Charlotte sun herald

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Charlotte sun herald
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AN EDITION OF THE SUN
VOL. 122 NO. 88


Pick of the Day
~ Violin case and


harlotteSun HERALD bow,$185
___ iIn Today's

AND WEEKLY lassifieds'
~~~HERALD ie,



GOOD FORYOUR HEART MOORE RETURNS TO MOUND
A study finds that married people are less likely than singles, divorced Friday was the first start for the Rays'Matt Moore since being
or widowed folks to suffer from heart or blood vessel problems,. hit in the face by a line drive on Sunday against Boston. SPORTS PAGE 1


AMERICA'S BEST COMMUNITY DAILY


SATURDAY MARCH 29, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net


$1.00


VIEWS ON NEWS


Pair of city

deals brewing

A pair of deals are in the works that,
if completed, would bring a Punta
Gorda landmark back to life and
transform a vacant former mobile home
park into an upscale
b condominium devel-
opment.
Punta Gorda
Realtor Lindsay
(if- Harrington of
1. Coldwell Banker is
brokering a deal for
Danny and Barbara
Biehl on the 3.6-acre
property behind
Brian the Slip-Not lounge,
which they sold in
GLEASON 2012. Meanwhile,
EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR Biehl is working
with Punta Gorda
resident Mike Bileti to fix up and reopen
the restaurant and lounge once Bileti
closes a deal with owner Scott Cook, who
bought the property in September 2012
for $1,550,000 and later shut down the
restaurant.
"They're supposed to close in about
10 days. He's going to open it up the
old way and try to keep it as original as
possible and hire the original crowd. I
think he's going to do real well," said Biehl,
who is also selling his Punta Gorda home
and moving to a new home he and his
wife will build on Riverside Drive east of
the city.
Harrington is working with Bonita
Springs broker Darren Boole of Florida
Real Estate Advisors on the sale of the
parcel behind the Slip-Not to Naples
investors Frank and Martha Ibarra,
who are exploring a potential two-story
condominium development with between
45-54 units, Harrington said.
"We are still in due diligence. Nothing
is going to happen until June," said Boole,
who confirmed the investors are working
with city officials to review the zoning,
land use and allowable density of the site.
"I won't have to mow it any more," joked
Biehl.
"This project is within one block of the
library, several blocks from a number of
churches, within a few blocks of a number
of restaurants, a grocery, dentist's and
doctor's office," Harrington said. "This will
be a real shot in the arm to the downtown
community. If they make this a rental
condo they'll have a land office business.
People are not going to sit around up
north in the winter. They're going to come
down here."
*0@
Real estate professionals like to say
three things matter in their business: loca-
tion, location, location. But there's another
word that more accurately describes the
force behind rising home prices in recent
years: demand.
Charlotte and Sarasota counties both
hit record high populations again -
in the latest Census Bureau estimates
released Thursday. As of July 1, 2013, the
bureau estimates Charlotte County had
164,736 people, while Sarasota County hit
390,429. That's an influx of 2,133 people
into Charlotte and 4,320 into its northern
neighbor. We'll get a better idea of where
that Sarasota County growth is going (hint:
North Port) when the bureau releases its
estimates for cities and towns in May.
DeSoto County actually lost 128
residents between July 1, 2012 and 2013,
as its population fell to 34,517. Going
back to the 2010 Census, DeSoto has
lost 345 residents, nearly 1 percent of its
population.
Take the estimates with a grain of salt
because annual figures for the same years
can change dramatically year to year.
For example, the July 2012 estimate for
Charlotte's 2012 population was 162,449,
but in July 2013, the estimate for 2012 was
162,603, a difference of 154. The county's
population growth from 2011 to 2012
alone was estimated to be 2,990 people,
but the total growth estimate between July
2013 and the 2010 Census was only 2,625.
Go figure.
Brian Gleason is editorial page editor for
the Sun Newspapers. Readers may reach
him at gleason@sun-herald.com, and
follow him on Twitter at @bglesun.


DeSoto family tragedy


Report: Area man beats parents, kills father


By SUSAN E. HOFFMAN
STAFF WRITER

DESOTO COUNTY-A sad family
tale unfolded Thursday night when a
man allegedly beat both his parents -
killing his father and leaving his moth-
er with critical injuries according to
the DeSoto County Sheriff's Office.
Deputies arrived at the Burnham
house, on the 2400 block of Northwest
Owens Avenue, shortly after a 911 call
came in at 5:15 p.m. The 911 caller was
screaming "hysterically," according
to a DCSO press release, but officials
were able to learn the couple's Lexus
had been stolen. Deputies found
George Burnham, 79, dead, and his
wife JoAnn, 72, in critical condition.


Both reportedly had been beaten with
an unspecified blunt object. JoAnn
was transported to an area hospital for
treatment of her injuries,
but she was able to speak
with deputies when they
arrived at the scene,
according to the press
release.
Evidence pointed to
the couple's son, Karl
.BBBHA Edward Burnham, 49, as
K. BURNHAM the suspect in the attacks,
the DCSO press release states, and
officials called on other law enforce-
ment agencies to help find him. Karl
lists his parents' Owens Avenue home
as his residence.
TRAGEDY112


See the flying


SUN PHOTO BY SUSAN E. HOFFMAN
The Burnham home, on the 2400 block of
Northwest Owens Avenue in DeSoto County,
was marked off with crime scene tape Friday
morning. George Burnham was discovered
dead Thursday, and his wife, JoAnn, with
critical injuries, allegedly at the hand of their
son, Karl.


'dinosaur


By BRENDA BARBOSA
STAFF WRITER
PUNTA GORDA If you can imagine
planes as creatures, each with its own
distinct personality and temperament,
the B-25 Mitchell bomber might be
considered a sleeping dinosaur.
At least that's how pilot Syd Jones
describes the hulking "Panchito," one
of two vintage B-25 bombers on display
this weekend at the 34th Annual Florida
International Show at the Punta Gorda
Airport.
The spectacular World War II-era
S plane restored by owner and his-
S toric preservationist Larry Kelley is
marked to look exactly like the original
B-25J "Panchito" flown by combat pilot
SDon Seiler over Japan.
For a fee, visitors to this year's air
show can schedule a ride in "Panchito"
call 443-458-8926 for more informa-
tion to feel firsthand what a young
soldier must have experienced while
riding in the belly of this roaring beast.
"It's kind of like a dinosaur in today's
world," Jones said. "If you saw the

FLYING 112


SUN PHOTO BY BRENDA BARBOSA
An aerial view of Charlotte Harbor from the tail
of"Panchito," a World War II-era B-25 bomber
on display this weekend at the 34th Annual
Florida International Air Show in Punta Gorda.
(Yep, that's this reporter white-knuckling
it while peeking out an open section of the
plane.) For a fee, visitors to the air show can
ride aboard "Panchito" and experience what
it was like for young soldiers to ride inside the
belly of a bomber.


Bayfront Punta Gorda CEO to exit post


By GARY ROBERTS
STAFF WRITER

PUNTA GORDA Bayfront Health
Punta Gorda announced Friday that
its CEO, Jose Morillo, is resigning his
position, effective April 25. Efforts to
recruit a new CEO already have started,
according to a press release from the
hospital.
"While we are excited to move closer
to family in Texas and start my own
business, I leave with a heavy heart,"
Morillo stated in the release.
In a letter to associates, Morillo
stated he is proud of his achievements
since becoming the CEO in May 2010.
"The sense of family that emanates
through our hallways is a feeling I will
never forget and (will) miss dearly as I


move on to another chapter in my life,"
he wrote. "My goal will always be to
reproduce what we accomplished here;
in a setting I can call my own."
Morillo could not
be reached for further
comment Friday.
Richard Satcher, market
CEO for Bayfront Health
Port Charlotte and Punta
Gorda, stated in the press
release that Morillo's re-
Ml- ~cord of accomplishment
MORILLO reflects his commitment
to the hospital and the community.
"Jose has been such an asset to this
hospital and the community, and we
appreciate his leadership and dedica-
tion," Satcher stated. "Jos6 has created a
wonderful legacy, and he will be missed."


After beginning his career as a
physical therapist in Texas, he assumed
numerous leadership roles in health
care. Punta Gorda was Morillo's initial
destination when he moved from
Texas to Florida in 1995, and it was
at Charlotte Regional Medical Center
(now Bayfront Health Punta Gorda)
where he served as director of Rehab
and Wellness Services until 2004.
During those eight years, he played
a key role in the development of the
hospital's outpatient wound care
center and the highly successful Joint
Academy joint replacement program,
the release stated. He served as CEO
at the 88-bed Lehigh Regional Medical
Center in Lee County, before taking
over Charlotte Regional in 2010. He
EXIT 112


INDEX I THE SUN: Obituaries 51 Legals 81 Crosswords 9 1 Viewpoint 101 Opinion 11 Police Beat 14 CLASSIFIED: Comics 9-121 Dear Abby 12 TV Listings 13
I THE WIRE: Nation 21 State 3,91 World 51 Business 6-81 Weather 10 SPORTS: Lotto 2 _


Daily Edition $1.00 ,-...
252 00025 8 50 percent chance of rain
7 05252 00025 8 50 percent chance of rain


:'"-" Look inside for valuable coupons --"'
:i SUNCO ipo This year's savings to date |:
: SUN COUPON $28 1 1 :
:: VALUE METER 1 ,1
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CHARLIE SAYS ...
I hope they don't recall
my swamp buggy.


CALL US AT
941-206-1000






:Our Town Page 2 C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014


SUBSCRIPTIONS I COMMUNITY CALENDAR


Home Delivery Rates:
Newspaper designated market:
City Zone- Carrier home
delivered 1 days.
Rates as follows
plus 7% Florida Sales Tax:
Monthly Bank/
CreditCard......................... $16.47
3 Months............................ $66.51
6 Months.......................... $113.05
1 Year ............................... $197.69
Does not include Waterline and TVTimes.
Above rates do not include sales tax.
DESOTO COUNTY RATES
Monthly Bank/
Credit Card ....................... $16.40
3 Months.......................... $74.09
6 Months ....................... $119.54
1 Year............................. $196.70
Arcadian home delivery
$29.99 per year.
Mail subscription rates: Rates as
follows (advance payment required):
7 Days
3 Months 6 Months 1Year
$120.88 $216.81 $386.10
Sunday Only
3 Months 6 Months IYear
$58.81 $110.56 $186.19
Single Copy rates
Daily $1.00 Sunday $2.00
Unclaimed account balances
under $10, inactive for 15
months, will be used to purchase
newspapers for classroom use.
Sun Newspapers
CUSTOMER SERVICE POLICY
Delivery should be expected prior
to 6 a.m. Monday through Saturday
and 6:30 a.m. Sunday. Customer
Service hours: 6 a.m. to 5p.m.
Monday- Friday; Saturday and
Sunday 7 a.m. to noon. To subscribe
or to report any problems with your
service, please call 941-206-1300 or
toll-free at 877-818-6204.You may
visit our office at: 23170 Harborview
Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980.


* EVENTS

* TODAY
PG Farmers Market,
8am-1 pm,Taylor & Olympia, 941-391-
4856. Enjoy fresh veggies, fish, meats,
pasta, cheese, citrus, breads and more.
Music
Yard Sale, 8am-1 pm, Sat.,
Mar. 29,4435 Tamiami Trail, PC. Public
invited. Benefits Community Cats of
Charlotte. 941-628-9001
Acme Bicycle Ride, Acme
Bicycle Ride, 615 Cross St., PG. 8am,
free, adults, helmet required, 3 levels.
Info 941-639-2263
Sierra Club Bike, Sierra
club bike BabcockWebb Wildlife Area
with master naturalist. Rsrv. req.
941-639-7468
Charity Yard Sale,
PGBoatClub, 802 W. Retta Esplanade


PG. Sat. March 29,8:30am-2pm.
Lots of stuff, Benefits AMIkids &PGBC
foundation. 941-286-8082
Bone Health, Arthritis & Bone
Health, with Dr. Carrie Demers, M.D,
9am-12pm, $55,941-505-9642
FOE Eagles 3296, Lunch
Mon-Fri 11am-2pm. Dinner Tue-Fri
5-8pm. Music Wed-Sat 6:30-9:30pm.
Join us! 23111 Harborview Rd, PC,
941-629-1645
American Legion 103,
Veteran Appreciation Day, kitchen
menu, 11am-3pm,2101 Taylor Rd.,
941-639-6337
Punta Gorda Elks, Lunch
11am-2pm; Dinner 5-8pm; Music by
Two Can Jam, 6:30-10:30pm; Tiki open
2pm. 25538 Shore Dr., PG. 941-637-
2606. Members & guests
Bingo Saturday, Saturday
Bingo-Friendliest Bingo game in town.
Quarter, games start at 10:15am.


PAID ADVERTISEMENTS

Featured Events


Exotic Bird Expo, The
Expo will be Sun., April 6,9am
to 4pm at the Charlotte County
Fairgrounds, 2333 El Jobean Rd., PC.
Exotic birds on display and for sale.
Bird toys, cages, food & other needs
also available. Information. Raffles!
Lunch and snacks on premises.
$5 adult; up to 18 free. Nikki
Chouinard, 941-286-9691
Free Open Cruise In,
Sat., Mar. 29, 9:30 am to 12:30 pm.


A Centennial Hall Cultural Center,
941-625-4175
Steak Nite PC Elks, sirloin
steak! All the Trimmings+1 Free
well drink or draft-only $10.50. No
reservations needed. Kenilworth, PC
625-7571 Paul Strowe, Live Music,


- Notice to Calendar Event Submitters -


The Sun revised the calendar events we publish in
the paper and display online. All events must be entered
by the person submitting them through our website.
It's easy. Go to www.yoursun.com, select an edition and
click on the "Community Calendar"link on the left. Click
"Submit Event"and fill out the appropriate information.
The"Print edition text" area of the form is for
information intended for the print edition of the
paper. Information outside of the "Print edition text"
area will appear online only. Please don't repeat the
"Event Title;' as thatwill be included automatically.
We will print a maximum of four lines per event (the
Event Title plus 120 additional characters, to be included
in the "Print edition text"field, up to three lines deep)
at no cost to the event submitter. Your contact number
must be included in these 120 characters.
You may, however, purchase additional space for $10
per day, per event, per community edition. Simply choose
"Paid Listing"on the Submit Event page. All paid listings
will run in the location designated for the event type.


If you do not have the ability to enter your events via our
website, we can type them in on your behalf at the rate of
$5 per event, per community edition, but this fee does not
guarantee your event will make the printed version. Please
call 941-206-1180 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. weekdays to make a
payment or to have us enter your event.
The Sun reserves the right to exclude any submitted
event that does not meet our specifications or that
requires excessive editing. There is no expressed or
implied guarantee that any free listing will be included
in any event calendar or run in any specific location.
This is on a first-come, first-served basis. Be sure to
review the "Important Tips"on the Submit Event page
to help ensure you get the most information in without
exceeding the line limit.
Remember to save the confirmation email you receive
after submitting each event. If you made an error or
the event gets canceled, simply click on the "Withdraw
submission"noted at the bottom of that email, follow the
provided instruction and then resubmit the event.


Free Open Cruise at Home Depot,
3941 Tamiami Trail/Burnt Store Rd.,
PG by the Veteran Motor Car Club of
America. No fees or preregistration
nor to have been in the military.
Free OJ, coffee & doughnuts to
drivers of all makes, years & model
vehicles. Lee at 941-626-9359
FOE Eagles 3296, Pull out
your dancing shoes because we're
going to rock & roll to the music
of Eddie & The Edsels on Sat. nite,


Fishermen's Village, Center Stage, Paul
Strowe, 5-9pm, 639-8721

* SUNDAY
Farmers Market, History Park
Farmers Market open every Sunday
9am-2pm, 501 Shreve St., between
Virginia Ave.& Henry St. 941-380-6814
Easter Musical, "The Day He
Wore My Crown"as 9:30am & 11am
worship, 75-voice Chancel Choir.
Englewood UMC, 700 E Dearborn,
941-474-5588


Mar. 29, from 6:30-9:30pm after
enjoying a delicious Prime Rib or
Fish dinner (5-8pm)! Join in the
fun! Accepting memberships. 23111
Harborview Rd., PC. 941-629-1645
Run For Your Wife,
Run ForYour Wife, Cultural Center
Theater, 7:30pm, Mar. 27, 28, 29;
2 p.m. Mar. 30. 2280 Aaron Street,
Port Charlotte. Adults $18; Students
$9. Presented by Charlotte Players.
For info, call 941-255-1022


FOE Eagles 3296, Lunch
Mon.-Fri. 11am-2pm. Dinner Tue.-Sat.
5-8pm. Music. Wed.-Sat 6:30-9:30pm.
Join us! 23111 Harborview Rd, PC,
941-629-1645
Punta Gorda Elks, Bar
open 12pm; Tiki open 12pm; Officer
Inauguration 5pm followed by cocktails/
dinner at 25538 Shore Dr., PG. 941-637-
2606. Members & guests
Garden Tour, Guided tour
of gardens at History Park, 501 Shreve
Street, PG, 2pm, $5 suggested donation;
Q&A. 941-380-6814


SUN NEWSPAPERS
--_Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulation A3
Chairman .................................. Derek Dunn-Rankin..................... 941-206-1001
Publisher................................... David Dunn-Rankin..................... 941-206-1003
Executive Editor ........................ Chris Porter ................................. 941-206-1134
Advertising Director.................. Leslee Peth.................................. 941-205-6400
Circulation Director ................... MarkYero.................................... 941-206-1300
Arcadian Editor.........................Susan E. Hoffman........................863-494-0300
Arcadian Publisher.................... Joe Gallimore .............................. 863-494-0300
Charlotte Sun Editor.................. Rusty Pray................................... 941-206-1168
North Port Sun Publisher ..........Steve Sachkar..............................941-429-3001
North Port Sun Editor................Lorraine Schneeberger................941-429-3003
Englewood Sun Publisher .........Carol Y. Moore .............................941-681-3031
Englewood Sun Editor...............Clinton Burton ............................ 941-681-3000


CONTACT US WITH YOUR NEWS: Email Charlotte Sun Editor Rusty Pray at rpray@sun-herald.com, or call 941-206-1168, or mail Deputy Charlotte Editor Garry Overbey at overbey@sun-herald.com or call 941-206-1143. Fax to
941-629-2085. On Saturdays, contact Assistant Charlotte Editor Marion Putman at mputman@sun-herald.com or 941-206-1183, or the newsroom at 941-206-1100. On Sundays, contact Garry Overbey or call the newsroom. Circu-
lation director -Mark Yero, 941-206-1317. Business news -email business@sun-herald.com or call 941-206-1121. Consumer advocacy -email dmorris@sun-herald.com or call 941-206-1114. Obituaries -call 941-206-1028 or email
obituaries@sunletter.com. Religion/ church news or events mputman@sun-herald.com. Editorial letters email letters@sun-herald.com or write: Letter to the Editor, c/o Charlotte Sun, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL
33980. Puzzles 941-206-1128. Classified ads 866-463-1638. Subscriptions- For missed papers, or to put your paper on hold, call 941-206-1300. Display advertising 941-206-1214


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BILOfl I Il IILUMILnnrIMLrM1


The SUN (USPS743170) is published daily at Sun Coast Media Group, Inc., 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980-2100. Periodicals postage paid at Punta Gorda, FL Postmaster: Please send address changes to the SUN, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, Florida 33980-2100.


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The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014


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:The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014 www.sunnewspapers.net


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:Our Town Page 4 C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014


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The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014


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The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


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C OurTown Page 5


I OBITUARIES

CHARLOTTE
There were no deaths
reported in Charlotte
Friday.

ENGLEWOOD
There were no deaths
reported in Englewood
Friday.

NORTH PORT

Ramon Harbison
Ramon Harbison,
77, of North Port, Fla.,
passed away Monday,
S March 17, 2014,
...at Fawcett
,; .Memorial
Hospital in Port
Charlotte, Fla.
He was born Oct. 6,
1936, in San Juan, Puerto
Rico, to Clarence
E Harbison and
Encarnacion Ortiz.
Ramon served in the
U.S. Air Force.
Survivors include his
beloved wife, Lydia;
daughter, Lorraine; son,
Ramon Jr.; and sister,
Claire Wagenblast.
A Memorial Mass
will be held at 10 a.m.
Wednesday, April 2,
2014, at St. Maximilian
Kolbe Catholic Church.
A Graveside Service
will follow at 1:30 p.m.
at Sarasota National
Cemetery in Sarasota,
Fla. To share a memory,
visit www.
farleyfuneralhome.com.
Arrangements are by
Farley Funeral Home.

Stefan Solohub Sr.
Stefan Solohub Sr., 90,
of North Port, Fla., and
formerly of Randolph,
Mass.,
passed
Saway
Monday,
March 24,
2014.
He was
born Jan. 13,
1924, in
Rava-Rus'ka, Ukraine.
Stefan and his loving
wife, Wera Solohub,
moved from their long-
time home in Randolph
to North Port, where
they wintered many
years, until becoming
full-time residents in
2010. He was passionate
about working with the
Ukrainian community
in Boston, Mass., and
served as President of
the Ukrainian American
Youth Association, CYM,
Boston Branch, for many
years.
He is survived by
his beloved wife of
nearly 69 years, Wera;
son, Stefan Solohub
Jr.; daughter, Anna
Henderson Solohub;
grandsons, Stefan
Solohub III and Adam
Henderson; and many
family members in
Ukraine.
The family will receive
friends from 6 p.m. until
8 p.m., with a panikhida
service at 7:30 p.m.,
Sunday, March 30,
2014, at McKee Funeral
Home, 14538 Tamiami
Trail, North Port. The
Rev. Severyn Kovalyshin
will officiate. The fu-
neral Mass will be held
at 9:30 a.m. Monday,
March 31, 2014, at
St. Mary's Ukrainian
Catholic Church in
North Port, followed by
an interment ceremony
at Venice Memorial
Gardens in Venice, Fla.
The family asks that,
in lieu of flowers, those
so inclined consider a
donation in the name of
Stefan Solohub Sr. to ei-
ther St. Mary's Ukrainian
Catholic Church in
North Port, or Christ the
King Ukrainian Catholic
Church in Jamaica Plain,
Mass. For online condo-


lences, please visit www.
mckeenorthport.com.
Arrangements are by
McKee Funeral Home,
North Port.

DESOTO
There were no deaths
reported in DeSoto
Friday.


I RELIGION BRIEFS


EASTER EGG HUNTS
* Adaptive Easter Egg Hunt: 11 a.m.-
12:30 p.m. April 12 at Bayshore Live Oak
Park, 23157 Bayshore Road, Charlotte
Harbor. Free; for children 12 years old and
younger with physical, developmental or
intellectual disabilities, along with their
siblings/families. Presented by Charlotte
County Community Services and the
Charlotte Harbor Community Redevelop-
ment Agency. Includes arts and crafts, story
time, a bounce house, face-painting and a
meet-and-greet with the Easter Bunny. Egg
hunt begins at 11:45 a.m. Preregister/info:
941-627-1074.
* Pilgrim Church, 24515 Rampart Blvd.,
Port Charlotte: Easter Eggstravaganza,
11 a.m.-1 p.m. April 13. All welcome.
941-629-2633 or www.pilgrimonline.org.
* Bunny Breakfast and "Egg-Normous"
Egg Hunt: April 19 at the George Mullen
Activity Center, 1602 Kramer Way (off
Sumter Boulevard near North Port City
Hall), North Port. Bunny Breakfast, 8-9 a.m.
for $4 per person in advance; $5 at door (if
available- Preregistration recommended;
for ages 2 and older). Family pictures with


A Festival of
Hymns
Burnt Store Presbyterian Church,
11330 Burnt Store Road, Punta
Gorda, invites the public to the
8:15 a.m. or 11 a.m. worship service
Sunday. The church's Praise Chorale
will present A Festival of Hymns at
both services. Throughout worship,
attendees will sing hymns from
across the ages, celebrating our rich
musical heritage, along with hearing
first-person accounts from the hymn
writers themselves, relating the
origins of those hymns.
The choir will be accompanied
by Michael Harris, the church's new
organist, on both piano and organ.
Also accompanying will be three
instrumentalists and several handbell
ringers. The hymnfest is composed by
Hal Hopson. For more information,
call 941-639-0001, or email bspc83@
embarqmail.com.

Breakfast, health
check
Punta Gorda Seventh-day
Adventist Church's Health Ministries
department plays host to a free
breakfast and health screening to
the public between 9 a.m. and noon
the last Sunday of most months. The
next planned date is Sunday. The
church's Community Service Center
also will have a yard sale that day,
from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. The church is
located at 1655 Taylor Road (on the
corner of Cooper Street and Taylor
Road). For more information, call
941-629-5388.

'The Day He Wore
My Crown'
The Englewood United Methodist
Church Music Ministry Concert Series
presents the EUMC Chancel Choir,
conducted by organist Fonda Davis,
performing the musical "The Day He
Wore My Crown,"as the 9:30 a.m.
and 11 a.m. worship services Sunday
in the Sanctuary at 700 E. Dearborn
St. The Passion and Resurrection story
will be brought to life in scripture
and song, accompanied by organ
and orchestra. Free child care is
provided. For more information, visit
www.englewoodumc.net, or call
941-474-5588.

Sunday Message
Series
Cleveland United Methodist
Church, 28038 Cleveland Ave., east
of Punta Gorda, continues to offer its
Sunday Message Series emphasizing
the Christian's response to the issues
of our everyday experiences that
can hinder our living abundantly.
The public is invited to join in as
members examine"There Was A Man
Born Blind"- Jesus heals a blind
man who immediately becomes an
evangelist. Traditional worship is at
9:30 a.m., and contemporary worship
is at 11 a.m. For more information,
call 941-639-2775.

'Vietnam: The Real
War'
At 7 p.m. Tuesday, Temple Shalom
of Charlotte County, 23190 Utica
Ave., will show a DVD of"Vietnam:
The Real War"with Pete Hamill,
Peter Arnett and Kimberly Dozier.
This program was taped from a live
performance in NewYork sponsored
by the 92nd StreetY. Join war corre-
spondent Arnett, veteran combat
reporter Dozier and author Hamill,
along with other guests, to look at
the images of the war that left so
deep and lasting an impression on
American life.
This program is free and open to
the community, and is sponsored


the Easter Bunny available. Free egg hunt
for ages 2-10 begins at 9:30 a.m. sharp;
14,000 eggs, 3 age groups, and lots of
prizes; bring a basket. Co-sponsored by the
Early Bird Kiwanis and the city of North
Port. Register/info: www.cityofnorthport.
corn, then "Parks and Recreation" tab; or
941-429-PARK (7275).
* Hippity Hop Cottontail Trot: 8 a.m.
April 19 at Gilchrist Park, 400W. Retta
Esplanade, Punta Gorda. One-mile fun run/
hop Easter egg hunt. Free registration,
starts at 7:30 a.m. at the park gazebo.
Presented by The Foot Landing in Punta
Gorda. For cottontails of all ages. Little ones
will fill their baskets with hidden treats
and surprises along the way. For those who
don't have an Easter basket, brown bags
will be available.
* 50th Annual Easter Egg Hunt:
9 a.m.-noon, April 19 at North Charlotte
Regional Park, 1185 O'Donnell Blvd., Port
Charlotte. Free; for children from preschool
through fifth grade, and their families.
Kickoff is 1-mile Fun Walk at 9 a.m., then
hunts (bring a basket): birth-3 years old,
10:15 a.m.; 4-5 years old, 10:30 a.m.;
6-7 years old, 11 a.m.; 8-10 years old,


Faith

Spirituaity









by the Sylvia Hershkowitz Memorial
Fund. Refreshments will be
served. For more information, call
941-625-2116.

Lenten prayer,
reflection
Gulf Cove United Methodist
Church, 1100 McCall Road (State
Road 776), Port Charlotte, announced
its sanctuary will be open at noon
every Wednesday, through April 9,
for a time of prayer and reflection.
The public is welcome. For more
information, call 941-697-1 747,
email gulfcoveumc@centurylink.net,
or visit http://gulfcovechurch.com.

'A Salute to the
Academy Awards'
"A Salute to the Academy Awards"
... through the years, featuring
vintage clothing, artifacts and acces-
sories, will take place at 1:30 p.m.
Thursday at Temple Shalom, 23190
Utica Ave., Port Charlotte. The event
will be presented by Charlotte
Todd, a fashion interpreter, who
has been doing historic fashion
shows for years. The Sharon Chapter
of Hadassah is sponsoring the
event. The cost is $15, including
refreshments. For tickets and
more information, call Karen at
941-575-2815.

Lenten fish fry
each Friday
Knights of Columbus Council
8074 will offer the community a
hearty fish fry during the Fridays
of Lent before Good Friday, from
4 p.m. to 7 p.m., at the Sacred
Heart Parish Hall, 211 W. Charlotte
Ave., Punta Gorda. The remaining
dates include: Friday and April 11.
Diners can choose between several
platters: an 11-ounce beer-bat-
tered haddock fillet, or eightjumbo
butterfly fried shrimp, or half
shrimp and half fish, or a baked
9- to 10-ounce fish fillet (4 p.m. to
6 p.m. only). All platters include
french fries, coleslaw and green
beans. A new item to be offered
is a bowl of New England clam
chowder for $2, with the purchase
of each adult platter only.
The cost is $10 for adults,
and $5 for kids younger than 10.
Refreshments will be available for
a small donation. Takeout platters
also will be available. For more
information, call 941-258-2822.

Lenten fish fry
The St. Maximilian Kolbe K ofC
Ladies Auxiliary will play host to
a fish fry every Friday during the
Lenten season at St. Maximilian
Kolbe Catholic Church, 1441 Spear
St. (behind Sam's Club), Port
Charlotte. The menu includes
a large batter-dipped fillet of
fish, fries, coleslaw, dessert and
a choice of beverage -all for
$7.50. Everything is cooked-to-
order, with serving to begin at
4:30 p.m., and continuing until
7 p.m. The public is invited.
For more information, call
941-743-6877.


11:15 a.m. Event also includes tethered hot
air balloon rides, a decorated egg contest
(register by 10 a.m.), raffles, door prizes,
bounce houses, games, arts and crafts,
treats, vendors and more. Children also will
get a chance to meet the Easter Bunny.
Vendor/sponsor opportunities available;
contact Harold Avenue Recreation Center
staff at 941-627-1074.
* Gulf Cove United Methodist Church,
100 McCall Road (State Road 776), Port
Charlotte: 10 a.m. April 19. For children
through age 12. After the hunt, there will
be snacks and a couple of games. 941-697-
1747, gulfcoveumc@centurylink.net, or
http://gulfcovechurch.com.
* Spring Spectacular: 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
April 19-20 at the Charlotte County
Fairgrounds, 2333 El Jobean Road,
Port Charlotte. Free parking; admission:
adults (18 and older), $5; kids (2 years
and older), $1; seniors (65 and older), $3
- portion of profits to benefit Charlotte
and Sarasota counties. Huge egg hunt
for infants through age 10 (bring a
basket), with more than 30,000 eggs and
1,500 prizes. Ages/times: 10:30 a.m.,
infants through 1 year old; 11:15 a.m.,


Winter Concert
Series
Peace River Baptist church, 478
Berry St. Punta Gorda, will offer a
Winter Concert Series. The remaining
schedule includes:
Friday: New Ground. The group
hails from Alabama, and brings a
close-knit harmony.
The concert will begin at 7 p.m.
The concert is free, but a love
offering will be received. For more
information, call the church office
at 941-637-6768, orJim Reuter
941-628-9789; or visit www.
peaceriverbaptistfl.org.

First Class
Concerts
First United Methodist Church
of Punta Gorda is sponsoring a First
Class Concert series in its Bryant
Life Center, 507 W. Marion Ave. The
remaining schedule includes:
Friday: Entertainment Revue.
The Entertainment Revue Foundation
is a professional song and dance
ensemble based in Tampa, which
performs more than 40 shows in a
variety of venues each year.
Each concert is set for 7:30 p.m. to
9:30 p.m. Tickets are $25 for adults,
or $10 for students. The box office
can be reached at 941-322-7276. A
full schedule is available at http://
whatislst.com/firstclassconcerts.

Pancake
Brunches,
Farmers Market
This is the 41st season of the
Men's Fellowship Pancake Brunches,
held from 7:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
select Saturdays in season at the
Englewood United Methodist
Fellowship Hall, 700 E. Dearborn St.
The remaining date this season is
April 5. A cost of $5 ($3 for children)
buys unlimited pancakes; orange
juice, and bottomless coffee or tea;
plus egg and sausage, biscuits and
sausage gravy, or quiche and fresh
fruit as side choices. Enjoy live music.
Buy nuts, grapefruit, honey and
Creative Workshop handcrafted gifts.
Proceeds benefit local charities. For
more information, visit www.
englewoodumc.net, or call
941-474-5588.
The same day, the church also
presents a Farmers Market from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Purchase fresh and
organic produce and other natural
foods, special coffees and teas,
desserts, flowers and plants, art,
crafts,jewelry and more. All vendor
fees are donated to missions. There
also are new Trunk and Treasure
Sales: pay $15 to sell items from your
car trunk. Promotion and signs are
provided. To sell, call 941-626-5161.

Breakfast offered
Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 2565
Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte, offers
breakfast from 8 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. the
first Saturday of most months. The next
offering will be April 5. Hot breakfast
is made to order, and costs only $6 per
person; children younger than 12 eat for
free. There are new items each month.
For more information, call 941-625-5262.

Rummage sale
St. Vincent de Paul, Sacred Heart
Conference in Punta Gorda will hold
a rummage sale from 9 a.m. to noon
Saturday, April 5, at its distribution
center, 25200 Airport Road (on the
northeast corner of Taylor and Airport
roads), Punta Gorda. A variety of
items will be available, including
household goods, furniture, clothing,
jewelry, linens, shoes, purses and
books. No merchandise may be
inspected or sold before 9 a.m.


Proceeds will help the organization
provide much-needed assistance to
deserving families and individuals
throughout Charlotte County. The
rain date in Saturday, April 12.

Family Fun
Festival
From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
April 5, Lutheran Church of the Cross
and the Lutheran Child Development
Center will hold their free Family
Fun Festival at 2300 Luther Road,
Deep Creek. There will be trucks to
explore, games to play, inflatable
play areas, free food and ice cream,
a magic show, a wildlife show,
face-painting and much more. All are
welcome. For more information, call
941-967-6060.

Fundraiser
breakfast
From 8 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Sunday,
April 6, the St. Charles Knights of
Columbus Council 5399 will hold a
fundraiser breakfast at the St. Charles
Borromeo Catholic Church Parish
Center, 21505 Augusta Ave., Port
Charlotte. Breakfast will include:
scrambled eggs, three sausage links,
juice and coffee, and all the pancakes
you can eat. The cost is $5 for adults;
kids younger than 9 eat free. The
public is invited. All money collected
helps needy adults and youth of
Charlotte County.

Mobile Food
Pantry
The Harry Chapin Food Bank plans
to have a Mobile Food Pantry from
10 a.m. to noon select Mondays,
including April 7 and 21; May 5 and
19; and June 2,16 and 30- all at
Sacred Heart Catholic Church, 211
W. Charlotte Ave. (corner of U.S. 41
South and West Charlotte Avenue),
Punta Gorda. The pantry truck will
be located in the parking lot across
West Charlotte from the church. The
mobile pantry provides free food
to needy families and individuals
in Charlotte County. Recipients are
asked to bring a bag or a box to


2-3 years; noon, 4 years; 12:45 p.m.,
5 years; 1:30 p.m., 6 years; 2:15 p.m.,
7 years; 3 p.m., 8 years; 3:45 p.m., 9
years; and 4:15 p.m., 10 years. Event
includes Firefighters'MDA"Fill the Boot"
drive, Easter Bunny on-site for pictures,
"Imagination Station" coloring contest,
free arts and crafts for kids, a "Play-Doh"
table, free kids tattoos available, a
DJ, food and more. Also, an Xtreme
Kids Zone with bouncers, mega slides,
mechanical bull rides, midway games,
an obstacle course, a rock wall, bungees
and more. There is an additional cost for
some rides and activities.
* Salty Paws Fifth Annual "Easter
Bone Hunt": 11 a.m.-1 p.m. April 19 in
Center Court at Fishermen's Village,
1200W. Retta Esplanade, Punta Gorda.
For kids of the canine variety. Benefits
local animal shelters. Preregistration
required; call 941-575-7599.
* Community Life Center, 19048 Edge-
water Drive (at Pellam Boulevard), Port
Charlotte: 5-7 p.m. April 19. Free; for
all ages all welcome. One age group
at a time in a large chain-link-fenced
playground on grass. 941-629-0999.


carry their food. The Sacred Heart
Conference of St. Vincent de Paul is
playing host to the pantry. For more
information, call 941-575-8770.

Hard Rock
Casino-Tampa Trip
The St. Charles Borromeo Knights
of Columbus 5399 is sponsoring its
last Hard Rock Casino-Tampa Trip
of the season on Monday, April 14.
The tour is open to the public. There
is a chance to win $1,000 for bus
patrons. Play booklet discounts will
be given to each patron on the bus.
The bus ride will include games and
snacks. The tour departs from the
St. Charles Borromeo Parish Center;
check-in is at 9 a.m., with return at
approximately 6 p.m. The cost is $27
per person paid reservations only,
by Thursday, April 10. Proceeds
will benefit the St. Charles Borromeo
School and local charities. For
reservations and information, contact
Dave Sloma at 941-624-0550.

Spring barn, crafts
sale
From 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday,
April 11, and Saturday, April 12, the
Men's Club and the Crafty Ladies of
Gulf Cove United Methodist Church,
1100 McCall Road (State Road 776),
Port Charlotte, will hold their spring
barn sale and handmade crafts
sale. Barn-sale questions can be
directed to 941-697-1 414, and craft
questions to 941-697-5533. For more
information about the church, call
941-697-1 747, email gulfcoveumc@
centurylink.net, or visit http://
gulfcovechurch.com.

Pancake breakfast
and more
The United Methodist Men's
Fellowship of First United Methodist
Church of Punta Gorda, 507 W.
Marion Ave., welcomes everyone
to enjoy a pancake breakfast from
8 a.m. to 10 a.m. the second Saturday
of each month in the church's

RELIGION 16


40 Days for Life

Monday was the midpoint of the 40 Days for Life campaign
which began March 5 and runs through April 13 and,
despite the rain, saw many local volunteers taking part in
Port Charlotte. The event is billed as a "peaceful, prayerful
... pro-life campaign,;' and includes prayer and fasting,
peaceful vigils, and community outreach. For more informa-
tion, contact Katie Huntley at kwhuntley83@icloud.com, or
visit www.40daysforlife.com/portcharlotte.



JAMES W. MALLONEE, P.A.
LAW OFFICE
JAMES W. MALLONEE
PROBATE WILLS/TRUSTS
GUARDIANSHIPS REAL ESTATE
Office Hours Monday thru Friday, 9:00AM to 5:00PM
946 Tamiami Trail, #206, Port Charlotte, FL 33953
901 Venetia Bay Blvd. #360, Venice, FL 34285
(941) 207-2223
www.jameswmallonee.com
(941) 206-2223


PHOTO PROVIDED BY MICHELLE BURNS





OurTown Page 6


C www.sunnewspapers.net


RELIGION NEWS


The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014


The Fabric of Our Faith: Forgiveness


I once read a story
about a young girl
who'd invited her
boyfriend home after
school. Her biggest con-
cern about his visit was
that her grandfather, who
lived with them, was very
demonstrative about his
personal faith in Christ.
He read the Bible most of
the day. When he came
to a passage of scripture
that excited him, he often
shouted, "Hallelujah,"
"Praise the Lord," or
"Thank you, Jesus."
Since the girl wanted



RELIGION

FROM PAGE 5

Bryant Life Center, adjacent to Lenox
Hall. The next date is April 12. Fare
includes all-you-can-eat pancakes,
sausage patties, eggs and applesauce.
Coffee, decaf, tea and orange juice
also are available. Attendees get all
this for a "love offering"to the Men's
Fellowship; proceeds go to benefit its
many ministries, ranging from food
for the homeless to youth to foreign
missions.
For more information, call
941-639-3842, or visit www.
puntagordamethodist.com.


Preventing Falls
In 2014
The Care Ministry also will have
a Seek and You Will Learn session
the same day at 9:30 a.m. in the
fellowship hall. For more informa-
tion, contact Marilyn Gregory at
941-286-6075.
The church's Bargain Boutique
thrift store also will be open from
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. that day. Using dona-
tions, the boutique carries a houseful
of affordable treasures, including
clothing, shoes, kitchenware, linens,
jewelry and home decor goods. Sales
proceeds are used to support church
missions and community outreach
programs. For more information, call
941-505-0794.

'Heaven Bound the
Remix'
The Music Ministry from St. Mary
Primitive Baptist Church, 605 Mary
St., Punta Gorda, will present "Heaven
Bound the Remix"- a gospel play


things to go right for
her boyfriend's visit, she
asked her grandfather
if he would be a little
quieter while her boy-
friend was there. She even
suggested that he always

set to music and dance at 6 p.m.
Saturday, April 12. The evening will
include refreshments. Tickets cost $10
for adults, and $5 for children 12 and
younger. For ticket information, call
941-740-1088.

Flea market
thrift shop helps
homeless

Jesus Loves You Ministry Inc., the
county's only mobile outreach program
for the homeless, will benefit from
spaces at the Sun Flea Market, 18505
Paulson Drive, Murdock, from January
through June. Stop by the Charity
Thrift Store booths from 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. Friday through Sundays.
Proceeds go to help this nonprofit
to provide services such as in-depth
case management (which includes
helping individuals file for Social
Security, veterans and other benefits;
facilitating medical and mental health
appointments; and much more),
along with a mobile food pantry and
lunch program, and a mobile clothing
and hygiene pantry. Funds also will
help the ministry purchase tents,
tarps, sleeping bags, etc., for those
it helps.
The organization always can use
donations (monetary, along with item
donations, such as furniture, that it
can resell) and volunteers. To make a
financial contribution, mail a check to
Jesus Loves You Ministry Inc., P.O. Box
380275, Murdock, FL 33938-0275.
For more information, call Leslie at
941-661-8117.

'Pierogies and
Kielbasa'
St. Andrew's Ukrainian Religious
and Cultural Center, 4100 S. Biscayne
Drive, North Port, offers "Pierogies and


could read her geography
book during the boy-
friend's visit.
Not wanting to interfere
with his granddaughter's
plans, he agreed to
comply with her wishes.
As promised, during
her boyfriend's visit, the
grandfather sat in the next
room, quietly reading
her geography book. All
seemed to be going well,
when suddenly, without
any warning, her grand-
father raised his hand
and shouted: "Hallelujah!
Praise the Lord!"

Kielbasa"for takeout from 10 a.m. to
6 p.m. every Friday, and from 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m. each Saturday. Homemade
pierogies with potato and cheese, and
with sauerkraut, are available for $6
per dozen; kielbasa is sold by weight.
For more information and advanced
orders, call 941-786-5256.

Food pantry
Discipleship Driven Ministries offers
a food pantry and has partnered with
Harry Chapin Food Bank and Feeding
America to help make sure that no
one in Charlotte County is without
food. The agency is located at 4040
Tamiami Trail (at the end of the U.S.
41 Access Road at Gardner Drive),
Port Charlotte.
The pantry has a variety of food
including baby food to put
in people's cupboards. All who have
a need are welcome. The pantry is
open 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, and
1 p.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday. For more
information, call 941-764-8458.

Free food package,
breakfast
New Vision Fellowship of Port
Charlotte offers a free food distribution
from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. the second
Saturday of each month at the Woman's
Club of Port Charlotte, 20271 Tappan
Zee Drive. Each recipient is given a
large bag of food with items suitable
for breakfast, lunch and dinner. A free
breakfast, with coffee and juice, also
will be available during distribution
hours. Any family that can benefit from
this program is eligible. New Vision
Fellowship is affiliated with the Free
Methodist Church. Worship Services
also are held at the Woman's Club and
start at 10 a.m. Sunday. For more
information, call 941-457-5153 or
941-743-4999.


Before the girl could ask
her grandfather what he
was so excited about, he
said, "Look at this! There
is a place in the Pacific
Ocean that is almost 7
miles deep, and my Bible
says that God buried my
sins in the depths of the
sea, never to be remem-
bered anymore. Praise the
Lord! Hallelujah!"
The grandfather's words
were his own paraphrase
of Micah 7:18-19, where
Micah asks, "Who is
a God like you, who
pardons sin and forgives


transgression? You do not
stay angry forever but de-
light to show mercy. You
will again have compas-
sion on us; you will tread
our sins underfoot and
hurl all our iniquities into
the depths of the sea."
Micah's early 8th
century B.C. writing was
to remind Israel of God's
promises to Abraham.
Most importantly of all,
his message pointed
ahead to Jesus Christ and
the forgiveness we receive
from him for our sins.
Because of his sacrifice


PASSOVER SERVICES
* Chabad of Charlotte County at Chabad Jewish
Center, 204 E. McKenzie St., Unit B, Punta Gorda:
Passover/Pesach Seders: First Seder, 7:30 p.m. April
14; Second Seder, 8:30 p.m. April 15; Yizkor service,
11:30 a.m., and Third Seder-- Feast of Moshiach,
6:30 p.m., both April 22. Jewish community invited
- all welcome, regardless of background or
affiliation. Donation requested upon reservation.
Sponsor, $180. Includes hand-baked shmurah


Food pantry
Holy Trinity Lutheran Church,
2565 Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte,
offers a food pantry from 9 a.m.
to noon Mondays, Wednesdays
and Thursdays. The pantry now is
connected with the Harry Chapin
Food Bank of Fort Myers, which
will expand the inventory, so
the pantry will be able to serve
the community better and more
efficiently. The pantry is open to the
public. For more information, call
941-625-5262.

Food ministry
The Community Outreach Center
at Trinity Baptist Church, 11234 Royal
Road, Punta Gorda, provides food
from 9 a.m. to noon every Tuesday
to help needy families or individuals.
The ministry is an equal-opportunity
provider. For more information, call
941-575-1211.

Food pantry
Punta Gorda Seventh-day
Adventist Church, 1655 Taylor Road
(on the corner of Cooper Street and
Taylor Road), offers its food pantry
to the public from 10a.m. to1 p.m.
the first and third Thursdays of each
month. For more information, call
941-629-5388.


on Calvary's cross, we
have hope through that
forgiveness for eternal
life in heaven with Christ,
and with our loved ones
who've already died after
they placed their faith in
Jesus.
Have you put Christ at
the center of your faith? If
not, why not?

The Rev. LarryArmbrust,
a retired United Methodist
Florida Conference pastor,
lives in Port Charlotte.
Email him at pastorlwa2@
embarqmail. com.


matzah, four cups of fine kosher wine, and a deli-
cious Passover dinner. Reservations before April 10
to 941-833-3381 or info@chabadofcharlottecounty.
corn.
* Temple Shalom: Second Night of Passover
Seder, 5:30 p.m. April 15 at Kingsway Country Club,
13625 Kingsway Circle, Lake Suzy. Services will be
conducted by Rabbi Solomon Agin. Brisket dinner
is $36 per person; no charge for children younger
than 5. RSVP by April 7. Temple, 941-625-2116; or
Cindy Melser, 941-347-8488.


Closet of Hope
The Closet of Hope at Gulf Cove
United Methodist Church, 1100
McCall Road (State Road 776), Port
Charlotte, offers free clothing for
individuals of all ages. It is open
from 9:30 a.m. to noon the first and
third Saturdays of every month.
Recipients must show a photo ID
card (such as a driver's license) upon
entering the closet. The ID card
should reflect residency in Charlotte
County, or in Englewood, North
Port or Venice in south Sarasota
County. For more information, call
941-697-1747, email gulfcoveumc@
centurylink.net, or visit www.
gulfcovechurch.com.

Thrift store

Pilgrim United Church of Christ
operates The Pilgrim Church Thrift
Store at 23278 Harborview Road, Port
Charlotte. The hours are 10a.m. to
3 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The
store has something for everyone -
lots of clothes, with great values on
children's clothing; shoes; toys and
other items for children and infants;
appliances; household items; furni-
ture; books; tapes; and much more.
For more information, call 941-629-
2633, email puccpc@hotmail.com, or
visit www.pilgrimonline.org.


Free lunches
offered
Trinity United Methodist Church of
Charlotte Harbor offers its Free Lunch
Friday and food pantry programs to
the public from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
every Friday at 23084 Seneca Ave.
(on the corner of Parmely Street
and Seneca Avenue, behind KFC).
The programs serve those in need
and those qualified for the USDA
food-distribution program. For more
information, call 941-625-3372.

Homeless dinners
North Port Cares for the Hungry
will hold a free dinner from 4 p.m. to
6 p.m. the first and third Thursdays of
each month at Lutheran Church of the
Living Waters, at North Port Boulevard
and Chancellor Boulevard in north
Port Charlotte. The menu includes
an entree, a drink and dessert. All
those in need are welcome. For
more information, call Kris Dines at
941-625-8090.

Thrift store,
lunches
Shop the Christ Community
United Methodist Church Thrift Store
Thursday, Fridays and Saturdays.

RELIGION 17


Trinity AnIglicdiai Church
1928 Book ofCommon Prayer
Worshipping at
McDonald Hall
Sunday, 10am
2230 Hariet St., Port Charlotte
For Info Contact Don Kieffer
941-235-8052



Eastside Baptist
Church
Pastor Mike Mowry
6220 Golf Course Blvd., Punta Gorda
639-1648
Sunday Worship 1 am & 6pm
Sunday School 9 45am
"AWANA" Wednesday 6 00-7 45pm
Wed Discipleshtup & Prayer Service 6 45 pm
Nursery & Children's program provided
eastsidebaptist co



First Baptist Church
Port Charlotte
20035 Quesada Ave.
Jim McCarty, Pastor
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:30 AM & 11:00 AM
WORSHIP 8:00AM, 9:30AM, 11:00AM
12:30 Hispanic Service
Call for information on weekly
activities and special events.
24-HOUR INFO LINE 629-0444

rif^^^^^I, S


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF PUNTA GORDA
459 Gill St., Punta Gorda
639-3857
www.fbcpuntagorda.org
Barrett Hardin, Pastor
Sunday School 9:15 a.m.
Worship Services 10:30 a.m.
Team Kid Wednesday- 6:00 p.m.
Prayer/Bible Study 6:15 p.m.
Nursery Provided


Peace River
Baptist Church
478 Berry Street, Punta Gorda
www peaceriverbaptistfl org
Jim Stultz, Pastor
637-6768
Sunday School 9 45am
Sunday Worship 8 30am, 11 00am, 6 00pm
Tuesday AWANA & Youth Group 6-8pm
Wednesday Prayer & Bible Study 6 30pm


You are Invited to
Berean Baptist Church
An Old Fashioned C',uii, Church
17377 Godwin Avenue
(Located off Collingswood Blvd)
Port Charlotte 941-629-7053
Bible Study- 9:30 am
Sun. Worship Service 10:30 am, 6:00 pm
Wed. Evening Service 6:30 pm



Tri-City Baptist Church
24058 Heritage Place,
Port Charlotte, FL 33980
941-625-7412
Jay Sheppard, Pastor
website: tri-citybaptistchurch.com
Sunday School 10am, Sunday Worship 1 am
Sunday Eve Worship 6pm
Wed Bible Study/Prayer Meeting 7pm
Nursery Provided & Children's Program
tricitybaptist@4comcast.net


SAN ANTONIO
CATHOLIC CHURCH
24445 Rampart Blvd.
Port Charlotte, FL 33980
(941) 624-3799
sanantoniorcc.org
Weekdays 8AM Saturday's 8:30AM
Saturday-9:OOAM & 3PM Confessions
Saturday Vigil- 4PM & 6PM
Sunday 7AM, 9AM, 11 AM
Holy Days 6:00PM


SAN PEDRO
CATHOLIC CHURCH
14380 Tamiami Tr.
North Port, FL 34287
Sat. Vigil: 5:00 pm (May -Nov.)
4:00 pm & 5:30 pm (Dec. Apr.)
Sun.: 7:30 am, 9:00 am & 10:45 am
Weekdays: 8:30 am Daily
Holy Days: 7:30 am, 9:00 am, 7:00 pm


Welcome to
-'. ST. CHARLES BORROMEO
CATHOLIC CHURCH
2500 Easy Street, Port Charlotte
941-625-4754
Mass Times: Weekdays- 7:00am &8:30am
Sat. Vigil: 4:00 pm & 6:00pm (Jan. -Apr.)
Sun: 7:00am, 9:00am, l1:00am,
1:00pm (French Creole)
& 6:30pm (Youth Mass)
www.stcharlespc.org



SMAXIMILIAN KOLBE
CATHOLIC CHURCH
1441 Spear Street
Port Charlotte, FL 33948
(941) 743-6877
Email parishoffice@stmaxcatholic org
Website http //stmaxcatholic org
Winter Mass Schedule Mon -Fri 8am
-,t~r-l,-"1gll 430pm
S..,6 30pm)
Sunday Mass 7 30am, 9 30am,
11 30am
Confessions on Saturday 3 00-4 15pm
and by appointment


MURDOCK
CHRISTIAN CHURCH
17500 Elmwood Ave., Murdock

255-1858
Minister Keith Sergent
Sunday Worship 10:30amrn


I- i-


FIRST ALLIANCE CHURCH
20444 Midway Blvd.
625-7435
Sat. 6:00pm
Sun. 8:00am, 9:20am
and 11:00am
Youth Ministries 6:00pm
Wed. 6:30pm (Life U)
Rev. W. Scott Borden

Cj'
PUNTA GORDA
ALLIANCE CHURCH
Pastor Clint Stasney
7500 Florida Street, PG 33950
(Corner Airport Rd/Florida St. near Edison)
941-637-6444
9:30am Adult Sunday School
10:30am Sunday Worship
Wed. 10am Prayer & Bible Study
www.pgachurch.org



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
SOCIETY
OF PORT CHARLOTTE
LaPlaya Plaza Unit LI
2811 Tamiami Trail
10:00 am Sunday Service
3:00 pmon 1st&3 Wed.
941-625-2765
Reading Rm. 1-3 pm Wed.
www.christianscienceportcharlotte.org


INU
ENGLEWOOD EAST
CHURCH OF CHRIST
9600 Gulfstream Blvd
Englewood, FL 34224-9256
(941) 475-4973
Evangelist: Jim Ratliff
Adult Sunday School 10 00 am
Worship Service 11 00 am
Youth Service 11 30 am
Wednesday Eve Fellowship 5 00 pm
Wednesday Eve Bible Study 6 00 pm
www.engchurch.com


COULSHARBOUR
CHURCH OF GOD
451 West Helen Ave. Punta Gorda
941-639-1048
Welcome
Sunday School, 10:00 am
Morning Worship, 11:00 am
Midweek Service, Wed., 7:00 pm
Pastor, Phil Keaton


THE CHURCH OF
THE GOOD SHEPHERD
401 W. Henry St., Punta Gorda
639-2757
The Rev. Roy W. Tuff, Pastor
"AllAre Welcome"
Sunday 8 & 10 am Holy Eucharist
Nursery Available at 10 Oam Svc
Email church@goodshepherdpg com
www goodshepherdpg corn


St. James Episcopal Church
1365 Vizcaya Dr., Port Charlotte
627-4000
The Very Rev Cesar Olivero, Pastor
Sunday 8 00AM & 10 30AM -Holy Echarnst
Sunday School 11 OAM
Wednesday 10 00 AM Holy Eucharist healing service
Praise andworship 1st Sunday of each month @ 5 30 PM
AdiultBible Study Sunday @ 930AM &Wednesday @ 3 OOPM
www stjamespcfl org



ST. NATHANIEL'S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
4200 Biscayne Dr, North Port
426-2520
Priest-In-Charge
the Rev. Jean Hite
Sunday 8 & 10 am -
Holy Eucharist
Sunday School 10:45 am
www.stnathaniel.org



DEEP CREEK
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1500 Cooper St.,
Punta Gorda
941-235-REAL
Sunday Services
9:00am& 11:00am
www.dc3.TV
Real Love, Real People


To Place Your Ad

In Our Worship Directory

Please Call (941) 429-3110


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The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014


RELIGION NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 7


Sermon of the Week: 'l am undone!'


"Woe is me, for I am
undone! Because I am
a man of unclean lips,
and I dwell in the midst
of a people of unclean
lips; For my eyes have
seen the King, The Lord
of hosts. Then one of the
seraphim flew to me,
having in his hand a live
coal, which he had taken
with the tongs from the
altar And he touched
my mouth with it, and
said: "Behold, this has
touched your lips; Your
iniquity is taken away,
and your sin purged."
(Isaiah 6:5- 7)


saiah was undone in the
presence of God! Isaiah
became aware that his
mouth was unclean, and
also that of the people he
dwelt among. The live coal
taken from the altar of God
purged Isaiah of his iniquity
and sin.
We, as believers, have the
new birth where our iniq-
uity and sin are removed. A
miracle takes place inside
us, and we are never the
same.
Like Isaiah, the man-
ifestation of God inside
the believer alters the way
we speak. Before, we said
anything we wanted to.


Faith


Spirituality










Now we have something
new inside us, the Holy
Spirit to guide, lead and
convict us.


We may say some of the
things we use to in the
past, but we are no longer
comfortable with the kind
of language the world
uses. The God inside of us
is holy and pure, but the
world is not. As we grow in
the wisdom and knowl-
edge of God and His Son
Jesus Christ, our speech
becomes refined. Not that
we are so eloquent, but
now we are conscious of
what we say in the pres-
ence of a God who knows
and hears all.
When we are born of
God, who is righteous
and holy, we desire to be


the same way. We grow
to be more Christlike as
time goes on. The Bible
tells us we have the mind
of Christ. Since the Bible
is the truth, then we can
assume that we will speak
and act like the truth also.
God wanted to use
Isaiah, so He opened
Isaiah's eyes in a vision
that would change his
ministry forever. We have
the completed Bible and
the Holy Spirit to remove
the cover off our eyes, and
prepare us to be used by
God.
Many Christians are
being called by God for a


purpose and a ministry
in the kingdom, but they
aren't listening. When the
Lord said, "Whom shall I
send?" Isaiah said, "Here
am I! Send me."
God is looking for such
people in these last days
to hasten the day of Jesus'
return; if you are saved,
make sure you have
answered the call.
Serving God is what we
were created for. No other
duty is more important.
Judy Onofri is a church
elder at Father's House
Fellowship in North Port.
Email her at onofrijudy@
yahoo.com.


RELIGION

FROM PAGE 6

Continuing through May, the store will
hold its regular hours of 10 a.m. until
4 p.m. The church is located at 27000
Sunnybrook Road, Harbour Heights.
There store offers clothing items
priced from 50 cents, along with many
other bargains on items such as books,
dishes, furniture, small appliances,
linens, knickknacks, shoes and more.
Donations are welcome.
The church still is serving lunches
from the Kozy Kitchen in its Waters
Fellowship Hall from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Thursday and Fridays. The menu will
include a hamburger or cheeseburger
with french fries; two hot dogs with
french fries or chips; or tuna or egg
salad with a cup of soup. Watch for
specials.
Everyone is welcome; do not let
the bridge construction deter you. For
more information, call 941-629-1593.

Thrift shop

Bargain hunters, have you visited
the Port Charlotte Seventh-day
Adventist Thrift Shop? It has low
prices, with new items arriving
daily. Business hours are 9 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. Sunday, Tuesdays and
Thursday at 2036 Loveland Blvd. For
more information, call 941-629-0398.

'Horn of Plenty'
First Baptist Church of Punta Gorda,
450 Gill St., provides a year-round
ministry titled "Horn of Plenty.:' It
now is open from 9 a.m. until noon
Saturday, and includes free nonper-
ishable food items and incidentals.
Clothing needs are met on a limited


rFAITHLCMS
Punta Gorda
"Welcome Home!"
Contemporary Sat. 5:30
Traditional Sun. 9:30
941-639-6309
4005 Palm Drive
1/4 mile west of US41
on Rio Villa


HOLY TRINITY
LUTHERAN, ELCA
2565 Tamiami Trail, Pt. Charlotte
625-5262
Traditional Service 7:45, 11:00 AM
Celebration Service 9:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Rev Ken & Andrea Barrios Co-Pastors
Food Pantry Open Mon, Wed & Thurs 9am-12pm
Email office@htlchurch org
We are an equal opportunity provider


LIVING WATERS LUTHERAN
CHURCH & PRESCHOOL, ELCA
"The Little White Chudh In The County"
12475 Chancellor Blvd.
(North Port Blvd & Chancellor)
North Port -941-625-8090
SundayWorship 8:15 am & 10am
Sunday School 10:00am
Lent Midweek Service 7pm
Rev. Dr. Dell Shiell
We Welcome Snowbirdsl
www.LivingWatersLutheran.comn


LUTHERAN CHURCH
OF THE CROSS LCMS
2300 Luther Road, Port Charlotte
627-6060
Sun. Worship 7:45 & 10:15 a.m.
Christian Education Hour
Sunday 9:00 a.m.
Rev Kenneth Redmann Pastor
Rev James Cotter, Winter Asst Pastor
Nursery Provided
Email Secretary@lccross org
www lccross org


basis from September through April
each year. The ministry is an equal
opportunity provider. For more
information, call 941-639-3857 or
visit www.fbcpuntagorda.org.

Farmers Market

Liberty Community Church,
2759 Wylam Drive (off Veterans
Boulevard in Port Charlotte,
between Harbor and Orlando boule-
vards), North Port, offers a Farmers
Market from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. each
Friday through April (except the day
after Thanksgiving). It may include
fresh farm produce, fruits, nuts,
honey, breads, meats, kettle korn,
teas, organic pet treats, organic
garden products, art, jewelry, live
music and much more. Spiritual
information also will be available
to those interested, at the church's
booth. For more information, call
941-429-0776.

Friend to Friend

Friend to Friend at Gulf Cove
United Methodist Church, 1100
McCall Road (State Road 776), Port
Charlotte, is a social gathering that
provides a place where adults of all
ages can meet for fellowship and
develop new friendships. Expect
fun, laughter, a relaxed atmosphere
and more. All you need to bring is a
nonalcoholic beverage for yourself,
a wide-open heart and a welcome
spirit. Friend to Friend meets from
1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday in rooms
109/110. The fourth Tuesday of each
month, the group meets at noon
and goes out for lunch. For more
information, call 941-697-1 747,
email gulfcoveumc@centurylink.
net, or visit www.gulfcovechurch.
com.


UUR SAVIUO LU IHERKAN
CHURCH LCMC
Meeting in the El Jobean Community Center
14344 Jamison Way, Port Charlotte
10am with Communion every Sunday
Clyde W. Kaminska, Ph.D Pastor
Preaching Grace, Faith, Scripture
"No Warmer Christian Fellowship
Anywhere!"
For further information phone
(941) 766-7567 or (941) 764-8646


CHRIST COMMUNITY
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
IN HARBOUR HEIGHTS
27000 Sunnybrook Road
629-1593
Pastor Duane Waters
Sunday Worship at 10 am
Communion first Sunday of the Month
Covered Dish Dinner
First Sunday of the Month at 11 30 am
[ ,,, ]" ....1 1 ... 1 i, [ d


CLEVELAND UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
28038 Cleveland Avenue
Punta Gorda, FL 33982
941-639-2775


Traditional Service 9:30 am
Contemporary Service 11:00 am
Reverend Thomas Moore, Pastor


EDGEWATER UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
19190 Cochran Blvd.
(Atthe corner of US 41 & Cochran Blvd)
www edgewaterchurch com
625-3039
Pastor Dan Prine
Services:
Saturday Night Contemporary Woshlip Service 6:00pm
8:00am Traditional 9:30& 11:00amContemporaiy
11:00am Sunday Bible Study Class
I ...,1 S, chol 9. -1.0 -. Mi.......... n.,.Pro.ie


Food for the Soul

The public is invited to join in
every Wednesday evening at Gulf
Cove United Methodist Church,
1100 McCall Road (State Road 776),
Port Charlotte, for Food for the
Soul. From 4:30-5:30, the Rev. Bill
conducts the Pastor's Bible Study,
based on the next Sunday's sermon.
From 5:30 to 6, an optional, light
dinner is served; for those who
are able to pay, the cost is $3
per person, with a $10 family
maximum. At 6, there are various
activities for all ages. A nursery
is available for the very young
through prekindergarten; Jesus
Rocks is offered for those in kinder-
garten through fifth grade; all
youth in grades six through 12 are
invited to join the ECHO (Energized
Christians Helping Others); and
adult sessions also are offered. All
sessions end at 7:30. For more infor-
mation, call 941-697-1 747, email
gulfcoveumc@centurylink.net, or
visit www.gulfcovechurch.com.

Crafty Ladies
The Crafty Ladies of Gulf Cove
United Methodist Church, 1100
McCall Road (State Road 776), Port
Charlotte, remind everyone that
people do not need to wait for
the Fall Bazaar or the January Arts
& Crafts Show to purchase their
handcrafted items. The items are
available from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
every Thursday morning (except
holidays) at Oak's Cove, the small
building behind the church. For
more information, contact Helen at
941-697-5533, email gulfcoveumc@
centurylink.net, or visit www.
gulfcovechurch.com.


METHODIST CHURCH
507W. Marion Ave.
Punta Gorda, FL 33950
639-3842
Rev. Michael Loomis
Sunday Worship 8:00 & 11:00 a.m.
Contemporary Service 9:15 a.m.
Adult, Teen & Youth Sunday School
Nursery Provided
www.puntagordamethodist.com


FRIENDSHIP
UNITED METHODIST
12275 Paramount Dr.
Punta Gorda

637-1717
Pastor Bruce Antle
9:30 am -Traditional Service
9:30 am Children's Church
10:55 am Contemporary Service


O0RT CHARLOTTE
UNITED METHODIST
21075 Quesada Ave
625-4356
Brian James, Pastor
Worship Services
8 00 a m Traditional Service
8 00 a m Radio Broadcast
on WVIJ FM91 7
930am (i .. ,,,,, Service
11 00anr i i .. .. Service
Sunday School 930 and 11 00 a m
P www pcumc info


TRINITY UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
23084 Seneca Ave.
Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980
625-3372
Pastor Marion R. Sortore
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Nursery Provided
Sunday School Adults & Children
9:00Oam-9:45am
Fnday Food Pantry & Lunch 11 00am-1 00pm


HOLYWEEK/EASTER SERVICES
Grace Community Church of Englewood at
Indian Mound Park, 210 Winson Ave., Englewood:
annual Easter Sunrise Service 7:30 a.m. April 20, with
children's activities for ages 4-10. After service, a
continental breakfast will be served, followed by an
Easter egg hunt for the children. Seating for 300 will
be provided. All welcome to come as you are. Free;
for all ages.
Gulf Cove United Methodist Church, 1100
McCall Road (State Road 776), Port Charlotte: Maundy
Thursday Tenebrae service, 7:15 p.m. April 17 -
gradual extinguishing of candles while a series of
readings and scripture are recited; Good Friday,
April 18, chapel open for prayer between 9 a.m. and
3 p.m., then 7:15 p.m. worship service; Easter Sunday,
April 20 7:15 a.m. sunrise service, traditional
services at 8 a.m. and 11 a.m., and contemporary
service at 9:30 a.m. (this service signed for hear-
ing-impaired). Bring fresh flowers to place on the
cross outside. All welcome. 941-697-1747, gulfcov-
eumc@centurylink.net or http://gulfcovechurch.com.


Young Adults

The Young Adults of Gulf Cove
United Methodist Church, 1100
McCall Road (State Road 776), Port
Charlotte, meet on an ad-hoc basis
throughout the year. The group is for
young adults between the ages of 18
and 35. Find out more information
by mailing youngadultsGCUMC@
gmail.com, calling 941-681-0477, or
checking Facebook at the"Gulf Cove
The YARD" page. More information
about the church is available at www.
gulfcovechurch.com.


Men's Club
All men are welcome to join
the Gulf Cove United Methodist
Men's Club. It meets at 8 a.m. the
first Tuesday of every month for
breakfast and discussion at Stefano's


Freedom Bible Church
New Location:
Port Charlotte Cultural Center Theater
2280 Aaron St., Port Charlotte
Powerful Bible Message. Praise & Worship
Full Nursery & Children Classes
Sunday Services
10:30 am
CASUAL DRESS, NO RELIGIOUS
PRESSURE (1 Thess. 2: 3 & 4)
For directions or questions, call 255 5613 or visit
us at: www.FreedomBibleChurch.com


3/U Atwater St., Port Cnarlotte
Rev. Dr. David Blood
Contemporary Service 9:30
Coffee 9:00
Welcome Hope Children's Home
Casual Dress Nursery Provided
www.onlinenewhope.com
866-717-3946



BlessedAssurance
Bible Chapel
Worship Service with Meaningfuld Bible Message
Sunday Mornings 10:00am
A different speaker each week
1435 Collingswood Blvd.
Port Charlotte, FL 33948
www.swfbi.org 941-625-3255
A ministry ofthe
SouthWest jForida Bibhe Institute, Inc.
Refreshments after every service


FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
OF PORT CHARLOTTE
SUNDAY HOURS
9:00am Contemporary Service
10:00 11:00am Coffee Fellowship
11:00 Traditional Service
Rev. Donald Buck, Pastor
2230 Hariet St.-Between Midway & Gibralter
625-5045
www. fpcpc.com


Lighthouse Baptist Church, 14251 Chancellor
Blvd., (behind the North Port Home Depot) Port
Charlotte: outdoor Easter sunrise service, 7:30 a.m.;
complimentary breakfast, 9 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.;
indoor celebration service, 11 a.m.- all April 20.
Children's puppet show with the Rev. Tommy
Sheffield, pastor, in the fellowship hall during both
services. All welcome. 941-624-6462 or www.
Ibcministry.com.
Pilgrim Church, 24515 Rampart Blvd., Port
Charlotte: 8 a.m. traditional service, 10 a.m. contem-
porary service Palm Sunday, April 13; 5 p.m. dinner,
6:30 p.m. service Maundy Thursday, April 17; noon
lunch, 1 p.m. service Good Friday, April 18; and 9 a.m.
service April 19 at South Port Square, 23023 West-
chester Blvd., Port Charlotte. Easter Sunday services
April 20:7 a.m. Sunrise Service at the Nav-A-Gator
Bar & Grill, 9700 S.W. Riverview Circle (off County
Road 769/Kings Highway), in DeSoto County, just
past Port Charlotte (rain site is Pilgrim Church); then,
at church: 8 a.m. traditional service, and 10 a.m.
contemporary service. All welcome. 941-629-2633 or
www.pilgrimonline.org.


Family Restaurant, 401 S. Indiana
Ave. (State Road 776), Englewood
(phone, 941-475-0868). The club
provides Christian fellowship, and
its members assist with numerous
church functions. Proceeds from
its various projects support the
ministries of the church and the
community. For more information,
call Al Crosby at 941-697-8373.
More information about the church
is available at www.gulfcovechurch.
com.


Spiritual quote:


Even the gods love jokes."
Plato

Marion Putman is handling religious
news for the Charlotte Sun. You can
contact her by phone: 941-206-1183;


FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
OF PUNTA GORDA
25250 Airport Rd., Punta Gorda
639-1959
Rev. Stephen Mock
Sunday Worship
New Betinnin.mt Service 9:00am
Ti l,,i...,l ,,... 10:30am
Watch Services Live via Website
ECOA Covenant Order Of
Evangelical Presbyterians
www.fpcpunta.org


Living & Learning
God's Word
Sun. Traditional Uplifting
Worship 10:30 a.m.
10548 Kings Hwy., 4 mi. N.E. of 1-75
941-743-7971
gracelakesuzy.com
Presbyterian Church in America

PRESBYTERIAN
BURNT STORE
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
11330 Burnt Store Rd, Punta Gorda
(2 miles south of US 41)
S941.639.0001 wwwiqSOinueg
Tradiflional R15 a.m. and 11:00 a.m.
Contemporary Come As You Are 9:40 a.m.
Nursery and age specific activities for
preschoolers for all Sunday morning activities.



SPIRITUAL HOME WHERE
RELIGION AND REASON MEET


UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP
OF CHARLOTTE COUNTY
Rev Amy Kindred
Worship Sun 10:30 AM
Welcoming and inclusive
www.uufcc.orfc
www.facebook.comTuufcc
1532 Forrest Nelson Boulevard
Port Charlotte 941.627.4303


fax (to her attention): 941-629-2085;
email: marionmputman@gmail.com;
or write (to her attention): c/o the
Charlotte Sun, 23170 Harborview
Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980.
TYPE or PRINT submissions, each
of which MUST include the church's
NAME, ADDRESS, PHONE and the
name of a contact person. Don't forget
the TIME, DATE and LOCATION of the
event. Email is the preferred method
for communicating this information.
Email photos, in .jpg format, as
file attachments. Submissions will
be edited for length. Information
must be received NO LATER than
NOON WEDNESDAY for inclusion in
the upcoming Saturday's column;
announcements will run on a
space-available basis. If you would
like to purchase an ad to guarantee a
spot in the paper for your event, call
941-206-1000 and ask for Display
Advertising.


CONGREGATIONAL
UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST
1201 Aqui Esta Drive, Punta Gorda
www.puntagorda-ucc.com
637-8443
Worship at 10:30amn
Rev. Bill Klossner



PILGRIM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
24515 Rampart Blvd. Pt. Charlotte
629-2633
Rev. Matthew L. Neumann, Sr. Pastor
Sunday Traditional Service 8:00am
Contemporary Service 10:00am
Nursery & Children's Church
Provided during all services.



UNITY CHURCH
OF PEACE
1250 Rutledge St.
(Veterans & Torrington)
North Port, FL., 34288
941-423-8171
Rev. Susan Miller
Sunday Service 10AM
unitychurchofpeace.com


NEW LIFE FAMILY
WORSHIP
28330 Bermont Rd., Punta Gorda
941-639-1700
9:30am Sunday Bible Study
10:30am Worship Service
7:00pm -Wednesday
Children's Church
Youth & Young Adults
nlfw@embarqmail.com
newlifefamilyworship.org


e JiNI e*


m r7l







Our Town Page 8 C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun ISaturday, March 29, 2014


31 00 NOTICE OF ACTION
IL 3116 1


LEGALS


3/29/2014

I INVITATION
TO BID
two 3114^


NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY OF
BID SPECIFICATIONS
REQUEST FOR BIDS
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
The County of Charlotte will be
receiving sealed bids at the Pur-
chasing Division, Suite 344, Char-
lotte County Administration Cen-
ter, 18500 Murdock Circle, Port
Charlotte, FL 33948-1094, for:
BID NO. 2014000226
DREDGING MANCHESTER-
ACKERMAN-HYATTSVILLE
WATERWAYS
It is the intent of Charlotte County
to secure the services of an expe-
rienced firm to furnish all labor,
equipment, supplies, materials,
transportation, fuel, power,
water, providing environmental
protection, and performing all
operations in connection with the
Manchester, Ackerman, and
Hyattsville Waterways dredging in
Charlotte County, Florida. The
project is located within the Gas-
parilla Sound Charlotte Harbor
Aquatic Preserve.
The Local License required to
perform this services are: Certi-
fied Building, Certified General,
Certified Marine, Registered
Building, Registered General or
Local Marine Construction.
PRE-BID CONFERENCE:
9:00 a.m. (EST),
APRIL 9, 2014
ADMINISTRATION COMPLEX,
ROOM 344
BID OPENING:
2:00 p.m. (EST),
APRIL 30, 2014
PURCHASING DIVISION
CONFERENCE ROOM
Bid Documents may be obtained
by accessing the Charlotte Coun-
ty Purchasing Division's website
at
www.charlottecountvfl.com/pur-
chasing under "Purchasing Bids
Online", document number
142262. Any questions can be
answered by contacting Arthur C.
Markham, Contract Specialist, at
941.743.1377.
Publish: March 29, 2014
163352 3020877

L NOTICE OF ACTION

Z 3116 ^

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 08-2011 -CA-003912
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff,
VS.
ARNOLD J. AHONEN, TRUSTEE
OF THE ARNOLD J. AHONEN LIV-
ING TRUST DATED; et al.,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Unknown Beneficiaries of the
Arnold J. Ahonen Living
Trust Dated December 13,
1988
Last Known Residence:
Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action to foreclose a mort-
gage on the following property in
Charlotte County, Florida:
LOT 13, BLOCK 368,
PUNTA GORDA ISLES, SEC-
TION 18, A SUBDIVISION,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 10, PAGES 4A
THROUGH 4Q, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF CHAR-
LOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any, to
it on ALDRIDGE CONNORS, LLP,
Plaintiff's attorney, at 1615 South
Congress Avenue, Suite 200, Del-
ray Beach, FL 33445 (Phone
Number: (561) 392-6391), within
30 days of the first date of publi-
cation of this notice, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before 5/1/14on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
Dated on March 26., 2014
BARBARA T. SCOTT
As Clerk of the Court
By: C. L. G.
As Deputy Clerk
Publish: 3/29/14 and 4/5/14
334261 3021348
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 12-003749-CA
DIVISION:
FIFTH THIRD BANK, AN OHIO
BANKING CORPORATION, AS
SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO
FIFTH THIRD BANK, A MICHI-
GAN BANKING CORPORATION
ALSO KNOWN AS FIFTH THIRD
BANK (SOUTH FLORIDA)
Plaintiff,
vs.
JIRI SIRUCEK, et al.,
Defendants.


NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: JIRI SIRUCEK
235 Mentel Terrace
Port Charlotte, Fl 33952
Or
1981 Pollard Ave
North Port, FL 34286
Or


2197 Ringling Blvd
Sarasota, FL 34237
Or
955 Starling Dr., Apt 380
Kissimmee, FL 34747
Or
1235 Charleston Ln
Columbus, OH 43229
THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF JIRI SIRUCEK
235 Mentel Terrace
Port Charlotte, Fl 33952
Or
1981 Pollard Ave
North Port, FL 34286
Or
2197 Ringling Blvd
Sarasota, FL 34237
Or
955 Starling Dr., Apt 380
Kissimmee, FL 34747
Or
1235 Charleston Ln
Columbus, OH 43229
You are notified that an action
to foreclose a mortgage on the
following property in Charlotte
County:
BEING LOT NUMBER
159, BLOCK 2106 IN
PORT CHARLOTTE SUB-
DIVISION, SECTION 25,
A SUBDIVISION AS
SHOWN IN THE RECORD
PLAT/MAP THEREOF IN
PLAT BOOK 5 PAGES
18A THROUGH 18C,
INCLUSIVE OF CHAR-
LOTTE COUNTY
RECORDS.
The action was instituted in the
Circuit Court, Twentieth Judicial
Circuit in and for Charlotte, Flori-
da; Case No. 12-003749-CA ;
and is styled FIFTH THIRD BANK,
AN OHIO BANKING CORPORA-
TION, AS SUCCESSOR BY MERG-
ER TO FIFTH THIRD BANK, A
MICHIGAN BANKING CORPORA-
TION ALSO KNOWN AS FIFTH
THIRD BANK (SOUTH FLORIDA)
vs. JIRI SIRUCEK, UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF JIRI SIRUCKE, JANE
DOE, JOHN DOE, AS UNKNOWN
TENANTS IN POSSESSION. You
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to
the action on Mikael Hirsch, Esq,
Plaintiff's attorney, whose
address is 255 S. Orange Ave,
Ste 900, Orlando FL 32801, on
or before 4/23/14, (or 30 days
from the first date of publication)
and file the original with the clerk
of this court either before service
on ____ or immediately after
service; otherwise, a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
The Court has authority in this
suit to enter a judgment or
decree in the Plaintiff's interest
which will be binding upon you.
DATED: March 18. 2014
As Clerk of the Court
By: C.L.G.
As Deputy Clerk
Publish: March 22 and 29, 2014
357986 3017584
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
Case Number: 13-2569-CA
In Re: The Forfeiture of:
$1,624.00 U.S. Currency
Claimant: DEQUAN HINTON
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO CLAIMANT, DEQUAN HIN-
TON and his devisees, grantees
creditors, and all other parties
claiming by, through, under or
against it; and all unknown natural
persons, if alive and if not known
to be dead or alive, their several
and respective spouses, heirs,
devisees, grantees, and creditors
or other parties claiming by,
through, or under those unknown
natural persons and their several
unknown assigns, successors in
interest, trustees, or any other
persons claiming by, through,
under or against any corporation
or other legal entity named as a
defendant; and all claimants, per-
sons or parties natural or corpo-
rate whose exact status is
unknown, claiming under any of
the above named or described
defendants or parties who are
claiming to have any right, title or
interest in and to the property
hereafter described.
You are notified that a forfeiture
action on the following property,
to-wit: $1,624.00 U.S. Currency
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any, to
it on WILL W. SUNTER, ESQUIRE,
@ FARR, FARR, EMERICH, HACK-
ETT and CARR, P.A., Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is 99
Nesbit Street, Punta Gorda, FL
33950, on or before the 10th day
of April, 2014, and file the origi-
nal with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiffs'
Attorney or immediately there-
after otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint.
Witness my hand and seal of the
Court this 5th day of March,
2014.
BARBARA T. SCOTT,
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: C.L.G.
Deputy Clerk
Publish: 3/8/14, 3/15/14
3/22/14, 3/29/14
114849 3012157
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.:
08-2014-CA-000127
DIVISION:
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK,


NATIONAL ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
FLORIDA FIRST ESCROW
COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR
THE BALD EAGLE TRUST
3169 DATED JANUARY 1,
2002, et al,


NOTICE OF ACTION

Z 3116 ^

Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION
To:
THE UNKNOWN BENEFICIA-
RIES OF THE BALD EAGLE
TRUST 3169 DATED
JANUARY 1, 2002
Last Known Address:
Unknown
Current Address:
Unknown
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH,UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO
BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN
INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS
Last Known Address:
Unknown
Current Address:
Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage
on the following property in Char-
lotte County, Florida:
LOT 5, BLOCK 3, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION,
SECTION 1, A SUBDIVISION,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 3 AT PAGES
26A, 26B AND 26C, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
A/K/A 3169 SUNRISE TRL,
PORT CHARLOTTE, FL
33952-6662
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses within 30
days after the first publication, if
any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiff's
attorney, whose address is P.O.
Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623,
and file the original with this Court
either before 4/23/14 service on
Plaintiff's attorney, or immediately
thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once a week for two consecutive
weeks in the Charlotte Sun-Her-
ald.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court on this 18th day of
March, 2014.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: C.L.G.
Deputy Clerk
**See the Americans
with Disabilities Act
If you are a person with a disabili-
ty who needs any accommoda-
tion in order to participate in a
court proceeding, you are enti-
tied, at no cost to you, to the pro-
vision of certain assistance.
Please contact the Administrative
Services Manager, whose office
is located at 350 E. Marion Ave.,
Punta Gorda, FL 33950 and
whose telephone number is
(941)637-2281, within two (2)
working days of receipt of this
notice; if you are hearing or voice
impaired, call 1-800-955-8771.
To file response please contact
Charlotte County Clerk of Court,
350 E. Marion Street, Punta
Gorda, FL 33651-1687, Tel:
(941) 637-2238; Fax: (941) 637-
2216.
Publish: March 22 and 29, 2014
272484 3017364


AUCTION
<^ 3119 ^

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
JOHNSON'S TOWING OF VENICE
gives Notice of Foreclosure of Lien and
intent to sell these vehicles on
4/23/2014, 9:00 am at 604 TAMIAMI
TRL N. NOKOMIS, FL 34275-2137, pur-
suant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida
Statutes. JOHNSON'S TOWING OF
VENICE reserves the right to accept or
reject any and/or all bids.
2002 FORD
1FAFP36362W180146
1997 FORD
1FTCR10U2VTA58127
2004 SATURN
1G8AK52F54Z102855
2005 PONTIAC
3G2JB12F55S132715
1998 CHEVROLET
4G1JF32T7WB901074
PUBLISH: March 29, 2014
248408 3020091

I NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE I



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 10001106CA
BANK OF AMERICA, NA.,
Plaintiff
vs.
JOHN MENZIES A/K/A
JOHN L. MENZIES, et al.,
Defendants)
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pur-
suant to an Order Rescheduling
Foreclosure Sale dated 26 day of
March, 2014, entered in Civil
Case Number 10001106CA in
the Circuit Court for Charlotte
County, Florida, wherein BANK OF
AMERICA, N.A. the Plaintiff, and
JOHN MENZIES, et al, are the
Defendants, Charlotte County
Clerk of Court will sell the proper-


ty situated in Charlotte County,
Florida, described as:
LOT 26, BLOCK 428, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION,
SECTION 18, A SUBDIVISION
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 8A
THRU 8E, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
at public sale, to the highest and
best bidder, for cash, at
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
at 11:00 AM. on 29 day of May,
2014. Any person claiming an


I NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE
k^ 3122^^

interest in the surplus from the
sale, if any, other than the prop-
erty owner as of the date of the
lis pendens must file a claim with-
in 60 days after the sale.
Dated: March 26. 2014
By: J. Miles
Charlotte County Clerk of Court
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
If you are a person with a disabili-
ty who needs any accommoda-
tion in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please con-
tact the Administrative Services
Manager, whose office is located
at 350 E. Marion Avenue, Punta
Gorda, Florida 33950, and whose
telephone number is (941) 637-
2281, within two working days of
your receipt of this [describe
notice]; if you are hearing or voice
impaired, call 711.
Si ou se yon moun ki gen yon
andikap ki bezwen aranjman nen-
pot nan lod yo patisipe nan sa a
pwose dapel, ou gen dwa, san sa
pa koute ou, ak founiti asistans a
seten. Tanpri kontakte Adminis-
tratif Sevis Manadje a, ki gen
biwo sitiye nan 350 Avenue Mari-
on E., Punta Gorda, Florid 33950,
epi ki gen nimewo telefon se
(941) 637-2281, nan de jou k ap
travay yo resevwa ou nan sa a
[avi dekri]; si ou se odyans oswa
vwa ki gen pwoblem, rele 711.
Si vous etes une personnel handi-
capee qui a besoin d'une adapta-
tion pour pouvoir participer a
cette instance, vous avez le droit,
sans frais pour vous, pour la four-
niture d'une assistance certain.
S'il vous plait contacter le
Directeur des services adminis-
tratifs, don't le bureau est situe au
350, avenue E. Marion, Punta
Gorda, Floride 33950, et don't le
numero de telephone est le (941)
637-2281, dans les deux jours
ouvrables suivant la reception de
la present [decrire avis]; si vous
etes audience ou de la voix
alteree, composer le 711.
Si usted es una persona con una
discapacidad que necesita
cualquier acomodacion para
poder participar en este proced-
imiento, usted tiene derecho, sin
costa alguno para usted, para el
suministro de determinada asis-
tencia. Por favor, pongase en
contact con el Administrador de
Servicios Administrativos, cuya
oficina esta ubicada en 350 E.
Avenida Marion, Punta Gorda,
Florida 33950, y cuyo numero de
telefono es (941) 637-2281, den-
tro de los dos dias habiles sigu-
ientes a la recepcion de esta
describea aviso]; Si usted. esta
escuchando o la voz alterada,
Ilame al 711.
Publish: 3/29/14 and 4/5/14
276862 3021299
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 10002811CA
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff.
vs.
JASON M. EASTWOOD, ET AL.
Defendants
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Fore-
closure dated February 11, 2014
and entered in Case No.
10002811CA, of the Circuit
Court of the Twentieth Judicial Cir-
cuit in and for CHARLOTTE Coun-
ty, Florida. BANK OF AMERICA,
N.A. (hereafter "Plaintiff"), is
Plaintiff and JASON M. EAST-
WOOD; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
JASON M. EASTWOOD N/K/A
KATHLEEN S. EASTWOOD; CHAR-
LOTTE COUNTY, are defendants. I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash via the Internet at
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
, at 11:00 a.m., on the 20 day of
June, 2014, the following
described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment, to wit:
LOT 25, BLOCK 776, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION,
SECTION 26, A SUBDIVI-
SION ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
5, PAGES 19A THROUGH
19E, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
If you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the
Administrative Services Man-
ager, whose office is located
at 350 E. Marion Avenue,
Punta Gorda, Florida 33950,
and whose telephone number
is (941) 637-2281, within two
working days of your receipt
of this Foreclosure Complaint;
if youare hearing or voice
imparied call 711.
Dated this 26 day of Feb., 2014.
Barbara Scott
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY J. Miles
As Deputy Clerk
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the Lis Pendens
must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.
Publish: March 22 and 29, 2014
232598 3017401
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN


AND FOR CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 08-2010-CA-005039
U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIA-
TION, AS TRUSTEE FOR
CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST, INC. 2006-NC2, ASSET
BACKED PASS THROUGH CER-
TIFICATES SERIES 2006-NC2
Plaintiff,
V.
KHAMEEL SINGH; SHARDA F.
ALISINGH; UNKNOWN TENANT


I NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE I
^^ 3122^^

1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; AND
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
ING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE ABOVE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS, WHO (IS/ARE)
NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDI-
TORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES,
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; SEC-
TION 20 PROPERTY OWNERS
ASSOCIATION, INC.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pur-
suant to the Summary Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure entered on
August 6, 2013, and the Order
Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale
entered on March 18, 2014 in
this cause, in the Circuit Court of
Charlotte County, Florida, I will
sell the property situated in Char-
lotte County, Florida, described
as:
SITUATE IN CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, STATE OF FLORI-
DA, TO-WIT:
LOTS 2 AND 3, BLOCK 569,
PUNTA GORDA ISLES, SEC-
TION 20, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF,
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
11, PAGE 2A THRU 2Z-42,
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
a/k/a 404 SAN AMBROSIO
ST, PUNTA GORDA, FL
33983-5775
at public sale, to the highest and
best bidder, for cash, at
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
, at eleven o'clock a.m.. on April
17, 2014.
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis
pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Dated at Punta Gorda, Florida,
this 19 day of March, 2014.
Barbara T. Scott
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: J. Miles
Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact
Jon Embury, Administrative
Services Manager, whose
office is located at 350 E.
Marion Avenue, Punta Gorda,
Florida 33950, and whose
telephone number is
(941)637-2110, at least 7
days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immedi-
ately upon receiving this noti-
fication if the time before the
schedule appearance is less
than 7 days; if you are hear-
ing or voce impaired, call
711.
Publish: March 22 and 29, 2014
146641 3017945
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 2012-256-CA
ELINOR C. NOBLE, AS TRUSTEE
OF THE ELINOR C. NOBLE TRUST
DATED AUGUST 12, 1996,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JAMES ENGEL
and DEBRA BRENT,
Defendants.
AMENDED NOTICE
OF FORECLOSURE SALE
Notice is hereby given that I, the
undersigned Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Charlotte County, Flori-
da, shall sell the real property set
forth below at public sale to the
highest bidder for cash, except
as set forth hereinafter, on April
17, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. at
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
in accordance with Chapter 45
Florida Statutes:
Lot 4, Block 4484, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION,
Section 81, a subdivision
according to the plat thereof,
recorded in Plat Book 6,
Pages 51A through 51IP, of
the Public Records of Char-
lotte County, Florida.
The said sale will be made pur-
suant to final judgment of foreclo-
sure of the Circuit Court of Char-
lotte County, Florida.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PEN-
DENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH-
IN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
Dated this 19 day of March,
2014.
BARBARA T. SCOTT
Clerk of Court
By: J. Miles
Deputy Clerk
Publish: March 22 and 29, 2014
108096 3017903
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE No. 122158CA
BANK OF AMERICA, NA.,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
PETA GAY DALE. ET AL.
DEFENDANTSS.
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-


suant to the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated in the above
action, I will sell to the highest bid-
der for cash at Charlotte, Florida,
on June 12. 2014, at 11:00 AM,
at WWW.CHARLOTTE.REALFORE-
CLOSE.COM for the following
described property:
LOT 14, BLOCK 632, PUNTA
GORDA ISLES, SECTION 23,
A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
12, PAGES 2A THROUGH
2Z41, INCLUSIVE, OF THE


I NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE
k^ 3122^^

PUBLIC RECORDS OF CHAR-
LOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis
pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale. The
Court, in its discretion, may
enlarge the time of the sale.
Notice of the changed time of
sale shall be published as provid-
ed herein.
DATED:
By: K. Polito
Deputy Clerk of the Court
If you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact
Lee County, James Sullivan,
ADA Coordinator at 239-533-
1700, fax 239-533-1733 or
at jsullivan@ca.cjis20.org,
Lee County Justice Center,
1700 Monroe Street, Ft
Myers, FL 33901 at least 7
days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immedi-
ately upon receiving this noti-
fication if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; if you are hear-
ing or voice impaired, call
711.
Publish: March 22 and 29, 2014
295673 3018028
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 13-002983-CA
DESJARDINS FLORIDA
LOAN CENTER, INC.,
a Delaware corporation,
Plaintiff
v.
JANE PATRICE MERRITT
a/k/a JANE P. MERRITT. et al.,
Defendants
CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY given that
pursuant to a Summary Judgment
in Foreclosure entered in the
above-entitled cause in the Circuit
Court of the Twentieth Judicial Cir-
cuit in and for Charlotte County,
Florida, I will sell at public sale
that certain parcel of real proper-
ty, situated in Charlotte County,
Florida, more particularly
described below, to the highest
bidder for cash, at the Charlotte
County Justice Center, 350 E.
Marion Avenue, Punta Gorda, FL
33951-1687, in accordance with
section 45.031, Florida Statutes,
using the following method
(CHECK ONE), on the 14 day of
May, 2014:
[ ] At 350 E. Marion Avenue.
Punta Gorda, FL 33951-1687,
beginning at__ a.m./p.m.
on the prescribed date.
[X] By electronic sale beginning
at 11:00 a.m. on the
prescribed date at www.char-
lotte. realforeclose .corn
(list name of website).
UNIT 218, FIDDLER'S GREEN
NATURE TRAIL, A CONDO-
MINIUM ACCORDING TO THE
DECLARATION OF CONDO-
MINIUM RECORDED IN OFFI-
CIAL RECORDS BOOK 2606,
PAGE 420, ET SEQ., AND
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN CON-
DOMINIUM PLAT BOOK 13,
PAGES 13ATHROUGH 13F OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA, TOGETHER WITH AN
UNDIVIDED INTEREST IN THE
COMMON ELEMENTS APPUR-
TENANT THERETO.
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis
Pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale.
DATED this 19 day of March,
2014.
BARBARA T. SCOTT, CLERK
Circuit Court of Charlotte County
By: K. Polito
Deputy Clerk
Publish: March 22 and 29, 2014
366622 3018001

NEED CASH?

NOTICE OF
MEETING



The Southwest Florida Water Man-
agement District (SWFWMD)
announces the following public
meeting to which all interested
persons are invited:
The District's Environmental
Advisory Committee will be
touring the Lake Hancock
Lake Level Modification and
Outfall Treatment Projects.
One or more Governing Board
members may attend.
DATE/TIME:
Tuesday, April 15, 2014; 1 p.m.
PLACE: 2205 Old Bartow- Eagle
Lake Road, Bartow, FL 33830
Pursuant to the provision of the
Americans with Disabilities Act,
any person requiring reasonable
accommodations to participate in
this workshop/meeting is asked
to advise the agency at least 5
days before the workshop/meet-
ing by contacting SWFWMD's
Human Resources Bureau Chief,


2379 Broad Street, Brooksville,
Florida 34604-6899; telephone
(352) 796-7211, ext. 4703 or 1-
800-423-1476 (FL only), ext.
4703; TDD (FL only) 1-800-231-
6103; or email to ADACoordina-
tor@swfwmd.state.fl.us
For more information, you may
contact: cindy.taylor@watermat-
ters.org; 1(800)423-1476 (FL
only) or (352)796-7211, x4150
(Ad Order EXE0318)
Publish: March 29, 2014
112958 3021181


OurTown Page 8 C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014





The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 9


SUN PHOTO BY BILL JONES
Outgoing Lifelong Learning Institute president Hasan Hammami, left, stands with past pres-
idents Craig Anderson, Charles Brox and Phyllis Pirner, as Brox holds a past presidents plaque
during a recent reception honoring LLI presidents and volunteers.


Lifelong learning, there is no end


By BILL JONES
SUN CORRESPONDENT

It all started back in
1966 when Jack Price,
executive director of
the Charlotte County
Foundation, saw the
need to provide lifelong
learning opportunities for
adults in the county.
The foundation bro-
kered a grant to fund
the start-up of a small
group of volunteers called
Learning in Retirement.
The initial cadre of tutors
included community
veterans Vernon Peeples
and Lindsay Williams.
That was then and this
is now. In 18 years, LIR
became Lifelong Learning
Institute, incorporated as
a nonprofit 501 (c) (3) or-
ganization, forged a close
working relationship with
Edison State College, and
joined a group of Lifelong
Learning Institutes across
the nation.
It's the only one in
Charlotte County, with
classes at Edison and
libraries in Englewood
and Arcadia.
The Charlotte County
Foundation has pro-
gressed as well. It's now
the Charlotte Community
Foundation, still the
primary supporter
of Lifelong Learning
Institute.
LLI's mission and
vision involve "advancing
lifelong learning, con-
tinuing pursuit of knowl-
edge, building skills,
exploring new ideas,
enriching life, personal
development, and im-
proving citizenship and
competitiveness."
To accomplish these
pursuits, LLI's class


offerings are almost end-
less: Shakespeare, short
stories, classic novels,
book clubs, world reli-
gions, American foreign
policy, income growth
and inequality, nature
hikes, walking tours,
world history, modern
art, nature photography,
learning Spanish, writing
memoirs, international
film festivals, and the
historic murals of Punta
Gorda, to name just a few.
In 2013, LLI scheduled
45 classes, three day trips,
four foreign film discus-
sion groups, two monthly
book clubs and a health
fair, serving more than
500 Charlotte and DeSoto
County residents.
The outstanding aspect
of this organization is
that it's comprised of all
volunteers, except for a
half-time office person at
Edison.
So, outgoing president
Hasam Hammami was
asked how all this was
accomplished.
"With a lot of passion,"
he said. "people working
together, talented people
with passion and a spark
in their minds and hearts
for continuous enlight-
enment. There is no limit
to human creativity in
making life better for the
community."
How Hammami, 81,
of Punta Gorda, got to
Charlotte County and
became president of LLI
is a story in itself.
Born in Palestine, he
became a professional
engineer and technical
and project manager. His
first job, at 18, was work-
ing in the Saudi Arabian
desert. Thus began a jour-
ney that would take him


to 23 countries, working
for Proctor & Gamble
"around the world,"
studying at the University
of Beirut and graduat-
ing from Nottingham
University in England.
Retiring in 1993, he
found his way to Punta
Gorda, "where I've lived,"
he smiled, "longer than
anywhere else in the
world." In retirement,
he said, "I just couldn't
sit around. I had to be
active." But pro-bono
work for a couple of years
for the United Nations
didn't cut it, until he took
some classes at LLI, and
was hooked.
He volunteered to teach
classes and did it for 21
years, joined the board
and became president.
LLI, he said, is one of the
most satisfying experi-
ences in his globe-trot-
ting life.
At 81, he emphatically
shares his lifelong learning
philosophy. "As long as
you live life," he coun-
seled, "there is no end."
LLI membership
categories range from
$35 for individual mem-
berships up to corporate
memberships of $1,000 or
more. Members receive a
discount on the cost of all
classes.
LLI actively seeks
volunteers for everything
from serving on the
board of directors and
its committees, through
personal and professional
development training and
class instruction, to office
and clerical work.
Its website is www.life
longlearning-charlotte.
org. To contact LLI:
charlottelli@edison.edu,
or 941-637-3533.


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


Pride Fest comes
to Punta Gorda
Charlotte County Pride
will hold Pride Fest from
noon to 6 p.m. May 3 at
Laishley Park, 100 Nesbit
St., Punta Gorda. A walk-
ing promenade will begin
at 11 a.m. on the Harbor
Walk from Gilchrist Park,
400 W Retta Esplanade,
Punta Gorda, to Laishley
Park. Participants are
encouraged to wear their
brightest colors, carry
rainbow flags, and show
their pride.
The entertainment
for Pride Fest will be
Nexxlevel, Zombie
University and Kate Keys,
plus a live DJ by Mac's
Sound Machine. Local
business vendors will
be on-site. Food and
drinks will be available
for purchase. There
will be a free rapid HIV
testing lab. CHAPS will
be on-site accepting food
and personal-hygiene
donations.
Admission to the
festival is a $5 donation.
