Charlotte sun herald

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Charlotte sun herald
Uniform Title:
Charlotte sun herald (Charlotte Harbor, Fla. : 1995)
Running title:
Sun herald
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Sun Coast Media Group
Place of Publication:
Charlotte Harbor, FL
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Charlotte Harbor (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Charlotte County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Charlotte -- Charlotte Harbor

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued on microfilm from Crest Technologies.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 103, no. 225 (Aug. 13, 1995)-
General Note:
"An edition of The Sun Herald."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 36852667
lccn - sn 97027762
ocm36852667
System ID:
AA00016616:00267

Related Items

Related Items:
DeSoto sun herald
Related Items:
Englewood sun herald
Related Items:
North Port sun herald
Preceded by:
Sun herald (Charlotte Harbor, Fla. : Charlotte ed.)


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Full Text

Doctors are told to get serious about obesity


THE WIRE
PAGE 1


Pid


harlotte Sun
HERAI

AFGHANS PLANT PROFIT CROP: 106K OBAMACARE SIGNUPS
Afghanistan's farmers are rushing to replant their fields after : Just 26794 people, actually enrolled for health
H the country's biggest poppy harvest last May. insurance during the first flawed month.


(k of the Day
Comic books, $40
In Today's
Classifieds!


VOL.121 NO.318


AMERICA'S BEST COMMUNITY DAILY


THURSDAY NOVEMBER 14, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net $1.00


PUBLISHER'S INBOX


More readers

mailbag

n a recent column, I wrote about
how the artificially low interest rates
being paid on bank savings and
bonds are punishing our seniors. Many
of you agreed. A few
did not.
"Thank you for
the article on the
front page of the
North Port Sun
Thursday, you are
right on the money
and we appreciate
that someone
David understands what
Davd is happening to
DUNN-RANKIN those of us who lived
PRESIDENT AND PUBLISHER simple and saved for
retirement hoping
that the safe way to earn a little interest
was the bank and CDs. Thanks." CR
"Your piece on Punishing Our Seniors
said it all. My first savings account paid
5 percent interest, and that was in 1947.
Just a plain old savings account. Now
I am tying up my money for a year at
1.01 percent and that is supposed to be
a special deal. Older seniors who have
saved for years, even conservatively,
should not be having to deplete those
savings just to live, and try to enjoy,
retirement. Thank you for expressing this
so well."
"My wife and I read your editorial
today titled 'Punishing our Seniors' and
wish to compliment you on a job well
done. We can't add or take anything
away from the editorial, but to say you
are spot on. Thanks." TF
"Your article this morning as the
expression goes, 'hit the nail on the
head.' Neither party has even spoken
out about the damage done to seniors
with the basically 0 interest rates for
methods of savings. They have nowhere
to invest their money safely with any
rate of return. Further, it tells the rest
of the population that saving money is
for fools. This is one of the reasons so
many seniors have had to return to work
because their well-thought-out plans
for retirement have been devastated by
gutless, greedy, follow-the-party-line
politicians. These elderly are now taking
up many jobs that younger people could
have." DE
"I want to thank you for that beautiful,
beautiful article. I am thrilled for what
you did for us seniors today." BD
"I haven't seen any article written
exactly the way his was (that describes)
so clearly what has happened to us
seniors. I hope sometime the powers
that be will do something to rectify this
situation." HG
Not everyone agreed that our elderly are
being hurt by these artificially low rates.
"You claim that the elderly are pun-
ished by the low interest rates. However,
the elderly are actually net beneficiaries
of the low interest rates ... According to
the 2012 PEW study of the middle class,
the elderly have done better than other
age groups since the recession. They are
also getting more than they paid into
Social Security and Medicare, but that is
another inconvenient truth." FV
"Where have you been? It has been over
a generation since it has made any sense
to rely on bank or CD interest. Let's at least
share some of the blame on uninformed
seniors and greedy banks." TT
There is a lot of blame to share with the
Great Recession. Our government, banks,
Wall Street speculators, ill-informed
investors. Thanks for the feedback I still
think our retired seniors seem to be the
ones paying the heaviest price.
David Dunn-Rankin is the publisher
and president of Sun Coast Media
Group. He can be emailed at daviddr@
sun-herald.com.

CORRECTION
The Goldtones singing group will perform at 7 p.m.
Friday at Burnt Store Presbyterian Church in Punta Gorda.
A column in Wednesday's Charlotte Sun stated otherwise.


Helping hands


Relief efforts underway for typhoon victims


By BRENDA BARBOSA
STAFF WRITER
Amado Jesus "Jess," as his friends
call him Cendana can't bear to watch
the images of ruin wrought by Typhoon
Haiyan on his native Philippines without
getting overwhelmed.
Though none of his relatives was
directly affected, the emotional impact of
the devastation is indelible.
Sitting in a small office in Port
Charlotte recently, where he came to
ask for the community's help in aiding
the victims of a monster typhoon that
slammed the island chain last Friday, the
67-year-old North Port man looked down
at his hands and began to weep.


"We are used to having typhoons, but
we never had anything like this before,"
he said softly. "It's so moving. It's really
horrible."
Cendana is a member of the Filipino-
American Association of Charlotte
County, a community organization
with roughly 200 members who come
together mostly during the holidays
and each year to celebrate Philippines'
Independence Day.
They have no headquarters or fancy
website to tout. They don't advertise or
do much marketing. Like many immi-
grant groups, they rely on strong familial
connections, community outreach and
word-of-mouth to network. Often when
a family is in need, members make a few


phone calls or notify their local church
groups to take up a special collection.
This time, however, things are different.
The jarring images flashing across televi-
sion screens each night since the natural
disaster, which is feared to have claimed
as many as 10,000 lives, are more than
anyone could ever fathom and more
than one group can handle alone.
Images of crying babies clinging to
their mothers, dead, bloated bodies
washing ashore, hulking cargo ships
stranded on neighborhood streets, and
miles and miles of debris blanketing
what remains of Tacloban City in Leyte
province the region hardest hit by
HELPING 110


SUN PHOTO BY BRENDA BARBOSA
Members and volunteers from the Filipino-American Association of Charlotte County and the Crossover Christian Fellowship Church in Port
Charlotte gather at Shine Physical Therapy office in Port Charlotte to set up of donation boxes for victims of Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines.


Sarasota seeks source


of Lamarque stench


By DREW WINCHESTER
STAFF WRITER

NORTH PORT Sarasota County
School District officials insist that
ongoing health concerns at Lamarque
Elementary School are not tied to
poisonous or defective drywall, and now
are looking for other reasons for what
they describe as "allergy-like symptoms"
being experienced by staff and students.


District superintendent Lori White
said during a Wednesday afternoon
press conference that a toxicology expert
from the University of South Florida
is being brought in to investigate the
possible sources of the problem.
White said very directly there is no
"health issue" at Lamarque Elementary,
and she is certain that Chinese drywall
is not to blame for ongoing symptoms
STENCH 110


Englewood chamber


names new director


By STEVE REILLY
STAFF WRITER
ENGLEWOOD Deborah Beck is
ready to be the new executive director
of the Englewood Area
Chamber of Commerce.
Her first day was
Tuesday.
Born in Sarasota and
proud to describe herself
as a "Florida cracker,"
Beck said what she likes
BECK about Englewood is that


the community retains its old Florida
feel and is home to so many "mom-
and-pop businesses."
Englewood reminds her of Sarasota
when she was a girl.
Her father served in the Marines
and her childhood was spent wher-
ever her father served, but she thinks
of Sarasota as home. Her parents and
other relatives live in Sarasota.
"I remember Proctor Road when
it was all orange groves and when
DIRECTOR 110


Charlotte

schools OK

deal for dual

enrollment
By IAN ROSS
STAFF WRITER
MURDOCK-The Charlotte County
School Board approved agreements
with local colleges Tuesday that, for
the first time, require the district to
pay tuition for students to take college
classes.
The change is the result of a new
law mandating that school districts
pay colleges for dual-enrollment
courses on college campuses. Districts
will not have to pay for dual-enroll-
ment classes on high school campus-
es. The new costs are incurred entirely
by the districts, and students will
not have to pay for dual-enrollment
courses.
"It's an issue statewide because of
the actual cost to the school districts,
and there are some school districts
that are significantly cutting back on
their dual-enrollment courses," said
School Board member Lee Swift.
But, for now, school officials say it's
still business as usual.
Charlotte County school
DEAL 110


INDEX I THE SUN: Police Beat 41 Obituaries 51 Legals 6-71 Viewpoint 81 Opinion 91 THE WIRE: Nation 2-3 Business 5-61 State 7 IWorld 8 Weather 81 SPORTS: Lotto 2CLASSIFIED: Comics 9-121 Dear Abby 12 TV Listings 13
Daily Edition $1.00: F- :h"-6w -Look insidefor valuable coupons "-- --'.j: CHARLIE SAYSV
i*~~~~~~~11110 CHnUjj^ l i, -^ ^r^ rARLIE SAYS ...
11111111111111111111111111gII Low This year's savings to date... ,: CAL U1 AT '
Dlyitii o $1 0 7 : SUNCOUPON i: CALL US AT sBrr, it's cold in here! There
111111111 VALUE METER Ol1 U ,1 941-206-1000 must be some gators in the
7 05252 00025 8 Breezy with more clouds than sun. Wii. .... --..... atmosphere!






Our Town Page 2 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Thursday, November 14, 2013


I CHARLOTTE EVENTS


*GOVERNMENT

* TODAY
Agricultural and, Natural
Resources Advisory Committee
meeting,9 a.m., 18500 Murdock Circle,
Bldg. B, Room 207, PC. 623-1094.
Marine Advisory, Committee
meeting, 9:30 a.m., 18500 Murdock
Circle, Room 119, PC. 764-4909.
MPO Transportation,
Disadvantaged Local Coordinating
Board meeting, 10a.m., 25550
Harborview Road, PC. 883-3535

* EVENTS

* TODAY
American Legion 103,
Cafe opened for B'fast/ Lunch Thu-Sun
7a-2p Public invited. Help us support
our Vets! 2101 Taylor Rd PG 639-6337
Project Linus, Quilt blankets
for kids every Thur 9-11am Hucky's
Softball Training, Inc 17426 Abbott
Ave Pt, Charlotte Nancy 627-4364
Sierra Club Paddle, Sierra
Club Paddle Lettuce Lake 11/14/13
9-3, led by master naturalist. Rsrv.
req. 941-637-8805


Garden Club, Port
Charlotte Garden Club "tablescapes"
9:30 am-12:00 pm, 2565 Tamiami
Trail. All Welcome. 235-1224
Deep Creek Elks 2763,
Lunch With Kathy 11-2:30, Investigation/
Orientation @ 6:30, FLOE Meefing @ 7pm
Port Charlotte Elks,11 9,
20225 Kenilworth Blvd, 625-7571, bingo
11-1,Lunch11-2, Dinner 4-8\Full Menu,
Fried Chicken Dinner, Mahjong @1
PG/PC AAUW meeting,
Gen. mtg.11 am 2 pm. Charlotte
Harbor Yacht Club. Speaker Cathy
Graham. Optional Lunch. 639-4958.
Punta Gorda Elks, Lunch
11-2,Dinner5-8,Bingo 6:30-8:30, mmbrs
& their gstsC.B.O.D. Meeting 5:30 mmbrs
only@25538 Shore Dr PG 637-2606
Mahjong, Cultural Center
2280 Aaron St. 11:30a-3:30p $2.
Cultural Center MembersPLUS free.
Everyone Welcomed 625-4175
Warm Water Exercise,
Aquatic fitness classes, 3280 Tamiami
Trail,STE11;12,1 &2pm;Tue&Thur;
$3/class, pay by month; info 575-2034
Chess Club, Cultural Center
2280 Aaron St.1 p-4p$1.50.SOcultural
Center MembersPLUS free. Everyone
Welcomed 625-4175


I NORTH PORT EVENTS


*GOVERNMENT

* TODAY
Public Utility, Advisory
Board meeting, 9:30am, North Port
City Hall, Room 244, 4970 City Hall
Blvd., off Sumter Blvd. 429-7000
Council of Govts, meeting,
11:30am, Sarasota County School
District office,1980 Landings Blvd.,
ConfRms A&B, Sarasota. 927-9000
Charter Review, Advisory
Board meeting, 6pm, North Port City
Hall, Room 244,4970 City Hall Blvd.,
off Sumter Blvd. 429-7000

* EVENTS

* TODAY
Crafty Ladies, Handcrafted
items every Thursday 9-11:30am
(except holidays). Oaks Cove, Gulf
Cove UMC, 1100 McCall, PC. 697-5533
Jazzercise, 9-10 Oam at the
Morgan Family Community Center, call
941-429-7275 for more information.
Table tennis, 9-11am, North Port
senior center, 4940 Pan American Blvd.,
equipment provided, $2.00,426-6276.
Turbo Kick, 9:30-10;30am at the
Morgan Family Community Center, call
941-429-7275 for more information.
Current Events/Conve,
10-11:30am NP Senior Center 4940
Pan American Blvd 426-2204 Bring a
topic/joke join in the discussion


Home Delivery Rates:
Newspaper designated market:
City Zone- Carrier home
delivered 7 days.

Rates as follows
plus 7% Florida Sales Tax:
Monthly Bank/
CreditCard......................... $16.47
3 Months............................ $66.51
6 Months.......................... $113.05
1 Year ............................... $197.69
Does not include Waterline and TVTimes.
Above rates do not include sales tax.
Subscribers residing in outlying
areas may incur additional
delivery charge.

DESOTO COUNTY RATES
Monthly Bank/
Credit Card ....................... $16.40
3 Months.......................... $74.09
6 Months ....................... $119.54
1 Year............................. $196.70
Arcadian home delivery
$29.99 per year.

Mail subscription rates: Rates
as follows (advance payment
required):
7 Days
3 Months 6 Months 1Year
$120.88 $216.81 $386.10
Sunday Only
3 Months 6 Months 1 Year
$58.81 $110.56 $186.19
Single Copy rates
Daily $1.00 Sunday $2.00
Unclaimed account balances
under $10, inactive for 15
months, will be used to purchase
newspapers for classroom use.

CUSTOMER SERVICE POLICY
HOURS: 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-
Friday; Saturday and Sunday 7 a.m.
to noon. To subscribe or to report
any problems with your service,
please call orvisityour local office.

Englewood: 941-681-3000
120W. Dearborn St
Charlotte: 941-206-1300
23170 Harborview Rd.,
Port Charlotte
North Port: 941-429-3000
13487 Tamiami Trail, North Port
DeSoto: 863-494-0300
or toll-free at 877-818-6204
108 S. Polk Avenue, Arcadia


Current Events Convo,
10 AM, North Port Library, 941-861-
1307, Bring a news article and/or
joke you would like to share.
Medicare Enrollment,
10,North Port Library, 941-861-1307,
Chance to review & change your health
or drug plan. Call for info 866-413-5337.
North Port Moose, Meat
Bingo 7:30. Great fun, Member/Qualified
Guest 14156Tamiami 426-2126
Bingo mania, 11 -1,20225
Kenilworth Blvd, PC Elks, bingo
mania to benefit the Homeless
Coalition, Special Games and prizes
Zumba Gold, 11-11:45am at
the Morgan Family Community Center,
call 941-429-7275 for more information.
Mexican Dominos,
12-3pm NP Senior Center 4940 Pan
American Blvd 426-2204 Come learn
the game &join all the fun
Mixed Media Art, Mixed
Media Art Clas 1-4pm at the Morgan
Family Community Center, call
941-429-7275 for more information.
Movie Quartet, 1-3pm
NP Senior Center 4940 Pan American
Blvd 426-2204 Maggie Smith stars as
a resident in home for retired singers
AMVETS 2000 Dinner,
LAUX Taco Bowl Salad 4-7pm $6.
Members & guests welcome QOH @7pm
401 Ortiz Blvd NP 941-429-1999.
Brunch VFW Post 8203,
Bingo is fun for all ages, come and enjoy
excitement of the game. Come try your


I eVeII.

TODAY

Ewd Country Liners, 9:30-
11:30AM, Christ Lutheran Church,
701 N Indiana Ave. Begin/intermed.
line dances. Public welcome. Nancy
474-6027
Plant Clinic,10-Noon, Gota
plant/tree problem? Bring in a sample
to be identified @ New Englewood
Library, 3450 S McCall 475-6903
Bingo mania, 11 1,20225
Kenilworth Blvd, PC Elks, bingo
mania to benefit the Homeless
Coalition, Special Games and prizes
Story Time, Thursdays 11 am
Stories, movement & playtime for
children of all ages. Elsie Quirk Library,
100 W Dearborn St 861-5000
RWWomans Club
Meets, 11:30 AM, Amer Legion
#113,3436 Indiana Rd,Rotonda.
lunch $9.00 Call 828-7481
Englewood Bridge Cl,
Contract bridge is played everyThu &
Mon from 12:15 til 3:30 at The Hills Rest
RGCC, 100 Rotonda Cir, 698-7945, $2.
Entertainment, Baby Back
Ribs 5-7 p.m.! Music by Dave Grahn,


Walk N Dine Singles, 50+
Singles meet 5:25 at Gazebo in Laishley
Park@ 100 Nesbit St. Walk or Ride to
local Restaurant. 704-402-7444
Pinochle, Cultural Center 2280
Aaron St. 5:30p-8:30p $2 Cultural
Center MembersPLUS free 625-4175
All Welcome
Sons Of Italy-Dinner,
Pasta, Meatballs, Salad, Brd/Btr, Dessert,
Bev/Cofe, 6pm.$7.5OMbrs,$8.5OGsts,-
karaoke aft Din,7325Easy St.
ResvReq.941-764-9003
Kiwanis Dart Tourny,
Kiwanis Dart Tournament on
November 14 beginning at 6:45 pm;
Ice House Pub in Punta Gorda. Call
941-769-0864 for info.

* FRIDAY
Craft Fair@Emrald Lk, Craft
Fair & Bake Sale at Emerald Lake, 24300



luck,you mite even WIN a game or two
Meditation Class, 6-7:30pm
at the Morgan Family Community Center,
call 941-429-7275 for more information.
Zumba, 6:30-7:30pm at the
Morgan Family Community Center, call
941-429-7275 for more information.
Horse Racing @VFW,
Saturday 7pm- Opm Come join the fun &
experience the races. Don't miss out snacks
Charity Men's Auxiliary VFW Post 8203

* FRIDAY
Basic Exercise, $30/8 wks
9-10 Oam North Port Senior Center
4940 Pan American Blvd 426-2204
Join and start feeling better
North Port Moose, Dan &
Sunny Karaoke 7-11. Member/Qualified,
Guest 14156 Tamiami 426-2126
BP & Sugar Screening,
9:30-10:30am NP Senior Center 4940
Pan American Blvd 426-2204 Done
by a RN Have yours checked
Pierogies, Take-Out, Pierogies/
Kielbasa, Every Fri.10am-6pm Sat.
10am-1pm. St. Andrew Ukr. Ctr.
4100 S. Biscayne Blvd. North Port.
941-786-5256
Tai Chi, 10:30am-12pm NP
Senior Center 4940 Pan American
Blvd Cost ask Jerry 496-4932 Helps
with balance/makes you feel better
Bingo mania, 11-1,20225
Kenilworth Blvd, PC Elks, bingo
mania to benefit the Homeless
Coalition, Special Games and prizes


5-8 p.m. V.F.W. 550 N. McCall Rd.
Englewood, Public Welcome!

* FRIDAY
Annual Craft Bazaar,
9-2 pm Lemon Bay Woman's Club 51
N. Maple St E'wood 474-9762. Holiday
and other crafts, raffle, lunch and bake
sale.
Bingo mania, 11-1,20225
Kenilworth Blvd, PC Elks, bingo
mania to benefit the Homeless
Coalition, Special Games and prizes
Port Charlotte Elks, 11 9,
20225 Kenilworth Blvd, 625-7571,
Lunch 11-2, Dinner 4-8, Full Menu,
AYCE Fish, Music by Mark McKinley
5-7, Karaoke 7-10
Blue Medicare 2014,
2:00-3:00pm IHOP Venice, Losing
your doctor? Learn 2014 FL BCBS
Medicare benefits. 941-223-5592
RSVP


The Sun revised the calendar events we publish in
the paper and display online. All events must be entered
by the person submitting them through our website.
It's easy. Go to www.yoursun.com, select an edition and
click on the "Community Calendar"link on the left. Click
"Submit Event"and fill out the appropriate information.
The"Print edition text"area of the form is for
information intended for the print edition of the
paper. Information outside of the "Print edition text"
area will appear online only. Please don't repeat the
"Event Title;' as thatwill be included automatically.
We will print a maximum of four lines per event (the
Event Title plus 120 additional characters, to be included
in the "Print edition text"field, up to three lines deep)
at no cost to the event submitter. Your contact number
must be included in these 120 characters.
You may, however, purchase additional space for $10
per day, per event, per community edition. Simply choose
"Paid Listing"on the Submit Event page. All paid listings
will run in the location designated for the event type.


Airport Rd. in PG on Saturday, 11/16 from
9-2. Come and bring a friend!
American Legion 103,
Cafe opened for B'fast/ Lunch
Thu-Sun 7a-2p Public invited. Help us
support our Vets! 2101 Taylor Rd PG
639-6337
Fitness'n' Fun, Exercise to
contemporary Christian music; 11330
Brnt Str Rd, PG; 9am; Mon, Wed &
Fri; $35 for 10 classes; info 575-2034
Help our teens, Avoid
substance abuse w/Drug Free Charlotte
County, 9 to 6, Charlotte State Bank &
Trust, 1100 Tamiami Trail. 624-5400
Fiber Arts Meeting, Join
fellow fiber artists for meeting, lecture,
demos and swap. 10:30am at PC
Library, 2280 Aaron St. Info at 764-5559
BINGO, 2280 Aaron St. Game
Packs start at $12. Over 25 games
with payouts up to $250.



Lunch VFW Post 8203,
Lunch 11 -2 every day except Tues, Sat,
Sun, Take out& Public welcome sit enjoy
Enjoy great food & special in canteen
Port Charlotte Elks, 11 9,
20225 Kenilworth Blvd,625-7571, Lunch
11-2, Dinner 4-8, Full Menu, AYCE Fish,
Music by Mark McKinley 5-7, Karaoke 7-10
Blue Medicare 2014,
2:00-3:00pm IHOP Venice, Losing your
doctor? Learn 2014 FL BCBS Medicare
benefits. 941-223-5592 RSVP
Fish Fry Post 8203, Come
and enjoy the best Fish Fry in town,
your choice of Bake, Fried or Chicken
and all the fixings
Fish and Queen Game,
Weekly fish fry and Queen of hearts,
7:00 draw. ?'s 941-423-7311
Jazzercise, 6:30-7;30pm at the
Morgan Family Community Center, call
941-429-7275 for more information.
A Night At The Races,
Saturday 7pm-10pm Come join the fun &
experience the races. Don't miss out snacks
Charity Men's Auxiliary VFW Post 8203

* SATURDAY
Pancakes and More!,
Drinks; egg & sausage/biscuits
& gravy/or quiche & fruit; $5/$3
kids. Englewood UM Church, 700 E.
Dearborn, 474-5588
Christmas bazaar, and
Yard Sale Nov 16 8:00 am -1:00 pm.
4200 S. Biscayne Blvd, North Port.
Call 426-2520


Chef Lori's Seafood,
VFW10476 Chef Lori's broiled or fried
haddock, shrimp, scallops, burger
3725 Cape Haze Dr Rotonda 697-1123
$7+ 4:30-8pm
VFW Seafood Night,
VFW 10476 3725 Cape Haze Dr 5-8
Fresh haddock shrimp or scallops-fried
broiled or blackened 697-1123

* SATURDAY
Pancakes and More!,
Drinks; egg & sausage/biscuits & gravy/
or quiche & fruit, $5/$3 kids. Englewood
UM Church, 700 E. Dearborn, 474-5588
$5 Post Breakfast, Great
B-fast/smoke free Post, 3436
Indiana Rd.,697-3616,8-12:30 PM.
Annual Craft Bazaar,
9-1pm Lemon Bay Woman's Club
51 N. Maple St E'wood 474-9762.
Holiday and other crafts, raffle, lunch
and bake sale.


If you do not have the ability to enter your events via our
website, we can type them in on your behalf at the rate of
$5 per event, per community edition, but this fee does not
guarantee your event will make the printed version. Please
call 941-206-1180 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. weekdays to make a
payment or to have us enter your event.
The Sun reserves the right to exclude any submitted
event that does not meet our specifications or that
requires excessive editing. There is no expressed or
implied guarantee that any free listing will be included
in any event calendar or run in any specific location.
This is on a first-come, first-served basis. Be sure to
review the "Important Tips"on the Submit Event page
to help ensure you get the most information in without
exceeding the line limit.
Remember to save the confirmation email you receive
after submitting each event. If you made an error or
the event gets canceled, simply click on the "Withdraw
submission"noted at the bottom of that email, follow the
provided instruction and then resubmit the event.


PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Featured Event
Humanist Club of Charlotte County, Humanist Club of
Charlotte County monthly meeting Sat., Nov. 16,11 AM. Lunch and speaker,
Donna Kramm, FL president of Hemlock Society, to discuss end-of-life issues.
Open to public. Kings Gate Country Club, 24000 Rampart Blvd., PC. Contact:
Herb Levin, 941-286-7939, or engspl@gmail.com.


By BRENDA BARBOSA
STAFF WRITER
Chris Evans, son of
local entrepreneur Ron
Evans, founder and
president of Smuggler's
Enterprises one of
the largest employers in
Charlotte County has
been the public face
of his father's bar and
restaurant empire for
more than a
decade.
This week,
32-year-
old Chris
announced
he is leaving
the family
C. EVANS business to
pursue other
opportunities.
"I think I'm going to take
a break from the food and
beverage industry and
see what's out there," he
told the Sun in a phone
interview. "It's time for
me to pursue other career
paths."
In an email statement,
Ron and Smuggler's part-
ners Bruce Laishley, Rick
Treworgy and John Hall
said they appreciated the
younger Evans' contribu-
tions and wished him well.
"Smuggler's Enterprises
... partners appreciate the
contributions of Chris
Evans over the past
12 years," the statement
read. "His father, Ron
Evans ... said that he hates
to see his son leave the
company; however he
loves him and supports his
decision to move forward
with his own initiatives."
Although it's not clear
who if anyone will
replace Chris, Smuggler's
"is poised to utilize its
core management to have
a more hands-on control
of the operations of their
individual restaurants,"
according to the state-
ment. Currently, there
are six restaurants under
the Smuggler's umbrella,
including the Captain's
Table, Harpoon Harry's,
John Hall's Goal Post Grill,
the Laishley Crab House
and Crab House Sushi
and the Muscle Car City
Diner.


A graduate of Charlotte
High School, Chris
started in the family
restaurant business
some 12 years ago after
a short, yet cold stint in
Minneapolis running a
manufacturing company.
"I don't know if you've
been to Minneapolis," he
said. "But if you're from
Florida, it's definitely a
different experience -
22 below zero."
After two winters, Chris
moved back to Charlotte
County, where he began
working for his father
overseeing multiple
Smuggler's operations.
"It was my life," he said.
"We took the company
from a $4 million com-
pany to $13.5 million and
300 employees."
Chris was instrumental
in expanding the compa-
ny's portfolio to include
an events company, a
charitable foundation
and the popular Laishley
Crab House in Punta
Gorda.
Although he plans to
continue to live in Punta
Gorda, Chris said he is
exploring work opportu-
nities in Lee and Sarasota
counties.
"Charlotte County is
a tough place to earn a
living," he said, pointing
to the county's heavy eco-
nomic reliance on hous-
ing and construction, and
the area's seasonality. "I'm
having conversations with
people in Lee (county)
and Sarasota, but it has to
be a win-win. It's got to be
a fit for them and a fit for
me, where I can maximize
my potential."
For now, though, Chris
said he plans to spend
more time with his
8-year-old daughter and
continue his involvement
in the community.
"Charlotte County has
been my home for a long
time, and, certainly, I have
the relationships here," he
said. "I plan on staying.
My daughter will keep
me here, but I'm certainly
exploring anything that
comes to the table."
Email: bbarbosa@sun-herald.com


Land yachts ready to line up

On Sunday from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m., the Veteran Motor Car
Club of America will display antique vehicles during the
Isles Yacht Club Open House and Car Show located at 1780
W. Marion Ave., Punta Gorda. The public is invited to tour
the clubhouse facility and meet members, plus vote for
their favorite vintage auto. Tasty complimentary refresh-
ements for those interested in learning about joining
the Yacht Club. Pictured here, left, with his 1929 Ford is
Jerry Riseley; Peter Fischer, membership chairman; Don
Royston, president VMCCA, SW Florida Region, center; Lois
and Bob Mang, club members; and Clyde Goodall, owner
of the 1942 Buick Century.



SUN NEWSPAPERS
--_ Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulation
Chairman ..................................Derek Dunn-Rankin.....................941-206-1001
Publisher...................................David Dunn-Rankin.....................941-206-1003
Executive Editor ........................ Chris Porter ................................. 941-206-1134
Advertising Director.................. Leslee Peth.................................. 941-206-1262
Circulation Director ................... MarkYero.................................... 941-206-1300
Arcadian Editor.........................Susan E. Hoffman........................863-494-0300
DeSoto General Manager..........Joe Gallimore ..............................863-494-0300
Charlotte Sun Editor..................Rusty Pray...................................941-206-1168
North Port Sun Publisher ..........Steve Sachkar..............................941-429-3001
North Port Sun Editor................Lorraine Schneeberger................941-429-3003
Englewood Sun Publisher .........Carol Y. Moore .............................941-681-3031
Englewood Sun Editor...............Clinton Burton ............................ 941-681-3000


The SUN (USPS743170) is published daily at Sun Coast Media Group, Inc., 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980-2100. Periodicals postage paid at Punta Gorda, FL Postmaster: Please send address changes to the SUN, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, Florida 33980-2100.


Evans steps


down


at Smuggler's


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decorated lighted trees, gift & everyday crafted items. Baked goods. Lunch.
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PHOTO PROVIDED BY LEE ROYSTON


- Notice to Calendar Event Submitters -


OurTown Page 2 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, November 14, 2013











Newcomers learn about North Port


SUN PHOTO BY
DALLAS EMRICH

From left, June
West, Susan
Aaron and Lorin
West represented
the North Port
Symphony during
the recent North
Port Newcomer
Day at the North
Port Library.


Mary Williamson, a longtime member of Trinity United Methodist Church
on Wesley Lane in North Port, speaks to a guest during Newcomer Day. The
free event, held several times during the year, is sponsored by the city, the
North Port Area Chamber of Commerce and the library.


SUN PHOTO BY DALLAS EMRICH
Mike Saxton, of New Hope Church, explains to a Newcomer
Day participant how the North Port church is planning a free
Thanksgiving dinner for the community. There is still a need
for drivers to deliver food to the homebound, servers and
other volunteers. Call 941-276-5770 or email Saxton at mikes@
newhopeofnorthport.org for more info.


SUN PHOTO BY DALLAS EMRICH


The Friends of the Library table was popular at the event, which
introduces both new and longtime North Port residents to
clubs, nonprofits, businesses and other groups in the city. The
Friends group donates time, talent and money to the North
Port Library for nonbudgeted items.


SUN PHOTO BY DALLAS EMRICH
Amy Lynch, a Sarasota Memorial Hospital physicians liason, tells
Sherri Smith from the Sarasota County Tax Collector's Office
about a new doctor in North Port, Janet Lewis. Her Internal
Medicine and Pediatrics office is located at 2345 Bobcat Village
Center Road, Suite 202 (off Toledo Blade Boulevard), where she
joined family medicine physician, Elizabeth Cefalu.


I FINANCING AVAILALmI NO PANTS FOR 9 0 DAYS SAV IG ANNIVSAY SPECIALS ON ALL INVNTOY


SUN PHOTO BY DALLAS EMRICH


PHOTO PROVIDED BY BILL NURSE
Bill Nurse, Hank Chiminiello and John Kromish represent the
North Port Lions Club at Newcomer Day.


:The Sun /Thursday, November 14,2013


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 3


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS










Report: Homeless trio arrested after fighting in woods


MURDOCK -Two
men and a woman
were arrested Tuesday
for allegedly fighting in
homeless camps near
Murdock Circle.
Carleen Rose Tom, 34;
Brian Edward Haack,
48; and Matthew Owen
Keener, 43; were each
arrested and charged
with battery, according
to the Charlotte County
Sheriff's Office. Tom
also was charged with
resisting an officer.
According to the
report, Haack, who was
staying at a homeless
camp in the woods near
Luscar Avenue, told Tom
she should move to his


I POLICE BEAT
The information for Police Beat is gathered from police, sheriff's office, Florida High way
Patrol, jail and fire records. Not every arrest leads to a conviction and guilt or innocence is
determined by the court system.


site and leave the site she
shares with Keener, her
ex-boyfriend, located in
the woods near Hineline
Avenue.
Tom and Haack alleged-
ly got into a heated argu-
ment about it just before
10 p.m., and a witness told
authorities Tom struck
Haack multiple times in
the head and face.
Tom and Haack shortly
thereafter went to the
Hineline site to retrieve
Tom's belongings, and
a fight allegedly broke
out between Haack and
Keener.
All three were being
held Wednesday at the
Charlotte County Jail
without bond.

Man charged
with attacking
younger brother
NORTH PORT- A
19-year-old man


knocked over a stack of
his older brother's tires
Tuesday afternoon and
was pummeled with
punches and kicks to the
head from his older sib-
ling as a result, according
to the North Port Police
Department.
William Albert
Neathawk Jr., 24, of
the 1300 block of S.
Chamberlain Blvd., was
charged with battery in
the alleged attack on his
younger brother around
3 p.m., a police report
states, after discover-
ing his tires had been
knocked over.
The elder brother
punched the victim in
the back and the left
eye repeatedly, which
knocked the victim to the
ground. Then Neathawk
kicked his brother in the
same eye and their father
was eventually able to
pull Neathawk off the
victim, the report states.
Neathawk was arrested
and transported to the
Sarasota County Jail,
where he was held on
$500 bond. The victim
suffered injuries to his
eye and scrapes to his
knees from falling on
the ground, the report
shows.

Man dies
following
scooter accident
NORTH PORT Police
reported Wednesday
that a 71-year-old North


Port man died following
a Friday scooter crash,
during which he suffered
a torn spleen.
According to a North
Port Police report, Russell
Blaine Slocum crashed
his 2005 Herh Motor
scooter on Nora Lane at
Salmista Terrace around
11:50 a.m. He was given a
ride home and went to a
local hospital on his own
to be checked for inju-
ries. He was released and
returned to the hospital
on Saturday after feeling
sick, the report states.
He was rushed into
surgery for a torn spleen,
the report states, and
died after coming out
of surgery. The crash
was not reported to
police until late Sunday,
after Slocum had died,
the report states. The
incident is still under
investigation.

Suspected
squatter busted
PORT CHARLOTTE
- A woman has been
arrested after she was
found living in a house
where the water had
been shut off at least
three times, according
to the Charlotte County
Sheriff's Office.
Teresa Jones, 27, was
apprehended Wednesday
at the home on the
21000 block of Randall
Avenue and charged with
trespassing and theft of
utilities.
Deputies responded to
the home for a suspi-
cious person complaint
in July. Charlotte County
Utilities had shut off the
water, but it was back


on a month later. In
September, the house's
water meter had alleged-
ly been tampered with
again.
Jones was found to be
still living in the home in
late October. She main-
tained she was renting
the home, according to a
report.
Detectives contact-
ed the homeowner
Wednesday. She said she
never rented the place.
Jones was being
held Wednesday at the
Charlotte County Jail on
$1,500 bond.

The Charlotte County Sheriff's
Office reported the following
arrests:
James Hunter Santo, 24, 200
block of Washington Ave., Sarasota.
Charges: three out-of-county
warrants. Bond: none.
Scott Joseph Godsey, 49, 2000
block of Taylor Road, Punta Gorda.
Charge: violation of probation
(original charge: battery). Bond:
none.
Jeffery Scott Belcher, 52, 23300
block of Robin Drive, Port Charlotte.
Charge: failure to appear. Bond:
none.
Aubri Lavar Jernigan, 26, 22100
block of Coulton Ave., Port Charlotte.
Charge: failure to appear. Bond:
none.
Christine Mary Woodard, 51,100
block of Dunn Drive, Port Charlotte.
Charge: failure to appear. Bond:
$4,000.
Francisque Paulemon, 62, 3400
block of Melissa Court, Port Charlotte.
Charge: failure to appear. Bond:
$4,000.
Colette Marie Harrelson, 56,
13200 block of Windcrest Drive,
Port Charlotte. Charges: two counts
of violation of probation (original
charges: possession of less than 20
grams of marijuana and possession of
drug paraphernalia). Bond: none.


Joshua James McCurdy, 22,
12000 block of Alumna Ave., Port
Charlotte. Charges: two out-of-
county warrants. Bond: none.
Mark Angelo Mugavero, 53, of
Pinellas Park, Fla. Charge: driving
with a suspended license for failure
to pay child support. Bond: $500.
William Jean, 36, of Lehigh
Acres. Charges: soliciting business
from a motor vehicle accident,
patient brokering and attempting to
solicit or conspire. Bond: none.

The North Port Police
Department reported the
following arrest:
Bryan Allan Major, 40, 5300
block of Malamin Road, North
Port. Charge: violation of probation
(original charge: reckless driving).
Bond:none.

The Sarasota County Sheriff's
Office reported the following
arrests:
Jessica Rost, 40, Bradenton, Fla.
Charge: possession of marijuana.
Bond:$500.
Kimberly Nicole Gardner, 28,
1300 block of Neopolitan Drive,
Punta Gorda. Charge: contempt
(original charge: petty theft-second
conviction). Bond: none.
Nathan J. Ndege, 30, 300 block
of Shore Road, Nokomis. Charge:
grand theft. Bond: $2,000.
Jason T. Phillips, 37,100 block of
W. Colonial Lane, Nokomis. Charges:
driving with a suspended license-
third offense, attached license plate
not assigned and failure to register a
motor vehicle. Bond: $1,740.
Ryan William Montalbano,
20, 3000 block of Polka St., North
Port. Charge: violation of probation
(original charges: resisting arrest
with violence and fleeing). Bond:
none.
Timothy Michael Gregory, 36,
700 block of Francis St., Nokomis.
Charge: grand theft of a vehicle.
Bond: $1,500.
SCompiled byAdam Kreger and
Drew Winchester


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Take a hike
The Charlotte Harbor
Environmental Center
will resume interpretive
guided hikes at 10 a.m.
Monday at its Alligator
Creek Environmental
Center, 10941 Burnt Store
Road, Punta Gorda. Hikes
also are scheduled for
10 a.m. daily, Tuesday
through Nov. 22, and
Nov. 26, 27 and 29.
Hikers will meet at the
"Hikes Start Here" sign


in the parking lot. Hikes
are easy-to-moderate,
and last about two hours.
Participants should
wear close-toed shoes or
hiking boots, and a hat,
and should bring sun-
screen. For comfort and
enjoyment, you may want
to bring a walking stick, a
camera, binoculars, water
and bug spray. For more
information, call 941-575-
5435, or email eileen@
checflorida.org.

Women's Club
benefit fashion
show
The North Port Area
Women's Club will have a
Fashion Show/Tea from
1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday
at St. James Episcopal
Church, 1365Viscaya
Drive, Port Charlotte, to
benefit the group's schol-
arship fund. Fashions will


be provided by Bon Worth.
There will also be food and
raffles. Tickets are $15 per
person, and walk-ins are
welcome. For more infor-
mation, call 941-276-4885.

Wading trips
gear up
The Charlotte Harbor
Environmental Center
will conduct free Seagrass
Adventure EstuaryWading
Trips at Cedar Point
Environmental Park, 2300
Placida Road, Englewood.
The trips are set for 9 a.m.
the following dates: today
and Nov. 26; and Dec. 11,26
and 31. After an introduc-
tory program about aquatic
environments, participants
will walk a short distance
to Lemon Bay where, using
dip nets and hand viewers,
they will wade into the
shallow waters in search of
the plants and animals that


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Serving all of Charlotte County.


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reside there. This hands-on
activity is both educational
and fun for people of all
ages.
Participation is limited,
therefore preregistration
is necessary for this free
program. All children must
be accompanied by an
adult. For more informa-
tion and to register, call
941-475-0769. Visit www.
ChecFlorida.org for addi-
tional wading trip dates in
2014. Seagrass Adventures
are made available with
funding support from
the Mosaic Company
Foundation, in cooperation
with Charlotte County
Parks, Recreation and
Cultural Resources, and are
conducted by CHEC.

Current Events
Conversation
A "Current Events/
Cultural Commingle
Conversation Group"
meets from 10 a.m. to
noon Thursdays in the
North Port Library Juliano
Room, 13800 S. Tamiami
Trail.
On the first, second
and third Thursdays of
the month, bring a news
article you would like
to discuss, or just come
catch up with what's going
on in the world, in a fun
setting. On the fourth
Thursday, come share
what you're reading, a
film or PBS show you're
enthused about, or a re-
cent trip you've taken. The
group always ends with a
joke, so you can bring one
of those too. Moderated
by Pat Petersmark. Open
to all. For more informa-
tion, call 941-423-0598.

Wings, Wheels
and Keels
The Wings, Wheels
and Keels scale model
club meets at 7 p.m.
the second and fourth
Tuesday of each month
at the Englewood Art
Center, 350 S. McCall
Road. All ages and skill
levels are welcome. For
more information, call
941-475-9679.


:OurTown Page4 E/N/C


www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, November 14, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS





The Sun /Thursday, November 14,2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 5


She never shirked her duty:




Women soldiers in the Civil War


By AL HEMINGWAY
SUN CORRESPONDENT

Albert Cashier did not
look like your typical
soldier.
The smallest member
of the 95th Illinois
Infantry, he nonetheless
successfully participat-
ed in all the arduous
marches, was a skilled
marksman, and fought at
Vicksburg, Miss.; Mobile,
Ala.; plus 40 other
skirmishes during the
CivilWar.
"He kept up on
the hardest marches,
skillfully handled a rifle
and never shirked duty,"
said one of Cashier's
comrades.
When the war
ended, Cashier got
out and finally settled
in Saunemin, Ill. But
he kept a dark secret
until his death in 1915 -
Albert Cashier was really
Jennie Hodgers, who
had cut her hair, donned
men's clothing and
enlisted in the Union
Army.
On Friday, the
Charlotte County
Historical Center held a


Veterans Day program,
Petticoat Soldiers, to
remember those women
who broke the gender
barrier and fought along-
side men during the Civil
War. The event is part of
the ongoing "History is
her story, too" series.
"There is quite a bit of
documentation proving
that women did join
both the Union and
Confederate armies,"
Jackie Brown, histor-
ical coordinator for
the Charlotte County
Historical Center, said.
"It includes letters,
diaries, journals, and
newspaper reports of
their activities."
Records show that
about 400 women served
in a combat role during
the conflict. Of that num-
ber, an estimated 80 were
killed. Two females were
known to have fought
at Gettysburg on the
Confederate side. They
served in the Alabama
Brigade that charged
Little Round Top on the
second day of the battle
held by the 20th Maine.
What would motivate
a woman to disguise


Albert Cashier, aka Jennie Hodgers, never
shirked "his" duty when a member of the 95th
Illinois Infantry."He" kept his gender a secret
until"his"death in 1915.


herself as a man to fight
and maybe die?
"Women during that
era could not vote,
own land, have a bank
account, they weren't
valued and considered
not very intelligent by
men," Brown said. "They
did it for economic
reasons, adventure, free-
dom, personal interest
and patriotism."
One such adventuress
female was Cuban-born
Loreta Janeta Velazquez,
who donned a fake
mustache and joined
the Rebel Army as 1st
Lt. Harry T. Buford.
"Buford" went on to
fight at Shiloh, one of the
bloodiest engagements
of the war where about
24,000 were killed,
wounded, or missing;
Fort Donelson; and
First Bull Run before
"he" was wounded and
before "his" secret was
discovered, "Buford" left
the Army and eventually
became a Rebel spy.
Her autobiography,
"The Woman in Battle: A
Narrative of the Exploits,
Adventures, and Travels
of Madame Loreta Janeta


V
WE


SUN PHOTOS BY AL HEMINGWAY
Loreta Janeta Velazquez served in the Confederate Army as a
soldier and spy. The authenticity of her 1876 autobiography is
still questioned by some historians.


Velazquez, Otherwise
Known as Lieutenant
Harry T. Buford,
Confederate States
Army," was published
in 1876. It was widely
condemned when it
first appeared in print,
especially by Confederate
General Jubal Early, who
called it "pure fiction."
Although some aspects
of her writing have been
verified, historians are
still debating her book to
this day.
Some women did
not choose to disguise
themselves and fight like
their male counterparts,
but they still left their
mark on Civil War histo-
ry. Individuals like Clara
Barton and Dorothea
Dix, who organized
the Nursing Corps for
the Union Army. Annie
Etheridge, who was the
regimental nurse for a
unit of Michigan volun-
teers and rode into battle
with her saddlebags
crammed with medical
supplies to tend to
the wounded. She was
exposed to enemy fire
on so many occasions
that Union Gen. Ulysses


S. Grant had to finally
order her not to go on
the battlefield. She was
awarded the Kearney
Cross because of her
meritorious and heroic
acts.
Although a surgeon,
Dr. Mary Edwards
Walker was not allowed
to practice her profes-
sion and served as a
nurse with the Yankee
Army. It was not until
Gen. William T. Sherman
gave her permission
to be a Union Army
doctor, did she actually
treat the wounded.
She was even captured
by Confederates but
was later released in a
prisoner exchange.
She was awarded the
Medal of Honor, but it
was rescinded in 1917
by President Woodrow
Wilson because he
claimed that she was
ineligible. Infuriated,
Walker continued to
wear the decoration
until her death in 1919
and was buried wearing
it pinned to her dress.
In 1977, President
Jimmy Carter reinstated
Walker's award.


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


Golf fundraiser to
aid homeless
Riverwood Golf Club,
4100 Riverwood Drive,
Port Charlotte, will play
host to a fall Golf Scramble
fundraiser at 7:30 a.m.
Saturday. This event is
sponsored by Greener
Cleaner and Integrity
Employee Leasing.
Registration will begin at
7:30 a.m., with a shotgun
start at 8:30 a.m. There
will be a chance for one
lucky participant to win
a 2014 Ford, courtesy of
Don Gasgarth's Charlotte
County Ford. There
also will be hole-in-one
contests, where a partici-
pant may win a golf cart;
this contest is sponsored
by Caddy Carts. The cost
is $85 per player, and
includes a continental
breakfast, a southern bar-
becue lunch buffet, a golf
cart, contests and prizes.
All proceeds will benefit
the Charlotte County
Homeless Coalition.
To register, contact Tina
Figliuolo at 941-627-4313,
ext. 118; or visit www.
cchomelesscoalition.org.

Korean War
veterans to give
talk at SCF Venice
The State College of
Florida History/Political
Science Club will host
a presentation by local
Korean War veterans
at 11 a.m. Tuesday in
the Selby Room at SCF
Venice, 8000 S. Tamiami
Trail. The event is free
and open to the public.
The Korean War
Veterans Association's
"Tell America" Program


is designed for veterans
to tell the story of the
Korean War and help
citizens understand the
meaning of freedom. The
presentation Nov. 19 will
focus on the 60th anni-
versary of the ceasefire
agreement in 1953 that
ended the Korean War.
Reservations are not
required, but seating is
first come, first served.
For more information,
contact Michael Rogers,
History/Political Science
Club adviser, at 941-408-
1485 or rogersm@scf.edu.

Christmas Parade
planning
The Annual Rotonda
West Christmas Holiday
Parade starts at 2 p.m.
Dec. 7 at Rotonda Circle
and Rotonda Boulevard
North. Some 70 units are
expected to participate,
and thousands to line the
parade route. Englewood
Helping Hand is the ben-
eficiary. Last year, 1,960
pounds of canned goods
and toys were collected
from spectators, plus $600
in cash and checks. All are
encouraged to participate.
For more information, call
Earl Haas at 941-698-9207.

Santa arrives
in town
Santa is coming a little
early this year to the Port
Charlotte Town Center. In
celebration of his arrival,
families are invited to a
fun and festive breakfast
from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Saturday in the food court
of the shopping mall, 1441
Tamiami Trail. Kids will


enjoy coloring and danc-
ing, along with breakfast.
After Santa comes to town,
he will set up shop in his
winter wonderland in the
food court, where he will
pose for ho-ho-ho photos
and listen to holiday
wishes through Christmas
Eve. The breakfast event
with Santa is free and open
to the public. Photos with
Santa vary in price. For
more information, call
941-624-4833.

Get Medicare info
Annual Medicare
enrollment "one-on-one"
sessions will be held
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. today
at the North Port Library,
13800 S. Tamiami Trail.
SHINE volunteers will
be available to review
your Medicare health or
prescription drug plan;
people may see premium
increases or coverage
changes for 2014. Bring
your Medicare ID Card
and your list of medica-
tions with dosage infor-
mation. Free; open to the
public. For more informa-
tion, call 1-866-413-5337.

Classic cars
on Dearborn
Dearborn Street
features "Cruizin' on
Dearborn" from 5 p.m. to
8 p.m. the first Saturday
of each month, with
hundreds of classic cars
and old-car enthusiasts
lining Dearborn Street.
Most restaurants are
open, and '50s music
is spun by a DJ. It's a
"Grease"-type party. For
more information, call
941-315-1248.


I OBITUARIES

CHARLOTTE

There were no deaths
reported in Charlotte
Wednesday

ENGLEWOOD

Jackie Sue
Gardner
Jackie Sue Gardner, 56,
of Englewood, Fla., died
Monday, Nov. 11,2013.
Arrangements are by
Englewood Community
Funeral Home Inc., with
Private Crematory.

NORTH PORT

Karen Sue Hall
Karen Sue Hall, 71, of
North Port, Fla., passed
away peacefully Saturday,
Nov. 9,2013, with her family
by her side, at Charlotte
Harbor Healthcare in Port
Charlotte, Fla.
She was born March 27,
1942, in Mansfield, Ohio,
to Harold and Lillian
LeMunyon.
Karen graduated from
Mansfield Senior High in
1960, and moved with her
family to Port Charlotte. In
1962, she married Calvin
M. "Gator" Hall, in part
because she claimed,
"He beat up all my other
boyfriends." They cele-
brated their 50th wedding
anniversary last year. Karen
was an avid bowler, to say
the least. She was a charter
member of the Charlotte
CountyWomen's Bowling
Association, and was its
Secretary/Treasurer. Karen
won numerous awards and
was the "Woman Bowler
of the Decade" 1980-1989.
She was inducted into the
CCWBA Hall of Fame in
1991.

"A special thank-you
to Dr Scott D. Lunin of
Florida Cancer Specialists
for his compassionate
treatment ofKaren's
illness, myelofibrosis/
multiple myeloma, which
took her life."

She will be greatly missed
by her husband, Calvin
"Gator" Hall; brother,
George (Cheryl) LeMunyon;
son, Steven (Diana) Hall;
daughters, Shellee (Cindy
Booher) and Ashlee (Jack)
Donlan; and grandchildren,
Jake, Colbee, Shelbi, Brice
and Brady
A gathering of family
and friends will be held
from 10 a.m. until a service
to celebrate Karen's life at
11 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 16,
2013, at LarryTaylor
Funeral and Cremation
Services, with Pastor George
Abosamra officiating. In
lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to The
Multiple Myeloma Research
Foundation via www.mmrf.
org; or to Tidewell Hospice.
To express condolences to
the family, please visit www.
Ltaylorfuneral.com and
sign the online guest book.

Russell B. Slocum
Russell B. Slocum went to
meet Jesus early Monday,
Nov. 11,2013.
^ .. He served in
.',; ".. the United States
Navy.
Russell is
survived by his wife of 47
years, Cheryl; daughters,
Jennifer (George Ayres) and
Beth (George Davis); and
his grandchildren, Jesse,
Kaylyn and Jacob Ayres.
A Celebration of his
life will be held at 3 p.m.
Sunday Nov. 17, 2013, at
New Hope Community
Church, 5600 S. Biscayne
Drive, North Port, FL 34287.
The family welcomes
anyone who would like to


share in his Homecoming.
In lieu of flowers, we
ask that you continue in
Russell's ministry of paying
it forward.

DESOTO

There were no deaths
reported in DeSoto
Wednesday.


Loreta Janeta Velazquez, 1842-1902


Dr. Mary Edwards Walker was presented the
Medal of Honor only to have it taken away
in 1917. It was reinstated to her in 1977 by
President Jimmy Carter.


RUBY TUESDAY GIVEBACK EVENTS
Ruby Tuesday restaurant in the Port Charlotte Town Center mall offers a
Community GiveBack Program for area nonprofits, churches, schools and
others. This is a great way to raise money for your cause while enjoying
lunch or dinner, organizers say. Ruby Tuesday gives back 20 percent of net
sales to each organization.
The following organizations have GiveBack events scheduled this month.
If you are interested in supporting any of these, visit the organization's
website for a flier or contact the group/individual and request a flier to
attend.
Today and Nov. 21 Cultural Center of Charlotte County -
Fitness Salon Fundraiser
The Fitness Salon at the Cultural Center, 2280 Aaron St., Port Charlotte, a
nonprofit community center, needs to replace and upgrade some of its used
equipment.
Contact: fitness@theculturalcenter.com for a flier.
Friday Arts & Humanities Council of Charlotte County
The mission of the Arts & Humanities Council of Charlotte County is to
encourage, strengthen, promote and foster cultural and artistic opportunities
of all residents and visitors in Charlotte County.
Contacts: Robert M. Dickinson, 941-768-6185 or pgaefa@aol.com; or Judy
Malbuisson, 941-764-8100 or info@charlottearts.org.
Saturday Meals on Wheels of Charlotte County Inc.
MOW prepares and delivers hot, nutritious meals for the homebound or
others who require assistance.
Contact: Henry Ereth, 941-625-4343; or pick up flier at the office, 3082
Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte.
Sunday Church of the Good Shepherd
The Church of the Good Shepherd, at 401 W. Henry St, Punta Gorda,
welcomes everyone.
Contact: Sheila Stidham at 941-766-1367 or sheila33980@hotmail.com
(fliers also available after church services).
Monday Temple Shalom
Temple Shalom is a welcoming reform Jewish congregation at 23190 Utica
Ave., Port Charlotte, that strives to meet the spiritual, educational, cultural and
social needs of its members.
Contact: Joyce Gelfand,jteachu@yahoo.com.
Nov. 22-24 Charlotte County Library System
The giveback will benefit the youth services department and youth
programs for the library system.
Contact: Kayce Austin, 941-613-3160.
Nov. 25 Epilepsy Foundation
The Epilepsy Foundation of Florida leads the fight to stop seizures, find a
cure and overcome challenges created by epilepsy.
Contact: www.epilepsyfla.org.
Nov. 30 Cultural Center of Charlotte County
Cul-Cen Productions is an all volunteer, nonprofit group that produces
an annual variety show to raise funds for the Cultural Center of Charlotte
County Inc.
Contact: http://theculturalcenter.com/ccp.html
If your organization is interested in participating in the RubyTuesday
GiveBack Program and having your event published, visit www.rubytues-
daygiveback.com and click on the"Giving Back"tab. Complete the GiveBack
application, providing the required federal tax documentation. For more
information, call RubyTuesday at 941-629-7144.







Our Town Page 6 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Thursday, November 14, 2013


INVITATION NOTICE OF NOTICE OF
TO BID AUCTION I FORECLOSURE
Lwo 3114 ^^ W4 3119^^ ^ 3122 ^


3100








LEGALS



|FICTITIOUS NAME
L 3112 ^


11/14/13
Notice Under Fictitious Name
Law Pursuant to Section
865.09, Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of AAA Florida Wire-
less located at 519 S. Brevard
Ave., in the County of Desoto, in
the City of Arcadia, Florida 34266
intends to register the said name
with the Division of Corporations
of the Florida Department of
State, Tallahassee, Florida.
Dated at Port Charlotte, Florida,
this 12th day of November,
2013.
/s/ Abdalrahim Zaben
Publish: November 14, 2013
110833 2964614

S INVITATION
TO BID
0^.114^^

NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY OF
BID SPECIFICATIONS
REQUEST FOR BIDS
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
The County of Charlotte will be
receiving sealed bids at the Pur-
chasing Division, Suite 344, Char-
lotte County Administration Cen-
ter, 18500 Murdock Circle, Port
Charlotte, FL 33948-1094, for:
BID NO. 2014000022
ELECTRIC RUNS TO
ROTONDA WEST BRIDGES
It is the intent of Charlotte County
to construct an electric power
system to the Rotonda West
Bridges which include Cape Haze
Drive, Rotonda West Boulevard,
Rebel Court, Rotonda Boulevard
North, and Rotonda East Boule-
vard. Work specified shall consist
of furnishing all materials, equip-
ment, labor and operations nec-
essary to complete the work as
indicated in the plans and specifi-
cations.
The licenses) required to perform
these services for this project
are: Certified Building, Certified
General, Certified Master Electri-
cian, Certified Underground Utili-
ties, Registered Building, Regis-
tered General, Registered Master
Electrician, or Registered Under-
ground Utility.
PRE-BID CONFERENCE:
10:00 a.m.,
November 18, 2013
ADMINISTRATION COMPLEX
BUILDING B ROOM 106-B
BID OPENING: 2:00 p.m.,
December 11, 2013
PURCHASING DIVISION
CONFERENCE ROOM
Bid Documents may be obtained
by accessing the Charlotte Coun-
ty Purchasing Division's website
at
www.charlottecountvfl.com/pur
chasing under "Purchasing Bids
Online", document number
140222. Any questions can be
answered by contacting Kathleen
M. Lindback, CPPB, Contract
Specialist at 941.743.1376 or
email: kathy.lindback@charlotte-
fl.com.
Publish: November 14, 2013
163352 2964523
LAKESIDE PLANTATION
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
DISTRICT
NOTICE OF SOLICITATION
FOR REQUEST FOR
PROPOSALS
LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE
SERVICES
SARASOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Notice is hereby given that the
Lakeside Plantation Community
Development District (referred to
herein as the "District" or the
"Owner") requests proposals to
provide landscape maintenance
services (Request for Proposals
2014-101) including, but not lim-
ited to, maintenance of turf,
trees, shrubs, ground cover, and
irrigation, as more specifically set
forth in the bid documents.
The bid documents will be avail-
able for public inspection and
may be obtained beginning
Wednesday, November 13, 2013
at 10:00 AM, from the District
Manager's office, located at 135
W. Central Blvd., Suite 320,
Orlando, FL 32801, or by con-
tacting George Flint at 407-841-
5524.
Firms desiring to provide services
for this project must submit
seven (7) copies of the required
proposal no later than Friday,
December 13, 2013 at 2:00 PM
at the Office of the District Man-
ager, located at 135 W. Central
Blvd., Suite 320, Orlando, FL


32801 ATTN: George Flint, at
which time proposals will be pub-
lically opened. Proposals must
be submitted in a sealed enve-
lope pursuant to the bid docu-
ments. Proposals received after
the time and date stipulated
above will be returned unopened
to the Proposer.
A non-mandatory pre-proposal
conference will be held on Thurs-
day, November 21, 2013 AT
11:30 AM at the Lakeside Planta-
tion Clubhouse located at 2200


Plantation Blvd., North Port, FL
34289.
Evaluation of proposals will be
conducted in accordance with the
process described in the bid doc-
uments. The District reserves the
right to reject any and all propos-
als with or without cause, to
waive minor technical errors and
informalities, or to accept the
proposal which, in its judgment, is
in the best interest of the District.
George S. Flint
Governmental Management
Services Central Florida, LLC
District Manager
Publish: November 13, 14, 2013
297693 2963931

L NOTICE OF ACTION

Z 3116 ^

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 13-2035-CA
SUSAN VACCA,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GERALD MERTZ, and
EARLIER S. GODWIN,
Defendants,
NOTICE OF ACTION
(Service by Publication)
TO: GERALD MERTZ, any
unknown spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees, and any other
parties claiming an interest in
regard to Gerald Mertz
Last Known Address Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a trust
action has been filed against you,
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Plaintiff's attorney,
Pamela D. Keller, Esquire whose
address is Keller Law Office, P.A.,
126 E. Olympia Avenue, Suite
200, Punta Gorda, FL 33950
within 20 days from the last date
of publication and to file the origi-
nal with the clerk of this court
either before service on plaintiff's
attorney or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint.
DATED on this 25th day of Octo-
ber, 2013.
BARBARA T. SCOTT
Clerk of the Court
By C.L.G.
Deputy Clerk
Publish: 10/31/13, 11/7/13,
11/14/13, 11/21/13
281608 2958504
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CIVIL ACTION
Case No. 13-2761-CA
JACK V. KARCHES,
Plaintiff,
vs.
SYLVIA L. SCULLY, WESLEY A.
LUSE, KATHLEEN A. LUSE And
FIFTH THIRD MORTGAGE COMPA-
NY
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: SYLVIA L. SCULLY, WESLEY
A. LUSE, KATHLEEN A. LUSE
And FIFTH THIRD MORTGAGE
COMPANY, if alive, or if dead,
their unknown spouses, widows,
widowers, heirs, devisees, credi-
tors, grantees, and all parties
having or claiming by, through,
under, or against them, and any
and all persons claiming any
right, title, interest, claim, lien,
estate or demand against the
Defendants in regards to the fol-
lowing-described property in
Charlotte County, Florida:
Lot 11, Block 4974. PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION,
SECTION 93, according to the
plat thereof, recorded in Plat
Book 9, Pages 1A thru 1Z4,
of the Public Records of Char-
lotte County. Parcel ID No.
412115254010.
Notice is hereby given to each
of you that an action to quiet title
to the above-described property
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve your
written defenses on Plaintiff's
attorney, Sandra A. Sutliff, 3440
Conway Blvd., Suite 1-C, Port
Charlotte, FL 33952, and file the
original with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court, Charlotte County, 350
E. Marion Avenue, Punta Gorda,
FL 33950 on or before December
4 2013, or otherwise a default
judgment will be entered against
you for the relief sought in the
Complaint.
THIS NOTICE will be published
once each week for four consec-
utive weeks in a newspaper of
general circulation published in
Charlotte County, Florida.
DATED this 28th day of Oct.,
2013.
BARBARA T. SCOTT
Clerk of the Court
By C.L.G.
Deputy Clerk
Publish: 10/31/13, 11/7/13,
11/14/13, 11/21/13
129606 2958588

NOTICE OF
AUCTION



NOTICE OF AUCTION
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT SS
OSPREY, LLC D/B/A SIMPLY SELF STOR-
AGE LOCATED AT 660 SOUTH TAMIAMI
TRAIL, OSPREY, FL 34229 INTENDS TO
SELL OR OTHERWISE DISPOSE OF THE
PERSONAL PROPERTY DESCRIBED
BELOW TO ENFORCE A LIEN IMPOSED
ON SAID PROPERTY UNDER THE FLORI-
DA SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT


STATUTES (83.801-83.809). THE PUBLIC
SALE OR OTHER DISPOSITION OF THE
FOLLOWING PROPERTY WILL TAKE
PLACE (UNLESS OTHERWISE WITH-
DRAWN) VIA AN ON-LINE AUCTION AT
WWW.STORAGEBATTLES.COM ON
11/13/13 BEGINNING AT APPROXIMATE-
LY 1:30 P.M. AND CONCLUDING ON
11/23/13 AT APPROXIMATELY 1:30 P.M.
THIS PUBLIC SALE WILL RESULT IN THE


GOODS BEING SOLD TO THE HIGHEST
BIDDER. CERTAIN TERMS AND CONDI-
TIONS APPLY:
1003 Brandon Druge (misc); 2025
DeAnne Owne (misc); 3003 Chantal Bour-
deau (misc); 4013 Build Up Unit (misc)
Publish:October 31, November 14, 2013
361847 2957077

L NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
M 3120 O

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CHAR-
LOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
IN PROBATE
IN RE: The Estate of
BOBBIE B. MIZE,
Deceased
Probate No. 13-1656-CP
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate
of BOBBIE B. MIZE, deceased,
File Number 13-1656-CP is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court for Char-
lotte County, Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which is 350
East Marion Avenue, Punta
Gorda, Florida 33950. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, con-
tingent or unliquidated claims, on
whom a copy of this notice if
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate, including unma-
tured, contingent or unliquidated
claims, must file their claims with
this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this Notice is November 14.
2013
By: J. MICHAEL ROONEY
Attorney for Petitioner
Florida Bar No. 157880
Post Office Box 510400
Punta Gorda, Florida, 33951-
0400
(941) 639-2591
trabuelaw@vahoo.com
COY LEE WILLIFORD. JR.,
Pers. Rep.
10900 Greenfield Lane
Amelia Courthouse, VA 23002
Publish: November 14, 21, 2013
121501 2963230

L NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE I
^ ,3122 ^

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 08-2010-CA-002552
BANK. OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ROBERTO AFONSO; JULIE C.
AFONSO A/K/A JULIE ALFONSO;
et al.,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
sale will be made pursuant to an
Order or Final Summary Judg-
ment. Final Judgment was award-
ed on September 17. 2013 in
Civil Case No. 08-2010-CA-
002552, of the Circuit Court of
the TWENTIETH Judicial Circuit in
and for CHARLOTTE County, Flori-
da, wherein, BANK OF AMERICA,
N.A. is the Plaintiff, and ROBERTO
AFONSO; JULIE C. AFONSO
A/K/A JULIE ALFONSO, are
Defendants.
The clerk of the court, Bar-
bara T. Scott will sell to the high-
est bidder for cash www.char-
lotte.realforeclose.com at
11:00 a.m. on the 8 day of Jan-
uarv, 2014, the following
described real property as set
forth in said Final Summary Judg-
ment, to wit:
LOT 4, BLOCK 4475, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION,
SECTION EIGHTY-ONE,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 6, PAGES 51A
THROUGH 51P, INCLUSIVE, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CHARLO'TE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PEN-
DENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH-
IN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
Dated this 16 day of October.,
2013.
Barbara T. Scott
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: KisN P.
Deputy Clerk
IMPORTANT
If you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain
assistance, Please contact the
Administrative Services Man-


ager, whose office is located
at 350 E. Marion Avenue,
Punta Gorda, Florida 33950,
To view today's legal notices
and more visit,
www.floridapublicnotices.com


and whose telephone number
is (941) 637-2281, within two
working days of your receipt
of this notice; if you are hear-
ing or voice impaired, call
711.
Publish: November 14 & 21,
2013
334261 2964435




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
20TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2010-003738 CA
U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIA-
TION AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BEN-
EFIT OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLD-
ERS CWMBS, INC. REPERFORM-
ING LOAN REMIC TRUST CERTIFI-
CATES, SERIES 2005-R3,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RONALD S. BECK; ET AL.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Fore-
closure dated June 25, 2013 and
an Order Cancelling October 24,
2013 Foreclosure Sale and
Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale
entered October 11, 2013,
entered in Case No. 2010-
003738 CA, of the Circuit Court
of the 20th Judicial Circuit in and
for CHARLOTTE County, Florida.
U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIA-
TION AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BEN-
EFIT OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLD-
ERS CWMBS, INC. REPERFORM-
ING LOAN REMIC TRUST CERTIFI-
CATES, SERIES 2005-R3 is Plain-
tiff and RONALD S. BECK; DEBO-
RAH D. BECK AKA DEBORAH
BECK; BENEFICIAL FLORIDA,
INC.; PORTFOLIO RECOVERY
ASSOCIATES, LLC are defen-
dants. I will sell the following
described property at public sale
to the highest and best bidder for
cash, except as set forth here-
inafter, on January 9, 2014 at
11:00 a.m. at www.charlotte.real-
foreclose.corn as set forth in said
Final Judgment and in accor-
dance with Chapter 45 Florida
Statutes, to wit:
LOTS #46 AND 47, OF
SOUTH PUNTA GORDA
HEIGHTS, 1ST ADDITION
AMENDED, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
5, PAGES 17A THROUGH
17C, OF THE PUBLIC OF
CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
a/k/a 11332 8th AVENUE,
PUNTA GORDA, FL 33955
Dated the 21 day of October,
2013.
BARBARA T. SCOTT
As Clerk of said Court
By: Kristv P.
As Deputy Clerk
Publish: November 14 & 21,
2013
337582 2964446
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
20TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CASE No.: 2012-CA-001019
HSBC BANK USA, N.A.,
AS TRUSTEE FOR THE REGIS-
TERED HOLDERS OF RENAIS-
SANCE EQUITY LOAN ASSET-
BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES
2007-3,
Plaintiff,
vs.
Rosemary E. Miller and Wells
Fargo Bank, National Association,
successor by merger of
Wachovia Bank, National Associa-
tion,
Defendants.
RE-NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Summary Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated March
26, 2013, and to an order on
plaintiff's motion to cancel fore-
closure sale, dated July 22,
2013, and entered in Case No.
2012-CA+001019, of the Circuit
Court of the 20th Judicial Circuit
in and for Charlotte County, Flori-
da, wherein, HSBC BANK USA,
N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE REG-
ISTERED HOLDERS OF RENAIS-
SANCE EQUITY LOAN ASSET-
BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES
2007-3, is Plaintiff and Rosemary
E. Miller and Wells Fargo Bank,
National Association, successor
by merger of Wachovia Bank,
National Association, are Defen-
dants, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash online at
www.charlotte. realforeclose .com
at 11:00A.M. on the 6 day of
December, 2013 the following
described property as set forth in
said Summary Final Judgment, to
wit:
LOT 14, BLOCK 3495
PORT CHARLOTTE SUBDI-
VISION, SECTION 84, A
SUBDIVISION ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
6, PAGE 59A THROUGH 591
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF CHARLO'TE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
STREET ADDRESS:
9347 EL CAMPO AVE,
ENGLEWOOD, FL 34224
and all fixtures and personal prop-
erty located therein or thereon,
which are included as security in
Plaintiff's mortgage.
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus funds from the sale,
if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis
pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Dated at Punta Gorda, Charlotte


County, Florida, this 4 day of
November, 2013.
Barbara T. Scott
Clerk of said Circuit Court
By: Kristv P.
As Deputy Clerk
Publish: November 7 & 14, 2013
349874 2961662


I NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE
^^ 3122^^

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
20th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 08-2012-CA-001981
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.
Plaintiff,
vs.
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LOVIS
JONES, DECEASED, CHARLOTTE
COUNTY UTILITIES, DONALD
GEORGE JONES, AS CO-SUCCES-
SOR TRUSTEE OF THE LOVIS
JONES REVOCA, CECIL DOU-
GLAS, AS CO-SUCCESSOR
TRUSTEE OF THE LOVIS JONES
REVOCABLE TR, DONALD
GEORGE JONES, INDIVIDUALLY,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Summary Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated
09/10/2013, and entered in
Case No. 08-2012-CA-001981 of
the Circuit Court of the 20th Judi-
cial Circuit, in and for CHAR-
LOTTE County, Florida, where in
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., is the
Plaintiff and UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF LOVES JONES, DECEASED,
CHARLOTTE COUNTY UTILITIES,
DONALD GEORGE JONES, AS CO-
SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE OF THE
LOVIS JONES REVOCA, CECIL
DOUGLAS, AS CO-SUCCESSOR
TRUSTEE OF THE LOVIS JONES
REVOCABLE TR, DONALD
GEORGE JONES, INDIVIDUALLY,
are the Defendants, the Clerk of
Court shall offer for sale to the
highest bidder for cash on Janu-
ary 6. 2014, beginning at 11:00
A.M., at WWW.CHARLOTTE.REAL-
FORECLOSE.COM, in accordance
with Chapter 45 Florida Statutes,
the following described property
as set forth in said Summary Final
Judgment lying and being situate
in CHARLOTTE County, Florida, to
wit:
Lot 17, Block 1468, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION,
SECTION 34, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 5, Page(s) 38A
through 38H, inclusive, of the
Public Records of Charlotte
County, Florida.
NOTICE: If you are a person
with a disability who needs any
accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you, to
the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact the Admin-
istrative Services Manager whose
office is located at 350 E. Marion
Avenue, Punta Gorda, Florida
33950, and whose telephone
number is (941) 637-2281, at
least 7 days before your sched-
uled court appearance, or imme-
diately upon receiving this notifi-
cation if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; if you are hearing or
voice impaired, call, 711.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PEN-
DENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH-
IN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
THE CLERK SHALL RECEIVE A
SERVICE CHARGE OF UP TO $70
FOR SERVICES IN MAKING,
RECORDING, AND CERTIFYING
THE SALE AND TITLE THAT
SHALL BE ASSESSED AS COSTS.
THE COURT, IN ITS DISCRETION,
MAY ENLARGE THE TIME OF THE
SALE. NOTICE OF THE CHANGED
TIME OF SALE SHALL BE PUB-
LISHED AS PROVIDED HEREIN.
DATED this 7Z day of Septem
ber, 2013.
Barbara T Scott
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: M. B. White
Deputy Clerk
Publish: November 14 & 21,
2013
337549 2964372
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 12003426CA
SOVEREIGN BANK, N.A.
Plaintiff,
vs.
EUGENE 0. HAUGHEY, et al
Defendants.
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Summary Final Judg-
ment of foreclosure dated Sep-
tember 10. 2013 and entered in
Case No. 12003426CA of the
Circuit Court of the TWENTIETH
Judicial Circuit in and for CHAR-
LOTTE COUNTY, Florida, wherein
SOVEREIGN BANK, N.A., is Plain-
tiff, and EUGENE 0. HAUGHEY, et
al are Defendants, the clerk will
sell to the highest and best bidder
for cash, beginning at 11:00AM
at
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
, in accordance with Chapter 45,
Florida Statutes, on the 6th day of
January, 2014, the following


I NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE I
^^ 3122^^

described property as set forth in
said Summary Final Judgment, to
wit:
LOT 15, BLOCK 446, PORT
CHARLOTTE SECTION 18,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 8A
THROUGH 8E, INCLUSIVE, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus funds from the sale,
if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis
pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Dated at Punta Gorda, CHAR-
LOTTE COUNTY, Florida, this 27
day of September, 2013.
Barbara T. Scott
Clerk of said Circuit Court
By: M. B. White
As Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disabili-
ty who needs any accommoda-
tion to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the
Administrative Services Manager
whose office is located at 350 E.
Marion Avenue, Punta Gorda,
Florida 33950, and whose tele-
phone number is (941) 637-
2281, at least 7 days before your
scheduled court appearance, or
immediately upon receiving this
notification if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than seven (7) days; if you are
hearing or voice impaired, call
711.
Publish: November 14 & 21,
2013
336737 2964409
/ -NEED A JOB?--)
CHECK THE
V CLASSIFIED!
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY. FLORIDA.
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.
082012CAOO362OXXXXXX
BANK OF AMERICA. N.A.,
Plaintiff.
vs.
MARK W. SHOEMAKER; ET AL.,
Defendants,
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order or Summary
Final Judgment of foreclosure
dated September 10, 2013, and
entered in Case No.
082012CAOO362OXXXXXX of the
Circuit Court in and for Charlotte
County, Florida, wherein BANK OF
AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and
MARK W. SHOEMAKER; GAR-
DENS OF GULF COVE PROPERTY
OWNER'S ASSOCIATION, INC.;
UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1:
UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
ING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED
DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION,
OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO
HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR
INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY
HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defen-
dants, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash website of
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
County, Florida, January 6. 2014,
11:00 a.m. on the, the following
described property as set forth in
said Order or Final Judgment, to-
wit:
LOT 16, BLOCK 4303, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION
SECTION SIXTY SIX, AS PER
PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGES 4A
THROUGH G, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PEN-
DENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH-
IN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
If you are a person with a
disability who needs any
accommodation in order to
participate in this proceeding,
you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the
Administrative Services Man-
ager whose office is located
at 350 E. Marion Avenue,
Punta Gorda, FL 33950, and
whose telephone number is
(941) 637-2281, at least 7
days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immedi-
ately upon receiving this noti-
fication if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; if you are hear-
ing or voice impaired, call
711.
DATED at Punta Gorda, Florida,
on September 30, 2013.
BARBARA SCOTT
As Clerk, Circuit Court
By: M. B. White
As Deputy Clerk
Publish: November 14 & 21,
2013
105230 2964274


7 okingfor the


Perfect


Companion?


A'ind him in the

Classifieds






NEWSPAPERS


OurTown Page 6 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, November 14, 2013





The Sun /Thursday, November 14,2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 7


NOTICE OF SALE



NOTICE OF SALE/AUCTION
PER FL STATUTE 713.78
LOCATION OF SALE:
1590 S MCCALL RD
ENGLEWOOD, FL 34223
DATE OF SALE: 11/25/2013
TIME OF SALE: 10:00 AM
VEHICLE DESCRIPTIONSS:
1FMZU62K05UA90582
2005 FORD
Publish: November 14, 2013
108475 2964318
PROMPT WRECKER SERVICE
11139 TAMIAMI TRAIL
PUNTA GORDA, FL 33955
(941) 639-4000
AUCTION DATE 12/2/13
AT 10:00 AM
1997 JEEP
VIN# 1J4FJ78SXVL520227
Publish: November 14, 2013
103614 2964598


LN T1i11:i
CLASSIFIED
YOU CAN.....
."Find a Pet
VFind a Car
oFind a Job
./Find Garage Sales
.Find A New Employee
/Sell Your Home
/Sell Your Unwanted
Merchandise
VAdvertise Your
Business or Service

Classified -
it's the reliable
source for the
right results

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.
082012CA003267XXXXXX
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RICHARD B. BAILEY A/K/A
RICHARD B. BAILEY, SR.; DEBO-
RAH L. BAILEY; SCOTT MARTIN
ROTH; UNKNOWN TENANT NO.
1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2;
and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING INTERESTS BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A
NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS
ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIM-
ING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE
OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY
HEREIN DESCRIBED.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order or Summary
Final Judgment of foreclosure
dated September 10, 2013, and
entered in Case No.
082012CA003267XXXXXX of the
Circuit Court in and for Charlotte
County, Florida, wherein FEDERAL
NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIA-
TION is Plaintiff and RICHARD B.
BAILEY A/K/A RICHARD B. BAI-
LEY, SR; DEBORAH L. BAILEY;
SCOTT MARTIN ROTH;
UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1;
UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
ING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED
DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION,
OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO
HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR
INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY
HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defen-
dants, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash website of
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
County, Florida, 11:00 a.m. on
January 6, 2014, the following
described property as set forth in
said Order or Final Judgement, to-
wit;
LOT 1, BLOCK 452, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION
SECTION EIGHTEEN,
ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORD-
ED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES
8A THROUGH 8E, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF CHAR-
LOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PEN-
DENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH-
IN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
If you are a person with a
disability who needs any acco-
modation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the
Administrative Services Man-
ager whose office is located
at 350 E. Marion Avenue,
Punta Gorda, FL 33950, and
whose telephone number is
(941) 637-2281, at least 7
days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immedi-
ately upon receiving this noti-
fication if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; if you are hear-
ing or voice impaired, call
711.
DATED at Punta Gorda, Florida,
on October 3, 2013.
BARBARA SCOTT


As Clerk, Circuit Court
By: M. B. White
As Deputy Clerk
Published: November 14 & 21,
2013
105230 2964189

find your Best
Friend in the
Classifieds!


Report: A/C company


owner arrested for


unlicensed work


PROVIDED BY ABC-7
VENICE -The owner
of aVenice air-condition-
ing company has been ar-
rested after investigators

no contrac-
^^^^^^^say he had

tor's license
and hired
unlicensed
personnel.
James
Sohol, 55,
SOHOL owner of
Air Today
in Venice, was arrested
by the Sarasota County
Sheriff's Office in con-
nection with nearly a
dozen cases of unlicensed
contracting, a report
shows.
According to the re-
port, Sohol would obtain
prospective customers
by telemarketing, and
when residents were in
need of services, Sohol
would schedule an
inspection that would
lead to the installation
of new A/C units. Sohol
does not have a state
or local license and his
company does not have
a state-certified qualifier,
deeming all work illegal,
investigators say.
In four of the 11 current
cases, Sohol listed the
license of a New York man
who has no affiliation
with him or his company.
All totaled, Sohol collect-
ed more than $55,926
from the current victims


for illegal work, according
to the SCSO.
Deputies arrested Sohol
Wednesday morning at his
home in Bradenton. He is
charged with 11 counts of
unlicensed contracting and
is being held at the Sarasota
County Jail on $275,000
bond.
When hiring a contrac-
tor, the Sarasota County
Building Department
recommends the follow-
ing steps:
Get a signed, detailed
contract that spells out
the work to be done,
when and for how much.
Ask for local referenc-
es and check them.
Verify the company's
reputation with organi-
zations such as the local
chamber of commerce.
Ask to see the con-
tractor's license and
verify its status. To check
a Sarasota County license,
call 941-861-6126.
Do not make a large
down payment and do
not pay in full until the
work is complete.
If you think some-
one is acting as an
unlicensed contractor,
contact the county
Building Department,
the Florida Department
of Business and
Professional Regulation,
or visit www.scgov.net/
DevelopmentServices/
Pages/ Contractor
Licensing.aspx.


North Port named


a best small city

to move to


By STEVEN J. SMITH
SUN CORRESPONDENT
NORTH PORT
- Movoto, an online
real estate brokerage
firm based in San
Mateo, Calif., released
its rankings this week
on 'America's Best Small
Cities to Move to,"
and North Port ranked
seventh on the list.
According to Movoto
spokesman Nick Johnson,
the list was based on
demographic and other
data collected from about
100 cities across the
U.S. with populations
under 60,000. Criteria
included cost of living,
crime, median household
income, unemployment
rate, median home price,
and homes for sale per
capital.
"We have an algorithm
and a spreadsheet we use
to crunch all that data,"
Johnson said. "We used
the U.S. Census, Bureau
of Labor Statistics, FBI
and crime data, educa-
tion scores, the cost of
living index, employment
rates and affordability.
We throw all of these
numbers and different
categories into an
algorithm and it spits out
an ordered ranking."
The top 10 ranked
cities on the list include
Rowlett, Texas; Idaho
Falls, Idaho; Cedar Park,
Texas; Noblesville, Ind.;
Hendersonville, Tenn.;
Mansfield, Texas; North
Port, Fla.; Bartlett,
Tenn.; Tinley Park, Ill.;
and Moore, Okla. Other
Florida cities on the list
include Jupiter (17th),
Port Orange (19th),
Margate (21st), Coconut
Creek (33rd), Wellington
(40th) and Ocala (50th).
Johnson said one
unusual aspect of North
Port in comparison to
other cities on the list is
that it is not a suburb of a
large city.


"North Port isn't a
suburb of Miami or
Jacksonville," he said.
"You're kind of out there
in between other smaller
cities, but not next door
to a large one. That's
pretty unique. There were
some Dallas suburbs,
an Austin suburb, a
Memphis suburb, an
Indianapolis suburb, a
Nashville suburb, and a
Chicago suburb. Those
are all pretty major
cities."
In its ranking descrip-
tion, the Movoto study
points out North Port's
"58,378 residents enjoy a
cost of living that's
10 points below the
national average," and
locating a home here is
easier than anywhere
else on its top 10 -with
a median home price of
$139,900, "which is 30 per-
cent below the national
average," and a crime rate
that is "16 percent less."
North Port Economic
Development Manager
Allan Lane was pleased
to learn of the study
and said it joins other
positive rankings the city
has enjoyed from such
groups as CNN Money,
NerdWallet and Forbes
Magazine.
"Forbes actually ranked
us the best place for
business and careers,"
Lane said. "But this is great
news. All of the efforts the
city has undertaken to
market and brand itself
in the marketplace not
only here in Florida, but
nationally is really
beginning to pay off. This
is exciting news and it's
good news. It tells us
North Port, Fla.'s name
is getting a lot of looks
and a lot of recognition.
We have assets and
amenities that make us
attractive for businesses
and people that want to
move to Florida."


- 0.sd Cro6 6Ss


ACROSS
1 Frat letter
6 Mad Money
airer
10 Darer's cry
14 Zones
15 Thieves' take
16 facto
17 Billing cycle,
often
18 Sicilian spewer
19 Reach across
20 Medley relay
technique
23 "Psst!" follower
24 Pale
25 Suffix for stock
26 Portray in
words
29 Sung drama
32 Decline in
value
34 On the
Waterfront star
35 What
Kingston is
39 Glorifies
40 Cavalry
weapon
41 Electric car
company
42 Levelheaded
43 Picnic discard
46 One of
India's official
languages
48 Hoity-toity
51 Niagara Falls
accommodations
55 Bit of physics
56 Bavarian
carmaker
57 Sews hose
58 Novelist
Mae Brown
59 Stairway part


60 Currently
unavailable
61 "Got it!"
62 Shin neighbor
63 Caravan stops

DOWN
1 Senegal
surrounds it
2 In the
neighborhood
3 Creme de
4 Dull photo
finish
5 Son of Jacob
6 White hat
wearer
7 Part of NPR
8 Pilgrim's
Progress
author
9 Elegance


SPREAD STARTERS by Clive Probert
Edited by Stanley Newman
www.stanxwords.com


10 Broken
condition
11 Antagonist
12 Author
Dinesen
13 Muscle quality
21 Ancient
artifacts
22 Legendary
Native American
athlete
27 Gilbert &
Sullivan
princess
28 Smart society
30 Former
nutritional fig.
31 MSN competitor
32 College loan
agency
33 Tedious recital
34 Noisy scenes


35 Jacuzzi spray
36 Tree toppler
37 Love letter
38 Corn holder
42 Native American
language group
43 Vitamin C
source
44 Danish port
45 Quarters of
some quartets
47 Euro
predecessor,
for short
49 Sound
transmission
50 Jazz singer Krall
51 Mata
52 Elevator giant
53 Dog in Garfield
54 Egyptian
waterway


CREATORS SYNDICATE 2013 STANLEY NEWMAN STANXWORDS@AOLCOM 11/1


Lookfora third

crossword in .

the Sun Classified

section.

................................................


Answer to previous puzzle


11/14/13


Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis


ACROSS
1 Moll's leg
4 Word after fire or
power
9 Like some
wedding
dresses
13 Biblical priest
who trained
Samuel
14 Zellweger et al.
16 Together, in
music
17 Architect's add-on
18 *Make it not hurt
so much
20 Tre times due
21 Bark relative
22 IHOP array
23 *Marching order
26 Type of cranial
nerve
28 Role for John
Cho in "Star Trek"
29 Jets and others
31 nutshell
32 Mex. neighbor
34 Motor extension?
35 At any time
36 *Has unfinished
business with the
IRS
40 Spot on the tube
41 Good buddy
42 Play about
Capote
43 Ran across
44 Film critic Jeffrey
46 Long haul
49 de Chine: light
fabric
51 *Entice with
54 Eggheads
56 Govt. surveillance
group
57 PTA meeting site
58 *Sagacious
60 _out: barely
make
61 Aleutian island
62 Faunae
counterparts
63 Grassy area
64 Harness part
65 Yeats' 'The Wild
at Coole"
66 Many AARP The
Magazine
readers: Abbr.

DOWN
1 Silly sorts
2 Strike zones?
3 Social setting


By Mark Bickham 11/14/13


4 Mr. Holland
portrayer
5 Put on again
6 Hip joint
7 Author Harper
8 Conversation
opener
9 Drink & la Fido
10 Capable of
change
11 Cookbook
categories
12 Nikkei Index
currency
15 Lacking the
required funds
19 Winged god
24 Turned around
25 Opponents of the
'60s-'70s New
Left
27 Golf, for one
30 Simpsons creator
Groening
33 "Eight Is Enough"
wife
35 Bedroom
community
36 Orthodontic
concern
37 Ride the wake,
say
38 Awakenings
39 Some auction
transactions


Wednesday's Puzzle Solved
HEM LARVA LUR I D
ARE EAILe ASADA
T I NL I E D 0 Z ER

TOD DLEAR0


S I LVE ACiKBJEEWS
A LAI NiTIE o CA D E T
GAZ GOL I I G E R
E TRIN ETC0
DEUS E
ALR OH IA E AND


EFROiN LAT TEEL


(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC


40 "Movies for movie
lovers" network
44 "Aren't you a little
short for a
Stormtrooper?"
speaker
45 Isabel Allende
title
47 Stands for things
48 Any of the top 25
NFL career
scoring leaders
50 Song of praise


11/14/13


52 Egyptian dam
53 MLB team,
familiarly (and
what's missing
from the
sequence found
in the answers to
starred clues?)
55 Bad check letters
58 Card game for
two, usually
59 'What are you
waiting for?!"


I






Our Town Page 8 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Thursday, November 14, 2013


VIEWPOINT


Derek Dunn-Rankin Chairman
David Dunn-Rankin Publisher
Chris Porter Executive Editor


Brian Gleason Editorial page editor
Stephen Baumann Editorial writer


Email letters to letters@sun-herald.com


I OUR VIEW

State lawmakers

grappling with

marijuana issue

OUR POSITION: A move to
block a potential 2014 state bal-
lot issue on medical marijuana
is motivated purely by politics.
A movement to legalize
marijuana in Florida,
for medical purposes or
possibly recreational use, seems
to be gaining steam and the
Republican hierarchy would nip
it in the bud.
Powerful attorney John
Morgan and others are pushing
for a 2014 ballot proposal to
make medical marijuana legal
under an amendment to the
Florida constitution. Morgan
and proponents of marijuana
use face tough sledding to
accomplish their goal.
A recent count showed they
had less than 125,000 signatures
out of 683,000 needed to get
the proposal on the ballot.
But, according to an Orlando
pollster in an Associated Press
report, there was a 70 percent
approval rate among Floridians
for medical marijuana and a
somewhat surprising 55 percent
approval among Republicans.
Young people and the hippie
generation those in their
60s were among the most
supportive.
Republican lawmakers, and
Attorney General Pam Bondi,
are moving to sabotage any
chance of the proposal going to
a vote.
Bondi has sent an advisory
opinion to the Florida Supreme
Court criticizing the proposed
ballot's language. She claims the
proposal, as written, would open
the door for widespread toking.
She has the support and encour-
agement of top GOP lawmakers,
including House Speaker Will
Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel
and Senate President Don Gaetz,
R-Niceville, who submitted their
own written objections to the
ballot.
While it is entirely possible
the lawmakers oppose the
marijuana amendment ballot
for ethical reasons, it is also
quite obvious that such an
amendment on the 2014 ballot
would not help Gov. Rick Scott's
re-election plans.
The opportunity to pass a
medical marijuana bill would
attract young voters and inde-
pendents to the polls in 2014
- two demographic groups
that are not normally kind to
Republican candidates. Those
two groups are credited with
winning Florida for President
Obama in 2008 and 2012.
Early Democratic candidates
for governor in 2014, Charlie
Crist and Sen. Nan Rich are all
for legalizing medical marijuana.
Gov. Scott has been fairly quiet
on the controversy but did say
he supports Bondi's challenge.
There are legitimate concerns
about the amendment. Some
Republicans say its language
opens the door for just about
anyone to smoke marijuana.
The other downside is the
increasingly common use of
petitions to add amendment
issues to the ballot. We can
only blame the state Legislature
for people resorting to these
measures to get issues before
the voters.
If the Legislature had the in-
clination to tackle controversial
issues, it would not be neces-
sary to resort to tack on amend-
ments to the state constitution.
Diluting the document that is
supposed to be a blueprint for
Florida's governance is not the
answer.
We urge lawmakers to take
on the challenge of medical
marijuana in the 2014 session
and end any need for an
amendment on the ballot.
But, if they do not, and the
campaign to add the question
to the ballot is successful, then


Florida voters should be given
the opportunity to have their
voices heard.


LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR

Disaster tax
could be answer

Editor:
Citizens Insurance will in-
crease their rates by 45 percent!
They already increased their
rates by 43 percent in the
last four years! Flood insur-
ance rates are increasing by
25 percent each year. This
will force Floridians to make
terrible decisions, by dropping
their insurance if they can,
people with mortgages will be
trapped.
Everyone in the state, every
snowbird, everyone who visits
Florida has a stake in the wel-
fare of the state. As Americans,
as one state, one nation we
all share this great state, this
great country, which means
everyone has the responsibility
to protect and defend it.
We need to have a disaster
property tax, a disaster sales
tax, and employee disaster
tax, Place a $1 toll for bridges
and thruways, a gas, alcohol,
smoking, lotto, gambling,
sports tax. Eliminate the
"retire rehire" that is double
dipping and bilking the
citizens of Florida to the tune
of $4 million a year! This is
not right and nothing is done
about it.
These small tax increases
will spread out to all and help
all of us since a catastrophic
disaster affects everyone, we
have to think of others along
with our state and county
governments and be good re-
sponsible American citizens.
Getting back to our families,
homes, jobs and schools is the
most important priority we
could ever have.
Neal Borasch
Port Charlotte

Gala honors
50 years of AWL

Editor:
Last night, I attended the
AWL 50th Anniversary Gala.
My wife, Diane, was the
chairwoman of the event,
along with a tremendous
team of superwomenn"
whose collective talents and
dedication made this one of
the premier events in Punta
Gorda for 2013. Not only did
the AWL put this event on to
commemorate their 50 years
of community service, but to
help fund our efforts to make
up for the shortfall created
by the Charlotte County
commissioners.


At the BCC meetings over
a year's time on AWL fund-
ing, this inept collection of
narrow-minded, unfocused and
supposed community leaders
noted how easy it is to raise
money and how they could not
comprehend the scope of the
service AWL is to our communi-
ty nor our financial needs.
Of course, none of them
ever bought a ticket and
none of them even expressed
verbal support for the AWL. As
noted in a prior edition of the
Viewpoint, they were, however,
pleased that they could buy a
tractor with the money they
saved with the AWL.
The gala went off with 500
people in attendance. The
outpouring of love for the
AWL was clear. The gala was a
true success in every way and,
as a sponsor, I would like to
thank all those who attended,
supported and partied with us.
Erik Hoffer
Punta Gorda

Commissioners,
where are you?

Editor:
Churches in the city limits
of Punta Gorda pay zero taxes.
Churches in Charlotte County
pay non-ad valorem taxes, as
do the 100 percent disabled,
blind and disabled veterans.
A special assessment tax is
a non-ad valorem tax that
should have an amount figure
that can be paid off or carried
on the tax roll for a number
of years until the amount and
interest is paid.
Charlotte County and the
arrogant MSBU and MSTU
committees have chosen a
way to tax the tax exempt.
Commissioners, where are
you and who do you serve?
Churches, where are you and
who do you serve?
Don Monroe
Port Charlotte


USA becoming
police state


Again, our government is
attacking individual liberties.
Per the Sun Oct. 31, "Black
boxes in cars?" Federal and state
governments are considering
black boxes in cars to track our
mileage and where we travel.
They say that black boxes will
provide greater gas tax revenue
and improved road planning.
Rest assured, the 47 percent
who pay no taxes would
suddenly become exempt from
paying highway gas taxes as
well.


The government already
monitors our phone conver-
sations and emails. Social
Security "enumerates" us at
birth. Cameras watch us on city
streets, highways, office build-
ings, malls and toll booths.
Government satellites overhead
record minute details about
our homes. All medical records
are computerized and, as with
Medicare, details of every med-
ical visit are maintained. Oddly,
your government forbids you to
eat trans fats but allows you to
smoke yourself to death.
The Obama Administration
signed the U.N. Arms Trade
Treaty to take government con-
trol of arms and ammunitions
that enter, exit or travel through
the U.S. Fortunately, the treaty
failed ratification by the Senate.
Our Bill Nelson voted "yea."
For those of us old enough
to remember freedom and
privacy, the ever-growing
government control in every
aspect of our lives is scary. Even
scarier is the fact that these leg-
islative infringements have put
us on the precipice of meeting
the definition of a totalitarian
police state.
Is totalitarianism the will of
today's majority?


GI


Thanks fro
Future Build


Editor:


lenice Reed
Punta Gorda


)m
lers


Many thanks to everyone
that participated and attended
the fundraiser for the Future
Builders Of America/Charlotte
Technical Center Chapter that
was held on Oct. 29. Because
of your support we were able
to raise $5,268. The list is too
long for this letter, but special
thanks to all.
Rick limberger
Port Charlotte

Taxpayers already
overburdened

Editor:
The release of the latest
IPCC report has once again
begun a period of media-driv-
en climate hysteria and world
conferences arguing that
something must be done.
For the next two weeks,
talks are being held in Warsaw
where "no major decisions are
expected." In a world where
almost instant communication
is made possible by technol-
ogy, I question the need for
jetting envoys around the
world, emitting and spewing
into the atmosphere the very
carbon whose levels they want


to reduce. Wined and dined,
these envoys suggest levying
carbon taxes, an idea that has
failed miserably in Norway,
cap-and-trade markets which
have been overrun with fraud,
and government-subsidized
"green energy" resources
which have been unreliable
and absurdly expensive.
Perhaps the time has come to
put aside political correctness
and stop being afraid to offend
"environmentalists" and, if there
is, indeed, a problem, look at
sensible and effective ways to
solve it. Rather than instituting
new taxes, be they carbon taxes
or cap-and-trade, we should be
working to lower the costs and
raising the efficiency of "green
energy" and using technology
which is available to us today
such as nuclear power, pipelines
to import ethical oil, natural
gas to replace coal and cracking
technology to lower costs to
consumers.
Taxpayers are already
overburdened.
Henrietta Wasik
Port Charlotte

Tiger Cats play
for Grey Cup

Editor:
One of the most exciting and
entertaining sports leagues is
the Canadian Football League,
which, I believe, has many fans
here in southwestern Florida.
Yesterday, a semifinal game
was played in Ontario between
the Hamilton Tiger Cats and
the Montreal Alouettes. The
game went into overtime with
Hamilton winning in the final
seconds 19-16.
Today, the report in your
newspaper has Montreal as
the victor. I write to correct
this misprint and to remind
readers that Hamilton will
be playing its arch-rivals,
the Toronto Argonauts, this
Sunday to determine the
eastern division champion
with the right to play for the
Canadian Championship in
the annual Grey Cup game.
Leonard Gargarello
Punta Gorda

Very pink day
at Bicycle Center

Editor:
NToJriw that Elcrtiron Davir


Li vv MULEtI LIUU11 i IJUd1
over and there is more space
in your newspaper, I wish to
mention the wonderful "Breast
Cancer Awareness Event" that
was held a few weeks ago at
The Bicycle Center in Port
Charlotte.
What an uplifting event for
all the family and not just bicy-
clists. This was a fun-filled day
with lots of things to partici-
pate in, other than the cycling
of either 10-, 25- or 50-mile
rides. There was face-painting,
manicures, bra-decorating
contest, massages, auction and
many, many raffle prizes. From
auctioning off a new bicycle,
certificates for YMCA member-
ships, jazzercise classes and a
Boca Grande beach getaway.
It was very moving to see all
the cancer survivors line up in
front of the many cyclists and
lead off the ride. This was a
very pink day. There must have
been close to 300 people who
attended during the day.
The big tent was a real treat,
to get out of the sun and be
able to sit down to enjoy lunch,
as well as listen to the fun live
band to top it all off they also
had an "ice cream social" in
which you put your desired
toppings on your serving.
Already looking forward to
next year's event. Hope they
raised many dollars to support
breast cancer awareness.
Thank you, Bicycle Center!
Anne Webster
Port Charlotte


I LETTER SUBMISSION POLICY
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to less than 250 words. Letters will be edited to length as well as for grammar and spelling. All and statements made in letters are solely those of the individual writers. The newspaper takes
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included. The phone number and address are not for publication, but must be provided. Due to the Letters to the Editor, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980, or fax to 941-629-2085.
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OurTown Page 8 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, November 14, 2013





The Sun /Thursday, November 14,2013


VIEWPOINT


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 9


Japan trade mission and missed opportunities


rade missions are
intended to foster
trade agreements
between countries and
to lure business and in-
vestment to one's home
turf. So when Gov. Rick
Scott recently left for
Japan on his 10th trade
mission abroad, I said
"sayonara and ganbatte!"
All Floridians should
join me in wishing the
delegation "good luck" in
its endeavor to increase
international trade and
to entice businesses
or investment into our
job-hungry state.
While in Japan, the
Florida delegation
traveled between Tokyo
and Osaka, a 345-mile
trip, in two hours and
18 minutes averaging
approximately 150 mph.
It's ironic that the
governor and his en-
tourage experienced
riding Japan's network
of high-speed rail
lines, the Shinkansen
(fondly called the "bullet
train"), on an economic
development mission
after turning down
$2.4 billion in federal
funds and guarantees
of up to $400 million
in private equity from
the very country he was
visiting.


