It (R) [Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters
HIST 818181813365128 American (R) (H()) American (R) (H()) American: Pinch Picker American (1 (H()) American (R) (H)) (:02) American (R) (H))
LIFE 363636365241 140 Swap Helicopter mom. Wife Swap (H()) Betty (N) Betty (N) Swap Devout; partier. Little Dance class. (R) True Tori Double date.
NICK 252525252444 522Sponge Sponge Sponge ISam&Cat Sam&Cat Sam&Cat Full Hse Full Hse Full Hse [Full Hse Friends Friends
OWN 5858585847103161 Phil Dr. Phil obsession. Phil Women and sex. Oprah (R) (H()) Oprah Rick Springfield. Oprah (R) (H()) Oprah (R) (H))
QYC f4 1414 9 1413 150 ISAACMIZRAHILIVE! Stylish fashions. DellTM Comp bareMinerals bareMinerals makeup. Friday Night Beauty
SPIKE 575757572963'54 Cops (R) ICops (R ICops (R) Walking Tall ('04, Action) ** Man fights crime. (35) Law Abiding Citizen ('09, Crime) A man seeks revenge.
SYFY 6767676725364 18oLockout (12, Thriller) **12 Rescue mission. WWE SmackDown (HD) Continuum (N) Wheaton Continuum
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(15) While the City Sleeps ('56, Drama)**1/ Dana Newsfront ('78, Drama) Bill Hunter. Two Australian Sunday Too Far Away ('75) *** Top (45)
6 169230 Mdrews. Reportersnseek a serial killer. (NR) brothers risk their lives to obtain news footage. shearer loses status, then gambles. Blacksmith
TLC 45 45 45 45 57 72 139 Say Yes Big budget. (R) Say Yes Scaling back. Say Yes (R) (H)) Say Yes (N) (H)) Gown (N) Gown (N) Say Yes (R) (H))
Castle: A Death in the Family Castle: Deep in Death Man The Lincoln Lawyer (1 1, Drama) Matthew McConaughey. An attorney The Score ('01, Thriller) **1/2 A club
TNT 61 61 61 61 2855 51 Plastic surgeon. in tree. (HD) operates his legal practice out of the back of his car. owner returns to a life of crime. (
TOON 80801241244620 257lTitansGo! Gumball Adventure Regular King Hill IKing Hill Cleveland Cleveland Dad (H) Dad (HD) FamilyGuy FamilyGuy
TRAY 6969696926066 170 Bizarre: Suriname (R) v Food (R) v Food (R) Bizarre (R) Mysteries (R) Mysteries (R) Mysteries (R)
TRUTY 636363635030 183 Top 20 Wedding dress. Lizard Lic Lizard Lic Lizard Lic Lizard Lic Lizard Lic ILizard Lic Lizard Lic ILizard Lic Lizard Lic Lizard Lic
TYL 6262626231,54 244 Cleveland Cleveland Cleveland Cleveland Cleveland Cleveland One Night Only Tribute to icon. (HD) Queens Queens
USA 343434342252150 NCS Psych evaluation. NCS: Defiance (HD) Modern Modern Modern Modem Modern Modern Modem Playing
WE 117117117117 117149 Marriage Marriage Boot The camp ends. (R) Marriage (1 Marriage: The Ambush Mystery (N) Marriage: The Ambush
WGN f6 16161941 11 9 Home Videos (IVP) fHome Videos (IVP) e MLB Baseball: Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee Brewers (liWe) (HD) Howl Met Howl Met
CNBC 39393939 37 102 Mad Money (N) Fugitives (R) Ult. Factories: IKEA Ult. Factories: UPS Factories: John Deere Ultimate (HD)
CNN 323232321838 100Situation Crossfire Ern Burnett (N) Cooper 3600 (N) (H1) CNN Tonight (N) CNN Spot jUnguarded Inside Man (N)
CSPAN 18 1818183712 109 Politics& Public Policy Today Political events. Speeches ISpeeches (10) Politics Today Politics & Public Policy Today Political events.
FNC 646464644871 118 Special Report (N) (HD) On the Record (N)((HD) The O'Reilly Factor (N) The Kelly File (N) Hannity (N)(HD) The O'Reilly Factor (R)
MSNBC 8 83 838 185 4 l13 PoliticsNation (N) (H) Hardball with Chris (N) All in with Chris Hayes Rachel Maddow (N) Lockup (R) (H) Lockup (1 (H)
SNN 1616 6 11 11 News (N) News (N) INews IPaid News INews Paid fNews News (N) News (N) News (N) News (N)
CSS 282828284970 The Best CSS: Through College Football: Auburn vs Alabama (Replc) (HD( CSS: Through Hurricane
ESPN 292929291258 70 SportsCenter (HD) INBA Countdown (HD() 2014 NBA Playoffs: Indiana vs Miami ([We) (HD) SportsCenter (H)
ESPN2 30303030 6 59 74 College Ilnterruptn l 2014 NCAA Women's CWS: Game #5 (We) Update 2014 NCAA Women's CWS: Game #6 ([We) Olbennann
FS1 484848484269 83 Camping World Truck: Lucas Oil 200 (bve) (H) Race Hub (H) Monster (H1) MLB Whip Around (H) FOX Sports Live (H)
FSN 72727272 56 77 Ship Shape Marlins MLB Baseball: Atlanta Braves at Miami Marlins from Marlins Park (le) Marlins MLL Lacrosse: Boston vs New York
GOLF 494949495560304 PGA (H1) Golf Cntrl Champions Tour. Principal Charity Classic: First Round (H) IPGA TOUR Golf. The Memorial Tournament: Second Round
NBCSN 7117171715461 90 (5:30) Pro Top 10 NHL Live 1/2014 NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs: Teams TBA(We) Overtime Heads Up gapeH) (H)
SUN 38384014014557 76 Florida (1 Rays LIVE! E MLB Baseball: Tampa Bay Rays at Boston Red Sox ([We) (HD) Rays LIVE! Inside Inside P1 AquaX
Jessie Jessie Love Dog with a Austin &Ally The Muppets (11, Entertainment) *** Mickey Austin &AIly Jessie High Dogwitha GoodLuck
DISN 1361361361369945 250 Berram's song. (R) (HD) Blog Stan's Trish acts odd. Three fans help Kermit reunite the Muppets Mouse: Dez directs. ( school friends. Blg: Too Sho Amy's prom
mother. (R) choice. I(R to save their old theater. Potatoland (R) (R) (R) dress.
(5:30) Independence Day ('96, Science Fiction) *** Will Iron Man 3 ('13, Action) ***1/2 Robert Downey Jr., (]5) Superrnan ('78, Action) Christopher Reeve, Margot
ENC 150150150 150 150350 Smith. An alien mothership launches a fleet ofspacecraft Gwyneth Paltrow. Tony Stark must protect the loved ones Kidder. Superhero battles injustice on Earth while posing as a
which destroy entire cities. who are most important to him. (PG-13) mild-mannered reporter.
(5:30) Armageddon ('98, Science Ficton) Bruce Willis, Billy Warm Bodies (13) *** A zombie Faceoff Real Time with Bill Maher VICE BP oil Real Time
HBO 302 302302302302302400 Bob Thornton. An unruly crew of oil rig workers is trained to learns his romance with a human has set w/MaxCotto/JoseAntonioVargas.(VAW (R) spill.J(V14)(l( w/BillMaher
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(4:45) Beautiful(50) Dodgeball: ATrue Underdog Story ('04, Comedy) Last Week Fast & Furious 6 (13, Action) ***1 2 Vin Diesel, Paul (15) Classic Boxing on
HB02 303 303303303303303402 Creatures Vince Vaughn. Agroup of misfits enters a ddgeball John Oliver Walker. Agent Hobbs enlists the help of Dominic and his HB02: Chavez, Jr. vs.
(13) tournament in order to save their gym. (HD) team to take down a gang. (P-13) Martinez (9/12) (HD)
(5:40) The Island ('05, Science Fiction) **12/ Ewan Big Love: Eviction Store Bullet to the Head (13, Action) A hit man AGood Day to Die Hard (13) ** John
HB03 304 304304304 304404 McGregor. Two people escape holding facility to expose ruth promotion; Sarah's friend and a detective work together to bring down travels to Russia to work with his son, who
behind Utopian society. (P3-13) visits. (H1) a dangerous enemy. turns out to be in the CIA.
House of Wax ('05, Horror)** Elisha Cuthbert. An Snitch ('13, Drama) *** Dwayne Johnson, Barry Now You See Me (13, Thriller) *** Jesse Eisenberg,
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trapped in a wax museum. (R) (HD) to clear his name. (P-13) (H1) on bank heists while performing.
(5:30) The Campaign (12) (10) The World's End ('13, Comedy) ***1/2 Simon Pegg, 2 Guns (13, Action) *** Two men (:50) Co-Ed Confidential: (:25) CoEd
MAX2 321321321321321321422 ** Long-ime Nick Frost. Five friends' stuggle to find a fabled pub turns into discover they have been set up by the mob 4Play: Performance Anxiety Conf. (HD)
cngressman challenged. (R) a fight to save mankind. (R) to investigate each other. (R) Tango duo. (H)
(:15) Judge Dredd('95, Action)Sylvester Stallone, Armand Scary Movie 5 ('13, Comedy)* A couple Penny Dreadful: Nurse Jackie: 2014 AVN Awards Show
SHO 340 340340 340340340365 Assante. In a domed city of the future, a respected Street notices a demon lurkng around after Resurrection Vanessa's Rat on a Show honors excellence in
Judge is framed for murder. bringing home their newborn, vision. (R) Cheeto adult film. (N)
Byzantium ('13, Thriller) **I/2 Gemma Arterton, Saoirse Diary of a Mad Black Woman ('05, Comedy) *1 2 The Best Man ('99, Drama) ** Taye Diggs, Nia Long. A
TMC 350350350 350385 Ronan. In a coastal town, two strange women are revealed Kimberly Elise. A rejected wife turns to her gun-toting new novel has stories about everyone at the wedding of
as 200-year-old vampires. (R) grandmother for help and advice. (P-13) the author's friend. (R) (H))
m, .I, ar J a r 7, a1.I, '. .11 v, ~.. i v a a-,. E a v, = r.-


Today's Live Sports

12 p.m. GOLF LPGA Tour Golf
ShopRite LPGA Classic: First
Round from Stockton Seaview
Club in Galloway, N.J. (L)
2:30 p.m. GOLF PGA TOUR
Golf The Memorial Tournament:
Second Round from Muirfield
Village Golf Club in Dublin, Ohio.
(L)
3:30 p.m. FS1 NASCAR Sprint
Cup Qualifying FedEx 400
from Dover International Speed-
way in Dover, Del. (L)
5:30 p.m. FSI NASCAR Camp-
ing World Truck Series Lucas
Oil 200 from Dover International
Speedway in Dover, Del. (L)
7 p.m. ESPN2 2014 NCAA
Women's College World
Series Game #5 from ASA Hall
of Fame Stadium in Oklahoma
City. (L)
FSN MLB Baseball Atlanta
Braves at Miami Marlins from
Marlins Park. (L)
SUN MLB Baseball Tampa Bay
Rays at Boston Red Sox from
Fenway Park. (L)
8 p.m. WGN MLB Baseball
Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee
Brewers from Miller Park. (L)
8:30 p.m. ESPN 2014 NBA
Playoffs Eastern Conference
Finals, Game 6 (If Necessary)
Indiana Pacers at Miami Heat
from AmericanAirlines Arena. (L)
9:30 p.m. ESPN2 2014 NCAA
Women's College World
Series Game #6 from ASA Hall
of Fame Stadium in Oklahoma
City. (L)


