Charlotte sun herald

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Charlotte sun herald
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harlotte SunHEL
D HEKALY TI


Air mattress, $20
In Today's
Classifieds!


REWIRE
PAGE 1


SENATORS GRILL VA CHIEF
SVeterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shineski said Thursday he's
"mad as hell"over allegations of wrongdoing atVA facilities.


AMERICA'S BEST COMMUNITY DAILY


Honoring the fallen


By ADAM KREGER
STAFF WRITER
PUNTA GORDA Do you
remember the head of the Punta
Gorda Police Department who was
assassinated in front of his family?
How about the agency's assistant
chief who was killed while searching
for an escaped murderer?
The PGPD certainly won't forget its
two fallen brothers City Marshal
John Bowman and Assistant Chief
Richard Beecher. The department
held a ceremony Thursday morn-
ing- on Peace Officers Memorial
Day at the police station in


Punta Gorda to dedicate two newly
acquired granite memorial benches
to honor Bowman and Beecher.
Now, anyone who passes through
the PGPD's popular community
garden will also see a tribute to the
city's two officers who were killed in
the line of duty.
"This is long overdue," Police
Chief Albert "Butch" Arenal told a
crowd of about 100 who gathered for
Thursday's dedication. "It's time we
do this in memory of them."
Arenal noted that any of the
officers standing in the garden could
have traded places with them, and
he was humbled.


"It's often a thought in our mind
that we might not make it home
from work," he said somberly.
Beecher, 34, was killed in 1978
after being struck by a car on U.S. 17
while working a road block set up to
look for Raleigh Porter, a murderer
who had escaped from the Charlotte
County Jail. Beecher had been with
the PGPD for nine years, part of
which was spent in the road patrol
unit with fellow officer Tom Burns.
"I have a lot of gratitude for the
city and the people who stepped up
to do this," said Burns, 65, who was
FALLEN 12


Tarpons graduate



in style


^^-^^'"''By'--de


SUN PHOTO BY PAUL FALLON


Charlotte High School seniors Katie Downey, 17, from left, and Riley Lambros, 18, both of Punta Gorda; and Afton Folsom, 17, of
Port Charlotte, are ready to receive their diplomas at Thursday evening's commencement ceremony at the Lee Civic Center in North
Fort Myers. For the story and more photos, see Saturday's CharlotteSun.


FUND STRONG FOR STORM SEASON
The Florida Hurricane Catastrophe Fund should have nearly $13 billion
available for the Atlantic hurricane season that starts June 1.


www.sunnewspapers.net


INSIDE TODAY!


$1.00


lij ,t in ta e oi,r Satray ;, Hurricane Bj,,;eW po
a1 the Charlh:te Harbor Evenri anid Cnriferenrie enterr in
d:':wnirtown f'una G:,orda rthe ii. Qivei; vou i, Hurricarin
Preparation iujide 1'014l Hijrriarne ,ea ; rn 1 beQl In j ine 1



Report: Son


shoots father


during dispute


By ADAM KREGER
STAFF WRITER
PORT CHARLOTTE
- A local man has
been accused of
shooting his father
with a shotgun
Wednesday night,
although family
members say it was an
accident.
Tucker Christopher
Hucknall, 30, was
arguing with his father,
Jim
Hucknall,
49, around
S8:15 p.m.
at their
home on
Barnes
Lane
T. HUCKNALL in Port
Charlotte,
according to the
Charlotte County
Sheriff's Office. Jim's
other son, Chandler
Hucknall, was in the


house during the spat.
He told deputies that
after Tucker went into
his room and grabbed
a shotgun, his father
taunted him to fire it at
him and the gun went
off, the report shows.
Jim suffered a
gunshot wound to
the lower abdomen.
He was taken to Lee
Memorial Hospital
in Fort Myers. The
victim remained in
the hospital Thursday
afternoon, but no one
answered the phone in
his room.
Tucker's wife, Kelly
Hucknall, told the
Sun Jim was anxiously
awaiting release from
the hospital so he
could try to get his son
exonerated.
"Jim is doing fine
(physically)," she said.
DISPUTE 112


Grads show Pirate Pride during ceremony


By PAUL FALLON
STAFF WRITER
NORTH FORT MYERS -
Ray Clark, 46, traveled from
Kenton, Ohio, to North Fort
Myers to watch his youngest
child graduate Wednesday
night. Her three words for all
of the Port Charlotte High
School graduates:
"Follow your dreams."
Ray was on hand to see the
last of his three children, Kelly


Clark, graduate. She was one
of 387 Pirates to receive their
diplomas and move onto the
next step in their lives.
Juliana Porcides, the 2014
senior class president, referred
to the act of moving on when
she addressed the graduates at
the ceremony. She mentioned
1 Corinthians 13:11, which
touches on the act of stepping
into adulthood.
"When I grew up, I put away
childish things," Porcides said


during her speech.
Porcides also reminded the
seniors that the relationships
they made during their formative
years would be remembered for
the rest of their lives. She also
congratulated the seniors for
reaching their goal of graduating.
"The countless hours of
homework and late-night
study sessions were worth it,"
she said.

GRADS14


They're putting' on the Ritz every night


SIDE DISH L ouisArmstrong
SIDE ISH I said of one New
L Orleans club: "The
/ ^^Brick House was one of


Sue
Wade
COLUMNIST


the toughest joints I ever
played.... Guys would
drink and fight... like
circle saws. Bottles would
come flying over the band-
stand."
In Depression-era
Boston, the queenly Ritz-
Carlton was so empty that
it turned all its lights on to
create the illusion of pros-
perity. Yet from its rooftop


lounge sweet notes still
burbled out over the city
from Benny Goodman's
clarinet.
In Port Charlotte, Joe
LeClair has transformed a
Brick House into a Ritz.
The restaurant affixed to
the Day's Inn- JD's Bistro
& Grille used to be
Johnny's Be Good or, more
popularly, Johnny's Diner.
There might not have been
fights like the Brick House,
but it was, as one review
said, "a sports bar."


Manager Joe, a wiry New
Englander with a passion
for jazz, has helped put
JD's on the fine-dining map
over the last four years,
with the full blessing of
Day's Inn owner, Linda
Grother.
Joe said: "When we first
started doing this, they all
said, 'You'll never make it
with jazz and fine dining
here. You don't have the
demographic.'" Gotta love
it when "they're" wrong. He
said, "We've been packed


every night."
Joe spent 27 years in
Boston's Back Bay, went to
culinary school there, and
worked as a Ritz-Carlton
chef before moving to the
front of the house, where
he is now. The whole Ritz
legacy including how
turning on all the lights
and playing jazz got it


IF YOU GO
Where: JD's Bistro & Grille,
1951 Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte
When: 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Monday,
5 p.m. to 10 p.m. Tuesday to
Saturday
More info: 941-255-0994
through the depression
- mesmerized him.
"That concept of a 1940s
supper club that's what I
wanted.
SUE 112


CORRECTION
Becky Bovell was Charlotte County's second director of tourism. The first was
Cheryl Lauzon. An article in Wednesday's Sun stated otherwise.


IMN FY I THE SUN: Obituaries 51 Legals6 1 Crosswords 71 Police Beat 71 Viewpoint 81 Opinion 9-10 CLASSIFIED: Comics 11-141 Dear Abby 141 TV Listings 15


,, v0- I THE WIRE: Nation 21 State 31 Business 5-61 Weather 81 World 8 SPORTS: Lotto 2_
Daily Edition $1.00 :.*-" Look inside for valuable coupons --.. .._.".I CHARLIE SAYS ...
H1 ig il hil l This years savings to date || l | Time to stock up on bottl
I-.,- 82 : SUNCOUPOCN $h3y i: CALL US AT water and Spam!
1821159 : $32,593 : 941-206-1000waerand Spain!
2 00 8:111111111111111111 :1ui, VALUE METER -3 ,93 ,- 941-206-1000-
7 0 5252 00025 8 Partly sunny, breezy and less humid Ai. -. -.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-..........


THE WIRE PAGE 1


An Edition of the Sun
VOL. 122 NO. 136


FRIDAY MAY 16, 2014


SUN PHOTO
BY BETSY
WILLIAMS
Amber Marie
Bucci and
Jacquelyn
Diane
Burckley
signify
the end of
this year's
commence-
ment.


ed


I





OurTown Page 2


C www.sunnewspapers.net


FROM PAGE ONE


The Sun /Friday, May 16, 2014


Cooler temperatures, clear skies on tap


STAFF REPORT
A front that moved into
Southwest Florida on
Thursday night will bring
cooler temperatures, dry
weather and clear skies
throughout the weekend,
according to the National
Weather Service's Tampa
office.
Although the system
can't really be described
as a cold front, it is



FALLEN

FROM PAGE 1

in attendance Thursday.
"(Beecher) was a good
man. We worked together
for several years, and he
deserved this."
Burns said Beecher did
certain things that gave
him an amusing persona,
like the fact that he was
always chewing on a
cigar but never smoked.
"It was just little quirks
like that that made him
a special person," Burns
said.
Beecher was the
second Punta Gorda
lawman to be killed in
the line of duty. The first
was in 1903.
That's when Bowman,
45, was gunned down
at home in front of his
wife and four children.
A man with a shotgun
had evidently been upset
with Bowman's stance
against drinking and
gambling. Isaiah Cooper,
37, was convicted of the
murder and sentenced
to be hanged, though the
penalty was later com-
muted to life in prison.
Bowman was known
for his long handle-bar
mustache, big badge,
long coat and helmet,
according to the 1998
book "Forgotten Heroes"


cooler than the weather
that Southwest Florida
residents have been ex-
periencing over the past
several days, said Andrew
McKaughan, a meteorol-
ogist with the agency.
"It's not super cold air,
but it's cooler," he said.
Today's high should be
around 80 degrees and
the sky should be clear
and sunny. The tempera-
ture should dip down


to a chilly 63 degrees
tonight and the sky
should be mostly clear.
"It's going to be pretty
nice through the week-
end," McKaughan said.
The wind should blow
out of the north and
could reach gusts of 15 to
20 mph, he said.
"It's not going to be
what I would call a strong
wind, but it could be
gusty," McKaughan said.


The temperature
should begin to inch
back into the mid-80s as
the weekend progresses,
he said. Saturday's high
should be around 85,
and the sky should be
clear and sunny. Wind
gusts could reach around
25 mph.
The low temperature
Saturday night should be
around 62, and the sky
should be mostly clear.


l~~~~~~tip rJ".r' _, 01,.li ,,i

------ ....


SUN PHOTO BY ADAM KREGER
Punta Gorda Police Chief Albert"Butch" Arenal addresses a crowd of around 100 Thursday
morning at the Punta Gorda Police Department's community garden. In honor of Peace Officers
Memorial Day, the department dedicated memorial benches to its two fallen officers during a


special ceremony.
by William Wilbanks.
The author also noted
the police leader was
"fearless" and known
for "fair play and strict
enforcement of the law."
Bowman was reportedly
paid $50 a month. He
was with the department
for seven years.
"These people died
while working to keep us
safe," said Justin "Doc"
Cornwell, 33, secretary
of the Port Charlotte
chapter of Patriot Riders
of America. Several of the
group's bikers turned out


I COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* TODAY

Deep Creek Elks 2763,
Dinner 5-8 pm, AYCE fried fish, prime
rib, crab cakes and more. Music with
Twice As Nice 6:30-9:30 pm.
Port Charlotte Elks, Lunch
11 am-2pm; Dinner 5-8 pm, full
menu and specials. Karaoke 6-9 pm
with Don and Jo.

SUBSCRIPTIONS
Home Delivery Rates:
Newspaper designated market:
City Zone- Carrier home
delivered 7 days.

Rates as follows
plus 7% Florida Sales Tax:
Monthly Bank/
CreditCard......................... $16.47
3 Months............................ $66.51
6 Months.......................... $113.05
1 Year ............................... $197.69
Does not include Waterline and TVTimes.
Above rates do not include sales tax.
DESOTO COUNTY RATES
Monthly Bank/
Credit Card ....................... $16.40
3 Months.................... ...... $74.09
6 Months ....................... $119.54
1 Year............................. $196.70
Arcadian home delivery
$29.99 per year.

Mail subscription rates: Rates as
follows (advance payment required):
7 Days
3 Months 6 Months 1Year
$120.88 $216.81 $386.10
Sunday Only
3 Months 6 Months IYear
$58.81 $110.56 $186.19
Single Copy rates
Daily $1.00 Sunday $2.00
Unclaimed account balances
under $10, inactive for 15
months, will be used to purchase
newspapers for classroom use.

Sun Newspapers
CUSTOMER SERVICE POLICY
Delivery should be expected prior
to 6 a.m. Monday through Saturday
and 6:30 a.m. Sunday. Customer
Service hours: 6 a.m. to 5p.m.
Monday- Friday; Saturday and
Sunday 7 a.m. to noon. To subscribe
or to report any problems with your
service, please call 941-206-1300 or
toll-free at 877-818-6204.You may
visit our office at: 23170 Harborview
Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980.


Punta Gorda Elks, Lunch
11 am-12pm; Dinner 5-8 pm; Music
by Two Can Jam 6:30-10:30 pm; Tiki
open at 2 pm @ 25538 Shore, PG.
637-2606 members/guests.
Bingo Friday, Friendliest
Bingo game in town. Quarter games
start at 10:15 am, Centennial Hall
Cultural Center. 625-4175.
Mahjong, 1-5 pm, Cultural
Center, Music Room. 75 cents an hour.
625-4175.
Ukrainian Dinners, 4:30-
6 pm, homemade pierogies, call about
takeout. St. Mary's Church at Price and
Biscayne. Cost $9.423-2427.
Tessa and Jae, Live music,
Fishermen's Village Center Stage,
5-9 pm, 639-8721.
American Legion 103,
Post ham and scalloped potato, fish/
shrimp dinner 5:30-7 pm; music
Buddy Lynch until 9 pm, 2101 Taylor
Road. 639-6337.
Family Dinner/Movie,
6-8 pm at Port Charlotte UMC.
625-4356. Free dinner and movie,
"Frozen."
PG Hibiscus Festival, 6
10 pm, Gilchrist Park PG, four bands,
food/drinks; replica of Vietnam Wall,
457-3659.
Friday Night Dance, A
variety of local entertainers for your
enjoyment. $7.7 pm, Cultural Center,
625-4175.

* SATURDAY

Wicked Tutu Obstacle,
YMCA Dotzler Center will host the
Wicked Tutu Obstacle Race for ages
8 to adults, Call 629-YMCA for details.


Thursday. "I served in the
military, so I know what
it's like to lose someone
close to you at work. It's a
great thing they're doing
here to remember these
men."
PGPD Lt. JeffWoodard
came up with the idea
of a memorial for the
fallen officers late last
year, after hearing the
Southwest Florida Public
Service Academy in Fort
Myers was including
memorial bricks in its
renovation plans.
"We started asking for


Acme Bicycle Ride, 8 am @
615 Cross St., PG. Free, adults, helmet
required, three levels. 941-639-2263.
Flea Market, Train Depot
Outdoor Flea Market, 9 am-1 pm,
Historic Depot Freight Dock, 1009
Taylor Road at Carmalita Street,
941-639-6774.
Furniture Fundraiser,
9 am-1 pm, 17783 Toledo Blade, south
of 776. Sofa, beds, couches, tables,
dressers, dryer and more.
PG Hibiscus Festival,
9 am-4 pm, Gilchrist Park. $1, huge
plant sale; music/pageant age 4-18
10 am, Secret Gardens, free trolley
457-3659.
Punta Gorda Elks, CBOD
Meeting 9 am; Lunchl1 am-
2 pm; Dinner 5-8 pm; Music/Twice as
Nice 6:30-10:30 pm; Queen of Hearts
6pm; Tiki 2pm @25538 Shore, PG.
637-2606 member/guest.
Closet of Hope, Free
clothing, ID required. 9:30 am-noon,
Gulf Cove UMC, 1100 McCall, PC.
697-1747.


SUN NEWSPAPERS
Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulation J
Chairman .................................. Derek Dunn-Rankin..................... 941-206-1001
Publisher................................... David Dunn-Rankin..................... 941-206-1003
Executive Editor ........................ Chris Porter ................................. 941-206-1134
Advertising Director.................. Leslee Peth.................................. 941-205-6400
Circulation Director ................... MarkYero .................................... 941-206-1300
Arcadian Editor .........................Susan E. Hoffman........................863-494-0300
Arcadian Publisher.................... Joe Gallimore .............................. 863-494-0300
Charlotte Sun Editor.................. Rusty Pray ................................... 941-206-1168
North Port Sun Publisher ..........Steve Sachkar.............................. 941-429-3001
North Port Sun Editor................Lorraine Schneeberger................941-429-3003
Englewood Sun Publisher .........Carol Y. Moore .............................941-681-3031
Englewood Sun Editor...............Clinton Burton ............................ 941-681-3000


donations to raise $200
for some bricks here," he
said. "Then it just grew."
About $3,000 came
in. Memorial bench-
es with the officers'
names and End of Watch
dates and plaques for
the police station's lobby
were added to the bud-
get. Major sponsors in-
cluded the Punta Gorda
Garden Club, Charlotte
Memorial Gardens and
PGPD volunteer deputy
coordinator Bob Soriano.

Email: akreger@sun-herald.com


Blue Star Dedication,
10 am, State Veterans'Home, 21281
Grayton, sponsored by PC Garden Club.
Guests welcome. 875-9416.
Deep Creek Elks 2763,
Wings & Dogs 12-2 pm, Dinner 5-8
pm, filet, fish and much more; music
with Quiet Fire from 6:30-9:30 pm.
Key Lime Festival, Family
Fun Events, Fishermen's Village,
10 am-6pm, 639-8721.
Port Charlotte Elks,
Crockpot lunch with the bartender
11 am-2 pm. Dinner 5-8 pm, full menu.
Bingo Saturday, Friendliest
Bingo game in town. Quarter games
start at 10:15 am, Cultural Center,
625-4175.
American Legion 103,
noon-3 pm, Veterans Appreciation
Day, 2101 Taylor Road, 639-6337.
Andrew Dean-Country,
Country Music Star Andrew Dean,
Fishermen's Village, Center Stage,
5-9 pm, 639-8721.

* SUNDAY

Cardiac Bicycle Ride, join
us for a 40-mile no drop -13 to
15 mph ride. Call Bill 941-740-2257
for start location.
Farmers Market, History
Park Farmers Market, 9 am-1 pm, 501
Shreve St., between Virginia Avenue
and Henry Street. 941-380-6814.
PG Hibiscus Festival,
10 am-2 pm, Gilchrist Park. $1, huge
exotic plant sale, crafts, food/drinks
with inspirational music.
Punta Gorda Elks, Bar open
noon; Picnic on the water 1-4 pm;
Music by Escape; Tiki open 2 pm,
25538 Shore, PG. members/guests.


Sunday should be
more of the same with
a high temperature
around 85. The sky
should be mostly clear
and sunny. Sunday
night's low should be
around 65 degrees and
the sky should be mostly
clear.
The wind gusts could
again reach 25 mph.
The forecast for the
remainder of the week


is dry and clear, but the
temperature should
begin to creep back
up into the high 80s to
the low 90s as the week
progresses.
"We should be back
up into the lower 90s by
midweek," McKaughan
said.
The humidity should
also gradually increase
through the week, he
said.


Arcadia man sentenced


to life in
STAFF REPORT

An Arcadia man
was sentenced to life
in prison for multiple
counts relating to
sexual abuse against a
minor after a one-day
trial Wednesday.
A jury returned a
guilty verdict against
Walter Knoeringer,
46, of one count of
lewd and lascivious
molestation of a child
under 12, three counts
of sexual battery by a
person 18 years old or
older upon a child less
than 12, and one count
of lewd and lascivious
molestation of a child
12 years old or older


sex case
but less than 18.
Knoeringer also has
sex crimes charges
pending in Sarasota
and Manatee counties,
according to Cliff
Ramey, assistant state
attorney. Ramey was
lead prosecutor in the
case.
"This defendant
deserves every day of
the life sentence for the
crimes he committed,"
Ramey said.
The crimes were
committed over a 16-
year period from Jan. 1,
1996 to Sept. 16, 2012.
The charges were
investigated by the
DeSoto County Sheriff's
Office.


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEF


Hibiscus Festival
this weekend
Beautiful waterfront
Gilchrist Park in Punta
Gorda will be the site of
the 10th annual Punta
Gorda Hibiscus Festival
today through Sunday,
with proceeds again to
benefit the Charlotte
County Historical
Center, our local mu-
seum. The event kicks
off with a Music Fest
from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.
today, including sweet
and savory foods, King
Harry's Gazebo Bar,
local veterans groups
and all motorcyclists
invited to the fundrais-
ing efforts for a local
Vietnam Memorial Wall,
along with four bands
onstage.
Saturday, the events
run from 9 a.m. to
4 p.m.: at 10 a.m., Mayor
Rachel Keesling will
conduct the Opening
Ceremony, announcing
the 2014 King and
Queen of Hibiscus;
followed by the Lil'
Miss & Master Hibiscus
Pageant; a Huge Exotic


Plant Sale throughout
the park; the Charlotte
Harbor Community
Sailing Center again
sponsoring the Hibiscus
Cup Regatta on the
harbor; Secret Garden
Tours with master gar-
deners at each garden;
the Green Hibiscus
trolley offering free
tours around town; the
Veteran Motor Car Club
of America, Southwest
Florida Region pre-
senting a vintage car
display; Plein Air Artists
in the Park; a variety of
vendors; and musicians
performing on stage all
day.
Events are set for
10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Sunday: the exotic
plants sale will contin-
ue, surrounded with
inspirational and gospel
music onstage, as well
as food, crafts and more;
the People's Choice
Award of Saturday's
favorite plein air artist
will presented at noon.
For more information,
call Stan at 941-457-
3659, or visit www.
thehibiscusfestival.com.


PET MEMORIAL


99^o r 9^















Aug. 23,2000 -May 12,2014

Rusty went to puppy heaven __
( Monday, May 12,2014. 5 l
S Rusty was born Aug. 23, 2000, in
\ Morristown, N.J., at the Seeing Eye.
He was my eyes, companion,
S best friend and keeper of my
secrets. Rusty loved everyone


The SUN (USPS743170) is published daily at Sun Coast Media Group, Inc., 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980-2100. Periodicals postage paid at Punta Gorda, FL Postmaster: Please send address changes to the SUN, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, Florida 33980-2100.


PAID ADVERTISEMENTS


Featured Events
Visual Arts Center Flea Market, Come this Saturday to
one of Punta Gorda's best flea markets! All kinds of goodies and fleas
from our members. Collectibles, jewelry, lines, books, art supplies, home
decor, etc. All proceeds benefit the Visual Arts Center. Hours: Saturday
8am-1 pm.
Boca Grande Invitational Art Festival, Friday and
Saturday, May 16-17,10 am-6 pm. The Boca Grande Invitational Art
Festival is a Showcase of the best marine and wildlife artists in the
country. It is a premier art collecting opportunity for the residents of our
community.
Friday Fish Fry, Monthly fish fry from 4 pm-7 pm at 27000
Sunnybrook Road (Harbour Heights), PG, Come one come all. Fried/
baked fish, fried shrimp, and all the trimmings. Cost: $8. We will be
looking for you.


f'


4 he met.
S Online condolences may be
made under "Pet Loss" at
www.kays-ponger.com, width the
I Last name "Fortunato."




:The Sun /Friday, May 16,2014 www.sunnewspapers.net


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PORT CHARLOTTE
4200 Tamiami Trail
(North of Kings Hwy.)
941-624-3377


SARASOTA
5301 Clark Road
(At NE Corner of Honore Ave.)
941-923-4200


FORT MYERS
4580 Cleveland Ave.
(At SW Corner of Colonial Blvd.)
239-278-4401


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:OurTown Page 4


C www.sunnewspapers.net


FROM PAGE ONE


The Sun /Friday, May 16, 2014


Brett Yanni, Will Louttit, Cullen Pitts and Chris Soto ham it up for the camera, just before the
start of the walk over to the Lee Civic Center for their high school graduation ceremony.


2014 PCHS graduate Kayla Philips, with a few of her family members, for a graduation photo.


Something lan Bush did not learn in high school was fitting a
somewhat small graduation cap on his head and having it stay
in place.


Chellsi Kaufman got help with her cap from classmate Taylor
Fullington.


Michael Robert Bakogiannis watches himself on the Jumbotron
from his seat among his classmates.


Family and friends surround graduates Tashae'Anastasjah White and Anita Abalone for a group
photo after the Commencement, held Wednesday evening for the PCHS class of 2014.


Close to 400 seniors walked across the stage at the Lee Civic Center Wednesday evening to receive
their diplomas during the PCHS 2014 Commencement.


Erik Heitter, his stepson Darren Price, and his son Erik Heitter take photos
after the ceremony.


Right: Casey
Cristen
Cumberworth
accepts her -
diploma from
principal Steve
Dionisio, at
the same
time shaking
his hand and
having her
Commence-
ment photo
taken onstage.



GRADS
FROM PAGE 1

Porcides also encour-
aged the graduates to
keep up the hard work.
'And remember,
seniors, if you make it
a great life or not, the
choice is yours," she said.
Port Charlotte senior
Lauren Katz also ad-
dressed her classmates
during the ceremony.
Katz pointed out that a
high school is designed
to turn nervous teenagers
into successful, confident
adults.
And she believes Port
Charlotte High School is
the perfect example of
that statement.
"The Pirate family has
a strong sense of com-
munity," she said. 'And


Class of 2014 president Juliana Porcides and Christopher Bennett were the first of the graduates out the door heading
over to the Lee Civic Center for their Commencement Wednesday evening.


the staff's pride is just as
intense as the students'."
Both Katz and Porcides
referred to Port Charlotte
High School's accom-
plishments over the past
year in both the academic
and athletic fields. Katz
added that Port Charlotte
High cannot be referred
to as the academic
school, the athletic school
or the artsy school.
"Port Charlotte High is
the everything school,"
she said. "It's the crown
jewel of Charlotte
County."
Port Charlotte High
School principal Steve
Dionisio also congratu-
lated the seniors, adding
that he was proud of their
accomplishments. He
agreed with Katz's state-
ment that the students
had accomplished many
things in many different


fields throughout the
year, be that beating
rival Charlotte High in
athletics or being named
a silver medal school by
U.S. News andWorld
Report.
He referred to the
class as being "very
well-rounded. The
seniors also work first and
play later.
"This class has become
the everything class. They
have set the bar very high
for future classes."
Port Charlotte resident
Mike Walsh attended the
ceremony to see his son
Chase Walsh graduate.
Walsh said he was proud
of all the graduates and
that they had achieved
their goals.
He also gave the school
itself high marks.
"You can always go to
the teachers and talk to


Oscar Saenz uses his phone to take a selfie that included classmates as they waited in the staging
area for the start of the Port Charlotte High School 2014 Commencement Wednesday evening at
the Lee Civic Center.


them," Walsh said.
Terry Moore, 50, of Port
Charlotte watched his
daughter, Taylor, walk
across the stage. Moore


said he was proud of his
daughter and the other
graduates.
When asked if he had
any advice for the newly


graduated students,
Moore answered, "Stay
out of trouble."

Email: pfallon@sun-herald.com


koom





The Sun/Friday, May 16,2014


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 5


I OBITUARIES

CHARLOTTE


Jozsef Csaszar
Jozsef Csaszar, 85,
of Port Charlotte, Fla.,
died Thursday, May 15,
2014, in Port Charlotte.
Arrangements are by
Roberson Funeral Home &
Crematory, Port Charlotte.

Lawrence L.
Lawson
Lawrence L. "Larry"
Lawson, 89, of Port
Charlotte, Fla., passed away
Wednesday,
May 14,
2014, at his
4V1, home.
He was
born July 26,
1924, in
Springfield,
Ohio, to
Edith and
... Homer Lawson.
'-;:.:& Larry lived
in Arcanum,
Ohio, and West
Milton, Ohio, where he was
a member of the Pitsburg
and Salem Brethren
Church from 1952 to 1979.
He served in the U.S. Army
as a medic duringWorld
War II with 106th Infantry
Division, where he was a
surgical nurse at the Battle
of the Bulge. Larry moved
to Port Charlotte in 1979,
after retiring from Chrysler
Corp. in Dayton, Ohio. He
started at Chrysler in 1959,
working his way up to
General Foreman of Quality
Control for their Defense
Operations Air Temp
Division, building M-60
Tank Range Finders.
Larry was a member of
First Baptist Church of Port
Charlotte, and served the


Lord as a Sunday School
Teacher in Ohio and
Florida for over 50 years,
with many years minis-
tering to those who were
homebound.
He is survived by his wife,
AdaWhitney Lawson; sons,
Gary (Sharon) Lawson and
Rex (Diane) Lawson; step-
son, GaryWhitney; step-
daughter, Gale (Don) West;
10 grandchildren; and 26
great-grandchildren. Larry
was preceded in death by
his parents; first wife of
53 years, Betty Eddelman
Lawson; brothers, Charles
andWalter; and grand-
daughter, Denise.
The family will receive
friends 3 p.m. until a service
to celebrate Larry's life at
4 p.m. Saturday, May 17,
2014, at Larry Taylor
Funeral and Cremation
Services. Burial will be at
Florida National Cemetery
in Bushnell, Fla. Memorial
donations maybe made
to Tidewell Hospice Inc.
or First Baptist Church
of Port Charlotte. To
express condolences to the
family, please visit www.
Ltaylorfuneral.com and
sign the online guest book.

Dion K. Newcomb
Dion K. Newcomb, 42,
of Port Charlotte, Fla.,
passed away Monday,
May 12, 2014, at Fawcett
Memorial Hospital in Port
Charlotte. Arrangements
are by National
Cremation Society of Port
Charlotte.

NORTH PORT

There were no deaths
reported in North Port
Thursday.


ENGLEWOOD


Nancy Bates
Nancy Bates, 71, passed
away Saturday, May 10,
2014.
She moved to Florida from
South BeloitEIIl., in 1977.
Nancy leaves behind her
husband, Ronald Bates;
her five children, Rhonda
Walton, Tammy Herbert,
Susan Goff, Craig Bates
and James Bates; and six
grandchildren.
Services will be held
from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. to-
day, Friday, May 16,2014,
at Placida Road Church of
God in Grove City, Fla.
Arrangements are by
Lemon Bay Funeral Home
and Cremation Services.

Betty Leeper
Betty Leeper, 92,
formerly of Englewood,
Fla., passed away Tuesday,
May 13,2014.
She is survived by her
sons, Robert (Barbara)
and Barry (Teresa) Leeper;
grandchildren, Ann
Leeper, Christina (Park
Allen) Goebel-Leeper,
Christina (Joel) Ulrich and
Adam (Zerilda Daniels)
Leeper; eight great-grand-
daughters; and sister, Ruth
Templeton. Betty was
preceded in death by her
parents, George and Myrtle
Braun; husband, George
Leeper; daughter, Linda
Ness; and great-grand-
daughter, Addyson Ulrich.
Services will be held
privately. In lieu of flowers,
donations maybe made
to Acclaim Hospice. To
send a message of condo-
lence, please visit www.
newcomerdayton.com.


DESOTO


Michael
Coronado-Lopez
Michael Coronado-
Lopez, 16, of Arcadia,
Fla., passed away
Tuesday May 13, 2014.
Arrangements are by
Ponger-Kays-Grady
Funeral Home and
Cremation Services,
Arcadia.

Horace Thomas
Hurst
Horace Thomas
Hurst, 64, passed away
Wednesday, May 14,
2014, at his home in the
Brownville, Fla., commu-
nity, surrounded by his
loving family.
Horace was the owner/
operator of Hurst Logging
Company. He transported
lumber and pulp wood
trees throughout the state
of Florida. Horace was a
devoted family man. He
would load the family up
and go to the beach, or
just drive around looking
for trees that he could
harvest. He was a member
of Upper Room Church of
God.
Horace is survived by
his beloved wife, Mona
Ruth McClelland Hurst
of Arcadia, Fla.; son,
Dean (Jennifer) McCaig
of Trenton, Tenn.; four
daughters, Jessica Mae
Hurst, Tisha (Wesley)
Coker, Carry McClelland
and Angel Hurst, all of
Arcadia; brother, Bud
(Judy) Hurst of Arcadia;
three sisters, Essie
(Wayne) Cooper, Ruby
Newberry and Mary (Bill)
England, all of Arcadia;


18 grandchildren; six
great-grandchildren;
and numerous nieces
and nephews. He was
preceded in death by his
parents, James Edward
Hurst Sr. and Elvery Mae
Fipps Hurst; and two sons,
Horace Thomas Hurst Jr.
and James L. Hurst.
Visitation will be
conducted from 4 p.m.
until the funeral services
at 5 p.m. Saturday,
May 17, 2014, from the
chapel of Ponger-Kays-
Grady Funeral Home,
50 N. Hillsborough Ave.,
Arcadia. The Rev. Wayne
Cooper and the Rev. Rufus
Caraway will officiate. In
lieu of flowers, donations
maybe made to the
Florida Sheriffs Boys
Ranch, 1813 CecilWebb
Place, Boys Ranch, FL
32060. Online condolences
may be made at www.
pongerkaysgrady.com.
Arrangements are
by Ponger-Kays-Grady
Funeral Home and
Cremation Services,
Arcadia.

Frank H. Platt
Dr. Frank H. Platt, 85,
passed awayWednesday,
May 14, 2014.
He was
born Dec. 30,
: 1928, to
Frank
and Edna
McClenithan
H Platt.
Frank was
a graduate of
DeSoto County
". High School.
'' -"' He served in
the United
States Army, and later
attended the University
of Florida on the GI Bill.


Frank later graduated from
Auburn University School
ofVeterinary Medicine
in 1955. He practiced in
Okeechobee, Fla., from
1957 to 1996. Frank served
in various civic organiza-
tions throughout the years,
and was a member of the
United Methodist Church.
He is survived by his
loving wife, Reba; daugh-
ter, Phyllis Bass; two sons,
Kevin (Vicki) Platt and
Michael (Theresa) Platt,
all of Okeechobee; 10
grandchildren; and two
great-grandchildren.
Visitation will be from
3 p.m. until a memorial
service at 4 p.m. Sunday,
May 18, 2014, at First
United Methodist Church
of Okeechobee, 200 N.W
Second St., Okeechobee.
In lieu of flowers, please
send donations to St.
Jude Children's Research
Hospital, 501 St. Jude
Place, Memphis, TN
38105.
Arrangements are
by Buxton & Bass
Okeechobee Funeral
Home, Okeechobee.




Obituaries are accepted from funeral
homes only. There's no charge for
publishing an abbreviated death notice.
Full obituaries and repeat death notices
will be subject to an advertising charge.
Obituaries must be received by
2 p.m. for Tuesday through Saturday
publication. For Sunday publication
deadline is noon on Saturday. For Monday
publication deadline is noon on Sunday.
In Loving Memories must be received
by 2 p.m. forTuesday through Friday
publication. For Saturday through Monday
publication deadline is noon on Friday. The
American flag accompanying an obituary
indicates a veteran of the
U.S. Armed Forces. Please send emails to
obituaries@sunletter.com.


Charlotte County students set for history competition


wo L.A. Ainger Middle
School students finished
second in the state
History Fair, earning a trip
to the National History Day
competition at the University
of Maryland.
Jenna Dunakey and Lorrie
Konopasek, both sev-
enth-graders, finished second
in the Junior Group for their
documentary "Title IX."
Dunakey and Konopasek are
students in Susan James' class.
The two will travel to College
Park, Md., for the Kenneth E.
Behring National Contest held
June 15-19.
The submissions are judged
on a local, state and national
level. They are evaluated by
professional historians and
educators.

PCHS seniors receive
scholarships
Four Port Charlotte High
School seniors recently
received $1,000 scholarships
from the GFWC Women's Club
of Port Charlotte during a
luncheon on May 9.
Ariana Burns, Juliana
Porcides, CindaLeigh


I 04THE


ii rrii mgf UNION _J

Schoullis and KaraValliere
each will receive a scholarship
to a Florida college or universi-
ty. The recipients were chosen
from a number of qualified
applicants.
The women's club is dedi-
cated to contributing to the
Port Charlotte Community. In
addition to the scholarships,
the organization is also in-
volved in a variety of different
fundraisers.
For more information about
the club, call 941-875-3737.

Charlotte County
teams advance
Four Charlotte County
schools will represent the
district in the Engineering
Encounters Bridge Design
Competition's national semifi-
nal to be held May 30.
Two of the teams


PHOTOS PROVIDED
Four Port Charlotte High School seniors were awarded $1,000 scholarships from the GWFC Women's Club of Port
Charlotte. Winners include Ariana Burns, Juliana Porcides, CindaLeigh Schoullis and Kara Valliere.


representing the school district
are from Charlotte Technical
Center. Port Charlotte High
School and Lemon Bay High
School will also send one team
apiece.
One of the Charlotte
Technical Center's teams,
dubbed the "BridgeDesigners,"
is made up of Jannelle
Spergeon and Michael Barnes.
They were ranked 11th in the
nation after the qualifying
round.
The school's second team,
the "CTCIA," is made up of Nick
Cuoco and Thomas Tessier.
The team is ranked 16th in the
nation.
All four are students in the
drafting program at the school.
The PCHS team, called the
"JDMsquad," is made up of
Jonathan Garcia and Shamar
Campbell. They were ranked
13th in the nation after the
qualifying round.
The Lemon Bay High team,
the "LBHS P1 1," is comprised
of George Yeater and is ranked
19th in the nation. Yeater is a
student in the school's drafting
class.
The teams that score in
the top five will win laptop
computers and a trip to West
Point, N.Y., for the national
competition. The team that
comes in first in the national
competition will win a $5,000
scholarship.

Edison State
professor hands out
books in Haiti
An Edison State College


professor recently returned
from a humanitarian trip to
Haiti.
Mireille Lauture traveled
to the island country in
April. She helped hand out
medication, personal items,
clothing, books and even
laptop computers to those
still recovering from the 2010
earthquake. Lauture was
invited on the humanitarian
trip by JetBlue Airways after
company representatives
learned that she had written
five books on Haitian folklore
which had been passed down
to her verbally during her
childhood.
Lauture was born in Haiti,
but has lived in the United
States for more than 40 years.
Although she has traveled to
Haiti numerous times, this
is her first trip back to her
homeland since the earth-
quake ravaged the country.
Lauture and others visited
a school and two orphanages
while in Haiti, where she hand-
ed out copies of her books.
"Most of these children have
never owned their own books
before," she said. "There were
so excited to be given books of
their own that they would not
put them down."
"They would smell the
pages and hold them in their
hands with such amazement,"
Lauture added.

Edison State's
attorney named to
post
Edison State College's


general counsel has been
named the vice chairman of
the Florida Bar Association's
Education Law Committee.
Mark Lupe will serve on the
committee that brings togeth-
er education law attorneys
to review existing education
laws. The committee also
studies recent developments in
education law in order to keep
the Florida Bar Association
members apprised of any
changes in the field.
The committee also keeps
the full association informed
of any legislative changes in
the area.
"Mark brings a wealth of
expertise in education law,
and his contributions to this
committee will only be en-
hanced in a leadership role,"
said Jeff Allbritten, president
of Edison State College. "This
is an important committee
whose thoughtful consider-
ation of current and future
laws can greatly impact our
state's education system."

Edison students
donate items
Edison State College
students living in the
Lee Campus' Lighthouse
Commons recently donated
around 670 pounds of various
items to Goodwill Industries.
The students donated the
items after leaving the dor-
mitory following the spring
semester. The donations equal
about $536 for those in need in
the community.
Compiled by Paul Fallon


Two L.A. Ainger Middle School seventh-graders will be traveling to the
University of Maryland in June for a national history competition. Pictured
from left are Jenna Dunakey and Lorrie Konopasek.







Our Town Page 6C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Friday, May 16, 2014


3100








LEGALS


5/16/2014

L NOTICE OF ACTION

L : 3116 ^

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 2014 CA 000013
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.
Plaintiff,
vs.
JAMES R. MANN, JR. A/K/A
JAMES RANDALL MANN, JR.,
ET AL.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
SHEILA D. MANN
19359 BOULDER AVENUE
PORT CHARLOTTE, FL 33954
OR
463 THERESA BLVD
PORT CHARLOTTE, FL 33954
OR
791 SPRING LAKE BLVD NW
PORT CHARLOTTE FL 33952
OR
772 NEPTUNE STREET
PORT CHARLOTTE, FL 33948
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS
STATED,
CURRENT RESIDENCE
UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action to foreclose Mort-
gage covering the following real
and personal property described
as follows, to-wit:
LOT 28, BLOCK 932,
PORT CHARLOTTE SUBDI-
VISION SECTION SEVEN-
TEEN, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
5, PAGE(S) 6A THROUGH
6D, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any, to
it on Nelson A. Perez, Butler &
Hosch, P.A., 3185 South Conway
Road, Suite E, Orlando, Florida
32812 and file the original with
the Clerk of the above-styled
Court on or before 30 days from
the first publication, otherwise a
Judgment may be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
said Court on the 5th day of May,
2014.
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT. If you are a person
with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order
to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no
cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please
contact Jon Embury, Adminis-
trative Services Manager,
whose office is located at 350
E. Marion Avenue, Punta
Gorda, Florida 33950, and
whose telephone number is
(941) 637-2110, at least 7
days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immedi-
ately upon receiving this noti-
fication if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; if you are hear-
ing or voice impaired, call
711.
Barbara T. Scott
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: C.L.G.
Deputy Clerk
Publish: May 9 and 16, 2014
109392 3037511
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
20TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 08-2014CA-000853
SECTION NO.
MIDFLORIDA CREDIT UNION,
Plaintiff,
V.
ROBERT FERREIRO; DEBORAH V.
FERREIRO; SANDY PINE DRIVE
PROPERTY OWNER'S ASSOCIA-
TION, INC.; and ANY AND ALL
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, AND UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN-NAMED
DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST
AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, AND UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN-
NAMED DEFENDANTS WHO
ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER
SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES
MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action to foreclose on the


following real property in Char-
lotte County, Florida:
The North one-half of Lot 10
of the subdivision of FLORIDO-
NIA, Section 15, Township 40
South, Range 24 East, as
shown on the plat thereof
recorded in Plat Book 1, Page
44-U, Public Records of Char-
lotte County, Florida.
TOGETHER WITH the following
easement, pursuant to the
Sandy Pine Drive Easement
recorded in Official Records
Book 1942, Page 1835, Pub-
lic Records of Charlotte Coun-


NOTICE OF ACTION

: 3116 ^

ty, Florida, for the benefit of
the above-described property,
said easement being
described as follows: Over,
upon and across the Easterly
30 feet of Lots 24 and 9 and
the Southerly 30 feet of Lot 7
and the Westerly 30 feet of
the South 1/2 of Lot 10, all of
the subdivision of Section 15,
Township 40 South, Range 24
East, as shown on the plat
thereof recorded at Plat Book
1, Page 44-U, in the Public
Records of Charlotte County,
Florida.
ADDRESS: 2080 Shady Pines
Drive, Punta Gorda, FL 33982
has been filed against you in the
Circuit Court of the Twentieth
Judicial Circuit, Charlotte County,
Florida, and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses to the Complaint, if any,
to Gregory A. Sanoba, Esq., 422
South Florida Avenue, Lakeland,
Florida 33801, on or before June
18, 2014, and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's attor-
ney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise, a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint.
DATE: May 13. 2014
BARBARA T. SCOTT
Clerk of the Court
By: C.L.G.
Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact
Jon Embury, Administrative
Services Manager, whose
office is located at 350 E.
Marion Avenue, Punta Gorda,
Florida 33950, and whose
telephone number is (941)
637-2110, at least 7 days
before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notifica-
tion if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; if you are hear-
ing or voice impaired, call
711.
Publish: May 16 and 23, 2014
369528 3040426

FIND YOUR
BEST FRIEND
IN THE
CLASSIFIED!

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 14-1012-CA
Division:
Monica Ann Perreira,
Petitioner
and
Dale Thomas Perreira,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: Dale Thomas Perreira
Last Known Address
Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and
that you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Monica Ann Perreira,
whose address is 2210 Hayworth
Rd. Port Charlotte, FL 33952 on
or before 6/10/14, and file the
original with the clerk of this
Court at 350 E. Marion Ave.,
Punta Gorda, FL 33950 before
service on Petitioner or immedi-
ately thereafter. If you fail to do
so, a default may be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the petition.
Copies of all court docu-
ments in this case, including
orders, are available at the
Clerk of the Circuit Court's
office. You may review these
documents upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of
the Circuit Court's office noti-
fied of your current address.
(You may file Notice of Cur-
rent Address, Florida
Supreme Court Approved
Family Law Form 12.915.)
Future papers in this lawsuit
will be mailed to the address
on record at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285,
Florida Family Law Rules of
Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of docu-
ments and information. Fail-
ure to comply can result in
sanctions, including dismissal
or striking of pleadings.
Dated: 5/5/14
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: C.L.G.
Deputy Clerk
Publish: 05/0914, 05/16/14,
05/23/14, 05/30/14
339038 3037493
] NOTICE OF
AUCTION



PROMPT WRECKER SERVICE
11139 TAMIAMI TRAIL
PUNTA GORDA, FL 33955
941-639-4000
AUCTION DATE 5/30/14
AT 10:00 AM
1997 TOYT
VIN# 1NXBAO2E4VZ587359
2007 DODGE
VIN# 2B3KA43G17H776795
Publish: May 16, 2014


103614 3040133
NOTICE OF SALE/AUCTION
Per FL Statute 713.78
Time of Sale 10:00 am
Location of Sale: Al Auto Body,
23309 Harborview Rd.
Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980
Date of Sale: 6/2/14
VEHICLE DESCRIPTION:
VIN: 4TANL42N5VZ271485
1997 Toyota
Publish: May 16, 2014
130547 3040573


L NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE I



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CHAR-
LOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 08-2012-CA-002487
Section:
CITIMORTGAGE, INC.
Plaintiff,
v.
KEVIN S. YAGER; BARBARA S.
NEAL; AMBER M. YAGER; ANY
AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST
AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS; TENANT 1 N/K/A
JENNY A. MILLER
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order of Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated April
22, 2014, entered in Civil Case
No. 08-2012-CA-002487 of the
Circuit Court of the Twentieth
Judicial Circuit in and for Char-
lotte County. Florida, wherein the
Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell
to the highest bidder for cash on
the 23rd day of May, 2014, at
11:00 a.m. at website:
https://www.charlotte. realfore-
close.com, in accordance with
Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, rela-
tive to the following described
property as set forth in the Final
Judgment, to wit:
LOT 35, SOUTH PUNTA GORDA
HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION, 8TH
ADDITION ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 4, PAGES 6A THRU
6D, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH LAND AND
MOBILE HOME, YEAR: 1983.
MAKE/MODEL: COUN, VIN#
C251S14343
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the Lis Pendens
must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT. If you are a person
with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order
to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no
cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please
contact Jon Embury, Adminis-
trative Services Manager,
whose office is located at 350
E. Marion Avenue, Punta
Gorda, Florida 33950, and
whose telephone number is
(941) 637-2110, at least 7
days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immedi-
ately upon receiving this noti-
fication if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; if you are hear-
ing or voice impaired, call
711.
Dated at PUNTA GORDA, Florida
this 6th day of May, 2014.
K. Sandrock
Barbara T. Scott
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Charlotte COUNTY, FLORIDA
Publish: May 9 and 16, 2014
329037 3037755
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTiE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 13-2480-CA
SUNCOAST SCHOOLS
FEDERAL CREDIT UNION,
Plaintiff,
v.
ROBERT F. OSBORNE; LAURIE
OSBORNE; ROTONDA WEST
ASSOCIATION, INC.: and ANY
UNKNOWN PERSONS IN
POSSESSION,
Defendants.
CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY given that
pursuant to a Final Judgment in
Foreclosure entered in the above-
entitled cause in the Circuit Court
of the Twentieth Judicial Circuit in
and for Charlotte County, Florida,
I will sell by electronic sale at
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
, pursuant to Chapter 45, Florida
Statutes, to the highest bidder for
cash at 11:00 A.m., on the 21
day of July, 2014, that certain
parcel of real property situated in
Charlotte County, Florida,
described as follows:
Lot 1182, Rotonda West Oak-
land Hills, according to the
map or plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 8,
pages 15Athrough 15K of the
Public Records of Charlotte
County, Florida.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the Lis Pendens
must file a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale.
DATED this 18 day of April,
2014.
BARBARA T. SCOTi, CLERK
Circuit Court of Charlotte County
By: K. Polite
Deputy Clerk
Publish: May 9 and 16, 2014
298007 3038090
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 12-003786-CA
Bayview Loan Servicing, LLC
Plaintiff,


VS.
FLORIDA STATE ROOFLNG &
CONSTRUCTION, INC.;
GALAXY AMERICA LLC;
UNKNOWN TENANT/OCCU-
PANT(S) N/K/A MELISSA
HOLSKE; ROBERT G. GREGO-
RY A/K/A ROBERT GREGO-
RY;
To view today's legal notices
and more visit,
www.floridapublicnotices.com


L NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE
^^ 3122^^

Defendants
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accor-
dance with the Default Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated Majy9.
2014, in the above-styled cause,
I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash beginning at
11:00 a.m. at
www.charlotte.realforeclose.c
om on June 13, 2014, the follow-
ing described property:
LOT 6, BLOCK 4937, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION,
SECTION 93, A SUBDIVI-
SION ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF, RECORD-
ED IN PLAT BOOK 9,
PAGES 1A THROUGH 1Z4,
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
Property Address:
9038 Calumet Boulevard,
Port Charlotte, FL 33981
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PEN-
DENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH-
IN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
Dated: May 13. 2014
If you are a person with a
disability who needs any
accommodation in order to
participate in this proceeding,
you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the
Administrative Services Man-
ager whose office is located
at 350 E. Marion Avenue,
Punta Gorda, Florida 33950,
and whose telephone number
is (941) 637-2281, at least 7
days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immedi-
ately upon receiving this noti-
fication if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; if you are hear-
ing or voice impaired, call
711.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court on May 13, 2014.
CLERK:
CLERK:
K. Sandrock
Deputy Clerk of Court
Publish: May 16 and 23, 2014
340189 3040397
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 14-300-CA
Cl BANK F/K/A
COMMUNITY BANK & COMPANY,
Plaintiff,
V.
YAD V'KIDUSH HASHEM -
HOUSE OF MARTYRS, INC.
D/B/A YVH INSTITUTE,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Fore-
closure filed May 12, 2014,
entered in Civil Case No. 14-300-
CA of the Circuit Court of the
Twentieth Judicial Circuit in and
for Charlotte County, Punta
Gorda, Florida, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash
at
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
in accordance with Chapter 45
Florida Statues at 11:00 a.m. on
the 16 day of June, 2014 on the
following described property as
set forth in said Summary Final
Judgment:
Lots 26 and 27, Block 2956,
Port Charlotte Subdivision,
Section 59, as per plat there-
of, recorded in Plat Book 5,
Pages 73A through 73F, of the
Public Records of Charlotte
County, Florida
and
Lot 14, Block 4367, Port
Charlotte Subdivision, Section
71, according to the plat
thereof, recorded in Plat Book
6, Pages 27A through 27L, of
the Public Records of Char-
lotte County, Florida
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis
Pendens, must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Dated the 13 day of May, 2014.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
As Clerk of the Court
By: K. Sandrock
Deputy Clerk
Publish: May 16 and 23, 2014
277412 3040406
| NOTICE OF

I HEARING
^,3124 ^

The Board of County Commis-
sioners of Charlotte County pro-
poses to adopt the following ordi-
nance:
AN ORDINANCE OF THE
BOARD OF COUNTY COM-
MISSIONERS OF CHAR-
LOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA;
AMENDING THE SPEED
LIMITS ON CERTAIN POR-
TIONS OF AIRPORT ROAD,
BURNT STORE ROAD, COL-
ISEUM BOULEVARD, ELMI-
RA BOULEVARD, ENCAR-
NACION STREET, FLAMIN-
GO BOULEVARD, GULF-
STREAM BOULEVARD,
LEAN BOULEVARD,
TUCKERS GRADE, VENAN-
GO STREET, VETERANS
BOULEVARD, WARRING-
TON BOULEVARD, BOUND-


ARY BOULEVARD, PARADE
CIRCLE, ROTONDA BOULE-
VARD NORTH, ROTONDA
BOULEVARD EAST,
ROTONDA BOULEVARD
WEST AND ROTONDA CIR-
CLE, IN CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA; PRO-
VIDING FOR PENALTIES
FOR VIOLATION; PROVID-
ING THAT SPEED LIMITS
SHALL NOT BE AFFECTED
BY NAME OR ROAD DESIG-
NATION CHANGES; PRO-


NOTICE OF
/HEARING
two 3124^^

VIDING FOR CONFLICT
WITH OTHER ORDI-
NANCES; PROVIDING FOR
INCORPORATION OF
EXHIBITS; PROVIDING FOR
SEVERABILITY; AND PRO-
VIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE
DATE.
A public hearing on this ordinance
will be held at lOAM, or as soon
thereafter as it may be heard, on
the 27th day of May, 2014, in
Room 119 of the Charlotte Coun-
ty Administration Center, 18500
Murdock Circle, Port Charlotte,
Florida.
Copies of the proposed ordinance
and the economic impact esti-
mate, if applicable, are available
for inspection by the general pub-
lic in the Charlotte County Attor-
ney's Office, 18500 Murdock Cir-
cle, Port Charlotte, Florida.
Interested parties may appear at
the meeting and be heard with
respect to the proposed ordi-
nance.
Should any agency or person
decide to appeal any decision
made by the Board with respect
to any matter considered at such
meeting, he will need a record of
the proceeding, and for such pur-
pose, he may need to ensure that
a verbatim record of the proceed-
ings is made, which record
includes the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to
be based.
BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CHARLOTTiE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Charlotte County Board of County
Commissioners does not discrim-
inate on the basis of disability.
This nondiscrimination policy
involves every aspect of the
County's functions, including
access to and participation in
meetings, programs and activi-
ties. FM Sound Enhancement
Units for the Hearing Impaired are
available at the Front Security
Desk, Building A of the Murdock
Administration Complex. Anyone
needing other reasonable accom-
modation or auxiliary aids and
services please contact our office
at 941-764-4191, TDD/TTY
941-743-1234, or by email to
Walt.Black@charlottefl.com.
REFERENCE No.: 052714-A
PUBLISHED: May 16, 2014
163352 3040270

| NOTICE OF SALE

::: 3130 ^

FIRST INSERTION NOTICE OF
PUBLIC SALE OF PERSONAL
PROPERTY
METRO SELF STORAGE
Notice is hereby given that the
undersigned self storage
unit(s) will be sold at a public
sale by competitive bidding, in
their entirety to the highest
bidder, on or after date and
time below to satisfy the lien
of Metro Self Storage for
rental and other charges due
from the undersigned. The
said property has been stored
and generally described
below is located at the respec-
tive address. The sale will
begin at the date and time
below on or after on said date
and will continue hour by hour
until all units are sold. Auc-
tioneer Lic# AU4167 and
AB2825, 10% Buyers Premi-
um.
Tuesday June 3rd 2014
10:00 AM
1231 Kings Highway
Port Charlotte, FL. 33980
08019 Maurice Graham
08031 Kenneth Ferman
10026 Gregory Faust
12007 John W Moult Jr
The contents consist of gener-
al, household and miscella-
neous items. The terms of the
sale will be cash only and
must be paid for at the time of
the sale. All goods are sold as
is. Metro Self Storage
reserves the right to withdraw
any or all units for the sale at
any time. All contents must be
removed within 48 hours or
sooner.
Publish: May 16 and 23, 2014
108437 3040115
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF
PERSONAL PROPERTY
Notice is hereby given that the
undersigned will sell, to satisfy
lien of the owner, at public sale by
competitive bidding on June 4,
2014 at 11:00 AM or there-
after at the Extra Space Storage
facility located at:
23215 Harborview Road
Port Charlotte, Florida 33980
941-624-2962
The personal goods stored there-
in by the following may include,
but are not limited to general
household, furniture, boxes,
clothing, and appliances.
1. Unit #61, Chris Mattingly
2. Unit #16, Myriah Melton
3. Unit #542, Jonathan Warren
4. Unit #1054, Amelia Lyons
5. Unit # 30, Frank Polanshek
6. Unit #466, David Gould
Purchases must be made with
cash only and paid at the time of
sale. All contents are sold as is
and must be removed at the time
of purchase. Extra Space Stor-


age reserves the right to refuse
any bid. Sale is subject to
adjournment.
Publish: May 16 and 23, 2014
111034 3040105
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF
PERSONAL PROPERTY
Notice is hereby given that the
undersigned will sell, to satisfy
lien of the owner, at public sale by
competitive bidding on
06/04/2014 at 2:00 PM at the
Extra Space Storage facility locat-


NOTICE OF SALE
L 3130 ^


ed at:
17960 Paulson Dr
Port Charlotte, FL 33954
941-764-4085
The personal goods stored there-
in by the following may include,
but are not limited to general
household, furniture, boxes,
clothes, and appliances.
Unit #107 Shaun David
Unit #118 -Heather Gotcher
Unit #1252 David Beck
Unit #580 Stacy Burke
Purchases must be made with
cash only and paid at the time of
sale. All goods are sold as is and
must be removed at the time of
purchase. Extra Space Storage
reserves the right to refuse any
bid. Sale is subject to adjourn-
ment.
Publish: May 16 and 23, 2014
130345 3040074
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF
PERSONAL PROPERTY
Notice is hereby given that the
undersigned will sell, to satisfy
lien of the owner, at public sale by
competitive bidding on Wednes-
day, June 7, 2014 at 12:30pm at
the Extra Space Storage facility
located at:
2080 Tamiami Tr.,
Port Charlotte, FL 33948
(941) 625-3597
The personal goods stored there-
in by the following may include,
but are not limited to general
household, furniture, boxes,
clothes, and appliances.
Unit # Name
316 Kaleena Banish
Purchases must be made with
cash only and paid at the time of
sale.
All goods are sold as is and must
be moved at the time of pur-
chase. Extra Space Storage
reserves the right to refuse any
bid.
Sale is subject to adjournment.
Publish: May 16 and 23, 2014
327465 3040084
IAPVER'rmSE-"I

7 WORKSHOPS
,W::3134 OPS


PUBLIC NOTICE
OF A SECOND
NEIGHBORHOOD WORKSHOP
A Second Neighborhood Work-
shop will be held to discuss a pro-
posed Rezone Petition on an
11.07 acre + parcel located on
the west side of S.R. 776 (Engle-
wood Road) and east side of Old
Englewood Road (across from the
Buchan Airfield). This property is
currently vacant. This parcel is
designated as Office/Multi Family
Residential on the Sarasota Coun-
ty Comprehensive Plan Future
Land Use Map. The purpose of
this second Neighborhood Work-
shop is to discuss the Applicant
agreeing to make the Develop-
ment Concept Plan Binding as a
Planned Unit Development.
Because this is a change not pre-
viously discussed, a second
Neighborhood Workshop is being
held. The new proposed Rezon-
ing Petition is a request by the
property owner to change the
current zoning on the 11.07 acre
parcel from OUE-2 (Open Use
Estate, 1 dwelling unit per 2
acres) to RSF-4/PUD (Residential
Single Family, 5.5 dwelling units
per acre/Planned Unit Develop-
ment). Residential RSF-4/PUD will
allow up to 10% percent of allow-
able Office Professional and Insti-
tutional (OPI) uses which will be
located on the northern 1.0 acre
+ tip of the project. The pro-
posed project called Gateway
Square & Villas will be a pedestri-
an friendly/mixed use office/resi-
dential project. The project pro-
poses a cluster subdivision of 16
- one story paired (Villa Houses)
for a total of 32 dwelling units in
the southern portion of the site
adjacent to the Pine Lakes Subdi-
vision. The northern tip of the
property will contain two office
buildings. One office building will
be a 4,600 sq. ft one story build-
ing with a drive through and the
second building will be a two
story 14,000 sq. ft. building. All
setbacks and landscape buffers
and height restrictions will be con-
sistent with the requirements of
the Sarasota County Zoning Ordi-
nance or the more restrictive
requirements of the adopted S.R.
776 Corridor Plan. This is not a
public hearing. The purpose of
the neighborhood workshop is to
inform neighboring residents of
the nature of the project, view the
Binding Development Concept
Plan, and to seek citizen input.
The workshop will be held on
Tuesday, June 3, 2014, at 6:00
pm at the Lemon Bay Park, 570
Bay Park Boulevard, Englewood,
Florida 34223. For more infor-
mation, call Brian Lichterman, PA
at 941-780-4166. More informa-
tion on the Neighborhood Work-
shop can also be obtained on the
County's web site by clicking on:
https://www.scgov. net/Plan-
ningServices/Pages/Work-
shops.aspx.
Sarasota County prohibits dis-
crimination in all services, pro-
grams or activities on the basis of
race, color, national origin, age,
disability, sex, marital status,
familial status, religion, or genetic
information. Persons with disabili-


ties who require assistance or
alternative means for communica-
tion of program information
(Braille, large print, audiotape,
etc.), or who wish to file a com-
plaint, should contact: Sarasota
County ADA/ Civil Rights Coordi-
nator, 1660 Ringling Blvd., Sara-
sota, Florida 34236. Phone:
941-861-5000, TTY: 7-1-1 or 1-
800-955-8771. Email: adacoor-
dinator@scgov.net
Publish Date: May 16, 2014
227966 3039830


OurTown Page 6 C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Friday, May 16, 2014






The Sun /Friday, May 16, 2014 www.sunnewspapers.net


Report: 1-75 speeder




had 10 lbs. of pot


By ADAM KREGER
STAFF WRITER

A man driving through
Punta Gorda was arrest-
ed earlyWednesday after
authorities found about
10 pounds of marijuana
in his vehicle, according
to the Charlotte County
Sheriff's Office. And it
wasn't the cheap stuff.
Deputies
] stopped
SYoure
'9 Vazques
4 j Gonzalez,
36 of
i Miami,
around
GONZALEZ 11:30 a.m.
for weaving
in and out of traffic and
speeding on Interstate 75
near U.S. 17, the report
shows. The driver, who
was alone, told authori-
ties he was heading to a
friend's house in Tampa,
and allowed them to
search his Chevrolet
Suburban.
A K-9 alerted deputies to
the presence of drugs, the
report shows, so deputies
looked inside the SUMV They
found a large duffel bag
containing 19 one-gallon
plastic bags full of mari-
juana. The weed weighed
almost 10 pounds.
"It was really good
quality, probably worth
about $3,000 a pound,"
said Sgt. Rick Goff,
who oversees the Street
Crimes Unit. "It was
double-bagged and
everything."


PHOTO PROVIDED BY
CHARLOTTE COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE


Deputies arrested Youre Gonzalez, 38, of Miami, early
Wednesday on 1-75 northbound near U.S. 17 in Punta Gorda. He
was allegedly speeding and had about 10 pounds of marijuana
in his vehicle.


Gonzalez, who had
been talking with dep-
uties shortly after the
stop, said "I don't speak
English," when he was
asked whom the bag
belonged to, the report
shows. He was arrested.
Though Gonzalez may
have had a destination of
Tampa, Goff said, 1-75 is a
popular place to find peo-
ple delivering from Miami
to further destinations.
"People (delivering
drugs) are constantly
coming and going from
Miami," he said. "Miami-
to-Texas is a common
route."
Goff said the CCSO


will investigate the case
further to try to nab more
criminals linked to this
marijuana.
Gonzalez is facing
charges of possession of
marijuana with intent to
distribute and possession
of drug paraphernalia.
He was issued traffic
warnings for following
too close and speeding
(he was allegedly going
79 mph). Gonzalez was
released Thursday on
$7,500 bond from the
Charlotte County Jail. His
booking sheet did not list
a phone number.

Email: akreger@sun-herald.com


Report: Md. man charged


in local real-estate scam


ACROSS
1 Sounding stuffy
6 Certain wedding
official
11 Fallon's first big
TV gig
14 Cue for a
singer
15 Cuts gradually
16 Ballet pivot
17 Female friend of
Thoreau
20 Hyphen cousin
21 Loom product
22 Worn away
25 Good for gold,
perhaps
26 Some Snugli
carriers
30 Available for an
added cost
33 One with a large
following
34 Omelet option
35 Llama look-alike
40 Plant seen in
Yukon forests
43 Jerusalem-born
novelist
44 Nevertheless
45 Mine product
46 Toothbrush
material
48 With diffidence
49 35 Across
habitat
53 Common
whodunit crime
55 Managed
58 1.5 liters
63 Address of the
Giants' ballpark
66 KLM
announcement
67 Social
refinement
68 Official
examination


69 Metaphor for
hope
70 Perfects
71 Provoke,
perhaps

DOWN
1 River of interest
to Livingstone
2 Shortly, in verse
3 Wall support
4 Diva's delivery
5 Accounting stats
6 Spinning stat
7 High bond rating
8 See 9 Down
9 With 8 Down,
football
coaching great
10 Spot of land
11 Common film
credit
12 Still snoozing


Lookfora third


crossword in

Ithe Sun Classified:

I section.
.. .. .. .. .


C OurTown Page 7


MIDMONTH by S.N.
Edited by Stanley Newman
www.stanxwords.com


13 Turn loose
18 "That's it!"
19 Frequent bird
watcher
23 Word before
sports or spirit
24 Bloomberg,
since 1/1/14
26 Glittery mineral
27 Sistine Chapel
depiction
28 Part of MSG
29 Oral lament
31 Possible way off
a 10 Down
32 Nothing but
34 Less than lucid
36 Upmarket
37 From here
38 Small
compartment
39 Flamboyant
41 Get dressed in


42 Strong wishes
47 Oater stock
character
48 Be short with
49 Megalomaniac's
motivation
50 Best Song Oscar
film for '96
51 Send on
52 Online ID
54 Meditation
sounds
56 Oral lament
57 Prefix for space
59 Mortar,
essentially
60 Zilch
61 Beverly Hills Cop
weapons
62 Matching sock
64 First-rate
65 "May I help
you?"


Answer to previous puzzle
CBY TOPS BEGUN
REAB 'HOH OMANI
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ASS NOI RESSN
ENTRUCUNLENT
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RATOSDEN HAZY
5/16/14


A Maryland man is
facing several charges in
connection with running
a Florida real-estate
scam that has affected
some Charlotte County
residents, according to
the Florida Department
of Law Enforcement.
Mark Alan Ledbetter,
39, of Severn, Md.,
allegedly established a
Florida corporation -
referred to as Florida
Tarpon last year.
The name was meant
to mimic that of the
Delaware corporation
Delaware Tarpon, which
is a large-scale buyer
of distressed properties
in Florida. Authorities
say Ledbetter used the
phony Florida Tarpon as
a mask from March
to October 2013 -to
deceive potential buyers
into thinking he had the
power to sell Delaware
Tarpon properties.
According to the
FDLE's report, Ledbetter
defrauded three couples
looking to buy lots in
Tern Bay Golf & Country
Club in Punta Gorda.
One of those couples
was allegedly scammed
into paying $12,000 for
what ended up to be a
fake title transfer from
the suspect in April 2013.
As the result of similar
fraudulent deals with
Ledbetter, there was a
handful of other victims
in Charlotte, Lee, St.
Lucie, Hillsborough,
Pinellas, Putnam, Duval
and Broward counties,
authorities said.
Ledbetter advertised
real Delaware Tarpon
properties on eBay, and
received more than
$50,000 in payments and
much more in agree-
ments, the report shows.
Delaware Tarpon
became aware of what
was happening and
sought an injunction. The
FDLE investigated.
Ledbetter was arrested


I POLICE BEAT
The information for Police Beat is gathered from police, sheriff's office, Florida High way
Patrol, jail and fire records. Not every arrest leads to a conviction and guilt or innocence is
determined by the court system.


April 23 in Maryland.
He was extradited
Wednesday to Charlotte
County, where he will be
prosecuted on 13 counts
each of uttering a false
or forged instrument
and communications
fraud, and one count of
scheming to defraud.
He was being held
Thursday in the county
jail Thursday on $230,000
bond.

CCSO number
possibly spoofed
Somebody may be
spoofing the Charlotte
County Sheriff's Office
phone number.
A resident recently
informed the CCSO a
call had been received
from a number listed
as 941-639-2101 -the
administrative number
for the Sheriff's Office.
The person who called
from that number left a
message for the resident,
telling the person to call
back a different number
(with a different area
code).
The 639 number is
the CCSO's actual main
number, but if someone
calls from it, the caller
ID should show up as
private, unknown or
unavailable.
Authorities aren't sure
what the alleged spoofer
may be trying to do, but
they'd like to warn resi-
dents about the possible
scam.