Because Gov. Scott
killed Florida's high-
speed rail project, many
of the promising details
were never released
or they were released
after the fact from the
Florida Department
of Transportation,
the agency that Scott
controls. The favorable
feasibility study was pur-
posely held back from
release, the requests for
proposals were purpose-
ly delayed and, unbeliev-
ably, major international
firms that wanted to
create jobs and bring
investment to Florida
could not get a meeting
with the governor.
Lobbyists who repre-
sented eight different
consortium eager to
bid on the project were
stymied in their efforts
to get their clients an
appointment with the
governor. Several of the
teams were bringing


the good news that they
would cover the state's
portion of the project
cost above the federal
funding along with any
cost overruns and any
risk of ridership.
That's right. They
wanted to discuss private
equity contributions and
the assumption of risk in
ridership, construction
and operations. But the
governor had no interest
in hearing what they had
to say.
Who were these eight
consortium? Were they
fly-by-nights?
Team 1 was a mixture
of principals from Spain,
Portugal and the United
States with companies
such as: Soares De Costa,
Ferrovial Agroman,
Talgo, Cintra, Prince
and Invensys Rail North
America.
Team 5 included
companies from Spain,
Brazil, the United
States and China:
ASC Infrastructure
Development, Dragados,
Odebrecht, CRCC China,
T.Y. Lin International
and G.E. Transportation.
The governor's trade
missions took delega-
tions to both Spain and
Brazil.
Team 2 was made


up of SNCF America
from France and U.S.
companies, Bechtel and
Amtrak.
Team 6 was truly mul-
tinational with Veolia
from France, Siemens
from Germany, Skanska
from Sweden, Global
Via USA and FCC from
Spain and Granite and
Jacobs from the United
States.
Team 7 had French
companies; Alstom,
and Vinci Concessions;
British companies;
Virgin Group and Virgin
Rail Group; a Spanish
company, OHL, USA
and American compa-
nies; PBS&J, AECOM,
Hubbard Construction
and Archer Western
Contractors.
Team 8 was com-
prised of Bombardier
from Canada, National
Express from the UK and
Kiewit from the United
States.
The governor and his
economic development
gurus also visited France,
Canada and the United
Kingdom on prior trade
missions.
Team 3 was primarily
a South Korean team
including: Samsung,
Korail, Hyundai Rotem
USA, KRTC, GRDC,


KRRI, Korea Railway
Association, along with
its U.S. partner, Parsons.
Which brings us
to Team 4, one of
the strongest among
the strong. Entities
from Japan included:
Mitsubishi International,
Central Japan Railway,
Sumitomo Corp.,
and Japan Bank
for International
Cooperation. Rounding
out the team were U.S.
companies: Fluor, HDR,
Parsons Brinckerhoff,
PCL Civil Constructors
and Lane Construction,
and a British company,
Balfour Beatty Rail.
Referred to as the
Japanese Group, this
team was particularly
eager to meet with the
governor. They traveled
to Tallahassee on numer-
ous occasions to seek
help from legislators to
gain an audience with
the governor.
Interestingly, while
in Japan, the governor's
delegation had a sched-
uled tour of a Mitsubishi
manufacturing plant
in Osaka, the same
company that was part
of the Japanese Group's
high-speed rail effort.
Scott's group also sched-
uled a meeting with the


governor of the Japanese
state of Wakayama.
Seems he was more
gracious in granting the
Florida business delega-
tion a meeting.
So governor, if your
goal was to reach out
to successful overseas
companies to attract
business and capital to
Florida, you need not
have gone to the trouble
and expense of interna-
tional travel. Companies
from many of the
countries you visited
were beating a path to
your door offering for-
eign investment, tens of
thousands of direct jobs
and countless indirect
jobs.
I trust you enjoyed
your state-of-the-art,
fast, safe ride on Japan's
high-speed rail that car-
ries well over 150 million
passengers a year. That's
what you denied us here
in Florida.
Oh, and all the jobs
that would have come
with it.
Paula Dockery is a
syndicated columnist
who served in the Florida
Legislature for 16 years
as a Republican from
Lakeland. Readers may
reach her at paula
dockery@aol.com.


Why won't Jimmy Kimmel apologize some more?


immy Kimmel used
to be a professional
comedian. His new
job is apologizing.
A few weeks ago, the
host of ABC's late-night
show "Jimmy Kimmel
Live" aired a bit where
a 6-year-old boy recom-
mends killing everyone
in China. Kimmel and
the network have been
apologizing ever since.
Over the weekend,
protesters besieged
ABC studios around
the country. They want
Kimmel fired or, failing
that, more apologies.
The bit was part of
a routine called "Kids
Table," where Kimmel
talks to cute 5- and
6-year-olds, and hilarity
ensues. In the offend-
ing episode, Kimmel
asked the kids what
to do about our debt
to China, and one boy
chirps, "Kill everyone
in China." Kimmel
laughs and jokingly
calls it "an interesting


idea," before returning
to it later when, with
mock seriousness, he
asks the kids whether
the Chinese should be
allowed to live.
It doesn't take a
well-honed sense of
humor to realize that
"Kids Table" is a forum
for kids to say laugh-
ably and harmlessly
absurd things, not for
the discussion of
serious foreign-policy
initiatives. If the boy's
proposal for a genocidal
war against China as a
solution to our national
debt were getting a
respectable hearing, he
would have been invited


to debate it on CNN's
"Fareed Zakaria GPS"
with deadly earnest
foreign-policy pan-
jandrums like Richard
Haass and Zbigniew
Brzezinski.
Nonetheless, the grim
gears of offense-taking
began to grind.
Previously, Jimmy
Kimmel's main offense
against humanity had
been encouraging
parents to get a rise out
of their kids by telling
them that they had eat-
en all their Halloween
candy. Now, he was
guilty of incitement to
mass murder.
The anti-Kimmel
protesters sported signs
festooned with swasti-
kas and pictures of the
comedian with a Hitler
mustache, accusing
him of "manipulating
children" and "promot-
ing racial genocide."
Needless to say, if Adolf
Hitler's crime had been
joking around with kids


who innocently talked of
killing people for laughs,
he wouldn't be known
as one of world history's
greatest monsters.
The protesters still
managed to extract an
apology from ABC and
from Kimmel on air,
who said he thought "it
was obvious that I didn't
agree with that state-
ment." Obviousness,
though, isn't a de-
fense. Kimmel had to
apologize in public
to protesters outside
his Hollywood studio
in a scene that bore a
distant resemblance to
a "struggle session" in
the Cultural Revolution
wherein accused ene-
mies of the people were
humiliated and engaged
in coerced self-criticism.
Kimmel said he was
"very, very sorry" and
bowed to the protesters,
who still demanded
every imaginable kind
of other apology from
him. No matter how


sorry he said he was,
they wanted him to
be sorrier still. With
protests demanding
Kimmel's ouster con-
tinuing to roll on, ABC
has apologized yet again
and emphasized its
promise to tighten its
Standards and Practices.
The Chinese Foreign
Ministry is now in on
the act, calling on ABC
to "face its mistakes
head on." The Chinese
government's entry into
the debate might seem
opportunistic, but in
fairness to Beijing, no
other entity in the world
has proven itself as
adept at killing Chinese
people en masse. The
Kimmel controversy
is of inherent concern
since it involves its core
competency.
The Kimmel kerfuffle
is worthy of a Monty
Python skit, but also
typical of the surreal
theater of offense-taking
in contemporary


America. Are we, in such
matters, a ridiculous
country? One that
encourages a sense of
victimhood and griev-
ance? One that lacks any
sense of proportion? Yes,
yes and yes.
It would have been an
invigorating blow for the
culture of free speech
if ABC and Kimmel had
issued the following
serial apologies to their
tormentors: We're sorry
that you are so humor-
less. We're sorry you
don't have anything bet-
ter to do with your time.
We're sorry that you are
cheapening every geno-
cide in history. We're
sorry, in short, that
you are whiny bullies.
If you're so offended,
please go watch Leno or
Letterman.
Rich Lowry is the
editor of the National
Review. Readers may
reach him at comments.
lowry@nationalreview.
com.


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OurTown Page 10 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


FROM PAGE ONE


The Sun /Thursday, November 14,2013


HOW TO HELP
Donations such as blankets, towels, diapers, hygiene goods,
canned foods, medicine, flash lights, tarps, towels, and clothing
can be placed in the drop-off boxes at the following locations:

Step Up Physical Therapy
14866 Tamiami Trail, North Port

Shine Physical Therapy
2301 Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte

Dr. Rhona Holganza's office
2525 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte

Dr. Jose Domingo's office
2484 Caring Way, Port Charlotte

Sheriff's Office, Port Charlotte
3280 North Tamiami Trail, 505
Port Charlotte (close to Winn Dixie)

Rehab 1 of Charlotte County
4166 Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte

Crossover Christian Fellowship (only this Sunday from 11 a.m.
to 2 p.m.)
Board of Realtors, 3320 Loveland Blvd., Port Charlotte

Deep Creek Community
Universal Fitness
1544 Rio De Janeiro Ave., Punta Gorda

Charlotte County Sheriff's Office
7474 Utilities Road, Punta Gorda

Galleria Antiques
212 W. Virginia Ave., Punta Gorda

(Note: Donations-in-kind will be accepted until Nov. 22. Please
note that LBC Foundation is accepting these boxes (not more
than 24x18x18) and will be shipped for free but on a limited time
only. The foundation taps these donations to the Philippine Red
Cross. Monetary donations will be sent to ABS-CBN Foundation in
Redwood, Calif.)

Compiled by the Filipino-American Association of Charlotte
County and Crossover Christian Fellowship Church


HELPING
FROM PAGE 1

the storm are beyond
comprehension.
"It's the biggest one ever,"
saidWendell Hizon, vice
president of the Filipino-
American Association. "It
was almost as big as the
country"
Hizon is a relative of
local doctor, businessman
and activist MarkAsperilla,
who was in the Philippines
visiting family when the
typhoon hit. Hizon said
Asperilla will be back in
Charlotte County this week
to help coordinate local
relief efforts, but he plans
to return to the island
archipelago with medical
assistance and aid.
"There's so much devas-
tation," said Jenny Hizon,
Wendell's wife. "It will be
years before they recover."
Volunteers from the
Filipino association and
Crossover Christian
Fellowship Church in Port
Charlotte, which has a
large Filipino membership,
have begun to reach out
to schools, community
organizations, churches,
doctors offices, law enforce-
ment and local government
asking for permission to set
up donation boxes where
people can drop off canned
goods, bottled water, first aid
kits, toiletries, blankets and
other relief items for victims.
The association also is


DIRECTOR
FROM PAGE 1

Cattlemen Road was
dirt," Beck said. "(Small
businesses) are full of
creativity. Mom-and-
pop places are what
really make a town."
Among her prior ex-
periences, Beck worked
23 years for the Florida
Bar in Tallahassee. She
also served as the ex-
ecutive director for the
International Academy
of Matrimonial
Lawyers. She also
worked as an inde-
pendent contractor
staging conferences,
and has been the
events director for the
Florida Chamber of
Commerce.
Closer to Englewood,
Beck has assisted Lew
Hastings, the Boca
Grande Area Chamber
of Commerce's execu-
tive director.
When asked why
someone would work
for a chamber, Beck
said, "Any executive
director whether it's
a chamber or asso-
ciation facilitates
leadership. A chamber
is different than an
association because


you are promoting the
businesses in the area,
especially the small
businesses."
Englewood cham-
ber president Scott
Barber announced
to members Tuesday
the chamber board's
decision to name Beck
as the new executive
director. Six applicants
vied for the position.
"(Beck) has the
pulse of our Southwest
Florida economy
and understands the
impact our seasonal
residents and tourism
have on our economy,"
Barber told chamber
members in an email.
"She brings 18 years of
executive professional
leadership skills in
areas such as admin-
istration, finance,
board and committee
management."
After giving her a few
months to acclimate,
Barber said, he expects
Beck will sit down with
the chamber board and
identify goals.
Beck replaces Don
Musilli, who served as
the chamber's interim
director after Mary
Smith resigned as the
executive director in
April.
Email: reilly@sun-herald.com


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STENCH
FROM PAGE 1

being reported by a
"handful" of staff.
"The health and safety
of our children is our
priority," White added.
The school district has
spent more than $250,000
this year alone trying
to solve the problem,
according to Jody Dumas,
director of facilities for
Sarasota County Schools.
It's also spent $100,000
a year since the North
Port school opened in
2006 and was plagued
with what they described
as "sewer odor" that
was coupled with initial
reports of allergy-like
symptoms from staff,
according to Dumas.
Dumas insists that
the school was not built
using defective Chinese or
American drywall, which
can cause respiratory
problems like asthma
attacks, coughing and dif-
ficulty breathing, as well
as headaches and sinus
issues. But local activist
Charles Hummer, who
is fighting his own battle
with defective American
drywall at his North Port
home, thinks the school
district is asking all the
wrong questions.
Hummer said the
school district tested
only for the presence
of Chinese drywall, a
product that has a dif-
ferent chemical makeup


DEAL
FROM PAGE 1

superintendent Doug
Whittaker said the chang-
es came unexpectedly.
"It caught all of us by
surprise," he said. "We
had already firmed up


PHOTO PROVIDED
Charles Hummer in a still photo from his YouTube video, shot in
front of Lamarque Elementary School in North Port.


than tainted American
drywall. Hummer who
has multimillion-dollar
lawsuits filed against
Adams Homes, which
built his house, and the
manufacturers of the
defective drywall used in
its construction thinks
there are at least five
schools in North Port,
including the high school,
that were built using the
tainted product.
"(District officials) can't
say I'm crazy because
they listened to me," said
Hummer, who recently
made a video of his claims
outside Lamarque and
posted it onYouTube,
where it quickly was
shared.
Indeed, Dumas said
he has heard Hummer's
concerns and has taken
them into consideration.
Dumas and Jim Rizk, pres-
ident of OHC Engineering,
one of the firms brought
in by the school district
to inspect the school,
both claim to have

our budgets, and this got
dropped on our lap be-
cause it was last-minute."
According to Mike
Riley, Charlotte County
Public Schools spokes-
man, the district is
anticipating funding
about $45,000 in
dual-enrollment costs.
The district's agreements


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tested Lamarque for both
Chinese and American
drywall, and all tests have
revealed there are not
enough chemicals, like hy-
drogen sulfide, present to
do any harm. The school
district also brought in
Florida Department of
Health, which cleared the
school of any possible
health risks.
But the lack of answers
and, more importantly,
the lack of communi-
cation from the school
district, has worried par-
ents like Crystal Robinson,
who has two children who
attend Lamarque.
Robinson said her
children have experienced
increased headaches since
the school year started,
and parents have begun
to speculate as to what's
actually happening using
social media, especially
in the wake of Hummer's
video.
If it wasn't for social
media, Robinson said she
wouldn't have had any

encompass Edison State
College, State College of
Florida and Florida Gulf
Coast University, but
for now no students are
taking courses at FGCU.
Even though Edison's
per-credit tuition is
less than SCF's ($71.98
compared with $73.20),
the district actually will
pay less for SCF courses
due to an agreement
that reduces tuition for
Charlotte and Sarasota
students.
"They found ways
to give credits to the
Sarasota school system
that Edison didn't allow,
because of how they
interpreted the statute,"
Whittaker said, adding
that SCF agreed to give
Charlotte County the
same break.
Charlotte school officials
still say the new legislation
hurts education.
Chuck Bradley, an
assistant superintendent


idea there were potential
concerns, a situation for
which she blames the
school district.
"I just want to know if
there's a problem," she
said, adding, "I don't want
to take my kids out of
school, but I don't know if
I should be letting them
stay there."
Last November,
Lamarque principal Sally
Mancheno told the Sun
that the district's facilities
department did extensive
work to determine the
source of the stench,
placing air monitors in
classrooms and fixing
leaky toilets. Workers
ultimately believed they
traced the problem to
vents on the roof, she said
at the time.
"Basically, there's an
outlet of gas going out and
on that same roof (facing
it), there's a fresh-air in-
take. It's bad placement,"
she said last year. "We've
put little vents so it doesn't
go in that direction....
We've fixed that and
rerouted it."
Mancheno couldn't be
reached for comment
Wednesday.
District officials said
during the press confer-
ence that they would be
planning a parent ques-
tion-and-answer session,
possibly next week, but
did not have any further
details. Parents maybe
able to call into the Q&A,
White said, but she did
not confirm that option.
Email: dwindiester@sun-herald.com

for CCPS, said the "incen-
tive for dual enrollment
was taken away by the
state when they put this
new requirement in
place."
Districts have the
option of offering more
dual-enrollment and
Advanced Placement
courses on high school
campuses, but Charlotte
officials say that's not
happening for now.
Rebel Balkman, a guid-
ance counselor at Port
Charlotte High School,
said at her school it's still
business as usual.
"There's been no
impact on our school.
Here, at my level, the
school (had) always been
whatever the kids need.
... I don't recall that even
being an issue at the
guidance meeting ... our
county's always been
very supportive of dual
credits," Balkman said.
Email: iross@sun-heraldx.com


SUN PHOTO BY BRENDA BARBOSA
Volunteers from the Filipino-American Association of Charlotte County Wednesday sort through
clothing donations for typhoon victims in the Philippines at Wendell Hizon's physical therapy office,
Rehab 1 of Charlotte County in Port Charlotte. Association vice president Hizon (second from left)
said local relief efforts are underway to assist victims with medical supplies and aid. Hizon's uncle,
Charlotte County doctor and businessman Mark Asperilla, was in the Philippines when the typhoon
hit. He is fine and on his way back to Charlotte County.
organizing aWalk for a
Cause fundraiser at Bayshore ORGANIZATIONS
live Oak Parkin Charlotte American Red Cross www.redcross.org: 800-RED-CROSS (800-733-
Harbor on Nov. 23 beginning 2767)
at 8 a.m. Registration is $10. CARE International www.care.org: 800-422-7385
All funds will go to disaster Catholic Relief Services www.crs.org or www.dioceseofvenice.org/
relief organizations, includ- typhoon: 877-435-7277
ingthe PhilippinesRedChristian Aid Mission www.christianaid.org: 434-977-5650
Cross, event organizers said. Lutheran World Relief www.lwr.org: 800-597-5972
"It's all one mission, Oxfam America www.oxfam.org: 800-77-OXFAM (800-776-9326)
said Filipino-American Save the Children www.savethechildren.org: 800-728-3843
Association president UNICEF www.unicefusa.org: 800-FOR-KIDS (800-367-5437)
Ramon Otakan. "They need World Food Program USA www.wfpusa.org: 202-747-0722
help badly" Source: Washington Post
Email: bbarbosa@suni-heraldx.om




:The Sun /Thursday, November 14,2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 11


Twins

Tot

Walk
The Just Against Children
Drowning recently held
its second Twins Tot Walk
across the A.W Gilchrist
Bridge, with nearly 200
walkers and runners in
attendance. The event
was organized by Paul
DeMello and dozens of
sponsors. DeMello lost his
nearly 13-month-old twin
sons Joshua and Christian
DeMello to drowning
in 2010, so he wants to
educate the community
on keeping safe around
water and to raise money
for the community-based
nonprofit Just Against
Children Drowning, which
is dedicated to ending
childhood drownings
through education and
offering financial assistance
when available for pool
fencing, CPR classes,
swimming lessons and
other water-safety devices.


Trina Hadley brought her 5-year-old son, Blake Sutor, to
walk the bridge for the Twins Tot Walk and show support on
educating the community on drowning. Blake was a near-
drowning victim when he was just 2 years old.


SUN PHOTOS BY DONNELL BATES
The Just Against Children Drowning recently held its second Twins Tot Walk across the A.W.
Gilchrist Bridge, with nearly 200 walkers and runners in attendance. The event was organized
by Paul DeMello and dozens of sponsors. DeMello lost his twin boys, Joshua and Christian, to
drowning in 2010, so he wants to educate the community on keeping safe around water and to
raise money for the community-based nonprofit Just Against Children Drowning, which is dedi-
cated to ending childhood drownings through education and offering financial assistance when
available for pool fencing, CPR classes, swimming lessons and other water-safety devices. Here,
Jeff Lenz brought brought his children, Urban, 20 months, and Trista, 8, to the walk.


Four-year-old Kayana Drake sits with Lindsey DeLorme and her
10-week-old boxer, Mia, at the Twins Tot Walk in Gilchrist Park.


Paramedic Holden Gibbs is showing Lisa Hauser some life-saving
techniques for a drowning victim. Her daughter Kimmy, looking
on, was a near-drowning victim when she was 18 months old.


Paul DeMello, who organized the event and lost his twin boys
to drowning, poses with his son, Jesse, and firefighter/EMS Alex
Davenport prior to walking the Gilchrist Bridge.




Joseph Luciano 'b I
brought his son,
Joseph Jr., to '. '
walk the Gilchrist
Bridge for the
Twins Tot Walk.


Waiting for the walk to begin from Gilchrist Park across the
Gilchrist Bridge and back for the Twins Tot Walk are Brian Davis,
Emmi Beckner, Elyssa Beckner, Ashley Lynes and her baby
daughter, Kayleigh, and Denise DuChene.


UH


BI/N~N


Entertaining the kids at the second Twins Tot Walk is Josh the
Baby Otter, seen here with Nicole Allen and 13-month-old
Emeriana Borra.


Shannon Casey, Sade Romain and Nathan Shipley get ready to
head out for the Twins Tot Walk.
At left: Ready to head out for the Twins Tot Walk are Bobby
Barkevich and his 4-year-old pug, Chewy.


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:Our Town Page 12 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net LOCALIREGIONAL NEWS The Sun /Thursday, November 14,2013


Salute to Marine Corps


Maj. Larry Altenburg gives the birthday toast.


Per tradition, the oldest Marine, retired Master Gunnery Sgt.
John Ptacek, takes a bite of the second piece of cake.


The youngest Marine, Charles Wahlgren, takes the third slice of
the traditional cake.


Above: Maj. Gen. Richard Carr and his wife, Capt. Jean Carr, are
seated for dinner at the ball.

Right: Celebrating the 238th birthday of the Marines, active
and retired members of the Charlotte County League Marine
Corps League Detachment attended a Birthday Ball Sunday
at Kingsway Country Club in Lake Suzy. Here, local league
Commandant Pete Shanks cuts the ceremonial cake as part of
the traditional event.


Retired U.S. Navy Cmdr. Gary Harrell takes a bite of the first piece of the cake. The commander
was also the guest speaker for the birthday ball.


The Lemon Bay High School NJROTC take part in the birthday celebration and the ceremony.


Hank Mastowski, left, and Gary Lubitz, right, receive the Distinguished Service Award at the 238th Birthday Ball. Between them,
Sgt. Maj. Richard Frattarelli receives the Marine of the Year Medal and a Traveling Plaque.


Attending the 238th Birthday Ball at Kingsway Country Club are
Sgt. Richard Bonelli and his wife Mary, and the guest speaker,
retired U.S. Navy Cmdr. Gary Harrell.


:OurTown Page 12 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, November 14,2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS






INSIDE

Indexes climb back
to records after


The S&P 500 rose 14.31 points,
or 0.8 percent, to 1,782, its
34th record close this year.

Page 5 -


Afghans plant
new opium crop


Afghanistan reaped its biggest
poppy harvest ever last May.
Page 8 -


10 things to know


1. Medical crisis in
ravaged Philippines
Doctors are fearful of coming maladies
such as pneumonia, dehydration,
diarrhea and infections. Seepage 1.

2.106K signed up
for Obamacare
Only 26,794 of those signups were
done on the federal Obamacare
website. Seepage 1.

3. Doctors told to get
serious about obesity
Next time you go for a checkup, don't
be surprised if your doctor gets on
your case about your weight.
Seepage 1.

4. Hew biofuels still
years away
As refineries churn out so-called
cellulosic fuel, it has become clear,
even to the industry's allies, that the
benefits are far away. Seepage 1.

5. Kerry: Hew Iran
sanctions could
scuttle diplomacy
Kerry warned that a historic nuclear
pact with Iran could be scuttled if
Congress opts for more sanctions.
See page 5.

6. Florida help
for seniors with
reverse mortgages
There is aid available for seniors who
have taken a reverse mortgage and
have run out of money. Seepage 7.

7. Woman caught on
camera with alligator
on Chicago train
Officials suspect the reptile is the same
one that was found abandoned at
O'Hare Airport. See page 2.

8. Whitey Bulger
to receive
sentence today
The notorious mob boss declined to
speak in court Wednesday. A prose-
cutor called him a "little sociopath"
as he urged a judge to sentence the
South Boston gangster to life in
prison. See page 2.

9. Samsung says it
owes Apple $52M,
not$380M
At issue are 13 older products a
previous jury found infringed several
Apple patents. Seepage 5.

10. Weathering the
next storm
Today's Consumer Reports column
will tell you how to prepare properly
before a major storm comes into your
vicinity. See page 5.


I'IN





heWire re
tJ eJ r^ www.sunnewspapers.net
THURSDAY NOVEMBER 14, 2013




Typhoon medical crisis


Emergencies overwhelm makeshift clinics


By KRISTEN GELINEAU
and JIM GOMEZ
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRrrITERS
TACLOBAN,
Philippines A
run-down, single-story
building with filthy
floors at Tacloban's
ruined airport has
become the area's main
medical center for
victims of last week's
powerful typhoon. It
has little medicine,
virtually no facilities
and very few doctors.
What it is not short
of are patients.
Hundreds of injured


people, pregnant
women, children
and the elderly have
poured into the squat,
white building behind
the control tower
since Typhoon Haiyan
ravaged the eastern
Philippines on Friday,
killing thousands.
Doctors who have
been dealing with cuts,
fractures and pregnan-
cy complications said
Wednesday they soon
expect to be treating
more serious problems
such as pneumonia,
dehydration, diarrhea
and infections.


The medical woes
add to the daunting
tasks for authorities,
including dealing with
looters and clearing
the bottlenecks holding
up thousands of tons
of aid material from
coming in.
"The priority has
got to be, let's get the
food in, let's get the
water in. We got a lot
more come in today,
But even that won't be
enough, We really need
to scale up operation


in an ongoing


basis,"
CRISIS 14


Al-' H'MUIU
Typhoon Haiyan survivors walk through the ruins of
their neighborhood in Tadcloban, central Philippines on
Wednesday. A man named J.R. Apan painted a plea for help
in front of his destroyed home the day after the typhoon
hit hoping for aid to arrive but says he has not yet received
food and water supplies.


106K Obamacare signups


By RICARDO ALONSO-
ZALDIVAR
and LAURIE KELLMAN
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITERS
WASHINGTON
- Planting a paltry
number on a national
disappointment, the
Obama administration
revealed Wednesday
that just 26,794 people
enrolled for health
insurance during the
first, flawed month of
operations for the feder-
al Obamacare website.
Adding in enrollment
of more than 79,000
in the 14 states with
their own websites, the
nationwide number of
106,000 October sign-
ups was barely one-fifth
of what officials had
projected and a
small fraction of the
millions who have
received widely publi-
cized private coverage
cancellations as a result
of the federal law.
The White House
raced to reassure
anxious Democrats who
are worried about the
controversial program,
which they voted into
existence three years
ago and which seems
sure to be a major issue
in next year's election
campaigns. The ad-
ministration, trying to
regain the initiative, for
the first time indicated a
willingness to consider
legislation to stave off
the wave of cancella-
tions that's compound-
ing the website technol-
ogy problems.
Some Democrats
are seeking changes
in Obama's signature
program, and key
SIGNUPSI4


~tz7


AP PHOTOS
From left, David Powner, director of information technology management issues at the Government Accountability
Office, Henry Chao, deputy chief information officer for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Frank Baitman, deputy
assistant secretary for information technology at the Department of Health and Human Services, Todd Park, U.S. chief
technology officer at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and Steve VanRoekel, U.S. chief informa-
tion officer at the Office of Electronic Government in the Office of Management and Budget, are sworn in to testify before
the House Oversight Committee about problems implementing the Obamacare health care program, on Capitol Hill in
Washington, Wednesday.


House Oversight Committee Chairman Rep. Darrell Issa,
R-Calif., holds up a checklist related to the preparation
for the implementation of the Obamacare healthcare
program, and specifically, the healthcare.gov website, on
Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday.


get


serious about obesity


By MIKE STOBBE
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
ATLANTA Next time
you go for a checkup,
don't be surprised if your
doctor gets on your case
about your weight.
The medical profession
has issued new guidelines
for fighting the nation's
obesity epidemic, and
they urge physicians to
be a lot more aggressive
about helping patients
drop those extra pounds.
Doctors should cal-
culate your body mass
index, a weight-to-height
OBESITY 14


APr ruIu
In this Tuesday photo, Diane LeBlanc, 50, poses for a photograph
her office in Baton Rouge, La. LeBlanc lost 40 pounds since joining
"Heads Up,"a supervised weight loss assistance program, provided
by the Pennington Biomedical Research Center and the Louisiana
Office of Group Benefits.


White House chief technology officer Todd Park testifies
before the House Oversight Committee about problems
with implementation of the Obamacare health care
program, and specifically, the healthcare.gov website, on
Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday.


Next generation

of biofuels is

still years away

By JONATHAN FAHEY
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
NEWYORK The first trickle of fuels
made from agricultural waste is finally
winding its way into the nation's energy
supply, after years of broken promises and
hype promoting a next-generation fuel
source cleaner than oil.
But as refineries churn out this so-called
cellulosic fuel, it has become clear, even
to the industry's allies, that the benefits
remain, as ever, years away.
The failure so far of cellulosic fuel is
central to the debate over corn-based

BIOFUELS|4


Doctors are told to





-Page 2 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


NATIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Thursday, November 14,2013


BOSTON (AP)- A
prosecutor called James
"Whitey" Bulger a "little
sociopath" Wednesday
as he urged a judge to
sentence the infamous
South Boston gangster
to life in prison, but
Bulger himself declined
to speak.
"The defendant has
committed one heinous
crime after another,"
said Assistant U.S.
Attorney Brian Kelly.
"The carnage that he has
caused is grotesque."
Bulger, now 84, was
convicted in August in
a broad indictment that
included racketeering
charges in a string of
murders in the 1970s
and '80s, as well as


CHICAGO (AP)-
After tracking down a
small alligator skulking
in a baggage claim area
at Chicago's O'Hare
International Airport,
authorities are now
hunting for its traveling
companion.
The Chicago Transit
Authority has released a
series of images showing
a woman who they be-
lieve rode to the airport
on a CTA Blue Line train
with the 2-foot-long ga-
tor in the early morning
hours of Nov. 1.
Thanks to one of the
most extensive surveil-
lance systems in the
United States, officials
know this about the
alligator's trip to O'Hare:
It boarded a train at the
Pulaski stop with the
woman at 1:17 a.m.
The security camera
captured the woman


extortion, money-laun-
dering and weapons
charges.
At least a dozen fam-
ily members of people
Bulger was involved in or
accused of killing spoke
Wednesday.
The first to do so was
Sean McGonagle, the
son of Bulger victim
Paul McGonagle. He
called Bulger "Satan,"
a "domestic terrorist"
and a "sad, lonely and
irrelevant old man."
Several family mem-
bers of victims also
blasted the Boston office
of the FBI and the Justice
Department for corrup-
tion that allowed Bulger
to continue his reign of
terror for years.


petting her little friend
on her knee as she talked
on her cellphone.
Blue Line rider Mark
Strotman also snapped
a picture of the woman
and the alligator with his
phone.
"She was sitting with
it, petting it, letting
people take pictures of it
and telling everyone how
she raised it from an ear-
ly age," said Strotman,
23, who initially thought
the alligator might
have been part of some
"crazy Halloween getup"
because it was on the
train just an hour after
Halloween turned into
Nov. 1.
An hour later, the
woman, presumably
with the alligator,
disembarked the train at
the airport. At 2:44 a.m.,
she is again recorded
by the security cameras


"My family and I have
nothing but contempt
for you," said David
Wheeler, the son of
Roger Wheeler, an
Oklahoma businessman
who was shot between
the eyes after a round of
golf at a Tulsa country
club.
Bulger,
wearing
an orange
prison
jumpsuit,
stared
down at
Sthe defense
BULGER table and
mostly did not look at
victims' relatives as they
spoke. He was given the
opportunity to speak but
declined.


This combination of images provide
Authority on Wedensday shows a w
gator aboard a CTA Blue Line train
near the O'Hare stop,
but with no reptilian
companion.
Strotman said given
how fond the the woman
seemed of the alligator,
he suspects that it
might have gotten away
from her at the airport.
Besides, he told The
Associated Press, "You


His attorneys said he
refused to provide any
information to probation
officials preparing a
report for Judge Denise
Casper, who will sentence
him Thursday. Attorney
J.W Camrney Jr. said he
would make no sentenc-
ing recommendation be-
cause his client believed
his trial was a sham.
Bulger also called his
trial a sham in August
after he was not allowed
to use as a defense his
claim that a now-de-
ceased federal prosecu-
tor gave him immunity
to commit crimes. He
did not testify.
The federal jury that
convicted Bulger found
prosecutors proved he


played a role in 11 of 19
murders.
Jurors found the gov-
ernment had not proven
Bulger participated in
seven other killings and
were unable to reach a
verdict in another. But
Casper ruled Wednesday
that relatives of all 19
people could speak
at the sentencing if
they wanted, despite
objections from Bulger's
attorneys.
Bulger, the former
head of the Winter
Hill Gang, fled Boston
in 1994 ahead of an
indictment and spent
more than 16 years
as a fugitive before
being captured in Santa
Monica, Calif., in 2011.


told The Associated
Press. The society took
custody of the alligator.
Hood said the alligator
spotted on the train has
the same markings as
the animal captured at
the airport. It was never
a serious threat to the
public, too small for
its bite to hurt anyone,
he said. It's believed to
be a 2- or 3-year-old
AP PHOTO American alligator and
ed by the Chiccago Transit its gender is unknown.





ddbthe Chpicag byTrappngsit Hood says the onlyoi
woman with a two-fot-long alli- Hood says the only
in the morning of Nov. 1. way to determine the sex
Ntoearly dthoid ofN of an alligator is by an
can drop off an alligator internal exam and, he
anywhere. You don't have notes, "you want it not to
to take it to O'Hare." be on death's door before
An airport employee you bother about that."
found the alligator As for the woman,
later in the day under she could be in trouble
an escalator near a because while carrying an
baggage claim- insert alligator bag may be con-
alligator-skin bag joke sidered stylish, carrying
here. Police captured a live alligator is a crime.
the reptile by trapping it Hood said the Illinois
beneath a trash can. Dangerous Animals Act
Not only did officials makes it illegal to own an
name the creature Allie, alligator in the state.
but also handed it over What's more, the CTA
to people who could said she could be in yet
care for it, just in the more trouble.
nick of time. "Those responsible
"It's not responding for this act can face a
well to food ... It hasn't misdemeanor charge
had the proper nutrition, of cruel treatment of
Its growth has been an animal or face a fine
stunted. It has a bent of $300 to $1,000 for
spine, soft bones, soft cruelty to animals for
fingernails and a soft abandoning the animal
skull," Jason Hood, in a public place," the
president of the Chicago authority said in a news
Herpetological Society, release.

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I NATION

Spending cuts,
shutdown lower
US budget deficit

WASHINGTON (AP)
-The U.S. government
started the first month of
the 2014 budget year with
a smaller budget deficit,
signaling further im-
provement in the nation's
finances at a time when
lawmakers are wrestling
to reach a deal to keep
the government open
past January.
The Treasury
Department said
Wednesday that the
deficit in October was
$91.6 billion. That's
24 percent lower than the
$120 billion imbalance
recorded in October
2012. The deficit is the
gap between the govern-
ment's tax revenue and
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and a better economy
also boosted revenue.
J&J said to reach
$4B settlement
on hip-implants
(Bloomberg) -
Johnson & Johnson will
pay more than $4 billion
to resolve thousands of
lawsuits over its recalled
hip implants in the
largest settlement of U.S.
legal claims for a medical
device, three people
familiar with the deal
said.
The accord will resolve
more than 7,500 lawsuits
in federal and state courts
against J&J's DePuy unit,
said the people, who
requested anonymity
because they weren't au-
thorized to speak publicly
about the settlement.
Patients who have had
hips replaced claimed in
the cases that the im-
plants were defective.
The company will pay
an average of $300,000
or more for each of those
surgeries, the people said.

Teen moms
abused as children
more likely to
become abusers
(LA Times) Eighteen
and pregnant, Jessica
Chandler was terrified.
Taken away from her men-
tally ill mother and placed
into the foster care system
as a child, she wanted to
be a good parent. "But I
didn't really know what that
meant," said Chandler, now
a graduate student at Cal
State Northridge. Although
she got help from programs
that taught her about child
rearing, two of her sisters
were less fortunate. They
struggled with parenting
and lost their children to
the same system that once
claimed them.
A new report by
University of Southern
California and University
of California at Berkeley
researchers confirms
what social workers have
long suspected: that teen
mothers who suffered
mistreatment as children
risk repeating the cycle with
their own children.
In Los Angeles County
more than 40 percent of
teen mothers had previ-
ously been reported to
Child Protective Services as
possible victims of child-
hood mistreatment; nearly
20 percent were confirmed
to have suffered such abuse
or neglect.


Woman seen on Chicago train with alligator


Easy as pie

Expert bakers share recipes and secrets to help bring
the ideal Thanksgiving dessert to your table.


lose
1441 C
(9






The Sun /Thursday, November 14, 2013 NATIONAL NEWS www.sunnewspapers.net WIRE Page 3


Kerry: New Iran


sanctions could


scuttle diplomacy


WASHINGTON (AP)-
Secretary of State John
Kerry warned Congress
Wednesday
against
scuttling
a historic
opportunity
for a nuclear
pact with
Iran by
KER pressing
KERRY ahead with
new sanctions while inter-
national negotiators seek
to prevent Tehran from
being able to assemble an
atomic weapons arsenal.
Kerry, who as a sena-
tor joined the effort to
impose crippling oil,
trade and investment
restrictions on Iran, said
the United States and
other world powers are
united behind an offer


see the U.S. as "dealing in
bad faith."
"They would bolt and
they will say, 'That's not the
deal,'" he said. "And then
the sanctions do fall apart."
"What we're asking
everyone to do is calm
down, look hard at what
can be achieved and what
the realities are," Kerry
added. "If this doesn't
work, we reserve the
right to dial back up the
sanctions. I will be up
here on the Hill asking
for increased sanctions
and we always reserve
the military option. So we
lose absolutely nothing,
except for the possibility
of getting in the way of
diplomacy and letting it
work."


Smithsonian doing 3D imaging of artifacts


WASHINGTON (AP)-
With most of its 137 million
objects kept behind the
scenes or in a faraway
museum, the Smithsonian
Institution is launching
a new 3D scanning and
printing initiative to make
more of its massive collec-
tion accessible to schools,
researchers and the public
worldwide.
A small team has begun
creating 3D models of some
key objects that represent
the breadth of the collec-
tion at the world's largest
museum complex. Some of
the first 3D scans include
the Wright brothers' first
airplane, Amelia Earhart's
flight suit, casts of President
Abraham Lincoln's face
during the CivilWar and
a RevolutionaryWar
gunboat. Less familiar
objects include a former
slave's horn, a missionary's
gun from the 1800s and
a woolly mammoth fossil
from the Ice Age. They are


pieces of history some
people may hear about but
rarely see or touch.
Now the Smithsonian
is launching a new 3D
viewer online Wednesday
to give people a closer look
at artifacts in their own
homes. The data can also
be downloaded, recreated
with a 3D printer and used
to help illustrate lessons
in history art and science
in schools. While some
schools might acquire 3D
printers for about $1,000,
other users may examine
the models on their
computers.
Smithsonian digitization
director GunterWaibel said
museums are working to
redefine their relationship
with audiences to become
more interactive.
"Historically, museums
have just tried to push data
out. It's been a one-way
street," he said. "Now mu-
seums are really rethinking
their relationship with their


audience, and they're trying
to empower their audi-
ences to help them along
whatever learning journey
they're on.
With the cost of 3D
scanning and printing
equipment declining in
recent years, Waibel said
there's a new opportunity
for museums to transform
how they collect, curate
and conserve artifacts and
also how they educate.
Three-dimensional models
can help tell stories and
create more engaging
lessons, he said.
Smithsonian educators
are building interactive
tours to view 3D models
online. On the Wright Flyer
aircraft from 1903, they
have created hotspots to
help explain its engine and
wing design, and the user
can rotate the object in all
directions for a closer look.
With the Lincoln masks,
the 3D viewer allows the
user to adjust lighting levels


to see the aging of the pres-
ident's face over the course
of the war. And a 3D scan
of a Chinese Buddha statue
allows the user to examine
and unravel a story carved
in its surface.
So far, the Smithsonian
is devoting about $350,000
annually to 3D digitization,
with companies also
donating equipment.
But museum officials are
working to raise $15 million
going forward to move the
3D lab from a suburban
warehouse in Maryland to
a new innovation center
planned for the National
Mall. There, the public
could see some of the
latest 3D technology and
even make their own 3D
prints of museum objects
in a "maker lab." Within
minutes, a 3D printer can
create a plastic replica of an
object by reproducing the
digital model layer by layer.
Smithsonian 3D
Program: http://3d.si.edu/


o The Sun/Thursday, November 14, 2013


WIRE Page 3


www.sunnewspapers.net


NATIONAL NEWS






Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Thursday, November 14,2013 FROM PAGE ONE


CBS doing review over '60 Minutes' Benghazi story


CAIRO (MCT) -When
"60 Minutes," perhaps
the United States'
premier news program,
apologized for featuring
a security contractor in
its report on Benghazi
whose story turned out
to be a lie, it said it had
been "misled." But a
close examination of the
controversial piece by
McClatchy shows that
there are other problems


CRISIS
FROM PAGE 1

U.N. humanitarian
chief Valerie Amos told
reporters after touring
Talcoban, the capital of
Leyte province. Her office
has released $25 million
in emergency relief fund,
accounting for a chunk
of the millions of dollars
pledged by countries
around the world.
The World Food
Program distributed
rice and other items to
nearly 50,000 people
in the Tacloban area


SIGNUPS

FROM PAGE 1

Republicans, many
pressing for repeal, said
that even Wednesday's
feeble sign-up figures
appeared to be pumped
up. The final number -
106,185 people -would
be even smaller if it
counted only those who
finalized their enrollment
by actually paying their
first month's premium,
Republicans said.
Administration
officials and senior con-
gressional Democrats
expressed confidence
in the program's future.
"We expect enrollment
will grow substantially
throughout the next five
months," said Health
and Human Services
Secretary Kathleen
Sebelius, who is in
overall charge.
"Even with the
issues we've had, the
marketplace is working
and people are en-
rolling," Sebelius said.



OBESITY
FROM PAGE 1

ratio. And if you need to
lose weight, they should
come up with a plan and
send you for counseling.
"We recognize that
telling patients to lose
weight is not enough,"
said Dr. Donna Ryan,
co-chair of the guidelines
committee.
The good news? By
next year, most insurance
companies are expected
to cover counseling and
other obesity treatments,
following in the steps of
the Medicare program,
which began paying for
one-on-one help last year.
More than a third of
U.S. adults are obese, and
that's been the case since



BIOFUELS
FROM PAGE 1

ethanol, a centerpiece of
America's green-energy
strategy. Ethanol from
corn has proven far
more damaging to the
environment than the
government predicted,
and cellulosic fuel
hasn't emerged as a
replacement.
"A lot of people were
willing to go with corn
ethanol because it's
a bridge product,"
said Silvia Secchi, an
agricultural economist
at Southern Illinois
University.
But until signifi-
cant cellulosic fuel


with the report, whose
broadcast renewed
debate about one of the
most contentious events
in recent U.S. diplomatic
history.
In its first acknowledge-
ment that the issues with
the report may go deeper
than just the interview
with security supervisor
Dylan Davies, CBS on
Wednesday, in response
to a series of questions

Wednesday, U.N. spokes-
man Martin Nesirky said.
While the cogs of
what promises to be a
massive international aid
effort are beginning to
turn, they are not quick
enough for the 600,000
people displaced, many
of them homeless,
hungry and thirsty.
With the Tacloban
airport battered and roads
made impassable by
debris, very little aid has
arrived in the city. Most of
it is stuck in Manila and
the nearby airport of Cebu,
a 45-minute flight away.
Many among the
desperate residents


posed by McClatchy, said
that it had undertaken "a
journalistic review that is
ongoing."
"60 Minutes" spokes-
man Kevin Tedesco
said CBS had begun the
review "the moment we
confirmed there was an
issue in our story." But
he declined to elaborate
on the investigation and
did not respond to the
specific issues McClatchy

have resorted to raiding
for food. Mobs overran
a rice warehouse on
Leyte, collapsing a wall
that killed eight people.
Thousands of sacks of
the grain were carted off.
Also Wednesday, security
forces exchanged gunfire
with an armed gang.
Tacloban Mayor
Alfred Romualdez urged
residents to flee the city
because local authorities
were having trouble pro-
viding food and water and
maintaining order, The
New York Times reported.
He said the city desper-
ately needed trucks to
distribute relief shipments


had raised, which
included unsourced
assertions that al-Qaida
was behind the Benghazi
attacks and claims about
the investigation into the
attacks that the FBI and
other experts question or
deny outright.
The "60 Minutes"
report, narrated by long-
time CBS correspondent
Lara Logan, was contro-
versial almost from the

accumulating at the air-
port as well as equipment
to pull decaying corpses
from the rubble.
Despite those incidents,
police said the situation
was improving.
"We have restored
order," said Carmelo
EspinaValmoria, director
of the Philippine National
Police special action force.
"There has been looting
for the last three days,
but the situation has
stabilized."
With the local police
force unable to operate
- most were victims -
the government rushed
thousands of soldiers and


moment it was broadcast
Oct. 27, as could be
expected for another ren-
dition of what took place
Sept. 11, 2012, when
gunmen stormed a U.S.
diplomatic compound
and set its main building
on fire. U.S. Ambassador
Christopher Stevens
and State Department
computer expert Sean
Smith, trapped inside,
died of smoke inhalation.

600 policemen from other
parts of the country. The
security forces, including
army engineers, are
helping clear roads and
remove the dead, many of
them on roadsides. A
6 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew
was in place.
"There's a lot of dead
bodies outside. There's
no water, no food," said
Dr. Victoriano Sambale,
one of the dozen med-
ical staff tending to
thousands of people
at the airport clinic.
Until Wednesday, there
was no anesthetic, so
open wounds had to be
stitched without it.


buy coverage on the
markets, with about
one-third qualifying for
U tax credits to reduce
Their premiums. Another
396,000 have been found
A O eligible for Medicaid,
the safety-net program
That is shaping up as the
D of et health care law's early
success story.
For many Democrats,
concerns over the
cascade of website
problems has been
compounded by the
focus on Obama's
misleading promise that
Americans who liked
their health insurance
AP PHOTO plans could keep them
From left, David Powner, director of information technology management issues at the Govern- under the overhaul. But
ment Accountability Office, Henry Chao, deputy chief information officer for Medicare and millions of people are
Medicaid Services, Frank Baitman, deputy assistant secretary for information technology at the receiving cancellation
Department of Health and Human Services, Todd Park, U.S. chief technology officer at the White notices. They have plans
House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and Steve VanRoekel, U.S. chief information officer that for various reasons
at the Office of Electronic Government in the Office of Management and Budget, testify before don't qualify for the law's
the House Oversight Committee about problems implementing Obamacare. "grandfather clause"


Responding to GOP
critics, she said the first
premiums are not due
until Dec. 15.
The online, state-level
insurance markets were
envisioned as the new

the middle of the last
decade. Officials define
someone with a BMI of
30 or higher as obese. A
5-foot-9 person would be
obese at 203 pounds.
Doctors are well
aware that excess
weight can trigger
diabetes and lead to
heart disease and other
health problems. Yet
surveys have shown
that only about a third
of obese patients recall
their doctor talking to
them about their BMI or
counseling them about
weight loss.
The guidelines were
released this week by
a group of medical
organizations that
include the American
Heart Association, the
American College of
Cardiology and the

materializes, she
said, "It's a bridge to
nowhere."
Cellulosics were the
linchpin of part of a
landmark 2007 energy
law that required oil
companies to blend
billions of gallons of
biofuel into America's
gasoline supply. The quo-
ta was to be met first by
corn ethanol and then, in
later years, by more fuels
made with non-food
sources.
It hasn't worked out.
"Cellulosic has been
five years away for
20 years now," said
Nathanael Greene, a
biofuels expert at the
Natural Resources
Defense Council. "Now
the first projects are up


portal to coverage for
people who don't have
health plans on the job.
But the federal market
was overwhelmed by
technical problems
when it opened Oct. 1,

Obesity Society.
They come amid
a spate of important
developments in the
fight against obesity.
Last year, the
Food and Drug
Administration ap-
proved two more
obesity-fighting drugs.
And this year, the
AMA labeled obesity
a disease, a measure
intended to get doctors
to pay more attention to
the problem and prod
more insurers to pay for
treatments.
Yet many people
have been on their
own when it comes
to slimming down,
left to sift through
the myriad diets and
exercise schemes that
are promoted for weight
loss. And most doctors

and running, but actually
it's still five years away."
Cellulosic makers are
expected to turn out at
most 6 million gallons
of fuel this year, the
government says. That's
enough fuel to meet U.S.
demand for 11 minutes.
It's less than 1 percent of
what Congress initially
required to be on the
market this year.
Corn ethanol is
essentially as simple to
make as moonshine but
requires fossil fuels to
plant, grow and distill.
For that reason, it has
limited environmental
benefits and some
drastic side effects.
Cellulosic biofuels,
meanwhile, are made
from grass, municipal


and the experience of
state-run markets has
been mixed.
The administration
said an additional 1
million individuals have
been found eligible to

have little training in
how to help their obese
patients, other than tell-
ing them it's a problem
and they need to do
something about it.
"I feel for these guys,"
said Dr. Tim Church, a
researcher at Louisiana
State University's
Pennington Biomedical
Research Center. "They
have patients who
come in and ask them
about the latest fad diet.
They're not trained in
this stuff and they're not
comfortable" recom-
mending particular diets
or weight-loss plans.
The guidelines advise
doctors to:
At least once year,
calculate patients' BMI,
measure their waists
and tell them if they are
overweight or obese.

waste or the woody,
non-edible parts of
plants all of which
take less land and
energy to produce.
Cellulosics offer a huge
reduction in greenhouse
gases compared with
petroleum-based fuels
and they don't use food
sources.
InVero Beach, Fla., for
example, agricultural
waste and trash are being
turned into ethanol.
In Columbus, Miss.,
yellow pine wood chips
are being turned into
gasoline and diesel. In
Emmetsburg, Iowa, and
Hugoton, Kan., construc-
tion is nearly complete
on large refineries that
will turn corncobs, leaves
and stalks into ethanol.


protection against
cancellations.
Obama has said he's
sorry that people are
losing their coverage
and has vowed to find
ways to address "holes
and gaps" in the law.

Develop a weight-
loss plan that includes
exercise and moderate
calorie-cutting.
Consider recom-
mending weight-loss
surgery for patients with
a BMI of 40 or for those
with a BMI of 35 who
also have two other risk
factors for heart disease
such as diabetes or high
blood pressure.
Refer overweight
and obese patients who
are headed for heart
problems to weight-loss
programs. Specifically,
discuss enrolling them
in at least 14 face-to-
face counseling sessions
over six months with
a registered dietitian,
psychologist or other
professional with
training in weight
management.

But despite the man-
date and government
subsidies, cellulosic fuels
haven't performed. This
year will be the fourth
in a row the biofuels
industry failed by large
margins to meet required
targets for cellulosic
biofuels.
"Has it taken longer
than we expected?
Yes," acknowledges
Agriculture Secretary
TomVilsack.
The Obama adminis-
tration's annual estimates
of cellulosic fuel produc-
tion have proven wildly
inaccurate. In 2010, the
administration projected
5 million gallons would
be available. In 2011, it
raised the projection to
6.6 million.


ALMANAC

Today is Thursday, Nov. 14,
the 318th day of 2013. There are
47 days left in the year.
Today in history
On Nov. 14,1862, during the
Civil War, President Abraham
Lincoln gave the go-ahead for
Maj. Gen. Ambrose Burnside's
plan to capture the Confed-
erate capital of Richmond; the
resulting Battle of Fredericksburg
proved a disaster for the Union.
On this date
In 1851, Herman Melville's
novel "Moby-Dick; Or, The Whale"
was first published in the United
States.
In 1881, Charles J. Guiteau
went on trial for assassinating
President James A. Garfield.
(Guiteau was convicted and
hanged the following year.)
In 1889, inspired by Jules
Verne, New York World reporter
Nellie Bly (Elizabeth Cochrane)
set out to travel around the
world in less than 80 days.
(She made the trip in 72 days.)
Jawarharlal Nehru, the first
prime minister of independent
India, was born.
In 1910, Eugene B. Ely became
the first aviator to take off from
a ship as his Curtiss pusher
rolled off a sloping platform on
the deck of the scout cruiser
USS Birmingham off Hampton
Roads, Va.
In 1940, during World War II,
German planes destroyed most
of the English town of Coventry.
In 1969, Apollo 12 blasted off
for the moon.
In 1970, a chartered Southern
Airways DC-9 crashed while
trying to land in Huntington,
W.Va., killing all 75 people on
board, including the Marshall
University football team and its
coaching staff.
In 1972, the Dow Jones
Industrial Average closed above
the 1,000 level for the first time,
ending the day at 1,003.16.
In 1986, the Securities and
Exchange Commission imposed
a $100 million penalty against
inside-trader Ivan F. Boesky and
barred him from working again
in the securities industry.
Today's birthdays
Actress Kathleen Hughes is
85. Former MLB All-Star Jimmy
Piersall is 84. Former NASA
astronaut Fred Haise is 80. Jazz
musician Ellis Marsalis is 79.
Writer P.J. O'Rourke is 66. Zydeco
singer-musician Buckwheat
Zydeco is 66. Britain's Prince
Charles is 65. Rock singer-mu-
sician James Young (Styx) is
64. Singer Stephen Bishop is
62. Pianist Yanni is 59. Former
Secretary of State Condoleezza
Rice is 59. Presidential adviser
Valerie Jarrett is 57. Actress
Laura San Giacomo is 52. Actor
D.B. Sweeney is 52. Retired MLB
All-Star pitcher Curt Schilling is
47. Rock musician Travis Barker
is 38. Contemporary Christian
musician Robby Shaffer is
38. Actor Brian Dietzen is 36.
Actress Olga Kurylenko is 34.
Actor Graham Patrick Martin
is 22.


Pot-laced treats
dropped on
central Pa. street

STATE COLLEGE, Pa.
(AP) Police say they
found some tricky mari-
juana-laced treats that
somebody apparently
dropped on a central
Pennsylvania street.
State College police
told the Centre Daily
Times that a resident
found the treats on
Halloween morning,
several hours before
trick-or-treating was to
begin.
The treats were
similar to marshmallow
crisped rice treats,
except they were made
with a different kind
of cereal and tested
positive for marijuana.
The three bars were
wrapped in foil and
found inside a plastic
bag that someone
apparently dropped by
mistake.
Police don't know
who made the treats
but have been trying to
find out.


Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, November 14,2013


FROM PAGE ONE






The Sun/Thursday, November 14, 2013


BUSINESS NEWS/STOCKS


www.sunnewspapers.net WIRE


Indexes climb back to




records after retail boost


NEWYORK (AP) -
Macy's gave the stock
market some early
holiday cheer.
Stock indexes climbed
back into record terri-
tory Wednesday after
the department store
chain gave an optimistic
forecast for holiday
sales. Macy's surged
9 percent, leading strong
gains among retailers
including J.C. Penney,
Nordstrom and Target.
The shopping season
is a make-or-break time
for retailers because it can
account for as much as 40
percent of annual reve-
nue. It also gives investors
an indication of where
consumer spending, a
crucial component of the
U.S. economy, is headed.
"When the consumer


starts spending, it's
pretty much a rising
tide," said Ron Florance,
deputy chief investment
officer for Wells Fargo
Private Bank. "That
gives a big lift across the
board."
The S&P 500 rose
14.31 points, or 0.8
percent, to 1,782, its 34th
record close this year.
The Dow Jones
industrial average
gained 70.96 points,
or 0.5 percent, to
15,821.63, also a record.
The Nasdaq composite
rose 45.66 points, or
1.2 percent, to 3,965.58,
well below its record
close of 5,048.52 reached
in March 2000.
Macy's jumped $4.35
to $50.68. Its earnings
climbed 22 percent for


the quarter ended. Nov.
2. The department store
chain, which rose the
most in the S&P 500
index, was the first major
retailer to report earn-
ings for the quarter.
U.S. stocks started the
day lower as investors
considered when the
Federal Reserve might
start reducing its eco-
nomic stimulus.
The Fed is buying
$85 billion of bonds a
month to keep interest
rates low and support the
economy. That has helped
drive a rally in stocks this
year. Surprisingly strong
reports on economic
growth and hiring last
week have led investors
to speculate that the Fed
may pare back its stimu-
lus sooner than expected.


Samsung says it owes Apple



$52 million, not $380 million


SAN JOSE, Calif (AP) -
How much does Samsung
Electronics owe Apple
for copying vital features
of the iPhone and iPad,
such as scrolling and the
"bounce-back" function
at the end of documents?
Apple says $380 mil-
lion. Samsung counters
with $52 million.
The companies
made their demands
Wednesday during open-
ing statements of a patent
trial in San Jose, Calif.
At issue are 13 older
products a previous jury
found infringed several
Apple patents. That
previous jury awarded
Apple $1.05 billion after
determining 26 Samsung
products had infringed


six Apple patents.
But a judge found
the jury miscalculated
$400 million in damages
for 13 products and
ordered a new trial to
determine the proper
amount.
'Apple lost sales
because Samsung was
selling infringing prod-
ucts," Apple attorney
Harold Mclhenny told
the jury. He argued
that Apple's lost profits,
Samsung's profits on the
offending devices and
royalties owed Apple, add
up to $380 million.
"In a fair fight, in a fair
competition, the money
they got would have and
should have gone to
Apple," Mcllhenny said.


Samsung's attorney
Bill Price countered that
consumers preferred
Samsung's devices, which
operate with Google's
Android system, because
of the many differences -
rather than the similarities
- they have with Apple's
products. Price told the
jury that Samsung owes
Apple $52 million.
'Apple is simply asking
for much more money
than it's entitled to," Price
said.
Price readily conced-
ed that Samsung was
guilty of copying Apple's
features, but downplayed
the significance of the
technology in devices
that are built with hun-
dreds of patents each.


here's no telling
whether the rest
of this hurricane
season will bring anything
like Superstorm Sandy,
which flooded more than
150,000 homes, killed
more than 140 people
and left about 8.5 mil-
lion homes in 20 states
without power. A relatively
minor storm can also
cause major damage if
it includes high winds,
heavy rain or tree-snap-
ping ice or snow.
Consumer Reports offers
these ways to help protect
your home and the people
in it before disaster strikes.
Cover windows proper-
ly. Experts used to recom-
mend taping windows to
limit breakage to a few
large pieces, rather than
many smaller ones. But
small and large pieces can
be equally deadly. A safer
bet: Keep windows shut,
and close blinds, shades
and drapes.
Secure outdoor items.
High winds can turn lawn
chairs, potted plants and
trash cans into deadly
projectiles. Move whatever
you can into a garage or
basement.
Park cars on high
ground. Two feet of
floodwater can carry a car
away. What's more, driving
in water just 8 inches deep
can ruin the engine if the
water seeps in through the
air intake. Park at a high
elevation or on a hill -
but not beneath trees.
Protect your valuables.
Move what you can to
higher floors if you expect
flooding. Also, think ahead
by documenting and pho-
tographing items you'd
include in an insurance
claim if lost or ruined.
Build an emergency kit.


Consumer

Reports


It should have a whistle to
attract help, dust masks,
duct tape, a wrench or
pliers to turn off water
if needed, flashlights,
batteries and local maps.
Plan on a gallon of water
per person per day for at
least three days. Include
moist towelettes, garbage
bags and plastic ties
for personal sanitation.
Also consider changes of
clothing and sleeping bags
or blankets.
Be prepared for inju-
ries. A first-aid kit should
be stocked with bandages
in various sizes, sterile
dressings and gloves, hand
sanitizer and antibiotic
towelettes, a thermometer,
pain medicines, tweezers
and scissors.
Fuel up. Fill all of your
vehicles' tanks, because
gas stations could lose
power. Remember that
most gas generators
require roughly 12 to
20 gallons of gas per
day. Also figure on at
least a gallon of gas for
extensive chainsawing.
Store fuel away from the
house.
Have the right phones.
Keep at least one corded
phone because cordless
phones require AC power.
Be sure cellphones are
charged.
Get the right foods.
Frozen food may last two
days without power, but
refrigerated items can
spoil after four hours.
Consumer Reports
recommends keeping at
least a three-day supply of
nonperishable foods such
as crackers, whole-grain


cereals and canned foods.
Don't forget the manual
can opener.
Check your fire
extinguishers. You should
have one with a minimum
classification of "2-A:10-
B:C" on each floor. Check
the dial or pop-up pin for
adequate pressure each
month. Professionally
repressurize extinguishers
older than six years, and
replace any older than
12 years.
Have some ready cash.
Banks and ATMs could be
out of service, assuming
you can get to them.
During the storm,
Consumer Reports recom-
mends the following:
Find the safest place.
Stay in a central room
without windows. Have
kids? Ease the fear factor
with books, a toy or two,
and if you have power or
a generator, some movies
and video games.
Avoid electrocution
risks. Don't use any
plug-in device if flooding
or wetness is nearby.
Landline phones can also
be a shock hazard in an
electrical storm. If you
must make a call during
a storm, use a cell or
cordless phone if possi-
ble or use a landline
phone's speaker mode to
reduce contact with the
handset. Avoid baths and
showers until the storm
passes. Watch out for
downed power lines and
live wires.
Use cars safely. Obey
emergency crews and
follow designated routes.
If your vehicle stalls in
water, shut off the ignition
and seek higher ground;
the leading cause of
Sandy-related deaths was
drowning.


MutualFunds
3-yr
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
Advance Capital I
Balanced b 19.31 +.11 +9.8
EqGrow b 32.30 +30 +13.9
Retinc b 8.65 +.01 +3.5
Alger Group
SmCapGrB m 8.77 +.09 +15.1
Alliance Bernstein
SmCpGroA m 51.94 +.65 +22.2
AllianzGI
WellnessD b 34.43 +.20 +18.2
Alpine
DynBal d 12.51 +.07 +8.3
DynDiv d 3.76 +.02 +4.6
Amana
Growth b 31.49 ... +10.0
Income b 42.84 ... +13.8
American Beacon
LgCpVlls 28.15 +.26 +16.7
American Century
CapVallv 8.69 +.07 +16.4
Eqlnclnv 9.08 +.04 +12.4
HiYIdMu 8.83 ... +4.7
InTTxFlBInv 11.22 ... +3.1
InvGrlnv 33.42 +35 +14.1
Ultralnv 33.82 +37 +16.4
American Funds
AMCAPA m 27.64 +.23 +16.8
BalA m 23.80 +.16 +13.1
BondA m 12.49 +.02 +3.1
CaplncBuA m 57.95 +.14 +9.5
CapWIdBdA m 20.25 +.05 +2.1
CpWdGrIA m 43.85 +.15 +10.4
EurPacGrA m 47.06 +.01 +6.3
FnlnvA m 50.76 +39 +14.9
GIbBalA m 30.14 +.13 NA
GrthAmA m 43.66 +.41 +15.0
HilncA m 11.31 -.02 +7.3
IncAmerA m 20.33 +.06 +11.8
IntBdAmA m 13.49 +.02 +1.5
InvCoAmA m 37.81 +.32 +14.5
MutualA m 34.62 +.24 +15.1
NewEconA m 38.20 +.17 +17.5
NewPerspA m 37.84 +.16 +11.9
NwWrldA m 58.11 +.10 +3.5
SmCpWdA m 49.45 +.20 +10.6
TaxEBdAmA m 12.42 ... +4.2
WAMutlnvA m 39.00 +.26 +16.9
Artisan
Intl d 29.38 +.05 +11.7
IntlVal d 37.87 +.04 +14.2
MdCpVal 27.60 +.24 +17.9
MidCap 49.31 +.53 +18.4
BBH
TaxEffEq d 21.41 +.20 +16.9
Baron
Asset b 64.42 +.60 +16.6
Growth b 71.62 +.63 +19.8
Partners b 31.80 +.05 +20.1
Berkshire
Focus d 19.27 +.26 +17.4
BlackRock
Engy&ResA m 15.32 +.15 +.9
EqDivA m 23.50 +.14 +14.0
EqDivl 23.55 +.14 +14.3
GlobAIcA m 21.92 +.09 +6.6
GlobAlcC m 20.34 +.08 +5.8
GlobAlcl 22.04 +.09 +6.9
HiYIdBdls 8.24 ... +9.5
HiYldSvc b 8.24 ... +9.1
Bruce
Bruce 458.96 +1.94 +12.1
CGM
Focus 37.23 +.44 +4.6
Clipper
Clipper 88.15 +.73 +15.8


Cohen & Steers
Realty 66.26 +.41 +9.9
Columbia
AcornlntZ 47.49 +.02 +9.0
AcornZ 37.74 +34 +15.5
DivlncZ 18.13 +.13 +15.8
IntlVIB m 14.60 +.08 +5.0
Mar21CB m 16.40 +19 +11.8
MarGrlA m 27.24 +35 +14.1
DFA
lYrFixInI 10.33 ... +.7
2YrGIbFII 10.06 +.8
5YrGIbFII 11.13 +.02 +2.6
EmMkCrEql 19.19 -.07 -1.9
EmMktVall 27.87 -.11 -4.4
IntCorEql 12.46 +.04 +7.9
IntSmCapl 19.88 -.04 +11.2
IntlSCol 19.21 +.02 +9.7
IntlValul 19.27 +.10 +5.8
RelEstScI 26.85 +.18 +10.8
USCorEqll 16.01 +15 +17.5
USCorEq21 15.89 +15 +17.8
USLgCo 14.09 +12 +16.5
USLgVall 30.26 +30 +19.3
USMicrol 19.97 +19 +19.9
USSmVaIIll 35.14 +35 +18.6
USSmalll 30.54 +.30 +19.4
DWS-Scudder
EnhEMFIS d 10.33 -.01 +1.3
EqDivB m 41.49 +37 +11.5
GIbOA m 46.68 +.20 +11.6
GIbOB m 41.30 +18 +10.8
GIbOC m 41.58 +18 +10.8
GIbOS d 48.24 +.21 +11.9
GrlncS 23.67 +.23 +16.7
HlthCareS d 36.49 +.27 +23.2
LAEqS d 29.39 +.17 -6.2
LC2020S 15.26 +.07 +8.1
StrHiYIdTxFS 11.90 ... +4.0
Davis
NYVentA m 41.22 +35 +13.1
NYVentY 41.73 +36 +13.4
Delaware Invest
AmerGovtA m 8.33 +.01 +3.3
Dodge & Cox
Bal 95.73 +.73 +14.7
Income 13.58 +.02 +4.2
IntlStk 41.93 +.15 +8.3
Stock 161.91 +1.67 +18.4
DoubleLine
TotRetBdN b 10.91 ... +5.9
Dreyfus
Apprecialnv 50.91 +.38 +12.9
MidCapldx 37.20 +.38 +16.7
MuniBd 11.20 ... +3.4
NYTaxEBd 14.40 -.01 +2.8
ShTrmlncD 10.65 ... +1.8
SmCoVal 38.23 +.32 +16.9
Eaton Vance
DivBldrA m 13.02 +.11 +13.4
TMSmCaB m 19.89 +.19 +13.7
FMI
CommStk 30.33 +.24 +16.2
LgCap 21.46 +.15 +15.4
FPA
Capital d 48.18 +.41 +13.7
Cres d 33.26 +14 +11.5
Newlnc d 10.36 ... +1.8
Fairholme Funds
Fairhome d 42.18 +.85 +10.2
Federated
HilncBdA m 7.78 -.01 +8.2
IntSmMCoA m 47.11 -.02 +9.0
KaufmanA m 6.68 +.06 +12.6
MDTMdCpGrStB m 4124+47 +126
StrVall 5.80 +.02 +14.3
Fidelity
AstMgr2O 13.53 +.03 +4.9
AstMgr5O 18.12 +.06 +8.2


Bal 22.43 +14 +11.5
BIChGrow 61.58 +.72 +17.2
Canada d 58.20 +.43 +3.5
CapApr 37.82 +32 +17.1
Caplnc d 9.75 +.01 +7.5
Contra 98.39 +1.05 +15.5
DivGrow 34.99 +30 +14.0
Divrlntl d 35.53 +.05 +7.9
EmergAsia d 29.87 -.36 +1.1
EmgMkt d 23.40 -.08 -2.2
Eqlnc 57.50 +35 +13.7
Eqlncll 23.86 +15 +13.8
FF2015 12.81 +.05 +7.4
FF2035 13.43 +.06 +9.9
FF2040 9.46 +.05 +10.0
Fidelity 41.86 +.40 +14.3
FItRtHiln d 9.99 ... +4.2
FocStk 19.76 +.24 +18.5
FourlnOne 35.22 +.21 +12.4
Free2000 12.67 +.03 +4.4
Free2OlO 15.34 +.05 +7.2
Free2020 15.69 +.06 +7.9
Free2025 13.34 +.06 +8.9
Free203O 16.18 +.07 +9.2
GNMA 11.32 +.02 +2.8
GrowCo 122.79 +1.38 +18.7
Growlnc 27.09 +.18 +18.2
Hilnc d 9.36 -.01 +7.8
Indepndnc 34.06 +.41 +14.2
IntRelEst d 10.36 -.03 +8.8
IntlDisc d 39.16 -.04 +8.0
InvGrdBd 7.71 +.01 +3.8
LatinAm d 38.58 +.25 -8.9
LevCoSt d 41.87 +39 +18.3
LowPriStk d 49.01 +.29 +17.6
Magellan 94.38 +.89 +12.6
MeCpSto 15.20 +.13 +18.6
MidGap d 38.66 +34 +17.6
Munilnc d 12.73 ... +3.9
NewMille 39.54 +36 +18.0
NewMktln d 15.69 ... +5.4
OTO 77.84 +1.09 +18.5
Overseas d 38.80 -.02 +9.4
Puritan 21.01 +14 +11.4
ShTmBond 8.59 +.01 +1.5
SmCapDisc d 31.33 +.28 +22.3
Stratlnc 10.97 ... +4.7
TaxFrB d 10.99 ... +4.0
TotalBd 10.48 +.02 +4.0
USBdldx 11.44 +.02 NA
USBdldxlnv 11.44 +.02 +2.8
Value 100.38 +.69 +16.9
ValueDis 20.88 +.18 +16.3
Fidelity Advisor
EqGrowB m 70.53 +.87 +15.4
IntlCapAB m 12.47 +.01 +8.1
LmtdTermBondA m 11.46+.01 +2.8
LmtdTermBondB m 11.45+.01 +2.1
LrgCapA m 27.69 +.22 +19.3
LrgCapB m 25.86 +.21 +18.4
NewlnsA m 28.87 +34 +14.6
Newlnsl 29.28 +34 +14.9
StratlncA m 12.25 +.01 +4.4
Fidelity Select
Biotech d 166.94 +1.74 +37.9
Electron d 59.85 +.55 +11.0
Energy d 63.18 +.63 +10.9
Gold d 19.87 +.02 -26.2
Leisure d 133.78 +1.17 +18.1
Materials d 83.28 +.60 +12.2
MedDeliv d 73.22 +.65 +18.9
MedEqSys d 37.66 +.24 +17.7
NatGas d 38.53 +31 +8.3
NatRes d 38.66 +.43 +7.6
Wireless d 10.12 +.06 +12.9
Fidelity Spartan
50c1dxbAdvtg 63.30 +.52 +16.5
5001dxlnstl 63.31 +.53 NA
5001dxlnv 63.30 +.53 +16.5
ExtMktldAg d 52.45 +.58 +17.6
IntlldxAdg d 40.36 +.03 +7.8
TotMktIdAg d 52.69 +.47 +16.8
First Eagle
GIbA m 54.89 +.16 +9.5


OverseasA m 24.18 +.03 +7.1
First Investors
GlobalA m 8.34 +.01 +9.2
TotalRetA m 19.16 +12 +12.1
Firsthand
e-Comm 7.85 +.15 +10.3
FrankTemp-Frank
FedTFA m 11.77 ... +4.0
FrankTemp-Franklin
CATFA m 6.94 ... +4.0
EqlnA m 22.49 +18 +14.5
FLTFA m 10.87 -.01 +2.6
GrOppA m 28.74 +.32 +15.0
GrowthA m 62.69 +39 +13.8
HYTFA m 9.87 ... +3.8
Income C m 2.42 +.01 +9.7
IncomeA m 2.39 +.01 +10.2
IncomeAdv 2.37 ... +10.3
NYTFA m 11.21 ... +2.6
RisDvA m 47.81 +30 +15.9
StrlncA m 10.54 +.01 +5.7
TotalRetA m 9.96 +.01 +3.9
USGovA m 6.53 +.02 +2.2
FrankTemp-Mutual
DiscovZ 34.89 +.09 +11.3
DiscovA m 34.34 +.09 +11.0
SharesZ 27.90 +14 +13.6
SharesA m 27.63 +.15 +13.3
FrankTemp-Templeton
GIBondC m 13.03 +.01 +4.2
GIBondA m 13.01 +.02 +4.7
GIBondAdv 12.97 +.02 +4.9
GrowthA m 24.54 ... +13.9
WorldA m 19.84 ... +13.7
GE
S&SUSEq 57.88 +.59 +16.0
GMO
EmgMktsVI d 10.93 -.08 -2.3
IntltVIIV 25.11 +.11 +8.2
Quill 26.94 +.21 +16.2
QuVI 26.96 +.21 +16.4
Gabelli
AssetAAA m 65.90 +.49 +15.8
EqlncomeAAA m 27.96+.22 +15.0
Value m 19.47 +.17 +16.2


Goldman Sachs
HiYieldls d 7.33
MidCpVals 50.13
ShDuGovA m 10.18
Harbor
Bond 12.20
CapAplnst 55.00
Intllnstl 70.05
Intllnv b 69.18
Hartford
CapAprA m 46.35
CpApHLSIA 57.70
SmalICoB m 21.35
Heartland
ValuePlus m 37.80
Hennessy
CornerGrlnv 15.87
Hodges
Hodges m 35.04
INVESCO
CharterA m 22.45
ComstockA m 22.96
Divlnclnv b 18.76
EnergyA m 45.58
Energylnv b 45.42
EqlncomeA m 11.02
EuroGrA m 38.67
GIbGrB m 27.67
GrowlncA m 26.75
GrwthAIIA m 13.50
PacGrowB m 22.14
SmCapEqA m 17.22
Techlnv b 39.23
USMortA m 12.49
Ivy
AssetSTrB m 29.26
AssetStrA m 30.34


-.01 +8.2
+.47 +15.2
.. +.3
+.03 +3.4
+.64 +16.3
+18 +7.6
+18 +7.2
+.43 +12.8
+.53 +13.8
+.25 +16.5
+.21 +13.6
+16 +14.9
+.41 +19.4
+.19 +13.9
+.20 +16.9
+10 +13.1
+.45 +6.6
+.45 +6.6
+.07 +12.1
-.05 +11.1
+.11 +9.9
+.22 +15.1
+.05 +9.8
+.04 +1.6
+15 +17.3
+39 +10.7
+.02 +2.8
+.08 +8.7
+.08 +9.5


AssetStrC m 29.40 +.07 +8.7
JPMorgan
CoreBdUlt 11.64 +.02 +3.4
CoreBondA m 11.64 +.03 +3.0
CoreBondSelect 11.63 +.03 +3.2
HighYldSel 8.18 -.01 +7.8
LgCapGrA m 29.92 +31 +14.9
LgCapGrSelect 29.92 +31 +15.2
MidCpVall 35.78 +32 +18.8
ShDurBndSel 10.92 ... +1.1
USEquit 14.42 +.15 +16.4
USLCpCrPS 28.84 +.29 +16.1
Janus
BalC m 29.99 +.16 +9.5
ContrT 19.97 +.01 +11.5
EntrprsT 82.19 +.59 +16.0
RexBdS b 10.53 +.02 +4.0
GIbValT d 14.52 +.07 +11.6
HiYldT 9.32 -.02 +7.9
OverseasT 36.85 +.18 -5.9
PerkinsMCVL 26.53 +.20 +11.7
PerkinsMCVT 26.24 +.20 +11.5
PerkinsSCVL 26.73 +.20 +11.8
ShTmBdT 3.08 ... +1.9
T 39.62 +.28 +12.4
USCrT 19.96 +.19 +17.7
VentureT 72.70 +.66 +20.5
John Hancock
UfBal b 15.20 +.07 +9.1
UfGrl b 15.93 +.09 +10.6
Lazard
EmgMkEqtl d 18.92 -.20 +.3
Litman Gregory
MaslntllntI 17.56 +.06 +6.7
Long leaf Partners
LongPart 32.54 +.16 +14.3
Loomis Sayles
BdlnstI 15.24 +.05 +7.7
BdR b 15.18 +.05 +7.4
Lord Abbett
AffiliatA m 15.23 +.13 +13.6
BondDebA m 8.25 +.01 +7.9
ShDurlncA m 4.57 +.01 +3.7
ShDurlncC m 4.60 +.01 +2.9
MFS
IslntlEq 22.02 +.01 +9.2
MAInvB m 26.33 +.19 +14.7
TotRetA m 17.38 +.10 +10.5
ValueA m 32.63 +.23 +16.4
Valuel 32.79 +.23 +16.7
MainStay
HiYldGorA m 6.05 -.01 +7.9
Mairs & Power
Grthlnv 108.95 +.96 +19.8
Manning & Napier
PBConTrmS 14.17 +.04 +5.9
PBMaxTrmS 21.09 +.14 +11.4
WrIdOppA 8.93 +.02 +5.8
Marsico
21stCent m 18.88 +.22 +12.6
RexCap m 18.79 +.22 +16.2
Merger
Merger b 16.31 +.03 +3.0
Meridian
MeridnGr x 35.48-12.88 +14.5
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdl 10.66 +.02 +5.5
TotRtBd b 10.67 +.03 +5.3
Midas Funds
Magic m 24.47 +.14 +18.7
Midas m 1.45 ... -34.4
Morgan Stanley
FocGrB m 46.70 +.56 +14.4
MdCpGrl 45.70 +.58 +12.1
Muhlenkamp
Muhlenkmp 67.74 +.88 +12.5
Natixis
LSInvBdY 12.27 +.04 +5.7
LSStratlncA m 16.32 +.06 +8.6
LSStratlncC m 16.41 +.05 +7.8


Needham
Growth m 43.08 +.40 +12.1
Neuberger Berman
Genesislnstl 63.69 +.44 +17.9
SmCpGrlnv 26.52 +.22 +18.1
Northeast Investors
Growth 19.92 +.29 +9.2
Northern
HYFixInc d 7.59 ... +8.1
Stkldx 21.99 ... +16.1
Nuveen
NYMuniBdl 10.49 ... +3.1
Oak Associates
BIkOakEmr 3.69 +.03 +8.0
HlthSinces 19.33 +.12 +20.4
PinOakEq 44.07 +39 +18.1
RedOakTec 14.24 +.14 +17.9
Oakmark
EqlncI 34.37 +.24 +11.3
Global I 30.45 +17 +13.2
Intl I 26.44 +.04 +13.3
Oakmark I 63.41 +.58 +18.5
Select I 40.18 +33 +18.4
Old Westbury
GIbSmMdCp 17.31 +.07 +11.1
LgCpStr 12.10 +.07 +6.6
Oppenheimer
DevMktA m 36.80 +.06 +2.7
DevMktY 36.47 +.06 +3.0
GlobA m 78.01 +.46 +11.5
IntlBondA m 6.06 +.01 +1.0
IntlGrY 36.62 +.03 +12.2
MainStrA m 46.47 +39 +15.0
RocMuniAr m 14.74 -.01 +2.8
SrFItRatA m 8.40 ... +5.9
StrlncA m 4.12 ... +4.0
Osterweis
OsterStrlnc d 11.87 -.01 +6.2
PIMCO
AAstAAutP 10.21 -.01 +4.1
AIIAssetl 12.26 ... +5.7
AIIAuthA m 10.21 ... +3.8
AIIAuthIn 10.21 -.01 +4.2
ComRIRStI 5.52 ... -3.9
Divlnclnst 11.53 +.01 +5.3
EMktCurl 10.11 +.03
EmMktslns 11.03 +.01 +4.0
ForBdlnstl 10.63 ... +5.6
HiYIdls 9.57 ... +7.6
LowDrls 10.37 +.01 +2.5
RealRet 11.23 +.03 +3.3
ShtTermls 9.87 ... +1.5
TotRetA m 10.86 +.02 +3.5
TotRetAdm b 10.86 +.02 +3.7
TotRetC m 10.86 +.02 +2.7
TotRetIs 10.86 +.02 +3.9
TotRetrnD b 10.86 +.02 +3.6
TotlRetnP 10.86 +.02 +3.8
PRIMECAP Odyssey
AggGr 29.17 +.27 +23.6
Growth 23.55 +.22 +17.5
Parnassus
Eqlnclnv 37.45 +33 +17.2
Permanent
Portfolio 47.54 +.09 +3.4
Pioneer
PioneerA m 41.26 +38 +12.5
Principal
LCGrllnst 12.90 +.13 +17.0
SAMConGrA m 17.60 +12 +11.6
Prudential Investmen
BlendA m 23.68 +.26 +13.7
IntlEqtyC m 7.01 +.02 +7.0
JenMidCapGrZ 40.49 +35 +16.1
Putnam
GlbUtilB m 11.50 +.04 +3.3
GrowlncA m 19.01 ... +15.7
IntlNewB m 16.96 -.01 +5.4
SmCpValA m 14.71 +.14 +16.6
Pyxis
PremGrEqA m 32.48 ... +16.2


Stocks of Local Interest


Reynolds
BlueChip b 74.67 +.89 +13.5
Royce
PAMutlnv d 14.83 +.12 +15.2
Premierlnv d 23.26 +.14 +13.3
ValueSvc m 14.05 +.22 +10.4
Rydex
Electrlnv 61.14 +.87 +5.2
HithCrAdv b 24.72 +.17 +19.7
NsdqlOOlv 22.23 +.26 +16.8
Schwab
1000l1nv d 49.03 +.43 +16.3
S&P500Sel d 28.21 +.23 +16.5
Scout
Internal 36.26 +.11 +6.6
Sentinel
CmnStkA m 42.86 +35 +15.5
Sequoia
Sequoia 212.21 +1.13 +20.3
State Farm
Growth 66.79 +.36 +11.7
Stratton
SmCapVal d 72.48 +.67 +18.5
T Rowe Price
Balanced 23.59 +.12 +11.1
BIChpGr 60.84 +.66 +18.6
CapApprec 26.54 +.14 +13.9
Corplnc 9.66 +.02 +5.0
EmMktStk d 31.94 -.08 -2.3
Eqlndex d 48.12 +.40 +16.3
Eqtylnc 32.90 +.23 +16.0
FinSer 19.57 +13 +15.0
GIbTech 13.15 +11 +18.1
GrowStk 49.58 +.51 +17.2
HealthSci 58.89 +.63 +30.9
HiYield d 7.11 -.01 +8.6
InsLgCpGr 25.73 +.27 +18.1
IntlBnd d 9.56 +.03 +1.2
IntlEqldx d 13.43 +.02 +7.3
IntlGrlnc d 15.31 +.01 +7.3
IntlStk d 15.81 +.02 +5.3
MediaTele 70.39 +1.01 +19.1
MidCapVa 30.38 +.25 +15.3
MidCpGr 74.10 +.72 +16.6
NJTaxFBd 11.49 ... +3.7
NewAmGro 46.86 +.55 +16.4
NewAsia d 16.20 -.10 +1.6
NewEra 47.48 +.45 +2.9
NewHoriz 47.30 +.53 +25.1
Newlncome 9.41 +.01 +2.9
OrseaStk d 9.96 +.02 +8.7
R2015 14.48 +.06 +9.5
R2025 15.35 +.08 +11.4
R2035 16.10 +10 +12.6
Rtmt2010 18.08 +.06 +8.4
Rtmt2020 20.53 +.10 +10.6
Rtmt2030 22.49 +.12 +12.1
Rtmt2040 23.14 +.15 +12.9
SciTech 36.37 +.47 +13.0
ShTmBond 4.80 +.01 +1.5
SmCpStk 45.20 +.42 +19.7
SmCpVal d 49.72 +37 +17.3
SpecGrow 23.91 +.16 +13.8
Speclnc 12.92 +.03 +5.6
SumGNMA 9.64 +.02 +2.4
SumMulnc 11.18 ... +4.1
TaxEfMult d 19.86 +.21 +16.3
TaxFShlnt 5.65 ... +2.1
Value 34.80 +30 +18.1
TCW
TotRetBdl 10.11 +.02 +6.2
TIAA-CREF
Eqlx 13.85 +12 +16.8
IntlE d 19.16 +.06 +7.9
Target
SmCapVal 28.03 +.22 +17.0
Templeton
InFEqSeS 22.53 -.11 +7.2
Third Avenue
Value d 58.02 +.27 +6.0
Thompson
LargeCap 45.98 +.42 +16.3


Thornburg
IncBldC m 20.60 +.04 +8.3
IntlValA m 30.10 ... +4.2
IntlVall 30.75 ... +4.6
Thrivent
IncomeA m 9.00 +.01 +4.8
MidCapGrA m 21.82 +19 +11.7
Tocqueville
Gold m 35.78 +10 -23.6
Turner
SmCapGr 46.23 +.46 +17.3
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 27.22 -.03 +11.0
U.S. Global Investor
Gld&Prec m 6.48 +.03 -25.9
GlobRes m 9.73 +.08 -1.6
USAA
CorstnMod 14.78 +.05 +7.0
GNMA 9.94 +.02 +2.1
Growlnc 20.94 +.21 +14.6
HYOpp d 8.82 ... +8.8
PrcMtlMin 14.61 +.04 -26.4
SdTech 19.44 +19 +17.5
TaxELgTm 13.05 ... +4.7
TgtRt2O4O 13.24 +.05 +9.2
TgtRt2050 12.98 +.06 +9.5
WorldGro 26.51 +14 +14.6
Unified
Winlnv m 17.06 -.02 +7.6
Value Line
PremGro b 35.23 +.25 +17.0
Vanguard
500Adml 164.70 +1.37 +16.6
5001nv 164.67 +1.36 +16.4
BalldxAdm 27.04 +17 +11.4
Balldxlns 27.04 +16 +11.5
CAITAdml 11.31 ... +4.3
CapOp 46.10 +.42 +17.3
CapOpAdml 106.52 +.97 +17.4
Convert 14.63 +.03 +9.3
DevMktsldxlP 119.00 +31 NA
DivGr 21.02 +15 +17.2
EmMktlAdm 33.48 -.14 -2.4
EnergyAdm 128.21 +1.13 +7.9
Energylnv 68.27 +.60 +7.8
Eqlnc 29.86 +18 +18.5
EqlncAdml 62.59 +.38 +18.6
ExplAdml 102.26 +1.08 +19.3
Explr 109.81 +1.17 +19.1
ExtdldAdm 60.70 +.66 +17.9
Extdldlst 60.71 +.67 +17.9
ExtdMktldxlP 149.84 +1.64 NA
FAWeUSIns 97.42 +16 +5.2
FAWeUSInv 19.50 +.03 +5.0
GNMA 10.54 +.03 +2.6
GNMAAdml 10.54 +.03 +2.7
GIbEq 22.72 +12 +11.0
Grolnc 38.23 +32 +16.9
GrthldAdm 45.76 +.46 +16.5
Grthlstld 45.76 +.46 +16.5
GrthlstSg 42.37 +.42 +16.5
HYCor 6.01 -.01 +7.9
HYCorAdml 6.01 -.01 +8.0
HltCrAdml 80.52 +.53 +21.6
HlthCare 190.79 +1.24 +21.5
ITBondAdm 11.30 +.03 +3.8
ITGradeAd 9.82 +.02 +4.4
InfPrtAdm 26.10 +.06 +3.3
InfPrtl 10.63 +.02 +3.3
InflaPro 13.29 +.03 +3.2
Instldxl 163.62 +1.36 +16.6
InstPlus 163.63 +1.36 +16.6
InstTStPI 40.86 +.36 +16.9
IntlGr 22.41 +.05 +7.4
IntlGrAdm 71.36 +17 +7.6
IntlStklcbdxAdm 27.44 +.03 NA
IntlStkldxl 109.75 +15 NA
IntlStkldxlPIs 109.77 +15 NA
IntlStkldxlSgn 32.92 +.05 NA
IntlVal 36.56 +.07 +7.1
LTGradeAd 9.62 +.02 +6.9
LgCpldxlnv 33.07 +.28 +16.4
LifeCon 18.02 +.07 +6.8


UfeGro 27.16 +16 +11.1
UfeMod 22.93 +.11 +9.1
MidCapldxlP 144.57 +1.41 NA
MidCp 29.21 +.29 +16.5
MidCpAdml 132.68 +1.29 +16.7
MidCplst 29.31 +.29 +16.7
MidCpSgl 41.87 +.41 +16.7
Morg 25.56 +.27 +15.1
MorgAdml 79.31 +.84 +15.3
MuHYAdml 10.57 ... +4.4
Mulnt 13.76 ... +3.5
MulntAdml 13.76 ... +3.6
MuLTAdml 11.05 -.01 +4.0
MuLtdAdml 11.04 ... +17
MuShtAdml 15.86 ... +1.0
Prmcp 93.27 +.90 +17.0
PrmcpAdml 96.81 +.93 +17.1
PrmcpCorl 19.69 +.16 +16.6
REITIdxAd 94.67 +.66 +11.1
STBondAdm 10.55 +.01 +1.6
STBondSgl 10.55 +.01 +1.6
STCor 10.73 ... +2.3
STGradeAd 10.73 ... +2.4
STIGradel 10.73 ... +2.4
STsryAdml 10.72 +.01 +1.0
SelValu 28.57 +.24 +18.7
SmCapldx 51.22 +.55 +18.2
SmCpldAdm 51.30 +.54 +18.3
SmCpldlst 51.30 +.54 +18.3
SmCplndxSgnl 46.22 +.49 +18.3
SmVlldlst 22.79 +.22 +17.2
Star 23.66 +.12 +10.6
StratgcEq 29.08 +.29 +20.4
TgtRe2OlO 26.00 +.10 +7.7
TgtRe2015 14.86 +.07 +8.9
TgtRe2020 27.01 +.13 +9.7
TgtRe2030 27.40 +.15 +11.2
TgtRe2035 16.79 +.10 +11.9
TgtRe2040 27.90 +.18 +12.3
TgtRe2045 17.51 +.10 +12.3
TgtRe205O 27.78 +.17 +12.3
TgtRetlnc 12.65 +.04 +6.4
Tgtet2025 15.67 +.09 +10.5
TotBdAdml 10.64 +.02 +2.9
TotBdlnst 10.64 +.02 +2.9
TotBdMklnv 10.64 +.02 +2.8
TotBdMkSig 10.64 +.02 +2.9
TotlntI 16.41 +.02 +5.0
TotStlAdm 45.08 +.40 +16.9
TotStllns 45.09 +.40 +16.9
TotStlSig 43.51 +39 +16.9
TotStldx 45.06 +.40 +16.7
TxMCapAdm 91.24 +.80 +16.9
VallcbdxAdm 29.02 +.21 +16.6
ValldxIns 29.02 +.21 +16.6
Wellsl 25.37 +.07 +9.4
WellslAdm 61.46 +.17 +9.5
Welltn 38.80 +.22 +12.0
WelltnAdm 67.01 +.38 +12.1
WndsllAdm 65.32 +.51 +16.8
Wndsr 19.78 +18 +17.6
WndsrAdml 66.75 +.61 +17.7
Wndsrll 36.80 +.29 +16.7
Victory
SpecValA m 20.23 +.20 +10.0
Virtus
EmgMktsls 9.56 -.01 +3.4
Wasatch
LgCpVal d 17.61 +18 +11.7
Wells Fargo
Discovlnv 34.47 +.43 +20.2
Growlnv 51.46 +.57 +20.0
Outk2010OAdm 13.51 +.05 +3.9
Western Asset
MgdMuniA m 15.91 -.01 +4.5
Yacktman
Focused d 25.75 +.16 +15.3
Yacktman d 24.07 +.16 +15.7


52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV

AV Homes Inc AVHI 11.34 0 19.53 19.34 +.08 +0.4 V A A +36.0 +36.3 dd
Arkansas Bst ABFS 6.43 0 31.90 31.70 +.34 +1.1 A A A +231.9 +333.0 dd 0.12
Bank of America BAC 8.92 0 15.03 14.64 +.32 +2.2 A A A +26.1 +52.8 20 0.04
Beam Inc BEAM 52.88 -0- 70.63 67.86 +.42 +0.6 V V A +11.1 +25.3 27 0.90
Carnival Corp CCL 31.44 -0- 39.95 35.83 +.16 +0.4 V A A -2.6 -3.4 25 1.00a
Chicos FAS CHS 15.27 -0- 19.95 17.96 +.25 +1.4 A A A -2.7 -2.8 17 0.22
Cracker Barrel CBRL 60.07 --- 0 115.00 111.06 -.18 -0.2 V A A +72.8 +81.3 23 3.00
Disney DIS 46.96 0 69.87 68.97+1.20 +1.8 A A A +38.5 +44.4 20 0.75f
Eaton Corp pic ETN 47.93 0 72.54 72.45 +.55 +0.8 A A A +33.7 +48.5 19 1.68
Fortune Brds Hm&Sec FBHS 26.32 -0- 44.04 41.37 +.79 +1.9 A A V +41.6 +46.0 31 0.40
Frontline Ltd FRO 1.71 -0-- 4.03 2.50 +.07 +2.9 A A V -23.3 -23.8 dd
Harris Corp HRS 41.08 0 63.66 63.86 +.52 +0.8 A A A +30.4 +34.8 22 1.68
HIth Mgmt Asc HMA 7.25 -0- 17.28 13.24 +.71 +5.7 A A A +42.1 +56.2 24
iShs U.S. Pfd PFF 36.93 -0-- 41.09 37.86 +.07 +0.2 A -4.4 +0.1 q 1.97e
KC Southern KSU 72.80 -- 0 125.86 125.04+1.21 +1.0 A A A +49.8 +61.3 42 0.86
Lennar Corp A LEN 30.90 -0-- 44.40 33.33 +.42 +1.3 A V V -13.8 -9.1 17 0.16
McClatchy Co MNI 2.13 -0- 3.46 2.91 +.06 +2.1 A V V -11.0 +1.1 dd
NextEra Energy NEE 66.05 -0- 89.75 86.10 +.45 +0.5 V A A +24.4 +32.1 19 2.64
Office Depot ODP 2.72 -0- 6.10 5.38 +.17 +3.3 A V A +64.0 +79.7 41
PGT Inc PGTI 3.25 --0- 11.69 9.19 -.02 -0.2 V V V +104.2 +155.1 20


52-WK RANGE *CLOSE


YTD 1YR


NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV

Panera Bread Co PNRA 150.33 194.77 168.53+1.45 +0.9 A A A +6.1 +2.0 25
Pembina Pipeline PBA 26.91 -0- 34.70 32.67 +.02 +0.1 V A V +14.1 +25.4 40 1.68
Pepco Holdings Inc POM 18.04 -0-- 22.72 19.08 +.14 +0.7 V A A -2.7 +5.6 18 1.08
Phoenix Cos PNX 20.51 0 44.78 44.31 +.83 +1.9 A A A +79.2 +83.1 dd
Raymond James Fncl RJF 36.35 -0- 48.22 46.80 +.87 +1.9 A A A +21.5 +22.4 18 0.56
Reliance Steel Alu RS 53.09 0 76.78 74.72 +.20 +0.3 V A A +20.3 +36.9 17 1.32
Ryder R 42.78 0 67.07 65.99 +.56 +0.9 A A A +32.2 +46.3 15 1.36
St Joe Co JOE 18.07 O- 24.44 18.48 -.54 -2.8 V V V -19.9 -13.5 dd
Sally Beauty Hid SBH 23.14 -0- 31.86 27.64 +.28 +1.0 A A A +17.3 +9.7 19
Simon Property Gp SPG 142.47 -0-- 182.45 149.68+1.08 +0.7 V V A -5.3 +1.5 37 4.80f
Stein Mart SMRT 5.77 0 15.70 16.06 +.45 +2.9 A A A +113.0 +147.6 25 0.20
Suntrust Bks STI 25.30 0 36.29 35.43 +.29 +0.8 V A A +25.0 +33.5 13 0.40
Superior Uniform SGC 10.08 -0- 16.97 16.11 +.71 +4.6 A A A +40.7 +44.2 20 0.54
TECO Energy TE 16.12 -0-- 19.22 17.29 +.17 +1.0 A A A +3.2 +7.5 18 0.88
Tech Data TECD 42.90 -0- 54.60 52.91 -.10 -0.2 A A A +16.2 +16.9 10
Wendys Co WEN 4.28 -0- 9.51 8.64 +.14 +1.6 A A A +83.8 +100.0 86 0.20
World Fuel Svcs INT 34.57 --- 45.20 38.33 +.34 +0.9 A A A -6.9 -2.2 14 0.15


Page 5


Weathering the




next big storm






Page 6 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, November 14,2013


STOCKS LISTING CHANGE REQUESTS WELCOME! our readers don't want. If you do not see your stock in the paper, please let us
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S&P500 +14.31 NASDAQ +4566 DOW +7096 6-MO T-BILLS 30-YR T-BONDS a -04 CRUDE OIL +.84 EURO +.0034 GOLD -2.80
1,782.00 3,965.58 15,821.63 .09% I '" 3.82% "V $93.88 4 + $1.3461 4 + $1,268.30 V



Money Markets


CombinedStocks
From the New York Stock Exchange
and the Nasdaq.