Today's Talk Shows

7:00 a.m. ABC Good Morn-
ing America Curtis "50 Cent"
Jackson; US Men's Soccer Team;
Harley Pasternak. (N)
7:00 a.m. NBC Today Actors
James Earl Jones and Boyd
Gaines discuss Broadway's "Driv-
ing Miss Daisy." (N)
9:00 a.m. CBS LIVE! with Kelly
and Michael Kelly Ripa and Mi-
chael Strahan interview President
Barack Obama. (N)
9:00 a.m. MYN The 700 Club The
life of a drug addict changed after
he went to a Christian recovery
center. (N)
10:00 a.m. CBS Rachael Ray Bill
O'Reilly plays a game while kick-
ing off the hottest topics.
10:00 a.m. FOX Maury Nicole's
daughter becomes pregnant, she
wants to know who the father is.
10:00 a.m. IND Jerry Springer A
woman confronts her boyfriend's
mistress; man says he was
seduced.
10:00 a.m. MYN Maury Nicole's
daughter becomes pregnant, she
wants to know who the father is.
11:00 a.m. ABC The View Nicolle
Wallace; Lizzie Velasquez; summer
beauty trends; skin treatments.
11:00 a.m. CW The Queen Latifah
Show Kristen Bell discusses the
fan revival of "Veronica Mars" into
a feature film.
11:00 a.m. IND The Steve Wilkos
Show A woman has been accused
of holding her child down to be
burned.
12:00 p.m. CW Dr. Phil An elderly
woman has sent all of her money
to a man she met online.
1:00 p.m. ABC The Chew Curtis
Stone; Debi Mazar; Gabriele
Corcos. (N)
1:00 p.m. CW The Bill Cunning-
ham Show Two mothers who
struggle with their children's
choices join the set.
3:00 p.m. CW Steve Harvey A
man who has never expressed the
words "I love you"; 100-year-old
best friends. (N)

Convenient Complete Satellite
ONLINE TV Listings
www.sun-herald.com/tv







The Sun Classified Page 14 EINIC ads yoursu n net Friday, May 30, 2014


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GOREN BRIDGE

WITH BOB JONES
2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC


LOL


Both vulnerable. South deals.


NORTH
68532
KJ5
+A74
*A106
WEST
*AKQJ7
Y8632
0J92
47


SOUTH
610
(AQ1097
0K63
4QJ93


EAST
4964
Q4
0Q1085
4K8542


The bidding:
SOUTH WEST NORTH
1F 14 24*
4 Pass Pass
*Heart raise, 11 points


EAST
Pass
Pass


Opening lead: Ace of A

West started with two rounds of
spades. Declarer ruffed the second
spade, drew trumps in four rounds
and took the club finesse. When that
lost and East produced a third spade,
the contract was defeated by two
tricks.
"That was unlucky," said South.
"Four-one trumps, the club finesse
off-side and East had a third spade to


boot." North was a perfect partner.
"Yes, bad luck indeed," he said, but
he knew the truth South had
misplayed the hand.
Instead of ruffing the second
spade, South should have discarded a
low diamond from his hand. This
simple loser-on-loser play (LOL)
could never cost there was a sure
diamond loser anyway and it
would have catered to a layout like
this one.
South would have been able to ruff
the third spade, draw trumps in four
rounds and then take the club finesse,
exactly as he did. This time, however,
East would have no spade to hurt him
with and the contract would make
with ease.
The loser-on-loser play is a
technique that is not used often
enough. It may sometimes give away
the chance for an overtrick, an
overtrick that might not materialize
anyway, but it frequently gives you a
better chance to bring home your
contract.

(Bob Jones welcomes readers'
responses sent in care of this
newspaper or to Tribune Content
Agency, LLC., 16650 Westgrove
Dr., Suite 175, Addison, TX 75001.
E-mail responses may be sent to
tcaeditors@tribune.com.)


7 Little Words

Find the 7 words to match the 7 clues. The numbers in parentheses
represent the number of letters in each solution. Each letter -
combination can be used only once, but all letter combinations
will be necessary to complete the puzzle. a,
M
CLUES SOLUTIONS.

1 like some newer brakes (8)

2 tacit (8)-J

3 putting gaps between (7) __

4 Supreme Court justice Kagan (5) 0

5 steakhouse entrees (8) 0

6 costume ball (6)_ _a

7 in a silly way (9)__m


AC


OL


UN


ENA


Thursday's Answers: 1. BREECHES 2. GRAVELY 3. JUNIPERS
4. HOTTEST 5. MODULATES 6. AROUND 7. PRAIRIES 5/30


ANT


STA


INS


ING


SI


MAS


FO


ISH


TED


LY


EL


IL


OCK


RLO


SP


QUE


ACROSS
1 Bean for
sprouting
5 River through
Cologne
10 Hazard to ships
14 Moccasin,
maybe
15 Lab slide dye
16 A Muppet
17 Early Teuton
18 Played charades
19 Nun's apparel
20 Himalayan
guide
22 Jazz guitarist
John -
24 Fleming and
Holm
26 Bleaters
27 Use the mind's
eye
30 Sew up
34 Drag along
35 Kingdom
38 Video-game
pioneer
39 Mont. neighbor
40 Sink from
exhaustion
42 Thousand gee's
43 Leave-taking
46 March composer
48 Little, to Pierre
49 Generator
51 Humor that's
not funny


53 Meat in a can
55 Lamb's alias
56 Parson
60 Edged a doily
64 Buffalo's lake
65 Shake off
67 Astronomer's
sighting
68 Sis and bro
69 Concrete
reinforcer
70 Roman highway
71 D.A. backup
72 Comes across
as
73 Sponge feature
DOWN
1 Email contents
2 "Oops!" (hyph.)
3 Reminder
4 Baseball's
"Iron Horse"
5 Hired new staff
6 -polloi
7 Doctrines
8 Brother's
daughter
9 Funds a college
10 Seek old haunts
11 Gen. Robert

12 Zatopek or
Jannings
13 Pleat
21 Socks set


PREVIOUS PUZZLE SOLVED

E R U PITIAH E AR
J A I L ASS L T

A N TIHAHHA AIL ED
0VIBE MA TRO0N
LOWERED ONT
AP AR TcINAGES
MAV S A GALA
BLEACHR BASIN
EA FGRIPPE

ASHEW JADE OPT
OMN I DRAT PI PER
LI EN LAvE SLICE
TERAYIEA LEASE
5-30-14 2014 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


23 Greek-salad
topper
25 Grills a steak
27 Homer's tale
28 Full of puddles
29 A second time
31 Busch Gardens
city
32 Shouts
33 Seed scar
36 London lav
37 Cursor mover
41 Monks' books
44 Least involved
45 Safe callers


47 Diva's solo
50 John Wayne
movies
52 Herb for kitty
54 Fracas
56 Flat-topped hill
57 Late spring
flower
58 Robin beaks
59 Country cousin
61 "Oz" pooch
62 Hardly-
63 Boldly attempt
66 Beaver project


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com

Venice Gondolier readers: Look for the puzzle solution in the Our Town section


TODAY'S

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


The Sun Classified Page 14 E/N/C


ads~yoursun~net


Friday, May 30, 2014






Friday, May 30, 2014


ads.yoursun net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 15


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SINCE 1969
Shingle, Tile, Built-Up, Single-
Ply, Metal, Full Carpentry,
Service Available
Reagan Leonard
941-488-7478
LIC # RC 0066574

PAUL DEAD ROOFING
PROTECTING YOUR BIGGEST
INVESTMENT. 22 YRS EXP.-
941-441-8943 Lic#1329187


R.L. TEEL ROOFING
Reroofs & Repairs
Insurance Inspections
Veterns Discounts
941-473-7781
RC29027453 Lic/Ins
STEVE'S ROOFING &
REPAIRS
Call Steve & See What
He Can Do For You!
Voted Best of the Best
2011, 2012 & 2013!
Free Est. 941-625-1894
Lic. CCC1326838

-rTI Ir-E
W A Tr F R -, C ,,O L L
941-483-4630
Shingles, Slats, Metal, Tile, Repairs
SOld Roof Removal Our Specialty
SFull Carpentry
Free Estimates
LaC #CCC 068184
FULLY INSURED



SREALTOR
JJ4 5188


KELLI KONRAD
RE/Max Anchor
Accepting NEW Listings!
I will work hard for YOU!
906-250-5483 cell or
941-697-5606 office.
Advertise Today!

WINDOW CLEANING

z 5225


CLEAN WINDOWS
Over 30 Years doing
Windows, Pressure Washing
& Painting. Also available
Wallpaper Removal
941-493-6426 or
941-321-4845
Serving Sarasota County
WE DO WINDOWS &
PRESSURE WASHING.
e New Customers e
*Specials Package Deals e
Residential & Commercial
Free Estimates. Lic,/Ins.
(941)-661-5281

WINDOW REPAIR







SLIDING GLASS
DOOR
And Window Repair
Lowest Prices
GUARANTEED!!!
941-628-8579
Lic#CRC1130733


I SLIDING GLASS I
I DOOR REPAIRS I
I Wheels Tracks. Locks
IiFree Estimates Lic/Ins.
Bob @ 941-706-6445
SLIDINGDOORSANDMORE.COM

ISCLLANEOUS7


South Florida Backwaters
Redfish, Tarpon,
Speckled Sea Trout,
Snook & More.
Sight Fishing, Tours & More.
john@snowbirdcharters.com
lori@snowbirdcharters.com
855-567-SNOW (7669)


SCREENING ROOFING


MERCHANDISE

GARAGE SALES


6001
6002
6003
6004
6005
6006

6007
6008
6009
6010
6011
6012
6015
6020


Arcadia
Englewood
Lake Suzy
Nokomis
North Port
Port Charlotte
Deep Creek
Punta Gorda
Rotonda
Sarasota
South Venice
Venice
Out Of Area
Flea Market
Auctions


MERCHANDISE


6013
6025
6027
6030
6035
6038
6040
6060
6065
6070

6075
6090
6095
6100
6110
6120
6125
6128
6130
6131
6132
6135
6138
6140
6145
6160
6165
6170
6180

6190
6220

6225
6250
6260
6270


Moving Sales
Arts & Crafts
Dolls
Household Goods
Furniture
Electronics
TV/Stereo/Radio
Computer Equip
Clothing/Jewelry/
Accessories
Antiques &
Collectibles
Fruits/Veges
Musical
Medical
Health/Beauty
Trees & Plants
Baby Items
Golf Accessories
Exercise/Fitness
Sporting Goods
Firearms
Firearm Access.
Bikes/Trikes
Toys
Photography/Video
Pool/Spa & Supplies
Lawn & Garden
Storage Sheds/
Buildings
Building Supplies
Heavy Constr.
Equipment
Tools/Machinery
Office/Business Equip
& Supplies
Restaurant Supplies
Appliances
Misc. Merchandise
Wanted to Buy/T rade


ARTS AND CRAFTS

Z 6025

CRAFTING ITEMS Stamps,
Ink, embosser. $25 941-426-
0825
VINTAGE AUDUBON FRAMED
PRINTS 24X30 $45 941-460-
8189
DOLLS
6027


BRATZ DOLLS
RV& sports car 25 BRATZ
DOLLS $50 941-474-0192
DOLL HOUSE furniture from
$5.00 For information 941-
457-0339

Looking for

Adventure?

Find it

in the

Classifieds


MISCELLANEOUS


IE-CIGS, NEW STORE I
OPENING!! 3109 Tamiami
Tr P.C. Mon.-Sat. 10-6
Wide Selection & Bargain
Prices. 941-235-1500

6000
qv 1D


MOVING SALES




ILOOKI



MOVING MUST SELL
Cherry BR Suite-King Sleigh Bed
$350.00
Dinnette Set $135.00
Computer desk $40.00
Mirror Cherry 40 x 50" $75.00
Recliner $35.00
Patio table chairs $30.00
Appt. 941-662-0123


HOUSEHOLD GOODS
Z:6030

ACUVUE2 CONTACTS
+5.25 $20 941-575-6332
BED MATTRESS & BOX.
New-Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
BED DOUBLE bed with bed-
ding $120 941-623-2817
BUFFET HOTTRAYS (3) elec,
7x25, 10x16, 14x25, all $20
941-830-0524
CHINA NORITAKE "Diana"
Srvc 10 + serving pcs $250
941-704-0322
CONAIR GARMET Steamer
Professional type $30 941-
627-6542
CORELLE DINNERWARE
Blue Rose design
$40 941-697-7592
CORELLE IMPRESSIONS
Pink Trio Service for 12 $100
941-575-2675
DISHES, CORNING Floral
pattern set of eight, $30
941-575-6332
DUMBELL SET 2/3/5/8 lb
weights w/rack LN $20
941-830-0524
FILE CABINET 4 drawer lock-
ing drawers beige $29 941-
525-0756
INEED CASH I
Have A Garage
Sale!.