The Charlotte County Sheriff's
Office reported the following
arrests:
Shamar Dameon Blair, 17,23000
block of Nugent Ave., Port Charlotte.
Charges: three counts of burglary, and
one count each of petty theft, grand
theft, armed robbery, credit card
fraud, tampering with evidence and


organizing theft. Bond: none.
Katie Rose Byrne, 25, 20300 block
of Calder Ave., Port Charlotte. Charge:
failure to appear. Bond: $24,000.
Lisa Monique Corbo, 52,1300
block of Guild St., Port Charlotte.
Charge violation of probation (original
charge: DUI). Bond: none.
*Wendy Marie Grundvig, 38,18300
block of Quadrille Ave., Port Charlotte.
Charge: violation of probation
(original charge: DUI second
offense). Bond: none.
Brian Ross Orme, 40, 400 block
of San Marie Drive, Punta Gorda.
Charges: possession of less than 20
grams of marijuana, possession of
drug paraphernalia and failure to
appear on a felony. Bond: none.
Thea Michelle Psathas, 39,
22100 block of Hernando Ave., Port
Charlotte. Charges: possession of
a controlled substance without a
prescription, possession of drug
paraphernalia and possession of a
weapon, firearm or ammunition by a
felon. Bond: $100,000.
Javon Richardson, 22, 20400
block of Andover Ave., Port Charlotte.
Charge: aggravated battery on a
pregnant victim. Bond: $15,000.
Fred Lee Sheetz, 59,14500
block of Cannel Lane, Port Charlotte.
Charges: two off-bond forfeitures
from previous charges. Bond: none.
Lance Allen Thomas, 56, 21500
block of Olean Blvd., Port Charlotte.
Charges: two off-bond forfeitures
from previous charges. Bond: none.
James Edward Thurston, 37,
22100 block of Hernando Ave., Port
Charlotte. Charges: possession of
a controlled substance without a
prescription, possession of drug
paraphernalia and possession of a
weapon, firearm or ammunition by a
felon. Bond: $21,000.
Steven Michael Vest, 61,3100
block of Circleville St., North Port.
Charge: out-of-county warrant. Bond:
$1,191.

The Punta Gorda Police
Department reported the
following arrest:
Angelina Tina Corsi, 38,21500
block of Gibralter Drive, Port Charlotte.
Charge: petty theft. Bond: none.
Compiled by Adam Kreger


Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis


ACROSS
1 Trick or treat, e.g.
5 Center of
authority
9 One on the lam,
perhaps
13 DH, usually
14 Novelist Jaffe
15 Mixed bag
16 Be a part of
treaty
negotiations?
19 "Silver Lining"
album maker
20 Tulsa sch.
21 Satisfied sound
23 Bay State cape
24 Unexpected
political
upheaval?
29 Trick or treat, e.g.
31 Irish
32 It helps smooth
things out
33 Palm Pre
predecessor
34 Like "la" in Fr.
35 Smelting waste
36 "White Fang," for
example?
40 Words after give
or take
43 Nice setting
44 Touch
48 Humorous
50 Item tied with a
decorative knot
51 Shore thing
52 One that keeps
bumping into
senators?
55 Reunion, par
example
56 Midnight
indicator, maybe
57 W, for one
58 Champagne
toast?
60 Endless spiel?
65 Yu the Great's
dynasty
66 "No problem"
67 Coach K's team
68 Bibliog. term
69 Trick
70 1974 CIA spoof

DOWN
1 Drifter
2 First lady after
Lou


By Jack Mclnturff
3 Attendants
4 One putting a
tyre into a boot
5 Sellout sign,
briefly
6 It's quite a
stretch
7 Pantry raider
8 Lake near the
Kirkwood
Mountain
Resort
9 They're often
blocked
10 She, in Lisbon
11 Sitcom family
name
12 Thick soups
17 Some Windows
systems
18 Sea eagles
22 Indicator of
possession in
the bathroom
25 Failed '80s
gridiron org.
26 Indicator of
possession
27 Janitor's tool
28 Like much
spam
30 Calming words
37 Agreeing words


5/16/14
Thursday's Puzzle Solved
CALMS GOAL UNIT
ALLAH OKI EPETA
S LAKE TONE PLOT
CoMEBACKTIR I L
ATA OSHISHTICK
S PE AK E ASE R A
WAFT YE-TIBAT
EMALL DIOIGENLTE
BN AI YE S
TIT I EITII
STN A -AL I AIM


ER K NE LRVA
FACIEN GKO


(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
38 First name in 47
country 491
39 It may be left in a
copier: Abbr. 53
40 Mr. Clean rival 54
41 Concerned 591
question about a I
sick friend 61 _
42 Most gross 621
45 Developed
46 Word from a 631
grumpy gambler 641


5/16/14
Sprouts incisors
Home to Sean
O'Casey
One full of hot air
Clairvoyance
s more than a
bystander
_ Dolorosa
French
quencher
Pack animal
Deli choice


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


s Crosswor


I


The Sun/Friday, May 16,2014


www.sunnewspapers.net






Our Town Page 8 C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Friday, May 16, 2014


VIEWPOINT


Derek Dunn-Rankin Chairman
David Dunn-Rankin Publisher
Chris Porter Executive Editor


Brian Gleason Editorial page editor
Stephen Baumann Editorial writer


Email letters to letters@sun-herald.com


I OUR VIEW

Big league

baseball bears

big benefits
OUR POSITION: Spring train-
ing paying dividends for Charlotte
County.
he Tampa Bay Rays have
struggled out of the gate in
the Major League Baseball
regular season, but an econom-
ic impact study of their spring
training camp in Port Charlotte
showed they were big winners
for Charlotte County. The study
estimated the team's Grapefruit
League season had a $21 million
economic impact on the county,
based on the direct and indi-
rect spending of out-of-county
visitors.
The team and its opponents
- drew more than 47,000 visitors
from out of the county, account-
ing for 60 percent of the 78,624
who attended games. The visitors
spread the wealth, too, staying
in the county for an average
of five nights and patronizing
restaurants, stores and watering
holes, according to the study
from Research Data Services, Inc.
That latter figure is surprising
and encouraging. We would have
thought the alternating home and
away makeup of the schedule
would discourage overnight
stays, but instead fans seem to be
staying awhile and taking advan-
tage of away game dates to hit the
beaches or the links.
The encouraging economic
data comes on the heels of
national publicity the county re-
ceived when community boosters
used a social media campaign to
get locals to vote Charlotte Sports
Park the best spring training
facility in the country in a USA
Today 10Best contest. That should
pay dividends next spring as the
word spreads about the park's
amenities and popularity.
Economic impact figures can
be more art than science, but the
fact is the estimate doesn't even
include spending by the Rays
themselves, visiting teams or local
and seasonal residents. The team,
its players, friends and family
spend untold dollars outside the
ballpark on food, golf, fishing,
rentals and homes. For example,
Rays All-Star Evan Longoria,
who has a long-term contract
but used to rent homes during
spring training, bought a home in
Charlotte Harbor before training
camp began.
There were some interesting
statistical details in the study,
especially when compared with
a 2009 Florida Sports Foundation
study. That survey showed
48 percent of fans came from out
of state, while the RDS survey put
that figure at 22.7 percent, with
68 percent coming from other
counties. The discrepancy may
involve out-of-county visitors
self-identifying as Floridians,
without noting they are seasonal
residents from other states. It's
safe to say a goodly number of the
21,000 Charlotte County residents
who attended games are now back
at their northern homes for the
summer. That's almost certainly
true of our Canadian neighbors
who accounted for the bulk of the
9.3 percent of Rays spring training
spectators from foreign countries.
The Grapefruit League schedule
the Rays play, with multiple home
games against a small group
of geographically close oppo-
nents Fort Myers, Bradenton,
Sarasota, Tampa, Clearwater,
Dunedin is a perfect match for
the demographics of Charlotte
County. Sellouts when the Rays
faced the New York Yankees,
Boston Red Sox and Toronto Blue
Jays attest to the drawing power
of the team's visitors. We doubt
contests against teams with a
scant fan footprint locally-- such
as fellow Grapefruit League
teams the Washington Nationals,
St. Louis Cardinals, Atlanta Braves
and Florida Marlins would
have the same impact.
The numbers bear out the
bold decision county commis-
sioners made in 2008 to renovate


Charlotte Sports Parks and keep
the county in the big leagues at
least for the spring.


LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR

Some reasons
for confusion

Editor:
I am thoroughly confused.
Back in 2012, Hillary
Clinton had a fall which led
to a concussion, which led to
the discovery of a blood clot.
Republicans claimed that she
was faking the whole thing
to get out of the ridiculous
Benghazi hearings.
Fast forward two years, now
the same people claim that
she may have suffered brain
damage from the fall. Which
is it? Pick one.
This reminds me of when
President Obama was be-
ing called a Muslim, then
six months later he was called
out for being mentored for
20 years by the Rev. Jeremiah
Wright, who is the pastor of a
Christian church.
Anyone else confused
like me?
John Davidson
Placida

Crist couldn't win
as a Republican

Editor:
It didn't take Charlie Crist
long to learn the Democrats'
talking points. Of course, it's
not complicated, Just call
everyone a racist. He didn't
leave the Republican Party
because of racism. He left
because he couldn't win.
Ray Simmons
Punta Gorda

These Marines
deserve the truth

Editor:
In the Wednesday paper,
I read the story about
Operation Allen Brook, Go
Noi Island, in Vietnam in
May 1968.
Does anyone check out the
facts first?
The article states that
700 green, untrained, un-
skilled Marines were sent in
from Hawaii. The truth is that
Operation Allen Brook lasted
3 1/2 months and resulted
in 917 enemy killed. The
Marines lost 170 and two sail-
ors killed in action and 1,124
wounded. Even more fell to
heat, disease, snake bites,
accidents and a lot of other
hazards.
Your story also stated that
after the Marines left, B52s


dropped napalm on the
island. Ask any pilot, napalm
was never dropped from
aB52.
The story reads like
a Hollywood show. The
Marines who fought in
Operation Allen Brook
deserve better. They deserve
the truth.
Dick DelRossi
North Port

More arts education
dumbss down'America

Editor:
I read with great interest
that Sen. Nancy Detert and
Rep. Charles McBurney got
their bill passed making sure
that students have access to
such classes in the visual arts,
music, dance and theater.
The article goes on to say
that she wanted to make sure
that the fine arts don't get
left out in anybody's quest to
teach nothing but science,
technology, engineering and
mathematics. In the same
paper its goes on to say that
the 12th graders show no
signs of growth in areas of
reading or math.
Let's forget about
teaching more courses in
mathematics, sciences and
technology. Lets teach more
basket-weaving courses. The
dumbing down of America.
Don't believe me? When
was the last time you pur-
chased something at a store
and had someone count
out your change for you?
America, you have been
warned.
Scott Sorenson
North Port

Make kids work
for the butter

Editor:
We are robbing our children
and their children, of money
with the huge national
debt, but also of something
much more valuable. We are
stealing their independence,
creativity, self-worth. We
are allowing them (in many
cases) to be dependents of
the state with no ambition, no
ability to deal with adversity,
no belief in themselves as the
captains of their own ship.
The thing that made this
country great was our rugged
individuality, our ability
to invent and develop and
imagine, our strength to
overcome long odds, and
our vision. The grandparents
of today lived very different
lives than those of a short


40 years younger. We grew
much of our food and ate it
together at the family table.
We all had responsibilities,
from the youngest to the old-
est. We repaired things rather
than replacing them. We read
books, wrote letters, listened
to baseball on the radio and
helped our neighbors.
Time marches on, we read
Kindles, send emails, watch
every possible event on TV
and often don't even know
our neighbors. We think a
certain level of living is a
right. We have no problem
being cared for cradle to
grave. We think every kid de-
serves a trophy. We deny the
differences in our cultures.
We don't want to see our kids
hurt or lonely or struggling.
Maybe they don't need
to churn their own butter
but they do need to earn it,
Our desire to make our kids'
lives better than our own is
robbing them of all the good
stuff.


Tastelesss


Dick Doonan
Rotonda West

salt,


rotten yeast

Editor:
"There is nothing new
under the sun."Man is the
same today, yesterday and,
regrettably, tomorrow.
The life cycle of democracy
is supposed to be 200 years.
Long enough for people to
realize they can vote or legis-
late themselves what they do
not earn. Long enough for
the government to become
as corrupt as Cuba in the
1950s when it was controlled
by the mob and a military
dictator, a form of fascism,
while the mass of people
starved.
The U.S. is bankrupt. The
dollar, the prolific money
tree controlled by the Federal
Reserve, is set for a precipi-
tous fall. It will be discovered
to be worthless.
What occurs today is not
an anomaly. It has occurred
always. Only 15 percent were
starving, without clothing
and armaments during the
eight grueling years of the
Revolution and only the
few salts of the earth, the
yeast of goodness pushed
through the Constitution
that allowed the majority
to prosper. The British had
more American militia
because they paid more. The
individual American colonies
did not pay at all and wanted
to renege on the promise of
payment. That it all came
to fruition is a miracle of a


"Few Good Men." A miracle
of their common sense,
purpose and duty, the out-
come of a morality founded
on faith in "Providence."
Washington's inaugural
address is filled with the
source of his indispensable
character.
The United States is a
godless nation; the salt has
lost its flavor and the yeast is
rotted on the vine.
Xavier Narutowicz
Punta Gorda

Mother's kudos
to The Academy

Editor:
My son never did well
in school, socially or aca-
demically. Every day was a
struggle.
Two years ago, his coun-
selor at Port Charlotte High
recognized that my son had
untapped potential and
suggested he move to The
Academy, an offshoot of the
public school system that is
geared toward helping those
who need a unique learning
environment.
I wish to thank the faculty
and staff at The Academy for
teaching my son to succeed.
His teachers encouraged
him to explore his thoughts,
to take interest in current
events and to express his
ideas. Last night, he received
his first-ever academic
award, and he will graduate
next week ahead of schedule.
The Academy brought him
from a boy simply getting
through each day to a young
man with plans to enter a
career in the fire service and
dreams of pursuing a degree
in psychology.
Kudos to The Academy!
Pamela Staricha
Port Charlotte

More money won't
buy better outcomes

Editor:
"Officials: Budget surplus
should go to schools," (Sun,
May 6) quotes our local
school officials Vincent, Swift
Sand Whittaker.
More money does not buy
a better education. If that
were true the United States


would be ranked number
one in the world. The United
Nation's Education Index
ranks the United States 21st
out of 180 countries in the
world. The United States
ranking of 21st is lower than
Cuba and the Barbados plus
18 other nations.
Second: The Charlotte
School Board receives
32 percent more property
tax income than does the
county ($100 million versus
$75 million) and they still do
not do produce acceptable
score results. More money?
They must to be kidding!
More money for what? For
lower test scores?
The quest by the school
"leaders" pinpoints the root
cause of the poor results of
our education system. Their
efforts should be directed
to accepting our education
scores as a challenge and put
all their effort into improv-
ing the education program
and not on diverting more
money into the School Board
coffers. Charlotte County
needs a school board that
sends our children into
the world with confidence
and with the promise of a
rewarding future. It is time
for a change in our school
system starting from the
top and working down.
Pass the student not the
plate.
Douglas M. Young
Punta Gorda


I LETTER SUBMISSION POLICY
Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have some rules. Please keep them to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community discourse, and the opinions
to less than 250 words. Letters will be edited to length as well as for grammar and spelling. All and statements made in letters are solely those of the individual writers. The newspaper takes
letters must be signed with full name not initials. An address and telephone number must be no responsibility for the content of these letters. Please send or bring correspondence to the Sun,
included. The phone number and address are not for publication, but must be provided. Due to the Letters to the Editor, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980, or fax to 941-629-2085.
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;w


OurTown Page 8 C www.sunnewspapers.net


IVK


The Sun /Friday, May 16, 2014





The Sun/Friday, May 16,2014


VIEWPOINT


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 9


Tax base cannot pay for growth


I am responding to
recent guest col-
umns of two envi-
ronmentalists and an
ex-county commis-
sioner, who collectively
agree Charlotte County's
planning document,
Smart Charlotte 2050
(SM2050) must not be
changed. Another en-
vironmentalist recently
stated publicly that eco-
nomic growth is bad for
Charlotte residents.
Their evaluation
ignores economic
reality existing in
Charlotte. Major fi-
nancial challenges are
looming because our
long dormant tax base
will not be capable of
funding future greatly
expanding financial
demands. Unless our
stagnant local economy
expands and generates
many new residential/
business taxpayers, our
taxpayers will ultimately
experience substantial
tax increases.
Florida TaxWatch
places Charlotte in
the 10 highest taxed
counties per capital of
Florida's 67 counties,
but we rank only 29th in
population. Via unprec-
edented use of MSBU
and MSBT infrastructure
project funding, our
taxpayers experience by
far the highest special
assessment taxation in
Florida. An overtaxed
taxpayer base and aver-
age per capital income


Bill Bigelow
Guest Columnist


levels coupled with
current water rates,
which are among the
highest in Florida with
significant water rate
increases being project-
ed clearly shows the
expected jump in future
funding needs cannot be
met by current taxpay-
ers. Go to pgteaparty.org
and read "Open Letter
to Charlotte County
Taxpayers," which
expands discussion of
this problem.
Why must future
county revenue intake
significantly increase
via expansion of tax/
utility rate payer bases?
Answer: To maintain our
excellent living stan-
dards. Charlotte's old,
deteriorating infrastruc-
ture and our potable
water resources must
both be expanded/mod-
ernized. Additionally,
future renovation of
deteriorating neigh-
borhoods is now on the
commission's agenda
and keeping our exten-
sive waterways free of
pollution is critical. All
will cost big money.
Such project funding
will be well beyond the
aggregate generating
capacity of: (1) existing
tax/water utility rate
bases; (2) governmental


borrowing/grants; and
(3) county's free finan-
cial reserve position.
Since 1990, free reserves
have fallen dramatically
to a concerning level, as
governmental spending/
investing in unnecessary
and bad projects/law-
suit damage, payments/
water pollution control
costs constantly exceed
revenue intake. This
trend is projected to
continue. Debt exceeds
$300 million with at
least $100 million not
backed up with ap-
propriate asset value
coverage / dedicated
reserves.
Thirty-eight percent
of Charlotte acreage
is off the tax rolls.
Implementation of an
unchanged SM2050, will
increase this percentage
to over 50 percent.
Taxpayers must not
tolerate an increase
in an already lopsided
asset tax exempt
situation.
SM2050 and existing
codes/ordinances must
be changed appropri-
ately to address this
problem for as currently
structured both in com-
bination will make our
deteriorating economic/
financial situation
worse.
Although, Sarasota
County enjoys signifi-
cantly higher tax base/
financial strength than
Charlotte, Sarasota
is not satisfied with


mediocre economic
growth. Sarasota hired
Arthur Laffer, pres-
tigious free market
principled economist, to
provide ideas to jump-
start its economy with
emphasis on growth
in new residents/new
business re-locations/
well-paying jobs/
affordable housing.
Laffer immediately
identified Sarasota's
Smart Planning policies
as major reasons for
sub-standard growth.
With Laffer's assis-
tance, Sarasota just
announced 25 changes
to its Smart Plan and
stated more changes
will be forthcoming.
Sarasota clearly now
realizes a more balanced
approach to planning
and code/ordinance
policies is preferable to
the anti-growth ap-
proach the two counties
have been utilizing.
We have yet to follow
Sarasota's sage lead.
Our position for
growth is strongly
supported by Charlotte
County Family Services
Division and Student
Services of the Sarasota
County School District.
In a May 5, Sun article,
heads of both organi-
zations stated (and I
paraphrase): the only
way to truly combat
poverty is by creating
economic opportuni-
ties for families in our
regions and generating


economic development
creating jobs paying
better than those in our
regions' retail service
industry.
Charlotte commis-
sioners must follow
Sarasota's lead and re-
tain Laffer to: (1) refor-
mulate existing codes/
ordinances and recom-
mend SM2050 changes
to move Charlotte to the
necessary pro-business/
pro-private property
rights orientation
required to spur eco-
nomic growth; and (2)
establish sophisticated
analytical tools required
by governments to
properly, accurately and
quickly analyze whether
projects proposed will
have the long-term
net financial benefits
necessary to justify
permitting. We do not
have rapid turnaround
capability to perform
such critical analytical
tasks.
New ideas are critical
building blocks for
building/maintaining a
thriving community and
flow from the creative
thinking associated with
economic growth. They
represent the basis for
maintaining excellent
quality of life standards
in changing societies.
Economic stagnation
kills creative thinking
and ultimately destroys
communities.
SM2050/prohibitive
regulations subject


our citizens to envi-
ronmental dictates of
unelected bureaucrats
managing/interpreting
the "vision" with strong
private property rights
necessary for strong
economic performance,
being denigrated in the
process. A proper bal-
ance between economic
needs of a people and
environmental preserva-
tion concerns is manda-
tory. Charlotte citizens/
businesses primarily are
environmentally sensi-
tive for we know we are
blessed with a unique
landscape, which
generates tourist visits/
attractive revenues.
Protecting our local
environment is neces-
sary for preservation of
our excellent lifestyle
and for expansion
of most businesses.
However, this objective
must happen only
through individual
initiative. Charlotte
County sponsored
environmental educa-
tional information/pro-
grams for citizens and
businesses is the correct
method, not mandated
regulation, which stifles
all economic growth
critical for our future.
Bill Bigelow is on
the board of Tea Party
of Punta Gorda LLC
and chairman of the
Tea Party's seven-
person Agenda 21/
Environmental
Committee.


Wingers in British and American politics


I n recent times,
British and Amer-
ican politics have
often flowed in parallel
currents.
Margaret Thatcher's
election as prime minis-
ter in 1979 was followed
by Ronald Reagan's
election as president in
1980. As Charles Moore
notes in his biography
of Thatcher, the two
worked together, albeit
with some friction,
reversing the tide of
statism at home and
ending the Soviet
empire abroad.
They seemed to
establish British
Conservatives and
American Republicans
as their nation's natural
ruling parties.
In time, Democrats
and Labour responded.
Bill Clinton's "New
Democrat" politics pre-
vailed in 1992, and Tony
Blair's New Labourites,
adapting Clinton's
strategy, won the first
of three big national
landslides in 1997.
But after any party is
in power for an extend-
ed period, its wingers
start to get restive -
rightwing Republicans
and Conservatives,
leftwing Democrats and
Labourites.
They complain that
their leaders failed to
enact needed changes
and betrayed core
beliefs. They take their
party's past electoral
success for granted and
push for a return to
ideological purity.
An internal rebellion
in the Conservative par-
ty overthrew Thatcher
in December 1990, and
the hatreds it inspired
festered for years.
Thatcher's successor,
John Major, did win an-
other term in May 1992.
But he was hectored by
Thatcherite true believ-
ers more obdurate than
Thatcher had been in
office. This intraparty
civil war raged through
three electoral defeats
and only subsided
after David Cameron
was elected party


leader in 2005.
In America, anti-tax
conservatives rebelled
at George H.W Bush's
acceptance of tax
increases in 1990, and
Reagan speechwriter
Pat Buchanan launched
a quixotic challenge
of Bush in the 1992
primaries.
That, plus Ross Perot's
independent candidacy,
led to Bush's loss to
Clinton that November.
Rightwing frustration
promptly found tar-
gets in the Clinton
tax increases and
Hillary Clinton's health
care plan, and Newt
Gingrich's Republicans
captured the House in
1994.
Then Bill Clinton's
successful negotia-
tions with Gingrich
caused discontent on
the Democratic left.
It supported Clinton
on impeachment but
gave 2.9 million votes
to Ralph Nader in 2000,
which helped defeat
Al Gore.
George W Bush's
bipartisan achievements
on education and
Medicare and continued


spending increases
caused distress on the
Republican right. It
found a voice after he
left office in the Tea
Party movement, whose
anger was directed
at "establishment"
Republicans as well as at
President Obama.
Republican primary
voters chose provocative
candidates, some of
whom lost winnable
seats. Only now do
primary voters seem to
be simmering down and
trying to pick general
election winners.
Blair's victories
came with
diminishing percentages
and turnout. On the left,
there was increasing
rage at Blair's support of
the Iraq war, and today
Blair is virtually a non-
person, unmentioned if
not reviled, in the party
he led. No one follows
his example.
After Labour's defeat
in 2010, the party
rejected as leader the
Blairite David Milliband
in favor of his brother
Ed Milliband, who more
faithfully represented
the views of their
Marxist intellectual
father.
Milliband "Red
Ed" to the Conservative
press has led his
party sharply to the
left, backing higher
taxes on high earners,
a mansion tax on big
properties and a freeze
on energy prices. He's


even considering rena-
tionalizing the railroads
though privatization has
been widely accepted.
At the behest of the
teacher unions, Labour
opposes Education
Minister Michael Gove's
"free schools" (similar
to American charter
schools), despite their
success with disadvan-
taged students. The lat-
est Labour TV ad depicts
Conservatives as snob-
bish "toffs" old-fash-
ioned class warfare.
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Milliband's critics say
his strategy is to nail
down 35 percent of the
vote quite possibly
enough to win in a
nation with competi-
tive minor parties and
parliamentary district
boundaries that heavily
handicap Conservatives.
An obvious question:
Why is Milliband's


Labour party abandon-
ing a governing strategy
so successful under Tony
Blair? Another question:
Why would American
Democrats such as New
York Mayor Bill de Blasio
and Sen. Elizabeth
Warren abandon a
strategy so successful

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The prevalence on college campuses


I recently wrote
about the
connection between
college social life
and socioeconomic
stratification, and the
way the party scene
at many universities,
oriented toward heavy
drinking and hooking
up, creates distinctive
challenges for working-
class students, whether
they're attracted to its
thrills or alienated by its
excesses.
What I didn't discuss
was the ongoing ideo-
logical war over a more
specific and toxic issue
in college social life: the
prevalence on campuses,
often in alcohol-infused
situations, of rape and
sexual assault, and the
question of what college
administrations should
be obliged to do about it.
The conflict pits an
array of campus activists
- students who have
been raped or assaulted,
supported by left-wing
and feminist groups -
against their own deans
and administrators and
disciplinary committees.
The activists, lately
with the support of the
Obama White House,
have leveraged Title IX's


rules against sex dis-
crimination to pressure
colleges to expand
counseling for victims,
to cooperate more fully
with police departments
and most important
- to take a much harder
disciplinary line against
sexual misconduct.
The colleges, for
various reasons, are
disinclined to push
back too hard publicly
against their critics.
So conservative and
libertarian observers a
mostly female group, it
should be said, including
Reason's Cathy Young,
Bloomberg View's Megan
McArdle, the American
Enterprise Institute's
Caroline Kitchens and
others have stepped
into the breach.
These writers have
cast doubt on some of
the statistics invoked
by campus activists


(particularly the White
House's claim that 1 in
5 collegiate women will
be sexually assaulted),
questioned whether
college disciplinary
committees are really
equipped to adjudicate
guilt and innocence in
such cases ("if a college
wouldn't conduct a mur-
der trial, it shouldn't be
conducting rape trials,"
writes McArdle) and
cited instances which
might be multiplied if
the activists had their
way in which accused
male rapists were denied
a fair hearing and
railroaded instead.
Such arguments add
up to a plausible case
against some of the
activists' prescriptions.
But they don't inspire
much sympathy for the
colleges' position in this
controversy. The pro-
testing students may be
overzealous and unduly
ideological, but when
you're running an essen-
tially corrupt institution,
sometimes that's the
kind of opposition you
deserve.
Corruption is a strong
word, but not, I think,
unmerited. Over the
last few generations,


America's most promi-
nent universities both
public and private -
have pursued a strategy
of corporate expansion,
furious status compe-
tition, and moral and
pedagogical retreat. But
the moral retreat has
in certain ways been
disguised: Elite schools
have abandoned any
explicit role in policing
the choices and shaping
the character of their
students, but they have
masked that abdication
in the nostrums of con-
temporary PC piety -
promising diversity, tol-
erance, safe spaces, etc.,
with what can feel like a
preacher's sincerity and
self-righteousness.
This has allowed
them, notionally, to be
many things to many
people: Students are
promised adult liberty
and a community that
will protect them if
anything goes wrong;
parents get a fuzzy rather
than a corporate vibe
from deans, RAs and
other authority figures;
admissions departments
get to pitch a fun, even
bacchanalian lifestyle
while faculty-lounge
liberals get to feel as if


DR 529
AMENDED R1209
Rule 12D 16.002
NNOTICE Florida Administrative Code

TAX IMPACT OF VALUE
DEPARTMENT
OF REVENUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD
Charlotte County TaxYear

Members of the Board
Honorable Ken Doherty Board of County Commissioners, District No. 1
Honorable Bill Truex Board of County Commissioners, District No. 3
Honorable lan Vincent School Board, District No. 4
Citizen Member Rodney Taylor Business owner within the school district
Citizen Member Eric C. Loche Homestead property owner

The Value Adjustment Board (VAB) meets each year to hear petitions and make


decisions relating


to property tax assessments, exemptions, classifications, and


tax deferrals.

~______ Summary of Year's Actions ___
Number of Parcels Reduction Shift in
Type of in County Taxes
Property Exemptions Assessments* Both Taxable Value Due to
Withdrawn Due to Board Board
Granted Requestec Reduced Requested or Settled Actions Actions

Residential 0 2 3 84 62 $ 92,304$ 1,911.00

Commercial 0 0 22 147 85 $ 8,486,846 $ 179,947.00

Industrial and 2
miscellaneous 0 0 3 25 18 $ 312,707 $ 5,469.00
Agricultural or 0 0 0 3 1 $ 0 $ 0.00
classified use
High-water recharge $ $

Historic commercial or
nonprofit $ $
Business machinery and
equipment 0 0 0 111 99 $ 0$ 0.00
Vacant lots and
aceagnt 0 0 3 68 51 $ 983,069 $ 17,033.00
acreage

TOTALS 0 2 31 438 316 $ 9,874,9261$ 204,360.00

All values should be county taxable values. School and other taxing authority values
may differ.
*Include transfer of assessment difference (portability) requests.

If you have a question about these actions, contact the
Chair or the Clerk of the Value Adjustment Board.
Chair's name Ken Doherty Phone: 941-743-1300 ext.

Clerk's name BarbaraT. Scott Phone: 941-743-1403 ext.
470;21


they're part of a worthy
ideological project.
But the modern uni-
versity's primary loyalty
is not really to liberalism
or political correctness
or any kind of ideological
design: It's to the school's
brand, status and bottom
line. And when some-
thing goes badly wrong,
or predators run loose
- as tends to happen
in a world where teens
and early-20-somethings
are barely supervised
and held to no standard
higher than consent -
the mask of kindness and
community slips, and
the face revealed be-
neath is often bloodless,
corporate and intent on
self-protection.
I glimpsed this face,
and saw it reflected
in my friends' eyes, at
various moments of
crisis during my own
four years in higher edu-
cation; I doubt that any-
thing has changed for
the better in the 12 years
since. This seems to
be what the anti-rape
activists victims,
friends, sympathizers-
are reacting against so
strongly: the realization
that an institution that
seemed to make one set


BARONE
FROM PAGE 9

under Bill Clinton?
One answer is that
they're acting out of gen-
uine conviction. Another
is that circumstances
have changed.
Blair and Clinton
adapted after their party
suffered multiple serious
defeats. Today's Labour
and Democratic leftists
act out of frustration with


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of promises had other
priorities all along.
That the activists'
moral outrage is justified
does not mean, again,
that their prescriptions
are correct. Their fatal
conceit in many cases is
the idea that by sweep-
ing away misogyny they
can resolve the internal
contradictions of social
liberalism, and usher in
a world where everyone
can be libertines togeth-
er, and a hard-drinking,
sexually permissive cul-
ture can be experienced
identically by male and
female, rich and middle
class and poor.
This is a utopian,
ahistorical vision, and
its pursuit is fraught
with peril: Like many
revolutionaries, today's
campus activists might
well end up toppling a
corrupt order only to
install a kind of police
state in its stead.
But the regime they're
rebelling against still
deserves richly
- to eventually be
overthrown.
Ross Douthat is a New
York Times columnist.
Readers may reach him
via www.newyorktimes.
com.

how their parties have
governed.
Party politics tends to
attract people of strong
beliefs, left and right.
Until they get whacked
repeatedly by defeat,
they'll try to advance
them as far as they think
they can.
Michael Barone is a
senior political analyst
for The Washington
Examiner. Readers can
reach him via www.
wash ingtonexam iner
com.


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Our Town Page 10 C


www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Friday, May 16,2014


VIEWPOINT





:The Sun/Friday, May 16,2014


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 11


Port Charlotte man charged with sexual battery


By DREW WINCHESTER
STAFF WRITER

NORTH PORT-
Authorities arrested a
Port Charlotte man on
Wednesday for allegedly
raping and beating a
woman on Feb. 2 in
a remote area near
Interstate 75, according
to the North Port Police
Department.
William D. Parson,
30, of the 400 block
of Waterside St., was
charged with sexual
battery and aggravated
battery in connection
with the incident, after
allegedly picking the


S- female
victim up at
the Paddy
Wagon
bar in Port
Charlotte.
According
to the
PARSON report, the
victim,
whose age was redacted
from the report and was
not supplied by NPPD
Assistant Police Chief
Tony Sirianni, got into a
fight with her boyfriend
at the Paddy Wagon and
he left her at the bar.
It's unclear if Parson
knew the victim, but he
offered her a ride, which


she accepted because
she thought Parson
and her boyfriend were
friends, the report states.
Parson told the victim
he was going to drive her
to her boyfriend, who
was parked farther away
in the parking lot. But,
instead of taking her to
her boyfriend, Parson
allegedly drove her to a
secluded area near Brice
Boulevard and Vailview
Court in eastern North
Port, where he then
attacked her.
The report states that
the victim tried to flee
once Parson stopped
his vehicle, but Parson


punched her in the
face and she fell to the
ground. Parson then beat
her head into the ground
several times, then
sexually assaulted her.
Parson then left the
scene, but the victim
stayed on the ground,
curled up in a ball, for an
unknown length of time,
the report states.
She then wandered in
an unknown direction
until she saw the lights
of a home in the 1800
block of N. Orlando
Blvd., where she asked
for help. She arrived at
the home with injuries
to her head and missing


her underwear, shoes
and her purse, the report
states.
Police searched the
alleged crime scene,
which was roughly half
a mile from the home
on North Orlando
Boulevard, where they
found items including
a pair of underwear, a
condom wrapper and a
$5 bill with blood on it,
the report states.
Police also found a
used condom near the
crime scene, which
they used to establish
a DNA profile that
matched Parson's. He
was placed under arrest


Wednesday at the NPPD
station and transferred
to the Sarasota County
Jail, where he remains
without bond.
According to court
records, Parson has no
previous arrest history
in Sarasota County.
But, according to the
Florida Department
of Corrections, Parson
served time in prison for
possession of cocaine and
burglary charges in 2004,
and has drug, theft and
burglary charges dating
back to 2003 in Charlotte
County, according to the
Sheriff's Office.
Email: dwinchester@sun-heraldx.com


Officer resign


amid criminal investigation


By DREW WINCHESTER
STAFF WRITER

NORTH PORT- Police
Chief Kevin Vespia
confirmed Thursday that
Officer Melanie Turner
resigned from the North
Port Police Department,
but would not comment
on the cir-
Lcumstances
due to open
S internal
affairs and
criminal in-
I vestigations
S involving
TURNER Turner.
Turner's
St. Petersburg-based


attorney Diane Bailey
Morton could not be
reached for comment,
but Vespia added that he
expected the department's
internal investigation of
Turner, and now-deceased
Officer Ricky Urbina, to
be completed by late next
week.
Turner had been on un-
paid administrative leave
since her March 21 arrest,
when she was charged
with sexual battery and
false imprisonment by the
Sarasota County Sheriff's
Office.
Vespia said he cannot
stop an officer from
resigning, but the


investigation rolls on.
Former NPPD Sgt. Patrick
Sachkar, son of North
Port Sun publisher Steve
Sachkar, resigned amid his
own internal affairs inves-
tigation last month in
which he was ultimately
cleared of sexual harass-
ment allegations.
Turner and Urbina
came into the spotlight
following a March 2
party at the 38-year-old
victim's North Port home
in which it's alleged they
handcuffed and sexually
assaulted her.
Urbina, 44, who was on
duty and in uniform at the
time of the alleged assault,


was called over to the
party byTurner, 33, who
was highly intoxicated
at the time, according to
reports.
They handcuffed the
victim and took her into
her bedroom, where
Turner and Urbina
allegedly performed sex
acts on her against her
will. Turner would later
tell sheriff's investigators
she was too intoxicated
to remember what
happened after Urbina
arrived, while Urbina
later admitted to investi-
gators to having sex with
the victim and perform-
ing a role-playing game


with her.
Urbina would take
his own life on March
21, the day that county
investigators made their
decision to arrest Urbina
and Turner. Turner was
later released on $200,000
bond and placed on
unpaid leave.
Turner was employed
with the department
since 2004, according to
personnel information.
Turner's written resig-
nation simply stated, "I
resign."
Craig Schaeffer, chief
assistant of the State
Attorney's Office in the
12th Judicial Circuit, said


they would decide in the
next two weeks whether
they will drop the charges
against Turner.
The city recently hired
the Center for Public
Safety Management LLC
- a private, Washington,
D.C.-based firm that
specializes in reviewing
public-safety agencies
like police and fire de-
partments to examine
the police department
culture. Plans call for
paying the consultant
$59,000 for the review,
which could take up to
135 days to complete,
according to the city.
Email: dwinchester@sun-heraldx.com


Construction worker hurt at Tervis


By GREG GILES
STAFF WRITER

A construction
worker was rushed to
Blake Medical Center
in Bradenton Thursday
morning after he fell
off a beam from the
24,000-square-foot
Innovation Center being
built at Tervis in North
Venice. The incident took
place around 10 a.m.
The 38-year-old worker,
employed by All Steel
Construction Inc., based in
Palmetto, was not identi-
fied due to HIPAA privacy
rules. All Steel is a sub-
contractor for Willis Smith
Construction, leading the
project.
The Occupational Safety


and Health Administration
is investigating, said Venice
Police Chief Tom McNulty.
The injured worker
was in the operating
room much of Thursday
afternoon.
"The last we heard,
he had come through
surgery," saidWayne
Varnadore, head of
operations at Tervis, later
that day. "He's still in pretty
bad shape. It will likely be
tomorrow before they get
a feel for his prognosis.
Our thoughts go out to
him and his family. We're
all concerned for his
recovery."
Willis Smith president
David Sessions confirmed
the subcontractor fell
off a steel beam and was


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEF


Blue Star
Memorial Marker
to be dedicated
The dedication of the
new Blue Star Memorial
Marker at the Douglas T.
Jacobson State Veterans
Nursing Home, 21281
Grayton Terrace, Port
Charlotte, will take place
at 10 a.m. Saturday.
As sponsors of the
prestigious marker and
event, the Port Charlotte
Garden Club extends
a warm welcome to all
military personnel, past
and present.
The Blue Star Memorial
program has been in
existence for almost
70 years, with commem-
orative markers often
seen along highways, in
parks and at government
locations. To date, more
than 2,500 markers
have been placed across
the country, with more
than 150 in Florida.
There has been no such
marker in Port Charlotte
until now. Scheduled for
Armed Forces Day, the
unveiling of the marker
will be in tribute and





A ']CM *
PdLEASE TI

GIVIEIBLOOD


acknowledgment of all
the branches of military
service. In this yearlong
project, the garden club
has received support and
funding from several lo-
cal veterans associations,
along with members of
the community.
The public is welcome.
For more information,
call Anne Hudson at
941-875-9416.


transported by Bayflite to
the hospital.
The worker was ap-
proximately 25 feet off the
ground when he fell, said
Capt. Jerry Jensen, with
Sarasota County Fire and
Rescue.
The Sarasota County
Sheriff's Office confirmed
there was head trauma.
A call to All Steel
Construction was not
immediately returned.
Tervis, home of Tervis
Tumbler insulated
drinkware and other
products, broke ground
on the newA renter located


headquarters on Triple
Diamond Boulevard, in
February.
The groundbreaking
ceremony took place just
last week. The project is
scheduled for completion
in November.


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funding for Homeowners in the counties listed
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homeowners with home repairs and needed
energy efficient upgrades. ALL HOMEOWNERS
QUALIFY. We currently have money for your
home but once it has been reserved there will be
no more funding. (Mobile homes now qualify.)
You must meet these qualifications:
Must be the Homeowners Renters do not
Qualify.
Homes that qualify for the program and need
at least one of the following improvements:
Solar power for your home Stop paying the
electric company.
Solar powered AC system The sun creates the
power to run the AC.
Solar (attic fans, water heaters, solar pool
heating & solar powered pool pumps)
Insulation (foam, radiant and fiberglass)
Windows and Door upgrades "Energy Efficient"
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:OurTownPagel2 C www.sunnewspapers.net FROM PAGE ONE The Sun /Friday, May 16, 2014


Sports tourism a home run


By BRENDA BARBOSA
STAFF WRITER
PUNTA GORDA-
Charlotte County is
batting a thousand in
sports tourism.
At an awards break-
fast hosted by the
Charlotte Harbor Visitor
& Convention Bureau
on Thursday, officials
honored local sports
hero Anthony Hargrove
and former tourism di-
rector Becky Bovell, who
spearheaded efforts to
make Charlotte County a
destination for sporting
events.
Bovell, who served
as Charlotte's director
of tourism for nearly
10 years, was inducted
into the Tourism Hall of
Fame during an hour-
long ceremony at the
Charlotte Harbor Event &
Conference Center.
Before coming to
Charlotte County, Bovell
had worked in both
the U.S. Senate and the
White House before serv-
ing as deputy director of
tourism for 16 years for
the state of Rhode Island.
"I can assure you that
it took three presidents,
two governors and a
United States Senator to
prepare me for working


Anthony Hargrove, a retired
pro football player who
attended and played football
at Port Charlotte High School,
was the keynote speaker at
awards breakfast.
with the board of County
Commissioners," Bovell
said to a room full of
tourism professionals
and government offi-
cials who boomed with
laughter.
Despite many chal-
lenges 9/11, Hurricane
Charley, a devastating
oil spill in the Gulf and a
prolonged recession -
under Bovell's leadership,
the tourism office grew
into a robust, award-win-
ning marketing organi-
zation that understands
the value of tourism in a
struggling economy.


A"VVERTBFV IN THE CLA=BSIFIEDS CALL 26O-1200


Steve Berlin, visitor bureau executive director; Jack W. Wert; and Lauren Bourgoing stand for a
photo with Becky Bovell, second from right, the 2014 Hall of Fame inductee.


"Tourism needs to
have a respected place
at the economic devel-
opment table because
tourism and economic
development share direct
and important synergy,"
Bovell said. "Vacationers
come because of tourism
marketing and return to
become homeowners,
business owners, and
taxpayers."
No doubt, Charlotte
County has benefited
greatly from tourism-
related activities, particu-
larly in the sports arena.
Since 2008, Charlotte
County has hosted


DISPUTE
FROM PAGE 1

"But he is very upset
Tucker was arrested."
Kelly said the family is
"just trying to show their
support (for Tucker)"
because they believe he
didn't mean to shoot his
father. Kelly didn't know
what the two men were


I, .. .... arguing about.


i Leadership Charlotte Class
of 2014 Invites You To Their

Fiesta on the Green


& Gran Fiesta

St. Andrews Golf Club,

w Saturday, May 17, 2014


Come to One Event or Both

Fiesta on the Green Golf Tournament
7:30AM Check-in 8:30AM Shotgun Start $75
Includes golf, continental breakfast, lunch, team prizes, hole-in-one, putting contests, & more.

Gran Fiesta Evening Celebration
6PM Fiesta Attire Encouraged 165
Featuring: Fiesta Food, Margarita Bar, DJ spinning Latin Dance Music, Mariachi Band,
Silent Auction and Raffle to win Bucket of Cheer and Pinata Full of Prizes
Proceeds Benefiting:
Special Olympics Florida Charlotte County
The Punta Gorda Police Department's Jammers Basketball League
Girls on the Run of Southwest Florida

tpO ; "f Fawcett Memorial Hospital RR LAWFIRM
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www.LeadershipCharlotte.net (941) 627-2222


multiple high-profile
events that have gener-
ated some $41 million
in direct expenditures,
including the AAU state
gymnastics champi-
onships, the women's
national Golden Gloves
boxing championships,
the Snowbird Baseball
Classic and the IFDS
disabled sailing world
championships, which in
2012 served as a qualifier
for the Paralympic games
in London.
Of course, Charlotte
also hosts Tampa Bay
Rays' spring training
along with the Charlotte

Tucker told deputies the
shooting was an acci-
dent, the Sheriff's Office
report shows. But he was
arrested on a charge of
aggravated battery with
a deadly weapon and
booked into the Charlotte
County Jail after midnight.
Tucker was being held
Thursday on $100,000
bond and had not yet
been assigned an assistant
public defender.
"There are different


SUE
FROM PAGE 1

"Jazz is the original
American art form, but
so many people haven't
been exposed to it. All
they have up and down
41 is trop rock. But we've
proved the area can
support jazz as music
that's approachable for







Shop Charlotte

Where Shopping Makes Cents
charlottecountychamber.org


Stone Crabs minor
league team.
Sean Doherty, sales
and sports market-
ing manager for the
Charlotte Harbor Visitor
& Convention Bureau,
said the bureau has
targeted sporting events
as a priority because of
their wide appeal.
"Sports tourism has
proven to be a reliable
economic engine,
providing strong return
on investment in most
cases," Doherty said, not-
ing a recent University
of West Florida study
that showed sports and

kinds of accidents," CCSO
spokeswoman Debbie
Bowe said. "If someone is
cleaning a gun and it goes
off and someone is hit,
that's one kind of acci-
dent. If someone is having
an argument, goes and
arms themselves, comes
back and the gun goes off,
that's a different kind of
accident."
Bowe pointed out
the charge which is
a second-degree felony

everyone.
"Guys who think this
is still Johnny's come in
to shoot pool and drink
beer. Their jaws drop, but
they stay."
The place is now a
softly lit supper club. As
their eyes adjust to the
dark, they see a stage
with blue spotlights,
sideboards and candles
worthy of the Ritz, and
jazz-themed prints on
the walls. The full stage
now makes musicians
the focal point, playing
to a nice room, elevated
so everyone can see and
dance to them.
The waiters are the
smoothest dudes south
of New York City, serving
an endless menu of
martini concoctions
named after jazz artists.
And the regular jazz acts
here have played with


recreation in Florida are
responsible for $44.4
billion of economic
output.
"Even during down-
turns in the economy,
most of these events still
take place," Doherty said.
"Parents and grandpar-
ents still find the need
to see their child or
grandchild participate
in a state or national
championship, as that
opportunity may just
come once in a child's
life."
For former NFL
lineman and keynote
speaker Anthony
Hargrove, sports was a
way of overcoming the
difficulty of losing both
parents as a child.
The Port Charlotte
High School graduate
urged leaders to continue
pushing to bring activ-
ities to the county that
serve youth and engage
families.
"I have been under-
neath the helmet for the
last 20 years of my life
and it took me places
I never thought I was
going to go," Hargrove
said. "It opened doors
of opportunity I never
thought imaginable."
Email: bbarbosa@sun-heraldx.com

suggests Tucker pulled
the trigger.
In Florida, a person
convicted of aggravated
battery one of several
specified felonies while
armed with a gun is
subject to a minimum of
10 years in prison, even if
it's the person's first such
offense.
Tucker's arraignment is
set for June 23.
Email: akreger@sun-herald.com

everyone from Harry
Connick Jr.'s band to the
Brubeck Quartet.
When world-renowned
13-year-old trumpet
prodigy Geoffrey Gallante
was in North Port for a
concert, he sat in with
the resident Danny Sinoff
Trio as a surprise. There's
something magical about
a blond kid in a jacket
trading solos with pros
and afterwards writing
on his Facebook page, "It
was like we could read
each other's minds." Joe
said, "When they were
playing, you could have
heard a pin drop."
When someone asked
Satchmo what jazz was,
he answered, "If you still
have to ask, shame on
you."
Ask that question here,
and Joe will say, "Just
listen."
Sue Wade is a local col-
umnist for the Charlotte
Sun. You can recommend
restaurants and/or bars
to her by email to sue.
gleasonwade@cengage.
com.

COMMUNITY
NEWS BRIEF

Microtunneling
to begin
Microtunneling under
U.S. 41 will begin at the
Elkcam Waterway Monday,
Zep Construction and
Huxted Tunneling will
bore an 84-inch micro-
tunnel under U.S. 41 to
increase the stormwater
flow capacity within this
waterway. When work
begins, construction will
be carried out 24 hours
a day through Thursday,
Motorists and pedestrians
are urged to exercise ex-
treme caution in this area,
as construction crews will
be on-site day and night.
More information about


this project is available at
www.charlottecountyfl.
gov click "Project Status
Updates" in the "Popular
Links" list on the left.


:OurTown Page 12 C


www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Friday, May 16,2014


FROM PAGE ONE






INSIDE

Authorities: Casey
Kasem found in
Washington state
Casey Kasem
was located in
Washington
state on
Wednesday,
three days after
a Los Angeles
judge expressed
concerns about
the ailing radio
host's safety.
Page 2 -

Ancient skeleton
shedding light on
first Americans


A skeleton thousands of years
old, and its DNA, are bolstering
the long-held theory that
humans arrived in the Americas
by way of a land bridge from
Asia, scientists say.
Page 4 -

10 things to know

1. Death toll rises amid
anger and grief in Turkey
Chanting the names of lost miners,
relatives laid their dead to rest in mass
burials as gravediggers labored to make
room for scores more victims. Seepage 8.

2. Where wildfires
roar back to life
Just when firefighters thought they
had the upper hand in California,
a new fire gains strength near San
Marcos. Seepage 2.

3. State hurricane
fund in good shape
New estimates show the Florida
Hurricane Catastrophe Fund should
have nearly $13 billion available for
the Atlantic hurricane season that
starts June 1. See page 1.

4. Wave of
anti-government
protests begin in Brazil
Demonstrations spread across the
country to draw attention to housing
and education needs before next
month's World Cup. Seepage 8.

5.9/11 museum
opens to relatives and
survivors
Victims'friends, relatives, rescue workers
and survivors come together as President
Obama calls the museum a symbol that
"Nothing can ever break us."Seepage 1.

6. Gay marriages
quickly resume in
Arkansas
A judge whose previous order had
sown confusion among county clerks
expands his ruling to remove all
vestiges of same-sex marriage bans
from state law. Seepage2.

1. Tampa mom guilty
of killing her teens
A Florida Army officer's ex-wife has
been convicted of first-degree murder
in the shooting deaths of her children.
Seepage 1.

8. Fast-food protests
spread overseas
Labor organizers plan to stage
actions in more than 30 countries,
building on a campaign to get
the public behind the idea of a
$15-an-hour-wage. Seepage2.

9. Aaron Hernandez
charged in 2 more
shooting deaths
The former New England Patriots tight
end ambushed and gunned down two
men after an encounter inside a nightclub,
prosecutors say. SeeSportspage 5.

10. GM adds to its
recall total
The latest batch of recalls brings the
company's 2014 total to 11 million.
See page 5.


Ihe'wire 'C
he H Fir www.sunnewspapers.net
FRIDAY MAY 16, 2014


Hurricane Catastrophe Fund strong


Estimates: State should have $13B available for storm season


ByGARYFINEOUT
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
TALLAHASSEE Florida's
state-created fund intended to
help private insurers pay out
claims after a hurricane has
billions in the bank as hurri-
cane season starts, indicating
it's capable of withstanding a


big storm this year.
New estimates show the
Florida Hurricane Catastrophe
Fund should have nearly
$13 billion available for the
Atlantic hurricane season that
starts June 1.
"We are very strong at this
point and very capable of
handling a large event," said


Jack Nicholson, chief operat-
ing officer for the fund.
The financial health of
the account known as the
"Cat Fund" is important to
Floridians regardless of where
they live because the state can
impose a surcharge on most
insurance policies to replenish
it if it runs out of money.


Some critics have called the
surcharge a "hurricane tax."
The amount of money in
the fund has grown because
Florida hasn't been hit by
a hurricane since Wilma in
2005.
An advisory council for the
STORM 14


Relatives, survivors tour 9/11 museum
By JONATHAN LEMI RE _
,^ = **" '~J' 1: ,,
and VERENA DOBNIK
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITERS
NEWYORK Tears in -. ;": .' -
her eyes, firefighter widow H "4,' ---
Maureen Fanning emerged
Thursday from the new
Sept. 1 I museum deep
beneath ground zero, unable'.
to bring herself to look at allA3 A:,
of it. -
I just think it would be "
a little too overwhelming i
today," she said, unsure when 4
she would return. "It's a lot to "
digest, to absorb. Not anytime
soon." 0 ." :" a.


dedicated bPrsdn aak I |e--* fi H -..'. 9i i- /. ..* .i'"
Victims' friends and rel-
atives, rescue workers and
survivors of the terrorist attack .- 3 Ilf9
descended into the subterra- .._,
nean space and revisited the
tragedy as the National Sept. -
11 Memorial Museum was
dedicated by President Barack
Obama as a symbol that says
of America: "Nothing can ever
break us."
The museum's artifacts th I
range from the monumental, [lBI--I
like two of the huge fork-
shaped columns from the
World Trade Center's facade,
to the intimate: a wedding --- ...
ring, a victim's voice mail ..."
message.
Some relatives found the
exhibits both upsetting and
inspiring.
Patricia Smith's visit came
down to one small object: the
New York Police Department
shield her mother, Moira, was
wearing 12 1/2 years ago when
she died helping to evacuate
the twin towers.
Patricia, 14, said she left
feeling a new level of con-
nection to her mother. Still, AP PHOTO
"seeing that, reading the story Recovery workers Manny Rodriguez, Pia Hofmann, Det. Anthony Favara and Lt. Stephen Butler speak beside the
that goes along with it, even if ,mknli, WAnIAd TrAad ntarfin nham ,iurinn tknflnheifltinnherenmnn. in inFondaltinn Hallii .f tkn he tinnal


UMSIEM VmV4IS 1 U Iem riau mu e umIlnm NIeu YUI, TUUrIsda yL. uu IU cee 11u m.dmm VI n l 1mLn IILIUI
MUSEUM 14 Sept. 11 Memorial Museum, in New York, Thursday.


Watchdog: No proof


treatment delays killed vets


By MATTHEW DALY
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
WASHINGTON New
complaints about long wait
lists and falsified patient
appointment reports have
surfaced atVeterans Affairs
hospitals and clinics across
the country, the depart-
ment's internal watchdog
said Thursday, but he said
there's no proof so far that
delays in treatment have
caused any patient's death.
VA Secretary Eric
Shinseki said he was "mad
as hell" about allegations of
severe problems and said
he was looking for quick
results from a nationwide
audit. He rejected calls for
him to resign and a sena-
tor's suggestion that he call
in the FBI to investigate.
At a sometimes-combat-
ive congressional hearing,
Richard Griffin, the depart-
ment's acting inspector
general, said that after an
initial review of 17 people
who died while awaiting
appointments at the
Phoenix VA hospital, none
of the deaths appeared to
have been caused by delays


AP PHOTO


Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki is sworn in on Capitol Hill
in Washington, Thursday, prior to testifying before the Senate
Veterans Affairs Committee hearing to examine the state of
Veterans Affairs health care.


in treatment.
"It's one thing to be
on a waiting list, and it's
another thing to conclude
that as a result of being on
the waiting list that's the
cause of death, depend-
ing on what your illness
might have been at the
beginning," Griffin told
the Senate Veterans Affairs
Committee.
Griffin said his office is


working off several lists
of patients at the giant
Phoenix facility, which
treats more than 80,000
veterans a year. He said a
widely reported list of 40
patients who died while
awaiting appointments
"does not represent the total
number of veterans that
we're looking at." He said his

DELAYS|4


Mom guilty


of killing


her teenage


children
ByTAMARA LUSH
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
TAMPA -A 53-year-old former
military linguist and longtime
Army officer's wife was convicted
Thursday of first-degree murder,
with jurors rejecting the argument
that she was legally insane when she
shot and killed her 13-year-old son
and 16-year-old daughter more than
three years ago.
Julie Schenecker wiped her nose
and eyes, then the bailiffs hand-
cuffed her as the verdict was read
after just over an hour of deliber-
ations. She started to cry. She was
sentenced to two life terms to be
served at the same time.
Schenecker, killed her daughter,
Calyx, and son, Beau, in January
2011 while her now ex-husband,
Army Col. Parker Schenecker, was
on a 10-day deployment to the
Middle East.
Before the judge sentenced her,
Schenecker said, she takes responsi-
bility for what she's done.
GUILTY 14





Page 2 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


NATIONAL NEWS


The Sun/Friday, May 16,2014


I NATIONAL NEWS BRIEFS


Judge strikes all
Arkansas bans on
gay marriage
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP)
-A judge cleared the
way on Thursday for gay
marriages to resume in
Arkansas, striking down
all state laws that prevent
same-sex couples from
wedding.
A day after the state
Supreme Court effectively
halted gay marriages in
the state, Pulaski County
Circuit Judge Chris Piazza
expanded his ruling
striking down a constitu-
tional ban to also include
the prohibition on clerks
issuing same-sex mar-
riage licenses. Justices
had ruled Wednesday that
Piazza's decision on the
gay marriage ban did not
change that license law.
Piazza also rejected a
request to suspend his
ruling, saying there's
no evidence the state
would be harmed by
allowing gay marriages
to continue.

GOP chairman
revives Benghazi
subpoena of Kerry
WASHINGTON (AP) -A
Republican House chair-
man on Thursday issued a
new subpoena for Secretary
of State John Kerry to tes-
tify about the deadly 2012
attack in Benghazi, Libya,
in an escalating fight with
the Obama administration
over its cooperation with
Congress.
Rep. Darrell Issa, who
heads the House Oversight
and Government Reform
Committee, said he had
no choice as the State
Department had failed
to negotiate in good
faith on an appropriate
date for Kerry to testify.
Earlier in the week, Issa
had lifted a subpoena
for a May 21 appearance
amid ongoing discussions
between the panel and the
department.
Kerry is scheduled to
travel to Mexico next week.
"Soon after I lifted
the subpoena, the State
Department backtracked,
stating publicly that we
should accept 'a more
appropriate witness' and
refusing to commit to
making Secretary Kerry
available," Issa said in a
statement.


San Diego County
fire roars to life
SAN MARCOS, Calif.
(AP) One of the nine
fires burning in San Diego
County suddenly flared
Thursday afternoon and
burned close to homes as
new winds arrived.
The flare-up near the
state university city of San
Marcos occurred after a
half-day lull in winds that
firefighters had seized
as an opportunity to
make progress against
flames that have scorched
thousands of acres.
State fire Capt. Kendal
Bortisser said the fire was
running east along hillsides
behind California State
University San Marcos.
The flare-up appeared
to involve a change in
wind direction.

10,000 gallons of
oil spill on Los
Angeles streets
LOS ANGELES (AP)- A
geyser of oil sprayed onto
buildings and puddled
in knee-high pools of
crude in Los Angeles
streets after a valve on a
high-pressure pipeline
failed early Thursday.
About 10,000 gallons of
oil spewed 20 feet high
over approximately half
a mile of the industrial
area of Atwater Village at
about 12:15 a.m., said Fire
Capt. Jaime Moore.
Crews were able to re-
motely shut off the 20-inch
line after about 45 minutes.
By dawn, an environ-
mental cleaning company
had vacuumed up most
of the mess. Crews put
down absorbent material
to sop up the remaining
crude and then used
high-pressure hoses to
wash the streets with a
soap solution.

Media file lawsuit
to challenge
execution secrecy
ST. LOUIS (AP) -The
Associated Press and four
other news organizations
filed a lawsuit Thursday
challenging the secret
way in which Missouri
obtains the drugs it
uses in lethal injections,
arguing the state's actions
prohibit public oversight
of the death penalty.


The lawsuit asks a state
court judge to order the
Missouri Department of
Corrections to disclose
where it purchases drugs
used to carry out execu-
tions along with details
about the composition
and quality of those drugs.

Roommates buy
$20 used couch,
find $40K in cash
NEW PALTZ, N.Y. (AP)
- Three roommates who
bought a used couch
for $20 found $40,000 in
cash stashed inside and
returned the money to
the 91-year-old upstate
New York widow who had
hidden it there.
WABC-TV in NewYork
City reports that a State
University of New York at
New Paltz student and his
two roommates found the
money stuffed in envelopes
hidden in the couch they
bought from the Salvation
Army in early March.
One envelope had a
woman's name on it. After
debating what to do, the
roommates contacted the
woman and delivered the
money to her the next day.

Authorities: Casey
Kasem found in
Washington state
LOS ANGELES (AP)-
Casey Kasem was located
in Washington state on
Wednesday, three days
after a Los Angeles judge
expressed concerns about
the ailing radio host's
whereabouts and safety
amid a dispute between
his wife and children
from another marriage.
Kasem's condition was
not immediately known,
although his children
rejoiced after days of
uncertainty and said in a
statement that locating
their father was the first
step in bringing him back
to the Los Angeles area.
Santa Monica police
Sgt. Mario Toti said
Kasem was located by the
Kitsap County Sheriffs
Department onWednesday,
hours after Kasem's children
filed a missing person's
report. Kasem's daughter
Kerri, who was appointed
his temporary conservator
at a court hearing on
Monday, had to wait for
court filings before she was
able to file the report.


As a Sun Newspaper Subscriber

you can access your account

information online at

www.yoursun.com

Go to Directory and then My Subscription

Pay Subscription Renewal Notice
STransaction History Stop or Start Service
SEnter a Complaint Change Your Information

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to sign up online for these great benefits.

If you have any questions, please call 941-206-1300.


-. -, ~t


-- r~. ~*C.. a a.1*
-~ .-
I I *

~ ~
)
I
-. -,-
U V -


10 years later, gay


marriage tactics still in use


BOSTON (AP)-
Supporters and activists
routinely ask gay
couples to meet with
reluctant lawmakers
to put a human face
on same-sex marriage.
They file lawsuits.
They use unexpected
allies in some cases,
churches to spread
their message.
It's a strategy that has
shown results, with state
bans falling in courts at a
brisk clip, most recently
this week in Idaho. And
it was one that was first
tried in Massachusetts,
where 10 years ago
Saturday, gay couples
became the first in the
nation to legally tie the
knot.
"We've really used a
spirit of relentlessness,"
says Marc Solomon, the
national campaign direc-
tor for Freedom to Marry.
"That's the way we've
approached this entire
movement from the get-
go in Massachusetts and
around the country."
Seventeen states and
the District of Columbia
have legalized same-sex
marriage. Judges in
seven other states have
struck down bans on
gay marriage, though
officials are appealing.
In one of those states,
Arkansas, more than 400
same-sex weddings have


taken place in the past
week amid uncertainty
over the scope of the
ruling.
Opposition remains
stiff in many places, and
critics point out that
most states still do not
allow gay marriage and
that in most of those
that do, it was the work
of courts or legislatures,
not the will of the peo-
ple. Only Washington,
Maryland and Maine
have approved gay mar-
riage through a public
vote.
As supporters have
racked up victories,
opponents have shifted
their tactics. They still
argue that gay marriage
will damage the tradi-
tional institution, but
they've intensified their
arguments on religious
freedom and states'
rights.
"I think the notion
that it is a freight train
of momentum has been
greatly exaggerated
and is just not true,"
says John Eastman,
chairman of the National
Organization for
Marriage.
What is undeniable,
though, is a change in
public attitudes.
Recent polls show that
a majority of Americans


30 percent favored it.
The U.S. Supreme Court
last year struck down
a key part of a federal
law defining marriage
as between a man and a
woman.
Forty percent of
Americans now live in
states where gay people
can marry, compared
with zero back then
- though some jurisdic-
tions did and continue
to offer civil unions or
domestic partnerships
that provide some of
the legal and financial
benefits of marriage.
"What's really
interesting here in
Massachusetts is that
it has really become no
big deal," says Robyn
Ochs, who married Peg
Preble the day same-
sex marriage became
legal. "When we were
fighting to protect
marriage equality in
Massachusetts, there
were all these predic-
tions of doom and
destruction, and terrible
things would happen.
You know, when we got
married on May 17,
2004, on May 18, the
buses still ran, children
still had to go to school
and the grocery stores
still had food on the
shelves."


support same-sex mar- Preble chimes in: "The
riage; in 2004, only about sky didn't fall."


Fast-food protests spread overseas


NEWYORK (AP)-
Labor organizers turned
up the pressure on
McDonald's and other
fast-food chains to raise
worker pay on Thursday,
with plans to stage
actions in more than 30
countries.
The demonstrations
build on a campaign by
unions to bring attention
to the plight of low-wage
workers and get the
public behind the idea of
a $15-an-hour wage.
Industry groups say
such pay hikes would
hurt their ability to
create jobs and note that
many of the participants
are not workers.
The protests are being
backed by the Service
Employees International
Union and began in New
York City in late 2012.
Since then, organizers
have steadily ramped up
actions to keep the issue
in the spotlight.
In March, for in-
stance, lawsuits filed
in three states accused
McDonald's of denying
breaks and engaging
in other practices that
deprive employees of


their rightful pay. Workers
were referred to lawyers
by union organizers, who
announced protests over
"wage theft" the following
week.
Organizers say work-
ers across the country
walked off the job on
Thursday, including 20
from a restaurant in St.
Louis that had to tem-
porarily close as a result.
But turnouts have varied
and the scope of actions
planned for overseas also
differed depending on
the country.
In Denmark,
McDonald's worker
Louise Marie Rantzau
said a collective agree-
ment with McDonald's
in the country prevents
workers from protesting
the chain. But Rantzau,
who earns about $21
an hour under the
agreement, and workers
planned to demonstrate
outside Burger King or
other restaurants and post
photos on social media.
Images on social
media showed workers
demonstrating in places
including Dublin and
Sao Paulo, Brazil.


I BREAKING NEWS!
Log onto www.sunnewspapers.net for the latest updates.


In New York City, a
couple hundred dem-
onstrators beat drums,
blew whistles and chant-
ed in the rain outside
a Domino's for about a
half-hour. Among those
who took turns speaking
were local lawmakers,
community leaders and
fast-food workers.
"Corporations are
able to make money-
millions and billions of
dollars. We should be able
to make a decent salary
so we can take care of
our families," said Sheila
Brown, a mother of four
who works at a KFC.
In Philadelphia,
19-year-old Justice
Wallace said she earns
$7.50 an hour and was on
strike because she wants
$15 an hour and a union.
"It's a poverty wage.
We can't live off of it,"
she said.
Although many
customers say they're
not aware of the ongoing
actions, the campaign
has captured national
media attention at a time
when the income gap
between the rich and
poor has widened and
executive pay packages
have come under greater
scrutiny.


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* A!-1. I- -^






The Sun /Friday, May 16, 2014 www.sunnewspapers.net WIRE Page 3 STATE NEWS


I STATE BRIEFS

5 years later,
Fla.-Va. terrorism
case in limbo
ALEXANDRIA, Va. (AP)
- For five years, a fed-
eral judge upset with the
prosecution of a Florida
professor once accused of
being a leading terrorist,
has simply refused to
rule on his case. It's left
the government unable
to deport him, unable
to prosecute him, and
flummoxed on how to
move forward.
In April 2009, U.S.
District Judge Leonie
Brinkema told lawyers
she would rule "soon" on
whether to dismiss crimi-
nal contempt charges filed
in Virginia against former
University of South Florida
professor Sami Al-Arian,
a longtime prominent
Palestinian activist, who
refused to testify in a
separate terror-related
investigation.
The ruling hasn't come,
and nothing has happened
in the case. The delay is
unusual for Alexandria's
federal courthouse, known
in legal circles as the
Rocket Docket for its swift
disposition of cases.

Darden lays off
'handful' of HQ
workers
ORLANDO (AP)- A
company spokesman says
Darden Restaurants, Inc.
is laying off a "handful"
of workers at its Orlando
headquarters as the
restaurant company
anticipates spinning off
its Red Lobster chain.
Darden spokesman
Rich Jeffers said Thursday
the positions are at all
levels of the company. He
refused to say how many
employees are involved.

Deputies' death
investigation
interrupted by gator
PLANT CITY (AP) -
Tampa Bay-area author-
ities say they shot an
alligator that threatened
to disturb a dead body
awaiting a coroner.
The Hillsborough
County Sheriff's Office says
a park ranger discovered
the dead man's body
Wednesday evening near
the lakeshore in Edward
Medard Park.
Sheriff's spokeswoman
Cristal Bermudez Nunez
says the body was partially
in the water near a tackle
box and fishing pole.
While awaiting the med-
ical examiner, deputies
noticed an alligator circling
in front of the body. Then
it began swimming directly
toward the body.
Bermudez Nunez says
a deputy fired at the gator
so it would not disturb the
body. The alligator was
struck in the skull, and it
sank beneath the surface
and was not seen again.
Wildlife officials were
notified.

Everglades event
raises focus on
nonnative fish
DAVIE (AP) -
Biologists say nearly two
dozen nonnative fresh-
water fish species call the
Everglades home, which
isn't good for Florida's
native fish communities.
To combat the prob-
lem, the Everglades
Cooperative Invasive
Species Management
Area is hosting a "non-
native fish round-up"
Saturday across South
Florida. All anglers fishing
the Everglades that day
can participate. Prizes


will be awarded, includ-
ing a "slam" prize to the
person who catches the
most nonnative species.
The goal is to raise
awareness about potential
negative foreign fish have
in Florida waters while
encouraging anglers to
target these nonnative
species for food.


Immigration officials


review mistaken citizenship


MIAMI (AP) -
Immigration authorities
said Thursday that they
are reviewing the case
of an Army veteran
and Cuban native who
recently discovered he is
not a U.S. citizen.
Mario Hernandez
served in Vietnam with
the U.S. Army and worked
for the Department of
Justice's Bureau of Prisons
using a social security
number he received when
he arrived in the country
as a child. The 58-year-old
Tallahassee man always
thought he was a U.S. citi-
zen and repeatedly voted.
It was only last fall when
he sought a passport to
take a cruise with his
wife that he discovered
the authorities did not
list him as a citizen or
a permanent resident.
Suddenly, he was in limbo
and under investigation


by the U.S. government.
"I served this country,"
Hernandez said. "I've
always tried to prove I'm
a good American citizen.
I have always taught my
children and grandchil-
dren we need to be good
stewards of this country.
My parents came for
freedom. We owe a lot to
this country."
Hernandez's attorney
Elizabeth Ricci said
they planned to meet
with officials Tuesday in
Tallahassee.
Since the Cuban revo-
lution, those who leave
the communist island
generally get fast-tracked
to U.S. residency and
citizenship. Hernandez
came in 1965 with his
mother and assumed she
filed immigration papers.
When he entered the
military, he recalls taking
two oaths, one to become


a soldier and another
to become a citizen. He
never worried about
receiving a certificate.
Nobody ever asked for it.
U.S. Citizens and
Immigration Services
Spokesman Christopher
Bentley said Thursday his
agency is reviewing the
case and will meet with
Hernandez.
"When an error is
discovered, either through
the appeals process or by
other means, we work dil-
igently to review the case
and take steps to correct
the error and prevent sim-
ilar issues from occurring
in the future," he said.
Ricci said Hernandez's
years of service in the
military and his work
guarding criminals,
including Oklahoma
City bomber Timothy
McVeigh, should be
rewarded not punished.