Charlotte County Pride
seeks sponsors for this
event. For more infor-
mation, or to become


a sponsor, call Carrie
Egbert at 941-304-3505,
email cmj@charlotte
countypridefl.org, or visit
www.charlottecounty
pridefl.org.

Hook Kids on
Fishing is back
In partnership with
other like-minded
organizations, the
Anglers for Conservation
will coordinate a Fish
Earth Day using the
Hook Kids on Fishing
Program, set for 9 a.m.
April 5 at Fishermen's
Village, 1200 W Retta
Esplanade, Punta Gorda.
Sign-in begins at 9 a.m.,
with the clinic following
from 10 a.m. to noon.
Children and youth, 6 to
16 years old, are wel-
come, along with their
parents. The first 80 kids
registered may receive
a free rod and reel.
Registration is mandato-
ry by calling King Fisher
Fleet at 941-639-2628.
These conserva-
tion-minded Hook Kids
on Fishing programs,
taught by professional
guides and knowledge-
able anglers, teach


casting, fishing safety,
knot tying, the tackle
box, catch-and-release
tactics, fishing habitat
and conservation.
Volunteers and
donations are greatly
appreciated. To volun-
teer or participate as a
sponsor, contact Theresa
Ellershaw at 321-433-
3340 or tellershaw@aol.
com. For general infor-
mation about Anglers
For Conservation, call
321-750-1113, email
info@anglersfor
conservation.org, or
visit www.anglersfor
conservation.org.

Easter Bunny
hops to mall
The Port Charlotte
Town Center mall, 1441
Tamiami Trail, will
play host to Breakfast
with the Easter Bunny
from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m.
April 5. All the sweet
little bunnies and chicks
will enjoy visiting with
the Easter Bunny, as
well as a complimentary
breakfast, crafts, games
and more. Reservations
are requested; call
941-624-4833.


s CrosswordI


ACROSS
1 Dispense
8 Blitz initiator
13 Fundamentally
15 Crumb
16 Cry of reproach
17 They're filled in
factories
18 El AI no-show?
19 Son of Calliope
21 Mimicking
22 Backdrop for
some schools
24 James Monroe's
opposition in
1820
25 Salida sol
(sunrise: Sp.)
26 Florence
Nightingale's
birthplace
28 Pulitzer
composer of '76
30 Bagel flavor
31 What a ghost
might be
responsible for
33 Turns, as a
corner
35 Raspberry
37 Female _
38 Unfolds
41 Cello bottom
45 Watershed
protection
agency
46 Painter with a
"New Orleans
period"
48 Fabric in the
etymology of
"denim"
49 Turned yellow
50 Blues singer with
10 Grammys
52 "Paramount
leader" met by
Thatcher in '84
53 "Cliquez_"
(French web
instruction)


54 Wall-climbing aid
56 Beast known by
its genus name
57 Legendary forger
59 Launch setting
61 Subject of
marine-resource
regulation
62 Rule often
disobeyed by
foreigners
63 Goes full-tilt
64 Makes
available

DOWN
1 Shade source
2 Letter recipient
3 Heat, for
example
4 Small specimen
5 Emperor after
Galba
6 Uncommon GPS
recommendation
7 Opposite of "zip"


Look for a third

crossword in .

the Sun Classified

section.
.. .. .. .. .


SATURDAY STUMPER by Brad Wilber
Edited by Stanley Newman
www.stanxwords.com
8 Among other 39 Not especially
things edgy
9 Focus of much 40 Broke the ice,
of a Lansing perhaps
museum 42 To be delivered
10 One accepting 43 Winked at
charges 44 Wipes out
11 Rhododendron 45 Stand on more
relatives than two feet
12 Tiki-bar 47 Police-car
stipulation accessory
14 Beaver State 51 Ironman
high point Triathlon
15 Silkscreening licensee
need 54 Town a bit
20 Recruit east of the
23 Big name at the Rio Grande
Seoul Olympics 55 Drillmaster's
27 Submit word
29 Avenue 58 OSHA
32 Hushed, compliance
maybe course
34 Bonus 60 Honoree
36 Shakespearean on a 2009
false flatterer bicentennial
38 One out stamp


Answer to previous puzzle


AIM PE


3/29/14


Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis


ACROSS
1 Lunch To-Go
maker
9 Espresso feature
14 Inherit
15 Boring tool
16 A vacation often
involves one
17 State birds of
Connecticut,
Michigan and
Wisconsin
18 Tony Soprano,
for one
19 Navajo relative
20 Super Smash
Bros. Brawl
console
21 Pole, for one
23 Party person
24 Building owner,
often
28 Air traveler's
concern
31 Real time news
source
34 Many a Saudi
35 Quickly cooked
cut
36 Seawater
evaporation site
37 Brand no one
wants
41 Time of
existence
42"_ chance!"
45 Poppycock
46 Prevails in
49 Listing
53 Ocean floor
dwellers
54 Payback
55 Like some
angels
56 Slow-cooking
method involving
plastic bags
57 Circular
58 Not entirely

DOWN
1 Rough writer's
output
2 Multimetallic
Canadian coin
3 Guarneri
relatives
4 Insta- relative
5 Cultural group


By Julian Lim 3/29/14


6 Words before a
subject
7 Arouses
8 One-named
Tevye portrayer
9 Frame in a photo
lab
10 2000s sitcom set
in Houston
11 Spenser's 'The
Faerie Queene,"
for one
12 Its arrival is often
celebrated in
ritual
13 11th-century
Benedictine
philosopher
15 Crosses
22 Pribilof Islands
native
25 Action movie
staple
26 Cop (to)
27 Shepherd
memorably
rescued during
WWI
29 F neighbor
30 Japanese
hands-on
healing practice


Friday's Puzzle Solved
REALMIKEBAB SILIR
AZTEC ATOLL TOO

T AM U NE A DO0R ES
A F-T G I V E'N- S
THE FR I L L SG _N E


M-A R I- 1 -1_LI _S s 0 _



FRO EI NTH OEWEL
A I L ANYRA EIASE

RAD FETAS RENTS


(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
32 Pair with 44U
33 Reg. symbols 47 (
34 Without a peep 48 I
35 Like love potions
36 Shorten, in a 50 (
way (
38 Cooking crust e
39 One-celled 51 \


organisms
40 Truman's U.K.
counterpart
43 Tibia neighbors


52"

(
/


3/29/14
Jsed to hold food
Only
Many an "SNL"
performer
Color slightly
darker than
electric blue
Work (out)
To travel is to
": Hans
Christian
Andersen






Our Town Page 10 C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun ISaturday, March 29, 2014


VIEWPOINT


Derek Dunn-Rankin Chairman
David Dunn-Rankin Publisher
Chris Porter Executive Editor


Brian Gleason Editorial page editor
Stephen Baumann Editorial writer


Email letters to letters@sun-herald.com


I OUR VIEW

Put court records

back on

the Internet
n 2006, the Florida Supreme
Court banned the release of cer-
tain court records online just as
the Internet was maturing into the
most powerful informational tool in
history. We understand the concerns
over privacy, especially regarding So-
cial Security numbers, but the move
was a step back for a state with such
a strong public records culture. Last
week the court lifted the ban, after
a lengthy pilot program in Manatee
County demonstrated how sensitive
information could be safely and
quickly redacted from records and
subsequently posted.
The end of the ban won't unleash
a flood of records onto the Internet
automatically. Each county clerk
opting to make records available
must apply to the Office of the State
Courts Administrator for approval.
After that, the clerks' system will
be monitored for 90 days to ensure
compliance.
Manatee County Clerk of Court
R.B. "Chips" Shore has offered to
provide the software code used to
redact information to any clerk who
asks. Shore told the Florida Times-
Union the system has resulted in
cost savings for Manatee because
he no longer has to budget as much
staff time to handle in-person
requests for records.
In the years the ban has been in
place, the state court system has
adopted a series of procedures
and administrative rules that have
limited the amount of sensitive
personal information in court docu-
ments, while moving toward a more
digitized filing system. Justices noted
this migration to electronic filings
in its March 20 order, writing that
these steps are "significantly moving
the courts toward a fully electronic,
mostly paperless environment."
We urge local clerks to adopt
Shore's system and return court
records to the Internet as soon as
possible.


Lower'fees'

give'tax'relief
I | ax" relief should be coming
Sfor Floridians soon, consid-
T ering the ease with which
the Senate last week passed a bill
that would roll back motor vehicle
fees to pre-2009 levels.
It's entirely appropriate, consid-
ering the improved economy. Also
good politics in a gubernatorial
election year. (Watch for campaign
commercials coming to a TV near
you.)
The measure approved unani-
mously in the SenateWednesday
would drop vehicle registration fees
by roughly $20 per year. Large pick-
ups and cars would see annual fees
reduced from $71 to $46. Medium
cars would see a decrease of roughly
$21; smaller cars a little more than
$18. Annual boat registrations would
decline by $2. Registrations for
mobile homes officially classified
for taxing purposes as "vehicles"-
would drop by a little more than $5.
The budget impact will be
$309 million this year and
$395 million thereafter.
The new fee schedule would go
into effect on Sept 1, assuming it
passes the House and is signed by
Gov. Rick Scott. Safe to assume,
considering Scott trumpeted the
politically friendly fee proposal
before the session began.
We welcome the rollback We
weren't happy about the hikes
five years ago; we're glad to see the
old rates restored.
But let's also note that when the
higher fees hikes were approved,
the Republicans in control of the
Legislature were loathe to char-
acterize these as "tax" increases.
Conservative Republicans do not
raise "taxes"; they only lower them.
This, despite the fact that there
are more than 15 million vehicles
registered in Florida and nearly
15.5 million licensed drivers. One way
or another, a lot of people are affected.
This week, party leaders were only
too happy to apply the appropriate
label.
"It's away to get broad-based tax
and fee relief to the people," said bill
sponsor Sen. Joe Negron, R-Stuart.
No argument there.


Meanwhile, we'll pass on the
advice from a state transportation
official: If you can, wait until Sept. 1
to send in your renewal.


LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR


Questions a
GOP candid

Editor:
If the three Repu
are telling the truth
their opponents in
election in Lee and
counties, then non
should be elected.
If they are lying,f
don't think we wou
someone who lies t
Congress.
I hope we have a
or independent rui
What do you think?
Steph



Try living
old-fashione

Editor:
We want to be ha
why have our prob
depressed us so mi
seldom smile or lai
Space age techn
increases daily, m
electronics part ol
life. Many of us liv
private twilight zo
our computers an
electronic marvels
their slave, they h
time to laugh and
with others. Some
but money cannot
happiness.
Growing up in th
Depression, I reme
ing happy people s
laughing. We were
but we cared and s
we survived.
Let's try living th
ioned way. It work
and it will for us. Le
and laugh every da
will see how happy
Let's do it now.


bout
dates


blicans
About
i tho ,norin


and put an end to the place
once and for all.
I am sick of reading about it
every other day.
Andrew Hartman
North Port

Obamacare:
winners, losers


Stne sjpcaiEditor:
Collier Now that the enrollment
e of them period for the Affordable Care
e Act (ACA), or Obamacare, is
then almost over let's take a look
Id want at some of the winners and
to us in losers of this controversial
i Democrat legislation.
Deoca WINNERS: Everybody who
nning. has health insurance and no
longer has to worry about being
ien Bilodeau canceled for pre-existing con-
Rotonda editions or getting sick, lifetime
limits and has free preventive
care among other benefits. The
ig estimated 6 million people who
ed way will sign up for the ACA and
now may have health insurance
for the first time for themselves
ippy, but and their families and/or have
lems affordable health insurance.
uch that we The insurance companies
uigh? who have millions of new
ology customers. The investors who
making bought their stocks which I bet
f our include the billionaires who
re in our fund the anti-Obamacare ads!
me with Democrat-leaning states that
d other expanded Medicaid and will
s. Being receive billions of federal dollars
ave no to fund the expansion of health
enjoy life care to their poorer citizens. My
are rich, wife and I, as I am on Medicare,
t buy real but my wife has now replaced
her catastrophic coverage for a
ie much better plan.
*mber see- LOSERS: Americans who
miling and bought all the negative
all poor, publicity and missed a chance
hared, and at getting affordable health
care perhaps for the first time.
e old-fash- Republican states including
ed for them, Florida who rejected Medicaid
yet's smile expansion and will see billions
y and we that would have been used
Swe can be. to fund it instead going to
other states and will still have
Donald Bohr millions of uninsured citizens.
Port Charlotte Florida alone is estimated to
lose $5 billion.


Enough malarkey
about WMS

Editor:
Let's go commissioners.
All of this "malarkey" that
has been dragging on and
on about Warm Mineral
Springs seems like more than
enough.
I have lived here since 1981
and have never been, nor do
I ever plan on attending, so
just get the place opened on
a full-time, permanent basis
or just bring the bulldozers in


There are many more
winners and losers that can't
be listed in one letter. Let's
hear yours.
Greg Nelson
Englewood


Honest talk about
climate change

Editor:
Let's be honest when we talk
about climate change. It might
be an easier pill to swallow
if the major proponents of
the idea were not reaping


the rewards of the "green"
bandwagon.
Our government has poured
billions into failed green energy
companies. It has also awarded
billions more in grants to local
communities to buy "energy
efficient" buses and fleets. It
has paid consultants more
billions to "study" different
aspects of the movements.
Countless good companies
with job creating ideas have
been regulated out of existence
or stymied in their expansion.
The "Green Movement" has
made Al Gore and many others
filthy rich. It has deprived
people of their land through a
legal taking called eminent do-
main. It has closed industries
and caused unemployment. It
dictates the future use of land
and it permeates our educa-
tional system.
To the extent that we all
should treat our natural re-
sources and the other creatures
of the land with respect, one
might argue that the move-
ment is a good thing. But in the
bigger scheme, this is a whole
lot about the money pocketed.
Any meaningful discussion
should include the financial
information.
Shirley Reynolds
Englewood

North Port police
incident is sad

Editor:
I am deeply saddened by
recent news of the arrest of one
North Port police officer and
the apparent suicide of anoth-
er. Both the result of an alleged
sex offense reported by a victim
who knew both officers. This
certainly reflects poorly on
the officers and to some the
department as a whole.
First of all I applaud the chief
for having an outside agency
investigate the original com-
plaint. It eliminates complaints
from people saying the investi-
gation was biased.
I have lived in North Port
for approximately four years.
I retired after 35 years in law
enforcement in Upstate New
York. I have told people many
times that police officers are no
different than plumbers, car-
penters and electricians. That
is, there are very good people in
all those professions and there
are those who make mistakes
and are not so good. We are all
human and we make choices
that have consequences.
The officers' choices that
night will have a profound
effect on their families and
their department for a long
time to come.


I have met officers of the
North Port Police Department
and have found them to be
professional in every regard. I
urge residents to continue to
support their department in
this difficult time. That night
in question should not reflect
poorly on all the other dedi-
cated officers that are sworn to
protect us.
My prayers and thoughts
go out to the families of the
officers and the victim in this
case.
Gene Mitchell
North Port

Readers says Sun
slanted its news

Editor:
The Sun's ownership con-
tinues to slant political stories.
First they did it regarding the
ethics complaints filed against
two sitting Charlotte County
commissioners. The Sun ran
numerous articles about the
plight ofTricia Duffy and
never even mentioned the
same exact verdict had already
been rendered by the Ethics
Commission of Florida against
Christopher Constance almost
two months earlier. A letter
to the editor exposed their
charade.
Now they try and take down
former State Rep. Paige Kreegel
by publishing a front page
article slamming him and
withholding facts pertaining to
the article. The Sun published
four advertisements placed by
Dr. Kreegel announcing the
temporary suspension of his
practice and that his patients'
charts remain at the Janick
Medical Group. These notices
were published on Jan. 18, 19,
25, 26, in the Sun. The Sun
then issued a certificate of
attestation to the fact they had
printed these announcements
to Dr. Kreegel. Other local me-
dia printed this information,
but not the Sun.
What concerns me most is
not that the Sun plays political
favorites, but that they hide
information from the public
and print only what they want,
enabling them to slant the
story one way or another.
The Sun newspapers are
not worthy of their readership.
Freedom of the press does
not include the freedom to
withhold vital information
pertaining to what they print.
Now I must always question if
all the information is presented
in an article.
Robert Herriman
Port Charlotte

Ukraine crisis
exposes players

Editor:
What is developing in the
Ukraine has nothing to do with
national sovereignty, self-de-
termination or concern for the
Ukrainian people.
It is a clash of predators and
wolves, driven by competing
economic, political and
geostrategic interests. It is
about which imperialist camp
will exert leverage and de facto
control over the Ukrainian
economy and its state.
If they are not stopped, there
will come a time when the
heads of the four families (U.S.,
EU, Russia, and China) will no
longer be able to resolve their
differences with a sit-down,
as they divide the world, test
each other's strengths and
weaknesses and contest which
territory belongs to whom.
For the people of the world
to provide cover or support for
any of them is to strengthen
all of them, and make another
world war inevitable.
Arthur J. St. Lawrence
Punta Gorda


I LETTER SUBMISSION POLICY
Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have some rules. Please keep them to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community discourse, and the opinions
to less than 250 words. Letters will be edited to length as well as for grammar and spelling. All and statements made in letters are solely those of the individual writers. The newspaper takes
letters must be signed with full name not initials. An address and telephone number must be no responsibility for the content of these letters. Please send or bring correspondence to the Sun,
included. The phone number and address are not for publication, but must be provided. Due to the Letters to the Editor, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980, or fax to 941-629-2085.
number of letters received, we are able to run only one letter per person per month. The Letters Readers with access to the Internet may email Letters to the Editor at letters@sun-herald.com.


Our Town Page 10 C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014





The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014


VIEWPOINT


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 11


Who is being uncivilized?


n response to Keith
Waltz's guest column,
Save Our Sewers will
answer with facts, not
feelings.
Let's start with his
comment that the sewer
lines around Sunshine
Lake/Sunrise Waterway
are "fine ... according
to Charlotte County
Utilities." This is the
same CCU that has lost
two lawsuits over sewers
and cost taxpayers tens
of millions of dollars.
Well, if CCU said it, it
must be true.
Waltz also says com-
missioners, "have done
all they can to solve the
problem." Seriously?
Joanne Mulvaney, who
lives on the lake, had
been repeatedly warning
the commissioners since
2009 that something was
terribly wrong. No one
listened to her or her
group while we remind
readers of the Board of
County Commissioner's


Scott Andrichak
Save Our Septics


own $50,000 commis-
sioned report from the
Atkins Group in 2012.
Their scientists stated
the nutrient load in
the Sunrise Waterway/
Sunshine Lake is
equivalent to "100 to
150 million gallons of
sewage" that accumu-
lated over time. The
Sunrise/Sunshine area is
completely surrounded
by sewers, not septics.
The BCC demanded a
retraction, but Atkins
refused.
The BCC, under
Commissioner Tricia
Duffy's "leadership" on
the critical human health
issue in her district, did
nothing, for years. The
problem literally grew
worse while they did
nothing and taxpayers


must pay millions for this
environmental disaster.
We won't even discuss
here the immorality of
the county's actions, led
by Administrator Ray
Sandrock, in letting our
neighbors live alongside
toxic cyanobacterias and
algae that, at one point,
was 9 feet thick.
Even the contract for
cleaning up the lake was
so badly written that a
$1,200,000 cost overrun
was required, yet Waltz
thinks everything is just
peachy keen. We wonder,
if he lived on a poison
lake for five years, with
its reeking stench and
unknown health effects,
would he still think the
commissioners "have
done all they can"?
Waltz also wrote
this about the Spring
Lake sewer project:
"This mental stress
was brought about
by a group that calls
itself Save Our Sewers.


This group has misled
the public by twisting
statements from repre-
sentatives of Charlotte
Harbor National
Estuary Program and
the Florida Department
of Environmental
Protection."
We here at Save Our
'Septics' are used to such
mendacity. As always,
we let the facts speak for
themselves.
Dr. Lisa Beever, direc-
tor of CHNE front page,
Charlotte Sun, July 2,
2013, saying to the BCC,
"The problem is there
is not very much data
in the area you want to
sewer." Did the Sun twist
her words?
The CHNEP &
University of South
Florida made the Water
Atlas scientific charts
that show no fecal
coliform in the harbor
for nearly 40 years. Their
charts show massive
fecal spikes on Sunrise


Waterway at the same
time the Sunrise/
Sunshine environmental
disaster was beginning.
SOS didn't make the
charts. We just revealed
them.
FDEP Director Jon
Iglehart, August 22,
2013, NBC2 News
interview, when asked
about pollution in the
harbor, he said: "It's really
inconclusive, and doesn't
... (pause) ... you know, it
kinda says there may be
something here to look at,
but it really doesn't give
any definition of what
that really is." Was he
"twisting" his own words?
In his May 24, 2013,
internal email to Mr.
Sandrock, Iglehart wrote
there was "not a specific
study from the area to
be sewered," meaning
Spring Lake. He also
wrote that any environ-
mental benefit of the
sewers, "was based on
assumptions."


August 23, 2013,
Sandrock's internal
"memorandum" to
the BCC told the com-
missioners the "first"
reason for the sewers
in Spring Lake was "the
science." Mr. Sandrock
knowingly wrote this to
the commissioners after
Iglehart told him there
was no science for Spring
Lake. The Sun, and Waltz,
failed to report these crit-
ical facts to the public.
We could go on, but
readers get the point.
None of the above came
from SOS.
So to whom is Waltz
referring as "twisting
words," "misleading" and
causing "mental stress?"
He demands "civility",
but apparently lacks the
self-awareness to know
that it is he, CCU and
Sandrock that are being
uncivilized.
Scott Andrichak is a
member of Save Our
Septics.


Community service is a breeze in Punta Gorda


ot a good idea for
a service project?
Get it done in
Punta Gorda! Recently,
Team Punta Gorda vol-
unteers became interest-
ed in a national project
called Paint Your Heart
Out. This gem of an idea
has become Paint Your
Heart Out, Punta Gorda,
a community partner-
ship designed to help
elderly, disabled, and
needy residents give their
homes a face-lift while
beautifying Punta Gorda.
On April 26, hundreds of
volunteers will join to-
gether with Comcast and
Charlotte County Habitat
for Humanity to paint -
for free the homes of
people who could use a
hand. This program has
been used successfully in
cities large and small for
many years. Anaheim,
Pittsburgh, and Tampa
are just a few Paint Your
Heart Out cities.
The reason that we
know this project will be
successful here is what
we call the "Punta Gorda
Factor." When there is
a need and an idea in
this town, volunteers
and resources will
readily appear. Here's
how this particular idea
became a reality. When
Comcast representatives
approached the City for
ideas for their annual
Comcast Cares Day of
community service, the
City sent them to Team
Punta Gorda. Could
we identify a worthy
project for more than 100
volunteers? Yes, indeed!
Paint Your Heart Out,
Punta Gorda will be a
major project for this


year's Comcast Cares
Day. We are excited that
they selected us as a 2014
"Comcast Cares Day"
local community partner,
one of hundreds across
the United States.
We also knew that this
project would have the
potential to mobilize
volunteers from many
sectors to work together
to have an impact on
the community. With
Comcast on board,
we took this idea to
Charlotte County
Habitat for Humanity,
knowing that they would
be great partners for
this project, and would
have the expertise to
do it right. Together we
shaped the project to
include a wide range of
partners. First, we asked
the City to recommend
a neighborhood to focus
on for this first year.
Then we reached out
to pastors from those
neighborhood churches
to nominate homes
owned by citizens who
could use a hand. As a
result of this outreach,
and with thanks to
Deep Creek Community
Church and St. Marys
Primitive Baptist
Church, we'll paint as
many as 10 houses. We'll
be giving that landmark
blue house known as


the Blanchard House
Museum of African
American History and
Culture a fresh coat
of paint as well. Deep
Creek Community
Church will provide
the staging area and
volunteer headquarters
for more than 300
volunteers on the day of
the event.
The next step was
to find some profes-
sional expertise. With
a little assist from the
Punta Gorda Chamber,
builders, banks, service
clubs and tradesmen
began jumping on board.
Charlotte State Bank and
Trust, Bayfront Health
Punta Gorda, Rotary
and Sunrise Kiwanis,
as well as Deep Creek
Community Church,
Gulfview Construction,
PGI Homes, Fero
Construction and West
Coast Builders have all
adopted homes. Not
only have they donated
funding, but many will
provide volunteers for
site preparation and
supervision as well as
help with the painting.
Other businesses and
community groups
are providing teams
of volunteers to work
together at the various
sites. Hoover Pressure
Cleaning and Economy
Pressure Washing are


providing their services
for free, while Superior
Paint will work its own
special magic on The
Blanchard House.
Following the event,
landscaping will be
provided for one of
the houses which will
receive a makeover
from Team Punta
Gorda's Beautification
Committee.
We believe that Paint


BREAKING NEWS!
Log onto www.sunnewspapers.net for the latest updates.
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Your Heart Out, Punta
Gorda will do more
than paint homes. It
will send a message of
pride and build a sense
of community spirit and
unity that will last long
after this day of service is
over. Punta Gorda has a
culture of service that is
alive and well.
Want to help? We
have many painting and
non-painting volunteer


opportunities. For more
information, visit our
website, www.teampunta
gorda.com. If you'd like
to volunteer with Team
Punta Gorda contact
us by email at team@
teampuntagorda.org, or
call 941-637-8326.
Nancy Johnson is the
CEO of Team Punta
Gorda. Readers may reach
her at team@teampunta
gorda.org.


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OurTownPagel2 C www.sunnewspapers.net


FROM PAGE ONE


The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014


Comp plan draws criticism


By GARY ROBERTS
STAFF WRITER

MURDOCK-
Positioned directly
opposite one another,
in both across-the-table
seating and contrasting
viewpoints, representa-
tives of the pro-business
Tea Party of Punta Gorda
and the eco-friendly
Sierra Club debated
proposed revisions to
the Smart Charlotte 2050
Comprehensive Plan.
In Thursday's review of
the long-term planning
document, the tea party's
Bill Bigelow argued the
current plan represents a
major barrier to growth,
with overly stringent
regulations that strip
property and business
owners of their land-use
rights. Citing 37 percent
of county land is owned
by government, and
therefore off the tax rolls,


Bigelow called for more
free market-oriented
guidelines to encourage
development needed
to pay for deteriorating
infrastructure.
"(The comprehensive
plan should be) a magnet
for growth, not a repellent
for growth," he said.
But Deb Highsmith,
conservation chairwom-
an of the Sierra Club's
Greater Charlotte Harbor
Group, countered that
land should be seen as
an invaluable and limited
resource that needs to be
preserved because, once
it's lost, it's gone forever.
"Natural resources are
what makes this county
what it is," she said. "We
will not support changes
that diminish any of
the natural resource
protections."
These divergent
perspectives encapsulate
the challenges in revising


Smart Charlotte 2050,
a blueprint for county
growth and development
over the next 35 years.
Charlotte County
is currently in the
process of revising its
comprehensive plan
and land development
regulations in an effort to
update, streamline and
remove duplications to
existing state and federal
guidelines. Community
members are engaged
in first rewriting the
comprehensive plan, then
creating a Unified Land
Development Code that
collects all the regulations
that govern the develop-
ment of land into a single
document.
"This plan is about a
balance between private
property rights and
protecting the environ-
ment that, presumably,
will attract people to our
area," Ty Harris, county


community development
director, said of Smart
Charlotte 2050. "We're
going to try and make a
better document than
what we have right now."
Easier said than done.
Attorney Robert
Berntsson said the com-
prehensive plan should
provide a vision for the
county that sets direc-
tion, with specific issues
decided at the local level
through land develop-
ment regulations. Land
use attorney Geri Waksler
called for the separa-
tion of rural and urban
guidelines, warning that
regulation appropriate
for rural land is starting
to creep into urban areas,
eroding the tax base and
impeding development.
Percy Angelo, of the
Cape Haze Property
Owners Association,
representing roughly 200
homeowners, objected to


some of the proposed re-
visions that could unleash
development in wetland
areas, which are critical to
the environment.
"The idea that this is a
nonproductive use of that
land is simply wrong,"
Angelo said. "I think the
(proposed) changes have
been made hastily and
without a lot of thought."
Meanwhile, sitting
quietly listening to the
discussion wasWes
Brumback, owner of TRB
Groves off State Road 31.
His family has been work-
ing the land since 2000,
employing 10 people,
paying taxes and adding
millions of dollars to
the local economy each
year. He said his family
business is threatened
by corporations looking
to buy up his property
because agriculture no
longer holds sway at the
decision-making table.


"I see a lot of people
here with financial inter-
ests. I see a lot of people
here with political and
environmental interests,
and I have interest
from a family business
standpoint. There are a
lot of people in this room
trying to drive agendas
that don't have anything
to do with what's actu-
ally happening in East
County," Brumback said.
"I don't want any more re-
strictions of our property
rights. I don't think we
need them, I don't think
we deserve them."
In setting another
meeting for the group,
Harris said the county is
trying to finalize changes
in Smart Charlotte 2050
before finishing the land
development regulations,
which he hopes to com-
plete by September.

Email: groberts@sun-herald.com


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


Lincoln-Reagan
Day Celebration is
today
The Charlotte County
Republican Party's
Lincoln-Reagan Day
Celebration will be held
at 5 p.m. today at the
Charlotte Harbor Event
and Conference Center,
75 Taylor St., Punta Gorda.


TRAGEDY
FROM PAGE 1

The DCSO secured a
warrant for Karl's arrest.
Officers from several
agencies were seen
watching traffic Thursday
night in DeSoto County,
looking for the Lexus.
Karl was found around
9 p.m. in Orange County,
near Orlando, reportedly
driving the Lexus. DeSoto
sheriff's Maj. James
Vitali said he expected
Karl to be brought back
to DeSoto County, but
did not know when that
would happen.
Karl Burnham is no
stranger to law en-
forcement and, in
fact, was convicted of
second-degree murder
back in 1988. He has
arrest records dating to
1985 in Manatee County,
with charges including



FLYING
FROM PAGE 1

movie 'Jurassic Park,'
where the dinosaurs are
suddenly alive, it's kind of
like that. It's like a dino-
saur that comes alive."
He's not kidding.
Riding inside the tail of
this twin-engine beauty
is like stepping back in
time to an era before
modern technology and
conveniences made
wartime easier, if such a
things exists.
"Panchito's" bare metal
walls, simulated ammuni-
tion belts and vintage seat
belts are as close to the
original combat planes as
possible.
According to Kelley, the
original "Panchito" was
destroyed, along with the



EXIT
FROM PAGE 1

also has served as chief
operating officer at
Venice Regional Medical
Center now Venice
Regional Bayfront
Health.
Under his stewardship
at Bayfront Health Punta
Gorda, the 208-bed hos-
pital won awards for its
stroke, orthopedic and
respiratory care, earning


Michael Needham, CEO
of Heritage Action for
America, the grassroots
arm of the Heritage
Foundation, will be the
featured speaker.
Prior to the patriotic
opening ceremony, there
will be a separate VIP
Reception with a chance
to speak with state and lo-
cal elected officials, as well

forgery and grand theft
auto, according to
Florida Department of
Corrections records.
Karl again was arrested
in 1988 this time on
charges of second-de-
gree murder, unarmed
robbery and grand theft
auto all in Orange
County for which he
was sentenced in 1989
to 22 years in prison,
according to the DOC.
An Orlando Sentinel
story from November
1988 mentioned Karl as a
suspect, along with two
other men, in the killing
of a vacationing 43-year-
old Natick, Mass., man,
whom authorities found
suffocated in a motel
room in Orlando. The
victim's credit cards, cash
and rental van had been
stolen, the Sentinel story
states.
Karl was released in
2004, back in custody in
2006, released again in


as Needham. Doors will
open at 5 p.m. to socialize,
enjoy live jazz music, win
auction treasures, sample
some appetizers and enjoy
a drink. Dinner will be
President Lincoln's favor-
ite, Chicken fricassee, with
a white wine sauce. The
Event Center's executive
chef developed this dish
especially for the event.

March 2010, and back in
custody by October of
that year. He was re-
leased nearly 16 months
later in early 2012.
DCSO records show
his parents called the
Sheriff's Office in August
2010, when they discov-
ered Karl had taken their
debit card and obtained
$100 in cash advances
two days in a row, then
took the couple's truck
without permission. They
also found he had taken
two 9 mm handguns.
He was charged with
grand theft auto, grand
theft of firearms, and
possession of a weapon
by a convicted felon.
However DeSoto court
records show that case
was dropped in October
2010. Karl was charged
in January of this year in
DeSoto with disorderly
public intoxication
and criminal mischief,
with less than $200 in


SUN PHOTO BY BRENDA BARBOSA
"Panchito,"a World War 11-era B-25 bomber, is on display this
weekend at the air show. The twin-engine beauty was restored
and marked by pilot and historic preservationist Larry Kelley,
to represent the original "Panchito," flown by combat pilot Don
Seiler.


rest of the aircraft that
served with the 396th
Bomb Squadron, 41st
Bomb Group that fought
in the Central Pacific.
"The original 'Panchito'


national distinction.
Moreover, he oversaw
last year's transition
when Charlotte Regional
became part of Bayfront
Health, a seven-hospital
regional network owned
by Health Management
Associates that spans
from Brooksville, Fla., to
Punta Gorda.
Morillo graduated
from the University
of Puerto Rico with
bachelor's degrees in
biology and physical
therapy, earning an MBA


served in Okinawa
(Japan) with the 41st
bomb group. All the 41st
group airplanes were
destroyed at the end of
the war. They were lined


from Kennedy-Western
University.
Friday, Morillo also re-
signed his post as chair-
man of the Punta Gorda
Chamber of Commerce.
His unexpected depar-
ture caught members of
the chamber's executive
committee by surprise.
"The board was visibly
upset," said John Wright,
chamber president.
Morillo began his one-
year term as chairman
on Sept. 1, succeed-
ing Ron Monck of


For more informa-
tion and ticket prices,
call Barry Jollett at
941-875-8680.


Children's Easter
event set
Charlotte County
Community Services
and the Tringali

property damage. He
pleaded no contest to
those charges, was found
guilty, and was assessed
court costs.
Facebook postings
from the family's pages
indicate George and
JoAnn Burnham celebrat-
ed their 50th wedding
anniversary last year.
George retired at the rank
of major from the DeSoto
Road Prison.
Email: shoffman@sun-heroald.com


PHOTO PROVIDED
JoAnn Burnham's Facebook
page shows a photo of her
with her husband, George,
around the time of their 50th
wedding anniversary. The
DeSoto County Sheriff's Office
alleges their 49-year-old son,
Karl, beat George to death
Thursday, and critically injured
JoAnn. Karl later was taken
into custody after he and the
couple's Lexus were found in
Orange County, Fla.

up, blown up, and all the
crews were sent home.
"This airplane stayed
stateside as a transition
plane for B-25 crews,"
Kelley said of his shiny
restored masterpiece.
"This airplane is marked
to represent the original
'Panchito.' It was built to
be a combat airplane. It
has everything on it as
the original."
Thousands of hours of
work have been logged to
restore and maintain the
plane where it is today,
Kelley said.
"You learn very quickly
to feed the dinosaur and
stroke the dinosaur and
take good care of the
dinosaur so he don't bite
you," Kelley said, laugh-
ing. "We spend a lot more
time working on it than
flying it."
The B-25 seems to be


Centennial Bank. Monck
and Della Booth of Time
Realty Services have
agreed to serve as co-
chairs of the chamber
until the start of the new
fiscal year, when Booth,
as chairwoman-elect,
will assume the role.
"Jose has served the
Punta Gorda Chamber
of Commerce in exem-
plary fashion, and he
will be sorely missed as
our leader," Wright said.
"He was another in a


Recreation Center will
play host to "Make a
Craft with the Easter
Bunny" from 9 a.m.
to 11 a.m. April 12 at
the Tringali Recreation
Center, 3460 N. Access
Road, Englewood.
Children and their
parents will create
memorable Easter crafts
to take home and use on


Easter. There also will be
pictures with the Easter
Bunny. This event is for
children 5 years old and
older, with a participat-
ing adult. The cost $5
per child. Preregistration
is requested, and began
Wednesday.
For more information
or updates, visit www.
CharlotteCountyFL.gov.


>4


a perfect fit for this year's
air show theme "A
Salute to Veterans."
In addition to enjoying
classic beauties like
"Panchito," visitors also
can enjoy this year's
headlining act, 'America's
Ambassadors in Blue"
- the famed U.S. Air
Force Thunderbirds. The
pilots will perform their
jaw-dropping forma-
tion-flying in their F-16D
Fighting Falcons. Also
scheduled to perform
their hair-raising act is
the Lima Lima Flight


long line of dedicated,
community-spirited di-
rectors who have moved
the chamber forward
over the years."
Morillo joined the
chamber in 2012, and
immediately became a
board member. Wright
described Morillo as
"'very personable" and
an effective leader.
"He directed chamber
policy with a firm and
friendly hand, and was
always there when we


Team, aboard their T-34
aircraft.
Air show officials are
hoping the weather will
cooperate for a smooth,
delay-free event. The
Florida International Air
Show reserves the right
to cancel, terminate or
suspend the show in the
event of severe weather.
"We have a tremendous
lineup here this year," air
show operations director
Bob Hall said. "I think one
of the best and largest
lineups we've ever had."
Email: bbarbosa@sun-herald.com


needed him," Wright
said.
Under Morillo's watch,
the chamber welcomed
a number of new busi-
nesses to the organiza-
tion, posting a record
high of more than 1,300
chamber members.
Morillo also has
served as a member of
the Punta Gorda Rotary
Club and on the Lee
County Volunteers in
Medicine board.
Email: groberts@sun-herald.com


IF YOU GO
What: 34th Annual Florida International Air Show
When: Today and Sunday (gates open at 9 a.m. and major show is
set to start around noon, both days)
Where: Punta Gorda Airport, 28000 Airport Road
Cost: Tickets/parking vary by choices and purchase date
Tickets/other info: www.floridaairshow.com or 941-575-9007


OurTown Page 12 C


www.sunnewspapers.net




:The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014 www.sunnewspapers.net


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LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014


Report: Road rage beef


leads to arrest


PORT CHARLOTTE-
An elderly man who was
arrested after sticking up
for his 61-year-old wife
following a road rage
incident took things too far,
authorities say.
Robert Howard Negrich's
wife was driving back to
their home on the 2400
block of Levali Street in
Port Charlotte Thursday
afternoon. For unspecified
reasons, an 18-year-old
man driving behind
Negrich's wife began
honking at her and making
a rude gesture with his
hand, near the intersection
of Pellam Boulevard and
Wintergarden Avenue,
according to a Charlotte
County Sheriff's report.
Unknown to both, the
angry teen was heading
next door to the woman's
house to visit a friend. They
pulled into neighboring
driveways at the same
time, and the two report-
edly yelled at each other
before going their own
ways.
When the teen was
inside his friend's house,
they heard Robert Negrich
yelling outside, the






(
Shop Charlotte

Where Shopping Makes Cents
charlottecountychamber.org


I POLICE BEAT
The information for Police Beat is gathered from police, sheriff's office, Florida High way
Patrol, jail and fire records. Not every arrest leads to a conviction and guilt or innocence is
determined by the court system.


report shows. He allegedly
entered the home uninvit-
ed, pushed the teen and
challenged him to a fight.
Negrich, 64, eventually
left without a fight, but
authorities said it was too
late. He was arrested on
charges of battery and
burglary with battery a
first-degree felony. He was
released from the Charlotte
County Jail Friday after
posting $18,500 bond.

Report: Man
sleeping in car
caught with drugs
PORT CHARLOTTE- A
man authorities found
sleeping in his car early
Thursday turned out to be
a suspect they had been
searching for on drug
charges. And he allegedly
had more drugs in the car.
James Robert Brown,
26, of the 900 block of
Silver Springs Terrace, Port
Charlotte, was arrested on
17 drug charges in all.
In January, an unrelated
missing person case led
Charlotte County Sheriff's
detectives to Brown's ad-
dress, where he was living
with a relative. According
to a sheriff's report,
authorities searched the
home and found cocaine,
methamphetamine,
spoons, pipes and needles
in Brown's room. But they
couldn't find Brown.


A warrant later was
issued for his arrest, and
deputies served it just
before 9 a.m. Thursday,
when they found Brown
snoozing in his car near
Fairfax Terrace and Riviera
Lane in Port Charlotte. A
search of the car yielded
spoons, a smoking pipe,
needles with opiate residue
in them, synthetic mar-
ijuana, a Brillo Pad with
cocaine on it, a couple of
Roxicodone pills, and five
packages of Suboxone, the
report states.
In all, Brown was
charged with seven counts
each of possession of
drug paraphernalia and
possession of a controlled
substance without a
prescription, two counts of
possession of cocaine, and
one count of possession
of synthetic marijuana.
He was being held at the
Charlotte County Jail
Friday on $54,500 bond.

FHP keeping eye
on 1-75
The Florida Highway
Patrol will be cracking
down on aggressive drivers,
speeders, seat belt use and
commercial vehicle safety
through the weekend on
Interstate 75.
The effort is part of a
Friday through Sunday
campaign called: "Staying
Alive on 1-75." Authorities
in Georgia, Tennessee,
Kentucky, Ohio and
Michigan also are intensi-
fying their watch along the
1,786 miles of the heavily
traveled interstate.
The International
Association of Chiefs of
Police has set a goal to re-
duce traffic-crash fatalities
by 15 percent this year.
"Staying Alive on 1-75" is
aimed at helping the cause.
Compiled byAdam Kreger


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CHARLOTTE COUNTY COMMISSION HOW THEY VOTED TUESDAY








KEN CHRIS BILL STEPHEN R. TRICIA
DOHERTY CONSTANCE TRUEX DEUTSCH DUFFY
District 1 District 2 District 3 District 4 District 5

Approved a public hearing to consider approving an ordinance to extend the temporary suspension of all
nontransportation impact fees until Sept. 30. The current suspension of the fees is set to sunset April 10.
Commissioner Chris Constance voted against setting a public hearing because he wanted to have the impact
fee for libraries reinstated, explaining that keeping the moratorium on the library impact fee is contrary to the
county's goal of building a new library in South County. His motion to exclude the impact fee for libraries from
the suspension of other nontransportation impact fees, however, failed for lack of support.
Yes No Yes Yes Yes

Deferred action on a resolution authorizing Charlotte County Utilities to submit an application to the Florida
Department of Environmental Protection for a loan through the State Revolving Fund Loan Program, for the
cost of preconstruction design for the vacuum sewer system for the East & West Spring Lake Wastewater
MSBU area. Feb. 12, the sewer project was placed on the priority list for preconstruction design funding. The
county has 210 days from that date to apply for, and enter into, an agreement for SRF loan funding. However
Commission Chairman Ken Doherty opposed borrowing money for this purpose. Other commissioners also said
they wanted more information before taking action.

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Postponed a settlement agreement that addresses code-enforcement violations, related to both the Florida
Building Code and Charlotte County Zoning Code, for several properties owned by Jan Musil. The Florida Land
Use Dispute Resolution Act request by Musil's attorney allows for these types of settlement agreements,
in order to address certain land-use disputes without the need for litigation, but is a seldom-used process.
Musil's request for relief concerns four of the petitioner's properties, which he bought in foreclosure and then
proceeded to fix up without the proper permits or licenses. Commissioners decided to postpone the case until
their April 8 meeting, saying they did not have enough information on how much in fines and penalties was
owed, and were wary that such an agreement could set a bad precedent.
Yes Yes Yes Yes No

Approved the closeout of the East/West Spring Lake Wastewater Pilot Program contract with Banks Engi-
neering, reducing the contract amount by $136,925, due to removal of services no longer required. This was
for the services of a firm to review and evaluate wastewater-service options in the East/West Spring Lake
area. Constance said it was important to note that contract change orders do not always ask more money, but
rather, as in this case, can save the county money.

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Approved the contractor/builder annual contract for a wide variety of work on an as-required basis to
CH Construction Services of Port Charlotte. The term of contract is through the end of the year. The submitting
firms were asked to provide a unit cost labor rate for any work being performed, which includes a 7 percent
markup on both materials and subcontractors, if required.
Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


Golf tourney
fundraiser to
benefit Habitat
Charlotte County
Habitat for Humanity
will hold its first Charity
Golf Classic at at
8:30 a.m. April 12 at the


* Bankruptcy And Foreclosure .^ """*,c
* Sole Proprietorships (Self Employed) A & 3
* Farms Retirement Schedule K-1 s = 7, =
* Employee Business Expenses '
* Estates Trusts Small Business Rentals
* Investments Sale of Home Corporations
* State Returns Itemized Deductions ..
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Port Charlotte FL 33952
Tel: 941.235.9231
FAX: 941 235-9236


Port Charlotte Golf Club,
22400 Gleneagles Terrace.
The tournament will
begin with an 8:30 a.m.
shotgun start. It will be
a four-person scramble
event. There will be
several contests, includ-
ing the longest drive, a
putting contest, closest
to the pin, and hole-in-
one. There also will be a
50/50 raffle and a silent
auction. Proceeds from
this fundraiser will benefit
Habitat for Humanity.
Individual registrations
are $75 per person,
or $300 for a group of
four the registration
deadline is April 5. The
entry fee includes green
fees, a cart, a continental
breakfast and lunch.
Register by Tuesday for
a chance to win golf
for four. Registration
forms are available at
the Port Charlotte Golf
Club, and online at www.


charlottecountyhfh.org.
For more information, call
Gabrielle at 941-639-3162.

Boat club to hold
fundraiser
The Punta Gorda
Boat Club, 802W Retta
Esplanade, will sponsor
a Charity Yard Sale from
8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. today.
All bargain hunters are
welcome to this huge
indoor/outdoor sale.
Household and kitchen
items, marine and
boating gear, collect-
ibles, jewelry, books
and much more will be
available for purchase.
The club's kitchen will
be open to sell food and
refreshments. Proceeds
will benefit AMIKids
Crossroads and the PGBC
Foundation.
For more infor-
mation, call Karen at
941-286-8082.


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LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014


United Way thanks donors


SUN PHOTOS BY
BETSY WILLIAMS
United Way of Charlotte
County held a donor appre-
ciation reception Tuesday
evening at South Port Square
in Port Charlotte, to give its
donors a sense of all the great
agencies that it partners 40..'-.
within Charlotte County.
The two-hour cocktail party --
was made possible through
the generosity of South ,N
Port Square. Pictured here
are Nancy Fash, marketing
director for United Way of
Charlotte County; Linda
Dobson, finance office
manager with United Way;
and Kay Tvaroch, executive
director of the Center for Mercie Chick, executive director of the Charlotte HIV/AIDS
Abuse and Rape Emergencies People Support food and hygiene pantry, shared a few stories
of Charlotte County, who was of how United Way helps CHAPS feed and provide for those in
one of two guest speakers. need in Charlotte County.


Alan Holbach, Emily Chidester, Bonnie Holbach and John Chidester, donors and supporters of the
United Way of Charlotte County.


Whitney Hindman of South Port Square, which played host to the event, with Jay Roughton of
Publix, his wife Lisa, and Don McDonough of Publix, a major supporter of United Way of Charlotte
County.


Helen Cavanaugh; her husband, Punta Gorda City Councilman Tom Cavanaugh; Punta Gorda
City Councilwoman Carolyn Freeland; her husband Tom; Dianne Tufts; Ken Ellingson; and Mark
Martella, of the Martella Law Firm.


Linda Lusk, of the Center for Abuse and Rape Emergencies of Charlotte County; Ray and Marilyn
Wagoner, new to the area; and Bob Clendenin of the Charlotte Harbor Rotary, all supporters of
the United Way of Charlotte County.


United Way donors Donna McCrea of SunTrust Bank, Sandy Colon of the Clerk of the Court office,
and Tina Soucier of SunTrust.


Dr. David M. Klein, a major advocate for the United Way of Charlotte County, visits with Carrie
Hussey, executive director of United Way; and Kevin Russell, United Way president.


Dr. Bob Andrews, Jim Silverberg and his father-in-law, Joe Dozier, visit while enjoying the food
and refreshments.


Debbie Fitzgerald, incoming United Way treasurer; Kevin Russell, United Way president; and
Kathy Silverberg, board member.







INSIDE


GM adding 971,000
vehicles to recall


General Motors is boosting by
971,000 the number of small
cars being recalled worldwide
for a defective ignition
switch, saying cars from the
model years 2008-2011 may
have gotten the part as a
replacement.
Page 2 -





Village waits to hear
full toll of mudslide


A mountainside community
waited in anguish Friday to
learn the full scope of the
Washington state mudslide as
authorities worked to identify
remains and warned that they
were unlikely to find anyone
alive nearly a week after the
disaster.
Page 2 -




Mother: Jahi McMath
'still asleep'
The girl
has been
declared
brain-dead
by multiple
neurologists
after a
routine
tonsillectomy
went wrong.



Page 2 -





Obama meets with
Saudi king


President Barack Obama is
considering allowing shipments
of new air defense systems to
the Syrian opposition, a U.S.
official said Friday, as Obama
sought to reassure Saudi
Arabia's king that the U.S. is not
taking too soft a stance in Syria
and other Mideast conflicts.

Page 5 -


Spending edges
stocks higher


The Dow Jones Industrial
average rose 58.83 points,
or 0.4 percent, to 16,323.06.
The Standard & Poor's 500
index rose 8.58 points, or
0.5 percent, to 1,857.62.
Page 6 -


By GARY FINEOUT
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER

TALLAHASSEE -
Florida added thou-
sands of jobs last
month, but new num-
bers released on Friday
showed that the state's
overall unemployment
rate is remaining
steady.
The state's jobless


By MARILYNN MARCHIONE
AP CHIEF MEDICAL
WRITER
Love can sometimes
break a heart but mar-
riage seems to do it a
lot of good. A study of
more than 3.5 million
Americans finds that
married people are
less likely than singles,
divorced or widowed
folks to suffer any
type of heart or blood
vessel problem.
This was true at any
age, for women as
well as for men, and
regardless of other
heart disease risk
factors they had such
as high cholesterol or
diabetes, researchers
found.
"It might be that if
someone is married,
they have a spouse
who encourages them
to take better care of
themselves," said Dr.
Jeffrey Berger, a pre-
ventive cardiologist at
NYU Langone Medical
Center in New York.
But "we can't prove
by any means cause
and effect," he said.
This is the largest
look at marriage and
heart health, said Dr.
Carlos Alviar, a cardi-
ology fellow who led
the study with Berger.


rate in February was
6.2 percent, which is
the same rate it was
the previous month.
There are an estimated
588,000 people out of
work in the Sunshine
State.
The unemployment
rate held steady even
though the state
gained an estimated
33,400 jobs last month.


Only California and
Texas gained more jobs
in February.
While the overall
statewide number
remained unchanged,
some counties in-
cluding ones such as
Duval, Hernando and
Manatee reported a
rise in unemployment.
Gov. Rick Scott
stressed the job gains


on Friday during an
appearance at the
Port of Tampa, saying
the latest numbers
continue to show
that businesses are
growing in the state.
Scott maintains his
policies since becom-
ing governor in 2011
have helped the state's
economy recover.
"It is clear that


businesses are growing
and creating more jobs
and opportunities for
Floridians," Scott said
in a statement. "We
are moving Florida's
opportunity economy
forward."
State economists
have said a big reason
for the unemployment
JOBLESS 14


: Married hearts healthier

Previous studies most- .
ly compared married '" ,' ..
to single people and lH_ ...
lacked information
on divorced and
widowed ones. Or
they just looked ath
heart attacks, whereas
this one included "
a full range from
clogged arteries and
abdominal aneurysms rlaeFidy
to stroke risks and
circulation problems
in the legs.
Researchers used
health questionnaires
that people filled out
when they sought
various types of
tests in community
settings around the
country from an Ohio
company, Life Line
Screening Inc. Some
of these screening
tests, for various types
of cancer and other
diseases or conditions,
are not recommended
by leading medical
groups, but people
can still get them
and pay for them
themselves.
The study authors
have no financial ties
to the company and
are not endorsing this
type of screening, AP PHOTO
Berger said. Life Figurines of a bride and a groom sit atop a wedding cake in Raleigh, N.C., on May 8, 2012.
Line gave its data to A study of more than 3.5 million Americans finds that married people are less likely than
singles, divorced or widowed folks to suffer any type of heart or blood vessel problem. The
HEARTS 14 results were released Friday.


Flight 370 search shifts after sightings


By ROB GRIFFITH
and GILLIAN WONG
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITERS

PERTH, Australia-
Three weeks into the
mystery of Flight 370,
investigators relying
on newly analyzed sat-
ellite data shifted the
search zone yet again,
focusing on a swath of
Indian Ocean where
better conditions could
help speed a hunt that
is now concentrated
thousands of miles
from where it began.
Planes combing
the newly targeted
area off the west coast


of Australia spotted
several objects Friday,
including two rectan-
gular items that were
blue and gray, the
Australian Maritime
Safety Authority said.
Although those are
part of the colors of
the missing Malaysia
Airlines jet, it was not
clear if they were from
the plane.
The newly targeted
zone is nearly 700
miles northeast of sites
the searchers have
crisscrossed for the
past week. The rede-
ployment came after
analysts determined


that the jet may have
been traveling faster
than earlier estimates
and would therefore
have run out of fuel
sooner, officials said.
"This is a credible
new lead and will be
thoroughly investigat-
ed," Australian Prime
Minister Tony Abbott
said.
The Australian
maritime agency will
analyze photos of the
objects seen in the
area, and a Chinese
patrol ship will try to
locate them Saturday,

SIGHTINGS 14


In this image made from TV, released by AMSA (Australia
Maritime Safety Authority), a marker flare is deployed
into the Indian Ocean from a Royal New Zealand Air
Force (RNZAF) plane searching for debris from the
missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, off the west coast of
Australia, Friday.


Putin, Obama discuss solution to Ukraine crisis


By JIM HEINTZ and
VLADIMIR ISACHENKOV
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITERS

MOSCOW-Russian
President Vladimir
Putin called President
Barack Obama on
Friday to discuss a
diplomatic solution to
the Ukrainian crisis,
while Ukraine's fugitive
leader urged a nation-
wide referendum that
would serve Moscow's
purpose of turning its
neighbor into a loosely
knit federation.


The statement from
Viktor Yanukovych,
the former Ukrainian
president who fled
to Russia last month
after three months of
protests, raised the
threat of more unrest
in Ukraine's Russian-
speaking eastern
provinces, where
many resent the new
Ukrainian government.
Also Friday, Russian
Defense Minister Sergei
Shoigu told Putin the
Ukrainian military
withdrawal from


OBAMA


Crimea was cor
Ukrainian soldi
were seen carry
duffel bags and
as they shipped
the Black Sea pe
sula that Russia
annexed.


While Yanukovych
has practically no
leverage in Ukraine,
his statement clearly
reflected the Kremlin's
focus on supporting
separatist sentiments in
eastern Ukraine.
PUTIN The White House
said that Putin called
nplete. Obama Friday to
ers discuss a U.S. pro-
ing posal for a diplomatic
flags resolution to the crisis
South of in Ukraine, which U.S.
enin- Secretary of State John


has


Kerry presented to
Russian counterpart


Sergey Lavrov earlier
this week. Obama
suggested that Russia
put a concrete response
in writing and the
presidents agreed that
Kerry and Lavrov would
meet to discuss the
next steps.
"President Obama
noted that the
Ukrainian government
continues to take a
restrained and de-es-
calatory approach to
the crisis and is moving
UKRAINE 14


11 rr rqI' II II N II




he Wi"re

h eJ Ip |^|www.sunnewspapers. net
SATURDAY MARCH 29, 2014




Fla. jobless rate static

Amid 6.2 percent figure, estimated 588,000 Floridians out of work





Page 2 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


NATIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014


DETROIT (AP)-
General Motors is
boosting by 971,000 the
number of small cars
being recalled worldwide
for a defective ignition
switch, saying cars from
the model years 2008-
2011 may have gotten the
part as a replacement.
The company previ-
ously announced the
recall of 1.6 million
cars, only through
the 2007 model year,
which were built with
the faulty switch. The
recall involves six cars:
the Chevrolet Cobalt,
Chevrolet HHR, Pontiac
G5, Pontiac Solstice,
Saturn Ion and Saturn
Sky.
GM says it sold 95,000
faulty switches to
dealers and aftermarket
wholesalers for use as
replacement parts. Of
those, 90,000 were used
to repair vehicles from
the 2003-2007 model
years. But 5,000 of the
switches were used to
fix cars from the 2008-
2011 model years.
GM said it doesn't
know which cars got
those 5,000 switches, so
it needs to recall all of
them. Of the cars being


(LA Times) -The
mother of Jahi McMath,
the 13-year-old Oakland,
Calif., girl declared
brain-dead by multiple
neurologists more than
three months ago, in-
sisted Thursday that her
daughter was "asleep"
and "blossoming into a
teenager."
Jahi was declared
brain-dead Dec. 12 after
complications during
surgery three days earlier
to remove her tonsils,
adenoids and uvula
at Children's Hospital
& Research Center
Oakland.
At least three neurol-
ogists confirmed that
the girl was unable to
breathe on her own, had
no blood flow to her
brain and had no sign of
electrical activity in her
brain.
A court order kept
Jahi's body on a ventila-
tor while independent
experts could be brought


In this 2008 photo, rows of cars sit on a lot in Lordstown, Ohio. General Motors is increasing the
number of small cars recalled for a defective ignition switch.


added to the recall,
824,000 were sold in the
U.S.
The ignition switch-
es can move out of
the "run" position
and cause the car's
engine to stall. It can
also knock out power
steering and power
brakes, making the
vehicle harder to
maneuver, and disable
the air bags. GM has
said the defect is linked
to at least 12 deaths


Village waits to hear
ARLINGTON, Wash.
(AP) A mountainside
community waited ?
in anguish Friday to
learn the full scope of 3
the Washington state .
mudslide as authorities -S.=.
worked to identify
remains and warned that
they were unlikely to find
anyone alive nearly a_ 'r -'"- ."
week after the disaster. -., .
Leslie Zylstra said
everybody in town knows
someone who died, and
the village was coming
to grips with the fact that Workers comb through debris a
many of the missing will Friday, in Oso, Wash. Besides th
never turn up. dozens more people could be bi
"The people know from the mudslide nearly one v


there's no way anybody
could have survived,"
said Zylstra, who used
to work in an Arlington
hardware store. "They
just want to have their
loved ones, to bury their
loved ones."
Authorities delayed an
announcement that they
said would substantially
raise the death toll to
allow the Snohomish
County medical exam-
iner's office to continue
with identification
efforts.
That job, along with
the work of the ex-
hausted searchers, was
complicated by the sheer
magnitude of the dev-
astation from Saturday's
slide. Tons of earth


and ambulance-sized
boulders of clay smashed
everything in their path,
leaving unrecognizable
remnants in their wake.
"There's a process
that we have in place,
and I don't want to get
into too many details of
that," Snohomish County
District 21 Fire Chief
Travis Hots said Friday.
"It's not as simple as
saying this is the number
of people that we have
that we have recovered."
The fire chief said he
expected to receive an
update from the medical
examiner's office by
Friday evening.
In addition to bearing
the stress of the disaster,


in cars from the 2003-
2007 models years. On
Friday, the company
said it isn't aware of any
fatalities connected to
the defect in the 2008-
2011 models.
"We are taking no
chances with safety,"
GM CEO Mary Barra
said in a statement.
GM has said that it
expects to have replace-
ment switches starting
next month for the cars
originally included in


the recall. GM expects
those repairs to be
completed in October.
The company said
owners of the cars add-
ed to the recall Friday
will be contacted the
week of April 21.
Until the recalls are
performed, the compa-
ny says drivers should
remove everything but
the key from their key
chains, to avoid pulling
the ignition switch out
of the "run" position.


full toll of mudslide


t the site of a deadly
e 26 bodies already
uried in the debris p
week ago.
townspeople we
increasingly fru
the lack of infoi
from authorities
Mary Schoenfel
disaster trauma
who has been p
counseling serve
at schools and f
public employee
volunteers.
"The anger an
tion is starting t(
said.
That's normal
phase of a disast
the physical toll
not having eatel
normally in day
There were als
of resilience. Ha
signs have appeal
say "Oso strong"


i pride" in reference to the
stricken community and
state Highway 530 that
runs through it.
Authorities have
Acknowledged the deaths
of at least 25 people -
with 17 bodies recovered.
Reports of more bodies
being found have trickled
in from relatives and
workers on the scene.
Searchers are working
from a list of 90 missing
people, which equates
AP PHOTO to about half of the
ly mudslide, population of Oso, a
' found, North Cascades foothills
pile left community some 55 miles
northeast of Seattle.
That list has not been
ere made public, but officials
strated by have said it includes not
rmation just residents who may
s, said have been in their homes
Idt, a but others thought to be
itologist in the area or traveling the
providingg highway when the slide
ices struck.
'or Authorities have all but
es and eliminated the possibility
that some people on the
id frustra- list may have been out of
o rise," she the area and simply have
not checked in. And they
for this warned the chances of
ter, as is finding anyone alive amid
taken by the tons of silt and mud
n or slept was slim.
s, she said. "I would say there's
so signs always some hope, but,"
ndmade Tom Miner said Thursday
ared that trailing off before finish-
Sand "530 ing his thought.


in to affirm the findings.
Even so, the McMath
family was able to secure
the release of Jahi's body
via the county coroner -
which issued a death cer-
tificate and have been
keeping her on a venti-
lator at an undisclosed
facility ever
since.
In an
interview
Thursday
with
KNTV-TV
in San Jose,
JAHI MCMATH Calif, Jahi's
mother,
Nailah Winkfield, insisted
that her daughter was
"still asleep," adding that
she refuses to refer to the
girl as being brain-dead.
"I don't use the word
'brain-dead' for my
daughter. I'm just waiting
and faithful that she will
have a recovery," she
told the news station.
"She is blossoming into a
teenager before my eyes."


Winkfield gave
the interview from
Philadelphia, where
she was being honored
Thursday night at the
Terri Schiavo Life & Hope
Network's awards gala for
protecting a loved one
"against overwhelming
odds."
Describing her daugh-
ter as "very responsive,"
Winkfield told the TV
station that Jahi has
physical therapy three
or four times a week and
moves her head from
side to side.
Winkfield acknowl-
edged, though, that Jahi
was unable to speak or
squeeze her hand. She
gives her daughter vita-
mins and fish oil herself
"to feel useful."
Her comments come
roughly a month after
she posted similar
comments on Facebook,
saying Jahi had improved
physically. Winkfield
also thanked supporters


for helping the family
through an "unbelievably
difficult time."
Bodies of the brain-
dead have been main-
tained on respirators for
months or, in rare cases,
years. However, once
cessation of all brain
activity is confirmed,
there is no recovery,
Rebecca S. Dresser,
professor of law and
ethics in medicine at
Washington University
in St. Louis, told the Los
Angeles Times.
And, according to a
U.S. District Court dec-
laration from Dr. Heidi
Flori, a critical care
physician at Children's
Hospital & Research
Center Oakland, which
had sought to remove
the teen from the ven-
tilator, Jahi's body will
inevitably deteriorate,
"regardless of any heroic
measures that any facil-
ity in the country might
attempt."


GM adding 971,000 vehicles


to ignition recall


The latest change came
this week, when people
were allowed more time
to enroll in government
health care exchanges if
they began the process
before the deadline, a
move that opens the
chance for more last-
minute enrollees.
McMorris Rodgers


NATION
US House to vote
next week on aid
to Ukraine
WASHINGTON (AP)
- Aid to cash-strapped
Ukraine and sanctions on
Russia remain on track in
the U.S. Congress, but it
will take a few days longer
before the legislation
gets to President Barack
Obama.
House leaders decided
to vote Tuesday on the
package, putting off an
expected Friday vote.
Congressional aides
said the decision by the
International Monetary
Fund on Thursday to
release billions of dollars
to Ukraine lessened the
urgency to act.
The delay ensures that
House members will have
a chance to go on record
with a roll-call vote
in backing the Senate
version of the bill.
Obama to issue
rules cutting
methane leaks
from landfills
WASHINGTON
(Bloomberg) -The
Obama administration
says it will propose rules
to cut methane emissions
at landfills and coal
mines as well as begin
a study that may result
in regulations to reduce
leaks from oil and gas
production.
A 15-page plan released
Friday outlines steps
to help utilities curb
leaks in transport and
distribution of natural
gas. The plan calls for the
Environmental Protection
Agency to study methane
emissions from oil and
gas production to deter-
mine whether rules are
needed. If it decides to
regulate, the standards
would take effect in 2016.

Jet lands safely in
NYC after reported
bird strike

NEWYORK (AP)- A
plane has landed safely
at New York's Kennedy
Airport after a reported
bird strike.
Port Authority of
New York and New
Jersey spokesman Joe
Pentangelo says the
JetBlue flight reported the
bird strike Friday morn-
ing. The agency runs the
airport.
JetBlue says Flight 671
was heading from New
York's Westchester County
Airport to Palm Beach
International Airport. It
says the captain decided
to divert the flight to JFK
as a precaution. It landed
there around 9:55 a.m.
JetBlue says the 142
passengers were given the
option of getting another
flight or being taken back
to Westchester County.

Obama changes to
health law illegal,
Rodgers says
NEW YORK
(Bloomberg) President
Barack Obama is "picking
and choosing" how the
2010 health care law will
be implemented and
"doesn't have the flexibil-
ity" legally to do so, Rep.
Cathy McMorris Rodgers
said Friday.
Asked if she was saying
such changes to the law
are illegal, McMorris
Rodgers, R-Wash., replied,
"Yes, I am."
The administration has
repeatedly pushed back
deadlines and adjusted
rules to smooth the roll-
out of the law, Obama's
top domestic initiative.


emails to September traf-
fic jams at the foot of the
bridge in Fort Lee, whose
mayor didn't endorse the
governor's re-election.
Samson has been wanting
to step down for a year,
and Christie told report-
ers Friday in Trenton that
he had asked him to stay
on through the election.


said in a meeting with
Bloomberg editors and
reporters in New York that
uncertainty over imple-
mentation of the Patient
Protection and Affordable
Care Act is preventing
businesses from plan-
ning. Affordable Care
Act rules "keep changing
from week to week," she
said.
Consumer
spending
increases
WASHINGTON (LA
Times) Consumer
spending increased last
month the most since
November as Americans
appeared to start shaking
off the effects of severe
winter weather.
Spending rose 0.3
percent in February, up
from 0.2 percent the
previous month, the
Commerce Department
said Friday. The report
was in line with econo-
mists' expectations.
After a robust 0.6
percent increase in
November, spending
tailed off to just a 0.1
percent increase in
December as bitter cold
and snow swept into
much of the country.
Consumers had more
money to spend last
month. Personal income
was up 0.3 percent,
matching January's gain.
It was the second straight
monthly increase.

Stephen Colbert
accused of racism
over Asian tweet
NEWYORK (LA Times)
- Satirist Stephen Colbert
is under fire for what
some people are calling a
racist tweet sent from the
account of his show, "The
Colbert Report."
The original message,
posted Thursday afternoon
but now deleted, was a
play on Asian stereotypes.
It was pulled directly from
a segment onWednesday's
show mockingWashington
Redskins owner Dan
Snyder for responding to
pressure to
change his
team's name
by instead
setting up
aScharity to
aid Native
Americans.
E The tweet
COLBERT read, "I am
willing to show Asian
community I care by intro-
ducing the Ching-Chong
Ding-Dong Foundation for
Sensitivity to Orientals or
Whatever."
But taken out of the
larger context, many
Twitter users thought
the message trafficked in
the very racism the show
was originally trying to
lampoon. By Thursday
evening, the hashtag
.CancelColbert was trend-
ing on Twitter, with users
been sent by Colbert rather
than a representative of his
show, personally blasting
the host for perceived
insensitivity.
Port Authority
chairman quits
TRENTON, N.J.
(Bloomberg) Port
Authority Chairman
David Samson has
resigned after a report
commissioned by New
Jersey Gov. Chris Christie
to probe lane closings at
the George Washington
Bridge recommended
changes at the agency.
Samson, appointed
by Christie to the Port
Authority of New York and
New Jersey, which runs
the span, was linked by


Mother: Jahi MeMath 'still asleep








Fla. Legislature may reject consumer protections


TALLAHASSEE
(AP) Florida's chief
financial officer went
to the Legislature this
spring with a simple
request: grant additional
protections to customers
dealing with property
insurance companies.
But the push by Jeff
Atwater is in serious


jeopardy. That's because are now divided over the fight," Atwater said.
insurers, such as State issue and are advancing Atwater says he's
Farm Florida, are only very different versions pushing the bill in
willing to accept the of the bill. It's a sign that reaction to thousand
added protections if they nearly halfway through calls his offices rece
come with other changes the Legislature's 60-day from consumers con
that could help keep session that the bill could fused about how to
their costs down. easily die. claim when their ho


And that's proving to
be a big problem.
The House and Senate


"I really hope some
important consumer
stuff is not lost in the


ds of
ive
)n-
file a
ome


is damaged by a storm or
a fire. Atwater oversees
the state's insurance


consumer advocate
office.
The bill would create a
"homeowner claims bill
of rights" that requires
insurers to spell out to
homeowners what they
can expect when they file
a claim.
The legislation also
would prohibit insurance


companies from using
credit information to
deny a claim or cancel
a policy if the policy
has been in effect for
more than 90 days. This
provision came out of a
dispute between regula-
tors and one of Florida's
largest insurance
companies.


Advertisement


-) Advertisement





WiE &GARDEN


SUN


Official Projections For The Upcoming

Atlantic Hurricane Season Haven't Been Released Yet.


But homeowners don't have to wait
until the announcement from Dr.
William Gray, the pioneer of seasonal
hurricane forecasting, to begin preparing
their properties. The months in between
hurricane seasons are the perfect time to
make the necessary upgrades or
purchases in storm protection. Alufab
USA in Fort Myers has a variety of
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protection they need. Experts there help
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storm protection for the home's
openings--doors and windows--that are
so vulnerable to the wind, water and
debris of a serious storm.
Accordion and roll-up shutters are
manufactured and stored in the back
area of the Alufab building. These
shutters, whose exterior appears as a
vertical or horizontal covering when in
place, are most popular because they are
easy to control. They are especially

f^P^ia


suitable for people who aren't able to
mount products by themselves. For
example, steel and aluminum shutters
can be too heavy for one adult to affix.
Accordion shutters can be accessed and
locked from within the home. Installers
make sure the vertical blades of the
accordion shutters do not block the
everyday view out of the window or door.
And the two- to three-week turnaround
on accordion installations adds to the
appeal of cost efficiency.
Accordion shutters are typically a
choice for people who are having a home
built, noteworthy during this time of new
construction. A trench track that holds in
place the bottom of the shutters along
sliding glass doors can be set into pavers
on the lanai, making the track flush with
the ground. Because the track is flush and
does not require people to step over it,
there is no chance of stumbling over the
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Besides the accordion and roll-up
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those who want beauty in addition to
function. The selection of products is on
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building, where company experts are
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Alufab USA is an employee-owned
company dedicated to providing quality
workmanship and customer service. The
company is the largest manufacturer of
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So before the Atlantic hurricane
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your home in advance. Visit Alufab USA
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call (239) 226-4872. Or visit http://
www.alufabusa.com which offers a
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special usually offers a discount on the
most popular forms of protection--
shutters. Its March Markdown Madness,
which ends Monday, includes discounts
on accordion and roll-up shutters and
impact windows and doors.


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iI


o The Sun/Saturday, March 29, 2014


WIRE Page 3


www.sunnewspapers.net


STATE NEWS






Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014 FROM PAGE ONE


Denton, Vietnam POW and US senator, dies


(Washington Post) -
Jeremiah A. Denton Jr., a
retired Navy rear admiral
and former U.S. senator
who survived nearly eight
years of captivity in North
Vietnamese prisons, and
whose public acts of defi-
ance and patriotism came
to embody the sacrifices
of American POWs in
Vietnam, died Friday at a
hospice in Virginia Beach.
He was 89.
The cause was com-
plications from a heart
ailment, said his son Jim
Denton. Denton was a
native of Alabama, where
in 1980 he became the
state's first Republican to
win election to the Senate
since Reconstruction.
Denton lost a re-elec-
tion bid six years later.
But he remained widely
known for his heroism
as a naval aviator and
prisoner of war, and par-
ticularly for two television
appearances that reached
millions of Americans
through the evening news
during the Vietnam War.
In the first, orches-
trated by the North
Vietnamese as propagan-
da and broadcast in the
United States in 1966, he
appeared in his prison
uniform and blinked the
word "torture" in Morse
code a secret message
to U.S. military intelli-
gence for which he later



JOBLESS
FROM PAGE 1

rate decline since
December 2011 is that
people are leaving the la-
bor force or had delayed
their job search.
But Sean Snaith,
an economist at the
University of Central



HEARTS

FROM PAGE 1

the Society of Vascular
Surgery and New York
University to help
promote research.
The results are from
people who sought
screening from 2003
through 2008. Their
average age was 64,
nearly two-thirds were
female and 80 percent
were white. They gave
information on smoking,


SIGHTINGS
FROM PAGE 1

officials said.
During the search,
hundreds of objects have
been seen in the water
by satellites, but so far
not a single one has been
confirmed as being from
missing Boeing 777.
New Zealand Air Vice-
Marshal Kevin Short said a
search plane had spotted
11 objects Friday clustered
in a small area about 1,000
miles west of Perth.


UKRAINE
FROM PAGE 1

ahead with constitutional
reform and democratic
elections, and urged
Russia to support this
process and avoid further
provocations, including
the buildup of forces on
its border with Ukraine,"
the White House said in a
statement.
A White House official,
who wasn't authorized to
comment by name and
demanded anonymity,
said that Obama and
Putin spoke for an hour.


He said the plan was the
old off-ramp roadmap
that had been drafted
before Russia annexed
Crimea last week.
The Kremlin said
in its account of the


received the Navy Cross.
In the second television
appearance, during
Operation Homecoming
in 1973, he became the
first freed POW to step off
a plane at a U.S. air base
in the Philippines. He
spoke through tears be-
fore cameras, expressing
his gratitude for having
had the opportunity to
serve his country under
"difficult circumstances."
Denton was shot down
south of Hanoi on July 18,
1965, about a month
after his deployment to
Southeast Asia. A former
test pilot and the
father of seven he was
a commander at the time
and was flying an A-6
Intruder on a bombing
mission near the Thanh
Hoa Bridge. When his
plane came under an-
ti-aircraft attack and fell
into a tailspin, he ejected
and was captured.
Over the next seven
years and seven months,
Denton was incarcerated
in prisons including
the infamous Hoa Lo
complex, also known as
the Hanoi Hilton, and the
facility dubbed "Alcatraz"
that was reserved for the
most willful resisters. Also
at Alcatraz were James
B. Stockdale, the future
vice presidential running
mate of Ross Perot, and
Sam Johnson, the future

Florida, said the latest
numbers are signs that
people are beginning
to look for work again.
That's why the addition
of jobs did not change
the overall rate.
"I think it's consistent
with a recovering labor
market," said Snaith.
But Snaith cautioned
that as people start look-
ing for work again it will

diabetes, family his-
tory, obesity, exercise
and other factors, and
researchers had blood
pressure and other
health measures.
The study found:
Married people had
a 5 percent lower risk of
any cardiovascular dis-
ease compared to single
people. Widowed people
had a 3 percent greater
risk of it and divorced
people, a 5 percent
greater risk, compared to
married folks.
Marriage seemed to

One appeared to
be a fishing buoy but
the others were white,
rectangular in shape and
floating just below the
surface, he said Saturday.
Each was no larger than
3 feet in length.
"Our crew couldn't
identify anything that
would say it was definite-
ly from the Malaysian
aircraft," Short said. "I
think the main issue is
that those objects will
have to be picked up by a
ship so they can physi-
cally examine them."
The shift to the new

conversation that Putin
talked about action by
extremists in Ukraine and
suggested "possible steps
by the international com-
munity to help stabilize
the situation" in Ukraine.
It added that Putin also
pointed at an "effective
blockade" of Moldova's
separatist region of Trans-
Dniester, where Russia
has troops. Russia and
the local authorities have
complained of Ukraine's
recent moves to limit
travel across the border
of the region on Ukraine's
southern border. There
were fears in Ukraine
that Russia could use its


forces in Trans-Dniester
to invade.
Deep divisions between
Ukraine's Russian-
speaking eastern regions,
where many favor close
ties with Moscow, and


DENTON
Republican congressman
from Texas.
Denton was subjected
to four years in solitary
confinement. Living in
roach- and rat-infested
conditions, he endured
starvation, delirium and
torture sessions that
sometimes lasted days.
In one such session, his
captors placed across his
shins a nine-foot-long,
cement-filled iron bar,
he recalled in his mem-
oir, "When Hell Was in
Session," written with Ed
Brandt.
One torturer "stood on
it, and he and the other
guard took turns jumping
up and down and rolling
it across my legs," Denton
wrote. "Then they lifted
my arms behind my back
by the cuffs, raising the
top part of my body off
the floor and dragging me
around and around. This
went on for hours."
"They were in a frenzy,"

make it more difficult for
the unemployment rate
to drop in the months
ahead.
That could be a bit of
trouble for Scott since
he has made the state's
economic recovery a
centerpiece of his 2014
election campaign. Scott
has routinely touted
unemployment numbers
every month.

do the most good for
those under age 50; they
had a 12 percent lower
risk of heart-related dis-
ease than single people
their age.
Smoking, a major
heart risk, was highest
among divorced people
and lowest in widowed
ones. Obesity was most
common in those single
and divorced. Widowed
people had the highest
rates of high blood
pressure, diabetes and
inadequate exercise.
Researchers don't know

zone could be a break
for searchers because it
is a shorter flight from
land and has much
calmer weather than the
remote stretch previously
targeted.
"It is a different
ballpark," said Erik van
Sebille, an oceanogra-
pher at New South Wales
University. "Where they
are searching now is
more like a subtropical
ocean. It is not nearly
as bad as the southern
Indian Ocean, which
should make the search
easier."


Ukrainian servicemen hold Ukrair
the Belbek airbase near Sevastop
started withdrawing its troops ar
controlled by Russia.
the Ukrainian-speaking
west, where most want
to integrate into Europe,
continue to fuel tensions.
The Crimean
Peninsula, where ethnic


he continued, "alternating
the treatment to increase
the pain until I was
unable to control myself
I began crying hyster-
ically, blood and tears
mingling and running
down my cheeks.... My
only thought was a desire
to be free of pain."
Ten months into his
imprisonment, Adm.
Denton was ordered to
submit to an interview
with a Japanese report-
er. He said the North
Vietnamese tortured
him before the meeting
in an effort to compel
him to assist with their
Communist propaganda.
In the footage, Denton
walks through a doorway,
bows and then, with
evident discomfort,
takes his seat in a chair.
Hunched over, he clasps
his hands. Looking into
the camera lights as he
speaks, he blinks his eyes
hard and repeatedly,
in a manner that to an
untrained observer might
have seemed involuntary
- and that in Morse code
spelled t-o-r-t-u-r-e.
Denton later said that,
while the blinking drew
more attention, the words
he spoke to the inter-
viewer required greater
courage. At one point, the
reporter asked him what
he thought about the "so-
called Vietnamese War."

Florida initially report-
ed earlier this month that
the January employment
rate was 6.1 percent. That
figure was revised back
up to 6.2 percent with
the release of new data
on Friday.
Federal statistics
showed that Florida's gain
of more than 33,000 jobs
last month was the third
highest in the nation.

how long any study par-
ticipants were married
or how recently they
were divorced or became
widowed. But the results
drive home the message
that a person's heart
risks can't be judged
by physical measures
alone social factors
and stress also matter,
said Dr. Vera Bittner,
a cardiologist at the
University of Alabama at
Birmingham.
She heads the heart
disease prevention com-
mittee of the American

But in Malaysia,
Defense Minister
Hishammuddin Hussein
cautioned that while
the conditions had
improved, they remained
challenging and the area
"although more focused
than before, remains
considerable."
The new search area
is about 80 percent
smaller than the old one,
but still spans about
123,000 square miles,
roughly the size of New
Mexico. In most places,
depths range from about
6,560 feet to 13,120 feet,


"Well, I don't know
what is happening,"
Denton replied. "But
whatever the position
of my government is, I
support it fully.... I am a
member of that govern-
ment, and it is my job to
support it, and I will as
long as I live."
Another torture session
followed.
Denton was among the
highest-ranking officers
to be taken prisoner in
Vietnam and retained his
full sense of responsibility
toward his men. "I put out
the policy that they were
not to succumb to threats,
but must stand up and say
no," he told the New York
Times. "We forced them to
be brutal to us."
On Feb. 12, 1973,
shortly after the signing
of the Paris Peace Accords
that helped end U.S.
involvement in the war,
Denton and hundreds
of other POWs began
coming home. By virtue
of his rank and length
of imprisonment, he
was the first returnee to
disembark from the plane
at Clark Air Base in the
Philippines.
"We are profoundly
grateful to our command-
er in chief and to our
nation for this day," he
said in a speech on behalf
of his fellow POWs. "God
bless America."

Florida has also gained
more than 211,000 jobs
in the last 12 months.
California led the nation,
followed by Texas.
The leading industries
that are adding jobs are
professional and busi-
ness services, construc-
tion and the leisure and
hospitality areas, includ-
ing increases in jobs at
restaurants and bars.

College of Cardiology.
The study results were
released on Friday ahead
of presentation this
weekend at the group's
annual meeting in
Washington.
"We don't really have
a clear explanation" for
why marriage may be
protective, Bittner said.
"You may be more
willing to follow up with
medical appointments,"
take recommended
drugs, diet and exercise
if you have a spouse, she
said.

although the much deep-
er Diamantina trench
edges the search area.
Flight 370 disappeared
March 8 while bound
from Kuala Lumpur
to Beijing. The hunt
focused first on the Gulf
of Thailand, along the
plane's planned path. But
when radar data showed
it had veered sharply
west, the search moved
to the Andaman Sea,
off the western coast of
Malaysia, before pivoting
to the southern Indian
Ocean, southwest of
Australia.


denounced as illegiti-
mate. Talk percolates of
similar votes in other
r-, TI f Ukrainian regions with
large Russian popula-
tions, although none has
been scheduled.
Russia has pushed
strongly for federalizing
Ukraine giving its
regions more autonomy
but Ukraine's interim
authorities in Kiev have
rejected such a move. The
aeone vote that has been
scheduled is a presiden-
AP PHOTO tial election on May 25.
"Only an all-Ukrainian
nian flags as they wait to leave referendum, not the early
ol, Crimea, Friday. Ukraine presidential elections,
Ad weapons from Crimea, now could to a large extent
stabilize the political
Russians are a majority, situation and preserve
voted this month to Ukraine's sovereignty
secede from Ukraine and territorial integrity,"
before Russia formally Yanukovych said in a
annexed it, a move that statement carried by the
Western countries have ITAR-Tass news agency.


ALMANAC

Today is Saturday, March 29,
the 88th day of 2014. There are
277 days left in the year.
Today in history
On March 29,1951, Julius and
Ethel Rosenberg were convicted
in New York of conspiracy to
commit espionage. (They were
executed in June 1953.)
On this date
In 1638, Swedish colonists
settled in present-day Delaware.
In 1790, the 10th president of
the United States, John Tyler, was
born in Charles City County, Va.
In 1882, the Knights of
Columbus was chartered in
Connecticut.
In 1912, British explorer
Robert Falcon Scott, his doomed
expedition stranded in an
Antarctic blizzard after failing to
be the first to reach the South
Pole, wrote the last words of his
journal: "For Gods sake look after
our people."
In 1943, World War II rationing
of meat, fats and cheese began.
In 1962, Jack Paar hosted
NBC's "Tonight" show for the final
time, although the network aired
a repeat the following night.
(Johnny Carson debuted as host
the following October.)
In 1971, Army Lt. William
L. Calley Jr. was convicted of
murdering 22 Vietnamese
civilians in the My Lai massacre.
(Calley ended up serving three
years under house arrest.) A jury
in Los Angeles recommended
the death penalty for Charles
Manson and three female
followers for the 1969 Tate-La
Bianca murders. (The sentences
were later commuted.)
In 1973, the last United
States combat troops left South
Vietnam, ending America's direct
military involvement in the
Vietnam War.
In 1974, eight Ohio National
Guardsmen were indicted on
federal charges stemming from
the shooting deaths of four
students at Kent State Univer-
sity. (The charges were later
dismissed.)
Today's birthdays
Political commentator John
McLaughlin is 87. Author
Judith Guest is 78. Former
British Prime Minister Sir John
Major is 71. Comedian Eric Idle
is 71. Composer Vangelis is 71.
Singer Bobby Kimball (Toto) is
67. Actor Bud Cort is 66. Actor
Brendan Gleeson is 59. Actor
Christopher Lawford is 59.
Pro and College Football Hall
of Famer Earl Campbell is 59.
International Gymnastics Hall of
Famer Kurt Thomas is 58. Actor
Christopher Lambert is 57.
Rock singer Perry Farrell (Porno
for Pyros; Jane's Addiction) is 55.
Comedian-actress Amy Sedaris
is 53. Model Elle Macpherson
is 51. Rock singer-musician John
Popper (Blues Traveler) is 47.
Actress Lucy Lawless is 46.
Country singer Regina Leigh
(Regina Regina) is 46. Country
singer Brady Seals is 45. Former
White House Press Secretary
Robert Gibbs is 43. Tennis
player Jennifer Capriati is 38.
Actor Chris D'Elia is 34. Pop
singer Kelly Sweet is 26.




Florida deputy
rescues
drowning bull

TAMPA (AP) No
bull: This was one
interesting distress call
to Hillsborough County
deputies and rescue
crews.
The Tampa Tribune
reports that a
Hillsborough County
Sheriff's deputy was
the first to arrive Friday
morning at the scene
where a weakened
20-year-old bull was
close to drowning in a
pond.
Deputy Christina
Ammons held the
bull's head until


crews arrived with a
winch and pulled it to
safety.
The Hillsborough
County Sheriff's Office
documented the rescue
through tweets, photos
on Twitter, and on
Facebook.
The bull is expected
to make a full recovery.


Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014


FROM PAGE ONE






The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014 www.sunnewspapers.net


WORLD NEWS


WIRE Page5


I WORLD

Iron Age
skeletons unearthed
in English pipeline
LONDON (Bloomberg)
- It's not your usual
tweet from a water utility.
"We unearthed a
footless skeleton with
two sheep on her head in
Wiltshire," read the March
25 posting on Twitter by
Wessex Water Services, a
water and sewage compa-
ny serving southwestern
England.
Accompanying the
online post was a photo
of a spine, hip, leg and
assorted bones believed
to date from the Iron Age
being examined by an
archaeologist brought in
byWessexWater, which
serves the Bristol, Bath
and Bournemouth areas.
What archaeologists
have discovered so far
as they scour Wiltshire
during 200 million
pounds ($333 million) of
water supply and pipeline
works "is quite amazing,"
WessexWater spokes-
woman Lucy McCormick
said Friday by phone.
'A 10-year-old with a
sword wound in the hip,"
she said. "A lady without
her feet with a couple of
sheep on her head" that
staff think were re-buried
with her in a shallow site
as a means to "ward off
bad spirits."
In total four skeletons
thought to be from the
Iron Age that lasted in
Britain from 800 BC to the
time of the Roman con-
quest that began in AD 43
have been unearthed in
fields along the A303 mo-
torway near West Knoyle,
the company said.
NATO taps
Norway's
Stoltenberg to
deal with Russia
BRUSSELS (Bloomberg)
- NATO Friday picked
former Norwegian Prime
Minister Jens Stoltenberg
as its next civilian leader,
as the western military
alliance confronts a more
assertive Russia and
winds down the war in
Afghanistan.
Stoltenberg, 55, will be-
come the North Atlantic
Treaty Organization's 13th
secretary general and
first Norwegian to hold
the post, representatives
of the 28 allies decided
in Brussels. He will take
over from Anders Fogh
Rasmussen of Denmark
in October for a term of
four years.

Turkey blocks
YouTube after
Syria incursion
DUBAI, United Arab
Emirates (Bloomberg)
- Turkey defended its
decision to block YouTube
after a leaked recording
of a meeting where top
officials discussed a
possible military incur-
sion into Syria appeared
on the site.
Foreign Minister Ahmet
Davutoglu Friday equated
the leak to an "attack on
Turkey's borders" in an
interview with NTV tele-
vision. Davutoglu said he
had chaired the meeting
with the head of national
intelligence and other
military and diplomatic
officials to discuss how
to respond to threats by
Islamist militants against
an enclave of Turkish
territory inside Syria.
Some sections of the
tape were "doctored," the
foreign ministry said in a
statement Thursday.

Russia dairy
plant closed after


workers' milk bath
MOSCOW (LA Times)
- A Siberian dairy plant
was temporarily closed
Friday after its workers
had been found bathing
in milk, a Russian con-
sumer oversight agency
reported.
Trade House Cheeses,


a dairy producer in
Omsk, about 1,600 miles
east of Moscow, was
closed for 90 days by
regional authorities for
an urgent inspection
after complaints resulting
from photographs and a
video posted by one of its
employees on a Russian
social network.
In the photographs
and video clips posted on
New Year's Eve by worker
Artyom Romanov, a group
of undressed employees
relaxes in a container of
milk as part of their New
Year celebration. While
still partly undressed,
they then demonstrated
cheese making in a
clownish manner.

Brazil broad
inflation measure
exceeds estimates

RIO DE JANEIRO
(Bloomberg) Brazil's
broadest measure of
inflation rose in March
more than economists
estimated as drought
pushed up food prices.
Wholesale, consumer
and construction prices,
as measured by the
IGP-M index, rose 1.67
percent this month, more
than the 0.38 percent
increase in February,
the Getulio Vargas
Foundation said on its
website Friday. The gain
was the biggest since
July 2008 and was higher
than every forecast from
31 analysts surveyed
by Bloomberg, whose
median estimate was for
a 1.53 jump.

Gay marriage ban
ends in England,
Wales today
LONDON Partners
for nearly a decade, Sarah
Keith and Emma Powell
are moving next month
from their native England
to New York. But first,
they have an important
piece of business to take
care of: their wedding.
"We're quite calm about
it," Powell said Friday as
she strolled the coastal
streets of Brighton with
24 hours to go before
"I do" time. "We're not
bridezillas."
England, too, has been
quite calm about their
wedding, even though it
marks the sort of trans-
formational moment that
has both cheered and
horrified people world-
wide in recent years.
With the stroke of
midnight Saturday, same-
sex couples will, for the
first time, be permitted
to marry in England and
Wales.

Former Vatican
bank managers to
go to trial in Italy
ROME (dpa) -Two
former top managers
of the Institute for
Religious Works, or IOR,
the Vatican's scandal-
tainted bank, will go
to trial over money
laundering charges,
Italian prosecutors said
Friday.
Former IOR Director
General Paolo Cipriani
and deputy Massimo
Tulli quit their positions
in July, days after the
arrest of a high-ranking
Vatican prelate who
allegedly used the bank
to launder money on
behalf of wealthy family
friends.
Tulli and Cipriani are
accused of having broken
anti-money laundering
laws in connection to the
transfer of $31.5 million
from an account IOR
held at a Rome branch
of Credito Artigiano, part
of Milan-based Credito


Valtellinese.
The date for the start
of their trial has yet to
be set.
Italian authorities
seized the funds in 2010,
holding on to them for
about one year.


RFI
(AP)
Obai
allow
new


Obama meets with Saudi king,


weighs new Syria aid

YADH, Saudi Arabia
- President Barack
ma is considering
ving shipments of i 111
air defense systems


to the Syrian opposition,
a U.S. official said Friday,
as Obama sought to
reassure Saudi Arabia's
king that the U.S. is not
taking too soft a stance in
Syria and other Mideast
conflicts.
A key U.S. ally, Saudi
Arabia would be likely
to cheer a decision by
Obama to allow the
portable missile launch-
ers into Syria. Saudi
officials were dismayed
when Obama scrapped
plans last year to launch
a strike against Syrian
President Bashar Assad,
and they have been
pressing the White House
on the issue. The Saudis
could play a direct role
in sending the systems,
known as "manpads,"
to the rebels fighting
Assad's forces.
Manpads are compact
missile launchers with
the range and explosive


AP PHOTO


President Barack Obama meets with Saudi King Abdullah at Rawdat Khuraim, Saudi Arabia,
Friday. Rawdat Khuraim is a green oasis located 62 miles northwest of the capital city of
Riyadh and King Abdullah's private desert encampment is located within Rawdat Khuraim.


power to attack low-fly-
ing planes and helicop-
ters. Assad's forces are
known to have them, and
some have been brought
into Syria by rebels and
their sympathizers.
The Saudis have held


off providing them in
the past because of U.S.
opposition.
Word of Obama's
potential shift came as
Obama was paying a visit
to Saudi King Abdullah's
desert oasis at the


conclusion of a week-
long, four-country trip.
The aging monarch has
been nervously watching
Washington's negotia-
tions with Iran and other
U.S. policy developments
in the Middle East.


Taliban attack foreigners in Kabul


KABUL, Afghanistan
(AP) Taliban militants
attacked the residence of
an American charity and
a nearby day care center
Friday in Kabul, sending
foreigners including
women and children -
fleeing the scene while
Afghan security forces
battled the gunmen
holed up in the building.
An Afghan girl and a
driver were killed in the
crossfire, officials said.
An uptick in bold
attacks on foreigners


in the Afghan capital
suggests the Taliban
are shifting tactics to
focus on civilian targets
that aren't as heavily
protected as military and
government installations
as part of an overall surge
in violence ahead of
April 5 elections.
It also appears aimed
at sending a message
that the U.S. and its
allies aren't wanted as
the Obama administra-
tion presses the Afghan
government to sign a


security agreement that
would allow thousands
of international troops
to stay after the NATO-
mandated combat mis-
sion ends in December.
The assault Friday eve-
ning began in a way typ-
ical of the Taliban, which
claimed responsibility
for it in a statement.
A suicide car bomber
detonated his explosives
in front of the four-story
building housing workers
with the California-based
Roots of Peace, then four


gunmen rushed into the
compound.
Roots of Peace said
the organization's
guards pursued the
attackers into the house
and killed two of them,
while four foreigners -
two Americans, a South
African and a Malaysian
- took cover inside.
Two foreigners went to
the roof while the other
two hunkered down in
their rooms, the group's
president Gary Kuhn
said.


Palestinians threaten peace talks walkout


RIYADH, Saudi Arabia
(Washington Post)
- The Obama admin-
istration sought Friday
to keep peace talks
between Israel and the
Palestinians from falling
apart over Israel's refusal
to free about two dozen
Palestinian prisoners,
who were scheduled to
be released Saturday.
"The Israeli govern-
ment has informed us
through the American
mediator that it will
not abide with its
commitment to release
the fourth batch of
Palestinian prisoners
scheduled for tomor-
row," Palestinian spokes-
man Jibril Rajub told the
AFP news agency.
Palestinians have
threatened to walk out
of talks with a month to
go before an unofficial
deadline for an outlined
peace deal if Israel
reneges on the release
of longtime prisoners,
including several con-
victed of terrorist crimes
against Israelis.
Secretary of State John
Kerry and U.S. negotia-
tors are trying to prevent
a Palestinian walkout,
either by securing an
Israeli pledge to carry
out the release or by
brokering a new com-
promise that would
extend talks.
The Palestinian
Authority had agreed
to shelve plans to seek
further statehood
recognition through the
United Nations during
nine months of fast-
track talks brokered by
Washington.
In exchange, Israel
agreed to release 104
prisoners whose impris-
onment since before the
1993 Israeli-Palestinian
agreement known as the
Oslo Accords is a rallying
cry among Palestinians
protesting Israeli


occupation and police
tactics.
Israel has released
78 prisoners in three
groups.
The final group was
always assumed to be
the hardest for Israel
to release, because
many convicted of the


worst crimes were left
for last and because
of heavy opposition
to the move within
Israeli Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu's
right-leaning political
coalition.
Israeli cabinet mem-
bers had warned they


would block the final
release if the Palestinians
refused to extend the
talks beyond their April
29 deadline. Israeli
hardliners also said the
talks had failed to make
progress and accused
Palestinians of dragging
their feet.


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.--.- ,-. ^- I a.- *_^- S^.;i^'' '''".* ^


.-.r lll""^ ."*'
* .attC"^ l^Bik '' W .*>
i '^ ^ '-.*'*'""'- ,*< <-''* ^^ ^^p9


The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net


-1- 1






Page 6 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014 BUSINESS NEWS


Spending edges stocks higher


NEWYORK(AP)- A
positive report on U.S.
consumer spending
helped push stocks
mostly higher Friday for
the first time in three
days.
The gains were modest
as investors continued
to cut their holdings in
biotechnology stocks,
some of the best per-
forming names of 2013.
Instead, the stocks that
advanced the most
were mostly mature,
large companies such


as Microsoft, Exxon and
Cisco Systems.
The Dow Jones
Industrial average
rose 58.83 points, or
0.4 percent, to 16,323.06.
The Standard & Poor's
500 index rose 8.58
points, or 0.5 percent,
to 1,857.62. The Nasdaq
composite, which
includes a number of
large biotech companies,
rose just 4.53 points, or
0.1 percent, to 4,155.76.
The biggest gainer in
the Dow was Microsoft,


which rose 94 cents, or
2.4 percent, to $40.30.
The company announced
Thursday that it was
bringing Microsoft Office
to the iPad and would
shift its focus away from
Windows, a move that an-
alysts liked. Satya Nadella
made the announcement
in his first public appear-
ance as the new leader of
Microsoft.
"We continue to
view (Office on the
iPad) as a massive
revenue and operating


profit opportunity for
Microsoft," analysts at
Credit Suisse said in a
report Thursday.
Microsoft helped lift
other large technology
companies, with Cisco
Systems, Intel and
Oracle up roughly
1 percent or more.
In contrast to tech-
nology, biotechnology
had another horrible
day. Gilead Sciences,
Biogen Idec andVertex
Pharmaceuticals were all
down 4 percent or more.


SCORE Business Talk: Financial ratios


ne way to evaluate
the financial health
of your business is
to calculate some ratios
using your financial state-
ments. You can use a ratio
as a snapshot of your busi-
ness at a particular point
in time by tracking your
ratios over time and by
comparing your numbers
to an industry standard.
Ratios vary quite a bit
from industry to indus-
try, so it requires some
research to identify what
is usual in your industry.
For that, your tools are
your local library and the
Internet.
There are many ratios
useful for this purpose. I
describe a few of them in
this column. You can find
a longer list at Wikipedia.
org or investopedia.com.
The website www.
dinkytown.com provides
an illustrated example of
the calculations. I have
included some ratios for
a sampling of industries
based on 2010 corporate
tax return statistics (IRS
stats via www.bizsats.
com).
One group of ratios is
profitability ratios. These
are gross profit margin
(gross profit divided by


sales), operating profit
margin (earnings before
interest and tax divided
by sales), net profit
margin, aka return on
sales (net profit after
tax divided by sales),
return on assets (net
profit divided by average
assets) and return on net
worth (net profit divided
by equity).
The higher the better.
The return on sales
for food services and
drinking places (food and
drink) was 5.9 percent
and for beer, wine and
liquor stores (liquor) was
3.1 percent. Return on
assets for constructors of
buildings (buildings) was
9.5 percent and for physi-
cians' offices (physicians)
was 63.5 percent.
A second group are
liquidity ratios. These are
the quick ratio (current
assets minus inventory


divided by current liabili-
ties) and the current ratio
(current assets divided
by current liabilities).
They indicate a busi-
ness' capacity to pay off
current debt obligations
with liquid assets and as
a measure of effective
use of working capital.
A quick ratio between
0.5 and 1.0 is considered
acceptable. A current ra-
tio between 1.0 and 2.0 is
desirable. The quick and
current ratios for furni-
ture and home furnishing
stores (furniture) was 0.68
and 1.52 respectively. For
buildings they were 0.95
and 1.35.
Another group is op-
erating ratios. These are
inventory turnover (cost
of goods sold divided by
inventory), receivables
turnover (sales divided
by accounts receivable),
and return on assets (net
income divided by total
assets).