FILE CABINET 4 drawer lock-
ing drawers black $19 941-
525-0756
FOLDING CHAIR Papasan-
style, turquoise. Nice! $18
941-276-1881
GAS GENERATOR 3 hr use
5250W 120/240V LN $330
941-697-0501
HAMPTON BAY REMOTE
CONTROL NEW $25 941-460-
8189
HURRICANE PANEL new for
man door $55 941-918-1239
KITCHEN ITEMS prices vary
on each $150 941-623-2817



FREE MERCHANDISE ADS!!
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and place your ad.
"CLICK ON CLICK HERE
TO PLACE YOUR AD NOW"
and follow the prompts.
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merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
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SUNITSI R


HOUSEHOLD GOODS



MATTRESS & Box Springs full
size $75 941-918-1239
MATRESS, QUEEN & BOX.
Brand New Will Sell $175.
Also Have KING.
941-629-5550
ORIENTAL DECOR coord
pics, vases, 11 pcs, each $10
941-830-0524
PICTURE FRAME, Oak
Collage 12.5x17.5. Good
Cond $7 941-629-4973
PICTURE FRAMES, Oak
Collage 17x21.Great Cond.
$8 941-629-4973
SEASHELL HANGING, 6'
Multilevel, cascading, for lanai
$55 941-276-1881
SHOWER CURTAIN DOL-
PHINS-NEW $7 941-235-
0799
STEAMER POT, Seafood,
2pc, faucet, 20qt blue $25
941-830-0524
SWEEPERS
2 FOR $5 1 for $25
941-445-6002
TABLE CLOTH 66X84 wht ctn
embr 8 napkins new in pack-
age $25 941-697-0501
THROW, White, Cotton,
Fringe. Embossed Hearts.
Nice $10 941-276-1881
TIFFANY STYLE Ceiling light
beautiful $20 941-627-6542
1 Classified = Sales
TWIN BED Comforters Like
new. Beautiful $25 941-423-
7795
VACCUM KENMORE Pro-
gressive Upright $35 941-
426-0760
HOLIDAY ITEMS



TURKEY PLATE Beautiful dish
for your turkey. $20 941-423-
7795
FURNITURE



ARMOIRE SOLID Wood 36w x
72h Adj shelves $185 941-
704-0322
ARMOIRE TV 3PCS 104"
Lighted Thomasville $450
941-626-1365
ASIAN CABINET flower
design $50 941-266-6718
ASIAN CABINET flower
design $50 941-266-6718
BAR Can use Outside or In.
Unique. Many features. On
wheels. $365 941-564-6866
BAR STOOLS (2) Coastal
decor aqua $265 937-732-
5406
BAR STOOLS (2) Vintage
wooden swivel $175 937-
732-5406
BDRM SET FULL-SIZE Under
bed storage, mattress. $400
941-626-1365
BED MATTRESS & BOX.
New -Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
BED, King Size beautyrest
Pillowtop Complete Bed, box
& frame exc condit. $125
941-223-2150
BEDROOM SET, 2 twins
dresser/mirror nitestand $325
315-406-5402
BEDS, TWIN (2) Excellent
Condition $100 941-460-
8560
BOOKCASE- Oak Barrister-
style w/ 4 glass doors $150
401-741-1258
CHAIR & FOOT STOOL
Stressless, All Leather, Bone.
Like New! (3 Yrs. Old) $500
941-497-0734
CHAIR SOFT ivory fabric.
Swivels. Deep Creek $75 obo
443-618-8161
CHAISSE LOUNGE (2) Heavy
plastic $50 203-927-6976


SUN




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Friday, May 30, 2014


L FURNITURE /


CHEST MAPLE,
48H X 17W, great cond.
$100 863-990-1730
CHEST OF Drawers 24 x 42,
8 drawers $20 941-380-7090
CLAW FOOT sofa beautiful
$499 941-769-2389
COFFEE TABLE Great Condi-
tion! $95 727-639-9926
COFFEE TABLE WOOD &
Glass .& End tables New $225
954-881-6662
COMPUTER DESK CABINET
50W, 28H, 24D $100
863-990-1730
COUCH 7 2 tone, micro
suede, recline, new $300
941-769-5995
COUCH, 80" Broyhill
Excellent condition $180
941-493-6351
COUCH, FLORAL seats
three/great condition $225
941-882-3139
DESK, All wood! Mission
style. Text for pics. $60
401-741-1258
DINETTE CHAIRS 4 small
rattan LN gin uphol. $80
941-830-0524
DINETTE SET 4 swivel chairs
$40 941-575-0202
DINETTE SET Glass top. Four
chairs. $100 941-474-6557
DINETTE SET GLASSTOP
45"-4 CHAIRS $50 941-743-
2424
DINING ROOM SET Troy 42"
round wood $250 941-626-
5468
DINING SET 39x39 dark
wood (4) chairs good condition
$65 218-340-7115
DINING SET 48X30 table/6
chairs $300 941-882-3139
DINING TABLE, Wrought iron
and glass 48 inches. $125
401-741-1258
DRESSER W/MIRROR good
condition. $25 941-698-1002
DRESSER, WICKER six
drawers/honey finish $225
941-882-3139
END TABLE Good Condition!
$55 727-639-9926
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
Aprox 6x8. Lt Oak. $150 941-
698-1002
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
wood/whitewash $225
941-882-3139
FURNITURE, 2-end, 1-coffee,
1-sofa Table glass/stone $200
941-681-2433
FUTON ALL Wood Black
Cover $200 609-618-2082
HALL TABLE Metal and Glass
$40 941-613-0060
I BUY FURNITURE
Or anything of value!
941-485-4964
LANAI CHAIRS
4-White PVC on Casters
$40 941-698-9896
LANAI FURN.-WHITE WICK-
ER 4 pieces $195 941-580-
4460
LANAI FURNITURE white
fiberglass wicker, dining table
6 chairs, coffee & coctail
tables &3 seat sofa. New cush-
ions $600 941-637-3993
LANAI TABLE Bin cast alu-
minum+12" tiles 65x42" $150
941-698-9896
LANAI TABLE, 4 CHAIRS,
cushions, footrest $190 941-
255-0874
LEATHER LARGE
Sofa, 2Chairs, 2Ottomans
$200 941-626-1365
LOVE SEAT micro suede,
v,good condition $89 941-
426-5875
LOVE SEAT, Colonial, Warm
colors. Maple trim. $200 941-
474-6557
LOVE SEAT, Leather
Good Condition! $109
727-639-9926


FURNITURE



COUCH $250 941-809-0022
MAPLE DRY Sink Colonial
style. Good condition. $150
941-474-6557
MATTRESS & BOX.
New -Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
MIRROR & CHEST oriental
$395 941-575-4364
PATIO SET 42" glass table, 4
ch, sm tbl & ottmn $325 941-
488-1522
PATIO SET, Wicker 5 Piece
White Resin, Great Co. $350
941-585-1644
QUEEN BEDROOM set
Queen bedroom set $135
941-505-7780
QUEEN SOFA Bed Nice $125
941-681-2493
RECLINER 54"L x 32"W
Beige w/flower print $75 941-
457-0339
RECLINER SOUTHERN
Motion POWER mocha $475
941-697-4713
RECLINER tan NEW recliner
not power $195 941-426-
5519
RECLINER, LANE, LIKE NEW,
SAND COLOR $200 610-698-
1549
RUG, 11X8 Foral French
Nourison Rug $225
\941-681-2433
SETTEE BEIGE/YELLOW
zebra stripe $225 941-426-
5519
SLEEPER SOFA sofa bed,
nice 125.00 317-755-7371
$125 317-755-7371
SOFA 4-PC. sectional, exc.
cond. $475 941-255-0691
SOFA 7 Micro Suede recline
ends, new condition. $300
941-769-5995
SOFA BOTH ends recline, exe-
ant condition. $130 941-426-
5875
SOFA MATCHING chair,
ottoman, tan, very clean $299
941-412-5283
SOFA New micro suede,
recliner 7ff. $300 941-769-
5995
SOFA New micro suede,
recliner 7ft. $300 941-769-
5995

SOFA Sleeper, Norwalk, Floral
design. Queen size. $200
941-474-6557
SOFA, 2 Power recliners, light
brown, microfiber good cond.
$200 PGI 941-575-7446
SOFAS & RECLINERS 2, 1
w/double bed 1, w/2 recliners
$100 941-492-9116
SWIVEL CHAIR, Large
back cushioned. $110
941-426-8776
TWIN BEDS, 2 Like new
with mattress $250
941-474-5240
VINTAGE CHAIRS TELL CITY
Model 8031 set of 4 $250
941-266-6718
WALL UNIT/WRITING Desk 4
shelves. Warm color. $100
941-474-6557
WICKER CHAIRS Fan-back
armchairs (2). Color Honey.
$150 941-460-0719
WICKER CHEST
Tan, Swivel Top
$200 941-698-0636
WICKER VANITY with bench
and mirror. $75 941-416-
9709
WINE RACK wrought iron w/
glass top New $50 218-340-
7115
WOOD WALL MIRROR NICE
OAK $25 941-460-8189
ELECTRONICS


AUDIO-VIDEO RECEIVER
Sherwood RD6500 $25
941-918-1236


ELECTRONICS



7" RIOLA TABLET STILL IN
BOX $25 941-235-0799
AUTO HEADLAMPS
LAZERBLUE (WAGNER) $20
941-429-8415
COMPUTER MINI
hp computer .warranty
$175 941-580-4460
DVD, Magnavox player LIKE
NEW $7 941-235-0799
HOME THEATER, Onkyo 7
channel $150 941-830-1030
OUTDOOR ROCK SPEAK-
ERS (4)w/iPod dock $225
941-426-7078
PRINTER, HP Deskjet
1000 like new-little used.
$7 941-235-0799
SAMSUNG 19" Monitor
920BW $45 941-387-4485
SOLAR 12V CHARGER Bat-
tery trickle charger $16 941-
629-9149
XBOX ELITE 360 120gb
used twice $179 941-575-
9891

TV/STEREO/RADIO



55" TV
LG LED 3D Smart tv
$500 941-276-7836
HAM RADIO Icom 718 HF
manual, hand mike $475 941-
639-3670
HAMRADIO KENWOOD
TS440 HF manual Mike $375
941-639-3670
ICOM 229H 2 Meter moble
$135 941-639-3670
SURROUND SOUND
RECEIVER, Yamaha 7.1 All
Metal case not cheap plastic
model North Port, L/N condi-
tion $300 941-257-8325
SURROUND SOUND
SPEAKER System, Paradigm
7.1, Fronts Rears Sides Cen-
ter and Sub Top Pro Quality
not Plastic Junk, North Port
$400 941-257-8325
TV 55" RCA HD projection,
exc w/remote $150 941-624-
0121
TV SAMSUNG LCD 32" Very
good cond. $95 941-505-
6290
TV, 32" RCA, Flat Screen,
New In Box new $200
941-876-3356
TV, RCA 42" LED 1080p, in
excellent condition. $225
941-875-2285
YEASU FT2200 @ meter
moble $135 941-639-3670