Tkr Name Last Chg
A-B-C
ADT ADTCorp 42.74 +.15
AES AESCorp 15.11 +.25
AFL AFLAC 66.27 +1.02
GAS AGLRes 47.49 +.39
AKS AK Steel 5.23 +.01
AOL AOL 45.60 +2.34
ASMI ASM Intl 32.56 -.44
T AT&Tlnc 35.07 -.10
ABT AbtLab s 37.77 +.30
ABBV AbbVie n 47.85 +.37
ANF AberFitc 35.23 +1.01
AXAS Abraxas 3.86 +.31
ACN Accenture 77.41 +1.11
ARAY Accuray 7.91 +.22
ACHN Achillion 2.69 -.10
ACT Actavis 162.88 +1.22
ATVI ActivsBliz 17.32 +.21
ADBE AdobeSy 57.55 +1.31
AEIS AdvEnld 23.06 -.32
AMD AMD 3.54 +.10
ABCO AdvisoryBd 62.02 -.55
ACM AecomTch 28.95 -.01
AET Aetna 63.88 +.81
A Agilent 51.20
AYR Aircastle 18.91 +.15
ARG Airgas 109.38 +.77
AKAM AkamaiT 46.53 +1.42
ALSK AlaskCom 2.13 -.01
ALU AlcatelLuc 4.07 +.04
AA Alcoa 8.99 +.07
ATI AllegTch 33.22 +.12
AGN Allergan 94.80 +3.10
ALE Allele 49.39 -.03
ARLP AllnceRes 74.85 +.28
ACG AlliBInco 6.99
AB AlliBern 21.52 -.10
LNT AlliantEgy 52.64 +.21
ANV AlldNevG 3.83 -.03
ALL Allstate 53.95 +.57
ANR AlphaNRs 7.94 +.05
AOD AlpTotDiv 4.14 +.04
AMLP AIpAlerMLP 17.37 -.07
ALTR AlteraCplIf 33.18 +.02
MO Altria 37.58 +.27
AMRN Amarin 1.54
AMZN Amazon 356.22 +6.69
ABEV Ambevn 7.29 -.09
AMEDAmedisys 12.96 -1.36
AEE Ameren 36.18 +.21
AMX AMovilL 21.00 +.20
AGNC ACapAgy 21.43 +.36
ACAS AmCapLtd 14.19 +.11
AEO AEagleOut 16.07 +.04
AEP AEP 47.32 -.05
AXP AmExp 81.44 +.41
AIG AmlntlGrp 48.58 +.39
ARCP ARItCapPr 13.18 +.30
AWR AmStWtrs 28.36 +.10
AMT AmTower 78.17 +.21
AWK AmWtrWks 42.41 +.02
APU Amerigas 43.04 +.12
AMP Ameriprise 104.16 +1.29
ABC AmeriBrgn 68.49 +.20
AME Ametek 49.07 +.36
AMGNAmgen 113.53 +.82
APH Amphenol 81.69 +.32
APC Anadarko 91.22 +1.29
ANEN Anaren 27.87 +.09
BUD ABInBev 103.76 -.09
NLY Annaly 10.72 +.21
ANH Anworth 4.51 +.10
AON Aonplc 80.17 -.40
APA Apache 90.85 +1.14
APOL ApolloGrp 26.30 +.49
AINV Apollolnv 8.68 +.05
AAPL Apple Inc 520.63 +.62
AMAT ApldMatl 17.67 +.03
WTR AquaAms 25.10 +.06
MT ArcelorMit 16.61 -.26
ACI ArchCoal 4.30 +.03
ADM ArchDan 41.43 +1.01
ARNA ArenaPhm 5.20 +.15
ARCC AresCap 17.72 +.04
ARIA AriadP 2.42 +.04
ABFS ArkBest 31.70 +.34
ARMH ArmHId 44.95 +.23
ARR ArmourRsd 4.02 +.12
ARRY ArrayBio 5.73 +.03
ARW ArrowEl 53.67 +.41
ASH Ashland 89.69 +.21
AGO AssuredG 23.31 +.28
AZN AstraZen 52.66 +.27
APL AtlasPpln 36.29 +.18
ATML Atmel 7.32 -.01
ATO ATMOS 46.73 +.96
ADSK Autodesk 43.54 -.07
ADP AutoData 76.45 +.73
AVY AveryD 47.85 +.44
CAR AvisBudg 33.82 +.65
AVA Avista 27.84 +.14
AVP Avon 17.40 +.20
BBT BB&TCp 33.26 +.22
BCE BCEg 44.04 +.21
BBL BHPBiIlplc 61.60 -.16
BP BP PLC 46.45 +.54
BPT BP Pru 78.60 +.45
BWC BabckWil 31.96 +.47
BIDU Baidu 152.98 +2.55
BHI BakrHu 57.55 +.42
BLL BallCorp 49.47 +.13
BLDP BallardPw 1.38 +.03
BALT BalticTrdg 4.95 +.05
BBD BcoBradpf 13.37 +.23
SAN BcoSantSA 8.62 -.01
BSBR BcoSBrasil 6.54 +.15
BKMU BankMutl 6.23 +.03
BAC BkofAm 14.64 +.32
BMO BkMontg 70.18 +.79
BK BkNYMel 33.00 +.44
BNS BkNovag 62.04 +.63
BCS Barclay 16.21 -.06
VXX BiPVixrs 48.15 -.19
BCR Bard 137.99 +.27
BKS BarnesNob 15.52 +.22
ABX BarrickG 18.10 +.07
BAX Baxter 66.37 +.47
BEAM Beam Inc 67.86 +.42
BZH BeazerHm 19.10 +.09
BBBY BedBath 78.16 +1.74
BMS Bemis 39.23 +.22
BRK/BBerkH B 114.81 +.60
BBY BestBuy 43.99 +.22
BIG BigLots 37.78 +.63
BCRX Biocryst 5.74 +.11
BIIB Biogenldc 236.10 +.48
BMRN BioMarin 64.19 +2.22
BITA BitautoH 29.70 +1.49
BBRY BlackBerry 6.52 +.04
BME BIkHLthSci 33.39 +.09
BX Blackstone 26.97 +1.18
BOBE BobEvans 54.59 +.32


Interestrates


Efll



The yield on the
10-year Treasury
note fell to 2.70
percent Wed-
nesday. Yields
affect rates on
mortgages and
other consumer
loans.


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MOAGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


BA Boeing 133.17 +.84
BWA BorgWarn 100.88 +.46
SAM BostBeer 242.94 +.73
BSX BostonSci 11.93 +.02
BYD BoydGm 10.30 +.19
BBEP BreitBurn 18.27 -.79
BPI BridgptEd 18.18 +1.32
BGG BrigStrat 18.89 -.10
BMY BrMySq 51.86 -.68
BRCM Broadcom 27.58 +.35
BRCD BrcdeCm 8.33 +.11
BIP Brkflnfra 39.99 +.33
BPL Buckeye 65.45 -.14
BKW BurgerKng 20.38 -.36
CA CA Inc 32.83 +.70
CBG CBREGrp 22.60 +.57
CBS CBS B 60.17 +1.44
CMS CMSEng 26.94 +.03
CNHI CNH Indl 11.33 +.11
CSX CSX 26.89 +.11
CVRRCVRRfgn 23.11 +.19
CVS CVSCare 64.38 +.42
CYS CYS Invest 8.18 +.13
CVC CblvsnNY 15.31 +.27
COG CabotOGs 33.88 +.37
CDNS Cadence 12.84 +.07
CALM Cal-Maine 51.75 -.19
CHY CalaCvHi 12.77 +.08
CCC Calgon 20.43 -.05
CWT CalifWtr 22.49 +.11
CPN Calpine 19.23 -.04
CLMT CalumetSp 27.71 +.45
CAFI CamcoF 6.23 +.01
CPT CamdenPT 60.61 +.21
CAM Cameron 54.88 +1.08
CPB CampSp 42.18 +.57
CNI CdnNRyg 112.13 +.31
CNQ CdnNRsgs 30.88 +.27
CSIQ CdnSolar 32.00 +3.77
COF CapOne 70.06 +.55
CSU CapSenL 20.51 +.19
CMO CapsteadM 11.73 +.20
CPST CpstnTurb 1.27 -.01
CAH CardnlHIth 63.93 +.93
CFN CareFusion 38.99 +1.05
CKEC Carmike 23.38 +.13
CCL Carnival 35.83 +.16
CRS CarpTech 60.66 +.19
CRZO Carrizo 43.24 +.95
CAT Caterpillar 84.20 +.35
FUN CedarF 47.04 +.04
CELG Celgene 149.28 -.13
CX Cemex 10.52 +.22
CIG Cemigpf 8.21 +.07
CNP CenterPnt 24.98 +.29
CTL CntryUink 31.48 +.05
CVO Cenveo 3.34 -.07
CKP Checkpnt 13.96 +.01
CHGG Chegg n 9.68
CHTP ChelseaT' 3.16 -.17
CHFC ChemFinl 29.89 +.25
CHK ChesEng 25.92 +.37
CVX Chevron 120.09 +.09
CBI ChicB&l 78.15 +1.16
CIM Chimera 2.97 +.02
CHD ChurchDwt 65.75 +.79
CIEN CienaCorp 23.54 +.12
CBB CinciBell 3.20 +.02
CINF CinnFin 50.52 +.40
CRUS Cirrus 20.14 +.63
CSCO Cisco 24.00 +.26
C Citigroup 49.99 +.47
CTXS CitrixSys 58.02 -2.93
CLNE CleanEngy 12.28 +.67
CLF CliffsNRs 27.36 +1.09
CLX Clorox 92.42 +1.38
COH Coach 53.31 +.83
CIE CobaltlEn 22.74 +.61
KO CocaCola 40.12 +.24
RQI CohStQIR 9.79 +.05
PSF CohStSelPf 23.79 +.06
COLE ColeREIn 14.23 +.39
CL ColgPalms 65.09 +.37
COBK ColonialFS 13.46 -.03
CMCSAComcast 47.39 +.41
CMA Comerica 44.67 +.03
CYH CmtyHIt 43.25 +.91
CTG CmpTask 17.24 +.19
CPWRCompuwre 10.53 +.08
CMTL Comtech 30.59 +.08
CAG ConAgra 32.81 +.48
CTWS ConnWtrSv 33.12 +.24
COP ConocoPhil 73.34 +.52
CNSL ConsolCom 19.26 +.21
ED ConEd 57.13 +.30
CTB CooperTire 24.33 +.26
CSOD CorOnDem 48.61 +1.55
GLW Corning 16.85 +.22
OFC CorpOffP 23.50 +.08
COST Costco 123.17 +1.03
COTY Cotyn 15.44 +.18
CVA CovantaH 18.12 +.30
XIV CSVelIVST 30.95 +.13
TVIX CSVxSht rs 9.82 -.08
CEQP CrestwdEq 14.80 -.04
CROX Crocs 13.89 +1.24
XTEX CrosstxLP 25.78 +.72
CCK CrownHold 43.34 +.30
CTRP Ctrip.com 51.93 +1.94
CMI Cummins 131.55 +1.45
CYBE CybrOpt 5.10 +.01
CY CypSemi 9.32 +.31
CYTR OytRx 2.13 +.04
D-E-F
DCT DCTIndl 7.41 +.07
DDR DDRCorp 16.33 +.17
DNP DNPSelct 9.68 +.06
DHI DR Horton 19.05 +.14
DTE DTE 68.16 -.13
DTZ DTEEn61 23.88 -.46
DAN DanaHldg 19.33 +.16
DHR Danaher 73.76 -.14
DRI Darden 52.21 +.29
DV DeVryEd 36.50 +.66
DF DeanFdsrs 18.03 -.17
DECK DeckrsOut 76.83 +4.00
DE Deere 82.84 +.72
DAL DeltaAir 27.79 -.33
DNR DenburyR 17.62 -.04
DNDN Dndreon 2.53 -.05
DVN DevonE 60.60 +.77
DEO Diageo 128.74 +.29
DO DiaOffs 61.22 +.19
DKS DicksSptg 55.48 +.73
DBD Diebold 30.47 +.29
DGII DigilntIl 10.28 +.25
DLR DigitalRIt 46.29 -.09
DDS Dillards 89.55 +5.55
DTV DirecTV 63.87 -.15
NUGT DxGIdBII rs 40.99 +.53
FAZ DxFinBr rs 25.33 -.57
TZA DxSCBrrs 19.90 -.56
FAS DxFnBull s 78.25 +1.83


TREASURIES


1,800 ................................

1,7,,- ,

1,720 ......... 10DAYS


S&P 500
Close: 1,782.00
Change: 14.31 (0.8%)


4,000 ...............................



3,840 ........ 10 DAYS ..


Nasdaq composite
Close: 3,965.58
Change: 45.66 (1.2%)


1 ,8 0 0 ........ ............ ............ ................ ........... ............. ..... 4 ,0 0 0 .... ........................... ............. ............ ...................
1,7500 ................... ... ..............00 .................. ... ....... .. ...........................






1 ,6 0O ........ .. ....0.............A......................... ............... 3 ,4 0..........................................................
1,550 .- ...... j-; ..... .... .... j ... .........A, ...... s... .. .........0 ........N 3 ,200 .A ....sj ...... .......,0...... ........ N...... .


StocksRecap

NYSE NASD
Vol. (in mil.) 3,274 1,768
Pvs. Volume 3,106 1,719
Advanced 2087 1782
Declined 969 765
New Highs 166 155
New Lows 50 43


DUST DirDGdBr s 34.82 -.52
TNA DxSCBulls 68.86 +1.80
DFS Discover 50.92
DISH DishNetwh 51.52 +1.17
DIS Disney 68.97 +1.20
DM DolanCo .90 -.15
DG DollarGen 59.24 +.77
DLTR DollarTree 59.62 +.33
D DomRescs 66.33 +.68
DPZ Dominos 69.21 +.77
RRD DonlleyRR 16.66 +.10
DOW DowChm 39.60 +.26
LEO DryStrt 7.66 +.05
DRYS DryShips 3.19 +.10
DD DuPont 60.94 -.66
DUC DufPUC 10.22 +.03
DUK DukeEngy 70.92 -.02
DRE DukeRIty 15.80 +.21
DLNG Dynagasn 18.00
DVAX Dynavax 1.32 +.05
DANG E-CDang 9.01 +.26
EJ E-House 11.16 +1.14
ETFC E-Trade 17.93 +.31
EBAY eBay 53.03 +.20
EMC EMCCp 24.21 -.04
EOG EOG Res 169.46 +2.36
ELNK ErthLink 5.21 +.02
ETN Eaton 72.45 +.55
EOS EV EEq2 12.38 +.06
ECL Ecolab 106.29 -.14
EIX Edisonlnt 48.07 -.16
EW EdwLfSci 63.68 +.04
ELN Elan 17.63 +.04
EGO EldorGIdg 6.48 -.02
EA ElectArts 26.42 -.02
EMR EmersonEI 66.85 +.98
EDE EmpDist 22.94 +.41
ELX Emulex 7.69 -.08
EEP EnbrdgEPt 29.05 +.16
ENB Enbridge 43.12 -.50
ECA EnCanag 17.77 +.02
ENDP EndoPhrm 64.42 +.87
ENR Energizer 107.19 +1.59
ETP EngyTsfr 52.52 +.01
EBF EnnisInc 17.95 -.04
ESV ENSCO 62.05 +.72
ETR Entergy 62.79 -.22
EPD EntPrPt 60.88 -.27
EAC EricksnAC 18.28 +.11
ERIC Ericsson 12.32 +.02
EL EsteeLdr 73.03 +2.35
XCO ExcoRes 5.25 -.06
EXC Exelon 28.06 +.20
ESRX ExpScripts 65.93 +1.27
STAY ExtStay n 23.87
XOM ExxonMbl 92.59 -.08
FFIV F5Netwks 84.64 +.51
FU FAB Univ 5.46 -.45
FTI FMCTech 49.14 +.21
FNB FNBCpPA 12.40 +.08
FB Facebook 48.71 +2.11
FDO FamilyDIr 69.63 +.93
FAST Fastenal 46.49 -.51
FDX FedExCp 135.29 +.66
FNHC FedNatHId 11.95 -.16
FGP Ferrellgs 23.68 +.30
FNF FidlNFin 27.41 +.32
FSC FifthStFin 10.15 +.04
FITB FifthThird 19.91 +.35
FNFG FstNiagara 11.11 +.08
FSLR FstSolar 64.20 +2.48
FE FirstEngy 36.07 -.62
FMER FstMerit 22.43 +.03
FLEX Flextrn 7.62 +.08
FLO FlowrsFd s 22.28 -.07
FLR Fluor 79.08 +1.60
F FordM 17.10 +.38
FST ForestOil 4.30 +.09
FBHS FBHmSec 41.37 +.79
BEN FrankRess 53.46 +.75
Fl Frankslnt n 25.47 -4.05
FREE FrSearsh .32 +.02
FCX FMCG 36.33 +.43
FTR FrontierCm 4.78 +.08
FRO Frontline 2.50 +.07
FCEL FuelCellE 1.45 +.11
G-H-I
GOM GMAC44 25.35
GSVC GSVCap 13.29 +.57
GTAT GTAdvTc 10.40 +.43
GDV GabDvlnc 21.05 -.04
GGT GabMuItT 10.32 +.06
GUT GabUtil 6.40 +.03
GALE GalenaBio 3.00 +.32
GLPI Gam&Lsrn 44.90 -.52
GPS Gap 41.36 +.49
GRMNGarmin 45.89 +.04
GKNT Geeknet 19.82 +.09
GAM GAInv 35.95 +.10
GD GenDynam 87.08 +.35
GE GenElec 27.15 +.10
GGP GenGrPrp 20.65 +.04
GIS GenMills 50.88 +.42
GM GenMotors 38.44 +1.78
GMpB GM cvpfB 52.53 +1.80
GEL GenesisEn 48.40 -.19
GNTX Gentex 29.28 +.38
GNW Genworth 14.38 +.23
GGB Gerdau 7.77 +.09
GERN GeronCp 5.28 +.26
GILD GileadScis 68.50 +.89
GSK GlaxoSKIn 51.94 +.38
GRT GlimchRt 9.80 +.09
GLUU GluMobile 3.21 +.08
GOGOGogo n 28.30 +3.39
GOL GolUinhas 4.32 -.04
GFI GoldFLtd 4.44 +.06


YEST PVS


NET 1YR
CHG AGO


3-month T-bill .07 0.06 +0.01 .10
6-month T-bill .09 0.09 ... .14
52-wk T-bill .13 0.10 +0.03 .17
2-year T-note .29 0.33 -0.04 .25
5-year T-note 1.36 1.46 -0.10 .62
10-year T-note 2.70 2.78 -0.08 1.59
30-year T-bond 3.82 3.86 -0.04 2.72


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.58 3.61 -0.03 2.40
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 5.12 5.11 +0.01 4.14
Barclays USAggregate 2.40 2.38 +0.02 1.68
Barclays US High Yield 5.78 5.79 -0.01 6.60
Moodys AMAA Corp Idx 4.69 4.69 ... 3.40
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.65 1.68 -0.03 .91
Barclays US Corp 3.29 3.27 +0.02 2.66


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


GG Goldcrpg 24.20 +.24
GS GoldmanS 162.94 +.05
GT Goodyear 21.58 +.52
GOOG Google 1032.47+20.69
GRA vjGrace 93.04 +.96
GPT GramrcyP 4.56 -.05
GNI GNIron 72.24 +.56
GXP GtPlainEn 24.20 +.30
GMCRGreenMtC 60.67 +.85
GEF GreifA 53.71 +.21
GRIF Griffin h 32.32 +.09
GRFS GrifolsSA 31.07 -.59
GRPN Groupon 10.30 +.02
BSMX GpFnSnMx 13.34 +.20
GSH GuangRy 25.38
HCA HCAHIdg 45.63 +.19
HCP HCPInc 39.45 +.16
HAIN HainCel 85.00 +1.59
HK HalconRes 4.67 -.11
HAL Hallibrtn 55.54 +1.08
HBI Hanesbrds 68.64 +.90
THG Hanoverlns 60.80 +.94
HOG HarleyD 65.38 +1.38
HSC Harsco 27.03 -.10
HIG HartfdFn 34.94 +.66
HAS Hasbro 52.95 +1.70
HTS HatterasF 17.02 +.14
HE HawaiiEl 26.61 +.26
HCN HItCrREIT 59.99 +.35
HCSG HlthCSvc 26.90 -.30
HMA HItMgmt 13.24 +.71
HTA HlthcreTr 10.53 -.10
HL HeclaM 3.06 +.02
HLF Herbalife 64.64 +1.95
HERO HercOffsh 7.21 +.16
HSY Hershey 97.82 +.94
HTZ Hertz 23.40 +.58
HES Hess 80.78 +.84
HPQ HewlettP 26.49 +.27
HSH Hillshire 32.64 +.48
HTH HilltopH 20.27 +.60
HIMX HimaxTch 9.43 +.28
HFC HollyFront 44.88 -.46
HOLX Hologic 20.59 +.08
HD HomeDp 77.60 +1.42
AWAY HomeAway 34.85 +.66
HMC Honda 40.78 +.71
HON HonwIllntI 87.51 +.92
HRL Hormel 43.43 +.48
HPT HospPT 28.13 +.17
HST HostHotls 18.71 +.26
HOV HovnanE 4.87 -.05
HNP HuanPwr 39.22 -.15
HUB/BHubbelB 108.61 +1.05
HCBK HudsCity 9.04 +.13
HBAN HuntBncsh 8.93 +.12
HII Huntgtnlng 78.44 +1.19
HUN Huntsmn 23.22 +.37
lAG IAMGId g 4.53 -.05
IGTE iGateCorp 32.90 +.22
ING ING 12.83 +.11
IAU iShGold 12.36 +.05
EWZ iShBrazil 46.92 +.58
EWH iShHK 19.95 +.01
EWJ iShJapan 11.94 +.09
EWY iSh SKor 61.73 -.48
EWM iSMalasia 15.58 +.05
EWT iSTaiwn 13.93 -.07
SLV iShSilver 19.78 -.22
DVY iShSelDiv 70.33 +.49
FXI iShChinaLC 36.49 -.41
IVV iSCorSP500179.28+1.38
EEM iShEMkts 40.80 +.07
LQD iShiBoxlG 113.44 +.26
TLT iSh20yrT 103.88 +.38
SHY iShl-3yTB 84.46 ...
EFA iS Eafe 65.35 +.21
HYG iShiBxHYB 92.77 +.35
IWD iSR1KVal 91.33 +.64
IWM iShR2K 110.52 +1.05
HDV iShHiDiv 70.34 +.25
PFF iShUSPfd 37.86 +.07
IYR iShREst 64.17 +.45
ITB iShHmCnst 22.13 +.30
IDA Idacorp 50.12 -.44
ITW ITW 79.25 +.42
IMUC ImmunoCII 2.56 +.33
INCY Incyte 43.95 +3.05
IBCP IndBkMI 10.75 -.27
IR IngerRd 67.54 -.23
INGR Ingredion 69.63 +.92
IRC InlandRE 10.58 +.21
INO InovioPhm 1.87 +.12
TEG IntegrysE 56.11 +.40
INTC Intel 24.60 +.17
ICPT InterceptP 52.09 -.13
INAP InterNAP 7.13 -.10
IBM IBM 183.55 +.48
IGT IntlGame 17.96 +.01
IP IntPap 44.55 +.47
IPG Interpublic 17.04 +.19
INTX Intersectns 8.01 -.65
INTU Intuit 72.96 +.55
ISRG IntSurg 396.25 +.21
INVN InvenSense 17.37 +.79
IVZ Invesco 33.28 +.07
ITUB ItauUnibH 14.23 +.48
J-K-L
JASO JA Solar rs 12.29 +.62
JDSU JDS Uniph 12.49 +.04
JPM JPMorgCh 54.14 +.17
JEC JacobsEng 63.29 +1.19
JRCC JamesRiv 1.40 +.22
JNS JanusCap 10.25 -.01
JBLU JetBlue 8.68 +.52
JNJ JohnJn 93.34 -.22
JCI JohnsnCtl 48.53 +.53


Foreign
Exchange
The dollar fell
against the
British pound on
speculation that
the Bank of
England may
raise interest
rates sooner
than earlier
expected. The
dollar also fell
against the euro
and yen.




kW1


140


HIGH
15822.98
7143.31
499.42
10079.89
3965.58
1782.00
1302.14
18943.62
1112.22


LOW
15672.00
7057.36
491.83
9963.74
3899.31
1760.64
1283.26
18705.34
1095.69


JNPR JnprNtwk 19.29 -.31
KBH KB Home 16.35 +.37
KFN KKRFn 9.60 +.18
KFH KKRFn 41 26.77 +.02
KSU KCSouthn 125.04 +1.21
K Kellogg 62.47 +.42
KERX KeryxBio 12.69 -.38
KEG KeyEngy 8.74 +.26
KEY Keycorp 13.00 +.16
KMB KimbCIk 108.84 +.63
KIM Kimco 20.92 +.07
KMP KindME 80.67 +.07
KMI KindMorg 34.53 -.07
KMI/WSKindrM wt 4.38 +.16
KGC Kinross g 4.98 +.08
KOG KodiakOg 12.06 +.21
KSS Kohls 58.26 +.66
KRFT KraftFGp 52.52 +.56
KTOS KratosDef 7.01 +.22
KKD KrispKrm 25.53 +.31
KR Kroger 42.13 +.39
KLIC Kulicke 12.86 +.38
LTD L Brands 64.25 +1.20
LLL L-3Com 101.87 +.63
LSI LSI Corp 8.33 +.06
LTC LTC Prp 38.80 +.24
LSTR Landstar 56.18 -.05
LVS LVSands 71.95 +1.11
LHO LaSalleH 31.51 +.16
LF LeapFrog 8.13 +.16
LEG LeggPlat 29.49 +.09
LEN LennarA 33.33 +.42
LVLT Level3 29.85 -.02
USA LbtyASE 5.70 -.01
LRY UbtProp 34.40 +.12
LOCK LifeLock 17.58 +1.05
LFVN Uifevantge 1.82 +.09
LLY UllyEli 50.55 +.98
LNKD Linkedin 220.77+11.49
LINE UnnEngy 29.28 +.18
LGF LionsGtg 34.00+1.67
LYG UoydBkg 4.89 +.01
LMT LockhdM 137.26 +.03
LO Lorillard s 52.08 +.28
LPX LaPac 15.99 +.37
LOW Lowes 51.28 +1.16
LULU lululemn gs 68.98 +2.03
LUX Luxottica 52.43 -.06
LYB LyonBasA 76.52 +1.19
M-N-O
MTB M&TBk 111.67 +.28
MBI MBIA 12.31 +.65
MCGCMCG Cap 4.59 +.04
MDC MDC 28.15 +.17
MDU MDURes 30.55 +.49
MFA MFAFncl 7.39 +.19
MTG MGIC 7.83 +.12
MGM MGMRsts 19.70 +.44
M Macys 50.68 +4.35
CALL MagicJack 12.51 +.93
MHR MagHRes 7.12 +.20
MTW Manitowoc 19.47 +.55
MNKD MannKd 5.19 +.22
MFC Manulifeg 18.81 +.19
MRO MarathnO 36.15 +.33
MPC MarathPet 75.10 +1.09
GDX MktVGold 23.91 +.13
OIH MVOilSvc 50.43 +.52
RSX MktVRus 28.30 -.04
PRB MVPreRMu 24.59 -.09
MWE MarkWest 67.75 -7.60
MAR MarlntA 46.68 +.25
MMLP MartinMid 46.37 +.13
MRVL MarvellT 13.96 +.29
MAS Masco 20.99 +.53
MSTX MastThera .43 -.01
MXIM Maximlntg 29.35 +.24
MDR McDrmlnt 8.06 +.12
MCD McDnlds 98.11 +.45
MUX McEwenM 1.97 +.03
MWV MeadWvco 33.95 -.05
MTL Mechel 2.20 -.67
MDGNMedgenics 6.73 +.02
MPW MedProp 12.79
MDT Medtrnic 58.19 +.30
MPEL MelcoCrwn 35.33 +.40
MRK Merck 47.34 -.25
MCY MercGn 46.99 +.60
MDP Meredith 52.76 +.34
MTOR Meritor 6.93 +.12
MET MetUife 50.03 +.72
KORS MKors 82.19 +.05
MCHP Microchp 43.44 -.07
MU MicronT 18.92 +.29
MSFT Microsoft 38.16 +.80
MVIS Microvis 1.35 -.09
MIDD Middleby 220.19 +3.43
MSEX MdsxWatr 21.19 +.02
MM MillenMda 7.18 +.41
MTU MitsuUFJ 6.53 +.20
MBT MobileTele 21.84 +.17
MOLX Molex 38.60 +.03
MCP Molycorp 4.77 +.01
MDLZ Mondelez 33.31 +.88
MON Monsanto 109.99 +1.48
MWW MonstrWw 5.52 +.17
MS MorgStan 30.05 +.29
MOS Mosaic 48.20 +.18
MYL Mylan 41.62 +.20
NIHD NIl Hldg 2.98 -.24
NPSP NPS Phm 25.55 -.20
NQ NQ Mobile 13.05 -1.26
NRG NRG Egy 27.26 +.20
DCM NT7DOCO 15.97 +.10
NBR Nabors 17.61
NSPH Nanosphere 2.26 +.09
NBG NBGrcers 5.63 +.05


CLOSE
15821.63
7141.84
499.38
10079.89
3965.58
1782.00
1302.06
18943.60
1112.18


CHG.
+70.96
+43.57
+1.20
+70.05
+45.66
+14.31
+13.02
+162.43
+10.71


NFG NatFuGas 71.46
NGG NatGrid 62.43
NHI NtHlthlnv 61.42
NOV NOilVarco 82.42
NKTR NektarTh 11.23
NEOG Neogen s 46.93
NTAP NetApp 41.29
NFLX Netflix 335.28
NURO NeurMx rs 2.79
NGD NwGold g 5.53
NJR NJ Rscs 45.56
EDU NewOrEd 26.92
NRZ NewResdn 6.23
NYCB NYCmtyB 16.51
NYMT NYMtgTr 6.70
NCT Newcastle 5.39
NFX NewfldExp 29.61
NEM NewmtM 27.30
NWSA NewsCpA n 17.22
NEE NextEraEn 86.10
NI NiSource 31.50
NLSN NielsenH 40.19
NKE NikeB s 77.85
NTT NipponTT 26.88
NE NobleCorp 40.24
NOK NokiaCp 7.94
NAT NordicAm 8.87
JWN Nordstrm 63.38
NSC NorflkSo 87.62
NU NoestUt 42.17
NTI NthnTEn 24.36
NOC NorthropG 109.31
NRF NStarRlt 9.65
NWBI NwstBcsh 13.99
NWN NwstNG 42.80
NVS Novartis 78.85
NVAX Novavax 2.91
NVO NovoNord 173.57
NUAN NuanceCm 16.00
NUE Nucor 52.39
NAD NuvDivA 12.53
JPZ NuvEqtP 12.45
NIO NuvMuOpp 12.79
NQM NvlQI 13.13
NMA NvMAd 12.11
NUW NvAMT-Fr 14.83
NNP NvNYP 13.13
NPP NuvPP 13.10
JPC NvPfdlnco 8.65
NPF NvPMI 12.14
NPI NuvPI 12.16
NPM NuvPI2 12.40
NPT NuvPI4 11.54
NQU NuvQInc 12.20
NES NuverraE 1.60
NVDA Nvidia 16.15
NXTM NxStageMd 10.08
OCZ OCZ Tech .71
OGE OGE Egys 37.81
OXY OcciPet 97.00
OCFC OceanFst 17.78
OCN OcwenFn 51.28
ODP OfficeDpt 5.38
OIBR OiSA 1.56
ONB OldNBcp 15.07
ORI OldRepub 17.17
OLN Olin 24.23
OHI OmegaHIt 32.21
OME OmegaP 13.22
ONNN OnSmcnd 7.25
OGXI OncoGenex 7.36
OKS OneokPtrs 52.63
OPK OpkoHlth 10.22
OPLK OplinkC 16.19
ORCL Oracle 35.00
ORBK Orbotch 12.97
ONVO Organovo 10.20
OFIX Orthfx 21.36
OSK OshkoshCp 51.32
O0ER OtterTail 29.76
OC OwensCorn 36.40
P-Q-R
PCG PG&ECp 40.97
PNC PNC 74.27
PNM PNM Res 23.03
PKX POSCO 75.75
PPG PPG 184.62
PPL PPL Corp 30.33
PCAR Paccar 56.59
P Pandora 29.25
PNRA PaneraBrd 168.53
PAMT ParametSd 15.47
PKD ParkDrl 8.32
PH ParkerHan 117.00
PRKR ParkerVsn 3.38
PTEN PattUTI 24.62
BTU PeabdyE 20.40
PBA Pembinag 32.67
PENN PnnNGm 14.54
PWE PennWst g 8.37
PNNT PennantPk 11.34
JCP Penney 8.67
PAG Penske 42.04
PNR Pentair 68.45
PBCT PeopUtdF 14.65
PBY PepBoy 13.36
POM PepcoHold 19.08
PEP PepsiCo 85.95
PRGO Pernigo 150.71
PETM PetSmart 72.94
PBR/A PetrbrsA 17.20
PBR Petrobras 16.42
PFE Pfizer 31.87
PCYC Pharmacyc 123.82
PM PhilipMor 90.62
PHG PhilipsNV 34.83
PSX Phillips66 66.05


MAJORS CLOSE CHG %CHG
USD per British Pound 1.6023 +.0129 +.81%
Canadian Dollar 1.0467 -.0026 -.25%
USD per Euro 1.3461 +.0034 +.25%
Japanese Yen 99.36 -.31 -.31%
Mexican Peso 13.1060 -.1086 -.83%
EUROPE/AFRICA/MIDDLE EAST
Israeli Shekel 3.5240 +.0005 +.18%
Norwegian Krone 6.1738 +.0007 +.43%
South African Rand 10.3254 +.0005 +.52%
Swedish Krona 6.6515 -.0000 -.00%
Swiss Franc .9151 +.0035 +.32%


ASIA/PACIFIC
Australian Dollar
Chinese Yuan
Hong Kong Dollar
Indian Rupee
Singapore Dollar
South Korean Won
Taiwan Dollar


1.0723
6.0929
7.7533
63.310
1.2471
1070.55
29.63


-.0034
-.0015
+.0004
-.420
-.0034
-3.52
+.03


%CHG. WK MO QTR YTD
+0.45% A A A +20.74%
+0.61% A A A +34.58%
+0.24% V A A +10.22%
+0.70% A A A +19.38%
+1.16% A A A +31.33%
+0.81% A A A +24.95%
+1.01% A A A +27.60%
+0.86% A A A +26.33%
+0.97% A A A +30.94%


PNX PhoenxCos 44.31 +.83
PNY PiedNG 33.24 +.40
PFN PimlncStr2 10.05 -.01
PNW PinWst 54.33 -.34
PXD PioNtrl 195.44+12.69
PBI PitnyBw 22.27 +.38
PAA PlainsAAP 50.92 +.31
PLUG PlugPowrh .55 +.02
PCL PlumCrk 43.56 -.22
PII Polaris 136.21 +6.10
PLCM Polycom 10.74 -.02
POT Potash 32.47 +.23
PBPB Potbelly n 29.58 +2.52
BKLN PS SrLoan 24.92 +.03
QQQ PwShs QQQ83.54 +1.00
PX Praxair 124.54 +.49
PCP PrecCastpt 248.20 -1.51
PCLN priceline 1124.20+24.71
PFG PrinFncl 48.28 +.43
PRA ProAssurs 46.01 -.02
SH ProShtS&P 26.30 -.21
QLD ProUItQQQ 89.57 +2.14
QID PrUShQQQ 16.81 -.41
SSO ProUItSP 94.98 +1.52
UVXY PrUVxSTrs 21.78 -.20
PG ProctGam 83.50 +.70
PGR ProgsvCp 27.07 +.55
SDS ProUShSP 32.26 -.52
TBT ProUShL20 77.70 -.58
TWM ProUSR2K 13.33 -.25
SPXU PUSSP500 17.12 -.42
SQQQPrUPShQQQ17.00 -.68
PSEC ProspctCap 11.42 +.06
PRU Prudentl 87.83 +1.19
PEG PSEG 33.57 +.38
PSA PubStrg 160.26 +1.14
PHM PulteGrp 17.03 +.27
PMM PMMI 6.62 +.04
QEP QEPRes 32.51 +.45
QIHU Qihoo360 89.38 +7.97
QCOMQualcom 70.03 +1.52
QTWWQuantFu rs 6.75 +1.76
DGX QstDiag 62.88 -.44
STR Questar 22.84 +.37
KWK QksilvRes 2.36 -.01
ZOK Ouiksilvr 9.16 +.49
RFMD RF MicD 5.14 +.04
RAX Rackspace 42.68 -.77
RDN RadianGrp 12.71 -.04
RSH RadioShk 2.66 -.03
RL RLauren 176.07 +4.58
RAVN Ravenlnds 33.90 -.28
RYN Rayonier 44.30 -.01
RTN Raytheon 85.46 +.61
RLD RealD 8.76 +1.76
RHT RedHat 46.37 +1.77
RWT RedwdTr 18.75 +.74
RGP RegncyEn 24.27 -.28
RF RegionsFn 9.67 +.03
RS RelStlAI 74.72 +.20
SOL ReneSola 4.95 +.21
RENN Renren 3.43 -.01
RGEN Replgn 12.78 +.20
RSO ResrceCap 5.88 +.04
ROIC RetailOpp 14.50 +.10
RAI ReynAmer 52.12 +.52
RIO RioTinto 51.86 -.02
RAD RiteAid 5.26 +.04
RVBD RiverbedT 19.04 +1.46
ROK RockwIAut 113.75 +.80
COL RockColl 70.53 +.18
RMTI RockwIlM 13.72 +.91
ROG Rogers 60.60 +.11
ROP Roper 126.26 +.63
RY RoyalBkg 68.02 +1.40
RCL RylCarb 43.20 +.33
RDS/BRoyDShIIB 68.26 +.16
RDS/ARoyDShllA 65.68 +.29
RYL Ryland 36.77 +.28
S-T-U
STBA S&T Bcp 24.35 +.25
SCG SCANA 46.50 +.33
SKM SKTcm 23.40 +.16
SLM SLMCp 25.85 +.17
SM SM Energy 89.84 +2.70
DIA SpdrDJIA 158.06 +.69
GLD SpdrGold 122.85 +.40
SPY S&P500ETF178.38 +1.42
XHB SpdrHome 30.73 +.40
JNK SpdrLehHY 40.36 +.14
KRE SpdrS&P RB38.28 +.34
XRT SpdrRetl 87.31 +1.13
XOP SpdrOGEx 68.51 +1.01
XME SpdrMetM 39.99 +.33
SBS SABESPs 10.52 +.18
SBR SabnR 50.98 -.07
SB SafeBulk 7.57 -.58
SWY Safeway 33.91 +.20
SAIA SaialIncs 31.76 -.04
JOE StJoe 18.48 -.54
CRM Salesforcs 57.21 +.50
SLXP SalixPhm 85.34 +.52
SBH SallyBty 27.64 +.28
SJT SJuanB 15.96 -.04
SNDK SanDisk 69.90 +.81
SD SandRdge 5.97 +.03
SNY Sanofi 52.99 +.18
SNTS Santarus 31.97 +.06
SRPT SareptaTh 12.89 -.27
SLB Schlmbrg 93.08 +1.09
SCHW Schwab 23.98 +.27
SDRL SeadrillLtd 45.45 +.37
STX SeagateT 48.77 +.96
SHLD SearsHldgs 63.89 +2.19
SRE SempraEn 89.49 +.66
SNH SenHous 23.46 +.37
SQNMSequenom 2.32 +.03


Commodities
Crude oil recov-
ered some of its
sharp loss from
Tuesday, when
its price fell to
its lowest lev-
el since May.
Copper slumped
and fell at one
point to its low-
est price since
August.





1222

CEg~


1YR.
AGO
1.5874
1.0013
1.2705
79.41
13.1912

3.9259
5.7658
8.7825
6.7808
.9474


.9580
6.2342
7.7507
54.970
1.2223
1089.70
29.01


SHW Sherwin 185.38 +1.38
SFL ShipFin 16.88 +.32
SID SiderurNac 5.56 +.16
SLW SilvWhtng 21.57 +.36
SPG SimonProp 149.68 +1.08
SINA Sina 84.55 +8.64
SIRI SiriusXM 3.74 +.02
SWKS SkywksSol 26.01 +.45
SMSI SmithMicro 1.13 +.07
SJM Smucker 107.93 +1.10
SNA SnapOn 105.98 +1.63
SODA SodaStrm 55.86 -.28
SLRC SolarCap 22.29 +.20
SCTY SolarCity n 53.92 +1.36
SON SonocoP 39.87 +.28
SNE SonyCp 17.94 +.71
SOR SourcC 64.60 +.34
SJI SoJerlnd 57.01 -.31
SO SouthnCo 41.74 +.35
SCCO SthnCopper 26.85 -.36
LUV SwstAirl 18.00 -.03
SWN SwstnEngy 35.92 +.11
SSS SovranSS 69.37 +.02
SE SpectraEn 34.10 -.08
SRC SpiritRCn 10.08 +.05
S Sprint n 7.06 +.07
XLB SP Malls 44.27 +.24
XLV SPHIthC 53.56 +.30
XLP SPCnSt 42.97 +.36
XLY SP Consum 64.28 +1.00
XLE SP Engy 86.66 +.75
XLF SPDRFndcl 20.85 +.18
XLI SP Inds 49.65 +.29
XLK SPTech 34.32 +.29
XLU SP Util 38.80 +.19
SPF StdPac 7.42 +.12
SWK StanBlkDk 82.37 +.55
SPLS Staples 15.92 +.09
SGU StarGas 5.53 -.06
SBUX Starbucks 81.46 +.85
ST7 StateStr 70.88 +.98
STLD StIDynam 19.05 +.03
SWC StillwIrM 11.16 +.24
BEE StratHotels 8.49 -.28
SPH SubPpne 46.13 -.02
SUBK SuffolkBcp 20.27 +.11
SMFG SumitMitsu 10.15 +.25
SNHY SunHydrl 39.97 +.47
SU Suncorgs 35.60 +.78
SUNE SunEdison 13.20 +.26
SPWRSunPower 32.64 +1.39
STI SunTrst 35.43 +.29
SVU Supvalu 7.10 +.29
SWFT SwiftTrans 21.97 +.12
SYMC Symantec 23.17 +.12
SNV Synovus 3.32 +.02
SNTA SyntaPhm 3.78 -.48
SYY Sysco 33.40 +.25
TMUS T-MoblUS n 26.05 -.04
TCP TCPpLn 46.68 +.11
TE TECO 17.29 +.17
TJX TJX 62.72 +1.10
TSM TaiwSemi 17.61 -.20
TLM TalismEg 12.04 +.06
TGT Target 66.87 +1.43
TASR TASER 17.71 +1.25
TOO Taubmn 66.12 +.47
TEAR TearLab 9.54 -1.18
TCK TeckResg 26.15 +.18
TLAB Tellabs 2.44
TEN Tenneco 55.08 +.97
TDC Teradata 44.95 +1.02
TNH TerraNitro 194.60 +.17
TSLA TeslaMot 138.70 +.90
TSO Tesoro 53.27 +1.06
TEVA TevaPhrm 38.39 +.64
TXN Texlnst 42.39 +.54
TXRH TexRdhse 27.35 -.02
TGH Textainer 37.80 -.63
TXT Textron 31.08 +.41
TMO ThermoFis 98.81 +1.12
DDD 3DSyss 78.12 +.18
MMM 3M Co 128.59 +.23
THI THortong 60.28 +.96
TWX TimeWarn 67.69 +.90
TKR Timken 53.65 +.91
TOL TollBros 32.66 +.50
TRU TorchEngy .45
TMK Torchmark 74.82 +1.18
TD TorDBkg 92.42 +.58
TOT Total SA 59.28 +.55
TWGPTowerGp If 4.23 +.42
RIG Transocn 55.30 +.16
TRV Travelers 87.22 +.78
TPH TriPointe n 18.42 +1.60
TY TriContl 19.31 +.11
TYp TnCntl pf 45.05
TSL TnnaSolar 16.70 +.53
TRN Trinity 55.27 +1.88
TRIP TipAdvis 87.49 +2.59
TQNT TriQuint 7.53
TRLA Trulia 39.62 +3.54
TRST TrstNY 6.80 +.01
TUP Tuppwre 89.43 +1.46
TRQ TurqHillRs 4.41 -.15
FOXA 21stCFoxA 33.69 +.52
TWTR Twitter n 42.60 +.70
TWO TwoHrblnv 9.38 +.15
TYC TycolntIl 36.73 +.39
TSN Tyson 28.53 +.47
UBS UBSAG 18.53 +.17
UDR UDR 23.84 +.20
UGI UGICorp 41.04 +.63
UIL UlLHold 37.84 +.15
UNS UNSEngy 48.66 +.10
LCC USAirwy 23.31 -.21
USU USECrs 10.01 +3.58
UPL UltraPtg 19.23 +.08
UA UnderArmr 82.64 +2.57


UNF UniFirst 100.00 +.30
UN UnilevNV 38.68 +.09
UNP UnionPac 158.05 +1.39
UNT Unit 49.36 +.25
UAL UtdContI 36.02 -.77
UPS UPS B 101.04 +1.22
URI UtdRentals 66.08 +.89
USB US Bancrp 38.02 +.27
UNG USNGas 17.68 -.36
USO US OilFd 33.90 +.26
X USSteel 27.60 +.58
UTX UtdTech 107.46 +.60
UNH UtdhlthGp 71.01 +1.06
UVV UnvslCp 51.48 +.80
UNM UnumGrp 32.80 +.05
UEC UraniumEn 1.65 -.06

V-W-X-Y-Z
VFC VFCp 223.01 +5.18
VALE ValeSA 15.44 +.04
VALE/P Vale SApf 13.78 -.13
VLO ValeroE 41.24 +.22
VR Validus 39.39 -.56
VLY VlyNBcp 9.88 +.06
VVTV ValVisA 5.33 +.10
VNDA VandaPhm 13.04 -.26
VNQ VangREIT 66.82 +.43
VIG VangDivAp 73.72 +.57
VWO VangEmg 40.26 +.16
VGK VangEur 56.26 +.24
VEA VangFTSE 40.49 +.11
VVC Vectren 35.26 +.36
VELT Veltih .15 +.00
VTR Ventas 60.51 -.22
VE VeoliaEnv 17.00 +.19
PAY VeriFone 25.23 +.26
VRSN Verisign 55.10 +.37
VZ VerizonCm 49.99 -.17
VRTX VertxPh 61.20 +1.02
VIAB ViacomB 83.13 +1.01
VVI ViadCorp 26.22 +.18
VIP VimpelCm 12.82 +.09
VPHM ViroPhrm 49.55 +.05
VSH Vishaylnt 12.44 +.25
WVVUS Vivus 9.34 +.54
VMW VMware 79.58 -1.08
VOD Vodafone 37.04 +.37
VMC VulcanM 56.06 +.22
WDFCWD40 73.71 +.32
WPC WPCarey 64.53 +.01
WMT WalMart 78.90 +.19
WAG Walgm 60.59 +1.11
WLT WalterEn 17.82 +.47
WRES WarrenRs 3.00 +.04
WRE WREIT 24.77 +.29
WM WsteMInc 44.18 +.39
WAT Waters 100.05 +.53
WFT Weathflntl 16.89
WBMDWebMD 40.28 +3.17
WBS WebsterFn 28.49 +.32
WRI WeinRIt 29.92 +.16
WLP WellPoint 88.02 +.52
WFC WellsFargo 42.76 +.48
WEN WendysCo 8.64 +.14
WR WestarEn 31.99 +.25
EMD WAstEMkt 11.92 -.08
WIA WAstlnfSc 11.58
WNR WstnRefin 36.81 +.68
WU WstnUnion 17.51 +.03
WBK Westpac s 30.40 -.09
WY Weyerhsr 29.73 +.58
WHR Whdpl 144.25 +2.11
WFM WholeFds 59.05 +.05
WMB WmsCos 34.39 -.18
WIN Windstrm 8.28 +.10
WEC WiscEngy 41.06 +.20
DXJ WTJpHedg 48.46 +.38
EPI WT India 15.97 +.29
WWD Woodward 39.45 +.20
WWE WIdWEnt 13.21 +.16
XL XLGrp 31.05 +.16
XEL XcelEngy 28.51 +.14
XRX Xerox 11.04 +.35
XLNX Xilinx 44.94 +.37
YRCWYRCWwde 7.72 -2.01
YY YY Inc n 54.00 +4.72
YHOO Yahoo 35.11 +1.03
AUY Yamana g 9.30 +.04
YELP Yelp 66.81 +1.68
YGE YingliGrn 6.58 +.38
YORWYorkWater 20.68 +.35
YOKU YoukuTud 27.15 +.77
YUM YumBrnds 73.19 +1.70
ZAGG Zagg 4.21 +.12
ZLCS Zalicus rs 1.21 +.09
ZMH Zimmer 89.64 +.39
ZTS Zoetisn 31.72 -.12
ZF ZweigFd 14.07 +.11
ZNGA Zynga 3.81 +.30


Stock Footnotes: Stock Footnotes. cild Issue has been called for
redemption by company, d New 52-week low. ec Company for-
merly listed on the Amerncan Exchange's Emerging Company Mar-
ketplace. g Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars, h Does
not meet continued-listing standards. If Late filing with SEC. n -
Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low fig-
ures date only from the beginning of trading, pf Preferred stock
issue, pr Preferences. pp Holder owes installments of purchase
price. rt Right to buy security at a specified price, rs Stock has
undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50% within the past year.
s Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi -
Trades will be settled when the stock is issued, wd When distnb-
uted. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock, u New 52-week
high. un Unit,, including more than one security, vI Company in
bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankrupt-
cy law. Appears in front of the name. Stocks in bold are worth at
least $5 and changed 5 percent or more in price. Underlining for 50
most actively traded stocks of the day. Dividend Footnotes: a -
Extra dividends were paid, but are not included, b Annual rate plus
stock, c Liquidating dividend, e Amount declared or paid in last 12
months. f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent
dividend announcement, i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no
regular rate. I Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend
was omitted or deferred, k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative
issue with dividends in arrears, m Current annual rate, which was
decreased by most recent dividend announcement, p Initial divi-
dend, annual rate not known, yield not shown, r Declared or paid in
preceding 12 months plus stock dividend, t Paid in stock, approxi-
mate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q Stock is
a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown, cc P/E exceeds 99. dd -
Loss in last 12 months. Mutual Fund Footnotes: b Fee covenng
market costs is paid from fund assets, d Deterred sales charge, or
redemption fee. f front load (sales charges), m Multiple fees are
charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption
fee. NA not available, p previous day's net asset value, s fund
split shares during the week. x fund paid a distribution during the
week. Source. Morningstar and the Associated Press.


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 93.88
Ethanol (gal) 1.77
Heating Oil (gal) 2.90
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.57
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.63

METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1268.30
Silver (oz) 20.43
Platinum (oz) 1432.00
Copper (Ib) 3.16
Palladium (oz) 735.00

AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.33
Coffee (Ib) 1.03
Corn (bu) 4.30
Cotton (Ib) 0.78
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 370.00
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.34
Soybeans (bu) 13.20
Wheat (bu) 6.46


PVS.
93.04
1.74
2.85
3.62
2.59

PVS.
1271.10
20.77
1439.60
3.24
741.85

PVS.
1.33
1.06
4.32
0.78
368.60
1.35
13.19
6.45


%CHG
+0.90

+1.56
-1.41
+1.61

%CHG
-0.22
-1.62
-0.53
-2.24
-0.92

%CHG
+0.06
-2.60
-0.58
+0.12
+0.38
-1.22
+0.04
+0.04


%YTD
+2.2
-19.2
-4.8
+6.4
-6.5

%YTD
-24.3
-32.3
-6.9
-13.1
+4.6

%YTD
+2.2
-28.3
-38.5
+3.8
-1.0
+15.2
-7.0
-17.0





SThe Sun/Thursday, November 14, 2013


STATE NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


WIRE Page 7


Up to $25K available for seniors with reverse mortgages


BOYNTON BEACH
(Cox Newspapers) -
Florida's senior home-
owners who have run
out of money after taking
on a reverse mortgage
can now apply for up to
$25,000 in aid through
the state's $1 billion
Hardest Hit foreclosure
prevention program.
Announced this week,
the new Elderly Mortgage
Assistance Program is
expected to help an esti-
mated 2,500 seniors who
are in danger of losing
their homes because
they can't afford such
housing-related expenses
as taxes, community
association dues and
insurance.
Reverse mortgages,
which are available only
to people at least 62


years old, allow seniors
to convert their home
equity into cash, paying
out either in a lump sum
or monthly installments.
But borrowers remain on
the hook for other prop-
erty costs. Not paying
those expenses can lead
to foreclosure.
"Our goal is to keep
people in their homes as
long as possible, and that
whole mission is pred-
icated on there being
a home," said Charles
Corely, secretary of the
Florida Department
of Elder Affairs, which
worked with the Florida
Housing Finance Corp. to
develop the program.
Heavily advertised
reverse mortgages can be
a boon for some home-
owners who want to use


the money they've built
up in equity for their
retirement and defer
payment until they die,
move, or sell the home.
Because it is a non-re-
course loan, the lender
cannot seek repayment
from any source other
than the property.
But the Consumer
Financial Protection
Bureau warned last
year that homeowners
largely don't understand
reverse mortgages. They
are taking them out at
younger ages, leaving
them fewer resources to
pay for expenses later in
life. And more borrowers
- 70 percent take the
lump sum payout rather
than an income stream,
which can put them
at risk of defaulting on


future insurance and tax
payments.
That's what happened
to 79-year-old Boynton
Beach resident Clarence
Hullfish, who took
a $75,000 lump sum
payout from a 2008
reverse mortgage to help
a relative with legal fees.
Hullfish, who lived in
his home for more than
40 years, realized in 2010
that he couldn't pay the
property taxes on his
home. He said he tried to
work with the mortgage
company to figure out a
way to stay in his home,
but it filed for foreclosure
in May.
Instead of losing his
home to foreclosure,
Hullfish put it on
the market. County
records show it sold to


a corporate investor in
September for $222,000.
Hullfish said he didn't get
any money from the sale.
"I would never take out
a reverse mortgage again
in my life," said Hullfish,
who learned about
the reverse mortgage
through an advertise-
ment he got in the mail.
"I went by the house the
other day and there was
a Dumpster outside. It
was devastating."
The Consumer
Financial Protection
Bureau found about
57,600 reverse mortgage
borrowers, or 9.4 percent
of the nationwide total,
were at risk of foreclo-
sure because of unpaid
taxes, insurance or fees.
About 10,000 Florida
homeowners are believed


to be struggling with
their reverse mortgages,
according to officials
from the Florida Housing
Finance Corp., which
oversees the Hardest Hit
Fund.
The Hardest Hit Fund
is a federal program ini-
tiated in 2010 that gave
18 states and the District
of Columbia $7.6 billion.
Florida received
$1.06 billion.
The Elderly Mortgage
Assistance Program
announced this week is
the fifth foreclosure pre-
vention plan in Florida to
use Hardest Hit money.
Others include mortgage
assistance for unem-
ployed and underem-
ployed homeowners and
two principal reduction
plans.


I HEADLINE NEWS FROM AROUND THE STATE


Spike Lee wants
Zimmerman tweet
lawsuit ended
ORLANDO (AP)-
Spike Lee has asked a
federal judge to throw out
lawsuit filed by a Florida
a couple who say the
movie director mistakenly
retweeted their address
as the home of George
Zimmerman.
Lee's attorneys filed a
motion Tuesday to dis-
miss the lawsuit brought
by Elaine and David
McClain. The director's
attorneys argued the law-
suit should be tossed out
since the couple reached
a $10,000 settlement with
Lee last year.
"The court should
dismiss this case because
plaintiffs have already
settled the claim of neg-
ligence," Lee's attorneys
said.
Fake cop wanted
cheap doughnuts
TRINITY (AP)- A
Florida man is facing
charges that he imper-
sonated a law enforce-
ment officer during an
attempt to get discounted
doughnuts.
Pasco County sheriff's
deputies say 48-year-old
Charles T. "Chuck" Barry
tried to use the ploy twice
recently at a Tampa-area
Dunkin' Donuts.


They say the first time
he showed the clerk a
badge and a holstered
gun, telling him, "See, I
am a cop!"
When he returned the
next day, the manager
wrote down his license
plate number.
On Tuesday, deputies
set up surveillance at
the store and arrested
Barry when he returned.
They said they found a
badge and a .38-caliber
revolver in his pocket.
He was arrested and later
released.
Anthony Florida
house facing
foreclosure
ORLANDO (AP) -The
Orlando house where
Casey Anthony lived with
her parents and 2-year-
old daughter is facing
foreclosure.
A lender filed a foreclo-
sure complaint against
Anthony's mother, Cindy,
earlier this month.
Nationstar Mortgage
says Cindy Anthony owes
almost $129,000 on the
house. The lender says it
hasn't received a payment
since 2011.
Casey Anthony lived
at the house with her
daughter, Caylee, and her
parents until 2008 when
she was arrested in the
toddler's killing.
Anthony was acquitted


of murder at her 2011
trial.
After Caylee's 2008
disappearance, protest-
ers gathered outside
the house demanding
Anthony's arrest.
The house also was
searched by detectives
investigating the disap-
pearance. Items seized
from the house were used
as evidence at trial.
Trial continues for
man charged in
two cops' deaths

TAMPA (AP) The
trial continues in Tampa
for a man accused of fa-
tally shooting two police
officers during a traffic
stop in 2010.
Dontae Morris is charged
with two counts of first-de-
gree murder. He's already
serving a life sentence
for another murder, but
prosecutors are seeking
the death penalty for the
slaying of Officers David
Curtis and Jeffrey Kocab.
Curtis' wife was the
first witness called to
testify Tuesday. Kelly
Curtis identified her
husband's handwriting in
a notebook where he had
written Morris' name and
date of birth just before
he was killed.
Jurors saw a video
recorded from the dash-
board of Curtis' patrol car


that captured the officers'
deaths as they tried
to place a man under
arrest. The video was
shielded from courtroom
spectators.


0. v- COMING SOONV.7
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Sun Newspapers, reaching thousands of readers and online at
sun-classified.com including the power of these options:

* Upload photos (up to 6)
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Place your ad online 24/7 ..






SUN^^^>^

Amierica's BEST Community Daily *Not all categories qualify for free.
ACertain restrictions apply


T P C l e s


FESTIVAL


Saturday, November 16,2013
10:00am to 7:00pm
Promenades Mall
(On Aaron Street between
Harbor and Olean Boulevard)

Come and enjoy a day of
food, drinks, live entertainment,
a kids' fun park, vendors and more!


*The Parkside Festival committee is seeking vendors,
artists and crafters. For more information,
contact Susan Swanson at 941457-3126.




jl "?1 f -t,"l t

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS:

Fawcett Memorial Hospital k ,atm1e, Ri. ,

._ TAm UTa, lir
Mi NiM Sylvia Orr Marc A. Meler, M.D.
NMiIII^N'Nit SylviaOrr Marc A. Melser, M.D.


.. .. A bufl ralo
ygraffix


SUN


"' Saturday, November 23rd, 2013

Featuring Goods & Services

for our Winter residents
\returning to enjoy our
beautiful Florida

climate.



SUNwA

NEWSPAPERS
America's BEST Community Daily"

To advertise your business, call your sales
representative today at

941-429-3110





-Page 8 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


WEATHER/WORLD NEWS


The Sun /Thursday, November 14,2013


TODAY

*!b.. ;:

Breezy with more
clouds than sun

78 / 600
10% chance of rain


CONDITIONS TODAY
UV Index and Real Feel Temperature9 Today


4 5


57 70 75 76 74 68
8a.m. 10a.m. Noon 2p.m. 4p.m. 6p.m.
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number,
the greater the need for eye and skin protection. 0-2 Low;
3-5 Moderate; 6-7 Hiigh; 8-10 Very Hiigh; 11+ Extreme.
RealFeel Temperature is the exclusive
AccuWeather.com composite of effective temperature
based on eight weather factors.


AIRPORT
Possible weather-related delays today. Check
with your airline for the most updated schedules.
Hi/Lo Outlook Delays
Ft. Myers 78/64 cloudy none
Sarasota 78/61 part cldy none


SUN AND MOON
The Sun Rise
Today 6:47 a.m.
Friday 6:48 a.m.
The Moon Rise
Today 3:45 p.m.
Friday 4:25 p.m.


Set
5:38 p.m.
5:37 p.m.
Set
3:56 a.m.
4:52 a.m.


AIR QUALITY INDEX Full Last New First
Air Quality Index readings as of Wednesday 3 0
35___ 'CE
5W i r 200 30 Nov17 Nov25 Dec2 Dec9
0 50 100 150 200 300 50


0-50 Good; 51-100 Moderate; 101-150 Unhealthy
for sensitive groups; 151-200 Unhealthy; 201-300
Very Unhealthy; 301-500 Hazardous
Main pollutant: particulates
Source: scgov.net

POLLEN INDEX
Pollen Index readings as of Wednesday
Trees
Grass II
Weeds ."X, p 0va."
Molds
absent low moderate high veryhigh
Source: National Allergy Bureau

ALMANAC
Punta Gorda through 5 p.m. Wednesday
Temperatures
High/Low 727/630
Normal High/Low 82/600
Record High 90 (2008)
Record Low 360 (1968)
Precipitation (in inches)
24 hours through 5 p.m. Wednesday Trace
Month to date Trace
Normal month to date 0.92"
Yearto date 52.12"
Normal year to date 47.88"
Record 0.32" (1992)

MONTHLY RAINFALL
Month 2013 2012 Avg. Record/Year
Jan. 0.43 0.77 1.80 7.07/1979
Feb. 2.12 0.73 2.43 11.05/1983
Mar. 1.98 0.75 3.28 9.26/1970
Apr. 3.06 0.81 2.03 5.80/1994
May 2.76 3.08 2.50 9.45/1991
Jun. 10.50 13.44 8.92 23.99/1974
Jul. 7.38 5.43 8.22 14.22/1995
Aug. 9.29 8.36 8.01 15.60/1995
Sep. 11.12 5.05 6.84 14.03/1979
Oct. 3.48 5.71 2.93 10.88/1995
Nov. Trace 0.02 1.91 5.53/2002
Dec. 1.78 1.78 6.83/2002
Year 52.12 45.93 50.65 (since 1931)
Totals are from a 24-hour penod ending at 5 p.m.


SOLUNAR TABLE
Minor Major Minor Major
Today 2:25a 8:37a 2:49p 9:01p
Fri. 3:08a 9:20a 3:32p 9:44p
Sat. 3:53a 10:05a 4:18p 10:30p
The solunar period schedule allows planning
days so you will be fishing in good territory or
hunting in good cover during those times. Major
periods begin at the times shown and last for
1.5 to 2 hours. The minor periods are shorter.


TIDES
High
Punta Gorda
Today 12:01a
Fri. 12:29a
Englewood
Today 12:16p
Fri. 1:llp
Boca Grande
Today 11:21a
Fri. 12:16p
El Jobean
Today 12:33a
Fri. 1:01a
Venice
Today 10:31a
Fri. 11:26a


Low High Low

7:25a 1:39p 6:42p
8:08a 2:34p 7:13p

5:41a 11:06p 4:58p
6:24a 11:32p 5:29p

4:02a 10:llp 3:19p
4:45a 10:37p 3:50p

7:54a 2:llp 7:llp
8:37a 3:06p 7:42p

4:20a 9:21p 3:37p
5:03a 9:47p 4:08p


FLORIDA CITIES
Today
City Hi Lo W
Apalachicola 66 55
Bradenton 78 63
Clearwater 77 64
Coral Springs 76 71c
Daytona Beach 70 61c
Fort Lauderdale 76 73c
Fort Myers 78 64c
Fort Pierce 76 67c
Gainesville 70 52
Jacksonville 64 53
Key Largo 78 73c


Fri.
Lo W
63 c
68 sh
69 sh
75 c
67 c
76 sh
70 sh
72 sh
61 sh
58 c
77 sh


FRIDAY


SATURDAY


Increasing clouds Chance for a couple of
showers


79 / 680
70% chance of rain


I
Cleamrater,
77 64





J
St. Petersburg
77/64


(b. .
Tampa
78/63


p


SUNDAY



Warm and humid with
periods of sun

87 / 670
20% chance of rain


JBrandui
77 59


Plant City
J771 58

n1


MONDAY THE NATION


Partly cloudy


87 / 680
20% chance of rain


J
Winter Hawen
75, 60


Bartu*


-a,


S 74,60 ,

Apollo Beach Ft. Meade
77 61 I 75/57


*Bradenton
78/63


Wauchula
76 60


Longboat Key% ________ Myakka Cit Limestone
78/64 79/ ,78 59
Sarqta v*I .* --- -- -----


78/61


a


Osprey
79/62 *

Shown is today's weather.
Temperatures are today's
highs and tonight's lows.
Engle
78 E
Gulf Water
Temperature
750 B
7E


Venice
* 78/62


elm1d H.--.


,2 -. _. ,, r

Placida%
80/61.
oca Grande%
8/67


Forecasts and graphics, except for the
WINK-TV 5-day forecast, provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. 02013

Publication date: 11/14/13


Fort Myers
78/64

Cape Coral
78/62


-tic

Lehigh Acres
78/62


MARINE
Wind Speed Seas Bay/Inland Sanibel
direction in knots in feet chop 78/68
Cape Sable to Tarpon Springs Bonita Springj
ENE 15-25 2-4 Moderate 78/63 ......
Tarpon Springs to Apalachicola "
ENE 10-20 4-7 Heavy AccuWeather.com


City
Key West
Kissimmee
Lakeland
Melbourne
Miami
Naples
Ocala
Okeechobee
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola


Today
Hi Lo W
80 75 c
75 58 pc
74 57 pc
74 66 c
78 71 c
80 65 c
70 56 pc
74 62 c
75 60 pc
64 53 pc
62 53 pc


Fri.
Lo W
78 sh
67 c
66 sh
69 c
76 c
70 sh
62 sh
69 sh
66 c
61 c
61 c


City
Pompano Beach
St. Augustine
St. Petersburg
Sanford
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Titusville
Vero Beach
West Palm Beach
Winter Haven


Today Fri.
Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
76 72 c 80 76 sh
66 61 pc 73 65 c
77 64 pc 78 70 sh
74 61 pc 77 67 c
78 61 pc 79 69 sh
66 51 pc 72 57 c
78 63 pc 80 68 sh
72 63c 76 67 c
76 67 c 80 71 sh
76 72 c 81 75 sh
75 60 pc 78 68 sh


High ...................... 95 at Corona, CA


City
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
Fairbanks
Fargo
Hartford
Helena
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis


Today
Hi Lo W
59 42 pc
43 24 r
56 41 s
52 30 s
50 29 c
58 41 s
53 31 pc
48 37 s
46 35 s
44 31 pc
54 28 s
56 31 s
47 32 pc
50 34 s
48 34 s
58 34 pc
48 31 s
47 21 s
60 48 pc
54 32 pc
48 33 pc
46 32 s
38 29 pc
37 10 c
44 29 pc
48 26 s
44 26 c
80 70 r
64 57 pc
50 30 s


WORLD CITIES


City
Amsterdam
Baghdad
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo


Today
Hi Lo W
47 40 sh
76 49 s
58 35 s
45 31 s
90 64 s
80 59 s


Fri.
Lo W
41 pc
23 pc
49 pc
36 pc
28 pc
53 pc
35 pc
41 s
36 pc
32 pc
36 pc
50 pc
37 pc
42 pc
37 pc
53 c
38 pc
25 pc
60 pc
31 pc
38 pc
34 pc
33 pc
5 pc
33 pc
31 pc
24 c
72 sh
62 c
40 pc


Fri.
Lo W
37 pc
50 s
36 s
31 pc
46 r
59 s


18 1
W1
Miami '
*78fflS 1 '
\
Precipitation

Rain Flurries Snow Ice


Low ....................... 9 atAlamosa, CO
Today Fri.
City Hi Lo W Hi LoW
Jackson, MS 60 40 pc 69 56 c
Kansas City 52 34 pc 57 49 pc
Knoxville 54 30 s 56 41 pc
LasVegas 74 53 pc 67 50 pc
Los Angeles 84 60 s 70 56 pc
Louisville 52 34 s 55 45 pc
Memphis 54 41 s 63 55 c
Milwaukee 44 34 pc 48 38 pc
Minneapolis 48 32 pc 48 37 pc
Montgomery 60 41 s 68 50 c
Nashville 54 33 s 60 50 pc
New Orleans 66 58 pc 75 63 c
New York City 48 40 s 54 46 pc
Norfolk,VA 54 39 s 61 48 pc
Oklahoma City 58 41 pc 64 55 pc
Omaha 54 32 pc 55 43 pc
Philadelphia 52 36 s 56 40 pc
Phoenix 82 62 s 83 59 pc
Pittsburgh 46 30 s 52 35 pc
Portland, ME 46 29 s 51 30 s
Portland, OR 53 43 c 50 43 sh
Providence 50 34 s 56 36 s
Raleigh 54 32 s 62 49 pc
Salt Lake City 59 39 s 45 35 pc
St. Louis 56 36 s 56 48 c
San Antonio 66 50 pc 75 62 pc
San Diego 77 60 s 65 59 pc
San Francisco 63 50 pc 61 50 pc
Seattle 53 42 c 50 40 r
Washington, DC 56 35 s 57 44 pc


City
Mexico City
Montreal
Ottawa
Paris
Regina
Rio de Janeiro


Today
Hi Lo W
72 49 pc
44 39 pc
42 33 pc
46 32 sh
34 17 c
78 65 s


Fri.
Lo W
50 pc
42 pc
31 pc
32 c
17 pc
67 s


Calgary 38 23 pc 35 7 c Rome 65 54 s 63 48 c
Cancun 81 76 t 84 77 t St. John's 33 30 pc 44 35 pc
Dublin 48 39 pc 53 42 s San Juan 88 75 s 88 74 s
Edmonton 38 21 pc 36 3 sf Sydney 82 59 s 73 61 sh
Halifax 46 39 pc 52 41 s Tokyo 55 48 pc 57 48 sh
Kiev 43 29 c 38 28 c Toronto 46 36 s 50 37 pc
London 50 45 sh 46 34 pc Vancouver 50 42 pc 47 37 r
Madrid 63 39 s 55 34 pc Winnipeg 34 25 sf 38 27 pc
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow lurries, sn-snow, i-ice.


After record opium year, Afghans plant new crop


CHAM KALAI,
Afghanistan (AP) -The
seeds flew from his hands
into the soil. Wrapped in a
woolen shawl against the
cold, Khan Bacha sowed
his fields with the only crop
he says brings him enough
money to pay his bills and
feed his family: Poppies.
Afghanistan's farmers
are rushing to replant
their fields with the base
ingredient of opium after
the country reaped its
biggest poppy harvest ever
last May. That harvest pro-
duced a staggering 5,500
metric tons (6,000 tons) of
opium, 49 percent higher
than the previous year and
more than the combined
output of the rest of the
world, according to a
report issued Wednesday
by the United Nations'
drug control agency.
Bacha's village, Cham
Kalai, is in the eastern
province of Nangarhar,
which saw a dramatic five-
fold increase in the area
planted with poppies from


2012-2013, the country's
biggest increase. The
province also illustrates
all the factors fueling the
increase and thwarting
efforts by Afghan officials
and their U.S. allies to
eradicate the crop. Poverty
is widespread, making
the lucrative poppy crop
a draw. Instability is high,
making any attempt
to control planting
impossible.
In Bacha's village of
traditional sun-baked mud
houses, there's no electrici-
ty no running water. There
isn't a health clinic for
miles. Schools for girls are
shunned as against Islam.
"People are poor,
families are big. Wheat is
no good," Bacha said. "The
only thing that is good is
poppies. They are gold."
The area is also a
stronghold for Taliban
insurgents. Talk of security
in the area just makes
Bacha smile. Squatting
on the edge of his small
plot of land, he gestures


AP FILE PHOTO


In this May 10 file photo, Afghan farmers collect raw opium as
they work in a poppy field in Khogyani district of Jalalabad east
of Kabul, Afghanistan.


off in the distance where
he said that just the night
before the Taliban fought
a fierce battle with Afghan
troops backed by "foreign
soldiers" his reference
to NATO troops.
Soon after the
Associated Press arrived
in Cham Kalai earlier this
week, climbing down to
the fields across a narrow
stream, the whispering


among the village chil-
dren began "Taliban,
Taliban," signaling that
fighters were nearby. At
first, Bacha looked worried
but did not flinch. Then
the whispers became loud-
er. Bacha's glances toward
the nearby ridges seemed
to pickup something, and
his worry turned to panic.
"Go. Go. Now," he said.
The AP team left the area.


The poppy planting
season in Afghanistan
began last month and lasts
until the end of November.
Last season, which ended
with the May harvest,
brought a number of grim
milestones: Not only was
production the highest lev-
el ever, more land than ever
before was cultivated with
poppies some 209,000
hectares (516,000 acres),
36 percent more than the
previous season, according
to the 2013 drug survey
by the U.N. Office of Drug
and Crime. The amount of
poppy crop eradicated by
authorities went down
24 percent, to 7,348
hectares (18,000 acres).
Cultivation spread to
two provinces that had
been declared poppy-free.
The vast majority of
cultivation 89 percent
- took place in nine prov-
inces that are among the
most insecure areas in the
country, the report said.
The biggest producers are
Helmand province, where


the Taliban insurgency
is strong, and Kandahar
province, the birthplace of
the Taliban.
That is bad news for
Afghanistan, which has
a burgeoning addiction
problem, and for Europe,
the main recipient of
Afghanistan's harvest,
said Jean- Luc Lemahieu,
the UNODC's regional
representative in Kabul.
More than 1 million
Afghans are addicts, living
in squalor in its cities. In
the capital Kabul they
sleep on the street, in a
garbage-filled dried river
bed reeking of human
waste. The U.N. report said
Afghanistan has increased
its services to treat addicts,
but caregivers say they
are overwhelmed. Fifteen
percent of the 1 million
addicts are women, often
drawn in by an addicted
husband, or children, who
are sometimes sent by
their parents to find opium
to feed their habit and in
turn become addicts.


I HEADLINE NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD


Bangladesh Morsi: No stability
garment factories in Egypt unless
shut amid protests coup reversed


DHAKA, Bangladesh
(Bloomberg) -About
250 Bangladesh garment
factories will remain
closed for a second day
Thursday after workers
protesting against low
wages clashed with
police.
The factories in the
Ashulia industrial zone
on the outskirts of the
capital Dhaka will stay
shut "for security rea-
sons," the Bangladesh
Garment Manufacturers
and Exporters Association
said in a statement
Wednesday, without
elaborating.


CAIRO (AP) -Egypt's
ousted President
Mohammed Morsi accused
the military chief who
deposed him of treason in
a message from prison read
by lawyers onWednesday,
saying the country cannot
return to stability until the
coup is reversed and those
behind it are tried.
The statement was part
of a bid by Morsi to rally
his supporters since his
emergence from the secret
military detention where
he had been held, with
virtually no contact with
the outside world since his
July 3 ouster.


Morsi was moved to
a high security civilian
penitentiary last week
after the first session of his
trial on charges of inciting
murder. There, he had his
first extensive meeting with
a team of lawyers from his
Muslim Brotherhood and
other allies on Tuesday,
outlining to them his
"message to the Egyptian
people."
But he is emerging to
a dramatically changed
situation from four months
ago.
Since then, a fierce
crackdown by security
forces has crippled the
Brotherhood, several thou-
sand members have been
arrested, and hundreds
have been killed.


Syrian army
captures suburb
south of Damascus

BEIRUT (AP) -Syrian
troops captured a contested
suburb of Damascus on
Wednesday as the govern-
ment forged ahead with a
punishing military offensive
that already has taken four
other opposition strong-
holds south of the capital,
state media said.
For more than a year,
much of the belt of neigh-
borhoods and towns just
south of Damascus has
been a rebel bastion and
a key arms conduit for the
opposition. But government
forces bolstered by
fighters from Lebanon's


Shiite militant Hezbollah
group and Shiite militants
from Iraq have made
significant headway there
in recent weeks as President
Bashar Assad pushes to
shore up his hold on the
capital and its doorstep.
The recent government
advances also could give
Assad's government a stron-
ger position in proposed
peace talks that the United
States and Russia have been
trying to convene since May.
The town of Hejeira on
Wednesday became the
latest rebel-held suburb
to fall into government
hands. State news agency
SANA said the army seized
control of the town, but was
still battling rebels on the
outskirts.


Brit unemployment
falls to 7.6 percent

LONDON (Bloomberg)
- British unemployment
edged closer to the Bank
of England's key threshold
in the third quarter and
a narrower measure of
joblessness dropped for
a 12th month in October
amid signs that the recov-
ery is gathering strength.
The jobless rate
as measured by
International Labour
Organisation standards
declined to 7.6 percent,
the lowest since 2009,
from 7.7 percent in the
three months through
August, the Office for
National Statistics said
in London Wednesday.


80 / 670
40% chance of rain


-10s I -Os 10s I 20s I 30s I 40 Os 50s 60s I 70s 8O 90Os
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation.Temperature bands are higis for the day.
Wnipeg
53,42 Z ;7(


.LosA gele .
84W0
ElPaso--
"--- "W~f \/ &
C" ou,,on
'WOl
*ChIhuia HuS7?
7046 \
Monterrey
Fronts
Cold Warm Stationary Showers T-storms
Cold Warm Stationary Showers T-storms


U.S. Extremes (Forthe 48 contiguous states yesterday)


Arcadia -a "
78, 62 "

North Poit jHull
78/60 79/59
1 PortCharlutte
I 78/60


Punta Gorda
78/61


I: I










SPORTS


Thursday, November 14,2013


Kershaw, Scherzer claim
Cy Young Awards, *Page 2


* PREP SPORTS


Tarpons' James



signs up for seasons


Area athletes
ink college
letters of intent
By ZACH MILLER
AND ROB SHORE
SPORTS WRITERS
Hannah James needs
to invest in a winter coat
and some boots.
The Charlotte High
School senior officially


signed her letter of intent
to swim at the University
of Wisconsin on
Wednesday, the first day
that athletes could sign
for most NCAA sports.
"Part of my decision
was I wanted somewhere
with seasons," James
said. "I definitely will get
seasons inWisconsin, it
snowed (there) before
Halloween this year."
James is familiar


with the weather in the
Midwest after living in
Illinois for a year and
a half about six years
ago. She also spent last
summer there with her
grandparents.
She owned a winter
coat when she lived in
Illinois, but she's pretty
sure it no longer fits. So
before she leaves Florida,
SIGNS 13


SUN HOIUU BY ZACH MILLEI-


Charlotte High School swimmer Hannah James signed a letter of intent to compete for the
University of Wisconsin on Wednesday in Punta Gorda. Flanking James is her father, Brian, and mother,
SDustin. Behind her are Charlotte athletic director Brian Nolan, right, and swimming coach Jeff Cain.


* COLLEGE FOOTBALL: Florida


AP PHOTO
Florida coach Will Muschamp looks on during a game against LSU this season in Baton Rouge, La. The Gators have their second
four-game losing streak in Muschamp's three seasons and are facing the possibility of missing a bowl game.





A brass backing


Florida officials defend Musehamp amid losing streak


By MARK LONG
ASSOCIATED PRESS
GAINESVILLE Florida
officials are coming to coachWill
Muschamp's defense.
President Bernie Machen
and athletic director Jeremy
Foley voiced strong support for
Muschamp on Wednesday, telling
the school's website they are fully
committed to keeping Muschamp
around to fix the team's problems.
The Gators (4-5) have their


GATORS AT GAMECOCKS
WHO: Florida (3-4,4-5 SEC)
at South Carolina (5-2,7-2)
WHEN: Saturday, 7 p.m.
WHERE: Williams-Brice Stadium, Columbia, S.C.
TV:ESPN2
INSIDE: Florida State QB Winston investigated
in sexual assault, PAGE 8
second four-game losing streak
in Muschamp's three seasons
and are facing the possibility of


missing a bowl game for the first
time since 1990. If Florida doesn't
upset No. 11 South Carolina or
second-ranked Florida State this
month, the program will have its
first losing record since 1979.
"I'm a thousand percent con-
vinced that Will Muschamp is the
guy to lead this football program,"
Foley said. "Nothing has changed in
what we feel about Will Muschamp
from the day we hired him.
FLORIDA 15


* PREP VOLLEYBALL: Ocala Vanguard 3, Venice 1


Venice's quest


for repeat ends


in state semis


By ROB SMITH
SPORTS WRITER
KISSIMMEE -Venice
High School's quest
to win back-to-back
state volleyball titles
for the first time ended
Wednesday with a 3-1
loss to OcalaVanguard in
the Class 6A semifinals at
Silver Spurs Arena.
Venice (23-8) scored
three of the first four
points, but the Knights
outscored the Indians
24-7 the rest of the first
game en route to a 25-10,


18-25, 25-21, 26-24
victory.
"The first game, it was
kind of a wash," Venice
coach Brian Wheatley
said. "That's my fault. We
just weren't ready to go."
The Indians rebounded
to tie the match, taking
the second game on
the strength of Hannah
Richards' nine kills.
The sophomore set a
career-high with 22 on
the day.
"We really picked up
QUEST 13


Venice senior Cassie Kasmirski had a team-high 15 digs in
Wednesday's Class 6A semifinal match against Ocala Vanguard.

* NFL: Tampa Bay


Backs fill gaps as


fast as Bucs need


ByRICKSTROUD
TAMPA BAY TIMES
TAMPA -It doesn't
seem to matter which
running backs the
Buccaneers plug in their
lineup lately stars or
schlubs they plow
through doubters, not
to mention oncoming
defenders, with equal
success.
From Doug Martin
to Mike James to Brian
Leonard to Bobby Rainey,
the baton is passed
without the rushing game
breaking stride.
Two weeks ago, with
Martin ticketed for
injured reserve with a
torn labrum in his left
shoulder, James ran wild
for 158 yards against
the Seahawks. He had
41 more on the opening
drive Monday night
against the Dolphins


FALCONS AT BUCS
WHO: Atlanta (2-7)
atTampa Bay (1-8)
WHEN: Sunday, 1 p.m.
WHERE: Raymond James
Stadium, Tampa
TV: FOX
RADIO: 103.5 FM, 620 AM,
1580 AM
TICKETS: Ticketmaster.com

before breaking his left
ankle.
No problem. Leonard
and Rainey, claimed off
waivers from the Browns
three weeks earlier,
helped the Bucs backfield
combine for 140 yards
and a touchdown.
"Basically, I came into
the NFL with a chip on
my shoulder because I
didn't get drafted," said
BUCS|8


INDEX I Lottery 21 Community calendar 21 MLB 2 1 College basketball 2 1 Autoracing 2 1 NBA 3 1 Preps 3-4 1 NHL 5 | Quick Hits 51 Scoreboard 51 College football 6,81 NFL 7,8


www.yoursun.net www.Facebook.com/SunCoastSports @SunCoastSports


Sports Editor: Mark Lawrence






Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Thursday, November 14,2013


Florida Lottery
www.flalottery.comrn
* CASH 3
Nov. 13N ................................1 5-O-5
Nov. 13D..................................... 7-4-8
Nov. 12N ....................................3-6-6
Nov. 12D.....................................1-8-8
Nov. 11N ....................................4-8-9
Nov. I11D.....................................6-3-4
D-Day, N-Night
* PLAY
Nov. 13N .......................... 85.......8 -7-7
Nov. 13D..................................2-5-2-0
Nov. 12N .................................2-2-4-7
Nov. 12D......................3.........7-1-3-7
Nov. 11N .................................0-0-7-5
Nov. 11D..................................1-0-0-4
D-Day, N-Night
* FANTASY 5
Nov. 13............................ 1-7-8-21-23
Nov. 12........................8-24-25-30-32
Nov. 11 .......................... 1-5-16-34-35
Nov. 10...................... 15-23-26-35-36
PAYOFF FOR NOV. 12
1 5-digit winners.......... $209,792.50
244 4-digit winners............. $138.50
8,007 3-digit winners............. $11.50
* MEGA MONEY
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M egaBall........................................... 5

Nov. 8...............................5-7-11-22
M egaBall.........................................18
PAYOFF FOR NOV. 12
0 4-of-4MB..........................$550,000
3 4-of-4...................................$1,930
50 3-of-4 MB .......................... $253.50
1,151 3-of-4............................$32.50
1,281 2-of-4 MB......................$20.50
* LOTTO
Nov. 13...................5-12-14-28-45-50
Nov. 9.....................9-12-15-21-33-45
Nov.6...................20-25-29-30-36-37
PAYOFF FOR NOV. 9
0 6-digit winners ......................$27M
50 5-digit winners.............$3,457.50
2,415 4-digit winners............. $55.50
43,371 3-digit winners ..................$5
* POWERBALL
Nov. 13........................5-31-50-55-56
Powerball.......................................... 9

Nov. 9............................ 3-9-37-49-56
Powerball........................................32
PAYOFF FOR NOV. 9
0 5 ofS + PB.............................$87M
0 5 0of5............................... $1,000,000
2 4ofS + PB.........................$10,000
59 4of 5 ....................................$100
ESTIMATED JACKPOT
$110 million
MEGAA MILLIONS
Nov. 12...................... 20-30-32-42-71
MegaBall......................................... 15

Nov. 8.......................1-42-51-57-65
MegaBall..........................................17
PAYOFF FOR NOV. 12
0 5 of5 + MB........................... $132M
0 5 0of5.............................. $1,000,000
1 4of5 + MB............................$5,000
19 4of 5 ....................................$500


Corrections
Is is the Sun's policy to correct all
errors of fact. To report an error, call or
email the sports department.


How to...
Submit a story idea: Email or call
Mark Lawrence 941-206-1175. Must
contain name, address and phone
number.
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877-818-6204 or 941-206-1126 by
10:30 p.m. the day the event is held.
Submit local golf scores: Email
scores to golfscores@sun-herald.com.
Scores appear in the weekly Herald
sections.


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V


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EMAIL: sports@sun-herald.com
FAX: 941-629-2085


THIS WEEK ON TRACK

NASCAR SPRINT CUP SERIES
FORD ECOBOOST 400
Site: Homestead
Schedule: Friday, practice (ESPN2,1:30-
2:55 p.m.), qualifying (ESPN2, 6-7:30 p.m.);
Saturday, practice (Fox Sports 2, noon-1
p.m., 3-4 p.m.); Sunday, race, 2 p.m. (ESPN,
1-7 p.m.).
Track: Homestead-Miami Speedway (oval,
1.5 miles).
Race distance: 400.5 miles, 267 laps.
2012 winner: Jeff Gordon.
Fast facts: To take the title if Matt Kenseth
wins the race, Jimmie Johnson needs to
finish 23rd or better, 24th with a lap led, or
25th with the most laps led. ... Kenseth has
a season-high seven victories. Johnson has
six.... Harvick is third in the standings, 34
points behind Johnson. Harvick is making his
final start for Richard Childress Racing. He
will drive for Stewart-Haas next season.
Online: http:www.nascar.com


By BEN WALKER
ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK -Clayton
Kershaw of the Los
Angeles Dodgers and
Max Scherzer of the
Detroit Tigers breezed
Wednesday to baseball's
Cy Young Awards.
Kershaw won the prize
as the National League's
best pitcher for the sec-
ond time in three seasons
after posting a 1.83 ERA
- lowest in the majors in
13 years.
"This is such a cool
thing. I can't even explain
what it means to me,"
Kershaw said in an inter-
view on MLB Network. "It
really is a huge honor."
The 25-year-old lefty
with a big-breaking curve
drew 29 of 30 first-place
votes from members
of the Baseball Writers'
Association of America.
Adam Wainwright of the


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ORLANDO Scott
Boras had some words for
the New York Mets and
Chicago Cubs, and they
were far from kind. And
he also backed the Tampa
Bay Rays' desire for a new
ballpark.
On the third day of the
general managers' meet-
ings, the baseball agent
with the highest profile
stood in the hotel lobby
for a question-and-an-
swer session that
gathered an amount of
media so large that hotel
security told him to move
to a remote corridor.
Boras compared the
Tampa Bay Rays' situa-
tion to Charles Dickens'
"Tale of Two Cities,"
saying there was "the one
they're in and the one
they should be in." The
Rays repeatedly have said
Tropicana Field in St.
Petersburg is inadequate,
and they drew a major
league-low 1.5 million at


NASCAR NATIONWIDE SERIES
FORD ECOBOOST 300
Site: Homestead
Schedule: Friday, practice (Fox Sports 1,
10-11 a.m.; Fox Sports 2,3-4:30 p.m.);
Saturday, qualifying (Fox Sports 2,1-2:30
p.m.), race, 4:30 p.m. (ESPN, 4-7:45 p.m.).
Track: Homestead-Miami Speedway (oval,
1.5 miles).
Race distance: 300 miles, 200 laps.
2012 winner: Regan Smith.
Fast facts: Austin Dillon leads the stand-
ings, eight points ahead of Sam Hornish
Jr.... In the owners'standings, Penske
Racing's No. 22 Ford has a four-point lead
over Gibbs'No. 54Toyota. Penske's No. 22
also has 12 victories this year, six by Brad
Keselowski, three by Joey Logano, two by AJ
Allmendinger and one by Ryan Blaney.
Online: http:www.nascar.com


St. Louis Cardinals was
picked first on one ballot.
Kershaw went 16-9 and
topped the NL with 232
strikeouts. He also won
the Cy Young Award in
2011 and finished second
last year to knuckleballer
R.A. Dickey.
Scherzer took the AL
honor after leading the
majors with 21 wins. He
received 28 of 30 first-
place votes.
The right-hander lost
only three times and was
the lone 20-game winner
in baseball. He ranked sec-
ond in the majors with 240
strikeouts and was fifth in
the AL with a 2.90 ERA.
Scherzer smiled and
raised both arms when the
results were announced.
"It's unbelievable. It just
vindicates everything I've
done," he said, acknowl-
edging all the run support
he received from Detroit's
powerful lineup probably


home despite reaching
the playoffs for the fourth
time in six years.
"They need a new
ballpark. They need to
address that," he said.
"But certainly the bell's
been answered by the
organization as far as
putting a product on the
field that would normally
attract fans."
Boras wants to goad
teams into spending more
on free agents. When he
focused on the Mets, he
pointed out their concen-
tration on captain David
Wright and young pitchers
such as Matt Harvey his
client and ZackWheeler.
"The Mets are like
NASA," Boras said. "They
have big rockets, a lot of
platforms and very few
astronauts. Astronauts are
hard to find. They've got
one guy with the 'Wright'
stuff, that's for sure. And
they've got a lot of Arm-
strongs, too. But they're
certainly a club that I'm
sure that's in pursuit of a


NASCAR CAMPING WORLD TRUCK SERIES
FORD ECOBOOST 200
Site: Homestead
Schedule: Friday, practice (Fox Sports 1,
11 a.m.-1 p.m.), qualifying (Fox Sports 2,
4:30-5:30 p.m.), race, 8 p.m. (Fox Sports 1,
7:30-10 p.m.).
Track: Homestead-Miami Speedway (oval,
1.5 miles).
Race distance: 201 miles, 134 laps.
2012 winner: Cale Gale.
Fast facts: Matt Crafton needs a lead-lap
finish to become the first driver in the
series' 19-year history to complete every
lap in a season. ... In the owners'standings,
Crafton's No. 88 ThorSport Racing Toyota has
a 23-point lead over Kyle Busch Motorsports'
No. 51 Toyota. Erik Jones won last week
in the No. 51. Busch is driving the car this
week.
Online: http://www.nascar.com


helped his candidacy.
"I've been working so
hard all these years to
get better and better," he
added. "I think I took a
big step forward in 2013."
Yu Darvish of the Texas
Rangers was second,
marking the highest
finish by a Japanese-born
pitcher in Cy Young
voting. Hisashi Iwakuma
of the Seattle Mariners
came in third.
Wainwright went
19-9 for St. Louis and
finished behind Kershaw.
Miami right-hander Jose
Femrnandez, picked earlier
this week as the NL Rookie
of the Year, was third.
Kershaw's win marked
the record 11th time a
Dodgers pitcher has won
the CyYoung since the
award was first presented
in 1956. Sandy Koufax won
three times, and the Hall of
Fame lefty has developed a
friendship with Kershaw.


higher level of talent."
The Cubs were 15th in
payroll this year at about
$101 million. Boras said
the Rickets family, which
bought the team four
years ago, has put too
much emphasis on the
redevelopment of Wrigley
Field and not enough on
major league payroll.
"You're developing the
infrastructure, but fans
don't come to see seats,
grass, cement. They come
to see players," he said.
"They've done a great job
in the draft and develop-
ment and they've got a
really good core of young
players coming, but it is
just not what's expected
when you have a (family)
buy a major-market club."

Punto agrees to 1-year
deal with A's: Infielder Nick Punto
agreed to a $3 million, one-year contract
with Oakland following a little more than
a season with the Los Angeles Dodgers.
Punto's deal calls for a $2.75 million
salary and includes a $2.75 million club
option for 2015 with a $250,000 buyout.


FORMULA ONE
U.S. GRAND PRIX
Site: Austin, Texas.
Schedule: Friday, practice (NBC Sports
Network, 1-3:30 p.m.); Saturday, practice,
qualifying (NBC Sports Network, 6:30-8 p.m.);
Sunday, race, 2 p.m. (NBC, 1-4:30 p.m.).
Track: Circuit of The Americas (road course,
3.427 miles).
Race distance: 191.94 miles, 56 laps.
2012 winner: Lewis Hamilton.
Fast facts: Red Bull's Sebastian Vettel, who
already secured the season title, is trying to
break a tie with Michael Schumacher (2004) for
the most consecutive victories in a season. Vettel
needs to win the race and the season-ending
Brazilian Grand Prix to match the mark of 13 set
by Schumacher in 2004 and the overall winning
streak of nine set by Alberto Ascari in 1952-53.

-Associated Press


* MEN'S BASKETBALL:


Seminoles keep


Knights at bay


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ORLANDO Guard
Ian Miller scored 18
points and Devon
Bookert added 17 as
Florida State outlasted
UCF for an 80-68 win
Wednesday night.
After five straight
points out of halftime
by the Knights to close
the gap to 40-38, Okaro
White and the Seminoles
(2-0) took control. The
6-foot-9 forward, who sat
all but six minutes in the
first half, juggled a pass,
collected himself and
fired a 3-pointer to ignite
a 13-3 run in which he
accounted for seven.
By the time Florida State's
Montay Brandon breezed
through the UCF defense
for back-to-back layups
with 10 minutes remaining,
the Seminoles had accu-
mulated a 62-45 advantage.
North Port High School
graduate KaseyWilson
knocked down a 3-point-
er with two minutes
remaining for UCF to
shave the Seminoles' lead
to 75-66, but Ian Miller
ran half a minute off the
clock and buried a jump-
er from the top of the key
to silence the crowd and
any further UCF hopes.
White finished with
13 points for Florida
State, with 11 coming in
the second half. Florida
State shot a rock-solid 49
percent on field goals to


UP NEXT
Florida State: vs. Tennes-
see-Martin, Sunday, 2 p.m.
Central Florida: vs. Bethune-
Cookman, Sunday, 2 p.m.

MEN'S STATE
SCHEDULE
TODAY
Texas Southern at Miami, 7 p.m.
Stetson at Florida A&M, 7 p.m.
Florida College at Florida Inter-
national, 7 p.m.

the Knights' 39 percent.
Guard Calvin Newell
and Wilson led the
Knights (1-1) with 15
points each, withWilson
hitting four second-half
3-pointers.
The Seminoles, who
were making their first
trip to UCF, have beaten
the Knights in all 10 of the
intrastate rivals' meetings.
FLORIDA ST. 80, UCF 68
FLORIDA ST. (2-0)
White 4-7 4-6 13, Gilchrist 5-9 0-4 10, Bo-
janovsky 0-1 0-0 0, Bookert 6-12 4-7 17,
Brandon 3-71-2 7, Smith 2-2 0-0 4,Thomas
3-5 3-4 9, Miller 5-13 7-7 18, Ojo 1-2 0-1 2.
Totals 29-5819-3180.
UCF(1-1)
Spurlock2-8 3-4 8,Wilson 4-10 3-4 15, Blair
3-5 0-1 6, Sykes 5-15 3-4 13, Newell 6-12
2-5 15,Walker 0-10-0 0, McCrory 4-7 0-18,
Williams 1-5 0-2 3, Karell0 00- 0,Goodwin
0-0 0-0 0, Haney 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 25-63 11-
2168.
Halftime-Florida St. 38-33. 3-Point
Goals-Florida St. 3-11 (White 1-1, Bookert
1-2, Miller 1-6, Gilchrist 0-1, Brandon 0-1),
UCF 7-19 (Wilson 4-6, Newell 1-2, Williams
1-4, Spurlock 1-5, Walker 0-1, Sykes 0-1).
Fouled Out-Blair, Wilson. Rebounds-
Florida St. 40 (Brandon 9), UCF 38 (McCrory
9). Assists-Florida St. 13 (Bookert 5), UCF
10 (Newell 5). Total Fouls-Florida St. 18,
UCF 22. A-9,343.


* WOMEN'S BASKETBALL ROUNDUP


Top-ranked UConn


deals with injuries


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STORRS, Conn. -The
Connecticut women's
basketball team has lost
two frontcourt players to
injury, two games into the
season.
The school said
Wednesday that All-
American Kaleena
Mosqueda-Lewis sus-
tained a nerve contusion
of her right elbow when
she took a hard fall while
coming down with a
rebound in UConn's
76-57 victory over No.
3 Stanford on Monday
night.
The junior is out
indefinitely, and will be
re-evaluated next week
The school said soph-
omore forward Morgan
Tuck will miss between
four and six weeks after
having arthroscopic sur-
gery Tuesday on her right
knee. The school says
Tuck has had swelling in
the knee due to a carti-
lage injury since the start
of the season.
The top-ranked
Huskies (2-0) visit No. 8
Maryland on Friday night
and No. 13 Penn State on
Sunday.


No.18 Purdue 76, IUPUI
56: In Indianapolis, KK Houser
scored 20 points and led Purdue past
IUPUI.
Houser was S of 7 from the
floor, hit 2 of 3 from 3-point range
and 8-of-10 free throws for the
Boilermakers (2-0). She also had four
steals and two assists. Teammate
Courtney Moses had 13 points, two
steals and one assist. Whitney Bays
came off the bench to score 13 points
with four rebounds, two steals and
one assist. The Boilermakers hit 82
percent of their free throws.
Purdue led 32-26 at the half and
were able to open up a 16-point lead
by holding IUPUI (1-1) scoreless for
the first seven minutes of the second
half.

No. 7 Kentucky 103,
Georgia Southern 38: In
Lexington, Ky., reserve Bernisha
Pinkett scored 19 points to lead
the Wildcats to a rout of Georgia
Southern.
Playing the morning home opener
before about 2,000 enthusiastic sixth
graders, the Wildcats (3-0) followed
up Sunday's 39-point win over Wagner
with a 54-point second half against
the outgunned Eagles (1-2).
Kentucky thrived on both ends,
forcing 35 turnovers and shooting
percent to win its first meeting
against the Southern Conference
member.


0 MLB:


AP FILE PHOTO
Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Clayton Kershaw won the National League Cy Young Award
on Wednesday. Detroit's Max Scherzer won the American League honor.