Scott will release financial details


TALLAHASSEE (AP) -
Florida Gov. Rick Scott
is promising to release
his tax returns and hand
over whatever financial
details the courts require.
His promise came a
day after a lawsuit was
filed that challenges a
year-old state law that
allows elected officials
to place their assets in
a blind trust instead of
reporting each invest-
ment publicly. The state
Supreme Court has been
asked to rule before can-
didates start qualifying
for the ballot next month.
Scott, who was a
wealthy businessman


before seeking office, is
the only elected official
using a blind trust.
Scott's campaign man-
ager Melissa Sellers wrote
a letter to the Secretary of
State on Thursday saying
"whatever the rules are,
the governor will gladly
comply with them."
"If the courts believe
the trust should be dis-
solved, all assets will be
disclosed in accordance
with the law for qualify-
ing," wrote Sellers.
The campaign also
said Scott would publicly
release his tax returns al-
though they did not specify
when that would occur.


During his first run
in 2010, the Republican
released three years of
tax returns and a lengthy
list of all his business
holdings. But shortly after
he took office, he received
permission from the
state's ethics commission
to set up a blind trust to
remove direct control over
his finances in order to
avoid potential conflicts.
A new ethics law
passed last year by the
Florida Legislature au-
thorizes blind trusts, but
says that public officials
who set them up must
disclose the initial assets
placed in the account.


HOW THEY
VOTED

U.S. SENATE


SEN. BILL
NELSON,
D-FLORIDA


SEN. MARCO
RUBIO,
R-FLORIDA


* BILLS INTRODUCED

May 14:
S. 2336: A bill to eliminate
the payroll tax for individuals
who have attained retire-
ment age, to amend title II
of the Social Security Act to
remove the limitation upon
the amount of outside income
which an individual may earn
while receiving benefits un
der such title, and for other
purposes.
Sponsor: Sen. Marco Rubio
[R-FL]
This bill was referred to the
Senate Committee on Finance
which will consider it before
sending it to the Senate floor for
consideration.
Sen. Bill Nelson [D-FL] is a
member of the committee.

* VOTES

May 12:
On the Nomination PN1186:
Robin S. Rosenbaum, of Florida,
to be United States Circuit
Judge for the Eleventh Circuit
Nomination Confirmed 91/0
Sen. Nelson [D-FL]: Yea
Sen. Rubio [R-FL]: Yea

Cloture on S. 2262: Energy
Savings and Industrial
Competitiveness Act of 2014
Cloture Motion Rejected 55/36
Sen. Nelson [D-FL]: Yea
Sen. Rubio [R-FL]: Nay


May13:
Cloture on H.R. 3474: Hire
More Heroes Act of 2014
Cloture Motion Agreed to 96/3
Sen. Nelson [D-FL]: Yea
Sen. Rubio [R-FL]:Yea

May 14:
On the Cloture Motion
PN1215: Steven Paul Logan,
of Arizona, to be United States
District Judge for the District
of Arizona
Cloture Motion Agreed to 58/37
Sen. Nelson [D-FL]: Yea
Sen. Rubio [R-FL]: Nay

On the Cloture Motion
PN1218: John Joseph Tuchi, of
Arizona, to be United States
District Judge for the District
of Arizona
Cloture Motion Agreed to 62/35
Sen. Nelson [D-FL]: Yea
Sen. Rubio [R-FL]: Nay

On the Cloture Motion
PN1213: DianeJ. Humetewa,
of Arizona, to be United States
District Judge for the District
of Arizona
Cloture Motion Agreed to 64/34
Sen. Nelson [D-FL]: Yea
Sen. Rubio [R-FL]: Nay

On the Nomination PN1215:
Steven Paul Logan, of Arizona,
to be United States District
Judge for the District of Arizona
Nomination Confirmed 96/0
Sen. Nelson [D-FL]: Yea
Sen. Rubio [R-FL]:Yea

On the Nomination PN1218:
John Joseph Tuchi, of Arizona,
to be United States District
Judge for the District of
Arizona
Nomination Confirmed 96/0
Sen. Nelson [D-FL]: Yea
Sen. Rubio [R-FL]:Yea

On the Nomination PN1213:
Diane J. Humetewa, of
Arizona, to be United States
District Judge for the District
of Arizona
Nomination Confirmed 96/0
Sen. Nelson [D-FL]: Yea
Sen. Rubio [R-FL]:Yea


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The Sun/Friday, May 16, 2014


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STATE NEWS






Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Friday, May 16, 2014 FROM PAGE ONE


Ancient skeleton shedding light on first Americans


NEWYORK (AP)-
Thousands of years ago,
a teenage girl toppled
into a deep hole in a
Mexican cave and died.
Now, her skeleton and
her DNA are bolstering
the long-held theory
that humans arrived in
the Americas by way of
a land bridge from Asia,
scientists say.
The girl's nearly
complete skeleton was
discovered by chance
in 2007 by expert divers
who were mapping
water-filled caves north
of the city of Tulum, in
the eastern part of the
Yucatan Peninsula. One
day, they came across
a huge chamber deep
underground.
"The moment we en-
tered inside, we knew it
was an incredible place,"
one of the divers, Alberto
Nava, told reporters.
"The floor disappeared
under us and we could
not see across to the
other side."
They named it Hoyo
Negro, or black hole.


Months later, they
returned and reached
the floor of the 100-foot
tall chamber, which
was littered with animal
bones. They came across
the girl's skull on a ledge,
lying upside down "with
a perfect set of teeth and
dark eye sockets looking
back at us," Nava said.
The divers named the
skeleton Naia, after a
water nymph of Greek
mythology, and joined up
with a team of scientists
to research the find.
The girl was 15 or 16
when she met her fate
in a cave, which at that
time was dry, researchers
said. She may have been
looking for water when
she tumbled into the
chamber some 12,000
or 13,000 years ago, said
lead study author James
Chatters of Applied
Paleoscience, a con-
sulting firm in Bothell,
Washington. Her pelvis
was broken, suggesting
she had fallen a long
distance, he said.
The analysis of her


In this June 2013 photo provided by National Geographic, diver
Susan Bird, working at the bottom of Hoyo Negro, a large dome-
shaped underwater cave in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, brushes
a human skull found at the site while her team members take
detailed photographs.


remains, reported
Thursday in the journal
Science by researchers
from the United States,
Canada, Mexico and
Denmark, addresses a
puzzle about the settling
of the Americas.
Most scientists say
the first Americans
came from Siberian
ancestors who lived on
an ancient land bridge,


now submerged, that
connected Asia to Alaska
across the Bering Strait.
They are thought to have
entered the Americas
sometime after 17,000
years ago from that land
mass, called Beringia.
And genetic evidence
indicates that today's
native peoples of the
Americas are related to
these pioneers.


But the oldest
skeletons from the
Americas including
Naia's have skulls
that look much different
from those of today's
native peoples. To some
researchers, that suggests
the first Americans came
from a different place.
Naia provides a crucial
link. DNA recovered
from a molar contains
a distinctive marker
found in today's native
peoples, especially those
in Chile and Argentina.
The genetic signature is
thought to have arisen
among people living in
Beringia, researchers
said.
That suggests that the
early Americans and
contemporary native
populations both came
from the same ancestral
roots in Beringia not
different places, the
researchers concluded.
The anatomical differ-
ences apparently reflect
evolution over time in
Beringia or the Americas,
they said.


New health cost controls get go-ahead from feds


WASHINGTON (AP) -
The Obama adminis-
tration has given the
go-ahead for insurers and
employers to use a new
cost-control strategy that
puts a hard dollar limit on
what health plans pay for
some expensive proce-
dures, such as knee and
hip replacements.
Some experts worry
that such a move would
surprise patients who
pick more expensive
hospitals. The cost
difference would leave
them with big medical
bills that they'd have to
pay themselves.
That could undercut
key financial protections



STORM
FROM PAGE 1

fund heard from Wall
Street firms Thursday
on how much money
the fund would have to
borrow if Florida was hit
with a devastating storm
this season. The panel
approved estimates
that show that the fund


MUSEUM
FROM PAGE 1

I already know it, is really
upsetting," she said.
David Greenberg, who
lost a dozen colleagues
who met for breakfast
at the trade center's
Windows on the World
restaurant on Sept. 11,
called the museum
"breathtaking, awe-in-
spiring and emotional."
"You have your
moments when there can


DELAYS
FROM PAGE 1

office has 185 employees
working on the Phoenix
case, including criminal
investigators, and said he
expects to have a report
completed in August.
The U.S. Attorney's
office in Arizona and



GUILTY
FROM PAGE 1

Through tears she said,
"I know I shot my son
and daughter. I don't
know why. But I have
time to try to understand
that."
If she had been
acquitted by reason of
insanity, she would be
committed to a mental


in President Barack
Obama's health care law
that apply not just to the
new health insurance
exchanges, but to most
job-based coverage as
well.
Others say it's a
valuable tool to reduce
costs and help check
premiums.
Some federal regulators
appear to be concerned.
A recent administration
policy ruling went to un-
usual lengths, acknowl-
edging that the cost-con-
trol strategy "may be a
subterfuge" for "otherwise
prohibited limitations on
coverage."
Nonetheless, the

should be able borrow
more than $8 billion
- or about twice what
would be needed to pay
all potential claims.
Nicholson called
the fund's borrowing
needs this year the "best
situation we have ever
been in."
Florida created the fund
after Hurricane Andrew
ravaged the state in
1993. It offers insurance

be solitude, moments
when there can be
happiness, and a mixture
of emotions through the
entire museum," said
Greenberg, who worked
at an office nearby.
The museum opens to
the public Wednesday,
but many of those affect-
ed most directly by 9/11
could start exploring it
Thursday.
Family members also
paid their first visits
to a repository at the
museum that contains
unidentified remains


the Justice Department's
public integrity section
also are assisting in the
investigation.
Since reports of the
Phoenix problems came
to light last month, allega-
tions about problems at
VA facilities have spread
nationwide. At least 10
new allegations about
manipulated waiting
times and other problems

hospital until doctors
and a judge agree that
she is no longer a danger
to herself or others.
She also said she be-
lieved in the U.S. judicial
system and would accept
her sentence.
Earlier, prosecutors
said Schenecker wrote
in her journal that she
wanted to kill herself and
wanted to be cremated
with her children, their
ashes mixed together.


departments of Labor
and Health and Human
Services said the practice
- known as reference
pricing- could con-
tinue. Plans must use a
"reasonable method" to
ensure "adequate access
to quality providers."
Regulators asked for pub-
lic comment, saying they
may publish additional
guidance in the future.
HHS spokeswoman
Erin Shields Britt said
in a statement that
the administration is
monitoring the effects
of reference pricing on
access to quality services
and will work to ensure
that financial protections

companies reinsurance
at prices generally lower
than those in the private
market. It was designed
to help keep private
insurers from leaving the
state. Every company
is required to purchase
coverage to pay off claims
after insurers reach a
certain level of damages.
The situation still isn't
perfect: Multiple large
storms over a two-year

from the disaster.
Monica Iken never re-
ceived her husband's body.
"But he's here. I know he's
here," Iken, a museum
board member, said after
leaving the repository.
Many in the audience
wiped away tears during
the dedication ceremony,
which revisited both the
horror and the heroism
of Sept. 11, 2001, the day
19 al-Qaida hijackers
crashed four airliners
into the trade center,
the Pentagon and a field
in Pennsylvania. Nearly


have surfaced in the past
three weeks, Griffin said.
VA Secretary Shinseki
told the committee he
hopes to have prelim-
inary results within
three weeks on audits he
ordered at the VA's 150
medical centers and 820
community outpatient
clinics nationwide in
an effort to determine
how widespread the

She mentioned that she
was going to try to move
her son's body into her
bed and wanted to die
next to him.
Before she was sen-
tenced, she talked about
her children.
"I know our children
are in heaven. I want
people to try to find
comfort in believing as
I do that they are in no
pain and they are alive
and enjoying everything


for consumers are not
undermined.
One way the new ap-
proach is different is that
it sets a dollar limit on
what the health plan will
pay for a given procedure.
Most insurance now pays
a percentage of costs, and
those costs themselves
can vary from hospital
to hospital. Now if you
pick a more expensive
hospital, the insurance
still pays the same
percentage.
The new strategy works
like this:
Your health insurance
plan slaps a hard limit on
what it will pay for certain
procedures, for example,

period could leave the
fund short of money.
Florida was hit with a
series of storms in 2004
and 2005. Floridians are
still paying extra on their
insurance policies to pay
off money borrowed in
the wake of Hurricane
Wilma. That has prompt-
ed some state legislators
to recommend scaling
back the size of the fund,
but the bills have been

3,000 people were killed
in an attack that plunged
the U.S. into a decade
of war in Afghanistan
against al-Qaida's Taliban
protectors.
After viewing some of
the exhibits, including a
mangled fire truck and a
memorial wall with pho-
tos of victims, Obama
retold the story of Welles
Crowther, a 24-year-old
World Trade Center
worker who became
known as "the man in
the red bandanna" after
he led others to safety


treatment delays and
falsified reports are.
"I'm not aware, other
than a number of iso-
lated cases, where there
is evidence of that," he
replied when the com-
mittee's chairman, Sen.
Bernie Sanders, I-Vt.,
asked bluntly ifVA offi-
cials at the facilities were
"cooking the books."
Shinseki resisted

and anything that heaven
has to offer ... Jesus is
protecting them and
keeping them safe until
we get there."
Parker Schenecker and
his mother looked sad
and exhausted as the
verdict was read. Julie
Schenecker's sister cried
softly.
All six mental health
experts who testified said
Schenecker was mentally
ill, but three experts


hospital charges associ-
ated with knee and hip
replacement operations.
That's called the reference
price.
Say the limit is $30,000.
The plan offers you a
choice of hospitals within
its provider network.
If you pick one that
charges $40,000, you
would owe $10,000 to
the hospital plus your
regular cost-sharing for
the $30,000 that your plan
covers.
The extra $10,000 is
treated like an out-of-
network expense, and it
doesn't count toward your
plan's annual limit on
out-of-pocket costs.

defeated out of fears it
would raise homeowner
insurance premiums.
Still, this year's situa-
tion is much better than
it was during the height
of the Great Recession,
when convulsions in
the financial industry
created fears that the
fund would not be able
to borrow enough money
to cover claims from a
major storm.

from one of the towers.
He died in the tower's
collapse.
The president said the
museum pays tribute to
"the true spirit of 9/11
love, compassion,
sacrifice."
"Like the great wall
and bedrock that em-
brace us today," Obama
said, referring to the
way an underground
flood wall withstood the
attack, "nothing can ever
break us. Nothing can
change who we are as
Americans."


calls from Sen. Richard
Blumenthal, D-Conn., to
call in the FBI.
"Isn't there evidence
here of criminal wrong-
doing, that is falsifying
records, false statements
to the federal govern-
ment? That's a crime,"
said Blumenthal, a
former state attorney
general and federal
prosecutor.

called by prosecutors
said she was legally
sane when she shot her
children.
Defense attorneys said
Schenecker is so affected
by bipolar disorder and
depression that she
doesn't know right from
wrong. Under Florida
law, the inability to tell
right from wrong is
one of the criteria for a
not guilty by reason of
insanity plea.


ALMANAC
Today is Friday, May 16, the
136th day of 2014. There are
229 days left in the year.
Today in history
On May 16,1929, the
first Academy Awards were
presented. "Wings" won "best
production/while Emil Jannings
and Janet Gaynor were named
best actor and best actress.
On this date
In 1763, the English lexicog-
rapher, author and wit Samuel
Johnson first met his future
biographer, James Boswell.
In 1770, Marie Antoinette,
age 14, married the future King
Louis XVI of France, who was 15.
In 1868, the U.S. Senate failed
by one vote to convict President
Andrew Johnson as it took its
first ballot on the 11 articles of
impeachment against him.
In 1920, Joan of Arc was
canonized by Pope Benedict XV.
In 1939, the federal govern-
ment began its first food stamp
program in Rochester, New York.
In 1943, the nearly month-
long Warsaw Ghetto Uprising
came to an end as German forces
crushed the Jewish resistance and
blew up the Great Synagogue.
In 1948, CBS News corre-
spondent George Polk, who'd
been covering the Greek civil
war between communist and
nationalist forces, was found
slain in Salonika Harbor.
In 1961, Park Chung-hee
seized power in South Korea in a
military coup.
In 1974, former U.S. Attorney
General Richard G. Kleindienst
pleaded guilty to failing to testify
fully at his Senate confirmation
hearing about an investigation of
International Telephone & Telegraph
Corp.; he was fined $100 and given
a suspended 30-day sentence.
In 1984, comedian Andy
Kaufman died in Los Angeles at
age 35.
Today's birthdays
Jazz musician Billy Cobham
is 70. Actor Danny Trejo is 70.
Actor Bill Smitrovich is 67.
Actor Pierce Brosnan is 61.
Actress Debra Winger is 59.
Olympic gold medal gymnast
Olga Korbut is 59. Actress
Mare Winningham is 55. Rock
musician Boyd Tinsley (The
Dave Matthews Band) is 50.
Rock musician Krist Novoselic
is 49. Singer Janet Jackson is
48. Rhythm-and-blues singer
Ralph Tresvant (New Edition)
is 46. Actor David Boreanaz
is 45. Musician Simon Katz is
43. Actress Lynn Collins is 37.
Actress Melanie Lynskey is 37.
Actress Megan Fox is 28. Actor
Drew Roy is 28. Actor Jacob
Zacharis 28.




UK tower accused
of melting car to
get sunshade
LONDON (AP) -A
London skyscraper that
drew ire for having a
glare so strong it melted
nearby cars and shops
will get a permanent fix.
The offending
tower known as
the Walkie-Talkde for
its curved, bulging
shape is to have a
sunshade attached to its
south-facing facade to
stop the concave surface
from reflecting sunlight
and beaming concen-
trated rays to a nearby
street, developers said
Thursday.
The 37-story build-
ing made headlines
in September when
a Jaguar owner who
parked his car at its foot
complained that the
solar glare melted part
of the vehicle. Local
shopkeepers also said
the beams dubbed
"death rays" by the
British press blistered
paintwork and burnt
a hole in a floor mat
during the hottest parts
of the day.
Developers Land
Securities and Canary


Wharf had put up a
dark netted screen as
a temporary measure.
They now say they have
received permission
to erect a permanent
sunshade of horizontal
aluminum fins, which
they say will solve the
problem by absorbing
and diffusing sunlight.


Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun/Friday, May 16,2014


FROM PAGE ONE






The Sun/Friday, May 16, 2014


BUSINESS NEWS/STOCKS


www.sunnewspapers.net


WIRE Page5


Dow dips to worst day in 5 weeks


NEWYORK (AP) -
Investors retreated from
stocks Thursday, leading
the Dow Jones industrial
average to its worst
day in five weeks, after
disappointing earnings
from Walmart and mixed
news about the global
economy.
Financial markets
reflected broader investor
jitters: government bonds
rose, small-company
stocks continued to plunge,
and safe, slower-growth
industries fared the best.
The latest economic
data from the United
States was mixed: Factory
output fell. But fewer
people sought unemploy-
ment benefits, evidence
that solid hiring should
continue. The news was
more disappointing in


Europe, where the econo-
my of the 18 countries that
share the euro saw output
rise just 0.2 percent in the
first quarter.
"People are just a little bit
nervous about the entire
global economic environ-
ment at the moment," said
Ryan Larson, head of U.S.
equities at the Royal Bank
of Canada.
The Dow lost
167.16 points, or 1 percent,
to 16,446.81. The Standard
& Poor's 500 index fell
17.68 points, or 0.9 percent,
to 1,870.85 and the Nasdaq
composite fell 31.33 points,
or 0.8 percent, to 4,069.29.
The Dow was dragged
down byWalmart, which
fell $1.91, or 2.4 percent,
to $76.83. The company
reported lower earnings for
its most recent quarter and


I BUSINESS NEWS BRIEFS

GM's latest recalls FCC fast-lane web
bring 2014 total to plan advances
44 .11millin


I I IIIIIIIUII

SOUTHFIELD, Mich.
(Bloomberg) General
Motors is recalling an
additional 2.7 million
vehicles, including
models with faulty brake
lights that have led to
hundreds of complaints,
pushing the automaker's
total number of cars and
trucks called back for
fixes in the U.S. this year
to more than 11 million.
The new total for the
year so far is more than
GM recalled during the
previous six years com-
bined. Chief Executive
Officer Mary Barra is
grappling with the recall
of 2.59 million cars to fix
a defective ignition switch
linked to at least 13
deaths. She reorganized
the engineering depart-
ment, added personnel to
investigate problems and
introduced a program
to encourage employees
to flag safety concerns.
An internal report is due
later this month.


WASHINGTON
(Bloomberg) Federal
regulators Thursday
advanced a proposal to let
Internet-service providers
led by AT&T and Comcast
offer fast lanes for payment
fromWeb companies such
as Google and Facebook.
Federal
Communications
Commission Chairman
Tom Wheeler had enough
reluctant support from
his two fellow Democrats
to win a 3-2 preliminary
vote for his proposal,
which advocacy groups
and Internet companies
said undermines the
'net-neutrality' ideal of
treating Web traffic equal-
ly. Wheeler revised the
proposal May 12 to add
consideration of tougher
regulations, including
potential rate controls,
under the agency's review.
The vote opens a
comment-and-review
period intended to lead to
a second vote and a final
rule later this year.


warned that the current
one was not expected to be
much better.
The company, like many
other retailers, blamed
harsh winter weather.
Department store operator
Kohl's fell after announcing
a drop in first-quarter
earnings. Kohl's ended
down $1.82, or 3.4 percent,
to $52.21.
One bright spot was
Cisco Systems. The tele-
communications equip-
ment maker jumped $1.37,
or 6 percent, to $24.18. It
was one of only two stocks
in the Dow 30 to rise. Cisco
reported earnings that
were better than expected.
The broader stock sell-
off comes two days after
the Dow and S&P 500 hit
record highs.
But the bigger story of


what happened on Wall
Street was in the bond
market.
Bonds had their best day
since early February, when
measured by the Barclays
U.S. Aggregate bond index,
a broad gauge of the entire
market, from Treasurys to
corporate debt.
The yield on the U.S. 10-
year note hit its lowest level
in 10 months, dropping
to 2.49 percent. At the
beginning of the week,
the 10-year had a yield of
2.66 percent. That is an
extraordinary move for
bond yields.
Typically, such a move-
ment in the bond market
would signal that there
was something wrong with
the U.S. economy. But
recent economic data has
been mixed at worst.


WASHINGTON
(Bloomberg) Industrial
production unexpectedly
declined in April, held back
by a plunge in utilities as
temperatures warmed and
a broad-based decrease in
manufacturing.
Output at factories,
mines and utilities
decreased 0.6 percent after
a 0.9 percent gain the prior
month that was larger
than previously reported,
a report from the Federal
Reserve showed Thursday
in Washington. The medi-
an forecast in a Bloomberg
survey of 81 economists
called for an unchanged
reading. Manufacturing,
which makes up 75 per-
cent of total production,
decreased 0.4 percent.
The disappointing
result in April may signal
a pause after the biggest
back-to-back monthly
gains in manufacturing
since 2010, as factories
rebounded from an
unusually harsh winter.


(AP) -The price of
oil fell below $102 a
barrel Thursday as weak
economic data in the U.S.
suggested demand for
crude could fall.
Benchmark U.S. crude
for June delivery fell 87
cents to close at $101.50 a
barrel in New York.
Brent crude, a bench-
mark for international
oil used by many U.S.
refineries, rose 25 cents to
close at $110.44 a barrel
in London.
Oil slipped after the
Federal Reserve said
Thursday that U.S.
industrial production
dropped in April. The
decline in activity, along
with weak retail sales data
released earlier in the
week, suggested demand
for U.S. crude may not be
as strong as expected.
Also, stockpiles of oil
rose by 900,000 barrels
last week, while analysts
had been expecting a
drop.


Armed Forces



Day at American



Legion Post 254


T heAmerican
Legion Post 254
Auxiliary pres-
ents "Kickin' Up Dust
on Armed Forces Day"
from 1-7 p.m. Saturday
at the post home, 6648
Taneytown St., North
Port. There will be a raffle
with prizes, food and two
bands Sons of Beaches
playing from 1-3 p.m., and
Bandana from 4-7 p.m. All
proceeds will benefit local
veterans and community
programs. For more infor-
mation, call 941-423-7311.
*

The U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary Flotilla 92
of North Port will host
an open house from
11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday at
the Auxiliary building at
Chancellor Boulevard and
Kenwood Drive.
On Monday, the North
Port City Commission
presented a proclamation
recognizing National Safe
BoatingWeek, which runs
from May 17-23. Flotilla
92 hosts several boating
safety classes throughout
the year, provides vessel
checks, patrols local water-
ways and hosts a variety of
other safe boating pro-
grams in the city. The flo-
tilla's location is at Marina
Park, 7030 Chancellor
Blvd., which offers a boat
ramp to the public to
access the Myakkahatchee
Creek (which flows into the
Myakka River).
Refreshments will
be provided, along with
instruction and demon-
stration of safety equip-
ment and free vessel safety
checks. For more informa-
tion, call 941-426-7147.


The Olde World
Restaurant, 14415
Tamiami Trail, North
Port, wants to remind
everyone that it has
karaoke from 7-10 p.m.
Friday and Polish


specialties on Tuesdays.
On Saturday, Kim
Jenkins will be featured,
with classic rock hits from
the 1950s and '60s; and
May 24, Bandana will re-
turn from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.
with rock 'in' roll music. For
more information about
any of these performanc-
es, call 941-426-1155, or
visit www.owrl.com.
000

The North Port Area
Chamber of Commerce
will participate in the
annual Tri-Chamber
Business Card Exchange
at Plantation Golf &
Country Club in South
Venice, set for 5:30-7 p.m.
May 22. The event
includes members from
the North Port, Englewood
and Venice chambers.
Cost is $5 for chamber
members and $10 for
non-chamber members.
For more information or to
register, call 941-564-3040.
000

Greek Grille & Gallery,
14828 Tamiami Trail, in
the North Port Commons,
across for Lowe's, is
pleased to announce
that they now serve
falafel. Check the Let's Go
section of the Wednesday,
May 12 Sun newspaper
for coupons for souvlaki
skewers and gyros. For
more information, call
941-423-6400.
Steve Sachkar is publish-
er of the North Port Sun.
Email him atssachkar@
sun-herald.com or fax
business information to
941-429-3007.


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Hiffldls 975 -01 +140
IncomeD b 1263 +146
Incomelnl 1263 +149
LgTmCrdln 1269 +04 +145
LowDrls 1037 -01 +44
RealRet 1151 +04 +67
ShtTermls 9 89 +22
TotRetA m 1092 +61
TotRetAdm b 1092 +62
TotRetC m 1092 +53
TotRetls 1092 +65
TotRetmD b 1092 +62
TotlRetnP 1092 +64
UnconstrBdlns 1127 -01 +46
PRIMECAP Odyssey
AggGr 2922 -28 +264
Growth 2348 -25 +198
Parnassus
CoreEqlnv 3804 -26 +186
Pax World
Bal b 2483 -15 +114
Permanent
Portfolio 4441 -24 +90


Stocks of Local Interest


Principal
LCGrllnst 1232 -12 +201
SAMConGrA m 1798 -13 +150
Prudential Investmen
BlendA m 2163 -21 +164
IntlEqtyC m 728 -04 +115
Putnam
GIbUtilB m 1244 -03 +79
GrowlncA m 2059 +182
IntlNewB m 1782 -21 +129
SmCpValA m 1484 -14 +203
Reynolds
BlueChip b 7133 -72 +177
Royce
ValueSvc m 1318 -12 +159
Rydex
Electrlnv 6546 -90 +135
HlthCrAdv b 2498 -21 +193
NsdqlOOlv 2122 -16 +21 1
Schwab
1000l1nv d 4950 -45 +187
S&P500Sel d 2942 -27 +186
Scout
Intemntl 3742 -16 +127
Sentinel
CmnStkA m 4297 -38 +171
Sequoia
Sequoia 22194 -234 +194
State Farm
Growth 7130 -63 +149
Stratton
SmCapVal d 7403 -45 +203
T Rowe Price
Balanced 2352 -12 +141
BIChpGr 6233 -64 +202
CapApprec 2658 -15 +161
Corplnc 988 +01 +96
EmMktStk d 3341 -15 +109
Eqlndex d 5055 -47 +184
Eqtylnc 3322 -27 +180
FminSer 1989 -27 +162
GIbTech 1301 -02 +244
GrowStk 5044 -51 +194
HealthSci 5963 -71 +285
HWYield d 729 +145
InsLgCpGr 2631 -28 +206
IntlEqldxk d 1383 -08 +125
IntlGrlnc d 1612 -13 +139
IntlStk d 1675 -06 +143
MediaTele 6680 -24 +251
MidCapVa 31 17 -25 +200
MidCpGr 7308 -62 +21 1
NJTaxFBd 1199 +03 +56
NewAmGro 4222 -38 +181
NewAsia d 1666 -01 +164
Ne-wHonz 4319 -26 +257
Newlncome 956 +01 +56
OrseaStk d 1030 -05 +141
R2015 1467 -06 +137
R2025 1567 -09 +158
R2035 1652 -12 +170
Rtmt2020 2084 -11 +149
Rtmt2030 2298 -16 +165
Rtmt2040 2372 -18 +172
SciTech 3799 -07 +186
ShTmBond 480 +26
SmCpStk 4275 -36 +228
SmCpVal d 4836 -30 +197
SpecGrow 2418 -20 +180
Speclnc 1309 -01 +91
SumGNMA 972 +39
SumMulnc 1176 +03 +66
TaxEfMult d 1955 -20 +187
TaxFShlnt 567 +28
Value 3492 -39 +206
TCW
TotRetBdl 1025 +88
TIAA-CREF
Eqlx 1432 -12 +191
Target
SmCapVal 2633 -20 +196


Templeton
InFEqSeS 2327 -25 +124
Third Avenue
Value d 5864 -29 +128
Thompson
Bond 1198 +01 +87
LargeCap 4797 -40 +179
Thornburg
IncBldC m 2156 -11 +143
IntlVall 3053 -21 +102
Thrivent
IncomeA m 933 +01 +98
MidCapGrA m 1909 -17 +173
Tocqueville
Gold m 3881 -63 +18
Turner
SmCapGr 3451 -30 +184
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 2762 -09 +158
U.S. Global Investor
Gld&Prec m 661 -09 -66
GlobRes m 950 -14 +110
USAA
CorstnMod 1529 -05 +135
GNMA 1001 +33
Growlnc 2183 -20 +176
HYOpp d 896 +163
PrcMtlMin 1485 -21 -52
SciTffech 1950 -15 +216
TaxELgTm 1370 +03 +72
TgtRt2040 1319 -08 +145
TgtRt2050 1302 -08 +148
WorldGro 2751 -13 +180
Unified
Winlnv m 1824 +02 +157
Value Line
PremGro b 3405 -30 +196
Vanguard
500Adml 17298 -160 +187
5001nv 17295 -161 +185
500Sgnl 14289 -132 +187
BalldxAdm 2801 -13 +136
BalldxIkns 2801 -13 +136
BdMktlnstPIs 1083 +01 NA
CAITAdml 1171 +02 +55
CapOp 4719 -48 +192
CapOpAdml 10898 -1 12 +193
Convrt 1399 -08 +143
DevMktIdxkAdm 1349 -05 +126
DevMktkIdxInstl 1351 -05 +127
DivGr 2170 -17 +174
EmMktlIAdm 3495 -21 +99
EnergyAdm 13600 -105 +128
Eqlnc 3051 -20 +196
EqlncAdml 6395 -42 +197
ExplAdml 9105 -73 +212
ExtdldAdm 61 86 -46 +21 7
Extdldlst 61 86 -46 +21 8
ExtdMktldxlP 15266 -114 NA
FAWeUSIns 10114 -44 +122
FAWeUSInv 2025 -08 +120
GNMA 1070 +01 +41
GNMAAdml 1070 +01 +42
GIbEq 2404 -15 +168
Grolnc 4034 -36 +185
GrthldAdm 4806 -41 +195
Grthlstld 4806 -41 +195
HYCorAdml 614 +127
HItCrAdml 8156 -64 +213
HlthCare 19332 -153 +212
ITBondAdm 1148 +02 +68
ITGradeAd 995 +01 +85
InfPrtAdm 2673 +12 +55
InfPrtl 1089 +05 +55
InflaPro 1361 +06 +54
Instldxkl 171 85 -159 +187
InstPlus 171 86 -159 +187
InstTStPI 4271 -38 +194
IntlGr 2317 -09 +143
IntlGrAdm 7372 -28 +144
IntlStkldxAdm 2855 -14 NA
IntlStkldxl 11417 -56 NA


52-WK RANGE 0 CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV

AV Homes Inc AVHI 1262 ---- 2082 16.82 -.10 -06 V V V -74 +298 dd
Arkansas Bst ARCB 1606 --- 0 4235 40.24 -.77 -19 A A A +195 +1445 41 012
Bank of America BAC 1213 --- 1803 14.55 -.29 -20 V v v -66 +115 19 004
Carnival Corp CCL 3144 -0- 4189 38.54 -.43 -11 V A A -41 +136 29 100
Chicos FAS CHS 1520 -0-- 1995 15.77 -.54 -33 V V V -163 -142 19 030
Cracker Barrel CBRL 8473 -0-- 11863 95.20 +.41 +04 V V -135 +133 19 400f
Disney DIS 6041 -0- 8365 80.15 -.77 -10 V A A +49 +212 21 0 86f
Eaton Corp plc ETN 6123 -0- 7819 72.39 -.35 -05 A v V -49 +145 17 196
FortuneBrds Hm&Sec FBHS 3580 -0--- 4792 37.85 -.89 -23 v V V -172 -80 25 048
Frontline Ltd FRO 1 77 -0-- 518 2.90 +.05 +1 8 V V V -225 +377 dd
Harris Corp HRS 4769 -0 7622 74.89 -.68 -09 A A A +73 +566 18 168
iShs U.S. Pfd PFF 3663 -0- 41 05 39.60 -.01 A A A +75 +33 q 2 53e
KCSouthern KSU 8856 -0-- 12596 98.94 -1.86 -18 V V V -201 -126 32 112
LennarCorpA LEN 3090 -0- 4440 38.49 -.10 -03 A A V -27 -117 17 016
McClatchyCo MNI 215 -0- 739 5.22 -.11 -21 V V V +535 +1107 29
NextEra Energy NEE 7478 -- 101 50 96.27 -.34 -04 V V A +124 +238 21 2 90f
Office Depot ODP 377 -0- 585 5.38 +.09 +1 7 A A A +1 7 +329 dd
PGTInc PGTI 757 0-- 1261 8.03 -.12 -1 5 V V V -207 -66 16
Panera Bread Co PNRA 14960 0-- 19477 152.66 -.51 -03 V V V -136 -172 23
Pembina Pipeline PBA 2876 4276 41.25 -.54 -1 3 A A A +171 +284 34 1 74f


52-WK RANGE 0 CLOSE


YTD 1YR


NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV

Pepco Holdings Inc POM 1804--0 2775 27.68 ... A A A +447 +308 23 1 08
Phoenix Cos PNX 3353 -0-- 6154 38.47 -1.83 -45 V V V -373 +136
Raymond James Fncl RJF 4001 -0- 5632 48.29 -1.32 -27 V v v -75 +144 16 064
Reliance Steel Alu RS 6193 --- 7678 72.29 -.79 -11 A A A -47 +93 17 140
Ryder R 5517 0 8490 82.19 -.39 -05 V A A +114 +369 18 136
St Joe Co JOE 1682 ---- 2328 20.34 +.11 +05 A A A +60 +21 5
Sally Beauty Hid SBH 2438 -0-- 31 86 26.21 +.21 +08 A V V -133 -153 17
Simon Property Gp SPG 14247 18245 174.88 +.61 +04 A A A +149 +06 39 5 20f
Stein Mart SMRT 903 -0- 1617 12.85 +.13 +10 V v v -45 +171 23 030f
SuntrustBks STI 3017 --o- 4126 37.63 -.35 -09 V V V +22 +244 13 0 80f
Superior Uniform SGC 1008 -0- 1697 15.88 -.12 -08 V V A +26 +422 18 054
TECO Energy TE 1612 -0-- 1922 17.17 -.01 -01 V V A -04 -28 18 088
Tech Data TECD 4604 -0- 6598 62.29 -.69 -11 V V A +207 +309 13
Wendys Co WEN 557 -0- 1027 8.08 -.10 -1 2 V -73 +416 37 020
World Fuel Svcs INT 3457 -0- 4675 44.72 -.37 -08 A A A +36 +104 16 015


Industrial Oil below $102
production on weak US
unexpectedly falls economic data


IntlStkldxlPIs 11419
IntlStkldxlSgn 3425
IntlVal 37 80
LTGradeAd 1048
LgCpldxlnv 34 74
LifeCon 1847
LifeGro 28 20
LifeMod 2368
MdGrlxlnv 3554
MidCapldxlP 151 20
MidCpAdml 13877
MidCplst 3066
MidCpSgl 4379
MorgAdml 78 35
MuHYAdml 1110
MulntAdml 1418
MuLTAdml 1160
MuLtdAdml 1108
MuShtAdml 1587
Pmcp 9578
PmcpAdml 9934
PmcpCorl 2027
REITIdxAd 10475
STBondAdm 1054
STBondSgl 1054
STCor 1078
STGradeAd 1078
STIGradel 1078
STsryAdml 1071
SelValu 2846
SmCpldAdm 5187
SmCpldlst 5187
SmCplndxSgnl 4673
SmVlldlst 2359
Star 24 51
StratgcEq 3076
TgtRe2010 2626
TgtRe2015 1514
TgtRe2020 2778
TgtRe2030 28 24
TgtRe2035 1733
TgtRe2040 2886
TgtRe2045 1810
TgtRe2050 2873
TgtRetlnc 1278
Tgtet2025 1612
TIIntlBdldxlnst 3062
TIIntlBdldxlnv 1020
TotBdAdml 1083
TotBdlnst 1083
TotBdMklnv 1083
TotBdMkSig 1083
Totlntl 1707
TotStlAdm 4711
TotStllns 4712
TotStlSig 4547
TotStkldx 4709
TxMCapAdm 9561
ValldxAdm 3049
Valldxlns 3049
Wellsl 25 67
WellslAdm 6220
Welltn 3900
WelltnAdm 6736
WndsllAdm 6733
Wndsr 2098
WndsrAdml 70 80
Wndsrll 3793
Victory
SpecValA m 2102
Virtus
EmgMktsls 1012
Wasatch
LgCpVal d 1245
Wells Fargo
Discovlnv 3026
Growlnv 46 81
Outk2O010Adm 1352


-56 NA
-16 NA
-22 +122
+05 +117
-32 +187
-05 +98
-17 +147
-11 +124
-30 +204
-1 32 NA
-1 22 +21 8
-26 +218
-38 +218
-73 +185
+02 +70
+02 +49
+02 +59
+24
+13
-96 +194
-1 00 +195
-19 +193
-15 +250
+25
+25
+01 +43
+01 +44
+01 +45
+14
-29 +215
-37 +221
-37 +221
-34 +221
-18 +217
-09 +136
-25 +233
-07 +108
-06 +120
-12 +131
-16 +148
-11 +156
-19 +159
-12 +159
-19 +159
-02 +86
-08 +139
+03 NA
NA
+01 +48
+01 +48
+01 +47
+01 +48
-08 +119
-42 +193
-42 +193
-40 +193
-42 +191
-86 +192
-29 +182
-29 +183
-04 +123
-08 +124
-17 +142
-29 +143
-49 +184
-22 +195
-72 +196
-28 +183

-20 +155

-02 +152

-10 +139

-25 +220
-44 +21 7
-01 +69






Page 6 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


STOCKS


The Sun/Friday, May 16,2014


STOCKS LISTING CHANGE REQUESTS WELCOME! our readers don't want. If you do not see your stock in the paper, please let us
know and we will put it in the listings. Email the name of the company and the
The Sun Newspaper is tweaking the way stocks are listed in the daily paper, symbol to nlane@sun-herald.com, or call 941-206-1138. You can leave the stock
We will continue to run a wide range of stocks, but we're trying to eliminate stocks name and symbol on voice mail.



S&P 500 V 17.68 NASDAQ -31.34 DOW -167.16 6-MOT-BILLS .01 30-YRT-BONDS a -.05 CRUDE OIL a -.87 EURO A +0008 GOLD 4 -12.20
1,870.85 4,069.29 16,446.81 .04% "V 3.33% $101.50 1.3716 $1293.50


Money Markets


CombinedStocks
From the New York Stock Exchange
and the Nasdaq.


YTD Name Last Chg
A-B-C
-11.3 ABB Ltd 23.57 -.16
-20.8 ADTCorp 32.07 +.01
-2.1 AESCorp 14.20 +.02
-7.4 AFLAC 61.89 -1.01
+11.3 AGLRes 52.56 -.29
-19.3 AKSteel 6.62 -.13
+25.7 ASMIntl 41.47 -.83
+3.9 AT&TlInc 36.52 +.13
+2.4 AbbottLab 39.24 -.69
-.2 AbbVie 52.69 -.18
+12.6 AberFitc 37.06 -1.17
+44.4 Abraxas 4.71 -.39
-4.6 Accenture 78.42 -.43
-6.1 Accuray 8.17 +.01
+22.4 Actavis 205.55 -.53
+12.6 ActivsBliz 20.08 -.20
42.0 Acxiom 21.44 -5.70
+.5 AdobeSy 60.20 -.68
-21.9 AdvEnld 17.86 -.29
+2.3 AMD 3.96 -.02
-21.2 AdvisoryBd 50.16 +.87
+3.5 AecomTch 30.46 -.90
+11.3 AeroViron 32.43 -.78
-4.7 Agilent 54.49 -1.36
-11.4 Aircastle 16.98 -.47
-5.3 Airgas 105.89 -1.06
-15.1 AlaskCom 1.80 -.04
-9.3 AlcatelLuc 3.99 -.07
+25.3 Alcoa 13.32 -.24
+18.7 Alexion 157.71 -2.01
+13.6 AllegTch 40.48 -1.38
+43.0 Allergan 158.89 -.98
-1.8 Allete 48.99 -.31
+19.6 AllnceRes 92.12 +.46
+4.1 AlliBInco 7.42 +.01
+7.7 AlliBern 22.99 -.92
+11.1 AlliantEgy 57.34 -.23
+5.5 Allstate 57.56 -.53
+1.3 AllyFin n 24.30 -.47
-38.4 AlphaNRs 4.40 -.09
+2.0 AlpToDv rs 8.55 -.05
... AlteraCplIf 32.50 +.07
+4.3 Altria 40.05 -.28
-30.5 Amarin 1.37 -.15
-26.0 Amazon 295.19 -2.43
+.4 Ambevn 7.38 -.10
+8.9 Ameren 39.37 +.10
-13.9 AMovilL 20.13 -.32
+51.2 AmAirln 38.19 -.65
+20.4 ACapAgy 23.23 +.05
-5.1 AmCapLtd 14.85 -.29
+13.5 ACapMtg 19.82 -.10
-20.1 AEagleOut 11.50 -.34
+11.3 AEP 52.02 -.34
-3.4 AmExp 87.60 -.86
+6.2 AHm4Rntn 17.20 -.03
+3.5 AmlntlGrp 52.86 -.53
+2.9 ARItCapPr 13.22 -.07
-.8 AmStWtr s 28.49 -.21
+12.1 AmWtrWks 47.38 +.32
+4.2 Amerigas 46.46 +.33
-5.9 Ameriprise 108.23 -2.24
-4.0 AmeriBrgn 67.50 +.44
-.7 Ametek 52.32 -.47
-3.3 Amgen 110.29 -1.78
+50.4 AmkorTch 9.22 +.09
+6.3 Amphenol 94.80 -.77
+25.5 Anadarko 99.55 -1.98
-.3 AnalogDev 50.78 -.28
+1.8 ABInBev 108.34 -.80
+17.2 Annaly 11.68
+26.6 Anworih 5.33 -.02
+3.5 Apache 88.92 -.95
-6.8 Apollolnv 7.90 -.03
+5.0 Apple Inc 588.82 -5.05
+5.7 ApldMatI 18.69 -.26
+3.9 AquaAm s 24.50 -.26
+19.5 ArkBest 40.24 -.77
-9.9 ArcelorMit 16.07 -.22
-6.7 ArchCoal 4.15 -.06
+.3 ArchDan 43.53 -.32
+8.9 ArenaPhm 6.37 -.02
-5.1 AresCap 16.86 -.03
-4.7 AriadP 6.50 -.15
+5.0 ArmourRsd 4.21 -.01
-23.4 ArrayBio 3.84 -.10
+3.7 ArrowEl 56.26 +.13
+5.4 Ashland 102.30 -1.36
+35.6 AstraZen 80.52 +2.23
-8.0 AdasPpln 32.26 -.19
-.9 Atmel 7.76 -.14
+10.4 ATMOS 50.14 -.34
-5.0 Autodesk 47.82 -.25
-5.0 AutoData 76.75 -1.34
+28.5 AvagoTch 67.93 -.58
+49.1 AvanirPhm 5.01 -.04
-5.5 AveryD 47.43 -.69
+36.2 AvisBudg 55.07 -.36
+13.2 Avista 31.90 -.12
-20.0 Avon 13.77 -.12
-1.4 BB&TCp 36.81 -.39
+5.9 BCE g 45.84 +.22
+10.8 B/EAero 96.41 -1.54
+15.5 BGC Ptrs 6.99 -.16
+7.4 BHPBilplc 66.73 +.09
+4.7 BPPLC 50.90 +.47
+12.2 BPPru 89.35 +.23
-12.6 Baidu 155.39 -.63
+24.7 BakrHu 68.92 -1.26
+15.1 BallCorp 59.45 -.24
+102.6 BallardPw 3.07 +.05
-2.2 BcBilVArg 12.12 -.24
+25.1 BcoBradpf 15.67 -.26
+8.6 BcoSantSA 9.85 -.25
+24.1 BcoSBrasil 6.70 -.08
-15.0 BankMutd 5.96 -.03
-6.6 BkofAm 14.55 -.29
+3.6 BkMontg 69.04 -.40
-3.7 BkNYMel 33.65 -.53
-.8 BkNovag 62.02 +.52
-12.1 BiPVixrs 37.42 +.39
+9.0 Bard 145.96 -.41
+8.7 BamesNob 16.25 +.02
-4.4 BarrickG 16.85 -.55
+59.3 BasicEnSv 25.14 -.84
+7.2 Baxter 74.58 -.87
-23.3 BeazerHm 18.74 -.60
-22.4 BedBath 62.30 -.12
-.2 Bemis 40.87 -.26
+6.6 BerkH B 126.36 -1.17
-36.1 BestBuy 25.47 -.55
+18.0 BigLots 38.09 -1.09
+11.2 Biocryst 8.45 -.10
+3.6 Biogenldc 289.53 -6.97
-.8 BlackBerry 7.38 +.05
+.6 BIkHIthSci 35.66 -.31
-7.7 Blackstone 29.07 -.54
-3.8 BlockHR 27.94 -.32
-7.6 BobEvans 46.75 +.27


Interestrates


gill



The yield on the
10-year Trea-
sury fell to 2.49
percent Thurs-
day. Yields af-
fect rates on
mortgages and
other consumer
loans.


PRIME FED
RATE FUNDS
YEST 3.25 .13
6MOAGO 3.25 .13
1 YRAGO 3.25 .13


-3.9 Boeing 131.21 -1.78
+5.6 BorgWrns 59.06 -1.29
-9.2 BostBeer 219.66 -.88
+5.6 BostonSci 12.69 -.10
-3.6 BoydGm 10.86 -.16
-6.4 BrigStrat 20.37 -.09
+3.7 Brinker 48.04 -.63
-7.9 BrMySq 48.93 -3.19
+8.0 BritATob 115.98 +.24
-.5 Broadcom 29.50 -.33
-4.5 BrcdeCm 8.47 +.13
+2.8 Brkflnfra 40.33 -.45
+9.7 Buckeye 77.90 -.33
-4.9 BuffaloWW 139.92 -.08
-13.7 CAInc 29.05 -1.02
+9.7 CBREGrp 28.86 -.01
-11.5 CBSB 56.39 +.45
-19.0 CITGrp 42.20 +.68
+9.2 CMSEng 29.23 -.02
-6.6 CNH Indl 10.60 -.08
+1.0 CSX 29.07 -.29
+16.9 CVR Rfng 26.44
+5.6 CVSCare 75.56 -.44
+19.6 CYS Invest 8.86 +.13
-4.0 CabotOG s 37.21 +.09
+10.9 Cadence 15.55 -.01
+3.8 Cal-Maine 62.53 +.38
+9.9 CalaCvHi 14.21 -.09
+1.8 Calgon 20.93 -.17
-7.9 CalifVWr 21.25 +.81
+16.4 CalumetSp 30.29 +.19
+23.4 CamdenPT 70.18 -.48
+8.6 Cameron 64.64 -.96
+4.0 CampSp 45.03 -.28
+3.1 CdnNRgs 58.79 -.47
+19.2 CdnNRsgs 40.35 -.39
-15.1 CdnSolar 25.32 -1.61
-.2 CapOne 76.42 +.25
-5.5 CapSenL 22.68 -.22
+6.7 CapsteadM 12.89 -.02
+7.8 CpstnTurb 1.39 -.01
-2.8 CardnlHIth 64.93 -.29
+5.1 CareFusion 41.87 +.68
+15.6 Carmike 32.19 -.14
-4.1 Carnival 38.54 -.43
+4.5 CarpTech 65.00 -.48
+23.2 Carrizo 55.16 -.93
+15.6 Caterpillar 104.99 -1.54
+.7 CedarF 49.95
-11.9 Celgene 148.85 -2.90
42.1 CelldexTh 14.02 -1.72
+9.2 Cemex 12.42 -.11
+20.4 Cemig pfs 7.17 -.46
+.5 CenovusE 28.78 -.17
+1.6 CenterPnt 23.55 -.15
+18.8 CntryLink 37.83 +.17
-11.6 Cenveo 3.04 +.01
... ChambStn 7.65 -.19
-21.3 Checkpnt 12.41 -.12
+48.8 ChelseaTh 6.60
-13.5 ChemFinl 27.41 -.20
+32.1 CheniereEn 56.98 -2.05
+6.8 ChesEng 28.99 -.24
-.9 Chevron 123.81 -1.54
-6.0 ChicB&l 78.19 -1.75
-16.3 Chicos 15.77 -.54
-1.3 Chimera 3.06 +.01
+2.0 ChurchDwt 67.59 +.15
-20.7 CienaCorp 18.97 +.27
... Cigna 87.46 -.93
+5.9 CinciBell 3.77 +.01
-7.6 CinnFin 48.41 -.50
+7.5 Cirrus 21.95 -.33
+8.6 Cisco 24.18 +1.37
-10.7 Citigroup 46.52 -.60
-3.8 CitrixSys 60.82 +.63
-23.2 CleanEngy 9.89 -.14
-33.5 CliffsNRs 17.44 -.37
-4.8 Clorox 88.35 -.78
-25.8 Coach 41.65 +.07
+5.0 CobaltlEn 17.27 -.64
-1.9 CocaCola 40.52 -.37
-6.6 CognizTcs 47.18 -1.41
+16.2 CohStQIR 11.02 +.01
+3.6 CohStSelPf 25.59 -.09
+1.8 ColgPalm s 66.41 -.55
-12.8 ColonialFS 11.60 -.06
+10.2 ColumPTn 27.55 -1.31
-3.2 Comcast 50.31 +.48
-3.4 Comerica 45.90 -.83
-18.5 CmpTask 15.34 +.16
-8.2 Compuwre 10.29 -.04
-1.8 Comtech 30.95 +.08
-7.7 ConAgra 31.11 -.36
-11.2 ConnWfrSv 31.54 -.21
+10.6 ConocoPhil 78.11 -.42
+15.9 ConsolEngy 44.08 +.20
+2.5 ConsolCom 20.13 +.08
-.6 ConEd 54.96 -.29
+19.4 ContlRes 134.34 -.38
+17.2 CooperTire 28.17 +.36
-27.7 CorOnDem 38.52 +1.27
+17.6 Corning 20.96 -.23
+15.1 CorpOffP 27.26 -.12
-3.9 Costco 114.35 -.78
+4.7 Cotyn 15.97 +.20
-2.0 CowenGp 3.83 -.23
-62.6 CSVInvNG 3.31 -.15
+1.9 CSVeIIVST 35.05 -.38
-29.6 CSVxShtrs 5.28 +.10
-5.7 CrestwdEq 13.04 -.04
-5.3 Crocs 15.08 +.28
+9.1 CrownHold 48.61 -.45
+6.2 Cummins 149.64 -2.06
+26.0 CybrOpt 8.05 +.02
-9.2 CypSemi 9.53 -.23
-47.2 CytRx 3.31 -.11
D-E-F
+7.2 DCT Indl 7.64 -.05
+7.9 DNPSelct 10.16 -.01
-.3 DR Horton 22.25 +.13
+14.2 DTE 75.85 -.30
+7.5 DTE En 61 25.99 +.04
+6.7 DanaHldg 20.93 -.57
-2.9 Danaher 74.97 -.24
-6.8 Darden 50.69 +.22
+22.8 DeVryEd 43.60 +.10
-11.1 DeanFdsrs 15.29 +.20
-.1 Deere 91.21 -.49
-12.2 Delek 30.20 -.90
+38.8 DeltaAir 38.13 -.31
+2.6 DenburyR 16.85 -.24
+14.3 DevonE 70.74 -1.01
-3.3 Diageo 128.09 +2.08
-12.2 DiaOffs 49.96 -1.05
+13.2 Diebold 37.36 +.18
-32.5 Digilntl 8.18 -.05
+18.6 DigitalRIt 58.24 -.56
-.6 Dillards 96.60 -1.88
+23.3 DirecTV 85.12 -.14


TREASURIES
3-month T-bill
6-month T-bill


1,920................................ S& P 500
1 .H., ,, '1 Close: 1,870.85
Change: -17.68 (-0.9%)
1,840 ........ 10 DAYS .........


4 irn ........................... Nasdaq composite
4 0,_, ` ,0 Close: 4,069.29
Change: -31.34 (-0.8%)
4,000 ........ 10 DAYS .........


1 ,9 2 0 ......... .................................................................. ...... 4 ,4 0 0 .. ..................................................... .............. ......

,8 8 0 ...... ............. ..... .......... .... 4 ,3 0 0 ..............


, .8 4 0 . .. 2 0 0 .... . . .. .. .... ... .. .


1 ,7 6 0 "1 .... .. .,0 00.. .... .... ..... F .... ... ...A .. .. "1 .. .. .i. .. .. ... .
1 ^7 6 0 .....;. ....... ...; ............ ......... .......: ...... .......; .......4, 0 J W ........... r......... ............. .... V....... ......

1,720 .. .... ......... ........ ....... M ... ... .. -k ..... 3 ,90 0 ... -.. ....... ........ .j ...........p. ........... M ........... ;k .. .. .


StocksRecap

NYSE NASD


Vol. (in mil.)
Pvs. Volume
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows


3,446 2,031


-9.1 DirSPBrrs 30.20 +.79
+24.0 DxGIdBII rs 34.00 -1.88
-4.1 DrxFnBear 20.61 +.62
+8.7 DrxSCBear 18.44 +.34
-.3 DrxEMBull 28.62 -.79
-3.5 DrxFnBull 87.15 -2.69
-43.7 DirDGdBrs 24.81 +1.07
-18.6 DrxSCBull 63.06 -1.26
+4.9 Disney 80.15 -.77
-8.4 DollarGen 55.26 -.98
-9.6 DollarTree 51.01 -.73
+8.3 DomRescs 70.08 -.49
+2.2 Dominos 71.21 -.04
-25.4 DonlleyRR 15.12 -.05
+9.5 DowChm 48.61 -1.59
+9.3 DryStrt 8.31 +.02
-35.5 DryShips 3.03 -.01
+2.9 DuPont 66.83 -.89
+5.4 DufPUC 10.57 +.05
+3.4 DukeEngy 71.38 +.11
+14.8 DukeRlty 17.26 -.19
+3.4 E-CDang 9.87 -1.67
-44.4 E-House 8.38 -.30
+.6 E-Trade 19.76 -.97
-6.4 eBay 51.36 -.29
+2.9 EMCCp 25.89 +.09
+22.4 EOG Res s102.74 -1.16
-4.9 Eaton 72.39 -.35
+.5 EVEEq2 13.06 -.04
+2.7 EVTxMGIo 10.27 -.07
+1.5 Ecolab 105.81 -.39
+30.6 EdwLfSci 85.87 -.15
+47.3 ElectArts 33.79 -.34
-19.5 EmeraldO 6.17 -.33
+34.0 Emeritus 28.99 -.16
-5.0 EmersonEI 66.64 -.66
+4.0 EmpDist 23.59 +.07
+1.0 EnbrdgEPt 30.18 +.14
+9.2 Enbridge 47.68 -.02
+27.4 EnCanag 23.00 +.21
+5.9 Endolnld 71.45 +.94
+5.0 Energizer 113.67 -.23
-2.1 EngyTsfr 56.02 -.17
-24.6 EngyXXl 20.40 -.69
+2.4 EnLkLLCn 37.49 +.25
-13.5 EnnisInc 15.15 +.05
-12.2 ENSCO 50.20 -.66
+17.4 Entergy 74.29 +.02
+10.2 EntPrPt 73.08 -.30
+1.5 Ericsson 12.42 +.16
... ExcoRes 5.31 +.02
+26.1 Exelon 34.55 -.25
+.2 Expedia 69.78 -.78
+3.8 Expdlntl 45.93 +1.27
-2.7 ExpScripts 68.37 -.04
-42.3 ExtrmNet 4.03 +.19
-.4 ExxonMbI 100.78 -1.51
+6.4 FMCTech 55.53 -.27
-4.8 FNBCp PA 12.01 +.01
+6.0 Facebook 57.92 -1.31
-13.4 FamilyDIr 56.26 -.43
+1.3 Fastenal 48.15 +.02
-3.5 FedExCp 138.68 -.65
+51.9 FedNatHId 22.28 +.75
+13.3 Ferrellgs 26.00 +.30
+3.6 FidlNFin 33.61 -.84
-.4 FifthStFin 9.21 +.10
-4.1 FifthThird 20.16 -.31
-2.4 Finisar 23.34 +.80
-37.9 FireEyen 27.08 -.17
-3.8 FstHorizon 11.21 -.17
-20.2 FstNiagara 8.47 -.17
+10.0 FstSolar 60.10 -1.79
-2.2 FirstEngy 32.26 -.09
-14.9 FstMerit 18.91 -.37
+20.6 Flextrn 9.37 -.19
-3.4 FlowrsFd s 20.73 -.05
-7.6 Fluor 74.21 -1.69
+17 FordM 15.69 -.06
-40.4 ForestOil 2.15 -.04
-17.2 FBHmSec 37.85 -.89
-5.9 FrankRess 54.31 -1.56
-6.7 FMCG 35.21 -.29
+31.4 Freescale 21.09 -.51
+27.7 FrontierCm 5.94 -.08
-22.5 Frontline 2.90 +.05
+46.8 FuelCellE 2.07 +.02
-7.0 Fusion-io 8.29
G-H-I
+57.2 GTAdvTc 13.70 -.18
... GabDvlnc 22.17 -.02
-17.6 GabMultT 10.22 -.05
+8.8 GabUtil 6.95 -.02
-55.2 GalenaBio 2.22 -.08
-27.2 GameStop 35.87 -.59
-10.1 Gam&Lsrn 34.55 -.29
-8.5 Gannett 27.06 -.16
+4.2 Gap 40.72 -.52
+19.1 Garmin 55.01 -.94
-24.5 Geeknet 13.65 +.01
-.1 GAInv 35.17 -.41
+18.5 GenDynam113.22 -1.44
-5.1 GenElec 26.60 -.16
+16.3 GenGrPrp 23.34 -.11
+7.0 GenMills 53.41 -.69
-15.9 GenMotors 34.36 -.58
+4.4 GenesisEn 54.87 +.61
-12.9 Gentex 28.60 -.41
+11.4 Gentivah 13.83 +5.29
+14.7 Genworih 17.81 -.42
-17.5 Gerdau 6.47 +.01
-60.8 GeronCp 1.86 -.04
+6.7 GileadSci 80.10 -.88
+3.9 GlaxoSKIn 55.49 +.30
+10.6 GlimchRt 10.35 -.04


YEST PVS


NET 1YR
CHG AGO


.01 0.02 -0.01 .04
.04 0.05 -0.01 .08


52-wk T-bill .08 0.08 ... .10
2-year T-note .35 0.37 -0.02 .25
5-year T-note 1.52 1.57 -0.05 .83
10-year T-note 2.49 2.54 -0.05 1.94
30-year T-bond 3.33 3.38 -0.05 3.15


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.13 3.16 -0.03 2.85
Bond Buyer Muni ldx 4.48 4.51 -0.03 4.10
Barclays USAggregate 2.23 2.28 -0.05 1.90
Barclays US High Yield 4.99 4.99 ... 5.21
Moodys AM AACorp Idx 4.12 4.20 -0.08 3.93
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.77 1.81 -0.04 1.12
Barclays US Corp 2.91 2.96 -0.05 2.73


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


-47.7 Gogo n 12.99 -.43
+39.8 GolLinhas 6.39 +.01
+15.0 Goldcrp g 24.93 -.35
-11.6 GoldmanS 156.64 -2.81
+3.9 Goodyear 24.79 +.52
-5.7 GoogleA 529.12 -5.29
-6.9 GoogleCn519.98 -6.67
-7.0 vjGrace 91.94 -1.07
-9.1 GrafTech 10.21 -.28
-6.6 GramrcyP 5.37 +.04
-3.6 GranTrrag 7.05 -.19
+8.5 GraphPkg 10.42 -.25
-74.3 GNIron 17.47 -.04
+5.0 GtPlainEn 25.46 -.12
+4.3 GreifA 54.67 -.60
-16.7 Griffin h 27.81 +.21
-48.6 Groupon 6.05
-18.5 GuangRy 18.83 +.26
+16.4 HCPInc 42.26 +.06
-5.0 HSBC 52.38 +.76
+1.1 HainCel 91.81 -.27
+47.4 HalconRes 5.69 -.21
+22.9 Hallibrln 62.37 -1.62
+15.9 Hanesbrds 81.47 -.87
-.5 Hanoverlns 59.43 -1.06
+2.6 HarleyD 71.02 -1.39
-6.7 Harsco 26.14 -.71
-5.5 HartfdFn 34.24 -.43
+21.3 HatterasF 19.82 -.02
-6.8 HawaiiEl 24.28 +.34
+20.5 HItCrREIT 64.55 +.58
+2.5 HlthCSvc 29.08 +.25
-1.9 HeclaM 3.02 -.09
-32.2 HercOffsh 4.42 -.10
-.8 Hershey 96.48 +.44
-.6 Hertz 28.44 -.29
+15.8 HewlettP 32.41 -.56
+10.0 Hillshire 36.78 +.22
-9.9 HilltopH 20.83 -.27
-1.6 Hilton n 21.90 -.65
-51.9 HimaxTch 7.07 +10
-.3 HollyFront 49.55 -1.04
+6.8 Hologic 23.87 -.30
-7.4 HomeDp 76.24 -.07
-20.0 Honda 33.06 -.42
-.2 HonwlllntI 91.16 -1.58
+7.9 Hormel 48.73 -.07
+7.1 HospPT 28.95 -.10
+10.2 HostHotls 21.43 -.03
-32.5 HovnanE 4.47 -.04
+11.8 HuanPwr 40.51 -.07
+5.8 HubbelB 115.21 -.51
+1.8 HudsCity 9.60 -.09
-6.3 HuntBncsh 9.04 -.12
+7.2 Huntgtnlng 96.45 -3.25
+1.7 Huntsmn 25.03 -.46
-.3 IAMGId g 3.32 -.08
+24.8 ICICI Bk 46.37 -1.57
-11.6 iGateCorp 35.50 -.11
-4.4 ING 13.40 -.33
+9.7 iShBrazil 49.00 -.68
+2.6 iShEMU 42.45 -.40
-1.0 iShGerm 31.45 -.18
+6.7 iShltaly 16.63 -.52
-8.3 iShJapan 11.13 -.11
-.7 iShSKor 64.21 -.35
-3.0 iShMexico 65.94 -.94
+7.0 iShSpain 41.26 -.91
+1.9 iSTaiwn 14.70 -.02
+.2 iShSilver 18.74 -.26
+3.5 iShSelDiv 73.83 -.53
-7.3 iShChinaLC 35.57 -.25
+1.6 iSCorSP500188.55-1.64
+1.4 iShEMkts 42.38 -.40
+2.1 iShACWI 58.81 -.37
+11.8 iSh20yrT 113.86 +.90
+1.9 iSEafe 68.34 -.30
+1.7 iShiBxHYB 94.44 -.09
-5.6 iShR2K 108.88 -.74
+4.1 iShHiDiv 73.14 -.45
+7.5 iShUSPfd 39.60 -.01
+12.3 iShREst 70.86 -.12
-7.0 iShHmCnst 23.09 -.07
+4.5 Idacorp 54.15 -.16
+2.2 ITW 85.96 -.27
+.6 Incyte 50.95 4.95
+4.2 IndBkMI 12.50 -.16
-7.2 IngerRd 57.16 -1.35
+8.1 Ingredion 74.02 -.89
-.5 InlandRE 10.47 -.03
-26.2 InovioPhm 2.14 -.02
+18.1 IntgDv 12.02 -.14
+5.3 IntegrysE 57.29 -.47
+.2 Intel 26.01 -.32
+313.2 InterceptP 282.11+11.17
-4.8 InterNAP 7.16 +.05
-.6 IBM 186.46 -2.26
-31.9 IntlGame 12.36 -.12
-4.5 IntPap 46.84 -.25
-.8 Interpublic 17.56 -.18
-38.8 Intersectns 4.77 -.09
-5.1 IntSurg 364.43 -7.24
-15.0 InvenSense 17.66 -.33
-4.9 Invesco 34.62 -.96
+3.7 InvBncps 10.40 -.05
-2.5 IronMtn 29.60 -.12
-35.9 Isis 25.53 +.07
+23.1 ItauUnibH 16.69 -.20
J-K-L
+4.8 JA Solar 9.61 -.03
-15.9 JDSUniph 10.92 +.08
-7.9 JPMorgCh 53.51 -.85
-14.5 JacobsEng 53.85 -.63
+22.5 JklsPac 8.23 -.13
-8.5 JanusCap 11.32 -.47


Foreign
Exchange
The dollar fell
against the yen,
euro and British
pound amid
data showing
the European
Union's
economy is
recovering more
slowly than
expected.