COMPUTER
EQUIPMENT


COMPUTER CART, Wood.
Used $50 954-881-6662
COMPUTER MONITOR 17"
Used $35 954-881-6662
DELL ALL in One Touchscreen
Desktop $290 941-404-
5359
KEYBOARD MACINTOSH
Model A1048, USB plug $25
941-379-5586
NETBOOK CASE 11.6"
CARRY CASE, BLACK $22
941-661-9839
POWER SUPPLY Antec 400
Watts, Tested $25 941-379-
5586
ICLOTHING / JEWELRY

L ACCESSORIES J


CLOTHES, 4-6 Ladies skorts,
capri's, jeans, tops nice
$7/ea. 941-681-2433
CRUISE ROBE New, white
cozy robe. $25 941-426-0825
MINK CAPE blonde ex
condition medium $125
941-426-1686


CLOTING / JEWELRY
L ACCESSORIES


IVlMINS:
BLOND MINK CAPE LARGE
SIZE & DARK MINK COAT
LARGE SIZE GREAT COND.
$250/EA 941-204-3734
SHOES NAME BRAND High
Heels, size 6.5-7, all different
kinds Whole bag Excellent
cond. 10 pair $100 941-625-
4139


COLLECTIBLES


ALWAYS BUYING
ANTIQUES, ART, SILVER
NEW ENGLAND ANTIQUES
(941) 639-9338
ANTIQUE CRIB turned
daybed yellow. Iron. $399
041-426-7078
CHILDS TABLETOP ORGAN,
Magnus, very old $50
941-423-2585
CIVIL WAR NEWSPAPERS,
85 issues. Great Gift Your
choice $20/ea 941-488-8531
All war News- Venice***
COIN 1922 PEACE DOLLAR
GEM BU $40 941-457-0155
COIN 1923 PEACE DOLLAR
GEM BU $40 941-457-0155
COIN, 1877-S half
dollar seated liberty EF $175
941-697-6592
COIN, silver peace
dollar 1922-S EF $45
941-697-6592
DESK, 1948 DucanPhyfe
Mahogany nice $225
941-681-2433
ELVIS TEDDY BEARS HAVE 4
$75 941-627-6780
GUY HARVEY Signed Macker-
el RunDown $125 941-735-
2119
NEWSPAPER 100 yr. old.
London Times. TITANTIC Great
gift. $25 941-488-8531
NORITAKE ABERDEEN 8-5
pc, 4 serving PGI $150 941-
575-2675
OLIVER TYPEWRITER
1912 model #9 good cond
$40 941-629-5746
OX-YOKE HAND carved oak
vintage $75 941-697-6592
PICTURE, Thunderbirds
airplane 16x20 $25
941-423-2585
ROGERS SILVERPLATE 7
pcs $50 941-266-6718
ROGERS SILVERPLATE 7
pcs $50 941-266-6718
SEWING DESK
1950's, good condition
$70 941-266-6718
SPONGE LARGE (basketball)
cost 45 sell 20 $20
941-585-8149
STAR TREK VHS, 39
tapes Mostly sealed $50
941-423-2585
TINS ASSORTMENT of 89
tins. $60 941-266-6718
TINS ASSORTMENT of 89
tins. $60 941-266-6718
TONKA-TOY CAR carrier
pressed steel collector $80
941-697-6592





W. BRITAIN TRADITIONAL
Toy Soldiers & Minitures. Sets
& Singles. ALL MIB. Priced to
Sell at 1/2 Original Retail,
$15. & Up. Call M-F from 9-5
for Details. 941-484-6394
ZENITH TRANSOCEANIC
radio Lights up no sou $50
941-423-2585


MUSICAL



ALVAREZ ACOUSTIC/ELEC-
TRIC 2014 w/hard case $399
843-735-8912
AMP FENDER PRINCETON
Chorus Amp reverb $199
941-626-8739


Royale, Like New! All the
Bells & Whistles! $7,500.
Comparable at $60,000. New!
941-456-2797
SCHECTER BASS Stiletto
Studio 2013 Excellent. $499
843-735-8912
WAMPLER Hotwired pedal
overdrive $225 941-626-
8739

L MEDICAL /



BATH BENCH with Arms and
Back like new $50 941-697-
4713






BATHTUB & SHOWER
GRAB BARS INSTALLED
Don't Wait to Fall to Call!
Free In-Home Evaluation
22 Years Experience
CALL JIM'S
BATHROOM GRAB BARS, LLC
941-626-4296
COMMODE PORTABLE
Hardly used, very clean. $40
941-918-0005 Nokomis
ELECTRIIC RECLINER lift
chair orig 1100. $395 941-
580-4460
LIFT CHAIR elec reclining
chair $350 941-255-8638
MEDLINE TOILET Safety Rail
like new $35 941-697-4713
POWER SCOOTER
Electric, by Shop Rider $150
941-268-8951
QUAD CANE like new $20
941-697-4713
RECLINER ELECTRIC
liftchair.orig 1100
$395 941-580-4460
SCOOTER, 3 wheel raly excel
cond $450 941-255-8638
SHOWER CHAIR, 2 WHEEL
WALKER Clean each $20
941-268-8951
WHEELCHAIR LIFT Harmer
AL500 Outside $400 941-
426-4166
WHEELCHAIR, ELECTRIC
Shoprider Jimmie $499
941-882-3139

L TREES & PLANTS



AZALEAS, Tiger lily White-Red-
Violet $5 941-204-9100
I NEED CASH? I

BAMBOO GREEN in 3 gal
pots app.7 ft $25 941-697-
7375
BANANA/PLANTAIN OR
SNOW BUSH 3 ft 3 gal pot $6
941-258-2016
DESERT ROSE,15Gal Pot
Grown From Seeds! Will deliver
locally. $250 941-204-9100
DESERT ROSES, Large
Flowering, 3 Gallon Pot $35
941-204-9100


VIBURNUM GREAT FOR
PRIVACY HEDGE 15GAL,
ALMOST 5' TALL $45/EA
AND LOTS MORE.
*GREATPRICES***
Sufs NusuRY 941-488-7291


TREES & PLANTS



FRANGIPANI /PLUMERIA 3-
4 ft pastel color $8 941-258-
2016
ORCHIDS WHITE, Large Catt-
leya $20 941-876-0472

PAPAYA PLANTS, 1 gallon
pot $4 941-697-0794
PASSION VINE or MILKWEED
butterfly host plant $6 941-
258-2016
POINCIANA DWF yel or CAS-
SIA 3-4 ft in 3 gal pot $6 941-
258-2016
SKY HIGH CEDAR Column
$25 941-204-9100

BABY ITEMS



BOY CLOTHES 2t to 5t Excel-
lent condition $1 941-875-
0547
GIRLS HIGH Chair New Condi-
tion $50 941-626-2627
GOLF ACCESSORIES


4 Passenger
New Trojan Batteries 48 Volt
(5-24-14), 6" Lift, 12" Alu-
minum Rims & 22" Tires
"Black" Body, Lights and
Rear Folding Seat.
New M-Cor 4, 19/20 mpr
Factory Reconditioned
-$ 5275-
Local Delivery Included
941-830-5312
GOLF BAG, brand name
Bagboy $15 941-625-1537
GOLF BALLS 5 gallon bucket
$20 941-627-6542
GOLF CLUBS and Bag Older,
right handed. $25 941-625-
2627
GOLF SHOES 10 xxwd excell
cond foot joy lit $30 941-697-
5643
ODYSSEY VERSA 1 33" new
with cover (MINT) $75 941-
391-0042
TIGER SHARK Irons 3-PW 3
woods 1-3-5 $45 941-625-
1537


ELLIPTICAL New balance
8000 great condition $299
941-575-9891
ELLIPTICAL, NordicTrack
Excellent Shape. $250
941-270-7458
EXERCISE BIKE NO Electron-
ics, Nice $35 941-268-8951
ROLLER BLADES Women's
Reidel size 8, white $25 941-
484-1379
ROLLER SKATES Ladies
white size 8. $30 941-496-
4903
SKI/ROWING MACHINE
good condition
$25 941-629-5746

L SPORTING GOODS



ARCHERY ITEMS, Traditional
archery items. $2
941-426-6941
BAIT BUCKET 10 GAL WITH
AIR PUMP $35 941-628-3613
DALE JR race jacket Bud
2006 Lg new gc $125 941-
460-8743
DALE SR race jacket
2001 black XL new gc
$125 941-460-8743







Friday. May 30, 20]4 ads.yoursun.net E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 17


SPORTING GOODS


FIREWOOD No camping
trip is complete without it!
Pine, Oak, or Citrus
Split, Bundled, and ready for
the firepit!
941-468-4372
FISHING GEAR 7 rods 11
reels, 3 shirts, 1 net 5250
941-575-2675
SE ploy Classified!
RECUMBENT BIKE Pursuit
E25X-Train w/wts $80
941-764-1521
SCOPE KONUSPRO 10X50
Mil-Dot, 1" Tube, NIB $90
941-379-5586
SCUBA FINS Mares Piano XL
& SmExc Cond $25 941-474-
1902
SLOLAM WATERSKIS HO
Sports fiberglass gc $110
941-460-8743
TRAPOUNE, Good Cond.
14%f $100 785-408-0363
L FIREAMS



A COLLECTOR buying US GI
45's, Carbines, German Walthers,
WW2 items, M1's, 941-705-5145










RUE e 80 fS/S, mag
Nals. S 3a



Sat 5/3109-979-04d
$375. BUFREESARKCc30
4 olctr nas$3094-7906


I TRICYCLES I

4 613~
2-KID BIKE trailer w/ 16" air
tires $35 941-497-3702
ADULT TRIKE, Sanibel New
tires Ig Seat & Basket $125
941-5440042
]Advertise Today!I
BANANA SEAT
Easy Ride Muscle Bike ape
hangers $85 941-544-0042
BICYCLE 26"
Roadmaster 15 spd gd cond
$45 941-493-0674
BIKE RACK Trunk
Mount, Holds 2 Bikes $20
941-268-8951
BIKE, 24" GIRLS Mt Sport
Bike Roadmaster, 18 sp $45
941-223-6212
BIKE: TREK 7000 USA alu-
minum MT Touring 21 sp 26
$175 941-544-0042
BIKE: TREK CALYPSO Cruis-
er Mens 7 sp w basket $99
941-5440042
HITCH-MOUNTED, Thule
Bicycle Carrier 914XT N $175
941-639-7834
HUFFY BEACH Cruiser like
new $75 941-625-2779
SCHWINN 21 SPEED, UN-
SEX 26" MOUNTAIN BIKE
$100 941-2235159
SPAULDING NEW adult bicy-
cle helmet $5 941-426-0825
TRICYCLE 1929 Ohio USA
Fairy w solid tires $99 941-
544-0042
TRICYCLE RED & white
w/back basket $200 941-
380-2487

L PHOTOGRAPHY/
/ IDEO I
~6140~

CAMERA CANON 35mm film,
EOS Elan, Very Good Condition
$80 941-505-6290
CAMERA KONICA MINOLTA
5D 2 ex zoom lens, digital
$400 941-764-3977


I VIDEO
L PHOTOGRAPHY/


CAMERA, Canon EOS620
35MM auto lens 35-105
F1.35-4.5 flash filters & bag
$125 941-223-2150
CANNON VIXIA HF20 HD
Camcorder. $275 941-639-
9102
FUJI FILM SCHC Card New
4GB SDHC card $5 941-426-
0825


HOT TUB NEVER USED
SEATS 5 WITH LOUNGER,
LIGHT, MAINT.FREE CABI-
NET. CAN DELIVER $1895.
941-421-0395


ZU INTC

www.sgasandmnoreflorda.comn
9WS41-625-66W00m
HOT TUB, Like New Key West
Style Plug & Play, Waterfall,
Jets, Lights, Steps Inc.
$2,000. obo 443-253-0693
Seize the sales
with Classified!