Convincing wins


Kershaw, Scherzer easily earn Cy Young Awards


* MLB NOTEBOOK


Boras backs new park for Rays


Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, November 14,2013






The Sun/Thursday, November 14, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3


* NBA: ORLANDO 94, MILWAUKEE 91



Afflalo rallies Magic past Bucks


His 36 points

set career mark
By JOSH ROBBINS
ORLANDO SENTINEL
ORLANDO Nothing
tangible was at stake
Wednesday night when
the Orlando Magic hosted
the Milwaukee Bucks.
Not a playoff berth. Not
a playoff series.
But the Magic simply had
to win. The injury-riddled
Bucks a sub-.500 team
even when healthy -
dressed only eight players.
Arron Afflalo made sure
that victory occurred. His
outside shooting pro-
vided a badly needed lift
in the third quarter and
propelled the Magic to a
94-91 win over the Bucks


at Amway Center.
Afflalo set a career-high
by scoring 36 points and
made eight of the 11
3-pointers he attempted.
He tied a Magic franchise
record for made 3-pointers
in a quarter by sinking
five of them in the third
period, and his jumper
from behind the arc with
7:49 remaining in the game
broke a tie at 76-and gave
Orlando its first lead.
After Milwaukee
regained the lead, Afflalo
sank a pair of free throws
with 2:06 left to put
Orlando ahead 90-89.
Afflalo made another
key play. With Orlando
clinging to a 92-91 lead,
Afflalo drove into the lane
and dished to NikVucevic
for an easy dunk with 9.2
seconds left.


MAVERICKS AT
MAGIC
WHO: Dallas (5-3) at Orlando (4-5)
WHEN: Saturday, 7 p.m.
WHERE: Amway Center, Orlando
TV: Fox Sports Florida
RADIO: 1010 AM, 1280 AM,
1480 AM
TICKETS: Ticketmaster.com

With the win, the Magic
(4-5) snapped a three-
game losing streak.
Vucevic scored 17
points and collected a
game-high 11 rebounds.
Under NBA rules,
a team must dress a
minimum of eight players
for a game. Eight were all
Milwaukee (2-5) had.
Milwaukee's injured
players included centers


Zaza Pachulia and Larry
Sanders, power forward
Ersan Ilyasova and guards
Brandon Knight, Gary
Neal and Luke Ridnour.

MAGIC 94, BUCKS 91
MILWAUKEE (91)
Butler 7-17 3-3 20, Middleton 6-11 6-6 19,
Udoh 0-2 0-0 0,Wolters 3-8 3-4 9, Mayo 10-
224-425, Henson5-110-1 10, Antetokoun-
mpo 1-2 4-4 6, Raduljica 1-1 0-0 2. Totals
33-7420-2291.
ORLANDO (94)
Harkless 5-11 0-4 10, Maxiell 0-1 0-0 0,
Vucevic 6-105-6 17, Nelson 3-11 2-2 8, Af-
flalo 11-15 6-636, Moore 1-80 0-02,0O'Quinn
3-51-27,Oladipo4-141-1 10,LambO-20-0
0, Nicholson 1-2 0-02, Price 1-3 0-02.Totals
35-82 15-21 94.
Milwaukee 36 18 20 17 91
Orlando 23 22 27 22 94
3-Point Goals-Milwaukee 5-13 (Butler
3-5, Mayo 1-3, Middleton 1-3,Wolters 0-1,
Antetokounmpo 0-1), Orlando 9-26 (Afflalo
8-11,Oladipo 1-1, Nicholson 0-1, Lamb 0-2,
Price 0-2, Harkless 0-2, Moore 0-3, Nelson
0-4). Fouled Out-None. Rebounds-Mil-
waukee 45 (Henson9),Orlando 51 (Vucevic
11). Assists-Milwaukee 16 (Middleton 4),
Orlando 20 (Afflalo 6). Total Fouls-Mil-
waukee 19, Orlando 17. Flagrant Fouls-
Nelson. A-13,588 (18,500).


SUN PiHOUOU B Y URB SHUEt
Lemon Bay High School's Brendan Cutting shares a laugh with his father, William, left, and mother, Lauri, on Wednesday in
Englewood after Cutting signed his commitment to play baseball at Eastern Kentucky University.


SIGNS
FROM PAGE 1
she'll have to get a new
one.
"I'll wait until the sales
come out," she said.
"Once winter is over, my
mom and I will probably
go and raid whatever's
left. I might need my
grandma to get me a real
thick one, though, they
probably don't sell that
down here."
James wasn't the
only Charlotte senior
to sign her letter of
intent Wednesday. Jenny
D'Alessandro signed to
play volleyball at State
College of Florida.
Lemon Bay senior
catcher Brendan Cutting
inked his commitment to
play baseball at Eastern
Kentucky, a Division I
school in the Ohio Valley
Conference.
James already feels like
a part of the Wisconsin
family, gloating about
the Badgers basketball
team beating Florida on
Tuesday night. She said
she can't wait to get to
Madison, but first she'll
compete at the Class 3A
state championship on
Friday in Stuart. James


QUEST
FROM PAGE 1
our intensity; I picked up
my intensity and the sets
were perfect," Richards
said. "It all worked better
in the second game."
Venice rode its middle
hitters to a win when
the teams first met in
September, but the
Knights responded
Wednesday by funneling
Venice's attack to the
outside. After getting 32
kills from its middle hit-
ters when the teams first
met, Venice got just seven
from them Wednesday.
Richards and Gen
Beaumier (12 kills)
picked up the slack,
but Vanguard's Reagan
Davey was too much to
overcome. Davey had


Charlotte High School's Jenny D'Alessandro signed a letter
of intent to play volleyball at State College of Florida on
Wednesday in Punta Gorda. At right is Charlotte volleyball coach
Michelle Dill.


is looking for her first
state title in an individual
event.
"I'm really excited to
be signed and be able to
go compete at states and
know that I'm a Badger
and hopefully make them
proud," James said.
D'Alessandro felt right
at home at State College
of Florida, a big part of
her decision.
"I loved the girls right
when I met them,"
D'Alessandro said. "They
were so nice and made
me feel like part of their
family."
She plans to spend two
years studying sports

a match-high 25 kills,
including one that sealed
Vanguard's 25-21 win in
the third game.
"I was just trying to
get it over, get the kills
and just be there for my
team," Davey said.
The Indians struggled
to get their offense going,
as keeping Davey's at-
tacks off the floor became
the main priority.
"I just had to get the
ball up anywhere so
that we could get it back
over," senior libero Cassie
Kasmirski said.
The teams traded
blows in the fourth game,
Venice jumping to a
10-4 lead only to see the
Knights respond with a
6-1 run to take a 20-18
lead. Venice faced match
point down 24-22, but
kills by Richards and


medicine at the school
before transferring. State
College of Florida reached
out to D'Alessandro
after two other Charlotte
volleyball players recently
played there. Former
Tarpon Alyssa Latham is
graduating this school
year and JaNhea Beisner
will still be there when
D'Alessandro comes
aboard this summer.
D'Alessandro, who is
one of the top discus
throwers in the state, had
some track and field of-
fers and even some offers
to play volleyball and do
track and field, but she
didn't have any doubts


PREP SCHEDULE
TODAY
Girls soccer
Lemon Bay at Charlotte, 7p.m.
Girls basketball
Island Coast at Charlotte, 7p.m.
Manatee at Venice, 7p.m.
Boys soccer
Charlotte at Lemon Bay, 7 p.m.
Port Charlotte at Lakewood
Ranch, 7p.m.
Girls weightlifting
Riverview, DeSoto, Booker at
Charlotte, 5p.m.

Beaumier tied it at 24 and
breathed new life into the
Indians' season.
Those would be the
last points Venice would
score, however, as kills
by Vanguard's Taylor
McNamara and Davey
ended the match.
"We're usually not as
high-error as we were


about her decision.
"My heart was mostly
towards volleyball
because this will be my
seventh year playing
volleyball," she said. "I
just started freshman year
playing track, I just like
volleyball a lot better.
"I just want to have fun
this (field season), hope-
fully break the record."
Cutting hit .272 with a
homer and 15 RBIs for the
Manta Rays last season,
but offseason events had
as much to do with the
signing as anything.
"In July, we went up to
East Cobb, Ga., for a big
tournament," Cutting
said. "I just played a really
good game and they saw
me and talked to my
coaches. They came down
to my travel coach's high
school and wanted me
to come by to work out.
So I drove out to Fort
Lauderdale and worked
out for them and they
offered me a scholarship."
Cutting said Eastern
Kentucky would keep him
at catcher. He said it was
nice for the process to be
over.
"Yeah, (it's a relief),"
Cutting said with a grin.
"It's definitely a stressful
situation."

today," Wheatley said.
"They played excellent,
and we just didn't play
well enough to win. We
didn't bring our 'A game."
"That's a greatVenice
team, Vanguard coach
Jason Morris said. "They
beat a lot of great teams
this year, including us.
But we're a little different
team now, a few more
weapons, a lot more
focus, and we executed
and won."
The Indians have a
lot to look forward to.
Venice returns Richards,
Beaumier, Lauren
Mattmuller and freshman
Tanner Gauthier, a four-
some that gives it a good
chance of being back in
this position next season.
"We'll be back,"
Wheatley said.
Email: RSmith@VeniceGondolier.com


* NBA ROUNDUP


Anthony helps


Knicks clip Hawks


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATLANTA -Carmelo
Anthony continued his
success against Atlanta
by scoring 25 points and
the New York Knicks
regrouped after blowing
a 17-point lead to beat
the Hawks 95-91 on
Wednesday night.
The Knicks, relying on
3-pointers, led 47-30 in
the second period and 55-
45 at halftime. New York
made only 5 of 25 shots
from the field while being
outscored 23-10 in the
third period, leaving the
Hawks with a 68-65 lead.
Anthony and the
Knicks regained control
after the Hawks led 78-72
early in the fourth quarter.
Anthony made a free
throw, driving layup and
a 3-pointer to launch an
11-0 run that gave New
York the lead. Andrea
Bargnani's 3-pointer
capped the run.
Bargnani had 20 points
and 11 rebounds, and
rookie Tim Hardaway Jr.
had 14 points for New
York.
Jeff Teague led Atlanta
with 25 points and eight
assists. Al Horford had 23
points.

76ers 123, Rockets 117,
OT: In Philadelphia, Tony Wroten had
his first career triple-double, James
Anderson scored a career-high 36
points and Spencer Hawes made the
go-ahead basket with 34 seconds left
in overtime to lift the 76ers. Wroten
had career highs with 18 points, 10
rebounds and 11 assists in his first start
for injured rookie Michael Carter-
Williams, who didn't play because of a
bruised left arch.

Bobcats 89, Celtics 83:
In Boston, Al Jefferson had 22 points
and 11 rebounds to lead Charlotte,
which snapped the Celtics'four-game
winning streak. Gerald Henderson had
13 points, Jeff Taylor 12 and Anthony


BALL BOY PUTS
JORDAN'S SHOES
UP FOR AUCTION
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) -The
boy ball leveraged applesauce for
Michael Jordan's shoes.
Preston Truman befriended
Jordan by fetching him his
favorite snack, and years later has
decided to sell the shoes Jordan
turned over from his famous "flu
game"during the 1997 NBA finals.
Truman, now 35, kept them in
a safe-deposit box at a Utah bank
for 15 years, finally deciding to
"get those things out there'."

Tolliver had 11 for Charlotte, which
ended a two-game skid. Jeff Green
paced Boston with 19 points and
Jordan Crawford had 16 points and six
assists.

Timberwolves 124,
Cavaliers 95: In Minneapolis,
Kevin Love had 33 points, eight
rebounds and six assists, and Ricky
Rubio added 16 points and a career-
high 16 assists for the Timberwolves.
Corey Brewer scored 27 points for
Minnesota while filling in for Kevin
Martin, who was out with an illness,
and the Timberwolves outscored
Cleveland 29-6 in transition points to
run the Cavaliers out of the building.

Raptors 103, Grizzlies
87: Rudy Gay scored 23 points in his
return to Memphis and Kyle Lowry
added 21 to help Toronto to the victory.
Gay, who was part of a Jan. 30 trade
that sent him to the Raptors after
spending his first 6-plus years in the
league with Memphis, was 8 of 18 from
the field, but missed his first four shots
in the game. DeMar DeRozan scored 13
of his 18 points in the first quarter.

Spurs 92, Wizards 79: In
San Antonio, Tony Parker had 16 points,
leading six Spurs in double figures.
Boris Diaw had 15 points, Kawhi
Leonard added 13 points, and Manu
Ginobili and Marco Belinelli each had
10 for San Antonio. Tiago Splitter had
12 points and nine rebounds.


* GIRLS BASKETBALL:


Mantas pull away


from Booker


STAFF REPORT
SARASOTA -When the
Lemon Bay High School
girls basketball team
stopped turning the ball
over and started making
its free throws, Booker
just couldn't keep up.
The Manta Rays got
16 points from Kayla
Reid and 15 from Hayley
Smith, and used a big
fourth quarter to pull
away from the Tornadoes
for a 49-39 win on
Wednesday.
"We're still trying to
work out some rotations,"
Lemon Bay coach Mike


Young said. "With the
depth we have we're
mixing some upper-
classmen with some
lowerclassmen."
"When kids are on
the floor they're playing
hard."
Lemon Bay (2-0) hosts
Port Charlotte on Monday
at 7 p.m.

LEMON BAY 49, BOOKER 39
LEMON BAY 1810 714- 49
BOOKER 15 9 8 7 39
Lemon Bay: Kayla Reid 16, Hayley Smith
15, Lutz 9, Shirley 4, Chapman 3, Azwoir 2.
Totals 17 (3) 12-16 49.
Booker: Guevarez 11, Huff 11, Chaplin 6,
Ige 6, Randall 3, Jackson 2. Totals 18 (2)
1-439.


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The Sun/Thursday, November 14, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3








WINTER SPORTS PREVIEWS GIRLS SOCCER BOYS SOCCER GIRLS BASKETBALL BOYS BASKETBALL WRESTLING GIRLS WEIGHTLIFTING WINTER SPORTS PREVIEWS


WRESTLING


FOUR TO WATCH


Days and times subject to change
Friday, Nov. 15
Weeki Wachee (HS) Tournament, 10 a.m.
(Venice)
Saturday, Nov.16
Lemon Bay (HS) Duals, 10 a.m. (Port Char-
lotte)
Weeki Wachee (HS) Tournament, 3 p.m.
(Venice)
Friday, Nov. 22
Foxboro Duals at Lely HS, 2 p.m. (Port Char-
lotte, North Port)
Saturday, Nov. 23
Foxboro Duals at Lely HS, 9 a.m. (Port Char-
lotte, North Port)
Palmetto Ridge (HS) Invitational, 5:30 p.m.
(Lemon Bay)
Tuesday, Dec. 3
SFCA (HS) Tri-meet, 6:30 p.m. (Port Char-
lotte)
Wednesday, Dec. 4
Charlotte at Fort Myers, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 6
East Lake (HS) Tournament, noon (Venice)
Fort Myers (HS) Duals, 4 p.m. (Charlotte,
Port Charlotte, Lemon Bay)
Sunday, Dec. 7
Fort Myers (HS) Duals, 9:30 a.m. (Charlotte,
Port Charlotte, Lemon Bay)
East Lake (HS) Tournament, 10 a.m. (Venice)
McBride Duals at Satellite Beach HS, TBA
(North Port)
Wednesday, Dec. 11
Charlotte at Port Charlotte, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, Dec.14
Captain Archer Tournament at Charlotte
HS, 10 a.m. (Port Charlotte, Lemon Bay,
North Port, Venice)
Friday, Dec. 20
Immokalee (HS) Tournament, TBA (Port
Charlotte, North Port)
Boca Ciega (HS)Tournament,TBA (Venice)
Saturday, Dec.21
Immokalee (HS) Tournament, TBA (Port
Charlotte, North Port)
Boca Ciega (HS)Tournament,TBA (Venice)
Thursday, Dec.26
AJ. Jones Invitational at Osceola HS, TBA
(Lemon Bay)
Friday, Dec. 27
Lakeland (HS) Invitational, TBA (Charlotte)
AJ. Jones Invitational at Osceola HS, TBA
(Lemon Bay)
Saturday, Dec. 28
AJ. Jones Invitational at Osceola HS, TBA
(Lemon Bay)
Thursday, Jan. 3
Southeast (HS) Duals, TBA (Port Charlotte,
Lemon Bay, Venice)
Buzz Hill Tournament at Gulf Coast HS,TBA
(North Port)
Friday, Jan. 4
Southeast (HS) Duals, TBA (Port Charlotte,
Lemon Bay, Venice)
Barron-Collier (HS) Tournament, 2:30 p.m.
(Charlotte)
Saturday, Jan. 5
Barron-Collier (HS) Tournament, 9:30 a.m.
(Charlotte)
Wednesday, Jan. 8
Lakewood Ranch at Venice,6:30 p.m.
Charlotte at North Port, 7:30 p.m.
Ida Baker at Port Charlotte,TBA
Friday, Jan. 10
Manatee (HS) Duals, TBA (Port Charlotte,
Lemon Bay, Venice)
Saturday, Jan. 11
Palmetto (HS) Tournament, 10 a.m. (Char-
lotte, North Port)
Manatee (HS) Duals, TBA (Port Charlotte,
Lemon Bay, Venice)
Wednesday, Jan.15
Riverdale at Charlotte, 7:30 p.m.
Friday, Jan.17
Titan Duals at Golden Gate HS, 3 p.m. (Port
Charlotte, Lemon Bay)
Brandon (HS) tournament, 4 p.m. (North
Port, Venice)
Saturday, Jan.18
Jensen Beach (HS) Tournament, 9 a.m.
(Charlotte)
Titan Duals at Golden Gate HS, 10 a.m. (Port
Charlotte, Lemon Bay)
Brandon (HS) tournament, 10 a.m. (Venice)
Wednesday, Jan. 22
Charlotte at Venice, 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, Jan.23
Mariner at Charlotte, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 25
Bidwell Duals at Lemon Bay HS, 8 a.m. (Port
Charlotte)
Monday, Jan. 27
First date of districts
Saturday, Feb. 8
Regionals atTBD
Friday, Feb. 14
State tournament at the Lakeland Center,
10a.m.
Saturday, Feb. 15
State tournament at the Lakeland Center,
9:30 a.m.


THE FLENARD FILE
NAME: Dacoda Flenard
CLASS: Sophomore
SIBLINGS: Ty (14), Lucas (10)
COLLEGE PLANS: Wants
to wrestle at the next level,
possibly at Oklahoma State or
Penn State.
FAVORITE SUBJECT: History
FAVORITE TV SHOW: Call of
the Wildman on Animal Planet


JOSH POLLARD
North Port Senior
Was named an AAU all-American at the
Disney Duals this summer. Coach Mark
Kemble said he's expecting Pollard to place
at the state tournament.


ROBERT WARNER
Port Charlotte Senior
Has been with the team for four years and
is a captain this season. He's one of two
returning Pirates who made it to regionals
last year.


BUCKY DENNIS
Charlotte Junior
Coming off ofa district title in the
285-pound class last season. He's the
team's only returning district champion.


DOMINIC SCHOFIELD
Lemon Bay Junior
Joined the powerlifting club to improve his
strength for this season. He went 34-23 as
a sophomore last year.


IN THE SPOTLIGHT


"Last year, my confidence wasn't as high as it is this year because I was a freshman and going

against high schoolers is a lot different. I was intimidated because they were so much bigger,

but now I've realized it's all the same."


-DACODA FLENARD


SUN PHOTO BY JENNIFER BRUNO
North Port High School's Dacoda Flenard wrestles a teammate during a recent practice. Flenard is trying to build off a strong freshman season that saw him go
29-10 and win a district championship.




For Flenard, an intense focus

North Port sophomore sticks to strict regiment in effort to improve


By ZACH MILLER
SPORTS WRITER
NORTH PORT For most
freshmen, a district title is quite
an accomplishment. But North
Port High School's Dacoda
Flenard doesn't see it that way.
"I didn't have a very good
season last year," the sophomore
said of his 29-10, district-cham-
pionship-winning season. "I
thought I should've gone to
states."
With the memory of not
making it past the first day of
last season's regionals lingering,
Flenard is putting in nearly
six hours of training each day
outside of practice.
A normal school day for
Flenard starts with an hour of
calisthenics exercises using
his own body weight, like situps
and pullups before school.
In the evening, after a full day
of classes and a two-and-a-half
hour wrestling practice, the day
isn't close to finished.
Flenard spends the next four


to five hours training, mostly
with his 10-year-old brother
Lucas, before finally getting
around to his homework. The
first few hours of home training
are spent doing drills in the ga-
rage, which has a wrestling mat
and some weight equipment.
Then, to cap things off, Flenard
runs six miles.
And he runs the first five of
those with a 35-pound vest
strapped on.
His daily diet is just as strict
as his work regiment: yogurt for
breakfast, salad for lunch and
chicken or fish for dinner.
This is the most intense
Flenard's training has been since
he started wrestling five years
ago. Flenard, who was playing
football at the time, realized he
wanted to try wrestling after
going and watching some of
Lucas' meets.
"Picking kids up and slamming
them, that's something everyone
wants to do," Flenard said.
He quit football and has been


His other brother, 14-year-old Ty,
started wrestling too, making it
the family sport.
"They've always got something
to do with wrestling," North Port
coach Mark Kemble said.
For this season, Kemble
expects Flenard to place at states
in the 138-pound weight class.
He went 7-1 at the Disney Duals
during the summer, earning AAU
All-American honors.
Flenard has physically ma-
tured since last season, up three
weight classes from wrestling
at 120 pounds. He said that
he's matured mentally as well
and that he's more comfortable
wrestling at the high school
level.
"Last year, my confidence
wasn't as high as it is this year
because I was a freshman and
going against high schoolers is
a lot different," Flenard said. "I
was intimidated because they
were so much bigger, but now
I've realized it's all the same."
Kemble also sees Flenard's


a year-round wrestler ever since, mental maturity, but he sees it


with the sophomore stepping
up to help teach the first-year
wrestlers during practices.
"I like to put experienced kids
with non-experienced kids as
practice partners, and the way
that benefits the experienced kid
is when (he) can really dissect
a move or position and be able
to explain it, it really makes him
better," Kemble said.
Flenard's practice partner
last season was Cole Murray,
who was one of the team's top
wrestlers and who now wrestles
at UNC-Pembroke. Flenard's
partner this season is freshman
John Cruz, a 132-pounder who
also earned AAU All-American
honors at the Disney Duals.
"Those two really need to push
each other," Kemble said. "Those
two boys, if they push each
other, there's no limit to what
they can do."

Contact Zach Miller at 941-206-1140 orzmiller@
sun-herald.com.


THE TEAMS


CHARLOTTEE


COACH: Rob Hoff
LAST SEASON: 18-5, third place in district
DISTRICT: 2A-11 Cape Coral, Fort Myers, Ida Baker,
Island Coast, North Fort Myers, Port Charlotte, Riverdale
KEY STARTERS LOST: Stevenson Henry, Joey Marques,
Joey Gentry, Cody Cope, Zach Stover
KEY RETURNERS: Trey Hoff, Bucky Dennis,
Dylan Mooney, Ethen Tenney, Ryan Adams
OUTLOOK: Last season was the first time in eight years
that the Tarpons didn't win a district title, so doing that is
a big goal for this season. Freshman Brody Mansfield and
Travis Locklier will fill the voids left by state placewinners
Henry and Marques.


LEMON BAY


COACH: Gary Jonseck
LAST SEASON: 21-15, won district, finished third in region
DISTRICT: 1A-12 Clewiston, Dunbar, Evangelical
Christian, Gateway Charter, Immokalee, LaBelle, Lely,
Mariner, Oasis, Southwest Florida Christian
KEY STARTERS LOST: James Connaghan, Josh Brady,
Brian Rains
KEY RETURNERS: Jack Lipp, Dominic Schofield, Ryan
Dodge, Bobby Caspolich
OUTLOOK: Jonseck said the team's goal is to win another
district title, although that will be tougher in a larger district.
He's focusing on developing young wrestlers, including Tyler
Nelson, the school's quarterback who just started wrestling.


NORTH PORT


COACH: Mark Kemble
LAST SEASON: 15-0, won district and finished
14th in state
DISTRICT: 3A-8 Bloomingdale, Durant, East Bay,
Manatee, Newsome, Riverview, Sarasota-Riverview
KEY STARTERS LOST: Cole Murray, Carlos Martinez,
Dejuante Pabellon, Dustin Lamar
KEY RETURNERS: Josh Pollard, Dacoda Flenard, Matt Detert
OUTLOOK: Kemble's goal for the season is for the team to
finish sixth in the state and have three wrestlers in state
finals. Four Bobcats earned AAU all-American honors at
the Disney Duals over the summer, including freshman
John Cruz.


PORT CHARLOTTE


COACH: David Winger
LAST SEASON: Didn't have enough wrestlers for full
team, three made it out of district
DISTRICT: 2A-11 Cape Coral, Charlotte, Fort Myers,
Ida Baker, Island Coast, North Fort Myers, Riverdale
KEY STARTERS LOST: Daniel Joseph
KEY RETURNERS: Nick Dowling, Robert Warner, C.J.
Maler, BrettYanni
OUTLOOK: New coach Winger brings 37 years of coaching
experience and is trying to instill a winning attitude.
He's also hoping the end of football season will help him
get his numbers up. Winger hopes newcomers William
Montgomery and Gannon Abernathy can help out.


Page 4 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, November 14,2013






The Sun/Thursday, November 14, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 5


FLORIDA

FROM PAGE 1

"Everyone around here
wants the same thing.
We want to do what is
right for the University of
Florida. We understand
that this football season
has not gone the way
any of us wanted it to go,
certainly not the way our
fans wanted it to go, and
most of all, not the way
Will Muschamp wanted it
to go."


Muschamp is 22-13
at Florida, including
13-10 in Southeastern
Conference play. The
latest loss came against
Vanderbilt on Saturday.
It was the Commodores'
first win in the series
since 1988 and first in
Gainesville since 1945.
Sure, the Gators have
been ravaged by injuries
this season. They lost quar-
terback Jeff Driskel, de-
fensive tackle Dominique
Easley, running back Matt
Jones and seven others to


season-ending injuries.
But many wonder how
Florida even with back-
ups can have the worst
offense in the SEC and lose
toVandyby 17 points.
"We have a history of
being successful. We have
a history of fixing things
when they need to be
fixed," Foley said. "And that
is what is going to happen
here, and coach Muschamp
is the one that will fix it.
"I understand the
passion and the disap-
pointment. But at the end


of the day, we've got great
fans, they love the Gators
and their passion makes
this place special. They
are hurting. They want the
program to be successful,
and we feel that hurt."
Florida finished
11-2 last year, losing to
rival Georgia and then
Louisville in the Sugar
Bowl. Had the Gators
beaten the Bulldogs,
they would have played
Alabama for the SEC title.
Foley said he doesn't
"think that was a fluke."


SCOREBOARD


Sports on TV
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
7:30 p.m.
ESPN GeorgiaTech at Clemson
FS1 -Marshall atTulsa
GOLF
2p.m.
TGC PGATour, OHL Classic, first round, at
Playa del Carmen, Mexico
8:30 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour of Australasia, Australian
Masters, second round, at Cheltenham,
Australia
3a.m.
TGC European PGATour, DP World Tour
Championship Dubai, second round, at
Dubai, United Arab Emirates
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
9p.m.
ESPN2 -TexasTech at Alabama
NBA BASKETBALL
8p.m.
TNT- Houston at NewYork
10:30 p.m.
TNT Oklahoma City at Golden State
NFL FOOTBALL
8p.m.
NFL Indianapolis at Tennessee


Glantz-Culver Line
NCAA Football
FAVORITE 0 T 0/U DOG
atClemson 10 11(591/2) GeorgiaTech
Marshall 121/2131/2(61) atTulsa
Friday
at UCLA 3 21/2(601/2) Washington
Saturday
Miami 3 3 (611/2) at Duke
atWisconsin 181/222 (70) Indiana
atVanderbilt 131/2121/2(53) Kentucky
at Louisville 161/216(571/2) Houston
Cent. Michigan 21/2 21/2 (53) atW.Michigan
atVirginia Tech 131/2151/2(42) Maryland
at Boston College7 71/2(531/2) NC State
at Rutgers +3 Pk(52) Cincinnati
at Pittsburgh PkPk(53) No. Carolina
UCF 17161/2(551/2) atTemple
at Penn St. 201/2211/2(441/2) Purdue
at So. Carolina 11131/2(411/2) Florida
at Northwestern+1 3 (521/2) Michigan
at Florida St. 381/239 (55) Syracuse
FAU 14 17(491/2) atSo.Miss.
Akron 7 7 (45) at UMass
at East Carolina 25 261/2(651/2) UAB
atSMU 141/2141/2(57) UConn
WestVirginia 71/2 61/2 (50) at Kansas
La.-Lafayette 21211/2(591/2) at Georgia St.
at Colorado 1 21/2 (67) California
Baylor-x 241/227 (85) TexasTech
at Boise St. 20 23(681/2) Wyoming
at Arizona St. 131/2 14 (641/2) Oregon St.
atAuburn 3 31/2(621/2) Georgia
Oklahoma St. 1 3 (631/2) atTexas
at Oklahoma 21241/2(50) Iowa St.
at Oregon 25 26 (64) Utah
at Navy 91/2 81/2 (57) So.Alabama
Michigan St. 31/2 61/2 (42) at Nebraska
Ohio St. 32 321/2 (67) at Illinois
San Jose St. 7 71/2(661/2) at Nevada
Alabama 241/2251/2(52) at Miss. St.
Stanford 3 31/2 (46)at Southern Cal
Colorado St. 4 61/2(641/2) atNewMex.
Memphis 21/2 11/2(401/2)at So. Florida
at Rice 15 17 (52) LouisianaTech
at Kansas St. 101/2101/2(47) TCU
at Mississippi 28 29(671/2) Troy
atArkansasSt. 7 71/2(511/2) TexasSt.
atUTEP 6 6 (49) FlU
at Arizona 121/213 (66)Washington St.
San Diego St. 5 51/2(581/2) at Hawaii
x-at Arlington, Texas

NFL
FAVORITE 0 T 0/U UNDERDOG
Indianapolis 21/2 3 (421/2) atTennessee
Sunday
Atlanta 1 11/2(431/2) atTampa Bay
at Buffalo Pk 1 (41) N.Y Jets
Detroit 3 2 (471/2) at Pittsburgh
at Philadelphia 3 31/2(521/2) Washington
San Diego 1 11/2(451/2) at Miami
at Chicago 3 3 (461/2) Baltimore
at Cincinnati 6 51/2 (42) Cleveland
at Houston 7 7 (42) Oakland
Arizona 61/2 7 (41) atJ'ville
atDenver 8 81/2(491/2) KansasCity
at Seattle 13121212(46) Minnesota
atNewOrleans 3 3 (471/2) San Francisco
at N.Y Giants 4 51/2(421/2) Green Bay
Monday
at Carolina 21/2 21/2 (46) New England

NCAA BASKETBALL
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG
atUConn 171/2 Detroit
at Boston College 141/2 Toledo
atTowson 2 Temple
at Rutgers 8 Yale
atWichitaSt. 18 William&Mary
at UAB 15 Troy
at Houston 8 UTSA
atAlabama 12 TexasTech
Loyola Marymount 1 at Long Beach St.
at San Diego St. Pk Arizona
at Stanford 11 Northwestern
atWashington 9 UC Irvine
at Belmont 11/2 Indiana St.
at Memphis 24 Austin Peay
at S. Dakota St. 41/2 Montana
at Saint Mary's (Cal) 10 N. Dakota St.
at Iowa 33 Md.-E. Shore

NBA
FAVORITE LINE 0/U UNDERDOG
Houston 11/2(2041/2) at New York
atGolden State 3 (2071/2)OklahomaCity


FAVORITE
Los Angeles
at Boston
Anaheim
at St. Louis
at Chicago
at Calgary
atVancouver


NHL
LINE UNDERDOG LINE
-115 at N.Y. Islanders -105
-200 Columbus +170
-120 atTampaBay +100
-165 Colorado +145
-190 Phoenix +165
-115 Dallas -105
-115 SanJose -105


College football
Today's games
SOUTH
GeorgiaTech (6-3) at Clemson (8-1),7:30 p.m.
Morgan St. (4-6) at SC State (7-3), 730 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
Marshall (6-3) atTulsa (2-7), 730 p.m.
Friday's games
WEST
Washington (6-3) at UCLA (7-2), 9 p.m.

Saturday's games
EAST
Monmouth (NJ) (5-5) at Bryant (4-6), Noon
Richmond (4-6) at Delaware (7-3), Noon


SPenn (4-4) at Harvard (7-1), Noon
Purdue(1-8)atPennSt. (5-4),Noon
Sacred Heart (9-2) at Robert Morris (5-4), Noon
Cincinnati (7-2) at Rutgers (5-3), Noon
Wagner (2-8) at St. Francis (Pa.) (4-5), Noon
UCF (7-1) at Temple (1-8), Noon
CCSU (4-6) at Duquesne (5-4), 12:10 p.m.
NC State (3-6) at Boston College (5-4), 1230
p.m.
Dartmouth (4-4) at Brown (5-3), 1230 p.m.
SRhode Island (3-8) at Maine (9-1), 1230 p.m.
North Carolina (4-5) at Pittsburgh (5-4), 1230
p.m.
SGeorgetown (1-8) at Bucknell (4-5), 1 p.m.
Lehigh (7-2) at Colgate (4-6), 1 p.m.
Columbia (0-8) atCornell (1-7),1 p.m.
Mercer(9-1)atMarist(7-3),1 p.m.
Yale (5-3) at Princeton (7-1),1 p.m.
Akron (3-7)atUMass(1-8),1 p.m.
New Hampshire (5-4) at Albany (NY) (1 -9),330
p.m.
Fordham (10-0) at Lafayette (3-6),3:30 p.m.
SSouth Alabama (3-5) at Navy (5-4), 330 p.m.
SOUTH
Troy (5-5) at Mississippi (6-3), Noon
Kentucky(2-7)atVanderbilt(5-4),12:21 p.m.
FAU (3-6) at Southern Miss. (0-9), 1230 p.m.
Maryland (5-4) atVirginiaTech (7-3),1230p.m.
Presbyterian (3-6) at Coastal Carolina (9-1), 1
p.m.
UT-Martin (6-4) at E. Kentucky (6-4), 1 p.m.
Stetson (2-7) at Jacksonville (4-6), 1 p.m.
Butler (8-3) at Morehead St. (3-7), 1 p.m.
Savannah St. (1 -10) at NC A&T (5-4), 1 p.m.
Campbell (2-8) at Old Dominion (7-3), 1 p.m.
VMI (2-8) atThe Citadel (4-6), 1 p.m.
Charleston Southern (9-2) at Gardner-Webb
(5-5), 130 p.m.
Towson (8-2) atWilliam & Mary (7-3), 130 p.m.
Appalachian St. (2-8) atWofford (5-4), 130 p.m.
Ark.-Pine Bluff (2-7) at Alabama A&M (3-7), 2
p.m.
SE Missouri (2-8) at Austin Peay (0-10), 2 p.m.
UAB (2-7) at East Carolina (7-2),2 p.m.
Delaware St. (4-5) at Florida A&M (3-7),2 p.m.
I Louisiana-Lafayette (7-2) at Georgia St. (0-9),
2p.m.
Alabama St.(6-4)atMVSU(2-8),2p.m.
Norfolk St. (3-7) at NC Central (4-6),2 p.m.
Georgia Southern (5-4) at Elon (2-8),3 p.m.
Alcorn St. (8-3) at Jackson St. (7-2),3 p.m.
Chattanooga (8-2) at Samford (6-4), 3 p.m.
Murray St. (5-5) atTennessee St. (8-3),3 p.m.
Georgia (6-3) at Auburn (9-1),330 p.m.
Miami (7-2) at Duke (7-2), 330 p.m.
Syracuse (5-4) at Florida St. (9-0), 330 p.m.
SStony Brook (3-6) at James Madison (6-4), 330
p.m.
Brevard (3-7) at Liberty (6-4), 330 p.m.
Furman (5-5) atW. Carolina (2-8),330 p.m.
SHampton (4-6) at Bethune-Cookman (8-2), 4
p.m.
Cent. Arkansas (5-5) at Nicholls St. (4-6),4 p.m.
Sam Houston St. (8-2) at SE Louisiana (8-2), 4
p.m.
Houston (7-2) at Louisville (8-1),7 p.m.
Florida (4-5) at South Carolina (7-2),7 p.m.
Memphis (2-6) at South Florida (2-6),7 p.m.
ClarkAtlanta (3-6) at Southern U. (6-4),7 p.m.
SAlabama (9-0) at Mississippi St. (4-5), 7:45 p.m.
S Northwestern St. (5-5) at McNeese St. (8-2), 8
p.m.
I MIDWEST
Ohio St. (9-0) at Illinois (3-6), Noon
West Virginia (4-6) at Kansas (2-7), Noon
Cent. Michigan (3-6) at W. Michigan (1-9),
Noon
Indiana (4-5) atWisconsin (7-2), Noon
JacksonvilleSt. (8-2)atE. llinois(9-1),1 p.m.
SN. Iowa (5-5) at Missouri St. (5-6),2 p.m.
S. Dakota St. (6-4) at South Dakota (4-6), 2 p.m.
Dayton (6-4) atValparaiso(1-9),2 p.m.
N. Dakota St. (9-0) at Youngstown St. (8-2), 2
p.m.
W. Illinois (3-7) at Indiana St. (1-9),2:05 p.m.
Illinois St. (5-5) at S. Illinois (5-5),3 p.m .
TCU (4-6) at Kansas St. (5-4),330 p.m.
Michigan St. (8-1) at Nebraska (7-2),3:30 p.m.
Michigan (6-3) at Northwestern (4-5),330 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
Iowa St. (1 -8) at Oklahoma (7-2), Noon
SAbilene Christian (5-5) at Prairie View (5-5), 2
p.m.
UConn(0-8)atSMU(3-5),3 p.m.
SHoward (4-6) atTexas Southern (2-8),3 p.m.
Oklahoma St. (8-1) atTexas (7-2),330 p.m.
Stephen F.Austin (3-7) at Lamar (4-6),7 p.m.
Louisiana Tech (4-5) at Rice (6-3),7 p.m.
Texas St. (6-3) at Arkansas St. (5-4), 730 p.m.
Texas Tech (7-3) vs. Baylor (8-0) at Arlington,
Texas,8p.m.
FIU(1-8)atUTEP(1-8),8p.m.
WEST
SWeber St. (1 -9) at Montana (8-2),2 p.m.
S Washington St. (4-5) at Arizona (6-3),2 p.m.
IdahoSt. (3-7)atBYU(6-3),3p.m.
EWashington (8-2) at Cal Poly (5-5), 3:40 p.m.
Utah (4-5) at Oregon (8-1),4 p.m.
Drake (6-4) at San Diego (7-3),4 p.m.
Sacramento St. (4-6) at Portland St. (6-4), 4:05
p.m.
California (1 -9) at Colorado (3-6), 530 p.m.
N. Colorado (1 -9) at N. Arizona (7-2),6 p.m.
S. Utah (7-3) at Montana St. (7-3), 605 p.m.
Colorado St. (5-5) at New Mexico (3-6),7 p.m.
North Dakota (3-7) at UC Davis (3-7),7 p.m.
Stanford (8-1) at Southern Cal (7-3),8 p.m.
Oregon St. (6-3) at Arizona St. (7-2), 930 p.m.
Wyoming (4-5) at Boise St. (6-3), 10:15 p.m.
San Diego St. (5-4) at Hawaii (0-9), 1030 p.m.
San Jose St. (5-4) at Nevada (3-7), 1030 p.m.

Transactions
| BASEBALL
American League
OAKLAND ATHLETICS Agreed to
terms with INF Nick Punto on a one-year
contract.
S National League
S LOS ANGELES DODGERS Named
RoyClark national crosschecker.
SEastern League
S READING FIGHTING PHILS Named
Eric Freeman director of food and beverag-
es and Brian Hoeper operations manager.
Frontier League
TRAVERSE CITY BEACH BUMS -
Signed RHP Dre Watts.
BASKETBALL
NBA Development League
DELAWARE 87ERS- Named Rod Baker
coach.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
ATLANTA FALCONS Activated LB
Sean Weatherspoon from the injured re-
serve/return list. Signed OT Sean Locklear.
Released LB Thomas Howard.
CAROLINA PANTHERS Agreed to
terms with LB Dan Connor. Placed CB
| James Dockery on injured reserve. Signed
GTravis Bond from the Minnesota's practice
squad.
| CHICAGO BEARS Signed S Derrick
Martin to a one-year contract.
I GREEN BAY PACKERS Signed RB Or-


win Smith to the practice squad.
HOUSTON TEXANS Signed LB DJ.
Smith and S Jawanza Starling. Signed CB
Loyce Means and WR Rico Richardson to
the practice squad. Placed WR Andy Cruse
on the practice squad injured list.
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS Claimed WR-
KR KyleWilliams off waivers from San Fran-
cisco. Released WR Chad Hall.
MINNESOTA VIKINGS- Signed OTJa
maal Johnson-Webb to the practice squad.
OAKLAND RAIDERS Re-signed DL
Brian Sanford. Re-signed OL Jack Cornell to
the practice squad. Signed LB Chris McCoy
Sto the practice squad.
TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS Signed
RB Michael Hill from Green Bay's practice
squad.
Canadian Football League
WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS An-
Snounced coach Tim Burke will not return
next season.
HOCKEY
S National Hockey League
BUFFALO SABRES Fired general
Manager Darcy Regier and coach Ron
Rolston. Named Ted Nolan interim coach
and Pat LaFontaine president of hockey
operations.
MONTREAL CANADIENS Assigned
F Gabriel Dumont and D Greg Pateryn to
Hamilton (AHL).
SWASHINGTON CAPITALS Assigned
D DmitryOrlov Hershey (AHL).
American Hockey League
BRIDGEPORT SOUND TIGERS -
SSigned F Chris Langkow and F Sean Wiles
to professional tryout contracts. Loaned F
Greg Miller to Stockton (ECHL). Announced
F Kirill Kabanovwas reassigned to the team
bythe NewYorklIslanders. Announced FJa-
son Clarkwas reassigned to Stockton.
SHARTFORD WOLF PACK Loaned F
Andrew Rowe to Greenville (ECHL). An-
nounced F Michael St. Croix was assigned
to Greenville.
SAN ANTONIO RAMPAGE Reas-
signed G Michael Houser and F Logan Shaw
to Cincinnati (ECHL). Loaned FPhilippeCor-
Snet to Cincinnati.
ECHL
READING ROYALS Signed F Kyle
Thomas.
Central Hockey League
ARIZONA SUNDOGS Claimed F Chad
SCostello off waivers.
DENVER CUTTHROATS Announced
G Kieran Millan was reassigned to the team
by Lake Erie (AHL). Placed G Casey Sher-
wood on waivers.
SST. CHARLES CHILL -Placed F Max Mo-
bley on waivers.
LACROSSE
National Lacrosse League
COLORADO MAMMOTH Named
John Grant Jr. director of select teams.
SOCCER
North American Soccer League
NEW YORK COSMOS Signed MF
Ayoze to a contract extension.
National Women's Soccer League
SSKY BLUE FC Announced the retire-
ment of D Melanie Booth.
COLLEGE
VIRGINIA TECH Dismissed senior K
Cody Journell for a violation of team poli-
cies.

Pro football
NFL
AMERICAN CONFERENCE


East
New England
N.Y Jets
DOLPHINS
Buffalo
South
Indianapolis
Tennessee
Houston
JAGUARS
North
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Baltimore
Pittsburgh
West
Kansas City
Denver
San Diego
Oakland


W L T Pct PF PA
7 2 0 .778 234 175
5 4 0 556 169 231
4 5 0 .444 193 209
3 7 0 300 199 259
W L T Pet PF PA
6 3 0 .667 222 193
4 5 0 .444 200 196
2 7 0 .222 170 248
1 8 0 .111 115 291
W L T Pet PF PA
6 4 0 .600 234 186
4 5 0 .444 172 197
4 5 0 .444 188 189
3 6 0 .333 179 218
W L T Pet PF PA
9 0 01.000 215 111
8 1 0 .889 371 238
4 5 0 .444 212 202
3 6 0 .333 166 223


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


Pct PF PA
500 274 258
500 252 244
333 165 243
333 230 287
Pet PF PA
.778 265 163
.667 214 115
.222 186 251
.111 146 209
Pet PF PA
.667 238 216
.556 259 247
.556 245 212
.222 220 279
Pet PF PA
.900 265 159
.667 227 155
.556 187 198


East
Dallas
Philadelphia
N.Y Giants
Washington
South
New Orleans
Carolina
Atlanta
BUCS
North
Detroit
Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota
West
Seattle
San Francisco
Arizona
St. Louis


Today's game
Indianapolis at Tennessee, 8:25 p.m.
S Sunday's games
Baltimore at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Oakland at Houston, 1 p.m.
N.Y Jets at Buffalo, 1p.m.
SAtlanta at BUCS, 1 p.m.
SDetroit at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Arizona at JAGUARS, 1 p.m.
San Diego at DOLPHINS, 4:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.
San Francisco at New Orleans, 4:25 p.m.
Green BayatN.Y.Giants, 4:25 p.m.
S Kansas Cityat Denver, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Dallas, St. Louis
S Monday's game
New England at Carolina, 8:40 p.m.
CFLPLAYOFFS
Sunday's results
Division Semifinals
East Division
Hamilton 19, Montreal 16,OT
West Division
Saskatchewan 29, B.C. 25
Sunday's games
Division Finals
East Division
SHamilton atToronto, 1 p.m.
West Division
Saskatchewan at Calgary, 430 p.m.


Hockey
NHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W LOTPts GF GA
LIGHTNING 18 13 5 0 26 56 43
Boston 17 11 5 1 23 48 30
Toronto 18 11 6 1 23 52 42
Detroit 19 9 5 5 23 47 51
Montreal 19 9 8 2 20 49 42
Ottawa 18 7 7 4 18 53 56
PANTHERS 19 411 4 12 40 66
Buffalo 20 415 1 9 36 63
Metropolitan Division
GP W LOTPts GF GA
Pittsburgh 18 11 7 0 22 51 42
Washington 19 10 8 1 21 61 55
N.Y.Rangers 18 9 9 0 18 41 49
Carolina 18 7 7 4 18 34 49
NewJersey 18 6 7 5 17 38 46
N.Y. Islanders 19 7 9 3 17 54 61
Philadelphia 18 7 10 1 15 33 45
Columbus 17 6 10 1 13 44 50
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W LOTPts GF GA
Colorado 17 14 3 0 28 55 30
Chicago 18 12 2 4 28 66 49
Minnesota 19 11 4 4 26 50 41
St.Louis 16 11 2 3 25 54 37
Winnipeg 20 9 9 2 20 53 57
Dallas 17 8 7 2 18 46 52
Nashville 18 8 8 2 18 38 57
Pacific Division
GP W LOTPts GF GA
Anaheim 20 15 4 1 31 68 48
Phoenix 19 13 4 2 28 63 58
SanJose 18 11 2 5 27 66 43
Vancouver 20 11 7 2 24 54 54
LosAngeles 18 11 6 1 23 52 44
Calgary 18 6 9 3 15 49 64
Edmonton 19 4 13 2 10 48 75
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for
overtime loss.
Tuesday's results
Buffalo 3, Los Angeles 2, SO
LIGHTNING 2, Montreal 1, SO
Winnipeg 3, Detroit 2, SO
N.Y. Islanders 3, Nashville 1
NewJersey3, N.Y Rangers 2
Washington 4, Columbus 3, OT
Carolina 2, Colorado 1
Philadelphia 5, Ottawa 0
PANTHERS 3, Anaheim 2
Phoenix 3, St. Louis 2, OT
San Jose 3, Calgary 2, OT
Wednesday's results
Minnesota 2,Toronto 1, SO
Philadelphia 2, Pittsburgh 1
Dallas at Edmonton, 10 p.m.
Today's games
Columbus at Boston, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at NY Islanders, 7 p.m.
Anaheim at LIGHTNING, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Colorado at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Calgary, 9 p.m.
San Jose at Vancouver, 10 p.m.

ECHL
Wednesday's results
Orlando 4, Cincinnati 2
Ontario at Idaho, late
Today's games
Stockton at Bakersfield, 1:30 p.m.
Elmira at Wheeling, 7 p.m.
Florida at Gwinnett, 7:05 p.m.

Pro basketball


NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic W L Pet
Philadelphia 5 4 556
Toronto 4 5 .444
Boston 4 5 .444
NewYork 3 4 .429
Brooklyn 2 4 .333
Southeast W L Pet
Miami 5 3 .625
Atlanta 4 4 500
Charlotte 4 4 .500
Orlando 4 5 .444
Washington 2 6 .250
Central W L Pet
Indiana 8 0 1.000
Chicago 3 3 .500
Cleveland 3 6 .333
Milwaukee 2 5 .286
Detroit 2 5 .286
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest W L Pet
San Antonio 8 1 .889
Dallas 5 3 .625
Houston 5 4 .556
New Orleans 3 5 .375
Memphis 3 5 .375
Northwest W L Pet
Oklahoma City 5 1 .833
Portland 5 2 .714
Minnesota 6 3 .667
Denver 2 4 .333
Utah 0 8 .000
Pacific W L Pet
Phoenix 5 2 .714
L.A. Clippers 5 3 .625
Golden State 5 3 .625
L.A. Lakers 4 5 .444
Sacramento 1 5 .167


Tuesday's results
Miami 118, Milwaukee 95
Dallas 105,Washington 95
Golden State 113, Detroit 95
L.A. Lakers 116, New Orleans 95
Wednesday's results
Orlando 94, Milwaukee 91
Philadelphia 123, Houston 117, OT
Charlotte 89, Boston 83
Minnesota 124, Cleveland 95
Toronto 103, Memphis 87
NewYork95, Atlanta 91
San Antonio 92,Washington 79
LA. Lakers at Denver, late
New Orleans at Utah, late
Phoenix at Portland, late
Brooklyn at Sacramento, late
Oklahoma City at LA. Clippers, late
Today's games
Houston at New York, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.

Soccer
MLS
CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIP
Eastern Conference
Leg 1 -Nov 9: Sporting KC 0, Houston 0
Leg 2 Nov. 23: Houston at Sporting KC,
7:30 p.m.
Western Conference
Leg 1 -Nov. 10: Real Salt Lake 4, Portland 2
Leg 2 Nov. 24: Real Salt Lake at Portland,
9p.m.


0 NHL ROUNDUP


New York Islanders coach Ted Nolan talks with his players during
a timeout against the Pittsburgh Penguins in Pittsburgh in
2007. The Buffalo Sabres have fired coach Ron Rolston and
rehired Nolan to replace him.





Sabres go





back in time


Buffalo fires

coach, GM,

hires Nolan,

LaFontaine

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BUFFALO, N.Y. -The
Buffalo Sabres fired coach
Ron Rolston and hired
former coach Ted Nolan
to replace him.
Sabres owner Terry
Pegula also announced
Wednesday that he fired
general manager Darcy
Regier and hired Pat
LaFontaine as president
of hockey operations.
The Sabres are off to a
4-15-1 start, the worst in
franchise history. Buffalo
edged Los Angeles 3-2
in a shootout Tuesday
night to avoid tying the
worst home start in NHL
history.
Rolston was 19-26-6
in his brief tenure as
Buffalo coach. Regier had
been the Sabres general
manager since 1997.
"He didn't do what he
did by himself," Pegula
said of Regier. "There was
input from many people,
prior owners, myself. Why
now? I just decided and
that's the only answer I
can give you. We work


together and sometimes
you get to the point where
a change was needed."
The Sabres organi-
zation has plenty of
familiarity with Nolan and
LaFontaine.
Nolan was the Sabres
coach from 1995-97,
winning the Jack Adams
Award in 1997 as the
NHL's top coach. Nolan
also coached the New
York Islanders from
2006-08.
His current job is coach
of the Latvian men's
national team, a role he'll
continue into the 2014
Winter Olympics in Sochi,
Russia.
LaFontaine starred for
the Sabres from 1991-97
and was inducted into the
Hockey Hall of Fame in
2003. He started a job as
senior executive for the
NHL last month.

Wild 2, Maple Leafs 1,
SO: In St. Paul, Minn., Zach Parise
and Jason Pominville scored in the
shootout, lifting Minnesota over
Toronto. Parise tied the game late in
the third period for Minnesota.

Flyers 2, Penguins 1: In
Pittsburgh, Brayden Schenn scored two
goals and backup goalie Ray Emery
stopped 30 shots to lead Philadelphia
over Pittsburgh for its third straight
victory.


I QUICK HITS


MEXICO ROMPS IN

FIRST QUALIFYING LEG

MEXICO CITY (AP)
- Oribe Peralta scored
twice and Mexico beat
New Zealand 5-1 on
Wednesday in the first leg
of their intercontinental
playoff to close in on a
spot in the World Cup
next year.
Paul Aguilar put
Mexico ahead in the 32nd
minute, and Raul Jimenez
made it 2-0 before the
break. Peralta scored his
first goal 3 minutes into
the second half, collect-
ing a cross from the left
and slotting home a shot
from 6 yards. He made
it 4-0 with an 80th-min-
ute header, and Rafael
Marquez added scored
in the 84th. Chris James
scored a minute later for
New Zealand.
The second leg is next
Wednesday in Wellington,
New Zealand.
"We're going to go there
like the score is 0-0, like
we need a winning goal,"
Mexico coach Miguel
Herrera said.
Mexico scored only sev-
en goals in 10 qualifying
games, but broke through
under new coach Miguel


Herrera. The coach of
Mexican club America,
Herrera was hired for only
the two playoff matches,
declined to speculate
about his future....
Clint Dempsey and Fabian
Johnson have been dropped from
the U.S. roster for exhibition games
at Scotland and Austria. Dempsey
strained his right calf during training
Wednesday.


OLYMPICS

USADA offers to help
Jamaica with doping
issues: In Johannesburg, the chief
executive of the United States Anti-
Doping Agency said his organization
has held discussions with The World
Anti-Doping Agency and the Jamaica
Anti-Doping Commission.
Travis Tygart said the Jamaican
commission "reached out"to its
United States counterparts soon after
an inspection visit by WADA to the
Caribbean island at the end of last
month.
The audit of Jamaica's anti-doping
efforts came after revelations of a lack
of out-of-competition testing ahead
of the 2012 London Olympics ...
Russian tennis star Maria
Sharapova will work for NBC during
its Winter Olympics coverage in
her childhood home of Sochi. The
four-time Grand Slam champion lived
in Sochi until she was 6 and still has
family and friends in the area.


.4W ZZ0 Z434






Page 6 www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Thursday, November 14,2013


* COLLEGE FOOTBALL


AP FILE PHOTO
Florida State quarterback Charlie Ward looks for a receiver as Notre Dame tackle Jim Flanigan (44) bears down on him during the first quarter of a 1993 game in South Bend, Ind. Two decades later,
it's still open to debate whether college football ever had a better afternoon than on that November day when No. 1 Florida State visited No. 2 Notre Dame.





Was 1993 FSU-ND college





football's best game ever?


By JIM LITKE
ASSOCIATED PRESS

EXACTLY 20 YEARS
AFTER ONE, THE VERY
IDEA OF A "GAME OF
THE CENTURY" SOUNDS
SO, WELL, LAST CENTURY
NOW.
Maybe because these days,
it's seems like there's one on TV
every week. And maybe it's not
all hype.
By any measure, college
football has never been bigger:
the number of fans, teams,
dollars rolling in, bowl games;
take your pick. But two decades
later, it's still open to debate
whether the game ever had a
better afternoon than on Nov.
13, 1993.
So rewind the tape check
that, go to YouTube and
check out the highlights from
then-No. 1 Florida State at No.
2 Notre Dame. The Seminoles
arrived with two dozen future
NFL draft picks, soon-to-be
Heisman Trophy winner
Charlie Ward, and a deserving
coach, Bobby Bowden, still
chasing his first national
championship. If you bought
what Notre Dame's Lou Holtz
was selling, all the Irish had
was their mystique.
"Perfect seasons at stake,
a game in a perfect place, a
collision in history," Bob Costas
said as NBC came on the air.
But soon after the football
went up, Notre Dame raced
out to a 24-7 lead. The Irish
scored their first touchdown
on an improbable 32-yard
reverse by Adrian Jarrell, a
part-time receiver and full-time
punter making his first rushing
attempt of the season, and just
the third of his career. Full-time
safety Jeff Burris ran for two
more.
"I thought we had it under
control a few times," Holtz
recalled ruefully. "But that's
what makes great fights. They
kept getting up off the ground."
Out of timeouts, but back
within 31-24, Ward marched
FSU down to the Notre Dame
14 with three seconds left.
Flushed from the pocket on
the final play, he rolled left and
took dead aim at the left corner
of the end zone.


"It's sounds funny now," Irish
cornerback Shawn Wooden
said. "But they'd scored on a
tipped pass just before that,
so on the sidelines, coach was
yelling at the defense, 'quit
trying to intercept it! Just knock
the ball down.'"
Wooden did exactly that at
the goal line.
"Knocked away!" announcer
Charlie Jones howled a heart-
beat later. "The ghost of Knute
Rockne is living! And he is
smiling!"
But not for long.
The following week, Notre
Dame was caught looking
ahead and lost its last regu-
lar-season game, at home, to
19th-ranked Boston College.
Florida State went unbeaten
the rest of the way, and all the
other dominoes in their path to
a title game toppled just right.
"What do I remember,"
Bowden asked. "One is how
poor ole' Charlie Ward was run-
ning for his life all afternoon.
"The other thing," he chuck-
led softly, "is that we lost that
battle but won the war."
As fate would have it,
Wooden's knee, weakened earli-
er in the game, was shredded
right after the final play when
a pack of teammates jumped
on his back. He recovered
and like 20 of his teammates
that day went on to play in
the NFL. But when Wooden
runs into Bowden on the
charity circuit in south Florida,
there is still only one topic of
conversation.
"I love Coach Bowden,"
Wooden said, "but every time I
see that ring on, I remind him
only half of it belongs to him.
The other half, that should
have been ours."

POWER STRUGGLE
College football revenues are
up a whopping 347 percent in
the 20 years since that game,
totaling about $3 billion a year.
Over that same span, expenses
have increased 324 percent, to
$1.8 billion. Even more money
awaits just down the road,
beginning with the game's
first-ever playoff in 2015.
By then, the Bowl
Championship Series' com-
puters will be in storage and
all the lobbying by coaches


and players will matter only so
much. But at the end of that
appropriately gray afternoon,
Florida State receiver Matt Frier
created quite a stir by pleading
with poll voters not to forget
the Seminoles.
"I wasn't trying to take any-
thing away from Notre Dame,"
he said. "I was just frustrated
because we didn't finish the
deal. Charlie was a good friend
of mine, too, and all of us who
came in in 1989 we were the
No. 1 recruiting class that year
- were frustrated. We always
seemed to come up a play
short. Those memories kind of
came rushing back.
"Then someone stuck a
microphone in front of me and
asked, 'How far do you think
you should drop?' All I said
was, 'I don't think we should
fall farther than No. 2,'" Frier
recalled. "By the time I got
back, my answering machine
was full of messages from fra-
ternities in Lincoln (Nebraska)
and West Virginia. I can't repeat
some of what was said, but the
gist was ... their teams were still
unbeaten."
Frier is lucky Twitter wasn't
around at the time. In a few
campus towns, he was dubbed
"Matt Crier," but Frier got the
last laugh. He made the cover
of Sports Illustrated, one of
three that singular game gen-
erated, and still has plenty of
souvenirs from Florida State's
18-16 win the following Jan. 1
over Nebraska in the Orange
Bowl.
"At first, I was kind of like the
public -'I wished he wouldn't
do that,'" Bowden said. "It
sounded like begging.
"But you know what? He and
his brother both played for me;
they did a lot to help build the
program. And most of all," he
added, "things turned out all
right."
The plea also turned out
to be a harbinger of things to
come. With the same cartel
that morphed into the BCS just
starting to take control of the
postseason and TV networks
throwing around cash, the jock-
eying for position only became
more intense. The power con-
ferences began trying to pick
off schools from one another,
sacrificing long-established


loyalties and-or rivalries to gain
even more power. Every school
scrambled to get a piece of the
growing pie, none more than
the 19 that paid a king's ransom
step up into major college's top
division and play against the
big boys.
"The single-biggest change I
see is the spread offense," Holtz
said. "What an equalizer that's
been. It's why you don't see a
lot of great defenses anymore
and how, all of a sudden, an
Appalachian State is capable of
beating Michigan. It's opened
the game up to a lot more
folks."
Yes and no.
Many of the same power-
house programs that ruled
then still hold sway today.
The Southeastern Conference,
fronted by Alabama, has a vise
grip on the national champion-
ship, and schools like Southern
California, Oklahoma, Texas
and Ohio State still bubble up
toward the top every few years.
Florida State won a second
national championship in 1999
under Bowden, who retired
four years ago, and after a few
seasons on the outside, the
Seminoles are squarely back in
the picture for this one. Notre
Dame still rakes in as much
money as any program, but on
the field it's a different story.
They finally made it back to
No. 1 in the rankings last year
for the first time since 1993,
and went on to play in the title
game against Alabama. But the
42-14 beating absorbed there
was just one clear indicator of
how far Notre Dame still has
to go.

CAN WE GET BACK THERE?
One thing that may never
come back is the primacy
of college football Saturday
afternoons. Back in 1993, a
game like Florida State-Notre
Dame could make it seem like
time was standing still.
Depending on whose criteria
you accept, there were nine
"Game(s) of the Century" in
the 90-plus years before that.
Some people argue the 2006
regular-season game between
Michigan and Ohio State,
and especially the Rose Bowl
contest at the end of the 2005
season between Texas and USC


for the national championship,
were worthy of the same moni-
ker for the 21st century.
What's clear is that whether
those games are deserving or
not, the intensity of the argu-
ment has waned. The audience
has a shorter attention span,
recruiting has become a season
unto itself, and with so many
games on TV, the focus has
been diffused. Being designat-
ed the "Game of the Week" is
enough for most fans now.
"I don't know that we'll ever
see a game of that magnitude
again," Holtz said. "What
people forget, now that we try
to make every game into a big
deal, is that neither of us were
one-year wonders. We'd been
good for seven years by that
point, and Bobby and them for
10 years.
"It wasn't just No. 1 vs. No.
2, or North vs. South, like
some people made it out. It
was two of the best near their
peak, and because of the way
the college football was set
up, people thought we could
only meet in a bowl game, if
we met at all. Plus, remember,
when we played it was still
mid-November."
All these years later, when
a big TV payday is the only
reason established powers take
scheduling risks, the timing
that made Florida State-Notre
Dame possible seems like the
most serendipitous twist of all.
"We were originally sched-
uled to play Penn State, and
they cancelled," Holtz said. "So
the administration came to me
and said, 'Who do you want to
play?' I said, 'Miami,' because
it was such a great rivalry. But
they said no, because those
games brought out the worst in
both sets of fans. They remind-
ed me of the whole 'Catholics
vs. Convicts' label people
slapped on those games.
"I said, "That's not fair, all
our kids aren't Catholics.' But
no one else thought that was
funny.... Well, we'd stayed with
Bobby and Ann (Bowden) on
our honeymoon, because we
didn't have any money, so I
finally said, 'OK, let's schedule
Florida State.'
"Man," Holtz laughed one
last time, "I had no idea what I
was getting myself into."


Page 6 www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, November 14,2013






The Sun/Thursday, November 14, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net Page 7


U MIAMI DOLPHINS:


AP FILE PHOTO
The bullying saga that has enveloped the Miami Dolphins involves guard Richie Incognito (68), center left, and tackle Jonathan Martin (71).



Let's agree to move on in bullying saga


By GREG COTE
MIAMI HERALD
MIAMI
A t some point and with
astonishing speed, a
XAairly interesting, gossipy
little locker room story about
how two football teammates
got along or didn't me-
tastasized uncontrollably and
swallowed an NFL team and
its season.
Two guys who play their
sport's most anonymous
position, offensive line, for one
of the league's under-radar
teams, the Dolphins, suddenly
found themselves starring in
a national soap opera that
became less about what really
happened than about the
media's coverage of it, and all
of our overreaction to it.
The whole tale, couched in
such profound gravity, has
become utterly ridiculous, by
which I mean ripe for ridicule.
It is one of the most excessive-
ly scrutinized stories I have
seen in more than 30 years of
doing this.
Enough!
A Dolphins assistant coach
was overheard Wednesday to
say, "This is the most over-
blown story." And he is dead-
on accurate, but what is right
is also so politically incorrect
that nobody connected with
the Dolphins has the gump-
tion to publicly say it.
To watch the opposite,
overtly prudent response has
become comical, with all the
involved parties in a limbo
contest, seeing who can bend
over backward the most to
appear the most politically
correct.
Don't get this wrong. I
understand and appreciate
why this story became big and
must be handled with care. It
involves a buzzword that hauls
it beyond ESPN SportsCenter


and into CNN and the Today
show: Bullying. It involves
the sociology of locker-room
culture. Involves the legalities
of work-place environment.
Involves race.
So I get that the NFL al-
ready reeling from issues of
player health and safety, would
scramble to cover its corporate
butt by appointing an inde-
pendent investigator.
I get why Dolphins owner
Stephen Ross, finally reacting
publicly to Bullygate Monday
night, would use words like
"appalled" as he appointed not
one but two committees of his
own.
I get why coach Joe Philbin,
his team hijacked by the
controversy, would expound
gravely (and repeatedly) about
how seriously he takes all of
this.
I get why the bully, Richie
Incognito, would dress himself
up like a defendant given a
fresh haircut for his court
appearance, and try to explain
himself in a one-on-one
interview with Fox Sports.
And I get why the victim,
Jonathan Martin, would
ensconce himself with lawyers
and legal strategists before
finally agreeing to share his
side of the soap.
But in everybody's intent to
make this bigger than it is, we
have lost the ability to distill
this to its essence. So let me
help.
Miami's locker room fea-
tured a bully waiting to hap-
pen in Incognito, a career-long
dirty player and vulgar,
hard-partying loudmouth. To
be surprised Incognito is at the
center of this is to be surprised
by tomorrow's sunrise.
Miami's locker room also
featured a shy, cerebral, "soft"
younger player in Martin, a
high draft pick who wasn't very
good and also didn't make


much effort to fit in a bad
combination.
So Incognito goes overboard
with his bullying, including a
profane text message to Martin
that includes the N-word, a
use Incognito says was in jest
and not uncommon in lock-
er-room parlance.
Incognito ends up being
suspended by the team, Martin
leaves under emotional duress,
the media swarms, investiga-
tions ensue and here we are.
Only on this team could this
have happened, not because
Miami is different from
other teams, but because only
Miami had the combustible
combination of a meathead
boor like Incognito and a shy,
ill-fitting underachiever like
Martin.
May we be honest here?
I'm not saying Martin is a
"baby," as Mike Ditka called
him. What I am saying is that
Martin has shown evidence of
having emotional issues that
may not be ideally suited to a
career in football.
I shake my head at general
manager Jeff Ireland being
in trouble for supposedly
advising Martin's agent to tell
Martin to punch Incognito, to
stand up for himself. We speak
of a sport and locker-room
environment filled with
testosterone and vulgarity. Not
just here; in football. Part of
the brotherhood bond is to be
tested, on and off the field.
From all that is known thus
far, Incognito pushed things
too far, but Martin perhaps did
not push back far enough, if at
all. Maybe both of those things
are true.
Let me be clear:
Bullying is a terrible thing.
It is terrible when the victim
is a young boy having his
lunch money stolen. It is a
criminal outrage when the
victim is a preteen girl being


cyber-bullied to the point of
suicide. It is less terrible, quite
frankly, when the victim is a
grown, 320-pound man whose
profession is one of violence
and physicality.
Meanwhile, this story has
become the stuff of lunacy.
Incognito being interviewed
by mixed-martial arts trainer
Jay Glazer ... Former Dolphins
lineman Lydon Murtha writing
a column on it for Sports
Illustrated ... Ex-QB Sage
Rosenfels slamming Ireland on
Twitter ... Ireland getting inun-
dated with hateful messages
after a signed business card
with his contact info material-
ized on Twitter.
And here was my favorite:
Incognito saying the vulgar
exchanges with Martin went
both ways, citing that Martin
had forward him a text that
read, 'I'll kill your (blanking)
family.' Then Martin's lawyer
countering by revealing that
those words were attached to
an Internet meme, a photo of
a grinning dog supposedly was
saying that.
Enough! Please?
The Dolphins are being
shamed nationally to great,
almost preposterous excess.
This is not a cheating
scandal, as when the Patriots
secretly videotaped oppo-
nents' hand signals, and this
is not a moral scandal, as the
Saint's "Bountygate" was. Yet
this franchise is being collec-
tively tried as if it were.
This does not involve a tight
end who has been indicted
for a gangland-style murder,
or a receiver implicated in a
DUI death, or a quarterback
who was running a deadly
dog-fighting operation. Yet it is
being covered as if it were.
Bullygate also has caused on
overreaction to the travails of
the team itself.
Inhale deeply, please. Exhale


slowly.
Miami is 4-5 with seven
games to play.
This is how many games
Miami is off playoff pace:
One. One!
Can we please see what the
NFL investigation finds out
before we shake fists, demand
accountability and summon a
guillotine? Can we see where
this season ends up before we
fire everybody and detonate
everything? I mean, seriously.
The Dolphins have serious,
tangible problems, such as
bad blocking, an inconsistent
running game, erratic tackling,
continuing non-chemistry
between Ryan Tannehill and
Mike Wallace, and whether
Tannehill's "go, go-go" snap
count is tipping off defenders.
The swarming media infat-
uation with Incognito/Martin
should not continue to be
among this team's problems.
Again: Enough!
Now maybe the NFL inves-
tigation will reveal shocking
details that demand recon-
sideration here. But based on
what is known now, let's do
this:
Let's have the league and
its teams enact a simple
locker-room code based on
respect. Players, do not use
the N-word, even if you think
it's in a joking manner. Leave
the juvenile hazing to the
college frat houses. Don't bully
anybody. And quit demanding
that rookies carry your shoul-
der pads and pay for your
meals. It's asinine.
Let's have Miami waive both
Incognito and Martin, because
both those bridges are burn-
ing, and let's have the NFL
suspend Incognito for the rest
of this season.
Then let's do this:
Let's move on.


U NFL:


Tampa Bay's Rainey hopes to have home for game ball soon


By JOE SMITH
TAMPA BAY TIMES
TAMPA -Tampa Bay
running back Bobby
Rainey received a game
ball for his breakout
performance on Monday
Night Football.


Rainey, 26, hopes he'll
soon have a house to put
it in.
It has been a whirlwind
month for Rainey. He was
claimed off waivers from
the Browns on Oct. 21 and
flew back to Paducah, Ky.,


a week later for the birth
of his first baby, daughter
Kyvee Jolie. While Rainey
caught up on the play-
book, he also was house
hunting, finding a place in
Westchase on which he's
waiting for approval.


But more important,
Rainey might have found
a home with the Bucs.
Monday, he stepped in for
the injured Mike James
to rush for 45 yards and
the go-ahead touchdown
in the 22-19 win over the


Dolphins. He likely will
shoulder a significant
load going forward.
"Monday Night
Football, everybody's
watching," Rainey said
of his first carries for the
Bucs. "After the game, I


looked at my phone and
had 36 text messages or
whatever. The first person
I called was my fiance.
I wanted to talk to my
daughter, but she can't
talk back. Then I called
my mom afterwards."


The Sun/Thursday, November 14, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 7






Page 8 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Thursday, November 14,2013


COLTS AT TITANS
WHO: Indianapolis (6-3) at
Tennessee (4-5)
WHEN: Today, 8p.m.
WHERE: LP Field, Nashville,
Tenn.
TV: NFL Network

* NFL NOTEBOOK


Former


Raiders


star dies


at 57

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SALT LAKE CITY-With
his penchant for poetry,
Todd Christensen never
fit the Raiders' renegade
mold. But that didn't keep
him from becoming one
of the team's best all-time
tight ends.
A five-time Pro Bowl
selection and two-time
Super Bowl winner,
Christensen died from
complications during
liver transplant surgery
Wednesday. He was 57.
Christensen's son,
Toby Christensen,
said his father died at
Intermountain Medical
Center near his home in
Alpine, Utah. He had been
waiting for 10 months for
a donor liver.
After a stellar career
at running back for BYU
from 1974-77, Christensen
was a second-round pick
for the Dallas Cowboys in
the 1978 NFL draft.
He was waived by the
Cowboys after breaking
his foot in training camp
but landed the next year
with the Raiders, where he
played for 10 seasons at
tight end and won Super
Bowls in 1981 and 1984.
In 1983, he had 92
catches, setting the NFL
record at the time for
tight ends. He finished
the season with 1,247
yards receiving and 12
touchdowns.
He broke his own record
three seasons later with
95 catches. He finished
his pro career with 467
catches for 5,872 yards
and 41 touchdowns a
TD record for a Raiders
tight end.

Kubiakto coach Texans
vs Raiders: Houston Texans coach
Gary Kubiak is back after recovering
from a mini-stroke, and he can't wait
to coach his team on Sunday against
Oakland.
"It just feels great to be back;he
said."You have a true appreciation for
the opportunity that you have and the
opportunity to be around the players...
and the chance to do my job again'."

Chiefs' Bowe to start
against Denver after
arrest: Dwayne Bowe deftly avoided
the locker room full of prying TV
cameras, finally emerging onto the
Kansas City Chiefs' practice field as if
nothing was amiss.
The former Pro Bowl wide receiver
spent the rest of the afternoon
preparing for Sunday night's AFC West
showdown against the Broncos, a game
in which he'll start despite a weekend
arrest for speeding and possession of
marijuana.
Chiefs coach Andy Reid said that he
intends to let the legal situation run its
course, but he made it clear that Bowe
will be in the starting lineup for the
unbeaten Chiefs.


* NFL:

- -,-


A Mr rni-
Miami Dolphins coach Joe Philbin talks to the media during a news conference after practice at
the Dolphins training center in Davie on Nov. 6.



Jobs in jeopardy



in harassment case

Dolphins GM, organization will likely be But he has always been
designated the primary supportive."
coach under culprit for the scandal, To the dismay of many
and Ireland's the early Miami fans, Ireland is in
fire for roles front-runner. Ross said his sixth year with the
he had "total, utmost Dolphins even though
in Martin flap
in artin lp confidence" in Philbin but they haven't had a win-
SSTEVEN NE barely mentioned Ireland, ning season since 2008,
BySTEVNWIN who didn't attend the and Ross'patience with
ASSOCIATED PRESS news conference, his beleaguered general
DAVIE Last month, Philbin, who is 11-14 manager might finally be
Richie Incognito said se- since joining the Dolphins exhausted. Among the
vere repercussions would last year, said he ap- many questionable per-
be warranted if the Miami preciated Ross' vote of sonnel decisions in recer
Dolphins kept allowing confidence, years, pairing Martin anc
sacks at such an alarming "The only way you Incognito on the left side
rate. succeed if there is support of the line appears to hax
"Everybody should be within the whole entire been the most disastrous
fired," he said. organization," the coach "It is not just about
Nobody in Miami said. "It starts at the top." Richie Incognito, it's
is talking about sacks Ireland, who rarely just not about Jonathan
anymore. Firings remain a speaks publicly didn't Martin, it is about the
distinct possibility for very respond to a request for organization as a whole,
different reasons, comment, from the top down,"
The Dolphins' harass- The findings of the NFL former NFL receiver
ment scandal is threat- investigator could sway Keyshawn Johnson said
ening the season and job Ross' opinion, as could on ESPN, where he is no"
security, leaving the future the final seven games and an analyst. "In a locker
of coach Joe Philbin, his dwindling fan support, room setting, everybody
assistants and general The Dolphins (4-5) have has to coexist. Or you
manager Jeff Ireland in slumped after a 3-0 start, at least have to know
doubt, and on Monday they what personalities go
Tackle Jonathan Martin became the first team to together.. Obviously, the
alleges he was harassed lose to Tampa Bay. Dolphins didn't do their
daily by teammates, The intensity of media homework."
including Incognito, who scrutiny abated a bit Former Dolphins coach
has been suspended. Wednesday. Some 60 Jimmy Johnson echoed
While Martin is scheduled reporters and cameramen that opinion on Fox and
to meet with an NFL filled the locker room after questioned Ireland's
special investigator late practice, but Philbin was decision to take Martin ii
this week, Dolphins owner asked only two questions the second round of the
Stephen Ross has formed about the scandal during 2012 draft.
two committees to study his daily news conference. "The Dolphins used
the team's locker room He also was asked two a high pick on Jonathan
culture, questions about Ireland. Martin and had high ex-
S"Changes need to be "Jeff and I have worked pectations," Johnson saki
Madee" Ross said at a news closely since the day I've "Well, other teams shied
conference Monday. "We gotten here," Philbin away from Martin. Mayb
need to examine every- said. "The discipline of the Dolphins should hayv
thing internally." the team is in my hands, investigated why they
SSomeone in the I'm in charge of that. shied away."


I


It














I.
d

e
















h


n




:1.
e
e


10000F


BUCS
FROM PAGE 1
Rainey, a second-year
player out of Western
Kentucky. "I feel like I
have something to prove
not to everybody else, but
to myself."
What Rainey and the
others might have proved
is the Bucs offensive line
can make heroes out of
zeroes. Not to diminish
the talent of Tampa Bay's
tailbacks Martin led all
rookies with 1,454 yards


and 11 touchdowns while
being named to the Pro
Bowl last season but
the holes are there to bolt
through.
"I think opportunity is
the key," Bucs coach Greg
Schiano said." (Right
guard Davin Joseph) is
getting more healthy. He's
getting a better feel. But
I think you've got to give
them shots, and I think
that's what's paying off."
The Bucs have used
five offensive line
combinations over nine
games. But it wasn't until
Jamon Meredith took


over at left guard, against
the Seahawks, that the
running game really took
off.
Joseph, who missed last
season with a torn pa-
tellar tendon, is starting
to get his sea legs under
him and playing much
better. Jeremy Zuttah is
back at center, a position
he's most suited for. And
tackles Donald Penn and
Demar Dotson have been
solid.
"All the credit goes to
the offensive line," Rainey
said. "They're the ones
that open up the holes


for us to be able to read
and get yardage. The
offensive line did a great
job (Monday) and the
week before. It's a matter
of picking the hole and
hitting it."
The Bucs are 14th in
the league in rushing at
111.1 yards per game.
Following its per-
formance against the
Dolphins, the offensive
line was awarded game
balls.
"I think our offensive
line is going to be the key,
our receivers, everybody
blocking," Schiano said.


'Deep


Creek
Golf Club


I


Page 8 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, November 14,2013


* COLLEGE FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK


FSU's Winston


investigated in


sexual assault

SeminolesQB YELLOW JACKETS
hasn't been AT TIGERS
interview ed WHO: Georgia Tech (6-3,5-2
y olic ACC) at No.8 Clemson (8-1, 6-1)
y pol c WHEN: Today, 7:30 p.m.
BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS WHERE: Memorial Stadium,
TALLAHASSEE- Clemson, S.C.
Florida State quarterback T N
Jameis Winston is under
investigation in an and football," Jansen said.
alleged sexual assault The school and coach
reported nearly a nearly a Jimbo Fisher wouldn't
year ago. comment because the
The university and investigation wasn't
Winston's attorney con- closed. The school also
firmed Wednesday that said there was no change
the Tallahassee Police in Winston's status for
Department is conduct- the Seminoles' home
ing an investigation, game Saturday against
Winston has been Syracuse.
spectacular for the No.
2 Seminoles in his first Baylor coach Briles
college season and the gets new 10O-year deal:
redshirt freshman is one Baylor coach Art Briles has agreed
of the leading contenders to a new 10-year contract with the
for the Heisman Trophy. fourth-ranked Bears, the team he
He has passed for 2,661 has taken from perennial Big 12 loser
yards and 26 touchdowns to the conference's lone remaining
to help Florida State win undefeated team.
its first nine games and Briles told The Associated Press he
move into position for a is really"humbled and blessed"by the
spot in the BCS national new deal that goes into effect after
championship game. this season.
Tallahassee Police Baylor regents approved the deal
Department officials Wednesday. Financial terms weren't
refused to answer any revealed, which is standard policy for
questions, although they the private university.
did release a heavily re- Briles is 41-30 at Baylor, which is
acted two-page incident 8-0 for the first time in school history.
report. The report does
not mention Winston Two more charged in
by name, but it says North Carolina agents
the incident took place probe: A sports agent's employee
between 1:30 and 2 a.m. and a former college football player
last Dec. 7. are charged with violating North
It describes the suspect Carolina's agent law, making them the
in the sexual assault case fourth and fifth people facing criminal
as being between 5-foot- charges for providing benefits to Tar
9 and 5-11. Winston is Heels football players in 2010.
listed by Florida State at Willie James Barley Jr. and Michael
6-4. Wayne Johnson Jr. are charged with
Timothy Jansen, a facilitating Georgia-based agent Terry
Tallahassee attorney, Watson's efforts to sign Robert Quinn
said Winston hasn't been and Greg Little both now in the
interviewed by police. NFL in violation of the law.
Jansen said that at one They are the last of the five to
point he had believed the appear in court after being indicted by
matter had been resolved, an Orange County grand jury on Sept.
"We basically hope it 30. Those indictments came after
will be resolved quickly testimony from an investigator with
and that Winston will be the North Carolina Secretary of State's
exonerated and he will office after a three-year investigation
be able to focus all his and were immediately placed under
attention on academics seal.













AC










AP PHOTO
Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston reacts during the
fourth quarter against Miami. Tallahassee police are investigating
whether Winston was involved in a sexual assault.


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Southwest Florida's
ONLY weekly guide to
outdoor recreation


Rommiynim




23170 Harborview Road
Port Charlotte, FL 33980

PUBLISHER
JOSH OLIVE
941-206-1010
WaterLineWeekly@gmail.com

EDITOR
LEE ANDERSON
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WaterLineMagazine@gmail.com

CONTRIBUTORS
Capt. Ralph Alien
Dr Mark Asperilla
Abbie Banks
Greg Bartz
Billy Carl
Capt. Josh Greer
Bill Hempel
Capt. Van Hubbard
Ryan Ingle
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Jeff Kincaid
Robert Lugiewicz
Capt. Mike Myers
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Betty Staugler
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Walter W. Wilt

MARKETING
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Some of WaterLine's subject matter con-
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this publication, but matters of opinion
are left to each individual author.


WaterLine photo by Josh Olive
Zipping along the Peace River
in an airboat is a popular way
to spend a weekend afternoon
in DeSoto County.


||p, Be sure to see Capt.
S Van Hubbard's
column on page
S15for hisviewson
K i netting and Florida's '
Fishing heritage. P
j. 4 ""4

I've been doing a lot of thinking about
.,, "gill nets over the past two weeks. When
..L news of Judge Jackie Fulford's ruling first
\- <, reached me, I was attending a saltwater
media conference in Key Largo. Our hosts,
r-1. the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation
L Partnership, are ardent supporters of
*' recreational fishing and hunting. Several
of the presentations throughout the
conference focused on the economic value
of recreational fishing over commercial
fishing. In this setting, it was not a surprise
to hear scant sympathy for the netters'
cause. But no one seemed too concerned.
The consensus was basically "no big deal
it'll go away."
Well, if you've kept up with the story
in the news, you know it didn't just go
away. The good news is that it's settled for
the moment and law enforcement is back
enforcing the law. The less-good news is
that we now need to revisit the idea of not
only gill nets but fishing nets in general.
A gill net catches fish by ensnaring them
by the gill covers. Fish swim forward into
the net, but the mesh is too small to let
their bodies through. They try to back out,
but are held by their overlapping gill flaps.


Stuck in this way and struggling, a fish has
difficulty breathing and often dies in a fairly
short period of time. Modern gill nets are
usually made of monofilament fishing line,
which is barely visible in the water. The nets
have floats at the top and weights at the
bottom, basically forming a wall covering
a portion of the water column. In shallow
water, the nets often reach all the way to
the bottom. The fish don't recognize there's
anything blocking their way, so they swim
right into the net. In some cases, fish are
driven into the net by boats. Either way,
they are stuck fast. If the net is pulled in
after a short time in the water, many of the
ensnared fish will still be alive. It's possible
to remove undesired fish and release
them alive, though some will be injured to
varying degrees in the process. Nets that are
left to soak for several hours are usually full
of dead fish when they're hauled in.
In the early 1990s, inshore fishing
was quite a bit tougher than it is today
and seemed to be on a downward slope.
Whether it was fair or not, gill netters
took much of the blame for this situation.
Although they targeted mullet most of the
time, it was commonly believed that they


were killing redfish, snook, trout and other
gamefish in large numbers. Depending who
you heard the story from, those fish got
discarded at sea, ended up on the netters'
tables, or were filleted and sold as grouper.
It's likely that all those things happened on
a small scale rumor often has a kernel of
truth but there exists little evidence of
large-scale abuses.
Regardless, tensions were high, and there
was a definite "us versus them" vibe on both
sides of the issue. A virtual trench was dug,
and Florida fishermen were on one side
or the other. In these types of situations,
where words such as "fight" "battle" and
"war" become commonplace, compromise
is not on most stakeholders'minds. Instead,
it's about winning or losing. In this case,
those opposed to nets had more human
and financial resources at their disposal.
The Save Our Sealife petition drive began in
1992 to get a constitutional net-ban amend-
ment on the 1994 ballot. The initiative had
major support from the Florida Conservation
Association (now CCA Florida) and massive
exposure in Florida Sportsman Magazine.
NET 125


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SO1 ll ide, '
Angling 101 ROBERT LUGIEWICZ
lUlrer a trin:hl t blue ';I.v
Angling 201 CAPT. JOSH GREER
fish ar C I nart


Peace River Wildlife Center ROBIN JENKINS, DVM
Fh:ieri> rhe ron
Around Charlotte Harbor CAPT. RALPH ALLEN
A; iea3 :'r charge. ;: ,:i [hiiri regiulati :,r
Shooting Straight, RYAN INGLE
W1ith great polver (onie, great reiporiiiily
Diving Delight* WALTER W. WILT
it ; a vwhie rnemiv wo,,rld
A Life on the Water CAPT. VAN HUBBARD
Let [ find a Qiill net oniproniie
,allwater reQiula1i i ri harl
The World of SUP NICOLE MIERS-PANDOLFI
j11eir,] vert1a1 rl n a Ianrdj-up pajddjlet)ardj
Tournament Bassin'* GREG BARTZ
S'niaill niotor 1 headarhei


I all about ran tlyai la'Pam ilWand Marina
Mechanical Mobo TONY TOWNS
Sniall n bir t, riheadarihe
SeaA/rld 'e to appellate (c)ijurl


1i0:12 1 Tibdrha


a,.e Tackle Tech*
JEFF KINCAID
F Holiday shopping
for your favorite
f angler
If you read WaterLine, chances
S are that you at least occasion-
ally go fishing. And with the
holidays rapidly approaching,
Faqe 11 you might be looking for
angling-related items.


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P'ale 1 iliur,,jd turtle t reatedl at Mianii Sealuariuni


Pa.le 14


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Paqe 1.' Baiaria.i iavery iaie
'a,.le ],:, al,,,al-,a hee t play. l.,ey role ,,i artni.; l. re won,,.
Editor's Viewpoint* LEE ANDERSON
'aQ.e .: Hiddlliqe n i.e


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BULLETIN BOARD i '. e FISH PROFILES I'age; 12, 14

TIDE CHARTS I Page 4 FISH RECIPES I Page II 1s'2:4:

FISH FINDER READER PHOTOS i 'ae l.,

MAP OF LOCAL WATERS 7 aqe SOLUNAR TABLES I Page 30





^ &Pr.wau Page 3 November 14,2013


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I You have meetii tournament o her t yo t ildd inthe Outo Bullei Boar il it t WateLinagaine@gmil.
if yo have a meeting; tournaments, fesfival or other event you want inicludedidiin h Otor Hews Bulletin Board, email 1110 oWatierLin-eMa-gazinFe@ gmaiI.com


STAKEHOLDER WORKSHOP II ON SNOOK
The topic is local differences in snook populations, and the
Nov. 14th workshop at 6 p.m. is free. These workshops are
the second in a series of events organized by the University
of Florida as part of a research project on stakeholder
involvement in local fisheries management. We will discuss
the data we have and how we can assess what is happening
with the local fishery. Join us for a discussion and the chance
to provide your input to ongoing research! Contact Chelsey
Crandall, Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, University of
Florida, at 813-690-2334 or email her at kicksea@ufl.edu.
LEMON BAY SEAGRASS
ADVENTURE WADING TRIPS
Explore the creatures within the sea grass beds of Lemon
Bay on Nov. 14th from 9 to 11:30 a.m. at Cedar Point
Environmental Park (2300 Placida Road, Englewood) using
nets and buckets while wading out into knee to hip-deep
water. Hold sea horse, crabs, fish and others while watching
dolphin jump in the bay. Family educational fun. Free but
reservations are required. Call 941-475-0769 for more
information.
ENGLEWOOD FISHING CLUB MEETING
The Englewood Fishing Club will hold its monthly meeting on
Nov. 14th at 6:30 p.m. at the Lemon Bay Park Environmental
Center, (570 Bay Park Blvd., Englewood). Featured will be a
presentation by Capt. Chris O'Neil speaking on "Wintertime Bay
Transitional Fishing" Admission is free and open to the public.
Further info can be found at EnglewoodFishingClub.net.
SIESTA KEY CRYSTAL CLASSIC MASTER
SAND-SCULPTING COMPETITION
Ten teams of master sand sculptors from the U.S. and abroad
compete on Nov. 15th-18th at the 4th Annual Siesta Key
Crystal Classic. The Crystal Classic has connected visual art
and the beach in ways never seen before in Sarasota. The art
event will include master sand sculptors competing with all
day viewing each day with over 50 vendors. Off-site shuttle
service from Riverview High School. The cost is $5. Call
941-349-3800 for more information.
TARPON SAMPLING IN LEMON CREEK
Hike with a guide down to Lemon Creek at the Wildflower
Preserve (3120 Gasparilla Pines Blvd., Englewood) to observe
seining for juvenile tarpon, measurement and marking of
fish on Nov. 16th from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Call 941-830-8922 for
more info.


BULLETIN 129


WIHIR R Iipdtpm rio LAR OTFFI~ it avHl il fo rp rol~imi i old fIIiipM pw fiidt


iin.J iu vu i mi JR .3tn~u aiR .% llnaLIIe IIUIIIIin
with the scrub jays at Oscar Scherer State Park (1843
S. Tamiami Trail, Osprey) from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. every
Sunday. This unique Central Florida experience includes
a nature walk to see the park's diverse ecosystems,
native flora and fauna. Call 941-483-5956 for more info.
SIX MILE CYPRESS SLOUGH PRESERVE: Take a
leisurely stroll on our fully accessible boardwalk trail
anytime dawn to dusk (7791 Penzance Blvd., Fort
Myers). Visit our Interpretive Center to learn more about
the plants and animals that live in the Slough or just
talk to a friendly volunteer. The center is open Tuesdays
through Sundays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Parking is $1
per hour per vehicle. Reservations not required. No
groups of eight or more. Call 239-533-7550 or visit
LeeParks.org/SixMile.
FREE PADDLE DEMONSTRATIONS: Grande Tours
(12575 Placida Road, Placida) is holding free kayak
and stand-up paddleboard demos from 11 a.m. to
I p.m. every Saturday. Call 941-697-8825 for more
information.
VOLUNTEER AT SHAMROCK PARK: Shamrock Park
Nature Center (3900 Shamrock Drive, Venice) holds its
monthly volunteer work mornings from 8 to 10 a.m. on the
third Friday of each month. As abilities and interests allow,
volunteer tasks may include trash collection along trails and
within vegetated areas of the park, light trimming along
paved multi-use trail, organization of storage areas, exotic
plant removal and other maintenance tasks. Long pants,
closed-toe shoes, sun protection, and plenty of drinking wa-
ter are recommended. Park staff will provide trash collection
buckets/bags, pickers, gloves, and other tools as necessary.
Meet at the Shamrock Park Environmental Center. For more
information, call Jennifer Rogers at 941-861-5000 or email
her atjrogers@scgov.net.
WHAT'S THAT BIRD?: Volunteer bird interpreters share
their expertise on ID and behavior of raptors, shorebirds,
waterfowl and other avian visitors at Myakka River State
Park (13208 State Road 72, Sarasota). Volunteers set up
scopes and help people identify birds from 9 a.m. to
I p.m. every day of the week.
BOTTOM TIME DIVE CLUB: We are a Scuba dive club
that meets on the 3rd Tuesday of each month. Club is
based out of Punta Gorda. Call 941-740-4245 or contact
www.BottomTimeDiveClub.net.


LClRIA,| iv | i .it .,o ,,. U ., lllly iil i d l w 1,,i i i d e
saltwater fly tying seminar every Wednesday from
4:30 to 6 p.m. at West Wall Boats (787 Tamiami Trail,
Port Charlotte). The public is invited to attend. Call
941-875-9630 for more info.
BIRD WALK AT LAKES PARK: A bird patrol guide will
lead an easy walk along clear paths of Lakes Regional
Park (7330 Gladiolus Drive, Fort Myers) at 8:30 a.m. on
the first Saturday of each month. This free walk offers
an opportunity to see birds in natural vegetation as your
guide points out the many species in what is a birding
hot spot and crucial nesting area for many birds. Arrive
at 8 a.m. at Shelter A7 for a brief intro and sign-in. Wear
comfortable shoes and dress for outdoors. Bring water,
hat, sunscreen, binoculars and camera. Call 239-533-
7580 for more info.
CHARLOTTE HARBOR MULTIHULL ASS'N: Members
of this club for multihull owners, sailors or those who
are interested in it exchange ideas about equipping and
sailing boats, share information about anchorages and
cruising destinations, hold informal races that help to
improve their sailing ability, and have local raft-ups.
No dues. The club meets at Harpoon Harry's on the first
Monday of each month at 6 p.m. For more info, visit
Yhoo.it/XV96fO or call 941-876-6667.
KORESHAN STATE HISTORIC SITE STROLL: Walk
or bike the historic site (3800 Corkscrew Road, Estero).
Park fee is $2 for walk or bike; $4 for single-occupant
vehicle; $5 for two to eight occupants vehicle and $2
each additional person over eight per vehicle. Call
239-992-0311 for more information.
SARASOTA FITNESS WALKS: Join Sarasota County
Parks staff each Friday for a fitness walk through
Rothenbach Park (8650 Bee Ridge Rd., Sarasota) from
8:30 to 9:30 a.m. The pace will be geared toward fitness,
aiming for a 20-minute-mile pace. The walk will cover
approximately three miles in one hour of brisk walking.
Enjoy the beautiful scenery and wildlife, but keep up
the pace. Wear appropriate workout clothing, including
good walking shoes, and bring your water bottle. Meet
in the pavilion near the playground. Call 941-861-5000.
FREE SAFETY CHECKS: The Coast Guard Auxiliary
conducts free vessel safety checks every Saturday
morning from 8:30 to 11:45 a.m. at the Venice boat
ramp (200 N. Seaboard Ave., Venice). They'll make sure
the safety equipment mandated by federal and state


iq ulUl HNIN il DOMiiUU l. 11ii Ul illeua S .tuvessell sioUlla (u
be safe, a "Seal of Safety"is affixed to it. For more info
or to schedule an appointment, call PatrickWheeler at
941-412-1026.
PADDLING AND BIRDING AT OSCAR SCHERER:
Year-round ranger-led paddle tours of South Creek are
offered each Wednesday at Oscar Scherer State Park
(1843 S. Tamiami Trail, Osprey). Register at 8:30 a.m.,
tour at 9 a.m. Cost is park fee plus canoe or kayak
rental fee. Bird walks are also offered every Thursday at
7:30 a.m., and guided scrub jay walks every Sunday at
8:30 a.m. For more info on any of these programs, call
941-483-5956.
CONSERVANCY WALK AT TIGERTAIL BEACH: Listed
as Site #73 on the Great Florida Birding Trail. Meet your
volunteer guides (weather permitting) at 8:30 a.m.
Monday through Friday at the kiosk atTigertail Beach.
Directions: U.S. 41 (Tamiami Trail) to 951 South to Marco
Island. Turn right on Kendall Court, the fifth light after
crossing the bridge to Marco Island. Turn left at four-way
stop sign at Hernando Court to Tigertail Beach. Water
shoes and binoculars are also suggested. The following
walks in the Naples area are offered at no cost through
the Conservancy of Southwest Florida (1450 Merrihue
Dr., Naples). For more info, call 239-262-0304 or visit
www.conservancy.org.
BOATERS GATHERING AT NAV-A-GATOR: A boaters'
get-together is held from I to 2 p.m. the second
Sunday of each month at the waterfront chickee hut at
Nav-A-Gator Grill/DeSoto Marina (9700 S.W. Riverview
Circle, Lake Suzy). This informal gathering is open to
the public to discuss boats, fishing, the Peace River and
other topics. For more information, call the Nav-A-Gator
at 941-627-3474.
WE WANT YOUR SNOOK: Scientists with the FWC
Fish and Wildlife Research Institute are asking snook
anglers to save their filleted carcasses and take them
to a participating bait and tackle store in their area.
These carcasses provide information on the size, age,
maturity and sex of the catch. Drop your snook off
at the following locations: Stump Pass Marina (260
Maryland Avenue, Englewood), Gasparilla Marina
(15001 Gasparilla Road, Placida), Captain Ted's Tackle
(1189 Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte), King Fisher Fleet at
Fishermen's Village Marina (1200W. Retta Esplanade,
Punta Gorda).