kTA


HIGH
16622.90
7831.94
540.93
10636.45
4098.25
1888.16
1356.09
19966.91
1099.19


LOW
16397.46
7706.29
535.62
10518.95
4035.96
1862.36
1331.24
19673.18
1082.53


+2.5 JetBlue 8.75 -.03
-18.6 JinkoSolar 23.85 -2.41
+9.9 JohnJn 100.69 -.18
-13.0 JohnsnCtl 44.63 -.68
+9.5 JnprNtwk 24.71 +.10
-13.3 KB Home 15.85
-8.0 KKR 22.39 -.71
+4.1 KKRFn41 27.90 +.08
-20.1 KCSouthn 98.94 -1.86
+12.5 KateSpade 36.08 -1.52
+10.1 Kellogg 67.23 -.35
-1.1 KeryxBio 12.81 -.03
+51.5 KeurigGM 114.41 -1.59
+.8 KeyEngy 7.96 -.30
-1.9 Keycorp 13.17 -.18
+6.0 KimbClk 110.74 -.28
+15.1 Kimco 22.74 -.04
-6.5 KindME 75.44 +.45
-7.1 KindMorg 33.45 +.28
-9.4 Kinross g 3.97 -.05
+9.0 KodiakOg 12.22 -.11
-8.0 Kohls 52.21 -1.82
+5.7 KraftFGp 57.00 -.51
-6.3 KratosDef 7.20 -.27
-5.6 KrispKrm 18.21 -.04
+17.1 Kroger 46.29 -.38
+4.2 Kulicke 13.86 -.12
-8.1 L Brands 56.85 -.73
+8.9 L-3Com 116.35 -1.00
+11.4 LTCPrp 39.41 +.07
+9.4 Landstar 62.84 +.22
-1.8 LaredoPet 27.19 -1.27
-6.9 LVSands 73.41 -.28
+3.1 LaSalleH 31.83 -.30
+6.5 LeggPlat 32.94 -.29
-2.7 LennarA 38.49 -.10
+31.3 Level3 43.55 +.21
+9.8 LexRItyTr 11.21 -.04
-3.7 LbtyASE 5.75 -.04
-1.3 LibGIobCs 41.62 -.29
+11.7 LibtProp 37.83 -.05
-17.6 Lifevantge 1.36 -.01
+14.1 LillyEli 58.21 -1.89
-8.2 LincNat 47.41 -2.58
-31.8 Linkedln 147.86 +2.30
-6.3 LinnEngy 28.84 -.09
-9.0 LinnCo 28.03 -.01
-82.1 LiquidHldn 1.24 -1.06
-5.5 LloydBkg 5.03 -.17
+10.0 LockhdM 163.54 -1.72
+12.4 Lorillard 56.96 -.83
-22.0 LaPac 14.44 -.69
-9.9 Lowes 44.63 -.54
+3.4 Luxottica 55.77 +.07
+18.6 LyonBasA 95.24 -1.33
M-N-O
+2.0 M&T Bk 118.72 -1.08
-2.4 MBIA 11.65 -.36
-22.5 MCG Cap 3.41 +.01
-13.0 MDC 28.06 +.35
+10.5 MDU Res 33.75 -.45
-1.9 MGICInv 8.28 -.24
+2.9 MGMRsts 24.21
+6.9 Macys 57.06 -.77
+2.3 MagHRes 7.48 -.03
+18.0 Manitowoc 27.52 -.35
+33.3 MannKd 6.93 -.08
-6.5 Manulifeg 18.45 -.23
+2.6 MarathnO 36.22 -.36
-2.0 MarathPet 89.90 -1.92
+13.2 MVJrGIldrs 35.15 -.71
+11.8 MktVGold 23.62 -.39
+6.4 MVOilSvc 51.13 -.87
-16.3 MktVRus 24.15 -.38
+.5 MVPreRMu 24.62 -.02
-5.1 MarkWest 62.79 -.11
+1.0 MarshM 48.82
-7.0 MarfnMid 39.80 -.10
-11.5 Masco 20.15 -.09
-12.5 MasterCd s 73.08 -1.02
-18.5 Mattel 38.80 -.47
+14.9 Maximlntg 32.06 -.05
-22.8 McDrmlnt 7.07 -.07
+5.6 McDnlds 102.50 -.53
+7.1 MeadWvco 39.57 -.66
+16.5 Medgenics 6.98 -.22
+10.0 MedProp 13.44 +.05
+4.4 Medtrnic 59.91 -.74
-17.6 MelcoCrwn 32.31 -.12
+11.7 Merck 55.89 -.48
-3.8 MercGn 47.81 -.39
-14.7 Meredith 44.17 -.07
+30.1 Meritor 13.57 -.14
-8.1 MetUfe 49.56 -1.36
+18.9 MicronT 25.86 -1.00
+5.9 Microsoft 39.60 -.64
+24.2 Microvisn 1.64 -.04
-6.3 Middleby 224.67 +7.12
-4.7 MdsxWatr 19.95 +.02
-47.2 MillenMda 3.84 +.02
-50.2 Molycorp 2.80 -.11
+5.5 Mondelez 37.24 -.36
-16.5 MonstrWw 5.95 -.04
+1.8 MoogA 69.18 -.23
-5.1 MorgStan 29.77 -.48
+4.3 Mosaic 49.30 -.70
-1.7 MotraSolu 66.34 -.86
-10.1 MuellerWat 8.42 -.23
+10.6 Mylan 48.02 +.56
-6.7 NCR Corp 31.79 +.34
-77.9 NIIl Hldg .61 -.02
-11.3 NPSPhm 26.92 +.39
-50.5 NQ Mobile 7.27 -2.96
+17.3 NRG Egy 33.68 -.39
-.2 NTTDOCO 16.47 +.07


MAJORS


CLOSE
16446.81
7781.32
536.28
10568.37
4069.29
1870.85
1345.79
19789.38
1095.99


CHG.
-167.16
-53.07
-1.71
-87.75
-31.34
-17.68
-11.27
-177.53
-7.15


%CHG.
-1.01%
-0.68%
-0.32%
-0.82%
-0.76%
-0.94%
-0.83%
-0.89%
-0.65%


+29.9 NXPSemi 59.65 +.11
+46.0 Nabors 24.81 -1.13
-48.2 NBGrcers 2.90 -.56
+4.1 NatFuGas 74.36 +.10
+.6 NatGenH n 14.33 +.33
+10.7 NatGrid 72.32 +.43
+9.8 NtHlthlnv 61.59 +.07
+1.1 NOilVarco 80.44 -.59
-7.4 Navientn 15.74 -.01
-2.8 NektarTh 11.03 -.08
-20.2 Neogens 36.45 -.53
-15.7 NetApp 34.70 +.13
-6.5 Netflix 344.19 -7.69
+10.5 NJ Rscs 51.09 +.58
+30.7 NwMedian 13.72 -.18
-24.3 NewOriEd 23.83 -.49
-7.6 NewResdn 6.17 -.11
-11.1 NYCmtyB 14.98 -.01
+8.0 NYMtgTr 7.55 -.03
-3.4 Newcastle 4.67 -.03
-9.8 NewellRub 29.25 -.27
+35.5 NewfldExp 33.37 -.79
-100.0 NewLead rs .39 -1.26
+5.5 NewmtM 24.29 -.34
-6.4 NewsCpAn 16.87 -.32
+12.4 NextEraEn 96.27 -.34
+10.1 NiSource 36.19 -.05
-7.2 NikeB 72.94 -.64
+6.7 NipponTT 28.84 +.21
-20.3 NobleCorp 29.87 -.80
-10.5 NokiaCp 7.26 -.02
-12.8 NordicAm 8.46 -.07
+3.9 NorflkSo 96.43 -.99
+7.3 NoestUt 45.47 -.17
+9.9 NthnTEn 27.03 -1.35
+4.0 NorthropG 119.19 -2.55
+16.1 NStarRIt 15.61 +.12
-10.7 NwstBcsh 13.21 +.25
+59.2 NwstBioth 6.00 +.06
+3.2 NwstNG 44.20 +.33
+11.9 Novarfs 89.93 +.69
-18.3 Novavax 4.19 -.07
+14.9 NovoNords 42.46 -.22
... NuanceCm 15.20 -.08
-2.3 Nucor 52.17 -.78
+11.8 NuvDivA 14.08 +.09
+2.8 NuvEqtP 12.90 +.08
+7.2 NuvMuOpp 14.17 +.06
+9.4 NvlQI 14.80 +.06
+10.5 NvMAd 13.44 +.06
+9.5 NvAMT-Fr 16.64 +.06
+8.6 NvNYP 14.46 +.07
+10.6 NuvPP 14.97 +.07
+7.0 NvPfdlnco 9.49 -.04
+10.8 NvPMI 13.71 +.06
+10.6 NuvPI 13.64 +.08
+10.0 NuvPI2 13.81 +.06
+6.0 NuvPI4 12.86 +.07
+12.9 NuvQInc 13.83 +.01
+12.4 Nvidia 18.00 -.10
+29.7 NxStageMd 12.97 +.05
+5.4 OGE Egy s 35.73 -.32
+2.1 OcciPet 97.06 -.32
-3.8 OceanFst 16.48 +.44
-39.2 OcwenFn 33.69 +.65
-20.3 OdysMar 1.61
+1.7 OfficeDpt 5.38 +.09
-47.5 OiSAC .86 -.09
-49.9 Oi SA .80 -.09
-12.5 OldNBcp 13.45 -.11
-3.3 OldRepub 16.70 -.14
-5.3 Olin 27.32 -.19
+21.0 OmegaHIt 36.06 -.07
+6.5 OmegaP 13.09 -.08
-8.9 Omnicom 67.74 +.73
+2.3 OnSmcnd 8.43 -.11
-54.2 OncoGenex 3.82 -.11
+2.1 OneokPtrs 53.78 -.10
-3.2 OpkoHlth 8.17 -.01
-15.1 OplinkC 15.80 +.40
+9.6 Oracle 41.93 +.05
+6.5 Orbotch 14.40 +.07
-3.2 Orexigen 5.45 -.21
-41.5 Organovo 6.48 -.22
+41.3 OrThofix 32.24 -.61
+3.6 OshkoshCp 52.19 -.77
-5.9 OtterTail 27.54 -.60
-3.5 OwensCorn 39.28 -.09
P-Q-R
+8.3 PG&ECp 43.63 -.15
+6.5 PNC 82.64 -.65
+14.6 PNMRes 27.63 -.05
-3.1 POSCO 75.55 -.27
+2.6 PPG 194.63 -1.93
+12.2 PPLCorp 33.77 +.22
+3.4 Paccar 61.21 -.67
-11.2 Pandora 23.63 +.01
-13.6 PaneraBrd 152.66 -.51
-33.9 ParametS 9.15 +.17
-26.3 ParkDrl 5.99 -.16
-4.7 ParkerHan 122.56 -2.38
+26.1 PattUTI 31.93 -.84
-2.5 PeabdyE 19.05 -.08
+17.1 Pembinag 41.25 -.54
+3.2 Pengrih g 6.40 -.07
-21.2 PnnNGm 11.29 +.08
+52.5 PennVa 14.38 +.01
+9.2 PennWstg 9.13 -.13
-7.5 PennantPk 10.73
-8.5 Penney 8.37 -.24
-5.3 Penske 44.67 -.58
-4.6 Pentair 74.10 -1.12
-6.1 PeopUtdF 14.20 -.04
-18.0 PepBoy 9.95 -.10
+44.7 PepcoHold 27.68


1YR.
CLOSE CHG %CHG AGO


USD per British Pound 1.6795 +.0023
Canadian Dollar 1.0877 +.0002
USD per Euro 1.3716 +.0008
Japanese Yen 101.54 -.23
Mexican Peso 12.9496 +.0519
EUROPEIAFRICA/MIDDLE EAST
Israeli Shekel 3.4606 -.0005
Norwegian Krone 5.9503 -.0005
South African Rand 10.4081 -.0009
Swedish Krona 6.5681 -.0000
Swiss Franc .8900 -.0002


ASIA/PACIFIC
Australian Dollar
Chinese Yuan
Hong Kong Dollar
Indian Rupee
Singapore Dollar
South Korean Won
Taiwan Dollar


1.0688
6.2309
7.7518
59.405
1.2519
1025.00
30.22


+.0025
+.0017
-.0001
-.105
+.0015
-2.70
+.04


+.14% 1.5220
+.02% 1.0175
+.06% 1.2875
-.23% 102.32
+.40% 12.2296

-.17% 3.6574
-.30% 5.8514
-.94% 9.2713
-.00% 6.6756
-.02% .9658


+.23% 1.0130
+.03% 6.1470
-.00% 7.7618
-.18% 54.785
+.12% 1.2470
-.26% 1118.45
+.13% 29.97


MO QTR
A A
A A
V A
A A
V V
A A
V A
V A
v v


YTD
-0.78%
+5.14%
+9.32%
+1.62%
-2.57%
+1.22%
+0.24%
+0.42%
-5.81%


+3.4 PepsiCo 85.74 -1.10
+155.2 PernixThh 6.43 +.85
-13.7 Perrigo 132.37 +1.11
-11.0 PetSmart 64.76 -.55
+10.8 PetrbrsA 16.27 -.24
+10.8 Petrobras 15.27 -.32
-5.1 Pfizer 29.06 -.04
-5.5 Pharmacyc 100.00 -3.40
-2.1 PhilipMor 85.33 -.42
-13.7 PhilipsNV 31.91 -.15
+6.3 Phillips66 82.01 -1.05
-37.3 PhoernxCos 38.47 -1.83
+4.2 PiedNG 34.54 +.01
+8.3 PimlncStr2 10.78 -.04
+22.9 PinnaclFds 33.75 +.35
+3.8 PinWst 54.93 -.23
+9.9 PioNtdr 202.30 -2.51
+10.9 PithyBw 25.85 -.18
+9.7 PlainsAAP 56.77 -.16
+160.0 PlugPowrh 4.03 +.21
-7.9 PlumCrk 42.85 -.25
-12.5 Polaris 127.46 -4.11
+11.6 Potash 36.77 -.36
-4.8 PS BasMet 16.05 -.30
-.9 PwShsQQQ87.14 -.70
+.3 Praxair 130.36 -1.07
-9.8 PrecCastpt 242.99 -5.94
-5.7 PriceTR 79.03 -2.00
-2.2 Priceline 1136.25 -9.56
-8.2 PrinFncl 45.25 -1.30
-8.5 ProAssur 44.36 +.18
+10.9 ProLogis 40.99 -.28
-2.7 ProShtS&P 24.56 +.22
-1.9 ProUltQQQ 97.71 -1.50
+2.8 ProUltSP 105.40 -1.91
+4.0 ProShtR2K 17.55 +.10
-4.0 PrUPQQQs59.55 -1.41
-30.7 PUVixST rs 46.51 +.84
-1.1 ProctGam 80.53 -.64
-7.2 ProgsvCp 25.31 -.13
-5.3 ProUShSP 28.09 +.49
-2.4 PUShQQQ rs58.54 +.90
-22.9 ProUShL20 61.10 -.98
+7.2 PUSR2Krs 51.58 +.70
-4.7 PShtQQQ rs54.68 +1.22
-8.4 PUShSPX rs55.20 +1.44
-11.2 ProspctCap 9.96 +.06
-13.3 Prudentl 79.98 -2.46
+18.5 PSEG 37.98 -.26
+13.3 PubStrg 170.55 -1.10
-7.6 PulteGrp 18.82 +.10
+9.2 PMMI 7.25 +.04
+.5 QEPRes 30.79 -.10
-2.5 Qihoo360 80.00 -2.24
-21.4 QlikTech 20.94 +.11
+7.4 Qualcom 79.78 -.63
+1.9 Questar 23.42 +.07
-15.6 QksilvRes 2.59 -.01
-30.7 Quiksilvr 6.08 -.15
+69.3 RF MicD 8.74 -.01
-21.6 Rackspace 30.68 +2.04
+1.3 RadianGrp 14.31 -.39
-48.8 RadioShk 1.33 -.01
-16.5 RLauren 147.47 -.05
-27.2 Ravenlnds 29.95 +.49
+7.2 Rayonier 45.14 -.26
+5.9 Raytheon 96.06 -1.34
-26.8 Realogy 36.22 -.39
+15.7 Rltylnco 43.18 -.42
-2.0 RedwdTr 18.98 -.20
+5.4 RegncyEn 27.68 -.11
+1.5 RegionsFn 10.04 -.15
-4.7 RelStlAI 72.29 -.79
-30.1 ReneSola 2.41 -.14
+27.4 Rentech 2.23 -.02
+32.8 Replgn 18.12 +.14
-8.9 ResrceCap 5.40 -.05
+6.4 RetailOpp 15.66 -.04
+102.0 RexahnPh 1.03 +.17
+12.9 ReynAmer 56.46 -.19
+52.2 RiteAid 7.70 -.07
+1.4 RockwlAut 119.77 +.14
+4.9 RockColl 77.52 -1.09
-1.9 Rogers 60.34 -.62
... Roper 138.71 -1.25
-14.8 Rowan 30.11 -1.09
+.1 RoyalBkg 67.29 -.25
+9.6 RylCarb 51.95 -.90
+14.4 RoyDShIIB 85.92 +.26
-13.8 Ryland 37.42 -.05
S-T-U
-9.6 S&T Bcp 22.89 +.02
+9.7 SCANA 51.48 -.21
-44.1 SFXEntn 6.71 -.15
-5.7 SLMCp 8.85 -.05
-8.7 SM Energy 75.85 +1.48
-.6 SpdrDJIA 164.55 -1.56
+7.4 SpdrGold 124.77 -1.04
+2.2 SpdrEuro50 43.12 -.51
+1.5 S&P500ETF187.40 -1.66
-8.3 SpdrHome 30.55 -.25
-8.0 SpdrS&P RB37.38 -.20
-6.5 SpdrRetl 82.37 -.98
+8.3 SpdrOGEx 74.25 -.76
+6.4 SabnR 53.80 -.05
+29.1 SaialIncs 41.39 +.28
+6.0 StJoe 20.34 +.11
-6.8 Salesforce 51.42 -.46
+18.9 SalixPhm 106.90 +1.32
-13.3 SallyBty 26.21 +.21
+10.3 SJuanB 18.47 -.20
+25.2 SanDisk 88.32 -1.57
+10.9 SandRdge 6.73 -.10
-1.9 Sanofi 52.61 +.03
+10.4 Schlmbrg 99.50 -1.24


Commodities
The price of oil
slid below $102
a barrel
Thursday on
news that U.S.
crude oil stock
piles increased
last week.
Natural gas
rose, while gold,
silver, copper
and other
metals declined.



BE


-3.8 Schwab 25.00 -1.20
-13.9 SeadrillLtd 35.37 -.15
-9.4 SeagateT 50.89 -.36
-1.0 SearsHldgs 39.33 -1.41
+3.2 SeaWorld 29.68 +.34
+6.0 SeIllncREIT 28.35 -2.03
+9.0 SempraEn 97.84 -.65
+7.3 SenHous 23.86 -.02
+8.1 Sherwin 198.35 -.57
+6.5 ShipFin 17.44 -.06
-30.6 SiderurNac 4.30 +.01
+25.5 Signetjwlrs 98.79 -1.32
+7.9 SilvWhth g 21.78 -.28
+14.9 SimonProp 174.88 +.61
-43.6 Sina 47.52 -.25
-21.9 Sinclair 27.90 +.34
-9.7 SiriusXM 3.15 -.07
-1.7 Skullcandy 7.09 -.01
+43.0 SkywksSol 40.84 -1.08
-42.0 SmithMicr .86 +.03
-5.9 Smucker 97.51 -1.08
+4.1 SnapOn 113.96 -1.57
-18.5 SodaSfrm 40.46 -.16
-6.5 SolarCap 21.08 -.17
-9.8 SolarCity 51.25 -3.11
-.2 SonocoP 41.63 -.60
-5.2 SonyCp 16.39 -.11
-26.3 Sothebys 39.23 -1.16
-33.0 SouFuns 11.04 -.54
+.7 SourcC 67.55 -.66
-.1 SoJerlnd 55.90 +.10
+5.7 SouthnCo 43.44 -.29
+31.4 SwstAidrl 24.76 -.15
+15.1 SwstnEngy 45.26 -.23
+15.1 SovranSS 75.03 -.23
+11.3 SpectraEn 39.66 -.15
-82.4 Spherix 1.42 -.31
+14.4 SpiritRCn 11.25 +.56
-36.5 Splunk 43.60 -.10
-11.3 Sprint n 9.53 +.54
+3.3 SP Matls 47.73 -.68
+4.5 SPHIthC 57.95 -.59
+2.4 SPCnSt 44.01 -.39
-5.3 SP Consum 63.28 -.46
+5.8 SP Engy 93.64 -1.08
-.6 SPDR Fncl 2172 -.25
+1.5 SPInds 53.02 -.47
+2.0 SPTech 36.45 -.22
+10.6 SP Util 42.01 -.17
-14.1 StdPac 7.77 -.07
+5.3 StanBlkDk 84.99 -.79
-18.1 Staples 13.02 -.25
+23.8 StarGas 6.50 -.03
-10.9 Starbucks 69.85 -.32
-2.0 StarwdHtl 77.85 -1.11
-13.9 StateStr 63.21 -1.66
+23.9 Statoil ASA 29.90 -.20
-7.5 StlDynam 18.08 -.06
+11.1 StratHotels 10.50 -.10
+5.3 Stryker 79.12 -.99
-2.4 SubPpne 45.79 -.10
+2.0 SuffolkBcp 21.21 -.04
-10.2 SunHyddrl 36.66 -.29
+12.4 Suncorgs 39.40 -.15
+33.3 SunEdison 17.40 -.67
+2.2 SunTrst 37.63 -.35
+19.0 SupEnrgy 31.66 -.67
-.1 Supvalu 7.28 +.03
-19.9 SwftEng 10.82 -.51
... SwiftTrans 22.22 -.23
-5.4 Symantec 22.31 +.90
-13.1 Synovus 3.13 -.03
-4.6 SynthBiol 1.46 +.30
-1.1 T-MobileUS 33.26 +.42
-8.0 TAL Educ 20.22 4.94
+7.3 TC PpLn 51.95 +.16
-3.1 TDAmeritr 29.68 -.92
-.4 TECO 17.17 -.01
-8.8 TJX 58.12 -1.01
-21.1 TableauA n 54.39 -.39
+18.5 TaiwSemi 20.66 +.08
+8.3 TakeTwo 18.81 -.18
-8.0 Target 58.18 -1.09
+15.4 Taubmn 73.78 -.21
-12.0 TeckResg 22.89 -.33
+6.7 Tenneco 60.35 -.66
-10.9 Teradata 40.53 -.34
-.1 Teradyn 17.60 -.18
+2.7 TerraNitro 144.98 -4.10
+25.4 TeslaMot 188.59 -2.03
-6.7 Tesoro 54.58 -.04
+24.9 TevaPhrm 50.07 -.46
+2.2 Texlnst 44.89 -.72
-13.7 TexRdhse 23.99 -.36
-6.3 Textainer 37.68 -.37
+6.6 Textron 39.17 -.53
-48.5 3DSys 47.83 -1.49
+.5 3MCo 140.98 -.62
-5.6 THortong 55.11 -.09
-1.7 TimeWarn 68.50 -.45
+13.1 Timken 62.31 -.05
-7.6 TollBros 34.17 -.18
... TorchEngy .45
+2.1 Torchmark 79.80 -.80
+2.1 TorDBkgs 47.68 -.37
+14.7 Total SA 70.29 -.66
-34.9 TowerGrp 2.20 -.08
-10.2 Toyota 109.50 -.93
-15.5 Transocn 41.75 -.45
+2.0 Travelers 92.37 -.28
+1.2 TriContl 20.22 -.14
+5.6 TriCntl pf 47.00
+11.5 TriangPet 9.28 -.02
-22.5 TrinaSolar 10.60 -.58
+25.3 TriNetn 23.94 +.47
+47.3 Trinity 80.33 -.82
+.9 TripAdvis 83.61 -.58


+73.9 TriQuint 14.51 -.01
-.9 TrueBlue 25.55 -.71
-9.7 TrstNY 6.48 -.03
-11.6 Tuppwre 83.61 -.91
+17.0 TurqHillRs 3.86 +.02
-3.3 21stCFoxA 34.02 -.26
-3.9 21stCFoxB 33.26 -.20
-48.5 Twitter n 32.77 -.08
+21.3 Tyson 40.60 +.45
+17.2 UDR 27.37 +.11
+14.9 UGICorp 47.65 +.16
-6.7 UILHold 36.17 -.08
+.8 UNSEngy 60.32 +.12
-22.1 UltraClean 7.81 -.23
+28.0 UlrtaPt g 27.72 +.53
-15.3 Umpqua 16.21 +.21
+6.1 UndArmrs 46.32 -1.00
-11.8 UniFirst 94.40 -.17
+8.0 UnilevNV 43.45 +.32
+13.8 UnionPac 191.12 -1.09
+21.8 Unit 62.89 -.84
+7.9 UtdContl 40.80 -1.09
-4.4 UPS B 100.46 -.91
+21.2 UtdRentals 94.44 -2.29
+.4 US Bancrp 40.57 +.21
+19.0 USNGas 24.63 +.35
-14.4 USSteel 25.25 -.21
+1.7 UtdTech 115.70 -1.62
+1.6 UtdhlthGp 76.48 -.69
-.3 UnvslCp 54.44 -.60
-6.9 UnumGrp 32.66 -.70
-25.0 UraniumEn 1.50 -.03
-4.7 UrbanOut 35.36 -1.30
V-W-X-Y-Z
... VF Corps 62.36 -.72
-8.3 ValeSA 13.98 -.18
-9.4 ValeSApf 12.69 -.08
+5.7 ValeantPh 124.04 -2.93
+10.8 ValeroE 55.83 -.69
-4.8 VlyNBcp 9.63 +.02
-30.5 ValVis A 4.86 +.08
+1.5 VanSP500 rs171.67-1.56
+14.6 VangREIT 73.96 -.04
+.7 VangDivAp 75.75 -.80
+2.3 VangEmg 42.09 -.38
+2.6 VangEur 60.30 -.26
+.7 VangFTSE 41.99 -.19
-6.2 Vantv 30.59 -.84
+9.5 Vectren 38.86 -.29
+17.7 Ventas 67.43 +.34
+11.8 VeoliaEnv 18.29 -.25
-19.0 Verisign 48.43 -.43
-2.4 VerizonCm 47.96 -.05
-14.0 ViadCorp 23.89 +.04
-41.3 VimpelCm 7.59 -.22
+96.5 Vipshop 164.46+14.46
-6.8 Visa 207.45 -2.41
+8.4 Vishaylnt 14.37 -.20
+4.6 VMware 93.85 +.12
-9.3 Vodafone 36.28 -.79
-.7 Vringo 2.94 -.11
+.5 VulcanM 59.74 -1.14
-4.4 WD40 71.05 -.63
+1.0 WPCarey 61.98 +.09
+5.3 WPX Engy 21.45 +.44
-2.4 WalMart 76.83 -1.91
+18.6 Walgrn 68.11 -.50
-59.8 WalterEn 6.69 -.10
+5.1 WREIT 24.56 +.06
-2.1 WsteMInc 43.95 -.06
+1.6 Waters 101.59 -.55
+32.3 Weathflntl 20.49 -.59
-7.2 WebsterFn 28.93 -.19
-34.3 WtWatch 21.65 -.33
+13.2 WeinRIt 31.03 -.43
+13.6 WellPoint 104.93 -.74
+8.0 WellsFargo 49.03 -.26
-7.3 WendysCo 8.08 -.10
+9.9 WestarEn 35.36 -.12
+9.5 WAstEMkt 12.97 +.03
+5.6 WAstlnfSc 12.06 +.05
-7.1 WstnUnion 16.03 +.03
+10.4 Westpacs 32.07 +.20
-4.8 Weyerhsr 30.07 -.41
-8.1 Whrlpl 144.13 -.40
-33.0 WholeFds 38.76 +.02
+17.8 WmsCos 45.45 +.16
+19.8 Windstrm 9.56 +.21
+10.2 WiscEngy 45.55 -.24
46.6 WisdomTr 9.45 -.94
-9.6 WTJpHedg 45.97 -.51
+17.5 WT India 20.50 -.19
+.3 Woodward 45.76 +.08
+20.2 WIdW Ent 19.93 +.58
-13.9 WuXi 33.05 -3.35
+3.9 Wynn 201.72 +.50
+.4 XLGrp 31.96 -.27
+9.4 XcelEngy 30.58 -.27
-2.5 Xerox 11.86 -.12
-1.0 Xilinx 45.46 -.36
+20.3 YRCWwde 20.90 +.01
+8.6 YYInc 54.59 -.84
-16.4 Yahoo 33.80 -.37
-14.6 Yamanag 7.36 -.19
-30.8 Yandex 29.84 -.11
-19.9 Yelp 55.20 +.59
-43.0 YingliGrn 2.88 -.17
-7.5 YorkWater 19.35 +.15
-1.0 YumBrnds 74.87 -.99
+5.3 Zagg 4.58 +.08
... Zendeskn 13.43
+7.5 Zimmer 100.15 -.78
-6.8 Zoetis 30.46 -.18
+.9 ZweigFd 15.00 -.12
-11.6 Zynga 3.36 -.16


Stock Footnotes: Stock Footnotes. cild Issue has been called for
redemption by company, d New 52-week low. ec Company for-
merly listed on the American Exchange's Emerging Company Mar-
ketplace. g Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars, h Does
not meet continued-listing standards. If Late filing with SEC. n -
Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low fig-
ures date only from the beginning of trading, pf Preferred stock
issue, pr Preferences. pp Holder owes installments of purchase
price, rt Right to buy security at a specified price, rs Stock has
undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50% within the past year.
s Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi -
Trades will be settled when the stock is issued, wd When distnb-
uted. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock, u New 52-week
high. un Unit,, including more than one security, vj Company in
bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankrupt-
cy law. Appears in front of the name. Stocks in bold are worth at
least $5 and changed 5 percent or more in price. Underlining for 50
most actively traded stocks of the day. Dividend Footnotes: a -
Extra dividends were paid, but are not included, b Annual rate plus
stock, c Liquidating dividend, e -Amount declared or paid in last 12
months, f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent
dividend announcement, i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no
regular rate. j Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend
was omitted or deferred, k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative
issue with dividends in arrears, m Current annual rate, which was
decreased by most recent dividend announcement, p Initial divi-
dend, annual rate not known, yield not shown, r Declared or paid in
preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t Paid in stock, approxi-
mate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q Stock is
a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown, cc P/E exceeds 99. dd -
Loss in last 12 months. Mutual Fund Footnotes: b Fee covering
market costs is paid from fund assets, d Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. f front load (sales charges), m Multiple fees are
i 1 i ...*ii ......i -'... fee and either a sales or redemption
-- ii- ,, i ,i ,i- I. previous day's net asset value, s fund
split shares during the week. x fund paid a distribution dunng the
week. Source. Morningstar and the Associated Press.


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 101.50
Ethanol (gal) 2.18
Heating Oil (gal) 2.95
Natural Gas (mm btu) 4.47
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.96

METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1293.50
Silver (oz) 19.45
Platinum (oz) 1469.90
Copper (Ib) 3.16
Palladium (oz) 811.90

AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.37
Coffee (Ib) 1.94
Corn (bu) 4.84
Cotton (Ib) 0.90
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 322.10
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.57
Soybeans (bu) 14.70
Wheat (bu) 6.78


PVS.
102.37
2.17
2.96
4.37
2.97


%CHG
-0.85
+0.09
-0.41
+2.34
-0.17


PVS. %CHG
1305.70 -0.93
19.74 -1.46
1485.70 -1.06
3.17 -0.38
828.60 -2.02


PVS.
1.37
1.81
4.95
0.91
332.80
1.63
14.96
6.81


% CHG
-0.04
+7.41
-2.27
-0.37
-3.22
-3.72
-1.10
-1.76


%YTD
+3.1
+14.0
-4.1
+5.7
+6.4

%YTD
+7.6
+0.6
+7.2
-8.1
+13.2

%YTD
+2.2
+75.4
+14.8
+6.8
-10.6
+14.8
+12.0
+12.1




SThe Sun /Friday, May 16,2014 www.sunnewspapers.net


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WEATHER/WORLD NEWS


The Sun/Friday, May 16,2014


TUESDAY THE NATION


Partly sunny, breezy Mostly sunny and
and less humid delightful


82 / 590
10% chance of rain


86/600
0% chance of rain


)AY AIRPORT
nature@ Today Possible weather-related delays today. Check
with your airline for the most updated schedules.
Hi/Lo Outlook Delays
6, Ft. Myers 83/62 part cldy none
S Punta Gorda 83/58 part cldy none
1 Sarasota 80/61 sun none
83 77 SUN AND MOON


8a.m. 10a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. 6 p.m. The Sun Rise Set
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV IndexT number, Today 6 a 8 pm
the greater the need for eye and skin protection. 0-2 Low; Td .40 a.m. 8:10 p.m.
3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very Highi; I11I Extreme. Saturday 6:40 a.m. 8:10 p.m.
RealFeel Temperature is the exclusive The Moon Rise Set
AccuWeather.com composite of effective temperature Today 10':17 p.m. 8':22 a.m.
based on eightweatherfactors. Saturday 11:13 p.m. 9:22 a.m.
AIR QUALITY INDEX Last New First Full
Air Quality Index readings as of Thursday 0

0 50 100150200 300 500 M 21 May28 Jun5 Jun12
0 50 100 150 200 300 500 May 21 May 28 Jun 5 Jun 12


0-50 Good; 51-100 Moderate; 101-150 Unhealthy
for sensitive groups; 151-200 Unhealthy; 201-300
Very Unhealthy; 301-500 Hazardous
Main pollutant: ozone
Source: scgov.net

POLLEN INDEX
Pollen Index readings as ofThursday
Tress J
Gress
Weeds ".o A
Moids *
absent low mode aite high veryigh
Source: National Allergy Bureau

ALMANAC
Punta Gorda through 5 p.m. Thursday
Temperatures
High/Low 88/730
Normal High/Low 89/660
Record High 960 (1985)
Record Low 560 (2013)
Precipitation (in inches)
24 hoursthrough 5 p.m.Thursday 0.03"
Month to date 2.76"
Normal month to date 0.96"
Year to date 14.77"
Normal year to date 10.50"
Record 1.22" (1974)

MONTHLY RAINFALL
Month 2014 2013 Avg. Record/Year
Jan. 3.67 0.43 1.80 7.07/1979
Feb. 1.24 2.12 2.52 11.05/1983
Mar. 5.10 1.98 3.28 9.26/1970
Apr. 2.00 3.06 2.03 5.80/1994
May 2.76 2.76 2.50 9.45/1991
Jun. 10.50 8.92 23.99/1974
Jul. 7.38 8.22 14.22/1995
Aug. 9.29 8.01 15.60/1995
Sep. 11.12 6.84 14.03/1979
Oct. 3.48 2.93 10.88/1995
Nov. 0.01 1.91 5.53/2002
Dec. 0.97 1.78 6.83/2002
Year 14.77 53.10 50.74 (since 1931)
Totals are from a 24-hour period ending at 5 p.m.


SOLUNAR TABLE
Minor Major Minor
Today 7:41a 1:26a 8:10p
Sat. 8:44a 2:30a 9:14p
Sun. 9:49a 3:35a 10:18p


Major
1:55p
2:59p
4:04p


The solunar period schedule allows planning days
so you will be fishing in good territory or hunting in
good cover during those times. Major periods begin
at the times shown and last for 1.5 to 2 hours.The
minor periods are shorter.
TIDES
High Low High Low
Punta Gorda
Today 6:09a 10:01a 4:04p ---
Sat. 7:06a 12:22a 4:47p 10:36a
Englewood
Today 4:46a 8:17a 2:41p 10:38p
Sat. 5:43a 8:52a 3:24p 11:30p
Boca Grande
Today 3:51a 6:38a 1:46p 8:59p
Sat. 4:48a 7:13a 2:29p 9:51p
El Jobean
Today 6:41a 12:03a 4:36p 10:30a
Sat. 7:38a 12:51a 5:19p11:05a
Venice
Today 3:01a 6:56a 12:56p 9:17p
Sat. 3:58a 7:31a 1:39p 10:09p


FLORIDA CITIES


City
Apalachicola
Bradenton
Clearwater
Coral Springs
Daytona Beach
Fort Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Fort Pierce
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key Largo


Today
Hi Lo W
78 57 s
79 63 s
79 64 s
82 67 c
81 61 s
83 72 c
83 62 pc
80 65 pc
81 52 s
81 53 s
83 71 c


Sat.
i1 LoW
1 60 s
4 64 s
365 s
370 s
1 60 s
3 74 pc
7 64 s
265 s
355 s
254 s
272 t


,'.Sunny and pleasant Brilliant sunshine and
Sunny and pleasant Brilliant sunshine and


87/ 630
0% chance of rain


Clearwaterl
79 64




'j
St. Petersburg
79,63


Plant City
J82 59


Tampa
79/60


JBrandun
80 58


Apollo Beach
79 62


City
Pompano Beach
St. Augustine
St. Petersburg
Sanford
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Titusville
Vero Beach
West Palm Beach
Winter Haven


Plenty of sunshine
'",*.-'"
Plenty of sunshine


J
Winter Haven
80, 61


*^ 4 -.;*" .
BartuA ..-j
80,61 '*^


Ft. Meade
80/57


J
Wauchula
81 61


Longboat Key -
79/64
Sarasota '
80/61


Ospre
79/6

Shown is today's weather
Temperatures are today's
highs and tonight's lows.


Gulf Water
Temperature

800


yo


Arcadia
82 62 4 ..


Venice Hull
S80/60 North Port u'
82/59 82/59
i Port Charlotte
t a.82/59
Engleuud 4 .- .. .
81 59 -..
Punta Gorda


Placida9
81/58.


Boca Grande*
81/64


Forecasts and graphics, except for the
WINK-TV 5-day forecast, provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. 2014

Publication date: 5/16/14
MARINE
Wind Speed Seas Bay/Inland
direction in knots in feet chop
Cape Sable to Tarpon Springs
NNW 12-20 2-4 Moderate
Tarpon Springs to Apalachicola
N 12-25 2-5 Moderate


City
Key West
Kissimmee
Lakeland
Melbourne
Miami
Naples
Ocala
Okeechobee
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola


Today Sat.
1 Lo W Hi Lo
2 72 pc 84 73
2 59 s 84 61
0 59 s 84 61
0 66 pc 82 66
3 70 c 83 73
0 63 pc 86 65
1 53 s 83 54
0 65 pc 81 65
2 60 s 84 61
9 57 s 79 62
9 62 s 82 65


Fort Myers
83/62 1
4
Cape Coral
82/61


Lehigh Acres
83/61


Today Sat.
1 Lo W Hi Lo W
2 68 c 82 73 pc
9 61 s 77 61 s
9 63 s 84 65 s
3 61 s 85 62 s
0 61 s 84 62 s
9 49 s 85 59 s
9 60 s 84 63 s
0 64 s 81 63 s
0 65 pc 82 65 s
1 67 c 83 70 s
0 61 s 83 63 s


*10s -Os I Os I 10s I 20s 30s 40s I 50s I 60s 70s 80s I 90s
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
.Sealttie Wln1'P ', '. *'f-
7 T/51 ^ ________ 59(3 .,Veonireak
5Yi2 Otiawa. ,72nr,53
"6848
Billings ', ,- ,
'Tororta
64'5 ,~M*nnrespol.u 56141
56/40 ;
DelroI Yo
S Denver Chicago. 5842 7
e ever 51r39
.Son Francisco KSr ,3 4*
71,53 4. Wasrnngtlorl

LIPAngele; '7 ,.
^k L -^ Ailarta
El Paso .4
'1 ^ Housion
U 82/62
Chihuahia, ;
9113j Monlerrey M-arni"
,-, V ,:: 'f^ ::
Fronts Precipitation
*- AAAA-W. T'-] =a 77] E5 76] Z
Cold Warm Stationary Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice
U.S. Extremes (For the 48 contiguous states yesterday)


High ............ 104 at Santa Maria, CA


City
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
Fairbanks
Fargo
Hartford


Today
Hi Lo W
83 57 pc
70 51 s
71 48 s
68 51 r
64 45 sh
70 50 s
84 54 pc
70 56 c
54 41 r
74 58 r
64 42 sh
74 43 pc
51 39 sh
58 41 t
56 42 sh
78 45 pc
58 44 pc
72 56 sh
84 58 s
64 44 c
59 39 sh
58 42 sh
51 31 sh
70 47 pc
58 34 pc
70 59 sh


Helena 70 44
Sanibel Honolulu 87 73
81/65 Houston 82 62
Bonita Springs Indianapolis 56 40
81/62
:, WORLD CITIES


C
s
2s
)sh


Sat.
Hi Lo W
87 60 s
70 50 s
77 57 pc
72 51 pc
69 46 pc
77 55 c
77 50 pc
68 52 r
57 38 c
66 47 r
65 40 pc
73 50 pc
58 40 pc
62 41 pc
56 39 sh
79 55 s
61 43 pc
66 50 r
84 63 s
74 47 pc
66 44 pc
58 42 c
59 36 pc
64 43 sh
66 41 pc
74 51 r
70 46 c
85 72 s
83 65 s
61 43 pc


Low ................. 10 at Eagle Nest, NM
Today Sat.


City
Jackson, MS
Kansas City
Knoxville
Las Vegas
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Montgomery
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk, VA
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Salt Lake City
St. Louis
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Washington, DC


Hi Lo W
78 53 s
62 41 c
66 42 pc
99 80 s
93 62 s
58 43 t
69 51 pc
50 38 sh
56 40 sh
76 49 s
66 45 t
81 63 s
70 57 r
73 56 r
79 51 pc
60 39 pc
71 55 r
103 78 s
60 43 c
66 52 c
74 55 pc
71 58 c
75 49 pc
80 56 pc
62 42 sh
86 58 s
86 62 s
71 53 pc
70 51 pc
71 54 r


Hi Lo W
82 58 s
66 43 pc
66 49 sh
98 79 s
78 59 s
66 46 pc
71 54 r
55 41 pc
65 45 pc
82 55 s
66 49 sh
83 63 s
75 56 pc
75 56 pc
75 56 pc
67 43 pc
74 54 pc
102 77 s
59 40 sh
60 50 r
67 51 sh
69 54 r
72 50 s
80 56 pc
67 47 pc
86 65 s
73 61 s
67 52 pc
62 49 sh
74 53 pc


Today Sat. Today Sat.
City Hi Lo W Hi LoW City Hi Lo W Hi LoW
Amsterdam 62 48 s 65 50 s Mexico City 73 46 pc 76 49 s
Baghdad 101 77 s 104 78 s Montreal 72 53 r 62 47 r
Beijing 84 58 s 81 61 s Ottawa 68 48 r 62 42 pc
Berlin 66 48 pc 66 50 r Paris 66 49 s 69 50 s
Buenos Aires 66 52 pc 64 45 s Regina 63 40 sh 66 42 c
Cairo 92 67 s 90 66 s Rio de Janeiro 79 68 s 79 70 pc
Calgary 58 39 sh 58 42 sh Rome 69 51 pc 69 53 pc
Cancun 84 75 t 87 74 s St. John's 57 41 pc 52 37 pc
Dublin 63 45 pc 65 49 pc San Juan 89 75 pc 88 75 t
Edmonton 60 36 s 65 39 pc Sydney 75 54 s 75 54 s
Halifax 59 45 c 57 42 pc Tokyo 78 61 pc 75 59 pc
Kiev 73 59 sh 78 58 t Toronto 56 41 sh 56 39 c
London 72 53 pc 74 53 pc Vancouver 67 52 pc 64 49 sh
Madrid 81 50 s 79 52 s Winnipeg 59 32 pc 63 38 pc
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.


Turkish families bury miners


SOMA, Turkey (AP) -
Women sang laments
and swayed with grief
Thursday over the graves
of relatives killed in
Turkey's worst mining
disaster, even as more
hearses pulled up and
backhoes dug more
graves around them.
Rescue teams recov-
ered eight more victims,
raising the death toll to
282, with some 142 peo-
ple still unaccounted for,
according to government
figures. The disaster
Tuesday has set off pro-
tests around Turkey and
thrown Prime Minister
Recep Tayyip Erdogan's
presidential ambitions
off stride. Blackening
his reputation further,
one of Erdogan's aides


was accused of kicking a
protester on the ground.
At a graveyard in the
western town of Soma,
where coal mining has
been the main industry
for decades, women
wailed loudly in an
improvised display of
mourning. They swayed
and sang songs about
their relatives as the
bodies were taken from
coffins and lowered into
their graves. Pictures
of the lost relatives
were pinned onto their
clothing.
"The love of my life
is gone," some sang,
chanting the names of
dead miners.
No miner has been
brought out alive since
dawn Wednesday from


the Soma coal mine
where the explosion and
fire took place. Many
mourners said they spent
their whole lives fearing
something like this.
"The wives of the min-
ers kiss their husbands in
the morning. When they
come back, even if they
are five minutes late,
everyone starts calling.
You never know what is
going to happen," said
Gulizar Donmez, 45, the
daughter and wife of a
miner and neighbor of
one of the victims.
Energy Minister Taner
Yildiz on Thursday an-
nounced that a fire inside
the mine was dying
down, offering hope that
rescuers would soon be
able to speed up their


search for those missing.
Erdogan, who is
expected to soon an-
nounce his candidacy
for Turkey's presidential
election in August, was
not welcome during
his visit to the area
Wednesday. He was
forced to take refuge
at a supermarket after
angry crowds called him
a murderer and a thief,
in a reference to alleged
corruption, and clashed
with police.
Turkish newspapers
Cumhuriyet, Milliyet
and others on Thursday
printed photographs
they said were of an
Erdogan aide kicking a
protester who was on the
ground and being held
by special forces police.


Afghan candidates differ in style not substance


KABUL, Afghanistan
(AP) One is suave,
debonair, and well-
groomed, often wearing
bespoke suits and ascot
ties. The other looks and
even dresses a bit like
the famously ascetic
Mahatma Gandhi.
Afghanistan's presiden-
tial campaign is going
to a runoff between two
candidates with little to
distinguish them on is-
sues but sharply different
personal backgrounds
and styles.
The first, former
Foreign Minister Abdullah
Abdullah, is a one-time
aide to a famed warlord
during the Afghan anti-
Soviet guerrilla campaign.
The second, ex-Finance
Minister Ashraf Ghani
Ahmadzai, is a Columbia
University-educated
anthropologist who spent
much of the '90s working
for the World Bank.
Both have promised


to sign a deal to allow
some U.S. forces to stay
in Afghanistan after the
end of the year and have
emphasized in their
campaign speeches that
they will do "whatever is
necessary" to advance
peace without offering
specifics. With no visible
differences in either
candidate's position on
talks with the Taliban
or relations with the
U.S., the run-up to the
June 14 final round is
likely to be dominated by
horse-trading among the
country's still powerful
ethnic voting blocks.
After an inconclusive
first round of voting in
April, Afghan voters must
now return to the polls
to select a successor to
President Hamid Karzai,
a one-time close U.S.
ally who lately has been
more a thorn in its side.
A peaceful transfer of
power would offer some


hope that the hundreds
of billions of dollars
spent and more than
2,000 American lives lost
in the war to stabilize
Afghanistan after more
than three decades of
conflict were not wasted.
The second round will
likely feature a tight race,
but some observers have
raised concerns that the
balloting will highlight
ethnic fault lines in the
country of 30 million.
Abdullah, 53, has both
Pashtun and Tajik par-
entage. During the Soviet
occupation in the 1980s,
he served as adviser to
and spokesman for Tajik
warlord Ahmad Shah
Massoud, who was assas-
sinated by al-Qaida two
days before the Sept. 11,
2001 attack.
In the early days after
the U.S.-led alliance
toppled the Taliban
regime, Abdullah became
the face of Afghanistan's


anti-Taliban movement,
giving frequent press
conferences to interna-
tional media. He served
as foreign minister and
then was the runner-up
in Karzai's disputed
re-election in 2009.
Ahmadzai, a 64-year-old
Pashtun, received a Ph.D.
in anthropology from
Columbia University and
taught at Johns Hopkins
University during the
years of Soviet occupation.
He then began a career at
the World Bank and was
finance minister in the
first post-Taliban govern-
ment. He also ran in the
2009 election, coached by
American campaign con-
sultant James Carville, but
received only 3 percent of
the vote.
Both candidates have
named running mates
chosen strategically from
other ethnic groups, a
Pashtun for Abdullah and
an Uzbek for Ahmadzai.


I WORLD NEWS BRIEFS


Israeli troops kill
2 Palestinians in
Nakba clash

RAMALLAH, West Bank
(AP) Israeli troops shot
dead two Palestinian
teens in a West Bank clash
that erupted Thursday
after Palestinians marked
their uprooting during
the Mideast war over
Israel's 1948 creation, a
doctor said.
Three Palestinians were
wounded, one seriously,
when Israeli troops
fired to disperse stone
throwers near an Israeli
military checkpoint in
the West Bank, said Dr.
Samir Saliba, head of the
emergency department at
Ramallah Hospital.
Saliba said those killed
were 15 and 17 years old
and were shot by live
rounds in the chest.


Bombing outside
restaurant in


activist group said.
The attack came as
President Bashar Assad's
forces have seized the
momentum of the
country's 3-year-old civil
war ahead of presidential
elections scheduled for
June 3.


Wave of protests
begins in Brazil

SAG PAULO (AP) -
Protesters began a wave
of demonstrations around
Brazil on Thursday,
burning tires and block-
ing highways to draw
attention to housing and
education needs before
next month's World Cup.
In Sao Paulo, the coun-
try's biggest city, dem-
onstrators blocked two
key roads into the city
and hundreds protested
near one of the stadiums
built for soccer's premier
tournament.


ISLAMABAD (AP)-
Police in Pakistan say
a bomb attached to a
motorcycle has exploded
outside a restaurant near
the capital, Islamabad,
wounding at least
15 people.
Police officer Abdul
Majeed says the bomb
exploded late Thursday
in Rawalpindi, a garrison
city near Islamabad.


Activists: Bomb
kills at least 43 in
north Syria

BEIRUT (AP)- A
massive car bomb ripped
through a crowded
garage Thursday near a
rebel-held border cross-
ing between Syria and
Turkey, killing at least 43
people in an area that has
seen fierce fighting be-
tween rival rebel groups,
an anti-government


II,,,.L PIC, -FYI ,v,
gas from June 1

KIEV, Ukraine (AP) -
Ukraine must pay in ad-
vance for Russian gas sup-
plies starting next month,
Russian President Vladimir
Putin said Thursday, raising
pressure on the struggling
neighbor as Moscow voiced
dismay over what it says
is Ukraine's reluctance to
implement an international
peace plan.
Putin said in a letter
to European leaders that
Ukraine's debt for Russian
gas supplies has reached
$3.5 billion, and because of
its refusal to pay Moscow,
it will have to switch to
pre-paid gas deliveries
starting from June 1.
The Russian president
first warned of the move
in April in a letter to
European leaders, whose
nations are customers of
Russian state-controlled
Gazprom natural gas giant.


TODAY


SATURDAY


SUNDAY


MONDAY


CONDITIONS TOM
UV Index and RealFeel Temper


10 10,
.... ,"


89/670 90/660
0% chance of rain 20% chance of rain


68 74 81 84


AeeuWmeather.com -'-


Pakistan wounds 15 Putin: Ukraine
miuit nr.-nav for


E
T


83/58











SPORTS


Friday, May 16,2014


* NBA: Miami

PLAYOFF GLANCE
Thursday's results
Indiana 93, Washington 80
Oklahoma City at LA. Clippers,
late
Sunday's games
Miami at Indiana, 3:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Oklahoma City,
7:30 p.m. (if necessary)
See more NBA playoffseries glance
in Scoreboard, Page 5



Two


down,


two


to go

By TIM REYNOLDS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
MIAMI During the
dog days of the regular
season, the Miami Heat
often spoke about the
need to not take any
shortcut on the way to
the playoffs.
And that's true.
That doesn't mean they
necessarily enjoyed the
82-game run-up to the
best time of year.
"None of us," Heat
forward LeBron James
finally confessed, "are here
for the regular season."
When this core of Heat
players was assembled,
the only stated goal
was winning NBA titles,
which also explains why
even getting through
the first two rounds of
these playoffs basically
unscathed only merited a
short celebration.
Miami is back in the
Eastern Conference finals
for the fourth straight
season, where they'll
face Indiana. The Pacers
ended their series with
Washington by beating
the Wizards 93-80 on
Thursday in Game 6.
The Heat got there by
ousting the Brooklyn
Nets in five games, the
end of that series on
Wednesday night being
briefly accompanied by a
few hoots and hollers in
the immediate moments
after the clinching 96-94
win was completed.
Before long, order
was restored to the Heat
locker room. Two series
wins are nice, but they
know the road only gets
tougher from here.
"Like LeBron said, to be
in this position four years
in a row, this is the reason
we came together four
years ago," Heat guard

HEAT13


* PREP FOOTBALL: North Port 25, Lemon Bay 16


SUN PHOTO BY JENNIFER BRUNO
North Port High School quarterback Brennan Simms throws a pass during Thursday's spring game against Lemon Bay at The
Preserve in North Port.




Spring in his step


Simms rushes for 2 TDs, passes for another as Bobcats win


By ROB SHORE
SPORTS WRITER
NORTH PORT Brennan
Simms punctuated a humid,
soggy night with a winding 20-
yard touchdown run, and North
Port High School won what might
have been the first game of Larry
Detwiler's coaching tenure at the
school with a 25-16 victory over
Lemon Bay on Thursday.
It was Simms' second rushing
touchdown of the night. He also
fired a 10-yard touchdown pass
to Stantley Thomas.
But typical of the spring game,
it was a somewhat uneven


LIKE US ON FACEBOOK
For more photos from Thursday's spring
game: Facebook.com/SunCoast Sports

performance, and the North Port
quarterback acknowledged that.
"At some points, we were (click-
ing) and at some points we were
off," said Simms, who will be a
junior in the fall. "We're working
toward the fall."
But it was a good start for
Detwiler maybe the start of
something interesting.
Detwiler took over for coach
Billy Huthman on an interim


basis on February 28. He has
yet to formally accept the head
coaching role.
But the Bobcats gave him
plenty of food for thought.
"I don't know that I'm going to
go to DisneyWorld tomorrow,"
Detwiler quipped. "I'll take it. As
a lot of people don't understand,
I've been coaching football for 25
years and this is my first shot at a
high school varsity program. I'm
pretty excited by it."
If his mind needed swaying,
the Bobcats sometimes appeared
to be doing their best sales pitch.
BOBCATS|6


* HORSE RACING: Preakness Stakes


At 85, trainer has his best horse


Exercise rider Domingo Navarro gallops Social Inclusion on
Thursday at Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore.


By BETH HARRIS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
BALTIMORE Manny Azpurua
could be retired, enjoying the South
* Florida sunshine. He could walk away
S from training, secure in his success
S back in Venezuela, where he won
more than 3,500 races before coming
S to the United States 35 years ago.
._ Few would begrudge him wanting
San escape from the rigors of the race-
track the pre-dawn wakeup calls,
the physical labor, the constant worry
about his horses.
Except that Azpurua is training
HOTO the best horse of his life, at age 85.
Heck, there's no way he wants to call
it quits now. Not when he has Social


PREAKNESS STAKES
WHAT: 139th running WHO: Field of 10
WHERE: Pimlico Race Course, Baltimore
WHEN: Saturday, 6 p.m PURSE: $1M TV:NBC

Inclusion, a precocious colt with just
three career races under his belt but a
wealth of talent.
Social Inclusion won his first start
by 71/2 lengths. In his second race, he
won by 10 lengths and broke a track
record at Florida's Gulfstream Park.
Then he finished third in the Wood
Memorial, aced out for second by a
nose. As a result, he came up short on
HORSE 16


With Zobrist out, Rays'
rhythm in jeopardy,
*Page 3


Sports Editor: Mark Lawrence


* GIRLS LACROSSE:


* GIRLS LACROSSE:
Port Charlotte


Club


seeks


varsity


status
By ZACH MILLER
SPORTS WRITER
PORT CHARLOTTE -
With everything the Port
Charlotte girls lacrosse
club accomplished this
season, coach Joanne
Parker still has higher
expectations.
The team won a district
title and played in its
league championship
game this month, but
Parker's big goal is not
one that can be earned
on the field. She wants to
see girls lacrosse added
as one of Port Charlotte
High School's varsity
sports.
"That is my dream,
that's why I started
the team," Parker, who
started the club three
years ago, said. "I came
from the east coast, and
coming over here, from
Cape Coral down to
Naples there's lacrosse,
and from Tampa up
there's lacrosse. There's a
gap in between, and that's
why I started this team, to
hopefully close that gap
and eventually go into
varsity."
Right now, the club is
not affiliated with the
high school even though
it uses school fields for
practices and games and
every player on the team
attends PCHS. The same
goes for the boys club,
which has been around
for nearly a decade.
It's a situation Parker
is familiar with, having
coached club lacrosse at
Cypress Bay High School
for four years before the
school, thanks to some
urging by parents, added
lacrosse as a varsity sport
in 2010.
"There was a lot more
backing over there
because we had a lot
more schools and a lot
more parent involvement
because there were so
many feeder programs as
far as middle school and
elementary programs,"
Parker said. "That's our
stumbling block here
because we have no
feeder programs there's
no elementary or middle
school programs."
Despite the lack of
youth programs in
Charlotte County, the
lacrosse clubs in Port
Charlotte draw a large
number of students,
something that hasn't
gone unnoticed by PCHS
athletic director James
Vernon.
Vernon said there have
been talks about adding
lacrosse as a varsity sport
at the school. He said the
school board balked at
the idea last year in order
to stay in line with budget
cuts.
"They didn't think it
was proper to add sports
while they were cutting
academic programs,"
Vernon explained. "I
understand it. I feel bad
for the kids and I know
it's frustrating for lacrosse
parents, but I understand.
"At basically every AD

CLUB 16


INDEX I Lottery 21 Community Calendar 21 Away at College 2 | Golf 2 NBA 31 Baseball 3-41 Scoreboard 5 | Quick Hits 51 Horse racing 6


YourSun.com Facebook.com/SunCoastSports @SunCoastSports SunCoastSportsBlog.com






Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Friday, May 16, 2014


Florida Lottery
www.flalottery.com

* CASH 3
May 15N.....................................5-0-4
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D-Day, N-Night

* PLAY
May 15N..................................6-2-8-1
May 15D .................................1-0-8-8
May 14N..................................7-1-3-9
May 14D .................................5-3-0-6
May 13N..................................0-3-2-0
May 13D .................................1-6-5-4
D-Day, N-Night

* FANTASY 5
May15........................2-10-13-28-31
May14..........................4-9-21-29-35
May 13 .......................6-10-13-27-30
PAYOFF FORMAY 13
2 5-digit winners.......... $114,663.11
346 4-digit winners............. $106.50
9,989 3-digit winners ................. $10

* MEGA MONEY
May 13................................3-6-10-44
M egaBall......................................... 12

May 9......................3.........3-5-26-34
M egaBall......................................... 21
PAYOFF FOR MAY 14
1 4-of-4MB..........................$700,000
3 4-of-4.................................... $2,030
53 3-of-4MB..........................$251.50
920 3-of-4..................................... $43

* LOTTO
May14.................18-19-30-31-33-43
May10.....................1-2-10-35-42-44
May 7 .....................4-12-15-24-38-40
PAYOFF FOR MAY 14
0 6-digit winners ......................$45M
29 5-digit winners.............$4,920.50
1,467 4-digit winners.............$75.50
30,314 3-digit winners ..................$5

* POWERBALL
May 14........................ 7-33-39-52-55
Powerball ........................................33

May10.....................4-31-41-47-55
Pow erball .......................................... 1
PAYOFF FOR MAY 14
0 5 of5 + PB..............................$90M
0 5 of5.............................. $1,000,000
0 4of5 + PB.........................$10,000
54 4of 5 ....................................$100
ESTIMATED JACKPOT
$100 million
MEGAA MILLIONS
May 13...................... 37-46-48-70-74
M egaBall........................................... 1

May9........................10-28-39-51-59
MegaBall......................................... 14
PAYOFF FOR MAY 13
0 5ofS+MB...........................$121M
0 5 of5.............................. $1,000,000
04of5 + MB............................$5,000
11 4of5 ....................................$500


Corrections

It is the Sun's policy to correct all
errors of fact. To report an error, call or
email the sports department.


How to...

Submit a story idea: Email or call
Mark Lawrence 941-206-1175. Must
contain name, address and phone
number.
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scores to golfscores@sun-herald.com.
Scores appear in the weekly Herald
sections.
Report a high school result: Call
877-818-6204 or 941-206-1126 by
10:30 p.m. the day the event is held.


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Contact us

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mlawrence@sun-herald.com
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mbambach@sun-herald.com
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mstevens@sun-herald.com
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shore@sun-herald.com
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zmiller@sun-herald.com
Josh Vitale Staff writer
jvitale@sun-herald.com
EMAIL: sports@sun-herald.com
FAX: 941-629-2085


*AWAY AT COLLEGE:



Hendricks keeps improving at Nova


By BARBARA BOXLEITNER
SUN CORRESPONDENT
Darren Hendricks wasn't con-
tent with his first-year success.
So the Nova Southeastern
University sophomore did even
better this track and field sea-
son. The U.S. Track and Field
and Cross Country Coaches
Association recognized the
North Port resident with
all-South Region honors in the
discus and hammer throws.
Hendricks was one of four
Nova men to be recognized
in two events. He broke the
school record in both, adding
4.08 meters in the discus and
nearly 4 in the hammer. He also
achieved school bests in the
javelin and shot put.
"It's a pretty good increase,"
said Hendricks, the Peach Belt
Conference freshman of the
year in 2013. "Last year was just
getting adjusted to using the
collegiate implements, getting
stronger and faster while using
the implements."
"I'm really happy where I
am," he said. "I've just got to


keep getting better and better."
The 5-foot-11 Hendricks was
ranked third in the discus and
hammer and eighth in the jave-
lin in the conference, according
to the Track & Field Results
Reporting System online site.
His progress
pleasantly sur-
prised coach
Bryan Hagopian.
"He was defi-
nitely ahead
of schedule,"
Hagopian said. "I
thought the ham- HENDRICKS
mer was going to
be his go-to. He was
really, really good this year in
the discus."
Hendricks entered this
season physically stronger to
produce longer throws. He
said weightlifting workouts,
with a focus on the hang clean,
created more explosiveness in
his lower-body movement and
releases.
"If you're not tall, you want to
be quick in the ring," Hagopian
said. "It's more of how quick


you can get your movement
going."
The coach cited better form,
too, especially Hendricks'
footwork.
"He was dropping his foot
a little wider instead of so
quickly," Hagopian said.
Hendricks finished third in
the discus at the conference
outdoor championship. His
toss traveled 42.17 meters, and
he was the only underclassman
to finish in the top six. He was
third in the hammer with a sea-
son-best effort of 44.14 meters,
again the top underclassman.
He was eighth in the javelin
throw but did score a point to
help the team.
He already is practicing in
the throwing circle at his home.
He trains Monday through
Saturday, sometimes twice a
day.
The shot put is his weak
event, not necessarily one the
team counts on him for top
performances. Still, he is trying
to improve in it. He is using a
20-pound ball to build strength


* GOLF ROUNDUP



Hanson leads after strong staid


Cold weather,

wind cause

difficulty at

Shoal Creek
BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

IRVING, Texas Peter
Hanson made his only
back-nine birdie with a
6-foot putt at the 18th
hole Thursday, closing
a 5-under 65 for a one-
stroke lead over David
Duval and two others
after the first round
of the Byron Nelson
Championship.
Marc Leishman and
Tim Wilkinson matched
Duval at 66.
Duval birdied his last
three holes, Nos. 7-9. The
42-year-old Duval, ranked


890th in the world 15
years after being No. 1,
almost withdrew before
the round because of a
painful muscle issue in
his right elbow.
Hanson made the turn
at 5 under after shooting
30 on the front side. The
Swede couldn't keep up the
pace on the back nine that
he hadn't played before
Thursday because of travel
issues and a sore back.

Munoz, Ernst tied
for Kingsmill lead: In
Williamsburg,Va., Azahara Munoz
and Austin Ernst had strong finishes
to share the first-round lead in the
Kingsmill Championship at 6-under
65.
The former NCAA individual
champions completed their morning
rounds on the front nine at Kingsmill's
River Course, with Munoz birdieing


four of her last seven holes, and Ernst
closing with birdies on No. 7 and 9.

Weather keeps field
even at Shoal Creek: In
Birmingham, Ala., the Champions Tour
players put on long-sleeved pullovers
and tried to figure out which way
the wind was swirling from hole to
hole. They left Shoal Creek with little
separation at the top.
Jay Haas, Mark Calcavecchia, Olin
Browne and Chien Soon Lu shared
the first-round lead at 3-under 69 in
the Regions Tradition, the first of the
50-and-over tour's five majors. Nine
others were within two strokes of
the lead.
With windy, unseasonably cool
conditions, it was the highest score
for first-round leaders at the Tradition
since three players tied at 3-under
in 1990 at Desert Mountain Club in
Arizona. The course absorbed more
than an inch of rain heading into
Thursday and the players were allowed


to lift, clean and place their go

Pepperell leads Spa
Open: In Girona, Spain, Edd
Pepperell of England shot a 4-
68 for a one-shot lead after th
round of the Spanish Open.
Spanish players Sergio Gard
Miguel Angel Jimenez were ar
eight chasing Pepperell at the
Catalunya Resort golf course.
Garcia, coming offa third-p
finish at the Players Champion
Sawgrass, shrugged off jet lag
himself in contention for his s(
Spanish Open title -12 year
his first.

Canadian Open ba
at Glen Abbey in 201
Golf Canada said the Canadian
will return to Glen Abbey next
marking the 27th time the nal
championship will be played a
Jack Nicklaus-designed course
Oakville.


I GOLF SCOREBOARD


PGATour
BYRON NELSON
AtTPC Four Seasons Resort
Irving,Texas
Purse: $6.9 million
Yardage: 7,166; Par: 70 (35-35)
First Round
Peter Hanson 30-35-
Marc Leishman 33-33-
David Duval 32-34-
TimWilkinson 33-33-
Ryan Palmer 34-33-
BooWeekley 33-34-
John Huh 32-35-
TyroneVanAswegen 34-33-
AlexCejka 34-33-
Martin Kaymer 34-33-
Alex Prugh 34-33-
LeeWilliams 33-34-
Tim Herron 35-33-
BrendonTodd 37-31-
Louis Oosthuizen 35-33-
Charles Howell III 34-34-
Aaron Baddeley 34-34-
Rod Pampling 36-32-
Eric Axley 33-35-
Jason Allred 34-34-
Graham DeLaet 34-34-
Morgan Hoffmann 33-35-
GaryWoodland 34-34-
Ryan Moore 31-37-
MikeWeir 35-33-
Padraig Harrington 35-33-


0 NHL NOTEBOOK


Ben Crane
Miguel Angel Carballo
Sean O'Hair
Vijay Singh
Dustin Johnson
Derek Ernst
Carl Pettersson
Brice Garnett
Danny Lee
Edward Loar
Jim Renner
Matt Kuchar
Brandt Snedeker
Chad Campbell
Luke Guthrie
ChrisThompson
Kevin Kisner
Hudson Swafford
Michael Putnam
Jason Dufner
John Senden
Jordan Spieth
JJ.Henry
Jhonattan Vegas
Stephen Ames
Andrew Svoboda
Billy Hurley III
Daniel Chopra
Steve Marino
Brian Davis
Martin Flores
Keegan Bradley
Rory Sabbatini
Ken Duke
Retief Goosen


LPGATour
KINGSMILL CHAMPIONSHIP
At Kingsmill Resort, River Course
Williamsburg,Virginia
Purse: $1.3 million
Yardage: 6,347; Par: 71 (36-35)
(a-amateur)
First Round
Austin Ernst 33-32-6
Azahara Munoz 32-33-6
HeeYoung Park 32-34-i
Kathleen Ekey 33-34-6
DanielleKang 37-30--
Cristie Kerr 34-33--
Brittany Lang 34-33-6
LizetteSalas 33-34-6
Thidapa Suwannapura 36-31-6
Lexi Thompson 32-35--
Dori Carter 34-34-i
Sandra Changkija 33-35--
Jessica Korda 35-33-i
Alejandra Llaneza 33-35--
Ai Miyazato 36-32-i
Sarah Jane Smith 34-34-i
Yani Tseng 34-34-i

Champions Tour
REGIONSTRADITION
At Shoal Creek
Birmingham, Ala.
Purse: $2.2 million
Yardage: 7,231; Par: 72 (36-36)


Kings force Game 7


Rangers get

much-needed

break before

next series
BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ANAHEIM, Calif.-
The Los Angeles Kings
have pushed another
playoff opponent to the
limit, and the Anaheim
Ducks have one last
chance to push back.
After two weeks of
tight games, dramatic
momentum swings and
improbable heroes, the
first postseason Freeway
Faceoff will be decided in


Game 7 at Honda Center
tonight.
The Ducks have more
at stake than extending
beloved forward Teemu
Selanne's career into
the Western Conference
finals against Chicago.
Coach Bruce Boudreau
and the top-seeded
Ducks had the best
regular season in fran-
chise history, but will
have little to show for it
without a win.
Los Angeles' postseason
poise is undeniable. With
a workmanlike victory
in Game 6, the Kings
improved to 6-1 in elimi-
nation games over the last
two years since their 2012
Stanley Cup run.


PLAYOFF GLAN
Wednesday's resu
Montreal 3, Boston 1
Los Angeles 2, Anaheim 1

Today's game
Los Angeles at Aneheim, 9

Rangers get brea
before playing Can
The New York Rangers'lates
seven-game playoff victory
with a bonus: a much-need
The overworked Broadway I
suddenly found themselves
different and enviable posit
resting and waiting for thei
opponent in the Eastern Con
finals.
Now they know they wil
Montreal Canadiens with as


First Round
JayHaas 34-35-69
MarkCalcavecchia 36-33-69
Chien Soon Lu 33-36-69
Olin Browne 35-34-69
Corey Pavin 35-35-70
Steve Elkington 34-36-70
WillieWood 34-36-70
Marco Dawson 34-37-71
Bill Glasson 34-37-71
John Cook 35-36-71
Scott Dunlap 35-36-71
Fred Funk 34-37-71
John Riegger 36-35-71

European Tour
S OPEN DE ESPANA
At PGACatalunya Resort (Stadium
Course)
Girona, Spain
Purse: $2.06 million
Yardage: 7,333; Par: 72 (36-36)
First Round
Eddie Pepperell, England 35-33-68
Jose-Filipe Lima, Portugal 35-34-69
Peter Uihlein, United States 36-33-69
Sergio Garcia, Spain 35-34-69
Thomas Pieters, Belgium 36-33-69
Richie Ramsay, Scotland 33-36-69
Robert-Jan Derksen, Nethelands33-36-69
Rafa Cabrera-Bello, Spain 35-34-69
Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain 34-35-69


vs. Ducks

the Stanley Cup finals on the line.
ICE After a hectic ending to their first-
Its round series against Philadelphia,
and a hurried and condensed start
to their matchup with Pittsburgh,
the Rangers got a three-day break
before they face Montreal in Game 1
p.m. on Saturday.

ik Blackhawks, WGN
diens: extend TV deal: The Chicago
st Blackhawks and WGN-TV have agreed
came to a three-year contract extension
ed break. that runs through the 2018-19 NHL
Blueshirts season.
season.
ina
ion, The team and the station
announced the extension on Friday.
iference Comcast SportsNet Chicago shows
most Blackhawks games, but
I meet the WGN-TV broadcasts 20 regu-
spot in lar-season games each year.


and make the 16-pound ball
feel lighter.
And he has reverted to the
glide technique in the shot put
after a failed attempt to master
the rotational technique.
"I'm more explosive when it
comes to the glide," Hendricks
said. "I'm better technically and
with my explosiveness. With
the rotation, sometimes I was
too out of control."
At the spring awards banquet,
Hendricks received the coach's
award for the second consec-
utive season. The team award,
which is a plaque, recognizes
performance and other contri-
butions, Hagopian said. As a
member of the Student-Athlete
Advisory Committee, Hendricks
kept the coach informed about
pertinent athletic matters.
"He works hard. He listens.
He goes beyond what is expect-
ed," Hagopian said. "He's basi-
cally like my second coach."