LAWN & GARDEN 1



BLADES JD 52x3 Mulching
18" long 5/8 hole $25 941-
497-3702
BLADES PR MTD 42x2 6-pt
hole 21 3/16" long $35 941-
497-3702
CHARCOAL GRILL Great
shape $40 941-743-6757


SLAWN & GARDEN/



CONCRETE EDGING Con-
crete Edging, FREE $100
941-423-8563
Cuddle up by the fire!
Firewood Split, Bundled and
ready for the firepit!
Pine, Oak, or Citrus,
941-468-4372
FOLDING LAWN CHAIRS
3 chairs @ $5 ea
941-445-6002
HAMMOCK W/STAND New
w/stand $60 941-460-8189


w/ 54" Deck. MUST SELL!!!
LOW HOURS THIS THING
IS A DREAM $8,500
517-404-2368
LAWN MOWER Craftsman
21" 6.75 hp B&S $100 941-
485-0681
LAWN MOWER Toro 22" self
propelled 6.75hp $200 941-
485-0681
LAWN MOWER, Murray
b&s eng runs great $69
941-564-6062
LAWN TRACTOR Troybuilt
17.5 hp 42 in lvmsg $375
941-716-5351
MOWER BLADES JD set of 3
for 60" deck. $20 941-497-
3702
MULCHER BLADE NOS JD
29.5" long $10 941-497-
3702
POLE SAW, Remington
adjustelect gc $90
941-460-8743
PRESSURE WASHER, Troy
6.75hp 2550psi $220 941-
4850681
PUSH MOWER MTD 6.75hp.
21" $75 941-485-0681
RAKES (2) $14 obo Call 941-
474-8286


/ LAWN & GARDEN/

RIDING LAWN MOWER
11 hp 36in cut $350 941-564-
6062
RIDING LAWN MOWER
Ariens 46" Deck, 20 HP
$1,100 941-697-4423
RYOBI TRIMMERS 2 Strait
Shaft $40 941-232-2599
SMOKER Used but in good
cond, Wood chips included
$20 941-743-6757
STORAGE SHED, Suncast
38Hx56Wx39D. Plastic $40
941-697-7558
SWING LAWN swing old with
lions $65 941-474-8286
TOP SOIL For Sale! Please
call: 941-468-4372
TORO RIDER
421n cut. 20 Hp Kohler.
$500 941-445-6002
TRIMMER, Ryobi w/ Brush
Blade. Model #RY30160
$125obo 941-624-4758 (PM)
VERMONT, 3 Burner Grill Cast
Iron $40 941-232-2599
WANTED: Stepping Stones
Any Size 941-629-3419
Classified = Sales

STORAGE SHDS
BUILDINGS
~6165


HURRICANESHED.COM
FENCED YARD....
TIGHT SPACES.-NO PROBLEM
941-626-4957
LICENSE # CBC1259336


BUILDINGS Purchase or
Rent To Own! Free Delivery &
Set Up. Ask Your Dealer,
Mattas Motors About Options
941-916-9222


S BUILDIG I
| SUPPLIES 1
~~6170

150 FT. of Composite
Fencing, S750
941-623-2443
BLOCKS 3X16 95 pcs. all for
one price $50 941-815-9050
DECKING Gray veranda 16
1/2x5 1/4 21 piec $325 941-
735-2119
GLASS 2 pieces 81x29
1/2x7/8 E/C $375 941-735-
2119
IADVERTISEI
PATIO DOOR FRAME
Kit 72xSOwht-md16068 $25
941-764-1521
ROOF SUPPLIES
dry in tabs $30
941-629-5746
SIDING 80 boards 12'6"X7
1/4 face boards $450 941-
735-2119
STAINLESS STEEL sink
w/faucet $30 941-626-5736
STORM PANELS White 26
panels/5 sizes, Aluminum,
DadeCo $399 941-575-8187
TABLE SAW, 10" With stand +
jigs $35 941-204-2332
THOMPSON WATERSEAL,
6gls new $80 941-764-1521

SHEAVY/CONST.
I QUIPMENT I

Z 180.
STUMP GRINDER Carlton 65
H.P. Gas wood chipper, Ver-
meer diesel. 1996 Ford 1 1/2
ton dump diesel. 1993 Ford
700 boom truck diesel 65 feet
941-626-8532
ITOOLSIMACHNERY



8" TABLE saw Older Sears
model $50 941-613-0060
BELT SANDER Craftsman
Belt Sander 3"x18" $45
941-255-8420


~(iQheLI iUTYtmtM i I *S


6000
flv


MERCHANDISE


GARAGE SALES
L EGLEOOD

STORE CLOSED
INVENTORY SALE!
SATURDAY, 8:00-3:00pm
No Early Birds Please.
242 North Broadway
(Behind Pubix at
earborne & 776)
Nascar Collectibles, Beanie
Babies, Boyd's Bears,
Disney Collectibles, Wizard
of Oz, Elvis. Porcelin Dolls,
Steins & Beer Memorabilia,
Die Cast Car/Trucks, Token
Slot Machines, Vintage Toys,
Store Display Equipment,
16' Hauler & MUCH MORE!

A Bargain Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds First!
A Whole
Marketplace of
Shopping is right at
your
Fingertips!


L NORTH PORT
I EARAE SALES I







Dont Miss our
HUGE ESTATE SALE
Next weekend June 7Th
& 8th Sale By:
PIECES OF OLDE


Sat & Sun 9-3 228 San Remo
Ave. ENTIRE HOUSE SALE! Fur-
niture (some cheap furn.) dish-
es, office items, sm. appli-
ances, hospital bed, Jazzy
chair & other medical supplies.
FIPT CHARLOTTEEEP
CREEK GARAGE SALES


m7FRI-SAT 8-1 597 West
"Tarpon Blvd. Household
items, kitchenware, home
decor, and much more!
--FRI-SAT 8-1. 771 Ellicott
Cr. MOVING SALE. Furnim
ture, appliances, lots of house-
hold. Off Midway Blvd.
mFRI-SAT. 8-2 90 Valdiva
St. (off Deep Creek Bvd)
Furn., HH, craft supplies, co-
lectibles, Xmas & much more!
r-iFRI.-SAT. 8-4 4454 Ocala
Terr. (Behind 41 Walmart)
Treadmill, 26" TV, Camping
Toilet, Linens, Dishes & More!


PT. CHARLOETDEEP
CREEK GARAGE SALES


F]FRI-SUN ONLY 8-4
18055 Rickardway Ave.
Leather Recliner w/ foot stool,
Picture Frames, Trundle Bed,
Household Items & Much More!
mFRI1.-SAT 8AM-1PM .
3278 GREAT NECK ST,
"ESTATE SALE" Full Contents
of home! Come and See!
m-SAT 7-12 3644 Harbor
LJHuge Sale! Tools, fishing,
trolling motor, mower, power
washer, weedeaters-rotor tiller
mSAT 8-2 1318 Amelia
Ave. Multi Family, Car,
Tools, Household. Something
for Everyone.
ESAT-SUN 8-12 22528
Tennyson Ave. Household
items, treadmill, bicycles, lots
of clothing, kitchenware, etc!
F7 SAT. ONLY 9-2
3715 Brooklyn Ave
Between Olean & Westchester.
Furn, nic-nacks, crafts, etc

MOVING


SATURDAY ONLY 8-1
19592 Kapok St. Furniture,
Housewares, Women's Cloth-
ing (Sz 4-10) & Much More!
seze the sales
with Classified!
mTHUR.-FRI. 8-2 1482
Dewitt St. Misc army
items, canopy, tent, kitchen
items. Too Much to List!


L PUTGORDA
I GARAGE SALES I
6O0


FrI-SUN3'/-O3, a-:?
35711 Washington Loop Rd.
MH28 Rose St. Household,
Tools, Records, Bar Stools,
End Tables, Holiday & Night
Stands. *OPEN HousE ALso
fdyow r~

IFlendin the
lassfieds

EFRI.8-12 27363 Dutch
Ave. Off Riverside Dr.
household, outdoor furn.,
video games, books & more.
SATURDAY 5/319-2
300 Klispie Dr.. Estate
Sale: Antiques Collectibles
Furniture Rugs Silk
Flowers Pictures Tools.
SATURDAY MAY 31 &
SUNDAY JUNE 1. 8am-
4pm. 3406 Nighthawk Court,
Punta Gorda Isles. Moving!
Designer furniture. Tuscany
queen bed, armoire & night-
stands, wood bar with granite
top & barstools. Matching din-
ing table with 4 chairs & buf-
fet. Loveseat, wing back chair
& cocktail table. Rust iron
queen canopy bed & armoire.
Bombay chest. Much more.
Call for details 520-247-7073.


F7PRTA GOiRDA
I GARAGE SALES I






SATURDAY ONLY 8-12
27064 Safe Haven Lane. Fur-
niture Tools, Knick Knacks &
Miscellaneous Items.
FIND YOUR
BEST FRIEND
IN THE


I D ONLuh U I -.1
518 La Caruna Ct. 94 BMW
2521 (69k mi.), Leather
Chair 32" TV Painting, Fold-
ing table & airs, &More


GARGESAILES



1 -

FRI. & SAT., 5/30-5/31,
946 BOUNDARY BLVD.
ROTUNDA W., 9-3PM
FINE TROPICAL FURNITURE &
DECOR; LOTS OF RATTAN,
ANTIQUES, UNIQUE ART, SCULP-
TURES & POTTERY, WONDERFUL
KITCHEN ITEMS & SO MUCH MORE!


FT S. VENICEA7
SGARAGESALES



H:] Sat Only 7am-lpm
3483Roslyn Rd
S. Venice Household
items. Some furniture.

You Save
Big Bucks
Shopping
Classifieds!

F ENICEAiiA
GARAGE SALES
t~611

FRI-SUN 7-12
580 Sunset Beach Dr..
kitchen stuff, tools, sewing
machines, books, some
furniture, legos, toys,
collectibles and more.


GARAGE SALES I


FRI-SAT 9-2 13237 Feldspar
Ave. Gulf Cove. Just Moved
Sale! Furn., fridge, kitchen
items & more! Worth Seeing!!
-i SAT. & SUN. 9:30-4:00
9300 Hialeah Terrace
UPSCALE MOVING SALE!
Many Decor Items, Original
Paintings, Lanai & Inside
Furniture & MUCH MORE!!


Friday, May 30, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/NIC The Sun Classfied Page 17






The Sun Classified Page 18 E/N/C


ads.yoursunnet


Friday, May 30, 2014


TOOLS/MACHINERY



BACKPACK BLOWER, Home
Lite $60 941-626-8475
CHAINSAW, Husqvarna
254 pro 16" hurricane $150
941-697-6592
CONCRETE MIXER, Electric
3-1/2 CU. FT. $175
941-628-2311
DRILL PRESS, Bench
Top 1/2" Craftsman $65
941-255-8420
ELECTRIC CONCRETE Mixer
3-1/2 CU. FT. $175 941-628-
2311
ELECTRIC SAW 14 inch
Great condition $35 941-743-
6757
GENERATOR, COLEMAN
1850 powermate 2-12 $375
941-626-6627
GENERATOR, Coleman 6250
Watts $400 941-627-1004
HOLE SAW, Klein 6 3/8"
for recessed lights $25
941-585-8149
HYDRAULIC JACK 20- ton
SHORTY model $20 941-697-
0794
JOINTER PLANER
6-1/8" Never used
$250 941-698-0636
JOINTER PLANER
Craftsman 4 1/8" 5/8hp
$20 941-697-7558
MILLER WELDER
thunderbolt 225 arc, gd cond
$250 941-493-0674
MISC TOOLS wrench's and
sockets $20 941-629-5746
MITRE BOX w/saw Plastic
box $7 941-347-7422
PALM SANDER Loop-
hook,.8amp, 12kRPM-new $8
443-618-8161
POWER TOOLS, Many misc.
items. call for details reasonable
price 941-625-5595
RYOBI SAW CSB143 $40 Call
941-626-1365
SCREW GUN B&D NEW IN
BOX $75 941-628-3613
SCROLL SAW 16" Var. Speed
Tilt Bed $75 941-255-8420
SHALLOW WELL Jet Pump
Rebuilt 1/2hp $120 941-485-
0681
SHOP FAN, 24" High Velocity,
Multi Spe $75 941-255-8420
SHOP VAC 12 Gal shop Vac
$40 941-255-8420
TOOL CHEST
COMBO Craftsman
$100 941-626-1365
TOOL CHEST Craftsman 13
drawers $225 941-575-4270
TOOLS, Shed full of Tools
Many types of tools $149
941-426-8776
/FARMEQUIPMENT