These are indicators
of how well capital
invested in tangible and
intangible assets is being
used to generate sales
and produce profits.
Inventory turnover varies
widely by industry but
generally a high number


is desirable and a low
one indicates excess cap-
ital is tied up in invento-
ry. Inventory turnover in
food and drink was 63.1
and in furniture was 6.2.
And finally there are
solvency ratios. These are
debt to worth (total liabil-
ities divided by net worth)
and a number rather than
a ratio, working capital
(current assets current
liabilities). The first is an
indicator of the risk level
inherent in the use of
debt as opposed to equity
in financing a business.
The higher the number
the greater the risk.
The second, using
the same numbers as
the current ratio, shows
how much working
capital would be left after
immediate obligations
were paid down during
an economic crisis. The
debt to worth ratios for
food and drink were 2.4
and for liquor were 1.4.
You can arrange to
receive free advice on a
business issue from a
SCORE mentor by going
to www.portcharlotte.
score.org, by calling 941-
743-6179 or by mailing
us at port. charlotte@
scorevolunteerorg.


A map of Atlas


ear Mr. Berko: In my
IRA, I have $15,000
face value of the
7.75 percent Alcatel-Lucent
convertible stock, which
was recently called at
$1,000. You recommended
Alcatel at $725 in 2006,
and I need to replace that
10 percent income I was
getting. So I was looking at
the Atlas Energy LP stocks
in the oil and gas business.
What are the differences
among the stocks, and do
you have a problem with
buying a limited partner-
ship or a master limited
partnership in an IRA? -
CC, Syracuse, N.Y
Dear CC: Some folks do
but can't figure out why
they do! I have no problem
with purchasing an LP or
an MLP in an IRA.
Greek mythology tells
us that Atlas was the
primordial titan who held
up our celestial sphere. And
Atlas was the title founder
Edward Cohen and son
Jonathan chose to name
the companies, which paid
them more than $16 million
in salaries last year.
Atlas Resource Partners
LP (ARP-$21.06) searches
for natural gas, crude oil
and natural gas in basins
across the U.S. ARP has
ownership interests in
more than 600 wells
located in the Barnett
Shale and Marble Falls
basins of North Texas plus
more than 11,000 wells
in the Appalachian basin,
northeastern Colorado,
Oklahoma, southwestern
Indiana, northeastern
Tennessee and Michigan.
Atlas Pipeline Partners
LP (APL-$30.63) gathers,
processes, transports and
treats natural gas in the
Anadarko, Arkoma and
Permian basins in the
southwestern and mid-
continent regions of the
U.S. APL owns an interest
in and operates 12 natural
gas plants, with a capacity


of more than 1 billion cubic
feet per day. APL also
owns about 11,200 miles
of a natural gas system
in Oklahoma, Texas and
Kansas. About 42 percent
of its contracts are fixed-
fee, which mitigates the
company's exposure to
price swings. Revenues
of $1.9 billion last year are
expected to increase to
$2.5 billion in 2014, and
EBITDA is expected to
improve from $242 million
to $310 million.
Atlas Energy LP (ATLS-
$43.10) primarily sells,
sponsors and manages
tax-advantaged natural gas
and oil investment partner-
ships. It also owns 2 percent
of the stock of Atlas Pipeline
Partners plus 6 percent
of its production units -
and 2 percent of the stock
of Atlas Resource Partners
plus 37 percent of its pro-
duction units. That's smart
because this approach
allows ATLS to receive in-
come from the production
units of APL and ARP, as
well as incentive distri-
bution rights. Last year's
$2.3 billion in revenues
paid dividends of $1.84,
which are very likely to rise
to $2.60 this year. Though
ATLS' dividend (which is
now paid monthly) yields
less than its brethren's,
the company provides its
shareholders with impres-
sive diversification and
faster dividend growth. S&P
Capital IQ, RobertW Baird
and Citigroup are bullish on
the shares.
Email Malcolm Berko at
mjberko@yahoo.com.


Target-Date Funds 101 T Mtl Fr
Can you explain whatTt
Q target-date funds are, and
if they're good investments? -7 .


P.L., Headland, Ala.
A Target-date funds are some-
times referred to as "lifecycle"
funds. Relatively new, they're
designed to simplify your financial
life. Each fund is focused on a
particular year when shareholders
would be expected to retire, and
its asset allocation is adjusted over
time as retirement approaches.
If you plan to retire around
2030, for example, you might buy
into a 2030 fund from Vanguard,
T. Rowe Price, Fidelity or many
other companies. It will likely
be invested largely in stocks and
some bonds, and over time it will
decrease its stock holdings and add
more bonds for you.
They're not all the same,
though. Fees vary widely, and
even among funds targeting the
same year, holdings and per-
formance vary, too. So do your
research before buying, knowing
that you're not restricted by your
age. You might plan to retire
in 2020, but a 2025 fund might
have the kind of stock-bond
mix you prefer.
Keep your big picture in mind,
too. You might invest $20,000 in
a target-date fund with a 90-10
stock-bond ratio, but if you hold
$100,000 in bonds separately a:..i
your retirement is 25 years /
away, your overall asset allo- 4
cation might not be what you
want or need it to be.
***
QIs there any silver lining
to inflation?- A.A.,
Pueblo, Colo.


A Yes. Imagine locking in a
30-year fixed-rate mortgage.
Inflation will make the dollar
value of your payments worth less
over time. You might be earning
$50,000 now and paying $1,000
monthly, but in 15 years, if infla-
tion-driven raises have you earn-
ing $80,000, that $1,000 payment
will represent a much smaller
chunk of your income.
Got a question for the Fool? Send it in
- see Write to Us


Not a Good
Taboo Topic
One of the topics many people
avoid discussing with each other is
finances. But by doing so, we and
our loved ones remain more in the
dark about money than we need to
be with costly consequences.
Kids might repeat the credit card
sins of their parents. Co-workers
might settle for lesser raises than
they could have received. And when
loved ones die without discussing
their final financial wishes, heart-
ache and headaches ensue. Don't
contribute to this damaging tradition.
Talk with your parents (or oth-
ers), if you can. Find out what they
earn (or did, when they were work-
ing), and share your own income.
Discuss mortgage payments. Ask
about financial sacrifices they made
in order to have the life they built.
You can learn a lot, especially if
you're planning on buying a home
or deciding between public and pri-
vate school for your kids. Talk about
long-term-care insurance and living


To E.iucahe, Amuse & Enrich


on a fixed income, for yourself or
them. Hear your parents' wishes and
let them learn about yours.
Talk with your kids. Do they
know what it costs to put a roof over
their heads and food in their tum-
mies? Why not? Consider an open-
checkbook policy, and find ways to
expose them to some of the financial
products particularly credit cards
- that they'll face in a few years.
How do your friends and peers
spend their paychecks? Do they max
out contributions to their 40 1(k)
accounts? What does their weekly
grocery bill come to? These kinds of
discussions can deliver insights and
spread smart strategies.
If you can share salary information
with friends in your industry, you'll
have a good barometer of what's
happening in your industry and
whether your employer is keeping
pace. If you're too squeamish to talk
finances with friends, join conversa-
tions online, such as in our discus-
sion boards at boards.fool.com.
Try practicing financial openness.
Talk about your next major purchase
and how long it's taking you to save
for it. See what you learn when
you're open about money issues.


4 /Name That Company
I began in 1969 as a national
1 _x >wholesale food distributor. Today,
W based in Houston and raking in $44
-/ billion annually, I'm the leader in sup-
0 plying food and related products
and services to anywhere meals are
prepared outside the home a $235
billion market. (That means restaurants,
horels, hospitals, nursing homes, schools,
':I iIse ships, sports venues and more.) My
48,:,':',:-plus employees serve about 425,000
S.Lis,:.rmers and operate from nearly 200 loca-
Itions I deliver roughly 1.3 billion cases annually
and ,:,i more than 400,000 products, including
40,000 ...1:,etaring my own name. I'm a Systems and
Sei vi:es Coimpany. Who am I?
'* .... 1. '.ndit to us with Foolish on the top andyou'll be
*... '.. .... zigfor a niftyprize!


.I I l inr

Gloom and Doom
My dumbest investment move
was listening to Marc Faber, who
predicted a market plunge. -
D.Q., online
The Fool Responds: Some pun-
dits and financial prognosticators are
known for their sunny dispositions,
while others, such as Dr. Faber, are
more associated with gloom and
doom. Each side can claim vindica-
tion when the market does j,
what they predicted, but it .
often goes the other way, and
you rarely hear about that. There are
many folks suggesting they know
what the market will do in the next
few months or years, but no one
knows or can know.
What we do know is that over long
periods of time, the market has gone
up, but never in a straight line. There
will always be occasional hiccups
and drops, and each will have been
predicted by one or more experts
(who got other predictions wrong).
As long as you have plenty of
investing years (or decades) ahead
of you, consider just investing for
the long haul in strong and growing
companies, and staying the course
during downturns. A simple broad-
market index fund can serve you
well, too, roughly matching
the market's returns.
Do you have an embarrassing
lesson learned the hard way?
,, ,, ,, 100 words (or
less) and send it to The Motley Fool co My
Dumbest Investment. C(- ., .. 11. .....
Submit -.' j ... 'Investment. If we
print yours, you 1 ool'scap!


T I I I "

Coke's Big Plans
Coke is one of the most dominant
and valuable trademarks on Earth,
likely to prosper for decades to
come. But Coca-Cola's (NYSE:
KO) sweetened carbonated bever-
ages are losing their fizz a bit, as
consumers seek healthier alterna-
tives. The company has been aiming
to revitalize sales with bottled juices,
waters, energy drinks, coffees and
teas, and it has a bigger plan, too.
In 2010, Coca-Cola laid out its
"2020 Vision" for the next decade,
aiming to double revenue, raise
profit margins, and increase its total
number of global servings to 3 bil-
lion per day (from nearly 2 billion
recently). The goals are ambitious,
but not impossible.
Factors in its favor include a grow-
ing global middle class, increasingly
able to afford beverage treats. It also
sports massive brand power, with
16 billion-dollar brands to its name,
such as Diet Coke, Fanta, Sprite,
Coca-Cola Zero, vitaminwater,
Powerade, Minute Maid and Sim-
ply. Brand strength leads to pricing
strength. Coca-Cola is also forging
strategic partnerships, such as its 10
percent stake in the maker of Keurig
machines, which can boost its pres-
ence in households.
Shares of Coca-Cola have a decent
chance of growing at a solid clip in
coming years. But even if growth
stalls, the global powerhouse will
still be a generous income provider,
via its dividend that recently yielded
3.1 percent. (The Motley Fool owns
shares of Coca-Cola and its newslet-
ters have recommended it.)


LAST WEEK'S TRIVIA ANSWER
I began in Alexandria, Va., in 1993, as a print newsletter. Today, I oversee a
great global investment community, educating, amusing and enriching mil-
lions through my website, newsletter services, books, audio programming,
syndicated newspaper feature, CAPS stock-rating service, asset manage-
ment service and more. (There are more than 2 million copies of my books in
print.) I've long advocated for individual investors, exposing conflicts of inter-
ests on Wall Street. My name is taken from Shakespeare and refers to the
character who could tell the king the truth without getting his head lopped
off. My favorite holiday is in April. Who am I? (Answer: The Motley Fool)
y Write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or
^ Smartest) Investments (up to 100 words), and your Trivia entries
to Fool@fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The
Motley Fool. Sorry, we can'tprovide individual financial advice.


Page 6 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014


. . . . . . . . .


BUSINESS NEWS





The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014


WIRE Page 7


our readers don't want. If you do not see your stock in the paper, please let us
know and we will put it in the listings. Email the name of the company and the
symbol to nlane@sun-herald.com, or call 941-206-1138. You can leave the stock
name and symbol on voice mail.


LARGE-CAP
,- S&P 500
IV -0.5%
week


Nasdaq
-2.8%
week


% -0.5% -0.1% +0.5%
YTD Mo YTD


52-week wk YTD
Hi Low Name Div PE Last chg %chg
8.41 3.85 Exels ... dd 3.38 -2.91 44.9
37.80 26.45 Excon 1.24 17 33.29 +.74+21.5
81.78 45.69 Epda .60 44 72.21 -1.99 +3.7
79.37 54.57 EapScipts ... 33 75.52 -1.47 +7.5
101.74 84.79 ExxonMU 2.52 11 97.70+3.39 -3.5
59.79 47.58 FMCTech ... 24 52.41 -.13 +0.4
13.67 11.01 FNBCpPA .48 16 13.14 -.20 +4.1
72.59 22.67 Facebook ... cc 60.01 -7.23 +9.8
75.29 57.28 Fampr 1.24f 15 57.76 -2.44 -11.1
53.12 42.48 Fasteal 1.00 32 48.98 -.14 +3.1
144.39 90.61 FedExCp .60 25132.01 -4.78 -8.2
17.60 7.00 FedNdHIcd .12 12 17.45 +.54+19.0
25.69 18.10 Ferrdlgs 2.00 30 22.66 +.82 -1.3
33.80 21.99 RdNRn .72 16 31.14 -.19 40
11.13 8.94 RFlht n 1.00 9 9.49 +.05 +2.6
23.90 15.62 R--lhThrd .48 11 22.72 -.55 +8.0
28.07 12.17 Rrisar ... 31 26.09 -1.68 +9.1
97.35 33.30 FiroEye n ...... 63.44 -6.22+45.5
11.34 8.19 FstNiagara .32 13 9.27 ... -12.7
74.84 25.66 FstSolar ... 15 68.64 4.73+25.6
46.77 30.10 FirstEngy 1.44 15 34.08 +1.23 +3.3
23.51 15.54 FsiMelit .64 17 20.35 -1.27 -8.5
9.71 6.60 Raexn ... 28 9.09 -.33+17.0
25.67 18.70 RowroFds .45 19 21.00 -.37 -2.2
83.93 53.50 Ruor .84f 19 76.41 -.21 4.8
18.02 12.15 FordM .50f 9 15.45 -.02 +0.1
47.92 33.20 FBHmSec .48f 28 41.79 -.54 -8.6
58.87 44.22 FrankJess .48 15 53.67 +1.45 -7.0
38.09 26.37 FMCG 1.25a 12 32.86 +.55 -12.9
24.39 12.35 Frooscae ... dd 23.68 +.32+47.5
5.59 3.71 RontrtCm .40 47 5.62 +.21+20.9
5.18 1.71 F--ine ... dd 3.75 -.24 +0.3
4.74 .84 FuelCdlE ... dd 2.29 -.28+62.4
20.20 8.32 Fudon-io ... dd 10.37 -1.28+16.4
G-H-I
19.44 2.63 GTAdfTc ... dd 17.17 -1.44+97.0
22.35 18.00 GabDlnc 1.20 q 21.79 ... -1.7
12.56 8.40 GabMulfT .88 q 10.76 -.05 -13.3
7.12 6.22 GabUIl .60 q 6.70 +.03 +4.9
7.77 1.65 GalenaBio ... dd 2.22 -.70 -55.2
57.74 25.21 GameStop 1.32f 13 40.62 +2.80 -17.5
40.48 30.46 Gam&Lsrn .52p ... 36.18 -.06 -5.9
46.56 34.71 Gap .88f 15 40.17 -1.52 +2.8
58.21 32.52 Gamin 1.92f 20 55.57 +.47+20.3
20.00 12.38 Geeknt ... dd 14.00 -.04 -22.6
36.04 30.28 GAInv 2.10e q 35.02 -.17 -0.5
113.57 65.37 GonDynam2.48f 16107.70 +.62+12.7
28.09 21.11 GenElec .88 19 25.88 +.48 -7.7
23.33 18.63 GenGr~p .6Tf 78 21.88 +.15 +9.0
53.07 46.18 GoiMIs 1.64f 19 51.30 +.27 +2.8
41.85 27.11 GenMobrs 1.20 14 34.73 -.28 -15.0
56.80 44.04 GonessEn 2.14f 48 53.33 +.47 +1.4
34.41 19.01 Gentex .56 20 30.82 -.32 -6.2
18.26 8.98 Genwodh ... 16 17.22 -.78+10.9
8.41 5.27 Gerdau .13e ... 6.40 +.15 -18.4
7.79 .98 GeronCp ... dd 2.02 -.19-57.4
84.88 44.76 GileadSd ... 37 68.55 -3.52 -8.7
56.73 45.70 GlaxoSKln2.47e ... 53.90 +.83 +1.0
13.34 8.38 GlimchRt .40 dd 9.90 +.14 +5.8
5.65 2.10 GluMobile ... dd 4.50 -.46+15.9
7.85 2.92 GddFLtd .02e ... 3.90 -.17+21.9
33.79 20.54 Gddcrpg .60 dd 25.11 -1.55+15.9
181.13137.29 GddcnanS 2.20 10162.30 -4.65 -8.4
28.32 11.83 Goodyear .20 12 25.94 -.98 +8.8
1228.88761.26 Goog1e ... 291120.15-62.89 ...
105.05 72.00 vGrace ... 31 98.68 -3.58 -0.2
6.28 3.96 GramrcyP .14f 1 5.16 -.12 -10.3
81.00 18.76 GNIron 10.00e 2 19.30 -.15 -71.7
27.02 21.46 GtPlaJnEn .92 16 26.57 -.12 +9.6
58.27 45.49 GrofA 1.68 20 51.62 +.04 -1.5
34.40 26.80 Gr!Mnh .20 dd 29.57 -.66 -11.4
12.76 5.37 Groupon ... dd 7.85 -.44-33.3
17.77 10.02 GpFnSnWx.96e ... 11.98 +.51 -12.2
28.17 18.73 GuangRy .64e ... 21.46 -.49 -7.1
56.06 35.50 HCPInc 2.18f 18 38.17+1.30 +5.1
26.85 17.80 HDSuppn ...... 26.68 +3.49+11.1
98.83 59.25 HainCel ... 32 89.46 4.01 -1.5
8.12 3.16 HalconRes ... dd 4.14 +.26 +7.3
59.69 36.77 HallibrtI .60 20 59.46 +1.40+17.2
76.44 42.86 Hanesbrds 1.20f 23 76.21 +.75 +8.5
61.72 45.81 Hanovertns 1.48 11 60.44 +.33 +1.2
70.04 49.15 HaieyD 1.10f 20 66.17 -1.49 4.4
6.43 2.35 HarmonyG .05e ... 3.20 -.18+26.5
28.99 20.98 Harsco .82 dd 23.30 +1.16 -16.9
36.76 24.67 HartfdFn .60 20 34.88 -.54 -3.7
28.28 16.17 HaterasF 2.25e dd 18.65 -.40+14.1
28.30 23.84 HawaiiB 1.24 15 24.95 +.07 4.3
80.07 52.43 HItCrREFT 3.18f cc 59.13 +.90+10.4
29.53 21.60 HlKCS .63f 41 28.40 -.56 +0.1
4.10 2.63 HedaM .Ole dd 3.11 -.28 +1.0
108.69 84.84 Hershey 1.94 29103.24 -1.60 +6.2
29.81 19.73 Herz ... 33 25.88 -1.54 -9.6
33.12 19.07 HWete .64f 12 32.04 +.09+14.5
38.01 30.35 Hillshre .70 22 36.99 -.71+10.6
25.61 12.59 HIIbpH ... 17 22.55 -.95 -2.5
16.15 4.22 HimaxTch .25e 76 11.38 -2.67 -22.6
83.20 69.00 HomeDp 1.88f 21 78.72 -1.70 4.4
42.96 34.24 Honda .79e ... 34.84 -.17 -15.7
95.91 70.92 Hontlnl 1.80 18 90.89 -2.10 -0.5
18.30 2.11 HodzPrn ... dd 14.81 -2.54+94.4
48.58 37.46 Hormel .80 24 48.40 +1.10 +7.2
32.64 23.75 HospPT 1.92 39 28.58 +.38 +5.7
20.64 15.60 HostNons .56f 46 19.94 -.20 +2.6
6.80 4.56 HwoanE ... 40 4.78 -.03-27.8
49.59 31.43 HuanPwr 1.37e ... 37.91 -.79 +4.6
122.55 91.22 HubbelB 2.00f 23117.70 -2.07 +8.1
9.98 7.89 HudsCiy .16 26 9.80 +.01 +3.9
10.11 6.82 HLntBncsh .20 14 9.86 -.03 +2.2
106.59 49.73 HurtgInblg .80 19 99.90 +.40+11.0
25.82 16.02 HuLtsrmn .50 30 23.84 +.07 -3.1
7.54 3.15 IAMGIdg ... 19 3.63 -.12 +9.0
41.41 13.98 iGateCorp ... 25 30.35 -.55 -24.4
14.93 7.00 ING ... ... 13.72 -.05 -2.1
56.39 38.00 iShBraul 1.44e q 44.87 +3.20 +0.4
42.42 31.99 iShEMU .92e q 42.10+1.08 +1.7
31.93 23.66 iShGrm .44e q 31.30 +.81 -1.4
12.43 10.36 iShJapan .13e q 11.33 +.45 -6.7
14.77 12.48 iSTaiwn .26e q 14.31 +.41 -0.8
21.44 17.55 iShUK .50e q 20.52 +.35 -1.7
27.95 17.75 iShSiler q 19.06 -.46 +1.9
73.31 62.25 iShSelDiv 2.23e q 72.52 +.45 +1.6
40.32 31.35 iShChinaLC1.02e q 35.83 +1.88 -6.6
190.13154.31 iSCorSP5003.44e q186.56 -.80 +0.5
44.43 36.16 iShEMis .86e q 40.74 +1.76 -2.5
124.26101.17 iSh20yrT 3.35e q109.37 +1.14 +7.4
68.19 56.44 iSEafe 1.70e q 66.86 +1.70 -0.4
96.30 88.27 iShiBxHYB6.05e q 94.25 +.26 +1.5
275.40154.39 iShNsdqBo.07e q229.38-16.63 +1.0
120.58 89.13 iShR2K 1.45e q114.29 -4.02 -0.9
71.24 64.20 iShHiDiv 2.27e q 70.92+1.04 +1.0
41.09 36.63 iShUSPfd 2.49e q 38.97 +.11 +5.8
76.21 60.92 iShREst 2.56e q 67.28 +.10 +6.7
26.56 20.18 iShHmCnst.04e q 24.10 +.14 -2.9
56.65 45.62 Idacorp 1.72 15 54.91 +.21 +5.9
6.87 .43 IderaPmn ... dd 4.53 -1.55 -2.2
84.32 60.02 rTW 1.68 20 80.76 +.42 -3.9
183.30 52.75 IIIunina ... cc142.02-10.58+28.4
14.25 5.51 IndBkMI 4 12.77 -.44 +6.4
63.42 41.53 Ingerid 1.00f 18 56.54 -2.32 -8.2
74.31 58.28 Incgedon 1.68 13 67.35 +.89 -1.6
12.05 9.17 InlandRE .57 9 10.34 -.19 -1.7
3.95 .49 InoPhrn ... dd 3.28 -.41+13.1
63.58 52.08 IntegysE 2.72 16 58.99 +1.13 +8.4
27.12 20.75 Intel .90 14 25.62 +.45 -1.3
497.00 30.38 hteraptP ... dd317.58-73.33+365.1
9.60 6.51 InterNAP ... dd 7.07 -.30 -6.0
214.89172.19 IBM 3.80 12190.45 +3.78 +1.5
21.20 13.31 InllGame .44 13 13.72 -1.18 -24.4
50.33 42.36 Int~ap 1.40 15 45.80 +.02 -6.6
18.00 12.76 InterpLdic .38{ 29 17.04 +.03 -3.7
10.68 5.56 Inteisootns .80 45 5.90 -.31 -24.3
516.07351.14 Int~ig ... 26434.99+6.10+13.3
24.21 9.09 Ionvon~ase ... 54 22.70 -.53 +9.2
36.88 27.86 Ir'vesco .90 17 36.44 +.29 +0.1
3.77 .44 IsoRay ... dd 2.31 -.11+362.0
16.43 11.38 ItauUribH .51r ... 14.62 +1.25 +7.8
J-K-L
13.14 3.37 JASdar ... dd 10.07 -.98 +9.8
16.61 11.68 JDSUriph ... 44 13.56 -1.05 +4.4
61.48 46.05 JPMergCh 1.6f 14 60.04 -.13 +3.3
66.88 48.86 JacobsEng ... 20 63.12 -1.70 +0.2
11.75 4.45 JlksPac ... dd 7.08 -.15 +5.4
9.45 5.95 JetBlue ... 17 8.42 -.09 -1.4
98.47 79.47 Joh'nJn 2.64 20 97.44 +1.51 +6.4
52.50 31.95 JohnsnCtI .88 17 46.55 -.46 -9.3
28.75 15.62 JnprNtwk ... 30 25.62 -.34+13.5
25.14 15.48 KB Hame .10 23 17.02 -.77 -6.9
36.70 26.34 KBRInc .32 17 26.61 -1.04-16.6
13.38 8.91 IKKRFn .88 9 11.44 -.17 -6.2
29.40 25.65 KKRFn41 2.09 ... 27.95 -.08 +4.3
22.40 3.55 KendTech ... dd 16.14 -2.76+36.9
125.96 88.56 KCSoulhn1.12f 31 99.61 +1.03-19.6
67.98 55.69 Kellogg 1.84 13 62.13 +.55 +1.7
17.29 6.61 KeiyxBio ... dd 16.61 +1.77+28.3
124.42 52.58 KeurigGM 1.00 32108.15 -3.85+43.2
14.70 9.29 Keycorp .22 14 14.14 -.22 +5.4
111.71 91.44 KImbcik 3.36"f 20109.82 -.34 +5.1
92.99 71.32 IMndME 5.44f 27 73.65 +.50 -8.7
41.49 30.81 KIndMerg 1.64 28 32.14 +.99 -10.7


52-week wk YTD
Hi Low Name Div PE Last chg %chg


52-week wk YTD 52-week wk YTD
Hi Low Name Div PE Last chg %chg Hi Low Name Div PE Last chg %chg


33.55 28.44 PPLCorp 1.49f 13 32.98 +.54 +9.6
68.81 47.12 Paccar .80a 20 66.56 -.83+12.5
40.44 12.66 Pandora ... dd 29.55 4.46+11.1
194.77150.33 PanaBlrd ... 26174.00-14.95 -1.5
22.39 10.21 ParametS ... dd 13.49 +.29 -2.6
8.67 3.75 PaikDa ... 27 7.01 -.29 -13.8
129.77 84.50 ParkerHan 1.92f 19119.24 -.14 -7.3
21.85 14.34 PeabcdE .34 47 16.12 +.38 -17.5
37.57 28.76 PRmbinag 1.68 34 37.83 +1.85 +7.4
6.88 4.46 Paig'ihg .48 ... 6.14 +.10 -1.0
15.50 10.84 PmNGm ...... 11.95 -.04 -16.6
13.16 7.03 PenWstg .56 ... 8.35 +.02 -0.1
12.19 10.32 Penantk 1.12 11 11.04 +.02 -4.8
19.63 4.90 Penney ... dd 8.83 +.34 -3.5
47.79 27.61 Penske .72f 15 41.30 -4.17 -12.4
83.37 49.67 Panter 1.00 28 77.66 -.59
15.70 12.62 PeopUtdF .65 20 14.64 -.35 -3.2
14.07 10.21 PepBoy ... dd 12.62 -.65 +4.0
22.72 18.04 PapooHdd 1.08 18 20.24 +.27 +5.8
87.06 77.01 PepsiCo 2.27 19 82.95 +.81
168.39112.05 Pemigo .42f 50153.16 -5.85 -0.2
77.32 61.38 PetSmart .78 17 68.49 +2.47 -5.9
20.75 10.66 Pea .82e ... 13.90+1.96 -5.4
19.65 10.20 Pehtras .44e ... 13.18+1.59 -4.4
32.96 27.12 Plizer 1.04f 16 31.88 -.30 +4.1
154.89 71.85 Pharmacyc ... cc100.49-19.31 -5.0
96.73 75.28 PhlipMer 3.76 15 81.02 +.96 -7.0
38.40 26.51 PhlipsNV .98e ... 35.37 +2.24 4.3
80.39 54.80 Phllips66 1.56 13 76.65 -1.30 -0.6
61.54 26.03 PhoenxCos ... dd 51.35 -2.65 -16.4
35.78 31.56 RedNG 1.26{ 19 34.84 +.15 +5.1
11.81 9.56 PimlncSr .96 q 10.42 +.17 +4.7
61.89 51.15 PinWst 2.27 15 54.03 +.09 +2.1
227.42109.19 PioNW .08 dd 188.85+2.80 +2.6
59.52 47.26 RainsAAP 2.46f 18 54.66 +1.18 +5.6
11.72 .15 RlugPowh ... dd 6.90 +.96+345.2
54.62 40.73 PLrnuQk 1.76 31 41.64 -.06 -10.5
146.99 83.20 Pdais 1.92f 26138.07 -1.32 -5.2
44.13 28.55 Potash 1.40 18 35.56 +1.24 +7.9
91.36 66.88 PwShsQQQ1.30e q 87.05 -1.95 -1.0
135.24107.69 Praxair 2.60f 22129.34 -3.58 -0.5
274.96180.06 PrecCastpt .12 21247.58 -5.22 -8.1
1378.96677.72 picaine ... 331192.01-76.83 +2.5
50.97 32.59 PnFnd 1.12f 15 45.81 -.61 -7.1
55.44 42.29 ProAssr 1.20 9 43.84 +1.12 -9.6
31.22 24.53 ProShtS&P ... q 24.88 +.10 -1.4
107.71 57.54 ProUItQQQ.13e q 98.11 -4.43 -1.5
106.77 70.11 ProURtSP .25e q103.55 -.88 +1.0
69.41 27.63 PrUJPQQQs ... q 60.25 -4.14 -2.9
359.36 59.32 PUVDxSTrs ... q 63.84 -2.37 4.9
85.82 73.61 ProctGam 2.41 21 79.76 +1.88 -2.0
28.54 22.53 ProgsvCp 1.00e 12 23.98 -.24 -12.1
45.59 28.02 ProUShSP ... q 28.83 +.21 -2.8
109.52 54.43 PUShQQQrs... q 59.47+2.52 -0.8
82.80 58.23 ProUShL20 ... q 67.27 -1.50 -15.1
143.31 49.38 PShtQQQrs ... q 56.283+3.47 -2.0
116.36 55.16 PUShSPXrs ... q 57.57 +.61 4.5
11.62 10.05 ProspdCap1.32 ... 10.77 -.04 4.0
92.68 54.58 PFudonl 2.12 dd 83.59 -3.25 -9.4
37.41 31.03 PSEG 1.48f 15 37.37 +.47+16.6
176.68145.04 PRbg 5.60 34168.03 -1.33+11.6
24.47 14.23 PulteGrp .20 3 19.01 -.10 -6.7
8.08 6.47 PMMI .47 q 6.99 +.04 +5.3
34.24 25.93 QEPRes .08 35 29.71 +.75 -3.1
124.42 28.11 Whoo360 ... cc 95.24-12.59+16.1
79.72 59.02 Qualcom 1.63f 20 79.283+1.09 +6.8
64.10 50.46 QstDiag 1.32f 10 57.80 +2.03 +8.0
26.01 21.44 Questar .72 19 23.54 +.09 +2.4
3.67 1.44 QksilvRes 3 2.66 +.03 -13.4
7.96 4.50 RF icD ... dd 7.70 +.03+49.2
54.20 30.84 Rackapace ... 52 31.26 -1.75 -20.1
16.24 9.62 RadanGrp .01 dd 14.55 -.77 +3.0
4.36 2.00 RadoShk dd 2.14 -.12 -17.7
192.03146.00 RLauren 1.80 20158.24 -2.35-10.4
42.99 28.38 Ravonlnds .48 27 31.95 -.22 -22.3
60.62 39.49 Rayorir 1.96 16 45.22 +.82 +7.4
102.15 55.85 Raylheon 2.42f 16 98.65 +1.15 +8.8
55.48 36.58 Rlylnco 2.19 54 40.75 -.17 +9.2
61.45 41.89 RedHat ... 56 52.23 -5.17 -6.8
24.78 16.28 RedwdTr 1.12 11 20.34 +.02 +5.0
29.52 23.70 RegncyEn 1.90f cc 26.91 -.91 +2.5
11.54 7.62 RegionsFn .12 14 10.95 -.14+10.7
76.78 59.44 RdSlAI 1.40f 16 69.75 -1.06 -8.0
6.00 1.25 RoneSola ... dd 3.24 -.63 -6.1
17.26 6.43 Reapgn ... 25 12.48 -2.44 -8.5
6.81 5.38 ReareCap .80 16 5.54 -.06 -6.6
15.79 12.60 ReteilOpp .64f 32 14.80 +.14 +0.5
56.77 43.61 ReynAraer2.63f 17 53.02 -.51 +6.1
60.61 39.14 RioTinl 1.94e ... 54.74+2.09 -3.0
7.05 1.65 RiteAld ... cc 6.43 -.21+27.1
125.60 80.60 RockwlAut 2.32 22124.25+1.21 +5.2
84.06 58.79 RodcCdl 1.20 17 79.01 -1.40 +6.9
65.73 37.20 Rogers ... 28 59.35 -3.83 -3.5
142.53118.01 Roper .80 24132.78 -1.93 -4.3
68.89 55.49 RoyalBkg 2.84f 15 65.50 +1.13 -2.6
54.93 31.35 RylCarb 1.00 23 53.54 -.83+12.9
80.07 65.02 RoyDShlIB 3.60 10 77.94 +2.29 +3.8
50.42 33.04 INand .12 6 39.64 +.69 -8.7
S-T-U
26.41 17.14 S&TBap .64 16 23.20 -1.01 -8.3
54.41 44.75 SCANA 2.10f 15 50.62 +.89 +7.9
27.34 19.32 SLMCp .60 8 24.60 -1.11 -6.4
94.00 55.30 SMEnegy .10 19 71.72 +.87-13.7
165.51143.60 SpdrDJIA 3.58o q162.85 +.22 -1.6
155.62114.46 SpdGdd ... q 124.56 -3.91 +7.3
189.02153.55 S&P500ETF3.48e q 185.49 -.71 +0.4
34.27 27.73 Spct-lome .1e q 32.24 -.20 -3.2
31.18 29.36 SpclShTHiY1.57e q 30.96 +.09 +0.4
42.79 29.73 SpdrS&PRB.58e q 40.61 -1.41
88.95 68.76 SpirRel .61e q 83.84 -2.19 4.8
73.76 54.04 SpdrOGEx .54e q 71.64 +1.21 +4.5
16.08 8.16 SABESPs .39e ... 9.10 +.60 -19.8
55.00 45.64 SalnR 3.90e 13 49.37 -.36 -2.4
40.25 22.26 Sateway .80b 3 37.30 -.71+14.5
40.68 21.91 Saialncs ... 21 36.70 -2.54+14.5
23.28 16.82 StJoe ... cc 19.20 +.34 +0.1
67.00 36.09 Saesfrcs ... dd 55.75 -1.28 +1.0
120.00 47.60 SaliPhrm ... 47 99.52-10.72+10.7
31.86 25.25 SallyBty ... 18 27.48 -.94 -9.1
18.25 14.01 SJuanB .98e 23 17.82 +.54 +6.5
82.55 50.68 SanDisk .90 18 80.61 +.51+14.3
6.96 4.52 SandRdge ... dd 6.27 -.18 +3.3
55.94 46.95 Sanot 1.91e ... 51.98+1.24 -3.1
97.43 69.08 Schlmbrg 1.60f 19 97.57+4.90 +8.3
29.13 16.05 Schwab .24 37 27.19 -1.34 +4.6
48.09 32.83 SeachiLUd 3.92f 15 34.89 +.78 -15.1
62.76 33.22 SeagaleT 1.72 11 54.92+1.43 -2.2
67.50 32.85 SearsHIdgs ... dd 46.61 -1.33 -5.0
97.48 77.49 SempraEn 2.64f 22 95.75 +.11 +6.7
29.99 20.70 SonHous 1.56 23 22.40 +.35 +0.8
208.63162.22 Shewin 2.20f 27194.69 -5.72 +6.1
19.35 14.12 SipRn 1.60f 9 18.08 +.67+10.4
6.29 2.38 SideraNac .55e ... 4.41 +.25 -28.9
31.95 17.75 Sil~htn g .38e 22 23.15 -1.89+14.7
182.45142.47 SimonProp5.00f 39163.86+2.58 +7.7
92.83 45.54 Sina ... dd 58.95 -7.18 -30.0
4.18 2.95 SidusXM ... 53 3.16 -.20 -9.6
11.40 4.80 Skdlcandy ... dd 8.94 -.57+23.9
39.34 19.57 SkyqksSol ... 23 36.94 -.61+29.3
2.69 .79 SmilhMicr ... dd 1.96 -.13+32.4
114.72 87.10 Smucker 2.32 18 96.48 +.46 -6.9
115.29 79.88 SnapOn 1.76 19112.20 -.28 +2.4
77.80 35.27 SodaStn ... 19 43.53 +1.63 -12.3
25.04 21.13 SdarCap 1.60 15 21.95 -.09 -2.7
88.35 18.00 SdarCity ...... 61.38 -3.67 +8.0
15.00 7.15 Solazyme ... dd 11.21 -2.15 +2.9
43.75 32.03 SonooP 1.24 19 40.33 -.81 -3.3
3.08 1.98 Sinus ... dd 3.32 -.21 +5.4
28.38 15.28 Sony(p .25e ... 18.65 +.89 +7.9
70.48 56.91 SourcC 3.28f q 67.75 -1.35 +1.0
62.28 51.77 SoJednd 1.89 18 55.21 +.51 -1.3
48.74 40.03 Soulhnco 2.03 19 43.37 +.45 +5.5
24.17 12.45 SwstlArl .16 21 23.16 -.02+22.9
46.90 34.68 SwsnEngy ... 80 45.81 -.76+16.5
80.24 62.11 SowranSS 2.72f 31 72.66 -.91 +11.5
38.04 29.45 Spetan 1.34f 22 36.82 +.19 +3.4
12.11 8.24 SoilifRCn .66 dd 10.73 -.23 +9.2
106.15 38.48 Splurk ... dd 71.41-13.37 +4.0
11.47 5.15 Sprintn ... dd 9.29 +.24 -13.6
48.26 37.10 SPMals .99e q 46.77 -.60 +1.2
60.50 44.60 SPH~lhC .84e q 57.71 -.47 +4.1
43.46 38.87 SPCnSt 1.05e q 42.75 +.25 0].5
67.85 51.95 SPConsum.82e q 64.28 -1.40 -3.8
88.54 73.52 SPEngy 1.59e q 89.086+2.00 +0.6
22.65 17.75 SPDRFnd .34e q 22.11 -.29 +1.1
53.25 40.02 SPInds .91 e q 51.73 +.08 -1.0
36.75 29.10 SPTech .64e q 36.07 -.24 +0.9
41.44 35.80 SPUIIl 1.47e q 41.01 +.50 +8.0
9.97 7.03 S'd~ac ... 18 8.28 -.09 -9.1
92.76 73.77 S'tan~kDk 2.00 25 80.69 +.98..
17.30 11.04 Staples .48 12 11.37 +.04 -28.'4
5.99 4.44 S'talGas .33 11 5.89 -.02+12.2
82.50 56.15 Staibucks 1.04 31 73.70 -3.01 -6.0
82.81 59.21 S'tewdtl-r 1.40f 24 78.45 +.22 -1.3
76.24 54.57 S'te'te 1.04 15 68.99 +.44 46.0
19.74 13.85 S1Dynam 46{ 21 17.44 -.12 -10.7
16.04 9.78 SIlwtM ... 36 14.96 -.66+21.2
83.86 63.35 S'ykr 1.22 26 80.54 -.01 +7.2
50.25 39.91 SubFpne 3.50 14 40.89 +.19 -12.8


22.48 13.77 SuffdkBap ... 20 22.09 -.13 +6.2
46.38 29.34 SunHycti .36a 29 42.10 -1.53 +3.1
37.00 26.83 Sumrgs .92f 12 34.53 +1.97 -1.5
21.93 3.95 SunEdson ... dd 18.86 -1.47+44.5
37.14 9.00 SLnPower ... 25 31.85 -1.30 +6.8
41.26 26.97 SLnTrst .80f 14 39.03 -1.33 +6.0
8.76 4.55 Supvdu ... dd 6.75 -.01 -7.4
26.71 12.75 S'wATrans ... 22 23.65 -1.84 +6.5
27.10 17.95 Symantec .60 16 19.79 +1.59-16.1
3.79 2.46 Synovus .04 26 3.36 -.12 -6.7
34.10 16.01 T-McHUSn ...... 32.60 -.11 -3.1
52.61 42.16 TCPpLn 3.24 23 47.59+1.48 -1.7
35.82 18.79 TDAme* .48a 26 33.40 -1.92 +9.0
19.22 16.12 TECO .88 18 16.97 +.28 -1.6
64.38 46.53 TJX .58 20 60.10 -1.65 -5.7
20.30 15.70 TaiwSemi .50e ... 19.64 +1.11+12.6
73.50 54.66 Target 1.72 20 59.98 +.53 -5.2
89.46 61.43 TaLbmn 2.161 41 70.04 +.76 +9.6
62.75 34.26 Teoo ... 19 57.02 -3.10 +0.8
65.96 39.16 Teradat ... 21 48.10 +.31 +5.7
231.30132.51 TerraNW12.82e 10153.00 4.00 +8.4
265.00 36.77 TedaMet ... dd212.37-16.52+41.2
51.41 36.26 TevaPhTm1.31e 99 49.45 +.04+23.4
47.65 33.56 Texlnst 1.20 27 46.64 -.51 +6.2
29.07 19.33 TexRdhse .60f 23 25.81 -.41 -7.2
42.36 33.53 Textaoner 1.88 10 37.65 +.58 -6.4
40.55 24.87 Texaft .08 22 38.53 +.12 +4.8
97.28 29.88 3DSys ... cc 59.07+2.26-36.4
140.43102.89 3MCo 3.42f 20134.20+1.08 4.3
27.15 18.18 TibcoSft ... 39 20.04 -1.12 -10.9
61.46 50.67 THol-long 1.26f 18 54.71 +.01 -6.3
147.28 89.81 TNCaede 3.00f 20135.87 -.78 +0.3
70.77 55.71 TimeWarn 1.27f 17 64.65 -1.69 -7.3
64.35 50.22 Tirkan 1.00f 20 58.59 -1.64 +6.4
39.95 29.64 TollBros ... 30 35.72 ... -3.5
TorchEngy ....... 45 ...
80.43 57.69 Trchnark .76f 14 77.35 -1.86 -1.0
47.33 38.22 TorDBkgs 1.88f ... 46.54 +.51 -0.4
66.23 45.93 TotMlSA 3.19e ... 65.98+2.14 +7.7
22.30 2.40 ToweGplf ... dd 2.73 -.10-19.2
55.79 38.47 Transom 2.24 cc 41.19 +.79 -16.7
91.68 77.38 Travelers 2.00 9 83.99 +.21 -7.2
20.24 17.22 TdConil .65e q 19.93 +.05 -0.3
51.99 42.10 TdCnllpf 2.50 ... 46.01 -.49 +3.4
18.77 3.31 TdrnaSolar ... dd 13.47 -2.13 -1.5
19.45 17.28 TdNetn ...... 21.31 ...+11.6
75.95 34.57 Tdriy .60 15 70.85 -3.78+30.0
13.62 4.62 TdQdnt ... dd 13.06 -.12+56.6
29.53 19.31 Tuleue ... 26 28.79 +.20+11.7
7.67 5.14 TrstNY .26 16 6.89 -.25 4.0
97.14 73.07 Tuppwre 2.72f 16 82.25 +.12 -13.0
5.99 2.94 TLrqHilRs ... dd 3.42 +.06 +3.6
35.75 26.16 21stCFbxA .25 ... 31.61 -1.12 -10.1
35.19 26.39 21stCFoxB .25 11 30.72 -1.11 -11.2
74.73 38.80 Twittern ...... 47.30 -3.62 -25.7
12.77 8.94 TwoHrblrl.11e 10 10.20 -.05 +9.9
44.10 30.62 Tycolnd .72f dd 41.81 -.90 +1.9
27.04 21.96 UDR 1.04f 37 25.68 +.37+10.0
45.49 36.43 UGI Corp 1.13 17 44.80 +.29 +8.1
42.14 34.37 UILHold 1.73 17 36.22 +.38 -6.5
60.57 42.51 UNSEngy 1.92f 22 60.00 -.04 +0.3
15.00 4.52 UltraClean ... 35 12.47 -1.85+24.3
124.79 49.79 UnderArmr ... 77115.22 4.94+32.0
117.91 87.28 UriRrst .15 18107.38 -3.23 +0.4
190.48135.75 UnionPac 3.64f 20184.75 -2.58+10.0
64.32 40.51 Urit ... 30 64.57 +1.13+25.1
49.20 27.32 UJConl ... 30 42.96 -1.37+13.6
105.37 81.95 UPSB 2.68f 21 97.34 +.48 -7.4
96.51 44.85 UtdRendtls ... 23 92.43 -2.48+18.6
43.66 31.99 USBancrp .92 14 42.30 -.49 +4.7
27.89 16.60 US NGas q 25.00+1.02+20.8
31.15 15.80 USS'ted .20 dd 27.17 +.08 -7.9
118.42 90.30 Ulcech 2.36 18114.81 +.24 +0.9
83.32 54.44 UtldhGp 1.12 15 81.62 +.28 +8.4
63.59 48.13 UnvrCp 2.04 10 55.03 -1.33 +0.8
36.30 25.55 UnunGrp .58 11 34.44 -1.21 -1.8
2.39 1.26 UniiredP ... dd 2.09 +.15+51.4
2.65 1.30 UrariLrnEn ... dd 1.33 -.22-33.5
V-W-X-Y-Z
63.45 40.82 VFCorps 1.05 23 61.37 -.93 -1.6
18.55 12.29 ValeSA .78e ... 13.68 +.64 -10.3
17.54 10.79 ValeSApf .78e ... 12.27 +.73 -12.4
55.96 33.00 ValeroE 1.00f 10 52.86 -.93 +4.9
10.73 8.75 VlyNBcp .44 15 10.24 -.11 +1.2
7.06 3.16 VaVisA ... dd 4.72 -.66 -32.5
78.86 63.40 VangREIT2.67e q 70.03 +.24 +8.5
75.75 64.64 VangDivAp1.43e q 74.65 +.19 -0.8
44.81 36.02 VangErng 1.20e q 40.28 +1.74 -2.1
60.63 46.85 VangEur 2.28e q 58.60 +1.22 -0.3
42.30 34.33 VangFTSE1.36e q 41.04+1.06 -1.5
38.82 31.83 Vecren 1.44 23 38.77 +.72 +9.2
84.11 54.89 Vontas 2.90f 39 60.36 +.73 +5.4
20.21 10.98 VediaE .91e ... 19.63 +.33+20.0
62.96 43.28 Veidgn ... 14 53.49 +.71 -10.5
54.31 45.08 VeizonCm 2.12 12 47.42 +.51 -3.5
28.97 21.89 ViadCorp .40a 19 23.73 +.23 -14.6
235.50160.50 \Asa 1.60 27212.09-11.28 -4.8
15.44 11.54 Vishaylnt .24 18 14.49 -.65 +9.3
15.62 5.50 VMJs ... dd 5.72 -.12 -37.0
111.45 64.86 VMware ... 45106.29 -2.92+18.5
42.14 27.49 VoMone ...... 36.45 -.86 -8.8
69.50 45.42 VdcanM .28f cc 66.39 +.28+11.7
79.31 51.31 WD40 1.36 31 76.51 -.83 +2.9
79.34 55.23 WPCarey 3.58f 42 59.58 -.98 -2.9
23.69 14.87 WPXEngy ... dd 17.85 -.73-12.4
81.37 71.51 WalMart 1.92f 16 76.01 -.09 -3.4
69.84 43.31 Walg'n 1.26 23 65.36 +.61+13.8
29.66 7.07 WalterEn .04 dd 7.65 +.06-54.0
30.58 22.30 WREB 1.20 cc 23.85 -.35 +2.1
46.38 37.97 WsteMInc 1.50f cc 41.15 +.42 -8.3
115.06 87.85 Waters ... 21107.68 -3.06 +7.7
17.53 11.55 Weehfrnl ... dd 17.36 +.58+12.1
32.67 22.04 WebsterFh .60 16 30.55 -1.00 -2.0
35.91 27.21 WanRIt 1.30f 37 30.11 +.38 +9.8
102.56 63.80 WellPoint 1.75f 12 99.39 -.38 +7.6
49.97 36.19 WdlsFargo 1.20 13 49.29 +.17 +8.6
10.27 5.28 WenoisCo .20 82 9.01 -.16 +3.3
35.24 29.79 WestarEn 1.40f 15 34.80 +.12 +8.2
15.74 11.31 WAsEMkt 1.02 q 12.25 +.32 +3.5
13.78 11.14 WAslnfSc .38 q 11.68 +.03 +2.3
19.50 14.24 WslnUrion .50 11 16.21 +.61 -6.0
35.12 24.98 Weslpacs1.92e ... 31.80 +1.31 +9.5
33.24 26.38 Weyerhsr .88 25 29.18 -.11 -7.6
160.01107.88 Whrtpl 2.50 14146.75+1.82 -6.4
65.59 40.70 WhaeFds .48 34 51.15 -3.89 -11.6
42.94 31.25 Vtnscos 1.61f 48 40.92 +.31 +6.1
8.88 7.18 Winds"rn 1.00 18 8.22 +.67 +3.6
40.05 39.04 WiscEngy 1.56f 18 45.94 +.83+11.1
18.56 9.83 WisdamTr ... 34 12.94 -.67 -26.9
53.95 40.70 WTJpHedg1.24e q 47.04 +1.97 -7.5
19.18 12.99 WTInda .16e q 18.84+1.11 +8.0
40.69 33.40 Woodward .32 18 40.68 -.71 -10.8
31.08 8.56 V~dWEnt .48 cc 27.52 -3.31 +66.0
249.31114.41 Wym 5.60{ 30217.51 -8.69+12.6
31.79 26.90 XcdEngy 1.28f 16 30.08 +.39 +7.7
12.65 8.11 Xerox .25f 12 11.06 -.08 -9.1
55.59 34.08 Xilinx 1.16{ 25 53.84 -.66+17.2
36.99 6.69 YRCWwde ... dd 22.21 -.28+27.9
41.72 22.70 Yahoo ... 28 35.90 -2.04 -11.2
15.50 8.31 Yamanag .15m 26 8.08 -.36 +4.2
45.42 19.93 Yandex ... ... 29.47 -.54 -31.7
101.75 22.48 Yap ... dd 76.44 -6.99+10.9
8.77 1.62 YingliGrn ... dd 4.35 -.41 -13.9
22.00 17.86 YakWater .57 27 26.33 -.13 -2.9
37.74 15.54 YoukuTud ... dd 27.31 -1.47 -9.9
78.68 63.16 Yu'nBmds 1.48 31 74.20 -1.07 -1.9
7.92 3.58 Zagg ..8 4.48 -.15 +3.6
98.95 72.31 Zirmer .08f 19 9(3.71 +.39 +0.6
33.33 28.10 ;ionBap .16 18 30.29 -.95 +1.1
34.74 28.77 Zoofs .29 29 29.01 -.25 -11.3
5.19 1.25 Zogonix ... dd 2.70 -.53 -20.6
15.25 12.28 ZweigFd .92e q 15.09 -.04 +1.5
5.89 2.50 Zynga ... dd 4.42 -.5,3+16.3


22.50 18.25 KIngDEnn ...
8.09 4.01 Kinrss g
14.11 7.27 KodakOg ...
59.00 45.33 KoHs 1.56f
58.76 49.79 KredFGp 2.10
9.18 4.71 KratsDef ...
26.63 12.32 spKrm
45.25 31.52 Krogr .66
13.70 10.08 Kdicke
67.16 43.16 LBrands 1.36f
118.80 79.50 L-3Com 2.40f
11.11 5.99 LSICorp .12
48.69 34.30 LTCPrp 2.04
61.92 50.39 Landstar .24a
88.28 47.95 LVSands 2.00f
33.36 22.84 LaSalleH 1.12
34.28 28.00 LeggRat 1.20
44.40 30.90 LenarA .16
39.69 19.12 Levd3
6.41 4.97 LblyASE .37e
46.45 35.16 UbGlobAs ...
43.55 31.87 UbGlobCs ...
30.12 19.79 UbtylntA
45.02 31.96 UbtProp 1.90
2.68 1.10 Ufevantge ...
60.12 47.53 Ullli 1.96
49.78 34.21 UnearTch 1.08f
257.56160.20 UrVdln
39.47 20.35 UmEngy 2.90
44.20 23.03 UnnCo 2.90
37.81 22.25 UonsGtg .20
5.76 2.82 UoydBkg
168.41 91.91 LocdhdM 5.32
56.85 39.89 LAllard 2.46f
52.08 37.09 Lowes .72
82.50 44.32 dulerm gs ...
57.78 48.59 LLmol ca .76e
91.94 55.02 LycnBasA 2.40


... 18.08 ... 4.8
dd 4.21 -.59 -3.9
23 12.10 +.45 +7.9
14 57.00 +1.21 +0.4
12 55.70 +.33 +3.3
dd 7.44 -.27 -3.1
37 17.72 -.96 -8.1
15 43.95 -.02+11.2
17 12.31 -.36 -7.4
19 56.55 -2.08 -8.6
14117.41 +1.40 +9.9
53 11.07 +.02 +0.3
23 37.51 -.51 +6.0
18 58.18 -1.12 +1.3
28 78.25 -3.17 -0.8
43 31.34 -.73 +1.6
20 32.23 +.28 +4.2
18 39.58 +.01 +0.1
dd 38.51 -.11+16.1
q 5.84 -.05 -2.2
dd 41.29 -.79 -9.2
... 40.44 -.60 -4.1
... 28.62 -.41 -2.5
23 36.55 +.14 +7.9
15 1.32 -.04 -20.0
13 57.61 -.17+13.0
27 47.85 -.33 +5.0
cc190.59 -6.13 -12.1
dd 28.47 -.52 -7.5
... 27.32 -.87 -11.3
14 25.20 -2.35 -20.4
... 5.01 -.10 -5.8
17160.54 +3.14 +8.0
17 53.35 +1.20 +5.3
23 48.92 -.33 -1.3
27 51.89 +4.26 -12.1
... 58.00 +5.13 +7.6
15 88.38 -1.66+10.1


22.00 16.21 Calgon ... 25 21.07 -.51 +2.4
24.60 18.54 CalidW* .65f 24 23.53 -.58 +2.0
39.75 24.23 CalunetSp 2.74 dd 25.47 -.13 -2.1
76.06 56.09 CamdenPT2.64f 38 66.49 +.38+16.9
66.12 52.50 Cameron ... 21 61.46 -1.39 +3.2
48.83 38.30 CampSp 1.25 27 44.56 +.02 +3.0
58.40 46.48 CdaNRgs 1.00f ... 55.57 -.01 -2.5
38.41 26.98 CdaNRsgs .90f ... 38.07 +.80+12.5
44.50 3.16 CdnSdar ... 51 31.99 -3.15 +7.3
27.10 19.87 CapSonL ... dd 25.47 -.50 +6.2
15.47 8.42 CapilSrce .04 19 14.23 -.62 -1.0
13.28 11.08 CapsteadM1.27e 14 12.60 -.05 +4.3
2.60 .82 CpsnTubT ... dd 2.02 -.32+56.2
74.40 41.54 CaralHIlh 1.21 60 69.68 -.26 +4.3
41.98 32.48 CareFudon ... 24 39.47 -.73 -0.9
32.60 15.44 Carmke ... cc 29.25 -1.54 +5.1
41.89 31.44 Carnival 1.00 28 37.24 -2.74 -7.3
66.54 43.30 CarpTech .72 26 65.80 +.57 +5.8
53.23 22.90 Canizo ... 26 53.57 +1.46+19.7
99.60 79.49 Caelpilar 2.40 18 99.39 +2.00 +9.4
54.70 38.28 CedarF 2.80 26 50.95 -1.02 +2.8
174.66110.53 Cdgoe ... 41139.29 -5.11 -17.6
4.25 .97 Cdrhra ... dd 3.38 -.43+77.0
38.84 10.70 CdldexTh ... dd 16.95 4.57 -30.0
13.51 9.13 Comex .45t ... 12.56 -.35 +6.2
9.91 5.23 Camigpfs2.02e ... 6.80 +.84+14.2
25.65 22.22 ConterPht .95f 33 23.54 -.18 +1.6
38.40 27.93 Cnt'yUnk 2.16 dd 32.68 +1.34 +2.6
3.92 1.85 Camveo ... dd 3.04 -.28 -11.6
18.25 10.50 Chedkont ... dd 13.01 -.49 -17.5
33.26 23.18 ChmRFid .92 16 31.77 -1.00 +0.3
56.03 24.27 CherireEn ... dd 54.87 +.83+27.2
29.06 18.21 ChesEng .35 38 25.67+1.00 -5.4
127.83109.27 Chevron 4.00 11118.50 +2.87 -5.1
87.41 50.41 ChicB&l 26{ 30 85.06 -1.81 +2.3
19.95 15.27 Chicos .30 20 16.13 -.43 -14.4
3.34 2.71 Chimera .36a ... 3.03 -.04 -2.3
69.44 56.36 ChurchDwt1.24f 25 68.11 +.48 +2.8
27.94 14.14 CiaCorp ... dd 22.24 -1.91 -7.1
90.63 61.47 Cigna .04 13 79.41 -2.63 -9.2
3.87 2.62 indBdl ... dd 3.46 -.29 -2.8
53.74 43.62 CinnRn 1.76f 16 48.25 +.33 -7.9
25.91 16.46 Cirrus ... 11 19.52 +.39 4.4
26.49 19.98 Cisco .76f 15 22.33 +.69 +0.3
55.28 41.60 Olgoup .04 11 47.25 -2.83 -9.3
77.16 51.18 CibxSys ... 32 57.47 4.55 -9.1
14.48 8.27 CieanEngy ... dd 8.83 -.19-31.4
28.98 15.41 CiffsNRs .60 5 20.00 +.31 -23.7
96.76 80.20 Clorox 2.84 21 88.09 +.55 -5.0
43.43 36.83 Cocacola 1.22f 21 38.95 +.51 -5.7
54.00 30.46 CoycizTcs ... 25 49.69 +.94 -1.6
13.08 9.01 Cod-SOIR .76f q 10.40 +.19 +9.7
29.60 22.58 CohSiSdPf2.06a q 24.90 +.06 +0.9
66.49 55.47 CdgPalms1.44f 27 64.10 +.64 -1.7
17.00 10.11 CdonialFS ... dd 11.00 -.33 -17.3
55.28 38.75 Concast .90f 19 49.56 -.44 -4.6
53.50 33.55 Comarca .76f 17 51.09 -1.28 +7.5
26.11 13.57 CmpTask .24f 18 16.51 +.03 -12.3
12.62 9.66 Compuwe .50 cc 10.32 -.20 -7.9
33.80 22.65 Comtech 1.20 28 31.72 +.21 +0.7
37.28 28.09 ConAgra 1.00 16 30.69 +.62 -8.9
36.45 27.75 CornWhSv .99 20 33.99 -.24 -4.3
74.59 56.38 ConocoPhl 2.76 11 70.35+2.87 -0.4
20.42 16.31 ConsdComl.55 26 19.65 -.30 +0.1
64.03 52.23 ConEd 2.52f 15 53.17 +.71 -3.8
124.69 72.35 ConlRes ... 30125.67+4.69+11.7
34.79 20.55 CooperTire .42 9 23.74 -.74 -1.2
61.85 31.24 COnDern ... dd 46.39 -7.89 -13.0
20.75 12.64 Corning .40 15 20.61 +1.09+15.7
29.95 21.48 CerpOfP 1.10 dd 26.62 +.66+12.4
126.12103.20 Costco 1.24 25111.66 -2.17 -6.2
17.74 12.83 Cotyn .20 ... 14.99 -.18 -1.7
20.52 2.74 CSVInvNG ... q 3.40 -.490-61.5
36.62 17.90 CSVdlVST ... q 30.66 +.46 -10.8
44.40 6.45 CS\xShtrs ... q 7.23 -.18 -3.6
16.89 11.83 CrestwdEq .55f dd 13.85 -.41 +0.1
17.95 11.96 Crocs ... cc 15.55 +.15 -2.3
45.40 37.29 CruomHd ... 17 43.87 -.18 -1.6
61.09 18.87 Clp.com ... 56 48.37 -1.12 -2.5
148.60103.41 Cummins 2.50 19146.00+1.65 +3.6
9.17 4.91 C"to pt ... dd 8.05 -.76+26.0
13.23 8.61 CypSemi .44 25 10.05 -.56 -4.3
8.35 1.95 CytRx ... dd 3.43 -.39-45.3
D-E-F
8.45 6.62 DCTIndl .28 dd 7.82 -.10 +9.7
10.77 9.30 DNPSdct .78 q 9.78 +.02 +3.8
27.75 17.52 DRHorten .15 14 21.67 +.25 -2.9
73.32 63.38 DTE 2.62 19 73.19 +1.67+10.2
28.73 23.07 DTEEn61 1.63 ... 25.64 +.51 +6.0
55.25 44.78 Darden 2.20 20 50.62 -.04 -6.9
42.72 26.70 DeVryEd .34 40 40.27 -.89+13.4
22.96 13.59 DeanFdsrs .28 ... 15.24 +.09 -11.3
93.88 79.50 Deere 2.04 10 88.75 -.58 -2.8
35.85 13.94 DdtaAlr .24 3 33.53 +.80+22.1
19.65 15.56 DerbuyR .25 15 16.67 +.24 +1.5
5.38 2.23 Drreon ... dd 2.97 -.05 -0.7
66.92 50.81 DevinE .96 dd 65.79 +1.70 +6.3
134.08111.87 Diagoo 3.09e ...124.79 +6.29 -5.8
73.19 43.69 DiaOffs .50a 11 47.92 +.63 -15.8
40.78 27.89 Diebold 1.15 dd 39.18 -.95+18.7
12.75 8.51 Dijilnl ... 47 9.86 -.60 -18.6
74.00 43.04 DigitalRIt 3.32f 25 53.50 +3.53 +8.9
97.87 75.60 Dilards .24 13 91.83 +.94 -5.5
80.77 53.50 DrTVoc 15 75.72 +1.78 +9.6
64.75 30.25 DirSPBris q 31.55 +.34 -5.0
287.50 24.14 DxGldBIls q 36.86 -7.62+34.5
44.62 18.67 DxRnBris q 20.14 +.85 -6.3
42.95 14.31 DxSCBrrs q 16.49+1.55 -2.8
35.27 18.72 DxEMBIs q 25.55+3.09-11.0
98.98 50.87 DxFnBdls q 91.58 4.20 +1.4
83.25 16.16 DirDGdBrs q 24.45 +3.36 44.5
86.68 37.18 DxSCBdls1.19e q 74.27 -8.10 4.1
63.98 34.77 DishNetwh ... 39 61.80 +.73 +6.7
83.65 55.87 Disney .86& 22 78.99 -1.36 +3.4
62.93 48.61 DdlarGen ... 17 55.40 -2.63 -8.2
60.19 45.57 DdlarTree ... 19 52.15 -.60 -7.6
72.22 53.79 DomRescs2.40f 22 71.09+1.03 +9.9
80.61 49.09 Dorinos 1.00f 31 76.23 -1.30 +9.4
21.20 10.93 DorleyRR 1.04 15 17.77 -.94 -12.4
50.96 29.81 DawChm 1.48f 13 48.20 -1.64 +8.6
9.52 7.34 DoyStt .59 q 8.07 +.08 +6.2
5.00 1.65 DiySips ... dd 3.25 -.23 -30.9
67.95 48.21 DuPont 1.80 13 66.62 -.36 +2.5
12.49 9.81 DuPUC .84 q 10.32 +.04 +2.9
75.46 64.16 DukeEngy 3.12 19 70.44 +1.36 +2.1
18.80 14.12 DukBeRy .68 35 16.65 +.15+10.7
10.99 2.26 DyaxCp ... dd 8.48 -.40+12.5
19.05 3.70 E-CDang ... dd 13.90 -.67+45.5
17.28 3.88 E-House .20e 32 12.02 -.94 -20.3
25.58 9.52 E-Trade ... 78 22.59 -2.27+15.0
59.70 48.06 eBay ... 25 55.19 -1.77 +0.6
28.26 21.45 EMCCp .40 21 27.48 -.40 +9.3
195.40112.05 EOGRes 1.00f 24197.16 +5.52+17.5
78.19 55.41 Eaton 1.96f 18 74.23 +1.58 -2.5
13.60 10.80 EVEEq2 1.05 q 13.26 -.18 +2.1
10.32 8.75 EVTxMGIo .98 q 10.12 +.05 +1.2
111.83 77.84 Ecdab 1.10 34106.23 4.50 +1.9
54.52 44.26 EdisonInt 1.42 20 55.29 +1.78+19.4
86.11 60.62 EdwLfSd ... 25 71.16 -.97 +8.2


A-B-C
49.38 27.93 ADTCTrp .80 16 29.68 +.43 -26.7
15.54 11.17 AESCorp .20 16 14.29 +.40 -1.5
67.62 48.54 AFLAC 1.48 9 62.66 -.32 -6.2
49.84 41.18 AGLRes 1.96f 18 48.33 +.59 +2.3
8.47 2.76 AKSted ... dd 6.90 -.07-15.9
40.26 26.15 ASIAMnl 6.11e ... 39.65 +.23+20.2
39.00 31.74 AT&Tlnc 1.84 11 35.07 +.77 -0.3
40.49 32.70 AbbottLab .88f 25 38.31 -.08 -0.1
54.78 38.93 Abb\le 1.68f 20 50.98 -2.48 -3.5
55.23 31.14 AbarRtc .80 55 38.78 -.85+17.8
85.88 69.00 AcceOtM 1.86e 16 78.81 4.02 4.1
10.85 3.76 Accuray ... dd 9.23 -.33 +6.1
230.77 90.00 ActaMs ... 36203.77 -5.60+21.3
21.50 13.27 AcdvsBiz .201 22 20.45 -.33+14.7
71.11 41.91 AdobeSy cc 64.88 -2.26 +8.4
29.15 15.95 AdvEnId 31 23.90 -2.89 +4.5
4.65 2.26 AMD dd 3.88 -.16 +0.3
70.55 44.20 AdvisayBd cc 63.07 -4.48 0.9
35.24 27.35 AecomTch 12 31.66 -.82 +7.6
17.10 4.73 Aeroposl dd 4.99 -.59-45.1
41.45 17.69 Aero\vron cc 39.19 -.06+34.5
61.22 40.32 Agilont .53f 20 54.69 -1.40 -4.4
21.35 12.88 Aircasle .80 22 19.10 -.63 -0.3
113.16 92.86 Argas 1.92 23105.90 -2.02 -5.3
3.90 1.60 AlaskCom 1 1.92 +.02 -9.4
4.68 1.27 AlcaldLuc .18e ... 3.91 +.04 -11.1
12.68 7.63 Alcoa .12 38 12.48 +.47+17.4
185.43 87.01 Alexion ... cc149.42-10.37+12.4
38.30 25.60 AllegTch .72 27 37.49 +.20 +5.2
132.04 81.33 Allargan .20 36121.05 -4.00 +9.0
54.14 45.78 Allete 1.96f 19 51.76 -.02 +3.8
86.76 62.51 AllnceRes 4.79f 11 82.80 +.75 +7.5
8.43 6.80 AliBInco 41a q 7.37 +.03 +3.4
27.38 18.77 AlliBern 1.79e 14 25.26 -.51+18.4
56.05 46.79 AlliariEgy 2.04f 17 55.91 +1.55 +8.4
17.39 3.01 AlldNevG ... 26 4.64 -.85+30.7
56.60 45.60 Allstate 1.12f 12 55.80 -.26 +2.3
8.50 4.12 AlphaNPs ... dd 4.26 -.18 -40.3
8.65 7.52 AlpToE rs .68 q 8.34 +.07 -0.5
38.58 33.12 Alfia 1.92 16 37.12 +.67 -3.3
408.06245.75 Amazon ... cc338.29-22.33 -15.2
7.85 6.23 Ambevn ...... 7.46 +.31 +1.5
42.24 32.34 Amern 1.60 35 40.80 +.32+12.8
23.75 18.40 AMoIlL .34e 11 19.26 -1.00 -17.6
39.88 23.45 AmAdlln ... dd 35.39 -.72+40.2
33.31 18.84 ACapAgy 3.15e 5 21.25 -.58+10.2
16.37 11.82 AmCapLtd ... 10 14.21 -.56 -9.1
26.62 16.01 ACapMtg 2.80e dd 18.72 -.56 +7.2
21.07 12.11 AEag1eOut .50 17 12.32 -.62 -14.4
51.60 41.83 AEP 2.00 16 50.00+1.11 +7.0
94.35 63.43 AmExp 1.04f 19 90.46 -1.06 -0.3
53.33 36.90 AmlnllGrp .50f 8 49.88 -.14 -2.3
18.05 12.13 ARICapPr 1.00 dd 13.94 -.33 +8.5
33.09 25.07 AmSYr, s .81 20 31.92 -.63+11.1
45.86 38.91 AmWWVks1.12 22 45.13 +.07 +6.8
50.45 40.96 Amenigas 3.36 26 41.99 +.37 -5.8
116.82 69.35 Amaiprise 2.08 16108.81 -2.97 -5.4
71.92 49.84 AmaiBrgn .94 50 64.82 ... -7.8
62.05 39.46 Ametek .24 24 51.33 -1.59 -2.5
128.96 94.15 Amgen 2.44 18120.55 -2.38 +5.7
93.62 70.09 Amphnol .80 24 91.62 -1.63 +2.7
98.47 73.60 Anadarko .72 54 84.94 +1.35 +7.1
23.95 11.14 AnglogdA .10e ... 17.55 -.44+49.7
106.83 83.94 ABInBev 3.03e ...105.81 +3.87 -0.6
16.18 9.66 Amaly 1.35e 3 10.93 -.25 +9.6
6.38 4.02 Anworih .49e 10 4.96 -.15+17.8
94.84 67.91 Apache 1.00f 15 83.02 +2.31 -3.4
9.21 7.28 Apdlolrw .80 6 8.26 +.02 -2.5
575.14385.10 AppleInc 12.20 13536.86+3.99 4.3
20.81 12.65 ApldMA .40 52 20.18 +.01+14.1
28.12 22.40 AquaAms .61 20 24.62 -.32 +4.4
17.92 10.83 ArcdorMit .20 dd 15.82 +.17 -11.3
5.82 3.47 ArchCcoal .04m dd 4.81 +.26 +8.1
43.99 31.50 ArchDan .96f 21 43.21 +.54 -0.4
9.25 4.05 ArenaPhrn ... dd 6.10 -.05 +4.3
18.63 16.15 AresCap 1.52a 10 17.53 +.10 -1.4
23.00 2.15 AriadP ... dd 7.98 +.14+17.0
37.61 9.62 Mdkest .12 60 35.26 -1.88 +4.7
6.54 3.64 AmouirRsd .60 dd 4.13 -.13 +3.0
6.34 1.00 Arotech ... 28 5.82+1.60+66.8
7.10 4.32 AirayBio ... dd 4.47 -.71 -10.8
59.37 36.11 ArrowB ... 14 57.36 -.04 +5.7
27.63 1.65 AnrowRsh ... dd 15.62 -5.08+44.0
100.87 72.11 Ashland 1.36 11 98.09 +.40 +1.1
68.76 46.87 AstaZen 2.80e 14 65.20+1.06 +9.8
40.06 28.38 AlasPln 2.48 dd 31.57+1.14 -9.9
8.91 5.89 Ahnd ... dd 8.11 -.48 +3.6
48.08 08.00 ATMOS 1.48 17 46.07 -.05 +1.4
58.68 33.01 Autedesk ... 49 48.34 -1.70 -3.9
83.82 63.30 AuteData 1.92 26 76.95 -.80 -4.8
52.17 39.72 AveryD 1.16 24 49.98 -1.17 -0.4
50.48 25.74 ANisBudg ... 47 46.78 -2.33+15.7
30.34 25.55 ANista 1.27f 16 29.94 +.04 +6.2
24.71 14.23 Avon .24 dd 14.36 -.32 -16.6
41.04 29.18 BB&TCp .92 18 39.83 -.36 +6.7
48.06 38.72 BCEg 2.47 ... 42.93 +.38 -0.8
7.30 3.84 BGCPts .48 14 6.36 -.32 +5.1
66.29 49.56 BHPHIlplc2.32e ... 61.70+2.52 -0.7
51.02 40.12 BPPLC 2.28 11 48.37 +1.86 -0.5
98.22 70.50 BPPru 9.26e 9 84.95 +.95 +6.7
189.34 82.98 Baidu ... 31150.66 -7.65 -15.3
64.20 42.60 Bal-u .60 26 65.27 +3.16+18.1
56.33 41.52 BallCorp .52 20 53.97 -.07 +4.5
8.38 .76 BdlardPw ... dd 4.29 -.04+183.2
17.79 10.23 BcoBradpf .23e ... 13.57 +1.50 +8.3
9.40 6.31 BcoSantSA.81e ... 9.39 +.41 +3.5
6.76 4.48 BcoSBradl .95e ... 5.37 +.32 -0.6
7.35 5.00 BankMul .12 27 6.21 -.35-11.4
18.03 11.23 BkoAm .20f 17 16.98 -.58 +9.1
71.26 55.61 BkMontg 3.04 ... 66.45+1.31 -0.3
35.88 26.64 BkNYMd .60 22 35.10 -.15 +0.5
63.50 52.05 BkNovag 2.56f 11 57.54 +.17 -8.0
92.56 39.85 BiPVDirs ... q 43.55 -.73 +2.4
148.34 97.61 Bard .84 17145.50 -.34 +8.6
23.71 12.59 BamesNob ... dd 20.13 -.81+34.6
29.48 13.43 BartickG .20 dd 18.30 -1.10 +3.8
27.15 11.06 BascEnSv ... dd 26.96+1.51+70.8
75.68 62.80 Baxter 1.96 20 72.85 +5.14 +4.7
84.00 60.13 BeamInc .90 37 83.28 +.10+22.4
25.34 13.91 BeazeriHm ... dd 19.67 -.98 -19.5
80.82 62.12 BedBalh ... 14 68.43 +.83 -14.8
42.34 37.01 Beanis 1.08f 19 38.34 ... -6.4
125.91101.92 BeakHB ... 16123.53 -1.67 +4.2
44.66 21.47 BestBuy .68 17 26.07 -.89 -34.6
39.22 25.50 BigLos ... 17 37.20 -.82+15.2
13.33 1.17 Biooyst ... dd 10.14 -.59+33.4
358.89175.63 Bogonldc ... 38294.12-24.41 +5.2
16.59 5.44 BlackBery ... dd 8.41 -.77+13.0
40.05 28.92 BlHkllhSd 1.72a q 36.88 -1.02 +4.1
35.39 18.76 Backstne1.34e 17 33.04 -.88 +4.9
32.42 25.98 BockHR .80 37 30.36 +.34 +4.5
60.22 39.64 BobEvans 1.24 29 50.09 -.84 -1.0
144.57 83.80 Borng 2.92f 21124.46 +1.83 -8.8
63.04 35.22 BorgWms .50 22 60.02 -1.72 +7.4
265.53143.42 BostBeer ... 47242.40 -7.41 +0.3
14.08 7.07 Bostaci ... 24 13.20 +.38 +9.8
14.75 7.51 BoydGm ... dd 13.04 -.73+15.8
24.88 18.21 BigS'at .48 dd 21.77 -.74
55.45 36.43 Btinkf .96 22 52.09 -.10+12.4
57.49 39.18 BtMySq 1.44 33 51.82 -.24 -2.5
115.21 94.19 BDiATob 4.62e ...110.79+4.47 +3.1
37.85 23.25 Broadcom .12f 43 31.03 -.25 +4.7
10.59 5.14 BrcdaCm ... 15 10.15 -.25+14.5
41.50 34.01 Bkilnrta 1.72 ... 39.22 +.18
75.83 58.33 Buckdye 4.35f 47 74.52 +1.96 +4.9
36.22 24.01 CAInc 1.0M 13 30.84 -.27 -8.4
68.10 43.77 CBSB .48 21 62.03 -3.66 -2.7
CBSOuldn ... ... 29.50 .. ..
29.98 25.74 CMSEng 1.08f 17 28.83 +.25 +7.7
13.29 10.09 CNHInd ..9 11.27 +.40 0].7
29.45 22.40 CSX .60 15 28.58 -.18 -0.7
35.15 20.16 CVRRfng3.68e 7 28.11 +.29 +2.2
76.36 53.94 CVSCare 1.10 20 74.26 -.69 +3.8
12.50 6.74 CYSIr'est 1.28 dd 8.24 -.12+11.2
41.78 31.63 CabotOGs .08 48 33.84 +.88-12.7
16.25 12.33 Cadence ... 28 15.40 -.72 +9.8
61.34 40.46 Cal-Maine .85e 23 57.51 -1.45 4.5
13.97 11.69 CalaCvHi 1.02 q 13.48 -.16 +4.3


M-N-O
123.04 95.68 M&TBk 2.80 14120.44 -.69 +3.5
16.15 8.73 MBIA 11 13.83 -.72+15.8
5.55 3.52 MCGCap .50 13 3.81 +.21 -13.4
40.93 27.00 MDC 1.00 4 28.00 -.30 -13.2
35.10 23.37 MDURes .71 23 33.87 +.12+10.9
9.55 6.98 MFAFnd .80 10 7.66 -.04 +8.5
9.46 4.31 MGICIn ... dd 8.15 -.42 -3.4
28.75 11.72 MGMRsis dd 24.88 -1.30 +5.8
59.95 41.33 Macys 1.00 15 58.92 -.05+10.3
9.27 2.37 MagHRes ... dd 8.30 +.52+13.5
32.80 16.18 Manibwoo .08 27 30.91 -1.66+32.5
8.70 3.27 MamKd ... dd 4.83 -1.04 -7.1
20.36 13.43 Manulteg .52 ... 19.03 -.12 -3.5
38.18 29.47 MaratnO .76 14 35.22 +.83 -0.2
94.88 61.32 MarahPet 1.68 13 87.67 -3.02 -4.4
67.88 28.82 MVJGldrs ... q 37.29 -2.56+20.1
38.13 20.24 MVlVGdd .19e q 24.10 -1.42+14.1
51.11 39.42 MV IlSc .54e q 50.28 +1.35 +4.6
30.25 20.86 MkVFjs .74e q 22.90 +.59 -20.7
26.35 23.54 MVPreRMu.14e q 24.53 -.07 +0.2
75.79 56.90 MakWest 3.44f cc 65.32 -.14 -1.2
56.15 38.17 MarlntA .68 28 55.44 +.19+12.3
48.90 36.81 MartnMid 3.14f dd 42.93 +1.07 +0.3
16.62 9.46 MarvdlT .24 24 15.43 -.76 +7.3
23.73 18.27 Masmo .30 29 22.04 +.15 -3.2
84.75 51.86 MasterCds .44 29 73.22 -2.77 -12.4
48.48 34.98 Matd 1.52f 15 39.95+1.26 -16.0
11.09 6.68 McDrmlnt ... 14 7.73 -.40 -15.6
103.70 92.22 McDrids 3.24 17 97.24+1.77 +0.2
3.74 1.63 McEwenM ... dd 2.47 -.41+26.0
39.38 33.38 MeadWoml.00a 8 37.24 +.59 +0.8
9.00 3.50 Medgonics ... dd 6.99 -1.31+16.7
17.73 11.47 MedProp .84 20 12.69 +.21 +3.8
60.93 45.39 Medhric 1.12 17 60.41 +1.58 +5.3
45.70 20.46 MdcoCrwn .34e 60 37.46 -2.55 4.5
57.65 43.51 Merck 1.76 38 55.98 +1.32+11.8
51.00 37.40 MercGn 2.46 22 44.02 -.46 -11.4
53.84 36.06 Meredilh 1.73f 18 45.52 -.57 -12.1
12.95 4.29 Maeter ... cc 11.84 +.16+13.5
54.80 35.25 MtLife 1.10 15 52.56 -.86 -2.5
25.68 9.04 MiconT ... 14 21.91 -1.75 +0.7
40.99 27.96 mvrosot 1.12 15 40.30 +.14 +7.7
3.49 1.03 Mvroisn ... dd 1.80 -.22+36.4
306.12140.51 Middleby ... 32259.40-17.54 +8.2
22.46 18.58 MdsxWek .76 21 21.32 +.01 +1.8
24.06 15.06 MoleTde .94e ... 17.14 +.73 -20.8
8.06 4.51 Moo:ap ... dd 4.75 -.29-15.5
36.05 28.22 Monddez .56 15 34.40 +.41 -2.5
69.97 42.85 MoogA ... 24 63.16 -1.22 -7.0
33.52 20.16 MergStan .40f 21 30.91 -1.69 -1.4
67.69 53.28 MokiaSdu 1.24 16 64.30 -2.51 4.7
57.52 27.66 Mylan ... 31 48.83 -3.31 +12.5
39.68 9.68 NPSPhn ... dd 28.27 -1.81 -6.9
25.90 7.05 NQMobie ... cc 16.83 -2.83+14.5
31.31 24.86 NRGEgy .56f dd 31.55+1.17 +9.9
16.86 14.58 NFTDOC0.61e ... 15.48 +.22 -6.2
60.48 24.66 NXPSerri ...... 57.66 -.31+25.5
25.06 14.34 Nabos .16 53 24.78 +1.21+45.9
77.05 56.80 NdFuGas 1.50 21 69.06 -.01 -3.3
70.07 55.16 NaIGdd 3.17e ... 63.97+1.50 +5.6
72.99 53.01 NtHIlhlnv 3.08f 19 59.94 +.11 +6.8
84.71 63.08 NOlVarco 1.04 14 77.67+3.20 -2.3
15.34 8.72 NekdarTh ... dd 11.76 -1.68 +3.6
51.22 31.83 Neogens ... 59 44.58 -1.85 -2.5
45.96 32.75 NetApo .60 22 36.18 -1.62 -12.1
458.00159.00 Nelix ... cc358.8747.12 -2.5
9.55 4.68 NwGoldg ... 30 5.08 -.44 -3.1
49.34 40.60 NJ Rscs 1.68 22 49.24+1.51 +6.5
15.65 10.35 NwMedan ... ... 14.99 -.09+42.8
34.50 15.63 NewOiEd .35e 39 29.47 +.76 -6.4
17.39 12.91 NYnCmtyB 1.00 15 15.90 -.34 -5.6
8.12 5.55 NYMtgTr 1.08 7 7.75 -.25+10.9
5.05 3.74 Newcasle .40b 14 4.66 +.27 -3.6
32.55 19.57 NewldExp ... 42 31.55 +1.47+28.1
42.00 20.79 NewrntM .60m dd 23.92 -.63 +3.9
95.43 74.78 NexdEraEn 2.90f 22 94.72 +.15+10.6
36.82 27.11 NiSource 1.00 21 35.35 +.28 +7.5
80.26 57.98 NikeB .96 25 73.54 -1.67 -6.5
29.21 21.14 NipponTr ...... 26.72 -1.08 -1.2
42.34 28.67 NobleCorp 1.50f 15 32.47 +.85-13.3
8.20 3.02 NokaCp ...... 7.34 +.17 -9.5
19.91 17.24 NorcdAEdn ...... 19.66 ... +9.2
12.61 7.00 NordcAm .48b dd 10.05 -.06 +3.6
98.09 70.27 NodlkSo 2.16f 16 96.35 -.12 +3.8
45.66 39.35 NoostUt 1.57f 18 44.95 +.53 +6.0
30.87 17.83 NhnlTEn 2.63e 10 25.46 -1.25 +3.5
125.37 67.77 NethropG 2.44 14121.81 -.07 +6.3
16.37 8.14 NSteaft 1.00f dd 15.86 -.45+17.9
15.07 11.98 NwstBcsh .52a 20 14.40 -.30 -2.6
45.89 39.96 NwsiNG 1.84 20 43.68 +.77 +2.0
4.62 1.90 NovaGldg ... dd 3.75 -.27+47.6
84.37 67.67 Novats 2.72e 21 81.59 -.14 +1.5
6.95 1.68 Novavax ... dd 4.24 -.44 -17.2
48.42 29.90 NovoNords.84e ... 45.20 +1.30+22.3
140.50 42.03 NuSkn 1.38f 14 83.06 +8.06 -39.9
23.38 13.00 NuanceCm ... dd 17.17 +.33+13.0
54.73 41.32 Nucor 1.48 33 50.06 -.80 -6.2
15.37 12.10 NuvDivA .89 q 13.44 +.05 +6.8
13.22 11.98 NuvEqP 1.08 q 12.59 +.07 +0.3
15.18 12.29 NuvMLuOpp .88 q 13.78 +.23 +4.2
16.25 12.82 NvlQI .96a q 14.16 +.16 +4.7
14.99 11.76 NvMAd .80a q 13.00 +.09 +6.9
17.90 14.57 NvAMT-Fr .80a q 16.08 +.16 +5.8
16.87 12.83 NvNYP .85 q 13.98 +.22 +5.0
16.08 12.61 NuvPP .92 q 14.42 +.22 +6.6
10.70 8.44 NvPfdlnco .76 q 9.26 -.02 +4.4
15.04 11.96 NvPMI .86 q 13.21 +.12 +6.8
14.73 11.78 NuvPI .86 q 13.10 +.07 +6.2
15.04 12.01 NuvPI2 .89a q 13.37 +.14 +6.5
14.52 11.10 NuFPI4 .85 q 12.42 +.15 +2.4
15.33 11.84 NuvQInc .82 q 13.31 +.13 +8.7
19.05 12.04 Nvidia .34 24 17.90 -.64+11.7
15.00 8.77 NxStogeMd ... dd 12.55 -1.12+25.5
40.00 32.20 OGEEgys .90 19 36.39 +.41 +7.3
99.42 77.21 OcdPet 2.88{ 13 95.55+1.48 +0.5
19.47 13.43 OcanFst .48 18 17.50 -.30 +2.2
5.85 3.55 OflceDpt ... dd 4.11 -.26 -22.3
15.80 11.68 OdNBcp .44f 15 14.54 -.39 -5.4
17.45 12.02 OdRepub .73f 13 15.96 -.19 -7.6
29.52 21.79 Oin .80 12 26.80 -.47 -7.1
38.41 27.37 OmegaHIt 1.96f 23 33.34 +.38+11.9
15.27 8.30 OmegaP 8 12.14 -.09 -1.2
9.75 6.80 OnSmcn ... 26 9.19 -.17+11.5
14.25 6.55 OncoGenex ... dd 11.42 -1.80+36.9
57.84 45.40 Oneo 12.95 6.14 OpkoHlh ... dd 8.96 -.39 +6.2
22.54 15.37 OpinkC ... 34 17.54 -.62 -5.7
39.85 29.86 Orade .48 17 39.57+2.07 +3.4
14.97 9.09 Orbotch ... dd 14.86 +.13 +9.9
13.65 3.27 0ganovo ... dd 7.41 -1.04 -33.1
37.06 19.350rlhx ... ... 30.29+4.91+32.7
59.15 33.88 Ost oshCp .60 15 58.07 -.15+15.3
31.88 25.84 OterTail 1.21f 22 30.29 ... +3.5


9.78 5.35 BdorGldg .06e
30.56 16.65 EledActs
32.30 18.15 Emeilis
70.66 53.09 ErnesonB 1.72
24.46 20.77 EmpDist 1.02
33.49 26.30 EnbrdgEPt 2.17
48.41 39.69 Enbridge 1.40f
21.29 16.48 EnCanag .28
82.16 29.94 Endonll
33.70 8.18 Endocyte
113.16 90.59 Energizer 2.00
57.31 45.16 EngyTst 3.63f
37.75 33.40 EnLkLLCn ...
19.59 13.54 EmisInc .70
72.60 60.22 Entergy 3.32
70.99 56.11 EnPrPt 2.8W{
29.42 14.10 EicksnAC ...
14.22 10.67 Ericsson 43e
15.60 6.93 ExactSdh ...
9.00 4.60 ExcoRes .20


97 5.81 -.46 +2.1
dd 28.53 -1.22+24.4
dd 30.99 -.28+43.3
19 66.76 +1.41 -4.9
16 24.10 -.02 +6.2
dd 27.43 +.74 -8.2
... 45.29 +.73 +3.7
20 21.42 +1.12+18.7
24 66.86 4.64 -0.9
dd 21.96 -6.21+105.6
16 99.27+2.10 -8.3
dd 54.01 -.09 -5.7
... 33.34 -1.42 -8.9
12 16.14 -.42 -7.9
16 66.65 +.62 +5.3
24 69.04 +.18 +4.1
17 19.34 -.05 -7.0
... 13.09 +.03 +6.9
dd 12.86 -.70 +9.4
6 5.51 +.24 +3.8


Stock Footnotes: Stock Footnotes cld Issue has been called for redemption by company d New 52-week low
ec Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's Emerging Company Marketplace g Dividends and earn-
ings in Canadian dollars h Does not meet continued-listing standards If Late filing with SEC n Stock was a new
issue in the last year The 52-week high and low figures date only from the beginning of trading pf Preferred stock
issue pr Preferences pp Holder owes installments of purchase price rt Right to buy security at a specified price
rs Stock has undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50% within the past year s Stock has split by at least 20
percent within the last year wi Trades will be settled when the stock is issued wd When distributed wt Warrant,
allowing a purchase of a stock u New 52-week high un Unit,, including more than one security v| Company in
bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law Appears in front of the name Stocks in
bold are worth at least $5 and changed 5 percent or more in price Underlining for 50 most actively traded stocks of
the day
Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating
dividend ea- Amount declared or paid in last 12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent
dividend announcement i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I Sum of dividends paid this
year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends
in arrears m Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial divi-
dend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t -
Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


P-Q-R
10.21 7.07 PDLBo .60
48.50 39.43 PG&EOp 1.82
87.80 63.69 PNC 1.76
27.25 21.11 PNMRes .74
80.46 62.30 POSCO 1.77e
201.29130.56 PPG 2.44


5 7.99 -.33 I.3
20 41.89 -2.02 +4.0
12 85.70 -1.14+10.5
20 26.79 ...+11.1
... 6i.37 +.65 -12.3
26190.81 -4.31 +0.6


www.sunnewspapers.net


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Money&Markets






Extra


MID-CAP
S&P 400
-1.6%
week

-1.3% +1.2%
-/MO 1) YTD


SMALL-CAP
SRussell 2000
IS -3.5%
week

-2.6% -1.0%
151 MO 1_ YTD


^ Dow industrials _
+0.1%
t _^ week

+0.0% -1.5% -3.5%
It MO 15' YFD ^FMO


CombinedStocks
From the New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq.
52-week wk YTD | 52-week wk YTD
Hi Low Name Div PE Last chg %chg Hi Low Name Div PE Last chg %chg






Page 8 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014


MutualFunds


12 mo
Fund NAV chg %rtn
AQR
DivArbtl 11.02 -.01 +1.9
MaFtStrl 9.91 -.07 -.6
MIStrAltl 9.70 +.07 +3.7
Advance Capital I
Balanced b 19.86 -.04+11.0
EqGrow b 25.85 -.29+18.6
Retinc b 8.74 +.01 +1.2
Alger Group
CapAplnsl 26.56 -.60+23.4
SmCapGrB m 7.66 -.37+16.6
Alliance Bernstein
HighlncA m 9.53 +.03 +6.4
HighlncC m 9.64 +.03 +5.6
IntDivA m 14.39 ... -.4
SmCpGroA m 50.82 -2.90 +30.4
AllianzGI
NFJAIICpVaA m16.11+.07+19.4
NFJAIICpVallns16.18 +.07+19.7
NFJSmCVIs 34.85 -.54+16.4
NFJSmCVIA m32.83 -.50+16.0
WellnessD b 31.53 -.60+26.5
Alpine
DynBal d 13.02 +.02 +8.5
DynDiv d 3.84 +.03+13.2
Amana
Growth b 32.78 -.21 +18.7
Income b 43.91 +.15+17.8
American Beacon
LgCpVllnv 27.86 +.10+23.5
LgCpVlls 29.40 +.10 +23.8
SmCaplnst 27.15 -.60+23.0
American Century
CapVallv 8.98 +.02+20.4
DivBdlnsl 10.69 +.02 -.3
DivBdlnv 10.69 +.02 -.5
EqGrowlnv 31.06 -.04+21.8
EqlncA m 8.77 +.03 +12.5
EqlnclnstIl 8.78 +.04 +13.0
Eqlnclnv 8.77 +.03 +12.7
Hentlnv 25.91 -.75+21.7
HiYldMu 9.07 +.03 -1.5
InTTxFBIns 11.31 +.01 -.3
InTTxFBInv 11.31 +.01 -.5
IncGrlnv 36.61 +.21 +23.6
InfAdjI 11.73 +.02 -7.2
IntlGrlnv d 13.50 +.18+16.9
InvGrlnsl 33.17 -.47+20.5
InvGrlnv 32.81 -.46+20.3
MdCpVallnv 16.16 -.03+19.6
Selectlnv 55.35 -.85+20.6
Ultralnv 33.80 -.62+26.6
Valuelnv 8.39 +.05 +19.8
American Funds
AMCAPA m 27.87 -.36 +26.4
BalA m 24.52 -.02+15.0
BondA m 12.58 +.03
CaplncBuA m 58.46 +.67 +10.6
CapWldBdA m20.57 +.02 +1.4
CpWIdGrIA m 45.48 +.38 +18.2
EurPacGrA m 49.02 +.87+16.7
FnlnvA m 51.15 -.27+20.5
GIbBalA x 30.66 -.02 +14.2
GrthAmA m 43.03 -.60 +23.3
HilncA m 11.46 ... +6.3
HilncMuA m 14.86 +.04 +.2
IncAmerA m 20.91 +.13+13.2
IntBdAmA m 13.48 +.01 -.4
IntlGrlnA m 34.97 +.68 +16.4
InvCoAmA m 37.07 +.01 +22.9
LtdTmTxEA m 16.01 ... +.2
MutualA m 35.02 +.02 +16.9
NewEconA m 38.22 -.62 +29.4
NewPerspA m 37.41 +.14+18.9
NwWddA m 58.56 +.98 +8.1
STBdFdA m 9.98 ... -.3
SmCpWIdA m 49.14 -.87+18.5
TaxEBdAmA m12.71 +.04 +.2
USGovSecA m13.73 +.02 -1.1
WAMutlnvA m 39.69 ...+21.7
Arbitrage
Arbitragl d 12.80 ... +1.0
Ariel
Appreclnv b 54.56 -.85+23.9
Ariellnv b 71.64 -1.37+21.5
Artio Global
GlobHiYldl x 10.23 +.02 +9.6
TotRtBdl x 13.18 +.03 -.8
Artisan
Inl d 29.67 +.33+15.9
InUVal d 36.42 +.25+21.5
MdCpVal 27.20 -.18+17.6
MidCap 48.12-1.71 +27.7
SmCap 29.05 -1.75+25.2
SmCapVal 18.53 -.28+15.6
Aston Funds
MidCapN b 45.41 -.57+29.9
MtgCIGrl 27.73 -.41 +13.3
MtgCIGrN b 27.58 -.41 +13.0
BBH
BrdMktFxl x 10.35 -.01 +1.2
TaxEffEq d 21.63 +.07+15.5
BNY Mellon
EmgMkts 9.68 +.42 -2.5
MidCpMuStrM 14.70 -.26+23.2
NtllntM 13.53 +.01 +.3
Baird
Aggrlnst 10.58 +.01 +.6
CrPIBInst 10.94 ... +.7
ShTmBdlns 9.71 -.01 +1.4
Baron
Asset b 61.79 -1.74+21.0
Growth b 71.65 -1.73+20.8
Partners b 34.78 -1.04+29.9
SmCap b 34.01-1.08+19.6
Berkshire
Focus d 17.67-1.49+36.5
Bernstein
DiversMui 14.39 +.01 -.1
IntDur 13.56 +.03 -.1
InUPort 16.41 +.28+15.5
TxMIntU 16.50 +.28+15.8
Berwyn
Income x 14.18 -.04+14.8
BlackRock
BasicValA m 31.01 +.02+25.6
BasicVall 31.26 +.02+26.0
CapApplnA m 26.46 .91 +21.7
Engy&ResA m15.48 +.36+14.7
EqDivA m 24.39 +.07 +15.3
EqDivl 24.45 +.07+15.5
EquitDivC m 23.80 +.06 +14.4
GlobAIcA m 21.34 +.12 +9.8
GlobAlcC m 19.74 +.10 +9.0
GlobAlcl 21.46 +.12+10.2
HiYldBdls 8.33 ... +8.9
HiYldlnvA m 8.32 -.01 +8.5
HiYldSvc b 8.33 ... +8.6
HthScOpA m 42.61-1.22 +27.3
LowDurlvA m 9.76 ... +1.0
NatMuniA m 10.69 +.06 +.3
NatMunil 10.69 +.07 +.6
Brown Advisory
GrEqlnv d 18.63 -.33+16.8
Brown Cap Mgmt
SmCols b 71.25 -2.42+25.1
Bruce
Bruce 483.13-4.17+15.9
Buffalo
SmallCap d 35.47-1.38+24.8
CG Capital Markets
LgCapGro 20.71 -.48 +22.6
CGM
Focus 38.83 -.53 +16.1
CRM
MdCpVllns 34.74 -.42+21.6
Calamos
GrincA m 33.12 -.40+12.3
GrowA m 46.72 -1.39+25.3
MktNeul 12.81 -.03 +4.3
MktNulnA m 12.94 -.04 +4.1
Calvert
EquityA m 47.63 -.95 +18.9
Causeway
InUVllns d 16.12 +.25+22.1
Clipper
Clipper 92.82 -.89 +20.2
Cohen & Steers
Realty 68.42 +.10 +4.3
Realtylns 44.39 +.06 +4.6
Columbia
AcornA m 35.25 -.95+17.1
AcornlntZ 46.87 +.73+14.8
AcornUSAZ 35.45-1.23+18.6
AcornZ 36.80 -.98 +17.5
CAModA x 12.25 -.02 +9.5
CAModAgrA x 13.31 -.05 +11.7
CnfrnCoreZ 20.66 -.12 +22.1
ComlnfoA m 52.26-1.28 +21.5
DivlncA m 18.44 +.03 +16.6
DivlncZ 18.45 +.03 +16.9


DivOppA m 10.23 +.09 +15.0
DivrEqlnA m 13.87 -.01 +19.6
IncOppA m 10.18 +.01 +5.8
IntIVIB m 14.61 +.28 +19.8
IntmBdA m 9.09 +.02 -.5
IntmMuniBdZ 10.63 +.02 +.5
LgCpGrowA m33.23 -.69+20.0
LgCrQuantA m 8.50 ... +22.5
Mar21CB m 17.10 -.63+26.8
MarGrlA m 24.25 -.83 +20.1
MdCapldxZ 15.26 -.24+19.2
MdCpValZ 18.56 -.16+25.0
SllncZ 9.96 ... +.4
ShrTrmMuniBdZlO.47 ... +.5
SmCaVallZ 18.59 -.42+23.5


12mo
Fund NAV chg %rtn
SmCapldxZ 23.36 -.67+25.2
StLgCpGrA m 18.76 -.80+28.1
StLgCpGrZ 19.06 -.81 +28.4
TaxExmptA m 13.61 +.03 -.1
ValResrZ 49.13 -.28+21.9
Constellation
SndsSelGrl 17.83 -.74+31.4
SndsSelGrll 17.42 -.72+31.1
DFA
1YrFixlnl 10.32 ... +.3
2YrGIbFII 10.00 +.4
5YearGovl 10.64 -.01 -.3
5YrGIbFII 10.90
EmMkCrEql 19.39 +.75 -2.1
EmMktVall 27.12+1.21 -4.6
EmMtSmCpl 20.60 +.47 -1.3
EmgMktl 25.65+1.11 -2.2
GIAI60401 15.62 +.04+11.6
GlEqlnst 18.08 +.04+20.0
GIblRIEstSecsl 9.45 +.10 +1.6
InfPrtScl 11.69 +.02 -7.2
IntCorEql 12.92 +.27+19.8
IntGovFII 12.40 +.01 -2.1
IntRIEstI 5.19 +.10 -.6
IntSmCapl 21.38 +.55+28.9
IntlSCol 19.86 +.36+24.0
lntlValu3 17.23 +.35+21.5
IntlValul 19.58 +.40+21.3
LgCaplntl 22.49 +.50+16.3
RelEstScl 28.25 +.13 +3.1
STMuniBdl 10.20 ... +.4
TMIlntlVal 16.10 +.32+20.8
TMMkWVal 23.75 -.21 +23.6
TMUSEq 20.31 -.17+21.7
TMUSTarVal 32.36 -.73 +25.5
TMUSmCp 36.23 -1.12+26.0
USCorEqll 16.65 -.18+23.4
USCorEq21 16.46 -.17+23.8
USLgCo 14.65 -.07+20.8
USLgVal3 23.81 -.10+24.8
USLgVaIll 31.76 -.12+24.6
USMicrol 19.84 -.62+27.8
USSmVall 35.21 -.91 +24.5
USSmalll 30.67 -.90+25.2
USTgtVallnst 22.85 -.49+26.1
USVecEql 16.41 -.25+24.6
DWS-Scudder
EnhEMFIS d 10.48 +.02 -2.2
EqDivB m 43.20 -.16+15.8
GNMAS 14.38 -.02 -2.0
GIbOA m 45.05 -.55 +20.8
GIbOB m 39.36 -.48+19.9
GIbOC m 39.66 -.49+19.9
GIbOS d 46.63 -.56+21.1
GrlncS 22.96 -.50+20.2
HlthCareS d 37.27 -.98+33.0
LAEqS d 27.83+1.69 -9.5
LC2020S 15.35 -.04+10.1
MgdMuniA m 9.08 +.04 -.5
MgdMuniS 9.10 +.05 -.2
SP500IRew 26.39 -.38+20.6
StrHiYIdTxFS 12.20 +.04 -1.9
Davis
NYVentA m 41.94 -.47+22.7
NYVentC m 40.04 -.46+21.7
NYVentY 42.47 -.47+23.0
Delaware Invest
AmerGovtA m 8.45 +.02 +.5
DiverlncA m 9.02 +.02 +.7
OpFixlncl 9.54 +.02 -1.1
USGrowls 24.77 -.44+21.1
Valuel 16.55 +.14+21.2
Diamond Hill
LngShortl 22.78 +.02+14.7
Dodge & Cox
Bal 98.93 -1.09+20.1
GIbStock 11.81 +.20+27.5
Income 13.69 -.12 +2.4
IntlStk 43.90+1.13+24.3
Stock 170.30-1.21 +27.7
DoubleLine
TotRetBdN b 10.96 +.03 +1.1
Dreyfus
Apprecialnv 52.41 +.53+12.9
BasSP500 38.21 -.17+20.7
Fdlnc 11.91 -.23+21.7
InUStkl 15.12 +.42 +2.3
MidCapldx 37.25 -.58 +19.0
MuniBd 11.45 +.04 -.2
NYTaxEBd 14.56 +.03 -1.9
SP5001ldx 49.28 -.22 +20.3
ShTrmlncD 10.63 +.01 +.8
SmCapldx 29.38 -.84 +25.1
SmCoVal 35.51-1.20+29.3
Driehaus
Activelnc 10.74 -.07 +2.4
EmMktGr d 32.01 +.42 +2.8
Eaton Vance
DivBldrA m 13.50 -.01 +16.1
FloatRateA m 9.47 -.01 +3.0
IncBosA m 6.12 +.01 +7.0
LrgCpValA m 24.27 -.08 +20.3
NaUMuniA m 9.47 +.06 -2.8
TMSmCaB m 20.57 -.44+19.5
FMI
LgCap 21.21 +.12+19.1
FPA
Capital d 46.95 -.03 +17.7
Cres d 33.42 +.07+15.3
Newlnc d 10.33 +.01 +.7
Fairholme Funds
Fairhome d 40.29 -.28 +28.5
Federated
HilncBdA m 7.93 +.02 +6.5
InstHiYIn d 10.35 +.01 +7.2
IntSmMCoA m 43.08 +.49+17.2
KaufmanA m 6.19 -.26 +26.0
KaufmanR m 6.20 -.26 +26.1
MDTMdCpGrStB m37.21-.39+26.5
MuniUShlS 10.04 ... +.5
MuniUltA m 10.04 +.1
SWrValA x 5.87 +.07+15.2
SWrVall x 5.89 +.07+15.4
ToRetIs 11.01 +.02 +1.0
Ultrals 9.16 ... +.6
Fidelity
AstMgr20 13.47 ... +4.6
AstMgr50 17.80 -.03+11.0
Bal 23.06 -.14+15.3
BIChGrow 63.88 -1.72+29.3
CAMulnc d 12.62 +.03 +1.3
Canada d 58.52 +.16 +8.0
CapApr 36.01-1.02+22.6
Caplnc d 10.04 -.01 +8.9
ChinaReg d 32.24 -.11+16.2
Contra 94.94 -2.43 +22.6
ConvSec 31.36 -.60+16.0
DivGrow 35.58 -.15+21.0
Divrlntl d 36.40 +.49 +18.2
EmergAsia d 30.25 +.73 +2.8
EmgMkt d 23.87 +.54 +.9
Eqlnc 59.59 +.29 +17.0
Eqlnc II 24.74 +.16+16.5
ExpMulNat d 24.27 -.09 +15.0
FF2015 12.85 ... +8.4
FF2035 13.51 -.02+13.8
FF2040 9.54 -.02 +14.1
Fidelity 43.07 -.84 +18.8
FItRtHiln d 9.97 -.01 +3.3
FocStk 19.82 -.65 +25.6
FourlnOne 35.97 +.03 +16.8
Fr2045 11.00 -.02+14.4
Fr2050 11.06 -.02+14.6
Free2000 12.56 +.01 +3.8
Free2010 15.44 ... +7.8
Free2020 15.72 -.01 +9.2
Free2025 13.40 -.01 +11.3
Free2030 16.35 -.02 +12.3
Freelnc 11.83 ... +3.7
GNMA 11.37 +.01 -.4
Govtlnc 10.28 +.01 -.9
GrStr d 28.47 -.42 +23.2
GrowCo 120.76 -3.60 +28.5
Growlnc 27.97 +.03+21.1
Hilnc d 9.46 ... +6.0
Indepndnc 37.58-1.05 +31.8
InfProtBd 12.12 +.02 -6.9
IntBond 10.90 +.01 +.2
IntMunilnc d 10.35 +.02 +.5
IntRelEst d 10.25 +.21 +7.1
InUDisc d 39.73 +.62+16.5
InvGrdBd 7.79 +.01 +.3
JapanSmCo d 12.48 +.46+12.0
LargeCap 27.69 -.21 +27.8
LatinAm d 30.49+1.39 -17.8
LevCoSt d 43.33 -.14+20.5
LowPriStk d 50.06 +.07 +23.2
MAMulnc d 12.05 +.04 -.2
Magellan 93.35 -1.57 +25.3
MdCpVal d 22.60 -.11 +21.9
MeCpSto 15.55 +.01 +22.8
MidCap d 40.59 -.77 +26.2
Munilnc d 13.04 +.05 +.4
NYMulnc d 13.13 +.05 ...