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5i4& e~*fVi *Page 4 *November 14,2013


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THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY
VENICE INLET 27.1117 N, 82A633 W


VENICE INLET
Thursday 04:17 0.17feet
10:32 1.50Ofeet
15:37 0.94feet
21:22 2.11 feet
Friday 05:02 -0.02 feet
11:27 1.48feet
16:10 1.04feet
21:48 2.18feet
Saturday 05:42 -0.15 feet
12:15 1.45feet
16:40 1.11 feet
22:14 2.23 feet
Sunday 06:19 -0.21 feet
12:57 1.41 feet
17:08 1.15feet
22:41 2.25 feet
Monday 06:55 -0.22 feet
13:37 1.37feet
17:36 1.17feet
23:11 2.25 feet
Tuesday 07:31 -0.20 feet
14:16 1.34feet
18:08 1.16feet
23:45 2.21 feet
Wednesday 08:10 -0.16 feet
14:55 1.33feet
18:48 1.16feet


PUNTAGORDA


Thursday 00:04
07:13
13:55
18:41
Friday 00:31
07:58
14:52
19:14
Saturday 00:58
08:39
15:39
19:45
Sunday 01:26
09:17
16:20
20:13
Monday 01:55
09:54
16:57
20:38
Tuesday 02:28
10:32
17:31
21:05
Wednesday 03:04
11:11
18:05
21:39


1.81 feet
0.15 feet
1.35 feet
0.86 feet
1.92 feet
-0.03 feet
1.33 feet
0.95 feet
2.00 feet
-0.14feet
1.30 feet
1.03 feet
2.05 feet
-0.19 feet
1.26 feet
1.07 feet
2.07 feet
-0.21 feet
1.23 feet
1.09 feet
2.07 feet
-0.18feet
1.20 feet
1.09 feet
2.04 feet
-0.14feet
1.19 feet
1.08 feet


MONDAY


PLACIDA
Thursday 0458
11:05
16:16
21:55
Friday 05:42
12:01
16:47
22:22
Saturday 06:21
12:49
17:14
22:48
Sunday 06:58
13:32
17:40
23:16
Monday 07:32
14:11
18:07
23:45
Tuesday 08:07
14:48
18:37

Wednesday 00:18
08:44
15:25
19:13


0.13 feet
1.19 feet
0.72 feet
1.65 feet
-0.03 feet
1.17 feet
0.80 feet
1.72 feet
-0.13 feet
1.14feet
0.86 feet
1.76 feet
-0.18feet
1.10 feet
0.89 feet
1.77 feet
-0.19 feet
1.07 feet
0.91 feet
1.77 feet
-0.18feet
1.04 feet
0.91 feet

1.74 feet
-0.14 feet
1.03 feet
0.90 feet


TUESDAY WEDNESDAY


IfrL,- 21 22 2148 22 14 2241 23 11 2345
1032 2.11 1127 2.18 12 15 2.23 1257 2:25 1337 2.25 1416 2.21 1455
rt-1:50 "ON 1:48 1.45 1.41 1.37 1:34 1.33

/ 15 37 1610 \ / 1640 \ / 1708 \ /1736 \ / 1808 \ /1848
,- 0.94-- 1.04 -1.11 .1.15 1\.17 .1.16 ^1.16
0417 0502 0542 0619 0655 07 31 0810
0.17 -0.02 -0.15 -0.21 -0.22 -0.20 -0.16
MHHW 2 201, MHW 1932, MSL 1172, MTL 1152, MLW 0 371, MLLW 0 000 All measurements in feet, for more info seeTidesAndCurrents noaa gov
THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY
PUNTA GORDA 26.9283 N, 82.06500 W (ADD 32 MINUTES TO TIMES FOR EL JOBEAN TIDES) 0304
0004 1355 0031 1 0058 0126 0155 0228 2.04
1 1.5 .,1:921 -1,5,'. 2051620 2.7-1657- 2.07-1731 18 05-
13.9 -1331.30 .61.2 31.0.9

\ 1841 / 1914 / 1945 \ 2013 \ 2038 / 2105 \ 2139
F-- 086 095 1.03 1.07 1.09 1.09 1.08
0713 0758 0839 0917 0954 1032 1111
0.15 -0.03 -0.14 -0.19 -0.21 -0.18 -0.14
MHHW 1 962, MHW 1 703, MTL1 076, MSL 1 070, MLW 04.149, MLLW 0 000


THURSDAY Fl
PLACIDA, CASPAR
r_110 215
2"-11 05---65
1.19 6


IIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY
1ILLA SOUND 26.8333 N, 82.2667 W (ADD 28 MINUTES TO TIMES FOR LEMON BAY TIDES)
55 2222 2248 2316 2345 0018
5 1201 1,.72 1249 ,.1.76 1332 1.77 1411 -1.77 14-48- 1.74-1525
1.17 / 14 1.10 1.07 1.04 1.03 /


1 616 1647 1 14 E
F V 60.8 0 V 0 .8 6
0458 0.72 0542 0621 0658
0.13 -0.03 -0.13 -0.18
MHHW 1407, MHW 1.175, MSL 0.784, MTL 0 768, MLW 0 358, MLLW 0.000


740
0.89


\/ 1807 \ / 1837
\ 0 .9Q1 091


v
0732
-0.19


0807
-0.18


\ / 1913
0n.n


0844
-0.14


MATLACHA PASS
Thursday 07:25 0.15 feet
13:15 1.41 feet
18:43 0.85 feet


Friday 00:05
08:09
14:11
19:14
Saturday 00:32
08:48
14:59
19:41
Sunday 00:58
09:25
15:42
20:07
Monday 01:26
09:59
16:21
20:34
Tuesday 01:55
10:34
16:58
21:04
Wednesday 02:28
11:11
17:35
21:40


1.96 feet
-0.03 feet
1.39 feet
0.95 feet
2.04 feet
-0.15 feet
1.35 feet
1.02 feet
2.08 feet
-0.21 feet
1.31 feet
1.06 feet
2.10 feet
-0.23 feet
1.27 feet
1.07 feet
2.10 feet
-0.21 feet
1.24 feet
1.07 feet
2.06 feet
-0.17feet
1.22 feet
1.07 feet


THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY
MATLACHA PASS (BASCULE BRIDGE) 26.6333 N, 82.0667 W 0126 0155 0228
0005 0032 0058 2.10 2.10 2.06
S1315 1.96 1411 204 1459 2.08-15 42 ^ 1621 1658 1735_
1.41 /- 1.39 / 1.35 / 1.31 / \ 1.27 / 1.24 / 1.22

\ 183 / 1914 \ 19 941 \ /2007 \ /2034\ / 2104 \ 2140
18.4- -- / 0.95 V 1.02 -\ .06 \ 1.07 \ 1.07 / 1.07.
0725 u.8 0809 0848 ,
0.15 -0.03 -0.15 0925 0959 1034 1111
MHHW N/A, MHW N/A, MSL N/A, MTL N/A, MLW N/A, MLLW 0000 -0.21 -0.23 -0.21 -0.17


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ujt &u, ut. Page 5 *November 14,2013


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laboratory director for the Alaska Fisheries Science
Center Kodiak laboratory, says the project is a long way
from claiming that. "This is just an experiment, not a
stocking effort,"Foy said. In all, nearly 5,000 crabs were
released. Surveys just before the release showed the
area to be devoid of juvenile red king crabs. The day
after the release red king crab juveniles were present,
indicating that the initial release was successful.
Researchers will continue to monitor the sites to
estimate how well these crabs survive in the wild.
SARASOTA BOATMAKER FIGHTS PIRATES


Meet BlinKy. Ties tiny fresnwater crab nas tnree eyes,
just like its mutant fish namesake from The Simpsons.
But unlike the fictional Blinky, whose deformity is
blamed on nuclear waste, this crab may actually be a
pair of conjoined twins, one of which is nothing but
part of the head. Instead of the usual two compound
eyes, it has three. It also has a peculiar structure on
its back, rather like an antenna. No animal has been
seen with this particular pattern of deformities before.
When scientists took a closer look, they found that the
crab's brain had not developed properly either. It was
unusually small, and somewhat deformed. It's not clear
how the crab ended up like this. The best guess is that it
is actually a pair of conjoined twins. In this scenario, the
crab grew up with an extra pair of eyes, one of which
developed between the normal pair while the other
was forced onto its back. Later, this fourth eye was dam-
aged, and the tissue regenerated into the antenna-like
structure Scholtz found.
KING CRAB STOCKING EXPERIMENT
UNDERWAY IN ALASKA
In other crab news, the first experimental release of
hatchery-reared red king crabs in Alaska has been
completed. The juvenile crabs, from broodstock
collected off Kodiak Island, were reared at the Alutiiq
Pride Shellfish Hatchery and transported to the NOAA
Kodiak Laboratory. They were released at Cozy Cove near
the village of Old Harbor on Kodiak Island Sept. 25. The
site was selected because it is well-sheltered and has
plenty of red king crab habitat. While the reintroduction
might lead some to believe this is the start of restoring
the once-plentiful Kodiak king crab fishery, Bob Foy,


Sarasota-Dasea Doat manufacturing nrm Hann
Powerboats is building vessels that will be used to fight
ocean piracy off the coast of Nigeria. The company has
built bulletproof patrol boats with a top speed of more
than 56 miles per hour designed specifically for this
task. The 45-foot gunboats, which have twin 500-horse-
power Fiat diesel engines, have passed inspections and
are to be handed over to MOP International Marine
Ltd., a security service company providing protection to
oil workers. The company has offices in Lagos and Port
Harcourt, Nigeria. The price tag is about $1 million per
boat, according to the Sarasota Herald-Tribune.
OYSTERS LOVE TO PLUG IN
Normally, electrical current is something you want to
keep away from water, but researchers at Texas A&M
University-Corpus Christi have refined a way to create
oyster reef by charging sea water with electricity. Those
involved with the project say they can use this infor-
mation to restore, maintain and protect oyster reefs in
Coastal Bend bays and coast-wide in the state of Texas.
It's a project that could hold the key to replenishing a
key Gulf Coast ecosystem. While electrically charging


FYF FYF EYE!


---4


water to create artificial reef is not a new concept, Dr.
Paul Zimba, director of the Center for Coastal Studies at
A&M-Corpus Christi, and his team performed lab studies
to determine exactly how much electrical current was
needed. Zimba's team evaluated polarity, voltage, and
electrical current to determine correct current type
and voltage to maximize reef formation. Once they
were able to perfect the formation of artificial reef in a
laboratory setting, they moved their work to the field.
"After one month we had a solid community covering
the original material,"said Zimba. "Our hope is that this
technology is used for restoration of reef communities,
replacement of hard bottom habitat to prevent
sediment re-suspension, and aquaculture."
TURNING FISH SKIN INTO YOUR SKIN
The skin is usually very good at knitting together at
the site of injury, but any of a number of circulatory or
inflammatory disorders can prevent wounds from healing
properly. There are a variety of medical products designed
to help these stubborn wounds heal, but only one is made
from fish. A substance called MariGen Omega3 from
Icelandic company Kerecis Limited has just been approved
by the FDA. It's made entirely from fish skin. These sheets
of"skin"aren't just whole fleshy slabs right off the fish.
MariGen Omega3 consists of the layers of connective
tissues that are left after the cells have been removed. The
remaining material is known as extracellular matrix. The
removal of the fish cells prevents any possible infection or
immune reaction when applied to the patient's wound.
When used to promote wound healing, the layers of
fish skin act as a natural scaffold for the human cells
to repopulate the wound surface. Covering an open
area with sterile ECM also serves to reduce the chance
of infection. Similar products made from pig skin have
existed for some time, but the fish-derived material is
believed to offer a better surface for skin to regrow. It also
contains Omega3 lipids that reduce inflammation at the
wound site. Fish-based ECM comes with the additional
benefit of sidestepping cultural and religious objections
to the use of pig flesh in medical products.
VIRUS KILLING DOLPHINS
Dolphins are dying by the hundreds all along the
East Coast, from New York to Florida. Scientists have
determined that morbillivirus, some types of which
cause measles in humans, has been responsible for
killing nearly 800 dolphins since July. "These animals,


14th Annual

Charlotte Harbor Nature Festival

Charlotte Sports Park
2300 El Jobean Rd.
S.R. 776 in Port Charlotte,
2.5 miles west of U.S. 41

Admission and parking are FREE.


Join us at the Festival where young
discovering the natural environment

* Hands-on activities.
* Guided walks and wagon rides.
* Children's Discovery Zone.
* Free fishing poles to children 4-14 who
pass an on-site fishing and fishing course
* Mote Marine Laboratory touch tank.
* WaterVentures Florida's Learning Lab.
* Native plant sale.


and old can enjoy a day outdoors
of southwest Florida.
SPONSORS
* Charlotte Harbor National Estuary Program
* Charlotte County Community Services
* Mosaic Print Media
Chiarlotte Suni

* CF Industries Tents & Events WGCU
Public Media Janicki Environmental *
Lemon Bay Conservancy Coastal Wildlife
Club Fish Florida Mote Marine Laboratory
and many more


* Raffle and so much more.
Visit www.CHNEP.org/CHNF.html to learn more.


w w-
S OS 5 .65 -- S S S.Sg~S F 7MM


dolphins, carry the virus in their system;said Maggie
Mooney-Seus of NOAA. Now scientists say this outbreak
is the most unprecedented stranding and die-off in
their recorded history. The last major die-off occurred
between 1987 and 1988 but experts say in 2013 alone,
753 bottlenose dolphins died. That exceeds the die-off
in the 1980s. "This really is an unprecedented event
in the large numbers that are occurring and in such a
quick time frame since July 1,"said Jennifer Dittmer of
the National Aquarium. Experts say even though they
know what's killing the bottlenose dolphins, right now
there doesn't appear to be anything they can do to stop
it from spreading. Although morbillivirus can occur
naturally in dolphins, scientists do not yet understand
why this strain has been so deadly.
AND THEN GOD LAUGHED
A pastor had been trying to plan a snook fishing trip for
weeks, but every time he was rained out. Finally, the
weather was perfect but it was Sunday morning.
He fell to temptation and called up his associate pastor,
saying he had the stomach flu and couldn't deliver his
sermon. Then he hitched up the boat and headed off
to his favorite honeyhole. His line hadn't been in the
water five minutes before he got a strike, and landed
the biggest snook he had ever caught. A half-hour later,
he had another hit and reeled in the biggest snook he
had ever seen. Another 45 minutes later, he brought in
a snook that was bigger than the world record. All this
time, Saint Peter and God had been watching the pastor
from heaven. Saint Peter turned to God and said, "How
can you reward this unfaithful shepherd? He lied. He let
down his congregation."God smiled at Saint Peter and
said, "This is no reward. It's a punishment. After all, who
can he tell his fish story to?"


n.eu...lr;.ki.e.u
msa~mmm~wuumuu m~hummmm~.inaehEum


Saturday,


Nov. 23

10 a.m. to 3 p.m.





uJe.w ,f,.au Page 6 November 14,2013


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H20NLY
Nokomis
941-488-8229


FISHERMAN'S EDGE
Grove City
941-697-7595


Trout have been hitting shrimp under a popping cork early in the morning in clear
water.The blackdrum bite has been consistent.There have been few cobia reports.
Sharks are scattered and are not picky eaters. Frozen or livebait. Pompano are
chewing on pompano jigs tipped with cut shrimp near the Venice jetties. Some
scattered redfish are also feeding in and around the jetties.The snook bite has been
good inside the Venice Inlet, with a few good slotfish and a bunch of smaller ones.


The East and Northeast winds have stirred up some flounder and Spanish and
king mackerel off the beaches. Pompano and whiting are also playing in the surf.
Blackdrum are being caught. Sharks are still around.The sheepshead are biting
inside near structure. Buck Creek is holding little tarpon and snook. Catfish Creek
and the Placida Trestle are also stocked.The fish are moving around this time of year
with the lower tides.


Mangrove snapper have reportedly been biting more than 9 miles
offshore. Fish in at least 100 feet of water for gag grouper using
live pinfish or frozen squid.


Amberjack are reportedly being caught around 30 miles offshore.
Target gag grouper and mangrove snapper on the way back.


U, AIVARM
Go for king mackerel more than 20
pounds within 9 miles offshore.Try using
a big blue runner or threadfin on a flatline.
Some people are using balloons to keep the
bait from getting too deep.


Redfish are still busy. There are some nice
schools in Lemon Bay being caught with
swimming plugs that you can work over
the grass. The reds are stretching down to
Boca Grande Pass and are also chewing on
shrimp.


Toms Adams Bridge are sheltering some mangrove snapper, and the occasional No offshore reports. Too windy. But after this week's cold front, it Go after sheepshead off the El Jobean
smaller gag grouper. Ladyfish are in schools along the beaches. Jacks, pompano, should be steady again. Pier.They are not yet in big numbers, but
flounder and whiting are also cruising the beaches. Try the area piers and bridges they are coming.Try using cut shrimp
FINE BAIT & TACKLE for black drum using cut shrimp. Reds and snookon the flats have been caught under a cork. And be patient. They tend to
North Port using live bait. Smaller tarpon are in the Myakka River and like white bait. Bass and be picky nibblers.
941-240-5981 crappie are feeding in the canals from dusk til dawn using shiners or minnows.

Inshore the smaller trout are chewing and the bigger ones are swimming in the Going for grouper and kingfish offshore is theway to go. Just keep Jack crevalle are swimming in schools
passes, eating artificial and shrimp. Sebiles and Yozuri minnows are catching snook in mind the weather. It gets choppy with just a little bit of wind out and are feasting on glass minnows.Toss
in canals and up the Myakka River. Tarpon have been caught up the Myakka using there, anything out there. Look for birds diving,
CAPT. TED'S TACKLE whitebait. Pompano are biting in the passes using jigs. Sharks are on the shoals and the jacks will be there.
Port Charlotte eating everything. Spanish mackerel and ladyfish are in abundance when the
41-51 0 birds are diving, and some pompano may be lurking underneath. Scattered cobia
l941-627-6800have been caught by sight fishing.The bass bite should pick up nextweek.

Spanish mackerel and bluefish are scattered throughout the Harbor. Mangrove Go out to 65 to 75 feet of water for king and Spanish mackerel, This week's best bet is flounder, especially
E I \snapper are congregating in passes.They like shrimp. Redfish are singled out. Move gag grouper and mangrove snapper and 24-inch mahi.There's a off the beaches, nearshore reefs, the 7-mile
from bush to bush to find them.There are no more big schools of reds.The snook lot out there. Look for deeper and clearer water, ledge and passes. Keep bait on the bottom
FISHIN' FRANK'S bite off beaches and ICW is good. Trout are chewing, but the big ones will be coming while using a smaller leader. Use a bucktail
Charloltte Harbor in with the cold water temperatures. Pompano are scattered around the passes tipped with cutbait.You can also use cut-
941-525-3888and beaches. Sheepshead need cooler temps like the trout. Crappies will light up bait alone. If angling near reefs, don't fish
941-D625-38 6 during our next full moon, so get your shiners ready, over structure. Fish around the perimeter.

Redfish are scattered along the West Wall, Cape Haze and Bull and Turtle bays.The Offshore reports indicate there are plenty of king mackerel and Trout are back in numbers in the Harbor.
Early morning snook bite is on, and they have made theirway into the area canals, some blackfin tuna. Look for the small ones to find the big
Artificials work well, but nothing beats a live greenback. Spanish mackerel are ones. Outside of the bars, in deeper holes
LAISHLEY MARINE feeding from Alligator Creek all the way to Boca Grande Pass.The pompano and and over the sandholes are good hideouts.
Punta Gorda flounder bite is on just outside of bars and in the passes. Artificials or shrimp are working well.
941-639-3949

Trout have been caught along the grassflats of Pine Island Sound. Pompano have Red and gag grouper are chewing better in 60 to 70 feet of water. Redfish are roaming near the mangroves
WI IJ been coming in from the passes. Snookare hanging around the Matlacha Bridge and along Pine Island and seem most active
Matlacha Pass. Shark are scattered around the flats and the bigger ones hanging during moving tides. They are eating
D&D BAIT AND TACKLE 3roind the p R Ritfi h wr plentiful in the rliner w1tirn ofthe Sond shrimp ind whitfhiit riqht now irrordinq
Matlacha I,, I
239-282-9122

Redfish iri- u iiiiiiii r, i r 4,inil l'.,l.-- i- li- i ir ii- i r i ,] l i. i, l1 Sharks I rl ii r,-riirl ii i.,- liiw--r ll-r,-, l li i li-i ,-,[,li,-, i. ii ] 'i,- I1 l lin, l .ijiiil trout r,-l r iri ,]i i
ir- ii. ]iii ] iriiiri i J rr i 1i i i 11i [i ir l,-ii ii- II i i, ii r lrii -i ,-i ril, ir rrii r]i i11.. 1 r m ii[ red irl gag grouper Iri if ii,-,- il l 1 -r Ii iii- -r heal' ir f' 1w-r irii l ,-ii,-r,- -ii i,-,Iiii-r [i |i- i ],i ,,ii
li- 1i,-i Snook iir,- li liriirnl i ir, in l lii- iiilir ir v,- ill iriiiriil N1 1 i i ii.-v --iii li--1-1 lii [lv ii,- I Av,,i l ,ili- [iiirr,, iirri I---, ilihir | 4 ll li, [ hr ir,,lh,-i- iii lii,- iil
OLD PINE ISLAND M ARINA [ hr, ,ii r,-,j riiiiiiiri- I iiii,,vi,[i&r ii- ilri,-I tarpon iii i 1 ii ih l iI- iP.i-r 1 ,i iiiI lrilr, -I [ ii ii. ilr i- i, iir ihiriii ijiiii-r
S t. Ja m e s C ity 1' I, r ,1- ,ii ,irri ,i ii i 1 l l ,r ,i ,i ii ,r liii- riii ri r li ,,i r in ri, l i.,rI[
239-283-2548



Sizes are measuLred 1otal length [(o 'n'or iwrd- Cobia: Mini lul i ,[i33 lim it i 6l i hfish Redfish: Slot 1:; -27, limaIt I .. :; f- .l per ves.s.el) NO-HARVEST SPECIES: Zern:, hajg limit Ior B:one-
most part of head to tip of pinched tail) unless per vessel) Shark: Min. 54" except Atlantic sharpnose fish, Goliath Grouper (Jewfish), Sawfish, Spotted
otherwisernoted..All bag limitslareiper harveste
otherwise noted. All bag limits are per harvester Dolphin: Limit 10 blacknose, blacktip, bonnethead, finetooth and Eagle Rays, Lemon Sharks, Hammerhead Sharks
per day. Other limits may apply; for most current smooth dogfish, limit 1 (max 2 fish per vessel) (go to the website listed below for a full list of
rules visit www.MyFWC.com/fishing. Federal Flounder: Min. 12", limit 10 Sheepshead: Min. 12" limit 15 no-harvest species)
regulations may differ from state regulations. Grouper, Black: Min. 22", limit 4, season closed Visit http://bit.ly/l OnYDlz for full rules.
LICENSES Feb. 1-March31 Snapper, Lane: Min. 8', limit 100 pounds
sd s t o A a 7, Grouper, Gag: Min. 22'" limit 2, season July Snapper, Mangrove: Min. 10", limit 5 FRESHW ATER FISH
Residentsaltwaterorfreshwater:Annual $s I Dec. 3 in state waters; July I until quota met Snapper, Mutton: Min. 16", bag limit 10 Largemouth Bass: South of State Road 80:
5-year $79. Ifyou fish from shore only, a license is in federal waters 0Max. size 14" bag limit 5 (may possess one over
requiredbutisfree.Residentlicenseforbothfresh- n federal waters Snapper, Red: Min. 16", limit 2,2013 season Max.size 4 bag imit (maypo
water and saltwaterfishing: $32.50 annually. Grouper, Red: Min. 20", limit 4, season closed June I July 14 in state waters and June I June 14") North of State Road 80: Slot 14"-22",
Nonresident saltwater or freshwater: 3 days Feb. 1 March 31 28 in federal waters bag limit 5 (may possess one over 22")
$17,7 days $30, annual $47. Free shore fishing Grouper, Scamp: Min. 16" limit 4, season Snapper, Yellowtail: Min. 12", limit 10 Sunfish (excluding crappie): Aggregate limit 50
license not available for nonresidents. closed Feb. March 31 Mangrove, Mutton, Red and Yellowtail Snap- Crappie: Limit 25
Fishing permits: Snook $10/year, lobster $5/ closed Feb. March 31 Mangrove, Mutton, Red and Yellowtail Snap- Crappie: Limit 25
year, tarpon $51.50 per fish Black, Gag, Red and Scamp Grouper per included in aggregate bag limit of 10 Butterfly peacock bass: Max. 17', limit 2 (may
included in aggregate bag limit of 4 Snook: Slot 28"-33" (west coast), limit 1, season possess one over 17")
SALTW ATER FISH Hogfish: Min. 12"fork, limit 5 closed until at least Sept. 2013 Grass carp: Must be released immediately.
Greater Amberjack: Min. 30" fork, limit 1, Mackerel, King: Min. 24"fork, limit 2 Spotted Seatrout: Slot5"-20' limit 4 (may Other exotic fishes: Please keep and eat or
season closed June I July 31 possess one over 20") otherwise destroy. Do not use as live bait.
Lesser Amberjack/Banded Rudderfish: Mackerel, Spanish: Min. 12"fork, limit 15 Tarpon: No size limit, tag required to possess Unregulated species: No bag or size limits on
Slot limit 14"-22", aggregate limit 5 Mullet: No size limit, limit 50 Triggerfish, Gray: Min. 14", limit 2, season gar (except alligator gar; possession ofthis spe-
Black drum: Slot 14"-24", limit 5 (may Permit:Slot 11"-22"fork, limit2 (maypossess closed June- July cies is illegal), bowfin, pickerel, and all catfish.
possess one over 24") one over 22") Tripletail: Min. 15", limit Visit http://bit.ly/lOnYJQr for full rules,
Bluefish: Min. 12"fork, limit 10 Pompano: Min. 11"fork, limit 6 Wahoo: Limit 2 including special management areas.




SJ' // nAo;, .in,.--r=, k;S- ,A,,,
xi/tjacrs*vue Page 7 November 14,2013 i-uos munun wmsma.unm.us.




IntelVI MARINATE
\ SARASOTA COUNTY FRIENDLY FUN FESTIVE
Blackburn Pt Boat Launch -800 Blackburn Pt Rd, Osprey
DallasWhitePark O5900tGreenwoodAve, NorthPort [
SHigel Park. 1330 Tarpon Center Dr,Venice rn-rr -n /
Indian Mound Park. 210 Winson Ave, Englewood L ALI tL ,LL
.e. ~t Loreto BayAccess 800 Loreto Court, Nokomis .
lb Manasota Beach Park 8570 Manasota Key Rd F
( 7.a- .Marine BoatBamp Park.301E.VeniceAve,Venice
0 Marina Park *7030 Chancellor Blvd, North Port
% ^\ .~~~~~~~~~Nokomis Beach Park 901 Casey Key Rd Pj / j I [\ j | J n
.-Snook Park. 5000 E. Venice Ave, Venice
@ \o, DESOTO COUNTY
rV\ J Brownyville Park. 1885 NE Brownville St ~
S-. Deep (reek Park. 9695 SW Peace River St
-\ .C *-DesotoPark.2195lNWAmerican LegionDr B r f
f ~ ^ V ^ Liverpool Park 09211 Liverpool Rd
SNocatee. 3701 SW County Road 760
I, Ir I, ll ,I *. Lettuce Lake. 8801 SW Reese St C A L T ,
*^ K V' CHARLOTTE COUNTY m^ti~fi r^M^^^ ^1*' ^
I :,." \ N.. *Ainger (reekPark2011PlacidaBRdEnglewood a. .
IHaa Pr3 :46Wahge. .a. / .ButterfordWaterwayPark. 13555 %

\Pacida Park. 6,99 a.parissa BdoiPlaci.a
D Pe-\ Marathon BldPortCharlotte B'eac 0 h By P
^ .DarstPark.h537DarstAve,. PuntaGorda tP er t h.a t PEACErt
El J"e .EIJlboan Boat Ramp .4224 RIVER
N, ^; S~ftS1^^'^'^El Jobean Rd, Port Charlotte \ 1 v RIVER
^V?^^ ^ .~~Harbour Heights Park- 27420 ^ -f
^ \S~~~n ^ ... ~~Voyageur Dr, PuntatGorda Si'* 7C ^R^^"
em V. 'S"@3? Hathaway Park 35461 Washington Loop, Punta Gorda |L I 1 t
Placida Park 6499 Gasparilla Rd, Placida
i^ ... ,'^\ ^. Port Charlotte Beach 4500 Harbor Blvd, Port Charlotte
---- 9fSeeC, SouthGulf Cove Park.-10150 Amicola St, Port Charlotte : ,
^ ^CapeHaze Spring Lake Park.3520 Lakeview Blvd, Port Charlotte 4 4
S Marina e I [ T. .f ;
Iw'#8 '\
-0.50 0.5 1 2 5 .-3
.o_.o o,-- : o. ff p ^ ..,

NAUTICAL MILES .RM V
00 >%?N^ 0. U 'iL" l ^X
Pi4 aida ae 2
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FUN Sandfly
F E ST IV ,..Key7 Turtle
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D Key Pei
Come for a lesson or rental... r St
hang at our pool & cabana .
for a true "destination paddle"
Rent a GoPro video camera rfc Iu
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Like us on Facebook for event updates" .
facebook.com/hookedonsup Cti *
^- r--\ w/ ^ S
j Shoal
Capriva Pass
p io 4 0 Little '

6950 Placida Road '._"Y
Englewood, FL 34224
CapeHazeMarina comrnt
Directiu across the ICW from vie' B$$ v t
Palm Island Resort & Rum Baul
This map is not keg
intended for 0 c
navigational
purposes.
a'*-Refer to a o
nautical Chart (
'r-for navigation
-._ information. s

anbl sln TF-I7.977





yj#EMle Pt&VU Page 8 *November 14,2013


One of Florida's nicknames is the Sunshine
State. Although we have plenty of thunder-
storms in the summer, during the winter
tourist season sunshine is the general rule.
Often, the bright days are marked by skies
of pure robin's egg blue, with not a cloud
in sight. This makes the tourism board very
happy, but few anglers smile about it.
There are several reasons a hard blue sky
can put a frown on a fisherman's face. First,
cloudless days usually come just after a cold
front blows through. That means the air
pressure is up and the temperature is down,
neither of which is ideal for great fishing.
The wind is usually blowing something like
20 knots out of the northwest, which means
boat rides are bumpy and areas that are
usually shallow often become impassable
due to the wind pushing water right out of
the Harbor.
The easiest advice is to skip on-the-water
activities on these chamber of commerce
days, but inevitably they show up when you
have guests from out of town or on the only
day you have to fish. You need a plan for
how to make the best of a less-than-ideal
situation.
One thing you can do is explore. When
the wind pushes water out, it's amazing
how much of the Harbor's bottom contours
become visible. This is a great learning
opportunity for you. You can see that sandbar
you keep hitting, or identify the deepest
potholes on your favorite flat, or make note
of the natural channels fish use when moving
between areas. This information will make
you a better fisherman and a more confident
navigator. You'll burn a bit of gas running
around, but an education always costs.
If you have visitors who really want to go
out on the boat, you can turn your planned
fishing expedition into an eco-tour. Most
anglers love the outdoors, but all too often
we miss out on many aspects of it while we're
busy casting. In winter, the local waterbird
population more than doubles. There are
manatees and dolphins to watch. And the
grassflats are always filled with life, if you
take a little time to look.
OK, I hear you birds are super, but you
want to go fishing. Well, I can't guarantee
you'll catch the heck out of'em, but I can
offer some tips that will probably keep you
from getting skunked.
The first order of business is to find some-
place to hide from the wind. A lee shoreline
is good, if you have enough water depth.


Another good idea is to go into one of our
many local canals.
Canal fishing is a tricky tradeoff. You'll find
more fish near the mouth of the canal, where
there's moving water, but you'll be more
sheltered from the wind farther up the canal.
Try to find a happy medium. Cobia, small
sharks and Spanish mackerel are all possibil-
ities in the canal mouths, but they don't like
confined spaces. Trolling the canals with a
small spoon or lipped plug can be a produc-
tive method, plus you can pick up some new
spots. And think about this: If you find a spot
where the bite is decent on a tough day,
think how phenomenal it might be when the
weather is more favorable.
Although I wouldn't rule out any species
offish, some are more likely to bite than
others. Trout (especially the smaller one),
sheepshead, flounder and to a certain extent
mangrove snapper don't seem bothered by
chilly water and high air pressure. Maybe
they have more voracious appetites, or
maybe they're better adapted to our winter
conditions. Whatever the reason, they still
are fairly dependable about putting a bend
in a rod.
How you fish is just as important as where
you fish. Being cold-blooded (or ectothermic,
if you like learning ten-dollar words), a fish
relies on ambient temperature to regulate its
metabolism. Cooler water, slower metabo-
lism. That means they aren't moving quite as
fast, and they are looking for meals that are a
mouthful and not a banquet.
If you're a live bait angler, you're probably
going to be using shrimp now that the baitfish
are scarce. Save a little money and skip the
super-jumbo shrimp on colder days, even
big fish are much more eager to go after a
smaller crustacean. If you prefer artificial
lures, a small soft plastic or a suspending
twitchbait is ideal: Not too big, and you can
work it slowly. Although the live bait is more
appealing to fish, at least most of the time,
you can cover more water with artificial.
There's always the one-two approach: Use lures
to find fish and then target them with bait.
A final thought: Although it may be cooler
out there, it's still sunny. And though you may
not noticeably sweat, that's probably because
the wind and low humidity are keeping you
dry. Sunscreen is always a requirement, and be
sure to stay hydrated. Blue-sky days may not
be the best for fishing, but if you do these few
things to maximize your chances of hooking
up, you may find they're not such a bad thing.


Robert Lugiewicz is the manager of Fishin'
Frank's Bait & Tackle, located at 4425-D
Tamiami Trail in Charlotte Harbor. Call


941-625-3888 for more information about
the shop or for local fishing info, or visit them
online at FishinFranks.com.


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#,Mnfn. Page 9 November 14,2013


MnI lnnf,, ln.lr-'lnk.nn.,.
intqeUIMIunhI I taEnll sllI I mJIluI ii nEEUIPl


A lot of fishermen spend a lot of time and
energy trying to figure out how to outsmart
fish. But if you stop and think about it, this is
pretty ridiculous. Fish are stupid. They don't
have much in the way of intelligence or wit.
They rely on instinct to stay alive. So your goal
is not truly to outsmart the fish, but to trick his
instincts with a baited hook or artificial lure.
Fish are all pretty dumb, but some fish
are dumber than others. Now, don't get me
wrong here I don't want somebody to
think I'm insulting their favorite fish. Being
dumb doesn't necessarily make a fish easier
to catch. Two of the dumbest fish I know are
redfish and largemouth bass.
A lot of guys get hung up on catching
redfish, thinking there's a huge amount
of skill involved. Let's think about what a
redfish does. He meanders around with a
school of his buddies, rooting around in
the seagrass for something to eat. In that
way, they're a lot like cows. The hard part
of catching redfish is finding them and not
scaring them. Put a bait in front of one, and
it'll usually eat it.
Speaking of dumb fish that people put
wa-a-ay too much thought into pursuing,
largemouth bass are even stupider than
redfish. You can watch a bass swim up to
your lure, eat it, get hooked, jump, throw the
lure and then you can cast to the exact
same spot and have the same fish swim up
and eat your lure again. That's not a sign of
high intelligence. Look at some of the bass
lures that anglers use. They're some of the
dumbest-looking things I've ever seen. What
does a spinnerbait look like? And what about
all those wacky soft plastics that look like
hybrids of frogs, lizards and crawdads? What
exactly does that bass think he's eating?
The trend toward ultra-realistic detailing
on lures is much more about hooking your
wallet than hooking fish. Strikes on artificial
lures are basically reaction strikes. When
a fish sees your bait, it either triggers an
automatic feeding response or it doesn't.
He doesn't hang back and think about it,
debating whether it looks real or whether the
color is just perfect. He just ain't that smart.
A lure with a photo-realistic baitfish
printed on it looks real pretty, but how much
of that do you think a fish sees when the bait
goes skittering past in murky water? If the
species-specific scale pattern is so necessary,
how is it that lures made out of a plain
wooden dowel also catch fish? A predatory
fish isn't after a perfect-looking healthy
baitfish. His instincts are fired up by one that
looks messed up somehow damaged,


crippled, broken and easy to catch. How a lure
moves is much more important than how it
looks. I know some really good fishermen who
will take a bait straight out of the package
and scrape up the finish before they ever put
it in the water. They do that to make it look
like a baitfish that's been beaten up and is
nearly dead. That's what a predator wants.
Lure color is another thing that hangs up
a lot of anglers. I'm a firm believer that color
doesn't matter nearly as much as some people
think it does. There are a few basic color rules
that you ought to follow: Light baits work
better in clear water, dark baits in stained
water or at night. It's usually a good idea to
use baits that have similar colors to whatever
the fish already happen to be feeding on. Once
you get beyond that, colors are meant to catch
fishermen much more than they're meant to
catch fish. Take a look at Zoom's online catalog.
They have hundreds of colors, some of which
are very similar: Watermelon, watermelon
red, watermelon red magic, watermelon red
pearl, watermelon seed, seedless watermelon.
Really? They're pretty much all green. Anyone
who's putting that much effort into choosing
just the right color is overthinking it. I'm pretty
sure the fish aren't. When I was a kid, we had
four colors of plastic worms. Guess what? We
caught fish just fine.
Look, fish do what fish do. When they're in
the mood to eat, they eat. If you happen to
be there and you happen to throw some-
thing that looks edible near enough for them
to grab it, they do. Simple, really.
It might be too simple. Because fish aren't
always where we expect to find them, and
because they're not always feeding readily,
trying to catch them can be very frustrating.
When we think or know the fish are there and
we can't hook them, we start thinking of them
as wily or slick some sort of finny geniuses.
They're not. They're pretty stupid. And
all you need to do is fool the fish for long
enough to get a hook in his mouth. The hard
part is not outsmarting yourself as you try to
get that done.
Capt. Josh Greer is a fourth-generation
Floridian, born and raised in South Florida.
Growing up near the ocean and the Gulf
of Mexico, he developed a true passion for
the water. His mild manner and fun-loving
attitude promise an enjoyable experience for
you and your family, and you'll benefit from
his 20 years of experience. Contact him at
863-781-1373 or visit his website, XXLSport-
fishing.com. You can also visit him at Fishin'
Frank's or Sportrap Gun Shop when he's not
on the water.


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/ ^^, Page 10* November 14,2013









*WPhoenix flI


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SUMUEtIlUUnME B~EtDIIUiU.MEia


ies on


Peace River Wildlife Center had a VIP guest
recently. An old friend stopped by briefly to say
hi. A bald eagle was seen perching on a pole
over the parking lot at Ponce de Leon Park.
Our rehabber, Cara, was able to take a quick
picture before he flew away. After uploading
the digital photo to the computer and zooming
in, we were able to tell that he had a band
on his leg. While not definitive proof that it
is Phoenix, our spirits were buoyed by the
prospect.
Phoenix is a bald eagle that was admitted
to PRWC in January 2013 after having been
shocked while perching on a power line. The
massive discharge did not flow through his
body, which undoubtedly would have meant
certain death. Rather, the heat from the
energy discharge flowed past and around him.
Unfortunately the heat released burned the
feathers off the entire right side of his body.
His right wing was damaged so badly, it could
have taken years to replace all the feathers he
would need to sustain flight.
Fast forward a mere seven months and
Phoenix was seemingly ready for release. He
was flying all over his 100-foot flight cage.
While a cage that size seems massive to a
bird that cannot fly, once it takes to the sky
again, that area is way too small for such a
majestic bird. The feathers on Phoenix's right
wing were not perfect. They had not all grown
out to their full length. The very first primary
feather at the tip of that wing was still the
denuded shaft of the singed feather that had
yet to be replaced. But Phoenix was flying,
soaring to the best of his ability in the limited
space available to him. At times we feared he
would cause further damage to himself by
being cooped up in his recovery habitat. So the
decision was made, with the advice of experts
from US Fish and Wildlife and the Center for
Birds of Prey, that Phoenix had risen from the
ashes. He was ready to be released.
Every release is a celebration for PRWC. Each
is also fraught with trepidation. We worry
that the orphaned rabbit we labored over for
so many hours will be eaten by a hawk within
hours of its release. We worry that the hawk
we released after tending to its broken wing
will starve if it can't find and catch enough
food. And we really lost sleep over whether
or not Phoenix would thrive in the wild with
his less than perfect wing. But keeping him in
captivity any longer risked having him fly into
the side or roof of the cage, breaking more
feathers or even a bone.
In August 2013 Phoenix was released
within his home range the 10-mile radius
of where he was found. With newspaper and
television media there to witness the release,
a group of 20 or so people from PRWC met to
say goodbye to one of our favorite patients.
So many people helped with his recovery.
Rehabbers admitted and tended to his


immediate needs. Cleaners kept his cage clean
while also taking care not to stress him out
by human presence. Tour guides told his story
even though he could not be on display to the
public while awaiting release. Other volunteers
and even members of our board of directors
helped with the daily feeding once Phoenix
was transferred to an offsite flight cage that
was too remote for the busy rehabbers to visit


often. All these people were in attendance
when Phoenix was set free once again.
Collecting a flighted eagle from a 20-foot
tall, 100-foot-long cage is never as easy as
it might seem at first blush. It's hard to say
exactly who got more winded during the
process Phoenix or me. But then, I didn't
have to try to fly away after the encounter.
With a large fishing net attached to an


extendable pool pole, I ran from one end of
the cage to another like a deranged entomol-
ogist, tripping over every weed and rock with
my attention turned skyward. Having at long
last caught the bird, I wrestled him into a
medium-sized dog kennel. We were both out
of breath, but the further stress on Phoenix of
being confined and transported to the release
site added to his anxiety.
When the time finally came it's hard to say
who was more nervous. Phoenix just knew he
was in an unacceptable state and he would
do anything to flee from it. I was worried he
would run out of the kennel and be unable to
take off. Or worse yet, fly low over the small
lake a short distance away and plunge right
into it. But the time had come. I opened the
kennel door, grabbed Phoenix's massively
taloned feet in my gloved hand, freed him
from the kennel, and raised him aloft. He
immediately stroked his powerful wings and
pulled from my grip. He flew low over the lake
and out of site. We were all concerned that he
had indeed fallen into the water, but he had
just swung up into a tree to perch there and
peruse his surroundings. Would he be able
to find and catch enough food? Would he be
able to avoid predators? Would he be ready for
mating season in a few short months when
other eagles and osprey would start to jockey
for territory? We had done all we could do.
Now we had to leave it to faith or karma or
whatever power watches over the innocent
and helpless.
We have had a couple possible sightings of
Phoenix over the past few months since his
release. It is hard to say whether any of those
were actually him or not, since we are lucky
enough to have so many bald eagles in this
area. This time, though, we got a photo. And
in it we can see that the bird perched over our
parking lot had a silver metal band on its right
leg. USFW made sure we were issued just such
a band to place on Phoenix's leg before his
release. And while most birds are banded with
a simple metal ring, this band was riveted on
- the same type of band in evidence in Cara's
photo. And maybe it is a coincidence that the
feathers on the right side of the bird appear to
be slightly ruffled. But maybe, just maybe it
was Phoenix, looking hale and hearty before
soaring away again.
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like to I 0/llitEEI OI liIke >i doliO tioliOI1 iilldlm1i
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5aK4/&t &i~, Page II November 14,2013


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msa~mmm~wuumuu m~hummmm~.inaehEum


Some people lament the lack of "change
of seasons" in Southwest Florida, but the
seasons really do change here. We may
not get to enjoy brightly colored leaves on
our trees, but this seems a small price to
pay for the pleasure of not owning a snow
shovel or an ice scraper. What are sleet and
slush anyway? I can't seem to remember.
Whenever I see a vehicle with a license plate
from a northern-tier state and an extension
cord plug hanging from the front grill, I'm
reminded of how nice it is to be able to enjoy
seeing green plants year-round.
Yes, our seasons do change. The days
shorten, the humidity drops, the breeze picks
up (that's a polite way of saying that the
harbor can become rougher than an outhouse
corn cob), temperatures drop and fish go
on the move. But there's another change
that comes this time of year regulatory
changes of fish. Some fish seasons open, and
some close. The following are a few of the
highlights.

SNOOK
Here's a quiz question: What do snook and
hurricanes have in common? Answer: Snook
season and hurricane season both end at
midnight on Nov. 30, but the end of their
respective seasons does not mean that you
can't experience them. The end of hurricane
season is an arbitrarily selected date past
which hurricane development is statistically
unlikely, but there have been hurricanes that
defied the statistics and made an appearance
in December and even into January. The
end of snook season is a date selected by
the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission past which it's illegal to harvest
snook, but snook can be experienced on a
catch-and-release basis year-round.

GREYTRIGGERFISH
Due to concerns about overharvest, in
recent years several new regulations have
been enacted for grey triggerfish. The size
limit has been increased to 14 inches, fork
length. The bag limit has been decreased to
two per person and there is a closed season
during the months of June and July. Afew
months ago, the Gulf of Mexico Fishery
Management Council looked at recreational
harvest estimates and determined that
despite the restrictions, too many triggerfish
were being harvested in the Gulf this year.
As a result, the season for grey triggerfish in


federal waters of the Gulf (more than nine
nautical miles off Florida's coast) was abruptly
closed until the end of the year. The closure
will end at midnight on Dec. 31, so that New
Year's Day is also the beginning of a new trig-
gerfish season. (The FWC did not close grey
triggerfish season in state waters).

GAG
Due to increased fish stocks, the gag season
in Gulf waters this year was set at slightly
more than five months long a month
longer than last year's four-month season.
I'll mention two interesting notes here. First,
probably due to miscommunication between
the FWC and the Gulf Council, there's a slight
mismatch in the closure dates in state and
federal waters. In state waters, the season is
open through Dec. 3 at midnight. In adja-
cent federal waters, the season is open only
through Dec. 2 at midnight. Second, the
season is subject to early closure if harvest
is estimated to be too high (see triggerfish
above), but as of this writing, it appears as
though the season will be allowed to run to
the scheduled end in early December.

RED GROUPER
Along the coast of Southwest Florida,
keeper-sized red grouper are somewhat
uncommon in state waters, and most of the
harvest comes from further offshore in federal
waters. There is a welcome change in the
season for red grouper in 2014, but anglers
who quickly glance at the federal regulations
might miss it. If you visit GulfCouncil.org and
take a look at the "Quick Guide to Recreational
Seasons" link, the chart shows that the season
for red grouper in federal waters is closed
in February and March. However, if you go a
step further and download the "Recreational
Fishing Regulations" pamphlet, you'll learn
that this year the closure only applies to
water deeper than 20 fathoms, which means
that red grouper season is not slated to close
at all in 2014 for Gulf anglers who limit their
fishing to water shallower than 120 feet.
Let's go fishing!
Capt. Ralph Allen runs the King Fisher
Fleet of sightseeing and fishing charter boats
located at Fishermen's Village Marina in Punta
Gorda. He is an award-winning outdoor writer
and photographer and is a past president of
the Florida Outdoor Writers Association. Call
him at 941-639-2628 or email Captain@
KingFisherFleet.com.




/ ., Page 12 Noember 14,2013
j^M~riv-9 Page 12 9 November 14,2013


n*,anflnnfl nen -knn, earn
SUMUElIlUUnME EtmDIIUiEu.MEia


Holiday shopping for


If you read WaterLine, chances are that you
at least occasionally go fishing. And if you fish,
you probably have family and friends who also
fish. And with the holidays rapidly approaching,
you might be looking for angling-related
items to give as gifts to your loved ones. If that
sounds like your situation, read on.
Choosing just the right tackle for yourself
is challenging. Choosing just the right tackle
for someone else is even harder. The way a lot
of people solve that dilemma is by purchasing
a Bass Pro Shops gift card. But that's not a
perfect solution. Bass Pro is a pretty good
drive, their selection is not always specific to
our local fishing, and you've left your local
tackle dealer out of the process. Whatever
happened to shopping local?
So what's the best way to both give
an awesome gift and support your local
merchant? Well, Bass Pro isn't the only place
to get a gift certificate. Yes, that means you'll
have to actually stop by the store, rather than
grab a Bass Pro card at Publix. However, that
minor inconvenience is more than offset by
the boost you're giving to your hometown
economy not to mention the fuel and time
saved by not sending a gift recipient all the
way to Estero.
Some folks just don't like giving gift cards,
preferring the personal touch of an actual
gift. That's OK I can offer up a few gift
suggestions that will tickle just about any
fisherman's fancy.
High on many saltwater anglers' lists is the
new Shimano Stradic C14+. This reel is the
latest version of Shimano's very popular carbon
fiber-bodied Stradics, which have become
the standard for inshore saltwater fishing in
Southwest Florida. Although the reel is made
in five different sizes, you can't go wrong with
the 3000 size. It's super lightweight at just
7 ounces, which means you can cast all day
without fatigue, yet it's very durable and can
take on big snook and redfish with no trouble.
The body is made of corrosion-proof carbon
fiber, and the internals are built for saltwater
use. The older versions of this reel have been
almost problem-free, and their newest genera-
tion should only be better.
Here's an item that's been around for a while,
but if you haven't got one, you still want it: A
genuine BogaGrip. There are a lot of lip-gripping
tools out there, but there are none that will
outlast the original. It doesn't rust, it doesn't
fall apart, it doesn't let you down. It just does
what it's supposed to do lets you safely
pick up fish without hurting them and without
them hurting you. You can even get a float to
keep your BogaGrip from sinking if it's dropped
overboard, which makes a fine stocking stuffer.
Of course, anyone who fishes needs polarized
sunglasses. There are dozens of brands on
the market, but Costa seems to be the local
favorite. This is partly due to the wide variety of
styles they produce for both men and women,


voutrtfavorite anaget


partly due to the numerous lens options they
offer, and partly due to the brand's excellent
quality, which is backed by a "limited" lifetime
warranty. When it comes to getting the right
Costas, you really need to have the opportunity
to try them on. This is one of those cases when
you need to bring your gift recipient in with
you. Trust me, they'll still be thrilled.
UV-blocking shirts are another great gift
choice for your favorite angler. Not only do
they keep the harmful rays of the sun off your
skin, they also do a much better job keeping
you comfortable and dry than cotton or even
nylon. The style choices are few, but there are
a variety of colors and artwork choices suited


to both men and women.
Although it rarely gets cold in Florida, at
least by "up north" standards, anglers who
wade will appreciate wading boots or waders.
They're not quite as hard to fit as sunglasses,
but if you can get a peek at the intended recip-
ient's shoe size and pants size, that informa-
tion is most helpful in getting a good fit.
If you aren't able to spend quite so much
on your fisherman, terminal tackle is always
good. Artificial lures from Sebile, Live Target
and Rapala are great fish-catchers that many
fishermen won't splurge on for themselves.
Any tackle shop employee can help you pick
out the right ones if you're not sure. Packs of


jigheads, soft plastic baits, hooks, floats, fluo-
rocarbon leader and other items are fantastic
stocking stuffers and can be had for just a
couple dollars. When you come in, it will be
helpful if you know what type of fishing your
loved one likes to do.
Whatever your budget may be, you can pick
up something at your local tackle shop that
will be just perfect for every angler on your
shopping list. Happy holidays!
JEff KhiiIiid S TIE tlMe 1ei i011iiOpEIOitolI Of
(opt TEos focklwE t Pot (,i lottE COntIoct
P1hun >t i i i COptnEldsTcklaE (oi Ot 9-11-627-
68O(( Oti stop ti at the sthop 1 1S9 Tai6 anTni
IoaI 11 fiiii [of lt.Ic h in A Ia I ie i


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S SIZE LIMIT: n/a NOTES: One
DAILY BAG LIMIT: Zero Florida's Gulf
AVERAGE SIZE: 10 feet across sight. A simil
R ESIZE:the devil ray,
STATE RECORD: n/a; maximum size 25 feet Most often si
across and 5,300 Ib nnnrlv undrsr


HABITAT: Open ocean; occasionally
visiting nearshore waters.
FOOD VALUE: Edible but grainy and
unappealing.
FISHING METHODS: Formerly hunted
recreationally using harpoons. Now
protected under the Endangered
Species Act and international law.
A


leaps complex
Thousands ai
world to sup
touted as a (


e relatively common along
f Coast, but now a very rare
lar but much smaller species,
is sometimes seen in this area.
lighted when free-jumping, a
stood behavior in which the ray
etely free of the water's surface.
re harvested annually around the
ply a demand for the gill rakers,
cure-all in Chinese -WO


medicine.


Hi I m Captain John Howe
I,.t a, ', ~,: h i ,,- ..i h ,~ -1 ,,1 1,,, i h, n,,i i i. buy or sell
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(941)915-3575
(888) 891-8569
taptainjohn.,.ilknot 10o'iM


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FOR SALE

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j/?4 e v /j *
j^Mpriv. Page 13 November 14,2013


"With great power comes great responsibility."
Voltaire

This quote has been used over and over
throughout the years in reference to many
things. Today, with more than 100 million Amer-
icans owning and using firearms, we are going
to be discussing it in relation to firearm safety.
All too often we read news reports of
people, usually small children, obtaining
a firearm stored in a home and having an
"accidental discharge.":' The truth is that
the accident started when the adult who
purchased the firearm did not keep it prop-
erly locked. Perhaps when they bought the
gun, they weren't given a lock for it. In every
state, this is actually now a crime in itself.
All firearm manufacturers are required to
include a lock or locking mechanism for the
firearm. If a new or used firearm is purchased
through a reputable gun shop, the staff will
make sure a lock and proper instruction on its
use are provided.
There are a few methods of storing guns,
based on the weapon's size and intended use.
For example, if you have rifles or shotguns that
you use for hunting, you may want to keep
them unloaded in a full-size safe. A full-size
safe is nice to have because it will accommo-
date many firearms and ammunition as well as
other valuables.
But what about a firearm that needs to be
quickly accessible, such as a handgun? There
are many companies that make small safes
that use a key or combination lock. Some even
your fingerprint to open. These are called


biometric safes, and they are becoming very
popular because of their small size, high level
of security, and ease of use.
One of the most innovative products I have
come across lately is an item called SAF T LOK.
This product actually becomes part of your
handgun's grip or magazine and prevents the
firearm from "accidental discharges.":' Either
version is easily installed to your handgun
with no modification to the firearm, and
allows you to prevent the gun being fired
unintentionally but offers access in a few
seconds when you need it.
Maybe you don't have kids and think there's
no need to lock up your guns. Even if you have
no children at home, you may from time to time
have your grandchildren over for a visit. You
should also consider they could possibly have
access to your firearm. And what if someone
were to break in? You probably don't want them
to be able to get to your guns easily.
Firearm safety is everyone's responsibility!
This begins at the manufacturer, designing
and producing the firearm, continues on to
the gun dealer in educating their customers,
and carries through to each individual who
owns and uses firearms. As a gun owner and
user, you must take responsibility for the safe
handling and storage of your weapons. Gun
safety is up to you.
Ryan Ingle has owned and operated Higher
Power Outfitters in Punta Gorda since 2011. His
lifelong passion for firearms has led to many
connections in the gun world and in the local
community. Contact him at 941-347-8445 or
sales@higher-power-outfitters.com.


3 cups broiled mullet
3 tbsp finely chopped onion
3 tbsp finely chopped dill pickle
1 tbsp parsley, minced
Salt and pepper to taste
1/4 cup mayonnaise
1 egg, beaten


A clip-n-save seafood
recipe provided by


Shred mullet with fingers. Combine fish, onion, pickle, parsley, salt and pepper, mayonnaise and
egg and mix well. Form into patties and fry or broil. Serves 4.
Recipe adapted from www.all-fish-seafood-recipes.com


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Since I'm a new contributor to WaterLine,
I've been asked to introduce myself to the
readers. From the age of 3 or 4, I wanted to
be a diver. I loved watching the old TV show
"Sea Hunt.":' My brother and I used to pretend
we were Mike Nelson and "dived" all over the
house. Our mother made SCUBA tanks for
us from empty oat meal boxes. That dream
finally came true for me in 1983 when I took
a class and learned the skills I would need to
follow where Mike had gone all those years
before.
I began sharing my love of diving by
teaching it to others in 1986, and within five
years, I was teaching at the instructor level.
I've been an instructor and instructor-trainer
for both the YMCA SCUBA Program and for
Scuba Educators International (SEI).
My experience includes extensive diving
all over Florida. I've been to the Keys all the
way to the Panhandle. I've also been fortu-
nate enough to dive at places such as the
Caribbean, the Sea of Cortez, California, the
Great Lakes, the wrecks off North and South
Carolina. I've even done a little bit in Siberia.
It's my goal, in the future, to share with
you various topics about diving. I hope you
will have a spark ignited about diving, much
like I did after watching "Sea Hunt.":'


Now lets explore why youy should learn to
SCUBA dive.
If you aren't a diver, diving is probably
not what you imagine. What is diving?
Diving is basically breathing and swimming
around underwater. But is that all divers are
doing down there? Sometimes, but usually
there's more to it.There's a goal involved. The
goal will vary according to the individual's
interests and desires. Perhaps you want to
put food on the table. Maybe you just want
to do a little sightseeing. Diving is not an
activity for thrill seekers, but rather a fun
way to enjoy a weekend or vacation with
family and friends. More than anything else,
diving is a social activity. Divers are ordinary
people; mothers, fathers, grandparents and
children doing something extraordinary. You
can join us.
Almost all divers start out as sightseers.
They enter a new world. That world is beau-
tiful! It's exciting! Your first close encounter
with a 6-foot long moray eel gets your heart
rate up pretty quickly. You are awed by the
beauty of your first queen angelfish.
Don't get caught in the trap of thinking
sightseeing is all there is to diving. While
we all enjoy clear water on beautiful reefs
covered with colorful fish; there are many


other activities for divers to enjoy.
Fossil collecting is one of those activities
we can find in our own backyard. Fossils are
common right here in Southwest Florida. Our
local beaches at Englewood and Venice are
loaded. Waters in these areas are not as clear
as some other parts of the world, but they
have treasure for the taking. From mammoth
to shark teeth to shells, fossils are found
daily by divers right here.
Shipwrecks attract sea life: eels, grouper,
sponges, coral, tropical fish, even tarpon and
rays. Wrecks provide them a place to live and
protection from predators. All the life on a
wreck is one of the reasons wrecks are very
popular with divers. Many divers also enjoy
exploring the structure of a wreck.
Eventually, it seems like every diver gets
into underwater photography. It's a way we
can share our experiences with other divers,
and even with friends and family who don't
dive. Photography also gives us something
to hang onto from a dive, and helps us
remember these special experiences.
We have wonderful local dive oppor-
tunities, especially with regard to fossil
collecting, wreck diving and spearfishing,
but we are not limited to staying in our own
backyard. Dive travel is something most


divers enjoy on occasion it's expensive
to travel. The kelp forests of California are
amazing to experience in the sunlight and
shadows. Bonaire, part of the Dutch Antilles
in the Caribbean Sea, has unlimited diving
and beautiful reefs in clear water. Wrecks
are almost perfectly preserved in the cold
waters of the Great Lakes. The choices are
almost unlimited. But remember, we have
wonderful diving right here.
This barely scratches the surface, there are
many more reasons people love to dive. You
can go after lobster or stone crabs. You can
spearfish. You can dive from commercial or
private boats. You can dive from shore. You
can learn fish identification. You are only
limited by your desires and your imagination.
Diving is fun!
Walter Wilt began diving in 1983. He is
a retired Instructor Trainer with two dive
training agencies, YMCA SCUBA and SEl. He
is also a retired boat captain having operated
dive boats in the upper Keys from the mid
1980s through the early 1990s. An avid
diver with thousands of logged dives, Walter
enjoys diving vintage equipment. His hobby is
making artwork (primarily bells and umbrella
stands) from condemned SCUBA tanks. You
can see his art on his Facebook page.


SIZE LIMIT: Min. 15"total length
DAILY BAG LIMIT: 2 per harvester
AVERAGE SIZE: 1 to 3 Ib
STATE RECORD: 40 Ib, 13 02
HABITAT: Tripletail are


fish of open waters, but B
are generally found in
association with structure:
Crab trap lines, buoy cables, deep-
water pilings and almost any lo:aling obljed
LEGAL GEAR: Hook and line gear only
(no nets or spearing). Harvest prohibited
by or with the use of any multiple hook in
conjunction with live or dead natural bait;
snatching prohibited
FOOD VALUE: One of the best.
FISHING METHODS: Tripletail are crustacean
feeders, so live shrimp and especially crabs
are the best baits. They will take whitebait as


I ]


v-v well. Because they are often
found near barnacle-encrusted
structures, the tackle used is often heavier
than for other similarly sized fish. They pull
hard, but not for long. And they jump.
NOTES: During stone crab season, many
anglers patrol the crab trap buoys looking for
tripletail. When disturbed, they often submerge
but rarely leave the immediate area.


*S|


CU-STOM

CHART ____
:-HRT. .... .... ..-...


-_ FRAMING

320 CROSS STREET rili
PUNTA GORDA, FL 33950
CALL NOW,.1-800-423-9026
www.waterproofcharts.com
0460045 -


-THE ORIGIiNiAL-


WATERPROOF CHARTS
WWWWW~I


ROTTOiil.INSHORE
EES1EI3 FISHING
*H'ATI^Ij CHARTS





js4_mncrr .,s Page 15 0 November 14,2013



I .. .


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- a---


As I'm writing this column, the tempera-
tures are dropping and the snow is falling
- literally. I'm up north in Wisconsin doing
a little hunting. I came up here to spend
some time thinking about what's important
in life, and what's next. Don't worry; I'm not
gone for good. In fact, I'm coming back in
a week. I'm just at a point in my life where
I'm realizing that life is short and won't last
forever. Change is constantly happening.
This past week, I've done some soul
searching, and I've discovered that I'm
troubled by the perceptions that many of
today's "Floridians" have about our Florida
fishing heritage. When you think about
it, our fisherfolk were the pioneers that
settled in Florida. I'm very disappointed
that so many of our newer residents lack
knowledge of our Florida heritage. Fishing
was the way folks fed their families, earned
income and bartered for necessities.
And this wasn't that long ago. The last
of these pioneers'children are old or have
passed on by now. Many families have
great-grandparents that came here in
wagons or by ship, but their stories are
being lost forever. From their point of
view, most of our current fishing problems
are not from recreational and commercial
fishing, but from habitat change: Problems
like pollution from industry, agriculture


and development. All of these have had and
continue to have negative impacts on our
fish populations.
It's easy to blame the commercial fish-
ermen that you see with boatloads of fish,
especially when we come back with nothing
after a day on the water. But think about
this: Do you realize that almost all of the
fish being commercially harvested inshore
are cast-netted mullet? It's a fish that most
of us don't catch or eat. Some will try to
convince us that mullet stocks are threat-
ened by commercial harvesting, but that's
just not the case. Even with all the fishing
problems and last year's red tide blooms,
we have healthy mullet stocks. Just look
around for yourselves.
Then why do organizations like the
Coastal Conservation Association devote
so much of their "conservation" efforts
to driving our pioneer families and other
commercial anglers into extinction? I
understand that there are a few problem
individuals that ruin it for the rest of us. But
by punishing those few individuals, we are
punishing an entire industry.
The 1994 net ban amendment allowed
the poachers who were the problem to
reap riches, while the responsible fisher-
folk suffered. I personally informed the
head of CCA at a Florida Fish and Wildlife


Conservation Commission meeting in 1998
about the excessive pompano harvesting
after the net ban. I asked him to look up
the facts, and he realized I was right. So
what happened next? We recreational
and charter anglers had our bag limit
reduced by half from 12 to six fish, and the
minimum size raised from 9.5 to 11 inches.
This jump was way too much. It eliminated
several months of good pompano fishing,
because more than 95 percent of our
pompano are smaller than 11 inches in our
area during that time of year.
Again, poachers were the problem, and
everyone paid for their greed. Many say
these commercially netted pompano were
taken in federal waters, and didn't have to
follow Florida law. Wouldn't that be nice if
we could prove it? How about we require
vessel monitoring systems like the federal
reef-fishing boats have?
So, back to the CCA: Please show us how
concerned your organization is with regard
to helping fish and anglers. It appears to
me that your efforts are directed toward
benefiting your membership, not the fish.
I couldn't believe the CCA wouldn't support
tarpon catch-and-release until they had to.
Furthermore, they never came out against
the Boca Grande tarpon jig, which is now
illegal to use in the Pass. Please show us


your conservation agenda, not your anti-
fishing agenda. I did work with the CCA a
while back, but found them too biased and
lacking in objectivity. I felt they didn't want
to listen to any opinions but their own. It
would be wonderful if we could all work
together to find middle ground.
The snow has arrived and I'm sippin'a
cup of hot chocolate. Life is good, but it can
be better. I ask all of you to help us create
solutions that fix problems rather than hurt
others and create bigger problems, like the
net ban did in 1994. It's a problem we need
to deal with, especially now with these
latest court rulings (if you haven't been
paying attention, Google"Florida gill net").
The FWC and the commercial fishermen
don't need to be wasting funds fighting this
out in court. FWC was created to regulate
our fisheries based on sound science, not
eliminate commercial fishing. Let's all look
objectively at compromises that lead to
sustaining our fishery and our commercial
fishing way of life.
Capt. Van Hubbard is a highly respected
outdoor writer and fishing guide. He has
been a professional USCG-licensed year-
round guide since 1976, and has been
fishing the Southwest Florida coast since
1981. Contact him at 941-740-4665 or
VanHubbard@CaptVan.com.


^ T':TI'----:


1 pound bluecrab meat, cooked
1/2 cup sour cream
1 cup grated cheddar cheese
1 hard-boiled egg, chopped fine
6 slices bacon, fried crisp, crumbled
1 tsp minced onion
2 tbsp minced fresh dill weed


A clip-n-save seafood
recipe provided by


1 tbsp minced fresh basil
12 leaves buttercrunch lettuce
1/2 head iceberg lettuce, torn into pieces
6 small spinach leaves, torn into pieces
6 red or yellow Roma tomatoes, sliced
Salt to taste
Pepper to taste
Tabasco sauce to taste
Lemon wedges
Gently mix crab meat, sour cream, cheese, egg, bacon, onion, dill weed, basil, salt and pepper.
Toss with salad mix and serve. Serves 6.

Recipe revised from AII-fish-seafood-recipes.com


INTRODUCING


0 l,


Pioneer
~Boats


Powered
by Yamaha

Exclusive Area Dealer for Peterson ,
Aluminum Boat Trailers (; '14s


7UUIU -- T?1
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Abel's Marine
91 7341 Sawyer Circle -
SPort Charlotte, FL 33981
941-698-4006


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Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: 100 pounds per harvester in
state waters; included in aggregate bag of 20
reef fish in federal waters
Season:none
Notes: 9,11

AMBERJACK, GREATER


Size limit: 30" min.
Daily bag limit: 1 per harvester
Season: Closed June 1-July 31; subject to
additional closure in federal waters if quota met
Notes: 1,3,4,5,9

AMBERJACK, LESSER
BANDED RUDDERFISH


Size limit: Slot 14"to 22"
Daily bag limit: Aggregate 5 per harvester
Season:none
Notes: 1,4,5,9

BLACK
DRUM .,ImLjmwb


Size limit: Slot 14"to 24"(may possess one
fish larger than 24")
Daily bag limit: 5 per harvester
Season:none
Notes: 5,7,8

BLACK
SEA BASS k r.


Size limit:
10 nun.
Daily bag limit: 100 pounds per harvester
Season:none
Notes: 2,4,5,9

BLUEFISH


Size limit: 12"min.
Daily bag limit: 10 per harvester
Season:none
Notes: 1,5


Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: 100 per harvester (proposed;
FWC vote expected Nov. 21,2013)
Season:none

BONEFISH A


Size limit: n/a T
Daily bag limit: Zero, harvest prohibited
Season:none
Notes: May be possessed temporarily at site of
capture for photos, measuring and weighing.


Size limit: 33" min.
Daily bag limit: In state waters, 1 per
harvester or 6 per vessel, whichever is less. In
federal waters, 2 per harvester.
Season:none
Notes: 1,5

CRAB, BLUE ,. 9V=
Size limit: none
Daily bag
limit: 10
gallons
whole

Season: Closed (
Sept. 20-Oct. 4 :.
in state waters bey:nrd 3 niileh
Closed to trapping July 10-19 in
odd years for trap cleanup. Traps not allowed in
federal waters.
Notes: 5 trap maximum. 10

CRAB,STONE
Size limit: 2.75"
min. from
nonmoving
claw tip to S
base of first
joint -
Daily bag ,
limit: 1 gal-
Ion per harvester
or 2 gallons per vessel, whichever is less
Season: Closed May 16 to Oct. 14
Notes: 5 trap maximum. Possession of whole
crab illegal; harvest claws only. 10

DOLPHIN (MAHI MAHI)


N


Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: 10 per harvester or 60 per
vessel, whichever is less
Season:none
Notes: 5

FLOUNDER, ALL SPECIES


Size limit: 12 nun. -
Daily bag limit: 10 per harvester
Season:none
Notes: Harvest by gig or spear allowed. 2,5,8

GROUPER, BLACK


Size limit: 22" min.
Daily bag limit: 4 per harvester within
aggregate bag of 4 grouper
Season: Closed Feb. 1-March 31 ONLY in
federal waters outside 20-fathom break
Notes: 2,3,4,5,9

GROUPER, GAG


Size limit: 22" min.
Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester within
aggregate bag of 4 grouper
Season: Scheduled to open July 1 in both state
and federal waters; closure to be determined.
Notes: 2,3,4,5,9


Brought is you by ,


State and federal saltwater fishing / ( o


an.il.Itinno fni @nnithiAnoet linwirld


I oiUIULIUIIO HUN UUUIIfIoo lUl ullIua


GROUPER, GOLIATH


Season: n/a
Notes: Legal to target for catch and release in
state waters but not in federal waters

GROUPER, NASSAU


Daily bag limit: Zero, harvest prohibited.
Season: n/a
Notes: n/a


Size limit: 20" min.
Daily bag limit: 4 per harvester within
aggregate bag of 4 grouper
Season: Closed Feb. 1-March 31 ONLY in
federal waters outside 20-fathom break
Notes: 2,3,4,5,9

GROUPER, SCAMP


Size limit: 16" min.
Daily bag limit: 4 per harvester within
aggregate bag of 4 grouper
Season: Closed Feb. 1-March 31 ONLY in
federal waters outside 20-fathom break
Notes: 2,3,4,5,9

GROUPER, SNOWY
GROUPER, YELLOWEDGE


Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: 4 per harvester within
aggregate bag of 4 grouper
Season:none
Notes: 2,3,4,5,9

GROUPER, SPECKLED HIND
GROUPER. WARSAW


Size
limit: rn:,re
Daily bag limit:
1 per vesel vviLhir aggregate bag of 4 grouper
Season:none
Notes: 2,3,4,5,9


Size limit: '"
20"min.
Daily bag limit: 4 per harvester within
aggregate bag of 4 grouper
Season: Closed Feb. 1-March 31 ONLY in
federal waters outside 20-fathom break
Notes: 2,3,4,5,9

GROUPER, OTHER
(CONEY, GRAYSBY, RED HIND,
ROCK HIND AND TIGER)


Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: 4 per harvester within
S aggregate bag of 4 grouper
Season: Closed Feb. 1-March 31 ONLY in
federal waters outside 20-fathom break
_ Notes: 2,3,4,5,9

HOGFISH I /


Size limit: 12" min.
Daily bag limit: 5 per harvester
Season:none
Notes: 1,4,5,9

MACKEREL, KING (KINGFISH)


Size limit: `4 nmin
Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester
Season:none
Notes: Bag limit reduced to 1 per harvester
in some state waters when federal waters are
closed to harvest. See MyFWC.com/Fishing for
current regulations. 1,5

MACKEREL, SPANISH


Size limit: 12" min.
Daily bag limit: 15 per harvester
Season:none
Notes: Transfer of Spanish mackerel to other
vessels at sea prohibited. 1,5


MULLET, STRIPED AND SILVER





Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: Feb 1-Aug. 31: Aggregate
50 per harvester or 100 per vessel, whichever
is less; Sept. 1-Jan. 31: Aggregate 50 per
harvester or per vessel
Season:none
Notes: Bag limit also applies to mullet
used as bait. Harvest or possession of striped
mullet prohibited in Punta Gorda between
6 p.m. and 6 a.m. from Nov. 1-Feb. 29. See
http://bit.ly/urExej.

OYSTERS
Size limit: .
3"min. shell
Daily bag limit:
60 pounds or 2 '
5-gallon buckets
whole in shell per /
harvester or per ve.;.;el
Season: Closed /
July 1-Sept. 30
Notes: Go to www.Florida
Aquaculture.com for allowable harvesting areas.

PERMIT -

f ---% '"*



Size limit:
Slot 11"to 20"(may possess one over 20")
Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester
Season:none
Notes: No more than two fish over 20" per
vessel. Hook and line gear only; spearing legal
only in federal waters. Rules differ in Special
Permit Zone south of Cape Sable (Florida Bay/
Keys); see http://bit.ly/rA94BJ. 1,5,7

POMPANO,
FLORIDA


SHEEPSHEAD


Size limit: Slot 18"to 27"
Daily bag limit: 1 per harvester or 8 per
vessel, whichever is less
Season:none
Notes: Gigging, spearing or snatching pro-
hibited. Illegal to harvest or possess in federal
water. Transport limit 6 per person. 2,5,7

SAILFISH jj


Size limit: 63" min.
Daily bag limit: Aggregate 1 per harvester all
tiiilish (sailfish and marlin)
Season:none
Notes: Measured from tip of lower jaw to
center of fork. Highly Migratory Species
permit required to harvest in federal waters.
All harvested fish must be reported to NOAA
within 24 hours; call 800-894-5528.5

SEA TROUT, SPOTTED





Size limit: Slot 15"to 20" (may possess one
fish larger than 20")
Daily bag limit: 4 per harvester
Season:none
Notes: 2,5,7

SHARK, ALL A
SPECIES


Size limit: -_
11" minimum
Daily bag limit: 6 per harvester -
Season:none


Notes: Legal to harvest with a cast net or
seine. 1,5,7


'7,
Size limit: 24" min.
Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester or per vessel
Season:none
Notes: Spear fishing prohibited. 1,5,7

PORGY, ,
RED ,,


Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: 100 pounds per harvester
Season:none
Notes: 4,5,9


Size limit:
54" min., except Atlantic sharpnose, blacknose,
blacktip, bonnethead, finetooth and smooth
dogfish (only exceptions to 54"min. in federal
waters are Atlantic sharpnose and bonnethead)
Daily bag limit: In state waters, 1 per
harvester or 2 per vessel, whichever is less; in
federal waters, 1 per vessel
Season:none
Notes: May be harvested by hook and line
only HiQhily Migratory Species permit required
1) harvet; min federal waters. 1,5,7


none
Daily bag limit:
5 gallons heads on per harvester or per vessel
Season:none
Notes: 5


SNAPPER, SCHOOLMASTER


Size limit: 12" min.
Daily bag limit: 15 per harvester
Season:none
Notes: 2,5,7

SNAPPER, FIA RA


Size limit: Slot 12"to 30"(may possess 2 over
30"per harvester or per vessel)
Daily bag limit: Included in aggregate bag of
10 snapper per harvester if under 30"
Season:none
Notes: 2,4,5,9

SNAPPER, GRAY (MANGROVE)


Size limit: 10"
min. in state waters; 12" min. in federal waters
Daily bag limit: 5 per harvester within
aggregate bag of 10 snapper per harvester
Season:none
Notes: 2,4,5,9

SNAPPER, '
LANE ..-


.1 I ~ --


Size limit: 8" min.
Daily bag limit: In state waters, 100 pounds
,per harvester in state waters; not included in
aggregate bag of 10 snapper per harvester. In
federal waters, 20 per harvester.
Season: none
Notes: 2,4,5,9,11

SNAPPER, MUTTON


Size limit: % --
16" min.
Daily bag limit: Included in aggregate bag of
10 snapper per harvester
Season: none
Notes: 2,4,5,9

SNAPPER
RED





Size limit: 16" min.
Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester within
aggregate bag of 10 snapper per harvester
Season: Scheduled to open June 1 in both
state and federal waters; closure date has yet to
be determined.
Notes: 2,3,4,5,9


Size limit: '
10" nmn
Daily bag limit: Included in aggregate bag of
10 snapper per harvester
Season:none
Notes: 2,4,5,9

SNAPPER, VERMILION (BEELINER)


Size limit:
10"min.
Daily bag limit: 10 per harvester; not
included in aggregate bag of 10 snapper per
harvester; included in aggregate bag of 20 reef
fish in federal waters
Season:none
Notes: 2,4,5,9,11

SNAPPER, OTHER
(BLACKFIN, DOG, MAHOGANY,
QUEEN, SILKAND YELLOWTAIL)








Size limit: 12" min.
Daily bag limit: Included in aggregate bag of
10 snapper per harvester
Season:none
Notes: 2,4,5,9

SNOOK

=.. ._. .--". -


Size limit: Slot 28"to 33"
Daily bag limit: 1 per harvester
Season: Closed Dec. 1-Feb. 29 & May 1-Aug. 31
Notes: $10 snook permit required to harvest
when license is required, including free resident
shore fishing license. State regulations apply in
federal waters. 2,5,6,7,8

TARPON A


-I

Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: 1 per harvester per year
Season:none
Notes: $51.50 tarpon tag required to harvest
or possess, which is legal only in pursuit of an
IGFA record. For seasonal Boca Grande Pass
rules, see http://bit.ly/l6zrDj. 6,8

TRIGGERFISH, GRAY


Size limit: 14"min. (12"min. federal waters)
Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester per day
Season: Closed June 1-July 31
Notes: 1,4,5,11


State waters extend from the shore 9 miles into the Gulf of Mexico. Federal waters extend from 9 miles out to 200 miles. Regulations for Monroe County & Atlantic waters may differ significantly. These regulations were updated Nov. 12, 2013 and are subject to change at any time
by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and/or the National Marine Fisheries Service. Visit MyFWC.com and nmfs.noaa.gov for current regulations. This list does not contain every fisheries rule with which an angler must comply. Ignorance of the law is no excuse.


TRIPLETAIL A


Size limit: ^ '
15 mn.
Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester
Season:none
Notes: May be harvested by hook and line
only. 2,5,7,8

WAHOO




Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester
Season:none
Notes:1,5

LIONFISH 0..




Size limit: none P
Daily bag 'i
limit: none
Season:none
Notes: This invasive species is native to the
South Pacific and is spreading through the
Atlantic, Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico. Kill all
specimens on sight. Fins have venomous spines.

UNREGULATED SPECIES
The following species do not have established bag
limits, so the daily bag limit is two fish or 100 pounds
per harvester, whichever is greater: Anchovy,
Atlantic croaker, Atlantic thread herring,
barracuda, blackfln tuna, bonito (little tunny),
cero mackerel, cownose ray, gafftopsail
catfish, grunts (all species), hardhead catfish,
jack crevalle, ladyfish, palometa, pigflsh,
pinfish, porgies (exc. sheepshead), sand bream
S(mojarra), sand seatrout, scaled sardine, silver
seatrout, spadefish, Spanish sardine, stingray
(all species) and whiting.
PROHIBITED SPECIES
The following species are closed to all harvest and if
captured must be immediately released unharmed:
Goliath grouper, Nassau grouper, Atlantic
angel shark, basking shark, bigeye sand tiger
shark, bigeye sixgill shark, bigeye thresher
shark, bignose shark, Caribbean reef shark,
Caribbean sharpnose shark, dusky shark,
Galapagos shark, great hammerhead, lemon
shark, longfin mako shark, narrowtooth shark,
night shark, sand tiger shark, sandbar shark,
scalloped hammerhead, sevengill shark, silky
Shark, sixgill shark, smalltail shark, smooth
hammerhead, spiny dogfish, tiger shark,
whale shark, white shark, manta ray, spotted
eagle ray, longbill spearfish, spearfish (all
species), sturgeon, Florida queen conch.


NOTES
1. Measured fork length. Fork length is the straight
line distance from the most forward part of the head
with the mouth closed to the center of the tail.
2. Measured total length. Total length is the
straight line distance from the most forward part
of the head with the mouth closed to the farthest
tip of the tail with the tail compressed or squeezed
together while the fish is lying on its side.
3. Bag limit zero for captain and crew of for-hire
vessels on a paid trip.
4. Reef fish gear rules apply. Anglers must use
non-stainless steel circle hooks when using natural
baits, and must possess a dehooking device.
5. Must remain in whole condition (head and tail
intact) until landed ashore. Removal of gills and
internal organs OK.
6. Harvest by spearfishing prohibited.
7. Use of multiple or treble hooks in conjunction
with natural bait prohibited.
8. Harvest by snatching prohibited.
9. Except for sand perch and dwarf sand perch, fish
designated as reef fish are illegal to use as bait in
federal waters or aboard a vessel with a federal
reef fish permit. In state waters, legal-size reef
fish may be used as bait but must remain in whole
condition and count against bag limit.
10. No harvest of egg-bearing females.
11. Included in 20-fish reef fish aggregate bag in
federal waters (vermilion snapper, lane snapper,
almaco jack, grey triggerfish, all tilefishes).


~uuinmm.~vinmmsam uumu.m.~.suuwum.


11 ..............................


w





_______ ___ 4 P i Page 180 November 14,2013

THEWOLD FSU ICOLE IER-ADLI


*aam6~..u U .e.UFie~Imi.eeu E~~hUi
ma~esasamm~muumuu m~.umuumu.s.mhuEm


Looking down into the water
from a new vantage point is
an amazing way to see nature.ba
But first you have to learn
how to stand up! Stand-up
paddleboarding looks really
easy. However, if you have ever seen
someone trying the sport without Ph:.:.-; ro ,-e
any instruction it can be pretty .
comical. Knowing how and where to
stand makes a big difference when
you're learning the sport.
First-timers on a SUP board should
find a calm waterway. Usually
inshore locations are best, preferably .
someplace sheltered from the wind. .
The Gulf is perfect for learning when ,
the water is flat with no swells. An ..
east winds keeps the swells low
in the Gulf. Mornings are ideal for
learning, as the sea breeze usually
picks up in the afternoon.
Protect the board by ensuring that
the fin is completely submerged in
water before putting any weight
onto the board. For the most
stability, place both hands on the
board and position your knees
parallel to the handle. Always -
position your body over the handle
of the paddleboard. The handle is- .--'.
the center of the board the sweet
spot and provides the easiest
place to balance.
Paddling in a kneeling stance
for a few moments will help you
to establish balance on the board.
Once you are comfortable kneeling
and paddling, it's time to transition
from kneeling to standing. Keep your
hands on the paddle and position
your hands under your shoulders.
Once in a table position on the board,
move one foot up to the handle. Lift
up on the other foot and slowly tran- -_
sition it up to the handle as well.
Positioning of the feet makes a
big difference in balance. You may ....
want to take a moment and look at
your feet to ensure that they are hip
distance apart. If your feet are too
close or too far apart, that will cause
instability on the board. Always
point your toes forward toward
the nose of the board. From this
forward fold, just slowly transition to
standing and you're up! Remember
to breathe.
Once you're vertical, gaze out -
onto the horizon. It helps to keep
you balanced. Try to avoid looking _
at your feet. Keep your paddle in
hand and glide the blade into the
water. Be sure to keep moving -
momentum and maintaining the
paddle close to the water helps to
ease a beginner into balancing. Don't
lock your knees. Slightly bent knees
absorb shock, allowing for any wake
or swell to gently flow under your
board.
It's a challenge to stand up without
paddling, at least at first. With
enough practice, balance will become
second nature. However, if you feel
any instability, don't fight it. Make a
splash, not a crash! Remember, even
the best paddleboarders fall off their
boards at some point.
With determination and a few
tips, anyone can paddleboard.
Once you try SUP, your life will be
changed. Now get out there and
explore the coastline. .
Nicole Miers-Pandolfi is owner of
SUP Englewood, a touring paddle- .
board company servicing Sarasota
and Charlotte counties. Explore our
gulf coast islands with SUP Engle-
wood. Call 941-234-4311 or visit
SUPEnglewood.com for paddleboard
rental and tour reservations.




/i Page 19 November 14,2013
^OM/^M.* Page 199* November 14,2013


if you've n rhad this happen to you, up running t
consider yourself a lucky fisherman. But when move to ano
the little rope with the plastic handle that went to lift t
allows you to put your trolling motor into the snapped anc
water, and subsequently lift it back out, breaks deck of the b
during one of these functions, it can be one asked what I
of the most complicated things to fix on the rope in his ha
water. The worst
Seriously, a 20-cent piece of rope and I'd never giv
75-five cent plastic handle are all that stands I had no idea
in the way of complete heartache if either one to get it badc
of them break. You wouldn't think this is such tied to so it \
a big deal, until it happens to you just once I didn't have
especially when the trolling motor is down that I could
and you can't get it back up in the boat to start for braided I
your big motor. It's probably the one thing doubled it uI
that is overlooked the most when it comes to paths before
checking things over and making sure nothing allow us to s
is broken, ordeal, we t(
The only time, and I mean only time, this called it a da
has ever happened to me, I made sure I came When I go
up with a solution to never get caught in this braided line e
situation again. I'd been fishing on Crooked nylon rope. I
Lake in a tournament, and my partner was than the one





/WEEKLY MAGAZINE

AND


KEEPAMERICA



FISHING


hetr
their
thetr
Sent
boat. (
hiappi
and.
thin
en thi
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TAKEA KID FISHING!


oIling motor. We decided to trolling motor. But wait, I didn't stop there. I cut
area of the lake. When Rick another length of rope just a few inches longer
oiling motor up, the rope than the one that I just put in. I proceeded to
t him flying backwards off the route that rope through the same as the one I
Once I knew he was okay, I intended to use and also tied it to the handle.
ened. There he lay with the Now, in the event it breaks, I have a backup rope
already in place to be used so that I never get
g about this was that because caught without one.
at little rope much thought, Since the first time I broke off that rope and
v the rope had to be routed was stuck with fishing line to lift the motor,
he eye where the end was I've broken that rope two additional times.
d work again. On top of that, But because I've had that backup rope already
her piece of rope handy in place, I've never been caught without a
Replace it. Thank the Lord means to lift or lower the trolling motor.
unspooled a bunch of it, Sounds simple, but until you break that rope,
d it to the eye and tried a few you have no idea how much that cheap rope
ind the right one that would and handle can mean. Like I said, it only had
he trolling motor. After that to happen once before I came up with a way to
ie boat out of the water and make sure it never happens again.
So often in the past, I've headed out on
ie that day, I replaced the the water without giving consideration to
agency fix with a new braided the little things that we use every time we
e sure it was much stronger go out. I've learned over the years, mostly
originally came with the through trial and error, but sometimes due to


! iIIHIm
w wob, -


something bad happening to a friend. Now, I
look the boat and equipment over before and
after each trip on the water. In the event I see
something that I can identify and fix to keep
a bad situation from happening, I fix it imme-
diately. Obviously, there are some things that
happen you can't prepare for, but it's always
a good practice to fix what you can when you
can or when you see it.
I know some of you anglers probably have
another backup plan in place to prevent the
trolling motor from ever getting stuck in the
down position with no way to get it raised
back up again. If you don't, take the time to
run another rope just a little longer than the
one you already have. In the event the rope
breaks, and trust me, it will, you will have a
solution in place to not let a cheap item ruin
your day on the lake.
Greg Bartz is a tournament bass fish-
erman based in Lakeland. Greg fishes lakes
throughout Florida's Heartland with his wife
and tournament partner, Missy Snapp. Contact
him at Greg.Bartz@SummitHoldings.com.


51 m *I uuuu "ni U
iL:IPIJitiL:


-Md m m m mlm -II m


SLeonard & Susie-v/
' Bolyard (941) 255-0970 1

!22.~F2 fl YY h 22l 2

CHARLOTTE HARBOR
CUSTOM UPHOLSTERY, LLC
" MariM r U upholstery
Canvas Cushions
SBFull Enclosures Biminis
'*: Owers:-9BIL -S 53P 9



-- ^ *Canv s *Cus io.ns.


SI I
Bennett Marine Construction, Inc.
Seawalls Boat Docks Boat Lifts
"Serving the Gulf Coast Since 1961"
Call 941-697-3882 Englewood
www.bennettmarineconsCruction.com
FREE ESTIMATES


G&R Marine Canvas
a Mooring Covers Cushions
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Removal of Ethanol, Water, & Sludge
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To Place Your Ad
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Please Call
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/ Page 20 November 14,2013
j^M~r~i-* Page 20 November 14,2013


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/ Page 22 November 14,2013
j^ M~r iv-9 Page 22 9 November 14,2013


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CHARLOTTE COUNTY'S
#1 GUN SHOP ,

s* A~v meIA


23ox Tamiami Trail
Port Charlotte FL 33952
Phone' 941.889.7065
Fax: 941.889.7068
www.aandhgunso fswflcom

We Buy & Trade Guns!
I OVER 100 YEARS OF WEAPON EXPERIENCE!


MMElGME
Here's how it works: Take pictures of your outdoor
adventures. Send your high-quality digital photos to
WaterLineMagazine@gmail.com, or send prints by snail
mail to The Charlotte Sun, 23170 Harborview Road,
Port Charlotte, FL 33980, ATTN: Lee Anderson. Include
a self-addressed stamped envelope if you want your prints
returned to you.
PLEASE don't send us photos of oversized or other
release-only fish being poorly handled. Photos of such
fish being gaffed, held by the lower jaw only or obviously
damaged or dead WILL NOT be published, no matter how
big the fish is or how proud the angler may be.


nice,








.. :E




/ Page 23 November 14,2013
j^M~riv-9 Page 23 9 November 14,2013


lnnn;mnnfflnfnkinn arn,
MMSEEUIIinl 1"iMUllia *S*m* ln.tuuD*l l


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Swill te talking about

it s all about fl Ckr

ReelSharlccm 'ti

at Palm Islandi Marina S941416.-8o04Pt
at Palm i Marina 11 SHARKS- TARPON-GOLIATH GROUPER REDFISH SNOOK TROUT


Staff Report

Very few people are fortunate
enough in life to do exactly what they
want to do. Having a job around boats
and the water may seem like a dream
job to some, and that's exactly what it
is for Terry and Tim Lynch.
For the past 15
years,
the
father-
and-son
duo have
owned
and
operated -.
Palm Island .
Marina in r-
Cape Haze.
They've been
around boats
for most of
their lives, and
they plan to keep it that way. It's kind
of a family thing. In fact, their slogan
on their website says the marina is "A
Charlotte County Marina that you can
call home.":'
If you are a boater, Palm Island
Marina offers all you need for a
comfortable family vacation, getaway
or time by yourself to unwind.
It's no surprise the Lynches grav-
itated toward the boating industry.
Terry was born and raised in Cape Cod.
He began sailing since before he can
remember, but has collected his share
of sailing memories along the way. His
son Tim grew up in the Venice area and
also took to boating at an early age.
It's that experience that the Lynches
say reflects in the service and quality
that the marina has to offer.
"Boating is in the blood'" says Terry.
"I've got a lot of stories to tell, and
some that I probably shouldn't. But


the boating lifestyle is like no other.
It's special, and that's what we are
doing at Palm Island. When you come
here, everybody knows each other by
name. Almost like family.":'
In addition to a full-service and
parts
S' department
and two
monstrous
storage
units, There
1are also
S condo-
miniums
available
S through
.....Palm
.. ..- : Island
Resort.
But
the marina does
offer resort-style accommodations
included with wet slip or dry boat
storage
including
free beer on
Saturday. And
speaking of
beverages,
Leverock's
Restaurant
sits adjacent
to the Palm
Island
Yacht
Club's pool
area, and t
delivery is
available.
Terry and Tim also specialize in
hosting cruise clubs, something they
both did for years, especially in the
Bahamas and the Keys.
"We would lead 12 boats at a time;"
sayd Terry."That means we made all of
the arrangements, reservations, took


care of emergencies and all complaints.
It was a lot of work, but look what I was
doing. I was cruising with my family.
We even brought our basset hound. You
can't beat that.":'
As much as he enjoys the water, Tim
almost took a different path through
life. He graduated with a degree in
computer software engineering and
took a job in Munich, Germany. But
two years later, he was back at the
marina.
"Germany was great, but I grew up
around the water'" says Tim. "I need to
be around marinas. It all worked out,
and the funny thing is that we have
guests from Germany, so I can talk
about soccer with them in their own
language. It all worked out.":'
And what would true watermen be
without a little fishing in their blood
to go with boating?
"Yeah, we've fished'" sayd Terry.
"Tim was basically running charters
from a young age, and I kind of made
a name for myself fishing up
in Sarasota.
Especially for
shark.



and
cruising



other way. That's for sure."up
For more information about ofPalm



Island Marina visit PalmislandMarina.
co or call 800-226-DOCK.ur time
these days.
!And we
S D wouldn't
have it any
other way. That's for sure."

For more information about Palm
Island Marina visit PalmlslandMarina.
corn or call 800-226-D0CK.


Shark tooth dives
Scuba malem, mnvce, hinbutmon and chirte. E


FRANK up5
ii a -^ Il iL


I-'


niminimiminin


*


piT1 I iH


your moe ates


~NE:


r

b


Et ^OM 'WO




I*n*** --*n* ndfl*mknn A*w
WklltO 1 kh3 II f~lhUMUUSUU EE5.t9WaIIIiII loNUEUII


1 199i Nailc .:. Cal Hull Juhp .l.:.hr,...:. r lhr Irjilr nn
Very Dry and stable ride for it's size. New Floor and transom.
BiminiTop, Brand NewTrolling Motor, and CMC Jack Plate
Draft's 8 Inches.
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com


i '-, ., .


Why visit the boat show?
Well there are several reasons.
For one, you can see what
you've been missing. If it's been
a while, you can go and see


season


what's new in the industry.
There have been some impressive advances
in technology the past few years. If you've never
been to a show, you're in for a treat. There's is no
better place to get ideas and compare models.
Who knows, you just may find that one thing
you can't live without. From boats, clothing,
trailers, accessories, cleaners, polishes and new
products, these shows normally have something
for everyone. If you already have a boat, maybe
you want a new piece of equipment for it. Why
not look at the boat show.
Have your electronics seen better days? Go
look at the new technology. It's quite amazing.
From depth, GPS, Radar, Flir to aux inputs,
there is enough to keep the biggest enthusi-
asts occupied. These new electronics have tons
of features. If your engine is NEMA 2000, you
can interface to bring up your engine informa-
tion on your new electronics. For those that
don't know, NEMA the new world standard in
marine electronics data protocol, established
by the National Marine Electronics Association,
for networking multiple instruments on boat.
Yes, electronics have certainly advanced over
the years. The depth readings on a new unit
is unbelievably clear. You can get all types of
readings. The sky is the limit, literally. Chirp
sonar, down scan, side scan and the processors
now can give all kinds of pictures to the user.
You can check out what's under the boat,
next to the boat, under the dock and even
under the mangroves. When it comes to GPS
units, even more information is available
from what was available just a few years ago.


Obviously, they indicate where you are and you
can plot where you want to go. But the new
models also show hazards, channel markers,
marinas, tide charts and moon phases. So get
to the show and check them out.
Are you thinking about a new engine for
your boat? There are plenty to see at these
shows. There are many more brand names than
there used to be at the shows, and you can get
the info about them from price to warranty
and just about everything in between. Many
dealers go to shows to make deals, so this
could be an opportunity to shop for that best
price and compare features.
Plus, most boat shows also have tackle and
fishing seminars. There's so much more to see
than just boats. My favorite part is checking
out the vast amount of products and innova-
tions. I get excited just thinking about it.
There are several shows coming up. The
Fort Myers Boat show is held Nov. 14-17. The
Charlotte County Show is Jan. 16-19, and is a
little closer to home. Of course, the big one is
the Miami Boat show held Feb. 13-17.
See you at a boat show!
Tony Towns is owner and operator of A bel's
Marine located at 7341 Sawyer Circle, off
Gasprilla Rd. Tony has over 25years'experience
in the marine industry and certifications for
Mercury Marine, Johnson/Evinrude, Yamaha
and is the state of Florida's only Honda Marine
master tech. To contact Tony with any ques-
tions please feel free to email Tony@
AbelsMarine.com or call Abel's Marine at
941-698-4006. We are boaters serving boaters!


18 2UUb 0 ; HawK uay uoai w/ unp -our StrOKA IIrL
Asking $13,990. Very Low hrs almost like a nevvbw o.:.I
SS Propeller, Garmin Color Chart Plotter GPS. C.:.-."- viir.
trailer. Bimni top, Live Well, Coast Guard Equ pm-r.i
Ready For the Water!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bavshoremairA-i i.:.-,


18'6" 2005 Larson Bow Rider, 43 Vortech V ,hi,


1I V l I I661~I. t llem r VV s IIYVI lQ V -.. .. ............. ..- .. .......
Mooring Cover 75HP Evinrude. 4,00 $1350. Sale price @ $11,990. Very Low Hrs Since New. L.:.-.r Uri
a just completely redone. Full cover. Engine is spotiA.- irun."
c,-fvstaltCay Center- Exc.needs nothing!.Very solid boat with a great riod r-a i3i'
9M41-630-6603
-T WWW CR YSTALCAY.COMIV
,4225 Taylor Road. PG BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarlr. L.:.m-.


Call Richard Rosano 203-912-95
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only a A
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL rrrs.. i m


17' SUNCATS 2004, 2007 & 2013 Available
Please call for pricing!
Punta Gorda's Com-Pac Dealer
941-833-0099


19'1996 Wellcrall Cenler Console. Johnson 112HP
$7,990. Fish Finder, CD Player, Fishing Chair.
Life Jackets, Bimini Top & Swim Ladder. Fresh Waler
Boat Very Good Condition! Has Trailer. This boat
Needs nothing ready for fun in the sun today!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bavshoremarln-.i o:.m-



il- -s -t W0rn4
-a --S ---m.p


19' 2000 Seaswirl Center Console: Good shape.
115HP Johnson. NewVHF, Garmin fishfinder'charlplol-
ter combo, battery and bilge pump. Bimini and console
cover included. Asking $11,500. t ,
Ray Mason, 941-505-7269 iunx.tL

--fc^BP(r^ $ALL,


ii I 1V1 1~j I / ii'
a.,


19' SEAPRO 115 Merc with trailer $16,000
Call Tod at 941-457-0131
or 941-833-0099
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers


gI small onion, minced lOCi
1 -m-,l l ro^^ ,n ,^,no^minr.- /41 'I"N


appellate court


Associated Press

ORLANDO A federal appellate court in
Washington is hearing arguments on whether
citations issued to SeaWorld Orlando should be
upheld following the death of a trainer.
Three judges on the U.S. Court of Appeals
for the District of Columbia are listening to
arguments.
SeaWorld is contesting two citations
issued by the Occupational Health and Safety
Administration following the death of trainer


Dawn Brancheau.
She was killed in February 2010 when a
six-ton killer whale named Tilikum pulled her
into a pool.
An administrative judge last year upheld the
citations but downgraded them from willful to
serious.
SeaWorld is arguing that the job safety
agency overreached with its citations.
One of the attorneys representing the marine
park before the appellate court is the son of U.S.
Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia.


i mIdIan In peppeI, mmIIIIIILCU
6 tbsp butter
3 medium to large potatoes, boiled, peeled, and diced
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp celery salt
Generous sprinkling of freshly ground black pepper
Dash of cayenne pepper
4 eggs, well beaten


i-n-save seafood
ipe provided by
\ Wn ( .
VM&CM P%&Ut.


- Recipe from www.
all-fish-seafood-recipes.iom


Saute onion and green pepper in butter in a medium-size heavy skillet until tender-crisp, about 2
to 3 minutes. Add crab meat and potatoes. Season with salt, celery salt, pepper, and cayenne. Stir
eggs gently into crab and potato mixture, and mix lightly but well. Cover skillet and cook mltutre
over low heat, without stirring, for about 5 minutes or until set. Cut into wedges and serve right
from the skillet. Serves 4.


..INI 1 I 11J 11iL h^sital Cay Cent.e
941-639--6603
^t WWW CRYSTALCAY COIVIJ.C
w :422S Taylor Road, PG, S

It's close to



b o at sh ow 16 MITCHEIL. Can a Cnncnla
^^^^^B^ ^B^ ^^ ^^r^ ^^B^^^--^" ft MITPUCI I i a'nlar P~ncli la 1 J'


A





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n nl miImU umaSEEinS aE llIN tu I i EUEm innI5.a UOEEBI imN


lt/ A Page 25 November 14,2013
j^M~r~i.* Page 25 November 14,2013


Ph Call 941-429:310.

tainly be used Cao list l u41-42boaT
t there'sm to list your uboo5 -
an a gill net. -



I^HUKHM --^^/L\-\LJ -_1UJ \-JL\ 1IL~v^-1n-lL J\J\&


20 1997 Aquasport 200 center console $14,999
Call Orion Wholean at 941-249-0177
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only B 3
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL C.%AIAR I N A1 *.-


CU IedIII Q IIIIsII, 1996, WLII LIhIII. .eIILeI r UIIo UIe, live
well, motor Yamaha 130,2 stroke, w/ SS prop, recently
tuned up trailer. New hubs, brakes, buddy bearings, and
tires, excellent condition, ready to launch and go fishing.
Was $7,900 REDUCED To: $6,900
941-626-4571 or 941-627-5777


REDUCEDD.