EXERCISE STEP STOOL
NEW, 9"H X 31 X15 $12 941-
627-6780
HORSE SADDLE $100
Call John 941-626-5736


IEQUIP/SUPLIES I
~622~

OFFICE OUTFITTERS
Pre-owned & new office furniture.
VENICE 941-485-7015
EXECUTIVE DESK CHAIR
Dk. Brown leather $50
941-380-7090

RESTAURANT
SUPPLIES


COMM CHEESE WARMER
stainless
$50 941-421-9984
STAINLESS STOCK POT
4 1/2 galw/lid Heavy duty.
$40 941-421-9984


CATS



NOTICE: Statute 585.195
states that all dogs and cats
sold in Florida must be at least
eight weeks old, have an offi-
cial health certificate and prop-
er shots, and be free of intesti-
nal and external parasites.
KITTENS READY for Adoption
Adorable, 7 wks+, good
homes only. 941-232-9932
Nokomis





NOTICE: Statute 585.195
states that all dogs and cats
sold in Florida must be at least
eight weeks old, have an offi-
cial health certificate and prop-
er shots, and be free of intesti-
nal and external parasites.


zo iI i I.u r ur, o C.r) ,
Male, 1st Shots, $600 941-
822-4577
LIVESTOCK



CHICKS, 1 Month Old, Rhode
IsI. Red/Americana, Straight
Run $4.50/ea 941-629-3419

L PET SUPPLIES
I SERVICES I


DOG GROOMING clippers
WAHL :high quality $10 941-
235-0799
KENNEL 48X3OX35 LIKE
NEW $60 941-628-3613
PETMATE TRAINING kennel
for large dog $25 941-626-
5736

APPLIANCES



DISHWASHER, FRIGIDAIRE
Undercounter, white $75 941-
625-3275
DISHWASHER, Maytag 4
Years old like new stainless
steel with black front controls.
Needs new control panel.
$200 941-662-9587
DRYER, GE, large capacity
7 cu ft, new 2010 $225
315-406-5402
DRYER- Hotpoint Works great!
$175 401-741-1258
EMERSON REFRIGERATOR
mini, used 1 month. $75
941-889-7297
G.E. REFRIGERATOR
white good condition
$75 218-340-7115
ICEMAKER COUNTER top,
portable, electric $75 612-
308-5787 PGI
JACK LALANNE Power
Juicer, CLOOAP $75 941-457-
0339
JUICEMAN JR. Like new.
Have all books. $50 941-815-
9050
MICROWAVE GE, 30" White
Over the range model. $75
941-625-3275
PEDESTAL FOR WASHER
/DRYER EX COND $40 941-
460-8189
RANGE SS ELECTRIC Range
New with ceramic top $400
513-562-0626


F'md tin &e



RANGE, GE Bisque
Electric glass top$ 100
941-626-8475


APPLIANCES



RANGE, WHIRLPOOL, Elec-
tric, AccuBake WHITE $110
941-286-2119
REFRIGERATOR excel condi-
tion white 20. 6 cf top freezer
frost free 100 941-423-2701
REFRIGERATOR, MINI 6 CF
$50 941-625-3275
STOVE, GE 30" electric
range, White, self cleaning
$75 941-625-3275
TOATER OVEN like new black
in decker $30 941-697-0477
TURKEY ROASTER Works
great $15 941-423-7795
UPRIGHT FREEZER frost free
G.E. 16' $185 941-627-0690
UPRIGHT FREEZER,
5 cuft Wht-Front Load-GC
$75 941-764-1521
WASHER AND Dryer Exc.
condition. $300 941-698-
1002
WINDOW A/C Emerson
12,000 BTU, Ice cold $65
941-625-2779

MISCELLANEOUS



2"BALL HITCH New w/lock-
washer $8 941-347-7422
32 AUTO 470 rounds feder-
al,cci,umc $175 305-632-
9796
AFFORDABLE SMOKES
$1.30/PACK $13./CARTON
ROLL YOUR OWN AT HOME!
ToP BRAND TOBACCOS, TUBES,
CASES, RYO MACHINES & PARTS
VAPOR E-CIGS
E-LIQUID MADE IN USA
LOW PRICES!
ROLL A PACK TOBACCO
2739 Taylor Rd. P.G.
941-505-2233
BASEBALL BOOK OUT TO
THE BALLPARK $30 941-627-
6780
BASEBALL CARDS,
Black/white old in binder
$10 941-426-1686
BEAR RUG cinnomon phase
black bear with head open
mouth 810-766-32-66 $350
BENDER FOR rebob-steel
$15 941-496-9252
BOAT ANCHOR
Ig. good condition
$30 941-629-5746
CASSETTE TAPE PLAYER
New-battery $3.25
941-496-9252
CATHOLIC LEATHER Bible
Engraved rosary $50 941-
423-7795
CATHOLIC MISSAL Post-Vati-
can. Nice. $30
941-423-7795
COFFEE, HONDURAS Excel-
lent quality 4 Lbs $34 941-
697-0794
CORVETTE BOOKS 50 year
anniversary history $20 941-
426-0825
DESERT STORM CARDS in
binder $15 941-426-1686
DOOR INTERIOR white
36x80 6 panel+hardware $55
941-441-8030
DUFFLE BAG/BACKPACK
folds, w/wheels, new $25
941-505-6290
FINGER PRINT SAFE
19x14x12 BRAND NEW $225
941-628-3613
FIREWOOD Split, Bundled,
and ready for the firepit!
Perfect for these cooler nights!
Pine, Oak, Citrus
941-468-4372
FOUNTAIN 3 tiki heads
fiberglass LED lights
$225 941-585-8149
GAS CANS
Five cans
$5 941-445-6002
GOLDEN CHAMPION
Scooter excellent
$400 941-764-0993


MISCELLANEOUS



DOG SNARE snarem 5ftdog
snare gc $40 941-460-8743
HELMET LRG CAMO BRAND
NEW $35 941-628-3613
LICENSE PLACE 08 RioDe-
Janeriro. $32 941-496-9252
LIFE JACKETS West Marine,
(2)Youth, New, each $15
941-268-8951
MAILBOXES & MORE
Standard & Custom Mailbox-
es, House Numbers, etc.
Starting at $100 including
installation!
www.RedFlagMailboxes.com
941-270-2829
ORANGE COUNTY
CHOPPERS picture in color
$20 941-423-2585
PRESIDENTIAL QUARTERS
w/stamps $8.25
941-496-9252
PURSE- COACH NEW!
Signature. Text for pics.
$90 401-741-1258
SILK FLOWERS arrange-
ments angels $35 941-580-
4460
Solar Panels (15) 200 watt,
(1) factory assembled control
panel, (2) 40 watt inverters, (1)
40 watt voltage controller,
everything less than 2 years
old, Top brand names, enough
to furnish power for 1500
square foot home. Solar Pan-
els $200 ea. Control units
$1,000. Will deliver within 200
miles. 941-743-4023 or 941-
661-1929
SUPERBOWL BOOK,
1-24 hard cover $10
941-426-1686
TABLE TOP GRILL
Grand Cafe,New.21x14"
$100 941-421-9984
TANK POLY. 35gal. W18"
X 33" H / drain valve
$50 941-585-8149
TANK, fiberglass 120 gal.
24"W X 72"H / 100 psi $100
941-585-8149
TRASH CAN Stainless steel
10 gal's. $15 941-575-0690
TWO BURNER STOVE Camp
Chef Explorer on stand $100
941-421-9984
WALKING SHOES SZ. 10
MEN'S ROCKER OBO $15
941-627-6780
WEBER Q3200 gas grill with
propane tank 2 burner gas grill
w/ propane tank. New $320.
Asking $100. 941-412-1072
WOOD CIGAR BOXES 14.
For crafts/storage $20
941-258-0472

7000







TRANSPORTATION





1998 BUICK CENTURY, fully
loaded, sunroof, good transp.
$1350 obo. 941-380-2026.
2005 BUICK LUCERNE
72,128 mi, $12,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2005 BUICK RENDEZVOUS
72,508 mi, $10,450
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 BUICK LECROSSE
26K $26,990
877-211-8054 DLR

CADILLAC


2011 CADILLAC ESCALADE
42K $41,990
855-280-4707 DLR


CADILLAC



2011 CADILLAC SRX
33K $27,990
855-280-4707 DLR





1986 CAMARO IROC Z28
59,073 mi, 383 stroker
motor, $6,500 973-713-4012
1999 CHEVY CAMARO
Z-28 Only $6995
941-916-9222 DIr.
2001 CHEVY CORVETTE
CONVT. 27K $23,990
855-280-4707 DLR
2002 CHEVY BLAZER LS
4X4, 1 owner. Extra Clean
$4,900 Call Bob 941-624-2394
Employ Classified!
2002 CHEVY SILVERADO
114,486 mi, $7,985
855-481-2060 DIr
2007 CHEVY CORVETTE
Coupe, LT3 with navigation,
Velocity Yellow, 23K miles.
$32,500 941-575-7646
2012 CHEVROLET MALIBU
29,507 mi, $13,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2013 CHEVY CAMARO
9K $27,990
855-280-4707 DLR

SCHRYSLER



2001 SEBRING CONV. LTD
6 Cyl, Auto, A/C, 52K Exc.
Condition $3950
941-929-2923 dlr
2004 CHRYSLER CON-
CORDE LX Gold, 4dr, 88k
miles, Drives & Looks like new
$4875/obo 941-214-0889
2006 CHRYSLER 300M
53,758 mi, $13,950
855-481-2060flilr


Cony, hardtop, 79K miles, exc.
cond. $10,500 941-276-1372
2014 CHRYSLER SEBRING
Convertible, 85,000 mi 6 cyl,
very good shape. $ 3750 OBO
941-321-2566.

DODGE



2003 DODGE DURANGO SLT
3rd Row Seat $6495
941-916-9222 DIr.
2004 DODGE DURANGO ST
$7995 941-916-9222 DIr.
Mattas Motors
2005 DODGE CARAVAN
94,342 mi, $7,458
855-481-2060 DIr
2005 DODGE NEON
Black, $6499 $5995
941-916-9222 DIr.
2007 DODGE 024
47,479 mi, $12,454
855-481-2060 DIr
2007 GRAND CARAVAN
Stow N Go, Leather.
VERY NICE! $9495
941-916-9222 Dlr.
2009 DODGE JOURNEY
35,653 mi, $24,600
855-481-2060 DIr


Blue, Ex. cond. 33 miles.
Lots of extra chrome.
$19,900. 941-235-1617
2011 DODGE RAM150
32,227 mi, $31,866
855-481-2060 DIr


FORD/



1997 FORD EXPEDITION
150,874 mi, $4,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2003 FORD EXPLORER
67K $8,990
855-280-4707 DLR
2004 FORD MUSTANG
57,852 mi, $8,975
855-481-2060 DIr
2006 FORD FOCUS ZX4
$6995 Mattas Motors
941-916-9222 DIr.
2006 FORD FREESTYLE
75,015 mi, $9,874
855-481-2060 DIr
2008 FORD F-150
110,250 mi, $12,584
855-481-2060 DIr
2010 FORD MILAN
75,168 mi, $14,587
855-481-2060 DIr
2010 FORD TAURUS
39,488 mi, $17,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 FORD ESCAPE
85 mi, $18,957
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 FORD FUSION
30,146 mi, $13,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 FORD FUSION
30,771 mi, $13,960
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 FORD ESCAPE
26,721 mi, $18,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 FORD FOCUS
7,958 mi, $12,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 FORD MUSTANG
46,322 mi, $20,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2013 FORD TAURUS
33,328 mi, $16,950
855-481-2060 DIr




FREE MERCHANDISE ADS!.
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
SUN-CLASSIFIEDS.COM
and place your ad.
"CLICK ON CLICK HERE
TO PLACE YOUR AD NOW"
and follow the prompts.
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merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
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GMC /




2013 GMC YUKON
DENALI 25K $49,990
855-280-4707 DLR





2011 JEEP GRANDCHERO-
KEE 23,150 mi, $26,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 JEEP LIBERTY
40,995 mi, $16,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 JEEP PATRIOT
33,882 mi, $15,450
855-481-2060 DIr






Friday, May 30, 2014


ads.yoursun net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 19


I JEEP



2012 JEEP PATRIOT
37,856 mi, $15,745
855-481-2060 DIr
2014 JEEP GR.CHEROKEE
NAVI 11K $38,990
855-280-4707 DLR
r GET RESULTS
US ASSIFIED!