NewMille 40.44 -.58 +27.1
NewMktln d 15.95 +.28 -1.4
OTC 78.91 -3.20 +39.4
Overseas d 40.30 +.80 +20.1
Puritan 21.56 -.23+15.5
Reallnv d 34.70 +.20 +2.6
RelEstlnc d 11.59 +.02 +3.4
Seriesl00Idx 12.08 -.02+19.3
ShTmBond 8.59 ... +7
SmCapDisc d 30.94 -.63+18.2
SmCapStk d 20.73 -.47 +17.5
SmCpOpp 13.34 -.43+20.2
SmCpVal d 19.77 -.35+16.1
StkSelec 36.20 -.49+24.1
StrDivlnc 14.36 +.06+11.5


12mo
Fund NAV chg %rtn


Stratinc
TaxFrB d
TotalBd
Trend
USBdldx
USBdldx
USBdldxlnv
Value
ValueDis
Worldwid d


11.03 +.05 +2.7
11.29 +.04 +.6
10.58 +.02 +.8
85.27 -1.68 +26.3
11.50 +.01 -.3
11.50 +.01 -.4
11.50 +.01 -.5
106.34 -.45 +24.1
22.35 +.08+25.6
24.46 -.26+21.2


Fidelity Advisor
AstMgr70 20.78 -.04 +15.2
CapDevO 15.67 -.11 +24.0
DivStk 23.29 -.01 +24.3
EmMktIncI d 13.65 +.24 -1.6
EqGrowB m 76.25-2.48 +28.2
FItRateA m 9.99 ... +3.0
FItRatel d 9.97 ... +3.4
Fr2020A m 13.46 -.01 +8.7
Fr2025A m 13.24 -.02+10.8
Fr2030A m 14.04 -.02+11.7
GrowOppT m 56.96-2.00 +25.9
InrCapAB m 13.03 +.13+12.8
LeverA m 53.57 -.18+20.5
LmtdTermBondA m11.48... +.1
LmtdTermBondB m11.47+.01-.6
LrgCapA m 27.18 -.22+27.7
LrgCapB m 25.38 -.21 +26.7
NewlnsA m 26.70 -.56 +23.5
NewlnsC m 24.76 -.51 +22.6
Newlnsl 27.17 -.56+23.8
NewlnsT m 26.20 -.55 +23.2
StSIctSmCp d 26.03 -.86+21.4
StratlncA m 12.31 +.06 +2.4
StratlncC m 12.27 +.05 +1.6
Stratlnci 12.47 +.06 +2.7
Fidelity Select
Biotech d 188.77-17.66+43.0
Electron d 69.68 -.73 +37.0
Energy d 57.51 +.95+14.8
Gold d 20.95-1.01 -31.7
HealtCar d 202.68-8.67 +46.6
ITServcs d 35.75 -1.22 +27.5
Leisure d 133.12-2.98 +25.3
Materials d 86.35 -.91 +17.2
MedDeliv d 76.13 -.63+31.3
MedEqSys d 37.62 -.47 +30.6
NatGas d 40.17 +.67+20.0
NatRes d 38.45 +.43 +12.6
Pharm d 20.53 -.32 +34.1
SoftwCom d 118.58-4.25+37.1
Tech d 124.36-4.41 +27.0
Wireless d 10.49 +.03+20.0
Fidelity Spartan
5001dxAdvtg 66.13 -.30+20.8
5001dxAdvtglnst66.14 -.29 +20.9
5001dxlnstl 66.14 -.29 +20.9
5001dxlnv 66.12 -.30 +20.8
ExtMktIdAg d 54.07-1.38+23.7
ExtMktldl d 54.06-1.39+23.6
InlldxAdg d 40.75 +.96+17.0
Inlldxin d 40.74 +.95+16.9
TotMktIdAg d 54.68 -.47+21.4
TotMktidl d 54.67 -.48+21.3
Fidelity-,/E
LtdTermMunilnc d10.69 ... +.5
First Eagle
GIbA m 54.82 +.58+12.4
OverseasA m 23.86 +.46+11.1
USValueA m 20.40 +.02+12.5
First Investors
GlobalA m 8.34 -.05+15.9
GrowlncA m 21.73 -.11+21.2
TotalRetA m 19.18 -.04+12.1
Firsthand
e-Comm 8.16 -.35+39.5
Forum
AbStratI 11.06 +.10 -1.6
FrankTemp-Frank
FedTFA m 12.11 +.06 -.4
FedlntA m 12.16 +.02 -.1
FrankTemp-Franklin
BioDisA m 135.43-12.00+46.0
CATFA m 7.21 +.03 +.6
CAInTFA m 12.55 +.07 +1.4
DynaTechA m 43.48-1.98+25.5
EqlnA m 22.98 +.11 +19.5
FLTFA m 11.03 +.02 -2.7
FLRtDAAdv 9.20 ... +3.8
FIRtDAccA m 9.19 -.01 +3.5
FIxCpGrA m 55.10-1.83+25.7
GrOppA m 28.97-1.09+24.1
GrowthA m 66.02 -.60+21.4
HYTFA m 10.16 +.03 -2.1
HighlncA m 2.14 ... +8.0
HighlncAd 2.14 ... +7.7
IncomeC m 2.51 +.02+12.1
IncomeA m 2.48 +.02+12.3
IncomeAdv 2.46 +.01 +12.6
InsTFA m 12.05 +.04 +.1
NYTFA m 11.45 +.05 -1.3
RisDivAdv 48.51 +.07+17.0
RisDvC m 47.80 +.06+15.8
RisDvA m 48.55 +.07+16.7
SmMdCpGrA m41.12-1.21+24.7
StrIlncA m 10.58 +.06 +3.4
StrincC m 10.57 +.06 +3.0
TotalRetA m 9.98 +.04 +.7
USGovA m 6.51 +.01
UtilsA m 15.96 +.14 +9.4
FrankTemp-Mutual
DiscovC m 33.31 +.30+16.5
DiscovZ 34.19 +.32+17.7
DiscovA m 33.67 +.31 +17.3
Euro Z 24.69 +.19+21.2
QuestZ 18.52 +.18+19.0
Shares Z 28.76 +.18+18.3
SharesA m 28.51 +.17+17.9
FrankTemp-Templeton
DvMkA m 22.00 +.25 -5.9
FgnA m 8.31 +.14+25.7
Frgn Adv 8.21 +.14+26.0
GIBondC m 13.09 +.22 +.8
GIBondA m 13.06 +.21 +1.2
GIBondAdv 13.01 +.21 +1.4
GrowthA m 25.50 +.29+25.7
WorldA m 19.52 +.19+23.6
Franklin Templeton
FndAIIA m 13.67 +.09+18.0
FndAIIC m 13.46 +.10+17.1
HYIdTFInA 10.20 +.03 -2.0
ModAIIcA m 15.84 -.05+10.4
GE
ElfunTr 55.63 -.60+21.9
ElfunTxE 11.64 +.05 -.5
IslnUEq d 13.00 +.26+15.2
S&Slnc 11.49 +.03 +1.2
S&SUSEq 55.66 -.29 +23.7
GMO
EmgDbtIV d 9.94 +.15 +2.9
EmgMktsVI d 10.31 +.52 -7.1
IntlVIIII 26.31 +.57+25.5
IntItVIIV 26.28 +.58+25.6
Quill 25.23 +.19+14.9
QuIV 25.25 +.19+15.0
QuVI 25.24 +.19+15.1
USCorEqVI 17.40 +.09+17.8
Gabelli
AssetAAA m 65.25 -.26+18.5
EqlncomeAAA m28.63-.03+17.0
SmCpGrAAA m48.23 -.61 +20.9
Value m 19.35 -.21 +16.3
Gateway
GatewayA m 28.91 +.01 +4.7
Glenmede
SmCapEqAd 26.04 -.87 +29.4
Goldman Sachs
GrOppls 30.75 -.68 +22.3
HiYdMunIs d 8.93 +.03 -1.3
HiYieldls d 7.25 +.01 +7.7
MidCapVaA m 45.17 -.50 +20.4
MidCpVals 45.58 -.49 +20.9
ShDuGovA m 10.17 ... +.1
ShDuTFIs 10.55
SmCpValls 56.51-1.44 +23.6
Harbor
Bond 12.04 -.04 -.9
CapAplnst 56.17 -1.97+27.6
CapAprlnv b 55.19-1.95+27.1
HiYBdinst d 11.00 -.10 +6.7
InUAdm b 70.72+1.88+14.5
IntlinstI 71.25+1.90+14.8
Intlnv b 70.50+1.87 +14.4
Harding Loevner
EmgMkts d 47.99+1.15 +3.5
InUEq d 17.66 +.44+10.2
Hartford
BalHLSIA 25.42 +.01 +14.5
BallncA m 13.28 +.02 +9.2
BallncC m 13.14 +.04 +8.4
CapAprC m 40.64 -.22+24.8
CapAprA m 46.40 -.25 +25.7
CapAprI 46.45 -.25 +26.1
CapAprY 50.67 -.27 +26.2
CpApHLSIA 59.94 -.30 +25.9
DivGrowA m 25.25 +.01 +20.5
DivGrowl 25.15 -.01 +20.8
DivGthY 25.66 -.01 +21.0
DvGrHLSIA 27.56 +.09 +21.2
EqlncA m 18.20 +.10+18.4
FloatRtA m 9.03 ... +3.7
FloatRtC m 9.02 ... +3.0
FloatRtI 9.04 ... +4.0


InOpHLSIA 14.71 +.19+16.3
MdCpHLSIA 38.87-1.08+25.9
MidCapA m 25.73 -.72 +25.1
SmCoHLSIA 26.15-1.31 +25.8
SmallCoB m 19.35 -.97+24.0


12 mo
Fund NAV chg %rtn
StkHLSIA 58.49 +.34+19.9
TRBdHLSIA 11.59 +.04 +.5
Heartland
ValuePlus m 36.26 -.62 +23.2
Henderson
InUOppA m 26.70 +.55 +22.2
Hennessy
CornerGrlnv 16.98 -.40 +19.5
GsUlldxlnv 28.17 +.21 +16.9
Hodges
Hodges m 37.15 -.50 +39.2
Hotchkis & Wiley
MidCpVall 42.27 -.14+26.4
ING
CorpLeadB 32.26 -.11 +17.7
GIREstA m 18.73 +.23 +1.3
INVESCO
CharterA m 22.35 ...+18.8
ComstockA m 23.97 -.01 +22.5
DivDivA m 17.37 +.08+17.7
DivDivlnv b 17.36 +.08+17.7
Divlnclnv b 19.35 +.18+13.6
EnergyA m 47.18+1.00+15.1
Energylnv b 47.01 +.99+15.2
EqlncomeA m 10.79 -.06 +16.1
EqlncomeC m 10.63 -.07 +15.2
EuroGrA m 39.71 +.62+18.4
GIbGrB m 28.07 +.40+19.3
GrowlncA m 27.33 -.19+20.7
GrwthAIIA m 13.75 +.11+10.4
HiYIdMuA m 9.45 +.04 -1.2
InUGrA m 33.79 +.82+14.4
InlGrl 34.27 +.83+14.8
MidCapGrA m 37.64 -.93 +26.2
MunilncA m 13.26 +.05 -.3
PacGrowB m 21.53 +.34 +2.5
SmCapEqA m 16.66 -.47+19.0
SmCapValA m22.26 -.50+28.2
Summit b 17.28 -.42+25.4
Techlnv b 38.24 -1.53+18.9
USMortA m 12.39 ... -.2
Ivy
AssetSTrB m 30.34 -.21 +15.8
AssetStrA m 31.40 -.21 +16.7
AssetStrC m 30.49 -.21 +15.8
AssetStrY b 31.45 -.21 +16.7
HilncA m 8.74 +.01 +8.9
HilncC m 8.74 +.01 +8.1
LtdTmBdA m 10.90 ... -.8
MdCpGrA m 23.18 -.55+18.7
MdCpGrthl 24.32 -.57+19.1
ScTechA m 51.61-2.09+33.1
JPMorgan
CoreBdUlt 11.64 +.02
CoreBondA m 11.63 +.02 -.4
CoreBondSelect11.62+.02 -.2
DiscEqUlt 22.56 -.10 +23.0
EqlncA m 13.06 -.01 +20.2
EqlncSelect 13.24 -.01 +20.5
FInVals 14.91 +.30+15.0
HighYIdSel 8.12 +.01 +6.7
HighYIdUl 8.12 +.02 +6.9
IntmcndTFIs 11.01 +.03 +.6
InfrAmerS 35.42 -.09 +22.8
InvBalA m 14.79 ...+10.4
InvConGrA m 12.71 +.02 +6.6
InvConGrC m 12.65 +.01 +6.0
InvGrlnA m 16.48 -.04+13.5
InvGrowA m 18.68 -.10+18.1
LgCapGrA m 31.04-1.13+21.8
LgCapGrSelect 31.05 -1.14+21.9
MdCpGrSel 35.52 -.38 +19.4
MidCapVal m 35.21 -.38+19.1
MidCpVall 35.86 -.38 +19.7
MktExpEhldxS 13.22 -.25 +20.9
MorBacSeU 11.31 +.01 +.5


ShDurBndSel
ShtDurBdU
SmCapSel
SmRt202O01
SmRt203O01
TxAwRRetl
USEquit
USEquityl
USLCpCrPS
ValAdvSel


10.89 ... +.1
10.90 +.01o +.4
49.89 -1.20 +20.3
18.11 +.04+10.1
18.70 +.03+14.0
10.06 +.01 -1.4
14.20 -.12 +23.8
14.22 -.12 +24.0
28.01 -.20+24.5
27.88 -.03+21.0


James Advantage
GoldRainA x 24.36 -.16 +8.0
Janus
BalC m 30.00 -.18+12.2
BaiT 30.20 -.18 +13.1
ContrT 21.66 -.32+28.2
EntrprsT 82.26 -2.08 +20.4
FlexBdS b 10.50 +.02 +1.1
GlbValT d 14.38 +.20+14.8
Gr&lncT 44.89 -.20 +20.3
HiYldT 9.34 ... +7.9
OverseasT 35.88 +.80+11.2
PerknsMCVL 23.91 -.15+14.9
PerknsMCVT 23.66 -.15+14.7
PerknsSCVL 26.36 -.52+17.6
RsrchT 43.77 -.95+24.3
ShTmBdT 3.07 ... +1.0
T 40.57 -.78+19.6
TwentyT 62.02-1.20 +23.8
USCrT 20.17 -.26 +22.5
VentureT 62.72 -2.49 +22.0
Jensen
QualtyGrl 37.44 -.13+18.8
QualtyGrJ b 37.44 -.12+18.5
John Hancock
DiscVall 18.28 -.06+24.5
UfAgl b 15.99 -.07+18.6
JfBal b 15.47 -.03+12.1
UfCol b 13.89 +.03 +4.5
UfGrl b 16.18 -.06+16.0
lifMol b 14.48 +.01 +8.3
Keeley
SmCapVal m 37.74 -.92+15.7
Laudus
InMktMstS d 24.02 +.37+16.6
USLCGr d 18.04 -.62 +23.8
Lazard
EmgMkEqlnst d18.41+.91 -1.1
EmgMktEqOpen m18.87+.93 -1.3
InUStEqlnst d 14.53 +.33 +18.3
Legg Mason
CBAggressGrthA ml 89.70-3.39+30.6
CBAggressGrth1204.86-3.65 +31.0
CBAIICapValueA m16.58+.04+17.2
CBAppreciatA m19.37-.11 +17.5
CBEquitylncA x18.35 +.03 +14.5
CBSmallCapGrA m27.86-1.23 +24.5
ValueC m 59.99 -.41 +26.6
WACorePlusBdFI bl11.40+.04+.8
WACorePlusBdl11.40+.04 +1.1
WAManagedMuniA m16.31+.05 -1.0
Litman Gregory
MaslntllnU 17.88 +.26 +14.0
Longleaf Partners
InU 18.38 +.17+22.5
LongPart 33.66 -.02 +18.0
SmCap 33.95 -.04+21.7
Loomis Sayles
Bdlnsl 15.42 +.01 +6.3
BdR b 15.36 +.02 +6.0
GIbBdInsU 16.44 +.02 +.8
Lord Abbett
AffiliatA x 15.70 ...+20.8
BondDebA m 8.27 -.02 +7.3
BondDebC m 8.29 -.02 +6.6
CalibrdDivA m 15.46 ...+16.1
DevGrowA m 25.70-1.37 +38.1
DevGrowl 28.28 -1.50 +38.6
FdmlEqtyA m 15.20 -.28 +19.6
FItRateF b 9.49 ... +4.4
MABalOppA m12.51 -.01 +12.5
NatlTaxFA m 10.88 +.04 -2.2
ShDurlncA m 4.55 ... +1.8
ShDurlncC m 4.58 ... +1.1
ShDurlncl 4.55 +.01 +2.0
SmCpVall 35.82 -.98 +16.9
ValOppA m 21.24 -.37+23.1
MFS
BondA m 13.94 +.04 +1.8
GrAllocA m 18.05 +.02+13.2
GrowA m 64.68 -1.48+23.0
Growl 67.58 -1.54+23.3
IntDivA m 16.33 +.43+10.9
InINDisA m 28.41 +.70+12.4
InINDisl 29.20 +.73+12.7
InUValA m 33.87 +.92+18.4
IslnlEq 22.13 +.59+13.4
MAInvA m 27.85 -.14+20.0
MAInvB m 27.18 -.14+19.1
MAInvGrA m 22.84 -.13+19.8
MAInvl 27.27 -.13+20.3
ModAlocA m 16.47 -.03 +9.9
MuHilncA f 7.72 +.02 -2.0
ReslnlI 18.25 +.39+13.1
ResearchA m 36.79 -.37 +20.1
TotRetA m 17.77 +.06+12.5
UtilA m 21.95 +.36+15.5
ValueA m 33.06 -.14+21.2
Valuel 33.22 -.16+21.5
MainStay
HiYldCorA x 6.11 -.02 +6.2
Infl 35.67 +.49+15.9
LgCapGrA m 9.83 -.30 +22.2
MAPI 44.85 +.05+18.0
SelEql x 49.33 -.08+16.9
Mairs & Power
Grthlnv 111.20 -.29+21.3
Managers
BondSvc 27.97 +.07 +2.7
Manning & Napier
PBConTrmS 13.87 +.05 +6.0


12 mo
Fund NAV chg %rtn
PBMaxTrmS 20.29 +.01 +17.4
WrldOppA 9.17 +.20+14.6
Marsico
21stCent b 19.71 -.74+27.5
RexCap b 17.64 -.56 +21.7
Matthews Asian
Divlnv d 15.16 +.39 +.9
Grinc d 18.95 +.59 +.6
PacTlger d 25.42 +.83 +2.6
Merger
Merger b 16.07 -.01 +3.7
Meridian
MerdnGr d 36.16 -.98+13.3
Metropolitan West
LowDurBd b 8.81 ... +1.4
LowDurBdl 8.81 ... +1.6
TotRetBdl 10.68 +.02 +1.3
TotRtBd b 10.68 +.01 +1.0
Midas Funds
Magic m 23.67 -.44 +20.8
Midas m 1.48 -.06 -29.9
Morgan Stanley
FocGrA m 50.97-2.19 +39.1
FocGrB m 44.37 -1.92 +38.0
InlEqA m 16.71 +.39+13.2
InlEql d 16.93 +.40+13.5
MdCpGrA m 42.96-1.89 +25.3
MdCpGrI 44.94 -1.97 +25.6
SmCoGrl d 19.37-1.11+33.6
Muhlenkamp
Muhlenkmp 66.69 -.73 +17.8
Munder Funds
MdCpCrGrA m41.91 -.72+18.6
MdCpCrGrY 43.13 -.73+18.9
Mutual Series
Beacon Z 16.97 +.14+18.7
Nations
LgCplxZ 36.01 -.16+20.6
Nationwide
Inlldxl 8.52 +.20+16.7
S&P500Is 14.25 -.06 +20.7
Natixis
LSInvBdA m 12.20 +.11 +3.3
LSInvBdC m 12.09 +.10 +2.6
LSInvBdY 12.20 +.10 +3.5
LSStratincA m 16.69 +.05+10.4
LSStratlncC m 16.79 +.05 +9.6
LSValY 27.21 -.01 +22.6
Needham
Growth m 44.86 -1.64+22.6
Neuberger Berman
GenesislnsU 60.22-1.18+19.9
Genesislnv 40.58 -.79 +19.7
GenesisTr 62.75 -1.23 +19.6
SmCpGrlnv 27.57-1.61 +28.2
Nicholas
Nichol 64.21 -.83 +22.7
Northeast Investors
Growth 16.45 -.54+13.1
Northern
Bdlndx 10.54 +.02 -.2
Rxedin 10.24 +.02 +1.1
HYFixInc d 7.61 +.02 +7.4
IntTaxE 10.45 +.03 +.3
Inllndex d 12.34 +.29+16.3
MMInUEq d 10.83 +.25+10.7
SmCapVal 20.78 -.49 +21.0
Stkldx 22.99 -.20+20.7
Nuveen
HiYIdMunA m 16.24 +.06 +.1
HiYIdMunC m 16.23 +.07 -.4
HiYIdMunI 16.24 +.06 +.3
IntMunBdl 9.09 +.02 +.5
LtdTmMunl 11.02 ... +.6
NYMuniBdl 10.76 +.06 -.4
RIEstSecl 21.60 +.07 +4.0
Oak Associates
BIkOakEmr 3.94 -.10 +28.3
HIthSinces 19.95 -.01 +30.2
PinOakEq 46.77 -.37+28.2
RedOakTec 15.41 -.10+32.5
Oakmark
EqlncI 33.03 +.04+18.4
GISell 16.62 +.29+25.2
Global I 30.38 +.50 +24.6
Inl I 26.39 +.63 +23.1
InUSmCpl d 17.51 +.37+22.2
Oakmark I 64.61 +.24+27.2
Select I 41.50 -.08 +31.5
Old Westbury
GIbOppo 7.97 +.05 +7.3
GIbSmMdCp 17.24 +.03+15.1
LgCpStr 12.58 +.07+18.8
Oppenheimer
ActAllocA m 11.89 ...+14.5
CapApA m 59.28-1.68+17.7
CaplncA m 9.74 +.01 +7.3
DevMktA m 36.95+1.25 +5.2
DevMktY 36.53+1.23 +5.5
DevMktsC m 35.15+1.18 +4.5
DiscoverA m 76.28-4.30 +25.4
EqlncA m 31.61 +.01 +19.8
EquityA m 12.33 -.17 +18.5
GlobA m 78.68 +.20+18.2
GlobOpprA m 41.29 -.99+31.6
GlobY 78.78 +.21 +18.5
InUBondA m 6.09 +.04 -3.0
InUBondY 6.08 +.03 -2.8
InUDivA m 14.67 +.28+16.2
InlGrY 38.36 +.77+18.9
InUGrowA m 38.53 +.78+18.6
MainSSMCA m31.36 -.40 +22.5
MainStrA m 48.58 -.30+21.7
RisDivA m 19.70 -.21 +15.9
RisDivY 20.21 -.20+16.2
SrRtRatA m 8.42 +.01 +4.9
SrRtRatC m 8.43 +.01 +4.3
StrIlncA m 4.16 +.02 +.3
Oppenheimer Rocheste
FdMuniA m 14.96 ... -6.5
LmtTmMunA m14.28+.01 -1.6
LtdTmNY m 3.13 ... -4.1
RochHYMA m 6.96 +.02 -2.4
Osterweis
OsterStrInc d 11.97 +.01 +5.6
PIMCO
AAstAAutP 10.04 +.16 -3.2
AIIAssetA m 12.26 +.16 +1.4
AIIAssetC m 12.22 +.16 +.6
AIIAssetl 12.25 +.17 +1.9
AIIAuthA m 10.04 +.16 -3.5
AIIAuthC m 10.04 +.16 -4.3
AIIAuthIn 10.03 +.15 -3.1
ComRIRStI 5.91 +.08 -7.8
Divlnclnst 11.62 +.06 +.9
EMktCurl 10.15 +.13 -2.4
EmMktslns 10.82 +.19 -3.2
Floatlncl 8.83 +.03 +3.2
ForBdInsU 10.72 +.03 +1.9
ForBondl 10.33 +.07 +1.7
HiYldls 9.72 +.01 +6.1
Income P 12.46 +.03 +4.9
InvGrdlns 10.46 +.04 +.1
LowDrA m 10.33 -.01 -.4
LowDrls 10.33 -.01
LowDurD b 10.33 -.01 -.3
LowDurP 10.33 -.01 -.1
ModDurls 10.62 +.2
RealRet 11.18 +.03 -7.2
RealRtnA m 11.18 +.03 -7.5
RealRtnC m 11.18 +.03 -8.0
RIEstStRetl 4.31 +.04 -8.0
ShTermAdm b 9.88 +.01 +.7
ShtTermis 9.88 +.01 +1.0
ToRtlllls 9.45 ... -1.4
ToRtllls 10.28 ... -1.2
TotRetA m 10.77 ... -1.7
TotRetAdm b 10.77 ... -1.6
TotRetC m 10.77 ... -2.5
TotRetIs 10.77 ... -1.3
TotRetmD b 10.77 ... -1.6
ToURetnP 10.77 ... -1.4
PRIMECAP Odyssey
AggGr 30.54 -1.27 +37.6
Growth 24.27 -.68 +23.8
Stock 21.74 -.18+23.1
Parametric
TxMgEMInsU d48.96+1.58 +2.2
Parnassus
Eqlnclnv 36.60 -.11 +18.6
Pax World
Bal b 24.62 -.08+11.3
Permanent
Portfolio 43.95 -.44 -.5
Pioneer
CoreEqA m 15.81 -.21 +20.4
PioneerA m 39.60 -.31 +20.9
SfratlncA m 10.99 +.04 +2.3
SfratlncY 10.99 +.04 +2.7


Principal
BdMtglnst 10.84 +.04 +.8
DivlntI 11.89 +.15+13.6
HiYIdA m 7.86 +.01 +6.8
HiYIdll 10.66 +.03 +6.5
LT20201 14.35 -.03+11.1
LT20301 14.56 -.06+13.4
LT20401 15.00 -.08+15.2
LT20501 14.54 -.08+16.4
LCGrIllnst 12.61 -.40+24.6
LCIIIInst 14.68 ...+21.0
LgCGrlnst 10.76 -.52+21.8
LgCSP5001 13.08 -.10+20.7
LgCVaIll 13.18 -.07+19.6
MGIIIInst 12.17 -.38+21.8
MidCapA m 20.29 -.27+19.1
PrSeclnst 10.23 +.03 +4.0


Country (currency)
Argent (Peso)
Australia (Dollar)
Bahrain (Dinar)
Brazil (Real)
Britain (Pound)
Canada (Dollar)
Chile (Peso) .
China (Yuan)
Colombia (Peso) .
Czech Rep (Koruna)
Denmark (Krone)
Dominican Rep (Peso)
Egypt (Pound)
Euro
Hong Kong (Dollar)
Hungary (Forint)
India (Rupee)
Indnsia (Rupiah) .
Israel (Shekel)
Japan(Yen) .
Jordan (Dinar)
Malaysia (Ringgit)


Currency in US$ US$ in Currency
Last WkAgo Last WkAgo


.1249 .1255 8.0050
.9251 .9088 1.0810
2.6518 2.6518 .3771
.4418 .4305 2.2636
1.6645 1.6495 .6008
.9046 .8921 1.1055
001817 .001779 550.50
.1610 .1606 6.2122
000509 .000501 1966.40
.0501 .0503 19.95
.1842 .1848 5.4295
.0232 .0232 43.13
.1435 .1436 6.9700
1.3751 1.3795 .7272
.1289 .1289 7.7584
.0045 .0044 224.43
.0167 .0164 59.895
000088 .000087 11360.00
.2856 .2873 3.5012
009729 .009784 102.79
1.4118 1.4164 .7083
.3056 .3023 3.2725


7.9690
1.1004
.3771
2.3229
.6062
1.1210
562.10
6.2253
1994.50
19.89
5.4114
43.17
6.9618
.7249
7.7587
227.31
60.920
11470.00
3.4803
102.21
.7060
3.3085


Country (currency)
Mexico (Peso)
N. Zealand (Dollar)
Norway (Krone)
Pakistan (Rupee)
Peru (New Sol)
Philpins (Peso)
Poland (Zloty)
Russia (Ruble)
Saudi Arab (Riyal)
Singapore (Dollar)
So. Africa (Rand)
So. Korea (Won)
Sweden (Krona)
Switzerind (Franc)
Taiwan (Dollar)
Thailand (Baht)
Turkey (Lira)
U.A.E. (Dirham)
Ukraine (Hryvnia)
Uruguay (New Peso)
Venzuel (Bolivar)


Currency in US$ US$ in Currency
Last WkAgo Last WkAgo


.076441 .075737
.8659 .8537
.1664 .1652
.0102 .0102
.3557 .3557
.0223 .0221
.3297 .3285
.0280 .0276
.2666 .2666
.7945 .7851
.0944 .0918
.000937 .000926
.1538 .1557
1.1276 1.1332
.0328 .0327
.03078 .03089
.4566 .4476
.2722 .2722
.0909 .0950
.0438 .0438
.1590 .1590


13.0820
1.1549
6.0086
98.07
2.811
44.80
3.03
35.7731
3.7505
1.2587
10.5886
1067.21
6.5015
.8868
30.47
32.49
2.1902
3.6731
11.0050
22.8199
6.2877


13.2035
1.1714
6.0543
98.10
2.811
45.27
3.04
36.2525
3.7504
1.2738
10.8923
1080.03
6.4243
.8825
30.59
32.38
2.2339
3.6731
10.5250
22.8499
6.2877


MoneyRates
Last/Wk Ago Last/Wk Ago Last/Wk Ago
1-year 0.14 0.12 3-month 0.23 0.23
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25 T-Notes: 6-month 0.33 0.33
Discount Rate Primary 0.75 0.75 1-year 0.14 0.14 FHLB Cost of Funds, 11th District:
Fed Funds Target .00-.25.00-.25 2-year 0.45 0.43 Eff. Feb.28 0.768 0.768
T-Bills: 5-year 1.75 1.71 FNMA 30-year mortgage commitment:
3-month disc 0.05 0.05 10-year 2.72 2.74 60-days 4.05 3.99
6-month disc 0.06 0.08 T-Bond: Money market fund:
T-Bill, annualized, adjusted for 30-year 3.55 3.61 Fidelity Cash Reserves:
constant maturity: Libor: 7-day avg yld: 0.01 0.01


Commodities FUELS CLOSE PVS. %CHG %YTD
Crude Oil (bbl) 101.67 101.28 +0.39 +3.3
The price of Ethanol (gal) 3.27 3.00 +0.50 +71.0
copper extend- Heating Oil (gal) 2.96 2.95 +0.35 -3.9
ed its recent rise Natural Gas (mm btu) 4.49 4.58 -1.16 +6.0
after the world's Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.94 2.94 -0.17 +5.5
largest produc-
er reported a METALS CLOSE PVS. %CHG %YTD
drop in output Gold (oz) 1293.80 1294.70 -0.07 +7.7
S o tai Silver (oz) 19.77 19.69 +0.42 +2.2
In other trading, Platinum (oz) 1404.70 1397.20 +0.54 +2.5
wheat fell, while Copper (Ib) 3.06 3.04 +1.58 -11.1
corn and soy- Palladium (oz) 774.10 761.00 +1.73 +7.9
beans were un-
changed. AGRICULTURE CLOSE PVS. %CHG %YTD
Cattle (Ib) 1.47 1.46 +0.02 +8.9
Coffee (Ib) 1.81 1.76 +2.41 +63.1
S Corn (bu) 4.92 4.92 ... +16.6
Cotton (Ib) 0.94 0.93 +1.27 +10.8
SLumber (1,000 bd ft) 334.40 335.50 -0.33 -7.1
... Orange Juice (Ib) 1.51 1.50 +0.17 +10.3
Soybeans (bu) 14.37 14.37 ... +9.5
Wheat (bu) 6.96 7.11 -2.11 +14.9


12 mo
Fund NAV chg %rtn
SAMBalA m 15.77 -.08+11.4
SAMConGrA m17.93 -.14+14.7
SCGrIllnst 14.01 -.89+26.9
SCVallll 13.68 -.35+23.6
Prudential
GblRealEstZ 22.52 +.32 +.5
JenMCGrA m 38.91 -.78+18.6
Prudential Investmen
BlendA m 22.02 -.55 +22.1
InlEqtyC m 7.13 +.19+14.6
JenMidCapGrZ40.57 -.81 +18.8
JennGrZ 28.71-1.02 +27.5
NaturResA m 52.19 +.67+11.4
ShTmCoBdA m11.34+.01 +1.2
SmaIllCoZ 28.89 -.77 +21.6
UflityA m 15.32 +.12+20.1
Putnam
DivrlnA m 7.99 +.03 +6.5
EqlncomeA m 20.75 -.09 +19.9
GIbUbIB m 12.15 +.13+11.4
GrowlncA m 20.20 +.02 +23.8
InUNewB m 17.91 +.31 +16.6
InvestorA m 19.74 -.07 +24.1
MuIrCapGrA m76.69-1.79 +26.1
SmCpValA m 15.49 -.33 +24.3
VoyagerA m 31.28 -.62 +30.9
Reynolds
BlueChip b 73.40-2.27 +20.8
RidgeWorth
LgCpVaEql 16.84 +.08+21.6
MdCpVlEql 13.91 -.03+20.5
SmCapEql 17.68 -.23+19.5
USGovBndl 10.12 ... +.1
Royce
Opportlnv d 15.79 -.45 +28.7
PAMutInv d 14.57 -.29+21.4
Premierlnv d 22.16 -.40 +20.0
SpecEqlnv d 24.49 -.53+16.5
TotRetlnv d 16.33 -.20+18.7
ValueSvc m 13.45 -.18 +23.7
Russell
EmgMktsS 17.65 +.61 -2.3
GIbEqtyS 11.38 +.05+18.2
ItlIDvMktS 36.88 +.63+18.0
StratBdS 11.03 +.02 -.2
USSmCpEqS 30.74 -.98 +26.8
Rydex
ElectrIlnv 68.67 -1.96 +31.9
HIthCrAdv b 25.05 -.62 +28.8
NsdqlOOIv 21.23 -.48 +26.8
SEI
ldxSP500E d 49.99 -.43 +20.6
InUEqA d 10.15 +.17+16.7
IsCrFxIA d 11.32 +.02 +.4
IsHiYdBdA d 7.85 +.01 +6.2
IsHlEmMA d 10.44 +.35 -2.9
IsLrgGrA d 32.41 -.60 +20.6
IsLrgValA d 24.59 -.12 +23.4
IsMgTxMgA d 18.65 -.23 +22.1
Schwab
1000lInv d 49.16 -.33+21.0
CoreEq d 23.13 -.09+20.3
DivEqSel d 18.01 +.01 +19.6
FUSLgCInl d 14.37 +.02+20.5
InlIndex d 19.88 +.46+16.6
S&P500Sel d 29.13 -.13 +20.8
SmCapldx d 27.39 -.98 +22.5
TotStkMSI d 34.00 -.29+21.3
Scout
IntemU 36.77 +.91 +8.3
Selected
AmerShS b 50.84 -.49+21.9
Amercan D 50.85 -.48+22.4
Sentinel
CmnStkA m 42.88 -.11 +18.4
Sequoia
Sequoia 224.38-4.61 +22.3
Sound Shore
SoundShor 50.36 -.04+30.2
Spectra
SpecraA m 17.38 -.40+23.1
State Farm
Balanced 63.50 +.23 +9.7
Growth 69.70 +.54+16.5
SteelPath
MLPIncA m 10.79 +.04 +7.3
Stratton
SmCapVal d 75.66-1.83 +25.3
SunAmerica
FocDvStrC m 16.69 +.07 +18.9
T Rowe Price
Balanced 23.26 -.18 +14.1
BIChpGAdv b 63.00-2.14 +28.0
BIChpGr 63.34 -2.15 +28.3
CapApprec 26.22 -.14 +16.2
Corpinc 9.69 +.04 +1.5
DivGrow 33.76 -.31 +18.7
EmMktBd d 12.71 +.22 -2.8
EmMktStk d 31.72+1.27 -4.0
Eqlndex d 50.06 -.43 +20.6
Eqtyinc 32.95 -.02 +17.8
EqtylncAd b 32.88 ...+17.4
EurStock d 21.93 +.21 +32.6
FinSer 20.55 -.36 +24.0
GNMA 9.51 ... -.8
GIbTech 13.43 -.27+41.7
GrStkAdv b 50.83-1.72 +26.3
Growinc 29.75 -.37+21.9
GrowStk 51.51-1.74+26.6
HealthSci 60.08 -2.94 +36.7
HiYield d 7.25 ... +8.2
InSmCpStk 20.32 -.68 +23.8
InsLgCpGr 27.03 -.93+32.2
InstlHiYI d 9.86 +.01 +8.0
InstlLgCV 19.09 -.05 +22.0
InUBnd d 9.70 +.03 +2.2
InUDisc d 56.84 +.35+19.6
InlEqldx d 13.53 +.34+16.0
InUGrlnc d 15.69 +.29+18.8
InIStk d 16.32 .37+11.6
MDTaxFBd 10.66 +.03 +.2
MediaTele 67.78 -1.86 +27.9
MidCapE 41.33 -1.19 +25.0
MidCapVa 30.87 -.12 +20.6
MidCpGr 74.00 -2.04 +24.4


12 mo
Fund NAV chg %rtn
NJTaxFBd 11.76 +.05
NewAmGro 43.36-1.38 +24.8
NewAsia d 16.12 +.52 +.4
NewEra 45.64 +.30+11.5
NewHoriz 46.38 -2.20 +31.8
Newlncome 9.43 +.02 -.3
OrseaStk d 10.08 +.21 +16.8
PerStrBal 23.09 -.14 +13.5
PerStrGr 30.59 -.12 +17.7
R2015 14.48 +.02+11.1
R2025 15.51 -.02+14.9
R2035 16.39 -.05+17.6
Real d 23.05 -.03 +6.5
Ret2020R b 20.30 ...+12.5
Ret2050 13.13 -.05+18.3
Retinc 14.90 +.03 +6.8
Rtmt2010 18.05 +.05 +8.9
Rtmt2020 20.60 ...+13.1
Rtmt2030 22.77 -.06+16.4
Rtmt2040 23.55 -.09+18.3
Rtmt2045 15.70 -.05+18.3
SciTech 39.62 -.94+35.5
ShTmBond 4.79 ... +.5
SmCpStk 44.68-1.48 +22.7
SmCpVal d 50.15-1.09+19.1
SmCpValAd m49.78-1.08 +18.8
SpecGrow 24.04 -.10+19.9
Specinc 12.93 +.03 +3.6
SumGNMA 9.60 ... -1.0
SumMuInc 11.50 +.04 -.2
SumMuInt 11.72 +.03 +.8
TaxEfMult d 20.07 -.61 +22.7
TaxFHiYld d 11.38 +.04 -.4
TaxFInc 10.10 +.04 -.2
TaxFShInt 5.65 ... +.5
TrRt2020Ad b 20.46 ...+12.8
TrRt2030Ad b 22.61 -.05+16.2
TrRt2030R b 22.45 -.05+15.8
TrRt2040Ad b 23.37 -.08+18.0
TrRt2040R b 23.24 -.08+17.7
Value 34.60 -.16+24.5
T.Rowe
ReaAsset d 11.28 +.09 +3.2
TCW
EmglncI 8.51 +.10 -2.9
SelEql 24.89 -.80 +18.1
TotRetBdl 10.13 +.01 +2.1
TotRetBdN b 10.44 +.01 +1.7
TIAA-CREF
BdPIns 10.58 +.02 +1.2
Bondin 10.40 +.02 +.9
Eqlx 14.26 -.12 +21.4
Gr&lncln x 11.99 -.23 +22.8
HYIIns d 10.38 +.01 +6.7
InfL x 11.42 +.02 -6.5
InME d 19.24 +.45+17.0
InlEqln d 11.96 +.13+24.3
LCVal 17.69 -.03 +20.7
LgCVldx 16.62 +.02 +20.4
LgGrlns 14.80 -.47+24.1
MidValln 23.40 -.20+21.0
MidValRmt 23.28 -.20+20.7
SCEq d 18.79 -.72 +24.4
SPIndxIn 20.86 -.10+20.8
Target
SmCapVal 26.77 -.57+20.6
Templeton
InFEqSeS 22.96 +.44+19.5
Third Avenue
RealEsVal d 30.13 +.36+16.7
Value d 57.19 +.80+12.3
Thompson
Bond 11.88 -.07 +3.2
LargeCap 48.32 -.18+24.0
Thornburg
IncBIdA m 21.20 +.23+10.7
IncBldC m 21.19 +.23 +9.9
InUValA m 29.68 +.45 +6.5
InUVall 30.35 +.47 +6.9
LtdTMuA m 14.45 -.01 +.2
LtdTMul 14.46 ... +.6
Thrivent
IncomeA m 9.18 +.02 +2.0
LgCapStkA m 26.65 -.10 +20.1
MidCapGrA m 19.55 -.46 +18.2
Tocqueville
DIfld m 37.85 -.45+19.0
Gold m 38.84-1.89 -26.3
Touchstone
SdCaplnGr 22.31 -.92 +31.8
Transamerica
AstAIMdGrC m14.60 -.05+12.8
Turner
SmCapGr 37.51-1.78 +20.7
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 26.89 +.39 +11.8
U.S. Global Investor
GId&Prec m 6.82 -.47 -31.5
GlobRes m 9.43 -.01 -3.5
USAA
CorstnMod 15.08 -.02 +7.9
CorstnModAgrsv25.35+.12 +8.4
GNMA 9.93 ... -.4
Growinc 21.76 -.26 +24.3
HYOpp d 8.86 -.02 +7.7
Income 13.14 -.01 +1.1
IncomeStk 17.20 -.09+19.9
IntermBd 10.85 +.02 +2.2
InU 30.02 +.79+12.7
PrcMtlMin 15.18 -.81 -30.5
S&P500M 26.39 -.37 +20.6
SciTech 19.92 -.55+32.3
ShTmBond 9.22 ... +1.0
TaxEInt 13.37 +.03 +.9
TaxELgTm 13.48 +.07 +1.0
TaxEShTm 10.72 ... +.7
TgtRt2040 13.04 +.07+12.0
TgtRt2050 12.88 +.08+12.9
WorldGro 27.00 +.30+17.2
Unified
Winlnv m 17.81 +.26 +8.5
VALIC Co I
MdCpldx 26.80 -.42+19.1
Stockldx 33.36 -.15+20.5


12 mo
Fund NAV chg %rtn
Value Line
PremGro b 33.95 -.35 +16.1
Vanguard
500Adml 171.27 -.76 +20.8
500Inv 171.27 -.77 +20.7
A-WexUSIdxAdm31.04+.60+11.6
Balldx x 27.77 -.25 +12.2
BalldxAdm x 27.77 -.26 +12.4
Balldxlns x 27.77 -.26 +12.4
BalldxSig x 27.47 -.26 +12.4
CAITAdml 11.52 +.02 +1.6
CALTAdml 11.65 +.05 +1.2
CapOp 47.85 -1.23+27.3
CapOpAdml 110.51-2.82+27.4
CapVal 15.02 -.11 +32.8
Convert x 14.05 -.19 +15.6
DevMktidx 11.56 +.29 +16.6
DevMktIdxAdm 33.24 +.81 +16.7
DevMktsldxlP 119.43+2.94 +16.7
DivAppldxlnv 29.88 +.07 +15.8
DivEqlnv 30.85 -.37 +23.5
DivGr 21.52 +.12 +19.7
EmMklnsld 25.42+1.09 -3.7
EmMktIAdm 33.43+1.43 -3.7
EmMktStkldxIP 84.56+3.61 -3.7
EmerMktldlnv 25.46+1.10 -3.9
EnergyAdm 129.13+3.04+14.6
Energylnv 68.80+1.62+14.6
Eqinc x 29.98 +.07 +18.7
EqlncAdml x 62.84 +.14 +18.8
EurldxAdm 73.29 +.31 +24.3
ExMktIdSig 54.52 -1.40 +23.9
ExplAdml 95.37 -3.02 +27.3
Expir 102.52 -3.26 +27.1
ExtdldAdm 63.45 -1.63 +23.9
Extdldlst 63.45 -1.63 +23.9
ExtdMktldxlP 156.59-4.02 +24.0
Extndldx 63.45 -1.63 +23.8
FAWeUSIns 98.38+1.90+11.7
FAWeUSInv 19.70 +.39+11.5
GNMA 10.57 +.02 -.3
GNMAAdml 10.57 +.02 -.2
GIbEq 23.74 +.17+19.2
GrIncAdml 65.09 -.35+21.1
Groinc 39.86 -.22+20.9
Growthldx 47.73 -.89+21.0
GrthldAdm 47.73 -.90+21.1
Grthlstid 47.73 -.90+21.1
GrthlstSg 44.20 -.83+21.2
HYCor 6.11 +.01 +5.4
HYCorAdml 6.11 +.01 +5.5
HItCrAdml 81.26 -.84 +34.4
HIthCare 192.62 -1.99 +34.3
ITBond 11.28 +.02 -1.5
ITBondAdm 11.28 +.02 -1.4
ITGradeAd 9.81 +.02 +.6
ITIGrade 9.81 +.02 +.5
ITFsry 11.21 ... -2.2
ITrsyAdml 11.21 ... -2.1
InfPrtAdm x 25.97 +.03 -6.7
InfPrtl x 10.58 +.01 -6.7
InflaPro x 13.23 +.02 -6.8
Instldxl x 170.15 -1.57+20.9
InstPlus x 170.15-1.58+20.9
InstTStId x 42.58 -.56 +21.6
InstTStPI x 42.58 -.57 +21.6
IntlExpIn 19.04 +.35+26.4
IntUGr 22.96 +.42+17.4
IntIGrAdm 73.03+1.35 +17.5
InUStkldxAdm 27.84 +.52 +12.0
IndStkldxl 111.35+2.10+12.1
InUStkldxlPIs 111.36+2.09+12.1
InUStkldxlSgn 33.40 +.63 +12.0
InUVal 37.04+1.12 +18.5
ItBdldxSI 11.28 +.02 -1.4
LTBond 13.15 +.13 -1.2
LTGradeAd 10.15 +.08 +.8
LTInvGr 10.15 +.08 +.7
LTsryAdml 11.65 +.10 -4.3
LgBdldxls 13.15 +.13 -1.0
LgCpldxAdm 43.08 -.42+21.1
LgCpldxlnv 34.45 -.33 +20.9
LifeCon x 18.23 -.06 +7.1
LifeGro 27.90 +.05 +14.7
Lifeinc x 14.50 -.05 +3.4
LifeMod 23.40 +.04+10.8
MdGrlxlnv 36.03 -.73 +19.5
MdPDisGr 18.69 +.11 +11.5
MidCapGr 24.84 -.67 +21.0
MidCapldxIP 151.52-1.88+22.3
MidCp 30.64 -.38 +22.1
MidCpAdml 139.07-1.73 +22.3
MidCplst 30.72 -.38 +22.3
MidCpSgl 43.88 -.55 +22.3
Morg 25.58 -.55 +23.5
MorgAdml 79.27-1.71 +23.6
MuHYAdml 10.86 +.04 +.5
Mulnt 13.98 +.04 +.7
MulntAdml 13.98 +.04 +.8
MuLTAdml 11.35 +.04 +.7
MuLtd 11.04 -.01 +.6
MuLtdAdml 11.04 -.01 +.7
MuSht 15.86 ... .5
MuShtAdml 15.86 ... .6
NJLTAdml 11.93 +.06 +1.1
NYLTAdml 11.38 +.06 +.6
PALTAdml 11.33 +.05 +.9
PacldxAdm 72.84+2.36 +4.6
PrecMUs 11.04 -.07 -18.1
Prmcp 95.66 -1.30 +26.8
PrmcpAdml 99.21-1.35 +26.9
PrmcpCorl 20.20 -.21 +25.0
REITIdx 23.27 -.07 +3.3
REITIdxAd 99.29 -.30 +3.4
REITIdxInst 15.37 -.05 +3.4
REITIdxSg 26.50 -.09 +3.4
STBond 10.49 ... +.1
STBondAdm 10.49 +.2
STBondSgl 10.49 ... +.2
STCor 10.72 +.01 +1.2


12 mo
Fund NAV chg %rtn
STFedAdml 10.71 ... -.1
STGradeAd 10.72 +.01 +1.3
STIGradel 10.72 +.01 +1.3
STsryAdml 10.68 ...
SelValu 28.44 -.26+27.3
SmCapldx 53.17 -1.40 +23.1
SmCapIldxIP 153.62-4.04+23.3
SmCpldAdm 53.22-1.40+23.3
SmCpldlst 53.22 -1.40+23.3
SmCplndxSgnl 47.95-1.26 +23.3
SmCpValldxAdm42.54-.78 +22.7
SmGthldx 34.37 -1.24 +22.8
SmGthlst 34.43 -1.24 +23.0
SmValldx 23.72 -.44 +22.4
SmVIlldlst 23.78 -.43 +22.7
Star 24.26 +.04+13.7
StratgcEq 30.90 -.50 +28.2
TgtRe2010 25.93 +.04 +6.7
TgtRe2015 14.96 +.02 +9.4
TgtRe2020 27.44 +.04+11.3
TgtRe2030 27.93 +.05+14.2
TgtRe2035 17.14 +.02+15.5
TgtRe2040 28.57 +.05+16.6
TgtRe2045 17.92 +.03+16.6
TgtRe2050 28.44 +.05+16.6
TgtRetinc x 12.61 -.03 +4.6
Tgtet2025 15.93 +.03+12.7
TotBdAdml 10.69 +.02 -.3
TotBdlnst 10.69 +.02 -.3
TotBdMklnv 10.69 +.02 -.4
TotBdMkSig 10.69 +.02 -.3
TotlntI 16.65 +.32+12.0
TotStlAdm 46.98 -.62+21.5
TotStllns 46.99 -.61 +21.5
TotStlSig 45.34 -.59+21.5
TotStldx 46.96 -.61 +21.4
TxMBalAdm x 25.27 -.18+10.8
TxMCapAdm 94.84 -.65+22.1
TxMGIAdm x 83.28 -.76 +20.8
TxMIntlAdm 13.19 +.18+16.7
TxMSCAdm 43.26-1.22 +25.5
USGro 28.66 -.59 +23.4
USGroAdml 74.18-1.53 +23.6
ValldxAdm 30.19 -.07+20.9
ValldxIns 30.19 -.07+20.9
ValldxSig 31.41 -.08+20.8
Valueldx 30.19 -.07+20.7
VdHiDivlx 24.83 +.20+17.7
Wellsl x 25.20 -.06 +7.4
WellslAdm x 61.05 -.15 +7.5
Welltn x 38.38 -.08+13.8
WelltnAdm x 66.28 -.15+13.9
WndsllAdm 66.61 +.17+21.0
Wndsr 20.85 -.04 +24.8
WndsrAdml 70.34 -.15 +24.9
WndsrIIll 37.53 +.09 +20.9
ex-USIdxIP 104.17+2.00+11.8
Victory
SpecValA m 21.27 -.23 +19.6
Virtus
EmgMktsls 9.69 +.28 -6.4
MulSStA m 4.88 +.01 +1.8
MulSStC b 4.93 ... +1.5
Waddell & Reed Adv
AssetStrA m 11.52 -.08+17.3
CorelnvA m 7.25 -.14+22.1
HilncA m 7.71 +.01 +9.5
NewCncptA m 11.63 -.28+19.3
SciTechA m 15.75 -.71 +36.1
VanguardA m 9.80 -.27 +22.7
Wasatch
IntIGr d 28.29 +.18+11.7
LISInv d 16.24 +.06 +9.1
LgCpVal d 12.34 +.04+13.7
SmCapGr d 51.87-1.64 +18.8
Weitz
ShtIntminc 12.51 -.06 +.6
Wells Fargo
AstAIIIcA f 14.13 +.13 +8.5
AstAIIIcC m 13.64 +.13 +7.6
Discovlnv 32.66 -1.36 +22.6
EmgMktEqA f 20.57 +.72 -3.1
GrI 54.12 -2.20+21.4
Growlnv 49.52-2.01 +20.9
GrowthAdm 52.43-2.13+21.2
Outk2010OAdm 13.34 -.05 +3.0
PrmLrgCoGrA f14.15 -.44+22.5
STMuBdInv 9.99 ... +.9
UISTMInA f 4.82 ... +.1
UISTMInl 4.82 ... +.4
William Blair
InsllnUG 17.17 +.23+12.6
IntIGrI d 26.53 +.36+12.6
World Funds
EpGIoEqShYI x19.90 +.12 +18.1
Yacktman
Focused d 25.13 +.17+13.2
Yacktmnan d 23.54 +.11 +14.1


Mutual Fund Footnotes: b Fee covering market costs is paid
from fund assets, d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee.
f- front load (sales charges), m Multiple fees are charged, usual-
ly a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. NA not
available, p previous day's net asset value, s fund split shares
during the week. x fund paid a distribution during the week.
Source: Morningstar and the Associated Press.


ForeignExchange










Will federal site hold up for insurance deadline?


MIAMI (AP) -With
just days left to sign up
for insurance under the
president's new health law,
people around Florida are
continuing to have mixed
results as they try to enroll.
The website problems
appear to be fewer than
when the site launched
in the fall, but users are
still experiencing minor
hiccups and jammed
phone lines as they join
the millions around the
country seeking to beat
the March 31 deadline. It
can take several visits to
the website to finish an
application, even without
technical glitches.
And aside from techni-
cal problems, confusion
persists about who
qualifies for tax credits,
along with enrollment
deadlines and extensions.


The deadline was recently
extended through mid-
April for those who start
the application process by
Monday.
In Miami, a navigator
sped throughWillie
Washington's application
on Monday, signing up the
50-year-old construction
worker for health insur-
ance in less than an hour
with minimal problems.
"You'd be surprised. A
lot of guys in this neigh-
borhood still don't have it,"
saidWashington, who said
he planned to spread the
word.
Washington chose a pre-
ferred medical plan with
no premium or deductible
and a $1,500 out-of-pocket
max thanks to a $352
monthly tax credit.
"It ends a lot of frustra-
tion because you can live


a better life knowing you
can go to the doctor now
that you've got insurance,"
he said.
On Tuesday, Sandy
Raphael tried to sign up at
a Miami hospital during
her work break, but the
website kept kicking her
out and she eventually had
to leave without complet-
ing her application.
"I'm frustrated," said
Rafael, a 37-year-old unin-
sured medical assistant.
All week long, dozens
of students at Florida
International University
tried to enroll with the
help of two counselors.
Several applications were
stalled by website glitches,
while others moved along
smoothly.
"It's a mixed bag,"
said counselor Anthony
Rouzier, who was helping


several students enroll
at the same time. When
healthcare.gov flashed a
message that it couldn't
verify one student's identi-
fication, he said the federal
government's hotline was
too backed up to even
bother calling.
"I tried to call and they
said 'we're not accepting
calls right now,'" said
Rouzier.
Gustavo Chabarro, a
34-year-old graduate assis-
tant, said the process has
been complicated. He first
filled out an application in
February and the system
was down so he called the
hotline. He was instructed
to call back a week later.
"The system is down
more times than it's up,"
said Chabarro, who is hop-
ing to find a cheaper plan
for him and his wife. He


would have to pay $5,200
a year to add his wife onto
the university's plan.
He finally made it
through the application
process Wednesday and
was narrowing down his
plans, hoping to find one
with a low deductible.
Still, the website
troubles are minimal
compared to the problems
in October and November.
The White House an-
nounced that more than
6 million have signed up
nationwide, meaning the
Obama administration
met its target goal a few
days early.
Florida has emerged
as one of the Affordable
Care Act's biggest success
stories, enrolling more
than 440,000 through the
end of February the
highest number of the


three dozen states relying
on the federal exchange.
That comes despite
Republican opposition to
the law. The state banned
navigators from enrolling
consumers at county
health departments and
offered no extra dollars to
help with outreach.
But with roughly 3.5 mil-
lion uninsured Floridians,
state Democrats, health
advocacy groups and
Enroll America formed
strategic partnerships
to fill in the gaps in this
politically important swing
state, where the success
or failure of the law will
likely impact mid-term
elections. Enroll America
has 40 staff and nearly
5,000 volunteers in Florida
compared to 38 staff and
about 3,000 volunteers in
Texas.


I HEADLINE NEWS FROM AROUND THE STATE


Fla. House votes
to move future
session dates
TALLAHASSEE (AP) -
Florida legislators could
begin their session a bit
earlier in 2016.
The Florida House on
Thursday voted in favor
of a bill (HB 9) that would
start the annual legisla-
tive session in January
during even-numbered
years.
The vote was 102-11.
The 60-day session
now starts in March.
Legislators every 10
years meet in January
when they are drawing
new Congressional and
legislative districts.
Florida's constitution
requires the session start
in March in odd-num-
bered years but leaves it
up to legislators to fix the
date in even-numbered
years.
A Senate bill (SB 72)
would move up the date
of the 2016 session but
for that year only.

Groups defend
Florida's same-sex
marriage ban

MIAMI (AP)- A
coalition of black and
Hispanic civil rights
groups and pastors
is defending Florida's


constitutional ban on
same-sex marriage.
They are challenging
the grounds of another
lawsuit that seeks to
overturn the ban.
The groups said Friday
that the effort to over-
turn the ban threatens
to violate the rights of
the Florida voters who
approved the ban by a
wide margin in November
2008.
The ban defines mar-
riage as "the legal union
of only one man and
one woman as husband
and wife" and states that
no other unions can be
recognized. It passed with
62 percent of the vote.

Ex-FAMU band
member facing jail
in hazing death
ORLANDO (AP) -A
former Florida A&M band
member could become
the first to be sentenced to
jail time for his role in the
hazing death of a drum
major.
Jessie Baskin faces nine
years when sentenced
Friday for participating in
the beating death of Robert
Champion in November
2011 during a hazing ritual
aboard a bus parked outside
an Orlando hotel.
Champion originally
from Decatur, Ga. -
collapsed and died after


prosecutors said he walked
down the aisle of a bus
as other band members
beat him with fists and
instruments.
Prosecutor JeffAshton
described the 22-year-old
Baskin as being "most-con-
sistently identified as the
most enthusiastic" band
member in the hazing
ritual. Baskin pleaded no
contest to manslaughter,
though his attorneys
can argue for a lighter
punishment.

Fla. House keeps
pushing major
voucher expansion

TALLAHASSEE
(AP) Republicans in
the Florida House are
pushing ahead with a
major expansion of a
state-backed program
that helps low-income
children attend private
schools.
Just last week it
appeared that private
school voucher legislation
was dead for the 60-day
session after the Senate
sponsor withdrew his bill.
But on Friday a House
committee voted along
party lines for a revamped
version intended to win
support from Senate
Republicans.
This time House
Republicans included
the expansion of the


voucher program in a bill
that also would expand
a separate program that
aids disabled children.
The Senate is advancing
a similar bill to help par-
ents of disabled children
get additional services.
A top official with
the Florida Education
Association said the
House was being "disin-
genuous" by pairing the
two proposals together.

Boy, 9, recovering
after shark bite
NORTH PALM BEACH
(AP) -A Palm Beach
County boy is recovering
from a shark bite that left
him with 80 stitches on
his foot.
The Palm Beach
Post reports 9-year-old
Sebastian Cozzan was
about 20 feet offshore
John D. MacArthur State
Park when the shark


attacked him on
March 21.
The boy's father, David
Cozzan, says Sebastian is
recovering and looking
forward to surfing again.
Cozzan says he was
bitten by a shark while
surfing in the same
area about 20 years ago.
His bite didn't require
stitches.
Officials say there
have been several recent
reports of shark bites in
Palm Beach County.

Mama cat accepts
Chihuahua pups
into litter
TITUSVILLE (AP)- A
cat has taken two prema-
turely born Chihuahua
puppies into her litter
at the Brevard SPCA in
Titusville.
Florida Today reports
the mother Chihuahua
gave birth earlier this


week to four puppies.
Two of them died and
the mother rejected the
remaining two, each
weighing only a few
ounces.
Staff members decided
to introduce the pup-
pies into a litter of four
Siamese mix kittens, born
a week earlier.
The mother cat is now
nursing and grooming the
two puppies, along with
her kittens.


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o The Sun/Saturday, March 29, 2014


WIRE Page 9


www.sunnewspapers.net


STATE NEWS






-Page 10 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


WEATHER


The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014


TODAY

x;t,, A

Rather cloudy, a
couple of showers


CONDITIONS TODAY
UV Index and RealFeel Temperature Today


73 76 90 90 84 78
8a.m. 10a.m. Noon 2p.m. 4 p.m. 6 p.m.
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number,
the greater the need for eye and skin protection. 0-2 Low;
3-5 Moderate; 6-7 Highi; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme.
RealFeel Temperature is the exclusive
AccuWeather.com composite of effective temperature
based on eight weather factors.
AIR QUALITY INDEX
Air Quality Index readings as of Friday
32
0 50 100150200 300 500
0-50 Good; 51-100 Moderate; 101-150 Unhealthy
for sensitive groups; 151-200 Unhealthy; 201-300
Very Unhealthy; 301-500 Hazardous
Main pollutant: ozone
Source: scgov.net

POLLEN INDEX
Pollen Index readings as of Friday
Trees
Grass
Weeds*o o .a
Molds "'
absent low moderate high veryhigh
Source: National Allergy Bureau

ALMANAC
Punta Gorda through 5 p.m. Friday
Temperatures
High/Low 82/630
Normal High/Low 82/59
Record High 91 (1980)
Record Low 38 (2013)
Precipitation (in inches)
24 hours through 5 p.m. Friday 0.01"
Month to date 4.53"
Normal month to date 2.99"
Year to date 9.44"
Normal yearto date 7.22"
Record 1.90" (1987)

MONTHLY RAINFALL
Month 2014 2013 Avg. Record/Year
Jan. 3.67 0.43 1.80 7.07/1979
Feb. 1.24 2.12 2.52 11.05/1983
Mar. 4.53 1.98 3.28 9.26/1970
Apr. 3.06 2.03 5.80/1994
May 2.76 2.50 9.45/1991
Jun. 10.50 8.92 23.99/1974
Jul. 7.38 8.22 14.22/1995
Aug. 9.29 8.01 15.60/1995
Sep. 11.12 6.84 14.03/1979
Oct. 3.48 2.93 10.88/1995
Nov. 0.01 1.91 5.53/2002
Dec. 0.97 1.78 6.83/2002
Year 9.44 53.10 50.74 (since 1931)
Totals are from a 24-hour penod ending at 5 p.m.


SUNDAY


Sunshine and less
humid


MONDAY


Sunshine


80/64 80/53 81/57
50% chance of rain 10% chance of rain 0% chance of rain


AIRPORT
Possible weather-related delays today. Check
with your airline for the most updated schedules.
Hi/Lo Outlook Delays
Ft. Myers 85/64 storms all day
Punta Gorda 85/64 storms all day
Sarasota 81/62 storms all day
SUN AND MOON
The Sun Rise Set
Today 7:23 a.m. 7:44 p.m.
Sunday 7:22 a.m. 7:45 p.m.
The Moon Rise Set
Today 6:25 a.m. 6:52 p.m.
Sunday 7:07 a.m. 7:55 p.m.
New First Full Last


CE I
Mar 30 Apr7 Apr15 Apr22

SOLUNAR TABLE
Minor Major Minor Major
Today 4:59a 11:12a 5:25p 11:38p
Sun. 5:49a 12:02p 6:15p --
Mon. 6:41a 12:28a 7:07p 12:25p
The solunar period schedule allows planning days
so you will be fishing in good territory or hunting in
good cover during those times. Major periods begin
at the times shown and last for 1.5 to 2 hours.The
minor periods are shorter.


TIDES
High
Punta Gorda
Today 2:46a
Sun. 3:39a
Englewood
Today l:23a
Sun. 2:16a
Boca Grande
Today 12:28a
Sun. l:21a
El Jobean
Today 3:18a
Sun. 4:lla
Venice
Today 12:08p
Sun. 12:31a


Low High Low

9:26a 3:16p 9:44p
9:56a 3:38p l0:30p

7:42a l:53p 8:00p
8:12a 2:15p 8:46p

6:03a 12:58p 6:21p
6:33a l:20p 7:07p

9:55a 3:48p l0:13p
10:25a 4:10p 10:59p

6:21a --- 6:39p
6:51a 12:30p 7:25p


FLORIDA CITIES
Today Sun.


City
Apalachicola
Bradenton
Clearwater
Coral Springs
Daytona Beach
Fort Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Fort Pierce
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key Largo


Hi Lo W
70 45 s
75 56 s
75 57 s
80 61 pc
72 51 s
81 64 pc
81 55 s
76 54 s
74 42 s
72 43 s
80 64 pc


Cleaater,
82 64





St. Petersburg
82/64


Tampa
80/59


TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THE NATION


';


Mostly sunny Most


83 / 59
0% chance of rain 0%


Wi
84


Bartui
83, 62


Ft.'
82,


':-10s I -Os Os 10s 20s I 30s I 40s 50s I 60s I 70s 80% 1905s
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
T" I ***.. -I I 7
ly sunny, nice and 5542 &V A1
w'-m' r ,., \-i 1Ti on-tr

84 / 62 .. 66 Minneapolis 3923 h New.York
chance of rain .,.,'. 1 3 ,S 4 .' 1 ..^ ,
S Fraciaco .Denver Kansas"City '.,
*61/50\ **M --6W'4() it.''," .'.*' .*'.*i'Waniglor ..'

Los \ Angel- 57:45'
inter Ha'en n 6957 ..
69/57.. .......



2 _i O ..eo n -H. ... ....
C7 1'Ihahau 7 .0 i alm
S79'u1 i Monterey .u ...........
85,72
Meade ,' 'l59 ;;e" ;;;*'
/62 Fronts Precipitation

Cold Warm Stationary Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice


Wauchula
84 61


S Limestone
j84 63


Arcadia '
84,65


U.S. Extremes (For the 48 contiguous states yesterday)
High .................... 96 at Kingsville, TX Low ................. -8 at Crane Lake, MN


City
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
Fairbanks
Fargo
Hartford
Helena
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis


Today
Hi Lo W
67 45 s
38 22 s
68 39 r
58 45 r
62 36 pc
69 41 pc
55 39 r
47 43 r
37 25 sn
40 31 pc
55 36 r
73 41 t
42 26 pc
44 26 r
38 25 r
79 45 t
41 27 r
48 36 r
76 46 s
70 39 s
53 38 s
39 23 c
35 25 pc
31 -6 s
45 29 pc
51 41 r
53 31 c
81 71 sh
78 50 pc
44 27 sn


WORLD CITIES


City
Amsterdam
Baghdad
Today Sun. Beijing
i Lo W Hi Lo W Berlin
5 71 sh 79 62 pc Buenos Aires
0 54 t 70 49 s Cairo
2 64 t 75 57 s Calgary
3 61 t 75 52 s Cancun
1 62 t 76 54 s Dublin
1 51 t 74 39 s Edmonton
0 59 t 74 54 s Halifax
1 64 t 72 53 s Kiev
5 68 t 75 54 s London
4 69 t 79 60 pc Madrid
4 63 t 77 54 s Weather (W): s-s


Today
1 Lo W
2 44 pc
9 63 s
2 48 s
4 41 pc
2 66 pc
7 57 s
1 14 c
3 72 s
1 43r
9 9 sf
2 33 pc
5 26 s
3 46 pc
9 41 sh


Sun.
i Lo W
4 44 pc
) 24 s
6 42 s
) 36 r
3 27 r
7 40 s
4 34 c
4 38r
1 27 c
8 28 sn
5 31 pc
5 35 pc
) 39 s
5 35 s
4 30 pc
138 s
1 35 s
4 32 r
) 57 s
5 38 pc
3 49 s
3 33 s
8 25 pc
3 8 pc
) 14 c
7 35 r
4 28r
3 71 pc
5 52 pc
7 39 s


Sun.
i Lo W
4 46 pc
9 52 c
2 51 s
5 38 s
3 55 r
7 58 s
7 17 c
7 74 t
4 46 pc
2 7c
3 35 r
2 37 s
6 51 pc
9 45 c


City
Jackson, MS
Kansas City
Knoxville
Las Vegas
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Montgomery
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk, VA
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Salt Lake City
St. Louis
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Washington, DC



City
Mexico City
Montreal
Ottawa
Paris
Regina
Rio de Janeiro
Rome
St. John's
San Juan
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Vancouver
Winnipeg


Today Sun.
Hi Lo W Hi Lo
70 41 pc 71 44
60 40 s 79 52
63 38 r 60 35
79 64 pc 70 55
69 57 pc 70 54
48 31 r 61 40
62 42 pc 70 48
39 27 pc 56 38
41 33 s 53 37
75 43 t 71 40
58 36 pc 62 38
74 54 pc 69 51
51 46 r 49 38
69 49 r 52 39
71 42 s 78 51
58 38 s 77 46
52 45 r 48 37
85 64 s 84 59
46 32 r 50 30
48 36 pc 40 35
58 43 sh 55 41
53 44 r 47 39
73 44 t 59 36
68 45 pc 56 34
57 35 pc 71 47
81 51 pc 80 57
68 60 pc 67 57
61 50 r 60 48
55 42 sh 52 38
57 45 r 49 37


Today
Hi Lo W
82 54 pc
39 27 pc
37 21 c
65 44 pc
38 12 sn
84 73 pc
66 47 s
37 23 c
86 72 pc
80 68 pc
69 52 pc
39 25 c
51 44 sh
35 26 sn


-unny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurres, sn-snow, i-ice.


83 60


'*4,*
Apollo Beach
81 62


Bradenton
81/64
Longboat Key% 8Mya/ka Ci
80/64 84/65
Sarasota ................
81/62
Osprey 44
82/63 *


Shown is today's weather.
Temperatures are today's
highs and tonight's lows.
E

Gulf Water
Temperature

69


Venice
S82/63


North Pol Hull
84/63 85/66
I PuT Charlutte
I 80 64


triginvywoU &------ 4
83/63 .,
^*y
Placidai%
83/64.
Boca Grande%
83/66


Forecasts and graphics, except for the
WINK-TV 5-day forecast, provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. @2014

Publication date: 3/29/14
MARINE
Wind Speed Seas Bay/Inland
direction in knots in feet chop
Cape Sable to Tarpon Springs
SSW 8-16 1-3 Light
Tarpon Springs to Apalachicola
SW 10-18 2-4 Moderate


City
Key West
Kissimmee
Lakeland
Melbourne
Miami
Naples
Ocala
Okeechobee
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola


Today Sun.
Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
84 74 pc 80 68 pc
83 67 t 77 53 s
82 65 t 77 52 s
84 62 t 74 53 s
85 72 sh 81 64 pc
84 67 t 80 57 s
82 54 t 75 42 s
84 69 t 77 54 s
83 64 t 77 52 s
75 50 t 70 47 s
77 46 t 71 49 pc


Cape
84/6


Punta Gorda
85/64 ,


..........
Fort Myers
85/64 6 *

Coral Lehigh Acres
4 85/66


City
Pompano Beach
St. Augustine
St. Petersburg
Sanford
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Titusville
Vero Beach
West Palm Beach
Winter Haven


ARCADIA


t:ah/ CHEVROLET l WCX lEVY 1UUCESi


END OF THE MONTH SAL


6% &r mumlOunu


TOI MU- 1 US fU


300 Chevys, Buicks, Cadillacs, GMC Trucks, At Our 3 GM Dealerships on


2014 stk#21

Silverado 1500-o

2WD LT

Double Cab
MSRP ................... $32,515
Supplier................ $30,996
Holdback.................-$942
USAA.............................. .$750
Factory Rebate ..........- $1,750
CDRAC Vehicle..... -$3,000
............ $24,554
Any Old trade or $2,5
cash worth..............$3.000*
NEW 2013 NEW 2013 NEW 2013
CHEVROLET SUBURBAN 2WD BUICK
SONIC LS 1/2 TON LTZ ENCLAVE





r1 F P r 1 z Fo I ,,-. 'kl W226-.7
HOI k : ,- .: 1 1..S.: ,- 77
r.n:A' ,:C
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A-: -=,L- : Mo ,: .99l, u
,.'',F ,." .t..i:,-:, ',lV "7 -- r : ur ,c ',1 l 'V:rlr,. :: Tr .jq h: ,[1
uleins riceae Vii.Ial


Sale S, OWNER'S DEMO Sale, B1t
Price o- SAVE BIG Price o44


ARCADIA ,;
1^ f ^ ^ j1^ I z^ cH"^ .z .j .....wBc


SALES HOURS: MON. FRI. 9AM 8PM 210 South Brevard *Ave., Arcadia
SATURDAY 8AM GPM, SUNDAY 11 AM GPM
SERVICE HOURS: MON. FRI. 7:30AM GPM
SATURDAY 8AM 1PM, SUNDAY CLOSED www.ArcadiaChevroletBuick.com
+0% finanang in lieu of rebates, th approved credit, through ALL' GUARANTEETHE LOWEST PRICE ON EVERYNEWCAR 7TRUCK PERIOD We guaranteeto beat
your bes deal by $750 Customer must present a local competitors legitimate ad used pnce or written buyers order of identical vehicle Must be in stood< comparatiely
equipped *Customer must qualifyfor ad manufacturers incentrves Offer'id date of publication only Not responsIble fro any typographical erors or photo placement errors
Automotive groups authoazed to buy competitors vehice ay price presented by customer Id able to do so competitor offerwIll not be deemed "legitimate offer "All rebates
are subjectchange wrhouttnotice at anytime Prices don't relecttaxtagttie, ordealerfees Sale ends in 72 Hours


Ptawue' VENICE PREOWNED




SUPERSTORE
Labelle Sale Ends March 31st Truck Month and Truck of the Year line
Everything Else That Is Presently On There Now

End of the Sale All New 2013, 2014 Sold At


735 US 41 BY-PASS SOUTH


M I -

1=9 1=46=636ISNS SE
wwPATTAFUTMOIVGRUPCO


Plant City*
J83; 62

S* Bndn f
*'Brandon|


Sanibel
83/67
Bonita Springs
85/67

AeLuWalthercm -mm


Sun.
i Lo W
6 56 pc
7 27 sn
9 24 c
9 47 c
5 4 pc
6 75 pc
7 47 pc
321 c
5 72 pc
9 66 t
2 54r
4 27 c
) 40 sh
9 3c


. I


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Cnol_.l...-..u


AftrVWw m %flm myra










SPORTS


Saturday, March 29, 2014


Jones-Drew joins Raiders,
*Page 5


* MLB: Tampa Bay



Moore rebounds



from liner to face


He returns to BLUE JAYS
mound in final AT RAYS


spring start
By GREG ZECK
SUN CORRESPONDENT
LAKELAND -The
jitters were present, and
Matt Moore admitted
to flinching "a couple
times," but the Tampa
Bay left-hander was
happy with his final start
of the spring.
Friday was the first start
for Moore since being


WHAT: Opening day
WHO: Toronto at Tampa Bay
WHEN: Monday, 4:10 p.m.
WHERE: Tropicana Field,
St. Petersburg

hit in the face by a line
drive on Sunday against
Boston. It was an up-and-
down outing for Moore,
who threw 72 pitches over
three innings, surrender-
ing three runs on seven
hits and no walks.


"It felt pretty normal,
and my arm felt pretty
good heading into it,"
Moore said. "I felt like I
was in a good place. They
had a few more hits than
I would have liked ... but
physically I liked where
I'm at, throwing a lot
more off-speed stuff in
the zone tonight."
Classifying the start as
a rough one, based on the
numbers, would appear
warranted. Based on the
process of leading up to
the regular season, that
MOORE14


By CHUCK BALLARO
SUN CORRESPONDENT
PUNTA GORDA- Episcopal
Academy didn't come all the
way from Newtown Square,
Penn., to lay down.
The Churchmen capitalized
on early Charlotte mistakes
before holding on for a 5-3 vic-
tory Friday at Tarpon Stadium,
ending Charlotte's three-game


winning streak.
Junior pitcher AlexViscusi,
who has verbally committed to
play at Princeton, allowed two
hits, struck out eight, and gave
the Tarpons fits with her un-
orthodox delivery and riseball
they couldn't catch up with.
"We executed on some small
ball and were lucky to capitalize
on their mistakes," Churchmen
coach Terry Coyne said. "But


Rays starter Matt Moore throws against the Detroit Tigers on Friday in Lakeland. Moore made his
final appearance of spring, giving up three runs on seven hits.


* PREP BASEBALL: North Port 5-3, Palm Harbor 4-0


d-P


SUN PHOTO BY R.C. GREENWOOD
North Port High School's Mike Brown reaches home ahead of the throw during Friday's doubleheader against Palm Harbor. The Bobcats swept the Hurricanes,
winning the first game 5-4 and the second game 3-0.



Bobcats sweep double dip


Guilbault, Glenney spark victory


By GARY BROWN
SUN CORRESPONDENT
NORTH PORT North
Port High School starter Chris
Guilbault put the finishing
touch on a doubleheader sweep
of Palm Harbor University on
Friday afternoon.
Guilbault went the distance,
striking out six batters and
allowing five hits as North


Port blanked the visitors 3-0.
In the first game, the Bobcats
came from behind to edge the
Hurricanes 5-4.
In the second game, the
Bobcats scored twice in the
fourth inning to take a 2-0
advantage. Travis Glenney
singled with one out. After a
strikeout, Mike Brown doubled
to score Glenney. Calvin Hough


UP NEXT
North Port: vs. Charlotte, Tuesday, 7 p.m.

singled to bring in Brown with
the second run,
North Port (10-6) added its
third run in the bottom of the
sixth inning. With one out,
Glenney singled. Jacob Sheldon
slammed a hit down the left
field line, scoring Glenney.
Sheldon tried to go to second


base but was out sliding on a
close play. Brown grounded out
to end the inning.
Guilbault controlled the Palm
Harbor batters the entire game.
He retired 10 straight batters at
one point. The Bobcats made
the most out of seven hits.
In the opener, North Port
scored two runs in the bottom
of the third inning. Hough hit a
sacrifice fly to bring in the first
BOBCATS|6


0 NCAA TOURNAMENT:
Florida


Gators'


bench


could


be key

By EDGAR THOMPSON
ORLANDO SENTINEL
MEMPHIS, Tenn.-
Florida's seniors have
led the way all season,
but the Gators' young
bench could be the key to
reaching the Final Four.
The No. 11 Dayton
Flyers will come at the
No. 1 Gators in waves
today, unleashing as
many as a dozen players
to push the pace and
create havoc.
Coach Archie Miller's
formula has carried the
school to the cusp of
its first Final Four since
1967. The Flyers' playing
style has the attention
of the Gators, even
though they are 10-point
favorites.
"We're playing a
dangerous team," Florida
senior center Patric Young
said. "They earned their
spot to be here. They were
the best team to make
this spot.
"Hopefully we can be
the best team (today)."
Winners of 29 straight
games, the Gators (35-2)
are even better when
their bench gets involved.
Gators' reserves scored
23 points, grabbed 15

GATORS 13

GATORS VS.
FLYERS
WHO: Florida (35-2)
vs. Dayton (26-10)
WHAT: South Regional final
(Elite 8)
WHEN: Today, 6:09 p.m.
WHERE: FedExForum, Memphis,
Tenn.
TV:TBS
RADIO: 620 AM, 930 AM

NCAA
TOURNAMENT
FRIDAY'S RESULTS
UConn 81, Iowa State 76
Michigan State vs. Virginia, late
Michigan 73, Tennessee 71
Kentucky vs. Louisville, late
TODAY'S OTHER GAME
Wisconsin (29-7) vs. Arizona
(33-4), 8:49 p.m. (TBS)


UP NEXT
Charlotte: vs. DeSoto County, Tuesday,
7p.m.

they capitalized on our mis-
takes, so it was a good game."
Episcopal Academy took a
2-0 lead in the top of the first
on Gabby Donatucci's two-run
single off Charlotte starter


Courtney Sunnarborg.
The Churchmen (2-1) padded
their lead in the second as the
Tarpons committed three errors
with two outs.
Nina Pagano grounded to
shortstop Melissa Stack, who
juggled the ball and threw
late to Tiffany Dodson at first.
Dodson then threw wild to third
in an attempt to get Kate Ortlieb
TARPONS16


INDEX I Lottery 21 Golf 2 | NHL 2 | College basketball 3 | MLB 41 Scoreboard 51 NBA 5 | NFL 5 | Preps 6 | Quick Hits 6


YourSun.com Facebook.com/SunCoastSports @SunCoastSports. SunCoastSportsBlog.com


Sports Editor: Mark Lawrence


* PREP SOFTBALL: Episcopal Academy 5, Charlotte 3

Pennsylvania pitcher proves too much for Tarpons






Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014


Florida Lottery
www.flalottery.com

* CASH 3
March 28N .................................9-6-7
March 28D .................................1-9-5
March 27N .................................6-4-4
March 27D .................................0-2-0
March 26N .................................3-7-8
March 26D .................................0-6-5
D-Day, N-Night

* PLAY
March 28N ..............................9-1-8-4
March 28D ..............................3-8-0-9
March 27N ..............................1-6-1-7
March 27D ..............................3-5-8-4
March 26N ..............................8-5-2-4
March 26D ..............................6-2-7-8
D-Day, N-Night

* FANTASY 5
March 28.......................1-5-15-21-30
March 27.......................2-4-16-20-21
March 26................... 11-21-23-29-36
PAYOFF FOR MARCH 27
2 5-digit winners.......... $113,440.78
347 4-digit winners .................. $105
10,444 3-digit winners............ $9.50

* MEGA MONEY
March 28.........................14-20-25-34
M egaBall...........................................4

March 25...............1......I10-12-14-23
M egaBall........................................... 5
PAYOFF FOR MARCH 25
1 4-of-4MB..........................$550,000
6 4-of-4...................................$1,040
64 3-of-4MB..........................$213.50
1,181 3-of-4.............................$34.50

* LOTTO
March 26................2-16-24-32-40-47
March 22..................1-8-10-16-52-53
March 19..................8-9-24-36-38-40
PAYOFF FOR MARCH 26
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37 5-digit winners.............$3,589.50
1,738 4-digit winners .................... $2
29,346 3-digit winners ..................$5

* POWERBALL
March 26................... 28-33-41-44-59
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Powerball........................................15
PAYOFF FOR MARCH 26
0 5 of5 + PB.............................. $40M
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1 4of5 + PB.......................... $10,000
45 4of 5 ....................................$100
ESTIMATED JACKPOT
$50 million

MEGAA MILLIONS
March 28......................... 2-3-9-50-73
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PAYOFF FOR MARCH 25
0 5of5 + MB............................. $20M
0 5 of5.............................. $1,000,000
0 4of5 + MB..........................$5,000
14 4of 5 ....................................$500

Corrections

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errors of fact. To report an error, call or
email the sports department.


How to...

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Lawrence 941-206-1175. Must contain
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Mark Lawrence Sports Editor
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Zach Miller* Staff writer
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EMAIL: sports@sun-herald.com
FAX: 941-629-2085


* HOMETOWN HEROES



Hendricks shines in hammer throw


He competes

for Nova

Southeastern

By BARBARA BOXLEITNER
SUN CORRESPONDENT
Sophomore Darren Hendricks
continues to prove his value
to the Nova Southeastern
University track and field team.
The North Port resident set
a school record in the hammer
throw March 21 at the Hurricane
Invitational. Hendricks, who


was the Peach Belt Conference
Freshman of the Year, finished
fifth with a toss of 144 feet, 9
inches.
Hendricks placed fourth in the
javelin throw (146-09) and eighth
in the discus (143-06).

MORE MEN'S
TRACK AND FIELD
University of South Florida junior Chase
Meyers won the high jump at the Bulls
Invitational. The Charlotte High School graduate
had an effort of 6-8.
Another past Tarpon, Colorado College
freshman Patrick Glastonbury finished the


400-meter run in 54.47 seconds at the UNLV
Classic.
Formerly at Lemon Bay High School,
University of North Florida junior Stephen Krupa
placed third in the high jump at the Atlantic Sun
Conference indoor championship. His effort was
6-06.75.
Port Charlotte High School graduate Nick
Williams finished seventh in the long jump
(22-02.25) for Bethune-Cookman University
at the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference indoor
championship.

MEN'S GOLF
Berry College's Chase Kulczak shot a 161
(76-85) at the Wynlakes Intercollegiate. The


North Port High School alumnus tied for 30th.

MEN'S LACROSSE
Dillon Volk, previously a Pirate, is no
longer playing for Mercer University. He was a
goalkeeper the past three years.

MEN'S TENNIS
Charlotte High graduate Asti Adams has a
5-10 singles record and 3-10 doubles record for
Palm Beach Atlantic University. The sophomore
has competed at fourth singles in all but one
match and at second and third doubles.
Send updates about area athletes to Barbara
Boxdeitner at BKLE3@aol.com.


Carter leads

Kia Classic

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN ANTONIO -Phil
Mickelson made the cut
on the number in the
Texas Open on Friday,
blasting out of a green-
side water hazard to 5
feet to set up a birdie on
the final hole.
Mickelson shot a
2-under 70 after opening
with a 77 his worst
score of the season on
TPC San Antonio's AT&T
Oaks Course. Lefty was
11 strokes behind leader
Steven Bowditch, the
Australian who had a 67
to reach 8-under 136.
Mickelson was in the
stream that runs in front
of the 18th green after
attempting to reach the
par 5 in two from 288
yards with a 3-wood.
"I needed to make a
birdie to have a chance
at playing tomor-
row," Mickelson said.
"Fortunately, barely went
in, and it looked like the
water overlapped the
grass. It was not that hard
of a shot."
Bowditch holed out
from 83 yards for an
eagle on the par-4 12th.
The 30-year-old topped
the leaderboard at the
end of a round for the
first time in his PGA Tour
career.
"My wedge shots
have been pretty good,"
Bowditch said. "I was try-
ing to hit (the one on No.
12) a little past the pin
and hope it came back
to a reasonable distance.
Got lucky."
He closed the round
with a double bogey on
the par-4 ninth, taking
two chips to get out of the
heavy rough.
Chad Collins and rookie
Andrew Loupe were a
stroke back.


* GOLF ROUNDUP





Mickelson makes cut


Phil Mickelson watches his drive off the second tee during the second round of the Texas Open on
Friday in San Antonio.


Carter takes Kia Classic
lead: In Carlsbad, Calif., Dori Carter
might have gotten a bit ahead of
herself late in the second round of the
Kia Classic. She still left everyone else
behind Friday.
After birdieing six of the first
seven holes on the back nine, Carter
bogeyed the final two holes for an
8-under 64. The round was her lowest
in competition and broke the Aviara
course record.
Winless on the LPGA Tour, the
former University of Mississippi player
had I11 birdies and three bogeys. At
10-under 134, she had a two-stroke
lead over Stacy Lewis and Cristie Kerr.
Lewis shot 66, and Kerr had a 68.


Europe leads 7-3 after 2
days at EurAsia Cup: In Kuala
Lumpur, Malaysia, Asia had two wins
and two halves in the five foursomes
matches at the EurAsia Cup, with
Europe needing a late rally in the other
match to hold a 7-3 lead after two days
at Glenmarie Golf and Country Club.
Prayad Marksaeng ofThailand and
South Korea's Kim Hyung-sung had a 4
and 3 win over the Danish pair of Thomas
Bjorn and Thorjorn Olesen in the first
resultof the day.Then Anirban Lahiri and
Siddikur Rahman closed out a 1 -up victory
overJoost Luiten and Victor Dubuisson
after Asia led 2-up with two to play.
Europe, which led 5-0 after
winning all fourball matches


Thursday, then gained two halves
before Graeme McDowell and Jamie
Donaldson combined to give the
visitors their only full point of day two.
McDowell and Donaldson, 1-down
with three to play, rallied for a 2 and
1 win over Gaganjeet Bhullar and
Nicholas Fung.
"It wasn't really anything to do
with complacency on the European
side,"McDowell said of the turnaround
on day two. "I think it was a lot to
do with the fact that the Asian team
came out and played very well today.:'
The teams will play 10 singles
matches today, when Europe will
need just 3.5 points to clinch the first
trophy in the Ryder Cup-style event.


I GOLF SCOREBOARD


PGATour
VALERO TEXAS OPEN
At TPC San Antonio
San Antonio
Purse: $6.2 million
Yardage: 7,435; Par 72 (36-36)
Second Round
Steven Bowditch 69-67 -
Chad Collins 71-66-
Andrew Loupe 67-70-
Cameron Beckman 69-70 -
Pat Perez 68-71 -
Daniel Summerhays 72-68 -
Kevin Na 70-70 -
Freddie Jacobson 70-70 -
James Hahn 71-70-
Trevor Immelman 70-71 -
JoshTeater 71-70 -
Will MacKenzie 69-72 -
Aaron Baddeley 70-71 -
ZachJohnson 70-71 -
Wes Roach 75-66 -
Brian Harman 70-72 -
Jason Kokrak 71-71 -
Martin Flores 71-71 -
Jerry Kelly 71-71 -
Chesson Hadley 69-73 -
Matt Kuchar 70-72 -
Fred Funk 70-72 -
Justin Hicks 69-73 -
BoVan Pelt 69-73 -
Brian Davis 71-72-
GeoffOgilvy 74-69 -
Michael Putnam 72-71 -
Scott Gardiner 74-69-
Ryan Palmer 72-71 -
William McGirt 72-71 -
Carl Pettersson 70-73 -
Brice Garnett 70-73-
Russell Knox 74-70 -
Scott Brown 70-74 -
Brian Gay 73-71 -
CamiloVillegas 71-73 -
TimWilkinson 74-70 -
Robert Streb 72-72-


Briny Baird
SJimFuryk
Alex Prugh
Alex Aragon
CameronTringale
Stephen Ames
AndresRomero
Brendon deJonge
S Justin Leonard
Miguel Angel Carballo
Troy Merritt
Jamie Lovemark
Jordan Spieth
Michael Thompson
SJohn Senden
Charley Hoffman
Ben Curtis

LPGATour
KIACLA
At Aviara G
Carlsbad,
Purse: $1.7
Yardage: 6,593; P
S(a-amat
Second R
S Dori Carter
Stacy Lewis
Cristie Kerr
S Lizette Salas
TiffanyJoh
Mariajo Uribe
S Chella Choi
Lexi Thompson
Shanshan Feng
SPaula Creamer
Ashleigh Simon
SJulieta Granada
Se Ri Pak
Inbee Park
Anna Nordqvist
Jenny Suh
Ai Miyazato
So Yeon Ryu
SAyakoUehara


r
SSIC
olf Club
, Calif.
million
'ar 72 (36-36)
eur)
ound
70-64 -
70-66 -
68-68 -
69-68 -
69-69 -
67-71 -
74-65 -
69-70 -
68-71 -
67-72 -
71-69 -
70-70 -
70-70 -
69-71 -
73-68 -
72-69 -
70-71 -
70-71 -
70-71 -


SAzahara Munoz 69-72 -141
MiHyangLee 68-73 -141
LydiaKo 74-68 -142
Jenny Shin 73-69 -142
Ji Young Oh 72-70 -142
YaniTseng 71-71 -142
Giulia Sergas 75-68 -143
KarrieWebb 75-68 -143
Carlota Ciganda 73-70 -143
I.K.Kim 73-70 -143
Meena Lee 73-70- 143
KatieFutcher 71-72 -143
KarinelIcher 71-72 -143
Katie M. Burnett 70-73 -143
Brooke Pancake 70-73 143
MichelleWie 70-73 -143
JodiEwartShadoff 68-75 -143
Sydnee Michaels 76-68 -144
Julia Boland 73-71 -144
Christina Kim 73-71 -144
Giulia Molinaro 73-71 -144
NaYeonChoi 72-72 -144
Seon Hwa Lee 72-72 -144
BelenMozo 72-72 -144
Eun-HeeJi 71-73 -144
Katherine Kirk 71-73 -144
Gerina Piller 71-73 -144
Rebecca Lee-Bentham 70-74 144
Mo Martin 70-74 -144
Becky Morgan 70-74 -144

European Tour
EURASIA CUP
At Glenmarie Golf and Country Club
Europe 7, Asia 3
Foursomes
Asia 3, Europe 2
Miguel Angel Jimenez and Pablo Larraza-
bal, Europe, halved with Thongchai Jaidee
and Kiradech Aphibarnrat, Asia.
Kim Hyung-sung and Prayad Marksaeng,
Asia, def. Thomas Bjorn and Thorbjorn
Olesen, Europe, 4 and 3.
Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano and Stephen
Gallacher, Europe, halved with Koumei Oda


Sand HidetoTanihara, Asia.
Siddikur Rahman and Anirban Lahiri, Asia,
def Victor Dubuisson and Joost Luiten, Eu-
rope, 1 up.
Graeme McDowell and Jamie Donaldson,
Europe, def Gaganjeet Bhullar and Nicho-
las Fung, Asia,2 and 1.

Web.com Tour
CHITIMACHA LOUISIANA OPEN
At La Triomphe Country Club
Broussard,La.
Purse: $550,000
Yardage: 7,006; Par: 71 (36-35)
Second Round
Jonathan Randolph 66-65 131
Fabian Gomez 66-67 -133
RyanBlaum 65-68 -133
Bill Lunde 69-64 -133
Sebastian Vazquez 69-65 134
Bronson Burgoon 69-65 134
Max Homa 69-65 -134
AndresEchavarria 67-67 -134
Jon Curran 71-64 -135
ShaneBertsch 67-68 -135
ZackSucher 68-67 -135
Justin Thomas 69-66 -135
Ryan Baca 66-69 -135
ZackFischer 68-67 -135
Jason Gore 68-67 -135
Kyle Reifers 65-70 -135
DougLaBellell 66-69 -135
TonyFinau 68-67 -135
TJ.Vogel 68-67 -135
Roland Thatcher 73-63 136
Scott Harrington 71-65 136
Carlos Ortiz 70-66 -136
Glen Day 66-70 -136
Ash Hall 70-66 -136
Rod Pampling 70-66 -136
Sam Saunders 70-66 -136
Garth Mulroy 70-66 -136
Hunter Haas 68-68 -136
JeffCurl 66-70 -136
Kris Blanks 71-66 -137


* NHL ROUNDUP


LIGHTNING
AT SABRES
WHO: Tampa Bay (39-24-9) at
Buffalo (20-45-8)
WHEN:Today, 7p.m.