Send updates about area athletes to Barbara
Boxleitner at BKLE3@aol.com.

I COMMUNITY

CALENDAR

rt BASEBALL

If balls. Englewood Youth
Baseball Fun Fest: Saturday,
anish 9 a.m.,at Englewood Sports Complex
ie (Cal Ripken Fields). Food, drinks,
under games. Event is free and open to the
e first public. Call Al, 941-474-3786.

iaand BASKETBALL
among
PGA Port Charlotte High
School camp: June 9-12 for
place boys and girls in grades 1-9 and June
ship at 16-19 for boys in grades 5-9. Cost: $50.
to put Each camper receives a T-shirt. Daily
second prizes will be awarded. Call Bill Specht,
s after 941-255-7485,ext. 3515.

Charlotte High School
ck girls camp: June 9-13,9 a.m. to
5: noon; girls entering grades 4-9; Cost:
1 Open $50. Each camper receives a T-shirt.
t year, Call Mike Robishaw, 661-9636.
tional
atthe Joe Dooley Individual
in Basketball Camp: June
30-July 2; 9 a.m.-noon; at Alico
Arena, FGCU campus; open to boys
in grades 3-12; cost: $150. Call (859)
229-8809 or email: mfly@fgcu.edu.


FISHING
Lemon Bay Touchdown
Club tournament: June 14, out
of Gasparilla Marina. Cost before June
2: $300 per 4-person team ($50 every
additional angler); after June 2 ($350
per 4-person team). Deadline: June 2.
Categories: red grouper, snapper and
mystery fish. ContactJohn Redman,
941-456-1186, Eric Fogo, 941-468-
9888, or Dan Reigle, 941-716-2795.

ROWING
National Learn to Row
Day: June 7,8 a.m. to 11 a.m. at
Indian Mound Park in Englewood.
Learn the basics: how to work out on
an erg and row in a 60-foot rowing
shell. Come ready to row, wear water
shoes, close fitting clothing and
sunscreen. Visit Lemonbaycrewclub@
gmail.com or call Lynn, 941-830-8802.

RUNNING
Florida Keys Ultra-
Marathon: Saturday; three races:
a 100-mile individual race from Key
Largo to Key West, a 50-mile individual
race from Marathon to Key West and
a 100-mile, six-runner team relay
race from Key Largo to Key West. Cost:
$265/100-mile; $240/50-mile; $780/
relay team. To register: www.keysl 00.
com.

WRESTLING
Lemon Bay Summer
Training Center: For wrestlers
10 and older, Tuesdays, Wednesdays
and Thursdays from June 3-July 31,10
a.m.-noon and 2-4 p.m. Fee: $80. Call
GaryJonseck, 734-915-4699.

The Community Calendarappears daily
as space permits. To have youractivity
published,fax (941-629-2085) ore-mail
(sports@sun-herald.com) event details to
the Sports Department at least one weekin
advance. Phone calls will not be accepted.
Submissions suitable for publication will be
edited for length and clarity.


Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun/Friday, May 16,2014






The Sun /Friday, May 16, 2014 www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3


* FSL:


Charlotte,

Daytona

game gets

rained out

STAFF REPORT

DAYTONA BEACH -
Thursday's game between
the Charlotte Stone Crabs
and Daytona Cubs was
cancelled due to rain.
The Stone Crabs open
a four-game home series
against the Clearwater
Threshers tonight at
Charlotte Sports Park.
JeffAmes (1-3, 5.14),
who was scheduled to
start Thursday's contest,
will take the mound for
Charlotte (19-20).
Tonight is Breast
Cancer Awareness night,
with the first 500 fans
receiving a pink Stone
Crabs hat. There will also
be an auction of pink
Stone Crabs jerseys and a
postgame fireworks show.
FLORIDA STATE LEAGUE
North Division
W L Pet. GB
Dunedin (Blue Jays) 28 11 .718 -
Lakeland (Tigers) 25 13 .658 21/2
Brevard County (Brewers)20 18 .526 712
Tampa (Yankees) 18 20 .474 91/2
Daytona (Cubs) 12 24 .333 141/2
Clearwater(Phillies) 8 29 .216 19
South Division
W L Pet. GB
Fort Myers (Twins) 23 16 .590 -
St. Lucie(Mets) 22 17 .564 1
Bradenton (Pirates) 19 20 .487 4
Charlotte (Rays) 19 20 .487 4
Jupiter (Marlins) 19 21 .475 41/2
Palm Beach(Cardinals) 18 22 .450 51/2
Wednesday's results
Jupiter 5, Clearwater 1
Daytona 6, Charlotte 2
Fort Myers 4, Brevard County 3
Tampa 7, St. Lucie 1
Lakeland at Bradenton, ppd, rain
Palm Beach 9, Dunedin 2
Thursday's results
Dunedin 4, Palm Beach 1,8 innings
Bradenton 7, Lakeland 6, 10 innings, 1st
game
Tampa at St. Lucie, late
Fort Myers at Brevard County, ccd, rain
Jupiter 6, Clearwater 5
Charlotte at Daytona, ccd., rain
Lakeland 4, Bradenton 3,2nd game
Today's games
Dunedin at Bradenton, 6:30 p.m.
Clearwater at Charlotte, 6:30 p.m.
Brevard County at Jupiter, 6:35 p.m.
Palm Beach atTampa, 7 p.m.
Daytona at Fort Myers, 7:05 p.m.
St. Lucie at Lakeland, 7:11 p.m.
Saturday's games
St. Lucie at Lakeland, 6 p.m.
Palm Beach atTampa, 6 p.m.
Clearwater at Charlotte, 6 p.m.
Daytona at Fort Myers, 6:05 p.m.
Dunedin at Bradenton, 6:30 p.m.
Brevard County at Jupiter, 6:35 p.m.

Crabs planner
Sunday: vs. Clearwater, 1:30 p.m.
Monday: vs. Clearwater, 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday: at Lakeland, 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday: at Lakeland, 6:30 p.m.

THRESHERS AT
STONE CRABS
WHO: Clearwater (8-29) at
Charlotte (19-20)
WHEN: Today, 6:30 p.m.
WHERE: Charlotte Sports Park,
Port Charlotte
PROBABLE PITCHERS:
Ethan Stewart (2-3, 4.50)
vs. Jeff Ames (1-3, 5.14)
RADIO: 91.7 FM,
www.stonecrabsbaseball.com
TICKETS: 941-206-3511 or at
the stadium ticket office (open
9a.m.)

Get the latest news and notes in
Josh Vitale's Crab Cakes posts at
suncoastsportsblog.com.


* NBA:


AP PHOTO
Washington Wizards forward Nene, left, passes around Indiana Pacers center Roy Hibbert and
forward Paul George during the second half of Game 6 of an Eastern Conference semifinal series
Thursday in Washington.




Pacers seal deal

Indiana sets up rematch with Miami


By JOSEPH WHITE
ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON For
all their mysterious
slumps and chemistry
curiosities, the Indiana
Pacers are back where
they were last season -
in the Eastern Conference
finals.
David West scored 29
points Thursday night,
and the Pacers blew a
16-point second-half lead
before pulling away late
in a 93-80 win that ousted
the Washington Wizards
in six games.
Next up, a rematch with
the Miami Heat.
Lance Stephenson
added 17 points and eight
assists for the Pacers, who
earned a Game 1 at home
against the two-time de-
fending NBA champions


HEAT

FROM PAGE 1
Dwyane Wade said. "We've
got a lot more work to
do but we're a team that
doesn't take it for granted.
We're a team that worked
very hard to get to this
point, so we're going to
go to the next round, the
Eastern Conference finals
and continue to do what
we've done, play this game
as hard as we can and
try to continue to move
forward."
The Heat are 32-7 in
first- and second-round
games in the last four
postseasons, that stretch
coinciding with the start
of the era featuring James,
Wade and Chris Bosh
teaming up in Miami.
That first year, even
that star-studded trio


HEAT AT PACERS
WHO: Miami at Indiana, best-
of-seven, Eastern Conference
finals, Game 1
WHEN: Sunday, 3:30 p.m.
WHERE: Bankers Life Fieldhouse,
Indianapolis
TV:ABC
RADIO: 99.3 FM

on Sunday. Indiana took
Miami to seven games in
the conference finals a
year ago.
Marcin Gortat scored
19 points, and John Wall
had 12 points and nine
assists for the Wizards,
who ended their best
playoff run in decades.
Washington won a playoff
series for the first time
since 2005 and a sec-
ond-round game for the

wasn't enough. More
pieces were added, like
Shane Battier a year later
and Ray Allen two years
later, and they've all paid
dividends since. Allen
kept coming up big at
big times in the Brooklyn
series, hitting clutch free
throws to seal Game 4 and
then knocking down a
3-pointer with 32 seconds
left to put Miami ahead
for good in Game 5.
Never mind that Alien
had missed 11 of his last
12 3-point tries in the
series. Just like last year
when he saved Miami's
season with the legendary
desperation 3-pointer in
Game 6 of the NBA Finals
against San Antonio, when
the stakes were highest,
Alien came through.
"We did what we
needed to do, when we
had to do it," Allen said.


first time since 1982. But
the team was ultimately
undone by an inability to
win at home, going just
1-4 at the Verizon Center
and 5-1 on the road in the
playoffs.
The Wizards appeared
to have a fix on the home-
court demons when
Bradley Beal stole a re-
bound from Roy Hibbert,
then hit a 3-pointer at
the other end to put the
Wizards up 74-73 with 81/2
minutes to play.
But that was
Washington's only lead
of the second half. West
answered with a pair
of jumpers, including a
tough fade-away, and
Stephenson added a
layup to start a decisive
20-6 run that included
three Wizards turnovers
in four possessions.

"Total team effort."
Miami had trailed for
the entire second half of
Game 5 against the Nets
until that 3-pointer by
Alien, a shot set up by
Mario Chalmers seeing
that Brooklyn's Shaun
Livingston was charging at
him and somehow leaving
the best long-range
shooter in the history of
the game wide open.
That was the only break
Miami needed.
"The most important
thing is to stay in the
moment," Battier said.
"And I don't there is
anyone maybe in the
history of the game who
does it better than Ray
Allen."
Added Chalmers: "That's
a great option when you
know you have the all-time
greatest 3-point shooter to
your left."


* MLB:


Cobb coming to Charlotte


PORT CHARLOTTE- Tampa Bay
Rays starter Alex Cobb will make a
start with the Charlotte Stone Crabs
on Saturday as part of his rehab
assignment.
The right-hander, who threw a
bullpen session in St. Petersburg on


Wednesday, has been on the disabled
list since April 13th with a strained
left oblique muscle. Before the injury,
Cobb (1-1) started the season with a
1.89 ERA in three appearances.

-StaffReport


Zobrist's absence


may throw Rays off


ByMARCTOPKIN
TAMPA BAY TIMES
ANAHEIM, Calif. -
There are numerous ways
the Tampa Bay will miss
Ben Zobrist while he
spends the next 2-3 weeks
on the disabled list while
his dislocated left thumb
heals.
His defense at second
base and in the outfield,
contributions from both
sides of the plate in terms
of on-base percentage
and key hits, savvy on the
bases and the flexibility
he affords manager Joe
Maddon to make in-game
moves.
Also his presence.
"He's really part of our
heartbeat," Maddon said.
"He's the guy that puts you
back in a normal rhythm a
lot of times."
The Rays and Zobrist
hope he can return at
the end of the month but
acknowledge it might take
into June.
Making sure the thumb
is fully healed when he
comes back was a big
part of the Rays' decision
to put Zobrist on the
disabled list with infielder
Cole Figueroa called
up for what will be his
major-league debut.
"That's probably the
safer approach than trying
to push it and maybe have
an unstable joint and try-
ing to come back earlier,"
Zobrist said. "It's probably
a smart decision."
Typical absences for this
type of injury range from
1-3 weeks, and Maddon
said head athletic trainer
Ron Porterfield was lean-
ing toward the back end.
"Ronnie really believes
it shouldn't be too long
after a normal (15-day) DL
stint; maybe a two-three
weeks kind of a thing
could be something that's
reasonable," Maddon said.
"We'll know more over the
next couple days."
In Zobrist's absence,
the Rays will fill second
base by committee with
Maddon working out a
job share among Sean
Rodriguez, who got the
start Thursday, Logan
Forsythe and Figueroa,
the lone left-handed hitter
of the group.
"Everybody is going to
be involved," he said.
Zobrist's injury is the
latest in what has been a
rough start to the sea-
son with three starting
pitchers Alex Cobb,


RAYS AT ANGELS
WHO: *Tampa Bay (18-23)
at *Los Angeles (21-18)
WHEN: Today, 10:05 p.m.
WHERE: Angel Stadium of
Anaheim, Anaheim, Calif.
PROBABLE PITCHERS:
Chris Archer (2-2, 5.16)
vs. Jered Weaver (4-2, 3.22)
TV: Sun Sports
RADIO: 620 AM, 1220 AM, 1480
AM, 1530 AM

*Records do not reflect the result of
Thursday's game, which was not
completed in time for this edition.

Jeremy Hellickson and
Matt Moore already on
the disabled list.
"It's no fun," Maddon
said. "But we've had to
go through this moment
before. In some of our
best years, we've had to
go through adversity with
injury."
Zobrist hitting .260
with three homers, nine
RBIs and a .352 on-base
percentage -was injured
Wednesday trying to avoid
a tag on a head-first slide
into second. He said he
doesn't plan to abandon
sliding head-first but will
stop trying to get around
the fielder because that
was also how he broke
the same thumb in spring
training 2008.
"It's not a matter of
sliding head first, but of
trying to do something
crazy when you're sliding
head first," he said.
Zobrist did say he
expects to start wearing
a protective device when
he is on the bases -
probably similar to the
"oven mitt" that Desmond
Jennings wears to protect
his fingers.
When he was hurt
Wednesday, Zobrist
feared the worst; that
his thumb pointing at
about a 65-degree angle
- was fractured and he'd
miss months. So he was
relieved with the current
prognosis.
"It's just one of those
things. It's going to
happen at some point in
your career, and fortu-
nately, I haven't had many
things I've had to go on
the DL for," he said. "So
yes, it's disappointing. But
at the same time, it'll let
everything heal up a little
bit so when I come back,
hopefully, I'll be more
fresh and ready to help
the team out."


* NBA NOTEBOOK


Experts: NBA likely to win in Sterling fight


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
A cadre of attorneys
and a flurry of lawsuits
could certainly slow
down the NBAs plan to
force Donald Sterling
to sell the Los Angeles
Clippers over his recent
racist comments, but le-
gal experts say the league
would likely prevail in
the end.
And that goes for
Sterling's wife, Shelly,
who has said she'd like
to keep her stake in the
team even if her husband
is ousted.
The NBA's consti-
tution, which Donald
Sterling signed as
controlling owner of
the Clippers, gives its
Board of Governors
broad latitude in league
decisions including


who owns the teams.
NBA Commissioner
Adam Silver is pushing
for a swift vote against
Sterling, which requires
a minimum of three-
fourths of the other 29
controlling owners to
agree. Silver also has
imposed a lifetime ban
on Sterling and a $2.5
million fine. The ban
does not apply to Shelly
Sterling.
"Sterling's own signa-
ture will come back to
haunt him," said Michael
McCann, founding
director of the Sports
and Entertainment Law
Institute at the University
of New Hampshire. "You
agree to certain basic
understandings. That's
what makes a sports
league different from
other businesses."


The key to the NBA's
authority, attorneys say,
is Article 13(d) of the
league's constitution.
That section says that,
whether Sterling intend-
ed to or not, an owner
cannot "fail or refuse
to fulfill" contractual
obligations to the NBA
"in such a way to affect
the Association or its
members adversely."

Spurs advance; Parker
injury not serious: Danny
Green and Kawhi Leonard each
scored 22 points, and San Antonio
overcame an injury to Tony Parker
to close out the Western Conference
semifinals with a 104-82 victory
over the Portland Trail Blazers on
Wednesday. Parker has a Grade 1
strain of his left hamstring, the least
severe level of the injury and he is
listed as day-to-day. Parker had an
MRI exam of the injury that caused


him to miss the entire second half of
the clincher.

Around the league: The
NBA fined Clippers coach Doc Rivers
$25,000 for publicly criticizing the
officiating in Los Angeles'105-104
loss to the Oklahoma City Thunder
earlier this week. Rivers was livid
after the game, saying the Clippers
were "robbed." ...
The NBA's board of governors
unanimously approved the sale of
the Milwaukee Bucks to NewYork
investment firm executives Wesley
Edens and Marc Lasry, bringing the
forlorn franchise one step closer to
starting a new era....
Portland signed coach Terry Stotts
to a multi-year contract extension.
Stotts led the Blazers to a 54-28
regular season for the team's biggest
improvement in its history. Portland
made the playoffs for the first time
since 2011, falling to the San Antonio
Spurs in five games in the Western
Conference semifinals.


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The Sun/Friday, May 16, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3


Ar sli-a-s






www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun/Friday, May 16,2014


He and other

execs tasked

with replacing

Bud Selig

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEWYORK -St. Louis
Cardinals chairman Bill
DeWitt was appointed
chairman of a succession
committee on Thursday
to determine the process
for replacing baseball
Commissioner Bud Selig.
Chicago White Sox
chairman Jerry Reinsdorf
also is on the panel,
which includes Colorado
chairman Dick Monfort,
Philadelphia president
Dave Montgomery, Los
Angeles Angels owner Arte
Moreno, Pittsburgh chair-
man Bob Nutting and
Minnesota chief executive
officer Jim Pohlad.
Selig, who plans to retire
in January, sidestepped
a question of whether he
would remain as commis-
sioner emeritus.
"Our committee will
conduct a thorough,
discreet process and
ultimately will provide
guidance to the executive
council on identifying a
successor," DeWitt said
in a statement. 'All of the
parties involved share
the goal of acting in our
game's best interests."
Rob Manfred, baseball's
chief operating officer,
appears to be the top
internal candidate from
Selig's staff. No candidates
appear to have a devel-
oped a consensus among
owners. A 75 percent vote
among owners is needed


for election.
Among those specu-
lated as possibilities for
the job include former
deputy commissioner
Steve Greenberg, former
big league executive Andy
MacPhail, Toronto chief
executive Paul Beeston,
Los Angeles Dodgers
chief executive Stan
Kasten and NewYork
Mets general manager
Sandy Alderson.

Hamm to play in
celebrity game: "Mad Men"star
Jon Hamm is coming to Minneapolis
to play in a celebrity softball game
on July 13 at Target Field as part of
the All-Star game festivities. The
Minnesota Twins said Hamm will join
TV personalities Andrew Zimmern
and James Denton, former Twins
Jack Morris and Jim Thome, Kevin
Love of the Minnesota Timberwolves,
Maya Moore of the Minnesota Lynx,
Zach Parise of the Minnesota Wild
and Minnesota Vikings running back
Adrian Peterson.

Fernandez will have
Tommy John surgery: The
Miami Marlins said ace Jose Fernandez
will undergo Tommy John surgery
today on his right elbow. The move was
expected after Fernandez was put on
the disabled list this week. The season-
ending operation will be done in Los
Angeles. Fernandez becomes the latest
in a string of major league pitchers this
year who have needed Tommy John
surgery. The Texas Rangers'Martin
Perez also went on the disabled list for
the same reason.

Around the league: New
York placed outfielder Carlos Beltran
on the 15-day disabled list with right
elbow inflammation. ... Oakland
acquired Kyle Blanks from San
Diego in exchange for minor league
outfielder Jake Goebbert and a player
to be named.


I BASEBALL SCOREBOARD


I STANDINGS


Baltimore
NewYork
Toronto
Boston
RAYS

Detroit
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago
Cleveland

Oakland
Los Angeles
Seattle
Texas
Houston


W L Pet
Atlanta 22 17 .564
Washington 21 19 .525
MARLINS 21 20 .512
NewYork 19 21 .475
Philadelphia 17 21 .447

W L Pet
Milwaukee 26 15 .634
St. Louis 21 20 .512
Cincinnati 18 21 .462
Pittsburgh 17 23 .425
Chicago 13 26 .333

W L Pet
San Francisco 26 15 .634
Colorado 23 19 .548
Los Angeles 22 20 .524
San Diego 20 22 .476
Arizona 16 27 .372

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Wednesday's results
Detroit 7, Baltimore 5
LA. Angels 3, Philadelphia 0
Kansas City3, Colorado 2
ChicagoWhite Sox 4, Oakland 2
RAYS 2, Seattle 0
Cleveland 15,Toronto 4
N.Y Yankees 4, N.Y. Mets 0
Boston 9, Minnesota 4
Houston 5,Texas4
Thursday's results
Minnesota 4, Boston 3,10 innings
Toronto 4, Cleveland 2
N.YYankees 1,N.Y.MetsO
Baltimore 2, Kansas City 1
RAYS at LA. Angels, late
Today's games
Oakland (Gray 4-1) at Cleveland (I
3-3),7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Volquez 1-3) at N.Y
(Phelps 0-0), 7:05 p.m.
Detroit (Scherzer 5-1) at Boston (L
7:10 p.m.
Toronto (Hutchison 1-3) at Texas
3-1), 8:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Tillman 3-2) at Kan
(Guthrie2-2),8:10p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Quintana 1-3
ton (McHugh2-1),8:10p.m.
Seattle (C.Young 3-0) at Minnesot
3-3),8:10p.m.
RAYS (Archer 2-2) at LA. Angels
4-2), 10:05 p.m.
Saturday's games
Pittsburgh at N.Y.Yankees, 4:05 p.r
ChicagoWhite Sox at Houston, 4:1
Oakland at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Kansas City, 7:10 p.m
Detroit at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Seattle at Minnesota, 7:10 p.m.
Toronto atTexas, 8:05 p.m.
RAYS at LA. Angels, 9:05 p.m.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
t GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
3 6-4 W-1 9-10 12-8
5 2 5-5 W-2 9-10 12-9
S 11/2 1 6-4 W-1 10-11 11-10
S 11/2 1 6-4 L-1 10-11 10-9
4 31/2 4-6 W-2 8-12 10-11
Central Division
t GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
7 7-3 W-3 13-8 11-4
6 1 6-4 L-1 10-8 10-12
7 61/2 11/2 5-5 W-1 10-10 9-10
5 7 2 5-5 W-1 11-10 9-12
3 71/2 21/2 6-4 L-1 12-8 7-14
West Division
t GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
S 6-4 L-1 12-10 13-6
3 3 6-4 W-2 8-10 13-8
S 41/2 1 5-5 L-2 8-10 12-10
3 5 11/2 3-7 L-2 11-10 9-11
11 71/2 4-6 W-2 8-14 6-13
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
5-5 L-1 13-8 9-9
112 4-6 W-1 11-9 10-10
2 1/2 5-5 W-1 17-5 4-15
31/2 2 3-7 L-2 9-12 10-9
41/2 3 3-7 L-3 6-11 11-10
Central Division
GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
-- 5-5 W-1 14-10 12-5
5 1/2 6-4 W-2 9-6 12-14
7 21/2 5-5 L-1 11-10 7-11
81/2 4 5-5 L-1 12-11 5-12
12 71/2 2-8 L-2 7-11 6-15
West Division
GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
6-4 W-1 12-6 14-9
3312 4-6 L-3 13-5 10-14
41/2 4-6 L-1 9-13 13-7
61/2 2 6-4 W-1 12-11 8-11
11 61/2 5-5 L-1 4-17 12-10

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Wednesday's results
L.A. Angels 3, Philadelphia 0
Kansas City3, Colorado 2
Washington 5, Arizona 1
San Francisco 10, Atlanta 4
N.Y.Yankees 4, N.Y. Mets 0
San Diego at Cincinnati, ppd., rain
Pittsburgh 4, Milwaukee 1
Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, ppd., rain
MARLINS 13, LA. Dodgers 3
Thursday's results
Cincinnati 5, San Diego 0,1 st game
Milwaukee 4, Pittsburgh 3
St. Louis 5, Chicago Cubs 3
San Diego 6, Cincinnati 1,2nd game
N.Y.YankeesI1,N.Y.MetsO0
MARLINS at San Francisco, late
McAllister Today's games
Milwaukee (Lohse 4-1) at Chicago Cubs (Sa-
Yankees mardzija 0-3),2:20 p.m.
Cincinnati (Simon 4-2) at Philadelphia
ester 4-4), (K.KendrickO-3), 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Niese 2-2) at Washington (Roark
S(Darvish 2-1),7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Volquez 1-3) at N.Y. Yankees
nsas City (Phelps 0-0), 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta (E.Santana 4-0) at St. Louis (Lynn
atHous- 4-2),8:15 p.m.
San Diego (Stults 2-3) at Colorado (J.De La
a (Gibson Rosa 4-3), 8:40 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 6-1) at Arizona (Miley
s (Weaver 3-3), 9:40 p.m.
MARLINS (H.Alvarez 2-3) at San Francis-
co (Hudson 4-2), 10:15 p.m.
M. Saturday's games
10p.m. Atlanta at St Louis, 2:15 p.m.
Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
N.Y. Mets atWashington, 4:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y.Yankees, 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, 8:10 p.m.
San Diego at Colorado, 8:10 p.m.
MARLINS at San Francisco, 9:05 p.m.


TWINS 4, RED SOX 3,10 INNINGS
Boston AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Pedroia2b 5 0 1 0 0 0 283
Bogaertsss 5 1 1 0 0 0 .257
D.Ortizdh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .303
1-J.Herrerapr-dh 0 1 0 0 1 0 .184
Napolilb 5 0 0 0 0 2 .255
J.Gomesrf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .238
CarplIf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .268
2-G.Sizemorepr-lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .243
D.Rossc 4 0 1 0 0 2 .171
Middlebrooks3b 4 0 1 2 0 2 .203
BradleyJr.cf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .205
Totals 39 3 9 3 112
Minnesota AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
Dozier2b 3 0 1 1 1 0 245
Mauerdh 4 0 2 0 1 1 .301
Plouffe3b 4 0 0 0 1 2 .245
Colabellolb 5 0 0 0 0 2 .238
Kubellf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .262
a-Nunezph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .304
K.Suzukic 5 2 3 0 0 1 .325
Parmeleerf 5 1 1 2 0 2 .320
A.Hickscf 4 1 1 1 1 1 .170
E.Escobarss 4 0 3 0 0 0 .347
Totals 38 412 4 510
Boston 000100002 0- 3 90
Minnesota 030000000 1- 4120
Two outs when winning run scored.
a-grounded outfor Kubel in the 10th. 1-ran
for D.Ortiz in the 9th. 2-ran for Carp in the
9th. LOB-Boston 7, Minnesota 11. 2B-
Pedroia (15), K.Suzuki (8), E.Escobar (11).
HR-Parmelee (2), off Buchholz. RBIs-
Carp (3), Middlebrooks 2 (9), Dozier (20),
Parmelee 2 (4), A.Hicks (8). CS-Dozier (3).
SF-Dozier. Runners left in scoring posi-
tion-Boston 3 (D.Ross, Bogaerts, Bradley
Jr.); Minnesota 4 (Plouffe 2, Mauer, Parmel-
ee). RISP-Boston 3 for 7; Minnesota 1 for
7. GIDP-Mauer. DP-Boston 1 (Bogaerts,
Pedroia, Napoli).
Boston IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
Buchholz 610 3 3 3 61086.17
Breslow 1 0 0 0 1 1 15 3.75
Capuano 1 00 0 1 1 13 2.21
A.MillerL,1-2 1% 2 1 1 0 2 22 2.95
Minnesota IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
P.Hughes 6 5 1 1 0 8 96 3.61
BurtonH,5 1 00 0 0 0 65.51
FienH,6 1 00 0 0 0 62.20
PerkinsBS,2-12 1 4 2 2 0 3 233.93
DuensingW,1-1 1 0 0 0 1 1 17 1.59
IBB-off Buchholz (Mauer). Umpires-
Home, Chris Guccione; First, Sean Barber;
Second, Tom Hallion; Third, Eric Cooper.
T-3:21.A-29,628(39,021).

YANKEES 1,METSO0
NewYork(A) AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
Gardner If 2 0 0 0 2 1 .290
Jeterss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .254
Dav.Robertsonp 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Ellsburycf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .284
Teixeiralb 3 0 1 0 1 1 .272
McCannc 4 1 1 0 0 1 .224
A.Sorianorf 4 0 2 1 0 2 .248
Solarte3b-2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .325
B.Roberts2b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .239
Betancesp 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
a-ZAImonteph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000
Warrenp 00 0 0 0 0 ---
Ryanss 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000
Whitleyp 1 0 1 0 0 0 1.000
KeJohnson3b 1 0 0 0 1 1 .218
Totals 30 1 6 1 4 8
NewYork(N) AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
E.Younglf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .236
Mejiap 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Dan.Murphy2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .317
D.Wright3b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .282
Grandersonrf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .194
C.Youngcf-lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .222
Dudalb 4 0 0 0 0 2 .250
Tejadass 2 0 1 0 1 1 .200
Centenoc 2 0 0 0 1 1 .000
deGromp 1 0 1 0 0 0 1.000
Ricep 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Familiap 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Edginp 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
b-BAbreuph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .217
1-Lagarespr-cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .296
Totals 29 0 3 0 314
NewYork(A) 000000100- 1 60
NewYork(N) 000000000- 0 30
a-struck out for Betances in the 8th.
b-walked for Edgin in the 8th. 1-ran for
BAbreu in the 8th. LOB-New York (A) 6,
New York (N) 6. 2B-Ellsbury (12), A.Soria-
no (9). RBIs-A.Soriano (16). S-deGrom.
Runners left in scoring position-New
York (A) 5 (Teixeira, Jeter, Solarte 2, Ellsbury);
New York (N) 4 (Dan.Murphy, E.Young 2,
D.Wright). RISP-NewYork (A) 0 for 6; New
York (N) 1 for 5. Runners moved up-Cen-
teno. GIDP-Solarte 2. DP-NewYork (N) 3
(deGrom, Tejada, Duda), (deGrom, Duda),
(Tejada, Dan.Murphy, Duda).
NewYork(A) IP H RER BBSO NP ERA
Whitley 4% 20 0 2 4 740.00
BetancesW,2-021 0 0 0 0 6 27 1.61
WarrenH,6 % 1 0 0 1 2 16 1.54
Dav.Robertson S11 0 0 0 0 2 19 1.74
NewYork(N) IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
deGrom L, 0-1 7 41 1 2 6 91 1.29
Rice 4 00 0 2 1 175.40
Familia % 00 0 0 0 63.38
Edgin 4 00 0 0 0 10.00
Mejia 1 2 0 0 0 1 19 4.76
Inherited runners-scored-Betances 2-0,
Dav.Robertson 2-0, Familia 2-0, Edgin 2-0.
WP-Familia. Umpires-Home, Hunter
Wendelstedt; First, Mike Estabrook; Second,
Jerry Layne; Third, Mike DiMuro. T-3:04.
A-40,133 (41,922).
ORIOLES 2, ROYALS 1
Baltimore AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Markakisrf 4 0 3 0 0 1 .302
Machado3b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .200
A.Jonescf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .280
C.Davislb 3 1 0 0 1 3 .234
N.Cruzdh 4 1 1 2 0 3 .275
Clevengerc 4 0 0 0 0 1 .278
Hardy ss 4 0 2 0 0 1 .263
Flaherty2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .205
Loughlf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .167
Totals 35 210 2 113
KansasCity AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
Aokirf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .260
Hosmerib 4 1 1 0 0 1 .302
B.Butlerdh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .232
S.Perezc 3 0 1 0 1 1 .277
A.Gordonlf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .261
:Valencia3b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .283
Giavotella2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .200
L.Caincf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .319
A.Escobarss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .285
Totals 32 1 7 1 1 4
Baltimore 000200000- 2100
KansasCity 000100000- 1 70
LOB-Baltimore 7, Kansas City 6. 2B--
Hardy (7), Valencia (2). HR-N.Cruz (12),
off Ventura. RBIs-N.Cruz 2 (35), Valencia
(4). SF-Valencia. Runners left in scoring
position-Baltimore 4 (C.Davis, Flaherty, A.
Jones, Clevenger); Kansas City 3 (Giavotella
3). RISP-Baltimore 1 for 9; Kansas City
1 for 5. Runners moved up-Machado.
GIDP-AJones, A.Escobar. DP-Baltimore
1 (Machado, Flaherty, C.Davis); Kansas City
1 (A.Escobar, Giavotella, Hosmer).
Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
:W.ChenW,5-2 5/ 71 1 1 1 95 3.69
O'DayH,5 1% 0 0 0 0 1 200.54
PattonH,i1 A 00 0 0 1 41.80
R.WebbH,5 % 00 0 0 1 11 3.78


Z.BrittonS,1-1 1 00 0 0 0 120.81
KansasCity IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
VenturaL,% 6'A 72 2 1 91042.40
Ti.Collins % 1 0 0 0 1 10 7.94
Coleman 0 2 0 0 0 0 12 5.56
K.Herrera 1 00 0 0 2 11 1.40
Crow 1 00 0 0 1 100.00
Coleman pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
Inherited runners-scored-O'Day 2-0,
Ti.Collins 2-0, K.Herrera 2-0. Umpires-
Home, Brian O'Nora; First, Doug Eddings;
Second, Chris Segal; Third, Cory Blaser.
T-2:56. A-12,455 (37,903).


CARDINALS 5, CUBS 3
Chicago AB R H BIBBSO
Bonifaciocf 5 0 0 0 0 0
Kalishrf 5 0 0 0 0 2
Rizzolb 3 2 2 0 1 0
S.Castross 4 1 3 2 0 0
Valbuena2b 3 0 2 0 1 0
Lakelf 3 0 1 1 0 1
Olt3b 3 0 0 0 1 1
Jo.Bakerc 3 0 0 0 0 2
c-Schierholtzph 1 0 0 0 0 0
N.Ramirezp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Hammelp 2 0 0 0 0 1
Verasp 0 0 0 0 0 0
a-Coghlanph 1 0 0 0 0 0
W.Wrightp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Castilloc 1 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 34 3 8 3 3 7
St. Louis AB R H BIBBSO
M.Carpenter3b 4 0 1 1 0 1
Jh.Peraltass 4 0 1 0 0 1
Hollidaylf 4 1 1 0 0 2
MaAdams1b 4 0 0 0 0 0
YMolinac 3 1 2 1 1 1
Craigrf 3 1 0 0 1 0
Bourjoscf 2 1 0 0 1 1
M.Ellis2b 2 0 0 1 1 0
Wachap 2 1 1 2 0 1
b-J.Butlerph 1 0 0 0 0 0
Siegristp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rosenthalp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 29 5 6 5 4 7
Chicago 000200 010-
St. Louis 040001 OOx-
a-grounded out for Veras in the
b-grounded into a fielder's choice fo
cha in the 7th. c-grounded out for Jo.
in the 8th. E-Ma.Adams (3). LOB-
cago 8, St. Louis 4. 2B-M.Carpente
Holliday (10), Y.Molina (9). HR-S.C
(6), off Wacha. RBIs-S.Castro 2 (21),
(15), M.Carpenter (15),Y.Molina (20), M
(8), Wacha 2 (2). SF-Lake. Runners I
scoring position-Chicago 5 (Valb
Hammel, Olt, Schierholtz 2); St. Louis
Peralta, Craig). RISP-Chicago 0 for
Louis 2 for 6. Runners moved up-WM
ams, M.Ellis. GIDP-Olt, Craig. DP-(C
go 1 (S.Castro, Valbuena, Rizzo); St. Lc
(Jh.Peralta, M.Ellis, Ma.Adams).
Chicago IP H R ER BBSO NF
Hammel L,4-2 5 5 5 5 2 6106
Veras % 0 0 0 0 0 5
W.Wright 1 00 0 1 0 19
N.Ramirez 1 1 0 0 1 1 13
St. Louis IP H R ER BBSO NF
WachaW,3-3 7 72 2 0 5104
SiegristH,11 t 1 1 1 2 1 19
RosenthalS % 00 0 1126
Inherited runners-scored-Veras
Rosenthal 3-1. WP-N.Ramirez.
pires-Home, Will Little; First, Mark
son; Second,Ted Barrett;Third, Paul Sc
ber.T-2:49.A-42,501 (45,399).


First Game
San Diego
Venable rf
E.Cabrera ss
S.Smith If
Headley3b
Gyorko 2b
Grandal c
Alonso lb
Maybin cf
Kennedyp
Roach p
a-Hundleyph
Totals
Cincinnati
B.Hamilton cf
Schumaker rf
Phillips2b
Votto 1 b
Frazier3b
Ludwick If
B.Pena c
Cozart ss
Cueto p
Totals
San Diego
Cincinnati


REDS 5, PADRES 0


AB R H
301
401
201
3 0 1
4 0 1
2 0 1
3 0 0
3 0 0
3 0 0
3 0 0
3 0 0
2 0 0
0 0 0
1 0 0
27 0 3
AB R HE
5 0 2
4 1 1
5 1 2
3 0 1
4 0 2
4 1 1
4 1 2
4 1 3
3 0 0
36 514
300
300
300
300
300
200

27 0 3
AB RH
502

512
301
402

412
413
300
36 514


BI BBSO
0 1 1
0 0 0
0 1 0
0 0 1
0 0 2
0 0 2
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 1
0 0 01
0 0 1
0 2 8
Bl BBSO
0 0 0
0 1 1
3 0 1
0 1 0
0 0 1
0 0 1
0 0 0
2 0 0
0 0 2
5 2 6
011


002
002




028
BI BBSO
0 00
011
301
010
001
001
0 00
200
002
526


000000 000-
000032 00x-


a-struckoutfor Roach in the9th.LOB-
Diego 2, Cincinnati 10. 2B-Phillips
B.Pena (5). HR-Phillips (3), off Ken
RBIs-Phillips 3 (12), Cozart 2 (11). C
Cabrera (4), Frazier (1). S-Cueto. Rui
left in scoring position-San Die
(E.Cabrera); Cincinnati 7 (Frazier 2, C
Votto, Schumaker, Phillips 2). RISP-
Diego 0 for 1; Cincinnati 2 for 9. Rui
moved up-Schumaker, Phillips, C
GIDP-E.Cabrera, Headley DP-Cinc
2 (Cozart,Votto), (Votto, Cozart,Votto)
San Diego IP H R ER BBSO NF
KennedyL,2-5 611 5 5 1 4101
Roach 2 3 0 0 1 2 4C
Cincinnati IP H R ER BBSO NF
CuetoW,4-2 9 30 0 2 8116
WP-Kennedy Umpires-Home, Ac
Johnson; First,Chad Whitson; Second,
Vanover; Third, Angel Hernandez. T-
A-27,686 (42,319).


Second Game
San Diego
Denorfia rf-If
E.Cabrera ss
Headley3b
Quentin If
1-Venablepr-rf
Gyorko 2b
Maybin cf
Rivera c
Alonso lb
T.Ross p
c-S.Smith ph
Vincent p
Quackenbush p
Totals
Cincinnati
B.Hamilton cf
Heisey If
Phillips2b
Votto 1 b
Frazier 3b
Bernadina rf
Barnhart c
R.Santiago ss
Francis p
a-N.Sotoph
Ondrusek p
S.Marshall p
b-B.Pena ph
LeCure p
Hoover p
Totals
San Diego
Cincinnati


PADRES 6, REDS 1


3 R H BIBBSO
1 2 0 0 2
1 1 1 0 2
4 1 1 1 1 1
0 1 0 1 0
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 1
1 1 0 0 1
1 1 2 1 0
S1 2 2 0 0
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 00
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0
5 6 9 6 3 7
3 R H BIBBSO
1 0 0 1 0
0 1 0 2 0
40 0 1 01
0 0 0 1 3
0 1 0 1 1
0 0 0 0 2
0 0 0 1 1
40 1 0 01
0 0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 00
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0
1 3 1 611
021001 110-
100000 000-


a-struckoutfor Francis in the5th. b-gro
ed into a double play for S.Marshall i
7th. c-flied out for T.Ross in the 8th.
for Quentin in the 7th. LOB-San Die
Cincinnati 7. 2B-Denorfia (4), Heise
HR-Rivera (2),off Francis; E.Cabrera (
S.Marshall; Alonso (1), off LeCure. RB
Cabrera (4), Headley (12), Rivera 2 (9),
so 2 (9), Phillips (13). SB-B.Hamilton2
Runners left in scoring position-
Diego 3 (Quentin, TRoss 2); Cincinr
(Bernadina, Phillips). RISP-San Diegc
7; Cincinnati 0 for 4. Runners moved
Phillips. GIDP-B.Pena. DP-San Die
(Gyorko, E.Cabrera, Alonso).
San Diego IP H R ER BBSO NF
T.RossW,5-3 7 3 1 1 5 8101
Vincent 1 00 0 1 2 21
Quackenbush 1 00 0 0 1 9
Cincinnati IP H R ER BBSO NF
Francis L,0-1 5 5 3 3 0 4 71
Ondrusek % 0 1 1 3 0 2C
S.Marshall 1 3 1 1 0 1 18
LeCure 1 1 1 1 0 0 2;
Hoover 1 00 0 0 2 19
Inherited runners-scored-S.Ma
3-1. PB-Rivera. Umpires-Home,
Basner; First, Larry Vanover; Second,A
Hernandez; Third, Chad Whitson. T-
A-23,544 (42,319).


ego 1 Encarnacion hit a solo homer in the
NATIONAL LEAGUE
P ERA BATTING-Tulowitzki, Colorado, 391; Ut- second off Danny Salazar and added a
2.81 ley, Philadelphia, .343; SSmith, San Diego, two-run blast in the fifth off C.C. Lee.
3.31 336; Blackmon, Colorado, .333; Stanton,
9 4.91 Miami, .325; Puig, Los Angeles, .324; Pagan,
P ERA San Francisco, 322 Orioles 2, Royals 1: In
S5.40 RBI -Stanton, Miami, 42; Tulowitzki, ColNelson Cruz homered
6.30 orado, 33; Puig, Los Angeles, 31;,Morneau, Kansas City, Mo., Nelson Cruz homered
S6.00 Colorado, 30; Blackmon, Colorado, 29; Ad- and first-place Baltimore beat Kansas
S1.10 Gonzalez,LosAngeles,28;Arenado,Colora- City to snap a four-game losing streak.
S9.24 do, 26; Goldschmidt, Arizona,26.
marshall HOME RUNS-Stanton, Miami, 11;Tulow- Cruz homered in the fourth after
Toby itzki, Colorado, 11; Belt, San Francisco, 9; Chris Davis drewa walk to lead off
Angel Blackmon, Colorado, 9; CGomez, Milwau- t w r hm
-2:47. kee, 9; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 9; Morse, the inning. It ws Cruzs 12th home
San Francisco, 9; JUpton, Atlanta, 9. run, which is second in the American
SLeague to the 15 of Chicago White Sox
Rookie Jose Abreu.


Page 4 SP


* MLB NOTEBOOK



DeWitt to chair



new committee


EMLBROUNDUP



Avg. For Wednesday's late linescores, Y a n k s
302 see Scoreboard, Page 5
259
284beat
291
240 BREWERS 4, PIRATES 3 b
255 Pittsburgh AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
.181 Sniderrf 2 0 0 0 1 1 216
.063 a-S.Marteph-lf 2 0 0 0 0 1.255 Mt i
.198 N.Walker2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 265
A.McCutchencf 3 0 0 0 1 1 306 M etsin
.063 P.Alvarez3b 2 0 0 0 2 1 215
G.Sanchezlb 4 1 1 1 0 0 .290
158 Mercerss 4 0 0 0 0 1.209 f
Tabatalf-rf 4 1 2 0 0 1.267
.246 T.Sanchezc 4 1 1 2 0 1 .271 l
W.Rodriguezp 2 0 1 0 0 0 .286
Avg. JuWilsonp 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000
.256 Watson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
250 c-I.Davisph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .266 BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
266 1-J.Harrisonpr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .294
299 Melanconp 0 0 0 0 0 0 --- NEWYORK Derek
.315 Totals 32 3 6 3 5 8 wath th last
217 Milwaukee AB R H BIBBSO Avg. Jeter watched the last
.218 R.Weeks2b 4 1 3 1 0 1 .365 four outs of his final
.185 Segurass 3 0 1 0 1 0 .248 regular-seasonSubway
063 Braun rf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .316 S
.000 Lucroy lb-c 3 1 0 0 1 1 .304 Series game from the
Mar.Reynolds3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .214 bench, pulled off the field
.000 K.Davislf 4 0 1 2 0 1 .227
Maldonadoc 3 1 1 1 0 1 .333 during a double switch in
3 80 Wooten p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --- the bottom of the eighth
5 61 L.Schafercf 2 0 0 0 0 1.208 nin Thursda niht
7th. b-EHerreraph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .235 inningT ursday night
DrWa- Gallardop 2 0 0 0 0 2 .077 as the NewYorkYankees
Baker Dukep 0 0 0 0 0 0 000 held off the Mets 1-0.
-Chi- Thornburgp 0 0 0 0 0 0 -
r(7) Bianchi3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .174 Alfonso Soriano's RBI
Castro Totals 30 4 7 4 310 double in the seventh
Lake Pittsburgh 000021 000- 3 60
^ | B e oo~o^ broke a scoreless duel at
M.Ellis Milwaukee 001010002--4 71
eft in No outswhen winning run scored. a-struck Citi Field between pitch-
)uena, out for Snider in the 7th. b-struck out for ers making their major
2(Jh L.Schafer in the 8th. c-walked forWatson in
5; St the 9th. 1-ran for I.Davis in the 9th. E-Mar. league debuts. Rookie
Ia.Ad- Reynolds (2). LOB-Pittsburgh 7, Milwau- reliever Dellin Betances
Chica- kee 5. 2B-R.Weeks (3). HR-T.Sanchez struck out SIx in a row
ouis 1 (1), off Gallardo;G.Sanchez (4),offGallardo;
R.Weeks (1), off W.Rodriguez; Maldonado as the Yankees earned a
P ERA (2), off W.Rodriguez. RBIs-G.Sanchez split of this year's series
S3.06 (10),T.Sanchez2 (10), R.Weeks (5), K.Davis
1421 2 (12), Maldonado (4). SB-A.McCutchen between crosstown rivals
S2.08 (5). Runners left in scoring position- with their second straight
S1 08 Pittsburgh 4 (Mercer 2, PRAlvarez, S.Marte); shutout.
P ERA Milwaukee 2 (Lucroy, Braun). RISP-Pitts-
S2.82 burgh 0 for 7; Milwaukee 2 for 5. GIDP-S. David Robertson got
4.00 Marte, G.Sanchez, Braun. DP-Pittsburgh DavidWright to ground
4.74 1 (W.Rodriguez, Mercer, G.Sanchez); Mil-
1-0, waukee 2 (Mar.Reynolds, R.Weeks, Lucroy), out to Jeter's replacement
Urnm- (Segura, R.Weeks, MarReynolds). at shortstop, Brendan
Carl- Pittsburgh IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
chrie- W.Rodriguez 5 4 2 2 1 4 73 6.84 Ryan, with runners at the
JuWilsonH,4 2 00 0 0 4 21 2.93 corners to end the eighth.
WatsonH,8 1 1 0 0 0 2 141.42 tr ft aftran
MelanconL, 1-2 0 2 2 2 2 0 182.37 Jeter let ater an
Milwaukee IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA 0-for-4 night. The Yankees
Avg. Gallardo 6@ 5 3 3 2 61083.07 captain came out when
.191 Duke 2 00 0 0 1 71.50
.252 Thornburg % 0 0 0 2 0 15 2.37 Robertson entered to
.339 WootenW,1-1 1H 1 0 0 1 1 21 3.72 faceWright. Robertson
.193 Melancon pitched to 4 batters in the 9th. it a prf t ninth
157 Inherited runners-scored-Wooten 1-0. pitched a perfect ninth
209 Balk-W.Rodriguez. Umpires-Home, for his seventh save.
.191 CB Bucknor; First, Tripp Gibson; Second,
318 Dale Scott; Third, Dan lassogna. T-3:00.
.125 A-34,743(41,900). Twins 4, Red Sox 3: In
1.000 Minneapolis, Aaron Hicks delivered
286 Cleveland AB R H BIBBSO Avg. the game-winning single in the
Avg. Bourncf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .258 bottom of the 10th and Phil Hughes
.266 Swisherlb 4 0 1 0 1 1 .200 struck out eight in six innings to help
.241 Raburnlf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .181
.289 C.Santana3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .158 Minnesota beat Boston in the series
.263 A.Cabrerass 4 0 2 0 0 0 .265 finale.
.272 Aguilardh 2 0 0 0 1 1 .000
.262 b-Chisenhallph-dhi 0 0 0 0 0 .357 All-Star closer Glen Perkins
.286 Y.Gomesc 4 0 1 1 0 0 .268 blew his second save ofthe season,
.208 Dav.Murphyrf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .280 iin a tw run n tWill
.174 Aviles2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .297 giving up a two-run single to Will
Totals 35 2 9 2 3 6 Middlebrooks with the bases loaded
0 30 Toronto AB R H BIBBSO Avg. that tied the game in the ninth
5140 Reyesss 3 0 1 0 2 0 .220
San Me.CabreralIf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .318 inning. But Kurt Suzuki doubled down
S(11), PillarIf o o o o o o .000 the left field line and Hicks lined a 3-2
qnedy. Bautistarf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .296
S-EI Encarnaciondh 4 2 3 3 0 0 .253 pitch to left field offof Andrew Miller
nners Lindlb 4 0 0 0 0 3 .300 (1-2) to win it
go I J.Francisco3b 3 1 1 1 0 0 .293
ueto a-StTollesonph-2b0 0 0 0 1 0 .318
-San Lawrie2b-3b 3 0 2 0 1 0 .244 Cardinals 5, Cubs 3: In St.
nners Kratzc 4 0 1 0 0 1 226 Louis, Michael Wacha pitched seven
:ozart. Gosecf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .250
ozat Totals 32 4 9 4 5 7 innings and drove in two runs, helping
:innati
Cleveland 000010010- 2 91 St. Louis to an afternoon victory
'ERA Toronto 020020 OOx- 4 91 against Chicago.
3.60 a-walked for J.Francisco in the 7th. E-C.
S2.57 Santana (3), J.Francisco (2). LOB-Cleve- The 6-foo00t-6 Wacha (3-3) had
'ERA land 9, Toronto 10. 2B-Raburn (3), lost his last three decisionssince an
S1.25 A.Cabrera (11), Reyes (9), Encarnacion A in Th
drian (13), Lawrie (5). HR-Dav.Murphy (3), off :April 13 win against the Cubs. The
Larry Happ; Encarnacion (7), off Salazar; J.Fran- 22-year-old right-hander allowed
-2:36. cisco (7), off Salazar; Encarnacion (8), off seven hits, including a homer, but did
C.Lee. RBIs-Y.Gomes (18), Dav.Murphy
(25), Encarnacion 3 (30), J.Francisco (18). notwalka batter. He struck out five.
CS-Reyes (1). Runners left in scor-
ing position-Cleveland 5 (Y.Gomes 2,
Avg. Aguilar, Raburn, Dav.Murphy); Toronto 7 Reds 5-1, Padres 0-6: In
.304 (Reyes, Lind, Me.Cabrera 2, Kratz 2, Bau- Cincinnati, Johnny Cueto pitched a
.250 tista). RISP-Cleveland 1 for 10; Toronto 0 r r r chtt
195 for 7. Runners moved up-Me.Cabrera. three-hitter for his second shutout
.195
.167 GIDP-YGomes, Bautista. DP-Cleveland oftheseason, and Brandon Phillips
.191 1 (A.Cabrera, Aviles, Swisher); Toronto 1 hit a three-run homer and a double,
.153 (Lawrie, Lind). r n
.313 Cleveland IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA leading Cincinnati past San Diego in
.255 Salazar L, 1-4 4 5 2 2 2 3 985.53 : the first game of a day-night double-
.200 C.Lee 0 22 2 0 0 10 5.40
.063 Outman 0 0 0 0 1 10 3.27 header. Cueto (42) loweredthe
.336 Atchison 1% 2 0 0 0 1 25 1.62 majors' best ERA to 1.25 and extended
Rzepczynski 0 0 0 1 1 13 2.45 oneofthebestseason-opening
Axford % 00 0 2 1 164.41
Allen % 0 0 0 0 0 41.69 stretches in more than 10O years.
Avg. Toronto IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA In the second game, Rene Rivera
259 HappW,2-1 6 6 1 1 2 41003.57
228 CecilH 10 1 1 0 0 0 1 11 4.34 hit the firstof San Diego's three
.281 DelabarH,9 % 2 1 1 1 0 153.57 homers, and Tyson Ross allowed

.257 J L ,2 100 0 0 0 15 000: three hits in seven innings to lead
.111 C.Lee pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. Inher- the Padres toa win anda splitofthe
.120 ited runners-scored-Axford 1-0, Allen doubleheader.
.200 1-0, Loup 2-0. HBP-by Salazar (Gose).
.000 Umpires-Home, Paul Emmel; First, Chris
118 Conroy; Second, Jordan Baker; Third, Jerry Brewers 4, Pirates 3: In
___- Meals.T--3:23.A--7,364(49,282). Milwaukee, Khris Davis hit a game-
282 Iaei aer ending two-run single and Milwaukee
--- I rallied in the ninth off Pittsburgh
-- *ExcludesThursday'slategames closer Mark Melancon fora victory.
6 90 AMERICAN LEAGUE Ryan Braun led off the inning by
1 30 BATTING-VMartinez, Detroit, .336; So- singling to right before Melancon
)und- larte, New York, .325; KSuzuki, Minnesota,
n the .325; AIRamirez, Chicago, .319; MeCabrera, (1-2) walked the next two hitters to
1-ran Toronto, .318; Choo, Texas, .315; Loney, load the bases with nobody out.
ego 6, Tampa Bay, .308.
iy (4). RBI-JAbreu, Chicago, 41; MiCabrera, De-
(),off troit, 35; NCruz, Baltimore, 35; Moss, Oak- Blue Jays 4, Indians 2:
Is--E. land, 33; Brantley, Cleveland, 30; Colabello, In Toronto, Edwin Encarnacion hit
Alon- Minnesota, 30; Encarnacion,Toronto,30.
2(14). HOMERUNS-JAbreu, Chicago, 15;NCruz, two home runs, Juan Francisco also
-San Baltimore, 12; Ortiz, Boston, ii; Bautista,To- connected for one and Toronto beat
nati 2 ronto, 10; Pujols, Los Angeles, 10; Donald- Cleveland to give manager John
o2for son, Oakland,9; Dozier, Minnesota,9;VMar- : levelandrogive manager Jon
up-- tinez, Detroit, 9; ColRasmus, Toronto, 9. Gibbons his 400th career win.







The Sun /Friday, May 16, 2014 www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 5


SCOREBOARD


Sports on TV FAVORITE
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AUTO RACING
11 a.m. at Montreal
FS1 -NASCAR, Truck Series, final practice Montreal
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Noon
FS1 NASCAR, Sprint Cup, final practice
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1:45 p.m.
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BOXING
9p.m. AS
ESPN2- Junior middleweights, Delvin Ro- Texas
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at Montreal Tepesch, PC
10p.m. N.Martinez
SHO-Junior middleweights, Frank Galar- D.Downs (6
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super featherweights, Joel Diaz Jr. (15-0-0) tinez 0-1.
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COLLEGE BASEBALL
8p.m. Pro b
ESPNU -Mississippi atTexas A&M
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
4:30 p.m. CO
ESPN2 NCAA Division I playoffs, region- (Be:
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da,atTallahassee,Fla. I
7p.m. May6:Miar
ESPN2 NCAA Division I playoffs, region- May8: Miar
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CYCLING Monday: M
5p.m. Wednesday
NBCSN -Tour of California, stage 6, Santa Ind
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GOLF May7:lIndi.
5:30 a.m. May 9: Indi.
TGC European PGA Tour, Open de Sunday:lnd
Espana, second round, part I, at Sevilla, Tuesday:W
Spain Thursday:I
9:30 a.m. WE
TGC European PGA Tour, Open de San
Espana, second round, part II, at Sevilla, May6:San
Spain May 8: San
12:30 p.m. Saturday: S
TGC -ChampionsTour,TheTradition,sec- Monday:PF
ond round, at Birmingham, Ala. Wednesday
3p.m. Oklahc
TGC- PGATour, Byron Nelson Champion- May 5: LA.
ship, second round, at Irving,Texas May 7: Okla
6:30 p.m. May 9: Okla
TGC Web.com Tour, BMW Charity Pro- Sunday: L.A
Am, second round, at Greer and Greenville, Tuesday: 0
S.C. (same-day tape) Thursday: (
8:30 p.m. Sunday: L./
TGC LPGA, Kingsmill Championship,
second round, at Williamsburg, Va. (same- Pro h
day tape) r
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9:30 a.m.
NBCSN IIHF, World Championship, Ka-
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NBCSN Thoroughbreds, Black-Eyed Su- May 1: Mor
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MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL May 6:-Mor
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WGN -Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs Saturday: E
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MLB Regional coverage, Pittsburgh at Wednesday
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NBCSN Playoffs, conference semifinals, Sunday: N.
game 7, Los Angeles at Anaheim Tuesday: R
WE
Ch
Glantz-Culver Line May2:Chic
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National League May 9: Mini
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE Sunday:Ch
atChicago -115 Milwaukee +105 Tuesday:CI
atWashington -135 NewYork +125 Ana
Cincinnati -110 at Philadelphia +100 May3:LosA
atSt.Louis -115 Atlanta +105 May5:LosA
at Colorado -145 San Diego +135 May 8: Ana
Los Angeles -135 at Arizona +125 Saturday:/
at San Francisco-160 Monday:Ai
Miami +150 Wednesday
American League Today: Los
Oakland -125 atCleveland +115
atBoston -110 Detroit +100
atTexas -165 Toronto +155
Baltimore -110 atKansasCity +100 CO
atHouston -120 Chicago +110
atMinnesota -115 Seattle +105 EA:
at Los Angeles-140 TampaBay +130 Cir
Interleague Monday: G
atNewYork(AL)-130 Pittsburgh +120 Tuesday:G


LINE UNDERDOG
-120 LosAngeles
Tomorrow
-125 N.Y. Rangers
Odds to Win Series
-110 N.Y.Rangers

SOCCER
Tomorrow
FACup
Final
At London
LINE UNDERDOG
-370 HullCity


LINE
+100
+105
-110





LINE
+300


baseball
ESDAY'S LATE LINESCORES
RLINS 13, DODGERS 3
060601000 -13 170
s 000011010 3 101
Wolf (7) and Mathis; Maholm,
, Withrow (5), B.Wilson (6),
J.Wright (8), Butera (9) and
-DeSclafani 1-0. L-Maholm
Miami, Lucas (1), RJohnson (2),
os Angeles, C.Crawford (2).

iTROS 5, RANGERS 4
011 020 000-4110
000002201-5110
oreda (6), Frasor (6), Cotts (7),
(8) and Arencibia; Feldman,
(), Clemens (6), Sipp (7), Quails
stro. W-Quails 1-1. L-N.Mar-
HRs-Texas, Rios (3). Houston,


basketball


NBA PLAYOFFS
IFERENCE SEMIFINALS
st-of-7;x-if necessary)
STERN CONFERENCE
Miami 4, Brooklyn 1
ni 107, Brooklyn 86
ni 94, Brooklyn 82
rooklyn 104, Miami 90
liami 102, Brooklyn 96
ay: Miami 96, Brooklyn 94
liana 4,Washington 2
hington 102, Indiana 96
ana 86,Washington 82
ana 85,Washington 63
iana 95,Washington 92
/ashington 102,Indiana 79
ndiana 93,Washington 80
STERN CONFERENCE
SAntonio 4, Portland 1
Antonio 116, Portland 92
Antonio 114, Portland 97
San Antonio 118 Portland 103
ortland 103, San Antonio 92
y: San Antonio 104, Portland 82
oma City 3, L.A. Clippers 2
Clippers 122, Okla. City 105
Ia. City 112, L.A. Clips 101
a. City 118, L.A. Clippers 112
A. Clippers 101, Okla. City 99
kla. City105,L.A. Clippers 104
Okla. City at L.A. Clippers, late
A. Clippers at Okla. City TBA

ockey
NHL PLAYOFFS
SECOND ROUND
st-of-7;x-if necessary)
STERN CONFERENCE
Montreal 4, Boston 3
ntreal 4, Boston 3,20T
ton 5, Montreal 3
ntreal 4, Boston 2
ton 1, Montreal 0,OT
Boston 4, Montreal 2
Montreal 4, Boston 0
,y: Montreal 3, Boston 1
Rangers 4, Pittsburgh 3
Rangers 3, Pittsburgh 2, OT
burgh 3, N.Y. Rangers 0
burgh 2, N.Y. Rangers 0
burgh 4, N.Y Rangers 2
Rangers 5, Pittsburgh 1
Y. Rangers 3, Pittsburgh 1
angers 2, Pittsburgh 1
STERN CONFERENCE
icago 4, Minnesota 2
ago 5, Minnesota 2
ago 4, Minnesota 1
nesota 4, Chicago 0
nesota 4,Chicago2
hicago 2, Minnesota 1
hicago 2, Minnesota 1,OT
iheim 3, Los Angeles 2
Angeles 3, Anaheim 2, OT
Angeles 3, Anaheim 1
heim 3, Los Angeles 2
Anaheim 2, Los Angeles 0
naheim 4, Los Angeles 3
iy: Los Angeles2,Anaheim 1
Angeles at Anaheim, 9 p.m.


ECHL PLAYOFFS
(x-if necessary)
CONFERENCE FINALS
BEST OF 7
STERN CONFERENCE
icinnati vs. Greenville
reenville at Cincinnati, 7:35 p.m.
reenville at Cincinnati, 7:35 p.m.


Thursday: Cincinnati at Greenville, 7 p.m.
NBA PLAYOFFS May 24: Cincinnati at Greenville, 7 p.m.
Sunday x-May 25: Cincinnati at Greenville, 3 p.m.
FAVORITE LINEO/U UNDERDOG x-May 27: Greenville at Cincinnati, 7:35
at Indiana 41/2(1791/2) Washington (if pm.
necessary) x-May 28: Greenville at Cincinnati, 7:35
atOklahomaCity 5 (2101/2) L.A. Clippers(if p.m.
necessary) WESTERN CONFERENCE
Alaska vs. Bakersfield
NHL PLAYOFFS Today: Bakersfield atAlaska, 11:15 p.m.
Tonight Saturday: Bakersfield at Alaska, 11:15 p.m.


May 23: Alaska at Bakersfield, 10 p.m. HOUSTON ASTROS Placed RHP An-
May24:AlaskaatBakersfield,10 p.m. thony Bass on the 15-day DL, retroactive
x-May25:Alaska at Bakersfield,3 p.m. to Sunday. Recalled RHP Josh Fields from
x-May 27: Bakersfield at Alaska, 11:15 p.m. Oklahoma City (PCL).
x-May28: Bakersfield at Alaska, 11:15 p.m. MINNESOTA TWINS Optioned OF
Oswaldo Arcia to Rochester (IL).
NEW YORK YANKEES Reinstated
rPro soccer RHP Bruce Billings from the 15-day DL and
MLS designated him for assignment. Placed OF
EASTERN CONFERENCE Carlos Beltran on the 15-day DL, retroactive
W I T Pts GF GA to Tuesday. Selected the contract of RHP
W L T Pts GIF GA ., .,,,
Sporting Kansas City 5 3 2 17 15 8 Chase Whitley from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre
NewEngland 5 3 2 17 14 10 (IL)
D.C. 4 3 2 14 13i 11 OAKLAND ATHLETICS Acquired
Houston 4 5 2 14 15 19 OF/1B Klye Banks from San Diego for OF
NewYork 3 3 5 14 18 17 Jake Goebbert and a player to be named
Columbus 3 4 3 12 10 11 and/or cash considerations. Designated 1B
Philadelphia 2 5 5 11 12 15 Daric Barton for assignment.
TorontoFC 3 4 0 9 7 9 TEXAS RANGERS-Sent LHP Joe Saun-
Chicago 1 2 6 9 17 18 dersand2BDonnieMurphytoRoundRock
Montreal 1 5 3 6 7 17 (PCL) forrehabassignments.
WESTERN CONFERENCE TORONTO BLUE JAYS Placed OF Col-
W L T Pts GF GA byRasmusonthe 15-dayDL, retroactiveto
Seattle 7 3 1 22 22 19 Tuesday. Recalled OF Anthony Gose from
Real Salt Lake 5 0 5 20 21 12 Buffalo (IL).
FCDallas 5 5 1 16 20 19 National League
Vancouver 4 2 4 16 16 12 CHICAGO CUBS Placed LHP Zac
Colorado 4 3 3 15 11 12 Rosscup on the 15-day DL, retroactive to
San Jose 2 3 4 10 10 11 Saturday. Reinstated RHP Jose Veras from
LosAngeles 2 2 3 9 8 6 the 15-dayDL
ChivasUSA 2 5 3 9 12 19 CINCINNATI REDS Optioned RHP
Portland 1 3 6 9 13 16 NickChristiani to Louisville (IL). Selected the
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point contract of LHP Jeff Francis from Louisville.
for tie. Transferred RHP Mat Latos to the 60-day DL
Wednesday's result MIAMI MARLINS Selected the con-
Philadelphia 2, Sporting Kansas City 1 tract of RHP Anthony DeSclafani from Jack-
Saturday's games sonville (SL).
NewYorkatTorontoFC,4:30p.m. MILWAUKEE BREWERS Sent LHP
Montreal at D.C. United, 7 p.m. Tom Gorzelanny to Brevard County (FSL)
New England at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. for a rehab assignment.
ChivasUSA at FC Dallas,8:30 p.m. NEW YORK METS Transferred RHP
Los Angeles at Houston, 8:30 p.m. Bobby Parnell to the 60-day DL Assigned
Colorado at Real Salt Lake, 9:30 p.m. RHP Kyle Farnsworth outright to Las Vegas
San Jose at Seattle FC, 10 p.m. (PCL). Placed CTravis d'Arnaud on the 7-day
ColumbusatPortland,10:30p.m. DL, retroactive to Wednesday. Recalled
Sunday's game LHP Josh Edgin and C Juan Centeno from
Sporting Kansas City at Chicago,3 p.m. Las Vegas. FLUSHING, N.Y, May 15, 2014 -
The New York Mets today announced the
NWSL club placed catcher Travis d'Arnaud on the
W L T Pts GF GA 7-Day Disabled List, retroactive to May 14,
Seattle 7 0 0 21 16 4 with a concussion and recalled catcher
Portland 3 1 2 11 7 4 Juan Centeno from Las Vegas (AAA) of the
Western NewYork 3 1 1 10 8 4 Pacific Coast League. Centeno will wear
FCKansasCity 3 4 1 10 13 13 number.36andstarttonight'sgame.
Chicago 2 2 1 7 3 3 PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Sent RHP
Washington 2 4 0 6 8 11 Miguel Alfredo Gonzalez to Clearwater
SkyBlueFC 1 3 3 6 6 10 (FSL) fora rehabassignment.
Boston 1 3 0 3 5 9 PITTSBURGH PIRATES Optioned OF
Houston 1 5 0 3 3 11 Jaff Decker to Indianapolis (IL). Reinstated
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point LHPWandyRodriguezfrom the 15-day DL
for tie. SAN DIEGO PADRES Reinstated RHP
Wednesday's results DaleThayer from paternity leave.
Portland 1,Houston0 WASHINGTON NATIONALS Sent
Seattle FC 3, FC Kansas City 2 RHP Ross Ohlendorf to Potomac (Carolina)
Thursday's result fora rehab assignment.
Chicago at Boston, 7 p.m. BASKETBALL
Saturday's game National Basketball Association
Western NewYorkatWashington,6:30 p.m. NBA Fined L.A. Clippers coach Doc
Sunday's games Rivers $25,000 for public criticism of offici-
Houston at FC Kansas City, 6 p.m. ating. Announced the sale of the Milwau-
Chicago at Boston, 6:30pm kee Bucks to Wesley Edens and Marc Lasry
has been approved.
Tennis FOOTBALL
National Football League
INTERNAZIONALIBNLD'ITALIA ARIZONA CARDINALS Signed TE
At Foro Italico, Rome Troy Niklas, DE Kareem Martin and WR
Purse: Men, $4.77 million (Masters John Brown to four-year contracts. Promot-
1000);Women, $3.63 million (Premier) ed Malik Boyd to assistant director of pro
Surface: Clay-Outdoor scouting, Chris Culmer to Western Regional
Singles scout, Luke Palko to Eastern Regional scout,
Men Zac Canty to area scout, Glenn Fox to pro
Third Round scout and Darius Vinnett to NFS scout. Re-
Tommy Haas (15), Germany,vs. Stan- assigned Josh Scobey to Western Region
islasWawrinka (3), Switzerland, 5-7, area scout and John Ritcher to Southeast
6-2,6-3. Region scout.
Milos Raonic (8), Canada, def. Jo-Wilfried BUFFALO BILLS Signed DB Michael
Tsonga(11),France,7-6(5),6-4. Carter, CB Ross Cockrell, LB Randell John-
Andy Murray (7), Britain, def.Jurgen Mel- son and OL Seantrel Henderson.
zer, Austria, 7-6 (1), 6-4. CHICAGO BEARS Agreed to terms
Jeremy Chardy, France, def. Ivan Dodig, with DTWill Sutton on a four-year contract.
Croatia,6-3,6-2. CLEVELAND BROWNS Agreed to
Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, def. Mikhail You- termswith WR Miles Austin. Signed WR Earl
zhny (14), Russia, 6-7 (4), 6-2,6-1. Bennett and DL Elhadji Ndiaye.
Grigor Dimitrov (12), Bulgaria, def. Tomas GREEN BAY PACKERS-- Signed C Corey
Berdych (6),Czech Republic, 6-7(3),6-2,6-2. Linsleyand WR Jared Abbrederis.
David Ferrer(5), Spain,def. ErnestsGulbis, INDIANAPOLIS COLTS Signed OT UI-
Latvia,6-2,6-3. rickJohn and LB AndrewJackson. Released
Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, def. Philipp OTErikPikeandCBDariusPolk.
Kohlschreiber, Germany, 4-6,6-2,6-1. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS Released
Women QB Matt Scott.
Third Round KANSASCITYCHIEFS- Signed CB Phil-
Carla Suarez Navarro (13), Spain, def. Si- lipGaines.
mona Halep (4), Romaniawalkover. MIAMI DOLPHINS- Named Eric Stokes
Li Na (2), China, def. Sam Stosur, Australia, assistant general manager
6-3,6-1 NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS Released
Sara Errani (10), Italy, def. Petra Cetkovs- TETylerBeckand LSCharleyHughlett.
ka, Czech Republic, 6-4,7-6 (3). OAKLAND RAIDERS Signed LB Khalil
Agnieszka Radwanska (3), Poland, def. Mack.
Francesca Schiavone, Italy, 6A,6-1. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS Named
Ana Ivanovic (11), Serbia, def. Maria Jon Robinson director of player personnel
Sharapova (8), Russia, 6-1,6-4. and AndySpeyer national scout.
Zhang Shuai, China, def. Christina TENNESSEETITANS-Agreed to terms
McHale, United States, 6-2,46,6-2 with DL DaQuan Jones and DB Marqueston
Jelena Jankovic (6), Serbia, def. Flavia Huff
Pennetta (12), Italy, 6-2,6-3. WASHINGTON REDSKINS Signed TE
Serena Williams (1), United States, def. Kevin Perry, RB Silas ReddQBTommyRees,
Varvara Lepchenko, United States,6-1,6-2. DB Bryan Shepherd, NTs Chris Davenport
and Robert Thomas and WRs Lee Doss,
Transactions Cody Hoffman, Kofi Hughes and Rashad
Lawrence.
BASEBALL HOCKEY
American League National Hockey League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES Optioned NHL Suspended Buffalo F Zenon
RHPs Preston Guilmet and Kevin Gausman Konopka 20 games for violating the terms
to Norfolk (IL). Recalled RHP Evan Meek of the NHL/NHLPA performance-enhanc-
from Norfolk. ing substances program.
CHICAGOWHITE SOX- Sent LHP Chris OLYMPIC SPORTS
Sale and OF Adam Eaton to Charlotte (IL) U.S. ANTI-DOPING AGENCY An-
forrehabassignments, nounced wrestler Obenson Blanc tested
CLEVELAND INDIANS Placed OF Ny- positive for a prohibited substance and ac-
jer Morgan on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF cepted a two-year suspension, retroactive
Jesus Aguilar from Columbus (IL). to June 22,2013.