LINCOLN









2002 LINCOLN TOWNCAR
4 Door Executive Sedan. Sil-
ver, Leather Interior, 75K
Miles. Garage Kept! Very
Clean! Runs Great. $6,300.
941-639-2745 (Punta Gorda)
2003 LINCOLN TOWN CAR
$8495 941-916-9222
Mattas Motors
MERCURY




2000 GRAND MARQUIS
1 Owner, 71k, $5495
941-916-9222 DIr.
2008 MERCURY MARINER
Premier, 106k mi.,
$10,695 941-916-9222 DIr.

OLDSMOBILE



1998 OLDSMOBILE Royale
66,059 mi, $3,987
855-481-2060 DIr
PONTIAC




2004 PONTIAC SUNFIRE 2
Dr. Coupe, Sunroof, 4Cyl., Auto,
AC $4995 941-916-9222 DIr.
2009 PONTIAC G6
CONVT. 50K $17,990
855-280-4707 DLR
/ SATUPRN /




2005 SATURN ION
116,763 mi, $5,845
855-481-2060 DIr
2008 SATURN AURA
4 Cyl., Auto, Extra Clean!
$8295 941-916-9222 DIr.
2008 SATURN VUE
109,108 mi, $7,987
855-481-2060 DIr

PRO POWER AUTO SALES
4140 Whidden Blvd
Port Charlotte, 33980


98 SW2 Wagon
98 SW2 Wagon
90 SL2 Sedan
93 Vue 4cyl
94 Vue 4cyl
06 Vue 4 cyl
06 Vue 4cyl
06 Vue 4 cyl
98 Vue 4 cyl
09 Vue XR leather


$1,55C
$2,50C
$2, 95C
$3,899
4,20C
4,799
$5,899
$6,899
$7,80C
$10,80C


Used Saturn Parts & Service
941-627-8822

USED CAR DEALERS




MATTAS MOTORS
941-916-9222
"SAVING YOU MONEY MATTERS
AT MATTAS MOTORS

Mattas Motors
941-916-9222
Buy Here Pay Here


/ ACURA // HONDA


2010 acura 3.2TL
54,843 mi, $21,784
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 ACURA TL
11K $27,990
855-280-4707 DLR

AUDI



2011 AUDI S4 QUATTRO
30K $36,990
855-280-4707 DLR
2012 AUDI A4 2.OT
23K $24,990
855-280-4707 DLR

BM



2011 BMW 3281
NAVI 31K $25,990
855-280-4707 DLR
2011 BMW 3281S
66,410 mi, $20,574
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 BMW M3
20K $47,911
855-280-4707 DLR
2012 BMW 6501
CONVT., NAVI, 9K $71,988
855-280-4707 DLR

HONDA
7160


2006 HONDA FIT
50,511 mi, $11,844
855-481-2060 DIr
2007 HONDA ACCORD
71,521 mi, $12,454
855-481-2060 DIr
2007 HONDA ACCORD
97,453 mi, $10,445
855-481-2060 DIr
2007 HONDA CIVIC
88,532 mi, $11,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2007 HONDA ELEMENT
82,465 mi, $14,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2008 HONDA ACCORD
20,998 mi, $17,845
855-481-2060 DIr
2008 HONDA ACCORD
49,685 mi, $17,452
855-481-2060 DIr
2009 HONDA ACCORD
30,527 mi, 17,858
855-481-2060 DIr
2009 HONDA ACCORD
35,720 mi, $16,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2009 HONDA CIVIC
203,398 mi, $10,897
855-481-2060 DIr
2009 HONDA ODYSSEY
62,184 mi, $18,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2009 HONDA pilot
120,663 mi, $17,846
855-481-2060 DIr
2010 HONDA ACCORD
44K $16,990
855-280-4707 DLR
2010 HONDA ACCORD
55,536 mi, $16,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2010 HONDA CIVIC
28,535 mi, $16,454
855-481-2060 DIr
Find the
perfect
companion
in the
Classifieds!
2010 HONDA CIVIC
42,121 mi, $12,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V
18,225 mi, $17,846
855-481-2060 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V
65,129 mi, $15,950
855-481-2060 DIr


2010 HONDA CR-V
7,365 mi, $18,754
855-481-2060 DIr
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
69,418 mi, $23,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
15,453 mi, $18,754
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
21,529 mi, $16,547
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
30,602 mi, $16,985
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
33,745 mi, $15,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
34,318 mi, $16,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
35,144 mi, $16,758
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
39,456 mi, $19,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
39,686 mi, $17,985
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
40,619 mi, $15,874
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
40,701 mi, $15,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
41,859 mi, 17,854
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
42,932 mi, $15,784
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
47,366 mi, $14,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
CERT,. 19,641 mi, $19,485
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
CERT,. 25,401 mi, $20,457
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
CERT,. 29,146 mi, $18,975
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
CERT,. 29,146 mi, $19,485
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC
24,695 mi, $13,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
22,623 mi, $20,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
28,557 mi, $18,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
30,876 mi, $15,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
33,435 mi, $22,758
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
35,632 mi, $23,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
36,758 mi, $15,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
CERT,. 23,182 mi, $19,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA FIT
43,514 mi, $14,587
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ODYSSEY
EXL, NAVI 40K $25,990
855-280-4707 DLR
2011 HONDA PILOT
38,051 mi, $30,874
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD

18,142 mi, $18,975
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
23,037 mi, $17,544
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
25,225 mi, $17,895
855-481-2060 DIr


HONDA



2012 HONDA ACCORD
26,448 mi, $17,854
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
33,704 mi, $21,885
855-481-2060 DIr
CHECK THE
~C ASIESIFIEDS!
2012 HONDA ACCORD
34,097 mi, $19,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
34,238 mi, $81,874
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD

35,848 mi, $18,857
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
38,655 mi, $17,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
CERT,. 11,409 mi, $18,754
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD

CERT,. 12,485 mi, $18,975
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
CERT,. 22,953 mi, $19,485
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
CERT,. 24,221 mi, $17,895
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
CERT,. 25,661 mi, $18,745
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
CERT,. 27,768 mi, $17,985
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
CERT,. 29,531 mi, $19,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
CERT,. 8,143 mi, $21,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
22,751 mi, $19,986
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
24,687 mi, $16,455
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
28,463 mi, $18,754
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC CERT,.
22,802 mi, $15,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA CR-V
31,220 mi, $23,458
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA CR-V
32,034 mi, $25,687
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA CRV
AWD 14K $22,990
855-280-4707 DLR
2012 HONDA FIT
13,277 mi, $14,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
20,201 mi, $21,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
44,382 mi, $22,457
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
76,162 mi, $16,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA PILOT
28,075 mi, $26,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA PILOT
38,265 mi, $33,954
855-481-2060 DIr
2013 HONDA ACCORD
CERT,. 12,736 mi, $25,841
855-481-2060 DIr
2013 HONDA CIVIC
14,704 mi, $18,754
855-481-2060 DIr
2013 HONDA CR-V
10,420 mi, $22,857
855-481-2060 DIr
2013 HONDA CR-V
CERT,. 15,094 mi, $25,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2013 HONDA FIT
CERT,. 1,313 mi, $16,455
855-481-2060 DIr


HONDA



2013 HONDA FIT
CERT,. 1,313 mi, $16,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2013 HONDA PILOT
CERT,. 10,330 mi, $28,754
855-481-2060 DIr
2013 HONDA PILOT
CERT,. 10,983 mi, $36,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2013 HONDA PILOT
CERT,.25,975 mi, $35,876
855-481-2060 DIr
2014 HONDA ACCORD
CERT,. 6,650 mi, $21,874
855-481-2060 DIr
2014 HONDA CR-V
9,258 mi, $23,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2014 HONDA CR-V
CERT,. 4,823 mi, $27,844
855-481-2060 DIr

7~I
OO 7163


2009 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
33K $16,988
855-280-4707 DLR
2010 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
25K $11,990
855-280-4707 DLR
2011 HYUNDAI GENESIS
30,174 mi, $18,745
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HYUNDAI SANTFE
57,348 mi, $16,888
855-481-2060 DIr






2013 HYUNDAI SONATA
11,300 mi Wife's Car Better
than new. $18,995.obo 941-
380-7077 Pvt Sr. owner
J AGUAR




1997 XK8 JAGUAR Cony.
65K mi, Clean and well main-
tained. Serv. Records Eye
Catcher $7,000 941-426-5051
2012 JAGUAR XK
CONVT., 25K $64,911
855-280-4707 DLR





2011 KIA SOUL
48,893 mi, $13,998
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 KIA SPORTAGE
39,015 mi, $17,895
855-481-2060 DIr
2014 KIA RIO
SX, GDI 2K $17,990
855-280-4707 DLR
/ LEXUS /




1999 LEXUS ES300
132,271 mi, $4,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2001 LEXUS RX300
130,508 mi, $7,895
855-481-2060 DIr
2004 LEXUS IS300
76,710 mi, $13,744
855-481-2060 DIr





2000 MAZDA MIATA-MX-5
Sr. owned, Garage kept, 59k
miles, $5762 941-661-2234
2011 MAZDA MAZDA3
66,871 mi, $14,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 MAZDA MAZDA6
44,406 mi, $15,474
855-481-2060 DIr


L MERCEDES
Waa 719 0


2011 MERCEDES R350
39K $33,988
855-280-4707 DLR

NISSAN



2002 NISSAN ALTIMA
75,364 mi, $8,745
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 NISSAN ALTIMA, 50K
miles! 2.5 Special Edition!
$12,988. 941-639-1601, DIr
2011 NISSAN MAXIMA
42,101 mi, $19,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 NISSAN ROGUE
44K $18,990
855-280-4707 DLR
2011 NISSAN ROGUE
49,,432 mi, $17,985
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 NISSAN SENTRA
26,689 mi, $14,897
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 NISSAN JUKE
SL TURBO 21K $19,990
855-280-4707 DLR
/ SUBARU /




2002 SUBARU FORESTER
1 owner, 140K mi, good con-
dition. $3,500 941-536-7080
/ TOYOTA /




2001 TOYOTA CAMRY
73,265 mi, $6,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2004 TOYOTA COROLLA
68,297 mi, $8,754
855-481-2060 DIr
2005 TOYOTA AVALON
XLS 93K $13,990
855-280-4707 DLR
2007 TOYOTA CAMRY
79K $11,990
855-280-4707 DLR
2007 TOYOTA COROLLA
72,301 mi, $10,874
855-481-2060 DIr
2008 TOYOTA PRIUS,
5 Door Sedan! Loaded!
$10,988. 941-639-1601, DIr
2010 TOYOTA 4RUNNER
64,284 mi, $26,986
855-481-2060 DIr
2010 TOYOTA COROLLA
41,102 mi, $13,874
855-481-2060 DIr
2010 TOYOTA VAN
65,034 mi, $20,475
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 TOYOTA CAMRY
28,119 mi, $19,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 TOYOTA CAMRY
53,206 mi, $16,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER
33K $33,988
855-280-4707 DLR
2011 TOYOTA PRIUS
35,797 mi, $15,987
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 TOYOTA RAV4
48,444 mi, $20,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 TOYOTA TACOMA
26,480 mi, $23,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 TOYOTA HILANDER
31,572 mi, $23,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2013 TOYOTA AVALON
LTMD NAVI 8K $33,990
855-280-4707 DLR
Advertise Today!I
2013 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER
LMTD SPORT 12K $35,990
855-280-4707 DLR
2013 TOYOTA TACOMA
16,203 mi, $26,987
855-481-2060 DIr






The Sun Classified Page 20 E/NIC


ads.yoursun net


Friday, May 30, 2014


VOLKSWAGEN


Loaded, 138k, Sunroof,
$6500/0B0 941-456-2022
2009 VOLKSWAGEN EOS
CONVT., 49K $18,990
855-280-4707 DLR
2011 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA
NAVI 28K $17,990
855-280-4707 DLR
2013 VOLKSWAGEN
PASSAT 11,955 mi, $17,950
855-481-2060 DIr

L ANTIQUES/
COLLECTIBLES


1969 ROLLS-ROYCE,
Interior/Exterior In Very Good
Condition, New Brakes, 1
PWR Window Not Working, PS
Squeaks. Asking $18,000
941-625-5921
1975 CORVETTE 61K orig.
miles. '69 AMC/AMX 390/4sp
Call for details 941-764-6802.