WHERE: First Niagara Center,
Buffalo, New York
TV: Sun Sports
RADIO: 970 AM, 1220 AM


CANADIENS
AT PANTHERS
WHO: Montreal (42-26-7) at
Florida (27-39-8)
WHEN:Today, 7p.m.
WHERE: BB&T Center, Sunrise
TV: Fox Sports Florida
RADIO: No local affiliate



Philly



tops



Toronto

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHILADELPHIA-
Vinny Lecavalier, Scott
Hartnell, Claude Giroux
and Wayne Simmonds
scored goals, leading the
Philadelphia Flyers to a
4-2 win over the Toronto
Maple Leafs on Friday
night.
Toronto's James van
Riemsdyk scored 4
seconds into the second,
matching an NHL record
for fastest goal from the
start of the period. But the
Maple Leafs' skid reached
seven games.
Lecavalier was dropped
from a spot on the wing
on the second line to his
more natural center on
the fourth line. But he
also had the spot on the
top power-play unit and
scored in the first with
Philadelphia holding a
two-man advantage.
Toronto coach Randy
Carlyle might have to
learn how to bob and
weave. Former heavy-
weight champion Riddick
Bowe, a huge fan, playfully
threatened on Twitter to
knock out Carlyle with a
loss. Bowe tweeted, "One
punch between the eyes."
He also predicted Toronto
would win 3-2.

Penguins 2, Blue Jackets
1: In Columbus, Ohio, Chris Kunitz and
Beau Bennett scored goals 47 seconds
apart midway through the third period
and Marc-Andre Fleury made 35 saves
as Pittsburgh clinched a playoffspot.
James Wisniewski scored a power-play
goal for Columbus with 3:06 left, with
Pittsburgh hanging on as Fleury made
huge saves on Brandon Dubinsky and
Cam Atkinson during a scrum in the
final seconds.
Curtis McElhinney, taking the place
of the ill Sergei Bobrovsky, stopped the
first 28 Penguins shots before Kunitz
notched his 34th with 9:25 left.

Senators 5, Blackhawks
3: In Ottawa, Ontario, Craig Anderson
had 46 saves and Clarke MacArthur had
a goal and two assists for the Senators.
Erik Condra, Cody Ceci, Milan Michalek
and Kyle Turris also scored for the
Senators.
Patrick Sharp, Marian Hossa and
Brent Seabrook scored for Chicago.
Antti Raanta made 24 saves.
Ottawa scored twice in the third
and killed offa 34 second two-man
advantage to hold off the Blackhawks.


Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014






The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014 www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3


TODAY'S TOURNAMENT GRID

SOUTH REGIONAL
At FedExForum, Memphis, Tenn.
1 Florida (35-2) vs. No. 11 Dayton (26-10) 6:09 p.m. TBS Florida byO10 Chicago Tribune's pick: Florida
Florida is the tournament's top overall seed in the NCAA Tournament for multiple reasons and should extend its win streak to 30.
WEST REGIONAL
At The Honda Center, Anaheim, Calif.
1 Arizona (33-4) vs. 2 Wisconsin (29-7) 8:49 p.m. TBS Arizona by 3 Chicago Tribune's pick: Arizona
Wildcats are the more athletic team with a veteran point guard, T.J. McConnell, and one of the nation's top freshmen: Aaron Gordon.

* NCAA TOURNAMENT ROUNDUP



Michigan holds off



Tennessee late surge


Vols erase

almost all of a

15-point gap;

UConn wins

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
INDIANAPOLIS -
Jordan Morgan scored 15
points and Nik Stauskas
had 14 including a
key free throw to help
Michigan hold on for
a 73-71 victory against
Tennessee in Friday's
first Midwest Regional
semifinal.
The second-seeded
Wolverines will play
either Louisville, who
they lost to in last year's
national championship
game, or 2012 national
champion Kentucky on
Sunday.
The Wolverines (28-8)
led by 15 with 10:55 to
go, but committed four
turnovers in the final
97 seconds. Tennessee
(24-13) cut the lead to
72-71 and had a chance
to take the lead, but
Jarnell Stokes was called
for an offensive foul with
6 seconds left.
Stauskas then made
1 of 2 free throws and
Tennessee's long desper-
ation heave was off the
mark.
Jordan McRae scored 24
to lead the 1lth-seeded
Vols.
For most of the first 36
minutes, Michigan was in
firm control.
Then came a stunning
turnaround by Tennessee,



GATORS

FROM PAGE 1
rebounds and dished
out 14 assists during
Thursday night's 79-68
win against UCLA in the
Sweet 16.
Back-up by point guard
Kasey Hill had 10 assists
to join Magic Johnson,
Keith Gatlin and Jason
Kidd as one of only
freshmen with as many
dishes in the Sweet 16.
Freshman Chris Walker,
a 6-foot-10 forward, had
seven points and three
rebounds in six minutes.
"Whenever we can
get games like that from
those guys, it's fun to
watch," senior point
guard Scottie Wilbekin
said.


Tennessee's Josh Richardson passes around Michigan's Glenn
Robinson III and Jon Horford during the first half of Friday's
Midwest Regional semifinal in Indianapolis. Michigan won 73-71.


a bubble team that had
to win a first-round game
just to get into the round
of 64.
Tennessee gave up just
one more basket and
steadily took advantage of
Michigan's miscues.

UConn 81, Iowa State
76: In New York, DeAndre Daniels
scored 27 points, including 19 in
the second half, and Connecticut
reached the East Regional final a year
after it was barred from the NCAA
tournament.
Daniels hit his first six shots after


Dayton (26-10) has
put on a show lately.
The Flyers have won 13
of 15 games, beating
Ohio State, Syracuse and
Stanford in the NCAA
tournament.
Dayton had 19 assists
during Thursday night's
82-72 win against
Stanford. During a
55-53 win a round earlier
against Syracuse, Dayton
hit seven 3s, while
holding the Orangemen
without one. Nine players
played double-digits min-
utes and scored during
a 60-59 shocker of Ohio
State during the opening
round.
"Sacrifice is part of
winning," leading scorer
Jordan Siebert said of the
Flyers' depth. "Anybody is
able to hit a game winner.
Anybody is able to take


halftime, the only Husky to make a
field goal for more than 8 minutes.
His 3-pointer gave seventh-seeded
UConn a 49-32 lead.
The Cyclones rallied, pulling
within four, 67-63, with 2 minutes
remaining. But senior Niels Giffey hit a
3 in the corner for his first points since
the game's opening moments, and
when the Huskies (29-8) made their
free throws in the final minute, the
UConn fans packing Madison Square
Garden could celebrate.
Dustin Hogue scored a career-high
34 points for third-seeded Iowa State
(28-8).


the last shot. Anybody
is able to make the big
play."
But the Gators can go
nine-deep themselves.
"Everybody on our
team needs to be ready to
play and give maximize
effort," Wilbekin said.

FLORIDA 79, UCLA 68
UCLA (28-9)
Adams 7-15 2-3 17, Powell 3-82-2 8, Ander-
son4-11 3-3 11, D. Wear 2-3 1-2 7,T. Wear
6-12 2-2 14, LaVine 2-7 1-1 5, B. Alford 1-5
0-0 2, Allen 0-0 0-1 0,Parker2-30-1 4.Totals
27-6411-1568.
FLORIDA (35-2)
Young 2-4 0-1 4,Wilbekin 5-13 1-1 13,Yeg-
uete 4-5 0-0 8, Frazier 11 7-13 0-019, Prather
3-5 6-8 12, Hill 2-4 2-2 6, Finney-Smith 3-8
3-410,C.Walker3-5 1-27,D.Walker 00-1 0
O.Totals 29-5813-1879.
Halftime-Florida 36-30.3-Point Goals-
UCLA 3-18 (D. Wear 2-3, Adams 1-5, Powell
0-1, Anderson 0-1, B. Alford 0-2, LaVine 0-3,
T.Wear 0-3), Florida 8-21 (Frazier II 5-8, Wil-
bekin 2-8, Finney-Smith 1-4, D.Walker 0-1).
Fouled Out-None. Rebounds-UCLA
30 (Anderson 9), Florida 40 (Yeguete 7).
Assists-UCLA 12 (Anderson 5), Florida 22
(Hill 10). Total Fouls-UCLA 19, Florida 15.
Technical-Prather. A-i14,991.


* AUTO RACING ROUNDUP




Top teams trade




barbs at opener


St. Pete starts

IndyCar year;

Busch earns

NASCAR pole

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ST. PETERSBURG-
Chip Ganassi just wanted
to watch a Yankees game,
not dodge a brush-back
pitch from his rival.
The president of Team
Penske aimed his barbs
high and tight at Ganassi,
and now IndyCar's top
two organizations are
embroiled in a spat that
spiced up the series'
version of opening day.
It began when Penske
President Tim Cindric
said Penske and Ganassi
have an "intense compe-
tition" instead of a rivalry
because "rivalries take
place over a long period of
time."
"If you want to think
of it in baseball terms, it
would be the Yankees and
the (Miami) Marlins- a
team with a long history
against a younger team
that came on strong and
won a couple of World
Series," Cindric told USA
Today.
That didn't sit well at


For NASCAR Sprint Cup lineup,
see Scoreboard, Page 5


Chip Ganassi Racing,
which has won five of the
last six IndyCar titles and
three Indianapolis 500s
since 2008.
"I was there Thursday
when the Pirates played
the Yankees and I didn't
see Tim there," Ganassi
said. "I don't really dignify
Tim's comments when
they are good or bad."
As the season kicked off
Friday with a pair of prac-
tices on the street course
of St. Petersburg, attention
was focused on the most
recent spat between the
two storied organizations.
There was squabbling
a year ago as Ganassi's
Scott Dixon raced Penske's
Helio Castroneves for the
title, and Dixon had a rash
of run-ins with Penske
driver Will Power during
a critical stretch of the
season.
Dixon ultimately won
the championship, his
third overall and the most
recent for Ganassi.
"Even Mr. Penske this
morning recalled that we
won five of the last six
championships," Ganassi
said.


TE ww.lggTIhMESco


Kyle Busch gains pole:
Kyle Busch has seen it time and again
at Martinsville (Va.) Speedway.
Driving down pit road, heading back
onto the track and in contention for
the lead, Busch is used to seeing the
pole-sitter gun the engine just off the
jack and reassume the race lead.
Busch hopes to finally get to
experience that for himself at
Martinsville Speedway on Sunday after
earning the pole on NASCAR's smallest,
tightest track for the first time in 19
career starts.
"I think that's a great thing for us,"
Busch said after winning the pole with
a lap at 99.674 mph. "We get to pit
there and of course drop the jack and
just lunge across the line and be good.
The pole is the 14th of Busch's
career.

Red Bull has more fuel
drams: In Sepang, Malaysia, Red
Bull experienced more issues with
the contentious fuel-flow sensors
during practice at the Malaysian Grand
Prix, raising the prospect of another
showdown with Formula One officials
similar to the one that resulted in the
team's disqualification in Australia.
Daniel Ricciardo was excluded from
the results in Melbourne after finishing
second, because race stewards said Red
Bull exceeded the new fuel flow limit of
100 kilograms per hour.
Red Bull blamed the issue on
faulty readings from the FIA-approved
fuel sensors and has appealed the
disqualification.


I COLLEGE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENTS


NCAATOURNAMENT
EAST REGIONAL
At Madison Square Garden, NewYork
Friday's results
UConn 81, Iowa State 76
Michigan State (28-8) vs.Virginia (30-6), late
Sunday's game
UConn (29-8) vs. Michigan State-Virginia
winner,TBA
SOUTH REGIONAL
At FedExForum, Memphis, Tenn.
Thursday's results
Dayton 82, Stanford 72
Florida 79, UCLA 68
Today's game
Dayton (26-10) vs. Florida (35-2), 6:09 p.m.
MIDWEST REGIONAL
At Lucas Oil Stadium, Indianapolis
Friday's results
Michigan 73,Tennessee 71
Kentucky (26-10) vs. Louisville (31-5), late
Sunday's game
Michigan (28-8) vs. Kentucky-Louisville
winner,TBA
WEST REGIONAL
At The Honda Center, Anaheim, Calif.
Thursday's results
Wisconsin 69, Baylor 52
Arizona 70, San Diego State 64
Today's game
Wisconsin (29-7) vs. Arizona (33-4), 8:49
p.m.
NIT
At Madison Square Garden, NewYork
Semifinals
Tuesday's games
Minnesota (23-13) vs. Florida State (22-13),
7p.m.
Clemson (23-13) vs. SMU (26-9), 9:30 p.m.


CBI
Championship Series
(Best-of-3 x-ifnecessary)
Monday's game
Siena (18-17) at Fresno State (20-16), 10
p.m.
Wednesday's game
Fresno State at Siena, 7 p.m.
Aprils5
x-Fresno State at Siena,TBA
COLLEGEINSIDER.COM TOURNAMENT
Thursday's result
Murray State 85,Towson State 73
Semifinals
Tuesday's games
Yale (22-12)at VMI (22-12),TBA
Pacific (18-15) at Murray State (21-11),TBA
DIV. II TOURNAMENT
Thursday's results
At Evansville, Ind.
Central Missouri 71, Metro State 69
West Liberty86, S. Carolina Aiken 83
Today's game
At Evansville, Ind.
Championship
Central Missouri vs.West Liberty, 3 p.m.
NCAA WOMEN'S TOURNAMENT
LINCOLN REGIONAL
At Lincoln, Neb.
Today's games
UConn (36-0) vs. BYU (28-6), 4:30 p.m.
DePaul (29-6) vs.Texas A&M (26-8),7 p.m.
Monday's game
Semifinal winners, 9:30 p.m.
STANFORD REGIONAL
At Stanford, Calif.


S Sunday's games
Stanford (30-3) vs. Penn St (24-7), 4:30 p.m.
S.Carolina (29-4)vs. N. Carolina (26-9),7p.m.
Tuesday's game
SSemifinal winners, 9 p.m.
NOTRE DAME REGIONAL
At Notre Dame, Ind.
Today's games
I Kentucky (26-8) vs. Baylor (31-4), Noon
Notre Dame (34-0) vs. Oklahoma State (25-
8),2:30 p.m.
Monday's game
S Semifinal winners, 7:30 p.m.
LOUISVILLE REGIONAL
At Louisville, Ky.
Sunday's games
Tennessee (28-5) vs. Maryland (26-6), Noon
Louisville (32-4) vs. LSU (21-12),2:30 p.m.
Tuesday's game
Semifinal winners, 7 p.m.
WNIT
Thursday's results
South Florida 74, George Washington 57
Indiana 66, Northwestern 65
Bowling Green 63, Michigan 53
Rutgers 91,Seton Hall 79,20T
Mississipi State 59, Auburn 54
South Dakota State 70, Minnesota 62
Friday's result
Colorado (19-14) vs. UTEP (26-7), late
Quarterfinals
Sunday's games
Indiana (21-12) at S. Dakota St.(25-9),3 p.m.
South Florida (22-12) at Mississipi State
(22-13), 6p.m.
Monday's game
Rutgers (25-9) at Bowling Green (30-4), 7
p.m.


.* ... ,* ,
-- J ..a .. *" >,i(


Call for directions


The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3





Page 4 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014


I EXHIBITION STA


AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L
Cleveland 19 8
RAYS 16 7
LosAngeles 18 10
Seattle 17 11
Baltimore 13 9
NewYork 17 12
Detroit 15 12
Toronto 15 13
Oakland 14 13
Kansas City 12 15
Houston 11 15
Boston 11 16
Chicago 9 14
Texas 10 16
Minnesota 8 16


Thursday's results
Washington 4, N.Y. Mets 0
MARLINS 6, St. Louis 4
Detroit 9, Atlanta 3
Toronto 3, Philadelphia 0
N.Y.Yankees 4, Pittsburgh 2
Chicago Cubs 4, ChicagoWhite Sox 3
Cincinnati (ss) 9, Arizona (ss) 1
Cincinnati (ss) 8, Milwaukee 2
Cleveland 3, Arizona (ss) 2
Boston 4, Minnesota 1
RAYS 4, Baltimore 3
LA. Angels 7, L.A. Dodgers 5
Oakland 4, San Francisco 0
Friday's results
Detroit 6, RAYS 3
Boston 4, Minnesota 0
Toronto 5, N.Y Mets 4
N.Y.Yankees 3, MARLINS O
Pittsburgh 3, Philadelphia 0
Houston 6,Texas5
Kansas City 5, Milwaukee 4
Cleveland vs. San Diego at San Diego, late


I EXHIBITION LINE

RED SOX 4, TWINS 0
At Fort Myers
Boston 000 202000-4111
Minnesota 000 000 000 0 70
Doubront, Britton (6),Workman (7), Baden-
hop (8), SWatanabe (9) and Pierzynski, La-
varnway; Hughes, Thompson (6), Deduno
(7), M.Hoffman (9) and Pinto, D.Rohlfing.
W-Doubront. L-Hughes. HRs-Boston,
Napoli (4).

ASTROS 6, RANGERS 5
At San Antonio, Texas
Houston 400001001-6 91
Texas 010000112-5112
J.Williams, Peacock (4), Quails (7), J.Buchan
an (8), J.Stoffel (9) and J.Castro, Corporan;
M.Harrison, N.Martinez (4), Cotts (9), Frasor
(9), Soria (9) and Arencibia, Snyder. W-J.
Williams. L-M.Harrison. Sv-J.Stoffel.
HRs-Houston, Carter (2). Texas, Kouz-
manoff (3), A.Beltre (1), Choice(5).

BLUE JAYS 5, METS 4
At Montreal, Quebec
NewYork(N) 000210100-4 90
Toronto OO0 101201-5131
Mejia, C.Torres (5), Germen (7), Rice (8),
Parnell (8) and d'Arnaud, Recker; Buehrle,
Janssen (5), Santos (6), Stroman (7),Jeffress
(8) and Navarro. W-Jeffress. L-Parnell.
HRs-New York (N), d'Arnaud (3). Toronto,
Bautista (6).

REGULAR SEASON

Sunday's game
Los Angeles at San Diego, 8:05pm
March 31 games
Interleague
Philadelphia (Lee 0-0) atTexas (Darvish 0-0),
2:05 p.m.
National League
Chicago (Samardzija 0-0) at Pittsburgh
(Liriano 0-0), 1:05 p.m.
Washington (Strasburg 0-0) at New York
(TBD), 1:10p.m.
Atlanta (Teheran 0-0) at Milwaukee (Gallar-
do 0-0),2:10p.m.
St. Louis (Wainwright 0-0) at Cincinnati
(TBD), 4:10p.m.
Colorado (De La Rosa 0-0) at Florida (Fer-
nandez 0-0), 7:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Bumgarner 0-0) at Arizona
(TBD), 9:40 p.m.
American League
Kansas City (Shields 0-0) at Detroit (Ver-
lander (0-0), 1:08 p.m.
Boston (TBD) at Baltimore (Tillman 0-0),
3:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Nolasco 0-0) at Chicago (Sale
0-0), 4:10 p.m.
Toronto (Dickey 0-0) at Tampa Bay (Price
0-0), 4:10 p.m.


NDINGS "MLB: "MOORE

NATIONAL LEAGUE I FROM PAGE 1
W L Pct
San Francisco 17 11 .607 assumption is put into
MARLINS 18 12 .600
Pittsburgh 15 10 .600 question.
Washington 15 13 .536 Of the seven hits given
|Arizona 412 a11 522 3 5 ,a .up, none were for extra
Colorado 14 13 .519
NewYork 14 15 483 bases and three came
St. Louis 11 13 .458 from the first three
San Diego 10 12 .455 batters.
Cincinnati 14 17 .452
Chicago 13 18 .419 In addition to his zero
Atlanta 12 18 .400 walks, Moore struck out
Milwaukee 12 18 .400
Milw.a.der a L 05 / Tigers slugger Miguel
Los-Angeles 6 11 .353
Philadelphia 9 18 .333 Cabrera looking, one of
NOTE: Split-squad games count in the his four strikeouts.
standings; games against non-major .-- "It's a little easier to










-------~It' B G E Z C ^i h w as litte.e s ert
league teams do not. S C ,P.
..... T1AE D walk away from a game
Chicago Cubs at Arizona, late like this where I was in
Colorado vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., late
L.A. Angels atL.A.Dodgers, late AP PHOTO maybe
I Oakland at San Francisco, late beat me," Moore said. "I
Today'sgames Detroit's Torii Hunter jumps back to first as Tampa Bay first baseman Wilson Betemit waits on the didn't put them on, put
Minnesota vs. Boston at Fort Myers, 1:05 throw during the third inning of Friday's exhibition game in Lakeland. Detroit won 6-3. them to home plate. You
N.Y Mets vs.Toronto at Montreal, 1:05 p.m. try work around some of
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 1:05 p.m. as t a those base hits, butwe'll
MARLINSvs. N.,.Yankees atTampa, 1:05 be ready for the season."
pm. Tampa Bay manager
Houston vs. Texas at San Antonio, 2:05 p.m.
Detroit atWashington, 2:05 p.m. as me Joe Maddon looked past
Kansas Cityat Milwaukee,2:10 p.m. the four singles and two
pmCSeattlevs ClradoatScottsdale, Ariz, 3:10are a runs Moore surrendered
San Francisco vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 4:05 in the first.
p.m. A r e a t "The ball out of the
Cleveland vs. San Diego at San Diego (Fowl-410rmes, c hand was really good
Chi cago), Cubsat Arzona ,4 10p p Ta again," Maddon said. "Of
L.A Dodgers at LAAngelson, 9: s p.m. Tam lpa Bay re-signs course the mechanics
IA. Dodgersa A. Angels, 9:0 pm. and velocity could have
R EE 4 Bedard and Fontenot-- been little bit sharper,
SESCORES. ad ad e o but I thought physically
By GREG ZECK V he was fine."
YANKEES 3, MARLINS 0 SUN CORRESPONDENT Perhaps the more
AtTampa LAKELAND -A dayafter agreeing important test for Moore
Miami 000 000 000--0 62dg
NewYork(A) 000 100 02x- 3 31 to a new 10-year, $292 million contract, would be how he would
Slowey, Marmol (4), DaJennings (5), A.Ra- Detroit star Miguel Cabrera was the reactt to a ball hit back
mos (6), M.Dunn (7), Cishek (8) and Salta- talk of the park before the Tigers played 'm to him after his outing
lamacchia; Kuroda,Tanaka (4) and McCann, ot t ato er Ma hn fe t against the Red Sox. In
SCervelli. WTanaka. LMarmola. host to Tampa Bay at Joker Marchant again e ed S addon
Stadium. ,the bottom of the second,
PIRATES 3, PHILLIES 0 The deal was the largest signed by /Alex Avila and Rajai Davis
A t P h ila d e lp h ia P a e a h h t g o n e s a
At PhO ila delp 3i,0 an athlete in any sport, surpassing Alex p ... each hit grounders at
Pittsburgh 000 002 0 10 00Moore, and he made the
Philadelphia 000 000 000--0 31 Rodriguez's 10-year, $275 million deal inM o'n ea.
Morton, Grilli (4), Watson (5), Morris (6), 2007. easy play at first on each.
J.Gomez (7),J.Ramos (8), R.Beckman (9)tand As the manager of a team whose totals- Cta't" I imagined it would be
R.Martin, Sanchez; K. Kendrick, Aumont p r slo. s r $ mli.i of na tu t flin ch
(6), Bastardo (6), Rosenberg (7), M. Hollands payroll seldom surpasses $70 million, kind of natural toflinch,"
(8), Diekman (8), Papelbon (9) and C. Ruiz, Tampa Bay manager Joe Maddon AP PHOTO Moore said. "Miguel hit
Nieves. W-Watson L- Aumont. Sv-R. couldn't help chuckling in disbelief. am ByPtr eon b t te trone first pitch to center
Beckan."God fo hi; h's rall god,"Tampa Bay's Patrick Leonard beats the throw
Beckmanv "o od for hom ; the's ra lly good," to Detroit's first baseman Dominic Ficociello field, and it was instinc-
S ROYALS 5, BREWERS 4 Maddon joked. "Heads up Mike Trout." durn the seventh inning Frida in Lakeland tual to give it that little
At Milwaukee,Wis. Maddon debated where Cabrera, who duck. I'm sure it will get
Kansas City 010 310A000- g 81 won the American League Triple Crown Hellickson said. better as we go.
Milwaukee 003 O000 010-4 51 in 2012, ranks among the best hitters Maddon added he
Vargas, K.Herrera (4), S.Patton (5), Crow(6), be Hellicksontookastep forward Frid ay, when histhn hasn't seen anything
Ti.Collins (7),W.Davis (8), G.Holland (9) and in his era, listing names such as Barry programincluded 10-15 throws at 0lo5 feet away. He a added t een a t










IS^erezHayesoGarzadeTho ayrnb thurg (4),d Wangs Kene and P [ a sd ou t of5 the ordinary fromr
S.Perez, Hayes; Garza, Thornburg (4),Wang Bonds,Ken Griffey Jr. andRodriguez. he'll dothat everyotherday for threesessions before out of the ordinary frome e
(6), Duke (8), Henderson (9) and Lucroy, "There's probably about 10 guys, if tedi o ee Moore in that respect.
Maldonado. W-Vargas. L- Garza. Sv-G. extending to 120 feet. o en em o
Holland. HRs-Kansas City, BButler (1). Mil- you sit down pencil to paper, that play "I'mfeeling really god;Hellicksonsaid."l'vebeensaying "He doesn't seem to
waukee, Braun (3). in another stratosphere," Maddon said. Iy eem ooodan he newe the on have any kind of residual
"Ie's def iito ely he topfives ori hope I may feelr"toogd"and have wondered when the soreness neg e cts (
"He's d in the top five or the top will come. But right now, I feel great. I've felt great since two negative effects," Maddon
IN SCHEDULE 10 .... He's really good about setting you days after the surgery" said. "I really think he's
up in a sense." going to be fine."
As for salaries around the league, Bedard returns: Tampa Bay announced it signed
Cleveland (Masterson 0-0) at Oakland Maddon added they were indicative left-handed pitcher Erik Bedard and infielder Mike Fontenot CRABS TICKETS
(TED), 10:05 p.m.CR B TIK S
Seattle (TBD) at Los Angeles (TED), 10:05 of the strength of the game and will to minor league deals on Friday. Bedard spent spring training
p.m. probably continue to go higher. with the Rays, competing for the fifth starter spot that While the Tampa Bay Rays
The money other teams pay their ultimately went to Jake Odorizzi. He was 2-2 with a 6.88 ERA have left the building for the
Calendar players will not affect the Rays, though,. in 17 innings this spring. year, the Charlotte Stone Crabs
"I've never been concerned about Fontenot, 33, was with the Tampa Bay organization last are preparing for their season,
Sunday: Opening day in North America, that," Maddon said. "The subtraction year, spending the season playing forTriple-A Durham. He which begins on Thursday.
Los Angeles Dodgers at San Diego Active of PED's from the game makes it more signed a minor league deal with Washington during the Single-game tickets are on
rosters reduced to 25 players.
June 5: Amateur draft realistic for us to be successful. If those offseason and spent spring training with the Nationals. He sale and can be purchased three
July 15: All-Star game, Minneapolis. were more prominent in the game, was released earlier this week after hitting .105. ways:
July 18: Deadline for amateur draft picks whereas we could not afford those
to sign. inflated numbers, then it would become Extra bases: Joe Maddon did not comment on Charlotte Sports Park
July 27: Hall of Fame inductions, Cooper- more difficult." the final two bullpen spots, but lockers for Josh Lueke and ticket office: Open 9 a.m. to
town, N.Y.
July 31: Last day to trade a player without Brandon Gomes were set up atTropicana Field's clubhouse. 5 p.m. on non-game days or 9
securing waivers. Hellickson continues throwing ... The Rays unveiled minor renovations oflTropicana Field a.m. through end of the game
Sept. 1: Active rosters expand to40players program: Tampa Bay starting pitcher Jeremy Hellickson to media on Friday. Included are freshly painted blue outfield on Monday-Friday and 10 a.m.
Sept. 30: Postseason begins, said he still targets an early June return to the club. walls, a walkway that extends around the entire park and through the end of the game on
Oct. 22: World Series begins.
November TBAc 2 Deadline for teams to The right-hander had elbow surgery in early February a revamped food menu. One new item is the 4-pound"Fan Saturday-Sunday.
make qualifying offers to their eligible for- before camp to remove"Ioose bodies"and originally hoped vs. Food" burger, which, if completed, earns two tickets to a Phone: 941-206-HITS (4487)
mer players who became free agents, fifth to return to the team in mid-May. future game and a T-shirt. .... The Rays announced a sellout
Series. Online: stonecrabsbaseball.com
day after World Seie."June 1 is probably the earliest I would get out there," for opening day for the ninth consecutive year.


* MLB NOTEBOOK


League, players agree on \DRUGPOLICY
HIGHLIGHTS


* Penalties increased from 50
to 80 games for first criminal
conviction involving PEDs and
from 100 to 162 for second.
* An arbitrator will be allowed
to reduce a suspension for a
first or second testing violation
by up to 50 percent if a player
proves by"clear and convincing
evidence"that a positive test
was not caused by his"signifi-
cant fault or negligence."
* Penalties may not be cut for
muscle-building substances
such as testosterone, human
growth hormone, Boldenone,
Nandrolone, Stanozolol. Gonad-
otropins and Anti-Estrogens.
* Increases in-season random
urine tests from 1,400 to 3,200
annually, in addition to the 1,200
mandatory random urine tests
during season and 1,200 during
spring training. Offseason urine
tests increased from 250 to 350.
* Increases random blood tests
for human growth hormone to
400 annually, in addition to the
1,200 spring training blood tests
* Didehydroepiandrosterone
(DHEA) added to the banned list.
* Clubs to provide certified
supplements to players year-
round.
-The Associated Press


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK -In the
wake of the Biogenesis
scandal that led to 14
suspensions last summer,
Major League Baseball
and its players' union
announced Friday they
are toughening penal-
ties and increasing the
frequency of testing in the
most substantial revisions
to their drug agreement in
eight years.
Players suspended
during the season for a
performance-enhancing
drug violation will not
be eligible for that year's
postseason. In addition,
discipline will increase
from 50 games to 80 for
a first testing violation
and from 100 games to
a season-long 162 for a
second. A third violation
remains a lifetime ban.
While there were
two-to-four major league
suspensions annually
from 2008-11, the number


increased to 12 in 2012
and 14 players were
penalized following last
year's investigation of the
Biogenesis of America
anti-aging clinic.
New union head Tony
Clark said his members
wanted to make sure "a
player is not coming back
and affecting a change
in the postseason as a
result of the decision that
particular player made
earlier in the year."
Trout, Angels agree on
6-year deal: Mike Trout and Los
Angeles agreed to a $144.5 million
contract that runs through 2020.
A news conference is planned for
today. Trout agreed on Feb. 26 to a $1
million, one-year contract for 2014.
His new deal runs from 2015-20. The
outfielder would have been eligible
for arbitration for the first time after
this season.

Cabrera deal incorpo-
rates existing contract: In
Lakeland, Triple Crown winner Miguel
Cabrera agreed to the richest contract
in American sports, a $292 million,


10-year deal with Detroit."l want to
finish my career here. I have worked
hard to get better, and Detroit is like
a house for me,"Cabrera said. Cabrera
has won the last two AL MVP awards,
and Tigers general manager Dave
Dombrowski said: "He's on track to
be one of the greatest players in the
history of baseball."Cabrera was due
$44 million over the final two years of
his $152.3 million, eight-year contract.
The new deal incorporates that money
and adds $248 million guaranteed over
the following eight years.
Around the nation: Barry
Bonds, Dick Groat and Jim Leyland will
participate in ceremonies honoring
Pittsburgh's award winners last season:
Andrew McCutcheon (MVP), Clint
Hurdle (manager) and Pedro Alvarez
and McCutcheon (Silver Sluggers).
... Philadelphia placed pitcher Cole
Hamels on the 15-day disabled list,
retroactive to March 21. ... Grady
Sizemore will start in center field for
Boston on opening day, completing
his comeback from a series of injuries
that kept him out of the majors since
September 2011. Jackie Bradley Jr. was
sent to Triple-A Pawtucket.


SMLBROUNDUP


Red S(


out Ml
BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FORT MYERS Mike
Napoli hit a solo homer
to help Boston defeat
Minnesota 4-0 on Friday.
The Red Sox gave
Grady Sizemore the
day off after telling the
oft-injured three-time
All-Star that he will be
their starting center field
on opening day. He has
not played in the big
leagues since 2011.
Red Sox starter Felix
Doubront struck out
seven and gave up seven
hits and two walks in five
innings. He improved his
spring ERA from 9.64 to
7.11 in five appearances.
Phil Hughes struck out
two, walked one and gave
up four runs and four hits
in 51/3 innings in his final
spring tuneup for the
Twins. He finished spring
training with a 4.74 ERA
in five appearances.

Blue Jays 5, Mets 4: In
Montreal, pinch-hitter Ricardo Nanita


ox shut


nnesota
singled with two out in the ninth
inning to lift Toronto at Olympic
Stadium. A crowd of 46,121 turned
out for the first baseball game at
the Big 0 since the Montreal Expos'
farewell game on Sept. 24, 2004 -
as much to show the world they want
Major League Baseball back and to
pay tribute to former catcher Gary
Carter as to watch an exhibition game.

Pirates 3, Phillies 0: In
Philadelphia, Neil Walker had three
hits and an RBI to lead Pittsburgh.
Pirates starter Charlie Morton allowed
one hit in three scoreless innings,
striking out one.

Yankees 3, Marlins 0:
In Tampa, Masahiro Tanaka struck
out 10 and allowed three hits in
six innings for NewYork. In five
exhibition games, Tanaka gave up
five runs and struck out 26 over 21
innings.

Royals 5, Brewers 4: In
Milwaukee, Brewers outfielder Ryan
Braun homered and doubled in his
first public appearance at Miller Park
since his doping suspension, but
Milwaukee lost.


tougher drug penalties







The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014 www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 5


* NFL NOTEBOOK




Jones-Drew returns home


Ex-Jaguar signs w ith O akland; memorabilia, exhibits and a guest- Vick signed with the NewYork Jets
book to allow fans to pay tribute to last Friday.

Eagles release star receiver the Hall of Fame owner, who founded
the former American Football League Player signing: Pittsburgh
BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS rushing and 68 touch- franchise in 1959. and free agent running back
downs for Jacksonville The 95-year-old Wilson died LeGarette Blount agreed on a
ALAMEDA, Calif. but was hampered by Tuesday at his home in Grosse Pointe two-year contract that will give the
ree agent running back injuries the past two sea- Shores, Mich. A private funeral team depth in the backfield behind
[aurice Jones-Drew is sons. That led the Jaguars service will be held in Detroit today, budding star Le'Veon Bell....


coming back home to
Oakland after signing a
three-year contract with
the Raiders on Friday.
Jones-Drew returns to
his native Bay Area after
spending his first eight
seasons with Jacksonville
and starring in college at
UCLA.
Jones-Drew was ham-
pered by injuries and
poor play his final two
seasons with the Jaguars.
He had 8,071 yards


I SCOREBOARD


Sports on TV
AUTO RACING
10a.m.
FS1 -NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practicefor STP
500, at Martinsville,Va.
11a.m.
FS1 NASCAR, Truck Series, pole qualify-
ing for KROGER 250, at Martinsville,Va.
2:30 p.m.
FS1 NASCAR, Truck Series, KROGER 250,
at Martinsville,Va.
8p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, qualifying for SummitRac-
ing.com Nationals, at Las Vegas (same-day
tape)
3:30 a.m.
NBCSN Formula One, Malaysia Grand
Prix, at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
BOXING
10p m.
HBO Junior welterweights, Karim May-
field (18-0-1) vs. Thomas Dulorme (20-1-0);
champion Sergey Kovalev (23-0-0) vs. Ce-
dric Agnew (26-0-0), for WBO light heavy-
weight title, at Atlantic City, NJ.
COLLEGE BASEBALL
2p.m.
FSN -Florida Atlantic at Rice
GOLF
1 p.m.
TGC PGATour, Texas Open, third round,
at San Antonio
3p.m.
NBC PGATour,Texas Open, third round,
at San Antonio
7p.m.
TGC LPGA, Kia Classic, third round, at
Carlsbad, Calif.
HORSE RACING
1 p.m.
FS1 Thoroughbreds, Dubai World Cup,
at Dubai, United Arab Emirates
6:30 p.m.
NBCSN -Thoroughbreds, Florida Derby, at
Hallandale Beach, Fla.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
3p.m.
CBS NCAA Division II playoffs, champi-
onship, Central Missouri vs.West Liberty, at
Evansville, Ind.
6p.m.
TBS NCAA Division I tournament, re-
gional final, Florida vs. Dayton, at Memphis,
Tenn.
8:30 p.m.
TBS NCAA Division I tournament, re-
gional final, Arizona vs. Wisconsin, at Ana-
heim, Calif.
MEN'S COLLEGE HOCKEY
3p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA Division I playoffs, East Re-
gional final, at Bridgeport, Conn.
5:30p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA Division I playoffs, West
Regional semifinal, Minnesota vs. Robert
Morris, at St. Paul, Minn.
MEN'S COLLEGE LACROSSE
6p.m.
FS1 -St. John's at Providence
MOTORSPORTS
8:30 p.m.
FS1 -AMA Supercross, at St. Louis
NBA
8:30 p.m.
SUN-PLUS -Miami at Milwaukee
NHL
SUN Tampa Bay at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
FSFL Montreal at Florida, 7 p.m.
SOCCER
8:30 a.m.
NBCSN Premier League, Aston Villa at
Manchester United
10:55 a.m.
NBCSN Premier League, Chelsea at Crys-
tal Palace
1:25 p.m.
NBCSN Premier League, Manchester
City at Arsenal
4p.m.
NBCSN MLS, Chicago at D.C. United
TENNIS
1 p.m.
ESPN2 ATP World Tour/WTA, SonyOpen,
women's championship, at Key Biscayne,
Fla.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
ESPN NCAA Division I tournament, re-
gional semifinal, Kentucky vs. Baylor, at
South Bend, Ind.
2:30 p.m.
ESPN NCAA Division I tournament, re-
gional semifinal, Notre Dame vs. Oklahoma
St.,at South Bend,Ind.
4:30 p.m.
ESPN NCAA Division I tournament, re-
gional semifinal, Connecticut vs. BYU, at
Lincoln, Neb.
7p.m.
ESPN NCAA Division I tournament, re-
gional semifinal, DePaul vs. Texas A&M, at
Lincoln, Neb.

Auto racing
NASCAR-SPRINT CUP STP 500
After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At Martinsville Speedway
Martinsville, Va.
Lap length .526 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (18) Kyle BuschToyota, 99.674 mph.
2. (11) DennyHamlin,Toyota, 99.548.
3. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 99.428.
4. (48) JimmieJohnson, Chevrolet, 99.178.
5. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 99.048.
6. (20) Matt KensethToyota, 99.048.
7. (14)(Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 98.883.
8. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 98.846.
9. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 98.625.
10. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 98.165.
11.(16) Greg Biffle, Ford,97.764.
12. (15) Clint BowyerToyota, 97.382.
13. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 98.965.
14. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 98.929.
15. (47)AJ AIImendinger,Chevrolet, 98.888.
16. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 98.877.
17. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 98.712.


to let him test the market
in free agency after his
five-year, $31 million
contract expired.
Jones-Drew was born
in Oakland and starred at
nearby De La Salle high
school.

Bills to hold Wilson
memorial: The Buffalo Bills will
honor late owner Ralph Wilson with a
public celebration and remembrance
at the team's fieldhouse on April 5.
The event will feature


Eagles release Jackson:
Philadelphia cut Jackson despite his
coming offa career-best season in
Philadelphia, one in which he led
the team with 82 catches for 1,332
yards and nine touchdowns. Jackson
had a $10.25 million contract for this
season, a price the Eagles were not
willing to pay. Earlier in the day, the
Eagles held a news conference to
introduce quarterback Mark Sanchez,
who signed late Thursday. The
signing effectively means Sanchez
and Michael Vick have swapped jobs.


18. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 98.707. Evansville at Orlando, 7p.m.
19.(23) Alex Bowman,Toyota, 98.661. Cincinnati at Florida, 7 p.m.
20. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 98.625. FortWayne at South Carolina, 7:05 p.m.
21.(27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 98.61. Reading at Elmira, 7:05 p.m.
22. (41) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 98.61. Greenville at Gwinnett, 7:05 p.m.
23.(13) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 98599. Toledo at Kalamazoo, 7:30 p.m.
24. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 98.599. Stockton at Ontario, 9 p.m.
25. (51)Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 98.43. Utah at Colorado, 9:05 p.m.
26. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr, Chevrolet, AlaskaatLasVegas, 10:05 p.m.
98.379.
27. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 98.359. AHL
28.(42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 98.333. Thursday's results
29.(32)Travis Kvapil, Ford, 98.246. No games scheduled
30. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 98.206. Friday's results
31.(78) Martin TruexJr., Chevrolet, 98.2. Abbotsford 2, Utica 1, OT
32. (95) Michael McDowell, Ford, 98.002. Syracuse 6, Adirondack 4
33. (98) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 97.957. Hershey4,Albany1
34.(3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 97.886. Manchester 5, Worcester 1
S35.(26) ColeWhitt,Toyota,97.82. Springfield 6, Hartford 1
36. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 97.759. Providence 6, Portland 5
37. (33) David Stremme, Chevrolet, owner Toronto4, Rochester 2
points. Binghamton 2, St.John's 1
38. (83) Ryan TruexToyota, owner points. Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 2, Norfolk 1
39. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, owner points. Milwaukee 4, Lake Erie 3
40. (7) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, owner Rockford 5, Grand Rapids 4
points. Hamilton at San Antonio, late
41. (30) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, owner I Today'sgames
points. IowaatToronto,3 p.m.
42. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, owner I Worcester atAlbany,5 p.m.
Points St.John'satHershey, 7 p.m.
43. (66) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, owner Springfield at Adirondack, 7p.m.
points Oklahoma Cityat Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Failed to Qualify Manchester at Portland, 7 p.m.
44. (35) David Reutimann, Ford, 97.759. Binghamton at Syracuse, 7 p.m.
Rockford at Grand Rapids, 7 p.m.
Pro bke tb all Bridgeport at Hartford, 7 p.m.
P basket all |Abbotsford at Utica, 7 p.m.
NB |Wilkes-Barre/Scranton at Norfolk, 7:15 p.m.
NBA Hamilton atTexas,8 p.m.
Thursday's results Lake Erie at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Portland 100, Atlanta 85
Houston 120, Philadelphia 98 C h c
Milwaukee 108, L.A. Lakers 105 College hockey
L.A. Clippers 109, Dallas 103
Friday's results DIVISION I CHAMPIONSHIP
Orlando 110, Charlotte 105, OT NORTHEAST REGIONAL
Washington 91, Indiana 78 At DCU Center, Worcester, Mass.
Toronto 105, Boston 103 Today'sgames
Brooklyn 108, Cleveland 97 Boston College (26-7-4) vs. Denver (20-15-
Miami 110, Detroit 78 6),4 p.m.
Portland 91,Chicago 74 UMass-Lowell (25-10-4) vs. Minnesota
IPortland 91, Chicago 74I T i^
Minnesota 143, L.A. Lakers 107 State-Mankato (26-13-1),7:30 p.m.
Minnesota 143,L.A. Lakers 107Sudysgm
Oklahoma City94, Sacramento 81 Smf wSunday's game
New rlens 02,Uta 95Semifinal winners, 5 p.m.
I New Orleans 102, Utah 95
San Antonio at Denver, late EAST REGIONAL
SNewYorkat Phoenix, late AtWebster BankArena, Bridgeport.
Memphis at Golden State, late Friday's results
Today's games Union (N.Y.) 5,Vermont 2
Providence 4, Quinnipiac 0
Detroit at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m. Providence 4, Qu piac
L.A. Clippers at Houston, 8 p.m. Today's game
Atlanta atWashington, 8 p.m. Union (29-6-4) vs. Providence (22-10-6),3
Sacramento at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. pm
Miami at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m. MIDWEST REGIONAL
New Orleans at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m. At U.S. BankArena, Cincinnati
SN Friday's results
Ferris State 1, ColgateO0
Pro hockey Wisconsin vs. North Dakota, late
Today's game
NHL Semifinal winners, 6:30 p.m.
S Thursday's results WEST REGIONAL
Phoenix 3, NewJersey 2,SO At Xcel Energy Center, St. Paul, Minn.
LIGHTNING 3, N.Y. Islanders 2, SO Today's games
Boston 3, Chicago 0 Minnesota (25-6-6) vs. Robert Morris (19-
Los Angeles 3, Pittsburgh 2 17-5), 5:30 p.m.
Montreal 5, Detroit 4 Notre Dame (23-14-2) vs. St. Cloud State
Carolina 3, PANTHERS 0 (21-10-5),9 p.m.
St. Louis 5, Minnesota 1 Sunday's game
Nashville 6, Buffalo 1 Semifinal winners, 7:30 p.m.
I Colorado 3,Vancouver 2, OT
Winnipeg4,San^ e College 3
Friday's resuIts College baseball
Philadelphia 4,Toronto 2 EAST
Pittsburgh 2, Columbusl1 Felician 5,Bloomfield 1-7
Ottawa 5, Chicago 3
Nashville at Dallas, late Mount St.Vincent 13-24,Yeshiva 0-0
N.Y.Ranersat Clgay, ateSlippery Rock 3-7, California (Pa.) 1-6, 2nd
N Y Rangers at Calgary, late
Anaheim at Edmonton, late ie R 7Cng6
SOUTH
SToday'sgames Brescia 7-1, Indiana-Southeast 0-3
Boston t Wshington, 1230pm Cedarville 7-4, KentuckyWesleyan 3-19
San Jose at Colorado, 3p.m. Clemson 37, Maryland 1
|LIGHTNINGat Buffalo,7 m. |^ ^ : en
LIGHTNING at Buffalo, 7 p.m. Davidson 5, Georgia Southern 2
Detroit atToronto, 7p.m. Duke 3, North Carolina 2
; ^eJ l l0^:7: Duke 3, North Carolina 2
Montreal at PANTHERS, 7 p.m. Florida St. 6-11, Boston College 0-7
New Jerseyat N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m. Louisville8,Xavier 1
ColumbusatCarolina,7p.m. Miami 1, NC State 1, 6 innings, susp.
Dallas at St. Louis, 8 p.m. weather
Minnesota at Phoenix, 9 p.m. MiddleTennessee 3, Rice 2
Anaheim at Vancouver, 10p.m. Morehead St. 12, Belmont 2
Winnipeg at Los Angeles, 10p.m. Old Dominion 7, Charlotte 2
Friday's late summary Pittsburgh 4, Georgia Tech 3,13 innings
LIGHTNING 3, ISLANDERS 2 Reinhardt 7, Bryan 4,10 innings
SE Missouri 13, UT-Martin 0
NY Islanders 0 2 0 0- 2 TreveccaNazarene3-9,Salemlntrntnl0-4
LIGHTNING 0 1 1 0 3 Vir:inia2,VirginiaTech1
'*0""''0 --- i 3 ;Virginia 2, Virginia Tech 1
LIGHTNING won shootout 5-4 MIDWEST
First Period-None. Doane 2-4, Northwestern (Iowa) 1-2
Second Period-1, LIGHTNING,Callahan Ohio 5,Western Michigan 3
14 (Gudas, Filppula), :29.2, N.Y. Islanders, SOUTHWEST
Strome 5 (Martin, Donovan), 1:33. 3, N.Y. Oklahoma Christian 4-3, McMurry 2-4
Islanders, Donovan 2 (Nielsen,A.Lee), 9:17. Oklahoma Baptist9-2,Wayland BaptistO -1
Third Period-4, LIGHTNING, Callahan St.Edward's6-10,TexasA&M-lntrntnl0-3
15 (Brewer), 5:50. Texas-Dallas6,Sul Ross St. 5
I Overtime-None. UTSA 3, Louisiana Tech 2
Shootout-N.Y. Islanders 4 (Strome NG, WEST
Nielsen G, Nelson G, Bailey NG, Clutterbuck New Mexico 13, Air Force 8
I NG, Martin NG, McDonald G, A.Lee NG, Seattle6,Texas-Pan American 5
Persson NG, Hickey NG, Cizikas G, Halmo
NG, Sundstrom NG),Tampa Bay 5 (Malone f t ll
NG, KostkaG, PalatG, Callahan NG, Filppula r oo ll
NG, Hedman NG, Stamkos G, Kucherov NG, AFL
Purcell NG, TJohnson NG, Carle G, Killorn Iy a
;NGSaI nG('Today's games
NG, Salo G).
Shots on Goal-N.Y. Islanders 9-12-4- SanJoseatPittsburgh,Spm
G San Antonio atJacksonville, 7p.m.
2-27. LIGHTNING 8-9-10-4-31. Goal- an at
I .YS ~ ov TN :; Orlando atTampa Bay,7:30 p.m.
ies-N.Y. Islanders, Nabokov. LIGHTNING, Celand Tampa Bay,730pm
Bishop. A-1-8,554 (19,204). T-2:49. at NewOrleans,8 pm
I ECHLr ,IPro soccer
Thursday's result
Orlando 5, Evansville 3 MLS
Friday's results Today's games
Wheeling 5,Toledo 3 Chicago at D.C. United, 4 p.m.
Greenville 4, Gwinnett 3 Montreal at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
FortWayne 7, South Carolina 4 Sporting Kansas Cityat Colorado, 6p.m.
Reading 4, Elmira 1 Houston at Vancouver, 7 p.m.
Cincinnati 5, Florida 2 Portland at FC Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Utah at Colorado, late Toronto FC at Real Salt Lake, 9:30 p.m.
Ontario at Bakersfield, late Columbus at Seattle FC, 10 p.m.
SAlaska at LasVegas, late New England at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Idaho at Stockton, late Sunday's game
i Today'sgames ChivasUSAatNewYork,3p.m.


Denver signed backup offensive
tackle Winston Justice to a one-year
deal. Justice was brought in early last
season after All-Pro left tackle Ryan
Clady was placed on injured reserve
with a foot injury. ...
Washington signed free agent
offensive lineman Mike McGlynn,
who can play center and both guard
positions. He's started 48 games over
five NFL seasons with Philadelphia,
Cincinnati and Indianapolis ...
San Francisco re-signed
cornerback Perrish Cox to a one-year
contract.


ta



















te


r










r







r





















r








r


HEAT AT BUCKS


Tennis
SONY OPEN
At The Tennis Center at Crandon Park,
Key Biscayne
Purse: Men, $5.65 million (Masters
1000);Women, $5.43 million (Premier)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Singles
Men
Semifinals
Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, def. Kei Nishi-
kori (20), Japan, walkover.
Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, def. Tomas
Berdych (7), Czech Republic, walkover.

Glantz-Culver Line
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
National League
Tomorrow
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
LosAngeles -120 atSanDiego +110
NCAA TOURNAMENT
At Memphis, Tenn.
FAVORITE LINEO/U UNDERDOG
Florida 10(1321/2) Dayton
At Anaheim, Calif.
Arizona 3 (130) Wisconsin
NBA
FAVORITE LINEO/U UNDERDOG
Detroit 81/2 (209) at Philadelphia
atWashington 6 (2041/2) Atlanta
atHouston 3 (2111/2) L.A. Clippers
at Dallas 91/2 (210) Sacramento
at San Antonio 11 (205) NewOrleans
Miami 10 (202) atMilwaukee
NHL
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
Boston -130 atWashington +110
San Jose -125 at Colorado +105
at Carolina -125 Columbus +105
atToronto -115 Detroit -105
TampaBay -230 atBuffalo +190
NewJersey -140 at N.Y Islanders +120
Montreal -175 at Florida +155
at St. Louis -220 Dallas +180
at Phoenix -130 Minnesota +110
at Los Angeles -200 Winnipeg +170
Anaheim -120 atVancouver +100

Transactions
BASEBALL
American League
BOSTON RED SOX-Optioned OFJack-
ie BradleyJr, LHP Drake Britton and C Ryan
Lavarnwayto Pawtucket (IL).
DETROIT TIGERS Agreed to terms
with 1B Miguel Cabrera on a 10-year con-
tract.
SEATTLE MARINERS Optioned RHPs
Blake Beavan and Brandon Maurer, LHP
Lucas Luetge and INF Nick Franklin to Ta-
coma (PCL). Reassigned RHPs Zach Min-
er, Dominic Leone, Ramon Ramirez and
Carson Smith; C Humberto Quintero; and
OF Endy Chavez to minor league camp.
Selected the contracts of LHPs Roenis Elias
and Joe Beimel from Tacoma. Designated
OF Xavier Avery and INF CarlosTriunfel for
assignment.
TEXAS RANGERS Claimed C Chris
Gimenez off waivers from Oakland. Des-
ignated LHP Michael Kirkman for assign-
ment.
National League
CHICAGO CUBS Released 2B Ryan
Roberts.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Optioned
RHP Jonathan Pettibone to Lehigh Valley
(IL).
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS Assigned OF
Joey Butler outright to Memphis (PCL). Pur-
chased the Memphis Redbirds (PCL).
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NBA Fined Brooklyn G Jorge Gutier-
rez $15,000 for making excessive contact
above the shoulders during Wednesday's
game.
NEW JERSEY NETS Signed G Jorge
Gutierrez to a multiyear contract.
SACRAMENTO KINGS Signed F-C
Willie Reed for the remainder of the season.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
OAKLAND RAIDERS Signed RB Mau-
rice Jones-Drew and DLCJ.Wilson.
PHILADELPHIA EAGLES Released
WR DeSean Jackson. Signed QB Mark San-
chez to a one-year contract.
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS Re-signed
CB Perrish Cox to a one-year contract.
WASHINGTON REDSKINS-- Signed OL
Mike McGlynn.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
PITTSBURGH PENGUINS Assigned
G Eric Hartzell from Wilkes-Barre/Scranton
(AHL) to Wheeling (ECHL).
SAN JOSE SHARKS Reassigned F
Freddie Hamilton toWorcester (AHL).
TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING Assigned
F Danick Gauthier from Syracuse (AHL) to
Florida (ECHL).
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
COLORADO RAPIDS Signed G Clint
Irwin and D Chris Klute.
L.A. GALAXY Loaned G Brian Rowe, F
Chandler Hoffman and DTommy Meyer to
L.A. Galaxy II (USL PRO).
TORONTO FC Signed M Issey Nakaji-
ma-Farran.
National Women's Soccer League
CHICAGO RED STARS Signed M/D
Julie Johnston, MVanessa Di Bernardo and
F Hayley Brock.
COLLEGE
CARSON-NEWMAN Named Randy
Wylie men's golf coach.
EAST TENNESSEE STATE Named
Adegboyega Oshoniyi men's soccer coach.
GEORGE WASHINGTON Signed
men's basketball coach Mike Lonergan to
a contract extension through the 2020-21
season.


RAPTORS AT MAGIC


WHO: Miami (49-22) at WHO: Toronto (36-37) at Orlando
Milwaukee (14-58) (21-52)
WHEN: Today, 8:30 p.m. WHEN: Sunday, 6 p.m.
WHERE: BMO Harris Bradley WHERE: Amway Center, Orlando
Center, Milwaukee, Wisconsin TV: Fox Sports Florida
TV: SUN Plus RADIO: 1010 AM, 1280 AM
RADIO: 99.3 FM TICKETS: Ticketmaster.com



* NBA:



James' big night



powers Miami


ByLARRYLAGE
ASSOCIATED PRESS

AUBURN HILLS,
Mich. LeBron James
produced 17 points, 12
assists and 10 rebounds
to help Miami build a
big lead before he rested
in the fourth quarter of
a 110-78 victory against
Detroit on Friday.
It was James' first tri-
ple-double of the season
and 37th of his career. It
also was the fourth time
he accomplished the feat
without playing in the
fourth quarter.
James' last triple-dou-
ble through three quar-
ters was Jan. 27, 2009,
for Cleveland against
Sacramento, according to
STATS.
The banged-up Heat
had little trouble with the
Pistons even though they
were without Dwyane
Wade, Mario Chalmers,
Ray Allen and Greg
Oden. They had plenty of
players make up for the


losses.
Udonis Haslem scored
12 of his 17 points in the
first quarter, when James
already had seven assists.
Chris Bosh scored 15,
Chris Andersen had 13
points, Norris Cole scored
12 and James Jones added
10 for Miami.

HEAT 110, PISTONS 78
MIAMI (110)
James 7-13 2-2 17, Bosh 6-10 1-1 15,
Haslem 8-11 1-2 17, Douglas 3-7 3-4 9,
Jones3-81-2 10,Cole4-93-5 12, Lewis4-6
0-0 9, Andersen 4-65-613, Battier 3-6 0-0 6,
Hamilton 0-1 0-0 0, Beasley 1-2 0-0 2.Totals
43-7916-22110.
DETROIT (78)
Smith 4-14 0-0 9, Monroe 5-14 2-4 12,
Drummond 4-7 1-2 9, Jennings 2-8 4-6
8, Singler 4-9 3-3 11, Stuckey 4-7 0-0 8,
Jerebko 3-7 0-0 6, Caldwell-Pope 1-4 0-0 3,
Bynum 3-5 5-6 12, Siva 0-2 0-0 0, Datome
0-2 0-0 0, Mitchell 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 30-79
15-21 78.
Miami 28 29 35 18-110
Detroit 23 19 18 18 78
3-Point Goals-Miami 8-19 (Jones 3-6,
Bosh 2-3, Lewis 1-2, Cole 1-2, James 1-3,
Hamilton 0-1, Battier 0-2), Detroit 3-24
(Caldwell-Pope 1-3, Bynum 1-3, Smith 1-5,
Stuckey 0-1, Siva 0-2, Jerebko 0-2,Jennings
0-4, Singler 0-4). Fouled Out-None. Re-
bounds-Miami 57 (James 10), Detroit
40 (Drummond 14). Assists-Miami 31
(James 12), Detroit 20 (Jennings 7). Total
Fouls-Miami 14, Detroit 22. Technicals-
Jennings, Detroit defensive three second.
A-21,231 (22,076).


Nets 108, Cavaliers 97:
In NewYork, Paul Pierce scored 17
of his 22 points in the first quarter,
and Brooklyn won its 12th in a row
at home.

Raptors 105, Celtics 103:
In Toronto, Amir Johnson scored the
winning basket with 7 seconds left,
and Toronto clinched its first playoff
berth in six seasons. DeMar DeRozan
scored 30 points as the Raptors won
for the 18th time in 24 home games.

Wizards 91, Pacers 78:
In Washington, John Wall scored 20
points for Washington, which lost its
first two games against the Pacers this
season by a combined 47 points. Of
Washington's three losses by 20-plus
points this season, two have been
against Indiana.

Thunder 94, Kings 81: In
Oklahoma City, Kevin Durant scored 29
points to lead Oklahoma City. Durant
has scored at least 25 points in 37
consecutive games, the longest streak
since Michael Jordan's 40-game run
for Chicago (1986-87).

Pelicans 102, Jazz 95:
In New Orleans, Tyreke Evans had
22 points and 15 assists, and the
short-handed Pelicans overcame the
loss of Anthony Davis to extend their
winning streak to a season-best five
games. Davis left the game with a left
ankle injury less than four minutes in.
I A *


Iimberwoives 14i.s,
Trail Blazers 91, Bulls Lakers 107: In Minneapolis,
74: In Chicago, Mo Williams scored Kevin Love had 22 points, 10 rebounds
18 points to lead five players in double and 10 assists for his second career
figures as Portland won on the road triple-double for Minnesota. Nikola
for a second consecutive night. Carlos Pekovic scored 26 points in his first
Boozer had 16 points and 12 rebounds game back from an ankle injury.


* Rates valid 3/29/


HERON CREEK
. "' ,' .*"*'*' -*... *"; *-"': ^"flr
WEEKEND SPECIALS

$39 before 8am
$59 after 8am-
15 before lpm

.$4 9 after lpm


-.$1 99 4 player special
Call for Twilight Rates
4/30/14. Not vaiid with other offer. 7Day Advance Tee Times (941)423,6955


Fr
M


* NBA ROUNDUP



Orlando outlasts



Charlotte in OT

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS in 24 minutes to lead Chicago.


Q41 2411 H-ion Ci,4,,oni
(,I H.-n C F I vd, N, 1) P- 4 F L '4 2
N 0, t 1, P --,, t t-, B 1, d. I B U S 4 1 & 1 7 E


I


The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 5


I


ORLANDO Nikola
Vucevic scored 24 points
and grabbed 23 rebounds,
and Jameer Nelson had
five points in overtime as
Orlando edged Charlotte
110-105 on Friday.
Aaron Afflalo, who fin-
ished with 17 points, sent
the game into overtime
with a 3-pointer with 7.6
seconds remaining as
Orlando won its second
in a row.
In overtime, Nelson's
3-pointer with 2:26 left
put Orlando ahead for
good.
MAGIC 110, BOBCATS 105
CHARLOTTE (105)
Kidd-Gilchrist 5-11 0-1 10, McRoberts 8-16
2-2 24, Jefferson 10-16 0-0 20,Walker 8-25
6-7 24, Henderson 7-13 0-0 14, Zeller 3-5
3-4 9, Douglas-Roberts 1-5 0-0 2, Ridnour
1-5 0-0 2, Biyombo 0-0 0-0 ,Tolliver 0-10-0
O.Totals43-97 11-14105.
ORLANDO (110)
Harkless 4-6 0-2 9, O'Quinn 5-10 3-5 13,
Vucevic 11-22 2-2 24, Nelson 4-9 0-0 11,
Afflalo 3-9 9-10 17, Nicholson 0-2 0-0 0,
Oladipo 5-12 4-6 14, Harris 5-11 5-6 15,
Moore 1-5 1-2 3, Lamb 1-1 2-2 4.Totals 39-
87 26-35 110.
Charlotte 30 20 31 16 8-105
Orlando 16 25 33 23 13-110
3-Point Goals-Charlotte 8-22 (McRob-
erts 6-12, Walker 2-6, Henderson 0-1, Jef-
ferson 0-1, Douglas-Roberts 0-2), Orlando
6-18 (Nelson 3-6, Afflalo 2-4, Harkless 1-2,
Oladipo 0-2, Harris 0-2, Moore 0-2). Fouled
Out-None. Rebounds-Charlotte 46
(Jefferson 8), Orlando 68 (Vucevic 23). As-
sists-Charlotte 24 (Walker 8), Orlando 17
(Nelson 8). Total Fouls-Charlotte 22, Or-
lando 14. Technicals-Orlando defensive
three second. A-16,003 (18,500).






~Page6 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014


I QUICK HITS


HANYU WINS
WORLD TITLE
SAITAMA, Japan (AP) -
Japanese teenager Yuzuru
Hanyu came back with
a brilliant free skate to
become the first man in
12 years on Friday to win
the Olympic and world
figure skating titles in the
same year.
The 19-year-old Hanyu,
who trailed compatriot
Tatsuki Machida by nearly
seven points after the
world championships
short program, produced
a near-flawless free skate
to finish with 282.59
points, just three-tenths of
a point ahead of Machida.
Javier Fernandez of
Spain was third with
275.93.
Skating to "Romeo
and Juliet," he opened
with a quad salchow and
followed with a quad toe-
loop. His only deduction
came on the triple flip
and he got extra points
on five straight jumps.
In ice dance, European
champions Anna
Cappellini and Luca
Lanotte received 69.70
points to finish first in the
short program. Ekaterina
Bobrova and Dmitri
Soloviev, the top-ranked
Russians, were forced to
withdraw after Soloviev
injured his groin in the
morning practice.
Defending champions
and Olympic gold med-
alists Meryl Davis and
Charlie White were not
taking part. The ice dance
concludes today with the
free dance.

TENNIS
Nadal, Djokovic set for
final: In Key Biscayne, Rafael Nadal
and Novak Djokovic advanced to the
Sony Open final without playing a
point. Both advanced when their
semifinal opponents withdrew for
health reasons. They'll play for the
title Sunday in their 40th career


meeting and their first of 2014.
Djokovic received walkover for the
second time in the tournament when
Kei Nishikori withdrew because of
a left groin injury. Four hours later,
Tomas Berdych withdrew before
his match against Nadal because of
gastroenteritis.
The women's final between Serena
Williams and Li Na is today.

JUDICIARY
Pistorius trial delayed: The
murder trial of Oscar Pistorius in Pretoria,
South Africa, has been delayed until April
7 because one of the legal experts who
will assist the judge in reaching a verdict
is sick, abruptly ending expectations
that the double-amputee athlete was
about to testify on his fatal shooting of
girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp.
Judge Thokozile Masipa announced
the delay in court on the day Pistorius'
defense lawyers were due to begin
presenting their case after four weeks
of prosecution-led testimony and a
two-day adjournment.

CYCLING
Mezgec wins stage win;
Rodriguez leads Volta:
Slovenian cyclist Luka Mezgec earned
his third stage win of this Volta a
Catalunya in Vails, Spain, edging the
pack in the final sprint.
Joaquim Rodriguez maintained the
overall lead, with the 218-kilometer
(134-mile) ride from Llanars Vail de
Camprodon to Vails producing no
changes at the top of the general
classification. Mezgec, riding for Giant-
Shimano, finished the stage in 5 hours,
16 minutes at the front of a large pack.
He also won the two opening stages of
the seven-day race with sprint finishes.

OLYMPICS
Killy resigns from IOC:
French ski great Jean-Claude Killy
has resigned as a member of the
International Olympic Committee,
declaring it's time to move on after
spending the past seven years
heading the oversight panel for
the Winter Games in Sochi. The
70-year-old said he completed his
mission of helping deliver successful
Olympics in Russia and defended
his close working relationship with
President Vladimir Putin, calling him
"a good man'."


SUN PHOTO BY R.C. GREENWOOD
North Port High School's Calvin Hough connects on a Palm Harbor pitch during Friday's doubleheader in North Port.


BOBCATS

FROM PAGE 1
run and Glenney clubbed a double
to score the second run.
The Hurricanes came back with
one run in the top of the fourth
inning and three runs in the fifth to
take a 4-2 advantage.
But the Bobcats scored three
times in the fifth inning to gain the
victory. Sheldon and Nick Brown
both had hits in the inning.
Nate Burke was the starting
pitcher for the Bobcats. He went


TARPONS

FROM PAGE 1
at third, who scored.
After a walk, Viscusi
hit a fly ball to left
that Kendall Chavarria
dropped for another run,
making it 4-0.
Sunnarborg settled in
and retired eight straight
batters before a base hit
and walk ended her night
in the fifth. Julie Dedrick
came in and, after anoth-
er error loaded the bases,
allowed Taylor Long to
score on a wild pitch to


PREP SCHEDULE
TODAY
Baseball
Venice at National High School Invitational,
Cary, N.C., TBA

three innings and was followed by
Zac Uecker, who pitched two in-
nings for the win. Glenney pitched
the final inning.
"We found a way to win games,"
North Port coach Dan Pavlue said.
"We're still looking to improve our
play. This was a good way to finish


make it 5-0.
Charlotte (8-11)
rallied in the fifth as the
Churchmen committed
three errors, including a
double error off the bat
of Rebecca Baldwin to get
the Tarpons on the board
at 5-2. Jessie Valerius
lined an RBI single off
third baseman Ariana
Feliciani's glove to cut the
lead to two.
But Viscusi retired the
last seven batters.
Charlotte coach Greg
Higgins said his team was
a little flat and jittery at
the start and couldn't "get


the mojo" back until the
fifth inning.
"We gave them extra
outs and that was the
ballgame against a
good pitcher," Charlotte
coach Greg Higgins said.
"Once we gave those
up and adjusted to her
and made our own luck,
we were okay. But you
can't spot someone four
runs."
EPISCOPAL ACADEMY 5, CHARLOTTE 3
Episcopal 220 010 0-553
Charlotte 000 030 0-324
Alex Viscusi and Gabby Donatucci; Courtney
Sunnarborg,Julie Dedrick (5) and JessieValeri-
us.W:Viscusi. L: Sunnarborg: Leading hitters:
Donatucci 2-4,2B,2 RBI;Taylor Long 1-3,run.


after losing last night. (8-0 against
Hardee)."

NORTH PORT 5, PALM HARBOR 4
First game
PalmHarbor 000 130 0 4 8 1
North Port 002 030 X 5 4 2
Shane Mullen, Andrew Bartolotti (4), Clay Moran (5) and
Ethan Olivero; Nate Burke, Zac Uecker (4),Travis Glenney (6)
and ClarkTrembley and Dominic LeFever (5). W: Uecker. L:
Bartolotti. Leading hitters: Glenney (NP) 2-3,2B, RBI; Dan-
ny Hasier (NP) 1-2,2 runs.
NORTH PORT 3, PALM HARBOR 0
Second game
Palm Harbor 000 000 0 0 5 1
North Port 000 201 X 3 7 0
Clayton Moran, Brian Auerbach (4) and Ethan Olivero; Chris
Guilbault and Clark Trembley W: Guilbault. L: Auerbach.
Leading hitters: Travis Glenney (NP) 2-3, run; Jacob Shel-
don (NP) 2-3, RBI.


MANTAS ROUT 'CATS
Lemon Bay 10, Hardee
2: In Wauchula, Lemon Bay is tied
for first place in Distict 5A-11 after
an easy win. The Manta Rays scored
three in the third, then took control in
the fourth with seven more. Ashton
Werden went the distance, allowing
two runs on eight hits. Kasi Shafer and
Danielle Koche combined for five hits,
each doubling and driving in two runs.

LEMON BAY 10, HARDEE 2
LemonBay 003 700 0-1014 0
Hardee 000 200 0- 2 8 1
Aston Werden and Brooke Clemens. Karlee
Henderson, Alex Ullrich (4) and Makayla
Deuberry. W: Werden. L: Henderson. Top
hitters: Kasi Shafer 3-4 2B 2 RBI, Danielle
Koche2-42B2RBI.


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Flexability Assessment
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:Page 6 SP


www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Saturday, March 29, 2014





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A special section of the Sun family of newspapers 4!., Serving readers along the Southwest Florida coast


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^ I !l IIII1 ,IIl l .il I Hie


-M I

23170 Harborview Road
Port Charlotte, FL 33980

PUBLISHER
JOSH OLIVE
941-276-9657
Publisher@WaterLineWeekly.com

EDITOR
LEEANDERSON
239-292-9230
Editor@WaterLineWeekly.com

MARKETING
Advertising Director
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& SUBSCRIPTIONS
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CONTRIBUTORS
Capt. Ralph Alien
Dr. Mark Asperilla, MD
Abbie Banks
Greg Bartz
Jared Brimer
Billy Carl
Capt. Josh Greer
Bill Hempel
Capt. Van Hubbard
Ryan Ingle
Robin Jenkins, DVM
Jeff Kincaid
Dawn Klemish
Robert Lugiewicz
Nicole Miers-Pandolfi
Capt. Mike Myers
Capt. Dan Sansiveri
Betty Staugler
Matt Stevens
Bryan Stockbridge
Tony Towns
Capt. Cayle Wills
Walter W. Wilt

Produced & printed by
Sun Coast Media Group
Some of WaterLine's subject matter con-
sists of the writers'opinions. We do our
best to be accurate in matters of fact in
this publication, but matters of opinion
are left to each individual author.

MU@M
WaterLine photo by Josh Olive
There's a lot to know about
boating and fishing around
Southwest Florida, and
learning as much as you can
will help you get the most
enjoyment out of your experi-
ences on the water here.


Welcome to the 2014 WaterLine Annual Guide
to Charlotte Harbor and the waters of Southwest
Florida. This guide is intended to serve two func-
tions: It's an introduction to our waters for those
who are new to them, and it's also a reference for
those who are still learning which is all of us,
or at least it should be.
At the Charlotte County Boat Show this past
January, a gentleman stopped by my booth to
chat. He told me he'd moved here from Michigan
a few years ago and was having the darndest
time trying to get the hang of boating and
fishing on Charlotte Harbor. He said,"/lt'sjust so
different from back home.":'
I told him that it's OK to not have all the
answers searching for them is all part of the
fun. But then he asked me how long it would
take for him to learn everything.
Everything?
I'm afraid I broke his heart a little when I told
him that he'd never know everything. I could see
it in his face. So I rushed to explain:
No matter how much you know (or how much
you think you know) about our waters, there's a
lot more you could learn. It would take dozens,
maybe hundreds, of lifetimes to learn it all -
and in that time, so much would change that
you'd have to start all over again.


That's part of what makes Charlotte Harbor
such an amazing place. If you're paying attention,
you'll learn at least one thing every single time
you go out on the water.
Even something that seems fairly straight-
forward can be immensely complicated. For
example, let's say you want to catch a few
redfish. You could go out and hope to stumble
across a few, but most anglers at least try to
outsmart the fish, which means you need to
figure them out.
What time of year is it? What color is the
water? What's the tide doing? Where's the wind
blowing from, and how strong? Air pressure?
Cloud cover? What are they feeding on? Are they
schooled up or scattered?
That's just a few of many, many potential
factors to account for, and knowing how each
affects those redfish is crucial to becoming a
consistently successful redfisherman. You know
that guy the guy who seems to be able to
catch whatever he wants whenever he wants.
If he does it once, that's just luck. But if he does
it just about every Saturday morning, then he's
been paying attention.
And that's really what this game is about.
Listen to what other people tell you, and sort out
the gems from the much larger piles of worthless


BOATINGANDFISHING.COM il


rubble. When you come across someone who
seems to have a clue, ask questions. Read as
much as you can, from a wide variety of sources.
But you can't fully rely on the experiences of
others after you listen and ask and read, get
out there and observe. Too often, we get impa-
tient. It's just human nature we want instant
gratification. If you can cool your jets just for a
little while, it will benefit you greatly to watch
what goes on out on the water.
If you learn from all these sources and most
especially, from the mistakes of others you'll
find that getting a Charlotte Harbor education is
not that difficult. Just keep your expectation real-
istic. You're not going to become an expert in a
year. You're never going to learn it all. And you're
going to keep making mistakes, some of which
will probably be expensive in terms of broken or
damaged equipment.
That's just the way life on the water goes.
Fortunately, it's worth all the trouble.


What can you catch when you go fishing in Southwest
Florida? The question isn't hard to answer, but it does take a
little time. The Gulf of Mexico, its associated estuaries and the
rivers that feed them are home to literally thousands of species
offish, not to mention a stunning array of invertebrate marine
life. Here are some of the fish you may find nibbling on the end
of your line.

INSHORE SPECIES
These are mainlyfish of the shallows and backwaters, though
being fish they may choose to swim out into the Gulf. Inshore
fishing encompasses the entire estuary system, from the river
mouths to the beaches and all 270 square miles of Charlotte Harbor.


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STarpon are a much-sought gamefish. Their aerobatic
S displays when hooked are largely responsible.


TARPON are perhaps Southwest Florida's best known and
most sought-after gamefish. Growing to massive sizes 250
pounds or more is possible, though 80 to 120 pounds is more
typical these schooling fish are tough customers. Aerial
acrobatics displays are a trademark of this species'fight.
The majority of the tarpon in our area are seasonal visitors,
arriving in late spring to spawn in the deep Gulf and sticking
around until winter cold fronts drive them south. There is also a
resident population that winter in the rivers, where the tannic
S acid tints their scales a beautiful golden color. Boca Grande Pass
is the epicenter of local tarpon action, though these fish can
be found throughout the backwaters and along the beaches
during the warm months. Dozens of area guides specialize in
-'- silver kings, and dozens more show up from out of town to cash
. -.-. in when the fish are thick. The best baits will depend on where -
5jo you find the fish. Tarpon in the Pass on an outgoing tide may be
: ... focused on swimming crabs and ignore any other bait. The same t
"-~ rt-~= fish might eagerly take a whole dead mullet under the U.S. 41
...... bridge over the Peace River a couple months later. Big artificial -
baits and jumbo flies, tied just for tarpon, also catch more than
z -z a few fish. The Boca Grande tarpon jig is also popular, though
W- si. a debate is still ongoing about whether the jig is designed to
S .-" snag fish. Small juveniles, which live in backwaters, creeks and
"- canals, are often targeted with light fly tackle and are just as
athletic as their parents. Tarpon are almost exclusively a catch-
-: ---- and-release species, sought just for the thrill of catching one.
S g They're considered inedible here, though commercially fished
,sq in the Caribbean and Africa's Atlantic coast. Killing a tarpon or %
_._-, r possessing it for longer than it takes to remove the hook is legal -
C-- only with a S51.50 permit issued by the state (at printing time, "
-...-; it appeared the state might do away with the permit this year,
...... making tarpon possession illegal at any time).
~ ~SNOOK are another top local gamefish, but are just as popular I
on the table as they are on a line. A tropical species, snook do
poorly when the water gets cold. A disastrous string of freezes in J
-. .- early 2010 killed large numbers of these fish, which is why the
.-. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission closed the
-._ season until at least Sept. 1, 2013, on Florida's west coast. During "
winter, many snook go up the rivers or seek refuge in deeper
canals. Most anglers think of this fish as a shallow-water species,
but snook are plentiful on some of the reefs and fish havens out
-&...- in the Gulf. Diving is a good way to locate these populations.
P IP" Inshore, snook tend to hang around structure mangrove
roots, dock pilings, bridge abutments and even seawalls will
T'" "I often hold a snook or two. Often, if you can see one, it can see
you and will refuse any bait. Although this can be frustrating,
remember that it's illegal to snag a snook. When they don't have
-,--. lockjaw, snook are known to eat crabs, shrimp and fish up to
j about half their own length. Live bait usually outfishes artifi-
-. ..m --^. cials in the backcountry, where chumming with freshly killed
whitebait is a popular method. During the summer, when most
Local snook move out to the beaches for their annual spawn, soft
.,. .


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plastic baits catch a lot of fish just a few feet
from shore. Snook from 18 to 27 inches are
common. Snook 28 to 33 inches the legal
slot when season is open are often hard to
find. These fish can grow to nearly 50 pounds,
though 5 to 10 average. When and if snook
become legal to harvest, they are considered by
many to be a top choice for dinner. Be sure to
remove the skin; it will impart a soapy taste to
the cooked meat.
Not too many years ago, REDFISH were
a commercially fished species here, and the
population was in trouble. Strict regulations
- a fairly narrow slot limit and a one-fish
bag led to a strong recovery, though
numbers have dropped a little the past couple
years. Reds are the target of several Southwest
Florida tournaments. Almost all of the fish
caught inshore are immature juveniles from
2 to 10 pounds, though an occasional school
of adult fish (aka bull reds) will move in from
the open Gulf during autumn months. These
big fish mingle with the near-adults inshore,
then move back out to sea, taking the larger
fish with them and leaving mostly younger


juveniles (aka rat reds), which is why decent
keeper fish are often hard to find in winter.
Unlike in many places along the Atlantic coast,
surf fishing is not a popular way to target
these fish here the bulls usually travel too
far off our beaches to reach by casting. Bull
reds can attain weights of 50 pounds or larger,
but it's rare to catch a fish over 20 pounds or so
in our area. Redfish on the flats and under the


mangrove roots feed best on incoming tides.
As the water floods into very shallow areas,
the fish move in, sometimes in large schools.
As the fish grub around on the bottom for
mollusks, crustaceans and worms, their tails
will sometimes stick out of the water. These
warm-weather"tailing" redfish are stalked by
many flats fishermen, who enjoy targeting a
preselected fish. During cool weather, these
fish move far up into mangrove creeks and
canals. Because reds grow fast a fish
that's under the slot in early spring may be
over it by the time fall's first real cold front
arrives they are often voracious feeders.
To take in enough calories, redfish are not
above scavenging. A dead shrimp or piece of
cutbait fished on the bottom is usually eagerly
taken by any red that finds it. Scented soft
plastic baits are also popular. When reds are
feeding on baitfish, hard or soft plastics will
draw strikes. Although they have underslung
mouths, redfish will hit a topwater plug hard
when they're in the right mood. As you might
expect of a fish with a commercial market,
redfish are good eating. Bigger fish are coarse-
fleshed, but bigger fish are also illegal to
harvest. Blackened redfish is tasty enough that
it nearly destroyed Florida's stocks.
SPOTTED SEATROUT are the third species
in the so-called "Charlotte Harbor slam"-


catching a snook, redfish and seatrout all in
one day. Of these species, the trout is likely
to put up the least tussle. Although not
renowned for their great fighting ability,
trout do have one important trait that makes
them an important fish to local anglers: They
often bite well when it's cold and most other
species aren't thinking about food. Trout,
also called specks, run smaller than many
popular gamefish; 1 or 2 pounds is average,
and anything over 5 pounds (a"gator"trout)
is worth bragging about. These fish don't like
fresh water, and often move out of the
river mouths during the rainy
season. They also dislike warm
weather, and will often retire to
deep areas near grassflats or over
hard bottom when the water heats .
up on summer days. When the .-
water is in the comfortable mid-60s
to high 70s, trout are found mostly
over grass. Water 3 or 4 feet deep
often holds good numbers of fish,
and deeper potholes on very shallow
flats may be packed with trout.
Drifting with live
shrimp fished under
a popping cork is the
standard method of
hunting trout. Smaller
artificial baits also work well;
tandem Love's Lures are espe-
cially popular. Trout caught in
warm weather often have soft,
mushy flesh. In cool weather,
they have better texture. It's
important to get trout on ice
as soon as possible if you want
them for the table. A couple
related fish, SAND and SILVER SEATROUT,
are also caught here, mostly in winter. They
tend to prefer deeper water than
specks.
Another winter target is the pris- Pe
on-striped SHEEPSHEAD. These fish
migrate inshore during winter and are
not put off by our coldest weather. In
spring, they move offshore to spawn
and then remain there. They can
be caught offshore year-round, -
but because of their feeding -
method they are an incidental
catch on the reefs. Sheepies are
crushers they use teeth that
look eerily human to smash the
shells of crabs, clams and snails to
get at the soft innards. A sheepshead will
often grab a hard-shelled creature, crunch
it and spit it


right -
out, then pick though the crushed shell
for edible meat. That means when you try to
set the hook on a sheepie, you're often just
pulling the bait away from it. Becoming a
successful sheepshead angler .
is a skill that takes time to ili
learn, and hooking one is
much easier when you're
fishing right under your feet -
-which is where they are ..-
in winter, haunting piers, :s-- ;
pilings, seawalls and rocky
shorelines. Most inshore l
fish are smallish males,
often around a pound or less.
Big females are more common on the reefs
and can run up to 8 pounds or more. Because
of their shellfish diet, sheepshead fillets are
delicious and highly desirable.
During the spring and fall runs, SPANISH
MACKEREL become one of the area's most-
wanted fish. Water temps in the mid-70s


macks, a short wire leader is
a good idea. This may reduce your strikes, but
it should eliminate cutoffs. Alternatively, use a
long-shanked hook. Fish in the 1- to 3-pound
range are common, with larger fish often
showing up ahead of the main run. Spanish
are oily and taste a bit fishy. Still, they're well-
liked by most people who like fish. The flavor
can be much improved by cutting out the red
meat before cooking. Broiling and smoking are
good ways to prepare mackerel.
POMPANO also have spring and fall runs


along our coast, traveling in loose schools. A
few fish stick around all winter and summer,
but May and October normally see the heaviest
concentrations. Pomps rarely eat
other fish, preferring to dine on
crustaceans. This is one of the few
r fish you're more likely to catch on
- the beach than in the backcountry,
Sj although pompano travel up the
Sestuaries as far as the river mouths.
k An unusual method of finding these
S J fish is called skipping. Basically, you
drive your boat over a flat in about 4
Feet of water and watch for jumping
pompano in your wake, then go back
and fish that area, hoping other fish in the
school haven't been spooked. Live shrimp,
crabs and sand fleas are good baits for these
fish, but jigs are just as popular and
Y4._ u perhaps


more
effective. Traditional pompano jigs
have a heavy round head and a short yellow or
white skirt. Silly jigs also catch plenty offish,
especially in hot pink or yellow. Pomps are not
big fish; 1 to 3 pounds is average. Exceptional
fish may reach 8 pounds. Don't expect them to


give up easily, though their fight is surpris-
ingly big for their size. Pompano are highly
prized as eating fish.
A close relative of the pompano, PERMIT
are often mistaken for their smaller cousins
when young. They're not easy to tell apart
---, when they're
--:. small, especially
if you don't
have one of each
to compare.
Permit are more
S rounded in
profile; pompano
are usually less
silvery and more
yellow. If you look
at the dorsal and
anal fins, on a
permit the start
S of both fins are
roughly aligned;
on aapompano, the
.... aeon anal fin starts well
Sheepshead behind the dorsal.
Unlike pomps,
permit get big.
Although juvenile permit are often found in
pompano schools, adults are usually found
solo or in aggregations over reefs or wrecks.
In the Keys, big permit are sight-fished on
the flats; in Southwest Florida, not so much.
But they eat the same baits hand-picked
shrimp or silver dollar-size blue crabs are the
top choices. Fish from 10 to 20 pounds are
reasonably numerous, and they can grow
larger than 40 pounds. Permit are fine table
fish, but most anglers release the big ones to
fight another day.
COBIA are often caught in this area but
hard to target. During spring and fall, there
are plenty of these fish around, but they don't
form schools like they do along the northern
Gulf coast. Instead, cobes are seen as single-
tons from the river mouths to the offshore
reefs. With so much water for these fish to be
scattered around, it can be difficult to locate
one. Markers and other fish-holding struc-
tures will draw in cobia, as will an anchored
boat. They also are often seen traveling with
manatees and big stingrays. Live pinfish and
eel-imitating lures are among the top baits,
though cobia will eat almost anything.
Small fish are rare; most will weigh 15 to
30 pounds, and fish up to 60-plus pounds
can be caught if you're lucky. Cobia are
notorious for tearing up equipment when
landed green, so fight the fish until it's
tired before you try to boat it.
The oddly named TRIPLETAIL is not
much of a sport fish, but it's got delicate,
snow-white meat that makes it a choice
fish for the cooler. Tripletail really have
just one tail, but the lobes of their dorsal
and anal fins overlap the tail fin, creating
the illusion of three tails (if you squint
just right, and you're drunk). Tripletail
hunters look for these fish around surface
structure. Some good examples: Marker


pilings, crab trap floats, a chunk of flotsam
out in the Gulf. Don't give up;
you may stop at 50 or more
Cobia trap floats before you spot
a tripletail. In cold weather,
They sometimes seem to
r vanish. These fish tend to be
seen near the surface and are
u usually sighted before casting.
If the fish sinks out of sight, cast
anyway it probably didn't go
far. Toss a small shrimp or white-
bait with as little terminal tackle as possible,
and pull the fish away from the structure
quickly or it'll wrap your line. A 2- to 5-pound
fish is about average, but tripletail bigger than
30 pounds are possible.


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bottom near rocky areas is ideal habitat;
fish can also be found in the surf or on mixed
grass and sand bottom. Despite their slug-
gish appearance, flounder can move quite
quickly to attack a bait. The best method is
to bounce or drag a shrimp or soft plastic
slowly across the bottom in good habitat. The
flounder around the nearshore reefs are often
bigger than the ones caught inshore. That's
because offshore you're more likely to run into
southern flounder, which can grow as large as
20 pounds (though one bigger than 5 pounds
is worth partying over). Inshore, Gulf flounder
are the more common fish, and they don't get
as large maybe 2 pounds. Flounder are
a commercial fishing standard and are very
good, but fish under 15 inches or so barely
have enough meat to be worth filleting.
BLACK DRUM are closely related to redfish
but don't have much of their sporty cousins'
vigor. A black drum fight is usually a minute
or two of hard pulling (no running) followed
by the fish surrendering to fate. Even more
inclined to scavenging than reds, they will
readily take day-old dead shrimp or crabs off
the bottom. Though they're hardly sporting,
black drum can be entertaining, especially the
bigger fish of 30 pounds or more (they can top
100). A good way to hook into one of the big
boys is to soak halfa blue crab on the bottom
next to a bridge piling. A photo of you holding
it up will be very impressive for the folks back
home, who don't know that it only fought
for 90 seconds. Juvenile drum up to about
5 pounds are fine food fish; bigger ones get
coarse and often have muscle parasites.
BLUEFISH are rarely numerous enough to
target, but schools of smaller fish (aka chop-
pers) are often found around schools of bait in
spring and fall. These blues sometimes cruise
up and down the beaches, but there's little
incentive to surf fish for them as they do in the
Atlantic. Why? A 20-inch bluefish is a pretty
big one here; over there that's practically bait
size. Oddly, a i
few big ones
have been H!|
taken out of ...,.
Punta Gorda
canals lately.
Fish for these
guys like
you would
mackerel- -
throw a shiny
artificial
and reel it
in fast. As
with macks,
a bit of wire
will increase
your landing
ratio. Some people find the taste of bluefish
objectionable. Trimming off the dark red meat
and soaking the fillets in
milk overnight will help.
WHITING are a tasty
little fish targeted by two
kinds of people: Those who
want to have a big fish fry,
and those who want to use
them for tarpon, cobia or
snook bait. Technically called
Gulf kingfish, whiting are
not much sport but sure
can fill a cooler. Big schools
of these fish run the surf
all summer and in winter
can be found all through


the estuaries into the
river mouths. A small jig works very well,
especially if tipped with a chunk of shrimp. To
catch a bunch, a castnet or beach seine works
even better. Most whiting are small under
a pound. Though bony, they are delicious
beer-battered and deep-fried.
The Rodney Dangerfield of saltwater sport
fishing, JACK CREVALLE get no respect. This
is mostly due to the fact that they're basically
inedible and were thought of for years as
trash fish. In today's catch-and-release world,
however, jacks need to be recognized for what


they are pound for pound, one of the
hardest-fighting and most spirited gamefish
in the world. Jacks are merciless predators,
slashing through baitfish schools and leaving
handfuls of dead and dying fish in their wake.
When they're in a feeding frenzy, any bait
is likely to draw a strike; at other times, try
fishing a popper or other surface lure, or a live


bait under a float. A small jack of 2
Nhiting to 5 pounds will fight like a trophy
snook, and if you hook one in the
20-pound range you'll wonder
why your tarpon isn't jumping.
They can grow to more than 50
pounds, and heaven help you if
you hook one that big. The smaller
f but very similar HORSE-EYE JACK
S is also a common catch; horse-
._ eyes have a less blunt snout and
.. '' reach about 30 pounds but are
:;: : .rare larger than 5 pounds.
.. The reason LADYFISH are
looked down on is that they're
small. Related to tarpon and
bonefish two of the world's
top sport fish they have as much fight
as their famous cousins but in a smaller
package. Another name
for this fish is ten-pounder,
because that's what you'll
swear you've got on the other
end of the line. A hooked lady-
fish often takes to the air in a
series of leaps that put most
other"gamefish"to shame. To
get the most out of these fish,
scale your tackle down. Don't
use your redfish rig to catch
? ladies use an ultralight
= outfit. Little plastic baits or
SLadyfish | spoons work great, as do small
S_. live shrimp. Ladyfish are no


Good to eat but do make excep-
Stional cutbait for redfish, snook, Rec
tarpon and sharks (for big fish, just
use the ladyfish whole).
Saltwater CATFISH are the least-
wanted fish in Southwest Florida. ..
They're seemingly inescapable for
many anglers, who weave tapestries
of curses in the air as they reel in _
catfish after catfish. But it doesn't
have to be that way. Catfish hunt for
edible material mainly by scent. No
smell, no catfish (most of the time).
Try artificial if the cats are all up
in your business. Southwest Florida
actually has two saltwater catfish species:
HARDHEADS and GAFFTOPSAILS. Gafftops
are easily recognized by their long fin exten-
sions. Sometimes gafftops will take an artifi-
cial lure fished near a baitfish school. Because
they are predator/scavengers, gafftops are
actually edible and taste pretty good. Hard-
heads taste like boat ramp muck. Most catfish
-- caught are
a pound
or so, but
gafftops
can get
to about
8 pounds
and put up
a decent
S fight on
light tackle.
Catfish
slime on
your line
will keep
other
fish from
biting, and
catfish
spines are

ok aand can






latafftop sage28 and2fish andenmUa
put you in a
world of hurt. To be safe,just cut the line close
to the hook.

REEF FISH
Reef fish live in the Gulf, but not every-
where generally, you'll find them only near
structure. Hard limestone bottom, springs,
ledges, wrecked boats or planes, coral-en-
crusted rubble and artificial reefs will all hold
these fish. Most reef fish stay near the bottom;
some, like amberjack and barracuda, prefer to
live in the open water above the reef itself To
legally take most reef fish, you
must use a non-offset circle
hook and have a dehooking
tool available (see the regu-
lations on page 28 and 29 for
more info).

Several species of grouper
are among the most popular
fish in our area. GAG and
RED GROUPER areothe most
frequently caught. BLACK
GROUPER and SCAMP also
can be found. Other species
are present but are either
small, rare or found only in
very deep water. All grouper
are reef fish as adults. Juvenile grouper up to a
foot or so live in the protection of the estuaries
before moving out to the reefs as they grow
larger. Gags generally live in shallower water
that the other species, so it doesn't take as
long a run into the Gulf to catch them. In the
cooler months, grouper move closer to shore.
Keeper-size gag can be caught in water as


shallow as 15 feet during winter, and reds can
be found in 40 feet instead of 80. Black grouper
and scamp are usually caught by accident while
fishing for gag or reds; both prefer deeper
water. All grouper will readily take live or cut
bait, usually fished with a heavy sinker or
jighead to get the bait to the bottom quickly.
Gag will also take big plugs trolled over hard
bottom areas; this works best in winter when
the fish are in shallower water. Heavy tackle
is normally used, because if you don't get the
fish off the bottom quickly, it's likely to dive
into a hidey-hole and cut you off. If you get
hung, keep pulling the fish often wedge
themselves in by flaring their gill covers, and
constant pressure will sometimes pull them
out. Once you've got the grouper coming to
the surface, you can settle in for the fight.
For some real fun, you can chum gags to the
surface and catch them on your snook tackle.
Grouper on the reefs average 3 to 5 pounds,
though they can get much bigger. Gags can get
to 70-plus pounds, and black grouper can push
100 pounds. Grouper are the quintessential
Florida table fish, very popular in restaurants
despite rampant fraud involving serving a wide
variety offish as "Florida grouper" because of
the name recognition.
GOLIATH GROUPER are a protected
species, so no harvest is allowed. Unlike other
grouper species, Goliaths can be found inshore
in very large sizes. This is because they mature
at a much larger size than other groupers -
the 150-pound fish living under local bridges
are still babies. Adult fish, which can weigh
700 pounds or more, move out into the Gulf.
Some live in water less than 50 feet deep;
others move into the crushing depths where
it's always night. Goliaths sometimes will eat
a hooked grouper or snapper on some reefs,
drawing the ire of anglers. If this happens,
pick up and move. These giants were once
harvested by spearfishermen for the seafood
industry. Because they are unafraid of divers,
this practice nearly wiped them out.


They are now fully
protected by law, a situation which fisheries
managers are currently looking at modifying.
Regardless of whether harvest someday
becomes legal, Goliaths are popular catch-and-
release subjects for those who want to catch a
truly huge fish. Specifically targeting Goliath
grouper for catch-and-release is OK in state
Sweaters but illegal in federal waters (9 miles
offshore on this coast). If you're not sure
if your fish is a Goliath, look at the tail -
among our groupers, only Goliaths have
paddle-shaped tail fins.
The various snapper species are almost
as esteemed for the table as grouper.
MANGROVE SNAPPER (sometimes called
gray snapper) are the most commonly
caught species off Southwest Florida.
These fish are very plentiful inshore as
juveniles, and can be seen around almost
any structure. Mangs up to about 15
inches can be caught inshore; as they
mature, they move into the deeper
I waters of the Gulf. Reefs, wrecks and
Stockpiles in water from 10 to 200 feet
often host swarms of mangrove snapper.
SOther snapper species also grow up
inshore, but are rarely seen as they are


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more secretive than juvenile mangs. LANE,
MUTTON and YELLOWTAIL SNAPPER are
more common in the Keys than off our coast,
but all these species are
uiw ^ ( J'ID


out there. For anglers willing
to run out far enough, RED SNAPPER can
be found starting in about 100 feet. As with
most other bright red fish, red snapper are
really creatures of deep water, so deeper water


will hold more and larger fish. To get the fish
feeding, a chum block is always a good idea.
Snapper are smart and will often refuse a
baited hook, but chum works on them a bit
like alcohol does on us: Their inhibitions are
lowered and they're easier to fool. Chum will
also bring them nearer to the surface, where
you can use lighter tackle because there's less
concern about getting snagged on the bottom.
Snapper will eat fish but seem to prefer crusta-
ceans. Sometimes it's hard to get a shrimp
past all the bait stealers; in those cases, try a
small crab. Mangroves are common to about


3 pounds, and fish of over 10 pounds can be
caught. Yellowtail are smaller at 1 to 2 pounds.
Big yellowtail, called flags, start at about 3
pounds, and 6 pounds is a
monster. Lane snapper are
even smaller, mostly under
a pound. Mutton snapper
average bigger; 5 to 10
pounds is a good fish and 20
is possible. Most red snapper
off our coast are about the
size of a mutton, though fish




pa lob ounds is agour fihandrs.
to 40 pounds are possible
it'll just take you all day
Sto get out to water deep
enough. In addition to
these species, the rare
CUBERA SNAPPER
can also be found in our waters.
This giant up to 100 pounds is a
specialist, feeding mostly on crabs and
spiny lobster. You've got to really want one
of these fish to use a whole lobster as bait.
GREATER AMBERJACK are punishing .


fish to catch. Typically large and endowed with
great strength and endurance, fishing for AJs
is a test of stamina. Amberjack live over reefs
and wrecks starting at about 50 feet deep,
with larger fish in deeper water. The biggest
fish, over 100 pounds, are rarely seen in our
area they prefer deeper water than is out
of easy reach on the Gulf coast. Still, the 20- to
40-pound fish common off our coast will put
up a major fight. Many anglers find that one
AJ is about all they really want to catch. These
fish also come in smaller versions: LESSER
AMBERJACK, BANDED RUDDERFISH and


ALMACO JACKS are very similar fish, but in
a 5- to 10-pound package. Amberjack will
readily take large live baits, or a dead bait
that's been butterflied (with the fillets cut free
at the sides but left attached at the head end).
Vertical or butterfly jigs will also take AJs, or
you can try big well-built topwater poppers.
Commercial fishermen pursue amberjack,
which are a delightful if underrated table fish.
Several species of porgies (pronounced
with a hard "g") call this area home. GRASS,
KNOBBED, RED and JOLTHEAD PORGIES
can be found on shallow and deep reefs off
our coast. Sheepshead are technically porgies
as well. As with many other reef species,
juvenile porgies


live inshore, either on the grassflats or in
the shelter of mangrove roots. Most bottom
fishermen welcome porgies these
fish are just as good to eat as snapper -
though few target them. The problem
is getting to the big ones, which prefer
deeper water. Jolthead porgies up to 3 or
4 pounds are fairly abundant in waters 50
feet deep or less, and this species is the
most desirable. Porgies are not fish-eaters
and bite best on shrimp or squid. As with
other reef fish, you need to get them off the
bottom quickly or risk them diving for cover
and fouling the line.
Like porgies, white or KEY WEST GRUNTS
are seldom the goal but rarely unwelcome.
Grits and grunts, a Florida Cracker favorite,
makes good use of this fish's excellent flaky
white meat. As with porgies, grunts are not
fish-eaters and are usually caught on shrimp
or squid. Most white grunts will be a pound


or so, though big ones can top 10 pounds.
MARGATES are another grunt species you
might catch; they're good but not quite as
good as a white grunt. Other grunts are also
found here BLUE-STRIPED GRUNTS,
' PIGFISH, SAILOR'S CHOICE but these
fish are mostly too small for consumption.
They do, however, make excellent bait for
any number of predatory species.
BLACK SEA BASS are not a common
catch here, though they're plentiful in the
Tampa Bay area. Sometimes you'll hook
one while fishing for other bottom fish, and
they're incidentally caught by those seeking


tripletail around crab traps (if you fish deep -
they rarely rise to the surface). They're not big
fans of cutbait but will take shrimp eagerly.
Most fish weigh less than 2 pounds, but they
are outstanding on the table and worth the
trouble of cleaning.