I QUICK HITS


HERNANDEZ
ACCUSED OF TWO
MORE MURDERS

BOSTON (AP) -
Former New England
Patriot Aaron Hernandez,
who was already accused
of murder in a man's
shooting death last year,
"ambushed and execut-
ed" two other men a year
earlier after an encounter
at a nightclub, prose-
cutors said Thursday
in announcing new
murder charges against
Hernandez in their
deaths.
The victims in that
killing, Daniel de Abreu
and Safiro Furtado, were
shot to death as they sat
in a car in Boston's South
End on July 16, 2012.
Police said they were
shot by someone who
drove up alongside in an
SUV with Rhode Island
license plates and opened
fire, and Suffolk District
Attorney Daniel Conley
said Thursday in an-
nouncing that Hernandez
has been indicted that
the victims were "am-
bushed and executed as
they drove home" and
that Hernandez was the
gunman.
Weeks later, Hernandez
signed a five-year deal
worth about $40 million
with the Patriots....
Ernest Wallace, an associate of
former New England Patriots tight
end Aaron Hernandez, has pleaded
not guilty to murder in the shooting
death of a man last summer near
Hernandez's home. Wallace was
arraigned Thursday in Superior Court
in Fall River.
Wallace has pleaded not guilty to
accessory charges in the 2013 killing
of semi-professional football player
Odin Lloyd. Another man who faces
murder charges, Carlos Ortiz, is being
arraigned May 27. Wallace and Ortiz
are from Hernandez's hometown of
Bristol, Connecticut.


TENNIS

Nadal, Murray advance:
In Rome, Rafael Nadal was pushed to
three sets for the second consecutive
match before ultimately prevailing
to set up an Italian Open quarterfinal
against Andy Murray.
The top-ranked Nadal dropped
behind a set and a break against


after the accuser failed to appear
for the hearing. Attorney Stephen
Goodwin also announced as he left
the courtroom that he's no longer
representing the accuser, citing
"irreconcilable differences."...
Wade Davis, the executive director
of the You Can Project, an advocacy
group seeking equality for gay and
lesbian athletes, is working with the
St. Louis Rams to help ease Michael
Sam's transition to the NFL. Davis said
Rams coach Jeff Fisher reached out to
him after the team picked Sam in the
seventh round on Saturday.


COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Pac-12 championship
game gets new home:
The Pac-12 Conference is moving its
league championship game to the
San Francisco 49ers'new stadium in
Santa Clara for the next three years.
The $1.2 billion stadium, which is
located about 45 miles south of San
Francisco, is opening this year and will
host the Pac-12 title game this season
on Dec. 5. The first three conference
championships had been held in the
stadium of the division champion with
the best conference record Oregon
in 2011, Stanford in 2012 and Arizona
State last year.


HOCKEY

Malkin headed to play
for Russia at worlds: In
Minsk, Belarus, star forward Yevgeni
Malkin will join Russia at the ice
hockey world championship in Minsk
after his Pittsburgh Penguins were
eliminated from the NHL playoffs by
the New York Rangers. Malkin was a
member of the Russia team that won
the 2012 worlds.
Led by Alex Ovechkin, Russia
has been unbeatable at the worlds,
scoring four straight victories as
they hope to put behind them a
mortifying elimination by Finland in
the quarterfinals in Sochi.


SOCCER

As World Cup nears,
protests continue: Protesters
began a wave of demonstrations
around Brazil, burning tires and
blocking highways to draw attention
to housing and education needs
before next month's World Cup. In
Sao Paulo, the country's biggest city,
demonstrators blocked two key roads
into the city and hundreds protested
near one of the stadiums built for
soccer's premier tournament. The
group claims many people have been
forced out of their homes because
of rising rents in the neighborhood
around the new stadium....


Mikhail Youzhny of Russia, then took Barcelona captain Caries Puyol
11 of the final 12 games to win 6-7 reluctantly retired from soccer, his
(4), 6-2,6-1 at the Foro Italico. right knee no longer able to endure
"Get used to (it),"Nadal said of his the demands of defending after a
recent struggles. "With the years that's 15-season career that included 21
the normal thing. Everybody suffers, trophies.
That's part of the sport'."
Nadal said he's looking forward CYCLING
to facing Murray for the first time
in more than two years. Murray Matthews wins Giro
eliminated Jurgen Melzer of Austria stage, leads overall: In
7-6(1), 6-4. Montecassino, Italy, overall leader
Michael Matthews claimed his

PRO FOOTBALL first individual victory on the sixth
stage of the Giro d'Italia but the day
Hardy's accuser denied was marred by a crash which left
protective order: In Charlotte, Giampoalo Caruso seriously injured.


N.C., a Charlotte District Court Judge
dismissed a protective order request
by a woman who said Panthers
defensive end Greg Hardy assaulted
and threatened to kill her. Judge
Charlotte Brown dismissed the order


American Taylor Phinney raced to
a 12-second victory in 100-degree
heat in the fifth stage of the Tour
of California, and Britain's Bradley
Wiggins retained the overall lead.


S EEBSESS3SE3al


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 5


(91.06HIS (448s


The Sun/Friday, May 16, 2014






~Page6 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Friday, May 16, 2014


CLUB
FROM PAGE 1
meeting, I bring it up
about Port Charlotte
being the pilot school
(in the county) to start
lacrosse because we have
the numbers for it. As of
right now, they're redoing
the budgets for next year
and I brought it to the
table for them to let me
try it next year as a sport.
Right now that's on hold
because they're looking at
the numbers."
Vernon said he thinks
it's unlikely for lacrosse to
be approved as a varsity
sport for next season, but
it's something he's going
to continue pushing for.
He added that lacrosse,
particularly girls lacrosse,
would be beneficial to
his athletic department
because it would help the
school stay in order with
Title IX requirements.
The ratio of girls to
boys playing varsity
sports at PCHS is skewed
toward boys because of
large football and basket-
ball teams, and the girls
lacrosse club is actually
lowering the number of
girls because many of
those athletes are play-
ing lacrosse instead of
softball or track and field.
Vernon said if lacrosse
and cheerleading were
added as varsity sports,
the ratio would be almost
even.
If Port Charlotte were to
add lacrosse as a varsity
sport, the most likely
competition would come
from the south. Eight
schools in Collier County
and seven in Lee County
have added varsity
lacrosse in the past five
years.
Contact Zlach Miller at 941-206-1140
orzmiller@sun-herald.om.


1W .~ ~


^ ". f^ ."* ** '

SUN PHOTO BY JENNIFER BRUNO
Lemon Bay's Anthony Marinola runs with the ball ahead of North Port's Devin Gouveia during
Thursday's spring game in North Port.


BOBCATS
FROM PAGE 1
Simms completed six of l
his first seven passes and .N. ...
finished with 171 passing '
yards.
"I think I played well,"
Simms said. "I made a
couple of mistakes, but
I'll clean them up in the
offseason."
It wasn't entirely a
Simms showcase. SUN PHOTO BY JENNIFER BRUNO
Matthew Laroche
North Port's Teddy Deas rushes during Thursday's spring game
scored on a 75-yard against Lemon Bay.
touchdown run on the
second play from scrim- with a one-yard plunge by to get our starters off the
mage and the Bobcats' Marinola just before half- field and get some rest."
defense twice stopped time and added a safety Contact Rob Shore at 941-206-1174 or
Lemon Bay drives inside after the break to cut the shore@sun-herald.con
the North Port 2. lead to 19-16. But that was
NORTH PORT 25, LEMON BAY 16
Laroche led North Port as close as they got. Lemon Bay 0 14 2 0 16
with 106 rushing yards. Lemon Bay coach D.J. NorthPort 13 6 0 6 25
First quarter
But after falling be- Ogilvie said the game NPS- Matthew Laroche 75 run (kickfailed),
hind 13-0, Lemon Bay highlighted the team's 11:42.
responded with a tough need for additional depth NP StantleyThomas 10 pass from : Bren-
nan Simms (NickAmuso kick),2 :30.
running game opening come fall. Second quarter
up holes for Tyler Nelson, "I think we played hard, LB- Sean Connaghan 2 run (Josh Kenne-
dy kick), 6:55.
Bobby Caspolich and so I'm proud about that," NP- Simms6run(kickfailed),3:00.
Anthony Marinola. Ogilvie said. "But we have LB Anthony Marinola 1 run (Kennedy
kick), :09.
Nelson led the way with things we can get better Third quarter
82 rushing yards and at. We need to find some LB Alan Pinkney tackled in end zone,
Marinola added 76. young kids to fill in and 840Fourth quarter
The Mantas surged give us quality minutes NP-Simms20run (passfailed),1:51.


HORSE
FROM PAGE 1
the points list that deter-
mined the 20 horses who
qualified for the Kentucky
Derby.
So Azpurua and his
horse waited for the
Preakness, where Derby
winner and overwhelm-
ing favorite California
Chrome will try to keep
alive a bid for the Triple
Crown with a victory on
Saturday.
Social Inclusion is the
solid 5-1 second choice in
the 10-horse field.
A victory would make
Azpurua the oldest trainer
to saddle a Preakness
winner, coming just two
weeks after 77-year-old
Art Sherman became the
oldest to train a Derby
winner in California
Chrome.
"Sunny Jim"
Fitzsimmons was 82 years,
10 months when he won
the 1957 Preakness with
Bold Ruler.
"Every race is the same,"
Azpurua said Thursday
in a soft voice. "The only
thing different is the
name."
If Social Inclusion is an
inexperienced as Azpurua
is wise, the trainer's faith
in his horse remains solid.
"I love this horse," he
said. "He's doing every-
thing and I'm pleased
about it. I expect a lot out
of him."
Social Inclusion will
have a lot of support in
Venezuela, where, like

PREAKNESS ODDS


Azpurua, owner Ron
Sanchez is from.
"I'd say two or three
million people will watch
the race," Sanchez said.
Azpurua's passion for
training is evident in his
emotion. His eyes watered
and he paused to collect
himself before saying, "I
love this business. I love
the horses."
He moves slowly around
the barn, and in a rare
concession to his age rides
a golf cart over to the track
to watch his horse train.
Sanchez appreciates
Azpurua's dedication and
passion, and describes
their relationship as being
like father and son.
"I feel a lot of respect
for him. He was a national
hero for horse racing fans
in Venezuela," Sanchez
said. "The more I know
him the more I want to
learn from him. He's my
man and we're going to
make it. It's a dream for
both of us."
After Social Inclusion's
second start at
Gulfstream, where he blew
away the field, Sanchez
began fielding offers for
the colt. And the prices
prospective buyers were
willing to pay got bigger.
Sanchez turned them all
down.
"I didn't sell the horse
because they wanted to
take it away from him," he
said, his right hand resting
lightly on Azpurua's
shoulder. "Loyalty is a big
word and I'm a loyalty guy.
We're still going to keep
together."


The field for Saturday's 139th 4. Ring Weekend
Preakness Stakes, with post position, 5. Bayern
horse's name and odds: 6. Ria Antonia
7. Kid Cruz
1. Dynamic Impact 12-1 8. Social Inclusion
2. General a Rod 15-1 9. Pablo Del Monte
3. California Chrome 3-5 10. Ride On Curlin


I ston.ec S. wbb I. *I


194.20.HIJ!H (44


:Page 6 SP


The Sun/Friday, May 16,2014


www.sunnewspapers.net


I







PORT


CHARLOTTE


Friday, May 16,2014 A weekly section of the Sun


/ Nicole Noles
EDITOR'S CORNER
nnoles@sun-herald.com




Welcome new Herald

publisher Leslee Peth
ou may have noticed a new
Y name on the page 2 bishop
(that's the box at the bottom of
the page) last week. Leslee Peth has
stepped in as the Port Charlotte Herald
publisher, so you can expect to see
her Out and About column each week
featuring different happenings around
town. She's involved with several
boards of local nonprofits as well as
this year's Leadership Charlotte class,
so chances are that you may have
already met her.
Another change you will see is in
the Herald's Biz Bits column. Robert
Nelson will be writing that again
starting next week, so please email
your business news to pcbizbits@
yahoo.com.
In the meantime, please enjoy this
week's Mother's Day issue of the Port
Charlotte Herald. Although the official
holiday has already passed by, it never
hurts to take the extra time to show
your appreciation to your mom or the
moms around you when they don't
expect it. Flowers are nice all year
round, right? And so are massages, and
chocolate. I bet she deserves it.


Habitat for


Fomen built it

Humanity dedicates home to single mom


HERALD PHOTO BY TAMI GARCIA


Michelle Rumreich, director for development of Charlotte County Habitat for Humanity,
prepares to hand a gift basket filled with various items to new homeowner Kirsten Eldridge
during the Women Build 2014 dedication ceremony Saturday morning in Port Charlotte. Gifts
were provided by the Daughters of the American Revolution, American Red Cross, Burnt Store
Presbyterian Church, Charlotte County Habitat for Humanity, Church of Jesus Christ Latter Day
Saints, Cleaning at Its Best, Edison Collegiate High School, Legeres Concrete Specialties, Proctor
& Gamble, St. Maximilian Kolbe Church, St. James Episcopal Church Women, Sun Country Decor
and the Sun newspapers.


By NICOLE NOLES
PORT CHARLOTTE HERALD EDITOR
Some moms get flowers, handmade
cards and breakfast in bed on Mother's
Day.
Kirsten Eldridge got a house.
Thanks to Habitat for Humanity, their
Women Build 2014 program recruited
women from all around Charlotte
County to give one of their own a hand
up, not a hand out. The project started
March 4, and the house was completed
by May 2, just in time for a Mother's Day
dedication.
Single mom Eldridge has her
daughters, Jaime Weldin, 5, and Jessie
Baker, 3, to thank for their new home.
The girls brought home a flyer from the
Baker Center in October describing the
Habitat program and inviting parents to
attend a meeting to learn more.
"It was a really fast process," Eldridge
said about the short timeline from
application to homeownership.
Although the homebuilding itself
was fast, it was not without hard work
and sweat. Organizations from around
Charlotte County chipped in with
various aspects of the 10-week home-
building process. Eldridge was right
alongside them, putting in her required
sweat equity hours when she wasn't
WOMEN 14


Habitat ceremony wraps up Women Build 2014


ay 10 was the culmination
of countless volunteer hours
from so many wonderful
folks in the community who helped
raise the funds and inject the sweat
equity needed into the building
of Charlotte County Habitat for
Humanity's first women-built home.
On this day, more than 100 people
gathered to celebrate Kirsten El-
dridge, a single mom with two young
girls ages 5 and 3 who has real-
ized her dream of home ownership
in Port Charlotte.
The occasion, held on Mother's
Day weekend, made us all realize
what a wonderful example she is
setting for her blossoming young
girls.
So many groups who made this all
happen were there to show support.
Centennial Bank was represented


Leslee Peth
OUT AND ABOUT


Leslee Peth is the publisher of the
Port Charlotte Herald. Contact her at
lpeth@sun-herald.com.
by Ron and Debbie Monck and Ricki
Thomas, and First Alliance Church
was represented by Leslie Boyle. Gulf
Breeze Promotionals was present,
as was WaterLine weekly magazine
and the Charlotte Sun team, both
represented by Susan Matthews
and myself. Kay's Kloset and so
many, many more were also proud
supporters of the project. County
Commissioner Stephen R. Deutsch,
PETH 113


HERALD PHOO"BT
2B

HERALD PHOTO BY TAMI GARCIA


More than 20 local businesses, churches and other organizations were responsible for raising
funds and participating in the Women Build 2014 for Kirsten Eldridge's new Port Charlotte residence,
where Charlotte County Habitat for Humanity hosted a home dedication ceremony on May 10.


Sta i te.no Sab utYo r -eath-Facet Semril ospia
Vote,"(est fositafanI I6 redesIf'heCha oteSu! C 'F=4 C -F U1
-g S.Reservations requiredUSplease
Wednsda, My 2th 9:0amto 2:0pm ridy, ay 0th I I p to2:0pmcal (41*62-441
FREEStroe-Sceenng! SrokSppot.Gou
Blod.pesure r sk ssss enartd rtrychckMetngoterstok sr ivoso aeiver wh unersandwha
H2UatPrmeade 1320Tmimi ralSute493yo ae oig troghca hlp:outhouhot yurreovry


0 RESTAURANT
Good Friends, Good Food, Good Times
Reservations recommended.
$4 Martini's
Happy Houra
Special!
Monday -Thursday w
4pm- 7pm
Exp. 6/30/14

1975Tamiami Trail, PuntaGorda .,' ,'.
941-575-7575 M X
www.phils4l.comr
Mon-Thurs & Sun 11-9 Fri & Sat 11-11 |


Fi








WHAT'S


INSIDE

GARDEN PARTY


SOUTH PORT/ MOM/S,
SEE PAGE 6

AWARDS NIGHT


JUNIOR NAVY ROTC,
SEE PAGES 8-9

CAKE DECORATING


THANKS TO PUBLIC,
SEE PAGE 12


I COMMUNITY CALENDAR

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* MAY EVENTS
Mark Preuss will exhibit his artwork
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* FRIDAY, MAY 16
Parkside Farmers Market, 1 ,1i m
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SATUESDAY, MAY 20
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* SATURDAY, MAY 17
Health Fair Mobile Screening,'( ,1 n
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%SUNDAY, MAY 18
"'It's all about love" spring concert,
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* TUESDAY, MAY 20
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* WEDNESDAY, MAY 21
Free Blood Pressure Clinic, '1,1 in i'
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Parkside Farmers Market, ,1 Im
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* SATURDAY, MAY 24
Memorial Day Ceremony. Wr1a ,i 1
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* TUESDAY, MAY 27
Free lech night, "Open Forund
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* WEDNESDAY, MAY 28
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* FRIDAY, MAY 30
Parkside Farmers Market, ,1 iim


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* TUESDAY, JUNE 2
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PORT CHARLOTTE HERALD e IFNIPFP'I P --I Aiil [:Ijrh m -.11 irill iulawn USPS 743170 II '. 1 1 liulli, I I 'Ii Iv 6 11 11 I i Ni ru I i i W il IIr lmp In :1 I-
S ^ ^ V ^ r ^ Hlrl.iu,ri^-.f,,1,1 l lullr,,ll Hlrl.,r IH1 .;.;'tul';:l tl
^ ^ j L I ^ ~ ^ ^ ^Derek Dunn-Rankin f m .'1 ,i iiii i hJ 1111.111111'l "_h"IIl ADVERTISING
David Dunn-Rankin 1Pr-i-,,Ia imr u ml wl 'l -h r' I-_ I'hluli: Leslee Peth, Adh,rn,,, milfiar-, rr fPH hil-Ih hwr 411.'1_'lr..1,11
Chris Porter F Fh. ,. ,hFlr '4l-_''IIh,- 1 Bob White, P ,iil AdIhru,' mi l rhi nv."'.
f^^ ^^^ L. ^ NEWSPAPERS RustyPtay I l alnI,,ilir III l-_.-I.;: PatrkiaCompton,.A.lvrh..rqA...,, .hv4 'm .".'''f 4
S U N ~~~~NEIWSPAPERS Ncl oe IIIia iijw ,
Charlotte DeSoto Englewood North Port Venice Nicole Noles HFIhl,,,r I,,h ,,-hr '4 I' '': Tanyah Lo(kett, Ailv..ri.,, .i.. r i iv nv .
lilll Iil,,l-' *, ',]l l ,i Darcy W oods, Ml.vi'rhii ,ii f -l ,ij i v f '--",. '-,_,
23170 Harb:or view Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980 206-1000 Mark Yero, o,, inh r,, i,,r -:,,,. i:. i-


AWL PET OF THE WEEK








hk














PH-C.TC-. PPC'.iDED
Hugh is a 18-month-old American Bulldog and Pit mix. He is a gentle and loving dog who
is crate trained, walks on a leash and loves to play. Hugh and other pets are available for
adoption at the Animal Welfare League of Charlotte County, 3519 Drance Street in Port
Charlotte. All animals are spayed or neutered and are current with their shots prior to
adoption, except for rabies. They are open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week. To
view adoptable pets, please visit their website at www.awlshelter.org.





:Fr1,,il May16,2014


PHOTO PROVIDED
Elite dancers, from left, in the front row are: Ambrynn Julius, Kaitlyn Wells, Abby Legget and
Alexa James. In the middle row are Ashley Amontree and Alexis Owen and in the back row are
Abby Breton, Sophia Hart and Haylie Barnhil.


Elite dancers tested on


graded ballet examinations


PROVIDED BY
ELITE FINE ARTS ACADEMY

Elite Fine Arts Academy would like to
congratulate all students who entered
Royal Academy of Dance Vocational
and Graded Ballet Examinations this
spring. The RAD is the world's largest
ballet examination organization. The
RAD stresses the importance of every
student having an age appropriate,
achievable goal with structured devel-
opment and annual progression. Pupil
development is measured through the
undertaking of yearly examinations pro-
gressing from the Graded Examinations
in Dance through the Vocational Graded
Examinations syllabus.
The vocational syllabus provides an
in-depth study of technique, musicality
and performance skills, introduces
pointe work and prepares students for a
career in dance.
The grade examinations consist of
presentation of classical ballet tech-
nique, the development of coordination
and performance quality, expression
and storytelling through dance, as
well as the theatrical presentation of
national folk dances through the study
of character dances.
Adjudication is performed in groups
of four or fewer by an examiner who
is unfamiliar with the entrants. Each
candidate is evaluated on an individual
basis according to an internationally
standardized rubric. Candidates may be
entered for examination only by a RAD
certified and registered instructor.
Elite Fine Arts Academy is the only
school in Charlotte County to offer
this level of quality instruction and the
opportunity for examination.
Elite's artistic staff would like to
recognize the following young ladies on
their hard work and accomplishment


at the in the Royal Academy of Dance
Grade Examinations:

Grade 2
Alexa James, Ambrynn Julius, Abby
Leggat and Kaitlyn Wells.

Grade 3
Ashley Amontree, Haylie Barnhill,
Abby Breton, Emily Brause, Sophia Hart
and Julia Labor.

Grade 3
Solo Performance Award
Alexis Owen.

The following ladies have distin-
guished themselves with their perfor-
mance in the Royal Academy of Dance
Vocational Grade Exams:

Intermediate
Foundation level
Wilmaryam Bosque, Emily
Bobenmoyer, Isabella Coogan, Talia
DiBenedetto, Analise Dilorio and
Annabelle Wessels.

Intermediate level
Angelica Asperilla, Alyssa Burckley
and Amanda Nease.

Advanced One level
Kayla Rykiel, Isabel Sanchez and Kara
Valliere.

Elite Fine Arts Academy is located
at 17960 Toledo Blade Blvd., Port
Charlotte. For more information, call
941-235-1441 or visit www.elitefinearts.
wordpress.com.


The minimally invasive surgery techniques performed
at Bayfront Health Port Charlotte and Punta Gorda give
you advantages not found anywhere else in Charlotte County.
Using robotic-assisted surgery, Ruben Guzman, M.D.,
can perform what was once considered a complex operation,
with complete precision. With smaller incisions, less pain and
a quicker recovery than a traditional hysterectomy, you won't
miss out on your next adventure. If your doctor recommends
a hysterectomy, find out if this surgical option is right for you.


Learn more at BayfrontHealthRobotics.com,
or for a free referral, call 941-637-2497.


Ruben Guzman, M.D.
OB/GYN


%JBayfront Health
SRobotics

BayfrontHealth Robotics.com
Port Charlotte: 941-766-4122 Punta Gorda: 941-639-3131


Elite dancers pictured, from left, include Alyssa Burckley, Isabella Coogan, Talia Di Benedetto and
Wilmaryum Bosque in the front row and Analise Di liorio, Annabelle Wessels, Kayla Rykiel and
Kara Valliere in the back row.


Patientresults may vary. Consult your physician about the benefits and risks of any surgical procedure or treatment. Member of the Medical Staff of Bayfront Health Port Charlotte and Punta Gorda.


Herald Page 3





I I


Mike Mansfield, chief executive officer for HEP-LI PH'-.T'-,S B T-Pl Pi
Habitat, welcomes attendees to the Women Michelle Rumreich, center, director of development for Habitat, responds by smiling to the
Build 2014 dedication ceremony Saturday remarks of general contractor sponsor for Women Build 2014 Ron Monck of Team Centennial
morning for Kirsten Eldridge and her daughters Bank, as he thanks all those sponsors who assisted in the funding and building of Kirsten
Jamie Weldin, 5, and Jessie Baker, 3. Eldridge's, right, new Port Charlotte residence.


Gabrielle Reineck, senior director of outreach
for Habitat, provides a scripture reading during
a new home dedication ceremony for Kirsten
Eldridge on Saturday morning.


WOMEN: Habitat for Humanity celebrates Mother's Day with dedication ceremony


FROM PAGE 1
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A house
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Ron and Annemarie Klein representing Burnt Store Presbyterian Church prepare to hand
new Charlotte County Habitat for Humanity homeowner Kirsten Eldridge a Bible.


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Charlotte County Commissioner Stephen
Deutsch provides congratulatory remarks to
new Charlotte County Habitat for Humanity
homeowner Kirsten Eldridge during the Women
Build 2014 dedication ceremony Saturday.


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RIGHT: Jessica Long, support services
commander for Charlotte County Sheriffs
Ihl- r 1 im milt lllllV s|'l||hI' l ,. 11r | >









Department, leans in to give Kirsten Eldridge a
, congratulatory hug after presenting her withll
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hydrangea, gardenia and viburnum plants
. .1111 I |'.,1 II |n| .\.,lld~ "

RIGHT: Jessica Long, support services
commander for Charlotte County Sheriff's
Department, leans in to give Kirsten Eldridge a
congratulatory hug after presenting her with
hydrangea, gardenia and viburnum plants
for her new Port Charlotte home through the
Charlotte County Inmate Flower Program.


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:F'1'il May16,2014


THEME CROSSWORD


BUT THEY OUGHT TO!


By James Barrick


ACROSS
1. Lamented
5.Gung-ho
10. Give entry
15. Hit the books
19.With regard to:
2 wds.
20. Pass
21. Backcomb
22. Country Music
Hall of Famer
23. Sundry: Abbr.
24. Remove,
in a way
25. Italic language
26.Joss


27. Start of a quip by
P.J. O'Rourke
29. Part 2 of quip:
3wds.
31.-de parfum
32. Right to leave
34. High points: Var.
35. Alabama's
Muscle -
38. Expel
39. Swarming insect
41. Boxing prize
42. Kink
44. Attacks
45. Princess in
comic opera


48. Caen's river
49. Feeble
50. Pelf
51. Condemn
52. Savings vehicle:
Abbr.
53. Gill cousin
54. Sitz and sponge
55.- dreadful
56. Lattice part
58. Business abbr.
59. Stake
60. Sass
61. Part 3 of quip:
5 wds.
68. Kindled


69. Architectural
elements
70. Louisa Alcott
71. Injure
72. Invited
75. Serpentine
shapes
76. Mouselike
creature
77. Truss
78. Gerund
79. Project Gemini
rocket
80.Tightwad
81. Sound loudly
82. Cask


83. Edible
mushroom
84. Manners
85. Military action
86. Repeating design
88. Low-cal
89. Trumpet call on
stage
90. Medicine man
92.Tex-Mex fare
94. Qty.
95. Part 4 of quip:
3 wds.
98. End of the quip:
2 wds.


103. Moneychanger's
charge
104.Tusk
105. Scottish
landowner
106. Jot
107. Monocle
108.- Boothe Luce
109. Taxing time
110. Fervor
111. Saab or Tahari
112. What Cerberus
guards
113. Wildfowl
114. Punta del -


DOWN
1. Hoarfrost
2. Part of LSU:
Abbr.
3.Celtic language
4.Taper
5. Mythical place of
darkness
6.- Condor Peru
7.Clearing
8. Laid-back
9. Liquor
10. Finally: 2 wds.
11.Doyens
12. Dillon or Damon
13. Fertility goddess


14.Arm of a kind
15. Big trouble
16. Edition
17.On high
18. Tom, Dick and
Harry
28. Lock brand
29. "The Wild Wild

30. Composer's
creation
33. Reddish color
35. Gone bad
36.Yippee!
37.Rococo
39. Given to weeping


40. A possessive
42. Insult
43. Shoulder rifle
44. Soft
46. Noble's title
47. Irving or Adams
49. Coquette
50. Port city in
Nigeria
51. One of three
dimensions
54. Innocents
55. Bolt
57. Daughter of
Zeus and Leda
59. Made on looms


60. Bed
62. Succor
63. Twangy
64. Where Swansea
is
65. Shiny material
66. Treatment-
priority process
67. Brunch item
72. Pismire
73. Old coin
74. Life force in yoga
75. The Emerald Isle
76. Outmoded
technology
79.A-one: Hyph.


80. Nocturnal flier
81. Diminutive
83. Sir's counterpart
84. Peninsular state:
Abbr.
85. Trailer truck
87. Levy
88. Machine tools
89. Seat
90. Fissile stone
91. German
philosopher
92. Saltpeter: Var.
93. Draft horse
breed
96. Sunfish


97. Blue dyestuff
99. Discord deity
100. Scuffles
10 1.Coup d'-
102.Vendition
105. Barrel stave


Answers on page 13.


5-11 2014 United Feature Syndicate, Dist. by Universal Uclick


Deep Creek, Higgs parks improvements
Charlotte County Community Services announced construc-
tion will start Monday at Deep Creek and Higgs parks, for ADA
accessibility improvements.
Deep Creek Park will be open during the improvements;
there will be ongoing construction activity for approximately
two weeks. Activities in these areas are not closed, but will be
limited.
Higgs Park will be partially closed during the improvements,
which are taking place by the shuffleboard side of the park. The
basketball courts will be open; there will be ongoing construc-
tion activity for approximately two weeks. Estimated comple-
tion for these improvements also is two weeks.

Forrest Nelson construction to start
Construction will begin on Forrest Nelson Boulevard
Monday. A portion of the road will be closed between Quesada
Avenue and Corktree Circle from May 27 through Sept. 30. The
contractor, Quality Enterprises Inc., will be installing new box
culverts within the Sunset Waterway to increase flow capacity
as part of an overall plan to upgrade Charlotte County's storm-
water infrastructure system.
Detours will be in place, however motorists are encouraged
to utilize alternate routes when possible. Exercise caution while
traveling through this area.
More information is available at www.CharlotteCountyFL.gov;
click "Project Status Updates" in the "Popular Links" list on the
left side.

Improvements to affect Chester Roberts Park
Charlotte County Community Services announced construc-
tion started Tuesday at Chester Roberts Park in Charlotte
Harbor for ADA accessibility improvements.
Chester Roberts Park will be closed during the ADA accessi-
bility improvements. Estimated completion for these improve-
ments is two weeks.


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Herald Page 5




IS u I P S lr. ,, a .r e 1 p.y 1 i i


South Port Square creates a garden party for moms


HERALD PHOTOS BY ROBERT NELSON
The Gable West dinning room at South Port Square was filled on May 7 for this years Mother's Day
garden party. Each month there is a different theme. For the month of May the theme is Cuba.
For special days like Mother's Day, the theme changes for the day.


From left, Elaine Brand, Mary Ellen Fanstill, Mary Perkins, Fran Reighley and Maxine Miller await
brunch to be served during the Mother's Day garden party at South Port Square, 23023 West-
chester Blvd., Port Charlotte.


From left, Danikah Munoz, Annabelle Flowers, Alexandra Hutchison, Kathleen Hutchison, Justine
Beckwith, Sammy Shinde, Justin Beckwith and Chase Flowers have a snack before they stand up
before the residents and guests of South Port Square to express "What Mother Means To Them.":'


From left, Kathleen Hutchison, Vicki Borrone and Alexandra Hutchison hug after explaining to
everyone'lNhat Mother Meant To Them.":' The event had 150 people attend, including residents
and guests.

DONATIONS NEEDED!
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Please Donate Clean, Usable Items.










Call To Sheule A Pickup For
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Now accepting pick up in Arcadia. All money received from donations
in Arcadia will be utilized to assist DeSoto County residents in need.
Charlotte County to assist people in need in Charlotte County.
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Executive
Director
Richard Finn
thanks the
staff and
guests who
helped with
creating the
1 Mother's Day
LGarden Party
S* at South Port
Square in the
Gables West
dinning room.




^ LEFT:
Harpist
S Natalie
Wagner
performed
i numerous
songs on her
i| harp while
E residents
and guests
enjoyed the
morning at
the South
Port Square
Garden Party
celebration of
generations.

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:Fr1,i'l May16,2014


Pirates move up, seniors get cool
T he second annual Port Charlotte
High School Moving Up Assembly A '
and Senior Pool Party was held ,
on the final day of school for this year's
graduating class. This assembly started '
with PCHS Principal Steve Dionisio / '-
saying a few words to the senior class, W"
followed by a slide show highlighting '
the Class of 2015. i -
After the slide show, the PCHS faculty q
and staff made a tunnel for the seniors A"' k
to walk through and say their goodbyes *
before enjoying a pool party for the last
hour of the day. When the seniors left, each
of the classes were rotated to their new i .
locations in the gym. Dionisio released
the rising sophomores and juniors back to
class before speaking to next year's seniors.


l4


'IS *IN CHARLOTTE COUNTY


o oTHE


OVER
IN THE
MEADOW
L/.hi' 11thC I,. I'


,, .. I SUMMER FUN!
Sthe a -..i a Swim & Sports
Sa -a Alpine Climbing Tower
Kayaking & Archery
sorki a Team Building
VCcI Ira Arts & Crafts
FRELU INCHi & 5AI a Marine Life classes ..,,, r..
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PIRATE PAGE
Pirate Page contributors
are students at Port Charlotte
High School. The content
displayed on this page is part
of grading requirements for
Curtis Williams'journalism
class. Send feedback to Curtis
Williams@ccps.kl2.fl. us.


I


usmu


m


Herald Page 7


X.,





Fi il.ii May16,2014 Fill.i, May16,2014


Pirate's ROTC Awards Night Banquet steers the ship to a new direct


ion


HERALD PHOTOS BY BETSY WILLIAMS


The 2013-2014 Pirate Battalion Commanding Officer C/CDR Alex Harvey relinquished his
command to new Pirate Battalion Commanding Officer C/SCPO Brianna Spieldenner as she fights
back tears. The change of command was the last event of the evening.


The Hunley Award from the Sons of Confederate Veterans was presented to P02 Ronnie Kirby for
his honor, courage and commitment to the PCHS Navy Junior ROTC by Tom Geffert.


Emil Venclik, life member of Post 5690 Port Charlotte Veterans of Foreign Wars presented the
JROTC Citation and Medal Award in recognition of outstanding achievement and exceptional
leadership ability to both C/SN Chadwick Davis and C/P02 Dylan Caparo.


By SHAYLIN FLORES
ROTC PAO OFFICER

Excitement, nervousness, anxiety or
complete happiness were the feelings
that roamed through the rooms of the
Kings Gate Country Club the night of
April 23. While Special Operation's Chief
Justin Grening walked around inspecting
every inch of the room until it was per-
fect, his assistants Clemente, Cupo and
Torres along with his helpers Francis,
Kern, Kirby and Moore were getting
ready to welcome all the cadets and
guests into the most waited-for event of
the year the 2014 Port Charlotte High
School Navy Junior ROTC Awards Night
Banquet.
That night was the last time ROTC
seniors Alex Harvey, Abby Adkinson,
Meaghan Chauvin, Allyssa Cuevas,
Thomas Elliott, Deanna Hannah, Jaroslav
Vanko, Kyle Creamer, Arianna Burns,
Cory Boike, Eleazar Gonzalez, Kenneth
George, Toni Starr, Matthew Baumgardt,
Kyle Croker, Kelly Clark, Adam Ely
Matthew Becker, Kody Spangler, Patrick
Cairns, Anita Abalon, Matthew Segarra,
Zachery Faust, Casey Cumberworth and
Kenny Gardiner would wear their uni-
form. The ceremony was a bittersweet
night, as the Pirate Battalion would soon
have to say their goodbyes to fellow
senior shipmates.
The seniors of the 2014 class will be
remembered for several years by their
ROTC family because many of them
touched the hearts of countless cadets
throughout their years in ROTC.
As the night sailed by and numerous
awards were handed out, it was finally
time to announce the 2014 Pirate
Battalion staff heads.

Battalion staff heads for
2014-15 announced
The first cadet to be called up
was Cadet Petty Officer First Class
Shaylin Flores, who was named the
Public Affairs Officer. Cadet Flores had
worked in Public Affairs with Brianna
Spieldenner the past year, where she
made tremendous improvement as a
leader, and showed she was a responsi-
ble and trustworthy cadet.
"It was an incredible honor to be
announced as the head of the PAO
department, all those nights I stayed up
finishing articles, annoying people for
quotes and pictures my hard work
finally took me to where my dream laid.
I am very excited for this upcoming
year; I have innumerable ideas and my
department and I will give my 110 per-
cent best to make this year successful,"
said Cadet Flores.
Operations staff head senior Meaghan
Chauvin turned over command to
Cadet Chief Justin Grening, who has
worked in the department for the past
three years and was recently the Special
Operations Chief and Unarmed Basic
team commander.
Cadet Grening is someone who always
has a party-time personality, and now
being the new Operations head, this
will fit very well. On the other side of
the ship, Administration department
and staff head Allyssa Cuevas also
turned over command to Cadet Ensign
Carly Cheatham. Cheatham is an NS3
who was recently the Supply Officer,
but has had experience in the Admin
department. She was also the Unarmed
Exhibition team commander. Cadet
Ensign Grening and Cadet Lieutenant
Junior Grade Cheatham will do a fan-
tastic job in Operations and the Admin
department during the upcoming year.
Aboard a Navy ship, someone has
to be in charge of making sure every-
one has a uniform, shoes, ranks and
ribbons all the proper items they
need to represent a Navy sailor. Well
at Port Charlotte High School's Navy
Junior ROTC, Cadet Mandi Shelton is


l),p IIi MI' [I h'
(11 Illr "l!|'l|'l\ ^ ^^^B
()llhi.'l l<> ( ,idh'l ^ ^ ^ ^
l'ni.4nr ,ll,'lll .\n ^ ^ ^^ ^
l ,* I s1l r i\ ,| s Vf|\ II
stn pu i, ..I, ill .,1'n ,I
overflowed with joy.
"I'm excited but
a little worried too,
because supply is
a very tough job,
but it's going to be
a challenge that I
am ready for," exclaimed Cadet Mandi
Shelton.
Cadet Senior Chief Petty officer
Mackenzie Coffey was promoted to the
Cadet Master Chief Petty Officer of the
Battalion.
"I am ecstatic, because this is exactly
what I've been working for. When I
joined ROTC as a freshman, I said I
wanted to be the CMC of the Pirate
Battalion, this is a dream come true,"
Coffey said.
Cadet Master Chief Coffey is the
unrivaled choice for this position as he
is a very effective leader; he will be in
charge of all the enlisted cadets. Cadet
Master Chief Coffey will ensure that all
cadets behave and live up to the three
core values of Honor, Courage and
Commitment.

The new Executive and
Commanding Officers
Last, but certainly not least, is the
Executive and Commanding Officer of
the Pirate Battalion. This was the mo-
ment that everyone was waiting for; the
moment that had slowly consumed the
hearts of every cadet present. The room
seemed a little warmer than usual, peo-
ple started to cough, rattle in their seats
while Commander Davis was stalling. As
Commander stopped talking, the room
grew silent and heart beats grew louder.
In the crack of silence, Commander
Davis calls Cadet Lukas Phillips front
and center. He was awarded the po-
sition of the Executive Officer of the


Pirate Battalion.
"Well, I was overwhelmed with
excitement, to be pinned the second
highest ranking cadet is a great feeling,"
said Phillips.
Phillips worked in the Administration
department for three years; he did
an outstanding job creating a new
advancement system, and he was also
the Armed Basic team commander.
He's demonstrated that he is the only
candidate suitable for this position.
Finally, the Commanding Officer
of the 2014 Pirate Battalion was an-
nounced as Cadet Brianna Spieldenner.
Likewise with her shipmate Phillips,
she has demonstrated total success
throughout her three years in ROTC.
Completing Leadership Academy her
freshman year, taking the initiative to
be a class commander her sophomore
year, and continuing with her success,
she took on the challenge to be the
Public Affairs Officer for two years, the
Marksmanship team commander also
for two years, and the Recruiting Chief.
"To be recognized as the new
Commanding Officer is the greatest
honor I can think of. I have dedicated
my whole high school career to ROTC
and I want to be able to steer the ship
steady from now on. I hope to be a
great role model for my cadets and lead
us into a great year for everyone. The
pride I feel for my unit is incredible
and I am so happy to be an integral
part in it for this upcoming year," said
new Commanding Officer Spieldenner.
Congratulations to all the Pirate
cadets who were recognized and


received awards, especially to the
2014 Pirate ROTC staff heads: Cadet
Commander Spieldenner, Cadet
Lieutenant Commander Phillips, Cadet
Master Chief Petty officer Coffey, Cadet
Lieutenant Junior Grade Cheatham,
Cadet Ensign Shelton, Cadet Ensign
Grening and Cadet Ensign Flores.
Oorahh, Pirates!


Team Commanders C/CPO Justin Grening, C/SCPO James Coffey, C/LTJG Allyssa Cuevas, C/CPO Lukas
Philips, C/SCPO Brianna Spieldenner and C/ENS Carly Cheatham were the first to receive the red
berets- a new tradition during the Port Charlotte High School NJROTC's Annual Awards
Banquet held April 23 at Kings Gate County Club.


Herald Page 9


Herald Page 8





I I


Do you remember when?


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:F5 ri May 16,2014


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Herald Page 11






Students decorate Mother's Day cakesI I,,
Students decorate Mother's Day cakes


First-graders Clifford Delzell and Logan Stchur work in complete silence on their
Mother's Day cakes.


HEP-LD PH'-.T'-.S B, BETS .IVLLI-r1S
Students at Charlotte Academy had the opportunity to
decorate heart-shaped cakes for their mothers through the
Peachland Publix that brought all the supplies needed to
their school on May 9. Second-grader Ethan Casey carries his
cake back to his classroom, having to keep it under wraps as
his mother works at the school.


. Am
^

Some just dumped their bag of sprinkles on the
cakes. Second-grader Samantha Schultz was
very careful not to let any of the sprinkles in
the center of her cake.


Second-grader
Melanie Maugeri
and first-grader
Allie Mae Poulin
show off their
decorated cakes.



RIGHT:| ,' J,

Mohammad -
Dewaik, kinder-
garten, was the
last of his class to
finish decorating i
his mother's
cake, which he
himself gave a
thumbs up.


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Gabby Tiseo,
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V and Robby
Ball, second
grade, were
all proud
of the
cakes they
decorated.
LEFT:
First-grader
Katherine
Triola
-, .squeezes
:' ..j every last
drop of the
rst-grade twins Frank and Madison Planer work on their Mother's', icing from
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:Fr1.iol May16,2014


PHOTO PROVIDED
Wearing their pink jerseys and making an early contribution to Dave"Fungus" Cabott's tip jar are
members of the Stone Crabs Booster Club, from left, Alberta Lemmler, Lori Bolz, Jack Simmons,
Cabott, Sally Simmons, Mary Jo Dungee and George Lemmler. All of the tips collected by Cabott at
today's Stone Crabs game will be given to Dollars For Mammograms.



Vendor collecting Dollars


for Mammograms


PROVIDED BY
STONE CRABS BOOSTER CLUB

If you've ever been to Charlotte
Sports Park for a baseball game, be it
Rays spring training or Stone Crabs,
you have no doubt crossed paths with
the resident beer vendor, Dave Cabott.
Affectionately known as "Fungus" by his
loyal customers at the ball park, Dave
has been there since the first pitch was
thrown more than six years ago.
Each year, during one of the Stone


Crabs games, Dave has donated his
entire tips for the night to "Dollars For
Mammograms," and this year is no
exception. Today, the Stone Crabs will be
sponsoring a silent auction with the win-
ning bidder taking home a pink jersey
worn by one of the Stone Crabs players.
The proceeds of that auction, along with
all of Cabott's tips for the night will go
to Dollars for Mammograms. "Fungus"
is hoping that his loyal customers will
help make this the best year ever for his
contribution to this worthy cause.


PETH: Habitat dedicates house May 10


FROM PAGE 1

Councilwoman Nancy Prafke and
representatives from Hypnotique
and Bisous Salon were also on hand
to support the event.
Of course, none of it could have
happened without Habitat staff
members Mike Mansfield, Gabrielle
Reineck, Michelle Rumreich, Ellen
Cardillo and Jan Nick.


Answers

to today's

puzzle

from

page 5.


Throughout the dedication cere-
mony, the family was presented with
gifts from many local groups. Lunch
was also provided by Centennial
Bank and Jason's Deli.
During its 26-year history in
Charlotte County, Habitat for
Humanity has served 299 families.
For more information about their
other building projects, visit http://
charlottecountyhfh.org.


GOLF SCORES
All golf scores must be
emailed to golfscores@
sun-herald.com.

* KINGS GATE
GOLF CLUB
Hole-in-One
May 10
Bill Thomas aced hole
No. 16 from 102 yards
using a gap wedge
club. It was witnessed
by Keith Harvey, Jack
Tretton and Andy
Daignault.

* KINGSWAY
COUNTRY CLUB
Sunday Couples
2 Best Ball of 4
April 27
1.) Gary and Gail
DaRos, Gus and Marge
Guglielmo, 120.
Men's Day
Better Ball of Partners
April 29
T-1.) Bob Pezzullo,
Rodger Dowdell, Jim
Beyl, PJ Fisher, 60.
2.) Ed Bouleris, Jim
McGee, 62.
3.) Bob Flowers, Wayne
Sherman, Tom Block, 63.
Ladies Day
2 Best Ball of 4
May 1
1.)Donna Sherman,
Colette Dowdell, Karen
Laneuville, 113.
2.) Carol Taylor, Sara
Croak, Vivian Hendricks,
Marge Guglielmo, 118.
Sunday Couples
Better Ball of Partners
May 4
1.) Mike and Nicki
DiSandro, 62.
2.) Dave and Carolyn
Stewart, 66.
Ladies'Day
May 8
Low Gross:
1.) Angela Walker, 93.
2.) Kathy Tolla, 94.
Low Net:
1.) Marny Boardway, 68.
2.) Barb Wojtkiewicz, 71.

* ROTONDA GOLF
& COUNTRY CLUB
Pine Valley Nine
Scramble
May 5
1.) John German, Robert
Bowen, Larry Luccio,
Charles Elliot, 35.
2.) Bill Webber, Jim
Knowlton, John Vanzut-
phen, Len Koldin, Bob
Zimmerman, 36.
3.) Jim Jones, William
Tait, Dave Metcalf, Dave
Weinberger, 36.
Closest to the pin: John
Vanzutphen on No. 4
and Robert Bowen on
No. 8.

* ST. ANDREWS
SOUTH GOLF CLUB
LGA 18-Hole Results
May 1
Individual Low Net:
1.) Judy Johnson, 65.
2.) Edith Nelson, 67.


3.) Joan Bradley, 69.
4.) Holly Larson, 70.
LGA 9-hole results
May I
Low Putts:
1.) Shelia Cunningham,
17.
2.) Norma Brownlow, 18.
LGA 18-Hole Results
2 Low Net of 4
May 8
1.) Joan Bradley,
Mickey Amy,
Judy Johnson,
Lois Bolger, 113.
LGA 9-Hole Results
1 Low Net of 3
May 8
1.) Norma Brownlow,
Helen Anderson,
Alyce Eberth, 29.
Twilight Results
2-person Scramble
May 9
1.) Kevin O'Shea and
Sue Blaisdell, 28.5.
2.) Lou and Sue Dieke,
30.3.

* TWIN ISLES
COUNTRY CLUB
Ladies'9-Hole Results
April 30
Low Net:
Flight A
1.) Cecelia Eames, 39.
2.) Phyllis Weber, 40.
Flight B
1.) Pat Fox, 31.
2.) Evana Young, 33.
Flight C
1.) Mary Pedalino, 36.
2.) Kate Curley, 46.
Flight D
1.) Ann Ashworth, 29.
2.) Ann Fitzsimmons, 39.
Ladies'18-Hole Results
2 Best Balls of 4
April 30
1.) Chris McCarthy,
Karla Frazier, Judy
Vanderweele, 115.
2.) Christine Ricci,
Franna Hall,
Mary Lou Miller,
Louise McDaniel. 125.
3.) Eileen Roehrig,
Sandy Lorden, Ina Bice,
Diane Buckingham, 126.
Mens'Day Results
Quota Points
May 2
FLIGHT A
1.) AI Ricci.
2.) Jim Kelley.
T-3.) Bob Hardesty,
Peyton Coles.
FLIGHT B
T-1.) Bob Fitzsimmons,
Orrin Eames.
2.) Woody McDaniel.
Ladies 9-Hole Results
Better Ball
May 7
1.) Cecelia Eames,
Evana Young,
Ginny Bowden.
Ladies'18-Hole Results
2 Best Balls of 4
May 7
1.) Christine Ricci,
Debbie Snedeker,
Lorrie Ross,
Diane Buckingham, 120.
2.) Anita Campion, Gail
Puckett, Sandy Lorden,
Joan Montovano, 124.
3.) Linda Seber, Franna
Hall, Mary Lou Miller,


Louise McDaniel, Roz
Hickey, Sue Galvin,
Monica Lucey,
Judy Vanderweele, 125.
Mens'Day Results
Stableford Points
May 9
Flight A
1.) Bob Hardesty, 44.
2.) Payton Coles, 43.
3.) Dave Carney, 40.
Flight B
1.) Ed Curley, 44.
2.) Dick Carr, 43.
3.) Bob Klug, 41.
Flight C
1.) Orrin Eames, 47.
2.) Ed Hartman, 35.
3.) Dick Miller, 34.

U BURNT
STORE GOLF &
ACTIVITY CLUB
Saturday Scramble
April 19
1.) Dan Pontius, Karsten
Kuhr, Jack Orr.
2.) Robert Paul, Lee
Plank, Barbara Mueller.
3.) Bill Story, Carl
Millerschoen, Andrea
Millerschoen.
Tuesday 9-Hole League
April 22
1.) Jerry and Lynn
Hunter, Jeanne Braun,
Jim Brown.
2.) Robert Paul, Millie
Hierro, Rick Kellner,
Wendy Synenberg.
3.) Phil Leonard, Cheryl
Fogg, Lynn Powers.
Backwards Scramble
April 26
FLIGHT A
1.) Kelly and John
Millar, Trish Murray, Bob
SanJuan.
2.) Carol and Doug
Chesser, Bob Hodges,
Stan Hochstadt.
3.) Amy and Dan
Pontius, Judy Coyne,
John Bubolz.
4.) Andrea Millerschoen,
Joan Cullen, Bill Story,
Vic Martel.
5.) Elba and Bill Brandt,
Rhea and Mort
Fleishman.
FLIGHT B
1.) Jeanne Brown,
Susan Macintosh,
Millie Hierro,
Bob Paul.
2.) Phyllis and Ray Love,
Barbara Mueller,
Lee Plank.
3.) Ruth Ann and
Bernie Dufour,
Julie and Alan Griswold.
4.) Missy and
Bill Coykendall,
Brenda Holmes,
Colin Burton.
5.) Denise and
Craig Holcomb,
Sue and Bob Kulina.
FLIGHT C
1.) Penny Berger,
WendyWhelan,
Phil Leonard.
2.) Margaret Hiestand,
Don Clements,
Deborah and Paul
Nicholls.
3.) Betty Brumitt,
Luch Jessen,
Tommy Shannon.


Herald Page 13

4.) Cheryl and Gordon
Fogg, Lynn Powers,
Gary Wieczorek.
5.) Lillian Bloom,
Nancy Pottinger,
Corrinne Osicki.
9-Hole Scramble
April 29
1.) Bill Brandt,
Elba Brandt,
Lucienne Jessen.
2.) Bill Story, Jack Orr,
Corrinne Osicki,
Cheryl Fogg.
3.) Jerry and Lynn Hunter,
Doug and Carol Chesser.
Ladies'League
April 30
FLIGHT A
1.) Babe Ahrens.
2.) Cherie Hanmer.
3.) Linda Wright.
FLIGHT B
1.) Paula Alton.
2.) Joan Ebbens.
3.) Donna Tattar.
FLIGHT C
1.) Cheryl Fogg.
2.) Pat Lawlor.
3.) Brenda Holmes.
Ladies'League
April 30
FLIGHT A
1.) Linda Wright.
2.) MaryAnne San Juan.
3.) Donna Tattar.
FLIGHT B
1.) Norma Yoder.
2.) Rhea Fleishman.
3.) Corrine Osicki.
FLIGHT C
1.) Amy Loughman.
2.) Brenda Holmes.
Mens'League
April 30
YELLOW FLIGHT
1.) Ron Marker.
2.) Dave Vigdal, Mort
Fleishman.
BLUE FLIGHT
1.) Stan Hochstadt
2.) Larry Marks
Hole-In-Ones
Margaret Thomas aced
Pelican 5 on April 17.
Judy White aced Heron 5
on April 7.
Bob Paul aced Osprey 1
on April 26.
Tuesday 9-Hole Scramble
May 6
1.) Bill Story,
Jack Orr, Vic Martel,
Wendy Synenberg.
2.) Phil Leonard,
Cheryl Fogg, Fred Hart,
Maggie Hart.
Saturday Scramble
May 7
1.) Patrick Cataldo,
Gary Wieczorek,
Ken Murray,
Andrea Millerschoen.
2.) Bill Story, Vic Martel,
Lynn Powers.
3.) Robert Paul,
Reggie Conrad,
Carsten Kuhr,
Judy Coyne.
Mens'League
May 7
YELLOW FLIGHT
1.) Victor Smith.
2.) Dick Bagwell.
3.) R. Conrad, Gordon
Fogg.
BLUE FLIGHT
1.) Tommy Shannon.
2.) Bill Brandt.
3.) Stan Hochstadt.


GULF OF MEXICO LUNCHEON CRUISE
Friday May, 23rd 11:00 AM-3:00 PM


I1 Golf CourS e
Afternoon beginning at 12 pm and
weekends anytime 3MOO

SAfter 3pm pav for 9 holes and play
L/ up to 18 holes ior 95
,t. S 4 Players:
SB 18 I holes includes cart
Sa\ expires 21 14 i
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RuED EAGER ADMIT GRAM
I N R E LR LA Y T E A S E R E B A
M I S C E RA SE L A T I N I D0 L
EVERYBODY WANTSTOSAVE
|E|V |E|R Y B | O'D T ~ f 'N|T|S|Tf lS
E|AJU EGRESS APICES
S HO AlLS 0 U S L 0 C U ST
P L U_ y_^|i^~ ||^~|~~T
TWTIS T M AULSID A0
0 R N PE FAI LT L U R E D 0 0 M
IH L TH THE I E NNY
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TL U E HDS ESE I GESE
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H E L P0 M W I T H||T H |E D IN S |H E S
A G 1 '0|T 0 0 T H||L A I R D 1J 0 T A
L E N 'S c L A R' E A P R I L Z E A L
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Mustangs rally to win thriller 8-7


By STEVE KNAPP



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only out of the night.
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caught a break as the Bulldog center
fielder misjudged a fly off of Parker's
bat for a double in the sixth inning. The
time limit for the game had expired in
the sixth inning, but if the Mustangs could
tie the game it would go extra innings.
Parker scored the tying run on a base
hit by starting pitcher Spencer Bennett.


The Community Christian Mustangs had an 8-2 record after beating DeSoto County 8-7 on April 1.


Jacob Foster, who came on in relief in
the fourth inning and picked up the
win, followed with a shot down the line
in left. With the winning run in scoring
position, a pop up and groundout
forced the game into the seventh inning.
"Tonight the bottom part of the order
came through for us," is another thing
Jackson told his team after the game. It
was so true as the Mustangs had their
bottom three hitters coming up in the
seventh inning.
Josh Foster led things off with a
screamer into right for a single. With
one out, Mike Wright stepped into the


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Mustangs left fielder Josh Foster leads off first base after lining a base hit to start the winning rally
in the seventh inning. Foster scored on a single by Austin Luggar in the win over DeSoto.

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Alex Parker sprained his left ankle as he stepped on the back of the bag to beat out this infield
single in the first inning. He left the game for three innings and returned to lead the Mustangs
with three hits in their thrilling 8-7 win over DeSoto County.


Adults Children
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:F5i 1-1, May 16 ,2014 Herald Page 15


PCHS athletes compete in track meet


HERALD PHOTOS BY MONICA AMAYA
Port Charlotte High School junior Michelle Atherley clears the bar in the high jump at 4-feet
10-inches at the Marcus Freeman Invitational at North Port High School on March 27.


PCHS sophomore Hayden Wilder participates in the boys' 1,600 meters.


PCHS freshman Delaney Geroffsky competes in the 1,600 meters during the Marcus Freeman
Invitational at North Port High School on March 27.


Senior Nick Dunakey participates in the boys' 3,200 meters during the Marcus Freeman Invitational.
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Pirate Brittany McGivern competes in the girls'3,200 meters.




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PUNTA GORDA
HERALD ON

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Friday, May 16,2014 -Since 1893


ILANCHAR HOUSE
TO PAY TRIBUTE
TO EMANCIPATION DAY
By AL HEMINGWAY, PGH CORRESPONDENT
Freedom.
That is what the Emancipation Proclamation meant to millions
of African-Americans held as slaves in the South during the Civil
War. Although President Abraham Lincoln issued the controversial edict
on Jan. 1, 1863, it took months, and in some cases years, for the news to
spread throughout the United States.
On May 20, 1865, in Tallahassee on the steps of the Knott House, Maj.
Gen. Edward McCook read the document for the first time in the state,
proclaiming all African-Americans were now free.
On May 24, to celebrate the historic event, the Blanchard House
Museum of African-American History & Culture will hold guided tours
illustrating the positive impact that African-Americans have
FREEDOM I P 8


Serving Puntad Gorda and Burnt Store A section of the SUN 16 pages


INSIDE

Filmmaker

among us


PUNTA ORDA MIDDLE* *
PUNTA 6ORLPA MIPL'LL


School

honors top

students




FFA program

earns donation


U


Sta i teSno ab utYo r eath Facetemril ospia
Vote,"(est fositafanI I6 redesIf'heCha oteSu! C 'F=4 C -F U1

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H2UatPrmeade 1320Tmimi ralSute493yo ae oigetroghcashlp outhouhot yurreovry


I RESTAURANT
Good Friends, Good Food, Good Times
Reservations recommended.
$4 Martini's
Happy Hour i
*|^^ Special! n
SMonday Thursday "
4pm 7pm
SExp. 6/30/14
1975Tamiami Trail, PuntaGorda '/,'
941-575-7575 I-
www.phils41.com I
Mon-Thurs & Sun 11-9 Fri & Sat 11-1(, .









Farewell to 2014 intern


_rGC


EDITOR'S INSIGHTS

I'PUNIA (iORD)A



WHAT'S

INSIDE


T.\nI i. < Ii CONNII.NI'
Editor's i nsi hts 'rI2
Happenngs on the Harbor 2
BusIness ne\\s -l


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40 1Yearrs Ago
Cofll utlllllr Bear
Tarponi Page
School Buzz


aii
8-11
12
14-16


Raising

futnids

fiesta

style
FILE PHC'.T,:.'
The Leadership Charlotte Class of 2014
is gearing up for its two fiesta-themed
fundraisers on May 17 in benefit of Special
Olympics Florida Charlotte County, the
Jammers Youth Basketball League of the
Punta Gorda Police Department and Girls
on the Run of Southwest Florida. For full
details, visit www.leadershipcharlotte.net.







'PH

HAPPENINGS

ON THE HARBOR


Submit information about public
events to Punta Gorda Herald Editor
Pamela Staik via email at pstaik@
sun-herald or by calling 941-206-1125.

ONGOING EVENTS
SThe 10th annual Punta Gorda
Hibiscus Festival is set for May
16-18 at Gilchrist Park, 400 W. Retta
Esplanade, Punta Gorda. For full
event details, see the story on page 9.


FRIDAY, MAY 16
A Friday Drive-in featur-
ing "Grease" will take place
at sunset at the Punta Gorda
Marketplace Property, 115
Tamiami Trail. Proceeds benefit
AMIKids Crossroads. For details,
call 941-456-8288 or visit www.
amikidscrossroads.org.

SATURDAY, MAY 17
The Leadership Charlotte Class
of 2014's Fiesta on the Green golf
tournament is at St. Andrews South
Golf Club, 1901 Deborah Drive,
Punta Gorda, beginning at 7:30 a.m.
A shotgun start is set for 8:30 a.m.
Visit www.leadershipcharlotte.net
for more information.
The Downtown Farmers Market on
Taylor Street, between West Olympia
Avenue and Herald Court, runs from
8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Call 941-391-4856 or
visit wwwpgdowntownmerchants.
com for details.
An outdoor flea market is set for


9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Punta Gorda
Historical Society's Train Depot
Antique & Collectibles Mall, 1009
Taylor Road. Call 941-639-6774 for
details.
A Key Lime Festival is set for
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Fishermen's
Village, 1200W. Retta Esplanade,
Punta Gorda. For full details, call 941-
575-3067 or visit www.fishville.com.
The Leadership Charlotte Class
of 2014's Gran Fiesta beings at 6 p.m.
at St. Andrews South Golf Club, 1901
Deborah Drive, Punta Gorda, The par-
ty will feature fiesta food, a signature
margarita drink, mariachi band, photo
booth, a DJ spinning Latin tunes, a
silent auction and the much-antici-
pated drawing for the Bucket'o' Cheer
raffle, which is worth about $500 in
libations. Tickets are $65. Visit www
leadershipcharlotte.net for details.

SUNDAY, MAY 18
The Punta Gorda Historical
Society's Farmers Market at History
Park, 501 Shreve St., runs from 9 a.m.


to 1 p.m. Call 941-380-6814 for detads

WEDNESDAY, MAY 21
SRegistration for The Foot Landii g-'s
free, weekly Pub Run begins at 6 p.m
at the store, 117 Herald Court, Suite
1112, Punta Gorda. This week's event
is a Mystery Run. All levels of runners
and walkers are welcome. Call 941-
347-7751 for details

THURSDAY, MAY 22
Author Diane Gilbert Madsen
will celebrate the launch of her new
book, "The Conan Doyle Notes: The
Secret of Jack the Ripper," at 2 p.m.
at Copperfish Books, 1205 Elizabetl
St., Suite A, Punta Gorda. Call 941-
205-2560 or email copperfishbooks",
comcast.net to reserve a spot at this
event.
The Gilchrist ParkWaterfront
Music Jam Session, known as Guitar
Army, will take place from 6 p.m.
to 10 p.m. at the park, 400W. Retta
Esplanade, Punta Gorda.


SN PUNTA GORDA HERALD MEMBER of the Audit Bureau of Circulation. USPS 743170 The Sun is published daily by Sun Coast Media Group, Inc., 23170
S Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980-2198.
DerekDunn-Rankin CEO,Chairman.....................206-1001 ADVERTISING
David Dunn-Rankin President, Sun Publisher ........ 206-1003 Leslee Peth, Sun Advertising Director/PGH Publisher ................... 205.
___|_____Chris Porter Exec.Editor.......................... 206-1134 Mike Ruiz, Retail Advertising Manager.............................................. 205,.4"'
S UN^ ^ L ^ NEW SPAPERS Rusty Pray Charlotte Editor...................206-1168 Colleen Daymude, Advertising Account Executive....................... 205 ,.4:.
Chare- o E o N h P- Venic Pamela Staik Punta Gorda Herald Editor, 206-1125 Lori White, Advertising Account Executive........................................ 205 -.44
Charlotte DeSoto Englewood North Port Venice Email: pgherald@sun-herald.com CIRCULATION
23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980 206-1000 Denise DiRamio Designer...............................206-1000 Mark Yero, Circulation Director........................................................ 206 1:. -


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:F'r1.il May16,2014


1> (7



BUSINESS NEWS

PUNTA GORDA


John R. Wright


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p Il, [ 'ur.) i,/0 l- lhnd ll l, t@,,


CONTACT THE CHAMBER
For more information about events listed in this column,
contact the Punta Gorda Chamber of Commerce at
941-639-3720 or visit its website at www.puntagorda
chamber.com. While on the chamber's website, don't
forget to sign up for the"Friday Facts"newsletter.


PHOTO PROVIDED
Lovely Nails was honored with a ribbon-cutting ceremony, which was put on by the Punta Gorda
Chamber of Commerce. The nail salon is located in the Burnt Store Shopping Plaza, next to Publix.


Festivals galore this weekend


here are festivals galore this week-
end for you to enjoy, especially if
you are into hibiscus and key lime.
Starting today (May 16) and running
through May 18 is the 10th annual Punta
Gorda Hibiscus Festival at Gilchrist Park.
This year's festival will again benefit
the Charlotte County Historical Society,
which funds the Charlotte County
Historical Center on Bayshore Road in
Port Charlotte.
Visit www.thehibiscusfestival.com
or find the festival's Facebook page for
complete information about the event.
May 17 is the Fishermen's Village Key
Lime Festival, which will take place from
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
This is a perfect event for amateur
bakers. Do you have the best key lime
pie in Charlotte County? Find out during
the festival's baking contest. Prizes for
the first-, second- and third-place pies
will be awarded.
The festival will also present a com-
petition for area bartenders during the
Key Lime Bartender Challenge. Bragging
rights are at stake. The requirement for
this competition is that each drink must
contain key lime as an ingredient.
For more information or to sign up for
one of the festival's competitions, call
Catherine Perry, the event coordinator,
at 941-575-3067. Email her at events@
fishville.com.
Finally, Bisous salon will continue
celebrating its 15th anniversary during a
celebration on May 17. The fun starts at
3 p.m. at the salon, located at 110 Herald
Court in downtown Punta Gorda. All
proceeds from the event will be donated
to the Back Pack Kids program.
Join in the party and help raise funds
for a great cause at the same time.
Just in case you missed last week's
announcement, there are only a fewVIP
tickets remaining for next year's 10th
annualWine & Jazz Festival. The lineup
is Dave Koz, Nick Colionne and Mindi
Abair.
Tickets are on sale for all cate-
gories, and many of the VIP tickets
have already been snapped up. Don't
delay. Either visit the Punta Gorda
Chamber of Commerce website, www.
puntagordachamber.com, or call the


office at 941-639-3720 to purchase
tickets. Full details of what is included
in each ticket price can also be found on
the website.
The only disclaimers are, sadly, no pets
and definitely no coolers. It is with great
pride that the chamber brings such a
talented lineup to the city.