Great Deals in

the Classifieds!


1987 GMC CABALLERO
(El Camino) Blue, 97,204
miles, V8 automatic with
air. Good cond. $6500
941-828-0246
941-662-0713
BUDGET BUYS




I see ~


1986 CHEVY CAVALIER
74K Mi! Auto, New Tires/Batt.
VGC $1,750. 941-716-2602
1997 PONTIAC BONNEVILLE
90K Mi! Moonroof, Loaded!
$3,988. 941-639-1601, DIr
2000 VW JETTA,
120K Mi, Black w/ Rims!
$1,588 941-639-1601, DIr
2003 TOYOTA CAMRY,
1 owner, MINT! Gas saver!
$2,988. 941-639-1601, DIr


Eye Sore Removal
We Buy Junk Cars
Running Or Not, No Title,
No Problem. I Buy Them
All! 941-586-8214 Chris

AUTOS WANTED


AUTOS WANTED


Available 24/7
941-623-5550, 286-3122
WE BUY CARS
$400 CASH + UP
Frank 941-276-0204






S AUTO PARTS

I ACCESSORIES


ALLOY RIMS, 17" Alloy w/
tires $325 941-628-0628
AUTOLITE SERVICE Cabinet
$300 941-474-0192
CARBERATOR $50 941-
474-0192
R700 TRANSMISSION $100
941-628-2311
R700 TRANSMISSION $100
941-628-2311
RAT FINK collectable $60
941-474-0192
TIRES- New take offs starting
@ $39.95 Installed & Balanced
Call for Inventory 941-639-5681
TRUCK CAP, Fiberglass, 8'
Truck, Sliding Glass Windows,
Very Good Condition.
$400 OBO 931-397-2424
VANS




1994 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY No rust, Runs
good. 140k miles, $1500/obo
724-664-8988
2010 DODGE Grand Caravan
WHEELCHAIR van, 10" lowered
floor & ramp. 941-8704325
2011 HONDA ODYSSEY
31,635 mi, $24,950
855-481-2060 DIr
2011 HONDA ODYSSEY
44,992 mi, $30,874
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
12,421 mi, $29,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
37,688 mi, $29,875
855-481-2060 DIr
2014 HONDA ODYSSEY
6,620 mi, $36,987
855-481-2060 DIr

/TRUCKS/PICK-UPS



1978 CHEVY SUBURBAN, 1
3/4 Body rough. STRONG 454,
$499 941-626-0959


UTILITY TRUCK., Custom Pipe
Rack $12,500 941-740-7313


2007 DODGE RAM 1500
SLT Quad Cab 4x4, only
34,000 mi, loaded, looks &
runs like new. Lifetime trans-
ferable power train warranty.
Why buy new? This truck is
new at half the price! $20,500
OBO. Owner: 941-769-0200
1 Classified = aes


TRUCKS/PICK-UPS






DON'T WAIT. DRIVE TODAY
GUARANTEED CREDIT
APPROVAL
941-473-2277 I
www.pctcars2.com I
--- WE-- "---R-
WE BUY CARS *
* Top Dollar for your car
or truck Call us today
941-473-2277
www.pctcars2.com
-- EFINAN

I EVERYONE
MUST HAVE INCOME
& DOWN PAYMENT
941-473-2277
--www.pctcars2.com I


IVEICLESI


2011 PORSCHE CAYENNE
GTS 42K $73,988
855-280-4707 DLR
2014 PORSCHE CAYENNE
S 4,205 MILES $79,990
855-280-4707 DLR
BOATS-POWERED




10' 30' USED BOATS
BUY-SELL-TRADE-CONSIGN
50 BOATS IN OUR SHOWROOM
BOATS ON LIFTS, TOO!
REPAIRS/SERVICE & FIBERGLASS
UPHOLSTERY & CANVAS, TOO!
CHARLOTTE RV & MARINE
4628 TAMIAMI TRAIL, PC
CHARLOTTE MARINE. COM
941-244-5288
ADVERIE


includes trailer & 6HP John-
son. Everything excl. All
access.. PRICED TO SELL
$1500 585-354-7733


Evinrude trim & tilt. 24 volt
MINN KOTA AUTO PILOT
bow mounted -Just aim it &
go! Trailer w/EL Winch,
Canopy. Ready to go fishing.
$2,900 941-485-4641


1989 90HP Evinrudew/2007
Trailer $4,800. 941-488-7283


w/ trailer. Utr console, Yama-
ha 130 2 stroke w/SS prop,
EC $6,900 941-626-4571 or
941-627-5777


21f"I' PRIVATEER ROAMER
II 2100 Center console
w/storage & porta pot. 150HP
Evinrude outboard. Includes
Magic Trailer. LOTS OF
EXTRAS! $15,900. Details
call: 941-627-5777


BOATS-POWERED1



14' GLASSTRON Boat and
trailer. No engine. $475 941-
629-3595
24' EVERGLADES Open
Fisherman, 300HP Yamaha,
Upholstery Very Good
Condition. W/Rebuilt Trailer
$35,000 941-625-5921


CRUISER IVierc /.4L, w/Bravo
3. A/C Cockpit & Cabin, GPS.
New Isinglass, flat screen TV.
$19,900 obo (941) 276-6552


1994 12" draft, 200HP John-
son. Great family & party Boat!
Large enclosed porta potty
cabin. $5,990 941-639-8649


CANOES/KAYAKS



16' OLDTOWN CANOE
Penobscot 164
$475 941-416-7777
AMERICAN EAGLE OSPREY
AE 15' DE Osprey GREAT Cond
w/oars $350 941-625-4243


& ACCESSORIES
m 7341


1 941-629-3595
ENCLOSED TRAILER, 14'
Pace 2 Axle, w/Barn Doors,
$2,000 941-764-0929


2014 6X10, Tandem Ale
$2195 Many Other Options
Avail. 941-916-9222 DIr.



476 TayorRd .G


Center Console, Twin Yam
150's Two Strokes, Both With
New Power Heads In Last Yr.
Fully Equipped, Ready To Fish,
Many Extras, On lift in PG
$22,500. 941-661-5560


Ready to go. $600. 941,
1160/941-697-0047


2UU2 Iwin IU Raaar, urP,
AC, Loaded. $41,000
508-942-4600

MMREflUCEIY


Mariner 350, Twin Merc
Cruisers, All electronics,
Shows like new.
$69,900 941-255-5311
PARTIAL MEMBERSHIP 1oI
Freedom Boat Club Call For
Details 303-995-1144

SSAILBOATS



SPINNAKER SAIL WHITE w/
"SNOOPY" on it. Off 27' Ves-
sel $475 941-625-0340



MISC. BOATS

7I: 333

12' FIBERGLASS Boat & trail-
er, Bimini top, No motor.
$550 508-656-4113 Pt Char
14' ALUMNIUM BOAT $325
941-626-5736


GAS OUTBOARD, 2.5 HP
Suzuki Motor very low hours
$200 (941)628-0628

& EQUIP.
733~

DOCK LINES, two 1/2" x
108ft nylon docklines $50
941-637-0092
SWIM PLATFORM All teak
with stainless steel $30
941-575-0690


I IL"RO NIUAI I
5 x 10 $1095!
941-916-9222
TRUCK CAP 6.5' LONG 5.5'
WIDE VERY GOOD CONDITION
$450 941-626-5669
UTILITY TRAILER, 12x6, Set
Up For ATV's, Side Access
Ramp Gate, 3000 lb Axle. As
New. $1,800 Call before 8pm
941-626-6868


I SCOOTERS I


2003 HONDA 1300VTX Like
new! W/shield, new tires, 11k
miles. $4200 270-579-1699


triKe, w/rev, 1UK ml, DIK, LX
cond $19,995 sold sold
CYCLE SHELL portable stor-
age; hard plastic floor. 3.6 x
10 feet $150 239-938-5454

SCOOTERS
FOR ALL YOUR
SCOOTER
NEEDS...






CAMPERS/
TRAVEL TRAILERS

7370[o :
Z 2KK


BUY ,LOCAL] i~][I, i


MOTOR HOMES!
/ RVsI


1996 34J Fleetwood Bounder
Chevy 454 Vortex engine with
28,000 road miles with Allison
5 speed automatic transmis-
sion. $10,000 334-531-1524

2014 WINNEBAGOS
2013 Model CLEARANCE!
NO.1 SELLING RV
RVWorld Inc.of Nokomis
FAMILY ONNED/OPERATED FOR 36YRs
2110 US 41, Nokomis
1-75 Exit 195
1-800-262-2182
www.rvworldinc.com


HOLIDAY RAMBLER
A MusT SEE MOTOR HOME
MANY MODELS
RVWORLD INC OF NOKOMIS
FAMILY ONEDIOPERATED FOR 36YRs
2110 US 41 NOKOMIS
941-966-2182



cis




I BUY TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS MOTOR HOMES &
TRUCKS I COME TO YOU! CALL
DAVE ANY IME. (813)-713-3217


LUXURY MOTOR HOMES
2014 MODELS UP TO 45
COME SEE ........ L[S TPADE!
RVWORLD INC OF NOKOMS
FAMILY ONNED/OPERATED FOR 36YRS
2110 US 41 NOKOMIS
941-966-2182
www.rvworldinc.com

RV Collision Repairs
Customer and Insurance
Modern shop, quality work!
FREE ESTIMATES.
RV WORLD Inc. of Nokomis
FAMILY ONNED/OPERATED FOR 36YRs
2110 US 41- Nokomis
941-966-2182

RV SERVICE SPECIALS
Factory Warranty
All models
RV Wash
Wash & Hand Wax
Brake Flush
New Tires & Balance
Roof Reseal
RV Propane & Bottles
Water Leak Test
Lg. Parts Showroom

RV WORLD INC. of Nokomis
FAMILY ONNED/OPERATED FOR 36YRs
2110 US 41 Nokomis,
941-966-2182

RVs WANED
CASH/CONSIGN/IrE
CALL: MARK
RVWORLD INC OF NOKOMIS
FAMILY ONED/OPERATED FOR 36YRs
2110 US 41 NOKOMIS
941-966-2182

SATURN TOW-CARS
Starting at $2,500. Blue-Ox
Tow hitches sold & installed.
THE SATURN GUYS
PRO-POWER AUTO SALES
4140 Whidden Blvd PC 33980
(941) 627-8822.
WANTED All Motor
Homes, TT's, 5th whls, Pop-
Ups, Vans conversion & pas-
senger, cars & trucks. CASH
paid on the spot for quick
sale. 941-347-7171

I/RV/CAMPER PARTS/


TOW BAR-ROADMASTER
STOWMASTER $179 941-
276-3820




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