GRAY TRIGGERFISH are also incidental reef
catches. With thick, leathery skin protecting all
the goodness inside, triggers are a challenge


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to anyone trying to clean them. If you can find
someone to show you the technique, it's


worth learning the
snowy meat is delicious. Triggerfish eat crabs,
sea urchins
and other B arc
reefinver- Barracuda
tebrates,
and will ',
readily take | .> .
shrimp or
squid. Their
feeding style
is similar to
a sheepshead's crush, spit and pick so
hooking them can be a challenge, especially
with the big circle hooks used for other
reef fish. Fortunately, small circle hooks are
available. Tough baits like squid or clam will
* ^


hold the hook better and are the best options
if you want to bring a triggerfish to the boat.
Triggers are usually about a pound or two,
but big fish can get to 5 or 6 pounds.
If you poll true seafood aficionados on their
favorite fish, HOGFISH will be near the top of
the list. A fish with little fear, hogfish are often
targeted by spearfishermen. In fact, more
are taken by spear than with hook and line.
Hogfish eat a variety of invertebrates, crushing
them with the specialized teeth in their
bizarrely gigantic mouths. Shrimp is usually the
best bait for hogs. Most fish taken are small,
about a pound, but they can get much bigger.
There are 20-pound fish out there. Part of the
reason big hogs are rarely seen is that they
usually live in depths beyond 100 feet, though
some are caught in water as shallow as 20 feet.
p'JFr


Popular with scuba divers, curious and
fearless BARRACUDA have fewer friends in the
angling community. Known for their trick of
chopping off the back half of a fish coming to
the boat, cudas are a decent sport fish in their
; own right. Over the reefs, barracuda
are strong fighters. On the flats of
Hogfish the Keys, they also are notorious
Kfor incredible jumps, Unfortunately,
.: 'cudas are rarely caught inshore in
"'-'- =. Southwest Florida. Enticing a barra-
cuda to strike can be a challenge.
Movement and flash are the triggers.
Try ripping a spoon or a brightly
colored tube lure rapidly across
the water. Using the front half of a
freshly cuda-snipped snapper works,
but be aware this is illegal in federal
waters (reef fish can't be used as
bait in these areas). Wire leader is a
requirement if you want to consis-


tently land these toothy torpedoes.
LIONFISH are an invasive exotic species
in the warm Atlantic and have become very
common in some areas, particularly the
Bahamas and Bermuda. In the past couple
years, lionfish have been found in
the Gulf (though not yet in Char-
lotte Harbor). These Pacific natives
have no predators in our area and
insatiable appetites potentially
Sa very bad combination. They rarely
Stake a baited hook but have no fear
of divers and are easily speared. If
you see one, do what you can to kill
it. The spines are highly venomous,
but the meat is very good.

PELAGIC SPECIES
These fish live in open water often very
deep open water. Deepwater species are not
often caught near the coast here. Unlike in
South Florida where blue water is a mile or two
offshore, you have to get out past 100 miles to


find truly deep water off Southwest Florida.

KING MACKEREL are a migratory species
of open waters. In the spring, kingfish fanatics
await the Spanish mackerel run, because they
know the kings will be just a few weeks behind
them. As with their smaller relatives, king
mackerel are fast-swimming fish eaters with
teeth designed to scissor a bait neatly in two.
Their method of attack is often to chomp off the
back half of a smaller fish, then turn and gobble
the front half as it starts to sink. That's why
many kingfish anglers use a stinger rig, which
features a second hook near the bait's tail to nab
a short-striking king. These fish are known for
making line-sizzling runs, and you'll need a reel
with a quality drag. Schools of smaller kingfish
sometimes will follow baitfish pods well up the
Harbor, but that's fairly rare occurrence. Most
fish stay a mile or two off the beaches, but the
bigger ones often run closer to shore. Anglers on
the Venice Municipal Pier catch good-sized kings
regularly when the fish are running. Trolling a
lure or rigged dead bait is a good way to hook
a kingfish, or drift a live blue runner or mullet.
As with other toothy fish, wire leaders are more
or less mandatory. Use diving birds to locate
the fish for the most success. Schooling kingfish
range from 5 to 20 pounds; big fish of up to 80
pounds are more solitary and sometimes patrol
the edges of a school of smaller fish.
CERO MACKEREL are an uncommon fish on
the Gulf coast. They look much like Spanish macks
but are usually found alone rather than in schools.
Cero prey on small fish and squid. You might catch
one by accident while fishing near bait schools.
Cero average about 20 inches
but can grow to 4 feet.
WAHOO are also in the
mackerel family, but are
more of an open-ocean
species. They are not common
catches off our coast because
the water is too shallow for
their liking a run of 80 or
100 miles is required to get to
their preferred depths. When
baitfish are schooling thickly
in the Gulf, sometimes a few


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wahoo will crash the party in water as shallow
as 30 feet. Catching one can be tough. The
same methods that catch kingfish will catch
wahoo, but you need a lot more luck because
there are fewer of them out there. Nearshore
wahoo are usually on the smaller side 30
pounds or less. Big ones in the ocean depths
can reach about 150 pounds.
DOLPHIN (or mahi, to avoid confusion
with Flipper) are another fish of open, deep
waters. Very young juveniles, called peanuts,
can be found in water as shallow as 30 feet
during the warm summer months. Small
dolphin form thick schools, which become
looser as the fish mature. Mahi from 5 to 10
pounds are called chicken dolphin. Eventually,
once they reach 20 pounds or so, dolphin give
up schooling altogether and travel alone or
in pairs. The fish may reach nearly 80 pounds.
Maximum size is attained quickly these fish
grow fast and die young, with 4 years being a
very long life. Dolphin are drawn to almost any


-- sort of floating object weed lines,
00 tree trunks, even your boat if you drift
Long enough. If dolphin are present
f- under flotsam, the golden flash from
their metallic sides should be easy to
Spot, Any small fish or shrimp will be
Eagerly taken by schoolies. Once you
L hook one, the school will usually stay
with the hooked fish, enabling you
to catch a double- or triple-header if
you've got people to man the rods.
Big fish are usually caught by trolling
or drifting. A good table fish. The electric
golden-green color of a freshly boated dolphin
fades rapidly to plain silvery gray once the fish


is dead. Many of the smaller dolphin caught off
our coast are actually POMPANO DOLPHIN, a
closely related but dwarf species that grows to
only about 5 pounds. Pompano dolphin have a
more rounded ventral profile; it's more or less
straight on a common dolphin.
BONITO more accurately,
little tunny are a hard-
hin fighting small tuna that will
readily take a hook. During
spring and fall, these fish
follow schools of bait up and
down our coast in water as
shallow as 20 feet. Often,
these fish are not given the
respect other tunas are. This
is because most anglers use
tackle too heavy for bonito to really
shine. On scaled-down equipment,
their sporting qualities become more
apparent. Bonito are a good fly fishing


species. Live or dead fish, or a fast-moving
jig or spoon, will entice bonito to the hook.
Although edible, their flesh is darker and fishier
than many of their larger relatives. These qual-
ities make them a popular baitfish for shark
anglers, and seekers of big blue-water game
often rig tunny for trolling. Average fish are 3
to 8 pounds, and they can reach nearly 30.
Our other small tuna, the BLACKFIN TUNA,
is more highly regarded. Blackfin tuna are
usually found in deep water but may come
farther inshore during bait runs, sometimes
even into the Harbor itself. Still, a blackfin in
water under 50 feet is a rarity. As with other
tunas, they have a strong tendency to school.
When the fish are crashing bait, they will
often hit just about anything in the water.
Otherwise, trolling a squid imitation is a good
method of locating blackfin. Just as spirited as
their legendary bigger relatives, blackfin tuna
put up a strong fight on light tackle. Heavy
_equip-


ment will overpower them
quickly. A much better table fish than bonito,
blackfin are excellent grilled, pan-seared or


as sashimi. Most fish will be under 15
ma pounds, with a maximum of about 40
Pounds. Other tunas- YELLOWFIN,
BIGEYE and BLUEFIN do live in the
Gulf but rarely come within 100 miles
of the Southwest Florida coast.
SAILFISH are occasional summer
visitors to our area. As with other
deepwater fish, pods of bait are the
reason they come near shore. Sails are
infrequent catches in water less than
100 feet deep but are sometimes taken
by those seeking kingfish with big live
baits. It's not unheard of to catch one on the
inside of Boca Grande Pass, which is techni-
cally in Charlotte Harbor. Unfortunately, if you
do catch one in the Harbor, no one will ever
believe you (get it on video!). Most Gulf sailfish
are in the 30- to 60-pound range, though fish
over 100 pounds are possible. These fish can
be eaten, but they're not very good best to
release them. Bigger billfishes swordfish
and blue and white marlin are even more
rare in shallow water. If you go out into the
open Gulf, billfish are available year-round in
water deeper than 500 feet.

SHARKS & RAYS
Sharks are misunderstood predators which
generate both fear and fascination. These
ancient fish have skeletons of cartilage instead
of bone. Due to intensive overfishing, mostly
for their fins, shark populations are in trouble
around the world. Because of this pressure,
there are strict limits on recreational sharkers:
All but a handful of species
have a 54-inch minimum limit
Saifish (exclusions: blacktip, blac-
knose, Atlantic sharpnose and
0 bonnethead), and an angler can
i Ikeep only one shark per day.
Sharks excrete urea through
their skin, and urea contamina-
Stion can quickly ruin the meat
Sif the shark is poorly handled. If
your shark is destined for the grill,
gut the fish and get the meat on
ice as rapidly as possible. Contrary to popular
belief, shark guts thrown overboard will not


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circle hook to produce
a tool that will probably hook the fish in the
jaw but which can be removed without causing
additional harm. When you're releasing a shark,
if the hook won't come out easily cut the wire
as short as possible. Many anglers tend to use
giant baits and hooks for sharks, but you'll catch
more fish on smaller baits (no bigger than half
a pound) and smaller hooks (6/0 to 10/0). By
the way, "sand sharks" do not exist it's a lazy
angler's term for any shark caught on the beach.
BULL SHARKS are a fairly common species in
Southwest Florida. Unlike other sharks, bulls
will often swim into pure fresh water areas
and can be caught far up the rivers. All sharks
are opportunistic feeders, but bull sharks are
among the least selective. Because of this,
their meat is bit gamey. Whole or cut mullet


or stingray make good bull shark bait.
Juvenile fish to about 40 inches are
frequently caught inshore; bigger fish
are usually found in the Gulf but can and
do show up in the shallows. Common to
6 or 7 feet, and big females can grow to
10 feet and 500 pounds.
BLACKTIP and SPINNER SHARKS
are often confused. Both are excellent
gamefish, putting up a strong fish and
often leaping clear of the water. Both usually
prey on smaller baitfish like sardines and
herring. And both are very good eating fish.
You need to know two differences: First, only
a spinner shark has black tips on all the fins,
including the anal fin. Second, while blacktip
sharks have no minimum size, spinners must be
54 inches to keep. Blacktips average 4 or 5 feet
and 40 to 50 pounds; spinners average about 6
feet and 100 pounds.
BLACKNOSE SHARKS are small, averaging
about 30 inches and growing to 4 feet and
about 40 pounds. They often gather in schools,
and these schools are often found associated
with pods of baitfish in water less than 30 feet
deep. The underside of the snout is grayish
or dusky, making it easy to distinguish from
other inshore sharks. Blacknose sharks are an
excellent target for light-tackle anglers.


ATLANTIC SHARPNOSE SHARKS are
another small schooling species. They rarely
grow larger than 3 feet and can be found
in loose schools of two to 50, mostly in the
estuaries and the surf zone. Usually, but not
always, these fish have small whitish spots
sprinkled on the upper body. As
with other small sharks, they eat
mainly small baitfish. Anglers
seeking large sharks sometimes
have their baits stolen bite by
bite by blacknose or sharpnose
sharks, .
LEMON SHARKS are
protected from harvest, because
they school in winter on near-
shore reefs and ledges, making
them vulnerable to commercial
fishing. They aren't the rarest
shark in Southwest Florida, but
their numbers are fewer than they should be.
Lemon sharks are often seen in shallow water


Ii


on the grassflats, where they pursue their
favored prey, mullet. These sharks commonly
attain 8 feet or longer and can grow to 400
pounds.
NURSE SHARKS are rarely sought by
anglers because of their sluggish fight a bit


like a waterlogged tree trunk. They
will scavenge, but their main diet is crabs and
lobster. Any fish that mostly eats crustaceans is
going to be an excellent table fish, and nurse
sharks are no exception. Crabs and lobster are
most common on reefs; therefore, so are nurse
sharks. These are big fish, averaging 7 to 9 feet
and 150 to 220 pounds.
Our most commonly caught shark, the
BONNETHEAD or SHOVELNOSE, is often
confused with a juvenile hammerhead.
Bonnetheads have a much more rounded
snout profile, though. Most bonnetheads are
less than 4 feet long and weigh less than 15
pounds. These little guys specialize in eating
shrimp and crabs, though they will take what
they can get. As with other crustacean feeders,


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the meat is excellent.
Two larger members of the hammer-
head clan also show up in our area: l
SCALLOPED and GREAT
HAMMERHEADS. Both are much bigger
than bonnetheads. Scalloped hammer-
heads average 6 to 8 feet and can grow to
14 feet and 400 pounds. Great hammer-
heads are huge, averaging over 10 feet
and reaching 20 feet and 1,000 pounds.
Hammerheads eat squid, mackerel and other
pelagic creatures, but they like stingrays when
they can get them. Great hammerheads also are
known to attack hooked or just-released tarpon.
Hammerheads are uncommon and getting rarer
with each passing year, which is why the state
passed a law in 2011 prohibiting their harvest.
The largest hammerheads to visit our coast are
females, and they usually arrive gravid, ready to
give birth.
SANDBAR SHARKS live in shallow water
elsewhere but in our area are a fairly rare
offshore species, usually found near the
bottom at 60 feet or deeper. They prey on
pelagic and deepwater reef fish. 6 feet and
100 pounds is about average, though they can
grow to more than 200 pounds.


Two species of mako sharks patrol the open
Gulf: SHORTFIN and LONGFIN MAKOS. These
species are difficult to tell apart, but longfin
makos are rarer and harvest is prohibited.
Shortfin makos are the fastest shark in the sea,
capable of swimming at 20 mph. This, combined
with their tendency to leap when hooked,
makes them a world-class sport fish. Mako prey
on tuna, swordfish and other pelagic species,


Tiger shark


and are themselves similar in taste and texture
to swordfish. Their prey lives in deep water, and
so do the sharks; don't expect to see these fish
in water less than 200 feet deep. Makos are
big fish, averaging 8 feet and 150 pounds but
reaching nearly 1,500 pounds.
TIGER SHARKS are very rare off Southwest
Florida, except during April and May when
they follow sea turtles, their favored prey,
coming to our beaches to lay their eggs. Even
then, tigers are never common, which is why
they can't be legally harvested. Besides sea
turtles, tiger sharks will eat sea birds, fish,
other sharks and all sorts of trash. Tiger sharks
spend a lot of time near the water's surface.
These are truly massive fish, capable of
reaching 20 feet and 3,000 pounds though
12 feet and 600 pounds in closer to average.


SMALLTOOTH SAWFISH are not likely to be
mistaken for anything else. Once common all
along the Gulf coast, sawfish were wiped out in
most areas and now are found regularly only in
Southwest Florida and the Keys. Sawfish grow to


huge sizes fish larger than 15 feet were
Once relatively common, and their distinc-
tive saw-toothed bills can still be seen in
S some of our older bait shops and waterfront
restaurants. Nowadays these fish are fully
Protected. As an endangered species, specif-
ically fishing for them is unlawful, and they
must be released unharmed if accidentally
hooked. They'll eat almost anything they
find on the bottom. Few giants exist today,
but juvenile sawfish are seen and sometimes
caught in muddy or sandy shallows.


Stingrays lie on the bottom in water as shallow
as 6 inches. If you step on one while wading, it
will arch its tail up and drive a venomous barb
into your leg. To lessen the pain, apply hot water
(don't scald yourself, though). To avoid the sting,
don't walk while wading in ray habitat shuffle
your feet instead. The ATLANTIC STINGRAY,
with a maximum disc width of about 14 inches,
is smaller and more common than the
SOUTHERN STINGRAY, which can
grow to 6 feet across, which in turn in
smaller and more common than the
ROUGHTAIL STINGRAY at a maximum
of 10 feet across. All three species feed on
bottom-dwelling mollusks, worms and
crustaceans, and all will readily take a
hook baited with dead shrimp or cutbait.
Stingrays use their broad bodies to suction
down to the bottom, and reeling one in
can be difficult. The wings are edible, each
yielding a top and bottom fillet.
There are several species of rays that
swim in open water. COWNOSE RAYS,


sometimes incorrectly called bay rays, are often
seen in dense schools, sometimes numbering
in the thousands. These fish love to eat shrimp
and will take a hook. They are strong and can
be a lot of fun on light tackle, but are not often
targeted. Unlike stingrays, cownose rays are
active swimmers and rarely lie on the bottom.
But they do have a short venomous barb, and
should be handled carefully.
SPOTTED EAGLE RAYS are not a common
species. They almost


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never take a hook, but can be
seen sometimes leaping clear of
the water, which is impressive
for a fish 6 feet wide. They're not
legal to keep.
MANTA RAYS, which also
leap, get much larger than other
rays up to 15 feet across.
Mantas used to be a common
sight along the coast but have
grown rare in recent decades,
and also are not legal to harvest.

ODDITIES
There are lots of unusual,
unique and just plain strange fish
that call the Southwest Florida
coast home. Here are just a few.

SEA ROBINS are sometimes
caught by anglers fishing shrimp
on hard bottom or on deeper Southern
grassflats. Almost all are juve-
niles under 8 inches; bigger fish
live in deep water. Inedible.
The GULF TOADFISH is sometimes caught
on shrimp or pieces of shrimp fished around
pilings, usually by anglers trying to catch
sheepshead or pinfish. This fish has a big,
scary-looking mouth full of sharp teeth but is
otherwise harmless. They can be eaten, but
there's not really enough meat to bother with.
LIZARDFISH are common on sandy bottoms
and will take a hook baited with shrimp or
cutbait. Usually under a foot long, lizardfish
should be handled carefully their numerous
teeth are sharp like tiny needles. Inedible.
SOUTHERN PUFFERS often steal baits meant
for other fish. These common fish love shrimp
and will sometimes take lures or flies that look
like shrimp. They are also aggressive and will
attack baits out of sheer meanness. Be careful
dehooking them; their buck teeth can easily cut
through bone. Puffers are usually 10 inches or
less but can get twice that size. The flesh is prized
in some cultures but the internal organs are
toxic, so it's best to not to eat these fish.
PORCUPINEFISH and COWFISH don't
often take a hook, but are sometimes seen


dead on the shore. These fish are highly
susceptible to red tide, which sometimes
kills them by the thousands. Both species
are sometimes dried and sold as beachfront
souvenirs.
ATLANTIC SPADEFISH are sometimes
mistaken for sheepshead because they have
a similar pattern. Unlike sheepies, though,
spadefish have little food value and are usually
caught by accident. Spadefish form schools of
several hundred fish. They will sometimes take a
shrimp, but their main diet is tiny invertebrates,
sponges, jellyfish tentacles and plankton.
Spadefish usually are less than a pound, but fish
to 5 pounds are sometimes seen.
The GUITARFISH looks like a cross between
a ray and a shark. These odd fish are some-
times caught by anglers in the surf, usually on
shrimp. They get to about 3 feet long and have
no sport or food value.
AMERICAN EELS were once abundant in
local estuaries and river mouths but are now
quite uncommon. They will occasionally take
a bait fished on the bottom. Although edible,
they should be released due to their rarity.


FRESHWATER SPECIES
The rivers that feed Charlotte Harbor are
also full offish. In addition to the rivers, there
are many miles of freshwater canals and thou-
sands of small ponds (though only a few larger
lakes) in our area. All of these places are home
to numerous gamefish.

LARGEMOUTH BASS, the largest members
of the sunfish family, were once Florida's claim
to fishing fame. Long before saltwater angling
was a popular pastime, Florida-strain bass (we
have our own subspecies, which grows bigger


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and faster than northern bass) were
drawing anglers from around the country and
around the world. Although the descendents
of these fish have been stocked in waters all
over the globe, Florida bass fishing is still
first-rate. Central Florida boasts a number of
large lakes where fast boats are the norm. In
our part of the state, most bass fishing is a bit
more relaxed, because we don't have big lakes
like that. Still, even ponds of less than an acre
can hold bass of surprisingly large size. More
than one angler fishing a neighborhood water
feature has caught a fish of over 10 pounds,
and you could be next. An average catch is more
like 1 or 2 pounds. Bass feed on a huge variety
of aquatic life crayfish, frogs, small water
snakes, fish and even ducklings are part of their
diets. Plastic worms are a favorite bait, and in
our tannin-stained waters dark colors work best
(purple is a killer). Spinnerbaits and topwater
plugs are also favorite lures. For livebaiters,
golden shiners are the standard. Small sunfish
also are good bait (to stay legal, you have to
catch your own on hook and line), as are cray-
fish. Although bass are edible, their flesh often
has a muddy flavor. If you want to eat fresh-
water fish, the next species is a better bet.
BLACK CRAPPIE, known locally as speckled
perch or just specks, are probably the best-eating
freshwater fish in our area. The mild white flesh
has earned them the name sac au lait (sack of
milk) in Louisiana. Unlike most other sunfish,
crappie prefer cooler water, which is why the
peak fishing season is the middle of winter.
When it's warmer, they can still be caught it's
a matter of finding the deepest spots, where the


water is coolest. Specks are dedicated
predators of smaller fish and rarely
take other baits, though they can be
caught on minnow-imitating lures.
The basic method is to tie on a jighead
or feather jig and put a minnow on
Sthe hook. This is often fished on
a long cane pole, and sometimes
crappie anglers will have dozens of
rods bristling out all around the boat.
Big ones (they can get larger than 2
pounds) sometimes take crankbaits
meant for bass. Crappie are narrow-
bodied fish and difficult to fillet without leaving
behind a lot of meat, so most fish are scaled,
beheaded, gutted and defined (in that order),
then battered or dusted with flour and fried
whole. Eating around the bones is a pain, but
that's the best way to minimize waste.
There are several smaller members of the
sunfish family in our waters BLUEGILL,
REDEARS (SHELLCRACKER), SPOTTED
SUNFISH and WARMOUTH. Most of these fish
are hand-size or smaller, but they make up for
small size with their willingness to bite. They
will take most small baits, including waxworms,
grass shrimp, chunks of nightcrawler and
minnows. Bluegills are the most common, and
the most aggressive feeders. Bluegills are also
the most likely to be caught on artificial lures;
they readily attack small spinnerbaits, flyrod
poppers and even miniature versions of popular
hardbaits. Small soft plastic grubs will take
bluegills also, and these"quieter" lures are also
eaten by the other species. Though less eager
to hit an artificial, shellcrackers pull harder. To
tell shellcrackers and bluegills apart, look for
a coppery patch on the forehead (a feature of
adult male bluegill) or a red edge to the flap on
the gill cover (on most, but not all, shellcrackers).
Spotted sunfish are smaller and have distinctive
coloration, very different from their cousins.
Warmouth are even easier to identify, with their
much larger mouths and stocky bodies. There
are no rock bass in Florida; warmouth take their
place. All of these fish are usually prepared using
the method described for crappie.
PICKEREL, a miniature version of the
northern pike, are popular sportfish that are


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strangely uncommon in this area. Despite
being plentiful both to our north and south,
pickerel are a rare catch here. In areas where
they live, they are often caught by bass anglers
using small lures in or near vegetation. Pick-
erel are ambush predators, hiding in tangles
of plants and darting out to grab small fish
swimming by. They're good to eat but very
bony, so they're usually released.
GAR and BOWFIN are members of an
ancient group of fishes, which explains their
primitive appearance. These fish can survive in
stagnant, polluted waters that would be fatal
to most other species. Aggressive predators
of smaller fish, gar are the bane of many bass
fishermen because they grab their shiners
and kill them. Gar are hard to hook because of
their bony mouths, but they are still frequently
caught. Although many anglers call their
catches alligator gar, that is a species of the
Mississippi River drainage and there are none
here. We have FLORIDA GAR (stocky with a
relatively short snout; grows to about 30 inches)
and LONGNOSE GAR (more slender with a long
snout; can reach nearly 6 feet). Bowfin, also


called mudfish, have more catholic diets and
often take lures meant for bass. Despite being
looked down on by many, bowfin are tenacious
fighters and much more entertaining on the line
than a bass of the same size.
In many parts of the country, freshwater
catfish are a favorite angling target. We're
spoiled for choice here and catfish are often


overlooked, but these bewhiskered
fish are plentiful and tasty. WHITE Blue ti
and CHANNEL CATFISH are both
silvery or grayish and are common
in the freshwater sections of the
Peace, Myakka and Caloosahatchee
rivers. YELLOW and BROWN
BULLHEADS are a bit smaller and
darker in coloration. All catfish bite
best at night or on overcast days.
Baits that smell strongly are used to
draw catfish, which hunt by scent.
Sometimes anglers use baits that
are rotten or putrid. In most cases,
baits that are fresher will work
better. Good choices include chicken
livers, smelly cheeses, dead shrimp
and prepared blood baits.

EXOTIC FRESHWATER FISH
Our warm waters are an inviting
habitat for a number of nonnative
fish, most of which were intro-
duced by accident (fish farm ponds
being flooded and spilling over
into other waters) or through state-sanctioned
programs. Some are also the descendents of
aquarium fish released by thoughtless owners.
Various African and South American cichlids
have made themselves at home in southern
Florida. In Southwest Florida, the most common
of these is the BLUE TILAPIA. If you seethe
bottom of a freshwater pond or canal pock-
marked by pits 2 to 3 feet wide, those are their
nests. Although sunfish also nest this way, tilapia
nests are bigger and closer together. Tilapia
eat a lot of plant material (in fact, they were
intentionally released as vegetation control) but
will also take meaty foods. They can be caught
on breadballs and worms, and sometimes will
hit an artificial lure or small dark fly. These fish
are delicious, and fisheries managers would like
you to kill every one you catch. In fact, practicing
catch-and-release with this and most other exotic
species is technically illegal.
MAYAN CICHLIDS, a brightly colored and
aggressive species, did poorly in the 2010
freezes and are just now rebuilding their popu-
lations locally. It's only a matter of time before


this is again a common fish here. Mayans will
hit almost any small lure and also like worms
and small fish. They are much stronger fighters
than native panfish of similar size. Many
cichlids OSCARS, BLACK ACARA, JAGUAR
GUAPOTE, MIDAS CICHLIDS, SPOTTED
TILAPIA and a whole host of other species
- are common in the canals of Naples and
throughout the Everglades. All are cold-sen-
sitive, and our regular winter chill is probably
sufficient to keep these fish from becoming
established here.
Some anglers who have heard of the incred-
ible PEACOCK BASS fishery in Florida will
be disappointed to learn that there are none
in this area. Before the state stocked
these fish to control other exotic :
species, they carefully evaluated K ,
the potential for them to spread
beyond the Miami-Dade canal
systems. Peacocks die in water
colder than 62 degrees, so these
amazing gamefish can't survive f rass
here year-round. It's worth the trip lm s
south to target them. Heck, back


when you had to go to Venezuela for peacocks,
it was still worth the trip.
GRASS CARP are the largest fish you're
likely to find in freshwater canals. These fish,
which are triploid (sterile), are stocked inten-
tionally in public waters to reduce vegetation
overgrowth. There's no point in keeping them,
since they taste terrible, and it's illegal anyway
- your tax dollars would have to buy more.
That's a lot of information, but there's a
lot more to be said about each of these fish
species. To learn more about the fishes of
Southwest Florida, read WaterLine every week.
If WaterLine doesn't come in your newspaper,
call 941-206-1300 to subscribe.


Srn


-1


;.j


w






IF YOU'RE MAPPYAND YOU KNOW IT...
We've devoted seven pages of this publication
to maps. These maps should give you an idea of
where to look for fish. We also helpfully includ-
ed locations of marinas, boat ramps and fishing
piers. If you take all the pages and put them
together, you'll have a map of the coastline
from Venice almost to Naples. You're welcome.


The Albee Road
and Blackburn
Point bridges over
Blackburn Bay are
confirmed snook
hangouts.


During stone crab season, the
crab trap floats are tripletail
magnets. When you spot one, go
back and wait for it to reappear.
Toss an unweighted shrimp or
whitebait and hang on.


Like all the Gulf passes, Venice
Inlet is a fantastic spot to fish. The
jetties here only make it better.
Snook lie in wait near the rocks,
sheepshead and snapper hunt
among the boulders, and mackerel
attack pods of bait in the channel.


N




w


Redfish and trout are more common
in grassy shallows than under the
bridges (most of the time, anyway).


Pompano
in the surf?
Yep they
like shrimp,
sand fleas or


Some of the same fish
you'll find at the jetties
also hang out around the
boulders that make up
the mitigation reef off
the beach, built to reduce
sand erosion. Flounder
are common on the sand
around the rocks.


The ICW is what makes
the island of Venice an
island. You'll find snook
around the bridges and
redfish feeding along the
edges of the channel.


The Venice Municipal Pier is one of the
longest Gulf piers in the state. In summer,
spawning snook prowl beneath it and tarpon
are a common sight as they run just off the
beach. You'll also find specialists here: Some
focus on sharks, which are not rare catches;
others try for king mackerel in spring and
fall. No license is needed to fish here the
city of Venice has you covered.


Any structure out in the open
Gulf is likely to hold reef fish.
Think of the seafloor as a desert
and piles of rubble or wrecks
as oases. Gag and juvenile red
grouper are quite common in
water as shallow as 20 feet.
Black grouper prefer deeper
water. Goliath grouper are
omnipresent on wrecks but less
common on ledges and natural
hard bottom.


Because structure is at a
premium out here, it pays
to investigate even the
smaller irregularities you
see on your fishfinder.
What looks insignificant
to you might be home to
hundreds of fish.


The rocks at Caspersen
Beach draw flounder,
pompano and other pred-
ators. You don't need huge
surf-style rods standard
inshore gear gets it done.


The ICW connects to
the north end of Lemon
Bay. Find healthy grass
and you'll probably find
trout and reds.


When the king mackerel are
running, you'll find more
fish hanging out above reefs
and wrecks. But the biggest
fish often cruise within a few
hundred feet of the beach.


A YEAR OF SALTWATER FISHING k
Tarpon "

Snook
Redfish.

Seatrout
Pompano
Permit
Sheepshead
Flounder
Cobia *
Tripletail
Bluefish
Spanish mackerel --
King mackerel_
Amberjack _

Snapper (inshore)
Snapper (offshore)i
Gag
Red Grouper

Sharks

* Poor; few fish around Fair; you have to be good or lucky Good; expect one or two Excellent; fish all over
PLEASE NOTE: This chart is intended to aive a general idea of an average year. Every year is different-- that's just part of the fun.




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By Josh Olive
WaterLine Publisher


Over the past few years, braided "superlines" have
become very popular. Many anglers who have made the
switch say they're converts for life and won't go back
to monofilament line. Braid has many advantages over
mono. It doesn't stretch, so it's much more sensitive -
you can feel every tap on your line, and you know just
what your lure is doing by feel alone. It's a lot smaller in
diameter than mono of the same strength, which means
it has less resistance to both air and water, enabling you
to cast farther and also allowing a live bait to move about
more freely. Reduced water resistance also makes it a
better choice for trolling. Because of the smaller diameter,
you can pack a lot more line on a given reel. It's more
abrasion resistant than mono sharp oysters or barna-
cles that would slice through monofilament will do much
less damage to braid. Braid both holds less water and is
less prone to drying out, both of which contribute to its
longer useful lifespan.
Of course, it's not perfect. Braid is opaque, so you have
to use leader, which many local anglers won't. Under

', ". 'YI- iab k


BOATINGANDFISHING.COM


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some circumstances, braid makes more noise as it moves ",...: ..
through the water. Because it won't stretch, it doesn't .,. ,:" '..'..
act as a shock absorber like monofilament does and can -.... ', '
be snapped by rapidly applied force (as in a snook taking -'" "*"
your bait a foot from the boat). K.. ;t.'. -.
Making the switch from mono to braid will require atjy.' '." /" "
you to relearn some techniques. Set your drag a little .**-" ** ;,. ,
looser since the line won't act a shock absorber, your ':'
drag will need to. When you cast, don't start cranking as 6-"' a'i,
soon as your lure hits the water. Flip your bail manually .: '
and pull the line taut, then pick up the slack and then S ":' '<
start working your lure. This isn't a bad thing. You may ., l '
recall having read somewhere that you should wait a few IW O6.
seconds after your bait splashes down to start working
it, and this little ritual will give you time to do just that. -ii g
Another difference is that unlike mono, you can cut your- -
self on braid that's been stretched taut. And cutting braid Fl'?&/'
will require a special tool you absolutely cannot snip it ,";
with your teeth. j-,- .. -- -s
Braided line is the latest step in the continued evolu- -.-- '- .-
tion of fishing line. Although monofilament will stick -
around for a while, it's not likely braid is going away -
until, of course, the next innovation comes along. --
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2 MILES


1 MILE 0.5 MILE


This map is not intended for use as a navigational chart. For your safety, use an actual chart for navigation.


~-1


Snook are quite at home in fresh
water and will often travel many
miles upriver in winter. It's not
uncommon to catch a snook on
one cast and a bass on another.


>-t,

yi:


Tarpon from 2 to 200
pounds use the Peace
and Myakka Rivers.
Small ones can be
found year-round; big
fish are most often
hooked in fall.


MAGAZINE .


/WeteTr 3)0

SWoAe. tC ewe















If your i i si


Lemon Bay is becoming
more turbid but still has a
lot of healthy seagrass at
the moment. This supports
large numbers of trout and
redfish, making Lemon Bay
an angling hotspot.


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Me-,co

Mexico


In addition to tarpon,
juvenile Goliath
grouper and young
sharks also utilize the
rivers. They're great
places to grow up.


5 MILES


A word about these maps:
The maps presented here are intended to be a representation of Southwest Florida's waterways and shorelines. No guarantee of exact dimensions or shapes is made or implied. Although every effort
has been made to include all available information herein, certain things may have been overlooked or may be incorrect. If you find any, point them out and we'll fix them next time. Fish are shown in
areas where that particular species is likely to find suitable habitat. Again, no guarantee is made or implied that you will be able to find or catch that species, or any other fish, in a given location.


MARINAS
1 Gulf Harbor Marina: 100 Circuit Road, Nokomis
2 Crow's Nest Marina: 1968 Tarpon Center Drive, Venice
3 Venice Yacht Club: 1330 Tarpon Center Drive, Venice (private)
4 Gulf Liner Marine: 601 Tamiami Trail N,Venice
5 MarineMax of Venice: 1485 STamiami Trail, Venice
6 Royal Palm Marina: 779 WWentworth Ave., Englewood
7 Stump Pass Marina: 260 Maryland Ave., Englewood
8 Marine Dynamics: 3340 Placida Road, Englewood
9 Cape Haze Marina: 6950 Placida Road, Englewood
10 Palm Island Marina: 7080 Placida Road, Englewood
11 Gulf Coast Marine Center: 4240 State Road 776, El Jobean
12 Charlotte HarborYacht Club: 4400 Lister Street, Port Charlotte (private)
13 Punta Gorda Marina: 25096 Marion Ave, Punta Gorda
14 Laishley Park Municipal Marina: 100 Nesbit Street, Punta Gorda
15 Fishermen's Village: 1200 W Retta Esplanade, Punta Gorda
16 Isles Yacht Club (private): 1780W Marion Ave., Punta Gorda
17 Gator Creek Marine: 5000 Deltona Drive, Punta Gorda
18 Gasparilla Marina: 15001 Gasparilla Road, Placida
19 Eldred's Marina: 6301 Boca Grande Causeway, Placida
20 Uncle Henry's Marina: 5800 Gasparilla Road, Boca Grande
21 The Inn Marina: 891 E 8th Street, Boca Grande
22 Boca Grande Marina: 220 Harbor Drive, Boca Grande
23 Whidden's Marina: E 1901 st Street, Boca Grande
24 Burnt Store Marina: 3192 Matecumbe Key Road, Punta Gorda
25 Bocilla Marina: 8115 Main Street, Bokeelia
26 Four Winds Marina: 16501 Stringfellow Road, Bokeelia
27 Jug Creek Marina: 16498 Tortuga Street, Bokeelia
28 Cabbage Key: Pineland
29 Pineland Marina: 13921 Waterfront Drive, Pineland
30 Old Fish House Marina: 4530 Pine Island Road NW, Matlacha


31 Pine Island Commercial Marina: 6001 Maria Drive, St James City
32 Cape Harbour Marina: 5789 Cape Harbour Drive, Cape Coral
33 Tarpon Pointe Marina: 1695 Silver King Blvd., Cape Coral
34 Cape Coral Yacht Club: 5819 Driftwood Parkway, Cape Coral
35 The Landings Marina: 5200 S Landings Drive, Fort Myers
36 Deep Lagoon Boat Club: 14030 McGregor Blvd, Fort Myers
37 Gulf Harbour Marina: 14490 Vista River Drive, Fort Myers
38 Peppertree Point: 14801 Laguna Drive, Fort Myers (private)
39 St. Charles Yacht aub: 15900 St. Charles Harbour Blvd., Fort Myers (private)
40 Monroe Canal Marina: 3105 Stringfellow Road, Bokeelia
41 Tween Waters Marina: 15951 Captiva Road, Captiva
42 Castaways Marina: 6460 Sanibel-Captiva Road, Sanibel
43 Sanibel Marina: 634 N Yachtsman Drive, Sanibel
44 Port Sanibel Marina: 14341 Port Comfort Road, Fort Myers
45 Moss Marine: 450 Harbor Court, Fort Myers Beach
46 Ft. Myers Beach Marina: 703 Fisherman's Wharf, Fort Myers Beach
47 Salty Sam's Marina: 2500 Main Street, Fort Myers Beach
48 Snook Bight Marina: 4765 Estero Blvd., Fort Myers Beach
49 Mullock Creek Marina: 1850 Mullock Creek Lane, Fort Myers
50 Fish Tale Marina: 7225 Estero Blvd., Fort Myers Beach
51 Big Hickory Fishing Nook Marina: 26107 Hickory Blvd., Bonita Springs
52 Bonita Bay Marina: 27598 Marina Pointe Drive, Bonita Springs
53 Fish Trap Marina: 4792 Bonita Beach Road, Bonita Springs
54 Cocohatchee River Marina: 13535 Vanderbilt Drive, Naples


RAMPS
55 Nokomis Ramp: 100 Casey Key Road, Nokomis
56 Loreto Ramp: 800 Loreto Court, Nokomis (limited parking)
57 Venice Marina Ramp Park: 301 E.Venice Ave., Venice
58 South Venice Ramp: 1500 Lemon Bay Drive, S.Venice (private)
59 Manasota Beach Ramp: 8570 Manasota Key Road, Englewood


Port Charlotfr


Don't overlook these
short canals when you're
fishing the Myakka.
There's a huge amount of
snook habitat in them.


-- At El Jobean, the
Myakka narrows
and flows through
a trestle and two
bridges. With so
Many ambush sites,
it's no wonder this 0 .
spot is as popular
with fish as it is
with fishermen. L.,
Excellent fishing Q '
from the trestle or.
from a boat. J


If you suspect a
wildlife or boating law
violation, report it lto
the FVWCs Wildlife
Alert Reward Program.
If your informal ion
results in an arrest, you
may be eligible for
a reward of up to $1.000.
Call 888-404-FWCC,
or dial FWVC or
FWC on your cell
MAKE A DIFFERENCE.


Stump Pass is a great
area to fish from shore,
but the walk is a killer.
Choose your tackle care-
fully and pare down to
the essentials or invest
in a beach cart.






Knight Island is accessible only by
boat, so the beaches see less foot
IQL traffic than others in the area. There-
fore, they are excellent for anglers
seeking to do a little surf fishing. Of
course, the hard part is getting there.


The canals of Port j
Charlotte are generally
salt south of U.S. 41 ,B
and fresh to the north.
Snook and baby tarpon
My can be found almost
* anywhere in the system.

,---L jiiJ Ii
, ,, .J __ L f Jl _LJ i

B JUJ rIL-LJLU)
Deafly TheMyakkaCutoff II
--"f is too shallow for
Q most boats, but the
\ fishing is great.


60 Snook Haven Ramp: 5000 E.Venice Ave., Venice (fee)
61 Marina Park: 7030 Chancellor Blvd., North Port
62 Indian Mound Park Ramp: 210 Winson Ave., Englewood
63 Ainger Creek Park Ramp: 2011 Placida Road, Englewood
64 El Jobean Ramp: 4224 El Jobean Road, Port Charlotte
65 Butterford Ramp: 13555 Marathon Boulevard, Port Charlotte
66 South Gulf Cove Ramp: 10150Amicola Street, Port Charlotte
67 Spring Lake Ramp: 3520 Lakeview Boulevard, Port Charlotte
68 Port Charlotte Beach Ramp: 4500 Harbor Boulevard, Port Charlotte
69 Harbor Heights Park Ramp: 27420 Voyageur Drive, Punta Gorda
70 Riverside Park: 8320 Riverside Drive, Punta Gorda (limited parking)
71 Darst Park Ramp: 537 Darst Avenue, Punta Gorda
72 Laishley Municipal Ramp: 100 Nesbit Street, Punta Gorda
73 Ponce de Leon Park Ramp: 3400 Ponce De Leon Parkway, Punta Gorda
74 Gasparilla Marina: 15001 Gasparilla Road, Placida (private)
75 Placida Ramp: Boca Grande Causeway and Gasparilla Road, Placida
76 Eldred's Marina: 6301 Boca Grande Causeway, Placida (fee)
77 Uncle Henry's Marina: 5820 Gasparilla Road, Boca Grande (fee)
78 Burnt Store Marina Ramp: 3192 Matecumbe Key Road,
Punta Gorda (private)
79 Lavender's Landing: 7290 Barrancas Ave. NW, Bokeelia
80 Pineland Marina Public Ramp: 13851 Waterfront Drive, Pineland
81 Burnt Store Ramp: 230 Burnt Store Road South, Cape Coral
82 D & D Bait & Tackle: 3922 Pine Island Road, Matlacha (private)
83 Matlacha Ramp: 4577 Pine Island Road NW, Matlacha
84 Pine Island Commercial Marina Ramp: 6001 Maria Drive, St.James City
85 Cape CoralYacht Club Ramp: 5819 Driftwood Parkway, Cape Coral
86 Punta Rassa Ramp: 18700 Punta Rassa Road, Fort Myers
87 Port Sanibel Marina: 14341 Port Comfort Road, Fort Myers (private)
88 Sanibel Ramp: Sextant Drive and Causeway Road, Sanibel
89 Ebb Tide Ramp: 1725 Main Street, Fort Myers Beach (private)
90 Lovers Key State Park Ramp: 8700 Estero Boulevard, Fort Myers Beach


This area often holds
small sharks and has
been known to hold an
occasional sawfish.


91 Big Hickory Pass Ramp: 26107 Hickory Blvd, Bonita Springs
92 Imperial River Ramp: 27551 S Tamiami Trail, Bonita Springs
93 Fish Trap Marina: 4794 Bonita Beach Rd, Bonita Springs (private)


FISHING PIERS
94 North Venice Jetty: 1000 Casey Key Road, Nokomis
95 South Venice Jetty: West end of Tarpon Center Drive, Venice
96 Venice Municipal Pier: 1600 Harbor Drive S,Venice (no license req'd)
97 Ainger Pier: 1385 Beach Road, Englewood
98 El Jobean Pier: End of Garden Road, El Jobean
99 Spring Lake Park: 3520 Lakeview Boulevard, Port Charlotte
100 Port Charlotte Beach Park: 4500 Harbor Boulevard, Port Charlotte
101 Bayshore Live Oak Park West Pier: 23157 Bayshore Road, Port Charlotte
102 Bayshore Live Oak Park East Pier: 23157 Bayshore Road, Port Charlotte
103 Adrienne Street Pier: East Marion Ave and Adrienne Street, Punta Gorda
104 Laishley Park Pier: 100 Nesbit Street, Punta Gorda
105 Gilchrist Park Pier: 400 West Retta Esplanade, Punta Gorda
106 Ponce de Leon Park Pier: 3400 Ponce De Leon Parkway, Punta Gorda
107 Allapatchee Park Pier: 3100 Hickory Court, Punta Gorda
108 Coral Creek Pier: Fishery Road and Gasparilla Road, Placida
109 Gasparilla Pier: Fishery Road and Gasparilla Road, Placida
110 Boca Grande Pier: 5810 Gasparilla Road, Boca Grande
111 Bokeelia Pier: end of Main Street, Bokeelia (no license req'd, fee)
112 Matlacha Community Park Pier: 4577 Pine Island Road NW, Matlacha
113 Yacht Club Community Park Pier: 5819 Driftwood Parkway, Cape Coral
114 Bunche Beach Piers: 18201 John Morris Road, Fort Myers
115 Lighthouse Beach Pier: Southern end of Periwinkle Way, Sanibel
116 Fishermans Wharf Pier: 700 Fisherman's Wharf, Fort Myers Beach
117 Lynn Hall Memorial Pier: 950 Estero Blvd, Fort Myers Beach
118 Lovers Key State Park Pier: 8700 Estero Blvd, Fort Myers Beach
119 Imperial River Pier: 27551 S Tamiami Trail, Bonita Springs


Many anglers
ignore the
Peace River,
which is dumb.
Navigation can
be a challenge
- go slow until
you know.


Harbor
Heights


Peace River


Punta Gorda


Upper 3I



Charlotte



Harbor


-^ ^"--(K


The canals of South
Gulf Cove are
important habitat
for many species
of fish. This also
makes them a great
spot to wet a line.


The U.S. 41 bridges over the Peace River
are a favorite shore-fishing spot. As of
this writing, it's legal to do so from the
catwalk. However, be careful to avoid
conflicts with those walking or running
the bridge. Be sure to take your trash
back with you, and collect any trash you
come across. It only takes a couple bad
actors to ruin this spot for everyone -
don't be one of them.


Alligator Creek is
shallow and muddy,
but there are some
huge snook-- if you
can figure out where
they like to stay.



tor Creek


0 3Q


Marinas

* Boat ramps

SFishing piers


**;
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- ~.u. mu. -


BOATINGANDFISHING.COM


By Lee Anderson
WaterLine Editor


Manatees are cute. They just are. We've all
seen them before, and if you've spent time on
the water in Southwest Florida, you've likely
seen one for yourself. They are big, with adults
often weighing more than 1,000 pounds. But
as big as they get, manatees are herbivores. No
meat here, they only consume vegetation. Their
role in Charlotte Harbor is as a plant eater. Like
cows, they spend much of their time grazing -
hence the nickname, sea cow.
Grazing is pretty important to our ecosystem.
They keep the grass population in check, and
re-fertilize the areas where they feed and
provide food for decomposers. Manatees
have adapted over they years to allow them
to harvest the food they need, even when it's
scarce. They feed everywhere from the water s
surface to the ocean floor. Flexible flippers and
long, maneuverable lips allow them to eat at
odd angles even on plants above water.
West Indian manatees are what we have
In iloxidL&..hey prefer warmer temperatures


through brackish water estuaries to freshwater
springs.
When water temperatures dip below 68
degrees and manatees endure sustained expo-
sure to colder waters, their metabolisms can
slow, causing them to stop eating. This weakens
their immune systems and can cause manatees
to become susceptible to secondary infections,
such as pneumonia. In 2010, when Southwest
Florida water temperatures dropped to 48
degrees and down to 20 degrees in Central
Florida, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission reported 282 manatees dying
from cold stress.
Historically, manatees were hunted for flesh,
bones, and hide by Native Americans, and later
by the early colonists. Manatee
fat was used for lamp oil, bones were used
for medicinal purposes, and hide for leather.
Manatees are now covered under the U.S.
Endangered Species Act of 1973, and can live
nearly 60 years.
Besides cold water temperatures, what
are other factors that


threaten manatees? In Charlotte Harbor,
humans and red tide.
How does red tide kill such large mammals?
The FWC says the toxins in the algal blooms
settle onto the sea grass that manatees
eat, causing them to become paralyzed and
incapable of surfacing for air. They eventually
drown, incapable of surfacing for air. The grass
beds are capable of retaining their poisonous
coating for another two months after the bloom
ends.
As mentioned, it is illegal to harvest a
manatee. So how do humans affect their
survival rate? By driving over them with boats.
State officials warn boaters to slow down and
be on the lookout for manatees, especially in
warmer, shallow water, where the mammals
can fall victim to boat propellers. To spot a sea
cow, boaters and personal watercraft operators
should scan the water near or in front of their
vessels and look for signs that manatees are
close by, including repetitive swirl patterns
called a manatee footprint, a mud trail, or a


snout or tail breaking the water's surface.
Here are some other steps boaters and
personal watercraft operators can take to
help manatees migrate safely: Keep vessels in
marked channels. Wear polarized sunglasses to
improve your vision. Obey posted boat speed
zones. Use poles, paddles or trolling motors
when close to manatees. Have someone help
scan the water when underway.
Besides following manatee-safety recom-
mendations, people can help manatees survive
by reporting sick, distressed, injured, orphaned
or entangled manatees to the FWC's Wildlife
Alert hotline at 888-404-FWCC or text Tip@
MyFWC.com. Florida residents also can call
#FWC or *FWC via cellphone.
Manatee conservation is supported by
Flonridians who purchase the state's manatee
license plate. Funds from this specialty tag go
directly to manatee research and conservation.
Copies of complete individual county waterway
rules are available atFLRules.org. VisitMyFWC.
com/Manatee or call 850-922-4330 for more
information.


Serving the Area Boater since 2003

We're ready-We're willing-We're Abel.


m ri-nrD-


*YAMAHA


S


Factory Authorized Certified Trained
Sales & Service


Abel's Marine
7341 Sawyer Circle, Port Charlotte, FL 33981
941-698-4006


WF MoSftorfuide
^^ NEVER STOR
Find us on
Facebook

www.AbelsMarine.com


Anywhere. Anytime.


--1 ^-


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tt t ,. '.' >"i L .] :" % k _.l1^ 'r
', Placida .-
"..,, \ Harbor ,j.-

k ^ I .


The Placida trestle holds
fish of many species. Both
ends are fishing piers, but
the midsection can only be rvr-
reached by boat. 'i


4 Gasparilla Pass is
tricky to navigate
-- the north side
is shoaling badly.
Use caution.





Gulf


Tarpon don't stay
in the pass. They
cruise along the
beaches to feed,
and the bite there
is often better.


._i



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SSound
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DeyMib
~ Key


Saltwater ponds are scattered
all over the Cape Haze penin-
sula. Most hold snook and
juvenile tarpon, both of which
grow up in this type of habitat.
Baby tarpon on fly? Yes, please.


1*
00 '*"**
siser wa


... ".-- .'-S ..,_..
S. ,-...J Look for areas of deep
'", ....- water right along
j shorelines. Reds, snook
S and mangrove snapper
S ..i love these spots.
.' -" L....
i' t' --i .- "^ -\ 'I' ', "'1 ""
.:._ -, (, 5 >. ". "^ i --..


little _j-..r-
Cape Haze


Gasparilla Sound,
Bull Bay and Turtle
Bay are all shallow
and grassy. Island
shorelines can
be particularly
productive areas.


of


Mexico





~~CIL

The largest gathering of
spawning tarpon in the
Atlantic Basin happens
every spring in Boca Grande
Pass. The Pass is also full
of gag grouper, but you're
more likely to snag the
bottom than hook a fish.

As tarpon head to the Pass,
they cross over very shallow
water where they can be "2
sight-fished. Guys who throw
flies at them like that sort of
thing, so they hang out here.


Docks and piers along
Gasparilla Island are
good places to find snook
and sheepshead. The big
oil drum hold Goliath
grouper bigger than you
probably want to catch.


Tarpon and
sharks both
frequent the
deeper holes
in the middle
of the Harbor.
They're here
to scavenge,
so dead baits
on the bottom
work best.


Hard bottom at
Cape Haze Point
holds flounder
and pompano.


The Charlotte Harbor
Reef can be highly
productive. Keeper
gags are a realistic
possibility, and Goliath
grouper (mostly in the
50-pound range) are
common. Watch out for
your anchor many
have been lost here.


Snook get way up into the
backcountry, including
into water that doesn't
really seem to connect to
the Harbor. It does.


Lower


Charlotte


Harbor


Cape Haze Reef is smaller than Char-
lotte Harbor Reef, but it's closer to
the Gulf. Fishing is good at both, but
if one isn't producing, try the other.


The shoals here can
sneak up on you. Use
extra care navigating
this area.


Gravel bottom in
this area of the
Harbor often holds
sharks some-
times big sharks.


Ii


Pirate


SCreek


W- ~ ~ -




OIL-p







020--; 1001-S N
144 0. n0


There are few large tarpon in
these canals, but lots and lots
of juveniles. They're more fun
anyway- at least, if you can
get them to bite. An assortment
of tiny flies might help.


Store


The shallow grassflats in this
area are known for redfish,
flounder and trout. The
barrier sandbar is patrolled
by smaller sharks, pompano
and (in summer) cobia.


I -


The area just south of
Two Pines often holds
large tarpon early in
the season. Later in
the summer, not so
much. Go figure.


Cayo
,.-', Costa


Healthy grass in the
northern part of
Matlacha Pass holds
good numbers of redfish,
which come here to feed
on worms and clams.


~ ~


4%
4


-~


The old Matlacha Bridge
used to be a world-fa-
mous snook hangout. The
replacement bridge has
some fish, but the good old
days are gone forever.


aw
6?Koy


Bottom fishing can be fantastic in
this general area. To find new spots,
try trolling a deep-running lipped
plug about 10 feet off the bottom.
When a gag hits it, mark the spot and
investigate with baits on the bottom.


5 MILES


You may think of redfish as an inshore
species, but those are the babies.
Adults spend most of their time in the
open waters of the Gulf. Big schools
come near shore in late summer and
early fall, but you'll have to be lucky.


SMIIFS


r navigation.


Pine


This map is uot intended for use as a navigaional ciat .For yr safme, use an actuali


Island


Sound


C


w mmmmba N&III|Nw


4W^S


\


I don't read the local news, but I want





dmC u
delivered to my door. Can you do that?.


q 411


I





/I/ ,,,o H li, i !ll |IIM lI IId Iif.! ;H i I '.r t Tl


BOATINGANDFISHING.COM


By Josh Olive
WaterLine Publisher
Having the right tools is important for any
project. Whether you're at work or at play, you'll
be much more efficient and effective when you
have what you need to get the job done.
Fishing is no different. But with so many
options available in rods and reels, it's easy to get
bogged down in the details when you're selecting
your gear. Let's simplify the situation.
You can take part in the majority of our local
fishing opportunities using one rod and reel
outfit: A 7-foot medium rod (rated somewhere
between 12- and 20-pound line) and a 3000-size
spinning reel, spooled with 12-pound monofil-
ament or 20-pound braid. This general-purpose
combo can be used to catch redfish on the
flats, snook around docks, flounder in the surf,
mackerel in the passes, snapper on the reefs
and bass in the canals. I suggest a 7-foot rod as
a compromise: A longer rod would be better on
the open flats, and a shorter rod would be better
when you're fishing straight down or among the
trees. Rod action is personal preference, but I
would suggest a softer rod if you use live bait and
a stiffer rod for lure fishing. If you do a little of
both, split the difference.
There are some things that your new all-pur-
pose outfit is ill-suited for, and those things can
be summed up in two words: Big fish. To be able
to go after tarpon, seriously big snook, cobia and
king mackerel, you need something heavier. A
dual-drag spinning reel in a 5000 or 6000 size
paired with a 7-foot heavy rod (rated for line
between 30 and 50 pounds) is just about right.
Line up with 30-pound mono or 50-pound braid.
The dual-drag reel makes this rig ideal for trolling
and for using big live baits, popular methods for
taking our bigger gamefish. In addition to the
species listed above, this is also a good outfit to
take on sharks up to about 5 feet, big snapper
and smaller grouper and amberjack on the reefs,
and the huge redfish that school just offshore in


the fall. You probably won't be casting artificial
lures with this rod too often casting with
heavy gear can be exhausting after just a few
throws. You will, however, probably be doing
some trolling, which works best with a rod that
has a softer tip.
So far you have two outfits: Medium and
heavy. But there are yet bigger fish swimming in
our waters, so your next rig is the extra-heavy.
With this, you can take on big grouper (including
Goliath grouper up to a couple hundred pounds),
bruiser amberjack, and all but the largest sharks.
A conventional reel in a 6/0 size and a 6-foot
rod rated for 50- to 80-pound line is about what
you'll want. Braided line is not really appropriate
on conventional reels (see sidebar). The reel can
be star drag or lever drag. Many rods in this class
have roller guides, which add significant cost.
They're nice but hardly necessary.
With the three rigs we've looked at, you can
catch 99 percent of what's out there. But sport
fishing is about having fun, so I'll suggest one
final outfit. As we all know, not every fish is a big
one. To make the most out of hooking smaller
fish ladyfish, sea trout, rat redfish, and even
panfish in salt or fresh water an ultralight rod
and reel is just the ticket. A 1000 size spinning
reel on a 6-foot rod rated for 2- to 8-pound line.
To maximize line capacity on a small reel, braid
in 4- to 8-pound test is the way to go. Most ultra-
light rods are 5 or 5.5 feet, but a longer rod will
cast a lot farther and is worth looking for. As you
gain angling experience, you may even use your
ultralight to take on larger fish, especially on the
flats or in the surf where there are few snags and
it's OK to let the fish run.
From this point, you can expand your tackle
into more specialized realms. There are any
number of rods and reels for specific purposes,
which is why there are so many choices avail-
able at a well-stocked tackle shop. But with a
carefully chosen arsenal of multipurpose rods and
reels, you can catch almost anything that swims
without spending a fortune on gear.


-~ j -,.nI. -
.-~--- .1~
- ~ ~

24
-


York Road


Marine 5



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Pine


It's nowhere near
as deep as Boca
Grande Pass,
but Redfish Pass
still attracts a
number of tarpon
in late spring and
summer. There are
also fewer anglers.


Canal snook often
hang out under boats. ]
Look for the ones that
rarely if ever move -] j-
from their docks. -i. .


Fort

Myers


Island


Sound


Deeper cuts in Pine Island
Sound are often haunts for
sharks. Lemon sharks especially
find the mix of shallow flats and
rocky channels to their liking.
CUMno
cbj f^


*op


When the Caloosahatchee is
Slowing strongly, fishing in this
area is usually slow. Focus your
Efforts elsewhere at such times.

a 0 ro


ru uIul MII aU


Tarpon Bay is (allegedly)
where the first tarpon
was caught on rod and
reel. It's still a good spot,
though there are more
snook than tarpon.


In winter, the saltwater
canals of Cape Coral teem
with sheepshead. There's
no better bait than a
chunk of fresh shrimp
meat with no shell.


Fort

Myers

Beach


Both the east
and west sides
of Pine Island
are very fishy.


Snook can be found
far up in small creeks
and waterways. They
seem to sometimes
prefer places where
they barely fit.


The pilings that support docks
and piers also provide a place
for oysters and barnacles to
attach. Sheepshead love to eat
both, which is why they love
pilings so darn much.


South

Fort

Myers


Although Blind Pass is offi-
cially closed, the fish seem
to remember. Pompano and
flounder, which like passes,
can still be caught here.


The Sanibel Causeway spans the
mouth of the Caloosahatchee
River. Its pilings harbor gag
and Goliath grouper, and the
structure attracts many other
finny visitors.


Look for small depth changes
in grassy areas. It doesn't
take much -just a couple
inches difference to
create an ambush spot for a
well-camouflaged trout.


Is'.',',


Sanibel is famed for world-class
shelling. You'll find the best goodies
after a storm moves in from the
south. The beaches here are great for
family fun: Dad can fish, Mom can
hunt shells, and the kids can play. Or
however your family does things.


Surf fishing can be tough on Fort
Myers Beach because of heavy
human traffic. The pier offers a better
shot at reaching undisturbed fish.


is Pail,#


Cobia cruise the beaches
regularly. Keep an eye out
for a swimming log. When
you see one, cast to it.


Small areas of hard
bottom such as gravel
beds or oyster bars
can hold surprisingly
large numbers of fish.
Pompano and redfish
especially like to feed
in these areas.


A lot of water flows through Big Carlos
Pass, which is why big predators swim
here. Snook cruise inches from shore here.
To avoid spooking them, cast upcurrent
and work your bait with the water flow.


.317' 12


S50.989' 82 05.
S50.989' 82 05.
S51.502' 82 05.:
' 51.502' 82 05.'


317'1 12


26 48.8.OU 018--.6l0U4
26 48.671' 82 19.620'
26 48.500' 82 19.541'


__^uoncete cuivetns ____
Concrete culverts
Reef balls, concrete modules


S 12 Reef balls, concrete modules
3' 12 Reef balls, concrete modules
5' 12 Reef balls, concrete modules^^^^
12 Reef balls, concrete modules, culverts


' 30 Reef Center, concrete bridge sections
9 30 Concrete culverts
4 30 Concrete culverts


1


,JI Z J I I
SP21
CD4EA4 I


1i


~f~3


60' steel barge
concretee culverts, limestone, seawall slab


(Creek


Bon
Springs


create culverts
icrete culverts


I 30 CConcrete culverts
30 Concrete culverts
30 Concrete culverts


NRMem 2006 26 48.557' 82 19.699' 30 Novak Memorial
NR7 2004 26 48.461' 82 19.822' 30 Concrete bridge sections
NRMB 2012 260 48.485' 820 19.602' 30 Matlacha bridge sections

Tremnblay Ree
TRB90 2006 26 48.415' 82 22.651' 42 90' Steel barge
TRCntr 2003 26 48.350' 82 22.700' 42 Reef Center, concrete bridge sections
TR1 2004 26 48.241' 82 22.822' 42 Concrete bridge sections


1


IA


I Concrete cuivers, power poles, boxes


I Concrete culverts, power
1I0'-qtp1 hqrr a. &Otpl


, boxes


If you catch a snook
in the Imperial,
look closely. All four
species of south
Florida snook have
been found here.


10


' 82 18.
'I R 1 1


Find all these species and more at the
reefs listed above. Public reefs are often
heavily used, so plan to fish early or late
if you don't want much company.


30U Cuoncrete pilings
29 I Concrete culverts


40' Steel ship


I 21nin 1OR A A7'I


42 1


When tarpon are in the rivers,
an excellent bait to use is
the back half of a saltwater
catfish, either on the bottom
or suspended under a float.


12
' 18


Although saltwater fishing is
very popular, Florida's orig-
inal claim to angling fame
was as the largemouth bass
capital of the world. Flori-
da-strain largemouths have
now been stocked around the
world, but we still have the
originals here. Now we also
have peacock bass, Mayan
cichlids and a bunch of other
hard-fighting exotic species
calling this state home. If
you're looking for something
a little different, try tossing
a Beetle Spin or small lipped
plug in a canal.


13












Talk

By Josh Olive
WaterLine Publisher

Southwest Florida tides are myste-
rious things. They come in and go out
in odd patterns, with as many as five
a day or as few as one. Low tide may
occur an hour after high tide and be
recorded at the same height, then the
water may flood in and get 18 inches
higher in a few hours.
It may seem like multiple person-
ality disorder, but our strange tides
are really just the result of the shape
of the Gulf of Mexico. See, on the open
Atlantic coast, you have one high tide
and one low tide in a 24-hour period.
These are called diurnal tides. In other
places, there are two high and two low
tides. These are semidiurnal tides. So
far, so good.
But along the Gulf coast, we have
what are called mixed tides some-
times diurnal, sometimes semidiurnal.
The mechanics of it are very complex,
so let's leave it at this: The sea bounces
off the coastal contours of the Gulf like
water sloshing about in an irregularly
shaped bin. Determining what it will
do can be done by mathematical equa-
tion, but not by simply observing the
previous day's tides.
Fortunately, there's a solution -
and we print it in every edition of
WaterLine Weekly Magazine. Tide
charts do all that pesky math for you,
so at a glance you can find out how
much water will be under your hull
when you're crossing the Cape Haze
bar. (Actually, that's only mostly true;
I'll explain in just a moment.) But a


I II I


ing tides


tide chart is no good unless you can
read it. If you're still in the dark, no
worries.
Here's how it works: Tide heights are
expressed in feet above or below mean
lower low water, which is a technical
term for sea level. Abbreviated MLLW,
these are the depths shown on a
navigational chart. On our tide charts,
these are expressed in both text and
graph form. The graph (the ones that
look a bit like a very unhealthy heart
rate readout) is a bit easier for the
uninitiated to grasp. Wherever the
line goes up, the tide is rising. Where
it goes down, the tide is falling. It's
easy to see the relative height of each
day's tides. The numbers at the top
and bottom of each squiggle show the
time of the maximum high of low in
a 24-hour format and the predicted
height. Days are represented by light
or dark blue boxes.
In this format, it's easy to see when
the tide will be rising or falling quickly
- the steeper the slope, the faster
the tide (again, mostly true; I really
will explain in just a sec here).
Below the graphs, you'll find the same
information in a text-only format. This
is how tide charts are usually presented
on giveaway cards, because you can fit
the information into a smaller space. If
you look at the numbers and compare
them to the ones on the graph, you'll see
they're the same.
Tide charts are only accurate for
the listed location. Inshore, the closer
you are to the Gulf the sooner a low
or high tide will happen. For example,
the times listed for Punta Gorda are


correct only for the exact spot where
the tide station is (I believe it's the U.S.
41 bridges). If you're at Ponce de Leon
Park, a couple miles closer to the Gulf,
low and high tides will occur a few
minutes sooner than the time shown.
It takes time for water to flow.
Now, about that explaining: There
are a couple variables that can affect
tide height, sometimes hugely. Tide
predictions are available years in
advance. They're based on moon
phase and season, and there's no way
they can account for local weather
conditions. In the winter, we have
naturally lower low tides. We also have
a prevailing north or northwest wind
that tends to push water out of the
Harbor. No tide chart takes this wind
into consideration, which is why some-
times a tide that's predicted to be, say,
0.36 can actually be -0.24. The harder
and longer the wind blows, the more
this effect will be magnified.
In summer, strong southerly or
westerly winds can have the opposite
effect, driving water levels up. We saw
that twice this past year, with high
tides nearly spilling over seawalls all
around the area. High rainfall and the
river flooding that ensues can also cause
tides to be higher than predicted.
Be absolutely clear on this tide
height is a prediction ONLY. You as
a responsible boater must factor in
conditions at your location. That weak-
ness aside, tide charts are a fantastic
tool for anyone who uses the water,
which is why we devote the time and
effort to producing them every single
week.


BOATINGANDFISHING.COM


water is moving on the incoming or outgoing tide, it sweeps little fish
and invertebrates along with it. The faster the water is moving, the
more food it carries along for the ride. That's why experienced anglers
generally fish when the tide is falling or rising, rather than the slack
water of high or low tide.
Of course, not all water movement is equal. Where water runs through
natural or manmade channels, it tends to run harder. These types of areas
also usually have spots where a predator can duck out of sight, creating
an ideal ambush point for example, the backside of an oyster bar.
Fish tend to seek this kind of structure, because that's where the food is
easiest to catch.
Fish also need enough water to swim in, which is why flats fishermen
check tides obsessively. When the grass has only 4 inches of water over it,
there'll be no redfish on the flat. But as the tide comes up, the reds will
flood into the grass along with the water, seeking out all the food that
was unreachable an hour before.
For those who fish the open Gulf, tides are less important. But if you
plan to fish anywhere in Charlotte Harbor, get familiar with a tide chart
and how to read it.
I --I


mair


-1


;.j












Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: 100 pounds per harvester in
state waters; included in aggregate bag of 20
reef fish in federal waters
Season:none
Notes: 9,11

AMBERJACK, GREATER


Size limit: 30" min.
Daily bag limit: 1 per harvester
Season: Closed June 1-July 31; subject to
additional closure in federal waters if quota met
Notes: 1,3,4,5,9

AMBERJACK, LESSER
BANDED RUDDERFISH


Size limit: Slot 14"to 22"
Daily bag limit: Aggregate 5 per harvester
Season:none
Notes: 1,4,5,9

BLACK
DRUM





Size limit: Slot 14"to 24"(may possess one
fish larger than 24")
Daily bag limit: 5 per harvester
Season:none
Notes: 5,7,8

BLACK
SEA BASS ..


Size limit:
10 nun.
Daily bag limit: 100 pounds per harvester
Season:none
Notes: 2,4,5,9

BLUEFISH



Size limit: 12" min.
Daily bag limit: 10 per harvester
Season:none
Notes: 1,5

BLUE RUNNER





Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: 100 per harvester
Season:none

BONEFISH A


Size limit: n/a T
Daily bag limit: Zero, harvest prohibited
Season:none
Notes: May be possessed temporarily at site of
capture for photos, measuring and weighing.


Size limit: 33" min.
Daily bag limit: In state waters, 1 per
harvester or 6 per vessel, whichever is less. In
federal waters, 2 per harvester.
Season:none
Notes: 1,5

CRAB, BLUE ,. 9V=
Size limit: none
Daily bag
limit: 10
gallons
whole

Season: Closed (
Sept. 20-Oct. 4 :.
in state waters bey:nrd 3 niileh
Closed to trapping July 10-19 in
odd years for trap cleanup. Traps not allowed in
federal waters.
Notes: 5 trap maximum. 10

CRAB,STONE
Size limit: 2.75"
min. from
nonmoving
claw tip to
base of first
joint -
Daily bag ^ ^i
limit: 1 gal- k
Ion per harvester
or 2 gallons per vessel, whichever is less
Season: Closed May 16 to Oct. 14
Notes: 5 trap maximum. Possession of whole
crab illegal; harvest claws only. 10

DOLPHIN (MAHI MAHI)


lj


N


Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: 10 per harvester or 60 per
vessel, whichever is less
Season:none
Notes: 5

FLOUNDER, ALL SPECIES


Size limit: 12 n n. -
Daily bag limit: 10 per harvester
Season:none
Notes: Harvest by gig or spear allowed. 2,5,8

GROUPER, BLACK


Size limit: 22" min.
Daily bag limit: 4 per harvester within
aggregate bag of 4 grouper
Season: None in most waters, closed Feb. I to
March 31 in federal waters outside 20-fathom break
Notes: 2,3,4,5,9

GROUPER, GAG


Size limit: 22" min.
Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester within
aggregate bag of 4 grouper
Season: July 1 Dec. 3 in state waters. In
federal waters, open July 1; closure TBD.
Notes: 2,3,4,5,9


Brought is you by ,


State and federal saltwater fishing / ( o


an.il.Itinno fni @n.ithulnoet linwirdl


I oUUIULIUIIO HUN UUuIIfIooL HUl E ua


GROUPER, GOLIATH


Season: n/a
Notes: Legal to target for catch and release in
state waters but not in federal waters

GROUPER, NASSAU


Daily bag limit: Zero, harvest prohibited.
Season: n/a
Notes: n/a


Size limit: 20" min.
Daily bag limit: 4 per harvester within
aggregate bag of 4 grouper
Season: None in most waters, closed Feb. I to
March 31 in federal waters outside 20-fathom br
Notes: 2,3,4,5,9

GROUPER, SCAMP


Size limit: 16" min.
Daily bag limit: 4 per harvester within
aggregate bag of 4 grouper
Season: None in most waters, closed Feb. I to
March 31 in federal waters outside 20-fathom br
Notes: 2,3,4,5,9

GROUPER, SNOWY
GROUPER, YELLOWEDGE


Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: 4 per harvester within
aggregate bag of 4 grouper
Season:none
Notes: 2,3,4,5,9

GROUPER, SPECKLED HIND
GROUPER. WARSAW


Size '
limit: rn:,re
Daily bag limit:
1 per vesel vvithinr aggregate bag of 4 grouper
Season:none
Notes: 2,3,4,5,9


Size limit: '"
20"min.
Daily bag limit: 4 per harvester within
aggregate bag of 4 grouper
Season: None in most waters, closed Feb. I to
March 31 in federal waters outside 20-fathom break
Notes: 2,3,4,5,9

GROUPER, OTHER
(CONEY, GRAYSBY, RED HIND,
ROCK HIND AND TIGER)


break


Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: 4 per harvester within
S aggregate bag of 4 grouper
Season: None in most waters, closed Feb. I to
March 31 in federal waters outside 20-fathom break
S Notes: 2,3,4,5,9
... .... .. .. .. .
HOGFISH



break


Size limit: 12" min.
Daily bag limit: 5 per harvester
Season:none
Notes: 1,4,5,9

MACKEREL, KING (KINGFISH)


Size limit: `4 nmun
Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester
Season:none
Notes: Bag limit reduced to 1 per harvester
in some state waters when federal waters are
closed to harvest. See MyFWC.com/Fishing for
current regulations. 1,5

MACKEREL, SPANISH


Size limit: 12" min.
Daily bag limit: 15 per harvester
Season:none
Notes: Transfer of Spanish mackerel to other
vessels at sea prohibited. 1,5


MULLET, STRIPED AND SILVER





Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: Feb 1-Aug. 31: Aggregate
50 per harvester or 100 per vessel, whichever
is less; Sept. 1-Jan. 31: Aggregate 50 per
harvester or per vessel
Season:none
Notes: Bag limit also applies to mullet
used as bait. Harvest or possession of striped
mullet prohibited in Punta Gorda between
6 p.m. and 6 a.m. from Nov. 1-Feb. 29. See
http://bit.ly/urExej.

OYSTERS
Size limit: .
3"min. shell
Daily bag limit:
60 pounds or 2 '
5-gallon buckets
whole in shell per /
harvester or per ve.;.;eli
Season: Closed /
July 1-Sept. 30
Notes: Go to www.Florida
Aquaculture.com for allowable harvesting areas.

PERMIT -





Size limit:
Slot 11"to 20"(may possess one over 20")
Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester
Season:none
Notes: No more than two fish over 20" per
vessel. Hook and line gear only; spearing legal
only in federal waters. Rules differ in Special
Permit Zone south of Cape Sable (Florida Bay/
Keys); see http://bit.ly/rA94BJ. 1,5,7

POMPANO,
FLORIDA


SHEEPSHEAD


Size limit: Slot 18"to 27"
Daily bag limit: 1 per harvester or 8 per
vessel, whichever is less
Season:none
Notes: Gigging, spearing or snatching pro-
hibited. Illegal to harvest or possess in federal
water. Transport limit 6 per person. 2,5,7

SAILFISH jjf


Size limit: 63" min.
Daily bag limit: Aggregate 1 per harvester all
tiiilish (sailfish and marlin)
Season:none
Notes: Measured from tip of lower jaw to
center of fork. Highly Migratory Species
permit required to harvest in federal waters.
All harvested fish must be reported to NOAA
within 24 hours; call 800-894-5528.5

SEA TROUT, SPOTTED




Size limit: Slot 15"to 20" (may possess one
fish larger than 20")
Daily bag limit: 4 per harvester
Season:none
Notes: 2,5,7

SHARK, ALL A
SPECIES


Size limit: -_
11" minimum
Daily bag limit: 6 per harvester -
Season:none


Notes: Legal to harvest with a cast net or
seine. 1,5,7


-


Size limit: 24" min.
Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester or per vessel
Season:none
Notes: Spear fishing prohibited. 1,5,7

PORGY, ,
RED ,,


Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: 100 pounds per harvester
Season:none
Notes: 4,5,9


Size limit:
54" min., except Atlantic sharpnose, blacknose,
blacktip, bonnethead, finetooth and smooth
dogfish (only exceptions to 54"min. in federal
waters are Atlantic sharpnose and bonnethead)
Daily bag limit: In state waters, 1 per
harvester or 2 per vessel, whichever is less; in
federal waters, 1 per vessel
Season:none
Notes: May be harvested by hook and line
onlyriI HiQ.hiy Migratory Species permit required
1to hrvet min federal waters. 1,5,7


none
Daily bag limit:
5 gallons heads on per harvester or per vessel
Season:none
Notes: 5


SNAPPER, SCHOOLMASTER


Size limit: 12" min.
Daily bag limit: 15 per harvester
Season:none
Notes: 2,5,7

SNAPPER, CUBERA






1Size limit: oI 1 t:, nimay po";;e;; over
30"per harvester or per vessel)
Daily bag limit: Included in aggregate bag of
10 snapper per harvester if under 30"
Season:none
Notes: 2,4,5,9

SNAPPER, GRAY (MANGROVE)


Size limit: 10"
min. in state waters; 12" min. in federal waters
Daily bag limit: 5 per harvester within
aggregate bag of 10 snapper per harvester
Season:none
Notes: 2,4,5,9

SNAPPER '
LANE ..-


.1 I ~ --


Size limit: 8" min.
Daily bag limit: In state waters, 100 pounds
,per harvester in state waters; not included in
aggregate bag of 10 snapper per harvester. In
federal waters, 20 per harvester.
Season: none
Notes: 2,4,5,9,11

SNAPPER, MUTTON


Size limit: --
16" min.
Daily bag limit: Included in aggregate bag of
10 snapper per harvester
Season: none
Notes: 2,4,5,9

SNAPPER
RED





Size limit: 16" min.
Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester within
aggregate bag of 10 snapper per harvester
Season: TBD in state waters. In federal waters,
June 1 July 11. For up-to-date information, go
to http://bit.ly/lgEILQj.
Notes: 2,3,4,5,9


Size limit: '
10" nun
Daily bag limit: Included in aggregate bag of
10 snapper per harvester
Season:none
Notes: 2,4,5,9

SNAPPER, VERMILION (BEELINER)


* Size limit:
10"min.
Daily bag limit: 10 per harvester; not
included in aggregate bag of 10 snapper per
harvester; included in aggregate bag of 20 reef
fish in federal waters
Season:none
Notes: 2,4,5,9,11

SNAPPER, OTHER
(BLACKFIN, DOG, MAHOGANY,
QUEEN, SILKAND YELLOWTAIL)








Size limit: 12" min.
Daily bag limit: Included in aggregate bag of
10 snapper per harvester
Season:none
Notes: 2,4,5,9

SNOOK

=.. 1._.- .--". -


Size limit: Slot 28"to 33"
Daily bag limit: 1 per harvester
Season: Closed Dec. 1-Feb. 29 & May 1-Aug. 31
Notes: $10 snook permit required to harvest
when license is required, including free resident
shore fishing license. State regulations apply in
federal waters. 2,5,6,7,8

TARPON A


-I

Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: 1 per harvester per year
Season:none
Notes: $51.50 tarpon tag required to harvest
or possess, which is legal only in pursuit of an
IGFA record. For seasonal Boca Grande Pass
rules, see http://bit.ly/l6zrDj. 6,8

TRIGGERFISH, GRAY


Size limit: 14"min. (12"min. federal waters)
Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester per day
Season: Closed June 1-July 31
Notes: 1,4,5,11


State waters extend from the shore 9 miles into the Gulf of Mexico. Federal waters extend from 9 miles out to 200 miles. Regulations for Monroe County & Atlantic waters may differ significantly. These regulations were updated March 16,2014, and are subject to change at any time
by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and/or the National Marine Fisheries Service. Visit MyFWC.com and nmfs.noaa.gov for current regulations. This list does not contain every fisheries rule with which an angler must comply. Ignorance of the law is no excuse.


TRIPLETAIL A


Size limit: "
15 mn.
Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester
Season:none
Notes: May be harvested by hook and line
only. 2,5,7,8

WAHOO




Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester
Season:none
Notes: 1,5

LIONFISH 0..




Size limit: none P
Daily bag 'i
limit: none
Season:none
Notes: This invasive species is native to the
South Pacific and is spreading through the
Atlantic, Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico. Kill all
specimens on sight. Fins have venomous spines.

UNREGULATED SPECIES
The following species do not have established bag
limits, so the daily bag limit is two fish or 100 pounds
per harvester, whichever is greater: Anchovy,
Atlantic croaker, Atlantic thread herring,
barracuda, blackfln tuna, bonito (little tunny),
cero mackerel, cownose ray, gafftopsail
catfish, grunts (all species), hardhead catfish,
jack crevalle, ladyfish, palometa, pigflsh,
pinfish, porgies (exc. sheepshead), sand bream
S(mojarra), sand seatrout, scaled sardine, silver
seatrout, spadefish, Spanish sardine, stingray
(all species) and whiting.
PROHIBITED SPECIES
The following species are closed to all harvest and if
captured must be immediately released unharmed:
Goliath grouper, Nassau grouper, Atlantic
angel shark, basking shark, bigeye sand tiger
shark, bigeye sixgill shark, bigeye thresher
shark, bignose shark, Caribbean reef shark,
Caribbean sharpnose shark, dusky shark,
Galapagos shark, great hammerhead, lemon
shark, longfin mako shark, narrowtooth shark,
night shark, sand tiger shark, sandbar shark,
scalloped hammerhead, sevengill shark, silky
Shark, sixgill shark, smalltail shark, smooth
hammerhead, spiny dogfish, tiger shark,
whale shark, white shark, manta ray, spotted
eagle ray, longbill spearfish, spearfish (all
species), sturgeon, Florida queen conch.


NOTES
1. Measured fork length. Fork length is the straight
line distance from the most forward part of the head
with the mouth closed to the center of the tail.
2. Measured total length. Total length is the
straight line distance from the most forward part
of the head with the mouth closed to the farthest
tip of the tail with the tail compressed or squeezed
together while the fish is lying on its side.
3. Bag limit zero for captain and crew of for-hire
vessels on a paid trip.
4. Reef fish gear rules apply. Anglers must use
non-stainless steel circle hooks when using natural
baits, and must possess a dehooking device.
5. Must remain in whole condition (head and tail
intact) until landed ashore. Removal of gills and
internal organs OK.
6. Harvest by spearfishing prohibited.
7. Use of multiple or treble hooks in conjunction
with natural bait prohibited.
8. Harvest by snatching prohibited.
9. Except for sand perch and dwarf sand perch, fish
designated as reef fish are illegal to use as bait in
federal waters or aboard a vessel with a federal
reef fish permit. In state waters, legal-size reef
fish may be used as bait but must remain in whole
condition and count against bag limit.
10. No harvest of egg-bearing females.
11. Included in 20-fish reef fish aggregate bag in
federal waters (vermilion snapper, lane snapper,
almaco jack, grey triggerfish, all tilefishes).


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11 ..............................





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By Lee Anderson
WaterLine Editor


If you're reading this, the odds are you
have fished before. If you've fished before,
it's likely that you have consumed seafood
before. Sure, it's nice to sometimes head out
to your favorite seafood restaurant, but you
can't beat preparing fresh fish for a meal
- especially if you caught it yourself. Next
time you decide to keep a fish for the table,
you should follow a few basic techniques
that will make your dinner marvelous,
instead of mediocre.
Keeping your fish alive until you're ready
to clean them is ideal, but that's not always
possible. Keeping your fish on ice is the
next best thing. You should always bring
plenty of ice on every fishing trip. More the
merrier. You never know when your baitwell
pump will fail and believe me, a dead
fish that's been floating around in your
baitwell all day is not edible. Fish are very
perishable, and due to their strong digestive
juices, it doesn't take long at all for them to
start decomposing.
To properly ice your catch, you should
line the bottom of your cooler with at least
an inch-thick layer of ice. Lay your fish over
that ice without overlapping them, then


cover them up with another layer of ice.
Repeat this process until you've filled the
cooler with what you intend to keep for the
day. Only keep what you need the next
generation of anglers will thank you.
If you ice your catch properly, it can stay
good in your cooler for a couple of days. A
big cooler with 20 pounds of ice will keep
fish longer than one with 5 pounds of ice
in it.
Always take care when icing your catch.
Here's a little trick look for clean red gills
and bright unclouded eyes, and make sure
there is no strong odor. A fresh fish will have
a mild fresh smell to it. If it stinks, then it's
not fresh.
Once you take the fish out of the cooler,
it's time to clean it. There's a different tech-
nique to clean just about every edible fish
we have in Southwest Florida and there
are a lot of them. Filleting is truly an art,
and there is no substitute for experience.
If you don't have any friends with filleting
skills, the Internet is a great tool for you to
use.
Whether you are a novice or a seasoned
veteran, a sharp fillet knife is key. A 6-inch
blade works for smaller fish, and a 9-inch
blade is good for larger fish. Go ahead and
invest in a quality knife it's well-worth


the price. Also, keep your blades sharp.
Professional fishmongers make sure their
blades are honed before the first fish of the
day is cut. You'll also need a surface to lay
the fish down, and a container to keep all
the scraps in (it should be noted that a fine
fish stock can be made with your scraps and
some simple ingredients like carrots, onions
and spices). Last but not least, you'll need
something to store your fillets in. Plastic
zipper bags work well.
As you're filleting, be sure to cut out any
worms or other deformities. Be sure to cut
out every bone you find. There is nothing
worse than biting into a tasty piece of fish
and getting stuck in the mouth by a bone.
Of course, it's best to eat the fish as soon
as possible, but fillets can be stored in the
fridge for a day or two. Just remember that
oxygen in bad. Be sure to seal the fillets nice
and tight. If you don't plan on eating the
fish anytime soon, you should get it into the
freezer immediately. Try to get as much air
out of the bag you are using to freeze your
fish in before you place it in the freezer. This
will cut down on freezer burn, which will


make your fish taste stale. Try placing the
fillets in a freezer bag, fill it with a little bit
of water and freeze it. A little pinch of salt
can also be added to help slow the break-
down of oils in fish just don't use too
much salt, or you'll be eating bacalao. Label
each bag with the type offish that's in it,
and the date you froze it. About 3 months
is as long as you really want to keep your
fish in the freezer, and it should never be in
there more than 6 months.
The best and safest way to thaw frozen
fish is to leave it in the refrigerator over-
night. If you need to thaw it out faster,
place the frozen fish in cold water until
thawed. You never want to just leave your
frozen fish on a counter or in a sink to thaw.
Fish spoils quickly. At room temperatures,
it starts to grow bacteria. Cooking your
fish will kill off many of these microbes,
but there are a few that heat can't kill. A
microwave oven is also another quick way to
thaw your fish, but it can change the flavor
of your prized catch.
Just remember, the fresher the better.
And marvelous, not mediocre.


639"2750
...Rpr/Your Full-Service Marinaru
"250296 Marnor, Avenie P,_,r, CuGr,_t. FL F I
Meca rial/GEecricUlepars
Canvs/Uh wwwerP/CHadina r/ acomvrig


Sr


....................





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BOATINGANDFISHING.COM


OEL~IEI7(ji


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-- ~


By Josh Olive
WaterLine Publisher M ..


Here's a scenario: You're out fishing the docks on the inside of
Gasparilla Island, trying to find a good snook or two. You lose a
couple fish to the pilings before you hook into a monster. After
muscling her away from the structure, you get her to the boat
and pose for a quick photo before releasing her carefully. Then,
S five seconds after you let her go, a bottlenose dolphin pops up
15 feet from the boat and tosses your just-released snook into
the air. A second dolphin appears out of nowhere and the two
play catch with your fish for a minute or two before one finally
eats her.
Try to not feel too badly. You're not the first angler to lose
a released fish to Flipper. In fact, sometimes it can be hard to
keep your fish out of the dolphins'jaws. When it's ladyfish or
jacks, most anglers don't mind too much, but if they're grabbing
Your over-slot snook or out-of-season gag grouper, people get
upset.
1 It's completely understandable. But try looking at it from


the dolphin's point of view you're offering an easy-to-catch
meal. They're too smart to not take advantage of it.
Besides, humans often encourage such behavior. Certain
charter guides in the area have been known to encourage
anglers to feed "trash fish"to dolphins. They use it as a photo
op and tip generator. But then these same guides get angry
when the dolphin takes a gamefish. Hey, to a dolphin, they're
all fair game. Regular Joe boaters and anglers have also been
guilty of the same practice, though it's usually more to impress
the grandkids than snag a bigger payday. If you have ever fed a
dolphin anything, you're part of the problem. Stop it!
Understanding the problem is fairly simple. Coming up
with a good solution is harder. Dolphins are intelligent and
persistent. Really, the only way to avoid them is to leave and
fish elsewhere. If you don't go too far, sometimes they'll follow
you. I have been known to temporarily stash a snook in the
livewell to shuttle it to safer waters. Please be aware that this


id. .. -


-- Dolphins are
voracious
_- eaters.

is technically illegal, but I felt that it was"morals over laws" at
that point. If you choose to do this, be prepared to explain your
actions to a law enforcement officer and possibly a judge.
If you're one of those lucky people who seems to have Flipper
show up no matter where you fish, you probably curse your
luck. Don't it's not fate, it's the sound of your boat. Dolphins
know a good thing when they hear it, and your boat probably
has an auditory signature similar to one of the boats that regu-
larly feeds them. Switching to a different boat (or maybe just a
different motor) may be the only way to fix it.
Much of dolphin behavior is learned from other dolphins, .f
and mothers who have learned to eat anglers'fish pass that i
habit on to their calves. That will continue so long as fishermen i
provide dolphins with fish, either by intent or by accident.
Dolphins can hunt for themselves just fine, but they'll be as lazy
as we allow them to be. It's up to each of us to break the cycle 'i
by not feeding the dolphins.


UPENN


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BOATINGANDFISHING.COM


Go ahead, pop a cor


STT


UIDhIDYE~IU
By Josh Olive
WaterLine Publisher
There are two different kinds of fishing. In
one, you match wits with your quarry, stalking
finny foes across the water and making casts
with pinpoint accuracy, then tricking them into
biting through expertly dexterous manipula-
tion of a bit of fur or plastic.
In the other, you catch fish.
If the second one is more your speed, you
need to get acquainted with a device that
will help you achieve maximum hookups
with minimum effort. It's a small piece of
Styrofoam called a popping cork, and it can
be used with almost any live bait. It's also
great paired with frozen shrimp or scented
soft plastic lures.
A popping cork is an ingenious device.
It's just a tapered cylinder with a concave
indentation at the wider end. Most also
include a molded-in weight, which causes
the narrow end to sit lower in the water.
The weight also helps with casting distance.
There's also a hole through the center of the
cork, running through the long axis, and a
plastic stopper that goes in the hole.
To use the popping cork, remove the
stopper, thread the line though the hole,
replace the stopper and then tie on your
leader as usual. Some popping corks have a


slit down the side, which makes them easy
to add or remove without retying. If you're
using a cork with a slit, be sure to wrap the
line around the plastic stopper; otherwise,
the cork may slip off the line and float away.
You may also want to add a small splitshot
sinker just above the hook.
Here is the first use for your popping
cork: It will keep your bait off the bottom,
where it can be more easily seen and eaten.
This is especially important if you're fishing
over grass or oysters, where a live shrimp or
baitfish can quickly hide. By sliding the cork
up or down the line, you can set the depth
you want your bait to be. Usually it's best
within a few inches of the bottom but not


sitting on it.
So your bait is out there, suspended above
the bottom and in plain sight, ready to be
eaten. Now, to make sure a fish actually
sees it. Reel up any slack in your line and
give the rod a firm twitch. The tip of your
rod should move maybe 6 to 12 inches. The
popping cork should respond with a hearty
"Blurp!" This blurping sound may not be
highly attractive to you but to a fish,
it sounds like another fish feeding. Being
opportunistic, fish commonly investigate
the sound of someone else having dinner.
And when they get to the source of the
noise, what do they find? Your bait!
This particular magic spell works


extremely well on seatrout, but a wide
variety of other gamefish will also fall for
it snook, redfish, ladyfish, even fresh-
water bass. The key to popping cork use is
to twitch often enough to draw fish to you
but not so often you frighten them away.
In clear, calm conditions, that might be
one soft pop every two minutes. When it's
overcast or dark, or if the water's rough or
murky, a loud blurp every 30 seconds or so
might work better.
For the ultimate in lazy-day fishing,
there's nothing quite like drifting the flats
with a popping cork and live shrimp. All the
work you'll have to do is reeling them in and
rebaiting. Lucky you.




. P UT /I 1!lI!/II,1111 iI I l[ ,! ; i.T


trick


Sheepshead are fun to

catch and good to eat, if you

know what you are doing


By Matt Stevens
You can't just wake up one day and decide
you're going to be a great sheepshead angler.
Learning how to catch sheepies isn't as easy
as 1-2-3. It requires patience, and you have to
know when and where to find them, what bait
to use and what tide to fish. And even when
you know all of the above, sheepshead can still
make you feel like a rookie because of the way
they bite. It drives most anglers crazy.
Once the water temperature is to their liking,
you can pinpoint certain destinations that are
famous for sheepshead because you know the
fish will be there. Around the area, some of the
best sheepie spots are the Placida Fishing Pier,
El Jobean and the Venice jetties. But even when
you know the fish are there, that doesn't always
mean they will cooperate. You might show up
to one of the aforementioned holes one day and
catch 10 fish, then head back the very next day
and be lucky to hook just one of the sheepish
sheepies. A fish that keeps you guessing is a fun
fish to pursue.
Detecting the bite and knowing when to set
the hook on a sheepshead is a time-honored
tradition in and of itself. The biggest reason
the prison-striped porgies have a reputation
for being bait thieves is because most anglers


don't know how and when to set the hook on
them. But patience, persistence and an uncanny ;-.'.....
knack for knowing the exact moment to pull the ., ..

A wide variety of live baits can be used to .-,' '- .
catch sheepies, which keeps things interesting. 1' ,1 ''
Mud crabs, fiddler crabs, barnacles, sand fleas,
mussels and shrimp are several of the most ." ..''
effective sheepie baits. But if you really want to /. '1'
get creative, that's just the tip of the iceberg. .
Sheepshead really are the king of wintertime L'..
pier fishing in Southwest Florida. Besides trout,
sheepies are one of the few local species that '
handle cold water temperatures well..,,-i
When it comes to table fare, sheepshead rank
right up there as some of the best-eating fish
an angler can bring home for supper. And unlike
many other species that offer tasty fillets, you
can keep 15 sheepshead over 12 inches a day.
Now that's a lot of fish. Granted, a sheepie isn't
the easiest fish in the world to fillet, and a sharp
knife is a must when working with them. But p ...
once you get the hang of it, you'll be enjoying pro:, g,
the flaky white meat for dinner once or twice a
week. If filleting really isn't your thing, simply Sheepshead have
scale a sheepshead, remove the head and guts, a set of strange-
then pan-fry or grill it whole. Either way you looking teeth.
prepare them, they're still delicious. I0

--


MA RINA


REfTA U RANT


TAVERN


EAS D i 3IA A AEekw C



GASANDDEE




IWI I kELESS[I NTEII II ETll l CCESS


BEST OF
AWARD OF
EXCELLENCE


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COOPERATING
%MARINA
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1968 TAR.PON CENTER. DR., VENICE


MAKE DOCKAGE
RESERVATIONS ONLINE


941


.484.9551


www.crowsnest-venice.com


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BOATINGANDFISHING.COM


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BOATINGANDFISHING.COM


Note: Sometimes saltwater species may be
found in fresh water in Florida. To harvest
these species, you must have a regular or
shore saltwater license (except mullet; see
below). You do not need a freshwater license
to specifically target saltwater species in a
freshwater environment, but ifyou do not have
a freshwater license then any freshwater species
must be immediately released unharmed. (If
you plan on doing this, just get a combo license
and save yourself the headache.)
......BLACK BASS ...


Size limit: South Florida (south of S.R.
80): 14" maximum; one fish larger than
14" may be harvested daily. Central
Florida (north of S.R. 80): 14" minimum.
Lake Okeechobee (see http://bit.ly/
Akzt7G for definition): 18"minimum. Lake
Weohyakapka (Walk-in-Water): Slot 15"
to 24"; may possess one over 24". Lake
Trafford: Slot 18"to 22".
Daily bag limit: 5 per harvester (Lake
Weohyakapka: 3 per harvester)
Notes: Bag is aggregate for all species of black
bass, but only largemouth black bass are found
in Southwest Florida. Special limits may apply
in Fish Management Areas; see below. 1,3
.. .............
PANFISH" "
(INCLUDES BLUEGILL, REDEAR SUNFISH
[SHELLCRACKER], FLIER, LONGER SUN-
FISH, MUD SUNFISH, SHADOW BASS,
SPOTTED SUNFISH STUMPKNOCKERR],
WARMOUTH AND REDBREAST SUNFISH)


Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: Aggregate 50 per harvester
Notes: Special bag and size limits may apply
in Fish Management Areas; see below. 1,4

CRAPPIE (SPECKLED PERCH)


Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: 25 per harvester
Notes: Special bag and size limits may apply
in Fish Management Areas; see below. 1
SUNSHINE ...BASS


over 24")


Daily bag limit: Aggregate 24 per harvester
Notes: This regulation also covers striped and
white bass, which are not found in Southwest
Florida. Sunshine bass, a striped/white bass
hybrid, are stocked by the state in waters
around Florida. Special bag and size limits
may apply in Fish Management Areas; see
below. 1


Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: none
Notes: 2
......................
FLORIDA GAR
LONGNOSEGAR


Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: none
Notes: Be careful if preparing for consump-
tion; the roe is toxic. 2

BOWFIN




Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: none
Notes: Can be confused with nonnative
snakehead. Look under chin for large flaplike
Scale and check for a short anal fin; this will
positively identify a bowfin. 2
......................
CHAIN PICKEREL
REDFIN PICKEREL






Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: none
Notes: Special bag and size limits may apply
in Fish Management Areas; see below. 4

iAMERICAN EEL W W _


......................
MULLET, STRIPED AND SILVER





Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: Feb 1 -Aug. 31: Aggregate
50 per harvester or 100 per vessel, whichever
is less; Sept. 1-Jan. 31: Aggregate 50 per
harvester or per vessel
Notes: Harvest or possession of striped
mullet prohibited in Punta Gorda
between 6 p.m. and 6 a.m. from Nov.
1-Feb. 29. See http://bit.ly/z9J6v3. May
not be harvested by spear fishing in fresh
water. Any resident fishing for mullet
in fresh water who has a valid Florida
freshwater fishing license does not need
a saltwater license. 2
......................
BUTTERFLY PEACOCK BASS
Size limit: 17" maximum (may possess
one over 17")
Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester
Notes: Nonnative species intentionally


Size limit: n/a
Daily bag limit: Zero; harvest or possession
prohibited without a research permit
Notes: Despite popular belief, alligator gar do
not occur in Southwest Florida. These giant fish
are restricted to the Panhandle in this state.

NONPROTECTED EXOTICS
These fish are unwelcome invaders in Florida's
waters. These fish have no bag or size limits
and are all popular food fish in their native
countries. Other than peacock bass and grass
carp, exotic fish may not be returned to the
water nor may they be used as live bait, and
should be consumed or disposed of properly.

BLUE TILAPIA


SPOTTED TILAPIA


OS R ,,
..............
OSCAR itiflgm


MAYAN'c'IHLI'.....


JAGUAR GUAPOTE


MIDASCICHLID


BROWN H L ....


SUCKERMOUTH CATFISH


WALKING CATFISH


introduced by state biologists to control other
nnnnn-ifi;n fi~kho( 1 1


...................... noninative fibii. m,
CHANNEL CATFISH ..........
GRASS CARP


\ *$WO 4 ^


Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: none
Notes: Special bag and size limits may apply
in Fish Management Areas; see below. 2
. ..BROWN BULLHEAD.