Chamber happenings
Check out these three great networking
opportunities in the coming weeks:
On May 20, chamber member will visit
the Sleep Inn and Suites, located at 806
Kings Highway, Port Charlotte, for the
monthly Business After Hours networking
event. The fun starts at 5:30 p.m.
There is no charge, and all new mem-
bers and guests are welcome to give
us a try. All we ask is that you reserve a
spot prior to the event, so we can cater
accordingly.
On May 28, the Punta Gorda Chamber
will invade Phil's on 41, located at 1975
Tamiami Trail, Punta Gorda, for the May
networking luncheon, which starts at
12:30 p.m.
The guest speaker will be a representa-
tive of the Small Business Administration
office in Tampa. The speaker will update
chamber members of recent changes
in Small Business Administration loans,
something that will be a benefit to our
entire membership.
Remember to bring a gift for the
drawing to help promote your business,
and don't forget to call the office to reserve
a spot with your food selection. The cost is
$15 per head.
Then on May 29, beginning at 5:30 p.m.,
the chamber will visit Studio Seven
Center for Creative Studies, located at
2509 Rio De Janeiro Ave., Deep Creek,
for a grand-opening and ribbon-cutting
ceremony. Everyone is invited to attend.

Corks 'n' Canvas event May 22
The chamber's next Corks 'n' Canvas
event will be held at the Charlotte
Community Foundation's new home,
located at 227 Sullivan St., Punta Gorda,


WEEKEND 112


The minimally invasive surgery techniques performed
at Bayfront Health Port Charlotte and Punta Gorda give
you advantages not found anywhere else in Charlotte County.
Using robotic-assisted surgery, Ruben Guzman, M.D.,
can perform what was once considered a complex operation,
with complete precision. With smaller incisions, less pain and
a quicker recovery than a traditional hysterectomy, you won't
miss out on your next adventure. If your doctor recommends
a hysterectomy, find out if this surgical option is right for you.


Learn more at BayfrontHealthRobotics.com,
or for a free referral, call 941-637-2497.


Ruben Guzmon, M.D.
OB/GYN


%tBayfront Health
SRobotics

BayfrontHealth Robotics.com
Port Charlotte: 941-766-4122 Punta Gorda: 941-639-3131


Patient results may vary. Consult your physician about the benefits and risks of any surgical procedure or treatment. Member of the Medical Staff of BayfrontHealth Port Charlotte and Punta Gorda.


Herald Page 3





II


Movie producer and screenwriter Keith Tracy ponders the message hanging in his studio. His
company provides an outlet for aspiring actors and screenwriters in Charlotte County.


-N'






PH"..T..S PPC'.'iDED
On the set of"School Marms'a short piece that Keith Tracy's company produced, appeared on
the Punta Gorda Chamber of Commerce website.


Independent film producer showcases Charlotte County


A en Keith Tracy began writ-
\fI ing screenplays in 2003, his
V technique and style began to
improve. However, as an independent
writer, big studios, like Fox and Para-
mount, would not even look at him.
After his retirement, Tracy relocated to
Punta Gorda and became an indepen-
dent film producer, forming his own
company, The Other West Coast Motion
Media Productions, LLC.
In just 3 years, Tracy's business
has skyrocketed. He not only makes
the films he wants, but he has been
approached by nonprofits to produce
short documentaries and marketing
films to promote their needs.
"We are getting the exposure," he said.
"My company provides an outlet for
writers and actors to get known as well.
Our work has opened people's eyes on
the local level. We are being asked to
produce promotional pieces. One was a
30-second high definition short for the
Punta Gorda Chamber of Commerce
publicizing the city."
Tracy is absolutely correct about
getting into the public eye. On April 23,
two of his films- "Seasons of Thunder"
and "Half Way Home" were chosen
to be screened at the Fort Myers Beach
Film Festival. Tracy wrote and was
executive producer for the films. Both
of the documentaries were directed by
Elizabeth Billings.
"Half Way Home" is a 9-minute
poignant tale of Acine, "an abandoned
dog who finds love, then loses love and
along the way learns that even half-way
home can be a good place," according to
a press release. The "stars" of the film are
Jasper, an Irish setter who plays Acline,
and Casey, a terrier, who portrays Zoe.
"The film was made to celebrate
the 50th anniversary of the Animal
Welfare League of Charlotte County,"


Al Hemingway



t V H~lnumpi, iu h -l. l ll, I I liter.
11111i,! llt,1 x ,a lltr I .lil )I '
gmail.com.

said Nanette Leonard, owner of Nanette
Leonard Public Relations. "They had a
casting call and Casey and Jasper just
wooed all of us."
According to Leonard, who is a
member of the AWL board of directors,
it took two days to shoot "Half Way
Home" at locations in Punta Gorda and
Port Charlotte, and it was a "real labor
of love" for everyone involved in the
project.
"It was shot in August 2013 and
premiered at the Black and Gold Gala
50th anniversary celebration last
November," she said. "We try to find a
home for 5,000 animals every year. They
can't speak for themselves, so we have to
speak for them."
Leonard said Tracy had a wonderful
concept that demonstrates the hard
work and dedication the Animal Welfare
League does for abandoned dogs in
Charlotte County.
"I wasn't interested about dogs in
cages," Tracy said. "I wanted to show
something that promoted the nonprofit
and the good work they do."
"Seasons of Thunder" is a 30-minute
film that follows the activities of Gulf
Thunder HOG Chapter 1786, a mo-
torcycle club that travels throughout
Charlotte County. The chapter currently
has nearly 300 members.
"I wanted to focus on the people who
ride," Tracy said. "They do a lot of fund-
raisers during the year, like parking cars


at Charlotte Sports Park for the Tampa
Bay Rays in spring training season. All
the money they raise goes back to the
community. They are a great group of
people."
Tracy said his company is also
sponsoring a contest called "Short Story
to Short Film." Aspiring screenwriters
can showcase their talent by submitting
a screenplay of 2,500 words or less, and
the one that is chosen will be made into
a film.
"It's a writer's outlet," he said. "They
can get the word out about their work
through this contest. Most of us have
been ignored by the agents in California.
So here is another alternative. Deadline
to submit an entry is June 30."
Tracy said he is currently working on
another short film and they are shooting
it in North Port and Port Charlotte. He
rarely spends time in an office because
his work takes him to his various
locations.
"I don't have an office in the tradition-
al sense," he said. "My office is where I
hang my hat."
For more information, visit www.
theotherwestcoastmotionmedia
productions.com.


A poster promoting "Half Way Home," a
9-minute film made to celebrate the 50th
anniversary of the Animal Welfare League in
Charlotte County.


Casey, a terrier, was one of the "stars" of "Half
Way Home:'

LEFT: Jasper, an Irish setter, played the role of
Acline in "Half Way Home" to commemorate
the golden anniversary of the Animal Welfare
League.


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:Fr1,i'l May16,2014


Habitat home dedication finalized Women Build 2014


May 10 was the culmination of
countless volunteer hours from
so many wonderful folks in the
community who helped raise the funds
and inject the sweat equity needed into the
building of Charlotte County Habitat for
Humanity's first women-built home. On
this day, more than 100 people gathered to
celebrate Kirsten Eldridge, a single mom
with two young girls ages 5 and 3 who
has realized her dream of home ownership
in Port Charlotte. The occasion, held on
Mother's Day weekend, made us all realize
what a wonderful example she is setting
for her blossoming young girls.
So many groups who made this all
happen were there to show support.
Centennial Bank was represented by Ron
and Debbie Monck and Ricki Thomas,
and First Alliance Church was represented
by Leslie Boyle. Gulf Breeze Promotionals
was present, as wasWaterLine weekly
magazine and the Charlotte Sun team,
both represented by Susan Matthews and
myself. Kay's Kloset and so many, many
more were also proud supporters of the


Leslee Peth
@ Ma axD 1kL


-Leslee Peth is the publisher of the
Punta Gorda Herald. Contact her at
Ipeth@sun-herald.com.
project. County Commissioner Stephen
R. Deutsch, Councilwoman Nancy Pralke
and representatives from Hypnotique and
Bisous Salon were also on hand to support
the event. Of course, none of it could have
happened without Habitat staff members
Mike Mansfield, Gabrielle Reineck, Michelle
Rumreich, Ellen Cardillo and Jan Nick
Throughout the dedication ceremony,
the family was presented with gifts from
many local groups. Lunch was also provid-
ed by Centennial Bank and Jason's Deli.
During its 26-year history in Charlotte
County, Habitat for Humanity has served
299 families. For more information about
other building projects, visit http://
charlottecountyhfh.org.


HERALD PHOTO BYTAMI GARCIA


More than 20 local businesses, churches and other organizations were responsible for raising
funds and participating in the Women Build 2014 for Kirsten Eldridge's new Port Charlotte
residence, where Charlotte County Habitat for Humanity hosted a home dedication ceremony on
May10.


Boat captain speaks to crowd at Copperfish Books


apt. Terry L. Howard, a retired
school teacher and licensed com-
mercial fishing captain, presented
his newest novel, "High Seas Wranglers:
The Lives of Atlantic Fishing Captains,"
at a book signing at Copperfish Books
on Elizabeth Street.
His current book, as well as his
previous, "Great Kingfish Captains (of
Fort Pierce, Florida, Tell Their Stories,"
explores the personal stories of well-
known commercial and charter fishing
captains in Florida.


14J
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Sue Paquin



'l, liil, h I' ll ) I I l h ,il
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HERALD PHOTOS BY SUE PAQUIN


Winnie and AL Blais are fascinated by the author's stories.


Capt. Van Hubbard, a fishing guide since 1981,
was interested in the author's book and came
from Placida to hear him speak.


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Cathy Graham and Serena Wyckoff, owners of
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author of"High Seas Wranglers: The Lives of
Atlantic Fishing Captains.":'


B1 I u ff' Gol~f Cousef
Afternoon beginning at 12 pm and
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Herald Page 5


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FROM OUR ARCHIVES



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Punta Gorda
L Il .Excerpts from40 years ago


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officers at luncheon
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:Fr1,i'l May16,2014


H
COMMUNITY
PUNTA GORDA


PHOTOS PROVIDED
Golf event organizer Donna Roderick poses for
a photo with Evelyn Cotyk, president of the St.
Vincent de Paul Sacred Heart Conference.


Golfers tee off for

St. Vincent de Paul
PROVIDED BY MARILYN
THOMAS
ST. VINCENT DE PAUL
SACRED HEART CONFERENCE
A golf scramble benefit-
ing the St. Vincent de Paul
Sacred Heart Conference
was held recently at St.
Andrews South Golf Club
in Punta Gorda.
Ed Nelson, Linda Johnston,
Linda Boettcher and Jerry
Cooper smile for a photo
during their big game.




Golfers Mike and Meride
Dooris and Arlene and
Mike Sofranko were up
for some fun in the sun
during the fundraiser.PM"U







Nancy Prescott, Jim .
Vetrone, Martha Goodman -
and Bill Pacyga enjoyed
their day on the golf
course for the St. Vincent
de Paul Sacred Heart
Conference fundraiser.


West


Virgina


grads reunite


in Punta Gorda


PHOTO PROVIDED


Some of the classmates from the 1958 graduating class from Gary High School in West Virginia
are shown here during a reunion. Mary Jane Freeman and Alma Miller, an honorary"Coal
Digger,"are shown in the front row. In the second row are Tootsie Harman, Bud Farmer, Barbara
Farmer, Charlotte Stallard, Jan Edwards, Marie Kish Tabbert, Betty Deel Twigg, Sue Deel Defoe
and Gerry Harmon. In the third row are Katherine Martin Keaton, Phyllis Lambert Cates,
Howard Harmon, Carolyn Hanks Larj, Judy Hanks Nuckolls, Ernie freeman and Maxine Martin
Thomaasson. In the back row are Larry Stallard, John Harman, and Tom and Barbara Reed.


Commodore honors

BSI Boat Club member


PHOTO PROVIDED
The Burnt Store Isles
Boat Club held its
annual Commodore's
Ball at the Charlotte
Harbor Yacht Club on
April 27. Commodore
Di Kandis presented
long-time member Ron
Levis with an award for
many years of dedica-
tion and devotion.


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Herald Page 7





:Fr1.il May16,2014H


Martha Bireda, executive director of the Blanchard House Museum of African-American History &
Culture, and volunteer Cynthia Beauford-Johnson, will conduct tours of the museum on May 24 to
celebrate Emancipation Day in Florida.


FREEDOM
FROM PAGE 1

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NIGHT OUT"
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l5 yrs &up) r^-
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"LIGHT HOUSE j
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includes 16x20 canvas, "R ""
supplies 8, instructor ^
Open Tues.-Fri. 10-5 .>-
Sat. 10-2
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to announce next year's
exhibit opening September 2014

"Emancipation"


'It ImI()


I


HER -LD PH:-.T:-.S eB. L HEPill,-.
A likeness of 1st Sgt. Owen B. Armstrong, who
served in the Union Army as a free Black man,
is displayed at the Blanchard House Museum of
African-American History & Culture.


Al Hemingway



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ON THE COVER: The Blanchard House Museum
of African-American History & Culture is
located at 406 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.
LEFT: The Blanchard House Museum of
African-American History & Culture will
commemorate Florida's Emancipation Day
with exhibits.


(Typical Florida Sawmill) John Lomans
worked at DeCoster's sawmill, which was
located on the lagoon near US 41 across
the bridge in Port Charlotte.
John Lomans worked for DeCoster after the Civil War in a sawmill, much like the one pictured
here.
Home ea trsOffice






Reliable Reasonable
Service 'Rates

I 941-249-9978 I


Hibiscus Festival returns for 10th year


he Punta Gorda Hibiscus Festi-
val has become a staple of the
local entertainment scene each
May since its start in 2004. In part, this
popularity is a result of the festival's
honoring the flower that made Punta
Gorda the "City of Hibiscus."
If you are into plants, especially
hibiscus, you are going to want to be
in Gilchrist Park May 16-18, where you
can find and purchase hibiscus and
other tropical plants for your garden
at the 10th annual festival. Those who
do the math will insist that adds up
to 11, but the festival was not held in
2010.
Some words of advice to non-
gardeners don't let the emphasis
on the city flower deter you from
attending. There will be the usual
unveiling and many sales of the
Hibiscus of the Year winners, again
this year presented by Curt Sinclair,
a LaBelle resident and well-known
hybridizer. This year's hybrid has
been named decennium in honor of
the event's 10th anniversary.
But plenty of other activities will
keep the entire family entertained for
the price of a $1 entry fee for adults
- three days of live music, vendors
selling food, beer, fruit and vegetables,
a showcase of vintage automobiles, arts
and crafts, a pageant, a free play area,
as well as a secret garden tour, courtesy
of the Punta Gorda Historic District
homeowners and the Green Hibiscus
Trolley. Two of the gardens were recent-
ly featured in the Punta Gorda Herald.
Festival spokesperson Teresa
Desguin said, "This all started as a
result of Dawn MacGibbon; this was
her vision. The point of the festival is
to celebrate Punta Gorda as the 'City
of Hibiscus' and the deep hibiscus
heritage it has through the Goulding
family."
That heritage extends back almost
a century. The city declared itself
the "Hibiscus City" in 1926, and City
Council reaffirmed that designation
in a 2000 resolution honoring Harry
Goulding, an internationally known
hibiscus hybridizer who made Punta
Gorda his home until his death in
1993.


Gordon Bower

EPifaa@@m


The festival has typically been held in
Gilchrist Park. Though most big events
are now in Laishley Park, it is moving
back to the smaller park after a brief
time at Laishley.
Desguin said, "We've had it at both
parks, but we prefer Gilchrist. It has
more trees for shade, and it's close
to the Historic District, so Becky's
(Copenhaver) trolley doesn't have
people waiting around."
Drivers attempting to navigate West
Retta Esplanade recently shouldn't be
alarmed by the construction activity
and occasional road closure in the area
of the park. Desguin said, "They (the
city) do clean it up for the weekends
and open the road. Parking will be the
same as always on the side streets
and nearby lots. There will be no
parking on Retta. It will be roped off,
so we can collect the $1 at the gate. We
have to charge a dollar to keep track of
attendance and have a little money for
the next one."
Live music by local groups is a staple
of the Hibiscus Festival. The schedule
was still being finalized at the time of
this writing, but music lovers can rest
assured they will hear bands no matter
when they arrive.
On May 17, look for music up on
the big stage from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.,
and check out the vintage autos of the
Veteran Motor Car Club of America
between sets during the morning.
May 18 features Still Friends during
the praise and celebration show from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The always popular Music Fest and
picnic is on May 16. Food and drink
will be available at 5 p.m., with live
music at 6 p.m. Local food vendors
and Harry's Bar will be there, and local
groups, like Chakull & Me, Screamin
and Cryin, Crestliners and Michael's


F F iin A IfAPunma Gorda's BEST InfAmationW WdIew!
The contestants for the Lil' Miss Hibiscus Festival Pageant pose for photos on the stage at Gilchrist
Park last year.


FILE PHOTO


While visiting her grandmother in Punta Gorda, Ava Henderson roams through the flowers on
display and for sale during last year's Hibiscus Festival.


I I
Michael Haymans and Chuck Berking sing songs about Charlotte County and living in Florida
during last year's Hibiscus Festival.
Hibiscus band, will be on stage. Kaley Miller at Mosaic."
New to Music Fest this year is Flower Another change is the Lil' Miss
Power Bike Night for motorcyclists. The pageant at 10 a.m. May 17 on the stage.
park will be a destination for bikers, It's been expanded to four age groups,
veterans and service groups in support running between the ages of 4 and 18,
of the Laishley Park Vietnam Wall and this year the boys get a chance to
Memorial. be crowned Lil' Master.
The major change for this year's Desguin said, "Parents were always
festival is the children's area, thanks to saying, 'Why not open it up for boys?'
Mosaic. There is no age limit, but par- We also dropped the $25 charge and
ents must accompany their children, made it free."
Desguin said, "We're gong to have a Visit www.thehibiscusfestival.com
petting zoo in the children's area with for more details.
a Clydesdale from Heaven Help Us Do not bring in food or drink, but
Animal Rescue, plus inflatables and a be sure to bring chairs, sun protection
bungee jump from Zero Gravity out of and some shade to enjoy a weekend of
Englewood. This is all free, thanks to fun, flowers and music.


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Herald Page 9


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ll,,' ,l r t. i', ,M ,i .l r




Friday, May 16,2014


Sue Paquin Leadercast broadcast draws local attention


Sue Paquin is a freelance
photographer. Contact her at
sjpaquinphoto@gmail.com.


HERALD PHOTOS BY SUE PAQUIN
Donna Barrett, the executive officer of Char-
lotte DeSoto Building Industry Associates, and
CDBIA president Bob Miller attended the event.


n May 9, a leadership development event was broadcast live from Atlanta, Georgia, to people across the world, and
Punta Gorda hosted its first viewing of this event, called Leadercast Charlotte Harbor. The event took place at First
United Methodist Church in Punta Gorda. Proceeds were donated to AMIKids Crossroads.


Abdiel Dantin and Heather Bacus found the event to be very informative.


Kalyn Comings, Ruth Soukup and Natalie Orobello chat outside the
hall during the lunch break. Soukup was a live speaker at the event,
discussing time management with the audience.


Jean Knoepfle, Joyce Tilden and Caroline
Wooters volunteered to help out during the
event.


Charlotte State Bank & Trust was well represented at the Leadercast
event. Here, Devon Gaboury, Krystle Sitzlar, Adriane McCourry and Kim
Maddy gather for a photo.


Taking a break for lunch are Kathleen Candales, the artistic director and
founder of Higher Ground Performing Arts, and Becca Reed and Robert
Whyte, both of Deep Creek Community Church.


Sheraton becomes sixth hub for TEAM PG's loaner bikes


By BILL WELSCH
TEAM PUNTA GORDA


Four Points by Sheraton Punta Gorda Harborside was
added to TEAM Punta Gorda's free bike loaner program,
bringing the total number of locations in the city up to
six, with 40 free bicycles available to the public.
Other sites include Fishermen's Village, Laishley
Marina, Isles Yacht Club, the Wyvern Hotel and
Bayfront Health Center. The Four Points location has
four yellow bicycles, two of which were donated by
Aber and Associates Merrill Lynch Wealth Management
and the remaining two by the Sheraton.
The hotel also built an all-wood pergola to shelter
the bicycles.
For more information about TEAM and the free
bicycle loaner program, call 941-637-8326 or send an
email to team@teampuntagorda.org.
PHOTO PROVIDED
TEAM Punta Gorda recently announced Four Points by Sheraton
Punta Gorda Harborside is its sixth location for the free bicycle
loaner program. Pictured here, from left in the front row,
are Punta Gorda Mayor Rachel Keesling; Judi Aber, Aber and
Associates Merrill Lynch Wealth Management; Kelly Williamson,
Four Points'sales director; and Danny Ali, Four Points' media
relations. In the back row, from left, are Gene Pawlowski, TEAM
volunteer; Craig Holt, Four Points'general manager; Stephen
Svecak, A2Z Hospitality Management vice president; Joseph
Metza, Four Points AGM; Greg Thomas, Aber and Associates
Merrill Lynch Wealth Management; John Zaccari, A2Z Hospitality
Management CEO; Jose Suriol, developer of Four Points; City
Councilwoman Nancy Prafke; and John Baird, TEAM volunteer.


I


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PUNTA GORDA
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: Herald Page 10


j




:Fo1'il May16,2014


Sue Paquin Garden Club awards scholarships
MGEMMY1M^


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he Punta Gorda Garden Club held a luncheon meeting on May 8 at the Isles Yacht Club, where they announced the
three winners of the group's higher education scholarships. The scholarships are awarded to graduating seniors at local
high schools and past recipients of the award who are continuing in their studies.
The 2014 recipients, who were unable to attend the luncheon due to scheduling conflicts, are: Chelsea Williams, a 2013
graduate of Charlotte High School; Kristen Boyd, a soon-to-be graduate of Charlotte High School; and Port Charlotte High
School senior Maria Pennella. Each recipient will receive $2,000.


HERALD PHOTO BY SUE PAQUIN


Karen Noonan and Caroline Briggs, co-presidents for the Punta
Gorda Garden Club, show off one of the many arrangements in
the hall.


A group of this year's newest members pose for a photo. In the
back row, from left, are Cathy Russo, Jeanne Meredith, Sarah
Corey, Pat Sandier, Elaine Lawell, Mary Chambers and Linda
Cedrone. In the front row, from left, are Caroline Wooters,
Kimmie Correll, Nancy Keppel and Struss Shirk.


BJ Hannon chats with Rosemary Kavanaugh, a guest at the
luncheon.


I NINO--
Anne Simpson, Kimmie Correll and Marion Westor enjoy
working with the club.


Judy Oswald and Joyce Tilden greet the members as they arrive
at the awards luncheon.


Linda Walsh, Nancy French and Molly Reifeis chat before the
start of the luncheon.


Marge Town and Suzanne McCormick have both
been members of the club for 6 years.


Chaplains lead staff in

prayer at Bayfront Health





*Ij




p-- -. .-, -


PHOTO PROVIDED
Chaplains from Bayfront Health Punta Gorda led staff and volunteers in a moment of prayer
in front of the hospital in recognition of National Day of Prayer, which was May 1.

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The tables were decorated with pineapples,
which were given to the newest member of the
club seated at each table, who will root and
grow a new plant from it.


[ A k US
About 0ur
W I
Senior
5ednesda
Specials
.A A,


Herald Page 11













IIC
_rH

TARPON PAGE

PUN IA (10RD)A



Technology adds to
classroom learning
By MORGAN TRACY
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Leadership Academy benefits school, community


By LAUREN SKEOCH
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PHC'-.TC'-. PP '-.,. ICDEDC,


Members of the Tarpon Leadership Academy work hard at Charlotte High School as well as in the community.


PH'-.T-. PPC'.. IDED
RIGHT: Members of the Punta Gorda Chamber of Commerce saluted Two Brothers Homestyle Cooking
with a ribbon-cutting ceremony. The new business is located at 307 E. Marion Ave., Punta Gorda.


DONATIONS NEEDED!

"Your donation makes a big difference"
Please Donate Clean, Usable Items.











Call To Sheule A Pickup For
Large Furniture & Appliances
Now accepting pick up in Arcadia. All money received from donations
in Arcadia will be utilized to assist DeSoto County residents in need.
Charlotte County to assist people in need in Charlotte County.
(941) 637-1981
V SALVATION ARMY
S THRIFT STORES
1048 Tamiami Trail, Punta Gorda
Open Mon Sal 9am 5pmi


WEEKEND
FROM PAGE 3

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Discover Punta Gorda


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:F5 ri May 16,2014


V


LC


IIAIO HOUR!
STEJIY SATIITlRDAY
FROM 9 TO 10 A.M.!
Join your hosts Josh Olive
and Capt. Mike every week
for an in-depth look at what's
going on out on the water.
They and their guests will
also be taking your calls live
on the air, so be sure to tune in.


II NEWS RADIO
te1580 @oWCCF

Jsgot aio trineoIan ouca iste
live o 1chck1ut4how thtIhve lI I v ired


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Herald Page 13




iii,' ''ir I


SCHOOL BUZZ

PUN IA (10RD)A


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Students join PGMS honor society


Donnell Bates



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ON THE COVER: Getting lined up for their entrance into the cafeteria for the Punta Gorda Middle
School's National Junior Honor Society Induction are sixth-graders Jake Sheets, Heather Schaff,
Heidi Rumreich, Shasta Robinson and Adam Roberts.


ow n AM
-/ Wlllll


HEP-L, PHC.T,:.T B., D.IIIELL B-TES
Punta Gorda Middle School inducted 146 students into the National Junior Honor Society.


Eric Bockin is all smiles after receiving his New inductee Annabella Anderson leaves the
certificate from the National Junior Honor stage after receiving her certificate for the
Society at Punta Gorda Middle School. National Junior Honor Society.


Leaving the stage after accepting a donation of $250 is Michelle
Rumreich from Charlotte County Habitat for Humanity. Both of
her daughters were also inducted into the honor society that
night Heidi is in sixth-grade and Victoria is in eighth-grade.


Rita Volk, Jacob Bergmanis and Danielle Deese present
Sharon Thomas from the Animal Welfare League of Charlotte
County with a check for $250.


Sixth-grade student Malea Lafley presents principal Cathy
Corsaletti with a rose corsage backstage before the induction
ceremony.


Officers of the Punta Gorda Middle School National Junior Honor Society are
shown on stage. They are Taylor Wikoff, president; Jacob Bergmanis, vice presi-
dent; Elodie Le, secretary; and Ryan Saunders, treasurer.


S ,i m I `4r
Bev Stancil from the Octagon Wildlife Sanctuary
receives a check for $250 from Ryan Saunders, Rita Volk
and Danielle Deese.


Elodie Le and Rita Volk present Cheyney Marshall,
representing the Wounded Warriors Project. with a
check for $250 for the Vietnam Memorial Wall being
planned for Punta Gorda.


GULF OF MEXICO LUNCHEON CRUISE S38OO
Friday May. 23rd 11:00 AM-3:00 PM380
FATHER'S DAY LUNCHEON CRUISE
Sunday. June 15th sails aI 12 30 AMN 300 PM a&l Sl33 O 1O O
ll-, 6 ,,^,I, ,,'n"iI ......s,3 0. 0 17 .0
de... ,, Orh--, ,-'


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:F'1'il May16,2014


NJROTC cadets honored by American Legion


PROVIDED BY KIM HILL
SECRETARY ALA #103

adets in the Navy Junior Reserve
Officers Training Corps from
Charlotte High School were treat-
ed to an awards dinner at the D.N. Mc-
Queen Post 103 of the American Legion
recently. More than 200 cadets were in
attendance.


Cadets in the Charlotte High School NJROTC program line up in front of a room of their
biggest supporters.
PHOTOS PROVIDED


LEFT: Tyler Oates, a cadet with the NJROTC
program at Charlotte High School, is deep in
conversation during the awards banquet.


RIGHT: Members of the NJROTC color
guard from Charlotte High School
present the colors.


I GOLF SCORES
* BURNT STORE GOLF & ACTIVITY CLUB
Saturday Scramble
April 19
1.) Dan Pontius, Karsten Kuhr, Jack Orr.
2.) Robert Paul, Lee Plank, Barbara Mueller.
3.) Bill Story, Carl Millerschoen, Andrea
Millerschoen.
Tuesday 9-Hole League
April 22
1.) Jerry Hunter, Lynn Hunter, Jeanne Braun,
Jim Brown.
2.) Robert Paul, Millie Hierro, Rick Kellner,
Wendy Synenberg.
3.) Phil Leonard, Cheryl Fogg, Lynn Powers.
Backwards Scramble April 26
FLIGHT A
1.) Kelly and John Millar, Trish Murray, Bob
SanJuan.
2.) Carol and Doug Chesser, Bob Hodges, Stan
Hochstadt.
3.) Amy and Dan Pontius, Judy Coyne, John
Bubolz.
4.) Andrea Millerschoen, Joan Cullen, Bill Story,
Vic Martel.
5.) Elba and Bill Brandt, Rhea and Mort
Fleishman.
FLIGHT B
1.) Jeanne Brown, Susan Macintosh, Millie
Hierro, Bob Paul.
2.) Phyllis and Ray Love, Barbara Mueller, Lee
Plank.
3.) Ruth Ann and Bernie Dufour,Julie and Alan
Griswold.
4.) Missy and Bill Coykendall, Brenda Holmes,
Colin Burton.
5.) Denise and Craig Holcomb, Sue and Bob
Kulina.
FLIGHT C
1.) Penny Berger, Wendy Whelan, Phil Leonard.
2.) Margaret Hiestand, Don Clements, Deborah
and Paul Nicholls.
3.) Betty Brumitt, Luch Jessen,Tommy
Shannon.
4.) Cheryl & Gordon Fogg, Lynn Powers, Gary
Wieczorek.
5.) Lillian Bloom, Nancy Pottinger, Corrinne
Osicki.
9-Hole Scramble
April 29
1.) Bill Brandt, Elba Brandt, Lucienne Jessen.
2.) Bill Story, Jack Orr, Corrinne Osicki, Cheryl
Fogg.
3.) Jerry Hunter, Lynn Hunter, Doug Chesser,


Carol Chesser.
Ladies'League
April 30
FLIGHT A
1.) Babe Ahrens.
2.) Cherie Hanmer.
3.) Linda Wright.
FLIGHT B
1.) Paula Alton.
2.) Joan Ebbens.
3.) Donna Tartar.
FLIGHT C
1.) Cheryl Fogg.
2.) Pat Lawlor.
3.) Brenda Holmes.
Ladies'League
April 30
FLIGHT A
1.) Linda Wright.
2.) MaryAnne San Juan.
3.) Donna Tattar.
FLIGHT B
1.) Norma Yoder.
2.) Rhea Fleishman.
3.) Corrine Osicki.
FLIGHT C
1.) Amy Loughman.
2.) Brenda Holmes.
Mens'League
April 30
YELLOW FLIGHT
1.) Ron Marker.
2.) Dave Vigdal, Mort Fleishman.
BLUE FLIGHT
1.) Stan Hochstadt
2.) Larry Marks
Hole-ln-Ones
MargaretThomas aced Pelican 5 on April 17.
JudyWhite aced Heron 5 on April 7. Bob Paul aced
Osprey 1 on April 26.
Tuesday 9-Hole Scramble
May 6
1.) Bill Story, Jack Orr, Vic Martel, Wendy
Synenberg.
2.) Phil Leonard, Cheryl Fogg, Fred Hart, Maggie
Hart.
Saturday Scramble
May 7
1.) Patrick Cataldo, Gary Wieczorek, Ken Murray,
Andrea Millerschoen.
2.) Bill Story, Vic Martel, Lynn Powers.
3.) Robert Paul, Reggie Conrad, Carsten Kuhr,
Judy Coyne.


Mens'League
May 7
YELLOW FLIGHT
1.) Victor Smith.
2.) Dick Bagwell.
3.) R. Conrad, Gordon Fogg.
BLUE FLIGHT
1.) Tommy Shannon.
2.) Bill Brandt.
3.) Stan Hochstadt.


* KINGS GATE GOLF CLUB
Hole-in-One
May 10
Bill Thomas aced hole No. 16 from 102 yards
using a gap wedge club. It was witnessed by Keith
Harvey, JackTretton and Andy Daignault.

* KINGSWAY COUNTRY CLUB
Sunday Couples
2 Best Ball of 4
April 27
1.) Gary and Gail DaRos, Gus and Marge
Guglielmo, 120.
Men's Day
Better Ball of Partners
April 29
T-1.) Bob Pezzullo, Rodger Dowdell,Jim Beyl,
PJ Fisher, 60.
2.) Ed Bouleris,Jim McGee, 62.
3.) Bob Flowers, Wayne Sherman, Tom Block,
63.
Ladies Day
2 Best Ball of 4
May 1
1.)Donna Sherman, Colette Dowdell, Karen
Laneuville, 113.
2.) Carol Taylor, Sara Croak, Vivian Hendricks,
Marge Guglielmo,118.
Sunday Couples
Better Ball of Partners
May 4
1.) Mike and Nicki DiSandro, 62.
2.) Dave and Carolyn Stewart, 66.
Ladies'Day
May 8
Low Gross:
1.) Angela Walker, 93.
2.) Kathy Tolla, 94.
Low Net:
1.) Marny Boardway, 68.
2.) Barb Wojtkiewicz, 71.


* ROTONDA GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB
Pine Valley Nine Scramble
May 5
1.) John German, Robert Bowen, Larry Luccio,
Charles Elliot, 35.
2.) Bill Webber, Jim Knowlton, John
Vanzutphen, Len Koldin, Bob Zimmerman, 36.
3.) Jim Jones,William Tait, Dave Metcalf, Dave
Weinberger, 36.
Closest to the pin: John Vanzutphen on No. 4
and Robert Bowen on No. 8.

* ST.ANDREWS SOUTH GOLF CLUB
LGA18-Hole Results
May 1
Individual Low Net:
1.) Judy Johnson, 65.
2.) Edith Nelson, 67.
3.) Joan Bradley, 69.
4.) Holly Larson, 70.
LGA9-hole results
May 1
Low Putts:
1.) Shelia Cunningham, 17.
2.) Norma Brownlow, 18.
LGA18-Hole Results
2 Low Net of 4
May 8
1.) Joan Bradley, Mickey Amy, Judy Johnson,
Lois Bolger, 113.
LGA 9-Hole Results
1 LowNet of 3
May 8
1.) Norma Brownlow, Helen Anderson, Alyce
Eberth, 29.
Twilight Results
2-person Scramble
May 9
1.) Kevin O'Shea and Sue Blaisdell, 28.5.
2.) Lou and Sue Dieke, 30.3.

* TWIN ISLES COUNTRY CLUB
Ladies'9-Hole Results
April 30
Low Net:
FlightA
1.) Cecelia Eames, 39.
2.) Phyllis Weber, 40.
Flight B
1.) Pat Fox, 31.
2.) Evana Young, 33.
FlightC
1.) Mary Pedalino, 36.


2.) Kate Curley, 46.
FlightD
1.) Ann Ashworth, 29.
2.) Ann Fitzsimmons, 39.
Ladies'18-Hole Results
2 Best Balls of 4
April 30
1.) Chris McCarthy, Karla FrazierJudy
Vanderweele,115.
2.) Christine Ricci, Franna Hall, Mary Lou Miller,
Louise McDaniel. 125.
3.) Eileen Roehrig, Sandy Lorden, Ina Bice,
Diane Buckingham, 126.
Mens'Day Results
Quota Points
May 2
FLIGHT
1.) AI Ricci.
2.) Jim Kelley.
T-3.) Bob Hardesty, Peyton Coles.
FLIGHT B
T-1.) Bob Fitzsimmons, Orrin Eames.
2.) Woody McDaniel.
Ladies 9-Hole Results
Better Ball
May 7
1.) Cecelia Eames, Evana Young, Ginny Bowden.
Ladies'18-Hole Results
2 Best Balls of 4
May 7
1.) Christine Ricci, Debbie Snedeker, Lorrie Ross,
Diane Buckingham, 120.
2.) Anita Campion, Gail Puckett, Sandy Lorden,
Joan Montovano, 124.
3.) Linda Seber, Franna Hall, Mary Lou Miller,
Louise McDaniel, Roz Hickey, Sue Galvin, Monica
Lucey, JudyVanderweele, 125.
Mens'Day Results
Stableford Points
May 9
FlightA
1.) Bob Hardesty, 44.
2.) Payton Coles, 43.
3.) Dave Carney, 40.
Flight B
1.) Ed Curley, 44.
2.) Dick Carr,43.
3.) Bob Klug, 41.
FlightC
1.) Orrin Eames, 47.
2.) Ed Hartman, 35.
3.) Dick Miller, 34.


Jerry O'Halloran, MBA
CDRae Rmin Low
$10,00 1 C = 1,00pe yar
$10,0 C@7,=$,00pe ya. al e 4 0
150 W. McKenzie Street, Ste. 111, Punta Gorda, FL 33950 941-205-2277
Jerry OT~alloran is registered with, supervised by, and offers securities through Kovack Securities, Inc.
Member FINRA/SIPC- 782-4771 6451 N. Federal Hwy., Ste. 1201, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33308


Herald Page 15


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I I


HEP-LD PH'-.T'-. B, C'PDC'-ll BC'-.\IEP
Charlotte High School FFA advisors/teachers Sarah Pinkston, front left in front row, and Cindy Webb, second from left, are all smiles as Phil and Linda Wilson, in white, present a $1,000 check to club
president Chelsea Croy. FFA members ran the Wilson family's corn booth at the April Block Party. The club also has checks coming from Block Party organizers and an anonymous donor that will put
their take for the day in the neighborhood of $2,000.



Future Farmers earn $2,000 check



for hard work, dedication


he Charlotte High School Future
Farmers of America and the Punta
Gorda Block Party have had a mu-
tual admiration society for some time.
For the FFA, the Block Party is a
major source of the club's funding each
year, and the member/volunteers look
forward to heading downtown to lend a
hand staging the popular street festival
in return for receiving a check after-
ward. They are the kind of volunteers
that allow the Block Party to limit the
entrance fee to only $1.
The Block Party organizers value
the club's help because members are
hard working, honest, reliable and
well worth the money paid for their
labors. If the FFA says it will man the
Coke wagons, organizers can rest
assured members will show up and do
so cheerfully and efficiently. They did
so this year, and their check is in, or at
least near, the mail.


2014

SALUTo TO
Smuzou

Celebrate the Class
of 2014 with the
May 23 edition of the
Punta Gorda Herald.
The annual Salute
to Seniors edition
features students
from Charlotte and
Edison Collegiate
high schools. For more
information, contact
Editor Pamela Staik at
9 941-206-1125.
To place an
S^ advertisement,
(y call Mike Ruiz at
941-205-6402.


Gordon Bower



i ,ih, l i, h )t ,i' ,,lr ,ii, Im ter
MOl,, ,'1 plt, 'i,,li,, l i .l ll l at


The FFA maintains a steady stream
of activities and has other benefactors,
like Phil and Linda Wilson, owners of
Wilson Realty, who admire the stu-
dents' work ethic and help keep the
organization going. At the annual Block
Party, the Wilsons buy a vendor space
to sell their popular corn on the cob
and ask the FFA to boil and sell it to the
ravenous eaters lined up at the counter.
PhilWilson said, "I provide the space,
the tents, seasonings, corn and equip-
ment. They provide the manpower.


They're great kids, real role models.
These kids' parents work together with
them; it's a real family situation. They
work from 8 in the morning to 10 in the
evening, and they are just one of the
many nonprofits that benefit from the
Block Party."
Lara Goulding, great-granddaughter
of legendary hibiscus grower Harry
Goulding, was one of those hard-work-
ing students at the April event.
She said of her long day, "It was hot,
and I wore sunscreen. I dipped the
corn in butter and sprinkled all the
stuff on it. It was fun; I want to do it
again."
FFA is a close-knit group, and that's
the reason for the fun. Goulding said,
"The Block Party is a big source of our
income every year, and we do a lot of
other functions. There's a lot of team-
work involved in running this booth.
I work a shift and then go get a drink.


W hen I .r,. .ii.-k ,, m. ,,., "
The ds, n's IInI > m[l,|\ ,.. -v,. I I. A.,
sizable ,. h_.i>. ,.11 .mil ,..iIIup' s .\ I-' d
awards h.,iitlUri I Ils \,ii i, Il,| i
at the ,'. h li ,il.ri'ii'i. i. d m innbi.
w ere in It ,1 |.ipJr.li,-. sit P[itI[-
Phil '.ud. Ill lir |l,i.'l Pr .rr.
giving lit.n '';>.5,, r.i.h \,..l |lr>.,.ill'-S,.
of the inmpij i in.iii I O ilir lii,.k J'.ilV
and thr niJ\ .itnk l jI Jl, 11,.t niii \ Jl.1",
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and I v, i..*ihlt it ,ivr in i .
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$250 and .i,1. hl. ,. k $j.iiiiii $ 1 I .*ithllli''n.
W ilson .11 ,uI ,.. i I. ,1 | ,l ,.h l.
who wi-h'li tii r.nl l ii iit\ m ii il
also admir.-, ilIr lub innti,- 'i iik
eth ic ard >.i -i .l h i ,i .l l-
ing $5(.i t, I I A i.id .iiiiliri $5l-' l i'
the 4-111
The Illi. ,.ll .,_k -t'% ill .id d Up I ..... ni .
$2,000 l, h1.llu. d.1\ 10I |lW,>.k Il'.i\ lt ull


FILE PH'-.T-..


I ______I ___Mark McKenzie helped out at the Wilson's Korn on the Kob booth during the Block Party.


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Friday, May 16, 2014



Has it been 10 years?


E ach year we assemble
a special Sun guide for
hurricane awareness. Its
purpose was and is to get people
ready for the possibility that we
can be clobbered by a hurricane.
As the 2004 Hurricane Season
approached, we did what we do.
We called uponWayne Sallade,
Charlotte County's emergency
management director, to write
a column about the realities of
hurricane force winds and storm
surges, and what they could do to
us. He graciously complied, and
has done so again this year.
Our reporters compiled
the lists of hurricane supplies
everyone should get, emergency
numbers, and explanations
of the differences between a
hurricane watch and a warning.
We encouraged our readers to
attend our hurricane seminar, or
any hurricane seminar, and learn
what to do.
And, as always, we ran a list of
the names for 2004 hurricanes.
I can't remember Alex or
Bonnie, but Charley is the
one we'll never forget. With
a fierce, tight eye, he made a
mid-afternoon landfall at Cayo
Costa Island and ripped up the
south end of Gasparilla Island.


He churned up the Peace River as
his winds smashed Punta Gorda
and Port Charlotte, Fort Ogden,
Nocatee, Arcadia, Zolfo Springs,
Wauchula and a half-dozen other
communities.
It will be 10 years ago this
Aug. 13.
Three other hurricanes from
that 2004 list Frances, Ivan and
Jeanne tormented us, which
was especially rough on people
who had no roof and no power,
or no home. But Charley was the
one that left its mark.
Of course, we didn't know any
of that when we printed the list in
May of 2004. Charley was just a
name on that list, just as Andrew
had been in 1992, and Katrina
would be in 2005.
Had we known what was
coming, we would have printed
that third name down using


bold typeface, underlined it and
maybe used red ink to set it apart
from the rest. We would have run
screaming headlines for the first
two weeks of August, making
sure everyone knew what was
coming, warning folks to board
up, harden your structures, pro-
tect your valuable family photos,
prepare for the worst. If you lived
in a mobile home, we may have
insisted on driving you to a hotel
in Sarasota.
Somehow, the Sun's office in
Charlotte Harbor was still stand-
ing when the hurricane passed.
Many of our colleagues who rode
out Charley here have moved on,
but quite a few are still here.
We've continued to print our
Sun Hurricane Guide each May.
But the last 10 are different than
the guides that came before.
It's put together by people who
know what a hurricane can do
with its winds, and pray we never
find out about storm surge.
We're including in this guide
a brand new list of names for
2014. They're innocuous enough.
Some may be the names of old
friends or of a grandchild. There's
Arthur, which is also the name of
a cartoon aardvark on PBS. Good
old Fay was my lunchroom lady,


Page 1

HURRICANE
NAMES FOR 2014


* Arthur
* Bertha
* Cristobal
*Dolly
*Edouard
* Fay
* Gonzalo
*Hanna
* Isaias
*Josephine
*Kyle


* Laura
* Marco
*Nana
*Omar
* Paulette
*Rene
*Sally
*Teddy
*Vicky
*Wilfred


and Nana is what my kids call
my mom. And who doesn't love
Dolly, right?
But don't let that fool you. One
of the names here may be a killer.
Maybe more than one. Maybe,
like 2005, they'll have to make up
new names to stick on the end
because Mother Nature doesn't
read the list.
And we just don't know which
ones to mark in red.
So, what's the point? Be
prepared as best you can. If you
really don't understand what
all the fuss is about, go to our
seminar, any seminar. Read this
guide. Learn what to do if the
National Weather Service issues a
Hurricane Warning for our area.
And while we're preparing, let's
hope we won't remember any of
the names on this list 10 years
from now.


IHD



Over 60 exhibitors:
SHurricane protection and supplies
" Government agencies
" Home and garden products/services
" Insurance and financial services
" Health care
" Automotive products and services
" Marine products and services


Saturday, May 17,2014

10 a.m.-3 p.m.
Charlotte Harbor Event & Conference Center,
75 Taylor St., Punta Gorda
Hurricane preparedness seminars at
10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.
Featuring WINK News meteorologists,
Wayne Sallade with Charlotte County Emergency
Management and the American Red Cross


The 2014 Hurricane Preparation Guide is a supplement to the Sun Newspapers Chairman........................................................................... Derek Dunn-Rankin
Publisher....................................................................... David Dunn-Rankin
Charlotte circulation................................................... 941-206-1300 U Advertising Director/Port Charlotte, Punta Gorda Herald Publisher................. Leslee Peth
Charlotteadvertising...................................................941-258-9521 T T Executive Editor......................................................................... Chris Porter
PuntaGordaadvertising..............................................941-205-6402 e Section Editor.....................................................................Christy Feinberg
3 NI IFWSIERS
Englewood circulation/advertising ............................. 941-681-3000 America's BESTCommun fity Daily Cover design.......................................................................Marie Merchant
DeSoto circulation/advertising....................................863-494-2434 Page design..............................................................................Nicol Kuchta









New residents especially need to prepare


By WAYNE SALLADE
CHARLOTTE COUNTY EMERGENCY
MANAGEMENT DIRECTOR

It's really a very simple
question: Were you here on
Aug. 13, 2004, when Hurricane
Charley ripped through the
heart of our community with
150 mph sustained winds
and gusts in downtown Punta
Gorda to maybe 190 mph?
If your answer was no,
maybe you'll need to digest
this article a second, or
possibly a third time. Those
who experienced the wrath
of the killer (four deaths in
Charlotte County) storm, will
have flashbacks to that fateful
day, but will be reminded how
quickly things can go downhill
when a tropical event targets
your hometown.
The 2014 hurricane season
is now just weeks away and
you've already heard or read
that the predictions are calling
for a below-average season in
terms of storm numbers. In
Emergency Management, we
don't care if they predict two
or 22 storms, our pre-season
preparations are the same and
yours should be too.
If you're a new resident, you
should know up front that you
are not alone. Our population
is beginning to grow and
change once again. Statistics
provided by the Regional
Planning Council show us
that more than half the folks
in Southwest Florida were not
here in 2004 when four hurri-
canes hit Florida in six weeks.
With that in mind, you'll
understand why we believe
we're facing a difficult task in
terms of public awareness.
That task involves con-
vincing those who hail from
Middle America that tropical
storms and hurricanes can
happen anywhere along
the Gulf or Atlantic coasts


SUN FILE PHOTO
Charlotte County Emergency Management Director Wayne Sallade discusses disaster planning with county
residents during a seminar last year.


and usually come when you
least expect them. We're now
nine years out since the last
hurricane (Wilma) hit Florida
in the fall of 2005 and left
Fort Lauderdale in shambles.
Tropical Storms Fay, Debbie
and Isaac have threatened,
but none left a legacy of
destruction like Charley.
When that Category 4
hurricane roared across Punta
Gorda, Port Charlotte and
Deep Creek late on a Friday
afternoon in mid-August,
he destroyed more than
11,000 dwelling units, six pub-
lic schools, four fire stations
and left all three hospitals in
limbo until repairs could be
made. Charley's total damage
tally was $3.2 billion, with
$64 million in storm debris
cleanup alone. Electricity was
knocked out to more than


97,000 customer accounts for
at least 13 days and it took
6,000 utility workers from
across the U.S. to get the lights
back on. Yes folks, all that
happened right here in little
old Charlotte County.
Out of that giant debris
pile left in Charley's wake,
has come what we have long
called, "Urban Renewal by
Disaster." Our reward for en-
during this monster are new
and much stronger schools
and fire stations, hardened
hospitals, hotels, churches,
the Events Center and much,
much more. Our housing
stock in Port Charlotte,
Charlotte Harbor and Punta
Gorda is likely among the
strongest in Florida.
So, are all you newer folks
still with me? Maybe you are
from the school of thought


that hurricanes are so rare
that you'll never experience
one. Or, maybe you're
buying into the forecasts
for a below-normal season
of storm activity and you'll
just wait until next year to
do anything about hurricane
preparedness.
I wouldn't if I were you.
You see, we went into
the 1992 hurricane season
having been told that we
could expect fewer storms
because of something called
the El Nifio in the Pacific
Ocean that warms the waters
and sends westerly winds
across the Caribbean. Those
winds aloft are supposed to
inhibit storm formation and
even keep them from getting
too strong if they do develop.

PREPARE14


Page 2


Friday, May 16, 2014





Friday, May 16, 2014


NUMBERS TO KNOW
EM ERG ENCY .............................................................911
During a hurricane, do not use 911 unless it is life threatening.
CHARLOTTE COUNTY
Charlotte County Emergency Management .... 941-833-4000
Charlotte County Sheriffs Office..................... 941-639-2101
Charlotte County Fire and EMS....................... 941-833-5600
Charlotte County Public Works........................ 941-575-3600
Punta Gorda Police Department...................... 941-639-4111
Punta Gorda Fire Department......................... 941-575-5529
Englewood Area Fire Control District............... 941-474-3311
Englewood Water District................................. 941-474-3217
American Red Cross....................................... 941-629-4345
SARASOTA COUNTY
Sarasota County Emergency Management.....941-861-5000
Sarasota County Sheriffs Office..................... 941-861-5800
SCSO non-emergency assistance............941-316-1201
North County office in Sarasota................ 941-861-4081
South County office in Venice................... 941-861-1704
Sarasota County Fire & EMS........................... 941-861-5000
Sarasota County Public Works........................ 941-861-5000
North Port Fire Department............................. 941-240-8150
North Port Police Department.......................... 941-426-3111
.................................................................. 9 4 1-4 2 9 -7 3 0 0
North Port Utilities 24/7 emergency................. 941-240-8000
American Red Cross....................................... 941-379-9300
DESOTO COUNTY
Emergency Management ................................863-993-4831
Arcadia Police Department .............................. 863-993-4660
DeSoto County Sheriffs Office ........................863-993-4700
DeSoto County Fire & Rescue ........................863-993-4842
Anim al Control................................................. 863-993-4855
American Red Cross .......................................863-494-2348
FEDERAL/STATE AGENCIES
Florida Division of Emergency Management...850-413-9969
.......................................................... TTY 800-226-4329
Florida Department of Insurance..................... 850-413-2842
Florida Power & Light...................................... 941-639-1106
National Weather Service: 813-645-2323
Small Business Administration........................ 800-827-5722
Florida Department of Elder Affairs............... 800-96-ELDER
.................................................................. 8 5 0-4 14 -2 0 0 0
Florida Department of Financial Services.......800-342-2762
National Flood Insurance Program ..................800-427-4661
Disaster assistance................................. 800-621-FEMA
Citizens Property Insurance Corporation.........888-685-1555


Page 3

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Friday, May 16, 2014


SUN FILE PHOTO
Charlotte County
Emergency
Management
Director Wayne
Sallade briefs
local leaders as
a storm named
Charley approaches
Southwest Florida in
August 2004.


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PREPARE


FROM PAGE 2
Now, ask the people of South
Miami-Dade County how
that worked out for them on
Aug. 24 of that year, when
Hurricane Andrew carved a
path across the landscape
with 165 mph winds and left
about a quarter of a million
people homeless in just two
hours.
Andrew hit the least
populated part of Miami-
Dade County and, like
Charley in 2004, he was
a smaller-than-normal
hurricane. He brought some
storm surge into Biscayne
Bay, but it was his winds that
peaked at 175 mph, which
resulted in 15 direct deaths
and to the severe damage
or destruction of more
than 110,000 homes. More
than a million people were
left without power and it
would be years before things
returned to normal.


Hurricanes have a rich
history in Florida and have
been a hazard since the
earliest man traversed the
Everglades. Great storms hit
Florida in 1919 (Florida Keys),
1926 (Great Miami), 1928
(Okeechobee), 1935 (Labor
Day) and 1960 (Donna in
Southwest Florida). In 2004,
Charley was followed by three
more storms (Frances, Ivan
and Jeanne) in just a six-week
span. A year later, four more
hurricanes (Dennis, Katrina,
Rita and Wilma) would strike
or pass close by Florida. Eight
hurricanes in two years and
now none for nine, tends to
put people to sleep.
So, will a hurricane strike
the U.S. or will one threaten
our area?
There's no way anyone can
tell you that at this point.
However, they can tell you
that you should approach
each season the same, under-
standing that preparedness
is protection and failing to
plan, means you are planning
to fail!


Page 4






Friday, May 16, 2014


DeSoto works to move on from Charley


By DOUG CHRIST
DESOTO COUNTY
EMERGENCY MANAGER
While it is hard to believe
that 10 years has passed
since Hurricane Charley rav-
aged our area, there is plenty
of evidence that points to the
devastation.
Vacant lots exist where
businesses and homes use
to be. Tree stumps and
blown-over large trees dot
the landscape. Remnants of
the infamous blue tarps still
flutter in the breeze.
What many people will
overlook is the progress
made by the community in
recovering from the storm.
We came together and
prioritized areas to focus
on recovery and rebuilding.


Between local, state, federal
and private efforts, 10 years
later here are some of the
accomplishments and
investments:
Connecting People
with Places Ongoing
programs to make safe routes
to schools. Investment:
$1,738,784
Repair/replace Public
Safety facilities and update/
develop evacuation plans
- built a new Emergency
Operations Center, updated
shelter and evacuation plans,
hurricane-screened Fire
Station 2, hardened Turner
Center Exhibit Hall and
installed a generator for use
as a special-needs shelter.
Investment: $1,361,228
Improve health facili-
ties Hospital expansion,


hardened hospital, DMH
expanded services, expanded
Health Department ser-
vices in partnership with
School Board. Investment:
$21,000,000
Housing Recovery -
Replace public housing,
develop farm worker
housing, not-for-profit
housing development,
county level housing pro-
gram. Investment estimate:
$56,550,000 (Investment does
not reflect private investment
in housing stock)
Improve road and
bridges Paving, culverts,
bridges, U.S. 17 four-laning.
Investment: $218,220,000
Improve water and
wastewater systems -
Replace water treatment
facility, add additional


groundwater
supply ,
build new
wastewater
treatment DOUG CHRIST
plant, force
main extensions, booster
stations, water interconnects.
Investment: $23,621,818
While Hurricane Charley
caused heavy damage to the
area, it also cast the seeds
of community reinvestment
that residents will benefit
from for years to come.
DeSoto County Emergency
Management can be followed
by any of these methods:
Website http://www.
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Facebook http://desoto
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Twitter https: / /twitter.
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Page 5






Friday, May 16, 2014


Will Sarasota County residents be ready?


By EDWARD McCRANE Jr.
SARASOTA COUNTY EMERGENCY
MANAGEMENT CHIEF

Hurricane season is a part of
living in Florida.
It's hard for people to
remember that after several
seasons with little to no storm
activity- but Tropical Storms
Debbie and Isaac, as well as
Hurricane Sandy in 2012, serve
as reminders that we can't
count on a hurricane-free year.
If we face a strong tropical
storm or hurricane this year,
your answers to the questions
below could save your life and
the lives of your family.
If a hurricane heads toward
Sarasota County how would
you decide whether to stay or
evacuate?
If you stay, have you pre-
pared your home for the effects
of hurricane-force winds?
If you leave, where would
you go, and what would you
take with you?
After the storm, would you
be self-sufficient for at least a
week?
Now is the best time to an-
swer these questions before
the next hurricane is 24 hours
from landfall and people are


lining up to buy storm sup-
plies. The only way to stay safe
is to prepare, and that means
doing these three things:
Have a plan for your family
and your pets.
Create a disaster supply kit
that will get you through the
first week after a storm.
Stay alert and be ready to
carry out your plan.
Your first step for storm
preparation and storm
information should be a visit
to Sarasota County's website,
scgov.net. Click on the 'All
Hazards Be Prepared" link
under Emergency Services
on the home page. On the
'All Hazards" page, you'll find
links to information about
preparations for your family,
your home, your neighbor-
hood and business. There
also is special information
and storm tips for senior
citizens. People who have
special needs during a storm
should call 941-861-5000 for
a PSN application to register
in advance for assistance. If
you do not own a computer
with Internet access, pick up
a Disaster Planning Guide
at your local library or at
the County Administration


Center at 1660 Ringling Blvd.,
Sarasota.
Whether to stay or go during
a storm partially depends on
which evacuation zone you
live in. You can find out if your
home is in an evacuation zone
at www.scgov.net. Click on the
"Evacuation Zones/Shelters"
link under Emergency Services
at the bottom of the page.
When the map appears, type
your home address in the
search box, to see where your
home is located in relation
to the evacuation zones.
As a storm approaches, the
Sarasota County Emergency
Management will issue
evacuation orders by zone,
depending on the intensity of
the storm and the expected
height of storm tide.
Even if you don't live in an
evacuation zone, your house
may not be safe if it wasn't
constructed to meet recently
updated Florida building
codes. If you haven't done a
wind inspection on your house,
of if you don't have storm
shutters, it may not be safe to
stay. This is especially true in
some areas of the county that
have high concentrations of
mobile homes or older homes


constructed V
before we m
learned how a
easily wind a
can damage EDMCCRANE
them.
If you determine that your
home is safe to stay in, remem-
ber your ABC's of preparation:
Anchor your roof,
especially if was built before
1994 and is gabled.
Brace the entry and
garage doors, which is where
80 percent of home wind
damage starts.
Cover windows with secure
impact-resistant shutters or
other window-protection
systems.
Safe, interior rooms provide
more protection than rooms
with windows and doors.
Sarasota County Emergency
Management will keep
residents informed as storms
approach, and residents can
count on us for help after a
storm passes. But residents
need to be prepared and
self-sufficient until we can
respond. Being prepared is the
best way to make sure your
family is ready for any disaster.
Remember, "The First 72 are
on you!"


SUN FILE PHOTO
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Florida in 2004. The Category 4 storm was one of six major hurricanes to hit
Florida during the month of August. According to the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration, September is the month most likely to have a
major hurricane hit Florida. From 1851 to 2011,19 major hurricanes hit the
state in September. Ten struck in October and two in July.


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Page 6









Storm readiness beyond flashlights


By DAVID MORRIS

Besides the requisite flash-
lights, batteries, drinking water
and nonperishable food, storm
readiness should involve some
important insurance, repair
and financial issues right now.
First, if you haven't reviewed
your homeowner's insurance
policy lately, Consumer Reports
suggests talking to your agent
before suffering a loss.
"Ask about house values
and the applicable minimum
coverage required to get full
protection in a total loss,"
notes CR. Additionally, know
all the limits including
property replacement value -
and review the covered perils
listed in the policy.
For example, take trees.
CR explains that if your neigh-
bor's tree hits your house, your
homeowner's policy needs to
cover it, not theirs. However,
if a tree falls on your car, your
auto insurance pays, but only
if the policy includes com-
prehensive coverage. And the
costs of removing fallen trees
not damaging any property
may not be covered at all.
As for those listed perils,
even with hurricane insurance
coverage, water damage caused
directly by flooding is excluded
under your homeowner's policy
unless wind blows in the water.
That's why it's also import-
ant to talk with your insurance
agent about a separate flood
insurance policy, especially
with the recently passed
Homeowners Flood Insurance
Affordability Act affecting
phased-in rate increases in
higher risk flood zones.
If you have a mortgage and
live in what FEMA determines
is a high-risk flood zone,
getting flood insurance isn't an
option. You're required by the
lender to purchase a policy.
However, if you're in a


"moderate to low risk" zone,
flood insurance isn't required.
And regardless of the risk zone,
if your home is mortgage-free,
you don't have to get it.
But a tropical storm can
produce more rainfall than a
Category 5 hurricane.
"As tropical storms move
inland, rainfall dumped in
short time frames can result in
flash flooding that can last up
to a week or more," explains
the National Flood Insurance
Program. "Only a few inches
of water can cause thousands
of dollars of damage to homes
and businesses." Not surpris-
ingly, it's one Florida's most
frequent natural hazards, ac-
cording to the state's Division
of Emergency Management.
Homeowners, condomini-
um owners and even renters
can buy National Flood
Insurance at any time includ-
ing those in non-ground floor
units because even if there's no
unit water damage, buildings
can be made uninhabitable by
damaged foundations.
However, there's usually a
30-day waiting period after the
premium is paid before a flood
insurance policy becomes
effective. To get more informa-
tion, visit www.floodsmart.gov
or call the NFIP referral center
at 800-427-2419.

Have a 'go-to'
contractors list
Also, while the weather is fair,
prepare a list of trustworthy
contractors, because good ones
are harder to come by after a
storm. That means having a list
of a plumber, air-conditioning
contractor, electrician, door
and window installer and, if
appropriate, a septic contractor
and a pool and spa contractor.
Preferably, you should


READINESS 18


SUN FILE PHOTO
Prepare for hurricane season now. Review your homeowner's insurance
policy before the season begins June 1.


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Friday, May 16, 2014


Page 7






Friday, May 16, 2014


READINESS

FROM PAGE 7

already have an existing
relationship with as many of
these as possible. Not only
does it allow you to approve
their work, but also current
customers will normally get
preferential treatment in an
emergency.
More than 300 licensed
contractors, besides the key
trades noted above, as well
as aluminum, drywall and
roofing contractors and
companies that specialize in
debris removal, garage doors,
gutters and painting, are
all in the Charlotte-DeSoto
Building Industry Association's
directory, at www.cdbia.com
or by calling 941-625-0804.
Additionally CDBIA verifies
appropriate state and/or


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Use only a licensed contractor to perform any repairs after a storm. To verify, contact the Department of
Business & Professional Regulation at 850-487-1395 or online at www.MyFloridaLicense.com.


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To verify compliance your-
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city where the work is being
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all contracting services re-
quire a state license. For those
where it is required, contact
the Department of Business
& Professional Regulation
at 850-487-1395 or online at
www.MyFloridaLicense.com.
Verify Charlotte County
registration by calling 941-
743-1201. For Punta Gorda,
call 941-575-3324. In North
Port, call 941-429-7016. And in
DeSoto County-including
the City of Arcadia call
863-993-4811.
Unlicensed activity typically
increases as scam artists
prey on desperate situations.
But during a declared state
of emergency, unlicensed
activity is a felony offense and
may be punishable by fines
or even prison. Additionally,
your insurance company may
not cover work performed
without a permit.
So, notify the Department
of Business and Professional
Regulation of any suspected
unlicensed activity by calling
866-532-1440 or directly
submit them to DBPR from
mobile devices on a new free
app available on the iTunes
and Google Play app stores.
It's up to you, however, to
check to see if a contractor or
company has any complaints.
Start with the state's primary
clearinghouse for complaints,


by contacting the Florida
Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services at
800-HELP-FLA (435-7352).
Then check the Better
Business Bureau of Southwest
Florida at www.westflorida.
bbb.org or 727-535-5522.
Don't just look at the BBB
letter rating, but consider
the number and types of any
complaints it has received.
Also, check consumer
complaint websites including
www.complaintsboard.com,
www.complaints.com and
www.consumeraffairs.com.
Then, authenticate refer-
ences and testimonials and
consider the recommenda-
tions of friends and service
winners of the Sun's Reader
Choice Awards.
Finally, understand the
risks of hiring someone who
is uninsured. Without liability
and workers' comp, you could
be liable for personal injuries
on your property and the cost
to repair any damage.
So, ask for, copy and verify
insurance is valid before work
begins. If you're just shown a
temporary insurance binder,
Erin Mullen-Travis, licensing
manager of Charlotte County's
Building and Construction
Services, cautions, "Some


READINESS 19


Page 8





Friday, May 16, 2014


READINESS
FROM PAGE 8

have obtained binders for
purposes of getting a license
then do not renew it, which
then cancels the insurance."
In the end, knowing which
contractors to call if needed,
as well as what's covered
under your insurance policy,
can make all the difference in
avoiding costly uninformed
impulsive repair decisions
or being surprised after a
hurricane or flood.

Financial readiness
Having important financial
documents and some cash
all in one portable place can
make a big difference during
a stressful time.
"Make a list of your


possessions and document
it with photos or a video.
This could help if you are
filing insurance claims,"
suggests the Federal Trade
Commission. "Keep one copy
of your inventory in your
home in a lockable, fireproof
file box; keep another in a safe
deposit box or another secure
location." Review and update
annually.
What else should go in that
portable fireproof box? The
FTC suggests the following:
A list of emergency
contacts, including family
members who live outside
your area.
Copies of health insurance
cards and current prescriptions
Policy numbers for auto,
flood, and homeowner's
insurance, and a list of
telephone numbers of your
insurance companies.
Copies of other important


financial and family records
- or notes about where they
are including deeds, titles,
wills, birth and marriage
certificates, passports, and
relevant employee benefit and
retirement documents. Except
for wills, keep originals in a
safe deposit box or some other
location. If you have a will,
ask your attorney to keep the
original document.
A list of phone numbers
or email addresses of your
creditors, financial institu-
tions, landlords, and utility
companies.
A list of bank, loan, credit
card, mortgage, lease, debit
and ATM, and investment
account numbers. (In fact,
make front and back copies of
all credit and debit cards.)
Social Security cards.
Backups of financial data
you keep on your computer.
An extra set of keys for


your house and car.
The key to your safe
deposit box.
A small amount of cash
or traveler's checks. ATMs or
financial institutions may be
closed.
Finally, if there's a declared
emergency in our area,
Florida law prohibits extreme
increases in the price of such
needed commodities as food,
water, hotels, ice, gasoline
and lumber. If you suspect
any price gouging, call the
Attorney General's hotline at
866-9-NO-SCAM (966-7226).
David Morris is the Sun's
consumer advocate. Read
David's column every
Monday in all editions of
the Sun. Contact him dco the
Sun, 23170 Harborview Road,
Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980,
email dmorris@sun-herald.
corn or leave a message at
941-206-1114.


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Red Cross aims to 'Prepare Florida'


SUN FILE PHOTO
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By BARBARA BEAN-MELLINGER
SUN CORRESPONDENT

"We live in the second-
most, disaster-prone state
in the nation," said Linda
Carbone, regional CEO
of Florida's West Coast
Region of the American
Red Cross, in introducing
"Prepare Florida" on the
organization's website.
According to Kiplinger.
corn, Florida is No. 2 on
the list of the 10 states
most prone to disaster.
Hurricane Katrina pushed
Louisiana to the No. 1 slot.
Yet, less than one-third
of Floridians have a family
disaster plan, said Carbone.
That's why the Red Cross
recently launched "Prepare
Florida," a three-year cam-
paign to educate people
on how to be prepared in
advance of disaster, and
to be able to take action
immediately when one
does occur.
The Red Cross' plan
includes:
Getting information out
to wide areas of the public
about how to personally
prepare for a disaster such
as a hurricane;
More than doubling the
number of trained volun-
teers from 4,500 to 10,000;
Training more than
500,000 people in CPR, first
aid and AED usage;
Doubling its capability
to distribute emergency
meals from 250,000 to
500,000 daily;
Arranging disaster sim-
ulations in every county.
"The biggest differences
in hurricane preparedness
through the Red Cross
over the past 10 years have
been in using technology,"
said Janet McGuire, who


handles media information
for the Southwest region
of Florida. "For example,
the Red Cross website has
a free hurricane app that
can be downloaded, and
it leads you step-by-step
through personal prepared-
ness procedures."
An interactive module on
the website also explains
how to prepare an emer-
gency kit, including water,
protein bars, canned food
with pop tops, or a hand
can opener for regular
cans, a first-aid kit, hand
sanitizer, disinfecting
wipes, a seven-day supply
of medicines, and more.
Another link shows the
preparedness classes avail-
able in the area and how to
register for them.
A Weather Channel video
on the Red Cross website
discusses your hurricane
preparedness plan, which
should include: making a
list of emergency contacts,
preparing your kit and
having one gallon of water
per person per day, for at
least three days.
Prepare children for what
can be a stressful situation
by involving them in the
planning. Let them know
they may have to leave their
home if a hurricane is com-
ing, but that the family's
adults will be with them.
"We can't control Mother
Nature, but we can control
what we do," said Carbone.
Go to www.redcross.
org for preparedness lists,
kit contents, classes, the
hurricane app, the "Prepare
Florida" program and much
more.
Knowing you're prepared
for a hurricane will give you
the confidence to handle
whatever comes your way.