21' CELEBRITY FISH HAWK WAC 1991, trailer.$4,59
Now $3,500. Motor available $2,800 installed.
c_^istal Cay Ceter
9 41-639-6603 <
WWW.CRYSTALCAY.CON M.
;;0 4225 Taylor Road, PG S







21' ROBALO i-?'., r.?.?4 .D 11 1,.:.un-.3 D'?', r4 [ ,,,- ,i,
Mercury 225 hp. Low Hours' excellent compression, tan-
dem trailer with brakes, new tire's, spare, hard top, rocket
launcher, electrons box, GPS, potty, 4 sided enclosure,
spreader light's. Been sitting need's TLC!!
$8750..0B0..941-875-8000 239-652-0000


NET
FROM PAGE 2
I was in high school, and I stood outside a
grocery store gathering signatures.
The amendment made it to the ballot and
was passed, with voters giving it a thumbs-up
by a 72 percent margin. The Marine Fisheries
Commission (now the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission) implemented regu-
lations disallowing the use of nets intended
to gill fish but exempting seine nets, which
are meant to be used to encircle rather than
ensnare fish.
While the regulations were based on the
amendment, there was one problem: The
amendment's language was vague in regard
to how to differentiate a gill net from a seine.
So the MFC, with FCA backing, came up with
a "bright line" distinction: Any net with a
stretched mesh of less than 2 inches would be
a legal seine net; if the mesh was larger, it was
an outlawed gill net. This regulation is the focus
of the latest lawsuit. According to commercial
fishing interests, the 2-inch mesh law is discrim-
inatory against mullet netters, depriving them
of the ability to earn a livelihood.
As with most things in life, there are both
good and bad aspects to gill netting. It's abso-
lutely irrefutable that a gill net is very effective
at catching fish. A fisherman can bring in more
of his targeted fish with less effort. Whether
that's good or bad depends on your viewpoint.
If you're a commercial fisherman, it's highly
desirable. If you want to make netters less
effective and discourage them from plying
their trade, it's a huge problem. Other fishing
methods that bring in a lot offish for little
effort dynamite, poison, electroshocking
- are illegal. However, one major benefit of
a gill net is that smaller fish don't get stuck
in the net they just slip through the large
mesh and swim on their merry way. Shrink the
mesh, and you'll catch more smaller fish along
with the bigger fish.
A lot of what is caught in a gill net depends
on how it's fished. String a net across a creek
mouth on a falling tide, and you'll catch mullet
- along with redfish, snook, trout and any
other large fish that were utilizing the creek at
high tide. Set up in a natural channel that fish
use to get from a shallow fiat to the outside
of the bar, and you'll get the same result. On
the other hand, if you set a net outside one of
the passes when the mullet are running into
the Gulf, you'll get mostly mullet with little
or no bycatch. Many gill netters were highly
experienced watermen who weren't out to
rape and pillage the resource. They wanted to
hand down their lifestyle to the next genera-


tion, and they knew if there were no fish, that
wouldn't be possible.
But not every netter was interested in
good stewardship. Some just saw the dollar
signs and caught whatever they could catch,
wherever they could catch it. In the old days,
that kind of behavior would not have flown,
and the bad actors would have been shamed
or threatened into shaping up or shipping out.
But remember, it was"us versus them" on both
sides, so the commercial guys stuck together
instead of policing their own ranks. Unfor-
tunately, that resulted in netterr" becoming
synonymous with "poacher" in the eyes of
many recreational anglers. That is what ulti-
mately led to the regulations we have today.
Are they fair? Maybe not. Have they led to
netters having to work harder for less reward?
Absolutely. But the net-ban amendment has
survived nonstop legal challenges since its
inception, and remains the law of the land.
The way I see it, there are two ways out of
this mess. One is to overturn the amendment.
That can be done by the Florida Supreme
Court or by a 60 percent popular vote of a new
amendment to supersede the old one. Neither
of those things has happened in the past 18
years. Whether one of them might happen in
the future is known only to those with fully
functional crystal balls. Mine's in the shop.
The other way is for the FWC to scrap the
mesh size rule and ban all nets. According to
the amendment:"Gill net" means one or more
walls of netting which captures saltwater
finfish by ensnaring or entangling them in the
meshes of the net by the gills, and "entangling
net" means a drift net, trammell net, stab
net, or any other net which captures saltwater
finfish, shellfish, or other marine animals by
causing all or part of heads, fins, legs, or other
body parts to become entangled or ensnared in
the meshes of the net, but a hand-thrown cast
net is not a gill net or an entangling net.
As Judge Fulford points out: "We cannot
have a provision in our Constitution that
outlaws the use of all nets in fishing, except
use of a hand-thrown cast net; and at the same
time have rules adopted by the FWC that make
exceptions to this constitutional provision.":'
That means seine nets are unconstitutional
too, since they catch smaller fish by killing
them. Basically, every net except cast
nets, which are specifically exempt under the
amendment is an unlawful entangling net.
Gill nets have a long history in Florida, and
figure prominently in our commercial fishing
past. But that time is over now. It might
turn out that those who have pushed hard
to bring gill nets back have instead forced
fisheries regulators to take away one more tool
commercial fishermen use to make a living.


20' THOMPSON 1988, V-6 Mercruiser I/O 22 2000 ROBALOWALKAROUNJD ',-,.-l .:.i .:..-
Boat & Trailer. Ready to ride! $4,895. $3,995. fishing! $23,990 Call Meagan McCall 941-268-3198
McCallMarineSales.com
,ta C3ay CO- nte By appointment only ll B .
9 2 41-a39-6603
~4WWWV CRVSTALCA .rCOM> Licensed Yacht Broker
4225 Taylor Road, P W Located at BEAUTIFUL NI. A. REI N.-$.I


2006 115 HPYamaha low hrs,
Garmin GPS/depth, trolling motor,
power pole, jack plate, trim tabs,
2 live wells, garaged, excellent condition.
$13,500 OBO 941 223-3004


Clean! $11,990. Garmin GPS Color Chart Plotter. '08 Alum.
Trailer. Full Windshield. Lots of seating. Much easy to main-
tain then a deck boat ( Removable Cushions) with a much
better ride. Turn Key! Ready for the water today!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bavshoremarinefl.com


21' 2003 SEASWIRL $17,500
Please contactTod Sullivan at 941-457-0131
or the office at 941-833-0099
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers and
Redfish Yacht Brokers


21 2013 HURRICANE SUNDECK Fun in Lhe Sun!
Full Warranty $28,900 Call Meagan McCall 941-268-3198
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Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL r. tAri .T .A 1%


1 2UJ0 rCT VVCOI ;)E34,9UU
Call For Details 941-662-0015
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22' SEA HUNT Escape220 LE $34,000
Escapes have everything you need! Call 941-662-0015
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22.4 225TRITON SEA HUNT CC "':"":' Fill ,'ii-i,
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23' 1993 SEA RAY SUNDANCER in;r,. l l r :-r ':,l:,1
$12,900 Call Meagan McCall for Details! 941-268-3198
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Located in BEAUTIFUL N[ ARI NA*J
i .. .... ..... .. .





24' 2000 Crownline, In Excellent Condtion! 5.7 Mercrusier
EFI Only $16,990. Garmin GPS Sounder, Sleeps 4
Comfortably. Was Dry rack Stored and she shows!
Very Low Hrs Always maintained. Great Price!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bavshoremarinefl.com


24' 2000 MARIAH 244 DECK BOAT
Like New! Merc 5.7, All maintenance records
Aluminum Road King Trailer, brakes,
SS fenders & EXTRAS! $17,500 OBO
941-698-4765





I*I anflnnn. I l'n *.mnn earn
Wkl lt qkh3IIII liflhUMUUSUU EE5.t9Wl I IiII loNUEU mI


Bill would grant




immunity in


I. -.
a-
rz~~e c


s.- .


b.


7 W -__


News Service of Florida


TALLAHASSEE- A measure that would
grant immunity to people who show guns or
fire warning shots in self-defense is moving in
the Florida House after an overhaul that could
make it more palatable to potential foes.
The so-called "warning-shot" bill, HB 89 by
Rep. Neil Combee, R-Polk City, has a new name
and would amend a different law if passed,
and already has gotten further during this
legislative season than in the last.
Combee sponsored the bill last year after
learning about the case of Marissa Alexander,
a Jacksonville woman who was sentenced to
20 years under the 10-20-Life sentencing law
for firing a gun into a wall during a dispute
with her husband. Alexander's sentence was an
example of the "negative unintended conse-
quences" of the sentencing law, Combee said.
Last year's bill would have amended 10-20-
Life, which requires mandatory-minimum
prison terms for gun-related crimes. Formerly
known as the Defense of Life, Home, and
Property Act, Combee's measure died in its first
committee in March the House Criminal
Justice Subcommittee. It drew opposition
from many prosecutors and law enforcement
officers, including Polk County Sheriff Grady
Judd, now president of the Florida Sheriffs
Association.
"There's no such thing as a warning shot;"
said Angela Corey, the state attorney in Duval,
Baker, Clay and Nassau counties. "That bill is
dangerous and shouldn't be implemented.
Prosecutors have a ton of discretion and case
law and jury instruction to guide us on the
filing of charges'."
This past week, the House Criminal Justice
Subcommittee passed the revamped measure,
now the Threatened Use of Force Act, by a 12-1
vote. Rep. Katie Edwards, D-Plantation, was
the prime co-sponsor, with 29 other co-spon-
sors from both parties.
The phrase"warning shot" never came up.
And the measure no longer would amend
10-20-Life it would amend the"stand
your ground" self-defense law. It would allow
people to display guns, threaten to use them or
fire warning shots if they were being attacked
and feared for their lives.
Under the 10-20-Life law, possessing a gun
while committing certain crimes is punishable
by at least 10 years in prison, discharging a gun
while committing those crimes is punishable
by at least 20 years in prison, and hurting or
killing someone during those crimes is punish-


able by 25 years to life in prison.
As cases like Alexander's have surfaced, so
has the will to add the threat of deadly force to
the use of deadly force in Florida law. Combee
can reel the cases off. So can Greg Newburn,
Florida project director for Families Against
Mandatory Minimums.
"10-20-Life was never intended to be used
against citizens who, in an act of self-defense,
threatened the use of force to stop an attacker,"
said National Rifle Association lobbyist Marion
Hammer, who has worked with Combee since
last year. "It was never intended to be used
on citizens who in fear for their own safety
threatened to use force to stop an attack. Yet
that's how certain prosecutors are using it -
certainly not all, but one is too many.":'
Yet many criminal justice professionals credit
10-20-Life with lowering the crime rate, and
many are wary of allowing citizens to do what
law enforcement cannot.
"Where's the warning shot going to go?"
Judd demanded. "Law enforcement officers
aren't permitted to fire warning shots why
do we want citizens to rip off a few rounds in
the community?"
The lone lawmakers to vote against the
committee substitute, Rep. Kionne McGhee,
D-Miami, said it sounded good at first"but
further research indicates differently'."
"We can begin by giving judges more
discretion" McGhee said."Speaking as a former
prosecutor, this (bill) is not the answer. The
answer is downward departure.":'
"Downward departure" means departing
from the applicable sentencing guideline
range to arrive at a lower sentence.
In a statement, Florida Sheriffs Association
spokeswoman Nanette Schimpf said the
sheriffs believe people should have to protect
themselves when in imminent danger, but
they haven't decided where they stand on
Combee's revised bill.
"The sheriffs have not taken an official
position ... and are continuing to review the
language to ensure that it does not cast too
wide a net and create unintended conse-
quences or public safety concerns," Schimpf
said. "We are pleased to see that the specific
authorization of warning shots and downward
departure from 10-20-Life are no longer in the
language."
Meanwhile, Marissa Alexander will get a
new trial in the spring, after an appeals court
found that the judge had given incorrect
instructions to the jury. Her bond hearing is
this week, and Corey opposes her release.


24' 2000 sea Hay SUNUtUDECK with 5.7 Bravo 3 uual Prop.
Only $15990. Plenty of seating. Porta Potty Room. Garmin
GPS, Stainless Bimini Top. New oil pan, oil exchanger &
shift cable just replaced.Turn key!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bavshoremarinefl.com


24 2002 HUN I bH M240
Water-Ballasted, Retractable Center-Board, 9.SEL
Nissan O.B. Motor & Trailer. 1 Owner, Sleeps 5, Nav
gear, full cushions & jackets Northern Water Sailed
Except the Last year. Ask about Charlotte Harbor
Access Dockage $9750 OBO 941-764-6468


rdplo
-~ Ad- I


I, iS


W.J E.?*UJ l I .3.- :,,r 1I .iH I U : I: -u l Inj,.:l.3 ','Y=m ;h -I "i'
Clean with rasied console.T-Top Rocket launcehers, w/ Float in 8"
of water & can run way offshore. Best of both worlds. Rare Find!


5.7L, 330 HP, fuel injected V8, Hard top with
Rod holders. Garmin electronics, Swim plat-
form, Many extras, in water nearVenice inlet
$26,000 Call Paul 941-258-6535


24'2004 TRITON
Superbly well kept loaded with extras. Also comes
with a complete full mooring and storage cover.
Also includes trailer. $40,000 Call John
@ Knot 10 Yacht Sales 941-915-3575


Cail Orion Wnoiean at 941-249-0177/
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only j lCt&m v A
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL M.1ARINA.-*.






25'1" 2004 Proline Walk Around Cuddy Wilh Nice
Honda 225hp Just Reduced! $34,990.00GREAT SHAPE!
Like New! 300hrs. Chart plotter GPS with Sonar. Hard
Top, A/C! Comes w/Aluminum trailer.
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com


pI



26' 2007 Andros 26 Tarpon $68,500
Call Richard Rosano at 203-912-9511
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only lalI llI ,
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL 'BM A RIN,]'N,


2f0hp alpha drive, 60 gal tuel tank, trailer. $7500
V.Vstal Cay Center.
941-639-6603
-A i WWW.CRYSTALCAY.COIVMJ .
%V 4225 Taylor Road, PGf







26' 1989 BOCA GRANDE Vj.- 11 Iri ,;,' -,:
Call Richard Rosano for Details! 203-912-9511
McCallMarineSales.corn
By Appt. ONLY lMm
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL INIAR I N Ai
Ry I N, s


24 2005 SHAMROCK : jC n-i 1-;d
Injuredturtle treated oosOhours. Call Richard Rosano 203-912-9511
*|r|im | **** *J **Sl fllMcCaflMarineSales.com
By appointment only
Injure t le t aLicensed Yacht Broker iA
SM SanLocated at BEAUTIFUL 'MAI


at Miami Seaquarum i


26' 1996 CHRISCRAFT CROWN
With new engine and trailer $15,000
Call Mike at 941-412-6430 or
the office at 941-833-0099
PUNTA GORDA YACHT BROKERS


Associated Press

MIAMI A threatened sea turtle is being
treated for a life-threatening gash to its shell
after apparently being struck by a boat in
South Florida, officials said.
A Miami homeowner spotted the lethargic,
injured loggerhead turtle Monday in a canal
that leads into Biscayne Bay, said Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
spokesman Jorge Pino.
The 250-pound turtle had a severe gash
running the length of its shell, and it was
missing its right front flipper, Pino said.
Wildlife officers loaded the turtle onto
their boat, covered it with a damp towel from
the homeowner and took it to the Miami
Seaquarium for treatment.
The turtle is fairly active but also is showing


signs of anemia, which may indicate that it is
suffering from parasites that may have made
the turtle listless and vulnerable to a boat
strike, Seaquarium spokeswoman Cristina
Rodriguez said.
Veterinarians will treat the turtle for para-
sites and disinfect the wound to its shell before
determining how to proceed with the turtle's
rehabilitation. The gash through its shell is
life-threatening, but it didn't damage the
spine so the turtle's mobility is not affected,
Rodriguez said.
The gash could take months or years to
heal completely, Rodriguez said. One possible
treatment involves temporarily placing metal
plates across the shell to close the gap.
The missing flipper appears to be an old
injury that doesn't threaten the turtle's
survival, Rodriguez said.


24 2008 Bay Scoul 240 4i'",, ,,,-ai :-i, i.: l.-i
boat!! Call Megan McCall at 941-268-3198
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only Al I
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL N.A R:fI NA.


REDUCED!
24 Privaleer Renegade 1987, ilh Iiailei, 260hp molo,
Stereo, Furuno Radar, GPS, plotter, much more! $14,000.
Cfvtal Cay Center
941-639-6603
WWW.CRYSTALCAY.COMVJ
%V 4225 Taylor Road, PG


and out, just waxed, 5.7Volvo w/289 hrs,
generator w/86 hrs, full camper enclosure.
Recent survey rated above average. Asking $34,000.
Call Ray Mason r'f3kr Oa,,
941-505-7269. T U





* ann inn In flfnknni.,..earn
MUUHaEEE~niUmaHtIEUE~i5.SmOEEil


Call 941-42k3iG- -
to list your boattodavY! __


26' Pursuit Denali 2670: Excellenl condilion,T-200Yamaha 28' Luhrs Open, twin Yanmar Diesel, 2006,
four strokes w/285 hrs, hardtop w/enclosure, windlass, $119K Contact Daryl at 941-685-2399
elec. head, Garmin GPS and fishfinder. Asking $68,500. or the office at 941-833-0099
Call Cpt. Bob Babineau, $S it er ," Offered by
941-626-1329 Un (- u aPunta Gorda Yacht Brokers


Too early to commit



on Okeechobee



cleanup funding?


News Service of Florida

STUART House Speaker Will Weatherford,
R-Wesley Chapel, got a quick lesson about the
ecological and economic crisis that Treasure Coast
residents faced this summer as polluted waters
were released daily from Lake Okeechobee.
But after an aerial tour of the region and the
lake this week, Weatherford said it's too early to
estimate how much of a $220 million Senate plan
to reduce future pollutants from the lake will land
in the state budget for the next fiscal year.
The package, intended to improve water
quality in the St. Lucie and Caloosahatchee
estuaries, was supported by the Senate Select
Committee on Indian River Lagoon and Lake
Okeechobee Basin last week, but still has to get
full legislative support and the backing of Gov.
Rick Scott, who has a couple of big-ticket items in
the plan.
Weatherford, who was invited to tour the
region by Sen. Joe Negron, R-Stuart, the author of
the Senate package, said funding will depend on
a revenue outlook that will be updated in March,
as lawmakers begin the 60-day regular session.
"We're aware of the problem, we know the
problem doesn't get solved without some
resources, so we know that's going to be needed;'
Weatherford said after the helicopter tour. "But as
far as how much we're going to have to spend, the
revenue picture can change over months'."
State economists in September released a
report projecting a surplus of $845.7 million for
the 2014-15 fiscal year, setting off a flurry of
budget requests.
Negron, who hosted Weatherford's tour with
the South Florida Water Management District,
has said each funding request in the package will
require an offset in the budget. Meanwhile, Scott
has requested a $500 million cut in taxes and fees
for next year.
Weatherford's tour included a brief"round-
table" in the Lyric's Flagler Center along the St.
Lucie River in downtown Stuart. The roundtable
was made up of local officials and residents
advocating for state assistance in cleaning the
water and offering their vision for the majority of
the flow from the lake being directed south into
the Everglades.
"I wish you could have been here a few months
earlier to see how incredibly awful it was and
what we had to put up with for five months;'said
Jacqui Thurlow-Lippisch, a real estate agent who
also serves on the Sewall's Point Town
Commission.
Sewall's Point is a peninsula that divides the St.
Lucie River and the St. Lucie Estuary.
The nutrient-rich water sent from the lake has
reportedly killed oysters and sea grass, along with
causing a toxic algae outbreak that during the
summer forced Martin County health officials to
warn residents against coming into contact with
the water.
Rep. MaryLynn Magar, R-Tequesta, said the
decline in water quality has been an economic
disaster for the region.


"It's not just the fishermen, but the tourism,
the hotels, the restaurants that weren't seeing
people, the real estate that wasn't selling'" Magar
told Weatherford.
Magar attended the roundtable with Treasure
Coast Reps. Larry Lee, D-Port St. Lucie, Debbie
Mayfield, R-Vero Beach, and Gayle Harrell,
R-Stuart. Each said they will push the House to
support the Senate package.
Among the governor's recommendations for
the water cleanup is $90 million that would
be spread over three years to bridge a 2.6-mile
section of the Tamiami Trail west of Miami.
Other provisions of the Senate package include;
$40 million to speed construction of the state's
portion of a C-44 reservoir and stormwater
treatment area for the Indian River Lagoon-South
Restoration Project; $32 million for projects tied
to ensuring that all surface water discharges
into the Everglades Protection Area meet water
quality standards; and a request for the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers to give the Department of
Environmental Protection authority to regulate
releases when the risk of failure of the dike
around Lake Okeechobee is less than 10 percent.
Weatherford, following Negron's repeated
examples, offered support to the request for more
state control.
"I was frankly astonished to see that the
federal government starts basically turning the
spigot on, I think, a little bit prematurely," Weath-
erford said."When I realized how little control we
have as a state and as a community in regard to
that discharge, it is something we need to work
with our federal partners on."
The Army Corps tries to maintain the water
level of the lake between 12.5 feet and 15.5 feet
to lessen stress on the Herbert Hoover Dike. The
Army Corps, which has declined to comment on
the recommendations, estimates that when the
lake is slightly above 18.5 feet, the risk of failure is
considered at 45 percent.
When the water level is low, the Army Corps
generally defers on water release decisions to the
South Florida Water Management District.
The Senate package also recommends
increasing the funding for the C-43 and C-44
reservoirs that link the lake with the estuaries;
cleaning water that comes into the lake from the
Kissimmee River; evaluating means to reduce
nutrients from septic tanks; raising the allowed
water levels in canals by a few inches; and a
general call to support projects that would even-
tually shift releases of water to the south through
the Everglades.
The proposal to move water through the
Everglades, estimated at more than $1 billion
and requiring a massive federal partnership, has
been rejected three times, in 1994,1999 and
2009. The South Florida Water Management
District concluded in 2009 the proposal was not
the most cost-effective or viable way to increase
flows south due to the changing landscape of
South Florida, which would require an extensive
network of pumps to recreate the historic sheet
flow.


Call Meagan McCall at 941-268-3198
McCallMarineSales.com
By Appt ONLY! G i
Licensed Yacht Broker 1
Located at BEAUTIFUL IARI NA







27'2006 GLASTRON
With its beautiful condition and many fine
amenities, this boat is a must-have
for any boating enthusiast.$34,000 Call John @
Knot 10Yacht Sales 941-915-3575
I \





27' 2006 SEA RAY AJ
This 27 Amberjack is the perfect all around
package. Engine has been updated
and shows 30 hrs.$40,000 CALL JOHN
@ Knot 10 Yacht Sales 941-915-3575







28 1991 Sea Ray Weekender: Two rebuilt
Mercs with low hours, large cockpit for
fishing, new interior
upholstery. Ask $23,900. Pj O e-
Ray Mason, 941-505-7269.- yROA'


28' 2001 SEA SPRITE aft cabin,
310 dual prop AC, GPS, bridge enclosure,
electric head, full galley, 45 mph, only 90 hrs.
lift kept. Excellent condition.
$28,500. 941-639-7890.







28' Boston Whaler Conquest 2000, T/250HP,Yamaha's,
A/C, genset, Furuno radar, color fish finder, Northstar
GPS chart, Standard Horizon VHF, Clarion CD/stereo,
Simpson Lawrence windless, twin spotlights, outrig-
gers, custom canvas, pristine condition, $69,000,
941-966-5400


0 CrUIr TUYIIL It01 ,.I iWlM IVIi UiU enyiIne,
Full canvas covers, Many extras. $25,000.
c stall Cay Center
9 -* 41-838-6603 -/
- UVWW -CRYSTALCAY-CONIJljW
4225 Taylor Road, Ps


(Nokomis), T/270 Chrysler I/B,Garmin color
plotter, V berth & pilot berth, encl. head.
$26,000 Reduced to $21,000 Bob Nordstrom
CPYB. 978-852-4844 World Class Yacht Sales


Z9 1 9 Curuisers
SVery clean with owner having kept her in great condition,
new bottom service, batteries and cockpit carpet are just
a few of the upgrades. $19,000 Call John
@ Knot 10 Yacht Sales 941-915-3575


29' 6" REGAL COMMODORE 2002 Twin 10,
AC, Radar, GPS, Canvas Camper Covers.
Electric Toliet, TV, VCR, Windless, Generator.
Loaded. $41,000 508-942-4600.


New seals in the outdrives. Radar Depth finder GPS
Marine Stereo, Bimini Tops, SS Prop. Full stand up
head w/ shower. Aft cabin with plenty of room. LOADED!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com


JU 1000 IVIUIItCICy OU z -lUIrCI P^,bUUU
Call Meagan McCall at 941-268-3198
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only An *
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL Ii \ I I N .\'1
PREDUCEDW


Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989
McCallMarineSales.corn
By appointment only I i
Licensed Yacht Broker ffl_ SSw
Located at BEAUTIFUL I.M RIN,-]





* ~g~ueeflFieUei.eeu
uu~a~mhm~w.umMmmumEumm~.mauumEm


Clearwater's new



planned aquarium



may shrink in size


Tampa Bay Times


CLEARWATER Clearwater's new planned
aquarium, propelled by a tail-less dolphin, may
shrink in size and cost less than half of the earlier
$160.5 million estimate, aquarium officials said
this week.
Last week, Clearwater voters approved a
referendum to allow Clearwater Marine Aquarium
to build its new facility on land now occupied by
City Hall. Discussions before the vote estimated
the size at 200,000 square feet, though aquarium
officials, at times, suggested that the size and cost
might come down.
In interviews with the Tampa Bay Times,
officials gave a more precise picture. They are still
hashing out details, but said the final product
might cost as little as $60 million.
The size might drop to 150,000 square feet,
with room to expand later, said chief operating
officer Frank Dame. A preliminary projection of
$800 a square foot might shrink to $400.
"We may have to cut back on some of the
wow factors;' Dame said. "We can make it a very
nice facility, but it is not going to be the Georgia
Aquarium. Monterey Bay is not the Georgia
Aquarium either, but it still attracts millions of
visitors a year.":'
Former Mayor Frank Hibbard, who will lead
fundraising efforts for a 2017 opening, said
aquarium officials will meet this week to consider
possible savings among them, building in
stages to cover more construction costs through
ongoing revenue rather than debt.
A dolphin tank, the two-story coral reef tank
and living spaces for the otters and sea turtles is
"non-negotiable, Hibbard said.
But delaying outdoor attractions like the Ever-
glades exhibit and manatee display gives visitors
a reason to return, he said.
The $800-a-square-foot estimate came from
Atlanta architects who used the ritzy Georgia
Aquarium as a template, he said.
"We didn't want to be low-balling and then not
be able to meet constructions costs;' Hibbard said.
"That being said, I think it was overdone.":'
The Georgia Aquarium was underwritten by a
Home Depot founder who "spared no expense.'
Hibbard said. "I1 don't think that fits with the
personality of CMA. We have humbler wants.":'
Aquarium CEO David Yates said spending a lot
of money to fine-tune plans before the refer-
endum didn't make sense.
"We didn't sit down, have the referendum pass
and then say,'Let's change this thing,'?"Yates said.
Tom Petersen, a vocal aquarium opponent,
said a smaller facility would mean fewer people
through the turnstiles. The aquarium has pledged
to pay the city $7.5 million from ticket sales for
a new city hall, he noted, and that would take
longer with lower attendance.
"It puts the whole thing up in the air," Petersen
said.
Last year, CMA drew 750,000 visitors to its
53,000-square-foot aquarium fashioned from a
former sewage treatment plant on Island Estates.
Throngs came to see Winter, whose prosthetic


tail was memorialized in the 2011 movie Dolphin
Tale. Filming is under way on a sequel.
Dame said a new 150,000-square-foot aquarium
could draw up to 2.1 million visitors a year.
"If we reduce overhead and attract the people
we say we're going to attract, we can pay back the
city more quickly,";' Dame said.
Mayor George Cretekos said he isn't worried
that a smaller aquarium will put a financial pinch
on the city.
"The important thing for us not to lose sight
of: This is going to be Winter's new home. Do you
need 200,000 square feet to tell that story or can
you do it in 150,000 square feet? I don't think it
will have much of an impact.":'
Though the nonprofit aquarium plans to
cover some construction costs through private
donations, officials also hope to tap into Pinellas
County's 5 percent hotels and motel "bed tax.":'
The tax now brings in more than $30 million
a year, which goes for marketing, beach nour-
ishment and various capital projects that attract
tourists.
An obligation to help payoffTropicana Field
bonds expires in 2015, freeing up about $6 million
a year for other projects. That amount could
double if the county bumps the tax up 1 percent
as allowed by state law.
The Tourist Development Council met Tuesday
and spent much of its time discussing how to
evaluate spending requests given the coming
influx of cash.
County Commissioner Karen Seel was
appointed to lead a committee to create criteria
for judging competing projects.
Based on a preliminary survey released earlier,
the aquarium may face headwinds.
When the tourist council's 17 members were
recently polled on their priorities, 11 did not want
to finance aquariums, according to a survey by the
Tampa firm Research Data Services. Five favored
money for aquariums and one vote came in late
and did not make the report.
Beaches were the council's top priority for
capital spending, followed by amateur and spring
training sports facilities. Professional sports
facilities like a new stadium for the Tampa Bay
Rays garnered mixed support.
"I think the reality is the longer the Rays
discussion doesn't happen, the longer they're
focused on Tampa, the more we're going to invest
those dollars elsewhere;'said Pinellas Commission
Chairman Ken Welch.
Dame found the council's lukewarm response
to aquariums disappointing, but said he hoped
to change minds in about six months when the
aquarium makes its official request.
Among other things, aquarium officials will
tout a financial impact study that indicates the
aquarium will generate $2 billion to $5 billion in
economic activity in the five years since the 2011
release of Dolphin Tale.
"It's an internationally recognized brand, Dame
told the council."It's worthy to have a building
that is appropriate for our visiting out-of-town
guests to come in, rather than a former sewage
treatment plant.":'


......................................U11.......
beautiful! $109,900 Call Meagan McCall at 941-268-3198
McCallMarinesales.com
By appointment only L
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL .,


30 CRUISER IND 1988,Twin 350s, 10 beam.
Full cabin, bimini top & more. 48, 000. $16,900.
cc tal Cay Cenr
2 a41-l39-6R 03 -d M


Call Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only .M IM
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL .M A R INA.]


;j I &zuu. Inapair Ila IV \ji lllatiul. e Lwutu o veviw~ lllII,
T-Mercs w/300 hrs, Bravo III outdrives, well main-
tained, lift kept. Owner open to a trade for 24'-26'
walkaround. Asking $98,000.
Ray Mason,941-505-7269 C.?, ZO v-
Pier One Yacht Sales V tTO,-,


31 Sporlcrafl 2002 3150: Lill keplIT- Mercruiser MPhI
5KW Kohler gen set, cherry interior loaded
w/amenities, radar, autopilot, 1.2MPG at 24 cruise.
$69,000. T;t 0r O^%
Ray Mason. 941-505-7269 rnLn $niI


clean inside & out, 5212 Garmin chartplotter, lift
kept & serviced on a regular basis. Trade an
option. Ask $75,000.
Ray Mason, Pf, Oe-
941-505-7269 I4cnir sIB


AC, heat, in mast furling, 1 owner,
$79,000. 941-347-4670
email irvina32@centurylink.net







33'2004 GRADY WHITE
Meticulously maintained and upgraded, this owner
knows how to keep his boat right! $129,900
Call John @ Knot 10 Yacht Sales 941-915-3575


33' OAL, 1998 Maxum 3000. Twin 4.3
Mercs. VERY well maintained. Above
average cond. Gen, Radar, GPS, AC/Heat,
Engine Flush Kits, Fridge, Micro, Sleeps
4-6. Lift Kept. $32,000 Call 941.268.5421


............. ....;...;;..;..;....;.


34' 2000 LEGACY 34 EXPRESS ..
Call Richard Horst 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By Appt ONLY!
Licensed Yacht Broker G
Located at BEAUTIFUL MI ..' RI NA.J
SREDUED! i


34' ZUU.J 34U OLM rHAY OUINUflINLfl $129,U
Call Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only A I
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL MA'RINA-J


34'2006 FOUR WINNS
This is one of the most beautiful boats in its class.
She is in superb condition showing
its high pride of ownership. $2,000. $87,000
Call John@ Knot 10Yacht Sales 941-915-3575


1 pound blue crab crab meat
2 tbsp butter
1 tbsp flour
2 quarts half-and-half
1/2 cup chopped onion
1/2 cup chopped celery
Chopped parsley, to taste
Salt and pepper, to taste
1/4 cup sherry
1/2 pint unsweetened whipped cream (optional)


A clip-n-save seafood B____ .......... P .'l>i^ i4 -m
recipe provided by MR
32' 2006 Century for $109,999 34' 2006 SEARAY 340 SUNDANCER S139,900
Call Orion for details at 941-249-0177 Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989
McCallMarineSales.com McCallMarineSales.com
9J^WUW^WT ^W By appointment only 4I L By appointment only & ,I
Licensed Yacht Broker nw Licensed Yacht Broker G i
Located at BEAUTIFUL M[M,1AKI NA.-] 1 Located at BEAUTIFUL [rM A R I NA .


Melt butter in double boiler. Add flour and blend to form a roux. Slowly add half-and-half, stirring
constantly. Add onion, parsley, celery, salt and pepper and cook until soup thickens. Add crab
meat and sherry. Serve with a dollop of whipped cream on top and crusty bread or crackers.

Recipe adapted from all-fish-seafood-recipes.com


32' 2008 Century Offshore Twin 350's outboards
$129,900 Call Megan McCall at 941-268-3198
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only n ii
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL LIMA RIN,.J


atalina mkl, 1989, diesel, new canvas,
.9K Call Jim at 941-740-0389 or the
office at 941-833-0099
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers
and Redfish Yachts


- Z-





Huw Miasynia *w rrii f WBiV i



BULLETIN
FROM PAGE 3

SIERRA CLUB NOVEMBER MEETING
The Greater Charlotte Harbor Sierra Club will hold its next
meeting Nov. 19 at 7 p.m. at the Unitarian Universalist
Fellowship (1532 Forrest Nelson Blvd., Port Charlotte). Guest
speaker will be Bobbi Rodgers, Environmental Resource
Manager with Charlotte Harbor Environmental Center (CHEC)
and Manager of the Cedar Point Environmental Park in
Englewood. Ms. Rodgers also conducts biological studies
within conservation lands and conducts environmental edu-
cation programs. Her topic will be "CHEC 25 Years of Local
Environmental Education" and will include an overview of
CHEC's mission and ongoing programs. For more information
about GCHSC meetings and outings, visit Bit.ly/19vQdap.

EXPLORING THE LESS TRAVELED HALF OF
SLEEPING TURTLES PRESERVE NORTH
Explore the 'sleepy'side of Sleeping Turtles Preserve North
(3462 Border Road, Venice) with Sarasota County volunteers
and Florida Native Plant Society members Al Squires and
Denny Girard on Nov. 20th from 9 to 11 a.m. Experience the
meandering trails while learning about the natural lands and
the plants they support. Register online at ScGov.net. Click
"Calendar"on the left.


FWC MEETING IN WESTON
All interested individuals may speak at workshops or
meetings of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (Commission) within the guidelines established
by the Commission. Starts at 8:30 a.m. Nov. 20,21 at the
Bonaventure Resort and Spa( 250 Racquet Club Road,
Weston). Swordfish, blue runners, ducks, geese and coots
regulations to be addressed. Visit bit.ly/18qBSbo.

GOOD FIRE, BAD FIRE ORANY FIRE?
WALK AND TALK
Hear why fire is important for public safety and environmental
health from experts on Nov. 21st from 9 to 11 a.m. at Manasota
Scrub Preserve (2695 Bridge St., Englewood). Fire is a Florida
natural occurrence and plays a large part in preserving our
native landscape. Pre-registration is necessary and is available
online at ScGov.net. Call 941-861-5000 for more details.

DROP YOUR DRAWERS FOR
SEW MUCH COMFORT
A non-profit organization that supplies our active men and
woman in the military that have been wounded in the line
of duty at no charge. On Nov. 23rd there will be a fundraising
event at Kellys II on Dearborn Street in Englewood from 11
a.m.- 4 p.m. Raffles, door prizes and live music supplied
by Sonny and Lloyd from 11a.m.-1 p.m., Just Us from 1
BULLETIN 130


I IIj
1. -, II. I


inese uring are open ro me puiic mree oTcnarge.
Paddle participants must provide own PFD, water-
craft and be able to swim. Voluntary donations to
the Charlotte Sierra Club are gratefully accepted.
Reservations are required for all outings. For more
information see website: http://bit.ly/16iF0nM
LETTUCE LAKE PADDLE: Nov. 14th from 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. with Master Naturalist Rick Fried through a maze
of channels into the Peace River, exploring side lagoons
to the Nav-A-Gator for lunch and back a different
route. Voluntary donations to Sierra Club are gratefully
accepted. To reserve call 941-637-8805.
FOOTPRINTS TRAIL AT BABCOCK RANCH HIKE:
Nov. 19th from 8:30 to 11 a.m. with Florida Master
Naturalists John Phillips and Jamie Reynolds through
pine flatwoods, prairie, cypress swamp on trails created
by Florida Master Naturalist Program graduates.
Voluntary donations to Sierra Club are gratefully
accepted. To reserve call 941-639-7468.
MYRTLE CREEK PADDLE: Nov. 20th from 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. with Florida Master Naturalists Jim Story
through freshwater jungle and brackish channels to
lower Shell Creek and waterfall over the dam contain-
ing Punta Gorda's water supply. Voluntary donations to
Charlotte Sierra Club are gratefully accepted. To reserve
call 941-505-8904.
PRAIRIE CREEK PADDLE: Nov. 22nd from 8:30
a.m. to 12p.m. with Florida Master Naturalist Jamie
Reynolds through cypress wetlands. Participants must
provide pfd, watercraft and be able to swim. Voluntary
donations to Charlotte Sierra Club are gratefully
accepted. To reserve call 941-637-8284.
PRAIRIE CREEK PRESERVE HIKE: Nov. 25th from
8:30 to 11 a.m. with Florida Master Naturalists, John
Phillips and Jamie Reynolds through pine flatwoods,
palmetto prairies, marshes and wetlands. Voluntary do-
nations to Charlotte Sierra Club are gratefully accepted.
To reserve call 941-639-7468.
LONGER SHELL CREEK PADDLE: Nov. 26th from
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. with Florida Master Naturalist Rick


riea rnrrougn cypress roresrana looming asrers..
Participants must provide pfd, watercraft and be able
to swim. Voluntary donations to Charlotte Sierra Club
are gratefully accepted. To reserve call 941-637-8805.
PRAIRIE SHELL CREEK PRESERVE HIKE: Dec. 5th
from 8:30 to 11 a.m. with John Phillips and Jamie
Reynolds through pine flatwoods, scrub and freshwater
pond habitats, Voluntary donations to Charlotte Sierra
Club are gratefully accepted. Reservations are required.
To reserve call 941-639-7468.
LETTUCE LAKE PADDLE: Dec. 10th from 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. with Master Naturalist Rick Fried through a
maze of channels into the Peace River, exploring side
lagoons to the Nav-A-Gator for lunch and back a
different route. Voluntary donations to Sierra Club are
gratefully accepted. To reserve call 941-637-8805.
SHELL CREEK PRESERVE HIKE: Dec. 12th from 8:30 to
11 a.m. with Florida Master Naturalists John Phillips and
Jamie Reynolds through pine flatwoods, scrub and hard-
wood hammock. Voluntary donations to Charlotte Sierra
Club are gratefully accepted. To reserve call 941-639-7468.
MYRTLE CREEK PADDLE: Dec. 13th from 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. with Florida Master Naturalists Jim Story
through freshwater jungle and brackish channels to
lower Shell Creek and waterfall over dam containing
Punta Gorda's water supply. Voluntary donations to
Charlotte Sierra Club are gratefully accepted. To reserve
call 941-505-8904.
PRAIRIE CREEK PADDLE: Dec. 16th from 8:30 a.m. to
12 p.m. with Florida Master NaturalistJamie Reynolds
though cypress wetlands. Participants must provide
pfd, watercraft and be able to swim. Voluntary dona-
tions to Charlotte Sierra Club are gratefully accepted. To
reserve call 941-637-8284.
CHARLOTTE FLATWOODS PRESERVE HIKE: Dec.
20th from 8:30 to 11 a.m. with Master Naturalists John
Phillips and Jamie Reynolds through pine flatwoods,
wetland marshes and freshwater habitats. Voluntary
donations to Charlotte Sierra Club are gratefully
accepted. To reserve call 941-639-7468.


Call 941-429 iG-
to list your boattoday! __


JUST REDUCED!


34' CruiserYacht Express, $99,900
Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only Ai& I
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL TMA= R i N ]







34' Sea Ray 340 Sportsman 2006
This is the upscale package with lots of
standard gear and over 700hp total $116,900
ContactTommy Head at 941-769-2594 Punta Gorda
Yacht Brokers & Redfish Yachts 941-639-9400
,_.. .......
^^^R "*-"" """


35' 1999 CARVER MARINER SPORT CRUISER
Listed for $63,500. Call Richard Horste at 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only All i A
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL [.NIARINA-l1







35 2014 Regal Sport Coupe -':::
Call Richard Horste at 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only ,A l&B
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL .,.I. RiN\*]


r-uUln la IUdi UdI aiUUpJ, dIi IUUIIne, 4U -MULt I Lt nMvL 1f-n i 1,-
diesel, wheel. $24,995 Totally Refurbished with Rebuilt Diesel
Call Mike 941-412-6430 or Ford Lehman, Fiberglass Hull.
the office at 941-833-0099 Full NewTanks. Asking $75,000
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers Call 941-408-9572


I '' 1




SARASOTA POWER SQUADRON 941-400-6467
Sail Trim Sem inar............................................................................................................6:30 to 7:34 p.m Nov. 21
Sail Trim Sem inar (Advanced) .....................................................................................................i7 to 9 p.m Dec. 5

VENICE SAIL & POWER SQUADRON 941-493-2837
Call for information

PEACE RIVER SAIL & POWER SQUADRON 941-637-0766
ABC Boating Course....................................................................................................... 8:30 a.m to 5 p.m Nov. 30
Charting Sem inar................................................................................................................. 9 a.m to Noon Dec. 7
G PS Sem inar .......................................................................................................................... I to 3:30 p.m Dec. 7

CAPE CORAL POWER SQUADRON 239-549-9754
How to Use a Chart Sem inar .....................................................................................................17 tp 9 p.m Nov. 21

Provided by Greg Scotten




PROGRAM DATES LOCATION CONTACT
Navigating with GPS..................................... Nov. 14................................. Punta Gorda ................941-639-3811
About Boating Safety.................................... Nov. 16 .................Nov.16 ................ Sarasota ...................... 941-758-5954
About Boating Safety.................................... Dec. 2 ...................Dec.2 ................Cape Coral ...................239-283-2208
About Boating Safety.................................... Dec. 21 .................Dec.21 ................ Sarasota ...................... 941-758-5954
About Boating Safety.................................... Dec. 21 ................................. Fort Myers...................239-322-7089
Provided by Dave Nielsen


REDUCED


36' 1998 CARVER Mariner 350,
Twin Merc Cruisers, All Electronics,
Shows Like New!
$69,900. 941-255-5311


36' 2000 Carver Mariner Diesels: (PRICED BELOW GAS
ENGINE MODELS) Twin Cummins diesels, Westerbeke
diesel gen set, radar, autopilot, much more. Just detailed
and serviced. Asking $79,900. Call Tier 0 "w
Ray Mason, 941-505-7269 YAUiil Au


'- _

36'2008 TWIN VEE
With a tower, cutty cabin and twin 300 HP Suzuki
engines makes this boat a great find.
$129,000 Call John @
Knot 10 Yacht Sales 941-915-3575


41'1989 Egg Harbor
Beautiful condition shows a meticulous owner
that has loved his boat and has it professionally
maintained. $89,000
Call John @ Knot 10Yacht Sales 941-915-3575


42' Chris-Craft Convertible, Diesel, $110K
Contact Daryl at 941-685-2399
or the office at 941-833-0099
Offered by
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers

/ I l .


McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only Al I
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL INI R,1N.


CaKK DicK Horst hor Uetails 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only HA Mi i
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL IA MARRINA-%..







37' SeaRay 370 aft cabin,Twin diesel,
Genset and much more!
Call Ed at 941-628-0167
or the office at 941-833-0099
PUNTA GORDA YACHT BROKERS


39' Mainship Trawler 1999 with single
diesel, AC and currently on the hard for
your inspection! $99,000 Contact Jim at
941-740-0389 Punta GordaYacht Brokers
and Redfish Yachts 941-833-0099


V q
40' DEFEVER DOWNEASTTRAWLER 1980,
twin diesel, new fiberglass decks,
fuel tanks, water tanks,
849,09, NOW $35,900
941-505-1770


li


............... I


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BULLETIN
FROM PAGE 29


p.m.-2:30 p.m. and Beth Marshall from 2:30 p.m.- 4 p.m.,
Leslie Dacosta fromI11a.m.-1 p.m. and Danny Beach from 2
p.m.-4 p.m. The event is being hosted by the GFWC Rotonda
West Womans Club, and members of the Vietnam Traveling Wall
committee. A $10.00 donation will be collected at the door. Food
and beverages will be on site for purchase. Contact Laura 941-
662-5503 or Cher 941-223- 5990 for further details or questions.

CHARLOTTE HARBOR NATURE FESTIVAL
The Charlotte Harbor Nature Festival is a regional family-friendly
celebration where people can learn about topics affecting the natural
environment of Southwest Florida. It takes place Nov. 23rd at 10 a.m.
at the Charlotte Sports Park (2300 El Jobean Rd., Port Charlotte).
There will be a wide variety of activities for adults and children, which
include guided walks in Tippecanoe Environmental Park, hands-on
activities, exhibits, vendors, music, a Children's Discovery Zone and
more. Admission and parking are both free. There is no rain date.
There is no need to register to attend the festival. Call 941-235-5010.

SIERRA CLUB'S THANKSGIVING
MYAKKA RIVER WALK
Join Sierra's Group for a Thanksgiving Myakka River Walk at the
Myakka River State Park (13208 State Route 72, Sarasota) on
Nov. 28th at 8:30 a.m. This will be a 5-mile walk through beau-
tiful and varied ecosystems, including a Pot Luck. Bring water,
sunscreen, repellent and wear wettable shoes. Sponsored by
the Manatee Sarasota Sierra Club. A donation $5 is appreciated.
Call Sally at 941-484-4113 for more information.

1 1i :I

Tle Peace RiverAudubon Societywill0os5te
following field trips and walkabouts. These trips are
free and open to the public.
CIRCLE B BAR FIELD TRIP: At Circle B Bar Reserve
(4399 Winter Lake Rd., Lakeland) on Nov. 16th.
Meet at 6:30 a.m. at the Peachland Mall. Call Bob
Winter at 941 -828-2627 for more information.
PRARIE SHELL CREEK WALKABOUT: At Prairie Shell
Creek (3081 Duncan Road, Punta Gorda) on Dec. 3rd at
8 a.m. Call Phyllis Cady at 941-286-7638 for more info.
OLLIE'S WALKABOUT: At Ollie's Pond Park (18235
Avon Ave., Port Charlotte) on Jan.1Istat8 a.m.
Contact Stu and Louise Lewis at 603-742-2874.
WILD TURKEY STRAND FIELD TRIP: At Wild
Turkey Strand Preserve (11901 Rod & Gun Club
Road, Fort Myers) on Jan. 25th. Meet at 7 a.m. at
south car pool location. Call Jim Knoy at 303-868-
8337 for more information.
PUNTA GORDA HISTORY PARK WALKABOUT:
At Punta Gorda History Park (501 Shreve St., Punta
Gorda) on Feb. 4th at 8 a.m. Call Starr Zachritz at
941-391-4446 for more information.
CELERY FIELDS FIELD TRIP: At Celery Fields (100
Coburn Rd., Sarasota) on Feb. 22nd. Meet at 7 a.m.
at the north car pool location. Call Eleanor Marr at
941-624-4182 for more information.
DEEP CREEK PRESERVE WALKABOUT: At Deep
Creek Preserve (10797 SW Peace River Street,
Arcadia) on March 4th. Call Shannon McGinnis at
941-268-0429 for more information.
BABCOCK FIELD TRIP: At Babcock-Webb Wildlife
Management Area on March 22nd. Meet at 7 a.m. at
the Babcock-Webb entrance. Call Dave Lancaster at
586-214-0203 for more information.


BIRDING IN CUBA HIGHLIGHTS
Venice High School zoology teacher, expert birder and
photographer highlights his recent birding trip to Cuba. He will
point out some of the 162 bird species his group witnessed. The
presentation will be held at the Venice Audubon Center (4002 S.
Tamiami Trail, Venice) on Nov. 26th at 6:30 p.m. The event is free.
Call 941-496-8984 for more info or visit VeniceAudubon.org.

VIEWING AT MOORE OBSERVATORY
Observation sessions the James and Barbara Moore Observatory (26300
Airport Rd., Punta Gorda) begin about 30-45 minutes after it is dark
enough to see the stars and continue as long as stargazers linger. Prior
to complete darkness, visitors cannot be admitted into the observatory
asthe equipment needsto be setup and aligned with the stars, but
early arrivers are welcome to enjoy views of the lake and the scenery of
the campusfrom the lakeside picnic tables. The public sessions are free,
weather permitting. all 941-637-3518 or941-637-5669.

FAKAHATCHEE ISLAND CRUISE
The Friends of Fakahatchee are offering a guided holiday cruise
to historic Fakahatchee Island Thursday on Dec. 19th. The island
off the coast of Everglades City was once home to a thriving
community of farming and fishing families. It even had a school. In
earlier days, Calusa Indians made the island their home. Everglades
National Boat Tours will head forthe island through the mangroves
of the Ten Thousand Islands. Once on the island, a naturalist will
point out unusual plants on the path to the historic cemetery. Cold
drinks and snacks will be served on the boat. The cruise begins at
the Everglades National Park shelter near the docks at 2:30 p.m.
and returns at 5:30 p.m. Advance reservations at $75 per person are
required. For details visit OrchidSwamp.org or call Bruce Bunch at
239-567-7919 contact him at brucebunch@yahoo.com.




C arlote Harbor Environmental enter and te
Charlotte County Natural Resource Department will
be conducting the following free guided walks and
programs in November. Unless noted, all walks begin
at 9 a.m. For directions or further information, call
Cedar Point Environmental Park at 941-475-0769.
NOV. 14: Join Gloria Hanson on a guided walk
through the old growth pine flatwoods and
mangrove fringe of 125-acre Oyster Creek/Ann
Dever Regional Park in Englewood. Meet at the San
Casa entrance.
NOV. 14: Get wild & wet! Join Bobbi Rodgers
at Cedar Point Park on a Seagrass Adventure
Wading Trip into Lemon Bay in search of marine
organisms such as sea horse, crabs and juvenile fish.
Registration required.
NOV. 17: Join Pat Peterson on a guided walk
through 308-acre Tippecanoe Environmental Park.
This Charlotte County park includes habitats such as
scrub, pine flatwoods, marsh and wetlands. Meet
behind the Charlotte County Sports Park.
NOV. 21: Join a CHEC volunteer on a guided walk
through the scrub and pine flatwoods of 217-acre
Amberjack Environmental Park in Cape Haze. Meet
in the parking lot at the end of Gasparilla Pines Blvd.
NOV. 23: Guided walks by Bill & Margaret Dunson,
Denny Girard and Al Squires at the Annual Charlotte
Harbor Nature Festival from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
at the Charlotte County Sports Park. ALSO: food,
music, numerous vendors, and more! Info at www.
chnep.org
NOV. 24: Join a CHEC volunteer on a guided walk
through the scrub and pine flatwoods of 217-acre
Amberjack Environmental Park in Cape Haze. Meet
in the parking lot at the end of Gasparilla Pines Blvd.


Whatisasolunar THURSDAY FRIDAY
table? The sun Sunrise: 6:49 a.m. Sunrise: 6:49 a
and moon, even Sunset: 5:39 p.m. Sunset: 5:38 p
when they are out Moonrise: 3:47 p.m. Moonrise: 4:26
of sight, exert forces Moonset: 3:57 a.m. Moonset: 4:54z
wild creatures can Moon Phase Moon Phas
feel.Theseforces 91%"Waxing gibbous 96% Waxing gib

andfotheranimals Major Times Major Time
feed.Weatherand 9:55 a.m. 11:55 a.m. 10:43 a.m. 12:43
tide also play a role, 10:19 p.m.-12:19 a.m. 11:07 p.m.-1:07
but expect fish to be Minor Times Minor Time
more active during 3:57 a.m. 4:57 a.m. 4:54 a.m. 5:54
the majorand minor 3:47 p~m. -4-47 pm 4:26 pm 5-26


SUNDAY
Suririi;e': 51 a fl
Suri't 5 ?.'p ni
M nri.e 5 5 3 p fl
Moonset: 6:45 a.m.
Moon Phase
100% Full moon
Major Times

12:21 p.m.- 2:21 p.m.
Minor Times
6:45 a.m. 7:45 a.m.
5:53 p.m. 6:53 p.m.
Prediction: Best


rreaiction: Gooa

MONDAY
uririf;v 1:. 5 a3 f l
Surit ; ?.7 p ni
M io rir i :' 34.' p fli
Moonset: 7:38 a.m.
Moon Phase
99% Waning gibbous
Major Times
12:46 a.m. 2:46 a.m.
1:10 p.m.-3:10 p.m.
Minor Times
7:38 a.m. 8:38 a.m.
6:39 p.m. 7:39 p.m.
Prediction: Better++


i.m.
i.M.
p.m.
a.m.
e
bous
es
! p.m.
a.m.
is
a.m.
pm


rreaicton: Beter

TUESDAY
uririf;v 1:. 5a 3 mn
uri;e 5 ?.7 p ni
0nri 6 :e 7 1 p mn
Moonset: 8:28 a.m.
Moon Phase
96% Waning gibbous
Major Times
1:35 a.m. 3:35 a.m.
1:59 p.m.-3:59 p.m.
Minor Times
8:28 a.m. 9:28 a.m.
7:28 p.m. 8:28 p.m.
Prediction: Better


SATURDAY
Sunrise: 6:50 a.m.
Sunset: 5:38 p.m.
Moonrise: 5:09 p.m.
Moonset: 5:50 a.m.
Moon Phase
99% Waxing gibbous
Major Times

11:32 a.m.-1:32 p.m.
Minor Times
5:50 a.m. 6:50 a.m.
5:Op.m -6-0pm
Prediction: Best

WEDNESDAY
Suriri;f 5 3. a m
ru, ;'1 e ?.7 p m
Moiiri 1e I." .l p m
Moonset: 9:17 a.m.
Moon Phase
91% Waning gibbous
Major Times
2:24 a.m. 4:24 a.m.
2:48 p.m.-4:48 p.m.
Minor Times
9:17 a.m. -10:17 a.m.
8:18 p.m. 9:18 p.m.
Prediction: Good


chartering (Bahamas here you come). Two staterooms (cen-
terline queen in aft), two heads, large living area refrigera-
tion, AC and spare sails. Asking r7
$75,000. Call Ray Mason, 941-505-7269!Pier Oxt


48'1999 SUNSEEKER
Very well taken care of and lift kept since 2002, this boat
is loaded with options. Low hours and superb Yanmar
engines. This boat is must-have! $279,000
Call John @ Knot 10 Yacht Sales 941-915-3575


49'2007 HUNTER
This is a one owner boat and never been chartered. In
superior condition and well-maintained for the next owner,
with many options and amenities.$295,000.
Call John @ Knot 10 Yacht Sales 941-915-3575


52'2007 BLUEWATER YACHT $297,000 HD: I-'.'I-:
THING you need to cruise!! Dick Horste 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL M-IA:R:I NA-


EDDYLINE SANDPIPER
Only 381bs and 12' long with 3501b capacity.
Anyone can paddle this boat and
take the dog along! $1,299.
Call 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter




.^ .... ........ .. A ^



Elie Gulf 120XE 12 foot long, 350 lb capacity
Stable fishing Ergoflex Seating system,
Bow and Center hatches
$729 Call 941-966-5477
A Silent Sports Outfitter


Feel Free Moken 12 Angler Kayak. New kayak:
127" long, 56 Ibs, unit-track quick release
system for custom fishing accessories. Kingfisher
seat, Wheel in the keel for easy transport.
$1099. 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


JACKSON ORION KAYAK
Great little kayak for fishing, birding,
photography. 10' long, only 52lbs 3001b capacity
Save $100 on year end sale! $799.
Call 941-966-5477
A Silent Sports Outfitter


REDUCED!! P
v\-,' ^""^


EVER DREAM OF LIVING ON A BOAT?
THIS IS FOR YOU!! 15.5'BEAM, DIESEL
EXCELLENT CONDITION. $116,000 NOW $92,500
ENGLEWOOD 941-266-6321


r-'^ibtal C(-ay =CerC>-
^* 941-639-6603 *'
WUW.CPVSIA-C-AY.COIVI.^
25Tyor Road, P3







Big Tuna by Jackson Kayaks
It's an angler's dream.
The "elite" seating is super comfortable and rotate
to face fishing buddy.
Live bait well, rod holders, stagers
$1599 Call 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


Cuda 12 From Jackson Kayak
New little brother to the Cuda 14. 12'6" long 31"
wide 3501b cap. High/low comfortable seat
rod holders and stagers everywhere. $1199
941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


KC Fishing Kayak Thermoformed ABS for
light weight only 631bs. 12 foot long
With mount can add a motor. $1,399.
941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter








OCEAN KAYAK TRIDENT 11 $949
CENTRAL COMMAND CENTER FOR ROD MOUNTS
MODULAR FISHING POD, BATTERY BAG,
TRANSDUCER COMPATIBLE
STABLE (400LB CAPACITY) AND QUICK. ONLY 54LBS
941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


Old Town Predator 13
Award winning new fishing kayak.
13'2" long, 15" adjustable seat,
425# capacity. $1,299
Call 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


Santa Cruz Sit On Top Fishing Kayak New 2013
$999
Very Stable, Easy to paddle
Optional Live bait tank
Rod Holders, Storage
Call 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


r

Nr1





aatesata**n**u* EtDIm**NIU U .mmm EE


/ eP Page 31 November 14,2013
j^M~r iv.9 Page 31 9 November 14,2013


LJL. LA LLILJ UkLLLUJ

. -TrRQ h nTP


The News-Press

NORTH FORT MYERS To say a river runs
through Robert Lee Taylor's life wouldn't be doing
the Caloosahatchee's role justice: The man eats,
sleeps and breathes that waterway, which rolls
just underneath his living room window.
Taylor's North Fort Myers mobile home perches
just feet from its grassy bank, close enough to
hear afternoon breezes riffling its amber surface.
Moored nearby is his boat, the Bonnie Jean, in
which the Chrysler retiree prowls the river for
monster tarpon at least on days when he's not
photographing, painting or creating computer
slideshows of it.
Self-taught in acrylics, many of Taylor's realistic
canvases depict nature and wild creatures:
sunrises, birds of prey, game fish many of
which he's painted in and around the
Caloosahatchee.
His latest project, a 12-foot tall mural on the
front of his house, depicts what else? a
river scene. Into it, he's woven images and
moments of his past 13 years at the Upriver RV
Resort, where the Maryland-born Taylor and wife
Bonnie moved after he retired from Chrysler as an
inspector.
Since then, he's logged hundreds of hours
on the river, many of them in the Bonnie Jean,
meticulously customized into a tarpon hunting
machine, rigged with a special top, rod mounts
and video camera docking station. It was from
this boat that he and four buddies caught a giant
tarpon they're sure would have qualified for a


world record,"except that all five of us handled it,"
Taylor says.
There are no tarpon visible in his mural yet, but
in the two weeks he's been working on it, Taylor,
76, has painted plenty of birds. A great egret
floats toward a nest in the center. There's the pair
of roseate spoonbills that sometimes breakfast
in Taylor's front yard. Tucked into a corner is a
peacock that once wandered into the park. And
perched in a tall pine is a bald eagle one of the
famous pair dubbed Ozzie and Harriet that nests a
few miles to the west.
Taylor knows the birds well "Every
morning, I get up and turn on the eagle's nest;'
he says, referring to the popular online Eagle
Cam."One morning, I watched one of them
come right here, pick a mullet up, then eight
minutes later, the eagle landed in the nest with
that mullet.":'
Of course, the bird had to be in the painting, to
the delight of his neighbor, Pam Herget.
"He's just so talented;' says Herget, who's
bought three of Taylor's paintings."And he knows
so much about the area if you have a question
about anything around here, just ask Captain Bob'."
Taylor says he never tires of watching and
learning about the river and its environs.
"Yes, it's a beautiful river the river is what
drew me here but I really never knew how
beautiful until I got into art. Most people can look
and they just see a wide-perspective thing, but
if you focus, there's a lot of beauty absolute
beauty on this river.
"It's phenomenal what you can see'."




/i Page 32 November 14,2013
j^M~r~9 'Page 32 November 14,2013


It does take too much to get mel
about fishing. It's pretty much been that way
since I can remember. Growing up, my sister
and I only had to walk about two blocks to a
little lake just south of St. Paul in Minnesota.
It was called Roger's Lake, and it was my
little fishing hole for years.
Although it was frozen for eight months of
the year, we pulled out our share of panfish
and cats.
Don't get me wrong, I get excited going
offshore and inshore, and everywhere in
between. And if I lived two blocks away from
salt water, I know I would have a couple
of holes. I don't live blocks away from salt
water, but I do live two blocks away from a
canal a canal I recently discovered after


'in North Port for more than five years!
Again, don't get me wrong, I do fish the Ndrth
Port canals, and I do fish them often. But this
particular canal is well-hidden off the beaten
path. Finding it was just like the good or'days.
For the past two weeks, I've been "taking the
dog for a walk;' or"going to get some milk,
babe. Be back in an hour." Most of the time
the fish are too small to keep, but that doesn't
matter at all. What matters is that I have a
little place to get away and do my thing when
I want at least some of the time.
So, I was going to yak about that fishing
hole for an entire column, until I realized
I needed a piece of art to go with it. Well,
most of the time the fellow sitting next
to me at the Charlotte Sun office in Port


2 r I p.
Charlotte is pblisher Josh Olive, and
usually has a camera dangling from his
next at all times. Our plan was to "stage"
a picture for the column by standing next
to the small retaining pond in
front of the office. I wen to
my truck and got my Star
Seagis rod equipped with a
Pflueger Patriarch reel, and
I was ready to pose. But then
people started coming out of
the office to see what we were
doing, including Brian Gleason,
who came out with a hot dog
bun. Brian made me a dough ball
and I put it on the hook. I tossed my bobber
about 7 feet half the width of the pond


~I a~nd al mos~XM
something Granted, it wasn't amonsrer. but
it was a Mayan cichlid one of Josh's favorite
species.
So there you have
it. I can head back
home and fish my
little hole, or I can
head to work and
fish that hole.
Challotte SuJn Words can't
MaVay c'chlid portray how gitty
Iam. Like I said, it
doesn't take too much to get
me excited about fishing!
P.S. To Sun Publisher David Dunn-Rankin, it
was all done in the name of work.


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1IuUI reiena ,wve,
Pt Charlotte, 33948
FRESH PAINT, REMODELED,
MOTIVATED SELLER
Sat and Sun l la-4pm
3/2, New S/S appliances,
tile, double liv rm, work-
shop, new septic,
Asking $84,899
NOW..... $79,800.
By Owner 305-731-9612


ENGLEWOOD SAT. 12-3PM
108 ABERCROMBIE AVE
Executive 3BD/2BA/2CG Pool
home in gated
community of Stillwater.
$279,900. Sondra Isgrig
RE/MAX Alliance Group
941-400-1448.
OPEN SAT 10:30 1:30
732 Phyllis St. PC 33948
Nice & cozy move in 2br
pos 3rd 1icar gar, shed
$66,900!
OPEN SAT 2:00 4:30
26106 Rampart Blvd. DC 33983
Pool home, Tile roof, newer
A/C, 3/2/2 cathedral
$144,900!
ROSE PADUA
CENTURY 21 SUNBELT
941-624-3800


PUNTA GORDA
Thurs Sunday Open 12-5
17400 White Water Ct
PRARIE CREEK CUSTOM ESTATE
HOME. 4/4.5/3 EXQUSITE
GOURMET KITCHEN. 5500+SF
UNDER AIR, 9000TOTAL SF,
POOL/SPA, STOCKED LAKE AND
MORE. ALL ON 5 ACRES.
$599,888. LEANN CROKE
RE/MAX ANCHOR 941-7694663


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11/14/13
SUN. 1-4 BEAUTIFUL HOME
31 Sportsman Ter.
Sandra Newell 941-735-6405
Re/Max Alliance Group
SUN. 1-4 EXCEPTIONAL
HOME 8180 Casa De
Meadows 941-735-6405
Re/Max Alliance Group
HOMES FOR SALE
L: 1020


PORT CHARLOTTE
3578 Harbor Blvd. Updated
3/2/carport home with
newer PGT windows/sliders,
1Ok HVAC. FL room and
newer pool, cage, lanai &
shed. Home Warranty &
Offered at $118,900.
Marge Trayner
Bud Trayner Realty, PA
941-380-2823


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Arcadia Englewood North Port Port Charlotte Punta Gorda Venice


NEED CA2bH?
S&e t items i tk(9 C44 ksSi3ds.
caU. (941) 429-3110


RESORT COMMUNITY





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VENICE, FL 34285
941-485-5444
AGED QUALIFIED


Thursday, November 14, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 1





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Thursday, November 14, 2013


HOMES FOR SALE

Z 020 ^


SELLING YOUR
HOME, CONDO,
OR LOT?
We can help you.
Advertise your home,
condo or lot with us
and reach over
I150000 readers in
Charlotte Sarasota, &
DeSoto Counties and
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866-463-1638
Realtors Welcome!

26336 Nadir Rd
Deep Creek


KM



GORGEOUS 2/2 TURNKEY
FURNISHED GOLF CONDO.
END UNIT W/ SKYLIGHTS
PANORAMIC GOLF COURSE
VIEWS. $1500 BUYER
REBATE IF PURCHASED
THROUGH
Fla Golf Properties Inc
941-698-4653

Seize the sales
with Classified!


PRAIRIE CREEK PARK!
5-30 ACRES Starting
$49,900
Punta Gordas's
BEST KEPT SECRET!
Minutes to town, beaches,
harbor! Deed restricted
Horses welcomeblack
top roads. "A Very Special
Ranch Community'!
JUDY K PETKEWICZ
GRI CRS
ALLISON JAMES Estates
& Homes 941-456-8304
www.PuntaGorda
Propertiesforsale.com


5257blacKjacK Uir., prairie
Creek West, Lovely 3/2/2
Pool home, built in 1981.
Detached stables, tack room,
storage & efficiency apt.,
Beautiful 5.6 acre fenced
property w/pond for horses.
Home Warranty. $299,900.
Marge Trayner
Bud Trayner Realty
PA 941-380-2823
5923 SW HWY 17
ARCADIA Short Sale


SIIlall L0 DUilt Dlock
and stucco 2 bedroom
home sitting on 1.4
acres of land adjacent
to state roadside park.
Great starter home or
snowbird retreat
$85,000 Make Offer
Fla Golf Properties Inc
941-698-4653


HOMES FOR SALE
L 1020 J


6 ACRE PUNTA GORDA
PRAIRIE CREEK
PARK BEAUTY!
MANY CUSTOM FEATURES
LIKE NEW 3400SF 3 BDRM,
SPACIOUS MASTER STE & BATH
+ OFFICE, 4 FULL BATHS,
FORMAL DINING RM, LIVING RM,
GREAT RM, LANAI AND OVER-
SIZED 2 STALL ATT GARAGE
$159,000-$449,000
NOW $429,000
CALL JUDY PETKEWICZ
ALLISON JAMES ESTATES & HOMES
941-456-8304


26220 Chesterfield Road
Tim Towles built,
immaculate, many upgrades,
electric hurricane shutters.
3/2.5/2 1920 Sq. Ft.
By Owner
$169,900 941-979-5785


DEEP CREEK
425 Bahia Grande Ave.
1990 Pool home 3/2/2,
2121 sq.ft. cul-de-sac lot,
mature trees, etc.
Too much to list! MUST SEE!
Asking $189,900 By owner
Call 941-815-6927 for
appointment
!c


u,-,-r nLr,--. d-du J)pu i
Street. Custom home, 2156
sq ft with pool, built in
2002, spectacular large
park-like yard with lake view,
cul de sac. FABULOUS!
Don't Miss this ONE!!!
$299,900
Pat Walker RE/MAX Anchor
Realty 941-276-4674
1-.W-11KNIII


r_.1L r_~h VVUU .U _-, ', .. -"
home on corner lot. 6127
Bennington St. 1746 SF,
J&J built home in 2004.
Immaculate, many upgrades,
hurricane shutters, propane
back-up generator. For Sale
By Owner. Appointment Only
941-475-9510













Turn your

trash into

cash!

Advertise

your yard

sale!


HOMES FOR SALE

Z 020 ^



PORT CHARLOTTE,
completely renovated,
3/2/1 + Den and office!
New kitchen & baths,
fenced yard & shed.
$109,900.00
By Owner 941-268-6820


GULF FRONT MANASOTA KEY
2/2 Top Floor with partial Gulf
view. Updated with private
beach on the Gulf of Mexico!
Turnkey furnished.
$299,900
RE/Max Alliance Group
Carla Stiver/Kim Shortt
941-548-4434
www.TheStiverGroup.com


Incredible Park like setting!
Beautiful Custom 3/2.5/2+CG
Estate Home. Amenities:
Granite, Custom Cabinets,
Fireplace, 18" tile throughout,
Electronic Gated entrance,
Board Fencing, Barn, RV pad,
+++. BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY
HomeServices Florida Realty
941-585-9599
www.Carol.Wade.com


broke, Circle. 3/2/2, 1964sf.
Beautiful Split Plan w/ Sepa-
rate Living & Family Rooms!
$249,900. MLS# C7048798
Linda 941-457-7245 or Jill
Brouwer 941-276-4459 Jill
Brouwer Realty
I Classified = Sales


IVIMANAUIHK IEY2/2/2/
Great Room, Beach & Bay
Easements, Oak Trees &
View of Lemon Bay $379,900
Immediate occupancy.
RE/MAX Alliance Group
Carla Stiver/Kim Shortt
941-548-4434
www.TheStiverGroup.com



Enter your classified ad online
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Go to:
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SUN'-6-


2300 Jasmine Way
Beautifully Remodeled 2005
Pool Home 3/2/2 Plus den,
1946 SF Under Air, New SS
Appliances, tropically Land-
scaped in gated Community
of Charleston Park. Asking
$259,900
Bay Bridge Homes
941-626-8200


HOMES FOR SALE

:Z^ 020 ^


home. County water possible
owner financing or best offer.
Cash Offers Pay Less!
941488-2418 or 496-9252
I .M..t,L I


PORT CHARLOTTE
3/2.5/2 in Gated Community
of Pepper Tree Estates!
Open Concept! 2,218 SF.
New Energy Efficient AC Unit
& Newer Water Heater!
$199,500
Jeff Runyan, Re/Max
Palm. 941-979-2843
ML- W-i


PORT CHARLOTTE
18085 Wintergarden Ave
Charming 3 bdrm 2 bath
Beautiful updated kitchen. S/S
Appl's, Huge lanai, Gardeners
delight. Herb garden, many
fruit trees, gazebo retreat.
Can't bet the price! $114,900
Pat Walker 941-276-4674
RE/MAX Anchor Realty

i I


Z33/Z iviullins Ave.
3/2/2 Pool home in
popular Sec 15 NO FLOOD
INSURANCE IS REQUIRED!
$159,900
June Poliachik,
Realtor CDPE, SFR
Sun Realty
941-916-0100


PORT CHARLOTTE
MOVE IN ready -Clean and
partially updated 2/2 home,
great location, lovely lot.
1452 Pulaski St. $72,500.00
Peggy Mardis, Broker
REMAX EXCEL 863-990-1877
PORT CHARLOTTE Newer
Home! 4Bedrrm/2Ba/2+CG
Owner Finance. Nice Area!
$225,000. (941)-763-9315
PORT CHARLOTTE,
Furnished 2/2/CP. New
Stove, Dishwasher, Micro &
Washer. New Living Room &
King Size Bedroom Furnishings
Charming, Clean & Ready For
You! $74,500. (615)-712-
1206 or (270)-407-3160
JADVIERIE


PORT CHARLOTTE-
1699 SF, Fence, Fireplace, Hot
Tub, SS Appl., All Util., Corner Lot,
Palm Trees Galore, Modem Decor,
Quck Access t Veterans or -75.
$134,500. Marianne Lilly,
RE/MlAXHabor 941-764-7585
WaterfrontHomeBuyer.com


PT CHARLOTTE
2/2/1.5 OVER 1500SQFT.
(BLOCK HOUSE) WITH
BONUS RM & POOL
JUST RESURFACED, NEW
TILE & POOL EQUIPMENT,
NEW ELECTRIC PANEL
$95K BY OWNER
941.268.8794


HOMES FOR SALE

Z 020 ^


rUdI I/ L UUHU beminole
Lakes gated golfing communi-
ty. 2 bdrm + den, 2 car gar
almost 1700 sq ft. Lovely
large lanai, great golf course
and lake views.
10296 Shadow Run Ct
$230,000
Pat Walker 941-276-4674
RE/MAX Anchor Realty





PUNTA GORDA
424 Panarea Ave. Custom
built home in Burnt Store
Isles with 80 ft seawall
sailboat access. $415,000
June Poliachik
Realtor CDPE, SFR Sun Realty
941-916-0100








ALROERLOOKING39TH0



THIRDHLE!r_

DlUI EBRA [VILAIE ll
i 609-l r I 458-,,4627 II '



PRDNTA FLRIAEAT


157 COUGAR WAY
Beautifully Remodeled 2001
Pool Home, 3 bd/2ba/2car,
Granite & New SS Appls.,
Park Like Setting, On DIb
Lot, Asking $225,000
BAY BRIDGE HOMES
941-626-8200


VrENIClEI 1/40 IlllpstHa ndr-
bor Loop, Stunning 3 BR/2.5
BA, Loft, 2 Story Home,
$258,000 Open floor plan,
Need to see to appreciate.
Terry Bole, Berkshire
Hathaway Florida Realty
(formerly Prudential)
941-323-1818
WATERFRONT
^ HOMES 1030 ^


water front zuilz Burnt
Store Isles 2408 SF
Custom Canal Home!
Seawall Dock & BoatLift
Nice locationPrivacy
Viewing Nature Preserve.
New Listing! $499 K
CALL JUDY PETKEWICZ
ALLISON JAMES
ESTATES & HOMES
941-456-8304
ENGL /Cape Haze on the
water, Lg. seawalled lot.
2br/lbath all tile, Appliances
$255/obo 920-737-9159
/--GET RESULTS --
k USE CLASSIFIED! _


S WATERFRONT
HOMES 1030


ENGOLO-VVUU ISLES
Protected Deep Sail Boat
Water, 10K Ib Lift, 2/2/2,
w/Community Heated Pool &
Lawncare, $285,000
Jerri King 941-374-2562





PORT CHARLOTTE- 17259
Lake Worth Blvd. Luxurious
3/2/2 HEATED POOL Home
on Canal! $429,900.
Sue Ellen Fumich,
941-276-2894
Coldwell Banker Morris Realty, Inc


I-'UN IA LAUKU ISLLE
Spectacular Water View!
3/2/2 w/ POOL!
Well maintained on Oversized
Sailboat Lot! $374,900.
Deb Sestilio,
(941) 391-1873
Fisherman's Village Realty
it II- -I


3/2/2, Updated Kitchen -
Granite Countertops. Heatec
Pool, Large Lanai, 30' Dock,
Boatlift & HurricaneShutters!
$429,900.
Deb Sestilio 941-391-1873
Fisherman's Village Realty

_...E-.DCREDUCED!


PUNTA GORDA ISLES
BRAND NEW Custom Home!
3/2/2 with POOL on Sail-
boat Canal! Granite Kitchen &
Baths. Tile Throughout.
EZ Access to Gulf.
$4,09,900. $394,900.
Chris Pelletier, Broker
PELLET-TE,

(941)-400-7730
C---NEED A JOB?--
CHECK THE
CLASSIFIED!






PORT CHARLOTTE
3448 Middletown St. 2/2/2
Pool home w/2 living areas
on canal. Sprinkler System
Storage bldg, fruit trees.
MOVE IN READY! $139,900
941-759-0217 or
918-213-9020
GOLF COURSE
COMMUNITY
%a 1035 J


55+ Active Community
Affordable Manufactured
Homes!!! 1 Year FREE
Golf Membership With
New Home Purchase!
Call Ted @
800-538-2590
for details or please
visit our website
www.arcadiavillage.com





Thursday, November 14, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 3


GOLF COURSE
I COMMUNITY I
^^ 1035^^


CONDOS/VILLAS
SFOR SALE
1^L040 1


PruNI TI IHLUOiT IL-,:rr,[
Nelson Blvd. Beautiful 2/2
Fully Renovated, New Kitchen
Tile and Paint. Furnished
Great Location. $69,900 OBO
OPEN SUN 12-2
Owner 423-343-6349


LAKE SUZY 3/2/3
12539 SW KINGSWAY CIR.
Newer S/S Appliances,
Granite Countertops, All Tile
except one guest bdrm, walk
in closets in master bdrm,
beautiful view of Kingsway
Country Club on 17th
Fairway, oversize garage,
New pool screen.
Jill Brouwer Realty,
Jill Brouwer 941-766-1606
or 941-276-4459 or
Call Linda 941457-7245

CONDOS/VILLAS
FOR SALE
~1040~


PORT CHARLOTTE
SUNRISE TOWERS
2486 CARING WAY
TOWNHOUSE 2 BR 2.5 BA
WITH INSIDE LAUNDRY ROOM,
EXTRA STORAGE ROOM AND
CARPORT. INCLUDES ALL
APPLIANCE, TASTEFULLY DECO-
RATED. MOVE IN CONDITION.
SMALL PETS ALLOWED!
$69,000
CARON REALTY, INC.
941-925-3300 RONNIE
DEEP CREEK Heritage Lake
front Villa, 3/2/2 1800 Sq Ft,
ceiling fans & much more. By
Owner $172,900 941-2584956

A Bargain Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds First!
A Whole
Marketplace of
Shopping is right at
your
Fingertips!


LAKE SUZY, 11335 SW
Essex Dr. Located in
Kingsway Golf Course Area.
2+Bed/Den, 2 Bath, 2CG
Single Unitl Meticulas!
MLS#C7047973 $209,950.
Linda 941-457-7245 or
Jill Brouwer 941-276-4459
Jill Brouwer Realty


L UL..l = l.//-I" ~vV VI W IIlUU.
$87,000 Lakefront, 1st
floor, furnished, Many new
upgrades. You have to see
this one! By Owner,
941-625-6053 or
978-319-7381


ruT i IHARLU I I
RIVERWOOD VILLA.
Gorgeous Jacaranda Model
with Pool. 3 Bedroom + Den/
2 Car Garage.
Carl Anderson
Real Estate Broker
941-629-9586





PUNTA GORDA ISLES
3/2/2 w/ Deeded Dock! Par-
tial Harbor View. 2nd Building
From Harbor! Walk to Fisher-
man's Village $419,000.
Elaine Martin, Fisherman's
Village Realty. 941-661-4800


Gateway Point 401A w/ lanai.
Short walk fisherman's village.
Sharp fully furnished 2/2/1
ground floor with handicap
bath, boat dock, min. to har-
bor, club house, large pool.
$119,000 419-863-9358


rUN In Auru-
TURNKEY Waterfront Condo
2 Bed/2 Bath Updated
Kitchen. Low Condo Fees -
$120,000
Deb Sestilio 941-391-1873
Fisherman's Village Realty
To Advertise in
The Showcase
of Homes
Please Call
866-463-1638
or Email;
special@sunnewspapers.net


2/2 with 2 Carport.
Single floor villa, tile &
laminated floor throughout,
10 x 30 Four Seasons lanai,
community pool & dock.
Surrounded by Curry Creek
Preserve near Legacy Trail.
1953 Sattlement Rd.
FSBO $59,500
941-488-7614

F MOBILE HOMES
1FOR SALE
^ 1090 ^


PORT CHARLOTTE- ':.':.+
Maple Leaf! Estates! 2/2/CP
in Gated Golf Course
Community! Open Floor Plan.
Amenities Galore!! $69,900.
Sue Ellen Fumich,
941-276-2894
Coldwell Banker Morris Realty, Inc


MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE
1^ 090^ ^

ARCADIA 2B/2B 55+,
$312/mo lot rent, CHA, Open
House 11/16 $32.5K 863-
473-1599 call to see anytime!
PALM HARBOR HOMES
MODULAR & STILT HOMES
Factory Direct
Save $25 off list price!!
Call John Lyons for details
1-800-622-2832 ext 210

VENICE RANCH M.H.E.
Community is being Renovat-
ed! Lot rental community
12x46 2BR/1BA, furnished,
asking $3,500
24x32 2BR/1BA, unfurnished,
new appliances,
asking $5,300.
Others to choose from.
WALKING DISTANCE TO
PUBLIC & CVS
55+ comm. No pets
Call Jane
941488-5672
www.VeniceRanch.com
VENICE, Doublewide,
2/2/CP, Furnished. 55+
Colonial Manor Res. Owned
Park $67,000. 941-488-8396

MANUFACTURED]
HOMES FOR SALE I
S1095^


PUNTA GORDA
RIVERSIDE!
$39,995
2/2, FURNISHED.
UPDATED & VERY CLEAN!
Call Mike, 941-356-5308
www.riversideoaksflorida.com
ARCADIA, Nearly New
3BR/2BA Manufactured
Home on 1/2 Acre.
Financing Available!
Prestige Homes, Punta Gorda
941-637-1122






Punta Gorda. 3 Bedroom.
Immaculate. Pergo. 1500
sqft. Private Lanai with
Serene View!
$59,900
Riverside Oaks
"WHERE WE LEFT THE TREES"
Call Mike 941-356-5308
www.riversideoaksflorida.com






SETTLE ESTATE
$29,900
IMMACULATE
ADULT COMMUNITY.
Immediate possession.
Conveniently located near
town. Immaculate all drywall
2/2 sectional. All new &
updated.
Call Mike 941-356-5308
www.riversideoaksflorida.com

HOMES FOR RENT
1210





PORT CHARLOTTE
1/1 2ND FLOOR APARTMENT $525
3/2/1 OAK HOLLOW $825
NORTH PORT
3/2/2 INCLUDES LAWN CARE $1150
2/2/2 LARGE 55+ GATED $1250
3/2.5/2 2 STORY ON LAKE $1400
FULL PROPERTY LIST ONLINE
www.almar-rentals.com
941-627-1465
800-964-3095
LET US MANAGE YOUR PROPERTY


HOMES FOR RENT
L 1210 ^






3/2/2 Pool NP $1000
3/2/1 fl rm N. Engl $995
3/2/2 lanai E. Eng $975
2/2/1 FL rm N Eng $900
West Coast Property
Mgmt 941-473-0718
www.rentalsflorida.net

CALUSA SPRINGS
NORTH PORT
4BR/2BA/2CAR GARAGE
SINGLE FAMILY HOMES
Starting at $1050/mo
-A-ABring your pets!-A-
Now Open Mon Fri 8-4
Evenings and Saturdays
By appt. only (941) 613-1469
SECTION 8 WELCOME

ANNUAL & SEASONAL
RENTALS
Call The Pineapple Girls
941-473-D333
Pineapple Gulf Prop. Mgmt. Inc.
www.RentEnglewood.com


Englewood- Cape Haze
Resort 2/2 w! pool, gym, etc.
Water & cable included
$825 month 941-350-1288

I-

jIg

ERA'
For a Complete List Go To
eraportcharlotte.com
$1050...3/2/3 1515 SqFt.....NP
$1000...3/2/2 1340 SqFt.....NP
$900....3/2/2 1184 SqFt......NP
$850....3/2/2 1404 SqFt......PC
$850....2/2/1 1355 Sq Ft....PC
LET US RENT YOUR HOME
Agent Available On Weekends
We Forgive Foreclosures For Renters
NEED A RENTAL*
Paradise Properties &
Rentals, Inc 941-625-RENT
MURDOCK, 3/2/2 Newer
POOL Home. All Kitchen
Appliances. QuietArea. $1,200.
mo. + 1st Sec. 941-544-0991

ASK US

HOW
you can place a
PICTURE
of your item
for sale
in your
classified ad!


InvestorsChoice Real Estate
A FaIlBaselS Business


ENGLEWOOD
3/2 PELICAN


$850.


ROTONDA WEST
2/2 ANNOPOLIS, POOL $1050
OFF SEASON/SHORT TERM
2/2 ENGL. HOME FENCED $1300

2014 SEASONAL RENTALS
Englewood, N. Port, Pt.Char
Rotonda and S. Venice
2/2 Venice ... $1600
3/2 Gulf Cove ... $1950
Diana Legg
Your Rental Expert
941-681-2053
941-681-1189
Website: www.icre.us
Call us for all of your
Real Estate Needs.
NORTH PORT
1866 Boca Chica Ave,
3/2/2, apple, carpet, lanai,
Avail Now!! $990/mo,
1st, Last, Sec. 941-429-2846


HOMES FOR RENT
L 1210 ^


PORT CHARLOTTE, 3/2,
117 Baldwin Ct. Sailboat
waterfront home. $1,000/mo.
+ sec dep. 941-380-1909
PORT CHARLOTTE, 4/2/2, Very
Lg Pool, Jacuzzi. Lg Driveway.
Near P.C. Beach. No Pets ALSO
4/2/2 $1200. 941-763-9315
PORT CHARLOTTE, Clean
3/2/2 Renovated, N/S. Nice
area, near schools. $1000/
Mo, 1st, L/S. 941-875-5013
PUNTA GORDA, Avail
12/1/13. Newly refurb., 3/2,
ample parking, lots of fans,
Ref, DW, W/D hookup. No Pets
$850/mo+Sec Dep. 4156400026





Reduced Mgmt Fees
ww^ aifordaeatyTcom




I CONDOS/VILLAS
FOR RENT
^^ 1240 1

ENGLEWOOD CONDO:
Annual in Hammocks @
Cape Haze Gated w/
Elevators. Upscale 3 Bdrm.,
2 Bath, Stainless Appliances,
Tile/Wood. Excellent Views,
$1500 per Month. No Animals
Fiddlers Green Rentals:
941-698-4111
PORT CHARLOTTE 2 Units
Oak Forest, 55+ 1/1, 2nd Fir
w/ lanai. No pets. Avail, now
$600-$650 941-235-2379
PT CHARLOTTE LOVELAND
COURTYARDS, 3BR/2BA, VERY
PRIVATE, 1 STORY, VAULTED
CEILINGS, GOURMET KIT., ALL
SS APPL. + W & D, TILE,
POOL, 1 PET OK, SCRND.
COURTYARD. $900/MO WTR
& SWR INCL. 941-627-4177
ROTONDA CONDO 1/1
W/ Pool, Yearly Rental, All
Utilities Paid. $750 Month.
First, Last & Security
Call: 330-507-4404

L TOWNHOUSES
I/FOR RENT/
^ 1280 ^

PUNTA GORDA ISLES,
Available 1/1/14.
2Bedrm/2.5Bath on Canal,
2 Large Lanais. $1000. per
month. Annual Rental.
No Pets. 941-637-0195
7 DUPLEXES
FOR RENT

Q ,,1300 ^


ENGLEWOOD 1/1 with
Lanai. No smoking/no
pets $550; 1st & sec.
941-400-1670

APARTMENTS
FOR RENT


CHARLOTTE HARBOR
1/1 apt. $600, updated, incl.
water pool screened lanai, no
pets. Call 941-628-3759.



NOW ACCEPTING
WAITING LIST
APPLICATIONS 941-473-0450

STUDIO APTS
Income-Based Housing
for those 62+ or HCA
Requirements. 941-624-
2266. Limited availability.
Restrictions Apply.
TTY: 1-800-955-8771


FOR RENT
1^^ 320 1




PORT CHARLOTTE
VILLA SAN CARLOS II
AFFORDABLE
Income Based Apartments
for 62 or Older
Income Limits Apply
Call 941-624-4404
TTY-1-800-955-8771


LOOK
VENICE CLUBSIDE APTS.
1 Bedrooms Available.
$375 Move-in Fee.
Call 941-488-7766.
Venice Studio & 1
Bedroom Accepting
Section 8 Vouchers
941-488-7766
VILLA SAN CARLOS 2550
Easy Street Income based
62+ or needing features
of accessible unit. Restric-
tions Apply. 941-624-2266
TTY-1-800-955-8771

oppORT UNIT
WILLOW CREEK
Affordable 55+ community
tucked away in North Port.
Pool, Activity Room, Fitness
Center, Restricted Access
Entries. Great Specials on 1BR
& 2BR Apartments. Small Pet
Friendly. Call us Today for a
Tour of our Community.
941-429-2402 %at


MOBILE HOMES
FOR RENT
~1340~

PUNTA GORDA, 2/1.5, furn.
or unfurn., quiet neighborhood
2 end. lanai's, carport & shed,
W/D, large yard, $750/mo.
lst/last/sec., 941-676-2454




L EFFICIENCIES
/ FOR RENT/
^^11350

HARBOUR HEIGHTS close to
river, newly renovated efficien-
cies w cable & internet, Sunny-
brookMotel 941-625-6400
| ROOMS FOR RENT

::: 360 ^

PORT CHARLOTTE m/f share
home. You get 2 rms + bath -
share rest of house. Nice lanai
+ pool. Excellent clean quiet
space $600 781-572-8215
PORT CHARLOTTE Room for
single female. Private w/bath-
room. No pets. W/D, Very
clean! 941-623-2028
PORT CHARLOTTE share
house master BR is yours 1 or
2 people. 941-249-1053.
PUNTA GORDA, Clean, Furn.
Room, Free Wi-Fi,TV. All Inclu-
sive $120/Wk 941-763-9171
I VACATION/
SSEASONAL RENTALS
^^, 1390*


AWARD WINNING
SUNBELT MGT.
SERVICES
RENTALS *
2/2/1 Lanai,
Church Ave., P.C.
$1350/mo
3/2 Waterfront,
Barre Dr., P.C.
$1500/mo

*we welcome new listings*
COMPLETE LISTINGS
(941) 764-7777
sunbeltmgtservices.com





The Sun Classified Page 4 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, November 14, 2013


I VACATION/
SSEASONAL RENTALS
^^,1390^

ENGL- MANASOTA KEY
Turnkey furn. 2br/2ba
Condo Balcony overlooks
Lemon Bay! Private
Beach access. Avail. Now
January. $2800/mo+
941-234-7077
Englewood/Rotonda
Great Selection Available
West Coast Property Mgt.
941-473-0718
www.rentalsflorida.net
P.C, Furn. 2/1./1 w/Lanai.
Avail. Jan. 1st.
941-628-9016
RENT THE ROYAL BOUNDARY
FOR THE WINTER SEASON!
DEC. JAN. MARCH & APRIL
STARTING AT $2000/MO +
12% TAX & $300 SECURITY
941-268-5275 orVisit us at
www.RoyalBoundaryBB.com

Need a
new Ride?
Find it
in the
Classifieds!
VENICE BEACH CONDO
2BR/2BA Pool, etc. Avail
Dec. Jan, Feb, March &
April 3 mo min Price
Negotiable 941-483-9093
SLOTS & ACREAGE

:Z^ 500 ^


SELLING YOUR
HOME, CONDO,
OR LOT?
We can help you.
Advertise your home,
condo or lot with us
and reach over
150,000 readers in
Charlotte Sarasota, &
DeSoto Counties and
online everyday.
Ask about our 90
day special.
Call one of our
classified experts for
all the details at
866-463-1638
Realtors Welcome!

WATERFRONT
Z^1515 ^


rPni 1C HALTIE I- 14/
Leland St SE. Prime Sailboat
Water cul-de-sac Lot w/dock &
lift on 130' seawall. 5 min to
Charlotte Harbor & Gulf access.
$229,000 941-625-7088
COMMERCIAL LOT
L 1530 ^







PUNTA GORDA
111 Rio Villa Dr.
2400 Square Foot Store.
Great for convenience store.
Located on busy street.
Contact Tim Boff
941-815-0618


I BUSINESS RENTALS
L 1610 J


PAULSON CENTRE
EXECUTIVE OFFICE SUITES
Suites start at $299/mo
Virtuals start at $100/mo
Info call (941)-206-2200



PORT CHARLOTTE
3315 Harbor Blvd, off US41
Retail or Office Space.
Approx. 425 sqft. All
Tile Floor, Great Location.
Call for More Details:
941-206-0250
PORT CHARLOTTE OFFICE
SPACE WITH SEPARATE
RECEPTION AREA AND 3 ADDI-
TIONAL OFFICES. SUITABLE
FOR ATTORNEY, CPA, INS CO,
ETC. 941-661-3971
SUS 41 Office Space I
941-815-2199
VENICE Office/Warehouse
Space. 2300SqFt,
2600SqFt, 4800SqFt.
Call for Pricing 941-484-4316

I INDUSTRIAL PROP
^^, 1620^


AHKLAUIA 4.4 ac By uwner!
House & Shop, 800 ft. Hwy
17 Frontage, Zoned Comm.
Info. 863-494-5540 or
863-244-3585
PORT CHARLOTTE- Prime office
space, 3 units 1,000sf. ea. Brand
new. Sandhill Blvd. Turnkey/Fully
built out. (941)-624-5992

PUT
CLASSIFIED
TO WORK
FOR YOU!


FIND A JOB!
BUY A HOME!
BUY A CAR!

VENICE/NOKOMIS, Profes-
sional Building, 919 S. Tamia-
mi Tr. Office Suites for Lease
$10 per sq. ft. Ample parking,
Ernest Ritz, 941-928-9002


& STORAGE
~164~

NORTH PORT 800SF
Warehouse $450/mo. 400SF
Office, $295/mo, All + Tax
941-661-6720

2000


EMPLOYMENT
EMPLOYMENT
2005 Services
2010 Professional
2015 Banking
2020 Clerical
2025 Computer
2030 Medical
2035 Musical
2040 Restaurant/Hotel
2050 SkilledTrades
2060 Management
2070 Sales
2090 Child/Adult
Care Needed
2100 General
2110 Part-time/Temp
2115 Home Based
Business
2120 Seeking Employment


2000


EMPLOYMENT

SCLERICAL/OFFICE

: 2020 ^

CUSTOMER SERVICE
DISPATCHER.
Positive People Oriented
Person Needed. The Applicant
will have a Strong Command
of Telecommunication
Techniques and Must be
Computer Literate. Bi-lingual
in Spanish/English a Plus.
Apply at: Young Trucking,
12164 Tamiami Trail.
Punta Gorda
JOB COORDINATOR
Schedule Jobs, creating
work orders, arranging appts
w/customers, purchasing
and receiving pprwk, profi-
cient in Micro. word, excel, &
outlook. Great at multi-task-
ing, prof. phone skills, and
quick typing skills, email
resume to:
caseym@heritageglassinc.com

Turn your

trash into

cash!

Advertise

your yard

sale!
OFFICE ASSISTANT F/T,
must have excellent computer,
customer service, phone and
organizational skills. Email
resume to Aults@verizon.net.
| MEDICAL

Lwawa 2030 ^



HARBuORCASE
(- elebratinao & r. ,
\" -Soenor W'

CERTIFIED NURSING
ASSISTANTS

CARE MANAGERS
FT/ PT/ PRN

TIRED OF BEING JUST A
NUMBER ... AT
HARBORCHASE WE CARE
ABOUT OUR EMPLOYEES AS
MUCH AS OUR RESIDENTS.


HARBORCHASE COM-
PETITIVE WAGES AND AN
EXCELLENT BENEFITS PACK-
AGE SUCH AS MEDICAL,
DENTAL, VISION & 401K

PART-TIME TEAM MEMBERS
RECEIVE BENEFITS
AT 20+ HOURS.

FOR CONSIDERATION PLEASE
APPLY IN PERSON TO:
HARBORCHASE OF
VENICE
ASSISTED LIVING AND
SKILLED NURSING
950 PINEBROOK ROAD
VENICE, FL 34285
(941) 484-8801 PH
(941) 484-3450 FAX
EOE M/F/D/V
SEmploy Classified!


MEDICAL
L ^ 2030 ^


BUSY CARDIOLOGY
practice is seeking
medical receptionist.
Experience &familiarity
with billing/coding pre-
ferred. Fax resume to:
941-627-2680
Or call: 941-625-6223

CNA or LPN Full Time
Needed for busy
Physicians office.
Experience is preferred.
Please email resume to:
cmazzarella@sunletter.com
ATTN: Dept 5000


IN THE
CLASSIFIED
YOU CAN .....
/Find a Pet
./Find a Car
/Find a Job
./Find Garage Sales
.Find A New Employee
/Sell Your Home
/Sell Your Unwanted
Merchandise
.Advertise Your
Business or Service

Classified -
it's the reliable
source for the
right results


CNA/HHA's
NEEDED FOR IMMEDIATE
PLACEMENT!







NEW OFFICE!
NEW OPPORTUNITIES!
NEW PAY PLANS!
MAJOR MEDICAL, & 401K &
LIFE INSURANCE
CALL TODAY,
WORK TOMORROW!
Call Mon. Fri., 8a-4pm.
941-764-0880 or
941-480-0880
ALL STAT HOME HEALTH

COOK
FULL TIME
MUST BE FLEXIBLE.
LOOKING FOR A PERSON
WHO IS HIGHLY MOTIVAT-
ED, THRIVES ON CHAL-
LENGES AND ENJOYS WORK-
ING IN A POSITIVE TEAM
ENVIRONMENT TO JOIN
OUR SKILLED HEALTH CARE
CENTER. LONG TERM
HEALTH CARE EXPERIENCE
WITH KNOWLEDGE OF
THERAPEUTIC DIETS AND
HEALTH CARE REGULATIONS
IS A REQUIREMENT FOR
THIS POSITION.
PLEASE APPLY
QUALITY HEALTH CARE
6940 Outreach Way
North Port
(941)426-8411 or
FAX Resume to
941-423-1572
EOE DRUG FREE
WORK PLACE

Looking for
Adventure?
Find it
in the
Classifieds


MEDICAL
L 2030 ^


S CNA's/HHA's
;fT l WORK
NOW!
Busy Home Care Agency
has F/T and P/T Open-
ings. EXP REQUIRED
CALL NOW! 941-257-4452
CNA, Male to live at
residence to provide total
personal care for disabled
veteran. Able to lift 1501bs.
for transfers, previous live-in
exp. req. Send resume to:
CNA, P.O. Box 494983
Port Charlotte, FL 33949


NEED CASH?
CNA/HHA'S
SARASOTA & SURROUNDING
AREAS. CALL 941-343-4416.
DENTAL RECEPTIONIST,
NEEDED FULL TIME
Must have Dental
Background & Front Desk
Experience.
Apply in Person with Resume
to: 21202 Olean Blvd.
Suite E2, Port Charlotte or
Call 941-629-3200
MASSAGE THERAPIST, FL
License, professional, exper.
w/ neuromuscular therapy &
deep tissue. Part time. Local
to Nokomis. Email resume:
beachsource@aol.com
MEDICAL BILLING/CODING
position available at Medical
practice in Englewood. Full
Benefits package. Must have
experience in Medical Coding.
Reply with CV to
sunclassifiedl@gmail.com
Include Dept 4108 in subject.

a
HARBORCHASE
Ciebrah I


PREP COOK,
DIETARY AIDE,
SERVERS
FT / PT

HARBORCHASE OFFERS
COMPETITIVE WAGES AND AN
EXCELLENT BENEFITS PACK-
AGE SUCH AS MEDICAL,
DENTAL, VISION & 401K

PART-TIME TEAM MEMBERS
RECEIVE BENEFITS
AT 20+ HOURS.