BRYELLOW BULLHEAD
YELLOW BULLHEAD


Size limit: n/a
Daily bag limit: Zero; harvest or possession
prohibited without a permit
Notes: These fish are introduced to areas
where vegetation overgrowth is a problem.
Grass carp released in Florida are triploid,
incapable of spawning.
_._._. _...... ..._.. ......


CLOWN KNIFEFISH


BULLSEYE SNAKEHEAD




Notes: There may be multiple species in
Florida. Can be confused with native bowfin.
Snakehead has long anal fin (on the belly) at
least one fourth of the fish's overall length.


rnn


ALLIGATOR GAR FISH MANAGEMENT AREA
oI ,SPECIAL REGULATIONS


For FMAs not listed, see www.MyFWC.com/Rules
AndRegs/FreshwaterFishRulesregions.htm.
Lakes Tohopekaliga (West Lake
Tohopekaliga), Cypress, Hatchineha, and
Kissimmee), Polk and Osceola counties: Open
to fishing. No bag limit for channel catfish. Minnow
lift nets, fish traps and trotlines may be used.
Manatee Lake, Manatee County: Open to
fishing. Trotlines may be used from sunset until 9
a.m., Sunday through Thursday. Outboard motors
more than 20 hp may not be used. No bag limit
for channel catfish.
Webb Lake, Charlotte County: Open to
fishing during posted hours. Gasoline motors
may not be used on boats. Panfish bag limit: 20.
Channel catfish bag limit: 6. Bluegill and redear
sunfish less than 8 inches in total length must
be released immediately. Black bass must be
released immediately. Vehicles may be used only
on designated roads.
Marl Pits 1 and 3, Charlotte County: Open to
fishing. Panfish bag limit: 20. Bluegill and redear
sunfish less than 8 inches in total length must be
released immediately. Channel catfish bag limit:
6. Black bass must be released immediately.
Marl Pit 2, Charlotte County: Open to fishing.
Bluegill and redear sunfish less than 10 inches
must be released immediately. Bluegill and
redear sunfish combined bag limit: 10. Channel
catfish bag limit: 6. Black bass must be released
immediately.
Tenoroc Fish Management Area, Polk
County: Fishing is allowed only by FWC permit.
All anglers must check in and out at the Tenoroc
Fish Management Area headquarters and deposit
their valid fishing license with the custodian
unless otherwise instructed. Days and hours of
operation and quotas shall be as designated by the
FWC and posted at area headquarters (currently
Friday through Monday only). Quotas will be
established for each lake, and fishing is permitted
in designated lakes only. Lakes may be closed
to public accessfor management purposes or if
accessto the lake exposes the public to danger,
by posting notice at the Tenoroc check station
office. Quotas for open lakes may be temporarily
increased to accommodate anglers during times
when other lakes are closed due to management
construction projects, road repair, unsafe access
or special recreational events. All dogs must be
leashed, except as authorized by FWC. Unless
otherwise specified, Tenoroc FMA harvest
restrictions are: Crappie bag limit: 10. Crappie
less than 10 inches in total length must be released
immediately. Sunshine bass bag limit: 6. Channel
catfish bag limit: 6. Black bass must be released
immediately. Fish may not befilleted, northeir
head or tail fins removed, until the angler has
checked out at the area headquarters. Cast nets
and minnow seines are prohibited. No person shall
have any gun under his/ her control while under
the influence of alcohol or drugs. Public access
is prohibited in areas posted as"Restricted"for
protection of threatened or endangered species,
or environmentally sensitive areas. Motor vehicles
may be operated only on named roads, designated
parking areas, and fishing ramps as designated in
the area use brochure. Vehicles may not obstruct
designated roads, boat ramps, gates orfire lanes.
Swimming and float tubes are prohibited.
Regulations for Tenoroc lakes are as follows:
Gasoline motors may not be used on boats on
Lakes A, Butterfly, C, F, Fish Hook, G, Half-Moon,
Horseshoe, Hydrilla, Legs Lost, Lake East, Lost Lake
West, Tern, 2,3, and 4 (primitive launch only on
Butterfly, F, Fish Hook, G, Half-Moon, Lost Lake
East, Lost Lake West, and Tern). Lakes B and 5:
Boats are restricted to idle speed-no wake. Black
bass 15 inches in total length or longer must be
released immediately. Black bass bag limit: 2.
Picnic Lake: Gasoline motors may not be used
on boats. Black bass bag limit: 2. Black bass 15
inches in total length or longer must be released
immediately. Pine (formerly East and West
Pasture Lakes) and Derby Lakes: Boats may


-1


;.j


NOTES
1. Game fish. May only be taken with pole and
line or rod and reel. There is no limit on the
number of rods an angler may use. May not be
filleted, nor their head or tail fin removed, until
you are done fishing for the day. Unlawful to
sell, offer for sale or transport out of the state
unless specifically permitted by the FWC, except
that licensed anglers may transport two days'
bag limit of legally harvested fish.
2. Nongame fish. May be taken by:
Pole and line or rod and reel. There is no limit
on the number of rods an angler may use.
Bush hook, setline ortrotline baited with cut bait
or other substance; but not including live game fish
orany part of anygamefish. Bush hooks, setlines
and trotlines must be clearlyand legibly marked
with the harvester's name and address.
At night by bow and arrow or gig.
During daylight hours by manually operated
spears, gigs, snatch hooks, crossbow or bow
and arrow from a boat or from shore except in
Dade County canals south of the C-4 and east
of the L-31N and L-31W canals inclusively.
By the use of cast nets.
3. Illegal to use as bait whole or in part.
4. May be used as bait only for rod and reel or
pole and line angling.

not be used. Other than anglers described above,
no one 16 years or older shall fish on Pine or Derby
lakes unless accompanied by a child under 16
years of age. Panfish bag limit: 20. Anglers may
keep no more than 5 bluegill and redear sunfish 8
inches or longer in total length per day. Cemetery
Lake: Boats may not be used. Anglers may keep
no more than 5 bluegill and redear sunfish 8 inches
or longer in total length per day. Lake Crago:
Largemouth bass, crappie and sunshine bass: state-
wide size and bag limits apply. Wire traps may be
used for nongame fish. Trotlines may be used from
sunset until 9 a.m. No bag limit for channel catfish.
Boats are restricted to idle speed-no wake.
Lake Istokpoga, Highlands County: Open to
fishing. No bag limit for channel catfish. Black
bass 15 inches or more in total length and less
than 24 inches must be released immediately.
Black bass bag limit: 3. Only 1 black bass may be
24 inches or greater in total length. Nongame
fish may be taken by cast nets, dip nets, seines,
trotlines, set lines, bush hooks and wire traps.
Refer to the Florida Commercial Freshwater
Fisheries brochure PDF.
Mosaic Fish Management Area, Polk and
Hardee counties: Open to fishing. Fishing is
allowed only by daily permit issued by the FWC.
All anglers must check in and out at the Mosaic
creel station, the designated entry point, unless
otherwise instructed. Days and hours of operation
and quotas shall be as designated by the FWC
and posted at the Mosaic creel station (typically
Mosaic is open Fridaythrough Monday). Fishing is
permitted in designated lakes only. All other lakes
and restricted areas, so posted, are closed to public
fishing. Any lake may be temporarily closed to
public access for management purposes, or in the
event that access to the lake exposes the public to
danger, by posting notice at the creel station.
Unless otherwise spedcified, Mosaic FMA
harvest restrictions are: Black bass must be
released immediately. Sunshine bass bag limit: 6.
Crappie bag limit: 10. Crappie lessthan 10 inches in
total length must be released immediately. Channel
catfish bag limit: 6. Fish may not be filleted, nor
their heads ortail fins removed, until the angler has
checked out at the Mosaic creel station. Disposal of
fish remains within Mosaic property is prohibited.
Taking offish and wildlife with guns is prohibited.
Motor vehicles may be operated only on designated
roads, parking areas and boat ramps. Vehicles may
not obstruct designated roads, boat ramps, gates or
fire lanes. Swimming and float tubes are prohibited.
Rough fish may be removed from designated lakes
by cast nets and minnow seines by permission of
the landowner. Outboard motors more than 10 hp
may not be used.
Regulations for individual Mosaic FMA lakes
are as follows: Haul Road Pit: Black bass 15
inches in total length or longer must be released
immediately. Black bass bag limit: 2. Long Pond
(LP2 West): No boats permitted.
Hardee County Park, Hardee County: Open
to fishing. All anglers shall enter at the Park main
entrance, the designated entry point, unless
otherwise instructed. Angling from a boat is
allowed by entry pass issued by Hardee County.
Angling from shore does not require an entry
pass unless otherwise posted at the Park main
entrance. Days and hours of operation and quotas
for freshwater fishing are posted at the Park main
entrance. Fishing is permitted in designated lakes
only. Any lake may be closed to public access by
Hardee County for management purposes, or in
the event that accessto the lake exposes the public
to danger, by posting notice at the Park main
entrance. Black bass must be released immediately.
Sunshine bass bag limit: 6. Panfish bag limit: 20.
Crappie bag limit: 10. Crappie less than 10 inches
in total length must be released immediately.
Channel catfish bag limit: 6. Fish may not be
filleted, nor their head ortail fin removed, until the
angler has left the Park. Disposal offish remains
within Hardee County Park is prohibited. Taking
offish and wildlife with guns is prohibited. Motor
vehicles may be operated only on designated
roads, parking areas, and boat ramps. Vehicles may
not obstruct designated roads, boat ramps and fire
lanes. Swimming and float tubes are prohibited.







Although artificial bait has come a long
way over the years, sometimes you just can't
beat the real thing. As stinky and smellyWhefishe used to eating Certainoodit
as some artificial are these days, nothing makes sense to use that as bait. For example,
can replicate the chemicals given off by a sheepshead at El Jobean aren't eating sand fleas,
living organism. In fact, some oil-based because there are no sand fleas there for them to
livingeat. Instead, they're eating small crabs and oysters.
attractants are undetectable because their Using sand fleas as bait here is not a good plan. But
molecules are too large for the receptor at the Boca Grande phosphate docks, just a couple abou
sites of the fish. Natural baits are any live or hundred feet for the beach, sand fleas are a fine eatel
dead animals, or any parts of them, used to choice. Another example: In winter, most of the the r
catch fish. You can catch many bait varieties; whitebait disappears. Many anglers, having gotten Fant,
others are usually purchased. The following used to using whitebait during the long summer, long
is a generalguidetonaturalbaitbutdoes will go to great lengths to locate a few. But even if mull
they find some, whitebait is not nearly as effective
not cover every possible bait out there, in winter. Why? Because the fish have switched over bradc
to other foods that are more abundant in the cooler or gr
SALTWATER BAITFISH months, to fir
Almost any small fish can also be used for ; cut m


bait, as long as iney aren't juvenile game-
fish or other regulated species. To keep your
baitfish alive, get them into the livewell as
quickly as possible. A bait flopping around
on a hot deck won't last long. Don't take any
more baitfish than you need. Remember,
the fish you want to catch rely on these
baitfish as a food source, and if they don't
feed well they won't reproduce well. There's
a lot of bait out there, but there are also
lots of guys with castnets.
BALLYHOO: These look a bit like needle-
fish, but only the lower jaw is elongated.
Most commonly used as a rigged trolling
bait for pelagic gamefish, ballyhoo can also
be castnetted inshore and used as bait for
other species.
BLUE RUNNERS: A small member of the
jack family, these fish are a good bait for king
mackerel, cobia, amberjack and other open-
water fish. Usually used live, blue runners are
durable on the hook and are ideally suited to
drifting or kite fishing. Also used for grouper.
Chum and catch on a sabiki.
BONITA: Used as cutbait for sharks. Size
your baits to the fish you want to catch.
Catch offshore or buy frozen.
CATFISH: Although most anglers curse
catfish, they can be an outstanding bait for
sharks. Tarpon also like them, especially
when they're in the rivers.
CIGAR MINNOWS: AKA round scad, these
are another small jack species. Tarpon like


them, as do most open-water gamefish.
Catch on a sabiki, or on small bare gold
hooks.
GLASS MINNOWS: Bay anchovies, also
called glass minnows, are an important
forage fish but are tough to use as bait
because they're small and delicate. They
make great chum, ground or cut into pieces.
Must be netted.
EELS: Infrequently used, but small eels
are a well-known cobia favorite.
GRUNTS: Hand-size grunts are excellent
grouper or amberjack bait on the reefs.
Smaller ones, including pigfish, are great for
trout, reds and snook inshore. A 3-inch pigfish
under a float is a hot ticket for big trout.
KILLIFISH AND SAILFIN MOLLIES:
Rarely used in this area, but very popular for
flounder and redfish in many other parts of
the Southeast. Killies can be caught on tiny
hooks baited with shrimp bits; mollies can't.
Both are easier to seine or dip-net.
LADYFISH: One of our most underrated
species, ladyfish not only are great fighters
on light gear but also are fantastic bait. Use
cut or whole for sharks, tarpon and monster
snook, or cut into smaller chunks for redfish.
Take only what you need for the day they
get mushy if frozen and thawed.
MULLET: Three mullet species are found
in Southwest Florida. The striped or black
mullet is the largest species, common to


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it 3 pounds, and is the only one usually
n (smoked or fried). White mullet are
midsize fish, usually about a foot long.
ail mullet are usually less than 8 inches
and are used only as bait. All three
et species can be found in shallow fresh,
kish or salt water, usually over muddy
assy bottom which they root through
id tiny invertebrates and algae. Live or
bullet are a top bait choice for most fish-
ig species, and are oily enough to make
good shark bait. Because of their diet,
are difficult to catch on hook and line. A
net works much better.
EEDLEFISH: These toothsome crit-
are not often used as bait but can be
standing for big snook. Sometimes,
n a big snook ignores every other bait,
e needlefish will entice a strike. Both
upper and lower jaws of a needlefish are
and pointed. Catch with a small baited
k skimmed across the surface.
NFISH: These small porgies are very
imon on shallow grassflats and around
Spilings. They won't usually be found
predatory fish everything likes to
hem. Tough and durable, pinfish are
y caught on a sabiki with bits of squid
he hooks. You can also chum them up
he grassflats and castnet them. Pins are
r bait for redfish, snook, tarpon, cobia
all reef fish.
IND TROUT: Small sand trout are good
for snook. Big sand trout are good bait
ig snook, and also for cobia. Some-
s, they're the only bait that matters.
h on chunks of shrimp.
BANISH SARDINES: These fish are
lar to whitebait but are less deep-
ed and usually larger, to about 16
es. They are edible and are in fact one
ie several species canned commercially
irdines. Often bought frozen, or catch


your own with a castnet or sabiki. If you
get frozen sardines, you should brine them
before use to toughen them. No, you can't
use canned sardines as bait they fall
apart.
SQUIRRELFISH: Sand perch, known
locally as squirrelfish, are irresistible to
big grouper. Sometimes you may find
them at the bait shop, but usually you'll
have to catch your own. Cut shrimp, fished
over sandy bottom on a small hook, will
catch sand perch. This same method will
catch many less-desirable species, so if you
don't start bringing up sand perch in a few
minutes try another spot.
STINGRAYS: A live bait for seriously
big fish, stingrays are a favorite food of
hammerhead and bull sharks. Goliath
grouper are also known to enjoy a ray snack.
If you aren't ready to hook a 500-pound fish,
you aren't ready to use a ray for bait.
WHITEBAIT: There is no one species
called whitbait. Whitebait is a generic term
that includes threadfin herring, scaled
sardines (aka greenbacks or pilchards)
and Spanish sardines (usually just called
sardines), among other small, schooling
fish. These fish are too delicate for bait
shops to carry alive, so you'll have to
catch your own with a cast net or sabiki
rig. Keep them in an oxygenated baitwell
and don't overcrowd them it's better
to have 20 live baits than 60 that are all
dead. Threadfins get to about 10 inches and
scaled sardines to about 6 inches. Both are
top inshore baits. Spanish sardines grow
to about 14 inches and are great inshore or
offshore as live or cut bait.
WHITING: See sand trout.

OTHER SALTWATER BAITS
SHRIMP: There are dozens of shrimp
species that live in the area, but for bait


purposes we divide them into two categories:
Shrimp and grass shrimp.
Grass shrimp are small (under 2 inches) and
are rarely used for bait, except for panfish-
ermen. Shrimp, on the other hand, are
hands-down the most popular bait in Florida.
They can be used live, dead or frozen and
thawed, either whole or cut into chunks. Very
few fish will turn down shrimp, but they also
draw lots of bait thieves. You can dip-net your
own (their eyes glow at night in a flashlight
beam), but they're a lot easier to buy.
BLUE CRABS: Very common in the
estuaries, these crabs are good bait for
many fish. Small ones (silver dollar size) can
be used live for permit, cobia and tarpon;
bigger ones can be cut to use for redfish or
black drum. Also a good bait to target big
snapper on the reefs. If a crab has an egg
mass under its tail, let it go. Catch in traps
or with a dip-net.
PASS CRABS: These crabs (technically,
they're iridescent swimming crabs, Portunus
gibbesii) look a bit like small blue crabs but
have longer claws with a pink tint. They're
called pass crabs because Boca Grande Pass
is where they're often seen, swimming on
the surface on strong summer outgoing
tides. Tarpon love them. Usually dip-netted.
FIDDLER CRABS: Easy to see on sandy
or muddy shores but hard to catch because
they scramble into their burrows when
you get close. The top bait for big sheeps-
head, fiddlers can also be used for porgies,
snapper and hogfish on the reefs. Only
males have a big claw; remove it before
using the crab as bait.
MUD CRABS: These small dark-colored
crabs are found among rocks and oyster
shells, usually over muddy bottoms. There
are actually several species. Be careful not to
collect juvenile stone crabs, which are illegal
to possess. Used mostly for sheepshead.


SAND FLEAS: More properly called mole
crabs, these little guys aren't fleas at all.
Fantastic bait for sheepshead, black drum
and pompano. Dig your own along the surf
zone of Gulf beaches or buy frozen ones.
OYSTERS: Although they are a pain to
collect, oysters can be harvested from pilings,
bridge abutments and oyster bars. They make
a good (if a bit delicate) bait for sheepshead,
redfish and black drum. You can also scrape
them and barnacles off the pilings with a hoe
to make sheepshead chum.
SQUID: Rarely caught here, squid are
nonetheless very popular bait. Whole squid
are an excellent red grouper bait. Smaller
pieces catch porgies and grunts. Squid is a
very tough bait and difficult to steal from
the hook, so it's an excellent choice for
tipping a sabiki rig.
MARINE WORMS: Few people bother to
collect these here, but any marine worms
you find are great bait for redfish and
sheepshead. You can also use earthworms as
a substitute (but don't tell anyone that's
a secret).
BARNACLES: That's right, barnacles.
Scrape off a couple handfuls of barnacles on
structure like pilings using a sharp object,
and be careful. They are sharp! This will
excite the fish and they will nearly bite on
anything, including the little barnacle you
secured on your hook.

FRESHWATER BAITS
CATERPILLARS: Many caterpillars
are good panfish bait. Collect your own
cutworms, or buy waxworms at the bait
shop. As with true worms, sometimes more
effective cut in half.
CATFISH BAITS: A wide variety of smelly
things are used as catfish bait: Cut fish
left in the sun, rancid chicken livers, stinky
cheeses, various blood dough concoctions,


etc. There are lots of others, both
commercially available and homemade, but
the thing they share is the ability to make
you retch.
CLAMS: Freshwater clams (round ones
with yellow-brown shells) can be pried
apart and the soft part used to catch
sunfish, or put several on a hook for catfish.
Don't use mussels (oval with dark shells),
which are in decline.
CRAYFISH: These look like a miniature
lobster. Bass love them (actually, so do
redfish, but that's another secret). Collect
your own in traps by dip-netting in weedy
areas. Sometimes you can find them
crawling on land at night after heavy rains.
CRICKETS: Cheap to buy at the pet shop.
Crickets and the related grasshoppers are
good bait for sunfish and cichlids.
EXOTIC FISH: A number of exotics,
including tilapia and jewel cichlids, are very
common and can be easily netted. Regard-
less, under Florida law, these fish cannot be
legally used as live bait all you can do is
dispose of them. Using goldfish and other
aquarium fish as live bait is also against the
law. It is permissible to use them as cut bait,
but if you have live specimens on the water
you are flirting with a citation. The only
exceptions: Platies and fathead minnows.
GOLDEN SHINERS: A standard for
big largemouth bass, shiners are easily
chummed with bread pieces and caught on
bread balls on tiny hooks, or you can buy
them. It takes a lot of oxygen to keep these
baits alive, and once they're dead you may
as well toss them overboard.
GRASS SHRIMP: A good bait for sunfish,
grass shrimp are easy to dip-net along
weedy shorelines. Use a light wire hook. You
can use big ones (1.5 inches is a big one)
singly, or put several on a hook to make a
bigger mouthful.
MINNOWS: This covers almost any
small nongame species, including mollies,
mosquitofish, killifish and a bunch more.
Bass and crappie love to eat them all. Seine
or dip-net.
SUNFISH: As long as you catch them
yourself on hook and line, bluegill and


T HE SABIKI RIG : A sabiki is just several s mall hooeks
spaced 12 or so inches apart. The hooks can be plain
or dressed with a small skirt. You can also use small
chunks of bait. Most commercially made sabikis
have three to six hooks. To use, tie a sinker to the
end and cast out or drop down and jig.
CASTNET: The gold standard in bait collection, a
castnet makes it possible (sometimes even easy)
to collect a day's worth of bait in a few minutes.
Learning to throw a net well is an art, and not one
that can be learned quickly. In fresh water, castnets
must have a mesh under 1 inch.
SEINE: A seine is basically a wall of mesh with floats
on top and sinkers on the bottom. Smaller seines
require two people to operate; big ones can be used
by one person in conjunction with a set pole. In salt
water, seines must be less than 500 square feet with
mesh no larger than 2 inches; in fresh water, a seine
must be not more than 20 feet long, not more than
4 feet high, and have a mesh no larger than 1 inch.
DIP-NET: Any net with a handle may be regarded
as a dip-net. Sometimes a regular landing net will
work, such as for larger blue crabs, but in most
instance the mesh is too wide and will allow your
bait to slip through. Specialized dip-nets with
extendable handles are used for shrimping from
bridges and piers. To be legal, your net's perimeter
must be less than 96 inches.
TRAPS: Trapping gamefish is prohibited, so bait
traps must be small. In salt water, traps must not
exceed 2 feet in any dimension, with a throat or
entrance not exceeding 3 inches in height by 3/4
inch in width. In fresh water, traps must be no
more than 24 inches long, 12 inches in diameter,
and have a maximum 1-inch funnel entrance. Any
unregulated species may be taken in traps.



other sunfish are legal to use as bait using
hook and line. Live bluegills are a excellent
big-bass bait.
WORMS: Big ones (nightcrawlers) are a
good choice for bass and catfish. Small ones
wigglerss) are readily taken by sunfish and
cichlids. You can dig your own wigglers, if
you can find a good spot for it, but you'll
have to buy nightcrawlers. Sometimes
cutting one in half or into pieces can draw
more strikes.


pp


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BOATINGANDFISHING.COM


By Lee Anderson
WaterLine Editor


Let's face it, sometimes it's inconvenient to
either catch your own bait. Even if you buy live
bait at your local tackle shop, you still have to haul
containers around and try your best to keep that
bait alive as long as possible. Sometimes, artifi-
cials are the right way to go. They are convenient,
less of a mess and sometimes work better than
live bait. Be assured that artificial do work.
Civilization has been inventing and modifying
lures since man first began to fish. Over the years,
certain lures have endured the test of time. There
are infinite options for anglers who want to use
artificial lures, but most can be sorted into one of
the following categories:
SPOONS: These lures are made from shiny metal
that flashes erratically as the spoon is pulled
through the water. The legend goes that an angler
lunching on his boat accidentally dropped a spoon
overboard and saw a fish attack it as it fell. The
earliest spoons were made from flatware, much
to some housewife's chagrin, but now spoons
are made in a huge variety of sizes and shapes.
The most popular here are eighth- to half-ounce
models in gold with some sort of weedguard.
Spoons can be worked by simply casting them out
and reeling them in, or you can impart bouncing
or jigging motion. No matter how you use a spoon,
they are prone to spinning, so it's good idea to use
a quality swivel so your line doesn't get twisted.
JIGS: A jig is nothing more than a hook weighted
at the eye with a piece of metal, usually lead. Jigs
can be dressed with nylon, feather, bucktail or
plastic skirts (an undresses jig is called a jighead).
For fishing in shallow water, a jig may be as light
as 1/64 ounce, or can be 16 ounces or more for
deepwater use. Most jigs weigh between an
eighth-ounce and 4 ounces, but for inshore use
you'll rarely use on heavier than half an ounce. Jigs
are usually most effective when bounced across
the bottom. A special type of jig called a silly jig is
meant to be worked erratically in midwater; silly


jigs are often paired with very small teaser flies.
Other heavy lures made of metal (butterfly jigs,
diamond jigs, etc.) are also called jigs, but most are
designed to be worked vertically rather than cast
outward like the jigs most of us are familiar with.
A jig can be used in combination with a spoonlike
blade to make a spinnerbait, popular for both
largemouth bass in fresh water and redfish in the
salt.
SOFT PLASTICS: These lures are made in sizes
from an inch long up to enormous, and in shapes
meant to resemble fish, worms, lizards, shrimp,
crayfish, frogs and anything else a fish might eat.
The main thing they have in common is that the
plastic is meant to move in a lifelike way in the
water. Many have curly or paddle-shaped tails that
are designed to swim when retrieved. Often, soft
plastic lures are impregnated with scent of some
sort, either to attract fish or to convince them to
hold onto the bait longer after they strike. These
baits are usually sold unrigged; depending on the
action desired, soft plastic lures can be rigged on
bare hooks, weighted hooks or jigs (either dressed
or plain).
SWIMBAITS: Technically a type of soft plastic
lure, swimbaits are shaped like small fish and
are usually sold with a weight and hook already
embedded into the lure. Swimbaits are easy to
use just cast it out and reel it in and come in
sizes from 2 inches to the size of an adult mullet.
TOPWATER PLUGS: These lures are probably the
most exciting to catch fish with. Even the most
jaded old salts get a thrill when a gamefish blows
up on a topwater. There are a number of different
types. Walk-the-dog lures are torpedo-shaped and
are meant to be worked with rapid, short rodtip
twitches, which cause the lure to dart back and
forth in a zigzag pattern across the water. Poppers
have concave fronts to make splashes and noise
when the lure is tugged sharply. Prop baits have
small propellers at the front and back of the lures
(sometimes just the back) that churn as the lure is
retrieved. All topwater plugs work best in low-light
conditions early morning, late evening or


overcast days and in water less than 6 feet
deep. Otherwise, fish are wary about coming to the
surface to hit a bait.
JERKBAITS: Most anglers are familiar with jerk-
baits (think of the original Rapala Minnow). These
lures have short plastic lips, which cause them
to dive under the water's surface. They're usually
worked by jerking the lure under, reeling it for a
few seconds and then allowing it to float back up.
Varying the amount of time between jerks and the
speed of the retrieve can make a huge difference in
the interest fish show these lures; you may need to
experiment to discover what works best for a give
set of conditions. As with topwater lures, jerkbaits
are usually most effective in low light. Sometimes,
soft plastic lures are also called jerkbaits.
CRANKBAITS: Many crankbaits are also lipped,
but the lip of a crankbait is longer because the lure
is intended to be worked underwater most or all
of the time. There are also lipless crankbaits (like
the Rat-L-Trap) that rely on the shape of the lure
to cause it to dive. All crankbaits are designed to
vibrate on the retrieve and often work best when
simply cast out and reeled back in. Much of Char-
lotte Harbor is too shallow for many crankbaits
that are popular up north.
TROLLING PLUG: A specialized type of crankbait
meant to be towed behind a moving boat. Of
course, you can troll with most lures, but these
baits are designed specifically to be used at trolling
speeds and to dive to a certain depth range.
Trolling plugs are usually big and usually expen-
sive, but they're also a fantastic way to target big
fish in relatively deep water without having to use
natural baits.
TWITCHBAITS: Usually made of hard plastic,
twitchbaits are weighted to be neutrally buoyant
or sink slowly. Unlike most other lures, a twitchbait
has virtually no action except what the angler
imparts with twitches of the rodtip. Because of
this, it can take some time to learn how to catch
fish with these lures. Once you get the hang of it,
though, there are few hard baits that are more
effective.


By Josh Olive
WaterLine Publisher


Live shrimp are far and away the most popular natural bait for local
saltwater fishing. But figuring out the best way to hook them is a challenge.
This is an important task, because an improperly hooked shrimp will either
fall off the hook or die quickly. You're paying a premium for shrimp that are
still alive, so keeping them alive as long as possible is just common sense. No
matter which method you choose, the smaller the hook, the less weight your
shrimp has to carry and the more lively it will be. Don't go too light for the
job, but go as light as you can.
Dead shrimp actually have most of the appeal that live ones do, and when
you're using them you don't need to worry about keeping them alive. In some
circumstances, frozen shrimp will do better than live ones because they put
more scent out into the water. However, they also tend to fall apart more
quickly. Really, this isn't a problem for most fish, since they use smell more
than sight for hunting. Some species (snook in particular) are pickier and
prefer live shrimp. When you're actively casting and retrieving a dead shrimp,
expect to get about 60 or 70 percent of the casts you would with a live shrimp
before it just falls off.
With the hook under the spine on thehed
the shrimp will live a long time but may fly






WaterLine photos
by Josh Olive-M


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into a




canal
By Capt. Ralph Allen

Learning about the fishing in Charlotte Harbor can
be a lifelong endeavor, and many anglers who live
the dream and relocate themselves here from homes
in other areas find themselves overwhelmed with
all the fishing possibilities. In many cases, the very
first encounter with fishing in Charlotte Harbor for a
newcomer occurs when she walks out into the back-
yard of a newly purchased Florida home and casts a
line into a canal. If a bite isn't forthcoming in short
order the question soon arises: are there any fish in
the canal to catch?
Canals comprise a significant portion of Charlotte
Harbor. There are approximately 50 miles of canals
in Punta Gorda, probably a similar amount in Port
Charlotte, more on the Cape Haze peninsula, some on
Pine Island, and more than 400 miles in Cape Coral.
The hundreds of miles of concrete seawall, thousands
of boat docks, and uncountable tons of rock rip-rap in
the Harbor's canal systems provide more submerged
structure than do all the artificial fishing reefs in
Southwest Florida combined and yes, there are fish in
the canals.
There are many fishing opportunities in the canal
systems, but there are a few things to understand
about canal fishing that will help your fishing pros-
pects. The most basic thing to know about a canal is
whether it's a freshwater canal or a saltwater canal.


While such a question may seem silly to the accom-
plished anglers in the area, I often talk to newcomers
who really don't understand the difference. The salt
versus fresh question has less to do with the salt
level in the canal than it does with whether or not
the canal connects directly to the Harbor. Almost all
of the Punta Gorda canals are saltwater, but there
are both freshwater and saltwater canals in Port
Charlotte and Cape Coral. For example, most of the
Port Charlotte canals which cross U.S. 41 are dammed
near the highway, with the result that the waterways
to the east of the highway are freshwater while those
to the west are saltwater. An easy way to tell: If the
water level in your canal fluctuates by a foot or two in
height during the day, it's responding to the tides in
the Harbor and is a saltwater canal. If the water level
remains relatively constant during the course of a
typical day, it's a freshwater canal. (Some freshwater
canals do rise and fall in water level over the course of
days or weeks during times of heavy rain or drought).
If you're fishing in a freshwater canal, the fish in
the canal are residents who cannot leave the canal
system and include species such as bass, bluegill,
shellcrackers, crappie and tilapia. The fishing for these
species does change seasonally (sometimes dramat-
ically), but the fish are in the canals year-round.
Fishing for these species can be similar to fishing for
the same species "up north;' except for the seasonal
differences. For example, in Southwest Florida bass
begin bedding in early winter and are mostly off the
beds by the end of February. Crappie fishing is best in
midwinter, though you'll need to start calling them


"specks" (short for speckled perch) if you hope to gain
acceptance among local anglers.
If you're fishing in saltwater canals, the fish in the
canals can enter and exit the canal systems. There
are certain species which tend to visit the canals at
certain times of year, and not so much at other times.
The fishing in our saltwater canals is best for most
fish during the winter. One major exception: Tarpon,
which are more often hooked in the canals during the
summer. Many other desirable sportfish, including
snook, redfish, trout, black drum and sheepshead
move into the canals in large numbers during the
winter. In fact, it's not uncommon for boating anglers
to go into the canal systems to fish when it's chilly
or windy, because the canals offer both protected
fishing conditions and a shot at good fishing.
Here are two thoughts which may help you catch
more fish in the canals. First, as mentioned above,
the seawalls, docks and other structures found in
the canals provide much habitat for a variety offish.
Why, then, do so many anglers stand on a seawall
and heave their baits into the center of the canal, as
far away as possible from the structure? While this
tactic does at times produce desirable fish (trout are
often found mid-canal), the technique is more likely
to produce catfish than anything else. Second, not
all canals are created equal. There are some canals,
or certain spots in some canals, which have produced
fish for years, and other canals which seldom seem to
produce a worthwhile catch. Did you ask your realtor
about the fishiness of your canal before signing that
mortgage?


STT


ne01 e O maineaIIIlIIIdIson
Charlotte Harbor is so full of life is
the healthy mangrove forests that
stand on much of its shorelines.
Although they have not fully
recovered from the beating they
took in Hurricane Charley, the roots
of these salt-loving trees provide
safe harbor for innumerable small
creatures, including juvenile tarpon.
According to biologist Dr. Kathy
Guindon, without mangroves, the
number of tarpon that grow up in
the Harbor would plummet
"Mangroves are important nursery
habitats for juvenile tarpon,"she
says. "Removing the trees or
developing those shorelines could
affect tarpon nurseries and the prey
items that also live in mangroves,
which tarpon rely on for food!'
According to the Bonefish and
Tarpon Trust, approximately 50
percent of Florida's mangroves have
already been lost, and degradation
of these habitats continues. As
coastal human populations continue
to increase, coastal ecosystems
and the fisheries they support are
becoming increasingly stressed due
to factors such as habitat loss and
degradation.
The mangroves ringing the
Harbor are protected by law, but if
developers begin dangling dollars
in front of lawmakers'faces, those
regulations could be watered
down or sidestepped. Even if that
never happens, protecting the trees
themselves is not enough. As with
every other living thing, mangroves
won't thrive in a degraded habitat
As development continues in areas
upriver, water quality is likely to
suffer in the estuary those rivers
feed. Well-conceived restrictions
will need to be observed to prevent
undue damage to the environ-
ment which supports Florida's
multi-billion dollar gamefish and
seafood resources.


-Josh Olive


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By Josh Olive
WaterLine Publisher

"This water is so dirty! Why isn't it clear, like it is
in the Keys?"This question or some variation of it is
posed to Charlotte Harbor fishing guides, bait shop
staff, harbormasters and magazine publishers thou-
sands of times every year. There are several reasons,
but let's start out with one basic fact: Charlotte
Harbor is one of the healthiest and cleanest estuaries
in the southeastern United States. Our water is NOT
dirty at least, no dirtier than water you'll find in
other parts of the state, including the Keys.
The number-one reason that our water isn't
gin-clear is the Peace and Myakka rivers. Charlotte
Harbor is an estuary, which means fresh water
and salt water mix together. This mixture is called
brackish water. Brackish water naturally is a bit more
turbid. You can easily see this effect for yourself if you
our a glass of fresh water into a saltwater aquarium.
But that's a minor issue. The main culprit is chemicals
called tannins. Both the Peace and Myakka rivers
flow mostly through forested or swampy areas, as
do the countless tiny creeks which feed these rivers.
Decomposing vegetation cypress leaves, palm


fronds, oak tree limbs releases brown tannins into
the water, tinting it.
To demonstrate this, dip up a jarful of river water
and hold it up to the light. It doesn't look dirty. It
looks like tea clear, but stained brown. If there's
been a lot of rain lately, flushing large amounts
of tannins into the water, it will look darker and
sometimes have a reddish tint. In the Harbor, where
the river water mixes with clear water coming in from
the Gulf of Mexico, the color is less strong, generally
tan or yellowish.
Although river water is the main cause of our
water's reduced clarity, another cause is the sediment
at the bottom of the Harbor. On the Gulf shoreline,
most beaches are composed of relatively large sand


BOATINGANDFIl


grains. In the Harbor's protected waters, though,
much of the bottom is silt or mud. When storms or
wind associated with a front churn the water, these
fine particles become suspended in the water. It
takes days for them to settle back to the bottom. This
is why the Harbor is usually at its clearest in May, just
before the summer rainy season kicks off but after
the regular winter fronts are well behind us.
The last reason for our water's dinginess is also the
reason our fishing is so fantastic: It's full of nutrients
and living things. The ocean's clearest water is far
away from coastlines. These areas are very poor in
nutrients and not much lives there. The visibility may
be great, but there's not much to see. Think of habi-
tats on land: Generally, you can see around you much
better in the desert than you can in a rain forest. So it
is with water: Low visibility often means the habitat
is more productive.
Crystal water is better for diving and glass-bottom
boat tours, but if you want to have a great day of
fishing, water that's tinted or murky is usually a much
better choice. The fish are less spooky, they're less
likely to see your leader and terminal tackle, they're
not as picky about the realism of your lure and
there are usually more of them to begin with.


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Punta Gorda, Florida
(941) 575-3000
www.fishville.com


U^l


SHING.COMIi


r Aseagrass bedis home to
countless tiny invertebrates,
which are food for both
baitfish and for juvenile
gamefish. A square yard of
seagrass is an ecosystem in
miniature, with innumerable
real-life predator-prey dramas
happening every day. Healthy
grass is a huge factor in a
quality fishery. So why would
you want to ruin that by
carelessly plowing your boat
over a grassflat that's too
shallow for your draft?
It's bad for the environ-
ment, bad for the fishing, and
bad for your boat. Running
aground by accident happens
to just about every boater
at some point, but ripping
across an entire flat with a
mud trail behind you and the
prop shuddering as it digs a
trench is just idiocy. Sand
is abrasive both to your prop
and the bottom of your boat,
and sucking sand or muck
up into your water intake
isn't going to do your engine
a lot of good. If you don't
care about the grass and all
its inhabitants that you're
literally mowing down if you
choose to transit a flat that's
too shallow, one would think
you'd at least care about the
boat you spent hard-earned
cash on.
If you're conscientious
about avoiding cutting
troughs through the flats,
thank you for caring. But if
you're one of those guys who
just can't be bothered to go
around the flat, or at least
trim your motor up so you
won't dig a ditch as you go,
please send me your address
so I can cut some donuts on
your front lawn.
Josh Olive





BOATINGANDFISHING.COM


^,^ ^^ Jii~~l'l^'^lIl*I' ;1I^!i!


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Practice makes perfect. When it comes to cast netting, there
is no substitute for experience. Sure, you can watch a video
about proper cast netting technique on the Internet, but your
best bet is to get out there and practice. When starting out, you
should use a smaller net something like 6 feet. As you hone
your technique, you can increase the size of the net. But at first,
keep it simple. The more you practice, the better you'll get. Plus,
you'll save money catching your own bait, and you'll look cool
doing it. Here are a few basics to get you started.
Step 1: Slide the loop of the line over your left wrist, coil the line
in your left hand and bring the horn of the net into your left hand.
Step 2: Loosely grab the net with your right hand Slide your
hand down as far as it will go.
Step 3: Take that portion of the net up and place it into your
left hand, forming a coil. Slide the right hand down as far as it
will go again.
Step 4: Repeat step 3, forming another coil. At this point, the
bottom of the net will be off the deck.
Step 5: Drop your left arm straight down so the lead weights
in the net are just above the ground.
Step 6: Raise the net and, with the thumb and index finger of
your right hand, pick a strand of net and follow it down to the leads.
Step 7: Gather about a third of the net and leads with your
right hand.
Step 8: Take that section of the net and bring it under the
elbow and wrist of the left arm.
Step 9: Flip that section of the net over your left shoulder.
Step 10: Leave that section on the left shoulder, but raise your
elbow to hold the net.
Step 11: Take the inside line of the net with your right hand
and begin flipping it over the right shoulder until another third
of the net remains.
Step 12: Take the net off the right shoulder and place the
knuckles of both hands together.
Step 13: You're ready to give it a toss. Rotate your body while
holding your hands together.
Step 14: Uncoil and toss the net. Don't be surprised if your
first toss doesn't come out just right. It takes a bit of practice to
get the hang of throwing a cast net.


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The short of the story is that "Whorehouse
Point;'" known today as Ponce Park, is the
Point where Miss Ollie Bracket conducted her
operations. Houses of III Repute were actually
ill-legal inside the town limits. She operated
mostly from river-lighters fashioned into
bunkhouse brothels. They were based and
outfitted/stocked at "Whorehouse Point". These
'houseboats'could be freely moved to follow
whatever and wherever the need would arise,
whether cowboys, fishermen, or whatever in
the harbor area.
We know that one of their popular hangouts
was"Whore Bay.":' Bucky thought that this might
be around by the entrance to Alligator Creek.
Mangrove Point was originally on Hog Island.
That is where all of the charts of the late 1800's
and early 1900's show it. It was only recently
that it appeared on the maps and charts at or
near Ponce Park.
The Long of the Story is told in "Our Fasci-
nating Past The Early Years"; by: Lindsey
Williams and U.S. Cleveland 1993 in their
chapter"Startling Secret of"Big Six".
"Startling Secret of"Big Six" Not may folks
today know that Punta Gorda before the turn of
the century was home to the"Ninth Wonder Of
the World!" Even more surprising was the fact
that this curiosity was a 6-foot prostitute known
familiarly to the male population as"Big Six".
Her professional name was Miss Ollie Bracket.
Miss Bracket ran a "disorderly bawdy house
of ill repute" in the large two-story frame house
called 'Castle Hall'at the end of West Marion
Avenue.. Just beyond was Punta Gorda's cess
pool. Beyond that was tidal waste land which
local people referred to as the"sand flats"-
today's posh Punta Gorda Isles.
Big Six took only a few of her customers; her
stable of seven"ponies" accommodated most
of the trade. Punta Gorda was the end of the
railroad, location of a busy cattle dock, and
site of a half-dozen large fish-packing houses.
It was a pioneer town with a population of


A lot has changed
at Punta Gorda's
Ponce de Leon Park
since the late 1800s.
That's for sure.


rough cowboys and fishermen without women.
Prostitution was tacitly tolerated. Evcen"High
Society" ladies pretended ignorance of it.
Punta Gorda council adopted an ordinance
levying $100 fines on those caught frequenting
"houses of ill fame"- a severe penalty next
only to that for cattle rustling and horse
stealing. However, the law was seldom enforced
as getting convictions was almost impossible.
There were several houses that displayed
a red light at night on the outskirts of Punta
Gorda. Houseboats with friendly females
anchored down the harbor at Whore Bay, where
fishermen spent five nights a week in the stilt
bunkhouses close to the best fishing grounds.
Miss Bracket covered her dark hair with a red
wig. She wore sexy dresses, hats with a large
plume, and a feathered boa. When she went to
town she rode side-saddle on a big white horse.


One can imagine that her clandestine clients
winked as she went by; while the town matrons
sniffed in disdain and fluttered their fans.
There was much gossip about Big Six, but
historians over the years have not been able
to substantiate much of her background.
Old-timers however, agree on the surprising
facts of her death.
She became seriously ill with dysentery in
1894 but would not let her girls call a doctor.
Finally she lapsed into a coma and the harlots
finally summoned a physician. She died in
delirium.... It was at this time that Big Six was
discovered to be the Ninth Wonder.
She was a man! It is not clear whether Big
Six's secret was discovered by the doctor or by
the"burial grannies" of the older women who
customarily were called in to"lay out" a body.
Mevertheless, news of her/his hidden identity


fueled much speculation.
The late Fred Farris, a popular columnist for
the Sun newspapers, wrote in 1982 that Big
Six was really George Asbel a name confirmed
in later years by his niece. She related that her
uncle had fled Georgia and assumed female
identity after killing a man by pushing him off
a cliff. One story has it that the man didn't even
die.
A WAYWARD LIFE
Asbel, alias Maria Dempsey, is said to have
married Dan Patrick in Tampa on March 2,
1892. Shortly afterward she left Patrick and
took up a wayward life first at Arcadia,
then at Punta Gorda.
Unfortunately, there is no tombstone or
cemetery record of a George Asbel or Miss
Ollie Bracket at Indian Springs. There is a
"potters" section of the cemetery where Bix
Six undoubtedly is buried, but the grave is
unknown.
Robert Kirby Seward, founding editor of the
Punta Gorda Herald from 1893 to 1901, was
said by Farris to have been called as a coroner's
witness. Also testifying to the death circum-
stances were James Corbern, Scott Burnham,
W.H. Johnson and L.E. White.
Seward published the sensational story with
the headline"Ninth Wonder Of the World'."
Apparently Big Six was an hermaphrodite
with both male and female sex organs a
rare but well known phenomenon which
Harry Goulding, ling-time comptroller of the
Punta Gorda Fish Company, said "confused the
cowboys".
Unfortunately all copies of the Herald prior
to 1902 have crumbled to dust.
The witnesses long ago joined Big Six at
Indian Springs.
Perhaps it is just as well we don't know all
the details. Legends are better that way and
provide employment for new generations of
columnists and for would-be historians.


U~ns


Water Front

bunws & TI ur

260 Maryland Ave.


Englewood, FL
(Located at Stump Pass Marina)

www.st u mppassg ri lle .com

941.697.0859


SI





Pi r !ii !l' l!IM l q I] Idi IH ;ti iI !.,


1W~


Pnolo pro.i ,o ,'J
A hook in the finger
caused by a flopping
fish is one of the many
mishaps fishermen
should be prepared
to deal with far away
from emergency help.


I


t


Getting off the hook


By Lee Anderson
WaterLine Editor


Ever hook yourself while fishing? As much as I'd like to say I
haven't, I have. Plenty of times. Most are minor incidents, but
sometimes the hook penetrates deep into the skin. When that
happens, the first thing to remember is to stay calm don't
panic.
The advance and cut technique is most effective when the
point of the fishhook is located near the surface of the skin.
Using pliers, the entire point of the fishhook (including the
barb) is advanced through the skin. The worst is over now.
The point and barb is then cut free with the pliers or another
cutting tool, allowing the rest of the now barbless fishhook to
be backed out of the wound with little resistance. Alternately,
the eye can be cut off and the hook advanced out point first.
When you get seriously hooked, a method called the string-
yank technique works wonders even is the barb is buried
into the skin. It may be used to remove any hook, but works
best on small or medium hooks. The hook may come out with
some force, so make sure you are wearing eye protection. Wash
the area with antiseptic and try to remember when you had
your last tetanus shot. To be safe, you may want to visit your


doctor to make sure there isn't a foreign body lodged in the
wound.
Be careful out there.
ADVANCE AND CUT
1. Using pliers, advance the point of the hook out through
the skin past the barb. Follow the natural curve of the hook.
2. Using the pliers or side cutters, cut the hook below the
barb.
3. Remove the hook by retracing back through the wound.
Sterilize and bandage.
STRING-YANK
1. A strong string, such as fishing line, should be wrapped
around the midpoint of the bend in the fishhook with the free
ends of the string held tightly. A better grip on the string can be
achieved by wrapping the ends around pliers or forming a large
loop to wrap around your hand and wrist.
2. The area should be well stabilized against a fiat surface.
3. Push down on the eye portion of the shank of the hook.
4. A firm, quick jerk is then applied parallel to the shank
while continuing to exert pressure on the eye of the fishhook.
Do not hesitate snap it out.


BOATINGANDFISHING.COM


IHTTI


mrr~@Jjor^


By Josh Olive
WaterLine Publisher


It's an image burned into our collective memory: An angler
stands grinning on a pier, rod in hand. Beside him dangles an
enormous fish with a long, pointed snout. Written on its side:
Blue marlin, 859 Ibs. So it's no wonder that when people come
from around the world to fish in Florida, they're expecting to
catch an 859-pound blue marlin.
Bad news, folks you need to adjust your expectations if
you're fishing out of this part of the state.
Actually, there are lots of marlin and other blue-water
gamefish off the Southwest Florida coast. It's just that not too
many anglers are willing to endure the 150-mile trip each
way! to get into water deep enough. Take a look at the
map. Off Florida's west coast, the water is relatively shallow
for a long way out. This extension of the continental shelf
used to be high and dry thousands of years ago, when sea
level was 300 feet lower because so much water was locked
away in land-based glaciers (aka The Great Ice Age). But along
the Florida Keys and the southeast coast, past Miami, Fort
Lauderdale and West Palm Beach, deep water is much closer
to port. In some areas, you can be trolling in water hundreds
of feet deep and still within sight of shore.
That's why big-game anglers rarely run out of Placida. Why
spend thousands on fuel when it's much more cost-efficient to
trailer across the state? Of course, in areas where the bottom
quickly drops off, there's not as much opportunity for inshore
fishing or even dropping lines down on the reefs. That's where
local fishing truly shines. It's a fair trade: They get the marlin,
but we get the pristine and productive estuary.


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BOATINGANDFISHING.COM


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By Josh Olive
WaterLine Publisher
Here in Southwest Florida, we are blessed with
the best boating waters in the world. What makes
this area so ideal for watercraft?
It's always boating season there's no harsh
winter forcing you to put your boat into storage
for several months because all the water has
turned to ice. Cold fronts do come through,
bringing temporary chills, but there's usually very
comfortable weather between them.
The Gulf is usually a relatively calm body of
water. Sarasota Bay and Charlotte Harbor are
usually calmer still, because they are protected
from the Gulf's swells by the chain of barrier
islands that runs along our coastline.
Although a large percentage of the local
population are boaters, you can usually find
seclusion if you want it. With the huge number of
small islands just a short boat ride away, having
your own private beach at least for a while -
can be a reality for anyone with a watercraft.
The water is mostly rock-free and soft. The
worst damage you're likely to do if you run
aground is to sand a bit of paint off your bottom
and jostle your passengers. In many other popular
boating waters, running aground means a good
chance of punching a boulder through the hull.
Our subtropical paradise is alive with an
extraordinary array of marine life. Dolphins,
manatees, seas turtles, thousands of water birds
and hundreds of species of fishes all call this
area home at least part of the year. People who
live elsewhere see this kind of thing at a public
aquarium or on The Discovery Channel. We have it
10 minutes from the boat ramp.
With all of these good reasons to be a part
of the Southwest Florida boating lifestyle, I'm
surprised you're still reading this you should
be running out to buy a boat. But before you do,
it's important to look at the different types of
boats out there. There are some things you need
to consider about how you'll be using your boat.
Are you going to mostly use your boat to get
you to the best fishing spots or for cruising along
the beach? Do you want to fish inshore, offshore
or both? Will your wife be accompanying you?
Does she fish, or does she prefer to sunbathe and
read? Will the kids (or grandkids) want you to tow
a wakeboard?
There are boats built to serve a specific purpose
- a tunnel-hull flats skiff, for example, is made
just for fishing in skinny water. It's understood
that you'll be sacrificing some comfort and
features to have the ability to go where other
boats just can't. Other vessels are multipurpose.
These Jack-of-all-trades boats have become
very popular lately, as families that might have
a couple boats in a more robust economy have
pared back to just one.
Most boats sold for use in salt water are
made of fiberglass, though some manufacturers
use aluminum. A handful of companies make
aluminum-hulled flats skiffs for marine use. Most
pontoon boats use aluminum, but aluminum
boats built for lake use are not recommended


I WaterLine photo
by Josh nile
Recreational boating
is very popular in
Southwest Florida,
especially on warm,
sunny days.


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for a marine environment. 'Glass is more or
less impervious to the elements, though the
gelcoat does require regular maintenance to
prevent oxidation. Fiberglass is also tougher
than aluminum and will stand up better to use in
choppy water.
If flats fishing is yourthing, a tunnel-hulled
vessel may fit the bill. These boats have a divided
hull similar to a catamaran, but the space
between them is smaller. The idea is to use the
boat's forward speed to ram air into the tunnel
between the hulls, lifting the boat a bit and
lessening the draft. Some vessels of this type
can run at speed in water a couple inches deep.
In places where other boats would just churn
mud, a tunnel hull skims above the seagrass. This
enables anglers to get into the deep backcountry
to find hidden fishing spots. Once the boat slows,
the ram-air effect goes away and 4 to 7 inches
of water are needed to float. Boats of this type
usually have other features flats anglers demand:
Poling platforms, flat decks for ease of casting and
fish fighting, and below-deck storage to keep the
deck clear. What these boats don't have: Space for
multiple passengers, a head (that's nautical-speak
for rest room), and big boomin'stereos.
Deck boats appeal more to families and
the partying crowd. These vessels have lots of
passenger room, usually in the form of comfy
padded seating. Although these boats have a
deeper draft than a dedicated flats skiff, they'll
still float in pretty shallow water usually
anything more than 12 to 14 inches deep.
These make good all-purpose vessels, and are
easily optioned for fishing with rod holders


and livewells. Larger models often include the
most important feature for many women an
enclosed potty. Guys, laugh if you want, but for
women it's a deal-breaker if they have to go over
the side (OK most women). With room for a
cooler, a couple of friends and some rockin'tunes,
a deck boat is sort of a pontoon boat minus the
nerd factor.
Speaking of pontoon boats, if you can get past
their stodgy reputation, they can actually be a
lot of fun. The main strike against them: They're
slow. If getting there fast isn't a priority, this
may be your boat. A pontoon boat is basically a
floating porch, with plenty of space for lounging
and relaxing. These are a great choice for younger
kids, because the experience is much gentler.
On the other hand, if you're all about speed,
there are some incredibly fast boats on the
market. Some utilize outboard engines, but
most are built with twin inboards. This makes
maintenance more of a chore. Most owners of
go-fast boats pay someone else to take care of
that, for the same reason that few Ferrari owners
tinker with their engines: These are expensive
and very complicated machines.
In the protected backwaters, small boats can
travel safely in good weather. On the open Gulf,
though, small craft are at risk regardless of the
forecast. Although there are days when the water
is flat calm and you could take your flat-bottomed
jon boat right out Boca Grande Pass, that's a bad
plan. If you take on water, you're sitting in a metal
tub that can easily sink. Local weather conditions
are not the onlyfactor controlling sea conditions
- though the surface may be glassy, swells can


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begin suddenly. Forecasts are not always accurate
(actually, are they ever?), and wind can come from
seemingly nowhere. Also, small boats rarely carry
visual distress signals or a VHF radio, two absolute
requirements for venturing onto big water.
If you know you'll be tempted to go out into
the Gulf, you should plan your boat purchase
accordingly. An 18-foot center console will cost
less than the 24-foot model, but the bigger boat
is much safer in Gulf conditions. Conditions can
deteriorate quickly, especially if you misjudge the
speed of an approaching storm or run afoul of
the weather some other way. Don't compromise
too much on this point if your boat's not big
enough for the Gulf, it's not worth risking your life
for a few grouper fillets.
Vessels designed for offshore sport fishing are
sometimes overkill in this area. Unless you plan to
make frequent long trips either 80-plus miles
offshore or down to the Keys you probably
don't need a boat meant for marlin fishing. Of
course, these large sportfishers are status symbols
for many, and if that's what you need there's
nothing wrong with it.
You have a lot of different boat options
available to you. Whether you're looking for your
first vessel or want to upgrade your current boat,
the best way to decide is simple: Talk to your local
dealer about your boating needs and take a test
ride or two. The most important thing is that you
get out on the water and start enjoying it. After
all, Southwest Florida's waterways are among the
best in the world.
It would be a shame to live so close and still
miss out.


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BOATINGANDFISHING.COM


By The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission

Controlled studies have shown that most fish
released after hook-and-line capture, survive.
Researchers working in Boca Grande Pass tagged
27 tarpon with sonic transmitters and found
that 26 of these hook-and-line-caught fish
survived. The one fish that died had been lifted
from the water for a prerelease photograph.
Scientists repeatedly caught bonefish held in a
large pond in the Florida Keys and found that 96
percent survived capture. A few of the bonefish
that ultimately died had been caught five to ten
times each, which suggests that bonefish hooked
and released in the wild probably have an even
higher survival rate. Angler-caught snook held
in large net-pens throughout Florida had a 98
percent survival rate. Most of the snookthat died
were caught with live bait, consistent with studies
showing that fish caught with lures generally
survive. Spotted seatrout caught in Tampa Bay
had a 95 percent survival rate. Hook position
affected survival rates; trout hooked in the gills or
gut had lower survival rates than those hooked
in the mouth. Redfish survival rates range from
84 percent in Georgia waters to 96 percent in
Texas waters. Like seatrout, hook position affected
survival rates; more than 50 percent of the throat
or gut hooked fish died. These studies demonstrate
that catch-and-release-fishing works-most fish
that are released survive. By following a few simple
guidelines, anglers can maximize survival rates.

SOME GUIDELINES FOR
CATCH-AND-RELEASE ANGLING
The most important steps an angler can take to
ensure a successful release are to hook and land
the fish as quickly as possible, leave the fish in
the water while removing the hook, and release
the fish quickly. There are several other ways to
improve survival rates:
Whatever you do, do it quickly. Keeping an
exhausted fish out of water is like holding a bag
over a runner who has just completed a mara-
thon. They both need oxygen to recuperate.
Wet your hands or gloves before handling
the fish. Do not injure the eyes or gills. Placing
the fish on a wet towel will help the fish retain
its protective slime. To keep the fish still, place
it on its back or cover its eyes with a wet towel.
Control the fish at all times! If you drop the fish,
its chances of injury and death increase.
Decide beforehand which fish are to be kept;
immediately release all others. Do not engage
in a prolonged debate over whether or not to
release the fish after the fish has been landed.
Never place a fish in your live well intending to
release it later if you catch a larger one. Once
you make a decision to keep a fish, stick with it.
The fishes you release from your live well have a
decreased chance of survival.
Avoid the use of gaffs, and never remove large
fish such as tarpon from the water. Large fish
can injure themselves and the crew and should,
therefore, be treated with respect. Take a photo-
graph of the fish in the water and release it.
Refrain from holding fish in a vertical position


when inspecting or photographing them. Internal
organs are displaced and stress is increased in
this unnatural position. Large fish should never
be held by the bottom jaw only, with a boca grip
or otherwise (any tool designed to grip the lower
jaw of caught fish to facilitate handling). Hold
the fish horizontally by the lower jaw with one
hand, and support the belly with the other hand.
If unsupported, many large fish, especially snook,
will rupture the isthmus-a cartilaginous bundle of
ligaments that connects the head and body--and
the fish will die a slow death from starvation.
This connection is necessary for the tremendous
gulping action during feeding.
If the hook is difficult to remove by hand, use
long-nosed pliers or a hook-removal tool. Do not
tear additional tissue by removing the hook. Back
the hook through the original wound. If this fails,
cut the leader and pull the hook forward through
the injury. Regardless whether or not you intend
to keep the fish cut the leader close to the hook
when releasing large Goliath Grouper jewfishh),
tarpon, sharks, and other fishes that are gut
hooked. Do not lift a gut-hooked fish out of the
water by the leader; this can increase damage to
the fish.
Try fishing with barbless hooks, or crimp and
remove the barb. Catch rates using barbed or
barbless hooks are not significantly different.
Barbless hooks are easier to remove, and they
cause less physical damage to the fish.
Use circle hooks. They cause less injury and
increase catch rates.
If your fish is in good shape, immediately
return it to the water headfirst. If it does not
swim or is lethargic or erratic, some"resuscita-
tion" may be needed until the fish can swim on
its own. Revive exhausted, but otherwise healthy
fish by first placing one hand under the tail and
holding the bottom lip with the other. If the fish
is in fair to good shape, merely hold it headfirst
into the current. If it is severely lethargic, depress
the bottom lip to cause the jaw to gape and
gently move the fish forward. Moving the fish in
an erratic back and forth motion will just induce
more stress. Have you ever seen a fish swim
backward and forward? At the first sign of the
fish attempting to swim away-let it go. Prolonged
attempts at resuscitation will be stressful to the
fish.
Large pelagic species such as sharks and tarpon
should be brought alongside the boat within 20
minutes of being hooked. If you are consistently
landing exhausted fish that require extensive
efforts at resuscitation, you should consider using
heavier tackle.
To vent or not to vent? Several studies
have been conducted to determine if venting
distended air bladders of fishes hauled from
deep water increases survival. It is inconclu-
sive whether it is beneficial to vent snappers;
however, venting groupers has been shown to
positively increase survival. It is important to
learn and use proper procedures.
Practice and share these techniques! Teach
your children and inexperienced anglers these
few simple procedures to help ensure abundant
fish populations for the future.






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PUT IT 1l TI! IIlIIIl![ r,; I .'T 1


The only knot


you need to know


BOATINGANDFISHING.COM


mi


By Josh Olive
WaterLine Publisher
When I was a kid, my grandfather taught me how to
tie a knot for fishing. Put the line through the hook eye,
bring it back up parallel to the main line, twist the hook
seven times, stick the tag end though the loop you
created, and snug it up. Presto fishing knot!
If you're still using that knot, listen up. Stop. Right.
Now. Clinch knots were great when monofilament
ruled the world. Now that we have braided superlines
and hard-surfaced fluorocarbon, a knot with more
holding power is required. Even if you are one of those
holdouts stubbornly sticking with mono (and I'm not
knocking you for that I still use mono on all my
conventional reels), you should give up the clinch
because I have a knot that you'll never pull through, if
you tie it correctly.
It's called the Uni knot, and it's the only know you'll
need for 95 percent of Southwest Florida fishing.
Betteryet, it can be used in multiple ways. There's a
double version for tying line to leaders. You can tie it as
shown forfishing with bait. If you need a loop knot for
artificial, you can back it off after pulling it snug -
instant loop knot. You can use it for selling hooks (tie
it like a double Uni, using the shank of the hook as the
other line). It's ajack-of-all-trades that actually does a
fantastic job at all of them.
SINGLE UNI
This knot is for tying line to terminal tackle.
1. Put the tag end of the line through the hook
eye. Pull about 6 to 8 inches of line through and lay it
parallel to the standing line.
2. Make a loop and lay the tag end across, going
over the line twice. Pinch where all three lines intersect
(arrow).
3. Bring the tag end underneath (the side away from
you) and wrap it around both lines. Make five to seven


wraps (in very heavy line, you can make as few as three
wraps; for very light line, as many as nine). On the final
wrap, be sure the line exits the loop on the side facing
you. Pull the line partially taut.
4. Release your pinch grip on the line and grasp
the hook shank. Pull the tag end and the hook shank
simultaneously (watch the point!) until the knot is taut
but not fully tight.
5. Let go of the tag end and grasp the standing line.
Now pull the knot fully tight.
6. Trim the tag end as close as you dare (I leave about
1/16 of an inch) and go fishing.
DOUBLE UNI
This knot is for tying lines of similar diameter. When
tying lines of dissimilar diameter, double the thinner
line before tying; everything else is the same.
1. Hold the two lines parallel, with the tag ends
pointing opposite directions.
2. Make a loop with one of the lines (I tie the thinner
line first) and lay the tag end across, going over the line
twice. Pinch where all three lines intersect (arrow).
3. Bring the tag end underneath (the side awayfrom
you) and wrap it around both lines. Make five to seven
wraps (in very heavy line, you can make as few as three
wraps; for very light line, as many as nine). On the final
wrap, be sure the line exits the loop on the side facing
you. Pull the line partially taut.
4. Release your pinch grip on the line and grasp both
lines below the knot (arrow). Pull the tag end and the
lines simultaneously until the knot is taut but not fully
tight.
5. Repeat steps 2 thru 4for the other line.
6. Grasp both standing lines and pull the knot fully
tight (when using braid, you may want to wear gloves
or wrap the line in a cloth to avoid cutting your fingers
or palms).
7. Trim the tag ends as close as you dare (I leave
about 1/16 of an inch) and go fishing.


--- IL JI


-F4&N=.- IQ


-p


Photo illustration provided
The single Uni knot.


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Photo illustration provided
The double Uni knot.


BOATINGANDFISHING.COM


Try not to be




a ramp hog


By Bill Hempel
While boaters are generally a congenial
group, tempers can flare at the boat launch
ramp. Fists have been known to fly in a sort of
"ramp rage."This is usually the result of boaters
not following a few simple guidelines and
spending too much time in the ramp area. On
hot summer days, boaters are anxious to get
under way and they have little patience waiting
for a ramp hog. One simple rule covers it all:
Spend as little time as possible on the launch
ramp.
The launch ramp is no place to learn how to
back up a boat trailer. If you are not accustomed
to backing up in a tight spot, first go to a vacant
parking lot and practice the art. Also, many
launch sites have an informal protocol. If it is
your first time at a specific ramp, park in the
staging area and watch a boat or two launch.
It may save you time and embarrassment
later. Whenever possible, have another person
with you. It makes the launch a lot faster and
smoother, and also minimizes your chances of
losing control of the boat after it is launched.
Patiently wait your turn. Don't be a line jumper,
and don't try to squeeze in when another trailer
or boat is on the ramp.
To minimize time on the ramp, you should
first park in a staging area and prepare the boat
for launch. Remove all tie-downs, except the
bow (winch) line. Put all gear aboard. Check your
battery's condition, prime the fuel bulb, turn on
the blower, set the motor or drive unit to the
proper trim level and put the key in the ignition.
If you are alone, tie a line from a boat cleat to


the trailer so you don't lose control of it during
the launch. Now you are ready to back into the
launch ramp. Back down so the boat just begins
to float off the trailer, then untie the bow line
and power or push the boat off the trailer. Have
your partner start the boat and immediately
move it to a courtesy dock while you take the
vehicle to a parking spot. If you are alone, take
the boat to a courtesy dock first and immedi-
ately come back and remove your vehicle.
The two most common and most disastrous
mistakes are failing to put in the drain plug and
removing the bow line before launch. A missing
plug will quickly fill your boat with water, and a
disconnected bow line may result in a launch on
the parking lot concrete instead of in the water.
When you are returning home, you still
want to minimize your time on the ramp.
Tempers are usually shorter after a long day in
the hot sun and ramp rage can escalate more
quickly than in the morning. Park the boat at
a courtesy dock while you retrieve your vehicle
and secure a place in line. Only after your
trailer is backed into the water should you pull
your boat onto the ramp for loading. Quickly
secure the bow line and pull the trailered boat
back to the staging area. Here you can offload
equipment, secure all tie-downs, pull the drain
plug and get ready for the trip home. Before
getting under way, run a safety check of your
boat and trailer.
A little preparation and thoughtfulness is
all you need to avoid being a ramp hog. Just
remember to be considerate of others and spend
as little time as possible with your boat or trailer
on the ramp.


INE CONThACTING GROUP
C&D MARINE
Seawalls Caps Docks
SBoat Lifts Dredging C

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BOATINGANDFISHING.COM


Could it happen to our Harbor?


By Lee Anderson
WaterLine Editor

It's almost impossible to imagine, but what
would it be like if one day all of the tarpon in
Southwest Florida simply vanished? On one day,
anglers from around the world were enjoying
fishing for one the most prized possession in our
waters; the next day, nothing. It sounds like an
impossibility, but as history often humbles our
beliefs and views, it can happen. It did happen.
It happened to a little port town in Texas more
than 50 years ago. Like Charlotte and Lee
County, tarpon helped put that little port town
in Texas on the map. The town is Port Aransas,
but around 1900, it was called Tarpon. Literally.

THE EARLYYEARS
The first known human occupants of the
island where Port Aransas is located were the
Karankawas Indians, and likely knew of the
abundance of tarpon in the area. The island
was first called Wild Horse Island, then Mustang
because of the wild horses called brought to
the island by the Spaniards in the 1800s. In the
1850s, regular steamship services ran between
Mustang Island and New Orleans. The first
deep-draft steamship went through the Pass
in 1859. Around 1880, the Aransas Pass jetty
project began. The Tarpon Inn was built in 1886,
using surplus lumber from Civil War barracks, to
house the project workers. The Inn would later
be named to the National Register of Historic
Places. Engineers and workers saw the great
schools of tarpon. Those project people who
were fishermen were excited, and why not?
Tarpon were like nothing they had seen before.
They offered islanders money to take them out


and teach them how to catch the silver kings.
The Tarpon Club, a group of wealthy anglers,
opened in 1896. By the 1890s the town was
called Ropesville, but due to the popularity of
tarpon fishing, it became known as Tarpon in
1899. The population at the time was around
250.
Around 1900, anglers from the Tarpon
Club introduced power boats to Port Aransas,
sparking a golden era of fishing and boat
building on Mustang Island.
"It was the beginning of the tarpon boom;'
said Rick Pratt, director of the Port Aransas


Museum. "The fact that the town was named
Tarpon says it all. People came to fish for
tarpon.":'
At the turn of the century, the town of Tarpon
was heavily involved in sea turtle exports, with
some catches weighing up to 500 pounds. They
were shipped live to market. It is estimated
that more than 600 species of saltwater fish
inhabited the waters off the island. Citizens
began calling the town Port Aransas around
1910. Mustang Island's geographic location at
the edge of the Gulf was tested by hurricanes
in 1916 and 1919 and did great damage to the


little town. However, residents rebuilt their
community after each storm. Residents knew
that the island town would be an ideal tourist
haven.
In the mid-1920s, the sport fishing industry
was alive and well throughout the country.
Those who had heard of the mythic tarpon
swimming along the beaches of Port Aransas
began flocking to the island. A new era in Port
Aransas'history began in 1932 when longtime
islander Barney Farley organized the Tarpon
Rodeo fishing tournament. The Tarpon Rodeo
established Port Aransas as the center of the
state's sportfishing industry and attracted
anglers from around the nation. Perhaps Port
Aransas'biggest milestone came in 1937, when
the most famous of all sportfishing tourists
at the time paid the town a visit. President
Franklin D. Roosevelt, an avid fisherman, arrived
off Aransas Pass aboard a U.S. Navy destroyer.
The president and his party immediately began
fishing outside the jetties, after which they
moved from the destroyer to the presidential
yacht, Potomac. As rumor has it, still hoping to
catch a decent size tarpon, which he had not yet
done, the President fished his last day with local
guides and hooked a 5-foot tarpon, and the
paparazzi immortalized the moment.
"When the president came, that pretty much
sealed the deal for Port Aransas becoming a
tarpon mecca;"says Mark Fisher, science director
of Coastal Fisheries for the Texas Parks & Wildlife
Department."It put the town on the map.":'
Boat builders like the Farley family flourished.
Hotels and restaurants were built to accom-
modate the tarpon tourists. Fishing guides
and their families lived the good
life. Port Aransas a boasted a 1


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thriving economy, all thanks to the silver king.
During this time, the most popular way to fish
for the tarpon was trolling from a small boat.
Baited hooks were let out about 50 feet and the
boat slowed to almost an idle speed. Mullet was
the favored bait. When a tarpon was caught, a
scale was taken as a souvenir, and the fish was
released. It seemed just about everybody wanted
to take a scale to the famous Tarpon Inn and
inscribe their name on it. Some 2,700 scales are
still displayed today, and most are inscribed with
the date and size of the catch. Few scales are
dated after the 1940s. What happened is still a
mystery, with no one single factor as the cause.
THE DECLINE
The Port Aransas Tarpon Rodeo enjoyed its
heyday during the '30s, '40s and early'50s
and attracted presidents and dignitaries.
In the 1950s, there were even road signs in
the Midwest advertising sportfishing in Port
Aransas. But as fewer and fewer tarpon were
being caught, the tournament was discontinued.
The boom was over, and the end came abruptly.
There does not seem to be one main contrib-
uting factor to the decline. Some people point to
development and overharvesting. Some point to
water pollution and contamination. Some even
say that extensive netting in Mexican waters
killed off most of the tarpon, to be made into
fertilizer and cat food. The true cause is likely a
combination of many things. The construction
of reservoirs and the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway
in the 1940s diminished and altered freshwater
inflows. A road connecting Port Aransas with the
Padre Island Causeway was completed in 1954,
providing direct vehicular access. In the 1950s
and 1960s, many Texas rivers were dammed to
create reservoirs. Some believe the resulting
reduction in nutrients and freshwater inflow had
a negative impact on crabs and other marine
life that tarpon were feeding on. This, in turn,
makes the waters of Texas less attractive to
tarpon during their migration.
"There really is no one definite answer;' said
Fisher."It was likely a scenario of development,
pollution and other external factors that all
combined to lead to the decline. Everybody
would like to point the finger at one factor, but
that is not the case'."
Regardless of the reason, by the 1960s and
'70s, the silver king was rarely seen off of Port
Aransas.
"When the tarpon began to decline, it really
hurt our local economy," Pratt said."People were
coming from all over the nation to fish for the
tarpon, maybe even from all over the world. It
took a long time to rebound, and many people
and families never did. A lot of people left. They
had to. Tarpon brought big business, and when
there were no more tarpon, there was no more
business'."
TODAY
Today, the population of Port Aransas is some-
where near 3,500. The economy now focuses on
ecotourism. Bird-viewing locations have been
established by the city and other Texas agencies.
Kayak paddling trails established by the state
also contribute to ecotourism. The town's annual
Whooping Crane Festival attracts enthusiasts
from across the nation, much like the tarpon
tournaments of old. While the fishery is nothing
like it was in the 1930s, tarpon along the Texas
coast seem to have made a minor comeback
in recent years. The numbers are sufficient
to support a small recreational fishery, and a
handful of guides specialize in catch-and-release
trips for the silver king.
"There are people who are devoted to helping
bring back the tarpon to Port Aransas" said


Pratt."lt might not ever be like it was, but I
think we'll see more and more come back to the
Texas coast'."
There are tagging programs by anglers and
agencies to improve the Texas tarpon fishery.
The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department
has also been studying hatchery techniques,
monitoring water quality and restoring critical
habitat along the Texas coast. Still, it's difficult
to imagine the Port Aransas of today becoming a
tarpon mecca.
CHARLOTTE HARBOR
Can what happened to Port Aransas happen
to Charlotte Harbor and Boca Grande Pass?
Again, it sounds like an impossibility, but as
history often humbles our beliefs and views,
it can happen. It did happen. It happened to a
little port town in Texas, much like ours.
Our Harbor is a big fishing destination, with
an estimated annual economic impact well
into the millions, and tarpon are a huge part of
that. According to the Dr. Aaron Adams, director
of Bonefish & Tarpon Trust,"Tarpon are prized
saltwater fish that can live to 80 years and grow
to well over 250 pounds. Past presidents have
taken part in this fishery, from FDR to George
H.W. Bush. Tarpon support a seasonal fishery
that stretches from Virginia to Texas that is
worth more than $6 billion per year. However,
tarpon populations face challenges that require
additional support and management to ensure
the fishery is accessible to future generations.
Tarpon populations face many challenges,
including habitat loss, recreational harvest in
the United States, and directed commercial
harvests by longlines and gill nets in Mexico.
Because tarpon are so long-lived, these types of
threats can have rapid and significant effects on
tarpon populations, and recovery of depleted
populations can take an extremely long time.":'
The Harbor is our community's bread and
butter. There are many commonalities between
Port Aransas and Charlotte Harbor. The Calusa
Indians were very familiar with the tarpon, and
the evidence shows tools were made from their
bones and their meat was eaten. Early pioneers
honed their craft of catching tarpon, and shared
their secrets with dignitaries who came to the
area to fish the silver king. The thousands of
tarpon that visited Boca Grande Pass during
those times still come today. People come from
all over the world to get a taste of the tarpon
experience. Presidents have graced Boca Grande
Pass. There are numerous restaurants bearing
the tarpon name. A tarpon is even the mascot at
a local high school. The silver king is embedded
in our community. It's almost impossible to
imagine what tomorrow would be like without
the fish. But it could happen.


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A couple of sleek street rods


oth of today's
featured autos are
outstanding in
design, have quality work-
manship, top-flight parts
and accessories. Their
entire interiors have the
best materials throughout
and paint that glistens.
Each belongs to longtime
modified car collectors
who wouldn't have it any
other way.
The shiny blue coupe is
two years older than the
swept-back Lincoln, thus
seniority deserves to be
the first written about.
It's a totally custom-
built "retro rod" that
resembles a 1937 Ford
Coupe. Well, at least some
of the chassis came from
such an automobile.
That's where the similar-
ity stopped, as even the
frame was "boxed in"Y for
more strength. It has a
brand-new Downs body
made of extra-strong
fiberglass. The roof was
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turer has the reputation
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-^ytl^0on and Lee

include a 400-cubic-inch
small-block, 300 horse-
power Chevy engine
tied to a 350 automatic
transmission, heavy duty
rear end, power brakes,
steering, electric windows,
special steering column
and wheel, custom
dash and neat gauges, a
modified Mustang front
suspension and rare style
Billett wheels. All this
is incorporated in his
2,600-pound, 15-foot-long
"dream machine." Best
of all, AC tops the list
in making it drivable in
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Randy traded an
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that, he was paid extra
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Randy, 65, presently a
North Port resident, was
a native of Indianapolis,
Ind. He was always in the
mechanical field. He was
a Harley-Davidson dealer
from 1982 to 1999 before
turning that business over


The beautifully enclosed engine compartment holds a 4.6-litre
Ford Police Interceptor engine.


Beautiful red leather interior and "all that beautiful chrome'."


to his son. This energetic
man also ran his father's
machine shop until selling
out in 1995.
He recently retired from
the city of Punta Gorda
and now is employed by
Tom's Traveling Tunes
as a DJ. Grace Saunders,
his significant other,
works for a Punta Gorda
government department.
A native of Massachusetts,
she was formerly a Marine
for eight years and later
managed a real estate
office in California. Their
blended family consists
of six children and four
grandchildren.
Watch for "Ole Blue"
at cruise-ins and shows,
especially from 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. today at the
23rd Annual Fire Ant
Follies benefit for Ronald
McDonald House. This
event has been moved to
Muscle Car City. It's hosted
by the Charlotte Classics
and Cruisers, of which
Randy is president.
Look for Grace who
will be helping Randy
throughout today's show.

Customized
street rod
The other black-and-
pewter machine looks like
a 1939 Lincoln Zephyr
Coupe but it's more like
a customized street rod.
Wow! is the one word
I heard a lot by people
around it recently at
Muscle Car City's fifth
anniversary show.
The owners are Canada/
North Port snowbirds
Randy Slack, 63, and his
wife of 44 years, Cathy. It
came to them by way of
trading a 1934 Plymouth
Street Rod for a 1958 Olds
similar to one his dad had
years ago. Neither were
happy with that car and
the dealer noted their
disappointment, then
showed them the Lincoln
Zephyr in the corner of his
warehouse. A couple of
days later a deal was made.
It's powered by a 4.6-
litre Ford Interceptor en-
gine, uses an AOD tranny


Randy Slack, owner of the
1939 Lincoln Zephyr.


SLIIl PHC.TC.S B, LEE P.'-.,ST,-.'II


"Ole Blue,'a"retro rod" that resembles a 1937 Ford Coupe.


and a Granada rear end.
A company near Tampa
built it using a custom
body and chassis made
in New Jersey adding AC,
PB, PS, PW, electric door
and trunk electric opener
controls, Sirius radio and
back-up camera. Such
eye-catching bodies are
now built in Clearwater
and there are several in
Southwest Florida, Randy
says.
The Slacks also own a
"bad" 1967 Nova SS with
a 540-cubic-inch all-alloy
engine that has Hilborn
E. fuel injection, special
tranny, rear and is consid-
ered a pro street car! Then
there is a 1962 Chevy
"Bubble Top" that also has
to be seen. Both may be
at Muscle Car City today
along with the Zephyr, so
look all three over and talk
to the Slacks.
Randy has always been
in the trucking business,
first employed by his
father's company, then
his own, which now has
80 trucks on the road haul-
ing steel in Canada and the
USA. He and Cathy have
two sons. Roger works for
Tony Stewart as GM at the
Eldora Speedway. Bob is
partner of Dicknell Racing
Products in Ontario. There
are two grandchildren
that keep everyone busy.
They all have racing in
their blood as Randy's
dad owned a speedway
for 27 years in Hamilton,
Ontario, Canada.
I'm sure many readers
are envious of the lifestyle
they enjoyed growing up
around racing people.
Don Royston is president
and co-founder of the
Veteran Motor Car Club
ofAmerica SW Florida
Region and may be
reached at 941-575-0202
or leekr42@embarqmail.
corn.


Exotically styled 1939 Lincoln Zephyr that looks like a customized Street Rod.


Custom dash with the "neat gauges;' special steering column
and wheel of the "retro rod.":'


Randy Wright and Grace Saunders.


UPCOMING EVENTS
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Saturday, March 29, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C/V The Sun Classified-Section A Page 3


Toyota Highlander has plenty of room for Muppets


By DAVID UNDERCOFFLER
Los ANGELES TIMES

(MCT) Maybe the
Muppets weren't such a
good idea.
Toyota, for those who
missed the Super Bowl
ad, has enlisted the
help of Jim Henson's
finest to sell its all-new
Highlander SUV.
This would be a hoot
except for one awkward
fact: This thing holds
Muppets a lot better than
actual people.
The new Highlander
has less head- and
legroom in the third row
than the previous gen-
eration model. In fact,
it has less space back
there than nearly all of its
SUV and crossover rivals.
That's disappointing,
particularly because the
outside of the Highlander
is actually about 3 inches
longer.
So you may have
an easier time fitting
Animal, Rowlf and Pepe
the King Prawn in the
way-back seat than your
friends and family.
The rest of the changes
to the 2014 Highlander
are good ones. Toyota
gave it a handsome new
body, a more refined cab-
in and a healthier dose
of safety and technology.
Engine choices still
include a four-cylinder, a
V-6 and a hybrid.
The Highlander,
starting at $29,215, is
among the more popular
in the mid-size crossover
set. It helped pioneer
the segment in 2001. Yet
crossovers' popularity
has more than doubled
in the past decade, and


the Highlander's market
share has eroded as more
competitors joined the
fray.
Still, the Highlander
has been a steady seller
in the face of pressure
from other three-row
players such as the
Hyundai Santa Fe, Mazda
CX-9, Honda Pilot,
Ford Explorer, Nissan
Pathfinder and Chevy
Traverse.
Fans of the previous
model will notice that
the new 2014 version has
bolder, more masculine
sheet metal than before,
a deliberate move. A
narrower grille, larger
horizontal headlights
and sharper shoulders
give the Highlander more
prominence up front.
The rear gets a healthy
infusion of edges to go
with the added length.
The interior also got
an overhaul. For better
or worse, the cabin of the
$45,170 AWDV-6 Limited
we tested was less
luxurious than practical.
Instead of Lexus-like
earth tones and faux
wood, it offered storage
bins and cubby holes. All
the buttons and controls
are easy to find and use,
but they're presented
with less style than in a
corresponding Hyundai,
Mazda or Nissan.
One neat trick: a
small shelf built into the
dashboard that runs to
the passenger door. It's
the perfect spot to store
cellphones, house keys
or a sewing kit for injured
Muppets. Toyota even
coated it with a grippy
material to prevent
objects from sliding


around.
Most versions of the
Highlander now seat
eight people, though
optional second-row
captain's chairs, like
those in our tester,
reduce seating to seven.
Neither configuration
allows enough room for
adults in the rear. This
won't matter to some
buyers, but if you try to
cram your mother-in-law
back there, you might be
repaid with a cold stare.
Otherwise this Toyota's
cabin was highlighted
by comfortable seats
inside a quiet and refined
cabin. Its functionality
encroaches on minivan
territory, an alternative
for people too cool to be
seen pulling van duty.
The ride is a bit stiffer
than before, Toyota's
attempt to shed a repu-
tation for soft handling.
The automaker takes this
quest a little too far by
programming the steer-
ing with forearm-busting
resistance, becoming one
of several automakers
who think stiff steering
somehow makes their
vehicle sporty.
As mentioned, a base
2.7-liter, four-cylinder
engine is available for
those who don't care
much about power
or who want to pinch
pennies. But Toyota
says about 85 percent
of buyers will opt for
the smooth and capable
3.5-liter V-6 we tested.
Carried over from the
previous generation, this
engine is direct-injected
and pumps out 270
horsepower and 248
pound-feet of torque.


MCT PHOTO
Kermit the Frog and Terry Crews on the set of Toyota's all-new 2014 Highlander commercial aired
during the Super Bowl on February 2, 2014.


New for 2014 is the
six-speed automatic
transmission that
Toyota bolted into the
Highlander. A replace-
ment for the earlier
model's five-speed, the
new gearbox gives this
crossover a nice boost in
fuel economy.
The EPA rates the V-6
Highlander with all-
wheel drive at 18 mpg
in city driving, 24 on the
highway. We averaged
16.3 mpg during a week
of testing this version in
mostly city driving.
The Highlander
Hybrid also carries over
the same power plant
as before, using a pair
of electric motors and a
V-6 engine for 280 total
horsepower and an EPA
estimated fuel economy


rating of 27 mpg in
the city and 28 on the
highway.
Standard gear on all
Highlanders includes
18-inch alloy wheels, a
6.1-inch touchscreen
audio system, eight air
bags, Bluetooth connec-
tivity, a backup camera,
heated side-view mirrors
and middle and rear
seats that split 60/40.
Front-wheel drive is
standard.
Our AWD Limited
model had nearly
everything Toyota offers,
including a rear-seat
Blu-ray entertainment
system with wireless
headphones, adaptive
cruise control, lane
departure warning,
blind-spot monitoring,
perforated leather seats


that were heated and
cooled up front, an
8-inch navigation and
infotainment screen,
parking sensors and a
JBL audio system.
For loyal Highlander
fans and those new to
the segment, the 2014
model will push all the
right buttons. With the
exception of the third
row of seats, the new
version takes the high-
lights of the previous
model and makes them
better. But others in
the class, especially the
Hyundai Santa Fe and
Mazda CX-9, have even
fewer flaws than this
Toyota, so cross-shop
accordingly.
And if you do go home
in the Toyota, check the
trunk for Muppets first.


His car is trying to give him a hot foot


DEAR TOM AND RAY:
Every time I drive my
1979 Fiat Spider, exces-
sive heat comes from the
engine compartment to
the area by the pedals.
What's causing this,
and can it be correct-
ed? During the colder
months, it's not so bad.
But during the summer
months, it's pretty
unbearable. Thanks.
- Daniel
TOM: Most Fiat Spider
owners would kill for
heat like that in the
winter, Daniel. I had to
wear six pairs of Bronko
Nagurski long underwear
whenever I drove my Fiat
in the winter.
RAY: Yeah, but it's
like Death Valley on
four wheels in the
summertime.
TOM: The exhaust
system happens to
run right behind those
pedals and continues
underneath where you're
sitting, Daniel. So my
first guess would be that
something's causing your
catalytic converter to run
hot.
RAY: When catalytic
converters get old, the


CLICK and CLACK

TALK CARS
by Tom & Ray Magozzi
I A1 ''


Because anyone who owns a car
needs a laugh.

insides can deteriorate
and get in the way of the
exhaust flow. When that
happens, a constricted
converter can get very
hot- over 1,000 degrees!
TOM: In fact, some-
time when you're driving
the car at night, wait
until you feel your shoes
melting to the floor. Then
stop, get out and take
a look underneath. You
might actually see the
converter glowing. They
literally get red-hot when
they're really plugged up.
RAY: It's also possible
that the primary problem
is not in the converter
itself. Something may be


causing it to run hot. For
instance, if your ignition
timing is very late, you'd
have gasoline getting
pushed into the exhaust
system without first
being combusted. Then,
what happens is that the
gasoline combusts inside
the catalytic converter.
And where there's fire,
there are hot feet, Daniel.
TOM: A bad fuel injec-
tor can cause the same
problem, by injecting
into a cylinder more gas
than can be combusted
and leaving some to be
burned in the converter.
RAY: If it's none of that
stuff, then it simply could
be that your heat shield
is missing.
TOM: Or your floor.
Does your Fiat still have
a floor, Daniel? Mine
didn't for the last couple
of years.
RAY: Heat shields are
thin pieces of metal that
are fitted around the hot-
test parts of the exhaust
system. They're designed
to absorb and dissipate
heat so it doesn't get
transferred into the
passenger compartment.
TOM: Or transferred


onto the dry grass or old
newspapers you park on
top of.
RAY: And on a car this
old, it wouldn't surprise
me in the least if your
heat shields are long
gone, having rusted away
and fallen off years ago.
Like most of the car's
other parts.
TOM: In either case, if
you're really producing
enough heat to make
driving the car uncom-
fortable, it could be a
fire hazard. So have
it checked out. And
until you do, keep some
running shoes on the
passenger seat just in
case you need to make a
very hasty escape.

Actual cost of
driving a car
DEAR TOM AND RAY:
So many of my friends
evaluate the cost of a car
trip only by the cost of
the gas. But I know that
the cost, given wear and
tear on the engine, oil
changes, tires wearing
out, alignment, etc., is
actually much, much
higher. I know this


depends on the car, but
how much, on average,
does it cost per mile to
run a car? Rachel
TOM: Well, every year,
the Internal Revenue
Service answers that
question. They want
to know the value of
one mile driven in the
average car so they can
let taxpayers know how
much they can deduct
for business use of their
personal vehicle.
RAY: The number they
came up with for 2014 is
56 cents a mile.
TOM: Now, let's say
the average car gets
25 miles per gallon
today, and the average
price of gas per gallon is
$3.50. That means that
gasoline represents only
14 of that 56 cents.
RAY: And the rest
- the other 42 cents -
covers wear and tear and
insurance.
TOM: In reality, that
maintenance-and-re-
pair figure will be even
higher on pricier cars.
Because if you're driving
a Lexus or a Lincoln, the
price of your mainte-
nance, repairs, tires and


even insurance is going
to be even higher.
RAY: But that
56-cents-a-mile num-
ber gives you an idea
of how much people
underestimate the cost
of operating a car when
they factor in only the
14 cents' worth of gas,
Rachel.
TOM: So next time you
drive your friends to the
mall, you can try hitting
'em up for the full IRS
reimbursement. See how
that goes over. And be
prepared to settle for a
grande cappuccino.
Don't get stuck with a
lemon. Be an informed
shopper Read Tom
and Ray's guide "How
to Buy a Great Used
Car: Secrets Only Your
Mechanic Knows." Send
$4.75 (check or money
order) to Used Car, P.O.
Box 536475, Orlando, FL
32853-6475.
Get more Click and
Clack in their new book,
"Ask Click and Clack:
Answers from Car Talk."
Got a question about
cars? Visit the Car Talk
website at www.cartalk.
com.






The Sun Classified-Section A Page 4 EINICIV ads .yoursun net Saturday, March 29, 2014
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Saturday, March 29, 2014 ads .yoursun net EINICN The Sun Classified-Section A Page 5


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L Free EstimatesIsl
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Prevent Fires a
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Phone 941-204-6468
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Lic#773-00006427 /Ins. 1
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^ I I R5 fCo ing ImnL si tunes l fdi iitzNir
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Ordiway* Venice Native
240-258 'Serving Sarasota County
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OLDE WORLD
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Over 30 Years
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941-876-3097
LICENSED


MILAZZO'S

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Pepper Berry Control,
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Family owned & operated 50 yrs.
LIC. & INSURED
Call Tommy
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)Hauling 71


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Lawn Service
941-483-0138
Mowing Most Lawns
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SMonthly Services
S Low Rates Free Estimates
'Also Fertilizing, Shrubs & Mulch
Serving Sarasota & Charlotte County


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941-415-0058
Lawn Cutting
Most Lawns
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$25-$3O When Needed
Trim Bushes, Plant Design
Weeding & Mulching
Serving Englewood, Cape Haze
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PROMPT, DEPENDABLE SERVICE
46 YEARS EXPERIENCE
LIC. & INSURED


Lawnsi
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Serving Charlotte
CountySince 1975
941-276-9693


Island Breeze
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! !II
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Serving Vence &
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For free estimate call Keith
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Wills Divorce
u. e-as .:Living Trusts
Psoidis'- Puwer of Attnorney
Vjfeslional low cost assistance In important document
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ron r Pu rlCh. rk.r-le 'W95
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HPacking Loading
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"Movers
Who
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0 We sell boxes!
359-1904
U.S. DOT No. 1915800
Fully Licensed and Insured


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Honest, Reliable
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Very Low Rates
20 Years Experience
Lie. & Ins.
941-237-1823
I .i .:, -, I .-.i I i r.1 4


Locally owned & operated
for over40 years
I Interior/Exterior
* Repaints & New Construction
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FREE ESTIMATES
T i ,,: l i-i -, i 1 I-. ,1'

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PISCOUNT ROCK

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f $39.99 per Yard
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M-Fga 4p, Sat9a -lp
A+ 941-5Z3-6192
Rated Lic/11-00002010/lns


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3-15 Gal
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" Ptril Vines, focus,
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HOME IMPROVEMENTS. INC. IRRIGATION
i 1 i ilrln ii
William Daniels Owner I i1 in1 1 1 1r1r1 11.
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fel 1941,-716-3351
M 941-587-2027
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WRIGHT &aSON Basic
LANDSCAPING, INC.
,wAcpig Landscaping, Inc.
Venice Mowing 0 Dependability
Englewood Mulch ibility
SNorth Port Stone Accessiiiy
Pt. Charlotte Design
Char eInstallation Customer Satisfaction
Rotonda Trees StrigA$8,e
Gulf Cove Shrubs
& S.G.C. Starting At month
Local& Owned & Operated
Great Work Ethic 50%in Winter
Satisfied Customers Lic. & Ins.
FREE ESTIMATES Lc s
941-426-7844 (941) 504-3307
Lic. RGLAN-SL-29 Ins.




CHRIS RABY'S
LAWNS
Hedges Trimmed
(Up to loft.)
Small Trees Trimmed
& Shaped
Shrubs Trimmed
Stump Removed
Rock or Mulch Laid
PORT CHARLOTTE,
PUNTA GORDA AREAS
1941-623.3601


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Saturday. March 29. 2014 ads .you rsun net EINICN The Sun Classified-Section A Page 7
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ST(W'S ,Mark
OWUSrOM FAINfN Pail
AFFORPAL E K Fine Interior & Exterior
QUALITY WOK My34th year in business
* 30 Years Experience
* Interior & Exterior Perfect work, prompt se
Free Estimates Pay nothing until work (
(941) 2554' 3 r Over 1,200 homes repa
References Avalable Free Estimates, Bonded,
Serving Punta Gorda, Venice, Serving Sarasota County Or
Englewood & North Port
Lic#10-00007724 Call 94 A '
Lic#1300015881 M
Insured Mark941-47



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VVWSWEENE YSAN.O
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The State of Florida Mike Dymond
Requires all
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Certified.
Be advised to H15440764 P;
Check License Int./Ext. Repaints ure
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I:,'
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MILLER i
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Hunter
nting
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s
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completee
inted
Insured
Fly Lic# 90000092534
75-2695


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PAINTING
sidentiaV/Commercial
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yearsjo
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i41-484-4576

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Over 27 Years Local Experience
Residential, Commercial
Specializing in Re-Paints
WHERE QUALITY & VALUE MEET
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LARRY
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pm M
IDoIG, Giow
complete Residential
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41-961-5532
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L,: Ir,;u.ea


______________________ JL


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941-270-1338





Lic AAAOO10068 & Ins
lalorpaintingwgmail.com
FREE ESTIMATES


I


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Pl Platt's
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Pressure
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S FREE DETAILED
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S94as',ia'Co1u59 ,8
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NOW OFFERING
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)our Bud from a7 l I Dm-*
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941468-2660 941-786-653
L ,- I ", I 1, F r E I, ,,, D ,- ,
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Former Firefightetr i..: t" I ).uuu i ,


[s-nnon-i71


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LIENE-
PLUBE
3YerExeienc


Furniture Refinishing
Full Spray Shop
Power Washing
FREE Estimates
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fgM II 41IiIii

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Benson's Bailey's VENICE Jenkins 'AI rL'John's--.
,ual" II and" PRESSURE Home Improvemeni & I- C Resoreening
uaizc Pool Cape
Cleaning Pressure CLEANING lnvlSiding. S ffit( &aua EIRoILB, :.LG IE'.N'A.L
SSafe No Pressure Cleaning NO WAL Inlallaion Repairs SR I,'OMS ce 1sed
Roof Cleaning Exterior/ Interior Painting NO WALK Pressure Washing 1.NE34 W l hES DoNn I Fleteeus ble Rescreeningl
Pool Cages & .** g TILE ROOF *Driveways ,E'. V C2,,r c Don't let the bubieRescreenin
Lanais CLEANING Pool Decks & CagesCll.Mi"-- Free Handyman Services
1I CHAMBER MEMBER-Seamless Gutters .fEstimates Available
941-697-1749 Lic.&nsuredinSarasota, 497-2493 PaintingI j- .l (941) 875-8296
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Lic/Ins. Sne 1983 Sin I14 941-497-2728 941-8 1381 Since 1995
www.BensonsQuaityCleaning.com 941-497-1736 1.1i.. I1 Ure I Free 4i. Oner'1Operaled Lic 'ins 941-883-1381 Serig Ch3otteCoun&tynre..
1 46-1.I1ut1.Fr e _IOn___padLi /is -.__''ii'_]uc__93.1i&InsureoI ,.-.-.. .,.-._
60406


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Saturday, March 29, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C/V The Sun Classified-Section A Page 7


*


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* I


SU ^-' -^- ^ NEWSPAPERS

BUSINESS & SERVICE

DIRECTORY
it EveryProfessionalS erviceYouNdF


I1Ln.


L bXwI II- 111t -iI "6LXw W


$55Tops, S30 Sides
Complete Rescwens
$1,295
(Up to 1500'S F"ITI
Free Estimates
SCREENMACHINE
Licensed & Insured
(941) 879-3136


) Rofe


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?a~~ E & F ji T N Put your rootingVOEBSTFTE
efeee, NE&F HO TOWN K 0^^^^ -d ii VOTED BEST OF THE
SCREENING RFamOscrewned s OpEat business on opV eV BEST IN CHARLOTTE
'AC R ,E owp, REPAIRS with an ad in ROOFI. N GaREPAIRs Chru2
S* Pool cages ROOFING REPLACEMENT
L :nais- .H.,,.T H INESS& COUNTY 2011 thru 2013
I NEgyways II.: : i ..: Call Steve Fora
... ..a ,1*.-aragIid:rs I:1-1111 I SEVIC RE IO Y
I ,, L ':Ah$ Honest Depsidable. i:,: iiiiT I i METAL-TILE-SHINGLE
i- Nis, Oualltu Service 1:,1:,|: 1 i :T: o,,H -- FLAT ROOFS
i: ,,: E,,i Refeences Available. FREE INSPECTIONS Over 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE
:','-: -"-' : FREE ESTIMATES & ESTIMATES IN SOUTHWEST FLORIDA
NH.:.i, :SA Ucensed Insured. C uA L55 L Smal or Large Repairs to Total '
941-809-1171 941-915-7793 ,, n.9b i RepcemenSstheManfortheJob!
----a or 4 _93-4570 & ,_ nded insured


R.L. TEEL a James Weaver Roofing...
ROOFING Protecting Your ENGLEWOOD WAT 5 CO
BiggestInvestment." ROOFING Roofingw.ei,91011
Family Owned Since 1961 Family U|,TI. Rp
Tiles. Shingles. Metal Owned &_ REROOFS & REPAIRS Isince Old Ro.o ISm
insulation. Roof Cleaning -- Operated Shingle -Tile Metal Flat .lilcufsy
Rerooks & Repairs Serving Sarasota & NEW ROOFS Since 1984 d SOCCe'g I4
uorkmansriip Charotte county for RE-ROOFS-REPAIR -8946 Call today for a FREE estimate 941-473-3605 'Rn..Mds
Guaranteedsyar Coms4 9 Redential -Financing Available 4S
Insurance [nupection s Stae LiUc I= 1325679 Free Estimates 48434M
01-4 =Q-R7[ 71 AeOu r S941.475487 Metal, shingles, flat roofs MARK KAUFMAN ROOFING
F941473-7781 F 94147454799 Replace& Repair www.markkaufmanroofing.com BBB t i
LIC RC?290?02i53 Call Ron Call John LIC#CCC1325895 ..License#CCCO44038


Re-Roofingf & Repair Specialists epe0fing nf 1 HADRBOD A II LAWN REPLACEMENT.
LEONARD'S ROOFING, ''R'nc IHAR PO RAY 1T rINS No Job Too BIG
& INSULATION INC. lo or Too small!