Page 10


Friday, May 16, 2014


_i=3A1Bi


'"WiifllMI


,ai-611-4
lawnsyw A -









Salvation Army prepares for hurricane season


By BARBARA BEAN-MELLINGER
SUN CORRESPONDENT

The Salvation Army's
mission after disasters such
as hurricanes is to be ready
to spring into action at a
moment's notice. To do that,
however, requires a lot of
advance preparation.
Its 42 mobile feeding units
have been inspected and are
positioned throughout the
state, ready to be put into
service to provide hot meals
and cold drinks should they
be needed.
Volunteer teams have
been trained in what to do
in an emergency, and more
volunteers have been invited
to join.
"This year, we've been
especially aggressive in our
preparations," said Kevin
Smith, director of Emergency
Disaster Services for the
Florida Division of the
Salvation Army.
Smith has experienced
more than his share of
disasters. He established
the overall feeding program
at Ground Zero in New
York City. He served as area
commander for all Salvation
Army disaster relief after
Hurricane Charley and the
other 2004 hurricanes. He


also coordinated the imme-
diate response to Hurricane
Katrina in Biloxi, Miss.
"We learn from every
disaster. What we learned
from Hurricane Andrew
we applied during Katrina
... and we've learned from
Sandy," Smith said.
The relationships that
the emergency managers
in Charlotte, DeSoto and
Sarasota counties have built
through the years along
with the support from
area nonprofit groups and
churches enabled the
area to react quickly after
Charley changed course and
made landfall here, Smith
said. According to Smith,
we are blessed in this area
to have such leadership and
cooperation.
"I don't say that lightly,
either," said Smith.
The lessons learned from
Charley are that even better
relationships were needed,
and the area leaders and
volunteers responded to
build that network. Now,
10 years later, GPS and other
advanced technology are
better able to track mobile
units, for example. Since
cellphone service was spotty
after the hurricane, relation-
ships have been developed


with amateur radio oper-
ators who can help after a
disaster.
One major area still needs
work, though, said Smith.
While research reveals the
Salvation Army, Red Cross,
FEMA, the state and others
have done a good job of
getting the message out
that everyone needs to be
prepared with a disaster
kit and a plan, very few
people actually have either
one. Some weren't here for
Charley, and for others, the
passage of time has dulled
the crisis.
According to Smith, every-
one needs to ask the ques-
tion: If a hurricane or other
disaster occurred today, am
I prepared?


Being prepared means
having adequate food and
water for your family for at
least 72 hours after a disas-
ter. It also means knowing
the storm zone you live in.
From Sandy, people learned
more about the dangers of
storm surge.
Listen to local officials
when they say to stay, or it's
time to evacuate. Meanwhile,
visit www. disaster. salvation
armyusa.org for information
on planning, having a kit,
and being ready for whatever
may occur.
"The more people who are
prepared, the fewer will need
emergency services," said
Smith, "and that will allow
us to help those who really
need it."


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Friday, May 16, 2014


Page 11





Friday, May 16, 2014


Ask NOAA


Q. Do Hurricane Hunters / TMOs
fly over the top of the
hurricane?
A. No. The tops /
of a big hurri- -4
cane can be g,,
over 50,000 feet
high, and our p >
aircraft could 0fw
never get up
there (they can go i h
up to 30,000 feet).
Besides, the weatherA
we're interested in is
down at the bottom of en
the storm. Where it will affect
the coastline it hits. For this reason, we fly in as low as
possible and still be safe. This altitude can be anywhere
from 1,000 feet to 10,000 feet.

Source: National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Association

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SAFFIR-SIMPSON HURRICANE WIND SCALE
Category 1 (74-95 mph winds) Very dangerous winds will produce
some damage: Well-constructed frame homes could have damage to roof,
shingles, vinyl siding and gutters. Large branches of trees will snap and shallowly
rooted trees may be toppled. Extensive damage to power lines and poles likely
will result in power outages that could last a few to several days.
Category 2
(96-110 mph winds) --
-Extremely dangerous i
winds will cause extensive /
damage: Well-constructed -.
frame homes could sustain ,
major roof and siding
damage. Many shallowly .m r an
rooted trees will be sap
snapped or uprooted and
block numerous roads.
Near-total power loss is
expected with outages that
could last from several days dmg i,
to weeks.
Category 3
(111-129 mph winds) --
Devastating damage will
occur: Well-built framed
homes may incur major
damage or removal of roof Power lines and street lights may be
decking and gable ends. downed in a Category 1 storm.
Many trees will be snapped
or uprooted, blocking numerous roads. Electricity and water will be unavailable
for several days to weeks after the storm passes.
SCategory 4 (130-156 mph winds) Catastrophic damage will occur:
Well-built framed homes can sustain severe damage with loss of most of the
roof structure and/or some
exterior walls. Most trees
will be snapped or uprooted
and power poles downed.
Fallen trees and power poles
will isolate residential areas.
Power outages will last weeks
to possibly months. Most of
the area will be uninhabitable
for weeks or months.
Category 5 (157 mph
or higher winds)-
-. Catastrophic damage will
occur: A high percentage
of framed homes will be
destroyed, with total roof
failure and wall collapse.
Fallen trees and power poles
will isolate residential areas.
> Power outages will last for
weeks to possibly months.
Most of the area will be
SUN FILE PHOTOS uninhabitable for weeks or
months.


A Category 4 storm wiil deliver
catastrophic damage like this caused by
Hurricane Charley.


Provided by
The National Hurricane Center


Page 12









Surviving memories of a hurricane


By RENEE LePERE
SUN CORRESPONDENT
Mary and Bill Tursellino's
memories of Hurricane
Charley a decade ago are
powerful.
"I remember Bill was
sitting in the recliner and
I was sitting on the couch
when the weatherman
said it was turning into
Charlotte Harbor," Mary
Tursellino said while she
and her husband were on
the lanai of their South
Waterway Circle home
in Port Charlotte ... on a
sunny, spring day. It's a
complete contrast to the
moody skies of Aug. 13,
2004. There was a sense of


"Even if you're in a shelter and you
like to read or listen to music, try to
find a way to do it. The quicker you get
back to a normal schedule, the better."
Benjamin Keyes, professor and program director of the master's
counseling program for Regent University in Virginia


foreboding about the sky
from the moment the sun
came up that day.
"I remember as the
storm (bore) down, the
sliding glass doors started
imploding. Bill and I ran
to the back room while the
roof was peeling off and
Bill holding the door shut


while it's doing this," her
hand slapping back and
forth in the air to mimic
the door furiously rattling
against the door frame's
inside stop.
Bill Condon's memories
are equally vivid and
disturbing. Condon, of
Punta Gorda, was a patient


at Bayfront Punta Gorda
- then Charlotte Regional
- on the top floor, in
the last room of the hall.
Like the Tursellinos, he
was watching WINK news
when meteorologist Jim
Farrell made the call -
Charley wasn't going to the
Tampa area as originally
forecast. It had made a
dramatic right turn into
Charlotte Harbor. Condon,
like the Tursellinos, was
just blocks away from the
entry point.
"I can still see the ceiling
swaying back and forth,
and this doctor holding
my hand telling me
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Page 13






Friday, May 16, 2014


MEMORIES

FROM PAGE 13

everything was all right,"
Condon said. "And even
without the grip he had
on me, I knew it wasn't."
Condon would be
transferred to a Fort
Myers hospital once the
storm passed; he was
living in North Port at the
time, so his home suffered
no damage, theoretically
giving him a safe place to
deal with the experience.
The mind doesn't always
work that way.
"It took me a good three
to six months to be able to
talk about the experience
without breaking down
and crying," Condon said.
In the days following the
storm, the Tursellinos were
literally trying to pick up
the pieces of their home,
which was now essentially
a roofless, windowless
shell. There was not much
salvageable in their home,
and many of their neigh-
bors had not fared much
better. The road was im-
passible for all the debris,
cutting the neighborhood
off temporarily. Mary said
she and Bill slept in sleep-
ing bags, literally looking
up at the stars.
"It's turned into a blur,"


Mary Tursellino said of
the weeks and months fol-
lowing. "I don't remember
much of any of it. The one
thing I do remember is
trying to clean the kitchen
up. I don't know what I
was thinking. Friends tell
me, I wasn't myself."
While Tursellino's
memories after Charley
are vague, Condon's are
high-definition clear.
Both though on
opposite ends of the
spectrum- are pretty
typical of someone who
has been through a trau-
matic event, according to
the National Institute of
Mental Health.
Post-traumatic stress
disorder is defined by
the NIMH as an "anxiety
disorder that some people
get after seeing or living
through a dangerous
event." Although the term
PTSD is almost automat-
ically associated with
combat troops, the reality
is any traumatic event -
natural disaster, sexual
assault, abuse, attack or
serious accident like a car
crash can trigger PTSD,
the NIMH reports.
The Nebraska
Department of Veteran
Affairs estimated
7.8 percent of Americans
will experience PTSD at
some point in their lives,


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with women (10.4 percent)
twice as likely as men
(5 percent) to develop
PTSD.
However, what most
people will suffer imme-
diately following a trau-
matic event is not PTSD,
but acute stress disorder,
according to Benjamin
Keyes, professor and pro-
gram director of the mas-
ter's counseling program
for Regent University
in Virginia. Keyes, who
lived in Florida for more
than 30 years, is also the
director of Regent's First
Response Trauma Team,
which has aided in the
aftermath of worldwide
crises such as Haiti's 2010
earthquake and Hurricane
Sandy in 2012.
The difference? Acute
Stress Disorder dissipates
in about 30 days, Keyes
said. It's when the night-
mares, avoidance, de-
tachment, numbness and
hypervigilance, intrusive
memories, mood irritabil-
ity and other symptoms
last more than a month
that Acute Stress Disorder
has crossed over into
PTSD.
"For most people, the
shock, the memory intru-
sion will go away within
30 days," Keyes said.
"But, about 15 percent
of the population who
went through Hurricane
Katrina, for example,
needed ongoing counsel-
ing beyond that 30 days."
Keyes said one of the
best ways to try to prevent
ASD and PTSD is talking
about the event and the
emotions of it as quickly
as possible. Telling others
of your experience and
how you survived it is
critical, Keyes said.
"The more you choke or
hold down those emo-
tions, the more likely it's
going to come back on


you," Keyes said.
Keyes said people
should not only share
their experiences or their
emotions, but learn re-
laxation techniques such
as meditation and prayer.
Research has suggested
those that do have a con-
siderable decrease in their
symptoms, Keyes said.
Also, regaining a nor-
mal schedule as quickly
as possible is also a key
component.
"Eating right, exercise,"
Keyes said. "Even if you're
in a shelter and you like
to read or listen to music,
try to find a way to do it.
The quicker you get back
to a normal schedule, the
better."
Both Condon and the
Tursellinos said the night-
mares and other stress
symptoms have stopped.
Normal life has resumed.
Condon said he wonders
if part of why he had
such a difficult emotional
recovery from the storm is
because he felt so helpless.
Condon had seen danger
before, both as a member
of the 82nd Airborne
and as New York Police
Department officer.
"It was common place
for me not to have fear
before, during or after," he
said. "But I think this had
a lot to do with the fact I
was incapacitated, I was
hooked up to IVs, and I
was on medication."
Bill Tursellino had also
seen his fair share of
dangerous situations as
a New York firefighter in
Brooklyn. His helmet was
one of the casualties in
the hurricane, but was
replaced by FDNY.
The Tursellino's original
house was razed, but a
new home was construct-
ed at the same address.

MEMORIES 116


Page 14












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Friday, May 16, 2014


Page 15






Friday, May 16, 2014


MEMORIES
FROM PAGE 14

"You can't beat the
view," Mary Tursellino
said, looking over her
shoulder. "And we like
the neighbors. We like the
place. Bill hates the cold,
so we stayed. But let me
tell you, every June 1, the
shutters go up on this
house, even though we
have the shatter-proof
glass. And we don't
fool around. If there's
anything close, we take
the cat and evacuate. I
told him (Bill) that if one
ever hits again, we're
selling the land. I can't go
through this again."
Condon no longer
spends hurricane sea-
son in Florida he


visits family across the
country. But, he has no
intention of moving out
of the state.
"Where am I going
to go? Didn't New York
City just get hit with
Hurricane Sandy? Do
I want to move to the
West Coast where there's
earthquakes? No. Do I
want to move to 'Tornado
Alley'? No. There's the
icicles up north I've
had enough of that. No
matter where you go,
there's a possibility of
getting hit by something,
so I'll stay here. It's sun-
shine most of the time,
and that suits me fine."
For more information
about ASD and PTSD,
visit http:/ /counsellingre
source.com/lib/distress/
anxiety-disorders/
acute-stress-symptoms/.


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According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration:
Tropical cyclones can be thought of as engines that require warm,
moist air as fuel. This warm, moist air cools as it rises in convective
clouds (thunderstorms) in the rainbands and eyewall of the hurricane.
The water vapor in the cloud condenses into water droplets releasing
the latent heat which originally evaporated the water. This latent heat
provides the energy to drive the tropical cyclone circulation, though
actually very little of the heat released is utilized by the storm to lower
its surface pressure and increase the wind speeds. In 1948, Erik Palmen
observed that tropical cyclones required ocean temperatures of at least
80 degrees for their formation and growth. Later work also pointed
out the need for this warm water to be present through a relatively
deep layer (150 feet) of the ocean. This 80-degree value is tied to the
instability of the atmosphere in the tropical and subtropical latitudes.
Above this temperature deep convection can occur, but below this
value the atmosphere is too stable and little to no thunderstorm
activity can be found.


Ga~ r


Page 16








Island residents should 'get serious early'


By AL HEMINGWAY
SUN CORRESPONDENT
Wayne Sallade knows a lot
about hurricanes. He has to.
As the director of Charlotte
County Emergency
Management, part of his job
is to ensure that residents are
prepared if a catastrophic hurri-
cane strikes Southwest Florida.
That includes those who reside
on the barrier islands: Don
Pedro Island, Palm Island, or
Knight Island, Little Gasparilla
Island, the southern part of
Manasota Key, and Gasparilla
Island that straddles both Lee
and Charlotte counties.
Sallade said the population
on the islands varies depending
upon the season and could be
as high as 3,000. The people
who live there are conscious of


the perils that may arise during
hurricane season especially
those who make their homes
on the bridge-less islands,
Don Pedro, Palm and Little
Gasparilla, according to Sallade.
'Although there is no land
route, the people who live on
these islands have the means
and mobility with watercraft
to get on and off," Sallade said.
"I did appraisals there for eight
years and believe me they are
very aware of the dangers if a
hurricane should make landfall
near them."
Sallade said residents on
these bridge-less islands are a
different breed of people. They
yearn for a quiet lifestyle. They
do without the amenities most
are accustomed to such as


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Palm Island Transit operates two 100-plus-foot barges and two water
ISLAND 118 taxis to ferry people to and from the barrier islands.


Friday, May 16, 2014


Page 17


P7





Page 18


ISLAND
FROM PAGE 17
gas stations and convenience
stores. The preponderance of
the homeowners there have
connections with Polk, Hendry
and DeSoto counties and the
property has been in the family
for years.
"Our biggest concern is
Labor Day," he said. "There are
more people on the islands on
that weekend than at any other
time of the year. That holiday
falls right in the middle of the
busiest time of the hurricane
season which runs from
mid-August to mid-October."
Although Florida is a man-
datory evacuation state, Sallade
said his department does not
have the resources or time to
go to every resident's home and
forcibly remove then.
"If they are viable and refuse


Friday, May 16, 2014


to leave, the police officer will
make note of the address and
the identity of the person they
talk to," he said. "It will be
put on file and if something
happens and a family member
asks us why we didn't get their
loved one out, we show them
the record that they were
warned."
The ferry ride from Cape
Haze to Palm Island is just
about three minutes. But for
those people who call the
island their home, it could
be the longest three minutes
of their lives if they decide to
depart at the last minute in the
event of a major storm.
Ryan Guirlinger, general
manager of Palm Island
Transit, the company running
the service between the two
points, urges residents not to
wait if there is an impending
storm. His advice: Get off as
quickly as possible.
"We will post bulletins on


our website and, depending
on the wind and tide, we may
run for 24 hours to help people
get off the island ahead of the
storm," he said.
Palm Island Transit has two
107-foot-long and 25-foot-
wide ferries or barges that can
take passengers, vehicles and
property on board. The com-
pany also has two 26-foot-long
and 18-foot-wide water taxis
that can transport passengers
from the island.
"The water taxis can take a
max of 15 people," Guirlinger
said. "But, they can't take on
any vehicles or property."
Guirlinger said the
U.S. Coast Guard captain of
the port decides when the
ports on the west coast of
Florida are to be closed when
a hurricane or tropical storm
nears. When that happens,
he said, all commercial traffic
stops immediately.
"We may operate beyond
that if there is a west wind
across Palm Island," he said,
"if it is a north/south wind,
maybe not."
Sallade said forecasters now
separate storm surge from the
wind speed when predicting
the path and strength of a hur-
ricane. The right front quad-
rant of a hurricane is the most
damaging and produces most
of the tornadoes that cause
additional destruction. New
technology, Laser Imaging
Detection and Ranging, or
LIDAR, transmits laser beams
that bounce off objects and
analyze the reflected light to
determine storm surges within
6 inches or less.
"The average eye of a hurri-
cane is between 40 to 50 miles
wide," he said. "By compar-
ison, Hurricane Charley's
was only eight miles wide. It
was very small and there was
virtually no storm surge. If
Hurricane Wilma had hit us in
2005, it would have finished
what Charley started. It only
missed us by 65 nautical miles.
If a Hurricane Donna hit as far
away as Venice today (it struck
western Florida in 1960), an


18-foot storm surge would be
in front of the River City Grill.
Everything would be under
water."
Ironically, the barrier islands
aren't really affected by the
storm surge because the water
would just pass over them,
according to Sallade. The large
waves, however, are of more
concern to the islands.
"If the first two or three
rows of buildings are not
secured properly, they may
wash away," he said. "The
large waves can cause a lot of
destruction."
Like Sallade, Guirlinger
urges people to leave Palm
Island as soon as the word is
given to evacuate.
"I recall a real bad tropical
storm in 2000, where the
winds reached 65 to 70 mph
and the tide was really high,"
he said. "I was operating the
ferry then and people waited
too long and couldn't get off.
They had to wait it out. We
couldn't operate our barges
for six hours. There was a lot
of debris floating down the
IntracoastalWaterway from
that one."
Guirlinger said the rising tide
is another factor in the safe
operation of the barges. If the
tide becomes too high before
the storm, the ramp is too
steep to get vehicles or people
on board when it is lowered.
"If that happens we can't op-
erate, doesn't matter what the
wind speed is," he said. "We
will do everything in our power
to continue to run as long
as it is safe for our operators
and equipment. We also need
time to secure our equipment
before a hurricane hits because
it will be used for the cleanup
after the storm. Residents
should get serious early during
hurricane season."
"We try very hard to reach
everyone," Sallade added.
"Don't wait until conditions
aren't good to get off, we aren't
sending anyone out to get you.
It'll be too dangerous by then.
We can only save those who
want to be saved."


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Friday, May 16, 2014


Chief: city prepared for



another Charley


By ADAM KREGER
STAFF WRITER

Though Ray Briggs has lived
in Punta Gorda virtually his
entire life, he never gave much
consideration to hurricane
season when he was growing
up.
"It's interesting because,
until I was in my teens, I never
really thought about it much,"
he said. "The threat of a hur-
ricane meant we might miss
school. High water meant
we could drive through the
flooded streets. I didn't really
pay much attention other
than that until I got into the
business of being a firefighter,
because the upcoming storm
season meant work."
Briggs was hired in 1990
by the Punta Gorda Fire
Department, where he worked
his way up through the ranks.
Last year, he became both
the fire chief and emergency
management director for
the city.
Now, the 45-year-old
Briggs thinks about hurricane
season a lot.
"From the position of
emergency manager, prepar-
ing for hurricane season is a
year-round process," he said.
"Obviously, efforts increase
as we approach June. But it's
kind of like dealing with bud-
gets ... it never really ends."
The Atlantic hurricane
season runs from June 1
through Nov. 30. To ensure the
city is prepared for a potential
disaster, Briggs must keep
up with an extensive and
ever-changing checklist.
"When imminent danger
is approaching, I feel like it's
our job to give folks as much


information as we have," he
said. "But it's up to them what
they do with that information.
So public education is very
important."
Public safety officials hold
seminars, which residents are
encouraged to attend, Briggs
said, to learn things like how
to take care of their boats if a
storm hits. And keeping the
local Community Emergency
Response Team trained is
also a focus. Other public
safety officials are also drilled
about what to do if they have
to work during a storm. It's
important, too, to ensure
communication devices
work, and backup methods of
reaching other authorities and
agencies are in place.
The local fire marshal
annually reviews health
care facilities to ensure an
evacuation plan is in place
in case of disaster. If a storm
is approaching, officials
double-check those plans to
make sure patients can truly
be relocated properly.
Then, if a storm is close,
there's little things to do,
like making sure emergency
vehicles are topped off with
fuel, and that trash bags are
available to cover computers
in the public safety building in
case water gets inside.
The list goes on.
"There is a lot," Briggs said.
"But there are great people in
place to help see everything is
done properly."
Adding to his confidence,
Briggs said he knows the
community is capable of
coming together to help
each other in a time of
disaster, as he witnessed
firsthand after Hurricane


Charley hit the area in 2004.
"You would go down a
street and see one house that
still had power," he recalled.
"And there would be like three
families that had been invited
in."
Briggs admitted he's not
sure what would have hap-
pened if Punta Gorda was hit
harder than it was by Charley.
But, he said he's certain now
the community is prepared
for anything moving forward,
after dealing with the massive
hurricane.
"I think if we were to expe-
rience the same Hurricane


SUN PHOTO BY ADAM KREGER
Punta Gorda Fire Chief and
Emergency Management Director
Ray Briggs says the city learned
enough from Hurricane Charley
in 2004 to be better prepared for
potential disaster in the future.
Charley today, we would
make out better than we did
in 2004," Briggs said. "And I'm
very confident in that."
Email: alreger@sun-herald.com


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Page 19





Friday, May 16, 2014


CHARLOTTE COUNTY
Note from Charlotte County: Do not depend on a
particular refuge site being open. Refuge sites may or
may not be opened depending on the size of the storm
and the predicted landfall area. Charlotte County has
no refuge sites if we have a Category 3 or higher storm
affecting the area.
If you are transportation dependent, call
941-833-4000 to request an application for special
needs assistance.
Refuge sites:
Cultural Center of Charlotte County,
2280 Aaron St., Port Charlotte.
Friendship United Methodist Church,
12275 Paramount Drive, Punta Gorda.
Kingsway Elementary School, 23300 Quasar Ave.,
Port Charlotte.
L.A. Ainger Middle School, 245 Cougar Way,
Rotonda West.
Liberty Elementary School, 370 Atwater St.,
Port Charlotte.
Murdock Middle School, 17325 Mariner Way,
Port Charlotte.
Myakka River Elementary,
12650Wilmington Blvd., Englewood.
Pilgrim United Church of Christ, 24515


Rampart Blvd., Port Charlotte.
Port Charlotte High School, 18200 Cochran Blvd.,
Port Charlotte.
Port Charlotte Methodist Church,
21075 Quesada Ave., Port Charlotte.
Port Charlotte Middle School, 23000
Midway Blvd., Port Charlotte. Pet-friendly shelter. All
pets must be in cages and have current vaccination
paperwork.
Sallie Jones Elementary, 1221 Cooper St., Punta Gorda.
South County Regional Park, Carmalita and
Cooper streets, Punta Gorda.
Ventura Lakes Clubhouse Building,
27110 N. Jones Loop Road, Punta Gorda.
Vineland Elementary School, 467 Boundary Blvd.,
Englewood.

SOUTH SARASOTA COUNTY
Atwater Elementary, 4701 Huntsville Ave.,
North Port.
Glenallen Elementary School,
7050 Glenallen Blvd., North Port.
Heron Creek Middle School, 6501 W. Price Blvd.,
North Port. Pet-friendly shelter. Bring proof of
updated license and vaccinations, and contain your
pet in an appropriate pet carrier. Cats and dogs only.


North Port High School, 6400 W. Price Blvd.,
North Port. Pet-friendly shelter. Bring proof of
updated license and vaccinations, and contain your
pet in an appropriate pet carrier. Cats and dogs only.
Toledo Blade Elementary, 1201 Geranium St.,
North Port.
Woodland Middle School, 2700 Panacea Blvd.,
North Port.
Venice Community Center, 326 Nokomis Ave. S.,
Venice.
Pine View School, 1 Python Path, Osprey.
Pet-friendly shelter. Bring proof of updated license
and vaccinations, and contain your pet in an
appropriate pet carrier. Cats and dogs only.
For more information, call 941-861-5000 or go to
www.scgov.net.

DESOTO COUNTY
Special Needs Shelter: South Florida State
College, 2251 N.E. Turner Ave., Arcadia. Applicants
must register. For a special needs application, call
863-993-4831 or go to desotobocc.com/index.php/
departments/emergency-management and click on
Special Needs.
Public shelter: DeSoto County Middle School and
Gymnasium, 420 E. Gibson St., Arcadia.


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Page 20





Friday, May 16, 2014


HURRICANE SEASON PLqj
S"A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall," Bob Dylan
S"Stormy Weather," Etta James
S"Against the Wind," Bob Seger & the Silveij
S"Rock you like a Hurricane," Scorpio.;
"Riders on the Storm,"The Doors
"Ridin' the Storm Out," REO Spegd
"Hurricane," Dustin Lynch
S"It Will Rain," Bruno Mars
S ."Singin'in the Rain," Gene Kelly
S"Standing in the Rain:' Al Green
S*"I Can't Stand the Rain," Ann Peebles
"Stormy," Santana
S"Like a Hurricane," Neil Young
S"Feels Like Rain," Buddy Guy
"Rain'The Beatles
*"Southern Thunder," Hank Williams JL,
S"Windy,"The Association
"1 Love a Rainy Night;' Eddie Rablbi
S"Who'll Stop the Rain,"Creedencu
Revival
S"No Rain," Blind Melon
S"After the Storm," Mumford & Sons
*"The Tide is High," Blondie
*"When the Levee Breaks," Led Zeppelin
*"When the Ship Comes In," Bob Dylan


WHAT TO BRING TO A SHELTER
Hurricane evacuation shelters are provided for public use in
the event an evacuation becomes necessary and you have no
other place to go.
Shelters are usually crowded, noisy and often without
generators. Therefore, when the power goes out, they are
dark and unventilated. It is highly recommended that if you
plan to evacuate your home, make arrangements to stay with
a friend or relative who lives outside the evacuation area or
flood zone.
You will probably be more comfortable in a less-crowded
area among friends and loved ones.
Weapons, alcohol and smoking are not permitted in public
shelters. Most also do not allow pets.
If you go to a public shelter, bring the following items:
0 Change of clothes, rain gear and sturdy shoes.
0 Toiletries and personal items.
0 Blankets or sleeping bag and pillows.
0 Identification.
0 Games, toys, books or other forms of quiet entertainment.
0 Special items for infants and the elderly.
0 Special dietary needs.
0 Nonperishable foods for snacks.
0 Battery-operated radio or television, along with extra
batteries.
0 Medications.


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Page 21





Friday, May 16, 2014


SPECIAL NEEDS CHECKLIST
The following are items that residents with special needs would need to bring to a
special needs shelter:
A list of your current medications and at least a three-day supply of the
medications.
Documentation of specific medical information.
Medical equipment that is needed, such as oxygen, nebulizers, wheelchairs and
diabetes equipment.
Nonperishable dietary items, especially required dietary foods.
Electronic equipment, such as a flashlight, radio, extra batteries and cellphone.
Personal care, such as clothing, socks and shoes.
Important papers, such as doctor's orders, prescriptions and insurance information.
Identification with current address.
Sleeping items, such as a pillow and a blanket.
Personal hygiene items.
Something to do, such as books or games.
A first-aid kit.
Personal equipment, such as glasses, hearing aids and dentures.

Don't bring:
Pets, except as medically determined, such as a seeing-eye dog.
Firearms.
*Alcohol.
*Perishable food items.

Source: Special needs shelter application


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HELPFUL WEBSITES FOR

HURRICANE SEASON


Charlotte County
www.charlottecountyfl.gov
Charlotte Emergency Management: www.charlottecountyfl.com/Emergency/
Charlotte County Sheriff: www.ccso.orq
City of Punta Gorda: www.ci.punta-gorda.fl.us

Sarasota County
www.scgov.net
Sarasota Emergency Management Storm Center: www.scgov.net/
StormCenter/Pages/default.aspx
Sarasola County Sheriff: www.sarasotasheriff.org
City of North Port: www.cityofnorthport.com

DeSoto County
desotobocc.com
DeSoto County Emergency Management: desotobocc.com/index.php/
departments/emergencymanagement
DeSoto County Sheriff: www.desolosheriff.com
City of Arcadia: www.arcadia-fl.gov

Federal/State Agencies
Florida Division of Emergency Management: www.floridadisaster.org
Attorney General's Office: myfloridalegal.com
Florida Department of Financial Services: www.myfloridacfo.com
Better Business Bureau West Florida: westflorida.bbb.org
Citizens Property Insurance: www.citizensfla.com
Florida Power& Light: www.fpLcom
National Hurricane Center: www.nhc.noaa.gov
American Red Cross: www.redcross.org
Salvation Army: www.salvationarmyusa.org





L EII~lrll llrl Allvdfi









There are many helpful websites, such as this one belonging to the
National Hurricane Center.


Page 22






Friday, May 16, 2014


FIND THE SAFEST PLACE TO SHELTER
The best buildings to be in during a hurricane are ones designed not to
interfere with wind swirling around them.
Windows and garage doors are weak points that should be covered with
shutters or plywood. Prior to a hurricane's arrival, clear yard debris that could
puncture a window.
Inside, look for a small, windowless room near the center of the house to
ride out the storm. A bathroom or closet usually fits the bill. Ifa bathroom is to
be used, lie inside a bathtub with a mattress over you to protect yourself from
glass or other debris.
If possible, find a room surrounded by concrete blocks.
Mobile home dwellers shouldn't try to ride out a storm at home, because
no matter how well-secured the mobile home is, it isn't designed to withstand
hurricane-strength winds.
Shelters are an option for those who do not want to move far from home
during a hurricane.


SUN FILE PHOTO
Mobile home residents should not attempt to ride out a storm in
their residence. Hurricane Charley destroyed many mobile home
parks in Southwest Florida.
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Page 24


Q. Why aren't Hurricane
Hunter storm planes torn
apart?
A. Planes are not struc-
turally destroyed by strong
winds while in flight.
Airliners routinely fly in
jet streams with winds
exceeding 150 mph over the
U.S. during the winter. It's
the shear, or sudden change
in horizontal or vertical
winds that can destroy an
aircraft, or cause its loss of
control. That's why we don't
fly through tornadoes. In a
like manner, we routinely
(but never casually) fly in
the high wind environment
of the hurricane and don't
fear it tearing the plane
apart. However, we're eter-
nally vigilant to "hot spots"
of severe weather and shear


Ask NOAA
that we can often identify
on radar and avoid if it's too
severe.

Q. Is the sea calm in the
eye of a hurricane?
A. No. In fact, it can be
persuasively argued it's just
as bad in the eye as else-
where in the hurricane, but
for different reasons. In the
eye, the winds are light to
calm, and the wildly blow-
ing sea spray on the surface
diminished, but towering
swells and seas approach
the center from all direc-
tions, due to the winds
generating them swirling
from all directions around
the eye. This results in
confused, tumultuous seas
that no mariner would ever
welcome, even if there was


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Friday, May 16, 2014



a temporary relaxation O
in the intense winds.

0
Source: National la
Oceanic and Z.
Atmospheric Association C

AENT Of@


PREPARE FOR THREE
TO SEVEN DAYS
OF SUPPLIES
Vital supplies:
Water: at least 1 gallon daily per
person
Food: nonperishable packaged or
canned food, juices, dry milk; foods
for infants or the elderly; snack foods.
Plastic bottles or juice pouches hold
up better in ice chests than cardboard
juice boxes.
Formula, diapers and other baby
items.
Medicines, prescription drugs.
Non-electric can opener.
First-aid kit.
Cash Banks and ATMs may not be
open or available for extended periods.
*Battery-operated radio or TV.
Flashlights or lanterns.
Extra batteries.
Keys.
Pet care items proper
identification, immunization records,
medications, ample supply of food
and water, a carrier or cage, muzzle
and leash.
Important documents insur-
ance polices, medical records, bank
account numbers, Social Security
card, important phone numbers,
family contacts all in a waterproof
container.


Fire extinguisher.
Helpful items:
*Cooking tools, fuel.
Disposable plates, utensils and
cups.
Disposable washcloths and
towels.
*Blankets and pillows.
Clothing seasonal, rain gear,
sturdy shoes.
Toiletries, hygiene items, moisture
wipes, sanitizing wipes.
Toys, books and games.
Fuel make sure car is filled;
keep extra in proper gas cans.
Filled propane tanks for grill.
Ice and ice chest. A plastic one
will not sweat onto carpets or floors
like Styrofoam ones sometimes do.
Matches.
*Non-electric clock.
Sterno.
*Plastic drop cloth.
*Cellular phone with extra
batteries and/or car charger.
*Portable generator.
Extension cords.
*Tool kit.
Sunscreen.
Insect repellent.
*Yard gloves for cleanup.
*Extra chlorine for pools.
Current credit card checks, in case
large expenditures are needed and
credit cards aren't accepted.
Trash bags.






Friday, May 16, 2014

PROTECT YOUR
PETSTHIS
SEASON
Make sure pets are
vaccinated. Pet shelters will
require proof of vaccinations.
If you don't have a current
photograph of your pet, take
one.
Each animal should have
a properly sized pet carrier.
Carriers should be large
enough for the animal to
stand and turn around.
Pack a disaster supply
kit for your pet that includes:
proper ID (including
immunization records and a
photo), ample supply of food,
ample supply of bottled water,
medications, muzzle, collar
and leash. It's also a good idea
to pack a roll of paper towels
and plastic bags for cleanup
and waste removal.


FILE PHOTO


Plan for pets along with yourself, and
be sure to put them in a carrier during
the hurricane.


Include your pet in your evacuation strategy. There are few special shelters
that allow pets and they are for those who have no other place to go. Other
possible refuges for your pet are veterinary clinics, boarding facilities and friends
or relative's homes.
If a storm is imminent, bring pets indoors well in advance. Remain calm and
be sure to reassure them frequently. Put them in a carrier.
As an alternative, ask your veterinarian if they provide emergency care for
pets following disasters. Obtain the numbers to several veterinarians outside
your immediate area
in the event your own
veterinarian's office
has to close because
of the emergency.
Contact a friendly
neighbor and make a
reciprocal agreement
to take charge of
each others' pets
in the event of an
emergency when one
of you is not home.
Exchange cellphone
numbers if you both
have them, and make
sure both of you
know the location of
your pet emergency
kits. Make a list of all
the aforementioned
SUN FILE PHOTO phone numbers for
Cosmo Kramer wears a Thundershirt to help your emergency kit.
reduce his storm anxiety. The Thundershirts are --Source:
available at local pet stores and may help keep Charlotte Animal
pets calm during hurricane season. Hospital


Ask NOAA


Page 25

Pr~MOS4


q.


Q. Are cruise ships safe 4
from hurricanes?
A. Only if they avoid the z
hurricane by a healthy
margin. No ship is so large, 0
not even an aircraft carrier,
that it cannot be dwarfed by Q
an intense tropical cyclone. Not to
only that, but the large swells pro- MENT OF c
duced by a hurricane in the Atlantic,
Caribbean or Eastern Pacific, or a typhoon in the western
Pacific can generate large swells that can travel thousands of
miles from the storm. These swells will not overly hazard a
cruise ship, but might make the ship's motion more uncom-
fortable to those prone to motion sickness.

Q.What is the difference between typhoons and
hurricanes?
A. Where they occur. Typhoons are tropical cyclones
west of the International Date Line in the Pacific Ocean,
hurricanes east of the Date Line. They're call Cyclones in the
Indian Ocean.

Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association






Friday, May 16, 2014


ASk NOAA
Q. What water temperature &
is needed to sustain a strong i
hurricane? a
A. In most cases, water
temperature above 80F I|
(26.5C) and warm water.
depths of 150 feet (50 meters) ',
as well.

Q. How is a hurricane tamed?


W~


A. In the natural sense, in four general ways:
By moving over cold water that reduces the heat
available to power its engine.
By moving over land, where the ocean heat is cut of]
altogether.
By encountering strong vertical shear in the atmosp
horizontal winds around the storm.
By being surrounded by profoundly dry conditions
in the mid-atmosphere, often coming from the Saraha
Desert. Nothing we can do in terms of human intervent
so far has shown a significant impact on the strength of
hurricane.

Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Associ


SECURING VESSELS
BEFORE A STORM

Find a place to moor your boat.
S Make sure the water will be deep
5 enough at low tide.
r Make a practice run to see how
Ct' long it takes to navigate and secure.
Keep all records, including
insurance papers, recent photos of
the vessel, registration, equipment
inventory and agreements, with other
important documents.
Have available lines of adequate
lengths.
Use chafing gear for all lines to
heric protect them from wear at contact
points. Old rags work well.
Use fenders of adequate size and
strength. Old tires work well.
ion Use oversized anchors.
:a Keep fuel tanks full.
Keep batteries charged. An extra
battery may come in handy as well.
aion Maintain bilge pumps.
nation ar i
WHEN A STORM THREATENS:
When securing lines, consider
tide fluctuations and storm surge. If
the line is too short, the boat can be
pulled under or be damaged by rising
tides.
Secure the boat from all angles,
as wind directions switch.
Remove all movable equipment.
*Seal all openings to the boat.
If the boat is left on a davit, leave
the boat drains open.
Those securing a boat on a trailer:
Place wooden blocks between the
frame member and the axle inside
each wheel. Let about half of the air
out of the tires. Fill the boat 1/3 full of
water to help hold it down. Tie the
boat and trailer to a strong object
using heavy-duty line. If your boat


SUN FILE PHOTOS


There are some tips to keeping
your boat afloat during
hurricane season, but not all
vessels will remain seaworthy
after a storm.
cannot be secured in this manner,
remove the boat from the trailer.
Partially fill the boat with water and
tie down the trailer.

WHEN A HURRICANE WARNING
IS ISSUED:
Leave early for land. Do not block
the passage of other boats. Help
others secure their boats. Follow
directions from local, state and
national officials.
*Do not stay aboard.
*Do not try to outrun or move
around a hurricane. Seas will be very
rough.

AFTER A STORM:
Check for damage.
*Closely watch for debris and
obstructions in the water.
Vessels that have sunk must be
removed.


Hurricane Charley damaged many boats in Charlotte County in 2004.


Page 26








Severe storms, tornadoes:


The difference between Watches and Warnings


By MICHAEL KUHNE
ACCUWEATHER.COM WRITER

While the peak occur-
rences for severe weather
events in the United States
happen between March and
October, severe weather can
occur at any time. In order
to save lives, branches of
the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration
will issue public watches and
warnings.
Knowing the difference
between the two can prepare
individuals for the necessary
steps to take when consid-
ering the threat of severe


weather. Watches and warn-
ings issued to the public are
based on different criteria.
Watches are issued by the
NOAAs Storm Prediction
Centers and warnings are
issued by local offices of the
National Weather Service.
"A watch is issued when
conditions are favorable,
for example, either for a
severe thunderstorm or
tornadoes," AccuWeather.
com Senior Meteorologist
Dan Kottlowski said. "It
doesn't mean severe weather
is imminent."
"Typical watches cover
about 25,000 square miles, or


about half the size of Iowa,"
according to the Storm
Prediction Centers.
Kottlowski said there are
no set criteria for issuing
watches, but if the con-
ditions seem consistent
with a developing severe
weather pattern, watches
can be changed and altered
by monitoring ongoing
developments.
"It can vary," he said.
"There is not just one set
of ingredients; every watch
may have a different set of
perimeters from one day
to the next since it is based
on a synoptic situation that


may change within several
hours."
Warnings mean that severe
weather is imminent and
is based on specific criteria
and existing reports received
by the National Weather
Service.
The criteria include hail
that totals more than 1 inch
in diameter and wind speeds
of 55 mph.
"Lightning is not a criteria
for a severe thunderstorm
warning," Kottlowski said.
"Heavy rain is not either."
Warnings must follow


TORNADOES 128


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Page 27









Hurricanes can impact baby names


STAFF REPORT

Hurricanes, especially
devastating ones, leave a
lasting impact on commu-
nities and regions.
One lesser-known im-
pact is baby names. That's
right, hurricanes can have
an impact on the names
parents choose for their
babies.
Here are some examples
of popular names provided
by the Social Security
Administration based on a
scale in which No. 1 is the
most popular:
Katrina. In 2005,
Katrina was ranked as
246 before the hurricane.
In 2006, the name dropped


to 379 and continued to
decline in popularity. In
2010, Katrina fell all the
way to 865.
Keith: In 2000, the
name was ranked as 222. It
fell a bit in 2001 to 237 and
continued falling. In 2011,
it fell to 367.
Frances took a hit after
the 2004 storm. It had
been ranked 638 before
falling to 753 in 2005. The
name continued dropping
for a few years and was
789 in 2011.
The name Sandy hasn't
been in the top 1,000
popular names since 2005
so last year's storm likely
won't have much of an
impact.


Some long-standing
popular names, how-
ever, remain relatively
unaffected:
Allison has been in
the top 50 since the 2001
storm.
Andrew has been in the
top 20 since the cata-
strophic storm hit South
Florida in 1992.
Dean was ranked as
351 in 2007. The name has
increased in popularity,
reaching 284 in 2011.
There's not much
data yet on the name
Sandy, but don't expect
it to become popular,
especially after the 2012
"Frankenstorm" devastat-
ed New York and the New


Jersey Shore. It had its
peak as a girl's name in the
1950s through early '70s,
which is around the same
time it was peaking as a
boy's name. (It had a tiny
revival around 1978, when
John Travolta sang about
Olivia Newton-John's
character in "Grease.") It's
also likely this name could
be linked to the school
shooting in Sandy Hook,
Conn., also in 2012.
There are many
long-standing popular
names on this year's hur-
ricane list, including Kyle
and Hannah. Hopefully,
none of the names on this
year's list will go down in
history like Katrina.


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ASk NOAA
Q. Does Cuba permit or even support op-
erations when the storm is over the island?
A. Cuba does permit operations by both oo
NOAA and the US Air Force Reserves in its
territorial waters when a hurricane is in the vicinity of the island.
Both units operate for the most part outside the 12-mile limit,
although NOAA have been permitted to operate over land
occasionally. The Cuban government is very supportive of this
operation as aircraft reconnaissance information is the main
source of information to them before the storm makes landfall.
Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association


TORNADOES
FROM PAGE 27

the two main criteria, he
said, adding urban flood
and stream advisories, flash
flood watches and warnings,
and flood watches and
warnings, may accompany a
storm with heavy rain.
Warnings are issued
through the efforts of
individuals working for the
National Weather Service.
"The way a warning is


issued is that a meteorologist
will monitor the weather by
radar and look for particular
areas where there could
be high impact damage,"
Kottlowski said. "They will
issue a warning and there will
be a signature for an existing
storm or developing tornado."
Trained National Weather
Service spotters will verify
reports of rotation or storm
damage.
"This gives the meteorol-
ogists confidence in what
they are seeing on radar," he
said.


Page 28


Friday, May 16, 2014









Deadliest hurricanes in US history


By VICKIE FRANTZ
ACCUWEATHER.COM WRITER
The top five deadliest
hurricanes to impact the
U.S. claimed the lives of
about 15,200 people and

RETIRED
STORM NAMES
The following list are storm names
that have been retired due to the
damage and deaths caused:
1954: Carol, Hazel
1955: Connie, Diane, lone, Janet
1957: Audrey
.1960:Donna
*1961: Carla, Hattie
.1963: Flora
S1964: Cleo, Dora, Hilda
1965: Betsy
S1966: Inez
.1967: Beulah
.1968: Edna
*1969: Camille
1970: Celia
.1972:Agnes
1974: Carmen, Fifi
1975: Eloise
1977: Anita
1979: David, Frederic
1980: Allen
1983: Alicia


impacted the states of
Florida, Georgia, Louisiana,
South Carolina and Texas.

Galveston, Texas
Galveston was impacted

1985: Elena, Gloria
1988: Gilbert, Joan
.1989:Hugo
1990: Diana, Klaus
1991: Bob
1992: Andrew
1995: Luis, Marilyn, Opal, Roxanne
1996: Cesar, Fran, Hortense
1998: Georges, Mitch
1999: Floyd, Lenny
2000: Keith
2001: Allison, Iris, Michelle
2002: Isidore, Lili
2003: Fabian, Isabel, Juan
2004: Charley, Frances, Ivan, Jeanne
2005: Dennis, Katrina, Rita, Stan,
Wilma
2007: Dean, Felix, Noel
2008: Gustav, Ike, Paloma
2010: Igor, Thomas
2011: Irene
.2012:Sandy
*2013: Ingrid

Provided by the National
Hurricane Center


SUN FILE PHOTO
Hurricane Charley damaged much of Charlotte County, leaving
behind lasting images such as this one in Punta Gorda. Charley can't
cause any more trouble. The name, along with its three Florida
troublemakers in 2004, has since been retired.


by a hurricane that made
landfall as a Category 4
storm on Sept. 8, 1900.
Winds were estimated to
be in excess of 140 mph.
The storm surge reached
15.7 feet, according to
the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration
(NOAA).
Meteorologists of the
era had little knowledge
of the behavior of tropical
storms. They believed the
hurricane would take the
usual northeastern track
after crossing over southern
Florida. The residents of
Galveston had little to no
warning about the powerful
hurricane headed straight
for the town, according


to Erik Larson, author of
Isaac's Storm.
Communication from
Florida was cut off as the
hurricane's outer bands
brought high winds and
heavy rain into southern
parts of the state. Florida's
meteorologists were unable
to report the track of the
storm to the weather bureau
in Washington. Local mete-
orologists and residents of
Galveston had no sign of the
storm until hours before the
hurricane made landfall.
The storm took the lives
of at least 8,000 people,
making it the most deadly
hurricane in U.S. history.

DEADLIEST 130


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Page 29






Page 30


DEADLIEST
FROM PAGE 29

Lake Okeechobee
On Sept. 16, 1928, a
Category 4 hurricane
with winds as high as
150 mph made landfall in
Palm Beach County, Fla.,
between Jupiter and Boca
Raton at 6:15 p.m., NOAA
reports.
Waves of up to 20 feet
and a storm surge of
at least 10 feet covered
southern Florida in water.
A levee in Lake Okeechobee
overflowed and flooded
75 miles of land around
the south end of the lake.
Thousands of people
drowned in several feet of
flood water.
Estimates set the


number of people killed
by the hurricane and flood
between 2,500 and 3,000.

Cheniere Caminada
Island, La.
On Sunday, Oct. 1, 1893,
a Category 4 hurricane hit
the islands of Grand Isle
and Cheniere Caminada,
off the coast of Louisiana.
When the storm was over,
most of the town of Grand
Isle was wiped out, accord-
ing to NOAA.
There were only four
houses and a church still
standing in Cheniere
Caminada. The people
of the town took shelter
in the buildings, unable
to leave before the storm
due to no warning and no
bridge to the mainland, ac-
cording to a 2009 website
by students at the Loyola


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University New Orleans.
When the storm was
over, between 1,000 and
2,000 people had lost their
lives. The hardest-hit area
was Cheniere Caminada
Island. Church records,
at the time of the hurri-
cane, reported the town
population as 1,471. The
hurricane had left 779 of
the residents dead. The
village never recovered.

Hurricane Katrina
Hurricane Katrina made
landfall Aug. 29, 2005, in
southern Plaquemines
Parish, La. Hurricane
Katrina weakened from
a Category 5 system on
Aug. 28 to a Category 3
hurricane at the time of
landfall.
As Katrina moved
onshore, the winds were
sustained at approximately
121 mph, according to
NOAA.
Hurricane Katrina took
the lives of about 1,200
people, making it the third
most deadly U.S. hurricane.

Sea Islands,
South Carolina
and Georgia
A Category 3 hurricane
hit the small group of
islands located off the
coast of South Carolina
and Georgia on Aug. 27,
1893.
Winds accompanying
the storm were reportedly
in excess of 115 mph, and
the storm surge rose as
high as 20 feet or more in
some places, according to
author Betty Joyce Nash
in the article Sea Island
Hurricane of 1893.
The hurricane left
about 700 people dead in
its wake, NOAA reports.
Most of the victims were
residents of Beaufort
County, S.C.


Friday, May 16, 2014


c j o


Ask


NOAA


Q. Can helicopters
be used in
hurricane research?

A. It is most unlikely that
anyone would attempt
to fly a helicopter into a
hurricane. Such aircraft
are not built to withstand
the severe turbulence
encountered in hurricane
rainbands and eye walls.
One reason is that a heli-
copter receives all of its lift
from its rotating blades,
and they are most likely
to break off in hurricane
conditions. Survival of the
aircraft and crew would
then be impossible.
While commercial type
aircraft have been used
in the past to penetrate
hurricanes, NOAA and the
U.S. Air Force Reserves use
sturdier P-3s and C-130s
for their research and
reconnaissance missions.
Both aircraft are safe and
reliable and take the pun-
ishment that hurricanes
up through Category 5 can
dish out.

Source: National
Oceanic and
Atmospheric Association










What to do before, during and after


Before the storm:
Purchase hurricane
supplies.
Gather all necessary
documents and supplies.
Make sure all phone
numbers, including insur-
ance companies, important
agencies and relatives, are
with your hurricane kit.
Secure boats and vehicles.
Fill gas tanks.
Get cash.
Know your evacuation
route and destination.
Before lowering a TV
antenna or satellite dish,
make sure to turn off and
unplug the TV, and avoid
power lines.
Turn off all swimming
pool pumps and filters, and
wrap them in waterproof
materials.
Turn your refrigerator
and freezer to their coldest
settings ahead of time to
keep food fresh longer in the
event of a power outage.
Secure property by pro-
tecting windows and doors.
Bring in all outdoor
furniture and items.
Notify local officials of
those with special needs.
Fill bathtubs and sinks
for extra water to use for the
toilet or washing.
Listen to radio or televi-
sion reports.
Turn off and unplug
electronics such as comput-
ers, microwaves and smaller
appliances.
Follow all evacuation
orders.

During the storm:
If you stay at home during
a hurricane, you should take
the following precautions in
addition to those mentioned
in the "Before the Storm"
section.
Stay away from windows


and doors, even if they are
covered. If you live in a
two-story home, go to an
interior first-floor room.
As the storm approaches,
move your family to an
interior section of the house
such as a hallway, bathroom
or closet.
Close all interior doors
and brace exterior doors if
possible.
Lie on the floor, under a
sturdy object if possible. Some
protection is afforded by cov-
ering with a mattress during
the height of the storm.
If the eye of the storm
passes over, it will be calm
for a short period of time.
REMAIN INDOORS! As
soon as the eye passes over,
winds will increase rapidly
to hurricane force from the
opposite direction.
Remain calm. It may take
several hours for the storm
to pass.
Listen to local media for
the most current information.

The day after; rules
to follow to stay safe:
If you can get water, boil
it before you use it. Your
local utility company will
likely issue an indefinite boil
water order for residents
after a storm.
Inventory all damaged
items before clearing away
debris.
Make as many tempo-
rary repairs as you can, but
look out for hazards gas
leaks, electrical problems or
structural damage before
proceeding.
Save all property rem-
nants and receipts for any
items you buy to repair
your home or business for
insurance purposes.
Report any downed
electrical wires or any wires


that are sparking by calling
800-4-OUTAGE (468-8243).
Don't drive through flood-
ed roads. Driving through
water can cause vehicles to
break down and can leave
drivers in a precarious situa-
tion, especially if driving over
terrain that cannot be seen.
Be wary of carbon mon-
oxide gas hazards. Engines,
generators and some stoves
people use when the elec-
tricity is out give off carbon
monoxide gas that can prove
poisonous. Burning wood
or charcoal also may cause
dangerous fumes.
If you're returning to a
home you have evacuated
or beginning the cleanup
process, look out for gas
leaks, roof damage, water
damage or other structural
concerns as well as downed
power lines and any interior
electrical problems before
beginning work.
Don't eat food that may
have spoiled in a power
outage or that was exposed
to flood water.
Pay attention to media


reports on the radio, televi-
sion or in newspapers.
Avoid candles. Use flash-
lights and battery-powered
lanterns instead.
Don't walk or play in
standing water.
Disinfect and dry out
buildings to avoid mold or
mildew damage.
Protect against mos-
quitoes; wear mosquito
repellent.
Be careful on the roads.
Many local streets are
covered with debris, from
twigs to turned-over trucks.
Be especially cautious when
approaching intersections
with inoperable streetlights.
Check on neighbors,
especially the elderly.
Don't walk around
outside in the dark. With
streetlights out, you may not
notice a downed power line
in your path.

Sources: The Centers
for Disease Control, Florida
Power & Light and the
Independent Insurance
Agents of America


ASk NOAA

Q. How do I become a
meteorologist for the NOAA
Hurricane Hunters?

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Friday, May 16, 2014


Page 31





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Page 33


m


m


m


J






Friday, May 16, 2014


12-week shopping list for hurricane supplies


To help residents
complete a
hurricane kit
with minimal
economic impact,
the Charlotte
County Emergency
Management
Office produced a
12-week shopping
list that allows you
to methodically
stock up on the
things you'll need
in a major weather
emergency just
not all at once.
This is not
designed as a perfect
list for everyone. It's
meant to be used
as a guide. Maybe
you don't need all
the canned meat
here, if you consider
you'll probably use
your outdoor grill to
cook what's in your
freezer the first few
nights if you have to.
A big plastic
storage bin will work
as a container, or use
a cooler wrapped
with a couple of
bungee cords.
If you start this
week, it will be
complete by the
time the heart of
Hurricane Season
arrives in August.
If you get through
the season without
it, you can have
a "Hurricane Kit
Feast" in December.

Source: Punta
Gorda Hurricane
Preparedness
Brochure (with
modifications)


WEEK
0 1 gallon of water per person
0 1 large jar of peanut butter
0 1 can meat
0 Hand-cranked can opener
0 Instant coffee, tea, powdered drink
0 Wooden matches
Other Supplies:
0 Flashlight/batteries
0 Hammers
0 Nails, wood screws

WEEK
01 gallon of water per person
0 1 box heavy-duty garbage bags
0 1 can fruit
0 Personal products
0 Pet food, baby food (if needed)
Other Supplies:
0 Smoke detector/battery
0 Heavy work gloves
0 Extra flashlight batteries
0 Duct tape

WEEK 3
01 gallon of water per person
0 1 can vegetables
0 1 jarjelly
0 2 rolls toilet paper
01 large tube toothpaste
0 1 box sanitary wipes/liquid hand sanitizer
0 Special foods for special diets (if needed)
First aid items:
0 Aspirin or acetaminophen
0 Rolls of gauze or bandage
0 First-aid tape
0 Adhesive bandages

WEEK
0 1 gallon of water
0 1 can soup (not concentrate)
o 1 can fruit
0 1 can vegetables
0 1 bottle of shampoo
First-aid items:
0 Scissors
0 Tweezers
0 Antiseptic
0 Thermometer


0 Spare eyeglasses, contact lens supplies
0 Items for denture care (if needed)

WEEK 5
0 1 can soup
0 1 can meat
0 Liquid dish soap
0 Unscented liquid bleach
0 Mosquito repellent
Other supplies:
0 Waterproof container for important papers
0 Portable radio (batteries or hand crank)
0 Blankets orsleeping bag for each person
0 Portable camp stove or grill
0 Stove fuel, charcoal, lighter fluid

WEEK 6
0 1 large can of juice
0 Zip-storage plastic bags
0 1 box snack bars
0 2 rolls paper towels
0 Aluminum foil
0 Oven mitts
First-aid supplies:
0 Anti-diarrhea medicine
0 Rubbing alcohol
0 2 pair latex gloves
0 Hydrogen peroxide
0 Petroleum jelly
0 First-aid book

WEEK 7
01 can meat
0 1 can fruit
0 1 can vegetables
0 1 pkg paper plates
0 1 pkg eating utensils
01 pkg paper/plastic cups
Other supplies:
0 Whistle
0 ABC fire extinguisher
0 Pliers
0 Vice grips

WEEK 8
0 1 can meat
0 1 can vegetables
0 1 box heavy-duty trash bags
01 box tissues
0 2 rolls toilet paper


0 1 box energy snacks
Other supplies:
0 Leash or pet carrier (if needed)
0 Tarps for temporary roof repair
0 Crowbar
0 Hatchet

WEEK
01 box crackers
0 Plastic containers/lids
0 Safety pins
0 Dry cereal
Other supplies:
0 Double-sided tape, zip ties, bungee cords
0 Masking tape
First-aid supplies:
0 Extra prescription medication
0 Extra hearing aid batteries (if needed)

WEEK10
0 1 box heavy-duty garbage bags
0 1 box energy snacks (granola bars, raisins)
0 Ice chest
Other items:
0 Camping or utility knife
0 Extra radio batteries
0 Local and state road maps
0 Window covers and fasteners

WEEK11
o 2 rolls paper towels
0 1 can meat
0 1 can fruit
Other items:
0 1 box disposable dust masks
0 Screwdriver
0 Plastic safety goggles
0 Handsaw and/or chainsaw, fuel

WEEK12
0 Large plastic food bags
0 Plastic wrap
0 Aluminum foil
0 Sandwich bread (freeze until needed)
Other items:
0 Battery-powered camping lantern
0 Generator and extra fuel
0 Broom, mop, bucket


Page 34









Protect livestock from hurricanes


PROVIDED BY THE FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
& CONSUMER SERVICES'
DIVISION OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY
Disaster preparedness is
important for all animals, but
it is particularly important
for livestock because of the
animals' size and their shelter
and transportation needs. If
you think disasters happen
only if you live in a flood
plain, near an earthquake
fault line or in a coastal
area, you are mistaken. It is
imperative to be prepared to
protect your livestock.

Take precautions
Make a disaster plan


for property, facilities
and animals. Create a list
of emergency telephone
numbers, including those
of your employees, neigh-
bors, veterinarian, state
veterinarian, poison control,
local animal shelter, animal
control, county extension
service, local agricultural
schools, trailering resources
and local volunteers.
Include a contact person
outside the disaster area.
Make sure all this infor-
mation is written down and
everyone has a copy.
Make sure every an-
imal has durable, visible
identification.
LIVESTOCK 136


LJ~


SUN FILE PHOTO
Livestock should be left outside during a hurricane, as they will likely
find their own way to safety.


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Friday, May 16, 2014


Page 35


* n n






Friday, May 16, 2014


LIVESTOCK
FROM PAGE 35

Ensure that poultry
have access to high areas
in which to perch, if they
are in a flood-prone area,
as well as to food and clean
water.
Reinforce your house,
barn and outbuildings with
hurricane straps.
Perform regular safety
checks on all utilities,
buildings and facilities.
Use native and
deep-rooted plants and
trees in landscaping.
Remove all barbed wire,
and consider rerouting per-
manent fencing so animals
may move to high ground
in a flood and to low-lying
areas during high winds.
Install a hand pump and


obtain large containers to
water animals for at least a
week.
Identify alternate water
and power sources.
Secure or remove
anything that could become
blowing debris; make a
habit of securing trailers,
propane tanks, and other
large objects.
If you use heat lamps or
other electrical machinery,
make sure the wiring is safe
and that any heat source is
clear of flammable debris.
Label hazardous materi-
als and place them all in the
same safe area.
Remove old buried trash
- a potential source of
hazardous materials during
flooding that may leech into
crops, feed supplies, water
sources and pasture.
Review and update your
disaster plan regularly.


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Sheltering in place
If evacuation is not
possible, a decision must
be made whether to
confine large animals to an
available shelter on your
farm or leave them out
in pastures. Owners may
believe that their animals
are safer inside barns, but
in many circumstances,
confinement takes away the
animals' ability to protect
themselves.
Whether you evacuate or
shelter in place, make sure
that you have adequate
and safe fencing or pens to
separate and group animals
appropriately. Contact the
state department of agricul-
ture and county extension
service in advance to learn
their capabilities and the
most effective communica-
tion procedure.

Evacuation planning
The leading causes of
death of large animals in
hurricanes and similar
events are collapsed barns,
dehydration, electrocution
and accidents resulting
from fencing failure.
Evacuate animals as soon
as possible. Be ready to
leave once the evacuation is
ordered. In a slowly evolv-
ing disaster, such as a hur-
ricane, leave no later than


72 hours before anticipated
landfall, especially if you
will be hauling a high pro-
file trailer such as a horse
trailer. Even a fire truck fully
loaded is considered "out of
service" in winds exceeding
40 mph. If there are already
high winds, it may not be
possible to evacuate safely.
Arrange for a place to
shelter your animals.
Potential facilities include
fairgrounds, other farms,
racetracks, humane soci-
eties, convention centers,
and any other safe and
appropriate facilities you
can find. Survey your com-
munity and potential host
communities along your
planned evacuation route.
Contact your local
emergency management
authority and become
familiar with at least two
possible evacuation routes
well in advance.
Set up safe
transportation.
Take all disaster supplies
with you or make sure they
will be available at your
evacuation site.
If your animals are
sheltered off your property,
make sure they remain
in the groupings they are
used to. Also, be sure they
are securely contained and
sheltered from the elements
whether in cages, fenced-in
areas or buildings.


Page 36




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Page 37









People turned to social media during Sandy


ByMEGHAN EVANS
ACCUWEATHER.COM
METEOROLOGIST

While Superstorm Sandy
wreaked havoc along the
East Coast late in October
2012, the power of sending
real-time weather informa-
tion and photos on social
media was apparent.
Sending out real-time
weather information and
pictures on breaking weather
events helps to inform
the public faster than ever
before that there may be a
weather danger. However,
the quickness of information
sharing can also lead to the
spread of false information
and fake photos.
"Social media offers


unbeatable immediacy,"
AccuWeather social media
coordinator and meteo-
rologist Jesse Ferrell said.
"Citizens worldwide can
obtain critical, breaking
weather information
through mobile devices and
transmit photos or videos
of severe weather events on
the Internet in real time to
platforms like Facebook."
On Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012,
AccuWeather's senior mete-
orologist Henry Margusity
and Ferrell held a Google
Hangout along with New
York's WABC meteorologist
Amy Freeze to explain the
severity of Sandy. The storm
surge was only beginning in
New Jersey and New York at
the time of the Hangout, but


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the devastation of the storm
was imminent.
Crucial warnings were sent
out utilizing social media
platforms such as Facebook
and Twitter, while the East
Coast was inundated at
the height of Sandy on
Monday Oct. 29, 2012. Even
as Sandy's powerful winds
knocked out power to more
than 2.4 million customers
in New Jersey, Sandy victims
were able to view important
information on mobile
devices and tablets.
According to Hootsuite,
#Sandy trended on Twitter
while millions of people were
without power. Hootsuite
said: "Social media tools are,
in some cases, the only assist
in connecting people and
supplying information."
Government officials were
among the millions on social
media to warn citizens of
the dangers that Superstorm
Sandy posed.
New Jersey Gov. Chris
Christie tweeted strongly
worded warnings to people,
cautioning them to stay away
from beaches and to evacu-
ate in mandatory areas.
New York Gov. Andrew
Cuomo was also sending up-
dates about power outages
and impacts of Sandy.
Due to the massive volume
of information sent out
over social media during
Superstorm Sandy, it was
a hot topic at Social Media
Week 2013 in New York City
during February.
"Companies are learning
that Social Media can be used
for crisis management and
communication with their
customers during weather
disasters," Ferrell said.
During Social Media Week
2013, power companies such
as Con Edison talked about
how useful social media was


in updating customers with-
out power during Sandy. Con
Edison is one of the largest
power companies in the
world, and it supplies more
than 3 million customers
with power in New York.
Power companies tweeted
pictures of damage to show
customers why there were
so many outages. They also
tweeted photos and videos of
crews out in the field to assure
customers that there was
progress in restoring power.
Besides sending out pivot-
al weather information from
AccuWeather social media
accounts during Sandy,
information was gathered
to help the storm coverage
on AccuWeather.com. The
long lines at gas stations and
the means of people coping
without power for days after
Sandy were found through
social media.
However, there are
downsides to the fast flow
of breaking weather infor-
mation and photos on social
media. False information
can be sent out and spread
quickly if steps are not taken
to verify.
Hoax photos, either
photoshopped or photos
from the past, are often sent
out during major storm
situations. For instance, fake
photos of sharks swimming
in the streets next to cabs in
New York City was one of the
hoaxes during Sandy.
As social media continues
to evolve and change, so too
does the sharing of weather
information. AccuWeather
continues to grow its
presence in different social
media platforms such as
Instagram and Pinterest.
The visual outlets lend
themselves well to sharing
weather information, since
the weather is so visual.


Page 38


Friday, May 16, 2014





Friday, May 16, 2014


The name behind the eye


HOW ARE STORMS NAMED?
Since 1953, Atlantic tropical storms had been
named from lists originated by the National
Hurricane Center. They are now maintained
and updated through a strict procedure by an
international committee of the World Meteorological
Organization.
The six lists are used in rotation and recycled
every six years, i.e., the 2013 list will be used
again in 2019. The only time there is a change in
the list is if a storm is so deadly or costly that the
future use of its name on a different storm would
be inappropriate for reasons of sensitivity. If that
occurs, then at an annual meeting by the WMO
committee (called primarily to discuss many other
issues) the offending name is stricken from the list
and another name is selected to replace it. Several
names have been retired since the lists were created.
If a storm forms in the off-season, it will take


the next name on the list based on the current
calendar date. For example, if a tropical cyclone
formed on Dec. 28, it would take the name from the
previous season's list of names. If a storm formed in
February, it would be named from the subsequent
season's list of names.
In the event that more than 21 named tropical
cyclones occur in the Atlantic basin in a season,
additional storms will take names from the Greek
alphabet.

WHAT HAPPENS IF THERE ARE
MORE STORMS THAN NAMES?
The 2004 and 2005 seasons were very busy.
As experienced in 2005, the Greek alphabet
is used when names run out: Tropical Storm
Alpha, Hurricane Beta, etc. "At present there are
no plans to retire letters of the Greek alphabet


from the list, but ifa very bad hurricane occurs
with a Greek letter name, this may have to be
revised;' according to the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration.

CAN I HAVE A TROPICAL
CYCLONE NAMED FOR ME?
We do not control the naming of tropical
storms. Instead, a list of names has been
established by an international committee
of the United Nations World Meteorological
Organization. For Atlantic hurricanes, there is
actually one list for each of six years. In other
words, one list is repeated every seventh year. See
here for more information: www.wmo.int/pages/
prog/www/tcp/Storm-naming.html.
Provided by the National Hurricane Center


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Page 39









HAM radios are a proven, but older, technology


By AL HEMINGWAY
SUN CORRESPONDENT

In November 1999, when
Hurricane Lenny was rac-
ing through the Caribbean
with wind speeds in excess
of 155 mph, Punta Gorda
resident Joe Kliment, a
member of the Peace River
Radio Association, was on
his boat heading right into
the eye of the storm.
Thankfully, Kliment was
an amateur radio operator,
or HAM, and was informed
to set a different course
to avoid the damaging
Category 4 storm.
"I kept in touch with
the HAM operators at the
National Hurricane Center
in Miami," Kliment said.


"They have them on duty
during a major storm. They
steered me about 200 miles
away from Lenny. HAM
radio saved my life."
Amateur radio clubs have
been saving people's lives
and property as in the
case of Joe Kliment for
many years. Their expertise
has proven invaluable
when communities have
been devastated by natural
disasters.
When telephone lines are
down, and cell towers have
collapsed, the volunteer
HAM operator is indis-
pensable in maintaining
communication with the
outside world.
Geahardt "Gay" Woster,
president of the PRRA, got


SUN PHOTOS BYAL HEMINGWAY
Geahardt "Gay"Woster sits in front of his HAM radio station at his
Punta Gorda Isles home.


his amateur radio license
in 1956 and built his first
Morse code station, a
small, handheld device,
in 1957. Since that time,
he has been an avid HAM
operator, and is part of a
10-county consortium to
assist if a disaster strikes
the region.
"In PGI alone, there are
350 HAM operators," he
said. "Charlotte County has
about 600."
The Amateur Radio


Emergency Services, or
ARES, a core of 100 expe-
rienced operators, is on
hand in the event a cata-
clysmic storm strikes.
They work in conjunction
with the Radio Amateur
Civil Emergency Service, or
RACES, and hold monthly
drills to sharpen their
operating skills.
"The Myakka and Peace
Rivers are our dividers,"


HAM 141


17776 Toledo Blade Blvd., Port Charlotte

941.625.9700

www.securityalarmcorp.com


Two HF antennas on Geahardt "Gay"Woster's property. The one in the
rear survived Hurricane Charley.


Page 40


Friday, May 16, 2014




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