FOR CONSIDERATION PLEASE
APPLY IN PERSON TO:
HARBORCHASE OF
VENICE
ASSISTED LIVING AND
SKILLED NURSING
950 PINEBROOK ROAD
VENICE, FL 34285
(941) 484-8801 PH
(941) 484-3450 FAX
EOE M/F/D/V

HORIZON
i-HEALTHCARE
4 INSTITUTE
www.HorizonTechlnstitute.Com
"ADVANCE YOUR CAREER"
Licensed & Accredited School
Murdock Town Center on 41
1032 Tamiami Tr Unit 3
YOU can become a LPN within
11 months. Enrollment ongoing.
PHLEBOTOMY, EKG, CNA,
Classes Start Dec 2 '13
LPN-next class starts
Jan 20th '14
Start Working In 2-5 wks!
Classes Start Each Month
Call For Class Dates
Nursing Assistant (120hrs)
Home Health Aide (75hrs)
Phlebotomy Tech (165hrs)
EKG Tech (165hrs)
Patient Care Tech (600hrs)
Job Assist. & Pymt. Plans
Call Now to Register!
941-889-7506


L MEDICAL
omwa:2030 ^






SEEKING LPN
CHEERFUL & RELIABLE
MULTITASKER
FOR DR. OFFICE
IN PT CHARLOTTE
EMAIL RESUME W/O
ATTACHMENT TO
NOSEDOC@SUNLINE.NET
OR CALL 941-766-3083

MUSICAL
LomwO 2035 ^





Enter your classified ad online
and pay with your credit card.
It's fast, easy, and convenient.
Go to:
yoursun.com
and click on Classifieds
*Fast Easy *
Convenient *
(Visa or Mastercard)
SUNiM".




i RESTAURANT/
HOTEL
Lim: 2040 ^


LINE COOK *
PREP COOK.
DISHWASHERS
Needed for fast paced,
family owned, award winning
Seafood Restaurant.
Must be reliable and able
to follow instructions
and recipes to meet our
exacting standards.
Drug Free Workplace.
Apply in person to:
Village Fish Market
& Restaurant,
Fishermen's Village or
send resume to:
admin@
village-fish-marketcom.
941-639-7959
PIZZA COOK F/T
EXPERIENCED ONLY
Pt. Charlotte Cony. Store
941-882-4015

I/iIN

RIVER CITY GRILL
Seeks Experienced
Host/Hostess and Servers
ApplDDy in Person: 2-4pm
Only 131 W Marion Ave
Punta Gorda, FL i

Seize the sales
with Classified!
SKILLED TRADES
2050 ^

ALUMINUM POOL CAGE,
LANAI & SCREEN
INSTALLER Full Time. Must
have experience, valid driver's
license, drill & hand tools.
Must pass a drug test.
Email resume to:
installaluminumnow@gmail.com






Thursday, November 14, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 5


SKILLED TRADES
L 2050 ^


ALUMINUM WINDOW
INSTALLER
EXPERIENCED
APPLY IN PERSON:
RAYMOND BUILDING
SUPPLY
2233 MURPHY COURT
NORTH PORT
DFWP/EOE

AUTO BODY / COLLISION
TECHNICIAN
American Auto Body is look-
ing for experienced collision
tech with references. Call
Jason at 941-764-0700
AUTO BODY SHOP NEEDS
EXPERIENCED DETAILER
SALARY & BENEFITS
Apply in person @
23309 Harborview Rd,
Charlotte Harbor

AUTO TECH NEEDED
Some Certs Preferred
But Not Necessary.
Must have own Tools.
Call Will, Service Manager
Gene Gorman Auto Repair
(941)-639-4722
ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!

CABINET INSTALLER/
BUILDER

EXPERIENCE
A MUST!
Valid FL DL. Required.
DFWP
Apply in Person to:
Southwest Restoration
4290 James St. #8
Pt. Charlotte 33980
941-743-4466
DRIVER, Part or Full time with
class A or B w/tanker
endorsement to drive VAC
truck. Must be non smoker in
good physical condition
with 2 yrs of exp. Must be
available for emergency calls,
nights & weekends.
Qualified applicants only.
SOS Septic Inc.
941-662-0095
80 Harvard St. Englewood
FISH CUTTER For Seafood
Company. Must be Exp'd.
941-380-9212.

(Healthcare Support)






FACILITY
MAINTENANCE
TECHNICIAN
Building Maintenance,
Equipment Repairs and
Installation, Plumbing
and Fixtures. Maintain
Swimming Pool, Spa
and Grounds.

Required

High School Diploma
or GED. Two Years
Related Experience
and/or Technical
Training and Pool/Spa
Operators Permit
(CPO), or Willingness
to obtain.

Apply at:
freedomsenior.com
Jacaranda Trace
3600 William Penn Wa
Venice, FL 34293


SKILLED TRADES
L 2050 J


PLUMBERS EXP

$ EARN
| ~WHAT
m YOUR
WORTH!

40hr work week,
full benefits, 401K &
Profit Share Program!
CALL 629-2500
IMMEDIATELY
POOL REPAIRMAN NEEDED
Must have experience in pool
construction & skimmer
changeouts. Call SherlockLeak
941-764-8181.
Advertise Today!

IITRIN-

TRIM CARPENTER
(EXPERIENCED)
OR HELPER
(EXPERIENCE A PLUS)
APPLY IN PERSON
RAYMOND BUILDING
SUPPLY
2233 MURPHY COURT
NORTH PORT
DFWP/EOE
Underground Utility
Contractor is looking for the
following positions.
PIPE LAYER, PIPE
FOREMAN, & PIPE
EXCAVATOR OPERATOR.
MUST BE EXPERIENCED!
Apply at 645 Charlotte St
Punta Gorda. 941-637-8500
WINDOW CLEANER- Skilled
only. Clearview Window Clean-
ing 941-484-5353

| SALES
Leo 2070 J


ADVERTISI G
ACCOUNT
EXECUTIIVE

SUN NEWSPAPERS IS LOOKING
FOR MOTIVATED SALES PROFES-
SIONALS WITH A COMMUNITY
SPIRIT WHO ARE READY TO
COMMIT TO A LONG-TERM
CAREER WITH AN ESTABLISHED
SUCCESSFUL MEDIA COMPANY.

DOES THIS DESCRIBE
YOU?
AGGRESSIVE
COLD CALLING PRO
DEAL CLOSER
STRONG WORK ETHICS
MONEY MOTIVATED
EXCELLENT COMMUNICATION
SKILLS
PEOPLE PERSON
COMPUTER LITERATE
*EXCEPTIONAL CUSTOMER
SERVICE SKILLS
*MARKETING FLARE
*ABILITY TO WORK
INDEPENDENTLY

WE OFFER:
*COMPETITIVE SALARY PLUS
COMMISSIONS
*VACATION
*HEALTH INSURANCE
*SICK AND SHORT TERM
DISABILITY
*401(K)
*TRAINING
*ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNI
TIES

WE ARE AN EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER & A
DRUG AND NICOTINE FREE
DIVERSIFIED WORKPLACE.
PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG AND
NICOTINE TESTING REQUIRED.

IF WE DESCRIBED YOU, SEND
OR EMAIL YOUR RESUME TO:
ENGLEWOOD SUN
ATTENTION: CAROL MOORE
120 W DEARBORN
ENGLEWOOD, FLORIDA
34223
FAX: 941-681-3008
EMAIL:
CYMOORE@SUN-HERALD.COM


SALES
L 2~070 ^


Advertising Sales
Executive

The Charlotte Sun is
looking for "Winners" to
join our team of
professional Advertising
Sales Executives.
If you are never satisfied
with average successes,
are self-motivated, goal
oriented, confident,
enthusiastic and believe
that the customer is all
important, we would like
to talk to you.
The successful
candidates must possess
good oral and written
communication skills, be
organized and a team
player. Sales experience
a plus but we will train
the right persons.

We offer:
Competitive salary plus
commission
Vacation
Health insurance
Sick and short term
disability
Training
Stable company that is
very Community minded
and involved.
Please send resume to:

Advertising Director,
Leslee Peth
Charlotte Sun
23170 Harborview Road
Charlotte Harbor, FL
33980
Email:
Lpeth@sun-herald.com
We are an Equal
Opportunity Employer &
a Drugand nicotine Free
Diversified Workplace.


READY TO MAKE
MORE MONEY?

SALES/NEW BUSINESS
DEVELOPER

Come work with the Sun
newspapers Telephone
Sales, New Business
Developer team
S located in
North Port Florida.

We are America's Best
:Community Daily newspaper,:
with the largest classified
section in Florida. This is an
outstanding opportunity to
join a company where you
make the difference. We are
looking for a full-time
person, with computer skills
and with a positive,
energetic, can-do approach
to join our telephone sales,
new business developer
team. We are looking for a
highly motivated individual
who thrives on challenges,
loves learning new skills and
enjoys working in a positive
team environment.

We offer:
* Training
* Stable company that
is very Community
minded and involved.
0 Opportunity to expand
your business skills

Please email your resume
: to:
Jobs@sunletter.com

Equal Opportunity
Employer/Drug & Nicotine:
SFree Diversified Workplace.:
Pre-Employment Drug &
Nicotine Testing Required.
I NEED CASH?"
Have A Garage
__ Sale!


SALES
L ^ 2070 ^


DIRECTOR OF SALES, need-
ed for 86 Room Port Charlotte
franchised Hotel. Hotel Sales
experience preferred but not
required. Please send resume
to bobbi.dewitt@sonmar.com
MIKE'S MATTRESS
Is Looking for Part/Full Time
Salesperson. Mattress Sales.
Experience a Plus.
Apply in Person:
23330 Harborview Rd. PC.
941-629-5550

FIND YOUR
BEST FRIEND
IN THE
CLASSIFIED!
SALES & MARKETING
ASSISTANT
Entry Level Marketing/
Entry Level Advertising
We are America's Best
Community Daily newspaper,
with the largest classified
section in Florida. We are
located in North Port Florida.
Duties Include, but are
not limited to:
Executing sales and
marketing functions to
company standards
Assists customers with any
questions they may have in
regards to our products
Gains knowledge on
all new clients the
company acquires
Ensure highest level of
customer service resulting in
increased productivity and
achieving sales goals
Knowledge of our
systems follow through of
advertising copy
Growth opportunities may be
available for those who
qualify.This position is entry
level, previous experience in
sales and marketing helpful.
We look for candidates with
the following:
Some college or
degree preferred
S* Outstanding
interpersonal skills
Student Mentality
Leadership Experience
Experience in retail, sales,
advertising & marketing
Ability to work in a high
energy environment
Please email resume to:
Jobs@sunletter.com
Sun Classifieds attention:
Geri Kotz EOE, DFWP
Pre-employment drug &
nicotine testing required.



Seeking Experienced
USED FURNITURE SALES
PERSON in Port Charlotte.
For more info call
941-743-0173


IN THE
CLASSIFIED
YOU CAN .....

/Find a Pet
./Find a Car
/Find a Job
/Find Garage Sales
/Find A New Employee
/Sell Your Home
/Sell Your Unwanted
Merchandise
/Advertise Your
Business or Service

Classified -
it's the reliable
source for the
right results


GENERAL
L 2100 ^


ALL SHIFTS-SEASONAL HELP
OSPREY,VENICE,ENG ELWOOD
APPLY EXPRESS EMPLOY-
MENT,2394TAMIAMITR.
PT. CHARLOTTE -629-2611
F/T LAUNDRY AIDE
Monday Friday 2-10:30pm
P/T HOUSEKEEPER
Saturday & Sunday Only
6:30 am to 3:00 pm
Apply in person to:
VILLAGE ON THE ISLE
930 Tamiami Trail
Venice, FL
Or Call 941-486-5479
To Make An Appointment
EOE Drug Free Workplace
LANDSCAPE INSTALLER
NOT LAWN MAINTENANCE!
941-662-8733

You Save
Big Bucks
Shopping
Classifieds!

POOL SERVICE Help, need-
ed Full-Time. 941-255-0732

PRODUCTION
OPENINGS

Sun Coast Press is
expanding shifts and looking
for enthusiastic individuals to
join our team. We are a
family and employee owned,
well-established and rapidly
growing multi-newspaper
media group and commercial
print operation on the sunny
Southwest Florida Gulf
Coast. Sun Coast Press has
the following full time and
part time employment
opportunities in our Venice
and Port Charlotte facilities.

Available day/night shift,
weekends, and holidays.

PRESS OPERATOR:
3- 5 years of experience
operating a web press. Goss
Urbanite or Community
single width press preferred.
Proficient with ink/water
balance, back to back color
registration, folder and 1/4
folder operations. Familiar
with automatic pasters, and
Gammerler stacker
operations a plus.

MACHINE OPERATOR:
Inserter operator, crew
leader. Training provided
Mechanical aptitude and
attention to detail and
customer needs.
ROLL TENDER: Entry level
position to operate and
maintain newsprint roll
splicers. Mechanical aptitude
and solid problem solving
skills required. Forklift skills;
training and certification
provided.

STACKER OPERATOR:
Entry level position to stack
down newspaper bundles
Mechanical aptitude and
attention to quality details

INSERTER: Entry level
position to handle insert
flyers for machine inserting
Ability to lift stacks of inserts
repeatedly.

For Full Time positions, we
offer health insurance, paid
holidays, paid time off, and
401K. We are a drug and
nicotine free workplace.

Pre-employment drug and
nicotine screening required.
Interested candidates please
contact Chuck Chambers,
operations manager, at
cchambers@suncoastpress.com
or (941) 206-1418
RAIN SOFT is seeking sports
minded people for PT reps in
Home Depot. Call Mike at
941-625-1000 ext 217


GENERAL /
L 2100 ^


RIVERWOOD GOLF CLUB
Golf Course Maintenance/
Handyman Position Available,
Experience Preferred. EOE
Apply in person 8am 3pm
Mon Thurs only
SWIMMING POOL
SERVICE TECHNICIAN
EXPERIENCED ONLY
CLEAN DRIVING RECORD
Call Carl 941-697-8580
Or mail:
chstrong@comcast.net

PART TIME/
TEMPORARY I
2110





COME WORK WITH THE SUN
NEWSPAPERS TELEMARKETING
TEAM, LOCATED IN NORTH
PORT, FLORIDA.
WE ARE LOOKING FOR A
PART-TIME PERSON WITH
COMPUTER SKILLS AND A
CHEERY PHONE PERSONALITY
TO JOIN OUR TEAM.
WE OFFER TRAINING IN A
STABLE AND COMMUNITY
INVOLVED COMPANY.
PLEASE EMAIL YOUR RESUME:
HR@SUNLETTER.COM
EOE DFWP
PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG &
NICOTINE TESTING REQUIRED
*********


Local Daily Newspaper
P/T Position
Uploading E-Edition

Computer knowledge a
must. Candidate must
know FTP and Network-
ing. Other duties include
light lifting. This is a late
night and weekend sched-
ule.

If you are looking for a
career in a positive envi-
ronment with growth
potential and have a real
desire to succeed.

Please contact:
stoner@suncoastpress.com

We are a drug and
nicotine free workplace
Pre-employment drug
and nicotine testing
required


Classifie = Sales
SALES TRAINEE/
ASSISTANT
PART TIME

We are looking for a self-
starter who wants to learn to
sell and work in a busy office
doing multi-faceted tasks. You
will be a front line customer
service employee who greets
people and offers assistance
to them part of the time and
you will work with seasoned
sales reps who will help you
grow. This entry level position
could be your entrance to a
career in advertising.

Good computer skills and
some basic accounting are
necessary as orders and cash
will be processed.
We are a fun-loving, but high-
production, successful busi-
ness. The dress code is rea-
sonable for meeting cus-
tomers.

Equal opportunity employer,
drug & nicotine free work-
place. Pre-employment drug &
nicotine testing required.

Please send resume to :
northportjobs@gmail.com





The Sun Classified Page 6 E/N/C


ads.yoursunnet


Thursday, November 14, 2013


3000







NOTICES
ANNOUNCEMENTS
L 3010 ^


$500 REWARD leading to
arrest of under 21 year old
youths. Grand Theft, home
burglary, 7000 block of River-
side Dr. 4 flat screen TV's,
Vizio, Panasonic, HP Comput-
er, Acer Laptop, Gold Watch.
CONFIDENTAL941-347-7130
CHRIST COMMUNITY
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
is renting spots for its Annual
Yard Sale on Nov. 23rd. Call
941-457-3077 to reserve.

ADVERTISE

In

The Classifieds!
ADOPTION: *
A Creative Financially
Secure Home, Art, Music,
LOVE, Laughter.
Family awaits 1st Baby.
Expenses Paid.
Beth 1-800-552-0045
FLBar42311 *

HAPPY ADS
oll 3015 ^




Place your Happy
Ad for only
$10.75
3 lines 1 day.

Add a photo for
only $10.00!

Please call
(866)-463-1638


PERSONALS
L10: 3020 ^



45 YEAR Old Male Looking
for Female Companionship.
David 941-258-4350
62 Year Old Male Looking
For Female 45-65.
941-624-2183
ADORABLE TASHA.
Stretch & Relax Therapy
941-497-1307
FEMALE hairstylist looking for
a Single Male 45-60 for rela-
tionship 941-201-9853
RELAXATION
1/2 HOUR SPECIALS
941-600-4317
RELAXATION
Located in Englewood
Call Stormy 941-549-5520
SENSATIONS
STRESS RELEASE
941- 766-7995
3860 RT. 41, 2 Mi. NORTH
OF PUNTA GORDA BRIDGE.
THE GIRL NEXT DOOR
941-483-0701 North Port
WELCOME BACK TO OUR
SEASONAL FRIENDS!
MASSAGE AND RELAXATION
941-626-2641 Lic. MA59041


CARD OF THANKS
L 3040 J


May the sacred heart of
Jesus be adored, glorified,
loved and preserved, through-
out the world now and forever.
Sacred Heart of Jesus have
mercy on us, St. Jude, worker
of miracles, pray for us. St.
Jude, helper of the hopeless,
pray for us. Say the prayer 9
times a day. By the 8th day
your prayer will be answered.
It has never been known to fail.
Publication must be promised.
Thank you St. Jude and Sacred
Heart. LMS
May the sacred heart of
Jesus be adored, glorified,
loved and preserved, through-
out the world now and forever.
Sacred Heart of Jesus have
mercy on us, St. Jude, worker
of miracles, pray for us. St.
Jude, helper of the hopeless,
pray for us. Say the prayer 9
times a day. By the 8th day
your prayer will be answered.
It has never been known to fail.
Publication must be promised.
Thank you St. Jude and Sacred
Heart. PR

Mnd your Best
IFfriend In the
Classifieds!
SCHOOLS
& INSTRUCTION


L. 40 001
CNA, HHA, MED ASST, CPR.
Onsite testing/finance avail
941-429-3320 IMAGINE
CNA & HHA CLASSES:
Days, Eves, Weekends. $449.
Small Class! CPR/First Aid
Incl. 941-966-2600
www.SunCoastCNA.com
ED KLOPFER SCHOOLS OF
CNA TRAINING 1 wk class $250.
Locations: Sarasota Port Char-
lotte, Ft. Myers. 1-800-370-1570
BORED WITH TAE KWON
DO & MIXED MARTIAL
ARTS? Try Something New.
FREE Classes Available in
Traditional Shaolin Kung Fu
More Info Call 941-204-2826
START A NEW CAREER
HOME INSPECTORS LICENSING COURSE
SPECIAL $1200! (SAVE $500)
Only 5 Seats Available
Sarasota Start Date 12/5/13
Ed Klopfer Schools
941-379-2378
www.edklopfer.com
UNEMPLOYED? Earn Your
Commercial Driver's License
(CDL) in Just 3 Wks. & Join
the Ranks of Employed Truck
Drivers Nationwide. Located
Punta Gorda FL. SunCoast
Trucking Academy. 941-855-
0193 941-347-7445
BIBLE STUDY
I & CHURCHES
Lwa! 3065 ^
CALVARY BIBLE CHURCH
1936 E. Venice Ave. Venice
Friday at 9am.
Study features video teachings
of noted Bible Scholars on
various subjects.
For more info. Call Rev. Jones
at: 941-485-7070 or visit
www.CBCVenice.com
COMMUNITY CENTER
4PM 7PM each Wednesday.
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
PC, Open to All Ages.
For more info 941-766-9357
FAITH BUILDERS
A Basic Study to Build your
Christian Faith. Call Pastor
Parsons at Christ the King
Lutheran Church for times.
941-766-9357 Port Charlotte
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
278 S. Mango St. Englewood
Monday & Thursdays
at 9am. Offering chair exer-
cise classes For more info.
Call 941-474-2473


BIBLE STUDY
& CHURCHES
3^ 065^ ^

GULF COAST
HEALING ROOMS
If you need healing, we want
to pray with you!
Our prayer teams are
available to minister to
you by appointment.
Thursday 10 am-12:30 pm
For apt. call p.863.558.7455
1538 Rio de Janeiro Blvd.
Punta Gorda, Fl 33983
Jesus Still Heals Today!
LIC. CHRISTIAN COUNSELING
941-876-4416
Liberty Community
Church
North Port Charlotte

BUILLOTS!
CRYPTS


RESTLAWN, Forrest Nelson,
2 burial plots, $995 each. Pt
Charlotte (941)-743-4028
/-GET RESULTS-^
USE CLASSIFIED!

LOST & FOUND
L ::3090 ^

FOUND: DOG, Pitbull mix,
brindle, Female, found behind
Warm Mineral Springs This
weekend. Call to identify! 941-
426-3031
FOUND: Iphone with green
case. Near Marion Ave. PGI.
Please call 941-575-3705
LOST DOG: CHIHUAHUA mix
female Tan colored, approx
151bs with white stripe down
her head. Jumped out of my
car window on US 41 near I-
Hop Restaurant in Pt. Char-
lotte. She was possibly picked
up by tan car. Reward for
Return. 734-878-2975
LOST PRESCRIPTION SUN-
GLASSES in a red case. Near
Race-Trac on Kings Hwy.
304-639-3143
LOST: TOY POODLE
Female, white w/black
markings on face, ear & back.
Missing from North Port
5/17/13.
Elderly owner heartbroken!
REWARD! 941-426-2909
ARTS CLASSES
L ^ 3091 ^


ACRYLIC PAINTING
Every Monday, 6-9 pm
Creative Classes
2357 S. Tamiami Trail
Holiday Center, Venice
Call Vickie Lucas, 941485-8150
BEACH GLASS & Shell
Jewelry @ Creative Classes.
New Designs!
Home Classes Available
Call Susan for info, Venice:
941-492-2150.
MAGIC OF MOSAICS
Classes & Workshops
Rosemary, Artist/instr
941-258-6873
www.FlamingoFanny.com
COMPUTER CLASSES

L Z 3092 ^


Repair & Virus Removal
Computer Classes & Lessons
941-375-8126 goodhands.org
/ EDUCATION

LW :3094 ^

MEDICAL OFFICE
TRAINEES NEEDED!
Train to become a Medical
Office Assistant! NO EXPERI-
ENCE NEEDED. Online training
at SC gets you job ready. HS
Diploma/GED & PC/Internet
needed. (888)528-5547.


EXERCISE CLASSES
L 3095 ^


GULF COAST ACUPUNCTURE
151 Center Rd.
Wednesday 5:30pm
Thursday 9:00 am
Saturday 8:30am
YOGA FOR BEGINNERS
Proceeds to
Venice Wildlife Center
Call Rick or Mary
941-488-1769
| RELIGION CLASSES
z ^3096

BEGIN YOUR DAY IN
DEVOTIONAL STUDY
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
TUES & FRI 9:00-9:30 am.
For more info 941-766-9357
Port Charlotte
FAITH LUTHERAN CHURCH
4005 Palm Drive, Punta Gorda
Various Days & Times
CONFIRMATION/BIBLE STUDY
Adult Infomational Class
941-639-6309


Fmdit'inthe



OTHER CLASSES

L:3097 ^

CONCENTRATIVE MEDITA-
TION with Linda Weser, 4 p.m.
every Monday at Unity Church
of Peace, 1250 Rutledge
Street, off Veterans Boulevard
between Orlando Boulevard
and Torrington Street, Port
Charlotte/North Port line.
Free; open to the public.
941-276-0124

5000






BUSINESS SERVICES
AN OCCUPATIONAL LIC.
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational
licensing bureau to verify.
ALUMINUM
5006UM

THE HEIGHTS ALUMINUM,
INC. Screen Rooms *
*Lanais Pool Cages *
Rescreens Seamless
Gutters Soffit Fascia .
Pavers Concrete
941-613-1414 OR
941-492-6064
Lic./Ins. AAA0010565 &
R6ALCL-5AC-33
S APPLIANCE
I SERVICE/REPAIR
LZ 5020 ^

DRYER VENT CLEANING -
Clean your dryer before it
catches on fire. Call Roger
941-321-7571
Lie 990010103532/Ins
DRYER VENT CLEANING &
INSPECTION. $49
30 yrs. exp. (941)-889-7596
/ ADULT CARE



25yrs Exp. Caregiver/HHA
looking for private care work.
W/great refs. 941-416-6383
SENIORS HELPING SENIORS
Light Housekeeping, Meals,
Errands and Companionship
Licensed & Bonded
941-257-8483


L CHILD CARE
L 5051 ^


ALL CHILDCARE
FACILITIES MUST INCLUDE,
WITH ADVERTISEMENT,
STATE OR LOCAL AGENCY
LICENSE NUMBER.
FLORIDA STATE LAW
requires all child care centers
and day care businesses to
register with the State of Flori-
da. The Sun Newspapers will
not knowingly accept advertis-
ing which is in
violation of the law

I COMPUTER SERVICE



COMPUTER TUTOR
(Your home or mine)
ONLY $25.00 an hour!
Please call Steve at:
941-445-4285
EXPRESS COMPUTER
REPAIR
Low Flat Rate. 7 Days!
Tech 10 Yrs. Exp!
(941)-830-3656 Lic./Ins.


We Come To YOU! *
November Special
$30 Flat Rate
CERTIFIED COMPUTER
REPAIR
ALL PC & LAPTOPS *
FREE over the
phone diagnostics!
Wireless Router Set-Up
Windows Upgrade
Virus/Spyware/Malware
Removal
Microsoft Certified
941-404-5373
941-276-6623
Visa MC Discover AMEX
JDS2 COMPUTERS
Affordable Repair!
FREE Computer Check!
NOW AVAILABLE FOR
HOUSECALLS!!
941-764-3400 or
941-276-5011
CONTRACTORS
LZ5:05C4

TEDDY'S HANDYMAN &
REMODELING, INC.
No Job Too Big or Too Small!
(941)-629-4966 Lic./Ins.
CRC 1327653
SCOURIER/TAXI
L Z 51055'T^


AIRPORT SHUTTLE SERVICE
ALWAYS RELIABLE
TRANSPORTATION
PROVIDING SAFE, RELIABLE,
COURTEOUS & AFFORDABLE
TRANSPORTATION TO AND FROM
ALL AIRPORTS!
941-626-5226
RSW-$50 SRQ-$55
TPA-$125 MIA-$225
*ALL RATES ARE FROM PC SEE
WEBSITE FOR ADDITIONAL RATES
WWW.ALWAYSRELIABLETRANSPORTATION.COM

CONCRETE
Low 5057


A-1 ROOF CLEANING
& COATINGS
Decorative Curbing,
Pool Deck, Lanai & Driveway
Coating, Epoxy Flake Garage
Floors, Poly Pebble Removal.
(941)-485-0037
Custom Design Driveways
Pool Decks Patios.
Decorative Concrete/Natural
Stone. A-1 COATINGS
941-426-9354
Lic# CC13-00001693
RICH LANDERS
STUCCO, INC.
Honest, Reliable work!
LIC/INS New Const &
Remodels. Rusted bands
& wire lathe repair.
spraycrete & dry-wall
repair (941)-497-4553


I CLEANING
SERVICES
^^ 5060^^

A CLEAN SWEEP Residen-
tial & Commercial Honest &
Reliable. Serving Sarsota
County. 941-223-0303
A&R PRO WINDOW
CLEANERS
In/Out, Tracks & Screens,
Also Vinyls, Clean & Polish,
H/W Team. Lic#25014 & Ins.
941-441-8658
BERNICE'S CLEANING
HOMES, 20 YRS EXP.
CALL 941-743-3803
MRS. CLEANING UP!
1st class cleaning Service!
Specials Now!
$10 off Window Cleaning
941-204-8057
www.mrscleaningup.com
Lic & Insured
ROSEMARY SUNSHINE
CLEANING SERVICES
Homes Offices Move In/Out
Plus much more!
Bonded....Free Estimates
Good References Available
941-423-5906
862-219-9748
Wunderlich Home Services
WUNDERWOMAN To the
rescue! 30 Years Experience!
residential cleaning, seasonal,
move in/out & one-time
cleaning. 941-544-2976
ELECTRICAL
^^ 570 ^

DRM ELECTRICAL
SERVICE,
"Plug Into Personalized Service"
Electrical Maintenance *
Repairs Troubleshooting *
941-480-0761 941-366-3646
EXCAVATING/
BUSH HOG
^ 5080 ^


BUSH BUSTERS INC.
Brush Mowing *
*Bush Hogging*
*ALL Mulching *
Selective Clearing
*Tree & Stump Removal
"We Can Do Anything!"
941-456-6332 or
941-204-1665
Lic./Ins
DUMP TRUCK SERVICES
A DIVISION OF
TREMENDOUS TREE
Bobcat Services, Fill Dirt,
Grading, Driveways Installed
(Shell/Rock), Private Roads,
Tri Axle Dump Truck
Free Estimates
South Sarasota & Charlotte Co.
941-426-8983

HANDYMAN/
GENERAL REPAIR


"HONEY DO" Handyman
& Odd Jobs
Kitchen & Bath Tune Ups
Faucets, counters,
windows, doors and more!
..related electrical &
plumbing work.
Experienced &
References Available
941-275-0712
HEATING & AIR
5090 ^


AC/DC AIR CONDITIONING.
Free Service Call with repair.
$39 Maintenance Special.
941-716-1476 Lic#CAC1814367
Employ Classified!
INTEGRITY AIR
Financing Available
FPL Rebates
Residential & Commercial
Sales-Service-Installation
941-465-5208
239-244-9554
Lic/Ins #CACA44874






Thursday, November 14, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 7


HEATING & AIR
Z ^5090 ^


AMERICAN SOLAR ENERGY
Cool your home with solar
powered A/C!! Call today for
your free estimate!
Tax credits! Lic#CAC1816692
941-284-4302
HONEST AIR CONDITION-
ING & HEATING. Comm. &
Res. Serving Sarasota & Char-
lotte County. 941-423-1746
Lic. CA C056738


A/C & Heat IS
941-468-4956 %
16 SEER
AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS
LOW AS $2695 INSTALLED
INSTALLED 10 YR WARRANTY
0% APR UP TO 5 YRS TO PAY1
FEDERAL TAX CREDIT AVAILABLE
ST. LIC #CAC1816023

HOME / COMM.
IMPROVEMENT
~5100

10'XlO' paver patio installed
for $499. 4 different patterns,
several colors to choose.
LYNCH Crete 941-875-2172.
5100 Basic Gutter
Cleaning & Handyman
Services Call: Mike
240-925-6806


TOPP'S FENCE INC.
941-429-0800
PVC
ALUMINUM
CHAIN LINK
"NOW HIRING"
LICENSE #AAAOO10261
ALUMASERV INC Guaranteed!
Best prices in town
941-627-9244
BILLS HANDYMAN SERVICE
fans, lights, faucets, toilets &
washer/dryer repair, etc...
(941)-661-8585 lic.
BILLS HANDYMAN SERVICE
fans, lights, faucets, toilets &
washer/dryer repair, etc...
(941)-661-8585 lic.
BOB'S CABINET SOLU-
TIONS 35 yrs exp. All your
cabinet/counter top needs.
(941)-276-0599 Lic22535
CARPENTER, INC. Handyman
Rotten wood, doors, soffit, facia,
etc. Phil 941-626-9021 lic. & ins.
COMPLETE DRYWALL
Hang, Finish, Patchwork, All
Textures, Paint. Matt Potter
941-232-8667Lic.& Ins CRC1328482
CONCRETE
Walkways, patios, driveways,
lanai, pool decks, etc.
Veteran & Senior Discounts
941-716-0872

CUSTOM RESCREENING
& Repair & Pressure Washing
Visa/MC 941-979-0922
DAN THE HANDYMAN
Bath rm & kitchen remodels
Painting, Carpentry, Anything?
941-697-1642
DAVE'S HANDYMAN
Honest, Knowledgeable & Reli-
able. Call for all your needs,
Sm/Lg 941-628-8326 Lic/Ins
DAVID BECK
The Handyman, LLC.
Kitchen Bath Remodels .
Ceramic Tile *
941-766-1767 Lic# 1327942
Ins. Member BBB
GUTTERS, 6" Seamless.
Ken Violette, Inc. (941)-
240-6699 Lic.CGC#60662/Ins.
GUTTERTOWN
Specializing in
5" & 6" gutters, Fascias,
Sofits, Seamless runs.
Call for FREE estimates!
Serving Sarasota County
941-525-3227


I HOME / COMM.
5100IMPROVEMENT


HANDYMAN
Home repairs. 30+ yrs Exp.
Call 941- 539-1694
*PRESSURE CLEANING*
Homes, Roofs, Etc.,
Auto Detailing, Window
Cleaning & More. Lic & Ins
Call 941-276-0628

J & J HANDYMAN
941-525-7967, 941-493-6736
Painting, Pressure Washing &
Much More!
Over 30Years Experience &
Satisified Customers
Serving Venice & Sarasota Areas
NO JOB TOO SMALL OR ODD
CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATE
LICENSED & FULLY INSURED

J. BONANNO
HANDYMAN SERVICES,
Complete Home Repair &
Maintenance. Pressure
Washing, Mowing, & Yard
Work. 35 years exp.
Call John 941-286-5940
JJ's RESCREENING &
Handyman Services.
941-875-8296
Lic and Insured.
John's Rescreening &
Handyman Service. No Job
To Small, Free Estimates
Lic9341./Ins. 941-883-1381
( -NEED A JOB?--~
CHECK THE
CLASSIFIED!
SELL'S ALUMINUM L.L.C.-
6" Seamless Gutters.
*Rescreens* Front Entries*36
Yrs. Exp! Greg 941-234-8056
or 941-497-4450 Lic. & Ins.
Servicing Sarasota County


SLIDING
GLASS DOOR
Wheel repairs.
Free Estimates Lic/Ins.
Bob @ 941-706-6445


SLIDING GLASS
DOOR
& Window Repair
Lowest Prices
GUARANTEED!!!
941-628-8579
"The Stucco Guy"
Drywall, Window Sill & Wire
Lathe Repair, Rusted Bands,
Decorative Bands,
Match Any Texture,
Senior & Veterans Discount
941-716-0872
TILE (Ceramic), Wood Floor-
ing, Installation. Robert Jones
Ceramic Tile (941)-204-2444
Lic. #AAA006338/lns.
PROTECT YOUR FAMILY
WITH CLEAN WATER!
OXIDIZES HOME
INLINE WATER f 30-DAY
BACTERIA & MONEY BACK
CHLORIDE GUARANTEE
RESIDUE
WATER CREEK INLINE SOLUTIONS
FLOW-BITE IS A SUPPLEMENTAL
DEFENSE SYSTEM THAT TAKES A
BITE OUT OF INLINE WATER BACTERIA
BUILD-UP & RESIDUE.
FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE
VISIT US ON OUR WEBSITE:
WWW.WATERCREEKINLINESOLUTIONS.COM
INFO@WATERCREEKINLINESOLUTIONS.COM
"FEED THE BEAR"
WE SELL & INSTALL Pavers,
Curbing,Concrete,Rock,Mulch,
DISCOUNT ROCKS
941-623-6192 Lic. 11-00002010
WILLY D'S HOME Improve-
ments, Inc. for all your Building
needs. (941)-716-3351

SLAWN/GARDEN
l & TREE
^^55110

AN OCCUPATIONAL LICENSE
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational licens-
ing bureau to verify


LAWN/GARDEN
I & TREE
^^ ^5110^


A COMPLETE TREE CARE CO.
TREMENDOUS TREE
Trust your lawn to an
ISA Certified Arborist
John Cannon FL-6444A
Tree sales, prune,
install, design, removal,
stump grinding.
Free Estimates, 10% Sr. Discount
South Sarasota & Charlotte Co.
941-426-8983
www.northporttree.com

AMERICAN IRRIGATION
Call 941-587-2027
FREE ESTIMATES!!!
Licensed & Insured
Charlotte Co. lic#AAA-11-
00010. Serving Charlotte
and Sarasota Counties

BOB'S LAWN SERVICE
NO LOT TOO SMALL OR BIG.
NEW EQUIP. CALL FOR QUOTE.
NO CONTRACTS. BOB
(94W-240-8608 OR 275-0919


CHRIS RABY'S LAWNS
* Hedges Trimmed (up to lOft)
eSmall Trees Trimmed & Shaped
*Shrubs Trimmed* eStumps
Removed *Rock or Mulch Laid
* Port Charlotte & Punta Gorda
Areas 941-623-3601
EXPERIENCED LANDSCAPER
Pruning & transplanting
plants, Pressure Washing &
TRUCK FOR HIRE
941-876-3097
FAMILY TREE SERVICE Tree
Trimming, Free Estimates. Call
Today 941-237-8122. Lic/Ins.
FLORIDA TREE INC.
Tree Trimming & Removal .
*Stump Grinding e
Lawn Service e
*Bucket Service e
941-613-3613
pcftree.com Lic./lns.

Great Deals in
the Classifieds!

GENERAL LAWN, landscape
services. (941)-426-7844
Wright & Son Landscaping Inc
J RIZ TREE SERVICES
Complete Tree Services
Servicing Charlotte & Sarasota
941-306-7532 Lic & Ins




,gPlart
\ "' OF FLORIDA INC. /
LAKE & POND SERVICES
INCREASE PROPERTY VALUES
CREATE AN AESTHETICALLY
PLEASING AMENITY
SERVICES TO FIT YOUR
SPECIFIC LAKE & POND NEEDS
FREE QUOTE
Call To Schedule An
Appointment With One Of
Our Licensed & Insured
Technicians.
941-378-2700
WWW.APOPFL.COM
LAWN REPLACEMENT
No Job Too BIG or Too small
Maloney's Sod
941-637-1333
PROFESSIONAL Tree Ser-
vice. Stump Removal, Palm &
Hedge Trimming. Free Esti-
mates! 941-624-4204 Lic
#001053
RESIDENTIAL LAWN CARE
Complete Lawn Care, with
Excellent Customer Service,
Hablamos Espanol
941-626-2623/941-564-7858
| ROMAN'S LAWN PRO |
RESIDENTIAL & COMM.
LICENSED & INSURED
941-380-LAWN
SANDEFURS-HOME & TREE
Maintenance Tree trimming,
removal. We do it all!
License/Insured941-484-6042
TJ MILAZO SR. 941-475-
0058 LAWN CUTTING
MOST LAWNS. $25-$30.
EXPERTLY DONE IN ENGLEWOOD ,
ROTONDA & CAPE HAZE


LAWN/GARDEN
& TREE
^^^5110

TJ MILAZZO JR.
941-830-1005
LAND CLEARING, LANDSCAPE
ALL KINDS OF CONCRETE WORK.
BOAT DOCK & SEAWALL REPAIR

| LEGAL SERVICES
L ^ 5115


Florida Paralegal Services
"Legal Help @ an Affordable
Fee" 941-623-9773
FloridaParalegalServices
@yahoo.com
MASONRY

L ao 5129 ^


AST MASONRY, 941-525-2435
Over 20 yrs exp. in pavers,
brickwork, concrete, stucco, stone
& decorative concrete.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!
LICENSED, INSURED & BONDED

MOVING/HAULING
^^ 5130 ^


ALL TYPES OF CLEAN-UPS!
Same Day Service! 24 Hrs. a
Day! 941-764-0982 or 941-
883-1231
MOVING HELP
$$$ Save $$$
Packing Loading Driving
30 yrs exp. 941-223-6870
SKIP'S MOVING
Local & Long Distance.
1 Item or Whole House!
941-766-1740
Reg.# IM1142 Lic/Ins

PAINTING/
WALLPAPERING
Lz 5140



BEST PRICES -- QUALITY JOB
Best Coast Painting
Residential/Commercial
Handyman services also!
10 /oOff With Ad!
941-815-8184
AAA00101254
L--__-------------
STEVEN'S CUSTOM PAINTING
Res/Comm. Int/Ext
FREE EST.
Lic. & Ins. 941-255-3834
A-1 ROOF CLEANING &
COATINGS-
Ext. & Int., Comm., & Res.,
Warranties! Free Estimates!
(941)-485-0037
Advertise Today!


50% OFF
Call Now to Lock in an
Amazing Bang For Your Buck
From a Seasoned Painter
941-468-2660
AAA00101266
FORMER FIREFIGHTER

SERVING ENGLEWOOD, NORTH
PORT, PORT CHARLOTTE, VENICE
DANNY MILLER PAINTING, LLC
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING
941-830-0360
FREE ESTIMATES
danspainting4602@comcast.net
LICENSED & INSURED AAO09886
LARRY ESPOSITO PAINTING
INC "It's Not What We Do, It's
How We Do lt!"Free Estimates,
10% off Senior & Veterans
941-764-1171 lic & insured
AAA007825
MARK HUNTER PAINTING
34 YRS IN BUSINESS
PREFECT WORK PROMPT SER-
VICE. PAY NOTHING UNTIL
WORK IS COMPLETE. FREE EST.
BONDED INS. Lic 90000092534
941-475-2695

MIKE DYMOND
Quality Painting
941-544-0764


S PAINTING/
WALLPAPERING
^^55140

LALOR PAINTING, Res. &
Comm. Also floors, Ref. Lic &
Inc. Free Estm. 941-270-1338
Nathan Dewey Painting Co
Commercial & Residental
Interior & Exterior
Pressure washing
Handyman Services
Free Estimates ~ Prompt Service
941-484-4576

PAINTING UNLIMITED
Where Quality & Value Meet!
Family Owned and Operated.
Call Now for a FREE Estimate
941-979-7947
Lic. &Ins. AAA-12-00015
SUPERIOR PAINTING, INC.
941-474-9091
Full Spray Shop Lie # AA009837
SWEENEYS PAINTING
Pressure Cleaning *
*MildewTreatment Painting *
Interior & Exterior *
SFree Est. Sr. Discounts *
941-916-1024
L0c AAA0010702
r------------------------9

WAYNE PATTON PAINTING,
LLC PAINTING,PRESSURE
WASHING POOL CAGE CLEAN-
INGS, INSULATIVE ROOF COAT-
INGS REMODELING. WE DO IT
ALL. 30 YRS EXP. LIC/INS.
941-276-5245 OR
941-258-5089 I
,_______ J

| PET CARE
LWOOOZ515 5


DOG CARE- by day/week,
exercise, fenced, loving home
environment. 941-625-0853

7iPLUMBING
L 5160 ^


DO ALL PLUMBING LLC
A Full Service Company for
ALL Your Plumbing Needs.
Call for Our Monthly Specials.
941-626-9353 Lic#CFC1428884
LARRY'S PLUMBING, Re-
Pipes (Most in 1 Day) Beat Any
Estimate Complete Service
941-484-5796 Lic.#CFC1425943
REPIPES, SLAB LEAKS
FULL SERVICE PLUMBING
PRECISION PLUMBING
941423-3058
#CFC1427378

THINK PLUMBERS
are too high? Give me a try!
Retired Master Plumber.
Ross (941) 204-4286
Lic. RF11067393

POOL SERVICES
LZ:5165


AL'S PARADISE
POOL SERVICE
Repairs & Service
FREE WATER TESTING
941-426-6500
GLENS POOL SERVICE
*Repairs* Chlorine Generators
*Pumps & Motors Heat Pumps
*Weekly Maintenance e
941-809-5121 CPC1458222/lns.
Strong Pool Services
REPAIRS & SERVICE
motors, filters, leaks, tile,
decks, heat pump
Insured & Licensed
Res. & Comm. 941-697-8580
RP0067268

S PRESSURE I
CLEANING
^^^ 5180

BENSON'S QUALITY
CLEANING
Pool Cages, Lanais, Drive-
ways, Window Washing..ETC!
941-697-1749
or 941-587-5007
www. BensonsQualityCleaning.com


CLEANING
5180

BAILEY'S PRESSURE
CLEANING Tile roof Clean-
ings starting at @$150.
Call 941-497-1736
PRESSURE WASHING
SERVICE
941-766-0902
PRESENT THIS AD
WORTH $20 OFF WHOLE HOUSE
FREE ESTIMATES
Pest Eliminators Inc.
LICENSE STATE OF FL #JF138591
LOCAL BUSINESS TAX LICENSE
CHARLOTTE CO. #4998
FL TAX CERTIFICATE #18-8015280394-1

L SCREENING
o^ll O5184


ALL ABOUT ALUMINUM &
SCREEN: Rescreen & new.
941-876-4779
wescreenflorida.com -
Lic# SA37, AL0511993X
RESCREENING by NORTH-
STAR Free Estimates. 941-
460-8500 or 863-221-9037
Lic# CC20597
RESCREENING Special
$55 Tops, $30 Sides.
Complete $1295 (to 1500SF)
941-879-3136 Lic.
22454/lns.
| ROOFING

5185





Repairs, Roofing Replacement
30Years Experience
Discounts to Seniors & Veterans
FREE Inspections & Estimates
Call Hugh 941-662-0555
RM COATS CONSTRUCTION, INC.
LICENSE C C C #1325731 & INSURED

JAMES WEAVER ROOFING
FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED
SINCE 1984. FREE ESTIMATE
941-426-8946
UC#1325995

LEONARD'S ROOFING &
INSULATION INC.
FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED
SINCE 1969
Shingle, Tile, Built-Up, Single-
Ply, Metal, Full Carpentry,
Service Available
Reagan Leonard
941-488-7478
LIC # RC 0066574

PAUL DEAO ROOFING
PROTECTING YOUR BIGGEST
INVESTMENT. 22 YRS EXP. -
941-441-8943 Lic#1329187
R.L. TEEL ROOFING
Reroofs & Repairs
Insurance Inspections
Veterns Discounts
941-473-7781
RC29027453 Lic/Ins
Reroofing Solutions-Products
for all roof types.
"Why replace when you
can Save it"
A-1 COATINGS
941-426-9354
Lic# CC13-00001693
STEVE'S ROOFING &
REPAIRS
Call Steve & See What
He Can Do For You!
Free Est. 941-625-1894
Lic. CCC1326838

WATe R1 ca
941-483-4630
Shingles, Slats, Metal, Tile, Repairs
Old Roof Removal Our Specialty
Full Carpentry
Free Estimates
LiC #ccc 068184
FULLY INSURED





The Sun Classified Page 8 E/N/C


ads.yoursunnet


Thursday, November 14, 2013


S PROFESSIONAL
SERVICES
^^,^5192^



POST SURGICAL HOME
CARE: Attending to daily
needs while you recover
from medical issues.
Pet services as well.
(239) 298-4701
(libbyuht@aol.com)
WINDOW CLEANING

z 5225 ^

CLEAN WINDOWS
Over 30 Years doing
Windows, Pressure Washing
& Painting
Also available Wallpaper
Removal
941-493-6426 or
941-321-4845
TERRY SOWERS
WINDOW CLEANING &
PRESSURE WASHING
Store Fronts, Residential,
and Commercial
FREE ESTIMATES
Accept all Credit Cards
941-697-9439
WE DO WINDOWS &
PRESSURE WASHING.
New Customers e
*Specials Package Deals *
Residential & Commercial
Free Estimates. Lic./Ins.
(941)-661-5281

6000






MERCHANDISE



Make Your


House a



HOME!


Adopt an

animal from

your local

animal

shelter.

Call

941.625.6720


SUNE


6000






MERCHANDISE

SARCADIA AREA
GARAGE SALES
6^^ 001 ^ -

[mFRI.-SAT. 8-2 HALF OFF
MOST ITEMS! Vintage Col-
lectables & jewelry, tools, misc
hsld, furniture & much more!
1953 SE Pear Drive., Arcadia.
L ENGLEWOOD
GARAGE SALES
^ 6002 ^

I-- FRI. 9-4 6800 Placida
Rd. Fidder's Green II
Clubhouse. Christmas Decor,
Homemade baked goods &
gift Items. New & Almost New
items. Very Reasonable.
rmFRI.-SAT. 8-? 1611 Over-
Ibrook. Collectibles, tebby
bears, glassware, nut crack-
ers, Amish rocking chair, etc..
mFRI.-SAT. 8-? 5247 Con-
IIner Terrace, 33981. Port
Charlotte Gulf Cove. Follow
the balloons signs! Too much
to mention! 5 Families!


FRI.-SAT. 8-2 1790 LORALIN
DR.. Lots of misc., sports
coll.,fishing gear, clothing &
plants.
m-FRI.-SAT. 9-3 11107
Greenway Ave. Sleeper
sofa, trundle bed w/mattress,
recliners, xmas & misc items!
[mTHU.-FRI. 8AM-4PM
I2809 Waxwing Lane. Yard
& assorted tools, household
items.
[-THU.-FRI. 9-1
30 S. Mango St.
Chairs, office, kids & womans
clothes, ice maker, much more
L NORTH PORT
GARAGE SALES
^ 6005 ^

[-FRI.-SAT. 8:30-3:30
1446 Gardenside Cir.
Xmas tree, Computer, clothes,
jewelry, household, tools, etc.

PUT
CLASSIFIED
TO WORK
FOR YOU!


FIND A JOB!
BUY A HOME!
BUY A CAR!

m-FRI.-SAT. 9-4 3854 Holin
ILn. Household goods,
tools, costume jewelry, furni-
ture, tv and more!
[-] FRI.-SAT. 9AM-4PM
4695 W Price Blvd.
MULTI FAMILY sofa, loveseat,
daybed, collectibles, christ-
mas gifts and much more.
[F- THU. AND SAT. 9-2
S3104 Emerald Lane.
3 FAMILY MOVING SALE!!
Motorcycle, Furniture, House-
hold, Clothes, Toys, Games,
Books, CDs, & Hardware!
SPT. CHARLOTTE/DEEP
CREEK GARAGE SALES
ii 6006 ^ ^

m FRI-SUN 8-3 3233 Deso-
I to Dr. Harbour Hgts HUGE
arage sale. Christmas decor,
hshld, tools, radial arm saw.


i FRI-SUN 8AM-1PM 349
lAdalia Ter. HUGE YARD
SALE! Both inside & outside
xmas decorations/trees, lights
including net, rope, icicle &
string figures. Great selection
of Xmas craft floral, center-
pieces, retired Charming Tails,
oak highback swivel barstools,
glassware, collectibles, and
much more!
[-FRI.-SAT. 8-? 2329
lAuburn Blvd. (Off
Collingswood) Antiques, Collec-
tables, Plants,& MUCH MORE!!
[-IFRI.-SAT. 8-2
I 3533 Beacon Dr.
Lots of yard and household
items. Something for everyone



[-IFRI.-SAT. 8-3
1426 Kellstadt Nw St.
3 FAMILY SALE Lots of great
stuff. Stop by and see.
F-IFRI.-SAT. 8-4 4246 East-
Lllake Ct. MOVING SALE,
EVERYTHING MUST GO! Tools,
Riding lawn mower, furniture,
household, Gardening tools &
Much More!
i-IFRI.-SAT. 9-2 Pagoda
lLane. Two Family Sale.
Household, DVD's etc. A little
Bit of Everything.
m-FRIDAY 8-NOON 2241
LCedarwood St. 2 Families,
men and women's clothes,
dog crates, & misc.

MOV NO


IJ1E
FRIDAY-SATURDAY 7:30-2
27419 Obdios Dr. Dining
room set, love seat, table
saw, tools, bike & household
items. Too much to mention!!
LISAT. 8-3. 17960 Toledo
Blade. Elite Fine Arts
Academy Performing at
Disney. Children & adult
clothing, furniture, DVD's,
toys, jewelry, books, appli-
ances and so much more!I
F-]SUNDAY,TUE,THUR. 9-1
IAdventist Comm Ser-
vices 2036 Loveland Blvd
PC LOTS of FURNITURE,
1/2 Price INSIDE SALE,
Lots of Misc,Clothes,Vege-
tarian Food,941-629-0398
r-iTHU. 8-2 90 Valdiva St.
I Deep Creek Furn,. Xmas
Trees/Decor, Luggage, Knik-
Knaks, Stereos, LP/45's ETC!
[-THU.-SAT. 8-2 1205
USetliffe Ct. Lots quality
baby items, toys, yard equip-
ment, furniture and lots more!
[-THU.-SAT. 9-3
1528 Blue Lake Ci.
Off Capricorn Blvd Deep Creek
Household tools & misc. items
r-iWED.-SAT. 21339 Gladis
UAve. MOVING SALE. furn.,
small trailer, bikes, lots of
misc. items. 941-249-1053

GARAGE SALES
6007^ ^

F-IFRI. 8-12 & SAT. 8-10
13662 Turtle Dove.
ESTATE SALE Assisted by
the Isles Girls and Guys. (Dir:
Bal Harbor to Albatross to
Whippoorwill to Turtle Dove
and turn right. Follow road to
house) Reclining Chairs;
Thomasville Leather Sofa &
Chair; Cloth Sofa & Matching
Chair; Coffee Table; Bar
Stools; Electronic Equipment;
TV; Chest; End Tables; Glass-
Top Kitchen Table; Bakers
Rack; Pictures; Vacuum Clean-
er; Lamps; Twin Beds; Dress-
er; Night Stand; Wicker Chair
& Table; 2 Sets of Lanai Furni-
ture; Smoker; Grill; 2 Marine
Jetty Express Bikes; Miscella-
neous Kitchen & Garage Items.
Buyers are responsible for
removal of purchased items.
Our cashier has a list of avail-
able, independent movers.


[-FRI. 8:30-? 5527 Papaya
IDr. Household goods,
antiques and collectibles.
[-FRI.-SAT. 8-1 2576 Mau-
1 ritania Rd. Children' cloth-
ing & toys, household items,
patio set, and much more!
[-FRI.-SAT. 8-12 3318
Trinidad Ct. Housewares,
glassware, cats meow, CD's,
cookbooks etc..
m-FRI.-SAT. 8-2 10303
Burnt Store Rd #40. Bed-
ding, Figurines Books, X-Mas
Items, Wicker Chair, Jigsaw
Puzzles, & Misc. Items!!
[-FRI.-SAT. 8:30-4:30
I619 Maltese Dr. Bookcase
& Books, Baby Gate, Holiday
Decor, & MORE! Cash Only.
[- MERCY'S ESTATE SALE
2500 RIO TIBER, PGI
Thur. Fri. Sat. 9-3
Hundreds Christmas items,
Buyer's Choice Lenox, Dept.
56, Heritage Village, David
Winter, paintings, new in box,
Ethan Allen furn., much more!
[-SAT ONLY 8-2 Harbor
IHeights Community Yard
Sale 27019 Shanahan Ln.

A Bargain Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds First!
A Whole
Marketplace of
Shopping is right at
your
Fingertips!
i-ISAT.8-1 3571 Whippoor-
Uwill Blvd. P.G.I. (Off of Bal
Harbor & Albatross) Household
Items, Lighted 6' X-Mas Tree,
Recliner, Glassware, Serving
Dishes, & MUCH MORE!!
m-|THU. FRI. SAT SUN. 8-4
I9226 ALFRED BLVD.. PG
* BIG SALE NEW ITEMS
Christmas, Crafts, DIY sup-
plies and lots more! Come by

GARAGE SALES
^ 6008 ^



FRI.- SAT. 8-?
5001 Woodfield Rd.
Antiques, Boat Parts, Tools,
Military, C-mas-$1, Furniture,
...ETC! Rain or Shine!
mFRI.-SAT. 9-2 44 Medal-
ist Road. Chicos, Art-
work, Household Items
VENICE AREA 1
GARAGE SALES
~6O 1


Fabulous
Flea Market
SPECTACULAR!
Jewish Congregation
of Venice
600 N. Auburn Rd.
(Off East Venice Ave.)
Sun. November 17th
10:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
GREAT PRE-HOLIDAY
BARGAINS
*Collector Artwork *Linens
*Kitchenware *Books &Toys
*Tools *Collectibles*Fumiture
*The list goes on...
MINI FOOD FESTIVAL
Big, Tasty Corned Beef or
Pastrami Sandwiches.
Traditional foods.
*Delicious home baked goods
Music while you nosh.
For information call
941-484-2022
Helping to support "Back
Pack for Kids"A program
of All-Faiths Food Bank,
For students in need


SFLEA MARKET
Z ^6015 ^




YI2i10


VENDORS NEEDED!!
WHO CARRY FISHING
SUPPLIES, GOLF SUPPLIES,
CELL PHONES, AIR BRUSH
DESIGNS, KITCHEN GADGETS
& PRODUCE ITEMS.
CALL SANDY
941-255-3532 OR COME
IN AND VISIT @ THE SUN
FLEA MARKET

AUCTIONS
6020


DrJACK ROBILLARDb
CAI, AARE
Auctioneers & Appraisers
(941)-575-9758

ARTS AND CRAFTS

LZ 6025 ^

LIGHT BOX for viewing
stained glass, home made,
$10 941-505-0081
MODERN SEWING Tall Cabi-
net pull out table $350, OBO
941-916-5570
| DOLLS
L 602L7S ^

ASHLEY DRAKE doll Ashley
Drake new baby, like new $50
941-380-33924-69
CABBAGE PATCH Kids
TWINS-1985 in orig. box $20,
OBO 941-451-40964
DOLLS EFFANBEE Legend
Series-in orig. boxes $20,
OBO 941-451-0964
GREAT CHRISTMAS GIFT!
DOLL HOUSE wood, 3
floors, furn. Painted blue ex
cond. $200 941-426-6671
MOVING SALES
9416029-

MUST SELL-Upright Kenmore
freezer $100. Oak china/dis-
play Cabinet $150. Oak tv cab-
inet 6.5'x4 $100. Twin
loveseat sleeper $50. Free
trampoline 941-456-1901
HOUSEHOLD GOODS
4 6030

AREA RUG ivory/cream with
aqua stripe border, 8xl0,good
cond. $60 941-460-9610
AREA RUGS 5x8 & Matching
2x3. Kas Collect. Pd 500.
$175, OBO 941-391-1797
BATH:TOWELS, S.CURTAIN,
soapdish,rug,etc.Brown.11
pcs/ $45 941-276-1881
BED MATTRESS & BOX.
New-Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
BREAD MAKER, Oster with
receive books. $25 941-375-
4054
BRITA WATER Filter System
10-cup pitcher w/7 filters
(boxed) $59 941-276-1881
CABINET 30" X 48" hard top
flat surface. $25 941-204-
1277
CALPHALON/UTENSILS 6
pieces like new $70
941-575-4364
CARPET CLEANER Bissell
ProHeat2x used once $75,
OBO 941-423-6356
CHAIR CUSHIONS, Thick,
black, Pier 1, new-with-tags.
6/ $99 941-276-1881
CHANDELIER MEDITER-
RANEAN style 3 lights $150
941-780-3977


HOUSEHOLD GOODS

z :^ 6030 ^

CHEST FREEZER White
$100 941-473-3544
CHINA DINNERWARE, Com-
plete serv for 12 & 5 serv pcs.
$200 941-429-9305
CHINA DISHES Cornet/Signa
Complete Service 12+acc.
$100 941-639-2143
COMFORTER/PILLOWS
QUEEN elegant new orig 149.
$55 941-580-4460
COMPUTER DESK sauder
64W24D54H GOOD SHAPE
$125, OBO 260-687-9740
CONDO SALEeverything must
go! Come & call at your conve-
nience PG 321-609-0117.
DECORATOR RND Wood
Table 25"H, 20"dia w/Custom
Glass $25 941-276-1881
DEEP FRYER Presto Digital
Pro, NEW! $75 941-423-1608
DORCHESTER POTTERY
Blueberry Pattern, 7 signed
pieces. $100 941-766-9138
ELEC SKILLET Presto 16"
skillet $10 941-828-0171

ELECTROLUX VACUUM
cleaner with attachments $60
941-743-0582
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
GOOD SHAPE 74W23D68H
$75, OBO 260-687-9740
EXTENSION LADDER alu-
minum extension ladder $75
256-694-3466
FABRIC STEAMER conair
New, $79 never used $20
501-442-8612
FABRIC STEAMER, CONAIR
Large Like new $30 941-356-
0129
FAN/LITE 52"DARK brown
like new $30 941-655-8982
FLOOR LAMP Great reading
light, 3 way switch $5 941-
356-0129
FLOOR STEAMER/SANITIZ-
ER Haan all accessories new
$65, OBO 941-423-6356
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**lf you have never
placed an ad online,
you will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page)**
FRY/BAKE PANS, contain-
ers, popper, cut bd, chopper
etc 18 pc $25 941-276-1881
GRAND FATHER CLOCK.
HOWARD MILLER MAKE OFFER
862-812-0995



Enter your classified ad online
and pay with your credit card.
It's fast, easy, and convenient.
Go to:
yoursun.com
and click on Classifieds
*Fast Easy *
Convenient *
(Visa or Mastercard)
SUNYTILT






Thursday, November 14, 2013 ads .you rsun net F/N/C The Sun Classified Page 9


Challenger
DIRECTIONS: -f/
Fill each square with a number, one through nine. / tIA f-
* Horizontal squares should add to totals on right. 1 1-4
* Vertical squares should add to totals on bottom.
* Diagonal squares through center should add to 6
total in upper and lower right.
THERE MAY BE MORE
THAN ONE SOLUTION. 2 6
Today's Challenge
Time 2 Minutes
57 Seconds 1 5
Your Working 6 2
Time Minutes 2 6
Seconds 16 6 5 5 55
2013 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.
solution 1I-13 F1
Yesterday's 3 7 7 9 26
Challenger V ff 7 9g27
Answers I5 23 27 2

Cryptoq U I p 2011lby King Features Syndicate

11-14


QV M R A F X


LR


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YMRCFWCG VK AYVMGSRCG

VK HSHX GWS NLVRG AWRC


AV QVROFWOSAW:


RWT


G W S N N S R C .
Yesterday's Cryptoquip: WHEN YOU PAINT AN
INTERVENING SPACE USING AN IVORY SHADE, I
WOULD CALL THAT WHITENING THE GAP.
Today's Cryptoquip Clue: L equals I


HI AND LOIS By Brian and Greg Walker
SCAN E I HAVE B M HOWlMUCHk
fA LITTLE LONGER TIME DO
STO FINISH MY UKd-y1 NEED?/
HOMEWORK K








BEETLE BAILEY By Mort Walker


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE By Chris Browne


MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM By I

iRlMM, TH 01e
MAILMAN'S M ROFMF
WOINO W I. WOTPN'
WNc THE
"-T---" MAILMAN
ANWOIE.


like Peters


"Now I remember. I'm sure you
buried your bone over there."


THEIR NFL
* JERSEY NUMBERS
RETIRED


MOL I E B Y VS QN KH E B
YWTROL J GE B YWUR P


NK I G
K E I G


ED A
E A


NW S E NIY


A 0 L
A E K S
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A HO U Z SQ P N
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I AN C LA R Y X


VUNWOR B M I J L TAG S
Q P N 0 ADG ATMEKT J H
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VUTRQC P HS TUGOFGOT
Wednesday's unlisted clue: U.S.A.
Find the listed words in the diagram. They run in all directions -
forward, backward, up, down and diagonally.
Thursday's unlisted clue hint: BRONCOS QB JOHN
Csonka Groza Marino Starr
Dawson Haynes Maynard Tittle
Fouts Jim Brown Namath Unitas
Griese Kelly Payton


c "013 Kin, Features Inc 11/14


PICKLES By Brian Crane
OKA, NELSON, I CAT REMEMBER.
NM OFF Ti4E I IAP 10 HOL/2MY
PHONE. AWW ) 1"4OUC4T0 LONG
IV ?yO b )AMTr THAT I FOR6OT.
1- ByL L ME?







B.C. By Mastroianni & Hart


-M IN


SPORTS
SLEUTH


Thursday, November 14, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 9


(2013 King Features, Inc.


11/14







ru I


Look for the g

Directory pul

Saturday ii


;reat deals in the Business & Service

blishing Sundays, Wednesdays, and

i the Classified Section of the Sun! /


DEAR DR. ROACH: I
read with interest your
recent column on pros-
tate-cancer prevention. I
am 42 years old and have
been taking finasteride for
a number of years for hair
loss. I have not noticed any
side effects. I take a 5 mg
pill and cut it into four
pieces, and take one piece
every day. Reading the
column made me think of
two things: 1. Will it have
long-term effects on my
prostate or any later medi-
cal needs, and 2. Given my
age, should I stop taking
it given the concerns
about its association with
cancer? Obviously I care
about hair loss, but I don't
want to compromise my
overall health. S.T.
ANSWER: In my previ-
ous column, I noted that
finasteride (Proscar) at the
5 mg daily dose actually
reduced overall pros-
tate-cancer risk, but may
have increased slightly the
risk of aggressive cancer,
although a subsequent
analysis disputed this.
At the 1 mg dose usual
for hair loss (and you
do what many men do,
breaking the pill to save
money), I would expect
minimal effect on prostate
cancer. Although I don't
recommend finasteride to
prevent cancer, I wouldn't
stop taking it for concern
of cancer.
DEAR DR. ROACH: My
wife, who is in her mid-
70s, recently had a cornea
transplant and has been
advised by her ophthal-
mologist not to have a flu
shot or any other immu-
nization because it would
activate her immune
system and increase the
chance of rejection of the
cornea. I expect that those
who have received other
forms of transplants are
in the same boat. She has
COPD and is not in the
best of health, so getting
the flu would be quite
hazardous, and I think
that getting the flu would
influence her immune
system, causing a possible
rejection. Short of living as
a hermit, avoiding expo-
sure to the virus would be
difficult. -D.WB.
ANSWER: There are
indeed a few case reports
of corneal-transplant re-
jection following influenza
vaccination. However, the
risk probably is very low,
and guidelines strongly
support influenza vacci-
nation (the inactivated
injection, not the live oral
vaccine) for all candidates
for, and recipients of, solid
organ transplants, such
as heart, liver, kidney and
cornea. One article I read


Dr. Roach

recommended that cornea
recipients be aware of this
complication so that if
after flu vaccination they
do develop symptoms of
rejection, including blurry,
uncomfortable or red eye,
they can be seen immedi-
ately and receive possibly
vision-saving treatment.
DEAR DR. ROACH:
Traveling for a length of
time say, six hours or
more on a train, bus or
plane makes me rather
tired. Others I discussed
this with have had similar
experiences. I find this
strange, because for most
of the travel time I am
sitting doing nothing but
reading or daydreaming.
My question is, are phys-
iological changes taking
place in the body brought
on by the long period of
sitting while in transit that
account for the fatigue,
or is it simply mental
boredom? R.S.
ANSWER: I think it's
both mental and physical.
Prolonged sitting recently
has been shown to put
people at increased risk
for heart disease, as well
as the known risk of blood
clots. Getting up and
walking around is always
a good idea physically,
and might help mentally
as well.
More than simple
tiredness, chronic fatigue
syndrome is all-encom-
passing. The booklet on
it explains the illness and
its treatment. To obtain a
copy, write: Dr. Roach-
No. 304, P.O. Box 536475,
Orlando, FL 32853-6475.
Enclose a check or money
order (no cash) for $4.75
U.S./$6 Can. with the
recipient's printed name
and address. Please allow
four weeks for delivery.
Dr Roach regrets that
he is unable to answer
individual letters, but
will incorporate them
in the column whenever
poeihibl' Readers may
email questions to
ToYourGoodHealth@med.
cornell.edu or request an
order form of available
health newsletters at P.O.
Box 536475, Orlando, FL
32853-6475. Health news-
letters may be ordered
from www.rbmamall.
com.


REX MORGAN By Woody Wilson and Graham Nolan


ZITS By Jerry Scott &
GS, I NFEPHaP
rmIrHisTh ThWA
^, OKA'(^


Jim Borgman

INHATOesTACLES
HAVE I oVER CZ
IN W LIFE-?




rd


FRESHLY SQUEEZED By Ed Stein
PAP, MY ALLOWANCE ] I HAVEN'T HAP A
HAS BEN THE SAME 'AISE IN TWO YEAR5,
SINCIG i WAS NINE! BUT YOU'VE APPEP
A BUN.H OF CHORES
S 0F1? ME TO PO.


MARY WORTH By Karen Moy and Joe Giella
IS EVERYTHING V 'VE BEEN ASKEP TO
ALL RIGHT ? MANAGE THE NEXT BIG
FUNPRAISER FORB
.J~^--EF*1EA PROMiSE ,r^7IU
r HAVEN


)ILBERT By Scott Adams

OUR NELW STRATEGY
IS TO LOLWJER OUR
PRICES TO INCREASE
SALES.


Do cancer concerns

outweigh hair-loss help?


SO OUR STRATEGY IS
TO START A PRICE UWAR
AND DRIVE OUR PROFIT
MARGIN TO ZERO?


The Sun Classified Page 10 E/N/C


,:,: .:. ',, ,u r..u r, r, t






Thursday, November 14, 2013 ads .you rsun net EINIC The Sun Classified Page 11


You can find every business and service under the

sun in the Business & Service Directory!

Make your business a part of it! Call 866.463 .1638


ISUN NEWSPAPERS


ia


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME BORN LOSER By Art and Chip Sansom
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek 7
ALL OKF..WOULI'OU LIK- | NO, U-RP:
SECONA>5 OF Al TIANNKS,






A I g B e YaKSh
HIoLARYPRC CIAU"?





BLONDIE By Dean Young and John Marshall


L jfAL A 1U.1A~kiE45M0066
k. '.l~rU_ FAVC97i P ,arLAC.E O
ONEGXY
; 7"--'~ Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as I
suggested by the above cartoon.
A:7 7 -T 7- 7MUTTS By Patrick McDonnell
A: THE m 01H, My LITTLE
(Answers tomorrow) MlOO-lOO CAKES...
Yesterday's Jumbles: DUCTS ALLOW ZOMBIE ACCESS S Ei E
Yesterday's Answer: When Quincy chewed up Jason's math home- SWEETI E
work, it was found to be a "CALCU-LOSS" I E_- _I .


Quick-cleaning your pooch


SLOVE. I
,LOVEV...


p.


PUPPy TAT... -I DONT THINK
WHITTLE MEE-MEE... S4E REMEMBERS
OOCHIE-GUCCI! Ey NAME.
.I NA


Dear Heloise: While vol-
unteering at a local animal
shelter, I picked up a great
pet grooming tip. I now
have three rescue dogs
of my own who go to the
groomer monthly. Between
visits, I wipe down my
dogs with baby wipes I
buy them by the case. It's
a quick way to keep them
clean and fresh-smelling.
The baby wipes work well
to pick up loose hair before
it falls on the furniture. -
N.J., via email

Purse shape
Dear Heloise: I just
opened some packing
boxes that had been in
storage, and all my purses
were smashed and out
of shape. I had lots of
packing paper, so I put a
plastic grocery bag into
each purse, then stuffed
it with packing paper. The
shape of each purse came
back quickly. I tied the
grocery bag at the top so
when I wanted to use the
purse, all I had to do was
pull out the grocery bag
and go. This also makes
it easier to "stand" my
purses on closet shelves.
- Dixie in Arkansas

Stuck foil
Dear Heloise: I have
a rather large piece of
aluminum foil that is stuck
to the bottom of the oven.
How can I remove it with-
out damaging the finish?
- Kathy P., via email
Yikes! This may take a
little work! Place a wet,
warm, soapy washcloth


BABY BLUES By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott


Hints from Heloise

over the foil and let it
sit for 20 to 30 minutes.
Then scrub the foil with
a nylon scrubbie or the
rough side of a sponge
with warm water to get as
much foil off as possi-
ble. Also, while wet, try
carefully scraping with a
plastic scraper or an old
credit card. This may take
several attempts, and all
the foil may not come
completely off.

Still perfect
Dear Heloise: Your
mom taught my mom to
place a silky scarf over
her hair, holding the ends
between her teeth, before
pulling a sweater over
her newly styled hair so it
wouldn't get messed up.
When done, pull it off,
front to back, and your
hair will still be perfect.
I've passed this hint on
to my daughters. Some
things never go out of
style. So thankful you
took up where your mom
left off. Paula Rice,
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Thanks! This also works
if you don't want to get
makeup on your sweater!
- Heloise


FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE By Lynn Johnston


NO, micHReL. IF VOU LUTHIM
HRnvr wHfAT w E'E EnrrNt
fLLKTHElMHE, iE!LL GEl-
.,,,a8.- SP'OILED.


JUMBLE
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


I I-


Thursday, November 14, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 11





The Sun Classified Page 12 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, November 14, 2013


Bullied classmate is surprised

by apologies, hugs at reunion


DEAR ABBY: I'm writing
regarding "Lost for Words"
(July 7), who skipped
her 10-year high school
reunion because she was
bullied in school. (She is
now receiving Facebook
messages from former
classmates who want to
apologize.)
That letter could have
been about me! I was
bullied all through school,
too. Things were so bad I
honestly don't know how
I kept it together. I never
even told my parents how
bad it was until years after
I had graduated.
My class (1972) had
their 10-year reunion
and I went, although I
almost didn't because I
was scared. When I got
there, I was given hugs
by classmates. Some of
them apologized, and it
was wonderful. I enjoyed
myself so much that I
helped organize our 20th
and 25th reunions.
"Lost," you can either
keep reliving those painful
moments and continue
to suffer, or rise above it,
prove to your classmates
and yourself that they can't
hurt you anymore and get
to know each other now as
peers.
Counseling helped me
to learn to deal with bad
things in my life. Don't get
me wrong, I still have some
issues and life isn't always
easy, but I have learned
to let go and forgive these
people. They, too, have
grown up and are now ma-
ture adults who know right
from wrong. CATHY IN
ESTERHAZY, CANADA
DEAR CATHY: Thank
you for sharing your expe-
rience and insights along
with many other readers
who were bullied in school.
One common denomi-
nator in their letters was
the word "forgiveness."
Interestingly, I received
none from the bullies
themselves! Read on:
DEAR ABBY: As middle
school teachers, we do
our best to curtail abuse,
but it happens behind the
scenes. The targets can
remain bullied for years,
as the writer expressed. It
is sad that this person is
affected to this day,
10 years after graduation.


Dear Abby

I agree the target has no
obligation to forgive the
bullies, but this would be
a perfect time to send a
strong message to them
via her Facebook page. An
article on the effects of bul-
lying could be posted with
a message that if the bullies
truly want forgiveness, they
should pass this life lesson
on to their children who
may be engaged in similar
behavior. -MARYANN IN
NEWYORK
DEAR ABBY: When I
attended my 10th reunion,
the people who had
bullied me apologized
and I told them I forgave
them. I just attended my
30th reunion, and some
of the same bullies asked
again for my forgiveness.
They are in a self-imposed
prison of guilt from which
they will be free only when
they can accept that I
forgive them. My advice to
"Lost" is to respond to the
Facebook messages with
a thank-you, and leave
it at that. -DAWNA IN
MONTANA
DEAR ABBY: Three years
ago, I went to my 50th.
It was the only reunion I
ever attended. Halfway
through the event, the
"bully brigade" came up to
me to apologize for their
behavior. I hadn't thought
about it and was having a
great time. But suddenly,
I was emotionally thrown
back into those years of
hating school because of
how I was treated.
On my way out, I
confronted the worst bully.
I told her that her apology
was not accepted, and
they could all keep their
apologies and hold onto
their guilt for another
50 years. The minute I said
it, it was like a great bur-
den had been lifted from
my shoulders. -ANNE IN
OHIO


"Ephraim is joined to idols: let him alone."
- Hosea 4:17
Idolatry can lead to terrible consequences. The
worst of these is that God totally ignores you. Turn to
Him before it is everlastingly too late.


MALLARD FILLMORE By Bruce Tinsley


& Chuck Ayers

C20(b5, RALPH AND I
IA15NT l'WO"0TI46R ANP
50OG'1T 4 T VFr,TW'q.
POL-t. S(. OJOXT A OF
LlOT'-EWY TlCYK.S, AND
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50mw&OHeRf.


[NOT REALL'i...





.4,


JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process elimination to solve the puzzle. The difficulty
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).
3 2 9 7 Rating: BRONZE

9 3 6 5 Solution to 11/13/13

4 1 93 6E6 5 1 9 4 8 7_

8 9 1 7 4 6 2 3 5196
3 8 1 9 891746235

9 4 3 8 2 41937856
18 7 4 65 9287465319
S98 2 7 4 -3652918743
1 49956182743
1 L738654921

9 8 3 5 11429 37161518

8 4 2 1I
11/14/13

Venice Gondolier readers: Look for the puzzle solution in the Our Town section


I HOROSCOPE
ARIES (March 21-April 19). Maybe it's because
you've been so effective at this in the past, but today
it's as though everyone is coming to you with the
same imperative:"Make me feel important!"
TAURUS (April 20-May 20).Your wonderfully
functioning brain has developed a number of
ways to help you manage. Some of those ways no
longer suit you, but you are notyourbrain's habits!
Separate the two and stop feeling guilty.
GEMINI (May 21 -June 21). Those who think charm
is about saying astute, adorable or funny things


have it all wrong. You know the secret. Charm is the
art of making other people feel pumped up.
CANCER (June 22-July 22).There's something on
the table to be won by the person who can make
the best case for it. Examine this prize carefully,
though. It may not be worthwhile.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22).You will be unflappable and
accepting of others.This takes confidence and is
only possible because you feel that ifyou really need
to defend yourself, it will be easy for you to do.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Ifyou wantyour time


where conversations are headed and get out while
the getting's good.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). In days of old, life was
hard until it got harder. Children worked, everyone
struggled to eat, and life was a daily battle. Com-
paratively, life now is pretty good for a lot of people.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21).Those who have noth-
ing to say but say it anyway will make whimsical
connections that, over the course of time, may prove
more meaningful than you might have expected.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21).Take time off from


accomplish a simple, small task. The minor win you
experience will give you fresh energy.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Some believe that
giving children too many things robs them of their
creativity. Today it may feel as though you have too
many resources to be creative.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). Usually, it's important
to make your deal before you start doing the work.
But in today's case, you would be wise to do a small
chunk of the work before you make a deal.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). It's better to contribute


and attention to be your own today, try to listen for that ambitious project you've been working on to meaningful, useful work to the world and not be


famous than to be famous and make headlines for
doing ordinary things that other people do every
day.
TODAY'S BIRTHDAY (Nov. 14).Think ofyourselfas
having plenty of time and freedom.You can afford
to experiment, and it makes your life richer and
more interesting to do so. New friends fit in beauti-
fully with the old. Affections develop quickly and
run deep.There are windfalls in January and July.
September brings a move. Libra and Sagittarius
people adore you. Your lucky numbers are: 20,1,
22,37 and 41.


PEANUTS By Charles Schulz


CRANKSHAFT By Tom Batiuk
'4-
"S/^ T'T E .. THAET5V
I TEU TICKETS
I BOUCGT/A4
7.51R~'TCT
ire,


SHOE By Gary Brookins & Susie
ARE THOSE PILLS WORKING THAT
,I GAVE YOU FOR YOUR SNORING? j






Thursday, November 14, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 13


Thursday Television


VEN-VENICE E-N-ENGLEWOOD SAR-SARASOTA PC-PORT CHARLOTTE ARC-ARCADIA SPG-SOUTH PUNTAGORDA


NOV. 14 E-E f __ PRIME TIME
ABC7 News World News To Be a To Be a Once Upon a Time in Grey's Anatomy Callie is Scandal: Everything's Coming ABC7 News (:35) Jimmy
ABC M0 7 7 7 10 7 7 at 6(N) Diane Sawyer Millionaire? Millionaire? Wonderland: Heart Of Stone sued. (N) (HD) Up Mellie Mellie's interview. (N) at 11 (N) Kimmel Live
_____ __(N) (N) (R) Cyrus escapes. (N) r(HD) )(N)
ABC7 News World News The 7 O'Clock Entertainment Once Upon a Time in Grey's Anatomy Callie is Scandal: Everything's Coming ABC7News (35) Jimmy
ABC (2 @ 7 11 7 6:00pm(N) Diane Sawyer News(N)(HD) Tonight(N) (HD) Wonderland: HeartOfStone sued. (N)(HD) Up Mellie Mellie's interview. (N) @11:00pm KimmelLive
(N) Cyrus escapes. (N) r(1HD) (N) (N)
WINK News CBS Evening WINKNews Inside Edition Big Bang The Millers The Crazy Two and Half Elementary: Blood is Thicker WINK News Late Show
CBS 11)213213 5 5 5 at 6pm (N) (HD) News (N) (HD) at7pm(N) (HD) Fashion Show. Theory Past Educating OnesFirst MenlIdeal Dead young woman connected at 11pm (N) Claire Danes.
m ______istake. Nathan. client. (N) dates. to CEO. (HD)1 (N)
10 News, CBS Evening Wheel of Jeopardy (N) Big Bang The Millers The Crazy Two and Half Elementary: Blood is Thicker 10 News, Late Show
CBS io 1010 10 o6pm(N) News(N)(HD) Fortune(N) (HD) TheoryPast Educating OnesFirst Menldeal Dead youngwoman connected 11 pm(N) ClaireDanes.
()_______ mistake. Nathan. client. (N) dates. to CEO. (N)
NBC2 News NBC Nightly Wheel of Jeopardy (N) Parks& Parks (.1l) Save Michael J. Parenthood: The Ring The NBC2 News (35) The
NBC 20 2 2 2 @ 6pm (N)(HD) News (N)(HD) Fortune(N) (HD) Recreation: Recreation: World(N)(HD) Fox: media reveals Kristina'ssecrets .@11pm(N) TonightShow
(HD) Filibuster Recall Vote Homecoming (N) (HD) (HD) (N) (HD)
NewsChannel NBC Nightly NewsChannel Entertainment Parks& Parks (.1l) Save Michael J. Parenthood: The Ring The NewsChannel (35) The
NBC I 8 8 8 8 8 8at6:OO(N) News (N) (HD) 8at7:OO(N) Tonight(N)(HD) Recreation: Recreation: World(N)(HD) Fox: media reveals Kristina'ssecrets .8at 11:00(N) TonightShow
_____ __Filibuster Recall Vote Homecoming (N) (HD1) (N) (HD)
FOX 4 News at Six Judge Judy SimpsonsTes The X Factor: Results Show Glee: The End of TwerkThe FOX 4 News at Ten Local FOX4 News The Arsenio
FOX IN6 4 4 4 Community news; weather; (R) (HD) rate threshold. Top vote-getters revealed. (N) glee club learns how to twerk. news report and weather at Eleven (N) Hall Show (N)
_____ traffic; more. (N) ___________ (HD) (N) (HD1) update. (N) (HD))
FOX 13 6:00 News News TMZ (N) omg! Insider The X Factor: Results Show Glee: The End of TwerkThe FOX 13 10:00 News The FOX 13 News Access
FOX IN 131313 13 13 events of the day are reported. Victoria's Top vote-getters revealed. (N) glee club learns how to twerk. top news stories are Edge(N)(HD) Hollywood(N)
_____ (N) (HD) Secret. (HD) (N) (HDP) updated. (N) (HDP) (HD))
BBCWoi_ d Nightly The PBS NewsHour (N) (HD) Antiques Rd Antiques Rd Doc Martin: Remember Me Secrets of Althorp The Charlie Rose (N) (HD)
SPBS (30 3 3 3 News Business Paintng; more. Chair; PC Penhale's wife returns; baby Spencers Estate's history.
America Report (N) necklace. named. (R) ((HP)
BBCWodid Nightly The PBS NewsHour (N) (HD) WEDU Arts Diamonds Antiques Roadshow: Secrets of the Dead: Ultimate Tut Scientists explore Tut's
WED0J1I 3 3 3 3 News Business Plus (HD) Along Politically Collect Past real story & build a definitive picture of the pharaoh. (R) (HD)
____ America Report (N) Highway (R) elections. (R) (HD))
Family Clare Modem The Big Bang The Big Bang The Vampire Diaries Death Reign: A Chill in the Air The WINK News @lOpm (N) (HD) 21/2 Men 21/2 Men
CW IM) 6 21 6 negotates. (HD) Family Trials Amy gets sick Amy's feelings, and the Maiden Amara's heretics make their anger Charlie Alan i ties
_____ of life. Isituaton. (N) (HDP) known. (N) (HDP) crushed. escaping.
Queens Funny King of 21/2 Men 21/2 Men The Vampire Diaries Death Reign: A Chill in the Ar The Rules Rules The Aisenio Hall Show
CW N) 9 9 9 4 new driver. (H)) Queens Inn Charlie Alan tries and the Maiden Amara's heretcs make their anger Engagement Engagement: Scheduled: Taye Diggs,
Escapable crushed, escaping, situation. (N) (HD) known. (N) (HD) Cheatng Role Play Terrence Howard. (N)
Loves Seinfeld A lot Family Feud Family Feud House: Emancipaton House: Last Resort Man Cops Cops Seinfeld Cormmunity
MYN I31i1 11 1 14 Raymond: of gum. (1VPG) (N) (1VPG) (N) Emancipated minor; Foreman's takes House, Thirteen Reloaded (H11)) Reloaded (H4) Tarnished Foosball
Humm Vac case. (H11)) hostage. (H11)) sweater, match.
Access Cleveland Family Guy Family Guy House: Emancipaton House: Last Resort Man Law& Order. Special Victims Seinfeld A lot Seinfeld
MYN [- 8 9 8 Hollywood (N) Show:Yemen Chores; singer. Peter's father. Emancipated minor; Foreman's takes House, Thirteen Unit: Manhunt Serial killer of gum. Tarnished
_____ (HD) Party case. (HDP) hostage. (HD) loose. (HDP) sweater.
Family Clare Modem The Big Bang The Big Bang Law & Order Special Victims Law & Order Special The Office The Office Family Guy Family Guy
IND 32 121212 38 12 negotates. (H)) FamilyTrials Amy gets sick Amy's feelings. Unit ManhuntSerial killer Victims Unit: Night Serial Schrute funeral Morning Chores; singer. Peter's father.
of life. loose. (HD) rapist. (HD) deliveries.
-Without a Trace: 22x42 Without a Trace: Last Call A Criminal Minds Legacy Criminal Minds Gideon is a Criminal Minds: Doubt Killer Law& Order Criminal Intent:
ION 65 2 2 2 13 26 18 17 Woman vanishes following criminal informant disappears. Homelessvictimsarea killer's suspect. (HD) targets women on college Playing Dead Goren gets
rooftop party. (HD)) target. (HDP) campus. (HDP) personal. (HD()
A&E 2626262639150181 The First 48 Dark past. First 48 Home invasion. 48 Manhunt launched. First 48: Kiss of Death Beyond: St. Clair, IL (N) (:01) Beyond (R) (H11))
(4:00) Twins Twister ('96, Drama) **1/ Helen Hunt, Bill Paxton. A storm chaser Men in Black ('97) **12 Two top secret agents commit (:01) Men in Black ('97)
AMC 5656 56 56 30 53 31 ('88) **//1 teams up with his ex-wife in pursuit of killer tornadoes, themselves to monitoring aliens on Earth. fk-/2 Agents watch aliens.
API 44 4444443668 130 Finding (R) (HDP)) North Wood (R) (HD) North Wood (R) (HD) North Wood (R) (HD) North Wood (N) (HD) North Wood (R) (HD)
BET 35 35 35 35 40 22 270106 & Park Wild-Out Wednesday. 1Game (R) Soul Man |Soul Man The Best Man ('99) A writer's new novel annoys his friends. Game ()
BRAVO 68 68686825451 185 Shahs Facing off. (R) Housewives Homeless. Housewives (1) (HD) Housewives Attack. (N) Housewives Attack. (R) Watch What Housewives
COM 66 6666661527190 South Prk ITosh.O (R) Colbert |Daily (R) Chapplle IKey;Peele Sunny Sunny Tosh.O (R South Prk Daily (N) Colbert
DISC 40 4040402543120 Alaska Udder issue. (R) Moonshiner () (H11)) Moonshiner () (H11)) Moonshiner (R) (H11)) Buying Buying Moonshiner (R) (H11))
E! 46 4646462726196 E! Spec. (1 (1D)( E! News (N) (H1D) The Lake House Man lives two years in the past. Total Diva (R) (H1D) C. Lately |News (R)
FAM 55 5555551046199 Burlesque (10) Cher. A girl develops into a burlesque dancer. Dirty Dancing ('87, Drama) Teenager finds love on vacation. The 700 Club (T1VG)
FOOD 3737 3737 76164 Food Court (R) (HD) Chopped Hot dogs. (R) 20th Birthday (R) |Chopped Faux meat. Restaurant (N) Restaurant (R)
F 53Anger (R) (HD() (31)X-Men: First Class (11, Action)***12 James McAvoy. Mutants learn to use their Anger X-Men: First Class ('11) Mutants learn to use their
SFX 5 51 53superpowers to try and stop a devastating war. (PG-13) (HD) Inheritance. superpowers to try and stop a devastating war.
GSN 179179179179 34179184 Fam. Feud Fami Feud Fam. Feud Fam. Feud Newlywed |Newlywed |Newlywed Newlywed Fam.Feud Fam.Feud |Fam. Feud Fam.Feud
HALL 5 5 5 17 73 240 A Christmas Wish (11) ** Struggling family. (H1D) A Very Merry Mix Up (13, Holiday) Wrong family. Annie Claus is Coming to Town ** Santa retiring.
HGTV 414141415342165 Property Property Hunters Hunters Addict Addict Addict Addict Hunters Hunters Hunters |Hunters
HIST 8 81 81 8133 65128 PawnStars PawnStars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars PawnStars PawnStars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars PawnStars PawnStars (:02) Bible (R) (HD))
LIFE 36 3636 3652 41 140 Project Debbie Harry. Project (R) (HDP) Project () (HD)) Project (N) (HDP) Million Dollar Face-off. Million Offended by fur.
NICK 25 252555 2444 252 Sponge Sponge Thunderman Hathaways Deadtime Deadtime Full Hse Full Hse Full Hse IFull Hse Friends |Friends
OWN 58 5858584710316120/20 Couple stranded. 20/20 Clara Harris. (R) 20/20 Missing coeds. 20/20 Wife murdered. 20/20 Anchor stalked. 20/20 Missing coeds.
QVC 141414 9 1413 150 Gotta Have It! Sole Sisters: Clarks Shoe collection. Great Gifts: QVC Customer Choice Gift List Name brand products.
SPIKE 5757 57 572963 54 Cops Naked driver. (R) Cops (R) Cops (R) Cops (R) Cops (1 Impact Wrestling (N) (HI)) PS4 All Access Live
SYFY 67 67676725364180 (5:00) Area51 (11) *1/2 V Aliens make contact. V Aliens make contact. V Aliens make contact. V Aliens make contact. V Aliens make contact.
TBS 595959 593262 52 Seinfeld eieSeinfeld Seinteld Family Fam ily Family Big Bang Big Bang Ground ~Ground (:05) Conan (N) (HD)
13(:15) Destroyer ('42) A shipyard welder enlists as a crew My Name Is Julia Ross ('45) (:15) Ziegfeld Follies ('46) *** Legendary entertainers The Lady from Shanghai A
TCM 65 65 65 65 1 member on a new American warship. Murdered wife. gather for a musical-comedy extravaganza, web of intrigue.
TLC 45 445 45 57 72139 Toddlers Heated rivals. Say Yes Say Yes Say Yes Say Yes Say Yes SayYes Say Yes Say Yes Say Yes Say Yes
Castle: Setup Conspiracy. Castle: Countdown Preventing NBA Basketball: Houston Rockets at New York Knicks from NBA Basketball: Oklahoma City
TNT 61 61 61 61 285551 (HD)) chaos. (HDP)) ( Madison Square Garden (bve) ((H) vs Golden State (Live) (HD)
TOON 80 80 124124 46 20 257 JohnyTest Grandpa Chima (N) Berk (N) TitansGo! JohnyTest Regular Adventure Dad (141) Dad (11)) Family Family
TRAV 69 69696926066170 Bizarre Foods: Uganda v Food (R v Food (R) Bizarre: Hungary (R)( Mysteries (N) Quiet Zone (R Gem Hunt (R)
TRUTV 63 6363635030183 Guinness World: Viva! Guinness Slicing team. Guinness((N() Jokers (R) Jokers (R) Jokers (N) Jokers (R) Top 20 Funniest (R)
TVL 626262 623154 244 Griffith Griffith Griffith Griffith Griffith 1(:48) Raymond (HD) Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond |Queens
USA 34 34 3434225250 SVU Murdered co-ed. SVU: Venom (1V14) SVU Sniper attack. (14D) White Neal the butler. (:01) Covert (N) NCIS Murdered marine.
WE 117117117117 l7149 Will Grace |WillGrace WillGrace WillGrace Braxton Family Values Braxton (1V14) (N) (HD) The Lylas: Alhoa L.A. (:02) Braxton (1V14) (R)
WGN 16 16 161941,11 9 Home Videos (1VPG) Home Videos (1VPG) How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met WGN News at Nine (N) How I Met Rules
CNBC 39393939 I37102 Mad Money (N) The Kudlow Report (N) Greed (R) Fugitives (R) Fugitives (N) Mad Money (R)
CNN 32 232 321838 100 Situation ICrossfire Erin Burnett (N) Cooper 360 (N) (14D) The Assassination of President Kennedy (N) Assassination (R)
CSPAN 18 1818183712109 U.S. House of Representatives (N) Tonight from Washington Public policy. (N) Washington (N) Capital News Today
FNC 64 64I64644871118 Special Report (N) (HD) On the Record (N) (HD) The O'Reilly Factor (N) The Kelly File (N) Hannity (N) (HD) The O'Reilly Factor (R)
MSNBC 3 8383 83 185 40103 PoliticsNation (N)H(141) 1Hardball with Chris (N) All in with Chris Hayes Rachel Maddow (N) Last Word (N) (11)) All in with Chris Hayes
SNN ~News() News() Paid Paid Evening News (N) PaidE News (N) News (N) News (N) News (N) News (N)
CSS 28282828 49 The Best Hurricane SEC Ftbll College Foolball: F-ii., :ir :r1.-rr:..r-.. West Georgia Wolves (bve) Talkin Football SEC Ftbll
ESPN 29 2929291258 70 SportsCenter (1I)) ) College College Football: Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets at Clemson Tigers (ive) SportsCenter (1D1))
ESPN2 3030 3030 6 5974 Horn (HD) lnterruptn SportsCenter (HPD) ) 30 30 (HD) I( College Basketball: Texas Tech vs Alabama Olbermann (HD)
FS1 48 48 4848 42 69 83 Football Daily (HD)) Thursday Colleg. Football: i i-,1:1-,il Thundering Herd at Tulsa Golden Hurricane (live) (HD)) I FOX Sports Live (HD)
SFSN 72727272~5677 Icons (HD) Insider New College (HPD) ) W Coast Customs (R) Game 365 Insider UFC (HD) UFC (HD) Wrld Poker (Reply)
GOLF 49 49 49 49 55 60 304 PGA TOUR Golf: OHL Classic at Mayakoba: First Round |Golf Cntri Lessons V PGA Tour Australasia: Australian Masters: Second Round
NBCS 71 71 71 71 54 61 90 (5:30) Pro Fantasy PL World College Basketball: Tern pie vs Towson (iWe) Auctions America (R)
SUN 3381401401455776 FSU First FSU First Lightning / NHL Hockey: Anaheim Ducks at Tampa Bay Lightning (live) Lightning Lightning New College (HI))
Good Luck Jessie Tony's Jessie: Toy Jessie Secret of the Wings (12) ToyStory Jessie Man at Good Luck Shake It Up! Austin &Ally: Jessie Jessie
DISN 136136136136 99 45 250Chariie (R)(H() parents. (R (HD) Con The old Homework *** The fairies go through ToonsRex's the fair. (R) (HD) Charilie: Story Failing grade. myTAB&My volunteers. (R)
toy. (R) wager. (R the winter woods. party. Time (R) Pet
(:55) Around the World in 80 Days ('04, Acton) **Jacke John Carter (12, Adventure) *** Taylor Kitsch, Lynn (:15) A Knights Tale ('01, Adventure) Heath Ledger, Rufus
ENC 150150150150 150350 Chan. British investor, Chinese thief and French artist travel the Collins. A Civil War vet is transplanted to Mars, where he Sewell. A squire pretends to be a knight and contends for the
globe in 80 days. (PG) discovers a lush planet. (PG-13) heart of a noblewoman.
Red Eye I, Robot ('04, Science Fiction) Will Smith, Bridget Promised Land (12, Drama) **12 Matt Damon, John Hello Ladies The Best of Taxicab
HBO 302 302 302 302 302 302 400 Onboard Moynahan. Technophobic cop investigates a murder that Krasinski. Natural gas company representatives try to buy Unlucky Confessions 2 Las Vegas
kidnapping, may have been committed by a robot, out a small rural town. (R) (11)) seating. travelers. (N) (11))
(4:20) Cloud Atlas (12, (:15) Muhammad Ali's Greatest Fight (13, Sports) Taken 2 ('12, Action) Liam Neeson. A Louis C.K.: Oh My God Comic Eastbound
HBO2 303 303303303303303402 Drama) The impacts of Legendary American boxer's refusal to participate in a war he retired CIA operative and his wife are performs at Celebrity Theatre. Christmas
,individuals' actions. (R) did not support. (NR) (HD) targets of revenge in Istanbul. (HD) lesson.
(5:30) Primary Colors ('98, Drama) John Travolta, Emma The Sopranos Moe and Joe Real Time with Bill Maher Boardwalk Empire: White Wanderlust (12, Comedy)
HBO3 304304304304 304404 Thompson. AClintonesque candidate campaigns with an odd Bacalaexperiences a vision Scheduled: Bill Binney. (IVAW Horse Pike Extra cargo. (HD) Urban couple embrace
assortment of supporters. problem. (HD) alternatve living. (R)
(4:40) The Island ('05) **-/2 Ted (12, Comedy) *** Mark Wahlberg, Zane Cowans. Strike Back: Origins Porter Gangster Squad (13, Crime) *** Sean Penn, Josh
MAX 320 320 320 320 320 320 420 Two people escape from A man's vulgar, living teddy bear comes between him and searches for elusive sniper. Brolin. Undercover cops work together to take down an
Utopian society, his girlfriend. (R) (HD) (R, (HD) intimidating mob king. (R) (HD)
Savages('12) (:45) Rain Man ('88, Drama) **-k*1'/2 After his father passes away, ajaded Meet the Fockers ('04, Comedy) **1/2 Robert De Niro, Skin to the Skin to the
MAX2 321321321321321321422 Fightng cartel, huster is leftwith nothing and kidnaps his autstic brother in the hopes of Ben Stiller. Greg Focker's fiancee and future in-laws meet Max 07 (HD) Max 08 (HD)
digging his way into the family fortune. his eccentric parents. (PC-13) (11))
(5:15) Save the Date (12) The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn: Part 1 (11, On the Road (12, Drama) **12 Sam Riley, Garrett Gigolos Open Masters of
SHO 340 340340 340 340 340365 ** Woman breaks up with Romance) ** Bella and Edward tie the knot but their Hedlund. A writer takes a journey across the country with a relationships. Study
her boyfriend. (R) marriage and honeymoon cause problems. young man and his girlfriend. (R) (HI)) (R) participation.
Gosford Park ('01, Comedy) *** A wealthy Englishman and his wife (:25) Resolution (13, Horror) A man handcuffs The Crow ('94, Action) *** A murdered Passion Play
TMC 350350 350 350 350 350 385 invite a group of friends and relatives to their country manor for a his friend to a pipe and tries to help him kick rock star comes back from the dead to take ('11)*12/
weekend shooting party that turns deadly. (R) his drug habit. revenge on his killers. (1 Attracton.
i m a, 1*. i-. 1.l P. m.l, a1" a-1 a al a1,, a'. c a i r -


Today's Live Sports

2 p.m. GOLF PGA TOUR Golf
OHL Classic at Mayakoba: First
Round from El Camaleon in
Riviera Maya, Mexico. (L)
7:30 p.m. CSS College Football
Delta State at West Georgia. (L)
ESPN College Football
Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets at
Clemson Tigers. (L)
FS1 College Football Mar-
shall Thundering Herd at Tulsa
Golden Hurricane. (L)
SUN NHL Hockey Anaheim
Ducks at Tampa Bay Lightning.
(L)
8 p.m. TNT NBA Basketball
Houston Rockets at New York
Knicks. (L)
9 p.m. ESPN2 College Bas-
ketball Big 12/SEC Challenge
Texas Tech at Alabama. (L)
9:30 p.m. GOLF PGA Tour
Australasia Australian Masters:
Second Round. (L)
10:30 p.m. TNT NBA Basket-
ball Oklahoma City Thunder at
Golden State Warriors. (L)
3 a.m. GOLF European Tour
Golf DP World Tour Champion-
ship: Second Round. (L)

Today's Talk Shows

7:00 a.m. ABC Good Morning
America Scheduled: from "Home-
land" actor Damian Lewis; from
"Mandela" actor Idris Elba. (N)
7:00 a.m. NBC Today Scheduled:
the contestants from "The Voice";
Martha Stewart joins the show. (N)
9:00 a.m. CBS LIVE! with Kelly
and Michael Scheduled: actor
Seth Meyers; actor Idris Elba;
meeting the new Miss Universe. (N)
11:00 a.m. ABC The View Sched-
uled: from "Shear Genius" host
CamilaAlves guest co-hosts. (N)
11:00 a.m. CW The Queen Latifah
Show Scheduled: from "NCIS: Los
Angeles," actor LL Cool J discuss-
es parenthood. (N)
12:00 p.m. CW Dr. Phil Scheduled:
a divorced couple continue to make
accusations against each other. (N)
1:00 p.m. ABC The Chew Sched-
uled: from "Top Chef" chef Gail
Simmons joins Daphne Oz satisfy
cravings. (N)
2:00 p.m. CBS The Talk Scheduled:
actress Christina Applegate; chef
Roy Choi. (N)
2:00 p.m. CW The Wendy Williams
Show Scheduled: from "Scandal"
actress Bellamy Young talks about
the show. (N)
2:00 p.m. NBC The Doctors
Scheduled: Dr. Phil sets the record
straight about his baldness. (N)
3:00 p.m. CW Steve Harvey
Scheduled: unlucky with love, two
women receive Steve's "Dating
Lab" guidance; (N)
3:00 p.m. NBC The Dr. Oz Show
Scheduled: an exclusive talk with TV
personality Camille Grammer. (N)
5:00 p.m. CW Dr. Phil Scheduled:
two parents are unconvinced about
the suicide ruling of their son. (N)
11:05 p.m. TBS Conan Scheduled:
Melissa McCarthy; Billy Gardell;
Chris Elliott. (N)
11:30 p.m. FOX The Arsenic Hall
Show Scheduled: actors Taye
Diggs, Terrence Howard and Morris
Chestnut. (N)
11:35 p.m. ABC Jimmy Kimmel
Live Scheduled: actress Sarah
Silverman; David Blaine; musician
Charlie Wilson. (N)
11:35 p.m. CBS Late Show with
David Letterman Scheduled: ac-
tress Claire Danes; actor Will Forte;
musical guests Metric. (N)
11:35 p.m. NBC The Tonight
Show with Jay Leno Scheduled:
comedian Craig Ferguson; actress
Jaimie Alexander. (N)

Convenient Complete Satellite
ONLINE TV Listings
www.sun-herald.com/tv






The Sun Classified Page 14 EINIC ads yoursu n net Thursday, November 14, 2013


HOUSEHOLD GOODS

Z :^ 6030 ^

FILE CABINET 4-drawer like
new $50, OBO 941-380-3392
HAVILAND CHINA 12Place
setting!Beige/Gold Trim Beauti-
ful! $200 941-347-8825
HOOVER VACUUM with lots
of attachments $100 941-
639-2143
LADDER 8' alum step $45
941-743-0582I
LAMP REPAIR
Why Buy a New One When
I Can Fix It For yUou!
941-468-1489
(Englewood/Venice Area)


HOUSEHOLD GOODS

Z :^ 6030 J

LAMP OLD-FASHIONED,
white milk glass, 2 parts, 21"
tall $20 916-396-7750
LAMP, GINGER jar style, rose
colored 25" tall $5 941-356-
0129
MATTRESS, QUEEN & BOX.
Brand New-Will Sell $175.
Also Have KING.
941-629-5550
NORITAKE CHINA 12 pc.
place settings plus serving
pieces. 92 pieces total.
$1800 value. Asking $500.
941-766-9138
1 Classifie = Sales


HOUSEHOLD GOODS

Z :^ 6030 ^

PICTURE FRAME, Room
Divider Tall Maple holds 15
photos $75 941-613-2854
RANGE GE, white, $50 941-
347-7955
REFRIGERATOR GE stainless
steel, 2 door 36" water and ice
ex. cond $500, OBO 941-
347-7955
ROASTER NESCO 18 Qt
Excellent condition $35 941-
639-2143
I ADVMERTmSE.! I
SEASCAPE PAINTING Large
41" x 29" beach scene. $45
941-627-6542


HOUSEHOLD GOODS

z :^ 6030 ^

SHOT GLASSES 42 Shot
Glasses in a case. $30 941-
415-8290
SLEEPER SOFA print good
condition $100, OBO 260-
687-9740
SEmploy Classified!
STAND MIXER: Kitchen Aid,
white, all inclusive. Unused.
Nice. $249 941-276-1881
TOTES, LARGE & MEDIUM,
APPROX 60, $7.00 -LARGE,
$5.00 -MEDIUM, OBO
941-564-6602


HOUSEHOLD GOODS

Z :^ 6030 ^

TABLE FOLDING LEGS 30 IN.
x 8FT $15 970-471-5596
TROPICAL ART Predominate-
ly teal,aqua,blues. Nice. pr/
59 941-276-1881
WASHER, General Electric
Model #WHDSR315DAWW
white, works fine. $100, OBO
941-484-4917
WINDOW AIR Conditioner
8,000 BTU, Frigidaire $50,
OBO 941-564-6602
WINE COOLER 20 bottle,
ex condition $150, OBO
941-505-0062


HOUSEHOLD GOODS

Z :^ 6030 ^

VACCUM, ROOMBA ROBOT
cleaner, $40 256-694-3466
WINE GLASSES Batch of 21
Stemed wine glasses $20
941-918-1239
| HOLIDAY ITEMS

Z 6031 ^

ARTIFICIAL PINE 6' Xmas-
Tree w/Stand Unlit. Realistic
$35, OBO 941-763-0442
CHRISTMAS DECORATIONS
9'Wreath Lighted, Ornaments
$75 941-347-8825


GOREN BRIDGE

WITH TANNAH HIRSCH & BOB JONES
2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
AN ELEGANT DEFENSE


Both vulnerable. South deals.