.s Family owned and routS oSCOOTERS Seawall Erosion Repair Maloney s
I C.1im operated since 1969 Products for For all your Repair Sink Holes &
.S igePy l lALL roof types -- scooter needs... Sodding SO D
"SigeSingle Ply All Colors- EVEN CLEAR B AY TeSE
Shingle Metal "Why Replace It When i I Tree Service Shrubs Rmoesoo
S Tile t Full Carpentry You Can Save It?" an S rp.la B e ie &Weeding i Sarasota County
*Built-up Service Available Yua~vl? aaoaCut
ASemoie APvaiabl e R i Sor o o_ 625-2124 941-955-8327



Rusedb-1s CO 81TOO S 31 aim Tal-PnaGod I 35 Licn & Insured Chl~lvfrirmwic arblote. CoudFornstyle
Reagan Leonard 488-7478N Coa ing Jiml Usc&linsured Charlotte CountyI
941-426-9354 474r10 E-il: c eOwner Operaeted
LIc.# RC 0066574 Lic#CC13-00001693 Lic.# 79232 ,. 1941-637-1333


JinsH ICe 5LNDERS CERAM C T LE1RMON BAY T'lIE
"S es uc Guy SSALES AND/OR Convert bath tub to Reach over 150,000 potential
Wire Lathe Repairs i A UATIHandicap access shower Remodel Baths Floors
Rusted Bands New Constriction / Showerrepair&replace YOURTILEORMINE
Decorative Bands & Remodels 35YRSEXP"*Free n-HoeShopping customers with your full color ad. oorcelain
-Window Sill Repair Rusted bands & NO JOB TOO SMALLII Lcensed & Insured Marble Wood Floors Installed
Match Any Texture Wire Lath Repair. Owner/Install Call today to reseirveyourspace.
M Drywall Repair 12 yrs. In Rotonda West./- Over 20 Years in Englewood 941-625-5186
No Job Too Small Spraycrete & Free estimates. 20x2OPorcelain CELL 94196280442
Senior&Veterans Discount Dry-wall repair. Installer/Owner. from $3.69 9I4I U-4 21U 1 L MRTY-OWNER/TILE SETTER
(941) 716-0872 Call Jim Professionally Installed Lie/ins Workman's Comp.
l-9-98Io 474-1000 Email: classified.sunlettercom CharlotteLCountlySince 1987
(940497-553 1 91-697-598 7 4-100Lic.#AAM006387


ROBE T JONES CERAIC TILE
Installation Of All
Repair & Replae Tile, Marble Stone
I 01 & Wood Flooring
Loose or Hollow Shower Bath Remodel
Floor yle rNew Construction
N '& Remodeling
FEE ESTIMATES
Established 1988
941-204-2444
Lic. #AAA006338 & Ins


We do it all!! J RIZ TREE T T ,
SEiRVICEETreemendous Treerf
':nSEROCVICE,%, Ih% should I hire a
,:,: T,,;,,i:. 1 OVwI SPEC LZNGNCertified Arboris
1, U DANGEROUS TREE REMOVAL
n, ," h' I,, I ,I I ,
",,Hinr, ,,r Complete tree i .
i P.,:,,, <^ i and yard service .
i.r i,:,'," l.. Serving Charlotte ,, ..... ..
David Sandefur and Sarasota i .... ... .. .'.' .. .
30 years experience Owner operated I ... ...
AMnDE l I'FREE ESTIMATE 10',.. SENIOR DISCOUNT
Home & Tree Maintenance 41 3067532 i 941n426o893
941-484-6042 9414744782 www.northporttree co
\^ m i-t W................n! .ln .^., I ^ _1. I --,'= _' .. 1 ^ .


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The Sun Classified-Section A Page 8 E/N/C/V


ads.yoursunnet


Saturday, March 29, 2014


)jTree


)fTree


')Tre (


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')Tree Expert








U 1 pAPER i To included
'7.~~~~~o DIILQoQD IIEbsness
BUSINESS & SERVICECall 866.463.163
DIRECTORY ;or email youradto"
DIRECTORY classited@snlettercomI


)Tree ervic


)Tree ervic


*IieflmmnEn


ffZw7W,
Jeff Pacheco, Owner
Free estimates
Tree
Trimming
and
Removal
941-237-8122
LICENSED & INSURED I


Sewfe


KEIH'S PROFESSIONAL TREE SERVICE
* Owner Operator Removals
* Stump Grinding Hedge Trimming
* Palm Tree Trimming o 10% Senior Discount
25 Years Experience Serving in
Charlotte County and North Port
FREE ESTIMATES
941-624-4204
Lie. #001053-Insured


WEDO
WINDOWS
&
PRESSURE
WASHING
New Customer
Specials
Package Deals
Res. & Comm.
Free Estimate
Lic/lIns.
41-661-5281


iIEA
-WINDOW
HomeMai n with
ThrtYa rs aere,- e
-WIDOW
" PANTN
"IPESUR
CLENIN
WALPAPE
REMOVE


?-- ---- m^^^^^^^^^ --



r Reach over 150,000 potential
S customers with your full color ad.
H Call today to reserve your space.
941-429-3110 SUNK
Email: special@sunnewspapers.net


Sliding
Glass Door
& Window
Repairs
941-628-8579
Free Estimates
SLicensed & Insured


Sliding
Glass Door
Repairs
941-106-6445
*Wheels
* Tracks
* Locks & Lock Sets
Free Estimates
Since 1981
Lic. / Insured


For 0ur Southwest Florida sideor lifestyle
,,.. utdo!iw


Every Thursday in the U NEW APERS,
P VChaelone eSio'Eng loe d kNor tPo rn'io e i '

Online at www.BoatingAndFishing.com


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Saturday, March 29, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C/V The Sun Classified-Section A Page 9


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The Sun Classified-Section A Page 10 EINICIV


ads.yoursun.net


Saturday, March 29, 2014


2000


EMPLOYMENT
EMPLOYMENT
2005 Services
2010 Professional
2015 Banking
2020 Clerical
2025 Computer
2030 Medical
2035 Musical
2040 Restaurant/Hotel
2050 SkilledTrades
2060 Management
2070 Sales
2090 Child/Adult
Care Needed
2100 General
2110 Part-time/Temp
2115 Home Based
Business
2120 Seeking Employment

PROFESSIONAL

Z2010 ^

CAM, ENGLEWOOD PART
TIME experienced Condo Man-
ager, Must have CAM License.
Fax resume to 941-473-7653

Is'-,^/,
IN THE
CLASSIFIED
YOU CAN .....
/Find a Pet
./Find a Car
/Find a Job
/Find Garage Sales
/Find A New Employee
/Sell Your Home
/Sell Your Unwanted
Merchandise
/Advertise Your
Business or Service

Classified -
it's the reliable
source for the
right results


A Bargain


Hunters


Delight


Check the


Classifieds


first!


A Whole


Marketplace


of shopping


is right at


your


fingertips!


i PROFESSIONAL

Z 2010 J

CAM: Busy office seeks Expe-
rienced PT CAM. E-mail
resume hrmgtdept@gmail.com
PRE SCHOOL DIRECTOR
Director Credentials or
Bachelor's Degree Required.
Please Call 941-625-7011
i FINANCIAL
L 2016 J


FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATOR
COMPTROLLER POSITION
Available With An International
Manufacturer With Corporate
Offices In Arcadia. Individual
Must Have Thorough
Knowledge Of Accounting,
Quick Books & Microsoft
Office Applications. Salary
Commensurate W/Experience.
Respond With Resume &
Salary Requirements To:
Bdyble@crownrooftiles.com
Advertise Today!
CLERICAL/OFFICE
2020

A/P CLERK, Busy office
seeks experienced accounting
clerk. E-mail resume to
hrmgtdept@gmail.com
ASSISTANT/ I in tast
paced Real Estate Office in
Engl. Organized, energetic,
exp in real estate desirable.
Computer/word processing
knowledge a must. Email to:
gillaspylisa@comcast.net
CUSTOMER SERVICE
DISPATCHER.
Positive People Oriented
Person Needed. The Applicant
will have a Strong Command
of Telecommunication
Techniques and Must be
Computer Literate. Bi-lingual
in Spanish/English a Plus.
Apply at: Young Trucking,
12164 Tamiami Trail.
Punta Gorda


NEEDED
ASSISTANT/ASSOCIATE FOR BUSY
REAL ESTATE TEAM THAT HANDLES
75+ LISTINGS. ATTENTION TO
DETAIL, COMPUTER AND
COMMUNICATION SKILLS A MUST.
REAL ESTATE LICENSE A PLUS.
SALARIED POSITION. EMAIL
RESUME IN STRICT CONFIDENCE TO
REOTEAM@EMBAROMAIL.COM

COMPUTER
LOIMZ2025


PAGE DESIGNER
The Charlotte Sun Is
Looking For Part-Time
Layout/Design Help.
Knowledge In InDesign
And/Or Newspaper
Experience A Plus. Computer
Experience A Must. Job
Involves Evening & Weekend
Hours. Send Resume To
nlane@sun-herald.com.
The Sun Is A Drug
& Nicotine-Free Workplace.

MEDICAL
Lawam:2030


ARNP orPA Needed FT
To Join Our Pediatric
Team. Ideal Candidate
Must Have A Current
Florida License, 1-2 yrs.
Exp. In A Similar Setting,
Strong Interpersonal Skills
& The Ability To See
Patients In A Fast Paced
Environment. We Offer A
Competitive Salary &
Benefit package. All
Qualified Candidates
Please Fax Or Email CV To
Tina @ 941- 629-4701 or
tlindenberger@comcastnet
CERTIFIED MA W/BMO LIC.
Part Time. Please Fax
Resume to 941-625-2751


i MEDICAL
2 AV0
L 2~030 ^



NOW


flilIN 0
CMA for extremely busy
internal medicine/walk-in
office. Must have experi-
ence with EHR. FAX
resume to Debbie (941)-
743-8562

CNA'S, HHA'S and
Caregivers
Find new clients by
advertising your services
in the Senior Directory
every Wednesday in
The Sun Newspapers.
This feature publishes in
Charlotte, Sarasota, and
Desoto Counties.
Market yourself reach
150,000 readers!

SUN
SUN NEWSPAPERS
CliA.-it DeS-l Engl-.od N-rh P-r Venic
Call 941-429-3110
for more information
CNA's/HHA's
rf77 NOW!
Busy Home
Care Agency
has F/T and P/T Openings.
EXP REQUIRED CALL
NOW! 941-2574452

DeSoto
Health & Rehab
has the following job
opportunities available:
oPT, OT & ST for
PT/PRN
*RN, LPN & CNA
for all shifts
Dietary Manager F/T
*Cook P/T & F/T
Fax resume to:
(863)-494-9470
For questions call:
(863)-494-5766

LPN For Busy Physician
Office In Port Charlotte.
Experience & A Valid FL Lic.
Req. EMR Training Pref. Must
Possess A Great Personality,
Flexibility & Multi-tasking
skills. Please email resume
to dianne-utset@pmg-fl.com

IntIiINC
LPN'S NEEDED
ALL SHIFTS
APPLY AT 2295 SHREVE ST.,
PUNTA GORDA.
ASK FOR JERRY.
OPERATORS
Part Time & Pool Positions
Days and evenings
VILLAGE ON THE ISLE
Venice, FL Call 486-5463
Or Fax: 484-0407 Or Email
kmargraf@villageontheisle.com
EOE Drug Free Workplace

SIGNATURE
HEATHCARE LLC
IS SEEKING DEPENDABLE &
COMPASSIONATE PEOPLE TO
JOIN OUR TEAM:





RN's and LPN's
and CNA'S
ALL SHIFTS

PLEASE APPLY IN
PERSON:
SIGNATURE
HEALTHCARE LLC
4033 Beaver Lane,
Port Charlotte.
EOE/DFWP


MEDICAL
L ^ 2030 ^


PORT CHARLOTTE REHAB
IS LOOKING FOR:
CNA's- ALL SHIFTS
in Long Term Care.
Apply in person at
25325 Rampart Blvd
Port Charlotte Fl 33983
RNA/LPN/MA, Needed For
Busy Dermatology Office. Full
Time/Part Time. Experience
a Plus Fax Resume to:
941-627-4389
SIGNATURE
HEATHCARE LLC
IS SEEKING DEPENDABLE &
COMPASSIONATE PEOPLE TO
JOIN OUR TEAM:





RN's and LPN's
and CNA'S
ALL SHIFTS

PLEASE APPLY IN
PERSON:
SIGNATURE
HEALTHCARE LLC
4033 Beaver Lane,
Port Charlotte.
EOE/DFWP
VENICE OFFICE SEEKS
DENTAL ASSISTANT
Full Time, requires CDA &
2yrs chairside general
dental experience.
Top Pay & Benefits in a
Great Practice!
Please fax: 941-484-6277
Email: info@venicedentist.com

HORIZON
_^ HEALTHCARE
INSTITUTE
www.HorizonTechlnstitute.Com
"ADVANCE YOUR CAREER"
Licensed & Accredited School
Murdock Town Center on 41
1032 Tamiami Tr Unit 3
YOU can become a LPN within
11 months. Enrollment ongoing.
PHLEBOTOMY, EKG, CNA,
Classes Start April 7 '14
LPN-next class starts
July 28 '14
Start Working In 2-5 wks!
Classes Start Each Month
Call For Class Dates
Nursing Assistant (120hrs)
Home Health Aide (75hrs)
Phlebotomy Tech (165hrs)
EKG Tech (165hrs)
Patient Care Tech (600hrs)
Job Assist. & Pymt. Plans
Call Now to Register!
941-889-7506



Life ___
Care -&
Meter
WWW.LCCA.COM
We're Life Care Centers of
America, the nation's largest
privately-owned skilled care
provider. If you share our
heartfelt approach to caring
for the elderly, consider
oining our family at Life Care
Center of Punta Gorda. We
offer competitive pay and
benefits in a mission-driven
environment.

FLOOR TECH
FULL TIME

LPN PRN

CNA'S ALL SHIFTS

A/R BILLING/ RECEPTIONIST
PART TIME

Come visit with us at 450
Shreve St. Punta Gorda EOE


i MEDICAL
low4:2030 ^


Surgeons office seeking
F/T CNA or LPN to assist
Dr. in office. Fax Resume
to 941-629-5070 for
immediate employment.

MUSICAL
2035


ORGANIST"GCCOMPANIST
PT Year Round Paid Position.
Burnt Store Presbyterian
Please Email Cover Letter,
Resume & Sample Of Work:
music83@embarqmail.com


Chefs, Cooks, Waitstaff,
bartenders & Host/host-
ess needed FOR FAST
PACED GROWING ENGLEWOOD
REST. SEND RESUME TO
SNOOKMAN56@YAHOO.COM
OR CALL 941-223-4781
COOK, MUST have restaurant
experienced. 941-204-2775


fnuTRIN
RIVER CITY
GRILL seeks full and
part time team members
LINE COOK,
SOUS CHEF,
PM HOST OR
HOSTESS
PM SALAD PERSON
Apply in Person:
1-4prm Only!
See Steve or Doug
131 W Marion Ave
Punta Gorda, FL
i SKILLED TRADES
L 2050 ^





AUTOMOTIVE
PAINTER
RV MANUFACTURER SEEKS
ONLY SELF MOTIVATED,
SEASONED PAINTER FOR ALL
PHASES OF EXTERIOR PAINT
DECOR. MUST HAVE VALID
DRIVER'S LICENSE.
WAGES OPEN -- BENEFITS
SIGN ON BONUS!
GREAT WORK ENVIRONMENT!
NOW INTERVIEWING!
941-485-0984
DFWP
EXP. AWNING HELP
Needed For Local Awning
Co. Must Have A Valid DL.
pply In Person 1242 Market
ir. Unit 9 P.C. 8AM-3PM M-F
HARLEY-DAVIDSON
CERTIFIED SERVICE
TECHNICIAN FT,
MOTORCYCLE OPERATOR
LICENSE REQUIRED, MUST
PASS DRUG SCREEN.
APPLY IN PERSON AT
2224 EL JOBEAN RD,
PORT CHARLOTTE, TUES-
DAYS THRU SATURDAYS,
9AM TO 5PM. No PHONE CALLS.
MARINE FORKLIFT OPERATOR
Experienced Only. Harbor at
Lemon Bay. 900 S. McCall,
Englewood. 727-735-5036
MECHANIC, Experienced.
Must have valid DL. 941-639-
2894 Hwy 17, Punta Gorda
QUALITY FRAMING
CARPENTERS, wanted.
Englewood/Boca Grande area.
Steady work, must have
exp/trans and own hand tools.
Start Immediately. 941-276-
2640 1


i SKILLED TRADES
L 2050 ^

ROOF COATING & Painting
People wanted. FL DL and Exp
a Must. Call 941-474-3533
ROOF REPAIRMAN wanted,
Must have valid Florida DL and
exp. Pay depends on Exp. Full
Time. Call 941-474-3533
i WANTED: EXPERIENCED i
MARINE MECHANIC
941-698-1144

PAl NTERS


WNTEDI
WELL ESTABLISHED Co. IN
VENICE, SEEKS EXPERIENCED
PAINTERS FOR INTERIOR & EXT.
REPAINTS. MUST HAVE VALID DL
CALL 941-488-0558 LV. MSG
WRECKER DRIVER, Must
have experience & be able to
work nights & weekends.
Live in Englewood area.
Clean Drivers License.
Apply in person:
Sterns Auto Service, 1590
S. McCall Rd., Englewood.

MANAGEMENT
i 2060


REGIONAL CITRUS
ASSOCIATION
with Office in Arcadia
Seeking Executive Director.
Details at: prvcitrus.org
Submit as Instructed.
SALES
Lv 2070 ^

ADVERTISI G
ACCOUNT
EXECUTIVE
SUN NEWSPAPERS IS LOOKING
FOR MOTIVATED SALES PROFES-
SIONALS WITH A COMMUNITY
SPIRIT WHO ARE READY TO
COMMIT TO A LONG-TERM
CAREER WITH AN ESTABLISHED
SUCCESSFUL MEDIA COMPANY.
DOES THIS DESCRIBE
YOU?
AGGRESSIVE
COLD CALLING PRO
DEAL CLOSER
STRONG WORK ETHICS
MONEY MOTIVATED
EXCELLENT COMMUNICATION
SKILLS
PEOPLE PERSON
COMPUTER LITERATE
*EXCEPTIONAL CUSTOMER
SERVICE SKILLS
*MARKETING FLARE
*ABILITY TO WORK
INDEPENDENTLY
WE OFFER:
*COMPETITIVE SALARY PLUS
COMMISSIONS
*VACATION
*HEALTH INSURANCE
*SICK AND SHORT TERM
DISABILITY
*401(K)
*TRAINING
*ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNI
TIES
WE ARE AN EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER & A
DRUG AND NICOTINE FREE
DIVERSIFIED WORKPLACE.
PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG AND
NICOTINE TESTING REQUIRED.
IF WE DESCRIBED YOU, SEND
OR EMAIL YOUR RESUME TO:
ENGLEWOOD SUN
ATTENTION: CAROL MOORE
120 W DEARBORN
ENGLEWOOD, FLORIDA
34223
FAX: 941-681-3008
EMAIL:
CYMOORE@SUN-HERALD.COM


NEED CASH?





Saturday, March 29, 2014


SALES ]
Lwow 2070 ^


ADVERTISING SALES
EXECUTIVE
THIS IS AN OUTSTANDING
OPPORTUNITY TO JOIN A
COMPANY WHERE YOU WILL
MAKE A DIFFERENCE.
I AM LOOKING FOR A TRUE
PEOPLE-PERSON WHO HAS
SALES SKILLS AND
EXPERIENCE.
YOU WOULD WORK ON
SELLING CATEGORY SPECIFIC
ADVERTISING TO
BUSINESSES AND BUSINESS
PROFESSIONALS WHO WANT
YOUR HELP WITHIN PRODUCTS
THAT HAVE BEEN CREATED
AND FOCUSED ON HELPING
THEM ACHIEVE THEIR GOALS.
THE POSITION WORKS OUT OF
A NORTH PORT OFFICE.
THE SUCCESSFUL
CANDIDATES MUST POSSESS
GOOD ORAL AND WRITTEN
COMMUNICATION
SKILLS, BE ORGANIZED AND
A TEAM PLAYER.
YOU MUST HAVE A VALID
DRIVER'S LICENSE.
WE OFFER:
*COMPETITIVE SALARY PLUS
COMMISSION
*VACATION
*HEALTH INSURANCE
*SICK AND SHORT TERM
DISABILITY
*TRAINING
*STABLE COMPANY THAT IS
ERY COMMUNITY MINDED
AND INVOLVED.
PLEASE SEND RESUME TO:
EMAIL:
JOBS@SUNLETTER.COM
ATTN: GERI KOTZ
WE ARE AN EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY
EMPLOYER DIVERSIFIED
WORKPLACE.
DRUG FREE AND NICOTENE
FREE WORKPLACE

Turn your

trash into

cash!

Advertise

your yard

sale!


PUT

CLASSIFIED

TO WORK

FOR YOU!



FIND A JOB!

BUY A HOME!

BUY A CAR!


ads.yoursun.net


I SALES /
L w 2070 J

Advertising Sales
Executive
The Charlotte Sun is
looking for "Winners" to
join our team of
professional Advertising
Sales Executives.
If you are never satisfied
with average successes,
are self-motivated, goal
oriented, confident,
enthusiastic and believe
that the customer is all
important, we would like
to talk to you.
The successful
candidates must possess
good oral and written
communication skills, be
organized and a team
player. Sales experience
a plus but we will train
the right persons.
We offer:
Competitive salary plus
commission
Vacation
*Health insurance
Sick and short term
disability
STraining
Stable company that is
very Community minded
and involved.
Please send resume to:
Advertising Director,
Leslee Peth
Charlotte Sun
23170 Harborview Road
Charlotte Harbor, FL
33980
Email:
Lpeth@sun-herald.com
We are an Equal
Opportunity Employer &
a Drugand nicotine Free
Diversified Workplace.
I//,/ VV/I/.v
IN THE
CLASSIFIED
YOU CAN .....
/Find a Pet
./Find a Car
VFind a Job
/Find Garage Sales
./Find A New Employee
VSell Your Home
/Sell Your Unwanted
Merchandise
/Advertise Your
Business or Service

Classified -
it's the reliable
source for the
right results


A Bargain
Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds
first!
A Whole
Marketplace
of shopping
is right at
your
fingertips!


E/N/C/V The Sun Classified-Section A Page 11


Stup]p'Iier
e~T _0



U Mri C Truck Center



SAVE $9,215
HB rMSRP $65,385
Duramax* Diesel, Navigation, Sunroof
i.TO14 20" Polished Aluminum Wheels



SAVE $9,000
MSRP $54,117
I /SS22" Chrome Wheels, Power Memory Seats.
1921 8 Passenger. HDTrailering


204 MCSIRA*IGT UT RE CB LEV


MSRP
Special Value Pricing


#4GT172


$42,907
$39,635


Special Value Discount $3,272
Customer Cash $1,750
OPD Cash $1,000
Option Package Discount $750
Bonus Cash $750
TOTALVALUE $7,522

MSRP $40,590
Special Value Pricing $37,760
SpecialValue Discount $2,830
Customer Cash $1,750
OPD Cash $1,000
Option Package Discount $750
Bonus Cash $750


TOTALVALUE


I


$7,080


2 1 M TRM WDSE
SPEC IA VALUE PRICING $26,352


PER
$289 MONTH**
'1 ease lerrr, base.:) on Ally Banb 39 ronih' 12 rni mile lerrms
Flus lag lag and Adrrirm Fes. Take delivery by 1'3 1)14
a Af 3* 1 1 am


SPECIAL VALUE PRICING $33,011

PER
0401$379MOn
04GO91 *!Lease terms based on Ally Bank, 36 monthia10,00 mile terms
Plustax, tag andAdnmn. Fees Take delivyby3M/1114

Take the 41 Bypass
to Business 41.r
S= 9Just over the Circus
___ Truc Cente-Bridge on your right.
a1 ---- a Truck Center S4 Venic
1455 S. Tamiami Trail On The Island of Venice


WWW.DARBYAUTO.COM


All prices, plus tax, tag
and $499 dealer fee.


&-3Di-\ T--\-


ADVERTISE IN THE

CLASSIFIED. CALL


S(941)429.3110





The Sun Classified-Section A Page 12 E/N/C/V ads.yoursun.net


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Wko say You Caott ka4 Ev'rtk4sgl


'14 FORD MUSTANG '10 DODGE CHARGER R/T
CONVERTIBLEV6 $s25,99 O

$23,970 Stk. #8610P
Stk. #8587P


IW wunUin n, UWI

3.01 LUXURY

$26,990
Stk. #8581P


'11 NISSAN ARMADA SL '11 FORD F-150
NISSANAMADAL SUPERCREW CAB LARIAT

s30,990 $32,890
Stk.#8613P Stk.#8580P


'13CHEVROLET TAHOE
4 DR1500 IT

s34,990
Stk. #8584P


q"


Saturday, March 29, 2014 Saturday, March 29, 2014


ads.yoursun.net E/N/C/V The Sun Classified-Section A Page 13






The Sun Classified-Section A Page 14 E/N/C/V


ads.yoursun netLr, rt


S.,jtur:,j .I.1,-Jr:. 2;- 20i:


SALES
Lwow 2070 ^



ADVERTISING
SALES MANAGER

The Smart Shopper
Group is rapidly
expanding their
Shoppers into the
Sarasota Fl Market and
is in need of an
experienced Sales
Manager. This position
will provdie leadership
and direction to Display
Sales Representatives.
Applicants must have a
proven track record of
motivating and managing
a sales group. Shopper
and/or weekly
experience is a plus.
Salary commensurate
with experience. Please
email your resume with a
cover letter and salary
requirements in
confidence to
R Knight, CEO at
rknight@smartshopg.com

READY TO MAKE
MORE MONEY?

SALES/NEW BUSINESS
DEVELOPER

Come work with the Sun
newspapers Telephone
Sales, New Business
Developer team
S located in
North Port Florida.

We are America's Best
:Community Daily newspaper,:
with the largest classified
section in Florida. This is an
outstanding opportunity to
join a company where you
make the difference. We are
looking for a full-time
person, with computer skills
and with a positive,
energetic, can-do approach
to join our telephone sales,
new business developer
team. We are looking for a
highly motivated individual
who thrives on challenges,
loves learning new skills and:
enjoys working in a positive
team environment.

:We offer:
.: Training
* Stable company that
is very Community
minded and involved.
* Opportunity to expand
your business skills

Please email your resume
to:
Jobs@sunletter.com

Equal Opportunity
SEmployer/Drug & Nicotine
: Free Diversified Workplace.
Pre-Employment Drug &
Nicotine Testing Required.

Turn your

trash into

cash!

Advertise

your yard

sale!

RV PARTS ASSOCIATE
IMMEDIATE OPENING, RV &
TRUCK EXPERIENCED PRE-
FERRED. FULL TIME.
DFWP NON-SMOKER
CALL TIM FINNEGAN AT
941-966-4800 FAX
(941) 966-7421 OR
JOBS@RVWORLDINC.COM


SALES & MARKETING
ASSISTANT
Entry Level Marketing/
Entry Level Advertising
We are America's Best
Community Daily newspaper,
with the largest classified
section in Florida. We are
located in North Port Florida.
Duties Include, but are
not limited to:
Executing sales and
marketing functions to
company standards
* Assists customers with any
questions they may have in
regards to our products
Gains knowledge on
all new clients the
company acquires
Ensure highest level of
customer service resulting in
increased productivity and
achieving sales goals
Knowledge of our
systems follow through of
advertising copy
Growth opportunities may be
available for those who
qualify.This position is entry
level, previous experience in
sales and marketing helpful.
We look for candidates with
the following:
Some college or
degree preferred
S* Outstanding
interpersonal skills
Student Mentality
Leadership Experience
0 Experience in retail, sales,
advertising & marketing
Ability to work in a high
energy environment
Please email resume to:
Jobs@sunletter.com
Sun Classifieds attention:
Geri Kotz EOE, DFWP
Pre-employment drug &
nicotine testing required.

SALES PROFESSIONAL
FOR MOTORCYCLE
DEALERSHIP PREVIOUS
VEHICLE SALES EXPERI-
ENCE PREFERRED FT
MOTORCYCLE OPERATOR
LICENSE REQUIRED MUST
PASS DRUG SCREEN
APPLY IN PERSON AT
2224 EL JOBEAN RD
PT CHARLOTTE TUESDAYS
THRU FRIDAYS 1PM 5PM
No PHONE CALLS OR EMAILS"

PUT CLASSFIEDS
TO WORK
FOR YOU!

FIND A JOB!
BUY A HOME!
BUY A CAR!

SENIOR ADVERTISING
EXECUTIVE

UP TO $50,000 per year.

If you have over 5 years
of proven print
advertising experience
you may qualify as a
Senior Advertising
Executive for The Smart
Shopper Group.

We have been publishing
for over 20 years and
have positions open in
Charlotte and Sarasota
Counties.

Send Resume to:
rknight@smartshopg.com

SERVICE ADVISOR
RV Dealership Immedi-
ate opening. Minimum 2
years experience, RV
experience preferred.
Full time position, bene-
fits. Drug-Free Work-
place. Call Ed Davidson
or Craig Hinshaw at
941-966-2182 or
fax resume to
941-966-7421 or
jobs@rvworldinc.com.


* SALES -INSIDE *
Mon.-Fri. 9-5 or PT
5 Experienced Phone Reps
To Call Businesses To Adv.
On TV Screens In Major Golf
Courses. Guarantee
Commission. Top Reps Earn
550,000 +/yr
PORT CHARLO'TE
941-268-7554

THE FURNITURE
WAREHOUSE a top 100
retailer is seeking highly
professional & engaging
sales associates for our
Venice location. Income
from $25,000 to $40,000
per year in commissions
with a guaranteed base
salary and comprehensive
benefits. Send resume to
jhughes@furnwarehouse.com
Call 941-780-7895 or apply
online FurnWarehouse.com

CHILD/ADULT
CARE NEEDED


LIVE IN POSITION 24/7 at
Group Home for (8) develop-
mentally disabled adults. Must
have valid Dr, Lic. & HS Dipl.
P/- avail, also. 941-505-0575
-NEED CASH?
Have A Garage
Sale!

GENERAL
^ 2100 ^



I TV & Radio Diary
Processing
Positions
Available



INTERESTED IN
WORKING 6 WEEKS
FOUR TIMES A YEAR
OR 48 WEEKS A YEAR
UP TO 30 HOURS
A WEEK?

Nielsen (the TV & Radio
Ratings company) is look-
ing for quality focused indi-
viduals to interpert and
input TV & Radio Diaries
up to four sweeps per year.
Basic to providcient
computer skills required.
No selling or
telephoning involved.
Day Shift
7:45AM 4:00PM
9:00 AM -3:00PM
Night Shift Hours
4:30PM-12:45 AM
6:OOpm-12:00AM

Positions starting at
$8.50 to $11. per hr

Apply on line at:
Nielsen.comrn
Click on "Careers"
Click on "Search All
Careers"
Search Job numbers:
Day shift 1401537
Night Shift 1401516
Paid Training begins
April 14th, 21st, &
28th 2014

SSavings Plan
SRetirement Plan
t The office where employ-
ees ARE appreciated!


nielsen
0 ** 0 Se0 O 0*&
1080 Knights Trail
Nokomis, FL 34275
941-488-9658
EOE 0 AA/M/F/D/V


IMMEDIATE OPENINGS!
We h- ve ,-ev;er :i:, er, IObn.b';
tior, i: ,i '.,le.r -'eire.r e tr:
tive. C :, r,:,n:te [e 'C.ur r
N ,:,ir; .- eV t V,: Or in
Re-tjlI 'l.Cr:e.. ri ri,1 [ lr :
sh,:,rrirye cirecic crl:e,:,ci
ev rit':, ,' [:. iThr: ric : 'irn ,:
aLie ec:r r c rld roc,'iiotr vcirh
potnert,,i C: cirri 1.[I 0.
$300+ :,e dci,! Foci,,zive. ,:r .

Fle. le ori:ij Fl,.-t b ,e I:jut.
gciriw. rle i:rcicrei
ari,:e. deeri L, rl r ic i-ve
relI el tijr,.cc ,:n r tiCi:,ri cr1
cell rhorie. :cc:[ rurid
che,:[. For irier v'ie c1:,irCt.
C E- [, 11 'I1 6 :.-'. 6
meriC i:i t ;.s c j:.1 ;


IN T1HE
C1..L.S.SII- 11-!)
YOIL" ('.M\.....

./Find a Pet
./Find a Car
VFind a Job
/Find Garage Sales
./Find A New Employee
*Sell Your Home
/Sell Your Unwanted
Merchandise
/Advertise Your
Business or Service

Classified -
it's the reliable
source for the
right results


CLEANER [ D-Lii-d,. ,,. I'r.
mhe.ijbl .. 'r.10. a er I',. +
TI:,". : vctl. le ,ri-ei. ::. ,.,: on,
FT SHIPPING & RECEIVING
CLERK Aie3 r rioiedye A
M :[_l.~ P, ,:,,,: rt Ir, M :[,- ,,-',Itt,
I. i:ellent Phronre .v: r :ton[ei
o inv,:- .[ i.-Q 'equir jed.
ArrI Iri I ri:, AC I 'f.0
I ,ri-:,ir, Av P,-
LANDSCAPE INSTALLER
[iOT LAMI I 1Al ITE JA[I l: E!
974 1.Q2. -. ":":
G GET RESULTS --
SUSE CLASSIFIED!

PAGE DESIGNER
The o: c I,:e '.urn I.:
Loon, ri Foi Pc i[Tin'ie
L:c,,uC Lecien Hel.
I ri,:vled:l e In In l,:eci- r,
And ,:,, [ie .c,:,r.ei
S' le eri: e A PiucJ. ,:oni:.ute
E .e nerie A [iu:. Job
rinvove,:' Lvernin, .. Veeerind
Hou, :.S-ern ,:n'eije T,:,
nljIi'n -:-:"un hii ]l3ion,,.
The 'Sur, I'1 A I-u,,
.!. []Ji,:,onre .Fie i. I:, .






FURNITURE SALES
J,,On sr, Fu,.irui.e, The
LeMdiy PRe-nmo Firj riturie
H'etii '.:,oie In FIi i ,,r: '. 1ie.
E l i-,e ,e ,: [li 1t';. .';.
W-olrend. H-q'ui edl:
Ful r Situr '-.,i. / Plu.! We
1 1 le, i: cn r.etiti.e
(;onxi'rr town, Ge'nyo.-io'
B:erMnith .!. M ':,i- t Plcce To
Wor, MPPLi II PEh'-:'[:
4 'i:": i TIn, nii Tii,I. Poi,
: hlot,. FL 3: :4:. '
&,, eni,:,,l:
Ih,,:I. e.n'-'io er'c.,:,on-,
WE'17FFjF\A/


POOL SERVICE TECH. II:,
e .r ,ieri,: eri. n eded, iill r t in.
[N ,-1 w:':' en'0^ i :'n nnie:n[. [ 1u';[
J,:re : i ,e:r i dviirin, ,eri,:.: li: 3
.e- e: ri r. i in. r. : o .r ::

SALES ASSOCIATE
4I1 hr.i cI .evciee

[ ,r'i -i 'j cr,,: ,: nI. c rll.
I : o,\,n tii.- oi t,,[
tP on. '-.tj. trr, ii...':.U I:,e h,.
'Z.n ,..,ll I(.*:. I... .. *: ,,Ic. ,:on Ic,..jr ,.
Hiring for North Port &
Port Charlotte locations
A L- in -r o .,r ,n',. :l:ni:
F41 : P :rijcrd E:lvd. : .4
P,:,,t ,:1,:,h :,ltte }.: }:'P .--.J

SUN COAST PRESS
A rapidly growing daily &
commercial print shop,
has the following
opportunity:
FT PRESS OPERATOR
[ lirni uni e:r t
e. Irer er,,: e orI:er :Ciri .
i-on'ini tir, 0 r ci i C
iiiinr n uric tco i,: d i, nir, i t
criii. vee[ end.- ri:iid.
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Poh:li ieri t vri,, t o,: C li.' .:
,, r,,.t e,.-~ .!.-u ti r:,-te :, n r .,hi ..
1lu.it L:er cionvioictL ,ivcoien
in j, tr:,.-t r,:- 3, ,::le : r .'.-
:u:,h. ,cc ,Cer Ccc er, v i :irnner,
We ,:,rrer riecii rn.ur :r e.
i::,,: hott I,,:: l, ..PTh irr i I ..
Kid3 I'~ri~iidc F'TC', 401 I-
AFLA,:. We cire ci druy .N.
ri: otire hree vr I.l:,l.,-e
Pr eienil:,io, nieriC [C.ec [Cry
:.Juir el.
Please Send Resume To
Christopher Germann,
Press Manager,
At: cgermann
:4suncoastpress.com


CI
-.
, r14


NEW 2014
Honda Civic LX
I f ll'l, -iii [ i


lease per monlh


DOWN
PAYMENT


S SALES SALES GENERAL GENERAL GENERAL
L w 2070 JL 2070 ^^Llo 210 ^ Late 210 ^ Lmal 2100 ^


, :I hIf, 1 1, h ,1 ,1 f f ',.,j ,- I ,,- F ,, ', d, I' h ,, h A ,- 1 :11 1, i1I,1 i,- I 1,- .iiii- ..Iih i- II II.,-i. ,- i,1 "A I





Saturday, March 29, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C/V The Sun Classified-Section A Page 15


L GENERAL
wow 2100 ^


TECHNICIAN, Swimming
Pool. If you are an
upstanding person with
excellent work ethics
applications accepted
between 9 12noon.
$12.00/HR TO START.
Must have Florida drivers
license. MUST HAVE 5 ys
of driving with absolutely
clean driving record.
Howard's Pool World,
12419 Kings Hwy.
Lake Suzy.
NO PHONE CALLS


Gondolier Sun



THE VENICE GONDOLIER SUN
IS NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS
FOR CARRIERS IN VENICE AND
SURROUNDING AREAS. MUST
HAVE DEPENDABLE VEHICLE, A
VALID FLORIDA DRIVERS
LICENSE AND PROOF OF INSUR-
ANCE.
APPLY IN PERSON:
200 E. VENICE AVE.
VENICE, FL 34285
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.
TRANSPORTATION COMPANY
HIRING CDL & NoN-CDL DRI-
VERS. MUST HAVE CLEAN
DRIVING RECORD & BE ABLE TO
PASS A BACKGROUND CHECK.
APPLY AT
WWW.AMEDITRANS.COM OR FAX
RESUME TO 941-625-3116
VET TECH FT for Busy Clinic.
EXP. NECESSARY. Apply:
Lemon Bay Animal Hospital,
3060 S. McCall Rd. Englewood
WAREHOUSE ASSOCIATE
Part Time, Valid FL Driver's
License Required, Able To Lift
751bs, Customer Friendly And
Saturday's A Must. Apply In
Person At 1750 Manzana
Avenue.

3000







NOTICES

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Z 3010 ^




FREE MERCHANDISE ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
SUN-CLASSIFIEDS.COM
and place your ad.
"CLICK ON CLICK HERE
TO PLACE YOUR AD NOW"
and follow the prompts.
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and the ad must be placed
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ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
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Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 5 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**Everyone Needs to
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Employ Classified!


S HAPPY ADS
111Z3015




Place your Happy
Ad for only
$14.75
3 lines 7 day.

Add a photo for
only $13.00!

Please call
(866)-463-1638


PERSONALS
:3020

ADORABLE TASHA.
Stretch & Relax Therapy
941-497-1307
MALE 70+... WIDOW, I DO NOT
LIKE LIVING ALONE! I DON'T
NEED A HOUSEKEEPER, SEEKING
COMPANIONSHIP WITH HONEST BEAU-
TIFUL FULL FIGURED WOMAN OVER
45 PLEASE DROP SHORT NOTE IN
PRINT WITH NAME AND PHONE #TO
PO BOX 631 VENICE, FL 34284-631
WILL BE DELIGHTEDTO
CALLYOU.
May the Sacred Heart of
Jesus be adored, glorified,
loved and preserved through-
out the world now and forever.
Scared heart of Jesus, pray for
us. St Jude Worker of Mira-
cles, pray for us. St Jude Help
of the Hopeless, pray for us.
Say this 8 times a day, by the
9th day, your prayers will be
answered. This has never been
know to fail. You must promise
to publish. MC
NICE, Attractive guy looking
for nice lady, 45-55, no
games. Englwd.815-546-1092
ORIENTAL MASSAGE in
Venice. 617 US 41 Business.
10% off w/ad. 941-786-3803
I/j,/ VV/I/,"
IN THE
CLASSIFIED
YOU CAN .....
/Find a Pet
./Find a Car
VFind a Job
/Find Garage Sales
./Find A New Employee
VSell Your Home
.Sell Your Unwanted
Merchandise
.Advertise Your
Business or Service

Classified -
it's the reliable
source for the
right results



PUT

CLASSIFIED

TO WORK

FOR YOU!



FIND A JOB!
BUY A HOME!

BUY A CAR!


PERSONALS
So3020 ^

PRETTY NURSE,58, brunette
would like to meet n/s,
respectable, financially secure,
retired male for marriage. 941-
549-3815 Please leave msg.
RELAXATION
Located in Englewood
Call Stormy 941-549-5520
RELAXATION
Located in Englewood
Call Stormy 941-549-5520



SENSATIONS
STRESS RELEASE
941- 766-7995
3860 RT. 41, 2 Mi. NORTH
OF PUNTA GORDA BRIDGE.
SINGLE FEMALE hairstylist
looking for Single Male 45-60
for relationship 941-201-9853
I SINGLE MAN looking for sin-
gle woman. 941-284-7939

CHECK THE
CLASSIFIED! ^
THE GIRL NEXT DOOR
941-483-0701 North Port
TOTAL RELAXATION
W/ ERICA 941-875-2964
1/2 HOUR SPECIALS

SCHOOLS
& INSTRUCTION




CNA Training, HHA, MED
ASST, CPR. Onsite testing
941-429-3320 IMAGINE
ED KLOPFER SCHOOLS OF
CNA TRAINING 1 wk class $250.
Locations: Sarasota, Port Char-
lotte, Ft. Myers. 1-800-370-1570
TRADITIONAL SHAOLIN
KUNG FU CLASSES for
Adults & children. FREE
classes available. All areas.
Call for more info.
941-204-2826
UNEMPLOYED? Earn Your
Commercial Driver's License
(CDL) in Just 3 Wks. & Join
the Ranks of Employed Truck
Drivers Nationwide. Located
Punta Gorda FL. SunCoast
Trucking Academy. 941-855-
0193 or 941-347-7445
BIBLE STUDY
& CHURCHES
Lwft!3065^i
CALVARY BIBLE CHURCH
1936 E. Venice Ave. Venice
Friday at 9am.
Study features video teachings
of noted Bible Scholars on
various subjects.
For more info. Call Rev. Jones
at: 941-485-7070 or visit
www.CBCVenice.com
COMMUNITY CENTER
4PM 7PM each Wednesday.
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
PC, Open to All Ages.
For more info 941-766-9357
FAITH BUILDERS
A Basic Study to Build your
Christian Faith. Call Pastor
Parsons at Christ the King
Lutheran Church for times.
941-766-9357 Port Charlotte
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
278 S. Mango St. Englewood
Monday & Thursdays
at 9am. Offering chair exer-
cise classes For more info.
Call 941-474-2473
GULF COAST
HEALING ROOMS
If you need healing, we want
to pray with you!
Our prayer teams are
available to minister to
you by appointment.
Thursday 10 am-12:30 pm
For apt. call p.863.558.7455
1538 Rio de Janeiro Blvd.
Punta Gorda, Fl 33983
Jesus Still Heals Today!


EDGAR CAYCE A.R.E.
Search for God Study Group
6 PM 7 PM each Tuesday at
Venice Public Library
More Info call 941-966-1964.
LOOKING FOR AFFORD-
ABLE COUNSELING?
LIC. CHRISTIAN COUNSELING
WITH OVER 40YRS EXP.
941-876-4416
Liberty Community
Church
North Port Charlotte

LOST & FOUND]
L ::3090 ^

FOUND: Ladies Prescription
Eyeglass with Case on 3/21
in Burnt Store Meadows.
Punta Gorda.
Call 941-505-1243
LOST LOVE BIRD: YEL-
LOW last seen in Deep
Creek area. Owner is heart-
broken, Mr. Toddy Please
call your mother. Please
941-286-9031
LOST SILVER Heart Bracelet
with black stones in Engle-
wood. Near or in, Saint David's
Thrift Shop, Food for Less, or
Beall's Outlet. Sentimental
Value. 941-492-6757
LOST: FEMALE CAT BLACK
& GINGER tortoise shell with
white flea COLLAR. ON THE ON
SATURDAY FEB. 22ND IN PT. CHAR-
LOTTE AREA. PLEASE CALL
941-875-9492
LOST: great-great grandmoth-
ers gold dome ring with 3 dia-
monds, heartbroken grand-
daughter. Charlotte Harbor
area REWARD 941-766-0120
LOST: MALE Mountain Kurr
Hound Dog Mix in the Vacinity
of David & Wimmington in
Port Charlotte/Englewood on
3/24. Answers to "Krypto"
REWARD! 941-883-1284
LOST: Man's Gold Wedding
Ring on 3/22. REWARD!
Call 941-505-6297

S ARTS CLASSES
L 3091 ^

BEACH GLASS & Shell
Jewelry @ Creative Classes.
New Designs!
Home Classes Available
Call Susan for info, Venice:
941-492-2150.
FUSED GLASS & STAINED
GLASS CLASSES at Creative
Classes in Venice. For info &
scheduling, Call Gayle Haynie
941-830-8448
SHELL CRAFT CLASSES
Saturday's 10-3
Make Gorgeous Shell
Art Decor.
Award Winning Designs.
Call Linda (941)-493-2276
EDUCATION
L 3094 ^

MEDICAL OFFICE
TRAINEES NEEDED!
Train to become a Medical
Office Assistant! NO EXPERI-
ENCE NEEDED. Online training
at SC gets you job ready. HS
Diploma/GED & PC/Internet
needed. (888)528-5547.
EXERCISE CLASSES

L Z 3095 ^

GULF COAST ACUPUNCTURE
151 Center Rd.
Wednesday 5:30pm
Thursday 9:00 am
Saturday 8:30am
YOGA FOR BEGINNERS
Proceeds to
Venice Wildlife Center
Call Rick or Mary
941-488-1769


I RELIGION CLASSES

Z ^ 3096 ^

BEGIN YOUR DAY IN
BIBLE STUDY
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
Wednesday 10AM-11AM.
For more info 941-766-9357
Port Charlotte
FAITH LUTHERAN CHURCH
4005 Palm Drive, Punta Gorda
Various Days & Times
CONFIRMATION/BIBLE STUDY
Adult Infomational Class
941-639-6309
NEW LIFE FAMILY WORSHIP
has "Discipleship Develpo-
ment" Class, "Building a Solid
Foundation" Starting 3/14
@7PM Every 2nd Friday of the
Month. (941)-639-1700.
/ OTHER CLASSES
Z ^3097 ^

CONCENTRATIVE MEDITA-
TION with Linda Weser, 4 p.m.
every Monday at Unity Church
of Peace, 1250 Rutledge
Street, off Veterans Boulevard
between Orlando Boulevard
and Torrington Street, Port
Charlotte/North Port line.
Free; open to the public.
941-276-0124

4000


FINANCIAL

L BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
4010

JANITORIAL BUSINESS
FOR SALE, $19,500.
Grossing $60K/Year, Some
Financing Available, Discount
for a Veteran, Supplies &
Equipment Incl. 239-826-2779

Great Deals in
the Classifieds!


5000


ijc-



BUSINESS SERVICES
AN OCCUPATIONAL LIC.
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational
licensing bureau to verify.
ALUMINUM
Loom 5006UM ^

THE HEIGHTS ALUMINUM,
INC. Screen Rooms *
Lanais Pool Cages. *
Rescreens Seamless
Gutters Soffit Fascia .
Pavers Concrete .
941-613-1414 OR
941-492-6064
Lic./Ins. AAA0010565 &
R6ALCL-5AC-33
S APPLIANCE
SERVICE/REPAIR I
^^Z 5020^^

STAY ALIVE FOR $25!
DRYER VENT CLEANING
Fact:15,000 house fires a
year caused directly from
clogged dryer vents!
FOR LIMITED TIME ONLY:
Sat & Sun calls only $20!
941-249-1161


CHILD CARE
L 5051 ^

ALL CHILDCARE
FACILITIES MUST INCLUDE,
WITH ADVERTISEMENT,
STATE OR LOCAL AGENCY
LICENSE NUMBER.
FLORIDA STATE LAW
requires all child care centers
and day care businesses to
register with the State of Flori-
da. The Sun Newspapers will
not knowingly accept advertis-
ing which is in
violation of the law
| COMPUTER SERVICE



COMPUTER TUTOR
(Your home or mine)
ONLY $25.00 an hour!
Please call Steve at:
941-445-4285

ASK US

HOW
you can place a
PICTURE
of your item
for sale
in your
classified ad!
*1A+ COMPUTER REPAIR &
TUTOR... Ii YOUR HONE
Reasonable & Prompt!
Sr. Disc. 941-451-3186
L CONCRETE
L 50C57 ^


CONCRETE
Driveways Patios
Sidewalks Pads
Decorative Options Available
Free Estimates
941-286-6415
RICH LANDERS
STUCCO, INC.
Honest, Reliable work!
LIC/INS New Const &
Remodels. Rusted bands
& wire lathe repair.
spraycrete & dry-wall
repair (941)-497-4553

CLEANING
SERVICES
Lr5060~
MAJESTIC CLEANING
PROFESSIONAL CLEANING AT
AFFORDABLE RATES! HAPPY TO
ACCOMMODATE YOUR NEEDS!
941-268-3075 LIC/INS

L HANDYMAN/
GENERAL REPAIR
IZ ^5089^^

"HONEY DO" Handyman
& Odd Jobs
Kitchen & Bath Tune Ups
Faucets, counters,
windows, doors and more!
electrical l &
plumbing references, exp.
941-275-0712

HOME / COMM.
IMPROVEMENT


DAVE'S HANDYMAN
Honest, Knowledgeable & Reli-
able. Call for all your needs,
Sm/Lg 941-628-8326 Lic/Ins
CARPENTER, INC. Handyman
Rotten wood, doors, soffit, facia,
etc. Phil 941-626-9021 lic. & ins.
"The Stucco Guy"
Drywall, Window Sill & Wire
Lathe Repair, Rusted Bands,
Decorative Bands,
Match Any Texture,
Senior & Veterans Discount
941-716-0872
WILLY D'S HOME Improve-
ments, Inc. for all your Building
needs. (941)-716-3351





The Sun Classified-Section A Page 16 E/N/C/V


ads.yoursunnet


Saturday, March 29, 2014


LAWN/GARDEN
I & TREE
^^^5110^

AN OCCUPATIONAL LICENSE
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational licens-
ing bureau to verify





Landscape Lighting
Sprinkler Sy-stern Rep
Shrub & Tree Trimming
Pressure Washing
Sod Installation
Landscaping
Free Estimates
404-640-7336
Edward Ross Construction
Services, Inc. 941-408-8500
pool cages. Scr. lanais etc...
EXPERIENCED LANDSCAPER
Pruning & transplanting
plants, Pressure Washing &
WINDOW WASHING
941-876-3097
FAMILY TREE SERVICE Tree
Trimming, Free Estimates. Call
Today 941-237-8122. Lic/Ins.
ISLAND BREEZE
LAWN SERVICE
Residential & Commercial
14 years experience
Owner operated. Lic&
Ins.Venice & surrounding
areas. For free estimate
call Keith 941-445-2982
J RIZ TREE SERVICES
Complete Tree Services
Servicing Charlotte & Sarasota
FREE ESTIMATES
941-306-7532 Lic & Ins
SOD WORK REMOVE &
REPLACE SMALL JOBS OK, ALL
TYPES OF soD941-716-9912
Tommy's Tree & Property
Service *Trim & remove
*Complete lawn care.
Lic/ins. (941)-809-9035

MOVING/HAULING
L 5130 ^



TWO MEN
AND A
TRUCK
"Movers Who Core."
us DIT no. 1915800
941-359-1904


PAINTING/
WALLPAPERING
~5140~



BEST PRICES -- QUALITY JOB
Best Coast Painting
Residential/Commercial
Handyman services also!
10/% Off With Ad!
941-815-8184
AAA00101254
L-------------------------
STEVEN'S CUSTOM PAINTING
Res/Comm. Int/Ext
FREE EST.
Lic. & Ins. 941-255-3834

Hnd your Best
Friend In ithe
Classffleds!

PRESSURE
CLEANING
~5180~


PACKERS A-Z PRESSURE
CLEANING & MORE
Roofs, Homes, Docks,
pool decks & cages,
Mobile detailing etc... No
job too small. Free Est.
Sr. Disc. 941-929-6775
BAILEY'S PRESSURE
CLEANING Tile roof Clean-
ings starting at @$150.
Call 941-497-1736


L ROOFING /
ol 4:518'5 J


PAUL DEAO ROOFING
PROTECTING YOUR BIGGEST
INVESTMENT. 22 YRS EXP. -
941-441-8943 Lc#1329187


6000


MERCHANDISE
GARAGE SALES


6001 Arcadia
6002 Englewood
6003 Lake Suzy
6004 Nokomis
6005 North Port
6006 Port Charlotte
Deep Creek
6007 Punta Gorda
6008 Rotonda
6009 Sarasota
6010 South Venice
6011 Venice
6012 Out Of Area
6015 Flea Market
6020 Auctions
MERCHANDISE
6013 Moving Sales
6025 Arts & Crafts
6027 Dolls
6030 Household Goods
6035 Furniture
6038 Electronics
6040 TV/Stereo/Radio
6060 Computer Equip
6065 Clothing/Jewelry/
Accessories
6070 Antiques &
Collectibles
6075 Fruits/Veges
6090 Musical
6095 Medical
6100 Health/Beauty
6110 Trees & Plants
6120 Baby Items
6125 Golf Accessories
6128 Exercise/Fitness
6130 Sporting Goods
6131 Firearms
6132 Firearm Access.
6135 Bikes/Trikes
6138 Toys
6140 Photography/Video
6145 Pool/ Spa & Supplies
6160 Lawn & Garden
6165 Storage Sheds/
Buildings
6170 Building Supplies
6180 Heavy Constr.
Equipment
6190 Tools/Machinery
6220 Office/Business Equip
& Supplies
6225 Restaurant Supplies
6250 Appliances
6260 Misc. Merchandise
6270 Wanted to Buy/T rade
| GULF COVE/SGC|
GARAGE SALES
^^ 6014^

FRI-SUN 9-2 GARAGE HOARD-
ER'S CLEAN-UP. 15140 Brain-
bridge Cir. Many Auto & Marine
parts. Much misc & Household.
37' Irwin Sailboat, 42' SeaRay,
Ultra lite Plane, & arco welder.
I NEED CASH? I








FLDESIGNS, KITCHEN GADGRKET





CALL SANDY
j^: 60 15 ^









VENDORS941-255-3532 OR COMED
SUPPLIES, GOLF SUPPLIES,
CELL PHONES, AIR BRUSH
DESIGNS, KITCHEN GADGETS
CALL SANDY
941-255-3532 OR COME
IN AND VISIT @ THE SUN
FLEA MARKET


ARTS AND CRAFTS

Z 6025 ^

FRAMED WATER Color
Vase/Flowers KeyWe $125
941-681-2433
| DOLLS
Loot 602L7S ^


BRATZ DOLLS RV & DOLLS
BRATZ DOLL C $125 941-
474-0192
DOLL 21" porcelain box &
papers glass display $50
941-255-1316
SSeize the sales
with Classified!
TEDDY BEARS elvis have 4
$75 941-627-6780
HOUSEHOLD GOODS
L 6030 ^


BED MATTRESS & BOX.
New-Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
BED SHEETS King set Drk.
Blu. 400 count E.C. $15 941-
585-8149
BEDSIDE LAMPS 1 pr, Like
New $6 941-488-0417
BLANKET 2 twin sz white
w/roses like new $10 941-
698-1021
BRADFORD REGISTERED
Plates w/holder & certificate
$10 941-629-4973
BRASS CHANDLER 4 lights
excellent condition $30 941-
391-6788
CARPET & PADDING 11'x19'
berber, tan $120 718-986-
3608
CHINA NORITAKE BLUE
BELL 91 PIECES PERF $300
941-575-8881
CHINA SET Noritake Savan-
nah 85 pieces $195 941-
492-2434
COFFEE TABLE 35" glass
top, nice $35 941-740-3286
COMFORTER SETS TWIN,
cream solid, 2 for $20 941-
697-0501
COOK BOOKS 50 cents Qty
40 Soft & Hard Cove $0.50
941-488-0417
COUCH/OTTEMON couch
92 in long new $135 941-
740-0276
CUISINART COFFEE On
Demand 12 cup New $65
719-649-1225
CUTTING TABLE Great for
seamstress. $35 941-815-
0969
CUTTING TABLE Great for
seamstress. $35 941-815-
0969
DAYBED COVER Quilted w/2
matching king shams. $35
941-456-3986
DINNERWARE SET Serves
12 Holly Berry Pattern $50
941-426-0760
DISHE SET of 8, dinner, sand-
wich, desert, $60 941-575-
6332
DISHES NEW dishes floral
stoneware 51 pieces $45
941-624-3372
DISHES ONEIDA/WICKER
PATTERNFour place $30 obo
941-575-4364
DRAPES 4 panels 39x84
sage grn val&ties all $20 941-
697-0501
DRAWER 34X41 4 drawers
solid pine gd cond $55 941-
740-3286
GEORGE FOREMAN Patio
Grille Excellent Condition $50
941-391-6024
GLASS BEVELED 5/16" 38"
x 38" round corners.$35 $35
941-815-7588
HOMEDICS DUAL shiatsu
massage cushion. $20 941-
830-0524
KING MATTRESS&BOX
beauty rest,lyr.gst.room
$275 941-697-1566


HOUSEHOLD GOODS
Z :^ 6030 ^

KITCHEN FAUCET
MOEN,SPRAYER IN SPOUT
$60 941-875-1757
MATTRESS & COMFORTER
King Size. Bed Skirt & Frame
Incl. $150. 518-586-2768
MATTRESS TOPPER memory
foam King size $40 770-546-
2131
MATTRESS, QUEEN & BOX.
Brand New-Will Sell $175.
Also Have KING.
941-629-5550



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To place a FREE
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and place your ad.
"CLICK ON CLICK HERE
TO PLACE YOUR AD NOW"
and follow the prompts.
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and the ad must be placed
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STINA
SUNIM
Ih < -I -' -'" \ SIFA'RS



ORIENTAL TYPE rug 5 X 9
Black bkgrnd very pretty $35
770-546-2131
PAINTING FLORIDA Print W/
Gold Frame $5 941-488-0417
RANGE HOOD Beige, Excel-
lent Condition. $30 941-999-
4456
SHEETS FULL & Queen sized
sheets & pillowcase $4 941-
613-6839
SOFA RECLINER Tan Sofa
Recliner,nice,125.00 $125
941-539-0626
SUITCASE 19X28 good con-
dition, expandable $30 941-
740-3286
TABLECLOTH 66X84 wht
embr 8 naps new pkg $30
941-697-0501
THROW RUG new 24" x 32"
med blue $5 941-613-8396
TOSS PILLOWS 3 16"
x16" red $3 941-613-6839
TOWELS & bathroom acces-
sories Towels & Ba $3 941-
613-6839
1 AOVERTeSE!., I
TWIN COMFORTERS Beauti-
ful. Blue, Rose & Teal green
$25 941-423-7795
VACUUM, Kirby Sentra, All
attachments Pd. 2150, $499
828-777-5610 (cell)
/HOLIDAY ITEMS
L 6031 ^


EASTER WREATH for Door
Beautiful purple $50 941-232-
3035

| FURNITURE
LW4046035 ^


(2)CORNER CABINETS in
excellent condition $300
941-575-1403
20" OTTOMAN,Red/4-
Chrome Legs Microfiv $50
941-681-2433
4 POSTER Bed Full size
exc.cond.w/mattress $200
414-899-0006


L FURNITURE
L OZ6035 ^


42"ROUND TABLE ,4 chairs
42"round table 4 c $75 941-
629-0806
7 PC patio set 7 Piece Patio
set. Br topEx. Con. $200 603-
918-6738
ANTIQUE ARMOIRE from
Sanibel Resort, large with TV
slot and drawers, great deal,
$100. 941-830-8410.
ARMOIRE ENTERTAINMENT
Beautiful Oriental style Drexel
Heritage $150 941-486-0189
ARMOIRE OAK for clothes,
like new $250 517-896-0761
BAR STOOLS 2 29" backless
black hardwood $85 941-
460-6027
BAR STOOLS 4 DARK ALU-
MINUM Tall swivel chairs &
table $400 320-249-2556
BAR STOOLS-3 white cane
fabric seats VG cond $100
941-480-1998
BDRM SET, Qn, Poster, dress-
er, chest, end tables, mirror &
steps $749 941-918-9665
BED MATTRESS & BOX.
New-Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
--GET RESULTS)---
USE CLASSIFIED!
BEDROOM SET light
wood, d/m, Ins $125
941-629-8096
BEDROOM SET qn mattress
& boxspring w/white head
board $200 941-485-1600
BEDS, TWIN 2 Complete sets
w/wicker headboards. Great
shape! $300 941-497-5559
BEVELED GLASS 3'x6' thick
top 3' $75 908-246-8218
BISTRO BAR with 4 swevel
chairs, new $450 941-830-
3542
BOOK CASES 2 36 wide 12'
deep 6' high blac $35 941-
497-7175
BUTCHER BLOCK Table w/4
chairs EX COND $120 obo
941-575-4364
CASUAL RATTAN SET
INCLUDES COUCH, CHAIR
OTTOMAN & TABLE -
$200.00. VINTAGE CHROME-
CRAFT DINETTE SET WITH 4
CHAIRS $150.00. ELEC-
TRIC LEATHER RECLINER, ONLY
7 MO. OLD $325.00.
DINING ROOM SET WITH 6
CHAIRS AND BUFFET $550.
CALL 941-276-2335 FOR
MORE INFO.
CHAIR & BED leopard print
cushion. New-cond. Mint $120
718-986-3608
CHAIRS 2 Armed Dining,
Upholstered Seats, Cherry.
Nice! $100. 941-875-9593
CHAIRS 2 Side Washed Lt
Wood/Cush $300 941-735-
6595
CHAIRS SAMSONITE card
table chairs $25 941-456-
3986
COCKTAIL TABLE 48" x 24"
pine/glass top metal leg $30
715-545-2590
COFFEE TABLE ethan allen
38 inch $30 941-624-3372
COFFEE TABLE Fossil Stone
Glasstop Highend $300 941-
735-6595
COUCH SLEEPER sofa never
used, like new, $200 941-
426-8353
DESK CHAIR cushion back &
seat. arms $29 941-426-
1088
DESK CHAIR fully cushioned,
5 wheels,sturdy $29 941-
426-1088
DESK CHERRY drop lid 3
draws orig $795 exc $295
941-412-5283
DESK DESK wicker w/glass
top stunning -Venice $95
912-604-2312
DESK WICKER desk with
glass top-stunning -in Ve $95
912-604-2312


FURNITURE
L ^ 6035 ^


DECK CHAIRS 4 alum sling -
vg cond $150 941-830-8307
DINETTE 48" round, 4 swivel
chairs, 60's "Jetson $150
941-451-4274
DINETTE SET $50 941 575-
4217 $50 941-575-4217
DINETTE SET w/ leaf 4 swiv-
el chairs $200.00 obo 941
941-979-6468
DINING CHAIRS 4 chairs.
chrome & leather $80 941-
538-6292
DINING PECAN Table 2
Pedestal 10 Chairs $500 941-
735-6595
DINING ROOM SET, 8 Piece
Beautiful solid wood $500
941-276-1902
DINING ROOM TABLE 6
Chairs, Walnut, 63x41 w/ 18"
Leaf. $600 603-520-9855
DINING SET & China Cabinet
Light dining table $500 941-
809-0022
DINING SET 42" ROUND
TABLE & 4 CHAIRS $50 941-
460-1961
DINING SET WROUGHT IRON
DINING SET Antique;Glass
$100 941-276-2411
DINING SET/4 chairs Good
condition $75 941-629-0326
DINING TABLE w 6 chairs
solid oak $150 obo 941-830-
8343
DRESSER 5 ft oak with side
by side mirrors. $100 941-
255-8245
DRESSER CHEST 8 drawers
t$20 920-720-0007
DRESSER WHITE wicker lin-
gere chest. 18" $30 941-
698-1021
END TABLES Glass top 3 +
coffee table. Excel. $50.00
941 575-4217
ENT. CENTER 68X80X16
Lots of storage & lighted
shelves. $100 941-493-1696
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
with 32' tv good condition $50
941-575-1403
ENTIRE CONTENTS of
2bdrm apt. for sale! From
kitchenware, linens to furni-
ture! Queen & Full bdrm sets!
Call for info 941-391-6926
FIREPIT PROPANE FIRE PIT
by Hampton Bay, $479 941-
979-5331
FLEXSTEEL SOFA Three (3)
Cushion Burgundy $150 941-
484-6050
HANGING CHAIR handmade
Oak and rope never used $75
941-375-8886.
HEADBOARD QUEEN
washed wicker-Crate@Ba $90
912-604-2312
I BUY FURNITURE
Or anything of value!
941-485-4964
KING/SIZE HEADBOARD &
frame black/gold finial $150
941-240-5540
KITCHEN SET 48 rndglass,
4chrs, 3bstls, whtcane $275
941-480-1998
KITCHEN TABLE and 6 chairs
light tan color $65 941-426-
8353
LANAI SET wrought iron $299
9416391932 $299
LAZY BOY sofa & loveseat
$450 941-460-8734
LIVINGROOM SET very nice
$275 941-629-0806
LOVEASEAT SAGE green
microfiber, wood trim, i $200
603-767-1475
LOVESEAT LOVESEAT, tan
microfiber, exc co $150 941-
698-0121
LOVESEAT/CHAIR Need to
sell quick/ Brown $150 941-
916-4474
MATTRESS & BOX.
New-Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550





Saturday, March 29, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C/V The Sun Classified-Section A Page 17


L FURNITURE
L OZ6035 ^


LOVE SEAT Beige Excellent
condition $70 412-779-4792
MATTRESS QUEEN Matt/Box
Spring Like New $250 941-
735-6595
MOVING! 2 bdrm sets,
barstools, family room set,
Reasonable prices! Call for
details! 917-496-6745
PATIO CHAIRS 6 cush-
ioned/alum/inc 2 swivel excl
$175 203-217-1307
PATIO SET 6 ft glass table, 6
reclining chairs $175 651-
633-3504
PATIO SET cast metal, bench,
chair, end table $100 941-
480-1998
PATIO SET Tropitone, 42rnd
glass table, 4 chairs, $100
941-480-1998
PATIO SET Wrought iron
30"x48" glass top table $150
941-451-4274
PEDESTAL TABLE 22h 26w
walnut & glass vg co $45
440-725-8658
PVC OUTDOOR furniture 40"
table 4 pa $175 413-237-
9807
QAK ARMOIRE clothes
armoire 40wxl8dx60h. $250
517-896-0761
RECLINER CHAIR&SOFA
Pallister Leather Burg excel
cond $425 941-492-5577
ROCKER CHAR-LOG pine &
fir very good condit $80 941-
266-6718
ROCKING CHAIR All wood,
Windsor style, $50 941-266-
6718
ROLL/TOP DESK Very good
condition $180 941-456-
5546
ROLLTOP DESK and Chair
(childs) CA1920 $175 941-
266-6718
SECTIONAL SOFA 2 pc
tweed, "smoke" USA $450
941-240-5540
SHELF (4), Glass, brass,
Finnish 72Hx33Wx12D $90
718-986-3608
SLEEPER SOFA Loveseat
Lamp VG Cond, Pal $450
440-725-8658
SOFA & LOVESEAT LazyBoy,
Genuine dk. brown leather.
$1200 OBO 941-235-2203
SOFA ,Full Size, Pillow Top,
Light Blue. Excellent Condition.
$100 941-623-6762
SOFA BED FULL SIZE beige
$125 941-493-8148
SOFA DUAL Recliners &
Chair recliner. Hydra Blue, exc.
cond. $475 941-875-1310
SOFA SLEEPER includes
matching automan & $350
941-412-5283
SOFA TABLE 46" X 20" X 30"
wood/inlay metal $65 715-
545-2590
SOFA TRAD 3pc Corner Sec-
tional Great Cond $400 941-
735-6595
SOFA& RECLINER matching,
good cond. $100
941-637-1517
SOFA, 82Lx39W36H Mint con-
dition. $280 718-986-3608
SOFA/LOVESEAT Fl colors,
sleeper sofa $200 941-423-
8243
STANDUP DRESSER OLDER
unit has doors on top w interoir
drawers $125 941-769-1275
STORAGE BED, new,twin,
white wicker/rattan, incl.
nightstand/vanity $450 828-777-
5610
TABLE DR 35X72 wood table
w chairs & bench $100 502-
558-0990
TABLE ROUND GLASS 4
upholstered chairs Exc $250
941-423-9371
TABLE ROUND Rattan w/4
chairs cream cushion $250
941-423-9371


FURNITURE
L ^ 6035 J


TABLE/CHAIRS 4 48" rnd
glass, white cane, fabri $175
941-480-1998
TEA OVAL glass table & 2
chairs wicker wood mint. $190
718-896-3608
TELL CITY Chairs Vintage Tell
City Chairs M $400 941-266-
6718
TV STAND 10' DEEP 3' WIDE
3" HIGH ON W $30 941-497-
7175
TWIN BED spotless quality
mattress $45 908-246-8218
TWIN MATTRESS, Boxspring
& Frame Twin m $50 941-
255-3903
WICKER BENCH Henry Link
4 feet $150 941-423-8243
WICKER ETERGERE Beautiful
condition $125 941-423-
8243
WICKER STAND 2 glass
shelves lighted w/cabi $75
941-391-6024
YOUTH BED w/matteress
excellent COndition $75 941-
697-7364
ELECTRONICS
LW :60380 ^


CD/VCR COMBO 920-720-
0007 $8
DIGITAL PHOTO Frame New
with SD card 7 inches $25
941-743-0649
SIRIUSRADIO FOR car. incl.
boom box. Paperwork $60
941-697-1430
TV 15"FLATSCREEN $30
941-475-7577
TV/STEREO/RADIO
L 6040 J


PIONEER SPEAKER SYST.
PDP-S36. NIB $25 941-505-
1611
TV 21" Phillips TV 21"
w/remote. exc cond $25 942-
544-5755
TV TOSHIBA 19" CRT with
video & audio input $20 941-
379-5586
COMPUTER
EQUIPMENT
^ 6060 ^

COMPUTER KEYBOARD
works good $10 941-228-
1745
COPIER/FAX/PRINTER
CANON MF4150 copy-fax
$65 941-564-8619
DELL B10 XP,1.25g
ram,2.66cpu,80g.HD, $50
941-445-9069
DELL PC Win XP
Mntr, KB,Mouse,MSOffice
$150 617-230-3845
DELL PRINTER
print/fax/copy/scan $100
617-230-3845
HP PHOTOSMART C7280
Fax Copy Print Scan $35 941-
698-1323
HP PRINTER Works Great
Mod 7310 $45 941-240-
5384
KEYBOARD MACINTOSH
Model A1048, USB plug $25
941-379-5586
Employ Classified!
POWER SUPPLY Antec 400
Watts, Tested $25 941-379-
5586
SONY 19" LCD Monitor SDM-
X95F This ite $95 773-322-
8383
CLOTHING / JEWELRY
L ACCESSORIES


FORMAL DRESS
w/jacket,beautiful size 18 $75
941-549-1460


CLOTHING / JEWELRY/
L ACCESSORIES


JACKET SET Bob Mackie 2pc
Beaded Blouse $50 941-391-
6024
LEATHER JACKET Grey-
Suade large w wool $15 941-
445-5619
1 Advertise Today!
MEN'S LEATHER Boots by
Chippewa size 7 1/2 ex $45
941-743-0649
MENS SPORTCOAT, It. blue,
42 short & like new. $20 941-
875-2285
MENS SPORTCOAT tan, size
42 short & like new. $20 941-
875-2285
IIsu lllTlff -l


MINKS:
BLOND MINK CAPE LARGE
SIZE & DARK MINK COAT
LARGE SIZE GREAT COND.
$250/EA 941-204-3734
MOTORCYCLE BOOTS Mens
sz 8.5W Slip on BIk $25 314-
609-1540
WEDDING GOWN w/crin
Sz12 White strapless classic
$195 941-704-0322
[ ANTIQUES 1
COLLECTIBLES


16 VINTAGE BOOKS CALL
FOR TITLES $75 941-764-
7971
1940'S WOODEN Airplane
Propeller Original $499 906-
322-3640
25"LARGE MOUTH Bass
Mounted 8#s-lloz $125 941-
681-2433
39 ORIG. Star Trek VHS tapes
Mostly sealed $50 941-423-
2585


ACTIVELY BUYING!
Antiques, Paintings; All Sub-
jects, Silver, Ivory, Jewelry, Ori-
ental Rugs, New England
Items. Anything Unusual or of
Quality! Local 941-306-8937
ALWAYS BUYING
ANTIQUES, ART, SILVER
NEW ENGLAND ANTIQUES
(941) 639-9338
AMER FLAG WWII 48 stars
5'x9' $100 941-445-5619
ANTIQUE WHEEL CHAIR
FULL SIZE,1880. $499 941-
697-6553
AUTOLITE SERVICE Cabinet
1950's 2 piece ME $450 941-
474-0192

I F i i7


Buying Pre-1965
Silver Coins
Top Prices Paid!
Call 941-759-3073
CANE ROCKER WITH ARMS
family heirloom $275 941-
460-6027
CANE SIDE CHAIRS family
heirloom, very g $250 941-
460-6027
CASH PAID**any old mili-
tary items, swords, medals,
uniforms, old guns. Dom
(941)-416-3280
CERAMIC LAMP antique Very
stylish la $90 773-322-8383
CHILD ORGAN tabletop Mag-
nus very old $50 941-423-
2585
CHOCOLATE OR Coffee Set
14K Gold $35 941-488-0417
CIVIL WAR NEWSPAPERS,
85 issues. Great Gift Your
choice $20/ea 941-488-8531
All war News- Venice***


ANTIQUES
COLLECTIBLES
6^^ 070 ^

COIN 1880OS PCGS CERTI-
FIED MS-63 MORGAN $65
941-457-0155
COIN 18840 PCGS MS61
DOLLAR $54 941-457-0155
COIN 1898 PCGS MS62 DOL-
LAR $55 941-457-0155
COIN 1924S PEACE DOLLAR
AU-58 $95 941-457-0155
COIN 1942D HALF DOLLAR
GEM BU $70 941-457-0155
ENGLISH MINERS Lamp
Authentic Coles/Manch $80
941-538-6292
GRANDFATHER CLOCK,
Oversized, ornate hanging wall
clock. $499 941-255-5550
LLADRO FAIRY w/wand
#4595 w/box retired. Mint
$100 941-456-3986
LLADRO GIRL w/milk pail
#4682. Retired. Mint. $80
941-456-3986
MILK GLASS unusual pattern,
white, per $35 941-575-8881
NEWSPAPER 100 yr. old.
London Times. TITANTIC Great
gift. $25 941-488-8531
RECORDS 45'S 100's 50's-
70 6174602341 $1 617-
460-2341
SEWING MACHINE 1919
westinghouse electric $275
941-889-7297
SNOWBABIES FOREVER
FRIEND'S, UNOPENED $30
941-627-6780
STERLING SALT Spoons
P&B, (6). Call for pic. $175
941-232-3035
TAPA CLOTH from Fiji
framed/glass 42"X42" $150
941-585-8149
VINTAGE CARS danbury mint
cars vintage papers call info
$75 941-698-1951
WANTED: OLD POST cards
pre 1940, stamp collections,
old photographs and paper
items
Collector pas highest prices
207-712-6216 or 9414934714
MUSICAL
L 6090 ^


3 DRUMS TAMA ROCKSTAR
AQUAMARINE $60 941-505-
1611
3/4 VIOLIN Made in USA-qual-
ity crafted Case & bow nice
sound $150 941-473-1690
BEHRINGER POWER Mixer
Power $295 941-457-5724
GUITAR IBANEZ white elec-
tric with case, good $125
941-575-8229
KEYBOARD 76 KEY, YAMA-
HA, WITH STAND $125 941-
625-2550
KEYBOARD, STAND, and
bench, Casio Used $100 941-
815-0969
ORGAN LOWRY console dbl
kbd w/bass pedals $499 941-
412-5283
ORGAN YAMAHA #PSRE423,
61 keyboard, 1 Y $150 941-
460-6378
VIOLIN V. good sounding-case
& bow incl.q $185 941-473-
1690
L MEDICAL
avao:6095 ^







BATHTUB & SHOWER
GRAB BARS INSTALLED
Don't Wait to Fall to Call!
Free In-Home Evaluation
22 Years Experience
CALL JIM'S
BATHROOM GRAB BARS, LLC
941-626-4296


L MEDICAL
low4:6095 ^


BAUSCH&LOMB SOFLENS
Daily disposable two $30
941-575-6332
BEDSIDE COMMODE or 2
Wheel Walker, each $20 941-
268-8951
CHAMPION GOLDEN Scoot-
er Very good cond $475 941-
764-0993
HOYER LIFT like new,
battery operated $1,000
Call 941-473-3577
JAZZY POWER CHAIR By
Pride. Like New $750 OBO
941-235-1946

ASK US

HOW
you can place a
PICTURE
of your item
for sale
in your
classified ad!
MOTORIZED WHEELCHAIR
newer battery joystick operat-
ed $350 941-423-8243
PATIENT TRANSFER BOARDS,
Beasy, Safe transfer board
$100 firm (941) 676-2049
PORTABLE OXYGEN COMP
12v/120v, w/batt pack, airline
approved $2,500 Pd. $5000
941-235-1946/612-750-9583
POWER CHAIR exc condi-
tion $275 770-546-2131
SHOWER CHAIR EX COND
$25 obo 941-575-4364
SHOWER STOOL or QUAD
CANE each $20 941-268-
8951
WHEELCHAIR w removable
arms good condition $110
941-575-8260
| HEALTH / BEAUTY

Z :^6100 ^

MAGNET PAD European
Health 3'x6' $200 941-575-
0690
| TREES & PLANTS

L 6110 ^


AZALEAS AZALEAS White-
Red-Violet $5 941-204-9100
BAMBOO CLUMPING 3 gal
pots $25 941-697-7375
CUCUMBER, KALE or BROC-
COLI seedlings. $1 941-258-
2016
FIG TREE Turkey Fig Fruiting
$15 941-204-9100
GREEN BELL pepper or toma-
to seedlings $1 941-258-
2016
HIBISCUS RED Giant Big Red
Hibiscus $10 941-204-9100
HUGE DESERT Rose $100
941-204-9100


VIBURNUM GREAT FOR
PRIVACY HEDGE 3-15GAL,
BARREL,SYLVESTER PALMS
PIGMY PALMS & MORE
**GREAT PRICES***
Sui's NusuRy 941-488-7291
RATTLE BOX TREE healthy,
lots of buds 5ft tall $8 941-
258-2016
ROYAL PALM 5-6 FT TALL IN
5 GAL POT $20 941-258-
2016
SKY ROCKET Junipers Col-
umn Juniper Trees $20 941-
204-9100


U-rI"l T I MIOUIVISI UEI4 l-cV
House Farm & Nursery, 4565
Hwy. 17 3 1/2 mi. east of 1-75
Mon-Sat 9-3. Tell your Friends.


BABY ITEMS
L ^ 61'20 ^


BABY WALKER good condi-
tion $15 941-235-1910
BABYCAR SEAT EVENFLO
20-40pond good condition $15
941-235-1910
CARS SEAT EVENFLO Child
Car Seat $19 $19 941-697-
2402
FISHER PRICE baby toys9 for
12 month old $30 941-375-
4054
GRACO TRAVEL system neu-
tral cost $100 941-375-4054
GRACO TRAVEL system neu-
tral cost $300 $100 941-
375-4054
NEED A JOB?RIE
CHECK THE
CLASSIFIED!

L GOLFACCESSORIES

L ^ 6125 ^


GOLF CART
Great 2012 Batteries
New Factory Recondition
Folding rear seat, lights
Choice of colors, $3875
Warranty 941-769-1431
6V GOLF CART BATTERIES
6V $429, 8V $499
PER SET/6
NEW, FACTORY WARRANTY
EXCHANGE/CASH & CARRY
941-769-1431
CLUB CAR DS 2003
2012 Batteries, Lights,
Charger. Excellent Condition!
As 2 Passenger: $2095
As 4 Passenger: $2495
941-716-6792
Please no text msg


4 SEATI GLFCARI, INEW,
6" LIFT, 12" ALUMINUM RIMS
23" TIRES, REAR SEAT & BODY.
2013 BATTERIES
AS NEW CONDITION. INC. CHARGER
$ 4475 941-830-5312
Please no text messages
GOLF BALL monogramer
park avenue its new $10 941-
228-1745





GOLF CART LIFTED
"BLACK" RECONDITIONED
2011 CLUB CAR DS
12'Aluminum Rims & 22"
Tires, Flip Rear Seat, Lights
Tinted Windshield and 6' Lift
6-8 Volt Batteries
48 Volt System
Factory Serviced
$ 4475 -
941-830-5312
Please no text messages
GOLF CLUBS 13 PIECE with
BAG Right hand golf $20 773-
322-8383
GOLF CLUBS Taylormade
SLDR 5-SW + AW. Sr. Graphite
shaft $400 810-399-3556
GOLF SHOES kid new,size
small, blac $20 941-627-
6780
GOLF SHOES MEN SIZE 10
med. soft SPI $40 941-627-
6780
NEW GOLF CART TIRES
ON WHITE STEEL RIMS.
SETS OF 4, $189
CASH & CARRY
DARS 941-769-1431
TITLEIST PROV1 $35/dz-
2dz/$65. NXT Tour $25 $35
941-625-2210







The Sun Classified-Seclion A Page 18 E/k/C N ads.yoursun.net Saturday, March 29, 2014


I POOL/SPA/
& SUPPLIES
614'J'^M "'P2


AB LOUNGER EX.COND.
Paperwork incl. $25 941-697-
1430
AB-LOUNGER like new with
manu $50 941549-1232
ELIPTICAL EXERCISER
Image 9.5 Model #Imel 3906
$150 502-558-1096
EXERCISE BIKE Weslo Pur-
suit $65 941-625-2779
HOME GYM golds gym
weight machine, e/c $75 941-
549-1460
OLYMPIC WEIGHT Set
Complete weight bench
$100 941-276-1902
PRO-FORM SR30 cycle Digi-
tal display with ow $75 941-
549-1232
PROFORM STRENGTH recoil
system see net for pic $125
obo 941-456-5907
ROLLER SKATES girl Size 2
941-627-0170 $60
SHARPER IMAGE stepoer
Like new S65 9414565907
SPORT VIBE 1000 New &
50% off list @ fullbody $349
941-763-2900
TREADMILL, (WESLO) Excel-
lent cond. Folds for storage.
$100 941-7864632
TREADMILL, PRO-FORM,
Model 745CS LIKE $350 941-
255-3903
WT. BENCH Golds Gym
XRS20 Great condition $220
941-815-0969
| SPORTING GOODS
L 6130 ^


2 GUYS GUN
SHOW
MAR 29TH & 30TH
Port Charlotte
Charlotte County
Fairgrounds
2333 El Jobean Rd
Buy-Sell-Trade
New-Used
FREE Parking
CWP Classes Avail.
Sat 9-5 and Sun 9-4
727-776-3442
www.nextgunshow.com
9FT FENWICK Surf Rod Spin-
ning W/ Okuma # 50 R $90
941 266-4731
BASEBALL DI MAGGIO & will
mays signature $300 941-
740-3286
BUMPER POOL Table 60'S,
coin op. slate $200 941-697-
1430
FIREWOOD No camping
trip is complete without it!
Pine, Oak, or Citrus
Split, Bundled, and ready for
the firepit!
941-468-4372
LIFE JACKET by West Marine
2 Youth,lew.each $20 941-
2688951
MERRIWEATHER KAYAK 12'
Kayak and paddle $450 941-
662-6250
NORDIC FLEX Gold Nordic
Fix GId 50. 6378316 $50
941-637-8316
OKUMA EPIXOR 9 BALL
BEARING REEL- GC $25 714-
599-2137
PENN 113H Cony. Reel W/
7ft Fenwick Rod. Ex $90 941-
2664731
SCOPE KONUSPRO IOX50
Mii-Dot, 1" Tube, NIB $90
941-379-5586

L FlIREA RM LS
L ^ 6131 --

Marlin 30-30 Scope. Lever act,
S425: Winchester 30-30 Scope,
Lever Act. $495; Marlin M 1894
44mag Scope $550; Ruger
P95DC 9mm SS $485. Private
collector Ex cond. 845-531-9079


L FIREARMtS
L 6131 ^

AK47 Yugo M70, BI Sporter
rifle, heavy duty, never fired
$1000 941-786-2715
COWBOY 6 SHOOTER 357
Cal. SAA, case hard, frame,
ivory grip, quick draw holster
& belt. S700 941 769-1367
FT MYERSAMNIQUIE ARMS
COLLECTORS SHOW
Sat, Mar 29 9am-5npm
Sun, Mar 30,9am-3pm
Show this ad for
$2 OFF Admission
Valid for 1 Anission onjy
Araba Shrine Tenmpile
2010 Hanson St.
33901 @RL 41
WEBSITE: fmaac.tripod.com
Call 847-863-3929



GUN & KNIFE SHOW
German American Club
2101 SW Pine Island Rd,
Cape Coral, FL.
Sat 3/29 9-5pm and
Sun 3/30 9-4pm.
Admission $5.00 under
12 FREE & FREE PARKING
CWP Classes $49.95
11am & 1pm daily.
Lee County Gun
Collectors LLC.
(239)-223-3370
BUY-SELL-TRADE
www~capecoraigunshow.com
ITALIAN SHARPS RIFLE
Vernier sight, set triggers,
45/70 $800 941223-3283
KAHR CM-40. used Great
cond. 4 mag 100 rounds
ammo. $500 (352) 322-0862
REMINGTON 1100, 12 ga.,
3" Mag, 30" F.C. Mint Cond.
$575 941-759-0013
I BICYCLES/
I TRICYCLES


WOMEN'S BIKES 2Men's
Bikes up to S50 515745-
1535
CLASSIFIED


ADULT TRICYCLE good tires
$175 770-546-2131
BICYCLE GIRLS BRATZ very
nice bike like new $20 941-
235-1910
BICYCLE MANS 26" avalon
7spd alum x2susp $100 941-
625-2779
BICYCLE NEXT Power
Climber 18 sp dual susp $50
941423-9371
BOYS 14" Mongoose like
new. 21 speed $75 941538-
6292
GIRLS BIKE 16in gc $30
941-257-8500
GIRLS BIKE 20in gc 941-257-
8500 $39
RECUMBENT EZ-1
Racer,24sp.compuler,cover, pi
x$300 319-9304219
WANTED: (1) USED BIRIA
BICYCLE 1-519-882-1536 or
941-575-0908

I PHOTOGRAPHY/
VIDEO
"^^ 6140^

CANON AE-1 CAMERA incl
macro telephoto 70- $115
941-764-8989

| POOLJSP1AA
I & SUPPLIES
LaoaaZ6145L^

HOT TUBS SWIM
SPAS FIBERGLASS
POOLS
WHOLESALE TO THE PUB-
LIC
SARASOTA FAIR
March 14th -23rd.
CALL: 941-421-0395


**SPAS&MORE**
ALWAYSS OVER
ZU IN STOCK

www.srasandmoreflorida.com
941-625-6600
AUTOMATIC POOL Cleaner
Dolphin Sprite like new $250
941-429-7914
BIOGUARD SMART Shock 10
lib bags $40 941-575-8881
HAYWARD C500 Body With
filter, 1-1/2" pipe $100 314-
609-1540
PATIO BAR Includes 4 chairs.
$1200= new. $450 979482
9853
LAWN & GARDEN
^^ 6160 ^

3FT CONQUISTADOR Heavy
cement lawn decor $75 941.
629-4973
CHAINSAW MCCCLLOCH
10-10 20" bar w/chainb $125
941-697-6592
CHAINSAW MCCULLOCH
10-10 14"bar & chain $50
941-697-6592
CHAINSAW MCCULLOCH
10-10 16" bar & chain $75
941-697-6592
CHAINSAW MCCULLOCH
10-10 16"w'chamin brake $100
941-697-6592
CHIPPER SHREDDER Crafts-
man 8 1/2 HP Ru $150 989-
365-3815
CONQUISTADOR HEAVY
cement lawn decor. $75 941-
629-4973
Cuddle up by the fire!
Firewood Spli. Bundled and
ready for the firepit!
Pine, Oak, or Citrus,
941-468-4372
GARDEN NOME joe maddon
new in the box $50 941-228-
1745
GAS WEEDWACKERS (3)
working -EA $100 714-599-
2137
KUBOTA L3430 GST, 175
hrs, 4WD with loader, 6' rotary
cutler, 7' blade, 12,000 lb
trailer. $28K New, asking
$18,500. Call Bill 941-81 20809
LADDER 12' Alum 920 720
0007 $12 920-720-0007
LAWN MOWER Club Cadet
rear drive SP 6.75 $120 941-
4850681
LAWN MOWER SELF
PROPELE. START 10H $175
941-429-8415
LAWN MOWER Toro 22in SP
6.75 hp $200 941-485-0681
LAWN MOWER TROYBILT self
prop w, bag leave message.
$175 941-493-0674


LAWNMOWERS John Deere,
zero turn, new cond. $3250
Also Troy/Built 50" excl. cond.
$2500 N. Port 317-607-8683
ULINE TRIMMER Murray 25cc
like new $60 941-485-0681
PATIO FURNITURE PVC, 4
Chairs,2 Lounges $200 941-
423-4239
PLANT BUCKETS plant buck-
ets,(large),$1 $100 941-624-
0928
RIDING LAWNMOWER 42"
craftsman riding $450 941-
255-5383
RIDING MOWER, Craftsman
ModLT1500, 42" 7 spd, 17.5
HP,, New, used 8 times. Can
Deliver $695 *SOLD in 1 Day'
RYOBI 30CC String Trimmer
needs help $20 941-575-
0690


LAWN & GARDEN
6160 ^

SCOTT'S TURF BUILDER
Deluxe Drop Spreader $35
941268-8951
SMUDGE POTS Mosquitoes
Season,smudge po $18 941-
624-0928
TOP SOIL For Sale! Please
call: 941-468-4372
TOW BEHIND thatcherizer
with Free spreader $45 941-
235-1303
| STORAGE SHEDS/
I BUILDINGS I
**^ 6165

HURRICANESHED.COM
FENCED YARD....
TIGHT SPACES...NO PROBLEM!
941-626-4957
LICENSE #CBC 1259336
BUILDING
SUPPLIES
6170~

BALL VALVES,NEW 1/2 &
3/4 ips & swt $5 314-609-
1540
BRASS CABINET pull handles
28 $21 941-496-9252
COUNTER TOP Formica light
tan marble pattern $8 941-
380-2376
CROWN MOULDING and
base moulding, 8ft lenghts $3
941-426-8353:
EXTENSION 16 ft Ladder 8
ft extends to 16ft al $70 941-
575-8229
FAUCET KITCHEN chrome
$5 941-276-1185
FEDERAL PACIFIC Breakers
Very hard to find! $20 314-
609-1540
GARBAGE DISPOSAL 1HP
works goods $15 941-380-
2376
SINK SS Double bowl $15
941-380-2376
I Classified = Sales [
VANITY SINK White 19" oval
w/pop up drain $10 941-380-
2376
WOOD BEAMS 10
8"xl2"x24' $500 863-993-
5036
TOOLS/MACHINERY

^^ 6190 ^

36" PIPE wrench Ridgid alu-
minum $85 314-609-1540
4" HEAVY Duty Vice 4 inch
Heavy Duty Vic $20 941-624-
6310
6X24 BELT sander belt
sander good sha $70 941-
539 0626
AC BLOWER Motors AC fan/
motors- $25 505-688-0781
ACETYLENE TANKS large
$200 941-6274617
AIR COMPRESSOR HUSKY,
17gal, 1.7hp 50' hose $75
315-406-5402
BESSY K CLAMPS New Con
edition 4-24" 440 $250 941-
255-3241
CHAINFALL 1000 lbs made
USA $65 941-6612547
CHAINSAW MACULLOCH
10-10 16" bar & chain $50
941-697-6592
COMPRESSOR 8GAL EL-
NDS NEW REG $20 714-599-
2137
CRAFTSMAN LEVEL 24"
HEAVYDUTY-ENGL. $10 941-
475-7577
DELTA DRILL Press Great
shape, floor standing. $225
94]1-286-5275
DRILL PRESS Sears 15in
floor model $200 941-627-
4617
DRILL/DRIVER SET crafts-
man with charger $39 941-
467-4320


ITOOLS/L MACHINERY

Zc 6190 ^

FLOOR LAMP work light 1
light works $10 908-246-
8218
GENERATORTECUMISEH Model
HM80-00 5250 watts. W/gas
cans $350 obo 941-5754364
GENERATOR, HONDA Never
used, 8000watts, 30amp. W/
cover. $1000 941-575-0607
GENERATORS (2), Honda
EX4500 & Kawasaki
GE50OOA. Electric Starts &
Very Low Hours! $2,500 ea
941-628-2270
HITACHI TABLE saw Model
C10FL. Excellen $140 941-
456-5907
LINCOLN ARC Welder no
calls past 9 pm $200 941-
627-4617
MITER SAW 10" Compound
Slide New inbox $60 941-
697-5699
MOTORCYCLE LIFT table
1000 Ib capacity motorcycle
$250 941-456-1582
PALM SANDER Loop-
hook,.8amp,1I2kRPM-new $8
443-621-7428
PIPE THREADER (Ridgid) 5
dies exc.cond. $100 941-
585-8149
RIDGID UPRIGHT handsaw
ridgid band $250 941-661-
1618
RYOB114.4V CORDLESS drill
charger,or battery bad $15
9414268353
SANDER CRAFTSMAN Dual
Motion Sander. $20 941815-
3951
SCROLL SAW delta $75
941-539-0626
SHALLOW WELL Jet Pump
Rebuilt 1/2hp $120 941.485-
0681
SHALLOW WELL MTR & PMP
HEAD WORKS $20 714-
599-2137
SHOPSMITH, Mark V Model
520. Never Used. Extras!!
$3,200. 941-628-2270
TABLE SAW, on wheels. Comn-
mer. grade,Craftsman. Less
10 hrs. $500 856404 0084
TILE/STONE SAW Wrkfrc
new used once $95 941-624-
2224
FARM EQUIPMENT
Z_^6195 ^

KUBOTA L3430 GST, 175
hrs, 4WD with loader, 6' rotary
cutter, 7' blade, 12,000 Ib
trailer. $28K New, asking
$18,500. Call Bill 941-812-0809
SOFFICEFBUISINESS
EQUIPJSUPLIES
L 6220

OFFICE OUTFITTERS
Preowred & new office furniture.
VENICE 941-485-7015
FELLOWS BINDING
MACHINE FELLOWS QUASAR
$60 941 764-9212
FILING CABINET oak, legal
size 2-drawer, g $50 941-
460-6027
FILING CABINETS 2 vertical
4 drawer, bei $135 941-460-
6027
PORTABLE TYPEWRITER.
Royal Exec. cond. Ri $25 941-
423-2585
[ RESTAURANT
SSUPPLIEES
66225~e

BLENTEC 15 smoothie
maker commercial $250 941-
375-4054
ICE CREAM maker with charg-
ers commercial $75 941-375-
4054
TABLE TOP 2 Burner Stove
Very Good Cond. IncI $50
941-421-9984


CATS
6232 _

NOTICE: Statute 585.195
states that all dogs and cats
sold in Florida must be at least
eight weeks old, have an offi-
cial health certificate and prop-
er shots, and be free of intesti-
nal and external parasites.
DOCGS
^ ^ 6233 _

NOTICE: Statute 585.195
states that all dogs and cats
sold in Florida must be at least
eight weeks old, have an offi-
cial health certificate and prop-
er shots, and be free of intesti-
nal and external parasites.
GERMAN SHEPHERDS AKC
8 Wks, Health & 1st Shots,
$450/Female or $450./Male
863-263-4060,863-263-4059


Mill I Uti V t1IEKJL UnEL V Ul
PUPPIES, AKC registered,
purebred, champion parents
health tested, hypoallergenic,
non shedding. Born 219 '14 at
home in SWFL. Available to
approved home. $2000
941-830-8690 Or email:
lyrigarkennel@grmail.com
TOY POODLE PUPPIES,
Adorable. AKC Beautiful Coats.
$1,500 ea. (239)-776-2915
YORKIES, F, Tea-cup, 9 wks,
Black & Tan, AKC, (Pt. Char-
lotte ) $600 347453-0472
IAP VERTISE; I
[i PET SUPPLIES
I & SERVICES I
6236 ^-*

PET CRATE used once 36"L
24"W $35 941-505-6990
APPL14NCES
Z^6'250 ^

CHEST FREEZER 5.Ocf $65
941-625-2779
CUISINART COFFEE On
Demand 12 cup Hew $65
719-649-1225
FRIGIDARE WHITE garage
fridge. Works great $100
941-629-0326
GE MICROWAVE Black.
Works great. $75 941-629-
0326
KENMORE WASHER $250
941-629-0806
KIRBY VACUUM 920720
0007 $100
MAYTAG REFRIGERATOR
Bisque, French Doors $450
941-626-2130
MICROWAVE BUILT IN
microwave needs glass plate
$35 941-743-6372
MICROWAVE for over the
stove. White Sha'p Carousel,
standard sz. $35 941493-1696
MICROWAVE MAYTAG
appx.29x16x15 o.t.s ex.co.
$80 941-697-1430
MICROWAVE OVEN Black.
Nearly new. $39 941 538
6292
MICROWAVE SAMSUNG 1.1
cf 1000 watts e/c white $75
941-549-1460
MICROWAVE SHARP
carousel white $50 941-391-
6788
MICROWAVE, GE White
Over stove mount, like
new $95 9412761902
OVEN ROASTER For counter.
Works great. $25 941-423-
7795
RANGE STOVE glass top con-
vection fridgedaire $275
941-629-0806
REFRIGERATOR $125 ice on
door $125 440-570-1019


The Sun Classified-Section A Page 18 E/N/C/V


ads.yoursunnet


Saturday, March 29, 2014





Saturday, March 29, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


EINIC/V The Sun Classified-Section A Page 19


APPLIANCES
L ^ 6'250 ^


REFRIGERATOR $170
330-285-0006
REFRIGERATOR GE like new,
black, side by side, water/ice
indoor. $495 260-438-8011
REFRIGERATOR WHITE 18
cubic. Call 941-257-8921
$150 941-257-8921
STOVE, GLASSTOP, cream
color, exc cond, remodeling
$150 obo. 941-889-7435.
STOVE, Kenmore White
self cleaning, glass
$100 941-276-1902
TOASTER OVEN BRAND NEW
MINI S/S $18 714-599-2137
WASHER & DRYER,
Kenmore, Front Load
$200 941-276-1902
WASHER KENMORE 800
Series, 3.2 cu ft $75 315-
406-5402
WASHER, MAYTAG Lg.
capacity, Ex.C. $150 (+con-
tents of apt.) 941-391-6926
WHIRLPOOL GOOD series
30" cooktop Like ne $350
941-764-7957


APPLIANCES
L ^ 6250 J


WASHER/DRYER Frigidaire
$150 941-456-3658
MISCELLANEOUS

L Z 6260 J

2 AFGANS Mint or Ivory
80x80 Queen size $25 941-
681-2433
A B beer steins A B
Steins, 1980,81,$165.00
$165 941-6