NORTH
A J 10 64
SKJ54
OAJ3
4K9


WEST
AAQ3
V987
0Q
46AQ8642
SOUTH
*K952
2AQ2
KK542
46105


The bidding:
SOUTH WEST
10 246
26 34
Pass Pass


EAST
687
1063
10 9 8 7 6
4*J73


NORTH
Dbl
44


EAST
Pass
Pass


Opening lead: Queen of

North's double was negative,
showing enough values to participate
in the auction, but nothing clear to
bid. Four cards in the unbid major
was strongly implied.
Dummy won the opening lead and
ran the jack of spades trying to draw


trump. How would you continue as
West after winning the queen of
trump?
West produced an elegant defense.
He led the club two! Declarer
guessed right, of course, and won the
club king in dummy. South tried a
second round of trumps, losing to the
ace. West now continued with the
club four to partner's jack. When
East recovered from his shock at
winning the trick, he reasoned that
partner must have had something in
mind when he went to all this trouble
to get him on lead. He must want a
diamond ruff. The diamond ruff
provided the setting trick. A beauty!
Four spades were bid and made at
almost every table in a recent
tournament. Most of the players
missed the beauty of this great bridge
hand. If not for West finding this
excellent defense and reporting it,
this gem of a hand would have been
lost forever.

(Tannah Hirsch and Bob Jones
welcome readers' responses sent in
care of ;i', newspaper or to Tribune
Content Agency, LLC., 16650
Westgrove Dr., Suite 175, Addison, TX
75001. E-mail responses may be sent to
tcaeditors@tribune.com.)


7 Little Words

Find the 7 words to match the 7 clues. The numbers in parentheses
represent the number of letters in each solution. Each letter
combination can be used only once, but all letter combinations
will be necessary to complete the puzzle.
D
CLUES SOLUTIONS |

1 skiing-and-shooting contests (9)
2 in an upbeat way (10) _______
3 neck problem (4) _______
4 wolfed down (5) _______
5 making a conjecture (8) _____o
6 made retroactive, in a way (9) _____
7 athlete who doesn't play (11) _____


KI


PO


BAC


EN


Wednesday's Answers: 1. STEPMOTHERS 2. OUTMODED 3. ENCASES
4. SUPERVISED 5. ZAPPER 6. BRENDAN 7. CROPS 11/14


HWA


EAT


ED


TI


BI


KD


SI


RMER


ONS SING


VELY BENC


ATHL GUES


NK


AT


ACROSS
Andes capital
Quibble
FBI counterpart
Dry run
Bauxite giant
Outstanding
Icky
Leniency
Convene
Baseball
honorees
Many times
Fond of arguing
Jet-set locale
Solar -
Gung-ho
Vexes
Ignorant of
Vocalist -
Sumac
Less modern
Oomph
Not liable
Track down
Scot character
Leafed out
Chamomile
infusion (2 wds.)
Dairy cattle
Of the hipbone
Disappear
gradually
Scale notes
Comfy-cozy
Bounce
Irritate


Perrier rival
Large slipknot
Utter
Beatrice's
admirer
Links champ
Sam -
DOWN
OJ purchases
Web addr.
Square root of
IX
Jaunty lid
Mount of the
gods
Funky
Porter and stout
TV adjunct
Winter Games
grp.
Travel stop
Hindu social
class
More remote
Insurance giant
CEO aides
Flat-needled
trees
Frisky
Usual weather
Loaf around
Guitar, slangily
Talked wildly
Disney's Bob -
Concluded
Ne plus-


PREVIOUS PUZZLE SOLVED
BLABNCFHESI OGA
RAN INH T STAB

AMKIEL N lA


DCO L [MO U RE
ALI N=TET 1EUSAGE
R EST S C R E TIS
0m Q-LE T mml
PETUI HB TAS

S P TITT0 A R AI by T A L
ISOLONHARDYDART
11-14-13 (D2013 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


34 Circumvent
35 Uncertain
37 Aunt Bee's
nephew
39 Docs prescribe
them
41 Isle off Sicily
42 Equaled
43 Soup servers
44 Hwys.
46 Sleeper's need
47 Platter players
(hyph.)
48 A moon of
Jupiter


49 Dangerous
50 Mansfield of the
movies
52 Hero's deed
55 Caviar, actually
56 Hr. part
58 Voight of film
59 Nondiscriminatory
hirer abbr.
60 1860s initials
61 Danson or
Kennedy


Venice Gondolier readers: Look for the puzzle solution in the Our Town section


TODAY'S

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


The Sun Classified Page 14 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, November 14, 2013





Thursday, November 14, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 15


HOLIDAY ITEMS

::^ 6031 ^

12' TALL ARTIFICIAL TREE
$125 941-769-1275
CHRISTMAS TIME NIKKO
China 8-6 pc extras $125
941-637-6681
CHRISTMAS TREE 4 1/2 ft
artificial tree lights and stand
$15 941-623-3343
CHRISTMAS TREE 7 1/2 ft.
very full $100, OBO
941-412-4462
CHRISTMAS VILLAGE Christ-
mas village with decorative
train. $175 941-815-8218
EXT. CORD'S (ALL SIZE'S) $1,
OBO 941-624-6617
HOLIDAY CHINA, Service for
12 Platter, Serving Bowl, &
more $75 941-426-0760
NUTCRACKERS 6 traditional
1995. Some boxed. $100
941-815-8218
OUTDOOR X-MAS LITES
STAKE (SANTA'S & X-MAS
TREES) $40 941-624-6617
PINEAPPLE PILLOWS Satin,
4-Lg/9-Sm, Great Decoration
Accent $125 941-681-2433
TOTES 2 full of christmas
lights assorted $10 each
941-769-1275
XMAS ORNAMENTS Orig
Boxes, Bargain Collectibles $5
ea 941-639-1517

L FURNITURE
L mZ6035 ^


4-MAPLE CHAIRS W/ARMS
COUNTER HEIGHT $45, OBO
727-365-9230
ARMOIR, Large, Maple, Like
New Condition. $300, OBO
609-824-3197
ARMOIR/DESK/COMPUTER
CHERRY 68x68x15, very nice
$350, OBO 972-369-2498
ARMOIRE /TV cabinet w/ 3
draws ex cond. 77"Hx31"W
x21"D $200 Leather Reclin-
er $125. 315-778-9721
BAR STOOLS 2, metal finish,
cushion seat, swivel $75, OBO
941-830-0285
BAR, Custom made with
4 swirling stools. $550
239-731-7373
BARSTOOLS LIKE new, solid
oak, w/swivel and high backs
$150 941-639-4319
BDRM SET: Solid Oak King
hdbd, chest, 2 nite, dress/mir.
Exc. $450 941-276-1881
BED MATTRESS & BOX.
New-Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550


FURNITURE / FURNITURE
'01 6035 LoolIZ6035 ^


BAR 73" LONG $50.00
941-626-4960
BED, TWIN with box spring,
matress & frame, like new
$125 941-625-3165
BEDROOM DRESSER and
vanity Mid-century modern,
walnut $500 913-486-8036
BEDROOM FURNITURE Ivory
dresser with mirror, 2 twin
beds, 2 night stands, 1 dress-
er will sell together or sepa-
rate. Call for more info. $450,
OBO 941-429-9122
BEDROOM SET 1930's 4
poster, chest, double mattress
$275 386-624-2869
BEDROOM SET Beige Queen
bed 2 drsrs & end tbls. $375,
OBO 941-743-0614
BEDROOM SET Walnut 6
pieces $149 941-457-6811
BOOK CASE 48 tall adj
shelves can be used for stereo
$40 941-613-2854
BUFFET/HUTCH,(2PC)
Complete with china & crys-
tal. $650, 941-625-3335
BUNK BED Warm Tone wood,
(frame only), VG cond. $200
941-484-7156
BUNK BEDROOM set Double
bottom,top single, 2 dressers.
$400, OBO 941-629-1467
CAFE CHAIRS ROUND SEAT
HAIRPIN BACK BENTWOOD 2
FOR $100 941-275-5837
CHAIR & Ottoman Stressless
style, brown, used 6 mo $250
941-497-3923
CHAIR, LLOYD/FLANDERS
Ex. Cond. Ash Wicker. pic.
aval. $300 OBO 941-5754364
CHAIRS (2) oak, Swivel on
castors, with fabric back and
seat. Medium brown, Brand
new. $75.00 each 941-474-
0630 Englewood
CHAIRS, 4 PHOENIX indoor/
outdoor, stackable $299, OBO
941-629-9149
CHAISE LOUNGE pale yellow
new cond. $150 941-255-
8420
CHANDELIER WILLIAMS-
BURG bright brass 8 lites $45
941-441-8030
CHINA CABINET maple w/
matching table/21eafs/4chairs
$475, OBO 972-369-2498
CHINA CABINET HIBRITEN
MOVING, $300, OBO 941-
626-6213
CHINA CABINET, Lighted,
glass shelves, doors on top,
storage below. $150, OBO
941-493-8068


SUN



CLASSIFIED


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CALL






1348 TAIAMI A




c H us Monll i M-5l



Check Out More SUN Classified Ads Online
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UPDATED DAILY!!!


CHINA CLOSET in good con-
dition $125, OBO 941-408-
4409
COCKTAIL TABLE 24x48
GLASS/METAL
Like new $75 630-664-8860
- 1


w/./ I L.L. Irll-u-L.L. ILI.ICIII mi- ll l
Cherry Colored, Glass Insert,
3' x 4'. Excellent Condition.
$100 941-429-4949
COFFEE TABLE Glass top
white rattan $25, OBO 941-
627-6542
COFFEE TABLE marble top,
36" round, 1" thick, 15" H,
$100 941-204-2332
COFFEE TABLE w/nice glass
top 52" x 26", wrought iron
base. $25 941-497-2228
COMPUTER DESK Older All
Wood comp. Desk $40, OBO
941-743-0614
COMPUTER DESK with
hutch. 6 months old. Must sell
$75, OBO 941-828-1771
COUNTER HGT Dining Room
Table, Chairs Like new, seats
8. $325 941-743-8537
CUSTOM DBL bed & desk
bed w/drawers $100, OBO
941-412-4462
DAY BED w/ pop-up trundle
tan metal $100 941-286-
6076
DAY BED WITH PULLOUT
$175 941-698-1489
DESK 1900S 44X23X30 fine
crafted all wood/leather inlay
top $225 941-882-3139
DESK 4 Drawer desk with
chair $75 941-629-5541
DESK WHITE shabby chic 3
drawers & chair $80 941-
441-8030
DESK, Oak custom with hutch
$225, OBO 941-423-8243
DINETTE SET, stone top w/4
upholstered chairs on casters.
$150, OBO 941-493-4729
DINING ROOM SET, Mid-cen-
tury modern all original by
Dillingham $500 9134868036
DINING SET 48X30 TABLE&6
CHAIRS ALL NATURAL WOOD
$329, OBO 941-275-5837
DINING SET 6 chairs, 2 leafs,
white washed wood! $450
941-488-2165
DINING SET dark rattan, 4
chairs very clean $250 941-
627-6542
DINING SET Table, 4 Chairs
Leaf Cabinet Oak Inlay LIKE
NEW!! $299 941-457-6811
1 Advertise Today!
DINING TABLE 6 chairs oval
dark brown $475 941-441-
8030
DINING TABLE 6 chairs, dark
walnut, pics. $195 941-266-
6718
DINING TABLE Acrylic base,
Glass Top, 38"X72" $85 Call
941-766-0129
DINNING TABLE & chairs
Table 35x71 4 chairs & bench.
Oak. $125 502-558-1096
DRESSER & 2 nightstands
Cherry, solid wood $145
941-661-1169
DRESSER W/MIRRORS MINT
6 drawers on rollers Light
wood $125 941-474-3290
END TABLES Walnut style
Beautiful 2 drawer $25 941-
629-5541
END TABLES, 2 real wood
1960's unique $40 941-356-
0129
END/COMP. TABLE cherry
on wls $15 617-460-2341
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
3 Piece. Will Fit 40" TV! Like
New! $500. 941-429-5157


S FURNITURE 1
Z ^6035 ^


ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
3 section wall unit, light color
solid wood w/cabinets, call
or text for photos $375
941-661-1169
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
oak.doors for tv.like new.
$125, OBO 941-235-2203
FLOOR BED Denim Floor Bed
with tilt. Great for kids/guest!
$150 941-979-8404
FUTON MED. Wood, Mission
Style, u/g mattress, NS home.
$125 941-544-5755
GAME TABLE VINTAGE Solid
oak, eight sided with 4 cor-
ner chairs, call or text for
photos $295 941-661-1169
GLIDER ROCKER Forest
Green Cushions $59.90 941-
629-5541
HOME FURNITURE Living
rm/Bdrm set/Lanai set,
linens, decor, etc. Used only
8 months, NICE! Call 216-
780-4308 or 941-225-3601

Classifie = Sales
HOSPITAL BED Electric Hos-
pital Bed w/2 mattresses.
$499 941-625-4731
I BUY FURNITURE
Or anything of value!
941-485-4964
LADIES DESK Far East
Design $200 941-473-35441
LANAI SET table 4 chairs
lounge $150 941-421-9393
LAZYBOY OFFICE Chair
Good Condition. Lazyboy War-
ranty. $200 941-600-1466
LG. ORNATE mirror 4'x2'.
beveled glass, new. $95, OBO
941-235-2203
LIVING RM set Sleeper Sofa,
chair, swivel rocker, 2 end
tables & 2 lamps $350. Exc.
941-698-7915 Rotonda West
LOVE SEAT Grey Pattern
Excellent Condition $50 941-
457-6811
LOVESEAT & CHAIR Floral
Excellent Condition $100,
OBO 417-225-0383
LOVESEAT BLACK Leather
Good Condition. $75
941-600-1466
LOVESEAT TWIN sleeper,
Al condition! $225
239-731-7373
LOVESEAT, 2 Cushions, with
skirt & pillows. Like New.
$105, OBO 941-629-4973
LOVESEAT/SOFA, High quali-
ty cream colored leather, like
new condition. $450 941-
286-8098
MAPLE CHEST 5 drawer,
high quality, like new $275
386-624-2869
MATTRESS & BOX.
New- Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
MATTRESS/BOXSPRING,
FULL size, Very good condi-
tion. $100 517-281-2584
MID-CENTURY MODERN
Buffet- walnut, all original by
Dillingham $500 9134868036
MID-CENTURY MODERN
Wall Unit, all original by Dilling-
ham $500 913-486-8036
OAK END Table Glass top cen-
ter with oak around edge $50,
OBO 941-380-3392
OAK ROCKERS, Like new
very nice $125 941-380-
3392
OFFICE CHAIR Swivel, arm
chair, vinyl back, cloth seat
$10 941-661-7092
ORIENTAL MIRROR, w/gold
bamboo trim 28Wx39L. Ex.
Cond. $100 941-575-4364
PATIO TABLE & 4 Chairs
Round $125, OBO
501-442-8612
PLATE GLASS table top
2x4'beveled 3/8" New $60,
OBO 941-423-6356


S FURNITURE /
4Z^6035 ^


RECLINER, LA-Z-BOY, Beige
Fabric, Great Shape, Iv. msg.
$145 941-493-0674
RECLINER, LARGE 54 in.
wide excellent condition $200
501-442-8612
RECLINER, MED size sage
swivel/ rocker good condition
$45 941-661-7132
ROCKER RECLINER Grey
Leather. Nonsmoker. $125,
OBO 941-235-2203
ROCKER, LADIES Petite
Refinished CA 1930 $30
941-266-6718
ROLLTOP DESK AND CHAIR
SET. (CHILDS) CA1920 Paris
Mfg $250 941-266-6718
SERVER HIBRITEN MOVING
$175, OBO 941-626-6213
SLEEPER sofa & loveseat
Multi-color. You pick up. FREE
989-743-0815
SOFA & LOVESEAT LIKE
NEW, MOVING $400, OBO
941-626-6213
SOFA BROWN 1 yr old -
PLUSH & COMFY. $250
941-429-9305
SOFA AND loveseat, earth
tones fabric, exc cond $150
941-769-7984
SOFA BED Blue/Grey
LIKE NEW!! $100
941-457-6811
SOFA BEIGE 2 years old
looks new $85, OBO 941-
204-1277
SOFA SECTIONAL -LANE
4pc beige tweed (two sides
recline) $350 941-697-1722
SOFA TABLE Annie Sloan
Chalk Paint ivory $425 941-
715-3259
SOFA, BEIGE leather reclining
both ends, good cond $100
941-769-7984
SOFA, SOUTHWEST COLORS
EX. COND. $125, OBO 862-
812-0995
TABLE & chairs 4 captains
chairs/casters. $50 989-743-
0815
TABLE 48" WOODGRAIN w/4
tan chairs/black metal legs
$100 630-664-8860
I NEED CASH? I
TABLE TOP, GLASS Oval
72x48 FREE!!
941-204-3458
TABLES END(2) All wood
maple glass insert $60
941-655-8982
TABLES, MAPLE/GLASS,
2end / coffee, see chinacab
ad $150, OBO 972-369-2498
TABLES, Oval Glass &
wrought iron, 2 end tables &
coffee $150. 941-391-5343
TV STAND 92" cabinet, cherry
finish 3 drawers $499 941-
780-3977
UPHOLSTERED CHAIRS
beige/brown/rust/white each
$50, OBO 941-493-0488
WATERBED, KING HEATED,
WHITE frame, exc. cond $495,
OBO 941-493-7930
WICKER DESK 3Draw
42"x22 Wicker Rattan Desk
$325 941-585-7740
WICKER SHELF Unit, white,
18 x 74 x 12 $85 941-488-
2165
ELECTRONICS
4:: 60308


CORDLESS PHONE, 2 hand
sets; w/answer system &
man. $25 obo 941-204-9515.
DVD PLAYER/SOUND sys-
tem Sony, 4 speakers & sub-
woofer $75 941-780-3977
GPS TOM TOM with car charg-
er. Touch screen. $30,
941-475-2727
PRINTER LASER, HP 2015
Very good condition. $60,
OBO 941-882-1772


TV/STEREO/RADIO
L 6040 ^


36" TOSHIBA Older TV
W/Remote/Manual, $1 941-
763-0442
ANTENNA TOWER 40' stop
paying cable $299 941-343-
7863
BOSE STEREO System 3-2-1.
. Perfect cond. Same as new
one. $450 941-497-2228
DVD, BOSE, Life Style
Home Entertainment Sys-
tem. Recently Factory
Checked. Excellent Condi-
tion. $1,000 813-480-8237

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ROCK SPEAKERS Wireless
audio Unlimited w/ mp3/ipod
player $350. 941-716-3259

SONY HOME Theatre speaker
sys, never used, details $115,
OBO 941-474-7387
SONY TV 46" 2D-3D Bravia
Excellent Condition. $400
941-585-7740
STEREO PIONEER 150
WATTS COMPLETE $175
941-629-6429
SURROUND SOUND system
5 speakers & subwoofer $175
941-780-3977
SURROUND SYSTEM Sam-
sung, $120 256-694-3466
SWIVEL PLATFORM for TV
Wall Mount for 21' TV $25
941-493-3851
T.V Panasonic Omnivision
with built-in VCR player like
new. $35, OBO 941-497-2228
TV 50" TOSHIBA THEATER-
VIEW WORKS GREAT $175
941-629-6429
TV SONY 32" HDTV. WORKS
GREAT. $75 941-889-7022
TV STAND black glass
58Lx20Dx24H Like new $100
630-664-8860
TV, LCD Vizio 55 inch NICE
condition.120HZ VF550M
$425, OBO 941-625-7988
COMPUTER
EQUIPMENT
~6O~
LW4 6060 -

ALL IN ONE HP 3015 Laser
Laser Printer, copier, fax.
$105, OBO 941-882-1772
COMPUTER DESK with
hutch. New must sell $75,
OBO 941-828-1771
COMPUTER MOUSE, GOLF
CLUB New, Looks like a dri-
ver. $5 941-228-1745
COMPUTER WORK STATION
ADJUSTS, 36 TO 48" HIGH. 3
SHELFS, $40 941-627-6780
DESKTOP COMPUTER Dell desk-
top/Win 7,complete with sub woofer
spkrs. $300, OBO 941475-2727
GOOGLE 10" Netbook
w/case & mouse. New cond.
$50 941-626-9027
PC GAMES, 25 for Windows,
good variety, all run great $25
941-743-2656







The Sun Classified Page 16 EINIC ads .yoursun net Thursday, November 14, 2013


CLOTHING / JEWELRY/
ACCESSORIES


MENS CLOTHING Pants
36X29-30, Shorts 36W, Polo
shirts XL $2 ea 941-460-0210
MINK STOLE, AUTUMN HAZE
Like New!! $200
941-429-9305


MINKS:
BLOND MINK CAPE LARGE
SIZE & DARK MINK COAT
LARGE SIZE GREAT COND.
$250/EA 941-204-3734
OMEGA WATCH 1965 Sea-
master DeVille, Self Wind and
works $499 941-661-7092
US ARMY DRESS SHOES
Black-dress-leather-still in box-
Size9R $5 941-445-5619
WEDDING DRESS Cream,
size 8 EX COND $40, OBO
941-391-6377
WEDGE SHOES, Ankle Cuff
7 For All Mankind Somali Size
9 Narrow $20 941-763-0018

COLLECTIBLES
6^(070^ ^

"1800'S" JUG stoneware.
stamped, exc. cond. $85,
OBO 941-235-2203
1920 ANTIQUE OAK DIN-
ING SET, Includes buffet
china cabinet, 52" round table
w/ 6 chairs, Best offer/ cash
only 941-474-4230
4 LEATHER top tables vintage
hand-tooled leather/mahogany
$300 941-493-0488
$50 BILL, 1928 NICE BILL
NO HOLES, TEARS OR WRIT-
ING. $80 941-268-9029


ACTIVELY BUYING!
Antiques, Paintings; All Sub-
jects, Silver, Ivory, Jewelry, Ori-
ental Rugs, New England
Items. Anything Unusual or of
Quality! Local 941-306-8937
ALWAYS BUYING
ANTIQUES, ART, SILVER
NEW ENGLAND ANTIQUES
(941) 639-9338
BEANIE BABIES 2001 excel-
lent cond great gifts $3 501-
442-8612
BIRD'S EYE MAPLE double
bedroom set 2 dressers/mir-
rors $225 941-474-4472
Seize the sales
with Classified!
BOOK "LINCOLN" 1924 EDI-
TION GREAT CONDITION $15
941-764-7971
BUDWEISER CHRISTMAS
Steins 32 pcs, from 1980-
2012 $175 941-460-0210
CASH PAID**any old mili-
tary items, swords, medals,
uniforms, old guns. Dom
(941)-416-3280
CEDAR CHEST 1947 Roos
with label. $295 941-815-
8218
CHINA NORITAKE, PATTERN
5558 Serv. 12 plus. Used
once $400 941-575-8881
CIVIL WAR NEWSPAPERS,
85 issues. Great Gift Your
choice $20/ea 941-488-8531
All war News- Venice***
CLOCK, ANTIQUE ANSONIA
CO. PERFECT TIME, CHIMES
$179. 941-764-7971
COIN 1955 FLAT PACK
PROOF SET ORIGINAL $110
941-457-0155
COIN 1956 PROOF SET ORIG-
NAL PKG $50 941-457-0155
COIN CANADA 1907 one
cent Newfoundland bronze AU
$150 941-697-6592
COIN CANADA 1919 50 cent
Newfoundland ex-fine $55
941-697-6592


COLLECTIBLES
6^^ 070 1

COIN CANADA UNCIRCULAT-
ED Mint set Expo 1967 fine
collector $75 941-697-6592
COIN, BASEBALL Card &
Stamp Collect. Selling by item
or group. $1 941-391-1797
COINS MANY STATE 1863
INDIAN PENNY A BEAUTY
$130 941-457-0155
COMIC BOOKS 40 FROM
THE 1990 EXC. COND. $40,
OBO 941-627-6780
COMIC BOOKS batman-
superman large collection,
N/M $1 941-496-7569
COORS LIGHT METAL SIGN
EXCELLENT CONDITION $20
941-391-6090
CRYSTAL BUD vase presiden-
tial cut-vintage estate pc great
gift $25 941-639-1517
CUP & SAUCER SET FRAN-
CISCAN DESERT ROSE PAT-
TERN $5 941-639-0838
DICKENS NEW ENGLAND
VILLAGE pieces $25/cash
941-661-4154
DON PERIGNON (1990)
CHAMPAGNE GREAT YEAR
$100, OBO 941-391-6377
EMENEE ELEC. ORGAN Old
Table top mdl. Made in USA.
Works!! $50 941-423-2585
FINE CHINA, Mikasa Serv/8
Many ex. Pieces, pic aval.
$300 OBO 941-575-4364
HASBRO SIMON Says Elec-
tronic Game from the 70's
$35 941-918-1239
MILK GLASS WESTMORE-
LAND, RARE PIECE, PERFECT
$25 941-575-8881
I Employ Class.ified!
MUNROS SCOTCH WHISKEY
RARE 80YEARS $130
941-391-6377
NEWSPAPER 100 yr. old.
London Times. TITANTIC Great
gift. $25 941-488-8531
NORMAN ROCKWELL
Framed Doll Doctor Print $25,
OBO 941-451-0964
OAK SIDE Tables lg.58.00
sm. $38, OBO 941-916-
5570
ORIENTAL DESK & Chair
Beautiful, 2 Oriental Lamps,
Cabinet. YOU HAVE TO SEE
TO ADMIRE! Make Offer!
Call 941-627-4462
PEWTER FIGURINES Hall-
mark Little Gallery-orig. boxes
$10, OBO 941-451-0964
PLATE, Major Kira Nerys of
Star Trek by Hamilton w/cert
$20 941-423-2585
PLAYBOY MAGS 200+
ISSUES 1960'S-2000 GOOD
COND. $100 941-875-1203
PORCELAIN FIGURINE
WOODCHOPPER MADE 1839
$200 OBO 941-268-9029
PRESTIGE PROOF SET 1995
COMMEMORATIVE CIVIL WAR
$85 941-268-9029
ROCKER, CHILD'S OAK
pressed back with cane seat
$140 941-474-4472
ROY ROGERS double holster,
needs repair, $35.00 941-
623-0346
ROYAL ADDERLY china place
card holders 5 mint vintage
Eng. pcs $30 941-639-1517
SAFE MADE 1888 28X18
OUTSIDE MEASUREMENT
$400 941-268-9029
SHOWER, STEELERS curtain
new,in pckg.,never used! $25,
OBO 941-979-6362
SILVER DOLLAR, 1884-0,
PCGS, FIRST GEN HOLDER
$90 941-268-9029
SILVER-DOLLAR CANADA
1959 Voyageur must for col-
lection $45 941-697-6592
SINGER SEWING MACHINE,
all attachments & carrying
case. $600 941-625-6636
SPOOL DAY Bed, Bench
w/cushion $375, OBO 941-
916-5570


ANTIQUES
COLLECTIBLES
6^(070^ ^

OLD OAK Mission for 6 pieces
$495, OBO 941-916-5570
STERLING SILVER Salt
Spoon "Antique"Collectable
$20 941-929-5432
TAPA CLOTH ART from Fiji
framed/mounted under glass
42"X42" $200 941-585-8149
TEA CART vintage cane-rattan
$90, OBO 419-863-9358
TRUNK SILVER and black
dome w/ wood trim. $495
941-815-8218
U.S. AIR Force Thunderbirds
Framed 16"by20" pic. w/sig-
natures $25 941-423-2585
US FLAG 1976 13 stars
around #76 rare bicentenial
$20 941-445-5619
WEATHER VANE
DIRECTIONAL ANTIQUE $10
941-698-1489
WEDGWOOD COV tureen,
platter, lunch set vintage
estate Ea $75 941-639-1517

VEGETABLES
42 (>75^ i

BUSH TOMATOES, Commer-
cial grade FL. Variety. Lg
Plants $6 ea. 941-815-8985
MUSICAL
6 ^ 690 ^


AMP, FENDER Frontman
15G, 12"x13"x7" deep $40
916-396-7750
AUTOHARP OSCAR Schmidt
hard case tuner books pick up
$375 941-412-9592
AUTOHARP, Oscar-Schmidt,
includes books and case.
$125 941-493-7166
FENDER JAGUAR SQUIRE
GIG BAG $250 941-456-5198
FISHER SPEAKERS Model
STV-873.36x14x13 $75 941-
497-6187
GUITAR, YAMAHA acoustic.
Like new with case. Good
Beginner guitar. $75, OBO
941-629-2266
PLAYER PIANO Pianola
Spinet, GC W/15 rolls electri-
fied $350 941-764-7445
MEDICAL
L ^ 6095 ^


3-WHEEL WALKER 8" bal-
loon tires, storage, brakes
$95 941-474-7387
BATHTUB & SHOWER
GRAB BARS INSTALLED
Don't Wait to Fall to Call!
Free In-Home Evaluation
22 Years Experience
CALL JIM'S
BATHROOM GRAB BARS, LLC
941-626-4296

FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**lf you have never
placed an ad online,
you will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page)**


MEDICAL
L ^ 6095 ^


AUTO LIFT, Used Harmar for
Golden Scooter. Good condi-
tion. $500 941-629-6646
HIGH-BACK WHEELCHAIR
reclining/elev rests & cushion
$60 941-493-0488
KNEE MEDICAL Walker,
brakes, VGC $110 941-474-
7387
KNEE WALKER (New) Good
for leg injuries below the knee.
$200, OBO 941-697-0822
KNEE WALKER New For all
broken bones below the knee.
$200, OBO 941-697-0822
LIFT CHAIR by Pride, brown
tweed, exc. cond. with book
$250 916-396-7750
LIFT CHAIR recliner orig 900.
up/down $375 941-580-
4460
MEDICAL BED hi-low full elec
w/matt gel top & more, $350
941-493-0488
POLAR CARE 300 Therapy
Unit Like New elec pump $100
941-423-8156
POWER HOYER LIFT, Easy
to use sling, rechargeable
battery, only used 5 times.
$1,100 941-408-7893
Leave message before 7pm.
SCOOTER BATTERIES used,
servicable 12v 12ah pride go
go elete $20 941-505-0081
SHOWER CHAIR Good condi-
tion, clean $15 941-627-
6542
WALKER BASKET new,
w/plastic insert use on 4 leg
walker $5 941-505-0081
WALKER, 4 wheel with
seat and brakes. $35.00.
941-629-6646
WALKER, FOLDING with four
feet, leave msg. $15.
941-493-0674
WALKER, PINK! Medline, 4
wheels, padded seat, basket
$35 916-396-7750
WHEEL CHAIR quality built,
foot rests $110 941-474-
7387
WHEELCHAIR FOR teen or
small adult w/leg extension
Like new. $75 941-497-2228


L MEDICAL
low4:6095 ^


WHEELCHAIR, ELECTRIC
MERITS P320 battery included
firm $499 941-882-3139
WHEELCHAIR,
Invacare good condition.
$50.00 941-629-6646
WHEELCHAIR, INVACARE
W/footrests, good cond. $75
941-268-5227
HEALTH / BEAUTY
L 6100 ^


AIR PURIFIER Ionic Pro Turbo
NEW IN BOX Never used.
$175 941-716-3259
DISPOSABLE BED PADS
600 pads $.35/ea.
941-244-2456
DISPOSABLE UNDERWEAR
Womens pull-up large $3 each
941-244-2456
DRYER CHAIR (1) and (1)
Adjustable chair $125/ea
941-698-7915
HAIR DRYER, Professional
ION Salon by Hot Tools.
$15.00, 941-475-2727
| TREES & PLANTS
L ^ 6110 ^


AMARYLLIS BULBS 4 for
$1.00 Red or White 870-395-
1658
BIRD-OF-PARADISE CROTON
hibiscus, amaryllis, call for
more! $10 941-882-3139
BROMELIADS RAINLILIES
liriope, mexican petunia, oys-
ter, snake $3 941-882-3139
CASSIA TREE gorgeous yel
Fall blooms, or JATROPHA red
3 gal pot $8 941-258-2016
CENTURY PLANTS 2'x2'Use
as living fence to deter critters!
$4 941-258-2016
(--GET RESULTS--)
USE CLASSIFIED!
CITRUS TREES ORANGE-
GRAPE-KEYLIME fruited deliv-
ered $40 941-204-9100
CRAPE JASMINS $10
941-697-3160


TREES & PLANTS

Z 6110 ^

DESERT ROSES FLOWERING
4 year old from seed large
plants $35 941-204-9100
FLOWER POT RACKS HAVE
2, @ HOLD 9+ POTS EACH
$55, OBO 941-627-6780
KING PALM Tree 5' in pot well
grown. $35 941-833-3326
MANGO PLANTS $10-$30,
CHEAP! 941-626-4960
ORCHID LARGE Plants Purple
Flowers $20 941-698-9798
Advertise Today!


VIBURNUM GREAT FOR
PRIVACY HEDGE 3-15GAL,
BARREL,SYLVESTER PALMS
PIGMY PALMS & MORE
Sui'sNusuRy 941-488-7291
PAPAYA PLANT
1 gallon pot
$4 941-697-0794
PAPAYA TREES Red Flesh
Papaya Trees 3' Tall In Pots
$10 941-204-9100
PLUMERIA FRANGIPANI
Golden Jony & Sangria $20
941-204-9100
University Ot I-L H&L PEACH
TREES $15 & $20 per tree,
3 gallon cont. Open Fri. &
Sat. Weekly 863-494-6933

BABY ITEMS
ate 61'20 ^

CRIB BEDDING Jungle Babies
Nojo COMPLETE Nursery Set
$125, OBO 941-391-1797
GRACO PACK and play navy
color nearly new $50, OBO
941-375-4054
GOLFACCESSORIES

L: 6125 ^

ADAMS LADIES Golf Clubs
RH Complete set, Woods
Hybrids, Iron, Bag & Cover
$125, OBO 419-796-7673
ATTACHE CASE Traditional
Samsonite, great condition,
asking $65. 941-276-5172


Need





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Friend?






Look in the



Classified


The Sun Classified Page 16 E/N/C


ads.yoursunnet


Thursday, November 14, 2013






Thursday, November ]4. 2013 ads.yoursun net E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 11


I GOLF ACCESSORIES
L 6125 --

CLUB GOLF CART, Lights,
Gas Operated & Cover.
$2,200 941-830-3588
COBRA WEDGE 53" Trusty
Rusty Wedge $25 941-423-
5701
EZ GO YELLOW, 2004 GOLF
CART Brand new batteries, 4
passenger, rear folding seat,
lights. Excellent Condition!
$2875 941-716-6792
EZGO TXT Golf Cart
White 2010 New Batteries
New folding rear seat
New Headlights & Taillights
Serviced.
Sale Priced $3995
941-716-6792





FACTORY
RECONDmONED
2010 CLUB CAR
PRECEDENT
4 Passenger Golf Carts
Folding Rear Seat
New TROJAN Batteries
New Colored body,
Lights & Interior
Lifted with custom wheels
or stock height
1/2 the price of new
From $4275
941-716-6793
GOLF BAG Classic Hot-Z, blue
w/ brown trim, excellent cond
$75 941-743-2656
GOLF Balls in good condition,
20 dozen, $2.50 per dozen
941-276-5172
GOLF CLUBS 4 Hybrids 4, 5
and 6, excellent condition $35
each 941 625-0331
GOLF SHOE'S NEW, women
SZ.8 NIKE, BLACK LOAFER
$15 941-627-6780
| EXERCISE/
FITNESS
~~6128~

AB PRO CIRCLE $50, OBO
941-876-3526
AEROBIC STEPPER 3 Tier
like new Cash only priced firm
at $29 941493-3851
ELULIPTICAL BY Nordic Track,
Audiostrider M#990 $499
941-661-1509
ELULIPTICAL MACHINE Pro-
form elliptical 600LE, never
used $400 941485-5764
ELULIPTICAL PROFORM
390-E, 12 PERFORMANCE
LEVELS $275 941-764-7971
I FISHING POLE Penn 113
Reel $65 941426-6671
RECUMBANT EXCER. bike
stamina 4825 ex.cond. $175
941-255-8420
TREADMILL NORDIC TRACK
C2420, FOLDUP, INCLINE, 12
MPH $499 941-268-5227
TREADMILL PROFORM
775 EKG barely used $100,
010 941-876-3526
TREADMILL ProForm, 520X,
foldup, works great. $100
941-276-0215
TREADMILL, PROFORM XP
incline feature, exc. cond.
$150, OBO 941-627-3803
|SPORTING COODS

[^Z 6130 _

ALI-FRAIZER AUTOGRAPH
BOXING GLOVES COA. $400
941-475-1379
ARCADE & PINBALL
Machines wanted will pay cash
working or riot! Will pick up.
Please call 863-558-0198
CHECK THE
N CAS 1SFIEDS!
BIG GAME GAMBRIL LIFT SYS-
TEM, 7001b Hoist $18, OBO
941 -629-9149


SPORTING GOODS
6130

E175 RAZOR scooter hardly
riden good up to 120 Ibs. $70
941 993-9856
FIREWOOD- No camping
trip is complete without it!
Pine, Oak, or Citrus
Split, Bundled, and ready for
the firepit
941-468-4372
FISHING REEL PENN 850SS
/1 Surf Rod/1 Deep Sea Rod
$150 941-681-2433
GO CART Frame only. $50
941-726-1522
GOLF CLUB Set Generic Set
includes Clubs,Bag.Ball& Tees
$35 941-918-1239
IGLOO KOOL Mate 12V
AC/DC Camp boating refriger-
ator $50 941-423-8156
LANDING NET 14 ft.handle
$17 941-697-3160
METAL DETECTOR CXlll
Garrett Premium $450 941-
697-3744
POOL TABLE 4x6 quality
balls, cue $165 786-306-
6335
QUANTEM ROD+REEL
NICE, K.V.D. Series. New-
Unused, $55 941-929-5432
ROLLER SKATES "Europa"
RD track control Size 11 $40
941-697-0794


SANIPOTTIE PORTABLE Tiw
let Camping or boating pot like
new $50 941-423-8156
SLEEPING BAG $15 941-
475-2727
TREADMILL, Lifestyler, Auto
Incline, & cushion deck, 125hp
$100 941-6294973
WEATHER RADIO Vector
VEC438 Stormtracker Like
New $50 941-423-8156
| FIREARMS
L 6131 IS

GLOCK 17 $545, Smith and
Wesson 9C $545, FNS 9
$565, Ruger SR9C $460,
All NIB. H&K USP $650.
941-830-8641















[Higher Power Outfitters
1826 Tamiami Trail in PG
Guns*Ammo*CCW
Financng Available l
Buy*Sell *Trade
941-347-8445

MARLIN 30-30, 60's Vintage
$325, 410 SHOTGUN $150
239-731-7373


I TRICYCLES I
'i6l35^'^

2-HUFFY BICYCLES 12} 26"
Huffy "Blades" Bicycles. Deep
Creek $25 614-519-9938
261N LADIES Huffy Good
condition. $40, OBO 941-423-
9888
BICYCLE RACK for 3 bikes
and 1' receiver $50
941-743-0582
BICYCLE RACK for 3 bikes
fits 1' hitch $45 941-743-
0582


I BICYCLES/
I TRICYCLES
4^ 6135 ^-

I BIKE CARRIER for 2 thule
like new$50 61746023411
BIKE TREK Mens new tires
$145 OBO 419-863-9358
BIKE, Road Master Mtn.
Sport 26 inch, 18 speed,
Like new! $70 941-830-8499
FOLDING BICYCLE
9FS Downtube $350
941-661-6637
FOLDING BIKE, DAHON 20"
WITH ACCESSORIES. $75
941-258-4177
MENS SCHWINN 1980S
WORLD TOURIST 5 SPEED
$199 941-275-5837
SCHWINN BIKE
new, $175 or best offer. Call
941-629-0496.
WOMEN'S BICYCLE 3 speed
Huffy, good cond. Comfy seat
$50, OO 573-418-9097
WOMENS-26-1NCH SIERRA
QUEST NEW, 15-SPEED $70
941-268-5227
TOYS
6:138 _

BOAT REMOTE CONTROL
Kyosho w/radio Piranha charg-
er xtras $150 941493-3851
LIONEL TRAINS, MANY trans-
formers $200 786-306-6335
| PHOTOGRAPHY/
VIDEO
L* 6140 ^
CAMERA TRIPOD Quantary
SX 660. Good Condition.
10 941426-0760
CANON AE-1 with 70/210
telephoto and speedflte flash
$115, OBO 941-764-8989
PROJECTOR, BELL &
HOWELL w/accessories
$75 941492-6984
TRIPOD FOR Camera etc.
aluminum total H=52" $20,
941-585-8149
I &POOL/SPA/
& SUPPLIES


Local Manufacturer
offering to sell direct
to public! 6 5 PH*( 'rN
SA $18q5.9 SWIN M SII,
LOADFJu $7995.0 FiII-r
(iL.sa jx-x_ 10K20 $670)
LocAt,: 941-421-0395





*SPAS & MORE**
TRADE-IN'S WELCOME
WE BUY USED &
MOVE HOTTUBS.
www.spasandmoreflorida.comn
941-625-6600
HOT TUB Hot Springs, Sover-
eign Model 2, seats 5, used 5
times $2900 941-769-1241
RING POOL 15ftx36in, as
new $150, OBO 941-828-
1151
LAWN & GARDEN
^^ 6160 ^

B AND D elec, edeger $45.00
OBO 11 amp Very good cond.
$45, OB0 941-629-2266
BLACK LANDSCAPING FAB-
RIC 100' X 6'$45. OBO 727-
365-9230
I Employ Classitiedl
BLADES 42X2 Star Center
Hole NOS New Old Stock
EACH $10 941-497-3702
CRAFTSMAN WEEDWACK-
ER 25 cc, good shape, runs
great $50 941-929-5432


LAWN & GARDEN
6160 -

Cuddle up by the fire!
Firewood Split, Bundled and
ready for the firepid
Pine, Oak, or Citrus,
9414684372
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad,
Click on Classifleds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be
placed online by you.
One item per ad and the
price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**It you have never
placed an ad online, you
will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page* *
HONDA HR2I5HXA Mower
Commercial quality. $300,
OBO 941-830-2911
JD BLADES 36x2 or 52x3
NOS 18" x 5/8 hole $60, OBO
941-497-3702
Advertise Today! 1
LANDSCAPE TIMBER
8" diameter. 84+ feet. $35
941-629-6618
LAWN FURNITURE
Top Quality. $60
239-731.7373
LAWN MOWER RIDING
2003 Scott-John Deere w/trail-
er to tow, 17hip, 42" cut, 5-
speed, great cond, $500
941-223-0338
LAWN MOWER rroy Bilt Brig-
gs & Stratton 21" self pro-
pelled w 'bag mulch-side dis-
charge. 675 series. $250
941-587-5162
LAWNMOWER CRFSTMN
BIGWHL SELFPROP. Nice!
$60, OBO 941-235-1006
MOWER BLADES New Over
100 $3 to $12 each $3 941-
497-3702
PATIO TABLE 42" rd. gls. w/4
chairs + umbr. $225 941-
496-7569
RANCH KING 48" 18.5hp
access incl. Runs great $375,
OBO 941-244-2678
SPIDER LAMP 5 domes
W/lites brass $75 941-496-
7569
SUNLAWN EM2 Rechargable
Reel mower w/catcher, new
battery $125 941-613-2854
TABLE, lanai tempered glass
w/6 vinyl strap cushioned
chairs & couch, Must see.
$125, OBO 941-6294973
TILLER TROY-BILT PORLINE
20"6.75 HP ALMOST NEW
$425 941-6293269
TORO BLADE NEW, for 32-
inch $32.98 at store $8 941-
497-3702
TRANSMISSION FOR TORO
21332 w/b s/p mower. NEW
$35, OBO 207-319-6141
TREE TRIMMER Brand new
Worx Jawsaw Tree Trimmer
and 12ft extension Pole.
$180 941-286-7342
WEED TRIMMER STIHL F5
Straight shaft, good condition.
$100 941-587-5162

SSTORAGE SHEDS/i
BUILDINGS
L: 6165~

HURRICANESHED.COM
FENCED YARD....
TIGHT SPACES..NO PROBLEM!
941-626-4957
LUCESE #CBC12S9336


42"X8' PICKET Fence Panels
USED-37 avav, Must take all
$175 941-735-2758
BATHROOM SINK White 19"
round american standard. $10
941-228-1745
DRAWER GLIDES Blurn sort-
close 21" full extension 5/8
New $30 941-613-2854
GARBAGE DISPOSAL 1/3 hp
badger swell shape $15 941-
6973160
GLASS SHOWER DOORS TUB
SIZE $35, OBO 727-365-
9230
STEEL SHELVING hi/d 36x36
mult units $50 941-625-
2779
TONGUE & Groove V-joint SYP
500sq ft+/-, primed one side
$475 386-624-2869
VICTORIAN WALL molding kit
One complete kit, NIB. $100
941-716-3259
WINDOW AC Goldstar 5000
Btu/ runs great $35, OBO
941-876-3526
WINDOW, THERMO Half
moon vinyl. 331/24193/4 6"
wide $50. 941-343-7863
7iiEAVWCONSr.
EQUIPMENT


18-WHLR ACC. Pigtail con-
nector & tire hose. $100/both
will separate. 941416-8290
BOBCAT 2012 MODEL 870
With mulching head &
attachments 941-697-3116
[TOOLS/ MACHINERY

Z^_ 6190 ^
AIR TANK 80 Gal, Upright air
storage tank $165 941-628-
9016
B+D CORDLESS Screwdriver
Lithium, New-Unopened $20
941-929-5432
CEMENT MIXER ELECTRIC
W/WHEELS $75 941-391-
0690
CHAINSAW CRAFTSMAN
16in./case runs well Venice
$55 941-492-9436
CHAINSAW MCCOULLOUGH
16" needs adj. $20 941-697-
3160
CHAINSAW POULAN Micro
12 inch Bar Runs Well Venice
$35 941-492-9436
CIRCULAR SAW 7 1/4"
RYOBI New cond. $25 941-
266-4731
CONCRETE FLOATS.
EDGERS AND CENTER CUTS.
$30 941-623-0346



CRAFTSMAN TOOL BOX TOP
CHEST HEW COST 390 SELL
$175 941-268-9029
DRYWALL JACK panel lift by
Telpro, 11'5" reach $195
941-628-2311
EDGE TRIMMER black and
decker $25 941-580-4460
FLOOR JACK craftsman 3 ton
cap $40 941-6244244
GENERATOR B&S Elite
5500/8500 Exc. cond $325
9416974877
GOLD PLATING machine for
trim on cars etc. $60 256-
694-3466
IMPACT DRIVER milwaukee
1/2 SQ h.d $40 941-624-
4244
LADDER, ALUMINUM 20ft
extention $660- $50 941587-
5162
LADDER. ALUMINUM
WERNER 24ft extention
w/rope. $90 941-587-5162
PORTERCABLE 2DRILLS
1Saw 2Chargers 4Batteries
$89, OBO 630-248-3596


ITOOLS/MACHINERY

ZB.6190 -
POWER WASHER 11HP
3300 PSI HOSE & GUN $350
941-6980793
ROUTER 11/2H.P wbits as
new In box $50 941-624-
4244
1 Classified = Sales
SAW CORDED RYOBI RECIP-
ROCATING New cond. $25
941-266-4731
SAWZALL MILWAUKEE 11
amp $40 941-255-8420
SHOP FAN, 24" high velocity
multi speed $75 941-255-
8420
SHOP VAC genie wet or dry
16gal. 2hp $30 941-625-
7900
SHOPSMITH TOOL stand For
mounting individual tools $15
941-918-1239
TOOL CHEST, Craftsman,
With Lots Of Tools. $60
941-6294973
WEED TRIMMER STIHL F5
Straight shaft, good condition.
$100 941-587-5162

SOFFICE/BUSINESS
EQLIP./SUPLIES
Z 6220

BRIEF CASE, soft black
leather w/strap,21"x9"wxl3"h
$49 941-391-6211
OFFICE OUTFITTERS
Preowned & new office furrture.
VENICE 941485-7015
UTILITY DESK
w/ File Drawer and Chair. $55
941-628-9016

I RESTAURANT
SUPPLIES
~6225~

BLENTEC 15 smoother com-
mercial smoothie $250, OBO
9413754054
PIZZA EQUIP: Mixers,
Prep Tables, Display
Cases: 941-627-3500
TABLE, (4)CHAIR(S) SETS
OUTDOOR RESIN BURGUNDY
$225, OBO 941-275-5837
BIRDS
LW_ 6231 ^


PIGEON WHITE FANTAIL
PD/F $50; DOVE WHITE
MAGICAL 15 in flock Cele
brate life, weddings, birth-
days $350, 734-751-6743

CATS
L W_ 6232 ^


NOTICE: Statute 585.195
states that all dogs and cats
sold in Florida must be at leasi
eight weeks old, have an offi-
cial health certificate and prop-
er shots, and be free of intesti-
nal and external parasites,
FREE to Good Home, Tuxedo
Kitten, Male, 5 to 6 mths old,
Friendly 863-993-9049




NOTICE: Statute 585.195
states that all dogs and cats
sold in Florida must be at least
eight weeks old, have an offi-
cial health certificate and prop-
er shots, and be free of intesti-
nal and external parasites.
MALTESE & MALTIPOO
home raised,CKC, $700 & up
Vet Ck'd Shots, 239-839-3003
STAINDAD PooDLE
Puppies w/health certificate.
Limited Registration $700.
Wirh Full Registration $1000
I 941-764-6036 or
941-8754839 For info.


Thursday, November 14, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 17





The Sun Classified Page 18 E/N/C


ads.yoursunnet


Thursday, November 14, 2013


DOGS
Lwow 60233S ^


MINIATURE SCHNAUZER
ACA Reg. Female Puppies.
904-955-4525

& SERVICES
Z^ 6236^^

A & R Aqua Pros Inc
Aquarium Services
Installation-Maintenance
Fresh & Saltwater
Reef Aquariums
Livestock Delivery
941-441-8658 Lic/Ins

S APPLIANCES



A/C WINDOW Unit Maytag.
$50 OBO 941-764-1234
DEHUMIDIFIER COMFORT-
AIRE, 50-PINT, EXC. COND.
$60 941-268-5227
DEHUMIDIFIER KENMORE,
50 pint, really does the job.
$40 941-391-1649
DRYER, GE 3 yrs old with vent
pipe & power cord, firm $85
386-624-2869
DRYER, KENMORE Good
condition $95, OBO 941-625-
3741
DRYER, WHIRLPOOL & May-
tag Washer $100 each or set
$200 941-625-2779
ELECTRIC RANGE Kenmore
Elite, 30", S/S, conv. oven, ex
cond., $300 941-423-2701
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end....you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
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FRIGIDAIRE WASHER and
Dryer Gallery Commercial
$275 941-716-4195
GE WASHER super cap.
plus $150 941-716-4195
GE WATERHEATER 50 gallon
electr. 12y warranty $250
941-716-4195
MICROWAVE, WHIRLPOOL
Above stove, Exc. cond $35
941-343-7863
RANGE, WHIRLPOOL ELEC-
TRIC WHITE, CLEAN IN VGC
$115, OBO 727-365-9230
REFRIDGERATER, STOVE,
MICROWAVE, white $395
941-441-8030
REFRIGERATOR FRIGIDAIRE,
18.2cu ft, White, 1 yr new
$325 941-661-4311
REFRIGERATOR
FRIGIDAIRE, 20.8 cu ft, VG
cond. $200 941-391-1649
STOVE WHITE works good
$50 941-228-1745
STOVE, White very clean.
Coil Type. $100
941-421-6107
WALL OVEN MICROWAVE
STAINLESS STEEL $399,
OBO 941-875-3334
WASHER & DRYER SET
Estate by Whirpool, $275,
941-8304571


APPLIANCES
L ^ 6250 J


WASHER ADMIRAL Super
Capacity. GC. $100 OBO Free
delivery 941-764-1234
WASHER/DRYER WHITE
both work, you pick up. Deep
Creek $100 614-519-9938
Washers, dryers, retnrigera-
tors & stoves w/warranty
$100 & up. 941-468-8489
WHIRLPOOL White 21.6 cf.
refrigerator, slide-in range,
dishwasher, microwave.
Works & looks great. $625
for all! 219-308-3755

MISCELLANEOUS
LZ 6260


2 BIKE Auto-carrier Hurculous-
Reese $95 941-496-9252
AFFORDABLE SMOKES
$1.30/PACK $13./CARTON
ROLL YOUR OWN AT HOME!
TOP BRAND TOBACCOS, TUBES,
CASES, RYO MACHINES & PARTS
VAPOR E-CIGS
E-LIQUID MADE IN USA
LOW PRICES!
ROLL A PACK TOBACCO
2739 Taylor Rd. P.G.
941-505-2233
ARCADE & PINBALL
MACHINES WANTED will pay
cash working or not! Will pick
up. Please call 863-558-0198
BEACH CHAIRS WITH COOL-
ER POUCH & umbrella
w/anchor $40 941-447-8149
BEER STEINS (2) from Ger-
many cost $90 sell $30 for
both 941-585-8149
BOOKS, MANY to choose
from- $1 each- History, Movie,
Mystery. $1 941-445-5619
BOW TIES + 1 CUMMERBUND
LEFT $1.-EA 941-475-7577 -
ENGLEWOOD
IAPVERTmSE'|I
BUTCHER'S GLOVE 3-fin-
ered butcher's glove. L-hand
15 734-674-7852
CARGO CARRIER alum fits
2' hitch $70 941-743-0582
CARGO CARRIER, aluminum
fits a 2" hitch, $70.
941-743-0582
CARVED AFRICAN ANIMALS
Assort. hand carved animals.
$20. & up. 941-391-6377
EMBROIDERED SOBE LEE
WESTERN SHIRT BLACK MED
$30 941-629-6429
FIREWOOD SEASONED split
oak 1/2 facecord FREE DELY
$120 941-526-7589
FIREWOOD Split, Bundled,
and ready for the firepit!
Perfect for these cooler nights!
Pine, Oak, Citrus
941-468-4372
PATIO TABLE & CHAIRS
glass, top, oval $60 786-306-
6335
PROPANE TANK 20 Ib, alu-
minum (won't rust), exc cond.
$45 941-548-1333
R22 REFRIGERANT 30LB
CANNISTER & 6 150Z CANS
$475 941-391-6090
ROPE HAMMOCK wanted, do
not need a frame. $1, OBO
941-204-9415
SAFE, FIREPROOF, Medium,
holds important documents
orig. $490, $85 (941)5804460
SCOOTER PARTS vip,tao
seat, gauges, headlights,
more, ea. $15 941-445-9069
SHICK XTREME-3 (4 PACK)
RAZORS $2.50 941-475-
7577 ENGLEWOOD
STAND-FOR-HAIR-DRYER-
FOR-ANIMALS $22 941-
496-9252
TELEPHONE/CORDLESS
(2) with answering sys. AT+T
$20 941-585-8149
TURKEY FRYER 32qt. like
new used twice $35 941-625-
7900


MISCELLANEOUS

Z 6260 ^

CDS (22), CLASSICAL, Per-
fect $8 941-496-9252
VENUS RAZORS NEW-
$5.00 941-475-7577 -
ENGLEWOOD
WARDROBE BOXES 12
USED MOVING BOXES $30
941-391-6090
WINE COOLER Terracotta
Like New $15
941-228-1745
WOODEN BIRDHOUSES
$15.00 TO $20.00
941-626-4960
WORKBENCH WOOD 8'X3'
MOVING $125, OBO 941-626-
6213
[ WANTED TO
I BUY/TRADE




Cash paid FOR WWI WWII
Korean Vietnam,German,
Japanese, etc Military items
(941)416-3280
WANTED: JEWELRY STORE
DISPLAY CASE WITH LIGHT
$75 941-698-1489
WANTED: SMALL CHEST
FREEZER, 941-426-0129

7000






TRANSPORTATION
| BUICK

Los 7020 ^


2003 BUICK CENTURY, 4
Door, Loaded! Like New Cloth
Int! $3,750. 941-441-7987
2005 BUICK LESABRE
Loaded, Mattas Motors
941-916-9222 DIr.
2008 BUICK LA CROSSE
61,842 mi, $10,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 BUICK LACROSSE
NAVI, 13K $29,990
877-211-8054 DLR
CADILLAC
L 7030 ^


DO 70K mi, Sr. Lady driven,
$5900/obo (218) 341-3300


1999 CADILLAC SEVILLE SLS,
Loaded, Leather, 97K Act! Sharp!
$3,550. 941-626-3674 DIr
2002 CADILLAC ELDORADO
Leather, all power, 80,300
orig mi. $6950. 941-575-6869
2004 CADILLAC DEVILLE
Like New! Have Car Fax!
$11,000. 401-781-1569 P.C.
2007 CADILLAC CTS
29,923 mi, $17,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 CADILLAC DTS
56,372 mi, $13,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 CADILLAC CTS
33K $20,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2008 CADILLAC SRX
39K $16,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2013 CADILLAC XLR
13,956 mi, $37,958
877-219-9139 DIr


CHEVY
Lao 7040 ^


2000 CHEVY CORVETTE
80K $17,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2003 CHEVY MALIBU
Mattas Motors
941-916-9222 DIr.
2003 CHEVY SILVERADO
2500 55,267 mi, $16,987
877-219-9139 DIr
GENEGORMAN
FAMILY MOTORS
2005 CHEVY AVEO LT,
Low Miles! $8,988. 941-625-
2141 #1 Used Car DIr.
2007 CHEVROLET HHR
26,452 mi, $12,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 CHEVY COBALT,
PW, PL, Cruise! New Tires!
$7,988 941-639-1601, DIr.
2012 CHEVROLET SPARK
66,900 mi, $9,950
877-219-9139 DIr
CHRYSLER
L ^ 70O50 ^


2004 CHRYSLER SEBRING
CONV. Mattas Motors
941-916-9222 DIr.
2005 CHRYSLER PT
CRUISER 21k miles, Dark
Plum immaculate, $7000.
N. Port 860-995-4768
2005 PT CRUISER LTD
$6995 Mattas Motors
941-916-9222


2006 CHRYSLER
SEBRING Touring Con-
vert. V6, full power, 73k
mi, New tires & battery,
$6995/obo. Ex condition
941-429-5329
GENEGORMAN
FAMILY MOTORS
2007 CHRYSL. PT CRUISER
CONV. 58K Mi! $7,988.941-625-
2141 C.C.#1 Used Car Dealer
| DODGE
L ^ 7060 ^
/ ]





2005 DODGE CARAVAN
Mini-van, 144,400 mi, 6 cyl.,
FWD, automatic, AM/FM cas-
sette/CD player, All season
tires, champagne, auto, a/c,
pwr brakes, pwr locks, pwr
seats, pwr steering, pwr win,
cruise, air bag, ABS, leather,
alloy wheels, heated seats,
rear pass dclim ctrl, 3rd row
seats, tilt, tinted glass, rear
defogger, rear wiper, fog
lights, $5,600 262-565-
7002
Employ Classified!
2013 DODGE RAM 1500
22,018 mi, $24,587
877-219-9139 DIr
SLFORD
L 70"70




GENE GORMAN'S
DIRT CHEAP CARS
COME MEET OUR NEW
SALES MANAGER,
BRANDON!
GUARANTEED AUTOMOTIVE
FINANCING. RATES AS
LOW AS 1.9%!
3305 Tamiami TrI. South
Punta Gorda
941-639-1601
1999 FORD MUSTANG
Convt., Auto, 20"rims, GC
$4500 OBO 941-268-7991
2000 FORD CONVERSION
VAN, Mattas Motors
941-916-9222 DIr.


I FORD
Late 7070 ^


2009 FORD FOCUS 49,086
mi, $11,475
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 FORD FLEX
30,143 mi, $21,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 FORD ESCAPE
40,959 mi, $17,458
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 FORD MUSTANG
21,058 mi, $20,987
877-219-9139 DIr



Enter your classified ad online
and pay with your credit card.
It's fast, easy, and convenient.
Go to:
yoursun.com
and click on Classifieds
*Fast Easy *
Convenient *
(Visa or Mastercard)
SUN'.




| GMC
Lwwwwo707C5


2007 GMC YUKON
72,532 mi, $25,748
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 GMC ACADIA
34,091 mi, $22,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 GMC TERRAIN
13,319 mi, $19,987
877-219-9139 DIr
| JEEP
Loew 7080P ^


1999 JEEP WRANGLER
95,021 mi, 6,0001b winch,
hard top, pair of 1/2 high soft
doors $8950 941-505-5615
2007 JEEP WRANGLER
Unlimited, 69,256 mi,
$18,753 877-219-9139 DIr
2008 JEEP WRANGLER
37K $18,911
877-211-8054 DLR
2012 JEEP LIBERTY
25,489 mi, $17,985
877-219-9139 DIr
LINCOLN
Low 7090 ^


2004 LINCOLN TOWNCAR
Ultimate, 1 owner, 57k mi.,
Gorgeous!! Mattas Motors
941-916-9222 DIr.
L MERCURY
wea:7100 ^


2002 GRAND MARQUIS
vynal top, leather, chrome. Ex
cond $5000. 941-426-4441
2005 MERCURY Grand Mar-
quis GS, Red w/ white top,
120K, $4400 941-429-8622
2010 MERCURY BASE
55,551 mi, $16,875
877-219-9139 DIr
SOLDSMOBILE
M 11 0


1993 OLDS EIGHTY EIGHT
Rare fin. A must see!
Mattas Motors
941-916-9222 DIr.
PONTIAC
L 7130 ^

1995 FIREBIRD P/C, V-6,
clean, red, 5 speed, economi-
cal. $1,000. 786-306-6335.


L PONTIAC
OW4:713'0


2007 PONTIAC G6
4 door, moon roof. Mattas
Motors 941-979-6234 DIr.
2007 PONTIAC G6
46,238 mi, $10,578
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 PONTIAC VIBE
77,325 mi, $10,477
877-219-9139 DIr
| SATURN



2001 SATURN SC2 3 Dr,
80K, Great Condition. $3000
941-429-8622
2005 SATURN VUE
126,300 mi, $5,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 SATURN OUTLOOK
58K $15,990
877-211-8054 DLR

PRO POWER AUTO SALES
4140 Whidden Blvd
Port Charlotte, 33980


98 SW2 Wagon
01 SL1 Sedan
02 L200 Sedan
04 Ion Sedan
04 Vue SUV
06 Vue SUV
05 Saturn Vue
08 Vue SUV


$2,500
$2,800
$3,499
$3,400
$4,200
$5,899
$6,299
$7,800


Used Saturn Parts & Service
941-627-8822

SCION
Low 7136 ^

2006 SCION TC, 89,000 mi,
sunroof, New engine block,
new brakes, looks great,
$7,200 941-740-0321
2012 SCION TC 2012
SCION TC under 25,000
miles, 6 speed manual
trans. Sun roof & moon
roof, New tires. $14,750.
941-743-8534
USED CAR DEALERS

Z 7137 ^

Mattas Motors
941-916-9222
Buy Here Pay Here

ACURA
7145


2011 ACURA TSX
25K $23,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2012 ACURA TSX
11,574 mi, $26,896
877-219-9139 DIr
AUDI
7147


GENEGORMAN
FAMILY MOTORS
2006 AUDI Tr CONVERTIBLE
Low Miles! $17,988. 941-625-
2141 C.C.#1 Used Car Dealer
2011 AUDI A4
PREMIUM, 34K $26,990
877-211-8054 DLR
| BMW
Low 7148 ^


2005 BMW 5251
68K $13,990
877-211-8054 DLR
71 0
L HONDA
o ^ 7160


2004 HONDA ACCORD
131,422 mi, $7,980
877-219-9139 DIr





Thursday, November 14, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 19


HONDA
0 160 ^


2004 HONDA CIVIC
86,963 mi, $8,345
877-219-9139 DIr
2005 HONDA CIVIC
163,582 mi, $5,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 HONDA ODYSSEY
103,984 mi, $12,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 HONDA ACCORD
64,311 mi, $13,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 HONDA CIVIC
60,511 mi, $11,425
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 HONDA CIVIC
73,935 mi, $11,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 HONDA CR-V
58,909 mi, $16,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 HONDA ODYSSEY
57,261 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA ACCORD
50,943 mi, $16,987
877-219-9139 DIr

2008 LEXUS ES 350s
STARTING @ $20,990
0% FOR 36 MONTHS
1.9% FOR 60 MONTHS
WAC
1-877-211-8054
LWIL"Af

2009 HONDA CIVIC
63,537 mi, $12,435
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA CIVIC.,
Blue! Low Miles!
$11,988. 941-639-1601 DIr.
2009 HONDA CR-V
36,615 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA CR-V
47,600 mi, $17,867
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA CR-V
65,002 mi, $16,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA Odyssey EXL
48,051mi. $20,500 863-491-
5409
2010 HONDA ACCORD
28,024 mi, $16,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CIVIC
33,949 mi, $13,877
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CIVIC
S/R, LTHR, 30K $15,911
877-211-8054 DLR
2010 HONDA CR-V
15,399 mi, $24,625
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V
19,848 mi, $21,564
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V
33,066 mi, $16,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA FIT
29,249 mi, $14,545
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
19,809 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
44,169 mi, $14/950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
52,175 mi, $17,876
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
59,158 mi, $15,784
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
CERT., 15,987 mi, $20,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
CERT., 21,812 mi, $19,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC
22,255 mi, $14,968
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC
26,689 mi, $14,875
877-219-9139 DIr


2011 HONDA CIVIC
27,243 mi, $15,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC
34,621 mi, $14,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC
34,987 mi, $15,748
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
24,873 mi, $19,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
25,047 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
27,234 mi, $19,854
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
29,098 mi, $17,990
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
29,940 mi, $18,758
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
30,451 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
36,013 mi, $22,536
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
38,727 mi, $18,745
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
CERT., 24,605 mi, $17,998
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA FIT
21,915 mi, $13,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 KIASORENTO
47,404 mi, $18,975
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 LEXUS ES 350s
STARTING @ $27,990
0% FOR 36 MONTHS
1.9% FOR 60 MONTHS
WAC
1-877-211-8054


2012 HONDA ACCORD
33,519 mi, $16,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
18,965 mi, $15,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CR-V
24,498 mi, $22,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CROSSTOUR
CERT., 40,492 mi, $21,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA FIT
19,541 mi, $14,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA ACCORD
V6, CERT., 2,958 mi,
$28,475 877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA CRV
5,091 MILES $28,988
877-211-8054 DLR
2013 HONDA PILOT LX
CERT., 13,706 mi, $30,745
877-219-9139 DIr
7~AI
L HYUNDAI
000:7163


2003 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
99k, $6500/obo 6 cyl.
Red/sunroof Sharp, Clean,
941-423-8390
GENE GORMAN
FAMILY MOTORS
2004 HYUNDAI ELANTRAGLS
Extra Clean! $5,988. 941-625-
2141 #1 Used Car Dealer
2007 HYUNDAI TUCSON Auto,
Blue, must see! $10995 Mattas
Motors 941-916-9222 DIr.
2008 HYUNDAI SONATA
35,168 mi, $8,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HYUNDAI TIBURON
109,569 mi, $8,577
877-219-9139 DIr

I NEED CASH?


2009 HYUNDAI GENESIS
48K $19,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2011 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
43,513 mi, $14,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HYUNDAI GENESIS
ULTIMATE 16K $44,911
877-211-8054 DLR
2011 HYUNDAI SONATA
17,062 mi, $15,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HYUNDAI SONATA
30,802 mi, $14,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HYUNDAI STERLING
16,612 mi, $17,985
877-219-9139 DIr
/ INFINITI
Loa 7165T' ^


2001 INFINITE 130
96,869 mi, $5,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 INFINITI QX56 Lthr,
Sunroof, 88,999 mi, $26,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 INFINITI G37 Lthr,
35,999 mi, $20,950
877-219-9139 DIr
JAGUAR
L 7175 ^


2001 JAGUAR XJR
49,953 mi, $12,785
877-219-9139 DIr
2003 JAGUAR S-TYPE 4 DR
53K mi., Light blue metallic,
cream leather interior, exc.
cond. Regular maint., garage
kept. Must see! $8,000, 941-
484-6490
2004 JAGUAR XJ8
65K $12,988
877-211-8054 DLR
| LEXUS
L 7178S ^


2004 LEXUS ES 330, Silver,
lots of options, 116k mi., exc.
cond. $9500 941-204-9461
2005 LEXUS ES 330
64,943 mi, $14,785
877-219-9139 DIr
2005 LEXUS LS 430
NAVI, 50K $22,911
877-211-8054 DLR
2008 LEXUS IS 250
53,275 mi, $18,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 LEXUS IS250
70K $21,988
877-211-8054 DLR
2010 LEXUS ES 350s
STARTING @ $26,990
0% FOR 36 MONTHS
1.9% FOR 60 MONTHS
WAC
1-877-211-8054

LEjKUS OF SmRa A.OT
2011 LEXUS IS250
CERT., 38K $27,911
877-211-8054 DLR
2012 LEXUS ES 350s
STARTING @ $30,990
0% FOR 36 MONTHS
1.9% FOR 60 MONTHS
WAC
1-877-211-8054


2012 LEXUS IS250
CERT., 9,626 MILES $32,911
877-211-8054 DLR

| MAZDA
7i 7
L ^ 7180 ^


2003 MAZDA MX5
63,925 mi, $10,857
877-219-9139 DIr


HONDA HYUNDAI
L 7160 JL 7163 ^


L MERCEDES
0L 0Z 7190 ^


1991 MERCEDES-BENZ 560
SEL, 4 new Michelin tires.
$3500 941-625-7005
2006 MERCEDES BENZ SLK
350, hardtop convertible, 62K
mi, red, exc. cond, $16,900
Punta Gorda, 303-888-4895
2008 MERCEDES E350W
72K $19,911
877-211-8054 DLR
2011 MERCEDES E350W
42K $23,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2013 MERCEDES C240
4,792 MILES $34,990
877-211-8054 DLR
L MINI COOPER
mmm::71092


2007 MINI COOPER, Red!
Double Moon Roof! $14,988
941-639-1601 P.G. DIr
[ MITSUBISHI
L 71959 'S'


2010 MITSUBISHI OUT-
LANDER 48,216 mi,
$17,854 877-219-9139 DIr
NISSAN



2001 NISSAN MAXIMA
Very Smooth Ride $5395
941-916-9222 DIr.
2008 NISSAN ALTIMA
SL, 77K $14,988
877-211-8054 DLR
2009 NISSAN CUBE
43,705 mi, $13,985
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 NISSAN VERSA
86,168 mi, $9,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 NISSAN MAXIMA
46,299 mi, $18,744
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 NISSAN JUKE
15,237 mi, $20,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 NISSAN 370Z
TOURING, 38K $27,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2012 NISSAN ALTIMA
29,204 mi, $17,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 NISSAN NV 3500
13,187 mi, $18,950
877-219-9139 DIr
SPORTS CARS
L ::7205 ^


2003 PORSCHE BOXSTER
115K "AS IS" $17,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2006 MAZDA MIATA MX-5
Convertible, 6 speed, met
silver, Gran Sport top line
model. ALL Options, Brown
top leather int, $12,600
781-572-8215
TOYOTA
Loalm:772100


1998 TOYOTA TACOMA
122,511 mi, $5,987
877-219-9139 DIr
NEED CASH?
Have A Garage
Sale!
2000 TOYOTA AVALON
103K MILES
877-211-8054 DIr
2006 TOYOTA CAMRY
58,851 mi, $11,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 TOYOTA SIENNA
57,107 mi, $17,845
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 TOYOTA CAMRY XLE,
V6 108K mi. $11,990
216-789-0901 Dir.


TOYOTA
Lwow 7Y2100 ^


2008 TOYOTA CAMRY
44,325 mi, $14,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 TOYOTA TACOMA
43,462 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 TOYOTA TACOMA
60,648 mi, $13,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 TOYOTA TACOMA
67K $22,911
877-211-8054 DLR
2008 TOYOTA TACOMA
94,577 mi, $18,745
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 TOYOTA COROLLA
88,309 mi, $10,789
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 TOYOTA SIENNA
55,076 mi, $20,475
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 TOYOTA RUNNER
58K, BLACK $27,988
877-211-8054 DLR
2010 TOYOTA AVALON
46K $20,990
877-211-8054 DIr
2010 TOYOTA COROLLA
50,780 mi, $10,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 TOYOTA SIENNA
59,109 mi, $18,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 TOYOTA COROLLA
20,411 mi, $14,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 TOYOTA COROLLA
33,115 mi, $12,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 TOYOTA VENZA
38,332 mi, $20,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 FORD FUSION
35,758 mi, $16,875
877-219-9139 DIr
SVOLKSWAGEN
L 7:220 ^


2004 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA
87,011 mi, $5,950
877-219-9139 DIr


2004 VW GTI, Turbo, 5 Spd.,
Leather, Loaded! New Tires! Sharp!
$5,495. obo 941-626-3674 DIr
2006 VOLKSWAGEN PASSAT
72,416 mi, $8,950
877-219-9139 DIr





2010 VW NEW BEETLE
CONV. 23,400 Miles, Like
New, Harvest Beige, $16,500
941-697-4748
2011 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA
42,407 mi, $15,847
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 VOLKSWAGEN PASSAT
SE, Silver, Leather, Back up
sensors, NAVI, 4922k miles,
Lost lics. must sell!
$18,900 941-426-2909
6VOLVO
L 72300 ^


2006 VOLVO C70 Hardtop
Conv! Red! $16,988 941-
639-1601 P.G. DIr.

L MISC. IMPORTS

Z 7240 ^

2011 LEXUS RX 350s
STARTING @ $34,990
0.9% FOR 48 MONTHS
9% FOR 60 MONTHS
WAC
1-877-211-8054

1.&KVr OF HA "


D.ead or f Se Tp .$6ai
Fre pik u


COLLECTIBLES
7250 i

1980 PONTIAC FIREBIRD
350 motor-B & M shift kit. Very
Stood condition! Sacrifice at
7800 OBO 941-828-0248
1985 CHEVROLET EL
CAMINO, 305 V8 Restored,
NICE! Runs great, 125K mi.
$6,900. 941-716-3733
BUDGET BUYS
Lw :72T52





GENE GORMAN
FAMILY MOTORS
1988 CHEVY S-10, Longbed!
Great Work Truck! $1,400 941-
625-2141 C.C.#1 Used Car Dealer
GENEGORMAN
FAMILY MOTORS
1997 FORD E250, Cargo
Van!! $1,988.. 941-625-2141
C.C.#1 Used Car Dk.
1997 FORD RANGER,
Auto! Ext. Cab! $788.
941-639-1601 DIr.
GENE GORMAN
FAMILY MOTORS
1997 MAZDA PROTEGE,
5 Speed! $1,300.. 941-625-
2141 CC#1Used Car DIr
1998 AUDI A4,
2.8 Sedan! $988.
941-639-1601 DIr. P.G.
GENE GORMAN
FAMILY MOTORS
1998 FORD MUSTANG CONV,
Go Topless! $1,300. 941-625-
2141 C.C.#1 Used Car Dealer
1999 CHEVY CAVALIER,
4 Door! Auto! Racing Wing!
$988. 941-639-1601, DIr
1999 CHEW SUBURBAN,
Extra Clean! $988
941-639-1601 DIr.

ASK US

HOW
you can place a
PICTURE
of your item
for sale
in your
classified ad!
1999 FORD F-150,
Extended Cab!
$988. 941-639-1601 RG.
GENE GORMAN
FAMILY MOTORS
2001 DODGE GR. CARAVAN
Sport. All Pwr Opt! $1,400 941-
6252141 CC #1UsedCarDear
2002 CHEVY VENTURE,
115K Miles! $988. 941-639-
1601, DIr P.G.
| AUTOS WANTED
L 7260 ^





The Sun Classified Page 20 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, November 14, 2013


AUTOS WANTED
L 7260 ^


$$ TOP CASH $$
FOR CARS & TRUCKS.
DEAD OR ALIVE.
941-485-7515
CASH FOR JUNKERS
Available 24/7
941-286-3122, 623-5550
WE BUY CARS
$400 CASH + UP
Frank 941-276-0204
ALL AUTOS WANTED with
or without title any condition,
year, make or model. We pay
up to $20,000 and offer free
towing. Call Cindy at
813-505-6939

I ACCESSORIES I
^ 7270 ^

1970-1973 CAMARO
FRONT GRILL VERY NICE $40
941-475-1379
1992 TOYOTA Camry Doors,
(No Door Panels) Buy ALL 4
$150 941-627-9466
2007-2013 GM TRUCK REAR
FENDER PLASTIC INNER LIN-
ERS $35 941-475-1379
4 NISSAN RIMS & TIRES
245/45ZR18 $450, OBO
941-875-3334
AIR CONDITIONER NEW
COMPRESSOR, FORD, MAZDA,
MERCURY $85 970-471-5596
CHEVY RALLY WHEEL CAPS
ALL 4 AT $20 941-475-1379
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end....you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**lf you have never
placed an ad online, you
will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page)**
HARDTOP STG complete
elect winch pd 600 ask $250,
OBO 941-764-8989
HUB-CAPS FOR 1960s era
VW Beetle style. Great shape.
$5 941-445-5619
MERCEDES 107 FRONT
BUMPER & DOOR $400 941-
629-6429
ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!
MERCEDES WHEELS 15" 4
orig. Alu. factory wheels $160,
OBO 941-629-9149
MICHELIN TIRE Like new,
215/65R16, on Chrysler
wheel $50 941-661-7092
MIRROR PASS. side for
1995-2002 Cavalier New.
$35, OBO 941-764-0312
SOUTHERNCOMFORT CUS-
TOM Rims 20" Fits GM. $225
941-270-7458
TIRES (4) Goodyear Fortera
HL 265/50/R20. Exc Tread.
$250 OBO 941-275-0405
TIRES NEW t/o's ContiPro's
235/40/18 $400 941-447-
8512
TIRES, 14&15" USED
CORVETTE rims $15 786-
306-6335
TIRES- New take offs starting
@ $39.95 Installed & Balanced
Call for Inventory 941-639-5681


/& REPAIR
7280 ^i

HEADLIGHT JENIE
Repair hazed, cloudy or dull
headlights... GUARANTEED!
We come to you!
941-587-0584

VANS
7290


2009 CHRYSLER T & C
71K $14,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2009 HONDA ODYSSEY
57,353 mi 22,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 DODGE Grand Caravan
WHEELCHAIR van, 10" lowered
floor & ramp. 941-8704325
2011 HONDA ODYSSEY
44,822 mi, $30,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA PILOT
20,491 mi, $23,574
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA PILOT
21,428 mi, $26,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA PILOT
29,116 mi, $27,864
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA PILOT
CERT., 14,981 mi, $24,577
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
CERT., 34,251 mi, $32,950
877-219-9139 DIr

You Save
Big Bucks
Shopping
Classifieds!
2012 HONDA PILOT
20,440 mi, $28,678
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA PILOT
24,762 mi, $28,975
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA PILOT
CERT., 17,759 mi, $29,785
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA ODYSSEY
CERT., 10,719 mi, $34,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA ODYSSEY
CERT., 4,761 mi, $37,950
877-219-9139 DIr

|TRUCKS/PICK-UPS /
L 7300 J


1994 DODGE PICKUP Truck,
2500 V10, $2,195, OBO 941-
276-1300
GENEGORMAN
FAMILY MOTORS
1998 DODGE RAM 1500,4x4
Quad Cab! $3,988 941-6252141
C.C. #1 Used Car Dealer!
2003 MAZDA B2300, Ext.
Cab! 80K Mi! Warr! Mint!
$7,988. 941-639-1601, DIr.
2004 FORD F-250, 4x4.
Lifted! New Tires! $14,988.
941-639-1601, DIr.
2004 GMC SIERRA 2500
SLT, 4dr, ext cab, 130K, have
title $10,500 863-781-2001
2005 FORD F-150 84K
Miles! Leather Seats, A/C! 4
WD, Great Condition! Drives
Like New! $10,750. 941-623-
7524
2006 TOYOTA TACOMA,
Ext. Cab! Black Beauty!
$15,988. 941-639-1601 P.G.
2010 HONDA RIDGELINE
45,389 mi, $24,950
877-219-9139 DIr


DON'T WAIT. DRIVE TODAY
GUARANTEED CREDIT
I APPROVAL H
941-473-2277
I www.pctcars2.com I
-- -- -- E


TRUCKS/PICK-UPS
L 7300 ^


2011 HONDA RIDGELINE
27,424 mi, $26,950
877-219-9139 DIr
W-- E BUY CARS *
STop Dollar for your car
or truck Call us today
941-473-2277
www.pctcars2.com
[--w- -mN-mN ''
* WE FINANCE
EVERYONE
MUST HAVE INCOME
& DOWN PAYMENT
I 941-473-2277 I
I www.pctcars2.com I
f--------- E
L SPORT UTILITY/
VEHICLES
^^ 7305 ^

1997 NISSAN PATHFINDER
160k miles, 2wd, Nice &
Clean! Runs good w/ rebuilt
trans and AC. New brakes, bat-
tery & updated stereo system.
$2850 Gene 941-286-7922
1998 CHEVROLET BLAZER
146K mi, 4wd, cruise, $1,850
303-596-0880


2001 OLDS BRAVADA, 4 Dr.
Loaded, Low Miles, AWD! V6.
$3,450. obo 941-626-3674 DIr
2005 SUBURU FORESTER,
Low Miles! Red! $14,988 941-
639-1601 DIr. P.G
2008 TOYOTA HIGH
LANDER 44,126 mi,
$22,784 877-219-9139 DIr
2010 LEXUS RX 350s
STARTING @ $30,990
0% FOR 36 MONTHS
1.9% FOR 60 MONTHS
WAC
1-877-211-8054
WILIE
LEPI.JS OF S bRASOTA
2013 NISSAN PATHFINDER
2,826 mi, $33,754
877-219-9139 DIr

PRO POWER AUTO SALEs
4140WhiddenBlvd
Port Charlotte, 33980


02 Saturn Vue
04 Saturn Vue
03 Kia Sorento
06 Saturn Vue
06 Saturn Vue
05 Saturn Vue
07 Chevy HHR
08 Saturn Vue XE
08 Saturn Vue XR


$3,299
$4,200
$4,899
$5,299
$5,899
$6,299
$6,60C
$7,80C
$11,500C


941-627-8822

AVIATION
7320


GPSMAP196 COMPLETE
Like new asking, $210
941-764-8989
| BOATS-POWERED
L 7330 ^


13' 03 BOSTON WHALER
130, 40 Merc T&T, w/trl., exc.
cond. $8K 941-467-0927
14' MITCHELL, bimini 9.9
Mercury, low hours, 4 stroke
2006. $1,000. 941-639-0567
15' KEYWEST CC 50 HP
Yamaha P/T &T, aluminum
trailer $6,700 586-214-5770
16.7' 2002 MAU PONTOON
Aluminum, Outboard, V-5, gas
$5,000 941-743-5474
17' EBBTIDE JOHNSON 90
N/RUN GOOD TRAILER $499
941-629-3269
19' PROLINE, 1999 Merc
125 HP, Compass, Depth Find-
er, Radio. Trailer w/ new tires.
Low Hours, In Top Cond.
$8,500, OBO 941-697-6841


[BOATS-POWERED
L 7330 ^


20' 1994 BAYLINER Needs
Starter. Make Reasonable
Offer. 5262 Lovett. NP 941-
268-2121
FREE CONSIGNMENT!
No fees to sell your boat
in our indoor showroom!
Sales Service Body
Shop Upholstery
Charlotte RV & Marine
4628 Tamiami Trail at
Kings Hwy., Port Charlotte
941-244-5288
CharlotteMarine.com

SAILBOATS
warm L7331 ^


25' SAILBOAT, $750. 941-
625-0340
32' 1985 MORGAN, Needs
engine, otherwise sound cond.
$7,500 941-637-1439
MISC. BOATS

L va: 7333 ^

10' INFLATABLE SEAHAWK
400 CAP 600# EXTRAS INC
$35, OBO 970-471-5596
14' ALUM V-HULL BOAT &
GAL TRAILER NO MOTOR
$499 941-268-9029
8' ZODIAC INFLATABLE
Looks new, oars, foot pump &
manual $499 941-697-2163
|MARINE SUPPLY
& EQUIP.
L ^7338 ^

ANCHOR MUSHROOM lOIb
$20, SlipRingAnchor 150' rope
$45, OBO 630-248-3596
CLOCK & BAROMETER AIR-
GUIDE, CHROME, WALL
MOUNT $50 941-575-8881
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**lf you have never
placed an ad online,
you will need to register
when you get to the
I sign in page)**
LIFE RAFT ZODIAC OFF-
SHORE 6 person $499 941-
661-5168
MERCURY 15HP LONG
SHAFT CONVERSION KIT $85,
OBO 970-471-5596
MERCURY LONG SHAFT
CONVERSION KIT 15HP $85,
OBO 970-471-5596
OIL 18GAL delo 400 15w40
motor oil w/pump 55gal drum
$175 941-505-0081
YAMAHA NEW trim button in
package #704-82563-41 $65
941-993-8250
CANOES/KAYAKS
L 7339 ^


14' PERCEPTION KAYAK
14'9" W/2DRY HATCHES.
$499 239-258-2318
15' MICHICRAFT Alum.
Canoe. 2 Paddles, Cushions,
$350 941-764-7453


YCANOES/KAYAKS
L 7339 ^


15' MONARCH CANOE
2HP Motor, $300
941-456-9391
I TRAILER I
& ACCESSORIES
7341

2 NEW SHIPMENTS OF
2014 LARK 6 X 10 V-NOSE
ENCLOSED TRAILERS.
BLOWOUT PRICE $2095.
941-922-9116 DLR.
25' TOY HAULER: 2003
5th Wheel Like new!
$9000 941-380-3390
REESE TRAILER, Hitch, NEW
will only fit a 04/05 Ford F150
pkup. $100 941-475-1959
ROY'S TRAILER COUNTRY
New- Pre-Owned Cargo- Utility
Trailers Parts Repairs-Tires
Welding 941- 575-2214.
4760 Taylor Rd P.G.
TRAILER BALL Mount 2"
w/SS 2" ball, 10" long w/2"
drop,CL3. $35 941-629-6096
WINDSHIELD, Harley, 20"
from 2013 Road King $100
314-609-1540

| CYCLES/MOPEDS/
I SCOOTERS I


2004 HARLEY DAVIDSON
Trike, low mi., garage kept,
reverse, trailer hitch, cover,
engine lites. 609-602-9285.
2005 Harley Davidson 883
Sportster, 6500 mi. Asking
$4900 call 863-245-6886
2006 FATBOY HD, 5,900
Miles. Custom Pipes. Remov-
able Windshield & Backrest.
Relocating, Must Sell! (941)-
697-6124
2007 SUZUKI BLVD Vance
Hines Pipes, bags, 4k mi, Exc.
cond. $4300 941-661-1937
2009 PEACE SPORT 50CC
Scooter, AUTO, Red, Full
Cover, Adult Rider. $850
239-470-0148
SAdvertise Today!
HD SADDLEBAGS, complete,
like new, $499 941-661-1509
S CAMPERS/
TRAVEL TRAILERS
L^ 73'70 ^

1999 STARCRAFT
Pop-up Camper $900
941-474-8939
2006 FOURWINDS, 24' Trav-
el trailer. Excellent cond.
$7000/obo (941)-743-0095
2011 TRAVEL TRAILER
Model Sportsman 14'. $6900 or
BO. Call 941467-0062.
28' 2006 CHEROKEE LITE
TT with Super Slide. Turnkey
for Camping! Includes Hitch,
Sway Bars & Extra Jacks.
$7,500. obo (941)-429-5144
WANTED All TT's, Motor
Homes, 5th whls, Pop-Ups,
Van conversion & passenger
vans. Cash paid on the spot.
for quick sale. Parts &
Service Avail 941-347-7171

| MOTOR HOMES/
/ RVs
*^77380

1999 3OFT FLEETWOOD
Flair Motor Home. 52k mi.,
$15,500. 941-979-8173

2014 WINNEBAGOS
2013 Model CLEARANCE!
NO.1 SELLING RV
RVWorld Inc.of Nokomis
FAMILY OVNED/OPERATED FOR 36YRs
2110 US 41, Nokomis
1-75 Exit 195
1-800-262-2182
www.rvworldinc.com


MOTOR HOMES/
/ RVs
:Z^ 7380 ^i

AIRSTREAM 35' DIESEL
1998. Gen/Slide, Many extras.
$29,995.00 734-751-6743
FREE CONSIGNMENT!
No fees to sell your RV
on our lot!
Sales Service
Body Shop Upholstery
Charlotte RV & Marine
4628 Tamiami Trail at
Kings Hwy., Port Charlotte
941-225-2712
CharlotteRV.com











LUXURY MOTOR HOMES
2014 MODELS UP TO 45'
COME SEE........tfrs TADE!
RVWORLD INC OF NOKOMIS
FAMILY OWNED/OPERATED FOR 36YRS
2110 US 41 NOKOMIS
941-966-2182
www.rvworldinc.com

RV Collision Repairs
Customer and Insurance
Modern shop, quality work!
FREE ESTIMATES.
RV WORLD Inc. of Nokomis
FAMILY OWNED/OPERATED FOR 36YRs
2110 US 41- Nokomis
941-966-2182
RV SERVICE SPECIALS
Factory Warranty
All models
RV Wash
Wash & Hand Wax
Brake Flush
New Tires & Balance
Roof Reseal
RV Propane & Bottles
Water Leak Test
Lg. Parts Showroom

RV WORLD INC. of Nokomis
FAMILY ONNED/OPERATED FOR 36YRs
2110 US 41 Nokomis,
941-966-2182

RVs WANTED
CASH/CONSIGN/PRADE
CALL: MARK
RVWORLD INC OF NOKOMIS
FAMILY OWNED/OPERATED FOR 36YRs
2110 US 41 NOKOMIS
941-966-2182

RVs WANTED
CASH/CONSIGN/PRADE
CALL: MARK
RVWORLD INC OF NOKOMIS
FAMILY OWNED/OPERATED FOR 36YRs
2110 US 41 NOKOMIS
941-966-2182
SATURN TOW-CARS
Starting at $2,150. Blue-Ox
Tow hitches sold & installed.
THE SATURN GUYS
PRO-POWER AUTO SALES
4140 Whidden Blvd PC 33980
(941) 627-8822.
WANTED All TT's, Motor
Homes, 5th whls,
Pop-Ups, Van conversion &
passenger vans. Cash
paid on the spot. for quick
sale. 941-347-7171

|RV/CAMPER PARTS
L 7382 ^


BASE PLATE KIT
ROADMASTER BP HONDA FIT
09-14 $225 941-447-7927
BRAKE SYSTEM, Brake
Buddy And Blue Ox, Com-
plete Towing System With All
The Cables And Wires. Likely
New. $1,000 813-480-8237
LADDER,TELESCOPING
EXPANDS 28 1/2" 10 1/2FT
$160 941-447-7927




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